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Full text of "Mining and Scientific Press (Jan.-June 1890)"

SOD? 1201020 S 

Calilomia State Library 



Accession No — — 



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When, from whom, and how this volume was obtained, 

zoith the p^nce paid, if any, may he found oppo^te 

ike above imviber in the Register- of Books, 

lohich is always open to inspection. 



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Skctiun 2296. Books may be taken from the Library 
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THKREOF, and by other State ofScers at any time. 

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period than two weeks. Books op repkrknck shall not 

BK TAKKN FROM THE LiBRARY AT ANT TIME.— [Extract from 

the Rules.] 

.^f"The foregoing Regulations will be strictly enforced.'®ft 




VOL. LX.- Number 1. 

DEWEY & CO., PUBLISHERB. 



FRANCISCO, SATURD-AY, JANUARY 



loUars per Annum. 
Stogie Copies, 10 Cta. 



The Regan Vapor Engine. 

Ad eTer-inoreasing demand by the meobani- 
oal world for oonoeotratioa and economy in 
motive-power baa directed the attention of 
many inventors to the importance of the sub- 
ject, with varying resnltB. The most snooess- 
fnl to which the attention of the Pkess baa 
been called is that of the Rejct^n vapor engine, 
invented and patented by Mr. Diniel S, Ragan, 
a welUknown mechanical engineer of thia city. 

As shown in the engraving, this is a simple 
compact upright engine, and is operated by 
means of vapor drawn into the cylinder by the 
snotion of the piston and there exploded by an 
electric sparlc. A galvanized iron tank (the 
carbnretor) contains a small quantity of gas* 
oline ; this is conected with the engine 
through any reasonable distance by means 
of a pipe. At eaoh revolntion of tho fly- 
wheel a onrrent of air is drawn through the 
carburetor and into the cylinder. In passing 
through the carburetor it vaporizes a quantity 
of gasoline, which anited with more air drawn 
through the pipe and an air valve, forms the 
explosive charge, tbc o: pti.a:0L -! which upon 
combustion developes the power. 

The electri'3 spark which produces the com- 



feet safety by any intelligent man or boy. The 
engine is olean and comparatively noiseless and 
no license Is required. Full power Is developed 
at once, and when it ceases to run all expense 
stops. The cost of running is about one cent per 
horse>power per hour, where gasoline is used. 
Where ordinary illuminating gas is available, 



band saws, oo£Fee-mill8 and roasters, polishing 
machines, fanning machines In restaurants, 
sewing machines, ventilating apparatus, emery 
wheels, mining and milling machinery. Partic- 
ular attention, also, is being given to launches 
and small boats of all kinds, either for business 
or pleasure, engines specially adapted to these 





LAUNCH OPERATED BY BEGAN VAPOR ENGINE. 



the connecting pipe can be attached to the 
meter, producing equally ae good results. 

Its ccmpactnesB, lightness and cheapness es- 
pecially commend it for such purposes as elec- 
tric lighting, pumping, running elevators, har- 



nses being built to order on short notice, and of 
any required horse-power. Its advantages in 
this oonneotioD are many, 

A corporation with ample capital has been 
organized for the purpose of manufacturing the 



THE REGAN VAPOR ENGINE. 

nesB circles: Franois Catting, president; W. 
E. Miller, vice-president ; Sanford Bennett, 
treasurer ; Henry P. Dimond, secretary and 
manager ; Daniel S. Regan, superintendent. 
The company occupies a commodious building 




EXTERIOR OF A TYPICAL NICARAGUA HOUSB-See page 8 



bustion is controlled by a very simple mechani- 
cal device, automatic and never-failing in its 
aotion, Jmple In construction is the Regan 

vapor engine that it can be operated with per- 



vesting and threshing maohines, printing 
presses, boot and shoe machinery and hoisting 
machines. In fact, it can be used anywhere 
that power is needed, as for circular, jig and 

C 



vapor engine, hulls for launches, irrigating 
pumps, etc., known as the Regan Vapor Eagine 
Oo, It Is composed of the following named 
gentlemen, well and favorably known in busi- 



of three floors, 40 by SO feet each, located at 
221 and 223 First street in thia city. They 
are well equipped with the best machinery, 
and employ a large foroe of skilled workmen. 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. I, 18J0 



COF^F(ESPOfJDE]^CE, 



We admit, uoindoraed, opiaiooa of correspondents.— fiDS. 



Mines of a Rainless Land-No. 2.. 

Iqulque .and the Silver Mines and Salt- 
peter Deposits. 

[Written for the Press hy "Don Juan."J 

In my last letter (page 448 of Dec. 14tb) I 
gave you a deBcription of the port of Iquique. 
Id this one I will take you through Bome of the 
famouB silver minea of *' Huataiia," situated on 
the high mesa, some 3000 feet above the city of 
Iquique and about nine miles in an easterly 
direction from that place. It was on a warm 
October mornine' that I started as a guest of 
the American Vice-Uonsul, Mr. Rosenstock, 
with him and his engineer, Mr. Phillipp, for 
my first visit and inspection of those mines. 
We started (on horaebaok, of course) about 4 
o'clock in the morniug, bo as to escape the 
greatest heat of the scorching sun, which in 
this shadeleas and windless country comes 
comes down mercilessly upon the traveler. The 
low beach upon which Iqu'que stands is about 
two miles wide, at the termination of which the 
greatest hardship of your short journey com- 
mences. Now yon are obliged to ascend the 
" crest " of the mesa, and in the short distance 
of less than two miles you are carried something 
like 2000 feet nearer heaven, over a very rough 
and narrow trail, when you finally stand upon 
the seemingly level and endless mesa. From 
this point of observation a grand and magnifi- 
cent panorama spreads itself around you. 
Looking east, your eyes sweep over the great 
mesa and foothills of the *' Cordilleras de los 
Andes;" but the eyes do not rest here, for yon 
also behold the Andes themselves in all their 
grandeur, and especially at this time of the 
morning ia the scene a grand one, for just now 
the sun creeps over the mountain, its golden 
rays thrown against this always blue sky. The 
blue waters of the Pacific, just at our feet, 
make a thoroughly grand picture not soon to 
be forgotten. 

From our temporary observatory, with the 
aid of our glass, we see the great mountain 
and volcano Sahama, rising to an altitude of 
22,000 feet above sea level, and even Sorato, 
21,286 feet, and lUimani, 21,224 feet, are vis- 
ible. Giving still greater scope to our imagin- 
ation, we turn our eyes further to the north 
and see old Misti from an elevation of 20,000 
feet looking down upon us. And now we 
throw one look back upon the city at our feet 
and behold Iquique still lying in darkness below, 
for the sun is not high and near enough to let 
its rays be felt here, but far, far out to sea, 
many miles, we see the waters of old ocean al- 
ready sparkling in sunshine. Surely a strange 
panorama — darkness here and sunshine there. 
Bat I think we have dreamed and admired long 
enough. Our horses, too, seem to have en- 
joyed the soenery and rest and are ready to 
start again. 

We now make a straight line for our object- 
ive point, La Mina, St. Augustine, about one 
mile this side of the village of Haatajia. This 
large property was formerly owned by the 
American vice-consul, Mr. Rosenstock, who, 
two years ago, organized the St, Augustine 
Mining Oo, with 12 000 shares at ^I each, 
which were selling at the time of my visit, 
Oct. 7, 1887. at $3 60 each. The shaft of this 
mine is down about 300 feet. The first 150 
feet the country rock passed through is a very 
hard porphyry, which is the cap rock of the 
whole surrounding country. Usually the lodes 
are vary poor in this formation, the thickness 
of which varies from 10 to 300 feet. Below 
this is found the limestone in which we find in 
this locality our richest metal. 

From this 300-foot (the main shaft of the Sb. 
Augustine) extend levels in both directions 
from 50 to 600 feet in length, and considerable 
stoping has been done. The lode is about eight 
feet wide, runs nearly east and west, and has 
an inclination of about 41 degrees. T'he value 
of the ore runs from §20 per ton to pure silver 
{plata blancha) of which sometimes large blocks 
have to be cnt up with chisels. The ore is 
hoisted by (Malacator) horse whim and sent by 
cart to the Iquique mills, where it is reduced. 
The cartage on tbe ore for this short distance 
of eight or nine miles is 40 cents per cental. 
The St. Augustine employs from 80 to 120 
peons (miners), who are watched over by a corps 
of some 25 Europeans, chiefiy Eaglish and Ger- 
man. 

Other prominent mines in this camp are the 
San Pedro and San Pablo, the Decubridora, 
the Margarita and many othera; what has been 
said of the St. Augustine holds good for all of 
them with the exception of the San Pedro and 
Sm Pablo, which is the richest in camp. It 
is owned by Mr, Chase, also an American, who 
oame to this coast some seven years ago — a 
poor sailor and is now worth about $20,000,000, 
all of which he baa made out of the above mine, 
of which he is the sole owner. I saw, myself, 
at this mine a block of native silver weighing a 
little over eight centals. Just think of it, a 
piece of solid silver just as it was taken out of 
the mine, over SOO pounds 1 Bat these rich 
nuggets of silver are common occurrences in all 
the great mines of the district. 

About one mile below these mines is located 
the town of Huatajia. It ia very old; the 
ohuroh is said to be 200 years old and I do not 
doubt it, for you can put your finger anywhere 



through the rotten boards. The tower leans 
off to the south at an angle of about 30 degrees. 
It is as famous a piece of architecture in this 
part as the great leaning tower of Fiaa. The 
mystery is that it has withstood so'many storms 
and the earthquakes which are so common in 
these regions. Haatajia has about 1000 in 
habitants, nearly all of whom follow mining 
for an occupation. From Huatajia it is about 
seven miles south to Santa Rosa, which, next to 
Huatajia, is the most productive mining-camp 
of Tarapaca. Of this I will tell you in my 
next. 

Mines on Railroad Lands. 

Editors Press: — Never since the beginning 
of time was there a greater fraud perpetrated, 
or attempted, than the getting of these mineral 
lands by the C. P. R. R. Co. These lauds which 
we have mined for 40 years, and from which have 
been taken out untold millions of gold, are now 
claimed by this R. R, Co. as "agricultural 
The fact is, there is little or no agricultural 
lands this high in the mountains, and for some 
miles below this. I will admit that there are 
some lands here that might be made agricult' 
ural by the application of manure and water in 
.sufficient quantities — and the same might be 
aaid of the Great Sahara Desert. I know of 
small tracts of land in this vicinity that were 
cultivated in early times, that have now been 
abandoned for more than thirty years, and 
have grown up with young pines as large as a 
man's body; and this, too, where the parties so 
cultivating bad an abundance of free water for 
irrigating purposes. Only think of it — in this 
township, 13 north. Rings 11 east, M. D. B , 
leas than a quarter-aeotion is in cultivation all 
told, and more than half of this is for horti- 
cultural instead of agricultural purposes — lens 
than 160 acrea out of 23,040 — rather a bad 
showing this, for the agriculturist; and yet 
these lands have been as free and open to the 
agriculturist as to the miner, for forty years. 

It is a well-known fact to most miners that 
in this mineral belt of Oalifornia, which ia 30 or 
40 miles in width, there ia a small belt, say six 
or eight miles in width, which is much richer 
than on either side of it, and it is right here in 
this rich belt that the R R. Co. has lately 
made application for 30,000 acres of agricult' 
ural land. These lands, when surveyed, were 
returned as mineral, and, as I eaid before, we 
have been mining them for 40 years; and now, 
if they are not mineral, I will unhesitatingly 
aay there is none such in California. 

It is high time Congress took hold of this 
matter and legislated upon the subject, and not 
only prevent this R. R. Co. from getting any 

more of these lands, but compel them to give 
up those already fraudulently obtained. 

If our statesmen at Washington have any 
doubts as to the mineral character of this part 
of California, let them appoint and send out 
a commission to investigate the question. 
Have them asoertain if it is the even-num- 
bered sections that are mineral, and from 
which the gold (if any) has been taken; and if 
the odd-numbered ones are agricultural, as the 
R, R. Co. claim they are. 

If this should prove to be the case it will 
certainly be a phenomenon worthy the atten- 
tion of all scientists. 

We miners are now more hopeful that justice 
will be done us than we have been for a good 
many years past. * 

We think now that we have a Secretary of 
the Interior who is Noble in more than one 
sense. May he last. J W Eumondson, 

Volcanoville. El Dorado Oo , Cul 



Oregon Quartz and Placer Mines. 

Editors PRtss : — Your correspondent met 
Mr. Gordon, well known in Healdsburg, Cal., 
who reports some valuable discoveries on the 
head-waters of the Sixes and its tributaries in 
the northern part of Curry county, Oregon. 
Mr. Gordon shows rich specimens of gold-bear- 
ing quartz from Sucker and Johnson's cretka in 
Oooa county, where he and his partner, Mr. 
Hayes, have staked out claims that they in- 
tend to work as soon as the weather permits. 
Mr, Gordon also showed me a specimen of 
native copper, samples of which have been 
assayed two or three times, proving to be 95 
per cent copper. * 

The Ddvilbias brothers, the discoverers of 
quartz mines on Johnson's creek, are working 
their mine and are very much encouraged at 
their prospects, getting free gold and rich 
quartz. Tiiere are a number of good placer 
minea being worked lower down on Johnson's 
creek, and on Sucker creek also. Mr. More is 
working a hydraulic mine on Salmon creek, also 
a tributary of the South fork of the Coquille 
river in Coos county. 

Others, who have prospected on the south 
aide of Johnson's mountain, report good pros- 
pects and have found gold in paying quantities. 
There has also been considerable placer mining 
along the west fork of Cow creek, in Douglas 
county. Prospectors who have been through 
that section declare that valuable mines are 
quite likely to be developed along that 
creek. 

Another Cilifomian, who has traveled the 
past two summers over Douglas and Cuos 
counties, claims to have discovered a coal mine 
and a_ petroleum spring in Camas valley, near i 
the divide between Cooa and Douglas counties. I 



Mr. Gorsline, of Roseburg, has opened a coal 
mine, located fourteen miles west of this place, 
that yields a good quality of coal for fuel, and 
the vein is four feec or more in thickness. Not 
far from this mine is a spring haVing indi' 
cations of petroleum. 

The Roseburg papers publiah the news of a 
preliminary survey that has been made to see 
if water can be brought from the Eist Umpqua 
into the Myrtle creek placer mines. The sur- 
vey proves the scheme to be a feasible one. 
The proposed ditch will be about twenty miles 
long, or by making two tunnels the distance 
can be shortened four or five miles. The 
canal or ditch will be eight feet wide on top, 
five on the bottom and carry two and a half 
feet of water. 

These placer mines were formerly worked 
and were remunerative when plenty of water 
could be obtained, but should the mining fail 
the water can be used for power and for trans- 
porting lumber made from the timber growing 
near, to Myrtle creek, a station on the 
0, & C. R. R. 

I was shown several rich specimens of gold 
quartz found near the head of the Eist Ump- 
qua by an old miner, who also showed a rich 
specimen of native copper found in the same 
section. 

I hear that the quicksilver mines above 
Oikland have been abut down, owing to the low 
price of that metal. 

Oroppings of chrome ore and other metals 
suitable for paint have been found in several 
places. 

It is claimed by those who have traveled 
over the different ranges that the mineral belt 
fixtends for two hucdred miles along Rogue 
River range, continuing northward in the C)aS' 
cades. 

There is no doubt that enterprise and capital 
will reap rich rewards if they will develop 
and thoroughly work the mineral resources of 
the county, proving that these ranges and their 
spurs were not made in vain or merely as oh 
structions to travel and settlement of the 
county. E, E. Deming 



Assessment of Mining Corporations, 

Editohs Press:— As we are a little dull on 
some subjects, that is, cannot see them in the 
light they are carried out here, I would like to 
hear from some more intelligent minds on one 
subject, that in the end I may receive more 
light. 

This subject ia, the assessment by our county 
assessor of mining corporations, at the value of 
their improvements, and leaving the stock of 
the corporation unasseased. This appears to 
be right only in some cases, as I see it. as 
where they are not dividend-payers. Bat take 
the big mines that have net dividends in the 
year to the full amount of their asseesment — is 
Dot the btock of such corporation assessable ? 
Has it not the value of a note bearing the same 
amount in interest? H:ia it really no value 
apart from the property? We will take for 
example a mine here that pays S5 per share 
per month, making $60 per share net, equal to 
S600 at 10 per cent, or, in other words, the 
mine referred to pays dividends to equal ten 
per cent on SI, S60, 000, and is assessed in the 
sum of about $240,000. Is that property as- 
sessed in proportion to its cash value? 

A Hayseed Subscriber, 

Grass Valley^ Nevada Co. 

[&. former assessor of this city Informs us 
that he aaaeased the iaoorporated companies as 
follows: He aasessed all the improvements 
and then took the aggregate value of the stock 
at its market value for one or more shares on 
assessment day, and from this he deducted the 
improvements, etc, already assessed, and the 
remainder he assessed as the value of the fran- 
chise. This manner of asseestng was declared 
valid, so that the Spring Valley Water Com- 
pany, mining and other incorporated companies 
paid in full the taxes due from such assess- 
ment. This, it appears, is the only way in 
which an incorporated stock company can be 
legally and successfully assessed to its full 
value.— Eds. Press ] 



Glazed Bricks are now largely used for 
both interior and exterior decorations. They 
are manufactured in Philadelphia and else- 
where in the United States. For this purpose, 
an ordinary light-colored or red brick is used, 
and a suitable enamel ia produced on the sur- 
faces to be exported. Some colors are very 
easily obtained. A simple lead glaze on a 
cheap buff brick makes a good yellow. A 
manganese and iron glaze is used for black. 
White and blue are the most diflBcult to pro* 
duce, since the red color of the brick must first 
be hidden by an opaque layer of white before 
the finishing glaze is applied. Green must be 
made in the same way. 

A Novel Engine. — A decidedly novel and 
simple engine is manufactured at Kulamazoo, 
Mich. It dispenses with piston-rod, crosshead 
and ways, and is claimed to reduce friction to 
the lowest possible point. It has an oscillating 
piston sustained in a journaled bearing, and 
turna about one-fourth of atrevolution to each 
stroke of the engine, the only friction outside 
of the shaft to which the rock oranka are at- 
tached being a alight pressure on the packing 
strips to keep it steam -tight. 



Calaveras Connty Notes. 

situation. 

The northwest corner of the county is 36 
miles southeast of Sacramento city, while the 
southwest corner is within four miles of being 
on a direct line east and west with San Fran- 
cisco, The Mokelumne river on the north di- 
vides the county from Amador, while the Stan- 
islaus river separates the county from Tuol- 
umne on the south. The extreme northeast 
corner joins Alpine. On the west, San Joa- 
quin and Stanislaus counties join Calaveras, 
making Calaveras almost a triangle 54 miles in 
length northeast to southwest, and 32 miles 
across its western border. The county con- 
tains 622,000 acres. 

Altitude. 

The lower plains, from Copperopolis across to 
Milton, Jenny Lind, Valley Springs, Comanche, 
Barson and Wallace, average about 400 feet 
above sea level. Carson, Angels, Valleoito, 
Douglass, San Andreas, Altaville and El Dor- 
ado, 1500 feet. Murphys, Mokelumne Hill, 
Sheep Rmch, Cave City and Railroad Flat are 
2000 feet, while West Point, In the extreme 
northeaat corner, is 2700 feet. 

Water Supply. 
The melting snow from the lofty Sierra Ne- 
vada mountains in the eastern part of the 
county, pours down a continuous stream of 
sparkling water, filling the Mokelumne river 
on the northern boundary and the Stanislaus 
on the south, thus holding the county in a water 
embrace, while the Calaveras, San Antone, 
Indian Creek, Jesus Maria, the forks of the 
Mokelumne river and innumerable smaller 
streams fill every gulch with their limpid 
streams. Throughout the entire foothill region 
are many springs pouring out from five to 200 
inches of water from nature's hidden reservoirs. 
Added to these sources of supply, free from 
nature's hoard, are the numerous systems of 
canals, the result of the county's mineral wealth. 
The early miner found the rich placers of the 
county extending far up the gulches on the 
mountain-sides, and when he had reached the 
summit the'mountain proved bnt an old river- 
bed, filled with rich gravel, elevated by some 
throe of Nature in her volcanic age. To reach 
theae deposits with water and to give that water 
the desired fall for preaaure, ditches were con- 
structed, which took out the water from the 
mountain streams at higher altitudes and con- 
veyed the water thence along the summits of 
the mountains to the mining-fields. Where 
the streama failed in furnishing a steady 
supply, great reservoirs were constructed. 
These ditches are today the factor which, 
in the summer months, causes the hill 
and valley to bloeaom as a roRe in the 
handa of the horticulturist, while the mining 
interest shows a greater degree of activity and 
prosperity than at any time since the days of 
old, the days of gold, the days of '49. On the 
southeast the Union Water Co.'s 90 miles of 
ditches take 10,000 inches of water from the 
north fork of the Stanislaus. In addition, 
their rtservoira hold in atore an amount of 
water sufficient to supply 500 inches a day for 
12 months. From these aourcea of supply their 
ditches lead to and coverall that portion of the 
county from Esmeralda on Indian Oreek, on 
the north, to Robinson's ferry on the Stanis- 
laus, on the south, and Mnrphys, Douglass, 
Valleclto, Altaville, Angela, Albany Flat and 
Carson in the center. When needed, this sys- 
tem can be extended to Copperopolis, thus cov- 
ering the entire southern border. Joining the 
Union on the north is the Table mountain ditch, 
taking its 500 inches of water from the San 
Antone and conveying it to Sheep Ranch; also 
the Ides ditch, covering 25 miles of country as 
it flows to El Dorado, Cave City, Old Gulch, 
San Andreas and vicinity. The south and 
middle forks of the Mokelumne oover the 
country between Railroad Flat and West 
Point, the middle fork carrying an average of 
1000 inches. The Blue lakes, with a capacity 
of 10,000,000,000 gallons, empty into the south 
fork of the Mokelumne river, while the north 
fork has a natural reservoir that can be made 
to hold 8,000,000,000 gallons of water, more 
than sufficient for the wants of San Francisco. 
This system was at one time surveyed for that 
purpose. 

The Clark ditch controls this unequaled sys- 
tem of water-supply, taking ita water from the 
south fork of the Mokelumne, near the Cala- 
veras big trees. It extends thence west over a 
belt of country 22 miles in width, covering 
Railroad Flat,Glencoe and Rich Gulch, a stretch 
of country 32 miles long. When needed, this 
system can be extended to cover all the county 
from Valley Springs and Jenny Lind to Mokel- 
umne Hill with a supply of 100,000,000 gallons 
a day, or, as one time intended, all Oakland, 
Alameda and San Francisco. Here is water 
without limit, only waiting for capital to carry 
its crystal stream to the water-taxed citizens of 
San Francisco. Joining this system on the ex- 
treme north is the West Point ditch, taking ita 
400 inches of water from the middle fork of 
the Mokelumne river at a point six miles east 
of West Point and conveying it thence to West 
Point and vicinity. Following the Ciark 
ditch into the valleys is the Mokelumne 
& Campo Seco Canal and Water Com- 
pany's ditches. One ditch takes lOOO 
inches of water from the south fork of the 
Mokeludone river, 2^ miles nertheast of Glencoe; 
the next, 300 inches, seven miles southeast of 
West Point; the third, 250 inches, three miles 



Jan. 4, 18S0.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



■oath o( R»ilro»d Flat. Their reservoir near 
Riilroad Flat auppliea in addition 200 inchea of 
water for three months. This extensive system 
of ditches oovers and will supply Mokelamne 
Hill, Campo Seco, Valley Springs, Barson, 
Wallace and Comanche. Following this is the 
I^ncha Plana and Poverty Bir ditch, U king its 
water from the main Mokelamne river at Italian 
Bar, covering Campo Seco, Comanche and 
Wallaoe. From this point water will be 
piped to Clement's, Lockeford, Lodi and 
.Stockton in the sdjoioing coonty of Sao 
Joaqain. At low-water tide this ditch haa 
1200 inches of water without reservoirs. 
Six reservoirs are being constructed, and when 
completed will give the ditch 5000 
inches of water. 

Near Uilton is the extensive reser- 
voir of the Sp iog Valley Water Co., 
oovering Milcon and all the land be- 
low that point. The location, course 
and extent of these ereat water sys- 
tems frove thit Calaveras is an- 
rqualed in her natural and supplied 
means of water-supply for all pur- 
DOses, not only furnishirg water to 
irrigate every foot of good land in hnr 
own limits, but having a surplas suffi- 
cient for all the plains and cities to 
San Francisco. In her mountains, 
reservoirs can be constructed of suffi- 
cient capacity to store more water 
than can possibly be need for years to 
come. Aa wa'er is recognized an the 
gre&t essential in fruit culture, Cala- 
veras may justly claim to have laid 
her foundation as a fruit county, 
broad and deep, only awaiting the 
coming of the experienced fruit-grow- 
er to plaoe her in the same front 
rank with Placer county, the advan- 
tages of Calaveras being similar in 
every respect. 

Timber Belt. 

The west line of the timber belt be- 
gins near Murphys and crosses north- 
east to West Point; it extends thence 
east and north to the oortheaet line 
of the coanty, embracing an area of 
100 ecjuare miles. The yastneas of 
this territory and the wonderful size 
of these giants of th« forest call forth 
exclamations of anrpriee and admira 
tion from all who visit thisnnequaled 
timber reserve. Many who criticised 
Horace Greeley when he in his lect- 
nres proceeded to show by calculation 
the vast amount of lamber that could 
be cat from one of Calaveras county's 



Mr, Carty's mill, at West Point. 250.000 
feet; Clark's New Kra mill, near Glencoe. 500,- 
000 feet. These mills, as a rule, are below the 
main timber belt. In the belt proper a vast 
amount of the choicest pine is each year worked 
up into shakes and palings, while the cedar is 
made to furnish the ranchers of the valleys with 
most desirable poats. There is no way of accu- 
rately estimating this output, bat the large 
number of teams constantly coming down from 
the mountains with their bulky loads of shakes 
and posts prove the extent of this industry. 
The wood-chopper plies his trade along the 
lower border, while the charcoal-burner and 
oontractor for mining timber and laggirga is 



field; sutficieDt to say that the mineral belt 
crosses Calaveras county. From the Copper- 
opolis copper mines, on the plains, to West 
Point, in the mountains, the clatter of the 
stamp-mill is heard in almost every ravine, 
while the hydranlic giants still pour out their 
powerfnl streams against the ancient river- 
banks. To Calaveras belouga the honor of giv- 
ing to the world the largest nagget of gold 
found in the United States, which was found 
in November, 1851, at Carson Hill. It 
weighed 195 pounds troy, with a valuation of 
$43 534. 

In addition to the numerons gold mines of 
the county are lar^e bodies of copper and iron 



ing these monsters of the forest. Year after 
year a steady stream of tourists from our own 
and foreign lands has visited these wonders un- 
til their fame has become as household lore. 
These sfquotaa are growing abont 15 miles 
northeast of Murphys, and are reached by a 
daily line of stages. In the center of the grove 
is located the commodious hotel of the owner of 
the grove, Mr. J. S. Sperry. In this seQtion 
all varieties of trees attain an immense size, be- 
ing giants in themselves. Sugar p'nea 275 feet 
in bight with a diameter of ten feet are not nn- 
common. The size of the surronnding trees has 
a tendency to dwarf the greater sequotati, but 
when their measurements are taken and the 




MAGNOLIA. AVENUE, RIVBflBIDE. OAL, 




A SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SCENE. 



sequoias, thinking he should have confined him- 
self to a description of their majestio beauty, 
wonld fiad themselves naturally falling into the 
same train of thought, ** How many homes 
can be erected from these monarcha?" " Who 
can estimate the number of the millions of feet 
contained in this belt ?" The yellow and sugar 
pine lead in quantity; then follow the spruce, 
fir and black oaks, while the Calaveras grove 
of •* Big Trees " is a forest in itself of sequoia 
gigantea. Tapping this timber on its western 
border are a number of amall sawmills, situated 
in the ravines leading down from the mount- 
ains. Joha Manuel and McKay Bros, are 
stationed near the big treea. Manuel's mill has 
a canacity of 15,000 feet a day of ten houra; 
McKay's, 25,000 feet a day. C. Croagrove'a 
portable-mill near Murphys cute 10,000 feet a 
day; Wiggins* mill on Jesus Maria creek cut 
600^000 feet in the season of 1888; Wood- 
cook's milU near West Pointi 800,000 ; 



working steadily up into the belt. By rea- 
son of its aituation the greater portion 
of this timber reserve will remain untouched 
until the railroad penetrates these forests and 
reduces the cost of transportation to a market 
sufficient to coasume the lumber output of this 
section. The present market is that of the 
oounty alone, which is supplied with lumber at 
an average price of $15 a thousand feet, A V- 
flume, with feeders extending into the differ- 
ent sections, would deliver the greater part of 
this timber at any desired point in the valleys. 
Water and sufficient fall for fiumes can be 
secured. 

Mineral WealtH. 
Calaveras has lost none of her old-time pres- 
tige, but is forging ahead. Her mining indus- 
tries are in a far more prosperous condition than 
at any time since the days of '49. Space will 
not permit even an abbreviated account of the 
extent of the territory and the riohneas of the 



ore. The eastern portion of the oounty is 
one vaab granite quarry. Between this granite 
and the slate of the foothills is a section of 
limestone extending across the county. Black 
and white marble, steatite, and other valuable 
building stones are in large supply. Lignite 
coat, gypsum, and roofing slate, fossils and 
petrifactions can be had for the digging. By 
reason of the activity in mining, the county has 
in her mining towns a home market where 
double the prices can be obtained over those 
paid in the cities. 

Population. 
The population in the mining towns is in- 
creasing very rapidly, making it difficult to esti- 
mate it, but 12,000 will not exceed the number 
in the county at this time. 

Scenic Attractions. 
'^Calaveras Grove of Big Trees.— Mr. John 
Bidwell:of Chico claims the honor of discover- 



apace measnred on the home lawn, far 
removed, their size seems incredible. 
In the north and south groves nearly 
1400 sequoiaa are now growing, while 
numerous fallen monarchs are found 
at every hand. Through one of these 
fallen trees the writer rode on horse- 
back for a distance of 200 feet. The 
Pioneers' Cabin allows the passage 
of a loaded coach through its base, 
while far above, its limbs wave their 
salutation. The New York, with its 
diameter of 35 feet and h^'ght of over 
400 feet, will give the stranger an 
idea, by comparison, of the wonders 
of the grove. On one stump four sets, 
or 32 dancers, can trip the light fan- 
tastic toe, the diameter being 25 feet. 
"Smith's Cabin" has an interior of 
16 by 22 feet, while the tree, despite 
its hoUowness, extends 340 feet 
heavenward. "Old Goliah," his 
neighbor, has fallea, and his 105 feet 
of circumference and length of 261 
feet, mark him a fallen giant. 

Scenes in Sonthern California, 

We give on this page photo-en- 
gravings of scenes familiar to all 
dwellers in the southern part of our 
Stite. The palms, orange groves, 
low verandaed house and general 
nature of the vegetation, sufficiently 
indicate the semi-tropioal latitude of 
the locality. To the dwellers in the 
high northern latitudes of our State, 
nothing could more convincingly in- 
dicate tts iofinite variety of olimate 
than pictures of the snow-crowned, 
cloud-oapped mountains audthe hardy 
vegetation of oak and fir on the one 
hand and the level, far-reaching 
vistas of citrus groves, frond-like 
vegetation »nd olear skies on the other. 
Magnolia avenue. Riverside, San Bernardino 
county, is one of the picturcEque and famous 
drives of that beautiful city. The growth and 
development of this famous city is one of the 
marvels of even this marvelous age and country. 
Less than a generation ago, within the memory 
of people still young, the place now covered 
with churches, schools, stores, beautiful man- 
sions, and all the evidences of culture and the 
highest civilization, was a wilderness whose 
greatest utility was thought to be in providing 
suatenance to a herd of sheep. But the mount- 
ain streams, which ran to waste and ended their 
useless career on the plains below, were tapped, 
their waters utilized, the wilderness was made 
to blossom as the roae, and taste and skill and 
irrigation made possible such soenea aa those 
here presented. 

The English Board of Trade reports 509 
strikes daring ISSS, with 83,000 strikers. 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 4, 1890 



II]lNlJMG gUMMAF^Y, 

The following Is mostly coudensed from joumalB publiBhed 
in the interior. Id proximltv to the mines mentioned. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Amador. 

Sutter Creek.— Cor, Amador Ledger, Dec. 28: 
The water has been taken out of the Lmcoln mine, 
and work is again being prosecuted, and the mill 
has been started. Mr. Stewart hopes to be able to 
run without further interruption. 

Fatal Accident. — Another fatal accident oc- 
curred at the Kennedy mine on Christmas eve, the 
victim being James G. Macdonald. He was work- 
ing his first shift at the mine, having come from 
Eureka, Humboldt county, a few days before. He 
had previously worked in the mill, however, and 
when the mill suspended went to Humboldt county 
and engaged in the lumber business. On his re- 
turn here, he remarked that there were so many 
cripples in that section, owing to accidents in con- 
nection with sawmill and logging business, that he 
thought he would rather take his chances in the 
mines. On going to work on the fatal evening, he 
was sent to the 6oo-foot level to do something with 
the water tank, and while engaged in this he fell 
into the shaft, falling to the water, over 400 feet. 
The body was soon recovered, but, of course, life 
was extinct. 

El Dorado. 

Good Pay.— Georgetown Gtzcc/Z^, Dec. 29: Judge 
Edmundson was down from Volcanoville during 
the snowstorm. He and Mr. Nye have been tak- 
ing out some good pay this winter from their lava- 
capped gravel mine. 

Inyo. 

Fish Springs Mines. — Inyo Independent, Dec. 
37: There are fine mining prospects at Fish Springs. 
Elliott and "Doc." Graham have opened up a ledge 
of gold ore that will p^.y well. Henry Melone and 
C F. Fuller have developed a fine ledge that gives 
from $60 to $80 per ton in gold and there is said to 
be enough in sight to give them both a "good 
stake." Commetti, an Italian miner, worked zo 
tons a week or so ago that netted him $800. All 
over the district new ledges of good paying ore are 
being found and all can be very easily worked. All 
the ledges opened so far are by tunnels and two men 
can work a ledge that may pay them well. Supplies 
of all kinds can be easily got; there is plenty of 
water and a fine farming country close to the mines. 
The distance from the town of Big Pine is but six 
miles and the locality is one of the pleasantest in 
Owens valley. 

Mine Sale. — Over at Fish Lake an old pros- 
pector named Kincaid has lately sold two mine lo- 
cations for $15,000. The buyer is Andy Fyfe, a well- 
known mining man. Kincaid has been prospecting 
in that locality for many years; he is now getting 
old, but this sale will give him enough to live the rest 
of his days in eomfort. The ore in the mines car- 
ries silver and lead. Beyond any doubt there will 
be a good deal of activity in mining about Fish lake 
the coming spring. The district is just over the Cal- 
ifornia line, in Nevada. Most of the farm products 
and beef used in the district will be obtained in 
Owens valley in the neighborhood of Big Pine. 
Napa. 

Mineral Paint Near Calistoga.— 02/zj/o- 
gian^ Dec. 29: The mining and refining of mineral 
paint found in this vicinity may develop into a busi- 
ness of great importance and value, judging from 
recent transactions. James H. Safley, whose resi- 
dence is on the Knights valley road, four miles from 
Calistoga, has been aware during the past three or 
four years that an immense deposit of red mineral 
paint was on his properly, and he has occasionally 
shown specimens at home and abroad, thinking 
that perhaps they might after awhile come under the 
eyes of appreciative persons; but not until lately has 
the paint created sufficient interest on the part of 
any one to make an investigation. During several 
days past, parties have had samples in San Fran- 
cisco analyzing and making experiments, and the 
result has been so very satisfactory that, to make 
sure the paint will not pass into the possession of 
others, they have bonded, for a term of six months, 
560 acres of Mr. Safley's land, and paid him a cer- 
tain amount of money in hand. As soon as the 
weather will permit, operations will be commenced 
to ascertain the extent of the deposit, and if it comes 
up to the expectations of the San Franciscans both 
as to extent and quality throughout, the land will be 
p>aid for. Then extensive refining works will be 
constructed, and the work of mining and refining 
engaged in extensively. It is said by those men who 
are first-class judges of red mineral paint, that the 
Safley paint is superior to any other they have seen. 
As to the question of quantity, Mr. Safley says there 
is very little or no doubt that it is all that can be de- 
sired, as he has often been over the ground and ex- 
amined it closely, the deposit being of large propor- 
tions. 

Nevada. 

The Washington 'iAv^^. — Transcript, Dec. 25. 
Another big bar of gold bullion was shipped to San 
Francisco this week from the Washington mine, 
which property is getting better and better with each 
day's work done on it. Work is being prosecuted 
in all four levels. The 20-stamp mill is pounding 
away without interruption on ore that pays about 
six dollars a ton, and the sulphurets which are saved 
yield over $100 a ton. Owing to the size of the 
ledge, the complete equipment of machinery and the 
fact that it is run by water-power, the total cost of 
mining and milling averages but $2.75 to each ton 
of ore produced, leaving a profit that ought to sat- 
isfy anybody. The upper level has been driven 
1260 feet and has three pay shoots, the first extend- 
ing 322 feet on an ore body two feet wide, the sec- 
ond 73 feet on a seven-foot body, and where the 
third is being raised on 1000 feet from the entrance 
to the level the ledge has widened out to 16 feet. 
On the second level the shoot now being sloped 
from shows a length of 200 feet and a thickness of 
10 feet. The third level is being driven through 
pay ore to a point 180 feet ahead to connect with a 
winze from the second level. In the fourth level 
and close to the shaft ihe ore body is eight feet 
thick. With the arraDgcments now under way the 
Washington will be one of the best ventilated mines 
in the county, and as Under Sheriff Reynolds says, 
*' good ventilation is one of the important requisites 
of successful mining." 

Mining Dividend. — Grass Valley Union, Dec. 



29: The North Star Mining Co. , of this district, has 
declared a dividend (No. 5) of 50 cents a share, 
amounting to $50,000, payable on and after the 30th 
inst. This will make $250,000 in dividends paid by 
the new company. 

Out of Supplies. — Transcript, Dec. 29: At the 
IX L mine on the south fork of Poorman's creek, 
there is a scarcity of provisions for the men and of 
shoes and dies for the mill, all on account of the big 
storm which has prevented getting these things over 
the road from the base of supplies to the mine. 
The scarcity has necessitated a temporary laying off 
of most of the force, but everybody will be at work 
again as soon as some "grub" can be taken over 
from Washington, which is five miles this side. The 
mine itself is all right. Men who have worked there 
say it is going to be a great producer by next sum- 
mer when everything gets fairly under headway. 
They report that the ledge varies in thickness from 
10 to 30 feet and has an average width of 17 feet. 
They say it mills over $10 a ton as far as tested. If 
a ledge of that size and as easily extracted averages 
$6 a ton, there is a fortune in it for the owners. 

A Great Mine.— " The Idaho mine of Grass 
Valley is a great property, but let me tell you that 
the California mine of Graniteville bids fair to 
make just as good a record," said a mining man who 
recently visited some of the claims in Eureka town- 
ship. The California has a very large ledge of ore 
that is richer than the most extensive deposits and 
as the ledge is followed it is improving in every way. 
.Supt. Foley, who in partnership with Mr. Bohannan 
owns the property, keeps persistently but quietly 
turning out the riches. He doesn't say much, but 
he wears a contented expression that cannot be mis- 
interpreted. 

That Re-organization. — Tidings, Dec. 26 : 
Anent the proposed re-organization of the Bruns- 
wick Mining Co. , operating in this district, the fol- 
lowing explanations are made: The holders of the 
judgment against the company are to receive the en- 
tire capital stock of a new company to be organized 
under the laws of California for their judgments 
against the present company, at the rate of $25 000, 
or five cents per share paid (still leaving 95 cents 
per share assessable). The holders of the entire cap- 
ital stock of the new company agree to exchange 
share for share of the old for the new on the pay- 
ment by the old of five cents, and the money received 
from the voluntary assessment on the old, less ex- 
penses, to be donated to the new company for the 
development of its property. All lapsed stock goes 
tojudgraent holders. The entire capital stock of the 
new company is to be deposited with H. R. Louns- 
berry. New York, until Aug. i, 1890. Up to this 
time only the judgment holders' stock will be traded 
in, the object of pooling the entire capital stock 
being to prevent the throwing of large blocks on the 
market and depressing prices. 

Another Big Dividend. — Tidings. Dec. 30 : 
The North Star M. Co., operating in this dis- 
trict, has declared dividend No. 5 of 50 cents a 
share, aggregating $50,000. This makes $250,000 
in dividends paid by the North Star under the 
present management. And this mine was shut 
down years ago, " worked out ! " Yet it has 
within three or four years been reopened, supplied 
with a hoisting and pumping plant and 40-stamp 
mill second to none in the State, in addition to 
paying a quarter of a million in dividends I Be- 
tween 150 and 200 men are given employment. 
The Empire, Omaha and Hartery are also shining 
examples of *' worked-out" mires. 

Coe Mine.— Grass Valley Union^ Dec. 31: The 
owners of the Coe mine received no information 
yesterday from Mr. Craig, of Denver, who has a 
bond upon the property which expires to-day, 
and they were of the opinion that he would not com- 
ply with the terms of the bond, and tliat they will 
again take possession oi the property. In that case 
it will not be long before arrangements will be made 
for conducting regular operations in the mine, and 
in the meanwhile the pump will be kept going to 
prevent the mine filling with water. 

Two Bits a Pan. — Transcript, Dec. 27: The 
workmen digging to bedrock to make a foundation 
for the north abutment of the new Main street 
bridge have struck gravel that pays two bits to the 
pan. Along about i860, John Williams, grand- 
father of ex- Postmaster Wallace J. Williams, ran a 
tunnel in north from Deer creek at about that point 
and drifted out considerable gold. He had to quit 
before the deposit was worked out, because of the 
sinking of Main street which was overhead. The 
Manzanita ravine which now has its dumping-place 
farther east came down that way in early times, it is 
supposed, the theory being that the point where the 
Union hotel. Lane's livery stable and adjoining 
buildings now stand was once a low flat and subse- 
quently fllled up with the natural wash. There is a 
channel of pay gravel even as high up as a few feet 
under the ground upon which the undertaking es- 
tablishment of W. C. Groves stands. 

Omaha Mine.— Grass Valley Union, Dec. 31: 
Everything is going on satisfactorily at the Omaha 
mine, except that the bad weather has interfered 
with the putting down of the water-pipe line to the 
Lone Jack shaft for hoisting purposes. As stated 
several days ago, a splendid body of ore is showing 
up in the No. 10 and No. ii drifts, which from its 
size promises to give permanent and profitable re- 
sults. The Omaha has about reached the point 
when diWdends can be paid, but they are postponed 
for the present, owing to the expenditures being 
made for surface improvements. 
Placer. 

Iowa Hill.— Cor. Placer Argus, Dec. 28: The 
latest news from all the mines in this vicinity and on 
the Upper Divide is encouraging. Fair & Davis have 
35 men at work on the Pioneer quartz mine, near 
Damascus, and keep 15 stamps running most of the 
time on rock that gives good dividends to the own- 
ers. A lower tunnel is being run to cut the ledge 
at a greater depth. C. Hoffman reports about 40 
men at work at the Red Point mine taking out 
gravel that must pay well if Mr. Hoffman's good 
spirits are any indication. Chas. F. Reed, owner 
of the Drummond quartz mine at Cottage Home, 
passed through town on Friday last on his way to 
the mine. About 25 men are now at work and the 
force will be doubled during the spring. The Hunt- 
ington mill crushes from 25 to 30 tons per day with 
good results. Mr. Reed is well pleased with his in- 
vestment in Placer county. The famous old Mount- 
ian Gate gravel mine at Damascus has been bonded 
to the same French syndicate that owns the Red 
Point mine. The Mountain Gate has been one of 
the richest mines on the Divide. Enough of the old 



blue channel still remains unworked to warrant the 
new owners putting in pumping machinery, or to 
run a new and lower tunnel to drain the mine. The 
French company have abundant capital to do 
either, and have intelligent engineers in their em- 
ploy who will bring back the old Mountain Gate to 
its former position as one of the best paying mines 
in Placer. It is rumored that the same company 
have bonded other claims in the same vicinity on 
which work will be commenced in the sprinjg. Ross 
Browne, the mining engineer, has been surveying 
and taking the levels on rim rock and channels on 
the Forest Hill Divide, and it would not be a sur- 
prise if you should hear that the French syndicates 
had got hold of some of the rich gravel mines in that 
district. The Morning Star gravel mine, at Iowa 
Hill, has been bonded to a company represented by 
Mr. J. Hammond, who is at p^sent working the 
mine under his bond. The main tunnel is being 
driven ahead 500 feet; when that work has been 
completed a larger force of men again be put to work 
taking out gravel and the mill again be run on full 
time. E. West has charge of the work. Tom Dick 
and the Schmidt boys are running a tunnel on the 
old McCall mine at Elizabeth town. They have 
started an upraise and expect to break through be- 
fore New Year's. They have christened the claim 
the Emma mine. The Huntington mill at the Hor- 
man mine, at Wisconsin Hill, is crushing 12 to 15 
tons of rich gravel per day. Another mill is on the 
way to the mine, but it will not get there before 
spring unless the roads improve. 

Sunny South.— Cor. Placer ^^^^/WiVaw, Dec. 25: 
Five miles from Michigan Bluff at the head of a 
tributary of El Dorado canyon lies the little town of 
Sunny South. It depends entirely upon the Hidden 
Treasure mine for its existence, but since it is " built 
upon a rock" no one is apprehensive as to its 
future. The Hidden Treasure mine has been 
worked for about 13 years and is now operated 
through 8300 feet of tunnel, through a slate forma- 
tion, by drifting. The pay gravel is white quartz. 
The bedrock is slate varying in color from white to 
black. The mine is timbered throughout with 
spruce and pine. The gravel is washed by water 
supplied by the mine. The cars are drawn into the 
mine by horses, and as the cars come out of the 
mine loaded their contents are dumped through a 
chute to the washing floor, where they are washed 
into sluices by a stream of water under a pressure of 
20 feet. After being washed the gravel passes 
through two sets of sluices lined with quartz bowl- 
ders and worn-out car wheels. Considerable quick- 
silver is used in the sluices. 

Shasta. 
Old Diggings.— Redding /^r« Press, Dec. 23: 

5. O'Neil of Old Diggings informs us that he has a 
contract to run the main tunnel on Haskell, Meyers 

6, Co.'s mammoth mine. Also that the Hart & Day 
mine is running 15 stamps and shipping a carload 
to Vallejo Junction every week. 

A Success.— Shasta Courier, Dec. 26: John 
Bowder has made a success in his management of 
the old Banghart mine on Mad Mule creek, nearly 
$3000 having been taken out in a few months. If 
there was a good supply of water on that claim a 
cartload of gold could soon be extracted. 

SlslElyau. 

Salmon River Items.— Cor. Yreka Journal, 
Dec. 25: The weather was quite cold on the even- 
ing of the 15th inst., the mercury reaching 20 above 
zero, the coldest of the season. The snow ranges 
from six inches to a foot deep on the river bars, and 
is disappearing rapidly under the influence of the 
hot sun. On the mountains the snow is six or seven 
feet deep. The placer miners are getting ready for 
business in the spring, when nearly all having claims 
will make good wages. The Golden Ball quartz 
mill is working 12 stamps, one battery being hung 
up for repairs. The ore crushed at present is the 
best milled in this district for a long time. The 
more the mine is developed the better showing it 
makes. RoHin & Co., with two arastras, frozen up 
at present, have plenty of ore on the dump to grind 
as long as water lasts, which good judges say will 
average not less than $100 per ton. Sheffield's 
quartz-mill has not been started yet. He expects to 
start up soon, with 200 or 300 tons of ore, which 
prospects very well. Ex-Lieut. Gov. Daggett is 
prospecting the Black Bear mine with a fair chance 
of bringing it up to its old standard. Ned Roberts 
has found a good ledge about one mile above the 
Golden Ball on Eddy's gulch. It is said he has. ore 
in sight in the tunnel that will yield $2000 per ton. 
Bully for Ned ! Harry Welker & Co. have a fine 
prospect below Tanner's Peak. They have run 40 
feet on the ledge and find good-paying ore all the 
way. 

Placer and Quartz.- Yreka/i'«r/7a^, Dec. 25: 
From Know Notning creek we learn that the quartz 
mines are all turning out exceedingly well, with 
prospects of improvement as the various ledges are 
more fully developed. The Gold Run mine of 
Radelfinger & Co. pays from $60 to $80 per ton, and 
employs from six to eight men in the mine and mill. 
The Know Nothing mine has been yielding very 
good pay, and the mill is kept running steadily. 
The Wolverine mine has been shut down for the 
present, owing to the ledge being too wet to work 
to advantage. As soon as it dries out after the 
heavy storms, work will be resumed again. The 
cold weather since the late storms freezes the ground 
and checks the flow of water, to prevent much work 
at placer mining, but when a change to warmer 
weather occurs, there will be an abundance of water, 
owing to the extensive supply of snow on the mount- 
ains. The frequentwarm spells during winter will 
give miners a better chance this season than for 
many years to mine successfully, and in the spring 
they will be favored with a still better chance of do- 
ing well. The hydraulic mines will also have an 
abundance of water to run several weeks longer 
during the spring and summer, as the snow already 
on the mountains will be sufficient to last until mid- 
summer, with a certainty of considerable more snow 
during January and February to pile up an addi- 
tional amount, Radelfinger & Co, havi built a fine 
new ditch at their mine on Know Nothing creek, 
which will enable them to run their quartz-mill all 
year round. They expect to start the mill again in 
March, when the new ditch will be ready for con- 
stant use. The Centennial Co. are pumping out 
their claim again, since being filled up by the heavy 
storm of two weeks ago. and have all the water out 
except about 10 feet. The boys do not entertain 
much hope of being able to mine during the venter, 
but concluded it would do no harm to start up the 



pump run by the water-power of the river. Should 
no great storms occur hereafter to raise the river, 
they may be able to start working again in taking 
out gold, provided the weather does not get cold 
enough to freeze the water in the pit. 

NEVADA. 

Wasboe D1st;rlct. 

Gould and Curry.— Virginia Enterprise, Dec. 
28: On the 200 level the southwest dnlt has been 
extended 20 feet; total length, 250 feet. Formation, 
soft porphyry. On the 400 level west crosscut No. 
2 has been extended 38 feet; total length, 138 feet. 
Formation, quartz. 

Best and Belcher.— On the 625 level east cross- 
cut No. I has been extended 28 feet; total length, 
78 feet. Formation, porphyry and clay, with streaks 
of quartz. On the 1000 level east crosscut No, i 
has been extended 15 feet; total length, 56 feet. 
Formation, hard porphyry. 

Alta. — Are still sinking the winze in the ledge 
below the 925 level. The slopes between the B25 
and 925 levels are looking well, and the mill reduces 
daily about 45 tons of ore. Have just made a large 
shipment of concentrates to Salt Lake City. 

Yellow Jacket.— Are shipping an average of 
60 tons of ore daily to Brunswick mill. The west 
drift on the 500 level is out 880 feet; face in por- 
phyry. Crosscutting east and west from north drifts 
on the 800 and 900 levels. 

Hendricks. — The hoisting machinery has been 
thoroughly repaired and is now as good as new. 
Work will be resumed in the shaft when the roads 
are again opened. 

Justice. — The 825 level north drift advanced 17 
feet during the week; total, 115 feet; face in fair- 
grade ore. The north drift, 622 level, is out 470 
teet, the face in low-grade ore and showing some 
moisture. The 490 level slopes are looking and 
yielding about as usual. Shipped to the mill dur- 
ing the week 241 tons of ore; average battery assays, 
$22.62. 

Keyes Mine. — Proprietorship in a chaotic con- 
dition. 

Occidental. — Too much gypsum. 

Savage. — Are extracting ore from the 400, 500, 
600 and 750 levels. During the week 455 tons of 
ore have been milled, the average battery assay of 
which was $21.58. Have bullion on hand and at 
the mill amounting to $22,315.50. 

Hale and Norcross. — They are extracting ore 
from the 500, 600, 700 and 1200 levels, and also 
from the 1300 level upraise. During the week have 
milled 1078 tons of ore; average batiery assays, 
$19.13. Have bullion on hand and at the mill 
amounting to $49,467.24. 

Scorpion.— On the 500 level the new east cross- 
cut from the south drift was advanced 56 feet; total, 
256 feet; face in porphyry, showing streaks of 
quartz. 

Chollar. — The north lateral drift, 750 level, is 
out 744 feet; face in quartz and porphyry, giving 
low assays. The north lateral drift, 930 level, is 
out 365 feet; face in porphyry. 

PoTOSi. — Timbering the south lateral drifts on 
the 650 and 750 levels is nearly completed. The 
east crosscut, 560 feet north of shaft, 930 level, is 
out 166 feet; face in porphyry. 

Exchequer, — The 500 level east crossciit on the 
north line is out 46 feet; face in quartz .and por- 
phyry. 

New York. — Owing to repairs being made to 
surface machinery, very little work has been done in 
the mine the past week. 

Alpha. — The west crosscut 100 feet north of 
shaft, 500 level, is out 373 feet; face in porphyry. 
The north lateral drift, 600 level, is out 62 feet; face 
in quartz, giving low assays. 

Silver Hill. — The 260 level east crosscut, 790 
feet nor'h from shaft, advanced 15 feet through por- 
phyry; total distance from shaft, 875 feet. North- 
east crosscut, 430 feet from shaft, advanced 15 feet 
through porphyry and clay ; total distance from 
shaft, 480 feet. 

Ward Combination Shaft.— East drift on the 
1800 station is out 113 feet; face in porphyry. 

Julia Con.— The northwest drift from the 1800 
Ward station is out 131 feet; face in clay and por- 
phyry. 

Challenge Con.— The joint Confidence and 
Challenge west crosscut from the 300 level is out 86 
feet, 20 feet having been added during the week. 
The face shows a mixture of quartz and porphyry. 

Crown Point. — The 600 third floor northeast 
drift is out 64 feet. Shipped to the mill during the 
week 847 tons of ore, the average battery assay of 
which was $17.67 per ton. 

Belcher. — The 1200 level No. 2 east crosscut 
was extended 67 feet during the week, making its 
total length 370 feet. The 200 south drift is out 123 
feet. 

Overman. — Extracted 185 tons of ore and ship- 
ped 205 tons to the Vivian mill. 

Caledonia. — At a point 313 feet in the south 
drift have commenced west crosscut No. 3 and ex- 
tended the same 38 feet. Formation, vein por- 
phyry. 

Con. Imperial. — West crosscut No. 2 from the 
300 level north drift is out 60 feet, having been ad- 
vanced 20 feet during the week. The face shows a 
mixture of quartz and porphyry. The north raise 
from the same level is up 70 feet, 14 feet having been 
added during the week. The top is in low-grade 
quartz. 

Oolumbus District. 

Candelaria. — Cor. Inyo Independent, Dec. 
27: There is a rumor in camp that the Candelaria 
Mill & Water Co. has bought the Holmes and 
Northern Belle properties. Mr. Sunderland is on 
his way from New York to San Francisco; he is the 
manager of the C. M. & W. Co. It is said that Mr. 
Wesierville, the resident superintendent, has de- 
manded the possession of the Holmes from Mr. 
Girard, the agent for the Holmes. Mr. Girard says 
the Holmes is sold but he has not received orders to 
turn the property over to the new owners. There 
are over 100 Chinamen working at Columbus for the 
Pacific Salt and Borax Co. They ship about 500 
tons of borax per month. Teals Marsh has also 
started up. The Mt. Diablo will shut down for a 
week to give the men a rest and overhaul the machin- 
ery at the hoisting works. Their mill at Sodaville 
is running on ore from the Columbus Con. mine. 
Thomas Harrington, formerly with Given & Ingalls, 
of Bishop, is foreman of the Columbus mine. Con- '. 
siderable chloriding is being done on the Potosi, 
the property "of T. Reddy, and other claims. There ■ 



Jan. 4, 1890 J 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



are 14 men working on the Garfield mine. Mr. 
Hooper, the supcriniendcDi. has gone to Lonilon 
and it is uoderstood that on his return they will 
put OD about 30 men. 1( the Holmes is sold there 
will be considerable money exprndetl here. Mr. 
Sunderland has ordered the resident supc-nntendent 
to examine the Holmes and send him a report to Sin 
Francisco what the proUible cost will be to put the 
Holmes prop*rty in good working order and what 
it will cost tu gel out 30 tons of ore per day. 
Bureka Dtatrlct. 

Adams Hill Mines. — Eureka Hentirtfl, Dec. 28: 
Some of the mines on Adanu I lill we learn are look- 
ing well. Inhere are seven iribulers working in the 
Silver I.ick, alt of whom are making good wages. 
Frank Roose is getting some good ore out of the 
Rio Members. Wm. Sanches is mining some rich 
ore in the Lone Pine. Al Hageman is prospecting 
and living m hopes of getting rich. He has good 
chances ahead of him and is very much encouraged 
with a vein of lead ore in sight in the Ida May mme. 
He is finishing his assessment work on the May lode. 
Johnny McNorioo and the Laird brothers are tak- 
ing considerable heavy lead ore from the Ttull- 
wbacker mine, which they are shipping 10 Salt Lake. 
They arc making good wage's. 

New Pass District. 

Closing Down. — Reese River Hrzeille^ Dec. 24: 
Ramdohr and Starrett Bros, have shut down the 
mine at New Pass for the present and discharged 
the miners. Dennis Scully, Jim Canwilh, George 
Francis, Bob Crawford and John McCormick ar- 
rived hrre yesterday, while th"se living in Battle 
Mountain have departed for that place. It is not 
known when they will begin operations again. 
Plocbe District. 

Furnace. — Record^ Dec. 21: The furnace shut 
down Thursday afternoon, owing to a lack of flux- 
ing material. It will depend on the state of the 
weather as to when it will start again. For two 
weeks past it has been impossible to bring in either 
ore or supplies from the outside, and the furnace 
during that time has been run on material accumu- 
lated before. After three weeks of almost uninter- 
rupted storm, appearances indicate further bad 
weather. On Thursday, the concentrators at the 
Reduction works after a lay-off of several weeks for 
alterations, started on Half Moon ore and will run 
until the ore now accumulated is finished. 

Tramway. — That portion of the Half Moon 
tramway running from the Raymond Shaft along 
the hillside west of town to the vicinity of the school- 
house is all graded, and rails are laid on a good 
portion of ii; cedar ties are used and the track is 
built the same width as the old BuUionville road, 
and some of the cars formerly used on that road 
will be utilized here. The completion of this por- 
tion of the tramway will greatly facilitate the deliv- 
ery of ore and supplies at the furnace when ne.xt 
it runs. 

Sylvanla District. 

Sale. —Cor. \nyo Index, Dec. 24: John Bush- 
ard, who was in town a lew days ago from Palmetto 
district, reports the sale of the Kinkead mines at 
Sylvania district to S. F. parties for $30,000, Fif- 
teen thousand was paid in cash, balance on com- 
pletion of sale. The sale was made by Andy F>fife, 
and reduction works will be put up this coming 
spring. These mines are in Esmeralda county, 
Nevada, about 60 miles east of Big Pine. A new 
wagon road will be built through the southeastern 
part of Deep Spring valley, cowrecting with the 
Ashmore toll road to Big Pine. 

Tuscarora District. 

Elko Con, — Times -Kevierw, Dec. 27: The cross- 
cut at the bottom of the incline has been extended 
five feet; rock very hard. 

Belle Isle. — West crosscut from the north 
gangway, 350-foot level, extended 14 feet. West 
crosscut from south drift, 250-foot level, extended 
nine feet; face is all in low-g^ade ore. 

Navajo. — The slopes above the iso-foot level 
continue as at last report. The crosscut near the 
station has been cleaned out and a crosscut from the 
north drift advanced four feet. Mill now running 
on Navajo ore. 

Grand Pkize. — 400-foot level: Winze from 
south drift sunk 15 leet, bottom in low-grade ore. 
West drift from north crosscut extended 14 feet. 
North crosscut, 500-root level, extended n feet 
through a very hard formation, 

Nevada Queen, — The south drift from Com- 
moowealih has been extended 22 feet, the whole 
face being ore, some of which is high grade. Joint 
crosscut from 600-foot level. North Belle Isle, is 
being pushed toward the vein as fast as possible. 

North Bblle Isle.— Slopes above the 300, 
near Queen line, are without material change. The 
concentrator is running as usual. 

North Commonwealth.— Third level; Joint 
crosscut east has been advanced nine feel; continues 
to show some ore in the face. Water is not so 
strong as at last report. East crosscut from south 
drift has been extended 17 feet without material 
change. 

Del Monte. — No. 2 west crosscut on the first 
level has beeu advanced eight feet. The face of the 
crosscut is low-grade ore and looking very favorable. 
The work of cutting out second level station is about 
complete; will have the chairs in to-day. Drift will 
be pushed into the ore as fast as possible. 

Commonwealth, — 300-foot level: North gang- 
way extended 17 feet. The slopes throughout the 
mine look well; 425 tons concentrating ore have 
been sent to the concentrator; average $15.83 per 
ton. Concentrates average assay for ihe week, 
$249.79 P^r ton. Average assay of first class, by 
car sample, $289 per ton, put in ore bins at Union 
mill. Some repairs needed at the mill are being 
made preparatory to starting on the isl. 

ARIZONA. 

Gold Bullion. — Prescott M'uier, Dec. 30: 
Wm. H. Faulkner, of the Quartz Mountain Mining 
Co., to-day shipped a $2000 bar of fine gold bul- 
lion, the result o( 40 hours" run of their mill. Par- 
ties who came through Copper basin yesterday say 
that the smelter there was in full blast. Frank A. 
Patty, foreman for J. R. Liston of the Old Reliable 
mine in the Bradshaws, says the mill is running to 
its full capacity, while the mine is in a splendid con- 
dition, showing up large quantities of good ore. 
A pack train of three animals came in yesterday af- 
ternoon from the Bradshaw mountains, loaded down 
with bullion from the Crowned King mine. The 
value of the bullion is not stated, though it is esti- 



mated by those who have seen it to l)e worth SM.- 
000 or more. The Fortuna mine near the lower 
dam has been sold to a Pl\u:nix blacksmith named 
Vasquei. E. S, liennelt, the hydraulic engineer 
who accompanied the Bates party to .Stanton, came 
in on last night's stage. He has made extensive in- 
vestigations of the placer grounds of the Electric 
Plaoer Co., and expresses himself highly pleased. 
Geo. E. Brown returned from an official visit to 
Cherry creek yesterday, and says the Mockingbird 
mill is crushing 20 tons of ore per d^y. J. R. Lis- 
ton gives employment to eight or ten men at his Old 
Reliable mine and the Del Pasco mill. The Rapid 
Transit, owaed by Jacob Henkle, in the Bradshaw 
mountains, is well opened up, and shows a large 
body of fine ore. Superintendent M. R. Kiley came 
in to-day from the Ryland mine at Minnehaha 
fiat, with a large shipment of fine gold bullion, the 
product of the Ryland mill. The value is supposed 
to be away up in the thousands. A clean-up will 
be made at the .Mockingbird mill to-day or to-mor- 
row. Parties who have recently visited this prop- 
erty say that the yield is even larger than was antic- 
ipated. Messrs. Palmer, Martin and Goodfellow 
shipped their supplies out to Martinez to-day, and 
the latter two will leave next week to commence 
work on the Highland Mary mine. W. H. Harlan 
is working the Wild Cat claim, on the Hassayampa, 
and is getting good ore, which he will run through 
the Howard mill in the spring. J. K. Hall was in 
from the Lynx Creek hydraulic works to-day. He 
says that there are six men employed there in wash- 
ing rich gravel. They have been running now for 
two weeks, but have not yet made a clean-up. A 
clean-up was made at the Mockingbird mill last week 
which proves highly satisfactory. The result was 
even greater than anticipated by Mr. Ried or Super- 
intendent De Kuhn. The ledge of the mine is five 
feet in width, and all the ore taken from it is run 
through the mill without sorting, 

Notes. — Prescott Courier, Dec. 29; Wm, A. 
Rinn has gone to Bradshaw district to start work on 
his Tiger claim. A. C. Gilmore and Wm. Murphy, 
just from the Oro Bella section of Bradshaw, say 
that mills and mines are doing first rale. Robert 
Dougherty has returned from a long prospecting 
trip in the Harcuavar mountains. Says he saw 
nothing to compare with this mineral belt. There's 
another Silver King complication. Company refuse 
to pay Mr. Ruberi balance of purchase money, over 
$7000. Mr. Baer, one of the company, is here from 
the East, so we hope for a settlement of questions. 
Mr, O. F. Place, president of the Crowned King 
M. & M. Co., does not want any saloons near the 
company's property, so he has enjoined Sheriff 
O'Neill from issuing license to a Mr. Patrick. 

OOLORADO. 

New Ore Contracts.— Aspen Times, Dec. 22: 
It was stated last evening on undoubted authority 
that the Aspen and Compromise mines had com- 
pleted contracts for their January output As near 
as could be learned, the contracts are with several 
different concerns and call for an aggregate of 150 
tons per day from each property. This figure is 
larger than the average for the two mines before the 
sbuidown and will require the employment of a 
greater number of men than were formerly en- 
gaged. The Mineral Farm continues to look well. 
It is reported that some ore has been found in the 
Romulus. The Edison improves rapidly. It is 
opening up at two points and both ore bodies give 
promise of being bonanzas. New developments 
have been made in the Silver Bell during the past 
few days that show the ore body to be even larger 
and richer than has heretofore been supposed. 

A New Placer %0HKWL\.—V>txis^x Republican, 
Dec. 26: A company is to be shortly organized 
with $300,000 capital to purchase 320 acres of placer 
ground on the Tyler estate, embracing 3?^ miles on 
Boulder creek and 2Ji miles on Beaver creek just 
above their junction. Forty acres of ground has 
been worked above the Tyler estate for 15 years, 
and it has yielded largely in gold, even at the pres- 
ent time paying excellent wages to the parties work- 
ing it under a lease. At the junction of the creeks 
about 2^ acres has been " pawed over,'' with the 
result that $40,000 in royalities have been paid. 
Bedrock on this small space has never been reached. 
The new company will work thoroughly all the 
ground on Beaver creek to the upper line of the es- 
tate, and on Boulder creek to the 40 acres which is 
now being worked and has proven so rich in the 
past. The area to be purchased is virgin ground, 
and for some reason has been heretofore supposed 
to contain very little gold. Recent prospecting has, 
however, demonstrated that the dirt is equally rich 
with that found at either place where mining has 
been done. W. C. Lothrop & Co. obtained a bond 
upon the properly some little time ago, and com- 
menced careful investigation as to the value. They 
got 1. B. Lambing, of California, a placer miner of 40 
years' experience, and reputed to be one of the most 
conservative experts in the United States. Mr. 
Lambing visited the property and spent several 
weeks in its thorough examination. He returned 
late last week and reported in substance as follows; 
That there are 300 acres of placer ground on both 
creeks. That the Beaver creek dirt for the whole 
distance of 2 J:^ miles will average 73 cents to the 
cubic yard, and that the 3^^ miles on Boulder creek 
will average 61 cents to the cubic yard. That there 
are 1000 inches of water, with a dump of 124 to 300 
feet to the mile. That it will require 20 men 20 
years to work the ground thoroughly. That the 
total product, all allowance being made for waste, 
cost of sluicing and other expenses not including la- 
bor, will be very little less than $2,000,000. Lothrop 
& Co,, S. H. Baker, Esq., being the silent member 
of the firm, are acting upon this report and will or- 
ganize in a short time a syndicate, which will con- 
tain at the most three other gentlemen. They will 
ground-sluice the property and work for awhile in 
this manner. Subsequently they will put in the 
giants and tear down a great amount of gold-bear- 
ing dirt and rock. The expectation is confident 
that $40,000 will be taken out the coming season, 

DAKOTA. 

Nigger Hill Tin.— Deadwood Pioneer, Dec. 
25: Chas. Finch, superintendent of developments 
on the claims of the American and Cleveland tin 
companies, is in the city, and from him we learn 
that more ore has been uncovered and taken out the 
last three months than during all the former years 
of developments. Three claims, Isabel, Tolo and 
Columbus, heretofore considered worthless, have de- 



veloped into .is good, if not better mines than the 
Clevcl.ind. Reduction works of some kind will be 
in operation before the close of the year 1890. 

Syndicate Smelter. — the Syndicate smelter 
will blow in for another run Iromedialely after Christ- 
mas. Contracts were made yesterday for fifty tons 
of Ross- Hannibal ore, and for an equal amount from 
the Tornado, Harmony and Double Standard com- 
panies. Pyrites will be obtained from Galena. 

IDAHO. 

Old A ue.— Charles Sinclair and partners are 
running a 2oo-foot tunnel on the Old Abe on Elk 
creek; a distance of 50 feet has been attained with 
most satisfactory results. The vein is six feet wide 
and averages well in silver and lead. 

Mavfluuer.— J. C. Rasberry and J. W. West 
are developing the Mayflower claim on Pine creek. 
Their incline is down 30 feet, in the bottom of 
which is a body of good concentrating ore, one and 
a half feet in width. The Maytlower is a most en- 
couraging prospect, 

Bea\er District. — The wonderful discoveries 
on Sunset Peak are regarded as among the most 
important made in any portion of Co^ur d'Alene, 
and the coming season will be one of much activity 
in and around Carbon Center. Notwithstanding 
the great elevation of the mines, work is progressing 
rapidly and will be continued during the winter. 

Sitting Bull.- The Portland M. Co., with W. 
H. Pettit as superintendent, keep a force of men 
employed on the Sitting Bull getting out ore, and 
teams are constantly employed in hauling the prod- 
uct to the railroad for shipment. The hoisting 
plant and other machinery which arrived over two 
months ago will be put up early in Ihe spring. 

Custer.— The Porter Bros, and W. H. Clagget 
are steadily working the Custer mine, and those fa- 
miliar with its development pronounce the property 
one of the richest in the prolific district in which it 
is located. 

Pony Gulch. — Success appears to crown the 
efforts of Sup't C. Kraus of the Fay Templeton 
mine, who keeps 20 men employed day and night 
on that property. The quality of the ore extracted 
is most excellent and the quantity in sight equally 
satisfactory. The mill is running uninterruptedly. 

The Elkhorn Mine.— Boise Statesman, Dec. 
24: Mr. E, H, Hesse, who has recently been engag- 
ed in making surveys of the famous Elkhorn mining 
property in the Boise Basin, gives a very encourag- 
ing account of the present condition and future pros- 
pects of the Elkhorn and adjoining properties. The 
old works on the original Elkhorn were abandoned 
many years ago on accountof theaccumulated water, 
for which the miners of that day had failed to pro-, 
vide means of drainage. The lode where left had 
proved very rich, over half a million dollars having 
been extracted during one short season's operations. 
During the past two years, Mr. Hugh Turner has 
been engaged in running a lower tunnel with a view 
to tapping the old Elkhorn lode. This tunnel is now 
in some 1200 feet, having cut through four parallel 
veins in that distance. These veins all show gl)od 
bodies of paying ore, from one of which Turner re- 
alised some $25,000 in a few weeks. At present the 
properly is bonded to a Boston company, which is 
pushing operations on a healthy scale. At the end 
of the tunnel named, a double compartment upraise 
is being prosecuted with a view of tapping the bot- 
tom of the old works on the Elkhorn. The new 50- 
stamp mill to be built next season will be run by 
water-power, as will also be the electric plant to 
light the mine and mill. Only a limited force — 
some twelve men— is now employed. The only 
means of crushing ore at present is the five-stamp 
mill used by Mr. Turner. The mine is situated on 
Elk creek, about ten miles above Idaho City. 

The Buttercup Mine. — Ketchum Keystone, 
Dec, 21; In consequence of the damages occasioned 
by the snowslide which occurred last week at the 
Buttercup mine on Willow creek, Supt. Childs has 
suspended further operations at the mine until 
spring. The closing of work during the winter will 
no doubt be quite a drawback to the development 
of the mine, but the casualty which has caused the 
cessation of work for the present was beyond the 
power of human effort to avert. 

MONTANA. 

Ruby District, — Butte Inter- Mountain, Dec. 
28: In the Lowland district operations have been 
suspended for the winter, though considerable pros- 
pecting and representing is being done by quite a 
number. The Amazon is just at present the only 
mine in operation in the district. The ore is ship- 
ped to Butte and is like all the ore in that locahty, 
gold in character with a sprinkling of silver. There 
is no excitement concerning the mines as in old 
times. No such excitement disturbs those now busi- 
ly engaged in developing this country. The best 
known mine and most prominent is the Ruby. The 
depth of the shaft is 100 feet, but the company have 
confined themselves to stopingfrom the 5o>foot level 
to the surface. That is about exhausted. It is 
stated by parties who have worked it that the com- 
pany has netted fully $100,000 from this amount of 
ore worked. 

The Lexington. — The Lexington shaft is push- 
ing on to the 1500-foot level and is the deepest per- 
pendicular shaft in the whole State of Montana. 
More attention is paid to the sinking of this shaft 
than the sinking that is being carried on in all of the 
mines of Butte, as on the results, when that crosscut 
connects with the lead on the 1500, will depend the 
future of deep mining in this district. Many asser- 
tions have been made by many of the prominent 
mining men as to the continuity of ore bodies in 
depth. Some claim that the leads become richer as 
depth .is attained as in the Mountain View, while 
others that the deeper, the more base becomes the 
ore and that it will run ultimately into iron or bar- 
ren rock. Thus far the former assertion seems to 
be more correct, as is witnessed by many of our great 
mines, though more particularly the copper ones. 
This company deserves great credit for being the 
first to commence sinking to any great depth and 
after reaching the looo-foot mark to keep right 
along without interruption. Edmond Williams, at 
the mouth of Park canyon, has his tunnel in 175 
feet. It will be continued in 250 feet farther, when 
it is expected it will tap the lead. The Iron mine 
in Park canyon has lots of ore on the dump to 
answer all demands made upon it. It is used en- 
tirely for fluxing. It is reported that the Butte Re- 
duction Works will shortly start up their blast 
furnaces that have so long lain idle. The concen- 



trator and calciners are running at their full capac- 
ity. Ihe Mountain View is having some ditficulty 
in getting rid of its ore. The mine is now compel- 
led to lay some of the boys off every once in a 
while on account of the chutes being full. The East 
Gray Rock continues shut down owing to part ol the 
machinery of that mine being used at the Silver Bow. 
Remarks have been current that the Anaconda Co. 
intends to shortly open the Anaconda mine. The 
Odin has again suspended operations. The pumps 
are hoisted to the surface. The IMutonia has also 
thrown up the sponge. It was operated by Messrs. 
Haupt & Rafferty. Dr. Larkin is working eight 
miners in Horse canyon on his claim. The lead has 
been encountered and looks very promising. Robt. 
Tait, the millwright who constructed the Champion 
milt, states that the mill will not be able to start till 
some time in February. There is shipped daily from 
the five Chamber syndicate of mines, the Mountain 
Consolidated, Green Mountain, Wake Up Jim, 
Modoc and Matte, about 1500 tons of ore, which is 
hauled to Anaconda by 70 or 75 of the Montana 
Union cars. 

The Kevstone.— AVu) A'orMK'fj/. Dec. 36: The 
report of an important strike in the Keystone has 
been verified. The dip of the lead brought it into 
the shaft at 112 feet, and it has straightened to such 
an extent that the working will be on vein matter 
for 20 feet at least. The ore body is about four and 
a half feet wide and sample assays go from 40 ounces 
up. 

The Champion.— Regular, though not large, 
shipments of ore continue to be made, enough to 
pay the running expenses of the mine pending the 
completion of the mill. With the exception of a part 
of the machinery, all the material for the mill is now 
on the ground. 

The Franklin. — The men who recently took the 
contract to extend the Franklin tunnel 500 feet had 
made 75 feet of the distance last Sunday. The de- 
velopment thus far on the contract has been a stringer 
of very fine ore and a change for the better in the 
character of the formation. 

ORKQON. 

Powder River. — Union Scout, Dec. 2t: Powder 
River is again attracting the attention of our miners 
and J. G, Lewis will leave for the East to perfect the 
organization of the Powder River Flume and Min- 
ing Co. on the three miles of the river owned 
and controlled by the J. G. Lewis Co. Owing 
to the very and unusual low stage of Powder 
river last summer only the rocker could be used, yet 
every one working realized good wages and it is now 
known that M. Ferri, doing assessment work for the 
J. G, Lewis Co,, realized over $1000 in three months. 

Sparta. — Cook & Younger, the Sparta Rustlers, 
have uncovered some very rich free gold and sul- 
phuret ore on their Bisn;iarck and Opulent mines 
belonging to the consolidated New Golden Era 
group adjoining the Gold Ridge group on the west. 
The OUie Woodman, belonging to this group, shows 
three feet of high-grade ore and the incline shaft 
will be sunk 50 feet this winter and levels run at 
this depth. The ore from the Ollie Woodman shows 
$18 in gold by free amalgamation and $21 gold in 
sulphureis to the ton. They have suspended work 
on their rich free gold property on East Eagle creek 
and will actively develop the consolidated New 
Golden Era group, which is now conceded to be one 
of the most promising group of mines in the Sparta 
district. 

UTAH. 

A Strike in Blue Ledge. — Park Record, Dec, 
29 : The Ontario bullion product for the week was 
29 bars, containing 17,047.55 fine ounces of 
silver. The bad condition of the ropds interfered 
with ore hauling the past week. The Crescent has 
not yet resumed shipments of first-class ore. Air 
connections between No. i and 2 levels have been 
made and the rich vein is being explored to better 
advantage. The Woodside's ore shipments will 
be larger than ever soon. During the week the 
Mackintosh sampler received and forwarded 394,490 
pounds of Ontario ore; 174,640 of May Flower 
No. 7 leasers; 67,390 of Daly, and 24,180 of Wood- 
side ore; 660,700 pounds. A discovery of a deposit 
of lithographic stone is reported to have been made 
recently in the hills below town. The Nevada- 
Northland leasers started this morning to ship 
high grade ore to the Mackintosh sampler and the 
first lot will be fifty tons. Work continues at the 
Creole No. 2, notwithstanding that a notice was 
served this week on the leasers, by a representative 
of the Townsite company, to the effect that he 
claimed the ore and for the sampler not to ship it. 
A good strike has been made in the Red Cross 
tunnel which is being run to develop the Silver 
Kay group, consisting of four claims and situated 
in the southern part of Blue Ledge district, near the 
Glencoe. The tunnel is in 28 feet and a ledge five 
feet in width was recently encountered which carries 
gray and yellow carbonates that assay well in siiver 
and lead. The group is owned by J. S. M. Jackson, 
Geo. Irwin, Wm. Shavelier and Ole Yorgenson, and 
the tunnel will be driven along the new-found 
ledge. 

NEW MEXIOO. 

Mine Sale. — Lordsburg Liberal, Dec. 20: The 
payment jwas made to Salcido & Co. for the mine 
San Francisco of which mention has been made in 
the Liberal recently, and the amount, it is said by 
some, was only $3000 or $4000, and others say that 
$20,000 was received from the Arizona Copper Co. 
on the i6th. The company is fortunate in obtain- 
ing the property as it has been a regular pay-pro- 
ducer from the grass roots. Ground was broken on 
it in December, 1887, and it yielded over $50,000 to 
the owners who never used any modern appliances 
in the way of machinery in extracting the ore. The 
waste dump holds over 2000 tons of ore that will 
run over <)% per cent copper. It is safe to say that 
Salcido & Co. did not receive any more for the mine 
than the dump is worth at the present price of cop- 
per. Of course, as to the amount reported received is 
only common report, but the writer knows that if 
the Arizona Copper Co. had not closed the sale as 
soon as it did, a good round figure within range of 
its value would have been tendered. J. H. Hovey 
has bought an interest in the Black Dyke mine, and 
has a force of men working night and day. It is 
also reported that he is goii]g to put a lo-stamp mill 
on it. 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 4, 1880 



II^ECHAjMieAL Progress. 



steel in Locomotive Boilers. 

steel boilers for looomotiveB are not generally 
used in France, and when recently the Farie, 
Lyons & Maditerranean road decided to use 
higher pressures for compounding, one of the 
first matters to consider was the material and 
construction of a boiler to withstand such prea- 
snres. It was decided to use eteel because of its 
greater strength, bat there were some doubts of 
its reliability. In the light of our experience with 
steel boilers, these fears seem out of place ; yet 
the steps taken to secure good steel show how 
oarefnlly such matters are considered in France, 
and some American boiler-makers could profit 
by the methods there used. 

The specifications for the steel required a 
minimum strength of 59.735 lbs, per square 
inch, and a minimum elongation of 26 per cent 
in pieces 7-87 inches in length. It is noticeable 
that no Diaximnm strength was specified, as is 
customary in the United States. 

In working the steel, great precautions were 
taken to prevent injury to the metal. Fnnohes 
were not allowed; all holes were drilled. All 
flanges were turned with hydraulic pressure, 
and work was stopped on the steel sheets when 
they were lowered in temperature to a dark red 
color. After flanging and after being fitted 
^nd drilled ready for use, and even when rolled 
into form, the sheets were placed in a large 
annealing furnace, about 1-00 cubic feet in 
capacity, constructed especially for the pur- 
pose, in which they were annealed, and after 
that the use on them of a hammer for any par- 
pose is carefully avoided. The holes were first 
drilled about 0.08 inches in diameter, less than 
the diameter of the rivets, and after being put 
in place they were reamed to size. In anneal- 
ing the sheets they were raised to a cherry red, 
and were kept at that temperature by a slow 
fire from 15 to IS hours. At this time the 
cover of the farnace was slightly raised, the 
fire pulled out, and the temperature of the 
furnace and the sheets allowed to become re- 
daoed during the next 48 hours. The sheets 
were then removed from the furnace, and 12 
hoars after were put into position. Iron rivets 
were used, and driven preferably by hydraulic 
riveters. 

The oase of careful manipulation of steel 
sheets, with other instances of the kind which 
the traveling engineers saw this sammer, go to 
show that the French, German and Eaglisb 
engineer has not that high confidenoe in sheets 
of that material which is possessed by the 
engineer in the United States. If it were not 
for the large number of steel boilers in use 
here, which run practically without cracking 
or rapture of any sort, one might be somewhat 
concerned at the contrast between the scrupu- 
lous care taken by the foreign engineer and the 
more free and easy methods of boiler construc- 
tion here. Bat the rarity of accidents to the 
vast number of steel locomotive boilers running 
in this country, often carelessly handled, is 
good evidence of the general reliability of our 
methods. It is true that we do punch steel 
boilers, but they seem to be none the worse for 
it. It is also true that the majority of all of 
the sheets in oar boilers are unannealed, yet 
only a few of the vast number ever fail by 
cracking. It may be, however, that we have a 
better class of steel sheets to deal with, and 
that the large demand for steel of a low tensile 
strength and a maximum elongation has fos- 
tered the growth of and improvement of 
processes whereby we are able to obtain steel 
for the construction of boilers which has a 
uniformity in general obaraoteristics that is 
almost unknown among boiler-makers abroad, 
Kevertheless, in spite of the good quality of 
steel which we are fortunate enough to possess, 
and the good fortune whioh seems to attend 
the construction of steel boilers — and their use 
as well — would it not be well to pay a little 
more attention to the matter of annealing steel 
sheets after they have been worked upon, par* 
ticularly after they are flanged? Attempts 
are now being made to do this, and nearly all 
the modern locomotive specifications call for 
" all sheets to be annealed after flanging," but 
this is almost never done in the full sense of 
the term ''annealed," or anything like it. It 
is no easy matter to anneal a steel sheet, and 
the mere heating over a wood fire for a short 
time, as the practice is in some localities here, 
not only does not properly anneal a sheet, but 
sometimes it ia hardened by the sudden cooling 
allowed. There are many steel boilers now in 
use whioh are ooustrnoted of plates that have 
been fianged, but which are too large to enter 
any annealing furnace used for locomotive 
boiler work in this coantry. In some shops, 
however, steps are being taken to meet the 
demands of the regular specifioations for loco- 
motive boilers, notably at the Khode Island 
Locomotive Works, where one of the largest 
annealing furnaces in the United States has 
been recently constructed, and is now in suc- 
cessful operation. — Railroad Gazette. 



Some Peculiarities of Iron. — Scientists are 
constantly developing new and interesting 
peculiari^ties of iron, many of which are being 
turned to useful account by practical mechan- 
ics. One of the latest developments in this di- 
rection is found in some French experiments, 
whioh show that if a bar of hard iron be 
allowed to cool from a white heat to a dull red- 
ness there is a spontaneous disengagement of 
heat, and its magnetic properties suddenly 



ohange. In order to ascertain whether this 
result might he due to the heat set free by the 
modification of the iron, or if it required the 
presence of iron, Iron was operated with con- 
taining from 0.16 to 1.25 per cent of carbon, by 
which means the first phenomenon above men- 
tioned was found to be due to the molecular 
transformation of the iron, and the second cor- 
responded to a change in the relation of the 
iron with its carbon. It takes place at 675° C, 
when the thermometer suddenly stops and rises 
some 6°, afterward resuming its regular fall, as 
the metal cools. This was observed with steel 
containing 0.57 per cent of carbon, while with 
only 0.16 per cent of carbon a much slighter 
effect of the hind was noticed at about 749''; 
with 1.25 per cent of carbon, the two effects 
appear to confound themselves. When the 
proportion of carbon is increased, the temper- 
ature of the transformation of the iron seems 
to be lowered, and that of recalescence raised, 
BO that both come to coincide in the hard steel. 
— Chicago Journal of Com. 

Shapers and Shaping Machinery. 

The position of the engineer and machinist 
of to-day, as compared with that of his prede- 
cessor of only a few decades back, may fairly be 
oonsidered as an enviable one. At that period 
machines which could make machines, or parts 
thereof, were almost or quite non est. Nas> 
myth's steam hammer did not exist, and the 
production of large masses of forged iron was 
an extremely laborious and often risky affair. 
And for preparing parts for the fittiog shop, al- 
most the only mechanloal apparatus driven by 
power was the lathe, with the slide-rest scarce- 
ly perfected. 

The planing machine, even in its most rudi- 
mentary state, as yet was not, and the only 
method of producing a perfectly plane surface 
on metal was by chipping with the chisel, and 
afterward scraping or grinding, a toilsome and 
unsatisfactory process. For pieces of irregular 
or peculiar shape there was no forming appa- 
ratus save the common file impelled by the arms 
of the worker, and the boring bar was equally 
a thing of the future. 

The invention of the planing machine was a 
great step. Henceforth the engineer or ma- 
chinist had a ready and certain method of se- 
curing perfectly plane surfaces by the aid of 
power. 

The planer naturally and of coarse gave birth 
to the shaper, which is, at least, equally use- 
ful with its parent, and of very wide appli- 
cability. 

The shaper is now found in every machine- 
shop, is made in many forms by different man- 
ufacturers, and of various sizes, from small ex- 
amples to be operated by hand to the larger 
species of power-driven machines. 

The difference between a planer and a shaper 
consists essentially in the length operated upon 
by the cutting-tool in one stroke. 

"The stroke of a shaper ia usually limited to 
a few inches, since the work is fixed, and the 
tool travels, and the rigidity of the tool is de- 
pendent upon the length of the arm that car- 
ries it. Bit in a planing machine the tool ia 
fixed on the cross slide, while the table travels, 
and the rigidity .of the latter, and that of its 
bed, will allow of a stroke of as much as 40 
feet being taken. Hence planing machines are 
proper for long faces, but shapers are quicker 
in action for small work." 

So was the distinction between the two 
clasees of tools tersely pat some time since by a 
writer in the English Mechanic. 

In many of the shapers the tool-boxes have 
motion in one direction only, but in the better 
class of machines both vertical and horizontal 
movement ia secured. 

Indeed, in some shapers of elaborate con- 
struction intended for use In large shops, the 
tool-plate is rendered capable of circular motion, 
also for the shaping of convex or concave sur- 
faces, the varying degrees of curvature required 
being obtained by very ingenious contrivances. 

These machines are susceptible of being actu- 
ated at different rates of speed, according to 
the work on them. For brass, for example, 
the speed at which thev are driven is faster 
than for iron. — London Builders' Reporter. 



Annealing and Hardening. — Copper, brass, 
German silver and similar metals are hardened 
by hammering, rolling or wire drawing, and 
are softened by being heated red hot and 
plunged in cold water. Copper, by being al- 
loyed with tin, may be made so hard that 
cutting instruments may be made from it. 
This is the old process of hardening copper, 
which is so often claimed to be one of the lost 
arts, and which would be very useful if we did 
not have in steel a material which is far less 
costly and far better fitted for the making of 
edge tools. 

The Most Powerful Rolling Mill en- 
gines in the world, according to the English 
Mechanic^ are the reversing engines just made 
by Galloways, of Manchester, for Palmer's 
Ship-Building Co. The engines drive a 44-iach 
train of rolls. The cylinders are 56 inches di- 
ameter and 6-foot stroke, and use steam at a 
pressure of 100 pounds. The finishing shaft 
has journals 21 inches diameter, and is of a 
total length of 23 feet 6 inches. The total 
weight of the engines is nearly 300 tons. 

Added Territory.— By the re-survey of the 
boundary- line between Nevada and California, 
the latter gains a strip over 200 miles long and 
three-quarters of a mile wide. 




Fossil Remains in Oregon. 

The John Bay region in Oregon was the 
scene in the Princeton University scientific ex- 
pedition last summer, and as a result a grand 
collection of fossils was obtained. 

From the Blue mountains westward to the 
Oascadea the country is a great volcanic 
plateau, made up of lava sheets piled one upon 
another and indioating ancient volcanic out- 
bursts upon a stupendous scale, in comparison 
with which such vents as iE^tna and Vesuvius 
are the merest pygmies. Tbroagh this mass of 
lava tbe streams, aided by the atmosphere, 
have out deep valleys, some of them broad and 
open, others deep, gloomy canyons. 

This country is very dry, bat the soil is ex- 
cellent, and where irrigated it produces well, 
the vegetables and fruit being of particularly 
fine quality. Great acres that are now arid 
sagebrush deserts will one day be turned into 
fertile farms by means of artesian wells, and 
the mild climate will insure success. At pres- 
ent tbe great industry ia wool-raising. The 
enormous bands of sheep utterly destroy the 
grass of the country over which they range, till 
it looks as if a plagae of locusts had visited it. 

The scientific attraction in the John Day re- 
gion ia the vast assemblage of fossil animals 
which is entombed In the rocks there, l^is 
entire district was in a former geological age 
the bed of a great fresh-water lake, into which 
the streams brought masses of sand and mad 
and volcanoes showered cinders and ashes. 
Animals whioh were swept into the lake in the 
times of flood became covered with silt, and as 
the latter was in the course of ages consolidat- 
ed into rock, the bones of the victims were 
gradually petrified and thus indefinitely pre- 
served. Now the rock is slowly disintegrated 
by the action of the rain, snow and frost, and 
the bones exposed to view or even washed en- 
tirely out. For the most part, however, the 
speoimens must be cut out with pick, hammer 
and chisel, a very laborious process, aa tbe rock 
is often extremely hard and the blazing sum- 
mer sun makes the faoe of a white cliff any- 
thing but an ideally comfortable place. 

Oould we produce a view of that ancient 
Oregon when the John Day lake existed, we 
should find ourselves in a very strange animal 
world; little three-toed horses hardly larger 
than donkeys, rhinooerosea, camels, peooaries — 
a great assemblage of large and fierce cat-like, 
dog-like and hyena-like animals — not to men- 
tion hosts of little rabbit and squirrel like 
creatures. The animals of this time were all 
rather small, the largest being the entelodon, 
a beast not anlike the hippopotamus in size and 
general appearance. As the. list shows, this 
assemblage has a very Oriental character, and 
this wonderful museum of a buried world baa 
been sealed up by subsequent lava floods, and 
is now accessible only on the sides of deep can- 
yons cut through the overlying masses of vol- 
canic detritus. — Scientific American. 



Book-Making in Japan. 

We recently described in these columns the 
peculiar manner in which a Japanese artist 
works to produce paintings and drawings. We 
now give the equally curious manner in which 
thoae peculiar people write, or rather paint, 
their books. We copy from the American 
Bookmaker: Having resolved to '* paint" a 
book — for, as all the world knows, the Japan- 
ese use a brush, and not a pen — the author be- 
takes him to his workroom. It is a little room, 
a very little room. " Six mats" is its Japanese 
measurement, and a mat is about six feet by 
four. It is full of soft, dull light which pulses 
from a square white paper lantern; the low, 
bright wooden ceiling gives back a pale brown 
gleam here and there. There ia a silvery glint 
in the frail paneled walla, and in a warm gray 
shadowed recess a gold Baddha crosses his feet 
and stretches forth his palms, smiling gently 
upon the lotas which he holds. In another re- 
cess stand the curious vesaela of iron and olay 
and bamboo for the tea ceremony. 

The author sits on the floor in a flowing gar- 
ment of brown silk lined with blue, hie legs dis- 
posed comfortably under him. In front of him 
stands a lacquered table about a foot, and upon 
it his writing materials, whioh are aa idyllic as 
his surroundings — his paper is delicately tinted 
yellow, with blue lines running up and down. 
His inkstand is a carved ebony slab, with one 
end hollowed out for water to rub his cube of 
india ink in, and holds the four or five daintily 
decorated bamboo brushes which are his pens. 
Naturally he does not write his novel; he paints 
it. Beginning at the end of the whole, at the 
left of every page and at the top of every line, 
atraight down between the two blue parallels 
his small brown hand goes, with quick, deli- 
cate, dark touches. Although this novelist's 
*' copy" might seem to a stranger to be dainti 
ness itself, yet he always has it duplicated 
"by an artist" before sending it to the pub- 
Ushers, the success of the book depending so 
largely upon its artistic forth-bringing. The 
"artist" to whom the **copy" is now intrusted 
proceeds to repaint the long series of word-pict- 
ures with a professional dexterity which is 
something astonishing. 

The carious letter characters whioh have 
been, and not inaptly, compared to " cross 
boxes playing cricket," are thrown upon the 
paper with bewildering rapidity. To snob an 
** artist," the straight up and down, rasping, 



scratching, spattering movement of the Oc- 
cidental pen muat be something fearfal. 

The next step in the making of this book ia 
to send tbe artistic reprodnction of the author's 
" copy" to the wood engraver — a man of mar- 
velous skill — whose duty it is to prepare the re- 
lief blocks, a task which he performs with ex- 
traordinary faithfulness to the original. 

The printing is extremely simple. The ink 
ia distributed with a brush, the paper laid 
upon the block, a feather, fashioned from a 
palm leaf, passed over it and the thing is done. 

The binding is of the simplest kind. The 
Japanese public, anlike the book-lovers of the 
West, care little for that feature. A plain pa- 
per cover suffices, with the title in the left up* 
per corner of the verso. 

But the arrangements with tbe publishers are 
simply delicious. Said a Japanese author in 
answer to the icqairy of a European friend: *' I 
pay the publisher myself; I do not mind losing 
by my own work, but I will not permit an- 
other person to make money by it." Think of 
it I Think of it, ye Murrays, Macmillans, 
Harpers and Appletona I Here's dignity of 
authorship for you. What a frnitless task a 
Western barbarian wonld have were he to at- 
tempt to explain to such childlike simplicity as 
this that the true dignity of authorship de- 
mands competition among publishers — imme- 
diate retarna and freedom from tbe risk of 
fickle public taste. 

A Reported Arctic Discovery has been com- 
municated by Captain George B. Leavitt, of 
the whaling ship Spy, of the Pacific Steam 
Whaling Company. He recently arrived from 
Alaska, where he has been for five years. He 
brings the first news, of what may possibly be 
the discovery of hitherto unknown land, many 
miles directly north of Alaska. Daring a cruise 
of one of the vessels of the whaling fleet, which 
ventured many miles farther north than any 
others, a few years ago, the offioera diacovered 
land that could not be found on any of the 
charts or accounted for in any way. A gale 
drove the vessel far north along the shore of 
the land, but the season was so late that the 
men did not stop to explore. The men held it 
was unknown land worthy of exploration at the 
proper season. No veaaels since then have been 
so far north. Leavitt thinks this may settle 
the question of an open polar sea and ioe drifts 
south of Point Barrow. He says the ice mast 
find an outlet some other place. 

Where American Art is Appreciated, — 
Some of tbe French artists at the Exposition 
range the foreign paintinga as follows, with 
regard to their respective merits: The tlnited 
States, Austria-Hungary, Holland. Belgium, 
England, Spain, Denmark, Italy, Polittos may 
account for the poor representation of Italy, 
and perhaps the close imitation of French work 
performed with astonishing dexterity by our 
young artists in Paris may have something to 
do with the place of the United States at the 
top of the list. Spain bad a fine show and 
disputed the first place with the United States, 
but Spanish art is mainly the work of a few 
men, whereas from America many bail. But 
throughout all the foreign section, with the 
exception of Great Britain and Holland, all 
that was good showed tbe influence of France. 
Holland has a distinctive style of its own and 
not a bad one. 



An Experiment Showing How Primary 
Colors Proddce White —Cut a circle of 
pasteboard nine inches across. Divide it into 
four parts; then divide each of these into seven. 
With bright, clear water-colors .paint these 
narrow pie-shaped slips with red, orange, 
yellow, green, blue, violet, indigo, in this 
order; then begin, and do this in each quarter. 
Put a round, smooth nail or pin through the 
center of the disk vhere the points of the 
colors meet; drive this into a heavy board edge 
and whirl it around as fast aa yon can. The 
colore diaappear, and yoa see a round but 
rather dirty white circle. If the oolors were 
pure it would be pure white; if they were really 
priamatio you wonld have a little shining white 
moon of light. — National Educator. 



An Important Photographic Discovert is 
reported to have recently been made by Mrs. 
N. Grey Bartlett of Chicago, tbe wife of a 
prominent analytic chemist, by which photo- 
graphs can be developed without the old-time 
process of washing in a dark room for hours and 
staining the fingers. By her process there is 
nothing to be done but to expose for a few 
minutes the negative, with tbe sheet of paper 
clapped on it for a few minutes, to the light. 
The pictures produced by Mrs. Bartlett's proc- 
ess are said to have the appearance of fine 
etchings. The development eolation ia sus- 
tained with ruby dye, which prevents white 
light from reaching the plate after being im- 
mersed in the liquid. 

An Apparatus for Producing Electricity. 
A very simple apparatus for obtaining an 
electric spark is made by a German physicist. 
Round the center of a common lamp chimney 
is pasted a strip of tin foil, and another strip 
pasted from one end of the chimney to within 
a quarter of an inch of this ring. Then a piece 
of silk is wrapped around a brush, and the in- 
terior of the chimney is rubbed briskly. In 
the dark, a bright electric spark may be seen to 
pass from one piece of tin foil to the other each 
time the brush is withdrawn from the chimney. 
Many other experiments uan be tried with thii 
apparatus. 



Jan. 4. 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific ^^ress. 



ELECTPjeiT/, 



The Future of Electricity. 

Thomas A. Kdisoo said. In an Interview with 
a reporter of the PitteburK Dhpatch: " Vou 
aak me about the future of electricity. It is 
the coming motlve*power. It will be used on 
all the railroade some day, but the point is to 
get an economical engine. My theory is to 
bfive immense dynamos located all along the 
line of the road, and have the eleotricity con- 
veyed from these stationary engin«>8 to the 
looomotiTes by wires through the rails. For 
example, I would put two big engines between 
New York and Philadelphia, and enough power 
could be furnished to whiak the limited at the 
rate of 100 miles per hour. 

"Bat this is the point I have been working 
on for years — to convert heat directly into 
electricity without the intervention of boilere, 
steam and all that. What an enormouB amount 
of expense conld be saved if this could be done! 
Think of patting something into the heat of 
that nataral-gas tire and making eleotricity out 
of it. It can be done. I feel it in my bones, 
and just now I have a suspicion that I am on 
the right track ; but it is a pesky problem — one 
that can be worked out only In time. 

" I have been experimenting with an electric 
road in New Jersey. I bad rails laid as they 
put them down on railroade, but the machine 
would ran off the track in going around the 
curves. I then raised the curve to an angle of 
40 degree?, and the motor went around all 
right. It looked aa if the engine would topple 
over, but it didn't. You know in a centrifugal 
machine yon can make a car go clear around a 
circle in the air without leaving the track." 



arranged that each parcel of aimilar size, as in 
tea cargoes, registers as it closes the eU'ctriual 
oonneotion. The same device can be applied in 
a pork'packing establishment, or in any pUce 
where it is necessary to record repeated action. 

Temperinc the Electric Lu:ut. — The elec- 
tric light has now been long enough in nee in 
our houses, theaters and public places to lose 
the right to claim any special privileges or im- 
munities as a novelty or a plaything. Will 
some one kindly notice that there is nearly al- 
ways too much of it? No sooner was gas laid 
on than people who had oonteutedly read their 
book by the tight of a single flickering candle 
must have gas-jets equal to 15 or 20 candles. 
Now, if there is not a regular sunburst of 100* 
candle power, the same people feel that they 
are in the dark. It is too, too much. At one 
or two theaters, for instance, you can't enjoy 
the comfort you would othetwise derive from 
the diminished heat and improved ventilatiou, 
because of the glaring noditorium lights that 
strike you blind. — New York Tribune. 



WuAT Branceiks Employ Electric Weld- 
ing. — At present, eleotric welding machines in 
different parts of the country are being nsed in 
the following capacities: Axle welding, car- 
riage gears, fifth wheels, twisted wire cables, 
welding tafe ends of boilers, wagon tires, hoops 
for barrels; it Is also used for joining wires of 
copper, iron, steel and German silver together 
in like metals and different combinations; bars 
of metal may be joined at angles, aa T or Y 
joints; welding eye rings to the end of bars; 
making rings of precious metals, uniting steel 
with iron in the manufacture of agricultural 
implements, tools, etc.; lengthening or short- 
ening rods, bars, screws, or bolts; welding of 
cast-iron pieces in the general conatruction of 
machinery, such as frames, fittings, etc. Elec- 
tric machines are also nsed in welding boiler 
plates and other sheet metal and thereby re- 
places the ordinary method of riveting. These 
machines are suitable for clamping devices, for 
electric soldering, brazing, forging or bending 
of metals. The electricians in thra establish- 
ment of the Thomson Electric Welding Com- 
pany of Bo&ton are now experimentiog on radi- 
ator and general brazing, on riveting machines 
which, it is claimed, will cause a complete rev- 
olution in Ihe old methods of riveting, aa by 
electricity the riveting can be done so aa to 
avoid all leaking. One of the latest and moat 
satiBfactory developments baa been that of 
welding chain. The company claims that a 
great merit to the electrically welded chain 
links is that when subjected to a fracturing 
load the limb will break away from the weld, 
whereas when welded by ordinary proceaseB it 
almost invariably breaks at the weld. 

Progress of Electric Welding. ~ The 
Thomson Electric Welding Company, at their 
Lynn works, have within a few weeks been 
able to weld wire cable I 5 16 inches in di- 
ameter for a oable to be nsed on a cable rail- 
road, showing greater efficiency than waa thought 
possible in doing this very difficult work. 
Although the strength of joints obtained by 
splicing was about 30 per cent that of the 
original cable, yet it was found from testa made 
at the Watertown arsenal of electric welds 
made of thla cable that 87 per cent of the effi- 
ciency of the rope iteelf had been obtained in 
these welds. The same company writes to the 
Pittsburg Reduction Company in regard to 
welding aluminum by electricity as follows : 
We have made tests of the aluminum which 
you are producing, and ffnd that it welds with- 
oat the least difficulty. We have a special ma- 
chine biylt for this work. The welda are very 
rapidly made and submit to the various teats 
and with most satisfactory results. We can 
weld the aluminum of any section or size. It 
simply depends upon the class of machine built 
for the purpose and the horse-power required. 

An Electric Register. — New electric de- 
Ticea are being brought out almost every day, a 
featnre characteristic of the electrical industry 
and its development. The latest invention, 
and one that has not yet been made public, is 
the "electrical register." It is intended to be 
used for a variety of purpoaea. A seriea of 
buttons along the inside of a horse car within 
easy reach for the conductor, connect with the 
register at the end of the car in somewhat the 
same manner as the present existing arrange- 
ment. By pressing one of these buttons the 
fare is registered and the announcing bell ringa 
BimultaneouBly. In the system used at present 
the conductor pnlla the leather strap which 
rings the bell and the fare is registered by the 
return action of the belt. It ia said that in the 
present method the gong can be rnng without 
registering the fare by skillful manipulation. 
Agaibi in unloading a ship, switohes can be so 



Electrical Utilization ok Wa^te Heat. — 
A very interesting paper was recently read be- 
fore the South Stafford Institute of Iron Steel 
Works Managers at Dudley, England, on *' The 
Application of Electtijity to Works and Mills." 
The reader stated that there was everything to 
recommend an electrical transmission plant. 
Waste heat from blast furnaces could be need 
miles away; steam boilers could be placed near 
the colliery to save hauling the coal; the power 
of a river or stream could be uaedand hundreds 
of horse-power conveyed along email copper 
wires, while the places could be I'ghted by elec- 
tricity at a very low cost. 

Electricity vs. Oil. — A report received at 
Washington from Guatemala states that since 
the introduction of electric lighting into the 
towns of that country, there has been a large 
diminution in the importation of mineral oils. 
Id the capital of the Republic, with a popula- 
tion of 70,000, and in Qaezaltenango, with 
30,000, the consumption ot oil has fallen off 
one-half. At San Joae, Rstalhulen and Anti- 
gua, the substitution of electric lights for oil 
illumination has been in a still larger proportion. 



Paint for Incandescent Lamps — Electric 
incandescent lamps are sometimes used in the 
dark'rooma of photographers; and in order to 
reuder the light non-actinic, it is recommended 
that the bulbs should be painted over with a 
mixture of the red ** fuschine " in negative var- 
nish. It may be remarked that the lower the 
current the redder the light from an incandes- 
cent lamp is, and hence the leas need there is 
for the paint. 

Electricity for Expanding Hoops an^ 
Whj^el Tires. — An American electrician ha^ 
devised a method of expanding hoopa and whee^ 
tires by heating them with the electric current. 
It is claimed for the new process that the heat 
is more uniformly distributed than with gaa 
furnacea or pilea of embers. The current is 
brought by wirea connected to opposite points 
on the tire, and divides equally through each 
half of the ring. 

Electric Lighting in England, — Lord Bal- 
four of Burleigh, the Parliamentary Secretary 
of the British Board of Trade, states that the 
board has been overwhelmed this year with ap 
plicitioDs under the Electric Lighting Acts of 
1S82 to 18SS for provisional ordera to sanction 
the production and supply of electric lighting 
in alt parts of the United Kingdom. Already 
the number of applications haa reached 430. 



300D HEj^LTH. 



Engraving by Electricity. — Engraving on 
glass and crystal ia now succeaafully accom- 
pllshed. The glasa is covered with a concen- 
trated solution of nitrate of potash and put i|f 
connection with one of the poles of the battery, 
and the design ia traced out with a fine plat- 
inum point connected with the other pole. By 
this process it is claimed that marvelously deli- 
cate work can be done. 



Chemical and Frictional Electricity. — 
Some one asks what ia the difference between 
eleotricity generated by chemical process and 
that generated by friction, magoeta and other- 
wise ? The answer given is that the difference 
consists in tension or potential; fricttora^ elec- 
tricity haa very high tension compared with that 
generated by a battery. 

The Storage Battery harnessed to the 
windmill is sure to become of great service in 
driving the machinery of future generations. 
Before very long more attention will have to be 
given to the yoking of the win^s, waves and 
tides to the driving shafts of our Industrial 
worka to supplement the storage-reaervoirs of 
the ooal mines. 



'cl 



A Novel Cough Remedy. 

The following is from a doctor connected with 
an institution with many children : *' There 
is nothing more irritable to a cough than a 
cough. For some time I had been so fully as- 
sured of this that I determined, for one minute 
at least, to lessen the number of coughs heard 
in a certain ward in a hospital of the institu- 
tion. By the promise of rewards and punish- 
ments, I Bucceedod in inducing them to simply 
hold their breath when tempted to cough, and 
in a Uttle while I was myself surprised to see 
how some of the children entirely recovered 
from their disease. Constant coughing is pre- 
cisely like scratching a wound on the outside of 
the body. So long as it is done the wound will 
not heal. Let a person when tempted to cough 
draw a long breath and hold it until it warms 
and soothes every air cell, and some benefit will 
soon be received from this process. The nitro- 
gen which is thoB refioed acts aa an anodyne to 
the mucous membrane, allaying the desire to 
cough and giving the throat and lunga a chance 
to heal. At the eame time a suitable medicine 
will aid Nature in her effort to recuperate," 



Melting Iron by Electricity. — In a 
foundry near Moscow, so intense a beat is ob- 
tained by means of electricity that metals can 
be fused almost instantaneously. The glare, 
however, of the electric light produces such 
painful effects that the workmen refuse to work 
for more than two hours a day. 



AreAsi'UAlt Fumes Injurious to Health? 
In the Circuit Court at Buffalo, N. Y,, a few 
weeks since, the trial waa begun of an action 
brought by Michael Kavanaugh against the 
Birber Asphalt Company. The case is the re- 
sult of the agitation on account of the odor 
arising from the asphalt works, Rsaidenta of 
the Weat Side have complained of it for a long 
time. Mr. Kavanaugh lives with his family at 
347 Fourth street, and claims that the emell ia 
injuring their health. He allegea, too, that it 
caused the death of his daughter. Dr. F. W. 
Birtlett was a witness, and his evidence waa 
directed to show how the odor from the worka 
might have led to consumption, the disease of 
which Mr. Kavanaugh'a daughter died. Raai- 
dents of the vicinity were called to the stand to 
testify concerning thfir experiences with the 
same odor. Richard H. Ferguson of 105 Mary- 
land street swore that it had a auffocating effect 
on him, Mr. Kavanaugh demands $10,000 
damages . 

The European Epidemic— Telegraphic re- 
ports eay that a frequent sequel to caaes of in- 
ffuenza at Vienna is an attack of inffammation 
of the lunga. A number of pnrsona in the hos- 
pital lately suffering from influenza have been 
stricken with inflammation of the lunga and 
several of them have died. The influeDzahas 
made its appearance in a Joerait school at Kalee- 

burg, the pupils of which are children of con- 
servative aristocrats. Sixty-eight acholarehave 
been attackpd. At Brussels, according to dis- 
patches of Dae. 24th, the epidemic ia rapidly 
spreading. Thirty per cent of the school 
children were then suffdring and the achoola 
were all cloaed. The diaeaae has apread to all 
the Government offices and many ofiBcials are 
prostrated. In Paris at the above date, iifla- 
enza reigned supreme. There were said to be 
over 300,000 persons in that city alone suffering 
from the epidemic. 

A Posi5iBLE Cause of Sleeplessness.— A 
physician, writing to the Medical and Surgical 
Reporter^ says: *' From some experience in 
my own family lam led to suspect that quite 
often aleeplessnesB may be due to a closely fit- 
ting night-dreas, I observed in the case of 
my own child, that whenever the night-dress 
waa buttoned tightly about the throat, she was 
sure to have an attack of night terrors; and 
that she never had them when the throat was 
left free and open. In certain positions of the 
head, the neatly fittiog band would ocoaaion 
constriction of the throat, whence arose me- 
chanical congestion of the brain, which gave 
rise to the * terrors.' A night dresa cloaely fit- 
ting around the throat ia a vicious thing, and 
gives rise to cerebral congestion, which may 
suddenly explode in a convulaion, but much 
oftener, I apprehend, take the form of night 
terrora." 

Excessive Humidity and Health.-— It ia 
consoling to Californiana just at thia time to 
learn from good medical au-thority that exces- 
sive humidity ia not injorious to health. The 
human race, like the wheat plant, can stand 
almost any quantity of water, Ifc ia bad for 
that class of maladies which physicians group 
uoder the head of rheumatism, but it is not 
necessarily injurious to delicate throats or 
lunga, and it is positively beneficial to persona 
who are liable to diaturbancea of the stomach. 
We believe that the death rate in thia State 
has not apparently been increased by the exces- 
sive raina of the last few weeks. 



The Maximum Power generated by an elec- 
tric motor ia usually considered TShorae 
power; but experiments indicate that lOO-horse 
power will be reached. 

Somebody aays that an electric wire is an 
ugly thing when anything serious croeaes it. 



tJSEFUL iNFORJVlATIOlvJ. 
To Distinguish Amber. 

Amber may be distinguished from its imita- 
tions by the following characteriatics: Copal ia 
yellow and always of a uniform color, while 
amber ia generally ahaded and striped or 
cloudy, and when rubbed with the palm of the 
hand, it evolves an aromatic odor, which is not 
the case with copal or artificial amber. Amber 
when coated with tallow, and held over the 
lire a few minutes, may be bent, while its sub- 
stitutes remain rigid. It is crushed with diffi- 
culty, cannot bs abraded or scratched with fin- 
gsr-nail; it can be cut, filed, sawed and pol- 
ished, but it cannot be welded, like oopal or 
artificial amber. 

To Unite Broken Pieces of Amber. 
Coat with linseed oil the surfaces that are to 
be united; hold the oiled parts carefully over a 
charcoal fire, a few hot cinders, or a gaalight, 
being careful to cover up all the rest of the ob- 
ject loosely with paper. When the oiled parts 
have begun to feel the heat so as to be sticky, 
press and clamp them together and keep them 
so until nearly cold. Only that part where the 
edges are to be united must be warmed, and 
even that with care lest the form or polish of 
the other parts shonld be disturbed; the part 
where the joint oconrs generally requires to be 
repolished. 

To Make a Whetstone. — It is easy to make 
a stone for sharpening tools and to make it suf- 
fioiently hard, and give it the *'bite" desired. 
Take gelatine of a very good quality, which 
melt in an ( qual quantity of water. The operation 
should be performed in darkness, aa daylight is 
iojurioua to gelatine. When melted, add 1^ 
per cent of bi-carbonate of potash previonsly 
dissolved. Then take about nine times, by 
weight, the quantity of gelatine employed of 
very fine emery and pulverized flintstone, 
which mix intimately with the dissolved gela- 
tine. Mold the cbualned paste according to the 
desired form, and press it in as hard as possible 
to consolidate the maaa well. After it has been 
dried in the sun, you will have a first-olaaa 
stone for sharpening. 



Disease Gekms, according to Medical Clas- 
sics, are very tenacious of vitality, and their 
destruction ia not always easy of accompliah- 
ment. The reaearchea of recent yeara show 
that many o^ the aubatances thna far relied 
upon as disinfectants have no power to destroy 
diaeaae-cauaing bacteria. 

A "Hoop Snake."— A aoientiat says that 
there is such a thing as a hoop-snake, but that 
it doesn't roll like a hoop. It simply makes a 
sacceaBion of loops, like the inch-worm, but so 
rapidly that it aeema to roll around like a hoop. 



Old Silver. — To imitate old artistic produc- 
tions made of solid silver, the groundwork and 
hollow portions not subject to friction are 
covered with a blackish-red earthy coat, the 
parts In relief remain with a bright lead luster. 
Mix a paste of floely-powdered plumbago with 
essence of turpentine, to which a email portion 
of red ocher may be added to imitate the copper 
tinge of certain old silverware; smear thia all 
over the articles. After drying, gently rub 
with a soft brush, and the reliefs are aet off by 
cleaning with a rag dipped in spirits of wine. 
To give the old silver tinge to small articles, 
such as buttons and rings, throw them into the 
above paste, rub in a bag with a large quantity 
of dry boxwood eawduat until the desired shade 
is obtained. 

Slow-drying Glue ia stronger than qaick- 
drying, and for general use uo method gives 
such good reaulta aa the following: Break the 
glne small and cover it with water in an iron 
Kettle and let it soak twelve hours; after soak- 
ing, boil till done, then pour it into an air*tigbt 
box, and when cold, cover it tight. As it is 
r( quired, cut out a portion and melt in the 
usual way, exposing no more of the made glue 
to the atmoaphere than is necessary, aa the 
atmosphere ia iDJurious to made glue. Of 
courae it should never be subjected to direct 
heat. It is better to use glue quite thin, work- 
ing it into the wood, rather than too thick. 
Except in veneering, glue both surfaces, and 
never have the wood heated. 



In Stave Dressing, twelve co-laborers with 
a machine can dress 12,000 staves in the same 
time that the same number of workers by 
hand could dress 2500 staves. Nearly all the 
staves in this country are made in Indiana, 
Michigan, Northwestern Ohio and Canada, 
Indiana turns out about 75,000.000, Michigan 
600,000,000, Canada 200.000,000. and North- 
weatern Ohio makea a big third of all the staves 
uaed in the United States. In Northwestern 
Ohio there are more staves made to-day than 
ever before. The busineas has been doubled 
within the last ten yeara. 



How to Clean Pearls and Coral, — Set 
pearls which have become discolored by wear 
may often be improved by placing in a covered 
vessel with a mixture of whiting, ammonia and 
water, and permitting them to remain a few 
hours. Coral may be cleaned by soaking in 
soda and water for some houra, A lather of aoap 
ia then made and brushed upon the ooral with 
the aoftest of hair brushes, A frequent chang- 
ing of water is desirable. 

Cement for Aquarium — Each one pound of 
litharge, fine white sand, and plaster of Paris, 
aa well as six ounces of finely pulverized rosin, 
are carefully ground into a paste with Unseed 
oil varnish. The cement ia good only after 
several houra, but is then excellent for either 
aalt-water or sweet-water receptacles. 

California leads in barley, grape, sheep, 
gold and quicksilver production. 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 4, 1890 




A. T. DEWEY, W. B. EWER. 

DEWEY & CO., Publishers. 

Ofce, 220 Market Si,y N. E. cor. Front SL , S. F, 
tsr Take the Elevator, No. It Front St.'J^ 

W. B. EWER Sbnior Editor 

TerznB of Subscription. 

Annual Subscription, $3. New BubacriptlonB will be 
declined without cash in advance. All arrearages must 
be paid lor at the rate of $3.50 per annum. 

AdvertlBlDff Rates. 

1 week. 1 month, 3 moB. 12 moa. 

Per Line (agate) 8 .25 $. 60 8 1.20 S 4.00 

Half Inch (1 square) 1.00 2.60 6.50 22.00 

One inch 1.60 6.00 13.00 42.00 

Large advertiBementa at favorable rates. Special or 
reading noticea, legal adverfcieementa, noticea appearing 
in extraordinary type or in particular parte of the paper, 
at apecial ratea. Four InaertionB are rated in a month. 

Address all literary and buainesB correspondence 
ftnd Drafta for this paper in the name of the firm, 

SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATENT AGENCY. 

DEWEY & CO., PATBKT SOLIOITORfl. 
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Entered at S. F. Post Office as Becond-olaas mail matter 

Our latest forma go to press on Thursday evening. 

SAN FBANCISOO: 

Saturday, January 4, i 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



ILLUSTRATIONS.— The Regan Vapor Engine; A 
Nicaragua Home, 1. Magnolia Avenue, Riverside, 
Cal.; A Southern California Scene, 3. The Mineral 
Belt of Peru, 9. 

BUITOKlAijCi.— A Nicaragua Home, 1. Passing 
Events; Prevention of Mine Accidents; Windom's Sil- 
ver Policy Defended; Mexican Silver Lead Ore, 8. The 
Mineral Belt of Peru, 9. 

OOBRESPONDENOB.— Mines of a Rainless Land 
— No. 2: Mines on Railroad Lands; Oregon Quartz and 
Placer Mines; Assessment of Mining Corporations, 2; 

MISCBLLANBOna.— Calaveras County Notes, 2. 
Scenes in Southern California, 3. 

MINING SUMMARY— From the various counties 
of California, Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho. Mon- 
tana, New Mexico, Oreiron, Utah, Wyoming, 4-5. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS.— Steel in Locomo- 
tive Boilers; ShaperB and bhaping Machinery; An< 
neaang and Hardening, 6. 

SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS.— Fossil Remains in 
Oregon; Book-Making in Japan; A Reported Arctic 
Discovery; Where American Art is Appreciated; An 
Expurimont SbowinK How Pritnary Colors Produce 
White, 

BLECTRICITT.— The Future of Electricity; What 
Branches Employ Electric Welding; Progress of Elec- 
tric Welding; An Electric Register; Tempering the 
Electric Light; Electrical Utilization of Waste Heat; 
Electrinty vs. Oil; Paint for Incandescent Lamps; 
Electric Lighting in England; Engraving by Elec- 
tricity, 7. 

GOOD HEALTH.- A Novel Cough Remedy; Are 
Asphalt Fumes Injurious to Health; The European 
Epidemic; A Possiole cause ot Sleeplessness; Exces* 
aive Humidity and Health, 7. 

USEFUL INFORMATION.— To Distinguish Am- 
ber; To Make A Whetstone; Old Silver; How to Clean 
Pearls and Coral, 7. 

MINING STOCK MARKET.— Sales at the San 
Francisco Stook Board, Noticea of Meetings, Assess- 
ments, Dividends, and Bullion Shipments, 14. 



Business AnnounGements. 

[KBW THIS IBSUB.] 
Delinquent Sale Notice — Booth G. M. Co. 
California Wire Works. 
Mining Machinery— Vulcan Iron Works. 

tS" See Advertising Columns. 



Passing Events. 

The pereistent rains keep on, and although 
inaaring a proeperoua year to California, are, 
for the time, InoonvenieDt, oauaing, as they do, 
washonts, looal fioode and oeBsation of most 
ont-door work. 

It is stated that the President has decided to 
send a special measage to Coogreas, in whioh an 
nnequivooal indorsement of the Windom plan 
of dealing with silver will be given. We pub- 
lished Secretary Windom's ideas on this anb- 
jeot at the time he made his report. 

The Utioa mine disaater is still the topic 
among miners. It does not appear that there 
is any possibility of getting at the bodies of the 
miners for months to oome, on account of the 
great mass of rock and debris that cover them. 

The snowfall of the present winter is ample 
to furnish an abundant supply of water for the 
mills and mines all over the country the com- 
ing season. 

The bullion yield of GhoUar ore crushed at 
the Nevada mill the current month will exceed 
$30,000. Blanket-slnioe men in Six-mile can- 
yon complain that the tailings from Choi- 
lar ore pulp are very thin, and oontain a very 
small percentage of cxuicksilver, whioh indioates 
that the Chollar and Hale and Nororoas ore is 
being worked to a much higher percentage of 
its assay value than last year. 



Windom's Silver Policy Defended. 

In a late telegraphic interview, Director 
Leech of the United States Mint throws more 
light upon Secretary Windom's silver policy 
and answers at length the charge of the Minino 
AND Scientific Press and reiterated by East- 
ern journals, that too much power would be 
given the Secretary of the Treasury by allow- 
ing him to temporarily suspend the right of de- 
posit of silver bullion, receiving treasury notes 
in return at the market value of the bullion, 
when he thought a corner was being run against 
the Government. As put by the Director of 
the Mints, the aecretary appears justified in 
asking for snoh disoretionary power after the 
price of silver bullion is forced above $1 an 
ounce Government standard. To understand 
this to better advantage, it is necessary to state 
that the Government standard ia 900, or niue- 
tenths 6ne; the Eogliah standard is 925, and 
ounce fine is lOOO. All prices for silver bullion 
are based on its relative fineness to 1000 fine, ao 
that in reality $1 an ounce Government stand- 
ard brings the bullion up to about par, so that 
tihe power asked for does not appear to be un- 
reasonable, seeing that with other safeguards 
he oan only use it when the price is advanced 
abnormally above $1 an ounce standard. 

While the Press is not fully committed to 
Secretary Windom's policy, yet we must admit 
that under the very general disoussion which 
it has inspired, his views have found favor with 
the conservative olassea at home, and are finding 
friends abroad even with leading mono-metal- 
lists who begin to aee that bimetallism is one 
of the inevitablea. So unmistakable are the 
signs that mono-metal papers are hedging and 
consequently carefully preparing the way for 
espousing bi-metallism. In witness of this as- 
sertion, we give the following from the London 
Money: 

It was expected in many quarters that the 
message to Oongresa from the President of the 
United Sbates would recommend a larger use of 
silver as money, and that even if an unlimited 
coinage were refused, the full limits under the 
Bland Act would be reached; that ia, that 
$4,000,000 would be coined every month in- 
stead of $2,000,000. On the other hand, there 
is a party which would prefer to have no silver 

ooioed at all, except aa tokens for petty trans- 
aotiona; in short, there are mono-metalliata and 
bi-metallista in the United States as well as in 
Great Britain, There is also some such division 
as we see at home in the headquarters of each 
school. Here the bi-metalliata are very strong 
in Lancashire, and comparatively weak in Lon- 
don. In the United States they are very pow- 
erful in the West, and less powerful in New 
York. 

After reviewing at some length the Presi- 
dent's message so far as it refers to silver, it 
gives expression to the following on Secretary 
Windom's silver policy: 

Mr. Windom proposes to issue notes on the 
deposit of silver at the market value. The 
more discreet bi-metallists in this country also 
make an identical proposal. If notes of £1 and 
£2 were issued against silver at the marhet 
valuey onr currency would be increased by sev- 
eral millions and so much gold set free for ex- 
ternal commerce. Every one knows that the 
gold now in circulation is insufficient for the 
increasing trade and growing population of this 
country, and in spite of all the fluster and 
bluster about gold mines in South Africa and 
elsewhere, we shall for many years continue to 
be short of gold. There are two alternatives 
before us: we may wait for a period of bad 
trade, in whioh there will be less demand for 
money, or we may make a limited and moderate 
use of silver by means of small notes for inter- 
nal oirculatlon. As to payments abroad, gold 
must go to whom gold ia due, and silver to 
whom silver. But the use of ten millions in 
silver certificates would raise the value of the 
rupee and greatly assist trade. If President 
Harrison can see his way to adopt Mr. Win- 
dom's suggestion, it is very likely that Mr. 
GoBchen will see hia way to a similar policy in 
England. 

The Nevada mill is crushing about 4500 tons 
of Hale and Norcroas ore monthly, and had it 
not been for the falling o£f of the assay value of 
the ore from $30 to $22 per ton — the average 
given in the last weekly report — the bullion 
yield for the current month would have reached 
nearly $120,000. The average for the month 
will not fall far short of $25 per ton, which, 
calculating that 85 per cent of the assay value 
is saved, will give a total bullion yield of $100,- 
000 for December. 



Martin C. Fisher, a mining engineer well 
known in Colorado and California, died in Lon- 
don on the last day of the year. He was one 
of the organizers of the Richmond Consolidated 
Mining Company. 



Prevention of Mine Accidents. 

The fatal accident at the Utica mine, in Cal- 
averas county, oauaed by an immense cave, has 
brought up a discussion on the proper methods 
of timbering in mines and the prevention of ao- 
oidents. It does not appear, however, that 
there was any negleot In the timbering of this 
mine. On the contrary, a skilled timberman, 
selected for his special knowledge, and aided 
by a special set of men, had charge of thia part 
of the work, and was given every facility to do 
his work properly. Timbers of very unusual 
size were employed, since it was known these 
were necessary in this mine. From all ac- 
counts, however, no system of timbering 
known to us could have withstood the pressure 
of the 50.000 or 60,000 tona of rook which 
oaved. 

In this country we have no Government or 
State officials to inspect mines and see that 
proper precautions against aooident are taken. 
In Great Britain, since 1835, there has been a 
succession of Royal Commissions and of Parlia- 
mentary Committees collecting and weighing 
the results of experience and the views and 
opinions of miners, experts and mine managers. 
In 1850, Government mine inspectors were ap- 
pointed to carry out certain important general 
rules for the conduct of mines. 

Even with all the precautions adopted in 
that country it does not seem that in the matter 
of preventing falls of roofs or sides and oaves in 
mines, they have been able to do mnch with 
reference to the inspection of mines for the 
purpose of ascertaining whether the roof or 
sides are safe. Mr. A. R, Sawyer, one of the 
inspectors, who is an authority, points out 
that the universal practice of tapping the coal 
or stone with some heavy tool and judging of 
its condition by the hoUowness or deadness of 
the sound and by slight vibrations, felt on 
placing the hand against the surface while the 
tapping is being applied, although good, it is 
not to be relied on implicitly; especially in the 
case of rock roofs and long pieces. It has 
often been stated by witnesses at inquests on 
deaths from oaves, that the roof had been 
sounded shortly before the aooident, and con- 
sidered psrfeotly safe. Many accidents would 
be avoided, if, in addition to the tapping teat, 
the roof were carefully inapected for the pur- 
pose of detecting natural dialooations, such as 
faults or slips or defects developed by the work- 
ing, and if the bearing, the inclination and the 
frequency of occurrence of slips were studied 
by mining officials, the timbering being regu- 
lated accordingly. 

In mines such as the Utica, and many others 
that might be mentioned, there ia no question 
that unremitting, careful and intelligent in- 
spection, and the continued devotion of skilled 
labor to the liberal provision and maintenance 
of reliable supports, even when their necesaity 
may seem open to question, constitute ]the best 
safeguards against accident. In this case there 
was provision of special labor and supervision 
for the application and maintenance of timber- 
ing in the mine generally. Every facility and 
encouragement was given for good work in the 
timbering. The unfortunate man in charge 
doubtless had faith in his work, for he himself 
was with the timber-gang when the cave oo- 
cnrred, and he lost his life with theirs. The 
whole ledge caved from top to bottom, evident- 
ly sliding down bodily. No one could have 
foreseen such an accident, though the mine ia 
one which needed special timbering, and the 
heavy rains had added weight to the upper 
mass. 

The Guadalupe Quicksilver Mine.— Com- 
missioner Houghton of the Circuit Court has 
reported the sale of the prop arty of the Guada- 
lupe Quicksilver Mining Co., which was fore- 
closed to the Farmers' Loan & Trust Co. of 
New York City for failure to pay the interest 
due on coupons maturing on Jannary 1, 1884. 
The loan was for $500,000 in bonds Issued by 
the trust company. The court issued a decree 
allowing the qnicbsllver company until October 
1, 1889, in which to pay its indebtedness, and 
on its failure to do so, December 7th was fixed 
as the day of sale. The property was sold to 
Maria Coleman, the highest bidder, for 
$378,700. 

The Sunflower mine. Pike City, Sierra Co., 
started up last Monday with about 20 men at 
work. Mr. T. E. G. Wolleb has gone up to 
the mine aa asaayer. 



Mexican Silver-Lead Ores. 

The exportation of silver-lead ores from Mex- 
ico to the United States practically began at 
Paso del Norte in lSS4,[upon the completion of 
the Mexican Central B. R. The ore trade 
rapidly assumed large proportions under the 
decision of the Treasury Department at Wash- 
ington establlehing a value standard rather 
than a quantity standard for the determination 
of the classification of ores. 

The soaroity of lead-fiuxing ores in the cen- 
tral and southwestern mining regions of the 
United States, and the rapid extension of the 
business of smelting ores of the precious metals, 
had oansed a demand for fiuxing ores out of all 
proportion to the supply in the United States. 

There were found in Mexico very extensive 
deposits of lead carbonates, and not infrequent- 
ly associated with a lime and iron gangue or 
matrix. These carbonates have a wide range 
in tbeir silver and lead values, carrying from 
15 to 50 per cent of lead and from 10 to 100 
ounces of silver. In many oases high lead per- 
centages are associated with low silver valnes. 

The presence of lime and iron in quantita- 
tive excess makes these ores from Mexico very 
desirable, not so much for their silver and lead 
values as for the actual work such ores will 
perform In the smelting furnace. As an evi- 
dence of the wide distribution of these Mexican 
ores in the United States, they were shipped to 
Pueblo and Danver, Omaha, St. Louis, Kansas 
City and Newark, N. J., as well as to points in 
New Mexico and along the frontier, where 
large smelting plants have been erected to treat 
Mexican ores in connection with dry or non- 
lead ores from New Mexico and Arizona. No 
complete data are at band showing annual 
value and tonnage of this ore trade, bat from a 
calculation based upon the export ore tonnage 
entering the United States at Ekgle Pass, Tex., 
the total annual shipments for fiscal year end- 
ing Jane 30, 1889, will approach $1,500,000 in 
value. 

The U. S. consul at Fiedras Negraa says the 
outcry in Mexico against the U. S. Treasury 
circular of July 17, 1889, comes principally 
from men engaged in the silver-lead ore trade 
who have suddenly lost their market and have 
large sums of money invested in Mexican mines; 
these men are principally Americans. The 
railroads are also heavy losers in ore freights, 
notably the Mexican International, the only 
railroad at present in Mexico said to be 
owned solely by American capital. The Mexi- 
can Government some years ago seriously con- 
sidered the advisability of imposiog an export 
duty on raw Mexican ores, so as to build up 
reduction works in Mexico, their only doubt 
being the question of fuel. With the develop- 
ment of the Sabonas coal-fields in the State of 
Coahuila, near the line of the Mexican Inter- 
national Railway, and the fair grade of coke 
made from the Sibonaa coal, Mexico la now 
able to smelt her own ores. The American 
miners will be very glad to have her begin its 
operation and keep her raw ores at home. 

A Nloaraguan House. 

The canal projectors oontend that Nicaragua 
is the greatest existing field for American en- 
terprise. However that may be, we shall all 
hail with delight the oommenoement of practi- 
cal work on that great engineering scheme. 
Since the virtual collapse of the Panama canal 
this Central American offers the only location 
possible for a ship canal between the Atlantic 
and Pacific oceans. The reason is two-fold. 
Firstly, the interruption of the great mountain 
chain, extending praotioally from Valparaiso to 
the Mexican frontier; secondly, that Nicaragua 
lies outside of the zone of calms, which would 
have rendered the Panama canal ueeless for 
sailing ships. The people of Nicaragua have a 
type of house— such as is shown in the 
engraving on our first page — much like 
that in whioh the Mexicans of California 
lived before the advent of the Americans. It 
is of adobe with tiled roof and an arched corri- 
dor or porch around it. Senator Stanford has 
adopted this general style for the bnildings of 
the Leland Stanford University, thinking it 
best fitted for the climate. The buildings are 
of one story, with arched corridors, but atone 
takes the place of the Mexican adobe. Such 
structures are warm in winter and cool in sum- 
mer. There are still numh'*-- of such buildings 
standing in portions of California ; a few of 
them being put toward the Miss! ^n in this oity. 



Jan. 4. 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



9 



The MiniBg Belt of Peru. 

The great mining region of Pera is a moaot* 
alnoua belt of coaotry, raoDiog nearly the 
whole length of the republic, and oomprialng 
the two grand range* of the Andes with the 
elavated table-lands between them. On the 
east of thia belt are the extensive plains and 
fertile valleys of the Amszon and its tributaries. 
On the west is a narrow strip of coast 20 to 50 
miles wide, for the most part a sandy desert, 
but prodaoing abundant crops where irrigated, 
and here are found petroleam, salt, nitrate of 
soda Id enormous amounts at the south, silver 
In a few localities, copper and other mineral 
products. 

The Western Cordillera, ranniog nearly par- 
allel with the shore-line, rises like a wall on 
the eastern side of the ooast belt, with passes 
from 15,000 to 18,000 feet high and peaks at- 
tuning 18,000 to '20,000 feet. Farther east, 
at a varying distance, is the Eistem Cordillera, 
composed of broken mountain ranges which, 
considered as one group, have a general par* 
allelism with the western chain, bat individ- 
ually vary greatly in direction, sometimes run- 
ning nearly east and west, in places projecting 
out into the Amazonian lands, or here and 
there curving around to unite with the western 
ridge, and with this inclosing Immense inter- 
alpine plains. These general features are indi- 
cated in Fig. 1, which cut. with the descrip- 
tion, we take^^from a paper on *' The Topography 
and Geology of the Cerro de Pasco, Pern," read 
before the American Institute of Mining Engi- 
neers Jby A. D. Hodges, Jr., formerly of this 
city, but now a resident of Boston. 

The sarfaoe of the plains is uneven and trav- 
ersed by lower ranges of hills which surround 
large lakes, or rolling pampas or fertile valleys, 
and through many of these last run rivers of 
considerable size. The whole country baa a 
high altitude (averaging up to 15,000 or 16,000 
feet), and slopes gradually north and east 
toward the Amazon, into whioh drain all the 
rivers. Its boundary mountain chains are 
scored on all sides by narrow, picturesque and 
precipitous ravines often thousands of feet 
deep. 

In all parts of this region are deposits of vain 



ment and of capital, this region has produced, 
according to Humboldt, an average annual 
yield of $5,:^00,000 in gold and silver. 
The Plateau of Junln. 
In the Department of -Tunin is a large mount- 
ain plateao encircled by the high Cordilleras, 



From its northern end issues the Upamayo or 
Chinchaioooha river, which, oommenoing to 
flow northerly, soon bends completely around, 
receiving the waters of the San Juan and the 
Colorado rivers, and then tlowing southerly be- 
hind the narrow range of hills bounding the 



w Vf.vt V&rU 

SKETCH SHOWING 

COMMUNICATIONS OF 
CERRO DE PASCO 

LIMA AND THE COAST. 



Ml RAllroadt In Operation . 
.1l(t.lli\>udf jiartly bulll and projected. 
-Mull' RuudB. 








the hills which here meet the lake, and some 
GOO or 700 feet above its waters. Here are the 
) salt-mine and works which supply the Cerro. 
I North of the lake is the Pampa of Bombon, 
j the easterly divlaion of which is often called 
the Pampa of San Juan. At the north-east of 
the Pampa of Sin Juan is the old town of 
Pasco, now nearly deserted, but said to have 
been formerly (before the discovery of the 
mines of Cerro de Paaco) an active mining camp. 
Directly west of Pasco, across the Pampa of 
San Juan, are the hill and once famous vein 
and mines of Colquijirca, where evidently much 
work has been done in times past, but where 
only spasmodic efforts at mining have been 
mude of late, the ores being sulphureted and 
unsnited for the patio process. 

Still farther north are the bills around Cerro 
de Pasco, familiarly known as "The Oerro," 
and at the extreme north or north-east of the 
plateau the Huallaja river, rising from springs 
near the last-named town, breaks through the 
Cordillera and flows north- easterly to unite 
with the Amazon. 

( To be contiriued.) 



which here unite to form the Knot of Pasco 
{Nudo de Pasco). In this plateau, which ex- 
tends north and south some two degrees of lat- 
itude, are the large lake of Junin, the pampa 



lake on the west, unites with the Huamanca 
river near Oroya, and passes out through the 
southern depression of the plateau to join finally 
the Amazon. 



Snow-Shoeing in Sierra. 

Editors Press:— In the high Sierrrs, where 
snow falls to such great depths that other 
means of travel are out of the question, snow- 
shoe riding has been carried to a science. 
When Snow-flhoe Thompson, who gained such 
celebrity in carrying the mail through Alpine 
and Plaoer counties, came to Sierra to show 
them how to ride, he could hardly keep np 
with the schoolboys. Since his day great Im- 
provements have been made, both in the groove 
that now runs the length of the shoe on the 
under side and makes it practical to guide the 
things, and in the lubricating material oalled 
*' dope" that makes the rider glide down the 
mountains with such UghtuiDg speed. 

Snow-Stioe Clubs. 

The Altnras Club was formed at Howland 
Flat, and rivals were soon formed at La Porte, 
Port Wine, Poker Fiat and Gibsonville. After 
practicing for weeks these clubs would send 
champions to contest for prizes, which were 
very liberal in . amount, and were made the 
occasion of much outside betting. Races would 
generally continue for a week and occasion 




able minerals. Gold and silver have been 
mined from the earliest periods; the quioksilver 
deposits of HuanoaTelioa were onoe famed 
throughout the world, although now practically 
abandoned ; lead and copper ores have been 
worked to some extent; salt and coal have been 
discovered at many points; and iron and other 
useful metals are said to exist, Notwithstand- 
ing all the dra*^%oka arising from want of 
roads, of proper methods and appliances of 
mining, of ekilled labor, of capable manf^e- 



of Bambon, and the famous "Basin of the Cerro," 
where, in latitude 10° 45' 45" south and longi- 
tude 73° 24' west of Paris is situated Cerro de 
Pasco, the capital of the Dapartment. Fig. 2 
is a map of thia plateau, compiled with care 
from accarate surveys. 

Lake Junin (also oalled L^ke Chinohaioooha 
and Like of the Kings), a body of water with 
an area of some 200 square miles and an alti- 
tude of 13,380 feet above the sea, covers the 
Boathern and principal part of this plateau. 



In the lake are several varieties of fish, and 
duck and other game-birds frequent it in num- 
bers. Along its level easterly shore is good pas- 
turage, and the breeding of animals is carried on 
here to some extent. At its southern end is 
Junin, a small town famous as the place near 
whioh the Peruvians won a great victory over 
the Spanish forces'in the War of Independence. 
There are a few villages near it. Thajmoat Im- 
portant locality in the vicinity is San Bias, 
situated about-half way ap its western shore in 



more excitement than any horse-races. Some- 
times thousands of dollars changed hands on 
the result of a contest. 

The Snow-Shoe. 
Basket-work shoes are disoarded entirely, 
and for racing the shoe is made the width of 
the foot and ten to fourteen feet long, turned 
up rat the ends, with a groove about one-half 
inch deep by one and one-half inches broad 
running along the whole length of the bottom. 
Experts prefer those made from fir of very 
straight grain. The thickness at the center 
where the foot is fastened is nearly one and a 



10 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 4, 1890 



fourth inches, tapering to five-eighths at the 
rear and a little thinner in front. 
The Training. 

After the enow has covered rooka and nnder- 
bruBh out of sight;, and has settled down to 
solid bufiineBB, the boys begin _ to get_ out the 
snow-shoes and practice under instraotion. The 
shoes are polished aa smooth as they can be 
made, and then the bottoms are smeared with 
some preparation to increase the speed. This 
mixture is looked upon aa the main thing In the 
race, and Ex-Senator "Wallace is now mainly 
famous for his wonderful *' dope " that won so 
many raoea. The base of all these preparations 
is spermaceti, but almost everything^ kept in a 
drug store has been experimented with. Most 
of these contain beeswax, rosin, turpentine, 
and some easential oils. It seems that the 
mixture must be adapted to the condition of 
the snow, and, above all things, must be kept 
secret from rival clubs. A little lard touched 
upon the bottom of a rival's shoes, or a little 
Bait sprinkled on his aide of the track, will 
lose him the race, and if you want a good 
fight on your hands in a hurry, get caught 
trying to find how a rival mixes his "dope." 

For weeks excited groups will be discussing 
the merits of difi"erent mixtures for cloudy and 
for sunny days, for hard snow and for soft 
snow and for different hours of the day. There 
seems to be no regularly establiahed course, A 
few days before the race they choose the place 
where they can get the longest and steepest 
run free from obstructions and convenient for 
spectators. Distance varies from 2000 to 5000 

feet. 

Speed. 

Talk about your racehoraes or lightniog 
trains. These men are reported by concurrent 
testimony of many spectators to have averaged 
as high a speed as 250 feet per second over a 
course nearly a mile long. This is more than 
four times the speed of a racehorse or twice 
that of a locomotive. Remember, too, that 
either of the latter goes over the course at uni- 
form speed, while the snowahoe rider movee 
with a conatantly accelerating motion, and we 
may say that his speed at the finish approxi- 
mates twice the average, or 500 feet per second. 
No wonder that they report that they hold the 
breath from start to finish, and cannot remem- 
ber having seen anything but a sort of bluish 
white light while running. They use a pole 
resembling a churn-daaher for helping them- 
selves uphill and as a brake at the finish. It U 
not supposed to touch the snow until the goal 
is passed. 

In Minnesota the Norwegians make "ski- 
racing," aa they call It, a leading winter sport, 
and an expert from the old country sometimes 
makes a sensation, but one never heard of the 
groove thoro nor of the ** dope." Sierra stands 
ahead. F. S. C. 



Our Agents. 

Ona FaTBHTDS can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and science, by assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their in- 
fluence and encouraging favors. We intend to send none 
but worthy men. 

J. C. HoAo — San Franeisco. 

R. G. Bailby— San Frandsco. 

M. D. SnaABBR— Santa Clara Co. 

W. W. TsBOBALDs— Los Angelcs Co. 

E. Fischer — Central California. 

Obo. WriiSOii — Sacramento Co. 

E. H. SCHAEFFLB — Fresno Co. 

C. Edward Robertson— Humboldt Co. 

Frank S. Chapih— Bntte and Yuba Cos. 

Wm. H. Hillbart— Oregon. 

E. E. Dbminq — Oregon. 



Attention, Southern California Miners. 

WORKS FOR SALE. 

The Works are situated at Daggett, Cal., in the 
Calico Mining District, and on side-track of the At- 
lantic and Pacific Railroad. They contain a first- 
class 50-horse power Engine and 45-horse power 
boiler, with Ore Crusher and other machinery, Mill 
Scales, Assaying Outfit, etc., all nearly new. Also 
upon the premises an office building and a comfort- 
able dwelling house (portable). The above can be 
had at a bargain. Apply to GILLISPY & CHILD3 
123 California St., San Francisco, 

Don't FaU to Write. 

Should this paper be reoeived by any subscriber who 
doea not want it. or beyond, the time he intends to pay 
for it, let him not fail to write us direot to stop it. A 
postal card (costing one cent only) will suffice. We will 
not knowingly send the paper to any one who does not 
wish it, but if it is continued, through the failure of the 
BubBorlber to notify us to discontinue It, or some Irre- 
sponaible party requested to stop it, we shall positively 
demand paymenttor the time It is sent. Look oARvruLLf 

A* tH» I.ABBL ON TOUB PAPSR. 



FOR RENT, CHEAP. 

BRICK BUILDING at corner of Folsom and Nineteenth 
streets, in gubdivieions, floors or parts of floors. "Will 
furnish powerand give leases. 

CHARLES ASHTON, 
411 Montgomery Street, S. F. 



THE RUSSELL PROCESS COMP'Y. 

TALCOTT H. RUSSELL, Secretary, 
NEW HAVEK CONN. 

p. O. Box 496. 



Back Files ol the Mranfa aud Sotektipic Prrsb (un 
bound) caD be had for $3 per volume of six months. Per 
year (two volumes) 96. Inserted In Dewey's patent bind- 
er, 60 cents additional per volnma. 



Vulcan Iron ^floMS, 

135-145 Fremont St., San Francisco, CaL 



( 



stamp Bitteries, Pans and Settlers, 
"Dodge," and Improved Blake, Rock-Breakers, 
"Dodge" Pulverizers, Slime IVlachines, etc. 



AERIAL WIRE ROPEWAYS. 

(VULCAN PATENT 8TSTBM,) 

Ths cheapest and moat reliable form of Transportation of Ore, Caal, eto. Sivee four-fifths 
of the ooat by any other method. 



SAW-MILL 



1 



S 



CORLISS, 



REFRIGERATING > MACHINERY. STEAM ENGINES { Meyer Cut-off, 
CABLE-ROAD ) ( Slide Valve. 

SPECIAL MACHINERY TO ORDER. 

"''^oYli. REPAIR WORK SOLICITED. 

HANGERS, etc. 



RUBBER FACTORY. 

Monarch Belting. 




The Flies of this Belt are 

UNITED by COTTON RIVETS 

Which hold them firmly together. 

Each Rivet is Independent 

And FoUowa the Stretch. 

THERE ARE NO STITCHES 

TO BREAK, and 

The Belt has a Smooth 
Surface. 



Hose, Belting, Packing, Etc. 

ALL KINDS OF RUBBER GOODS MADE TO ORDER IN A FEW HOURS. 

W, F. BOWERS & CO., 409 Market St., San Francisco. 



NEWYORKBEtTING&PACKING ea 



Warehouse, 15 PARK ROW, NEW YORK. 

The Oldest and Largest Manufacturers in the United States of 

VULCANIZED RUBBER FABRICS 

Solid Vulcanite 

EMERY WHEELS. 



Adapted to Mechanical Purposes. 



^ "^ 



Large Wheels made on Iron 
centers- 
Cuts Cooler and Freer 



THAN ANT OTHEH WHEEL 
IN THE MARKET. 



w 



imG\\\-2.Q^^\-t 



^^ot:By 





EXTRA RUBBER 

BELTING and HOSE 

lOE 

Mining Purposes. 

Circular woven Seamless Autiseptic 
Rdebek Lined "Cable" Hose and 
Test Ho^e for the use of Steam EnRines, 
Force Pumps Rolling MiUb, Iron Works, 
Paotories etc 



llillllllllllilllillllllil IIIIIMII 

Emery Vulcanite Wheel. 



ARNETT & RIVERS, 

17 and 19 MAIN ST.. SAU TEAITCISCO, 




Extra steam Hoso. 



ESTABLISHED 1866. 



Pacific Chemical Works. 

HENRY G. HANKS, 

Practica! and Indastrial Cbemist, Assayer 
aDd Geologist, 



718 MONTGOMERY ST., 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



1^ Will report on the condition and value of any mining property on 
the Pacific Coast. Rare Chemicals made to order. Instmotions given in 
Assaying and Practical Chemistry 




"WITTER'S SPRINGS." ]^.^^:!t!'T<, 

miles east of tfkiah. Comfortable Hotel. Quiet Cabins. 
Lovely Scenery. IjOW Charges. Its waters are a sure 
cure for Dropsy. Scrofulous and Skin Diseases, Rheuma- 
nism, etc. Address H L. DENIO. Upper Lake 



QUICKSILVER 

For Sale In Lota to Suit bv 

PAEROTT & CO., 
806 Oallfomla St., San Franolsoo. Osl 



tdlicatiopal. 



op 
ASSAYING AND CHEMISTRY, 

Rooms 46 Ss 47, 1 628 Montsromery St., 

2d Floor Montgomery Bl'k. f San Francisco, 
Also, Evening Classes, 7 to 10 o'clock. 

JOHN T. EVANS, M. A., Principal. 



School of Practical, Civil, Mechanical and 
MINING ENGINEERING, 

Snryeyig, ArcMtectnre, Drawing and Assaying 

72S MARKET STREET, 

The History Building, San Francisco, Cal, 

A. VAN DEB NAILLEN, President. 

Assaying of Ores, $26; Bullion and Chlorination Assay, 

$25; Blowpipe Assay, $10. Full course of assaying, 960. 

i^^end for circular. 






F 



BUSINESS OOLLEQE, 

24 POST ST.. S. F. 
iOR SKTENTY-FIVE DOIiLAKS THIS 

CoUet^e instructs in Shorthand, Type Writing, Book- 
deeping, Telegraphy, Penmanship, Drawing, all the En- 
g:liBh branches, and everything pertaining to buainesa, 
tor six full months. We have sixteen teachers, and give 
individual instruction to all our pupils. Our achool has 
its graduates in every part of the State. 

IV^INV FOR CiROUIiAB. 

E. P. HEALD, Fteildent. 
C. S. HALET. Seoretuy. 



FRANCIS SMITH & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Sheet Iron and Steel Pipe 

ALL SIZES. 

130 Beale Street, San Francisco, Gal. 



Iron cut, punched and formed, for making .pipe on 
ground. All kinds of Tools supplied for making Pipe. 
Estimates given. Are prepared for coating all sizes of 
Pipe with a composition of Coal Tar and Asphaltum. 



J. C. WILSON. C. A. O'BRIEN. 

J. MAODONOUGH & CO. 

IMPORTBRS AND CKALERS IN 

COAL ANDJIG IRON. 

Principal Office: 

41 MARKET STREET, CORNER SPEAR. 

Yards: 

S. W. Cor. Spear & 
Folaom, 

[Telephone No. 1S64.] 



S. W. Cor. Main & 
Folsom, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




WINE TANKS 1 

COOPERAGE CO. 



WATER TANKS , 

CALIFORNIA WINE 

FCI,I>A BROS., Proprietors, 

30 to 40 Spear St., San Francisco. 

ALL KINDS OF CASKS, TANKS, Etc. 

i^SHlp, Mremo, and Watbk Tanks a Specialty.*^ 



WINCHESTER HOUSE, 



44 Third Street, 



San Francisco, Cal. 



This Fire proof Brick Building is centrally located, in 
the healthiest part of the city, only a half block from the 
Grand and Palace Hotels, and close to all Steamboat and 
Railroad Offices. 

Laund ry Free for the use of Families. 



HOT AND COI,D BATHS FREE. 



Terms, Board and Room, $1.00 per Day 

And Upward. 

Booms with or without Board. 

Free Coach to the Honse. 

3". I»OOXjE-sr. 



Tioga District Mining Company, 

Incorporated June 11, 1SS9. Capital Stock, $10,000,000 
BUY AND SELL 

California Gold, Silver, Quicksilver, Copper 
and Lead Mines 

op ASCERTAINED VALUE. 

Office, No. IS PARROTT'S BUILDING, N. W. 

Corner of California and Montgomery Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

WM. B. WIGHTMAN, Pres. WM. H. V. CRONISE, Sec. 



Jan. 4, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



11 



List of U. S. Patents for Pacific Coast 
Inventors. 



Beported by Dewey & Oo.. Pioneer Patent 
SoUcltore for Pacific States. 



FOR WEEK ENDING DEC. 34, 

417.850.— Axle locricator— I. 



, 1889. 
B, Abraham 

s. f: 

417.851.— Ventilator— P. Abrahamsoo. S. F. 
417.853. — Tag Holder— Samuel Bjuman, Santa 
Cruz* Cal. 
'417.855.— Vineyard Plow--J. A. Bilz, Pleasan- 

ton, Cal. 

417.856.— Delivery Atiachment i-or Can 
Machines— Jos. Elick, S. F. 

4i7,86a"Booic Rest— W. C. Dow. Fresno. Cal. 

417, 86r.— Gate — A. W. Edwards. Shingle 
Springs, Cal. 

417,865.— Water Wheel-C. J. Green. Placer- 
ville. Ca). 

417.866.— SrouKiNG, ETC., Composition— Hollo- 
way & Frey, S. F. 

418.036.— Harness— F. T. Livingstou, Snoho- 
mish, Wash. 

417,876.— Mustache-Holder— W. H. Masier- 
man, S. F. 

417.936.— Harvester — J, & W. Paterson, 
Stockton, Cal. 

417.882.— Miner's Candlestick— G. Peterson, 
Tuscarora, Nev. 

417.885.— FRUlT-PiTTER—Sanguinelti & Steven- 
son. V.tllecito. Cal. 

417.888.— Propeller— R. Stevenson, S. F. 

418.096,— Turntaiile Mechanism— Watriss & 
Heynemaan, S. F. 

417,961.— Sprav Pump— a. W. White, San Jose, 
Cal. 

417,894.— Leak Stopper for Vessels — W. 
Wmchester. Mare Uland. Cal. 

The following brief list by telegraph, for Jan, i, 
will appear more complete on receipt of mail advices; 

California-Mark Anthooy, San FranclBCO, station in- 
dicator; the eame, etrctit or atatioD indicator; Jobn W. 
Bro>^D, S^n Francisco, eection bridge; Joseph P. Des- 
tabyo act! K. Mortimer Pctera, aaeh lotk; Culvin EwinR, 
San FranciHco, cotlar-atulllng machine; Icaac S. Gold- 
man, Loa Ancelce (aaeignor of part to H. TImkio and 
R. B Leare, San Diego), organ motor; S. B. Hackley, 
San Francisco hydrant coupler; Anrirew G- Norton, Ar- 
royo Granile, windmill; Alonzo P. Payaon, San Fr:in- 
cisco, setting epeed and K&u;,'e for drcd^era; John Rin- 
gen, Coronado, npparatua for utilbingaurf-power; James 
M. Whitburn, Lob Angek-s, hydrocarbon burner. 

NOTB. — Coplea of U. S. and Foreign pateota furnished 
by Dewey d: Co., in the Bhortest time possible (by mall 
or telegraphic order). American and Foreign patents 
obtained, and ifcneral patent bualness for Pacitio Coaet 
iDventors traiiaacted with perfect security, at reasooablo 
rates, and In the abortest possible time. 



will set more evenly arooad the dange oa the 
end o( the can, and aa the cans are carried 
along on the belt the solder has time to oool. 



Notices of Recent Patents. 

Among the patents recently obtained through 
Dewey & Co. 'a Scientific Press U, 8. and 
Foreign Patent Agency, the following are 
worthy of special mention: 

Mustacse-Holder. — W. H. Masterman, 
Alameda. No. 417,876. Dated Ddo. 24, 18S9. 
The object of this invention is to provide a 
simple, effective and readily applied guard, 
which will easily and accurately fit the face 
and pass over the muBtache, holding a portion 
of it back firmly and compactly against the lip 
and cheeks, whereby it is kept out of the way 
in eating, and especially in partaking of liquid 
food, snch as aonp. 

Vineyard Plow. — John A. Bilz, Pleasanton, 
Alameda Co. No. 417.855. Dated Deo. 24, 
1889. This is a novel construotion for plows 
which is specially adapted for oultivating the 
soil where there are rows of vines, shrubs or 
trees and where it is necessary to plow close to 
the roots or stems while maintaining the beam 
and handles of the plow at a considerable dis- 
tance to one aide in order to avoid the limbs 
and npper portion of the plant. It consiets in 
the combination of a reveraible plow, a beam to 
which said plow is connected and about which 
it may be turned, and handles and olevia made 
adjustable with relation to the beam, so aa to 
stand at any desired angle thereto. 

Tag-Holder. — Samuel Baumao, Santa Cruz 
No. 417,852. Dated Deo. 24, 1889. 
vice is intended for marking goods in dry-gooda 
stores, Buoh as are known as piece-goods. The 
invention waa described and illustrated in the 
Press of Dec. 2l8t last. 

Ventilator. — Peter Abrahamson, S. F. No. 
417,851. Dated Deo. 24, 1889. The inven- 
tion relates to that olass of ventilators in which 
a box having an opening on each aide is em- 
ployed. The object of the invention ia to pro- 
vide a simple and effective ventilator providing 
for the free and nninterrupted passage of the 
incoming and outgoing currents, thereby 
effecting perfect ventilation. 

Delivery Attachment for Can-Machines. 
Joseph Black, S. F. No. 417,856. Dated Dec. 
24, 1889. This is a delivering device uaed in 
connection with oanomaohlnes by which the 
cans are taken from the machines proper and 
delivered at any given point. Though the In- 
vention is applicable to any can-machine, from 
which it is required to receive the cane in a 
horizontal or inclined position and to deliver 
them in an upright position, it is especially ap- 
plioable as an attachment for a soldering ma- 
chine, In which the cans are rolled in a suitable 
way or trough through a bath of molted solder 
therein. The Invention conaista in the novel 
combination of the guides or tracks and the 
traveling carrier. The object of turning the 
can on end is to enable the solder to set better 
while the can is in an upright position, than if 
it were oODtloned in an inclined position, as It 



Gate. — Arthur \V. Edwards, Shingle 
Springs, £1 Dorado Co. No. 417,861. Dated 
Ddo 24, 18S9. This is one of that class of gates 
in which the gate is mounted by means of 
suitable rollers upon a tilting track, whereby It 
opens and closes by gravity, according to the 
direction in which the track is inclined. The 
patent covers details of construction and cer- 
tain combinations of devices. 

Miner's Candlestkic. — Onstavns Peterson, 
Tusoarora, Nevada. No. 417,882. Dated Dec. 
24, 1S89. The invention relates to that class 
of miner's candleeticke in which are combined 
a epear or piercing atick or bar, a hanging up 
hook, aaooket for the candle, a fase-cutter and 
a oap-crimper. The patent covers the novel 
arrangement and construction of these several 
parts in a single candlestick. 

Fruit-Cuttino and Pitting Machine. — 
Luke Sanguinetti of Vallecito and W. T. 
Stevenson of Douglas Flat, Calaveras Co. No. 
417.885. Dated Dec. 24, 1889. The invention 
consists in a caived knife for cutting the fruit 
and provided with teeth for engaging the pit 
or stone, a rotary feed-wheel provided with 
pins or points for engaging the fruit and carry- 
ing it down upon the curved knife, a hopper 
(or directing the fruit to the wheel, a feed- 
blook for controlliog the feed of the fruit and a 
vibrating screen for separating the pits from 
the cut fruit. 

Book Rest. — Wm. C. Dow, Fresno. No. 
417,860. Dated Deo. 24, 1889. The invention 
consists in the novel extenaible andcontractible 
frame, the stops for the book-oovera, the ad- 
justable leaf-holder and line-marker, theadjuat* 
able supports and details of construction and 
arrangement. The objeot is to provide a 
simple book-rest adapted to be adjusted to 
different sizes of books and which la provided 
with a means for holding the leaves open and 
marking the lines in copying. 

Scouring, Grinding, Polishing and Smut- 
ting Composition — James C. Holloway and 
John Frey, S. F. No. 417.866. Dated Dao. 
24, 1889. This is a new and useful composition 
of matter, the general object of which is to 
grind, and the particular objeot of which is for 
nse in machines for smutting, scouring and 
polishing grain. The mixture is applied to the 
circumference of a light iron cylinder, until it 
is coated to a thickness of about one inch or 1^ 
inch. This cylinder is then placed in an oven 
and allowed to remain for about 12 hours under 
a high degree of heat. It ia then taken out and 
while cue coacmg is acui uui> aoa i«b purca .»-<> 
open, they pour over it some of the liquid ex- 
tract of eucalyptus until the composition re- 
fuses to absorb any more, the cylinder being re- 
volved during the application and until the ex- 
tra coating or supply of extract ia dry. Thla 
last application of extract of euoalyptua com- 
pletely filla up the pores of the composition 
and renders the absorption of moisture impos- 
sible, and the solidity of the whole composition 
is increased. Silica is uaed in the composition 
to act as a cutting or grinding surface of a 
frlctional nature, the other material serving as 
a bond for holding the particles of silica to- 
gether, and being of a softer nature it wears 
away more rapidly, leaving the sharp edges and 
points of the silica particles projecting from the 
composition which, thus by friction, operate to 
effect the result desired. 

Combined Harvester.— James and William 
Paterson, Stockton. No. 417,936. Dated 
Dec. 24, 1889. The patent on this traveling 
harvester and thraaher covers a main frame 
upon which the thrashing and cleaning meoh 
aniems are supported, a single driving-wheel 
for communicating power to said mechanisms, a 
pole rigidly secured to the frame and extending 
in front, a swiveled-wheeled frame supporting 
The de- the front end of the pole, means for the attach- 
ment of a team to said swiveled frame, and for 
the attachment of a second team between the 
machine frame and swiveled frame, a timber 
rigidly secured to the right side of the main 
frame, and extending at right angles thereto, a 
non-driving wheel at the outer extremity of 
aaid timber, a header-frame suspended from 
eaid timber so as to swivel thereon, and a 
means, comprising a bell-crank lever, chain 
and pawl and rack, for raising the front of the 
header frame. 

Water-Wheel, — Cbaa. J. Green, Placer- 
ville. No. 417,865. Dated Dec. 24, 1889, 
This improvement in momentum or hurdy- 
gurdy wheels conaista in backeta adjaatably ar- 
ranged upon the wheel-rim, and so placed with 
relation to each other that a certain proportion 
of water from the nozzle ia diaoharged into the 
bucket nearest to the nozzle, while the remain- 
der strikes the bucket just behind the first 
one ; and also In a means for adjusting theae 
buckets so as to change the proportion of water 
which is diaoharged into the first and second 
buckets. In this class of wheels the buokets 
are made of snob a form that the water which 
is discharged from the nozzle under a high 
pressure is received into the buokets so as to 
pasB around the concavity of the bottom and 
be discharged at the outer edges, this being a 
common form of construction in several well- 
known wheels. In this invention Mr. Green 
improves the construotion of the wheel by mak- 
ing theae buokets transversely adjustable to 



and from the center of the rim of the 
wheel and placing them with relation to 
each other, ao that the stream of water ia al- 
ways divided between two buokets, one of 
which is behind the other. 

Centrifccal Auxiliarv Propeller. — Rob- 
ert Stevenson, S. F. No. 417 888. Dited 
Deo. 24, 1889. This ia a dtvice for assisting 
in the propulsion of vessels throogh the water. 
Itoonsista of radial blades or mugs, having 
the exterior edges either tapered or in straight 
or curved lines from front to rear, and secured 
to a shaft projecting from the bow of the ves- 
sel and beneath the surface of the water, ao 
that when driven at a high rate of speed the 
centrifugal action of these hladea will throw 
the water outwardly and produce a partial 
vacuum or open apace in front of the bow of 
the vessel, into which it may be moved or 
forced with less expenditure of power than 
when the vessel is moved into water in its ordi- 
nary condition. This invention was illastrated 
and more fully described in the Press of last 
week. 

New Incorporations. 

The following companies have been incorporated, 
and papers filed in the office of the Superior Court, 
department lo, San Francisco : 

Guatemala & California Cons. Co., Dec. 
27. Object, to receive concessions from the Gov- 
ernment of Guatemala, buy and sell real estate in 
that Republic, import into and export goods ihere- 
from and manufacture goods there. Capital stock, 
$1,000,000. Directors— Mrs. M. R. Crosswell and 
Mrs. M. L, Crawford of Guatemala and John B. 
Turrill, R. B. Brower and John Lee of this city. 

Alaska Coal Co., 'Dec. 27. Capital stock, 
$2,000,000. Directors— E. M. Patterson, B. E. 
Handy, W. H. Craig of Oakland, and L. B. Hatch 
and D. C. Gray of S. F. 

North American Commercial Co., Dec. 31. 
Object, to hunt fur-bearing animals and sell the 
skins; also, to deal in lands and construct boats and 
other apparatus necessary for hunting and transpor- 
tation purposes; also, to build all kinds of buildings 
for the purposes expressed; also, to purchase and 
sell all kinds of machinery, goods, wares and mer- 
chandise; also, to construct, purchase and operate 
trading-posts. Capit^il stock, $2,000,000. in 20,000 
shares. Directors — Lloyd Tevis, Henry Cowell, 
Albert Miller, Matthias Meyer and Isaac Liebes. 

Economy Building and Loan Association, 
Dec. 31. Capital stock, $1,000,000. Directors^ 
Barry Baldwin, Moses Blum, James K. Wilson, 
William D. English, H. R. Willias, Geo. D. Toy, 
Bernard Faymonville, Isaac Anderson and Charles 
G. Clinch. 

Installment Home Association, Dec. 31. 
Object, to deal in real estate and the construction 
of homes. Capital stock, $5,000,000. Directors- 
Felix Mprniisfi, A. S- T-^de (iner^P- A. Ci SirMMh^r. 
land, M, B. Frost and Eugene F. Bert. 

San Francisco Noveltv and Plating 
Works, Dec. 31. Object, to manufacture and 
deal in amalgamating plates and other articles for 
commercial use. Capital stock, $30,000, in 300 
shares. Directors — Andrew Rudgear, Isaac N. 
Demorest, William E. Sheepman, Isidore M. Merle 
and Adrian J. Merle. 

Popular Railroad Guide Co., Dec. 31. Ob- 
ject, to publish a railroad guide and hotel di- 
rectory. Capital stock, $25,000. Directors — J. 
Oliver Evans, Taliesin Evans, John L. Bromley, 
Fred L. Button and Arthur F. Price. 

Poso Creek Lumber Mill. Dec. 31. Capital 
stock, $100,000. Directors— Myer Ebrman, Chas. 
Green, Samuel Sussman, John Alexander Camp- 
bell and Joseph Ebrman. 

Apollo Con. M, Co., Dec. 28. Capital stock, 
$2,000,000. Directors— G. C, King. W. W. Gol- 
lin, R. Neuman, L. Sloss and G, Niebaum. 



Meetings and Elections. 

Annual meetings and elections have been held by 
the following mining companies : 

Peer M. Co., Dec. 26: V/. S. Lyle, president; 
C. H. Fish, vice-president, and J. B. Low, A. B. 
Clute and E. Gauthier, directors. Aug. Watennm 
was re-elected secretary, and William Pickett, Supt. 

Peerless M. Co., Dec. 26: William S. Lyle, 
president; C. H. Fish, vice-president, and J. B. Low, 
A. B. Ruggles and E. Gauthier, directors; Aug. 
Waterman, secretary, and William Pickett, Supt. 

Weldon M. Co., Dec. 26: William S. Lyle, 
president; C, H. Fish, vice-president, and J. B. Low, 
A. B. Ruggles and A. B Clute, directors; Aug. 
Waterman, secretary, and William Pickett, Supt. 

Combination M.Co., Dec. 26: William S. Lyle, 
president; C. H. Fish, vice-president, and J. B. Low, 
A, B. Clute and A. B. Ruggles, directors; Aug. 
Waterman, secretary, and William Pickett, Supt. 



The Southern Pacific Co. paid taxes amount- 
ing to $582,159 this week. The whole amount 
of taxes for the year 1889 charged upon the 
railroads aaseaaed to the State Board of Equal- 
ization was $668,024.45, of which $292 328.06 
was for State purposes and $375,696.09 for 
counties through which the roads run. Of 
these taxes, $667,778 37 has been paid, leaving 
$245,78 delinquent, which is due from the Pull- 
man Palace Car Company, the only company 
aasesaed by the State Board of Equalization 
which failed to make payment of its taxes. 

The California Wire-Works have discon- 
tinued the retailing -branch of their busineaa 
and moved their main oflBce to the factory, 332 
Bay street, corner of Mason. The city office 
has been establiahed at No. 9 Fremont street. 

Telegraphic diapatches state that a very 
rich deposit of cinnabar ore has been found 30 
miles from Tacoma, Washington. 



Bullion Shipments. 

We quote shipments since our last, and shall be 
pleased to receive further reports; 

Con. California and Virginia, Dec. 28, $48,770; 
Justice, 28, $5670; Hanauer, 24, $4750; 35, $5100; 
Young America South, 27, $8630; Hanauer. 27, 
$4800; Chollar. 31, $13,736; Hanauer. 28, $2550; 
Mt. Diablo, 28, $10,831; Savage, 28, $22,315; Alice, 
27. $23,848. 



DBLIKQUBNT SALE NOTICE. 
Booth Gold Mining Company. Location 

of principal place of bualne^e, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, Location of Works, Auburn, Placer Co., Cal, 
NOTICE.— Thoro is delimiuent upon the foUowinj,' 
iIoBcribfd Stock, on account ol AflaoHsment (No. i), levied 
OD the -ZSd day of November. ISS9. the several amounta 
Bet opposite the names of the respective Shareholders, 
OS followe: 

No. 
Certifi- No. 
Namrb. cate. Shares. Am't. 

Richard Chenory, Truflteo 1(10 0,275 $125 50 

Kichard Chenery 17 5 lo 

Cba les F. Eaton , 171 300 (i 00 

Charles F. Fnton 172 300 6 00 

Cliarlcp F. E iton 173 CO 1 20 

R. N. Graven, Trustee MS 250 6 00 

E. S. Harrison 177 1,000 20 00 

Geo. R. Spinney, Trustee 82 312 fl 24 

Geo. R. Spinney. Trustee 176 500 10 00 

E. P. SIOBSOo, Trustee 181 50O 10 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Directors, made on the 23d day of No ember, 1889, so 
many shares of each parcel of auch Stock as may be 
necessary, will be eold at public Auction, at the sales- 
room of Middleton & Sharon, No. 22 Moiittromery street, 
San Francisco, California, on MONDAY. THE TWENTI- 
ETH {20th) DAY OF JANUARY, 1S90, at the hour of 3 
o'clock p. M., of said day, to pay said Delinquent Assess- 
ment thereon, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses o( the sale. 

GEO. R. SPINNEY, Secretary. 
Ofhce, 310 Pine St., Room 2S, San Francisco, Califoroia. 



PRACTICAL 



Books on Mining 

AND IRRIGATION. 



PRACTICAL. GOtD-MINING. — A comprehen- 

jjsive treatise on the origin and occurrence of gold-bear- 
ing gravels, rocks, and ores, and the metlioda by which 
the gold is extracted. By C. G. Warnford Lock. 7B8 
pages, with S plates and 271 engravings id the text. 
4to, cloth, $15.00, express prepaid. 

IRRIGATION.— Egyptian Irrigation. By W. Will- 
coc'ds, with introduction by Lt. Col. J, C. Rosa. This 
work embodies the information, collected during four 
and a half J ears, of the irrigation systems of Egypt, 
Engineering queatiODs, such as ailt-deposita, drainage, 
irrigation, the Barrages, Hood protection, methods of 
regulation, locka, etc., have been treated In detail. 367 
pages, large Svo, with 26 plates and numerous engrav- 
ings in the text. Price S15,0O, express prepaid. 

MEXICAN MINES.— Dahlgren'a Historic Mines of 



Descriptive Catalogue and Circulars of Books relating 
to Aaaa.T ing. Mining, Electricity and Mechanical Engineer 
ng, sent free on applicafcioo. 

E. & F. N. SPON, Publishers, 

13 Cortlandt St., New York. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



One new double circular Sawmill to carry 60-inch bot- 
tom aaw, with wtought-iron bangers for top saw. Fric- 
tion feed-works, patent etael screw doublo-throw head- 
blocks, with track iron, saw carriage and fcame complete. 

RISDON IRON & LOCOMOTIVE WORKS, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



Tlie Gerian SaTinis aM Loan Society. 

S36 California Street. 

For the half-year ending Dec. 31, 18S9, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of five and forty-hur'dredths 
(5 40-100) per cent per annum on Term Dep08lts,;and four 
and one-half (4 1 2) per cent per annum on Ordinary 
Deposits. Payable on and after Thursday, Jan. 2, 1890. 
GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION, 532 Cilifornia St., 
cor. Webb. BRANCH, 1700 Market St., cor. Polk. For 
the half-year ending with che 31flt of December, 1S89, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of Five and Four- 
Teotha (5 4-10) per cent per annum on term deposits and 
Four and One-Half (4t)per cent per annum on ordinary 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Thursday, 
the 2d of January. 1S90. LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, 



On Market St. , corner of Tenth, is the most realistic and 
interesting picture ever produced. Read what General 
Howard aaya of It in our Catalogue. 



Open, A. M. to 11 P- M., Except Sundays. 



INVENTORS. TAKE NOTICE I 

L. petersonTmooel maker, 

8 Market St. , N. E. cor. Front (up stairs), San Francsico 
Experimental machinery and alt kinda of models Tin 

and brasswork. All communications strictly confident 

tioL 



12 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 4, 1890 



PARKE & LACY COMPANY 

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OP 

MINING, MILL and GENERAL MACHINERY. 



ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 

AIR COMPRESSORS, ROOK DRILLS, 
WALL'S CRUSHING ROLLS, 

CONCENTRATORS, PULVERIZERS, 
TURBINE WATER WHEELS, 

ROCK BREAKERS, DRT JIGS. 

Bullock's Diamond Drills 



GOLDEN GATE CONCENTRATORS, 

GREftTEST CAPACITY OF ANY CONCENTRATOR MADE, 

One Machine Taking Pulp from 10 Stamps. 




SAW MILLS, MACHINE TOOLS, 
PLANING MILLS, INJECTORS and EJECTORS 
BELTING, PACKING, OILS, LUBRICATORS, 
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS, 
CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS. 
ROTARY PUMPS, GANG BDGERS, 
CAMPBELL'S STEAM FEEDS, 
MILL and MINE SUPPLIES. 



«3-:EKr:En. at. .^.G-ziiNri^s z^oxi 



WESTINGHOUSE AUTOMATIC ENGINES. 



COMPOUND, 5215*HOKSE POWER, 



SALES DURING LAST FOUR MONTHS: 

RTAWr>AT?r) 99 ENGINES, TTIMTOT? i6e engines, 

yj-L.ti.±HiJXi.£\ilJ, 4500 HORSE POWER. U U ±N X^_» JAi, 4260 HORSE POWER. 

OiTfizica. n*ota,l, 309 XIxislxxois, .A.sex'es«''tlxi.g 13.975 XZoxrse f>oX'cre>x-. 



21 and 23 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 



189 Clarence St., Sydney, N. S. W. 



X880. 3.880. 

CATALOGUE OF 200 PAGES. 



The matter Is readily 
available . — Tradesman. 

A Complete Work. — 
Colliery Engineer. 

Handy for reference. — 
Siin. and Sci. Press. 

anoniu DB ni iiib uauua 
of every Engineer and 
Contractor.— Eng. and 
Min. Journal. 

A valuable addition to 
the literature on the 
Subject. — Eng. and B'l'g 
Record. 



A TKE&TISE AND HASDBODE ON 

ROCK DRILLING 

AIR COMPRESSING 

Mailed Free. 



23 Park Place, New York. 



In reality a band- 
book.— J.jn. Man'fact'r. 

SupplieR a long felt 
v/ant.—Man'/rs' Record. 

This Catalogue is one 
of unusual interest and 
value.— it R. Gazette. 

This is a thoroughly 
good publication, — En- 
ginecritig News. 

The useful information 
will be found specially 
valuable. — Eng. and 
B'l'g Record. 

00-, 




LIDGERWOOD M'F'G CO. 



MANUFACTtJRBRS OF 



HOISTING ENGINES. 

300 Styles and Sizes. 5000 in Use. 



96 Libertj' St, New 
York. 

34 & 36 West Monroe 
St., Chicago. 

197 to 203 Congress St. , 
Boston . 

PARIE &LACY CO., 



Agents, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Send for Catalogue. 




Lubricating Compound and Cups. 





SOLE ASBNT FOR 

A'aiantie 

CRUSHES PLATES, 

— AND— 

Clirome Cast Steel for 
Bock Drills, Etc. 




AlfcAMAMTIIVK. 



H. D. MORRIS, 
220 Fremont St., San Francisco, 

MANUFACTDRERS' anJ PMHASMfi AGENT. 

Special attentic given to purchase of 

MINE and MILL SUPPLIES. 

ADAMANTINE SHOES AND DIES.— Guar 

mteed to prove better and cheaper than any others 
Orders solicited, subject to above conditions. 

H. D. MOKRTS. 



PERFECXPULLEYS 

First Premium Awarded at Mechanics' Fair, 1884 
CJXiOO? eto IMC :E3 S3 S :]E2 , 

Sole Liceneed Manufacturers of the 

MEDART PATENT WROUGHT RIM PULLEY 

for the States of California, Oregon and Nevada, and the Territories of Idaho WashinirtoD 

Montana, Wyoming, Utah and Arizona. Lightest, Strongest, Cheapest and 

Beat Balanced Pulley in the World. Also Manufacturers of 

SHAFTING, HANGERS AND APPURTENANCES. 

gS" Send for Circulars and Prior List,'^ ' 
Noe. 129 and 181 FREMONT STBHET, BAN FRANOISOO, OAL. 




PAT. OCT. 26, 1881. 



1868. 
Manufacture commenced a 
Albany, J^ew York. 

1876. 

Introduced by us on Pacific 
Coast, 

1889. 

Cheap imitations having had 
time to show that they are the 
most expensive in the end, the 

Sales of the Oennine Albany 
Gomponnd are Larger than 
ever before. 




England, Belgium, 
France, 

And other Foreign Countries 
are now Large Consumers. 



We are also Sole Agents for 
the 

Albany Cylinder Oils, 
Albany Spindle Oils, Etc. 



FOE SALE ONLY BY 



TATUM & BOWEN 



Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast, 

Dealers in Improved Woodworking Machinery, 

Sawmill Machinery, Engines, Boilers, Ironworking Machinery, Supplies, Etc. 

Sole Agents for Hoe Chisel-Tooth Saw, Gardner Governor, Schultz 
Leather Belting, Etc. 

34 AND 36 FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

85 FRONT STREET, PORTLAND, OR. 



Smelter For Sale or Exchange. 



One 50-ton, wrought iron, water-jacket Smelting Fur- 
nace (36"x60" at the tuyeree) of the latest design, wi h 
Crueher, Blower, Boiler, Pumps, Engines, Tools, and 
everything complete for immediate delivery, and only 
used about »ix months. Cheap for cash, or will exchange 
for interest in a Lead-Silver Mine* or erect in any mining 
camp that will guarantee a certain output. For further 
particulars ad^ess Box 2S, Blkhom, Uontanft. 



TUBBS CORDAGE CO. 

(A Corporation.) 

Constantly on hand a full assortment of Manila Rope, 
Duplex Rope, Tarred Manila Rope, Hay Rope, Whale Lin 
etc. , etc. 

Extra elzea and lengths made to order on short notice. 

611 & 613 Front St, San Francisco, Cal, 



Jan. 4, 1890 ] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



13 



AMALGAMATING MACHINERY. 

stamp Mills lor Wei or Dry Crushing. 
Huntington Centrifugal Quartz Mill. Drying 
Cylinders. Amalgamating Pans, Settlers, 
Agitators and Concentrators. Retorts, Bul- 
lion and Ingot Moulds, Conveyors. Elevators, 
Bruckners and Howell's Improved While's 
Roasting Furnaces, Etc. 



FRASER & CHALMERS, 

MINING MACHINERY 



CONCENTRATING MACHINERY. 



IMPROVED CORLISS va'l^^h'sV^Im ENGINES. •K* BOILERS 



Blake, Dodgeand Comet Crushers, Cornish 
Crushing and Finishing Rolls. Hartz Plunger 
and Collom iigs. Frue Vanner & Embrey 
Concentrators, Evans', Calumet. Collom's 
and Rittengcr's Slime Tables. Trommels, 
Wire Cloth and Punched Plates. OreSam* 
pic Grinders and Heberle Mills. 



HORIZONTAL. VERTICAL 
. . . AND SECTIONAL. . . . 



:X3MI£^X^CI^]SO S'irE^ABffi ^^M.Tm^^ 



Hoisting Engines, 
Safety Cages, 

Safety Hooks, 

Ore CARS, Water & Ore 
BUCKETS, 

Air Compressors, 

Rock Drills, Etc. 

GENERAL MILL AND 
MINING SUPPLIES, ETC. 
Sectional Machinery 

FOR 

MULE-BACK 

TRANSPORTATION. 




Pumping Engines 

and Cornish 

Pumping Machinery, 

IMPROVED 
WATER JACKET 

Blast Furnaces for 
Galena & Copper Ores, 

SLAG GARS AND POTS, 

Roots & Baker 
Pressure Blowers, 

SUSPENDED 

TRAMWAYS. 



General Offices and Works: FULTON AND UNION STS., CHICAGO, ILL. 



BRANCH OFFICES: 



NEW YORK, Room 43. 
7 W. Second South 
Oalle de Juarez. LIMA. PERU, South America. 
SOLE WESTERN AGENTS FOB 



, No. 2 Wall St. DENVER, COLO., 1316 Eighteenth St. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, 
St. LONDON, ENC, 23 Bucklersbury, E. C. CHIHUAHUA CITY, MEXICO, No. II 
JOHANNESBURC, TRANSVAAL, South Africa. 

TTLBR WIRE WOEK3 DOUBLE ORIMPBD MINING CLOTHS. 



THE PELTON WATER "WHEEL 

GIVES THE HIGHEST EFFICIENCY OF ANY WHEEL IN THE WORLD. 






.¥ 



H"^*-^ 
%^^'^< 




OVER 800 ALREADY IN USE. 

Affords the Moafc Simple and Reliable Power for all 
Mining and Manufacturing Machinery. 

Adapted to heads running from 20 up to 2,000 feet. 

From 12 to 20 per cent better results guaranteed than 
can be produced from any other Wheel in the Country. 

ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION. 

Power from these Wheels can be transmitted long 
distances with small loss, and is now extensively used in 

light. 

APPLICATIONS 

Should state amount, and head of water, power required, 

%j and for what purpose ; with approximate length of pipe ; 

also, whether the application is with reference tn Wheels 

or J/o(ors described below. SEND FOR CIRCULARS. 

The Pelton Water Wheel Co. 

121 MAIN ST., SAN FKANCISCO, CAL, 



OlST lk7V-A.1"ES 



itj: 



Varying from the fraction of 1 up to 15 and 20-hor8e power, Uoequaled for all light-running maohinery. Warranted to develop a given 
amount of power with one-half the water required by any other, SST SEND FOR MOTOR CIRCULAR. ADDRESS AS ABOVE.'SS 




ffletalllirgy apd Ore^. 



SELBY 

SMELTING and LEAD CO.. 

416 Uontgomery St., San Francisco. 

GOLD AND SILVER REFINERY 
And Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and 
Lead Ores and Solphureta. 

UANUTAOTDRBRJB OF 

BLUESTONE, 

LEAD PIPE, 

SHEET LEAD, 

SHOT, Etc., Etc. 

ALSO MANlIFAOTaRBKtl OP 

Standard Shot-Gun Cartridges, 

Under Chamborlin Patent 



JAMBS LBFFBL'S 

Mining Turbine Water Wheel. 

Those Wheels are deslgDed (or all purposes where limited quantities of water and 
high heads are utilized, and are guaranteed to give more power with leaa water than 
any other wheel made. Being placed on horizontal shalt, the power is transmitted 
durect to shaftiog by belts, dispenaing with gearing. 

Estimates furnished on application (or wheels specially built and adapted in 
capacity to suit any particular case. 

Further information can be obtained of this form of construction, as well as the 
ordinary Vertical Turbines for Wooden Penstocka and in Iron Globe Cases, free of cost, 
by applying to the manufacturers. 



JAMES LEPFEL & CO.. 



Springfield, Ohio, 



or 110 Liberty St., New York. 



FRASER & CHALMERS, General Agents, 

Chicago, 111., and Denver, CoL 

PARKE & LACY, General Agents, San Francisco, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA IRON YARD. 

HENRY J, ROGERS & CO. 

Successors to CHA3. CALLAHAN 
IMPORTERS AND DEALBRB IN 

CAST and WROUGHT IRON SCRAP 

SECOND-HA^ND IiOII.£BS 

AND OLD MACHINERY 

01 every description. 

Tie ffiglesl Price palJ for all tMs ol Metals. 

OFFI08 AND Yard: 128 and 130 Folsom St.^ S. F 

Telephone No. 67. 



FOR SALE 

Hydraulic Mining Property in Soutbera Oregon. Good, 
EKtensive. For particuHre (Principals only) address, 

"A. M.," Box 77, 

Grants Pass, Oregon. 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO.. 

1UP0RTBR8 AND DBALBRS IB 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS, MINE 
AND MILL SUPPLIES, 

ALSO CHEMICALS. AND PHYSICAL. SCHOOL AND 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS. 
63 & 65 First St., cor. Mission, San Francisco. 

We would call the attention of Assayers, Chemists, 
Mining Companiea, Milling Companiea, Prospectors, eta, 
to our full stock of Balances, Furnaces, Muffles, Cruci- 
bles, Sooriflers, eta, including, also, a full stock of 
Chemioals. 

Having been engaged in furnishing these supplies slnoe 
the first discovery of mines on the Pacific Coast, we feet 
confident from our experience we can well auit the de- 
mand for these goods, both aa to qualitj' and price. Our 
New Illustrated Catalogue, with pricea, will be sent od 
application. 

tS" Our Gold Mid Silver Tables, showing the value pei 
ounce Troy at different degrees of fineness, and valuable 
tables for computation of assays in graina and grammes, 
will be sent free upon application. Agents fortbe Itlor- 
g:an Crucible Co., London, England. Also tor E. 
G. Senuiston's Silver Plated Amalgam Plates. The 
plates of this well-known manufacturer are thoroughly 
reliable, and full weight of Silver guaranteed. Ordeia 
taken at his lowest prices. 

JOHN TAYLOR A OO. 



Nevada Metallurgical Works. 

NO. 23 STEVENSON STREET, 



0. A. LnoBHARDT, Manager. 



ESTABLISBBD 1800 



Ores worked by any ProoeBB. 
Ores Sampled, 

Assaying in all its Branches. 
Analyses of Ores, Minerals, Waters, eto. 
Working Tests (practical) Made. 
Flans and Specifications furnished for the 
most suitable Process for Working Ores. 

Special attention paid to Examinations of 
Mines; Flans and Reports furnished. 

O. A. LUOKHARDT St CO., 
(Formerly Huhn & Luokhardt, 
UlnlnfiT EnKlneers and Metallurflrlsts 



^ METALLURGICAL WORKS. 

^\ 318 Pine St. (Basement,, 

Corner of Leidesdorfl Street, • - SAN FRANCISCO 

Ores Sampled and Assayed, and Tests made by my 
Process. 
Assaying and Analysis of Ores, Minerals and Waters, 
Mines Examined and Reported on. 
Practical Instruction given in Treating Ores by im- 
proved processes. 

G. KUSTBL & CO., 
Mining Engineers and MetallurGrista. 



THOMAS PRICE & SON, 

Assay Office, Chemical Laboratory, 

BULLION ROOMS and ORE FLOORS, 

524 Sacramento Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

COIN RETURNS ON ALL BULLION DEPOSITS IN 24 HOURS. 

WORKING TESTS OF ORES BY ALL PROCESSES. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO CONCENTRATION OF ORES. 
Ores Received on Oonsigmnent, Sampled, Assayed, and Disposed 
of in the Open Market to the Highest Bidder. 



GREAT REDUCTION! 

BATTiERY~~SOREENS. 

Best and Cheapest in America. 

No imitation, no deception, no planished or rotten 
Iron used. Only genuine Russia iron In Quartz Screens. 
Planished Iron acreens at nearly half my former rates. 

T ha\e a large supply of Battery Screens on hand 
suitable for the Huntington and all Stamp Mills, which 1 
will sell at 20 per oent discount. 




PERFORATED SHEET METAL 

For Flour and Rice Mills, Grain Separators, Revolving 
and Shot Screena, Stamp Batteriea and all kinda of Min 
Ing and Milling Machinerj'. Iron, Steel, Copper, Brass. 
Zinc and other metala punched for all uses. 

Inventor and Manufacturer of the celebrated Slot Cut 
or burred and Slot Punched Screens. 

Mining Screens a specialty, from No. 1 to 15 (finej. 
Orders promptly attended to. 

San Francisco Pioneer Screen Works, 

SI & ZZ3 First St., San Francisco, Cal. 

JOHN W. QUICK, Proprietor. 



Tbls paper Is printed with Ink Manufac- 
tured by Charles Eneu Johnson & Co., 500 
South 10th St., Philadelphia. Branch OfiQ- 
ces— 47 Bose St., New York, and 40 La Salle 
St.. Ohicaso. Affent for the Pacific OoBst— 
Joaepb Hi Dorety. 630 Oommfrclal Sd s F* 



14 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 4, 1890 



n^Ai^KET Reports. 



Local Markets. 

San Francisco, Jan. a, 1890. 

The year 1889 closed on a close money market, 
and also on a dull market in all branches of trade. 
The close money market was due to heavy remit- 
tances to the East in October, November and the 
fore part of December, aggregating about $10,000,- 
000— real estate speculation— and toward the close 
of December to the paying of taxes and the calling 
in of money for the payment of dividends, interest, 
etc. The transfer last week to this city of about 
$1,500,000 from New York had a beneficial effect. 
It is the prevailing impression that before the end 
of January the money market in this city and the 
Slate at large will be very easy under free disburse- 
ments on interest and dividends, and the payments 
-by the State and different cities and counties from 
funds received from taxes. 

The Eastern money market has been very close, 
with high rates of interest reported. Leading East- 
ern exchanges report that the outlook is favorable 
for an easy market after the turn of the year, as the 
general disbursements will be heavier than for 
years. 

The local dividends for December compare as fol- 

'°*^ • 18S3. 1S89. 

B,jlt8 S63,u00 

Gas and water c mpanies 8126,350 69,600 

Insurance companies 6.000 },t 

Powder oompmies 27 OOO 2/ ,000 

Street railroad oompames 25,000 12,600 

Sugar companies 36,000 60,000 

MiDing companies 26,260 291,000 

Miscellaneous companies 31,250 35»260 

Totals S502,S60 S572,760 

MEXICAN DOLLARS— The market has ruled 
dull throughout the week at about 75K@7SK cts. 
The stock here is reported to be large.considering the 
nature of the demand. If China, as reported by 
cable, decides to coin silver, as is being favorably 
considered, the demand lor Mexican dollars will not 
be so large. 

SILVER— The market has ruled dull and heavy 
throughout the week. The fall in sterling exchange 
has been against the market. The prospects are of 
a most flattering character, based on the following : 
The English Government will increase the currency 
of that country by the reinstatement of the two and 
a half sovereign and the coining of more silver; more 
coining by France, silver coining by China, and an 
increase in the silver coinage of the other countries 
which either use silver exclusively or in conjunction 
with gold. It is now a foregone conclusion that at 
the present session of Congress there will be favor- 
able legislation on silver— either increasing the pur- 
chase lor monthly coinage to $4,000,000, with free 
coinage after the market price reaches par, or else a 
dom's-pTant"TK!s"'^f^n'"«5fe'=|*?e°i#=HI"'KS!"o-, 
Dec. 14th, which is briefly as follows : To open the 
mints of the United States to the free deposit of 
silver, the market value of the same {not to exceed 
$1 for 412.5 grains of standard silver) at the time of 
deposit to be paid in Treasury notes, said notes to 
be redeemable in the quantity of silver which could 
be purchased by the number of dollars expressed on 
the face of the notes at the time presented for pay- 
ment, or in gold, at the option of,the Government, 
and to be receivable for customs, taxes and all pub- 
lic dues; and when so received they may be reissued, 
and such notes, when held by any national banking 
association, shall be counted as part of its lawful 
reserve. 

The United States silver standard is 900, which 
is one-tenth less than the commercial basis of 1000 
fine. At $r an ounce of 900 fineness (Government 
standard), the price would be over $1.29 per ounce 
1000 fine. 

To-day (Thursday) silver is stronger and higher, 
being quoted here at 96 cents, with no sellers, and 
in London at 44j^d. 

QUICKSILVER-Receipts the past week ag- 
gregate 214 flasks. The market is quiet but steady. 

BORAX — Receipts the past week aggregate 564 
centals, and exports by sea 216 lbs. to Guaymas. 
The market is firm at full quotations. 

LIME— Receipts the past week aggregate 2535 
bbls., and exports by sea 400 bbls. to Honolulu, and 
200 bbls. to Guaymas. The market is dull but 
steady. 

LEAD— The market is reported steady, with the 
usual demand at this season of the year. The East 
reports a strong tone to the market. 

TIN — The spot market for both pig and plate is 
unchanged, but for shipment the feeling appears to 
be stronger. The slock of pig abroad is quite light. 
* COPPER— The past week 47,000 lbs. copper 
matte was shipped to Liverpool. The market is 
very strong for all grades. Mail advices received 
from New York report heavy sales of Lake at 14 J^ 
to 14K cts. per lb. for delivery in the fore part of 
1890. The consumption the world over is increas- 
ing, with France and Germany taking more freely 
than before. In France extensive works are being 
constructed to prepare sulphate of copperas, using 
over 10,000 tons of copper to turn out 40,000 tons 
of sulphate of copperas. As this goes into the 
ground for the destroying of phylloxera and other 
vine diseases, it sinks forever, not returning in the 
shape of old copper, etc. 

IRON— Imports the past week aggregate 200 
tons of pig from Liverpool. The local market is 
quiet but firm. Holders are firm in their views ow- 
ing to the strong market abroad. A Philadelphia 
exchange says: " Ten years ago the United States 
was making about 3,000.000 tons of pig iron per 
annum; now we are making 8,500,000 tons, with 
prospects of a still larger production during 1890. 
Ten years ago, when prices began to advance, we 
were flooded with foreign iron, equal to nearly one- 
third of the domestic supply, while old rails, scrap, 
etc., came in almost endless quantities from all 
quarters of the globe, to say nothing of finished 
iron, steel rails, and other material. Now with a 
greatly reduced tariff, we are importing practically 
nothing, while at times our iron-roasters have 



seriously considered the possibility of their being able 
to export iron." 

COAL— Imports the past week aggregate as fol- 
lows: From Seattle, 7645 tons; Tacoma, 4650; 
Nanaimo, 2200; Port Moody, 1450; Coos Bay, 450; 
New York, 101: Departure Bay, 6500; Liverpool, 
199; Cliffstone, 200; Black Diamond, 1000; total, 
24,39s tons. The market for spot is rather quiet, 
but some holders look for more activity soon, but 
while expecting a better demand, they do not look 
for any better prices, owing to the free stocks here 
and readily obtainable coast supplies. The rainy 
weather is against the free consumption of steam 
coals. For cargoes of Australian on passage and 
for shipment the market is quiet and reliable quota- 
tions, or, at least, ' ' bottom fact " quotations, are 
hard to get. 

Eastern Metal Markets. 

By Telegraph. 

New York, Jan. 2, 1890.— The following are 
the closing prices the past week: 
Silver in Silver in 





New York 


Copper. 


Lead. 


Tin. 


Thursday.... 43 


94} 


$14 25 


S3 90 


821 00 


Friday 433 


94} 


14 25 


IS* 




Saturday 433 


94} 


14 26 


S 90 




Monday 431 


94} 


14 30 


3 90 




Tuesday 44 


95 


14 20 






Wednesday.. .. 











New York. Dec. 31.— Quicksilver closed easier 
at 68c. Pig lead is sparingly used at $3.90. The 
copper trade is moderate; no weakness in prices. 
No pressure of offerings. Lake, i4@i4Kc; Mon- 
tana and Arizona, i3@i3J^c; Casting, lajic; Lon- 
don cables, strong; £49 17s 6d Merchant bars spot; 
y49 155 future^ 

San Francisco Metal Market. 

■WHOLHSALB. 

Thdbsday, January 2, 1890. 

Antimony— 25 @ — 

Borax— Refined, in carload lots 74@ 71 

Powdered " " " 7|@ 

Concentrated " " " 62® 

All grades jobbing at an advance. 

Copper— „,„«-, 

Bolt Sii 2? 

Sheathing 22 @ 24 

ingot, jobbing '7 @ '8 

do, wholesale 15 @ lb 

Fire Box Sheets 22 W 24 

Lead— Pig 4i@ 43 

Bar B @ — 

Sheet l§ ~ 

Pipe @ ~ 

Shot, discount 10% on 500 baga Drop, ¥ bag. 1 45 ® — 

Buck, ^bag H^ ® ~ 

Chilled, do ^ ?^ ^ ;::; 

Steel— English, lb 16 @ 20 

Canton tool 9@ ^ 

Black Diamond tool 9 @ .9 

Pick and Hammer 8 @ 10 

Machinery * @ ° 

Toe Calk H@ - 

TiNPLATE-B. v., steel grade, 14x20, P. S 5 50 (& — 

B. v., steel grade, 14s20, spot 4 95 @ 5 10 

Charcoal, 11x20 6 75 M 7 00 

do roofing, 14x20 5 dO W — 

do. do, 20x28 11 00 <i5 - 

Pigain.spot, ^ lb 23 @ 25 

CoKE-Eng., ton, spot, in blk 13 oO WI5 00 

Do, do, to load !•) 00 @ — 

Qdioksilver— By the flask. 47 50 @ — 

Flasks, new @ — 

>..?!a5^.^.!, I'A,,-,' -c. izz- • • • u.--^ :.*:; «.^?-® 

Iron— Ear, base 3 @ 

Norway, base 4i(^ 

Spot. "■- 

fRON- Glengarnock ton 35 00 @ 

Eglinton, ton 35 00 @ 

American Soft, No, 1, ton.. @35 00 

Oregon Pig. ton @35 00 

Puget Sound 35 00 @ 

Clay Lane White 028 00 

ShottB. No.l 35 00 Cd35 00 

Bar Iron (base price) # fti . . . — @ — 

Langloan 35 00 @ 

ThorncUffie 35 00 @ 

Gartsherrle 35 00 @ 



Lumber. — 

Pine, Fir and Spruce. 

RETAIL. 

Rough Pine, merchantable, 40 ft S20 00 

41 to 60 tt 21 00 

51 to 60 ft 23 00 

61 to 70 ft 27 00 

1x3, fencing 23 00 

1x4, *' 21 00 

1x3, 1x4 and 1x6, odd lentfthe 19 00 

Second quality 17 00 

Selected 24 00 

Clear, except for flooring 31 00 

Clear for flooring 2 00 

Clear V. Q. No. 1 flooring 6 00 

Firewood 14 00 

Dreaeed Pine, fioooring, No. 1, 1x6. . . 32 00 

No. 1,1x4 34 00 

No. 1, ljx4, 1^x6, and odd sizes 37 00 

All sizes. No. 2 27 00 

Stepping, No. 1 44 00 

Stepping, No. 2 34 00 

Ship timber and plank, rough 27 00 

Selected.planed 1 side, av'ge 40 ft. . 29 00 

« M 2 " " " " .. 31 00 

" " 3 " " " " .. 33 00 

» (t 4 .. .* .<u 35 00 

Deck plank, rough, average 35 ft 35 00 

Dressed, average 35 feet 40 00 

Pickets, rough, B. M 20 00 

ixli, 4 ft long, ^ M 6 50 

Coal. 



.TOBBIHG. 


S17 00 


18 00 


20 00 


21 00 


19 00 


18 00 


16 00 


16 00 


22 00 


28 00 


'io'66 


29 00 


30 00 


33 00 


24 00 


35 00 


26 00 


18 00 


24 00 


26 00 


28 00 


30 00 


32 00 


36 60 


16 00 


6 00 



Australian ... 7 50 @ 7 75 

Liverpool St'm 8 50 @ 

West Hartley. 8 50 @ 9 00 

Scotch Sylint. 9 00 @ 9 00 



I Per Ton. 

Cardiff 9 50@10 00 

Lehigh Lump.. 16 50@17 00 
Cumberland bk 16 00@16 60 
Egg, hard 15 50@16 00 



SPOT FROM YARD. 



Wellington % 

Scotch Splint 9 00 

Greta 9 UO 

Westminster Brymbo. 9 00 

Nanaimo 9 oO 

Sydney 8 00 

Oilman 7 



Seattle 7 00 

Coos Bay 6 00 

Cannel 12 00 

Egg, hard 18 00 

Cumberland, In sacks 19 00 
do, bulk 18 00 



Complimentary Samples. 

Persons reoeivlDg this paper marked are re- 
qaested to examine its contentB, term of sub- 
Boription, and give it their own patronage, and 
as far as practicable aid in oiroulating the 
journal, and making its valae more widely 
known to others, and extending its infiuenoe in 
the oauBe it faithfully serves. Subscription 
rate, $3 a year. Extra copies mailed for 10 
cents, if ordered soon enough. If already % 
rabsoriber, pleaae show the paper to others. 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 

Compiled bvery TnuasDAY prom Advertisbmbntb in thb Mining anl Scibntific Prkbb and other S. F. Journals 

ASSESSMENTS. 



COMPANT. Location. No. Am't. Levied. 

Adelaide Copper M Co Nevada.. 1.. 1--Dec 31. 

Belle lele M Co Nevada. .13. . 15. .Dec 4. 

BuUion M Co Nevada. .35. . 23. .Dec 4. 

BodieCoD M Co California.. 11.. 25.. Nov 11 

Booth GMCo California.. 4.. 2.. Nov IS. 

Camp Creek M & M Co CaUfornia.. 1.. 2. .Dec 30. 

Con Imperial M Co 26.. 5..Nov 22.. 

Con New York M Co Nevada.. 2... 15.. Dec 11. 

Calaveras Blue Gravel Co lOalifornia.. 4.. 3. .Nov 15. 

Exchequer M Co Nevada. .28.. 25.. Dec 16. 

Goldfu Giant M Co California ^..Dec 17. 



Oct 16 
30.. Nov 21.. 
30.. Dec 11.. 
50..No\ IB.. 
50. .Dec 27... 
25.. Dec 21, 



25. .Nov 18.. ..Dec 23. 



Gray Eagle M Co....... California,. 15.. 

Grand Prize M Co Nevada. .23. . 

Kentucfc M Co Nevada.. 20.. 

Livermore Coal M Co OaliforLia.. 1.. 

Mayflower Gravel M. Co. California.. 45.. 

Mexican M Co Nevada.. 39.. 

Mono GMCo CaUfornia.. 29.. 

North Occidental G & 8 M Co.. Nevada.. 1.. 7..D(.c 2. ...Jan 

National Water fit M Co California.. 2.. 5. .Dec 21.. ..Jan 28. 

OvermanSMCo Nevada. .61.. 25..Dtc 31. ...Feb 5., 

Palisade MOo Nevada.. 2.. 5.. Nov I.... Dec 26. 

Piatt itGil onG M Co CaUforna.. 4.. 3 00. .Nov 13.. ..Deo 20. 

RaaBellReduction&MCo... .California.. 5.. 5. .Nov 11., ..Dec 16., 

Savage M Co Nevada.. 74.. 60. .Nov 5 Dec 10. 

Summit GM Co California.. 11.. 5.. Nov 14.... Dee 20. 

Trinity Kiver Tunnel &; M Co. California.. 2.. 50.. Nov 27.... Jan 
TeirakofEMCo California, " 



Dblinq't. Sale. Seoretarv. Place of Business. 

-Jan 31.... Feb 28..WH Graves 426 Saasonie St 

..Jan 8.. ..Jan 30..J WPew 310 Pine Sfc 

.Jan 8....Jao 24..R R Graypon 327 tine St 

..Dec 17.... Jan 22.. E L Burling 309 Montgomery St 

..Dec 28.... Jan 20.. Geo R Spinney 310 Pi ue St 

..Feb 12....MarlO..ASFolger 213 Fremont 8b 

..Dee 27.... Jan 15.. CL McCoy 329 Pino St 

..Jan 15. ...Feb S.-CEEllott 309 Montgomny St 

.Dec 23 ..,Jan 14..BBurri8 240 Montgonery St 

Jan 21, ...Feb n..CEEmott 309 MontgomerylSt 

.Jan 23.... Feb 12..HTBrigga DownieviUe 

Nov 18. ...Jan 4. .J M Bufttngton 303 California St 

.Deo 24.... Jan 15.. RR GrayBon 329 Pine St 

Jan 14.... Feb 4.. J WPew 310 Pine St 

Dec 1?.... Jan 4..GCHiggin8 120 Sutter St 

Feb 3. ...Feb 26. .J Morizlo 328 Montgomery St 

.Jan 27.... Feb 18.. C E Elliott 309 Montgomery St 



Jau 24..BL Burling 309 IVlo tgomery St 

..Jan 27.. W H Wateon 302 Montgomery St 

..Feb 25. .P W Ames 51(i California 8t 

..Feb 26. .G D Edwarda 414 California St 

..Jan 3U..D Biick 309 Montgomery St 

,. Ja,n 6,.0 Herrmann 32tt Kearny St 

..Jan 8., J Morizio 328 Montgomery Sfc 

..Dee 30.. EB Holmee 309 Montgomery St 

..Jan 14.. BL Burling 309 Montgomery St 

..Jan 28..LH Bookman 28 California St 

..Feb J4..W J Garrett 308 Pine St 



L.Dec 14.... Jau 21. 
MEBTINOS TO BE HELD. 
Name of Company. Looatton, Seorhtab.t Offiok in 8. F. Meeting Date 

Bald IVIt Extension M Co California.. J W Orear DownieviUe Annual Jan 23 

lowaM Co Nevada.. C B Hfggins 2u8 California Annual Jau 14 

Plait & Gilson M Co California.. C Hermann 326 Kearny St Annual Jan 14 

Sierra Nevada M Co Nevada.. E L Parker 309 MontgomerylSt Annual Jan 15 

Rising Sun M Co California.. L Sloss, Jr 310 Saosome St Annual Jan 7 

Const Gothard T Wetzell 522 M.,ntgomery St Annual Jan 14 

Guaiucaran & Oaliforoia M Co E Oliver 22 Mint Ave Annual Jai: 8 

Bullion M Co Nevada. -RR Grayson 327 Pine So Annual Jan 9 

IjAtest dividends— within three months. 

LOOAXION. SBUEETAHT. OfFIOK IN S. F AMOnNT. PAVABLF 



Name of Company. 



10.. 



Champion M Co T Wetzel 622 Montgomery St.. 

Caledonia M C Nevada.. AS Cbeminant.... 328 Montgomery St ua.. 

Con California & Va M Co Nevada. .A W Havens 309 Montgomery St 50.. 

Derbec Blue Gravtl M Co California.. T WetzeL 522 Montfforaery St 70... 

Idaho M Co California Grass Valley 5 00. . 

Mt Diablo M Co Nevada.. K Heath. 319 Pine St 30.. 

Pacilie Borax Salt & Soda Co. ..California, .A H Clough 230 Montgomery St 1 00.. 



.Nov 25 
...Aug 5 
..Dec 10 
. Aug 25 
...Nov? 

..Oct 23 
,.NovlO 



Mining Share Market. 

The mining share market the past week was fairly 
active, with lively and attractive fluctuations in the 
Comstocks, affording those able to secure the turns 
a good daily profit. The activity at the close of the 
year was not looked for, as the prevailing opinion 
has been and still is that we are to witness a lower 
range of prices, so as to force all the outsiders that 
it is possible into selling, after which have a deal. 
It is claimed that in this month the low prices will 
come. Experience has taught the more successful 
operators in buying to pay cash for the stock and 
not to hold for "big things" before selling, and also 
pay no attention to points. In outside stocks trad- 
ing was light, noiwithstarding well^irculated bull 
points, chit fly in the Tuscaroras. It is claimed by 
some of the better informed that another line ol 
assessments is to be levied on the Quijotoas, Bodies 
and Tuscaroras, after which they will have a deal. 

There can be no doubt but many of the mine 
managers are destroying the lit'le confidence yet bad 
in the mines by the persistency with which they 
gradp the ore to lower a.^sav<; and aUo hv thpir nnt 
making puDiic more details regarding the assays and 
the work going on in the mines. As a case in inter- 
est we give the following reoort of the average assay 
value of 2009 tons of Con. Virginia ore which is on 
file at the company's office in this city: 

Gold. Silver. Total. 

Per Car samples $8,402 $20,443 $28,845 

" R. R. " 9,106 20,287 29,393 

" Battery" 8,169 15-536 23.705 

Yield in bullion per ton: Gold, $9674; silver, 
$12,336; total, $22,010. 

The above report is dated at Virginia City, Nev., 
May 30, 1885, and signed, W, H. Lowell, clerk 
Con. Cal. and Virginia Mining Co. The report, as 
given above, affords stockholders a large degree of 
satisfaction, much more than are those now made, 
although W. H. Lowell still makes them out. By 
the reports now rendered stockholders are not 
allowed the privilege to see the car sample assays, 
nor are they allowed to know what percentage the 
mill returns to the mines. The report given above 
shows that the then contractor (Senator John P. 
Jones) returned 76 per cent of the assay of ores at 
the mines. 

The reports of the Savage and Hale & Norcross 
mines do not return more than 70 per cent of the 
assays of ore at the mill, without saying anything 
about the loss in the assays of ore at the mines, 
which, if made public, would show a much larger 
shrinkage. Several of the other buUion-producing 
mines are managed in the same unsatisfactory man- 
ner. 

The Hale and Norcross bullion product in 1889 
was about $600,000, no dividends; where did the 
bullion go? Savage's bullion product was about 
$260,000, no dividends, but two assessments; Com- 
monwealth's $313,004, no dividend; Cbollar's, about 
$250,000, and $112,000 paid in assessment, but no 
dividends. Several of the other mines show equally 
as bid. Con. Virginia's bullion product was about 
$3,250,000 and dividends about $1,020,000. Mt. 
Diablo's product was over $400,000, and dividends 
about $50,000. The total bullion yield of the mines 
listed on the two exchanges in this city was in 
i88g about $6,250,000, dividends about $1,070,000, 
and assessments collected, about $2,750,000. The 
above is not the best of showing for outside stock- 
holders, for out of about $9,000,000, only about 
$1,070,000 were returned in dividends. 

The market opened this (Thursday) morning dull 
and slightly lower. After the regular call the Com- 
stocks strengthened, with an average advance of 
about 10 per cent recorded. 

Reliable news from the Comstock mines continues 
hard to get This is usually the case when stocks 
are being depressed so as to get them in as low as 
possible. Private information speaks, as heretofore, 
very encouragingly of the situation, and hopes are en- 
tertained of a new development soon. This devel- 
opment may be more in name than in real game, so, 
if possible, to peddle out slocks. Official letters re- 
ceived from the Gold Hill mines were only received 
this morning from Challenge, Con. Imperial and 
Crown Point, The information about the work in 
the mines is about the .same as given last week. 
Crown Point reports less ore sent to mill and the 
battery assays less. Letters from Hale and Nor- 
cross and Savage were not on file when the writer 
called. As private information from these mines 



has been at variance with the official letter, the lat- 
ter is not considered much. The work now going 
on in Union and Mexican, Ward shaft, Belcher, 
Seg. Belcher and Yellow Jacket deserves careful 
watching, as does that in Con, Virginia. 



Table of Lowest and Highest Sales In 
S. F. Stock Exchange. 



AJpba... 

Alta 

^dea 

Belcher 

BeBt & Belcher,... 

Bullion 

BodieOon 

Beoton 

Bulwer 

Commonwealth ... 
Oon. Va. &Oal.... 

OhallenK^ 

OhoUar 

uunnaence 

Oon. Imperial 

Caledonia 

Crown Point 

Crocker 

BureKaOon 

Exchequer 

Grand Prize 

Oould& Ourry 

Hale & Norcross.. 

JuUa 

Justice 

Kentuck 

Lady Wash 

Mono 

Mexican 

Navajo 

North BeUelflle..., 

Nev. Queen 

Occidental 

Ophlr 

Overman.. 

Potosi. 



1.05 
1.15 
45 
2.15 
2.10 



Peer.. 



a.B.&M 

Sierra Nevada. . 

Silver Hill 

Scorpion 

Union Oon 

mall 

Weldon 

7ellow Jacket.., 



Wkkk 
Ending 
Doc. IL 



25 
15 

1.65 



.56 
.60 

1.65 

2.1 

i!50 
.70 
.30 



2.60 
.25 
.90 
.75 
.76 

3.65 



15 
1.30 
1.01 
2.25 

35 



2.66 
,65 



Week 
Ending 
Dec. 18. 



.75 1.05 

1 10 1 " 

.30 

1.60 2.10 

2.25 2.6i 

.40 .41 

.60 .70 



.16 



1.06 
2 05 



3.10 
.25 
.35 

1.30 

2,30 
.30 

1.25 
.35 
.25 
.06 

2.20 



1.70 

.25 

3.20 



10 
1.40 



2.10 
.50 



1. 00 
.70 

3.60 
.70 

2.25 
.35 

i 

1.0,5 

2.15 

.30 



Week 
Ending 
Dsc. 25 



.80 

1.25 1.3U 

.40 .45 

1.85 2.15 

2.35 2.50 



.66 



3:00 
4 26 
1.10 
2.15 

.a 

.15 

1.50 
.26 

".25 
.35 
1.30 
2.30 
30 



30 
40 

2.20 
30 

1.10 



1.65 
1.16 



.16 
2.40 



2.25 2.461.76 2.201.70 2.551.95 2.20 



Week 
Ending 
Jan. 2. 



1 00 1.15 
1.3J 1.55 



2.25 
2 86 



2.S5 3.06 

4! Si 

1.30 1.55 

2.35 2.76 
. . OO t.-ia 

.33 .35 

.26 .... 

1.60 2.bO 

.26 .30 

"25 ".35 

.65 .... 

1.36 1.65 
2.50 2.85 

.30 .35 

1.26 l.tO 

.55 .60 

.35 .... 

.50 .... 

2.35 2.80 

i!66 iiio 

1.00 

70 .80 

3.30 3.90 

70 



1.90 

35 

10 

1 40 

1.10 



.20 



2.15 2.60 
65 .70 



Sales at San Francisco Stock Exchange. 



Thursday. Jan. 2. 9:30 a.m. d 50 

I'O Belcher 2.00 500 

150 Bodje 69c 350 

750 Bullion 3'c 100 

300 Obollar 2.40 3O0 

350 Commonwealth 3.10 300 

150 Crown Point ;..1.75; 300 

100 Gould SiCurrr 1.401 150 

400 JuUa 36c 100 

200 Mexican 2.45 150 

150 Mono 40c| 100 



Navaio 25c 

N. Commonwealth. . .80c 

Occident 70c 

Opnir 3 45 

Overman. 70c 

PotoBi 1.90 

Savage 1.60 

S. B. ilL 1.25 

Silver Hill 36o 

Union 2.25 

Weldon i.5c 



We beg to call the attentioD of oar readers to 
the Teohnloal Pablicatioae of Heary Cirey Baird 
& Co., Philadelphia, advertised each week in 
our advertising colnmna. This honse, one of 
the oldest pabliahing houses in the United 
States, having been established by Mathew 
Carey in 1785, has jast completed its 40 years 
of the specialty of the publication of books in 
indnstrial literature. Its catalogue of 86 pages, 
which will be sent free of postage to any one in 
any part of the world who will furnish his ad> 
dress to the publishers, now comprises books 
on nearly every existing art and industry, 

Suooessful Patent Solicitors. 

As Dewey & Co. have been in the patent soliciting bus!* 
0688 on this Coast now for eo many years, the firm's name 
Is a well-luiown one. Another reason for its popularity 
is that a great proportion of the Pacific Coast patenta 
iBBued by the Government have been procured through 
their agency. They are, therefore, well and thcroughly 
posted on the needs of the progressive industrial classes 
of this Coast. They are the best posted firm on what 
baa been done in all branches of industry, and are able 
to judge of what is new and patentable. In this they 
bave a great advantage, which is of practical dollar and 
cent value to their olients. That tliis is understood and 
appreciated. Is evidenced by the number of patents 
Issued through theh: SoiiDrn?io Prbss Patent Agency (S, 
F.) from week to week and year to year. 



Jan. 4, 1890] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



16 






^MM^ 



nipg <.« 





V S^{§R^:CIS^Q}jCMLi 



s-A.^VE3 nvi: <3 isj e; 



BY USING 



WATER POWER TRANSMITTED BY ELECTRICITY 

To Run your Mills, Hoists and Trams. 

For (Areolar giving particaUn Bend to 

KEITH ELECTRIC CO.. 



- MASCTACrUBKBS OP — 



Apparatus for Electric Light and Electric Power, 

OFFICE, 40 NEVADA BLOCK, 



Factory, Stevenson St., bet. Kret and Eeker. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



HORACE D. RANLETT, 

Ores, Mining, and Commission, 

420 MoDtffomery St., 8. F. 

Ships ander ftdTft.nc«9 to giQeltiDi,' worka in Boston, 
St-w York, B*ltimore uid Liverpool. 

TwcDty-one years' experience in Shipping Ores and 
MMMttging Mines. 

Solicits CooaagnmeDts oi Copper Prodace and Manage- 
ment of Min*n^ Uattere. 

All bosineaB conducted on Casti Baals. 

Par(^iase and Bhipment of Miniog Supplies A Spbcialtt. 

Sales of Derelopra Copper Mines aodertakeo. 

Bnsineaa Mana^r of UNION COPPER HISK, Copper- 
opoli8,CU.; NEWTON COPPER MLS'Z, Amador Co., Cat 



BUTTE, MONTANA, 

The railroad, mining and commercial center of the new 
State, offers some of the best indacements for invest- 
ments in 

Real Estate, Mines & Mining Stock 

of anv localitv in the Nortnwegt, For particulars address 
The" Evan's-Terry-ClBUSsen Brokeraee uo.. 
41 E. Broadway. Butte. Montana, 



Postmasters : 



art re«^iuesled to be sure and notify us 
I when this paner is not taken from 
their office. If not stopped promptly 
throogb oreraight or other mishap), do oa the faror to 



The Celebrated H. H. H Liniment. 




The H. H. H. Liniment ta for the treatment of 
he Aches and Pains of Humanity, as well aa for the ail- 
ments of the beasts of the fields. Testimonials from 
importers Emd breeders of blooded stock prove Its won- 
derful curative properties. No man haa ever used It for 
an ache or pain and beeo dissatisfied. 
H. H. MOORE & SONS, Stockton, Cal., Proprietors. 
For Salb bt all DaneemTS. 



Dewey Engraving com- 
p%nv. No. 39n Uarket atreet. Ran IiVandsco. 



FRISBE E WE T MILL. 

This Mill, with a weight of less than 9000 pounds, 

has a capacity of three tons per hour of hard 

quartz to 40 mesh ; has been thoroughly 

tested ; we guarantee its work as 

represented, and we will give 

long time trial. 

r 




IT HAS NO MORE WEARING PARTS THAN CORNISH ROLLS 

And renewals wIU not cost over one-half as tnnch as for &tamp>8. Will mn empty, or with small 
amount of ore witboat injury. The attention of parties having Cement Gravel is called to this 
Mill, as it will run 100 tons per day to No. 8 meah; 30 to 35 H. P. 

OUK DRY MTTJiS are the most economical ever built, and are extensively need with 
record of several years. No grinding in Dans. Mill finishes to any fineness desired. 

FRISBEE-LUCOP MILL COMPANY. 

GIDEON FRISBEE, Manager, - - 59 & 61 First Street, San Francisco 
HOOKER & UWRENCE. Gen'l Aa'tt. 145 Broadwav. New York. 



SAN FRANCISCO TOOL CO, 

MANUFAOTUBEES OF 

IRRIGATING PUMPS 

AND 

Machinery of all Kinds. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

BABOOOK & WILOOX 

Patent Water Tube Steam Boilers. 




EBtimateg Furnished on Application. 



' Send for Oatalosues. 



OENTBIFUQAI. PUMP. 



FIRST and STEVENSON STS.. S. F. 




IMPORTANT TO GOLD MINERS! 

SILVER-PLATED AMALGAM PLATES for SAVING GOLD 

QUARTZ, 



IN 



GRAVEL AND PLACER MINING. 
PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. 

Only Kefined Silver and Best Copper nsed. Over 3000 Orders filled. Fifteen Medals Awarded. Old Mining Plates can be 

Eeplated. Old Plates Bought, or Gold Separated. 

These Plates can also be pnrcbased ol JOHN TATI.OB & CO.. Corner First and Mission Sts. 

San Francisco Gold, Silver and Nickel Plating Works, 653 & 655 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal., E. G. Denniston, Prop'r. 

Our Plates have been used for 20 yeara They have proved the beet. We adhere strictly to contract In welarht of Silver and 
CoDOer. SBND P >B OIBOObAB. 




.A.. HTJ3Xr"n3NrC3rT?'0 3xr, 



■ MANUFACTUEBR OF ■ 



LLS, 



CENTRIFUGAL ROLLER QUARTZ 

Concentrators and Ore Crushers, 
Mining Machinery of Every Description. Steam Engines and Shingle Machines. 

SEND FOR CmOUljAR. 



Centrlingal Roller Qnartz Mill. 



213 Fxzis'X' snrzixiziTr, 



S.A.3Nr I«3?l.^L.3NrOISCO, C&JI^. 



16 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 4, 1890 



Rose's MecM'!^! Drawing Selfrtauglit. 

FOURTH EDITION, 
Thoraughly Revised and Corrected. 

JTJST liE^^ZD^sr! 

mcclianival l>ia«iOB Seir-T.-»oKlil: roinpris- 
inR Instructions in the Sclect'oo and Preparation of Drawing 
luBtrumenla, Elementary Instinction in Practical Mccliiin- 
ical Draiving: together with examples in Simple geometry 
and Elementary Mechanism, including Screw Tlireads, Gear 
■Wheels. Mechanical Motions, Eogiues and Hollers. Ky 
Joshua Rose, M. E. Illustrated by 330 engravings. Pourth 
edition tboroughly revised and corrected. 8vo. Price, S-1.0» 

BY THE SAME AUTHOR: 

Modern Steam EnelnoK. An Elementary treatise 
uijon the St-am Entine. written in plaiu language, for use 
in the work hop as well as iu the drawing office; giving full 
explanations of the consruction of ftloderu yteam Engines. 
iocUidiug diagrams sliowiug their actual operatiou; together 
with comple'e but simple Cfplauations of the operations of 
various icinds of valvt-s valve motio: s, link motions, etf... 
therehy enabling the ordinnry engineer to clearly imderstaud 
the principles involved iu their construction and use, and (o 
plot out their mnvpraents upon the drawing board. By 
.Joshua Ro'e, M. E. lUuBtrated by 422 engravmgs. I" one 
volume, auarto, 321 pages. Price Sto.wu 

The Complete rmctical MaehiniRt. Em- 
bracin''LatheW..rk. Vi.se Woik. Drills and DrilUug. Tap-' 
and Dies, Hardening nnd Tempering, the Making and Use 
oi Toola Tool Grinding, Marking out Work, etc By Joshua 
Rose M E Illustrated by 356 engravings. Fifteenth edi- 
ti.m thoroughly revised and in great pait rewritten. JSino. 

439 pages. Price S_.->0 

TUe Slide Vnlve Practically Kxplained. 
Empracing Simple and Complete PractioHl Demon trations 
of the Operation of each element in a Slide Valve IVIove- 
meut. By Joshua Rose. M. E. niustratedby35eogr^/ings. 

12mo. Price Sl.OO 

Steam Boilers. A Practical Treatise on Boiler Con* 
atruction and Examination. For the use of Practical Boiler 
Makers, Boiler Users and Inspectors; and embracing in 
plaiu figures all the calculations necessary in Designing aua 
Cla,ssilyiugSttam Boilers. By Joshua Rose, M. E. Illus- 
trated by 73 engravings, Svo. 250 pages. Price 9-^.oit 

t^IUvstratedCircu'ar>,;ri'vinft the full table of con- 
tents of all the above workst sent free to antj one who 
wiil apply. 

wM'The above or any of our Books sent by vmil, free nf 
pos*a4fCt at the publication prices, to any address in th-t 
world. 

^■Our new revised. Descriptive Catalogue of Practical 
and Scientific Books. SO pagtis, Svo, and our Catalogue of 
Books on Steam and the Meam :Engine, Hcchamca, Ma- 
chincrif, and Dipiamical Enqineeiinqy and other Cnta- 
logucsi the whole covering every branch of Science applied 
tothe Arts, scntfrce and frc>'- of postage to any otie in 
any part of the world mho wilt furnish htsaddr sx. 

HENRY CAREY BAIRD & CO., 

iNDirSTRlAL PdBLISHERS, B lORSBLLBRS AND IMPORTKRH, 

810 Walnut St., Philadelpliia. Pa., €. S. A. 

RDUt FIRTH, 

225 and 227 First St,, San Francisco, Cal. 

Compressed Air and Water Power 
Machinery. 




KNIGHT'S WATER WHEEL, 

For Mills, Pumping and Hoisting. 

OVBB 300 IN DSE. 
All estimates s:iiaranteed. Seud for Circalar. 



STEARNS M'F'G CO., 

29 & 31 Spear St,, San Francisco, Cal. 



J II 111 II 



-MANDPACTURKRfl OF- 



HIGH-GRADE SAW MILL MACHINERY, 
ENGINES, STEEL BOILERS, Etc. 



— IMPOKTBRS OF— 



Munson's Loather Belting, Goodell & Watera' Woodwork- 
ing Tools, Hill's Clutch PuUeys and Couplinpe, Emerson's 
Savre, Emerj' Wheels, Tool and Knife Grinders, Ewart's 
Link Belting, L. & D. Wood Pulleys, Hoisting and Pile 
Driving EnKJaes, Etc 

SPENGERIAN 
TEEL PENS 

Are the Best , 

IN THE ESSENTIAI, QUjIMTIES OF 

Durability, Evenness of 
Point, and Workmanship. 

S.irarles fnr trial of 12 different styles by mnil. on 
recviptof 10 cents iu staiiips. Ask lor card 2^o. 8. 

iVlSOM, BUKEMiN & CO., '«S«^™A*rr^' 



.MANUFACTURKaS OP.. 



PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO., 

t 







UP TO 20,000 LBS. WEIGHT. 

True to pattern and superior In strength, toughneBS and durability to Oast or WrouBbt 
Iron lU'any position or for any service. 

GEARINGS, SHOES, DIES, CAMS, TAPPETS, PISTON-HEADS, RAILROAD and MA- 
CHINERY CASTINGS of Every Description. 



HOMOGENEOUS STEEL. 



SOFT and DUCTILE, 



SUPERIOR TO IRON FOR 



LOCOMOTiVE AND MARINE FORGINGS. 

ALSO Steel Rods, from J to 3 inch diameter and Flats trom 1 to 8 Inch. Angles, Tees, Channels and other abape 
Steel Wagon, Buggj', and Truck Tires, Plow Steel; Machinery and Special Shape Steel to size and lengths 
STEEL RAILS from 12 to 45 pounds per yard. ALSO, Railroad and Merchant Iron, Rolled 
Beams Angle, Channel, and T iron, Bridge and Machine Bolts, Lag Screws, Nuts, Washers, Ship and Boat 
Spikes; Steamboat Shafts, Cranks, Pistons, Connecting Rods, etc Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, 
i*nd Iron Forglngs of all kinds, Iron and Steel Bridge and Roof Work a Specialty. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR SCRAP IRON AND STEEL. 

tS" Orders will have prompt attention. Send for Catalogues. Address 

PACIFIC ROLLING MTLI CO., 202 Market St.. San Francisco. 



FULTON IRON WORKS, 

HINCKLEY, SPIERS & HAYES, Proprietors. 

[ESTABLISHED IN 1855.] 

— MANTTFACTURKRfl OP — 

MARINE ENGINES AND BOILERS.- 

Propeller Engines, either High Pressure or Compound, 
Stern or Side-wheel Engines. 

MINING MACHINERY.— Hoisting Engines and 
Works, Ct^es, Ore Buckets, Ore Cars, Pumping Encines 
and Pumps, Water Buckets, Pump Columns, Air Com- 
pressors, Air Receivers, Air Pipes. 

MILL. MACHINERY.— Batteries for Dry or Wet 
Crushing, Amalgamating Pans, Settlers, Farnaces, Re- 
torts, Concentrators, Ore Feeders, Rock Breakers, Fur- 
naces for Reducing Ores, Water Jackets, etc 

MISCELLANEOUS MACHINERY.— Flour 
Mill Machinery, Saw Mill Engines and Boilers, Dredging 
Machinery, Powder Mill Machinery, Water Wheels. 

Tustiu's Pulverizer 




TUSTIN'S PDLVBBIZBB. 



WORKS ORE WET OR DRY. 



ENGINESsBOILERS 

OP ALL KINDS, 

Either for use on Steamboats or for use on Land. 

Water Pipe, Pmnp or Air Colnnms, Fish 

Tanks for Salmon Canneries 

OF BVBRT DBaORIPTION. 

Boiler Repairs Promptly attended to and at y«ry moaerate rates. 

AQKNTS FOR Tint PACIFIC COABT FOR THB 

SPECIALTIES : 

CorllBS Engines and Tustln Ore Pnlverlzera. DBANB STEAM PUMP. 

Agents and Manufacturers of the Llewellyn Peed Water Purifier and Heater. 




THE GIANT POWDER COMPANY 

Manulaobire Three Kinda of Powder, which are acknowledged by all the Great Chemists of the World as ' 

The Safest and Strongest High Explosives in the Market. 

Of Different Strengths as Required. 

NOBEL'S EXPLOSIVE GELATINE," which contains 94 per cent of Nltro-GIycerlne, and 

OELATINE-DTN AMITE, Stronger than Dynamite and even Safer in Handling. 

JUDSON POWDER IMPROVED. 

rOR BAIXBOADS AND LAND CLEARING. Is from three to four times stronger than ordinary Blast- 
ing Powder, and is used by all the Railroads and Gravel Claims, as it breaks more ground, pulverizes better and 
saves time and money. It is as dry as the ordinary Blasting Powder and runs tis freely. 

BAXDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., 



OAFS and FUSE for Sale 



GENERAL AGENTS, «AN FRANCISCO CAL. 





QUARTZ SCREENS 



specialty. Round, slot 
or burred slot holes. Gen- 
uine Russia Iron, Homo- 
geneous Steel, Cast Steel or 
American planished Iron. 
Zinc, Copper or Brass Screens for all purposes. Call- 
fomia Perforating Screen Co., 145 & 147 Beale St., S. F. 




COAL MINES OF THE WESTERN COAST. 

A few copies of this work, the only one ever published 
treating of Pacific Coast Coal Mining, have been ob- 
tained, and are for sale at this office for S2.50 per copy. 
It was written by W. A. Goodyear. Mining and CiWl 
Engineer, formerly of the California State Geological 
Survey. 



N. W. SPAULDING 

Manufacturers of 
SPAULDINQ'S 

Inserted Tootli 

AND 

CHISEL BIT 

CIRCULAR 

Saws. 

SAW MILLS AND MACHINEEY 

Of all kinds made to order. Send for Descriptive Cata 
losne. 11 and 19 Fremont St., San Frandsoa. 




lro|i apd fAactiiiie tforl(3. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

8AOBAMENTO. OAL. 

ROOT, NBILSON & OO., 

UAMXTFACrnRBaB OF 

Steam Engines, Boilers, 

ADD ALL KINDS OF 

MACHINERY FOR MINING PURPOSES. 

fi'lourlng Mills, Saw Mills and Quartz Mills Uachlnery 
constructed, fitted up and repaired. 

Front St., bet. N & O Sta., Sacramento, Oal, 



CALIFORNIA MACHINE WORKS, 
WM. H. BIRCH & CO., 

ENGINEERS AND IfflACHINISTS, 



No. 119 Beale St.. 



San Francisco. 



BDILDBRB OF 

Steam Engines, Saw Mills, Mining Machinery, Dredging 
Machines, Rock Crushers, Cable Railway Machinery, 
Ellithorp Air Brake Co, 's Patent Steam and Hydraulic 
Elevators, Air Cushions and Air Brakes. HO'SITIVE 
SAFKTIES. Improved Ram Elevators, Sidewalk and 
Hand Hoists. B. B. Henrickson's Patent Automatic 
Safety Catches. 

Machines of all kinds Made and Repaired. 
Orders Solicited. 



Golden State & Miners Iron Works. 

Uonafactnre Iron Oastln^s and Maclilnery 
of all KlndB at Greatly Reduced Bates. 

STEVENSON'S PATENT 

Mold-Board AMALOAMATORS, 
Golden State Pressure Blowers. 

nrBL St.. between Howard jt Folaom, S. F, 



rSOUAS THOMPSON 



rHORNTON THOMPSON 



THOMPSON BROTHERS. 

EUREKA FOUNDRY, 

L29 and 131 Beale St., hetween Mission and Howard, S.F 

lUmiFAOTURHRa OF OAfiTINQS OF BVSET DBSORIPTIDH. 



Mining Engineers. 



CIVIL AND MINING ENGINEER 

Of long experieoce, practical and adminii-trative, io 
Copper, Silver and Qold Mining in Europe and Anerica, 
offers sorvices a** Manager or Superintendent, or to search 
t(.r and report on Mines. Now in Mexico. Several Lan- 
guages, Address C. P., Box 2617, San Francisco, Cal, 



W. A. GOODYEAR, 

Civil and Mining Engineer, 

MmiNQ EXPERT AMD GEOLOGIST. 

BusLiess Box A," office of this paper, San 



Address 
Francisco, 



ROSS E BROWNE, 

Mining and Hydraulic Gngrineer, 



No. 307 Sajisomb St., San Framoisoo. 



ISRAEL W. KNOX, 
Mining and Mechanical Engineer 

AND PUROHABISG AQBNT POR 

Mines, Mining Machinery & Supplies. 

Mines Examined, Reports and Estimates Furnished^ 

Contracts made, eta 
Office, 237 First St., San Francisco, Oal. 



O. H. EVANS & GO. 

(Successors to THOMSON &. EVANS), 

110 and 112 Beale Street* S. 

MACHINE WORKS, 
Steam Pumps, Steam Engines 




Practical Treatise on Hydraulic Mining, 

Br AUG. J. BOWTE, Jr. 

Ttiis new and important book is on the use anr* con- 
struction of Ditches, Flumes, Dams, Pipes, Flow of Water 
on Heavy Grades, methods of mining shallow and deep 
placers, history and development of mines, records of 
gold washing, mechanical appliances, such as nozzles, 
hurdy-gurdys, rockers, undercurrents, etc; also describes 
methods of" blasting; tunnels and sluices; tailings and 
dump; duty of miners' inch, etc A very practical work 
tor gold miners and users of water. Price, $5, post-paid 
For sale by Dbwht & Co., Publishers, 290 Market St., San 
Francisco. 



Jan. 4, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



It 



UNION IRON WORKS, 



Corner First and Mission Sts,, San Francisco, Cal. 

MANUFACTURERS OP 



SPECIALTIES: 

Scott Jt O'NvIl Automatic Cut-uff Koglueii, Itio Kti;liieK, Kuub 
ISreakerd, Ouartx Allll«, Hultitln^ Kn^lues. 



MINING AND MILLING MACHINERY, 

ROLLS AND CONCENTRATING MACHINERY. Cornish and Other 



COPPER AND LEAD FURNACES. 



^ "Sr I> n. -A. TJ Ij I C3 Ij I ^E* T X>OC!X£, 

Capable uf Docking the Largest VeHgelH. 
SEND FOR CIBCDL&RS. CABLE ADDRESS "UNION. 



ALL CLASSES OF MARINE WORK. 



WM. H. TAYLOR, President. 



R. S. MOORE, Superintendent. 



Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works, 

S. E. CORNER HOWtRD AND BEALE STS.. SAN FRANCISCO. 



MANDPACTDRBRS OF ALL KINDS OP 



Mining and Milling Machinery, Engines and Boilers, 

SHEET-IRON WATER PIPE for Mining and Irrigation Purposes. 
Exclusive Agents for the Pacific Coaet of HEINE PATENT SAFETY BOILER and MACBETH STEEL PULLEY. 



AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIO COAST OF 



BRYAN'S R OLLER QU ARTZ ]VEILL. 

NEW COMMON SENSE STEEL WH 

AN Complete for $150. 




M. 




-BtnLDERS OF- 



MINING MACHINERY, 

GENERAL OFFICE AND WORKS : 

1 27 First St., San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 

New Xork Office, 145 Broadway. 

PLANTS FOR GOLD AND SILVER SIILLS, 

embiacinK machinery ot LATEST DESIGN and 
MOST IMPROVED conetructiOD. We offer our 
ouBtomcra the BEST RESULTS OF 38 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE in this SPECIAL LINE o( 
worlt, and are PREPARED to furnieb the MOST 
APPROVED character of MINING AND RE- 
DUCTION MACHINERY, adapted to all grades of 
ores and SUPERIOR to that of any other make, at 
the LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES. 

Wo are alsn prepared to CONSTRUCT and DE- 
LIVER In COMPLETE RUNNING ORDER, 
In any locality. MILLS, CONCENTRATION 
WORKS, WATER .lACKET SMELTING 
FURNACES. HOISTING WORKS, PUMP- 
ING MACHINERY, ETC., ETC., of any DE- 
SIRED CAPACITY. 



No cog-wheels or clotcheB to break. Ninety per cent of this Whim is wrought iron and steel, and will spring or bend before brealcing, and besides 
can be repaired at any blacksmith shop, should breakage occur, thus obviating the necessity of sending away hundreds of miles sometimes, and waiting 
a week for repairs. The Brake sets itself when the horse stops or anything gives way. 

It can be packed anywhere a jack can go, the heaviest piece weighing but 100 pounds; total 
weight, 650 pounds. The sweep can be thrown out or in gear at any time, and the bucket hoisted, 
dumped or lowered while the horse is in motion. It is just as safe and reliable as an engine, and 
can be handled as readily, and is just the thing to open up a mine and make it pay. Spending 
thousands of dollars in fine machinery and shaft houses has "busted" many a company. Bay a 
COMMON SEN3E WHIM, and when you have got more ore than our Whim will hoist, then it is 

InmA .«. '-—7- rt--. *• ^ ' * ^'- —.l. w— 'V. j-\f^ vu^"wn.«ao \/I .. OTO. I o ^f l^^UU F miUO BbOUld UOt 

pay. Being all iron except the sweep, it will not rot, warp, twist, or get out of true. Being 
wrought iron, it will not break in transportation. We also m ke Two, Four and Eight Horse 
Power Whims, Derrick Whims, and Buildiug Hoists, Ore Buckets, and everything pertaining to 
Horse Power Hoisting. State for what purpose, and at what place you want to use it. 
4^ Come and see one at our works in operation, or send for circular. 

THE GATES CRUSHER 

Is beyond all question the most important improvement 
that has ever been made in this class of mining; ma- 
chinery. It will do more than twice the work with a 
given amount of wear than any other Crusher made, 
besides crushing so much finer that for mining uses, the 
capacity of the mill is greatly increased. It has the same 
relative superiority for macadamizing purposes, afford- 
ing the cheapest and most reliable machine for this use. 

SEND FOR CIRCULAE, 



PACIFIC IRON WORKS 



NO. 127 FIRST STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 




NOTICE TO GOLD MINERS! 






JUSTINIAN CAIRE. Agent. 

521 & 523 Market St., San Francisco, 



— DBALBR IN— 



f&jAJVXTSTGr C3rOIjX>: 



Assayers' aDd Mining Material. 



— MANUFACTUREE OF — 



IN QUARTZ. GRAVEL, OB PLACER MINES. MADE OF BEST SOFT LAKF UPERIOR COPPER 

Our plates are guaranteed, and by actual experience are proved, the besj in weight of Sil- BATTERY SCREENS AND WIRE CLOTH 

ver and durability. Old Mining Plates Replated, Bjught, or Gold Separated. THOUSAMDS 

OF ORDERS FILLED. . . , TinoirTWo' 

SAN FRANCISCO NOVELTY, GOLD, SILVER AND NICKEL PLATING WORKS, ^^^^ *" HOSKINS 

108 and 1 12 First St., San Francisco, Cal. HYDRO-CARBON ASSAY niRNACES 

US' SEND FOR CIRCULARS. 



18 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 4, 1890 



IMPROVED BELT FRUE ORE CONCENTRATOR. 



The Best Ore Concentrator in the market, having double 
the Capacity and doing its work as olose as the plain Belt 
machine, while its concentrations are clean. It is need in 
a number of Mills, the most notable of which is the 
Alaska M. & M. Go's Mill, where 24 Improved Belt Prues 
are taking the Pulp from 120 Stamps, crushing 350 tons 
per day, and is giving entire satisfaction as against 48 
plain Belt Machines, taking the Pulp from the other 120 
Stamps. 

♦ 

Price of Improved Belt Frue Vanner, $900, f. o. b. 
Price of Plain Belt Frue Vanner, $575, f. o. b. 



For Pamphlets, Testimonials and farther information 
apply at office. 




Protected by Patents December 22, 1874; September 2, 
1879; April 27» 1880; March 22, 1881; February 20, 1883; 
September 18, 1883; July 24, 1888. Patents applied for. 



There are Over 2200 Plain Belt Machines now 
in Use. 

Thb Montana Company (Limited), London, October 8, 1885. 
Dbak Sirs :— Having tested three of your Frue Vanners in a com- 
petitive trial with other similar machines (Triumph), we have satiafied 
ourselves of the superiority of your Vannera, as is evidenced by the 
fact of our having ordered 20 more of your machincB for immediate 
delivery. Toiirs truly, THE MONTANA COMPANY (Limited). 

N. B.— Since the above was written the 20 Vannera, havinR been 
started, gave such satisfaction that 44 additional Frues and more 
stamps have been purchased. ADAMS & CARTER. 



ADAMS & CARTER, Agents FRUE VANNING IVIAC?*"'-''^^.,. ;, Room 15, No. 132 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS, 



aNCOBPOEATBD SEPTEMBER 29. 188a) 



Nos. 39 to 51 Fremont Street, 



San Francisco, OaL 



lamifacturers of NEW and Dealers in SECOND-HAND BOILERS, ENGINES, PUMPS and MACHINERY 



Steam Pumps of all Makes, 

CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS, 

MINING PUMPS. 

BLOWERS AND EXHAUST FANS. 

LEATHER and RUBBER 

lOES Xj a? I nxr o- 

atotionary, Pi^rtablo, and Hoieting 

ENGINES and BOILERS. 

Shafting, 

Pulleys, 

Boxes, 
Hangers. 



LUBRICATING COMPOUNDS and OILS of the Best Makes. 
PIPE and PIPE FITTINGS. 

Brass Goods_and Fittings. 

Hydraulic Mining, Quartz, and Saw-Mill Machinery, Hydraulic Gravel 

Elevators, Hydraulic Giants, "Triumph" Ore Concentrators, 

Automatic Ore Feeders. 

WOODWORKING 

MACHINERY 

— ^XJMPRISINQ 

Band Saws, Stickers. 

Planers, Shapers, 
SHINGLE MILLS. Etc. 




COMPOUMl DUPLEX PUMP. 



IMPROVED SINGLE AND DOUBLE CIRCULAR SAW-MILLS. 

AGENTS FOB THE SALE OP 

" Eclipse" Corliss Engines, Porter Manufacturing Go's Engines and Boilers, " Baker" Rotary Pressure Blowers, "Wilbraham" Rotary Piston 
Pumps, " Hazleton" Tripod B ilers ," Jewell " Water Purifiers, Buffalo Duplex Steam Pumps, P. Blaisdell& Co.'s Machinists' Tools. 



CALIFORNIA WIRE WORKS 



-MANUFACTUKEBS OF- 



Steel Wire Rope, 



OF ALL KINDS FOB 



CABLE RAILWAYS, ROPEWAYS, A A^'tn-I | 
AND TRAMWAYS, 



-/^"S? 






Mining, Shipping and General Purposes. 

BAKBED WIRE. 

WIRE NAILS, 

WIRE CLOTH. 



OFFICE; & J* jreTvi out Stireet. 

Send for Illustrated Catalo^e, 




TRANSPORTATION OF ORB Br 



Hctlliciio's I=»a,tent ^Wiro nop>o^7V'cty. 



CLAHON 

AIR COMPRESSORS 

For Working 
Rock Drills, Coal Cutters, 
Hoisting Engines and Water 
Pumps in Mines and Tunnels, 
Sinking Caissons, Etc., Etc. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE No. 6~ 

Clayton Air Compressor Works, 

43 DEY ST., NEW YORK. 




Great Variety of SHOT GUHS, RIFLES, 

etc. Breech-Loaders from $4 to $100. 
SEND STAMPS FOB PRICE LISTS. 

GEO. W. SHREVE, 

525 Kearny Street, San Francisco, CaL 




An lllixsfrn 



VOL. LX.— Number 2. 
DEWEY & CO., PuQUSHERS. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, 1890. 



Ttiree Dollars per Annum. 

Singlo Copies, 10 Cta. 




THE NEW BUILDING FOR THE CHEMICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. 




Market-Place Scene in Nicaragua. 

la the published Report of the U, S. ^ioara- 
gaa survey log party, by A.G. Menocal, U. S. N., 
are a number of oharacterlstio pictures of the 
country and cities of that regiou, one of which, 
the market-place at Leon, is herewith given. 
It is a type of the market-places of many Cen- 
tral American and Mexican towns, where there 
are open booths for the sale of all sorts of 
articles. In some there is no roof around the 
sides of the plaza, as is here shown, but awn- 
ings are spread over the booths, which are only 
temporary affairs, set up on market days, two 
or three times a week. We used to have these 
plazas in California years ago, but we have 
dropped the Spanish word, and now have the 
commonplace "cquare" in its stead. 



SCENE IN THE MARKET PLAGE OF LEON. 



The Chemical Laboratory Building. 

An Ad dltlon to the University of California. 

The Chemical Department of the Uolversity 
of California has soffered for lack of accommo- 
dations for some time, but a legislative appro- 
priation of $70,000 for a special building has 
remedied this, and ground has been broken and 
foundations laid for the struoture. The new 
building, an engraving of which is shown on 
this page, is located south from the Mechan- 
ics' Art building, and it is expected will be 
oompleted this year. 

Basigns were drawn and plans made and the 
regents selected the design and plans as made 
by Mr. Clinton Diy, the well-known architect 
of Berkeley. It is a radical and welcome de- 
parture from the commonplace forms of the 
structures already built, and will be a decided 
ornament to the Univeraity grounds. 

The building will be of stone, brick and terra- 
cotta, and of the Victorian-Gothic style of 
architecture. It will be about ISO feet square, 
one story in front facing west, and two stories 
in hight on the side facing south. 
{Continued on page S9 ) 



20 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 11, 1890 



(7iO!^[^ESPOJMDEJ\'CE. 



We admit, unindorBed, opinions of correspondents. — fiDS. 



Californians in Austria and Germany. 

Editors Press:— We left Venice Saturday, 
10th, 9:15 A. M., without any regrets, and I 
would not put myaelf out much to make it the 
second vieit. Here, and the first place that I 
have seen on this tour, " distance lends en- 
chantment to the view," 

The artists of Venice get up some beautiful 
picturcB, tinted with all the colors of the rain- 
bow and set off with an Italian sky. Perhaps 
it would not look well for me to say all I think 
about Venice. I do not know that I have any 
complaint of the people. Let others go and see 
for themaelves. We retraced our steps as far 
as Verona, through level and well-cultivated 
fields. Here we go to the north up through a 
rough, rocky canyon, with very high, barren 
rocky mountains — only now and then a small 
piece of land worth tilling. 

We Arrived at Borzen 

About 6 P. M, and put up at the Hotel Kaiser- 
krone. It is a little city of 12.000, nestled be- 
tween two or more high mountains. After 
gently disposing of one of the best dinners 
we have had since we left Paris (we are in the 
Kiessling wine district, so I thought I had bet- 
ter prepare myself to pass on the imitations of 
some of my friends when I returned). We 
took a walk through some of the crooked 
streets and arcades, preparatory to pleasant 
dreams. 

I presume I have stated heretofore that we 
are traveling on Gaze & Sons' R. E. and hotel 
coupon tickets. Our route from Paris around 
to London is traced on a map by a blue pencil, 
and tickets are printed with each place where 
we desire to stop, and conpon torn off as we 
proceed. We bought hotel tickets for 15 days 
each. One coupon for bed-chamber, one for 
dinner and one [for tea. We usually do, and 
always should, tell as soon as we arrive at hotel 
that we have these tickets, and they assign 
rooms accordingly. We neglected to do so this 
time, and businesa being a little dull with 
them, they assigned us the best rooms in the 
house, which we felt very comfortable in. 
When we made it known that we had Gaze's 
tickets, they said these rooms did not go with 
those tickets. They showed na others, higher 
— not in price, but altitude. We declined, and 
stated as our coupons were getting short, we 
would pay them cash and retain the rooms. 
We requested them to make bills in francs, as 
we had that money, not Austrian, Every- 
thing was pleasant about the hotel except set- 
tling the bill — not on account of excessive 
charges, but currency. They made their bills 
in florins, and it seemed impossible for them to 
reduce the amount to francs, when French, 
Italians and Swiss are passing here every day 
and must have more or less intercourse with 
them. Finally they computed each florin 
equal to two francs, and we paid the bills and 
took our change in some paper and some silver. 

In the squabble to pay our bills, the ladies 
disappeared. After looking for them for 
awhile, some one mustered enough English to 
say gone. He went below and found that they 
had run them and the luggage down to the 
train. All the Jehu knew was to wield the 
whip and reins, and the moment he got a load, 
away he put for the station. When we arrived, 
the ladies were peering out of the station with 
anxious looks. 

We started for Munich, via Insbruck, in a 
rain, which very much disappointed us, as we 
expected to see the high, lofty mountains on 
the trip. The clouds came so low down in the 
mountains that frequently we could not see 
more than half-way to their tops. We could 
see the troubled river Adige hundreds of feet 
below us, looking more like dirty milk than 
water. We went through tunnels, over 
bridges and along the side of precipices to our 
hearts' content. I do not think any one of 
them was quite equal to Oape Horn, but there 
were so many grand ones that it kept us look- 
ing and explaining all the time. We passed 
some wonderful terraced vine lands. It seems 
almost incredible that men will spend so much 
time and labor in making a steep hillside pro- 
ductive. 

Incidents of Travel. 

At Kutstern, on the border between Austria 
and Germany, all the baggage had to be taken 
out of the cars, carried into the station, ex- 
amined and stamped. As we expected to re- 
turn to the same car, we left canes, umbrellas, 
shawl-straps, rubbers, etc. All passengers are 
driven into the station like so many sheep and 
locked in until all are examined and ready to 
load again. As soon as the door is opened all 
rush out pell-mell to secure seats. Eich one 
of our party took one or more grip-sacks and 
started to find our car, not knowing the train 
had been removed and a new one subBtituted. 
Aa soon as we discovered the train had been re- 
moved, we found part of our baggage gone, 
and we set up a search for that. Passengers 
were all on board, bell and brass horn had 
sounded, the guards were shutting the doors; 
half of our party ran one way and part in an- 
other, and would come together in the center 
like two opposing armies, one asking the guard 
where is my cane ? another where is my 
umbrella ? another to the conductor with high- 



keyed voice, where are my rubbers? etc., they 
not understanding a word we said, while the 
passengers were highly edified. Finally two 
of the ladies who are always looking for things 
that are [not lost looked into the baggage- 
room, and Mrs, F. saw two of Aunt Ellen's 
rubbers, and she snatched up one of them, and 
looked around and saw a woman with my um- 
brella and cane and field-glass, and wrenched 
them from her han^^ and ran for the train. 
Meantime Mrs. H, trotted in and loaded her- 
self with sandries and ran also. The conductor 
appeared on the scene and he took up one rub- 
ber and a fan cast away by former passengers, 
and he also ran for the car. Now the trouble 
was to get a seat, as everbody was on board 
and the cars in the act of startiog. A section 
was finally found with a Dutch woman and 
little daughter at the door and a man at the 
other end. She was determined not to give 
way and let us in, but we crowded in all the 
same, still good-naturedly but excited. The 
conductor came to the door and gave her a 
severe talking and she quieted down a little. 
Her face looked to me as though she had been 
employed by Bismarck as a hog-hater and the 
hated object had reflected back in her face. It 
seems to me anj important place like that where 
they change cars, passengers should be informed 
of the fact by a person that can speak a lan- 
guage that all can understand. This has taught 
us that when we get out of a car to take all 
luggage or else leave some one on guard. The 
surest way is to travel as J. Ross Brown did — 
clothes on your back and toothpick and tooth- 
brush in pocket. I expect this experience on 
the border will furnish material to relate to 
our grandchildren in years to come. 

Munich, 
The capital of Bavaria, is a much larger and 
finer city than I expected. They claim 250,000 
population. I should think it a little high. 
There are a good many government buildings, 
art galleries, museums, public halls and gardens 
here. The streets are well paved, some are 
straight and wide, and some narrow and crook- 
ed. Soldiers are everywhere, with their fine- 
setting blue frock coats, dangling swords, 
gilt bands on cap, and straight as an arrow. 
Women are shoveling up mud in street, sweep- 
ing street, cleaning railroad track, running 
handcarts, with dogs to assist them, and hand 
ling material on top'of a three and four story 
building, while men drive hacks, drink beer 
and smoke, I actually saw a boy, man and 
woman running. I think the boy ran to get 
warm, as his sleeves were rolled up and he 
looked cold; I think probably the man was a 
lunatio and had lost his mind; I think the 
woman ran to participate in the gossip or 
scandal that appeared to be going on around 
the corner, I saw an ox hauling a brewery 
wagon with kegs of bser; the yoke was padded 
and fastened in front and below the horns. 
They use a pole to a good many of their wagons 
instead of shafts, for a single animal. Most of 
the shafts to the hacks are hung on one side 
of the center, so that the horse walks in front 
of the wheel, the same as sleigh-shafts are 
hung. The shafts are held up by straps from 
end to collar, instead of saddle. 

In England and Paris stagings are built by 
lashing straight tall poles together by ropes. 
In Milan and Venice they use the tall poles, 
but fasten together by hoop-iron. In Munich 
they use tall ladders, fastened with ropes, and 
I think I have seen them SO feet high. I have 
seen them, natural growth, without splicing, 
sticking over the top of a three and four story 
building. 

There is a good deal of building going on and 
nothing looks dull or sleepy. The architecture 
does not present the sameness that it does in 
France. There is a liberal supply of bronze 
statues and fountains. The river laer fiows to 
the north on the east side of the city. It is 
about half as large as the Sacramento, and has 
a white, muddy color. 

Our time was so short here I did not have time 
to investigate much. There is not one in a 
hundred that can speak English, and therefore 
original information is pursued under great 
difficulties. 

The wind ia blowing from the north very 
fresh to-day, and is quite cool. I am very glad 
now that I did not get thin clothing at Venice, 
or I should have had a worse cold than I have 
now. Changing clothing with climate is dan 
gerous, if it is agreeable. 

Heidelberg 
Is a romantic little place of 26,000 inhabitants 
(they claim it) in a valley between the high 
mountains, either side of the river Necker. 
The river, about the siza of Sacramento, flows 
from east to west, and most of the city is on 
the left or south bank. The two notable 
things of this city are its University and castle. 
To the efficiency of the former, many a pro- 
fessional man in the U. S. can testify, and to 
the latter all tourists make pilgrimages, buy 
ample supplies of photographs, and take copious 
notes. I thought I had seen castle enough to 
last me my lifetime, but I am very glad that I 
took a look through this remarkable one with 
its remarkable history. It is of red cut granite, 
on the side of a steep hill, overlooking the 
city. It is wonderful in stairways, arches, 
towers, banquet and audience halls, promen- 
ades and dungeons, I saw the stone bed where 
they used to roast a whole ox at a time, and 
the tall chimneys that conveyed the smoke and 
simmering fragrance to the sky above. In the 
large arches underneath, where teams could 
drive in and turn around, are three large wine 
casks, two of which I supposed were the larg- 



est ever made. In going a little further along, 
I saw one called the *' Great Tun," constrncted 
in 1741, having an interior capacity of 49,000 
gallons. The staves were from six to eight 
inches thick. The hoops were made of tim- 
bers either natural or steam bent, and not more 
than one foot apart. In the museum room 
were shown relics connected with the castle, 
such as ancient horseshoes, chains, forks, 
swords, spears, helmets, bows, guns, etc. On 
the southeast, or upper side, is a mammoth 
pile of the castle still clinging together, that 
was undermined and blown down by the French 
invaders in 1689. They must have possessed a 
remarkable cement and quality of lime to 
cause this mass of rock to aafaere so tenaciously 
for such a length of time. Twice has this 
castle been rebuilt and burned. It is an in- 
teresting study to raed its history and contem- 
plate the vicissitudes through which it has 
passed. On the mountain-side north of the 
city, grapes are grown and the land is terraced 
all the way up, 

A brick building is being constructed on the 
side of the hill among the grapevines, and 
among the laborers I counted eight or ten 
women packing brick to it in tubs on their 
heads. Two good bridges span the river — one 
modern, iron and stone, the other wholly of 
stone, with six or eight arches, with a good 
deal of raise to center of bridge, and built over 
one hnndred years ago. At the approach on 
the left bank is an arch with two towers, and 
with figures appropriately inscribed. The 
Roman method of notation is employed on 
nearly all monuments, statues or buildings in 
Scotland, England or the continent, and we 
have to go back to our school days when we 
were taught that system to learn the dates. I 
saw a steamboat running on this river without 
wheel or screw, which seems almost as pre- 
posterous as a bird without wings. She is a 
tow for canal boats, and I presume there are 
rapids, which is the reason she is so construct- 
ed, A chain runs through pulleys at either 
end and aronnd a clutch windlass in center of 
boat. One end of this chain ia fastened up 
stream and one down, at what distance I do 
not know; the windlass revolved with steam 
power; the chain pulled In at one end and let 
out or overboard at the other — not a very 
speedy, bat secure, way of traveling. 

As we were out walking this morning down 
the bank of the river, we saw a number of 
wine-cellars built right from the street into the 
side of the hill. D. Flint. 



Woodbury Ooneentrators, 

Editors Press:— At the Hathaway mine, 
Newcastle, Placer county, they have made a 
number of tests in the past ten months between 
the Woodbury, Frue, Victor (or Shaw), Gar- 
nier and Gates concentrators and the systems 
of riffla-boxes and canvas tables. After these 
tests, the company concluded that the Wood- 
bury suited them best, handling the most pulp 
(from five stamps), and they have placed four 
Woodbury concentrators in their mill to work 
the pulp from 20 stamps. Mr. Woodbury is 
here at present superintending the erection of 
his machines. The 20 stamps are now running 
and crushing 50 tons in 24 hours. Everything 
in and about the mine and mill is in good run- 
ing order. 

There are other mines starting up around 
here. The Hathaway Co, is talking about 
larger works, by putting up four of D idge's 
No. 2 pulverizers, so as to see what the differ- 
ence will be between the stamps and the Dodge 
machines. J. P. 

Newcastle. Placer Co. 



Mining in Costa Rica. 

J, R, Stevens, an old California and Nevada 
mining man, returned from Costa Rica on the 
steamer San Bias, where he has been for the 
past four months, examining various mining 
properties, Mr, Stevens does not appear to 
entertain a very exalted opinion of the country 
lying back of Panta Arenas. 

"The mines I visited," said he, *'are about 
four leagues inland from Punta Arenas, the 
seaport, and are at an elevation of about 1200 
feet above the sea. There are two gold mines 
at that point, one called the Trinidad, worked 
on a small scale by an English company, and 
the mines of the Cerro del Aquacate, one of 
which is worked by a company called Compania 
de la Montana del Aquacate. There is still 
another called the * Sacra Familia,' a little 
north of the last-named mine, and at an eleva- 
tion of about 3000 feet above the sea. It has a 
vein of gold quartz similar to the Trinidad, but 
is worked on a very small scale. 

*'Gold deposits are also said to be on the 
Atlantic slope, in the Indian country, but their 
existence is very uncertain." 

Mr. Stevens would not advise Californians to 
go to Costa Rica to look for paying gold mines. 
Everything is quiet politically, the first elec- 
tion in the country having passed off in an or- 
derly manner last November, 

Mr. Sbevens says a number of new railroads 
are about to be built in the State of Tehuante- 
pec by Eoglish capitalists, and then a large 
amount of fine land suitable for coffee planta- 
tions will be opened up. In Costa Rica such 
land is held at $200 per acre, while in that part 
of Mexico it can be bought for $15 per acre, 
and the climate is about the same. 



Banking. 

[Written by a member of the " Q" Chafcauqua Circle, 
San Franciaco.j 

The Jews in the ancient Italian towns were 
in the habit of sitting in the market-places and 
there loaning money to those who might wish 
to borrow. They would sit on benches, the 
Italian for which word is " banco," and hence 
comes the word bank. Shakespeare evidently 
gets his character of Shylock from this custom. 

Banks are established to afford a safe place of 
deposit for the money of individuals, corpora- 
tions and governments, to facilitate the transfer 
of money from one person or party to another, 
and for the granting of aid by the loaning of 
money. 

The Bank of Venice, founded in 1171, was the 
firstinsLitution of its kind in Europe, and owed 
its existence to the Crusades and the necessity 
of the Government obtainingmoney to, conduct 
these wars. Various other banks were started 
from time to time in different cities of Europe. 
Finally the Bank of England was established 
in ]694, during the reign of William and Mary. 
To the war with France and the extreme diffi- 
culty experienced by the Government in ob- 
taining money, is this monopoly due. Like 
the Bank of Venice, it owes its existence to the 
wants of Government, which gave its life. The 
idea first originated with William Pattei'son, a 
merchant of London, who readily saw that a 
Government which had been paying from 20 to 
40 per cent per annum would without much 
hesitation grant exclusive and almost unlimited 
privileges to any institution which would fur- 
nish a tixed andpermanentloan at a reasonable 
rate of interest. The plan being brought to the 
notice of the King, was immediately approved, 
and the bank was incorporated under the title 
of "The Governor and Companv of the Bank 
of England," with a capital of £1,200,000. This 
bank granted the Government loans of 8 per 
cent per annum. 

All the first banks were established to obtain 
money for the Governments, for their wars and 
other expenses. 

In the year 1791, when the United States 
Government was in rather bad straits as con- 
cerning money matters, the question arose as 
to whether money should be raised for Govern- 
ment expenses by increased taxation or by 
loans made through a bank which Congress 
was then contemplating establishing. Through 
Alexander Hamilton's efforts, the latter plan 
was adopted and the "Bank of the United 
States" was founded with a capital of $10,000.- 
UOO, of which the United States was to subscribe 
$2,000,000. Its charter was to run for 20 years. 
Hamilton had observed that national banks 
had been successful in Italy, Germany, Holland 
and France, and the Bank of England was to 
all our countrymen the synonym of financial 
stability, and he felt sure his plan would suc- 
ceed. His hopes were not unfounded, for it 
aided the Government very materially in secur- 
ing the needed money. In 1811 its charter ex- 
pired, but it would most certainly have been 
renewed by Congress but for the fact that the 
bank had fallen into private hands, and it was 
feared it would become a monopoly. 

Two kinds of banks come to notice in more 
recent years — first, the Savings Banks. These 
banks receive from depositors money for safe- 
keeping, and also allow a small rate of interest 
on such money; but their functions are differ- 
ent from the second class, namely, the Com- 
mercial Banks, which seldom if ever allow 
interest on deposits. The Commercial Banks 
VI ill chiefly be spoken of in this article. They 
may be divided under two heads — the National 
Banks, established under United States laws, 
and the State Banks, incorporated under State 
laws. The latter are examined at least once 
each year by State Bank Commissioners, who 
may examine the condition of the bank at any 
time unexpected to the officers of the institu- 
tion. The National Bank is very similar to 
this, except that it is examined by United States 
Commissioners sent from Washington. The 
object of these commissions is, by examination 
into the condition of the bank, to ascertain if 
the management is careful as to the kinds of 
securities it receives on loans. The National 
Bank when being established is compelled to 
buy a certain number of United States bonds, 
either $50,000 or $100,000 worth, as the case 
may be according to its capital. These bonds 
it deposits with the Controller of Currency ^t 
Washington, who in return gives the bank 
National Bank notes to the extent of 90 per 
cent of its deposit of bonds. These notes the 
bank may loan out with the exception of 25 
per cent, which must be kept as a reserve fund 
to redeem any notes which may be returned to 
it. Some bankers claim that there is an ad- 
vantage in the National Bank over the ordinary 
commercial bank as regards profits, as they get 
profits on their money twice, namely, 4 per 
cent on the bonds which they deposit at Wash- 
ington, andG or 7 per cent on the notes which 
they receive in exchange for these bonds. But 
all bankers do not feel that these advantages 
compensate for certain restrictions which are 
put upon National Banks. This is why all 
banks do not incorporate under national laws. 
The first thing necessary in establishing a 
banking business is to secure the capital, which 
serves as a partial guarantee to depositors .that 
their money will be kept in safety. Then comes 
the election of officers and directors, if the busi- 
ne:ssbe a corporation. lis officers are known and 
reputable men interestpd in other enterprises, 
with the welfare of the community at heart, 
who seek their own in others' prosperity, and 
whose aim is to keep their bank a safe and 
sound institution, yielding a fair rate of interest 
on honest transactions. 

The bank runs its affairs like clock-work, 
opens and closes at regular hours, uses every- 
body alike, and treats all bitsiness as confiden- 
tial. 
Mr. Walker is a customer of the bank. He 



Jan. 11. 18? 0] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



21 



IH engaged in the coramission business, which 
is very active, and consequently he lias au act- 1 
ive bank account. He is honest and franlc in 
his dealings with his banker. He deposits his 
money in the hunk to keep it safe and tu have 
it cunvenient to check against for funds as 
Deeded. He depositJi his cliecks, drafts and 
note}!, a.'^ the bank is belter prepared to collect 
them. He gets his exchange at the bank, be- 
cause it is the most convenient niethiM) pf re- 
mitting money from one point to another, and 
the bank is at all times prepared to furnish him 
such exchange at lowest rates. He borrows 
money from his bank, because he is there 
known best, and the bank is always ready to 
give its customers preference in making loans, 
both as regards rate and amount. He goes tu 
his banker for recommendations, for informa- 
tion, for assistance and for advice. He expects 
fair treatment from the otficera and courteous 
attention from the clerks, and wants his trans- 
actions with the bank made known to no one 
outside. 
When leaving his signature at the bank, he 



National Bank of Boston or to whoever may be 
his correspondent there, with the instructions 
that upon payment of the amount of the in* 
voice by Brown, Craig &. Co., titc shipping re- 
ceipt be ileliveretl to them. Why does Jlr. 
Waker employ his banker in this case? Be- 
cause he knows that his banker has responsible 
agents in Boston, who will collect the money 
from Brown, Craig & Co. before delivering the 
shipping receipt to them, and they have no 
control over the goods until they possess this 
receipt. What becomes of tlie money paid to 
the Boston bank? As soon as they receive it 
they telegraph to the San Francisco banker, 
using their cipher code. The mef^sage roads like 
this: '* Kngine Walker lag steam hope Pleides." 
The San Francisco banker examines his code 
and linds that this means: " Draft of Walker 
on Brown S^iUOO for shipment of beans, paid." 
Then Mr. Walker's account is credited on the 
books uf the San Francisco bank and the First 
National Bank of Boston is charged with the 
amount. 
Mr. Walker has received goods from JUnn, 




Wild Rye Grasses. 

Since the perenoial rye grasa which came to 
QB by way of Australia (and thus earned the 
name AuBtraliao rye ffrast) has become so popu- 
lar la some parts of California, there has been 
frequent mention of the wild rye grass which 
seems to be wild in this State, and there has 
been some ooofueion in the local mind as to the 
different genera whiob popularly go under the 
name rye grasses. The grass whiob is usually 
meant by the term rye grass in this State is 
Lolium pereune, and there is another species 
whioh is more or less oonspicaous as the cheat 
of the wbeat'deMs of some parts of the State, 
which is Lolium ttmulenfum. The resemblance 
between these two Is close enoagh to enable a 
oareless obaerver to class them together. 

There is another genus the epecies of whioh 
are also called rye grasses, and that is the genus 
Elymus, of whioh two American species are 
figured on this page. Tbeee are both shorter 



bat it is a more slender grass In all its parts, 
varying from smooth to pubeecent. The spike 
is three to four inobes long, cylindrical, and 
inclined tn rlrnnp. The glumes are more slender 
than E. Viryinicus, with longer awns. The 
aplkelets are usually two flowered, the empty 
flumes narrow, rigid, and about one Inoh long. 
The body or dilated pirt of the flowering glnote 
is obloug, about four lines long, and tipped with 
a slender awn an inch or more in length. This 
speoies grows in rooky woods and on river banks, 
and it is said by some to furnish a good hay, 

lUuDCEU Freiuht on Ohk. — B. Campbell, 
general freight agent of the Union Faoiflo, after 
oonBultitiOQ with mine-owners iu the Cccar 
d'Alene mines as to the freight rates neoessary 
to seoure a liberal movement of ores, has fixed 
rates as follows : Oa crude ore, carrying less 
than 40 per cent of lead, to Missouri river 
points, 312; to San Francisco, §10 50. Ores 
carrying .50 per cent of lead and over, to Mia- 




TWO WILD RYE GRASSES— Elymus Vlrglnlcus and Strlatua. 



is supposed to write his name with the same 
natural and careless ease as he would at his own 
desk, and he should endeavor to write it the 
same at all times. Thus his signature will be- 
come as characteristic and recognizable as his 
face, and the possibility of successful forging is 
'much lessened. 

Mr. Walker receives a shipment of wheat, to 
pay for which he has not sufficient funds. He 
goes to his banker and states the case to him. 
The banker examines the quotations in the 
daily paper and finds that wheat is selling at 
$1.40 per bushel; so he tells Mr. W. that he can 
loan him $1.20 per bushel provided he has the 
warehouse receipt-s. Mr. Walker then places the 
wheat in some i esponsible warehouse, and tak- 
ing the receipts to his banker, has the amount 
of the loan placed to the credit of his account 
at the bank, so that he may check against it 
the same as against any deposit he may have 
made from time to time. 

Mr. Walker is in the habit of shipping beans 
to Brown, Craig & Co. of Boston, and wishes to 
collect the amount due bira on shipments made 
to them. He prepares the invoice, which is 
merely a statement of the goods sent, and also 
the shipping receipt, which is a receipt from the 
railroad company that they have received cer- 
tain goods marked B., G. & Co., which are to 
"be forwarded to Boston. These papers he takes 
to his banker, who forwards them to the First 



Bell & Co., New York, and wishes to send them 
the amount due for such goods. He goes to 
his banker and buys New York exchange, which 
is an order of the San Francisco banker on the 
Mercantile Bank of New York to pay Mann. 
Bell & Co, a certain sum of money. This order 
Mr. Walker mails to Mann, Bell &Co. They 
indorse it on the back, thus acknowledging the 
receipt of the money, and present it at the 
Mercantile Bank and receive payment. 

These transactions of Mr. Walker include the 
principal operations of a bank. Of course there 
are other details of business which the banker 
performs, such as the buying and selling of 
stocks for clients and the issuing of letters of 
credit on the principal cities of the world; but 
these are minor affairs compared with the loan- 
ing of money, the buying and selling of ex- 
change and the making of collections. 



The Napa Consolidated. — B. M. Newcomb, 
superintendent of the Napa Consolidated 
Quicksilver mine, makes the following state- 
ment, showing the production of and shipments 
from the mine during the year 1889: January, 
385 flasks; February, 400; March, 380; April, 
320; May, 445; June, 415; Julv. 340; August, 
450; September, 360; October, 385; November, 
380; December, 330; total, 4590.— i^apa I^eg- 
ister. Jan. 2d. 



in the head, more bearded and otherwise differ- 
ent from the species whioh is most abundant in 
this State, and is called "giant rye grass" 
[Elymua condensatus), but they all are different 
enough from our species of Lolium to enable 
one easily to pronounce them distinct from the 
more valuable kinds. 

The species which are shown by the reproduc- 
tion of encfravines from Dr. Vasey's reports are 
first, Elymus Virginicus, a coarse perennial 
grass, growing on alluvial river banks, or in 
rich low grounds. The culm is rather stout, 
two to three feet high, leafy; the lower leaves 
are 10 to 15 inches long, broad and rough. The 
sheath of the upper leaf usually incloses the 
stalk and sometimes the base of the flower 
spike. This spike is erect, dense and rigid, 
two to four or five inches long and one-half 
inch thick. The spikelets are two or three 
together at each jdint, all alike and fertile, 
sessile, two to five flowered, and each with a 
pair of empty glumes. These glumes are very 
thick and coarse, strongly nerved, lanceolate, 
and bristle-pointed, about one inoh long. Prof. 
Killebrew of Tennessee says it is very valuable 
and ought to be tried in cultivation. 

The other species is £.7^»iM5 s(7-fa(tts — "Smaller 
Wild Rye grass." This grass has a structure 
as to the flower*Bpike similar to the preceding. 



sonri river points, $16; to San Francisco, $12.50. 
But little ore has been shipped from Cceur 
d'Alene of late owing to the high rates charged 
by the Northern Paciflc. It is supposed that 
this reduction of from $5 to $10 a ton will 
cause a greatly inoreaBf d output, and that the 
shipments will be 150 tons a day and more 
after awhile^ 

CoMSTOCK Bullion. — The Dacember bullion 
yield of Comstook mines aggregates in round 
numbers about $620,000. divided as follows : 
Con, Cal. and Virginia, §300,000; Savage, S45,- 
000; Alta, $30,000; Hale and Norcross. SlOO,- 
000; Justice, $25 000; Yellow Jackot. $40,000; 
Crown Point, $55 000; Occidental, $15,000; and 
Overman, $10,000. 



Steamers' Records. — The Peninsular & 
Oriental Steam Navigation Co. owns a fleet of 
72 steamships of 190,270 tons and 189.000-horsa 
power. Last year the fleet steamed 2 500,000 
miles/* without accident or delay." There is 
a record worth talking about. 

The Tides on the IsTHMns. — At Asninwall 
on the Atlantic side of the Isthmus of Panama 
the rise of the tide is only 1^ feet, but at Pana- 
ma on the Pacific side there is at times a differ- 
ence of 21 feet between high and low water. 



22 



Mining and Scientific Press.' 



[Jan. 11, 1890 



IQlNIJMG SUMMAF^Y, 

The foUowing Is moBtly coudeosed from journals publiehed 
in the interior. In proximltf to the mines mentioned. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Amador. 

Sutter Creek.— Ledger ^ Jan. 4: The ten- 
stamp mill resumed operations last Tuesday, and a 
steady run for a considerable time is anticipated. 
The ore is being taken from an open cut 60 feet 
long and 30 feet wide. Everything is put through 
the mill. The formation is broken up, as a well- 
defined ledge could not reasonably be looked for at 
such a depth. We are told by the superintendent 
that the rock sent to the mill averages between $4 
and $5 per ton. At this rate, when fixed up to 
work economically and on a large scale, the mine 
ought to piy handsomely. There is a shaft on the 
property which, however, is only 60 feet deep, and 
it is not being worked at present. Seven men are 
employed — five in the mine and two at the mill. 
The property has been listed on the stock board in 
New York. At the present ten-stamp mill they have 
only 90 feet fall, consequently the cost of water- 
power is a material item. It is proposed to increase 
the milling capacity to 20 stamps, and to bring 
water direct from the Amador canal through an 11- 
inch pipe. This will necessitate a pipe-line 7000 
feet long. The survey for this line was made this 
week, and we are told the work will be pressed for- 
ward to completion as speedily as possible. Alto- 
gether the cost of the contemplated improvements 
is estimated at $20,000. The claim embraces iioo 
linear feet by 450 in width, Some rich pockets 
were met with near the surface. 

Amador Gold Mine.— At this mine there are 
about 80 men employed. The owners in London 
are clamoring for the completion of the mill. They 
of course do not realize the condition of the roads, 
and therefore cannot understand why the mill re- 
mains at a standstill so long. It is an utter im- 
possibility to get any teamster to undertake the 
hauling of the rock-crusher and other heavy material 
while the roads are so bad. Indeed, the outlook is 
not favorable for getting this machinery on the 
ground until the winter is over. 

Miscellaneous. — Most of the mines are greatly 
troubled from the increase of water necessitating the 
running of the oumps a considerable portion of the 
time. At the Z^ile the lower level is flooded. This, 
however, does not cause much difficulty, but if the 
flow of water continues, it will be hard to keep the 
mill going and at the same time prevent the water 
from flooding other levels. A 15-inch pipe 1500 
feet long has been laid from the Kennedy reservoir 
to the mill, which will hereafter be operated by 
water-power. 

Butte. 

Gold and Copper.— Oroville Register, Jan. 6: 
From the Stow mine, Forbestown, 3000 pounds of 
pure copper have been extracted and shipped below 
during the past few weeks. The copper is pro- 
nounced by experts to be equal to any in the world. 
The Stow and Golden Queen mines at Forbestown 
are panning out in a surprising manner. Since the 
erection of the latest improved chlorination works 
there, $1000 a month is being saved that has here- 
tofore been lost in the refuse. The rock is very 
high grade in gold, and the sulphurets are exceed- 
ingly rich. Other improvements in gold-saving ma 
chinery are being put in, and the rock is expected 
to average $250 a ton. 

El Dorado. 

Stopped Work. — Placerville Observer, Jan. 6: 
The present stage of bad weather has stopped work 
On the Taylor mine, near Garden Valley. The new 
company' taking hold of the mine will rebuild the 
surface works, putting in new hoisting works and 
20 stamps, with room for 20 more. Things will be 
lively on this mine as soon as the weather permits 
of surface workings. 

Henry's Diggings. — Water will be abundant 
next summer for mining. L. L. Alexander has 
stopped work at the Crystal mine, but is still 
at the mine. John McLane and J. Ryan are 
still at work in the Oak mine, with good prospects 
ahead. William Armstrong has out a big pile of 
gravel, taken from the Old Siand-By at Henry's 
Diggings. The Carrie Hale mine is lying idle lor 
the want of an owner and miner. 

Fresno. 

Hildreth. — Cor. Fresno Expositor, Jan. i: 
Things were lively for awhile around the old Hil- 
dreth mine, pioneer of the district, named after the 
late illustrious Tom Hildreth, from whom, by the 
way, the town also derives its name. This mine has 
had rather a checkered career, proving at times the 
joy and sorrow of its many owners, but owing to 
bad management and other adverse circumstances 
it has never paid any large dividends. Some very 
remarkably rich strikes have been made there, how- 
ever, and the present owner, Wm. Dunphy of San 
Francisco, is well aware of the fact that it only needs 
to be properly handled to prove a paying proposi- 
tion, T. P. Peck and Geo. Hildreth, Mr. Dunphy's 
right bowers, were with us recently looking after 
assessment work and getting everything into shape 
for future operations. Mr, Peck was we 1 pleased 
with the outlook and told us he hoped to see a gen- 
eral resumption of work on the mine early next 
spring. R'^'Sponsible parties are negotiating for a 
lease of the Abbey which proved so long the mainstay 
of the town, and although the final papers have not 
yet been drawn up we understand that no serious 
hitch lies in the way of a satisfactory agreement be- 
tween the interested parties. The syndicate oper- 
ating at the Zoller mine is from latest accounts 
making good headway, getting out plenty of ore and 
finding a better prospect the more they proceed with 
development work. The rough weather, however, 
is giving them some trouble with the crushing of 
rock and has likewise seriously retarded business at 
Zsbra. Here we understand it has necessitated a 
total suspension of work, which it is to be hoped will 
prove only temporary. 

Inyo. 

Good Mining Region. — Inyo Independent^ Jan. 
6: Mr. G, A. Smith, a real estate dealer and min- 
ing speculator of Los Angeles, made a trip recently 
through the Darwin and Panamint country and got 
back to Independence at the beginning of this week. 
He says that over a wide region of country he saw 
many mining claims that he is confident would pay 
good profit if rail transportation could be had for 



the ore. Immense quantities of ore are in sight 
that is too low grade to pay for hauling 70 or 80 
miles by wagon as must now be done to get it to 
a railroad. But if the railroad were within easy 
reach all of this ore would be taken out, affording 
employment for many men and much capital, Mr. 
Smith bonded an antimony mine from Mr. Hanni- 
gan situated on the Death Valley side of the Pana- 
mint mountains. Mr. Smith says this is a large de- 
posit of antimony, and he has no doubt the mine 
will be a valuable property if worked. He was in- 
duced to go into that country in the hope of the 
speedy extension of the railroad from Salt Lake to 
Los Angeles, but until this extension shall be made 
the properly has no value. He felt discouraged by 
recent reports that the road would not be extended 
beyond Pioche and said that his firm would not now 
expend any money in opening the mine. 

The Alexander Mine.— Scott Broder and his 
partner, Acunba, are working the Alexander mine 
in Waucoba. Several years ago John Alexander 
took out the first ore from this mine; it was found 
close to the surface, and was very easily mined. The 
second-class quality of the ore gave 17 ounces silver 
per ton and 44 per cent lead. " At the prices then 
paid for silver and lead, the ore was worth $55 per 
ton. The rest of the ore gave 24 ounces silver per 
ton and 56 per cent lead. This ore was then worth 
about $68 per ton. The cost of getting out the ore 
to the railroad was so great that Mr. Alexander 
made but one shipment of 11 tons and then quit 
work upon the mine. For packing i}^ miles to 
where the ore could be reached with wagons the 
charge was $3 per ton. He had also to provide 
water for the pack animals at an additional cost of 
$S per barrel, or nearly $2 for water against each 
ton of ore. The cost of hauling by wagons to the 
railroad was $4 per ton. Then railroad freight and 
cost of working added to the other expense left 
nothing for the miner. Now the ore can be got out 
and worked at far less expense than before, and the 
prospect is good that a fair margin of profit will be 
left for the miners. The mine is but little over 13 
miles distant from Alvord, on the C. & C. railroad. 
Cerro Gordo. — The combination shaft at Cerro 
Gordo is retimbered down to the Omega tunnel, a 
depth of 300 feet. To the next tunnel below, the 
distance is between 300 and 400 feet, and the work 
of timbering down to that point is being pushed as 
rapidly as possible. 

Ore, — In doing assessment work in the Beaure- 
gard mine at Cerro Gordo, Jack Dunphy has struck 
some fine ore. The extent of the body cannot yet 
be determined, but it looks as if there might be a 
good deal of it. Dunphy recently purchased a con- 
trolling interest in the property. 

Antimony.— Joe Danielson, John Curran and 
William Hannigan have bonded antimony mines in 
Wild Rose mining district to G. A. Smith of Los 
Angeles for $3000. Mr. Smith intends to develop 
the property, and if satisfied with the result, will 
build reduction works near the mines. 

Found Gold. — Inyo Index, Jan. i: In his 
search for lead ore in the old Uncle Abe mine, Ma- 
zurka Canyon, Phil. Cartier struck a fair-sized ledge 
of gold ore that promises to become a good mine. 
Several specimens sent to' town are rich in free gold, 
and the quartz is of excellent character. 

Chloriding.— Ben Laskey tells us that there are 
now 14 men chloriding at the Keynot mine in Bev- 
erage district. A bunch of very rich ore was struck 
the other day, the extent of which is not yet known. 
Lookout. — Register, Jan. 2: Through a pri- 
vate note from Lookout district, we learn that Supt. 
Frank Fitzgerald of the Modoc Consolidated 
is working nine men at $3.50 per diem, five at $3.14, 
and two at $45 per month and board. Since No- 
vember i8th, he has been concentrating and jigging 
the old dumps. The result of the first two carloads 
shipped was as follows: Concentrations from 
rocker, 70 ozs. silver, 31 per cent lead. Concen- 
trations from jigger, 166.6 ozs. silver, 54 per cent 
lead, and gold at the rate of $7.02 per ton. These 
dumps will last nine months or more, and will fur- 
nish steady employment for 20 or more men during 
that time. 

Kern. 
Metallic Antimony.— Kern County Califor- 
tiian, Jan. 4: A. Blanc, a gentleman from Oak- 
land, who has been having some mines prospected 
on Erskine creek, discovered a curious-looking ore 
which he took to San Francisco for determination. 
It puzzled almost all the experts until by analysis it 
proved to be native antimony and almost chemi- 
cally pure. The occurrence of metallic antimony in 
a native state is only once before known. In a 
scientific work published over a hundred years ago, 
mention is made of the discovery at Auvergne, 
France, of a small deposit of pure antimony. The 
metal is fine-grained, with steely fracture, and 
has puzzled ail the metallurgists. It is not ex- 
pected that much will be found, but from its rarity 
to find any at all may be considered a metallurgical 
event. 

Lake. 

Silver Mines.— Clear Lake Press, Jan. 3: Last 
week we had the pleasure of examining some of the 
ore from the newly discovered silver mines across 
the lake mentioned in a former article. The owners 
were confident that they had struck a bonanza and 
were shipping some of their ore to the city to have 
it worked, a much more satisfactory way of deter- 
mining its value than an assay made from choice 
pieces of ore. The general character of the rock 
seems to be a decomposed quartz carrying a heavy 
per cent of chlorides of silver; there is also quite a 
sprinkling of gray quartz in which native silver can 
be very easily traced. Many croppings are found in 
that neighborhood. 

Marluosn. 
Placers.— Cor. Mariposa Nti.vs, Jan. 4: Placer 
mining is now generally conceded to be a dead in 
duslry, a relic of '49. and the special object of ad- 
verse legislation. Mariposa placers and gravel 
claims, rich and numerous as they were in early 
days, have hardly been worked. The surface mines 
were exploited in primitive ways and deep diggings 
left undisturbed. Claims that did not yield $5 or 
$10 per diem were considered unproductive and 
were abandoned. A subsequent series of dry win- 
ters, scarcity of water due mostly to the improvi- 
dence of early settlers in not securing water rights, 
were the main facts of placer mining being discon- 
tinued, while the excitement that followed the dis- 
covery of quartz, mines diverted the attention to 
other channels. Enormously rich banks of gravel 
still exist in our county, and the present wet winter 
will give the "gambusino" a show to prove it. At 



Phillip's Flat there is one of the richest gravel banks 
in the State. It is the old river channel running in 
streaks parallel with the present course of the 
stream and pays all the way from five cents to $25 
per pan. This is not exaggeration, for there are 
men in our vicinity who have worked these and 
whom scarcity of water drove to more remunerative 
employment. Hundreds of thousands of dollars 
were taken out in early days. The fiat originally 
held 40 or 50 acres; of these some 10 or 12 only re- 
main on the upper part, and it has always been 
considered the richest, and is still left undisturbed. 



mostly on account of a high bank of cement that ^he Mayflower gives employment to the usual force, 
had to be blasted. In 1880-81, the owners, Messrs.' and shows no abatement in its output of dust. The 



adjoining the Gray Eagle. There has been but 
little mining either at Todds Valley or Yankee Jims 
during the year. Some work has been done on the 
Red Sea at the latter place, and C. Trafton has 
now a tunnel about 800 feet in length in his Georgia 
Hill claim. At Forest Hill there is but little raid- 
ing going on except at the Mayflower, Work on 
a large scale was suspended last spring at the Dar- 
danelles. Several men are at work there now. 
The Baker Divide Co. is, drifting, and would, if all 
their upraises and drifts had been put into the main 
tunnel, have been in between 6000 and 7000 feet 



M. Bauer and T. Branson, did a great deal of dead- 
work and ran a tunnel from the river to the old 
channel, blasting every foot of the way. Lack of 
water has since prevented further operations, but 
now things have somewhat changed. With a 40- 
foot fall, a 2-foot hose with a 2-inch nozzle, they are 
at work, and as the stream strikes the bank, earth, 
gravel and boulders come tumbling down at a lively 
rate, and find their way to the river through a long 
string of sluice-boxes, leaving the shining gold on the 
bottom. Although Mr. Branson says that he cal- 
culates the season's returns will go from $10,000 to 
$15,000, experienced miners think he will fall 
short of the mark. Were we to have the water fa- 
cilities other counties are blessed with, we would not 
feel the weight of the Mariposa Grant hanging on 
our necks, and would pull through anyhow. 

Chinese ON the Grant.— Mariposa A'^^j, Dec. 
28; A communication appeared in the last issue of 
the Mining and Scientific Press, in which the 
correspondent says that Chinese are exclusively em- 
ployed on the Grant,- in the mine at Bear valley. 
This is a mistake. At times it is found necessary to 
employ a few Chinese there doing work that white 
men will not like to do, and then only for a few 
days. 

Mapa. 
The Napa Consolidated.— ifftf^/j/^r, Jan. 3; 
B. M. Newcomb, superintendent of the Napa Con- 
solidated Quicksilver mine, favors us with the fol- 
lowing statement showing the production of and 
shipments from the mine during the year 1889; 
January, 385 flasks; February, 400; March, 38U: 
April, 320; May, 445; June, 415; July, 340; August, 
450; September, 360; October, 385; November, 380; 
December, 330; total, 4390 flasks. 

The Knoxville Mine. — James Raphael, fore- 
man of the Knoxville mine, says the roads between 
here and Knoxville are in a terrible condition, but 
he managed to get through on horseback. Of the 
mine he says it is closed down for the present. 
There is an abundance of ore, but because of bad 
roads they can neither get anything in nor out, 
The new engine shaft is running night and day. It 
is now at a depth of 160 feet. When a depth 40 
feet lower is reached a station will be established 
and a crosscut will be made into the ledge. With 
passable roads a^.ain the mine will be running in 
full blast 

Quicksilver Shipments. — Calistogian, Jan. i: 
There were shipped from Calistoga, during the 
month of December, flasks of quicksilver produced 
at the mines as follows: Bradford. 183; Napa Con,, 
275; Gt. Western, 116; Sulphur Bank, 159. Total 
flasks, 733. Exclusive of the above there were 25 
flasks received yesterday from the Bradford mine, 
but as they were not shipped from Calistoga until 
after the close of December, they will be included in 
January shipments. 

Nevada. 
Mining Drawbacks. —Grass Valley Union, 
Jan. 7: The storms of rain and snow which have 
so persistently prevailed this winter have not seri- 
ously interfered with quartz mining in this district 
up to the present time, although the pumps have 
been required to do extra duty in keeping the water 
in the mines under control, and since the heavy 
snowstorms have come there has been a constant 
apprehension of snowslides along the line of the 
ditches that supply water-power for the mines and 
mills. Such accidents have not yet occurred, and 
the amount of water carried in the large ditches 
may prevent them freezing up, but with the temper- 
ature getting down to within a few degrees of zero, 
that misfortune may occur at any time. The cold 
weather of yesterday interfered with milling, as the 
quicksilver plates on the aprons would not take up 
the gold readily, and there may be a temporary 
shutting down of the mills until the weather be- 
comes more mild. 

Frozen Up. — Tidings, Jan. 6: The snow and 
frigid temperature has resulted in difficulties at the 
mills and mines. The Pittsburg's supply ditch i= 
frozen, and the steam plant is being utilized for 
hoisting and pumping. The Idaho mill is froze up, 
and operations have been suspended until the 
weather moderates. At the mine, however, opera- 
lions are proceeding full blast. The .pump-rod at 
the Empire broke Saturday night, and that at the 
North Star Sunday night, necessitating delays 
of several hours. As is the case at the other 
mines of the district, water is at present giv- 
ing no little trouble and anxiety, the pump at the 
North Star being run at double the usual speed. 
Four feet of snow at Bloomfield and six feet at the 
Derbec. The Derbec mine has been shut down 
temporarily, because the ditches are frozen and wa- 
ter for the boilers cannot be had. A prolonged cold 
snap and the formation of ice in the South Yuba 
canal, from which water for power is derived by 
Grass Valley's principal mines, is feared. The ditch 
crew have been reinforced, we understand, and no 
expense will be spared to keep the canal open. 

The Peabody. — Transcript, Jan. 3: The work 
of pumping out the Peabody mine at Grass Valley 
was completed this week, and Supt Tilley now has 
his men at work enlarging the shaft. Sinking will 
be commenced as soon as the work of enlarging is 
completed. 

Placer. 
Forest Hill Divide. — Placer Herald, Jan. 6: 
Mining as it has been for years still claims the at- 
tention of most of the people, and probably will 
until the gravel beds are worked out. No startling 
developments have been made during the year, al- 
though much labor has been expended. The Gray 
Eagle Co., early in the spring, succeeded in sink- 
ing a shaft 350 feet in depth to good gravel. They 
then turned their attention to running a tunnel that 
should tap the channel and drain it. The tunnel 
is now over 500 feet in length. The rock is a soft 
black slate, and consequently admits of rapid prog- 
ress. Anthony Clark has started another tunnel 
farther up Owl Creek to tap the Wolverine, a. claim 



mill has been running almost steadily since it was 
started on Dec. 11, 1888, Twenty stamps have 
been in operation the greater part of the time. The 
yield in gold for the year ending Dec. 11. 1889, 
was $330,000, and for the month of November, 
the mme paid $34,000,,- For the last six months 
the principal part of the work has been done in the 
north gangway. The yellow deposit with its black 
gold has been cut through and connection will be 
made shortly with the old ground which paid so 
immensely in 1886. The old Paragon at Bath .has 
been beating its record for the last few months. 
This mine has been one of the richest in the State. 
It was worked in 1850 by George Webster. In 
1862 A, Breece, Judson Wheeler and W. A. Free- 
man owned it. Mr. Freeman afterward sold out 
and went to Oakland with a fortune. Messrs. 
Breece & Wheeler have owned the mine since then, 
and have consolidated with it the Mint and Rough 
Gold, There are two channels, an upper and lower. 
The upper was rich, but never paid so regularly as 
the lower. No work has been done on this for 
years. The tunnel in the lower channel is now 
9240 feet long. The pay dirt where work is now 
going on is six feet in depth and very rich. Gang- 
ways and crosscuts are being run in order to block 
out the ground so that a large force of men can be 
put to work. The channel here is 60 feet wide, 
and on one side yields $60 to the carload or ton of 
gravel. Mr. Breece has taken out as high as $3000 
to the pan in this claim, and in one crevice last win- 
ter he took out $15,000. It is a remarkable mine, 
and there appears to be no end to its rich- 
ness. It has always paid big dividends from 
the time it was opened. According to latest re- 
ports no mining has been done at Michigan Bluflf 
since last winter. W. Muir is operating at the Oro 
near the Weske, and is taking out some gold. The 
Hidden Treasure tunnel is now 8300 feet in length 
and in rich ground. Some idea of the amount of 
work that is done in this mine may be gained from 
the statement that 200,000 laggings and 40,000 caps 
and posts are used yearly in the tunnel, drifts and 
crosscuts. 

San Dleeo. 
Another Good Strike. — Julian Sentinel, Tan. 
i: Last week another new strike was made in Ban-, 
ner. This time it was in new ground, and by three 
deserving lads who have been wont to swing a ham- 
mer and shove a drill in this camp. The boys are 
miners from way back, and know a good thing when 
they see it. The ledge is well-defined, about eight 
inches in width, and will mill $60 per ton on the sur- 
face. This strike is proof of what we have always 
contended that this camp is not half prospected yet. 
Pine Valley. — San Diegan, Jan. 2: The 
Hawkes Brothers and others, who are in from the 
Pine Valley mining section, are much elated over 
the prospects in that locality. To-day they inter- 
ested a number of miners by showing specimens of 
rich quartz from claims which they have, situated 
about half-way between Noble's camp in Pine Val- 
ley and the Stonewall mine at Julian. " In 30 years' 
experience,'' said one, " I don't think I ever saw so 
many acres of rich rock in any one place— ore that 
runs $100 to $500 and up to $1000 to the ton. Take 
a piece of quartz in almost any place, the size of 
your thumb, and you can get upward of a hundred 
colors from it Within a radius of a mile and a 
quarter from our camp there are not less than 30 
claims, any one of which is as good as the average 
run in the Alamo, and with the added advantage 
that it is aU under the American flag." Governor 
Waterman's son, who is in charge of the famous 
StonewaU mine, was over in Pine Valley the other 
day to satisfy himself as to the truth of the reported 
rich finds there. According to the statement of 
one of the prospectors now in the city, the Gov- 
ernor's son was astonished at what he saw, and he 
predicted a very prosperous camp when develop- 
ments are well under way. The Pine Valley section 
is quite cool during the winter — snow not infrequent- 
ly falling there. This season, however, the weather 
has been very mild, in fact there is seldom a month 
in the year that mining cannot be carried on. The 
average climate is delightful; there is an abundance 
of wood and water, and from all accounts the field 
is a most inviting one to industrious miners. Pine 
Valley is bound to come to the front. 
Shasta. 
Squaw Creek.— Cor. Redding Free Press, Jan. 
4: Ihe Uncle Sam mine is running with a full force, 
there being about 60 men employed. Several of the 
laborers have moved their families in here and they 
expect to have a school in the near future. L. J. 
Fader is running three four-horse freight wagons 
into the Squaw Creek mines; also a daily stage. 

Dry Process — The large new mill of the Calu- 
met company, for working gold ores by Paul's new 
dry process, is now completed and will commence 
running the coming week. This is the second mill 
the company has built in the past year for the same 
process. 

Siskiyou 
South Fork of Scott River.— Cor. Yreka 
Journal, Jan. 8: All of the mines on the South Fork 
are in active operation although considerable snow 
has fallen. Those who had their mines well opened 
before the winter snows set in have no trouble in 
working their claims. The claim sold by Alex 
Parker to a Chinese company, for the modest httle 
sum of $50,000, is turning out several thousand dol- 
lars monthly, and is considered by all miners here 
to be one of the best mining properties in Northern 
California, The old Fosch claim opposite the town 
of French Flat is also owned by a Chinese company, 
and the receipts of th s claim amount to $300 and 
$400 weekly, in fact the Chinese own the South 
Fork for a distance of four miles, with the exception 
of a few hill drifting claims, just above the town, 
which have been steadily worked for a number of 
years. Boulder creek. Fox creek and Jackson creek, 
tributaries of the South Fork, are owned and worked 
by white men. • The snow on these creeks is five 



i 



Jan. 11, 1890.J 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



%^ 



and six feet in depth and still piling up. but most ail 
the claims are drift diggings where the rich aurifer- 
ous dust is brought to the surface through tunnels 
preparatory for spring washings. A number of men 
are wintering here Irora the North Fork o( Coffee 
creek. Trinity county, where they have good claims. 
to which they will return as soon as the winter 
storms are over. 



NEVADA. 



Wasboe oiecrict. 
Best and Beixhek.— Virginia Enltrprise. Jan. 
4: On the 625 level, east crosscut .No. 1 has been 
eitended 12 (eet; total. 90 leet. Formation, soft 
porphyry. On the 1000 level, east crosscut No. i 
has been extended 14 (eel; total. 70 feet. Forma- 
tion, hard porphyry. On the 1200 level, com- 
menced repairing the station on December 29. 

Gould and Cuhkv.— On the 200 level the south- 
west dnit has been extended 18 feet; total, 268 feet. 
Formation, quartz, clay and porphyry. On the 400 
level, in west crosscut No. 2. at a point 12a feet 
from the south drift, have started and advanced a 
southwest drift a distance of 30 feet. Formation, 
quartz, clay and porphyry. 

Savage.— On the 300 level have resumed work in 
the face of the main west drift (rom the station, and 
inade during the week 32 feet; total length, 475 feet. 
From the top of upraise No. i from the southwest 
drift on the 400 level, advanced t6 feet in low-grade 
quartz, and connected with the north slope in the 
Hale and Norcross mine. This connection gives 
ample ventilation to prospect the ground south (rom 
tfie upraise. Are extracting ore fiom the 400, 500, 
600 and 750 levels. Milled during the week 435 tons 
of ore. Have bullion on hand and at the mill 
amounting to $29,978.48. 

Alta. — Arc still sinking the winze in the ledge 
below the 925 level. The slopes between the 825 
and 925 levels are looking well, and the mill reduces 
daily about 45 tons of ore. 

Con. IMPERIAI-.— West crosscut No. 2 from the 
300 level north drift is out 71 feet, 29 feet having 
been added during the week; face shows quartz with 
occasional bunches o( ore. The north raise from 
the same level is being repaired. West crosscut No. 
I from the 500 level drift is out 98 feet, 26 (eet added 
during the week; face in low-grade quartz, and the 
main north drift itself on the 500 level is out 253 feet 
from the shaft; 31 feet added during the week; face 
in a mixture of quartz and porphyry. 

Confidence and Challenge. — The Con- 
fidence-Challenge joint west crosscut from the 300 
level north drift is out 120 feet, 17 feet having been 
added during the week; face shows quartz and por- 
phyry. 

Yellow Jacket.— The west drift on the 300 
level is out'90o feet. Crosscutting on the 900 level. 
Shipping to the Biunswick mill 60 tons of ore daily. 
Seg. Belcher.— During the week the west cross- 
cut on the 1000 level was advanced 29 feet; total 
length, 79 feet; (ace in porphyry seamed with small 
stringers of quartz. 

Crown Point.— Have cleaned out during the 
week 17 feel of the old 160 level west crosscut; total 
length cleaned, 90 feel. Resumed work during the 
week in the east crosscut and advanced it 22 feet; 
total length of crosscut to date, 150 feet; face in 
quariz and porphyry. The slopes in the mine show 
no change since last report. Milled 456 tons of ore 
during the week, the average value of which was 
$15.46 per ton. 

Belcher.— The east crosscut on the 850 level 
was advanced during the week 15 feet; total length, 
44 feet; face in quariz and porphyry. The east 
crosscut south of sha't on the 200 level has been ad- 
vanced 17 feel; total lengih, 45 feet; face in low- 
grade quartz, assaying from $5 to $10 per ton. The 
south drift on the 200 level is out 133 feet, having 
made 21 feet during the week; face in clay and 
porphyry. During the week a shaft sution 15x8x7 Ji 
was excavated and timbered on the 600 level, and a 
dri(t started south (rom it. 

Justice.— The 822 level north drift has been ad- 
vanced 6 (eet during the week ; total length, 127 feet. 
The 622 level north drilt has been advanced 37 feet; 
total length, 541 feel; face in low-grade quartz and 
porphyry. Have started an upraise from the south- 
west drift on the 490 level, with fair prospects of 
linding ore; the upraise is now up 15 feet from the 
track floor. The slopes are looking well and are 
yielding the usual quantity of ore. Shipped to the 
mUl during the week 227 tons of ore, the average 
value of which was $23.87 per ton, 

Chollak.— The north drift on the 750 level is 
out 760 feet; face in clay and quartz giving low as- 
says. The north drift on the 930 level is out 309 
feet; face in hard porphyry. 

PoTOSL— East crosscut No. 3, 520 feet south of 
north Hne, 650 level, is out 80 feet; face in quariz 
and porphyry. The east crosscut 560 feet south o( 
shaft, 930 level, is out 190 feet; face in clay and 
quariz. 

Exchequer.— The 500 level east crosscut on the 
north line is out 58 feet; face in quartz and por- 
phyry. 

Alpha. — The 500 level west crosscut 100 feet 
north of shaft is out 383 feet ; face in clay and quartz. 
Are cutting out for a winze station and sunk on ore 
foutid in the east crosscut 60 feet north of shaft. 
The north drift on the 600 level is out 75 feet; face 
in quartz, giving low assays. 

CON. New York.— The only work done in the 
mine the past week has been repairs in the north 
drift on the 800 level. 

Silver Hill.— The 260 level east crosscut, 790 
feet from shaft, advanced 15 feel through hard por- 
phyry; distance from shaft, 890 feet. The northeast 
crosscut, 430 feel from shaft, advanced ij feet 
through porphyry and clay, with small seams of 
quartz; distance from shaft, 495 feet. 

East Sierra Nevada.— On the 520 level the 
east crosscut from the south drift was advanced 42 
feet, making its total lengih 298 feet; face continues 
m porphyry, showing streaks of quariz and clay 
with some water. 

HALE& Norcross.— On the 300 level the east 
crosscut is advanced 230 feel; face in clay, porphyry 
and seams of quartz. The north upraise from the 
1300 level is advanced 75 (eet and continues in low- 
grade ore. The north drift slated from the lop of 
that upraise on the 1300 level was advanced 18 feet 
and connected with a south drift from the 1200 level 
ore slope. This connection greatly improves the 
ventilation of this part of the mine. Are still re- 



level. Are extracting ore from the 400, coo, 600 
700 and 1200 levels, and from the 1300 level up^ 



During the week have milled it 20 tons o( 
ore, the average battery assay of which was $19 80 
per ton. Have bullion on hand and at the mill 
amounting to $64,757.86. 

Ward Co.mbination SHAtT.-East drift on the 
1800 station is out 132 feet; face in porphyry 

Julia Con.— The northwest drift from the i8oo 
Ward station IS out ISO feet; face in clay and por- 
phyry. ^ 

ANDE.S.— Work has been resumed in this mine. 

Cherry Creek District. 
Merri.mac— While Pine .\nm. Jan. i- The 
Mernmac Co. of Cherry creek seems to be' in no end 
of hnancial trouble. Its creditors at home and 
abroad are clamoring for their dues. .\ Mr Nelson 
went through here a few days ago and took Deputy 
Sheriff Simpson with him to attach the company's 
properly at Cherry creek. We learn that the claim 
IS about $6000, held by San Francisco parlies. 
Eureka DIstrlot. 
Ore and Bullion Shipments.— Kureka Stnli- 
ml, Jan. 4: During the month of December. 1880 
there were shipped over the Eureka & Palisade rail- 
road the following products (rom the mines and fur- 
naces of this district: Sixty tons of Richmond lead, 
180 tons of crude bullion, 534 tons o( ore and 13 
tons o( scrap iron destined (or Salt Lake and San 
Francisco. The ore shipments were small, as none 
has been hauled from the mines for two weeks past. 
Jefferson District. 
At Work. — Belmont Courier. Jan. i: Work on 
the various mining claims in Jefferson district is 
prosecu'ed as usual. The Harrison Bros, are still 
encountering rich ore in their mine. 

Pblladelpbia DIstrlot. 
Widening.— Belmont Courier, Jan. i: The pay 
streak in the Laily mine in East Belmont is widen- 
ing as the work of sinking progresses. This is prov- 
ing one of the best properties in the district. 
Ploche DIstrlot. 
Ravmond %nM~i.- Record, Jan. r: The main 
work going on at the Raymond shaft of the Pioche 
Con. Co.'s mines of late, viz.: that of opening up 
the Black Ledge winze, west of the shaft on the 12th 
level, was brought to a rather sudden stop Wednes- 
day about noon, the immediate cause being a settling 
of the hill back of the hoisting works and directly 
behind the air-compressor, which forced the wall of 
the building against the fly-wheel of the machine 
and made a stop necessary to avoid serious damage. 
The winze at the time was clear for a depth of 187 
feet. Sufficient warning was given to allow the 
pumps and air-pipe connections to be removed from 
the winze. Ordinarily an accident of this character 
would necessitate a stoppage of work for less than 
24 hours, but occurring at this particular time it is 
not likely that work will be resumed for several 
weeks on account of the difficulty experienced in 
gelling in wood. Thirty cords a day are needed, and 
in such weather as we have had for several weeks 
past it is practically impossible to get in anv at all 
The reserve wood has been consumed during the 
bad weather until on stopping work on Wednesday a 
supply for eight days only remained on hand. Dur- 
ing the 24 hours preceding the accident seven feel 
was gained on the water, and this rate continued 
for a few days would have enabled the workmen to 
recover the pump submerged years ago on the I4lh 
station. 

TuBcarora Olstrlcc. 
Nevada Qv^^n.— Tlmes-Rtuiew, Jan, 6: Joint 
crosscut from 600-foot level of North Belle Isle has 
been advanced 34 feel, cutting seams of spar and 
must be very close to the vein. 

Belle Isle.— West crosscut from the south drift 
250-foot level, extended 14 feet; rock hard, showine 
faces of ore. 

Navajo.— A cleanup is being made at the mill 
preparatory to closing down. 

North Commonwealth.— 3d level: Joint cross- 
cut has been extended 11 feet, showing low-grade 
ore. East crosscut, from south drift, has been ad- 
vanced 14 feet, all in vein formation showing some 
mineral. 
Grand Prize, 



ready for work next spring. The ore looks well 
and everything is encouraging. At the Rock creek 
camp both hydrauhc and quariz machinerv have 
been taken in and considerable work has been done 
.^1 the Okanagan, much prospecting has been done 
and one claim has been bonded to an American 
company for $55,000. Greal expectations are held 
out lor next season. On Shuswap lake several good 
locations have been made, from which samples of 
ore have been taken assaying very high. Owing to 
lack pf capital the claims are not thoroughly de- 
veloped. The Allingham claim on the North 
I hompson has been further developed this season 
a shaft being sunk 45 feel. The prospects are good 
lor a paying mine. Other claims have been located 
in the vicinity o( Mr. Allingham's. At lamieson 
creek two locations have been made by',\Iunn& 
Co. , from the Toad mountain district. The pros- 
pects are very favorable and the claims will be fur- 
ther developed in the spring. One man is working 
in the claim during the winter. Some development 
work has been done this season on the coal s-ams 
near Kamloops. Not sufficient has been accom- 
plished, however, to say whether the find will pay 
to work. Nothing has been done on the coal find 
on the North Thompson. On Siwash creek, near 
Vernon, considerable excitement was occasioned 
during the summer on account of the diggings 
found there. About 150 claims were recorded, and 
the creek was fairly well worked with varying results. 
There are three or (our claims working all winter 
Some of the claims paid $3 a day per roan, but this 
was exceptional, and it is said the camp did not pan 
out as well as was anticipated. 

COLORADO. 



Smaller Camps.— Kamloops Senllnel, Jan. 2: 
There are several mining camps throughout the in- 
tenor which are not sufficiently developed to require 
an extended notice. At Cherry creek the Hidden 
Treasure Co. have accomplished nothing during the 

timbering the main' incline at and below-.h-e^oo | S d''ev:io^,Ser:or1t"1lo'?e'°and t' quaJu mm 
level statton; also the main shaft above the 1200 ' has been taken in this season and p"epara?ions made 



Face of north crosscut on the 
500-foot level advanced 15 feet through more favor- 
able ground. 

North Belle Isle.— Owing to the unprece- 
dented weather, concentration has been temporarily 
suspended. 

Del Monte.— No. 2 west crosscut, 00 ist level 
has been advanced 8 feel; work has been suspended 
at this point for the present, the miners having been 
put to work driving a drift north from joint 
crosscut; this drift is showing good ore Joint 
crosscut east on 2d level has been advanced 12 feef 
the rock is hard, but breaks well. On the 3d level 
joint crosscut continues to show low grade. 

ARIZONA. 

Yavapai.— Arizona /(7i;r«a^A/!«c/-, Jan. i: Par- 
ties are examining the Alligator mine in Crook can- 
yon, with a view of purchasing. It is one of the 
best gold properties in Yavapai county. Ten bars 
of gold bullion from the Crowned King mine were 
shipped out by express yesterday. Street rumor has 
It that Phelps, Dodge & Co. have ordered a mill to 
arrive soon, to work the ore from the Senator mine 
A deed has been filed for record from Dan O' Boyle 
and O. S. Morse to Wm. Smith, Jr., for six mines 
in Quartz mountain district. One-half interest in 
the Shannon mine. Humbug district, has been sold 
to Peter Arnold for $500. John Proutt has re- 
turned to Prescott, and will lake charge as foreman 
of the Senator. The marble quarry near Mayer 
owned by Geo. B. McCann and Joseph Mayer, has 
attracted considerable attention, and the prospects 
are good now for getting machinery to cut and pol- 
ish the marble. Seven mills are engaged in crush- 
ing ore now in this county, and two smelters are 
also in full blast, with a prospect for the number be- 
ing increased in the spring, 

BRITISH OOLDMBIA. 



Important Development.— Aspen Times, Jan. 
2: Reports that come from the Mineral Farm are 
to the effect that the recently-discovered ore body 
continues to improve in appearance, and the man- 
agement now feel convinced that they have a pay 
mine. It is not our purpose to discuss here the char, 
acler ol the developments, but simply to point out 
the important bearing that the opening of a bonanza 
mine at that point will have upon the (ulure prosper- 
ity o( Aspen. The discovery, if it proves to be a 
really good one, will be important for two reasons. 
The mine is at a point much farther north on the 
belt than any other pay mine and the discovery will 
prove the value of several thousand feet of the lode. 
While this will be a source of congratulation, there 
is another feature that will be of even more value to 
the district. The developments in the Mineral Farm 
have been upon an extended and expensive scale. It 
has not been one of those properties in which rich 
results have been attained with comparatively little 
exploration. Large sums of money have been ex- 
pended and repeated disappointments have been 
met with, but the gentlemen who have been pushing 
the enterprise have never hesitated, and at last suc- 
cess appears to have been attained. We have al- 
ways held that there was no section of 1500 feet of 
this contact that would not prove up rich if thor- 
oughly prospected. Their success is a great card 
for Aspen, and the Mineral Farm can be pointed to 
as a signal illustration of the proof of the claim that 
it will pay to develop any property on the belt no 
matter what expense may be required to prove it up. 
It proves that this camp is not one of those where 
there is one small section rich, with miles of barren 
extension. It proves that the rich ore chutes lie 
along the lode at pretty regular intervals and that 
future exploration will continue to disclose their 
treasures until the developed series shall extend all 
the way to some point near Ashcroft on the south 
and perhaps to the boundary of the county on the 
Morth. 

Mineral Output.— Idaho Springs News, Jan. 
2: The value of Colorado's mineral output for the 
year 1889 is estimated at $30,000,000, During 
the month of December there were shipped from the 
station at this place 131 cars containing 3,684,000 
pounds of ore, an excess of 979.450 pounds over the 
shipments for November. During the year 1889 
Clear creek county shipped to the Omaha and Grant 
smelter 13,661 tons of ore carrying 3,732,178 pounds 
of lead, 1,092,203 ounces of silver, 12.436.73 ounces 
of gold valued at $1,414,63876. The ore shipped 
from this county to the above smelter had more value 
than that shipped by any other county in the State. 
The Champion mine during nine months ending 
Dec, 3r, 1889, produced smelting ore and concen- 
trates to the value of $73,784,28, The ore is low 
grade, and it required a large quantity carefully and 
skillfully treated, to produce the above amount. 

Crested Butte.— Elk Mountain Pilot, Jan. 2: 
We have been in the habit at the end of every year 
of publishing a detailed statement of the mineral out- 
put for the year, but the output is so painfully small 
the past year from the silver mines that we have very 
little to state. This state of affairs is no fault of the 
mines — no mines have played out, because they have 
not been worked to get played out. Such mines as 
the Sylvanite, Augusta, Daisy and the Ruby Chief 
group, which have always been depended upon to 
make an output, failed to ship anything at all. 
There was only about 300 tons shipped, the most of 
which comes from the Forest Queen and the Black 
Queen mines. We are promised better things for 
the coming year. 



and conUnuous run some lime dming the present 
mon h. Ore from the company's re«nt puSe 
the Calumet, will be put through. This purchaS 
Ther'"V.?'"»r'"^ "-eto Iro^Hillsticfhode^. 
The ore IS full of pyrites, a valuable factor in the 
process by which it is to be treated, A portion of 
I^arteTu'^'" ^° '° ">e Galena smeller whenk is 
DlanrbloTsin'"""^'™' "'""'^ ^^'^ "•<= '-° «■" 

IDAHO. 

Yreka District. -Wardner Ncu.s, Ian. i- 
Among other promising claims in this district which 
have been patented during the year are the Idaho h 
bilver Casket lodes, the first westerly extensions of ihe 
Sierra Nevada Over $1000 have been expended in 
development of these claims this year, and in the 
near (mure they wiU, be thoroughly and systemati- 
cally developed. These prospective bonanzas ai^e 
owned by R. E. Brown, J. G. Gable and C. F. 
rurbush, 

LOWER CALIFORNIA. 

Among the MiLLS.-Alanio Nui;gH, Dec. 28: 
Col.S.fJ. Lucas returned a tew days ago in com- 
pany with Messrs. L. P. Uoldstone and W. S Bell 
of San Francisco. The colonel is an indefatigable 
worker, and we are glad to learn that he is succeed- 
ing in putting the affiirs of his company in such 
shape as to enable them to begin active operations 
at their stamp-mill in Mexican Gulch. The com 
pany has been reorganized under the name of the 
Liberty Mining and Milling Co. Messrs. Gold- 
stone and Bell are well pleased with Alamo. The 
Huntington mill, belonging to the International 
Co., IS at a standstill, but we believe it will start up 
again soon. The new amalgamator, Mr. Dobler of 
San Francisco, will arrive here soon, at which time 
the El Paso mill will resume operations. The Alamo 
mill IS grinding away again at a good rate on custom 
rock. We congratulate Mr. Lane on bis vigorous 
policy. This mill is now and has been a favorite 
with the camp. Since the new Gates rock-breaker 
has been added and the new pump and bed plates 
are in place, it is thought that even better results 
may be expected than the record of the mill has al- 
ready shown. The Torres mill under efficient 
present management is doing good work and run- 
ning quite steadily. Mr. Moore recently bought a 
large amount of ore from the Asbestos mine, which 
will produce an excellent cleanup, 

MONTANA. 

Struck it Rich.— Three assays made by I. C. 
Pyle, the Granite assayer, for John Whiting, of sam- 
ples from bis recent strike in the Montana, Red Lion 
district, run as follows: No, i, 112.40 ounces sil- 
ver and $2524 gold; No. 2, H0.6 ounces silver and 
$968 gold; No, 3, II. 5 ounces silver and $112 gold 
Mr. Whiting now thinks himself a millionaire, and 
if the above result continues even one-tenth as good 
he will have millions. Mr. Whiting refused a bond 
on Ihe property (or $20,000 the other day. 

DuNKLEBERG DISTRICT.— Mining in the Dunkle- 
berg district is keeping apace with other mineral 
sections in the State and at present is experiencing 
quite a boom. The Forest Rose, which is at present 
the most valuable mine in the district, is looking 
well. They are now shipping one carioad of ore 
each day and have about 40 carioads on the dump 
ready for shipment with plenty more in sight in the 
mine. The Rose is likely to be one of the richest 
mines in Deer Lodge county. There is some talk 
of the Hatta starting up again, but it is doubtful if 
this will be done before spring opens up. Numer- 
ous prospects are being worked and all are looking 
extremely well. It is expecled that with the open- 
ing of spring there will be quite a stir in the district. 

0TAH. 



DAKOTA. 

SEMI-MONTHLY CLEANUP.— Deadwood Pioneer, 
Jan. 3: Bullion from the Caledonia, Homeslake 
and associated mines, representing cleanup for the 
last half of December, was brought down yesterday 
and deposited in Wells-Fargo's express office. It 
amounts to about $170,000 and goes East to-day. 

No Jumping Yet. — No cases of mine jumping 
have yet been reported, but this does not necessarily 
argue that no mines have been jumped. Though 
assessment work was much more general last than 
for several years before, it is certain that a large 
number of claims were neglected and it is also quite 
probable that a goodly portion of these will be re- 
located. 

Black Hills Bullion. — The production of the 
Deadwood Terra Mining Co. for the first half of 
December was $22,176 from 8846 tons of ore. The 
production of the Homestake Mining Co. for the 
first half of December was I34.667 from 10,240 tons 
of ore. The company's credit balance increased 
from $35,603 on Oct. 1st to $50,396 on Nov. 1st. 

Iron Hill. — The Iron Hill Co. has commenced 
shipping matte accumulated from recent runs by the 
smelter. The plant will blow in again for another 



Camp Crosscuts.— Park Record, Jan. 4: The 
Crescent will inaugurate shipments of firsl-class ore 
by means of sleds in a little while. Shipments of 
ore have been rather light again this week on ac- 
count of the drifting snowstorms. Since the heavy 
snowstorm several miners have come down from 
the mountains and are engaged in working their 
Treasure hill and other properties near town. The 
road to the Anchor has been about as effectually 
blockaded as it is possible to be, and this has caused 
a delay in starting up the shaft-boring machinery, 
but it is believed that a good start will be made to- 
day. The shaft on the Silver King property, just 
above the Mayflower No, 7, is down about 100 (eet 
and the calculation is to go down another 100 feet 
before drifting. The indications for ore are very 
favorable and it is possible that the shaft will open 
into ore at any time. Work continues at the Creole 
No. 2, though not on as large a scale since the leas- 
ers were notified by a representative of the Townsite 
Company that he claimed the ore for trespass and 
damages. More ore is being sacked up and it is 
still believed that the troubled will be amicably set- 
tled. The Nevada-Northland leasers have secured 
the services of Jas. T. Kescel as night foreman, and 
they are taking out ore with as much speed as pos- 
sible and at the same time are opening new ground 
on the vein. The Nevada-Northland ore is very 
high-grade smelting and shipments to market 
will be gradually increased. Developments at the 
Woodside are of a very satisfactory nature and more 
ore is being taken out of the tunnel workings. The 
new strike is a big one. In running the south drift 
from the 200-foot level of the shaft a nice vein was 
struck a few days ago, and it is believed that it will 
open out into a big body of ore. Another impor- 
tant strike has been made in the Comstock mine. 
Only a few days ago the south crosscut, commenc- 
ing from a point 750 feet in the tunnel, revealed a 
fine seam of ore which assays well in silver and lead. 
The crosscut is in about 40 feet and will be contin- 
ued. Work will be kept up at the Comstock all 
winter and by spring everything will be in readiness 
to put up the big hoisting works and sink the shaft 
to a depth of 600 feet on the vein. 

Ore and Bullion Shipments. — The Ontario 
bullion shipment for the week was 38 bars, contain- 
ing 23.051.25 fine ounces of silver. During the 
week the Mackintosh sampler received and for- 
warded 520,060 pounds of Ontario ore; 278,750 of 
Mayflower No. 7 leasers'; 89.150 of Woodside, in- 
cluding 24,830 of dump sortings, and 52,100 of 
Nevada-Northland leasers' ore; total, 940,060 
pounds. 



24 



MmiNG AND Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 11, 1890 



'II^ECHAjMieAL Progress, 

Failure of Copper Steam Pipes. 

Qaite a diBcussion ia going on in England 
over the frequent failures of copper steam 
pipes. The failure seems nsually to take place 
at the seam where the pipe is brazed together, 
and quite naturally, since the pipe at this 
point 18 thinner than elsewhere and is composed 
of brass instead of copper, a metal of much lees 
tensile strength. The trouble is that the most 
careful workmanship is needed to insure a good 
joint, and as surely as the brazing is imperfect- 
ly done, trouble will ensue. 

The Engineer also propounds the hypothesis 
that a steam pipe is often subjected to much 
vibration and bending stress, which the brass 
at the joint will not endure, even when the 
brazing is thoroughly well done. In this way 
is explained the fact that pipes which have 
borne 300 pounds pressure under test have 
afterward burst open when working under half 
that pressure. Various remedies are proposed 
and tried for the trouble. In the Hamburg- 
American steamer Columbia the builders have 
wound the steam pipes with wire. iSteel hoop- 
ing and the use of seamless drawn copper tubes 
have been suggested, but for the large pipes the 
elbows must still be made of sheet metal. 

The real remedy is very tentatively suggested 
by the Engineer, which says, mildly : '*It may 
yet be founJ practicable to produce steel tabes 
deserving confidence." To an observer on this 
side the water it would seem that very ordi- 
nary steel pipe, auoh as may be bought for a 
fraction of the price of copper pipe, is deserv- 
ing of a great deal more confidence than a pipe 
with a longitudinal seam whose strength ia de- 
pendent on the Buocess of the delicate metal- 
lurgical operation of brazing. 

It may indeed be that it is not possible to 
use steel steam pipes in marine practice, but 
our cousins over the water were once sure that 
nothing but a copper fire-box would do for a 
locomotive until we, through our necessity, 
found out better. We are not inclined now, 
therefore, to take their assertion that it is 
necesaary to make steam pipes of copper as set- 
tling the question. 

Oar contemporary, the Engineer, indeed 
says: *' It is urged that steel tubes are liable 
to corrosion, and that scale is blown from them 
into the engines with bad results; also that they 
are not sufficiently flexible. Saeing that there 
are hundreds of miles of iron pipes in use on 
land, these objections are more imaginary than 
real; but perhaps the best pipe of all would be 
galvanized steel." 

From the theoretical point of view, it would 
certainly seem that steel rather than copper ia 
the proper metal for steam pipea. The boiler 
itself, which is subjected to the corroaion of the 
hot salt water, is made of steel; and since the 
steam pipe is aubjected ordinarily only to the 
action of water condensed from the steam and 
practically free from saline matter, there seems 
little need of protecting the pipe from corroaion. 
Id case the formation of scsle proves an objec- 
tion, it would seem an easy matter to prevent 
its reachicg the cylinders by placing a separator 
next the engioe. 

We are not informed what practice American 
builders of marine engines are now following, 
but for our new naval veaaela, at least, in whose 
success all are interested, it would certainly 
be best to refrain from following ancient 
practice in this matter, at least until careful 
teats have proved that mild steel is not a 
proper material for steam pipes.' — Engineering 
News. 

A Probable Faiaiiie in Eaglish Hema- 
tite Iron Ore. 

The Boglish correspondent of the American 
Manufacturer has for some time been asserting 
that there was a great possibility that a short 
supply of hematite iron ore would soon be en- 
countered by English iron-masters. These 
progQcistlcations are now fully considered as 
more than a matter of "probability." The 
Manufacturer says : The consumption of 
hemacite ores by the furnaces on the west coast 
of England in the past few months haa been on 
a scale much in excess of the production, and 
had it not been for the large stocks of ores that 
were held at various miuea the production of 
pig iron would have been very much restricted, 
aud both ores and pig iron reached a price that 
they have not yet attained. By the end of the 
year, however (which has now been reached), 
these surplus stocks will have been exhausted, 
and the makers of hematite iron on the west 
coast will have to depend, so far as relates to 
Eaglish ore, upon the output of the mines, 
which is insufficient to keep up the present rate 
of production. 

In view of these facts vigorous efforts are be- 
ing made to discover new deposits of ore. The 
west coast hematite ore region is being searched 
by owners of royalties with an energy that they 
have not displayed for many years ; an energy 
that is being stimulated by the fact that these 
ores are worth from $4 25 to $4,50 net at the 
mines, and it is no wonder that prospecting is 
being pushed when such tempting prices are 
ruling. The average value of these ores in 
1887 was but $2.30 and in 1S86 $2,64. 

Tbe makers of hematite iron in Eagland are 
not only searching their own country for in« 
creased supplies but are looking to foreign 
sources, in addition to the large amounts uen- 
ally bionght from Bilbao and elsewhere. Some 



cargoes of ore from Carthagena have already 
been sent from the west coast and others are to 
follow. 

Such a falling off of this most indispensable 
character of ore, in connection with the con- 
stantly increasing demand for the same, will no 
doubt soon result either in an active demand 
in England for American hematite ores, of 
which we have an abundance, or a call for 
American high-class iron in Europe, 

Horse Nails by the Bushel. — We "have 
already made notice of the invention of a ma- 
chine for the manufacture of horse-nails. We 
give below from the Toronto, Canada, Journal 
an account of the working of snch a machine 
in London : Some practical exhibitions of a 
novelty in the way of horae-nail-making ma- 
chinery have recently been given in L'jndon, 
Eag. It is the invention of Mr. G. P. Capewell, 
and is an ingenious mechanical appliance for 
greatly increasing the rate of production. The 
entire process is automatic. A coil of wire is 
at the top, and one end being inserted the ma- 
chine is set in motion, and in a very few sec- 
onds a constant stream of finished nails comes 
dropping out at the bottom. The following de- 
tails of the work are, as stated, all carried out 
automatically: A short piece of wire is out off 
aud by a series of dies is drawn out to the re- 
quired length; it is then beveled, pointed and 
headed. Eich piece passes through a dozen 
operations consecutively, without the interven- 
tion of hand labor at any one of them. The 
machine is completely under control, and there 
is an arrangement by which it stops automati- 
cally if a nail fails to pass through any one of 
the operations. It is said that each machine 
will produce over 600 pounds of average-sized 
nails per day of ten hours. The nails produced 
were subjected to hydraulic tests, and the 
results are greatly in favor of the Capewell 
machine for producing strong nails of most per- 
fect shape. There appears to be very little waste 
material, and we are told that this does not 
amount to 10 per cent. It is proposed to form 
a company to produae and work this machine 
in Great Britain, 



A Land-Clearing Machine — A Santa Rosa 
inventor has devised a machine for clearing laud 
that is attracting attention. Concerning a re- 
cent trial on Gay Grosse's place in Kincon val- 
ley, the Democrat says : With ita use stumps 
and trees which it would take an experienced 
and stalwart wood-chopper half a day to re- 
move from the soil, are dragged out by the 
roots, scarcely the smallest fibrous vestige be- 
ing left in the ground, in two and three min- 
utes, and apparently without the expenditure 
of great force. The ease with which these 
stubborn impediments to agricultural develop- 
ment are removed is due to the mechanical 
construction of the machine, which is in the 
form of a capstan. Around the drum of the 
capstan a heavy cable winds, the other end be- 
ing attached by meana of a heavy chain to the 
stump or tree. This cable is 160 feet in length, 
and, by meana of a patent block, any part of it 
can be hitched to the tree. The shaft which 
turns the drum is 15 feet in length aud is drawn 
with ease by one horse. Dividing the length of 
the shaft by half the diameter of the drum — 
five inches — it gives the multiplying power of 
the machine as 36. By the means of another 
block, the power of the machine is increased to 
72 times that of the horse which turna the 
shaft. The machine works on a hillsidB as well 
as on level ground, and two acres of land may 
be cleared without changing its position, 

Nickel Steel is attracting the attention of 
metallargists as the result of a paper read be- 
fore the Iron and Steel Institute, in May last, 
by Mr. James Riley of Glasgow. It is olaimed 
that tests made with an alloy of 95.3 per cent 
steel and 4.7 per cent nickel showed au increase 
in breaking stress from 30 to 40 6 tons per 
square inch, and the elastic limit was raised 
from 16 to 28 tons. The hardness oan be in- 
creased 20 per cent. Steel rich in nickel is 
practically non-corrodible, 25 per cent of nickel 
increasing this quality in the proportion of 10 
to $70. Some ot the breaking strains are said 
to have reached 87 and even 95^ tons per square 
inch. The possibilities of this new alloy are 
rousing the nickel producers, and especially 
the Canadian Copper Co., which claims to have 
the best nickel mines outside of New Caledonia, 



Metallic Railroad Ties seem to be con 
stantly but gradually working their way into 
general use. About 600 metallic ties have re- 
cntly been laid on the track of the Chicago & 
Western railroad at Chicago. These are the 
first metallic ties that have been laid in the 
West. The tie is a metallic trough in which 
the rails rest upon a wooden block, thus avoid- 
ing metal contact, and are clampsd firmly and 
securely in place without the use of fish-plates 
or angle-bars. The necessity for drilling the 
rails is thus obviated, and they are notched 
only when creeping plates are used under the 
joints. In riding over the tracks the change 
in passing from the wooden to metallic ties is 
said to be very noticeable in the greater 
smoothness. — Trade and Traffic. 

German Patents. — Baring the recent dis- 
cussion of the German Patent laws in the Reich- 
stag, it was revealed that last year Germany 
gf-auted only 3921 patents, against England's 
9779 and the Uaited States' 20 420. While in 
modt civilized countries the number of patents 
annually granted ia increasing, or, at least, not 
deoreaaing, the number in Germany has fallen 
off 927 in the last five years, 



SeiENTiFie Fflocbress. 



Phenomenal Gifts. 

Peculiar gifts in relation to the power of the 
unedncated human mind in certain given direc- 
tions are frequently brought to the knowledge 
of the world, and as yet without the remotest 
idea being snggested in regard to the laws or 
means by which these peculiar gifts are brought' 
into power. The reader will readily call to 
mind Blind Tom, the pianist, and quite a num- 
ber who have manifested this peculiar power in 
regard to figures. Indeed, music and mathe- 
matics seem to be the two directions in which 
these remarkable developments are generally 
made; although there are other directions in 
which they sometimes appear. The celebrated 
Sweet of New Eagland is an example of this 
kind in surgery. 

The latest novelty of this has appeared in the 
vicinity of Louisville, Ky., in the person of an 
unedncated negro. A late reference to this 
person is given by the Louisville Commercial 
as follows: Sam Summers, the negro prodigy, 
was in town recently, and, as usual, entertained 
a large crowd, who were testing him with all 
kinds of mathematical problems. Summers is 
a negro 34 years old, without the slightest edu- 
cation. He cannot read or write, and does not 
know one figure from another. He is a com- 
mon farm hand, and' to look at him and watch 
his actions he seem^ to be about half-witted, 
but his quick and invariably correct answer to 
any example in arithmetic, no matter how dif- 
ficult;, is simply wonderful. With the hun- 
dreds of testa that he has submitted to, not a 
single time has he failed to give the correct 
answer in every instance. 

Some examples given him were as follows: 
How much gold can be boueht for ^792 in 
greenbacks if gold is worth $1.65? Multiply 
597,312 by 13|. If a grain of wheat produoeB 
seven grains, and these be sown the seoond 
year, each yielding the same increase, how 
miny bushels will be produced at this rate in 
12 years, if 1000 grains make a pint? If the 
velocity of sound is 1142 feet per second, the 
pulsation of the heart 70 per minute, after see- 
ing a Bash of lightning there are 20 pulsations 
counted before you hear it thunder, what dis- 
tance ia the cloud from the earth, and what is 
the time after seeing the fiish of lightning un- 
til you hear the thunder ? A commission mer- 
ohant receives 70 bags of wheat, each contain- 
ing three bushels, three pecks and three quarts. 
How many bushels did he receive? And bo on. 

With Robinson's, R»y'a and other higher 
arithmetics before them, those who have test- 
ed him as yet have been unable to find any ex- 
ample that with a few momenta' thought on his 
part he is not able to correctly answer. 

Stanley's GeograpMcal Discoveries. 

It will probably turn out that Stanley's latest 
geographical diBooverlea in the equatorial regiona 
of Africa have been of as much importance as 
those made by him on previous expeditions, or 
that have been made by any of the African ex- 
plorers. There is more than a hint of the 
value of his recent discoveries in his announce- 
ment that the Victoria Nyanza is a much 
larger body of water than had heretofore been 
shown on any map. Stanley's discoveries add 
1900 square miles to this lake; and what is of 
even greater importance, it is shown that it 
extenda so far snuth that the actual distance 
between the Victoria Nyauza and Lake 
Tanganyka is only 155 miles, whereas the dis- 
tance heretofore computed has not been less 
than 250 miles. These two lakes afford a 
length of navigable waters somewhat exceeding 
500 miles. The other lakes, as they are fig- 
ured by the best authorities, have navigable 
waters hardly less in extent. That is, there 
are about 1000 miles of navigable waters af- 
forded by these great inland seas. 

Now, the nearer they are to each other the 
better it will be for all the future interests of 
commerce. Oo two of these great lakes, steam- 
ers have been plying for many years. The the- 
ory has long been a favorite one that all the 
navigable lakes of Equatorial Africa would 
finally be joined together by short lines of rail- 
road, and chat the lakes thus united would be- 
come a great commercial highway in Central 
Africa. These lakes have already become of 
new importance in that sense, by the organiza- 
tion of the Free State of Congo, which, while 
it nowhere borders on any of these waters, haa 
an exterior boundary near enough to derive 
great benefit from the future development of 
commerce by meana of thifl great chain of in- 
land navigation. 

Observations on Eclipses of the Sun. — 
Professor David P. Todd of the late expedition 
to the west coast of Africa to observe the 
eclipse which took place Dec. 223, says that 
the chief purpose of these observations is not 
to find the distance to the sun, as many sup- 
pose, but to find out with the highest degree of 
accuracy the position of the moon's diameter 
relative to that of the snn at several recorded 
instants of observation. The data so obtained 
bear directly upon the betterment of the numer- 
ical data from which the astronomer predicts 
the position of the moon and is a matter of 
serious moment in the future of the science of 
navigation and in further improvement of 
astronomical tables and theories of the motion 
of the moon. But in addition to this purpose, 
the last 20 years have seen a great development 



of the science of solar physios, and observations 
of the solar corona, only Been at time of total 
eclipse, have much to do with this acieoce. 
No one yet knows what this corona really is, 
and its study is depended upon to still further 
develop our present imperfect knowledge of the 
laws governing solar energy and the constitn- 
tion of the sun itself. The importance of taking 
advantage of every solar eclipse oan be appre- 
ciated when it is nnderetood that in the last 
100 years only a few hours over one day have 
been available for this purpose. Photography 
is the most powerful adjunct of the eclipse 
observer of to-day. These plates preserve the 
precise figure and relative brightness of the 
corona and all ita streamers with the highest 
precision, and permit careful and leisurely study 
to supplant the hasty and imperfect observa- 
tions of only a few years ago. Spectroscopic 
investigation is also added to photography. 

A Glass Telephone. — Jerome Prince of 
Milford, Maas., while lately reflecting upo;athe 
varied musical sounds given out by glass tum- 
blers, when more or less partially filled with 
water and properly manipulated, conceived the 
idea that these vibrations might be brought to 
some practical utilicy in connection with the 
telephone. With this conception he immedi- 
ately set to work to demonstrate his idea with 
the following result, as given by the Boston 
Journal of Commerce, *' The new telephone" 
which he has constructed, " consists of a dia> 
phragm or transmitter of simple glass, resting 
on a number of glass rods, and these commnni- 
catiog with an ordinary wire. The line in 
operation at Milford extends from a grocery on 
Main street to the residence of one of the pro- 
prietors, a distance perhaps of some 30 rods, 
pasaing some five or six sharp angles before 
reaching its destination. Over this wire the 
ticking of a watch can be distinctly heard, and 
a whispered converBation carried on with no 
difficulty whatever. The distance that sound 
can be transmitted with the new telephone 
varies according to the thickness of the glass 
transmitter. The one in consideration allows a 
whispered conversation three miles, and by 
using a thicker glass a much longer distance. 
It makes no difference how many angles the 
wire takes in reaching its deatination, the 
sound is transmitted just as readily. Another 
peculiarity of the invention is the increased in- 
tensity of the sound that is transmitted. Each 
vibration seems to gather strength and force 
from the vibrations behind it, and when the 
sound reaches the ear of the auditor it is won- 
derfully clear and distinct," 



The Wind at Top of the Eiffel Tower — 
Cireful observations were made last summer 
to determine the difference in the velocity of 
the wind at 65 feet above the ground at the 
Eiffel tower and at the top, 995 feet above 
the ground. Up to the 1st of October last 
complete observations had been obtained for 
101 days, and from these it appears that on an 
average the velocity of the wind is about 3 1 
times aa great at the more lofty station as it 
is at the lower. Moreover, the breeze at the 
top is always fairly strong, as during the whole 
of the summer months in which observations 
were taken, the'' average velocity of the breeze 
throughout any given day always exceeded 
23 ft. per second, and during 21 per cent of the 
whole period of the observations this average 
daily velocity was upward of 33 ft. per second. 
No great storm seems to have occurred during 
the time over which the observations extend, 
and we do not know the maximum wind veloc- 
ity registered during this time. 



The Hight of Ocean Waves haa long been 
a source of much speculation among scientists 
and others. Various meana have been adopted 
to reach accuracy, but hitherto with very little 
success. Perhaps the following may be con- 
sidered as near perfection as any device hitherto 
employed. We copy from an exchange: *' An 
interesting feat has just been acoompliBhed by 
Hon. Ralph Abercromby, who baa succeeded 
in measuring the bight of ocean waves by float- 
ing a sensitive aneroid barometer on the surface, 
and in gaging their width and velocity by 
timing their passages with a chronograph. 
Aa a result of these experiments, he supports 
Admiral Fitzroy in the conclusion that waves 
occasionally reaoh an altitude of 60 feet. The 
highest wave measured by Mr. Abercromby 
was 46 feet high, 765 feet from crest to crest, 
and had a velocity of 47 miles per hour." 

The Gulf Stream. — It haa been noticed for 
many yeare that the flow of the Gulf Stream 
appears to be approaching nearer and nearer to 
the Eastern coast of the Union. The question 
jast now seems to have acquired a new interest, 
due to an article recently pnbliahed in the 
Boston Transcript, by Lieut. Downes, U. S. !N ., 
wherein that gentleman states that this great 
ocean current is now flowing nearer to the New 
England shore than has probably ever been 
known before. This is in part at least owing 
to the weakness of the Arctic current, and its 
entire absence at times, in the North Atlantic. 
Lieut, Bownes thinks this proximity of the 
warm GulflStream to our coast accounts for the 
comparatively mild, open winters of the past 
two years. 

Forests and the Rainfall. — A drouth 
which has prevail^ in South Africa is said to 
be due to the same cause that mined Egypt, 
Mesopotamia and India, once the moat fertile 
countries in the world. It is the destruction of 
the forests. 



1 



Jan. 11, 1890.J 



Mining and Scientific Press, 



25 



-ECTPjeiTY, 



Electrical Progress. 

A great advance in the applioation of eleo* 
trioity (or the purpose of lif(ht and power dar* 
inf^ the preient year will certaioly exceed that 
of all previous time. A glanco at the oolamos 
of any of the weekly eleotriual journals of any 
date during the past year will show that 
handredB of arc and thouBands of Incandescent 
laoaps, and miles of electric railway have been 
contracted for. 

Electric motors, says Stationary Engineer^ 
have been mannfactared at a rate of upward 
of 250 per week, and their average rating will 
exceed 700 horse*power. 

The series system of incandescent lighting, 
whioh gives cheap dlstribation over extended 
areas, and can be easily and cheaply extended 
at any time, is being adopted by villages^ and 
Lb bailed as a blessing by the older people, 
whose eyesight is growing; dim aa age 
advances. 

The incandescent lamp in the homes of peo- 
ple of very moderate ciroumstanoes is a fact 
of to-day, and the price at which it is furnished 
ia Ifoand to be within their means. This is 
another triumph in the field of electric lighting, 
for the incandesoent light can now be 
introduced into places where gas will never be 
able to compete. The flexibility and Bimpllolly 
of the series incandescent system will make it 
the poor man's friend, for in any place where 
underground wiring is not compnlsory, the in- 
candescent lamp can be farniehed at a lees cost 
than would be charged for the same amount of 
light from gas. Electric railways are so 
rapidly multiplying in the United States, that 
reliable data is old and comparatively worthless 
by the time it ia compiled. 

Motors have been introduced for all oonoeiv* 
able purposes to which power can be applied, 
and small industries run by electrical power 
have started np in many plaoes where steam- 
power could not have been utilized. Motors 
of all the different designs that have been 
proven of value find a ready sale, and the 
factories engaged in their manufacture are, in 
many cases, being enlarged. The storage 
battery is being extensively applied to the 
many purposes for whioh it is applicable. 



Fusible Fire-Pldgs fob Electric Lioht 
WiBES. — Mayor Hait of Boiiton, who has been 
visiting a number of^oities, etndying their 
electric-light systems, was recently in Chicago. 
To a reporter he ia etated to have said that he 
believed that the only means to guard against 
the danger to buildings from fire from the elec- 
tric wires was by using fusible plugs, placed 
outside the building and protected from water. 
As to the neefulnesB of these appliances to 
a certain degree, there can be no question, but 
we hardly think Mayor Hart meant to be 
quoted as pronouncing them the only means of 
safety. That electric lighting will soon be 
made as safe from accident aa illuminating gas 
hardly admits of a question. If our metropol- 
itan Solona will use their endeavors to secure 
means of safety from electric wires as earnestly 
as they are now seeking to put a stop to one of 
the most important discoveries of the age, they 
will accomplish much more good. Electricity 
in all its phases has come to stay, and don't 
yOD forget it. 



for the purpose of making a study of what to 
them is a never-ceasing wonder, the eleotrio light. 
They are said to represent a Chinese syndicate 
whioh has a ninety years* contract with the Im- 
perial Government to furnish all the publio 
buildings and otfices with electric light. They 
will go from New York to Pittsbarg to con- 
tinae their study of the subject. 

Why Not Rei'DOIatk Stkkkt Caus and 
Illi*minatinu Gas? — Tne records of deaths in 
the city of Now York showed that there were 
killed by street-cars during the year 1888 no 
less than Hi persons, and by illuminating gas 
-3, making the number killed by the electric 
current (5j insignificant compared with the 
deaths of indivldaalB from any of the other 
causes named. 



So It Is Said. — The operator of an electric 
car at Pittsburg, Penn., reversed the current 
very suddenly, a few days ago, and the iron- 
work became ao heavily charged that two pas- 
sengers received severe ehocka. 

An Imi'oktant Industry. — It is eattmated 
that '250,000 persons in the United Statea are 
engaged in baainess depending solely on elec- 
trioity. 



Engijmeef^ing I^otes. 



The Lake Erie and Pittsburg Ship Canal 
Preparations are being made for the prelimi- 
nary aurveyof a feasible route for the projected 
ehip canal between Pittsburg and some port on 
Like Erie, by which lake ores and other com- 
modities can be taken without transhipment 
from the Northwest to the Smoky City. Much 
interest ia felt in the project, which is certainly 
a most important one, and one, also, that will 
undoubtedly succeed. The iron manufacturers 
and iron ore and coal miners, especially, will 
encourage the enterprise. The questions by 
which its projeotora are just now confronted are 
( 1 ) Can it be done ? (2) What will it oost ? and 
(3) Who will pay for it ? These problems will 
be oonsidered in detail and at length by a State 
Gommiaaion appointed by the Governor, and 
backed up by a legialative appropriation of 
$10,000 for a preliminary examination. Three 
routes are proposed — one via the old Pennsyl- 
vania canal, which at present is popular; one 
will pass through a portion of Obio, and the 
third is rather mysteriously, just now, kept 
in the background. One of the principal diffi- 
culties in the way will be the undermining or 
bridging of the numeroue railroad tracks along 
any route which may be adopted. There will 
also be many railroad " kiokera" to contend 
with among the companies which may be par- 
alleled by the canal. The question of cost or 
difficalty of securing funds will not present any 
special trouble. The city of Pittsburg would 
be immenaely benefited by the work in getting 
cheap and needed orea from the Lake Superior 
and other regions in the Northwest. It is an 
enterprise of national importance and must soon 
be carried through. 



SOOD HE>a,LTH. 



From Mr. Edison. — Mr. Edison recently 
said to an incerviewer: '* At the preaent time 
the phonograph ia occupying my time. I have 
been improving it, and it ia more perfect to- 
day than ever. In speaking into the phono- 
graph it was soon found that the slbilanta were 
not recorded. For instance, if I were to say 
'species ' the ' sp ' sound would be lost. Well, 
I have about solved the problem now, and the 
sound of *b' ia inscribed with the other letters. 
I rnn the phonograph or graphophone in three 
ways — with a treadle, a battery, or with the 
ordinary incandescent light by attaching the 
maohine with a wire to the lamp. Buainess 
people can have their choice. I shouldn't want 
to be bothered with a treadle, and I think the 
best plan is to use the electric light, since they 
are now so commonly distributed. The bat- 
tery is made to last for a month, three months, 
or six montha, without being renewed. Let 
every man take bis choice. I am making the 
three kinds." 



A New Electric Light Company. — Artiolee 
of incorporation have just been filed by the 
Central Electric Company with $250,000 capi- 
tal and $6000 subscribed stock to constrnot 
and maintain electrical apparatus in the cities 
and towns of the Pacific Coast. Directors : C. 
F. Fargo, J, Rsdding, L. L. Baker, G. P. 
Adams and C. E. Wilaon. A proposition is be- 
fore the City Trustees of Sacramento for an 
electric light franchise — to introduce into that 
city a Westinghouae electric light plant, to 
light the atreetB of that olty. 

Ruthless JDestrdction. — It was recently 
reported that a gang of lineraen was engaged 
in the ruthless destruction of telegraph and 
telephone lines in the city of Cleveland, 0.,aud 
that they were encouraged in the nefarious 
work by an enraged populace, simply on ao- 
ooant of the death of a horae. 



The Water Railway. — The scheme of a 
water railway to draw cars at a speed of 100 
miles an hour, which attracted much attention 
at the late Paris Expoaition, ia to have another 
trial under the patronage of the London Met- 
ropolitan Rulway Company. The location 
selected ia near the city of London. The 
London Spectatovt in alluding to the scheme, 
eays : " We shall soon have an opportunity 
to try what,if accounts are true,must be the very 
poetry of motion. The carriages run on skates 
or alides, but between the slide and the rail la 
forced a film of water, which prevents all jolt- 
ing, bumping and ahaking, and, in fact, makes 
the carriages ekim along as the boat does on 
the sea. Then, too, the pace ia 100 miles an 
hour. If the new railway ia really practicable 
for long distances, all England will be a sub- 
urb of London, and Surrey will be saved from 
becoming a chesaboard, covered with what the 
anotioneers call * villa reaidencea ' standing in 
their own three acres of park-like grounds. A 
hundred milea an hour would make Bath as ac- 
cessible as Brighton, while Manchester would 
be reached in one hour and 50 minutes." 



Poison in Pickles. 

Dr. Jackson, a Pittsburg physician, recent- 
ly analyzed a number of samples of pickles 
and oatsupa. In almost all the matter he found 
more or less Ballcylio aoid, used by the manu- 
facturers to prevent fermentation. In two- 
thirds of the samples there appeared fungi or 
molds, whioh indicated that the tomatoes had 
begun to ferment and grow moldy before the 
salicylic acid was added. Arsenic was found 
in one sample and sulphuric aoid in another. 
The coloring matters used were largely ooohi- 
neal and aniline red. About onC'third of the 
piokles analyzed contained impurities and adul- 
terations. The matter was ohietly in the vine- 
gar, and the former was in both vinegar and 
piokles. 

Of the ten samples there was copper present 
in two, oil of vitriol in aeven, lead in one, iron 
in two and zinc in one. Thia ia certainly a bad 
showing. Oat of all the adulterations used, 
cochineal is really the only barmleaa one. As 
for the lead, iron and zinc, it is assumed that 
their presence was accidental, as a result of the 
action of the acid on those metals with which 
they had come in contact. 

Salicylic acid is a vary common adulteration 
of foods and drinks; milkmen have used more 
or less of it, and it ia said that it is a frequent 
ingredient of lager beer. In fact in almost every- 
thing in the line of foods which undergo fer- 
mentation, this acid bai been used as a preaar- 
vator. Manufacturers contend that it is harm- 
less in the quantities in which they employ it. 
Could the consumption of the foods and drinks 
containing it be limited, this agent would not 
of course do muoh harm, but appetites cannot 
be anticipated. M^iny people crave acids, and 
some are very fond of catsup, and eat it 
freely with almost every kind of meat. 
Physicians give salicylic acid for acute rheum- 
atism, but it cannot be continued long, for the 
reason that the stomach very quickly becomes 
irritated and intolerant of it, Thia aoid ia a 
poiaon and capable of producing death in large 
dosea. Even if email doses are taken for a 
long time the nutrition of the indulger is so 
impaired that he loses fiash and strength, A<i 
to the effect of the mold found in the catsup on 
the system, it ia only necessary, aaya Dr. Jackaon, 
to atate that a number of yeara ago an experi- 
ment found that when rabbits were fed on 
moldy bread their ears sloughed off, deep ulcer- 
ations made their appearance and finally death 
resulted. Diluted sulphuric aoid ia aometimea 
given as a medicine, but only that which baa 
been prepared with exceeding care. In the acid 
generally used to adulterate vinegar there is 
very likely to be a trace, at least, of arsenic. 
As for copper, no one can justify its use in 
food. 

Dr. Jackson gives the following wholeaome 
advice to thoBe who purchase cataup : "In the 
first place, avoid a highly colored article, for 
the chancea are that much coloring matter hsB 
been added to disguise the color of half- 
ripened or rotten tomatoea. Again, do not 
buy a low priced article. When you see an 
array of catsup bottles in a window, with a 
price-card on them showing that they are 
being sold at half-prioe, don't you buy that 
catsup; it ia not fit to go into a human 
stomach." 

The writer has known of a bargain-hunter 
who walked four tquares out of her way to get 
a catsup that waa sold five cents cheaper than 
better gradea. Examination showed that catsup 
to be filthy; it was a network of moldy fiber. 
Considering how long a bottle of catsup will 
last, five cents is a very email aaving to the pur- 
chaser, yet that much difference in price 
means a great deal to the manufacturer, con- 
seqaently he cannot affjrd to put aa good 
tomatoea in it, nor make it up so carefully 
as the better quality, ao that this grade con- 
tains moat of the rotten tomatoes, the sweep- 
ings, etc., all colored up nice and red with 
roaaniline. Whose fault ia it that this kind 
of preparation is on the market — the manu- 
facturer's ? Not exactly. It is the fault of 
the bargain-hunter, who wants to get something 
for nothing — the bargain-hunter who holds a 
5 cent piece so close to her eye that she can- 
not see the dollar behind it. — Boston Herald. 



Useful Inforjviatio>;. 



BuivfUKTTK Making in Pennsylvania, — The 
Reading Coal Oo. at Mahanoy City baa 
adopted a aystem of briquette making from 
ccal-dust. This waste-aaving process conBists 
of the coal-doet being evenly distributed with 
one-tenth per loent of pitch. This, by an in- 
genious contrivance, is pressed into large cakes, 
Bteam being used to moisten the mass. So hard 
doea it become that it poBsesaes the same power 
of resistance aa coal, or, in other words, 100 
pounds of coal dust pressed will last as long as 
the same' amount of hard ooal. A pressure of 
35 tons is brought to bear on each briquette. 
Taere are two presses in operation now, and 
when run to their full capacity will turn out 
about SOO tons of the briquettes in 24 hourB. 
The briquettes take up 25 per cent less spaoe 
than ordinary coal, aod in consequence an 
engine can be loaded to go one-fourth farther 
without replenishing the supply of fael. 



To Investigate the Eleoteio Light. — Two 
gentlemen from the Celestial Kingdom named 
Wong and Fong were in New York reoently, 



A Milk Pipe Line ia talked of for the supply 
of New York with its indispensable lacteal sup 
ply, A company haa been formed with a cap- 
ital of $600,000 to atart the enterprise. Oae of 
the projectors aays : ** The scheme presents 
many ditfioulties, euoh as the milk becoming 
sour or churned, but we can deliver it in a half- 
frozen condition if we want to, and prevent its 
souring or churning. We shall probably be 
able to send milk to New York from towns 
within 100 milea of the metropolia for one cent 
a gallon. The concern oan be aa easily con- 
trolled aa a telegraph system. We shall be 
able to aend milk to the city in one hour." The 
main difficulty will be in keeping the conduits 
in thorough sanitary condition, 

Peeserving the Sacramento River. — In 
regard to the duty of the General Government 
to preserve navigable atreama, an exchange very 
correctly aays : ** It ia the first duty of the 
Government to keep navigable rivers In a navi- 
gable condition. Railroada oan never super- 
sede waterways. A single barge will carry as 
much food or material of war aa a train of 
cars, and a single tug will haul a dozen such 
bargee." 



Tue Whale. — Cjmparison with other living 
bodies must be made in order to form any ade- 
qaate oonoeption of the magnitude or weight of 
a whale, which Is, by far, the largest apeoimen 
of a living thing on the earth. Nillson remarks 
that the weight of the great Greenland or right 
whale ia 100 tons, or 220,000 pounds, or 110 
tone, equal to that of 88 elephants, or 440 
bears. The whalebone in such a whale may be 
taken at 3860 pounds, and the oil at from 140 
to ISO tons. The remains of the fossil whale, 
which have been found on the coast of Ystad, 
in the Baltic, and even far inland in Wanga- 
panae, Westergothland, betokens a whale whioh 
although not more than between 50 and GO feet 
in length, must at least have had a body 27 
times larger and heavier than that of the com- 
mon or right whale. 

To Lessen Accidents. — Avery useful inven- 
tion, tending to lessen the possibility of acoi- 
denta in factories, is now being extensively 
adopted in England. The breaking of a glass, 
which is adjusted against the wall of every 
room in the mill, will at once stop the engine, 
an electric current being established between 
the room and the throttle-valve of the engine, 
abutting off the ateam in an instant. By thia 
means the engine waa atopped at one of the 
milla recently in a few seconda, and a young 
girl, whose clothes had become entangled in an 
upright shaft, was released uninjured. 

Ears as Cigar Holders. — The women of 
Burmah, like ttte male smokers of Siam, use 
their ears as cigar-holders, but in quite a dif- 
ferent way. Every Burmese girl prides herself 
on the size of the hole she can make in the i.obe 
of her ears. Some of them reach the size of an 
ordinary napkin-ring. Into these they often 
place their olgara. The Burmese cigar is gen- 
erally of a mammoth size — an inch or more in 
diameter and from six to eight inches long. 

First American Coal to Brazil. — The first 
cargo of the American bituminous ooal that haa 
been known to be shipped direct to Brazil waa 
taken by the achooner Hannah McLoon, which 
recently sailed from Philadelphia for Santos. 
Many efforts have been made to introduce ooal 
from this country into Brazil, but every at- 
tempt was opposed by a combination whioh re- 
fused to handle the American product. 

To Take Out Grease From Marble. — Apply 
a little pile of whiting or fuller's earth saturated 
with benzine, and allow it to stand some time; 
or apply a mixture of two parts washing soda, 
one part ground pumicestone, and one part 
chalk, all first finely powdered and made into 
a paste with water; rub well over the marble, 
and finally wash off with soap and water. 



Falling from a Hight. — It may mitigate 
the diBtreea with which we hear of terrible falls 
to read the following from the New York Medi- 
cal Journal: A medical man, formerly a sailor, 
statea that in his youth he fell from the top- 
gallant yard of a vessel, a distance of 120 feet. 
Sensation was entirely lost during his transit 
through the air. It returned slightly on enter- 
ing the water, sufficiently to enable the lad to 
strike out {being a good swimmer) and seize a 
life buoy. The writer thinks death would 
have been painless had he fallen on some hard 
substance; bnt the assertion that peraona die 
in the act of falling ia, he thinks, evidently 
wrong. ^ . 

Coffin Nails. — In some parts of the West 
cigarettes are quite commonly referred to aa 
"coffin naila." Thia is by some oonaidered un- 
just to coffin naila, which are, in their way, 
useful and even necessary articles. 

Near - Sigbtedness is over-running the 
French people as much as the Germans. 
Among the senior boya in the different French 
ooUegea more than 46 per cent are near- 
sighted. 



Home Hand-Grenades — Anyone can make 
the hand-grenade fire extinguishers, and at a 
email fraction of the prices charged in the mar- 
ket. Any light quart-bottle will serve to hold 
the solution, which is composed of one pound 
of common salt, one-half pound of sal-ammoniac, 
dissolved in about two quarts of water. 

To Berlin by Sea. — Serious attention is now 
being paid in German official oiroles to a scheme 
for connecting the Baltic and Berlin by a sea- 
going ship canal. The question aa to whether 
thia could beat be brought about by deepening 
the Elbe or the Oder is at present under the 
consideration of a committee. 



A Knot and a Mile, — Comparatively few 
newapaper readers know, or have any special 
reason to know, that a knot is more than a 
mile, and that six of the former equal about 
seven of the latter. Accurately speaking, 
there are 60S6.7 feet in a knot and 5280 feet in 
a mile. 

Japanese Cement. — It is said that a atone 
has been discovered in Japan which haa re- 
markable qualities as a cement material, and 
can be worked up for a muoh leas price than 
the imported article coats. The cement will 
bear a weight of 400 to 500 pounds per square 
inch. 

Imported Weeds. — Of the seven weeds 
which the *' Weed law " of Wisconain requires 
farmers, under penalty, to destroy, only one is 
a native of the United States, all the rest being 
naturalized importationa from Earope, where 
they are common wild plants. 



26 



Mining and Scientific Prf::ss. 



[Jan. n, 1890 




DEWEY & CO., Publishers. 



Ofcey 220 Market Si., N. E.cor.Front St.,S. F, 

Kf Take the Mpvn.tor, No. IS Front S(.*e* 



W. B. EWER Sbkior Editor 



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SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturday, January ii, 



1890. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



EDITORIALS.— MarketPlpcc Scene in Nicaragua; 
The Chemical Laboratory Euildintj, 1 9. Passing Events; 
The Silver Problem; Standards of Me 'Sure and Weight; 
Electrical Engineering, 26. The Mining Beit of Peru, 
27. 

ILij0STRATION8. — The Chemical Laboratory 
Buildintr; Scene in the Marketplace of Leon, 19. Plan 
of the Cerro de Pasco; General Section Across the Basin 
of ihe Cerro de Pasco, Peru, 27- 

OORRBSPONDENOB.-Californiana in Austria and 
Germany; Woodbury Concentrators, 20. 

MININU SUMMARV—From Che various counties 
<>f California, Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Mon- 
tana, New Mexico, Orecon. Utah, Wyoming, 22-23. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS.— Failure of Copper 
Steam Pipes; A Probable Famine io Englieh Hematite 
Iron Ore; Horse Nails by the Bushel; A Land-Clearing 
Machine, 24. 

SOIENTIFIO PROGRESS. —Phenomenal Gifts; 
Stanley's Geographical Diecoveries; Observations on 
Eclii-ses of the Sun; A Glas3 Telephone; The Wind at 
Top of the Eiffel Tower; The Gulf Stream, 24. 

BLBCTRICITy.— Electrical Progreas; Fusible Fire- 
plugs for Klectric Light Wires; From Mr. Edison; A 
New Eleotric Litrhs Company; Ruthless Destruction, 
Miscellanpoug, 25- 

ENGINEERING NOTES. - The Lake Erie and 
Pitt^bu^g Ship Canal; The Water Railway; Preserving 
the Sacramento River, 25. 

GOOD HEALTH.— Poison in Pickles; Falling From 
a Hight; Coffin Nails, 25. 

QSEt'DL INFORMATION-— Briquette-Making in 
Pennsylvania; The Whale; To Lessen Accidents; Ears 
as Cigar-Uolders; First American Coal to Biazil; To 
Take Out Grease From Marble; Home Hand-Grenades; 
To Berlin by Sea, 25. 

MINING STOCK MARKET.— Sales at the San 
Francisco Stock Board, Notices of Meetiners, 
ments. Dividends, and Bullion Shipments, 32. 



Business Announcements. 

[NBW THIS I8SUB.] 
Engine and Boiler— J. W. Quick. 
Steam Pumps— Van Duzen & Tift, Cincinnati, O. 
KS" See Advertising Columns. 



Passing Events. 

The nnprecedented Btorms hare soaked the 
gronnd bo fall that the quartz mines have more 
pumping to do than usual, and in some places 
heavy snows have impeded work by blooking 
up ditohes and roads. 

The railroads in the State have been having 
a hard time of it for acme weeks. Floods in 
the south and heavy snows in the mountaiDS 
have given the division superintendents plenty 
to do. Up at the Summit they have had 16 
feet of snow on a level and the big rotary enow- 
plows have been kept busy. 

Since our last issue, the mining town of 
Wardner, in the Coear d'Alene region, Idaho, 
has experienced a disastrous fire; seven persons 
have been killed by a snowslide at Sierra City, 
and the hoisting works and shops of the 
Anchor mine, Utah, have been burned. The 
bodies of the men buried in the Utioa mine 
cave have not yet been recovered, nor are they 
expected to be for some time. 

Word has been received that the only suo- 
oessful one of the total-eclipse expeditions was 
that sent out from the Lick Observatory, Cali- 
fornia, through the liberality of Ohas. F. 
Crocker, who paid all the expenses. The 
party met with clear skies for their observa- 
tions, being more fortunate than the Govern- 
ment or private parties. 

A VAST deposit of sand was some time ago 
discovered in Placer county, which makes very 
valuable glass material. A company has been 
inoorporated, with a oapital of $50,000, with 
the object of establishing a manufactory of 1 
glass In the oounty on a large soale, | 



The Silver Problem. 

In last week's editorial under the caption 
' ' Windom's Silver Policy Defended " we should 
have entered more fully into the outside price 
to be paid by the Government in Treasury notes 
for silver bullion deposited in any one of the 
United States mints. The outside price to be 
paid is $1 for 412,5 grains standard silver. 
Leading bankers in this oityconcurln the opinion 
that by standard silver the Secretary most un- 
questionably means the United States standard, 
900 fine, which is one-tenth less than the high- 
est commercial standard, 1000 fine, on which all 
quotations are based. This being the case, then, 
in 412j| grains of United States standard silver 
there are 371^ grains of silver of 1000 fine, so 
that the Government will pay %\ for each and 
every 371^ grains of silver, 1000 fine, which is 
equivalent to over $1.29 or par, for each and 
every ounce of 480 grains. 

As we have before said. Secretary Windom's 
plan has several features that commend them- 
selves, not the least of which is the making of 
the United States, and not European oountries, 
the controller ofsilver; for any foreign govern- 
ment wishing silver bullion in this country 
must either enter the open market and bid up 
for it or else buy United States Treasury notes 
and ask for their payment in bullion at the mar- 
ket value of silver. 

If Secretary Windom's compromise plan is 
liable to receive favorable action, bimetallists 
should insist upon the placing of gold on the 
same footing as that of silver, for what is sauce 
for the goose is sauce for the gander. 

Already several silver bills have been intro- 
duced in Congress; among them is that of 
Senator Bland, demanding free coinage. This 
is, by far, the better course to pursue, and 
which must, sooner or later, come, not only 
in this country but in ;all leading commercial 
countries. The large and constantly increasing 
growth of trade demands more money, either 
silver and gold or else paper oarrenoy, based 
on the two metals, which latter can be de- 
manded and at once received on presentation of 
the paper representative. 

No country can have too much money; his- 
tory from time immemorial conSrms this well- 
established fact, and therefore the United 
States should not be an exception, as it now is, 
for by a scarcity of money corners can be more 
successfully run by the unscrupulous. 

In substantiation of the fact that no country 
can have too much money, we will give the 
statistics of the amount of money in circulation 
at latest date for which they are reported in 
the following conntries : 



Standards of Measure and Weight. 

The Prototypes Becently Brought to the 
UDlted States. 



Country, Paper. Gold. Silver. 

Germany 8207,561,732 §.142.720,000 $2]4,2'iO.CO0 

France 5ti6.59l,466 873,ii0n,000 5!*7,9!i0.000 

Great Britain 203,534.617 587,683,000 93. 164.' 00 

United States 913.581,833 375,917.715 110,485,452 

In France it is conceded by political econo- 
mists that the masses are more prosperous than 
they are in any other civilized nation. This 
was fully attested by the alacrity with which 
the call for the German indemnity fund was 
responded to, as money came in quickly from all 
classes. Notwithstanding the heavy losses met 
through the FrancO'German war, France's re- 
cuperative power was attested by its again soon 
taking the lead in general prosperity. No one 
has yet had the hardiness to assert that it was 
not to the large money currency of that country 
its prosperity has been and still is largely due. 
Although bi'metal, yet France holds nearly as 
much gold as both Germany and England com- 
bined, which should put to the blush those gold- 
bugs who fear dire disaster if we fully and une- 
quivocally adopt bi-metallism. 

John Jay Knox's plan to perpetuate the 
National Banks is hardly deserving notice. No 
paper currency should be issued except by the 
National Government, and not even by it unless 
redeemable at the will of the holder in either 
gold or silver, or both, if so desired. The 
National Binks were called into existence in 
perilous times, and have survived their useful- 
ness. The National Bink notes now in circula- 
tion should be replaced by Treasury notes 
issued by the Government against silver. 



The fire in the Anaconda at St. Lawrence 
mines, Montana, is practically out. The mines 
have been sealed since Nov. 23, but were 
opened this week. The shafts are full of gas 
and no one has gone down, but no signs of fire 
are apparent. They have been injecting steam 
into the mines ever sinoe they were closed. 



On the 2d of January, 1S90, the sealed boxes 
containing the prototypes of the meter and the 
kilogramme were opened by the President of 
the United States, in the presence of several of 
the heads of the Departments and of scientific 
men, at the office of the United States Coast 
and Geodetic Survey. These standards are one 
set of "national prototypes," oonstruoted un- 
der the direction of the " Bureau International 
des Poids et Meanres," at the Pavilion de 
Bretenil, near Paris. 

This International Bureau was organized in 
1875 upon the previous International Meter 
Commission of 1872. In 1875, 16 Govern- 
ments, including the United States, formed the 
International Bureau, and later four other 
Governments joined — Great Britain as late as 
1884. All the work and experiments were 
done at the cost of the Governments subscrib- 
ing. The standards adopted by the high con* 
tracting powers were the "meter and kilo- 
gramme of the archived of France." The pro- 
totypes were to be made from an alloy of plat- 
inum 90 per cent, and iridium 10 per cent. 
The meter was to have a length of 102 centi- 
meters, a cross-section nearly X, a weight of 
about seven pounds, and the graduations mark- 
ing the meter near each end were to be traced 
on the neutral axis. Standard thermometers 
were to accompany each meter and each kilo- 
gramme. 

The form of the kilogramme was to be a 
cylinder, whose bight should equal the diam- 
eter, with the edges slightly rounded and the 
designation marked simply by a difference in 
the burnishing. 

The accuracy of comparison of the meter was 
to be within one-tenth of a micron, or one 
two-hnndred-and-fifty-thonsandth of an inch; 
and the *' tolerance " or difference of the proto- 
type from the standard was fixed to be plus or 
minus less than five microns, or one five-thou- 
sandth of an inch, the quantity being known, of 
course, to the one-tenth of a micron. 

The meter of the archives is an " end meas- 
ure," and a "provisional standard," with gradua- 
tions, had to be determined therefrom; the com- 
parisons were made according to a method pro- 
posed by Fizeau. There were many difficul- 
ties to be overcome in this measurement. 
Finally the new provisional standard was ac- 
cepted from which the lengths of all the other 
prototypes were determined. 

These preliminary operations were carried on 
through 10 years, when a London firm, Johnson 
& Co., was selected to furnish the metals, which 
required 18 months of continued experiments 
and trials to produce In the required purity. 
The Messrs. Brunner of Paris constructed the 
meter bars, which were rolled by several opera- 
tions into the required form. To the "Conser' 
vatoire des Arts et Metiers " was assigned the 
graduation near the ends of each bar. Then 
the Director of the International Barean made 
the final comparisons of all the d ffarent meters 
with the provisional standard and with 
each other, and from a mathematical discus- 
sion of the obaervatioDS, derived the final 
difi'erence between each and the provisional 
standard. 

Among the different kilogrammes assumed to 
be standard it was fiaally agreed in 1882 that 
the kilogramme Kill in platinum iridium should 
be the international prototype, and the limit 
of "tolerance" was fixed at plus or minus 
0.2 milligramme, and the comparisons are made 
to the one>ten-thousandth part of a milligramme, 
and the final correction given to the one-thou- 
sandth part of a milligramme, or the one-sixty- 
seven-thousandth of a grain. 

Many supplementary studies were necessary 
to know the character of the meters; their 
rates of expansion, their length between gradu- 
ations when supported at different points, their 
possible change of character after long travel, 
etc. The whole subject of a standard ther- 
mometer was investigated and settled. It is 
reported that the length of the meter remains 
the same, whether the bar is supported at one 
point in the middle or at the two ends; and in 
the comparison of the kilogrammes it is said 
that two weights placed one above the other 
in vacuo differ from what they would if placed 
side by side, because the upper weight is farther 
from the center of the earth. If weighed in the | 



different density of the atmosphere in the places 
of the two weights. 

The 31 prototype meters were distributed to 
the different Governments on the 2Sth of Sep- 
tember, 1889, and on behalf of the United 
States, Hon. Whitelaw Reid, Minister to 
France, received two of three prototypes of the 
meter and one of the two prototypes of the 
kilogrammme. These were, by direction of the 
Secretary of State, through instruotions from 
the Superintendent of the United States Coast 
and Geodetic Survey, delivered to Prof. George 
Davidson of that service, who carried them 
from Paris to Washington, where they were 
delivered on the 27th of November to Prof. T. 
C. Mendenhall, the superintendent. The 
form of receiving, transmitting, opening and 
identification of these standards was based upon 
a similar proceeding when the standard En- 
glish pound was delivered to the United States 
Mint at Philadelphia many years since. It was 
originally intended that Prof. Davidson should 
be present at the opening before the President 
of the United States, but his duties called him 
to this coast. 

At the office of the United States Coast and 
Geodetic Survey in Washington comparisons 
will be made between the new standard meter 
and the one which has been heretofore the 
authority of the United States, and hence- 
forward it will be the absolute standard of the 
United States. The kilogramme will, in like 
manner, be subject to comparisons with other 
weights, and their relation thereto will become 
known and the standard established therefrom. 
Primarily this will reach the coin weights of 
the United States, to which earnest and ex- 
haustive experimentation will be given. These 
coin weights are made under the direction of the 
Superintendent of the United States Coast and 
Geodetic Survey. 

Electrical EngiDeerlng. 

It is noticeable just now when so mnofa at- 
tention is being directed to experimenting 
with electric street railroads, that there is a 
Kreat demand for " electric superintendents.'* 
A good many of the failures are attributed to 
incompetent superintendents. When the elec- 
tricians turn the roads over to the companies, 
in what is supposed to be good running order, 
more or less difficulties are met. Then the 
ordinary street-oar superintendent is at sea, 
and an ex-telegraph operator ia not any better 
off. 

Here is a field for young men who are willing 
and ready to study and prepare themselves for 
the work. Those who are expert in their 
work now have all they can do, and there ia 
room for many others. 

In fact, electric engineering is a coming pro- 
fession. So much attention is now being paid 
to electric lighting, electric power, electrio 
railroads, etc., and the field in all these 
branches is so constantly widening, that there 
are opportunities for the present and future for 
those with knowledge of electricity and its ap- 
pliances. The young men who now take up 
the study of electricity as a profession will be 
in a few years those who will be in charge of 
large companies and work. 



Mining Stock Association, — At the annnal 
meeting, held on last Wednesday, of the Min- 
ing Stock Association of this city, all the old 
offioers were rC'elected. At the meeting a res- 
olution was introduced and nnanimoosly 
adopted, instructing the president and sec- 
retary of the association to communicate with 
the Congressional delegation from the Pacific 
Coast, asking them to give their undivided at- 
tention in favor of the free coinage of silver. 



North Bloomfield OoNTEMPr Case. — The 
old-time North Bloomfield Mining Co. case was 
up before Judge Sawyer once more the other 
day. This time the company's officera were 
cited to show why they should not be punished 
for contempt in hydraulicking in spite of the 
order of court. The matter was argned by 
Statesman Cross of Nevada City, and taken 
ander advisement. 



There has been some danger of a strike at 
the Union Iron Works because the managers 
desired the men to contribute 30 oents a month 
each so as to secure the services of a surgeon in 
case of accident. The men obj acted, and some 



oi them refused to work, but the matter will 
air, the second disturbing element would be the J possibly be settled wlthont further troable, 



Jan. 14, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



27 



The Mining Belt of Pern. 



The Bsaln of the Oerro- 

The bftHiD of the Cerro ie formed by an irreg' 
aUr circle of hills aarroaodiDg it oa all aides. 
It la composed of a series of small terraced 
plaioB and of a low central ridge, the site of the 
town and the larger part of the mines. The 
central ridge is the Cerro (bill) de Pisoo. It is 
about one and onehaU miles long Ly three- 
foaiths of a mile wide. The town is laid out 
on its backbone and eastern slope, while its 
western slope is substantially occupied by a 
series of immense quarries or open cute called 
tajo» or tajoB abiertos. Mines have been worked 
to a greater or leas extent over all parts of the 
ridge, as well as on some of the hilla bordering 
the basin. Many of the mine-openings are 
inside of yards in the town, some are in the 
streets, and the majority now worked are in or 
arOQod the Ufjon. The altitude of the town is 
14,193 feet above sea level. 

The most striking feature of the place is 
formed by the huge tajon whioh line the west- 
ern slope of the ridge and puss into and through 
the town limits, threatening its (xistenop, aa 
Indicated by the ruined buildings around the 
edges of the pits. Huge cracks in the ground 
adjacent to these tajos are constantly opening 
and perhaps closing, but attract no notice from 
the residents, except in the case of the apeoial 
family whoaii dwelling commences to fall. 

The tpjoa were formed originally by the cav- 
ing] of the mines. Daring 250 years, since 
1630, the miners have been burrowing like 
moles under the aurface, driving here and there 
in a mofit onF^atematio minner, crodalng and 
recrosaing the same ground, extracting the 
richer ore and dumping the poorer where most 
convenient, and afterward returning for this 
poorer ore; andall this time making no attempt 
toseoarethe ground except for the moment, or to 
provide for future operations. They have ex- 
cavated huge chambers auderground and left 
them to stand or fall as might chance. An un- 
told nnmber have fallen; some have stood and 
are still to beaeen. 150 to 200 feet long, 50 to 75 
feet wide, 15 to 25 feet high; and labyrinths 
of connecting passages and chambers exist, ao 
intricate that, without a guide, one dare not 
penetrate far into them for fear of getting lost. 
When the Tajo Matagente first caved, 300 men 
underground are said to have perished. 

A tsj9 once formed ia constantly enlarged 
by subsequent caving, by falling of the sides 
and by quarrying of the walls. The superficial 
area of the tajoa of Sta. Rosa and Tingo (which 
connect) is about 41 aores, of Tajo Matagente 

I 




ment of the upper zones, a result intentitiad 
by periodical saturation of the mass with water 
daring the rainy seasons. 

The climate of the Cerro is nnasaally whole- 
some for those having proper convenlenosa of 
life and plenty of warmth and ventilation, but 
disagreeable and trying to some constitntiona; 
and I should advise agiinst long-continued resi- 
dence without oouaaional changes to warmer re- 
gions. But at distances of eight or ten miles 
from the Cerro in almost any direction, by de- 



andesites, slates and sandstones and the argen- 
tiferous formation. Fig. 3 shows their relative 
positions. Fig. 4 is a general section across the 
basin from east to west, so drawn as to include 
the main elemeota of the rook series. If the 
line of thia section were traced on Fig, 3, it 
would ran from P.iriajirca hill southwesterly 
to the center of Tajo S»nta Rosa, and thence 
northwesterly to Pargas ridge. 

[Unfortunately we have not space to give the 
details of Mr. Hodges' obaervations on the 




TOPOGRAPaiOAL AND GEOLOGICAL PLAN OF THE CERRO DE PASCO. 



Bceading the steep ravines, one can reach 
places where ie a soft and pleasant climate, and 
where the vegetation is abundant and beautiful. 
Physical Aspect. 
Fig. 3 is a general topographical and geolog- 
ical plan of the basin of the Cerro. The whole 
region around the Cerro at first eight ia apb to 
appear dispiriting. The trails are rough. Bar- 
ren hills of limestone, slate and aandatone, 



geology of the district, and mast confine our- 
selvas to a condensation of hie remarks on the 
argentiferous formation. — Eds. Press.] 

The argentiferous formation lies between the 
limestones on the east and the andesites on the 
west, and forms the central ridge on whioh 
the town ia built. At the north it rapidly nar- 
rows, as shown on the plan, while at the south 
its boundary is undefined, there being no ex- 



SAN ANDRES PAMPA 



-1 Horizontal - i Vertical- 




nOCK COVERED BY BOGS 



GENERAL SECTION ACROSS THE BASIN OP THE CERRO DE PASCO, PERU. 



about nine acres, of those of Oayao about the 
same as the last. 

It IB impossible to determine, with any exact- 
ness, the amount of material removed. The 
present sides, sometimes formed by toppling 
crage, vary from a few feet to hundreds of feet 
in bight. From the lowest point of Sta. Rosa 
tajo to the top of Sta. Gatalina hill, which is 
moving into the tajo, is a measured vertical 
hight of 329^ feet. 

If, for the aake of a general estimate, we as- 
Bume the average depth of the Sta. Rosa and 
Tingo tajoa to be 100 feet over a superficial 
area of 1,800,000 square feet, we have 180,000,- 
000 cubic feet, or somewhere near 9,000,000 
tone, extracted at this locality alone, from 
vertical depths ranging up to 350 or perhaps 
400 feet. The removal of any such amount has 
naturally resulted in constant caving and move- 



often in strangely-contorted or sharply'tilted 
strata of Jurassic and Cretaceous age, rise 
abruptly on all sides. The pampas are rolling, 
generally covered with short green grass, and 
eapecially in the wet season, abounding in 
treacherous bogs. In the vicinity of the Oerro 
the numerous mining haciendas, sometimes 
perched in unexpected places, form quite a 
feature in the landscape. Wherever water to 
run stones can be obtained, even if the supply 
is only for a few months in the year, there the 
ingenios have been erected. The combined 
grinding capacity of alltheae haoiendaels about 
185,000 tons a year. 

Geology. 

The mining belt of Fern is made up of rocks 

of Jurassic and Cretaceona age. In and around 

the basin of the Cerro there are visible on the 

Burfaoe limestone conglomeratea, limestones, 



ploratory work here. The area developed may 
be roughly stated as about one and one-half 
miles from north to south by three-fourths of a 
mile from east to west. It is very fully ex- 
posed for a maximum depth of 300 feet by the 
mines and iajoa along the backbone and western 
alope of the ridge. Elsewhere it is imperfectly 
open to inspection. 

This formation has long been a geological 
puzzle. The present attempt at a partial solu- 
tion of the problem dififera from all preceding 
theories on the subject principally in the respect 
that it combines in one formation rocka which 
have heretofore been considered radically differ- 
ent. The dividing line between the surface 
deposits above water level and the " deep de- 
posits " below water line may be taken roughly 
as occurring near the general level of the Quin- 
lacooha tunnel. 



Above the water level, the formation oonslatB 
of a highly metamorphosed and greatly oxidized 
material, of constantly varying stracture, color 
and composition. Over a large portion of the 
town-ridge there is a hard, compaot, reddish or 
yellowish and very quartzose cap-rock of ever- 
ohauging thickness. Below this, ae a rale, the 
formation is softer and more decomposed, being 
sometimes broken into loose or cemented frag- 
ments of all eizes, and passing by all gradations 
of structure and hardness, but without any 
evident regularity, into earthy masses or soft 
clays or sugary sands. The smaller fragments, 
whether loose or cemented, are often so arranged 
as to present a alate-like appearance. A hard 
gray quartzite is frequent; porous material 
resembling acoria is met now and then; and a 
rotten slate, generally pyritic, is not uncom- 
mon. Local evidences of stratification may be 
seen, but generally on a limited scale; and every- 
thing of thia kind is irregular and indistinct. 

The rook is everywhere very eilicious, always 
yielded considerable percentage of slimes when 
crashed wet, and everywhere contains at least 
traces of silver, of pyrites and of carbonate of 
lead (and of lime). Very rarely is the silver 
visible, even with the aid of the magnifying 
glaas, and then principally in small native 
Bcalea in connection with quartzite. 

It is noteworthy that the decomposition o 
the mineral constituents does not always pro- 
ceed gradually from the present surface down- 
ward. Very hard and very soft rocks often 
adjoin, and large bodies of solid pyrites in a 
chaloedonic matrix are found at varying 
depths, and generally In close proximity to 
greatly oxidized material. 

G-old occara in the merest traces, and thal- 
lium has ba^hi detected in the bnllion. The 
condition of the silver has not yet been satisfac- 
torily determined. All direct tEsts for ohlorine 
have given negative results. A part of the 
metal ia unquestionably in a metallio state, as 
may be seen occasionally. Undoubtedly it ex.- 
iets in varying oombinationa in the different 
classes of ores. The sulphurets of copper, 
silver and iron are common to the formation 
above and below water level. Native copper 
ocours rarely; zinc ia reported in all analyses, 
and galena at times rioh in silver is found in 
bunches south of the large oopper depoaits. 

Below the water level there ia evidence eaffi- 

dent to show that under the highly altered 

Burfaoe rock there are slates, sandstonea and 

limeatones, in strata which (according to 

Rivero), like everything east of the andesite, 

have a general northerly and soath'^rly strike 

and an easterly dip, which contain qnartz, calc- 

spar, pyrite and chalcopyrite very generally, 

and often in high percentages, 

and in whioh rich depoalta of 

anlphnrets and occasional native 

silver have been found in times 

paat. 

After a long study of the 
ground, I have been led to the 
conclnaion that the aurface rooka 
and the deep deposits are made 
up of eaaentially the same mate- 
rials and differ chiefly in the de- 
gree and kind of metamorphisoi 
whioh they have undergone. 

My impression ia, that the aite 
of the present Cerro was once cov- 
ered with atrata (more or leaa 
horizontal) of slates and sand- 
stonea, and, to a certain extent, 
limestones, which now form essen- 
tially what I call the argentifer- 
ons formation; that these strata 
have been repeatedly tilted, the western 
portions being gradually raised until they 
came to or above the present surface line, 
and naturally are more broken and altered 
than the easterly parts which now occupy 
levels below them; that there have been 
varioaa eruptiona of andesites, which rooka 
are now visible on the west of the argen« 
tiferoua formation on both sidea of San Andres 
pampa; that accompanying or following these 
eruptions, there have been ejected from below 
siliceoua and metalliferoas solutions whioh 
have attacked most strongly the more broken 
portiona of the strata, impregnating them with 
silica and silver and other metals, and other- 
wise altering them, such metamorphlsm be- 
ing reinforced by subsequent exposure to at- 
mospheric influences and intensified by buo- 
oeeding eruptions of the andesite; that the 



28 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 14, 1890 



limestones at the east were deposited before the 
time of the latest upheavals and impregnations 
which tilted and cracked them, and formed 
and filled with ore the veins now seen in them; 
and that the last period of the geological hU- 
tory was that of the final weakening and ero- 
sion which gave the surface rooks their present 
outlines and appearance, and of the deposition 
of the limestone conglomerate visible at the 
south and west. 

The Famlico-GtAhbison Decision.— In the 
final decree in this interesting mining case, 
Jadge Rising said : "I see no reason to change 
the views I expressed on the last day of court 
in Hawthorne upon the rendition of the verdict, 
in substance, that the form of the decree under 
the findings of the jury will be that the apex 
of the east and west veins are within the sur- 
face boundary lines of the Pamlico location, 
and that these veins in their course downward 
cross the aide liue of the Pamlico and enter 
the Lakeview ground; and according to Act of 
Congress the plaintiff has the right to follow 
them where they go. As to the fourth issue, 
the jury has found that prior to and at the 
oommencement of this action the defendants 
asserted an adverse claim to property of 
the plaintiff, and the plaintiff is therefore 
entitled to recover costs. So far as the 
third finding of the jury may be inconsist- 
ent with the first, second and seventh 
findings, I decide that the east vein and the 
vein exposed in the Eagle incline — at least at 
its intersection — are one and the same. ^ This 
fact is uncontradicted by any evidence in the 
case, and the vein at the Eagle incline, there- 
fore, is part of the Pamlico east vein. By the 
finding of the jury the defendants are entitled 
to the vein exposed at the Badger Hole, in the 
Bellview upraise, and extending from there And 
connecting with the Bellview tunnel, and at 
the Eartson tunnel, and has its apex in the 
Lakeview ground." 



tdlicatiojial. 



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Assaying of Ores, 326; Bullion and Chlorination Assay, 

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Monarch Belting. 




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furnish power and ^ive leases. 

CHARLES ASHTON, 
41 1 Montgomery Street, S. F. 



i< 



WITTER'S SPRINGS." f.^X'°^ 

miles east of Ukiah. Comfortable Hotel. Quiet Cabins. 
Lovely Scenery. Low Charges. Its waters are a sure 
cure for Dropsy, Sorofulous and Sldn BtseaseB, Bheuma* 
siBm, etc. Addrefle H Ij. 0BNIO. Upper Lake. 



Jan. 11. 1890,] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



29 



Notices of Recent Patents. 

Among the paWnta recently obtained through 
Dewey A Co.'b Scikntipic Pesss U. S. and 
Foreign Patent Agency, the foUowiog are 
worthy of special mention: 

HyuRANxCociUNo.— S. M. Hackley, S. F. 
No. 418,51.^. D^ted Deo. 31, 1SS9. This U 
one of that claM of coapliogi etpeoially adapted 
for conneotiog the hose with the hydrant; and 
the obj id Is to provide a coapHog which can 
be readily and qaickty manipulated, forminf; a 
watAT-tight j )iDt. The Invention coneistB In a 
two-part Bwinging or bioged coapliog applied to 
the end of the hose and aatomatically tighten* 
ing itse f under the pressure of water on to the 
hydrant screw. 

SrcTios Dredqk. — John W. Brown, S. F., 
assignor to the Golden State aod Miners' Iron 
Works. No. 418,496. D*ted Dec. 31. 18S9 
This improvement in snotion dredges oonaista 
of an improved constraction of what is termed 
the '* ladder-J9ict,"at which poiot the vertio* 
ally movable sac t ion-pipe is connected with 
the stationary portion of the pipe which is 
fixed npon the scow. By the oonftrootion 
adopted the inventor greatly simplifies t&e 
joint oooneoting the movable and stationary 
sections of the soction-pipe, and also the joar* 
nals or trunnions about which the movable 
portions are raised or depressed. 

Sbttino Spru AND Cage for Dredgers. — 
Alonzo P. Paysoo, S. F., assignor to the G >lden 
Bute and Miners' Iron Works. No. 418,471. 
Dated Dec. 31, 1SS9. The invention relates to 
a device for moving and setting the scow 
upon which a dredging apparatus is carried, so 
that the scow may be advauced to a certain 
distanoe, which distance istqaal to the amount 
of cut which can be excavated by the dredger. 
It consists of a supplemental spud movitg ver- 
tically in guides upon a frame at one side of the 
dredger scow, guiding channels fixed to the side 
of the scow, so that the spud passes down 
through these channels, the length of these 
channels being equal to the distance which it is 
desired to advance the scow from time to time, 
and in connection with this a chain or rope 
passing around the pulleys and connecting the 
independent epud'frame with the gipsy by 
which power may be applied to haul the 
dredge forward the length of the guide-slot or 
channel. 

Pulverizer and Concentrator. — Irwin 
W. Helwip, Pottstown, Pa., assignor of one- 
half to S. K. SaodgrasB, Dlaware, Ohio. No. 
418 514. Dited D.o. 31, 1839. This is a device 
for pulveriziog and concentrating gravel, earth, 
or other auriferous material, and is especially 
adapted for use in placer mines, where the 
earthy material needs to be broken and pulver- 
ized in order to separate the gold. It consistB 
essentially of the combination with a pulverizer 
and its operatint^ mechanism of a vibrating 
concentrator, having its bottom formed of wave- 
like surfaces and depressions, and having 
ledges overhanging the pocketo, means for 
vibrating the concentrator and an Inclined 
chute between the pulverizer and concentrator. 

Shirt. — Frank Batter of Slide, Humboldt 
county, assignor of one-third to P. C. L'ivar, 
Sumner, 0. No. 418 639. Dited Dic. 31, 1889. 
Great discomfort is often caused to the wearers 
of shirts by reason of the pressure upon the 
outer end of the back collar-button which is 
transferred to the bones of the spinal column 
with greater or lees severity. This invention 
is designed to do away with this difficulty by 
the use of the flexible tapes attached to the 
inner portion of the shirt-band, so as to pass 
throuftb the button-boles of the band and be 
secured by a peculiarly conetrnoted pin, which 
may, if desired, also pass throogh a buttou*hole 
in the center back portion of the tie, so as to 
hold that in place at the same time. 

List of U.S. Patents for Pacific Coast 
Inventors, 

The following brief list by telegraph, for Jan. 8, 
will appear more complete on receipt of mail advices: 

Cftlifornia— Henry Anderson of San Franciaco, me- 
tallic roofiog^; Henry Biyan of Mode-to, t-hoe for thraab- 
iDg macT'Oe; Robert B. Davis of Sao Diego, wave motor; 
Loyd C. Tibert of Sao Francisco, oat-huUer; Patrit;k F. 
Dancao of Sao FiaDcfS'to, • Uchar^e door for Bteam- 
U^bters and retorts; Julius Finck of San Francisco, an- 
Donciator; John J. Griffith of San Bernardi o, track 
pau^e and foldingr bedacreen; John L. Hazlett ot San 
Francisco, combined ruler and p«ncil sharpener; F. Lit- 
tleptge of Sao Jose, wdl-boring' appaiatus; Bartl^stt 
Mclntire of San Francisco, saw--ettiDg machine: Leoni- 
das C. Presaley of Brookhn, N. Y., and W, Lumbard of 
Wheatland, CaL. check-cotter; Olaf Quist of Colton, life- 
preserver; A fred J. Salisbury of Hueneme, wind-mill 
povemors; Joseph Thompson of Dec to, knife-cleaner; 
Benjamin Walton of Compton, bird-trap; Peter Weland- 
er of Sao Francisco, ventUator for boo^ or shoes. 



Market-PIace Scene in Nicaragua. 

{Concluded from page 10 ) 

There will be live entrances and tbe building 
will contain 50 rooms. In the center of the 
building, faoioK west, there will be a large 
leoture-toom, provided with all the necessary 
tables and instruments used in demonatratioD, 
and capable of accommodating '200 persons. 

Three rooms, each communicating with one 
another, and so arranged as to be made as one, 
will be provided for laboratory porposes. The 
dim<>niiinnt of the rooms are as follows: oS 2x 
32 0; 4<J 9x3s -i; 34x3S 4. In the old building 
•ocommodations were provided for only 60 
•todents, whereas in the new one ample room 
is provided for *200 students. 

The capacity of the institution will be more 
than trebled. A small lecture-room will be 
made for special purposes; also several rooms 
in which students can pursue their studies in 
special subjects, and other rooms for general 
use connect d with the laboratories, such 
as storerooms, sitting-rooms, and rooms for 
study. 

Oa the north side of the building a museum- 
room will be bnilt. A wing, to extend from 
the north end of the structure, size 43 6x27-10, 
will be used as an organic laboratory and a 
combustion and store room, and in the court, 
about the center of which will be the complete 
building, there will be 6ve rooms to be used as 
reading, sitting rooms, etc. 

The present design calls for ample accommo- 
dations for 12d students, which is double the 
capacity as now provided in the south hall. 



Attention, Southern California Kiners. 

WORKS FOR 5ALE. 
The Works are situated at Daggett, Cal , in the 
Calico Mining District, and on side-track of the At- 
lantic and Pacihc Railroad. They contain a first- 
class so-horse power Engine and 45-horse power 
boiler, with Ore Crusher and other machinery. Mill 
Scales. Assaying Outfit, etc., all nearly new. .WiO 
upon the premises an ctlice building and a comfort- 
able duelUng house (portable). The :>bove can be 
had ata bargain. Apply to GILLISPY & CHILD5 
123 C^lilornia Sl, San Francisco. 



Complimentary Samples. 

Persons receiving this paper marked are re- 
quested to examine its contents, term of sub- 
scription, and give it their own patronage, and 
as far aa practicable aid in circulating the 
jotanal, and making its value more widely 
known to others, and extending its influence in 
the catise it faithfully serves. Subscription 
rate, $3 a year. Extra copies mailed for 10 
cents, if ordered soon enough. If already a 
■nbsariber, please ahow the paper to others. 

On Wednesday five miners were buried by a 
oave in the Victor ooal mines, near Trinidad, 
Colo. 



Academy of Sciences. 

The aunnal meeting of the California Acad- 
emy of Sciences was held on Monday evening 
last. The Committee on Election announced 
that Dr. H. W. Harkness had been elected 
president for the ensuing year by S9 votes out 
of 127 cast. The following other officers were 
elected : First Vice-President, H. H. Behr; 
second vice-president. Geo. H^waton; corre- 
eponding secretary, F.ederick Gaizbow; re- 
cording aeoretary, J. R. Scuphan; treasurer, I 
E. Thayer; librarian, '.Prof. Carlos Troyer; di- 
rector of mneenm, J. Qr. Cooper. Trnatees — 
Chas. F. Crocker. D. E. Hayes, S. W. Hoi 
laday, Geo. C. Perkins, E. J. Molera, Irving 
M. Scott, John Taylor, 

The president read his report, which was a 
resume of the year's proceedings. According 
to it there are 2o7 members of the academy. 
Five died during the year and five were ad- 
mitted. 

Charles F. Crocker as chairman presented 
the report of the trustees. The board, immedi 
ately on its election last year, began work on 
the academy building, and at present nearly 
all contraots for construction are given out. 
The building, which is on Market street, near 
Fourth, will be ready for occupancy before the 
end of this year. A review of transactions 
with the Lick Trustees was also given. A note 
and mortgage for $300,000 had been signed last 
September to the trust. Miss Flood had been 
p^t id $4500 for interest in a division wall, and 
$1200 has been received from the Crocker 
Sn-ntific Investigation Fund, out of which 
$960 had been paid. The Bank of California 
bad been selected as custodian of the academy's 
money. Most carefnl and searching investiga- 
tion bad been made by the trustees regarding 
the new building, and the mode of constraction 
adopted was considered moat perfect. The 
total a'viount for contracts given out to date is 
$218,346, which includes entire cost of building, 
txoept elevators and glass lights for sidewalk. 
Already 1^117,045 of this amount has been 
paid, and there are ample fanda on hand to de- 
fray the entire cost of building. 

The treasurer in presenting bis report said he 
did not segregate the various items so closely 
as in former years, owing to the baildiog ac< 
counts being so large an addition. L^^t Jinu- 
ary there was a balance on hand of $2936 06, of 
which $2185 04 was from the general fund and 
$751.02 from the Crocker fund Daring the 
year dues received amounted to $1151; interest 
fr'^m Crocker fund, $1200; from general fund, 
$1,375; cash received from L'ck trust, $288 
969.40; rent of fence at new bailding, $425 
Tjtal receipts, $293 210 40. which, with the 
balance, amouncs to $296,156 46. Ditbarse 
nrif'nta were as foUowB: Prom Crocker fund 
S960; general fund, $270 029.93; sundry. $1.95; 
total, $270 991 88. Balance in Bink of Cali 
fornia, January 1, 1890, $25 164 58. 

The recording secretary was absent, and his 
report was not submitted. 

Prof. Carloa Troyer, librarian, announced 
that the library had received 2193 volumes. 

The Director of the Museum was absent, and 
did not present a report. 

The Curator of Birds and Mammale reported 
that the year had been satisfactory, although 
lack of funds was an obstacle in much work 
that might have been accomplished otherwiae. 
A committee of three is investigating the food 
habits of California birds, particularly regard- 
ing their deatrnction of fruit trees, etc. The 
catalogue recently compiled and now in press is 
the first one on birds in Lower California. The 
possibility of establiahing a zoological garden 
near the city is looked forward to with great 
interest by the Academy, 

The Curator of Botany reported that 5164 
species of herbs and plants had been presented 
to the Academy daring the year and was a val- 
tiable oolleotion, 



DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 
Booth Gold Mining Company. Location 

o( i»riDclpal place of buaiaess. San Francisco, CaH- 

fornla. Location o( Woiks. Auburn, Platf^r Co., Cal. 

NOTICE.— There U delinquent upon the following 
(]«8cril>(] Stock, on account ot AsseasmeDt (No 4), levied 
on the '23d dav of NovemtH^r 1!^S^. tbe seTeral amounts 
eet opp<)eite tbe names of the respective Shkreholdere, 
as folluwn: 

No. 
Certiti< No. 
Names. cat«. Shares. Am't 

Richard Cheoerj*. Trustee 1«0 0,275 $125 60 

Richard Chexery 17 & 10 

C a les F. Eaton 171 300 6 00 

Charles F. Faton 172 300 6 00 

t barle- F. E *ton 173 60 1 20 

R. N. Oaves. Trustee « aW 5 00 

E. S. IlarrisOD 177 1,000 20 00 

Geo. R. Soianey. Trustee 82 312 6 24 

Geo. R. Suinnev, Trustee 176 500 10 00 

E. P. SI08800, Trustee ISl 5D0 10 00 

An'1 in accoriaoce with l«w, and an order of the Board 
of Dirertore, made on the 23d day of No ember, 1S89, so 
manv shares of each parcel ol such Stock aa may be 
necessary', wilt be fold at public Auction, at the sales- 
rootn of Mid'JletOQ i Sbaron, Ni. tZ Woi tt'Omer^- Ptreet, 
San Francisco, California, 00 UOXDAT, THE TWENTI- 
ETH (20th) DAY OF JANUARY, 1S90. at the hour of 3 
o'clock p M.. of said day, to pay said Delinquent Assess- 
ment thereon, to«:etber v^ith costs of advertisiog aod 
expenSiS o! the sale. 

GEO. R. SPINNEY, Secretarv. 

Office, 310 Pine St.. Room 2S, San Francisco, Califoroia. 



THE ROLLER ORE FEEDER 



[Patented May 23, 1SS2.1 




DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Tlie Geman Mm anil Loan Societi, 

536 California Street. 

For tbe half-year ending Dec. 31, ISS9, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of Ave and forty-hu' dredths 
(5 -iO-lOO) per cent per annum on Term Deposits, and four 
and one-Dalf (4 1 2) per cent per annum on Ordinary 
Deposits. Payable on and after Thursday, Jan. 2, 1890. 
GEO. TOUBNY, Secretary. 



BUTTE, MONTANA, 

The railroad, mining: and commercial center of the new 
State, offers some of the best inducements for invest- 
ments in 

Real Estate, Mines & Mining Stocl( 

of anv localitv in the Nortnwest. For particulars address 
T&e'Evana-Terry-Ciaussen Brokeraffe 00., 
41 E. Broad^pay, Butte. Montana. 



Thu Is the best and cheapest Ore Feeder oow In use. 

It has fewer parts, requires less power, is simpler in 
idjustment than any other. Feeds coarse ore or soft clay 
alike uniformly, under one or all the stamps in a batten) 
as required. 

In the Bunker Hill Mill it has mo continuously for two 
years, never ha^'ing been out of order or costing a dollar 
tor repairs. 

Golden State and Miners' Iron Works, 

Sole Manufacttirere, 
827 First Street. San Francisco. CaL 

HORACE D. RANLETT, 

Ores, Mining, and GomiissioD, 

420 Montsomery St., S. F. 

Ships under advances to smelting works Ln Boston, 
Sew York, Baltim 're and Liverpool. 

Twenty-one years' experience in Shipping Ores and 
Uanagin)? Mines. 

Solicits Consignments of Copper Produca and Manage- 
ment of Min'og Matters. 

All business conducted on Cash Baais. 

Purchase and shipment of MiniD« Supplies a Spkcialtt. 

Sales ot Developed Copper Mines undertaken. 

Business Manager of U.>10y COPPER MINE, Copper- 
opolis, Cal.; NEWTON COPPER MINE, Amador Co., CaL 

¥•0X1. S A Ti33- 

Onn Obmen's 12x12 Autoinailc Eoglne; 

best strle in usp .ilso. 1 Boiler 4* in xl6ft. Both nearly 
new. Applvto . . W. QUICK, -A'Al First ^t.. 
(Top Floor) Sao Francleco, CaL 



JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS, 

Nos. 39 to 51 FREMONT STREET. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




' CHALLENGE " ORE FEEDER. 



"HENDT" IMPROVED 
The test form of Feeder ever devised, and pronounced by reputable mining men to be fai 
superior to any form of *' Roller " Feeder manufactured. We refer to the follow- 
ing gentlemen who have furnished us with testimonial letters to the 
above effect, which can be seen at our office, viz.; 

D. C. WiCKHAM, Taylor Mine, Greenwood, Cal. 



S, VV. Cbockzb, Supt. Bunker Hill Gold Min- 
ing Co., Amador City, Gal. 
W. G. RoBEETS, Greenwood, El Dorado Co., Cal. 



J. R. TKEGL0A2,-, Supt. South Spring Hill Gold 
Mining Co., Amador City, Cal. 



WE AKE MAXCTFACTtrEERS OF THE 



'CHALLENGE," "STANFORD," ' TULLOCK," & "ROLLER" FEEDERS, 

And will fnmUh descriptive Catalogues and quote prices upon applioation. 



30 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 11, 1890 



DAVIDSON STEAM PUMPS. 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works, 



Boiler-Feed Pumps, 
Tank Pumps, 
Marine Pumps, 
Wrecking Pumps, 
Fire Pumps, 
Brewery Pumps, 
Mining Pumps, 
Low Pressure 

Pumps, 
Vertical Pumps, 
Balanced Hydrauli 

AND 

Heavy Pressure Valve. 




S. E. COR. HOWARD AND BEALE STS., 

San Francisco. 




Sugar House Pumps. 
Railroad Pumps. 
Vacuum Pumps, 
Air Pumps. 
Circulating Pumps. 
Tannery Pumps, 
Hydraulic Pumps. 
Elevator Pumps, 
Independent Air 

Pump and Jet 

Condenser. 
Artesian or Deep 

Well Pumps. 



The Only Steam Pump Made that can be run at High Piston Speed without Shock and with Safety to the Machine. Piston Eods, 

Stufflng-Boxes, Valve Seats, Stems and Linings of Water Cylinders are of Best Oomposition Metal, U. S. Standard. 
EVERY PTJMP THOROUGHLY TESTED BEFORE LEAVING FACTORY. Sexica. for Oa.tAloS'U-es. 



Vulcan Iron "Woms, 



135-145 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 



11 



f stamp Bitteries, Pans and Settlers, 

\ "Dodge," and Improved Blake, Rock-Breakers, 

( "Dodge" Pulverizers, Slime Machines, etc. 



AERIAL WIRE ROPEWAYS. 

(VULOAN PATENT SYSTEM.) 

The cheapest and most reliable form of TransportaUon of O-e, Cjal, etc. Saves four*fifths 
of the cost by any other method. 

SAW-MILL ) ( CORLISS, 

REFRIGERATING MACHINERY. STEAM ENGINES \ Meyer Cut-off, 
CABLE-ROAD ) ( Slide Valve. 

SPECIAL MACHINERY TO ORDER. 



SHAFTING, 
PCI-tETS, 
BOXES, 

HANGERS, etc. 



/REPAIR WORK SOLICITED. 



s .ABATES itflionxrE: 



BY USING . 



WATER POWER TRANSMITTED BY ELECTRICITY 

To Run your Mills, Hoists and Trams. 

For Circnlar giving particulars send to 

KEITH ELECTRIC CO., 



— MANOFACTOEERS OF - 



Apparatus for Electric Light and Electric Power, 

OFFICE, 40 NEVADA BLOCK, 



ntory, Stevenson St„ bet, First and Eoker, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 



L. C. MARSHUTZ 



T. a. OANTRBLL. 



NATIONAL IRON WORKS 

N. W. Corner Main and Howard Sts., San Francisco, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Stationary and Compound Engines, Flour, Sugar, Saw 
and Quartz Mill Machinery. 



AMALGAMATING MACHINES. CASTINGS AND FORCINGS ^LXZl. 

ALL WORK TESTED AND GUARANTEED. 

IMPROVED PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINES. 



NATIONAL ROCKER QUARTZ MILL. 

KENDALL'S PATENT, AUGUST 24, 1886. 
O.A.X=*.^^CX7''Sr. IS 7*0X18 Ixx 24 H.oxM.rm. 3 XX. JE*. 

MARSHUTZ & CANTRELL, Sole Manufacturers. 

The Patentee and Manufacturers 
cordially invite miners to critically 
examine and pass judgment upon 
this improved system of milling 
add amalgamating ores In the fol- 
lowing particulars: 

1. The cost is less than one-half of 
stamps o( same capacity. 

2. The freight to mine is less than 
one-half of stamps. 

3. The cost of erecting is less than 
ooe-fourth of stamps. 

4. The power to drive it is less than 
one-half of stamps. 

5. The wear is less tlian one-quar- 
ter of stamps. 

6. There is no wear except on 
shoes and dies. 

7. In point of amalgamation it Is 
superior to any other machine 
in use. 

S. In its simplicity of conatruction. 
We challenge competition with 
Stamps, Ball Pulverizers or and 
other ore crushing machines now 
before the publia 

i^Send for Circulars and Price List. MARSHUTZ & OANTRBLL. 




PERFECT PULLEYS 

First Premium Awarded at Mechanics' Fair, 1884, 

Sole Licensed Manufacturers of the 

MEDART PATENT WEOTJGHT EIM PTJLLEY 

— / For the States of California, Oregon and Nevada, and the Territories of Idaho, Washington 
^ Montana, Wyoming, Utah and Arizona. Lightest, Strongest, Cheapest and 

Best Balanced Pulley in the World. Also Manufacturers of 

SHAFTING, HANGERS AND APPURTENANCES. 
tS" Send fob Circulars akd Priob List.*^ 
Noa. 129 and 181 FREMONT STBBBT ' BAN FBANOISOO, CAL. 




PAT. OCT. 25, 1881. 



Jan. 11, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



31 



AMALGAMATING MACHINERY. 

stamp Mills lor Wet or Dry Crushing. 
Huntington Centrifugal Quartz Mill. Drying 
Cylinders. Amalgamating Pans, Settlers, 
Agitators and Concentrators. Retorts, Bul- 
lion and Ingot Moulds, Conveyors, Elevators, 
Bruckners and Howell's Improved White's 
Roasting Furnaces, Etc. 



FRASER & CHALMERS, 

MINING MACHINERY 



IMPROVED CORLISS vaVv°e%VIIm ENGINES. ^ BOILERS 



CONCENTRATING MACHINERY. 

Blake, Dodge and Comet Crushers, Cornish 
Crushing and Finishing Rolls, Hartz Plunger 
and Collom Jigs. Frue Vanner & Embrey 
Concentrators, Evans', Calumet, Collom's 
and Rittenger's Slimo Tables. Trommels, 
Wire Cloth and Punched Plates. Ore Sam- 
ple Grinders and Heberle Mills. 



HORIZONTAL. VERTICAL 
. . . AND SECTIONAL. . . . 



:ici«ix»]E^oinsi3t mi^^M^im m'^M.wKi^m 



Hoisting Engines, 
Safety Cages, 
Safety Hooks, 

Ore CARS, Water & Ore 
BUCKETS, 

Air Connpressors, 

Rock Drills, Etc. 

GENERAL MILL AND 
MINING SUPPLIES, ETC. 
Sectional Machinery 

FOR 

MULE-BACK 

TRANSPORTATION. 




Pumping Engines 

and Cornish 

Pumping Machinery, 

IMPROVED 
WATER JACKET 

Blast Furnaces for 
Galena &CopperOres, 

SLAG CARS AND POTS, 

Roots & Baker 
Pressure Blowers, 

SUSPENDED 

TRAMWAYS. 



(fletallijrgy and Ore3. 



SELBY 

SMELTING and LEAD CO.. 

416 Kontgoniery St., San Francisco. 

GOLD AND SILVER REFINERY 
And Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and 
Lead Ores and Sulphnrets. 

HABUPAOTURBHS OF 

BLUESTONE. 

LEAD PIPE, 

SHEET LEAD, 

SHOT, Etc., Etc. 

ALSO MAMUFAOTURKfUl OP 

Standard Shot-Gun Cartridges, 

Uoder Chamberlin PateDt 



General Offices and Works: FULTON AND UNION STS., CHICAGO, ILL. 



BRANCH OFFICES; "Tw^^TooTsZt^ 

Calls de Juarez. LIMA, PERU, South America. 
SOLE WESTERN AGENTS FOR 



, No. 2 Wair St. DENVER, COLO., 1316 Eighteenth St. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, 
St. LONDON, ENC, 23 Bucklersbury, E. C. CHIHUAHUA CITY, MEXICO, No. I I 
JOHANNESBURG, TRANSVAAL, South Africa. 

TYLER WIBB WORKS DOUBLE ORIMPBD MINING OLOTSS. 



THE PELTOIT WATER "WHEEL 

GIVES THE HIGHEST EFFICIENCY OF ANY WHEEL IN THE WORLD. 






^v 






OVER 800 ALREADY IN USE. 

Affords the Most Simple and Reliable Power for all 
Mining and Manufaoturing Machinery. 

Adapted to heads running from 20 up to 2,000 feet. 

From 12 to 20 per cent better reeultB guaranteed than 
can be produced from any other Wheel in the Country, 

ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION. 

Power from these Wheels can be transmitted long 
distances with small lose, and is now extensively used in 
all parts of the country for generating both power and 
light. 

APPLICATIONS 

Should state amount', and head of water, power required, 
and for what purpose ; with approximate length of nipe ; 
also, whether the application U with reference to WheeU 
or ^o(ors described below. SEND FOR CIRCULARS. 

The Pelton Water Wheel Co. 

121 MAIN ST„ SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

itfl:oT?'c:> 

Varying from the fraction of 1 up to 15 and 20-horae power, Unequaled for all light-runninor machinery. Warranted to develop a given 
amount of power with one-half the water required by any other. SST SEND FOR MOTOR CIRCULAR. ADDRESS AS ABOVE. -^S 




<3nxr '\A7'Jsjr:E^ 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO.. 

IHP0RTBR8 AND DSAIiBRB IN 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS, MINE 
AND MILL SUPPLIES, 

ALSO CHEMICALS, AND PHYSICAL, SCHOOL AND 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS. 
63 & 66 First St., cor. Mission, San Francisco. 

We would call the attention of Assayers, ChcmlstB, 
Mining Companies, Milling Companies, Prospectors, etc, 
to our full stock of Balances, Furnaces, Muffles, Cruci- 
bles, Soorifiers, etc, including, also, a full stock of 
Chemicals. 

Having been engaged in furnishing these supplies slnor 
the first discovery of mines on the Pacific Coast, we feet 
confident from our experience we can well auit the de- 
mand for these goods, both as to quality and price. Our 
New Illustrated Catalogue, with, prices, wilt be sent on 
application. 

i^* Our Oold and Silver Tables, showing the value psi 
ounce Troy at different degrees of fineness, and valuable 
tables for computation of assays in grains and grammes, 
will be sent free upon application. Agents for the Mor- 
gan Crucible Co., London, England. Also for E. 
O. Denoistou's Silver Plated Amalgam Plates. The 
plates of this well-known manufacturer are thoroughly 
reliable, and full weight of Silver guaranteed, Ordets 
taken at his lowest prices. 

JOHN TAYLOR & GO. 



Nevada Metallurgical Works. 

NO. 23 STEVENSON STREET. 

Near First and Market Streets, S. F. 

C. A. Ldokhardt, Manager. Establishbd 1800 

Ores worked by any Prooess, 

Ores Sampled, 

Assaying in all its Branches. 

Analyses of Ores, Minerals, Watera, etc. 

Working Teats (practical) Made. 

Plana and Specifications furnished for the 
most suitable Process for Working Ores, 

Special attention paid to Examinations of 
Mines; Plana and Reports furnished. 

O. A. LUCKHAEDT Ss CO., 
(Formerly Huhn & Luckhardt, 

Minlmr Enelneers and MetaUurtrists 




JAMES LBFFBL'S 

Mining Turbine Water Wheel. 

These Wheels are designed for all purposes where limited quantities of water and 
high heads are utilized, and are guaranteed to give more power with less water than 
any other wheel made. Being placed on horizontal shatt, the power is transmitted 
direct to shafting by belts, dispensing with gearing. 

Estimates furnished on application for wheels specially built and adapted in 
capacity to suit any particular case. 

Further information can be obtained of this form of construction, as well &a the 
ordinary Vertical Turbines for Wooden Penstocks and in Iron Globe Cases, free of cost, 
by applying to the manufacturers. 



JAMES LEPFEL & CO.. 



Springfield, Ohio, 



or 110 liberty St,, New York. 



FBASEB Ss OEALMBBS, Qeneral Agents, 

OhlcaKO, 111., and Denver, CoL 

PARKE A LACY, General Agents, San Francisco, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA IRON YARD. 

HENRY J. ROGERS & CO. 

Successors to CHA3. CALLAHAN 
IMPORTEKS AND DEAL8HB IN 

CAST and WROUGHT IRON SCRAP 

SECOND-HAND BOII.ERS 

AND OLD MACHINERY 

Of every deaorlption. 

TIB Higlest Price pail for all MMs ol Metals, 

Offiob and Yard: 128 and 130 FolBom St., S. F 

Telephone No. 67. 



FOR SALE 

t Hydraulic Mining Property in Soumem Oregon. Good, 
Extensive. For particulars (Principals only) address, 

*'A. M.," Box 77. 

Grants Pass, Oregon, 



THOMAS PRICE & SON, 

Assay OflOice, Chemical Laboratory, 

BULLION ROOMS and ORE FLOORS, 

524 Sacramento Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

COIN RETURNS ON ALL BULLION DEPOSITS IN 24 HOURS. 

WORKING TESTS OF ORES BY ALL PROCESSES. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO CONCENTRATION OF ORES. 
Ores Received on Oonsignment, Sampled, Assayed, and Disposed 
of in the Open Market to the Highest Bidder. 



U. SOBTBL, 



^ METALLURGICAL WORKS. 

I^\ 318 Pine St. (Basement., 



Corner of Leldesdorff Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Ores Sampled and Assayed, and Tests made by my 
Proceea. 
Assaying and Analysis of Ores, Minerals and Waters. 
Mines Examined and Reported on. 
Practical Instruction given in Treating Ores by im- 
proved prooessee. 

G. KUSTEL & CO.. 
Hlningr Enerlneers and Metallurcrists. 



GREAT REDUCTION! 

BATTERY~~SOREENS. 

Best and Cheapest in America. 

No imitation, no deception, no planished or rotten 
iron used. Only genuine Russia iron in Quartz Screens. 
Planished iron screens at nearly half my former rates. 

I ha\e a large supply of Battery Screens on hand 
suitable for the Huntington and all Stamp Mills, which I 
will sell at 20 per cent discount. 

PERFORATED SHEET METAL 

For Flour and Rice Mills, Grain Separators, Revolving 
and Shot Screens, Stamp Batteries and all kinds of Min 
[ng and Milling Machinerj'. Iron, Steel, Copper, Brass. 
Zinc and other metals punched for all uses. 

Inventor and Manufacturer of the celebrated Slot Cut 
or burred and Slot Punched Screens. 

Mining Screens a specialty, from No. 1 to 16 (6neJ. 
Orders promptly attended to. 

San Francisco Pioneer Screen Works, 

ai & 223 First St., Saa Francisco, Cal. 

JOHN W. QUICK, Proprietor. 



This paper la printed with In^ Manufac- 
tured by Charles Eneu Johnson & Co,, 500 
South 10th St., Philadelphia. Branch Offi- 
ces— 47 Bose St.. New Yor^, and 40 La Salle 
St., Ohlcaso. Asent for the Faolflc Coast— 
Joeepb Hi Oorety, 630 Oommerciai St., S F. 



32 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 11, 1890 



II]af(ket Reports. 



Local MarJiets. 

San Francisco, Jan. 9, 1890. 
General trade continues quiet, yet the trade is 
more hopeful than for years, particularly since the 
cold weather set in, which has frozen the snow, 
causing it to become more compact, and gives more 
assurance of a long summer supply of water. The 
money market is beginning to work easier, which 
will be more pronounced when the large sums paid 
in for taxes are put in circulation. The East re- 
ports an easier tendency. This is reflected in the 
strength of sterling exchange. The latter is in de- 
mand for remitting interest and dividends abroad. 
An Eastern authority on the disbursements of 
money for the payment of interest and dividends in 
this month presents a compilation of figures, show- 
ing that the interest payments for 1S89 by railways 
and cognate corporations will amount to $238,370,- 
242, agamst $210,289,281 in 1888, an increase 
of $27,780,961, while the dividend payments will 
foot up to $[02,091,089, against $106,341,399 in 
1888, a decrease ot $4,250,310, leaving the total dis- 
bursements for interest and dividends at $340,461,- 
331, compared with $316,730,680 in 1888, a net gain 
of $23 730.651. 

MEXICAN DOLLARS— Thfe market, although 
still inactive, shows a slightly belter inquiry. The 
market held steady at 75?^, but at the close shows 
more strength with an advancing tendency, 

SILVER— Purchases the past week were made 
by the Government at 96 cents up to and in- 
cluding Tuesday. Exporters were irregular, bidding 
all the way from 95 5^ 1095.85. The close money 
marJtet is said to have been against a more active 
inquiry. The strong and higher rates for sterling 
exchange is in favor of a better export movement, 
which, combined with an easier money market, 
ought to bring about still higher prices. The 
Carson mint continues to use the silver output of the 
Comstock mines. We still adhere to the 
opinion that the work now being prosecuted on 
the Comstock is to open up the Red lode, which is 
nearly all gold. How long it will take to run into 
this lode it is hard to say, also iis extent and richness. 
There is nothing so uncertain as mining, owing to 
the difficulty o( seeing what is ahead. 

To-day's (Thursday's) telegrams quoted silver in 
London at 44^^, and in New York at 965^0, with 
both markets strong. In our market a sale U reported 
to have been made yesterday at 96.55 cts. One bank 
quotes 96^ cts. as bid to-day, but sellers name 97 
cts., with nothing doing. 

QUICKSILVER— Receipts the past week aggre- 
gate 66 flasks. The demand is slow, but the market 
has a simng tone. 

BORAX— The market is reported quiet but 
steady. At the East the demand is slower, but the 
market is strong. 

LIME— Receipts the past week aggregate only 
606 bbls. With clear weather an increasmg call is 
reported. 

LEAD— A better tone is reported at the East, 
with which our market naturally sympathizes. There 
is a prevailing opinion that the market will do 
better. European advices report a strong market. 

TIN— Imports the past week aggregate 26,029 
boxes of plate. For spot the market continues easy, 
but for forward shipment prices are too high to lead 
to business. Late cable advices report the market 
weaker, due to realizing sales. The statistical posi- 
tion is in holders' favor. 

COPPER— The market steadily advanced up to 
yesterday, when it shaded some. The weaker tone 
is not accepted as a bad omen. but. on the contrary, 
as a more favorable sign. There have been free 
sales, yet the market at the East and abroad has 
taken all and at improved prices. The visible stock 
the world over is largely reduced under an enlarged 
consumption. The movement so far has been en- 
tirely free from speculation. 

IRON— Imports the past week aggregate 200 tons 
pig from Hull and 135 tons from irondale. In the 
local market the demand is still slow, but now that 
t^e tight money market is tided over, an improved 
call is expected to set in. The markets at the East 
and abroad are reported by telegraph to be very 
strong under a continued good demand. The con- 
sumption in England is reported to have been phe- 
nomenally large in 1889, while the exports also show 
a marked gain. In the United States the consump- 
tion was also very large, considerably in excess of 
1888. 

COAL— Imports the past week were as follows: 
From Hull, 501 tons; Seattle, 2595; Newcastle, 
N, 5. W., 7815; Nanaimo, 1070; Coos Biy, 450; 
Departure B-iy, 2350; Philadelphia, 302; total, 15,083 
tons. The local market is reported more active, 
owing to cold weather, for house coal, and clear 
weather for steam coal. The large output of coal 
collieries is a controlling factor af,ainst an advance in 
prices, as is the advanced winter in deterring dealers 
from carrying liberal stocks. A spot cargo of Aus- 
tralian is said to have been placed at a concession. 
For near-by cargoes the market is hard to quote, 
owing to dealers preferring to wait arrival. For 
prompt shipment it is difficult to get a correct idea, 
owing to dealers and large consumers appearing 
ofiiih. In Austr.tlian charters there is nothing new 
to report during the week. 



Eastern Metal Markets. 

By Telegraph. 
New York, Jan. 9,, 1890. — The following are 
the closing prices the past week: 
Silver in Silver in 

London. New York. Hopper, Lead. Tin. 
Thursday.... 43 945 SU 25 §3 90 $2100 

Friday 444 954 14 25 3 92i 21 20 

Saturday.. ..44J 95^ 14 45 3 90 2120 

Monday 44^ 95i 14 50 3 90 2110 

Tuesday 44^ 954 1* 50 3 90 20 90 

WedDeadav..4H 5-16 96} 14 45 3 95 20 SO 

New York. Jan. 8.— California refined borax 
steady, 8^^@9c. Quicksilver strong, in sympathy 
with London cable, 68@7oc. Copper supported, 
salei 100,000 lbs. Lake Ingot, i4J^c; Arizona, 
I- ' @i3lifc; casting, 13c. Pig) lead, $3.87K@3.92 
- ; single car lots, >3-9S February; $3.97?^ 
-h; $4 May. 



San Francisco Metal Market. 

WHOLBSAIiE. 

Thubsdat, January 9, 1890. 

Antimony— ^^ @ ~ 

EoRAX— Refined, in carload lota 7 @ 7 

Powdered " " " 7 @ 

Concentrated " " " 6»@ — 

All grades jobbing at an advance. 

COPPEK— „, _ ^^ 

Bolt «.. 21-@ -22 

Sheathing 22 @ 24 

Ingot, jobbing ^^ ^ 

do, wholesale 15 @ 16 

Fire Bos Sheets 22 (« 24 

Lead— Pig 4 @ 4 

Bar 5 @ — 

Sheet 7 @ - 

Pipe 6@ — 

Shot, discount 10% on 500 baga Drop, ^ bag. 1 45 («S — 

Buck, ^bafe 1 65 @ — 

OhiUed, do 1 85 @ — 

Steel— English, lb 16 @ 20 

Canton tool 9 @ 9 

Black Diamond tool 9W 9 

Pick and Hammer 8 ^ 10 

MatJiinery 4@ 5 

Toe Calk H@ ~ 

TiNPLATE— B. v., steel grade, 14x20, P. S 5 50 @ — 

E. v., steel grade, 14x21), spot 4 95 @ 5 10 

Charcoal, 14x20 6 75 ((» 7 00 

do roofing, 14x20 6 00 @ — 

do, do, 20i28 12 00 @ - 

Pig tin, spot, ^ tt) 23 (* — 

CoKE-Eng., ton, spot, m blk 13 50 (ftlS 00 

Do, do, to load J« 00 @ — 

Qdicksilver— By the tlask, H 50 @ — 

Flasks, new '^ 

Flaatj. old 

Chrome Iron Ore, ^ ton 

Iron -Bar, base 

Norway, base 

Spot. 

fEON— Glengamock ton 35 00 @ 

Eglinton, ton 35 00 & 

American Soft, No. 1, ton.. @35 00 

CireETon Pig. ton @35 00 

Puget Sound 35 00 @ 

Ol^y Lane White (028 00 

Shotta, No.l 35 00 Cd35 00 

Bar Iron (base price) ¥1 lb. . . — @ — 

Langloan 35 00 @ 

Thoi-ncliffe 35 OO @ 

Gartsherrie 35 00 @ 



35 @ 
, 10 v0@- 



3@ 3i 
43<g 5i 
To Load. 
34 @ - 
32iC'» — 
32i@ — 

= 1 = 

27lS - 
32i@ - 



34 @ - 
34 @ - 



Coal. 



Australian . , . 
Liverpool St'm 
West Hartley. 
Scotch Splint. 



Per Ton. 



TO LOAD. 

Per Ton. I 

7 50 @ 7 75lCardiff 9 50@10 00 

8 50 @ Lehigh Lump.. 16 50@17 00 

8 50 @ 9 00 Cumberland bk 16 00@16 60 

9 00 @ 9 OOJE^g, hard 16 50@lfl 00 

SPOT FROM YARD. 



Wellington S 9 uO 

Scotch Splint 9 oO 

Greta 9 uO 

Weatmineter Brymbo . 9 ijO 

Nanaimo 9 uO 

Sydney 8 oO 

Oilman 7 



Seattle 7 00 

Coos Bay 6 00 

Cancel 12 00 

Egg, hard 18 00 

Cumberland, In Backs 19 00 
do. bulk 18 00 



The Mining Companies* Financial 
Standing. 

The following is the financial standing on the first 
Monday of the present month of the mining com- 
panies listed on the two exchanges in this city: 

Debt. 



$.. 



8,S49 
5,267 
1,089 



8,788 



Cash. 

Alta 8"43,186 

Alpha 9,687 

Andes 12, /53 

Bodie Con §21.285 

Benton Con 91,000 

Belcher 

Belle Isle 

Best & Belcher 

Bulwer 15.740 

Bullion §3,864 

Challenge Con 801 

Caledonia 82,287 

ChoUar t48,6S3 

Cod. Cal. & Virginia 176,992 

Confidence 1,630 

Con. Imperial 

Con. New York 1,890 

Commonwealth 

Crocker 

Crown Point 

Del Maute 

East tjierra Nevada 6,9 6 

Ex hequer §29 

Gould & Curr>' 15,600 

Grand ►'rize 

Hale & Norcross 

Holmes 

lud-^pendence 415 

Julia 8,674 

Justice t9,912 

Kentuck 

Lady Washington 119,690 

Locomotive 1,842 

North Belle lale 

North Conimoii wealth 

Mexican 

Mono §18,204 

Navajo 176 

Nevada Queen 

Occidental 

Ophir 8,435 

Overman 16,332 

Peer 8,071 

Peerless 6 335 

PotOBi t4,754 

Savage tl9.456 

Scorpion 7,680 

Seg. Belcher &, Mides 

Silver Hill 14.616 

Sierra Nevada 31,379 

Silver King 

Staadard 

St Louis 429 

Syndicate 7,817 

Union Con 10.061 

Utah ; 14,9.12 

Weldon 4,017 

*With proceeds of thesale o£ concentrates at Salt Lake 
to be received. 

tUnsold bullion to hear from. 

JUnsold bullion 8129,574 and further shipments to hear 
from, with S54, 000 In dividends and mine expenses about 
!§43,900 to come out. 

§Wit(i more assessments to be collecteil. 

llWith an offset of $19,000 in bullion and another ship- 
ment to hear from, out of which mine's December ex- 
panses (about §12,500) have to come. 

1 With monthly expenses to come out. 



51,504 
+7,113 
114 371 



49,766 
t3,155 



32,876 
16,6-3 
41,340 



3,266 
t30,440 



15,445 



3,573 
+13,819 



Bullion Shipments. 

We quote shipments since our last, and shall be 
pleased to receive further reports: 

Justice. Jan. 7, $7291; Crown Point, 7, $9655; 
Occidental Con,, 7, 514,272; Hanauer, i, $2050; 
Navajo, 7, $13 500; Hanauer, 3, $6900; Con. Cali- 
fornia and Virginia, 7, $44,870; Hanauer, 5, $4007; 
Savage, 9, $29,978; Con. Cal. and Virginia, 4, 
$90,000, 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 

Compiled every Thurbdat vkou Advertisbmentb in thb Mihing and Scientific Press ahd other S. F. Jodeham,' 

ASSESSMENTS. 



Company. Location. No. Am't. Levied. 

Adelaide Copper M Co Nevada.. 1.. l..Dec 31. 

Belle I^le M Co Nevada. .13. . 

Btsfc & Belcher M Co Nevada. .13. . 

Bullion M Co Nevada. .35.. 

Bodie Cod M Co California. .11.. 

Booth GM Co California.. 4.. 

Camp Greek M & M Co California.. 1.. 

Cou Imperial M Co 26.. 

Con New York M Co Nevada.. 2.. 

Calaveras Blue Gravel Co California.. 4.. 

Exchequer M Co Nevada.. 28.. 

Golden Giant M Co California. 

Grand Prize M Go Nevada.. 23.. 

Keotuck at Co Nevada- .20. . 

Mayflower Gravel M Co California.. 45.. 

Mexican M Co Nevada.. 39.. 

Mono GM Co California.. 29.. 

North Occidental G & S M Co. . Nevada. . 1. . 

Natoma Water & M Co California., 2.. 

Overman SM Co Nevada.. 61.. 

Palisade M Co Nevada. . 2, . 

Savage M Co Nevada. .74. . 

Beg Belcher & Mides M Co Nevada.. 5.. 

Summit G M Co California.. 11.. 

Trinity Biver Tunnel & M Co. California. , 2. . 
Teirakoffi M Co California, " 



Delinq't. 

Jan 31.,, 
..Jan 8.. 
,.Jan 8.. 
.Jan 8.. 

Dec 17 



15.. Dec 
15. Dec 4. 
25.. Dec 4. 
25.. Nov 11. 

2, " "'" 

2 

5. .Nov 22. 
15. .Dec n., 

3.. Nov 15. 
25.. Dec 16., 

i..Dec 17. 
30.. Nov 21. 
30..Dtc U., 
50. .Dec 27.. 
25.. Dec 21.... Jan 27 
25. .Nov 18.. ..Dec 23. 

7..DLC 2, - 

5. .Dec 21, 
25.. Dec 31. 

5.. Nov 1 
50.. Nov 5, 
25. .Jan 4 

5. .Nov ]4....Dec 20, 
50.. Nov 27.... Jan 6. 



Nov 23.... Dec 28. 

Dec 30.... Feb 12. 
" ..Dec 27. 
..Jan 15. 
. .Dec 23 
, .Jan 21. 
..Jan 23. 
..Dec 24 
.,Jan 14. 
.Feb 3. 



.Jan 6. 
, -Jan 2f 

.Feb £ 
. .Dae 2t 

.Dec 10, 
,.Feb 6, 



Sale. Secrbtart. Place of BvaiNffis. 

Feb 28..WH Graves 426SanBomeSt 

,..Jan 30..J WPew 310 Pine St 

. . Jan 30. . J W Pew 310 Pine St 

..Jan 24. .R R Grayeon 327 Pine St 

. . Jan 22. .E L Burling 309 Montgomery St 

..Jan 20.. Geo R Spinney 310 Pine St 

..Mar 10.. A a Folger 213 Fremont St 

. .Jan 15. .0 L McCoy .329 Pine St 

..Feb 5..CE Elliott 309 Montgomeiy St 

..Jan 14.. B Biutib 240 Montgoirery St 

..Feb U..CE Elliott 309 Montgomery St 

..Feb 12..H.TBrigg8 Downieville 

. Jan 15. .R R Grayson 329 Pine St 

. .Feb 4. . J W Pew 310 Pine St 

..Feb 25..JMorizio 328 Montgomery St 

..Feb 18.. CE Elliott 309 Montgomery St 

..Jan 24.. B L BurliDg 309 Mo tgomery St 

..Jan 27. .WH Watson 302 Montgomery St 

..Feb 25.. PW Ames 616 California St 

. .Feb 26. .G D Edwards 414 California St 

..Jan 30. .D Buck 309 Montgomery St 

..Dec 30.. E B Holmes 309 Montgomery St 

..Feb 26. .E B Holmes 309 Montgomerv St 

..Jan 14..BLBurling 309 Montgomery St 

..Jan 28..LHPockman 28 California St 

Feb 14., W J Garrett 308 Pine St 



Dec 14.... Jan 21 
MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 

NA.ME OP COMPAVT. tiOHATION. SbORETABT OfPIOE IN S. F. MbETINO DaTE 

Bald Mt Extension M Co Califorijia..J W Orear Downieville Annual Jan 23 

Iowa M Co Nevada.. C B Higgins 2u8 California Annual Jan 14 

Piait.fi: GilBon M. Co California.. C Hermann 32i) Kearny St Annual Jan 14 

Sierra Nevada M Co Nevada.. E L Parker 3i 9 Montgomery St Annual Jun 15 

Const Gothard T Wezell 522 M ntgomery St Annual Jan If 

Spriug Valley M is: Irrigation Co Cal. .WE Davis. 402 Front St : Annual Jan 20 

Silver Bang M Co Arizona.. A Waterman 309 Montgomery St Annual Jan 14 

Utah Uon M Co Nevada.. A H Fish 309 Montgomery St Aonual Jan 29 

Superior M & M Co J M Buffington 303 Ualifornia SI- ..-. Annual Jan 14 

Lone Star Quartz & Gravel M Co Cal, .AW Eluudell 2814 Sacramento St Annual 

NevauaSalt&; Borax Co H C Van Wyck 31u Pine St Annual -...Jan 21 

LATEST DIVIDENDS— WITHIN THREE MONTHS. 
Name ot Company. Location. Secrbtart. Oppiob in S. P Amoitnt. Patablk 

Champion M Co T Wetzel 522 Montgomery St 10 Nov 25 

Caledonia M C Nevada.. AS Cheminant 328 Montgomeiy St 08 Aug 5 

Con California & Va M ^^o Nevada.. A W Havens 309 Montgomery St 50 Jan 10 

Derbec Blue Gravtl M Co California.. T WetzeL 522 Montpomery St 10 Dec 23 

Idaho M Co California Grass Valley S 00 Nov 7 

Mt Diablo M Co Nevada.. E. Heath 319 Pine St 30 Oct 2? 

Pacific Borax Salt& Soda Co. .. California.. A H Clough 230 Montgomery St 1 00 Jan 10 



Mining Share Market, 

The market for the Corastocks has, the past week, 
been more or less dull, with the tendency to lower 
figures. The prevailing opinion is that they will go 
slightly lower before there is much of a turn, and to 
help them down one or two more assessments are to 
be levied. In the outside slocks, the Tuscaroras 
have shown an undue degree of activity under the 
leadership of Commonwealih. Usually well-informed 
parties look with confidence to those stocks being 
still more active, with the movement based on merit 
in several of the mines. As the stocks of several of 
them are well concentrated, quite a successful deal 
can be made before the spring months are over. 
They will probably soon begin to ship bullion by 
telegraph. In the Bodies and Quijotoas there is 
nothing doing. There are points out for still lower 
prices for the Bodies. So far the low price points 
have always come. 

From the Comstock mines the official news is of a 
more encouraging character. The letters received 
yesterday (Wednesday) report that in Hale and 
Norcross, on the 1250-foot north drift, running 
toward Savage, they were in nine feet of good ore — 
car samples assaying $35 a ton. This find is quite 
important. In Crown Point there is an improve- 
ment in the 300 south slope. The ore assays for 
the week show an increase of nearly $3 a ton. In 
Con. Imperial in West Crosscut No. 2 on the 300- 
foot level there is a decided improvement. 

In Alpha they are sinking on the ore found in 
the east crosscut 60 feet north of the shaft. On the 
600-foot north lateral drift they are in low-grade ore. 
The work in Ophir and also in Con. Virginia is be- 
ing closely watched, and as for that, all the work 
going on in the different mines is receiving special 
attention from mining men. The grade ot ore be- 
gins to show a higher value. lo this connection it 
is well for the association that is so bravely bittling 
to reform the abuses of the Comstocks not to forget 
that thev have an able coadjutor in the person of 
Hon. Francis G. Newhnds, for he has succeeded in 
reducing the milling charges of some of the mills 
from $7.50 to $5 a too. Not only has he done this, 
but he has increased the assay value of Yellow 
Jacket ore from $7.50 to $25 a ton. From the out- 
side mines there is nothing new to report outside of 
the published official letters, which are of a glowing 
character from the Tuscaroras, good from the Qui- 
jotoas and prospecting from the Bodies. 

Now that money is getting easy, and John W. 
Mackay is expected to return soon, the chronic 
bulls on the Comstocks look for an improvement 
in the mining share market. 

The bullion output ol Crown Point in last month 
was $38,616, and that of Con. Virginia $263,760. 
ChoUar's, Savage and Hale and Norcross outputs 
were not filed up to this (Thursday) morning. 

New Incorporations. 

The following companies have been incorporated, 
and papers filed in the office of the Superior Court, 
department 10, San Francisco : 

Northwestern G. & S. M. Co., Jan 4th. Loca- 
tion, British Columbia. Capital stock, $1,000,000. 
Directors— H. P. Bowie. William Harney, W. W. 
Williams, Charles H. Plum. Jr., Edward Connolley, 
T. B. Berrv and James D. Ruggles. 

Behring Sea Packing Co., Jan. 4th. Object, 
fishing, trading and mining. Capital stock, $100,000. 
Directors — jaraes Eva, James Madison, H. J. Bart- 
ling, Charles Lundberry and Chas. A. Johnson, 

Pacific Ocean Bathing Co., Jan. 4th. Ob- 
ject, to establish salt-water baths in this city. Cap- 
ital stock, $300,000, Directors — William Greer 
Harrison, E. A. Rix. W. T. Y. Schenck, J. D. Sul- 
livan and A. S. Murray. 

Alaska M. & M. Co., Jan, 8th. Location, Alas- 
ka. Capital stock. $10,000,000. Directors— Thomas 
Brown, I. J. Jarboe, A. C. Corbies, G. A. Taylor 
and E. F. Stone. 

Benicia Brick Co., Jan. 8th. Capital stock, 
$100,000. Directors— G. F. and E. J. Duflfey, J. E. 
Borland, A. S. Cheesbro, and John Boland. 

California Lustral Co. (Oakland). Jan 8th. 
Object, a general mining and manufacturing busi- 
ness. Directors— S. S. Steel, Samuel F. Burbank, 
William F. Burbank, J. W. Duttoo, Rufus B. 
Myers, Leighton W, Carson and Luke Doe, 



Table of Lowest and Highest Sales in 
S. P. Slock Exchange. 



Name of 

OOMPANT. 



Alpha 

dltft 

Andes 

Belcher 

BestA Belcher... 

Bullion 

Bodie Con 

Benton 

Bulwer 

Commonwealth . , 
Coa. Va. &Oal... 

OhaUeoge 

OhoUar 

Oonfldeoce 

Oon. Imperial..,. 

Oaledonia 

Grown Point 

Orocker 

Burexa Con 

Exijheciuer , 

Grand Frize 

Gould & Curry — 
Hale & Norcross.: 

Julia 

Justice 

Keotuck 

Lady Wash 

Mono 

Mexican 

Navajo 

North BeUe Isle.., 

Nev. Queen 

Occidental 

Ophir 

Overman 

Potoai 

Peerless 

Peer 



8.B.&M 

Sierra Nevada.. 

Silver Hill 

Scorpion , 

CJnioQ Oon 

Uta'> 

Weldon 

Veiloff Jacket.. 



Week 
Ending 
Dec. 18. 



75 
1.10 
.30 



1.05 

1 30 

.40 

2.10 

2.d: 
.45 

.70 



15 
3.1O 
4.05 
1.05 
2 05 
3.80 

is 

I 35 

3!i6 
25 
35 

1.31 

2.30 
,30 

1.25 
35 



2.20 
30 

1.00 
80 
6U 

3.00 
50 

1.75 



1.8{ 
1.0^ 
2.15 

.30 

15 

2.5 

.70 



Week 
Ending 
Dae. 25 



.80 .95 

1.25 1.3u 

.40 .45 

1.8i 2.15 

2,35 2,5u 

.30 



.65 



.65 



4.70 
1 25 
2.45 



.35 

1.30 

2.30 

30 



.30 
.40 
2.20 
.^0 
1.10 
85 
50 
3.05 



15 

1,40 

.75 

1.75 

16 
2.10 
M 



1.75 2.201.70 2.051.95 2. 



Week 
Ending 
Jan. 2, 



1.00 1.15 

1.30 1.66 
.00 

1.8J 2.2d 

2 30 2 85 
40 



,25 

2,85 3.0s 

1.30 1.5b 

2.35 2.75 

4.00 4.45 

33 

25 

1.60 2.1O 

25 .30 



.25 .35 



50 
2.35 



3.30 
70 



1 40 

1.10 

1.85 

45 



Week 

Ending 

Jau. 9. 



.95 1.05 

l.ii5 .... 

50 .f5 

1.65 1.85 

2.10 2 35 

.25 .60 

.30 .45 



3 10 3.65 

4 50 4.8') 
L.IO 1.20 
2.S5 2.45 

'.ih '^SO 

l!56 l!75 

■iO .25 



20 .25 

60 .75 

1 30 1.40 

2.50 2.^5 

.25 .30 



.35 



1.20 
30 

.35 

.30 .35 
2.15 2.45 

.35 *.40 
1.05 1.25 
1 00 1.13 
" .65 
3.05 3..^0 
55 .70 
1.65 1 85 

... .25 

.15 .... 
1.40 
1.'5 
1.75 

.30 

.15 
2.10 



1.55 

1.20 

1.95 

.35 

2!36 
.65 



Sales at San Francisco Stock Exchange. 



Thdrsday. Jan. 9. 9;30 a. m. 

4oO Alta 1.25 

75 Belcher 1.75 

150 B. & Belcher a .25 

500 BeUelsle 30t, 

50 Bodie 4'^c 

100 Chollar 2.25 

6C0 Commonwealth 3.75 

50 Crown Point 1.55 

350 Con Va&Cal 4.55 

100 Exchequer 20c, 



20!) Gould & Curry 1.70 

150 KentucK 35c 

50 Lady Wash 30o 

200 Mexican 2.15 

400 Nev. Oueeu 1.15 

300 N- Belle Is 1.25 

350 N. Commonwealth. ..85c 

VOO Peerless 25c 

150 Savage 1.50 

3 Q S. B. tM 1.05 

ISO Sierra Nevada 1.80 

100 Union 2.15 



Our Agents. 

Oim Friends can do much Id aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and BCience, by assieting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their In- 
Suenoe and encouraging favors. We intend to send none 
but worthy men. 

J. C. HOAO — San Franeisco. 

R. O. BA1LB7 — San Frandsco. 

Chas M. Moodt— San Francisco. 

W. W. Thsobalds— Los Angeles Co, 

E. Fischer — Central California. 

Obo. Wilsoh — Sacramento Co. 

E. H. SCHABFFLH — Fresuo Co 

0, Edward RoBBRTaoN— Humboldt Co. 

Frank S. Chapin— Butte Co. 

Wm. H. Hilleart — Oregon. 

E. E. Dbming — Oregon. 



Successful Patent Solicitors. 

As Bewey & Co. have been in the patent soliciting boal- 
aesB on this Coast now lor so many years, the firm's name 
is a well 'known one. Another reason for its popniarity 
is that a great proportion of the Pacific Coast patents 
issued by the Government have been procured through 
their agency. They are, therefore, well and thoroughly 
posted on the needs of the progressive industrial classes 
of this Coast. They are the best posted firm on what 
has been done in all branches of industry, and are able 
to judge of what is new and patentable. In this they 
have a great advantage, which is of practical dollar and 
cent value to their clients. That this is understood and 
appreciated, is evidenced by the number of patents 
Issued through their Soiknufio E>rbsb Patent Agency (S.. 
F.) from weeK to week and v«ar to vear 



A SNOW-SLIDE at Sierra City on the 4tb inst, 
killed eeren people, ' 



Jan. 11, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



33 



CALIFORNIA WIRE WORKS 



-MANUFACrUBEBS CF- 



Steel Wire Rope, 



OF ALL KINDS FOR 

CABLE RAILWAYS, 

ROPEWAYS and TRAMWAYS, 

Mining, Shipping & General Purposes. 



WIRE, 

BARBED WIRE, 
WIRE NAILS, 

WIRE OLOTH. 

Full ABsortment Always In Stock. 



OFFICEJ: 

9 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 




hallidie's 
Patent VV'RE Ropeway, 



For the Economical and Rapid 

Transportation of Ore 

and other material. 



Erected by Us During the Past Fourteeu Tears in Spans of 

200 TO 2,000 FEET. 



Simple, Economical and Durable. 



TKANSPOBTATION OF ORE BT H4LLID1E'S P TENT WIRE KOl'i'.WAY. 



HAVE BEEN THOROUGHLY TESTED 
In all Parts of the Country. 



PERFECTED 

DOUBLE 







Attached to each Mill 
ii an effective 

Automatic Ore 
Feeder. 



THE CRUSHING lo done by the rapid rocking movement in opposite dieeotions of 
two heavy oastinga, the bottoms of which are elightly circular in form, and eaoh provided with 
onr shoes. 

The Mill is a closer Gold-Saver and catches a larger percentage of 
the Clean-up in the Battery than any other Mill. 

It costs less, in proportion to what it will do, than any other mill. There are no working 
parts to buy for it, no matter how long it is used, except shoes and dies. Capacity of Mill, g 
to 10 tons per day. Weight of Mill, complete, 6400 poands. 

We manufacture, to go with the Mill, an 

IMPROVED ROOK BREAKER. 

Power required for Mill aod Rock Breaker, 6 H. P, Sekd 'fo'b. Ciegulab. AddresB 

TATUM & BOWEN, 

34 and 36 FREMONT ST., SAN FRANOISOO, OAL., 

AND PORTLAND, OREGON. 

MANUFACTURERS OF MINING AND SAW MILL MACHINERY. 



FRISBE E WE T MILL. 

This Mill, with a weight of less than 9000 pounds, 

has a capacity of three tons per hour of hard 

quartz to 40 mesh ; has been thoroughly 

tested ; we guarantee its work as 

represented, and we will give 

long time trial. 





IT HAS NO MORE WEARING PARTS THAN CORNISH ROLLS 

And renewals will not coBt over one-half ae mnoh as for Btampa. Will mn empty, or with small 
amount of ore without injury. The attention of parties having Cement Gravel ifl called to this 
Mill, as it will run 100 tons per day to No. 8 meah; 30 to 35 H. P. 

OUR DRY MILLS are the most economioal ever built, and are extensively used with 
record of several years. No grinding in cans. Mill finishes to any fineneaa desired. 

FRISBEE-LUCOP MILL COMPANY. 

GIDEON FRISBEE, Manager, - - 59 & 61 First Street, San Francisco 
HOOKER & LAWRENCE. Gen'l Ag'it. 145 Broadway, New York. 



^^ SAiyiliANCISCO,CAZf. 







A\ 




CORD" 



I'.^oitiis'ca-, 



Manutaoturea from strictly arst-cteas FUx and pure lubricants. Superior to all others tor wafer and steam. Packs 
with less (riction and makes a tighter joint than any other paok.ns made. »• Imital.ons of interior quality hav- 
taK been nut upon the market, we have been compelled to aoopt the above trad e-mark and all of our PJfkins will 
noVhave a RED CORD running through the oenier its entire length. See that you get it and take no other. Sold 
b? all Hardware dealers. Price, 50 cents per pound. W. T. T. SOHENCK, Sole Manufacturer, 233 aud 
834 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



INVENTORS, TAKE NOTICE I 
^. PETERSOnTmODEL MAKER, 

258 Market St. , N. E. cor. Front (up stairs). San Francdco 
Experimental machinerj- and all kinds of models Tm 
and braSBWOrk. All communications strictly confiden- 
tial. 



QUICKSILVER 

For Sale in LotB to Suit by 

PABEOTT & CO., 
S06 Oallfomla St., San Franolsco, Oal. 



ti 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 11, 1890 



Edwards' Works en tie ' Steam Engine. 

The American Steam Engineer. Theoretical 
and Practicil; with Examples of the Latest and Most Ap- 
proved American Practice in the De-^iein and Consfctuetion 
of Steam Engine? and Boilers of Every Description. For 
the U80 of Engineers, Maehiniata, Boiler-Makers and Stu- 
dents. By Emory Edwards, M. E. Illustrated by 77 en- 
gravings. 12mo,419 pages $8.60 

Modern American Marine Kn&fines, Boiler*", 
and Screw Propellers. Tbeir Design and Construc- 
tion. Showini; the P/esent Practice of the most Eminent 
Engineers and Marine Engine Buildars in the United 
States. By Emory Edwards. Dlustrated by 30 lar^e and 
, elaborate plates. 4to $5.00 

The Practical Steam Engineers' Guide in 
the Design, Construction and Management of American 
Stationary, Portable and Steam Fire Engines, steam 
Pumpsf, Boilers, Inrctora, Go^eroors, Inriicatore, Pistons 
and Kings, Safety Valves and Sttam Gauges. For the 
use of Engineers, Firemen and Steam Users. Illustrated 
by 119 engravings.- 420 page", 12mo $2.50 

A Catechism of the Marine Steam Engrine. 
For the use of Engineers. Firemen and Mechanics. A 
Practical Work for Practical Men. Illustrated by G3 en- 
gravings, including exBmplea of the most modern engines. 
Third edition, thoroughly revised, with much new mat- 
ter, 12mo, 414 pages .,.$3.00 

Modern American locomotive Engines. 
Their Design, Construction and Management, Illustrated 
by 78 engravings. 12mo, 383 pages $3.00 

tStThe above or any of our Books sent by mail, free of 
^os^Ojgc, at the publication prices, to any address in the 
world, 

t^Illustrated Circulars, showing full tables of cnn- 
tenis of all of the above valuable hoolcs, will be sent free 
to any one in any part of the world who will send his 
address. 

SS'Our new revised Descriptive Catalogue of Practical 
and Scientific Books, S6 paijes, 8vo, and our Catalogue of 
Soojcs on Steam and the Steam Engine, Mechanics, Ma- 
chviiery, and Dynamical Engineeiin<}, and othet- Cata- 
logues, the whole covering evei-y branch of Science applied 
to the Arts, sent free and f re", of postage to any one in 
any part of the loorld 2vho will furnish his addr-'.ss. 

HENRY CAREY BAIRD & CO.. 

iNDUSraiAL POBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS AND IMPORTERS, 

810 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 

STEARNS WI'F'G CO^ 

29 & 31 Spear St., San Francisco, Cal. 



ti:-:::iiliii-M: 



-MANUFACTURBRS OF- 



HIGH-GRADE SAW MILL MACHINERY, 
ENGINES, STEEL BOILERS, Etc. 

—IMPORTERS OF — 

Munson's Leather Belting, Goodell & "Waters' Woodwork- 
ing Tools, Hill'a Clutch Pulleys and Couplings, Emerson's 
Saws, Emery Wheels, Tool and Knife Grinders, Ewart's 
Link Belting, L. & D. Wood Pulleys, Hoisting and Pile 
Driving Engines, Etc, 

SPENGERIAN 
TEEL PENS 

Are the Best , 

IN THE ESSENTIAI, QUAMTXES OP 

Durability, Evenness of 
Point, and Workmanship. 

Samples for trial of 13 different styles hy mail, on 
receipt of 10 cents ill stamps. Ask for card No. 8. 

BLiKEMJN & CO., ^^.^r^^^^' 




Great Variety of SHOT GUNS, RIFLES. 

etc. Breech-LoaderB from S4 to §100. 
SEND STAMPS FOR PRICE LISTS. 

GEO. W. SHREVE, 

525 Kearny Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



WINCHESTER HOUSE, 

41 Third Street, - San Francisco, Cal. 

This Fireproof Brick Building is centrally located, in 
the healthiest part of the city, only a half block from the 
Grand and Palace Hotels, and close to all Steamboat and 
Railroad Offices. 

Laundry Free for the use of Families. 

HOT AND COtD «ATHS FREE. 



Terms, Board and Room, $1.00 per Day 

And Upward. 

Booms with or without Board. 

Free Coach to the House. 
ar- 3F»ooiji:ES-5r- 



BAOK F1LR8 of the MlNlNO AHD SOIBNTIFIO PrUSS (un 

jund) can be had for $3 per volume of eix months. Per 
ar (two volumes) 35. Inserted in Dewey's patent blnd- 
60 cents additlonikl per volume. 



PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO., 



.HANUFAOTDILKaS OF., 





IS 



and 




m 



UP TO 20,000 LBS. WEIO-HT. 

True to pattern and superior in atrengrtli, toughness and durability to Oast or Wrought 
Iron in any position or for any service. 

GEARINGS, SHOES, DIES, CAMS, TAPPETS, PISTON-HEADS, RAILROAD and MA- 
CHINERY CASTINGS of Every Description. 



HOMOGENEOUS STEEL. 



SOFT and DUCTILE, 

SUPERIOR TO IRON FOR 



LOCOMOTIVE AND MARINE FORCINGS. 

iLSO Steel Rods, from J to 3 inch diameter and Flat3 from 1 to 8 inch. Angles, Tees, Channels and other shape 
Steel Wagon, Buggj', and Truck Tirea, Plow Steel; Machinery and Special Shape Steel to size and lengths 
STEEL RAILS from 12 to 45 poimda per yard. ALSO, Railroad and Merchant Iron, Rolled 
Beams, Angle, Channel, and T iron» Bridge and Machine Bolts, Lag Screws, Nuts, Washers, Ship and Boat 
Spikes; Steamboat Shafts, Cranks, Pistons, Connecting Rods, etc. Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, 
and Iron Forgings of all kinds, Iron and Steel Bridge and Roof Work a Specialty. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR SCRAP IRON AND STEEL. 

jta" Orders will have prompt attention. Send for Catalogues. Address 

PACIFIC KOLUNQ MILL CO., 202 Market St., San Francisco. 



FULTON IRON WORKS, 

HINCKLEY, SPIERS & HAYES. Proprietors. 



[ESTABLISHED IN 1855.] 




TUSTIN'S PULVERIZER. 



— MANUFAOTURBRS OF— 

MARINE ENGINES AND BOILERS— 

Propeller Engines, either High Pressure or Compound, 
Stern or Side-wheel Engines. 

MINING MACHINERY.— Hoisting Engines and 
Works, C^es, Ore Buckets, Ore Cars, Pumping Engines 
and Pumps, Water Buckets, Pump Colunms, Air Com- 
pressors, Air Receivers, Air Pipes. 

MILL MACHINERY.-Batterlea for Dry or Wet 
Crushing, Amalgamating Pans, Settlers, Furnaces, Re- 
torts, Concentrators, Ore Feeders, Rock Breakers, Fur- 
naces tor Reducing Ores, Water Jackets, eta 

MISCELLANEOUS MACHINERY. -Flour 
Mill Machinery, Saw Mill Engines and Boilers, Dredging 
Machinery, Powder Mill Machinery, Water Wheels. 

Tustin's Pulverizer 

WORKS ORE WET OR DRY. 



ENGINES^BOILERS 

OF ALL KINDS, 

Either for use on Steamboats or for use on Land. 

Water Pipe, Pump or Air Columns, Fish 
Tanks for Salmon Canneries 

OF BVBRY DaSCRIPTION. 

Boiler Repairs Promptly attended to and at very moaerate rates. 

AGBNTS FOR THB PACIFIC COAST FOR THB 

SPECIALTIES : 

Corliss Engines and Tuetln Ore Pulverizers. DBANE STEAM PUMP. 

Agents and Manufacturers of the Llewellyn Feed Water Purifier and Heater. 




THE GIANT POWDER COMPANY 

MaDuIaoture Three Kinds of Powder, which are acknowledged by ail the Great Chemiets of the World as 

The Safest and Strongest High Explosives in the IVIarl<et. 

or Different Strensrths as Required. 

NOBEI.'S EXPLOSIVE GEiATlNB," which contains 94 per cent of Kitro-Olycerlne, and 

GEltATlKTE-DYN AMITE, Stronger than Dynamite and even Safer in Handling:, 

JUDSON POWDER IMPROVED. 

FOR RAIIiROADS AND LAND CI-EARINO. la fromthree to four timesstronger than ordinary Blast- 
ing Powder, and is used by all the Railroads and Gravel Claims, aa it breaks more ground, pulverizes better and 
aavee time and money. It is aa dry as the ordinary Blasting; Powder and runs as freely. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., 



GAPS and FUSE for Sale. 



GENERAL AGENTS. SAN FRANCISCO CAL. 





QUARTZ SCREENS 



A apecialty. Round, slot 
or burred slot holes. Gen 
uine Ruasia Iron, Homo 
geneoua Steel, Cast Steel or 
American planished Iron 
Zinc, Copper or Brasa Screens for all purposes. Call 
fornia Perforating Screen Co., 145 & 147 Besde St , S F 




COAL MINES OF THE WESTERN COAST. 

A few copies of this work, the only one e\er published 
treating of Pacific Coast Coal Mining, ha\e been ob 
tained, and are for sale at this office for $2 60 per cop> 
It was written by W. A. Goodyear, Mmmg and Civil 
Engineer, formerly of the California State Geological 
Survey. 



N. W. SPAULDINQ 

Manufacturers of 
SPAULDING'S 




Inserted Tootli 

AND 

CHISEL BIT 

CIRCDLAR 

Saws. 



SAW MILLS AND MACHINERY 

Of all kinds made to order. Send for Descriptive Cata 
logue. 17 and 19 Fremont St., San Franoiaco, 



Irop apd (Aachipe )tforl(3. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

SAOBAMENTO, OAL. 

ROOT. NEILSON & OO., 

MAWnPACTDIUtaS OP 

Steam Engines, Boilers, 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

MACHINERY FOR MINING PURPOSES. 

{■"louring Mills, Saw Mills and Quartz Milla Machinery 
constructed, fitted up and repaired. 



Front St., bet. N & O Sta., 



Sacramento, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA MACHINE WORKS, 

WM. H. BIRCH & CO., 

ENGINEERS AND MACHINISTS, 



No. llQBealeSt.. 



San EranclBco. 



BUILDERS OF 

Steam Eneinea, Saw Milla, Mining Machinery, Dredging 
Machines, Rock Crushers, Cable Railway Machinery,* 
Ellithorp Air Brake Co. 'a Patent Steam and Hydraulic 
Elevators, Air Cushions and Air Brakea. POSITIVE 
SAFETIES. Improved Ram Elevators, Sidewalk and 
Hand Hoists. B. E. Henrickson's Patient Automatio 
Safety Catches. 

Machines of all kinds Made and Repaired. 
Orders Solicited. 



Golden State & Miners Iron Works. 

Mannfacture Iron Osstlnsa and Maobinery 
of all KlndB at Greatly Bednced Bates. 

STEVENSON'S PATENT 

Mold-Board AMALGAMATORS, 
Golden State Pressure Blowers. 

Birsi St., between Howard A Folsom. S. F, 



CHOMAS THOMPSON 



THORNTON THOMPSON 



THOMPSON BROTHERS. 

EUREKA FOUNDRY, 

129 and ISl Beale St., between Uission and Howard, S.F 

HAHtrFAOItrBBRS OP OASTINSS OF BVHBT SISORIPTION. 



Mining Engineers. 



CIVIL AND MINING ENGINEER 

Of long experience, practical and administrative, In 
Copper, Silver and Oold Mining in Europe and America, 
offers servicea as Manager or Superintendent, or to search 
for and report on Mines. Now in Mexico. Several Lan- 
guages. Address C F., Box 2517, San Francisco, Cal. 



W. A. GOODYEAR, 

Oivil and Mining' Engineer, 

MINING EXPERT Ajro GEOLOGIST. 
Address " Business Box A," office of this paper, San 
Francisco. 



ROSS E. BROWNE, 

Mining and Hydraulic Engineer, 

No. 307 Sansomb St., San Franoisoo. 



ISRAEL W. KNOX, 
Mining and Mechanical Engineer 

AND PURCHASING AQBNT FOR 

fiCines, Mining Machinery & Supplies. 

Mines Examined, Reports and Estimates Furnished, 

Contracts made, etc 
Office, 237 First St., San Franclaco, Oal. 



The Celebrated H, H. H Liniment. 




The H. H. H. I.lnlment Is for the treatment of 
he Aches and Fains of Humanity, as welt as for the ail- 
ments of the beasts of the fields. Teatlmonlala from 
importers and breeders of blooded stock prove its won- 
derful curative properties. No man has ever used it for 
an ache or pain and been dissafcisfled. 
H. H. MOORE & SONS, Stockton. Cal., Froprietora. 
For Sai<b bt all Drusqibts. 



FOR ENGRAVINGS Dewey En^avffg Coui 
ptny, No. 220 Market street, San Francisco. 



■Jan. II, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



35 



PROVED BELT FRUE ORE CONCENTRATOR. 



The Beat Ore Concentrator in the market, having doable 
the Citpaoity and doing ita work aa oloae aa the plain Bslt 
machine, while ita ooncentrationa are clean. It ia need in 
a number of Mills, the moat notable of which ia the 
Alaaka M. t M. Co'a Mill, where 24 Improved Belt Fruea 
are taking the Palp from 120 Stamps, cruahiug 350 tons 
per day, and ia giving entire aacisfaction as againat 48 
plain Belt Machines, taking the Palp from the other 120 
Stamps, 

Price of Improved Belt Frue Vanner, $900, f. o. b. 
Price of Plain Belt Frue Vanner, $575, f. o. b. 



For Pamphlets, Teatimoniala and farther information 
apply at ofhce. 




Protected by Patents December 22, 1S74; September 2, 
1879; April 27, 1880; ilarch 22, 1881; February 20, 1883; 
September 18, 1883; Jnly 24, 1888. Patents applied for. 



There are Over 2200 Plain Belt Machines now 
in Use. 

Tub Moktaka CouI'Ant (Limited), LosttON. October S, ]SS5. 
Drar Sirs :— Hftvin^' tetttvd tbreu of your Kruu Vannors in a coiu- 
petitlvu trial with other elmilar inacliines (Trlum))h), we have BatlBfied 
'►urseivuB of tbo superiority of your Vanuerfl, as is evideoceil by the 
fact of our bftvioi: ordered 20 more of your machiues tor imtnediate 
delivery. Yours truly, TBE MONTANA COUPAKY (Limited). 

N. B. — Since the above was written tbe 20 VaoDers, havint; been 
started, ^ave such satiefoctlon that 44 additional Frues aud more 
stamps have beeo purchased. ADAMS & CARTER. 



ADAMS & CARTER, Agents FRUE VANNING MACHINE CO., Room 15. No. 132 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



"TRIUMPH" ORE CONCENTRATOR with IMPROVED RIFFLED BELT. 



The competitive trials which have been held between the 
"Triomph" Ore Concentrators, the " Frue" Vannera and 
other forms of concentrating devices, do not warrant the as- 
sertion that the "Frue"' Vanner ia the best ore oonoentrator in 
the market. The fact that the "Frues" have improved (oor- 
ragated) belts doea'not militate against the aaperiority of the 
"Triumphs;" for, when desired, they (the "Triumphs") can 
be mounted with a superior belt known as the " Blasdel " 
Biffled. 



$650 f. 0. b. fr 



Price " Triumph " Concentrators, with Im- 
proved (Patented) Belt 

Price " Triumph " Concentrators, with 
Plain Belt $550 f. o. b. 



Wo are prepared to giiarantee the 8up;rioritv of the " Tiiumph " 
the " Frue " or any other form of Concentrator, for coin if need bo. 
Circulars and testimonial letters furnished on applicatiou. 




JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS. 

39 to 51 Fremont Street, San Francisco, Cal, 



Both the "Triomph" Concentrator and "Blaedel" (riffled) 
Belt are protected by inconteatable letters patent^ granted 
by the Government of the United States. 

Original Empire Mill and Mining Company, ^ 

Principal Oltice, 401 California S*.. cor. Sansome, S. F. ;- 

Location of Works, Grfttn Vetlley, Ncvaila Co., Cal. ) 

Grass Valley, Nbvada Co., Cal., Nov. 10, 1886. 
Joshua ncnd;/ Machine Wot/ch, 30 to 51 Franunt St., S. F., Cal.: 

Gentlk-MBN— I am pleased to state, in reference to tlie " Triumph" 
Ore Concentrators, that four (4) o( them were plaoei io the mill of the 
Oriifiual Emipre Mill and Mining Company in April, 1884, and a thorough 
test made of their practical oper tion; and their clhciency having been 
demonstrated, four (4) more were subsequently introduced as the comple- 
ment of the Twenty (20) Stam}) Mill, aud the eight (S) have been and are 
now running with culirely satisfactory reaulta. 

At the Ten (10) Stamp Mill of the North Star Mining Company, uniler 
my 9upervihIon. four (4) are also in successful operation, and from my 
observation of their practical workings, I am convinced that this form of 
Concentrators is the equal, if not superior to any othcf style of Vann 
or concentrating devices. DA\TD McKAY, Jr., 

[Signed] Sup't North Star and Original Empire Miniog Co 

N. B. When the stamping capacity of the two above named mills was in- 
creased, more "Triumph " Concentrators were purchased, aud twenty- 
eight (28) are now in constant successful operation. 




-BDlLDRRfl op- 



MINING MACHINERY. 

GENERAL OFFICE AND WORKS : 

1 27 First St., San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 

New York Office, 145 Broadway. 

PI.ANTS FOR GOLD AND SILVER MILLS, 

embiacin^ machinerv of LATEST DESIGN and 
MOST IMPROVED construction. We offer our 
oustomere the BEST RESULTS OF 38 TEARS' 
EXPERIENCE in this SPECIAL LINE ol 
work. «nd arc PREPARED to furnish the MOST 
APPROVED character of MINING AND RE- 
DUCTION MACHINERY, adapted to all jrrades of 
ores and SUPERIOR to that of anv other make, at 
the LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES. 

We are ols" prepared to CONSTRUCT and DE- 
LIVER In COMPLETE RUNNING ORDER, 
In any locality, MILLS, CONCENTRATION 
WORKS, WATER JACKET SMELTING 
FURNACES. HOISTING WORKS, PUMP- 
ING MACHINERY, ETC., ETC., of any DE- 
BIBED CAPACITY. 



THE GATES CRUSHER 

Is beyond all question the most important improvement 
that has ever been made in this class of mining" ma- 
chinery. It will do more than twice the work with a 
given amount of wear than any other Crusher made, 
besides crushing so much finer that for mining uses, the 
capacity of the mill is greatly increased. It has the same 
relative superiority for macadamizing purposes, afford- 
ing the cheapest and most reliable machine for this use. 



SEND FOR CIKCULAR, 



PACIFIC IRON WORKS 



NO. 127 FTH&T STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



1886. X888. 

CATALOGUE OP 200 PAGES. 



The matter Is readily 
available . — TradeamaTi. 

A Complete Work. — 
Colliery Engineer. 

Handy for reference. — 
Min. and Sci. Press. 

Should be in the hands 
of every Engineer and 
Contract'ir.— Eng. and 
Mill. Journal. 

A valuable addition to 
the literature on the 
eubject.~jEni7.a7id B'Pg 
Record. 



A TREa.TISE AND HANDBOOK ON 

ROCK DRILLING 



-.A-ixria- 



AIR COMPRESSING 

Mailed Free. 



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36 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 11, 1890 



UN I I /^ K I I CD /^ N I \ A /A^ C!> ly O Corner First and Mission Sts,, San Francisco, Cal. 
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GomponBd EBgines. 

There is no other part of the United 
States where Bteani'power forms so im- 
portant a place in general indastry as on 
the Paoitic Coast, nor where it is so ex- 
tensively applied to mining, draining, 
agrioulture, grinding, manufaotnring, 
transportation, eta. The high prioe of 
labor oompets its use in all poseible cases. 
Among the tirst to construct compound 
engines on this coast were the Union Iron 
Works, who have applied the method in 
all of its different forms, and to engioea 
of alt kinds. The engines shown in one 
of the engravings on this page are those 
constructed to drive the main works of 
the Union Iron Works. They are com- 
ponod and condensing, with variable 
ont-o£f geariug on the first or initisl oyl- 
inder, aud adjustable cut-ofif valves on 
the low-pressure one. 

The cylinders are 16 inches and 32 
inches diameter by 4S" stroke, the steam 
being expanded to nine volumes. The 
engines are capable of a duty of 250-horBe 
power, and oonsome only two and one- 
quarter pounds of good coal for each 
horse-power per boar. There is a great- 
er gain by compounding when a con- 
denser is ased. In cases where fuel is 
dear, as on the Pacific Coast, and water 
for condensation oan be procured, the 
extra investment for compounding and 
oondensing is soon regained by the sav- 
ing in running expense. The Soott & O'Neill 
cut-off engine, also shown on this page, is an 
adaptation of the disc or poppet-valve system, 
with variable cut-off gearing to stationary 
engines. Such engines have been made for 
the past ten years by the Union* Iron Works 
and applied to various purposes with great 
snooess, especially to cable railroad work and 




SCOTT & O'NEILL PATENT COMPOUND ENGINE AT THE UNION lEON WORKS. 



mining. The total number of engines of this 
kind oonatrncted to the present time amounts 
to over 72,000-horBe power. 

A peculiarity and advantage of valves of this 
kind ia the rapidity with which they open and 
close, and the large area of the ports. As as- 
ually constrnoted, the length of the perimeter 
of the valves is equal to twice the diameter of 



the cylinder. For an engine of IS-inoh diame- 
ter the length of the openings or porta, both for 
induction and exhaust, is eqaal to a slide valve 
covering ports three feet wide. 

Another feature of these enginea is that eaoh 
is operated by an independent eccentric and 
can be adjusted at will to regulate the amount 
of oompression and lead. The orosa-head, 




SCOTT & O'NEILL VARIABLE CUT-OFF ENGINE-ONE HUNDBBD-HORSB POWER. 



cranks, connection and other of the main de- 
tails, are all made in accordance with the very 
best modern practice. The piston'roda are of 
steel and have patent metallic packing. 

Fly-wheels, band-wheels, rope-wheels or gear- 
wheels for transmitting power are shipped as 
wanted. Many of these engines have been ar- 
ranged for rope transmission, and have perform- 
ed very successfully with that method. 

The out of this lOO-horse power Scott 
& O'Neill engine shows the valve-gear- 
iog and regalating mechanism. The 
four valves are actuated by the shaft 
seen in front, and connected with the 
main ahaft by positive gearing. The 
governor and variable cut-off gearing are 
also driven from this same shaft, all the 
oonneotions being positive, bnt adjasta- 
ble and easy of access. 

The valves are so constructed that 
they are continually rotating at each 
revolution, so the faces are kept true 
and steam-tight without adjustment or 
grinding. This ia an important feature 
of the system, eeouring long endurance 
and economy of eteam. The rotation of 
the valves is performed by the ateam and 
without geariog of any kind. 

The governor is driven positively, and 
is connected by links to the cut-off gear- 
ing. The resistance required for regula- 
tion ia almost eliminated, so the motion 
becomes sensitive and regular under va- 
rying loads. When arranged in the com- 
pound form, the low-pressure cylinder 
has a similar valve arrangement; but the 
point of cutting off is usually adjust- 
ed by hand, the governor acting for the 
initial cylinder only. They also build 
them with a governor on both cylinders 
oonneoted together, thereby giving the 
same relative admission of steam at all 
points of cut-off. 



38 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 18, 1890 



COF^F^ESPONDE^CE. 



We admit, unindoraed, opinions of correBpondenta. — Eds. 



Califomians in Holland and Belgium. 

Editors Press: — We left Heidelberg at 3:50 
p. M. for Mayenoe, arrived at 5:30 and put up 
at the Hotel de Ehine. 

The country from Heidelberg to Mayence w 
similar to that from Munich to Heidelberg — 
level, with green fields and compact little vil- 
lages every few miles, and hundreds of small 
hop patches. No pasture -fields, no good large 
barns for storing their crops, and it is a mystery 
to me what they do with their hay aud grain. 

I think, without exaggeration, I have not 
seen 200 bead of loose stock out in the fields 
since I left France, and I am now in the fourth 
di£ferent country — Switzerland, Italy, Austria 
and Germany. 

We changed cars at Darmstadt, and there 
met a gentleman and wife and son from Los 
Angeles — Matthay, I think, was his name. 
We were as pleased to see them as though they 
had been old friend8,and we had a good Ameri- 
oan talk, and put up at the same hotel in May* 
ence. 

This is quite a town, with some very old 
bnildings. A tall tower close by the hotel they 
claim to be from SOO to 1000 years old. A fine 
, bridge spans the Rhine, which is a little wider 
than the Sacramento, Here tourists take and 
leave the boat for a trip up or down the Khine. 

We take the boat at nine o'clock on the Idth. 
A wet, gloomy, cold morning, with, perhaps, 
50 passengers. The country is very level Here, 
and the voyager does not get into the hills for 
an hour or so. The wind ia blowing a hurri- 
cane, all but the cane, and this is the third 
time I have worn my overcoat since I left Oali- 
fornia — once at sea, once off the coast of Ire- 
land and to-day on the Rhine. Not over half 
of the ladies can stay on deck, and it seriously 
interferes with the pleasures of the trip. I 
have read so much about the Rhine, heard it 
discussed by persons that have made the trip, 
and as some did not speak in flattering terms, 
I made up my mind to have no prejudice 
against it at starting. Some people get too 
exalted an opinion from others, and conse- 
quently they are disappointed when they come 
to view it. A person should see the Rhine be- 
fore he sees the Alps or Switzerland, or he is 
liable to be disappointed. It is entirely differ- 
ent scenery and will bear no oomparison. It is 
good and well worth the trip. The hills are 
well terraced with stone walls and grape-vines; 
the high peaks contain old castles and ruins and 
strong fortifications. We pass BiDgea,Coblentz, 
Bonn, etc., etc., all famous in history or song. 
There is a railroad on either side with numer- 
ous tunnels. At the mouth of each tunnel 
there is a fancy wall, put up in imitation of 
towers or castles. The roads seem to do an 
immense bnsinees, from the number of trains 
we saw passing to-day. A great number of 
canal-boats were being towed up and down the 
river. There was not much farming, except 
grapes, until we got out of the hills and pretty 
well down toward Oologne. 

Cologne is a much larger place than X antic- 
ipated. It has a very fine double iron bridge; 
one side for the public, and the other side, 
double track for cars, high enough for steam- 
boats without lowering funnels. It has a 
pontoon bridge, with 42 pointed scow-boats, 
anchored in the stream, and a great deal of 
travel. The pontoon bridge was quite a nov- 
elty to me. When steamers want to pass, three 
of the boats were dropped down and behind 
the others and then pulled back in place by 
machinery. The streets of the old town are 
narrow, dirty and crooked. The new part is 
being hnitt op in fine style. They claim the 
finest G-othic cathedral in the world. It cost 
away up in the millions. I am about tired of 
such luxuries, and I suppose I did not give it 
that consideration its mechanical merit de- 
serves, lam tired of feeing these idle loafers 
in their black robes, to see something their 
grandfathers did. 

They make everything work, eat or drink, in 
this country. The idle do most of the eating 
and drmking. They get more work out of 
their dogs than any place I have seen yet. 
One and two dogs are hitched to nearly every 
cart, and they pull with a will. I saw a three- 
tandem team. The man at end of shafts, one 
dog hitched to axletree, walking on the man's 
heels, the other dog bitched to the rear of the 
cart and walking behind the axletree, all doing 
good work. 

They have some very old buildings, the arch- 
itecture whereof must have been planned in 
some diseased mind. I took one of them to be 
the first handiwork of Adam when winter was 
approaching, and the other bnilt from the 
wrecks of the ark by Noah. I would give a 
good price for one of these country wagons to 
drive in a procession on Fourth of July. 

We took the cars at Cologne at 1:30 and 
arrived at Amsterdam at 8 p. m. The country 
is well tilled, and shows a good growth of sec- 
ond crop of clover in blossom, alfalfa, grain, 
and an abundance of vegetables. Before we 
crossed the Rhine, we passed over very level 
bottom land, used mostly for grazing purposes. 
And here we begin to see stook out to pasture, 
and most of it is the black and white Holstein 
or Dutch cow. Occasionally there is a fence 
or hedge, but the land is mostly divided by 
^jtobeEl with small bridges and bars and gates. 



We crossed the Rhine on a single-traok iron 
ferryboat. String wire cables are fattened to 
either bank, passing over or around large 
wheels on the boat, which are revolved by 
steam polling the boat. There are two boats, 
each boat carrying eight or ten cars. From 
here to Amsterdam is a level country, and 
water almost on the surface; feed was in abun- 
dance and thoueands of cattle enjoying it. 
Nothing but the Holstein cattle are seen. The 
village system of farming is disappearing, and 
I occasionally see a farmhouse with barns, 
stacks, etc. 

Amsterdam Is built upon a site like that 
which might be found between Suisun and 
Benicia, on the tules. The map of the city 
looks like the three sides of a spider's web, the 
streets and canals running like the threads of 
the web, converging gradually toward the cen- 
ter. With, all my reading about the city of 
Amsterdam, I had a very imperfect idea of It, 
I could hardly realize that there were as many' 
canals as there were in Venice, and much bet- 
ter arranged. Nearly every street of impor- 
tance has a canal in the center, with streets or 
roadway on either side. Some canals are 30, 
10 and 100 feet wide, and some few narrower. 
There are 90 islands and 300 bridges that cross 
these canals from one street to another. 
Oanal-boats are going and coming with their 
loads, like track teams. Small steamers built 
low down ply up and down the largest canal, 
some as tow-boats and others for passengers. 

The old houses are narrow and high, and not 
one in ten stands plumb. They look as though 
they would topple over very soon. There are 
some nice bnildings here. It must be expen- 
sive to get a proper foundation in such a wet 
soil. 

I beli€VB they claim 300,000 population, I 
should hardly think it would justify such fig- 
ures. We took carriage and rode around the city 
and| out to see the dikes. Failing to get a 
proper map, I found it difficult to obtain the 
desired information in regard to reclamation. 
There are so many dikes, canals, levees, eto., 
that I could not inform myself as I would 
like to. 

We found a young man who could speak 
good English and willing to impart anything 
that he knew, but the trouble was, he did not 
know much about the business and was liable 
to mislead. 

We found another bright young man, appar- 
ently an assistant engineer, who had the in- 
formation, but spoke indifferent English, and it 
was hard for him to explain. On the outer 
levee they were doing a fine piece of stone- 
work. From what I could gather and see, I 
think thay are putting in gates to let out the 
stagnant water of the city at low tide and let 
in new water at high tide. They have re- 
claimed a good deal of land from the inland sea 
and have it in a fioe state of cultivation. They 
have been most determined and persevering in 
building up this city and reclaiming its lands. 
It has cost an immense amount of money, 
thought and experiment, 

I took the little steamer and went up to the 
town or city called Ziandam, that claims a 
population of 12,000. I had hardly got ashore 
when I was solicited by a native to be my 
guide. I made arrangements with him and we 
took carriage and started. The first thing he 
showed me was an old house that had cut over 
the top of the door, "Anno 1654." We left 
the carriage and walked through a narrow lane, 
where stood a modern house, 1S25, over an old 
house built in 1632, and in which Peter the 
Great lived in 1697, when he worked at ship- 
building in this town. The chairs and table 
that he used were there. I had to stoop down 
to go through the door from one room to 
another. The boarding on the outside was over 
a foot wide and the whole thing had the ap- 
pearance of quite an ancient house. I also 
walked through the ship-yard where he worked 
at his trade. 

I went in and inspected one of those large, 
four-armed windtnills that we see pictured out 
BO much in the old country. Eiich arm must 
be at least 30 feet long and tdey go with tre- 
mendous power. This one was pumping water 
from the land side into the canal. An old man 
and his wife were living in it and attending to 
it. Their three sons were at home at the time. 
The mills are worked with wooden coga, and 
have a turntable, so as to be faced to the wind. 
There ia a powerful brake they apply when 
they wish to stop the mill. They stopped it to 
show me how it worked. They seemed as 
pleased to show me the mill as I was to see it. 
I loaned the old lady a small reminder until I 
call again. The old gentleman seemed pleased 
at my attentions to his frau, for he put on a 
very broad smile, and gave a strong whiff to his 
pipe. 

We drove several miles up a narrow street 
close to a small canal nearly on a level with 
the land. Houses were built on both sides, 
and nearly every house had to have a small 
bridge to get over to the street. 

I am very sorry I cannot stay here at least 
one week and make a thorough investigation 
of this old city, with its remarkable history, 
its dikes and processes and extent of reclama- 
tion. Any account I can get of this city. I 
shall read with greater interest than ever. For 
want of time I have not visited its museums, 
art galleries, or zoological gardens, which are 
said to be good. 

We left Amsterdam at 12:30, arrived in Brus- 
sels at 6 p.m., and putup at Grand Hotel de 
Saxe. Having a little spare time before we left, 
we took a run through a church founded in 1408, 
which had some very fin© pulpit carving and 



other oddities; also visited the King's palace. It 
is a large, plain stone building on the outside, 
and a person would hardly believe the beauty 
it contained within. Nearly every room was 
finished or covered with polished marble of the 
finest kind. It made a peculiar and rich room. 
Fine pictures were on the wall and on the ceil- 
ing. Each picture was emblematic or had a 
meaning and was appropriate to time and 
place. The equestrian statue of the father of 
the present King was in one of the large rooms. 
We regretted very much that we had to hurry 
throogh BO rapidly, as we probably shall never 
see another marble palace like that, and it was 
a mystery to us how the economic Hollanders 
ever allowed th':mselves so much extravagance. 

The trip was through a level country, with 
canals, ditches and levees everywhere; splen- 
did green grass and thousands of the black 
and white Holstein or Butch cattle in every 
direction. There were no fences, but some good 
large barns and good farm houses. I do Aot 
know that I ever went through snob an extent 
of level ground and such fine feed and crops. 
In one town, about half the place was occupied 
with nursery trees, shrubs and flowers and of a 
very fine growth, and showed a good deal of 
skill in their training. 

With all this rich soil, I had no desire to live 
on it, but would hke to have owned a few 
hundred acres to turn my stook in to see them 
grow and get fat. We passed through The 
Hague and Rotterdam, large, fine places on 
level ground with water nearly on the surface. 
Quite extensive improvements were going on 
at Rotterdam, on the outside of the city, which 
showed thrift and prosperity. 

We intended to stop at Antwerp, but con- 
cluded to go on to Brussels and 'stop as we 
came back to take steamer for London. We 
were more favorably impressed with Brussels 
than any city that we have seen on the continent, 
outside of Paris. There is a life, thrift and 
cleanliness about the city that takes right away 
and makes a person feel at home at once. The 
merchants have large show windows and have 
a knack of showing off their goods in a tasteful 
and attractive way, and causes a desire to buy 
something out of every window. We went to 
the lace manufacturers, which was a source of 
great joy to the three ladies in our party. If the 
skill of the fair bands in this city can prevent, 
our ladies are determined that mosquitoes and 
cold weather shall forever after be a stranger 
to them, while Mr. H. and myself sit in 
silent meditation, pondering the price of hops 
and bouquets in the future. Statues, monu- 
ments and oolumna are plenty. We took a 
ride on the electric street road which worked 
well for a diatanoe of about a mile, and some 
of the way up grade. A great many wooden 
shoes are worn in this country, and the first 
pair I saw I thought from the size that the 
owner- was about to perform some great feat in 
water-walkiog, so with purse in hand I followed 
him for awhile, desiring to purchase tickets for 
his exhibition. I soon saw so many with the 
wooden shoes that I thought I might see some 
of their feats without pay — a thing that never 
occurs in this country — so I saved my guilder 
and called at the corner to inquire the price of 
scheidam schnapps. 

We were shown through the Hall of Justice, 
which is a large, fine building, and everything 
seemed well arranged. We were shown a 
room where every day, at certain hours, civil 
marriages were solemnized by the proper official. 

We then went through the rain to visit the 
cathedral — a large, fine building, but no com- 
parison to some that we have visited. Oandles 
were burning by the hundred; men and women 
were at their devotional exercises. A big, 
burly six footer, with brass buttons, cocked 
hat and long wand, stalked through the aisles 
and waved back the visitors. I took a seat in 
one of the low chairs facing, as I supposed, the 
most oonspicuouB place in church. He tapped 
me on the shoulder and turned around my 
chair, as much as to say, that view is good 
enough for you heathens. I gave him a low 
bow and child-like smile by showing my dis- 
sent to his judgment, and moved off to another 
part of the church to commune with what 
seemed to me best. 

Porters or commissioners are standing on the 
streets everywhere, especially at stations and 
hotels, dressed with white blouses and brass 
bands around the arms with numbers. Mr. H. 
wanted to go to the bank to draw some funds, 
and was very near to it when he asked one of 
these men the direction. Two of them started 
with him to the bank, and as he was about to 
disappear in the door, both yelled out in broken 
Eoglish, *' Commission, commission." Mr. H. 
said: *' I did not ask you to go to the bank, I 
merely asked the direction." 

He went in and got some funds, and as he 
came out, they repeated again " Commission !" 
He saw it was useless to talk to them, bo he 
pulled out two pieces of Swiss money that all 
other natives refuse to take and gave each a 
piece. While they were examining them to 
ascertain the value of the queer coin, Mr. H. 
slid away. 

It reminded me of the story of the man rid- 
ing through a country that was full of 
wolves, and they made chase, while he would 
gain a little time by occasionally throwing out 
a piece of meat or a bundle of something for 
them to examine and fight over. They will 
stand at the hotel, and when a hack drives up, 
the driver will take gripsack off hack, and these 
porters will snatch it up and run in and demand 
a fee. They continually play into each other's 
hands, and the best way is to have as little to 
do >vith them as possible. D. Flint. 



Suggestions for Controlling our Rivers. 

Ebitoks Press: — In times of disastrous 
floods the public will be more open to convic- 
tion ooncerning the importance of doing what 
we oan to control our rivers and prevent the 
vast damage done by their overflowing, partic- 
ularly in washing away good soil, so that it is 
hoped the following suggestions and facts may 
tend to promote action toward these ends. 

Having lived for several years only too near 
the Santa Clara river of the South, and having 
sustained considerable damage, both from the 
recent and other floods, the public importance 
of controlling this serious, oontinuouB, and in 
great part needless waste of the resources of 
the country has been long impressed upon the 
writer. 

It is quite within the truth to say that the 
loss along this one mountain torrent for only 
about ten miles, the region best known to your 
correspondent, has been 100 acres of good farm- 
ing land within the past six years. This is 
written with but limited reports ooncerning 
our last flood. To estimate that this little 
county may have lost 500 acres of good farm- 
ing land in this time is putting' it too low. In 
the flood of '84 over 70 acres were washed 
away from one ranch alone, Taylor's on the 
Ventura river, the best part of it. 

The publio is interested in this waste by its 
loss of property to levy taxes upon for all time, 
as well as by the loss to the owner, a part of 
itself, many of whom are seriously crippled. 
To offset this loss there is no gain. If the loss 
to the State at large by this last flood runs into 
millions of dollars, as rumor already has it, 
surely the prevention of this for the future is 
of great publio importance. 

The plan to be brought forward here had been 
in successful operation several centuries, along 
the river Po in Northern Italy, before the great 
Goethe visited the country about 100 years 
ago. He was so struck by its great public im- 
portance, efficiency and simplicity that he gave 
an account of it in some of his writings and in- 
duced the Government of Weimar to try it on 
some of its small rivers. 

The physical geography of the valley of the 
Po ie very like that of our Sacramento and San 
Joaquin basin; both being liable to floods from 
sudaen melting of mountain snows; a long ex- 
tent of both valleys being very fiat. For ages 
the loss to population and property in the val- 
ley of the Po had been enormous, until the fol- 
lowing engineering plan was adopted: This 
consisted essentially in building solid immova- 
ble jetties into the current, where it tended to 
encroach, or to spread out too much, making 
the current swifter and deeper so that it washed 
along much loose material, stones, etc., that 
had formerly caused frequent changes of chan- 
nel by obstructing old ones. Jetties being 
built along the whole course of the stream, on 
alternate sides as the current required them, 
it was also prevented from making these dan- 
gerous changes of channel and confined to the 
most suitable course at will. The eddies 
formed bolow each jetty catch and deposit the 
light particles, which in time amount to consid- 
erable soil, thus reclaiming flat land not needed 
for the water course. 

Oar celebrated American engineer Eads fol- 
lowed practically the same plan in sucoesBfully 
deepening and keeping free one of the mouths 
of the Mississippi river, where he had to con- 
tend both with the enormous deposits brought 
down by the river, its current, as well as with 
the ocean tides. 

If, now, the river Po has been Buccessfully 
controlled for centuries, and the mighty Miss- 
issippi for years, snrely all Oalifornia rivers 
may be held within hounds, Sicramento and 
San Joaquin, as well as the mountain torrents 
of which there are so many. 

For broad, sandy bedded streams like the 
Santa Clara of the South, constantly shifting 
ltd channel and making new distribution, its 
banks being almost entirely of rich farming or 
occasional sandy lands, the most suitable jetty 
that I have been able to think of would be one 
made by driving long, strong piles, such as the 
railroads use for bridges, at the proper places 
and angles to the stream, spiking strong planks 
to them from below the sand bed to as high a 
point as the water rises in floods. As the 
leneth of these jetties need seldom be over 25 
or 30 feet, and as they might often be a quarter 
of a mile or more apart, the expense woulonot bo 
too heavy to be borne, especially if all riparian 
owners, as well as the public, shared in it 
equitably. Here the value of reclaimed land 
would be considerable. 

Of course the possibility of this being done 
at ail depends upon its being given in charge to 
some publio authority, whether of State or 
counties singly or jointly, so that some con- 
nected and sensible scheme could be followed; 
this to be determined by persons better 
acquainted with public affairs or engineering 
thhu the writer. 

Surely some of our oounty money now wasted 
on plowing up the dirt roads once in awhile 
would be better employed in controlling the 
streams, and if the politicians woald only allow 
us to enjoy as rational and profitable publio 
control ui our rivers, to lessen damages by floods, 
and of our forests, so closely associated with 
regulating the flow of the rainfall into the 
streams, to prevent floods, they would allow us 
to enjoy in this " free country " what some of 
the " effete monarchies of Europe'' have had 
for generatinns, - 

Ventura Co., Dec, 1SS9. 



Jan. 13, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



39 



Liberty Mining District, Siskiyou Co. 

Editors Press:— Tbere la probibly no aeo- 
tioD in OAltforoift which cffera better iadace* 
meats for extensive hydraulio placer miLiDg, 
or any so long neglected, &s Liberty mining dis- 
trict, Siskiyou ooanty. 

Mining cApitalists seldom reach farther than 
Etna Mills, owing to the termination of the 
wagon-road at that place and to the inconven- 
ienoes of traveling mnle-baolE over the mountain 
trail, which coDtiDoes on from EDna Mills 
aoross the Salmon range Into the north foik of 
Salmon river. 

There, there are many large deposits of 
gravel bars and high benches which are very 
rich, affordiog a productive field for bydraul- 
ioking. 

The faoilities for hydraalio operations are all 
that can be desired. The water privileges are 
exsellenfc. The river, having a natural descent 
of ever 80 feet to the mile, makes snffi.'ient 
wattsr available for all necessary purposes. 

One deoidtd advantage this district poBsesses 
in regard to hydraalioking is the liberty to 
dnmp the debris into the streams. There is 
not a spot along the entire course of the river 
frim its sources to where it empties into the 
Klamath, and from there on to the coast, that 
is dt voted to agrionlture; thns no complaints 
ever arise to interropt the constant ranoiog of 
the mines. 

Owing to lack of capital, the " river bars " 
have been practically nntouohed with the ex- 
oeption of the rims and outlets which have 
been sluiced two or three times over with re- 
munerative results. Good wages are being 
made by the miners working the galchea ana 
shallow deposits along the river. 

Quartz mining has taken a rapid stride 
dming the past year, and the present ontlook 
(or the future is certainly eaoouragtog. Many 
rich leads have been discovered, several of 
which, though worked on a small soale, are 
paying handsomely. 

The present heavy snowfalls in the mount* 
ains are eagerly welcomed by the miners, who 
all expeot a long and prosperous run next sea- 
son. Frank H. Hall, 

Etna Mills, Sitikiyou Co., Cat 



Mining Accidents Prevented. 

Editors Press: — In reviewing the late fear- 
fal, fatal catastrophe at the Ucioa mine, snob 
might have been prevented had the worked- 
oat ground been filled in between the timbers 
by debris, obtained if from no other available 
source, from the surface, by making npraisea, 
passes, or chutes, and so shoot the waste mate 
rial into the worked-oat atopea or open apaoes, 
thaa compactly secutiug the ground. This 
would prevent any possible chance of oollapee, 
if properly filled up to the weak surface por* 
tton of the minn. This system ia made oom- 
pulsory in the K;w Zealand mines, and ahonld 
be carried out in all extensive mining opera- 
trons, for it ia alwaya practicable. In New 
Zealand the mines are carefully inspected 
monthly, and oftener when there is a autpioioo 
that danger may exist, by a competent mining 
pngineer, who is a regular appointee of the 
Gr.vernment in the capacity of mining inapfot- 
or. An Act of the Legislature of thia State 
ahould be paased, enforcing some such regula- 
tion, whereby the Uvea of the miners may be 
better aeonred, and accideuta generally in 
mlDea reduced to the minimum. Arqus. 



A Mine Mystery. — While a party of miners 
were domg aeaetament work on what is known 
as the Black Sulphnrets mine in Irish Mount- 
ain, Nev., for A, W. Gsar, George Blythe, the 
leader of the party, while cleaning the debris 
from the above mine and after cleaning out 
about two feet of the accumulation, struok some 
bones, the first being the under j twbone, and 
after a thorough search a full human skeleton 
was unearthed of a white man about six feet in 
bight. This mine has not been worked for 15 
or 20 years. The shaft was 26 feet deep, 6 feet 
long by 3 wide, and waa dug in auch a way 
that the dirt on the corpse could not have got 
there but by being thrown in by human agenoy. 
There is a story sfliat that twomen left North- 
ern California some four years ago, one of 
whom had had hie left thigh-bone broken. 
Afterward the other retnrneH and said his part- 
ner had been killed in Irish Monntain, 



An Electric Meter — So general ia becom- 
ing the uae ot eleotrio lights that a meter to 
make an equitable charge to consumers for the 
amonnt of current actually utilizsd ia a necee- 
aity. Repeated experiments in this direotitn 
have been made, but with indifferent enooeaa. 
The latest invention, and which expert judi^es 
pronounce a anocees, ia that of Albert H. Mm* 
waren, a brother-in-law of M. D. Liw, formerly 
anperintendent in this city of the Brush Elec- 
tric L'ght Co. Hitherto those who used elec- 
tric lights have been at the mercy of the com- 
pany, but with the meter it ia stited that the 
preoise amount of current utilized is recorded — 
a great convenience to those who use either 
eleotrio light or eleotrio motora. 

A DiSPATCu from B uaaels Bays that the 
mine-owoeiB at Oharleroi, where strikes are in 
progress, will make no conoesaions, thinking 
that the minora will not be able to hold out 
long. This action baa greatly incensed the 
men, and the strike is assuming alarming pro- 
portioDB, 



Trusts Declared Unlawful. 

A little while ago tou country was greatly 
agitated ever the rprtai of anarchical eociaUsm. 
The people stood aghast before the H^ymarktt 
outrage in Chicago, and the oivio authorities 
hastened to stamp out the evil as they would 
the plague or a fire. But in the meantime 
there has been steadily and silently growing in 
our midst a more misohievoua and alarming 
evil, one that threatens to strangle the leading 
industries of the land. It differs from Chicago 
anarchism in the agencies it uses. The poor, 
beer*soaked, fanatical anarchist throws bombe; 
the oapitallstio anarchist proposes to so manipu- 
late the law governing partus rships and corpora- 
tions as to manufacture a vast shield to protect 
thit ving Bohemes. 

Such is the attitude of the so-called trusts 
or combines that have so alarmingly multiplied 
of late. The following indictment may be tiled 
against the trusts : 

1. They tend to build up monopolies and 
drive small oapitiUsts out of business. 

2. They dettroy competition, the great 
minifier of profit and equalizer of prices. 

3. They amaaa fottnnes at the expense of 
the community by increasing the price of com- 
modities. 

4. They build up an oligarchy which wields 
ita own interests against that of the community, 
thereby endangering pnraonal freedom and 
menacing the existence of democratic institu- 
tions. 

It is a matter of gratification that our courts 
so far have been so prompt and pronounced in 
trying to arrest the apread of this evil. Judge 
Birrett of New York waa the first to declare 
the Sugar Trust a " criminal enterprise," and 
bis opinion has been ratified by the Supreme 
Court of that State, And now Judge W. T. 
Wallace of this city has dealt the trust-method 
of doing business another staggering blow. It 
will be remembered that on the 5ch of Novem- 
ber, 1SS8, the Attorney-General, O. A, John- 
son, filed a complaint in the Superior Court of 
this county and city, alleging that the Aoierioan 
Sugar Refinery of this city had violated its 
charter by joining the Sugar Trust, thereby dis- 
regarding the purposes for which it was incor- 
porated by surrendering the management of ita 
cnnoerns to a body of men known as the Sugar 
Rsfineries' Company, usually called tbe Sogu 
Trust. That said company is not a corporation, 
but is an unlawful combination and monopoly, 
acting in the reetraiut of trade, and that the 
Ametioan Sugar Refinery Company by amalga- 
mating with the Sugar Truat bad ceased to 
maintain ita Identity and exerciae the functions 
for which it waa created and had therefore for- 
feited its charter. These allegations Judge 
Wallace has in hia decision ably and lucidly 
maintained. Aftfr stating a finding and a few 
established principles, hia honor says : 

**The stated purpose for which tbe * Ameri- 
can Sugar Refinery Company * became incor- 
porated was the production — the competitive 
production — of eugar to supply human want; 
the business franchise granted waa not for tbe 
sole benefit of the corporation or its atockhold 
ers, but, in a measure, for that of the pablio as 
well; the understood commercial policy under- 
lying the grant, and to the observance of which 
the defendant, by accepting it, atood commit- 
ted, looked to tbe promotion of trade in that 
commodity — the promotion of trade neceBsarity 
denotes the enoouragement of rivalry in the 
business — competition on equal terms ia oon- 
ceded to be the life of trade, and to invite and 
promote that oompetition is the established pol- 
icy of our laws. As oompetition tends to ore- 
ate trade, ao monopoly tends to destroy it. 
Thia ia the axiom which underlies the Constitu- 
tion and general legislation of this S sate, and 
upon which the decisions of ita courts have 
habitually, not to say uniformly, proceeded," 

We quote this clauae of tbe opinion because 
it has an ulterior bearing. Judge Wallace here 
clearly holds that a oorporation is not created 
for the sole benefit of the incorporators, but for 
the welfare of the public as wqII, and that a 
monopoly injures trade by destroying competi- 
tion in buaineaa. Now where shall we place 
the limit to thia principle ? Jay Gould controls 
the telegraph. A few railroad barons control 
transportation. A trust is a partnership of 
corporationa, and such a combine ia declared 
illegal and void; then why not be equally 
prompt and stern in limiting the powers of a 
oorporation managed by one or more men ? The 
only difference is that in one case we are under 
an oligarchy and the other under a deapot. 

But let us not shout before we are out of the 
woods. Trusts are lucrative and will not die 
easily. The action of the North River Sugar 
Refinery Co. in commencing to wind up its 
affairs looks as if it had been compelled to go 
out of business by the foroe of Judge Barrett's 
decision, but the New York Times aaya "the 
scheme is an attempt to throw over the Sugar 
Trust as it stands the cloak of a Connecticut 
charter, in order that the truit may oarry on 
its business as heretofore and in defiance of the 
courts of the State of Naw York." An effort 
may be made here to fiink Judge Wallace's 
decision by a similar aubterfuge. It ia under- 
stood that an appeal will be taken to the 
Supreme Conrt, which, if it furnishes no hope, 
may at least give the protean business time 
enough to change its shape and color, and it 
may emerge in another form. 

Bat why stop here? The whole family of 
trusts are illegal associations of capital, eeoret 
or aemi-seor^t Qnanc^al conapiraoieB, the object 



of which id to art.fioially enhance tbe price of 
ao article by monopolizing its maonf^cture and 
exercisirga puiicy of brutal forot- an* t<-iroi 
aeainet ait Df^Kible comretiti n. W> have tie 
8tao( arn Oil Trust, the Cntno-S-^ed Tru-t, th*- 
R.bher Tiust, tbe Cutle Trust. Coal T.ust, 
Uu Trust, and the B^ef Combine, that monopo- 
lizes and controls the live-8tcck)raarket through- 
out the Northwest and Middle States and levies 
a tax on every pound of l>eef, pork, mutton, 
lard, fiah, and is steadily orowding the small 
traders who do not come under the wing of the 
vulture. 

Arizona Minerals. 

Wm. p. Blake In Amertcaa Journal of 
Science. 

The deposits of salphate of soda of the valley 
of the Verde river, A. T., near the military post 
of Camp Verde, have long been known and 
extensively quarried by the ranchers of tbe 
region as a substitute for salt for cattle and 
horses. The occurrence of thenardite in Ari- 
zona was first made known to science by the 
late Prof. B. Sillimao, In 1S81, but be bad not 
visited the locality and it baa not been de- 
scribed, A recent visit to the place, and a 
somewhat hurried and superficial examination, 
enabled me, however, to collect and identify 
other allied tpeoiea in association with the 
thenardite and a peculiar paeudomorph of car- 
bonate of lime after glaubeiite. 

The deposits of the thenardite and associ- 
oiated minerals are of considerable magnitude, 
covering several acres in extent, and reach a 
thickness of some 50 or 60 feet or more. They 
appear as a series of rounded hills with sides 
covered with a snow-white effloreeoenoe and 
greenish-colored and yellow clay at the bottom 
and top, partially covering the saline beds from 
view. 

These beds are doubtless remnants of a much 
more extended deposit which occupied a local 
lake-like depression, or basin, probably at the 
olose of the great volcanic era during whioh 
most of the mountain valleys cf Central Ari* 
zona were filled up by sediments and then over- 
laid by BUOoessLve streams of lava. Sedi* 
mentary beds of volcanio origin remain through- 
out the Verde valley and its chief tributaries, 
and in ,the region of Camp Verde are deeply 
eroded, but rest on the uneven fioor of ancient 
pre-Silurian slates standing on edge. H'gh 
above the deposits of the valley, vertical cUffi 
of hard lava mark the edges of extended mesas 
of malpaia, under which all the other forma* 
tions are hidden and protected. But the exca- 
vations in the banks of the sulphate of soda are 
Insigoifioant in comparison with the magnitude 
of the beds, and have failed to show, conolu- 
sively, any bottom or top, or to reveal the 
true relations of the beds to the surrounding 
formations. Whether or not they are members 
of the voloanio series or of a later and more 
looal origin is yet uncertain. 

Thenardite. 

This salt constitutes the bulk of the depos- 
its. It is a ooareely crystalline mass, so com 
pact and firm that it can be broken out only 
by drilling and blasting with powder. It va 
ries in its purity. Some portions are more or 
less contaminated with a greenish -colored clay, 
but it ia obtained also in large masses neariy 
colorless and transparent, with a alight yel- 
lowiah tint, but seldom ahowing crystalline 
forma. 

Mlrabllite. 

The hydrous sulphatj of soda oocura in olose 
a^aooiation with the thenardite and appears to 
penetrate its mass in veins, but may prove to 
be an overlying bed. It is this species whioh, 
by its rapid tfflirescenoe when exposed to the 
air, covers tbe whole deposit with a white 
powder and a thick oruet through which the 
quarrymen must cut before they reach the 
bolid banks of the anhydrous sulphate. 
Halite. 

Rock ealt in beautifully transparent maesetf 
is sparingly disseminated in portions of the 
great beds. These crystalline maEses, so far 
as observed, do not exceed an inch or two in 
thicknees, and no evidence of the existence of 
any separate workable beds oould be seen. It 
is irregularly dis-eminated in the sulphate. 
Some masaea exhibit beautiful blue tints of 
color, like those seen in the salt of the Tyrol 
and of StaBsfnrt. G)od fragments for optical 
and thermal experiments could be obtained 

here. 

QUuberite. 

This anhydrous sulphate of lime and soda is 
an interesting af-sociate of the other species. It 
occurs chit fly near what appears to be the bate 
of the deposita in a compact green clay. It is 
in clear, transparent, colorless crystals, gener- 
ally in thin rhomba, lozenge-ahaped, with the 
plain angles of 80° and 100", and from half an 
inch to an inch or more broad and one-eighth to 
one quarter of an inch in thickness. The pris- 
matic planes. /, /, are generally nearly oblit- 
erated, or are absent, through the great devel- 
opment of the hemi-ootahedral planea -1, re- 
placing tbe obtuse terminal edges. The 
terminal plane, 0, is chit fly developed, and 
this, with the broad planea replacing the ob- 
tuse edgea, gives to aome of the ciyatals the 
appearance of rhombohedrons of the mint] a 
series. The general habit of the crystals ia 
similar to those from Westeregeln, near Stass- 
furt, described by Zdpharovioh, with the pre- 
dominating pyramid —1, poonr ajsp t^ie pyra- 



mids — i, — J and t ither — f or — 4-5; traces of 
a pyr -m I ou the acute ed^ed have aUo been 
uot< d. Thi're ia iv>(ftnr>e that the crysals 
vary greiitly in biz? auri in th<-lr habit in d ff<-r- 
eot p^rta tf the deposits. They ccour aUo in 
the middt of portions of tbe solid thenardite as 
inolusione, and in one instance a email crystal 
was found in the midst of a transparent maes of 
halite. Close inspection of the transparent 
tabular oryatals from the green clay reveals the 
presence of crystalline cavities with fluid in- 
clusions made evident by the movement of 
small bubbles. ,When heated, the decrepitation 
is violent. 

Carbonate of Lime Pseud omorphs. 

Where the lower bed containing tbe bulk of 
the glanberite crops out at tbe surface and has 
become oxid zed and dried, tbe gUubarite dia- 
appears and is lepUoed by carbonate of lime in 
an amorphous condition, but having the exdot 
form of the glanberite oryatals, whose matrix 
they have filled. These pseudomorphe are firm, 
compact and dense, but are withouc cleavage or 
interior orystalline strnotnre. Color, cream 
yellow. They weather out in great numbers, 
and show that the glanberite uiust occur in a 
great variety of sizes and forma of aggregation, 
in some placse in rosettes and in otheia in crys- 
tals two or three Inohes long. 

Boumonlte in Arizona. 

Bournonite occurs sparingly at the Boggs 
mine, Big Bug district, Y^vipai county, Ari- 
zona Territory, assooiattd with pyrite, zino 
blende, galenite and copper pyrites. The orya- 
tals are brilliant and oharaoteristio, with inter- 
esting modifioations not yet studied and com- 
pared. Tbis is believed to be the first an- 
nounoemeot of the occurrence of this specifs in 
tbe United States. I am indebted to Fred E, 
Murray, E.q., superintendent of the mine, for 
specimens. 

Railway Constructioii in 1889. 

The Railway Age of December 27th pub- 
lishes a tabulated statement by States of the 
railway construction (main linea only, not in- 
cluding sidings and additional traokE) in the 
Uaited States for tbe year 1S89. A recapitu- 
lation of the compilation gives the following 
summary by groupe: 

Linea. Miles. 

New England and Eastern group 69 657 

Central Northfra ^roup 40 784 

Soufhern group 97 i,829 

Southwesttfo group 37 71*3 

Northwestern group 28 615 

Pacific Coaat group 39 674 

Totals 3J 5,231 

The abrve shows a falling off compared with 
1888of 1800 miles, and that of 1887 of about 
7800 miles. By an examination ot tbe above, 
it will be seen that the list only embraces the 
line upon which track-laying was an accom- 
plished fact, and therefore does not include the 
roads graded and not yet railed. The average 
mileage of each line completed waa in I8S9 nnly 
about 16^ miles, againet about 20 mileain 1888, 
whioh gucB to show that the work laot year was 
chi<fiy done on small extensions and bianchea. 
Tbe Age in commenting on tbis fact says that 
the [lament of parallel railway buitdiog which 
caused the exceaeive and unhealthy activity of 
several previous years has been almost absent, 
and in nearly every case the extension or new 
road has been built because it was believed to 
be needed and not chiefly to get away busineea 
from a competitor. 

The southern group of States shows the 
greatest degree of activity in railroad building, 
and a much larger proportion of development 
when area and population is taken into consid- 
eration.' The Southwestern States and Terri- 
tories have made con i:lerab1e orogri^sB, but not 
one-half that tbey mide in 1S8S. The North- 
western States bave about held their own, 
while the Paoifio Coast S atea have fallen off 
sligbtlv. notwithstanding tbe large construo- 
tioo (398 milef) in Washirgton, owiog to Cali- 
fornia's email mileage of 120 miles, against 600 
miles in 1888. 

The Age is authority for the statement that 
tbe addtiion of, tay 5300 miles of new road dnr- 
irg the year, means that, at the moderate aver- 
age cf $20,000 per mile, the vast sum of $106,- 
000,000 has been invested in tbeir construction 
and equipment, and that employment for the 
future has been furnished thereby to from 25,- 
000 to 30, 000 more men who will be required 
to oarry on the operations of these lines, while 
thousands more will be kept buey in supplying 
the various manufactured articles, the demand 
for whioh is inoreaaed by the addition of every 
new mile of railway. ; 



There is nothing new in regard to the dread- 
ful Obve in the Ubica mine. The bodies of tbe 
dead miners are still buried in tbe drift. Work 
is progressing in the direction of the dead, and 
ore is being extracted a? usual. It may be a 
year before all the dead bodies will be reached. 

Tbe gas company of Jackson, Amador oounty, 
changed ita process last year from ooal to gaso- 
line. At their annual meeting it was shown 
that the change did not work well, aa tbe qual- 
ity of tbe gas was inferior while the cost waa 
fully equal to the old process. 

The hoisting works, maobine and blacksmith- 
shops and sawmill of the Anchor mine, Park 
City, Utah, were destroyed by fire on Wednes- 
day morning. 



40 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 18, 1890 



II]lNIJMG ZUMMAF^Y, 

The foUowing Is moBtly condensed from journals publiahed 
ID the interior, in proximity to the minea mentioned. 



CALIFORNIA. 

Alameda. 

Gold Discovery. — Livermore Herald, Jan. ii- 
Some years ago Wm. M. Mendenhall discovei-ed 
what he considered to be copper ore on the hillside 
near the large spring at Agua de Vida, lo miles 
southeast of this place. The ledge was unearthed 
in digging a trail from the cottages to the spring. 
Last summer Mr. Mendenhall decided to run a tun- 
nel into the hill on the ledge. He did so, getting in 
about 30 feet. The ore he took out was seen by 
quite a number of people, nearly all of whom pro- 
nounced it copper. Recently he sent three samples 
down to Price's assay office, and this week he se- 
cured a return, which, to say the least, astonished 
him. Of the three samples of rock, that from a 
small vein assayed 84 cents in silver and $3.10 in 
gold per ton; that from a ledge, 13 cents in silver 
and $2.07 in gold; and the quartz, 45 cents in silver 
and $9.36 in gold. This gives a return of valuation 
of the three specimens of $3.94, $2.20 and $9.88 re- 
spectively per ton. 

Amador. 

Sutter Creek Gold Mine.— Ztftf^<£?-, Jan. ii; 
The mill was brought to a standstill on Sunday, on 
account of the Amador Canal Co.'s flumes giving 
way. The mill resumed crushing last Thursday. 
Two shifts are now employed in the mine. 
aalaveras. 

Quartz and Gravel. — Calaveras Prospect^ 
Jan. 11: The persistent rains of the past month 
and a half have interfered very greatly with the 
active mining developments in this region of the 
State, but the amount of water now assured for the 
dry season will compensate for the present incon- 
veniences to mining operations. The snow fall in 
the mountains is ample to furnish an abundant sup- 
ply of water for the mills and mines. ■ The past year 
has given mining in this county a great impetus, 
and with the present encouraging prospect we an- 
ticipate much mining enterprise in the future. In 
our immediate vicinity we hear that the Union mine 
will soon again commence operations. The Lon- 
don syndicate that is working this mine has not 
spared money for a thorough and complete test of 
the genuineness of this mine, and contrary to all re- 
ports "the holes in the ground'' contain a fine 
body of ore. It is expected that alUegal incumbrances 
will be lifted within a few days and work will 
be resumed. Operations about Murphys and on 
the Stanislaus river are at a stand-still for the pres- 
ent, owing to the weather. The Norfolk, Mr. F. 
B. Morse, superintendent, is making vigorous head- 
way, despite snow and rain. At Robinson's Ferry, 
the new Huntington mill on the Calaveras mine is 
now in operation. The ore of this mine is said to 
be paying good returns. West Point has aspira- 
tions for the mining championship in the county. 
Prospecting in that section has been very active, 
and the indications for a revival of the mining boom 
are fair. Another district that is at present the cen- 
ter of attraction in mining circles is the historical 
and old-time Central Hill, (airaous in the 6o's for its 
enormous yield of gold. The gravel mine lying dor- 
mant for the want of capital and enterprise will yet 
prove highly remunerative. The outlook in this 
district cannot but attract the attention of practical 
mining men, and the old gravel mines will be made 
to yield their glittering sand, Calaveras is just 
now a mining county of no mean importance. Its 
quartz mines are good and are being worked by 
moneyed men. Its gravel mines are undoubtedly 
very good, and there will soon be a new era in 
gravel mining. Its copper mines at Copperopolis 
are in the midst of great activity, and they have 
been re-opened *'to stay." There is said to be 
sufficient pre on the ground to supply the smelting 
works for the next 10 years. 
Inyo. 

Fish Springs. — Inyo Register, Jan. 9: This old 
mining district, which in early days gained a credit 
of $225,000 gold output, is again coming to the 
front apparently to stay. The old McMurry and 
Westerville mines on Fish Springs HiU, at present 
the property of John Welch and J. D. Klairs, are 
under bond to gentlemen representing a company 
organized in Chicago and Scotland, and present 
condition of negotiations indicates a speedy and im- 
portant sale. J, N. Rose has a lease of the new ore 
concentrator which was put in the Maxim mill by 
McConnell & Davidson^ and is getting good returns 
out of the hundreds of tons of rich tailings on the 
site of the old Fish Springs arastras. A number of 
new properties situated about five miles to the 
northward and four miles southwesterly from Big 
Pine are looming up as tangible producers. Henry 
Melone and C. F. Fuller, a team of veteran pros- 
pectors, are drifting on a 2-foot ledge at the bottom 
of a loo-foot shaft. A sample lot of 3 tons of the ore 
yielded $65 per ton net, by arastra process. Doc. 
Graham and John Elliot have a ledge opened by 
a 130-foot tunnel, and 10 tons of $60 ore on the 
dump. As the result of about four months' work, 
another party recently sold to A. K. Engley $600 in 
gold. McCarty, the old stand-by arastra man of 
that country, lately bought a ledge from a Mexican, 
and got the purchase-money and $ioo mere out of 
the ore already extracted. Harry Hearne keeps up 
his lick on the placer as of old. Ahern has tunnels 
200 and 300 feet in length, running for gravel. 
O'Brien, Daley, Lavelle and others are working at 
different points. The region lies in the foothills on 
the east base of the Sierras, in a porphyritic and 
gold-bearing belt which extends from Mammoth to 
the Alabama mountains. It abounds with timber 
and water-power, and is accessible all the year 
round. 

Mono. 

Relocated.— Virginia Chronicle, Jan. 11: The 
Mocking Bird mining location in Homer district was 
relocated at. midnight on Dec. 31st, the original 
owners having failed to perform the annual holding 
work. The Mocking Bird is said to be one of the 
most promising locations in the district. It is now 
'' known as the Wolverine. 

Nevada. 

Prospecting Near Spenceville.— Grass Val- 
ley Union, Jan, 11: There are a number of mineral- 
learing veins in the vicinity of Spenceville, on what 
s known as the copper belt, but they contain other 



mineral besides copper, as it is found that they pros- 
pect both in silver and gold, and it is for the latter 
that quite an amount oT prospecting was done dur- 
ing the past season. The nnfavorable weather for 
the past few months has mainly suspended such 
operations, but with the opening of spring, and the 
cessation of storms, it is contemplated to renew 
work actively, as it is considered that the prospects 
are encouraging. It is well known that the copper 
mine at Spenceville is worked at a profit, making 
regular shipments of cement copper, but if to this 
can be added gold and silver the Spenceville district 
may become prominent for its mineral wealth. 
Practical miners have confidence that good mines 
can be opened there. 

Around Grass Valley.— 6^«/(7«, Jan. 9: The 
freezing weather serves to interfere somewhat with 
the operations of the quartz-mining companies 
of the district, as it is an obstacle to amalgamation, 
and besides checks the flow of water. The Idaho 
mill has been frozen up three days and the North 
Star mill at present is only run at night-time on ac- 
count of a scant water supply. The Idaho mill will 
start up again to-diy. At the Empire mine there has 
been no interruption, and everything is reported to 
be going on as usual. At the Peabody mine noth- 
ing is being done more than to keep the pump go- 
ing and holding the water. Arrangements have been 
made to get 20 inches of water from the town reser- 
voir for power to keep the pump going. No un- 
derground work will be undertaken until milder 
weather enables full water-power to be obtained. 
The cold weather interferes also with milling at the 
Omaha. The water-power to run all the machinery 
is ample. Work is going right along at the Hartery, 
and the mine continues to show up well in high- 
grade ore. Out at the Maryland mine the snow is 
three feet in depth, and on Tuesday night the wind 
drifted the snow until it filled the trail, and the men 
going to and from their work found it difficult to 
get through. The work of running a crosscut in the 
Maryland ground is going on steadily, 
Plumas, 

New Quartz-mill. — Greenville Bulletin, Jan. 
8: We are informed that a new lo-stamp quartz- 
mill will be erected next summer on the Winona 
claim, situated about one-half of a mile southwest of 
Greenville, and that a company is now being formed 
for that purpose. The new mill is designed to crush 
ore not only from the Winona but from other quartz 
mines needing the use of a custom mill. 

Shasta. 

Squaw Creek. — Redding Free Press, Jan, ii: 
Thii Uncle Sam M. Co. has just completed the erec- 
tion of a large air compressor at the mill. They are 
laying a 4-inch pipe to convey air from the mill to 
the tunnel which they are driving, a distance of 
three-quarters of a mile. Said tunnel is in a distance 
of 500 feet and it will require an additional 800 feet 
in order to reach the vein. The company expects to 
have the power drill running in a few weeks, when 
much better progress will be made, 

From Igo.— Cor. Courier, Jan. 11: The contin- 
ued heavy rains proved too much for the hoisting rig 
at the Crystal, and they have shut down till spring. 
At the Chicago they have the shaft timbered, and 
are running drifts at . the 150 and 200-foot levels. 
Excellent ore is coming out of both levels, although 
the work is slow, owing to the difficulties of hoisting 
in bad weather. P. Gibney is developing a large 
ledge of promising quartz at the head of Spanish 
gulch. Work continues in the lower tunnel of J. P. 
Wright's sulphuret ledge. The arastras are tempo- 
rarily shut down, owing to the soaked condition of 
the mines, as well as depth of snow in the roads. 
Whit George and Doc Dunham have put up a power 
arastra on their Muletown ledge and will be 
ready to run in a few days. Not much placer min- 
ing is being done at present, the gu'ches having 
been pretty well cleaned out in former years. 

Lower Springs.— Cor. Democrat, Jan. 8: The 
first day of January, 1890, appears to have been a 
very interesting day for prospectors in and about 
this district. Quite a number of quartz-seekers of 
Redding were feeding out this way for the purpose 
of jumping ledges; also to hunt up some rich de- 
posits. Since Halley made his new find, there has 
been quite a number of inquisitive ones trying to 
hunt him up, but as yet his whereabouts cannot be 
discovered. One of the Hills from Redding has 
jumped the Keystone mine, formerly Mrs. Kemp- 
ton's location. Bssset, from Redding, has located 
the old Hairgrave ledge, on the old Shasta road, a 
little above Salt creek. Some person has located 
the west extension of the Eastern Star. The Lucas 
property has been jumped by Ed Taylor. There 
are men employed working out assessments on the 
Van Bergin property on the Igo road. It is re- 
ported that parties are running a tunnel in the hill 
just above the old Gage plane. Hall & Co., I be- 
lieve, are carrying on the enterprise. 
Sierra. 

Tunnel, — Mt. Messenger, Jan. 4: The new main 
tunnel of the Bald Mountain Ex. Co. is in over 3600 
feet, and is being steadily pushed ahead for the 
channel, 

Siskiyou. 

Salmon River.— Cor. Yreka Jourrial, Jan. 11: 
The mines of this section, both quartz and placer, 
are. and have been for some time past, closed down, 
owing to the scarcity of water. There is an abun- 
dance of snow to make water, but it will require a 
rain to start. Our miners are looking to a long and 
prosperous run, as never since 1859 has there been 
as much snow as there is this winter. The Gold 
Ball quartz mine is destined to equal, if not exceed, 
any mine that has ever been discovered in this sec- 
tion. Even the famous Black Bear, in its palmy days, 
pales into insignificance when compared with the 
Gold Ball. A winze has been sunk from the lowest 
tunnel a distance of 53 feet; at this depth the ledge 
is three feet thick, and carries plenty of free gold, in 
short, the deeper they sink, the bigger and richer 
the ledge appears. There is an abundance of ore in 
sight to keep the mill busy for several years, The 
i6-stamp mill was started up in November, and 
alter a run of 25 days was compelled to shut down, 
as the supply of water gradually froze up. There is 
on hand at the mill at least 1200 tons of ore. Judge 
Hughes, John Grant and Joe Stevens have located 
and done considerable work on what is supposed to 
be the extension of the Gold Ball ledge. They have 
run two different tunnels, one of them 40 feet in 
length. In this tunnel they have uncovered a five- 
foot ledge of quartz, which prospects well. Messrs. 
Probasco, Stent, and H. Welker have discovered 
a ledge which will be remunerative. These men 



have done considerable work to develop their mine. 
They have a tunnel run on the ledge, a distance of 
80 feet. The ledge is from 12 to 18 inches in thick- 
ness, and carries free gold. It is estimated that 
their rock will yield at least $20 to the ton. 

Novelty. — Cor. Yreka Union, Jan. 9; The 
late storms have almost suspended quartz mining 
in this camp, Stoping had to be discontinued, on 
account of the water coming through from the sur- 
face. The Hansen, Gold Run and Know Nothing 
are the principal mines of the camp. They are all 
similarly situated, with development tunnels to tap 
the ledges at the depth of 300 feet from croppings, 
and'open up levels 100 feet below present work- 
ings. The work is now being prosecuted by two 
shifts of miners, working night and day, and will 
be continued uutil the ledges are reached. Then 
I am in hopes to be able to report developments of 
permanent value, as much of the future of this camp 
depends on developments made in those levels. 
The last cleanup of the Know Nothing' mill was a 
little over $6000, with the usual expenses of about 
$1500, Supt. Black, of the Know Nothing mine, 
is slowly recovering from injuries from a heavy fall 
three weeks ago and has been confined to his room 
continually since. The last cleanup of the Gold 
Run mill paid $40 per ton, which gave the four 
partners a handsome dividend, and the Hansen 
mine did about the same. These three mines have 
paid handsomely in the past, and have much ore 
in sight in their slopes, enough to run them two 
years on dividend- paying ore. The placer miners 
have a good season in this district, and will un- 
doubtedly take out more gold than has been taken 
out in the past three years. The prospects for 
southern Siskiyou are certainly flattering, and we 
predict great prosperity in the near future. 

Trinity. 

Quartz at Hay Fork.— /oz/rwa/, Jan. 11: 
Shepardson & Miller have been developing their 
ledge, which is situated about five miles from the 
town of Hay Fork, in a southerly direction, and they 
feel assured that now they have one of the finest 
prospects in the county. The ledge is about four 
feet wide and has well-defined walls. The ledge 
has been traced on the surface for 1000 feet. They 
have a shaft sunk to a depth of 75 feet, following 
the ledge the entire distance, and we are informed 
that the gold is as abundant at the bottom as at the 
top of the shaft. About one foot of the under side 
of the ledge prospects about $20 to the ton, while the 
other three feet goes about $300. Present indica- 
tions point to a good quartz camp at Hay Fork in 
spite of the prophecy of many to the contrary. 

East Fork, — From a private letter to a gentle- 
man in town we learn that the mill on the Yellow- 
stone mine in East Fork district is running and that 
the mine is looking well. 

Tuolumne. 

Golden Gate. — Sonora Detfiocrat, Jan, 11: 
On the Golden Gate mine half the stamps are run- 
ning dry and half wet — using on the latter a Frue 
and a Shaw concentrator. This will test the com- 
parative merit of the dry crushing continuous Boss 
system of roasting and amalgamation and that of 
concentration and subsequent roasting. There 
has been received at the Bonanza mine an Inger- 
soU drill for work in sinking the shaft. It is the 
improved Ingersoll. The improvement consists in 
reducing and simplifying the number of parts It 
substantially makes the machine a new one. Min- 
ers of experience who used the first form of the In- 
gersoll considered it cumbersome, liable to derange- 
ment. This has been overcome in the present im- 
proved form. It is a solidly constructed machine 
of few parts and light weight, and will do more ef- 
fective work. It will be operated by the compressed 
air taken from the Richmann compressor belonging 
to the mine, and the latter is driven by water-power. 
This will greatly reduce the expense as well as hast- 
en the work of development. Mr. G. !■'. Johnson 
of S. F. arrived in Sonora last week 00 mining busi- 
ness. He was unable to visit the mines he wished 
to examine in the interest of S. F. parties by reason 
of the heavy and unusual snowstorm of the past 
few days, but obtained important data as to certain 
mines that will lead to definite and eariy action, and 
to the industrial benefit of the county, 

NEVADA. 

Wasboe DtsDrict. 

Sierra Nevada. — Virginia Chronicle, Jan. ii: 
On the 520 level at a point in the south drift from 
the east drift, 275 feet from the main east drift, an 
east drift is advanced 392 feet, the face continuing 
in porphyry showing streaks of clay. 

Union Con.— On the 1465 level in the north lat- 
eral drift 100 feet south of the north line of the 
mine, west crosscut No. 4 is advanced 112 feet, and 
now in porphyry and clay. 

Ophir. — On the 1300 level from the end of the 
east crosscut from the shaft station a south drift is 
advanced 233 feet, from the end of the east cross- 
cut, 316 feet from the shaft station, continuing in 
porphyry mixed with quartz showing value. 

Mexican.— On the 1465 level from the north 
drift from west crosscut No. i, 50 feet in from the 
lateral drift face, west crosscut No. 2 is advanced 
122 feet in porphyry and c'ay. 

Con. California & Virginia. — From the 
stopes on the 1300, 1435, 1500, 1600 and 1650 levels 
the ore yield during the past week has b^en consid- 
erably less than usual on account of the Eureka 
mill having been shut dbwn the past few days, the 
accumulation of ice in the Carson river making it 
impossible to operate the mill. On the 1650 level, 
from points heretofore designated continue to ex- 
tract ore. The north drift from the winze bottom, 
60 feet below this level, is extended 505 feet, and 
are extracting ore from this point. During the 
week 1095 tons and 480 pounds of ore were shipped 
to the Morgan mill, 661 tons and 590 pounds to the 
Eureka mill. The average assay value of all the ore 
worked at these mills during the week, according to 
battery samples, was $25.77- Shipped to San 
Francisco bullion valued at $44,870.72. 

Best and Belcher.— On the 1000 level east 
crosscut No. i is extended 82 feet. Formation, 
hard porphyry. On the 1200 level, station has been 
repaired and north drift clean.ed out and repaired a 
distance of 30 feet. 

Hale and Norcross.— Shipped to the Nevada 
mill during the week 937 tons of ore, showing an 
average value of $19.49 per ton by pulp assays. 

Gould and Curey. — On the 200 level, the south- 
west drift has been extended 16 feet. Total length, 



284 feet. Formation, porphyry and quartz, showing 
some value. On the 400 level the southwest drift 
has been extended 20 feet. Formation, quartz, 
showing some value. 

Northwestern Con. — Shaft down 70 feet, the 
bottom in' low-grade quartz. 

West Comstock. — Face of lower tunnel within 
43 feet of the vein, which it will cut 400 feet below 
the surface croppings. 

- Savage.— Shipped 445 tons of ore, battery sam- 
ple assays showing an average value of $22.37 per 
ton. Bullion on hand valued at $5294 on January 
account. 

Chollar. — Crushed 420 tons of ore during the 
week, showing a pulp assay value of $21.50 per ton. 
The 750 north lateral drilt continues in low-grade 
quartz and 930 level north drift in quartz and por- 
phyry. 

PoTOSi. — The 930 level east crosscut continues in 
quartz and porphyry. The 650 level east crosscut. 
No. 3, is in quartz. 

North Gould & Curry and East Best & 
Belcher.— The west drift from the northwest drift 
is in quartz giving low assays. 

Imperial. — West crosscut No. i from the 500 
level joint Confidence-Challenge drift is in quartz 
and porphyry. West crosscut No. 2 on the 300 
level continues in quartz, showing bunches of ore. 

Yellow Jacket. — Daily ore shipments average 
78 tons, battery samples showing an average assay 
value of $21.75 per ton. 

Confidence and Challenge.— The jointr 300 
level west crosscut continues in quartz and por- 
phyry. 

Alpha. — The 600 north drift continues in low- 
grade quartz. 

Exchequer. — The 500 level east crosscut con- 
tinues in quartz and porphyry. 

Ward Combination Shaft. — The 1800 level 
east drift is advanced 169 feet. 

Overman. — Shipped 161 tons of ore to the Vivian 
mill during the week. Are preparing to slope ore 
from the 1200 level. 

New York Con. — Ore is showing in the lateral 
drifts from the raise above the 800 level. 

East Sierra Nevada,— The 520 level south 
drift is out 640 feet. 

Caledonia. — West crosscut No. 3 continues in 
porphyry. 

Crown Point. — Shipped to the Mexican mill 
764 tons of ore, showing a value of $18.17 P^"* ^o^ 
by pulp assays. 

Belcher.— The 850 level east crosscut is in por- 
phyry, showing streaks of quartz. The 600 level 
south drift is in porphyry. The 200 level east cross- 
cut is in low-grade quartz. 

Seg. Belcher. — Ore is still showing in the 1200 
level drift from the winze. 

Silver Hill. — Usual progress made in 160 and 
260 level exploration?. 

Justice. — Crushed 230 tons of orp, showing a 
va'ue ol $23.75 pe"" tofi by battery sample assays. 

Utah.— On the 600 level the southeast drift is 
advanced 690 feet from the shaft stiiion. Forma- 
tion, hard porphyry. 

Occidental Con.— On the 400 level orR of fair 
quality is being extracted. On the 500 level, 70 feet 
south of No. 3 raise, an east crosscut is still showing 
bunches of high-grade ore. On the 550 level the 
line crosscuts are in quartz and porphyry. 

North Occidental. —On the 550 level, joint 
east and west crosscuts at the south Ime of the mine 
are in porphyry and low-grade quartz. 
Cherry Creek District. 

Attachment.— White Pine Neios, Jan. 4: All 
the Merrimac company's operations in Cherry Creek 
have been suspended by the sheriff. An attachment 
for $6000 has been levied on the property by the 
Union Iron Works of San Francisco. The miners 
will file their liens. Nothing more is likely to be 
done before spring, when the property will change 
hands. Cherry seems to be in a hard streak of luck. 
Sylvanla District. 

Smelter. — Virginia Enterprise, Jan. 10: A 40- 
ton smelter will be put up at the mines in Sylvania 
District early in the spring, and there are other evi- 
dences that a big business will be done there. A 
wagon-road is also being constructed to the mines. 

Tuacarora District. 

Nevada Queen. — Times-Review, Jan. 10: 
North gangway from the 600-foot level of the N'^rth 
Belle Isle shaft has been advanced 28 feet. Rock 
hard. 

North Belle Isle. — The crosscut from the sta- 
tion, 300-foot level, extended 16 feet; ground is short 
and full of red slips. 

Belle Isle. — The crosscut from the north gang- 
way, 350-foot level, extended seven feet; rock very 
hard. The crosscut from the south drift, 25ofoot 
level, continues without material change. 

Del Monte. — North drift from east crosscut is in 
17 feet, developing fine ore, assaying as high as 
$1336 per ton. 

Grand Prize, — Face of north crosscut from west 
drilt on the 500 level advanced 11 feet, cutting nu- 
merous stringers of quartz. 

Navajo. — No. 2 crosscut from south drift, 350- 
foot level, advanced 21 feet; face begins to show 
water and looks favorable. Upraise from south 
drilt, I5o-foot level, extended 9 feet, showing larger 
ledge of chloride ore. The mill cleanup has been 
completed. 

North Commonwealth. — 2d level: Joint 
crosscut has been advanced 12 feet. 3d level: Joint 
crosscut east extended 9 feet. Work h<is been sus- 
pended at this point, and drift start* d to open the 
ore cut 30 feel back from the face, which looks well. 
East crosscut from south drift extended 11 feet; face 
continues in low- grade ore, and shows some water. 

Commonwealth. — ist level: Winz=j Irom east 
crosscut has been connected with No. 14 chute, ex- 
posing a fine body of ore. South drift trom No. 3 
chute extended 16 feet, following the ore. East in- 
termediate drift from No. 8 chute advanced 23 feel; 
face shows some low-grade ore. North drift from 
No. 5 chute is in 14 feet, two feet of good ore in the 
face. This drift is being pushed to the North Com- 
monwealth line, 70 feet to go. 2d level: South 
stopes looking well as at any time heretofore. 3d 
level: South drift from No. 2 crosscut advanced 8 
feet, exposing some good ore. Stopes just started 
at this point look well. 4th level: North gangway 
extended 11 feet; rock breaks very bad, causing 
slow progress to be made. The mill is running and 
doing good work. On account Of having to get 
roaster bins filled, pans were not started until the 
7th. The extreme cold and storms interfered great- 



Jan. 18, 1890] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



41 



ly in starting, especially in repairing any brick work. 
but all is now running nicely. Battery pulp assay 
for the week, $273 per ton; crude bullion on hand, 
$8000. Seven hundred tons have been sent 10 the 
conceoirator; crushed 550 tons; assay value, $18 per 
ton; average assay of concentrates for the week, 
$271.28 per ton. 

ARIZONA. 

Congress. — Prescott Courier, Jan. «: F. M. 
Murphy, superintendent ot the Congress, has just 
come up from mill and mine and has the same news- 
—both doing well. Quaru Mountain mill is running 
on rich gold ore from the company's mines. Now 
that Mr. Williams has come bick, matters will be 
pushed on Big Bug and al the Senator. A Phu-nix 
paper of recent date slated that there was a carload 
of unusually rich silver ore from Tip Top district, 
this county, at the store of J. Y. T. Smith, en route 
to the smelter at Kl Paso, Texas. Placer miners 
are sending in considerable gold. 

Oke TO Shii'.— Mohave .I////^r, Jan. n: There 
are between 150 and 200 tons of ore awaiting ship- 
ment from the various camps. Until the stormy 
weather subsides the ore teams will remain tied up. 
The crosscut tunnel being driven on the Little Boy 
mine is yet some distance (rom the ledge, and, owing 
to the nature of the ground, slow progress is being 
made. N. C. Amer recently had a shipment of 
high-grade ore (rom the Silver King mine worked at 
the sampler. Martin Jeminez and Juan Garcia have 
four men to work on the Goldback mine near Chlor- 
ide. They are getting some good ore from the main 
shad and will continue sinking for the present. T. 
Myers, lessee at the C. O. D mine, had between 5 
and 6 tons of ore worked at the sampler, which gave 
a result ol 314 ounces silver per ton. Dan McKin- 
non and Geo. Koster are working the Altata mine 
with very good results. They have a carload of very 
good ore ready for sacking and shipping. The ore 
canies considerable copper and will be shipped to 
Argo for treatment. W. B, Campbell is working 
the ore from his gold mine in the Twins" wash, near 
Cerbat. by arastra, witb fine results. The ore is very 
free, while the gold is coarse. The pay streak has 
grown to a width of 10 inches and much of the ore 
will be shipped. A whip has been erected at the 
main shaft of the Tuckyhoe mine, Chloride. At last 
accounts they were down 90 feet, with 10 inches of 
ore that will average 350 ounces silver and 1% 
ounces gold per ton. The new shaft at the Sunset 
mine has collapsed. The shaft had attained a depth 
of 95 feet, but it was sunk io a wash carrying much 
water during rainy weather, and the recent rains 
soaked through and caused the cave. Supt, Mack- 
enzie has about 25 men employed at the Cupel mine 
and the ore body continues to grow both in quantity 
and quality. 

Globe District in 1889. — Silver Belt, Jan. 4: 
The year 1889 was a fairly prosperous one for the 
mining industry of Globe district; the production of 
both silver and copper will show a considerable in- 
crease over that of the previous year, and the. out- 
look is bright for a more successful season in 1890 
than we h;ive enjoyed for many years. A. L, Walk- 
er, superintendent of theO!d Dominion Copper Co., 
tias kindly furnished us with the figures representing 
the output of copper by his company during the past 
year, viz., 5,915,510 pounds, as against 4,600,000 
pounds in i8ci8. This is certainly a fine showing 
lor the Old Dominion Co., and the value of their 
mine, the Globe, is better appreciated by those who 
recently had access to the underground works, and 
ocular proof ol the extensive ore bodies in sight, suf- 
ficient to supply the smelter with ore through the 
current year, and developments now in progress and 
contemplated will increase the ore supply and facili- 
tate its extraction. With an active copper market, 
a liberal supply of coke on hand and the probability 
of an oppn winter, there is every reason to hope that 
the Old Dominion Copper Co. will enjoy a contin- 
U0115. and prosperous run. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



American Mining Machinery Wanted. — 
Kamloops Sentinel, Jan, 4: So much has been said 
and written one way and another, regarding the 
necessity of placing mining machinery on the free 
list, and the arguments advanced in favor thereof 
have been so potent, that little more remains to be 
said on the subject. However, the importance of 
the subject is our only excuse for referring to it in 
this number, and that it is important can easily be 
gleaned by a perusal of the reports from the differ- 
ent quartz-mining sections of the province as they 
appear in this issue. There can be no two opinions 
regarding the great drawbacks the raining industry 
of the province suffers on account of the heavy duty 
on mining machinery. The majority of the ores of 
British Columbia are of a relractory nature, and 
special machinery such as is not manufactured in the 
Dominion is required for their reduction. To pur- 
chase this machinery in a foreign country and then pay 
the enormous duty fi.xed by the Federal Government 
is imposing a double burden on the miner, a burden 
he is in many cases unable to shoulder, and conse- 
quently his claim must remain undeveloped. With 
the knowledge of this fact in their possession we 
cannot understand why any delay should be made 
by the Government in deciding on this important 
subject. But another phase of the question presents 
itself. Already the plant for two smelting works 
has been imported into the province and the duty 
thereon has been paid. Another company has pur- 
chased plant for a smelting works, which has re- 
mained in the hands of the manufacturer for about 
a year. The company has been led by certain mat- 
ters under consideration to leave the plant where it 
is. And probably not among the least of these con- 
siderations was the desire to await the action of the 
Federal Government in placing such machinery on 
the free list. If so, and the Government f^hould, be- 
fore they decide to bring in the machinery, strike off 
the duty, then it would be no more than a simple 
matter of justice to refund to those companies which 
have imported plant and paid duty thereon, the 
amount so paid. The duty must come off mining 
machinery, and to be consistent the amount of duty 
already paid must be refunded. 

COLORADO. 

Locations. — Georgetown Courier. Jan. g: The 
records show that during 1889 there were 473 min- 
ing claims located in Clear Creek county, or a pre- 
emption of some 2365 acres of mineral-bearing 



lands, A location in 18S9 doesn't mean what it 
did in 1869— then if a man discovered mineral indi- 
catioos, he put up his stake and his neighbors who 
could afford a shingle and pencil proceeded to 
locate Nos. i, 2, 3, 4. etc. both,, west and east up 
to 20; DOW it means a survey, the sinking of a shaft 
10 feet from the lowest rim and the disclosing of a 
well-defined crevice. It costs at least $100 to do 
the simple location work and it is fair to assume 
that at least $200 has been spent on each new loca- 
tion, so tbat in new work alone we have spent 
at>out $100,000 in mining, on new ground. 

The Golden Falcon,— The Falcon lode, Mor- 
ris district, worked by tieorge Mills ife Co., has a 
body of gold ore, that, with a stamp-mill near by, 
could be made one of the largest producers in 
Clear Creek county. The value of the ore body 
has been determined by a mill-run of 30 tons, which 
averaged an ounce gold per ton. 

The Comet's Big Vein. — The recent strike on 
the Comet mine is in the old east shaft at a depth 
of about 65 feel. The lessee, Mr. O'Mallie, has 
run a drift west from the shaft about 15 feet through 
a 12-foot vein lode material, indiscriminately mixed 
throughout with rich ore, the entire 12 feet being 
taken out and sorted. 

Leadville's Pkoduceks. — Denver Republican, 
Jan. 9: The difiiculties existing between the Marian 
Mining Co. and the lessees on the properties owned 
by this company, have been amicably adjusted. 
These difticuUies having been so satisfactorily set- 
tled, the company assumed the entire control of all 
the ground belonging to them, and are now in full 
possession, and intend to work some of it them- 
selves. Mr. Havens, acting for the Marian Co., 
has granted a new lease to the former lessees of the 
Devlin, another of the company's properties, for a 
long term, the lessees being Dr. Galloway, of our city, 
and a number of others, fhe strike in the Lucy B. 
Hussey having demonstrated the fact that m order to 
get at, develop and handle the ore from the new 
chute to advantage, a new shaft must be sunk, with 
the customary promptness of the management of 
that property, surveys were made and a contract 
let for the sinking ol such a shaft, pending the 
reaching of the ore body, by which shaft all work, 
apart from keeping the old workings free of water, 
was abandoned, and all the force employed at the 
new shaft. The encountering of this chute by the 
Lucy B. Hussey is without doubt one of the most 
important events we have had to chronicle for a 
long time, and we shall anxiously await the reach- 
ing of the ore body by the new shaft and the subse- 
quent development of the chute. Mr. George 
Kruger of the Tip Top mine returned to Leadville 
after an absence of some eight months in Europe, 
and the mine has now closed down for repairs to 
machinery, but will be started up again and work 
resumed on the entire ground as soon as the nec- 
essary repairs are effected. The shipment of ores 
from this mine has increased very materially lately, 
the average amount per day being something over 
30 tons. 

Hunter Park M. Co. — Aspen Times, Jan. 10: 
The Hunter Park M. Co. has got its shaft down 
S40 feet on the Montgomery group in Hunter park 
and has just let a contract for another loo feet. 
The shaft is still in the blue lime, but it is expected 
that the present contract will carry it to or very near 
the contact. This company is amply supplied with 
funds for prospecting its properly. 

On Miller Creek. — Gus Carlson and his part- 
ner have been sinking a shaft on the Snow Fall 
claim on Miller creek and have gone down about 40 
feet. 

The Edison. — Manager Murphy of the Edison 
reports that he has 100 tons of ore on the dump 
ready to ship. This will be sent down to make 
room for what is being broken in the mine. The 
property is certainly improving, although the ore is 
not now as high grade as it was a few days ago. 

Low-Grade Dry Ores.— Mr. Charles Driver, 
manager of the Driver Public Sampling Works, has 
succeeded in securing a new schedule of prices for 
low-grade dry ores, which will enable the miner to 
ship 25 and 30-ounce ores at a profit. Many mines 
can now increase their output. This outlet for low^ 
grade dry ores running from 25 to 40 ounces per 
ton, will materially increase the prosperity of the 
camp. 



DAKOTA. 



Syndicate Smelter. - 



Wahl, Louis W.itil, Pha-be Grace, Eva and Pharaoh 
mines, together with millsites, water-rights and tun- 
nel-sites, situated near De Lamar, Owyhee Co. The 
price paid was $500,000. Nearly every one is glad 
thai the Captain purchased the properly, l>ecause 
to him more than any one else is the development 
of the nth mining camp near De I-amar due. The 
properly is well worth the price paid for it. The 
Captain will at once enlarge the mill, so we under- 
stand, to the end that he may reduce too tons of 
ore per day instead of 50. 

LOWER CALIFORNIA. 

New Placer^.— 5a« Diegan, Jan. 4: As pre- 
dicted, the rains are bringing new placer finds 10 
light, and from now on rich strikes may be expected 
in the vicinity of Alamo, as well as in places not 
yei prospected. The strike reported last week at 
Mexican gulch, where two men took out $200 in 
one day, brought many miners over from Alamo, 
and several discoveries were made. Three new 
ledges, named the Northern Belle, Las Dos Es- 
raeraldas and Las Flores, have been denounced, all 
of them situated near the new discovery. The 
quartz is almost entirely decomposed, and some of 
ine dirt yields $2 to $5 a pan. It is claimed that 
the quartz will run $1500 per ton, but this must 
not be granted till it is proven. The new veins are 
about four feet wide and have every indication of 
holding. They run directly north and south. W. 
S. Rerr, who is mterested in the Lane mill al 
Alamo, has ordered another mill of the same pat- 
tern (Wiswell) which will arrive from S. F. 00 the 
Newbern next month. It will be set up al Alamo. 

International Co. Work.— The International 
Co. is receiving bids for going ahead on the Prin- 
cesi. and aho other mines, to do the work required 
by law on mines to which possession has been 
given, which is equivalent to sinking a shaft 50 feet 
on each mine. This will result in putting a good 
number ot men to work who are now idle. Free 
milling ore will soon be taken out of the Princesa 
at 70 leel for immediate milling, while the work 
wilt still proceed at the 100-foot level in this mine, 
where the ore consists of sulphurets of iron, rich 
in gold. Lane's mill is running in full blast and 
will soon be inclosed with a new building. A 25- 
pound rock, full of free gold, from La Flor mine, 
eight miles southeast of Alamo, owned by the 
Frenchmen, has been on exhibition at Alamo, and 
excited no little admiration. 

At Real Del Castillo.— At the Real del Cas- 
tillo, work is still progressing on the Accidental tun- 
nel, and it is expected that the ledge will soon be 
struck. A. Morales has bought a new pump which 
he will put up at the San Nicolas. Ihe Chinese 
have been hindered by the rains from finishing the 
Masac flume, but it is being hurried to completion. 
Gold has been found in placer and quartz on Tana- 
ma mesa, near Tecate, about 70 miles northeast of 
Ensenada. The Florentina (placer) and Fortuna 
(quartz) have been denounced by Juan B. Morales 
and Jose Bustamente. 

MONTANA. 

Mountain View Ok'e.— Inter- Mountain. Jan. 8: 
The worst experience thus far encountered at the 
Mountain View mine is the hauling of its ores to the 
smelter in Meaderville. The teams have now al- 
ready all the roads so blocked with piles of ore from 
break-downs and the wagons sliding around that it 
has become almost impossible for them to navigate. 
Wagons have to be exclusively used, as sleds can- 
not be brought up into the concentrator, so wheels 
must be entirely resorted to as means of locomotion. 
This year will end all this trouble, as it is the in- 
tention of the company to build the branch from the 
Montana Central to the mines on the hill, the prop- 
erty of the company. 

Magna Charta. — The drifts in the Magna 
Charta on the 300 and 400 are being put in condi- 
tion to commence the sloping of ores at these 
points, more especially in the northeast. Ore has 
been taken all the way from the 700 to the surface 
and as much remains in sight as already abstracted, 
with considerable ground yet to prospect. The mill 
of the Alice company, of which the Magna Charta 
is a part, is pounding away steadily on ores taken 
out of both the Alice and Magna Charta mines and 
* At the Blue Wing 



is doing no custom work at all. 
-Deadwood Pioneer, Jan. a few men are working, placing the mine in a posi^ 



The plant was not blown in yesterday, as had 
been intended, but fires will probably be lighted to- 
day or to-morrow. The run, to be of two weeks' 
duration, will be on ores from several Bald Mount- 
ain and Ruby Bisin mines. 

Reduction Works. — Everything moves smooth- 
ly at Col. Carpenter's reduction works. Carpenter- 
ing is nearly complete, and repairs to machinery are 
all but finished. The plant will probably be ready 
for business by the 20th of the month, and started 
for its initial run not later than February ist, 

IDAHO. 

The Tip-Top Mill.— Wood River Times, Jan. 
8: The new Huntington mill at the Tip-Top mme, 
on the Gold Belt, was started up for tbe first time 
Christmas D^y. The mill was in first-class running 
order within 24 hours from the start, the only thing 
about it needing regulating being the tension of the 
belts. Ole Rorera was in Hailey last evening, and 
being asked how tbe mill was doing, replied: "We 
are grinding out gold night and day; two hundred 
dollars worth every 24 hours, and at an expense of 
only $60 a day. We have 14 men at work and will 
keep the lick up all winter." Only one Huntington 
mill is in operation, as they w^re only wanting to 
make a test. There is plenty of ore in sight to keep 
half-a-dozen such mills in motion indefinitely. 

Softer Ground.— Ketchum keystone, Jan. 11: 
It was reported a few days since that the parties 
running the Elkhorn tunnel had encountered soft 
ground and indications of quartz and iron. When 
it is remembered how slowly this important work 
has been going on for a long time, owing to the hard- 
ness of the formation encountered, the discovery cf 
soft ground — and the consequent reason for expect- 
ing more— is regarded with no little satisfaction by 
those interested. In fact, the whole community is 
interested. 

An Important Sale.— Owyhee Avalanche, l^xi. 
11: Gapt. J. R. De Lamar of De Lamar, Idaho, is 
the purchaser of the two-thirds interest of Christian 
and Louis Wahl, in the Wilson, Chicago, Christian 



lion to produce ores, ol which there is a known 
amount in sight without taking into consideration 
the ground that is not yet opened up. The Mount- 
ain Consolidated shaft is 550 feet in depth and ore 
is being produced from every level in the mine. 
There are no reports of new strikes to make, as for 
some lime past it is known they have a body of ore. 
copper in character w th a sprinkling of silver, second 
only to one mine in the camp. From reports cir- 
culated it is learned that it is the intention of the 
Colorado company to sink the Gignon to the 1000- 
foot level which is on an incline. A new pump was 
purchased yesterday for tbe Mountain Lion com- 
pany, size 5>^X3^X7. The Acquisition has again 
been started up by an Armstrong hoist. There 
have always been favorable prospects in this mine, 
but the leasers do not seem to make it stick. It 
changes management often. 

NEW MEXICO. 



The Savage Mine Sold.— Kingston Shaft, Jan. 
8: We are glad to announce that the sale ol the 
Savage mine and Savage (rartion, which has hung 
fire some time, has at last been consummated. We are 
informed that the deed in escrow calls for $65,000, 
and that considerable money was paid down. The 
sale was made on Dec. 20th, but was not com- 
pleted until Jan. ist. Horace McChristian was the 
lucky purchaser and we are informed that he is more 
than pleased with his bargain. The final payments 
will not be made for six months unless Mr. Mc- 
Christian so desires, but it is presumed that he will 
make them much sooner, as the property is in reality 
able to brmg ihai amount of money at any time. A 
force ^v men was placed at work upon the mine on 
the 3d inst., and the force will be increased as fast 
as room can be found to work them. 

Stein's Pass. — Lordsburg Liberal, Jan. 11: 
Bob Williams was in from Stein's Pass yesterday. 
He reports the camp in a flourishing condition. Re- 
cent prospecting indicates that big values are to be 
found in the ledge to the south. Winters & Kim- 
ball are taking out plenty of high-grade ore. The 



more work that is done in the Bachelor ihe belter it 
looks. Sam Meeks writes that he has bonded bis 
half interest in the Palchloki. Volunteer and Coon 
to John l'\ Miles. It is reported that the Volcano is 
about sold. 

ORKGON. 

The Dolly Varden Sold,— Bedrock Democrat, 
Jan. 8: The Democrat has been informed that the 
Dolly Varden mme in Sparta district, owned by 
Capi. E. M. White and others, has been sold to the 
Bowick Bros., representing a large English syndi- 
cate, the sale being consummated in Portland. The 
company purchasing this property are also tbe own- 
ers of the Monumental mine in Granite district, un- 
der the name of the Oregon Gold M. Co., Limited, 
of.London. England. The Dolly Varden is said to 
be a good buy, and included in the purchase are 
several other mines adjacent to that properly, form- 
ing a group of gold-bearing mines that will certainly 
yield a large output when properly equipped with 
suitable machinery. The sale of this property 
means the erection of a large milling plant and the 
result will be of great benefit to the whole district 
for miles around. 

Mines of Granite.— Cor. Bedrock Democrat, 
Jan. 8: Many new discoveries were made up in the 
Greenhorn mountains and all of that section give 
excellent promise of being a great bullion-producer 
in the near future, as soon as the proper milling fa- 
cilities are supplied. Mr, Henry Cable has worked 
quite a number of batches of ore from the Colum- 
bia mine, adjoining the E. & E., and obtained in 
every instance from 95 to 97 per cent of the assay 
value by chlorination. Up at the head of Cracker 
and Fruit creeks some fine developments have been 
made during the past season, and you will hear 
some good news irom Mr. Kinsey's properly up 
there next year. Al Cable Cove work is being 
pushed on the Miner claim, and there are al least 
20 locations that will give a good account of them- 
selves as soon as there are milling facilities. Over 
at the La Bellevue group of mines the concentrating 
works are turning out concentrates averaging $300 
per ton, faster than teams can be had to haul them 
to the railroad at Baker Cily. Here is the grandest 
mine in all this section of country. Two tunnels of 
800 feet each show a compact body of ore from 
three to ten feet in width for the entire distance, 
and not an ounce of waste in any portion of it. The 
La Bellevue has paid from the grass roots down, 
and the ore is belter in the lower tunnel than on 
lop. The ore taken from the tunnels and winzes 
have paid for all the work done upon the mine, and 
have been shipped more than 1000 miles 10 the re- 
duction works, and not a ton of ore has sloped. Is 
it not a good showing? 

UTAH. 

TiNTic District.— Salt Lake Trtbufre.Jau. 12: 
When snow came it blocked everything. This has 
caused the Mammoth to lay off part of its force, be- 
cause there was no storage room left for ore, all the 
bins and some of the old slopes being full. 

Castle Valley Coal-Fields.— Union Pacific 
officials have been looking over the Castle Valley 
coal-fields with a view to opening up extensive mines 
there. 

The Horn Silver.- At Frisco the Horn Silver 
is making its regular shipment of about 1000 tons of 
ore per month, such as net the company about $30 
per ton. During the past year this mine sent out a 
little over 12.000 tons of ore. They have in sight 
fully 18 months' work of similar ore in the mine, 
but it is not shipped separately, it being found best 
to mix it with the low-grade ore. The company em- 
ploys aboui 100 men. During the pas: year, under 
the superintendence of Hon, P. T. Farnsworth, 
there was paid a dividend of $50,000 and a surplus 
fund of $20,000 was created, besides loaning $200.- 
000. 

The Cactus Co.— The Cactus M. Co.'s property 
in Copper gulch, near Frisco, is being operated to 
some extent by the Comet Smelting Co.; also a 
French organization having a lease on the Cactus 
mines. After several months of inactivity they have 
put a few men at work. 

Copper Claims. — The French company owning 
some copper claims a few miles northwest of Mil- 
ford are working a small force there in developing 
their property. 

Iron Deposits at Tintic— Parties at Provo 
owning valuable iron deposits in Tintic, which they 
have been developing for years, and have in vain 
tried to start a furnace and foundry to use this iron, 
have had their hopes brightened the past few days. 
Outside capital is seeking a location for a stove 
foundry, and learning of these iron mines have made 
a proposition for 20,000 tons of pig iron during this 
year. Tbey are rustling for a local organization and 
funds to embark in making pig iron, and if success- 
ful will get a furnace in blast as soon as possible. 

Park Notes.— Record, Jan. 11: Last Tuesday 
morning the Nevada-Northland leasers broke into 
the leasers' workings in the Mayflower No. 7, and 
what will be the outcome can only be conjectured. 
It is alleged by the Nevada-Northland people that 
the Mayflower have been working in and extracting 
ore from their ground, and to confirm this suspi- 
cion they drifted and then sank to connect with the 
Mayflower workings. When but a thin space of 
ground remained between, a small hole was broke 
through which gave an opening. Each side is de- 
termined and it looks like the fight for possession of 
the valuable and disputed ground will find its way 
into court. 

Crescent's Upper Works Leased.— Messrs. 
Chas. H. Gitsch and Richard Campbell have se- 
cured a five months' lease, dating from January ist, 
and paying a royalty of one-sixth on the output, on 
all the Crescent Mining Co.'s property above the 
.E'na tunnel. 

Good News from the M'Cune. — The hard for- 
mation which the McCune tunnel has lately gone 
through has proved to be the footwall of a big and 
well-defined ledge, so they have started work drill- 
ing on it. 

Ore and Bullion Shipments.— During the 
week the Mackintosh sampler received and for- 
warded 545, r40 pounds of Ontario ore; 294630 of 
Mayflower No. 7 leasers'; 272 470 of Daly; 78,750 
of Alliance; 76.980 of Woodside. and 34.430 pounds 
of Nevada-Norlhland leasers' ore; total, 1.302,400 
pounds. The Ontario bullion product for the week 
was 35 bars containing 21,247,86 fine ounces of 
silver. 



42 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 18, 1890 



n^ECHAJMIQAL PROQRESa 



The Foundry. 



-The 



The Bequlrement of Modern Times- 
Apprentice Svatem. 

The nse of machinery has been attempted in 
the fouodryf bat its sncceBBful application has 
baen very limited, beiog confined to a compar- 
atively few olasBes of oaetinge; therefore the 
progreea made has not been the result of im- 
proved machinery so much as the general at- 
tention to the details of the work and the 
greater knowledge of the principles of the 
foundry work by the ma j irity of the men em- 
ployed in it. To the foandrymen whose names 
are connected with the foundry literature of 
the present time is due a great deal of credit in 
considering the progress made in foundry work 
during the paet decade; men who, in addltian 
to the cares of the management of a foundry 
during the daytime, have taken upon them* 
selves the extra labor of furnishing molders 
food for thought and new ideas for practice 
through the columns of mechanical papers. 

That there is abundant room for greater 
progress in foundry work, those who are most 
intimately arquainted with the art of founding 
unhesitdtiogly admit. How is this progress 
to be brought about! 

It is to a great extent in the hands of the 
foremen and proprietors of fonndiies, as well as 
the moldera themselves. 

The duty of the molder in helping onward 
the progress iu foundry work is to improve 
himself in the intricacies of his trade by care- 
ful observation and study* while the duty of 
the proprietor and foreman is to make better 
molders, men who are better qualified to rep* 
resent the trade in the mechanical world. 

We undoubtedly have in our ranks some 
men who are just as good mechanics as can be 
found in the ranks of any trade, but we also 
have men who travel about the country nnder 
the name of molders who are only a dipgraoe 
to the trade. There is a remedy for this state 
of affairs, and the remedy for this evil rests en- 
tirely in the hands of the proprietors and fore- 
men. I would suggest (ifcer a careful study 
and a thorough knowledge of the rtqairements 
of the casf ) a change in the apprenticeship sys- 
tem in vogue in m^ist foundries at present, in 
which every Tom, Dick or Harry gets a chance 
to ** learn the trade," and after an apprentice- 
ship of perhaps three years is launched upon 
the mechanical world as a molder. In nine 
oases out of ten, when such a molder (?) secures 
a job in a straDge shop, his ability is soon 
gauged, and he is kept at work on the poorest 
class of work, as there is no money in him on 
good work. He soon tires of such a job and 
makes a change, only to find the same program 
prepared for him, and such is his life, traveling 
from one shop to another, bat never getting a 
step higher in the knowledge of his trade. 0' 
course there are exceptions to this rule, but it 
is safe to say I have outlined the result in a 
gre%t maj:)rity of the apprenticeehips of to-day. 
Wa want and should have a more strict ap- 
prentice system, one that will insure the trade 
a good mechanic, and the apprentice a fair 
knowledge of hia trade when he enters the me- 
chanical world as a journeyman molder. I 
would suggest that each apprentice be ioden 
tured for at least five years, at a salary which 
will at least support him, yet be low enough to 
allow the employer to do his dutv by the ap- 
prentice, without loss.— tA. P. Pero, in The 
Tradesman. 

A Pneumatic Tire fob Bicycles.— A pneu- 
macic tire tor bicycles has btsen invented in 
Belfast, Ireland, which, if all that is claimed 
for it is true, must mark a new era in this 
method of recreation. The tire for a full road- 
ster is about two and one half inches in diame- 
ter, and is composed of an outer covering of 
rubber, graduated in thickness from about a 
quarter of an inch, wbereit touches the ground, 
and protected by canvas, where it is attached 
to the rim, which is very broad and nearly flab. 
Inside this outer covering is an ioner tube,whicb 
contains the air. The air is pumped in with a foot- 
ball blower, and a patent air valve prevents its 
return. V bration is practically annihilated. It 
is intercepted between the rim and the ground, 
and oonsfquently the frame receives no jir ex- 
cept when an unusually large hole is encoun- 
tsred. A. frame so protected should wear out 
two frames with solid tired wheels ; and not 
only BO, but riders will be able t6 use very 
much lighter frames without any danger of their 
collapsing. In a recent fifty-mile road cham 
pionship, in the Pbcsaix P<*rk, Dublin, one of 
the competitors rode a raciog safety, fittpd 
with *' pneumatic" tires, and scaling only 23 

pounds, and yet it passed through the ordeal 

an ordeal trying even to the heaviest makes 

without the si ghtest damage. Anti-vibration, 
l"86^ge *^nd camera-carriers and spring lamp 
brackets are quite unneoBssary.and the complete 
absence of noise puts the finishing touch to the 
comfort and enjoyment of the rider. 



points in connection with the machine which 
must be seen to be appreciated, especially the 
return of the blade after a cut has been made, 
and which is made without any springs to offer 
any resistance to the cutting motion. A great 
advantage and saving of time results from the 
finished manner in which the work Ib left after 
the cutting. 

Cut vs Cast Gears. — Cat gears run smooth- 
er than cast gears, and gears that have their 
teeth set on a skew run more quietly than 
those out square across, but there is a form of a 
tooth on the slant known as the herring bone, 
tbat no one ever attempted to cut on a milling 
machine until a gear-maker discovered that 
they could be oast iu halves and bolted togeth- 
er after the teeth had been snagged on a gear* 
cutter. It was claimed that che strength by 
bracing against each other was not impaired if 
the wheel was driven in the right direction, and 
where strength alone is not the vital point the 
space on one side can be made to match with the 
teeth on the other, and in this way get the 
best condition for a smooth-working gear. 



The Compocnd Engine. — To what an extent 
facts gathered from experience will overturn 
theory is well seen in the instance of the com- 
pound engine. It is but a few years ago that 
the utility of the compound engine in mills was 
opposed by most of the engineers in this coun- 
try. Now it looks as if in a few years the sim- 
ple condensing engine for large power would be 
a curiosity. And as the practice of compound- 
ing comes to be better understood, it is extend- 
ing to small sizes. Higher steam pressures and 
compounding are having an important influence 
in reducing the cost of motive-power. 

The Manufacture of Spikes. — Experiments 
of an encouraging character have been made ifi 
the manufacture of spikes, with a view to mak 
ing a finished article by rolling the bar so that 
its width shall be the length of the spike, and 
in such shapes that the spikes may be cut from 
it with sheaia, similarly as a cut nail is made, 
except that the head is made in the rolling 
process. In tests made by running through 
some steel nails that had been slowly heated 
for 2^ hours, the result showed that with some 
change in the working mechanism the opera- 
tion was entirely practicable. 

Largest Locomotive Ever Built. — The 
largest locomotive ever built has been ordered 
by the St. Guthard Riiiway Company of J. A. 
IVIaffit, of Munich, It will be a large double 
compound tender-locomotive on the Mallet sys- 
tem. The service weight will be 85 tons, and 
the engine will run on six axles coupled in two 
motor groups. In Stephenson's time the rail- 
way locomotive engines weighed only about 
seven tons. Now the best type of the ordinary 
express engine weighs about 50 tons. 



2QlENTIFie Fr.O(BRESS. 



A Machine Much Needed in JiIill Work. 
A machine for cutting up round or fiat iron 
and steel, and much needed in mil work, has 
been invented, says the Rockville, Conn,, 
Journal. It cats round iron or steel, from one- 
quarter to one-half inch, and fiat up to quarter 
inch, as eapy as on" outs a piece of card with 
pncket scissors. There is an ojenicg (or e^ch 
H'Z9 of round while a drawing shear cuts the 
'lat. There are several uoiqae movements and 



Aluminum in the MANUFAcruRB of Ship 
Plate — Aluminum is developing its value in 
another field of usefulness — the manufacture of 
ship plate. A plate in which ten per oent of 
it is used possesses great strength, will take a 
high polish, and is absolutely proof against the 
corroding action of sea-water and the adherence 
of barnacles, sea grass, and other similar mat- 
ter. Cun-barrela made of this alloy will not 
rust. 

A New Fashioning Machine. — A successful 
experiment in the operation ot a ponderous 14-ton 
machine, built to fashion steel railroad ties, was 
made at Pittsburg last week. The machine was 
set in motion at the mills of Carnegie, Phipps 
& Co., and from a three-quarters of an inch 
steel plate finished ties were turned out at the 
rate of SO per hour. 

The New Form of Screw, which has recent- 
ly been brought to notice, as a half nail and 
half screw, involves in its nse two blows of the 
hammer and two turns, with a screw-driver 
Its holding power in white pine is said to be 
332 pounds against 29S pounds, the holding 
power of a screw of the same size made after 
the usual manner. 



The Rotary Snow Plow, introduced upon 
the railroad this winter, works admirably. It 
goes through the deepest snow which has fallen 
this winter without any trouble, whatever, 
dashing the snow throngh the hopper 150 feet 
away from the track. 

A Steel Railroad Tie,— Gen. Lew Wal- 
lice, well known as the author of *' Ban Hu.r," 
has Invented a railroad cross-tie, which, some 
railroad experts think, may be of more pecuniary 
benefit to him than even his famous work of 
fiction. 

The Future Man-of War,— The Italian 
Admiral Albini thinks that the future man-of- 
war will huva double screws and a helm at each 
end, 80 that iu battle it need waste no time in 
turning around. Its sides will be unarmored. 

The New Railroad Law.— A requirement 
in the proposed railroad law calls for tlw pay- 
ment of mileage on all cars belonging to private 
companies or individuals — a very reasonable re- 
quirement. 

Pig Iron — It will be news to many that thf 
ooiiSumpcion of pig iron in this country 1= 
pr «ter than in Great Britain, but it was in 
18S6 and 1S$7, and ia again this year. 



Sulplmr in RefiniLg Sugar. 

A good deal of sulphur is used in the manu- 
facture of sugar, and in no country in the world 
is it employed to a greater extent than in Louis 
iana, says the Orocert' Criterion. Sulphur is 
applied to cane-jaice in the form of gas, and it 
makes the prodnct^ both of engar and molasses, 
lighter and brighter in appearance, planters 
claiming that it enhances the value from three 
to five cents on molasses, and that the sugar 
haa a brighter color and requires less washing 
to produce the same tone. The method gen- 
erally adopted is to burn sulphur in a small 
brick oven. The fumes of the sulphur are oar* 
ried by a pipe into a barrel of water, and 
the sulphurous gas coming in contact with 
the water is cleansed from sulphuric add. The 
fumes thus purified pass from the barrel by 
means of a pipe into the sulphuring-ohamber 
which is constructed of wood in such a manner 
that the juice is constantly coming in and go- 
ing out, and an arrangement is made so that 
the juice will fall in the form of rain or spray, 
the eff;;ct being to bleach out the coloring mat- 
ter contained in the juice. 

Some manufactureirs claim that a great deal 
of the sugar is destroyed by coming in contact 
with the sulphuric gas which contains a con- 
siderable quantity of sulphurous acid, and 
that by a little carelessness in apply- 
ing this acid to the cane-juice thousands of dol- 
lars a year have been lost in the larger manu- 
factories. The question has been raised and 
discussed largely by scientists and pure-food 
men as to whether the sulphur affected the 
sugar so as to make it irjurious to health, some 
claiming that it does and some that it does not. 
Where so many doctors disagree, it is extreme- 
ly difiQcult to determine whether bleached 
sugar is harmful or not. Tile existence of snl 
phurous acid iu molasses ia what causes it so 
often to corrode metal vessels of various kinds 
with which it is brought in contact. It may 
be taken for granted that any snbstance that 
would corrode an iron pan or a copper kettle is 
hardly fit for human consumption. 

Speed of Fishes, — The speed of fishes is al- 
most an unknown quantity, it being, as Prof. 
Gr. Browngoode says, very difficult to measure. 
If, says the professor, you could get a fish and 
put it in a trough of water 1000 feet long and 
start it at one end and make it swim to the 
other without stopping, the information could 
be easily obtained; but fish are unintelligent 
and will not do this. Estimates of the speed 
of fish are consequently only approximated, 
and more or less founded upon guessing. One 
can tell, however, at a glance whether a fish is 
built for speed or not. A fast fish looks trim 
and pointed like a yacht. Its head is conical in 
shape; its fins fit down close to its body, like 
a knife-blade into its handle. Fish with large 
heads, bigger than their bodies, and with short, 
stubby fins, are built for slow motion. The 
predatory fishes, those that live on prey, are 
the fastest swimmers. The food fishes are, as 
a general thing, the slowest, and consequently 
are easily captured. Their loss is recompensed, 
however, by the natural law which makes 
them very prolific in reproduction. Djlphins 
have been known to swim around an ocean 
steamer, and it is quite safe to say that their 
speed is 20 miles an hour; but it may be twice 
as much. The bonito is a faat-awlmming fish, 
but JQst what its speed is, is not known. The 
head of the goose fi^h is very large, 20 times as 
big as its body. It moves about very little, 
and swims at the bottom of the ocean. The 
Spanish mackerel is one of the fastest food 
fishes. Its body is oone-shaped, and is as 
smooth as burnished metal. Its speed is ae 
matchless as that of the dolphin, and in mo- 
tion, it cuts the water like a yacht. 



paper. Now comes the wonderful part, If 
the image of the photographic tracing ia pro- 
jected by means of an electric arc or oxhydro- 
ggn light upon a selenium receiver, the original 
Bpeech is then heard. It is evident that there 
is no limit to the development of this peculiar 
combination of methods. This ia very im- 
portant, if tvue,~Popular Science Monthly. 



A Light that Brings Out All the Colors 
OF A Picture Harmoniously.- Thomas A. 
Edison's latest achievement is the invention of 
a light by which pictures may be seen at night 
with nearly all the advantage of daylight. 
Electric lights have heretofore thrown either 
too brilliant a light or too yellow a light. 
Edison has secured a perfect light for pictures 
by placing at the back of the bulbs in 
his system of lighting a lead piece covering 
half of the bulb and fitting it closely. Inside 
of the bulb is a coating of silver. The yellow 
of the light and the silver reflection make a 
light that brings out all the colors in a picture 
harmoniously. It was first ufed in the illumi- 
nation of the Angelus in the Birye collection. 



Painting in Sand— A Pretty Novelty.— 
Parisians have been entertained by a remarka- 
ble artist who displays wonderful skill in her 
peculiar form of painting. With plates of va« 
rious-oolored sand before her, she takes the 
aand in her right hand and causes it to fall in 
beautiful designs upon a table. A bunch of 
grapes is pictured with violet sand, a leaf with 
green sand, the stalk with brown sand and re- 
lief and shadows by other sands, when the 
work is brushed away, and a bouquet of roses 
and other objects are represented with the 
same dexterity and delicacy. L'nea are drawn 
by the stream of sand as distinct as though 
made with an artist's brnsh. 



The Pressure Exerted by Seeds. — Mr. 
Grehant has recently made known the results 
of some experiments undertaken for the pur- 
pose of comparing the pressures exerted by 
seeds placed in a closed vessel in a current of 
water. The apparatus used consisted of a 
small Papin digester of oast iron, having a 
capacity of 48 cubic inches, and provided with 
a tight-fitting cover held in place with sorews 
and nuta. The vessel was filled with seeds up 
to the middle, then there was introduced in 
the center a rubber bag one inch in diameter 
filled with mercury, into which entered a glass 
tube at the top. This tube, which passed 
through the cover, served as a compressed air 
gauge, while a brass tube extending to the bot- 
tom also traversed the cover and served to in- 
troduce the water that had to be removed. 
Finally the vessel was filled with seeds and 
c'osed. With lupin seeds, Mr. Grehant found 
that the pressure rose to 15 atmospheres. 
Upon opening the apparatus he found the seeds 
very strongly compressed against each other, 
there beiog not the least interval between the 
flattened surfaces. When lentils were placed 
nnder the same conditions, the pressure did 
not exceed eight atmospheres. 

The Phonograph's Rival — M. Leon Es- 
quine, a Mexican, it is stated, has perfected a 
marvelous invention in electricity and photo- 
graphy. By speaking in a photophone trans- 
nnibter, which consists of a highly polished 
fiaphragm r>fl oting a ray of light, this ray of 
light is set into vibrations and a photograph is 
made of it on a traveling band of eensitized 



A New White Pitch for Shipbuilders has 
been introduced, which, it is said, supersedes 
the present laborious, expensive and InefSoient 
nietbod of forming white deck seams by work- 
ing putty into the seams with a knife. The 
peculiarity of the white pitch is that it is the 
only material hitherto introduced of a 
white color that can be run into deck 
Reams in a hot state like ordinary pitch. 
The material is especially suitable for hot 
climates, as it will stand a snn heat whioh 
would cause ordinary pitch to melt out of 
the seams. 

The Lotus as a Tank-Purifier.— /ndTian 
Engineering states that a large basket of the 
roots of the lotu-i has been received by the 
munloipality of Bangalore from Tanjore, and 
is now being planted ont in the beds of the 
tanks in the station. This squatio plant is one 
of the best water-purifiers known. It rapidly 
oxygenerates the water, and ridding it of its 
dead organic matter, brings it into a healthy 
condition. The presence of such like aquatic 
plants in reaetvoirs is said to diminish evapora- 
tion. 

Science Primers.— The American Society of 
Naturalists, at their reoent meeting in New 
York, appointed a committee to prepare a plan 
for the publication of a series of science primers. 
A resolution was also adopted recommending 
to oclleges the addition of natural science as a 
requirement for admission, and asking the col- 
leges to make a change, even if it necessitated 
a reduction in the amount of classical knowledge 
required. 

Preservation of Milk by Electricity. — 
M. Maisonhante, says the Bulletin International 
de VElectricite, having noticed that the passage 
of a current of electricity through milk re- 
tarded the formation of cream, made a series of 
experiments to see whether milk could be kept 
fresh In this manner. The result of these ex- 
periments is a patent for the preservation of 
mitk by means of either statio or current eleo- 
trioity. 

Dry Oxygen.— The acientifio world seems to 
be very much surprised at the late discovery of 
Mr. Bcereton Biker of Dulwich College, about 
oxygen. That gas, which is known as the 
great agent of combustion, losen its character 
when dried. It becomes inert. ■ Even charcoal 
will not burn in it when heated to redness, 
nor phosphorus become luminous. As yet 
there is no explanation. 



Aluminum Casting, — A gentleman in Phil- 
adelphia has been making some very successful 
experiments in casting aluminum. He has as- 
certained that it is possible to obtain exceed- 
ingly good results by the use of brass op iron 
molds, faced with plumbago. 



Nitrogen and Plant Color.— A French 
chemiet believes himself able to tell whether 
soil is deficient in phosphorus, potash or nitro- 
gen by the shade of green of the vegetation. 
The leaves become yellowish when nitrogen is 
lacking. 

Frozen Sixty Feet Deep.— Siberia Is said 
to have a spot of ground about 30 miles square 
that has not thawed out for a hundred years, 
and is frczsn to a depth of 60 feet. 



Cocoa Butter.— German chemists have dis- 
covered in the iiiocoanut a fatty substitute for 
butter, and this new product has begun to be 
manufactured on a large eoale, 



Jan, 18, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific i^ress. 



43 



Good Hej^lth, 



" La Grippe. ' 

The Bassisa ioflaenzA, '*U grippe," or by 
whatever name it may be koowu, la nothing 
new. Indeed, it i« vpry ancient, for it dates 
back ai far as 1510. Dr. John R. Hamilton of 
New York, a welNknown and accepted anthor* 
ity on all matters pnrtaining to the laws of 
health, and on the subject of " la grippe," says 
the disease has made periodical visitations dar* 
ing the last few hundred years. It spares no 
part of the world in its pilgrimages. 

The earliest recorded epiiemiu of iDfluenza is 
that of 1510. There were 20 visitations of the 
disease, which is aleo known as epidemio ca- 
tarrh, between 1510 and 1S37. The disease does 
not oontiae itself to men, but freqaently affects 
the lower animals. 

A complete history of the dieeasf* was pab- 
lished nnder medioal authority in Kogland in 
1852. AmoDg the articles in that work was 
one by Df. John Warren of Boston, written in 
1790, from which it appears that icflueczi, 
then well known in Europe, Invaded the whole 
of the United States in the course of the 
autumn of 17S9. 

What It Is. 

Dr. Albert Robin of the Paris Academie de 
Medioine eays: "This disease is known as 

* influenza,* or more commonly in French, as 

* la K"PP^'' Uoqaestionably the epidemic 
will continoe to spread — how far it is impoeei- 
ble to say — but there is no occasion for serious 
alarm. An ordinary case of influenza has noth> 
ing more to be dreaded than a severe cold of a 
week's duration, 

IC8 Symptoms Are Unmistakable. 

" Headaohe, pains in the eyes, soreness all over 
the body, as if one had been beaten, loss of ap- 
petite, a feverish condition, and a general sense 
of laesitude and discomfort. These general 
symptoms are apt to be followed by various lo- 
cal troubles, such as a bronchial attack, a cold 
in the head, sore throat, diarrhea, and some- 
times by pleurisy or pneumonia, 

** The only real danger is presented in the 
last two oases, which oan usually be guarded 
against by proper care. From three to eight 
days is the average duration of the disease 
proper, but its effects upon the system are com- 
paratively severe so that several weeks more are 
often needed for a full convalescence." Persons 
who may be seriously ill only a week will often 
require from three weeks to a month to at- 
tain once more their normal condition. 

Remiedles PropoBed. 

The New York Sun proposes the following 
remedies, presumably after competent medioal 
advice: 

Oa the first appearance of the characteristic 
symptoms a full dose of quinine should be 
taken. In an adult, without any consti- 
tntional peculiarity unfavorable to the ac- 
tion of quinine, the first dose should be 20 
grains. After this, ten grains may be taken 
three times a day, unless there should be in- 
tense ringing in the ears, with some impairment 
of hearing. An attempt should also be made to 
destroy the microbe by local applications, 

A gargle of one drachm of bora?:, one drachm 
of saDoylio aoid, one fiaid ounce of glycerine 
and seven onncea of rose-water should be used 
three or foar times in the day. At night, ten 
grains of Dover's powder, with hot drinks and 
abundant bedclothing to promote perspiration, 
would be useful. 

Those who prefer simpler means of treatment 
will find the adoption of a diet of fruit, 
farinaceous foods and cereals of great value. 
Lemons should be used freely, and the nasal 
passages cleansed often with common salt and 
water. Inhalations of carbolic acid and iodine 
will aid in destroying the germs. In most 
oaoes the latter treatment will probably be 
euffioient, and a resolute exercise of the will- 
power .will not come amiss in preventing the 
disease from acquiring the mastery. 

Nothing to Do With the Cholera. 

Dr. Robin, above quoted, says; "The the- 
ory has been advanced that iDfiueciza is the 
forerunner of cholera, bat I regard that as pure 
nonsense. It is true that' several times in the 
present oentury an influenza epidemic has been 
closely followed by a visitation of cholera. It 
is also true that several times in the same 
oentury there has been an epidemic of infla- 
enza with no cholera following, juat as there 
have been epidemics of cholera with no influ- 
enza preceding. The fact is that the two dis- 
eases are ao utterly dissimilar as to make any 
aucb sequence all but impossible, and any occa- 
sional instanoea of their simultaneous appear- 
ance mnat be regarded as a mere coincidence 
with no deeper aignificance." It is supposed to 
originate from a microbe. The microbe of con- 
Bumption, cholera and even of whooping cough 
has been discovered, and the Paris aavanta are 
already working to discover the infiuenza 
microbe. 

One Can Catch It In the Air. 

By mere breathing, the microbes can be taken 
into the aystem, ao that when it start? it soon 
has the whole population of a city aniffllng and 
aneeztng. Nearly all the civilized world, jast 
at this time, is sneezing as they never, coUect- 
iTely» sneezed before. 

Iznaelnatlon Has Much to Do With the 
Disease. 

The imagination, in this as in many other 
epidemlos, ia apt to aggravate the disease. 



Don't be afraid of it; but when you are at- 
tacked, jubt give way to It and put yourself nn- 
der the care of a good phytioian and you will 
soon be all right. The sensational reports 
given in the da'ly papers do much injury in 
this direction. A prominent phyoician of Wash- 
ington says: " I think that in 99 cases out of 
100 there ia nothing else the matter with the 
people who think they have the epidemio than 
a very natural and ordinary cold in the head. 
There is nothing unusual about auch colds at 
this time of the year. In fact, I do not know 
that I ever saw a year go by when two-thirds 
of my friends did not, at this season, suffer 
from such a cold. But the moment the news- 
papers call attention to the fact that there ia a 
new disease prevalent in some oorner of the world 
every man who has the anotlha begins to be- 
lieve that he has the symptoms of the epidemio. 
Of course, there ia undoubtedly some truth in 
the existence of this peculiar disease. The re- 
ports from the other half of the world prove 
that; but what I contend is that in a vast ma- 
jority of oases there ia nothing extraordinary 
the matter, but that the sufferers imagine that 
their cases correspond exactly with the genuine 
cases of la grippe. It all comes from the atten- 
tion which ia called to the epidemic in the 
newspapers. I would venture to sav that 
where there is one genuine case of influenza, 
there are 99 imitationa." 



E'LECTPjeiTY, 



The Continuous vs.' Alternating 
Currents, 

The prinoipala in the incandescent-lighting 
field have both had their aay in the North 
American Review, Mr. Westinghouee having 
answered Edison in the current number. Edi- 
son's argument appears to be dictated by aelf- 
intereat, and its motive ia stated in his own 
words: " My personal desire would be to pro- 
hibit entirely the oae of alternating currents." 
Westinghonse contends that the alternating 
current system, which is that upon which the 
incandeecent lamps in moat oitiea are run, is the 
safest, because the converter, which is placed 
on the premises of every consumer, Is an im- 
passable barrier through which none of the 
high-tension street currents can pass, and 
which absolutely protects the consumer agiinst 
injury or tire. The only danger which can re- 
sult from the use of the alternating-current 
system is from the wires in the streets carry- 
ing the high-tension ourrenta, and this danger 
Mr, Westinghouae believes oan be entirely re- 
moved by placing the wires nnder ground. 
Mr, Westinghonse expresaes himself aa being 
a firm believer in the underground system. He 
contends that the experience of Chicago and 
Philadelphia in the use of underground cables 
for high-tenaion carrenta, to say nothing of the 
large number of cables laid underground in 
Rome, Berlin, Milan and in other cities, in- 
dicates that the auccesa of properly constructed 
underground systems, whether for currents of 
high or low tenaion, has been established be- 
yond question. 

Whatever may be the result of this contro- 
versy, it is becoming more and more evident 
that something will have to be done regarding 
wires carrying electricity at high tenaion. 
Whether it is practical or not to obtain a 
proper insulation of the wires underground, 
their presence overhead, as now prepared and 
maintained, is clearly a source of too great 
danger to life to allow of their permanent con- 
tinuance. But instead of such violent action 
aa has been taken in New York for their abate- 
ment, would it not be muoh wiser to look 
around for some improved and more safe 
method of placement for the wires ? The rapid 
improvements that are being made in handling 
the electric current, and the great demand for 
its use, would seem to point to some auch con- 
servative policy. 

The telegraph has just, at this present writ- 
ing, announced that a method of personal in- 
sulation baa been devised in Erie, Penn., by 
which a person with a moist band, and stand- 
ing upon moiat ground, can safely grasp an 
uniuBulated wire in his naked hand, through 
which ia paaaing a current of over 500 volts. 
If such a thing ia possible, we ought certainly 
to look confidently for aome device by which 
that current oan be aafely carried from point to 
point, either above or under grouncT. In the 
present earnest need for a way, surely aome 
genius will soon give to the world a method by 
which electricity for light may be diatributed 
aa safely as gaa. 



Electric Micrometer. — Practical electricity 
says that a machine has recently been invented 
by Mr. Bun of Chicago, 111., which is of prac 
tical value to shoe manufacturers. The ma- 
chine is an electric micrometer which oan aort 
pieces of leather according to thickness and 
distribute them in separate receptacles. It 
aeparates taps which vary in thickneaa aa little 
as oae-thouBandbh of an inch. It baa a ca- 
pacity of 5000 taps per hour. Baaides sorting 
the pieces of leather, the machine automatic- 
ally records the number placed in each re- 
ceptacle. When the machine ia in operation, 
all that is required of the attendant ia to put 
the taps in a trough-like box. A follower is 
then adjusted behind the taps which keeps 
them in an upright position and maintains a 
constant pressure as they are fed from the 
trough into two abutting fingers. The taps are 



in return fed from the trough into micrometer 
Gogere, which pass successively into position. 
The fingers, which are fed around by a ratchet 
movement, pause a short time over the re- 
ceptacles for taps. When a micrometer finger 
reaches one of these bins in which the tap that 
it bold* should be dropped, the tuner extension 
of the finger touches an electric contaot, and 
the tap will fall from the jaws. The operation 
of the finger is made to actuate a counter which 
indioitea the number of taps in every receptacle. 
The appiratuB is furniehed with current by a 
small dynamo especially constructed for the 
purpose. The machine is simple and accurate, 
and is not liable to get out of order. The 
whole appliance ia the invention of Mr. Biin of 
Chicago. 

A Point of Scpbriokity of the Electric 
Car. — An accident in New York a few days 
ago when a cable car became unmanageable 
through the failure of a brake, brings to the 
front again one of the chief points of superiority 
of the electric car, namely, the possibility of 
an almoat instant reversal. If the brake of an 
electric car fails, the current can be reversed 
and the car brought to a standstill or even 
started in an opposite direction, quicker than 
by any other method used on street railways, 
and this is ucqueationably one of the strongest 
reasons why tne electrio oar ia best suited to 
run at a high rate of speed in ordinary city or 
Buburban streeta. — BoBton Journal of Com' 
meree. 

An Electrical Tooth Extractor. — An elec- 
trical icatrument has been invented which ia 
designed to remove the pain incidental to the 
extraction of teeth. It oonaiata of adjustable 
prongs carrying buttona and oonneoted with an 
electrical battery. The buttona are plaoed on 
the face over the nerves leading from the teeth 
to the brain, aud a circuit ia eatabliahed the 
moment the extracting instrument touchea the 
tooth to be removed. 



Progress OF Electric Welding, — It ia re- 
ported that the Tbomson Electric Welding Co. 
will erect a factory at East Chattanooga, Tenn., 
at a coat of $1,000,000. 



iiNCBI^^EEF^ING I^OTES. 



A Canal Across Italy. — Signer Vittorino 
Bocoa, the eminent Italian engineer, proposes 
to join the Tyrrhenian sea with the Adriatic 
by a ship canal, which orossiug the peninsula 
from Montalto di Castro, provmee of Kome, in 
a northeasterly direction, would reach the east 
coast of Fano. The canal ia to have a length of 
124 miles, to be 263 feet wide, and to have a 
depth of 40 feet. At each end of the canal a 
port is to be constructed, having an area of 
129 acres, and four entrances each of 74 acres. 
The coat of construction is estimated at £25,- 
000,000. Thia ia a highly important work in 
more senses than one. It is to be made a na- 
tional enterprise. The oanal, with ita great 
width and depth, would be navigable for the 
largest ironolada. It is also urged that the in- 
ternal trade of Italy would gain greatly by the 
canal, and that tbe provinces of Rome, Grosetto, 
Siena, Arezzo, Perugia, Pesaaro and Ancona 
would obtainthroughit direct water communica- 
tion. The drainage and improvement of the 
marshy districta through which the oanal would 
pass would be facilitated, and it is further stated 
that by the reclamation of the lakes of Bolsena, 
Chiuei aud Montepulcinno, and the Trasime- 
nian Lake, an area of 170 rquare miles would 
be rendered tit for cultivation. The coat of 
oonatruoting the oanal is estimated at $125,000,- 

oob. 

To BE Given a Practical Trial.— A practi- 
cal trial is about to be given to the pfoject for 
a railway for h<^avy ships. Tnere is a narrow 
neck of land, 17 miles wide, called Chignecto 
IsthmuB, which connects the two provinces of 
Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. It baa long 
been considered a matter of great commercial 
importance that either a ahip canal or a ship 
railway ahoutd be construoted across this isth 
mus. Such a work would save a voyage of 500 
miles through rough and stormy watera to the 
large and growing commerce which ia carried 
on between the St. Lawrence river and porta 
on the Atlantic coast, A ship railway waa 
decided upon some time ago, and work on the 
sanrie has been commenced and will be com- 
pleted in about twelve months from this time. 
The rails for this track will be of steel and tbe 
heaviest ever made — 110 pounds to the yard. 
There will be a double track, upon which a 
cradle will rest for holding the ship daring its 
transfer. Two locomotives of mammoth con- 
struction will be employed in drawing theoradle 
with ita burden across tbe isthmus. The 
veesela to be transported will be hoisted by 
hydraulic power from the basin into the cradle. 
The time of passage will occupy only two and 
one-half hours. 



The Proposed English Channel Bridge, — 
The French Government seems to be in earnest 
in regard to thia acheme. The Government 
baa appointed a committee to examine the 
plana which have been proposed by the pro- 
jectors. ^ 

Over 2C00 feet of the Hudson river tunnel 
have already been excavated, 

Eiffel Tower shares are quoted on the Paris 
bourse at 160, 100 being par. 



Useful Inforjviatio,\. 

WiiKKE Do Whales Go in Winter?— A 
myetery of the Arotic rcgiooa m.y be cleared 
up next year, if the season is open. Thia mys- 
tery is: Where do the whales go whrn ioe be- 
gins to set in along the Alaskan Coast ? Whale, 
men know thoy go eastward, and it is sup- 
posed they congregate about the mouth of the 
great Mackenzie river, but this and the region 
to the northeast of the river's month are prac- 
tically unknown territory. The Paoi6o Steam 
Whaling Co. of San Francisco has juat par- 
chased a strong steamer, which will be sent to 
the Arctic next spring with orders to push 
through to the mouth of the Mackenzie. Tne 
reason for this is that whalebone is rising la 
price, and this season's catch showed that the 
whales are rapidly decreasing in their usual 
feeding grounds. — Ex. 

Filaments for Incandescent Lajips. It 

may not be generally known that the fine fila- 
ments over which the electric current runs in 
an inoandescent lamp, are, in many oases, made 
of split bamboo. The preparation of these lil- 
annents is quite an art in itself. Each opera- 
tive is given a small bundle of bamboo splints 
of leaa than 1-16 inch cross-section, and these 
are drawn through a series of fine holes until 
shaven down to the required size. The- bam- 
boo is then quite pliable and easily bent into 
the peculiar twisted form, as seen in the lamp. 
In this condition it is carbonized and is then 
ready for the lamp and electric current. Dif- 
ferent oompanies use different methods. The 
Thomson-Houston use the bamboo filament; 
the Westioghouse, a prepared substance cov- 
ered with lampblack. 

Paint from Potatoes,— Paint from potatoea 
is a new wrinkle in the arts and sciences. 
Kuhlow's Trade Review gives the manner of 
preparation. Boil a kilo of peeled potatoes in 
water; after maehing, dilute with water and 
pass through a fine sieve. Add two kilos of 
Spaniah white diluted with four kilos of water, 
and the result will be a color of b«autiful milk 
white. Different colors can be effected by the 
addition of different oohers or minerals. Ap- 
ply with a brush; it adherea to plaster and 
wood very well, will not peel, and best of all 
ia cheap. 

To Wash Plush Cloaks,— First bang your 
oloak on the line and get all the dust ont of it 
with a switch. Then spread it on the back of 
a chair and sponge every inch of it with warm 
rain-water and a little ammonia. Take a dry 
sponge and rub the oloak until it is almost dry. 
Rub both ways, back and forth, until the nap 
is thoroughly raised. Lastly, hang the cloak 
in the sun until it is perfectly dry and brush 
it with a soft brush. 



How to Wash White Silk Hakdkeeohiefs. 
Never allow silk handkerchiefs to become too 
dirty. Wash them in a warm lather made 
with pure white curd soap. Thia water should 
be blued, also the rinsing-water. Roll up 
tightly in a cloth, and iron the handkerchiefs 
between linen. The iron must not touch the 
silk, otherwise it will turn yellow. Thia 
method has been found the best for keeping silk 
handkerchiefs white. 



Colonel Feed Ckooker and his railway as- 
sociates are pleased with the results of the land 
sales from their grants last year. For that 
period there were sold 198,477.63 acres for a 
total price of $748 456.42. Of these figures the 
land grant of the Central Paotfio road must be 
credited with sales aggregating 153,000 acres 
for $548,954.81 and the land grant of the South- 
ern Pacific road with 45,477.63 acres for $199,- 
501,61. 

Egyptian Mummies. — It has been estimated 
that more than 400,000,000 human mummies 
were made in E^ypt from the beginning of the 
art of embalming until its discontiunanoe in 
the seventh oentury. Herodotus and Diodorus 
agree in the statement that there were three 
grades of embalming. The first cost in our 
money, about $1225, the second about $375, and 
the third waa very cheap. 



A Novel Fkeak of Nature,— At Plant City, 
Fla., there has been found what aeems to be a 
half orange with a smooth skin, and a half 
lemon with a rough skin, the latter being a lit- 
tle larger, growing together as one fruit, 

A Woolen Cloth is much better than a 
brnsh to polish the kitchen stove, as it makes 
but very little dnst and gives a softer gloss to 
the iron. A person with weak lungs should 
never use a brush for this work. 

Cioabs. — It ia estimated that 4,000,000,000 
cigars are consumed in this country annually. 
Sixty-aix to every man, woman and child in 
the country^ 

Milk, If put in an earthen jar, or even the 
oan, will keep sweet for a long time if the 
receptacle is well wrapped in a wet cloth. 

The Wings of turkeys, geese and chickens 
are good to wash and clean windows, as they 
leave no dust or lint, aa cloth. 

Alaska coat the United States Government 
two cents an aore. 



44 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 18, 1890 




A. T. DEWEY. W. B. EWEB. 

DEWEY & CO., Pnblisliers. 



Ofce, 220 Market St„ N. E. cor. Front St. , S. F, 
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W. B. EWER Senior Editor 



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SAN PBANCISCO: 

Saturday, January i8, 1890. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



ILLUSTRATIONS.— Scott & O'Neill Variable Cut- 
Oflf Engine— lOO-Horse Power; tfcott & O'Neill Patent 
Compound Eneioe at the Union Iron Works, 37. Im- 
provident Methods of Cutting Timber, as Instanced in 
the Memorial uf the State Poird of Forestry, 45. 

BUl'lOislALitJ.— Compound Engines, 37- Passing 
Events; The Harvard Observatory; South African Gold; 
The Electric-Motor Plant; The Bowers Dredge; Com- 
Btock Superintendents' Salaries; in the Mouncains; W. 
T- Garratt, 44. Shocking Waste of Timber; Natural 
Gas, 45. 

COHHjijSPONDBNOE. — Californians in Holland 
and Belgium; Suggestions for Controlling Our Kivers, 
38. Liberty Mining District, Siskiyou Co.; Mining 
Accidents Prevented, 39. 

MISCELLANBOTJo.— A Mine Mystery; An Electric 
Meter; Trusts Declared Unlawful; Arizona Minerals; 
itailway Construction in 1SS9, 39. Notices of Recent 
Patents; The Ma^netitm of Some Metals and Minerals; 
MiniDg Bureau Museum, 47. 

MINING SDMMAK3C— From the various counties 
of California, Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Mon- 
tana, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, WyomiDg.40-41. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS.— The Foundry; A 
Pneumatic Tire for Bicycles; A Machine Uucb heeded 
in Mill Work; Cut vs. Cast Gears; The CompouHd En- 
gine; The Manufacture of Spikes; Largest Locomotive 
Ever Btiilt; Aluminum in the Manufacture of Ship 
Plate: a New Fashioning Machine; Miscellaneous, 42. 

SOIBNTIFIC PROGRESS. —Sulphur in Kefia- 
iug Sugar; Speed of Fiehes; The Pressure Exerted by 
Seeds; Xha Phonograph's Kival; A Light That Brings 
Out All the Colors of a Picture Harmoniously; Painting 
in Sand — A Pretty Novelty; The Lotus as a Tank Puri- 
fier; Science Primers; Preservation of Milk hi' Electric- 
ity; Dry Oxycen; Aluminum Casting; Nittogen and 
Plant uolor; Frozen Sixty Feet Deep; Cocoa Butter; 
Miscellaneous, 42. 

GOOD HEALTxi.— "La Grippe," 43 

BLiECTRI CITY.— The Continuous vs. Alternating 
Currents; Electric Micrometer; A Point of Superiority 
of the Electric Cai; An Electrical Tooth Extractor; 
Progress of Electric Welding, 43- 

ENGINEERING NOTES, -A Canal Acrosn Italy; 
To be Given a Practical Trial; The Proposed English 
Channel Bridge; Miscellaneous, 43- 

U3EFOL INKORMATION.-Where Do Whales 
Go in Winter; Filaments for Incandescent Lamps; Paint 
From Potatoes; To Wash Plush Cloaks; How to Wash 
White Silk Handkerchiefs; Egyptian Mummies; A 
Novel Freak of Nature; Cigars; Uiscellaneous, 43. 

MINING STOCK MARKET.— Sales at tim San 
Francisco Stock Board, Notices of Meetings. Assess- 
ments, Dividends, and Bullion Shipments, 50. 



Passing Events. 

The stormy weather faaa contiDaed, and in 
the mountains has blocked up roada and done 
more or leas damage. A great deal more water 
has to be handled in the mines than nsnal, and 
work at some of the mills has stopped owing to 
the oold weather. 

The inflaenza^ or grippe^ which has been pre- 
vailinK abroad and In the E^ist In epidemic 
form, has made its appearance here, but it ap- 
pears to be of a much milder nature than has 
been the case elsewhere. 

People in the mountains report a heavier 
Bnowfall than for many years. There will be 
an abundance of water in the spring — probably 
too mach — and the owners of gravel mines re- 
gret that they will be unable to utilize it. 

The electric plant of the Nevada mlll^ on the 
Comstook, has received its final teat and has 
been accepted. This sncoessful application of 
the use of electric-power to quartz-milling pur- 
poses will doubtless lead other mining companies 
to investigate the system. 



Last year Alex Parker sold a gravel claim 
on the South fork of Scott river to a Ohinese 
company, who paid §50,000. The Yreka Union 
says they are taking out large sums every 
month, and the miners think they have one of 
the befit properties in Northern California. 



The Harvard Observatory. 

The gift of $50,000 received last summer by 
the Astronomical Observatory of Harvard Col- 
lege from Miss C, W. Bruce of New York for 
the construction of a photographic telescope of 
novel form, has enabled the observatory to 
make a contract with Messrs. Alvan Clark & 
Sons for a telescope having an aperture of 24 
inches and a focal length of 11 feet. The Bruce 
telescope will be especially adapted to studying 
the very faint stars, and will give a large plate 
reducing the work of making star maps. Its 
principal use will be probably for the study of 
the distribution of the stars for complete cata- 
logues of clusters, nebulae and double stars and 
for the spectra of faint stars. 

The report of Prof. E. C. Pickering of the 
Harvard Observatory states that an expedition 
to Southern California gives them a mountain 
station under climatic conditions much superior 
to those of the eastern portions of the United 
States, and promises to be a satiBfactory solu- 
tion of the problem contemplated by Mr. Boy- 
den in his will. 

Under the Henry Draper Memorial Fund, 
the first research on the spectrum of over 10,- 
000 of the brighter stars is now nearly com- 
pleted and is partially in print. The photo- 
graphs required for the second research on the 
spectrum of the fainter stars are alao nearly 
complete. 

The 13-inch telescope mounted on Mt. Wil- 
son, Southern California, has done good work, 
and 1155 photographs have been obtained. As 
the same objects have been repeatedly photo 
graphed at Cambridge with the same instru- 
ment, an accurate comparison of the atmos' 
pheric conditions of the two places may be 
made. The evidence already secured shows 
that in summer results can be obtained at Wil- 
son's peak which cannot be obtained at Cam- 
bridge, The difference is very pronounced 
for such objects as the markings on Jupiter. 
Clusters like that on Hercules are well re- 
solved, 80 that the individual stars are easily 
measured, which cannot be done with the 
best Cambridge photograph. As a test object, 
the sixth star in the trapezium of Orion nebula 
18 clearly photographed for the first time. A 
new variable star has been discovered In the 
midst of the cluster 6. C. 3636. A beginning 
has been made of the meaeurements of the posi- 
tion and brightness of the double stars, and it 
is hoped to extend this work to the clusters 
and thus furnish an extensive addition to this 
department of miorometrio astronomy. 



South African Gold. 

Notwithstanding all the predictions of won- 
derful richness, the Transvaal gold-fields did 
not make such a remarkable showing last year. 
The whole of SouthAfrioa only produced $8,000,- 
000; and Instead of there being 2000 stamps 
dropping 1 with a monthly product of 75,000 
ounces, there are only 35 mills with 900 
stamps, and far less than that many ounces 
per month. 

The big English syndicates that were to reap 
such fortunes must be much disappointed. 
There has been more stock-gambling than min- 
ing, and the 160 companies operating have 
made very little money. There is a scarcity 
of water and a soaroity of competent miners. 

A good many rose-colored statements about 
these mines have been circulated in this coun- 
try, with directions how to get to the country, 
etc. Bat Africa is so distant, few good gold- 
miners have been attracted from here. Several 
California superintendents have gone out there 
and have done well; but it is no place for an 
ordinary miner to go if he is making a living at 
home. 

Reduction of Bodie Salaries. — At a spe- 
cial meeting of the directors of the Bodie Con- 
solidated Mining Co., held on January 15th, 
the salaries of the officials of the company 
were reduced over 50 per cent. This ac- 
tion, it is claimed, was due to the present 
discouraging outlook in the mine and also a 
difficulty of collecting future aeseBsmente. At 
thelmeeting Captain John Kelley sent in his res- 
ignation as superintendent, and another Kelly 
was appointed to the position. The latter per- 
son is very highly spoken of by those who 
know him. 

The coal shipments from the various col- 
lieries in Vancouver island during the past year 
amounted to 427,888 tons. 



The Electric-Motor Plant. 

The Brush electric -motor plant to operate the 
Nevada mill on the Comstock, fully illustrated 
and described in the Press a few months since, 
has been tested and finally accepted. The 
plant is the largest of the kind in the world. 
At first there were some obstacles to overcome, 
and nobody seemed to know how to remedy 
them, H. S. Conner, a skillful electrician, 
came out from Cleveland to ascertain if there 
were any defects in the eleotric plant that 
caused its failure to fill the contract with the 
mill company, Mr. Conner proceeded to thor- 
oughly overhaul the entire plant, from the 
dynamo chamber to the surface motors, and 
after a test was satisfied that the reason the 
plant did not fulfill the specifications of the cou' 
tract with the Nevada Mill Company was due 
solely to the incompetency of the electricians 
who had charge of it during the first test. The 
mill has now been in constant operation, pro 
pelled by this eleobrio plant, for three months 
as a final test. The test proved that 63^ per 
cent of the power generated in the dynamo 
chamber is landed on the surface motors- 
which is three and a half per cent more than 
the contract between the Brush Eleotric Com- 
pany and Nevada Mill & Mining Company 
specifies. The Virginia Chronicle says: 

The plant is the largest in the world and the 
cost is $100,000. It consists of six dynamos of 
100 horse power each, placed on the Sutro tuu' 
nel level of the ChoUar incline, 1630 feet below 
the surface. These dynamos are operated by 
Pelton water-wheels placed on the same level 
the wheels being driven by a volume of 187 
inches of water confined in an iron pipe ten 
inches in diameter, leading from the surface' 
tank to the point of discharge, 1630 feet below. 

The eleotric power generated by the dynamos 
is transmitted on copper wires to the surface 
motor-room, 2300 feet distant from the dynamo 
chamber. 

A total of 450-borae power is required to op- 
erate the mill, which is equipped with 60 
stamps, 16 pans, 10 settlers. 2 agitators and 3 
Bulphuret pans. OF the 450-horse power re 
quired to operate the entire mill, the Brush 
electric plant furnishes 3S0-horee power; the 
surface Pelton wheel on which the volume of 
wacer required to operate the Sutro tunnel 
dynamos id discharged prior to passing down 
the incline, furnishes the auxiliary power of 70 
per cent. 

The Bowers Dredge. 

We are informed that the Bowers dredge at 
Taooma ia now excavating — and discharging 
through 3600 feet of pipe— 2000 to 3000 yards 
of sand each 24 hours, and has nearly filled up 
a large tract of land for railroad purposes. It 
has another contract for filling in 1,000,000 cu 
bic yards on which it will commence work in 
about a month, as soon as the present contract is 
completed. This is the same machine whioh was 
at work for some time in San Diego bay, and 
was towed up to Tacoma. It is capable of 
handling a much larger quantity of material 
through a shorter discharge pipe, but in this in- 
stance there are many shells which lodge In the 
bottom of the pipe and cause considerable frio 
tioo. Otherwise the output would be two or 
three times as much. The harbor is being 
deepened at the same time that new land is 
being made for business purposes. 

It is reported on pretty good authority that 
the patent right for the Puget Sound region 
has been sold for a large sum of money. 

Mr. A, B, Bowers' suits for infringement 
against the Von Schmidt, Lynch, Chaquotte, 
Atlas and Hercules dredges are now pending in 
the United States Circuit Court in this city. 



. William T. Garratt. 

The well-known pioneer foundryman, Wm. 
T. Garratt, died suddenly of heart disease on 
Tuesday. Mr. Garratt was 60 years of age, 
and may be said to have been in vigorous health 
np to the time of his last illness. He was bom 
in Waterbury, Conn,, and came of Ecglish 
stock. He came to San Francisco in 1850, and 
after mining in Nevada Co. for awhile came back 
here and entered the foundry of G. W. Schnltz. 
The firm at that time was carrying on the dual 
business of coining $5 and $10 pieces and manu- 
facturing brass and iron implements. Shortly 
afterward there was a dissolution of partner- 
ship, Schultz retaining the coining department 
and Garratt taking the foundry. From that 
time until the day of his demise Mr. Gitrratt 
was connected with this business^ and not- 
withstanding many reverses, lived to see his 
labors orowned with success in the establish- 



ment of the most complete brass foundry on 
the coast. 

His establishment was burned down several 
times, but finally he took the premises corner 
of Natoma and Fremont, where he has been 
many years. The large branch on Fifth and 
Brannan has only been operated a few years. 
Mr, Garratt has been president of the Manu- 
facturers' Association and a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce and various organiza- 
tions. He was one of the trustees of ;the State 
Mining Bureau at the time of his death. Be- 
sides his interest in the foundries, he was large- 
ly engaged in steamboat, railroad and mining 
enterprises at various times, and stood high in 
the business community. 



Comstock Superintendents' Salaries. 

There were days on the Comstock when every 
mine, big or little^ had its superintendent at 
a handsome salary, some of them with very 
little indeed to do. But those days are gone; 
now, one man superintends several mines, even 
in the case of very important^ ones. The super- 
intendents, moreover, have not now mere or- 
namental positions, and there are no $1000 a 
month salaries, with double teams to drive and 
no duties except to entertain people. 

Among others, the following monthly sal- 
aries are paid to mine superintendents on the 
Comstock, Virginia City, Nev.: To R. P. 
Keating by Hale and Norcross, $400, Savage, 
$400, and Scorpion, $150; total, $950. A. C. 
Hamilton by OhoUar, $250, Potoii, $250, Ex- 
chequer, $150, Alpha, $150; total, $800. Mr. 
Kerwin by Bast and Beloher, $250, Gould and 
Curry, $250; total, $500. A. Lockey by Over- 
man, $200. D. B. Lyman by Con. California 
and Virginia, Ophirand Mexican, each $187.50; 
Occidental, $150, Sierra Nevada, $250, Union, 
$125; total, $987 50. S. L. Jones by Crown 
Point, $500, Beloher, charged in Crown Point, 
Seg. Baicher, $150; total, $650. W. E. 
Sharon, Challenge, $250; Confidence, $250; 
Yellow Jacket reported $250; total, $750. 

The largest aggregate salary of any official 
connected with Comstock mines is that of 0. 
E. Elliott, mining secretary, and next to the 
largest is that of A. K. P. Harmon, mining 
president. The latter's income from that 
source is $850 a month. 

But they do not pay the superintendents 
such salaries on the Comstock as are paid in 
some other places, A number of them have 
gone abroad for foreign companies and receive 
very handsome annual sums. For instance, 
Mr. Patton, formerly of the Comstook, gets in 
Australia $30,000 a year for superintending the 
Broken Hill mine. 



In the Mountains. 

In the mountain and mining counties, there 
has been a very heavy snowfall this winter. 
In fact there has been more snow than in the 
memorable winter of 1860, and more cold 
weather than in 1853-4. Some lives have 
been lost by snowslides and travel is every- 
where impeded. Some mills and mines have 
had to close down because of lack of supplies or 
the freezing up of ditches. The railroads have 
had difficulty to keep in operation, and team- 
ing has been impossible. In the gulches and 
bottoms the snow has been soft, so as to render 
snow-shoeing very bad. The ground is thor- 
ODghly soaked so that the pumps at all the 
mines have been kept busy. In some places, 
as at the summit, 16 to 17 feet of snow has 
fallen on a level. 

What will happen in the spring if this snow 
melts rapidly is unpleasant to contemplate. 
The hydraulic mine-owners regret that they 
will be unable to work, though there will be 
an abundance of water; but for other mining 
operations a prosperous year is predicted. The 
snow has come much lower down the foothills 
this year than is ordinarily the case. 



Two Competent Men — The mining conibi-. 
nation that has entered into a compact to com- 
mence pumping water out of the Gold Hill 
mines has engaged W. R. Eokart, a prominent 
mining and civil engineer, and Mr. James E. 
Dow, manufacturer of pumping and general 
hydraulic machinery, of San Francisco, to draw 
up plans for the purpose and to produce a 
pump for sinking purposes. After the water is 
lowered, it is intended to double the pumping 
capacity by placing a stationary pump at the 
lowest point obtainable. 



Jan. 18, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



46 



Shocking Waste of Timber. 

Wtt h&Vfi ofteo bad severe deDunoiatioDi of 
timber wute ftod earaeat appeale to people to 
refrain from it, but no verbal exhortation ooald 
be 10 elcqaeot aa the ptotnre whioh we give 
apon thia page. It was made by the Diwey 
Eagraviog Oo. for the State Board of Forestry 
directly from a photograph Babmitted by W. S. 
Lyon, State Forester. Oonseqoently it presents 
an ftotoal aoeoe and nae whioh fortunately one 
does not need to go far to see its lilce in the 
timbered regions of the State. The piotnre 
iiOoompaniea a memorial whioh the State Board 
of Forestry has jast transmitted to Oongrees 
and ii well oaloalated to open the eyes of the 
Law-makers to the culpable wsa^e of valnable 
property which should be lommarily checked 
by ad< qaats trgislation. The cuttiug which the 



stances these outrages are perpetrated upon 
the pablio domain, and are as indefensible as 
would be the aota of a farmer in burning the 
tialds and breaking down the fences of another 
for the pnrpose of seouriog a more expeditions 
route to market." 

The memorial of the State Bsard is a strong 
doonment on maoy aooounts. It alludes first 
to the need of maintaining a forest ooverlog oo 
onr mountains to conserve the water for irriga- 
tion of onr arid lands. Thia is a subject which 
is eaoh year oommandiog wider enpport, and 
we are glad to know that organized effort in 
some of onr irrigated diattiots is being put 
forth to secure the desired ends. The memo- 
rial preaents that the most feasible way to secure 
the retention of a forett ooveriog is to with 
draw the timber laid from tale or tntry sod tc 
sell the timber crop, goa-din^ the aiea fo tHat 



Natural Gas. 

The continuous discoveries of natural gas in 
so many different portioos of the world gives 
rise to the qnestion whether its generation la 
of modern occurrence or more antique origin. 
Its existence has been known in isolated loca- 
tions for over a century in the United States. 
1q those localities it was exceedingly limited in 
quantity, and while it was considered a ca- 
riosity, it ntver rose to any importanoe. Bat 
within a comparatively few years past, it has 
sBsumid Booh glgantio proportions as an illu- 
minator for cities and towns, and as a fuel in 
furnaces, factories and dwelliugs, that it be- 
comes a marvel, if it is not of reoent origin, 
why its utility was coffered to remain so long 
Qorfcngriz (I. It was known ^n the ProviDce 
of T-ii n liiin Tsing, Cblra, nrd wells were 



per diem, according to a report by Prof. James 
Dewar, F. K. S. This dow haa been going on 
from old wells for 10, 12 and even 20 years in 
the vicinity of Pittsburg. The immense ex- 
pansion that follows this wonderful flow rO' 
duoea the temperature bo greatly that near the 
top there is an ice coating on or near the whole 
of the pipe. This refrigerAting property haa 
manifested itself in several gas wells. In some 
cases the ice has formed so solid about the drills 
that it ohecked operations for the time being. 
At Jo Jo, in Western Pennsylvania, gas was 
struck at 1000 feet. In attempting to bait the 
well, the bailer stuck fast for awhile. When It 
was at last brought to the surfaoe, the bottom 
was ocvered with ice. 

Natural gas is now found in every oivilizsd 
couotry. Th3 aggregate flow of all the wells 
of the world would make such a etartling array 




IMPROVIDENT METHODS OF CUTTING TIMBER, AS INSTANCED IN THE MEMORIAL OF THE STATE BOARD OF FORESTRY. 



opeBiog the way to private property or to give 
•coeBB to still richer stores of publio property, 
Thas the acts are strictly within the scope of 
thd General Government. The memorial to 
whioh we allude makea thia forcible allusion to 
the deetmotioQ of timber to which we refer: 
" A^'foveat, or timber, like any other orop, when 
mature,' ie fit to harvest, and when not subject 
to wastefol abusea may with propriety and 
benefit be ont; when, however, to faoilitate ac- 
oesrto a tract, vast quantities of intervening 
Undfl are laid waste and valuable timber is left 
engiaving^ shows was not for the purpose of sup- 
plying ^merchantable lumber or fuel, bat merely 
for opening the way to more densely wooded 
trftotff. If men did thia on their own lands the 
oritib conld not do much more than deplore 
the wanton waste, bat snoh outting generally 
Gooara on the pnbllo domain for the purpose of 
to decay _aad destruction (as ia well illustrated 
inrtbeaooompanying photographic reproduction 
of fc oommon incident of our lumber country), 
thw-'aaoh methods become improvident and 
ihoaU be-vigoroualy aappressed. In most in- 



a aeoond growth shall not be interfered with by 
fire or sheep-herding. This would make the 
timber area of our monntainB, whioh is still 
owned by the Government, a perpetual reserve 
which shall, throagh all coming generations, 
famish ample sappliee of timber and fuel, and 
at the same time lescue the valleys in the 
future, to some extent at least, from ruinoas 
floode, and to store water to be Bent down grad- 
aally upon the plains as irrigators can use it. 
These things should command public attention 
and snpport, and we have no doubt' thelefforta 
of oar State Board will have mach influence in 
that direotlon. 



The Mint Commission. — Among the com- 
misioners appointed by the President to test 
and examine the weight and fineness of coins at 
the several U. S. Minta are Senator J. P. 
Jones, H. L. Dodge and Prof. Tho8. Price of 
this city. 

Rain fell in Oregon and Washington 19 days, 

iin Southern California on IS days, and in 
Northern Oaliforala on 24 days in Deoember, 



drilled there 3000 feet deep. The gas was con- 
veyed through bamboo pipes and burned in 
clay burners. In Virginia, in 1775, Washing' 
ton set apart a square mile of territory in 
Kanawha valley, in which was a barning spring 
whioh he deeded to the public forever, but his 
purpose was defeated. When General La- 
fayette passed through the then village of Fre< 
donia, N. Y., about 40 miles south of Buffalo, 
the inn at which he stopped was illuminated by 
natural gas through 30 burners. In 1859 its 
presence was well known in the coal regions of 
Pennsylvania. In 1865 a well was drilled near 
Wilcox, 100 miles east of Erie, from which gas 
fiowed under a pressure of 600 pounds to the 
square inch. Until 18SI, natural gas was only 
used for local illumination, for local fuel and 
the manufacture of high-grade lampblack. Its 
flow was permitted to escape without utiliza- 
tion. The exact loss cannot be aaoertained, 
but it approximates closely to an equivalent of 
100,000,000 tons of coal. The amount of gas 
whioh flows from some individnal wella reaches 
the enoimoas quantity of 30,000,000 cubic feet 



of figures ae would terrify those who aaw it 
into a belief that some terrible catastrophe 
would result from snoh an extraotion from the 
earth's center. Three hundred and fifty mill- 
ion cabic feet came daily to Pittsburg in Sep- 
tember, 1886. In aome adjacent localities the 
daily flow ia 30,000,000 onbio feet. The Karg 
well at Findlay, 0., discharged 40,000,000 
cubic feet per day, and other wells there wasted 
in the air 10,000,000 daily. At Belle Vernon 
the outflow is 12,000,000 feet per 24 hoars. The 
aggregate of eleven districts amounts to 8,644,- 
000,000 cubic feet of natural gas every 24 hoars. 
The pressure per Equare inch varies from 200 to 
over 600 pounds. The flames from the burning 
gas reach the hight of from 50 to over 100 feet. . 
If a correct statement of the products of the 
gaa-fielda of the United States could be ob- 
tained it would probably reach the enormous 
amount of over 20,000,000,000 cubic feet each 
day of 24 hours. This would be eqaal to a 
apace of 28,967.66 square milee. The elaatioity 
of the gaa and the additional supply whioh 
would rue to fill the otherwise vaoaam« pre- 



M 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 18, 1890 



■vents the occurrence of a catastrophe which 
would be direful in its consequencea. The 
question then ariBea; How long can this with- 
arawal from the earth's center continue harm- 
lees 2 At preaen^;, its eaoape from below, the 
surface of the earth may be preventive of an 
iftwful explosion. It may be the safety valve to 
let oflf some of the enormoua preaaure, which aa 
mentioned above reached at times over 600 
pounds to the square inch. This subterraneous 
pressure must be continually increasing, de- 
spite the activity of all the voloauoea of_ the 
world; and the drillings, though but an infin- 
itesimal factor compared with the smiface of 
the earth, may retard temporarily, in connec- 
tion with them, the final destruction by fire 
which IB foretold as the doom of the globe, 
■ When we remember that some far distant stars 
have suddenly burst into fiime and been lost to 
sight ever after, it may be a natural ratiocina- 
tion that they were resolved into their primal 
gaseous condition which La Place asserts to 
have been their origin. 

The commercial value of natural-gaa wells 
may be better understood when it is known that 
pipe lines are extended 20 or 30 miles, and that 
one of the companies is estimating the coat of 
piping the gas 90 miles to Cincinnati, and de- 
livering there 20,000,000 cubic feet per 24 
hours! The obstacle they will have to con- j 
tend with will be the condenaation in extreme 
cold weather, which will diminish the pressure 
at the terminus of the line. The Philadelphia 
Company is piping into Pittsburg 300,000,000 
to 500,000,000 cubic feet of natural gas per 
day. This is equivalent to from 20,000 to 25,- 
000 tons of coal. 

Regarding extensive explosions of natural 
gAB deep down in the wells, no apprehension 
need be experienced on that score. To render 
the natural gas explosive, it requirea to be in- 
termixed with from 9 to 14 parts of air to one 
of gas. While the pressure of gaa at the sur- 
face is over that of .the atmosphere, which is 
about 15 pounds to the gquure inch, it follows 
as a matter of course that the air cannot de- 
scend into the well. Before the pressure would 
be reduced sufficiently to admit from 9 to 15 
parts of air to one of gaa, the water would rise 
above the gas, even if it did not flaw from the 
well. Consequently under this condition the 
mixture of air and gas could not occur. An 
other preventive would be that when the press- 
ure became so greatly reduced, the taud would 
choke the well; this would keep the air from 
reaching the gas. There is therefore no cause 
to apprehend any vast explosion, or even a lim- 
ited one. • 

The durability of the yield of gas may be 
considered positive. The gas is the reaultant 
of the commingling of hydrocarbon oils and 
water. A slight quantity of air would accel- 
erate the evolution of hydrogen from the water 
blended with the oil. 

The most recent geological formations are all 
permeated by hydrocarbon compounds of some 
kind. It follows that the gas is generated by 
ohemical action or by reaolving into its orig- 
inal elements some compound mineral sub- 
stanoe; consequently the formation of the gaa 
is progressing continuously at the present time, 
as it has ever been. These carboniferous strata 
are replete with oils and hydrocarbons, which 
are continually being transposed into new 
forms by either or both an increase of 
oxygen or hydrogen. The liquid form, if ex- 
posed to the air, becomes a vaporous hydro- 
carbon. As this chemical action is in constant 
operation, the supply of the gas may safely be 
considered aa certain for all time to come. The 
final conflagration muat arise from some other 
eonrce than that of the gas wells, for their 
sphere is too limited to affect the entire globe, 
for the aggregation of them all would be equal 
only to a small grain of dust upon a six-toot 
globe. 

The natural-gas industry may therefore be 
considered as an enduring one that will increaee 
instead of diminishing its supply. 



DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 
Booth Gold Mining Company. Location 

of principal place of business, Sao Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. Locatioii of Works, Auburn, Placer Co., Cal. 
NOTICE.— There is delinquent upon the following 
described Stock, on account ol Assessment (No. i), levied 
on the 23d day of Novemlier. 18S9, the several amounts 
set opposite the namea of the respective Shareholders, 
as f oUowe: 

No. 
Certifi- No. 
Nambs. cate. Shares. Am't 

rtieUard Chenery, Trustee ISO , 6,275 8125 50 

Kichard Chenerj- 17 5 10 

Chailes F. Eaton 171 300 G 00 

Charles F. Faton 172 300 6 UO 

Charlea F. Eaton 17a 60 1 20 

R. N. GraveG, Trustee ^5 250 5 00 

E. S. Harriaoii 177 1,000 20 00 

Geo. R. Spioney, Trustee 82 312 6 24 

Geo. R. Spinney, Trustee .; 176 500 10 00 

E. P. Slosson, Trustee : 181 50O 10 00 

And in accordance with law, and an order of the Board 
of Directors, made un the 23d daj' of No ' ember, 1889, so 
many shares of each parcel of such Stock as may be 
necessary, will bo gold at public Auction, at the sales- 
room of Aliddleton & Sharon, No. 22 UoDteomery street, 
Sau Francisco, California, on MONDAY, THE TWENTI- 
ETH (20th) DAY OF JANUARY, 1S90, at the hour of 3 
o'clock I'. M., o( said day, to pay said Delinquent Assess- 
ment thereon, together \nth costs of advertising and 
■ expenses of the sale. 

GEO. R. SPINNEY, Secretary. 
Office, 310 Pine St., Room 28, San Francisco, California. 

•INVENTORS, TAKE NOTICE 1 

L. petersonTmodel maker, 

368 Market St., N. E. cor. Front (up stairs), San Francaico 

Experimetital machinery and all kinds of models. Tin 

and brasawork. All communications strictly confiden- 

lia.l 




^ 0* - "^ ^'^^ 

V^ I r n g and 
Scienbi r Pies<! 

Pacif" I. 

f^ural Press* 






RUBBER FACTORY, 




Monarch Belting. 

The I' ies of this B«lt are 

U ITEObyCOTrON RIVETS 

Which hdid -ht-ni firmly tofcefher. 

£ach Rivet is Independeiit 

And F Mows the Strwtili. 

THERE ARE NO STITCHES 

TO B11K4K, aod 

The Belt has a Smooth 
Surface. 



Hose, Belting, Packing, Etc. 

ALL KINDS OF RUBBER GOODS MADE TO ORDER IN A FEW HOURS. 

W, F. BOWERS & CO., 409 Market St., San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO TOOL CO, 

MANDFAOTUBBRS OP 

IRRIGATING PUMPS 

AND 

Machinery of all Kinds. 




PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

BABOOOK & WILCOX 

Patent Water Tube Steam Boilers 

^Estimates Furnished on Appliratiou. 



''Send for Oatalogues. 



OENTRlTUGAt PUMP. 



FIRST and STEVENSON STS.. S. F. 




LIDGERWOOD M'P'Q CO 



UANUPACTDRBRS OF 



HOISTING ENGINES. 

300 Styles and Sizes. 5000 in TTse. 



96 Liberty St., New 
York. 

34 & 36 West Monroe 
St., Chicago. 

'\ 197 to 203 Congress St. , 
BoatoQ. 

y PAEKE &UCY CO., 

Agents, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Send for Catalog:ae. 




Valuable Gold Mine 
FOR SALE, 

Bond, or will give party an interest who vdU erect a suit- 
able mill and furnish sufficient capital tor working pur- 
poses. SlO.OOO already expended in developments. 

Estimated Ore in Sight, $100,000. 

For particulars, addresH 

T. L B., Box 3617, San Francisco. 



QUICKSILVER 

For Sale In Lots to Suit bv 

PARBOTT Ss OOh 
806 Oalifomla St., San Frsnolaco, Oa). 



Books on Working Ores. 



By Guido Kustel, M.. E. 

Roasting of GooD and Silvkr Or es (Second Edition) and 
the Extiactiou of their Respective Metals without 
Quicksilver. By GuiDO Kustbl, U. E. 1880. 
This rare book on the treatment of gold and silver ore 
iiVitliQut quicksilver is liberally ilhistrated and crammed 
fullcf fact.~>. It t'ives short and conci-ie descriptions of 
various processes and apparatus employed in this countrj' 
and in Europe, and the why and wherefore. It contains 35fl 
paifci, euibracing Illustrations of furnaces, supplements 
and w orking apparatus. It is a work of great merit, by 
an author whose reputation is unsurpassed in his specialty 
Pricf,, S3, coin, postage free. Sold hy Dewey & Co., Pub- 
lishers, 220 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



PRACTICAL ' 

Books on Mining 

AND IRRiGATION. 



PRACriCAL GOt-D-MINING. — A comprehen- 
£Ki\'e treatise on the origin and occurrence of gold-bear- 
inif gravels, rocks, and ores, and the methoda hy wblcti 
the gold ia extracted. By C. G. Warnford Lock. 788 
pages, with 8 plates and 271 engravings in the texi, 
4to, cloth, §15 00, ixpresa prepaid. 

IRRIGATION".— Kgyptian Irrigation! By W. Will- 
I oc!<3, with introduction by Lt. Col. J. C. 'Ross. ThlB 
work embodies the information, collected durine four 
and a half .\ ears, of the irrigation eyetems of Egypt. 
EneineerinET iiuestirus. such as silt-deposits, dratnage, 
irrigation, the Barrngea, flood protection, methods of 
regniat'on, locks, etc., have been treated in detail. 367 
pages, Urne Svo, with 20 plates and numerous engrav- 
ings iu the text. Price S15.00, express prepaid. 

MEXICAN MINES — Dahlgren's Historic Mines of 
Mexico, on'ya few copies l^ft; price §25.00. Handbook 
to the Historic Mines ot Mexico, price $1.00. 



Descriptive Catalogue aod Circulars of Bol^ka -relsting 
I Assa; ing. Mining, Electricity and Mechanicil Eogiaeer 
ng, sent free on application. 

E. & F. N. SPON. Publishers, 

12 Cortlandt St., "New Tork. 




WATER TANKS, TOINK TANKSI 

CALIFORNIA WINE COOPERAGE CO. 

FULDA BBO.S., Proprietors, 

30 to 40 Spear St., San FranctBoo. 

ALL KIVDS OP CASKS, TANKS, Etc. 

lySuiP. MisiKQ. and Watbr Tanks a Specialty. 'El 



PENGERIAN 
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Are the Best , 

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Samples for trial of 12 different styles by luflil, oa 
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, BLftKEMiN & CO., "^.^JTSPiVr^' 



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Fob CATALOGl/ES, ESTIMATES, ETC. , Address, j. 

Clayton Air Compressor Works 1 



43 DEY ST., NEW YORK. 



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H. EVANS & GO. 

(Succesaore to THOMSON & EVANS), 

110 and 112 Beale Street. S. F. 

MACHINE WORKS, 
Steam Pumps, Steam Engines 

and all kinds ot MACHINERY. 

hdp 



FOR RENT, CHEAP. 

BRICK BUILDING at corner of Folsom ant| Nineteeuth 
streets, in subdivisions, floors or parts of floors. Will 
furnish power and give leases. 

CHARLES ASHTON, 
41 1 Monigomery Street, S. F. 




"WITTER'S SPRINGS." Ji^"^^ 

miles east ol Ukiah. Comfortable Hotel. Quiet Cabins 

Lovely Scenery. Low Chargea Its waters are a sate 

cure tor Dropsy, Scrofulous and Skin Diseases, Rhouma. 

'iwm. ete. AMreas. H L. DBNIO, Upper Lake. 



Jan. 18, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



47 



List of U.S. PateBts for Pacific Coast 
Inventors. 

Eieportad by I>ewey 6i Oo.. Plone«r Patent 
SoUoltore for Pacific States. 

FOR WEEK ENDING DEC, 31, 1889. 

418.346.— Station Indicator— M. Aoihony, 
Indicator— M. Anthony. 



S. F. 

418,347.— Station 
S. K. 

418,639.— Shirt— Frank Batler. Slide, Cal. 

418.496.— Suction Dkeuge— J. W. Brown, S. F. 

418,505.— Hasi' Lock— Descalw & Moriimer, 
Pelcrs. Cal. 

kii.os2.— Collar Stuffing Machine— C. Ew- 
•DR, S. F. 

418.407 —Fkuit Drier— F. H. Gilbert. Union 
Ridge. Washington. 

418,613.- Ocean Motor— I. S. Goldman, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

418,513.— Hydrant Coupling-S. R. Hackley, 
S. F. 

418.514.— Concentrator— I. W. Heilig, Poiis- 
town. Pa. 

418.531.— Windmill— A. G. Norton, Arroyo 
Grande, Cal, 

418.471.- Setting Spud for Dredgers -A.; P. 
Payson. S. F, 

418,331.— Derrick- W. B. Pless. Stockton, Cal. 

418.590.- Surf Power— J. Ringer, Coronado, 
Cal. 

^,8481.— Hydro Carbon Burner— J. H. Whit- 
burn, Los Angrles, Cal. 

FOR WEEK ending JAN. 7, 1890. 

418,860.— Metallic Roofing— H. Anderson, 
S. F. 

418.862.- Shoe for Thrashers— Henry Bryan, 
Modesto, Cal. ^ 

418 941. — Broom-Brush Bridle— J. B. Buten- 
schon, Portland, Or. 

■ 418.943 —Wave Motor— R. B. Davy, San 
Diego. Cal. 
418,865.— Oat Holler— L. C. Dibert, S. F. 
418.867.— Discharge Door for Steam Di- 
gesters— P. F. Dundon, S. F. 
418,868.— Annunciator -J. Finck, S. F. 
.418,712.— Track Gage— J. J. Gr.ffin, San Ber- 
nardino, Cal. 

418 946.— Folding Bed Screen- J. j. Grifiin, 
San Bi'nardino. Cal. 

419.014.— Stamp Canceling Machine — W. 
Groih, Seattle. Wash. 

418,870.— Ruler and Pencil Sharpener— J. 
T. HaztHi. S F. 

418.871. — Electrical Indicating Apparatus 
— G. A. Holt. O^k'and. Cal. 

418,730. — Hop-Drier — W. J. Leechman, 
Slaughter, Wash. 

418.873.— Well- Boring Apparatus— E. F. Lit- 
tlepage, San Jose, Cal. 

418,732.— Car-Coupling— A. Lynch, Eugene 
City. Or. 

418.874.— Saw Setting Machine — B. Mclntire, 
s. K. 

419,066.— Life Preserver— O. Quist, Colton, 
Cal. 

418.877.— Windmill Governor- A. J. Salis- 
bury, Hueneme. Cal. 

419,082.- Horse Checking Device — W. P. 
Smith, Renton, Wash. 

418,964. — Knife Cleaner — Jos. Thompson, 
Decoto. Cal. 
418.96?.— Bird Trap— B. Walton, Compton, Cal. 
418.966.— Ventilator for Boots and Shoes— 
P. Welander, S. F. 

The lolowiog: brief list by telegraph, for Jan. U, will 
appear more complete on receipt of mail advicea: 

California— James Spiers and E. H. Booth, S. F., rock- 
hreaker; Jacob Price, San Leandro, traction engine; 
James M. Schofleld, Merced, bottle.stopper; Bartlett 
Mclntyre, assignor to the Vulcan Iron Works, S. F.. clip 
for wire rope way; Geor^te W. Pardee and G. and R. H. 
Leaman, Tower Lake, wagon-brake; Edward M. Kniijht, 
San Mateo, assignor to Itapid Safety Fi.ter Co , S, F., 
filter; Frank A. Huntington, S. F , caishing-mill; Will- 
iam H. Keep, aasignor of half to S. A. Hathaway, 
Stockton, windmill; Miles B. Dodge, assignor to Parked 
Lacy, S. F., two patents for rock-breaker; George E. 
Dow, 3. F., pump; John W. Eiaenhuth, S. F., clipping 
machine; Isaac B. Abraham. S. F., adjustable and re- 
movable armor for ships; Frank W, Bitley, S. F., flexible 
shaft coupling. 

NOTB.— Copies of U. S. and Foreign patents furnished 
by Dewey & Co., in the shortest time poseible (by mail 
or telegraphic order). American and Foreign patents 
obtained, and general patent business for Pacific Coast 
inventors transacted with perfect security, at reasonable 
rates, and In the shortest possible time. 



lever ia looked in place, together with oertain 
details of coaetrnctioa. 

Anncsclatoh. — JaliuB Finck, S. F. No. 
418,868. Dited Jan. 7, 1S90. The invention 
reiatea to the drops for electric aoDODciators. 
It oonaiata in the novel arrangement of the drop- 
shutter and the armature of the magnet. The 
object of the invention ia to provide an annan- 
oifctor drop which ia adapted to be operated by 
a Bimple construotion and arrangement of the 
armature, thereby eimplifying and lesBeDinf; 
the cost of the manafacture of the device. 

Oat Hcller.— Loyd C. Dibert, S. F. No. 
418 865. Dittd Jan. 7. 1890, This invention 
belongs in the olasa of grinding mill-stock ma- 
chinery and the object is to provide a machine 
of this class of great capacity and adapted for 
rapid and tff^otive work 

Shoe for Thra.shing Macqines. — Henry 
Brvan, Modesto. No. 418,862. Dated Jin. 7, 
1890. This patent otfvere certain improvuments 
in thrashing-machines, and it ia especially ap- 
plicable to the shoe in which the aieves or screens 
are tixed. The peculiar movement given to the 
shoe ia particularly useful in clearing the sieve 
of green heavy weeds whioh are often cut and 
carried through the thrashing and cleaning 
machinery and whioh are liable to olog the 
cleaning aieves. By the peculiar motion de- 
signed the weeds are lifted continaoasly and 
the grain allowed to settle through and sepa- 
rate from them. 

Windmill Governor. — Alfred J. Salisbury, 
Hueneme, Ventura Co. No. 418 877. Oated 
Jan. 7, 1890. By means of a variable fulcrum 
and a series of weights any wind may be util- 
ized by the windmill, giving each velocity of 
wind only such work as it can do. 

Electrical Indicating AprARATUS.—Geo. 
A, Holt, Oikland (Mary £. Holt, administratrix 
of said G. A. Holt, deceased). No. 418 871. 
Dited Jan. 7, 1890. The object of this inven- 
tion ia to provide for the electrical transmisBion 
of the readings or record of one indicator 
located in a given position to one or more indi- 
cators located or distributed at convenient 
points, whereby the condition of the firet* 
named indioator may be readily seen without 
examining it directly. The invention consists 
in the novel circuit-maker and breaker in con- 
nection with the indicator whose readings are 
to be transmitted, the novel mechanism of the 
indicator to which the readings are transmitted, 
an electric circuit, and details of construction. 
This device maybe used in connection with the 
indioator of a ship's log, or, in fact, any kind of 
indicator. 

Saw-SetTing Machine. — Bartlett Mclntire, 
S. F., assignor to the Vulcan Iron Works. No. 
418.874. Dited Jan. 7, 1890. This is a simple 
and effective saw-setcing machine especially 
adapted for the setting of the teeth of band- 



The Magnetism of Some Metals and 
Minerals. 

[Written (or the PRF.qs by Mklvili.k Attwiod.I 

The nine metals ulossiGed as ** Noble Metals' 

are non-maguetic and do not therefore exert any 

influence on the magnetic needle. They are 

as follows : 

Speclflo gravity. 

1— Morcury 13.5 

2-Silver 10.47 

3-G..|d l!>--* 

4-fIatiuuni 21.5 

6-I'uliadiuui 11 » 

0— lUi.Klum — 11- 

7— Iridium l**- 

8— Kuthoriaml 7. 

fl— OHQjium 10. 

Of the base metals, five are knowD to be mag- 
netic, namely : 



Speoillc gravity. 

7.8 

3. 



I— Iron 

li-Niokel 

a— Cobalt S & 

4— Chromium 6.8 

5— Uau^iinese 7. 



Notices of Recent Patents. 

Among the patents recently obtained through 
Dewey & Co.'b Scientific Press U. S. and 
Foreign Patent Agency, the following are 
worthy of special mention: 

Combined Kdler and Pencil -Sharpener 
John T. Hazlett, 8. F. No. 418.870. Dated 
Jan. 7, 1890. This is one of that class of arti- 
cles in which a ruler and pencil-sharpener are 
combined in a single instrument or device. In 
this the ruler has a longitudinal groove in its 
top with side flanges, and a pencil-sharpener 
seated in said groove with its surface below 
the surface of the ruler, whereby the side 
flanges serve as guides for the movement of the 
penoil and the sliding strips in said groove at 
each end of the ruler, and abutting against the 
ends of the sharpener for holding the sharpener 
in place. 

Discfargb Door for Steam Digesters and 
Retorts.— P. F. Dundon, S. F. No. 418,867. 
Dated Jan. 7, 1890. The invention relates to a 
drop bottom or door for discharging the con- 
tents of digesters or steam tanks which are 
used for rendering lard, tallow, and other like 
matters. It consists of a door or bottom suit- 
ably fixed to the bottom of the digester, a 
lever-arm and a supplemental eccentric lever 
for looking the same, and the door when closed, 
and a sorew whioh acts against the door to pro- 
dace any desired oompression upon it after the 



Well-Boring Apparatus. — Europe F. Lit- 
tlepage, San Jose. No. 418,873, Dated Jan. 
7, 1890. A casing is lowered into the outer 
casing of the well, within which it moves easi- 
ly; a chain provided with elevator buckets is 
lengthened the desired extent, and a sutGcient 
number of the lengths of a ohannel-iron guide 
are attached together to lower the cutters to 
the bottom of the well. The chain being re- 
volved by means of the driving shaft and gear- 
ing at the top, it causes the revolution of the 
chain-wheel and shaft within the casing at the 
bottom of the well. The cutters are caused to 
continuously excavate the material beneath the 
well'Casiug so as to allow the latter to be 
pushed down as the work proceeds. At the 
same time the elevator buckets on the chain 
serve to carry up all the material excavated and 
delivered at the top of the well, this operation 
continuing as long as may be desired. 

Metallic Covering for Roofs and Walls, 
Henry Anderson, S. F. No. 418,860. Dited 
Jan. 7, 1890. This is an improvement in cov- 
eriog the roofs and walla of buildings and con- 
sists of narrow strips, which are nailed upon 
the studding or rafters of the building, and 
in conjunction with these of a series of over- 
lapping, flre-proof metallic plates or shingles, 
which are placed upon these strips and are in 
tarn held in plaoe by them. 



Quicksilver Statistics. — The Superintend- 
enc of Census has appointed J. B. Randol of 
this city as speoial agent of the Census Oflioe 
for the collection of statiatlos relating to quick' 
silver. No better appointment could have been 
made, Mr. Randol being thoroughly con' 
versant with the subject and accustomed to 
doing such work — in fact he has personally col- 
lected the data concerning quicksilver raining 
for many years past, and hia annual tables of 
production are considered authoritative. Mine 
operators and owners of works are assured that 
their answers to the questions sent them will 
be held strictly confidential and the names or 
operations of individuals will not be disclosed. 

Robert M, Howl AND of thiscity, well known 
in the mining regions of the coast, died at 
Lordsburg, N. M., on Tuesday last. He was 
51 years of age and came to the Pacific Slope 
from the State of New York 33 years ago, and 
was one of the first miners in the White Pine 
district and in several other camps of Nevada. 

The lumber-mills on Poget Sound have re- 
duced their working-time. 



To this number may albo be added the 
*' Native Alloy " found in the black sand with 
the sea-beach gold at Gold Bluff and other 
places on the California and Oregon coast. The 
native alloy occurs in thin scales of about 1-50 
of an inch in diameter, and in color very much 
resembles nickel. It is strongly magnetic and 
can easily be separated from the beaon gold and 
platinum with a common bar magnet. The 
specific gravity ia 18. An analysis was made 
with the following results : Platinum, 48; 
osmiridinm, 44; iron, 6; remainder unde- 
termined. 

The following are a few of the "minerals" 
known to exert a sensible influence upon the 
magnetic needle: 1st, magnetite (magnetic 
iron ore); 2d, pyrrhotite (magnetic pyrites); 31, 
franklinue (zinc ore); 4th, almandite (garnet); 
and 5th, kyanite. 

1st — Magnetite, magnetic oxide of iron. 
When pure it contains 72 41 per cent of iron. 
It occurs crystallized, massive, and in a state 
of sand. Chrome iron ore is sometimes met 
with in a similar state and may readily be mis- 
taken for magnetic ore, but it may be instantly 
distinguished from the latter by being non- 
magnetic. Magnetite is the moat important 
of the ores of iron, and it is from that ore, with 
charcoal as a fuel, that the finest kinds of iron 
and steel are produced. 

The Russians have acquired a high reputation 
for a particular description of sheet iron; their 
mode of manufacture is kept secret, but they 
are made from iron smelted and worked 
throughout with charcoal as the fad. 

The Norwegian charcoal blooms (bloom — a 
lump of malleable iron hammered nut into a 
solid, more or less rectangular mass) bring in 
Sheffield, England, from $90 to $100 per ton. 
The ore used for making the blooms is a mag- 
netite, and the fuel charcoal. The charcoal is 
made from sprnoe and Scotch fir. It takes 
upward of a ton of charcoal for every ton pig 
iron produced. 

The iron used at the gold mines in Brazil is 
mostly made by the Catalan process from mag- 
netites with charcoal, and is much cheaper and 
in every respect superior to the iron used in our 
CiUfornian quartz-milla, 

la considering the theory of the " Catalan 
Forge or Blooming Furnace " (although direct 
experiment is required to settle the point), it it* 
probable that during the first two hours when 
a weak stream of blast is found most advan- 
tageous to the process, carbonic oxide is a prin- 
cipal result of th'B smothered combustion, and 
this gas reacting for such length of time on a 
pulverized ore effects its complete deoxidation. 
The subsequent increase of temperature 
causes the grains of reduced iron to agglutinate 
together, as in the puddling process, into a 
bloom capable of being molded under the 
hammer. 

Specimens of Norwegian magnetite may be 
seen at this nffice. They were selected by the 
late D-vid Forbes, when consulting engineer 
to the Norwegian Charcoal Iron Co, 

In this State we have many large deposits 
of magnetites as pure as any found in Norway, 
and near them abnndance of spruce, nut pine 
and other timber from which the best of char- 
coal can be made. Water-power can also be 
had for the blast and for forging, so that the 
finest kind of iron can be made in this State at 
a comparatively cheap rate, and with the ad- 
vantage of a home market for all that can be 
made. 

A large quantity of Norwegian iron is now 
being used in our different quartz-mills. This 
is one of the industries that has been sadly 
neglected, 

NickeliferouB pyrrhotite is the ore from 
whioh most of the nickel of commerce is ob- 
tained. It is strongly magnetic, specific grav- 
ity from 4.50 to 4 90. It ia found in quantity 
at the Oap mine (New Jersey), at Modum, Nor- 
way, Craigmuir mine, Scotland, at Piedmont, 
etc. I lately received some specimens from t. 
large and newly discovered deposit in Canada. 
The ore was so strongly magnetic that I got 
Mr, Liine, the lapidary, to cut out from one of 
the'specimens a piece of the ore into the shape 
of a bar magnet with which I can now readily 
pick up iron filings. 

Prof. Price has lately discovered in one of 
the gold mines he is working near Placerville 
a considerable quantity of nickel mixed with 
the pvritic matter. 

Kyanite," a dense eilioate of alumina, 



compass needle and may be used as such, a 
fact little known but worth knowing. 

In the Mining and Scientific Press, Jan. 
21, ISSS, there iaa drawing and desonpcion of 
an '* Kit^ctro-Magnetic Apparatus for Separat- 
ing OtCB." Ic has been used extensively in 
freeing the magnetites from earthy matter and 
other impurities. 

The smaller machine with permanent mag- 
nets might be used to great advantage in the 
milling of gold <[aartz and silver ores; the 
pulp from the bitteries being made to pass 
over the rollers on its way to the amalgamating 
p^tna BO that any magnetite or abraded iron 
from the shoes and dies that might be in the 
pulp would be taken out of it. The abraded 
iron from the shoes and dies in a large mill will 
amount to from 100 to 300 pounds per day, ac- 
cording to the hardness of the veinstone. 

It frequently happens that in copper mines a 
large quantity of zincblende is mixed with the 
yellow ore, rendering both nearly valueless, as 
they cannot be separated by dressing, but if 
both are crushed fine and dressed together and 
afterward carefully calcined, and the calcined 
ore passed over the magnetic rollers, the cop- 
per will be separated and the zinc may be dis- 
tilled without ioj uring the retorts — so that 
both ores may by that simple means be made 
valuable. 

In 1867 David Forbes gave me a small " dip- 
ping needle "of tne same pattern as then used 
by the Norwegian mining engineers for tracing 
their magnetic iron deposits, which are some- 
times covered to a considerable depth with 
earthy matter. 

A large-sized instrument after the same pat- 
tern, with a movable graduated circle attached 
to it, could be used in the examination of large 
cast and wrought iron shaftings. By simply 
passing it along the face of the shaft it would 
show if there was any defect In the casting of 
the former or welding of the latter. 



Meetings and Elections. 



San Franctsco Stock and Exchange Board, 
Jan. 14. — President, W. £. N.)rwood; vice-presi- 
dent, Walter Tiirnbull; treasurer. Geo. T. Marye; 
chairman, O. V. Walker, and secretary, Fred W. 
Hadley; Commitiee on Membership— George C. 
Hickox, T. T. Atkinson, W. Edwards, J. B. Dyer, 
C. D. Laing. Charles E, Anderson and Charles H. 
Stoutenborough. 

PACirrc Stock. Board, Jan. 14.— Robert G. 
Horn, president; Stephen Oiis, vice-president; R. C. 
Tobin, treasurer; Frank Moroney, secretary; J. B. 
Bourne, Caller, and W. H. Wiight, W. S. Taylor 
and T. McGinnis, Executive Committee. 

Silver King M. Co., Jan. 14.— Directors— C. 
H. Fish, H. H. Noble, W. S. Lyle. Geo. E. Grey 
and E. A. liirney. Lawyer Crittenden submitted a 
resolution condemning the action of the directors in 
appointing a manager at a sa'ary of $200 a month, 
as contrary to law and the interests of the stock- 
holders. Upon being put (o the vote, the resolution 
was voted down. 

The Pioneer Business Association of Alaska 
has perfected its organ z uion and elected the fol- 
lowing permanent officers: John F. McGovern of 
Towrispnd, McGovern & Co., president; R. A, Wil- 
son of Sisson. Crocker & Co., vice-president; R. B. 
Kittredge of Neville & Co., secretary; Leon Maison 
of George W. Hume & Co., treasurer. The associ- 
ation has also decided to instruct Miner W. Bruce, 
the Eastern representative of the organizition, to 
take steps toward securing the appointment of a 
Fish Commission for Alaska. 

Silver King M. Co., fan. 15. — H. M. Noble, 
president; Geurge E. Gray, vice-president; Aug. 
Waterman, secreiary. 

Sierra Nevada M. Co.. Tan. 15.— Charles H. 
Fish, president; A. W. Havens, vice-president, 
and Con O'Connor, C. Hirschfeld and Herman 
Zidig, trustees. E. L. Pirker was reelected sec- 
retary and D. B. Lyman, superintendent. The 
secretary's financial report showed a credit of $26,- 

Appreciative. 

The Mining and Scientific Press, the stur- 
dy friend and advucate ot the minmg interests 
of the coast, has entered upon a new volume. 
The Fres.s has done much lor the interest it 
advocates and no miner should allow himself 
to be without it. — Trinity Journal, 

The Sin Francisco Mining and Scientific 
Frbss, the oldest nnd bettt paper known to us, 
has completed its 59 ih volume. — Prescott {A. T.) 
Courier. 

Complimentary Samples. 

Persons receiving this paper marked are re- 
quested to examine its contents, terms of sub- 
scription, and give it their own patronage, and, 
as far as practicable, aid in circulating the 
journal, and making its value more widely 
known to others, and extending its influence in 
the cause it faithfully serves. Subscription 
rate, $3.00 a year. Extra copies mailed for 10 
oents, if ordered soon enough. If already a 
subscriber, please show the paper to others. 



pird 250 
whe^fuBpended"on7n Ixisrwill behave like i companies employ from 200 to 75 men each, 



An Army of Miners. — A total of 6175 men 
are employed in the mines in and about the 
vicinity of Butte City, Montana. The Decem- 
ber pay rolln of mineu in that vicinity footed up 
a total of SE617,500. The Anaconda employs 
3000 men and pays out monthly $300,000 for 
employee' wages. The Boston & Montana and 
Butte & Boston Companies have a total of 1600 
employes on their pay-rolls. The Parrott em- 
ploys 400 miners and th6 Colorado and Blue 
~ " " and 300 resoectively. The other 



48 



Mining and Scientific Press, 



[Jan, 18, 1890 




-£L> HXJ ixn7i i>a"C3rT?o 3xr, 



. MANUFACTURE K OP - 



CENTRIFUGAL ROLLER QUARTZ MILLS, 

Concentrators and Ore Crushers, 
Mining Macliinery of Every Description. Steam Engines and Shingle Machines. 

SEND FOR CIRCULAR. 

Centrlfneal K"ll«i- Qnartji Mill. S13 IE'IUST JSTHTm:'!', ^'-^^^T "^'Ft-.A-TSTCHSCO, CA-Xj. 



FRISBE E WE T MILL. 

This Mill, with a weight of less than 9000 pounds, 
has a capacity of three tons per hour of hard 
quartz to 40 mesh ; has been thoroughly- 
tested ; we guarantee its work as 
represented, and we will give 
long time trial. 




IT HAS NO MORE WEARING PARTS THAN CORNISH ROLLS 

And renewals will not cost over one-half as much as for Btampa. Will run empty, or with small 
amount of ore without injury. The attention of parties having Cement Grravel is called to thi^ 
Mill, as it will run 100 tons per day to No. 8 mesh; 30 to 35 H. P. 

OUR DRY MILLS are the most economioal ever built, and are extensively used with 
record of several years. No grinding in Dana. Mill finishes to any fineness desired. 

FRISBEE-LUCOP MILL COMPANY. 

GIDEON FRISBEE, Manager, - - 59 & 61 First Street, San Francisco 
HOOKER & LAWRENCE. Gen'l Aa'tt. 145 Broadway. New York. 



Warehouse, 15 PARK ROW, NEW YORK, 

The Oldest and Largest Manufacturers in the United States of 

VULCANIZED RUBBER FABRICS 

Solid Vulcanite Adapted to Meclianlcal Purposes. EXTRA RUBBER 

EMERY WHEELS. X°^^^ ^^'■"'""^_?.olL^ "^^^ 

Large Wheels made on Iron f, ,,ivA™-v_«™il\A Mining PurpOSeS. 

Circular woven Seamless Antiseptic 
Rubber Linkd "Cable" Hose and 
Te 8T Hose f-v the upe of Steam EngineB, 
Force Pumps.RoUiog Mills, Ironworks, 
Factoriea, etc. 



Guts Cooler and Freer 

THAN ANT OTHER WHEEL 
IN THE MARKET 

rr 





Emery Vulcanite Wheel. 



ARNETT & RIVERS, 

17 and 19 MAIN ST., SAN FRANCISCO. Extra steam Hose. 




PERFECT PULLEYS 

First Premium Awarded at Mechanics* Fair, 1884. 

Sole Licensed Manufacturers ol the 

MEDART PATENT WROUGHT BIM PULLEY 

For the States of California, Oregon and Nevada, and the Territories of Idaho, Washington 

Montana, Wyoming, Utah and Arizona. Lightest, Strongest, Cheapest and 

Best Balanced Pulley in the World. Also Manufacturers of 

PAT. ooT. 26, X881. SHAFTING, HANGERS AND APPURTENANCES, 

jST SSOT) tor CIRCUI.AR8 AND PRIOB LlST,*^ 

tfoe. 129 and 181 FBBMONT STBEIBT SAN FRANOIBOO. OAL. 




Vulcan Iron "Works, 



135-145 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 



mil 



! stamp Batteries, Pans and Settlers, 
"Dodge," and Improved Blake, Rock-Breakers, 
"Dodge" Pulverizers, Slime Machines, etc. 

AERIAL WIRE ROPEWAYS. 

(VULOAN PATENT SYSTEM.) 

The cheapest and most reliable form of Transportation of Ocg, Coal, eto. Saves foar>fifth8 
of the cost by any other method, 

SAW-MILL ) ( CORLISS, 

REFRIGERATING } MACHINERY. STEAM ENGINES { Meyer Cut-off, 
CABLE-ROAD ) ( Slide Valve. 

SPECIAL MACHINERY TO ORDER. 

SHAVTING, 

''''b"x«\ repair work solicited. 

HANOERS, eto. 



AT-ES ILJIOnXTE! 



BY USING 



WATER POWER TRANSMITTED BY ELECTRICITY 

To Run your Mills, Hoists and Trams. 

For Circalar giving particulars send to 

KEITH ELECTRIC CO.. 



■ MANnFAOTUBEBS OF — 



Apparatus for Electric Light and Electric Power, 



OFFICE, 40 NEVADA BLOCK, 



Factory, Stevenson St., bet. First and Ecker, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



X888. X888. 

CATALOGUE OP 200 PAGES. 



The matter is readily 
available. — Tradesmati. 

A Complete Work, — 
Colliery Enginee-r. 

Handy for reference. — 
Min. and Sci. Press. 

Should be in the hands 
of every Engineer and 
Contra'^t'ir.— Eng. and 
Mill. Journal. 

A valuable addition to 
the literature on the 
mbject. — Eng. and B'l'g 
Rcc&i'd. 



A TRE&TISE AND HANDBOOK ON 

ROCK DRILLING 

AIR COMPRESSING 

Mailed Free. 



23 Park Place, New York 



In reality a hand- 
book. — Am. Man'fact'r. 

Supplien a lon^ felt 
want. — Man'/rs" Jiecord, 

This Catalogue is one 
of unusual interest and 
value.— it M, Gazette. 

This is a thoroughly 
good publication. — E^' 
gineering News. 

The useful information 
will be found specially 
viluable, — Eng, and 
B'l'g Record. 



60I.B AQBNT FOR 



AlaiaiDiie Sloes, Bifis and H. D. MORRIS, 

LRBSHEE PLATES, 220 Fremont St., San Francisco, 

MANUFACTURERS' M PURCHASINU ACEST, 



Chrome Oast Steel for 
Bock Drills, Etc. 




ADAMANTINB. 



Special attentir^ given to purchase of 

MINE and MILL SUPPLIES. 

>AMANTINE SHOES AND DXES.— Guar 
d to prove 'better and cheaper than any others 
x,.^v,.'B solicited, subject to above conditions. 

H. D. MOBBia. 



Jan. 18, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



49 



AMALCftMATINC MACHINERY. 

stamp Mills lor Wet or Orf Crushing. 
Huntington CentrKugil Quartz Mill. Drying 
Cylinders. Amalgamating Pans, Settlers, 
Agitators and Concentrators. Retorts, Bul- 
lion and IngotMoulds, Conveyors. Elevators, 
Bruckners and Howell's Improved White's 
Roasting Furnaces, Etc. 



FRASER & CHALMERS, 

MINING MACHINERY 



IMPROVED CORLISS vA^^v'^ElVifM ENGINES. -X* BOILERS 



CONCENTRATING MACHINERY. 

Blake. Dodgeand Comet Crushers, Cornish 
Crushing and Finishing Rolls, HarlzPlunger 
and Collom Jigs. Frue Vanner & Embrey 
Concentrators, Evans*. Calumet, Collom's 
and Rittenger's Slime Tal)les. Trommels, 
Wire Cloth and Punched Plates. Ore Sam* 
pie Grinders and Heberle Mills. 



HORIZONTAL. VERTICAL 
. . . AND SECTIONAL 



:XIMC^I^OV^D mitrnM^WL S^^^kHSIPS 



Hoisting Engines, 
Safety Cages, 

Safety Hooks, 

Ore CARS, Water & Ore 
BUCKETS, 

Air Compressors, 

Rock Drills, Etc. 

GENERAL MILL AND 
MINING SUPPLIES, ETC. 
Sectional Machinery 

FOR 

MULE-BACK 

TRANSPORTATION. 



General Offices and Works: 

BRANCH OFFICES; '^Vv^'^s^J^iTsZ" 

Oalie de Juarez. LIMA, PERU, South America. 
SOLW WESTERN AQBNT8 FOB 




Pumping Engines 

and Cornish 

Pumping Machinery, 

IMPROVED 
WATER JACKET 

Blast Furnaces for 
Calena& Copper Ores, 

SLAG CARS AND POTS, 

Roots & Baker 
Pressure Blowers, 

SUSPENDED 

TRAMWAYS. 

FULTON AND UNION STS., CHICAGO, ILL.| 

, No. 2 Wall St. DENVER, COLO., 1316 Eighteenth St. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH,} 
St. LONDON, ENC, 23 Bucklersbury, E. C. CHIHUAHUA CITY, MEXICO, No. I I 
JOHANNESBURG. TRANSVAAL, South Africa. 

TYLER WIBffi WORKS D IDBLB OBIMPBD MINING CLOTHS. 



THE PELTON WATER "WHEEL 

GIVES THE HIGHEST EFFICIENCY OF ANY WHEEL IN THE WORLD. 






/hi^^^ 






OVER 800 ALREADY IN USE. 

Affords the Most Simple and Keliable Power for all 

Mining and Manufaoturing Machinery. 
Adapted to heads running from 20 up to 2.000 feet. 
From 12 to 20 per cent loetter results guaranteed than 

can be produced from any other Wheel in the Country 

ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION. 

Power from these Wheels can be transmitted long 
distances with small loss, and is now extensively used in 
all parts of the country for generating both power and 
light. 

APPLIOATIONS 

Should state amount, and head of water, power required, 
and for what purpose j with approximate length of pipe ; 
also, whether the application i<i with reference to Wheels 
or Motors described below. SEND FOR CIRCULARS 

The Pelton Water Wheel Co. 

121 HAIK ST., SA.N FKANCISCO, CAL. 



oivr '^7^J!l.tis;:e^ :si/!£cyrcoFLf3, 



Varying from the fraotion of 1 up to 15 and 20-horae power. Unequaled fnr all light-runninsr machinery. Warranted to develoo a given 
amount of power with one-half the water required by any other. 63" SEND FOR MOTOR CIRCULAR. ADDRESS AS ABOVE "^ 





JAMBS LBFFBL'S 

Mining Turbine Water Wheel. 

These Wheels kre designed for all purposes where limited quantities of water and 
high heads are utilized, and are guaranteed to give more power with lessVater than 
any other wheel made. Beins: placed on horizontal shaft, the power 'is transmitted 
direct to shafting by belts, dispensing with gearing. 

Estimates furnished on application for wheels specially built and adapted In 
capacity to suit ftny particular case. 

Further information can be obtained of this form of construction, as well as the 
ordinary Vertical Turbines for Wooden Penstocks and In Iron Globe Cases, free of coetj 
by applying to the manufacturers. 

JAMES LEFFEL & 



Springfield, Ohio, 



CO., 

or 110 liberty St., New York, 



FRASER & OHALMER^, General Agents, 

Ohlcaso, 111., and Denver. CoL 

PARKE A LACY, General Agents. San Francisco, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA IRON YARD. 

HBNRT J. ROGERS & CO. 

Successors to CHA3. CALLAHAN 
IMPORTERS AND DEALBES IN 

CAST and WROUGHT IRON SCRAP 

SBCOND-HAND BOII.i;RS 

AND OI.D MACHIMERT 

Of every deaorlption. 

Tie Higlest Price pail [or all ilMs ol Metals, 

Office and Yahd: 128 and 130 Folsom St., S. F 

Telephone No. 87. 



FOR SALE 

' Hydraulic Mining Property in Souihern Oregon. Good, 
Estenslre. For patticuUts (Piincipals only) address, 

"A. M.," Box 77, 

Qrants Pass, Oregon, 



THOMAS PRICE & SON, 

Assay Oflace, Chemical Laboratory, 

BULLION ROOMS and ORE FLOORS, 

524 Sacramento Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

COIN RETURNS ON ALL BULLION DEPOSITS IN 24 HOURS. 

WORKING TESTS OF ORES BY ALL PROCESSES. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO CONCENTRATION OF ORES. 

Ores Beceived on Oonsignment, Sampled, Assayed, and Disposed 

of in the Open Market to the Highest Bidder. 



(Aetalllirgy apd Ore3. 



SELBY 

SMELTING and LEAD CO.. 

416 Montg^omery St., San FranciBco. 

GOLD AND SILVER REFINERY 
And Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Gold, Silver and 
Lead Ores and Snlphnrets. 

HUiUFACTURIRS 0F..» 

BLUESTONE. 

LEAD PIPE, 

SHEET LEAD, 

SHOT, Etc., Etc. 

ALSO UAJlDFACTUilKRS OF 

Standard Shot-Gun Cartridges, 

Under Chamberlio Patent. 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO.. 

IMPOHTBRB AND DHALSR8 IN 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS, MINE 
AND MILL SUPPLIES, 

ALSO CHEMICALS. AND PHYSICAL, SCHOOL AND 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS. 
6ff & 65 First St., cor. Mlsslon^San Franoisoo. 
^yp^ We would call the attention of -r- -^^ 
1 ( Asaayers, Chemists, Mining Com- <S LM-C-g ^3/ 
paniea, Milling Companies, Pros- ^SKVTERSE^ 
pectora, eto., to our full stock of V^-— -:: ? 
Balances, Furnaces, MufBes, Crucibles, Soori- 
6ere, etc., including, also, a full stock ol 
Chemicals. 

Having been engaged in furnishing these sup- 
plies slno> the ust discovery of mines on the 
Paci&c Coast, we feel confident from our experi- 
ence we can well suit the demand for these 
goods, both as to quality and price. 

Agents for the Morgan Crucible Co., 
BUtersea, England. Also for E, O. Uenuis- 
ton's Silver Plated Amalgam Plates. The plates 
of this well-known manufacturer are thorough'y relia- 
ble, and full weight of Silver guaranteed. Orde-s taken 
at bifl lowest prices. Our Illustrated Catalogue and As- 
say Tables sent free on Application. 

JOHN TAYLOR fy OO. 



Nevada Metallurgical Works, 

NO. 28 STEVENSON STREET, 

Near First and Market Streets, S. F. 

0. A. LncEBARDT, Manager. Establibhbd ISN 

Ores worked by any ProoeBe, 
Ores Sampled, 

Assaying in all its Branches, 
Analyses of Ores, Minerals, Waters, eto. 
Working Tests (practical) Made, 
Flans and Specifications furnished for the 
most suitable Process for Working Ores. 

Special attention paid to Examinations of 
Mines; Plana and Reports furnished, 

O. A. LUCKHABDT & CO., 
(Formerly Huhn & Luokhardt, 
MlnlnjT EnRlneers and Metanurorlsts 



J. BUBTBL. 



-k 



METALLURGICAL WORKS. 

S18 Pine St. (Basement,, 



Corner of IfOldesdorfl Street, 



SAN FKANOISCO 



Ores Sampled and Assayed, and Tests made by my 
Process. 
Assaying and Analysis of Ores, Minerals and Waters. 
Mines £^amined and Reported on. 
Practical Instruction given in Treating Ores by Im- 
proved prooefises. 

G. KUSTEL & CO.. 
Mining Engineers and Uetallurdsts. 



GREAT REDUCTION! 
BATTERY~~SOREENS. 

Best and Cheapest in America. 

No imitation, no deception, no planished or rotten 
Iron used. Only genuine Russia iron in Quartz Screens. 
Planished Iron screens at nearly half my former rates. 

I hate a large supply of Battery Screens on hand 
suitable for the Huntington and all Stamp Mills, which I 
will Bell at 20 per ^ent discount. 




PtRFORATED SHEET METAL 

For Flour and Rice Mills, Grain Separators, Revolving 
and Shot Screens, Stamp Batteries and all kinds of Min 
ihg and Milling Machinery. Iron, Steel, Copper, Brass. 
Zinc and other metals punched for all uses. 

Inventor and Manufacturer of the celebrated Slot Cut 
or burred and Slot Punched screens. 

Mining Screens a specialty, from No. 1 to 16 (flnej. 
Orders promptly attended to. 

San Francisco Pioneer Screen Works, 

SI & 323 First St., San Francisco, Cal. 

JOHN MSr. QUICK, Proprietor. 



TblB paper l3 printed with lnl£ Manufac- 
tured by Charles Eneu Johnson & Co.. 600 
South 10th St., Philadelphia. Branch Offl- 
oes— 47 Rose St., New York, and 40 La Salle 
St., Ohicaso. Asent for the Pacific Ooastr- 
Joaepb Hi Dorety. sao Oommerclal St. t S F 



50 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 18, 1890 



H^A^KET :KePORTS. 



Local Markets. 

San Francisco, Jan. i6, 1890, 
Clear weather the fore part of the week encouraged 
the trade in the opinion that distributive trade 
would soon set in, but this has been dispelled by 
heavy rains at the close. Although merchants, 
manufacturers, and business men in general are 
discouraged over the present situation, yet they look 
forward to a more prosperous year than enjoyed for 
several years past. 

Money is growing easier, with the general impres- 
sion in fioancial circles that there will be more ease 
within a short time than at any time in last year. 

The uncertainty regarding what action Congress 
will take on the silver question is at present a dis- 
turbing element in the silver market, which veiy 
naturally has its effect on silver mining, 

MEXICAN DOLLARS— Liberal stocks and a 
light demand cause a weak tone. With the spring 
months a freer demand is looked for. The market 
has held fairly steady at 75 ^©76 throughout the 
week. 

Mexican dollars closed to-day dull at 76 J^ cts. 
asked from first hands. 

SILVER— In the local market prices have ruled 
at New York prices, owing to a light export demand. 
The Mint is in the market and cleans up supplies 
fairly well. Yesterday (Wednesday) the market 
moved up to 97 cents in sympathy with an advance 
in New York and also abroad. Higher prices for 
silver were generally based upon the influences here- 
tofore given in these columns. It is reported by 
telegraph that Secretary Windom is drawing up a 
bill based on his last report to Congress on the sil- 
ver situation. It is claimed that he will make a few 
well-timed changes with a view of making his posi- 
tioQ still more acceptable to both mono-metaiiists 
and bimetallists. It is asserted that the latter are 
drawing more closely together in favor of free coin- 
age of silver, and failing to get it this session of 
Congress will insist on the monthly purchases of 
silver being increased to $4,000,000. 

Cables came through to-day quoting silver in 
London strong at 44 5:^ d. On this basis, with to- 
day's prices for sterimg exchange, our market ought 
to be very near 98 cents. Export buyers quote 
97 J^ cents. 

QUICKSILVER— Th.e market is quiet at quota- 
tions. Receipts the past week aggregate 146 flasks, 
and exports by sea 218 flasks to Mexico. 

BORAX— Receipts the past week aggregate 300 
ells, and exports by sea 25.745 lbs. to New York. 
The market is steady, with a continued free demand 
from the East 

. LIME— Receipts the past week aggregate 2586 
bbls., and exports by sea 350 bbls, to Honolulu. 
The market is quiet at steady prices. 

LEAD — The market is reported essentially un- 
changed. Thei-e is no denying but that there is an 
uneasy feeling in the market due largely to the un- 
certainty regarding congressional action in Mexican 
lead ores. A leading New York paper says that 
the administration is quietly at work furthering our 
trade relations with Mexico. That country, in re- 
turn for the simple establishment of a liberal policy 
toward her lead-ore product, is willing to open ex- 
ceptional privileges to this country for her manu- 
factured products of iron, steel, textiles and other 
articles in the long list of exports of the United 
States. This Government could afford to pay a 
bounty to the lead as proposed for the sugar pro- 
ducers, rather than have this single item interfere 
with the enormous trade which the United States 
would thus acquire with Mexico. And without 
some such evidence of friendly and reciprocal action 
the market which should be opened to the United 
States will continue to be controlled and occupied 
by Great Britain and even Germany. 

TIN — For spot the market is dull and heavy. 
Sales from second hand of B. V. plate are reported 
at $4.90, and of pig at 0.2% and 22j^c. The En- 
glish market for pig is weak under continued selling 
pressing. Imports the past week aggregate 33,380 
boxes of plate. English cables report tin plate 
strong and active at a sUght advance. 

IRON— The local market is reported strong at 
full prices, but the demand is still slow. The East- 
ern and European markets continue to be reported 
active and strong under free consumption. The 
impression prevails at the E^st that there will be 
continued activity in the market for some time to 
come. 

COPPER — The market has held to strong prices 
throughout the week. Late London cables to the 
Iron Age report as follows: Copper has ruled 
strong on the support of good demand for consump- 
tion and large speculative purchases. Merchant Bar 
selling up 10 ,^51 17s 6d. Stocks decreased in 
December aboui 9000 tons, the greater portion of 
which represents sales by bankers holding the late 
syndicate's stock. It is calculated that French 
financiers have sold during the past nine months 6g,- 
000 tons. The stock of Anaconda matte is now 
about 25,000 tons. About 460 tons were withdrawn 
from stores in December. I'he importations of this 
material into England last year were 19,000 tons. 
A sale has been made of 1000 tons argentiferous 
Anaconda matte at los 6d. The stock of copper 
decreased last month 2500 tons, and the visible sup- 
ply 1200 tons. The total supplies received in 1889 
were 13,000 tons less and the deliveries 49.000 tons 
greater than during the previous year. 

COAL — Imports the past week aggregate as fol- 
lows: From Newcastle, N. S. W. , 9749 tons; Ta- 
coma, 2200; Coos Bay, 1965; Seattle, 514; Depart- 
ure Bay, 2300; overland, 30; total, 4558 tons. The 
consumptive demand continues exceedingly heavy, 
and had it not been for the large spot supplies, 
prices would be higher. While agents for coast 
coals and importers of foreign are bullish in their 
talk, large dealers and consumers are offish and will 
not anticipate their ^ants to any extent except at 
concessions. As heretofore stated, the large output 
of the coast coUieries is an important factor in keep- 
ing prices down. 



Eastern Metal Markets. 

By T6legrai)h. 

New York, Jan. 16, i8go. — 'The following are 
the closing prices the past week: 
Silver in Silver in 



London. 


New York 


Copper. 


Lead. 


Tin. 


Thured»y....4« 


mi 


814 60 


S3 87, 


SSO 80 


Friday 448 


mi 


14 60 


3 87, 


20 65 


Saturday 44§ 


96J 


14 50 


3 87 


20 46 


Monday 44i 


flSi 


14 60 


3 87; 


20 60 


Tuesday 44^ 


96S 


14 60 


3 87 


20 46 


Wednesday.. 44f 


97 


14 45 


3 874 


20 45 



New York, Jan. 15 — Borax is without essential 
change. Quicksilver is dull but fairly steady. Tin 
has shaded off slightly under realizing sales abroad. 
Copper quiet and firm. Lake ingot advanced to 
i43^c.; spot. i4^@i4Kc. Futures helped specu- 
lators. Arizona, i3^c; casting, 13c; London cable, 
5o@5Tc per lb. spot. The market is a trifle easier. 
Pig lead, 3% c. There was no important trade in 
futures.' 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 

COMPILBD BVERY THURBDAT FROM ADVERnSKMENTB IH THE MiNINO AND SOIHNTIFIC PftB8B AND OTHER S. P. J0DRNAL8 

ASSESSMENTS. 



San JPrancisco Metal Market. 

WHOLESALE. 

Thursday, January 16, 1890. 

I Antimony — 25 @ — 

BORAX—Refincd, in carload lota 7@ 7 

Powdered " " " 7 @ 

Concentrated " " " 62@ — 

All grades jobbing at an advance. 

COPPKR— 

Bolt 21 & 22 

Sheathing 22 @ 24 

Ingot, jobbing ^' @ ^8 

do, wholesale 15 @ 16 

Fire Box Sheets 22 (o) 24 

Lead— Pig 4@ 4 

Bar S @ — 

Sheet 7@ — 

Pipe 6 @ — 

Shot, discount 10% on 500 baga Drop, $ bag. 1 45 (<$ — 

Buck, ^bag 1 65 @ — 

drilled, do 1 85 @ — 

Steel— English, a 16 @ 20 

Canton tool 9(^ 9 

Black Diamond tool 9 ® 9 

Pick and Hammer 8 @ 10 

Machinery 4@ 5 

Toe Calk 4i@ — 

TiNPLATK— B. v., steel grade. 14x20, P. S 5 50 @ — 

B. v., steel grade, 14x20, spot 4 90 @ 5 00 

Charcoal, 14x20 6 75 {a 7 00 

do roofing, 14x20 & m (fib — 

do, do, 20x28 12 00 @ — 

Pig tin, spot, ^ fi) 22 (01 22i 

Coke— Eng., ton, spot, in blk 13 50 tai5 00 

Do, do, to load IH OU @ — 

QuiOKaiLVKB— fiythetlask. 47 00 to47 50 

Flasks, new @ — 

Flasfea, old 35 M 

Chrome Iron Ore, ^ ton 10 ^0@ 

Iron— Bar, base 

Norway, base 



Spot. 

Iron— Glengarnock ton 35 00 @ 

Eglinton, ton 35 00 ^ 

American Soft, No, 1, ton,. @35 00 

Oregon Pig, ton @35 00 

Puget Sound 35 00 @ 

Uliiy Lane White (928 00 

Shotts, No.l 35 00 C<*35 00 

"Bar Iron (base price) ^ lb . . . — @ — 

Langloan 35 00 @ 

Thovnclifife 35 00 @ 

Gartsherrle 35 00 @ 



3 @ 3i 


(Se 6} 


To Load. 


34 @ - 


32i(0. - 


321@ - 


— @ — 


27 i - 


32}@ - 




34 (8 - 


34 (a - 


34 a- 



Lumber. 



Pine. Fir and Spruce. 

RRTAIL. 

Rough Pine, merchantable, 40 ft $20 oo 

41 to 50 ft 21 00 

51 to 60 ft 23 00 

61 to 70 ft 27 00 

1x3, fencingr 22 00 

1x4, " 21 00 

1x3, 1x4 and 1x6, odd lenertha 19 00 

Second quality 17 00 

Selected 24 00 

Clear, except for flooring 31 00 

i-lear for floorioff 2 00 

Clear V. G. No. 1 flooring 6 00 

Firewood 14 00 

Dressed. Pine, floooring, No. 1, 1x6, . . 32 00 

No. 1, ].\4 34 00 

No. 1, li.\4, ljx6, and odd aizes 37 00 

AH sizes, No. 2 27 00 

Stepping, No. 1 44 00 

Stepping, No. 2 34 00 

Ship timber and plank, rough 27 00 

Selected, planed 1 side, av'^e 40 ft. . 29 00 

*' •' 2 31 00 

" " 3 " " " " .. 33 00 

" " 4 " " "" .. 35 00 

Deck plank, rough, average 35 ft 35 00 

Dressed, average 35 feec 40 00 

Pickets, rough, B. M 20 00 

jxlj, 4 ft long, ^ M 6 50 

Coal. 



TO LOAD. 

Per Ton. I Per Ton, 

Australian ... 7 50 @ 7 75) Lehigh Lump.. 16 50@17 00 

Liverpool St'm 8 50 @ Cumberland bk 16 00@16 60 

Scotch Splint. 9 00 @ 9 00 Egg, hard 15 50@16 00 



.lOBBINQ. 


S17 OC 


IS OC 


20 OC 


21 00 


19 OO 


18 00 


16 00 


16 00 


22 00 


28 00 


'io'oo 


29 00 


30 00 


33 00 


24 00 


35 00 


25 00 


18 00 


24 00 


26 CO 


28 00 


30 00 


32 00 


S5 50 


16 00 


5 00 



Cardiff 9 50@10 00| 

SPOT TROM ■yARI>. 

Wellington 8 9 00 

Scotch Splint 9 uO 

Greta 9 uO 

WeBtminBterBrymbo. 9 oO 

Nanaimo 9 uO 

Sydney 8 yO 

Oilman 7 



Seattle 7 00 

Coos Bay 6 00 

Cannel 12 00 

Egg, hard 18 00 

Cumberland, in Backs 19 00 
do, bulk 18 00 



Bullion Shipments. 



We quote shipments since our last, and shall be 
pleased to receive further reports: 

Commonwealth, Jan. 13. $20,000; Con. California 
and Virginia, it, $44,870; Hanauer, 7, $3400; Ger- 
mania, 7, $4237; Savage (for December). $29,429; 
Hale and Norcross (for December), $71,607; Han- 
auer, 8, $3550; Germania, 8, $2042; Hanauer, 9, 
$2950; ID, $3190; II, S3000. 



Our Agents. 

Our FRrBNDB can do much in aid of our paper and the 
cause of practical knowledge and science, by asBisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their in- 
fluence and encouraging favors. We intend to aend none 
but worthy men. 

J. C. HoAQ — San Franelsco. 

K. G. Eailby— San Francisco. 

Chas M. Moody— San Francisco. 

W. W. Thbobalds— Los Angeles Co. 

E. Fischer— Central California. 

Gbo. Wilbok— Sacramento Co. 

E. H. S0HA8FFLB— Fresno Co 

C. Edward Robertson- Humboldt Co. 

Frank S. Chafin— Butte Co. 

Wm. H. Hillb art— Oregon. 

B. R Dbmimq — Oregon. 



Company. Location. No. Am't. Lbvied. 

Adelaide Copper M Co Nevada., 1 

Belle MeM Co Nevada '" 

Btsh & Belcher M Co Nevada, 

Bullion M Co... Nevada, 

Boiie Con M Co California, 

Booth G M Co California, 

Camp Creek M & M Co California . 

Con New York MCo N evatla , 

Con St Gothard M Co California. 

Exchequer M Co Nevada, 

Golden Giant MCo California 

Kentuck M Co Nevada 

Mayflower Gravel M Co California, 

Mexican M Co Nevada. 

Miueral King M & M Co Arizona, 

Mono G M Co California. 

North Occidental G & S M Co. . Nevada, 

Natoma Water & M Co California., 'i.. 

Overman SM Co Nevada.. 61.. 

Palisade MCo ....Nevada.. 2., 

Heg Belcher & Mides MCo Nevada.. 5.. 

Trinity River Tunnel & M Co. California. . 2. . 
Teirakoflt M Co California. . 3. . 



.13.. 
..35.. 
..11.. 
.. 4.. 

. 1.. 

. 2.. 

. 1.. 



,.45.. 



,.29.. 
.. 1.. 



Dblinq't. Salb. Skorbtart. Place of Businbbs, 

l..Dec 31... Jan 3l....Feb 2S..W HGraves 426 San some St 

15. .Dec 4.... Jan 8.... Jan 3U..J W Pew 310 Pine St 

15. Dec 4. . . . Jan 8 Jan 30. .J W Pew 310 Pine St 

25., Dec 4. ...Jan 8.... Jan 24.. RR Graypon 3^7 Pioe St 

25.. Nov 11.... Dec 17.... Jan 22,. E L Burling ;.. 309 Montgomery St 

2.. Nov 23.... Dec 28.... Jan 20.. Geo R Spinnty 310 Piue 8t 

2.. Dec 30.... Feb 12....Mar 10..A S Folger 213 Fremont St 

■ Feb 5..CEKlhott 309 Montgomuy St 

.Mar 10.. T Wetzel 522 M ntgomery St 

.Feb 11. .0 E EUiott 309 Montgomery St 

..Feb 12..HTBrigg3 DownieviUe 

.Feb 4.. J WPew 310 Pine St 

.Feb 25..JMorizio 328 Montgomery St 

.Feb 18. . <J E Elliott 309 Montgomery St 

.Mar 3..PHLeonard 419 California St 

.Jan 24..BL Burling 309 Mo tgomery St 

.Jan 27. .W H Watson 3U2 Montgomery St 

.Feb 25..PWAmes 516 California St 

.Feb 26..GD Ed wards 414 California St 

.Jan 30.. D Buck 309 Montgomery St 

.Feb 2'i..EB Holmea 309 Montgomery St 

Jan 28. .L H Pockman 28 California St 

Feb 14. . W J Garrett 308 Pine St 



15.. Dec 11 Jan 15, 

5. .Jan 14... .Feb 17. 
25. .Dec 16. ...Jan 21. 

i..Dec 17.... Jan 23. 
3U..Dec 11.... Jan 14. 
50. .Dec 27. ...Feb 3. 
25. .Dec 21. " " 
10. Jan 10, 
25.. Nov 18, 

7..DLC 2. 

5. .Dec 21. 
25. .Dec 31. 

5.. Nov 1. 
25. .Jan 4. 
50.. Nov 27. 



.Jan 27.., 
..Feb 10.. 
..Dec 23.. 
..Jan 6... 
..Jan 28... 
..Feb 5... 
..Dec 26.., 
..Feb 6.., 
..Jan 6.. 
..Jan 21,., 



Dec 14. 
MEETINGS TO BE HELD. 

Naste of Compawt, Looation. Seoretaby Offtoe m S. P. Meetdto Date 

Bald Mt Extension M Co California, .J W Orear .DownieviUe Annual Jan 23 

Chicago M& M Co W Graut 520 Montgomery St Annual Jan 20 

(JrockerM Co Arizona.. A Waterman 309 Montgomery St Amiual .... Jan 20 

Del Monte MCo Nevada. .J W Pew 310 Pine St Annual .... Jan 29 

Lucky Hdl Con M Co F D Black Baldwin Hol;el Feb 13 

MerrimacM Co R W Heath 318 Pine St Annual Jan 23 

North Commonwealth M Co Nevada.. J WPew 310 Pine St , Aimual .... Jan 28 

Natoma W & M Co California. .P W Amea Annual! ." Jun 21 

NevauaSaltS Borax Co HC Van Wjck 310 Pine St Amiual Jan 21 

Spriug Valley M k. Drigafcion Co Cal..W E Davis 402 Front St Annual Jan 20 

Sulphur Bank Quicksilver M Co Cal..TWiutringham 3il6 California St.... 

Utah Uon M Co Nevada.. A H Fish 309 Montgomery St Annual .. ' Jan 29 

Utali ConM Co Nevada.. A H Fiah 309 Montgomery St Annual '.Jan 29 

LATEST DIVIDENDS— WITHIN THREE MONTHS. 

Name ob" Company. Location. Shcbetakt. Office in S. F Amottnt Payable 

Champion M Co T Wetzel 522 Montgomery St 10 Jan 20 

Caledonia M C Nevada.. AS Cheminant 328 Montgomery St 08 " Aue 5 

Con California & Va M Co Nevada.. A W Havens 309 Montgomery St 50 . " "janlO 

Derbec Blue Gravel M Co California.. T Wetzel 522 Montiromery St 10.. .' Dec 23 

Idaho M Co CaUfornia Grass Valley 5 00 Nov 7 

Mt Diablo MCo Nevada,. R Heath 319 Piue St 30 Oct2^ 

Pacific Horax SaltJfc Soda Co. ..California,. A H Clough 230 Montgomery St 1 00 Jan 10 



Mining Share Market. 

The mining share market the past week was only 
fairly spasmodically active, with hardly perceptible 
fluctuations in the Corastock. The dull, depressed 
maruet, with reliable private information from the 
mines hard to get, suggests that it is done to secure 
all the stock possible, preparatory to an upward 
move. This (Thursday) morning the market 
opened very dull but at fairly firm prices; after 
Board call prices strengthened, with Yellow Jacket, 
Belcher and Crown Point the leaders. In outside 
stocks the Tuscaroras were more active, with an at- 
tractive up move, followed by a 20 per cent set- 
back. The Quijotoas were dull. In Bodie there 
was a little more doing, doubtless due to a report 
current that there would be a change in the super- 
intendent and a cutting down in the salaries of the 
officials, which was done at a special meeting of the 
directors held on yesterday. Usually well-informed 
parties look for still lower prices in the Bodies soon, 
owinR to a report of the necessity of another assess- 
ment later on. 

From the mines reliable private information is 
hard to get. The latest information confirms pre- 
viously received advices ot an important develop- 
ment in Belcher on the looo-foot level when work 
was stopped. Work will be, or has been, com- 
menced on the iioo-foot level to tap the find lower 
down. The ore is said to be high grade. In an- 
other Gold Hill mine a ten-foot body of rich ore was 
run into on an upper level, but no official mention 
made of it. Why it is that information of the above 
character is kept back is beyond our ken. It should 
undoubtedly receive attention from some quarter. 
Outside stockholders have some rights, and to keep 
tormed on the work in the mines is one of them. 
The mining superintendents get large enough 
salaries to take time to add a few more words to their 
skeleton and unsatisfactory weekly reports, so as to 
give fuller information. A report is current among 
well-informed persons of a strike in one of the North 
End mines, but we have not been able to get the 
news confirmed up to this writing. Official letters 
received to-day (Thursday) from Hale and Norcross 
report higher battery assays and very important 
work going on in the mines. From Belcher the 
letter goes out of the way to mention everything ex- 
cept that which is wanted. From Crown Point no 
ore was milled, owing to. the freeze-up; this caused 
the temporary .discharging of over 50 miners. The 
prospecting work in the mines is still continued. 
From Con. Imperial an improvement is reported in 
the crosscuts. Overman is reported to be stoping a 
higher grade of ore. From the outside mines there 
is nothing new to report outside of official letters. 
The change in the superintendency of the Bodie mine 
is looked upon as being more favorable for that mine. 
The Bulwer and Standard mines are running out 
bullion. Private advices from the Tuscaroras re- 
port that Commonwealth will make another ship- 
ment of bullion by telegraph soon. Owing to their 
size, these shipments are to be made every few days. 
The news from the mines is of a very promising 
character and augurs well for the future. From the 
Quijotoas nothing new is to hand. The annual re- 
port of the Silver King Mining Co, is of a fiat- 
tering character. Extensive work was done in last 
year and the mine put in position for better working 
this year. 

The Anaconda and St. Lanrena mines, Mon- 
tana, were opened last week, but had to be 
cloBed again, as the fire ia still ragini; in their 
depths. No attempts have been made to re- 
cover the five bodies known to be in the mine. 
It ia thoaght the company will now either at- 
tempt to flood the mine or subdue the 6rd by 
the iojection of carbonic acid gas. The latter 
will probably be resorted to, as the former 
would be difficalt on aoooant of the enormouB 
extent of the workings and the scarcity of 
water. 

The Con. California and Virginia Mining Co. 
has plaoed on special deposit the sum of $22, • 
836, the amount due for royalty on ore ex- 
tracted from the mine since auit was brought 
against the Comstock Tunnel Company by 
holders of Satro-tnnnel stock. This money 
will be paid over ae soon as the coart deoidea 
whioh of the litigants 1b entitled to receive it. 



Table of Lowest and Highest Sales in 
S. F. Stock Exchange. 



TSkMs or 

OOMPAKT. 



Alpha ,,,. 

Alta 

Aodes 

Beloher 

Best& Belcher... 

BullioD 

Bodie OoD 

Benton 

Bulwer 

Oommonwdaltb . , , 
Con. Va. &Oal.... 

Ohallenge 

Ohollar 

Oonfldence 

Oon. Imperial 

Caledonia 

OrowD Point 

Crocker 

EureJiaCon 

Exchequer 

Grand Prize 

Gould& Curry 

Hale & NororoBB. , 

Julia 

Justice 

Kentuck 

Lady Wash 

Mono 

Mexican 

Navajo 

North Belle Isle... 

Nev. Queen 

Occidental 

Ophir 

Overman 

PotOBi 

PeerlesB 

Peer 



Ending 
Dae. 25 



95 
1.25 1.3o 

45 

1.85 2.15 
Z.35 2.5U 
.30 



.65 



.65 



S. B. <iM 

Sierra Nevada. . 

Silver Hill 

Scorpion 

Union Oon 

Dtai- 

Weldon 

Vellow Jacket.. 



3.00 
i 25 4.70 
1.10 1 25 
2.15 2.46 

3i 

.20 .30 

.16 
1,50 1.90 

.26 



25 

.35 . 
1.30 1.50 
2.30 2.55 

30 



.30 .. 
,40 ,' 

2,20 2,1 

,iO .. 

1.10 1,: 

85 I.CO 
50 ,65 
3.05 \ 
76 

I 75 1,90 

30 .35 
15 

1,40 1.55 

.76 1.16 

1.75 2,00 



Week 
Ending 
Jan. 2. 



1.00 1.15 

1.30 1.L6 

,65 

2.25 

2.30 

40 



.25 



2.85 3. 05 

4i 51 

1,30 1..50 

2,35 2,75 

4,00 4.45 

33 , 

25 . 

1,60 2. 

25 ,30 



25 ,; 

65 .. 

1.35 I.I 

" FO 2.85 

30 

1.25 1,60 

55 



1,00 1,10 
1.00 



10 

2.10 2.40 
60 



70 

3.30 3.9n 

70 

1.90 2.20 

35 

.10 15 

1 40 1.80 

1,10 1.3* 

1,85 2,25 

45 

2,15 '2,60 

" 70 



Week 

Ending 
Jan. 9, 



1.25 
60 

1.65 1,85 
2,10 2.35 

.25 

.30 



Week 

Ending 
Jan. 16. 



3,10 3.61 

4,50 4,8 

1,10 1,20 

2.26 2.46 

25 ,30 

1.50 l!75 



3.40 3.85 

4,31 4,60 

1,10 1 25 

2 20 2.25 

3.25 .... 

25 .30 

15 .... 

1 60 1.65 

"■ ,25 



.60 



.25 



1.30 l.lO 
2.60 2 "" 

25 
1.20 . 

30 



.30 .35 

,15 2.45 

.35 ' .41 

1,05 l,2i 

1 00 I.IS 



3.05 

55 

1.65 

15 
1,40 
1.'5 
1.75 
.30 
.15 
2.10 



90 .... 
1.20 1.25 

60 

1.70 1.85 
2.25 2.35 
.55 
.45 



.15 .25 

.66 .75 

1.31 1.40 

' !0 2.75 

25 .30 

1.15 1 30 

.35 .70 

.30 

2'i6 



,36 



.40 
1.25 



1.05 
.25 

.60 .65 

3.05 3,40 

65 .60 

,'0 1.75 

25 .35 

1,40 i!55 

I.OO 1.10 

" l.i5 



35 



25 
15 

2.05 2.20 
.55 .60 



1.70 1.95 



Sales at San Francisco Stock Exchange. 



TauBaDAY. Jan, 16. 9:30 A. M 

150 Commonwealth 3.8C 

20O Justice. 1,30 

50 Kentuck 70c 

300 Mexican 2,30 

300 New York 4t'c 



200 Occident 65o 

200 Ophir 3 40 

500 Peerlesa 20c 

100 Savage 1.60 

20 Sierra Nevada 1,90 

100 Union 2,i6 

100 Weldon 16o 



New Incorporations. 

The following companies have been iDcorporated, 
and papers filed in the office of the Superior Courti 
departmcDt lo, San Francisco : 

Brunswick Con. M. Co.. Jan. 9. Location, 
California. Capital stock, $500,000. Directors — 
J, B, Robinson, H. W. Philbrook, W. C. Wallace, 
Ed Fitzgerald and W. N. Kempton. 

Merten Manufacturing Co., Jan, 9. Ob- 
ject, to manufacture drugs and chem'cals. Capital 
stock, $50,000. Directors — Geo. B. Bayley, A. V. 
Bayley, Aug. F. Merten, Geo. A. Story and Wm. 
P. Lamb. 

Pajaro Valley R. R. Co., Jan. 10. Object, to 
construct a railroad from Watsonville to Salinas, a 
distance of 20 miles. Capital stock, •530.000. Di- 
rectors — J. D Spreckels, J. B. Stetson, Myer Ehr- 
man, J. L. Koster and M. P. Jones. 

Marysville-California Ditch Co,, Jan. 10. 
Location, Yuba county. Capital "stock, $500,000. 
Directors — L. Bowles, J. H. Sayre, H. de Veuve, 
H. de Veuve Jr. and D, O. Doggett. 

Wilson & Brother, Jan. 13, Object, to man- 
ufacture doors, blinds, sa<:hes, etc. Capital stock, 
$300,000. Directors— G. E. Wilson, M. C. Wilson, 
Geo. H. and W. Y. Kellogg. 



The action against Governor Steveneon in the 
Kentack Mining Co.'s suit for accounting will 
come up next week before the referee appotnteil 
by the Conrt. 



Ono Ohmen's 12x12 .Automatic Enslne; 

best style in -uee. Also, 1 Boiler 48 in. x 16 ft. Both nearly 
new. Apply to . J. yfT. QOICK, 221 First bt., 
(Top Floor) San Franoieco, Oal, 



Jan. 18, 1890] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



51 



UNION IRON WORKS, 



Corner First and Mission Sts,, San Francisco, Cal. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



SPECIALTIES: 

Soott St O'Nell Automstlo Cut-off KoK'nea, Ide Enjlnuit, Rock 
Breakera, V!u»rtz Mllla, HulBtlng Kugintjii. 



MINING AND MILLING MACHINERY. 



ROLLS AND CONCENTRATING MACHINERY. Cornish and Other 



COPPER AND LEAD FURNACES. 



Capable of Uocklng the Lar£:ettt Vessels. 
SEND FOR CIRODLARS. CABLE ADDRESS "UNION." 



ALL CLASSES OF MARiNE WORK. 



DOW STEAM PUMP WORKS. 

office AND WORKS, 114 AND 116 BE ALE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, 

MANUFACTnEERS OP 

Independent Air Pump and 
Condenser, 

FOR STATIONARY ENGINES OR STEAM PUMPS. 



DOW'8 IMPROVED STEAM PUMPS, 

SINGLE OR DUPLEX, 

For Every Possibie Duty. 



Mining Pumps, 

IRRIGATION PUMPS, 
Artesian Well Engines, 




POWER PUMPING MACHINERY. 

SPEED GOVERNOES, 

Balance Valves and Pressure 
Regulators, 

FOR STEAM PUMPS. ETC., ETC. 



ZatO.. XJtO. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



HORACE D. RANLETT, 

Ores, Mining, and Commission, 

420 Montgomery St., S. F. 

8hlp8 under advances to imelting works Id Boflton, 
Hew York, Baltimore and Liverpool. 

Twenty-one years' experience in Shlppingf Ores and 
U&na^in^ Minos. 

SolicltB ConBignments of Copper Produce and Maoago- 
ment of Min'ng Matters. 

All bueintJ89 conducted on Cash Bania. 

Purchase andebipmcnt ol Mining Supplies A. Specialtt, 

Sales of Developed Copper Mines undertaken. 

Buflinesa Manager of UiNlON COPPER MINE, Copper- 
opolis, Cal.; NEWTON COPPER MINE, Amador Co., Cal. 



FRANCIS SMITH & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Sheet Iron and Steel Pipe 

ALL SIZES. 

130 Beale Street, San Francisco, Gal. 



Iron cut, punched and formed, for making pipe on 
ground. All kinds of Toole supplied for making Pipe. 
Jitimates given. Are prepared for coating all sizes of 
Pipe with a composition o( Coal Tar and Asphaltum. 



J. C. WILSON. O. A. O'BRIEN. 

J. MACDONOUGH & CO. 

IMPORTERS AND DBALKRB IN 

COAL AND PIG IRON. 



Principal Office: 

41 MARKET STREET, CORNER SPEAB. 

Yards: 

S. W. Cor. Spaar & g ■ S. W. Oor. Main Se 

Folsom, < Folsom, 

[Telephone No. 1864,] SAN VRAJMCISCO. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



One new double circular Savnuill to carry 60-inch bot- 
tom saw, with wrought-iron hangers for top saw. Fric- 
tion feed-works, patent steel screw double-throw head- 
blocks, with track iron,. saw carriage and frame complete. 

RISDON IRON & LOCOMOTIVE WORKS, 

San Francisco. Oal. 



Tioga District Mining Company, 

Incorporated June 11,1839. Capital Stock, $10,000,000 
BUY AND SELL 

California Gold, Sliver, Quicksilver, Copper 
and Liead Mines 

OF ASCERTAINED VALUE. 

bfflcB, No. IS PARROTT'S BUILDING, N. W. 

Corner of California and Montgomery Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

WM. B. WIGHTMAN, Prea. WM. H. V. CRONISE. Sec, 



IFiMflfili Bier Scale BgsoW. 

tf^Thie Reaolvent IS NOT AN EXPERIMENT but a FAOT, and it will do the work 
oUimed for it at a LESS EXPENSE than any other boiler purge, AND IN NO MANNER 
INJURE THE IRON. 

Carnbqie Brotders & Co., Proprietors op Edgar Thomson Steel Works, 1 
PiTTSBDRan, Pa. Works at Braudock. Oct. 4, l&sT. j 

We uB" tbe Pittsburgh " Boiler Scale Resolvent." and are well satisfied with the results obt-vined. We have 
tested neail> all Compounds presented to us, and this one la the oDly g:ooil thlajf we have ever used. 
Ouv feed- water is heated in Berryman Heateia.but owing to distance of heaters from boilers, we rarely exceed 150 
degrees of heat in feed-water. 

Our water is of the worst character, containing such bad impurities as salphate of lime, carbonate of 
lime, mud, and everything: that Is bad. Very truly yours, WM. R. JONES, Gen. Supt. 

No water in the United States produces scale in greater quantity or of a harder nature than 
the Monongahela River, containing SULPHATE and CARBONATE of lime, iron, MAGNESIA, 
SILICATE, SULPHUR, ALUMINUM, etc. The following well-known manufacturers, who 
are large steam users IN PITTSBURGH, and using the water from said river as boiler-feed for 
all their boilers, USE THIS RESOLVENT in their steam plant, and to whom reference is hereby 
made: Carnegie Brothers & Co., Proprietors of the Edgar Thomson Steel Works; Dilworth, 
Porter & Co. *a Spike Works; and Oliver and Robert's Wire Co. ; and many other firms in the 
great manufacturing center WHERE THE RESOLVENT IS MADE. Reference is also given 
to Robert MoMahon, Boiler Inspector for Alleghany Oo,, Penn., and to the following Railway 
Companies who use it on their locomotives: Kansas City, Fort Scott & Gulf Railroad; Central 
Iowa; Mexican Central; Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern, 
Terre Haute & Indianapolis; Mexican National; and Denver & Rio Grande Western. 

Upon receipt of order. WITH THE PROMISE OF FAITHFULLY CARRYING OUT 
THE PRINTED DIRECTIONS, we will furnish, FOR FIRST INTRODUCTION, a Barrel, 
or Half Barrel, of the Resolvent, and the invoice will bear the following stamp: 

( TO BE PAID FOR WHEN RESOLVENT \ 
I PROVES ENTIRELY SATISFACTORY, j 



tdlicational. 



OP 

ASSAYING AND CHEMISTRY, 

Rooms 46 & 47. ) 628 Montuomerv St., 

2d Floor Montgomery Bl'k. f 8an Francisco, 
Also, Evening ClaeseB, 7 to 10 o'clock. 

JOHN T. EVANS, M. A., PrincipaL 



School of Practical, Civil, Mechanical and 
MINING ENGINEERING, 

Snrveyiiig, ArcMtectire, Drawing and Assaying 

723 MARKET STBBBT, 

The History Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

A. VAN DER NAILLEN, President. 

Assaying of Ores, $26; Bullion and Chlorination Assay, 

826; Blowpipe Assay. $10. Full course of assaying, 960. 

^^Send for circular. 



FOR SALE ONLY BY 



TATUM & BOWEN 



Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast, 

Dealers in Improved Wood-Working Machinery, 

Saw Mill MacMnery, Engues, Boilers, iron-Worlaig MacMiery, Supplies, Etc, 

Sole Agents for Hoe Ohisel-Tooth Saw, Gardner Governor, 
Schultz Leather Belting, Etc. , Etc. 

34 & 36 Fremont St., San Francisco. 85 Front St., Portland, Or. 

iisrif in want of Machinery of any description, write us for Descriptive Circulars and Prices. 



ESTABLISHED 1866. 



PACIFIC CHEMICAL WORKS. 

HENRY G. HANKS, 

Practical and iDdnstrial Cbemist, Assayer 
and Geologist, 

718 MONTGOMERY ST^^ - SAN FRANCISCO. 

jVWill report on the condition and value of any mining property on 
tlie Pacific Coast. Rare Chemicals mode to order. InBtruotions Eriven in 
Assaying and Practical Chemistry 




HEALDS 



BUSINESS OOLLBQB, 

24 POST ST., S. P. 

FOR SEVENTY-FIVE DOLI^ABS THIS 
College inetructa in Shorthand, Type Writing, Book- 
seeping, telegraphy, FeomaDship, Drawing, all the En- 
glish branches, and everything pertaining to buaincss, 
For elx full months. We have sixteen teachers, and give 
Individual instruotlon to all our pupils. Our school has 
iliB graduates in every part of the Statei 

larSlNV FOR CiROXmAB. 

B, P. HEALD, FresldenI, 
o. a, HALKY. Seoretarv. 



RIX k FIRTH, 

225 and 227 First St., San Francisco, Gal. 

Compressed Air and Water Power 
Machinery. 




KNIGHT'S 'MATER WHEEL, 

For Mills, Pumping and Hoisting. 

OVER 800 IN DSB. 
All estimates guaranteed. Send for Circular. 



THE RUSSELL PROCESS COMP'Y. 

TALCOTT H. RUSSELL, Secretary, 
HEW HAVEK CONN. 

p. O. Box 406. 




52 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 18, 1890 




MINING AND ASSAYING. 



A Practical Manual of Wincrals, aiines 
and itlinln;;. ComprlanK i-uggeatiouaas to ti'C localiti-s 
and assuclations of all the Useful Miuerals; full deacriutioua 
of the mo3t effective methoas of both the' qualiDaiive and 
quautitative amUyses of each of theao miuerii]B,.ana hmts 
upoD the various opt-rationa of miuing, iududing arcmtec- 
ture and cooatruction. By Prof. H. S. OHbom, TjL'D. 
Illustrated by 171 engravings. 8vo, 367 pages. Price. .»l.»0 

CW.4 descriptive circular (living! the full table r.f cnn-- 
tents of the above book sent free to any one who will send 
ins address. 

A Treatise on MctallifcronB Minerals ana 
Iff ininff. B D. C. Daviea. With US lUuMtfiitiona. 12iii'i. 
«2iHgea Price »-^.O0 

Mini* Driiinasre. By Stephen Micliell. 8to, 277 en- 
graviufe'S. Price SC.OO 

A Treatise on Earthy and other Minerals 
and Mining. By D. C. Daviea. IVi h 76 engiavmg^ 

12.110. PriCi 85.00 

' The Prospector's Hand Boole. A Guide for the 
prospector +Q'i T.aveler in search of Mutiil-beariug or other 
valuable Miuerals. Illustrated. 12mo. Prme Sl.oO 

MIneralos'y Simplificil. Easy Methoda of Identi- 
fying Minerals, iiicludiug Ores, by meaas of the Blowpipp, 
by Flame Reactinna, liy the Spectro-icop^ and by Humid 
t;hemical Analysis, based on Vor> Koheirs Tables for the 
Determination of Minerals, etc. By Henri Erni, M. D. 11- 
lustra ed. 12mo. Price ».!.«« 

Vndcrff round Treasures: How anil Where 
to W'intl Them. A Key for the Ke;idy Determir.a'i -u 
of Minerals within the United States. By James Orfcnn^ 
Price Sl.->0 

The Assayers' Manual. -An Abridged Treatise on 
the Docimastic txamimitioo of Ores and Furnace and other 
Artificial Products By Eniuo Kerl, P>ofes3or iu the Royal 
SchoolofMi'ies; M-mber of the Royal Technical Commis- 
sion for the Industries and cf the Impt rial Patent Office, 
Eo'lin. Transl it^d from the <»ermaa by William T.Braunt. 
Editor of "The Techno-Chemica' Receipt Book," etc. 
SeoudArae'icau Edition, edited with extensive additions 
by F. Lymvood Garrison, Member of the American In-titute 
of Mining Engineers, Iron and Sttel Institute, Vtrein 
Deutscher Eisenhuttenleute, etc. Illustrated by 87 enj-rav- 
ings. 354 pages, 8vo. Cloth. Price S3.0(» 

A circular of S pages quarto, giving the full Table of 
Contents of this Important Book, as well as a new List of 
Leading Books on Metal Mining, Metailurgg, Mineralo(,y. 
Assaying, Chemical Analgsis, etc , sent free to any one 
in any part of the world who loill send his address. 

tgrThe above or any of our Books sent by mail, free of 
pos'a^ie, at the publication prices, to any address in the 
world. 

gS'Our New an<i Revised Catalogue of Practical and 
Scientific Books. 86 pages, Soo, and our other CataloQues, 
the whole covering eve)-y branch of .Science applied to 
the Arts, sent free and free of postage to any one in 
a7iy part of the world who loHl furnish his addrss. 

HENRY CAREY BAIRD & CO., 

Industrial Publi;Hbii3, B^okhbulers and Importbrs, 
SIO Walnut St., Philadelphta. Pa., U. S. A. 



STEARNS MFG CO., 

29 & 31 Spear St,, San Francisco, Cal. 



tif-fliiti*:-!!: 



MANUFACTDREaa OF 

HIGH-GRADE SAW MILL MACHINERY, 
ENGINES, STEEL BOILERS, Etc. 

—IMPORTERS OF— 

Munson's Leather Belting, Goodell & Waters' Woodwork- 
ing ToolB, Hill'B Clutch Pulleys and Couplings, Emerson's 
Saws, Emery Wheels, Tool and Knife Grinders, Ewart'e 
Link BeltiDEj L. & D. Wood Pulleys, Hoisting aud Pile 
Driving Engines, Eta. 




Great Variety of SHOT GUNS, RIFLES, 

etc. Breech-Loaders from §4 to $100. 
SEND STAMPS FOR PRICE LISTS. 

GEO. W. SHREVE, 

625 Kearny Street, San Francisco, Oal. 



WINCHESTER HOUSE. 



41 Third Street, 



San Francisco, Cal, 



ThiB Fire proof Bri k Building is centrally located, in 
the liealtbiest vart of the city, only a balf block from the 
Grand and Palaue Hotele, and close to all fate,iinboat and 
Kailroad ciHices, 

Laundry Free for the use of Families. 

HOT AND COLD BATHS FBEE. 



Terms, Board and Roam, $1.00 per Day 

And Upward. 

Rooms with or without Board. 

Free Coach to the House. 



VAN DUZEN'S 

STEAMjetPUMP 

For Water Supply Tanks. 

For Fire PDiiip 011 Yard or Switch £ng:lucs. 

For Round lltiUMC Cicneral IVorU. 

For Uralnin^ Ponds, I'itJt, Coirer Dams, etc. 

10 SUet*. «7 to S~5- TlioiiM»nd.s iu use. 

Write for Bescriptivo Pump Circular, v 

VAN DUZEN &, TIFT, CINCINNATI, O, 



PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO., 

UANUPACTUKSBS OP 

t Steel CasHic ?m steel Feriiis 




UP TO 20,000 LBS. "W^BIGHT. 

True to pattern and superior in Btren&rthf toushneBs and durability to Oast or WronsTbt 
Iron In any position or for any service. 

GEARINGS, SHOES, DIES, CAMS, TAPPETS, PISTON-HEADS, RAILROAD and MA- 
CHINERY CASTINGS of Every Description. 



HOMOGENEOUS STEEL, 



SOFT and DUCTILE, 



SUPERIOR TO IRON FOR 



LOCOMOTIVE AND MARINE FORCINGS. 

AIiSO Steel Boda, from } to 3 inch diameter and Flats trom I to S inch. ADgles, Toes, ChannelB and other shape 
Steel Wagon, Buggy, and Truck Tires, Plow Steel; Machinery and Special Shape Steel to Bize and lengths 
ST£!EIi RAIX.S from 12 to 46 pounds per yard. ALSO, Railroad and Merchant Iron, Rolled 
Beams, Angle, Cliannel, and T Iron, Bridge and Machine Bolta, Lag Screws, Nuts, Washers, Ship and Boat 
Spikes; Steamboat Shafts, Cranks, Pistons, Connecting Bods, etc Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, 
and Iron Forgings of all kinds, Iron and Steel Bridge and Roof Work a Specialty. 

HIOHBST PBICB PAID FOB SCRAP IRON AND STB£I.. 
t^ Orders wiU have prompt attention. Send for Catalogues. Address 

PACIFIC ROLLDTO MILL CO., 202 Market St., San Francisco. 



FULTON IRON WORKS, 

HINOKLEY, SPIERS & HAYES, Proprietors. 



^CB.oe, 2X3 



[ESTABLISHED IN 1855.] 



Sa,XX X*X-«t.3CXOllSOOa 




— MANUFACTURBJUi OF— 



TUSTIN'S PULVBRIZBB. 



MABINE ENGINES AND BOIIiEBS.- 

Propeller Engines, either High Pressure or Compound, 
Stern or Side- wheel Engines. 

MINING MAOHINERY.-Hoisting Enginee and 
Works, Cages, Ore Buckets, Ore Cars, Pumping En&flnes 
and Pumps, Water Buckets, Pump Columns, Air Com- 
pressors, Air Beoaivers, Air Pipes. 

MILL MACHINEBY.-Batteries for Dry or Wet 
Crushing, Amalgamating Pans, Settlers, Furnaces, B«- 
torts. Concentrators, Ore Feeders, Rock Breakers, Fur- 
naces for Reducing Ores, Water Jackets, etc 

MISCELLANEOUS MACHINE BY.— Flour 
Mill Machinery, Saw Mill Engines and Boilers, Dredging 
Machinery, Powder Mill Machinery, Water Wheels. 

Tustin's Pulverizer 

WORKS ORE WET OR DRY. 



ENGINE81B0ILER8 

OF ALL KINDS, 

Either for use on Steamboats or for uee on Land- 
Water Pipe, Pnmp or Air Golnmiis, Fish 
Tanks for Salmon Canneries 

OF KVBRT DRSORIPTION. 

Boiler Repairs Promptly attended to and at V9ry moaerate rates. 

AQBNT8 FOR TH8 PACIFIC COAST FOR THB 

I>e£i.XLO StefixxL IPxlzxx-^. 

SPECLALTIES : 

Corliss Bngrlnes and Tnstln Ore Pulverizers. DBANB STEAM PUMP. 

Agrents and Manufacturers of the Llewellyn Feed Water Purifier and Heater. 




THE GIANT POWDER COMPANY 

Manufaoture Three Kinds ot Powder, which are acknowledged by all the Great Chemiats of the World aa 

Ttie Safest and Strongest High Explosives in the Marlcet. 

Of Different Strengths as Required. 

NOBEL'S EXPI.OSIVE GELATINE," which contains 94 per cent of Nltro-GIyoerlne, and 

aELATINE-DTKAHITE, Stronger than Dynamite and even Safer in Handling. 

JUDSON POWDER IMPROVED. 

rOR BAII.ROADS AND LAND CLEARING. Is from three to four times stronger than ordinary Blast- 
ing Powder, and is used hy all the Railroads and Gravel Claims, as it hreaks more ground, pulverizes hetter and 
saves time and money. It is as dry as the ordinary Blasting Powder and runs as freely. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., 

OAFS and FUSE for Sale OBNBRAL AGENTS, «AN FRANCISCO OAL. 





QUARTZ SCREENS 



A specialty. Round, slot 
or hurred slot holes. Gen- 
uine Russia Iron, Homo- 
geneous Steel, Cast Steel or ' 
American planished Iron, 
Zinc, Copper or Brass Screens for all purposes. Cali- 
fornia Perforatina: Screen Co., 145 & 147 Beale St., S. F. 




COAL MINES OF THE WESTERN COAST. 

A few copies of this work, the only one ever published 
treating of PaciQc Coast Coal Mining, have been ob- 
tained, and are for sale at this office for 32.60 per copy. 
It was written by \V. A. Goodyear, Mining and Ci\il 
Engineer, formorl-y of the California State Geologioal 
Survey. 



N. W. SPAULDING 
s-A.'w^ oc>Mi»./k.Kr-sr 

Manufaoturers of 
SPAULDING'S 

Inserted Tootli 

AND 

CHISEL BIT 




Saws. 



SAW MILLS AND MACHINERY 

ot all kinds made to order. Send for Desoriptlve. Cata 
logue. 1^ and 19 Fremont St.. San Frftnoiioo. 



Irop apd ^achipe hjk. 



UNION IRON WORKS, 

8APBAMBNTO, OAL. 

BOOT, NBILSON & OO., 

MANDTA0TURBR8 07 

Steam Engines, Boilers, 

AND ALL EUTDS OF 

MACHINERY FOR MINING PURPOSES. 

Flouring Mills, Saw Mills and Quartz Mills Machinery 
oonstruoted, fitted up and repaired. 



P'ront St., bet. N & O Sta., 



Sacramento, Oal. 



CALIFORNIA MACHINE WORKS, 
WM. N. BIRCH & CO., 

ENGINEERS AND MACHINISTS. 

No. 119 Beale St.. - - San Francisco. 

BUILDBRB OF 

Steam Encines, Saw Mills, Mining Machinery, Dredging 
Machines, Bock Crushers, Cable Railway Machinery, 
EHithorp Air Brake Co. 's- Patent Steam and Hjdraulio 
Elevators, Air Cushions and Air Brakes POSITIVE 
SAFKTIE3. Improved Rum Elevators, Sidewalk and 
Hand Hoists. B. E. Henrickson's Patent Automatic 
Safety Catchea ■ 

MachlneH of all kinds Made and Repaired. 
Orders Solicited. 



Golden State & Miners Iron Works. 

UoEiiftkottire Iron Oastlngs and Machinery 
of all Kinds at Greatly Bednced Batea 

STEVENSON'S PATENT 

Mold-Board A MALOAMATOBS, 
Golden State Pressure Blowers. 

Sirst St., between Howard Sm Folaom, 8. F, 



FBOUAS TOOHPaON 



rHORNTON THOMPSON 



THOMPSON BROTHERS. 

EUREKA FOUNDRY, 

120 and 181 Beale St., between Mission and Howard, S.F 

UANnFAOTTTRHRS OP OASTmOS OP BVXBT DBBORIFTiOM. 



Mining Engineers. 



CIVIL AND MINING ENGINEER 

Of long experience, practical and admini-ttative, in 
Copper, Si'Ver and Gold Mining io Europe and An erica, 
offers STvices at Manager or Superintendent, or to search 
for and report on Mines. Now in Mexico Several Lan- 
guages. Address C. F.. Box 2S.7, San Francisco, Cal. 



W. A. GOODYEAR, 

Civil and Mining' Engineer, 

MINING EXPERT AMD GEOLOGIST. 

Business Box A," office of this paper, San 



Address 
francisco. 



ROSS E. BROWNE. 

Mining and Hydraulic Engfineer, 

No. S07 Samsomb St., Saji Fbakoisoo. 



ISRAEL W. KNOX, 
Mining and Mechanical Engineer 

AND PDROHASINQ AGENT POR 

Mines, Mining Machinery & Supplies. 

Mines Examined, Reports and Estimates Furnished, 

Contracts made, etc. 
0£Qce, 2S7 First 3c., San Francisco, Oal. 



The Celebrated H. H. H Liniment. 




The H. H H J..liiliiitiiit l-i fir rh tn iMimnt of 
he Aches ii i 1 . ■-■ f ilniii i' H i-< ^ II h fur ihe all- 
ments of the beasts of the fields. Testimonials from 
importers and breeders of blooded stock prove Its won- 
derful ourative properties. No man has ever used It (or 
an ache or pain ana been dissatisfied. 
H. H. MOORE & SONS, Stockton, Cal.. Proprietors. 
Pna Salr bt all DRDsaisTS 



FOR ENGRAVINGS E'X "Crf^co^ 

pany, No, 320 Market street. S^d Frandsco. 



Jan. 18. 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



63 



PARKE & LACY COMPANY 

IMPORTERS AND MANUPACTDRER3 OF 

MINING, MILL and GENERAL MACHINERY. 



ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 

AIR COMPRESSORS, ROOK DRILLS, 
WALL'S CEUSmNQ ROLLS, 

CONOBNTRATORS, PULVERIZERS, 
TURBINE WATER WHEELS, 

ROOK BREAKERS. DRY JIGS. 

Bullock's Diamond Drills 

GOLDEN GATE CONCENTRATORS, 

GREATEST CAPACITY OF ANY CONCENTRATOR MADE, 
One Machine Taking Pulp fi-om 10 Stamps- 




SAW MILLS, MACHINE TOOLS, 
PLANING MILLS, INJECTORS and EJECTORS 
BELTING, PACKING, OILS, LUBRICATORS, 
FIRfe EXTINGUISHERS, 
CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS, 
ROTARY PUMPS. GANG EDGBRS, 
CAMPBELL'S STEAM FEEDS, 
MILL and MINE SUPPLIES. 



ox:Krx3Ei..A.x< -A-Crnx^rcs x<ox<. 



WESTINGHOUSE AUTOMATIC ENGINES. 



SALES DURING LAST FOUR MONTHS: 



rJOMPOTTMn 44 ENGINES, .C!T A "NTT^ A T?r» 99 engines, 

\J\ja±r^KJIU IMXJ, 5215 HOKSK POWER. aXJ^nXJJXSXU, 4500 HOBSE POWER. u \^ ±-1 J.\JJ.V, 4260 BOKSE POWER. 

Gr3r«»xica. I^ota,!., 309 SESxxglXLes, .A.ss^^Bf»'*i-'^S 3.3.875 ZZorse X'o-VT^ex-. 



JUNIOR, »68 ENGINES. 



21 and 23 Fremont St., San Francisco, Gal. 



189 Clarence St., Sydney, N. S. W. 




I8S0. 



1888. 



BPILDRRS OF 

MINING MACHINERY. 

GENERAL OFFICE AND WORKS : 

1 27 First St., San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 

New York Office, 145 Broadway. 

PLANTS FOR GOLD AND SILVER MII,I,S, 

embiacio^ machinery of LATEST DESIGN and 
MOST IMFROVBD conBtruction. We offer our 
miBtomers the BEST RESULTS OF 38 TE.\KS' 
EXPERIENCE in this SPECIAL LINE of 
work, and are PREPARED to fumiah the MOST 
APPROVED character of MINING AND RE- 
DUCTION MACHINERV, adapted to all K:rade8 of 
ores and .SUPERIOR to that of any other make, at 
the LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES. 

We are also prepared to CONSTKUCT and DE- 
LIVER In COMPLETE RUNNING ORDER. 
In any locality, MILLS, CONCENTRATION 
WORKS. WATER JACKET SMELTING 
FURNACES, HOISTING WORKS, PUMP- 
ING MACHINERY, ETC., ETC., of any DE- 
SIRED CAPACITY. 



THE GATES CRUSHER 

Is beyond all question the most important improvement 
that has ever been made in this class of mining- ma- 
chinery. It will do more than twice the work with a 
given amount of wear than any other Crusher made, 
besides crushing so much finer that for mining uses, the 
capacity of the mill is greatly increased. It has the same 
relative superiority for macadamizing purposes, afford- 
ing the cheapest and most reliable machine for this use. 



SEND FOR CIRCULAE. 



PACIFIC IRON WORKS 



NO. 127 FJH&T STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




NOTICE TO GOLD MINERS! 






JUSTINIAN CAIRE. Agent, 

521 & 523 Market St., San Francisco, 



-DBALBR IN— 



IN QDARTZ, GRAVEL, OB PLACER MINES. MADE OF BEST SOFT UAKF DPBBIOR OOPPBR 

ja.T H.:H3r>XT03E3I> i»3aious. 

Our platea are guaranteed, aod by actual experience are proved, the beBJ In weight of Sil- 
ver and durability. Old Mining Platea Replated, Bought, or Gold Separ&ted. THOUSANDS 
OF ORDERS FILLED. 

SAN FRANCISCO NOVELTY, GOLD, SILVER AND NICKEL PLATING WORKS, 
1 08 and 1 1 2 First St., San Francisco, Cal. 

^r SEND FOR CIRCDLARS. 



Assayers' and Mining Material. 



-MANUFACTORBB OP— 



BATTERY SCREENS AND WIRE CLOTH 



Agent for EOSEIKS' 
HYDRO-CAKBON ASSAY FURNACES 




- IMPORTANT TO GOLD MINERS! 

SILVER-PLATED AMALGAM PLATES for SAVING GOLD 

QUARTZ, 



IN 



MINING. 



GRAVEL AND PLACER 
PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. 

Only Refined Silver and Best Copper used, Over 3000 Orders filled. Fifteen Medals Awarded. 

Replated, Old Plates Bought, or Gold Separated, 

Theso Plates can also be purchased o( JOHN TAJLOR & CO., Corner first and Mission Sts. 

San Francisco Gold, Silver and Nickel Plating Works, 653 & 655 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal., E. G. Denniston, Prop'r. 

Our Plates have been used for 20 years. They have proved the best. 
Copper. SKND FJ& OIROULAR.- 



Old Mining Plates can be 



We adhere Btrlctly to contract iD welubt of Sliver and 



54 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 18, 1890 



PROVED BELT FRUE ORE CONCENTRATOR. 



The Best Ore Concentrator in the market, having double 
the Capacity and doing its work as oloBe as the plain Belt 
machine, while its concentrationa are clean. It is used in 
a number of Mills, the most notable of which is the 
Alaska M. & M. Go's Mill, where 24 Improved Belt Frues 
are taking the Pulp from 120 Stamps, crushing 350 tons 
per day, and is giving entire satisfaction as against 4S 
plain Belt Machines, taking the Pulp from the other 120 
Stamps. 

^ : 

Price of Improved Belt- Frue Vanner, $900, f. o. b. 
Price of Plain Belt Frue Vanner, $575, f. o. b. 



For Pamphlets, Testimonials and farther informatic 
apply at ofitice. ^/ 




Protected by Patents December 22, 1874; September 2, 
1S79; April 27, 1880; March 22. 1881; February 20, 1883; 
September 13, 1883; July 24, 1888. Patents applied for. 



There are Over 2200 Plain Belt Machines now 
in Use. 

Thb Montana Compaky (Limited), London, October 8, 1885. 
Dear Sirs :— Having- tested three of your Frue Vanners in a com- 
petitive trial with other similar machines (Triumph), we have eatiafied 
ourselves of the superiority of your Vannere, as is evidenced by the 
fact of our havinpr ordered 20 more of your machinoH for immediate 
delivery. Yours truly, THE MONTANA COMPANY (Limited). 

N. B.— Since the above was written the 20 Vanners, having been 
started, gave such satisfaction that 44 additional Frues and more 
stamps have been purchased. ADAMS & CARTER. 



ADAMS & CARTER, Agents FRUt-?^e^^^~">'NG MACHINE CO., Room 15. No. 132 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal 



CALIFORNfe WIRE WORKS 



-MANUFACTURERS CF- 



:E:sa<.A.:^XjXsxzx:x> less. xxtrcoxiE'ozi.ia.fX'xix) xsss. 



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OF ALL KINDS FOR 

CABLE RAILWAYS, 

IROPEWAYS and TRAMWAYS. 

Mining, Shipping & General Purposes. 



WIRE, 

BARBED WIRE, 
WIRE NAILS, 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Full ABSorCmect Always in Stock, 



OFFICE : 



9 Fremont Street, San Francisco, ^-^ 




HALLIDIE'S 



Patent \J\J\k Ropeway, 

For the Economical and Rapid 

Transportation of Ore 

and other material. 



Erected by Us During the Past Fourteen Years in Spana 

3 ' 200 TO 2,000 FEET. 



Simple, Economical and Durable. 



Send for Illugtrated Catalogue. 



TRANSPORTATION OP ORE BY HALLIDIE'S PATENT WIRE ROPEWAY. 



HAVE BEEN THOROUGHLY TESTED 
In all Parts of the Country. 



WM. H. TAYLOK, President. 



B. S. MOORE, Superintendent. 



Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works, 

S. E. CORNER HOWARD AND BEALE SIS., SAN FRANCISCO. 



MANUPACTDBBRS OP ALL KINDS OP 



Mining and Milling Machinery, Engines and Boilers, 

SHEET-IRON WATER PIPE for Mining and Irrigation Purposes. 



Exclusive Agents for the Pacific Coast of HEINE PATENT SAFETY BOILER and MACBETH STEEL PULLEY. 

AGENTS FOB THE PACIFIC COAST OP 

BRYAN'S R OLLER QU ARTZ ]VIILL. 

NEW COMMON SENSE STEEL WHIM. 

All Complete for SI 50. 

No cog-wheela or clntcbes to break. Ninety per cent of this Whim is wrought iron and Bteel, and will spring or bend before breaking, and beaidea 
can be repaired at any blacksmith shop, should breakage occur, thus obviating the necessity of sending away hundreds of miles sometimes, and waiting 

a week for repairs. The Brake sets itself when the horse stops or anything gives way. 

It can be packed anywhere a jack can go, the heaviest piece weighing but 100 pounds; total 
weight, 650 pounds. The sweep can be thrown out or in gear at any time, and the bucket hoiafced, 
dumped or lowered while the horse is in motion. It is just as safe and reliable as an engine, and 
can be handled as readily, and is just the thing to open np a . mine and make it pay. Spending 
thousands of dollars in fine machinery and shaft houses has ** busted" many a company. Buy a 
COMMON SENSE WHIM, and when you have got more ore than our Whim will hoist, then it is 
time to buy an engine, not before. It will save you thousands of dollars if your mine should not 
pay. Being all iron except the sweep, it will not rot, warp, twist, or get out of true. Being 
wrought iron, it will not break in transportation. We also make Two, Foub and Eight Horse 
Power Whims, Derrick Whims, and Building Hoists, Ore Buckets, and everything pertaining to 
Horse Power Hoisting. State for what purpose, and at what place you want to use it. 

H^ Come and see one at our works in operation, or send for circular. 




BUTTE, MONTANA, 

The railroad, mming and commercial center of the new 
State, oSera some of the best iuducements for invest- 
ments in 

Real Estate, Mines & Mining Stool< 

of any locality in the Nortnwest. For particulars addresa 
Ttie Bvans-Terry-GlausBGu Brokerage Co., 
41 B. Broadway. Butte, Moncana, 



Smelter For Sale or Exchange. 

One EO-ton. wrought iron, water-jacket Smelting Fur- 
nace (36"x60" at the tuyeres) of the latest design, wi h 
Crusher, Blower. Boiler, Pumps, Engines, Tools, and 
everything complete for immediate delivery, and only 
used about Fix months. Cheap for cash, or will exchange 
for interest in a Lead-Silver Mine, or erect in any mining 
camp that will guarantee a certain output. For further 
particulars address Box 2S, Elkhom, Montana. 



California Inventors IHH 

AND Foreign Patent Solicitors, for obtaining Patents 
aud Caveats. Eatabliahed in 1860. Their long experience as 
joumaliBts and large practice aa Patent attomeya enables 
them to offer Pacific Coast Inventorfl far better flurvice than 
they can obtain elaewhere. Send for free circulars of Inf or 
mation. Office of the BIiTaNG and SoiEamii'Tc Pk«r« acd 
Pacific Kttrai. Pbksb No. 230 Market 8., Sao FraaciBOE. 
Elevabot, 12 Front Bt. 



TUBBS CORDAGE CO. 

(A Corporation.) 

Constantly on hand a full assortment of Manila Rope, 
Duplex Rope, Tarred Manila Rope, Hay Rope, Whale Line, 
etc., etc. 

Extra sizes and leng^s made to order on short notice. 

611 & 613 Front St., San Francisco, Cal, 




VOL. LX.- Number 4. 
DEWEY A, CO., PUBUSHER8. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 1890. 



Tbree Dollars per Annum 

Single CopicB, 10 eta. 



Concentration o!" Ore. 

A modern ooDcentrating mill inclOBes 
a good many forms of maohinery by 
which ores are prepared for subsfqaent 
metallurgioal treatment. The operation 
of oonoentration and dreesing ia baeed 
on the d-fferenoeof epeoi6o gravity of 
the mineral constitoente of an ore, by 
virtae of wbioh the mioerals h&ve aniike 
valooitlsB in falling through water (it 
other mediam). Water ie preferably 
the separating mediom. An imprcved 
coDoentratiDg plant, such aB ia made by 
the Union Iron Works of this city, is 
shown on this page. The coarse crash- 
ing of the ore ia done by rock^breakers, 
and the ** screenings " or coarse stock 
from the rook'breakerB is farther comml- 
nnted by rolls or stamps. Bat for this 
parpona rolls are preferable inasmuch 
aa their ase minimizas the amonnt of 
slimes iocideot to orushiDg, 

From the rolls the ore passes into the 
first (largest aod coarsest) of the series 
of 6ve revolving screens or ** trommels." 
The trommels are either cylindrical or 
conical in form. In the former class the 
conveyaDoe of the ** aoreenings " from 
the delivery end to the discharge end 
of the trommel is effected by the inclina- 
tion given to the axis of the trommels. 
In the latter class this is attained by 
virtue of the conical shape of the trom- 
mels. The screenings drop through 
''spouts" Into the jigs, which have 
sieves corresponding in mesh to those of the 
delivering trommels. The trommels have eheet* 
iron receiving aprons into which the ore falls 
after passing through the perforationfi of the 
screens. Through these aprons the ore is de- 
livered to the next finer sieved trommel of the 
seriea. 

The ordinary type of jig is a trough-shaped 
water-box divided into two compartments by a 
partition extendiog part way down. In some 
of the compartments is a looaely-working 
plunger operated reciprocally. In the other 
compartment ia a fixed horizontal screen on 




SECTIONAL VIEW OF MILL FOR CONCENTRATINQ AND DRESSING ORBS. 



which the sized ore ia fed. The strokes of the 
plunger oause a pulsation of water through the 
sieve. The ascending current raises the mixed 
particles, which, in their descent through the 
water, arrange themselves in layers or leade 
The sorting of the **eqnal- falling" minerals 
takes place in a seriea of inverted pyramidal 
boxea called *'SpitzkaBten." Water is brought 
to each compartment from above by a pipe, 
which, discharging the water downward 
against the bottom of the box, prodacea an aa- 
oendiug current. This aacending current pre- 
vents the depoaition of the lighter partiolea, 



which are oonaeqnently carried over into the 
next box in the seriea. Theae boxes are bo ar- 
ranged as to cause a slowly flowing current 
throughout the aeries. 

Where the ayatem of hydraulic clasaification 
is more extended, a aeries of boxes is used un- 
der proper conditions as to size, velocity of car- 
rent produced, etc., for the separation of the 
sands. From these boxea the slimes retained 
in the current goes to the slime claasifioators. 

When jigging ia not praotioable on account 
of the extreme fineness of the slimes, the pulp 
ia worked on round tables, buddies, perouaston 



sk 




Cross Section 

Wooden Pig-PaUerns 

Fig. 5. 




„ Longitudinal Section , 
ScalQ 1 — 4'' a.a Iron Straps.l 




Successive S'agesof Flanging 





End before Flanging 



LongI,tudiQQ|.s.oction of,*Jr.on. Pig-Patterns 
HOLLOW IRON PIG PATTERNS. 




tables, Triumph and Frue vanners, etc. A 
sizing is effected by these machines. The larger 
partiolea (apecifioally lighter) being acted upon 
'more readily by the' flowing water, are carried 
down the incline planes and pass away aa tail- 
ings, while the amaller (specifically heavier) 
particles remain as concentrates. 

Hollow Iron Pig Patterns. 

They have in use at the Durham furnaces in 
Pennsylvania a aet of hollow pig patterns made 
of iron instead of the usual ordinary wooden 
patterns. The iron pattern is more durable 
and cheaper in the long run. In describing 
this before the American Institute of LTining 
Engineers, Mr. B. F. Faokenthal, Jr., saye : 
The iron pattern is made of the best flange 
iron. No. 13 gauge. After the sheets have 
been ont to the proper size, three heats are re- 
quired for flanging. At the first heat each 
piece ia stamped in a oast-Iron form, which 
gives the proper shape to the bottom part of 
the pattern, as shown in Fig. 2. At the second 
heat. It is flanged at 5, aa shown in Fig. 3. At 
the third heat, it is flanged at a, giving the 
pattern its final shape, as shown in Fig. 4. The 
flanging at a and 6 ia done on a square mandril. 
These corners should be full and square. It 
now remains only to put the pattern together 
and put the heads or ends in. The ends are 
also made of No. 13 flange iron and are stamped 
in a oast-iron form or die by means of an old 
screw-punch, the iron being cut to the proper 
shape before stamping, as shown in !Fig. 5. 

These ends can be made very quickly, only a 
few seconds being required for the stamping. 
The finished end is shown in Fig. 6 and at c 
and d Fig. 7. 

The end farthest from the sow, and marked 
d in Fig. 7, is of course put in firat. The end 
next to the bow is then put in with the flanged 
part to the outside, as shown at c in Fig. 7. 



56 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 25^ 1890 



Gold-Panning Machine. 

There was tested this morning, saya the San 
Diego Sun, at Sanger & White's machine-Bhop, 
at the foot of Eighth street, a new invention 
for panning gold out of gravel that seems dea- 
tined to take a front rank in the economical 
extraction of the precious metal. This machine 
coDsistB of a long cylinder body, perhaps IS 
inches in diameter and 20 feet in length, in the 
center of which a set of iron teeth operate 
after the manner of a harrow. The gravel is 
shoveled into this at one end, and by the time 
itpasses. to the other end of the cylinder, it 
has received a thorough pulverizing. Here the 
gravel passes out of the cylinder to a aeries of 
plates, these plates (connected with one another 
in terraced form) being operated by a move- 
ment which is very much after the manner of 
hand-panning. The movement seems to quite 
thoroughly segregate 'the gold from all foreign 
substances, but when a small residue of gravel 
is left, it is carefully removed and panned out 
by hand. The gold from many tons of dirt 
after once passing through the machine, is ob- 
tained from one panning. 

In the course of the experiments with thie 
new invention, about $20 worth of fine gold- 
dust was distributed in ^bout ten tons of dirt 
and the machine turned it all out safely again 
with a loss of only about Cve per cent, and even 
this loss will be easily remedied. The maohine. 
will cost about $200, can be operated by a four- 
horse power engine and boiler, and has a capac- 
ity of 100 tons of dirt a day. The inventor is 
a miner named McDuffy from near Campo. 

[The same idea has been carried out in this 
State years ago, the revolving cylinder, bow- 
ever, being much larger in diameter, and hav- 
ing a acrew-fisnge from end to end, to pass the 
material along. It was used to work aurifer- 
ous gravel, which was more or less " cemented " 
together. — Eds. Press ] 



The Local Mmt. 

The following is Coiner Gorham's report of 

the coinage at the local Mint for December last, 

and also for the year 1889 : 

For Jan. 1 to 

December. Dec. 31. 

Double eagles Sl,34t,000 §15,444.000 

Eagles 14,030 4,254,000 

Standard dollars 500,000 70n,ono 

Dimes 97,267 

Totals Sl,g58,000 §20,495,207 

No coins were made last July, owing to the 
change in the office of superintendent, W. H. 
Dimond succeeding Mr. Lawton. The coinage 
of the other months varied from $1,390,000 in 
Jnne to $2,630,000 in Aoguat. The coinage 
for the year is about $5,000,000 less than In 
1888. The coinage for the past five years 
amounts to $121,262,733, an avarag« of over 
$24,000,000 per annum. The Sao Francisco 
Mint was established in 1854, and the amount 
of coin turned out from the start to December 
31, 1889, is as follows : 

Gold coin $739,321,857 

Silver coin 114,653,887 

Total 8853,975,744 

The above is California's contribution to the 
world's stook of gold and silver coins. 



Death of Emlen Painter. — Prof. Emlen 
Painter, president of the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association, and one of the trustees of 
the New York College of Pharmacy, died of 
consumption at his home at Spuyten Dayvil, 
January 15th. Prof. Painter was born at Con- 
cord, Pa., in 1844. His parents were leading 
members of the Society of Friends, and Emlen 
was educated at the Friends' College in Wil- 
mington, Del. He was also a graduate of the 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in the class 
of 1866. After Graduating he removed to San 
Francisco in 1876, and waia elected Professor of 
Physics in the San Francisco College of 
Pharmacy, and subaequently waa president of the 
college. In July last, at the Convention of the 
American Pharmaceutical Association, held in 
San Francisco, he was unanimously elected presi* 
dent of the association, and two months later 
he waa appointed to represent the State of Cal- 
ifornia at a convention for the revision of the 
Uoited States Pharmaoopcela to be held at 
Washington in the fall of the present year. 



From a "Worked Out" Mine, — The North 
Star Mining Company, operating in this dis- 
trict, has declared dividend No. 5 of 50 cents 
a share, aggregating $50,000. This makea 
$250,000 in dividends paid by the North 
Star under the present management. And this 
mine was shut down years ago, " worked out I ' 
Yet it haa within three or four years been re-' 
opened, supplied with a hoisting and pumping 
plant and 40 stamp mill second to none in the 
State, in addition to paying a quarter of a 
million in dividenda I Botween 150 and 200 
men are given employment. The Eaipire,Omaha 
and Hartery are also shining examples of 
" worked-out " mines. — Oraas Valley Tidings. 



During the month of Ddcember last there 
were shipped over the Eureka & Palisade rail- 
oad the following from the mmes of Eureka 
Ustrict : Sixty tons of Richmond lead, 180 
ons of crude bullion and 534 tons of ore. 



Mining Burean Museum. 

Among the recent contributions to the Muae- 
um of the California State Mining Barean are 
the following: 

Aznrite, in very large and handsome crystals, 
from Bisbee, Arizona, and native copper with 
ohalcocite from the same locality; presented by 
D. L. MoBgrove, 

Topaz from Colorado; F. E. Monteverde. 

Several specimens of eold and silver ores from 
various mines; W. H V. Cronise. 

Five specimens of gold quarlz from as many 
different mines in Amador county, Cal.; W. Q 
Mason. 

Rich, copper ore, Monterey county, Cal.; 
F. Ssone. 

R oh copper ore, Alaska; D/. E. Von Hasa- 
loober. 

Fluorite, Sin Bernardino county, Cal.;Jaa, 
H. Boyd. 

G psum of good quality from a large deposit 
in Ventura Co., C*l ; F. S. Hall. 

Placer gold of very peculiar form, Pilmetto, 
Esmeralda Co., Nev. 

Gjld in limonite, Fresno Co., Cal.; J. E, 
Hutchinaon. 

Group of mica crystals, Harney Peak, Dakota; 
R. D. Atkina. 

Copper ore and chromic iron, Fifteen-Mile 
House, Siinta Clara Co., Cal. 

A large number of specimens of gold and 
silver ores, etc., from San Bsrnardino Co., Cil. 

Aragonite (onyx marble), granite and otber 
building atones from Sin Bernardino Co.. Cal. 

Crystallized gold on quartz crystald. Love- 
lock, Batte Co., Cil. 

Cnmmingtooite from near Daggett, Oal. 

Asbestus from near Bjirstow, Cal, 

Almandite garnet wiih crystallized magnetite, 
Kern Co., Cal,; A. Blanc. 

Chrome mica — fuofasite — Aroh Bsach, Orange 
Co.,Cal.;H.S. Goff. 

Realgar in calcite. Trinity county, Cal.; J. 
S. Thompson. 

Stream tin, Potato Gulch, South Dakota; 
Joseph Swett. 

Asbastas, Orange River, South Africa; R. H. 
Jones. 

Prehistoric pottery from ancient g'-aves at 
Tarbigo and Labano, Andes Mts., U, S. of 
Colombia; D. T. Hughes. 

Pdudernite, San Bernardino Co., Cal, 

E'ght specimens Pennsylvania graoiteEi; J. Z 
Davis. 

Malachite, polished; John Carry. 

Gold in jiBoer and calcite, Alvoid mine, San 
Bernardino Co., Cal. 

Three fine slabs of polished marble, Ce^U- 
fornia Marble and Bailding Stone Co., Cotton, 
Oil.; also a very handsome slab of polished 
aragonite. 

Fme terra-ootta medallion; Gladding, Mc- 
Bean & Co. 

Cinnabar, very rich, Prescott, A. T,; G. K. 
W. McNara. 

Minium, Tulare Co,, Cal.; M. B^averman. 

Fme specimens of Colemanite, Calico,, CaL; 
Mrs. Perry. 

Five interesting mineral specimens from East- 
ern States ; D. C Stone, 

Tfventy ethnoligical specimens from San 
Nicholas island, Ventura Co., Cal. 

Biamutite and bismuthinite with gold. Oasis, 
Mono Co., Cal.; George B. Terrell. 

The following have been donated by J. Z. 
Davia ; 

Montmorillonite, Auburn, Maine, 

Ten specimens atone axea, Santa Fe, N. M. 

Pickeriogite, Tarapaca, Criili. 

Calcite, "hacked" with micaceous iron, Cum- 
berland, Eag. 

Aluoiinum, cast and wrought. 

Silicified wood, section from the Arizona pat- 
rified forest, polished. 

Iceland soar, fine specimen, 

Pyrite, Dux, Bohemia. 

Tetrahedrite. Kapuick, Hungary. 

Descolizite, New Mexico. 

Dolomite, Camberlaud, Eog. 

Limonite, Sie£ren, Prussia. 

Brochantite, Frisco, Utah. 

Marcasite, Guanajuato, Mexico. 

Marcasite, Lyme Rsgia, Eog, 

Birite, Penn, 

Crystallized quartz and agate, large polished 
specimen. 

Two verjT handsome specimens of onyx, pol- 
isbed. 

Four large and very beautiful specimens of 
agate, polished. 

Gold quartz, very rich. Peterson mine, Cargo 
Muchacho district, San Diego county, Cal.; 
Tbos. E. Frszer. 



_ Leadville and Aspen. — Aspen's output of 
silver and lead during the year 1889 amounted 
to nearly $7,500,000. Leadville figures up to 
more than $13,000,000. The latter camp al- 
ways claims everything shipped from her smelt- 
ers and we presume she has done the same this 
year. We have not made a close estimate 
of the amount that Aspen furnished to the 
smelters of our sister camp, but during much of 
the time, one-half and often more than one- 
half of the weekly output was conaigned to 
them. It may thus be safely asaerted that 
nearly $3,000,000 of the amount which Lead- 
ville claims waa furniahed by Aspen. Her re- 
ceipts from other points must also have been 
considerable, and it. is probable that the pro- 
duction of the mines of that camo did not 
amount to more than $9,000,000, or "about the 
same as they produced in 1888, The increaae 
claimed over last year's figures is all accounted 



for by the increased importations from the Sil- 
ver Metropolis. We have no desire to pull 
Leadville down, but it is oar duty to expose 
her when she seeks to make a strained oontraat 
between herself and our own city. During 1890 
Aspen will produce more than $9,000,000, and 
unless Leadville secures a bona fide increase, 
she will have to yield first place to Iter rival on 
this side of the range. — Aspen Times. 

Comstock Tunnel Company. 

Theodore Sutro, president, makea the follow- 
ing statement of the financial condition of the 
Comstock Tunnel Company, December 1, 1889: 

Total indebtedness, $3,000,000, covered by 
30-year first mortgage non- accumulative bonds, 
of which $2,139,000 have been issued; surplus 
cash, $115,000. The uncollected royalty due 
in October and November, 1889, amounts to 
about $34,000. Gross receipts from the prop- 
erty (including money received from the min- 
ing companies for making certain new connec- 
tions with the mines) for the 12 montha ending 
Sept. 1, 1889, were $261,133 02; operating ex- 
penses in Nevada (not including the coat of the 
aforesaid new oounections) daring the same 
period, $88 994,32. 

As regards the future, it is stated that the 
average receipts per annum for the three years 
ending Sept 1, 1889 (including money received 
for the aforesaid new connections during the 
same period) were $276,915.67; average operat- 
ing expenses in Nevada during the same period 
(includine cost of aforesaid new connectione) 
were $83,337 38. As no new connections ot 
any magnitude with the mines are in contem- 
plation for the coming year, it is estimated that 
the income for the year ending September 1, 
1890, will probably be about $265,000. The 
operating expenses will probably not exceed 
$70,000; other expenses outside of Nevada, 
$14,000, making a total of $84,000. Net in- 
come for 1890, about $181,000; inteiest on 
bonds the current year, $85,560; net surplus 
above expenses for 1890, $95,440; surplus avail- 
able for the redemption of bonds, paying divi- 
dends and extending the tunnel at the close of 
the fiscal year, Sept. 1, 1890, will be about 
$210,440. 

The Trusts and Combines. 

Continuing briefly the comments in previous 
issues upon the baneful power of the trusts and 
combines which are operating in agricultural 
products, we note a dispatch on Jan. 13ch from 
Kansas City, which annouoces that the Ameri- 
can Live-stock Commiesion Company will dis- 
band within a few days. This company waa 
organized about a year ago for the purpose of 
saving members the money they were paying 
to commission men in Kansas City and Chi- 
cago, A hundred thousand dollars was recent- 
ly divided as the first year's dividenda. 

A prominent member of the association says 
Armour, Swift and Hammond have threatened 
to boycott the concern iti the interest of the 
brokers. The Kansas City and Chicago Live 
Stook exchangea also threaten to do the same 
thing by the Chicago and Alton Railway if it 
continues to tease the cars of the association. 
Thus the great combine is killing out opposition 
to the middlemen who work in its interest, and 
tightens its grip upon common carriers, so that 
the public avenues of transportation caonot be 
available to parties outside the combine. There ia 
a little gleam of hope that the waya of the trusts 
may be made hard in the depression in trust 
circtee in New York over the iujanotion pre 
venting them from changing their form to 
avoid recent lawa; also over the decision of 
Judge Wallace of San Francisco. The pub 
lie should congratulate itself that there are 
some things which promise to check the prog- 
ress of these gigantic evile. 

An Important Case. — A case of more than 
usual interest has been commenced in the 
Superior Court by J. E Prewett, attorney for 
plaintiffs, not only on account of the large 
amount of money and property involved, but 
also on account of the important land questiona 
to be determined. The suit is to recover a 
tract of very valuable mining land situated 
near the Mayflower mine, on the Forest Hill 
divide, together with $51 000 rents and profits 
Judge Spaar and W. H. Ballock own the mine 
under the mining laws, and the Mayflower 
Company claims it under a patent to the rail- 
road company. The land has been known to 
be mineral land from 1860 down to the present, 
and the determination of the question will \>& 
of interest to many miners in all parts of the 
mining regions as to whether the railroad com- 
pany can acquire a valid patent to land known 
to be mineral at the time of the passage of the 
railroad grant in 1862. The Mayflower Com- 
pany is in possession of the property and is the 
defendant in the suit; and W. H. Ballock, 
Judge Spear, J. S. Raea and R, Greenwood are 
the plaintiffa. — Placer Jiepublican. 

The Miners' Union in Virginia City has 
elected the following officers for the first six 
mouths of the ensuing year: President, Mi- 
chael J. Owens; vice-president, Daniel McFad- 
den; recording secretary, M. Norton; financial 
secretary, Bernard Ooyle; treasurer, C. E. 
Mack; conductor, Jerome Qainlan; warden, W. 
B James; Library Directors — Michael Carroll, 
Henry Hatherel, Levy Atkinson, James Don- 
worth, Peter Malloy; Finance Committee, John 
Finnegan, M. Abrams, T. W. Flynn. 



Drugs and Doctors. 

It was the remark of the celebrated Dr. 
Boerhaave that the physicians in his day were 
like a blind man armed with a club; they raised 
the club and struck ; if they hit the disease 
they killed it; if they hit the patient they killed 
him. It is surely a matter of gratification that 
human life and health in our day are subject to 
no such blundering and nnoertainty. Dr. 
George M. Gould in the December number of 
the Forum speaks almost rapturously of the 
wonderful advancement medicine has made as 
a science. He says: *'If one thoroughly con- 
versant with the medical progress of the last 
few years takes up even the beat work on pathol- 
ogy or general medicine ieaaed five or ten years 
ago, he is astonished to find how much seems 
old and outgrown." He states it as a fact that 
the death rate in England from zymotic dis- 
eases had been reduced one-half, and in the 
class called fevers within the past 20 vears the 
death>rate had been reduced from 20.000 to 
5873. 

While we willingly acknowledge the debt of 
gratitude we owe the medical profession for 
their tireless energy ift improving the healing 
art and its handmaid, sanitation, still there 
are many of the profession who are very skep- 
tical, if not pessimistic, in their estimate of 
power over disease. Dr. Holmes once made the 
remark that if the whole materia medica were 
cast into the sea, it might be worse for the 
fishes, bat would certainlv be better for man. 
Dr. George K. Welch of Keyport. N. J., in an 
address before a medical school on "Many 
Drugs for Remedies," gives a very sad and 
graphic description of the helplessness of the 
average doctor in the presence of disease. He 
says: "Where is the young doctor who does 
not believe in the magic of drugs, and the old 
doctor, if he is a wise man, who does not look 
upon the most of them as mischievous, and the 
minority as deserving of reatriction ? The 
pathologist is skeptical of them all, Do we 
waiting behind the eye of Koch know anything 
of tuberculosis or believe that be does? Does 
not the ravage go on? And who has won emi- 
nence in caring yellow fever ? Are men no 
longer in dread of the cholera? Who cures 
rheumatism or chronic Bright's disease? And 
where is the stout heart that never failed be- 
fore th£ patient burning and broiling in the 
horrible slow flame of pyEemia ? " Stille and 
Matrch's dispensatory gives a list of 150 reme- 
dies for rheumatism, from grandma's teas and 
fomentations to' the last specialist with 40 
grains of salicylic acid to the dose. And what 
is true of rheumatism is largely trne of all 
other diseases. There are many drugs but few 
remedies. 

That medicine is not an exact science, nor 
likely soon to be, is evident from the great nn- 
gertainty of diagnosis. There are very few 
diseases whose signs and symptoms are so oon- 
stant that no mistakes can be made, and no 
fact ia more notorious than the almost daily 
difference of opinion among doctors. 

Of course the first thing to decide on enter- 
ing the sickroom is, what is the matter. To 
fail here is to fail in practice, and hence the 
abilty to diagnose la the surest test of real 
medical genius. Most any one may prescribe 
when it is known what ia the trouble, and the 
ability to diagnose is by no means an acquired 
talent, for in that case the dootora would all be 
nearly of equal merit. They all read and 
study the same books. They are generally well 
posted in anatomy and physiology. They all 
look at the tongue, explore the pulse, go 
through the process of auscultation and percus- 
sion. But in opinion and practice it is well 
known they often go widely of the mark. 
However valuable the schools may be, the fine 
insight, the acute, delicate and quick percep- 
tion that characterizes the superior physician, ia 
something that cannot be found in the books or 
transmitted through a diploma. 

We suspect, however, that one cause of so 
many mistakes in the treatment of disease 
comes from the fact that the physician is too 
haety in making up his mind. Here the patient 
is uaually largely to blame. He expects the 
doctor will be able to tell him what is the 
matter on the first visit, and the doctor is 
afraid to frankly state bis doubt and take time 
more thoroughly to study the case. The pa- 
tient may grow alarmed and aend for some one 
else. But were all physicians equally careful 
and cautious, their patients would soon learn 
not to expect the doctor to jump to a conclu- 
sion at the first visit, 

But passing all this by, we can hardly agree 
with most ' doctors in regard to prognosis. 
While quite free in making a diagnosis, they 
are usually very reticent on progoosie. Now 
the knowledge of an incurable disease does not 
aggravate the malady nor hasten its progress, 
and surely one who is approaching his end has 
an indefeasible right to know it. The matter 
may require prudence and wise caution, biit we 
have seen so much horror thrown around the 
deathbed by delusive hopes that we cannot re- 
gard such a course as anything less than iuex- 
ousable sympathy, if not absolute cruelty. 

Cigarette Smoking. — Soaerious a detriment 
to health has cigarette-smoking become in 
Frankfort, the capital of Kentucky, that the 
Governor made special reference to it in bis 
late message, and the city' authorities have 
followed up the matter by passing an ordinance 
forbidding the sale of cigarettes in that city. 



Jan. 25, 1890 J 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



57 



The Martin White Suit Ended. 

After maoy years of long tad wearisome llti- 
gatiOD, the celebrated Martin White miniog 
case was dtsmiased in Jadge Lawler's conrt last 
week. 

The suit had its birth In the old Nineteenth 
Dibtriot Ojnrt, and the boodle of da^ty reoords 
tied np with a string is all that is left of this 
famoQS suit. 

Like **Jarndyoe vs. Jarndyoe/' told of in 
Diokens' celebrated Bleak Uoase, many of 
those who had an interest in Its doal result have 
long since become dust. 

The suit was brought by Martin White 
against Annis Merrill, John A. Hooper, F. B. 
Hooper, K. D. Sawyer and Geo. C. Hickok. 
The Mirtio White Mining Co.'s mines were lo* 
oated at Ward, in Nevada, and the capital 
stock of the company comprised 100.000 shares, 
of which, on the 28th day of April, 1877. White 
claimed to own 58 6*25. His eait was brought 
agaicst these men as eharebolders to recover 



the current year, with an eooonragiog probabil- 
ity that a return to 50-ceDt dividends will be 
recorded before its expiration. The payment 
of this last dividend aggregates a total of $3,- 
S58,300 disbarsed to shareholders during the 
patt three years out of the ore HIeooverv made 
in 1886. and a total of above $80,000,000 dis- 
bursed from bullion realized from ore extracted 
from the ground Inoladed in the Cons. Cal. and 
Vs. bouodaries since the discovery of the first 
bonanza in 1874. 



Califokma's Wkaltii of Gulu — "The gold 
in yonr soil is not by one-tenth exhausted," 
said an {''.aglish mining expert to a reporter in 
the Palace hotel. ** Your mining induetry is 
as yet in its iofancv, and half that you produce 
you let go to loss. Now, I have jast made an in* 
spection of certain minea in behalf of an East- 
ern company, the locality of which I will not 
tell you, as I am not advertising any section of 
this State, nor any particnlar mines, and my 
journey carried me pretty well all over the 
mining counties of the State, both north 



Ie a Flower Garden. 

Our engraving prcaentB a pbotographto view 
in a well kept Kem county garden located on 
Greenfields Kinch, as the property is appro- 
priately called. The situation is about ten 
miles south of Bikersfield, and the ranch is one 
of the several belonging to Haggin &, Oarr, and 
the view represents a part of the ornamental 
horticulture which surrounda the superin- 
tendent's cottage. In the foreground, the large 
circular bed Is planted with geraniums and 
pinks arranged around the fan p'alm in the 
center. To the right is a large locust tree, up 
the trunk of which a Cherokee rose has grown, 
reaching nearly to the top of the tree, forming, 
when in bloom, an immense bouquet nearly the 
size of the tree itself. Upon the left is an end 
view of the cottage, with its veranda opening 
into a long grape arbor which extends to the 
building, the roof of which is seen in the dis- 
tance. Upon the veranda ie Bevis, the faith- 



CoMSTocK Total Bullion Yield. — A corre- 
spondent is Informed that In estimating the 
total bullion yield of the ComBtook lode from 
its discovery to date at $500,000,000. the esti- 
mate includes bullion realized from the work- 
ing of ore tailings. The estimate also inoludes 
the bullion realized from ore extracted from 
mines operated on individual account, of which 
no record of the exact amount is obtainable. 
Following is a statement of the bullion yield of 
some of the principal mines on the Comstook 
lode: Ophir, $20,000,000: Savage, $16,500,000; 
Hale and Norcross, $1.3,500,00; ChoUar and 
Potosi, $21,000,000; Gould and Curry, $15,500,- 
OnO; Yellow Jioket, $16 500.000; Crown Point, 
S24 000,000; Belcher, $.30.000. 000; Overman, 
$4,500,000; Imperial, $2,750,000; Kentuck, 
811,500 000; Con. Cal. and Virginia, $123.000,- 
000. — Virginia Chronicle, 

Peocjress of toe Irrioation Survey. — The 
report of the Irrigation Survey for the month 
of November, lately received by the Secretary 
of the Interior, 8tates,that_field-work,waB car- 




GARDEN SCENE ON GREENFIELDS RANCH, NEAR BAKERSFIELD, KERN COUNTY, 



$68,000 and over for money he had advanced 
the mine from time to time. 

Then the oauBes of the trouble go on through 
a thousand pages of legal cap, in which White 
attempted to show that the mine was in debt, 
and that was the reason why he advanced the 
money. When asked ^by he did not allow an 
assessment to be levied to defray these ex- 
penses, he replied that when he aaked his 
friends to buy into the mine, he represented 
that it was so rich that there would never be 
any need of an assessment, and after telling 
them that, said White, *'I had rather be at a 
personal loaa than that they should be pun- 
ished with asseaaments." 

Why the suit was diamisaed does not appear, 
nor does Judge Messick, who has grown gray 
in the long weary years of its trial, oare to tell. 



Cons. California and Virginia. — The Jan- 
nary dividend of $54,000 by the Cons. Cal. and 
Va. mine is the 32d dividend declared by the 
company since its incorporation nnder the pres- 
ent title in January, 1886. The first was 30 
cepts per share, the following 30, 50 oenta 
per share, and the present is the first of 
25 cents a share. The prospect is favorable 
that monthly dividends of 25 cents per ahare 
will be declared by the company throughont 



and south; and I will freely state to 
you that my reports were of a favorable charac- 
ter. Why, there are thousands of dollars of 
Eastern and English capital waiting for an op- 
portunity to find investment in California, 
which has been scared off by the land boom, but 
which could be induced to come into yonr 
mines if yon would only abow aome enterpriee 
yonraelvea. But I must say that some of 
your means of working out gold belong to an 
antedilnvian period, and your miners are fre- 
quently in the habit of allowing their snlpbnrets 
to run to loss instead of saving them. Now, 
with the Introdnotion of new machinery and 
the nse of an improved style of mining, I pre- 
dict that yonr minea will produce aa much, if 
not more, than your grain*fielda and orchards. 
Your mines are not by any meana exhausted 
and are to*day, in my opinion, the best prop- 
erty any one could Invest in." 

The Federal Land OfGce at Sacramento has 
decided in favor of the claim of John B, Hob- 
son to Iowa hill. This needs confirmation by 
the General Land Office. 



The Automatic Can Machine Co. has aued the 
Pacific Can Co, for infringement of patent on a 
machine for placing and soldering heads in 



ful watch-dog of the ranch, and just-beyond his 
figure is the trunk of the weeping willow whose 
graceful branches are seen above the grape 
arbor. This willow ie but 12 yeara old and has 
a trunk six feet in circumference. The picture 
ie quite suggestive of the quiet and warmth of 
the California valley in aummer-time — a good 
place for a day dream, or, as its products show, 
a good place also for industry^ as the heart of 
man ia inclined. 



Anti-Trcst Bill. — Oh the 14ch inat. the 
Senate Committee on Finance considered Sher- 
man's bill to declare truata unlawful. After 
adopting several amendments, which do not 
afifect the principle or scope of the measure, the 
committee ordered a favorable report to be 
made to the Senate, 



The State Board of Prison Commissioners 
have decided to establish the new Preston 
Home of Industry on land purohaaed from the 
lone Coal and Iron Co., half a mile north of 
lone, Amador county. 

Notwithstanding the comparativo inactivity 
of the Richmond and Eureka Con, Companies, 
says the Sentinel, the proapeota of the oamp 
are brighter than could have been expected a 
year ago. 



ried on in California, Nevada, Colorado and 
Idaho. In the California and Nevada section 
parties have finished the work aaaigned to 
them. The topography of 250 square miles of 
Pyramid Peak sheet area in California and the 
Reno sheet area in Nevada was completed. 
The report of the Hydrologic diviaion was pur- 
sued noly in California and the Rio Grande val- 
ley. New Mexico. In California, examinationa 
were made of a segregation of irrigable lands in 
the valley of Owen'a river. The Hydrographi- 
oal party inaugurated some experiments in Cal- 
ifouiia for gauging rivers by means of an ap- 
paratus worked from shore. A oamp is being 
located on Tuolumne river. 



Hand-Painted Textiles promise to be very 
popular thia year In holiday goods. The latest 
improvement in this class of decorative work is 
a process by which the colore are laid on with a 
pen in place of the heretofore inevitable brush. 
Very delicate shading ia produced by the new 
method. 

It is estimated that Philadelphia In fighting 
the '* grip" consumed 2,000,000 quinine pills, 
weighing about a ton, in ten days. If other 
dtiea swallow quinine at the same rate, a 
scarcity of the diag is more imminent than an 
ice famine. 



58 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 25, 1890 



IjQiNIJnJG gUMMAF^Y, 

The following in mostly coudensed from jouxnalB published 
ID the mterior, in proxlmltF to the mines mentioned. 



I Owing to the prevailing snow- blockade on the 
railroads, we are this week without our usual ex- 
changes from Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Montana, Ore- 
gon, Washington and portions of California, which 
will account for the absence of current mining news 
from those places. — Eds. Press.] 



CALIFORNIA. 

Amador. 

^ South Spring H1L.U— Ledger, Jan. 18; It is 
pleasing to be able to report that this mine— un> 
questionably the best bullion-producer in the county 
to-day — is looking better than ever. Judging from 
all appearances it has a long career of prosperity be- 
fore it. The ore body is large and of excellent 
grade, and the properly is ably managed by John 
R. Tregloan, the superintendent, to whose judg- 
ment the development of this grand mine is mainly 
due. 

Miscellaneous. — R. M. Ford was in Jackson 
the latter part of last week, delivering stock of the 
North Gover Improvement Co, to the subscribers, 
and collecting the two cents pzr share on the same. 
A carload of concentrator machinery arrived at the 
depot Wednesday, consigned to the Amador gold 
mine, at Jackson. There is now about 40 tons of 
machinery at the depot for this mine. The ten 
stamps of the Sutter Creek mill are now running 
steadily, the usual amount of ore being milled 
daily. The company will open their main tunnel 
as soon as supplies can be hauled in. 

Sutter Creek. — The mines are now running 
along quite smoothly on account of the excellent 
condition in which the Amador canal is kept. The 
Lincoln mine has met with an interruption on ac- 
count of losing the vein. They will run a crosscut, 
and expect to strike the ledge again in a few days. 

Galaveras. 

Waiting Transportation. — Calaveras Pros- 
pect, Tan. 18: We hear that 500 tons of mining 
supplies and 310 tons of coke for Copperopolis are 
now at the Milton warehouse awaiting transporta- 
tion to the mines. 

Sheep Ranch Mine. — Two large wire cables for 
the Sheep Ranch mine were brought into town on 
Saturday evening last by teamsters Javeaux and 
Bryan. The cables weighed 2000 pounds each, and 
were both put upon the reels at the mine on Sunday, 
the i2lh inst. The water having been sufficiently 
reduced, operations were resumed with a full force 
of men on Monday. The animated puff of steam 
and the renewed rumble of the stamps at the mill 
are cheering sounds to all. Our people had begun 
to predict a long and dull season of inactivity for 
our village. 

The Utica Mine. — Mouniahi Echo, Jan. 16: 
Work is being prosecuted in the slopes running 
north and the mill is kept in operation crushing ore 
taken from that part of the mine. The work to re- 
cover the bodies of the dead miners is progressing 
in the south end, but owing to the broken up and 
dangerous condition of the ground progress in that 
direction is necessarily slow. Nothing new has 
been developed during the past week and the dead 
miners still slumber in the position in which the 
death-dealing cave has laid thera. As we stated 
several weeks ago, it will be many weeks and per- 
haps months before any of the bodies can be recov- 
ered. Nevertheless the public and the friends of the 
dead have the consolation of knowing that the com- 
pany is doing its whole duty in the matter. 

El Dorado. 

Gulch Claims.— Placer ville Oiserver^ Jan. 21: 
Everything is still quiet among the various claims in 
the county, save in one or two of the large, well-de- 
veloped mines. The cold, stormy weather, with a 
heavy snowfall, has stopped all outside work of 
every description, and but little work can be done 
in the developed claims that are not well housed in. 
All mining ditches are frozen up at their heads, and 
water is scarce. It was hoped by all miners that 
the big storm had ended, and that warm, thawing 
weather would follow, giving plenty of water for 
milling and gulch work. There are a great many 
good gulch claims yet left in the county, remote 
from water-courses, which can be worked only in a 
season of abundant rainfall, such as the one upon 
us this year. Every ravine or swag where a head of 
water could be obtained had its busy miner some 
time back, and the prospects were for a large aggre- 
gate clean-up from this source throughout the coun- 
ty; but freezing weather came suddenly, and has 
lasted well, with the result that the water is checked 
and gulch claims are idle awaiting a thaw, which 
now appears to be remote. 

El Dorado. — The most important news of the 
week among the mines is from the old Church mine, 
now known as the El Dorado, situated in El Dorado 
mining district, adjoining the famous Springfield 
mine from which Hayward, Hobart and Pound- 
stone have realized sued a fine fortune in years gone 
by. The El Dorado mine was purchased a couple 
of years ago from G, G. Blanchard of this city, by 
Ex-Governor Perkins, Jacob NefF, W. H. Brown 
and others, who believed they secured a fine prop- 
erty. The mine had lain idle for a number of years 
with but little development work done on it. The 
new owners began prospecting it in a systematic 
manner, employing as their superintendent one of the 
best practical miners on the coast, Mr. Richards, 
formerly with the Hotaling Iron Co. at their mines 
in Placer county. They began a new shaft, striking 
good ore at once, soon erected a mill, crushing a 
large amount of rich rock. About a year ago, hav- 
ing prospected to their satisfaction, the company 
determined to put in a thorough system of works, at 
the same time putting the mine in the best shape 
possible for working. This they have accomplished 
during the past summer and now have works not 
excelled by any mine in the county. Their new 
double-compartment shaft is a model in every parti- 
cular and adapted to the expeditions handling of a 
tremendous amount of ore. The shaft is now down 
about 550 feet with about 50 feet more to go on the 
present contract, the job of sinking having been let 
in contracts of 200 feet each. The shaft was started 
considerably east of the lode, which dips cast, and 
it was expected to cut the lode at a good depth and 
then test its worth as compared with the surface 



rock. During the past week at a depth of a little 
over 550 feet the contractors struck the vein, which 
was found to be seven feet through of fine rock, 
free-milling and rich. This magnificent ore body of 
rich material is a bonanza for its owners, and shows 
alraoat conclusively that the El Dorado is one of the 
richest mines in the State. It has heretofore had 
the name of being one of the finest properties in the 
county, and has done for its owners what no other 
mine in the county has done, and what can be said 
to be true of few mines in California — namely, it has 
paid its way from the start and paid handsome divi- 
dends besides. 

Various Claims.— The news from the El Dorado 
this week is not only good news for its owners, but 
for every mining man in the county. For several 
years past El Dorado county has been looked at sus- 
piciously by men of capital inclined to invest in 
mines, from the fact that a great many men had 
taken hold of claims only to give them up after put- 
ting considerable money into them. This was look- 
ed upon as a suspicious circumstance, and the fail- 
ures were of course attributed to the fact that the 
mineral was not here, rather than to any failure of 
management or a proper development of the claims 
taken hold of. The few claims that have been well 
developed in the county show conclusively that the 
n'ineral is here and stays with depth. There are the 
Montezuma at Nashville, the McNulty, El Dorado 
and Springfield at El Dorado, the Mount Pleasant 
U Grizzly Flat, the Kelsey at Kelsey, the St. Law- 
rence at Louisville, the Taylor at Garden Valley, 
and others, all mines that have paid handsomely 
and have been well developed. All but the Mount 
Pleasant at Grizzly Flat are on the well-defined 
Mother Lode belt, showing that pay rock is to be 
found along the entire belt, from the famous Key- 
stone in Amador to the rich and unfailing mines in 
Nevada county. Most of these claims have been 
taken hold of by numerous individuals and compa- 
nies and as often abandoned as worthless, like many 
other claims in the county; but it is a noteworthy 
fact that such of these claims as have been taken 
hold of by men of experience, with thorough and 
competent men to manage them, have proven to be 
immensely rich with depth and have paid large fort- 
unes into the pockets of the undaunted owners. 
The developments in the El Dorado have added 
point to these remarks, for the El Dorado is a mine 
that has passed through varied experieoces, was 
generally considered of no account and was bought 
by the present owners for a mere trifle. Yet by 
judicious management the hidden wealth has been 
unearthed and dividends have been paid while pros- 
pecting the claim and erecting buildings and ma- 
chinery, and the mine placed in the front rank of 
the rich mines of the county. 

Nevada. 

The "Tie-Up."— ^iW/w^j, Jan. 14: The situ- 
ation at the mines is uncbangpck, but the "tie-up" 
will not be of long duration. At the Idaho only the 
pump is in operation, by water-power; steam is run- 
ning the Empire pump, and water the North Star 
pump. The mills and miners are idle, save that at 
the North Star the machine drill operators and 
contractors are at work. Steam is operating the 
Hartery machinery, but the mill remains idle. 
Water from Wolf creek is being utilized at the 
Omaha, and it is expected to start up the mill this 
evening with power from the same source. 

Omaha Mine.— Grass Valley Union, Jan. 21: 
The Omaha mine has not been interrupted in its 
operations and its eighteen stamps have been 
pounding away through the whole of the storm 
siege, while all the other stamps of the district are 
idle. The company fell back on its former plan of 
taking water from Wolf creek to run the big Pelton 
wheel and has thus been able to continue with but 
brief interruption. 

Filled Up with SNOW.-Graw Valley Unio?i, 
Jan. 19: No news from the South Yuba Canal, as 
to its condition, but it is supposed to be filled up 
with snow, which may have to be shoveled out be- 
fore water-power can be furnished to the mines of 
this district. The miners have before them an in- 
definite season of idleness. 

Placer. 

Too Late.— Placer Herald, Jan. 18: According 
to W, Hill, Grant Van Vacior was a month too 
late in starting to put up his machinery at Canada 
Hill. He succeeded in getting his cabin built, but 
the timbers and lumber for the mill and the machin- 
ery are lying under 25 feet of snow. The mortar 
was set and the gallows-frame was up -before the 
storm began. 

Channel. — John Schipraan has a valuable claim 
on New York Canyon and estimates thai he will 
have to run his tunnel only 75 feet further to tap 
the channel. 

San Diego. 

A Dandy Prospect.— Julian Smii?icl, Jan. 17: 
The new 20-stamp mill at the Stonewall mine is ex- 
pected to be put in operation by the first of next 
month. It will be a dandy mill, on a dandy mine, 
and we suspect it would take a dandy pile of cash 
to buy it. There are other dandy mines in these 
mountains, too, the Ready Relief for instance, but 
then, it is not owned by a governor. 

Santa Barbara. 
Beach Mining.— Lompoc Record, Jan. 12: 
There are now at work in the beach mines five com- 
panies, all doing well. There is nothing fabulous in 
these mines, but it is demonstrated that it pays to 
work them, There seems to be no exhausting a 
claim. With each recurring tide the mines are sur- 
charged with gold so that practically the mines are 
inexhaustible. For months the same ground has 
been mined over, week after week. The opinion 
prevails among the miners that this fine gold is car- 
ried along in the Japan currents which are known 
to touch the coast above Point Conception at the 
point where these mines are the best. It has been 
suggested that by the use of a dredging machine 
gold in much larger quantities might be secured. 

Sierra. 
Gravel. — Mountain Messenger, Jan. 11: The 
Wide Awake Mining Co. has struck gravel in its 
new main tunnel, and expects to take out pay-dirt by 
next spring. The company has, in our opinion, one 
of the best gravel claims in this county. 

Shasta. 

Closed Down.— C<?«riVr, Jan. i8: Wm. T. St. 

Auburn, Supt. of the Niagara mine, French Gulch, 

was here Thursday, and went on up to French 

Gulch to close down the entire works on account of 



the weather, and until a more favorable season of 
the year. 

More Stamps.— Redding Free Press, Jan. 16: 
The Gladstone M. Co., French Gulch, will add 
immediately ten stamps to their 12-stamp Paul bat- 
tery, making 22 stamps, and a capacity of 45 tons 
every 24 hours. 

Tuolumne. 

Too Hai^d. — Independent, Jan. i8: The men 
who took the contract of sinking the Bonanza, shaft 
at $14 per foot have quit, as they could not make it 
pay, owing to hard ground. The company have 
now taken hold of the work themselves, and are 
operating Burleigh drills. 

Eureka. — Sonora Democrat^ Jan. 18: The Eu- 
reka mine at Summersville is being reopened and 
further developed after many years cessation of 
work. Hayward & Hobart are the owners of this 
property, and it is a valuable one. It is situated 
north of the Dead Horse. 

NEVADA. 

\77aBhoe District. 

Hale and Norcross. — Virginia. Chronicle, Jan. 
14 : A body of ore, in some places two timber sets 
{12 feet) in width, is developed on the 1200 level in 
the Hale and Norcross mine. Car samples of this 
ore show an average value of $35 per ton. This ore 
is the upward continuation of that developed nearly 
three years ago on the 1300 level. At that time a 
winze was sunk on the ore, but it proved too narrow 
to extract and convert into bullion profitably. The 
streak was followed north and south with lateral 
drifts, and a raise driven into it qbove the south 
lateral drift showed no improvement in width, A 
north raise was recently made in the ore above the 
1300 level, following the strike of the vein, which 
led to the development mentioned above. The fact 
that it has steadily widened as it was followed up- 
ward indicates that a much greater breadth will be 
found in raising on the vein lo the 1000 level. 

Ophir.— 5f Telegraph, Jan. 18: On the 1300- 
foot level, from the end of the east crosscut on the 
shaft station, a south drift is advanced 225 feet from 
the end of the east crosscut, 316 feet from the shaft 
station, continuing in porphyry, mixed with quartz, 
showing value. 

Con. Cal. and Va.— From the slopes on the 
1300, 1435. 1500, 1600 and 1650-foot levels the ore 
yield during the past week has been almost entirely 
suspended on account of the ore side tracks being 
blockaded with snow. The men employed on the 
ore slopes are temporarily laid off for the same 
reason. 

Savage. — Explorations are progressing as usual 
on the 400, 560 and 600 levels. Ore shipments are 
temporarily suspended. 

Hale and Norcross. — We shipped to the Ne- 
vada mint during the week 537 tons of ore. The 
falling off is due to the snow blockade of the ore- 
house side track. 

Chollar. — We crushed 210 tons of ore during 
the week, showing a pulp assay value of S25.5oper 
ton. 

Belcher. — The 850-foot level east crosscut is in 
porphyry, showing streaks of quartz. The 200-foot 
level east crosscut is still in low-grade quartz. 

Seg. Belcher. — Ore bunches are still showing 
in the i2oo-foot level drift from the winze. 

Imperial. — West crosscut No. i, on the 500-foot 
level joint Confidence-Challenge drift, is still in 
quariz and porphyry. West crosscut No. 2, on the 
300-foot level, continues to show bunches of ore. 

Overman, — We have opened the laoo-foot level 
preparatory to stripping ore near the Seg. Belcher 
mine. 

ARIZONA. • 

Tombstone District. — Prospector, Jan. 16: 
There is a satisfaction in knowing that a crisis is 
approaching in Tombstone's history — that longed- 
for period when something will have to be done 
toward pumping out the water, or a virtual aban- 
donment of the mines that are the big producers 
of the camp. There is no disguising this fact even 
on the part of the owners themselves. The Con- 
tention folks are putting up $20,000 per year to 
keep their works and mine m shape. This has 
been a matter-of-fact durmg the three past years, 
and that company has expressed a flat-footed fiat 
that tliey will not continue to pay out money any 
more without some resulting benefits. The Grand 
Central Co, are feeling in the same mood as re- 
gards their properties, which will soon be in shape 
to hang up unless a deep working proposition is 
made and accepted. In Tombstone district and 
vicinity very little has been done of importance. 
The Comet is shipping no ore at present, but sink- 
ing is progressing rapidly. The Herschell is pro- 
ducing good ore in the north end. Ritter struck a 
very rich pocket during the week in the Sunset. 
Some of the ore that he brought in is half metal. 
A contract was about to be closed with the Sterling 
mill for the working of 3000 tons of ore from Tur- 
quoise district. It is understood now, however, 
that the deal was not consummated. 

Mohave Co. — Minety Jan. 18: The lessees of 
the Rural mine have made another strike of good 
ore. J. P. Finegan, is working a force of men on a 
claim below the Ithaca and is taking out some fine 
ore. Garcia & Jeminez have about 18 inches of 
fine ore on their gold claim near the Connor mine. 
P. H. Leddy struck a fine-looking prospect last Sun- 
day near Mineral Park, which shows wire gold in 
the croppings. T. A. Murphy is working a claim 
near the Tuckyho which shows up an ore-bearing 
streak 8 inches wide, which assays 10 ounces in gold 
and 12 in silver. Henry P. Ewing has on the 
dump of the Tuckyho mine about eight tons of high- 
grade ore. The Esmeralda mine, near Cerbat, at 
the depth of 115 feet shows up a three-foot ore body, 
which assays 70 ounces in silver and 20 ounces in 
gold per ton. The Rattan mine has been closed 
down temporarily, awaiting the erection of a mill 
for the treatment of their ores. The company ex- 
pect to have the mill ready for operation by May. 
In Gold basin operations will be commenced at an 
early day by the O. K. mining company. Water 
pipe sufficient has been purchased to lay six miles of 
pipe line. A mill will be put up, and it is expected 
that the mines and mill will be in operation by the 
first of May. An additional flow of water was 
struck at Patterson's well recently which insures 
plenty of water. 

Mineral Park. — A gentleman from Mineral 
Park gives us the following notes in regard to ore 



now on the dumps and awaiting shipment at the 
various mines in that place and Chloride: Coon & 
Son on the Sabbath Bell have a fine lot of ore for 
shipment. Erin Sherman has about 20 tons of ore 
ready for shipment from the Rainbow. The Queen 
Bee, Park & Henson, have icg sacks of ore on the 
dump awaiting the big team. Durden & Frolich 
have a lot of ore from their new claim in Chloride 
ready and expect to ship a carload, McKinnon & 
Kostar have a carload of ore on the Attalla dump 
ready for the teams. This ore carries a large per- 
centage of copper. E. F, Thompson has about 30 
tons of ore on the Ehapiredump, awaiting shipment. 
This is high-grade ore and will net a handsome sum. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Alluvial Diggings.— Victoria Colonist, Jan. 11: 
Prospectors in the Chilcoten country, about 150 
miles direct east from Soda creek, have discovered 
alluvial diggings which give promise of turning out 
well. Three creeks were prospected, and from each 
excellent prospects of gold were secured, although 
the ground has not as yet been properly opened up. 
The men who have visited the region are confident 
that they have a rich find. The creeks are on the 
western slope of the coast mountains, and empty 
their waters into Bute inlet. 

DAKOTA. 

Syndicate SMELTER.-^Deadwood Pioneer, Jan. 
11; Syndicate smelter blew in yesterday for a two- 
weeks' run on ore from the Ross-Hannibal, I=a- 
dorah. Double Standard and Toronto. Until the 
run is completed results will not be known, and they 
will not even then if the same secrecy is preserved 
that has marked the policy of those having the ex- 
perimental plant in charge to the present time. 

An Important Deal.— Some monihs ago men- 
tion was made of the fact that Patrick Killoren and 
Stephen J. Breyer had struck a body of very excel- 
lent silver ore on certain locations they made on 
Jim creek. Several claims were located and they 
are now known as the Calibogo group. Killoren 
and Breyer at once went to work developing the 
property; work met excellent results, what was ap- 
parently barren ground only a little while before be- 
gan developing into mines of more than common 
value. Certain Lead City parties learned the facts 
and became interested. Among them was Ernest 
May, who through Judge Rhinehart negotiated a go- 
days' bond on the property for a good round sum, 
of which $1500 cash was paid at the time. The bond 
is just about expiring, and Breyer, one of the own- 
ers of the claims, in town last night, staled to a 
Pioneer reporter he had no doubt conditions of the 
bond will be fulfilled within a day or two and the 
property purchased. The Calibogo ore carries a 
large percentage of lead, an element hitherto scarce 
in the Hills, and until the pyritic process was found 
applicable, essential to smelting our ores. When 
the sale is consummated it is believed parlies pur- 
chasing will at once begin working the mines on an 
extensive scale, put up a large plant and regularly 
turn out bullion. 

Float.— Considerable interest is felt in the test 
run being made on the Glendale tin mine near the 
Etta, by one of Gates machines. If it is success- 
ful, one or more will be ordered (or Nigger Hill 
mines. The machines only cost $2500 on board 
cars at Chicago, and it is hoped that it will be a 
success. 

LOWER OALIPORNIA. 

Alamo. — Lower Californian, Jan. 12: Business 
at Alamo has been quieter than usual for a week or 
two past, owing in a great measure to the heavy 
rains which have fallen in that district, efTeclually 
putting a damper on any progress being m^de in 
the various mines. Twenty-eight inches of rain is 
said to have fallen, and it will do good in disclos- 
ing various placer diggings which exist in that lo- 
cality. The Lane mill is the only one in operation 
at present. This mill crushed io|^ tons of ore from 
the Asbestos mine the latter part of last month, 
which yielded $525. This is a high average and 
sustains the good reputation of the Asbestos. Fe- 
liciano Aldrele has bought a half-interest in the 
Todos Santos mine, southwest of the Tarantula. 
It is pronounced a rich mine. Fifty-four tons of 
Aurora ore run $40 per ton in Lane's mill a few 
days ago. Judge Kerr has sold his half-interest in 
Lane's mill to J. M. Gonzalez, and the Judge in- 
tends to put up a Wiswell mill of his own in camp. 
Major Geo. B. Zimpleman, of the El Paso M. M. 
Co., went out to Alamo Tuesday, accompanied by 
Mr. Charles Dobler, an experienced miner, who 
will hereafter superintend the El Paso Co.'s several 
mines and mill. Major Zimpleman slates their 
mill will soon commence on 500 or 600 tons of 
ore now on the dump from the Avalina and El Paso 
mines, and that they intend to push their work. 
Judge A. J, Reeves, of the Liberty Mining Co., 
whose mill is located at Santa Clara, in Mexican 
Gulch, has been in town nearly a month waiting 
for the roads to become passable in order to bring 
lumber from Tableta to inclose their mill and make 
other improvements. The heavy roads and rainy 
weather have prevented them from doing any work 
whatever. The International Co. has let contracts 
for sinking shafts 4 by 8 feet, and 50 feet deep from 
the surface, to be well limbered, on the Grande and 
Penelope mines; and also for a shaft 50 feet deep 
from the surface and 4 by 5 feet in size, to be well 
timbered, on the Spider mine. 

NEW MEXICO. 

The Eclipse. — Kingston Shaft, Jan. 11: De- 
velopment upon this mine is being pushed ahead by 
Sup't Renchler. Four men are employed. 

The Gray Horse. —The ore bodies on this mine 
show up as good as ever. The vein is being strip- 
ped, and systematic explorations inaugurated. 

The Illinois.— This " Old Reliable " retains a 
full force of men. and continues to produce regu- 
lariy. It is presumed that the Illinois now has a 
continuous pay streak of ore for a distance of over 
300 feet. 

The U. S. — This property continues develop- 
ment by driving the main tunnel. From the winze, 
ore is constantly being taken out, and the ore body 
holds its own. 

The Brush Heap.— This famous producer con- 
tinues to open out new ore bodies. It is reported 



Jan. 26, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific ruEss. 



59 



thai it now has a lai^er aad richer body of ore in 
sight than ever. 

The Gvpsv. — This mine continues to produce 
steadily. An upraise is now being made on the ore 
body, and a winze is also being sunk» which is 
showing ore in fair quantities. It is reported that 
by the first of the next month, several prominent 
mines will resume active operations. 

Hiu^j«)RO DiSTkiCT. — Morris Lundy and 
Thomas Long, owners of the Heien mine, began 
work on this property last Tuesday. 

B(jnan;^a.— The Pioneer mill is running day and 
night upon ore from the Bonanza mine. 'Ihis week 
they wiH finish up a 400-ton run, and then stop to 
clean up. 7~he mine is in splendid condition, and 
the slopes fui of ore. 

El Oho. — This property is being worked steadily 
under the management of Mr. Richard Troeger. 
The new main working shaft is now down 100 feet, 
and is thoroughly timb'-'red. Ors-houses, boarding- 
houses, bunk-houses and a fine shaft-house, are now 
partially conipleied. over 50,000 feet of lumber be- 
ing used in their construction, It is the intention 
of the company to sink ibis shaft 500 feet before 
stopping. 

The Mamie Richmond.— This mine is working 
regularly under the lease system, as well as by the 
company, and the present workings are all in ore. 
The first of the week, a carload was shipped to Den- 
ver, from which the returns have been received, 
which ran $157 per ton, gold and silver. 

Caledonia and Hibeknia.— These properties 
lie northeast of Warm Springs, and are showing up 
very well. The former shows a paystreak of six 
nches of gold ore. Mr. John Donaboe recently 
purchased a one-third interest in the Caledonia and 
a one-fourth interest In theHibernia. W. S, Hope- 
well alfo purchased an equal interest in each of 
these mines, John Ryan retaining the remainder of 
the interests. They recently made a test mill-run 
of five tons of ore, which gave a return of $65.50 per 
ton in gold, which was highly satisfactory 10 the 
owners. 

The Golden Era. — The main shaft on this 
raioe is down 100 feet, and levels run at 50 feet, 
which show from three to four feet of ore similar in 
character to the ores of the Mamie Richmond mine, 
assaying well in gold arid silver. 



JGQai^ket J^eports. 



Local Markets. 

San Francisco, Jan. 23, 1890. 

The almost impassable condition of interior roads, 
together with snow blockades on two leading 
railroads, and several feeders, has interrupted gen- 
eral trade to such an extent as to make our princi- 
pal business streets wear more a holiday appearance 
than at any time this year. Although few, if any, 
merchants enjoy enough business to cover current 
expenses, yet each and all are very hopeful of the 
future a^id look forward to a more prosperous year 
than enjoyed for a decade. Remittances are still 
slow, but money does not appear to be close except 
in exceptional instances. The banks appear to be 
well supplied with funds and doubtless meet all 
legitimate requirements of regular customers. 

The steamer City of Peking, hence January 22d 
for China, etc., carried the following shipments of 
treasure: 

TO HONG KOIfQ. 

Chinese, Mexican" doUare S24,0S2 00 

Chinese, yold coin 1,975 00 

Anglo-Californian Bank, Mexican dollara 230,000 00 

Hong Kong and Shaoghai Bank, Mexican dol- 
lars 181,000 00 

Total , .8437,057 00 

MEXICAN DOLLARS— The market has ruled 
quiet throughout the week, with toward the close 
quite a shading in prices, being quoted yesterday at 
75J^@76 cents, and to take at the same range. 

SILVER — The principal buyer has been the 
United States Mint. The price paid was advanced, 
in sympathy with higher prices at the East and 
abroad, to gyJi cents, but on Monday lower prices 
were paid, and again on Tuesday, with a still fur- 
ther decline on Wednesday, the price being yester- 
day (Wednesday) 96^ cents. The available supply 
is still light, due largely to snow blockades. The 
recent advance abroad was owing to free purchases 
by India and not to the Bank of England. The lat- 
ter institution, it is stated by those in position to 
know, has not bought silver bullion, but the English 
Government did, which was, at the time, noted and 
cimmented on by this paper; but the Government 
has not bought any bullion within the past five or 
six weeks. The proposition to allow the bank to 
carry one-third of its reserve in silver has always 
been allowable, made so by an Act of Parliament 
years ago, but has not been laken advantage of. 
The issuing of ^i not°s against silver is a good 
proposition and will undoubtedly bs done. In both 
Ireland and Scotland ^r notes are in general use 
and found to meet with favor. The Chancellor of 
Exchequer is at work on some kind of general plan 
to give relief to the English money market by still 
further introduction of silver coin. 

In the local market export buyers are not, to any 
great extent, in the market, which gives color to a 
report that grain bills meet all or about all the de- 
mand for exchange purposes. After next month 
wheat shipments will be slower, and therefore fewer 
grain bills will be offering. 

This (Thursday) morning there is no telegraphic 
communication, owing to the lines being down, so 
that no silver quotations, at this writing, are obtain- 
able. Exporters are bidding below New York 
prices. This, they say, is du? to no China business. 
When the Chinese business toward the close of 
spring sets in, then prices will be apt to again rule 
above New York. The last purchase report by the 
Mint in this city was at 97^^ cents on last Tuesday. 
In the absence of telegrams, the Mint was not bid- 
ding this morning, or at least they so state. 

Since putting the above in type. Eastern tele- 
graphic communication is resumed, giving silver 
quotations in London at 44s g-i6d, and New York 
at 97 cents. 

QUICKSILVER— Receipts the past week aggre- 
gate 528 fl'isks. The home demand is quiet, owing 
to impassable roads in principal mining districts. 

TIN— Imports the past week aggregate 1345 in- 
gots from Australia. Both pig and plate on spot 
continue to favor buyers, but owing- to high prices 



abroad no business can be executed, Canners here 
appear to be well supplied for immediate wants. 
Some have started up for salmon packing. 

BORAX— Receipts the past week aggregate 264 
ctls. The market continues steady at firm pricrs. 

LIME— Receipts the past week aggregate 2184 
bbls and the exports 350 bbls to the Hawaiian Isl- 
ands. The demand contmues slow, owing to bad 
weather. • 

CHROME ORE— There was shipped the past 
week 115,780 tti> to New York. Quotations remain 
unchanged. 

COPPER— There was exported the past week 
20,100 lbs copper cement to New York. In refined 
copper there is nothing new to rt-port, owing 10 
continued bad and tnip.\ss.'iblc roads having cut off, 
temporarily, all reliable sources o( information. 

COAL — Imports the past week were as follows ; 
Newcastle, N. S. W. , 96r4 tons; Biltimorc (Cum- 
berland), 5917; Nanaimo, 152; Departure Bay, 800; 
Tacoma, 2000. Total, 18.483 tons. Greta and 
Cumberland are lower for spot, but for shipment 
they are firm. It now looks as if there will be a 
scarcity of Australian after the next 60 days. The 
tonnage on the way from Australian ports and on 
berth to load is smaller than for years. The worst 
of it is that new business cannot be executed except 
at higher prices. Coast colliery coal is without any 
special features of interest to note. With lessened 
Australian there will be more demand for coast 
coals. 

San Francisco Metal Market. 

WaOLB9ALE. 

TBDB3DAY, January 23, 1890. 

Antimont— 26 @ — 

Borax— Refined, in carload tots 7 @ 7S 

Powdered " " " 7 @ 

Coucontrated " " " 63@ — 

All grades jobbing at an advance. 

CoppKa— 

Bolt 21 @ 22 

Bbeuthini; 22 ^ 24 

Ingot, jobbing.. 17 @ 18 

do, wholesaJo 15 @ 16 

Fire Box Ubeets 22 (d 21 

Lead— Fig 4 @ 4j 

Bar 5 @ — 

Sheet 7 @ - 

Pipe 6 @ — 

Bbot, discount 10% on 500 bags Drop, ^ bag. 1 45 (cQ — 

Buok.^baB 1 65 @ — 

OhiUed, do 1 85 @ - 

Steel- English, lb 16 @ 20 

Canton tool 9 @ 9 

Black Diamond tool 9 @ 9 

Pick and Hammer i & 10 

Machinery 4@ 5 

Toe Calk 4i@ — 

Tjnplate— B. v., Bteel grade. 14x20, P. S 5 50 @ — 

B. y., steel grade, I4i20, spot 4 90 @ 5 00 

Oharcoal, 14x20 6 75 (d) 7 00 

do roofing, 14x20 6 00 @ — 

do. do,20x28 12 00 @ — 

Pig tin, spot, Ti) tt) 2-i & 22i 

CoKB-Eng., ton, spot, in blk 13 50 (^15 00 

Do, do, to load Jt; OO @ — 

QtnoKBiLVER— By the fiaak, ij 00 (047 50 

Flasks, new @ — 

FlasVa, nlrt 35 (Ol 

Chrome Ihon Ore, ^ ton 10 ^.0^ 

Iron— Bar, base 3 @ ■ 31 

Norway, baee 4^^ &| 

Spot. To Load, 

tRON- Glengarnock ton 35 00 @ 34 @ — 

Eglinton, ton ....35 00 & SSift* — 

American Soft, No. 1, ton.. @35 00 32i@ — 

Oregon Pig. ton @35 00 — @ — 

Puget Sound 35 00 @ _ @ _ 

OUy Lane White Cg28 00 27f@ — 

Shotfcs, No. 1 35 00 (d35 00 321@ — 

Bar Iron (base pricel^ ft)... — @ — - @ — 

Laugloan 35 00 @ 34 @ — 

Thorncliffe 35 00 @ 34 @ — 

Gartaherrie 35 00 @ 34 @ — 



Goal. 



Per Ton.) Per Ton. 

Australian ... 7 50 @ 7 75[Lehig:h Lump.. 16 50@17 00 

Liverpool St'm 8 50 @ Cumberland bk 16 00@16 50 

Scotch Splint. 9 00 @ 9 00 Egg, hard 15 50@16 00 

Cardiff 9 50@10 00| 

SPOT FROM YARD. 

Seattle ' 7 00 

Coos Bay 6 00 

Cannel 12 00 

Egg, hard 18 00 

Cumberland, in sacks 19 00 
do, bulk 18 00 



Wellington 8 9 00 

Scotob Splint 9 uO 

Greta 9 uO 

WeetminaterBrymbo. 9 ijO 

Nanaimo 9 itO 

Sydney 8 uO 

Oilman 7 



Eastern Metal Markets. 

By Telegraph. 

New York, Jan. 23, i8go. — The following are 
the closing prices the past week: 
Silver In Silver in 



London. 


New York. Copper 


Lead. Tin. 


rhursday 44; 


973 


$14 45 


il 87i $20 46 


Friday 441 


97 g 


14 45 


3 85 20 60 


Saturday ....44 


978- 


14 46 


3 S5 20 60 


Monday 44} 


97i 


14 40 


3 85 20 66 


Tuesday 44S 


98J 
96i 


14 40 


3 85 20 65 


Wednesday.. 445 


14 40 


3 86 20 60 


New York, J 


an. 22.- 


-Borax is 


quiet but ver.y 



firm at unchanged prices. Tin plate is offish, as 
is pig. Lead has a steadier tone, owing to lessened 
offerings. Quicksilver is fairly steady. Copper con- 
tinues strong, with a fairly active consumptive de- 
mand reported. European advices still favor the 
selling interest. 

List of U. S. Patents for Pacific Coast 
Inventors. 

The folowing brief list by telegraph, for Jan. 21, will 
appear more complete on receipt of mail advices: 

California- Henry Anderson, assignor to R, J. Davis, 
S.F , piln-covering; Alonzo F. Brown, S. F., stationary 
spittoon; Wilfred L Browh, S. F., machine for cleaning 
fiber; 'Vmasa J. Dewiojirt S- F,, piano soui ding-board; Jas. 
G. Divall, Oakland, Alter; Francois Frank, Grass Valley, 
combined cap, pillow and Hfe-preH^Tver; George Griseli, 
Golden Gate, assiffoor of two-thirds to F. S. Everlo and 
J. Case, S. F., machine for wrapping block matches; 
Lionel Heynemann, S. F., cable-street railway; Henry 
P. Kelley, S. F., flftb wheel: James Kelley, assignor of 
half to E. Dougherty, 3. F., two patents for transom- 
lifter; Darwin O. Livermore, Los Gatos, sash-fastener; 
John Parkin, assignor of half to H. P. Frear, S. F. , valve- 
gear for fluid rams and piston; Adolph Sommer, Berke- 
ley, neutralizing sulpho-chlorinated organic compounds. 

"Notices OF Recent Patents" — The pat- 
ents which sboald have arrived from Waahing- 
ton this week are on the delayed mails which 
are blockaded up in the Sierrae, ho we are un- 
able to publieh onr nsual '*NotioeBof Recent 
FatentB." 



MINING SHAREHOLDERS' DIRECTORY. 

OoMnmi) lt\BKV TllUsai'AV KEOM AuVERTlSUdlM* IN TlIK MlMNO A.NU SciiNTIFIC PBBfifl AND OTURB S. F. JoUIUiALB 

ASSESSMENTS. 

T. LSVIKD. DBLlNy'T, 



Company. LoctriON. No. 

Adt.-Uld« Cr>yrer iM Co Nevadft.. 1.. 

ftjiltimure M Uo Nevailt.. 6.. 

llellw MoM tv. Nevuau..l3.. 

liL^ii liulchcr M Co. Nevada.. 13.. 

(•amnCTt..-k ,M .\l M Co California., I.. 

Con Nuw YorkMCo NeTaila.. 3.. 

Cull Ut U'ltliurd MCu OalifurDia.. 1.. 

OrdcktT M Ou AtIxouu.. 8.. 

Eichi-ijUfr M fo Nevada. .28.. 

tioUliu Giant M Co Oalifurnia. 

(<ruy Etiglt- M Co ..CaUforufii,.I6., 

Kentiirk M Co Nevu<la -30.. 

MaylKiwer GruTel U. Co Cftliforuta . .45. . 

Muxtcau M Co.... Nevada.. 39.. 

MliiLTul KliJk' M& HCo Arli^ooa.. 4.. 

North OooldttuUil G & S MCo.. Nevada.. 1.. 

Naiuiua WaUji & M Co California.. 2., 

Oct iduu till Cof & M Co.... Wiiva'la.. 5.. 

Overniiiii S M Co Nevada., 61.. 

I'ubMtdu UCu Nevada., 3.. 

Riiiw -11 R ii M Co California.. C. 

f-i'jj Bek-hcr ft MideeMCo Neva*la., 5,. 

SilviT King M Co Arizona.. 2.. 

Trinity lilver Tunnel & M Co.Caiirornia,. 2.. 
Tcirakolf M Co California.. 3.. 



I. .Duo 31.. 

S^J.-Jan 17.. 
lS..I>ec 4.. 
15 Dec 4.. 

a..Di-c 30.. 
IS.. Deo Jl.. 

6..Jaa 14....Peb 17 
10, .Jan 30.. ..Mar 5, 
2B..DfO 16.. - " 

i.-Ueo 17.. 

4..Ja'i ai.. 
30.. Dec 11 



SALB. SKCRn-ART. PLACB OF Bu8l^•B88. 

Feb 28.. W H Graves 426 Sauaome St 

Mot 12.. A K CJrim 402 MoLtfiomt-ri- St 



Jan 31.. 
.Feb 21 „ „ ^„^v,:, «., 

Jan 8....Jun 30. .J W Pew 310 Pine St 

Jan 30.. J WPew 310 Pine St 

Mar 10. .A S Folger 213 Freiuiut St 

m' 5..CE Elliott 309Mont«omfiy St 

T Wntv.1) ftW \l ...7 .. u. 



..Jan .._ 
..Fab 12.. 
. .Jan 15.. 



10. .T Wetxel 622 M ntgoasery St 

T .-y^ ■■^^^^■■^'^,^}^^' 3U9 .MoiitKoiuMy St 

•l"^" ^,l----|^^'' ll..CKElliott 3lia Montgomery St 

,Jiini3....Febl2..HTBriKK8 Downienlle 

Feb 26....Murl7..J MBuffiuglon 303 Caltroraia at 

Jau 14.... Feb 4.. J W Puw 310 Pluu St 

M..DOC 27....Feb 3....Feb25..JMorirfo 328 Montgomery St 

25.. Deo 21-...J<*n 2?....Peb 18..C KKUlott 309 Moatt'omeiy St 

10. Jun 10....F«l, 10....Mar 3..PHLeoQard 419 Callforoia St 

7..ptc 2.... Jan 6....Jan 27..W H Watfou 302 Moutftomery St 

5. .Doc 21....Jan28....Feb25..PWAiiie« 51C Gilifmula 8t 

^— "" ...Feb 26....Mar24..A K Dunbar 309 Montgomery St 

..Feb 5.... Feb 26. .U D Edwards 4H California 8t 

.Deo 26.... Jan 30.. D Buck 309 Montgomery St 

•■.^•J** \J---^'^^P-'^ Mori^io 323 MontgonieTy Rt 

.Bob 6.... Feb 2^..E B Holmes 309 Montgomery St 

Feb 26.... Mat 27.. A Waterman 309 Moutfeomeiy St 

-T.... h Jan V8..LHPockman 28 Cftilforola St 



25. .Jan 20.. 

25..Dtc 31.. 

5. .Nov 1. 

5 .Jiiu 13.. 

25. .Jan 4.. 

30.. Jan 15.. 

50. .Nov 27... 



.Jau 



l..Dec 14....Jan 21 ..Feb 14. .W J Gartett..V.V.V.'.V.'r.'..~3tl8 Piiie St 
MEETINQS TO BE KELD. 
Nam" OF CoMPANi. Location. Sboretabt Office in 8 F. Mbetiko D*te 

Apollo M Co L SlosB, Jr SlOSansome St Annual Jan 27 

Cibjio Cre.k M Co L Oaborn 3(9 Montgomery Ht Annual... ' " Feb 3 

JJul MuTile MCo Nevada. .J W Pew 310 Pine fat AonuaJ " Jan ''S 

Luuky HiU Oou M Co FD Black Baldwin Hotel ." Feb 13 

Nortb Commonwealth M Co Nevada.. J W Pew 310 Pine St Annual Jau ''8 

Riaing Sun M Co L SIoeh, Jr SlflSuDBome St Annual !^!X'.!'.',X!jan 2G 

Utah Con M Co Nevada.. A H Fish 3(j5 Muntyiomery St Annual Jan 29 

Utah Con MCo Nevada.. A H Fish 30y Moutgumery St Annual '.,'.'.!'.'.l.!'.!jau 29 

Latest dividends— within three months. 

Name op Oompant. Location. Seubktaey. Office in 9. F. Amount Pavabt» 

Champion M Oo T Wetzel 522 Montgomery St 10. . . ! Jau 20 

Caledonia M C Nevada.. AS Chemiuant 328 Montgomery 9t 08 " Auk 5 

Con California 4 Va M Co Nevada.. A W Havens 309 Montgomery St '. 50!!!!!* " V V. "jau 10 

Derbec Blue Gravel M Co.... ,. Calif ornia..T WetzeL 522 Montgomery St 10 Deo 23 

Idaho M Co California Grass Valley 5 00 *.'.'.*.".*.' Nov 7 

MtDiabloMCo Nevada.. R Heath 319 Pine St 30 . Oct2t 

Pacitic Borax SaltJk Soda Co. ..California.. A H Clough 230 Montgomery St 1 00 ...Jan 10 



Mining Share Market, 

La grippe, close money market with the general 
public, bad roads, snow blockades and other evil 
(irom a stock point of view) influences have made a 
dull mining share market. If the few chippers went 
into the market to turn an honest penny by '• cinch- 
ing" the insiders or any other persons, they found 
it uphill work, for if they sold short anyway freely 
the market was advanced to make them fill, and if 
they bought heavily, long prices were sent down to 
make them disgorge. Outsiders now pin their faith 
to the coming of Col. Mackay, for points are out 
that there will be nothing much until after he gets 
here, but how long it will be before he deigns to 
visit this coast remains to be seen. It now looks as 
if it will be all of a month, if not longer, owing to 
snows, etc. It is generally claimed that before the 
Colonel arrives in this city prices will be lower than 
at any time this (1890) year. In the outside stocks 
the Quijotoas were lifeless, the Tuscaroras were 
hanging pending two or more assessments, and 
lower prices looked for; while the B''dies showed 
little more activity. Many well-informed on the 
Bodie stocks have no faith in them until after an 
assessment is levied on Bodie, which report gives at 
50 cents a share. 

Snow blockades have cut off all mail communica- 
tion from the mines, except the Quijotoas, whose 
stocks are listed on the two exchanges in this city. 
Telegraphic communication, which is at all times 
unsatisfactory, is still more so now. All ore-extract- 
ing in the Corastocks is reported to be suspended 
owing to heavy deposit of snow. The work now 
going on in the mines is of a prospecting character. 
Mining men here are watching with great interest 
the work going on running from the Ward shaft. If 
apparently authentic reports can -be depended upon, 
they have made connection from the Ward shaft 
wiih about the 800-foot level in Potosi, and now they 
are pushing the west drift on the 1800-foot Ward 
shaft to intersect the ore found before they werff 
flooded out on the 2400-foot level. This body of 
ore is said to be of a very important character, and 
if found as rich in the i8oo-(oot west drift as ex- 
pected, it ought to make quite a stir in the group of 
mines in the immediate vicinity. Whether the cor- 
rect information will be given out remains to be seen, 
for the drift running west has ever since Nov, 2, 
1889, been called the east drift, although when 
started, Pendergast, the superintendent, stated in his 
official letter that the drift was started west. The 
prospecting work going on in the other mines is be- 
ing closely watched. From the Quijotoa mines 
nothing new comes to hand. Advices from the 
Tuscaroras stated that it will take all of two weeks 
yet before certain important work can be done. 
From the Bodies no news is obtainable— telegraphic 
lines down and railroads blockaded by snow. From 
President Ives of the Bodie and Mono mines we 
learn that it was the intention to have more pros- 
pecting work done in Bodie and Mono, that is, fol- 
low up by drifts or otherwise every seam of ore 
which gave promise of running into a body of ore. 
He says that it was the merest accident (a cave in 
the mine) that they found the rich pocket ot ore from 
which Bodie paid its last dividends. Whether the 
company will be as fortunate again remains to be 
seen , at any rate, it looks as if work will be continued 
in the mines as long as the public pay assessments, 
provided no paying quantity of ore is run into. 

Bullion Sliipments. 

Owing to the prevailing snow blockades on the 
railroad lines, no bullion shipments have been re- 
ceived here for the past week. Wells, Fargo & Co. 
have refused for several days to receive any more 
bullion for shipment from the mines in the snow- 
bound districts. Already various shipments.'aggre- 
gating $100, ooo» lie tied up along the routes in the 
mountains. __^ 

Complimentary Samples. 

Persons receiving this paper marked are re- 
quested to examine its contents, terms of sub- 
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as far as practicable, aid in circulating the 
journal^ and making its value more widely 
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the cause it faithfully serves. Subscription 
rate, $3,00 a year. Extra copies mailed for 10 
cents, if ordered soon enouRh. If already a 
BubBoriber, please show the paper to others. 



Table of Lowest and Highest Sales in 
S. P. Stock Exchange. 



Name of 

OOMPAHT. 



Alpha 

Alta , 

Andes 

Belcher 

Best & Belcher.... 

Bullion 

Bodie Oon 

Benton 

Bulwer 

Commonwealth , . , 
Oon. Va. &Oal.... 

OhalleDge 

OhoUar 

OonAdence 

Oon. Imperial 

Caledonia 

Grown Point 

Crocker 

EureKa Con 

Exchequer 

Grand Prize 

Gk)uld& Curry.... 
Hale & NororoSB., 

Julia 

Jnetice 

Kentuc^ , 

Lady Wash 

Mono 

Mexican 

Navajo 

NTortb Belle iBle..., 

Nev. Queen 

Occidental 

Ophir 

Overman - 

Potosi 

Peerless 

Peer 

Savage. 

8.B.&M 

Sierra Nevada 

Silver HiU 

Scorpion 

[Jnion Oon 

TJta'' 

Weldon 

VTellow Jacket 



Week 

Ending 
Jan. 2. 



1.00 
1.3J 

.00 
I.8J 



25 

2.85 

U 

30 

2.35 

4.00 

,33 

,25 

1.60 

25 



1.55 
2.75 
4.45 



.25 
.65 
1.35 
2.F0 
3') 
1.25 



2.15 
,65 



Whbk 
Ending 
Jan. 9. 



.95 
1.25 

50 .r5 

1.65 1.85 

2.10 2.35 

25 .60 

3U .45 



3,10 3.65 
4.50 

I. 10 1.20 

2.25 2.45 

'!25 "36 

i'M I'.h 

.20 .25 



.20 

.60 

1.30 

2.50 

2i 

1.20 

.30 

.35 

.30 

:.]5 

.35 

1.05 

1 00 

.60 

.05 

.55 

1.65 

15 
1.40 
1.-5 
1.75 



1.55 

1.20 

1.95 

.35 

2M 
.55 



Week 

Ending 
Jan. 16. 



Week 
Ending 

Jan. 23. 



1.2( 



1.70 1.85 
2.25 2.35 
55 
45 



1 05 

1.251.25 1.30 

.W .f-n .... 

"1.8i 1.95 

2.40 2.55 

.5^ .60 

.50 .60 



3.40 3.85 
4.3') 

I. 10 1 25 

: 2.25 

3.25 .. 

.25 .30 

.15 ... 

1 50 1.55 

" 25 



.15 

1.31 

25 
1.J5 
.35 



1.05 
.25 

.60 
3.05 

.55 
l.f^O 

,25 

1.40 
1.00 



2.05 

.55 



3.60 3. SO 

4.45 4.75 

1.30 1 35 

2.31) 2.45 

33 .... 

.30 .... 

.15 .... 

1.50 1.70 

20 .25 



.45 
.55 
1.35 
" 80 
30 

i.:o 

70 



.50 



1.00 ... 

90 .... 

.65 .75 

3.45 3.70 

•JO .70 

1.60. 1 75 

is '.'.'.'. 

1.55 1.65 

1.05 1.23 

K90 2.05 

,0 .... 

2.25 2.35 

Hi .75 

15 .... 

.. 2.35 



Sales at San Francisco Stock Exchange. 



Thuksdat, Jau. 23, 9:30 a. m. 

400 Bodie 45c 

185 Belcher 1.95 

100 Chollar 2.45 

250 Crown Point 1.65 

ICO Exchequer 50c 



400 Mono 35c 

350 Mexican 2.70 

150 Savage 1.60 

50 Sierra Nevada 2.00 

350 S. E. &M l.IO 

500 Silver Hill 30c 



Oar Agents. 

OiTR Fribhdb can do much In aid of our paper aod the 
cause ol practical knowledge and science, \>y assisting 
Agents in their labors of canvassing, by lending their In- 
Quenoe and encouraging favors. We intend to send none 
but worthy men. 

J. C. HOAO — San Francisco. 

B. G. Bailby— San Francisco. 

W. W. Throbaldb— Los Angeles Co. 
E, Fischer— Central California. 
Geo. Wilsoh — Sacramento Co. 
E H. SoHABFFLB — Fresno Co. 

C. Edward Robertson— Humboldt Co. 
Frank 3. Chapik— Butte Co. 

Wm. H. Hillbart— Oregon. 
E. E. Dbming — Oregon. 
CuAS. M. Moody— Oregon. 



The death of General M. G. Vallejo removes 
the meet prominent survivor of the old Mexi- 
can regime in this State. Hia span of life cov- 
ered the rule of three Governmenta In Cali- 
fornia. He was born a subject of the King of 
Spain, became a citizen of the Mexican Kepub- 
lio when that country threw off Spanish alle- 
giance, and was made a citizen of the United 
States bv the Treaty of Gaadalupe Hidalgo. 
General Yallejo was one of the highest types of 
the Spanish gentleman. His hospitality was 
unbounded, and his integrity of the higheet 
standard. 

Don't FaU to Write. 

Should this paper be reoeived by any subscriber who 
does not want ft, or beyond the time he intends to pay 
for it, let him not fail to write us direot to stop It A 
postal card (coating one cent only) 'will suffice. We will 
not linowingly send the paper to any one who does nob 
wish It, but If It is continued, through the failure of the 
aubacrlber to notify us to discontinue It, or BOme irre- 
aponalble party requested to Btop It, we shall positively 
demand paymentfor the time It is sent. LOOK OARirULLf 
4f m UBU OH TO0R PAnft. 



60 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 25, 1890 



IQECHAJMieAL PROGRESa 



American Iron for England. 

It may be regarded as a matter of no little 
moment that a cargo of American pig iron baa 
recently been shipped to England. '*It is re- 
markable," says London Iron, "at a time when 
the home demand for pig iron has attained sach 
magnitude, and when a further impetus is ex- 
pected in certain quarters by orders from 
America, to find evidence of an opposite tenden- 
cy from the latter country. One of the most 
curiouB developments of the present active 
position of the iron trade is that a shipment of 
metal has already been made from the United 
States to this country, and more is likely to 
follow. The Thomas Iron Company has sold 
1000 tone of No. Ix foundry pig for delivery in 
Liverpool. The transaction, it is stated, was 
a perfectly regular one in the ordinary course 
of businesB at the ruling American prices. It 
is believed in Pittsburg that more iron will go 
if prices warrant the shipment. From this 
poaition, it is evident that, if the price of pig iron 
gets much higher, we may expect American com- 
petition — quite a new feature in the home iron 
trade. It would also appear probable on these 
premises that a check against any further 
marked advance in the value of pig iron will 
be found in American competition." 

The recent advance in prices will, no doubt, 
have a tendency to retard to some extent the 
abipment of iron abroad, and especially to Eng- 
land. Should the present speculative upward 
tendency die out, the indications are that one 
might look to an early-growing market in this 
direction for our surplus product. The United 
States is now the largest producer of iron of 
any country in the world, and there is every 
reason to believe in a continued rapid increase 
of that product. New discoveries of valuable 
iron ores and increased outputs are constantly 
being announced, while in nearly every other 
country we hear of iron mines giving out, or of 
their inability, to meet the growing demands for 
their yield. In many localities the yield of oar 
iron mines is limited only by the means for 
its transportation, but these facilities are rap- 
idly being improved. 

Prices of tools, machinery, barbed wire, tele- 
graph and other wires and many other minor 
articles made of iron, are gradually improving, 
not only in this country, but throughout the 
world as well. If under the existing order of 
things we can make it pay to export the raw 
material, why should not our abundant and 
priceless resources of iron be converted into 
machinery and other articles of necessity by 
our own mechanics for export, instead of send* 
ing abroad the unmanufactured material? More 
and more are our enormous resouroea of the 
baser metala becoming known and appreciated 
abroad. The United States now stands at the 
head of the world in the pjoduotion of both 
the precious and the baser metals. 

Car- Wheels of Rolled Steel. — One of the 
most difficult things In railway maintenance ia 
to secure safe and reliable car-wheels. Varioue 
kinds of material and various modea of con- 
struction have been tried; but thus far nothing 
has fully realized what would be considered a 
wheel which could be accepted as any very_ 
near approach to finality in perfection. The' 
latest and perhaps most promising device in 
this direction la a rolled-ateel wheel which hae 
been experimented upon with so good a degree 
of sucoeas, that, according to a Philadelphia ex- 
change, it ia thought the new induatry which 
may grow out of it may mark an important 
development in the manufacture of steel prod- 
ucts, and may revolutionize railroad car-wheel 
construction in this country. The Continental 
Car-Wheel Co. haa purchased ground for its 
buildings in Philadelphia, and will begin the 
manufacture of rolled street-car wheels. At 
the present time the car-wheels used for railroad 
rolling-stock in this country are made either of 
chilled iron or of softer substances, such as pa- 
pier maohe with a steel tire. There were 600,- 
000 tons of charcoal iron manufactured in the 
United States laat year, and of thie amount 
fully one-half went into chilled iron oar-wheels. 
For some time past, however, the increasing 
weight of passenger, but eapeoially freight loads 
whiob the wheels have to hear up, has con- 
vinced manufacturers that solid ateel would 
have to be need as material. The establiah- 
ment which is to be set up at Norristown ia 
somewhat experimental, but if rolled-steel car- 
wheels shall prove valuable iu service, the in- 
dustry is capable of indefinite expansion, ow- 
ing to the immense demand for railroad cars all 
through the country. 

New AIachine for the Recovery of Metals, 
A new machine for the abstraction and recov- 
ery of valuable metals from earth, sand, olay, 
alag, the aweepinge of jewelers' shops, and 
other refuse, haa been perfected by Mr. T. 
Badworth Sharp of Muutz'a Metal Works, 
Birmingham, England. The machine, which ia 
called '* The Hydraulic Separator," consists of 
a tube with two chambers. Into the upper 
chamber the refuse is introduced while water 
Is slowly rising in the lower tube at a regulated 
speed, and while the metals sink into a recepta- 
cle, the earthy particles are carried over the 
top of the tube into the refuse tank. The prin- 
ciple on which thia invention is based is that, 
assuming certain metal particles sink In still 
water at the rate of 30 feet per minate, 
whereas earth sinks at the rate of 20 feet, it 



follows that if the water is caused to rise in 
the tube at the rate of 25 feet per minute, the 
metal will sink to the bottom at the rate of five 
feet per minute, while the particles of lighter 
specific gravity are washed away. The ap- 
paratus has undergone various teats with com- 
plete success. One teat was the placing of a 
quantity of small shot in two barrowfuls of 
refuse, with the result that the whole of the 
shot was recovered, while the refuse was car- 
ried away. The machine is exceedingly simple 
of oonstruction, requiring no skilled labor, and 
the economy ia auch that at one of the leading 
works in tihe Midlands metal of the value of 
several thousand pounds is annually recovered. 
The invention is not only valuable to copper- 
smiths, braaafonnders, tin-plate manufacturers 
and jewelers, bat is claimed to be most effect- 
ive for gold-mining purposes, and several of 
these hydraulic separators are now being sent 
to the South African gold-fields, — Iron and 
Coal Trades Review, London. 



A Perfect Tin-Can Maker. ^The Phila- 
delphia Ledger deacrihes a new machine for the 
manufacture of tin cans aa follows: The ma- 
chine is about 50 feet long. The fiat tin of a 
proper size for a can ia placed on an endless 
chain at one end. It then passes into a ma- 
chine, where the tin ie rolled into the shape of 
a can and the edges fastened. A series of gas 
jets next heat the partly made can, and a pot 
of solder distributes ita metal along the edge. 
The can then pasaes by a sharp turn to a trav- 
eler, where fingers graap it and hold it in posi- 
tion aa the top and bottom of the can drop 
through a slot into position. Another aeriea of 
gas jets and solder further on fix one end, and 
then, by an ingenious movement of the traveler, 
the other end is presented to still another se- 
ries of gas jets and soldnr, and the can is ready 
for use. It waa just 45 seconds from the time 
the flit sheet of tin waa placed in the machine 
until it paaaed out, 50 feet away, a finiahed can. 



Iron and Steel. — While the population of 
the United Statea during the paat ten yearahae 
averaged about four per cent of the estimated 
population of the globe, the consumption of 
iron and steel in thia country has averaged 30 
per cent of the world's consumption and now 
exceeds 40 per cent. The consumption of iron 
steadily increases, notwithstanding the recent 
enormous reduction in ita use for railway pur- 
poses. Both iron and steel are being used 
more ani more widely every day in buildings, 
bridges and other structural work; and while 
the &.merican product for 1889 will exceed that 
of Great Britain, it is not large enough to sup- 
ply the home demand. One cause of the extra- 
ordinary growth of the iron and steel industries 
is the cheap conversion of iron into Bdsaemer 
ateel and the ready adaptation of ateel to 
atructural shapes for ships, bridges and build- 
ings into nails, wire, axles, springs, tools, shaft- 
ing, etc. 

Price of Steel. — Steel is now from 30 to 40 
per cent dearer than it waa in 1887. Thia, 
says London Invention of Nov. 30th, will sen- 
sibly aSdot the naval defense scheme, and will 
cause the cost of. the building of ironclads to be 
£30,000 per ship more than was calculated. 
There is also a proportionate increaae in work, 
so that much delay will be incurred in obtaiu- 
iog the delivery of platea and angle bars. This 
will likewise add from three to four montha in 
the coDBtruction of a cruiaer. With America, 
according to Mr. Carnegie, making ateel raila 
as cheaply as England, and according to Col. 
Shook, making iron at $2 a ton less than it can 
be made for in England, it looks aa if protec- 
tion ia anything but a failure. 

The Idea of the Railway Three Cent- 
uries Old. — Hitherto it has been supposed 
that English miners in the middle of the ISiih 
centnry firat utilized parallel raila, like the 
modern railway tracks, in the tranaportation of 
burdens. Iu a "Dasoription of the World," by 
Sebastian Munster, 1541, a woodcut has been 
found containing a representation of a little 
four-wheeled car loaded with ore, and with a 
man behind shoving it along parallel rails. The 
scene of the woodcut ia in an Alsatian mine of 
the firat part of the 16th century. Munater 
calls the car in question instrumentum trac- 
tornm, and mentions that its four wheels were 
of iron. 

Bronze fob Axle-Boxes. — With the large 
high-sp<^ed locomotives that do so much work 
on the New York Central, there haa been more 
or less trouble with the oast-iron axle-boxes 
breaking, and Mr. Buchanan has been trying 
bronze with decided success. There is now a 
likelihood of this material being adopted as the 
standard for all passenger locomotives, and its 
use may be extended to all classes of engines. 



SeiENTIFie FR.OGRESS. 



Annealing Steel, — A good method of an- 
nealing steel is to let it " goak * in the fire un- 
til red hot, as it heata more evenly; then take 
it from the fire and carry it to some dirk place, 
let it oool in the air until lyou lose aight of the 
dull red in the dark, and then oool it off in hot 
water. This method ia called the "water an- 
neal." 

Wire Nails.— In 1886 the production of 
wire nails waa about 600.000 kegs, made by 27 
wire-nail works; in 1887 the production waa 
estimated to have been 1,250,000 kegs, made 
by 47 works; and in 1S8S the production iaeati- 
mated to have been 1,500,000 kegs, or 150 per 
oent more than iu 1886. 



Scientific Progress in 1889. 

In Astronomy- 
Considerable progress haa been made during 
the year in photographing certain nebnlse and 
other star clusters. Photography haa also 
brought to light many very faint (gaseons) 
nebuTse which the telescope fails to detect. The 
moon's surface has also been photographed and 
its minutest details brought out with a distinct* 
nesB hitherto unknown. 

The 1475 photographs of the tranait of Venna 
for 1882, taken by the American aatronomers at 
Washington and elaewhere, have been reduced, 
and the solar parallax reaulting therefrom is 82 
in, .847, which corresponds to a mean distance 
of the earth from the sun of 92 385,000 miles, 
with a probable error of only 125,000 miles. 
These numbers are no doubt olose approxima- 
tions to the truth, but they cannot be regarded 
as final nntil all the obaervatlona made by as- 
tronomers in other coantries are reduced and 
discussed. From the known values of preces- 
sion, aberration, nutation, and all the other 
factors which can in any way enter into the 
solar parallax, Prof. Harkness of the Naval Ob- 
servatory at Washington has, on theoretical 
grounds, deduced a parallax of 8 in. .836 = 
ins. .004, which gives a mean distance of 92,- 
504,000 miles, with an exceedingly small prob- 
able error. With this value, the sun's diameter 
comes out 861,670 milea. 

Five new asteroids have been discovered this 
year. They are all exceedingly small bodiea 
for primary planets, and are situated in that 
immenae region between Mars and Jupiter. 

A very valuable discovery of great practical 
importance in the manufacture of astronomical 
telescopes haa been made by two diatinguiahed 
G-erman physicists. Prof. Abbe and Br. Sohott 
of Jena, Germany, The great defect in all 
large telescopes of the refracting kind ia the 
secondary spectrum, due to the fact that the 
lenaea corapoaing the objeot-glaaa do not focus 
all the refracted rays at the same point. By 
using different kinds of glass, opticians have suo- 
ceeded in bringing together two widely dlfier- 
ing rays of light, the red and the blue, but 
have not succeeded in bringing together all the 
other intermediate rays, so as to form a colorless 
image, owing to what ia called ** the irration- 
ality of diaperaion." After numerous experi- 
ments and extensive research into the chemical 
nature of various kinds of glass, German physi- 
cists have Bucceeded in practically reducing 
the secondary spectrum, or the color correction, 
to zero in the new glass they have made. It ia 
also claimed by the discoverers that the foci 
for visual and for photographic purpoaea are 
identical. All the telescopes hitherto made of 
the new glass have proved quite satisfactory in 
these respects. 

In Chemistry. 

A new metal has been discovered io both nickel 
and cobalt. Gnominm is the name proposed 
for it. Experiments on the compresaibility of 
oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen gaaea show that 
under a presaure of 15,000 pounda per sq. in. 
the compressibility of these gases is no greater 
than that of Ifquide, and increases.in proportion 
to the temperature. If the density of water be 
taken as unity, the density of oxygfn under a 
pressure of 3000 atmosphsres is 1.1054, that of 
air 8817, of nitrogen 0.8293, and of hydrogen 
0.0887. These facts have an important bearing 
on the physical constitution of the sun, whose 
interior ia now regarded as a vast maas of gaa- 
eouB matter under enormous pressure. 
In Solar Physics. 

M. Ja'^sen of Paris has made an important dis- 
covery in solar phyaica. By apectrosoopic ob- 
servations made on the top of Mt. Blanc he 
has shown that oxygen does not exist in the 
snn. Hia observations show that the band and 
lines of oxygen previously identified by him 
and others in the solar spectrum are due en- 
tirely to the earth's atmosphere. These sys- 
tems of lines iu the red, yellow and blue por- 
tions of the Bpeotrnm, which are known to vary 
with the square of the density of the absorbing 
oxygen, were altogether wanting, and the 
groups of dark linea in other parts of the apec- 
trum, which vary aimply aa the density of the 
absorbing medium, were ao faint aa to leave no 
doubt of their total disappe3.rance, provided 
we could entirely eliminate the efifeots of the 
earth's atmosphere. He has also repeated his 
obaervations on the top of the Eiffel Tower, and 
confirms his former results. Farther researohea 
in this direction are required to settle the mat- 
ter definitely. 

Explorations. 

Daring a coarse of deep-sea soandings on a 
line extending from New Zaaland to the Tonga 
or Friendly inlands, undertaken by Her 
Majesty's ship Egeria, an extraordinary depres- 
sion of five miles and 168 feet was found in lati- 
tude 24° 37 min. south, and longitude 135° 8 
min. west. Several other depreaaions were 
found near the same locality, varying from 
3.006 to 43 00 fathoms, all of which appear to 
be crater-like depressions in a tolerably shallow 
sea. — Baltimore Sun. 

While the IjAWS of Gravity are, no doubt, 
sufficient to explain the movements of the 
celestial bodies with respect to each other, 
there are some obscure movements which have 
long been investigated without any very satis- 
factory results; but the electro-dynamic the- 
ory is one which has often been suggested to 



account for them. This theory is indeed gain- 
ing ground for more than one reaaon. In the 
light of recent experiments, and in connection 
with the material properties of the electric cur- 
rent as now generally nnderstood, it would 
aeem that the ** ether " is not to be considered, 
as heretofore, the medium through which the 
force binding the celestial bodies to one 
another acts, but that it ia the actual binding 
element itaelf, fulfilling all the properties of an 
incompressible, hiphly elastic fluid. So sub- 
stantially Bays the Electrieal World, 



Taking Aim in Shooting. — Shooting, says 
Forest and Stream, is very much like driving a 
nail. Does a carpenter ever take aim with hia 
hammer, or a apikeman on a railroad with his 
long, swinging stroke at arm's length watch his 
maul as it goes around over his head to see if it 
is coming down in the right place ? If he did, 
would he be apt to hit the spike ? When I 
commenced trap-shooting I thought it was 
necessary to lay my cheek down on the gun 
stock and acrew around until I got my eye and 
the sight in a line with a glass ball. That was 
before the day of clay pigeons and blue rooks. 
Cons quently I was more often at the foot of 
the class than at the head. One time, after ao 
many misses that I became ashamed of myself, 
I got reokless and didn't care whether I scored 
or not. I called " pull," drew up my gun, 
watched the ball, fired, and waa as much sar- 
prised as were my companions tq see the ball 
go to pieces. It took me some time to get the 
idea, but I finally got it, and thereafter I sel- . 
dom saw the sight or even the gun when I 
pulled the trigger, and my success was aurpris- 
ing. I applied the same rule to field shooting, 
and, without boasting, my hunting companions 
sometimes tell me to my face that I oan shoot. 
Of course allowance must he made for birds 
crossing, rising or falling, but that is intuitive 
and seldom thought of by our most snccessful 
shots. Indeed, thinking has little to do with 
it. If it bad, one's bird would be out of range 
before he ooald collect his thoughts. 



Counterfeiting Kbndered Impossible. — 
The Paper Trade Journal says: The large 
and contmually increasing demand for paper, 
which cannot be duplicated by unauthorized 
parties, for uae in printing certificates of stock, 
bonds, drafts, notes, commercial paper, etc., 
has led to the production of a paper of peculiar 
deaigna. A lately patented process for making 
paper of thia deacription consists in applying 
ink to a lithographic plate of atone or other 
material, placing another plate, whloh may 
also be a lithographic plate, face to face with 
the first-named plate, rnbbing the faoes of the 
two plates together for a time and then taking 
them apart. The ink will be so distributed by 
the rubbing action that a variegated design 
will be produced upon the plate. If thia design 
is not pleasing, the plates are again plaoed to- 
gether and the rubbing continued until a satis- 
factory design ia prodnced. The ink ia then 
allowed to dry and the lithographic plate ia 
subjected to the usual treatment for litho- 
graphic purposss, and the design is transferred 
to the paper in the usual manner of printing 
from lithographic plates. Thia process is said 
to produce designs of such infinite variety of 
ooDfigurartion and shade that reproduction, ex- 
cept from the original plate, is practically im- 
possible. The impression may be made in any 
desired color. 



Zercon — What is it?— Zercon is a metal 
not found pure. In fact, no use for the pure 
metal has ever been found, therefore it haa not 
been reduced. An oxide of this metal, called 
zerconia, is the moat infnaible of all the known 
oxidea. The oxide ia reduced to a fine powder. 
A common cotton wick ia thoroughly filled 
with the powdered oxide, then the cotton is 
burned out. The wick ia all consumed except- 
icg a thin, delicate, snow-white column of the 
zerconia, which is left exactly the shape of the 
wick. As the burning gas impinges upon this 
column of oxide, the latter becomes heated 
white hot and glows with a eoft incandescence, 
second only to the electric light. A me- 
chanic may not know the name of this burner 
from the above description, but it is named the 
welsbaok and by that name will be readily 
recognized, — -?7". W. Mechanic, 



Artificial Propagation of the Sponge — 
A new industry io artificially cultivated sponge 
ia in prooesa of oreatiou. M. Oscar Schmidt, 
professor at the University of Gratz, in Styria, 
haa invented a method by which piecea of liv- 
ing sponge are broken off and planted in a fa- 
vorable spot. From very small cuttings of this 
kind Prof. Schmidt haa obtained large sponges 
in the course of three years at a very small ex* 
penae. One of his experiments gave the result 
that the cultivation of 4000 sponges had not 
cost more than 225 francs, including the inter- 
est for three years on the capital expended. 
The Auatro-Hungarian Government haa been 
so much struck with the importance of these 
experiments that it haa ofiioially authorized the 
protection of this new induatry on the coaat of 
Dalmatia, 

A New Calculating Machine has jnst been 
invented in France, and obtained a gold medal 
at the exhibition. The inventor ia M. Bollee 
of Li Mana, a clever machlniat, already very 
favorably known by other uaeful inventions. 
The machine does addition, multiplication and 
division with astonishing rapidity, and all by 
a turn of the wheel. 



Jan. 26, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



61 



SOOD I-IEj^LTH. 



Health of the State. 

No Serious Bpldemlca Reported. 

The aeoretary of the State R;>ard of Health 
has Usaed hh report for the mooth of Ueodm- 
bor. The figares givea show a pleasing state 
nf tbiogs regarding the health of the State. 
Riporta received from iocalitiea repreaentuig a 
popalatioD of 781,000 give the number of 
deaths at 963, a percentage of 1.-23 in the lOOO. 
or an annual mortality of 14.7tt, which is a lit* 
tie higher than the prevloaa month's rate- 
This is considered a very favorable report when 
compared with the general average of mortality 
tbroDghout the country. 

Reports received from 100 looalitiee indicate 
an absence of aerioaa epidemic disease within 
the State. The extreme moisture and cold 
which prevailed during the month Increased in 
a marked maoner the freqaenoy of all afifec- 
tions of the respiratory organs, with a oorre* 
BpondiDg fatality from consumption, pneumonia 
and broDchitis. 

Typhoid fever is quite prevalent throughout 
the State, and iofluenza is also reported quite 
prevalent, although not having as yet attained 
the severity which cbaraoterizen the dlseaee as 
reported from Europe and the Kistern States. 
It Is undoubtedly the same disease, and wilt 
become epidemic, although the type may be 
milder. No deaths from it have yet been re- 
ported, but many of our correspondents agree 
upon the-fact that the disease is characterized 
by that extreme debility which is likely to 
prove fatal to the debilitated, or those suffer- 
Ine from previous sickness, or in the very aged. 

The month has been marked by aa unnnual 
number of storms upon the Pacific Coast. Riin 
fell in Oregon and Washiogton on 19 days, in 
Southern California on IS days, and in North- 
ern California on 24 days. 

The mean temperature of the month was 
aligbtly above the normal temperature for De- 
cember in Southern California, and slightly be- 
low the normal in other Pacific Coast districts. 

In Western Washiagton and Northwestern 
Oregon the rainfall for the month was less than 
the average Daoember rainfall. In all other 
districte the precipitation was greater than the 
normal amount, particularly in California, 
where no station reported less than twice the 
usual amouDt. At several California stations 
more than five times the normal rainfall was 
reported. 

Long Lived People, — The Norwegians are 
said to be the longest-lived people in the world. 
Official statistics show that the average duration 
of life in Norway is 4S.33 for the men, 51 30 
for the women, and 49 77 for both sexes. The 
duration of life has increased in late ypars. 
The director of the Statistical Bureau of Nor- 
way, who is authority for the sfaove, says: *'If 
the mortality in Norwa}' is 17 per cent more 
favorable than In Central and Western Europs, 
it is greatly due to the comparatively elight 
mortality among our youngest children." To 
what particular causes this comparatively 
slight mortality among children is due we are 
not told, but probably anxious parents in 
warmer climates may take a hint from it and 
make inqairies. 

The Influence of Olive Oil on Biliary 
Secretion. — A late number of the Medical 
News says that the usefulness of olive oil in 
biliary colic seems to be substantiated by the 
recent experiments of Riaenherg, who, in dogs 
with permanent biliary fiatulie, fiads that large 
dosea of olive oil greatly increase the flow of 
bite and decrease the specific gravity. If fut- 
ure experiments prove the accuracy of the state- 
ments that olive oil assists the passage of cal- 
oali, not, as maintained by the supporters of 
the treatment, as a lubricant, but by increasing 
the secretion of bile and washiog out the gall- 
stones, it will probably be widely adopted if 
the patients do not object to the dose. 

Palpitation of the Heart. — A French phy- 
atoian aunounoes that distressing or excessive 
palpitation of the heart can always be arrested 
by bending double, the head down and the 
hands hanging, so as to produce a temporary 
congestion of the npper portion of the body. In 
nearly every instance of nervous palpitation 
the heart immediately resumes its natural 
function. If the movements of respiration are 
arrested during this action, the effect is still 
more rapid. 

A New Substitute for Tobacco is being 
introduced. It is a mixture of British herbs — 
the particular plants are kept secret — and 
smokers who have tried the compound declare 
it to be deliclously fragrant, slightly exhilarat- 
ing, and withal soothing to the nerves. Com- 
bined with ordinary tobacco it is said to make 
a blend as satisfactory as that of chicory or 
coffee. At present it is prepared in Scotland, 
nnder the name of ** herb tobacco," and it has 
rapidly grown in favor with all olasses in the 
north . 

White OR Black. — Experiments at Lsfpsic, 
Germany, show that skin grafted from a white 
to a oolored person becomes gradually black, 
and the black skin grafted upon a white person 
in time becomes white. 




Cheapening: Transportation. 

The American public does not appreciate or 
give due credit for the remarkable reductions 
in the charges for railroad transportation which 
have been made withio the past few years and 
are stilt going on. The St. Louis Republic re- 
ferring to a t»ritl sheet of the Chicago \. Alton 
road dated April 20, 1863, gives the following 
example of rates per hundred pounds from 
But St. Lonis to New York 27 years ago com- 
pared with those now in force : 

Corn 

Klonr, per barret , 

Bran 

PiK lead 

Cotton .., 

Beor , 

DreiauiJ boof....." '.'....■...'.., 

Hidea. dry....; , 

IIide8, Krcuii , ^5 9.i 

Flour, iu b»KS '29 1 CO 

In what other department of industry have 
charges decreased from 75 to 87^ per cent in 
the last 23 years ? 



I3sn. 


1$63 


«u iS 


SO »'. 


60 


1 90 


w 


96 


!i9 


95 


30 


2 60 


3i 


1 eu 


65 


2 SO 


87 


2 r>o 



Luminous Paint. — Until recently the com- 
mercial manufactareof luminous paint has been 
confined to England, where a single factory 
turns out a small supply at a price of about S3 
a pound. This enormous cost seems to have 
prevented the use of the paint except as a curi- 
osity. Daring the past year, however, a firm 
iu Austria has found means to produce it and 
place it on the market at 50 cents a pound, or 
about one-sixth of the English price. Even at 
50 cents a pound, a enhstance composed of 
roasted oyster shells and sulphur might be 
manufactured at a good profit, but at that prioe 
it is likely to come into extensive use. Wher- 
ever it can absorb light during the day it will 
give it forth at night,and it is said that a railway 
oar in England, which has had its ceiling painted 
with it, was so brilliantly illuminated that one 
could see to read a newspaper In it during the 
darkest night, without other light. With all 
due allowance for the enthusiasm of early ex- 
perimenters, there is no doubt that cars with 
ceilings so painted would be pleasant to ride in 
whether dlae could really see to read in them at 
night or not ; and for making keyholes, stair- 
ways and sign-boards luminous, the paint would 
be invaluable. Lts application to stairways 
is a particularly obvious one, and the Austrian 
manufacturers furnish a kind of wall paper on 
which the paint can be used to better advan- 
tage than on the bare plastering. The paper, 
which is of a leathery texture, is first treated 
with lime-water, and then primed with a com- 
position furnished by the same firm. After 
this is dry, two thin coats of the luminous paint 
are applied, and the whole may then be var- 
nished. 

Carbonized Sawdust for Filtering. — Car- 
bonized sawdust, saturated with certain chem- 
ical compounds, has recently been introduced 
into Germany aa a material for filtering and at 
the same time discoloring liquids. Sawdust 
treated first with alum, and then with sodium 
carbonate, becomes impregnated with a precip- 
i a':e of aluminum hydrate, which adheres 
firmly to it. After being well washed with a 
solution of barium chloride until no precipitate 
is given, the sodium sulphate simultaneously 
produced is entirely removed, and then pre- 
pared sawdust is ready for use. Colored 
liquids filtered with it have their color entirely 
removed by the formation of fiikes with the 
aluminum hydrate present in the filtering ma- 
terial. A sawdust similarly saturated with 
barium chloride is used for filtering liquids, 
from which it is required to remove calcium 
sulphate, and for the removal of calcium 
carbonate from a solution a sawdust that has 
been treated with magnesium sulphate and 
caustic soda is employed. 



■ Patent-Medicine Center. — St, Louis is 
now the great distributing center of the coun 
try for patent medicines. Its dealers in such 
goods reaoh more than 4,000,000 purohasers. 



To Mend Terra- Cotta. — Terra-cotta ware 
that is broken upon aslant, either outnard or 
inward, can be mended by roughing the broken 
surfaces with a chisel or hammer, then placing 
the pieces together and pointing them with a 
mixture made of 20 parts clean river sand, 
two parts litharge and one of lime, made into 
a thin putty with linseed oil. If the terra- 
notta is very red, the putty can be colored with 
Venetian red. If other colors are desired, yellow 
oohre or Spanish brown will give the desired 
shade. Two pieces of stone, brick, or similar 
material can be united with this cement 
Sometimes it is used for covering the outside of 
brick buildings to make them look like stone 
of different kinds. 

The Latest Thing in Gloves.— The carry- 
ing of money in the glove is a fixed habit 
among the female shoppers of all large cities in 
this and all other civilized countries. Glove 
manufacturers have at last recogaized the cus- 
tom and made preparations to meet its require- 
ments. The very latest " thing " in gloves is a 
palm pocket attachment, roomy enough for a 
respectable roll of bills or all the '* small 
change" necessary for the current expenses of 
an afternoon among the stores. It is selling 
readily in Paris, and has just made a very suc- 
cessful entree in the American market. 



Electric Lighting is said to be one of the 

hardest kinds of work for a steam engine. The 

continuons running and the work being thrown 

on and off instantaneously cause an immense 

I strain, 



jLECTPjeiTY. 



The Materials for Electric Wires and 
Gables. 

A diBonssion of electrical matters wonld be 
incomplete without reference to the important 
adjuncts, electric wires and cables. What 
belts and pulleys are to a steam system, the 
wires and cables are to an electric system. 
They are the conveyors or transmitters of the 
current, and through the current of the light, 
heat, power or sound. 

The different materials from which wires 
might be made present an interesting property 
called conductivity; that is, some convey the 
current much more readily than others, the 
size of the conducting pieces being rqoal. In 
a water analogy, a poor conductor ofiuring re- 
sistance to the passage of the current may be 
compared to a pipe with a rough and ragged in- 
terior, when the friction would materially re- 
duce the flsw. A few figures will show these 
differences. 

Taking the conductivity of pare copper as a 
maximum and giving in an arbitrary value of 
100. the relative conduotivity of wrought iron 
is 16; of pure lea*!, S; of mercury, 6; of silver, 
100; of gold. 78; of platinum, 10.6; of 
aluminum, 54 2. For telegraphic practice 
where the current is weak, galvanized wire is 
almost universally used. Much the same wire 
is used for short- distance telephone lines, but 
the long distance and metallic circuit lines are 
now using copper wire entirely. 

The high-pressure currents for lighting and 
power require wires and cables of the highest 
conductivity and carefully insulated to prevent 
leakage of the electrical current which not only 
reduces its working capacity but endangers life 
and property. 

The need of durable and reliable insulated 
wires has led to the establiehment and growth 
of an enormous industry for the manufacture 
of such wires and cables. The requirements to 
be met with are often of the most trying 
nature, and the problems of wire manufacturers 
have been difficult in the extreme. Not only 
must the covering exclude the air in dry 
weather, but must stand the storms of every 
season, must resist the action of gases and 
vapors in chemical works or in sub-surface con- 
duits, must even allow total submersion under 
water for indefinite periods, besides possessing 
a toughness that will be proof against the rub- 
bing or chafing of other wires and the wearing 
action of gravel or sand. 

Wben it is realized that almost every acci- 
dent or casualty due to electricity is either di- 
rectly or indirectly traceable to defective in- 
sulation, the importance of attention to this 
branch of the industry is seen, and to obtain a 
perfectly safe iosulated wire is the work of 
manufacturing companies that have already 
done so much toward improving the quality of 
electric wires and cablos. — Boston Advertiser^ 



The Electric Telegraph Suggested 
200 Years Ago. 

The R.v, Canon Jackson of L^igb Balamere, 
Chippenham, writes as follows to the Bath 
Chronicle : "Joseph Glanvill, sometimes called 
'Sadduoismus Triumphatus Glanvill,' rector of 
Bath from 1666 to 1672, was a learned writer 
upon abstruse and mystical subjects, but in a 
style of which it is not always easy to catch the, 
meaning. In one of his treatises, called ' The 
Vanity of Dogmatizing,' printed in 1661, Chap- 
ter XXI, he is speaking of 'supposed imposeibil- 
ities, which may not be ec' In the concluding 
sentence of the following passage he seems to 
have anticipated the electric telegraph : *But 
yet to advance another instance. That men 
should confer at very distant removes by an ex- 
temporary Intercourse is a reputed impossibil- 
ity; but yet there are some hints in natural op- 
erations that give us probability that 'tis feas- 
ible, and may be compassed without unwar- 
antable assistance from dfemoniack corre- 
spondence. That a couple of needles equally 
touched by the same magnet, being set in two 
dials exactly proportioned to each other, and 
circumscribed by the letters of the alphabet, 
may effect this * magnale ' {i. e., important re- 
sult), hath considerable authorities to avouch 
it. The manner of It is thus represented. Let 
the friends that would communicate take each 
a dial, and having appointed a time for their 
sympathetic conference, let one move his im- 
pregnate needle to any letter in the alphabet, 
and its affected fellow will precisely respect 
the same. So that would I know what my 
friend would acquaint me with, 'tis but observ- 
ing the letters that are pointed at by my 
needle, and in their order transcribing them 
from their sympbatised index as its motion di- 
rects; and I may be assured that my friend de- 
scribed the same with his; and that the words 
on my paper are of his inditing. Now, though 
there be some ill contrivance in a circumstance 
of this invention, in that the thus impregnate 
needles will not move to, but avert from, each 
other (as ingenious Dr. Browne hath observed), 
yet this cannot prejudice the main design of 
this way of secret conveyance; since It is but 
reading uounter to the magnetic informer, and 
noting the letter which is most distant in the 
abecederian circle, from that which the needle 
turns to, and the case is not altered.' Now,though 
this desirable effect possibly may not yet answer 
the expectations of inquisitive experiment, yet 
'tis no despicable item, that by some other 



such way of magnetick cffioiency it may here- 
after with success be attempted, when magical 
history shall be enlarged by riper inspections; 
and 'tis not unlikely but that present disoov- 
eries might be Improved to the porformanoe, " 

Accidents from Electrical Wires. — That 
Boston should have been seriously scorched on 
Thank«givtng Day by the undue energy of 
crossed electrical wires, says an exchange, ar* 
gucs nothing against the use of the electric 
fiuid as an illuminator or mechanical motor. It 
simply indicates the imperfection which at- 
tends the introduction of all dangerous sys- 
tems into eocal life, but which tbe age of im- 
provement will in time render innoouons, as 
their nature becomes better understood. Lives 
have been sacrificed and property burned, and 
there will be more of these disasters until the 
time arrives when proper safeguards, born of 
these rude experiences, will be adopted and 
life and property will be no longer jeopardized. 
The first Atlantic voyago of Columbus was a 
hazardous and fearful adventure; a voyage to 
Europe is now a safe and pleasant pastime. 
"Time oonqaers all things" in more sensea 
than one. 

Vast Electric Motive-Power for Port- 
land. — A committee has been appointed in 
Portland, Me., to consider the subject of devel- 
oping ihe industries of that city by obtaining 
electric-power from the Presumpscot river. It 
is said that a syndicate with a capital of $300,- 
000 has been formed, and that they now own 
the vast water-power on the Presnmpsoot, 
above the point where the large dam of S. D. 
Warren & Co, has been put in. It is claimed 
that when it is properly developed a manufact- 
uring power equal to the combined power at 
Saco, Biddeforo, Auburn, Lewlston and Lowell 
will be obtained, and that with that power at the 
command of the citizens of Portland, this may 
be made a great manufacturing city. The War- 
ren "plant" will be in addition to this new 
scheme and the combined power might be al- 
most beyond calculation. 

Electricity in Mining. — The Nevada mill 
at Virginia City, of 60 stamps, is now run by 
electricity. The plant is one of the largest in 
the world, and transmits on copper wires. 
The power is generated in the dynamo cham- 
ber, which is located on the Satro tunnel level 
of the Chollar incline, 1630 feet below the sur- 
face, and transmitted to tbe motor-room lo- 
cated on the surface, a total distance of 2300 
feet. The dynamos are operated by Pelton 
wheels driven by a volume of 187 inches of 
water flowing down the shaft through ten-inch 
iron pipes. Sixty-three and one-third per cent 
of the power generated is landed tn the surface 
motors. The plant has been in constant oper- 
ation for three months under the supetvieion of 
Horace S. Conner, the electrician tor the Brush 
Company. 

A New Cell. — Report says that Mr. Edison 
has perfected a new cell for telegraphic use 
whicb possesses some remarkable points in its 
favor. A cylinder of zinc, and inside this a 
thick stick of caastic soda in water, constitutes 
the cell. It is claimed to have an internal re- 
sistance of only 0.025 ohm., and permits a dis- 
charge of 15 amperes, with an inappreciable loss 
by local action; an £. M. F. of about one volt., 
and to be free from polarization, and never 
needs cleaning. These are very wide claims, 
and if they are substantiated in practice the 
cell will have an extensive field of usefulness. 



The Paper-Mills of the L, L. Brown Co., 
Adams, Mass., will be ran by electricity in a 
short time. They are now investigating a 
scheme for applying electricity in driving the 
machinery. A mile above Adams there is a 
30foot fall in the river, and the company pro- 
poses to put up an electrical plant to be run by 
the water-power thus obtained, the electricity 
being carried by wires to the mill. The en- 
gine now used is of 200-horse power, and if 
sufficient water-power can be obtained to run a 
djinamo strong enough to drive the machinery, 
the pro j set will be carried through. 

Electrical Tooth Extractor, — An elec- 
trical instrument bas been invented which is de- 
signed to remove the pain incidental to the ex- 
traction of teeth. Itconsistsof adjustable, pivot- 
ally connected prongs carrying buttons and con- 
nected with an electrical battery, tbe buttons 
being placed on the face over tbe nerves leading 
from the teeth to the brain, and a circuit es- 
tablished the moment the tooth- extracting in- 
strument touches the tooth to be removed. 

Telephones. — The action of France with re- 
gard to telephones appears to be contagions, 
and it is now announced by an Italian cotem- 
porary that the Italian Government intends to 
monopolize the telephone system in that coun- 
try. Our own Postmaster-General also has de- 
signs on the telephone compfiniee as eonn as the 
patents of the National Telephone Company 
run out, 

Electricity ' in South America,— Qaite a 
number of Boston firms are shipping large con- 
signments of electrical goods to South American 
countries, and from what they state it seems 
evident that matters are in a fair way for the 
opening up of a great market in South America 
for United States electrical goods. 

. Electrical Engineering. — The polytechnic 
institute at Worcester, Mass., has introduced 
a new course of electrical engineering leading 
to the degree of bachelor of science. 



62 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 25, 1890 




A. T. DBWBY, W. B. KWER. 

DEWEY & CO., Publishers. 

Ofce, 220 Market St., JV. E. cor. Front St, , S. F, 
tr Take the Elevator, Ho. IS Front Sf^^ 

W. B. EWER Sbhior Editor 

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Large advertisements at favorable rates. Special or 
reading notices, legal advertisements, notices appearing 
In extraordinary type or in particular parts of the paper, 
at special rates. Four insertions are rated in a month. 

Address all literary and business correspondence 
tnd Drafts for this paper in the name of the firm. 

SCIENTIFIC PRESS PATENT AGENCY. 
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Our latest forms go to press on Thursday evening. 

Entered at S. F. Post Office as second-class mail matter 
SAN FRANCISCO: 

Saturday, January 25, 1890. 



TABLE OP CONTENTS. 



ILLUSTRATIONS.— Sectional View of Mill for Con- 
centraHng and Dressing Ores; Hollow Iron Pig-Pat- 
terns, 55. Snow-Shoe Racing in the Sierras, 59. 

EDlTOiiLALS.— Concentration of Ore; Hollow Iron 
Pig-Pfttterns, 55. Passing Events; The Latest Sliver 
Bill; "Dope" for Snow Shovels; The Storm; Mine 
Superintendent's Reports, 68. Snow-Shoeing in the 

MISCELLANEOUS.— Gold-Panning Machine; The 
Local Mint; Dea'h of Emlen Painter; From a "Worked 
Out " Mine; Mining Bureau Museum; Leadvitle and 
Aspen; Comstock Tunnel Compary; The Trusts and 
Combiner; An Important Case; Drues and Doctors; 
Cigarette Smoking, 56. The Martin White Suit Ended; 
eons, rialifornia and Virginia; California's Wealth of 
Gold; In a Flower Garden; Anti-Trust Bill; Comstock 
Total Bullion Yield; Progress of the Irrigation Survey, 
57. 

MECHANICAL PROGRESS. — American Iron 
(or England; Car- Wheels of Rolled Steel; New Machine 
for the Recovery of Metals; A Peifect Tin-Can Maker; 
Iron and Steel; Price of Steel; The Idea of the Railway 
Three Centuries Old; Bronze for Axle-Boxea, Anneal- 
ing Steel; Wire Nails, 60. 

SCIENTIFIC PROaRESS.-Scientiac Progress 
in 1889; Taking Aim in Shooting; Counterfeiting 
Rendered Impossible; Zercon— What is it; Artificial 
Propagation of the Sponge; Miscellaneous, 60. 

GOOD HEALTH.— Health of the State; Long Lived 
People; The Influence of Olive Oil on Bdiary Secretion; 
Palpitation of the Heart; White or Black; Patent Medi- 
cine Center; Uiflcellaueous, 61. 

USEFUL INFORMATION.— Cheapening Trans- 
uortation; Luminous Paint; Carbonized Sawdust for 
Filtering; To Mend Terra-Cotta; The Latest Thing in 
Gloves; Miscellaneous, 61. 

ELECTRICITY.— The Materials tor Electric Wires 
and Cables; The Electric Telegraph Suggested 200 Years 
Ago; Accidents from Electrical Wires; Vast Electric 
Motive-Power for Portland; Electricity in Mining; A 
New Cell; Electrical Tooth Extractor; Telephones; 
Electricity in South America; Electrical Engineering; 
MtEcellaneouB, 61. 

MINING SUMMARY— From the various counties 
of California, Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Mon- 
tana, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Wyoming, 63-3. • 

MINING STOCK MARKET.— Sales at the San 
Francisco Stook Board, Notices of Meetings, Assess- 
ments, Dividends, and Bullion Shipments, 68. 

Business Announoemeiits. 

[NBW THIS ISSDB.] 

Assessment Notice— Gray Eagle Mining Co, 
Situation Wanted— "J. A.," Box 2517. 

i^ See Advertising Columns. 



Passing Events. 

The Btormy weather still oontinnes and the 
railroad linea in the Sierraa and Siskiyoas are 
blocked with snow. Hundreds of men and all 
the plows are at work, with bat little Buooess, 
however, as the snow drifts into the oats as 
fast as it is removed. 

No bullion was received from the mines this 
week, as the express companies have refused 
to receive any in the snow-blookaded dia- 
triots. 

Mining matters are pretty much at a stand- 
still in this State and in Nevada, owing to the 
storm. On the Oomstook no ore shipments can 
be made, and in this State many mills have 
been compelled to stop owing to the freezing of 
water supply. Hundreds of miners are tem- 
porarily out of work. 

Unprecedented snow and rainfalls have been 
experienced in all directions. All the mount- 
ain towns are covered with deep snow. In 
some places on the railroads it is from 25 to 
40 feet deep. Travel has been obstructed and 
business demoralized. We have had no letters 
or papers from north or east for a week past. 

Judge Lorenzo Sawyer, who decided the 
famous debris case, may resign shortly from 
the federal bench and retire on his pension. 



The Latest Silver Bill. 

On last Monday two important silver bills 
were introduced into the House of Rspresenta- 
tives. One was drafted by Secretary Win* 
dom, and the other by Colonel Kirby, the 
veteran financial editor of the New York 
Journal of Commerce. Secretary Windom's 
bill is in the same line as suggested in his an- 
nual report to Congress, which was published 
at the time in the Mining and Scientific 
Press. He neither adds to nor makes any 
changes, and therefore it is objectionable alike 
to the silver and gold men. The more bis bill 
is studied the more convinced mast even the 
most obtuse be that there is not only *'a negro 
behind the fence," but if enacted into a law as 
introduced, the result will be to make silver 
more of a commercial commodity than it is 
now. There can be no doubt bat the bill will 
meet with strong opposition and be relegated 
to a back seat. If absolute free coinage can- 
not be secured, then Colonel Kirby's bill com* 
mends itself in more ways than one as a 
compromise measure; not the least of which is 
the placing of silver on the same footiog with 
gold by making provision for free coinage on 
and after January 1, 1S92. The text of the 
bill as telegraphed is as follows: 

Section 1. From and after thelatdayof 
January, 1S92, any owner of gold or silver bull 
inn may deposit the same at any mint in the 
United States, to be formed into coin or bars, 
for his benefit, in the manner now prescribed 
by law for gold bullion. 

Sec. 2. After the Ist day of January, 1892, 
the owner of any gold or silver bullion, or of 
any gold or silver coins of the United States, 
may deposit the same at the Treasury, or any 
sub-treasury of the United States, in tven mul- 
tiples of one dollar, and shall receive for the 
same legal tender notes of such denominations 
authorized by law as he may demand. 

Sec. 3. After the Ist diy of January, 1892, 
legal tender notes of the United States shall ba 
substituted, as soon as possible, for all gold 
and silver oerti&cates outstanding, and all gold 
and silver certificates paid into the Treasury 
of the United States after the Ist day of Janu- 
ary, 1892, shall be canceled and destroyed, and 
legal tender notes of like denominations shall 
be issued in lieu thereof. 

Seo, 4. The Sesretary of the Treasury is 
hereby directed to purchase for coinage eaoh 
month the maximum amount of silver bullion 
authorized to be purchased by the existing taw 
from the date of the passage of this Act to Dd- 
oemberSl, 1891. 

Sec. 5. After the Ist day of January, 1892, 
no gold or silver ballion shall be purohaied for 
nr on account of the Treasury of the United 
States, except so much as may be necessary to 
carry out the provisions of tbe Act to provide 
for the redemption of specie payment, as pro- 
vided January 14, 1875, and as amended by this 
Act; provided that any bonds iesued for the pur- 
chase of gold or silver bullion shall bear inter- 
est at not less than 2 per cent per annutn, and 
shall be payable, principal and interest, in gold 
or silver coin, or bullion, or legal tender notes, 
at the option of the holder, and shall not be 
sold for less than par in gold or silver coin of 
the United States, or the equivalent thereof in 
bullinn, and shall be payable at the option of 
the United States after ninety days' notice, to 
be given by the Secretary of the Treasury. 

Sec, 6. After the Ist day of January, 1892, 
all legal tender notes of the United States shall 
be redeemed in gold or silver coin or bullion 
at the option of the holder, and when redeemed 
may be reissued from time to time as pablio 
interest may require, and shall be received in 
payment of duties on imports. 

The above ought to go still further and make 
the legal tender quality of silver coin up to 
$100, Experienced financiers say that no rea- 
sonable excuse can be given against increasing 
its legal tender quality, and if done, silver will 
take care of itself. The bill oug^ to go still 
farther in another direction, and make the 
United States the sole issuer of paper currency, 
and in pursuance of this policy force the retire- 
ment of national bank notes. Cleveland's ad- 
ministration broke up that monster of corrup- 
tion, the **Navy Ring," and if Harrison's ad- 
ministration breaks up the National Bank ring, 
it will deserve equal commendation. 



'*Dope" for Snow-Shovels. 

As a goodly number of the people cf Oalifor- 
nia, Nevada, Idaho, Montana and Utah are 
about these times engaged in shoveling snow, 
any hint to help them in their work ought to 
be acceptable. It is very generally known that 
snow la apt to atlok to the shovels and clog 
them up, so they have to be scraped frequent- 
ly; but it may not be generally known that 
there is a way to avoid this and make the work 
easier. Up around Truckee and that vicinity, 
where they know something about snow-shor- 



eling, a '*dope," something like that used on 
Oilifornia anowshoes, is applied on the shov- 
els. The snowshoe dope, which keeps the shoes 
free from snow, is ordinarily made of beeswax, 
resin and tallow. By mixing these ingredients 
together, though with more realn and lesa tal- 
low than for anowshoes, a compound is made 
which, applied on the shovels^ keeps them from 
clogging with snow. The dope is about the 
consistency of shoemakers* wax, and is applied 
by robbing in little dabs and then spreading it 
evenly by rubbiog until a coating is evenly put 
on, not too thick, and a polished surface is 
thus obtained, from which the snow readily 
slides off. 

The shovel should be slightly heated and 
the dope applied to the blade and up the 
handle for about a ^foot. This makes a 
smooth glazed surface which will last from a 
day to a week, according to the character of 
the snow and the amount the shovel is used. 
Paraffioe is better than tallow for this dope, 
but not so easily obtained. Any one who has 
ever used a snow- shovel covered in this way 
will decline an undoped one for the fature, aa 
the work is rendered so much easier. 



The Siorm. 

We have had no saoh continaed stormy 
weather in the State since tbe memorable win- 
ters of 1853-4 and 1861-2, until this year, but 
in some respects the winter ia worse thau any 
that has preceded it eince Americans occupied 
California. The snowfall in the mountains is 
heavier than ever before known, and rain on 
the coast has been wonderful in quantity. In 
Sin Francisco up to Wednesday the total rain- 
fall has been 30.24 inches, the heaviest, with 
one exception, sinoe 1849. The exception was 
in the season of 1861-62, at the -time of the 
great Sacramento floods, when the rainfall for 
January alone was 24 Inches. South of us, at 
Felton, in the Santa Cruz mountains, they 
have had 65 inches, and at Boulder creek, 
seven miles from Felton, they have had over 
81 inches this season. 

But it is on the mountains where most of the 
trouble is being experienced. Tbe trains are 
blockaded in the Stskiyous and in the Sierras, 
and have been for a week, notwithstanding the 
snow-plows and armies of men that have been 
working to open the roads and release the 
trains. We have had no mails from the East 
or North for a week, and at this writing 
(Thursday) tbe railroad officials cannot tell 
when the blockade will be raised. 

In many of the mountain towns of California 
and Nevada, owing to the blockiog of railroads 
and impassability of other roads, provisions are 
scarce and high. In some places they are tak- 
ing provisions in on pack-trains or snow-shoes. 
At Grass Valley the mines, all but the Omaha, 
have been closed since SUurday evening, 11th 
inst., cau<4ing a loes to miners alone of from 
$1500 to $2000 a day, to say nothing of the 
loss to the mining companies. The same state 
of affairs exists in most other mining districts. 
Ore shipments have been stopped and bands 
temporarily laid off. There have been no bull- 
ion shipments received for a week past, and 
Wells, Fargo & Oo.*s express are refusing to re- 
ceive any for the present, as they cannot trans- 
port it. 

A number of quartz-Dnills and hoisting works 
have been crushed by the snow. The hoisting 
works and buildings of the Brunswick and 
Pennsylvania mines, Grass Valley, the Orleans 
mill, the buildings at the G^ld Hill mill, the 
concentrating-room of the Laramie mill, the 
old Crosby smelting works and Fortuna hoist- 
ing works, are among those damaged. 

Mining work has practically stopped in most 
of the camps in this State and Nevada. In 
fact out-door work of all kinds, except snow- 
shoveling, ia at a standstill. Here in Sjiu Fran- 
cisco and other coast cities there is more or leas 
distress among the laboring population, num- 
bers of whom have been unable to do any out- 
door work for a month or more past. Building 
operations have ceased, and no street work can 
be carried on. The mercantile community are 
doing little or nothing in busioese, aa no goods 
can be shipped. All these things have brought 
about a stringency in money matters, a result 
due directly to the long-continued and excep- 
tionally stormy weather. 



Mine Superintendent's Reports. 

Judge Shafter this week sustained the de- 
murrer in the case of Theodore Fox against H. 
M. Levy and other directors of the Savage Min- 
ing Co. Mr. Fox sought to recover $12,000 
penalties alleged to have been incurred by the 
officers of the Savage Company on account of 
failure on their part to post up in their office 
certain information concerning the superintend- 
ent's report required to be published in that 
way. The decision virtually says the Act of 
the Legislature may be ignored and that the 
reports need not be posted. 

By Act of April 23, 1880, it is provided that in 
case of the failure of the directors to have the 
reports and acoonnta current made and posted, 
they shall be liable to a penalty of $1000, with 
costs of suit, to be recovered by any complain- 
ing stockholders. 

This action was brought for the purpose of 
enforcing thia penalty againat the dlreotore fo 
the failure to post the super in tend ent's report, 
such failure having occurred for three sucoesaive 
months, as specified in the complaint. 

The judge in his decision says: The ques- 
tion is, Were the directors obliged to publish 
tbe superintendent's report under tbe provi- 
sions of the statute f It eeema to me that there 
are many reasons why the report of a auperin- 
tendent should not be carried bodily into a 
balance-sheet or an itemized account of the di- 
rectors and be posted. In the first place, it is 
impossible, not being within the power of the 
directors. While the corporation must be or- 
ganized and doing business, having its principal 
office in this city, the mine may be in Mexico, 
in Nevada or in Colorado. The superintend- 
ent must, of necessity, be resident at the time. 
His duties are to be performed there. He is 
rehired to render his report to the directors 
on the very day that they are called upon to 
publish their itemized account. It will be seen 
at a glance that such an act on the part of the 
directors is impossible. 

The subject-matter of the superintendent's 
report could not possibly be included in any 
BDoh itemized statement or balance-sheet as 
mentioned In the first section of the Act. The 
provisions commandlag the superiotendent to 
make a weekly statement regarding the number 
of men employed and the rate of wages paid 
them would be unnecessarily carried into thia 
account, as it would furnish no facts from 
which conld certainly be asoertained the actual 
disbursement for labor. Nor can the aaperin- 
tendent be able by any possibility on the first 
Monday of the month to give a complete re- 
port, under oath, of tbe work done in the mine, 
the amount of ore extracted, what part of the 
mine taken from, what disposition has been 
made of the ore, what its assay value is, nor as 
regards the amount of bullion received or the 
manner of its final disposition. Nor could large 
quantities of ore which had been mined, and 
which remained piled in the mine t>r on the 
dump, be ascertained so that the superintend- 
ent could make a statement under oath re- 
garding such amounts of ore, or of the value 
thereof. Nor could the discoveries of ores and 
minerals, and how the location of those orei 
were ascertained, nor the assay value thereof, 
be ascertained. Certainly the directors could 
not be held to make a statement under oath of 
the particular existence of these facts, having 
no personal knowledge thereof. 

The final paragraph in the section seems to 
dispose of all the superintendent's report upon 
these very topics. It is provided there that 
all his accounts, reports and correspondence ■ 
shall be kept in some conspicuous place in the 
office of said company and be open to the in- 
spection of all the stockholders. In short, that 
the terms '* posted " and *' kept in some con- 
spicaous place" have separate and distinct 
meanings, and that these several reports and 
accounts cannot be held to be included within 
that section providing for a penalty. 



Albert E. Titus, a well-known mining man, 
died at Oakland on Sunday. 



Astronomical Society. — A meeting of the 
A<itronomical Society of the Pacific will be 
held on Saturday evening. The following 
papers are announced: **The Lunar Kills 
Ariadaeua and Hyginns," by E. S. Holden. 
''Physical Observations of Japiter in 1889, 
with Drawings," by James E. Keeler. "The 
Orbit of the Binary Star, Mu Herculis," by A, 
O. Lsnechner. '*'A New and Simple Form of 
Electrio Control for Equatorial Driving 
Clooka," by Jas. K. Keeler. 



Jan. 26, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press, 



63 



The Structure of Clay Slate Rocks. 

Strati Ucatloa or Btidcllofr> Jolnta aod 
Oleavase, 

The t«rni '* Clay Slate *' la now generally re- 
■trioted to the eedimeotary arKllUoeoaa rooks 
baviog a oteavage, and whtoh oan be split iato 
thin plates like roofing slate. 

The foUowiag analysis of ordinary Welob 
roofing slate (blue) given by IVofessor Hull will 
be snfTuient to show that the balk of a slate 
deposit is made up obiEfly of silioa and alumina, 
and was therefore at one time ordinary olay : 











IrOD (protoxiilo) 


7.80 


>'>fnHla 


220 


VMiah 


S.'S 


8od» 


8.20 


Water 


S TO 


Total 


lOO.CO 



The oolor of the deposit at any given place 
depends npon the qaantity and niture of the 
mineral matter which we see In smaller qnanti. 
ties is mixed up with it. 

In examining some of the slate material un- 
der the mierosoopd, the late Mr. Divid Forbes 
found a small quantity of agreenisb mineral, 
probably oblorate. 

The ordinary oolor of slates is bine, of differ- 
ent shades. This oolor is derived from the 
presence of protoxide of iron. The red and 
pnrple varieties take their oolor, like the marls 
of the Permian strata, from iron in the form of 
peroxide ; two parts of iron combined with 
three of oxygen. Into slate of a green oolor, 
which is the least common variety, iron leae 
largely enters, and in a combination with mag- 
nesia gives them the greenish hue. In soft 
black slates there ia a good deal of carbonaoeoue 
matter and sulphide of iron in a decomposed 
etste finely disseminated throughout the mass. 

The study of the C^Iifornian slate rocks ie of 
the greatest importance to those engQged In 
gold mining; by some geologists they have been 
oatled auriferous slates. 

Stratification, or as it is commonly called, bed- 
dings is a term employed by geologists to denote 
a parallel structure in rooks, oaused by the sue* 
cessive eobiqueoua deposition of layers more or 
less thick of mineral matter, previously held in 
solation or suspension in water, the arrangement 
being in layers or etrata more or less horizontal 
and parallel to each other. 

Although the planes of stratification in the 
slate rooks are usually spoken of as parallel, 
this is not strictly true; however, regarded on a 
large scale, stratification possesses all the gen- 
eral features of paTalletism. In some of the 
older slates it is often a matter of considerable 



cleavage generally follow the strike of those of 
the bedding. Oooasionally the lines of cleavage 
may coincide with those of the bedding when 
the strata stands at high angles, but for the 
most part it is transverse, and even often at 
right angles to the original sedimentary layers. 
Lines of cleavage were formerly often mistaken 
for lioes of beddiog and serious mistakes as to 
the relative position of great rook masses were 
made as a oonseqnence. The bulk of opinion 
seems to be in favor of the meohanical theory 
of the origin of slaty cleavage. It is neverthe- 
less true that the same result has In experi- 
meotB been obtained by the influenoe of mag- 



AsTKuNoMK Ai, FtiuTt-KiKAi-n V. — With refer- 
ence to the artiole on this subject by C. B. 
Hill, published in the Mini.no and Scikntifio 
Press of Nov. 30th and Deo. 7, ISSa, " F. R. 

A. S ," who ia an aothority on astronomy, 
writes as follows to the Unglith Mechanic: ** I 
have just been reading a leotare by Mr. Chaa. 

B. Hill, late of the Lick Ob^ervitory, which 
was delivered before the Oosmoa club of San 
Jose, California, in September. It is entitled 
'Astronomical Photography — Its Uses in Ob* 
servatory Work,' and contatossach a really ad- 
mirable precis of what had been effected up to 
the date of its delivery, that I should like to see 




c J c J 

DIAQBAM OF SLATE-BED. 



netio currents, so that we may readily con- 
clude that the total result was facilitated by 
previous long-continued action of ohemioal and 
magnetic foroes. 

The accompanying sketch shows the three 
strnotures — bb the planes of bedding, jj the 
joints, and cc the cleavage. 

Those Californian slate rocks met with in 
connection with what is called the " mother 
lode" and at different points where they are be- 
ing quarried for roofing slates, slabs, etc., are 
by analysis about the same as the best north of 
Wales slatss, containing the proportion of 
silica which aeems necessary for the perfection 
of cleavage and toughness. Koofing-slate 
rooks are not confined to one geological period, 
thongh in Great Britain they only ocour In the 
older formations, the Devonian, Silurian and 
Cambrian. Great mistakes have been made 
by some would-be ootliers, who have taken the 
shale-beds (having a laminated structure) like 
those met with in carbonifojons rooks and 



it reproduced in this country. I certainly 
know of no single work from which so good an 
idea of the recent triumphs of celestial photog- 
raphy is obtainable." 

Lower California Silver. — H. J, Patter- 
son, an old prospector, has returned from San 
Felipe bay, 125 miles sonth of Yuma, on the 
Gulf of California. He brings silver ore from 
an IS inch vein, which is found to be rich. He 
and two others lived 13 days on oysters after 
the supplies gcive out, and while waiting for a 
schooner ordered to come from Guaymas, Pat- 
terson walked 124 miles to Alamo, killing quails 
and jaokrabbits for food, and sent back sup- 
plies. 

Says the Lompoc Record : There are now at 
work in the beach mines five oompanies, all do- 
ing well. There is nothing fabulous in these 
mines, but it ia demonstrated that it pays to 
work them. With eaoh recurring, tide the 
mines are surcharged with gold, so that prac- 




HALP-PALN OF REVERBERATING FURNACE FOR ORBS. 



difficulty to determine correctly the lines of 
original sedimentary deposition. In all slate 
rocks, no matter of what geological age, there 
will be observed numerous lines of fraoture 
cutting through the slate rocks at anglea differ- 
ing more or less from the planes of bedding. 
These joints owe their origin to purely mechan- 
ical agency, as in the case of those accompany- 
ing the dislocation, elevation or depreaaion of 
the land, by which a portion of the planes of 
bedding are fraotnred and displaced, termed by 
miners *' a throw." 

Referring the direotlon of joints in strati- 
fied rooka to lines of upheaval. Professor Sedg- 
wick calls those which run parallel to the 
strike "strike joints," thoae parallel to the 
dip '* dip joints," and all others he calls "diag- 
onal joints." 

Cleavage is that peonliar structure in slate 
rooks which renders them capable of being' 
split indefinitely into thin plates, or lamina, 
and this in a direction independent of their 
bedding or stratification. These lines of 



sometimea forming the roofs of some of the 
seams of lignite for slate rocks. 
. The time ia coming when the great value of 
our Californian slates for roofing, and also the 
manufacture of slabs into various architectural 
and domestic uses, will be better understood and 
will no doubt supersede the wooden and metal 
fittinga now in nse. 

The slabs made into troughs, cisterns, and 
for sanitary purposes from their cleanliness, 
ought to Bupersede all other materials. 

In IS80 the profit derived from the whole 
production of slates of North Wales, G, B., 
was taken aa a million sterling. In this coun- 
try the production yearly of roofing slate ia 
valued at about $2,000,000. 



Wilfred T. Neweeery, of Plaoerville, and 
connected with mining affairs in thia State, 
died of alcoholism at the Baldwin hotel this 
week. 

The average wealth of each man, woman and 
ohild of Colnsa county is $1500. 



tically the mines are inexhaustible. For 
months the same ground has been mined over, 
week after week. 



New Lithograph ViewofGrass Valley. — 
We have received from Mr. H, S. Spaulding of 
the Graaa Valley Tidings, a large and beanti- 
fully executed lithographic view of Graaa Val- 
ley, Nevada oonnty. The work appears to be 
a full and faithful representation of the town aa 
it is at the present time. The streeta, churches, 
and many of the principal dwellings, are dis- 
tinctly shown in a bird's-eye view. All old 
residents of that beautiful mountain town 
should aecnre a copy. The map will be sent 
by mail, in a substantial paper cylinder, for 50 
centsfor one copy, or three copies for $1. Ad- 
dress the Tidings, Grass Valley, Cal. 



The Tombstone Prospector saya the mines 
must be pumped out and work started with 
outside capital or the whole oonntry will go to 
the dogs, 



The Silk ludustry in California. 

Since the work of the S;ate Board of Silk 
Culture has lapsed temporarily at least by fail- 
ure to receive funds from the State, it ie grat- 
ifying to note that experimental work has pro- 
ceeded with the small appropriation of money 
by the U. S. Government under the painstak- 
ing and economical administration of the Lidiea 
Silk Culture Society of C&lifornia. There hat 
been iesued recently an interesting report in 
pamphlet form of the transactions of this or- 
ganization for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
18S9. It comprises the report of the President, 
Mr. W. B. Ewer, the secretary, Mrs. L. E. 
Pratt, the Experimental Committee of whioh 
Mr. J. J. Rivers is chairman, and appended 
thereto is the financial statement as approved 
by R. J. Trumbull and Edward Bocqui, Audit- 
ing Committee. A copy of this report, which 
can be had by applioation at this oltioe, should 
be secured by every one in any way inter- 
eated in this industry. 

The report by Preatdent Ewer shows that 
the 15-acreSilk Eicperiment Station is progress- 
ing as well as the limited means at hand 
improvement will admit. The mulberry plan 
tations are growing well and will soon supply 
an abundance of foliage of good varieties, whioh 
is, of course, at the basis of all feeding trials. 
It is to be hoped that by the time this requisite 
ia arrived at the funds may be available for 
equipping the station buildings and other 
needed improvements. The president's report 
also alludes fittingly to the field for silk-oulture 
and the various aspects of the industry as af- 
fecting the prosperity of the people. Silk-onlt- 
ure is advocated as a cottage or family industry 
and not as a corporate or oapitalistio undertak- 
ing. Filatures may be profitably oondncted by 
capitalists, but the cocoons will be produced 
by family labor in the modest homes of the 
country. That ia the way it is done In Sorope 
and seems the most feasible and practical basts 
for its extension in this country. 

The report shows that the Ladies' Silk So- 
ciety did a very timely and important work in 
purchasing cocoons last summer when the State 
Board was obliged to suspend Its operations. 
The financial report shows that there were pur- 
chased up to June 29th cocoons from between 
30 and 40 producers, mostly ladies, resident in 
different parts of the State. 

Mr. Rivers, aa chairman of the Experiment 
Committee, makea an interesting report con- 
cerning a part of the work at the Piedmont 
Station, relating eapecially to the feeding of 
worms, the production of eggs, the killing of 
the chrysalis, etc. 

It will be gratifying to the friends of silk- 
oulture to know that the work has been con- 
tinued so intelligently in this State in spite of 
the many obstacles which have been encoun- 
tered. 

.Reverberatory Furnace. 

The accompanying cut shows a half-plan of a 
reverberatory furnace such aa ia used for ores. 
These furnaces are used for roasting ores in 
chlorination works, and are preferred by many 
to the different forms of meohanical furnaota 
where no hand-stirring ia required. The re- 
verberatory ia very effective in ita operation. 

The State University. — The titlea of the 
instructors, which were changed when the 
faculty was classified on " a commercial basis,* 
have been reatored, eo that there are now more 
"profeasors" than there were a month ago. 
Among othera, there is now a professor of min- 
ing and a professor of mineralogy and 
geology. 

Secretary Noble has decided that a married 
woman oan make timber-lind entries or pur- 
chase snob lands in the Statea of California, 
Oregon, Nevada and Washington, provided that 
it is conclusively shown that the entry ie made 
for her own uae and benefit, and not for the 
benefit of herself and husband jointly. 

The winter in the Eist has been ao mild that 
the Pennsylvania collieries are shutting down 
and discharging their miners. Over one-third 
of the collieries have already shob down. These 
employ about 3000 men. The officials say that 
of 20,000 coal cars in service, 11,000, all loaded, 
are now lying along the road. 



DoRiKO 1889 the immigration into British 
Columbia, by the Canadian Pacific system, was 
500 lesa than the number that departed. 



66 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 25, 1890 



PARKE & LACY COMPANY 



-IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURBRS OF- 



MINING, MILL and GENERAL MACHINERY. 



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csrJE:Tir'JEH*..AJii ..^SLCrXiiNru^s x<ox«. 



WESTINGHOUSE AUTOMATIC ENGINES. 



SALES DURING LAST FOUR MONTHS ; 

nOTVAPOTTMr* 44 ENGiNKS, STANTt AT?r> 99 engines, TTTMTOT? ig6 engines. 

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THE GATES CRUSHER 

Is beyond all question the most important improvement 
that has ever been made in this class of mining; ma- 
chinery. It will do more than twice the work with a 
given amount of wear than any other Crusher made, 
besides crushing so much finer that for mining uses, the 
capacity of the mill is greatly increased. It has the same 
relative superiority for macadamizing purposes, afford- 
ing the cheapest and most reliable machine for this use. 



SEND FOR CIKCULAB. 



PACIFIC IRON- WORKS 



NO. 127 FJH&T STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 




NOTICE TO GOLD MINERS! 





JUSTINIAN CAIRE. Agent, 

521 & 523 Market St., San Francisco, 

— DBALBR IN— 

Assayers' and Mining Material. 



GBAVBL, OR PLACER MINES. MADE OP BEST SOFT LAKF DPBRIOB COPPER 



— MAHUPACTUaKa OP — 



Our plates are guaranteed, and by actual experience are proved, the besj In weight of Sil- BATTERY SCREENS AND WIKE CLOTH 

ver and dnrabllity. Old Mining Platea Replated, Bought, or Gold Separated. THOUSANDS 

OF ORDERS FILLED. Trnou-TTtro. 

SAN FRANCISCO NOVELTY, GOLD, SILVER AND NICKEL PLATING WORKS, ^6°* *<»■ JOSKINS 

108 and 112 First St., San Francisco, Cal. HTDRO-CAEBON ASSAY FUBNACES 

SS- SEND FOR CIRCDLAKS. 




IMPORTANT TO GOLD MINERS! 

SILVER-PLATED AMALGAM PLATES for SAVING GOLD 

IN QUARTZ, GRAVEL AND PLACER MINING. 
PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. 

Only. Refined Silver and Best Copper used. Over 3000 Orders filled. Fifteen Medals Awarded, Old Mining Plates can be 

Replated, Old Plates BongM, or Gold Separated, 

These Platea can also be purchased of JOHN TAVLOR & CO.. Corner First and Mission Sts. 

San Francisco Gold, Silver and Nickel Plating Works, 653 & 655 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal., E. G. Denniston, Prop'r. 

Our Plates have been used for 20 years. They have proved the best. We adhere strictly to contract In weight of Silver and 
Copper, SEND FJB OISOULAR. 



Jam. 25, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



67 



AMALGAMATING MACHINERY. 

stamp Mills (or Wet or Dry Crushing. 
Huntington Centrifugal Quartz Mill. Drying 
Cylinders. Amalgamating Pans, Selllers, 
Agitators and Cor;contrators. Retorts. Bul- 
lion and Ingot Moulds. Conveyors, Elevators, 
Brucknors and Howell's Improved White's 
Roasting Furnaces, Etc. 



FRASER & CHALMERS, 

MINING MACHINERY 



CONCENTRATING MACHINERY. 



iMPMiD CORLISS v.\'v°.'sV^Im ENGINES. « BOILERS 



Blake. Dodge and Comet Crushers, Cornish 
Crushing and Finishing Rolls. Hartz Plunger 
and Collom Jigs. Frue Vanncr & Embrey 
Concentrators. Evans', Calumet, Collom's 
and Rittcnger's Slime Tables. Trommels. 
Wire Cloth and Punched Plates.. Ore Sam- 
ple Grinders and Heberle Mills. 



HORIZONTAL. VERTICAL 
. . . AND SECTIONAL. . . . 



'IJVCPXtOTrSO STEJL»DE ^WM^lMK^m 



Hoisting Engines, 
Safety Cages, 

Safety Hooks, 

Ore CARS, Water & Ore 
BUCKETS, 

Air Compressors, 

Rock Drills, Etc. 

GENERAL MILL AND 
MINING SUPPLIES, ETC. 
Sectional Machinery 

FOR 

VULE-BACK 

TRANSPORTATION. 




Pumping Engines 

and Cornish 

Pumping Machinery, 

IMPROVED 
WATER JACKET 

Blast Furnaces for 
Galena & Copper Ores, 

SLAG CARS AND POTS, 

Roots & Baker 
Pressure Blowers, 

SUSPENDED 

TRAMWAYS. 



General Offices and Works: FULTON AND UNION STS., CHICAGO, ILL. 



BRAMCH OFFICES: ''%V.%''J^onTsoJ^ 

Galle de Juarez. LIMA, PERU, South America. 
SOLW -WESTEaN AGENTS POS 



, No. 2 Wall St. DENVER, COLO., 1316 Eighteenth St. SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, 
St. LONDON, ENC, 23 Bucklersbury, E. C. CHIHUAHUA CITY, MEXICO, No. II 
JOHANNESBURG, TRANSVAAL, South Africa. 

TYLER WIBB 'WORKa DOUBLE ORIUPBD MINING CLOTHS. 



THE FELTOIT WATER T77HEEL 

GIVES THE HIGHEST EFFICIENCY OF ANY WHEEL IN THE WORLD. 






#>^^^ 






% 



OVER 800 ALREADY IN USE. 

Affords the Most Simple and Reliable Power for all 

Mining and Manufacturing Machinery. 

Adapted to heads running from 20 up to 2,000 feet. 

From 12 to 20 per cent better results guaranteed than 

oan be produced from any other Wheel in the Country 

ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION. 

Power rom these Wheels can be transmitted long 
distances with small loss, and is now extensively used in 
all parts of the country for generating both power and 
light. 

APPLICATIONS 

Should state amount, and head of water,^ power required, 
and for what purpose ; with approximate length of nipe ; 
also* whether the applioation Ir with reference to Wheels 
or Motors described below. SEND FOR CIRCULARS. 

The Pelton Water Wheel Co. 

121 MAIN ST„ SAN FKANCISCO, CAX. 

Varying from the fraction of 1 up to 15 and 20-horse power, Unequalpd for all light-running machinery. Warranted to develop a given 
amount of power with one-half the water required by any other. B^ SEND FOR MOTOR CIRCULAR. ADDRESS AS ABOVE. "^ 




O no- "XTSTAJF -HI 




JAMBS LBFFBL'S 

Mining Turbine Water Wlieel. 

These Wheels are designed for all purposes where limited quantities of water and 
high heads are utilized, and are guaranteed to give more power with less water than 
any other wheel made. Beintf placed on horizontal shaft, the power is transmitted 
direct to shafting by helts, dispensing with gearing. 

Estimates furnished on application for wheels specially built and adapted in 
capacity to suit any particular case. 

Further information can be obtained of this form of construction, as well as the 
ordinary Vertical Turbines for Wooden Penstocks and in Iron Globe Cases, free of cost, 
by applying to the manufacturers. 



JAMES LEFPEL & OO., 



Spring^eld, Ohio, 



or 110 liberty St„ New York, 



FBASER St CHALMERS, Qeneral Agents, 

Obicago, 111,, and Denver, Col, 

PARKE Si lacy, General Agents, San Francisco, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA IRON YARD. 

HENRY J. ROGERS & CO. 

Successors to CHAS. CALLAHAN 
IMPORTBRS AI4D DEALBR8 IN 

CAST and WROUGHT IRON SCRAP 

SECOND-HAND BOII-ERS 

AND OI-D MACHINEBT 

Of every description. 

Tie Higlest Price paiifor ill HMs ol Metals. 

Officb AMD Yard: 128 and 130 Folsom St., S. F 

Telephone No. 67. 



FOR SALE 

Hydraulic Mining Property in Souihem Oregon. Good, 
Extensive. For particulars (Principals only) address, 

"A, M.," Box 77, 

Q-rants Pass, Oregon, 



THOMAS PRICE & SON, 

Assay OflQce, Chemical Laboratory, 

BULLION ROOMS and ORE FLOORS, 

524 Sacramento Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

COIN RETURNS ON ALL BULLION DEPOSITS IN 24 HOURS. 

WORKING TESTS OF ORES BY ALL PROCESSES. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO CONCENTRATION OF ORES. 
Ores Received on Oonsigament. Sampled, Assayed, and Disposed 
of in the Open Market to the Highest Bidder. 



fAetalllirgy apd Ore3. 



SELBY 

SMELTING and LEAD CO.. 

416 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

GOLD AND SILVER REFINERY 
And Assay Office. 

Highest Prices Paid for Oold, Silver and 
Lead Ores and Solphnrets. 

MAHUFACTITRIBfl OP 

BLUESTONE, 

LEAD PIPE, 

SHEET LEAD, 

SHOT, Etc., Etc. 

ALSO HANUyAOTORRRJI OV 

Standard Shot-Gun Cartridges, 

Under Chamheriin Patent. 



JOHN TAYLOR & CO.. 

IHPORTBRS AND DBAL8RS IN 

ASSAYERS' MATERIALS, MINE 
AND MILL SUPPLIES, 

ALSO CHEMICALS. AND PHYSICAL, SCHOOL AND 

CHEMICAL APPARATUS. 
68 & 65 First St., cor. Mission, Sac Franolsco. 
Ay-— ^ Wa would call the attention of 



Assayera, Clicmiata, Mining Com- C^^^C^£^? 
panics, Milling Compauiea, Pros- ^K^TERSf^ 
pectora, etc., to our full stock of t ^ — -i :? 
Balances, Fumaces, Muffles, Crucibles, Soori- 
flere, etc, including, also, a full stock of 
Cbeinicals. 

Having been engaged in lurnlehing these sup- 
plies sinot the first discovery of mines on the 
Pacific Coast, we feel confident from our experi- 
ence we can well suit the demand for these 
goods, both as to quality and price. 
Agents (or the Morgran Crucible Co., 
^^^^ Battereea, England, Also for E. G. Dennis- 
ton's Silver Plated Amalgam Plates. Tfao plates 
of this well-known manufacturer are thoroughly relia- 
ble, and full weight of Silver guaranteed. Ordeis taken 
at bis lowest prices. Our Illustrated Catalogue and As- 
say Tables sent free on application. 

JOHN TAYLOR ft OO. 



Nevada Metallurgical Works, 

NO. 28 STEVENSON STEBET, 

Near First and Market Streets, S. F. 

C. A. LnoEHARDT, Manager. EIstablibhu) 18M 

Ores worked by any Prooeas. 
Ores Sampled, 

ABBaying in all its Branches. 
Analyses of Ores, Minerals, Watera, eto, 
Working Testa (practical) Made, 
Plana and Specifications furniahed for tbe 
most suitable Process for Working Ores. 

Special attention paid to Examinationfi of 
Mines; Plans and Reports famished. 

O. A. LUCBIHARDT & OO^ 
(Formerly Huhn & Luokhardt, 
MlxUtuc Engineers and Metallursrlsts 



3. EUBTHL. 



* 



METALLURGICAL WORKS. 

818 Pine St. (Basement,, 



Corner ol Leldesdorfl Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Ores Sampled and Assayed, and Tests made by my 



Assaying and Analysis of Ores, Minerals and Waters. 
Mines Examined and Reported on. 
Practical Instruction given in Treating Ores by im- 
proved processes. 

Q. KUSTBL & CO., ■ 
Uinlng Engineers and Metallurgists. 



GREAT REDUCTION! 

BATTERY~~SOREENS. 

Best and Cheapest in America. 

No imitation, no deception, no planished or rotten 
Iron used. Only genuine Russia iron in Quartz Screens. 
Planished iron screens at nearly half my former rates. 

I ha\e a large supply of Battery Screens on hand 
suitable for tbe Huntington and all Stamp Mills, which I 
will soil at 20 per cent discount. 



PERFORATED SHEET METAL 

For Flour and Rice Mills, Grain Separators, Revolving 
and Shot Screens, Stamp Batteries and all kinds ol Min 
Ingand Milling Machinerj', Iron, Steel, Copper, Brass. 
Zinc and other metala punched for all uses. 

Inventor and Manufacturer of the celebrated Slot Cut 
or burred and Slot Punched Screens. 

Mining Screens a specialty, from No. 1 to 16 (fine). 
Orders promptly attended to. 

San Francisco Pioneer Screen Works, 

31 & SS3 First St., San Francisco^ Cal. 

JOHN W. QUICK, FFoprletor. 



This paper Is printed with Ink Manufac- 
tured by Charles Eneu Johnson &: Co., 600 
South lOth St.. FhUadelphia. Branch Offl- 
oes— 47 Bose 3t, New York, and 40 La Salle 
St.. Ohloaso. ABont for the Paolflc Ooaat— 
Jaeepb Hi Doraty. 690 Oommerclal St., S F 



66 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 25, 1890 



tdlicatiofiai. 



np 

ASSAYING AND CHEMISTRY, 

Rooms 46 & 47, 1 628 MoDtsomerv St., 

2d Floor Montgomery Bl'k. ) San Francisco, 
Also, Evening Clasaea, 7 to 10 o'clock. 

JOHN T. EVANS, M. A., PrincipaL 



School of Practical, Civil, Mechanical and 
MINING ENGINEERING, 

Surveying, ArcMtecture, Drawing aM AssaFiig 

723 MAEKBT STREET, 

The History Building, San FRAKCiaco, Cal. 

A. VAN DER NAILLEN, President. 

Assaying of Ores,S25; Bullion and Chlorination Assay, 

§26; Blowpipe Assay, SIO. Full course of assaying, 850. 

iS'Send for circular. 



THE PIONEER COMMEBCIAL SCHOOI, 

o 




I.II'E 8Choi,absh:xfs, $7S. 
No YAOATlONB. Day and Evbnino Ssbbioms. 

Ladles admitted into all Departments. 
Address: T. A. BOBINSON, H. A.. President. 



HEALDS 



bUSINBSS OOLLEGB, 



Fo 
< 



24 POST ST., 
SEVENTT-PIVE 



S. P. 
DOI^I^ABS 



i^OB SEVENTY-FIVS DOI^I^ABS THIS 

College instructs in Shorthand, Type Writing, Boob* 
fceepfng. Telegraphy, Penmanship, Drawing, all the En. 
glish branches, and everything pertaining to business, 
for six full months. We have sixteen teachers, and give 
iDdlviduai instruction to all our pupils. Our school has 
its graduates in every part of the State. 

jarSsND FOB C1B0U1.AB. 

E. P. HEALD, FieBldenl. 
O. 8. HALICV. 8oer«Urv. 



PEACTIOAL 



Books on Mining" 

AND IRRIGATION. 



PRA.CTICA.t GOI.D-MINING. — A comprehen- 
sive treatise on the origin and occurrence of gold-bear- 
ing gravels, rocks, and ores, and the methods by which 
the gold is extracted. By C. G. Warnford Lock. 7S8 
pages, with 8 plates and 271 engravings in the text. 
4to, cloth, §15,00, express prepaid. 

IRRIGATION". —Fgyptian Irrigation. By W. Will- 
cocks, with introduction by Lt. Col. J. C. Rosa. This 
work embodies the information, collected during four 
and a half J ears, of the irrigation systems of Egypt. 
Engineering questions, such as ailt-deposits, drainage, 
irrigation, the Barrages, flood protection, methods of 
regulation, locks, etc., have been treated in detail. 367 
pages, large Svo, with 26 plates and numerous engrav- 
ings in the text. Price §15.00, express prepaid. 

MEXICAN MINES.— Dahlgreu's Historic Minos of 
Mexico, only a few copies left; price $25 00. Handbook 
to the Historic Mines of Mexico, price §1.00. 



Descriptive Catalogue and Circulars of Books relating 
to Assajing, Mining, Electacity and Mechanical Engineer 
ng, sent free on application. 

E. & F. N. SPON, Publishers, 

12 Gortlandt St., New Xork. 



FRANCIS SMITH & OO. 

Manufacturers of 

Sheet Iron and Steel Pipe 

ALL SIZES. 

ISO.Beale Street, San Francisco, Gal. 



Iron cut, punched and formed, for making pipe on 
ground All kinds of Tools supplied for making Pipe. 
Estimates given. Are prepared for coating all sizes of 
Pipe with a composition oi Coal Tar and Asphaltum. 



J. C. WILSON. 



C. A. O'BRIEN. 



J. MACDONOUQH & CO. 

IMPORTBRS AND DBAI.BRS IN 

COAL AND^IG IRON. 

Principal Office: 

41 MARKET STREET, COBNBE SPEAB. 
Yards: 



S. W- Cor. Spear & 
li'olscrQ, 

[Telephone No. 186i.] 



S.W. Cor. Main & 
Folsom, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




y "'"^ -^^^^S^gOSGS^.^^Sa 



&j^^s7':bi iLi:onxr:E3 



BY USING ■ 



timw^\ l^otice^. 



Gray Eagle Mining Company. Location 

of principal place of bu8inesB,San Francisco, California. 

Location of Woiks, Placer Co., Cal. 

NOTICE is herebv given that, at a meeting of the 
Board of Directors, held on the 21at day of January^ 1890, 
an Assessment, No. 16,of Four(4)Cents per share was levied 
upon th 9 Capital Stock of (he Corporation, payable im- 
mediatelv in United States Gold Coin, to the Secretary, 
at the office of the Company, Room 11, No. 303 Calilprnia 
Street, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain 
unpaid on the Tiventy-flfth (25th) day of February, 1890, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public 
auction ; and unless rayment is made before, will be 
sold on Monday, the l7th day of March, 1890, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, trgether with the coste of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. 

By order ol the Board of Directors. 

J. M.BUF KINGTON, Secretary, 

Office, Room 11, No. 303 California St., San Francisco, 
California, 



TUBBS CORDAGE CO. 

(A Corporation.) 

Constantly on hand a full assortment of Manila Rope 
Duplex Rope, Tarred Manila Rope; Hay Rope, Whale Line 
etc., etc. 

fixtraslzes and lengths made to order on short notice. 

n- -m a rt'H n -ra j. m n -n . «■ . ' *"' ■- 1' W Urt W I IIU^J DeWOy EDgrftVlng COm- 

611 & 613 Front St., San Francisco, Cal I p»d7i ko. 220 Muket street, san Frujciaco. 



WATER POWER TRANSMITTED BY ELECTRICITY 

To Run your Mills, Hoists and Trams. 

For Circular giving particulars send to 

KEITH ELECTRIC CO., 



— UAHUJ'AOTTIBSBS OF - 



Apparatus for Electric Light and Electric Power, 



OFFICE, 40 NEVADA BLOCK, 



Factory, Stevenson St., bet. First and Ecker, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 



HORACE D. RANLETT, 

Ores, Mining, and Commission, 

420 Montgomery St.. S. F. 

Ships under advances to smelting works in Boaton, 
New York, Baltimore and Liverpool. 

Twenty-one years' experience in Shipping Orea and 
Managing: Mines. 

Solicits Consignments of Copper Produce and Manage- 
ment of Min'ng Matters. 

All business conducted on Cash Basis. 

Purchase and shipment of Mining Supplies A Specialty, 

Sales of Developed Copper Mines undertaken. 

Business Manager of UNION COPPER MINE, Copper- 
opolia. Cal. ; NEWTON COPPER MINE, Amador Co. , Cal. 



Tioga District Mining Company, 

Incorporated Juoe 11,1889. Capital Stock, $10,000 ,000 

BUY AND SELL 

California Gold, Silver, Quicksilver, Copper 
and Lead Mines 

OP ASCERTAINED VALUE. 

omoe. No. 13 PABBOTT'S BUILDING, N. W. 

Coroer of Califoroia and Montgomery Streets, 

SAN FEANCISCO, CAL. 

WM. B. WIOHTMAN, Prea. WM. H. V. CRONISE, Sec. 



ESTABLISHED 1868. 



Pacific Chemical Works. 

HENRY G. HANKS, 

Practical and Industrial Gbemist, Assayer 
and Geologist, 

718 MONTGOMERY ST., - SAN FRANCISCO. 

iarWill report on the condition and value of any mining property on 
the Pacific Coast. Rare Chemicals made to order. Instructions given in 
Assaying and Practical Chemistry 





80LB A3BNT FOR 



AiaiaiDie Sloes, Dies aiJ H. D. MORRIS, 

LEDSHER PLATES, 220 Fremont St., San Francisco, 

MAUnf ACTDBERS' aM PURCHASINS AGENT. 



— ABD— 

Chrome Cast Steel for 
Book DrlllB, X:tc. 




A¥»Anr.Ai«Tiitfw:. 



Special attentlc" given to purchase of 

MINE and MILL SUPPLIES. 



ADAMANTINE SHOK8 AND DIES,— Quar- 
ftnteed to prove better and cheaper than any others. 
Orders solicited, subject to above conditions. 

H. D. MORRIS. 



H. M. RAYNOR, 

No. 25 Bond St., 
NEW YORK. 




ESTABLISHED 
1859. 



rOE AT.T, 



Laboratory 



Manufectiiriiig Purposes. 

Wholesale and Retail. 
Nativo Platinum and Scrap purchased. 



Valuable Gold Mine 
FOR SALE, 

Bond, or will give patty an interest who will erect a suit- 
able mill and (urnigb sufficient capital for working pur- 
oses. §10,000 already expended in developments. 

Estimated Ore in Sight, $100,000. 

For parliculars, addresa 

T. L. B., Box 261*7, San Francisco, 



FOR ENGRAVINGS 5' "" '^^- f""'^ '" 



CLAYTON 

AIR COMPRESSORS 

For Working 
Rock Drills, Coal Cutters 
Hoisting Engines and "Water 
Pumps in Mines and Tunnels, 
Sinking Caissons, Etc., Etc. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE No. 6, 

Clayton Air Compressor Works, 
43 DEY ST., NEW YORK. 




Great Variety of SHOT GUNS, KIFLES, 

etc. Breech-Loadera from $4 to $100. 
SEND STAMPS FOR PRICE LISTS. 

GEO. W. SHREVE, 

525 Kearny Street, San FranclBCO, Oal. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



One new double circular Sawmill to carry 60-lnch bot- 
tom saw, with wrought-iion hangers fpr top saw. Fric- 
tion feed-works, patent eteel screw double-throw head- 
blocka, with track iron, saw carriage and frame complete, 

RISDON IRON & LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 

San Francisco, Oal. 



BUTTE, MONTANA, 

The railroad, mining and commercial center of the new 
State, offers some of the best inducements for inveet- 
ments in 

Real Estate, Mines & Mining Stock 

of any locality in the Nortnwest. For particulars address 
The Evans -Terry-Gl an ssen Brokerage oc, 
41 E. Broadway, Butte, Montana, 



Smelter For Sale or Exchange. 

One 60-ton, wrought iron, water-jacket Smelting Fur- 
nace (36"x60" at the tuyeres) of the latSat design, wih 
Cniaher, Blower, Boiler, Pumps, Engines, Tools, and 
everything complete for immediate delivery, and only 
used about six months. Cheap for cash, or will exchange 
for interest in a Lead-Silver Mine, or erect in any mining 
camp that will guarantee a certain output. For further 
particulars address Box 2S,.Elkhoro, Uontana, 



THE RUSSELL PROCESS COMP'Y. 

TALCOTT H. RUSSELL, Secretary, 
NEW HAVEN CONN. 

p. O. Box 498. 



INVENTORS, TAKE NOTICE I 

L. petersonTmodel maker, 

25S Market St., N. E. cor. Front (up atalra), San Francaico 
Experimental machinery and all kinds of models Tin 
and bn^BWork. All communications strictly confiden- 
tial 



QUICKSILVER 

For Sale in Lots to Suit by 

PARROTT Ss CO.. 
nOfl Onllfomla St.. San FrannlHOo. fTal. 



One Ohmen's 12x12 AutomaTlc Engine; 
best style in use. Also, 1 Boiler 48 in.x 16 ft. Both nearly 
new. Apply to J. W. QOICK, ySl First Bt., 
(Top Floor) San Francisco, Oal. 



SITUATION WANTED.— Thoroughly competent Mill- 
manand A9«ayer of M j'ears' experience, desires a 
situation in Mill or to take charge of Mill and Mine. 
Underatanda concentrators of all rlass ores. Best ref- 
erence. Address, "J. A.," Box 2517, San Francisco, CaJ, 



Jan. 25, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



67 



CALIFORNIA WIRE WORKS 

hallidie's 
Patent VV'RE Ropeway, 



MANUFACTL'BERS OF— 

Steel Wire Rope, 

OF ALL K1ND.S FOR 

CABLE RAILWAYS, 

ROPEWAYS and TRAMWAYS. 

Mining, Shipping & General Purposes. 



ESIABLISHED 1852. 



INCORPORATED 1882, 



WIRE, 

BARBED WIRE. 
WIRE NAILS, 

WIRE OLOTH. 

Futl AesorttneDt Always In Stock. 



OFFICE: 

9 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 

ScDd for Illustrated Catalogue. 




For the Economical and Rapid 

Transportation of Ore 

and other material. 



200 TO 2.000 FEET. 



-^ r^i- Ereclud by Ua During tlie Past Fourtoou Yuars in Hi^as 

:a /'he 
,?afe>\^-^i/-* Simple, Economical and Durable. 



TRANSPORTATION OT OBH BT BAI,1,1I>1M'S PATENT WIBE ROPBWAY. 



HAVE BEEN THOROUGHLY TESTED 
In all Parts of the Country. 



RUBBER FACTORY. 

Monarch Belting. 




The PlieB of this Belt are 

UNITED by COTTON RIVETS 

Which hold them flrmly together. 

Each Rivet is Independent 

And Follows the Stretch. 

THERE ARE NO STITCHES 

TO BREAK, and 

The Belt has a Smooth 

Surface. 



Hose, Belting, Packing, Etc. 

ALL KINDS OF RUBBER GOODS MADE TO ORDER IN A FEW HOURS. 

W, F. BOWERS & CO.. 409 Market St.. San Francisco. 



NEW YORICBEitING ScRftCKING Ca 



Warehouse, 15 PARK ROW, NEW YORK, 

The Oldest and Largest Manufacturers in the United States of 

VULCANIZED RUBBER FABRICS 

Solid Vulcanite 

EMERY WHEELS. 



Adapted to Mechanical Purpoaea. 



Large WTieels made on Iron 
centers. 

Cuts Cooler and Freer 

THAN ANY OTHKR WHEEL 
IN THE MAJRKET. 





EXTRA RUBBER 

BELTING and HOSE 

tOK 

Mining Purposes. 

Circular woven Seamless Antiseptic 
Rubber Lined "Cable" Hose and 
Test Hose for the uee of Steam EnEines, 
Force Punipa, Rolling Mills, Iron Works, 

Factories, etc. 



UllllUlliiliillii 

Kmery VuIcanlte^Wheel 



BRANCH: 

ARNETT & RIVERS, 

17 and 19 MAIK ST.. SAN FRANCISCO, 




Extra Steam Hobo. 



X880. 1888. 

CATALOGUE OF 200 PAGES. 



The matter Is readily 
available. — TradesmuTu 

A Complete Work. — 
Colliery Enyirieer. 

Handy for reference.— 
Siin. and Sci. Press. 

Should be in the hands 
of every Engineer and 
Contractor.— Er^f. and 
Mill. Journal. 

A valuable addition to 
the literature on the 
Buhject.— .Eti^. and B'l'g 
Record. 



n^^isr: 



A TREATISE AND HANDBOOE ON 

ROCK DRILLING 



AIR COMPRESSING 

Mailed Free. 



3 I33E=tI 

23 Park Place, New York. 



In reality a hand- 
book. — Am. Maa'fact'r. 

Supplies a long felt 
want.~Ma7L'/rs' Record. 

This Catalogue is one 
of unusual interest and 
value.— it R, Gazette. 

This is a thoroughly 
good publication. — En- 
gineering News. 

The usc'ul information 
will be lou' d specially 
v^lualile, — Eti^. and 
B'l'g Record. 

00-, 



L. C. MARSHDTZ 



■X. U. OANTRELL. 



NATIONAL IRON WORKS 

N. W. Corner Main and Howard Sts., San Francisco, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Stationary and Compound Engines, Flour, Sugar, Saw 
and Quartz Mill Machinery. 



AMALGAMATING MACHINES. CASTINGS AND FORCINGS ^^ZrZ. 

ALL WORK TESTED AND GUARANTEED. 

IMPROVED PORTABLE HOISTING ENGINES. 



NATIONAL ROGKER aUARTZ MILL. 

KENDALL'S PATENT, AUGUST 24, 1886. 

MARSHUTZ & CANTRELL, Sole Manufacturers. 

The Patentee and Manufacturera 
cordially invite miners to critically 
examine and pass judgment upon 
this improved system of milling 
and amalgamating ores in the fol- 
lowing particulars: 

1. The cost is less than one-half of 
stamps of same capacity. 

2. The freight to mine is less than 
one-half of stamps. 

3. The cost of erecting is lesa than 
one-fourth of stamps. 

4. The power to drive it is less than 
one-half of stamps. 

^^ 6. The wear is less than one-quar- 

ter of stamps. 

6. There is no wear except on 
shoes and dies. 

7. In point of amalgamation it is 
superior to any other machine 
in use. 

8. In its simplicity of construction. 

We challenge competition with 
Stamps, Ball Pulverizers or and 
other ore crushing machines now 
before the publio. 

iS"Send for Girculars and Price List. MARSHUTZ & CANTRELL. 




HOISTING ENGINES FOR MINES 




1,2, or 4 Drums, with Reversible Link 
Motion or Pat. Improved Friction. 



MADE ONLY BT TnB 






LIDGERWOOD M'F'G CO.. 

96 Liberty St., New York. 

S4 and 86 'West Monroe St., Chicago. 

197 to 203 Congress St., Boston. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS, 

PARKE & LACY CO., San Francisco. 

Send for Catalogue. 



PERFECT PULLEYS 

First Premium Awarded at Mechanics' Fair, 1884. 

Sole Licensed Manufacturers of the 

MEDART PATENT WROUGHT RIM PTJLLEY 

For the States of California, Oregon and Nevada, and the Territories of Idaho, Washington 

Montana, Wyoming, Utah and Arizona. Lightest, Strongest, Cheapest and 

Beat Balanced Pulley in the World. Also Manufacturera ol 

PAT. OOT. 25, 1881. SHAFTING, HANG-BBS AND APPUKTBNANOBS. 
tS'Sain} FOR CiRcnLABfi amd Priob List. "St 
N08. 129 and 181 FRBMONT STHBBT BAN FBANOISOO, GAL. 




70 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 25, 1890 



VAN CLEVE'S 

Pnglish and American ffl echanic 



x<ro"vi7" M:wA.33"y- 



The Eaglish and American Mechanic. ComprisiDg a col- 
letioo of over 30l)n Receipts, Rules, a d Tables designed for 
the use of every Mechanic and Manufacturer. By B. Frank 
Van Cleve. Illustrated, 2S3 pages. 12mo. 

Price -il.oO, by mail, free of postage to any address in 
tJie World. 

Among the contents of this valuahle and useful hook are 
ExDlanation of didtrams for sheet metal work: Contents in 
gallons of diffei-ent vess Js; Weights < f Pipes. Tin-plates, Oil 
Cauisters, with the quantity of tin required; Diameters, Cir- 
cuiuferences. and Areis of Circles and the content of each 
in gallons at one foot in depth; Aiithmetic; Practical Ge- 
ometry Mensuration; Slide Kule; Stt-aro and the Steam 
Engine; Belts; Lime=i. Cemants, Mortars and Coucrejes; 
Artificers' HuIbs and Tables for computiug the work of Brick- 
layers Well Diggers, Masons, Carpenters, Joiners. Slaters, 
Pla'terers Painters, Glaziers, Pavers and Plumbers; Sewers, 
Arch-w and Ahutraeuts; Flour Mills, Saw Mills, Wood-work- 
ing Machinery; Water Power; Solders; Fusible Compounds; 
Fluxes for So'deriug or Welding; Strength of Materials; 
Weights of Materials: Wh-el Gearing; Gauging; Alloys and 
Compositions; Rare and Valuable Eeceip s for Mechanical 
Purposes. 

A circvlar, U pafies Uto, showing the full table of con- 
tents of this important book, will be sent free of pos'one 
to any one in any part of the world who will furnish h:s 
address. 

^Our New Revised DescH' tlve Catalogue of Practi- 
cal and Scie7itific Books, S6 payes, Soo, and our Cata- 
logues of Books on bteam and the Steam Fngine, 3/e- 
chanics. Machinery, aTid Dync/tnical Engine riny. and 
other Catalogues, the whole covering every branch of 
Science applied to the Arts, sent fre^ and free of post- 
age to any one in any part of the world who will furnish 
his addr: ss 

HENRY CAREY BAIRD & CO.. 

Industrial Publishers, Bioksellers and Importbrs, 
810 Walnut St., Piiiladelphia. Pa., U. S. A. 



STEARNS WI'F'G CO., 

29 & 31 Spear St., San Francisco, Cal. 




MANUFACTURKR-S OF 

HIGH-GRADE SAW MILL MACHINERY, 
ENOIITES, STEEL BOILERS, Etc. 

— IMPOKTBRS OF — 

Munson's Leather BeltiDg, Goodell & Waters' Woodwork- 
ing Tools, Hill's Clutch Pulleys and CoupIinES, Eroerson'e 
Saws, Emery Wheels, Tool and Knife Grinders, Ewart's 
Link Belting, L. & D. Wood Pulleys, Hoisting and Pile 
Dri\'ing Elngines, Etc 



The Celebrated H. H. H Liniment. 




The H. H. H. lilnlmeiit 1b for the treatment o! 
he Aches and Paine of Humanity, as well as for the ail- 
ments of the beasts of the fields. Teatimonlala from 
importers and hreedera of blooded stock prove Its won 
derful curative propertiea. No man has ever used It for 
an ache or pain ana been dissatisfied. 
H. H. MOORE & SONS, Stockton, Cal., Proprietora 
For Salb by all Druooibts. 



WINCHESTER HOUSE. 



4t Third Street, 



San Francisco, Cal, 



This Fire proof Brick Building: ia centrally located, in 
the healthiest fart of the city, only a ball block from the 
Grand and Palace Hotels, and close to all Steamboat and 
Railroad Offices. 

Laundry Free for the use of Families. 

HOT AND COLD BATHS FREE. 



PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO., 



.KAHtrFACJrnBBBS OF., 



Cast steel Castiip ^^ Steel Fdpb 



UP TO 20,000 LBS. WEIGHT. 

True to pattern and superior In strenerth, toughness and durability to Oaet or Wrought 
Iron in any position or for any service. 

GEARINGS, shoes; DIES, CAMS, TAPPETS, PISTON-HEADS, RAILROAD and MA- 
CHINERY CASTINGS of Every Description. 



HOMOGENEOUS STEEL. 



SOFT and DUCTILE, 



SUPERIOR TO IRON FOR 



LOCOMOTIVE AND MARINE FORCINGS. 

ALSO Steel Rods, from i to 3 inch diameter and Flats trom 1 to 8 inch. Angrles, Teea, ChannelH and other shape 
Steel Wagon, Buggy, and Truck Tires, Plow Steel; Machinery and Special Shape Steel to size and lengths 
STEEL RAII.S from 12 to 45 pounds per yard. ALSO, Railroad and Merchant Iron, Rolled 
Beams, Angle, Channel, and T Iron, Bridge and Machine Bolts, Lag Screws, Nuts, Washers, Ship and Boat 
Spikes; Steamboat Shafts, Cranks, Pistons, Connecting Rods, etc. Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, 
and Iron Forglngs of all kinds, Iron and Steel Bridge and Roof Work a Specialty. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR SCRAP IRON AND STESX. 

fy Orders will have prompt attention. Send £or Catalogues, Address 

PACIFIC ROLLIKG MILL CO.. 202 Market St.. San Francifico. 



Terms, Board and Room, $1.00 per Da> 

And Upward. 

Booms with or without Board. 

Free Coach to the House. 
or, i»oc»ijE"sr. 



VAN DUZEN'S 

STEAMjetPUMP 

For MILLS, FACTORIES, SHOPS, ETC. 

ror ElcvatiMfT and Conveying r.i(iiiids. 
For EmptyiiiK Pits, Sints. Cessiiools*, etc., 

and as a Fire Pump. 
10 Sizes. ST to S~5. Every Pomp warranted. 

Write for DL'Sfriptivc Pumxa Circular, V- 

VAN DUZEN 4. TIFT, CINCINNATI, O. 



FULTON IRON WORKS, 

HINCKLEY, SPIERS & HAYES, Proprietors. 



[ESTABLISHED IN 1SB5.] 



jS£t.aa. Z*xrc«.zxolisoo. 




— MANffPACTUttBRfl OF— 



TUSTIN'S PULVERIZER. 



MARINE ENGINES AND BOILBRS.- 
Propeller En^nes, either High Pressure or Compound, 
Stern or Side-wheel Engines. 

MINING MACHINERY.— Hoisting Engines and 
Worka, Cages, Ore Buckets, Ore Cars, Pumping Engines 
and Pumps, Water Buckets, Pump Coliunns, Air Com- 
pressors, Air Receivers, Air Pipes. 

MIIjL< MACHINERY.— Batteries (or Dry or Wet 
Crushing, Amalgamating Pans, Setthrs, Furnaces, Re- 
torts, Concentrators, Ore Feeders, Rock Breakera, Fur- 
naced for Reducing Ores, Water Jackets, etc. 

MISCELLANEOUS MACHINERY.— Flour 
Mill Machinery, Saw Mill Engines and Boilers, Dredging 
Machinery, Powder Mill Machinery, Water Wheels. 

Tustin's Pulverizer 

WORKS ORE WET OR DRY. 



ENGINESsBOILERS 

OF ALL KINDS, 

Hiither for use on Steamboats or for nse on Land. 

Water Pipe, Poinp or Air Columns, Fiah 

Tanks for Salmon Canneries 

OP BVBRT DH8CRIPTI0N. 

Boiler Repairs Promptly attended to and at very moaerate rates. 

AOBNTS FOR THB PACIFIC C0A8T FOR THB 

DecLXxe Sto^^xxx X=*i;i.xxft.'^. 

SPECIALTIES : 

Corllsi Engrinee and Tustin Ore Pulverizers,' DEANE STEAM PUMP. 

Agents and Manufacturers of the Llewellyn Feed Water Purifier and Heater. 




THE GIANT POWDER COMPANY 

Manufacture Three Kinds of Powder, which are acknowledged by all the Great Chemists of the World as 

The Safest and Strongest High Explosives in the Market. 

Of Different StrengrthB as Required. 

NOBSL'S EXPI-OSIVE GEI.ATINE," which contains 94 per cent of Xltro-Olycerlne, and 

GELATINE-DYNAMITE, Stronger than Dynamite and even Safer in Handling. 

JUDSON POWDER IMPROVED. 

rOB BAII.ROADS AND LAND CLEARING. Is from three to four times stronger than ordinary Blast- 
ing Powder, and is used bj' all the BaUroads and Gravel Claims, as it breaks more ground, pulverizes better and 
saves time and money. It is aa dry as the ordinary Blasting Powder and runs as freely. 

BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., 



OAFS and FUSS for Sale. 



GBNEBAl. AGENTS, SAN FRANCISCO GAL. 





QUARTZ SCREENS 



A specialty. Round, slot 
or burred slot holes. Gen- 
uine Russia Iron, Homo- 
geneous Steel, Cast Steel or ^ 
American planished Iron, 

Zinc, Copper or Brass Screens for all purposes. 

fornia Perforating Screen Co.. 145 &, 147 Beale St . 




Engraving 



Superior Wood and Metal Engrav- 
ing, Eleotrotfping and Stereotyping 
'done at the office of tins paper 



COAL MINES OF THE WESTERN COAST. 

A few copies of this work, the only one ever published 
treating of Pacific Coast Coal Mining, have been ob- 
tained, and are for sale at this office for S2.50 per copy. 
It was written by W. A. Goodyear, M ining and Ci\'il 
Engineer, formerly of the California State Geological 
Survey. 



N. W. SPAULDING 

Manufacturers of 
SPAULDING' S 

Inserted Tootii 

AND 

CHISEL BIT 

CiaCOLAB 

Saws. 

SAW MILLS AND MACHINEEY 

0( all kinda made.to order. Send Jor Desoriptive Cata 
logue, 17 and 19 Fremont St., San Franolica 




irop apd l^acliipe hh 



CALIFORNIA MACHINE WORKS, 

WM. H. BIRCH & CO., 

ENGINEERS AND MACHINISTS. 



No. 110 Beale St., 



San Francisco. 



BUILDERS OF 

Steam Eneines, Saw Mills, Mining Machinery, Dredging 
Machines, Rock Crushers, Cable Railway Machinery, 
Ellithorp Air Brake Co. '3 Patent Steam and Hydraulic 
Elevators, Air Cushions and Air Brakes. POSITIVE 
SAFSTIES. Improved Ram Elevators, Sidewalk and 
Hand Hoists. B. E. Henrickson's Patent Automatic 
Safety Catches. 

Machines of all kinds Made and Repaired. 
Orders Solicited. 



Golden State & Miners Iron Works. 

UacQtiactnre Iron Oastlnss and Maobinery 
of all KlndB at Greatly Bednced Bates. 

STEVBNSOira PATENT 

Mold-Board AMALGAMATORS, 
Golden State Pressure Blowers. 

s^ret St., between Howard A Folsom, S. F, 



rHOHAB THOMPSON . 



rEORNTON THOMF80II 



THOMPSON BROTHERS. 

EUREKA FOUNDRY, 

129 and 181 Beale St., between Uissioo and Howard, B.F 

HAHTTPAOTmUIRS OP OABTIKGS OP STBRT DBBOBIPTIOH. 



Mining Engineers. 



CIVIL AND MINING ENGINEER 
Ot long experience, practical aod admiDiE<trattve, In 
Copper, Silver and Gold Mining in Europe and. America, 
offers services as Manager or Superintendent, or to search 
lor aod report on Mines. Now in Mexico. Several Lan- 
guages. Address C. F.. Box 2617, San Fraacisco, Cal. 



W, A. GOODYEAR. 

Oivil and Mining Eng'ineer, 

mNINO EXPERT AKD GEOLOGIST. 
Address " BuslneBs Box A," office of this paper, 9aD 
Francisco. 



ROSS E. BROWNE, 

Mining and Hydraulic Engineer, 

No. 307 SAJfSOMB St., Sak Felahoisoo. 



ISRAEL W. KNOX, 
Mining and Mechanical Engineer 

ANB PURCHASING AOBNT FOR 

Hines, Kming Machinery & Supplies. 

UineB Examined, Reports and Estimates Furnished, 

Contracts made, etc 
Office, 287 First St, San PranclBCO, Oal. 



THE ROLLER ORE FEEDER 

[Patented May 28, 1882.] 




This is the best and cheapest Ore Feeder now in use. 

It has fewer parts, requires less power, is simpler in 
adjustment than any other. Feeds coarse ore or soft clay 
alike uniformly, under one or all the stamps in a battem 
as required. 

In the Bunker Hill Mill it has run continuously for two 
years, never having been out of order or costing a dollar 
for repairs. 

Golden State and Miners' Iron Works, 

Sole Manufacturers, 
S27 First Street. San Francisco, Gal. 



Lakeport, 20 

miles east of Ukiah. Comfortable Hotel. Quiet Cabina. 

Lovely Scenery. Low Charges. Its waters are a sure 

cure for Dropsy, Sorofulous and Skin Disefues,- Bheuma- 

' dsm, etc Address H L. DBNIO, Upper Lake. 



Jan. 25, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



71 



PROVED BELT FRUE ORE CONCENTRATOR. 



The Beat Ore Concentrator in the market, having doublft 
the CApaoity and doing ita work as close as the plain Bdlt 
machine, while its concentrations are clean. It is need in 
a number of MilU, the most notable of which is the 
Alaska M. &: M. Go's Mill, where 24 Improved Belt Frues 
are taking the Polp from 120 St^imps, cruehing '.i50 tons 
per day, and is fOvii>g entire satisfaction as against 48 
plain Belt Maohinee, taking the Palp from the other 120 
Btamps. 

Price of Improved Belt Frue Vanner, $900, f. o. b. 
Price of Plain Belt Frue Vanner, $575, f. o. b. 



For Pamphlets, Teatimonlale and farther information 
apply at office. 




Protected by Patents December 22, 1874; September 2 
1S79; April 27, 1880; March 22, 1881; February 20, 1883; 
September 18, 1883; July 24, 1888. Patents applied for. 



There are Over 2200 Plain Belt Machines now 
in Use. 

Tor Montawa Compant (Limited), Lont)On, October 8, 1886. 
Dear Sirs:— Having tested three o( your Fruo Vannera in a com- 
petitivo trial with other aliuilar niacliiiies (Triumph), we huve satisfied 
ourBelves of the superiority of your VaniiurB. as Is ovideuced by the 
fact of our havintf ordered 20 more of your macliinert tor Immediate 
delivery. Youra truly, THE MONTANA COMPANY (Limited). 

N. B.— Since the above was written the 20 Vannere, havioK been 
started, gave such satiBfactiou that H additional Frues and more 
stampe have been purchased. ADAMS & CARTEK. 



ADAMS & CARTER, Agents FRUE VANNING MACHINE CO., Room 15. No. 132 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



"TRIUMPH" ORE CONCENTRATOR with IMPROVED RIFFLED BELT. 



The oompetitive trials which have been held between the 
" Triamph " Ore Concentratora, the " Frue" Vannera and 
other forme of conoentratiog devicea, do not warrant the as- 
aertiOQ that the "I'Vue ' Vanner ia the best ore concentrator in 
the market. The fact that the "Fruee" have improved (cor- 
rn^ated) belta does not militate against the aaperioriiy of tho 
"Triompha;" for, when desired, they (the "Triumphs") can 
be mounted with a auperior belt known as the *' Blasdel " 
Riffled. 



Price " Triumph " Concentrators, with Im- 
proved (Patented) Belt - ■ - $650f. 0. b. 

Price " Triamph " Concentrators, with 
Plain Belt $550 f. o. b. 







We are prepared to ^arantoe the aupTloritv of the "Tiiuniph" 
the " Krue " or any other form of Concentrator, for coin if need be. 
Circulara and tostimooial letters furnished on application. 



JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS. 

39 to 51 Fremont Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



(E^-A-TUZXTTIEXD-) 

Both the ''Triumph" Concentrator and "Blaadel" (riflled) 
Bait are protected by inonntestable letters patent, granted 
by the Government of the United States. 

Orininal Empire Mill and Mining Company, \ 

Principal OtHce, 401 Colifornia S .. f^or. SanBume, S. P. > 

LotatioD o( Works, Grate Valley, Nevada Co., Cal. ) 

Grasb Vallet. Nkvada Co., Cal,, Nov. 10, 1885. 

Joshua Uiiiidy Machine Worku, 3D to 51 Frcitwnt St., S. F., Cal.: 

Okstlksien — I &m pleased to state, in roferonce to the •' Ttiumph" 
Ore Concentratora, that four (4) of tliem were placei )u the mUl of tho 
Oriulual Eiuipre Mill and Mining Company in April, 1SS4, and a thorough 
tcHl made of their practical oper tion; and their efficiency having been 
iltinionatrated, four (4) more w ore subsequently introduced aa the comple- 
ment of tiie Twenty (20) Stamp Mill, and the eight (8; have been and are 
now runniuy with entirely satisfactory rostiUs. 

At the Ten (10-) Stamp Mill of the North Star Mining Company, unf^er 
my supervision, four (4) are also in successful operation, and from my 
observation of their praciical workings, I am convinced that this form of 
Concentrators is the equal, if not superior to any othe^ Btyle of Yano 
or concentrating devices. DAVTD McKAY, Jr., 

[Siened] Sup't North Star and Original Empire Mining Co 

N. B. When the atamping capacity of the two above named mills waa in- 
creased, more " Triumph " Concentrators were purchased, and tweuty- 
einht (2S) are now in constant successful operation. 



DAVIDSON STEAM PUMPS. 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive Works, 



Boiler-Feed Pumps, 
Tank Pumps, 
Marine Pumps. 
Wrecking Pumps, 
Fire Pumps, 
Brewery Pumps, 
Mining Pumps, 
Low Pressure 

Pumps, 
Vertical Pumps, 
Balanced Hydraulic 

AND 

Heavy Pressure Valve. [ 



S. E. COR. HOWARD AND BEALE STS., 

San Francisco. 




SugarHouse Pumps. 
Railroad Pumps, 
Vacuum Pumps, 
Air Pumps, 
Circulating Pumps, 
Tannery Pumps, 
Hydraulic Pumps, 
Elevator Pumps, 
Independent Air 

Pump and Jet 

Condenser. 
Artesian or Deep 

Well Pumps. 



The Only Steam Pump Made that can be run at High Piston Speed without Shock and with Safety to the iVIachine. Piston Rods, 

StufiBng-Boxes, Valve Seats, Stems and Linings of Water Cylinders are of Best Oomposition Metal, D. S. Standard. 
EVERY PTJMP THOBOtJGHLY TESTED BEFOKE LEAVING FACTORY. SoziaL for C7Ata.losvi.es. 




ia:xj3Nri"inxrc3rTo isr. 



MANUPACTDRBR OF ■ 



LLS, 



CENTRIFUGAL ROLLER QUARTZ 

Concentrators and Ore Crushers, 
Mining Machinery of Every Description. Steam Engines and Shingle Machines. 



SEND FOB CIRCULAR. 



Centrifugal Koller Quartz Mill. 



S13 X^XZIST* S1MEt.-Ei:BlT, 



S-A-DXT 3E«I=t.-A.3XrC!ISCO, O.A.Ia 



■70 



Mining : and Scientific Press. 



[Jan. 25, 1890 



FRISBE E WE T MILL 

This Mill, with a weight of less than 9000 pounds, 
has a capacity of three tons per hour of hard 
quartz to 40 mesh ; has been thoroughly- 
tested ; we guarantee its work as 
represented, and we will give 
long time trial. 




IT HAS NO MORE WEARING PARTS THAN CORNISH ROLLS 

And renewals will not cost over one-half as much as for stamps. Will ran empty, or with small 
amount of ore without injury. The attention of parties having Cement Gravel is called to thi^ 
Mill, as it will run 100 tons per day to No. B mesh; 30 to 35 H. P, 

OUR DRY MILLS are the most economical ever built, and are extensively used with 
record of several years. No grinding in Dana. Mill finishes to any fineness desired. 

FRISBEE-LUCOP MILL COMPANY. 

GIDEON FRISBEE, Manager, - - 59 & 61 First Street, San Francisco 
HOOKER & LAWRENCE. Gen'l Ag'ts. 145 Broadway. New York. 



JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS, 

Nos. 39 to 51 FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




HENDY" IMPROVED "OHALLBNGB" ORE FEEDER. 



The best form of Feeder ever devised, and prononnced by reputable mining men to be fat 

superior to any form o{ " Roller " Feeder manufactured. We refer to the follow- 

iug gentlemen who have furnished us with testimonial letters to the 

above effect, which can be seen at our o£6lce, viz.: 



S. VV. Crocker, Snpt. Bunker Hill Gold Min^ 

ing Co., Amador City, Oal. 
W. G. Roberts, Greenwood, El Dorado Co. , Cal 



D. 0. WicKHAM, Taylor Mine, Greenwood, Cal. 
J. R. Tregloan, Supt. South Spring Hill Gold 
Mining Co., Amador City, Cal. 

WE ARE MANITFACTaRERS OF THE 

"CHALLENGE," "STANFORD," ' TULLOCK," & ' ROLLER" FEEDERS, 

And will furnish descriptive Catalogues and quote prices upon application. 



Lubricating Compound and Cups. 





1868. 
Manufacture commenced a 
Albjiny, Wew York. 

1876. 

Introduced by ua on Pacific 
Coast. 

1889. 

Cheap imitations having had 
time to show that they are the 
moat expensive in the end, the 

Sales of the Qennine Albfiny 
Gompoiind are larger than 
ever before, 




England, Belgium, 
France, 

And other Foreign Countries 
ar^ now Large ConsnmerB, 



We are also Sole Agents foi 
the 

L° Albany Cylinder Oils, 

Albany Spindle Oils, Etc. 



^ 



FOR SALE ONLY BY 



TATUM & BOWEN 



Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast, 

Dealers in Improved Woodworking Machinery, 

Sawmill Machinery, Engines, Boilers, Ironworking Machinery, Supplies, Etc, 

Sole Agents for Hoe Chisel-Tooth Saw, Gardner Governor, Schultz 
Leather Belting, Etc. 

34 AND 36 FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

85 FRONT STREET, PORTLAND, OR. 



Vulcan Iron '^obxs, 



135-145 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 



11 



i Stamp Batteries, Pans and Settlers, 
"Dodge," and Improved Blake, Rack-Breakers, 
"Dodge" Pulverizers, Slime Machines, etc. 

AERIAL WIRE ROPEWAYS. 

(VULOAN PATENT SYSTEM.) 

The cheapest and moat reliable form of Transportation of Ore, Coal, eto. Saves fonr-fifths 
of the cost by any other method. 

SAW-MILL ) ( CORLISS, 

REFRIGERATING } MACHINERY. STEAM ENGINES \ Meyer Cut-off, 
CABLE-ROAD ) ( Slide Valve. 

SPECIAL MACHINERY TO ORDER. 



SHAl^TING. 

BOXEN, 

HANGERS, etc. 



REPAIR WORK SOLICITED. 



IMPROVED FORM OF HYDRAULIC GIANTS. 




THE ABOVE CUT ILLUSTRATES THE IMPROVED FORM OF BOUBLE- JOIN TED HT- , 
DRAUIilC GIANTS which we manufacture. We jpiarantee purchasers of this form of Giants against all jj 
coats, expenses or damages which may arise from anj' arJverse suits or actions at law. We are further prepared to j 
furnish Single-Joiuted Giants when required. Prices, discounte and Catalogues of our specialties of hy- J 
draalic Mining Macliinery sent on application. 

JOSHUA HENDY MACHINE WORKS, 39 to 51 Fremont St., San Francisco. 




Axi IHmt rated 



A.1>T2>TXJ-A.Xj 2>/LXl<TI2<Ta- R.E'VIE'VT"— T^'CVEISTT^ST F-A-O-ES. 



VOL. LX.— Number 5. 
DEWEY i, CO.. PuButMtao. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1890. 



Ttiree Dollars per Annum. 
Single Copiee, 10 Cte. 



A Modern Gold-Mill. 

A OQt on this page sbows a modern 40-Btamp 
gold'inill run by steam-power, eaoh as are used 
all over California. The mill is asaally bailt 
in RQch a aitaatlon that the ore oan be delivered 
by oar or wagon at the apper part where it U 
dumped against an inclined ** grizzly," and the 
tioer ore passing tbrongh the interatices of the 
grizzly, falls directly into the main ore-bin. 
The ooaraer ore (too large to pass through the 
grizzly) is soreened off by gravity into the ooarse 
ore-bin, from which it ia drawn by gravity di- 
rectly into the rock-breakers, or It falle apon a 
floor in front of the rock-breakera. By these it 
is crashed, and falls into the main ore-bins. 
From the main ore-bins the ore passes throngh 
gates into the "self-feeders," which supply it 
automatically to the batteries. Qiickailver is 
ffd at intervals to the mortars of the battery, 
and coming in contact with the native or 
'* free " gold of the finely crushed ore ('* pulp "), 
forms with it an amalgam. Thia amalgam ia 
caught partly by the copper platea in the bat- 
tery, and partly npon the amalgamated or 
eilvdr-plated copper plates, after it faaa issued 
through the screens of the mortars. The amal- 
gam is "cleaned up" periodically and retorted. 
Rstorting consists in the anblimation of the 
quicksilver, the vapors of which are condensed 
in water and the quicksilver oollected. The 
residual gold is in a porous state. It is melted 
with flaxes in crucibles and oast in ingots. The 
mill shown in the engraving is from a design of 
the Union Iron Works in this city. 

The pulp from which the free gold has been 
extracted by amalgamation passes over concen- 
trators of various mechanical devices. These 
concentrators effect a separation of the aurifer- 
ous sulphnreta from the worthless gangue. In 
California the concentrated aulphnrets are 
treated by the chlorination process. In some 




METHOD OF QUARRYING OUT LARGE BLOCKS OP SANDSTONE. 



other aeotiona of the coantry the anlphuretsare 
sold to smelting works. The gold orea of Cali- 
fornia carry on an average two per cent of sul- 
phurets. The concentrated eulphnreta assay 
on an average from $60 to $90 per ton in gold, 
with from a trace to several dollars in silver. 
The custom chlorination works of California 
charge $20 per ton for the treatment of sul- 
pburets, and return 90 per cent of the assay 



value. Cinder conditiona ordinarily favorable, 
a plant treating 6 to 9 tons per 24 hours can re-, 
duce the anlpbarets at a cost of §8 to $10 per 
ton, extracting 90 to 94 per cent of the assay 
value of the gold. '- 

Sandstone. 

Around the Bay of San Francisco there occur 
sandstonea of a considerable variety of colors 




A CALIFORNIA 40-STAMP GOLD-MILL WITH OONOBNTBATOBS- 



whioh are beginning to come into use to some 
extent. The prevailing colors here are brown- 
ish and gray. On Aogel Island there occurs a 
flne sandstone of a greenish'gray color, which 
was used in the Biink of California building ; 
and others of a lighter shade are found in vari- 
ous parts of Alameda county. A few miles 
south of San Jose there are also inexhaustible 
supplies of light-gray and buff stone, but which 
are worked only in a, small way. Near 
Cordelia, Solano county, there occars a 
dark-gray, volcanic tufa that oan per- 
haps be utilized for rough construotion. 
A very valuable handbook, by Geo. 
P. Merrill, curator of the Dapartment 
of Geology at the Smithsonian Insti- 
tute, has just been issued, being a de- 
scription of the collection of building 
and ornamental stonea in the U. S. 
National Museum. The book is not a 
dry catalogue, but ia well written and 
interesting, giving as it doea so much 
information concerning all sorts of 
bnilding-stonea. 

Among other things is a description 
of the sandstone qaarriea at Porbland, 
Coon., a cut of which is shown on this 
page. The stone ia of medium fiae- 
nesB of texture, of a uniform reddish' 
brown color, and lies in nearly horizon- 
tal beds varying from a few inches to 20 
feet in tbiokness. Natural blocks 100 
by 50 by 20 feet occur, and hence blocks 
of any desired size can be obtained. The 
blocks are roughly trimmed down with 
picks at the quarry, and shipped thna 
to New York and other large cities to be 
worked up as occasion demands. Scarce- 
ly any of the ipaterial is dressed at the 
quarries. The stone hae been used 
In all our leading citiea, particularly 
in New York, and has even been ship- 
ped to San Francisco via Cape Horn, 



72 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Feb. 1, 1890 



Locked Up. 

Gold in Nevada County's Gravel Channels. 

It is ooly a mere matter of time, says the 
Nevada Transcript^ when the National Govern- 
ment will wake.up to the exigencies of the case 
and turn its attention to unlocking again the 
golden treasure-houae of the gravel channels, 
which are known to contain to-day more gold 
than has ever yet been taken out of them — 
laree as that sum haa been. In order that the 
pnblio may form some idea of the value of the 
gold known to exist in only one of the gravel 
channels in the county of Nevada, one need but 
look into the testimony taken in the Woodruff 
case from nnimpeaohable witnesses, backed up 
by facts such as could not be controverted, as to 
the yield of the one main channel which oc- 
cupiea the ridge between the Middle and South 
Yuba rivers. It has been from four to six mill- 
ions of dollars in gold per mile. 

There can be no doubt that the amount of 
^old remaining in the nuworked ground of the 
North Bloomfield Gravel Mining Co. is at least 
$10,000,000, perhaps more. Its deep tunnel, 
constructed at a coat of three-fourths of a mill- 
ion dollars, controls enough more ground along 
this channel, belonging to other parties, to 
turn out at least $8,000,000 more. And it owns 
other ground which is partially opened which 
certainly contains $4,000,000 more. 

The Milton Mining and Water Co. owna of 
nnworked ground on this channel enough to 
turn out at least $10,000,000 more, besides 
claims (that can be worked through its tunnels) 
not belonging to it, in which there is at least 
$10,000,000 more. 

The Eureka Lake Co. owns of this channel 
enough to turn out at least $20,000,000 more, 
thus making in the property owned and con 
trolled by these three companiea, not less than 
$60,000,000 in gold. If to the property of 
these three companies be added the remainder 
of this known channel on the rid£;e, it will carry 
the total value of gold, in some IS or 20 miles 
of this channel alone, up to nearly or quite 
$100,000,000. 

This value, as was stated in the evidence re- 
ferred to by one of the witnesses thoroughly 
familiar with the subject, and indorsed by 
others, *'is known not as a matter of conject- 
ure but as a matter of certainty." All hare a 
vague idea that the yield from the quartz mines 
has been in the past very large. Bat where $1 
has come from quartz mines, five or more have 
oome from gravel. In fact the auriferous gravel 
channels, so-called, are the great storehouse of 
the gold deposits of the world. 

This one hundred millions of treasure is now 
locked up by injunction, and while ita extrac- 
tion would keep thousands of workmen bney at 
large wages, and the product would stimnlate 
all industries in our State, the country must 
sit down by its* treasnre-box, fold ita arms and 
do nothing, because a few hundred acres of 
land in the great valley of the Saoramento is 
temporarily injured, and our wise judges say 
that none of our engineers are able to cope 
with BO simple a problem as the construction of 
a dam to impound the dirt or debris which 
may oome from mining out this gold, although 
there are engineers who have not hesitated to 
grapple with the problem of buildiug an earth 
dam 170 feet in bight, to impound water for 
the Spring Valley "Water Works of San Fran- 
cisco; to dam at Folsom a stream that during 
the winter months becomes a raging torrent; 
and in New York in connection with the 
Croton Water Works, to build a dam of stone 
250 feet high. 

This vast treasury has, in the past, been at- 
tacked by the three corporations named at a 
cost, for tnunels. water reservoirs and canals, 
of not less than $6,000,000. Bat under the de- 
crees of the ooutts, which have judicially de- 
termined that no dam can be built which will 
impound dirt and atones, these vast mines are 
Idle, and the works connected with them fast 
going to decay. This is the case in one section 
of the State, covering some 20 miles only in 
length of this golden channel. If to it is added 
the hundreds of miles of similar deposits in 
other parts of the State, it is certainly within 
bounds to say that because a few acrea of land 
in the Sacramento valley, of the value of about 
$1,500,000, are temporarily injured by the past 
mining operations of nearly forty years, theae 
hundreds of millions of dollars in gold which 
are known to be within these ohaunels must 
remain locked up. 

The result of the sage conclusion of these 
wise jadges is that the slime of litigation and, 
Btapiiityis gradually destroying and covering 
up all the extraordinary structures, built by 
tbe miners at enormous cost, rEqairiog years in 
their construction, so deep that unless some r^* 
lief can be had by legislation, they will soon 
be so buried and destroyed that they will 
never again be utilized, and tbe gold contained 
in these vast treasuries will remain there for 
all time. 

The vast water reservoirs with 'the thou- 
sands of miles of deep tunnels will never again 
be reconstructed, if now allowed to fall into 
disuse and decay; and the gold will remain 
locked up where it is until wiser counsels pre- 
vail. 

The Canas Mining Concession. — Mr. Fer- 
nando BsteCa de la Pona returned Wednesday 
from a trip occupying 28 days to the Cooopah 
country, 60 miles east by north of Atamo, 
where the mining territory recently conceded 
by the Government to Eagenio I. Oanas is 



located. Mr. Beteta haa abend on the proper- 
ty. He made a thorough examination of the 
territory embraced in the concession and found 
it to be very valuable both in placers and 
ledgea, and is confident that it will prove to be 
a grand property. There is an abundance of 
water for all ordinary purposes, but not enough 
to carry on mining operations on a large scale, 
and Mr. B&teta will proceed to dig wells in the 
most favorable locations. He states that excel- 
lent water oan be procured at from five to 20 
feet below the surface and in large quan- 
tities. He also states that his company will 
probably begin active work on the property 
within 60 days. — Lower Californian. 



.Valuable Deposits. 

Glass Sand. Coal and Porcelain Clay at 
Lincoln. 

A. H. Gates, who lives near Lincoln, fur- 
nishes the Auburn Herald with the following 
particulars relative to the glass industry aoon to 
be developed at that place. The tract in 
which the deposits named are found was re- 
cently sold by the Backeye Mill Company of 
Marysville : . 

'* Borings have been made this fall nnder his 
directions, on the property where the old coal 
mine la aituated, for sand anitable for manu- 
facturing glasa. The anticipationa of the 
projectors have more than been realized, as 
sand of the purest quality haa been found in 
large quantities and at various places. This 
sand, it has been found, is in one distinct layer, 
and occupies one entire 40-acre tract. It Iicb 
at a depth of from 13 to IS feet below the sur- 
face, and is from three to six feet in thickness. 
It is 95 per cent silica and ia as clear, as Mr. 
Gates expreeaee, as the water of a mountain 
spring. The projectors have calculated that 
there ia sand enough in this one layer to run 
a factory 100 years with an output of 20 tons of 
glass per day. Below this sand deposit ia one 
of coal, which is from S to 10 feet in thickness. 
A pound of this coal haa been found undnr a 
rigid test to yield four cubic feet of gas. The 
coal will be naed to run the engine and the gaa 
to melt the sand. Between the sand and the 
ooal is a deposit of fine porcelain clay, which 
in some portions ia three feet thick. The clay 
is of various shades of color, being pink in some 
places and dark gray in others. When burned 
it becomes pure white. Before this report 
reaches the readers of tbe Herald a company 
will have been formed with a capital of $500,- 
000. A factory will be erected on the land, and 
operations will JDegin at an early day. This 
means employment for a large nnmber of bands, 
and will add greatly to the prosperity of Lin- 
coln. The company intends to manufacture 
plate-glass exclusively, and will have a good 
thing though they charge the coat of tranapor- 
tation and the rate of duty only." 



A Gold Medal. — James D. Schuyler re- 
ceived notice yesterday morning that a gold 
medal bad been awarded him, but his nu- 
merous friends were not engaged in con- 
gratalating him during the day. In fact, they 
did not know anything about it, for the 
modesty of the member of the Board of 
Public Works kept him from informing his 
friends of the distinction which had been con- 
ferred upon him. A Union reporter, however, 
unearthed the facts, and found that Mr, Schuy- 
ler, who ia a member of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers, has been awarded what la 
known as the Normal Gold Medal, it being the 
first prize for a paper read by Mr. Schuyler be- 
fore the annual convention of the society Octo- 
ber 17, 1888, The paper, which has been pub- 
lished in pamphlet form and illnetrated, is en- 
titled ** The Oonatruction of the Sweetwater 
Dam." The last meeting of the society, at 
which the above-mentioned medal was awarded 
to Mr. Schuyler, has jast been held in New 
Hiven, Conn. — San Diego Uvion. 



Honduras Mines. — Tne Honduras Gold 
Placer Mining Company has executed a lease of 
their five-mile concession on the Gayape river 
to the Honduras Gold Company. The agree- 
ment dates from Ootober 1st last. By this ar- 
rangement it ia stated that the same amount 
of gold will be taken out of the one claim that 
would have been taken out of two aeparate 
claims, thus effecting the saving of tbe cost of 
turning the additional claim, and also avoiding 
any trouble that might have arisen from the 
labor question, tailings, back-water, or other 
points of difference that aometimea arise be- 
tween rival companies. The Honduras Gold 
Placer Mining Company will receive one-half of 
the net profits of the Honduras Gold Company, 
besides acquiring a half-interest in the extra 
2000 varas that have been turned over to that 
company, and their directors have also an 
equal voice in the control of the finances. 



Stock Exchange Committees, — The fol- 
lowing committeea have been appointed by the 
president of the San Francisco Stock and Ex- 
change Board: Executive— A. W. Foster, J. 
H. Crocker, George I. Ives, Thomas Whetesa 
and George W. Cope, Finance— A. F. Ooffia, 
C. E. Pixtoa and Geo. W. Kelly. Stnck List 
—Job. Marke, A. G. Gurnetc, H. H. Noble, E. 
P. Murphy and Werner Stauf. Cammiasion 
and Rales— CoU Deane, H. H. Shinn and E, 
Epstein. 



Utah's Metal Product for 1889. 

"Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Statement of tbe Mineral Product of 0tali for 1889. 



Germania Lead Works . . . 

Hauauer Smelter 

Mingo Furnace Co 

Daly Miaing Co 

Ontario Silver Mininf? Co. , 

Silver Retf District 

Other Mines and Piacers, . 



Net Product Bars and Base Bullion 

Contents Ore Shipped 

Contents Copper Oie Bullion and Matte Shipped 



9^ 

o a* 



63S,6L0 



4,761,63(5 
9,260.000 
11,278, 
2,124,841 
2,604,280 



30,029,497 
2:j,380,048 
1,012,185 



a? 



764,357 

972 442 

134,407 

6,200 

1,877,406 



372.875 
562,650 
692,517 
430,770 
989,622 



3,048,434 

2,103,111 

118,705 



5,270,250 



19,051 
4,S'J6 



RECAPITULATION. 

2,060,792 lbs. Copper, at 10 cents per lb $ 206.079 20 

2.359,540 lbs. Refioed Lead at S'O- 100 cents per lb 89,662 52 

59,421,730 lbs. Unrefined Lead at S46.40 per ton 1,378,S84 13 

7,147,651 ozs. Fine Silver at SO 93i per oz ... 6,6 >6, 254 65 

24,975 0Z9. Fine Gold at §20 per oz 499,500 00 

Total Export Value , . . . j. ". SS.S^u.OSO 50 

Computing tbe Gold and Silver at their mintvalaation and other metals at their value at the seaboard, it would 
increase the value of the product to §12,352,414,53 



Comparative Statement, showing the quantity of Silver and Gold contained in base bullion and ores produced in 
Utah: 



Total Ounces 
of Silver 
Produced. 



Total Ounces 

of Gold 

Produced. 



Ounces of Silver 
in Ores and 
B^ee Bullion. 



1830 
1831 

18S2 
IS 53 
1S84 
1SS5 
1886 
18S7 
1838 
1SS9 



3.783, 
5,400 
S,435. 
4,58i; 
5,669, 
5,972 
5,918, 
6,161, 
6,178, 
7,147, 



,444 
,763 



,842 
,737 
,855 , 
,651 



8,020 
7,95S 
9.039 
6,991 
5.530 
8,903 
10,577 
11,387 
13,886 
24,975 



1,403.819 
2,643,899 
2,581,789 
2.351,190 

3,2r.3,9S4 
3,189,576 
2,338,263 
4,049,273 
3.982.217 
5,270,250 



Ounces of Gold 
in Ores and 
Base Bullion. 



2,878 
2,622 
5,016 
5,597 
3,806 
7,289 
8.369 
10,714 
12,854 
24,336 



Per Cent of 

Total Silver 

Product. 



Per Cent of 
Total Gold 
Product. 



37.1-10 
48.9-10 
47.3-10 
5L8-10 
57.4-10 
53.410 
47.9-10 
((5.7-10 
64.4-10 
73.7-10 



35.8-10 

32.9 10 

55.5-10 

80. 

68.8-10 

81. 8-10 

79.1-10 

94 

92.5-10 

97 



i 



Comparative statement of the value of lead bulliou, including silver and fjold necesaarily 
manufacture west of the Missouri River, compiled from the annual reports issued ^y John J. 
President and General Manager. Wells, Fargo & Co., San Franeiseo, 



produced in its 
Valentine, Vice- 



1881 
1882 
1883 
1SS4 
1885 
18S« 
1587 
188S 



Total Value ofTtreeious 

Metals, including 

Lead. 



S°4,604,«7 
i)2,411,835 
90,813,612 
34,975,954 
90,181,260 
103,011,761 
104,646,959 
114,341,592 



Total Value of Lead Bullion, 

including Gold and 

Silver Contents. 



§30,2.53,430 
35,793 750 
34,810,022 
31,191,250 
35,731,711 
44.635 656 
41,595 853 
38,004,826 



Per Cent of Entire 
Product. 



35.8 10 
38.7.10 
38. 6-10 
:;6 7-10 
30.610 
43.3-10 
39.7-10 
33.2-10 



The metals, lead, silver and gold are obtained in small quantities in almost all the productive mines located in 
this inter-mountain reEion. The ores are mostly low jrrade, and the assimilation of the metals causes the proce -a 
of smelting to be tbe favorite and most economical nietbod of reduction. This fact will explain the increase in the 
percentage of gold and silver produced in the manufacture of base bullion. It demonstrates conclusively, that 
any legislation, having for its object the repeal of the present tariff on lead, or the placing of the product of lead 
or lead ores on the free list, must diminish its production, and decrease in the same ratio the gold and silver prod- 
uct of the United States. This injury to our yreat milling industry ia augmented by the action of the Treasury 
Department in admitting foreign ores (notably from Mexico) free of duty under a strained and doubtful interpreta- 
tion of the present laws. 



Stewart's Mining Bill. 

A correspondent of the Georgetown (El 
JDjrado county) Gazette B&ye : 

We have before us a copy of what is termed 
Stewart's Mining Bill— " to amend Chap. Six 
of the U, S. Revised Statutes, relating to min- 
eral lands and mining resources." 

After an experience in various kinds and meth- 
ods of mining since 1849, and the practical work- 
ings of the different laws and regulations which 
have from time to time been adopted, I sub- 
mit the following in reference to the proposed 
bill: 

That portion of Section 2324, R. S,, to be 
amended so far as relates to change of time, 
viz. : *' The year within which the annual 
labor or improvements reqaired to be perform- 
ed or made by this section shall commence at 
12 o'clock meridian, on the lat day of October of 
each year' — and further on in said section, *'In 
case the first day of Ootober falls on Sunday, 
or any holiday, the following secular day shall 
be oonstrned as the first day of October within 
the meaning of this Act " — no doubt would 
prove of real benefit, and correct some of the 
loo&enesB and misunderstanding of the present 
law. 

That portion of the proposed bill making 
distinction between placer and lode claims — the 
term placer embracing surface, drift and seam 
diggings, lode that of quartz only; surface and 
drift merge into each other, seams and lode 
into quartz— that only $25 worth of labor 
shonla be required to be performed on the 
former (placer) and $100 worth of labor on the 
latter (quartz), seems hardly just, as these 
claims embrace the same areas, 20 acres each, 
and the same surroundings according to loca- 
tion. Either assess the reqaired labor to be 
performed on each at $25 or SlOO. The amount 
really makes little or no diflference, but should 
be equal. The remaining portion of the bill is 
only ingenious tinkering or paraphrasing of the 
present law. With the change above noted, 
tbe present law answers all practical pur- 
poses, and no farther amendments onght 
to pass. 

It ia difficnlt to those who have been engaged 
in mining these many years to understand the 
neoeesity of putting the mining interest into 
strait-jackets or being corraled by barb-wire 
surroundings, which is not applied to other oc- 
cupants of the pnblic domain. 

The wise and early course pursued by the 
Government in allowing the miner the free use 
of the mineral lands for exploration should re- 
lieve him from being considered a highway 



by 



robber, to be pursued year after year 
ignorant legislators or bribed officials. 

If any legislation is necessary to advance the 
mining industry, it is in the direction of re- 
stricting the action of railroads within railroad 
grants by setting up their filse and fraudulent 
claims to lands known to be mineral, and their 
persittint attemptto secure the same by exhaust- 
ing the energies and means of those engaged in 
tbe oconpation of mining. Their ioflaenoe with 
the local land offi'^ers seems omnipotent. 



Nevada's Salt jUountaiks. — The paltmonn- 
t»iD8 located on ihe banks of the Rio Virgin, an 
affluent of the Colorado river in Lincoln oonn- 
ty, Ntv., cover an area of 25 miles, extending 
to within beven miles of the junction of that 
stream with the Oolorado. The salt they con- 
tain is pure and white and clearer than glass, 
and it is said that a piece seven or eight inches 
thick is sometimes clear enough to see through 
to read a newspaper. Over the salt is a layer 
of sandstone from two to eight feet thick, and 
when this is torn away the salt appears like a 
huge snowdrift. How deep it is has not yet 
been ascertained, but a single bias*; of giant 
powder will blow out tons of it. Under the 
cap-rock have been discovered charred wood 
and charcoal, and matting made of cedar bark, 
which the salt has preserved, evidently the 
camp of prehistoric man. 



The Elkhorn Mming Co., Jefferson county, 
Mont., was organized in 1883, and the divi- . 
dends paid out during the last year amounted 
to $180 000, The property has just been sold 
to the Mining and Financial Trust Syndicate 
(limited), London, for $560,000. The property 
(Embraced in the inventory of purchase includes 
90 acres of groand, a well-equipped mill, good 
machine-shop, hoist and all the snppUea and 
stores on hand. 



Silver Discount — T&e discount on silver 
bullion reduced the coin value of the Bpopmber 
yield of the Hale and Norcross mine $12,000. 
The discount on the yield of the Con. CiL and 
Va. for that month was $42,450. The dis- 
count on the entire December yiald of the lode 
footed up $102,000— more than one-sixth of the 
amount of the total product. 

A Tacoma Dispatch aaya at least ten human 
beings and thousands of cattle and sheep have 
perished in the blizzirds which have raged over 
the State of Washington since the first of the 
year. Raports from Colville reservation are 
that cattle are dying by hundreds from starva- 
tion and thirst. 



Feb. 1, 1890.] 



Mining and Scientific Press.- 



7a 



Snow-Shoeing; in the Sierra. 

The oontioaed itormy weather in the moaot- 
ainoaa portions of California haa broaght 
enow-8ho68 into prominence, since they are now 
being used in so many places by men to pack 
in snpplies where the roads are blockaded. 
The snow-shoea used here are very different 
from those in nse in Canada. SnoW'Sboes for 
traveling in California are from S to 12 feet 
long, 3^ to 4 inches wide, and I:i ioohee thick 
in the center. They are tapeied at the top 
from near the middle to onefoortb of an inch 
in thickness at the toes, and nearly flat. Tbe 
toes are turned up like slei(;h-rnoDere. They 
are nearly of aniform width from end to end — 
a little wider, if any, on the front — and a 
spring is worked in so that without weights 
they rest on tbe heels and points; but when 
the rider stands on them tbe weight is some- 
what evenly distributed and a concave groove 
is made at the bottom, beginniue near the toes 
and runoiog to tbe heels, similar to the bottom 
of the skates. Tbe bottoms are highly pol- 
ished and tar is burned and rubbed in until a 



or no spring being required on the baok part — 
the most essential being the front. The olject 
of this is that in running over rough places 
there will be no sudden jerk, endangering the 
equilibrium of the rider, who often attains a 
speed of 60 to SO miles an hour on these shoes. 
They have a tendency to " buck " when going 
over uneven snow, and the rider often finds 
that they are as uncertain ao all other things 
are here below. 

Tbe rider stands a little back of tbe center, 
hie feet being held by toe-straps of strong sole 
leather or india-rubber beltiog, fastened to 
either aide of the ahnn, and laoed where thef 
meet over tbe foot. The toe of the foot is put 
into tbe straps back to the ball, and in the hol- 
low of the foot there is a small block inserted 
crosswise to prevent the foot slipping back ; but 
this does not prevent tbe foot, when tbe heel 
is raised, from being slipped out of tbe atrapa. 
The bottom of tbe shoe resembles a akate with 
a groove, but instead of being convex, it is con- 
cave. Thia ia necessary to balance the weight 
of tbe rider aa equally aa poasible from end to 
end. They are constructed on tbe principle of 
skates, and to some extent tbe same evolutions 
are practicable, auoh as allowing the points and 



temperature, up to the frozen, when a hard dope 
ia required. Tbe manufacturer rtqairea consid* 
erable skill aud ingenuity. A gieat deal de- 
nenda anon the boiling of the dope; some re- 
quires hut a light simmer, enough to melt the 
parts together, while another requires a good 
deal of boiling — gum, beeswax, rosin, sperm 
oandle, and some other materials make an in- 
ferior quality of dope, only used for traTetiog 
purposes, but modern 'Migbtning dope" is 
manufactured from spermaceti, Burgundy pitch, 
Canada pitch, balsam of fir, spruce, oedar, 
Venice turpentine, oil of cedar, pine, hemlock, 
tir, apraoe and tar, glycerine, Barhary tallow, 
camphor, and oaetor oil, and mtnycoatly drugs 
known only to those who make it a speoialty 
and its manufaotore a secret. Oil, grease, and 
BQch material, one might naturally suppose 
would cause a shoe to slip easily over the enow; 
varnish or any other polished material is use 
less, nothing but the acientitio preparation will 
do. It may seem that a "snow-sboeist," who 
enters the arena for a hard contested race, to 
meet all tbe changes oi snow, must have a 
oommiaeary and neceaaary varieties of dope, for 
it is a common saying among enow'Shoers that 
" Dope ib King." 



strange gyratory motion In tbe air, a thing not 
uncommon with beginners upon these quick 
and uncertain carriera. 

Tbe racing track, clear of trees, shrubs and 
other obstructions covered with many feet of 
anow, the more the better, ia chosen on steep 
side hills and ia about 1000 to 2000 feet long with 
angle of depresalon of 15'' to SS*' being alwaya 
in a direct line and as even aa posaible. The 
winning polea are aet on tbe lower end, on 
comparatively even ground, in order to give 
the racers a chance to brake up, after passing 
through; which is done by dragging tbeir poles 
behind the shoes and bearing heavily on them 
in a sitting posture. 

Great steadiness la required in riding, and 
very perfect control over tbe ahoes ; but still 
with all, the best riders sometimes plow the 
snow and bound in the air at a fearful rate. 
Serious injury ia seldom sustained from falling. 
The greatest danger lies in other ridera oomiog 
in contact with one falling. 



The mills of the Citlifornia Uusiery Co. at 
0%kland have been closed down. Secretary 
Williams stated that the general depression of 
the woolen market was tbe principal cause of 




SNOW-SHOB BAOINQ IN THE SIEBBAS. 



full, mahogany-like finish ia obtained, which 
hardens the wood, makes a smooth surface, and 
attracts heat when exposed to the son — the lat- 
ter being a desideratum in patting on the 
''dope" when traveling. 

A good many years ago we had in the Press 
a description of snow-shoeing in the Sierra, 
written for aa by C. W. Hendel, the well- 
known depaty mineral surveyor of Sierra and 
Ptumaa counties. With this was a sketch 
which we here reproduoe as appropriate to the 
times and the season, showing a snow-shoe race 
in the mountains of California, 

Shoes made for racing are from 10^ to 13^ 
feet in length, from 3:^ to 4^ inches in width, 
wider on the front part Lhan on the back. 
Where the turn oommenoea to the heel, or back 
end of the ahoe, there is a fluted or concave 
groove about | of an inch deep at the heel and 
tapering in depth from the turn at the point. 
This groove is about 1^ inches wide, narrower at 
back end than in front. On top of the shoes, a 
little back from the center, there is about IS 
inchea of wood left flat, and toward tbf« front 
they are ahaved and planed, tapering aafficient' 
ly to leave the point springy. There is con- 
siderable wood left behind from the center to 
the end, which makes the proper balance — little 



ourvea to deaoribe a circle. Of courae they oan- 
not be tarned ao easily or quickly aa akates, 
but still they are easily managed by experts. 

The sine qua non of snow-shoe racing la 
"dope." Thia is the material used to lubricate 
the bottom of the ahoea and cause them to glide 
swiftly over the anow, as an axle ia lubricated, 
to oause the wheel to revolve eeaily, the object 
being to counteract friction as near as practi- 
cable. To such a perfection has the manufact- 
ure of this article attained that friction has to 
a great extent been overcome. 

The temperature of the enow ia aa variable 
aa that of the atmosphere, and for every tem- 
perature of snow a difi^erent kind of dope ia re- 
quired. Every raoer haa at least half a dczan 
reolpea for compounding the "dope," sometimes 
termed ** greased lightning " — one for cold 
anow and one for warm (?) or damp anow, as it 
is called by experts, as when the enow la 
heated by the rays of tbe sun; one for dry 
snow and one for wet, one for hard and one for 
soft; one for forenoon and one for afternoon; 
for extreme oold or frozen snow; and for new 
dry anow there is still another kind required. 
Some go 80 far as to have a different kmd for 
every hour of the day. For moist snow the 
dope la soft, and is made harder for inorease of 



The dope, in order to be good, must possess 
two qualities: First, it mast be sticky ao that 
it will adhere to the ahoe. Second, slippery, so 
that it will glide over the snow. And, strange 
as it may seem, they have attained anch a de- 
gree of perfection in making this oompound 
that a enow-shoe prepared with it and plaoe*^ 
by the aide of one with tbe bottom fluiabed 
with polished ateel, would ao far outrun it aa to 
make it no race at all. In riding for tbe first 
time down a ateep hill on shoes so prepared, 
the great nquisiteia confidence. Timidity ia 
fatal, and for one, on atarting down a hill, to 
be afraid of falling, will never do; he might 
with as much auccesa try to stem tho current of 
the Niagara river as to keep from falling when 
be thinks be may, or has not confidence in him- 
self. In racing, it is advisable to ride very 
low upon the shoes, in what is called the 
** squatting " position, and to hold the pole in 
the right hand, and in going over any obatruc- 
tion, occaaioned at times by a tree lying acrosa 
the track under tbe snow, or by the wind drift- 
ing and forming a depression and elevation, 
which will, when a anow-ahoeiat is going down 
very fast, make a considerable lift; both shoes 
and rider, and sometimes the shoes go on their 
coarse alone, while tbe rider is making a 



the company's going out of buaineBs, aa it was 
considered better to round up the affairs of the 
concern than to run it without proapect. The 
corjpany ia solvent. The entire woolen mar* 
ket has been at a atandatill for several years, 
aud that the directors decided not to wait until 
times impove. 



American Coke and Coal in Europe. — The 
Reading Rtilroad Co. ia reported to bb perfect- 
ing plans for exporting anthracite coal to Euro- 
pean marketa. Samples have been orepared 
and will be shipped to Antwerp. The high 
coat of this coal laid down on tbe continent, it 
is admitted, will prevent any but the wealthier 
claaaes from becoming conanmere of it. The 
price, it is aald, will range from $8 to $10 per 
ton. Similar action ia reported to be contem- 
plated by large coke operators who, it is said, 
anticipate developing some trade in this product 
with English iron manafacturera. 

What Is Latent Heat?— The following 
very good deflaiDion ia given by a ootemporary: 
*' Latent heat ia the quantity of heat which 
must be communicated to a body in one etate in 
order to convert it into another state without 
changing ita temperatare." 



74 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



[Feb. 1, 1890 



LQiNlJMG gUMMAF^Y, 

The foUowiog Is moatly coudensed from joumalB published 
Id the interior, in proximity to tha mines mentioned. 



[The snow blockade on the railroad lines has pre- 
vented the receipt of exchanges from Oregon, Wash 
ington, Idaho, Montana, Utah and parts of Nevada 
and California, so that we are again this week, as 
last, unable to give our usual quantity of current 
mining news.— Eds. Press.] 



gAIilFORNLA.. 



Sutter Creek, — Cor. Amador Ledger, Jan. 25; 
Work at the Lincoln is to take a more extensive 
range. Mr. Stewart, satisfied of the existence of 
another ledge, parallel with the one now being 
operated, has let a contract to sink 50 feet to test 
the quality of the ore, which from prospects taken 
from the surface will reach a paying standard. The 
mill has come to a temporary standstill to await 
more favorable weather. W. Body, an expert in 
the management of concentrators, has arrived from 
Nevada, and is engaged for a shor.t time to over- 
haul the Wildman concentrators. The North Star 
is running along in its usual groove. They ar-i 
working at the 600 level. -but in all probability they 
will conclude to return to the 8no level again before 
long, as it is known by all good miners that the ore 
chimneys pitch south, and as they are a consider- 
able distance south of the South Spring Hill mine, 
the ledge may be found at the 800 or looo-fool level. 

Amador. — Cor. Ledger, Jan, 25: The Keystone 
mine and mill have shut down in consequence of 
the large amount of water entering the mine this 
winter, A steam pump in the north shaft is unable 
to cope with it. Prospecting is still continued in 
the 1400-foot level. They are also short of wood, 
teams being unable to travel over the roads. The 
Gover mine has suspended operations, the supply of 
powder having run short, and there is no way at 
present of getting it from lone. The electric lights 
are again lighting the South Spring Hill, adding 
much to the appearance of this well-regulated mill; 
the stamps are dropping as regularly as ever. 

Keystone. — Amador Ledger, Jan. 25: All the 
men employed at this mine in extracting rock were 
laid oflF on Monday morning, owing to the imprac- 
ticability of keeping the mill going, and at the same 
time control the largely increased flow of water in- 
cident to the incessant rains. About eight men will 
be kept at work underground in prospecting opera- 
tions. 

Gardiner.— The tunnel which is being run on 
this property has reached a distance of over 700 
feet. Seven months have elapsed since Robert 
Stevenson bonded the properly and entered *upon 
the work of its development. Under the energetic 
management of James Gleasoti, 1000 feet of tunnels 
and drifts have been run. One ledge, 10 feet wide, 
known as the Paugh ledge, was cut some time ago, 
A few days back another quartz body was tapped 
by breaking into the side of the tunnel, the thick- 
ness of which has not been ascertained. A sample 
of the rock from this ledge was shown us this week. 
It is different from the general character of the 
quartz on the mother lode, but yields a very good 
prospect. The tunnel is now about 100 feet from 
the Union ledge — its objective point. All the 
hands were temporarily laid off Monday, owing to 
the heavy snowfall. There is talk of putting up a 
mill on the mine the coming summer. 

Hardeneukgh. — Work at the Hardenburgh 
mine has been suspended temporarily, owing to the 
impossibility of getting material for the erection of 
the hoisting works. The shaft has been retimbered 
down to a point where the timbers were found to 
be sound. This is all that c^n be done until lim- 
bers for the hoist are received. All work has been 
suspended at the North Gover mine until the 
weather becomes more favorable. The Bunker 
Hill keeps its 40-stamp mill working steadily, and 
is said to be running satisfactorily. 

The Amador gold mine continues to run its 
tramway over the Doyle ground, notwithstanding 
the injunction suit which has been commenced. 
A large force is at work under George Durham 
grading for the track. Owing to the late severe 
storms the lo-stamp mill of the Sutter Creek mine 
has been shut down. On the tunnel level the water 
is over the track. They expect to resume milling 
operations in a few days. 

OalaversB. • 

West Point.— Cor. Calaveras Chronicle, Jan. 
25: Messrs. Brown & Hurley started their 20-stamp 
mill last Monday morning. They have an abun- 
dance of rock on their dump and we hope to see 
them make a good cleanup. It is reported that Mr. 
Moore has found some very rich rock in the new 
shaft south of the Blazing Star. They are now 
taking out some very rich rock at the Blazing Star. 
Mr. Moore has a large amount of ore on the damp 
ready for shipment as soon as the weather and roads 
will permit. 

CoppEROPOLis.— Cor. San Andreas ProsJ>t\^ 
Jan. 25: As soon as the weather permits, an entire 
renovation of the Union mine office and chambers 
of the superintendent will be made. Several new 
rooms will be added and porches will be built over 
the front and sides. Five hundred cords of wood 
will be cut and stacked for the future use of the 
mine. The leaching process is going on and so is 
mining for ore. The large smelter will soon be in 
operation, and alarge force of men will be em- 
ployed. 

El Dorado. 

Black Sand. — An important discovery has re- 
cently been made in the matter of tailings, or black 
sand from cement gravel, now being worked by dif- 
ferent processes of reduction. This gravel, as found 
in the old river channels, is too hard to be worked 
by ordinary sluicing and therefore, in order to ob- 
tain the gold contained in it, it must be reduced by 
machinery. Not long ago, Mr. Louis Landecker, 
principal owner of the Chili Ravine mine and mill, 
concluded that gold might be escaping, and to test 
the matter took several pounds of tailings to Mr. 
Montgomery, a practical assayer of this city, who 
obtained gold from the sample at the rate of over 
$600 per ton of gravel. Not being fully satisfied, 
Mr. Landecker sent a sample of the same material 



to Thos. Price & Son, assayers of San Francisco, 
whose returns showed about the same result, giving 
over $600 per ton. The mill has ten stamps, and 
crushes about 60 tons of cement gravel per day. 
Mr. Landecker is now improvising means by which 
to remedy this great loss 01 gold. Dr. W. W. Stone 
had a test made from the tailings af the Gignac 
mine, where a Bryan roller-mill has been running on 
the same kind of cement gravel that is found in the 
Chili Ravine mine, and obtained gold at the rate of 
$250 per ton from the gravel. The tailings at the 
Chili Ravine mill sfeeTned to be more than double 
the value of the material at the Gignac mine. 
Whether the difference is caused by the mills, or in 
the richness of the material worked, is a question; 
in either event the loss is more than the mining m- 
terest can bear, and it is hoped that experiments 
now being made may stop this enormous loss. 

Nevada. 

No Damage to TiiE Brunswick.— Grass Val- 
ley Union, Jan. 22: The report that some of the 
works of the Brunswick Mining Co, had been 
crushed by the snow proved to be incorrect. Only 
a shed was broken down, which was of small value. 

Another Mill Crushed. — Tramcript, Jan. 
26: The Baltic Co.'s mill at the Gambrinus mine 
on Poorman's creek, Eureka township, has been 
crushed f? at by the snow. It has been unused for 
some time. 

The Hydraulic Item. — Grass Valley Union^ 
Jan. 25: The Nevada Herald published an item a 
few days ago that information had been received by 
snow-shoe line that the large hydraulic mines in the 
upper portion of the county were running at full 
head, as the snow blockade made it impossible for 
the anti-slickens spies to get into the country and 
obtain any knowledge of the work. Everybody up 
this way understood that the item was but a joke, 
but it has been taken somewhat seriously down be- 
low and the officers of the North Bluomfield. Ome- 
ga, Eureka Lake and Milton Mining Companies, at 
San Francisco, have felt called upon to send a letter 
to the press denying that there was any truth in the 
report. This was scarcely necessary, as it must be 
evident to any one who has heard of the snow- 
storms that have been prevailing in the mountains 
for several weeks that it was a physical impossibility 
to carry on hydraulic mining, even if there was a dis- 
position to do so. 

Some Water for the Mines.— Grass Valley 
Union, Jan. 29: On Monday the ditch-tender re- 
ported that about 150 inches of water was coming 
into the large reservoir of the South Yuba Company 
near Banner hill, which was furnished by Little 
Deer creek. From this supply the Pittsburg mine 
expected to start its pumps yesterday, and in a few 
days more, when the connecting ditch is cleaned out, 
the North Banner mine wiUreceive a supply from the 
same source. The pumps of both mines have been 
stopped for a week or more and the water has been 
rising in the lower levels. Superintendept Skewes 
says the North Banner can be pumped out in two 
weeks when they can get water-power again. There 
is no expectation that the main line of the South 
Yub I canal can be opened in less than 10 days or 
two weeks, with favorable weather, as there is a 
great depth of snow on a portion of the line, and 
the suow will have to be shoveled out of the canal. 
In the meanwhile the supply of water obtained from 
Little Deer creek will be of some use to the mines of 
the district, in aiding the pumps, and saving fuel, 
hich is scarce and difficult to obtain. All of the 
mines that were compelled to use steam to keep the 
pumps going, have but a scant supply of wood, 

Placer. 

Successful Engineering Work.— Placer Her- 
ald, Jan. 22: Connection has been made between 
the new and the old works ^t the Mayflower mine, 
and the work proved to be a great success. The 
survey came out right to a dot and the water in the 
old works was tapped without the least trouble. 
The surveys have all been made by Ross E. 
Browne, and from the beginning have proved cor- 
rect in the nicest particulars. His work included 
three very close calculations. First, there was the 
connection in the new tunnel between its mouth 
and its shaft: second, the tapping of the channel, 
and last, the connection with the old works just ac- 
complished. 

San Bernardino. 

Temescal Tin.— Chino Champion, Jan. 25; 
There is little if any doubt but that the famous 
Temescal tin mine will be practically worked soon. 
Mr, Robinson, a large owner in it, was recently re- 
ported on his way from England, whither he went 
on a cable dispatch from the intending purchaser. 
The English expert who examined the property for 
his clients made a very favorable report— more fa- 
vorable than the owners of the mine expected. With 
pottery, rock, cement and coal at South Riverside, 
coal and pottery at Elsinore. and a producing tin 
mine between, a railroad through Temescal can- 
yon will be a necessary and a paying property. 

Oil at Puente.— Ssn Bernardino Times-Index, 
Jan. 25: There are 14 wells being worked at Pli- 
enie, of an average depth of 1000 feet. They are 
situated high up the sides of a small canyon which 
winds through the bosom of the hills, and from 
them the oil is forced to two immense tanks at the 
summit of the range; from this hight it is piped by 
force of gravity to a reservoir at a siding of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad seven miles distant and 
about a mile from Puente Station. The economic 
advantages which characterize the situation and 
control the working of the enterprise are remarka- 
ble, and they greatly enhance the value of the prop- 
erty. For instance, the pumps are worked by 13 
steam engines, the steam for all these being sup- 
plied by two boilers — those at wells i and 9— the 
steam being piped from them to all the engines. 
The only fuel being required by the two furnaces is 
natural gas piped from the crossing of the wells, 
supplemented with less than a barrel of the crude 
oil every 24 hours. The heavy cost of wood or coal 
and the expense of transportation and handling 
that would attend their use as fuel is wholly saved. 

Iron.— San Diego Union, Jan. 23: There is 
good authoiity for stating that the two noted iron 
mines in Sm Bernardino county, known as the 
Iron Chief and the Granada, have changed owner- 
ship. From the relation the purchasers bear to the 
great San Luis Rey water enterprise, it is presum- 
able that the mines were bought for the purpose of 
manufacturing iron and steel water-pipe to be used 
in distributing the water of this great system. In 



this view the fact is quite significant, not only as 
showing the far-reaching purposes of the men con- 
nected with the enterprise, but also as pointing to 
the development of iron mines and manufactures as 
an outgrowth of the water enterprise. These iron 
mines are about a dozen miles from the Atlantic 
& Pacific railroad and can be reached by a spur 
from that road, or, perhaps, would be in or near 
the line of the new road to Salt Lake. Not only 
the iron of Utah, but the iron Irom these mines also 
will come here if the Utah coal can be brought here 
to smelt and manufacture the ores. 

San DlBf^o. 

Van Wert. — Julian Sentinel, Jan, 24: Ferger- 
son & Wilson are sinking a shaft on the Van Wert 
mine, north of towns- They are down 25 feet and 
intend to keep going until they strike it rich. There 
has been a large amount of gold taken out of this 
mine in former days and the boys have faith that it 
will pan out again. We should not be surprised to 
have the pleasure of recording another rich strike 
soon. 

Gold AND Copper.— San Diego Sun^ Jan. 18: 
Some three or four months ago, Wilson Baldridge 
entered upon a prospecting tour of the more prom- 
ising country in the vicinity of Alamo, He has re- 
cently returned to refit himself for a more protracted 
trip. In the course of his explorations he carefully 
prospected many miles of the country northwest 
from the present mines, and he claims to have dis- 
covered several very promising leads, which will, 
he thinks, prove as profitable as any yet opened in 
Lower California. Mr. Baldridge will endeavor to 
interest some moneyed men in that district, as he 
firmly believes it will yield as handsomely as the 
Alamo mines are now doing. Not only did he dis- 
cover very promising gold leads, but several rich in- 
dications of copper, which, he thinks, will assay 
equal to any ever known in California. 

Shasta. 

Lower Springs.— Cor. Shasta Democrat, Jan. 
22: The company that is operating the Gage 
place, on the Igo road, is managed by Mr. Beecher. 
He informs me that the tunnel is now in 130 feet, 
and he expects to strike the ledge soon. The com- 
pany has a shaft down upon the ledge over 30 feet, 
and all in good ore. The Swasey mining property, 
about half a mile north of the Beecher tunnel, has 
been sold to a S. F, Co., and three men are now 
running a tunnel. Halley's find, on Salt Creek, 
below John Tiffin's old hydraulic mine, turned out 
$500 or less, Pugh, of Salt Creek, has purchased 
the Kempton machinery and is placing it lower 
down on the creek, Randel, of Redding, has the 
working of ore from John Tiffin's mine. A young 
butcher from Shasta has found a very fine ledge of 
gold ore within 30 feet of the main ledge, which 
promises to be of considerable importance to this 
district. Dr. Reese of Shasta is running a deep cut 
for the purpose of striking the ledge 30 feet below 
the surface. Doc's mine is noted for producing a 
splendid lot of good ore. 

Calumet.— Redding Free Press, Jan. 25: The 
very day the Calumet Co. was ready to start its 
new mill for working by the Paul new dry process, 
a snowslide carried away some 75 feet of flume 
which conveyed water to the mill, thus cutting off 
their power; but this did not stop them, as they at 
once made connection with their steam-power and 
started up. 

Tuolumne. 

Rich. — Tuolumne /ndependettt, Jan. 25; The 
mine of A. B. Cruickshank, at Groveland — the 
M iry Ellen — is developing into a very rich property. 
Sixty feel below the old level they have struck the 
rich shoot worked last year, which is proving as val- 
uable as it was found above. Some of the rock 
worked before went $60 per ton, and the present 
strike is as good, if not better. 

Clio.— Some work is now being done on the Clio 
mine, near Jacksonville. This property produced 
some very good rock in early days; a 4-(oot vein of 
$14 rock was not considered a bonanza then, but it 
would be now. 

Pocket. — Messrs. James Stone & Pedro took 
out another pocket in their mine, at Brown's Flat, 
last week. The mme is owned by Mr. John Pedro, 
of Jamestown, from whom the mine is leased. We 
are pleased to learn of the young men's good fort- 
une, and hope they will unearth many more. The 
last cleanup was over $1500. It is said that the 
Gale & Wickham mine, at Tuttletown, has been 
steadily yielding a golden harvest. It is reported 
that the machinery for the Rawhide mine is about 
completed at the foundry in Amador county, and 
that active work will be commenced this spring. 

Dissatisfied. — There is a great deal of dissatis- 
faction among the miners at the Golden Gate mine, 
for being compelled to do single- hand drilling. 

Maltaian's chlorination works have started up 
again, and machinery for a quartz crusher in con- 
nection with the works, arrived this week. 

Work on the New Albany mine will be resumed 
just as soon as the weather will permit. 

NEVADA. 

Wasboe Dlacnct. 

Overman,— Z^y Telegraph, Jan. 29: Are strip- 
ping ore on the 1200-toot level, near the Seg. 
Belcher, 

New York Con.— Are timbering the upward 
continuation of the 800-foot level. 

Seg. Belcher.— Ore bunches are still showing 
in the i20o-foot level drift from the winze. The 
looo-foot lever east crosscut is in porphyry and 
clay. 

Justice.— Shipped 215 tons of ore. assays of bat- 
tery pulp samples showing an average value of 
$23 74 per ton. 

Alta.— The mill stamps are hung up pending 
repairs. We are sinking a winze below the 925- 
foot level to'cut the downward continuation of the 
high-grade ore from the above level, 

Utah. — The explorations on the 6oD-foot level 
were resumed Monday, The mine has a supply of 
fuel on hand sufficient to kepp the hoist plant in 
operation throughout the winter. 

Occidental Con. — Continue to extract ore of 
good quality from the stopes on the third and fourth 
floors above the 400-foot level. On the 450-foot 
level we are extracting ore from the third floor. 
The 500-foot level east crosscut is discontinued, and 
a west crosscut has been started 70 feet south of No. 



3 raise. The 550-foot level fine, east crosscut, is 
advanced 9 feet in porphyry and clay, and the west 
crosscut is extended 6 feet in quartz, showing value, 

Tuacarora Districts 

Nevada Q\3E.F.i<i.—SHperintendenfs Report, Jan. 
25: The north gangway from the 6oo-fooi level of 
the North Belle Isle shaft has been advanced 24 
feet. . The rock is harder. 

Belle Isle. — No. 2 crosscut from north gang-, 
way on the 350-foot level is extenied 13 feet; the 
rock continues hard. The crosscut near the south 
line on the 250-foot level is extended 20 feet, 

Navajo. — No. 2 crosscut from the south drift 
on the 250-foot level is extended 27 feet; the face 
is about the same as at last report. The upraise 
from the south drift on 150-foot level is extended 
7 feet, The vein contains much low-grade ore. 

North Commonwealth.— The north drift from 
No. I east crosscut on the first level has been ad- 
vanced 14 feet, exposing fine ore; the face of the 
drift is all in ore. The east crosscut from the 
second level station has been extended 20 feet. The 
formation is changing, and looks like the rock near 
the vein, 

Grand Prize. — The following Extensions have 
been made during the week: 400-foot level — The 
west drilt from the north crosscut -is extended 9 
feet, and the south drift from the winze 13 feet. 
500-foot level — The east drift from the north cross- 
cut, 21 feet; west drift from the same crosscut. 27 
feet. There is no change in the above-mentioned 
workings. 

North Belle Isle. — The north gangway on 
the 600-foot level is extended 24 feet. The rock is 
getting harder. The south drift from the station 
crosscut on the 300-foot level is extended 13 feet; 
the face is in vein formation. The south inter- 
mediate from No. 3 chute above the 300-foot level 
is extended 9 feet. The face shows high-grade ore 
of lair width. 

Del Monte.— On the first level the drift started 
to open up ore in the east crosscut is in 9 ffet. 
The ore is high grade and looks well. The joint 
crosscut on the Sfcond level is extended 30 ftet, 
and is b-^ing pushed to reach the vein. Th-; north 
drift on the third level is extended 5 feet, making 
the total 44; there is good ore the entire distance. 
Everything about the mine is working well. 

Commonwealth.— On the first level the east 
drift from No. i north drift is extended 15 feet. 
The west drift from the same point i^ extended 15 
feet. No. I upraise is up 31 feet. No. 2, 16 feet, 
and No. 3, 15 feet, all three showing high-grade 
ore. The opening from No. n chute is in a dis- 
tance of 23 feet and is ready for sloping. The 
north drift from No. 5 chute is extended ir feet, 
with but little change. The stopes on the first, 
second and third levels are all looking well. We 
sent 490 tons of ore to the concentrators, the aver- 
age assiy being $18.24 per ton, and the average of 
concentrations $266 per ton. One day was lost ■ on 
account of the storm. The mill is running well. 
Bullion was shipped to the value of $14,952.70. 
Bullion is on hand valued at $17,000, and will be 
shipped to-morrow. Everything about the mine 
and mill is working smoothly. 

ARIZONA. 

The Total Wreck. — Tucson Citizen, Jan. 16: 
The principal mines of this district are the Total 
Wreck mine, the Red Rock, the Justice, the Den- 
ver and the Prosperity, all of which have been pro- 
ducers of the paying ores. The first mine discov- 
ered in this district was the Justice mine, some 
time in 1876. This mine has been worked month'y 
on tribute by leasers, who have always derived a 
large profit from their leases. Next in prominence 
was discovered the Total Wreck mine. This mine 
has been alarge producer of silver, yielding about 
$300,000 in bullion. This mine following the vein 
has been worked to a depth of 650 feet. At this, 
the lowest depth, the ledge is over 50 feet in width 
but of low grade. Latterly, during October and 
November of i88g, work has been done on a hith- 
erto undeveloped part of the mine, between the 
350 foot level and 450-foot. This work has devel- 
oped ores richer ihan any yet discovered in the 
mine, several carloads of which have bpen shipped 
to El Paso, Texas. All familiar with the Total 
Wreck mine pronounce it a valuable property and _ 
cannot understand why it is hot continuously ' 
worked. There is one of the best mills in the Ter- 
ritory, built right at the mine, belonging to this 
property, two steam-hoisting works and extensive 
pumping machinery to supply water to mill and 
mine. The supply of water is inexhaustible. Every 
appliance for the economical working of the rame 
and mill is attached to this valuable property. 

Gold,— Prescott Courier^ Jan. 21: The storm 
caused" the Oro Bella mill to suspend action for a 
couple of davs. It is now knocking gold out of 
quaitz. The Ryland mill is crushing away. The 
Congress and Quartz mountain mills are running 
day and night, John McDonald recently shipped a 
big lot of rich silver ore through ihe Prescott ore 
works from the famous Blue Dick mine. He will 
follow this shipment with another shortly. The 
purchase of the Gray Eagle mine gives the Oro ' 
Bella Co. two very fine ledges. E. S. Junior and 
— ■ — Brittingham have plenty of shipping ore on 
their dumps in Bradshaw mountain, AH our min- 
ers believe that a great mining camp will soon 
spring up on Hassayampa creek, near the Senator, 
Dave Grubb's ledges, Harlan's, Flints, Ross' and 
other mines. Frank Moss of the juniper-mine, An- 
telope mountain, tells the Phoenix Herald KYia.\.\i& 
panned out a nice gold nugget from surface dirt 
which, for an average depth of six inches all over 
the claim, is placer ground worth $15,000. Mr. 
Palmer, ex-superintendent of the Congress mine, re- 
ported $285,000 in sight on the claim from present 
development. 

Different Camps. — Mohave Miner. Jan. 25: 
John Barrv has several men at work on the Minne- 
sota. J. O'Brif n has a big streak of galena on the 
Schuylkill. Geo. Roster is getting some very fair 
grade copper ore from the old stopes of the AUatta. 
Sample and Jamison now have the Bonanza of 
Layne Springs, 14 inches of 450-oz, ore. Shippee 
and Sherick are taking out some fair grade ore from 
the paymaster.- on a lease, Uncapher and Finegan 
struck it good on a new location near the foot of 
the Ithaca peak. Geo. Dyke and Chas. FroHch 
have a good streak of ore in their lopation just east 



Feb. 1, 18&0.] 



Mining and Scientific Press. 



^5 



of the Connor. Ihe whole face of the tunnel on 
the Empire is ifi very rich ore. showing much native 
and ruby stiver. Rogers and brinkly are driving 
the tunnel on the Aj.ix and are taking out some rici 
chloride ore. Unn Sherman has a carload of lead 
OD the Rainbow, which be will ship as soon as the 
roads and trails get in trav«-ling condition. Mac- 
kenzie's boDanz\ oo the Cupd is getting bitjger 
every day, and 25 m^n are knocking it out and 
bringing it to the surface at a lively rite. Moisting 
works have been bought for the Oro Plata, and will 
be erected at once. It is report^-d that C. E Sher- 
man has leased the Distaff mine in Chloride lo I>.*n- 
ver parties, who also have a bond on the c>aim and 
will imniediitely be^ia work on it. The miin shall 
on the Tuckyhoe ii b^ing sunk as rapidly as the bad 
weather will admit, and the ore is iniproving in 
quality as wf II as in quantity at each successive foot 
in depth. Park and Hudgt-ns have a lease and 
bo^d on the Sibbath Be'l near Mineral Park and 
have several men at worii sinking the shaft. They 
have about four inches of rich ore in the bottom, J, 
W. Marshall is driving the lower tunnel on the Pix- 
ley and has struck somr rich rock. The Pixley is a 
parallel vein with the Nii;ht M iwk, and is a i2-foot 
vein o( orr lying between a dyke of porphyry and 
the granite. It is reported that Geo. Biwers has 
bought out Mrs. Terry's intert-si in the Night 
Hawk, and he will put hoisting works on the mine 
and sink the shaft. Robert .Meara and J.is. Cad- 
den will start operations on the Kanawha belle. 
This claim has produced and has in sight some of 
the richest ore ever produced in the county. Heim- 
rod & MacDufTce have purcha-sed a one-half interest 
in the Sunset mine, near Chloridt*. from B, McCall, 
and have started to sink a new shaft. They have a 
good st'eak of exceptionally rich ore to sMrt on. 
C. A. Park has obiained a new lease on the t^ueen 
B?e and Ihey will put up some kind of hoisting 
works and sink the shaft down 150 feet deeper be- 
fore summer. The bottom of the lOO-foot drift on 
this claim has a showing of an average of six inches 
of ore for 150 feel in length without a break — ore 
that has been working from 285 to 600 oz3. silver, 
aod from >i to 4 ozs, in gold. Scores of other 
claims are being worked all over the district and are 
producing more ore, and better ore, than ever be- 
fore in the histoiy of the county, and on the whole 
there nev(^r was a time since the first discovery of 
ore in Mohave county when there was a brighter 
outlook or more activity in mining affairs than at 
present, and every one feels sflnguine thai by the 
time summer comes there will be ten times as many 
men at work in the mines and ten times as much 
ore being produced as has ever b^en before. 

. COLORADO. 

Tklluride.— Cor. Denver /Republican, Jan. 25 
Telluride is in a fair way to enjoy the boom which 
will reach us in the spring. Companies engaged 
in mining are making preparations to keep up wiih 
the times, and in Grey's basin a new stamp-mill will 
be built. Two mills in Turkey Creek basin are 
now ordered and will be in at an early day. Judge 
C^rtiga^, the sole owner of the Belmont mine, is 
thinking of putting in an electric plant and mill, 
and the Sheridan mill will run its full capacity of 40 
stamps. The Sheridan tunnel, one of the greatest 
undertakings the San Juan has ever known, will be 
driven through a mountain a di-iance of about 3300 
feet to connect with the shaft on the Sheridan mine, 
and will be finished in April if all goes well. This 
tunnel will tap the vein at a depth of 400 feel lower 
than the present workings and is expected to open 
up an immense body of ore. The Gold King now 
has a small force at work taking out ore, and as 
soon as water can be removed the mill will start 
up again, and an increased force of miners put at 
work. The lUium mill at Ophir will soon begin 
pounding away on Single Standard and El Mundo 
ore again. From the large amount of snow that has 
fallen your correspondent is warranted in saying 
that thft placers down the Miguel river will keep pace 
with ore lode claims, as several of them are now in 
the hands of companies who can and will work them 
if water c^n be bad. 

NEW MEXICO. 



Hermos.\. — Kingston Shaft, Jan. 18: The 
Pelican mine is showing up better than at any time 
for the past six months, although from 3010 40 tons 
of ore have been shipped from this mine every 
month. Considering the high-grade character of 
this ore, what mine in the country is doing better ? 
Culver and Knapp have taken a lease on the An- 
telope. They commenced work the first of the 
year. Some of the leasers on this claim are doing 
fairly well. Dr. North and Wm. Hall have taken 
a lease on the Ocan Wave, and have good ore lo 
start on. E. F. Holmes has purchased the Wm. 
Dunn interest in the Argonaut mine, which was 
owned by Drake ik. Dunn. Extensive developments 
mav be expected on. this claim. 

Hachita.— Weslern Liberal, Jan. 24: John 
Dsnnison was up from Hachita yesterday and re- 
ports matters as very qu et in that camp. 

The Carlisle Co. has enough ore rained to 
keep its mill running for several months, and so has 
■discharged all of its miners but four. The company 
now has about 40 stamps dropping in its big mill, 

FkUE Vanneks. — R. B. Potter, the superintend- 
ent of the Humboldt corapiny at Shakespeare, in- 
forms the Liberal that the Frue vanner recently 
placed in the mill has worked very successfully on 
Shakspeare ore, saving as high as 71 per cent and 
regularly saving 65 per cent. The company is so 
well satisfied with this work that it has decided to 
put in several more vanners, enough to work the 
mill to its full capacity. The steady running of this 
mill will add considerably to the prosperity of the 
camp. « 

Fifty-Four Thousand Ounces Silver.— Sil- 
ver Ciiy £«/(;r^r/jf, Jan. 21: They say things are 
quiet at Lake Valley, but there is quite a hum of 
interest up there now, on the lease of T. B. Savage 
and Frank Thoman on a 50-foot square piece of 
ground of the Silver Mining Co. They worked 
this ground for six months, getting small pay most 
of the time, but a day or two before their time was 
out ihey came into fine ore. The general manager 
promptly, gave them one month's extension of limp, 
and with only two men at work on ore, they have 
taken out the unusual amount of 54,000 ounces of 
silver. Savage has in the past four years made two 
other strikes rivaling this one in value. 



The Year's 



Work at 
Bureau. 



the Mining 



Through deUya io reoeiviog the mooey ap- 
propriated for its support, there was left to 
tbts ipetltution bat & abort working seaaoo the 
paat year. Notwtth&tftDdiog this hiadranoe, 
the forthooming report of the State Mineral- 
ogiat will, aa we UDderatftod, reaoh vary re- 
apBotable dimeoaioDa. Thti report, do w iotbe 
htndsof the S:at6 Pnater aod aearly ready for 
bindiog, will cootaio maob inforniKtioD of a 
thoroughly atilitariaa kind, very little spaoe 
haviug bsen givdn up to vpecalatiouB or theories 
UDBupported by faots. The moat of this io- 
formatioo haa been embodied ia a aeries of 
artiolea, each treating of aotne special aubjsot 
oonneoted with the oiiuiog Interesta aod in> 
duatries of the State, 

The moat important feature of the report, 
however, coneiata of the fidld-work performed 
during the year, and which has gone to the 
oolleoting of data for a complete topographical 
map of the State, this to serve as the basis of 
the projected geological map to be oonstructed 
thereon. Thia work, of which a good begin* 
ning has been made, will now be followed up 
and vigoroualy prosecoted the coming summer, 
it being the intention of Mr. Irelan to start out 
a oorpB of asaistanta as soon a? the weather will 
permit, preparations preliminary to that end 
having already been completed. Operationa 
win oommenoe on the aouthern border of the 
State, whence they will be extended north- 
ward. That they will, by reason of the un- 
Qsual snowfall on the Coast Ringe aod adja- 
cent mooDtaiDS be delayed beyond the expect- 
ed time, now seems probable. The topo* 
graphical map, which ia to comprise the results 
of all offioial surveys heretofore made in Cali- 
fornia, will, however, be completed in time to 
g!) with the next Annual Raport of the State 
Mineralogiat. 

The contents of this volume have besn pre- 
pared by men thoroughly qualiOed by educa- 
tion and practice to well perform the several 
tasks aaBigned them. This has insured for the 
papers that go to make up the body of the re- 
port, a value that would not attach to the work 
of the mere empirio or the tyro. Where it Is 
sought to use thia information it can, as a rule, 
be relied upon, nor will it ever be found grossly 
misleading. 

We have always contended that the work of 
the State Mineralogist should be of a more 
practical kind than charaoterizad some of the 
earlier reports emanating from the Bureau. To 
devote the whole or most of a volume to a de- 
scription of a single mineral product seems 
hardly politic, however perfect such a deaorip- 
tton or however important suoh product may 
be. Whenever especially full and detailed 
information ia in any particular case required, 
it can be obtained from other sources, generally 
within the easy reach of the student, and may 
therefore well be dispensed with in a volume 
deaigned for common use. 

We have in former iasues of the Press ex- 
preaaed the opinion that the information of 
which the miners, as a community, moat stood 
in need was such as related to the best meth- 
ods extant for ore extraction and reduction, In- 
eluding a description of the mechanisms, modes 
and prooesses employed to that end. They 
want to be more fully posted on the subjects of 
ore ornshing and smelting, amalgamation, con- 
centration, chlorination, etc. Happily the 
present State Mineralogist, with a just oompre- 
hension of these underlying wants, has from 
the first worked in the direction of supplying 
them aa far as may be. 

Looking over the several reports prepared by 
Mr. Irelan, we find them almost wholly given 
up to matters bearing on the solution of the 
above queatlons, some of the monographs pub* 
lished in these volumes amounting to a com- 
plete treatise on the subject considered. Take 
for example the paper on the building and out- 
fitting of quartz-mills; we don't see why a 
tolerably good millwright might not go on, 
select a site, put up and equip a plant of that 
kind, and do the work fairly well guided by the 
inatruotiona contained in that paper alone; 
nor could such mechanio go far wrong if, in 
selecting a water-wheel, he studied what is 
aaid a few pages further on concerning atruot- 
ures of that kind. Aod so of much more that 
requires to be learned from trustworthy sources. 
It can be found in this series of reports, the 
in ormation so conveyed being not only author- 



itative and practical, but brought down to 
most recent dates. 

The mineral apeoimens .aent to the Bureau 
have been very numerous of lata, aome of these 
coming from dtatant and widely separated 
localities. Aod thus the cabinet, already 
I^rge, grows apaoe, this collection comparing 
favorably with others its seniors by many 
years. The olasaifiottion and arrangement of 
these