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Full text of "Minutes of the ... annual session of the Synod of New Jersey"

BX8957.N4 A3 

Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Synod 

New Jersey. 

Minutes of ihe ... annual session of Ihe S 



MINUTES 



OF THE 



Eighty-fifth Annual Session 



OF THE 



Synod of New Jersey 



THE OLIVET PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Atlantic City, N. J., October, 1907. 
WITH AN APPENDIX 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SYNOD, UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 
THE STATED CLERK. 



TRENTON, N. J. 

MacCrELUSII & QuiGLEY, STATE PRINTERS. 



Officers of the Synod. 



Moderator, 

REV. WILLIAM W. HALLOWAY, D.D Dover, N. J. 

Vice-Moderator, 

REV. JOHN F. PATTERSON, D.D Orange, N. J. 

Stated Clerk, 

REV. WALTER A. BROOKS, D.D., ., Trenton, N. J. 

Permanent Clerk, 

REV. JULIUS H. WOLFF Newark, N. J. 

Recording Clerk, 

REV. JOHN T. KERR Elizabeth, N. J. 

Treasurer, 

REV. EBEN B. COBB, D.D Elizabeth, N. J. 

Treasurer of Synodical Home Missions. 

MR. WILLIAM P. STEVENSON,.. Roselle, Union Co., N. J. 




REV. WILLIAM W. HALLOWAY, D.D., 

Moderator of the Synod of New Jersey. 



MINUTES 

OF THE 



Eighty-fifth Annual Session 



OF THE 



Synod of New Jersey. 



The Synod of New Jersey met in Olivet Church, At- 
lantic City, on Monday, October 21st, 1907. at 8:00 
o'clock P. M. 

After devotional services, the sermon opening Synod 
was delivered by the Moderator, Rev. I. Alstyne Blau- 
velt, D.D., from I. Timothy 4 :8. 

The Synod was constituted with prayer by the 
Moderator. 

The roll was called, and the following members were r h. 
found to be present : 

Presbytery of Corisco. 

None. 

Presbytery of Elizabeth. 

Ministers — I. Alstyne Blauvelt, D.D., James G. Mason, D.D., 
William C. Rommel, Samuel Parry, William F. Whitaker, D.D., 
Eben B. Cobb, D.D., John T. Kerr, William I. Steans, D.D., Robert 
M. Craig, William Hoppaugh, John Sheridan Zelie, D.D., Joseph 
O. McKelvey, Frederick D. Tildon, William W. Casselberry, Joseph 
B. Ferguson, Joseph G. Symmes, John T. Scott, William B. Hamil- 
ton, John T. Reeve, Aimer W. Karnell, Herman Blaschke, Charles 
F. Shaw, Robert W. Mark— 23. 

Elders — Morris W. Robinson, Clinton ; A. S. Crane, Elizabeth, 
First ; John T. Newcomb, Elizabeth, Second ; Ogden Woodruff, 
Elizabeth, Third; Cornelius H. Clark, Elizabeth, Westminster; 



4 Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. Oct., 

William Hopf, Elizabeth, First German; Elias D. Smith, Elizabeth, 
Greystone; Lemuel Neighbour, Lower Valley; Joseph W. Clark, 
Metuchen ; Leander N. Lovell, Plainfield, Crescent Avenue ; W. H. 
C. Coles, Rahway, First; G. A. Bush, Rahway, Second; W. P. 
Stevenson, Roselle ; Walter M. Irving, Westfield; William Edgar, 
Woodbridge ; Clifford Willis, Springfield — 16. 

Presbytery of Havana. 

None. 

Presbytery of Jersey City. 

Ministers— Joshua B. Gallaway, D.D., Hugh R. McClelland, 
Ph.D., James H. Owens, D.D., Horace G. Underwood, D.D., James 
Scott Young, Henry T. Beatty, Ph.D., James Dallas Steele. Ph.D., 
C. Rudolph Kuebler, D.D., Jacob A. Frey, Fisher Howe Booth, 
Charles Ellis Smith, George O. Tamblyn, Walter B. Greenway (2), 
Henry C. Cronin (2) — 14. 

Elders — R. C. Haff, Hackensack, First; George W. Rouse, Ho- 
boken, First; Francis French, Jersey City, Westminster; Thomas 
M. Low, Leonia ; James S. Biddell, Passaic, First — 5. 

Presbytery of Monmouth. 

Ministers — Alexander H. Young, D.D., George Swain, D.D. (2), 
Samuel H. Thompson, D.D., Henry R. Hall, Charles B. Austin, 
D.D., Thomas Tyack, D.D., Ormond W. Wright, John Leroy Tay- 
lor, D.D., Ph.D., Adolos Allen, Frank R. Symmes, William P. 
Finney, Joseph E. Curry, S. J. McClenaghan, Arthur W. Reming- 
ton, Frank Lukens, James H. Dunham, Charles L. Candee (2), 
Henry T. Graham (2)— 18. 

Elders — Charles B. Van Horn, Allentown ; John C. Allen, 
Beverly; John B. Perrine, Cranbury, First; Jonathan L. Whitaker, 
Cranbury, Second ; William M. Moreau, Freehold ; T. H. Gordon, 
Hightstown; H. S. Simons (2), Lakewood ; James N. Huston, 
Moorestown ; James Steen, Shrewsbury; David V. Perine, Ten- 
nent; William V. Simpson, Matawan ; Julius Foster, Point Pleas- 
ant — 12. 

Presbytery of Morris and Orange. 

Ministers — Elijah W. Stoddard, D.D., Edward P. Gardner, 
D.D., William W. Halloway, D.D., Walter W. Hammond, Theo- 
dore F. Chambers, James F. Riggs, D.D., John F. Patterson, D.D., 
George L. Richmond, William T. Pannell, Robert J. Johnston, 
Minot C. Morgan, Robert H. Nichols, Robert S. Steen, Robert P. 
Howie — 14. 

Elders — Edwin J. Ross, Dover, Memorial ; Henry C. Dilworth, 
East Orange, First; Edward L. Cook, Madison; Fred Babbitt, 



igoy. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 5 

Mendham; James R. Voorhees, Morristown, First; E. H. Wil- 
liams. Orange, First ; Henry C. Ware, Orange, Central ; C. H. 
De Hart, Rockaway ; Augustus F. Libby, Summit, Central — 9. 

Presbytery of Newark. 

.Ministers — David R. Frazer, D.D., Julius H. Wolff, Davis W. 
Lusk, D.D., Alexander H. McKinney, Ph.D., E. Morris Fergusson, 
Edgar C. Mason, Nelson B. Chester, Robert Scott Inglis, D.D., 
Llewellyn S. Fulmer, D.D., Joseph F. Folsom (2), Robert T. 
Graham, Joseph Hunter, Albert N. Stubblebine, Thomas Mor- 
gan— 14. 

Elders — Daniel Demarest, Montclair, First; William I. Soverel, 
Montclair, Cedar Avenue; Philip Doremus, Montclair, Trinity; 
Westey C. Miller, Newark, First; Edmund K. Hopper, Newark, 
Third ; Waldo C. Genung, Newark, Sixth ; Eugene Eagles, New- 
ark, Fifth Avenue; James L. Maxwell, Newark, Few Smith 
Memorial — 8. 

Presbytery of New Brunswick. 

Ministers— Samuel M. Studdiford, D.D., Robert Hamill Nas- 
sau, S.T.D.. Daniel R. Foster, William W. Knox, D.D., Walter A. 
Brooks, D.D., Samuel McLanahan, Joseph H. Dulles, Sylvester 
W. Beach, Hugh B. MacCauley, D.D., George H. Ingram, James 
B. Clark, Paul Martin, D. Ruby Warne, Albert J. Weisley, D.D., 
Joseph Howell, George H. Bucher, Cordie J. Culp, William B. 
Frith (2), Frederick B. Newman, Norris W. Harkness, Egedius 
Kellmayer, Alexander Oren Macdonald, George S. Stark (3) — 23. 

Elders — A. S. Coriell, Bound Brook; William H. Cadwalader, 
Ewing; N. H. Furman, Lawrenceville; Thomas Kay (2), New 
Brunswick, First; Charles M. Titus, Pennington; Charles G. Rock- 
wood, Jr., Princeton, First; T. B. Stratton, Trenton, Third; I. 
Newton Dumont, Trenton, Prospect Street — 8. 

Presbytery of Newton. 

Ministers— James DeHart Bruen, William S. C. Webster, D.D., 
Isaac H. Condit, Nathaniel P. Crouse, Percy Y. Schelly, Edward 
Snyder, Henry Munro Bruen. Clarence W. Rouse — 8. 

Elders— A. M. Cammon, Belvidere, First; William W. Wood- 
ward, Newton; A. V. Johnson, Phillipsburg, First — 3. 

Presbytery of West Jersey. 
Ministers— Allen H. Brown, D.D., William Aikman. D.D., Al- 
fred P. Botsford, D.D., Frederic R. Brace, D.D., William J. Trim- 
ble, D.D., David H. Laverty, D.D., James Baillie Adams (2), 
James McLeod, D.D., John L. Landis, John E. Peters, Sc.D. (2), 
James M. Huntting, George W. Tomson (2), Eugene H. Mateer, 



Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 



Oct., 



David H. King, D.D. (2), Minot S. Morgan, William V. Louder- 
bough, Herbert R. Rundall, Newton W. Cadwell. D.D., Charles S. 
Barrett, Edmund J. Gwynn. D.D. (2), William F. S. Nelson, John 
McMillan, B.D., I. Mench Chambers (2), R. Hilliard Gage, Her- 
bert M. Gesner, Thomas C. Stirling, Ph.D., Samuel D. Price, John 
W. Kliefken, Harvey T. Casselberry (2), Harold S. Rambo (2), 
Homer W. Taylor (3), William Allen, Jr. (2)— 32.Samu.el H.Fh*Ce. r . 

Elders — Charles E. Adams, Atlantic City, First; J. A. Cunning- 
ham, Atlantic City, Chelsea ; Joseph R. Woodruff, Atlantic City, 
Olivet ; J. Newton Powelson, Camden, First ; F. B. Wallen, Cam- 
den, Second; B. Frank Nyce, Camden, Calvary; John W. McCray, 
Cape May; James MacWilliams, Clayton; Lawrence Isaacs, Col- 
lingswood; Jacob Ott, Deerfield ; Daniel E. Iszard, Mays Landing; 
Morris H. Stratton, Salem ; Thomas W. Synnott, Wenonah, Me- 
morial — 13. 

CORRESPONDING MEMBERS. 

From the Synod of New York, Rev. George H. Trull, Rev. D. 
Asa Blackburn, D.D., Rev. John Fox, D.D., Rev. John H. Kerr, 
D.D. From the Synod of Pennsylvania, Rev. James A. Worden, 
D.D., Rev. John M. Fulton, D.D., Rev. Joseph W. Cochran, D.D., 
Rev. William H Roberts, D.D., LL.D., Rev. W. Beatty Jennings, 
D.D.. Rev. Henry T McClelland, D.D'., Rev. Benjamin L. Agnew, 
D.D. From the Synod of Baltimore, Rev. Thomas A. McCurdy, 
D.D., LL.D. From the Synod of Tennessee, Rev. Robert R. Suther- 
land, D.D. From the M. E. Conference of New Jersey, Rev. Sher- 
man G. Pitt, Rev. G. Surtees. From the New Jersey Baptist Asso- 
ciation, Rev. E. E. Tyson — 16. 



Moderator. 



Arrange- 
ments. 



Rev. \Yilliam W. Halloway, D.D., of the Presbytery 
of Morris and Orange, was elected Moderator. 

The Committee on Arrangements reported, and the 
report was accepted and its recommendations adopted 
as follows : 



The Committee of Arrangements respectfully report to the 
Synod recommendations for the order of business as follows : 

1. That the services of this evening conclude with the reading 
of suitable portions of the Necrological Report and the observance 
of the Lord's Supper. 

2. That the sessions of the Synod begin at 9:30 A. M. ; that 
recess be taken from 12:30 to 2:30 P. M.. and from 5:00 to 7:30 
P. M., and that the devotional services occupy the last half hour 
of each morning session. 



zoo/. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 7 

3. That the order for Tuesday be a modification of the regular 
order of the Standing Rules; namely, Foreign Missions, with an 
address by the Rev. George H. Trull ; Sabbath Observance, Tem- 
perance, with an address by Rev. John M. Fulton, D.D. ; the Narra- 
tive and the devotional half-hour; for the afternoon, an address for 
the Board of Education, by the Rev. Joseph W. Cochran, D.D. ; 
Historical Materials; Home Missions, with an address by the Rev. 
Robert M. Craig; Sunday-school Work, with an address by the 
Rev. E. Morris Fergusson and Rev. James A. Worden, D.D. ; 
Young People's Societies : the evening to be devoted to a popular 
meeting with an address by the Rev. Henry M. Bruen, of Korea, 
for Foreign Missions, and the report of the Committee on the 
Presbyterian Brotherhood, Rev. Robert S. Inglis, D.D., Chairman, 
followed by a conference upon the Brotherhood. 

4. That the order for Wednesday be as follows : An address for 
Systematic Beneficence, by the Rev. D. Asa Blackburn, D.D. ; 
Synodical Home Missions ; an address by the Moderator of the 
General Assembly. Rev. Wm. H. Roberts, D.D., LL.D. ; the report 
of the Special Committee on Evangelistic work to be presented at 
11 130 A. M., with an address by the Rev. W. Beatty Jennings, D.D. ; 
the afternoon to be given to address for the College Board, by the 
Rev. Edward C. Ray, D.D. ; for Freedmen, by the Rev. Henry T. 
McClelland, D.D. ; for Sustentation. with the report of the Special 
Committee, by the Rev. Robert R. Sutherland, D.D. ; for Minis- 
terial Relief, by the Rev. Benjamin L. Agnew, D.D. ; for the 
American Bible Society, by the Rev. John Fox, D.D. ; for the 
American Tract Society, by the Rev. Judson Swift, D.D. 

5. That an evening session be held on Wednesday, occupied with 
the report of the Special Committee on Interdenominational Con- 
ference, the report of the Special Committee on Temperance Legis- 
lation, and address by Mr. J. Frank Burke, Secretary of the 
Ami-Saloon League; and to conclude with an address and an 
exhibition of pictures of churches injured by the earthquake at 
San Francisco, by the Rev. John S. Thomas, D.D., the General 
Assembly's representative of the San Francisco churches. 

The Necrological Report was presented, and extracts Necrology, 
from it read by Rev. William W. Knox, D.D., and at 
its close the sacrament of the Lord's Supper was ad- Lord's 
ministered. The services were conducted by Rev. I. 
Alstyne Blauvelt, D.D., who was assisted by Rev. R. 
Hamill Nassau, S.T.D., and Rev. Samuel M. Studdi- 
ford, D.D., and the following- Ruling- Elders: Augustus 
S. Crane, Charles B. Van Horn, Henry C. Ware, 
Nathan H. Furman, James S. Maxwell, Joseph Wood- 



Minutes of the Synod oe New Jersey. 



Oct., 



Minutes. 



ruff, George W. Rouse, W. I. Soverel, B. Frank Nyce, 
Jonathan S. Whitaker, Charles G. Rockwood, John F. 
Newcomb. 

In connection with the service, an offering amounting* 
to $54.50 was made for the Board of Ministerial Relief. 

After singing and prayer, Synod adjourned until to- 
morrow at 9 o'clock A. M. 



Tuesday, October 22d, 1907. 
Synod met, and, after prayer, resumed business. 

The minutes of yesterday's session were read, and the 
record was approved. 



stated cierk. The Stated Clerk presented his report, and it was ac- 
cepted, and is as follows : 



Vacancy 
Supply. 



and 



The Stated Clerk respectfully reports to the Synod of New 
Jersey as follows : 

1. That the records of the Synod for 1906 were approved by the 
General Assembly. 

2. That by the action of the General Assembly (Minutes. 1907, 
p. 229), the Presbytery of Havana was transferred from the former 
Synod of Florida to the Synod of New Jersey. 

3. That acting as the Synod's Committee on Vacancy and Sup- 
ply, the Stated Clerk has requested from the Presbyteries reports 
of vacant churches and ministers desiring employment, but has 
received such reports from only three of the Presbyteries. The 
Committee has not been called upon by any church or Presbytery 
for aid in the settling of pastors or the supply of churches. There 
are few churches able to support a pastor vacant in New Jersey, 
and the weaker churches are usually supplied by the aid of the 
Committee on Synodical Home Missions. The Committee on Va- 
cancy and Supply therefore judges that this matter must continue 
to be under the direction of the Presbyteries, rather than in any 
measure superintended by the Synod. 

Certain papers in the hands of the Stated Clerk were 
referred to the Committee on Bills and Overtures. 



igo7- Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 9 

The Moderator appointed as Vice-Moderator Rev. vice- 
John F. Patterson, D.D., and announced the following 
committees : 



I. Biles and Overtures. 

Ministers— I. Alstyne Blauvelt, D.D., Horace G. Underwood, Standing 
D.D., Samuel H. Thompson, D.D., Theodore F. Chambers. Committees. 

Blders — James L. Maxwell, William H. Cadwalader, William 
W. Woodward. 

II. Judicial Business. 
Ministers — Raymond Hilliard Gage, William S. C. Webster, 
D.D., Paul Martin, Llewellyn C. Fulmer, D.D. 
Elders— E. H. Williams, John B. Perrine, R. C. Haff. 

III. Minutes of General Assembly. 
Ministers — Minot Canfield Morgan, Fred. B. Newman. 
Elder — Leander N. Lovell. 

IV. Narrative for 1908. 
Ministers — William I. Steans, D.D., James M. Huntting. 
Elder— W. I. Soverel. 

V. Finance. 
Ministers — William P. Finney, Edward Snyder. 
Elders — E. J. Ross, J. Newton Powelson. 

VI. Synodical Home Mission Accounts, 1908. 
Minister — George L. Richmond. 
Elder — John C. Allen. 

VII. Revision of Permanent Committees. 
Minister — George H. Ingram. 
Elder — Cornelius H. Clark. 

VIII. Records of Presbyteries. 

Corisco — Rev. Samuel Parry, Rev. Joshua B. Gallaway, D.D., 
Elder Charles B. VanHorn. 

Elizabeth —Rev. Edward P. Gardner, D.D., Rev. Edgar C. 
Mason, Elder A. S. Coriell. 

Havana — Rev. Sylvester W. Beach, Rev. Henry M. Bruen, Elder 
Charles E. Adams. 

Jersey City — Rev. J. DeHart Bruen, Rev. W. W. Casselberry, 
Elder Thomas W. Synnott. 



Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 



Oct., 



Monmouth —Rev. Henry J. Beatty, Ph.D., Rev. Walter W. Ham- 
mond, Elder Daniel Demarest. 

Morris and Orange — Rev. Daniel R. Foster, Rev. Percy Y. 
Schelly. Elder F. B. Wallen. 

Newark — Rev. William F. Whitaker, D.D., Rev. Fisher Howe 
Booth. Elder James M. Huston. 

New Brunswick — Rev. William T. Pannell, Rev. Joseph Hunter, 
Elder A. M. Gammon. 

Newton— Rev. David H. Laverty, D.D., Rev. William Hoppaugh, 
Elder Francis French. 

"West Jersey — Rev. Alexander H. Young, D.D., Rev. Robert J. 
Johnston, Elder- Philip Doremus. 

Treasurer. The report of the Treasurer of Synod was presented, 

was received and referred for audit to the Committee on 
Finance. 



Treasurer of 'pj^ report of the Treasurer of the Trustees of Synod 

Trustees. 

was presented, was received and referred for audit to 
the Committee on Finance. 



Synodical 
Home 
Mission 
Accounts. 



The Committee to audit the accounts of the Treas- 
urer of Synodical Home Missions reported that they 
had examined the same for the year beginning October 
ist, 1906, and ending September 30th, 1907, compared 
the disbursements with the vouchers and have found the 
same correct. The report was received and approved. 



Next Place of 

Meeting. 



It was resolved to appoint a Special Committee to 
which should be referred invitations for the next place 
of meeting of Synod. The following were appointed : 
Rev. James McLeod, D.D., the Stated Clerk and Elder 
James Steen. 



Foreign 

Missions. 



The report of the Permanent Committee on Foreign 
Missions was presented by Rev. John F. Patterson, 
D.D., was received and its recommendations adopted as 
follows : 



igoj. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. ii 

i. That we heartily approve of the election by the Board of 
Foreign Missions of the Rev. Stanley White, D.D., as one of its 
secretaries to succeed Rev. Frank F. Ellinwood. D.D., now laid 
aside from active service by the infirmities of old age. 

2. That we pledge anew our loyalty to the interest and work 
of the Board, and strive to realize the expectations of the Board 
in an increase of our contributions to the amount of twenty per 
cent. 

3. That more attention be given to definite and systematic in- 
struction in the subject of missions in the Sabbath Schools, and 
that an effort be made to secure from each school at least one 
offering to this cause : also that we welcome the appointment of 
Rev. George H. Trull as assistant secretary of this Board, whose 
specific work will be the cultivation of the missionary field in the 
Sabbath School. 

4. That we congratulate the women of our churches in this 
Synod upon their good work in this cause, as shown in their 
report, which has been placed in the hands of the Committee, and 
that there be printed for their use 250 copies of this report. 

5. That we approve of the Men's Missionary Convention, to be 
held in Philadelphia in February, and that we send delegates 
through our Presbyteries. 

In connection with the report. Synod was addressed 
by Rev. George H. Trull, Assistant Secretary of the 
Board of Foreign Missions. 

The report of the Permanent Committee on Sabbath Sabbath 

Observance. 

Observance was presented by the Rev. Samuel D. Price, 
was accepted and its recommendations adopted as fol- 
lows : 

1. That the Committee on Sabbath Observance be directed to 
send a communication to each pastor in our Synod about March 
15th, calling upon him, in the name of Synod, to preach a sermon 
on the subject of the strict observance of the Lord's Day. some 
time during the month of April. igo8. 

2. That this Committee be authorized to incur expense in its 
work not to exceed $25.00. 

3. That we must heartily commend and warmly endorse the work 
of the American Sabbath Union and the Woman's National 
Sabbath Alliance, national organizations, in their efforts to pre- 
serve in its purity the Christian Sabbath. 

4. That, in harmony with the General Assembly Resolution No. 
10, we urge our churches to take an offering at the time of the 



Bills and 
Overtures. 



12 Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. Oct., 

Sabbath Observance sermon next April for the work of the 
American Sabbath Union, Col. A. S. Bacon, treasurer, 37 Liberty 
street, New York ; or, in lieu of an offering, we recommend that 
the Union be placed upon the list of benevolences of the churches. 

In connection with the report, Synod was addressed 
upon the subject of Sabbath Observance by the Chair- 
man of the Committee. 



At this point Synod was addressed by the Rev. James 
A. Worden, D.D., Superintendent of Sabbath School 
Work of the Board of Publication and Sabbath School 
Work. 

The Committee on Bills and Overtures presented a 
report recommending that the report of the Woman's 
Synodical Society for Home Missions be referred to the 
Permanent Committee on Synodical Home Missions, 
that sundry papers from the Sunday Rest Association be 
referred to the Permanent Committee on Sabbath Ob- 
servance, that a communication from the Anti-Saloon 
League of America and one from the Woman-' s Synod- 
ical Society of Pennsylvania be referred to the Perma- 
nent Committee on Temperance, that a communication 
from the Inter-Church Federation in reference to relig- 
ious instruction in the public schools be referred to the 
several Presbyteries of Synod for consideration with 
the request that they report their action to> the Synod 
at its next meeting, that certain papers from the Pres- 
byterian Brotherhood, organized within the Synod, be 
referred to Synod's Committee on the Presbyterian 
Brotherhood of last year, of which Rev. Robert Scott 
Inglis, D.D., is Chairman, that in reference to a letter 
from the Moderator of the General Assembly, as it was 
published in the religious papers and as ministers and 
churches will make such use of it as may seem to them 
wise, no action is recommended. 



jpo/. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 13 

The report was received and its recommendations 
were adopted. 

The report of the Permanent Committee on Temper- Temperance. 
ance was presented by the Rev. W. V. Louderbough, 
and was received. 

Pending a consideration of the recommendations of 
the report, Synod was addressed by the Rev. John M. 
Fulton, D.D., representing the General Assembly's 
Committee on Temperance. 

The order of the day having arrived, it was resolved 
to postpone the consideration of the recommendations 
contained in the report of the Permanent Committee on 
Temperance until the first order of the day this after- 
noon. 

The report of the Committee on Narrative was pre- Narrative. 
sented by Rev. James F. Riggs, D.D., and the report 
was approved. 

The order of the day having arrived, the Synod en- 
gaged in devotional services, led by Elder E. J. Ross, 
and then took recess until 2 130 P. M. 



Tuesday, 2 130 P. M. 
Synod met and resumed business. 

It was resolved to hear Rev. Joseph W. Cochran, 
D.D., Secretary of the Board of Education at this time, 
and accordingly Dr. Cochran addressed the Synod on 
behalf of the Board. 



14 Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. Oct., 

Temperance. The consideration of the recommendations contained 

in the report of the Permanent Committee on Temper- 
ance was now taken up, and the recommendations were 
adopted as follows: 



i. That this Synod, profoundly impressed with the sense of 
God's call to His people in this land to go forward and banish the 
liquor traffic from our midst, urges upon all of the ministers and 
laity under its jurisdiction to do their utmost in every lawful and 
judicious way to promote this righteous cause. 

2. That this Synod again commends to all our ministers and 
people the excellent literature provided and freely furnished for 
their use and distribution by our General Assembly's Committee 
on Temperance, and urges a larger use of the same for the pro- 
motion of temperance sentiment and work. 

3. That this Synod, appreciating and approving the largely 
expanded work of the Assembly's Permanent Committee and its 
need of increased funds to maintain this work, urges all of the 
Sessions of its churches to secure, by some method, an annual 
offering that we may contribute at least our proportionate share 
of the sum recommended by the Assembly, which for this year is 
$25,000.00, of which our share is $1,470.00. 

4. That this Synod, recognizing the Anti-Saloon League of our 
State under its present management and policy as a safe and very 
efficient agency for the promotion of the temperance cause, and 
especially for the furthering of the legal prohibition of the liquor 
traffic, heartily commends it to the support of the churches and 
people of our State, and pledges to give it such co-operation as 
is consistent with the constitution of our church. 

5. That this Synod would approve of the selection by the New 
Jersey Anti-Saloon League of three Presbyterian ministers and 
three Presbyterian laymen as members of its Board of Control, to 
be a medium of conference and co-operation between that League 
and our Presbyterian churches in this State. 

6. That we record and publish our strongest protest against any 
measures taken by army officers, or others, for the repeal of the 
Anti-Canteen Law passed by the United States Congress, while 
this law is so persistently upheld by such wise and honored 
veterans as Generals Miles, Daggett and others, and while the 
official reports of the War Department testify to its value in 
greatly improving the morals of the army. 

7. That this Synod, through its Stated Clerk, urges upon our 
National Congress and the President of these United States the 
adoption of the "Littlefield-Carmack Bill," to prevent gross in- 
justice to those States and communities which have legally out- 
lawed the liquor traffic, and urges its ministers and laymen also 



igoy. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 15 

to use their personal influence with the members of Congress from 
our State to secure the passage of said bill. 

8. That we are unalterably opposed to any legislation which 
contemplates the legalizing of the sale of alcoholic beverages on 
the Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday, believing that such 
legislation is directly contrary to the expressed will of God and 
would provoke his righteous judgments, and we believe that any 
man or party upholding or asking for such legislation is not 
worthy the support of God-fearing and patriotic citizens. 

9. That we favor and pledge ourselves to support the Bishop's 
Bill Law as now in force, but will strive to secure still more ad- 
vanced restrictive legislation, and will persistently and steadily 
press forward to obtain a local option law which will give us the 
right of home rule for the settlement of the saloon question. 

10. That we join with our General Assembly in recommending 
that the last Sabbath in October be observed as Temperance Day 
in our churches, Sabbath-schools and Young Peoples' Societies, 
and that we urge all Christians to make earnest supplication to 
God on that day for His blessing upon all efforts which are being 
made to promote total abstinence from the use of alcoholic bever- 
ages and the abolition of the liquor traffic. 

The report of the Permanent Committee on Histor- Historical 

1 Materials. 

ical Materials was presented by the Stated Clerk at the 
request of the Chairman, Rev. Allen H. Brown, D.D., 
and in connection with it the report of the Custodians 
of Historical Materials. These reports were received. 
It was ordered that the report of the Custodians be 
printed as an appendix to the Minutes of Synod. The 
following- recommendations were adopted : 

1. That all ministers, sessions and church members of the Synod, 
who may have in their possession records or material of any sort 
illustrating the history of tli£ Presbyterian Church in New Jersey, 
be urgently requested to deposit the same in the Synod's historical 
collection in Princeton. 

2. That sessions contribute to the Synod's collection, as soon 
as convenient, suitable pictures of church buildings and manses for 
proper preservation. 

3. That inasmuch as the former Stated Clerk of the Presbytery 
of Corisco is now removed to the Presbytery of New Brunswick, 
the present stated Clerk of the Presbytery of Corisco be added to 
this Committee. 

4. That inasmuch as the General Assembly of 1907 (Minutes, p. 
229), again annexed the Presbytery of Havana to the Synod of 



i6 



Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 



Oct., 



Home 

Missions. 



New Jersey, the Stated Clerk of that Presbytery, the Rev. Pedro 
Rioseco, be added to this Commmittee. 

In connection with the report of the Committee. Rev. 
Allen H. Brown, D.D., offered his resignation as Chair- 
man, for the reason that his advancing age made it im- 
possible for him to perform the duties of the place. 
Synod regretfully accepted the resignation, appointed 
Dr. Brown Chairman Emeritus, and Rev. Frank R. 
Symmes Chairman of the Committee. 

The report of the Permanent Committee on Home 
Missions was presented by Rev. Hugh B. MacCauley, 
D.D., was received, and its recommendations adopted 
as follows : 



i. That Synod does hereby call the attention of all onr churches 
to the present critical situation in Home Mission Work, and re- 
quest all our sessions to take up and consider the matter at a 
special meeting, with a view to increasing interest and contribu- 
tions. 

2. That Synod does hereby repeat the recommendation of the 
General Assembly, that on the Sabbath preceding Thanksgiving 
Day, an offering be taken in all our Sabbath-schools for the Mis- 
sion-school work, and on the Sabbath nearest Washington's Birth- 
day, one for the general work. 

3. That ' specially Synod does hereby call upon all the Men's 
Brotherhoods and other Men's Societies of our churches, to make 
plans that shall increase interest on behalf of Home Missions on 
the part of all the men of our churches. 

In connection with the report, Synod was addressed 
by Rev. Robert M. Craig, Superintendent of School 
Work of the Board of Home Missions. 



Sabbath 
School Work. 



The report of the Permanent Committee on Sabbath 
School Work was presented by Rev. Henry C. Cronin, 
was received and its recommendations adopted as fol- 
lows : 



1. That Synod urges in every Sunday-school the establishment 
of a Teachers' Training class, and a Home Department. 



igoy. Minutes of the Synod of Xew Jersey. ij 

2. That all our schools he urged to observe Children's Day and 
Rallying Day, and that liberal offerings be made on these days to 
the missionary and colportage work of the Board. 

In connection with this report Synod was addressed 
by Rev. E. Morris Fergusson, Secretary of the New 
Jersey Sunday School Association. 

The time of recess having arrived, it was resolved to 
extend the time of the session for a half-hour. 

The report of the Special Committee on Representa- inter- 
tion in Inter-denominational Conference was presented '^nA™ 
by Rev. Hugh B. MacCauley, D.D.. in the absence of Conference. 
Rev. Henry Collin Minton, D.D., Chairman. The re- 
port was received and its recommendation adopted as 
follows : 

The Committee on Representation in Interdenominational Con- 
ference hereby makes its first report. The representation that is 
provided for is in accordance with the deliverance of the last 
General Assembly (See Minutes, 1907, p. 228), "that Synods and 
Presbyteries may co-operate with other ecclesiastical bodies in 
seeking such legislation on the Sabbath question, marriage and 
divorce, saloon suppression, and such other questions as the Church 
has declared herself upon, without violating the spirit of our 
Constitution;' (See Confession of Faith, Chapter 31, Section 4.) 
Two years ago Bishop James MacFaul, of Trenton, and other 
ecclesiastics of the Roman Catholic Church, together with Bishop 
Lines, of Newark, and Bishop Scarborough, of Trenton, of the 
Episcopal Church, together with Rev. Henry C. Minton, D.D., 
Rev. Hugh B. MacCauley, D.D.. Rev. Edward J. Knight and other 
Protestant ministers, Hon. Bayard Stockton, Peter Backes, Charles 
B. Case and other laymen, formed the so-called Bishops' Con- 
ference in Trenton, and framed the new bill for excise reform, 
which, came to be known as the "Bishops' Bill." Somewhat 
amended, this was passed by the Legislature of 1905-06, after an 
exciting public hearing gotten up by the Bishops' Conference. 
The law went into effect, and at once began to work improvements, 
such as doing away with immoral back-rooms and illicit sales of 
liquor on Sunday. The Conference, as representatives of churches, 
requested this Synod, in 1906, to appoint an official representation 
to this body, and the Synod appointed the present committee to 
2 



i8 Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. Oct., 

act as such in their conference and any other interdenominational 
bodies of similar purpose. An effort was made to neutralize the 
''Bishops' Bill" by the introduction into the Legislature of 1906-07 
of a bill amending the principal features. Your committee joined 
with other members of the Bishops' Conference, in asking for a 
public hearing before the Legislature, and in creating a great 
popular demonstration against the repealer, which was ultimately 
lost. The Roman Catholics and Protestants worked together for 
this reform. We have made careful inquiries and can report that 
this Act has greatly improved the excise situation, by arousing 
public sentiment and providing features that render enforcement 
more easy. Also we would report that in Trenton, in the last year, 
Protestant churches, numbering thirty-seven, have formed an Inter- 
Church Federation along the lines of the National Federation Con- 
ference of 1905 in New York. This body has already accomplished 
some substantial reforms in Trenton as to excise and Sabbath 
observance, and has undertaken to federate the State for purposes 
of reform and evangelistic work. 

We submit the following recommendation for adoption, to wit : 
Resolved, That we protest against any legislation by the represen- 
tstives of the people of the State of New Jersey, which shall render 
more lax than they now are, the laws regulating the sales of in- 
toxicating liquors. 

It was also resolved to continue the committee for 
another year. 

Next Place The Special Committee on the Place of the Next 

of Meeting. . r „, . r ., 

Meeting of Synod presented its report as follows : 

Your Committee considered carefully the invitation extended to 
Synod by the pastor and elders of our church in Asbury Park, and 
we recommend that the thanks of Synod be given to these brethren 
for their kind invitation. 

Your Committee, however, are convinced that the Synod should 
meet next year in Atlantic City, and we so recommend, and, if 
agreeable to the pastor and officers of the First Church, that 
Synod meet in that building. 

It was suggested to the Committee that Synod might, from year , 
to year, with propriety, appoint a committee on the place of meet- 
ing for the ensuing year. 

The report was received and its recommendation 
adopted. It was also resolved to adopt the suggestion 
of the committee, and in accordance therewith the 



7007. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 19 

Clerks of Synod were appointed a Committee on the 
Place of the meeting of Synod for 1909. 

The Permanent Committee on Necrology presented Necrology, 
the remainder of its report without reading. The re- 
port was received and adopted. 

Synod took recess until 7:30 P. M. 



Tuesday, 7:30 P. M. 
Synod reassembled and engaged in services in ac- 
cordance with the recommendations previously adopted. 

After devotional exercises, conducted by the Moder- Foreign 
ator, the Rev. Henry Munro Bruen, of Taiku, Korea, 
addressed the Synod upon the work of foreign missions 
in Korea. 



The Special Committee appointed at the last meet- Presbyterian 

r 1 r> 1 11 1 ti 1 1 1 Brotherhood. 

ing of the Synod to secure delegates to the Brotherhood 
Convention of 1906 presented its report, which was 
accepted and its recommendations adopted as follows : 

The Committee appointed to secure delegates to the Brotherhood 
Convention of 1906 respectfully reports to the Synod that it ful- 
filled that duty to the best of its ability, and that many delegates 
from the churches of this Synod did attend that convention. In 
view of the evident propriety of organizing the Presbyterian 
Brotherhood within the Synod, the Committee ventured to proceed 
to such action, although not appointed for that specific purpose. 
The Brotherhood was organized at a convention called to meet in 
Trenton, February 12th, 1907, and the Brotherhood so constituted 
presents herewith a report to the Synod for its approval. 

The chairman of the Committee, having now removed without 
the bounds of the Synod, extends thanks to the other members of 
the Committee for their loyal co-operation. 

The Committee offers the following resolutions for adoption : 

1. That Synod approve the action of the Committee in following 
providential leadings to the formation of the Presbyterian Brother- 



20 Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. Oct., 

hood of New Jersey, and also approve the constitution which the 
Brotherhood has adopted. 

2. That Synod print in the Appendix to the Minutes the Bro- 
therhood's first report to Synod, with the accompanying constitu- 
tion. 

3. That this Synod does hereby approve the two resolutions 
passed by the Executive Council of the Brotherhood, namely: 

(a) That we believe the history of our religious and civil insti- 
tutions shows that the first day of the week, commonly called 
Sunday, has been observed by our people in such a way as to 
make it in a peculiar sense "the American Sabbath Day," and we 
further declare that this precious heritage received from our 
fathers should be preserved as one of the crown jewels of the 
State. 

(b) That we protest against any legislation by the representa- 
tives of the people of the State of New Jersey which shall render 
more lax than they now are the laws regulating the sales of 
intoxicating liquors. 

4. That a new Permanent Committee on the Presbyterian Bro- 
therhood be appointed, to consist of a chairman appointed by the 
Synod, the same to be a layman, together with the chairmen on the 
same work in the respective Presbyteries ; and, Resolved, That we 
request each Presbytery to appoint a Permanent Committee on 
the Brotherhood, whose chairman shall be a layman, and likewise 
a majority of its members; and, Resolved, That the Hon. Wm. M. 
Lanning of Trenton be elected as the first chairman of the new 
Committee of Synod. 

5. That all our pastors be requested to inform the men of their 
congregations of this action of Synod. 

The report of the comlmittee was followed by a con- 
ference concerning the work of the Presbyterian Bro- 
therhood. 

After prayer, Synod adjourned until to-morrow at 
9 :oo o'clock A. M. 



Wednesday, October 23d, 9 :oo A. M. 
Synod met and, after prayer, resumed business. 

Minutes. The minutes of yesterday's sessions were read and 

the record was approved. 



igoj. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 21 

The Permanent Committee on Sabbath Observance, £abbatfc 

< >l>sL-rvance. 

to which had been referred an appeal from the Feder- 
ation of Sunday Rest Associations of America, reported, 
recommending that the request of the Federation be 
granted, and that the Synod adopt the following reso- 
lutions : 

That we approve the formation of an Interdenominational Sab- 
bath Association, as outlined by the Interdenominational Federa- 
tion, for Sunday rest, and that we appoint Rev. Win. W. Knox, 
D.D., Rev. Percy Y. Schelly, Rev. Samuel D. Price, Elders John 
Rellstab and James B. Dusenberry as the Committee from our 
Synod to meet with like committees from other denominations. 

The Committee on Finance reported that it had ex- Finance. 
amined the books and vouchers of the Treasurer of 
Synod and the Treasurer of the Trustees of Synod and 
found the same correct. 

The Committee also recommended that the appor- 
tionment to the Presbyteries for Synodical expenses be 
as follows : 

Elizabeth, Morris and Orange, New Brunswick and Newark, 
$100 each. 

Jersey City and West Jersey, $80 each. 
Monmouth and Newton, $70 each. 

The report was received and its recommendations 
adopted. 

The records of the following- Presbyteries were ap- Presbyteriai 
proved : Corisco, Elizabeth, Jersey City, Monmouth. 
Morris and Orange, Newark, New Brunswick, Newton, 
and West Jersey. 



The report of the Permanent Committee on Propor- Systematic 

Beneficence 

tionate and Systematic Beneficence was presented by 
Rev. W. \Y. Casselberry, was received and its recom- 
mendations adopted as follows : 



22 Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. Oct., 

i. That the spiritual and financial value of the tithe principle be 
recognized, and its practice recommended to all affiliated with our 
churches, and that pastors be urged to read to their congregations 
recommendations No. 2 and 3, page 225 of the Minutes of General 
Assembly, 1907. 

2. That Sessions be urged to inaugurate and sustain an educa- 
tional campaign in their respective churches by using the literature 
provided gratis by General Assembly's Special Committee on Sys- 
tematic Beneficence, and such other on this subject which is easily 
procurable from many other sources. 

3. That, as a Synod, we adopt the "Budget Plan" for the Boards, 
and recommend its adoption by our Presbyteries. 

4. That in o,r-der to preserve the purity of the motive for and the 
character of our contributions to the extension of the Kingdom of 
Christ, and to observe in spirit and letter Chapter VI, of the 
Directory for Worship, the Worship of God by Offerings, Sessions 
be urged to discountenance fairs, bazaars, suppers and other com- 
mercial methods of procuring money. 

5. In view of the universal prosperity with which God has 
blessed our land, a good share of which has come to the members 
of our Church, and considering the increased cost of living, which 
has advanced during the last decade at least one-third, thereby 
causing embarrassment, and even suffering to some of the pastors 
of our Church, we do recommend that the Sessions of the several 
churches throughout our Synod do seriously consider the matter 
of a proportionate increase in their ministers' support, thus ful- 
filling the covenant entered into at the time of their call to relieve 
them from all care and avocation about worldly things. 

6. That Synod appropriates $25 for the work of this Committee 
for the current year. 

In connection with the report the Synod was ad- 
dressed by Rev. Asa D. Blackburn, D.D. upon the sub- 
ject of tithing. 

The following resolution, offered by the Rev. George 
Swain, D. D., was adopted by a rising vote : 

Rev. Allen II Resolved, That we recognize with great pleasure and satisfaction 
Brown, D.D. of heart the presence with us of our brother, the Rev. Doctor 
Allen H. Brown, so long and successfully engaged in missionary 
and historical work in our Synod, and that we hereby signify our 
appreciation of his valuable service, which he, because of extreme 
age, is obliged to hand over to his successors.* 



•Dr. Brown died at Montclair, N. J., Monday, November 4th, 1907. 



7907. Minutes of the Synod oe New Jersey. 23 

The report of the Permanent Commjittee on Synodical 
Home Missions was presented by Rev. Samuel McLan- 
ahan, was received and its recommendations adopted as 
follows : 

1. That the Synod express by a rising vote its thanks to Mr. 
William Paxton Stevenson for his efficient and laborious services 
as Treasurer, which have been rendered entirely without cost to 
the Synod. 

2. That in view of the retirement of the Rev. William Thom- 
son from the Committee on Synodical Home Missions, Synod 
hereby makes record of its appreciation of his long and faithful 
service in the Home Missionary work of Synod, extending over 
more than twenty-four years, and expresses to him the gratitude of 
Synod for the same, and directs that the Stated Clerk communicate 
this action to him. 

3. That the Synod approves the holding of an Intersynodical 
Conference on Synodical Mission Work, and authorizes the Com- 
mittee to send delegates, if such conference is held. 

4. That from the balance in the treasury the sum of $1,500 be 
and hereby is set aside as a special fund, subject to the control of 
Synod's Committee for new or exceptional work ; and that addi- 
tions to this fund, either subject to the Committee or for objects 
designated by the donors, be invited. It is understood that such 
special gifts shall not be counted as a part of the apportionment of 
any Presbytery or church. 

5. That the several Presbyteries be asked to raise, respectively, 
the following amounts for the current year : 

Elizabeth, $3,500 00 

Jersey City, 2,500 00 

Monmouth 2,000 00 

Morris and Orange, 3,600 00 

Newark 3,400 00 

New Brunswick 3,300 00 

Newton 1 .325 00 

West Jersey, 2,600 00 



522,225 OO 



6. That the several Presbyteries be allowed to draw on the 
treasury for sums not exceeding, respectively, the following: 

Elizabeth, $2,250 00 

Jersey City, 3,200 00 

Monmouth, 3,35° 00 

Morris and Orange, 1.800 00 

Newark, 3.400 00 

New Brunswick 1,95° 00 



--4 



Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 



Oct., 



Newton, $1,325 00 

West Jersey, 4,450 00 

Administration 500 00 



$22,225 00 



7. That the Twentieth Annual Report of the Woman's Synodical 
Society for Home Missions in the Synod of New Jersey be 
approved and that the congratulations of the Synod be extended to 
this society and its auxiliaries upon the work of the past year. 



Treasurer 
S. H. M. 



The report of the Treasurer of Synodical Home Mis- 
sions was presented by Mr. William P. Stevenson, 
Treasurer, and was accepted. 



Minutes of 

Assembly. 



In connection with the report, brief addresses were 
made by several members of the Committee and of 
Synod. 

The following resolution, offered by Rev. A. N. Stub- 
blebine, was adopted : 

That if, in the judgment of the Committee on Synodical Home 
Missions, a negro missionary is necessary to labor among the 
negro population, they are herewith authorized to appoint such a 
missionary, when the opportunity is ripe, to labor throughout the 
entire Synod. 

The Committee on the Minutes of the General Assem- 
bly reported that there was nothing in the Minutes 
which required action by the Synod. The report was 
received. 

The Judicial Committee reported that no business had 
come before it. 



Synod now listened to an address by the Rev. William 
Henry Roberts, D.D., LL.D., the Moderator of the 
General Assembly. 



igoj. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 25 

The order of the day having arrived, the half hour 
devotional service, it was resolved to hear at this time 
and in connection with the devotional service, Rev. W. 
Beatty Jennings, D.D., a member of the Evangelistic 
Committee of the General Assembly, and accordingly 
Dr. Jennings addressed the Synod. 

It was also resolved that at the second order of the 
day this afternoon, Synod hear Rev. John S. Thomas, 
D.D., the representative of the San Francisco churches, 
for rive minutes, and that immediately thereafter the 
report of the Evangelistic Committee be presented. 

After Dr. Beatty* s address, and prayer. Synod took 
recess until 2 -.30 P. M. 



Wednesday, 2:30 P. M. 
Synod met and resumed business. 

The following resolution, offered by Rev. Hugh B. 
MacCauley, D.D., was adopted: 

That the Synod not only welcomes the new movement called the Presbyterian 
Presbyterian Brotherhood of New Jersey, which has made its brotherhood, 
first report to us, but we also call upon the men in all our churches 
to arouse themselves as never before, for the promotion of the best 
spiritual interests of the Church, for the strengthening of its tem- 
poral support, and for the advancing of the cause of civic righteous- 
ness, public morality, missions and evangelistic work. 

The following resolution of thanks was unanimously 
adopted : 

The Synod of New Jersey expresses its appreciative thanks to Thanks, 
the pastor, session, trustees and members of the Olivet Church 
for their generous hospitality so freely bestowed upon the Synod ; 
to those who have so kindly assisted us in the worship of our 
devotional meetings, and to all others who have contributed to the 
comfort and pleasure of the Synod at the present meeting. 



26 



Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 



Oct., 



Synod now listened to an address by Rev. Edward C. 
Ray, D.D., Assistant Secretary of the College Board, 
on behalf of the work of the Board. 



Francisco. 



As the second order of the day, Synod listened to an 
address by Rev. J. S. Thomas, D.D., the representative 
of the Presbyterian churches of San Francisco, upon the 
spiritual and moral condition of that city. 



The following resolution, offered by Rev. J. L. Tay- 
lor, D.D., was adopted: 

The Synod of New Jersey, having listened with the deepest in- 
terest to the earnest appeal of Rev. John S. Thomas, of San 
Francisco, on behalf of the needs of that stricken city, would 
express its heartiest sympathy with the cause for which he pleads, 
and promise to bring the matter to the attention of the churches in 
our Synod. 



inistentation. 



The cause of Ministerial Sustentation was presented 
to Synod by Rev. R. R. Sutherland, D.D., representing 
General Assembly's Committee on Ministerial Susten- 
tation. At the close of his address the following reso- 
lution, offered by Rev. J. L. Taylor, D.D., was adopted : 



Evangelistic 
Work. 



This Synod, having listened with deepest interest to the address 
of the Rev. Dr. Robert R. Sutherland, explanatory of the object 
and provisions of the Ministerial Sustentation Fund, adopted by 
our General Assembly, and now being put into effect, 

Resolved, That the Synod hereby expresses its gratification at 
the launching of a plan for the support of our aged and disabled 
ministers and their dependent loved ones so comprehensive and 
practicable, and one in whose benefits its beneficiaries can par- 
ticipate without a feeling of humiliation ; 

Resolved, That the Synod cordially commends the Fund to the 
interest of our ministers and sessions and to the liberality of the 
churches under their care. 

The report of the Special Committee on Evangelistic 
Work was read by the Stated Clerk, in the absence, on 
account of sickness, of the Chairman, Rev. Charles A. 



iqo/. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 27 

Evans. The report was received and its recommenda- 
tions adopted as follows : 

Your committee reports that, while there has not been the active 
and aggressive evangelistic effort which was carried forward with 
such marked success in the years 1905-06, yet much has been ac- 
complished by the faithful work of the various Presbyterial com- 
mittees. 

In all of the Presbyteries, conferences have been held, under the 
direction of the Evangelistic committees, which have resulted in 
much spiritual benefit to the churches. 

A very profitable conference was held by the members of the 
Presbytery of West Jersey in Calvary Church, Camden, following 
the last meeting of Synod. In many of the churches of the Pres- 
bytery, this was followed by special evangelistic services — notably 
in the West Church of Bridgeton, the Second and Calvary Churches 
of Camden and the church at Collingswood. In several of the 
churches, these services were preceded by cottage prayer meetings, 
which prepared the way for the church services. In all cases the 
results were gratifying to pastors and people. Another meeting for 
conference and prayer is to be held by the members of the Pres- 
bytery on November 12th, and it is proposed that evangelistic 
meetings be held, in as many of the churches as possible, from 
December 1st to December 15th. It is also proposed that the ser- 
vices of a Presbyterial evangelist be secured. 

In the Presbytery of Elizabeth, the committee has urged the 
churches to follow the recommendation of Synod in an endeavor 
to quicken the spiritual lives of the church members, and to bring 
the young people to a sense of their duty and privilege in the 
way of a profession of faith. The Committee feel that much prog- 
ress has been made as a result of the year's work. 

In this Presbytery special effort has been made to bring the 
large foreign population under the influence of the Gospel of 
Christ. The Evangelistic and Home Mission Committees are 
closely allied in this work, and both are co-operating in every way 
possible with the Board of Home Missions to accomplish this 
result. 

In the Presbytery of Monmouth a special plan of co-operation 
in assisting in evangelistic meetings has been tried, and many of 
the smaller churches have been greatly benefited. 

In the Presbytery of Jersey City special evangelistic services 
have been held in ten of the churches, in some instances in union 
with other denominations. In several of these churches, the help 
of an Evangelist was secured; but in most cases the sendees were 
conducted by the pastors. 

While the number received into the churches of the State on 
confession of faith has not been as large as in 1906. following the 



28 Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. Oct., 

evangelistic campaign, yet the report shows a substantial advance 
over the number so received in 1905, and the evangelistic effort 
put forth throughout the Synod is still bearing fruit. 

The committee would urge upon pastors and people the great 
need of spiritual preparation for evangelistic work during the 
coming months. What pastor and people get out of such an 
effort will depend largely upon what they put into it. Thorough- 
ness in preparation is usually a measure of the blessing received. 

Prayerful and self-sacrificing work on the part of all Christians 
is essential. Let us not forget nor allow our people to forget 
that the true preparation is the spiritual preparation. This should 
begin in the heart of the pastor and kindle the hearts of his people. 
In this preparation there should be a more devout study of God's- 
word, more earnest prayer for the church and the salvation of 
souls, a more complete surrender to- the will of the Master and a 
readiness to follow the leading of the Holy Spirit. When we 
fulfill these conditions the promises do not fail. 

The committee would call attention to the importance of pas- 
toral evangelism as the ideal and hope of the church, and urge 
every pastor to take his rightful place as the leader in evangelistic 
effort. 

The Committee would recommend — 

1. That the Synod appoint a Committee on Evangelistic Work 
for the coming year, to be composed of the chairmen of the Com- 
mittees of the several Presbyteries. 

2. That special conferences of ministers and elders be held by 
each Presbytery at some time during the month of November, if 
possible, for the deepening of the spiritual life and to stimulate 
evangelistic, effort. 

3. That, so far as practicable, a series of special services for 
prayer and consecration be held by pastors in their own churches, 
beginning on Sabbath, December 1st, following the Presbyterial 
conferences. The purpose being, in a measure, to prepare the 
churches for the special services of the week of prayer. 

4. The inauguration of an evangelistic campaign to be par- 
ticipated in by all the churches in each Presbytery, to begin with 
the week of prayer (or at such other season as may be most con- 
venient for each pastor) and to> continue for two or more weeks. 

During these services, special effort should be made to reach 
and enlist the active interest of members of our churches who 
have become indifferent to their Christian obligations, that the 
work of the Kingdom of God may be carried forward by a united, 
harmonious and reconsecrated Church. 

5. In view of the expressed preference of many pastors for the 
assistance of their brethren in the Synod, that every pastor be 
requested, if possible, to place himself at the disposal of the 
Evangelistic Committee of his Presbytery, for a period of ten 



igoj. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 29 

days <>r two weeks, to be assigned to the various churches after 
conference with the pastors of the churches. 

6. That inasmuch as there seems to be an increasing interest in 
Christian service among the men of our churches, the members 
of the Brotherhoods be requested to co-operate with pastors in 
evangelistic effort. 

Synod now listened to an address on behalf of the i-reedmen. 
Board of Freedmen by Rev. Henry T. McClelland. 
D.D., Field Secretary of the Board, and at the close the 
following resolution, offered by Rev. Robert Scott 
Ing-lis, D.D., was adopted : 

The Synod approves the effort to raise within the bounds of the 
Synod, through the Freedmen's Committees of the Presbyteries, 
the sum of $987.50 by special contributions in order to bear Synod's 
proportion of $12,500, i. c, one share of $12.50 to each 1,000 com- 
municants, toward the endowment of the Library of Biddle Uni- 
versity, in order to secure Mr. Andrew Carnegie's conditional 
promise to erect a library building for Biddle if a like sum be 
raised for the maintenance of the library. 

The cause of Ministerial Relief was brought to the 
attention and consideration of Synod in an address by 
Rev. Benjamin L. Agnew, D.D., Secretary of the Board. 

Rev. John Fox, D.D., Secretary of the American American 
Bible Society, addressed Synod in the interests of that 
society, and at the close of his address the following 
resolution, offered by Rev. S. \Y. Beach, was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Synod has heard Dr. John Fox, of the 
American Bible Society, witli the greatest pleasure, and being 
stirred by a new sense of the vital importance of this work, would 
again commend the cause to all our churches and members. 

Rev. John H. Kerr, D.D.. Editorial Secretary of the American 

Tract 

American Tract Society, presented to the Synod the 
needs and aims of that Society, and at the close of his 
address the following resolution, offered by Rev. James 
Dallas Steele, Ph.D., was adopted: 



30 



Minutes of the Synod oe New Jersey. 



Oct., 



Committees. 



Resolved, That the Synod of New Jersey renews its approval 
and commendation of the work of the American Tract Society. 
The need of printing and circulating evangelical literature in 
foreign tongues, both here and abroad, grows greater, and the 
Synod recommends the increased support of the Society to the 
churches under its care. 

The Committee on the Revision of the List of Perma- 
nent Committees presented its report, which was ac- 
cepted and its recommendations adopted. 

(See list of committees in Appendix.) 



Trustees. The Board "oi Trustees of Synod reported the resig- 

nation of Rev. William Thomson as a member of that 
body, and the Stated Clerk was directed to cast the bal- 
lot for Rev. Percy Y. Schelly as his successor. The 
ballot having been cast, Mr. Schelly was declared elected 
a Trustee of Synod. 

Temperance. The Permanent Committee on Temperance made a 

supplementary report, which was received and its recom- 
mendations adopted as follows : 

i. In response to a request from the Women's Synodical Tem- 
perance Association of the Synod of Pennsylvania that this Synod 
endorse its petition to the International Committee of the Evan- 
gelical Alliance, asking that one entire day of the Week of Prayer 
be devoted to prayer for the removal of the drink usages of 
society, and the abolition of the traffic in alcoholic beverages and 
of the opium habit and trade. Your Committee recommend that 
this Synod follow the General Assembly of our Church in adopt- 
ing the following resolution, the same to be sent to the above as 
our reply to their request : 

That the Synod of New Jersey hereby requests the Executive 
Committee of the Evangelical Alliance to make Temperance Re- 
form the subject for prayer and consideration on one evening of 
the Week of Prayer. 

2. In response to a communication from the Anti-Saloon League 
of America, asking this Synod to be represented by delegates at 
the Thirteenth National Anti-Saloon Convention, your Committee 
recommend that our Stated Clerk inform the said League that 
our Synod is, by the constitution of our Church, committed against 
representation by delegates in non-ecclesiastical bodies or con- 
ventions. 



1907- Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 31 

3. In response to a request from the Woman's Missionary 
Society of the Pittsburg Presbytery, asking our endorsement of 
its plan to appoint Temperance Secretaries in Woman's Missionary 
Societies, Sunday-schools and Christian Endeavor Societies, your 
Committee deems it sufficient to simply call the attention of 
Synod to this plan. 

It is voted to extend this session of Synod for ten 
minutes. 

The resignation of Rev. Hugh B. MacCauley, D.D., l ou ^, 

b & ■" People s 

as Chairman of the Permanent Committee on Young Societies. 
People's Societies was accepted, and Rev. Frank Lukens 
was chosen to be Chairman in his place. 

The report of the Special Committee on College Visi- College 

1 L . Visitation. 

tation was read by the Stated Clerk, in the absence of 
the Chairman, Rev. W. W. Knox, D.D. It was accepted 
and its suggestions were adopted as follows : 

Your Committee, appointed to visit the colleges within the bor- 
ders of Synod to press their claims of the gospel ministry upon 
their students, would respectfully report that they have endeav- 
ored to fulfill their duties to the best of their ability, but have 
found themselves hindered by circumstances from making their 
visitations as extended as they desired and as successful as they 
had hoped. They cannot measure results. They corresponded 
with the officers of the Philadelphia Society of Princeton Uni- 
versity, and while receiving a most courteous reply, were informed 
that in the schedule of subjects drawn this had not been omitted; 
that the claims of the ministry had been very recently been pre- 
sented, and was again to be pressed after the holidays. They, 
however, invite further correspondence in the future that they 
may co-operate with the Committee of Synod. They inform us 
that the}' are about to form a Ministerial Band, to keep those 
who are looking forward to the ministry in touch with one an- 
other, and we trust to enlarge their circle from those now unde- 
cided. 

Your Committee further report that after an interview with 
the president of Rutgers College and the officers of the Y. M. C. 
A. of that institution they had the pleasure of addressing its 
members and other Christian students, pleading for consecration 
to the Christian ministry independent of denominational pref- 
erences. 



32 



Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 



Oct., 



They were pleased to learn that much thoughtfulness exists 
among the students of the college as to their duty in the matter, 
and that some are reconsidering their choice in professions, and 
that some who had thought themselves harred because they had 
not followed out a classical course in their preparatory studies 
have now taken up "beginner's Greek" that, if possible, they may 
now qualify themselves for a theological seminary course. 

i. Your Committee would suggest that Synod emphasize the 
fact the appointment of this Committee of College Visitation does 
not excuse the pastors of our churches from pressing the claims 
of the ministry among the families of their churches and among 
the boys of the Sabbath-schools. There may be many a Samuel 
ready to hear and respond to the call they fail to utter. 

2. They recommend that Presbyteries within whose bounds pre- 
paratory schools exist be urged to appoint similar committees, 
who shall be charged with the duty of pressing the claims of the 
ministry upon these students, and who shall report both to Pres- 
bytery and to this Committee. 

After prayer. Synod took recess until 7 130 P. M. 



Wednesday, 7 130 P. M. 
Synod reassembled and, after devotional services, led 
by the Moderator, resumed business. 



Young 

People's 

Societies. 



The report of the Permanent Committee on Young 
People's Societies was presented by the Stated Clerk, in 
the absence of the Chairman, Rev. H. B. MacCauley, 
D.D., was received and its recommendation adopted 
as follows : 



That Synod call the attention of all its sessions and societies to 
the decrease as compared with last year in societies, members, con- 
versions and contributions, and earnestly calls upon all our young 
people to advance their work and plan for much greater results. 



Temperance The re poi't of the Special Committee on Temperance 

Legislation. . _ . 

Legislation was presented by the Chairman, Rev. Joseph 
Howell, was received, and pending a consideration of 
the recommendations of the Committee, Synod was ad- 



igoy. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 33 

dressed by Mr. J. Frank Burke, Superintendent of the 
Anti-Saloon League of New Jersey. At the close of 
the address the report and recommendations were 
adopted as follows : 

The Special Committee on Temperance Legislation was con- 
tinued last year, the Moderator appointing Rev. Joseph Howell, 
Rev. D. Ruby Warne, Rev. Joshua B. Gallaway, D.D., with Elders 
Carroll Robbins and Ebenezer Mackey. Elder Robbins has since 
died. 

The past year has been one of hard fighting, and some very de- 
cided gains. While the hope of your Committee has not been 
realized, yet much good work has been done in the quickening of 
the public conscience, and in bringing to the forefront of the 
battle line the now State-wide issue of local option. We trust 
that in the near future New Jersey will take her rightful place 
in the great work of giving to her citizens the right of "home 
rule" in regard to the great and iniquitous liquor evil, which has 
become overgrown, eating up the inhabitants of the State, and, 
not content with the havoc and destruction of the six days of the 
week, has become so brazen and defiant as to place its slimy hands 
upon our most precious and holy of institutions, the Sabbath, and 
to demand that it be prostituted for the advancement of its unholy 
gain. 

The work of your Committee has been defined by resolutions, 
beginning in the April meeting of the New Brunswick Pres- 
bytery in 1905, when the Presbytery passed a resolution looking 
to the uniting of all the ecclesiastical bodies in our State in an 
effort to arouse public sentiment and concerted effort for the 
obtaining of a local option law. 

October, 1905, this Synod passed the following resolution : 
"That this Synod favors the plan of uniting all the churches and 
temperance organizations of our State for a movement to secure 
better temperance legislation, including a wise general local 
option law, and instructs its Moderator to appoint at this meet- 
ing a committee of five — three ministers and two ruling elders — 
to represent it in such a united effort." 

Again, this Synod last year passed the following resolution, 
through its Permanent Committee on Temperance : "That the 
special committee appointed last year to co-operate with other 
organizations to further temperance legislation in our State be 
continued and instructed to persevere in earnest efforts to secure 
the enactment of a general local option law, and that the mem- 
bers of our congregations be urged to support this movement." 

Also, the Synod, last year, by resolution of the special commit- 
tee, said : "That Synod recognizes the excellent work of the 



34 Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. Oct., 

Anti-Saloon League of New Jersey, in its co-operation with the 
Synod's Special Committee last winter, in the splendid fight made 
to try to secure a local option law, and would commend the 
League and the new superintendent, Mr. J. Frank Burke, to tlie 
confidence of the churches." 

You will note by all these steps from the inception of this work 
the goal has been "a wise general local option law" for this 
State. Except for the strenuous efforts to secure the local 
option law, the Bishops' bill would never have been passed two 
years ago. It is good so far as it goes, is to be held on to, as 
we again press on for "local option," or "home rule." With 
this end in view, your Committee has worked hand in hand with 
the Anti- Saloon League the past year. The Superintendent, Mr. 
J. Frank Burjjie, has been right on the firing line, and is now 
in the midst of the battle — just the right man in the right place. 
On February 19th, 1907, after a number of efforts to get a Local 
Option Bill introduced in the Legislature, Mr. Burke induced the 
Hon. B. Frank Buck, of Cumberland county, to introduce the bill. 
It was referred to the Judiciary Committee. 

On Sabbath, February 17th, two days before the introduction of 
the bill. February 19th, the churches all over the State passed 
resolutions, asking for the passage of the Local Option Law. 

When the bill was introduced by Mr. Buck, known as House 
Bill No. 254, numbers of petitions from the people of the State 
and letters were on every desk. 

On February 20th, the day following the introduction of the bill, 
Mr. J. Frank Burke communicated with the chairman of the 
Judiciary Committee, and asked that an early date be fixed for a 
hearing on the bill. 

In reply, the chairman made arrangements to give a public hear- 
ing on the Local Option Bill, with other excise legislation, Monday 
afternoon, March 4th, from 2:30 to 4:30 P. M. A rousing public 
hearing was given to the bill March 4th, at which time all three 
of the ministerial members of your Committee on Legislation were 
present and spoke on behalf of the bill. 

Delay in reporting the bill by the Judiciary Committee led this 
Committee to believe that there was a purpose to kill the bill in 
Committee, and Mr. Burke charged the members of the Judiciary 
Committee with conspiracy so to kill it. In consequence of this, 
Mr. Burke was, by vote of the Assembly, excluded from the floor 
of the House. 

On March 17th the bill was reported to the House. Upon the 
final vote it was lost by a vote of eleven to forty-five, four mem- 
bers not voting. 

Since the defeat of the Local Option Bill the work of the League 
and of your Committee has been aggressive. The League has been 
instrumental in securing, in Cumberland county, the re-nomination 



1907. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 35 

of the member who introduced the bill ; in Union county, the 
defeat for re-nomination of the former leader of the House ; 
in Cumberland county, the pledge of one of the candidates, if 
elected, to work and vote for Local Option, and is striving in other 
counties to secure the election of members who will do the same. 

Now, as to the issues before us this fall, there is a great deal 
of misunderstanding and confusion. The excise issue is composed 
of three distinct propositions. They are : first, The retention of. 
or the repeal of the Bishops' Bill ; second, Sunday local option, 
i. c not only shall the liquor dealers have full and legalized power 
for the sale of intoxicating liquors on the six days of the week, 
but liquors may be sold also on a portion of the Sabbath, or all 
of the Sabbath ; third, Local Option, or Home Rule of any Munici- 
pality, the right by a majority vote, to vote out the liquor evil en- 
tirely. The latter is what we, as a Synod, as a Christian State- 
hood, and believers in Home Rule, stand for. 

There are three candidates for the office of Governor before the 
people at the present time. With regard to the three propositions 
enumerated above, one candidate is absolutely silent on all three, 
another has made an emphatic declaration in support of the 
Bishops' Bill, but is silent upon the two important questions, and 
the third has openly declared himself as supporting the Bishops' 
Bill, opposing vicious legislation and ready to work for the obtain- 
ing of Local Option. 

The suggestion of your Committee is again reiterated, that the 
path of duty before us is independence in voting for members of 
the Legislature and the support of those who are willing to work 
and vote for the enactment of Local Option. 

The Bishops' Law is a past accomplishment. It is settled. Let 
us move onward to the goal — straight Local Option. In this field 
of the work, The Anti-Saloon League is doing a grand work. 
The opposition of the Church and temperance forces to the liquor 
evil has been reduced to a compact working system, and so forged 
into one powerful agency, before which the enemy trembles. After 
Synod's commendation of the League last year, its representatives 
have entered ninety-six of our churches in the State, and the hearty 
co-operation and willingness among the Presbyterian brethren are 
second to none in the State. 

Your Committee would offer the following resolution : 

1. That Synod would call the special attention of the churches 
to the appeals of its Permanent Committee on Temperance for 
prompt and united action of pastors and people in support of Local 
Option legislation during the next session of the Legislature, and 
especially in responding to calls for attendance upon public hear- 
ings before the Legislature, and the sending of letters and peti- 
tions to the members of the Legislature promptly at crucial times. 

2. Owing to the centralizing of all our forces in the Anti-Saloon 
League, and the entrance of the representatives of the League into 



36 Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. Oct., 

our churches, through the commendation of your Special Com- 
mittee, we think the time has come for the discharge of your 
Special Committee, and recommend that its work be included in 
the work of the Permanent Committee on Temperance, and that 
the Special Committee be and hereby is discharged. 

It was resolved that the Statistical Reports be printed 
without reading - . 

Bills Paid. The Treasurer was directed to pay the usual salaries 

and bills. 

Attendance. The report of the Permanent Clerk on Attendance and 

Leave of Absence was read and is as follows : 

MEMBERS PRESENT. 

Presbytery. Ministers. Elders. 

Corisco 

Elizabeth, 23 16 

Havana, 

Jersey City, 14 5 

Monmouth, 18 12 

Morris and Orange, 14 9 

Newark, 14 8 

New Brunswick, 23 8 

Newton, 8 3 

West Jersey, 32 13 

146 74 

Ministers, 146 

Elders, 74 

Corresponding members, 16 

236 
The following have been excused : 

FROM THE PRESENT MEETING. 

Elisabeth — Minister Ezra F. Mundy. 

Monmouth — Ministers Horace G. Hinsdale, D.D., William S. 
Steen, Courtlandt P. Butler. 



igoy. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 37 

Morris and Orange — Ministers, Thomas B. Ironside, Baker 
Smith. 

Newark — Minister George Louis Curtis. 

New Brunswick — Ministers, Francis Palmer, Spencer C. Dick- 
son. 

Newton — Ministers William Thomson, Horace D. Sassaman, 
E. Clarke Cline. 

West Jersey — Ministers Luther A. Oates, Joseph Lyons Ewing. 

AFTER TUESDAY MORNING. 

BUzabeth— Ministers John Sheridan Zelie, D.D., William I. 
Steans, D.D. 

Monmouth — Elder Forman H. Gordon. 

AFTER TUESDAY AFTERNOON. 

Elizabeth — Minister Robert M. Craig. 

Jersey City — Ministers Fisher Howe Booth, Joshua B. Galla- 
way, D.D. 

New Brunswick — Minister James B. Clark. 

West Jersey — Ministers, I. Mench Chambers, George W. Tom- 
son, Elder J. Newton Powelson. 

AFTER TUESDAY EVENING. 

Elizabeth — Ministers James G. Mason, D.D., John T. Scott. 

Jersey City — Elder James S. Biddell. 

Monmouth — Ministers Samuel H. Thompson, D.D., Joseph E. 
Curry. 

Neivark — Minister E. Morris Fergusson. 

New Brunswick — Elder T. B. Stratton. 

West Jersey — Ministers James McLeod, D.D., John E. Peters, 
Sc.D., William J. Trimble, D.D., Elders M. H. Stratton, John W. 
McCray, B. Frank Nyce. 

AFTER WEDNESDAY NOON. 

Elizabeth — Ministers Jos. O. McKelvey, Joseph G. Symmes, 
William Force Whitaker, D.D., I. Alstyne Blauvelt, D.D., Elders 
Lemuel Neighbour, Leander N. Lovell. 

Jersey City — Ministers James H. Owens, D.D., James Scott 
Young," C. Rudolph Kuebler, D.D.. Elder R. C. Hoff. 

Monmouth — Ministers George Swain, D.D., Adolos Allen, Henry 
R. Hall, Alexander H. Young, D.D., Charles B. Austin, D.D., 
Charles L. Candee, S. J. McClenaghan, Elders Julius Foster, H. S. 
Simon, Jonathan L. Whitaker, James Steen, George H. Freeh. 

Morris and Orange — Ministers Minot C. Morgan, George L. 
Richmond, Edward P. Gardner, D.D., Robert P. Howie, Walter 



38 Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. Oct., 

W. Hammond, Robert J. Johnston, William T. Pannell, Elders E. 
H. Williams, Fred Babbitt. 

Newark — Minister Nelson B. Chester, Elders Edmund K. Hop- 
per, Waldo C. Genung, James L. Maxwell. 

Nczv -Brunswick — Ministers Cordie J. Culp, Frederick B. New- 
man, Wm. W. Knox, D.D., Albert J. Weisley, D.D., Elder William 
H. Cadwalader. 

West Jersey — Ministers Allen H. Brown, D.D., Minot S. Morgan, 
David H. King, Eugene H. Mateer, Thomas C. Sterling, Ph.D., 
Elders Jacob Ott, Lawrence Isaacs. 

DURING WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON. 

Elisabeth — Minister Wm. W. Casselberry, Elder Jos. W. Clark. 

Jersey City— Ministers Hugh R. McClelland, Ph.D., J. Albin 
Frey. 

Monmouth — Ministers Henry T. Graham, Ormond W. Wright, 
Elder Wm. M. Moreau. 

Morris and Orange — Ministers James F. Riggs, D.D., John F. 
Patterson, D.D., Elder James R. Voorhees. 

Newark — Ministers A. N. Stubblebine, Joseph F. Folsom, Edgar 
C. Mason. 

Nczv Brunszvick — Ministers Egidius Kellmayer, Daniel R. Foster, 
Norris W. Harkness, Elders A. S. Coriell, I. Newton Dumont. 

West Jersey — Ministers Alfred P. Botsford, Frederic R. Brace, 
D.D., Samuel H. Potter, Samuel D. Price, Elder Francis B. Wallen. 

AFTER WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Elisabeth — Minister Joseph B. Ferguson. 

Monmouth — Ministers William P. Finney, Arthur W. Reming- 
ton, Elder James H. Huston. 

Newark — Ministers David R. Frazer, D.D., Alexander H. Mc- 
Kinney, Ph.D., Davis W. Lusk, D.D., Robert T. Graham, Elder 
Wesley C. Miller. 

New Brunszvick — Ministers Hugh B. MacCauley, D.D., George 
H. Ingram. 

West Jersey — Elder Daniel E. Iszard. 

The roll was called, and the following members were 
found to be absent without excuse : 

Elisabeth— Ministers Frederick D. Tildon, Robert W. Mark, El- 
ders Morris W. Robinson, Ogden Woodruff. Cornelius H. Clark, 
William Hopf, W. P. Stevenson. 



7907. Minutes of the Synod of New Jersey. 39 

Jersey City — Minister Walter B. Greenway. 

Monmouth — Ministers Thomas Tyack, D.D., Frank Lukens, El- 
der William V. Simpson. 

Morris and Orange — Ministers Edward C. Ray, D.D., Robert H. 
Nichols, Robert S. Steen, Elders Edward L. Cook, Henry C. Ware, 
C. H. DeHart, Augustus F. Libby. 

Newark — Ministers Llewellyn S. Fulmer, D.D., Thomas Morgan, 
Elders William J. Soverell, Eugene Eagles. 

Nezv Brunswick — Ministers Joseph H. Dulles, Paul Martin, 
George H. Bucher, Alexander O. Macdonald, Elders N. H. Fur- 
man, Charles M. Titus. 

Newton — Minister Percy Y. Schelly, Elders A. M. Cammon, 
A. V. Johnson. 

West Jersey — Ministers William Aikman, D.D., Edmund J. 
Gwynn, D.D., William Allen, Jr., John McMillan, B.D., Herbert M. 
Gesner, Harvey T. Casselberry, Homer W. Taylor, Harold S. 
Rambo, Elders Charles E. Adams, J. A. Cunningham, James Mac- 
Williams. 

The minutes of to-day's sessions were read, and the Minutes. 
record was approved. 

The Synod adjourned to meet in Atlantic City on the 
third Monday of October, 1908. 

The session closed with prayer and the benediction. 

JOHN T. KERR, 

Recording Clerk. 
WALTER A. BROOKS. 

Stated Clerk. 



■^U ^c<»u^i City QcMxr &<+& za* /fj 









General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 

in the U. S. A. 



Rev. W. H. ROBERTS, D.D., LL.D. 

Stated Clerk and Treasurer. 



Witherspoon Building, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Approved, so far as presented, in General 
Assembly at Kansas CJ.ty,Mo May 30th, 1908. 




Stated Clerk, 



APPENDIX. 



I.— NARRATIVE OF THE STATE OF RELIGION IN THE 
SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
OCTOBER 21 st, 1907. 

In the spirit of grateful praise we would acknowledge the divine 
goodness, rejoicing that this Synod can once more set up a milestone 
of thanksgiving. Whatever is good in the experience or achievements 
of our churches during this past year, we are happy to confess it as 
the outcome of gracious favor from our heavenly Father. And what- 
ever is bad, we regret it, but shall waste no time in lamentations. We 
can only point out the evil, and gird up our loins anew to a fresh 
grapple therewith. 

Any such rapid survey as the present must of necessity be sharply 
limited in its nature ; first, by the time and space allotted in Synod ; 
second, by the meagre information given us in the various Presbyterial 
Narratives ; and, third, by the lack of insight on the part of the Com- 
mittee to understand the statements made in these reports. For ex- 
ample, when mention is made of "attendance" on public worship, with 
percentage figures, how far are such assertions based on an actual 
counting of the congregations, and how far are they guess work? Your 
Committee cannot answer this question. 

Of some vital facts we are perfectly sure. The continued existence 
of the Church as an organic force in our community is a valid ground 
for continuous thanksgiving. Every church is a testimony for 
righteousness, every steeple is an appeal in behalf of soberness and 
truth, every minister is a standing challenge to the forces of evil. 
Hence, any such survey as this narrative cannot be pessimistic. If it is 
the embodiment of any criticism, that is only to point out, and so to 
conquer the obstacles that lie across our path. And in so doing we are 
only treating our churches as we treat our bodies when we require the 
aid of a physician. 

As we look over the field we are greatly impressed with the fact 
that God is caring for us the year around. In many ways the life of 
our churches has shown a remarkable steadiness, a regularity that seems 
to indicate depth of principle. The various organizations are main- 
tained, and the benevolent work goes on — the Ladies' Societies, the 
Sunday-schools, the mid-week prayer meetings, all continue to exercise 
their proper influence in city and in village. We wish that this in- 
fluence were more potent ; but it is a blessing not to be forgotten, that 
it should exist at all. 



42 Narrative. Oct., 

Nine Presbyteries have sent their narratives to your Committee, viz., 
eight Presbyteries in New Jersey, and our African sister, Corisco. 

One difficulty that confronts the brethren who try to make up these 
reports is the marked indifference of the local congregations. For 
example, Newark says, "Only twenty-three out of thirty-eight narratives 
were sent in, and most of these at the last moment." 

Our first inquiry is naturally in regard to the growth of the churches 
themselves. This is not uniform in the different parts of our State. 

Morris and Orange says, "Sixteen churches report a net gain, two 
report the same membership as last year, and eighteen report a net 
loss." 

West Jersey says, "Seventeen churches report a net loss, and thirty- 
three a net gain." The total net gain of the Presbytery was 259. 

Newton reports a net gain of forty-five individuals, i. c, less than one 
per cent, of the membership. 

Newark and New Brunswick have gained about two per cent. 
Elizabeth has gained about three per cent., and Jersey City rejoices in a 
net gain of four per cent, in her membersbip. 

Thus we see that there is a small net gain in our Synod from year 
to year. But as a whole we are not making the inroad that we long 
to make into the solid mass of selfishness and worldliness that sur- 
rounds us. 

Public worship is maintained in all these churches, and, with scarcely 
any exception, there is regular preaching of the Gospel, both morning 
and evening. The ratio of attendance to the communicant membership 
of the various bodies is as follows : 

Presbytery. Morning Service. Evening Service. 

Percentage. Percentage. 

Elizabeth, 56 30 

Newark 47 3° 

New Brunswick 65 35 

Newton 50 33 

Turning to the mid-week prayer meeting as to a token of spiritual 
activity, we find that with few exceptions it is thinly attended. One 
noteworthy exception is Corisco. In that far-off land the attendance 
is commendable. In every case where the churches have enjoyed 
pastoral care the effort has been blessed to a rich spiritual fruitage. 

Elizabeth reports the attendance as ten per cent, of her membership, 
adding that there has been "unusual interest" in two churches only 
during the year. 

New Brunswick says, "The power-plant is not in good working 
order." 

Monmouth says that the reports from the churches make one think 
of "Egypt's lean years, and of the Russian and the Chinese famine 
sufferers." 

Jersey City says, "The mid-week service is not the potent force in 
the church's life that it might be." 



J907- Narrative. 43 

One phrase that is employed in our question blanks has been criticised 
as tending to obscurity, viz., the expression "Unusual interest." How 
much is meant by these words? Some other term might perhaps be 
clearer as to its significance. 

Another suggestion made in the report from Monmouth should be 
noted. Most of the statements are drawn up by pastors. And it is 
natural that a pastor should shrink from saying anything in his report 
that would look like boasting. So the question is asked, "Ought not 
these reports to be drawn up by some one else?" We think so. or, 
at least, should there not be an opportunity for some person who is 
quite outside of local prejudice to have a chance in the report to say 
what ought to be said? 

The duties of a pastor are extremely difficult, and require the con- 
stant exercise of tact, judgment and moral insight. No one feels this 
more keenly than the pastor himself, but it renders the task of report- 
ing on his own work embarrassing. So he is tempted to fall back 
on mere statistics, and simply answers the questions of the General 
Assembly in a formal way. Those questions are not designed to 
put the pastors in a straight- jacket, or to fetter their free expression. 
Yet, when any man is face to face with the duty of summing up his 
own work, it is easy to see that he will be likely to fill up the blanks 
and think his duty done. 

If there were a larger liberty of expression in the local reports, and 
if something were said occasionally about the life of the young people, 
of their intellectual advance, their books and reading and the like, 
the outcome of this would appear in the Presbyterial and Synodical 
summaries. As it is now there is a total dearth of information on 
all such topics. 

In respect to our Sunday-school work the case is, perhaps, more 
encouraging. 

Elizabeth says: "Ninety-two per cent, of those who unite with the 
church by profession of their faith in Christ have been pupils in the 
Sunday-school." Jersey City says : "Eighty-one per cent, are from the 
Sunday-school." And their report adds: "Here is the fountain of 
perennial youth." Elizabeth says that almost all the schools use the 
Westminster Helps and teach the Shorter Catechism. But over against 
this bold statement we set the declaration of West Jersey: "The 
Shorter Catechism is well-nigh excluded from our Sunday-schools." 
In the opinion of your Committee both these statements are exag- 
gerated and much too sweeping. 

On the whole, the outlook is most hopeful in Jersey City. Their 
report says : "Almost the entire force of the churches is perfectly 
organized and doing splendid work." Again : "For the most part, the 
pastors of our churches have been their own evangelists and mission- 
aries, and they have had a mind to the work, and so far as they 
were able have done it." This is high praise, and we congratulate 
our brethren of Jersey City. They have received to the Lord's table 
on profession of their faith 378 persons. 



44 Narrative. Oct., 

In regard to family worship and the maintenance of domestic piety, 
we are sorry to find that the reports are gloomy. 

Newton says : "Family religion is sadly neglected." 

Jersey City, in a statement which is otherwise so jubilant, says: 
"More than one pastor has the secret misgiving that the fire of the 
family altar is not kept burning." 

Many pastors, in their reports to Presbytery, profess ignorance on 
this point. But we fear that neglect is the rule, rather than the ex- 
ception. In the case of one church the Session say that they "trust" 
that every family observes household piety. The Presbyterial report 
follows up this surprising bit of optimism with the apt quotation: 
"Faith is the evidence of things not seen." 

The famous Brotherhood meeting held at Indianapolis has stirred 
up many of our churches to "go and do likewise." A large number 
of the local brotherhoods have been organized and the results are yet 
to be measured. 

Elizabeth says : "About half the churches have such societies." 

Jersey City says : "Fifteen churches have them." 

New Brunswick says : "There are twenty-four societies for men." 

West Jersey has twenty, with a total of 536 members. 

Newark says : "About half the churches have them," but only one 
church has a boys' club. 

In regard to our work for young people, we feel that the right 
method has not yet been devised. The youth of our churches are 
exposed on every side to all sorts of perils, notably in their relation 
to the problem of amusements and secular entertainments. This is 
a difficult problem. It is linked in closely with the problem of books 
and reading for children, libraries for Sunday-schools, the social meet- 
ings of the C. E. Societies and a host beside. 

In the broader question of the Church and the world, we can only 
pray for a fresh baptism of divine grace. Is our Synod doing all 
that we might do to evangelize the community? 

In this hand-to-hand battling against the world, the flesh and the 
devil, we cheerfully assign the first place to our brave little African 
Presbytery of Corisco. In that field they are surrounded by the thick 
darkness of pagan life. Special difficulties are crowding upon them 
continually. Tremendous moral risks are involved in everything they 
try to do. They have a wide territory and few preachers. Distances 
are great, and the outward strength of temptation is reinforced by its 
ever-new subtilty within. And the natural obstacles are rendered 
more troublesome by the poisonous influence of some degraded white 
traders from Europe and from America. We all sympathize and 
delight to do honor to Corisco, praying that the Lord of the harvest 
may bestow His benediction on that portion of our wide field. 

Of our own eight Presbyteries at home, the most trying problems 
confront those who have to fight the Lord's war in the large cities. 
There is the forefront of the hottest battle, and there we must not 
slacken for a moment. If those villages in our State which contain 



jpo/. Narrative. 45 

four or five churches and support four or five ministers would con- 
solidate two or more of the churches and so spare one minister, send- 
ing him to the cities where he is desperately needed, it would be an 
unspeakable blessing. Our eight Presbyteries would set an example 
to all the world if they would lead off in such a consolidation. We 
could spare thirty or forty ministers, who could thus be marshalled in 
the large cities of our State and who would do a vast amount of good 
there. Such a system would simply double the size of certain con- 
gregations, and this would work no mischief. Some people would have 
to travel a little farther to church. But then they would have the joy 
of rendering a real service to the cause of our Redeemer. 

In the handling of large business enterprises there is a resolute effort 
made to avoid waste of material, waste of any sort of reserve power. 
Ought it not to be so in our work? Has not the time come when 
the Synod of New Jersey should set an example of common sense ? 
Our cities are swarming with human beings — Poles, Russians, Mag- 
yars, Italians, Germans, not to mention our own native American flesh 
and blood. And they are still coming in countless multitudes. On the 
other hand, the village life of our State is practically at a standstill. 
Now 7 , in view of the facts, which are beyond any challenge, your Com- 
mittee submits this question to Synod. Is it good business to keep 
three-fourths of the ministers in villages to do one-fourth of the work, 
and to set one-fourth of the ministers in the vast whirlpool of 
humanity to grapple with three-fourths of the work? 

We often pray the Lord of the harvest to send more laborers into 
His harvest. But there is another primary question. The Lord Him- 
self, by His providence and by the experience of the Board of Educa- 
tion, is asking us in no uncertain tones, 'What use are you making 
of the laborers that have been sent already?" 

May the All- wise and Almighty Father give us such wisdom, both 
as individuals and as a Synod, that when we stand before the great 
white throne we may be able to answer, "Lord, by thy grace we fought 
a good fight and we kept the faith." 

JAMES F. RIGGS. 

Chairman. 



46 Necrological Report. Oct., 



II. NECROLOGICAL REPORT. 

The Committee on Necrology, with mingled regret and rejoicing, 
report the deaths of eleven of the members of Synod. This is the 
largest number recorded in the past seven years. 

In igoi, there were 9 deaths; in 1902, 8; in 1903, 10; in 1904, 9; 
in 1905, 6; in 1906, 8; in 1907, II. 

Almost immediately after the adjournment of Synod last year, the 
messenger of death entered two of our Presbyteries; the Rev. John 
Turner was called from the Presbytery of West Jersey, and Rev. Henry 
C. Cameron, D.D., frpm the Presbytery of New Brunswick. And now 
in the month of our convening again, the Presbytery of Jersey City 
suffers loss in the death of Rev. John T. Osier, which occurred 
October 7th, 1907. Thus throughout the year has our path been 
shadowed by death. 

The Presbyteries of Corisco and Havana have made no report to 
your Committee, and we have heard of no deaths in their member- 
ship. The Presbytery of Newton is the only one reporting no deaths. 

Three deaths are recorded by the Presbytery of Jersey City; two 
each, by West Jersey and Morris and Orange ; one each, by Elizabeth, 
Monmouth, Newark and New Brunswick. 

In the order of their departure we enter their names in this year's 
Necrology. 

Rev. John Turner, 

Presbytery of West Jersey, October 20th, 1906. 

Rev. Henry C. Cameron, D.D., 

Presbytery of New Brunswick October 25th, 1906. 

Rev. Albert G. Bale, 

Presbytery of Monmouth, December 15th, 1906. 

Rev. Joseph M. McNulty, D.D., 

Presbytery of Elizabeth, December 24th, 1906. 

Rev. Thomas Alonzo Reeves, 

Presbytery of Morris and Orange, January 20th, 1907. 

Rev. Edwin A. Bulkley, D.D., 

Presbytery of Jersey City, March 25th, 1907. 

Rev. Samuel B. Dod, 

Presbytery of Morris and Orange, April 19th, 1907. 

Rev. Chester Bridgman, 

Presbytery of West Jersey, May 23d, 1907. 

Rev. Dupuytren Vermilye, 

Presbytery of Jersey City, June 8, 1907. 

Rev. George S. Hall, 

Presbytery of Newark, September nth, 1907. 

Rev. John T. Osier, 

Presbytery of Jersey City, October 7th, 1907. 



190/. Necrologicae Report. 47 

Three were in active ministry. Two had retired with the title of 
pastor emeritus. One was a life-long teacher and professor. Five were 
without charge. 

Two had passed fourscore years, seven had passed threescore and 
ten. The youngest was fifty-nine. The average age was seventy-one 
years and three months. 

Each had served faithfully and well, and all have been respected and 
loved for their personal virtues and pastoral services. Highly esteemed 
"for their works' sake" in life, they have been accorded high reward in 
death. 

Saddened in heart, sobered in thought, but also stirred in soul, we, 
the living, still serve, neither knowing nor caring to know the day 
nor hour of the messenger's coming to bid us cease our labors, only 
knowing whom we have believed and that He is able to keep that which 
we have committed unto Him against that day. 



Presbytery of Elizabeth. 

THE REV. JOSEPH M'CARROLL m'xULTY, D.D. 

was born in Shippensburgh, Pa., September 18th, 1827. At the age of 
twelve years he made his home at Newburgh, N. Y., with his uncle, 
Rev. J. M. McCarroll, D.D. He studied theology in the Newburgh 
Theological Seminary of the Associate Reformed Church. 

His first pastorate was at Kortright, Delaware count} - , N. Y., from 
1854 to 1858. He was called to the Congregational Church of Clark- 
son, Monroe county, N. Y., where he labored from 1858 to 1862. 
Then he removed to Montgomery, Orange county, N. Y., where he 
labored in the Presbyterian Church from 1862 to 1868. 

He was called from- this church to the Presbyterian Church of 
Winona, Minnesota, and remained 'there from 1868 to 1871. Then he 
came to the Claremont Avenue Church of Jersey City, and labored 
from 1871 to 1874. He was then called to Woodbridge, N. J., where, 
after a long and fruitful ministry of thirty-three years, he entered 
into rest December 24th, 1906. 

He was married twice. His first wife was Hannah B. Lander of 
Newburgh, N. Y., who died at the beginning of his ministry at Wood- 
bridge and was buried there. In the autumn of 1877. he was married 
to Margaret Praull, of Woodbridge, N. J., who survived him but a 
few months. One son by his first wife survives him, Mr. Benjamin 
McNulty. 

Dr. McNulty's ministry was long, varied and fruitful. His brethren 
of his Presbytery have recorded their appreciation of his ability as a 
preacher, his devotion as a pastor, his fidelity as a presbyter and his 
genial Christian character, in all the relations of life. 



48 Necrological Report. Oct., 

Presbytery of Jersey City. 

THE REV. EDWIN ADOLPHUS BULKLEY, D.D., 

was born in Charlotte, S. C. in 1826, and was a descendant of the Rev. 
Peter Bulkley, who was one of the founders of Concord, Mass., and 
the first minister of the First Church of that place. Dr. Bulkley was 
graduated from Yale College in 1844 and from Union Theological 
Seminary in 1847. Upon his graduation from the seminary he was 
married to Miss Catharine F. Oakley, daughter of Daniel Oakley, a 
merchant and a leader in religious circles. 

In the summer 0^847 he was called to the pastorate of the Con- 
gregational Church in Geneva, N. Y., and on October nth of that year 
was ordained to the ministry by the Fourth Presbytery of New York, 
in that city. 1 

After two years and a half in his first charge, he assumed the pastoral 
charge of the Congregational Church at Groton, Mass., with which he 
remained thirteen and a half years. In 1864 he accepted a call to the 
First Presbyterian Church of Plattsburgh, N. Y., and held its pastorate 
till 1878, when he became pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Ruther- 
ford. N. J. From his installation here, on December 10th, 1878, until 
the dissolution of the pastoral relation on April 19th, 1898, he ministered 
to that church faithfully and well. On the day the pastoral relation 
was dissolved, he was made pastor emeritus, and so remained until 
his death. 

The University of Vermont conferred upon him the degree of doctor 
of divinity in 1868. He was Moderator of Presbytery in 1879, and in 
1896, and was Moderator of the Synod of New Jersey in 1883. In 
1880 he was elected Stated Clerk of Presbytery, and served faithfully 
for many years. 

He died on March 25th, 1907, having spent sixty fruitful years in 
the ministry. When fifty of these had passed, he said : "I would look 
upward, and not downward ; if the eye is upon Christ, and turned to 
where He is, what else do we behold except a Master's hands, with 
recompenses in them and our own Lord's presence, in the glory of 
which we may share also." 



THE REV. DUPUYTREN VERMILYE 

was born at Peekskill, N. Y., in 1832 ; was graduated from Rutgers 
College in i860, and from the New Brunswick Theological Seminary 
in 1863. He was licensed by the Classis of Poughkeepsie of the Re- 
formed Church in the same year. He served at Jefferson and Pittsford 
from 1863 to 1865, and at Palisades from 1865 to 1868. Accepting a 
call to Guilderland, N. Y., he was transferred to the Presbyterian 
Church, in connection with which he remained until his death. 



190/. Necrological Report. 49 

During the past twenty-five years he was without a charge. He 
was regular in his attendance upon the meetings of Presbytery, and 
faithful in the discharge of whatever duties devolved upon him. 

He resided at Ridgewood, N. J. He was suddenly stricken with 
heart failure at noon on June 8th, 1907, and died a half-hour later, in 
the seventy-fifth year of his age. 

"He came to his grave in a full age; like a shock of corn cometh in 
his season." 

THE REV. JOHN THOMPSON OSLER 

was born in Danville, Pa., in November, 1832. He was graduated from 
the College of New Jersey in i860, and from Princeton Seminary in 
1863. He was ordained on April 5th, 1865, by the Central Presbytery 
of Philadelphia. He served as pastor at Hancock, Md., from 1865 to 
1867 ; at Kingwood, N. J., from 1867 to 1872, and at Bethlehem, Pa., 
from 1872 to 1875. In the midst of growing usefulness and power at 
Bethlehem his career was suddenly checked by a throat affection, which 
incapacitated him for pulpit work. The succeeding six years were 
spent privately and quietly at Princeton, N. J. 

In 1881 his health was so much improved that he was able to accept 
a call to the Presbyterian Church at West Milford, N. J., in the Pres- 
bytery of Jersey City, where he continued in honored service for 
twenty-six years, when he was made pastor emeritus just before his 
death. 

By his wisdom, faithfulness and ability and the charm of his char- 
acter he won a warm place in the affections of his people, and approved 
himself as a true servant of Christ. 

An illness in the summer of igo5 developed into nephritis, and he 
finally passed away in Christ Hospital, Jersey City, on October 7th, 
1907, aged seventy-five, and was laid to rest at Princeton, N. J. A 
widow survives him. 

Presbytery of Monmouth. 

THE REV. ALBERT GALLIFORD BALE 

was the son of John Bale and his wife Alary Galliford. He was born 
September 10th, 1840, at Barnstable, Devonshire, England, and with his 
family came to the United States in 1853. For several years he lived 
in Buffalo, N. Y., and there attended a private school taught by 
Lieutenant Smith, of West Point. He early manifested a taste for 
architecture and for some years studied in the office of one of the 
principal architects of Buffalo. In 1857 he went to Dubuque, Iowa, 
and was associated as draughtsman for a company of builders. 

In the autumn of 1859 he began preparatory studies in Phillips 
Academy, Andover, and entered Amherst College in 1861, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1865. While in Amherst he was for 

4 



50 Necrologicae Report. Oct., 

two years private secretary to President Stearns ; was a teacher in a 
district school, and instructed students in mechanical and architectural 
drawing. He was chosen orator of his class, taking first prize in de- 
bate and in original composition. 

Mr. Bale studied theology for one year at Bangor, and for two years 
at Andover Theological Seminary, where he graduated 1868. He 
was ordained to the ministry of the Gospel by the Congregational 
Council, at Melrose, Mass., December 3d, 1868 ; Dr. Seelye, President of 
Amherst, taking part in his ordination and installation. 

Two pastorates mark Mr. Bale's work in life. The first was in the 
First (Orthodox) Congregational Church of Melrose, Mass., which 
organization was at that time just twenty years of age. There Mr. 
Bale labored with mtfch acceptance and success through a long period, 
from December 3d, 1868, to July 1st, 1896, always prominent in mis- 
sionary, educational, and temperance work. While there he had the 
peculiarly trying experience of seeing his church building destroyed 
by fire, and of undergoing the arduous labors of erecting another. 
During his long pastorate there he was held in high esteem by the citi- 
zens of the town, and he maintained cordial personal relations with 
the members of his congregation, which grew to be a large and pros- 
perous church. He was the architect of a number of buildings in the 
locality of Melrose, one of which was the Grove Street School. 

His second pastorate was in the First Presbyterian Church of As- 
bury Park, N. J., from May 25th, 1897, to June 30th, 1902, where he 
manifested a lovable, loyal and peace-making spirit ; and partially, by 
the sacrifice on his part of resigning his pastorate there, the har- 
monious union of the two weakened Presbyterian churches of that 
place was completely effected. For six years Mr. Bale was Secretary 
of the Woburn Conference of Congregational Churches, Mass., and of 
the Boston Ministers' Meetings. Also, for ten years, he was State 
Registrar of the General Association of Congregational Churches, Mass. 

Mr. Bale was twice married; first to Miss Mary Caroline Pulsifer, 
December 1st, 1868, at Newton, Mass., who died in 1886; and, second, 
to Miss Martha Demaris Ring, December 2d, 1887, at Melrose, Mass. 
Five children were born to him, all by the first marriage. 

He died suddenly of heart disease, on Saturday afternoon, December 
15th, 1906. He had been raking leaves on his lawn, and apparently in 
good health, when his wife, calling him about 5 P. M., received no 
reply, and, going out, found him lying on the grass. Funeral services 
were held at his home in Asbury Park, and afterwards on December 
1 8th, 1906, in the First Congregational Church, Melrose, Mass., and his 
grave was made in Wyoming Cemetery of the same town. He was 
survived by his wife, his mother, 94 years of age, two sisters and a 
brother, Lionel, and by three sons, Albert Bacon, of New York; Harold 
Pulsifer, of New York, and Frederick Sewall, of Boston. 

Mr. Bale was an honored member of the Presbytery of Monmouth 
from 1897 until his death. 



1907- Necrological Report. 51 

Presbytery of Morris and Orange. 

THE REV. THOMAS AEONZO REEVES 

was born in Gallipolis, Ohio, in 1849, his parents being Richard and 
Mary Louisa Wakeman Reeves. His preparatory studies were taken at 
New Brunswick, New Jersey, and Munson Academy, Massachusetts, 
and he entered Amherst College in ■ 1871, graduating in 1875. One 
of his college mates says of him at this time : "While he took no pains 
to stand high in his classes, he had much more culture and literary taste 
than many who did. I felt my deficiency in comparison with him, and 
was helped by him. He was a great big-hearted fellow, and we all 
loved him. He was a general favorite." Another college mate also 
bears testimony to the fact that he "was universally beloved, most popu- 
lar in college, and a friend to every one." 

His theological training was obtained in Union Theological Seminary, 
where he spent the years 1875 to 1878. He was licensed .by the Presby- 
tery of North River immediately after leaving the Seminar}*. 

His first charge was over the First Presbyterian Church of King- 
ston, New York, his ordination and installation taking place on May 
21st, 1878. He remained there five years, and in that time a beautiful 
little church was built, and the additions to the church nearly equaled 
the total membership at the time of his assuming the pastorate. Mr. 
Reeves's second pastoral charge was at Matteawan, New York, over 
the Presbyterian Church, in which place he was installed on October 
22d, 1883. 

After a happy pastorate of three years at Matteawan, Mr. Reeves, in 
1886, removed to Woonsocket, Rhode Island, and became pastor of the 
First Presbyterian Church there. His work there was foundation work. 
There were several members of the Presbyterian family in the town, 
but they had no church building. A hall was secured and services 
were held there Sunday after Sunday, the congregations growing con- 
tinually. Mr. Reeves determined to have a church building, started a 
subscription list, drew up plans for the building, and labored so zeal- 
ously and effectively that at length a handsome church structure was 
completed at a cost of $15,000. Then Mr. Reeves was called to Rocka- 
way, in Presbytery of Morris and Orange, and began what proved to 
be his last pastorate on April 19th, 1893. 

It proved to be a very happy and successful one. The work to be 
done was different from that which had engaged his energies in pre- 
ceding pastorates. There was no new church to be built, no congrega- 
tion to be gathered and organized. Rockaway is an old and staid 
church. Yet even here opportunity presented itself for improvements,' 
and during Mr. Reeves's administration a new chapel was built and 
the old church building was thoroughly repaired and refurnished. He 
died February 20th, 1907. 



52 Necrological Report. Oct., 

As a pastor Mr. Reeves was especially successful and much beloved. 
His cheerfulness, his sympathy, his charitable spirit, his conscientious- 
ness, his sincerity, made him ever a welcome visitor in the home and 
a wise adviser in the family. Both in and outside of his own con- 
gregation he was highly esteemed. Business men welcomed his coming 
into their stores. The Royal Arcanum found in him a most enjoyable 
and companionable member. The whole community felt the influence 
of his bright and healthful presence. When he died the village of 
Rockaway mourned the loss of a man who by his character and work 
had proved himself worthy to be called its first citizen. In the pulpit 
or on the street, in the study and in the home, in devotional services 
and in the social gathering, he was always and everywhere the Chris- 
tian gentleman. 

The funeral services were held in the church he had served on 
Saturday, February 23d, 1907. It was the largest funeral ever held in 
Rockaway, and every one who had come to the church was there to 
testify to the affection and respect in which the pastor had been held. 
All classes of society were represented in the throngs, including several 
of his ministerial associates. 

Mr. Reeves was twice married. In 1878 he married Miss Frances 
Doughlass, who died in 1881. On October 6th, 1886, he married Miss 
Lizzie C. Van Dewater, who survives him. One son also survives him. 

In the death of Mr. Reeves the Presbytery loses a conscientiously 
faithful member, while his associates personally will miss a genial friend. 

THE REV. SAMUEL BAYARD DOD. 

Samuel Bayard Dod died at his home in South Orange, New Jersey, 
on April 19th, 1907. He was born in Princeton, New Jersey, on De- 
cember 3d, 1837, and was the son of Albert B. Dod, a professor of 
mathematics in Princeton College. Here Mr. Dod was educated, gradu- 
ating in 1856. He took a post-graduate course at the University of 
Berlin. His theological education was received at Princeton Seminary, 
from which he was graduated in 1862. The same year he was ordained 
to the ministry by the Presbytery of New Brunswick. From 1862 to 
1864 he was pastor at Monticello, New York, and from 1864 to 1868 
at Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. 

It was while he was in charge of the church at Wilkes-Barre that 
he was made executor-trustee of the estate of his brother-in-law, 
Edwin A. Stevens, of Hoboken, New Jersey. Soon he discovered that 
the work of looking after Mr. Stevens' estate was so large and so 
important, and that his appointment as executor involved so much, that 
he decided to resign his pastorate, and devote his entire time to carry 
out the wishes of his brother-in-law, who had provided in his will for 
the establishment of an educational institution, without defining its 
character. 

Mr. Dod set himself to devise plans by which the terms of Mr. 
Stevens' will might be most wisely and usefully complied with. After 



1907- Necrological Report. 53 

much deliberation, and consultation with others, it seemed best to 
found a technical school, inasmuch as Mr. Stevens belonged to a family 
prominent in engineering and mechanical work, and especially as there 
were but few institutions of the kind in this country at that time. 
Mr. Dod read widely upon the subject, and traveled extensively, ob- 
serving technical schools in Europe, thus making as careful preparation 
for the new enterprise as possible. In 1871 he announced his plans, 
and proposed that a beginning be made at once. A Board of Trustees 
was formed, with Mr. Dod as its President, and the school was founded 
in accordance with his design. 

Stevens Institute is his monument. He watched over it from the 
beginning with the utmost care, and gave to its development the best 
he had to give. In addition to the presidency of the Board of Trustees 
of Stevens Institute, he occupied several other positions of trust. He 
was a trustee of Princeton University, and President of the First 
National Bank of Hoboken. He was also at different times connected 
with the Hudson Trust Company, and the Hoboken ferry, gas and water 
companies. 

Mr. Dod was a man of extensive learning and broad culture, and 
though for many years he was deeply interested in business of various 
kinds, he still found time to devote to literary and artistic studies. He 
wrote and painted for relaxation, and the work which he did on the 
borders and ceiling decorations of his home in South Orange revealed 
his talent as an artist, and his love of the beautiful. He was the 
author of two books, one entitled "Stubble or Wheat," and the other 
"A Highland Parish." 

4 Mr. Dod was a man of retiring disposition, shunning notoriety, doing 
his splendid work and making his numerous benevolent gifts in an 
unostentatious manner. 

At the time of his death he was President of the Board of Trustees 
of the First Church of South Orange, and in whatever church he wor- 
shiped he was actively engaged in its work, a loyal friend and wise 
counsellor of the pastor. 

He is survived by a widow, who is a daughter of the Reverend Pro- 
fessor Edward Wall, a member of the Presbytery of Morris and Orange. 
Three children by his first wife also survived him. They are Miss 
Isabel Green Dod, of South Orange, Mrs. Sidney M. Colgate, of Orange, 
and Albert B. Dod, of Havana, Cuba. 

Funeral services were conducted at his late home by Rev. Stanley 
White, D.D., and Rev. John F. Patterson, D.D., on April 22d, 1907, 
and the body was interred in Rosedale Cemetery, Orange. 

Presbytery of Newark. 

THE REV. GEORGE S. HALL 

was born in Derby, England, in 1848, and graduated from Nottingham 
Congregational College and Theological Seminary in 1876. He then 



54 Neurological Report. Oct., 

took a post graduate course in Durham University, and was ordained to 
the ministry February 21 st, 1877. He then assumed the pulpit of 
Fawcett Congregational Church, Cumberland, where he remained eleven 
years. In June, 1889, he came to this country with his family. His 
first charge here was the Second Congregational Church in Santiago, 
Cuba. He was then transferred to the Congregational Church at 
Howells, Orange county, N. Y., and served for five years, when -he 
was called to the Wickliffe Presbyterian Church of Newark, N. J. He 
was received by the Presbytery of Newark July 1st, 1901 ; installed 
pastor of the Wickliffe Church October 2d, 1901. Here he served faith- 
fully and successfully for almost six years, when death by apoplexy 
suddenly ended his labors. 

He had but recently returned from his summer vacation, in seeming 
excellent health, when, after having conducted his weekly prayer- 
meeting and retiring to rest, he suddenly became ill, lost consciousness 
and remained in that state to the end. He died September nth, 1907, 
and was, after impressive funeral services in his church, laid at rest 
in Linden Cemetery September 14th, 1907. 

Mr. Hall is survived by a widow, two sons and a daughter. 

Presbytery of New Brunswick. 

THE REV. HENRY CLAY CAMERON, PH.D., D.D., 

son of John and Anna (McFall) Cameron, was born September ist, 
1827, in Sheperdstown, Va. He made a public confession of his faith 
in the Bridge Street Presbyterian Church of Georgetown, D. C, at the 
age of seventeen. His preparatory studies were pursued in Georgetown 
under James McVean, and he graduated from Princeton College in 
1847. The next three years were spent in teaching at King George 
Court House, Va. He entered the Seminary at Princeton in 1850, 
graduating therefrom in 1855. During his Seminary course he was 
joint principal of the Edge Hill School at Princeton, 1851-52, and tutor 
in Princeton College, 1852-55. This extra work accounts for the pro- 
longing of his course in the Seminary. He was licensed by the Presby- 
tery of Philadelphia, October 5th, 1859, and ordained an evangelist by 
the same Presbytery, February 1st, 1863. Immediately upon his gradua- 
tion from the Seminary he began what proved to be his life work, the 
teaching of Greek language and literature in Princeton College. From 
1855 to i860 he was adjunct professor of Greek in the college, and 
associate professor from i860 to 1861. From the latter date he was 
full professor of Greek, and continued such until the advancing in- 
firmities of age compelled him to give up the work of his chair and he 
was made professor emeritus in 1904, upon the fifty-second anniversary 
of his entering the service of the College of New Jersey. In addition 
to teaching in the Greek department, he was instructor in French from 
1859 to 1870, and the librarian of the college from 1865 to 1873. He 
continued his residence in Princeton until his death, October 23d, 1906, 



IQ07- Necroeogical Report. 55 

in the Presbyterian Hospital of New York City, after an operation, 
from which he was unable to rally, in the 80th year of his age. He 
received the degree of Ph.D. from Princeton in 1866 and the 
degree of D.D. from both Rutgers College and Wooster University 
in 1875. Dr. Cameron was clerk of the faculty of Princeton Col- 
lege from 1882 to 1903. He was also for many years a member of 
the Committee on Necrology »f Princeton Seminary. He prepared 
the triennial catalogues of Princeton College, which were printed 
in the Latin language from 1866 to 1893. He was a commissioner 
to the General Assembly at Cleveland in 1875, at Omaha in 1877 and at 
St. Louis in 1900. He published articles in the Princeton Review, 
Hours at Home, Johnson's & Appleton's Encyclopedias, and in the daily 
and religious papers. He also published a history o-f the American 
Whig Society. He assisted the late Professor Guyot in his series of 
classical wall maps of Greece, Italy and the Roman Empire. He also 
published numerous articles in the Princeton Press. 

Dr. Cameron was married September 14th, 1858, in Princeton, N. J., 
to Mina Louise Cecile Chollet, who survives him with one son, 
Professor Arnold Guyot Cameron. 

These dates, appointments, services and honors are the way-marks 
of a life earnestly devoted to the service of the College of New Jersey 
and the Presbyterian Church. Princeton had no more faithful lover 
and the Church no better servant than Dr. Cameron. 

He was always a faithful presbyter, attending with conscientious care 
the meetings of the ecclesiastical judicatories to which he belonged, and 
giving able and valuable service in matters of importance to the Church 
and the ministry. 

Sorrows clouded Dr. Cameron's later years, in which he had the 
sympathy of friends who knew his distinguished services and appre- 
ciated his virtues. He was buried in the Princeton Cemetery, where 
he rests in the company of many of those whose work he shared, and 
with whose honored names his own will ever be associated. 

Presbytery of West Jersey. 

THE REV. CHESTER BRIDGMAN, 

son of Clark and Sophronia (Clark) Bridgman, was born July 3d, 
1833, in West Hampton, Mass. He united with the Congregational 
Church at West Hampton, Mass., at the age of seventeen. He was 
prepared for college at Williston Seminary, East Hampton, Mass. He 
entered Amherst College in 1852, and was graduated in the class of 
1856. He entered Columbia Theological Seminary, Columbia, S. C, in 
1856, and spent one year there. He entered the Theological Seminary 
at Princeton in 1857, middle class, spent two years there and was 
graduated. He was licensed at Whately, Maine, May 4th, 1858, by the 
Hampshire West Congregational Association. On May 1st, 1859, he 
became stated supply of the Woodstown and Swedesboro churches, 



56 Necrological Report. Oct., 

Presbytery of West Jersey. Having been called to the pastorate of 
these cEurches, he was received as a licentiate by the Presbytery of 
West Jersey, and was ordained by them January 5th, i860, being in- 
stalled pastor of the Woodstown Church on January 5th, i860, and 
pastor of the Swedesboro Church on January 6th, i860. This relation 
was dissolved on November 17th, 1863. Having been called to the Con- 
gregational Church of Ludlow, Mass., ke was dismissed by the Presby- 
tery of West Jersey, April 20th, 1864, to the Hampden East Congre- 
gational Association, and was by them received May 3d, 1864. He 
served the Congregational Church at Ludlow, Mass., as pastor, 1864- 
1866, and afterwards the Congregational Church at Medfield, Mass., as 
stated supply, 1867-1868, having been dismissed to the Mendon Con- 
gregational Association of Massachusetts on May 7th, 1867.' He was 
received again into the Presbytery of West Jersey on October 7th, 1869, 
from the Hampden East Congregational Association. He was installed 
over the Williamstown Church, Presbytery of West Jersey, on October 
18th, 1869, from which charge he was released on July nth, 1871. 
Having received a call to the Upper Mount Bethel Church, he was 
dismissed by the Presbytery of West Jersey to the Presbytery of Lehigh 
on July nth, 1871. He served the church at Upper Mount Bethel 
as pastor-elect, 1871-1873. He returned to Woodstown, N. J., in 1874, 
and was received again into the Presbytery of West Jersey from the 
Presbytery of Lehigh on April 28th, 1875. He continued to reside at 
Woodstown, N. J., until he resumed the active duties of the ministry 
in 1878. Though retaining his membership in the West Jersey Presby- 
tery, he acted as stated supply of the Congregational Church of 
Torringford, Conn., 1 878-1879, and afterwards as stated supply of the 
Congregational Church of Greenfield Hill, Conn., 1879-1881. 

In 1 881 he returned to Woodstown, N. J., having retired from the 
active work of the ministry, and resided there till 1887. He then resided 
at Bordentown, N. J., at Haddonfield, N. J., and also at Merchantville, 
N. J., but returned again to Woodstown, N. J., in 1905, and resided 
there till his death. 

He died, aged 73 years, 10 months and 20 days, on May 23d, 1907, 
in Philadelphia, Pa., of nephritis, at the Hospital of St. Agnes. 

He was buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery, Woodstown, N. J. 

He was a Commissioner to the General Assembly at St. Louis, Mo., 
in 1890. 

He contributed numerous articles to the religious newspapers, and 
many of them attracted attention as being of more than ordinary value. 
His tract of eight pages, entitled "Come to Me," is still published by 
the American Tract Society. This tract grew out of an article pub- 
lished by him in the "Presbyterian." 

He published a sermon, sixteen pages, Salem, N. J., i860, entitled 
"The Mechanism of Man." 

He was married May 30th, 1861, at Bridgeton, N. J., to Miss Sarah 
H. Reed, of Woodstown, N. J., who, with one daughter, survives him. 



jgo/. Necrological Report. _ 57 



THE REV. JOHN TURNER, 

.son of Michael and Ellen Turner, was born November 1st, 1838, in 
Manchester, England. He came to this country in his early manhood, 
and resided in New York City. He was a sailor by occupation, and 
had served on a British man-of-war as a powder boy in the Crimean 
war. He was converted in New York City during the great revival 
of 1857, under the preaching of Rev. Dr. Charles John Jones, himself 
a sailor and then pastor of the Mariners' Church of New York City, 
and afterwards so well known as the Chaplain of Sailors' Snug Harbor, 
Staten Island, N. Y. When nearly nineteen years of age, he made a 
public confession of his faith, and was received, after baptism, on 
August 2d, 1857, into the Mariners' Church of the Port of New York, 
an undenominational church. He began his course of preparation for 
the gospel ministry while a member of the Mariners' Church, but hav- 
ing decided to enter the ministry of the Presbyterian Church, he was 
dismissed from the Mariners' Church on May 2d, i860, and was re- 
ceived, June 7th, i860, by the First Presbyterian Church of New York 
City, which church, through its pastors, interested themselves in his 
welfare during the next ten years. He was prepared for college in 
Woodbridge, N. J., at the Elm Tree Institute, under Prof. Thomas 
Harvey Morris. During his summer vacations he was employed in 
the Five Points House of Industry, New York City. He entered the 
College of New Jersey in 1863, and was graduated with the class of 
1867. Entering the Theological Seminary at Princeton in the fall of 
the same year, he took the full course, three years, and was graduated 
in 1870. He was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of New York 
City (O. S.), on August 14th, 1869. 

He was ordained by the Presbytery of Hudson, on May 26th, 1870, 
being at the same time installed pastor of the church of Hopewell, 
Orange county, N. Y. He served this church for over nineteen years 
with much success. Only one year of his pastorate passed without 
additions on profession of faith, and twice in his ministry the church 
at Hopewell was blessed with gracious revivals of religion. His wife's 
continued ill health and his own gradually failing health were the 
immediate causes of the dissolution of the pastoral relation, which took 
place September 17th, 1889. He took up his residence temporarily at 
Burnside, Orange county, N. Y., and resided there till he was called 
to his next pastorate, at Deerfield, New Jersey. He was called to 
Deerfield Church, Presbytery of West Jersey, on March nth, 1893, 
and was installed there August 23d, 1893. His health again failing 
him, the pastoral relation was dissolved June 30th, 1896. He was 
never again able to resume the active duties of the ministry. He 
removed to Bridgeton, N. J., and resided there from 1897 until he 
died, on October 22d, 1906, aged 68 years. He was buried in the 
cemetery connected with the Brick (Dutch) Reformed Church, near 
Montgomery, Orange county, New York. He was a commissioner to 



58 Necrologicai, Report. Oct., 

General Assembly at Buffalo, N. Y., in 1881. He was married on 
October 4th, 1871, at Hamptonburg, New York, to Margaret Hanford 
Young, who survives him. He was a fine speaker and a man most 
interesting in his personality. He had an iron will and a strong intel- 
lect. 

WM. W. KNOX, 

Chairman. 



iqo/. Synodical Home Missions. 59 



III.— REPORT OF THE PERMANENT COMMITTEE ON 
SYNODICAL HOME MISSIONS. 

PERSONAL NOTES. 

In April last the Rev. William Thomson withdrew from the chair- 
manship of the Synodical Home Mission Committee of the Presbytery 
of Newton, and so ceased to be a member of Synod's Committee. At 
the same time he gave up the pastorate after a service in the ministry 
of fifty years. Mr. Thomson had been a member of the Synod's Com- 
mittee on Church Extension and Home Missions, which was super- 
seded by the present Synodical plan in 1886. He became a member of 
the new committee created under that plan, and has rendered con- 
tinuous service upon it for more than twenty years. Last of the fathers 
who inaugurated this work and longest in official service in it, he has 
abundantly earned the gratitude of the whole Synod, even as through 
all these years he won and held the admiration of his associates on the 
committee, for his wise counsel and unvarying courtesy, his systematic 
methods and his unflagging zeal. 

Rev. Percy Y. Schelly, appointed by the Presbytery to the vacant 
position, has already taken his place upon our Committee and begun 
to render effective service. 

In April the Treasurer received a check for $1,000.00 for Synodical 
Home Missions. It bore the date of the day upon which its maker, 
Mr. Ralph Voorhees, of the Clinton Church, Presbytery of Elizabeth, 
passed from earth. Mr. Voorhees has been the largest individual 
giver to this cause in recent years. Beginning in 1901 with a gift of 
$100.00, he increased his annual gift the next year to $500.00, and this 
was again increased in 1905 to $1,000.00, which amount he gave each 
year since. This gift has been independent of the gifts of the church 
and Presbytery and in excess of their apportionments. In the provi- 
dence of God these gifts of his servant began to come just as the new 
demands for evangelizing the immigrants were pressed upon us, and it 
has been in large measure by means of these gifts that Synod has been 
able to advance as rapidly as it has in this work. We may well give 
thanks for the grace of God manifest through this liberal follower of 
Christ, and pray that the God of all grace will raise up others to 
continue and enlarge the work thus bereft of its most generous sup- 
porter. 

In August Edward Shields MacConnell, then serving in one of our 
aided fields, the Absecon Church, perished beneath the waves whose 
roar is in our ears as we meet here. Mr. MacConnell was grandson 
of Rev. Edward P. Shields, D.D., of our Synod, and son of Rev. John 
S. MacConnell, late of Pittsburgh, Pa. He was securing an education 
largely through his own efforts, and had passed through Wooster 
University and the Junior year at Princeton Seminary. He intended 



60 Synodical Home Missions. Oct., 

to become a foreign missionary. He was out in a sailing boat with 
friends when one of the number, who could not swim, fell overboard. 
Mr. MacConnell, himself an expert swimmer, instantly leaped into the 
sea to rescue him, but both went down to death. The spirit of true 
heroism and self-sacrifice, so often shown in the foreign field and upon 
the frontiers of our own land, is not wanting in those who are seeking 
to save their fellow-men in the mission fields of our own State. 

FINANCIAL COMPARISONS. 

Receipts. — Although Synod did not celebrate the twenty-first year of 
Synodical Home Missions by raising twenty-one thousand dollars for 
this cause, as we began to hope it would, it almost attained. The 
current receipts for the year were $20,763.82, a gain of $604.72 over 
last year, of this $563.12 was in increased contributions. 

This increase was needed. Excluding money received for specified 
objects, the receipts for the general work were $20,529.70; the ex- 
penditures for the same amounted to $20,255.90, but $34.80 less. A 
margin of less than $35.00 in a business of over $20,000, extending over 
a year, involving payments to over a hundred fields by eight independent 
Presbyteries, and collections from 350 churches, with the exact result 
only ascertainable when the books have closed, is an uncomfortably 
close margin for those having the matter in charge. It is very im- 
portant that there should be a good surplus, for under the conservative 
methods pursued this balance furnishes the basis and the measure of 
the new work to be undertaken in the succeeding year. 

As for years past, Elizabeth Presbytery leads in the gross amount 
contributed with a total of $4,303.00. The churches exceeded the 
apportionment of the Presbytery by more than $100.00 and the gifts of 
last year by nearly $250.00. 

Morris and Orange comes second with $3,312.15, $6.15 more than its 
apportionment and $11.12 more than last year. 

New Brunswick's total is $3,158.60. made up by exactly meeting her 
apportionment, and adding $260.00 for special work among Italians 
within her own fields. The Presbytery thus exceeds her previous gifts 
by $166.05. 

West Jersey gave $2,425.45, overleaping her apportionment by 
$111.71 and exceeding last year by $211.04. 

The total from Newark Presbytery is $2,217.19. This is $854.01 less 
than Synod asked and than the Presbytery intended and expected to 
raise, but it is $108.50 better than last year. 

But we do you to wit, brethren, the grace of God bestowed on the 
Presbytery of Jersey City and its churches. They not only gave this 
year $2,266.76, thus exceeding their apportionment by $59.62 and their 
own record by $162.44, but in addition the Presbytery, impressed by 
the need and opportunity for this work, voted unanimously that their 
apportionment for next year should be raised two cents per member. 
Complaints about the apportionment, requests to reduce it, have not 



1907. Synodical Home Missions. 6i 

been unfamiliar, but such a request as this never before rejoiced the 
ears of the Committee. 

Monmouth, the prompt, again met her obligations by a total of 
$1,857.71, which was $79.31 beyond her apportionment, and $98.41 beyond 
last year's gifts. 

Newton Presbytery gave $957.59; $367.25 less than the apportionment, 
but within $41.12 of the gifts of last year. 

These figures make evident, as nothing else could, that interest in 
this work and appreciation of its value, is growing all over the State. 

The Distribution. — The fresh calls and consequent distribution have 
been as widespread as the gain in interest and ingathering. 

In every Presbytery, save Monmouth, more money has been spent 
this year than last. In Monmouth, the growth in self help has thus 
far enabled the Presbytery to keep pace with the calls for new work. 

Payment to Morris and Orange increased $54.50; to Newton, $87.48; 
to Jersey City, $95.66; to New Brunswick (provided for by special con- 
tributions), $207.83; to West Jersey, $227.85; to Newark $229.20; to 
Elizabeth, $296.25. 

The making of maps, printing and distributing of the pamphlet, 
"Twenty Years of Synodical Home Missions in New Jersey," to all 
ministers and elders throughout the Synod, increased the administra- 
tion account by $145. 

In all, including administration, $1,082.05 more was expended for the 
work this year than last. 

TABULATED RESULTS. 

The reports from the separate fields are not complete in numbers or 
details. The tabulation of those received yields the following figures : 

Aid has been given for the payment of 73 ordained ministers, and 19 
unordained workers, a total of 92. These have in almost all cases been 
employed for the entire year. They have preached more than 7,060 
sermons. They have conducted more than 2,700 prayer meetings ; made 
at least 20,000 pastoral visits ; baptized 405 infants and 74 adults. There 
have been received into the churches and missions on certificate 326, 
and upon profession of faith, 472. The total Communicants number 
5,900. 

Ninety-five Sunday-schools report almost 7,000 members. Missionary 
and Aid Societies of Women, and Young People's Societies are general; 
a few have Men's Societies. The Missions among foreigners generally 
have a beneficiary society connected with them. 

The Synodical aid has helped to make available about 90 church 
edifices and chapels, worth over $400,000, with which manses, worth 
$100,000, have been connected. Upon these properties debts amounting 
to $65,000 now rest. The aided churches and missions raised during 
the year for the payment of debts, over $5,000; for new buildings 
(chiefly in Newark), about $20,000; for repairs and improvements, over 
$8,000; for pastor's salaries, over $32,000; for current expenses, $18,000; 



62 Synodical Home Missions. Oct., 

a total for their own work of over $80,000, or four times the amount 
of aid given. 

These aided churches and missions further contributed to beneficence, 
including church boards and other causes outside their own bounds, 
nearly $6,000. Thus yielding a direct money return to the church at 
large, in a single year, of 30 per cent, upon the amount of aid expended. 

QUESTIONS SUGGESTED. 

These reports show a large amount of faithful work done, and valu- 
able results secured at relatively small outlay. They start certain ques- 
tions which seem worthy of serious attention by Synod, Presbyteries, 
Committees and workers. 

Salaries. Twenty thousand dollars of aid may seem large in the 
aggregate, but when it comes to be distributed among over 100 places, 
many of which are served by ministers with families dependent on them, 
the impression is reversed. The average aid is little more than $200.00 
per man, or at the rate of $4.00 a week. 

When the amount reported as raised by these churches and missions 
themselves has been added, the figures would show an average salary 
of less than $600.00. This is doubtless too low for the average, 
but many have been down to that figure and some below it. This is 
sometimes also without manse. To-day even the most liberally sup- 
ported ministers are made sensible of the great increase in the cost 
of living. We have passed resolutions that salaries ought not to be 
less than $800.00 and a house. Is it not time to set definitely to work 
to realize this sufficiently low ideal? The immediate control of this 
matter is in the hands of the several presbyteries, but the concurrent 
action of the whole Synod will help directly and indirectly. Where 
aided churches can themselves increase, they should be stimulated to 
increase the support of the minister. Where this is not possible, an 
increased aid should be given. This will call for larger gifts from all 
the churches. 

Prayer-meetings and Out-stations. — In some fields, particularly in 
rural districts, no prayer-meetings or out-station work is reported, and 
in others it is stated that no prayer-meetings are held. The scattered 
residence of the people is doubtless the chief reason for lack of prayer- 
meetings, but does not this very fact call for neighborhood meetings, at 
least during favorable seasons. School houses are commonly available 
for work in sections not directly in touch with the church edifice. The 
rural communities are rapidly rivaling the cities in non-church going 
habits, and the minister and his earnest people must go out after the 
uninterested, carrying the church to them, if they will not come to the 
church. 

Visits. — In many reports it is stated that no record of pastoral visits 
is kept. The number reported by different men varies greatly. Ought 
we not to hold ourselves and one another up to the systematic and 
vigorous prosecution of this most important phase of pastoral work? 



jgoy. Synodicai, Home Missions. 63 

That he be a house-going minister is one of the first essentials for any 
man's real success in the pastorate, and above all in missionary fields. 

Evangelists. — In some Presbyteries the question of employing an 
evangelist who shall devote his whole time to holding evangelistic meet- 
ings in the several churches has been mooted. The Synodicai Con- 
ference at Indianapolis favored the appointment of such men to work 
under synodicai, rather than presbyterial, direction. The synods of 
Ohio and Illinois have several such. The Synod of New York had one 
last year. It is a fair question whether this Synod should not have 
one or more such men to aid the pastors in special evangelistic services 
in our mission fields without charge to the churches other than a free- 
will offering. A group of laymen in Chester Presbytery has provided 
the salary for such a man with satisfactory results for several years. 

In general, then, there appears call and opportunity in our mission 
fields for more aggressive work, which may be answered in part, at 
least, by better support, more activity and, if need be, new agencies. 

OUR NEGRO POPULATION. 

The needs of the colored people in different parts of the State have 
been brought to the notice of the Committee during the past year. 
The negro population has more .than doubled in twenty-five years, 
rising from less than forty thousand (38,853) in 1880 to nearly eighty 
thousand (79,485) in 1905. There are over thirty thousand more colored 
people in the State now than there were fifteen years ago. Three colored 
Presbyterian churches were established previous to the civil war, which 
still exist — Plane Street, Newark ; Siloam, Elizabeth, and Witherspoon 
Street, Princeton. Bethel Mission, Plainfield, was started about 
twenty years ago; Bethany Chapel, Englewood, somewhat later. 
Jericho Church, West Jersey Presbytery; St. Augustine Church, Pater- 
son, and Lafayette Church, Jersey City, originated still later. This 
makes for the whole State six churches and two small missions. But 
what are they among so many? Three Presbyteries have no organized 
work at all for colored people. Several of the colored churches are 
not now in good condition. They report, all told, a little over 500 
members with a slightly greater number in the Sunday schools. It 
may be thought that the tens of thousands of these people are looked 
after by other churches. But so far as we have been able to discover, 
the aggregate number of colored churches of other denominations 
does not much exceed one hundred, with an enrolled membership of 
not more than 20,000. 

It may be said fairly that our past efforts for the negro have not 
been very encouraging. But may not this be due in some measure to 
lack of care and vigor in its prosecution? To assert that the spirit 
and methods of our church are not suited to reach and influence the 
negro is to reflect not on him, but ourselves. But it has been proven, 
both in Africa and America, that with proper ministers we can do 
much for these people. It is the testimony of well-informed men, 
both of their own race and ours, that the indirect as well as direct 



64 Synodical Home Missions. Oct. r 

influence of Presbyterian teaching and worship is both needed and is- 
effective in promoting intelligence, morality and true piety in the 
members of this race. There is now in the city where we meet a body 
of intelligent and earnest colored men and women who are petitioning 
to be organized as a Presbyterian Church. If we can secure funds to 
warrant it, would not the appointment of a general missionary and 
evangelist for the colored people of the State be a wise step? In this 
way pertinent information could be obtained and effective measures to 
meet the need could be carried out. 

OUR IMMIGRANTS. 

The stream of non-English speaking immigrants continues to flow 
with increasing volurffe into and over the State. In every Presbytery 
the call has come in the past year to take up fresh work among them. 
In each of the Presbyteries of Jersey City, Morris and Orange, Newark, 
Elizabeth, New Brunswick, Monmouth, and West Jersey, new Italian 
missions have been undertaken. The Italians are everywhere and are 
generally accessible. Definite work has been carried on among them 
at eighteen different points during the year. Newton has received a 
Hungarian Church, and is tentatively at work among these people at 
two other places. The work in our seven Hungarian missions is still 
seriously disturbed by the factional efforts of the ministers of the 
National Church, and needs fostering care. 

The Board of Publication and S. S. Work has supported throughout 
the year a Ruthenian colporteur laboring chiefly among his own people, 
under direction of this Committee, in Newark and adjacent cities. 
We provided rooms for him in Newark for meetings and for a printing 
office, from which the only evangelical publication in that tongue in 
the United States was issued. This is all we have been able to do for 
the Slavic races, whose members have constituted nearly forty per 
cent, of the immigration into the State for the past eight years, and 
probably now number 150,000 to 200,000 souls. Work was carried on 
at two points each for Armenians and for Syrians. 

SHALL WE DO IT? 

Surely if the idea exists anywhere that the mission work of the 
Synod of New Jersey is a small and unimportant factor among the 
objects presented for the gifts of the churches, that idea will be 
banished by the facts just presented. Our opportunities constitute our 
obligations. As a Synod we have undertaken to do whatever home 
missionary work needs to be done within our own State. We have 
fairly kept pace with this work in the past. But it is evident that to 
meet present emergencies we should make immediate and very con- 
siderable advance in working force and in the means to sustain the 
workers. The Presbytery of Jersey City, seeing this in her own field, 
has already taken a forward step. Whether the apportionments are 
generally advanced or not, there is call for pastors and sessions, for 
churches and individuals to recognize, in even greater measure than 
in the past, that the apportionment is only the minimum need. Unless 



igo7- Synodical Home Missions. 65 

it is raised, the work already begun will suffer. The call for advance 
work must be answered by a liberality largely in excess of the appor- 
tionments heretofore asked. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

1. That the Synod express by a rising vote its thanks to Mr. William 
Paxton Stevenson for his efficient and laborious services as Treasurer, 
which have been rendered entirely without cost to the Synod. 

2. That in view of the retirement of the Rev. William Thomson 
from the Committee on Synodical Home Missions, Synod hereby makes 
record of its appreciation of his long and faithful service in the Home 
Missionary work of Synod, extending over more than twenty-three 
years, expresses to him the gratitude of Synod for the same, and 
directs that the Stated Clerk communicate this action to him. 

3. That the Synod approves the holding of an Intersynodical Con- 
ference on Synodical Mission Work, and authorizes the Committee 
to send delegates, if such conference is held. 

4. That from the balance in the treasury the sum of $1,500 be and 
hereby is set aside as a special fund, subject to the control of Synod's 
Committee for new or exceptional work ; and that additions to this 
fund, either subject to the Committee or for objects designated by the 
donors, be invited. It is understood that such special gifts shall not 
be counted as a part of the apportionment of any Presbytery or church. 

5. That the several Presbyteries be asked to raise, respectively, the 
following amounts for the current year : 

Elizabeth $3,500 00 

Jersey City, 2,500 00 

Monmouth, 2,000 00 

Morris and Orange 3,600 00 

Newark 3,400 00 

New Brunswick, 3.300 00 

Newton, 1.325 00 

West Jersey, 2,600 00 



$22,225 00 

6. That the several Presbyteries be allowed to draw on the treasury 
for sums not exceeding, respectively, the following: 

Elizabeth, $2,250 00 

Jersey City, 3,200 00 

Monmouth 3,350 00 

Morris and Orange, 1,800 00 

Newark 3-400 00 

New Brunswick, 1,950 00 

Newton, 1.325 00 

West Jersey, 4,450 00 

Administration, 500 00 

r $22,225 00 



o6 Synodical Home Missions. Oct., 

7. That the Twentieth Annual Report of the Woman's Synodical 
Society for Home Missions in the Synod of New Jersey be approved 
and that the congratulations of the Synod be extended to this society 
and its auxiliaries upon the work of the past year. 

SAMUEL McLANAHAN, 

Chairman. 



1907. Treasurer's Report — Home Missions. 67 



IV. TREASURER'S REPORT— SYNODICAL HOME MISSIONS. 

To the Synod of New Jersey: 

I present to you herewith my report as Treasurer of the Synodical 
Home Mission Funds for the twenty-first fiscal year, beginning October 
1st, 1906, and ending September 30th, 1907. 

The receipts have been as follows : 

To balance according to last annual report — 

General work, $1,740 07 

Van Meter Fund, 182 8a 

contributions from Presb. of Elizabeth, $3,303 00 

" Mr. Ralph Voorhees, Eliza- 
beth, 1,000 00 

" Presb. of Jersey City, 2,266 76 

' Monmouth, 1,857 71 

' Morris & Orange, 3,312 15 

' Newark, 2,217 19 

' New Brunswick,. 3,158 60 

' Newton, 957 59 

' West Jersey, .... 2,425 45 

20,498 45 

interest on bank balances, 52 25 

Van Meter Fund, West Jersey Presbytery, 213 12 



Total receipts for the year, $22,686 jj 

The disbursements to ministers and missionaries have been as fol- 
lows : 

In Presbytery of Elizabeth, $1,776 25 

" Jersey City 2,590 66 

Monmouth, 3,332 66 

" Morris and Orange, 1,730 00 

' Newark, 2,381 70 

' New Brunswick, i,955 00 

' Newton, 875 00 

" West Jersey, 4,163 09 

For administration expenses 447 39 

$19,251 75 

Out of the balance on hand October 1st, 1906, there has been 
expended for special work: 

In Presbytery of Elizabeth, $300 00 

" Newark, 275 00 

" Newton, 229 15, 



68 Treasurer's Report — Home Missions. Oct., 

In Presbytery of West Jersey $200 00 

' New Brunswick — special contributions were 

used, 260 00 

Payment account of Van Meter Fund, 130 00 

Balance to be carried to next year's work, 1,823 97 

" credit of Van Meter Fund, 216 90 

$22,686 77 

The following schedules are annexed to and form a part of this 
report : 

Schedule I. Showing the payments made to aid-receiving churches, 
the contributions received from congregations, Sabbath-schools, soci- 
eties and individuals, and the total contributions received from each 
church. 

Schedule II. Showing the total contributions received from the re- 
spective Presbyteries. 

Schedule III. Showing the amounts which the various Presbyteries 
were asked to contribute, and the amounts received from them re- 
spectively. 

Schedule IV. Showing the appropriations to the different Presby- 
teries, the amounts paid for services during the year, and the unused 
balances of appropriations which have fallen into the General Fund 
under the provisions of Article VI, Section 6, of the plan revised Octo- 
ber 17th, 1900. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. P. STEVENSON, 

Treasurer. 
Dated RosELLE, N. J., October 8th, 1907. 



1907. 



Treasurer's Retort — Home Missions. 



69 



Schedule i. 

Showing the payments made to aid-receiving churches, the contribu- 
tions received from congregations, Sabbath-schools, societies and indi- 
viduals, and the total contributions received from each church. 



NAMES OF CHURCHES. 


Payments to aid- 
receiving churches. 


Contributions from 
congregations. 


Contributions from 
Sabbath-schools. 


Contributions from 
societies. 

Contributions from 
individuals. 


c 

O «i 
'X2 <y 

SB 

u 3 

a-* 
o° 

°B 

— c 

O 


WITHIN PRESBYTERY OF ELIZABETH. 




$102 00 








$102 00 




$200 00 










10 00 

14 40 

15 00 
80 00 
21 90 
50 00 

117 00 

65 00 

103 57 








10 00 

14 40 

15 00 
80 00 
21 90 
50 00 

117 00 

65 00 

131 40 

260 00 


































1 00 00 









































$27 83 

260 00 

60 76 






2d 








3d 




89 24 

20 00 

130 55 

19 84 

2 65 

204 60 

8 83 














20 












130 55 
19 84 

2 65 
204 60 

8 83 














1 2 5 00 


















200 00 

341 35 

510 00 
300 00 


















1 1 70 
1 00 
5i 30 
61 80 
53 10 
5 00 
73 So 

1 16 00 
"5 50 
282 60 

25 50 
118 50 

79 80 

26 19 

117 00 
170 70 

10 00 
115 00 

60 00 
275 00 

67 00 








1 1 70 


















5i 30 

61 80 

53 10 

5 00 

73 80 

121 39 

115 50 

287 60 

25 50 

118 50 

79 80 

29 14 

117 00 

170 70 















































5 39 




















$5 00 




Bethel Chapel 




























2 95 














2d 












300 00 








Roselle 


50 00 






165 00 
60 00 

275 00 
67 OO 

IOOO 00 














| 




1 




















$1000 00 








1 




Totals 


1 
$2076 25 | 


$2891 07I 


$406 93 1 


$5 00 


$1000 00 


$4303 00 



yo 



Treasurer's Report — Home Missions. 



Oct., 



Schedule i — (Continued). 




Bayonne, Christ, 
Carlstadt, German, 
Englewood, ist 

West Side, 
Garfield, 
Grantwood, 
Hackensack, ist, 
Hoboken, ist, 
Jersey City, ist, 
" ^d, 

Claremont, 
" Tno. Knox, 

Westminster, 
Lafayette, 
Leonia. 
Norwood, 
Newfoundland 
Passaic, ist 

" German 

" Grace, 
" Wallington 

Paterson, ist, 
2d, 

'.'. 3d, „ 

ist German 
" Broadway German 

" Church of the Redeemer, 

■" Dundee Lake 

" East Side, 

" Lake View 

" Madison Avenue, 

" St. Augustine, 

" Westminster, 

" Albion Place, 

" Arnienian 

Ridgewood, ist, 
Rutherford, ist, 

Lyndhurst 
Kingsland, 
Emanuel, 
Shady Side, Hungarian, 
Tenafly, 
Teaneck 
West Hoboken 

Armenian 
" Syrian, 

West Mil ford, 
Wood Ridge, 



2266 76 



1907. 



Treasurer's Report — Home Missions. 



7i 



Schedule i — {Continued). 



* 

NAMES OF CHURCHES. 


Payments to aid- 
receiving churches. 


Contributions from 
congregations. 


Contributions from 
Sabbath-schools. 


Contributions frcm 
societies. 


Contributions from 
individuals. 


a 
^ 

j=> 

" 


~§ 


WITHIN PRESBYTERY OF MONMOUTH. 




$65 00 

68 90 

25 75 

14 10 

6 00 








$65 00 
68 90 
25 75 
14 10 






















Barnegat and 


$222 50 
16 50 

155 00 


























20 10 
74 54 
30 00 
61 93 












$12 85 


$3 00 




90 39 
30 00 
61 93 


















5 5 00 










ii 70 
125 00 
57 60 
9 10 
27 30 
29 55 
17 55 








1 1 70 
125 00 
57 60 
9 10 
27 30 
29 55 
17 55 












2d, 









































Farmingdale, and 

Oak Glen 


230 00 
















89 91 
60 00 

8 58 

26 40 
10 20 

13 52 

125 76 

8 60 

72 80 

1 00 

23 00 

24 00 
45 50 
62 40 
15 00 
58 75 
15 00 

27 60 

28 60 
8 00 

10 08 
30 24 
57 46 
52 12 

30 00 
56 16 

31 80 
21 32 








89 9i 














50 40 
180 00 

40 00 








8 58 
26 40 










Jacksonville and 














13 52 

125 76 

8 60 












34 60 










3 00 






75 80 




















23 00 

24 00 
45 50 




































10 00 






25 00 
58 75 
15 00 

27 60 

28 60 


Mt. Holly ' 








250 00 


















150 00 
















8 00 
























30 24 
57 46 
52 12 

30 00 
56 16 

31 80 
21 32 


Red Rank 






















100 00 


::::::: 














150 00 










1 




300 00 








108 52 

37 00 

21 00 

4 42 









108 52 
37 00 














210 00 

131 66 

182 00 
600 00 














4 42 




































$3332 66 


$1828 86 


$25 85 


$3 00 




$1857 71 



7-2 



Treasurer's Report — Home Missions. 



Oct., 



Schedule i — (Continued ). 



NAMES OF CHURCHES. 



1* 



E 
tfl o 

.2 « 
3 <D 

-D u 

§s 



£ . 

O W 

C o 
O <" 

II 



O rt 



! ° 



s 

•3 P 



WITHIN PRESBYTERY OP MORRIS AND 
ORANGE. 



Berkshire Valley 

Mine Hill, and 

Luxemburg, 

Boonton, ist, 

Chatham 

Chester, 

Dover Memorial, 

East Orange, ist 

Elmwood, 



$450 oo 



Arlington Avenue, 

Bethel 

Brick , 



Fairmount, 

Flanders 

German Valley, 

Hanover, 

Madison, 

Mendham, 

Morris Plains, 

Morristown, ist, 

" South Street, 

" Italian, 

Mt. Freedom, 

Mt. Olive, 

Myersville, German 

New Providence, 

New Vernon, 

Orange, ist, 

" Central, 

" German, ist. 

Hillside, 

St. Cloud, 

Orange Valley, German,.. 

Parsippany, 

Pleasantdale, German, . , 

Pleasant Grove 

Rockaway, 

Schooley's Mountain 

South Orange, ist 

Trinity, .. 

Stirling, 

Succasunna 

Summit, Central 

" North Chapel, . , 

Whippany 

Wyoming 

Wharton, Hungarian, . . 
Mr. Richard H. Allen,... 



Totals $1730 oo|$3o6i I4|$i27 86 



4S0 00 



$8 10 

8 10 

4 5° 

66 28 

98 46 

14 00 

113 23 

280 00 

8 00 

62 60 

95 98 

200 00 

17 00 

1 1 00 

6 87 



140 60 

80 00 

20 00 

275 00 

257 47 



7 00 

18 00 

5 00 

12 00 
31 64 

230 00 

250 00 

10 00 

150 00 

44 62 

13 00 
31 42 

S 00 
13 25 

45 25 
5 00 

106 20 
72 22 
10 00 
30 00 

183 55 



10 00 
10 80 



$10 00 



15 o° 
31 18 



$100 00 



$23 15I $100 00 $3312 15 



$8 10 

8 10 

4 50 

78 39 

98 46 

14 00 

173 23 

280 00 

23 00 

93 78 

95 98 

200 00 

17 00 

1 1 00 

6 87 



140 60 
80 00 
20 00 

278 15 

257 47 



7 00 

18 00 

5 00 

12 00 
31 64 

230 00 

250 00 

20 00 

150 00 

44 62 

13 00 
31 42 

5 00 
13 25 

45 25 
5 00 

115 77 
72 22 
10 00 
30 00 

183 55 



20 00 
10 80 



1907. 



Treasurer's Report — Home Missions. 



73 



Schedule i — {Continued ). 



NAMES OF CHURCHES. 



~'Z 



3^ 







Contril 
cong 


- .Q 

O 


h"3 

eg 

U 


£'■3 
c B 
o - ~ 
U 




WITHIN PRESBYTERY OF NEWARK. 
















$270 00 






















53 20 
51 43 








53 20 
5i 43 




















61 74 








61 74 












70 00 
5 00 








70 00 
5 00 












Sjoo oo 










350 00 

180 00 

300 00 

30 00 

20 00 
25 00 
25 00 








350 00 


2 d 








3 d 








300 00 
30 00 


" 6th 




































2 d 










3 d, 


20 00 

5 00 

5 00 

32 50 

10 00 








00 




650 70 








- 00 










5 00 
32 5° 






























40 00 
40 00 


!. 




40 00 

40 00 


" Forest Hill, 






" High Street 









150 00 
300 00 


20 00 
25 00 
19 65 




$20 00 






00 








00 








25 00 
27 95 


Park 


8 30 






50 00 






300 00 

184 73 

7 64 






300 00 

184 73 

7 64 










Wickliffe 









" West 




250 00 


















100 ool 13 00 






13 00 
15 00 










528 00 
228 00 


































$2656 70 $5 




$2217 19 
$140 00 


WITHIN PRESBYTERY OP NEW 
BRUNSWICK. 




$140 00 










$80 00 










50 00 

60 00 

17 00 

160 00 








50 00- 






















17 00- 




























80 00 

4 25 








80 00 
4 25 


Holland 














74 



Treasurer's Report — Home Missions. 



Oct., 



Schedule i — (Continued). 



NAMES OF CHURCHES. 



PRESBYTERY OF NEW BRUNS- 
WICK — (Con.) 



Hopewell 

Kingston, 

Kingwood 

Lambertville, 

Italian, 

Eawrenceville, 

Milford 

Mt. Airy, Amwell, 2d, 

Mt. Pleasant, Alexandria, 1st 

New Brunswick, 1st, 

2d, 

Hungarian, 1st, . . . . 

Pennington, 

Princeton, 1st, 

2d, 

Witherspoon Street, 

Italian, 

Reaville, Amwell, 1st, 

Ringoes, Amwell United, 1st, , 

" Kirkpatrick Memorial, 

Stockton 

Titusville, 

Trenton, 1st, , 

2d, 

3d 

" 4th 

5th 

" Bethany 

" E<TSt Trenton, 

" Italian 

" Prospect Street, 

Brookville, 

" Walnut Avenue 

Gift of G 

Credit of Presbytery of N. B., .... 



tn c 



C-- 






% 3 

J3 > 

'£'•3 



150 00 
300 00 



100 00 
160 00 



200 00 
100 00 



32 39 

33 00 

5 00 
190 00 



87 33 

50 00 

3 00 

15 00 

i6o 00 



75 50 

5i5 00 

50 00 

17 00 



10 50 



Totals,. 



WITHIN PRESBYTERY OF NEWTON. 



840 00 



337 
31 

105 

108 
27 
60 
21 
15 

203 



$5 00 



$6 00 



39 

25 

70I. 

87 



11 3' 
65 00 



8 30 



8 00 



100 00 
5 00 



32 39 

44 00 

5 00 

190 00 



87 33 

50 00 

3 00 

15 00 

j 60 00 



75 50 

515 00 

53 75 

17 00 



$150 00 
25 00 



M215 oo|$2758 51 



Alpha, Hungarian, 

Andover 

Asbury 

Beattystown and 
2d Mansfield, 

Beemerville 

Belvidere, 1st, 
2d, 

Blairstown, 

Bloomsbury, 

Branchville, 

Danville, 

Deckertown 

Delaware 

Franklin Furnace, 

Greenwich 

Hackettstown, . . . . 



SJ29 15 



$7 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 
50 00 



no 



$196 04I $29 05 



96 63 

20 00 

23 70| , 

20 00| . 

35 00 1 . 

1 1 oo| . 

20 00 . 

25 00 1 

no ool 



$175 00 



10 50 

12 00 

15 04 

23 00 
21 00 

337 02 
51 00 

170 25 

108 70 

27 87 

60 00 
40 00 

15 00 

303 00 

5 00 

25 00 
150 00 

25 00 



$3158 60 



$7 00 

10 00 
10 00 

6 00 
10 00 
50 00 



00 



125 00 

20 00 

23 70 

20 00 

35 00 

I I 00 

20 00 

25 00 

I 10 00 



1907. 



Treasurer's Report — Home Missions. 



75 



Schedule i — (Continued ). 



NAMES OF CHURCHES. 



WITHIN PRES. OF NEWTON (Con.) 



Hamburg 

Harmony, 

Knowlton, 

Lafayette, 

Marksboro 

Musconetcong Valley, . . . 

Newton, ist 

North Hardyston 

Oxford, ist 

2d, 

Phillipsburg, ist 

" Westminster, 

Sparta 

Stanhope, 

Stillwater 

Stewartsville 

Wantage, ist, 

Washington 

Yellow Frame 

Rev. W. S. C. Webster, . 



Totals, 



WITHIN PRESBYTERY OP WEST JERSEY. 



Absecon and _ 

Leeds Point, 

Atco, 

Atlantic City, ist 

" German, 

Olivet, 

" Chelsea 

" Westminster, . 
Audubon, Logan Memorial, . 

Berlin, 

Billingsport, and 

Swedesboro, 

Blackwood, ist 

Bridgetcn, ist, 

2d 

" 4th 

Irving Avenue, . . 

West, 

Bunker Hill, and 

Glassboro 

Camden, ist 

2d, 

3d, 

" Calvary, 

" Woodland Avenue, . 

4th, 

" Grace 

Cape May City, 

Cedarville, ist 

Osborn Memorial, 

Clayton, 

Cold Spring, 



t a 



11 43 

12 50 
10 oo 
18 25 

5 oo 



150 00 

5 00 

25 00 



22 16 
13 00 



17 00 
16 85 
41 59 

S 50 

75 00 
13 20 



$1104 15 $907 81 



M04 50 
180 00 



gc/i 



9 50 
4 9i 



$42 78 



o-s 



O rt 

•r; 3 
3:2 
£ > 



$5 00 



$5 00 



$2 00 



180 00 I 
100 00 



$12 25 

10 ool 

16 38 

70 00 $25 00 
7 00 1 

88 40' 

16 64 

32 50 

21 06 
6 00 

13 00 

20 43 

44 72 
115 00 
131 10 



185 77 
222 1 1 



17 68 

73 00 

10 14 

10 40 

164 06 

113 93 

10 40 

33 00 

13 00 

15 00 

37 44 

31 00 

31 00 

9 00 

50 00 



$2 00 



63 52 



76 



Treasurer's Report — Home Missions. 



Oct., 



Schedule i — (Continued). 



NAMES OF CHURCHES. 



WITHIN PRESBYTERY OF WEST 

jersey — (Con.) 



Collingswood, 

Daretown, Pittsgrove, 

Deerfield, 

Elmer 

Elwood, Brainerd, 

Fairfield, Fairton 

Gloucester City, 

Green Creek and 

Tuckahoe, 

Greenwich, 

Haddonfield, ist, 

Haddon Heights, 

Hammonton, ist 

Italian 

Holly Beach, 

Janvier, 
ericho, 

Laurel Springs, St. Paul's, 

Mays Landing 

Merchantville 

Millville 

Minatola, Italian, 

Ocean Citj', ist 

Pleasantville 

Salem, ist, 

Vineland 

Italian, 

Waterford 

Wenonah, Memorial, 

Williamstown, 

Woodbury, 

Woodstown 

Supplies, 

Presbyterial Missionary, ... 

Italian Work, 

Rev. Wm. Aikman, D.D., . 
Rev. Samuel H. Potter, . . 



Totals, 



'Sja 






200 00 

30 oo 
150 00 
240 00 



3^4 6 
336 32 

5 5° 00 



*3 c 



U 



30 00 
3^ 81 
52 00 
36 3° 
16 90 
3 85 
46 80 

8 25 
10 00 
30 00 

1 10 00 

15 00 

43 00 

5 00 

9 62 
20 00 

9 

15 00 
20 00 
30 00 
75 00 



30 00 

5 

60 00 
20 00 
6 80 
3 64 
93 56 
30 00 
44 79 
IS 00 



I 
$4363 09l$2i74 11 $191 34 



22 82 
10 00 



20 00 
5 00 
8 00 

5 



3-5 



f22 00 
I 00 



30 00 

42 8l 
52 00 

36 30 

16 90 

3 85 

46 80 

8 25 
10 00 
30 00 

1 10 00 

15 00 

43 00 
5 00 

9 62 
20 00 

9 10 

15 00 

20 00 

30 00 

75 00 



30 00 

5 00 
97 82 
30 00 

6 80 
3 64 

113 56 

35 00 

62 79 

20 00 



22 00 
1 00 



$37 00 



$23 00 



$2425 ^T 



1907. 



Treasurer's Report— Home Missions. 



77 



Schedule 2. 
Being a summary of columns 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of Schedule 1. 



PRESBYTERIES. 


Contributions 
from congre- 
gations. 

Contributions 
from Sabbath- 
schools. 


Contributions 
from societies. 


C . 

.2 3 

»-. S 3 

0— > 



'u 

c . 
ft 

c 
.2 

3 HI 

O.Q 
















$2,891 07 
2,078 29 
1,828 86 
3,061 14 
2,188 89 
2,758 51 
907 81 
2,174 11 


$406 93 
164 97 

25 85 
127 86 

28 30 
196 04 

42 78 
191 34 


$5 00 

23 50 

3 00 

23 IS 


$1,000 00 


$4,303 00 

$2,266 76 

1,857 71 

3,312 is 

2,217 19 

3,158 60 

957 59 

2,425 45 








Morris & Orange, . . . 


100 00 


New Brunswick, .... 


29 05 

5 00 

37 00 


175 00 

2 00 

23 00 




Totals, 


$17,888 68 


$1,184 07 


$125 70 


$1,300 00 


$20,498 45 





Schedule 3. 

Showing the amounts which the respective Presbyteries were asked to 
contribute, the amounts received, and the excess or deficiency. 



PRESBYTERIES. 



3 u.' 
O D 

< 



o £ 

< 



Corisco, 

Elizabeth 

Jersey City, 

Monmouth, 

Morris & Orange, 

Newark, 

New Brunswick, . 

Newton 

West Jersey, 



$3,197 70 
2,207 14 
1,778 40 
3,306 00 
3,071 20 
2,898 60 
1,324 84 
2,313 74 



$3,303 00 
2,266 76 
1,857 71 
3,312 15 
2,217 19 
3,158 60 
957 59 
2,425 45 



$105 30 

59 62 

79 31 

6 15 



260 00 

in 71 



$20,097 62 
19,498 45 



$19,498 45 



$622 09 



$854 01 



367 25 



$1,221 26 
622 09 



$599 17 



$599 17 



78 



Treasurer's Report — Home Missions. 



Oct. r 



Schedule 4. 

Showing the appropriations to the rcsepective Presbyteries, the amounts 
paid for services therein, and the unused balances. 



PRESBYTERIES. 



Corisco 

Elizabeth 

Jersey City, 

Monmouth, 

Morris & Orange, 

Newark, 

New Brunswick, . 

Newton, 

West Jersey, 
Administration, . . 



$1,800 00 
2,750 00 
3,400 00 
1,800 00 
2,500 00 
2,000 00 
1,100 00 
4,200 00 
500 00 



£20,050 00 

19.251 75 

$798 25 



o rt 

< 



2,590 66 

3.332 66 

1,730 00 

2,381 70 

i,95S 00 

875 00 

4,163 09 

447 39 



$19,251 75 



U a 



$23 75 

159 34 
.6.7 34 
70 00 

118 30 
45 00 

225 00 
36 91 
52 61 



$798 25 



1907. Home Missions. 79 



V. REPORT OF THE PERMANENT COMMITTEE ON HOME 

MISSIONS. 

The work of the Board of Home Missions is carried on in six 
general departments, as follows : 

(1st.) Indians: Two hundred and fifty thousand of them. Many of 
them are good Indians, not needing to be made dead in order to be 
made good. Most of them sadly need the Gospel. Amount appro- 
priated for this is $139,000. 

(2d.) Mormons: For the most part found in Utah, but extending 
into Idaho, Arizona and adjacent territory. The amount appropriated 
is $71,000. 

(3d.) Spanish-speaking peoples: Including 350,000 American 
Mexicans, and the natives of Porto Rico and Cuba. The amount appro- 
priated is $144,000. 

(4th.) Immigrants: Coming into our country at the rate of more 
than a million a year, of twenty-five different races, and from forty 
different countries. The Board's work is the encouragement and help 
of local agencies in their efforts to present the Gospel to these needy 
ones at the very beginning. The amount appropriated is $22,850. 

(5th.) Labor: A new movement, regarded as most significant in the 
life of the modern church. The amount appropriated is $8,000. 

(6th.) General w r ork among Americans: This includes the Moun- 
taineers, numbering one, three or five millions, according to the amount 
of westward extension considered, together wjth the struggling churches 
in all our new western territory ; together with the field formerly occu- 
pied by the Cumberland Church, and also in a general way the whole 
country in its social, civil, political, moral, religious needs. Of course, 
the supreme emphasis falls upon this department, for which the Board 
has appropriated $650,000. 

A summary of the work of the Board shows the following items : 
churches aided, 1,505 ; missionaries and helpers, 1,291 ; missionary 
teachers, 458; additions on examination, 7,265; on certificate, 5,046; total 
membership, 63,647 ; total in congregations, 69,896 ; adult baptisms, 
3.039 ; infant baptisms, 2,684 ; Sunday-schools organized, 167 ; total 
Sunday-schools, 1,575; Sunday-school membership, 93,608; church 
edifices, 1,278, valued at about $3,000,000; church edifices built, 73, 
valued at $253,052; church edifices repaired, 170, at a cost of $45,174; 
church debts cancelled, $96,794; churches reaching self-support, 119; 
churches organized, 124; parsonages, 399, valued at $549,018; receipts 
for all departments, $965,737.87. 

For the ninth successive year the Board reports no debt, but points 
with regret to the fact that there was last year no appreciable advance 
in the gifts of the churches. The General Assembly directed that all 
contributions to Home Missions, Synodical Home Missions, Presby- 
terial Home Missions and local missionary work of the same kind 



So Home Missions. Oct., 

should be reported under the one column of Home Missions. It is to 
he hoped that this will not operate in such a way as to cause any 
slackening of effort in behalf of the mighty work of the Board. 

For the better prosecution of this work, some great changes have 
been made. All the evangelistic work outside of large towns and cities 
has been taken over. The immense field of the South and Southwest, 
heroically, but partially undertaken by the Cumberland Church, has 
been added, demanding a large addition to the budget. Four great 
missionary centers have been established at St. Louis, Minneapolis, 
Denver and San Francisco, with a field secretary at each. It will be 
seen that three-quarters of the emphasis is put on the central portion 
of our country. 

In view of what this'great section has been, historically and politically, 
there can he no question that it is our duty to provide liberal things for 
the work of Home Missions. 

Another word should be spoken concerning the Department of the 
Church and Labor. The Board calls special attention to it, as follows : 
"Unchallenged by any other church throughout the world, the Presby- 
terian Church is to-day clearly in the lead in this important phase of 
Christian work. The superintendent, Rev. Charles Stelzle, has a very 
difficult task indeed to lead the masses of the working people more 
largely into the Church. It is probably impossible for him, as things 
arc now, to make speeches and give advice that will satisfy the em- 
ployer and the employed, the rich and the poor. But the same can be 
said of the Epistle of James." 

We must not close our report without noting the fact that the 
Women's Societies, and our other agencies contributing through the 
Women's Board, such as the Sunday-schools, Young People's Societies, 
etc., gave nearly one-half of the total receipts of the Board. 

Speaking particularly of this Synod, we note the fact that we come 
next after New York and Pennsylvania. Our 351 churches, with 1,670 
elders and 597 deacons, and 79,029 members, gave $147,822 to Home 
Missions. Deducting $20,000 for Synodical Home Missions, we have 
$127,822, or about one-tenth of what was spent for congregational ex- 
penses. This is about $1.50 per annum for each communicant enrolled. 

It must be evident to all that we have not yet, as a Synod, with all 
our able men, strong churches, liberal givers, risen to a height where 
we can get a commanding view of our magnificent field and our un- 
equaled opportunity, nor anticipate the long-drawn grapple of con- 
testing forces in our national life, which may well make the heart of 
every American patriot sink within him. 

Added to the social unrest is the impending danger of decay in 
morals. Shall religious convictions cease to govern our life as a 
nation? Shall the cause of Sabbath observance, reverence for God's 
name, chastity, the suppression of vice, the reformation of divorce go 
backward ? Shall we stand for men as holders of civil office who pro- 
claim by their conduct that they do not fear God nor regard His moral 
law ? 



190/. Home Missions. 8i 

These questions, and many others like them, belong to this work of 
Home Missions. We can solve them if we are faithful to the Great 
Teacher. We can conquer all the giants, if, like Caleb the Greatheart, 
we follow wholly the Lord. Let us make this year a great year for 
Home Missions and evangelistic work. "In a few years all our restless 
and angry hearts will be quiet in death, but those who come after us 
will live in the world which our sins have blighted, or which our love 
has blessed. Let us do our thinking on these great questions, not with 
our eyes fixed on our bank account, but with a wise outlook on the 
fields of the future, and with the consciousness that the Spirit of the 
Eternal, the Lord and Giver of Life, is seeking to distill from our lives 
some essence of righteousness, some odor of love, before those lives 
forever pass away." 

We propose the following recommendations : 

i. That Synod does hereby call the attention of all our churches to 
the present critical situation in Home Mission Work, and request all 
our Sessions to take up and consider the matter at a special meeting, 
with a view to increasing interest and contributions. 

2. That Synod does hereby repeat the recommendation of the General 
Assembly that on the Sabbath preceding Thanksgiving Day an offer- 
ing be taken in all our Sabbath-schools for the Mission School Work, 
and on the Sabbath nearest Washington's Birthday one for the general 
work. 

3. That especially Synod does hereby call upon all the Men's Brother- 
hoods and other men's societies of our churches to make plans that 
shall increase interest on behalf of Home Missions on the part of all 
the men of our churches. 

HUGH B. MacCAULEY, 

Chairman. 



82 Woman's Work for Home Missions. Oct., 



VI.— THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S 
SYNODICAL SOCIETY FOR HOME MISSIONS IN THE 
SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 

What does this organization for Home Mission Work mean to us 
assembled here? Do we realize we belong to a great movement, the 
establishing of Christ's Kingdom on earth, and are we cognizant of 
the joy we have a right to feel in connection with this great world 
movement ? 

A look backward over the work of the past year tells us what the 
Synodical Society of, New Jersey has done toward furthering this 
movement. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The eight Presbyterial Societies number 230 Auxiliaries, a gain of 
eleven over last year, with an approximate membership of 10,000 — 
thirty-eight Young Women's Societies, thirty-six Bands and eighty- 
nine contributing Sunday-schools. Two thousand meetings have been 
held by the different Auxiliaries for prayer and the study of Home 
Missions. 

THE FINANCES. 

Money Expended 

Home Missions. on Boxes. 

Elizabeth, $7,027 79 $666 32 

Jersey City, 2,756 89 877 13 

Monmouth, 2,434 64 366 89 

Morris and Orange 6,437 31 3,027 55 

Newark, 3,17647 . 1,323 95 

New Brunswick, 3,190 31 614 39 

Newton, 1,58200 119 98 

West Jersey, 1,580 95 320 41 

The total amount paid to the Woman's Board of Home Missions 
during the year, dating from March, 1906, to March, 1907, is $29,003.01. 
Of this total $2,214.12 was received for Freedmen. 

MESSAGES FROM PRESBYTERIAL PRESIDENTS. 

The President of Elizabeth Presbytery writes : "I have noticed in 
my going about a deeper interest spiritually in the work than in pre- 
vious years. We believe that this is due largely to the season of prayer 
and conference which has been held for several years in November in 
Elizabeth, and to which the officers from each society on the roll have 
been invited. Many have participated, and all have expressed them- 
selves as having been edified and blessed in the service." 



1907- Woman's Work for Home Missions. 83 

All of the Auxiliaries were represented at the annual meeting of the 
Jersey City Presbytery. The reports were encouraging and inspiring. 
Man}' of the Auxiliaries report a larger attendance at the monthly- 
meetings. Union meetings have been held in some of the large towns, 
these were of much interest. This Presbytery holds a semi-annual 
meeting in the autumn, at which short reports are given and some 
phase of the work is presented by a speaker. They aim this year to 
encourage the organization of Bands and more earnest work among 
the Young People. This Presbyterial Society is in a good condition 
and ready to press on to better work in the year to come. 

The work in Monmouth Presbytery is in a very active, flourishing 
condition. We reported 29 societies last year and 33 this year. We 
have taken up scholarship work, and will work for one in every line 
of work, from Alaska to New Mexico. We have six for New Jersey 
Academy this year. Our Presbytery is very much interested in our 
New Jersey Academy work. 

The Presbyterial Society of Morris and Orange can report a steady 
increase in membership as well as a slight increase in contributions. 
The endeavor has been made to visit as many of the Auxiliaries as 
possible this year, and it has been encouraging to note the deep in- 
terest evinced by the members, particularly those of some of the smaller 
and more remote societies. We are planning to reach all of the 
Auxiliaries this coming year by forming groups of adjacent societies, 
the President and the Vice-President each being responsible for visiting, 
encouraging and stimulating the societies in her group. One society 
has more than doubled its membership, 51 against 18 the year before. 
One society added 44 new members, which was largely due to the per- 
sonal work of their President. In most of the churches meetings in 
response to Mrs. James' call to prayer were held — in one of the country 
churches it was found impossible, yet the members of that society set 
apart the hour in their own homes, devoting it to prayer for 
blessings for the work. Is it any wonder that we find such a society 
increasing its gifts annually for the past five years? 

Newark — A ready response was given by the Executive Committee to 
the call for Conference, issued by the President, each officer giving 
her enthusiastic aid to the work. The President has visited many of 
the local societies, all of whom gave cordial and hearty response when 
asked for renewed activity along Home Mission lines. A circular letter 
has been sent to all local Presidents, asking their co-operation in getting 
into closer touch with the Woman's Board of Home Missions by attend- 
ing the meetings at the Mission Rooms. 

New Brunswick Presbytery has gained all along the line more money, 
more magazines taken, and more interest shown. The President writes ; 
"From my own observation, gained from correspondence and visiting 
the societies, that the women are becoming more and more interested, 
particularly is that the case in our rural cburcbes. We feel that a 
great point gained, because our country people are slipping away from 
the church, and wbere Christian families leave, the place is filled with 



84 Woman's Work for Home Missions. Oct., 

indifferent, non-churchgoing people, till it becomes mission work in our 
very midst, and a most difficult kind." 

From Newton Presbytery we have word of an increase over last year 
in gifts. While this is only slight, it is gratifying. The outlook for 
the coming year is most encouraging. The workers seem to be filled 
with renewed zeal and a spirit of willingness and devotion. A large 
Executive Meeting is to be called when the various phases of work will 
be presented, and plans for an advance along all lines of work con- 
sidered. 

West Jersey Home Presbyterial Society has added two new Auxili- 
aries, and had a slight increase in offering this last year, and is in 
full accord with the feelings which are filling every Christian heart — 
that the battle with .evil grows more intense every day — but just as 
surely the workers for Christ and home and native land are the more 
anxious for the advancement of our societies, in greater knowledge, 
larger gifts, more fervent prayer, and increased love and service for 
Christ. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK. 

There has been an increase in the number of Young Women's Socie- 
ties and Bands, also in the number of contributing Sunday-schools. A 
larger number of subscriptions to the magazine, "Ove-r Sea and Land," 
is noted. 

FREEDMEN. 

There are 140 societies contributing to the work for Freedmen. 
Twenty-nine Sunday-schools and thirty Young People's Societies. The 
need was never greater than at the present time, and it is to be hoped 
that the societies will enter upon this branch of the work with more 
zeal and energy than ever before. 

LITERATURE. 

There are 196 Societies who have Secretaries of Literature. There 
are 2,499 subscribers to the "Home Mission Monthly," and 1,701 to 
"Over Sea and Land." Six hundred and seventy-five Prayer Calendars 
are in circulation, and 23 study classes have been formed. 

SUMMARY. 

As we look back over the work of the year and realize its problems, 
difficulties and disappointments, as well as successes, we, like Gehazi, 
the servant of Elisha, have not half realized the divine powers which 
were on our side. 

"Behind our doubts and fears have been the horses and chariots of 
fire." Our prayer must be, "Lord open our eyes that we may see these 
spiritual allies, and enlist ourselves in the rank of their omnipotence." 

May our exultant cry always be, "God with us." 

HARRIET B. MILES. 
Corresponding Secretary. 



7907. Woman's Work for Home Missions. 



VII.— THIRTIETH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE WOMAN'S 
SYNODICAL SOCIETY FOR HOME MISSIONS IN THE 
SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 

The thirtieth annual meeting of the Woman's Society of Home 
Missions in the Synod of New Jersey, held in the First Presbyterian 
Church of Camden, October 10th, 1907, was called to order at 9 A. M., 
the President, Mrs. Honeyman, in the chair. After singing the hymn 
"Lead on, O King Eternal," and a responsive reading, "The Com- 
munion of Saints," Mrs. Harvey C. Olin led in prayer. 

A welcome was extended by Mrs. Danenhower, President of the 
Auxiliary of the First Presbyterian Church of Camden. 

The report of the Treasurer of the Contingent Fund, in the absence 
of the Treasurer, Mrs. Manning, was given by Mrs. W. D. Valentine, 
of Englewood, and showed a balance on hand of $122.62. This report 
was accepted. 

The report of the Freedmen's Department was given by Mrs. David 
Harvey. 144 Auxiliaries have contributed towards this cause — 30 
Young People's Societies and 29 Sunday-schools — a total amount of 
$2,205.00. Extracts were read from a letter from Rev. Mr. Young, the 
newly appointed Superintendent of Harbison College, our special 
object. Our contributions are asked for teachers' salaries, for scholar- 
ships and for needed supplies of household materials. A fire destroyed 
one of the buildings used as a dormitory for the girls, so there is 
special need for funds to replace this building. This report was, on 
motion, accepted. 

The following committees were appointed : Nominations, Miss L. F. 
Pond, chairman; Place of Meeting, Mrs. William Nelson, chairman; 
Resolutions, Mrs. H. D. Zandt, chairman. 

The report of the work of the Young People's Societies was given 
by Miss Mary M. Harding, mentioning, among other items, twenty- 
one Mission Study Classes conducted on the subject of Immigration, 
and urged three things : the organization of more Bands, the election 
of a Mission Study Secretary for each Presbytery, and that the Secre- 
taries of Young People's Work and the new Secretaries of Mission 
Study Classes (when appointed) should be advised to attend the 
summer Missionary Conferences. This report was, on motion, ac- 
cepted. 

The report of the Literature Secretary, in the absence of Mrs. 
Wilbur La Roe, was given by Mrs. E. C. White, and showed 219 
societies and 196 Secretaries of Literature, and an increase in the 
number of subscriptions to the Home Mission Monthly. The Freed- 
men's Board has issued a book for use in Study Classes, called "The 
American Negro," by Rev. S. J. Fisher, D.D. Attention was called to 
six books on the subject of Immigration: "Aliens or Americans," "The 
Challenge of the City," "Citizens of To-morrow," "The Incoming 



86 Woman's Work for Home Missions. Oct., 

Millions," "Our People of Foreign Speech," "Coming Americans," also 
to the book "Leaders in Conference," for leaders of Bands. This 
report was, on motion, accepted. 

The report of the year's work was given by the Corresponding Sec- 
retary, Mrs. E. C. Miles. Upon motion, this report was accepted and 
ordered sent, with the minutes of this meeting, to the Synod of New 
Jersey. 

The work for the coming year was outlined by the President, Mrs. 
Honeyman. For work in the Freedmen's Department we are asked 
for $1,600.00 for teachers' salaries in Harbison College; that the 
scholarships already undertaken in Harbison College be continued, and 
for $500.00 for farm, .homes for colored families in the South. The 
usual sums are asked for the following: $1,000.00 for the Asheville 
Farm School ; $500.00 for work in Alaska ; $500.00 for Good Will 
Mission, South Dakota, and $750.00 for ten scholarships at Logan. As 
new work, we are asked for $1,500.00 for the completion of the 
dormitory at the New Jersey Academy, Logan, Utah, and for $1,000.00 
for work among the foreigners in New Jersey. For the emergency 
fund one dollar is asked from each Auxiliary. Attention was also 
called to a Sunday-school program, with offering for San Juan Hos- 
pital, Porto Rico, recommended to be used in Sunday-schools on the 
Sunday before Thanksgiving Day. 

Mrs. F. S. Bennett spoke of "How to Conduct Study Classes." 
First, catch your leader ; then select the topic, one that can be grasped 
in the time given to it, something definite ; prepare thoroughly until 
saturated with the subject; know the text-book; read widely on the 
subject; do not start with the Mission end, but with a sub-stratum of 
facts ; show the needs, then the Mission work. 

An address was given by Rev. Allan Douglas Carlile, D.D., of the 
Throop Avenue Presbyterian Church of Brooklyn, touching on some 
of the civil and political problems of the day, and urging an effort to 
extend to the men of our Church information of the conditions and 
the needs and to enlist their interest in the work attempted. In closing, 
Dr. Carlile referred to the prayers of the Church in former days to 
remove the barriers, to provide the men, and said that these prayers 
have been answered, and that a special prayer of to-day should be for 
the money now needed to carry forward the work. 

Dr. Richard Holmes, editor of the "Westminster," spoke earnest 
Words concerning Home Mission work in the past and the needs of 
the future. 

An offering was taken, amounting to $16.71. Prayer was offered by 
Mrs. J. H. Owens. 

Mrs. dishing was called to the chair. The report of the Nominating 
Committee was given by the chairman, Miss Pond, presenting first a 
resolution, which was, on motion, accepted, as follows : Be it resolved, 
that as members of this Synodical Society of Home Missions we 
express our sincere gratitude to these our retiring officers, Mrs. 
Manning and Miss Harding, for the work they have done in the past, 



J907- Woman's Work for Home Missions. 87 

and our deep regret that they can no longer serve us in this capacity, 
and we would assure them that our thoughts and prayers will follow 
them in their future work wherever they may be. The election of 
officers followed, resulting as follows : 

President — Mrs. W. E. HonEyman, Plainfield. 
Vice-Presidents — Mrs. J. H. Owens, Paterson 

Mrs. Harvey C. Olin, East Orange. 
Mrs. John Hutchison, Arlington. 
Mrs. D. C. Blair, Belvidere. 
Mrs. S. B. Ketcham, Pennington. 
Mrs. H. L. Zandt, Jamesburg. 
Mrs. M. J. Paulding, Daretown. 
Mrs. A. S. Crane, Elizabeth. 
Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. E. C. Miles, Roselle. 
Recording Secretary — Miss E. D. Paxton, Princeton. 
Secretary of Literature — Mrs. Wilbur La Roe, Perth Amboy. 
Secretary of Young People's Work — Miss Harrietts R. Halloway. 
Plainfield. 
Secretary for Freedmen — Mrs. David Harvey, Asbury Park. 
Treasurer of Contingent Fund — Mrs. D. W. Valentine, Englewood. 



SYNODICAL COMMITTEES. 

PRESBYTERY OF ELIZABETH. 

Mrs. J. F. Pingry, Elizabeth. 

Mrs. E. C. Miles, Roselle. 

Mrs. E. B. Cobb, Elizabeth. 

Mrs. W. E. Honeyman, Plainfield. 

Miss M. Josephine Petrie, Plainfield. 

Miss M. J. Peck, Elizabeth. 

PRESBYTERY OF JERSEY CITY. 

Miss L. C. Pudney, Passaic. 
Mrs. Charles D. Shaw, Paterson. 
Mrs. William Nichols, Jersey City. 
Mrs. Alexander Campbell, Jersey City. 
Mrs. William Nelson, Paterson. 

PRESBYTERY OF MONMOUTH. 

Mrs. L. R. Somers, Burlington. 
Mrs. David Kirkpatrick, Jamesburg. 
Mrs. J. N. Husted, Freehold. 



88 Woman's Work for Home Missions. Oct., 



PRESBYTERY OF MORRIS AND ORANGE. 

Mrs. Robert Aikman, Madison. 
Mrs. J. B. Beaumont, Morristown. 
Mrs. Albert Erdman, Morristown. 
Mrs. Harvey C. Olin, East Orange. 
Mrs. Richard Allen, Chatham. 

PRESBYTERY OE NEWARK. 

Mrs. John Hutchison, Arlington. 
Mrs. Paul Babcock, Montclair. 
Mrs. J. P. Jones, Bloomfield. 
Mrs. Isaac Marshall, Newark. 
Mrs. John Maxwell, Montclair. 

PRESBYTERY OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

Mrs. S. B. Ketcham, Pennington. 
Mrs. Charles Brearley, Trenton. 
Mrs. Elmer E. Green, Trenton. 
Miss Margaret Sloan, Trenton. 
Miss E. D. Paxton, Princeton. 

PRESBYTERY OF NEWTON. 

Miss Isabel Stewart, Washington. 
Miss Frances McMurtrie, Newton. 
Mrs. William Morrow, Belvidere. 
Mrs. E. B. England, Asbury. 

PRESBYTERY OF WEST JERSEY. 

Mrs. M. J. Paulding, Daretown. 
Mrs. John M. Moore, Clayton. 
Miss S. M. Sheppard, Greenwich. 
Miss Alice Richman, Daretown. 

The Minutes of the meeting were read by the Secretary. The roll- 
call by Presbyteries showed a number present from each one of the 
eight Presbyteries. The number present was about 150. 

An invitation was subsequently received and accepted to hold the 
next annual meeting in Railway. 

ELIZABETH D. PAXTON, 

Recording Secretary. 



1907- Foreign Missions. 



VIII.— REPORT OP THE PERMANENT COMMITTEE ON 
FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Do Foreign Missions pay? This is a question that is sometimes 
asked. Is it worth while to give so much time, energy and money to 
the evangelization of the heathen? Well, do Foreign Missions pay? 
Why, they pay, if only the material benefits that have accrued from 
them are considered. The world owes a debt to Foreign Missions in a 
commercial way that it owes to nothing else. Foreign Missions have 
been the forerunner of commerce and civilization in Asia, Africa and 
the islands of the sea. They have made it possible for civilized coun- 
tries to enter with their trade into the midst of the most savage tribes. 
They have made a highway over which the West has traveled to the 
hitherto inaccessible East. Missionaries have done more than all others 
to bring the different sections of the world together ; and the material 
results of missions are worth far more than all the money the Church 
has put into them. 

Dr. Brown says, in his recently published book, "The Foreign Mis- 
sionary," that everywhere the missionary goes he "is the representative 
of a higher civilization. His teaching and his manner of living inci- 
dentally, but none the less really, create wants and introduce goods. 
He lights his house with a lamp, and straightway thousands of the 
natives become dissatisfied with a bit of rag burning in a dish of 
vegetable oil. So foreign lamps are being used by millions of Chinese, 
Japanese and Siamese and East Indians. The missionary marks time 
with a clock, and German, English and American firms suddenly find 
a new and apparently limitless market for their products. He rides a 
bicycle on his country tours, and the result is that to-day the bicycle is 
as common in the cities and many of the villages of Siam and Japan 
as it is in the United States. His wife makes her own and her chil- 
dren's dresses on a sewing-machine, and ten thousand curious Chinese, 
Japanese and Laos are not satisfied till they have sewing-machines." 

Foreign Missions have made large and important contributions to 
science. It is the testimony of an eminent British writer that "indi- 
rectly and almost unintentionally missionary enterprise has widely 
increased the bounds of our knowledge, and has sometimes been the 
means of conferring benefits on science, the value and extent of which 
it is difficult for us to appreciate and compute. Huge is the debt 
which philologists owe to the labors of British missionaries in Africa ! 
By evangelists of our own nationality nearly two hundred African 
languages have been illustrated by grammars, dictionaries, vocabularies 
and translations of the Bible. Many of these tongues were on the 
point of extinction, and have since become extinct, and we owe our 
knowledge of them solely to the missionaries' intervention." 

But Foreign Missions are not carried on in the interests of commerce 
and science. Their contributions to commerce and science, though 



cjo Foreign Missions. Oct., 

valuable, are only incidental. We send out foreign missionaries to 
teach Christianity and make Christian disciples. Have Foreign Mis- 
sions paid here? They have. Not to say anything about the success 
which other denominations have had in prosecuting their work of 
Foreign Missions, our own Church has made most gratifying progress. 

Our Board of Foreign Missions was organized in 1837. In that year 
we had, all told, only 26 foreign missionaries, and not a single native 
worker. To-day we have 889 missionaries, not including those who 
have gone out this summer and fall, which would make the number 
about 925, and a native force of 3,018, in all a band of workers num- 
bering more than 4,000. Then we had six principal stations. Now we 
have 139. Then we had no ontstations ; now we have 2,062. Then 
we had ten communicants ; now we have 70,000, with 443 organized 
churches. Then we had no schools ; now we have 1,145, with 36,924 
scholars. Then we had no printing press ; now we have seven presses 
from which there came last year 132,051,647 pages of Christian litera- 
ture. Then we had no hospital ; now we have 53 hospitals and 65 
dispensaries, in which were treated the past year 442,756 patients. 
Then there were no contributions on the field from native sources. 
This past year the natives gave $208,287. 

And there are other successes which cannot be tabulated. Homes 
and communities have been transformed, woman has been elevated and 
has been given to see that she is a human being and not a brute, and 
the face of heathenism has been turned towards the true light that 
lighteth every man that cometh into the world. 

"Do Foreign Missions pay? Ask the missionaries who have the un- 
speakable joy of leading hundreds of heathen out of darkness too 
awful to be portrayed, into the marvelous light of the Gospel. Ask 
the native Christians who have found the Saviour, and who have 
remained true to Him, despite the scorn and hatred and persecution 
of their friends. Look at the greater success that is attending the 
preaching of the Gospel in heathen lands than in our own land. Think 
of the doors that are open everywhere, and of the access that the 
missionary has to the hearts of the people. God is greatly encouraging 
His Church in her efforts to make disciples of the nations, and is thus 
calling her to fuller consecration to her divinely assigned world-wide 
work. It is too late in the day to ask whether Foreign Missions pay. 
Each passing year witnesses anew and with ever-increasing power to 
their value and success. 

Evidently this Synod believes that Foreign Missions pay. Our 
Churches prove their faith by their gifts. The large amount of money 
that goes into the Board's treasury each year is indeed noteworthy ; 
and especially so when we remember that there are but eight Presby- 
teries in this Synod, not including Corisco, and that there are many 
weak churches in each of them. The receipts from our churches last 
year, exclusive of those from the Woman's Boards, were $56,865, a 
gain of 7,779 over the preceding year, nearly jt> cents per capita, the 
highest among all the Synods. It is interesting to note that of 36 
Presbyteries in different parts of the church whose per capita gifts to 



JP07. Foreign Missions. 91 

this Board were the highest, five of those Presbyteries are in this 
Synod. Shall we not continue to show that we believe that Foreign 
Missions pay by doing fully our part, as a Synod, in meeting the 
steadily increasing demands from the field? The mighty movements 
in China, the great revivals in Korea, the outpouring of the spirit of 
prayer in India, the signs of progress in Persia, the rapid growth in the 
Philippines, together with marked encouragement in almost every 
other field, give added emphasis to the Master's great commission and 
call to us not only to pray that more laborers be sent into the harvest, 
"but also to devise new plans and methods for raising the money 
whereby they may be sent, that so the Lord's orders may not go 
disregarded. 

Concerning the money required for the Board's work this year, the 
language of the report is as follows : "In making out its budget for 
the fiscal year of 1907-1908, the Board felt that some relief in several 
directions was imperatively necessary, and has ventured to incur 
financial liabilities to the extent of nearly $1,600,000 in order to main- 
tain our existing work and to provide for the work formerly carried 
on by the Cumberland Board, to increase the salaries of the mis- 
sionaries in Japan, Siam, Laos and parts of China, and to add a little, 
in the missions where the emergency was most acute, to the inadequate 
appropriations for the native work." 

That the Board's expectations may be realized, it will be necessary 
that the contributions be increased by twenty per cent. It is earnestly 
hoped that our churches will do their utmost to secure this advance. 

The Committee submit the following resolutions : 

1. That we heartily approve of the election by the Board of Foreign 
Missions of the Rev. Stanley White, D.D., as one of its secretaries to 
succeed Rev. Frank F. Ellinwood, D.D., now laid aside from active 
service by the infirmities of old age. 

2. That we pledge anew our loyalty to the interest and work of the 
Board, and strive to realize the expectations of the Board in an increase 
•of our contributions to the amount of twenty per cent. 

3. That more attention be given to definite and systematic instruction 
in the subject of missions in the Sabbath Schools, and that an effort 
be made to secure from each school at least one offering to this cause ; 
also that we welcome the appointment of Rev. George H. Trull as 
assistant secretary of this Board, whose specific work will be the culti- 
vation of the missionary field in the Sabbath School. 

4. That we congratulate the women of our Churches in this Synod 
upon their good work in this cause, as shown in their report, which 
has been placed in the hands of the Committee, and that there be 
printed for their use 250 copies of this report. 

5. That we approve of the Men's Missionary Convention, to be held 
in Philadelphia in February, and that we send delegates through our 
Presbyteries. 

JOHN F PATTERSON, 

Chairman. 



92 Woman's Work for Foreign Missions. Oct. r 



IX. THE THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WOMAN'S 
SOCIETY FOR SYNODICAL FOREIGN MISSIONS IN 
THE SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 

This quotation, taken from a day-book of selected readings, has 
seemed to express most beautifully the thought that has been in my 
mind as I have endeavored to prepare the report of the year's work. 

"My child, thou mayest not measure out thine offering unto me by 
what others have done or left undone ; but be it thine to seek out to the 
last moment of thine earthly life what is the utmost height of pure 
devotion to which I have called thine own self." 

It has seemed not of so much importance that we record our gifts, 
as that we measure the consecration and spiritual power which 
prompted the giving; not so necessary that we review our foreign field 
as that we examine our methods of work. For "the gift without the 
giver is bare" is a truth in foreign missionary work as in the everyday 
deeds of charity at home. "A tithe of all that I possess" would be a 
good working text for us all for the coming year. 

As money is the most obvious and ordinary meaning of "tithe," let 
us examine the collective offering for the year. The following contribu- 
tions have been given from March, 1906, to March, 1907 : 

Study Contribu- 

Classcs. tions. Loss. Gain. 

Elizabeth 47 $5-634 90 $781 15 

Jersey City, 2,81595 $37 16 

Monmouth •. 2,17124 38570 

Morris and Orange 5,65032 1,477 68 

Newark, 14 5,899 18 423 52 

New Brunswick 5 4,58140 530 15 

Newton, 1,41248 14908 

West Jersey, 1,61781 18827 



Total, $29,783 28 $3,256 32 $719 39- 

Surely a goodly sum — $29,000. Yes, but it is $3,252.30 less than last 
year's offering. Can any secretary tell the reason. 

If Presbyterial records are to be kept should there not be some more 
exact method of keeping them, or perhaps I should say more accurate 
figures should be sent to the Synodical Secretary for the compiling 
of her report. 

We have thought, and have said, that mission study classes would 
bring increased knowledge, which would result in larger contributions. 
Three of the Presbyteries showing a decrease in their collections report 
mission study classes in number forty-seven, fourteen and five, re- 
spectively. The remaining five, including the three which report an 



J907- Woman's Work for Foreign Missions. 93 

increase in their gifts, record no study classes. I say report no study 
•classes. Would it not be interesting and valuable to know whether the 
decrease of $780,* in Elizabeth Presbytery, for instance, which has 
forty-seven mission study classes — a fine record — is in those societies 
where missions are studied systematically, or in those which have not 
yet adopted that method of study. 

Also, what is the cause for the falling off of $1,477 i n the Presbytery 
of Morris and Orange. 

Is our method of raising money the best possible. 

The average gift last year was $3.21 per member. Dr. Trumbull has 
said, "There has never been a time when it was right to give the Lord 
less than one-tenth of all one's income. There never has been since 
Jacob's day. Long before then, Jacob's grandfather had turned over 
one-tenth of the spoils of battle to the Lord's priests before he handed 
the remainder to the king of Sodom. The man who calls himself a 
Christian and gives less than one-tenth of his income to the Lord is a 
meaner man than Jacob, and has a lower standard than the king of 
Sodom, who was evidently accustomed to count the giving of tithes a 
duty." And, after the tithe, comes the thank offering. 

Perhaps our methods of work need changing. The average woman 
to-day has far more missionary information than the intellectual women 
of a few years ago. "Woman's Work," and the many other church and 
religious magazines put the same information in the hands of the 
majority of the women in a congregation at the same time. Yet many 
missionary meetings are conducted on the same lines as when they first 
started — an hour a month on one country — twelve countries a year. 
And yet leaders and presidents of societies complain that "missionary 
interest is lessening." That is not a fact. 

What is needed is accurate knowledge of foreign countries — not 
general information. One fact learned by personal study and investiga- 
tion is worth an hour's lazy listening to a map-talk — a sketch of the 
religion, and an outline of the mission stations. This is the need that 
mission-study classes supply. 

We have had second-hand missionary information for so many years 
that to many of us it seems the only kind. This is house cleaning time. 
Let us throw aside our second-hand methods and begin with earnest 
personal effort to become acquainted with conditions. Let us offer a 
tithing of our minds to the Lord's work. 

This week's issue of "Charities" says: "Increasingly there is a 
demand among people to know the world and the flesh in terms of life 
as great bodies of men and women are living it to-day." It is the 
method which fails to interest. To use a homely phrase :_"We are 
tired of being stuffed." 

The most important and significant item that I have found in the 
Presbyterial reports sent me is the appointment in Elizabeth Presbytery 



* An apparent decrease only — $500 went directly to the Board, $200 
came in too late to be counted in this year's report. 



94 Woman's Work for Foreign Missions. Oct., 

of a mission study secretary. Already forty-seven regular classes and 
eight irregular (meeting at irregular times) have been started. And 
these classes are composed of members who are to assume leadership 
of bands and C. E. Societies. This same method needs to be introduced 
into the Auxiliary Societies if they hope to claim the interest and efforts 
of the younger women, as they may outgrow their mission bands and 
younger societies. 

Thirty missionaries depend upon our Presbyteries for their support. 
Time would fail me were I to mention them by name, with their 
stations and work. Their patience, bravery, faith, noble service are 
familiar to you all. At least I hope "you have them in your hearts," to 
make use of an expression of the great missionary Paul. 

Let us tithe our pleasures and luxuries for these far-away friends, 
and learn to look at life from their standpoint that we may appreciate 
their needs. 

Let us become intimate with one missionary and come into vital touch 
with one consecrated life this year. It makes no difference whether it 
be the one supported by our own money or not — the support is the 
most mechanical part of it all — we give our gifts for the Board to use 
as it thinks best. But let us have a personal acquaintance with one 
woman. And choose a lonely one — there are so many of them. When 
we have enjoyed a book, why not send it to her. Listen to this extract 
from the letter of a little woman spending her first summer in Canton. 
Her husband, a physician, too busy to take her on a vacation to the 
hills. 

"It is boiling hot, and the oldest inhabitant says that it is the hottest 
summer he has spent here ; that is a comfort to know that it has not 
ever been any hotter, of course. I simply boil ; first, I decided that it is 
easier to sew, and I sew for a while, my needle sticking in the cloth 
and squeaking with every stitch ; then I get tired of that and try to 
read, and have read everything readable on the campus, and some things 
twice, and then I bathe my face and hands and begin with a new 
needle." 

"I have read everything on the campus, and some things twice." 
Think for a moment of our wealth of libraries, magazines, papers, and 
then of her, and she only one of the many starving for reading matter. 

Why not try having two literature tables at our missionary meetings 
this winter. One to dispense to us tracts on foreign countries, the other 
to collect books for distribution in foreign lands. Have a mailing com- 
mittee and use the prayer calendar for names. Book postage is the 
same the world over. 

And just here we shall note the appeal of Mr. Snooks of Laguna 
Bay for Sunday-school papers for the 40,000 children learning English 
in the public school in Manila. Give a tithe of your time and write a 
personal letter to someone who may receive few. 

And a tithe of our clothes and pretty things to wear — nothing is 
harder to get in those far away stations than collars and belts, and the 
little articles which add so much pleasure to our lives — children's hair 



7907. Woman's Work for Foreign Missions. 95 

ribbons, or a game. Some missionaries in the inland stations must 
send three thousand miles for darning cotton and needles. Remember 
that they are of like passions as ourselves. 

And let us not forget to tithe our prayers for our missionaries. That 
is necessary if their interests are to become a real part of our lives. 

There are problems that we need to help solve. Missionaries home 
on furlough find it increasingly difficult to live on the salary allowed 
them while on furlough. The renting of a furnished house leaves little 
to live on. One of our finest missionaries must needs preach on Sun- 
days to earn his living while at home to rest. 

Can we help in this by offering our furnished houses during the 
summer months to the Board for the use of missionaries. Could our 
Synod own a furnished house that should be used constantly by them. 

Away back in the days of Pilgrim's Progress, you remember there 
was a house by the wayside "called Beautiful, built for the relief and 
security of pilgrims." At Wooster, Ohio, there is one such house, I 
know, perhaps more. 

Any of us who may have been entertained in foreign lands by these 
friends, would be glad to be able to return their hospitality in a way 
which would lighten some of the hard conditions of the year in the 
home land. 

Another serious question, which is a most important one, is the 
necessity of finding some method of making the members of the younger 
societies, the Secretaries of Christian Endeavor and Bands interested 
and welcome at the Presbyterial meetings. That they should be trained 
as leaders, given charge of work and then allowed no opportunity to 
state their difficulties, discuss methods or exchange ideas is poor man- 
agement or lack of forethought. One Presbyterial Secretary states 
that she is allowed ten minutes to make her report, give new sugges- 
tions, recommend courses of study or work for the year. It is no 
wonder that she does not urge her societies to send delegates to the 
Presbyterial meetings. As she says, "there is nothing there for them." 

A word as to two changes that have come to the synodical Board 
during the year. The Presbytery of Morris and Orange has resigned, 
with a deep sense of personal loss, its president, that she might ac- 
cept the presidency of the Synodical Society. It has welcomed with 
loyalty and cordiality her successor, the personal friend of many of the 
Board. 

The resignation of Mrs. Walter Condit from the position of Corre- 
sponding Secretary is presented to-day. It will be received with deeper 
regret than she has expressed in her note to you, I am sure. The society 
loses much by her absence from its meetings. 

With a few changes the missionaries en the field remain as last year. 
Mr. Goheen, supported by Bands, has been called to his eternal rest. 
Miss London, of Germantown, has been assigned to the Bands in place 
of Miss Moore, of Wei Hsien, married. Miss London will teach in the 
girls school at Tokio. Mrs. Wm. Hunt, formerly Miss Anna Lloyd, has 
written of the birth of a son. 



96 Woman's Work for Foreign Missions. Oct., 

Dr. Elizabeth Anderson is soon to start for Soochovv to assist Dr. 
Cattell in her work, filling the place left vacant by Dr. Mary Litch, 
when she chose to change her dwelling place to the Tooker Hospital at 
Siangtan, as Dr. Tooker's wife. 

Mrs. Boggs, the physician supported at Canton by New Brunswick 
Presbytery, wrote last January of her need for a new dispensary, the 
floor of the old being under water at the rainy season — the water stand- 
ing 15 inches deep under the Bible woman's bed. It is a pleasure to 
report that money has been given by a friend for this very necessary 
building. 

The great need in our foreign missionary work is the consecration 
of our whole selves in practical service. May I repeat the opening 
thought of this report — "My child, thou mayest not measure out thine 
offering unto me by what others have done or left undone : be it thine 
to seek out to the last moment of thine earthly life what is the utmost 
height of pure devotion to which I have called thine own self." 

And close with the beautiful poem of Susan Gammon : 

If I could live to God for just one day. 

One blessed day, from early dawn of light 
Till purple twilight deepened into night — 
A day of faith unfaltering, trust complete, 
Of love unfeigned and perfect charity, 

Of hope undimmed, of courage past dismay, 
Of heavenly peace, patient humility — 
No hint of duty to constrain my feet, 
No dream of ease to lull to listlessness, 
Within my heart no root of bitterness, 

No yielding to temptation's subtle sway — 
Methinks in that one day would so expand 
My soul to meet such holy, high demand, 
That never, never more could hold me bound 
This shrivelling husk of self that wraps me round. 

So might I henceforth live to God alway. 

MARY R. TOOKER, 

Secretary pro tern. 



1907- Woman's Work for Foreign Missions. 97 



X.— THIRTIETH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE WOMAN'S' 
SYNODICAL SOCIETY FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS IN 
THE SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 

The thirtieth annual meeting of the Woman's Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Synod of New Jersey was held on the afternoon of 
October 10th, in the First Church of Camden, N. J. The President^ 
Mrs. dishing, presiding. 

The meeting opened with the singing of a hymn, Scripture reading 
and prayer by Mrs. Nelson. 

The report of the Corresponding Secretary was read by Miss Tooker. 
It was moved and carried that it be accepted with thanks. 

Mrs. Hall gave an excellent report of Young People's work, empha- 
sizing again the need of organized Mission Study classes. On motion it 
was accepted. 

The report of the Literature Department was given by the Secretary, 
Mrs. Coddington, in which she stated the fact that knowledge is the 
foundation of interest, and mentioned many of the sources of in- 
formation in books, tracts, etc. On motion it was accepted. 

Miss Van Meter, reporting for the Contingent Fund, stated that 
there was a balance of $112.43 m the bank. This report was accepted. 

Mrs. dishing stated that the need for a Synodical Mission Study- 
Secretary was becoming so urgent that the balance in the Contingent 
treasury would be held for that object if found possible. 

Mrs. dishing also made a few remarks as to the purpose of the 
Synodical Society, asking whether it was accomplishing the most 
possible. The officers and delegates present were asked to discuss this- 
question in their Presbyteries, and report to the Synodical President 
any suggestions for changes. 

* Mr. Fred Jansen spoke most interestingly of his work in Cebu,. 
Manila, telling of the eagerness of the people for the Gospel, reporting 
a church of 15,000 members as the result of five years' work. 

Mrs. Weitzel introduced to the meeting several members of the 
Philadelphia Board — Miss S. Elizabeth Jones, Secretary; Mrs. T. 
Elliot Patterson, Secretary of Bands and Junior Societies, and Miss 
Sarah E. Cattell. Treasurer. 

Miss Cattell spoke for a few moments on the difference between the- 
Land of Possession and the Land of Promise. 

Mrs. J. Beattie Howell, one of the five Vice-Presidents of the Board r 
read from letters of Mrs. Thorpe, who is traveling in Japan. 

Mrs. Weitzel told of the increased territory and work of the Phila- 
delphia Board, resulting from a reunited Church, asking all to be 
cordial and generous to the new members and the new work. 

* It was announced at the close of the meeting that a scholarship of 
$50.00 had been given by three ladies from Succasunna for the use of 
Mr. Jansen. 

7 



g8 Woman's Work for Foreign Missions. Oct., 

After a most beautiful rendering of the hymn "Lead, Kindly Light," 
the Nominating Committee made its report as follows : 

The Committee on Nominations respectfully recommend the fol- 
lowing list as their choice of officers for the ensuing year: 

President— -Mrs. G. W. Cushing., East Orange. 

ELIZABETH PRESBYTERY. 

Vice-Presidents— -Mrs. J. T. Kerr, Elizabeth. 

Mrs. Samuel Milliken, Plainfield. 

JERSEY CITY PRESBYTERY. 

Mrs. William Nelson, Patterson. 
Miss Caroline S. Pudney, Passaic. 

MONMOUTH PRESBYTERY. 

Mrs. Ella Stults, Cranbury. 

Mrs. Charles B. Austin, Toms River. 

MORRIS AND ORANGE PRESBYTERY. 

Mrs. A. J. Brown, East Orange. 
Miss K. Storrs, Orange. 

NEWARK PRESBYTERY. 

Miss A. M. Carter, Newark. 
Mrs. W. J. Rusling, Newark. 

NEW BRUNSWICK PRESBYTERY. 

Mrs. Peter Stryker, Bound Brook. 
Mrs. Walter B. Harris, Princeton. 

NEWTON PRESBYTERY. 

Mrs. E. B. England, Asbury. 
Mrs. W. R. Scranton, Belvidere. 

WEST JERSEY PRESBYTERY. 

Mrs. F. J. Collier, Woodstown. 
Miss J. Russell, Wenonah. 

Recording Secretary — Miss Mary Roberts Tooker, East Orange. 
Corresponding Secretary — (Mrs. Walter Condict, resigned.) 
Secretary Young People's Work— Mrs. W. H. Hall, 565 High street, 
Newark. 



1907- Woman's Work for Foreign Missions. 99 

Treasurer of Contingent Fund — Miss Van Meter, Salem. 
Secretary Literature — Mrs. L. B. Coddington, Murray Hill. 

The motion was carried that the report be adopted and the secretary 
be asked to cast the vote. The secretary declared the officers for the 
coming year to be as given above. 

The resignation of Mrs. Condict, Corresponding Secretary, was read. 
The following resolutions were adopted : 

"It is with deep regret that we are called upon to accept the resigna- 
tion of our Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Condict. Be it resolved, 
that this society records its appreciation of her long period of faithful, 
efficient service, her consecrated interest and loyal devotion to the 
society's work. Be it also resolved, that this resolution be spread upon 
the minutes of this Synodical society, and that a copy be sent to Mrs. 
Condict." 

The Committee on Place of Meeting reported that Rahway had 
invited the Synodical Society to meet there for its meeting in 1908. 
The recommendation to accept the invitation was carried. 

The following were offered by the Committee on Resolutions, and 
adopted : 

Be it resolved, That we, "the strangers within the gates," to-day do 
hereby tender our hearty thanks to the good ladies of the First Church 
of Camden for all their kindness to us. 

Resolved, That we make special note of not only the warmth of their 
welcome to us, but also of the warmth of the atmosphere which has 
made us so comfortable within these four walls, and for the bountiful 
entertainment which has refreshed and strengthened us. 

Resolved, That we acknowledge our appreciation of the efficient work 
of our Presidents, Mrs. Cushing and Mrs. Honeyman, during the past 
year, and also thank them for this day's pleasure and profit derived 
from their carefully prepared programs which have been so ably carried 
through. 

Resolved, That our thanks be also extended to the earnest, eloquent 
speakers, who have so edified us and awakened in us a stronger desire 
to do more and better service for our Master ; also that we express our 
pleasure and enjoyment of the beautiful •songs and for all the music 
of the day. 

And he it further resolved, That we who know the joy of "dwelling 
in the house of the Lord" should remember the source of all our* 
blessings and unite our hearts and voices in thanksgiving to the 
"Good Shepherd" who has led us in "green pastures," by repeating 
together the 23d psalm. 

After a few closing remarks by the Rev. Samuel Price, the benedic- 
tion was pronounced. 

MARY R. TOOKER. 

Recording Secretary. 



ioo Sabbath-School Work. Oct. r 

XL— REPORT OF THE PERMANENT COMMITTEE ON SAB- 
BATH-SCHOOL WORK. 

A comparison of the reports of the past year with those of the 
previous year show a loss of 25 schools, 445 officers and teachers, and 
93 scholars. The conditions are such as to demand more earnest work 
on the part of our churches in caring for the children and youth of our 
State, and especial effort is necessary to fill the depleted ranks of our 
officers and teachers. The loss of 445 during the year is so serious 
that we must needs pause and ask the question, how are we to increase 
the numbers and efficiency of our teaching force. We must not lose 
sight of the fact that the membership of our churches, and by far the 
largest part of our workers in the churches, come to us from our 
Sabbath-schools, and loss here means weakness all along the line of our 
work. 

Statistics. — Other parts of our work are more encouraging. We have 
442 schools, with 8,142 officers and teachers, and 67,387 scholars, making 
a total membership of 75,520. During the year 5.066 have been added 
to the schools. 15,290 of our scholars are reported as members of our 
churches, and there have been received into church fellowship during 
the year 1,947, ° r 997 l ess than last year, which was the banner year 
in the Synod's history. 4,451 infants are members of the Cradle Roll, 
a gain of 729; thus are we claiming the children for Christ and the 
Church. 8,723 adults are enrolled in Home Department classes, a gain 
of 765 — by this means we are impressing the importance of Bible study 
in the home life. 667 persons are enrolled in Teacher Training classes, 
a gain of 237. This is a vitally important part of our work, and is 
growing in importance every year. The Shorter Catechism is taught in 
235 schools, and 342 schools use the Westminster Lesson Helps. 

Benevolence— The schools of Synod contributed during the year to 
the Board of Publication and Sabbath-school Work $5,670, which is 
$17.19 less than last year. The offering of last year, $7,389, was the 
largest in Synod's history, and was an increase of $2,598 over the 
previous year. Aside from this record, our gifts for the past year 
show an increase over previous years. Add the gifts of our churches 
to the Board, and our offerings reach a total of $14,451. The schools 
have given to other Boards of the church $21,578, and to miscellaneous 
benevolence $14,690, and have raised for the support of the schools 
$45,528, making the total amount of money raised for all purposes 
$87,466. 

Mission Work. — During the past year 133 missionaries and 30 colpor- 
teurs have labored within the bounds of 30 Synods and 115 Presby- 
teries. They have organized 722 new Sabbath-schools and revived 
247, a total of 969, into which have been gathered 3,191 officers and 
teachers and 30,029 scholars, making a total membership of 33,220. 
They have also encouraged and aided 2,317 Sabbath-schools, which are 
under their care, the membership of these schools being 96,346. They 



1907- Sabbath-School Work. ioi 

have also held 4,838 Evangelistic services, in which 2,119 conversions 
came under their observation ; and have conducted 976 Sabbath-school 
Institutes and Conventions. The missionaries have sold or given away 
9,246 Bibles and Testaments, 18,774 volumes of good literature and 
1,423,496 pages of tracts and periodicals, and visited 108,823 families. 
From the schools started and carried on by the missionaries of the 
Board there have been developed during the year 114 churches, of 
which 99 are Presbyterian, and 15 of other denominations. During 
the past 20 years 1,065 Presbyterian churches have grown from our 
mission Sabbath-schools, an average of 56 new Presbyterian churches 
every year. 

Other denominations sharing in the fruits of the work have gathered 
528 churches, making a total of 1,593, an average of 84 churches eadi 
ye2r. 

There are now but few States in which our Sabbath-school mis- 
sionaries are not at work. To-day the Board has under its care 2,300 
mission Sabbath-schools, and can point to 1,065 Presbyterian churches 
that have grown out of its schools. Many of these churches would not 
be in existence to-day — certainly the great majority of them would not 
be Presbyterian churches — had not the Sabbath-school missionary 
seized the strategic point and planted the blue banner of Presby- 
terianism there. 

Foreign Population. — The Board's work among the foreigners in 
America has grown rapidly since the last meeting of Synod. The 
number of colporteurs, as well as publications in foreign languages, has 
increased. 30 colporteurs have been engaged in this work. They have 
visited 35,489 families, distributed by sale and gift 10,186 religious 
books, 508,611 pages of tracts, and 3,725 Bibles, Testaments and Gospels 
in at least twenty different languages. The work was carried on last 
year at an expense of $22,000, and will require even more than this 
amount for the present year. This work for the foreigners will 
naturally develop year by year. 

More than a million immigrants are annually flocking to our shores. 
God, in His providence, is giving us foreign mission work to do at 
home. Patriotism, philanthrophy and Christianity, all appeal to us 
earnestly to undertake it ; and surely they will not appeal in vain. The 
Board of Publication is prepared to go forward with its part of the 
work as rapidly as the Church will provide it with the necessary funds. 

Teacher Training. — In view of the great loss of 445 from our teach- 
ing force during the past year, your Committee would call attention to 
the great importance of establishing Teacher Training Classes in all 
our schools. To aid in this important work the Board of Publication 
in 1905 published "The Westminster Teacher Training Course" in two 
volumes. This has been used in a large number of schools. In the 
light of two years' experience the first volume is now being revised, 
and will be ready for use this fall. This is a vitally important field 
of work. We must increase the efficiency of our Sabbath-schools ; we 
must develop our teaching force. This we can do by grading the 



102 Sabbath-School Work. Oct., 

schools, by adding new departments, by teacher training, by bringing 
the work to a new spirit of appreciation on the one hand, and of con- 
secration on the other. The Board of Publication wishes to be a leader 
in this great work, and desires, by preparation of literature of various 
kinds, by the holding of conferences and institutes, by the suggestion 
of methods and plans of work, and by the encouragement and stimula- 
tion of our Sabbath-school workers, to be of service in this most im- 
portant field of church activity. 

During the past year the General Assembly has committed to the 
Board a new department, that of "Young People's Work." and the 
Rev. Willis L. Gelston has been elected its superintendent, and is 
already at work. The work of this department will be carried on in 
the interest of the yoUng people of the Presbyterian Church, and in- 
cidentally of all the Boards and other missionary agencies, and will 
be planned for the accomplishment of three general objects — Organiza- 
tion, Instruction and Inspiration. 

Your Committee would suggest the following recommendations for 
adoption : 

1. That Synod urges in every Sunday-school the establishment of a 
Teachers' Training Class, and a Home Department. 

2. That all our schools be urged to observe Children's Day and Rally- 
ing Day, and that liberal offerings be made on these days to the mis- 
sionary and colportage work of the Board. 

HENRY C. CRONIN. 

Chairman. 



K)Oj. Young People's Societies. 103 



XII.— FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PER- 
MANENT COMMITTEE ON YOUNG PEOPLE'S 
SOCIETIES. 

In the presentation of our report it has been our custom to hear 
first from the Presbyterial chairmen. They have all prepared a careful 
report of their respective fields, costing them much time and labor, 
tbree of which, especially, are presented herewith, to be read to Synod. 

Rev. Wm. B. Hamilton, for Elizabeth, says: "I would emphasize the 
need of larger gifts to Home Missions, an increase of senior societies, 
more personal interest taken by pastors and elders in work for and with 
young people." 

Rev. H. Iserman, for Jersey City, says: "There is needed some 
method or system that will arouse a deeper spiritual interest, both on 
the part of the Church toward the young people and among the young 
people tbemselves." 

Rev. Frank Lukens, for Monmouth, says: "I would emphasize the 
need of our young people showing their faith by their works. The 
practical side needs developing. Also there is danger that pastors will 
unconsciously leave to them, as an utterly unfit and inadequate substi- 
tute, the fundamentally important work of training the young, which 
is supremely his work. He should see that he has them organized into 
study groups around himself.'' 

Rev. Minot C. Morgan, for Morris and Orange, says : "I feel the need 
of a more systematic correlation of the Church's work for the young 
people, at present finding expression in such a diversity of ways." 

Rev. Dr. William Y. Chapman, for Newark, says : "I emphasize the 
fact that as a rule the societies do not attract the more intelligent young 
people of our churches — high school and college young people. Pastors 
should make a special effort to bridge that chasm." 

Rev. Henry A. MacKubbin, for New Brunswick, says : "The young 
people's work is is good shape in our Presbytery. It is up to the 
pastor to make the young people's work a success, and he must plan 
for it, and work with it, and push it." 

Rev. Irvin F. Wagner, for Newton, says: "The majority of the 
societies are C. E. Societies, meeting Sabbath evenings. Closer attention 
was given by the churches this year in compiling the statistics." 

Rev. Walter L. Steiner, for West Jersey, says : "Urge upon the 
various pastors and sessions the importance and the advantage of a 
junior society for the small children of every church and the formation 
of mission study classes." 

We note that the last General Assembly transferred to our Synod 
the Presbytery of Havana, with its ten churches. We welcome their 
young people back to our field. 

Also the last General Assembly noted "the condition resembling chaos 
in the administration of our young people's work," and recommended 



104 Young People's Societies. Oct., 

that "some plan for a central bureau for the Christian nurture of the 
young be undertaken." The Board of Publication reported that it had 
appointed Rev. Willis L. Gelston, of Coldwater, Michigan, to be the 
new Superintendent on Young People's Work. We bespeak for him a 
cordial welcome, if he shall visit our societies. As yet no plan nor 
policy has been announced by the new department. 



I. MISSIONARY ENTERPRISES. 

We have often noted these various enterprises and must refer 
enquirers to to the reported details of two and three years ago. They 
are about the same now. 

Comparing Presbyteries this year and last, we find the following 
Home Missions contributions, as reported by the Board, to wit : 

Elizabeth, $746: loss, $34. Jersey City, $492; gain $68. Monmouth, 
$514; loss, $75. Morris and Orange, $947; loss, $481. Newark, $1,469; 
gain, $781. New Brunswick, $292; loss, $112. Newton, $250; loss, $81. 
West Jersey, $392; loss, $60. Total to Home Missions Board, $5,104; 
gain, $135. The largest amount was from the Young People's Societies 
of the First Church of Newark. $633. 

The contributions- to the Foreign Board are: Elizabeth, $1,971; loss, 
$699. Jersey City, $397; loss, $19. Monmouth, $463; loss, $126. Morris 
and Orange, $1,101; loss, $241. Newark. $528; loss, $7. New Brans- 
wick, $1,044; gain, $79. Newton, $306; gain, $21. West Jersey, $430; 
loss, $215. Total to Foreign Mission Board, $6,240, a loss of $1,207. 
The largest amount was from the Westminster Church Societies, $633. 



II. GENERAL STATISTICS. 

In the same connection we note some of the leading statistical items, 
taken from the printed statistical blanks for Presbyteries. Elizabeth : 
societies, 68; membership, 2,223; conversions, 107; contributions, $2,643. 
Jersey City: societies. 48; membership, 2,140; conversions, 146; con- 
tributions, $3,739. Monmouth: societies, 70; membership, 1,867; con- 
versions, 100; contributions, $3,915. Morris and Orange: societies, 90; 
membership, 3,098 ; conversions, 73 ; contributions, $7,640. Newark : 
societies, 59; membership, 2,279 ; conversions, 43 ; contributions, $3,675. 
New Brunswick: societies, 79; membership, 2,386; conversions, 65; 
contributions, 3,059. Newton: societies, 58; membership, 1,804; con- 
versions, 61; contributions, $2,444. West Jersey: societies, 80; mem- 
bership, 2,048; conversions, 75; contributions, $2,717. 

The totals compared with last year are: Societies, 552; loss 19. 
Members, 17,845; loss, 2,546. Conversions, 670; loss, 108. Contribu- 
tions, $29,832; loss $4,081. Synod will notice that there is a loss in 
«ach of these main items. 



190?. Young People's Societies. 105 



III. MISCELLANEOUS. 

There is nothing special to report concerning methods of study and 
training classes. Full reference to the final year of the Christian Study 
Course was made in our last report. 

The historical celebration of our completed two hundred years of 
existence in America was arranged for according to the directions of 
the last Synod. A few of our churches and societies held celebrations. 
Synod asked the societies to give at that time $1,000 for Synodical Home 
Missions, but they only gave $125. The full amount could be obtained 
if anybody had time to go after it earnestly. 

With the conclusion of this report, the chairman presents his resigna- 
tion, after fourteen years of service at this post, and recommends that 
Synod elect Rev. Frank Lukens, the Presbyterial Chairman for Mon- 
mouth, to be the chairman of Synod's Committee. 

We recommend the adoption of the following resolution : 

Resolved, That Synod call the attention of all our Sessions and 
societies to the decrease, as compared with last year, in societies, mem- 
bers, conversions and contributions, and earnestly calls upon all our 
young people to advance their work and plan for much greater results. 

HUGH B. MacCAULEY, 

Chairman. 



106 Sabbath Observance. Oct. r 

XI1L— REPORT OF THE PERMANENT COMMITTEE ON 
SABBATH OBSERVANCE. 

We have reached the time when it is no longer necessary to argue 
that it is right to "Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy." The 
Bible gives explicit commands and our statute books are receiving- 
new laws on this great subject. We must either keep these laws, 
both divine and human, without any mental reservation, or become 
anarchistic. But while men and women have the liberty to do right, 
they seek license to do wrong from a lax public opinion. Stiffen this 
public opinion and the same result will occur that we are noting in 
the many "investigatid'fis" into flagrant evils in public and corporation 
life. There is a remarkable work for a Sabbath Observance Commis- 
sion to perform. Such a commission is already in existence in the 
very organization of the Christian Church. "Awake, thou that 
sleepest," is not an unseasonable cry. 

New Jersey has been taking some steps in this Forward Movement 
during the past year. The enforcing of the Bishops' bill has accom- 
plished much, and wherever it has been enforced it has been highly 
effective in keeping the saloon closed on the Lord's Day. The keep- 
ing of this law has produced a strong sentiment for the keeping of 
other Sunday laws. Many places throughout our State have brought 
honor upon themselves by closing various business houses on the 
Great Day. We especially recognize the g^ood result, for a little while, 
of the concerted effort here in Atlantic City. In the preparation 
of this report each Presbyterial chairman was asked to assist by 
offering suggestions and by stating the condition in each Presbytery. 
A single reply was received and that is gladly quoted. Speaking of 
the effect of a concerted effort by the pastors of a community, he 
says : "It is another case of 'united we stand, divided we fall.' The 
public officials fear a united church sentiment, but have a contempt for 
the spasmodic utterances of an unorganized few." Then, this Presbyte- 
rial chairman tells how the prosecutor stopped Sunday base-ball in 
one of the towns, when appealed to by all the ministers, though he 
personally was in favor of the game on the Lord's Day. 

A very bold insult to the Christians of our State was offered at 
Trenton this year when Mr. Daab, of Hudson county, fathered a bill 
in the House which would permit Sunday base-ball in cities of the 
first class. The bill was killed by the narrow margin of 28-27. This 
daring effort last March should make us alert to frustrate a possible 
repetition of the offense. Had this bill passed the House your Com- 
mittee on Sabbath Observance would have been unusually busy at 
once. 

What can be done to better the conditions in New Jersey is the 
one problem that concerns us in this report. Clear speaking on the 
subject is essential, and right here there are many failures. Very few 
of our ministers follow the repeated resolution of General Assembly 



1907. Sabbath Observance. 107 

and Synod, requesting that a special sermon be preached in the month 
of April. After earnest prayer and a strict observance of the day 
on the part of the pastor, the next step is a powerful sermon on the 
question. As long as our people desecrate the day by staying away 
from church wilfully, taking Sunday excursions, reading the Sunday 
newspaper, giving too liberal hospitality on the rest day and by 
spending the day otherwise than even a liberal interpretation of the 
Shorter Catechism answer No. 60 suggests, it is of vital importance 
that the pulpit speak out fearlessly. 

A yearly lament is heard from city and country pastors concerning 
the small summer congregations. If when the city pastor sees empty 
pews the country and seashore pastors told of crowded churches there 
would be great joy. Too frequently the remark overheard on the 
street last week is true of many : "I have not been to church siince 
the strawberry festival." When our members observe the day during 
the winter season by attending church regularly twice each Sunday 
they will have developed a 'habit that will not leave them when 
away from their own church during the summer. A great stimulus 
to the abuse of the day is furnished by those churches that hold their 
Sunday-school session at any other time than Sunday afternoon. 
Satan always is ready to find some mischief for idle hands, and he 
readily accepts this great opportunity that is offered to him by the 
churches when they give him the Sunday-school, including both 
teachers and scholars, for the entire afternoon of Sunday. 

We would respectfully call the attention of our churches and 
pastors to the resolutions passed by the last General Assembly, par- 
ticularly the ones which "enjoin all ministers, officers and members 
of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. to exercise special care 
and faithfulness and to discourage the holding of funerals on the Sab- 
bath." Forbidding the use of the Sunday newspaper: "the General 
Assembly reiterates its emphatic condemnation of the Sunday news- 
paper, and urges the members of the Presbyterian Church of the 
U. S. A. to refuse to subscribe for, or read it, or advertise in it." 

The following resolutions are submitted for your adoption : 

1. That the Committee on Sabbath Observance be directed to send a 
communication to each pastor in our Synod about March 15th, calling 
upon him, in the name of Synod, to preach a sermon on the subject 
of the strict observance of the Lord's Day, sometime during the month 
of April, igo8. 

2. That this Committee be authorized to incur expense in its work 
not to exceed $25. 

3. That we most heartily commend and warmly endorse the work 
of the American Sabbath Union and the Woman's National Sabbath 
Alliance, national organizations, in their efforts to preserve in its 
purity the Christian Sabbath. 

4. That, in harmony with the General Assembly Resolution No. 10, 
we urge our churches to take an offering at the time of the Sabbath 
Observance sermon next April for the work of the American Sabbath 



108 Sabbath Observance. Oct., 

Union, Col. A. S. Bacon, Treasurer, 37 Liberty street, New York ; or, in 
lieu of an offering, we recommend that the Union be placed upon the 
list of benevolences of the churches. 

SAMUEL D. PRICE. 

Chairman 



ipo/. Temperance. 109 



XIV.— REPORT OF THE PERMANENT COMMITTEE ON 
TEMPERANCE. 

Your Committee are glad to believe and report that the outlook for 
the complete prohibition by law of the liquor beverage traffic through- 
out the entire territory of the United States is brighter to-day than at 
any time during the past century of the temperance crusade. The long 
continued process of education and agitation, carried on through many 
agencies, is now bearing a manifest and splendid harvest of good fruit 
in a widespread and determined effort by the temperance people of 
the land to organize their forces and to use all proper means and 
measures for the destruction of the liquor business. The tide of 
aggressive public sentiment and of awakened conscience in reference 
to the great evil and injustice of the liquor traffic is rising higher every 
year, in our Christian communities especially, and the Christian Church 
has grown more bold and outspoken in her denunciation of the saloon 
and the drink habit, and in laying upon the Christian voters of the 
country the responsibility for the continued existence of these great 
evils. As a result, the lawmakers in all our State Legislatures and in 
our National Congress have been compelled to deal with the liquor 
problem, and we may truly say that it is the most prominent and vital 
issue in politics and legislation in these days. Especially are the 
people of this nation demanding the privilege of home rule in the 
settlement of this problem, and they are getting :t wherever they persist 
in their reasonable and righteous demand. In the aggressive and 
strenuous fight which is now waging against the liquor traffic, we see 
the cause of prohibition advancing so rapidly in our territory that 
even one of the leaders of the liquor champions likens it to the sweep 
of a prairie fire, and declares that it is too late now to stop it. Surely 
now is the time for all the foes of the liquor evil to unite and to push 
forward the cause of prohibition, with the faith that God is giving us 
the victory. 

Since the last meeting of our Synod the State of Georgia has, by 
an overwhelming vote, placed itself in the column of prohibition States, 
along with Maine, Kansas and North Dakota. Oklahoma, having in 
September last carried prohibition by the decisive majority of 30,000 
votes, will, we believe, soon be admitted into the Union, with Indian 
Territory, as another prohibition State. It is confidently believed by 
those well informed as to the situation that several other States, in- 
cluding North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, 
Tennessee, Missouri, Texas and Kentucky, in which a large part of the 
territory is already rid of the saloon, will, within a few years, follow 
Georgia in adopting prohibition as the law for the whole State. The 
State of Delaware, or most of it, will probably be carried for no 
license under a no-license privilege on the fifth of next month. In 
Ohio, Iowa, Indiana and Illinois the local option movement is gaining 



no Temperance. Oct., 

ground, and, indeed, over most of the entire country progress is being 
steadily made in the direction of prohibition. 

In New Jersey we are lagging behind in this movement, but are not 
content with present attainments. We purpose to go forward and not 
backward, and believe that the time is not far distant when our efforts 
to obtain a local option law will be crowned with success. We believe 
that the clamor of the liquor forces of our State for home rule on the 
question of an open Sunday for the liquor business will only help out- 
cause in showing up the godlessness and unAmerican spirit of those 
who make it. We should insist upon the continuance and enforcement 
of the Bishops' Bill law, and by pledging individual candidates for our 
Legislature, regardless of party, we should press steadily toward the 
goal of the local option privilege, and then aim for State prohibition. 
Some progress toward this end has been made this past year in getting 
a vote in our State Assembly on the Local Option Bill and in securing 
the nomination of men for our Legislature who are pledged to vote 
for this bill when the opportunity offers. 

In some parts of our State energetic efforts are being made to 
improve local conditions. In Atlantic City a strong Citizens' League 
has made effective warfare against gambling, selling liquor to children 
and selling liquor on Sundays. In Salem the temperance forces are 
aiming, through a Citizens' Reform ticket, to elect city councilmen who 
will refuse to grant liquor licenses. We are very sorry to report that 
an excise board, appointed by the city council of Asbury Park, has, 
since our meeting there last year, issued a license to retail alcoholic 
liquors to four hotel keepers in that city, which was founded as a 
temperance place, and we sincerely hope that this blot upon its fair 
name and this stumbling block in the way of its largest prosperity will 
soon be removed. We believe that the liquor traffic is a curse and 
blight to any city where it is tolerated, and we trust that the day is 
-not far distant when Atlantic City, this great seaside resort of people 
from many States and lands, will also be rid of the traffic in intoxicat- 
ing beverages. 

We are sorry to note that many officers of the regular army are still 
urging the repeal of the Anti-Canteen Law, in face of the fact that the 
Judge Advocate General of the army reports a decrease of over two 
thousand cases of generals court-martial in 1906 as compared with the 
number reported in 1900, when the Anti-Canteen Law went into effect, 
and when, it is estimated from the records of his office, that in ninety 
per cent, of the cases before such courts the defendants plead drunken- 
ness as an extenuating circumstance or defense. We are still of the 
opinion that the canteen should not be restored to the army posts or 
camps, and that if proper precautions were taken to safeguard the men 
against saloons, and stricter discipline enforced against drunkenness, 
the moral and physical condition of our soldiers would be greatly 
improved. 

We would call attention to the fact that some legislation on the part 
of Congress is imperatively demanded to prevent the introduction of 



J9°7- Temperance. iii 

liquors into prohibition territory under the provisions of the Inter- 
State Commerce Law, and we should all urge the members of Congress 
from our State to support the Littlefield-Carmack Bill, which aims at 
the cure of this evil. We would note the important fact that the 
decisions of several court judges in Indiana this year, refusing appli- 
cants for a license to retail intoxicating liquors for beverage purposes 
on the ground that it is contrary to the principles of the Constitution of 
the State and the United States, mark a new and strong form of 
attack upon the liquor business. It is expected that the Supreme Court 
of the United States will be required to give its decision in the matter 
by an appeal case, and, if so, the people of this nation, representing 
both sides of the liquor question, will await the decision with intense 
interest. The contention that the liquor business is detrimental to the 
material, physical and moral welfare of the people, and, therefore, 
subversive of the just aims of civil government, is, no doubt, true and 
proved true by the test of experience. We believe that the emphasizing 
of this argument against the licensed liquor traffic is called for at this 
time and must do great good. 

We want to call attention to the very large and admirable work 
which has been done by the Permanent Committee of our General 
Assembly this past year in the preparation and distribution of tem- 
perance literature, fifteen million of pages of which have been supplied 
to a great variety of institutions, besides our own churches and 
Sunday-schools. Some of this literature has gone into every State and 
Territory of the Union, and much of it to many foreign countries in 
the languages of their people. Pledge cards, Sunday-school lessons 
and programs for temperance day have been freely furnished to our 
Sunday-schools. A year book full of most valuable information has 
been prepared to furnish temperance material to pastors and others in 
promoting the cause, and much valuable information has been circulated 
through the religious press. In addition to this important work of 
education and agitation through literature, the Assembly's Committee 
has also employed and paid for the services of three Associate Secre- 
taries, one lecturer on Scientific Temperance and one colored evangelist, 
who have labored during the whole or part of the year, giving public 
addresses before many thousands of people in furtherance of the tem- 
perance cause, and all this work and much more has been done at the 
small expense of less than $17,000.00. We believe that the work car- 
ried on through this committee is of incalculable and increasing value, 
and we believe that it should be encouraged and supported far more 
liberally by all of our congregations, especially since its scope and 
volume are ever enlarging. 

We are glad to notice that the total contributions of the churches 
and Sabbath-schools of our Synod for the past year to the work of 
this committee were $245.80 more than last year, but we are sorry that 
245, or more than two-thirds of our churches, made no contribution 
whatever to this very efficient agency of our denomination for the 
promotion of righteousness and the progress of Christ's Kingdom. 



ii2 Temperanxe. Oct., 

Twenty-eight more churches and nineteen more Sunday-schools of our 
Synod, however, contributed this year to this agency than were re- 
ported last year, and we hope for a much larger increase next year. 
The Basking Ridge Church retains its honored place as the banner 
church of Synod in the amount contributed to this work, and the Sun- 
day-school of the same church is the banner school of the twenty-two 
schools contributing. Our churches, as shown by the temperance col- 
umn of the Assembly minutes, gave $2,247.00 to further this cause, in 
addition to the $693.00 given toward the work of the Permanent Com- 
mittee. It appears from the minutes that a large number of our Ses- 
sions probably neglected to make use of the temperance column last 
year to report all offerings for the temperance cause, and we would 
urge all such Sessions' to report their gifts to the Assembly next year. 
The banner church of our Synod for the largest amount given to the 
temperance cause last year is the Brick Church, of East Orange 
($293.00). 

We desire to express our grateful appreciation of the splendid work 
that has been done in our State by the New Jersey Anti-Saloon League 
during the past year in arousing, stimulating, organizing and directing 
the temperance sentiment of our people for effective work along polit- 
ical and legislative lines. This league has now five men devoting their 
entire time to the work. It has. by its representatives, spoken in four 
hundred churches, ninety-six of them Presbyterian, during the year, 
and distributed a half million pages of temperance literature in our 
State bearing upon its special line of work. It has received and ex- 
pended $12,376.46 during the year in support of the temperance cause. 
We believe that it deserves the confidence and generous support of all 
our churches and of all our citizens who desire to see the liquor traffic 
banished from our State and land. 

In conclusion, your Committee would say that we have abundant 
reason to praise God for the progress made in our State and nation, 
and over the world, indeed, -in the temperance cause. It is sadly true 
that there has been no perceptible decrease in the amount of alcoholic 
liquor consumed in our country for drink as yet, and that this amount 
and the cost of it are appalling in their magnitude, but this lack of 
decrease is doubtless due to the vast influx of foreign population 
addicted to the drink habit. It is true that there is very much land 
to be possessed for temperance, and the conflict must be long and 
hard, but the time has come, we believe, when the majority of the 
people of this nation are fully convinced that the liquor traffic, under 
any form of restriction that can be put upon it, is a crippling, deadly 
and unscrupulous foe to the material, moral and spiritual welfare 
of men, and that its iniquity is so patent and so enormous that we 
must rid ourselves of the responsibility for its continuance, or else 
stand in peril of God's righteous judgment upon us and upon our 
nation. An aroused church can make the sentiment which will de- 
mand that this nation shall no longer frame iniquity by law in licens- 
ing and thereby rendering respectable and defending the murderous 



igoj. Temperance. 113 

and God-defying traffic. And it is the duty of all ministers of God's 
Word, which pronounces a woe upon him who putteth the bottle 
to his neighbor's lips to make him drunken, and declares that no 
drunkard shall enter the Kingdom of Heaven, to lead on the people 
of God in a holy war against this great evil and crime of the legalized 
saloon, and to use all their influence and power to banish the liquor 
traffic and the drink habit from our land. This war is already wax- 
ing hot ; the enemy is showing signs of dismay, and, by the signs of 
the times, God is calling us to rise up and go forward to larger victory. 
We would recommend the adoption of the following resolutions : 

1. That this Synod, profoundly impressed with the sense of God's 
call to His people in this land to go forward and banish the liquor 
traffic from our midst, urges upon all of the ministers and laity 
under its jurisdiction to do their utmost in every lawful and judicious 
way to promote this righteous cause. 

2. That this Synod, again commends to all our ministers and people 
the excellent literature provided and freely furnished for their use 
and distribution by our General Assembly's Committee on Tem- 
perance and urges a larger use of the same for the promotion of 
temperance sentiment and work. 

3. That this Synod, appreciating and approving the largely-expanded 
work of the Assembly's Permanent Committee and its need of increased 
funds to maintain this work, urges all of the Sessions of its churches 
to secure, by some method, an annual offering that we may contribute 
at least our proportionate share of the sum recommended by the As- 
sembly, which for this year is $25,000, of which our share is $1,470. 

4. That this Synod, recognizing the Anti-Saloon League of our 
State under its present management and policy as a safe and very 
efficient agency for the promotion of the temperance cause, and especi- 
ally for the furthering of the legal prohibition of the liquor traffic, 
heartily commends it to the support of the churches and people of 
our State, and pledges to give it such co-operation as is consistent 
with the constitution of our church. 

5. That this Synod would approve of the selection by the New 
Jersey Anti-Saloon League of three Presbyterian ministers and 
three Presbyterian laymen as members of its Board of Control, to 
be a medium of conference and cooperation between that League 
and our Presbyterian churches in this State. 

6. That we record and publish our strongest protest against any 
measures taken by Army officers, or others, for the repeal of the 
Anti-Canteen law passed by the United States Congress, while this 
•law is so persistently upheld by such wise and honored veterans 
as Generals Miles, Daggett and others, and while the official reports 
of the War Department testify to its value in greatly improving the 
morals of the army. 

7. That this Synod, through its Stated Clerk, urges upon our 
National Congress and the President of these United States the adop- 
tion of the "Littlefield-Carmack Bill," to prevent gross injustice 

8 



ii4 Temperance. Oct., 

to those States and communities which have legally outlawed the 
liquor traffic, and urges its ministers and laymen also to use their 
personal influence with the members of Congress from our State 
to secure the passage of said bill. 

8. That we are unalterably opposed to any legislation which con- 
templates the legalizing of the sale of alcoholic beverages on the 
Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday, believing that such legislation 
is directly contrary to the expressed will of God, and would provoke 
His righteous judgments, and we befieve that any man or party up- 
holding or asking for such legislation is not worthy the support of 
God-fearing and patriotic citizens. 

g. That we favor and pledge ourselves to support the Bishops' 
Bill law as now in force, but will strive to secure still more advanced 
restrictive legislation, and will persistently and steadily press forward 
to obtain a local option law which will give us the right of home 
rule for the settlement of the saloon question. 

10. That we join with our General Assembly in recommending that 
the last Sabbath in October be observed as Temperance Day in our 
churches, Sabbath-schools and Young Peoples' Societies, and that 
we urge all Christians to make earnest supplication to God on that 
day for His blessing upon all efforts which are being made to pro- 
mote total abstinence from the use of alcoholic beverages and the 
abolition of the liquor traffic. 

WILLIAM V. LOUDERBOUGH, 

Chairman. 



igo7- Systematic Beneficence. 115 



XV.— REPORT OF THE PERMANENT COMMITTEE ON PRO- 
PORTIONATE AND SYSTEMATIC BENEFICENCE. 

Another year's record of our benefactions has been made up and 
your Committee sets itself to the task of review and emphasis of cer- 
tain things the record contains. In the way of reproduction of the 
things that are written in our church Year Book, we cannot attempt 
so very much. We may, however, give certain summaries and com- 
parisons which will aid us in telling the story of the past year's benefi- 
cence, and may incite us to larger things in the make-up of the record 
of the year now passing. To lead the members of our churches to 
look upon their material holdings as their loan from the Lord and to 
persuade them to administer their substance as good stewards, not 
forgetting the "storehouse tithes," is the ultimate object of this Com- 
mittee. But we expect little good will ever come of our efforts save 
through the intermediary service of the Presbyterial Committees and 
through the pastors and ruling elders who — more than any other 
human agents — hold the key to the treasuries of the church. More- 
over, if the subordinate Committees and the pastors and elders are 
content to bury the facts presented by your Committee in the shroud 
of inattention or the casket of many year's Synodical custom and not 
press them home in the Presbyteries and make them live down in 
the churches, then it were well that your Committee be dropped from 
its place on Synod's docket. 

An examination of the Minutes of General Assembly yields the fol- 
lowing comparative tables : 

Home Presbyteries. Membership. 

1906. 1907. 

Newark, 13.960 14.176 

Morris and Orange,. 11,020 11,123 

Elizabeth, 10,659 10,833 

New Brunswick,.... 9,662 9,793 

West Jersey 8,899 9. J °5 

Jersey City, 8,489 8,889 

Monmouth, 6,840 6,848 

Newton, 6,022 6,170 12,955 14,691 2.16 2.37 

We here discover a gain in the membership of our churches of 1,005. 
The comparison reveals a falling off in gifts to objects outside of 
church support of $294,243. If, however, for fairness of comparison we 
omit from 1906 the princely gifts credited to a single church in the 
Presbytery of Elizabeth, we shall find that 1907 shows a gain of $10,807. 
Then, if we make the same omission from the estimate, we discover 
that while the per capita gifts to benevolence were in 1906, $5.40, the 
average rose this year to $5.48. 



Gifts to Beneficence. 


Per Capita 


Gifts. 


1906. 


1907. 


1906. 


1907. 


$IOO,753 


$81,076 


$7.22 


$5-70 


93.369 


H7.944 


8.47 


IO.60 


397.518 


90,991 


37.28 


8.21 


46,252 


44.973 


4-77 


4-59 


22,220 


27,530 


2.50 


302 


32,869 


34.162 


3.87 


3-84 


21,416 


21.742 


3-13 


3-17 



n6 Systematic Beneficence. Oct., 

The relative standing of seven of the stronger Synods is seen in the 
following table : 

Total Per Capita 

Synod. Beneficence. Gift. 1902. 

New York $14,182.13 Illinois $7.08 $4.37 

Pennsylvania 11,099.58 New York, 6.98 5.54 

Illinois, 5.937-88 New Jersey 5.48 6.55 

New Jersey 4.33^-35 Baltimore 5.14 3.47 

Ohio, 3,295.69 Pennsylvania 4.47 5.46 

Baltimore 1,519.08 Ohio, 2.93 3.97 

Indiana 1,058.78 Indiana 2.24 3.47 

This table is presented not merely to show that our Synod has fallen 
from the third place in the aggregate of gifts to fourth place, and that 
instead of occupying the place of first honor in per capita gifts, which 
we held for some years, we have been outranked by both Illinois and 
New York, but our main object is to show that while membership has 
greatly increased and wealth multiplied in our churches, the per capita 
gifts in more than one-half of the Synods mentioned above have dropped 
below the rate of five years ago. Surely there is no ground for boasting 
here. Rather had we deck ourselves in the garments of humiliation. 

Another showing of the records worth noting is that the various 
Presbyteries of the Synod presented to the Boards of Foreign Missions, 
Sabbath School Work and Ministerial Relief, larger gifts than the 
previous year, while the other five approved channels of our beneficence 
received less than the amounts contributed the preceding year. 

Taking now the measure of the faithfulness of the church courts to 
contribute to every Board, we discover some things that encourage. Of 
our 336 churches, the Minutes of General Assembly indicate that last 
year 281 presented offerings to every one of the eight Boards. The 
number thus faithful the previous year was 255. It is thus observed 
that while in 1906 71 churches failed to comply with the admonition 
of their proper counsellor in the matter of offerings, only 55 were thus 
derelict the year for which we are accounting. Again, be it observed 
that 276, the number of blanks appearing in the Minutes of 1906, is re- 
duced this year to 242. A glance back over five years will still better 
reveal progress in this matter of church loyalty. Then there were 102, 
or nearly one-third of our churches showing blanks in the statistical 
columns, now there are 55, or less than one of every six of our churches. 
Then there were in all 427 blanks, now there are 242. In the Presbytery 
of Jersey City the number of churches having blanks was reduced from 
26 to 17. In West Jersey the reduction was from 30 to 14. The total 
number of blanks in Jersey City in this period of five years dropped 
from 120 to 79. In Newton from 53 to 15, and in West Jersey in 
four years, i. e., from 1903, from 164 to 78. Your Committee commends 
to all the Presbyteries the splendid example set by Monmouth and 
New Brunswick in regularly presenting annual offerings to every Board. 
The progress toward this goal by most of our Presbyteries in recent 



1907. Systematic Beneficence. 117 

years, as shown by the figures just given, is evidence enough that it 
can be reached. 

But if we are encouraged by such a showing; if a few dollars more 
than the year before have found their way into the work of Kingdom 
extension, and if a few more churches than in previous years came 
to the help of all the Boards, and a number of breaches in the col- 
umns of blanks were closed — what of it? Surely, that cannot con- 
tent us! And how may we be at ease in our Zion, even if there are 
hopeful signs that next year will see as many, or a few more, dollars 
rolling into the treasuries and a few less blanks mar the pages of 
the Minutes? When it is realized that the weekly per capita gifts 
of the Synod of New Jersey toward the sending of the Gospel of 
Jesus Christ to all the world last year was less than the price of a 
round trip fare on the street cars, and when with this it is remem- 
bered that New Jersey Christians are increased with goods as never 
before, is it not time for us pastors and elders to address oursellves 
to the matter of supporting the work of our boards with an interest 
and determination that are in keeping with the Church's mission? 

< )fttimes it appears that the last word has been said and the last 
act of devising done in the matter of method of securing from tihe 
church the money needed for her larger work. Our agencies of col- 
lection and distribution are, for the most part, above criticism. They 
touch each other without interference, forming a plan quite sufficient 
under God to meet the needs of a waiting world. And never was 
there a time when the men in charge of these agencies were quite 
so busy as now in pressing the churches for funds for the work. 
I suppose, too, that pastors have thrown more of their earnestness 
into this department of their work in recent years than ever before. 
And yet, with a membership growing in numbers and intelligence, and 
with wealth accumulating faster than our numbers, here is the humili- 
ating spectacle of reduced per capita gifts and smaller aggregate 
of gifts these latest years than were given several years ago. The 
question presses, "What can be done to secure increased gifts from 
our members that will be commensurate with the growth in numbers, 
the prosperity that attends the people and our share in the work of 
evangelizing the world? It must be acknowledged that with all our 
splendidly-working machinery the giving of our people needs to be 
lifted to a higher plane. All too long have we been content to go 
after the "spare" cash of the people in any sort of "splutter and spasm" 
method. With due deference to the best things we have devised, 
is there anything so unbusinesslike as the proposition to evangelize 
the world's millions with only such funds as may be gathered in the 
occasional collection, or through such indirect and unsanctified means 
as have neither command or promise to warrant them. For years 
we have talked and written and resolved and done things looking 
towards improvement in the whole matter, but in the face of all 
that the conviction is gaining ground that something vital has been 
left out of the Christian's program. Now. the Lord has not left 



n8 Systematic Beneficence. Oct., 

His church to have its support at haphazard. As fully as He gave 
rules to govern in prayer, in organization and in government so 
surely has He given directions for the ministry of substance. From 
the first recorded act of worship in the annals of time, which was 
the presenting of offerings to the Lord, as noted in the story of 
the first human family, down to the last chapter of the sacred oracles, 
precept and admonition regarding the use of money have stood with 
other calls to service in equal, if not greater prominence. Yet, despite 
the fact that fruitful vineyards, laden orchards, bursting barns and 
overflowing measure are, all down Scripture, guaranteed the Chris- 
tian who will properly administer his money, the divine rule has 
not been honored as it should be among those who have been made 
the stewards of the ford's money. For four years this Committee 
has been urging the honoring of original principles touching this 
all-important matter, and again to-day we reiterate the conviction 
that if ever there is to be a substantial and permanent increase 
of gifts flowing into the treasuries of our boards there must be 
less dependence upon what the people are in mood to drop on the 
plates from week to week and more reliance upon such measures 
as will secure in a regular, systematic way a definite proportion 
of each Christian's weekly increase. These original principles are 
none other than those of "tithes and offering," and the most hopeful 
sign in connection with this whole subject of beneficence, steward- 
ship or giving is the widening recognition of the obligation of the 
Christian disciple to make the tenth the minimum proportion to 
be taken out of one's wages or income as "holy unto the Lord." In 
1895 the General Assembly gave indirect recognition to this by ap- 
proving a table based upon the tenth, indicating the amount to be 
given for the support of one's own congregation, the amount each 
board should receive and miscellaneous objects also, from incomes 
ranging from $125 per annum to $10,000 per annum. The last Gen- 
eral Assembly gave emphatic sanction to the tithe-principle by the 
adoption, among others, of the following recommendations : "That an 
effort be made in all our churches to increase the number of those 
who set apart a definite portion of their income for the Lord's work." 
And "That the portion thus set aside be AT least a tenth, for, while 
under the Gospel dispensation no definite rule can be laid down as 
to the amount that should be set aside from one's income as the 
Lord's portion, yet the whole trend of the teaching of the Word 
would indicate that it should not be LESS than the tenth." 

Last year Judge Lanning reminded us that it had taken the Presby- 
terian Church 200 years to incorporate "The Worship of God by Offer- 
ings" in her Directory of Worship. It has taken her still more years 
than 200 to adopt God's measure and order of "tithes and offerings," 
but, thank God, she has done it. Four days prior to this action of 
General Assembly similar action was taken by the National Baptist 
Association in session in Washington, D. C, which resolved "That 
inasmuch as our people need thorough instruction concerning God's 



igo7- Systematic Beneficence. 119 

financial methods for His work, the pastors be urged to teach more 
systematically the Scriptural principles of Christian stewardship, and 
to enlist as many members as possible in a committal to lay aside at 
least one-tenth of their income for the Lord's work." Less than a 
month later the General Synod of the Dutch Reformed Church of 
America, in session in Albany, N. Y., declared in re-affirmation "That 
ministers be recommended to impress the duty of giving a definite 
proportion of one's income to God, as God has prospered everyone, the 
tithe principle being regarded as the norm, and indicative, in most 
cases, of the minimum." Surely these are inspiring evidences of "the 
new awakening." 

Further recommendations of General Assembly have a rightful place 
in this report, viz., "We recommend to the careful consideration of the 
boards the wisdom of throwing the responsibility of raising the total 
amount expected from church offerings upon the Synods and Presby- 
teries, believing that such a course will increase the enthusiasm of our 
Synods and Presebyteries in our missionary and benevolent work by 
increasing their sense of responsibility. And we recommend that 
this Assembly direct the boards to apportion to the Presbyteries the 
amounts recommended for each board by the Finance Committee of 
the Assembly. We further recommend to the boards to submit to the 
Presbyteries a joint statement of the amount apportioned, to be in 
turn apportioned by the Presbytery to the individual churches." 

The educational work of your Committee during the past year has 
consisted in sending to all pastors and some elders the leaflet entitled 
"The Christian Use of the Tithe System." In addition, about 2.500 
copies of leaflets issued by General Assembly's Special Committee on 
Systematic Beneficence were distributed. This work used the appro- 
priation made for the Committee. The remainder of the elders vvill 
receive the above-named leaflet shortly, which will take the expected 
appropriation for this year. It would help greatly in the much-needed 
educational campaign which was emphasized at General Assembly if 
Sessions were to see that a copy of this leaflet is placed in at least every 
family in their churches. The chairman of this Committee will gladly 
assist Sessions to procure them at lowest cost. 

We present for adoption the following resolutions : 

1. That the spiritual and financial value of the tithe principle be 
recognized and its practice recommended to all affiliated with our 
churches, and that pastors be urged to read to their congregations 
recommendations Nos. 2 and 3, page 225 of the Minutes of General 
Assembly, 1907. 

2. That Sessions be urged to inaugurate and sustain an educational 
campaign in their respective churches by using the literature provided 
gratis by General Assembly's Special Committee on Systematic Benefi- 
cence, and such other on this subject which is easily procurable from 
many other sources. 

3. That as a Synod we adopt the "Budget Plan" for the boards, and 
recommend its adoption by our Presbyteries. 



120 Systematic Beneficence. Oct., 

4. That in order to preserve the purity of the motive for and the 
character of our contributions to the extension of the Kingdom of 
Christ, and to observe in spirit and letter Chapter VI of the Directory 
for Worship, the Worship of God by Offerings, Sessions be urged to 
discountenance fairs, bazaars, suppers and other commercial methods 
of procuring money. 

5. In view of the universal prosperity with which God has blessed 
our land, a good share of which has come to the members of our 
Church, and considering the increased cost of living, which has ad- 
vanced during the last decade at least one-third, thereby causing em- 
barrassment and even suffering to some of the pastors of our Church, 
we do recommend that the sessions of the several churches throughout 
our Synod do seriouslyconsider the matter of a proportionate increase 
in their ministers' support, thus fulfilling the covenant entered into at 
the time of their call to relieve them from all care and avocation about 
worldly things. 

6. That Synod appropriates $25.00 for the work of this Committee for 
the current year. 

w. w. casselberry. 

Chairman. 



1907- Presbyterian Brotherhood. 



XVI.— REPORT OF THE PRESBYTERIAN BROTHERHOOD. 

To the Synod of New Jersey-' 

At its meeting in October, 1906, the Synod appointed Rev. Frederick 
E. Stockwelf, Rev. Robert S. Inglis, D.D., Rev. William I. Campbell, 
Elder Clarence C. Robinson and Elder Waldo C. Genung a Special 
Committee on the Presbyterian Brotherhood. This Committee called a 
Convention of the Brotherhoods of New Jersey, to be held in the Fourth 
Presbyterian Church of Trenton on February 12th, 1007. The Conven- 
tion was attended by 73 ministers and 102 laymen, or a total of 175 
men. Representatives were present from each of the eight Presbyteries 
in the State of New Jersey. 

After a most interesting meeting, which lasted the entire day, a per- 
manent organization was formed which took for its name "The Pres- 
byterian Brotherhood of New Jersey." A constitution was adopted 
which created the officers of President, three Vice-Presidents, Secretary, 
Treasurer and an Executive Council, the Council being composed of 
the above-mentioned officers and a minister and a layman from each of 
the eight Presbyteries in the State of New Jersey. A copy of the con- 
stitution is annexed to this report as a part thereof. The Brotherhood 
determined that the next annual Convention should be held on Feb- 
ruary 12th, 1908, in the Munti Avenue Presbyterian Church at East 
Orange. The officers elected under the constitution were as follows : 

President — Mr. William M. Lanning, of Trenton. 

Vice-Presidents — Mr. Elwood C. Harris, of Newark. 

Dr. Stephen Pierson, of Morristown. 
Mr. J. F. Tatem, of Haddonfield. 

Secretary — Mr. John E. Gill, of Trenton. 

Treasurer — Mr. Edward W. Dunham, of Trenton. 

Mr. Gill having declined to accept the office of Secretary on account 
of the pressure of other duties, the Executive Council have elected Mr. 
Waldo C. Genung, of Newark, as Secretary. 

In addition to the officers above named, the members of the Executive 
Council are : 

From the Presbytery of Elizabeth — Rev. Dr. William Force Whitaker 
and Mr. Samuel J. Berry, Jr. 

From the Presbytery of Jersey City — Rev. Dr. J. D. Steele. 

From the Presbytery of Monmouth — Rev. Charles B. Austin, D.D., 
and Mr. S. C. Harris. 

From the Presbytery of Morris and Orange — Rev. Dr. John F. Pat- 
terson and Mr. Harvey C. Olin. 

From the Presbytery of Newark — Rev. Dr. Charles E. Granger and 
Mr. Archibald M. Woodruff. 

From the Presbytery of Newton — Rev. J. deHart Bruen and Mr. Wil- 
liam W. Woodward. 

From the Presbytery of New Brunswick — Rev. Dr. Henry C. Minton 
and Mr. Calvin Solliday. 



122 Presbyterian Brotherhood. Oct., 

From the Presbytery of West Jersey — Rev. William V. Louder- 
bough and Mr. Thomas W. Synnott. 

In response to a call sent out to the churches of the Synod, the Ex- 
ecutive Council have received reports showing that there are in the 
Presbytery of Elizabeth, 13 men's organizations ; in the Presbytery of 
Jersey City, 14 men's organizations, with a total membership of 660; 
in the Presbytery of Monmouth, 13 men's organizations, with a total 
membership of 180; in the Presbytery of Morris and Orange, 17 men's 
organizations, with a total membership of 900 ; in the Presbytery of 
Newark, 23 men's organizations, with a total membership of 986 ; in the 
Presbytery of New Brunswick, 9 men's organizations with a total mem- 
bership of 475; in the Presbytery of Newton, 6 men's organizations; 
and in the Presbytery- of West Jersey, 15 men's organizations. This 
makes a total of no men's organizations, with a total membership of 
3,201. We are satisfied that there are other organizations in the 
churches that did not report to us. 

We find most of the organizations in a flourishing condition. Their 
objects are to promote religious work, to advance private and public 
moral standards, sociability, athletic and literary exercises, and to pro- 
mote the usefulness of men generally in the churches to which they 
belong. 

We do respectfully recommend — 

1. That the Synod approve the formation of the Presbyterian Brother- 
hood of New Jersey and the constitution which it has adopted. 

2. That the Synod appoint a Committee on Presbyterian Brotherhood, 
with whom the Presbyterian Brotherhood of New Jersey may, from time 
to time, confer in the prosecution of its work. 

We also report that at a meeting of the Executive Council of the 
Brotherhood held on October 7th, instant, the following declaration was 
adopted and ordered to be embodied in our report to the Synod, with a 
recommendation that the Synod do approve the same, to wit : 

"First. That we believe the history of our religious and civil institu- 
tions shows that the first day of the week, commonly called Sunday, 
has been observed by our people in such a way as to make it, in a 
peculiar sense, 'the American Sabbath Day,' and we further declare 
that this precious heritage received from our fathers should be pre- 
served as one of the crown jewels of the State. 

"Second. That we protest against any legislation by the representa- 
tives of the people of the State of New Jersey, which shall render 
more lax than they now are the laws regulating the sales of intoxicating 
liquors." 

All which is respectfully submitted, this twenty-first day of October,. 
A. D. 1907. 

The Presbyterian Brotherhood of New Jersey. 

(Signed) WM. M. BANNING, 

President. 
WALDO C. GENUNG, 

Secretary. 



jgoj. Presbyterian Br itherhi 123 



Constitution of the Presbyterian Brotherhood oe New Jersey. 

i. organization. 

This organization shall be called the Presbyterian Brotherhood 
of New Jersey, and shall be composed of the members of the men's 
societies of any name that are established in connection with the 
Presbyterian churches in the Synod of New Jersey and agree to abide 
by these by-laws. 

II. OFFICERS. 

The officers of this Brotherhood shall be a President, three Vice- 
presidents, being one each for the northern, central and southern 
sections of the State, a Secretary and a Treasurer, who shall be elected 
annually by the Brotherhood at its conventions, and shall perform 
the usual duties of their respective offices. 

III. EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 

There shall be an Executive Council, to be composed of the officers 
above named, together with sixteen others, being a pastor and a lay- 
man for each of the eight Presbyteries of the Synod, who shall be 
elected annually by the Brotherhood at its conventions. This Council 
shall be responsible for devising ways and means to advance the 
interests of the Brotherhood. All vacancies shall be filled by the 
Council. 

IV. MEETINGS. 

1. There shall be an annual convention, to be held on Lincoln's 
birthday, February 12th, or on such date as shall be determined by 
the Executive Council, which convention shall be composed of the 
pastor and one lay delegate from every Men's Society in the Synod 
that is a member of this Brotherhood, together with any other men 
as visitors that shall be in attendance. 

2. Other meetings of the State Brotherhood may be held as the 
convention shall determine, or, in the absence of its action, at the 
discretion of the Executive Council. 

V. REPORT TO SYNOD. 

In accordance with the Form of Government, Chapter XX I II, this 
Brotherhood shall make an annual report to the Synod of New 
Jersey, in such way and to such extent as the Synod shall require, 
or, in the absence of such directions, as the Executive Council shall 
determine. 

VI. NOMINATING COMMITTEE. 

The Executive Council shall at least one month prior to each annual 
convention appoint a Nominating Committee, consisting of the presi- 
dent and one member from each Presbytery, whose duty it shall be 
to nominate officers for the Brotherhood at the ensuing annual con- 
vention. Such nominations shall not exclude other nominations on 
the floor of the convention. 



124 Historical Material. Oct., 

XVII.— REPORT OF THE CUSTODIANS OF HISTORICAL 

MATERIAL. 

The Custodians of Historical Material respectfully report to the 
Synod of New Jersey that the following material has been placed in 
the Synod's depository during the past year : 

From the Rev. Allen H. Brown, D.D.: 

Presbyterian Church, Woodstown, Rev. Francis J. Collier, D.D. 

Fiftieth Anniversary, laying of corner-stone of First Presbyterian 
■Church, Atlantic City, 1906. 

Presbyterian Church" at Waretown, near Barnegat, in 1766. 

Many pictures of West Jersey churches. 

From the Rev. Allen H. Brown, D.D., and the Rev. Tillman S. Rush, 
D.D. : 
Historical Sketch, Green Creek Church, 1907. 

From James Steen, Fsq.: 

The Old Presbyterian Graveyard in the village of Middletown (not 
Middletown Point, now known as Matawan) , 1902. 

"The Presbyterian Church of Freehold and Middletowne," containing 
a paper on the life and character of the Rev. Joseph Morgan and 
another on An Early Parochial School and Classical Academy at Free- 
bold in 1766. 

From the Rev. John B. Peters, Sc.D.: 

Manual, Presbytery of West Jersey, 1905. 
Dedication of Wells Memorial Church, Avalon, 1905. 

From the Rev. J. Calvin Krause: 

History First Presbyterian Church, Janvier, 1906. 

From the Rev. John T. Kerr: 

Memorial, Rev. Joseph M. McNulty, D.D., 1907. 

From Adam R. Sloan, Esq.: 

Historical Sketch, Atco, Rev. Wm. L. Squier, 1907. 

From Mr. Elias Vosselcr: 

History Presbyterian Church, Flemington, 1894. 
Pictures of New Brunswick churches. 

From the Rev. Henry C. Crmiin: 

An Orchard in Harsimus, Second Church, Jersey City, 1906. 

From the Rev. Julius II . Wolff: 

Manual, Presbytery of Newark, 1907. 



iqo/. Historical Material. 125. 

From the Rev. Thomas Tyack, D.D.: 

Jubilee, Presbyterian Church, Hightstown, 1907. 

From the Session, Stewartsville : 

Rev. William Thomson, Thirty Years' Pastorate in Stewartsville,. 
1907. 

From the Rev. Minot C. Morgan: 

Dedication of Central Presbyterian Church, Summit, 1907. 

From the pastors and friends of the churches: 

Pictures of church buildings and manses of many churches. 

WALTER A. BROOKS, 
JOSEPH H. DULLES, 

Custodians. 



126 Historical Material. Oct., 

XVIII.— REPORT OF THE PERMANENT COMMITTEE ON 
HISTORICAL MATERIALS. 

The Permanent Committee on Historical Materials has first to report 
the death of one of its oldest and most valued members, the Rev. 
Henry C. Cameron, D.D., who departed this life on October 25th, 1906, 
after a long and useful service as professor in the College of New 
Jersey. Dr. Cameron's interest in historical studies and his faith in 
and love for the Presbyterian Church made him one of the most effi- 
cient members of this Committee, and to him is largely due the Synod's 
present occupancy of its depository in the library of Princeton Theo- 
logical Seminary. He*' was chairman of this Committee for its first 
four years. 

The list of historical sketches, pictures, &c, deposited in the Synod's 
stores during the past year, as shown by the accompanying report of 
the custodians, indicates a considerable interest in our historical work 
and collection on the part of pastors and others. It seems to the Com- 
mittee, however, highly desirable that a still more active interest should 
be taken in the important matter of preserving the history of the Synod 
and its churches, and the co-operation of pastors, sessions and all who 
have opportunities to contribute anything to our historical material is 
earnestly desired. 

The chairman of. this Committee has devoted very considerable time 
and study, during the past year, to the history of early evangelistic 
work by Presbyterians before the Revolutionary War along the Atlantic 
coast of New Jersey. Evidence of no little work is found in many 
localities. 

A particular instance of the existence of a Presbyterian church at or 
near the present village of Barnegat is elaborated in a paper prepared 
by the chairman, and deposited in the historical collection, which 
shows, from journals of John Griffith, John Brainerd and the histories 
of Webster and Edwin Salter the probable location of a Presbyterian 
church building at Waretown, "near Barnegat," as early as 1766. The 
history of this and similar early beginnings of Presbyterian labor 
along the coast offers a fruitful and profitable field for study. 

The deed of the Presbyterian Church of Quihawken, or Penns 
Neck (now Pennsville), mentioned last year in the report of the 
Custodians, deserves further notice. This early church, together 
with the church of Aloes Crook (also extinct), had as late as 1803 
eighty members. The deed of land was executed in 1748 and was 
not recorded until 1831, in the clerk's office of Salem county, where 
it was discovered by the antiquarian, James Steen, Esq. 

This example is cited to stimulate members of Synod to discover 
deeds and documents which will give the history of other churches 
now extinct and little known. 

Anniversary celebrations of events in the history of at least three 
of our oldest churches have taken place during the year. 



igoj. Historical Material. 127 

The two hundred and seventeenth anniversary of Cohansey, or the 
"Old Stone Church," at Fairfield, was observed with appropriate exer- 
cises, with services morning and evening in the Presbyterian church 
at Fairton, successor of the original organization, and in the old 
stone church at Fairfield in the afternoon. 

The two hundredth anniversary of the organization of the church 
at Greenwich was observed by a large gathering of people at the 
church on July 1st, the reading of an historical address and the serv- 
ing of a dinner on the church lawn. 

The re-dedication of the Deerfield church building, erected in 1771, 
greatly renovated and improved during the past year, was held on 
June 20th, with a service which occupied three sessions during the 
entire day. 

Newspaper accounts of these celebrations are deposited in the Synod's 
collection, together with such more complete historical sketches as 
have hitherto been published. 

Soon after the last meeting of Synod, on October 28th, 1906, the 
First Presbyterian Church of Atlantic City commemorated the fiftieth 
anniversary of the laying of the corner-stone of its building, and the 
Rev. William Aikman, D.D., delivered an historical discourse, which 
has been printed and is deposited in the Synod's collections. 

The custodians have been endeavoring to obtain suitable pictures of 
all the church buildings and manses in the Synod for proper preserva- 
tion among our historical records. A beginning has been made, mostly 
within the Presbyteries of New Brunswick and West Jersey. The 
Committee would respectfully urge the pastors and sessions of the 
Synod to supply such pictures as they may already have, or may have 
made, as soon as possible. 

The Committee offers the following recommendations: 

1. That all ministers, sessions and church members of the Synod 
who may have in their possession records or material of any sort 
illustrating the history of the Presbyterian Church in New Jersey be 
urgently requested to deposit the same in the Synod's historical col- 
lection in Princeton. 

2. That sessions contribute to the Synod's collection, as soon as 
convenient, suitable pictures of church buildings and manses for 
proper preservation. 

3. That inasmuch as the former Stated Clerk of the Presbytery of 
Corisco is now removed to the Presbytery of New Brunswick, the 
present Stated Clerk of the Presbytery of Corisco be added to this 
Committee. 

4. That inasmuch as the General Assembly of 1907 (Minutes, p. 
229) again annexed the Presbytery of Havana to the Synod of New 
Jersey, the Stated Clerk of that Presbytery, the Rev. Pedro Rioseco, 
be added to this Committee. 

ALLEN H. BROWN, 

Chairman. 



128 Report of the Treasurer. Oct. 



XIX.— REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF THE TRUSTEES. 

Aeeen H. Brown in Account with the Trustees of the Synod of 

New Jersey. 

1906. Dr. 

Oct. 15. To balance in the Camden Safe Deposit and 
Trust Co. — 

In General Fund $8 82 

In Monumental Fund, . 179 85 

$188 67 

Dec. 31. To accrued interest — 

In General Fund 27 

In Monumental Fund, 5 19 

■ 5 46 

To interest on Beakey mortgage, 50 00 

Interest on Barnegat mortgage, 36 25 

$280 38 

1907. Cr. 

By payment to Forked River Church $36 25 

Care Monument, &c, one year, 10 00 

Oct. 21. Balance in Camden Trust Co. — 

In General Fund, $9 09 

In Monumental Fund, 225 04 

234 13 

$280 38 
ALLEN H. BROWN, 

Treasurer. 

Note. — The Monumental Fund, $1,000, is in the Beakey mortgage; 
the Holmes Fund, $725, is in the Barnegat mortgage. 

Examined and found correct. 

WM. P. FINNEY, 
EDWARD SNYDER, 
EDWIN J. ROSS, 
J. NEWTON POWELSON. 



JQ07- Report of the Treasurer. 129 

XX.— REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 
Eben B. Cobb, Treasurer, in Account with the Synod of New Jersey. 

Dr. 

To balance from previous account, $413 63 

To apportionments from eight Presbyteries, 700 00 

To advertising, 20 00 

To interest on deposits, 4 55 



$1,138 18 



Cr. 

By janitor's bill ( Asbury Park) , $10 00 

By salaries for year ending September 30th, 1907,.. 210 00 

By expenses of Auditing Committee 5 10 

By expenses of officers of Synod 20 25 

By expenses of Evangelistic Committee, 14 68 

By expenses of Brotherhood Committee, 33 87 

By expenses of Systematic Beneficence Committee, . . 25 00 

By printing Minutes, 259 99 

By binding Minutes, 3 75 

By bond of Treasurer of Synodical Home Missions,. . 25 00 

By balance on hand September 30th, 1907, 530 54 



Elizabeth, N. J., October 1st, 1907. 



Examined and found correct. 



$1,138 18 

EBEN B. COBB, 

Treasurer. 

WM. P. FINNEY, 
EDWARD SNYDER. 
EDWIN J. ROSS, 
J. NEWTON POWELSON. 



130 Statistical Reports. Oct. r 



XXL— STATISTICAL REPORTS. 

I. The Presbytery oe Corisco consists of fourteen ministers and 
fifteen churches, and has under its care four licentiates, three local 
evangelists and nineteen candidates. 

Ministers received — 

December 17th, 1906, Rev. Frank O. Emerson, Rev. John Wright. 

Frank D. P. Hickman, 

Stated Clerk. 

II. The Presbytery^.of Elizabeth consists of forty-four ministers 
and thirty-three churches, and has under its care one local evangelist 
and three candidates for the ministry. 

Received — 

December 19th, 1906, Rev. John T. Scott, from the Presbytery of 

Washington. 
January 15th, 1907, Rev. Herman Blaschke, from the Presbytery of 

Hudson. 
May 10th, 1907, Rev. John R. Sutherland, D.D., from the Presbytery 

of Iowa. 
May 10th, 1907, Rev. William F. Whitaker, D.D., from the Presbytery 

of Albany. 

Dismissed — 

January 15th, 1907, Rev. Henry Ketcham, to the Presbytery of Minne- 
waukon. 

January 15th, 1907, Rev. Harlan G. Mendenhall, D.D., to the Presby- 
tery of New York. 

April 1 6th, 1907, Rev. Gilbert. Lovell, to the Presbytery of Hu Kwang. 

May 10th, 1907, Rev. Charles B. Condit, to the Classis of Newark. 
Ref. Ch. in Am. 

October 2d, 1907, Rev. Herbert K. England, to the Preesbytery of 
Brooklyn. 

Ordained — 
October 10th, igo7, Robert W. Mark. 

Installed — 

October 30th, 1906, Rev. Thomas D. Wesley, in the Pluckamin 

Church. 
December 19th, 1906, Rev. John T. Scott, Lamington Church. 
February 1st, 1907, Rev. Herman Blaschke, First German Church, 

Elizabeth. 
May 10th, 1907, Rev. William F. Whitaker, D.D., First Church, 

Elizabeth. 
October 10th, 1907, Rev. Robert W. Mark, Woodbridge Church. 



1907- Statistical Reports. 131 

Dissolved pastoral relations — 

November 12th, 1906, Rev. John E. Stuchell and First Church, Eliza- 
beth, to take effect November 18th, 1906. 

May 10th, 1907, Rev. Charles B. Condit and Liberty Corner Church, 
to take effect May 31st, 1907. 

June 18th, 1907, Rev. Herbert K. England and the Madison Avenue 
Church, Elizabeth, to take effect July 28th, 1907. 

Received licen tiate — 

May 10th, 1907, Robert W. Mark, from the Presbytery of New Bruns- 
wick. 

Received candidates — - 
January 15th, 1907, Harry Baremore Angus. 
June 18th, 1907, Wallace H. Marsh. 

Deceased — 
December 24th, 1906, Rev. Joseph M. McNulty, D.D., at Woodbridge, 
aged 79 years. 

Samuel Parry, 

Stated Clerk. 

III. The Presbytery of Jersey City consists of fifty ministers and 
thirty-eight churches, and has under its care two licentiates and four 
candidates. 

Ministers received — 

December 3d, 1906, Rev. Thomas H. Amos, D.D., from McClelland 
Presbytery. 

February 4th, 1907, Rev. George Coulson, from the Presbytery of 
New Castle. 

April 16th, 1907, Rev. Orey M. Demcott, from Holland Purchase 
Ministers' Conference of the Free Baptist Church. 

April 16th, 1907, Rev. F. Stanley Van Eps, from the Manhattan Con- 
gregational Association of New York City. 

October 1st, 1907, Rev. Charles H. Trusty, D.D., from the Presbytery 
of Chester. 

Ministers dismissed — 

December 3d, 1906, Rev. Nicholas S. Becker, to the Presbytery of 
Hudson. 

September 14th, 1907, Rev. David Chambers Stewart, to the Presby- 
tery of West Jersey. 

Ordination — 

November 2d, 1906, George Roberts, Jr. 



132 Statistical Reports. Oct., 

Pastoral relations dissolved — 

October 31st, 1906, Rev. Nicholas S. Becker and the Grace Church, 
of Passaic. 

April 16th, 1907, Rev. William E. Griffin and the Lafayette Church, 
of Jersey City. 

May 1st, 1907, Rev. David Magie, D.D., and the Church of the Re- 
deemer, Paterson. 

October 1st, 1907, Rev. J. Thompson Osier and the West Milford 
Church. 

Installations — 
October 18th, 1906, Rev. DeWitt C. Snyder, as pastor of the Madison 

Avenue Church, of'Paterson. 
November 2d, 1906, Rev. George Roberts, Jr., as pastor of the First 

Church, of Teaneck. 
December 27th, 1506, Rev. Thomas H. Amos, D.D., as pastor of the 

St. Augustine Church, of Paterson. 
May 9th, 1907, Rev. F. Stanley Van Eps, as pastor of the Grace 

Church, of Passaic. 
October 14th, 1907, Rev. Charles H. Trusty, D.D., as pastor of the 

Lafayette Church, of Jersey City. 

Candidates received — 
June 3d, 1907, George Becker. 
October 1st, 1907, William C. Napier. 

Ministers deceased — 

March 25th, 1907, Rev. Edwin A. Bulkley, D.D. 
June 8th, 1907, Rev. Dupuytren Vermilye. 
October 7th, 1907, Rev. J. Thompson Osier. 

James Scott Young, 

Stated Clerk. 

IV. The Presbytery of Havana consists of seven ministers and ten 
churches, and has under its care three licentiates and three candidates. 

Pedro Rioseco, 

Stated CUrk. 

V. The Presbytery of Monmouth consists of forty-nine ministers, 
and has under its care forty-eight churches, three licentiates and eight 
candidates. 

Ministers received — 

September 24th, 1907, Rev. Samuel J. McClenaghan, from the Presby- 
tery of Union. 
September 24th, 1907, Rev. Arthur Phillips, from the Presbytery of 

Philadelphia North. 
October 22d, 1907, Rev. J. Prentice Taylor, from the Presbytery of 
Westchester. 



igoj. Statistical Reports. 133 

Candidates received — 
June 24th, 1907, Rudolph F. Stier, from the Sayreville (German) 

Church. 
June 24th, 1907, Howard Job Smith, from the Tuckerton Church. 
September 24th, 1907, Gustav Thomas, from the Sayreville (German) 

Church. 
September 24th, 1907, William P. Finney, Jr., from the Moorestown 

Church. 

Dismissed — 

October 26th, 1906, Rev. Robert P. Howie, to the Presbytery of 

Morris and Orange. 
February 28th, 1907, Rev. James M. L. Eckard, to the Presbytery of 

Lackawanna. 
April 9th, 1907, Rev. F. E. Stockwell, to the Presbytery of North 

River. 
April 9th, 1907, Rev. Edgar C. Mason, to the Presbytery of Newark. 
June 24th, 1907, Rev. Spencer C. Dickson, to the Presbytery of New 

Brunswick. 
October 22d, 1907, Rev. Warren N. Nevius, to the Presbytery of 

Genesee. 

Pastoral relations dissolved — 

January 26th, 1907, Rev. Spencer C. Dickson and the church of West 

Mantoloking. 
February 28th, 1907, Rev. James M. L- Eckard and the Hope Church, 

Lakewood. 
April 9th, 1907, Rev. Frederick E. Stockwell and the church of 

Beverly. 
April 9th, 1907, Rev. Edgar C. Mason and the church of Jamesburg. 
June 24th, 1967, Rev. Spencer C. Dickson and the church at Point 

Pleasant. 
June 24th, 1907, Rev. Samuel W. Knipe and the church of Oceanic. 
September 24th, 1907, Rev. John L. Rushbridge and the church of 

New Gretna. 
October 22d, 1907, Rev. Alex. H. Young, D.D., and the church of 

Matawan. 
October 22d, 1907, Rev. Warren N. Nevius and the church of South 

Amboy. 

Ordination sine titulo — 

October 22d, 1907, R. Spencer Young. 

Installations — 

May 9th, 1907, Rev. Henry T. Graham, as pastor of church at 

Englishtown. 
October 4th, 1907, Rev. Samuel J. McClenaghan, as pastor of church 

at Jamesburg. 



134 Statistical Reports. Oct., 

Candidates licensed — 

June 26th, 1907, Wesley L. Hemphill. 

Candidates dismissed — 

April 9th, 1907, Frank E. Mason, to the Presbytery of Newark. 

Death — 

December 15th. 1906, Rev. Albert G. Bale, at Asbury Park, N. J. 

Benjamin S. Everitt, 

Stated Clerk. 

VI. The Presbytery oe Morris and Orange consists of sixty-five 
ministers and forty-four churches and has under its care three can- 
didates. 

Ministers received — 

October 16th, 1906, R. P. Howie, from the Presbytery of Monmouth. 
January 15th, 1907, P. D. Cowan, from the Presbytery of Syracuse. 
October 22d, 1907, George S. Mott Doremus, from the Presbytery of 
Philadelphia. 

Installations — 

November 21st, 1906, R. P. Howie, over the church at Pleasant 

Grove. 
September 30th, 1907, R. S. Steen, over the Hillside Church, of 

Orange. 

Pastoral relations dissolved — 

November 19th, 1906, G. L. Spining and the First Church, of South 

Orange. 
January 15th, 1907, Albert Erdman and the South Street Church, 

of Morristown. 
January 15th, 1907, H. P. McHenry and the church at German 

Valley. 
April 9th, 1907, Stanley White and the Hillside Church, of Orange. 

Ministers dismissed — 
January 15th, 1907, H. P. McHenry, to the Presbytery of Chester. 
April 9th, 1907, A. T. Tamblyn, to the Manhattan Congregational 

Association. 
June 18th, 1907, J. D. Hillman, to the Presbytery of Lackawanna. 
September 17th, 1907, E. D. Webster, to the Presbytery of Hudson. 

Ordinations — 

February 10th, 1907, J. J. Moment. 
March 17th, 1907, T. B. Ironside. 
April 17th, 1907, J. McC. Henry. 
September 30th, 1907, R. S. Steen 



iqp7- Statistical Reports. 135 

Licentiate received — 

September 17th, 1907, R. S. Steen, from the Presbytery of New 
York. 

Candidates taken under care of Presbytery — 
January 15th, 1907, J. J. Moment. 
January 15th, 1907, T. B. Ironside. 

Deaths — 

February 20th, 1907, T. A. Reeves. 
April 19th, 1907, S. B. Dod. 

Robert Hastings Nichols, 

Stated Clerk. 

VII. The Presbytery of Newark consists of seventy-three min- 
isters and thirty-eight churches and has under its care twenty-three 
candidates and one local evangelist. 

Ministers received — 

November 19th, 1906, Rev. William A. Berger, from the Presbytery 
of Zanesville. 

February 6th, 1907, Rev. Pleasant Hunter, D.D., from the Presby- 
tery of New York. 

February 6th, 1907, Rev. Harold C. Harmon, from the Presbytery 
of Columbia. 

February 6th, 1907, Rev. James L. Leeper, D.D., from the Presbytery 
of Chicago. 

April 3d, 1907, Rev. Henry K. Denlinger, D.D., from the Pres- 
bytery of Shenango. 

April 3d, 1907, Rev. William Hogarth Tower, from the Presbytery 
of North River. 

May 8th, 1907, Rev. Edgar C. Mason, from the Presbytery of Mon- 
mouth. 

May 8th, 1907, Rev. Oravia M. Bonfield. from the Presbytery of 
McClelland. 

May 8th, 1907, Rev. George Hauser, Ph.D., from the Classis of 
Orange, Reformed Church. 

May 17th, 1907, Rev. Robert T. Graham, from the Presbytery of 
Northumberland. 

May 17th. 1907, Rev. William T. Wilcox, from the Presbytery of 
Chicago. 

October 2d, 1907, Rev. W. P. Van Tries, from the Presbytery of 
Huntingdon. 

Ordinations sine titulo — 

June 13th, 1907, Leonard V. C. Mytton. 

June 20th. 1907, Franz Tomic. 

October 17th, 1907, Arthur A. Fellstrom. 



136 Statistical Reports. Oct., 

Ministers dismissed — 

November 19th, 1906, Rev. Harle W. Hathaway, to the Presbytery 

of Philadelphia North. 
November 19th, 1906, Rev. Otto Lichti, to the Mennonite Church. 
October 2d, 1907, Rev. Lewis Lampman, D.D., to the Classis of 

Green County, Reformed Church. 

Names Dropped from the Roll from Union with other Religious 
Bodies — 
February 6th, 1907, Rev. John J. Bridges, from union with Protestant 

Episcopal Church. 
April 3d, 1907, Rev. John H. Locklier, from union with Afro-Ameri- 
can Presbyterian Church. 

Installations — 

February 14th, 1907, Rev. Pleasant Hunter, D.D., as pastor of Second 
Church, Newark. 

February 15th, 1907, Rev. Harold C. Harmon, as pastor of West 
Church, Newark. 

May 2d, 1907, Rev. Henry K. Denlinger, D.D., as pastor of High 
Street Church, Newark. 

May 15th, 1907, Rev. Edgar C. Mason, as pastor of the Few Smith 
Memorial Church, Newark. 

May 22d, 1907, Rev. William T. Wilcox, as pastor of the West- 
minster Church, Bloomfield. 

Pastoral relations dissolved — 

November 19th, 1906, between the Rev. Lewis Lampman, D.D., and 

the High Street Church, Newark. 
November 19th, 1906, between the Rev. George A. Paull, D.D., and 

the Westminster Church, Bloomfield. 
April 3d, 1907, between the Rev. Joseph Hamilton and the Memorial 

Church, Newark. 

Candidates licensed — 

May 17th, 1907, Franz Tomic and William C. Kerr. 
June 5th, 1907, Isaac C. Bates. 

Licentiates received — 

May 8th, 1907, Leonard V. C. Mytton, from the Presbytery of Cayuga. 
October 2d, 1907, Arthur A. Fellstrom, from the Presbytery of 
Springfield. 

Candidates received by letter — 

May 17th, 1907, Frank E. Mason, from the Presbytery of Monmouth. 



igoy. Statistical Reports. 137 

Candidates received on Examination — 

October 2d, 1907, Stanley Chedister, John Azari, Gabriel Dokus, 
Stanislaus Zinckow, Max Schaff. 

Minister deceased — 

September nth, 1907, Rev. George S. Hall, aged 59 years. 

Julius H. Wolff, 

Stated Clerk. 

VIII. The Presbytery of New Brunswick consists of seventy- 
three ministers, thirty-eight churches, besides the Italian Evangelical 
Congregation of Trenton, and has under its care eight licentiates and 
fourteen candidates. 

Ministers received from other Presbyteries — 

January 29th, 1907, Rev. James Oscar Boyd, from the Presbytery of 
New York. 

January 29th, 1907, Rev. Isemu Lebbi Watanabi, from the Presbytery 
of San Francisco. 

July 1st, 1907, Rev. Spencer C. Dickson, from the Presbytery of 
Monmouth. 

September 23d, 1907, Rev. Paul F. B. Hamborszky, from the Presby- 
tery of Lackawanna. 

Ministers dismissed to other Presbyteries — 

January 29th, 1907, Rev. Frederick W. Loetscher, to the Presbytery of 

Philadelphia. 
January 29th, 1907, Rev. Matthew F. Johnston, to the Presbytery of 

New York. 
April 9th, 1907, Rev. Hironari Senouye, to the Presbytery of Tokyo, 

Church of Christ, in Japan. 
September 17th, 1907, Rev. William Cory Meeker, to the Presbytery 

of Topeka. 

Ministers dismissed to another Denomination — 

April 9th, 1907, Rev. Charles E .Corwin, to the Classis of Raritan, 
Reformed Church of America. 

Pastoral relations dissolved — 

January 29th, 1907, Rev. Matthew F. Johnston, with Hopewell 
Church, to take effect March 4th, 1907. 

Pastoral relations constituted — 

July 9th, 1907, Rev. Spencer C. Dickson, installed pastor of Hope- 

vvell Church. 
October 9th, 1907, Rev. Paul F. B. Hamborszky, installed pastor of 

the Magyar Evangelical Reformed Presbyterian Church of New 

Brunswick. 



138 Statistical Reports. Oct., 

Church dissolved — 

April 10th. 1907, Second Presbyterian Church, New Brunswick, to 
take effect May 1st, 1907. 

Church organized — 

April 24th. 1907, enrolled June 25th. 1907, Magyar Evangelical Re- 
formed Presbyterian Church of New Brunswick. 

Former Cumberland Presbyterian Churches received — 
June 25th, 1907, Plainsboro and Monmouth Junction. 

Candidates received from other Presbyteries — 

April 22d, 1907, W. Ernest Montgomery, from Presbytery of Bel- 
fast, Ireland. 
April 22d, 1907, Wallace H. Carver, from Presbytery of West Jersey. 

Candidates received on examination — 
January 29th, 1907, Robert Wilson Mark, John Bodry. 

Candidates dismissed to other Presbyteries — 

March 15th. 1907. Emanuel J. Kallena, to Presbytery of Cayuga. 
March 28th, 1907, Frederic Parley Mudge. to Presbytery of Chester. 

Licensures — 

April 22d. 1907. Robert Wilson Mark, Sidney Zandstra. 
September 17th. 1907. Giovanni Scarinci. 

Dismission of licentiate. 

April 22d, 1907, Robert Wilson Mark, to Presbytery of Elizabeth. 

Minister deceased — 

October 25th, 1906, Rev. Henry Clay Cameron, at Princeton, N. J. 

A. L. Armstrong. 

Stated Clerk. 

IX. The Presbytery of Newtox consists of forty-six ministers 
and has under its care thirty-six churches, one licentiate and three 
candidates. 

Ministers received — 

April 9th, 1907, Rev. Ward C. Peabody, from the Presbytery of 

Utica. 
April 9th, 1507, Rev. Irving P. Emerick, from the Presbyter} of 

West Jersey. 
September 24th, 1907, Rev. James Ferguson, from the Presbytery of 

Philadelphia. 



igoy. Statistical Reports. 139 

Ministers Dismissed — 

November 5th, 1506. Rev. Henry Hansman, to the Presbytery of 

Troy. 
June 25th, KjO/, Rev. Henry S. Butler, D.D., to the Presbytery of 

Kingston, now the Presbytery of Chattanooga. 

Installations — 

October 24th, ioo5, Rev. Jonathan Greenleaf, as pastor of the 

church of Branchville. 
April 12th, 1907, Rev. Luther B. Plumer, as pastor of the church 

of Franklin Furnace. 
April 18th, 1907, Rev. Ward C. Peabody. as pastor of the church 

of Musconetcong Valley. 
October 13th, 1907, Rev. James Ferguson, as pastor of the church 

of Stewartsville. 

Pastoral relations dissolved — ■ 

November 5th, 1906, Rev. Henry Hansman, with the church of 
Franklin Furnace, to take effect November nth, 1906. 

April 9th, 1907, Rev. Luther B. Plumer, with the churches of 
Beattystown and Second Mansfield, to take effect at that date. 

April 9th. 1907, Rev. William Thomson, with the church of Stew- 
artsville. to take effect April 21st, 1907. 

June 25th, 1907, Rev. Henry S. Butler, D.D., with the church of 
Blairstown, to take effect September 1st, 1907. 

September 24th, 1907. Rev. A. MacShannon Higgins. with the 
church of Stillwater, to take effect November 12th, 1907. 

Licentiate received — 

September 24th, 1907, Richardson Gray, M.D., on examination. 

Candidate received — 

June 25th, 1907, Charles L. Phillips, on examination. 

Church received and reorganized — 

April 9th, 1907, Magyar church of Alpha, from the National Re- 
formed Church of Hungary. 

E. Clarke Clixe, 

Stated Clerk. 

X. The Presbytery 0* West Jersey consists of sixty-eight minis- 
ters and has under its care sixty-three churches, one licentiate and nine 
candidates. 

Ministers received — 

April 1 6th, 1907, Rev. Charles A. Walker, from Presbytery of Lacka- 
wanna. 



140 Statistical Reports. Oct. r 

April i6th, 1907, Rev. Edmund J. Gwynn, from Presbytery of Hunt- 
ingdon. 

April 16th, 1907, Rev. Charles S. Barrett, from Presbytery of Balti- 
more. 

April 16th, 1907, Rev. John W. Bischoff, from Presbytery of Lacka- 
wanna. 

April 30th, 1907, Rev. James McLeod, D.D., from Presbytery of 
Lackawanna. 

June 18th, 1907, Rev. John W. Lawson, from Classis of Paramus, 
Reformed Church. 

June 18th, 1907, Rev. William Bullock, from Presbytery of Kansas- 
City. 

September 18th, 1907", Rev. E. F. Sherman, from Presbytery of Phila- 
delphia, of Reformed Presbyterian Church. 

September 18th, 1907, Rev. T. M. Nixon, from Philadelphia Associa- 
tion of Congregational Ministers. 

September 18th, 1907, Rev. John W. Keller, from Presbytery of 
Peoria. 

October 22d, 1907, Rev. Ralph Walsham Illingworth, from Presbytery 
of Baltimore. 

Candidate received — 
January 13th, 1907, John U. S. Tarns. 

Licentiate re c cived — - 
April 16th, 1907, William W. Johnson, from Presbytery of Pittsburg. 

Candidate transferred — 

April 16th, 1907, Walter H. Carver, to Presbytery of New Bruns- 
wick. 

Ordinations sine titulo — 

May 14th, 1907, William W. Johnson. 

September 24th, 1907, Howard Clark, William P. Blair. 

Candidates licensed — 
April 16th, 1907, Howard Clark, Arnaldo Stasio. 
June 18th, 1907, William P. Blair. 

Students' temporary permits — 
January 15th, 1907, Asa Ferry, Herbert Smith, Herbert A. Gibbons, 
Wm. P. Blair. 

Church organized — 
January 29th, 1907, Presbyterian Church, of Barrington. 



igo7- Statistical Reports. 141 

Ministers dismissed — 

November 8th, 1906, Rev. Julius A. Herold, to Presbytery of New 
Castle. 

January 15th, 1907, Rev. Maitland V. Bartlett, to Presbytery of New 
York. 

January 15th, 1907, Rev. Francis Berger, to Presbytery of Phila- 
delphia. 

February, 19th, 1907, Rev. Irving P. Emerick, to Presbytery of New- 
ton. 

February 19th, 1907, Rev. Arthur W. Spooner, D.D., to Presbytery of 
Philadelphia. 

June 18th, 1907, Rev. Arthur Richards, to Presbytery of New Castle. 

June 18th, 1907, Rev. Frank L. Snyder, to Presbytery of Siam. 

June 18th, 1907, Rev. Robert Westly Peach, to Synod of N. Y. and 
N. J. of Reformed Episcopal Church. 

September 18th, 1907, Rev. Howard A. Clark, to Presbytery of 
Arizona. 

September 18th, 1907, Rev. Frank Werner, to Presbytery of North 
Philadelphia. 

September 18th, 1907, Rev. Roland E. Crist, to Presbytery of Morris 
and Orange. 

September 18th, 1907, Rev. Arnaldo Stasio, to Presbytery of Phila- 
delphia. 

October 22d, 1907, Rev. Homer W. Taylor, to the Presbytery of 
Baltimore, South. 

Pastoral relations dissolved — 

November 8th, 1906, Rev. Julius A. Herold with the Logan Memorial 
Church, Audubon. 

January 15th, 1907, Rev. Homer W. Taylor with the Blackwood 
Church. 

February 19th, 1907, Rev. Irving P. Emerick with the Irving Avenue 
Church, Bridgeton. 

June 16th, 1907, Rev. Robert Westly Peach with the Second Church, 
Camden. 

June 16th, 1907, Rev. Horace P. Hill with the Grace Church, Camden. 

June 16th, 1907, Rev. Arthur Richards with the Fourth Church, Cam- 
den. 

September 17th, 1907, Rev. Roland E. Crist with the Pleasantville 
Church. 

Installations — 

October 30th, 1906, Rev. Arthur Richards, as pastor of the Fourth 

Church, Camden. 
May 7th, 1907, Rev. John W. Bischoff, as pastor of Logan Memorial 

Church, Audubon. 
May 9th, 1907, Rev. Edmund J. Gwynn, as pastor of Elmer Church. 



142 Statistical Reports. Oct., 1907. 

June 26th, 1907, Rev. James McLeod, D.D., as pastor of Cape May 

Church. 
August 8th, 1907, Rev. John W. Lowden, as pastor of Cold Spring 

Church. 
September 24th, 1907. Rev. William P. Blair, as pastor of the Third 
Church, Camden. 

Ministers deceased — 

October 22d, 1906, Rev. John Turner, of Bridgeton, aged sixty-eight 

years. 
May 23d, 1907, Rev. Chester Bridgman, of Woodstown, aged 
seventy-five years. 

0* Alfred P. Botsford, 

Stated Clerk. 



Standing Rules of the Synod* 



I. — The Synod shall meet annually, on the third Monday of October, 
at 8 o'clock P.M., unless otherwise ordered. 

II. — The officers of Synod shall be a Moderator, a Stated Clerk, a 
Permanent Clerk, a Recording Clerk, and a Treasurer. 

III. — The Moderator shall be elected annually, after calling the roll of 
the Presbyteries for nominations, when the Presbytery which 
has been the longest without having a representative in the 
Moderator's chair shall be called first. The Clerks and Treas- 
urer shall be elected by ballot, unless otherwise ordered, and 
shall hold office during the pleasure of Synod. 

IV. — It shall be the duty of the Stated Clerk to cause a notice of the 
time and place of meeting to be published in the religious papers 
most current in the Synod, at least three weeks prior to the time 
of meeting ; to lay on the Moderator's table at the opening of 
Synod, a printed docket of business; to preserve the proceedings 
of Synod in printed form ; to file and preserve all important 
papers coming into the possession of Synod; to furnish certified 
copies of minutes to those properly entitled to them; to conduct 
the correspondence of Synod ; to transmit to the General Assem- 
bly the Statistical Report and the duly certified printed Records 
of Synod ; to send a printed copy of the minutes of each annual 
meeting of Synod to every Minister, to the Session of each vacant 
church, and to each Ruling Elder who attended that meeting; 
and to cause the copies that have been submitted to the General 
Assembly to be bound in volumes at suitable intervals. The 
Stated Clerk shall print an Appendix to the Minutes, which shall 
contain all the papers and reports presented to Synod that are of 
permanent value. But in preparing such materials for publica- 
tion he shall be authorized to abridge the same except where 
resolutions and recommendations have been adopted by Synod, 
and when otherwise ordered by Synod. 

V.— The Permanent Clerk shall prepare a roll of Synod before the 
opening. To enable him to do this, all members shall report 
themselves to him on arrival at the place of meeting. To him 
reasons for absence or late attendance shall be given and of him 
permission to leave shall be obtained. He shall be the Reading 
Clerk, call the roll, and otherwise assist the Stated Clerk as he 
may require ; and he shall act as Stated Clerk in the absence or 
disability of that officer. 

(143) 



144 Standing Rules of the; Synod. Oct., 

VI. — The Recording Clerk shall make the minutes of the proceedings 
of Synod from day to day, and deliver them to the Stated Clerk 
on the adjournment of Synod; and he shall act as Permanent 
Clerk in the absence or disability of that officer. 

VII. — The compensation of the Stated Clerk shall be one hundred and 
fifty dollars per annum ; that of the Permanent and Recording 
Clerks, thirty dollars respectively. 

VIII. — The Treasurer shall receive and disburse all funds of the Synod 
for contingent expenses, and render an itemized account at each 
annual meeting. The Treasurer is authorized to pay the neces- 
sary expenses of the several committees of Synod, said bills to 
be forwarded to the Treasurer of Synod on or before October 
ist of each year. 

COMMITTEES. 

IX. — The Committees of Synod shall be divided into three classes, viz. : 
Standing, Permanent and Special. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

The Standing Committees, to be appointed by the Moderator 
at each annual meeting, shall be as follows : 

i. On Bills and Overtures, seven members — four Ministers, 
of whom one shall be the retiring Moderator, and three Ruling 
Elders. 

2. On Judicial Business, seven members — four Ministers and 
three Ruling Elders. 

3. On Records of Presbyteries, three members for each Pres- 
bytery — two Ministers and one Ruling Elder. 

4. On Minutes of General Assembly, three members — two 
Ministers and one Ruling Elder. 

5. On Narrative, three members — two Ministers and one 
Ruling Elder. 

6. On Finance, four members — two Ministers and two Ruling 
Elders, who shall audit the accounts of the Treasurer of Synod 
and of the Treasurers of the different funds, except the Synod- 
ical Home Mission Fund; and arrange the apportionment of the 
amount required from each Presbytery for contingent expenses. 

7. On Synodical Home Mission Accounts, a Special Finance 
Committee, two members — one Minister and one Ruling Elder, 
neither of whom shall be a member of the Permanent Committee 
of Synodical Home Missions, who shall examine and audit the 
accounts of the Treasurer of the Synodical Home Mission Fund, 
between the first day of October and the third Tuesday of Oc- 
tober next ensuing their appointment, and who shall report to the 
Synod immediately after such examination, and whose necessary 
traveling expenses shall be defrayed by the Treasurer of Synod. 

X. — The Committee of Arrangements shall consist of all the Presby- 
terian Pastors and one Ruling Elder from each church in the 



igoj. Standing Rules of the Synod. 145 

place where the Synod meets, together with the Stated Clerk of 
Synod, the Pastor of the church in which Synod meets to be 
chairman. They shall provide accommodations for the Synod ; 
suggest hours of meeting and adjournment; arrange for public 
services, and the persons to conduct them, and provide for hear- 
ing representatives of all our Boards each year that may desire 
a hearing, the representatives of the Boards of Home and For- 
eign Missions to have thirty minutes each, and the representa- 
tives of the other Boards to have twenty minutes each. 

PERMANENT COMMITTEES. 

XI. — The Permanent Committees of the Synod shall be as follows: 

1. On Synodicai, Home Missions, eight members — one for 
each home Presbytery. 

2. On Home Missions, eight members ; the chairman of the 
Committee on Home Missions in each home Presbytery ; the 
chairmanship of the Synod's Committee to pass annually in suc- 
cession to its members in the alphabetical order of the Presby- 
teries represented. 

3. On Foreign Missions, one member from the Presbytery of 
Corisco; the chairman of the Presbyterial Committee on Foreign 
Missions and one Ruling Elder, from each home Presbytery. 

4. On Historical Materials, ten members — one for each 
Presbytery. 

5. On Sabbath-school Work, eight members; the chairman 
of the Committee on Sabbath-school Work in each home Pres- 
bytery. 

6. On Sabbath Observance, eight members ; the chairman of 
the Committee on Sabbath Observance in each home Presby- 
tery. 

7. On Temperance, nine members — one from each home Pres- 
bytery, besides the chairman. 

8. On Necrology, three members — two Ministers and one 
Ruling Elder. 

9. On Proportionate and Systematic Beneficence, eight 
members — one from each home Presbytery. 

10. On Young People's Societies, a chairman appointed by 
Synod and the chairman of the Presbyterial Committee on Young 
People's Societies. 

11. On Presbyterian Brotherhood, a chairman appointed by 
Synod, the same to be a layman, together with the chairman on 
the same work in the respective Presbyteries. 

XII. — The Permanent Committees shall each report to Synod annually 
upon the matters assigned to them, and recommend suitable 
action to be taken by Synod in relation thereto. 

XIII. — The Necrological Committee shall present, at the annual meet- 
ing, brief obituary notices of all Ministers of Synod who have 
deceased during the Synodicai year. 
IO 



146 Standing Rules of the Synod. Oct., 1907. 

XIV. — Each Presbytery belonging to the Synod shall send a written 
Narrative of the State of Religion within its bounds to the 
Synod's Committee on Narrative at least one week previous to 
the stated meeting of Synod. 

XV. — The Sacrament of the Lord's Supper shall be administered at 
each stated meeting of the Synod, under the superintendence of 
the retiring Moderator, or the Minister presiding in his place, at 
such time and place as the Committee of Arrangements shall 
designate. 

XVI. — The Committee on Systematic Beneficence shall co-operate with 
the Stated Clerk and the Committee of Arrangements in selecting 
topics and securing speakers to address the Synod upon the sub- 
jects of Benevolence and Church Work, and the evening session 
of the second" day of the meeting of Synod shall be devoted 
exclusively to popular addresses by Secretaries of Boards or 
others. 

XVII.— To facilitate the transaction of business, the following order 
shall commonly be followed, subject to such exchanges as may 
be made between chairmen of committees in consultation with 
the Committee of Arrangements : 

1. The sessions of the Synod shall begin at 9 A.M., recess to 
be taken from 12:30 to 2:30 P.M., and from 5 to 7:30 P.M.; 
devotional exercises to occupy the last half hour of each morn- 
ing session. 

2. Permanent committees shall report in the following order: 
Tuesday morning, Foreign Missions, Synodical Home Missions, 
Narrative; Tuesday afternoon, Historical Materials, Home Mis- 
sions, Sabbath-school Work, Young People's Societies ; Wednes- 
day morning, Systematic Beneficence, Sabbath Observance, Tem- 
perance; the report of the Committee on Necrology to be pre- 
sented usually in connection with the celebration of the Lord's 
Supper. 

XVIII. — All notices of, or calls for, meetings of Presbyteries or Com- 
mittees, and all resolutions, shall be in writing and read by the 
Clerk. 

XIX.— The rules for Judicatories adopted by the General Assembly 
shall be the rules of the Synod, so far as they apply. 

XX. — These rules may be amended or repealed by a two-thirds vote, 
but if notice of a proposed change has been given at a previous 
stated meeting, a majority may amend or repeal; and any one 
of these rules may be temporarily suspended by a majority vote. 



Permanent Committees* 



SYNODICAL HOME MISSIONS. 

REV. SAMUEL McLAXAHAN, Chairman. 
REV. JOHN T. KERR. REV. FISHER HOWE BOOTH, 

REV. THOMAS TYACK, D.D., REV. WM. W. HAELOWAY, D.D., 

REV. ROBERT S. INGLIS, D.D., REV. PERCY Y. SHELLY, 

REV. RAYMOND HILLIARD GAGE. Clerk. 

HOME MISSIONS. 

REV. EDGAR A. HAMILTON, Chairman. 
JOHN S. ZELIE, D.D.. REV. C. RUDOLPH KUEBLER, D.D., 

REV. JAMES H. DUNHAM, REV. WALTER W. HAMMOND, 

REV. NELSON B. CHESTER, REV. HUGH B. MacCAULEY, D.D., 

rev. john McMillan, b.d. 

FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

REV. JOHN F. PATTERSON, D.D., Chairman. 

REV. WILLIAM C. JOHNSTON, ELDER EDWARD P. TENNEY, 

REV. WILLIAM I. STEANS, D.D., ELDER J. W. RANDALL, 

REV. SAM'L M. HAMILTON, D.D., ELDER JOHN S. SILVERS, 

REV. JOSEPH E. CURRY, ELDER JOSEPH F. RANDOLPH, 

REV. ORVILLE REED, Ph.D., ELDER DAVID McCONAUGHY, 

REV. JAMES W. ROGAN, D.D., ELDER ROBERT W. KENNEDY, 

REV. CLARENCE W. ROUSE, ELDER J. D. FLOCK, 

REV. WILLIAM ALLEN, Jr., ELDER P. KENNEDY REEVES. 

HISTORICAL MATERIALS. 

REV. ALLEN H. BROWN, D.D., Chairman Emeritus." 
REV. FRANK R. SYMMES, Chairman. 
REV. FRANK D. P. HICKMAN, REV. EBEN B. COBB, D.D., 

REV. CHARLES HERR, D.D., REV. JOSEPH F. FOLSOM, 

REV. STANLEY WHITE, D.D., REV. JOHN C. CLYDE, 

REV. WALTER A. BROOKS, D.D. 

SABBATH-SCHOOL WORK. 

REV. HENRY C. CRONIN, Chairman, 
REV. WILLIAM B. HAMILTON, REV. WILLIAM MOORE, 

REV. WENDELL P. KEELER, REV. ALEX. H. McKINNEY, Ph.D., 

REV. FREDERICK B. NEWMAN, REV. EDWARD A. McLAURY, 

REV. WILLIAM F. S. NELSON. 

SABBATH OBSERVANCE. 

REV. SAMUEL D. PRICE, Chairman. 
REV. CHARLES F. SHAW, REV. JOSHUA B. GALLAWAY, D.D., 

REV. SAMUEL H. THOMPSON, D.D., REV WENDELL P. KEELER, 
REV. JOSEPH HUNTER, REV. TAMES B. CLARK, 

REV. PERCY Y. SCHELLY. 

* Deceased. 

(147) 



148 Permanent Committees. Oct., 1907. 

TEMPERANCE. 

REV. WILLIAM V. LOUDERBOUGH, Chairman, 
REV. JAMES G. MASOX, D.D , REV. THOMAS HOUSTON, 

REV. HUGH K. FULTON, REV. WILLIAM T. PANNELL, 

REV. LLEWELLYN S. FULMER, REV. JOSEPH HOWELL, 

REV. JAMES DeHART BRUEN, REV. HERBERT R. RUNDALL. 

NECROLOGY. 

REV. WILLIAM W. KNOX, D.D., REV. JAMES DALLAS STEELE, Ph.D. 

ELDER WILLIAM P. STEVENSON. 

PROPORTIONATE AND SYSTEMATIC BENEFICENCE. 

REV. WM. W. CASSELBERRY, Chairman, 
REV. HARRY NESBIT, REV. CHARLES L. CANDEE, 

REV. GEORGE L. RICHMOND, REV. CHARLES E. GRANGER, 

REV. GEORGE H. INGRAM, REV. JONATHAN GREENLEAF, 

REV. JOSEPH L. EWING. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETIES. 

REV. FRANK LUKEXS. Chairman. 
REV. WILLIAM B. HAMILTON, REV. HARVEY ISERMAN, 

REV. MINOT C. MORGAN, REV. WILLIAM Y. CHAPMAN, D.D., 

REV. HENRY A. MacKUBBIN, REV. IRVIN F. WAGNER, 

REV. WALTER L. STEINER. 

PRESBYTERIAN BROTHERHOOD. 

ELDER WILLIAM M. LAXXIXG, Chairman. 

(Each Presbytery is to elect a layman a member of this Committee.) 

TRUSTEES OF SYNOD. 

REV. EBEN B. COBB, D.D., President, REV. CHARLES D. SHAW, D.D., 
REV. COURTLANDT P. BUTLER, REV. STANLEY WHITE, D.D., Sec'y, 

REV. SAMUEL M. STUDDIFORD, D.D..REV. PERCY Y. SHELLY, 
REV. ALLEN H. BROWN, D.D.,* ELDER HUGH H. HAMILL, Esq., 

ELDER ELWOOD C. HARRIS. 

CUSTODIANS OF HISTORICAL MATERIAL. 

REV. WALTER A. BROOKS, D.D., Stated Clerk, Trenton, N. J. 

REV. JOSEPH H. DULLES, Librarian Theological Seminary, Princeton, N. J. 

* Deceased. 



Special Committees* 



EVANGELISTIC WORK. 

REV. CHARLES A. EVANS, REV. EDWARD P. GARDNER, D.D., 

REV. WILEIAM T. STUCHELL, REV. SAM'L McLANAHAN, 

REV. JOHN G. LOVELL, REV. IRVIN F. WAGNER, 

REV. ROBERT S. INGLIS, D.D. 



REPRESENTATION IN INTERDENOMINATIONAL 
CONFERENCE. 

REV. HENRY COLLIN MINTON, D.D., 
REV. HUGH B. MacCAULEY, D.D., REV. WILLIAM V. LOUDERBOUGH. 

INTERDENOMINATIONAL SABBATH ASSOCIATION. 

REV. WILLIAM W. KNOX, D.D., 
REV. PERCY Y. SCHELLY, REV. SAMUEL D. PRICE, 

ELDER JOHN RELLSTAB, ELDER JAMES P. DUSENBERRY. 

COLLEGE VISITATION. 

REV. WILLIAM W. KNOX, D.D., REV. GEORGE SWAIN, D.D., 

REV. JOHN T. KERR, REV. DAVID R. FRAZER, D.D., 

ELDER MATTHIAS J. PRICE. 

VACANCY AND SUPPLY. 

THE STATED CLERK. 

PLACE OF MEETING. 
THE CLERKS. 



(149) 



Moderators Since the Reunion. 



DATE. 


PI,ACE OF 

MEETING. 


MODERATOR. 


PRESBYTERY. 


June 21, 1870 


Elizabeth 


*Rev. Jona. F. Stearns, D.D., .... 


Newark. 


Oct. 18, 1870 


Morristown, . . 


*Rev. Charles K. Imbrie, D.D., . . 


Jersey City. 


Oct. 17, 1871 


Bloomfield, . . . 


*Rev. Robert Aikman, D.D. 


Morris and Orange. 


Oct. 15, 1872 


Trenton, 


*Rev. Samuel Miller, D.D 


Monmouth. 


Oct. 21, 1873 


Washington, .. 


*Rev. J. H. Mcllvaine, D.D., .... 


Newark. 


Oct. 20, 1874 


Camden, 


*Rev. J. M. Macdonald, D.D.,. .. . 


New Brunswick. 


Oct. 19, 1875 


Orange, 


*Rev. William C. Roberts, D.D.,. 


Elizabeth. 


Oct. 17, 1876 


Elizabeth, .... 


*Rev. Thomas McCauley, 


Newton. 


Oct. 16, 1877 




*Rev. E. Kempshall, D.D., 


Elizabeth. 


Oct. 15, 1878 


Morristown, . . 


*Rev. William Bannard, D.D., . 


West Jersey. 


Oct. 21, 1879 


Trenton, 


*Rev. Abraham Gosman, D.D., . . 


New Brunswick. 


Oct. 19, 1880 


Bridgeton, .... 


*Rev. Charles E. Knox, D.D 


Newark. 


Oct. 18, 1881 


Asbury Park, . 


*Rev. Joseph G. Symmes, D.D.,. . 


Monmouth. 


Oct. 17, 1882 


Hackettstown, . 


*Rev. Alfred Yeomans, D.D...... 


Morris and Orange. 


Oct. 16, 1883 


Orange, 


*Rev. Edwin A. Bulkley, D.D 


Jersey City. 


Oct. 21, 1884 


Elizabeth, .... 


*Rev. Samuel M. Hamill, D.D., . . 


New Brunswick. 


Oct. 20, 1885 
Oct. 18, 1886 


Atlantic City,. 


*Rev Allen H. Brown, 


West Jersey. 
Newton. 


Camden, 


Rev. William Thomson, 


Oct. 17, 1887 


Asbury Park, . 


*Rev. Frank Chandler, D.D., 


Monmouth. 


Oct. 15, 1888 


Asbury Park, . 


Rev. K. P. Ketcham, D.D., 


Elizabeth. 


Oct. 21, 1889 


Asbury Park, . 


*Rev. Henry M. Storrs, D.D , 


Morris and Orange. 


Oct. 20, 1890 


Atlantic City,. 


Rev. David R. Frazer, D.D...... 


Newark. 


Oct. 20, 1891 


Long Branch, . 


Rev. Charles D. Shaw, D.D. 


Jersey City. 


Oct. 18, 1892 


Belvidere, .... 


Rev. R. Hamill Nassau, D.D., . . 


Corisco. 


Oct. 17, 1893 


Bridgeton, .... 


Rev. S. M. Studdiford, D.D., . . . 


New Brunswick. 


Oct. 16, 1894 


Trenton, 


Rev. Frederic R. Brace, D.D., . . 


West Jersey. 


Oct. 15, 1895 


N. Brunswick,. 


Rev. Henry S. Butler, D.D., .... 


Newton. 


Oct. 27, 1896 


Atlantic City,. 


Rev. Benjamin S. Everitt, D.D.,. 


Monmouth. 


Oct. 19, 1897 


Plainfield, 


*Rev. John A. Liggett, D.D., 


Elizabeth. 


Oct. 18, 1898 


Asbury Park, . 


Rev. Albert Erdman, D.D 


Morris and Orange. 


Oct. 17, 1899 


Asbury Park, . 


*Rev. A. Nelson Hollifield, D.D.,. 


Newark. 


Oct. 16, 1900 


Atlantic City,. 


Rev. Melvin Fraser, 


Corisco. 


Oct. 15, 1901 


Atlantic City,. 


Rev. Charles Herr, D.D 


Jersey City. 


Oct. 21, 1902 


Asbury Park, . 


Rev. Walter A. Brooks, D.D., . . . 


New Brunswick. 


Oct. 20, 1903 


Lakewood, . . . 


Rev. William V. Louderbough,. . 


West Jersey. 


Oct. 18, 1904 


Atlantic City, . 


Rev. James De Hart Bruen 


Newton. 


Oct. 16, 1905 


Cape May, .... 




Monmouth. 


Oct. 15, 1906 


v sbury Park,. . 


Rev. I. Alstyne Blauvelt, D.D.,. 


Elizabeth. 


Oct. 21, 1907 


Atlantic City,. 


Rev. Wm. W. Halloway, D.D.,.. 


.Morris and Orange. 



* Deceased. 



( 151 ) 



Ministers of the Synod of New Jersey. 



Abbott, Justin E., Bombay, India. J. C. 
Adams, James Bailie, Elwood. XV. J. 
Aikman, Wm., DA)., Atlantic City. W. J. 
Allen, Adolos, Cranbury. Mon. 
Allen, Lvman W., D.D., Newark. N'rk. 
Allen, William, Jr., Haddonfield. W. J. 
Amos, Thomas II.. I).!).. Paterson. J. C. 
Armstrong, Amzi L , Dutch Xeck. N. B. 
Armstrong. William P., Princeton. X. B. 
Aughcy, John H., Newton. Newt. 
Austin', Chas. B., D.D., Toms River. Mon. 

Baillie. John K., D.D., Hamburg. Newt. 
Baldwin, Caleb C, D.D., East Orange. 

Newark. 
Baldwin, Theodore A., Broussa, Turkey. 

Newark. 
Barbour, Robert, Montclair. N'rk. 
Barrett. Charles S., Laurel Springs. W. J. 
Beach, Svlvester W., Princeton. N. B. 
Beadle, Heber H., Bridgeton. W. J. 
Beatty. Henry T., Ph.D.. Hoboken. J. C. 
Beaumont. James P>.. Morristown. M. & O. 
Bennett, Wm. Russell, Morristown. M. & O. 
Berger, William A.. Bloomfield. N'rk. 
Bischoff, John W.. Audubon. W. J. 
Blaschke. Herman. Elizabeth. Eliz. 
Blair. William P., Camden. W. T. 
Blauvelt. I. Alstvne. D.D.. Roselfe. Eliz. 
Boardman, Samuel W., D.D., LL.D., 

Bloomfield. N'rk. 
Bone. William J., Stockton. N. B. 
Bonfield, Oravia M.. Newark. N'k. 
Booth, Fisher Howe. Tenafly. J. C. 
Bossert, Frank G., New Egypt. Mon. 
Botsford. Alfred P., D.D., Woodbury. 

W. J. 
Bowers, Nicholas, Basking Ridge. M. & O. 
Boyd, Tames Oscar, Princeton. X. B. 
Brace." Frederic R., Ph.D., D.D., Black- 
wood. W. T. 
Brooks, Walter A., D.D., Trenton. N. B. 
'Brown, Allen II., D.D., Montclair. W. J. 
Brown, Ernest R., Chrome. Eliz. 
Brown, John H., Budds Lake. M. & O. 
Brown, Josiah J.. Newark. N'rk. 
Brown. Nathan Thomas, Ph.D., Dutch 

Neck. N. P.. 
Bruen. Henrv Munro, Taiku, Korea. 

Newt. 
Bruen, James DeHart. Belvidere. Newt. 
Bryant. Robert A., Hanson, Mass. Newt. 
Bucher. Oeorge H.. Pennington. N. B. 
Bullard, Chns. P.. East Oramre. M. & O. 
Bullock, William, Fairton. W. L 
Butler. Courtlandt P.. Lakewood. Mon. 
Buttinghausen, Remi J., Bloomfield. N'rk. 



Cadwell, Newton \V., D.D., Atlantic City. 

W. T. 
Campbell, Wm. L. Princeton. N. B. 
Candee, Charles L.. Riverton. Mon. 
Carlile. Samuel, D.D.. Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Newt. 
Casanowicz, Tmmanuel M., Ph.D., Wash- 

ington, D. C. N'rk. 



* Died November 4th, 1907. 



(153) 



Casselberry, Harvey T., Ocean City. W. J. 
Casselberry, Wm. W., Dunellen. Eliz. 
Castro, Francisco, Artemisa, Cuba. Hav. 
Chambers, I. Mench, Merchantville. W. J. 
Chambers, Theodore F., Dover. M. & O. 
Chapman, John C, Xew York. Xewt. 
Chapman, Wm. Y., D.D., Xewark. N'rk. 
Chester, Nelson B., Caldwell. X'rk. 
Clark. Howard I!., Bridgeton. W. J. 
Clark, James B., Dayton. N. B. 
Clarke, John P., Hackensack. Xewt. 
Cline, E. Clarke, Phillipsburg. Xewt. 
Clyde, John C, D.D., Easton, Pa. Xewt. 
Cobb, Eben B., D.D., Elizabeth. Eliz. 
Cockins, James M., Baltimore, Md. W. J. 
Collazo, Evaristo P., Guira de Melena, 

Cuba. Hav. 
Collier, Francis J., D.D., Woodstown. 

W. J. 
Coltorti. Bismarck, Xewark. X'rk. 
Condit, Isaac H., Xewton. Xewt. 
Coulson, George, Paterson. J. C. 
Cowan, Perez I).. Summit. Si. & O. 
Craig. David Anderson, Parsippany. 

M. & O. 
Craig, Robert M., Westfield. Eliz. 
Crane. John P.. Great Meadows. Xewt. 
Crist. Roland E., Pleasantville. W. J. 
Cronin, Henry C, Jersey City. J. C. 
Crouse, Nathaniel P., Stanhope. Newt. 
Crowell, John. D.D., East Orange. M. & O. 
Culp. Cordie J., Bound Brook. N. B. 
Cunningham, James S., Batanga, W. Afr.. 

Cor. 
Curry, Joseph E.. Cranburv. Mon. 
Curtis, Geo. L., Bloomfield. N'rk. 

Dager, William M.. 1 ,6 Fifth Ave.. N. Y.. 

W. Afr. 
Dashiell, Alfred H., D.D., Lakewood. 

Mon. 
Davies, John M., D.D., Gloucester City. 

W. J. 
Davis, John D., D.D., LL.D., Princeton. 

N. B. 
Dawson, Rowland S., Kearney. N'rk. 
Demcott, < >rey Mason, New York. J. C. 
Denlinger. Henry K.. D.D., Xewark." X'rk. 
Dennis, James S.. D.D., 156 Fifth Ave.. 

Xew York. X'rk. 
DeWitt, John, D.D., LL.D., Princeton. 

N. B. 
Dick. Robert J.. Elizabeth. Mon. 
Dickson. Spencer C, Hopewell. N. B. 
Dikovics, John. Newark. X'rk. 
Dillon, Edward. Woodbury. W. T. 
Dix-on, Tohn, D.D.. Trenton. X". P.. 
Dodd. William S., M.D., Caesarea, Turkey. 

M. & O. 
Donaldson, Georsre, Ph.D.. Cliffside. T C. 
Doremus, Geo. S. Mott, Rockaway. M. & 

1 >. 
Doughty, lames Walter, Williams Bridge, 

X.'Y. X. I', 
Douglass, Brycc K.. Oneonta, X". Y. J. C. 
Dulles, Joseph IT.. Princeton. X. B. 
Dunham. James II., Mf. Holly. Mon. 
Dunlop, Tohn G., Fukui, Tapan. W. T. 
Dwight. Franklin B.. Convent. M. & O. 



154 



Ministers of the Synod of New Jersey. 



Oct., 



Edmondson, John B., Belvidere. Newt. 
Eduma, Batanga, W. Afr. Cor. 
Elmer, Theo. A., Marsovan, Turkey. W. J. 
Elmore, Carl H., New York, N. Y. M. 

& O. 
Emerick, Irving P., Sparta, N'rk. 
Emerson, Frank O., Batanga, W. Afr. 

Cor. 
England, Elias B., Asbury. Newt. 
Erdman, Albert, D.D., Morristown. 

M. & O. 
Erdman, John Pinney, Yamaguchi, Japan. 

M. & O. 
Erdman, Paul, Tripoli, Syria. M. & O. 
Evans, Chas. A., New York. J. C. 
Everett, Charles, D.D., Belmar. Mon. 
Everitt, Benjamin S., D.D., Jamesburg. 

Mon. 
Ewing, Joseph L., Bridgeton. W. J. 

Fellstrom, Arthur A., Newark. N'rk. 
Ferguson, James, Stewartsville. Newt. 
Ferguson, James A., D.D., Hanover. M. 

& O. 
Ferguson, Joseph B., Elizabeth. Eliz. 
Fergusson, E. Morris, Newark. N'rk. 
Finks, Delos E., Orange. M. & O. 
Finney, William P., Moorestown. Mon. 
Fishburn, Wm. H., D.D., Camden. W. J. 
Fisher, C. Allen, Manalapan. Mon. 
Fisher, John R., Newark. N'rk. 
Folsom. Joseph F., Newark. N'rk. 
Ford, Henry T., Kansas City, Mo. J. C. 
Foster, Daniel R.. Trenton. N. B. 
Fraser, Melvin, Batanga, W. Afr. Cor. 
Frazer, David R., D.D., Newark. N'rk. 
French. John Calvin, Frenchtown. N. B. 
Frey, Jacob A., Paterson. J. C. 
Frissell, Hollis B., D.D., Hampton, Va. 

N'rk. 
Frith, William B.. Reaville. N. B. 
Fullerton, Tohn Q. A., Ringoes. N. B. 
Fulmer, Llewellyn S., Montclair. N'rk. 
Fulton. Hugh K., Perrineville. Mon. 
Furnaiieff, Demeter N., Haskovo, Bulgaria. 

N. B. 

Gabrielian, M. C, M.D., Pipersville, Pa. 
N. P.. 

Gage, Raymond Hilliard. Wenonah. W. J. 

Gallaway, Toshua B., D.D.. Paterson. J. C. 

Gardner, Edward P., D.D., Chester. 
M. & O. 

Garretson, Ferdinand V. D., Franconia, N. 
H. Newt. 

Gay, Wm. Alfred. D.D., Newark. N'rk. 

Gesner, Herbert M., Atlantic City. W. J. 

Gibson. James R.. Newark. N'rk. 

Graham, Henry T., Englishtown. Mon. 

Graham, Robert T., Newark. N'rk. 

Graham, Samuel T., Newark. N'rk.- 

Granger, Charles E.. Newark. N'rk. 

Greene, George F., D.D., Cranford. Eliz. 

Greene. T. Milton. D.D., Havana, Cuba. 
Hav." 

Greene, Wm. Brenton, Jr., D.D., Prince- 
ton. N. B. 

Greenleaf. Tomthan. Branchville. Newt. 

Greenwav. Walter B., Jersey City. J. C. 

Griffin, William E., Tersev City. J. C. 

Gruhnert. Herman Carl. Oranee. M. & O. 

Gwynn, Edmund J., Elmer. W. J. 

Hackett, John Thomas. Cedarville. W. J. 
Hall, Henrv R., Columbus. Mon. 
Hallowav, William W., D.D., Dover. M. 

& O 
Hamborszkv, Paul F. B., New Brunswick. 

N. B. 
Hamilton, Edgar A., Sussex. Newt. 



Hamilton, Joseph, Newark. N'rk. 
Hamilton, Samuel M., D.D., Englewood. 

J. C. 
Hamilton, William B., Elizabeth. Eliz. 
Hammond, Walter W.. Morris Plains. M_ 

& O. 
Hardin, Oscar J., Abieh, Syria. Newt. 
Harkness, Norrls W., Trenton. N. B. 
Harmon, Harold C, Newark^ N'rk. 
Harris, Herbert S., Sancti Spiritus, Cuba- 

Hav. 
Harvey, Joseph C, Philadelphia. W. J. 
Hauser, George, Ph.D., Newark. N'rk. 
Heminger, Lon D., 156 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 

Cor. 
Henry, Harry H., Montclair. N'rk. 
Henrv, Tames McC, Summit, M. '& O. 
Herr," Charles, D.D., Jersey City. J. C. 
Herring, Charles E., Plainfield. Eliz. 
Hickman, Frank D. P., Batanga, W. Afr.. 

Cor. 
Higgins, A. MacShannon, Stillwater. Newt. 
Hinsdale, Horace G., D.D.. Lakewood, 

Mon. 
Hock, Carl T., Ph.D., Bloomfield. N'rk. 
Hock, Frederick W., Newark. N'rk. 
Hodge, Caspar Wistar, Ph.D., Princeton. 

N. B. 
Hodge, Samuel C, Trenton. N. B. 
Hollinshed, William, Sparta. Mon. 
Honeyman, William E., Plainfield. Eliz. 
Hoops, Henry H., Newark. N'rk. 
Hoppaugh, William, Springfield. Eliz. 
Hopwood, Isaiah B., D.D., Newark. N'rk. 
Horn, James F., Whippany. M. & O. 
Houghtaling, Paul A., Riverton. Mon. 
Houston, Thomas, Elizabeth. J. C. 
Howard, Lawrence R., Plainfield. Eliz. 
Howell, Toseph, Hamilton Square. N. B. 
Howie, Robert P., Pleasant Grove. M. & O. 
Hunt. Theodore W., L.H.D., Princeton. 

Eliz. 
Hunter, Joseph, Newark. N'rk. 
Hunter, Pleasant, D.D.. Newark. N'rk. 
Huntting, James M.. Glassboro. W. J. 
Hutchinson, David W., Paterson. J. C. 
Hutchison, John, Arlington. N'rk. 
Hutchison, S. Nye, Belvidere. Newt. 

Illingworth, Ralph Walsham, Camden. W. 

Inglis, Robert S.. D.D., Newark. N'rk. 
Ingram, George H.. Trenton. N. B. 
Ironside, Thomas B., Morristown. M. &r 

O. 
Irving, David O., East Orange. M. & O. 
Iserman, Harvey, Ridgewood. J. C. 

Jamison, Archibald B.. Lafayette. Newt. 
Janeway, Frank L., Hanover, N. H. 

M. & O. 
Janeway. Harry L-, New Brighton, N. Y. 

W. T. 
Tohns. William H., Woodbury. W. J. 
Johnson. Alfred V. C, Monsey, N. Y. 

M. & O. 
Johnson, Benjamin P.. New York. W. J. 
Johnson, Frederick W., D.D., Washington. 

Newt. 
Johnson, Wm. W.. Pittsburg, Pa. W. J. 
Johnston, Robert J., Mendham. M. & O. 
Johnston, William C, Batanga, West 

Africa. Cor. 
Jones. D. Lloyd, M.D.. Hillsdale. Mich. 

Newt. 
Jung, August, Passaic. J. C. 

Karnell, Aimer W.. Union. Eliz. 

Keeler Wendell Prime, Madison. M. & O. 

Keller. J. W. W. J. 



'907. 



Ministers of the Synod of New Jersey. 



i55 



Kellmayer, Egidius, Titusville. N. B. 
Kennedy, James B., Trenton. N. B. 
Kern, John F., Orange. M. & O. 
Kern, William J., South River. Mon. 
Kerr, John T., Elizabeth. Eliz. 
Kerr, Oliver A., Bordentown. Mon. 
Kilbourn, John K., D.D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

W. J. 
King, David H., D.D., Vineland. W. J. 
Kliefken, John W., Atlantic City. W. J. 
Klein, Chas. F. A.. D.D., Railway. Eliz. 
Knipe, Samuel W., Oceanic. Mon. 
Knox, William W., D.D., New Brunswick. 

N. B. 
Kohler, Ferdinand N., Carlstadt. J. C. 
Krause, J. Calvin, Williamstown. W. J. 
Kuebler, C. Rudolph, D.D., Hackensack. 

J. C. 
Kugler, John B., Clinton. N. B. 

Landis, John L., Cape May. W. J. 
Landis. Henry M., Tokio, Japan. X. B. 
Eanglois, Arthur James, 156 Fifth Ave., 

X. V. Cor. 
Laufer, Calvin W., Jersey City. J. C. 
LaVelle, James, New York. M. & O. 
Laverty, David H., D.D., Philadelphia. 

W. J. 
Leeper, James L., D.D., Summit. N'rk. 
Lindslev, Darius D., White Sulphur Spg., 

N. Y. J. C. 
Louderbough, William V., Salem. W. J. 
Love, Edward, Plainfield. Eliz. 
Lovell, John G., Long Branch. Mon. 
Lowden, Tohn W., Cold Spring. W. J. 
Ludlow, James M., D.D., East Orange. 

M. & O. 
Lukens, Frank, Burlington. Mon. 
Lusk, Davis W., D.D., Newark. N'rk. 
Lyle, Albert F., Newark. N'rk. 

Macartney, Clarence Edward, Paterson. 

J. C. 
MacCauley, Hugh B., D.D., Trenton. N. B. 
McClellan, Charles H., D.D.. Lakewood. 

Mon. 
McClelland, Hugh R., Ph.D., Paterson. 

J. C. 
MacClements, Samuel R., Ph.D., Ruther- 
ford. J. C. 
McClenaghan, Samuel J., Jamesburg, Mon. 
Macdonald, Alex. Oren, Kingston. X. B. 
McDonald, John A., Camden. W. J. 
McDowell, John, Newark. N'rk._ 
McGilvray, Henry, Pittstown. F.liz.^ 
McKelvey, Joseph O., Plainfield. Eliz. 
■McKinney, "Alexander H., Ph.D., Newark. 

N'rk. 
MacKubbin, Henry A., Lambertville. N. B. 
McLanahan. Samuel. Lawrenceville. N. B. 
McLaury, Edward A., Delaware. Newt. 
McLeod, Tames. D.D., Cape May. W. J. 
Macloskie. George. LL.D.. Princeton. N. B. 
McMillan, John, B.D., Atlantic City. W. J. 
Macnaughtan, John, D.D., Chatham. 

M. & O. 
McNaughton, James P., Smyrna, Turkey. 

J. C. 
Magie, David, D.D., Paterson. J. C. 
Mark. Robert W.< Woodbridee. Eliz. 
Martin, James W., Ph.D., Hackettstown. 

Newt. 
Martin, Paul, Princeton. N. P. 
Mason, Edgar C, Newark. N'rk. 
Mason, James G.. D.D., Mctuchon. KHz. 
Mateer, Eugene H., Daretown. W. J. 
Matheson, James A.. Delanco Mon. 
Maugeri, Giacomo, Susa, Italy. N. B. 
Mazzorana, Antonio. Havana. Cuba. Hav. 
Melkonyan, Samuel I,., Tarsus, Syria. N. B. 



Merrill, George R., Oxford. Newt. 

Metzler, Carl P., West Summit. M. & O. 

Milligan, Robert Henry, 156 Fifth Ave., 
New York. Cor. 

Minton, Henry Collin, D.D., LL.D., Tren- 
ton. N. B. 

Mix, Eldridge, D.D., Worcester, Mass. 
M. & O. 

Moment, John J., E. Orange. M. & O. 

Moore, James, Phillipsburg. Newt. 

Moore, William, Lakehurst. Mon. 

Morgan, J. Francis, Ph.D., Jersey City. 
J. C. 

Morgan, Minot C, Summit. M. & O. 

Morgan, Minot S., Elwood. W. J. 

Morgan, Thomas, Montclair. N'rk. 

Mott, Henry Elliott, D.D., Elizabeth. 
Eliz. 

Mudge. Lewis S., Princeton. N. B. 

Mundy, Ezra F., Lawrence, Kas. Eliz. 

Murgatroyd, Edwin R.. New Vernon. 
M. & O. 

Myongo, Frank S.. Benito. W. Africa. Cor. 

Mytton, Leonard V. C, Newark. N'rk. 

Nassau, Robert Hamill, S. T. D., German- 
town, Pa. N. B. 

Nelson, Wm. F. S., Clayton. W. J. 

Nesbit, Harry, Bayonne. Eliz. 

Newell, George Kennedy, West Orange. 
M. & O. 

Newman, Frederick B., Trenton. N. B. 

Ngande, George S., Bata, W. Afr. 

Ngube, Mbula ya. Batanga, W. Afr. Cor. 

Nichols, Robert H., Ph.D., South Orange. 
M. & O. 

Nixon, T. M., Atlantic City. W. J. 

Northrup, James H., Perth Amboy. Eliz. 

Oates, Luther A., Bridgeton. W. J. 
O'Brien, John Howard, Clarksboro. W. J. 
Owens, James II., D.D., Paterson. J. C. 

Palmer, Francis, Trenton. N. B. 

Palmer, S. Fielder, Paterson. J. C. 

Pannell, William T., Flanders. M. & O. 

Parmly, John E., Atlantic Highlands. 
Mon. 

Parry, Samuel, Somerville. Eliz. 

Patterson, Isaac M., Trenton. N. B. 

Patterson, John F., D.D., Orange. M. & O. 

Patton, Francis L-, D.D., LL.D., Prince- 
ton. N. P. 

Paull, George A., D.D., Montclair. N'rk. 

Payson, Edwa'rd P., Montclair. N'rk. 

Payson, George Phillips, Milburn. M. & O. 

Peabody. Ward C, Tunction. Newt. 

Peters, John E-, Sc.D., Camden. W. J. 

Phillips, Arthur, Beverly. Mon. 

Plumer, Luther B., Franklin Furnace. 
Xewt. 

Potter, Samuel H., Mays Landing. W. J. 

Pratt, Henry B., Hackensack. J. C. 

Price, Samuel D., Camden. W. J. 

Prugh, Harry C, Mt". Pleasant. N. B. 

Rambo, Harold S-, Haddon Heights. W.J. 
Rankin, Benjamin H., Elizabeth. Eliz. 
Ray. F.dward C, D.D., New York. M. & O. 
Raymond, George L-, L.H.D., Princeton. 

X. P. 
Reed, Orville. Ph.D.. Montclair. N'rk. 
Reed, Wm., D.D., Verona. N'rk. 
Reeve, John T., Basking Ridge. Eliz. 
Reimer," Edward F., Collingswood. W. J. 
Remington, Arthur W., Freehold. Mon. 
Reuscb. Gottlieb, Chatham. M. & O. 
Richmond, Geo. L-, Boonton. M. & O. 



156 



MINISTERS OK THE SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 



Oct., 



Riggs, James F., D.D., East Orange. M. 

& O. 
Rioseco, Pedro, Havana, Cuba. Hav. 
Roberts, George, Jr., Englewood. J. C. 
Robinson, Albert B., Roseland. N'rk. 
Robinson, Robert, B.D., Belvidere. Newt. 
Rogan, James W., D.D., Flemington. N. B. 
Rommel, William C, Elizabeth. Eliz. 
Rouse, Clarence W., Newton. Newt. 
Rowland, Samuel J., D.D., Clinton. Eliz. 
Rundall, Herbert R., Atlantic City. W. J. 
Rusbridge, John L-, New Gretna. Mon. 
Rush, Tillman S., D.D., Laurel Springs. 

W. J. 
Rutherford, J. Marshall, Manasquan. Mon. 

Sassaman, Horace D., Blairstown. Newt. 
Scarborough, John C, D.D., Paterson. 
J. C. 

Schaeffer, Joseph H., Newark. N'rk- 

Scheld, Louis W., Pleasantdale. M. & O. 
Schelly, Percy Y., Phillipsburg. Newt. 
Schenck, I. V. W., D.D., Newark. N'rk. 
Schoonmaker, Robert D., Brindletown, 

N. C. Eliz. 
Scofield, John H., Waverly, N. Y. M. & O. 
Scott, Tohn T., Somerville, R. F. D. 3. 

Eliz. 
Seibert, Henry \V.. Ph.D., Newark. N'rk. 
Serafini, Vincent, Trenton. N. B. 
Shannon, Thomas B., Newark. N'rk. 
Sharpe, Tohn C, D.D., Blairstown. Newt. 
Sharpe, Robert H.. Oak Ridee. J. C. 
Sharpless, Albert S., Tioga, Pa. W. J. 
Shaw, Charles D., D.D., Paterson. J. C. 
Shaw, Charles F., Rah way. Eliz. 
Sheddan, William Boyd, Princeton. Newt. 
Sherman, E. F., Sewells. W. T. 
Shields, Edward P., D.D., Bridgeton. W. T. 
Shurts, Jacob V. D., D.D.. Newark. N'rk. 
Sluter, George, Stirling. J. C. 
Smith. Baker, D.D., Califon. R. F. D. 

M. & O. 
Smith, Chas. Ellis, Englewood. J. C. 
Smith, George L., Cedarville. W. J. 
Smith, W. Everitt, Fusan, Korea. W J. 
Smvth, George H., D.D., East Orange. 

" M. & O. 
Smvth, George H., Tr., Holvoke, Mass. 

M. & O. 
Snyder, Alfred L. Bridgeton. W. J. 
Snyder, DeWitt C. Paterson. J. C. 
Snyder, Edward, Harmony. Newt. 
Snyder, Frank L., Vineland. W. J. 
Spining, Geo. L-> D.D., South Orange. 

M. & O. 
Squier, William L., Atco. W. J. 
Stark, George S.. Princeton. N. B. 
Stasio, Arnaldo, Vineland. W. T. 
Steans, William I., D.D., Westfield. Eliz. 
Steele, T.'mes D., Ph.D., Passaic. T. C. 
Steen, Robert S., Orange. M. & O. 
Steen, William S., Philadelphia, Pa. Mon. 
Steiner, Walter L.. Millville. W. J. 
Stevenson. A. Waldo, Guines, Cuba. Hav. 
Stewart. David Chambers, Hammonton. 

W. T. 
Stier, Richard R., Savreville. Mon. 
Stirling. Thos. C, Ph.D., Deerfield. W. J. 
Stoddard. Elijah W., D.D., Succasunna. 

M. & O. 
Stonelake, Chas. A.. Newark. N'rk. 
Strock, Linius L-. Trenton. N. B. 
Strong, Charles R., Plainfield. N. B. 
Stubblebine. Albert N.. Newark. N'rk. 
Stuchell, John E.. Plainfield. Eliz. 
Stuchell. William Torrence. Railway. Eliz. 
Studdiford, Samuel M., D.D., Trenton. 

N. B. 



Sutherland, Tohn R., D.D., New York. 

Eliz. 
Swain, George, D.D., Allentown. Mon. 
Symmes, Frank R., Tennent. Mon. 
Symmes, Jos. G., Califon. Eliz. 

Tamblyn, George O., Leonia. J. C. 
Taylor, John Leroy, Ph.D., D.D., Asbury 

Park. Mon. 
Taylor, J. Prentice, Pt. Pleasant. Mon. 
Thomas, John M., East Orange. M. & O. 
Thompson, Arthur Newton, D.D., East 

Northfield, Mass. J. C. 
Thompson, Samuel H., D.D., Red Bank. 

Mon. 
Thomson, Robert, Samakov, Bulgaria. 

N'rk. 
Thomson. William, Easton. 1'a. Newt. 
Tildon, Frederick D., Plainfield. Eliz. 
Tomic, Franz. Tlloomheld. N'rk. 
Tomson, George XV., Woodbury. W. J. 
Tower. William Hogarth, Newark. N'rk. 
Townsend, Charles, D.D., Orange. M. & O. 
Trimble, William J., D.D., Camden. W. J. 
Trusty, Charles II., D.D., Jersey City. 

J. C. 
Tyack, Thomas, D.D., Hightstown. Mon. 

Underwood, Horace G., D.D., 156 Fifth 

Ave.. N. Y. J. C. 
Updike, Hartley T., Trenton. N. B. 

Van Allen, Charles E.. Coolbaughs, Pa. 

Newt. 
Vanderbeek, Henry C, Newark. N'rk. 
van Dvke, Henry, D.D., LL-D., Princeton. 

N. B. 
Van Dyke, James W., Cranbury. X. P.. 
Van Dyke, 'Joseph S., D.D., Hightstown. 

Mon. 
van Dyke, Paul, Princeton. N. B. 
VanEps, F. Stanley, Passaic. J. C. 
Van Note, Eugene M.. Tuckerton. Mon. 
Van Orden, Archibald S., Farmingdale. 

Mon. 
Van Osten. Henry S., Ringoes. N. B. 
Van Syckel, Phineas B., Irvington, N. Y. 

N. B. 
YanTries, Wm. P.. Newark, N'rk. 
Voegelin, F. E., Newark. N'rk. 
Voorhies, William S., D.D.. Milford. N. B. 
Vos, Geerhardus, D.D., Ph.D., Princeton. 

N. B. 

Wagner, Trvin F., Bloomsbury. Newt. 
Wainwri/ht, Louis C. Greenwich. W. J. 
Walker. Charles A., Cedarville. W. J. 
Walker. Hush, Stewartsville. Newt. 
Wall. Edward. South Orange. M. & O. 
Wanderer, Adolphus E., Paterson. T. C. 
Warfield, Benjamin B., D.D., LL.D., 

Princeton. N. B. 
Warne, D. Ruby. Trenton. N. B. 
Watanabi. Isemu Lebbi, Princeton. N. B. 
Webb, Samuel G., Lakehurst. Mon. 
Weber, Henry L, Ph.D.. Bloomfield. N'rk, 
Webster, Wm. S. C. D.D., Andover. Newt. 
Weislev. Albert J.. D.D.. Trenton. X. B. 
Wells, "John A., Jersey City. Eliz. 
Werner, Frank, Philadelphia. W. T. 
Weslev. Thomas D., Pluckemin. Eliz. 
Weste'rvelt. William G., Beemerville. Newt. 
Whitaker, Charles H., Bordentnwn. Mon. 
Whitaker, William F., D.D., Elizabeth. 

Eliz. 
White, Henry Kirke. Chatham. M. & O. 
White. Tsiael I... Summit. N'rk. 
White. Stanley, D.D.. Orange. M. & O. 
White, Theodore F., D.D., Summit. M. 

& O. 



J907. 



Ministers ok the Synod of New Jersey. 



157 



Whiteside, Thomas, Ringoes. X. B. 
Wilcox, William T., Bloomfield, X'rk. 
Willits, Alphonso A., D.D., Spring Lake. 

Mon. 
Wolf, Toshua T., Marksboro. Newt. 
Wolff, Julius H., Newark. X'rk. 
Woodbridge, John, D.D., S. Pasadena, Cal. 

N. B. 
Woolverton, William H., Stockton. M. & O. 
Wright. John, Libreville, Gaboon, W. Afr. 

Cor. " 
Wright, Ormond W., Barnegat. Mon. 
Wynkoop, Asa, Albany, X. Y. M. & O. 



Young, Alexander H., D.D., Matawan. 

Mon. 
Young, James S., Garfield. J. C. 
Young, R. Spencer, Binghamton, X. Y. 

Mon. 



Zelie. Tohn Sheridan, D.D., Plainfield. 

Eliz. 
Zesch, Ferdinand Otto, Ph.D., Xewark. 



Total number of Ministers, 496. 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Allotments and apportionments, Synodical Home Mission? 23,66 

American Bible Society 29 

American Tract Society, 29 

Anti-Saloon League, 14, 30, 33 

Apportionments, 1907-1908, 21 

Arrangements, 6, 7, 13, 17, 25 

Attendance at Synod, 36 

Auditing Committee, 1908 9 

Bills and Overtures 8, 9, 12 

Bills to be paid, 36 

Brotherhood, 19, 20, 25, 121 

Brown, Rev. Alien H., D.D 16, 22 

College Board 26 

College Visitation 20, 31 

Committees, Permanent, 30, 147 

Foreign Missions, 10, 11, 19, 89 

Home Missions, 16, 79 

Historical Materials 15, 126 

Necrology 7, 19, 46 

Presbyterian Brotherhood 20, 121 

Proportionate and Systematic Beneficence 21, 22, 115 

Sabbath Observance, II, 21, 106 

Sabbath-school Work, 12, 16, 17, 100 

Synodical Home Missions, 23, 24, 59 

Temperance, 13, 14, 15, 30, 109 

Young Peoples' Societies, 31, 32, 103 

Committees, Standing 9 

Arrangements . 6, 7 

Bills and Overtures, 8, 9, 12 

Judicial Business, 9. 24 

Minutes of General Assembly 9, 24 

Narrative, 1908 9 

Finance, 9, 21 

Presbyterial Records 9, 10, 21 

Synodical Home Mission Accounts, 9, 10 

Committees, Special, 149 

On College Visitation 31 

On Evangelistic Work, 25, 26, 29 

On Interdenominational Conference 17 

(159) 



160 Index. Oct., 1907. 

Committees. Special — Continued. page 

On Interdenominational Sabbath Association 21 

On Place of Meeting 19 

On Presbyterian Brotherhood, 19 

On Sustentation, 26 

On Temperance Legislation, 32, 36 

Custodians, Historical Materials, 15, 124 

Docket and Order of Business, 146 

Education 13 

Evangelistic Work, 26-29 

Freedmen, 29 

I [avana, Presbytery of 8 

Ministerial Relief, 8, 29 

Minutes of Synod, 8, 10, 20, 39 

Moderator : 3, 6, 24 

Narrative 13. 44 

Necrology 7, 19, 46 

Place of Next Meeting 10, 18, 19, 39 

Presbyterial Records 9, 10, 21 

Roll of Synod 3-6 

San Francisco 25. 26 

Standing Rules 143 

Stated Clerk 10 

Sustentation 26 

Synodical Home Missions 23, 59 

Treasurer's Report 10, 24, 67 

Thanks, Resolutions of 25 

Treasurer's Report 10, 21. 129 

Treasurer of Trustees 10, 21, 128 

Treasurer Synodical Home Missions 10, 24, 67 

Trustees of Synod, 30 

Vacancy and Supply, 8 

Vice-Moderator, 9 

Woman's Home Missions 24, 82, 85 

Woman's Foreign Missions 11, 92, 97 



1886 1906 



TWENTY YEARS 



OF 

Svnodical Home Missions 



NEW JERSEY 



PREPARED BY 



REV. WALTER A. BROOKS, D.D. 

Stated Clerk of Synod 

AND 

REV. SAMUEL McLANAHAN 
Chairman of the Permanent S. H. M. Committee 



Published by the Committee # 



TRENTON, N. J. 
MacCrEllish & Quigley, Printers. 

1907. 



Introduction. 

The history of Synodical Home Missions in New Jersey is the 
record of a noteworthy experiment in home mission work. Other 
Synods were considepfhg somewhat similar proposals when the Synod 
of New Jersey established and set in operation its plan. They have 
accompanied this Synod in efforts to solve the difficult problems of 
home missionary enterprise. But it may be fairly said that New Jersey 
was the first Synod that actually assumed complete self-support; that 
in simplicity and effectiveness her plan has not been surpassed, and 
that her success has given encouragement and suggestion to others. 

No two of the self-supporting Synods agree in all details of plan 
and operation. But the fundamental idea in all is that of providing for 
and managing all home mission work within the Synod by agencies 
within the Synod itself. At the same time, provision is made in some 
way for contributions to the Board of Home Missions for work in 
other parts of our country. 

The carrying out of this idea has greatly benefited the weaker 
churches and has promoted aggressive mission work within the Synods. 
At the same time it has set free and enlarged the resources of the Board 
of Home Missions for the extremely important and ever growing pio- 
neer work which has remained under its charge. 

That the undertaking has passed from the stage of experiment to 
that of demonstrated effectiveness and adaptability, this sketch of 
twentv years of Svnodical Home Missions in New Jersey witnesses. 



I. 

Church Extension and Home Missions. 

The Synod of New Jersey had always given much attention to its 
own home mission work. Immediately upon the reunion of 1870, 
steps were taken to supply the needy churches within the Synod with 
the preaching of the gospel, and to encourage the organization of 
churches where there had hitherto been a lack of church privileges. 

A COMMITTEE FORMED. 

In 1872 the Synod constituted its Committee on Church Extension 
and Home Missions, composed of one member from each of the Pres- 
byteries, charged with the general duty of overseeing and stimulating 
home mission work within the Synod. That Committee consisted of 
the Rev. Allen H. Brown, Chairman, Rev. Elijah R. Craven, D.D., Rev. 
Charles K. Imbrie, D.D., Rev. Samuel S. Sheddan, D.D., Rev. Ben- 
jamin S. Everitt, Rev. John Abbott French, Rev. Abraham Gosman, 
D.D., and Rev. Hugh Brown Scott. Two years later the Rev. Robert 
Aikman, D.D., became chairman and served until 1884, when the 
Rev. Abraham Gosman, D.D., was appointed, and served until the 
dissolution of the Committee. 

THE COMMITTEE'S WORK. 

In 1873 the Committee reported to the Synod a survey of the great 
field existing in this old and presumably well evangelized State, and 
exhibited the pressing need for mission work. It described the Pres- 
byteries of Monmouth, West Jersey and Jersey City as covering terri- 
tory demanding much and diligent missionary labor. Already the 
Presbytery of Morris and Orange had anticipated the future Synodical 
Home Mission plan, and was supporting its own feebler churches with- 
out aid from the Board of Home Missions. The Committee recom- 
mended the appointment of a Synodical Missionary, to oversee the 
details of the work to be done. The Synod approved the recommenda- 
tion, and Rev. Allen H. Brown was appointed. He was supported by 
contributions from the Presbyteries, without aid from the Board of 
Home Missions. How ably Mr. Brown fulfilled his varied and absorb- 
ing duties for twelve busy years, many churches in Monmouth and 
West Jersey can testify. 

The Committee inaugurated and carried to a successful conclusion 
the raising of a ten thousand dollar fund for church building along the 
seashore. In connection with this, it secured the incorporation of Synod 
and the members of the Committee were elected the first Trustees. 



II. 

Origin of the Sy nodical Home Mission Plan. 

VICISSITUDES OF SUSTENTATION. 

In 1871 the General Assembly adopted a "Scheme of Sustentation," 
modeled upon that of Scotland. It aimed, through the enforcement of 
certain conditions for aid, to provide larger salaries and to develop more 
self help in weak congregations than the usual home missionary 
methods secured. The scheme was at first managed by a separate 
committee. It attained only meagre success and was presently turned 
over to the Board of^Home Missions, to be carried out as a separate 
department of the Board's work. After a few years' trial the Board 
in turn, in 1883, came up to the Assembly with the following sugges- 
tions : 

"The West is opening up so rapidly, and the demands made by its 
destitute fields on our treasury are so great, that it would be well for 
the large and wealthy Synods of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Ohio,, and perhaps Michigan, Indiana and Illinois, to undertake the 
support of their own weak churches, by special contributions, called 
sustentation contributions. Without indicating how the details should 
be arranged, the Board is satisfied that the suggestion is worthy of the 
careful consideration of the Synods." 

The General Assembly, adopting the report of its Standing Com- 
mittee on Home Missions, in which this suggestion was favorably 
viewed, 

"Resolved, That this Assembly commend to the favorable considera- 
tion of the older Synods the suggestions of the Board of Home Mis- 
sions in regard to Sustentation, as found on page 20 of the Annual 
Report." 

NEW JERSEY'S PROMPTNESS. 

The Synod of New Jersey, acting upon the proposal of the Presby- 
tery of West Jersey, within whose bounds was the widest home mission 
field, was not slow to respond to this fraternal challenge from the 
Board of Home Missions. That Presbytery sent up an overture to the 
Synod, at its meeting in the autumn of 1883, praying the Synod "to 
consider carefully the suggestions of the Board and of the Assembly. 
and to adopt such a scheme of Synodical Sustentation as in its wisdom 
may seem to be expedient and feasible." 

This overture was referred to the Synod's Committee on Church 
Extension and Home Missions, whose work we have already reviewed. 
That committee reported to the Synod a carefully formulated plan for 
Synodical Sustentation, aiming to combine Synodical supervision, Pres- 
byterial control, individual freedom and adequate support. The Synod 
did not feel itself ready, nor perhaps competent, to adopt so important 



a measure at once, and the plan was therefore sent down to the several 
Presbyteries for consideration, action of the Synod being postponed 
until the next meeting. 

A NEW IDEA INTRODUCED. 

But during the consideration and discussion of the plan proposed, an 
idea, wider in its scope than that proposed by the Board of Home Mis- 
sions, had formed itself in the minds of many of the Synod. The 
Board had suggested that the older Synods "undertake the support of 
their own weak churches," meaning, of course, the operation of the 
old Sustentation plan. Why should not the Synod literally take over 
the entire support of home mission work within its bounds, relieve the 
Board of Home Missions of so much of the work of administration, 
and at the same time contribute for home missions as before? This 
great and stimulating idea was vigorously pressed in the Synod of 
1884. It was expressed in the preamble and resolution by which the 
Synod determined to take care of its own, in the words : 

"Resolved, That the Synod of New Jersey will undertake the work 
thus recommended, together with the mission work within its bounds, 
according to the following plan." 

THE PROPOSAL DISCOURAGED. 

But the idea had yet a long road to traverse before it should obtain 
its controlling place in the plan of the Synod of New Jersey. The 
plan recommended by the Committee on Church Extension and Home 
Missions, including this preamble, and its idea of Synodical Home 
Missions, was indeed adopted by the Synod of 1884, but it was only 
by a vote of 52 to 48. Obviously, there could be no hope that a 
scheme adopted by so small a vote and so bare a majority could be 
put into successful operation. It was therefore reconsidered and again 
referred to the Presbyteries with the expectation of final action in 1885. 

The Synod of 1885 heard discouraging reports of the action of its 
Presbyteries on the proposed Plan for Synodical Home Missions. 
Three Presbyteries, those with the largest missionary fields, were in 
favor of it. Another favored it upon conditions. One opposed the 
Plan. The three largest Presbyteries, by which the bulk of the funds 
required for the great undertaking would have to be raised, reported 
orally that these Presbyteries were opposed to it. The Synod then 
laid the Plan upon the table and adopted a simple resolution which 
stated that it "approves of 'Synodical Sustentation' of weak churches, 
as it has been commended by the General Assembly to the attention 
of the older Synods." 

RESCUE AND ADOPTION. 

But at this critical juncture, the Rev. John Dixon, a member of the 
Synod who had recently come within its bounds (whose interest in 



home mission work and whose administrative ability were afterward to 
make him a Secretary of the Board of Home Missions), proposed that 
the Plan and the resolution just adopted be referred to a special com- 
mittee, to report at the next meeting. That reference was made. Rev. 
Mr. Dixon was appointed chairman. 

The work of this committee was most successful. Upon the assem- 
bling of the Synod in 1886 its report was presented, embodying the 
Plan for Synodical Home Missions which it had carefully elaborated 
during the year. Previous to the final adoption of the Plan, the 
Synod repeated in substance the resolution adopted in 1884, namely, 

"That, in addition to aiding, as heretofore, the. Board of Home Mis- 
sions in its work for the country at large, this Synod will now undertake 
the work of Home Missions within its own bounds, including the pro- 
vision of aid for its own weak churches." 

The Chairman of the Committee explained and defended the pro- 
visions of the Plan, meeting clearly the objections and anxieties still 
felt by many of the wisest members of the Synod. Finally, a practically 
unanimous vote was secured, committing the Synod to this new form 
of home mission work. 

Through this long process of careful consideration and elaboration, 
Synodical Home Missions in New Jersey was established. 

The Committee on Church Extension and Home Missions, which, 
since 1872, had done such excellent work, was discontinued, and its 
books and papers were turned over to the new Committee on Synodical 
Home Missions, which contained many members of the older Com- 
mittee. 



III. 

The Plan. 

The salient features of New Jersey's Plan are : 

1. Loyalty to the Whole Church coupled with Local Independence. 
Each congregation is expected to send a contribution every year directly 
to the Board of Home Missions, and also to make a separate annual 
contribution to the Synodical work. 

2. Synodical Unity and Oversight. — This is secured through a single 
treasury for the whole Synod and a Permanent Synodical Committee. 
The Treasurer is elected by Synod and all money is sent directly to him 
by the churches. Synod's Permanent Committee is composed of the 
chairmen of the Committees on this work in the several New Jersey 
Presbyteries, eight in number. This Committee, after hearing applica- 
tions in bulk from the Presbyteries, prepares an annual estimate of the 
total amount of money required for mission work in the Synod during 
the next Synodical year, the proportion of this which each Presbytery 
should raise and the part each Presbytery should be allowed to expend. 
This estimate is passed upon by Synod and, in the form finally adopted, 



is regarded as morally binding on the Presbyteries. The Synod's Com- 
mittee prepares the literature and other aids for collections and super- 
vises their progress and the state of the treasury. Since 1903, Synod's 
Committee has also been given independent control of any special 
funds which may be appropriated by Synod or given by the donors to 
provide for new work or other emergencies arising in the course of the 
year. Appropriations from this "special" fund are made subject to 
the sanction of the Presbytery within which the grants are to be ex- 
pended. The Committee meets quarterly and is also convened upon 
occasions in the intervals. 

3. Prcsbytcrial Authority and Responsibility. — It is left to each Pres- 
bytery to raise its quota in its own way, but it is expected to raise it. The 
Presbytery may distribute the sum allotted to it as the Presbytery or its 
Committee may decide, subject only to a few general conditions intended 
to stimulate the aid-receiving churches and secure proper reports and 
accounting. Money is drawn from tl# treasury upon orders from the 
Presbyterial chairmen. Checks are sent directly by the Treasurer to 
missionaries holding continuous appointments. The chairman may 
draw to his own order for occasional supplies and expenses, for 
which he receipts. The chairman in each Presbytery is furnished with a 
monthly statement of the receipts from the churches of his Presbytery 
and of the payments to them. He is expected to see that each church 
•contributes the minimum, at least, which the Presbytery asks from it 
in order to make up the Presbytery's quota for the Synodical fund. 

4. Economy through Voluntary Service. — No salaries are paid. Al- 
most the only items of expense have been for traveling, printing and 
postage. They have averaged little more than one per cent. But while 
the work has been done almost without cost, it has not been poor 
work. Many of the ablest and busiest men in the Synod, both clerical 
and lay, have given and are giving valuable service without stint. 
Both the collection and expenditure have been wisely and effectively 
accomplished, because made by intelligent and interested men, thor- 
oughly familiar with local conditions. 



IV. 
What Has Been Done in Twenty Years. 

With a definite amount of money at their command, and with im- 
mediate knowledge of the condition of their own churches, the Pres- 
byteries have been able to care promptly and wisely for their own needy 
fields. 

FOR THE RURAL CHURCHES. 

Older churches, depleted by removals and changes of population, 
nave been regularly supplied with preaching and pastoral work. 
Churches that had been closed because the cons-relation had become 



8 

too weak to support a minister have been re-opened and the congrega- 
tions built up. Thus, in a measure, the increasingly difficult question 
of the rural church, which must not be given up, and yet which has 
lost the ability of self-support, has been met. 

The need for such work is abundantly demonstrated by comparisons 
made by the Hon. Elmer Ewing Green, the first treasurer. He finds 
that eleven rural churches have disappeared from the roll of Synod 
in twenty years, and that of 151 such churches compared, 34 are 
reported as growing weaker, according to the judgment of those making 
report; 51 show smaller contributions for congregational expenses and 
58 fewer members in 1906 than in 1886. This is attributed to changes 
in the character of population rather than to decrease in population. 
In most instances, there are as many people to be reached as ever, but 
they must be won. -"" 

That there is good hope for the development of rural churches, how- 
ever, is also proven by Judge green's figures, for 90 churches report 
more members and ioo larger gifts for congregational purposes in 
1906 than in 1886. 

FOR STARTING CHURCHES. 

But the extension of the Church, as we have seen, also held a fore- 
most place in New Jersey's plan from the beginning. The Synod, as 
a whole, shows a splendid growth from 282 churches in 1886 to 335 
churches and 9 missions, separately reported, in 1906, or 344 in all, a 
net gain of 62, and, allowing for the II churches stricken off, a total 
of 73 new churches and missions in twenty years — a gain of over 25 
per cent. Not all of this has been directly due to Synodical Home 
Missions ; but the greater part has been, and these figures do not fully 
represent the present results. 

FOR SELF-SUPPORT. 

That the spirit of self help has been developed and the denomina- 
tional strength increased is shown by the fact that, at least, thirty-six 
churches, which had received aid under the Synodical scheme, have 
attained self support during the twenty years. 

These are in the Presbytery of Elisabeth, Madison Avenue, Carteret 
and Liberty Corner ; in the Presbytery of Jersey City, Paterson — First 
German, Claremont, Ridgewood, Garfield, Bayonne, Passaic — Grace, 
and Carlstadt ; in the Presbytery of Monmouth, Moorestown, Atlan- 
tic Highlands, Long Branch, Delauco, Point Pleasant and Toms River; 
in the Presbytery of Morris and Orange, Morris Plains, Orange Val- 
ley (German), Schooley's Mountain, Wyoming, Whippany and Myers- 
ville; in the Presbytery of Nezvark, Lyons Farms, Kearney and Rose- 
land ; in the Presbytery of Newton, Westminster Phillipsburg, Ox- 
ford, Hamburg, Stanhope and Sparta ; in the Presbytery of Netv 
Brnnsivick, Hopewell ; in the Presbytery of IVcst Jersey, Atlantic 



City German, Briclgeton Fourth, Camden Grace, May's Landing, Ocean 
City, Woodstown and Pleasantville. 

The management by the Presbytery itself of the fund allotted to 
it. has made it possible for some of the Presbyteries to make profit- 
able use of the services of ministers who were not in such situation 
as to be able to undertake a settled pastorate, yet who were able and 
anxious to be at work. A number of these have supplied churches 
aided by the Synodical Home Mission fund with great acceptance and 
have done very efficient work both in the pulpit and in pastoral visita- 
tion. 

FOR IMMGRANTS. 

The new feature of this period, and particularly of the last decade, has 
been the development of missions for immigrants of foreign speech. 
The German work previously begun has been maintained and devel- 
oped. It is now carried on at twenty points. Work for Italians was 
next taken up, and there are now two handsome stone church buildings 
for them in Newark, another with a manse at Vineland, and less ex- 
pensive ones at Montclair and Hammonton. An attractive and well 
arranged church is being built in Trenton. Work is also carried on 
for Italians in Bernardsville, Morristown, Princeton, Atlantic City and 
elsewhere. 

For the Hungarians four church buildings have been recently dedi- 
cated, one each at New Brunswick, Newark, South River and Whar- 
ton ; and services for them have been started at two or three other 
points. For the Syrians work is carried on at Summit and in West 
Hoboken, for the Armenians in West Hoboken, and for Ruthenians in 
Newark. 

GROWING WORK AND GIFTS. 

The Synodical work has grown along every line. The number of 
missionaries employed has increased from about fifty at the beginning 
to about one hundred recently, and the receipts from about $10,000 in 
the first year to $20,000 in that just closed. 

A table, showing the amounts contributed by the several Presby- 
teries, the amounts expended within each of them, and the small ex- 
pense of the operation of the plan is appended to this sketch. 

At the same time the gifts to the Board of Home Missions for 
Evangelization have been maintained and increased and those for 
School Work greatly developed ; so that the Board, which twenty 
years ago received less than $40,000, now receives more than $60,000 
per annum from New Jersey, and has received during the whole period 
$1,120,000. 

THE WORK NEEDED. 

This work has been not only warranted, but demanded by the great 
changes which have been taking place in the population and conditions 



IO 

of life within the State of New Jersey. The movement of people from 
rural communities, in which they had been the supporters of relig- 
ious work and worship, into the towns and cities, has gone steadily 
on. The country churches generally have been depleted. Some 
have been made incapable even of self-support, and much -more in- 
capable of the missionary labor needed to evangelize the people who 
have taken the places of those removed. 

During these years the seashore, already in 1896 dotted with many 
summer resorts, has become an almost continuous line of settlements. 
Many of these have developed into towns and cities with a large per- 
manent population. 

The growth of the great cities between which New Jersey lies has 
stimulated highly the establishment of suburban villages along every 
line of railway. Th« suburban towns themselves have come to have 
their suburbs, so that the railways in the northern part of the State 
are even more closely lined with compact communities than the sea- 
shore. 

Most of all, the immigrant population, of many diverse tongues, 
has increased with even alarming rapidity. The population of the 
State rose from 1,278,033, in 1885, to 2,144,134, in 1905, an increase 
of 6y per cent. Of the present population nearly two-thirds of a mil- 
lion (about 30 per cent.), are foreign born. Many of them are nom- 
inally Roman Catholic, but all of them need and thousands of them 
are accessible to immediate evangelization. 



Membership and Organization of the Committee. 

The following list shows those who have represented the several 
Presbyteries. The dates appended indicate the term of service. Those 
last named under each Presbytery constitute the Committee at the date 
of publication, April, 1907 : 

Elizabeth.— Rex. John A. Liggett, D.D., 1886; Rev. Joseph M. Mc- 
Nulty, D.D., 1887-1894; Rev. Eben B. Cobb, D.D., 1894-1904; Rev. John 
T. Kerr, 1904-. 

Jerscy City.— Rev. David Magie, D.D., 1886; Rev. Charles D. Shaw, 
D.D., 1887-1898; Rev. Philo F. Leavens, D.D., 1898-1905; Rev. Fisher 
Howe Booth, 1905-. 

Monmouth.—Rev. Alfred H. Dashiell, D.D., 1886-1902; Rev. William 
P. Finney, 1902-1906; Rev. Thomas Tyack, D.D., 1906-. 

Morris and Orange. — Rev. William Durant, 1886; Rev. Theodore F. 
White, D.D., 1887-1898; Rev. William W. Halloway, Jr., D.D., 1898-. 

Newark. — Rev. Isaac H. Polhemus, 1886-1890; Rev. J. Garland Ham- 
ner, Jr., 1890-1905; Rev. Robert S. Inglis, 1905-. 

New Brunswick. — Rev. Abraham Gosman, D.D., 1886; Rev. John 



1 1 

Dixon, D.D., 1887-1898; Rev. Samuel M. Studdiford, D.D., 1898-1902; 
Rev. Samuel McLanahan, 1902- 

Newton. — Rev. William Thomson, 1886-1907 ; Rev. Percy Y. Schelley, 
1907-. 

West Jersey. — Rev. Augustus Brodhead, D.D., 1886; Rev. Frederic 
Pv. Brace, Ph.D., 1887-1899; Rev. Raymond Hilliard Gage, 1899. 

The Rev. Abraham Gosman, D.D., was chairman of the Committee 
for a few months, but withdrew in order that Rev. John Dixon might 
be made a member of it, and the latter was immediately chosen chair- 
man, and served from early in 1887 until he was made Assistant Sec- 
retary of the Board of Home Missions in 1898. Then the Rev. Eben 
B. Cobb, D.D., of the Presbytery of Elizabeth, was made chairman 
of the Committee, and by his enthusiasm, sagacity and unwearied 
perseverance did much to forward and extend the Committee's work. 
It is to him that the portion of the plan which provides a fund for 
new work, to be administered by the Committee, is due. Upon his 
resignation in 1904 the Rev. Philo F. Leavens, D.D., was chosen. 
He had been for many years a member of the Committee and the 
leader of home missionary activity in the Presbytery of Jersey 
City. But within a few months after his election he was called from 
labor here to reward on high. He was succeeded by the present chair- 
man. 

The first treasurer was the Hon. Elmer Ewing Green, of Trenton, 
N. J., now Judge of the Court of Errors and Appeals of New Jersey. 
His care and accuracy during the first ten years of the work greatly 
aided in its operation. The second Treasurer was the Hon. William 
M. Lanning, also of Trenton and now Judge of the United States 
District Court for the District of New Jersey. He served from 1896 
to 1901. He was succeeded by the present Treasurer, Mr. William P. 
Stevenson, of Roselle, Union county, New Jersey. 



VI. 
The Outlook 

This is only the record of the beginning of Synodical Home Missions 
in New Jersey. The end is not yet. The opportunity and the need 
have grown even more rapidly than the splendid response of the Pres- 
byterians of New Jersey. This growth has not ceased. More old 
mother churches in the country must, under the circumstances, come 
to depend upon the support of their daughters of the town and city. 
They deserve this filial help not only for the good they have done, but 
for the good they are doing, and the good they will do. 

Growing cities and new town, will give birth to new churches which 
will demand fostering care to bring them to self-support and the 
power to help others. 



12 

The work for the men and women and children of foreign speech 
has only just begun. At the moment, it is more imperative, but it is 
more difficult, more expensive than any other form of our activity, be- 
cause of the numbers to be reached, the agencies which must be em- 
ployed and the relative lack of means among the people themselves. 
But this new field like the new land of the forest or the prairie hard 
at first to prepare and till, like that also promises abundant and excel- 
lent fruitage. 

The record of what has been done in the past is the pledge that these 
great and growing responsibilities of the present and future will be 
met by ever clearer knowledge of the work, ever deeper interest in it, 
ever increasing gifts to it, on the part of pastors, sessions, churches and, 
individuals. 

Will not each reader help to realize this promise and prophecy? 





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