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Full text of "Minutes of the forty-sixth session of the Holston Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, held at Abingdon, Va., September 22-29, 1869"

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LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/minutesoffortysi1869meth 



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MINUTES 



or THE 



FORTY-SIXTH SESSION 



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HELD AT ABINGDON, VA., 



SEPTEMBER 2 Q-2 9, 



1869. 



D^VID H. r)OGOT^:TT, I> residing Bishop. 
Jrt. IS'. PRICE, Secretary. 



jr. J^. I>A.YN"E, 



J. K. STR.I2>rGHriET_.TD, j 



!■ -A-ssistaiit Secretaries. 



M^ 



KNOXVILLE, TENN.: -^ 

PRINTED BY RAMAGE & CO. 

1869. 



"UTTT^S;^ 



46066 



MINUTES 



FORTY-SIXTH SESSION 



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HELD AT ABINGDON, VA., 



SEPTEMBER Q a-Q 9. 



ZS1.Q7 5 



1869. 



X)AVIX) H. DOG-O-ETT, Presiding Bishop. 

K,. IS". PRICE, Secretary, 

J. R. T>^^"^]S"E, ) . . . . c! ^ • 



KNOXVILLE, TENN.: 
PRINTED BY RAMAGE & CO. 

1869. 

/V\emer-Pfelffer Library 

Tennesstje VVcfieyan College 

Athons» Tennessee 



I^oursc of muHjj for UnddrjgraHualu^. 



First Tear. — The Bible, Historical and Biographical Parts, with refer- 
ence to Watson's Biblical and Theological Dictionary, enlarged, with 
New Biblical Atlas and Preachers' Text- Book ; Wesley's Sermons, vol. 
I ; Discipline; Clark's Preachers' Manual; Watson's Institutes, Part 
III; Theological Compend; English Grammar; Composition. 

Second Year. — The Bible, as to the Institutions of Christianity with 
reference to Watson's Dictionary, as above; Wesley's Sermons, vol. II; 
Discipline, with reference to Henkle's Analysis ; Hymn Book ; Smith's 
Elements of Divinity; Watson's Institutes, Part IV; Watson's Life of 
Wesley and Observations on Southey ; Essay or Sermon, with reference 
to Quackenbos' Advanced Course of Composition and Rhetoric. 

Third Year. — The Bible, as to the Doctrines, with reference to Wat- 
son's Dictionary, as above; Wesley's Sermons, vol. Ill; Discipline; 
Hymn Book; Watson's Institutes, Part II; Whatley's Rhetoric; Essay 
or Sermon, with reference to Vinet's Pastoral Theology. 

Fourth Year. — The Bible generally, with reference to Watson's Dic- 
tionary, as above ; Wesley's Sermons, vol. IV ; Discipline ; Hymn Book ; 
Rivers' Elements of Moral Philosophy; Watson's Institutes, Part I; 
Powell on Succession; Ruter's Church History; Whateley's Logic ; Es- 
say or Sermon. 

Candidates for admission on trial must be examined on the ordinary 
branches of an English education, with the addition of Wesley's Ser- 
mons on Justification by Faith and the Witness of the Spirit, and the 
Bible generally. 



APR '9'^ 



mtnnm 



OF TUE 



lorlj|"lMh fcsstott of tfo jbolstott iortf^iifttt^, 

M. E. CHURCH. SOUTH, 1869. 



Wednesday, Sept. 22, 1869. 

The J^orty-Sixth Session of the Holston Con- 
ference of the M. E. Church, South, was held at 
Abingdon, Va., beginning Sept. 22, 1869. 

At 9 o'clock, A. M., Bishop David S. Doggett 
took the Chair, and opened the session of the Con- 
ference with religious exercises. After a brief 
address by the Bishop, the Secretary of the last 
year called the roll of members, and the follow- 
ing answered to their names : 

Timothy Sullins, John M. Crismoiid> Wm. Hicks, E. E. Wiley, W. G. 
E. Ctmnyngham, Wm. Robeson> R. M. Hickey, C. Long, W. W. I>real, W. 
II. Bates, J. M. McTeer, J. C. Hyden, R. N. Price, David Sullins, James 
S. Ivennedy, John Boring, J. R. Long, J. W. Dickey, G. Taylor, G. W. 
Miles, G. Stewart, F. Richardson, P. S. Sutton, A. E. Woodward, B. W. 
S. Bishop, L. C. Delashmit, Thos. F. Glenn, W. H. Cooper, J. It. String- 
field, J. W. Bowman, C. K. Miller, A. J. Frazier, F. A. Farley, Enoch W. 
Moore, G. W. K. Green, S. R. Wheeler, T. K. Ilaylies, J. L. M. French, 
J. E. Payne, J. Smith, W. H. Stevens, J. Brillhart, H; C. Neal, S. D. 
Gaines, G. W. Martin, J. Torbitt, S. Phillips, J. A. Wiggins, F. D. Crum- 
ley, B. Arbogast, E. Vertigens, J. Mahoney, G. W. Callahan, J. S. "W. 
Neal, W. H. Weaver, W. W. Pyatt, G. T. Gray, D. B. Carter^ 



Solston A^nnual Conference 



The roll of lay Delegates being called, the fol- 
lowing answered to their names : 

Wytheville District— Eli C. Hale, Peter Gallagher, J. W. Paulett. 

Pearisburg " Eev. W. E. Neal. 

Abingdon " Rev. J. P. Thomas, M. Y. Heiskell. 

Jonesboro' *•' Rev. E. E. Hoss, J. F. Broyles. 

Rogersvillc " W. B. Aston. 

Knoxville " Vincent A. Moore. 

Athens " J. R . P. Ball, David Cleage, Y. R. Allen. 

Chattanooga " John A. Wilton. 

Pikeville " V. C. Montgomery, Samuel H. Dickey. 

Asheville " R. B. Vance,D. Profitt, J.D. Reynds, J. H. Calfse. 

Franklin " Wm. G. Wilson. 

On motion, R. ]^^. Price was appointed Secre- 
tary, and J. K. Stringfield and J. R. Payne were 
appointed Assistant Secretaries. 

On motion, a bar was established and members 
Avere required to sit within the limits when exer- 
cising the right of voting. 

The hours for meeting and adjournment were 
fixed at 9 o'clock A. M. and 1 o'clock P. M. 

For reasons given, the Joint Board of Finance 
was re-appointed, as follows : 



Wytheville District- 

Pearisburg 

Abingdon 

Jonesboro' 

Rogersville 

Knoxville 

Athens 

Chattanooga 

Pikeville 

Asheville 

Franklin 



-S. D. Gaines, Peter Gallagher. 

G. W. K. Greene, W. E. Neal. 

John C. Hyden, W. Y. Heiskell. 

J. W. Bowman, F. W. Earnest. 

F. A. Farley, W. B. Aston. 

Jacob Smith, V. A. Moore. 

W. W. Neal, David Cleage. 

H. C. Neal, C. A. Long. 

L. C. Delashmit, E. C. Montgomery. 

Frank Richardson, R. B. Vance. 

Thomas F. Glenn, W. G. Wilson. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Public Worship. — J. W. Dickey, W. G. E. Cunnyngham, John C. Hy- 
den, B. Arbogast. 

Books and Periodicals. — B. Arbogast, Joseph Torbitt, Jas. F. Broyles. 

Education.— T. P. Thomas, T. Sullins, R. B. Vance, J. W. Paulett, F. 
M. Grace. 



JlCethodist JSpiseopal C?iurch, South, S 

Sunday Schools. — E. E. Hoss, Eli C. Hale, Edward Vertigens. 

Bible Cause. — J. Atkins, J. E. Ball, James Wagg. 

Chtvrch Property.— G. W. Callahan, T. F. Smith, A. J. Frazier, E. C. 
Reeves, Geo. Stewart, Geo. T. Gray, Jos. A. Wiggins, J. L. M. French, S. 
H. Dickey, J. Profitt, J. Mahonoy. 

Colored People. — L. K. Haynes, J. F. Frazier, V. C. Allen. 

Ca^np- Meetings. — Chas. K. Miller, C. Long, J. M. Crismond. 

State of the Church. — James P. Kelley, T. P. Summers, W. P. Doane. 

Temperance.— i. S. W. Neal, B. F. "White, W, H. Cooper. 

The Fifth Question, "Who are received by 
transfer from other Conferences?" being called, 
was answered as follows : W. H. Barnes was re- 
ceived from the IS^orth Carolina Conference, Jas. 
Atkins from the Baltimore Conference, and A. R. 
Bennick from the South Carolina Conference. 

The Fifteenth Question, "Are all the 
preachers blameless in their life and oificial ad- 
ministration ?" being called, the characters of the 
following ministers were duly examined and 
passed: John Reynolds, Joseph Haskew, Timothy 
Sullins, Wile}^ B. Winton, and Thos. K. Munsey, 
were continued in the Superannuated relation. 

W. H. Kelle}^, W. P. Queen, L. W. Crouch, 
and J. W. Belt, were continued in the Supernu- 
merary relation. 

J. D. Baldwin, Hardy M. Bennett, and Charles 
K. Miller, were returned to the effective list. 

R. N. Price was excused from the Committee 
of the Third Year, and Frank Richardson was 
appointed in his place. 

At 1 o'clock Conference adjourned, with the 
benediction by the Bishop. 



ITolston A.nnual Conference 



Thursday, Sept. 23, 1869. 

The Bishop took the Chair at the hour of meet- 
ing, and religious services were conducted by 
Rev. J. W. Dickey. 

The roll was called, and the following members 
appeared, who had not been present on the for- 
mer call: 

Clerical : Joseph Haskew, T. F. Smith, B. '^. White, J. T. Frazier, C. 
T. Carroll, G. M. Massey, F. M. Grace, W. L. Turner. 

Lay : Rev. James Wagg, from the Wytheville District ; Rev. T. P. 
Thomas, James P. Kelley, from the Abingdon District; and Rev. E. E. 
IIoss, from the Jonesboro' District. 

The minutes of the preceding day were read 
and approved. 

A communication from A. H. Redford^ contain- 
ing an exhibit of the opercitions of the Publishing 
House at Kashville, was read and referred to the 
Committee on Books and Periodicals. 

A communication from Dr. J. B. McFerrin, in 
relation to his History of Methodism in Tennes- 
see, accompanied by a copy of the first volume of 
his work, was referred to the same Committee. 

A report from the Trustees of Holston Con- 
ference Female College w^as read and referred to 
the Committee on Education. 

A communication from A. B. Stark, Editor of 
the Home Monthly, was referred to the Commit- 
tee on Books and Periodicals. 

B. Arbogast, President of Martha Washing- 
ton College, presented and read a report in regard 
to the operations of that Institution, which was 
referred to the Committee on Education. 



Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 7 

The following resolution, presented by E. E. 
Wiley and J. K. Stringfield, was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Committee on Church Property be requested to as- 
certain, as far as possible, the amount of property within the bounds of 
this Conference, rightfully belonging to the M. E. Church, South, now 
wrongfully held by the M. E. Church, North, and to state in their report 
the probable value of such property, and also to specify the places where 
it is to be found. 

On motion, the Conference resolved to consider 
the examination of character with open doors. 

The FiFTEEXTH Question was resumed, and 
the characters of the following Elders were exam- 
ined and passed : 

J. M. McTeer, B, W. S. Bishop, W. L. Turner, S. D.Gaines, J. R. Payne, 
G. W. Callahan, Wm. Hicks, T. F. Smith, W. P. Doane, W. H. Stevens, 
James "W. Bennett, James W. Dickey, "W. G. E. Cunnyngham, B. Arbo- 
gast, J. C. Hyden, A. J. Frazier, Josiah Torbitt, D. Sullins, E. E. Wiley, 
James A. Davis, G. W. Miles, D. B. Carter, John W. Bowman, 8. R, 
Wheeler, G, W. Martin, Wm. Robeson, George Stewart, F. A. Farley, P. 
S. Sutton, W. H. Cooper, J. M. Crismond, W. II. Bates, G. Taylor, B. F. 
Nucholls, W. B. Lyda, A. E. Woodward, G. T. Gray, Jacob Smith, and F. 
M. Grace. 

Pending this question, Rev. C. H. Wiley, 
Agent of the American Bible Society, was intro- 
duced to the Conference, and made some interest- 
ing remarks, which were appropriately responded 
to by the Bishop. Revs. Messrs. Stewart and 
Hogshead, of the Presbyterian Church, w^ere also 
introduced, and invited to seats within the bar. 

After the usual notices had been given, Con- 
ference adjourned with the benediction. 



Friday, Sept. 24, 1869. 
The Bishop' took the Chair at the proper hour, 



8 



Sols ton ;4.nnuat Conference 



and religious services were held by Wm. Robeson. 
The roll was called, and the following took their 
seats who had not before been present : 

G. A. Long, Chattanooga District; A. G. Pendleton and Edward John- 
son, Pearisbuig District; and Rev. Geo. Spake, lay delegate from Frank- 
lin District. 

The minutes were read and amended. B. Arbo- 
gast, from the Board of Visitors to Emory and 
Henry College, read the report, which was refer- 
red to the Committee on Education. 

Rev. Dabney Ball, of the Baltimore Conference, 
was introduced. 

The Fifteenth Question was resumed, and 
the following were examined and passed, complet- 
ing the list of Elders : 

R. M. Hiekey, James K. Stringfield, J. BrilLart, "W. "W. Neal, C. Long, 
H. C. Neal, J. L. M. French, Sewell Phillips, L. C. Delashmit, J. Boring, 
L. K. Haynes, B. F. White, J. R. Long, R. N. Price, W. M. Kerr, J. S. 
Kennedy, F. Richardson, James Mahoney, E. \V. Moore, T. F. Glenn, C. 
Campbell, J. W. Bird. 

The character of W. H. Moody was passed, 
and he was granted a location at his own request. 

The character of J. ^N". Somers Avas passed, and 
he was continued in a Supernumerary relation. 

Complaints being lodged against the character 
of R. W. Pickens, the case was referred to the 
Presiding Elder of the Asheville District for in- 
vestis'ation. 

The Second Question, "Who remain on 
trial?" was called, and Daniel H. Carr, Robert 
H. Parker, M. L, Clendenin, A. Q. Harmon, 
Stephen I. Harrison, Kennerly C. Atkins, Tyre 
T. Salyer, and W. W. W. Bays, were called be- 
fore the Bishop, and having answered the ques- 



Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 



tions propounded in the Discipline, their charac- 
ters were passed, and they were admitted into full 
connection, except Stephen I. Plarrison, who was 
referred to the Committee for re-examination on 
the course of study. 

The Seventh Question, "What traveling- 
preachers are elected and ordained Deacons ?" 
was called, and K. C. Atkins, T. T. Salyer, D. H. 
Carr, and R. H. Parker, Avere elected to Deacons 
orders. 

Conference then adjourned with the benedic- 
tion. 

— »o^«><o« — 

ipotjie^th: r)j^-^. 

Saturday, Sept. 25, 1869. 

The Bishop took the Chair, and services were 
conducted by Dr. T. 0. Summers. 

The minutes of the previous day were read 
and approved. 

Rev. Dr. Summers, Editor of the Christian 
Advocate and of the Sunday School Visitor, was 
introduced, and made some remarks on the sub- 
ject of our Publishing interests. 

The following Lay Delegates appeared and took 
their seats : 

Rev. T. P. Summers, of the Rogersville District ; David A. Browder, of 
the Athens District; H. S. Bowen, of the Abingdon District; E. C* 
Reeves, of the Jonesboro' District. Also W. P. Queen and Thomas P. 
Queen, of the Clerical Members. 

Dr. W. E. Munsey, Secretary of the Board of 
Foreign Missions, was introduced. 

J. Atkins, former Agent of the Sunday School 
Cause, read a report of the disposition he had 



70 Hols ton A^iinual Cotiference 

made of the funds and books that were in his 
hands at the time of the discontinuance of his 
agency, which was referred to a Committee of the 
Presiding Eklers. 

The case of Stephen I. Harrison was called 
again, when the Committee on the Second Year 
having reported his examination satisfactory, he 
was admitted into full connection. 

The class of the Third Year was called, when 
John S. W. Neal and Wm. H. Weaver having 
been duly recommended by the Committee of Ex- 
amination, their characters were passed and they 
were continued in the relation of Deacons. 

The character of Sterling V. Bates was passed, 
and he was placed in a Supernumerary relation. 

W. W. Pyatt was reported by the Committee 
as absent from examination. He was excused 
for want of preparation on the ground of having 
been occupied in revivals of religion of extraordi- 
nary character; his character passed, and he was 
continued in the third year. 

Geo. T. Gray was excused from examination, 
with the understanding that he is to prepare on 
the studies of both the third and fourth years, 
before the next Conference, and his character 
passed. 

The Class of the Fourth Year was called. 
Jacob T. Frazier not having submitted to exami- 
nation on the course of study, his character was 
passed, and he was continued in the order of Dea- 
cons. 

G. W. K. Greene was called, and the Commit- 



Methodist JSpiseopal Church, South. // 

tee reported that he had not been before them for 
examination. 

Charles T. Carroll being properly recommended 
by the Examining Committee, his character was 
passed, and he was elected to Elder's orders. 

Gr. W. Martin not being recommended for pro- 
motion by the Committee, was continued in the 
relation of a Deacon. 

On motion, the character of M. A. Davidson 
was ppissed, and he was located at his own re- 
quest. 

E. Vertigens being recommended by the Com- 
mittee, was elected to Elder's orders. 

F. D. Crumley's character was passed, but a 
motion to elect him to Elder's orders failed, be- 
cause he had not completed the course of study, 
and he was continued in Deacon's orders. 

The character of Jos. A. Wiggins was passed, 
but for similar cause he was continued in Dea- 
con's orders. 

At this point the Bishop made some remarks 
commending the action of the Conference in re- 
fusing to confer orders on those who had not fully 
accomplished the prescribed course of study. 

The Eighth Question, "What local preach- 
ers are elected and ordained Deacons?" was called, 
and the following were duly elected : Charles M. 
Utley, A. G. Thompson, John Prather, Jas, Mc- 
Culloch, Hamilton B. Blackburn, John G-. Tate, 
W. K. January, Joel Seagraves, Chas. M. Greer, 
Abner J. Deane. 



72 Solston Annual Conference 



The Tenth Question, "What local preachers 
are elected and ordained Elders?" was answered 
as follows : Wesley M. O'Brien, Geo. Creamer, 
Wm. R. King, George Spake, George Cole. 

Samuel G. Swisher, of the Quarterly Con- 
ference of Cleveland Circuit, having recently 
withdrawn, together with his congregation, from 
the Congregational Methodist Church, was recog- 
nized by vote of the Conference as a local preach- 
er in Elder's orders. 

A communication from Dr. Bennett, of Vir- 
ginia, in reference to his proposed history of 
Methodism in that State, was referred to the His- 
torical Society. 

Bishop Doggett and Dr. Summers called atten- 
tion to the " Life and Times of Bishop McKen- 
dree," by Bishop Paine, now in press at Nash- 
ville. 

After usual notices. Conference adjourned with 
the benediction. 



3>«<0 



SERVICES ON THE SABBATH. 

There was preaching in every house of worship 
in the city by some of the members of Conference 
or the ministers in attendance from abroad. 

Bishop Doggett preached a most eloquent ser- 
mon at the Conference room at 11 o'clock, on 
Acts XX : 24, and afterwards performed the ordi- 
nation of Deacons in the presence of a vast mul- 
titude. 

In the afternoon. Rev. Dr. Summers, Editor of 



Jifetkodist JEpiscopal Chu7^ch, So^iih. /3 

the Christian Advocate, preaclied on the sentence 
in the Lord's Prayer, " Thy Kingdom come," a 
luminous aaid edifying discourse, after which the 
Bishop performed the ordination of Elders. 

On Saturday night, the Missionary fAnniver- 
sary was held, and was addressed by Dr. Sum- 
mers and Dr. Munsey, after which a collection 
was taken up, amounting to four hundred and 
twenty-four dollars. 

Monday, Sept. 27, 1869. 

Bishop Doggett took the chair at the hour of 
meeting, and religious worship was conducted by 
Wm. Hicks. 

Rev. G. B. Barr, of the Methodist Protestant 
Church, was introduced. 

The Fourth Questiots^, "Who are readmit- 
ted?" was called and answered as follows: Thos. 
J. Pope, James T, Smith, and W. C, Bowman. 

Samuel B. Harwell was received from the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, and granted a superan- 
nuated relation. 

Alexander Doniphan was received from the 
Methodist Protestant Church, as a traveling 
Elder. 

Dr. B. B. Lenoir, of the Knoxville District, 
took his seat as a lay delegate. 

The hour previously agreed upon having ar- 
rived. Conference proceeded to the'election of del- 
egates to the ensuing General Conference, to meet 



/4 Holston A.7imtal Conference 

at Mempliis, Tenii., in May, 1870. The Chair 
announced that the Conference was entitled to 
five ministerial and five lay delegates. D. Sullins 
and B. W. S. Bishop were appointed tellers, and 
the Conference proceeded to ballot. The first 
ballot resulted in the election of Carroll Long, 
and the second in the election of E. E. Wiley and 
David Sullins. 

On motion, the election was suspended at 12 
o'clock, to hear the address of Dr. W. E. Munsey, 
Secretary of the Board of Foreign Missions. 
After a very eloquent and powerful address, a 
Committee was appointed to consider certain re- 
commendations which had been urged by the 
Secretary in regard to missionary operations. The 
Committee consisted of W. CI. E. Cunnyngham, 
C. Long, and K. B. Yance, 

Conference then adjourned to meet at 3 o'clock, 

P. M. 

MoxDAY, Sept. 27, 3 P. M. 

Conference met according to adjournment, and 
proceeded with the balloting for delegates to the 
General Conference. On the third ballot. John 
M. McTeer was elected, and on the fifth W. G. 
E. Cunnyngham was chosen, R. jN". Price and 
Wm. Hicks were chosen as reserve delegates. 

Conference then proceeded to the election of 
lay delegates to the General Conference, the laity 
voting alone. The first ballot resulted in the 
choice of II. B, Vance; the second in that of T. 
P. Thomas; the third in that of F. W. Earnest 
and David Cleage ; the fourth in that of W. B. 



Methodist JiJpiscopal CMirch, South. 75 

Aston; and the fifth in the choice of Henry S. 
Bowen and Gr. K. Long, as reserves. 

After some remarks in belialf of the Christian 
Advocate and Sunday School Visitor, by Dr. 
Summers, and a brief valedictory by Dr. Mun- 
sey, the Conference adjourned. 

sixth: iDj^ir. 

Tuesday, Sept. 28, 9 A. M. 

Conference met and was led in devotions by R. 
M. Hickey. 

The case of J. H. Jefferson was called, and 
after some discussion his character was passed 
and he was granted a location at his own request. 

The FiEST Question was noAv called, "Who 
are admitted on trial ?" The following, mostly 
young men, were admitted from the circuits an- 
nexed : 

Joseph L. McGbee, from Marion Circuit. 

James R. Handy, from JefTerson Circuit. " 

Erastus H. Boyle, from East Tazewell Circuit. 

George D. French, from Seddonsville Circnit. 

Timothy P. Darr, from Seddonsville Circuit. 

Patton J. Lockhart, from Liljerty Hill Circuit. 

E. Embree Hoss, from Jonesboro' Station. 

James K. P. Ball, from Athens Circuit. 

Isaac R. Ellis, from Chattanooga Station. 

Robert H. Frist, from Chattanooga Station. 

Edward W. Marsh, from Kingston Circuit. 

The Fourteenth Question, "Who have died 
this year?" being called, and the answer being 
"IN'one," the Bishop called on the Conference to 
join in singing the Doxology, "Praise God," &c., 
after which Dr. Wiley led the Conference in 



/tf Jlolston Annual Conference 

thaiiksgivisg' and prayer, and the ministers con- 
secrated themselves afresh to the work of preach- 
ing the Gospel. 

After these exercises^ the regular hiisiness was 
resumed, and John C. Hyden presented the Re- 
port of the Joint Board of Finance, which was 
discussed and adopted. It may be found in the 
Appendix. 

E. C. Reeves, from the Committee on Cliiireh 
Property, presented their report, pending the 
discussion of which Conference adjourned, 

SE-VEisra?H: idj^"^. 

Wednesday, Sept. 29, 9 A. M. 
Conference met, the Bishop in the Chair, and 
Gr. W. Miles conducted opening services. 

The report on Church Property was taken up, 
and the Committee having requested the privilege 
of revising one of their resolutions, this was 
granted, and the report as thus offered was 
adopted. See Appendix. 

In pursuance to a resolution contained in the re- 
port, the following brethren were appointed a 
Committee to visit the Holston Conference of the 
M, E. Church at its next session, viz: E. E. 
Wiley, B. Arbogast, R. N. Price, F. W. Earnest, 
E. C. Reeves. 

B. Arbogast presented the report of the Com- 
mittee on Books and Periodicals, which was 
adopted. See Report in Appendix. 

The report of the Committee on Education was 



Methodist £'piseopal Church, Sout?i. /^ 

presented, and read in different sections by T. P. 
Thomas, F. M. Grace, and R. B. Vance. After 
some amendments it was adopted. See Report 
in Appendix. 

After notices, Conference adjourned to 3 P. M. 

Wednesday, Sept. 29, 3 P. M. 

By request of the Bishop, E. E. Wiley took 
the Chair. 

Wm. Hicks, from Committee of Presiding 
Eklers, on the report of James Atkins, former 
Agent for Sunday Schools, made their report, 
which was adopted. Appendix. 

E. E. IIoss presented the Report of the Com- 
mittee on Sunday-Schools, which was adopted. 
See appendix. 

James P. Kelley made the report of the Com- 
mittee on the State of the Church, which was 
adopted. Appendix. 

Gr. Taylor presented the report of the Trustees 
of the Ambrister Fund, which was adopted. 
Appendix. 

J. M. Crismond presented the report of the 
Committee on Camp Meetings, which was adopt- 
ed. Appendix. 

James Atkins presented the report of the Com- 
mittee on the Bible Cause, which w^as adopted. 
Appendix. 

A series of resolutions, by J. S. Kennedy and 
J. R. Payne, in reference to the duties of Exam- 
ining Committees, was adopted. See Appendix. 

A series of resolutions, by Frank Richardson, 



i8 Molston Annual Conference 

in regard to Missionary Meetings, was adopted 
and ordered to be printed in the Christian Advo- 
cate. Appendix. 

J. R. Payne, Assistant Secretary, presented the 
Statistical Report, which was adopted. Appendix, 

J. K. Haynes presented the report of the Com- 
mittee on the Colored People, which was recom- 
mitted and subsequently bruoght forward and 
adopted. Appendix. 

W. G. E. Cunnyngham presented the report of 
the Committee on Foreign Missions, in relation 
to which the Bishop made some appropriate re- 
marks, after which it was adopted. Appendix. 

Conference then adjourned to meet at 7 J P. M., 
to hear the reading of the appointments for the 
next year. 

Wednesday Eve, Sept. 29, TJ P. M. 

The Bishop took the chair, and the minutes of 
the preceding session were read and approved. 

J. W. Dickey presented the report of the Board 
of Domestic Missions, which was adopted. See 
Appendix. 

J. S. W. Neal presented the report of the Com- 
mittee on Temperance, which was adopted. See 
Appendix. 

On motion of W. H. Bates, the Secretary was 
instructed to have the minutes of the Conference 
published. 

The several Committees of Examination for 
Undergraduates were announced, as follows : 

Admission on Trial— G. Taylor, S. Phillips, H. C. Neal. 
l3t Year— Wm. Hicks, S. R. Wheeler, B. W. S. Bishop. 



JKethodist ^piseopat Church, South. f9 

2d " J. S. Kennedy, J. R. Long, E. W. Moore. 
3d " R. N. Price, W. C. Bowman, W. Robeson. 
4th " W. G. E. Cunnyngham, E. E. Wiley, D. Sullins. 

By resolution, J. S. Kennedy was requested to 
preach the Conference sermon on Wednesday 
night of the next session. 

Question Twenty-Second, ''Where shall the 
next Conference be held?" was answered by the 
election of Wytheville, Va. 

A series of resolutions of thanks oifered by R. 
B. Vance and Geo. Stewart was adoj^ted by a ris- 
ing vote. 

A resolution was adopted appointing R. B. 
Vance as Agent of the Conference, to look after 
the interests of its Church property. 

It was resolved to request the Bishops to hold 
the future sessions of the Conference in the month 
of October. 

Peter Gallagher offered a resolution instruct- 
ing the Presiding Elders to collect the amount 
necessary to defray the expenses of the delegates 
to the General Conference, which was adopted. 

Miscellaneous business being finished, the 
Bishop called the Twenty-Third Question, 
"Where are the preachers stationed this year?" 
and preparatory to reading the appointments 
made some appropriate and excellent remarks 
upon the economy of Methodism in the annual 
distribution of pastors and the operations of the 
itinerant plan. 

The following list of appointments was then 
made, and the Conference adjourned sine die. 



20 Hols ton A.nmial Conference 



APPOINTMENTS.. 

"VVvTHEViLLE District — J. W. Dickey, P. E. 
" Station— R. II. Parker. 
" Circuit— E. W. Moore, T R. Handy. 

Newbern " B. W. S. Bishop. 

Hillsville Station— B. F. White. 

" ■ Circuit — Kennerly C. Atkins. 

Sparta " Timothy P. Darr. 

Grayson " G. W. Callahan, J. R. Payne. 

Jefferson " Patton J. Lockhart. 

Marion *' S. D. Gaines. 

Jeffersontille District — Wm. Hicks, P. E. 
" Station — A. J. Frazier. 

Liberty Hill Circuit— J. W. Bennett. 

Buchanan Mission — -To be supplieil. 

East Tazewell Circuit— J. T. Frazier, W. II. Kelly, Supernamorary. 

McDowell Mission — A. Q. Harmon. 

Princeton Circuit — G. W. K. Greene. 

Pearisburg " "W. P. Doane, George D. French. 

Flat Top Mission — To be supplied. 

Seddonsville Circuit — P. S. Suttou. 
Abingdos District — Wm. Robeson, P. E. 
Station— H. C. Neal. 
" Circuit — J. C. Hyden, J. Haskew. 

Saltville " E. Vertigens, W. C. Bowman. 

Lebanon " J. Torbitt, H. W. Bays. 

Bristol Station — D. Sullins. 
" Circuit — Wm. H. Barnes. 

Dickensonville Circuit — J. M. Crismoad. 

Gladeville Mission — S. J. Harrison. 

Martha Washington College— B. Arbogast, President; W. G. E. Cun- 
nyngham. Professor. 

Emory and Henry College — E. E. Wiley, President; James A. Daris, 
Professor. 
Rogersville District— F. Richardson, P, E. 

Morristown and Mossy Creek — George Stewart. 

Russellville Circuit — C. K. Miller. 

Rutledge " T. F. Smith. 

Rogersville and Kingsport — D. R. Smith. 

Powell's Valley— D. H. Carr. 

Jonesville — A. Doniphan. 

Estillville— F. D. Crumley. 

Pattonsville— W. L. Turner, J. W. Belt, Supernumerary. 

Rye Cove — J. M. Massey, W. P. Queen, " 



Jfjihodlsi £Jpiscopal Church, South. ^ 

JosESBORo' District-— G. "W. Miles, P. E. 

Jonesboro' and Greeneville Station — E. E. IIoss. 

Jonesboro and Elizabethton Circuit — F. A. Farlej', A. R. Bennick. 

Rheatown and Gre6ne " J. W. Bowman. 

Blountville " S. R. Wheeler, W. D. Mitchell. 

Taylorsville and Cranberry Mission — To be supplied. 

Fall Branch Circuit — J. T. Freeman. 

St. Clair " , D. B. Carter. 

Newport " J. Mahoney. 

Watauga " To be supplied. 

Knoxville Distuict — J. M. McTeer, P. E. 

" Station— G. Taylor. 

" Mission — To be supplied. 

Lenoir and Knox Circuit — W. W. W. Bays. 
Maryville and Louisville — George T. Gray. 
Tazewell and Jacksboro' — J. D. Baldwin. 
Dandridge and New Market — M. L. Clendenin. 
Clinton and Maynardsville — T. T. Salyer. 
Sevierville and Little River — To be supplied. 
East Tennessee University — F. M. Grace, Professor. 

Athevs District — C;irroll Long, P. E. 

" Station — J. L. M. French. 

" Circuit— B. F. Nuckolls. 
Madisonville — -Coleman Campbell. 
Citico Mission — To be supplied. 
Sweetwater Circuit — J. Brilhart, J. L. McGhce. 
Riceville " J. T. Smith, L. W. Crouch, Supernumerary. 

Decatur — A. E. Woodward. 
Mine City Station— J. S. W. Neal. 

CiiATTiNxooGA DisTHrcT — R.. M. Hickej", p. E. 
station— C. T. Carroll. 
" Circuit— Isaac R. Ellis. 

Cleveland Station — J. Atkins. 

" Circuit — W. W. Pyatt, S. V. Bates, Supernumerary. 

Charleston and Calhoun Station — L. K. Haynes. 
Benton Circuit — Robert H. Frist. 
Trenton " Jacob Smith. 

Etna " L. L. H. Carlock. 

PiKEviLLE District— W. W. Neal, P. E. 
" Circuit — L. C. Delashmit. 
Jasper " W. B. Lyda. 

Washington" Erastus II. Boyle. 
Hamilton " E. W. Marsh. 
Kingston " S. Phillips, D. H. Atkins. 
Tracy City and Spencer Mission — H. M. Bennett. 
Cumberland and Jamestown — To be supplied. 



22 Molston Annual Conference ^ 

AsHEViLLE District — J. Boring, P. E. 
" Station— W. H. Bates. 

" Circuit— T. J. Pope. 

Sulphur Springs — "W. H. Cooper. 

Brevard— J. W. Bird- 

Hendersonville — James K. P. Ball. 

Catawba Circuit — J. N.'Somers, Supernumerary. One to be supplied. 

Burnsville " G. W. Martin. 

Marshall and Pine Creek Mission — To be supplied. 

Asheville Female College — J. S. Kennedy, Presmentj J. K. Stringfield, 
Professor. 

Franklin District — J. R. Long, P. E. 
" Circuit— T. F. Glenn. 

Murphy " Walter H. Stevens. 

Ft. Heiubree " W. H. Weaver. 

Webster " N. W. Vaughan. 

Waynesville " Joseph A. Wiggins. 

Echota Indian Mission — To be supplied. 

Cheowa " " " " 

'^'^'.o* 



JOINT BOAKD OF FINANCE. 

Wytheville District — S. D. Gaines. 

Jeffersonville " J. T. Frazier. 

Abingdon " J. C. Hyden. 

Rogersville " T. F. Smith. 

Jonesboro' " S. R. Wheeler. 

Knoxville " J. D. Baldwin. 

Athens " J. L. M. French. 

Chattanooga " C. T. Carroll. 

Pikeville " L C. Delashmit. 

Asheville " J. T. Pope. 

Franklin " T. F. Glenn. 

Lay members to be added on the first <Jay of next session. 

DAVIO S. DOGGETT, President, 
R. N. PRICE, Secretary. 



Methodist JSpiscopal Church, South. 23 



j^iPDPEisriDix:. 



I^eport of the |[ommittee on llit ^tate of tht :£liurt1t. 

Your Committee deem it inexpedient to attempt a statistical exhibit of 
the increase of the membership of the Church for the last year. Neither 
do they find the material at hand to give the strength ot the member- 
ship in the bounds of the Conference. They confine themselves to the 
actual spiritual condition of the Church, at the present, and to an inves- 
tigation of the agencies employed by the Conference for the advance- 
ment of the Kingdom of Christ. 

The termination of the political bloody strife, whose foot-prints are 
still deep in the sands past behind us, found but a very small segment 
of the area of the Conference enjoying the advantages of regular Church 
organization. This strife had devasted the land, crushed the aspirations 
and hopes, chilled the hearts, and for a time paralyzed the hands of the 
people. Those who had formerly enjoyed our Church Communion, sud- 
denly found themselves without pastors — their Church edifices wrenched 
from them — their children either nestled at the mother's knee and re- 
ceived the truth from her lips alone, or strayed at will on the Sabbath 
day. Others sang songs in our Churches, but they produced no melody 
in our hearts. No money to build new Churches; no money to pay for 
ministerial laber, that " the waste places might be made to blossom as 
the rose." What should we do? Only a "remnant of Israel had been 
saved." Happily for us, Methodism had its origin in equally perilous 
times •■, and truly did it exemplify its sublimity. Four years have 
scarcely passed by, and the agony is over. Our people sit under their 
own vine and fig tree, and none dare molest or make them afraid. 
Throughout the whole Conference, Societies have been reorganized, new 
Churches have been erected, and thousands of children are made glad 
and led in the way of life through the instrumentality of Sabbath 
Schools. 

To-day the Holston Conference is intact. " Blessed be God who giveth 
us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ." The spirituality of the 
Church is nearer its primitive paragonism than in any recent epoch. 
Your Committee are naturally led to the enquiry, How could such vast 
, results be accomplished, under such untoward circumstances? The an- 
swer is easy and natural. The solution of the problem is found in the 
symmetrical and concordant machinery of our Church organization, as 
well as in the leaven of truth and grace sown in the hearts of the peo- 
ple, in former years, by the clergy of the Southern Methodist Church. 
The pride of life had been rooted out and the true gold had been refined 
by the fires of affliction and persecution. 



2Ji. Molston A.nnual ConfereJice 

But animating as the reality of our present prosperity is, onr work is 
not done. Might not greater results have been achieved, and more souls 
brought into the fold of Christ, by a stricter observance of the tenets of 
the Church, and a more faithlul use of the prudential means of grace, 
which made the bond of perfectness in the Church in the days of our 
fathers. For the future, let us, as officers of the Church, regard with 
godly jealousy the fundamental doctrines and primitive simplicity of 
the Church. Whoever would remove the least pillar in this temple of 
grandeur, is but imitating the folly of the ignorant worshiper who dug 
beneath the ruins of the Ephesian Temple for the fuel upon which it 
rested to feed the fires on its altars. There is norning lacking, to set in 
flames the whole Church, but to give the proper direction to the corela- 
tive forces — class-meetings, faithful ministerial labor, pastoral visitation, 
and systematic financial benevolence. The Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, has but entered upon its career of usefulness. It had its incep- 
tion and origin in the providential foreknowledge of God. Its mission 
is to preserve the Gospel of Peace in its purity, in these times of politico- 
religious conglomeration. 

Your Committee are of opinion that the Church is greatly attenuated 
by the needless increase of preaching places. A policA' of eonsolidation, 
by which a greater number of classes would be brought into sympathetic 
association and church communion, would greatly strengthen the Church 
in most places. 

In order to give direction to the views of your Committee, they pro- 
pose the following resolutions for the action of this body : 

1st. Resolved, That the success that has crowned the labors of our 
ministers and people during the past year, should be an incentive for 
renewed effort in the future, and fill our hearts with profound gratitude 
to the Great Giver of every good and perfect gift. 

2d. Resolmd, That it shall be the duty of preachers for the Circuits 
and Stations during the coming year, to specially enjoin upon our peo- 
ple the necessity of a strict observance of class-meetings, and that as an 
incentive thereto, the preachers themselves shall hold at least one such 
meeting every quarter, when circumstances will so admit. 

3d. Resolved, That we will discourage the needless multiplication of 
preaching places, and endeavor to cone<uitrate larger congregations at 
our larger Churches already built, and to build others where they do 
not exist, that the ministry may give more earnest attention to mental 
culture and pastoral visitation. 

4th. Resolved, That the response of our Bishops to the communication 
from Bishops Janes and Simpson, of the M. E. Church, meets with the 
hearty endorsement of this Conference. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JAMES P. KELLY, 
W. P. DOANE. 



Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 25 

JAeport of l^ommtttee on Wucation. 

Your Committee are deeply impressed with the fact that the usefulness 
of the Church depends, in a great manner, upon its facilities for the edu- 
cation of the young. This work is second only to the preaching of the 
Gospel. And sanctified by Gospel influence, as it always should be, and 
generally is, when undertaken by the Church, it is the most mighty in- 
strumentality known for the elevation and salvation of our race. Mere 
intellectual culture is of doubtful expediency. It often becomes a mighty 
agent for evil. It warps and deforms the entire being. It .subjects the 
moral nature to cold and cheerless rationalism. But when the intellect- 
ual, the moral and the spiritual, are brought under equal and simulta- 
neous culture, there is a harmonious and grand development, as of the 
roots, the trunk and the branches of "a tree planted by the rivers of 
water." The world may educate intellectually; the Church only can ed- 
ucate morally. She is " the salt of the earth," without whose savor moral 
putrification must ensue. 

These great truths have been recognized by most Christian denomina- 
tions ; and we are glad to say they have not been ignored by our own. 
Sanctified mental culture "breathed the breath of life into" Methodism, 
when it first " became a living soul " in the world ; it has sustained that 
life down to the present time ; and the same mighty agent is essential to 
its prosperity and full development in the future. 

The important en4uiry then becomes : " Is the Church coming up to 
the standard of duty in this respect?" We think not. She has done 
much — much in labor, much in sacrifice. But how little has been done 
in comparison with what ought to be done I How few even of the youth 
of the Church are educated ! How little of the wealth of the Church is 
expended in this behalf I How poor, and consequently how much crip- 
pled in their operations, are most of our Church institutions of learn- 
ing 1 How meagre is their patronage! These things ought not so to be. 
"We humbly believe that no parent has a moral right to impoverish the 
brains and destroy the usefulness of his child, in order to fill his pockets 
with sordid pelf. Nor do we think that many would do so, could they 
fully realize that they are only stewards of God's bounty, and that in the 
final day they must give an account of their stewardship. 

Your Committee regard as first of all in importance, the education of 
our ministry. The time is past when ignorance can be tolerated in the 
public teachers of religion. The mere office of the ministry is no pass- 
port to the favorable consideration of an enlightened public, without the 
necessary qualifications. And yet we believe there are many young 
men throughout our country, whose hearts God has fired' to preach the 
Gospel, but who, for want of means to secure the necessary mental cul- 
ture, are deterred from the work. " Not many mighty, not many noble, 
are called." " To the poor the Gospel is preaehed." From this class God 
raises up many laborers for his harvest. Many of the great lights of 
the Church have struggled up from ignorance through poverty, to posi- 



26 Molston Annual Conference 

tions of usefulness, influence and eminence, in the ministry. But how 
often is the incipient, giant intellect crushed beneath the rubbish of ig- 
norance and poverty I What a noble benefaction the Church may and 
ought to bestow upon such, in developing and directing their powers to 
the salvation of thousands ©f souls. 

In connection with this part of their report, your Committee would 
recommend the adoption of the following resolution : 

Resolved, That the official members of each Presiding Elder's District 
in this Conference be requested, at their District Meetings, to-adopt such 
measures as they may deem proper, to keep at Emory and Henry Col- 
lege, or some other good school, one young minister, or candidate for the 
ministry, of their own selection. 

EMOET AND HENRY COLLEGE. 

The Committee on Education beg leave to report that while there is 
but one Institution belonging to the Conference, devoted to the educa- 
tion of young men, that one is of such a character that the Church has 
just reason to sustain it and increase its patronage. The substantial 
value of the property at Emory and Henry College is a permanent in- 
terest of the Church, and should be carefully preserved. The Commit- 
tee are pleased to report that valuable improvements are making on the 
dormitories, which will tend to the comfort of the students, and will add 
several thousand dollars to the value of the property. The erection and 
subsequent abandonment of costly edifices for the purpose of high 
schools has been one of the follies of a past impulse in behalf of educa- 
tion in this Conference. Tlie ghastly ruins of those once mighty Insti- 
tutions stare at us along the lines of travel to admonish us of the fact 
that it takes a large district of country to sustain an institution of high 
grade. A few scores of boys and girls may be collected by thefirstexeite- 
ment of opening a new school, but these even if numbered by hundreds, 
do not make a College. It is the grade of instruction, the high and sus- 
tained course of study, pursued by young men of mature growth, that 
entitles any institution to the name of a College, and to supply succes- 
sive classes of such students requires a wide area of country as a basis of 
support for the College, so that instead of having three or four Colleges 
to one Conference, there should properly be but one College for three or 
four Conferences. For example, Emory and Henry might well unite the 
efforts of the Baltimore, the Virginia, and the Holston Conferences. The 
Committee are proud to report that this College has received an exten- 
sive patronage from other States and Conferences. Of these, about forty 
came from Alabama, nine from Georgia, three from Texas, two from 
Kentucky, five from the Indian Nations, six from Louisiana, one from 
Mississippi, one from Florida, one from Missouri, one from Illinois, mak- 
ing in all sixty-eight students out of one hundred and eighty-nine, who 
have come from other States than the three which are partially included 
in the Holston Conference. Of these three States, Virginia has furnished 
sixty-eight, Tennessee thirty-two, and North Carolina seven. But in the 
four higher classes not more than one-half the students are from the 



CQ f.(o fO 



46066 



Metfiodist JSpiscopal Church, South. 



27 



patronizing Conferences. This leads us to remark upon the manifest in- 
difference of the people of this Conference, of Tennessee particularly, to 
the subject of collegiate education. Why shi^uld Alabama, which has 
within her borders three splendid Institutions belonging to the Metho- 
dist Church, send more students to Emory and Henry than does Tennes- 
see? Manifestly it must be because of a want of interest in the subject 
of education on the part of our people. It is the province and should be 
the work of our preachers to insist upon the value of collegiate educa- 
tion, and to resist the influence alluded to in the report of the Visitors 
of Em.iry and Henry College, which is willing to take a cheap article of 
education as a 'substitute for slow and laborious culture. 

The ministry has ever been regarded as a learned profession, and 
while, under our system, learning has never been required as a qualifi- 
cation for the work of proclaiming the Gospel, nevertheless, the ministry 
of the Methodist Church have been most zealous in founding and sus- 
taining institutions of learning. We hope they will redouble their ef- 
forts for Emory and Heury College. In supporting this Institution, they 
are rewarding a faithful servant for labor already performed, and are 
preparing friends for the Church who will in time to come be her most 
able supporters. 

We are happy to be able to state that the sons of members of this 
Conference are now admitted at Emory and Henry free of tuition, and 
so it has been in many instances in regard to candidates for the minis- 
try, nevertheless the Trustees regret their inability to meet all the de- 
mands of this kind that are made on the resources of the College. It is 
hoped that before many years some pious and benevolent friend of the 
Church may deposit a fund with the Trustees of this College for the spe- 
cial purpose of helping young men who are preparing to enter the min- 
istry. Such a legacy might be worth more to the soul of its donor than 
the annual interest upon bonds or houses on lands, and would be, if 
given in the spirit of true charity. 
■ The Committee therefore beg leave to report the following resolutions : 

1. That we have entire confidence in the management of the Board 
of Trustees of Emory and Henry College, under the care of this Con- 
ference, and that we will earnestly solicit for it the patronage of the peo- 
ple within our respective fields of labor. 

2. That the Conference be requested to appoint the usual Board of 
Visitors to attend the next Annual Commencement, and to report to this 
body; and we respectfully nominate the following : Benj. Arbogast, 
Enoch W. Moore, Samuel E. Wheeler, S. D. Gaines, G. Taylor, W. H. 
Bates, George Stewart, A. W. Stewart, James H. Gosset, Hon. A. S. Ful- 
ton, T. P. Summers, J. G. Cecil, A. W. Aston. ' 

THE HOi.STON CONFERENCE FEMALE COLLEGE. 

We are pleased to learn that this favorite Institution, under the Pres- 
idency of Rev. Jas. S. Kennedy, A.M., has been making steady progress 
towards its ancient prosperity. During the year, which closed 20th May 
last, there were 92 pupils present, embracing young ladies from North 

Tennessee VVetleyan College 
Afhens, Tennessee 



28 Solston cinnual Conference 

and South Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, Virginia, &c. The 
school is deservedly popular in all respects, and promises to be of great 
use to the Church and the country. Mr. Kennedy's popularity as a gen- 
tleman, as a teacher and as a minister, has never been surpassed by any 
one filling the Presidency. 

We regret to state that the debt upon the College (necessarily made for 
buildings, &c.,) could not be met by the Trustees, and that the same will 
have to go to sale under a mortgage in the hands of James Webb, Esq., 
of Baltimore, Md. To prevent the property from passing out of the 
control of its friends, and that the Institution might sustain, in an edu- 
cational Doint of view, the same relation to the Conference as formerly, 
a Joint Stock Company was formed, who will manage the echool on the 
same plan as before the sale. 

1st. Hesolved, That while we deeply regret that the embarrassments 
upon the College compel its sale, we are nevertheless gratified that a 
Joint Stock Company of its old and true friends has been formed for its 
purchase, who will conduct the College as truly and essentially in the 
interests of the Church as it has hitherto been. 

2d. Hesolved, That the thanks of this body are due to those who have 
thus interposed to save the College from an utter and absolute alienation 
from the purposes for which it was founded and from the control of our 
friends, and particularly to President Kennedy, whose efforts in this be- 
half have been untiring. 

3d. Resolved, That we are much gratified to learn of the degree of suc- 
cess it has already attained, and that we commend the Institution as 
highly worthy of the confidence and patronage of the public, especially 
since the daughters of our preachers are educated gratuitously, as here- 
tofore. 

4th. Hesolved, That we recommend the continued appointment of Rev. 
Jas. S. Kennedy to its Presidency, and the appointment of Rev, Jas. K. 
Stringfield to a Professorship in the same, as requested in the Annual Re- 
port of the Board of Trustees. 

MABTHA WASHINGTON COLLEGE. 

In reference to this Institution, your Committee are happy to report a 
steady advancement in prosperity and usefulness. Our confidence in its 
success is increasing. We believe that in its fo tunate location, its thor- 
oughness of instruction, and especially in the skill, ability and energy 
of its faculty, it has the elements of success. It is now more than pay- 
ing expenses, having appropriated something even in these times of pe- 
cuniary stringency, and consequent slim patronage, to the permanent 
improvement of its grounds and buildings, without increasing its pres- 
ent indebtedness, besides nearly $500 appropriated to the tuition of the 
daughters of ministers in the regular work. The debt of the Institution 
is its great embarr issment. It amounts to about $10,000. We are glad 
that the Trustees are oarnestly laboring for its liquidation through their 
Agent, Bro. Jos. N. Wilkinson, who has, within the last few days, se- 
cured a subscription of about $8,000, to be paid when $20,000 shall have 



Methodist JSpiscopal Church, South. 



29 



been subscribed for the payment of the debt and the erection of addi- 
tional buildings. We commend the enterprise and its Agent to the 
friends of the Institution. 

The patronage of Martha Washington is far below what it should be, 
and what it would be, if all its friends would exert themselves in its be- 
half. From the large scepe of fertile country, in the bounds of your 
Conference, convenient to it, by rail or otherwise, it ought to have a 
patronage, besides that from a distance, of two or three hundred young 
ladies. But the Church is derelect in duty, in some instances failing to 
educate her daughters when she is able, and in others sending to schools 
beyond our bounds and not under our control. We think the ministers 
of your body could do much, individually, to remedy this great evil, and 
we think they ought to feel, in conscience bound, to do so. 

In conclusion, on this point we most cordially recommend Martha 
Washington to the confidence, favor and i>atronage of all our people and 
friends. 

1st, Resolved, That the Presiding Bishop be requested to appoint Rev. 
B. Arbogast to the Presidency, and Dr. W. G. E. Cunnyingham to a Pro- 
fessorship, in Martha Washington College. 

2d. Reselved, That at the request of the President of Martha Wash- 
ington CoUege, he be relieved from the delicate duty of reporting to your 
body the condition of his own Institution, and that the Board of Trus- 
tees be requested to report through its President, or some member 
thereof. 

3d. Resolved, That T. P. Thomas, Samuel N. Honaker, James Feelds, 
T. P. Summers, John M. McTeer, G. W. Miles, B. W. S. Bishop, R. N. 
Price, W. P. Reeves, F. M. Grace, W. B. Aston, J. L. Buchanan, and T. 
F. Smith, be appointed a Board of Visitors to Martha Washington Col- 
lege. 

4:ih^ Resolved, That the Presiding Bishop be requested to appoint Rev. 
F. M. Grace to a Professorship in East Tennessee University. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 

T. P. THOMAS, 
T. SULLINS, 
JNO. W. PAULETT, 
R. B. VANCE, 
F. M. GRACE. 



Report of t!|e |[jramirttee on jRooks and aBtrtodicals. 

The Committee to whom was referred the several communications on 
books and periodicals, have carefully examined the papers committed to 
their charge, and beg leave to report as follows : 

Th« exhibit made by Dr. Redford, of the financial condition of our 
Publishing House at Nashville, is most satisfactory. 



so Jlolston dnnual Conference 

The wisdom of the last General Conference, manifested in the selection 
of Dr, Bedford, a man of first-class business attainments, for the Super- 
intendency of our Book Concern, has been abundantly attested by the 
satisfactory achievements of the Agent. 

"We recur to this view of the subject to express our gratitude to the 
General Conference for giving us Dr. Bedford in charge of that work ; 
and our thanks to Dr. Bedford himself, for the able manner in which he 
has discharged the duties of his ottice. 

We believe that in the affairs of the Church, as well as In affairs of the 
State, we ought to exercise the greatest possible care in the selection of 
our agents of trust; and that specific qualiiications for the business in 
hand ought to be made the basis of the selection of the officers of the 
Church. We repeat, the General Conference has given us, this time, the 
right man in the right place. 

We can, therefore, most heartily commend to the confidence of our 
people, our publishing enterprise at Nashville, and we solicit for the 
Agent the most liberal patronage, which it may be in the power of the 
Church to confer. 

Brethren, we are not enhancing the fortunes of Dr. Bedford when we 
purchase books and cast our money into the Treasury of the Agent at 
Nashville, 

We are relieving our own Publishing House from its embarrassments. 
We are aiding in the distribution of our own literature, and we are ac- 
cumulating a capital for the Church, which, in ages to come, will dis- 
pense blessings to the world. 

Let us not complain, therefore, if as a business man, Dr. Bedford is 
rigid in the enforcement of his collections. 

Let us not complain, if the prices of our books are somewhat in ad- 
vance of those of the bsoks of the publishing houses at the North, 'long 
established, richly endowed, and so extensively patronized that they 
may with safety sell at a mininum profit. 

Let us remember, that whatever profits accrue to the Publishing 
House, are our profits, profits for our Church, profits which we trust will 
be used in the future for the glory of God, and for the honor of Metho- 
dism. 

It is confidently believed by the Agent, that by the meeting of the 
ensuing General Conference, the Publishing House will be free from 
debt. 

To achieve this grand result, it was necessary, and may still be neces- 
sary for a time, to maintain a reasonable margin of profit on all the sales 
of the house. 

Who will regret the payment of these profits, when the commendable 
work of rescuing the house from failure, and the Church from dishonor, 
has been accomplished ? 

Who will not rather rejoice that he has borne a part in efforts crowned 
with such signal success, and destined to bless the Church with such per- 
manent good? 

Brethren, let us understand, once for all, that if we would see any or 



Methodist £Jpiscopal Church, South. 



Si 



all of the enterprises of Church, favored with the fullest success, we 
must give these enterprises our sympathy, our zealous commendation, 
our active support. 

"We must sink self in a common effort for the general good. 

We must remember that no one man, however brilliant his attain- 
ments or fervent his zeal, can realize for the Church all good, unaided 
by the cheerful colabors of his brethren. 

The Methodist Church, South, to-day, is the grandest organization for 
usefulness in the Southern States, could we avail ourselves of our re- 
sources of men and money for the work committed to our charge. 

Unfortunately, a large per cent, of our sons and daughters are com- 
mitted to Roman Catholics for education, and with them goes into the 
treasury of the Roman Catholic Churches the money v,'hich ought to en- 
rich our Colleges, and enhance the usefulness of our organization. 

Some of our jjeople, to save a few paltry shillings, replenish their li- 
braries and adorn their centre tables with books and periodicals from 
New York, which our Publishing House could furnish at a small ad- 
vance on the price paid North, which advance would fall, a precious and 
timely help, into the treasury of our own Church, 

We commend, therefore, to the preachers of the Conference, to the lay 
delegates, and to all influential members of our Church, the work of 
purchasing and distributing books ameng the masses of our people. 

Many of the members of our Church are without our Discipline, with- 
out our standard work on doctrines and government, without religious 
biography, without devotional works, so well suited to keep alive the 
piety of the Church. 

Much might thus be done, both for the Publishing House and for our 
people. 

Our members would be more intelligent, would comprehend better the 
wants of the Church, would better sustain the ministry and all benevo- 
lent Church enterprises. 

Men must know their duty before doing it. 

The history of Methodism shows that our most active and efficient 
members are our best informed members. 

It is not good for our people to be without knowledge. 

The world is advancing in knowledge. The adversaries of Christ's 
Kingdom are availing themselves of increased knowledge and cultivated 
intellect to assail the strongholds of virtue and piety. 

Shall the Church, then, leave its members in ignorance, without wea- 
pons of defense, while thus threatened by the emissaries of darkness? 

The Committee recommend for the action of the Conference the fol- 
lowing resolutions : 

Ist. Resolved, That the thanks of this Conference are due, and are 
hereby tendered, to Dr. Redford, for the ability and success with which 
he has managed the interests of the Publishing House. 

2d. Resolved, That we will do all in our power to promote the circula- 
tion of our own books among the people, thereby supplying the people 



32 JSbtston Annual Conference 

with useful literature, and aiding the Publishing House in liquidating 
the remainder of its indebtedness. 

THE OHBISTIAN ADVOCATE, 

The Committee beg leave to report in respect to the Christian Advocate 
and Sunday School Visitor, that as these papers are intimately connect- 
ed with the Publishing House at Nashville, and as both of them have 
contributed during the last year to the profits of the house — the former 
having turned over near $2,000 and the later above $2,200 — the Confer- 
ence ought not only to sustain these papers for their intrinsic worth, but 
for the valuable aid they are giving the Publishing House. 

We recognize the Christian Advocate as the official organ of the 
Church, and as that paper which specially represents our Conference. 

We are grateful to its Editor for the manner in which he has at all 
times vindicated the cause of right among our people. 

We approve of the spirit of the paper. It is conservative in tone, 
chaste in style, elevated in sentiment, and emphatically a religious, 
family newspaper. 

We earnestly advise all eur people to subscribe for the Christian Ad- 
vocate, to read it, to acquaint themselves with the current events of our 
history as Methodists, that they may understand our economy better, 
love our organization more, and labor with increased diligence for the 
cause of truth in the world. 

We counsel in regard to Church papers, as we have counseled in re- 
gard to Colleges, that there be not too many of them, that those we have 
be first-class papers, that they be well sustained, and a source of reve- 
nue to the Church, and not a burden. 

There are now, and there ought to be, other papers besides the Chris- 
tian Advocate, bnt we should guard against an unreasonable and unne- 
cessary multiplication of their number. 

We read with pleasure many other papers, both those published by 
order of the General Conference, and those which owe their origin to in- 
dividual enterprise. 

We wish all our papers a more extended circulation, and a wider field 
of usefulness. 

But we caution against the Church ni*glecting those in'which her rep- 
utation as a Church is involved, to sustain those which, however valuable* 
involve in their failure only the reputation of their projectors. 

Whatever papers the General Conference has established, wo feel 
bound, for the honor of the Church, to sustain. 

Whatever papers individuals have established, we may encourage, if 
we please, never, however, to the neglect of the official organs. 

Finally, we recognize the Home Monthly, published by Brother Stark, 
as a magazine of merit, published by one of our own brethren, and wor- 
thy of whatever encouragement we can give it. 

Respectfully submitted. 

B. ARBOGAST, Chairman Committee, 
JAS. F. BROYLES, 
J. H. TORBETT. 



JTethodist £Jpiscopal Church, South. 33 

DR. McFEBKIlSr. 

The Committee on Books and Periodicals has read with pleasure the 
communication from Dr. McFerrin, accompanied with his first volume 
on Methodism in Tennessee. 

They present for adoption the following resolutions : 

1st. Renolved, Tliat this Conference receives, and will file with their 
Historical Society, Dr. McFerrin's first volume on Methodism in Ten- 
nessee, and that they hereby tender to Dr. McFerrin their thanks for 
the consideration shown them in the presentation thereot, and they give 
him assurances that they will make an eflbrt to place this valuable book 
in the hands of all our peoi)le. 

2d. Resolved, That it is the earnest pra3'er of all the members of this 
Conference that God may prolong the life of our beloved brother, until 
he shall have completed a work which premises so much of good to the 
Church. B. ARBOGAST, Chairman Committee. 

||c}iort of 4onratittK on liiblc mxn^. 

Your Committee on the Bible Cause would submit the following as 
their report : 

To give tlie Bible, without note or comment, as an open book, into the 
hands of all nations, is an important step towards the world's conver- 
sion, one that should deeply interest every Christian heart, and call forth 
earnest effort on the part of all God's ministers. 

As the Gospel is the power of God unto salvation to every one that be- 
lieveth, and as faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God, 
every minister should feel it a part of his duty to see that that precious 
book of liie is in tlie hands of all his people, for its teachings are able 
to make men wisi-> unto salvation. A prayerful and daily reading of the 
Holy Scriptures has a wonderful effect u[)on all Christian people, for 
thus read, they enligh'^en, refine and jmrify the heart, " For the entrance 
of the words giveth light," and "The law of the Lord is perfect, convert- 
ing the soul." We have also long been of the opinion that the c/o.seand 
deep study of the great truths contained in tlie Bible is one of the very 
best methods by which to elevate a d expand the human intellect : and 
accompanied by the Holy Spirit, as it always will be to honest hearts, it 
is (Sod's chief instrumentality to rectify all the disorders oi our depraved 
moral nature. 

We would, therefore, recognize the high obligation that rests upon us 
to assist in every possible way to put the Scriptures of Divine Truth into 
the hands of all men, and especially to see that the children and youth 
ot our own country are well sui)plied. By so doing we will confer a 
benefit upon society that may be everlasting in its effects, for the Bible 
is the only book that teaches the whole duty of man to his Creator and 
to his fellow men, defining clearly the duties of every relation in life. 

As the free circul ition of the Bible is one of the great ne^ds of the 
world to-day, we should be devoutly thankful to Almighty God, that in 
the order of his merciful providence an institution has sprung into being 
so perfectly adapted to meet this want as the Bible Societies of England 
and America, printing and circulating the Bible, as they now do, in some 
near 200 languages and dialects, and ihey the'principal languages of the 
earth. Surely we witness a day far ahead of the day of pentecost, for 



3^ Sblston Annual Conferetice 



on that day fifteen or twenty nations, throuQ;h their representatives at 
Jerusalenn, heard the wonderful works of God, each in tlieirown tongue; 
but to-day the nations hear the same wonderful works in near 200 dif- 
ferent languages and dialects throughout their respective Empires. 

Cast your eyes abroad over the nations of the earth, and what a scene 
presents itself to the Christian mind. What a world is this in which 
God has called us to live; and what a day is this in which our lot is 
cast. Look over the political and moral status of our own beloved coun- 
try, and of the world, and behold the upheaving elements 1 But we 
trust God is in it, and is only shaking the nations to prepare them for 
some ntw and glorious developments that will soon appear; and that the 
results may be glorious it is the duty of the Christian world to pour the 
oil of Divine Truth upon the raging waves. Let the voice of t:ie Son of 
God be heard in the midst of this storm, saying, "peace, be still." Then 
the agitated elements shall quiet down into a glorious peace upon the 
principles of our holy religion, that perhaps shall never again be suc- 
ceeded by the horrors of war. Then shall the lion and the lamb lie 
down together, and none shall hurt or harm in all the holy mountain. 
When the knowledge of God shall cover the earth as the waters cover 
the channels of the great deep — when all flesh shall see the salvation of 
God, and when the Kingdoms of this world shall become the Kingdoms 
of God and of Christ. 

As the free circulation of the Bible will do much towards bringing 
about this glorious result, therefore. 

Resolved by the Holston Annual Conference, That we will heartly co- 
operate with the Agents of the American Bible Society whenever they 
visit our fields of labor, and do all we can to sustain and promote the 
Bible Cause. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. ATKINS, Chairman. 

Report of Committee on £tmgerante. 

Your Committee is as much as ever convinced of the great evil grow- 
ing out of the use of intoxicating liquors. We are also fearful that the 
use of wine is a growing evil ; but as this has been so thoroughly inves- 
tigated heretofore, by our Annual and District Conferences, we would 
only offer the following : 

First. That we will present the subject of Temperance to our people 

in our sermons, pastorial labors, and communications through the press. 

Second. That we will urge with more earnestness the observance of 

that rule in our Discipline which constitutes our Church a Temperance 

Society, j?er se. 

J. S. W. NEAL, 
B. F. WHITE, 
W. H. COOPER. 

Report of :fl^ommiitce on l^olored Ijcoplc. 

The Committee on the religious interests of the colored people beg 
leave to submit their report : 

From all tiie information that we have been able to collect, it appears 
that a large majority of the colored people, within the bounds of this 



Methodist £Jpiscopal Church, South. 36 



Conference, have deserted our Churcli and formed ecclesiastical relations 
with other denominations of Christians. 

Some have joined the M. E. Church, wliile the majority, perhaps, 
Imve connected themselves with what is known as the African Zion 
Church. 

Their alienation from us is attributable, in a great degree, to the bitter 
prejudices engendered by the late war. The impression has been made 
upon their impressible minds that we are their enemies; that the M. 
E. Church, South, is a pro-slavery organization, and that its ministers 
and members are desirous of, and are laboring to, effect their re-enslave- 
ment. These misrepresentations, as is perfectly natural, have driven 
the colored people from our congregations, and caused them to forsake 
and turn against that Church which has expended more money, and 
done more in every regard for their moral an(l religious improvement, 
than all other Churches combined; and under the inriuence of whose 
ministry hundreds and thousands of them have been converted from the 
error of their way, and brought into the fjld of Christ. The obligation 
still rests uf)on us as a Church to endeavor to remove those prejudices, 
under which they were led to sever their connection with us; to teach 
them that we are still their frien is; that we still feel deeply interested 
in their welfare, and that we are willing, as far as we may have oppor- 
tunity, to labor for their religious imp'ovement. 

While the relations of master and slave no longer exist among us, and 
while our people, as a consequence of the abolishment of that relation, 
are absolved, to a great extent, from the obligation to provide for the 
physical comfort of the colored people, we cannot, we dare not, fail to 
recognize the obligation to make provision, as far as we are able, for their 
moral and religiuus culture. It is our imperative duty as a Church to 
instruct them in the great science of salvation, to teach them that they 
are fallen in Adam but redeemed in Christ. We, as ministers, are bound 
by the great commission under which we hold the authority to preach 
the unsearchable riches of Christ, to offer the precious boon of salvation 
to all men — to the black as well as the white. We have no discretion 
in the matter — we dare not make distinctions. Therefore, be it 

1st. Resolved, That upon us as a Conference devolves the duty of look- 
ing after the relia;ious interests of the colored people within our bounds. 

2d. Resolved, That the ministers and preachers having a connection 
with this Conference be lequired to instruct religiously the colored peo- 
ple living within their respective charges, by preaching to them the 
pure word of God, as often as practicable. 

3(1. Resolved, That the colored people, who may unite with our branch 
of the Christian Church, shall, if thay prefer it, be organized into sepa- 
rate classes, and tliat the preacher in charge shall select prudent men of 
their own color to be their leaders. 

4th. Resolved, That we recommend the organization of the colored 
classes into Circuits, an<i the Circuits into an Annual Conference, under 
the jurisdiction of the General Conference of the M. E. Church, South, 
whenever it is practicable. 

Respectfully submitted. 

L. K. HAYNES, Chairman. 



|tgort of |o 



ommitlce on |^mp fl|cdhTgs. 



The Committee to whom the subject of Camp Meetings was referred, 
would submit the following as their report: 

In reviewing the history of the progress of our beloved Methodism, 
in the past, we find (as we th'nk) the great success which ha*? attended 



36 Ilolston ^Annual Conference 

the preaching of the Gospel in the tented grove, one of the great instrn- 
menlaiities by whicli her onward march has been accelerated, and be- 
lieving, as we do, that hundreds, and perhaps thousands, who have been 
brought into tlie. f.ild of Christ, at Camp Meetings, who have been orna- 
ments to the Cimrch, useful in their day and generation, many of whom 
are now in Paradise, and others on the way, who perhaps would never 
have been converted (some of them, at least,) had it not been for those 
annual meetinj;s of the jjcopla of God in the grove. These, and several 
other impiirtant considerations, incline your Committee to think and be- 
lieve ill the utility and great good brmght about through Camp Meet- 
ings; and believing, as your Commi .tee does, that a great amount of 
good is still being accomplished, wherever they are held, as is a'nund- 
antly manifest by the f(dlow ng report, viz: Three Camp Meetings were 
held this vear in Wytheville Distrii:t, 125 conversions reported; Pearis- 
burg District, one Camp M.^eting, 30 conver-iions ; Knoxviile District, 
one Camp Meeting, 10 conversions; Athens District,, two Camp Meet- 
ings, 130 conversions; Asheville District, four Camp Meetinsrs, some 80 
conversions; in all, 375. Therefore, in view of these and other impor- 
tant facts, vour Comnittee would recommend the adoption of the follow- 
ing preimble and resolutions: 

Wh"'.iibas, Camp Meetings have been of great benefit to the Church; 
and Whereas, they havo ti> a great extent gone out of use in several Dis- 
tricts in this Conference, therefore, 

1st. Resolved, That each Presiding Elder be requested to bring the sub- 
ject of Camp Meetings befoi'e the Q'lartjrly Meeting Conferences of each 
Circuit, and if possible have one or more Camp Meetings every year 
within the bounds of his District. 

2d. Resolved, Whenever it is practicable, if a shed and cabins cannot 
be built, recommend the use of cloth tents, and other temporary ar- 
rangements. 

Respectfully submitted. 

J. M. CRISMOND, 
C. K, MILLER, 
C. LONG. 

Abingdon, Va., Sept. 28, 1869. 



Report of ll^^ommilicc on Jorctgn j||issions. 

The Committee on Foreign Missions beg leave to submit the following 
report : 

1st. Resolved, That all the preachers on Circuits and Stations wjthin 
the Conference, be requested to organize the Sunday Schools in their 
several charges into Juvenile Missionary Societies, in which monthly 
collections shall be taken up, one-half for Foreign Missions and the 
other half for Domestic Missions. 

2d. Resolved, That all the preachers in charge of Circuits and Stations 
take up a collection in every congregation during the month of Decem- 
ber next, to aid in paying off the Missionary debt. 

3d. Resolved. That the preachers in charge of Circuits and Stations be 
advised to enlist, so far as possible, the co-operation of two or more ac- 
tive laymen in each charge, who shall assist in raising missionary 
money in every congregation. 

4th. Resolved, That a special sermon on Foreign Missions be preached 
before every congregation within the Conference during the month of 
December next. 

W. G. E. CUNNYNGHAM, Chairman. ' 



Methodist .^iscopat Church, South. 



37 



i^eport of |Lommittet on j||tssion.-,rj| ||ccfinc|S. 

1st. Itefsolved, That there is frequently too much levity in our Mis- 
sionary and other meetings, for the collection of money f)r the Church ; 
anil the end proposed bj'' such meetings would be better accomplished 
by cu tivating a b^'coming seriousness. 

2d. Resolved, That the too frequent appeal, on such occasions, t© State, 
county and village pride, and to our esteem of brethren whom it is pro- 
posed to make "life members," as motives for giving, does harm by di- 
recting the public mind away from the Scriptural motives for Christian 
beneficence 

3d Resolved, For a similar reason. Fairs, Concerts, Suppers, Charades, 
Tableaux, etc,, whatever be their character in the abstract, ought not to 
be resorted to as a means for raising money for the Church. 

FRANK EICHARDSON. 



mp\i of lb f ru.sia'S of liulrisicii fund. 

The Trustees of the Ambrister fund report that we received, at the 
hands of J; H. Bruner, former Trustee, notes and currency amounting 
to $3,025^ 18, together with the interest for last year; also a deed for a 
house and lot in Calhoun, Tenn., valued at $f500, together with insurance 
policy on same; also the receipt of Mr. M, Ginly, Esq., of Maryville, 
for a note for $400, placed in his hands for collection against the estate 
of Rev. l)owell, deceased ; making in all $-J,025 18. We loaned to Asa 
Ambrister .fS, 025 18, taking his note for the principal, due Isi October, 
1871, and his note for the in erest, due 1st October. '69, '70, and '71. We 
took a mortgage deed on a farm covering all these notes. 

We would respectfully recommend that the Trustees be required to 
sell the house and lot in Calhoun. 

We have on hand t'le interest for the present year .$181 50 

Less the expenses for the year 14 SO 

Saving on hand $161 20 

Respectfull)' submitted. 

E. E. WILEY, 
G. TAYLOR. 



|epori 



of the 



:|^ommUtce of ijrtsiding 



■Idtr5. 



The Committee to whom was referred the Report of Rev. Jas. Atkins, 
former Sunday School Agent, submit the following brief statement for 
the consideration of the Conference : 

On examining the Report referred to, and the bills of Sunday School 
books forwarded from the Publishing House at Nashville, Tenn., to the 
Presiding Elders of this body for the past year, together with small sums 
of monev paid by Brother Atkins to a few of our preachers, to be applied 
to Sunday School purposes, it appears that the whole amount of money 
and books which were in the hands of the Sunday School Agent, at the 
time his agency terminated, has been used in promoting the Sunday 
School enterprise, as directed by this body at its last session, if we ex- 



38 Solston A^nnual Conference 



cept two hundred dollars ■which the Agent retained, under conviction 
that he was entitled thereto In view of services rendered in the cause of 
Sunday Schools. 

The rominittee recommend that the amount retained hy the Agent be 
given him, not only in view ot the fact that he thinks it is his according 
to assessment of claims made while lie was in the agency, but also, and 
especially, in view of the fact that he has rendered considerable service 
in the cause of Sunday Schools since his agency closed. 

J. M. McTEER, Chairmaa. 

WM. IIICKS, Secretary. 



I^tsoluiicns on framination^^. 



1st. Eesohed, That the Committees of Examination, and the under- 
graduates and applicant.'? for admission on trial, be required to meet at 
the seat of Conference, from year to year, on Tuesday preceding, at 9 
A. M., for the purpose of completing the examination, if possible, before 
the opening of Conference. 

2d. Besolved, That if any Committeeman or undergraduate absent 
himself from this examination, without a lawful and satisfactory ex- 
cuse, such a Committeeman shall be discontinued, and the vacancy 
filhd by a new election; and in the casfe of the undergraduates, they 
shall forfeit the right of an examination for that year. 

3d. Resolved, That tlie report of the Examining Committee shall be 
read in the presence of the brother whose case is called up in Conference, 
belore he Atires. 

JAS. S. KENNEDY, 
J. R. PAYNE. 



inantial ||lan. 

The Financial Plan adopted at the last session of the- Conference is 
approved by all the preachers, who have given it a fair trial. We there- 
fore recommend substantially the same plan, modified as follows: 

1. So soon as practicable alter the adjournment of Conference, let the 
Presiding Elders call together the District Stewards in their several Dis- 
tricts, and let tliem fix the Presiding Elder's salary, and apportion it 
among the several charges composing the Districts, according to ability 
to pay. 

2. Let the Presiding Elders see that this is done, and immediately 
transmit to the preachers in charge within their several Districts, a copy 
of the proceedings of the District Stewards' Meeting, certified by their 
Secretary. 

3. So soon as practicable, let the preachers in charge call together the 
Circuit Stewards, and lay before th-m the report of the proceedings of 
the District Stewards' meeting, (if received,) and let them fix the salary 
of the Circuit or Station preacher, and apportion it, together with the 
amounts apportioned to their several stati ns and circuits by the District 
Stewards, among the Chur^'hes. according to ability to pay. 

4. Immediately tiiprea.''ter let the Steward or Stewards of each Church 
associate with himself or themselves at least two other members, and let 



Met7iodist JSpiscopal Church, South. 39 



them apportion the amount to be raised by each Church among its sev- 
eral members, according to ability to pay. 

5. Let the Stewards make the apportionment among the members of 
the Station. 

6. So soon thereafter as practicable, let the Stewards call together their 
several cwngregation" and read to them the reports of the meetings of 
the District Stewards, the Circuit Stewards, and the Assessing Commit- 
tees, which last shall be subject to amendment by the Church meetings. 

7. Let the Stewards read in a Church meeting, once a quarter in the 
Circuits, and once a month in the Stations, the amount apportioned to 
each member, the ami^unt paid, and the amount due. 

8. At the close of the jrear let the preacher in charge call a meeting of 
tne Stewards, and let them make out an account of the amounts collected 
for the Presiding Elder and the preacher in charge, and of the deficien- 
cies, (if there be any,) and transmit it, certified by their Secretary, to 
the Joint Board of Finance of the Annual Conference. 

9. Let the Presiding Elder collect the Bishops' Fund, and the preacher 
in charge that for the Superannuates and the widows and orphans of de- 
ceased preachers. 

10. Let each preacher in charge preach at least one sermon a year to 
each congregation upon the subject of ministerial support, and other 
benevolent enterprises of the Church. 

Eespectfully submitted. 

JOHN C. HYDEN, Chairman. 
BOBERT B. VANCE, Secretary. 



llmountj jytttssarj to Jjttt the ||^Iaim| 

Of the Superannuated preachers, and the widows and orphans of de- 
ceased preachers, and the Bishops' fund, as follows : (for next year.) 

Districts. Conference collections. Bishops' fund. 

Wytheville, $200 00 $70 00 

Pearisburg, 125 00 50 00 

Abingdon, 201) 00 70 00 

Rogersville 125 00 60 00 

Jouesboro', 125 00 50 00 

Knoxville, 150 00 50 00 

Athens, 150 00 60 00 

Chattanooga, 175 00 65 00 

Pikeville, 100 GO 40 00 

Asheville, 175 00 65 00 

Franklin, 125 00 40 00 

Total, $1,650 00 $020 00 









AO Hols ton Anmeal Conference 




STATISTICAL 


TABLES. 










NAMsg OP Circuits 
AXD Stations. 


NUMBKKS. 


SUXDAY So O'li.S. 




i 




S ^ 


■a -o 


^ CO 

- "3 


s . 

"Si 
«■? 

OH 


o . 

Ms 

a -^ 


III 


o 


° 3 
2 £ 

~ P 




Ifl/t/itrille m strict. 

Wytljuville Station, 

" Circuit, 

Newliern " 

Hillsville 

Grfiy.--on " 

Inrlependenoe Station... 
Jetferson C.rouit, 


8 
2 
8 
7 
2 
10 

c 

48 

7 

2 
2 

2 
15 


142 

1140 
fidO 
331 
0.50 
83 
765 

oeo 


13 
3 

16 

3 

8 
16 

3 

30 


10 
13.i 
20 
22 
38 

10 

59 

283 

28 

9 

6 

17 

12 

1^ 
10 

90 


1 
40 

8 
20 

9 

2 
13 
60 

1.33 

12 
16 
8 
7 
20 
10 
10 

6 
89 


1 
14 

4 

6 

13 




26 
16(1 
18 
40 
104 

51 


90 

1000 

. 100 

285 

932 

520 


288 
£500 
250 
100 
40(1 

1000 


35 

6 

12 

53 


1 
40 

7 
12 

15 
75 








Total, 




•1071 


44 


309 


2087 


4583 




Alifnfjilon District. 

AbinL;doii [Station 

" Circuit, 

Saltville " 




m 

68!) 
480 
llil 
576 
830 
187 
500 
310 


1 

11 
8 
1 


10 
1 
4 



20 
70 
40 
9 
2') 
75 
17 
20 
28 


85 
34(J 
410 
113 
255 
600 
125 
1.50 
165 


.356 
1100 
524 
400 
•.'50 
300 
300 
800 
250 


40 

27 

50 
52 


6 




Jeffersoiiville Station,.. 

Liberty Hill Circuit, 

LeI)anoii " 




Circuit 




liuchanan Mission, 

Total, 

Pearishnrtf Dist. 

Pcarisburg Station, 

•' Circuit, 

Ea.stTazwell '■ 

New Kiver " 

Seddcnsville " 

McDowtdl Mission, 




3053 


48 


311 


2249 


4280 


109 







3 

5 

7 

19 

1 
:i 

3 

fi 

5 

1 
1 

20 

2 

5 
5 
7 
4 

2 
7 


87 
.500 
8 8 
358 
475 
113 
187 


18 

20 
1 

13 
14 

54 
40 
10 


•2 
2o 
15 

15 

12 

1 

68 

10 
30 
13 
3(i 

30 
131 

6 
12 
31 
38 
35 
18 
10 
10 

16 


10 
21 

10 

1 

8 
10 
41 
45 

22 

132 

4 
20 

40 
150 
49 

36 

20 

3551 


1 
10 
4 

1 


9 
60 
41 
57 

5 


60 
30(1 
178 
1 99 
350 

30 


100 

35 

237 
50 




6 
2 




Total 




2548 


31 


197 


1117 


422 


C8 


11 

10 
.0 

27 




iTonfahoro' District. 

Jouesboro" Station 

" Circuit 

Rhea town & Ureenev'le 




107 
332 
340 
779 
3S0 
44 
41 
146 
204 
250 


9 


4 

2 

8 


00 
60 

45 

10 

2U 


of'O 
257 

230 

SO 
1 


241 
525 

80 




Wautauga, 




Klizab'ton Ji Taylorsv'f 








St. Clair 








Total, 

Ttoffersville Dist. 

Morristown and Mossy 




2iil3 


21 


160 


1072 


1140 


OS 




232 
364 
390 
506 
,551 
7 07 
7Sii 
310 
56. 
23.' 


4 
3 
3 
5 
10 
5 

1 


25 
IS 
15 
38 
78 
32 
00 
i; 
58 


200 
150 
1.50 
218 
530 
220 
440 
40 


500 
300 

280 
305 
250 
200 


29 
29 


S 
20 

25 




Russellvillo Circuit, 

Rutlt-dge 
KogcrsvilleA Kingsport 

Powell's Valley, 

Jouesville, 

Estellville 




Pattonsville, 




GUdeville Mission, 

Total, 




32 


4706 


^o^ 


145 


45 


330 2i7ll 


2825 















Methodist £^piscopal Church, South. ^/ 


STATISTICAL TABLES.- 


Continued. 




NUMBHt.-. 


ftUNJuY SU Ml 1.8 1 


Namis of Circu 
AND Stations 


TS 


i 

i. 


.a 


3 5 


■a 


•3 

II 

<23 


■5 1 

^1 


•a 

li 

0^ 


1* 


322 





= 1 


Kttoxiulle liistrtci. 


3 

1 
5 

2 

1 


27n 

396 

114 
323 
95 


15 


37 
6 

12 
6 

75 
6 


24 
34 
16 

4 
55 

9 


1 
2 

2 
5 

1 


20 
17 

12 

20 
20 


200 
no 

80 
3bi 
101 


650 
200 

TOO 
1000 

'50 


100 


34 

7 


Len ir & Kn ix Circuit 
Tazewe 1 & Jiicksboro', 
Diindiidjie & N.ltarket 
Cliuton & Maynardsv'le 
Sevierville & L. River, 

Total...... 


12 

3 
5 

3 

2 
8 

21 

3 
1 

1 
1 
1 
6 
3 

15 

3 

6 
5 

1 
1 
1 

22 

2 
4 

1 
2 

3 
4 

•2 

20 

G 
4 
4 
1 

2 

2j 


1572 

90 
356 
426 

4i 
319 
272 
319 

1822 


15 

1 
2 

3 

1 

1 

2 

1 

3 

7 
3 

1 
4 

6 

21 

24 
15 

6 


142 

10 
14 

6 
18 

li 

59 

7 
14 
8 
5 
(i 
16 
20 

7o 

2 
10 
12 

1 

3 

28 

5 

'2 
47 

7 
20 
11 

5 

67 
20 

17 

4 
41 


141 

30 
80 
15 
2(i 
86 
22 

209 

15 
U 
CO 
13 
4 
15 
50 

1U3 

3 

15 
30 
18 

4 

77 

1 

2S 

21 

8 

65 
45 

9 

t 
60 


11 

] 

3 

2 
2 
1 

9 

2 
1 
3 
) 
5 
6 
4 

22 


89 


9i 


2 00 


00 


41 


Aihenn Tiistrlet, 


14 

36 

13 
11 




5/ 
130 


450 

80 

1 


2iJ 
30 

56 

72 

35 

4 
2 

113 


14 

6 

20 

2 

18 
4 

10 
20 

54 
16 


'• Ciicuit 








Riceville, 




Total, 


80 


60^ 


530 


Chnttnnooga Oist. 


172 
Ul 
308 
93 
196 
402 
676 

3864 


12 
18 
2b 
11 

26 

20 
25 

140 


290 
130 
2io 
lOu 

ibo 

260 


EOT 
300 
200 
225 
209 
450 
300 






Charleston & lalhouii 
Boiiton Circuit, 






Total, 


1^:90 


2184 




PiJcevUle Distri 

Pikevilie Cirouit, .. 


Ct. 


256 
295 
292 
2411 
C6 
7(J 
123 


2 
2 
5 
3 
3 
1 
3 


14 
8 
31 
57 
15 
1 
18 


120 
60 
220 
250 
lU 
40 
lOl. 


150 

25 

leo 

250 
100 


12 

26 

811 
£0 








Altamont & Ira -y City, 
Spencer, 




Total, 


1342 


19 


144 


90- 


705 


68 
50 

50 


6 

6 

115 
56 

10 

187 




AsJiovllle Distr 


ict. 


150 
410 
147 
3j8 
3 3 
4!l3 
483 
19 1 

2i553 

650 
280 
300 
4j9 
455 
75 


1 
11 
2 
5 

4 
8 


23 
90 
17 
70 
33 
.2 
47 


150 
50u 
So 
3611 
20. 
100 
378 


4f0 
1240 
116 
210 
200 
4 
222 

2441 








Mills River, 




Suljihur Spring-i 
Spring Creek Mission,.. 

Total 


40 


310 


1893 


Ffnnldln District. 


6 
2 


40 
13 


400 
140 


600 




20 
10 

30 


Blurphy " 


Ft.lleuibree " 


Webster 




Mine City Station, 

Total, 


2239 i 115 1 


8 


53 


54 


600 



Ji.2 



Moist on Annual Conference 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 

RECAPITULATION. 



Continued. 







NCMBEBS. 






SiTNDAT Schools. 






Namis of CiBcniTS 
AND Stations. 


-A 


ll 


•a » 
1% 


5<S 




o 

11 


c . 

is 

OH 


o . 


■5 i: 


^ i 

S-.H 


.2 

j3 53 

r% 


Wytheville District 

Abingdon District 

PeariaburE District 

Jonesboro' District 

Rogersville District, 

Knoxville District, 


43 
15 
19 

20 
32 

!2 

21 
15 
22 
20 
20 

238 


407 1 
3653 
2548 
2613 
4706 
1512 
1822 
1864 
1342 
2654 
2239 

29724 


i6 

3 

20 

14 
104 

15 
3 
1 
3 

21 
15 

342 


285 
90 
68 
131 
145 
142 
59 
76 
28 
67 
41 


89 
103 
132 
355 
U 
269 
163 

77 

65 

6 


44 
48 
31 
21 
45 
11 

9 
22 
19 
40 

3 

268 


399 

31 

197 

160 

330 

89 

80 

140 

144 

319 

53 


2(87 
2249 
1117 
1072 
2171 

911 

609 
1290 

902 
1893 

640 


4538 
4280 

422 
1146 
1835 
2100 

530 
2184 

705 
2441 

600 


53 
179 

68 

49 
100 

56 
113 
168 

50 


75 
6 
11 
27 
5 
41 
20 


Chattanooga District,... 

Pikeville District, 

Asberille Districj, 

Tranklin District 


54 

16 

187 

30 


Total 


1132 I.'iStI 


2213 


1575! 


20782 


820 


631 











Cheow* and Echota Missions, 1 Local Preacher; 110 White and70 Colored Members. 















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:d dvertisemenfs. 



j;^9 



NUTICE TO OUR READERS. 



The Committee on printing the minutes take pleasure in commending tlie following 
Houses, which have been selected as adverti ers in our minutes, as worthy of the con- 
fidence and patronage of the Methodist public, being our personal friends and the 
friends of the Church. 

lu behalf of the Committee. F. M. dRACE 



IPI^OSIPECTTJS. 



The undersigned propose to commence on the First of January, 1870, 
the publication of a Weekly Newspaper at Knoxville, Tenii.,to le called 

The design of the projectors is to furnish a periodical superior to the 
ordinary political dailies and \veeklie^, in its moral and religious tone, 
as well as in its literary execution; and to embrace a wider range of 
subjects than can be ext)ected in the religious press i f the country. It 
will treat of Politics in the higher sense of that term, as the Economy of 
the State, without reference to party lines. A large space will be given 
to literary and religious in elligence, gathered from the periodical press 
^nd from local correspondence; and the news department will aim at a 
weekly review of imp^rant events in even part of tlie world. 

In the department of Science and the Arts, we shall endeavor to pre- 
sent facts and princijjles, and processes capable of being turned to prac- 
tical account in the various industrial pursuits and enjoyments of life. 

Original communications will iie solicited from intelligent sources, and 
one main object of the pa|)er will be to encourage the display of native 
talents and cotemporary tastes within the bounds of its circulation. We 
will endeavor to foster the production of a home literat ire, by offering a 
suitable medium for writings of acknowledged merit. Believing in the 
cafiabilities of our own section of the country for the attainnient of a 
high state of civilization, and knowing the wants of our people froiu 
long and intimate association ivith them, we shall give due prominence 
to the s 'cial, domestic, industrial, literary and religious interests of the 
Southern States. 

The paper will be a large four-page sheet, printed on good paper, and 
large type, and wi 1 be furnished at the rate of Three Dollars per annum, 
invariably in advance. It will be sent free to all ministers of the Gos- 
pel who desire it, and they are respectfully requested to act as our agents 
in procuring subscriptions, for which they are hereby authorized to give 
receipts. 

Subscriptions and advertisements are invifed immediately. 

All correspondence should be directed to the undersigned, 

Y. M. GRADE, 
R. L KIRKPATRICK. 



60 



A. dyertlsenien /s. 




xmj 



and 




KNOXVIT.I.E. 

LARGEST DAILY IM EAST TENNESSEE! 

Publishes, ever3' morning, 

SI'ECI^Ij TE XjE G-Oa a X' -H I C id ISI'j'^T c hes 

Of the Proceeilinsjs of tli«> 

^tnwtsstz 3ae0(sla[turc, 

And will publish full reports each morning, by telegraph, special to this 
journal, the proceedings of thn 

CONSTITUTIONAT. CONVENTION, 

And oftlu! NATIONAT- CONHRICSS, 

Besides the 

ASSOCIATEO PRESS DISPATCHES. 

The JUarliets of the princiiynl cities, hi/ tclt'ffrnj'h, etieh iiioriiiiiff, 
TERMS, 

Invariably in dvance. 

One Copy, one ve- r $;> 00 

" •' six months 3.00 

" " three months '2.(0 

" " one month, 75 

KAMAGE & ( 0., Publishers. 

^xt$$ and '^tmiipx, 

KNOXVILLE. 



AH HEIGHT 



PAGE HEV/SPAPEBI 



TEH MS OF SUHSCJilVTION. 

Single Copy, per annum, $1.00 

Such as the Press 'NP Mr-renoer has been in the past it will be in 
the future — the steadfast an I undaunted advocate of the peo)>le's rights, 
and we call upon the peo| 1 • of Tennessee to send in their subscriptions, 
in the confidence that no where cai they find more reliable news or 
abler comments upon the issues of the dav. than in tlie Press and Mes- 
senger. Address, ' EAMAGE & CO., 

Knoxville, Tenn. 



A.dyerti semen fs. 67 
» 

THE DAJLY AHO WEEKLY 
LATEST TELEGRAPHIC NEWS! 

LIST INCRi:A>INa RAPIDITY! 

Independent in its course— the supporter f no irmn unless lie deserves 
It — the a<ivo"ate f)f Edueation, A.;nc,ultui-e, Munufactures, and every- 
thing tending to build up East Tennessee. 

deceive daily Special I>isj)atclies from Nashville, and our 
Press Dispatches, also. 

Terms of Subscription. 

Daily, One Year, in a.ivanee, $8.0ft 

Daily, Six Montlis, in adviinee 4.00 

Daily, Three M nths, in advance 2.00 

Daily, One Month, in advance, 75 

Weekly, One Year, in advance,.; 2.00 

Weekly, Six Months, mi advance 1.00 

Weekly, in Clubs of Ten Subscribers, in advance, 17.50 

Weeklv, in Clubs of Twenty, !?<I. 60 each, in advance :{0.()0 

Weekly, in Clubs of Hfty 50.00 

Forward your nionev aud get a iive paper. 

Send to " C. y^ . CiiKRhTQ^, Editor Whig, 

Kiioxville, Teun. 

i\ o IP j^insr ! UNTO iD.A.iTOEi^ ! 




Are pleased to inform the citizens ol Knoxvilje and vicinity tha*' they 
liave in trod u I'd in their |)ractice a remedy that will annihilat • f ^ar, and 
render Tooth Extracting a pleasant op>^rati<ui. The feeble and timid, 
and all who <lesire, can hiive their a(diing teeth and fanijs extracted 
without the slightest p:i in, by inhaling Nitrous Oxide Gas, It is perfectly 
harmless, pass ni; off without h-aving the least unpleasant feelintr. 

In America, this Gas has been exhibited in 200,000 cases, and not in a 
sins;le case has even i.ausea ever followed. 

All Dental work carefully and skilfullv executed, in the latest and 
most improved styles. Our prices ;ire moderjite. Give us a call. 

Office on Clhurcii Street, between Gav and State. 



62 



ci-dyertisements. 



|H!" I 



,eim^s']c^ 



||itttn;n)itg, 



T'lis In'titutioii of learning;, fDiin lei sixty yea.-s ago by the munifi- 
cence of the State of North Carolina, has been in successful operation 
sin -e A. D., 1820. Nearly two hundred young men have graduated from 
its halls, besides a much larger number who have attended its course of 
instruction for a longer or shorter p<»rio i, without receiv ng the honors 
of graduation. It ha^ rscently been endowed by the State of Tennessee 
with the whole of the Agricultural (Jollege Fund donated by Congress, 
am>unting to several hundred thnu-aiid dollars, so that it is now one of 
the most richly endowed UrJversities in the Southern Slates. 

Its course of instruction is full, consisting of three departments, to-wit : 
the Classical, the Scien'ific. and the Agricultural College Courses. It 
has also two Preparatory Schools in successful operation, the oud Classi- 
cal, the >ther English. 

Its Faculty C(>nsists of a President, a Professor of Mathematics, two of 
Ancient Languages, one of Modern Languages, one of the English Lan- 
gua'Jte, and two of Natu-'al Sciencies all of whom are graduates either of 
the University it^elf or of the best Colleges in other states 

Three students from each county in he State are admitted free of 
charge, on recommendation of tlie Representative of the county in the 
State Legislature. 

For other students the price <>f tuition is Thirty Dollars per annum, 
room-rent Five Dollars, and incidental fee Five Dollars. 

Board can be obtained in respectalile families at from $3 00 to $4 00 
per week. 

Circulars giving full information mav be had bv addn^ssing 

Kkv. THOS. W. "HUMES. President. 

Or Professors F. M. Grace and R. L. Kikkpatkiok, Knoxville, Tenn. 



On the ISth of .January, 1870, tbe Spriiijj Soss'on begins and closes on the 8th of June 
followinir, which is commencement day. 

The next Fall sessi m o;jens on the 8th of the succeeding August. 

LocAiioN. — Ufsurii.isscd in he«lthfnlness, quiet and freedcim from temptations to vice. 

Buildings. — Thorough repairs have been madeof dorm tories. lecture rooms and halls, 
so th-it our accommodatiims have never been heretofore so desirable. 

Faculty. — The ch lirs are all filled with men of tried ability and success as discipli- 
narians and educators. 

Terms— One Hundred and Fifteen Dol'ars, payable in advance, will meet the charges 
for Tuition, Board, B'uel, Ilooni-rent, Washing and Contingent Fee, for five months. 

R'ferences. — We ask those seeking a school where thorough Collegiate training is 
given to consult the Faculty of the Virginia Univer>ity, and Bishops of the M. E. 
Church, Sou h. as well as our .\lunini students and patrons. 

More specific information may be (obtained by addressing, 

E E. WILEY, President, 

November, 1869. Emory P. O., Va. 



j±dvert.isements. 



63 



Ua iriinstan |j«. 



ABINGDON. VA. 



The only Female College now under the immediate management of 
the Holston Conference. 



FACULTY. 

lAternrif Depnrttnent. 

Rev. B. Arbogasf.. A.M., President. 

Jiev. W. G. H , Cimnyngham, D.D., Professor. 

Miss Lizzie Reeves, ^ 

Miss Mary J. D.<iiiphan, > Teachers. 

Miss Mary M. Page, J 

T. L. Finck, Professor. 

Miss Annie VauL-ateii, Assistant. 

Ornamental, 

Miss Ella Leftwitch. 



SESSIONS. 

Spring Term opens third Wednesday in February — closes second 
Thursday in July. 

Fall Term opens first Wednesday in August, and closes last Thursday 
in December, before Christmas. 

Board per term of 2(1 weeks,.., $75 00 

Tuition, Collegiate Department,, 30 00 

" Preparatory " 20 00 

Fuel, per term of 20 weeks, 8 00' 

Music — instrumental, 25 00 

T'se of instrument, 2 50 

Modern Languages, each, 10 00 

Ornamentals at usual rates. 

The p:itronage of this College has been steadily increasing for the 
past threie years. There are seventy paying boarders in the College 
now, besides the teachers, all of whom board with the students. It is 
the purpose of the Trustees to make Martha Washington College second 
to no Female College in the South. 

For information communicate with the President, or Dr. Cunnyng- 
ham. B. ARBOGAST, President. 

November 27th, 1869. 



<»' 



5^ 



d dyet 'tisenients. 



ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 




>X«o 



The First Term of the Collegiate Ye.-i- T8fi9-70, of this old and popular 
Institution opensoii Thursday, 5rh<>f August, 18fi9. and ends on ihe 23d 
of December. The Second Term will open on the 30th of December, 
1869, and end on the 20th of May, 1870, with the Collegiate year. 

|crm5i, per %^m\\ of Iiucntn ||cclii 

Tuition, from %\1 to $20.00 

Fee for Ineideiilal Ex|ienses, 3.00 

Board, including washing and iitiiits, 75.01 

M nsi(!, and u-^e of instrument 2/. 50 

Languages, Ancient and Modern, each, b.OO 

(Jharges for Painting, Drawing, &c , itc, nioderaie. 

Every puriil must furnish her own towels, toilet soap, and one pair of 
sheets and pillow-cases. Articles of wearing apparel, as well as sheets 
and towels, must be durably and distinctly marked with the ov ner's full 
name, 

Superior facilities for instruction in Music and French. ^V^\ ton lees 
remitted to daughters of Ministers having regular pastoral chaige?. 

Asheville is conceded by the medical faculty to have one of the finest 
climatvs in the world, and haslong been noted for its social, religious 
and educational advantages. The distinguithed Prof. Dickson, of .Jef- 
ferson Medical College, Philadelphi.ijon the subject of health, climate, 
&e., says "lie is not aware of any other sp^it in Eu-o|ie or .^mei-ica so full 
of all that is desirable, asthe country around Asheville. W. N C." 

Not more than one twentieth of our population in West'^rn Carolina 
is culored — another rea on why ulu friinds South should educate their 
daughters here. 

Railroads arc rapidly approaching us from the East and West, and 
will soon meet at Asheville. 

From the West and South, parents may send their daughters by way 
of Morristowii, Tennessee, to head of railroad, near Warm Springs, 
having to stage only 44 miles. 

Paymknts — One, lu'vdred dollars, at leant, scnii-anvually,proviptly in 
advance, on Board avd Tuition bills. 

For further information, send for Catalogue. 

JAS. S. KENVEDY, President. 



^ dyer ti semen ts. 



65 




nm%% 



Established in 1869, under the direction of the Wytheville District 
Conference M. E. Church, South. 



Rev. J. K. PAYNE, Principal. 



The course of study will be thorough and be suited to prepare students 
to enter College. 

The charges for Tuition, Board, &c., will be as follows, for the Session 

of Five Months : 

I'rimary Department— First Class $5.00 Second Class, $6.0 ' 

Intermediate - '• " 7.00 •< ' 8.00 

Academic " " " 10.00 " " l:i.00 

Commercial " ' " 10,00 

Hoard, in private f 'milies, %'\ to $i> per month 
Contingent Fee at ailmi-tion $1 00. 

The Scliool is finely located, near the New Lebanon Church, on Elk 
Creek, and in a beautiful and plei.tifiil country. 
For further information, address the Piincipal, or 

ELI C. HALE, 
Elk Creek P. 0., Grayson co., Va. 

MOSSY creek" 

The First session will c'ose the TSth January, and the Second will 
begin January 31st, 1870. 

Rev. r?.. IS". PRICTn, A.M., Fresideiit, 

:iVXi-s. ISJL. AX. JOI-INSXOISr lias cliaige of the ^Musical 
Depax'trneiit. 

»oj^4oo 

Terms "'^or Five Months, One-half in Advance. 

Primary Department $10.00 

Preparatory '■ 12 50 

Collegiate " 15. UO 

Contingent Fee t l.Oi) 

Ancient and Modern Languages, cacli, $5 extra. 

Board can be had in good families at .'52. 5 t to S3 per week. 

For further information, address the President, or 

J. C. JOHN-TON. 
Ser'y Board of Trustees. 



66 :)idyertisements. 



WIASOIIC MALE AND FEMALE ACADEMIES. 



Tlieso Institutions, nnder the present Principals, have been in successful operation 
since August, 18(i7. 

The success of these schools is attested by tlie fact that during the first year after 
their organization two hundred and sevonty pupils were entered. During the second 
year twu hundred and seventy-five, and two hundred and thirty the first (juarter of the 
present session. 

The fidlowing advantages are claimed for these schools : They are firmly estab'i»bed. 
The Principals have spent their lives in the school-room, and they employ noni- but the 
best Assistants. Morristown is beautifully situated on the E.ist Tennessee and A'irginia 
Railro!id,at the crossing of C, C. G. and 0. 11. U , is rapidly buildiing up, and contains 
an intelligent and moral populatit^n. The Male and Keniale Departments are entirely 
sepal ate, being taught in buildings half a mile apar'. The organization is thorough in 
the 1 rimary, Scientific, Classical, Mathematical and Musical Departments. 



fferm|, per M'^mw of fiuc ||oniIii 

Orthography, Reading, Penmanship, Geogr.nphy and Primary Arithmetic, $10 00 

Geography English Grammar, Arithni"tic and First Lessons in Composition, 12 50 

Elementary Algebra, W atts Nat. hilosophy, Familiar Science, History, Book- 
keeping, Astronomy, Geography of the Heavens and Khetoric. 15 00 

L)gic Mental and Moral Science*, Chemistry, Higher Mathematics, Latin and 

Greek, CO 00 

lixtrns. 

Music on Piano, 820 CO 

Vse of Instrument 2 50 

Frei'Ch s 10 00 

Contingent Fee, , I 00 

It is expected that the Contingent Fee and one-half the Tuition will be invariably 
paid in ad ranee. 
B lard may be procured from 8 ! 50 to $3 5^ per week. 

Pupils may entiir at any time, but no deduction after entrance will be made, except 
in case-f of sickness jtrotra-^ted for three or more weeks, 
The next session will commence January 10, 1870. 
For further information, address the I'riicipals. 

T. P. SOMMEUS. Principal Female Department. 

A. VV. Wli.SJN. Principal Male Department. 

Miss M. FANNIE DEADERICK, Teacher of Music. 



j±dyerti semen ts. 67 



ABNER 0. JACKSON. J. II. JOCROLMON. C. TURNER. 

A. G. JACKSON & CO. 

GAV STREET, KNOXVILLE, TENN., 

DEALERS IN 

SAW MILLS, FLOUR & CORN MILLS, 

Wdf/ons, Cdfts, Wlieelharrows, 

Field and Garden Seeds, Plaster, Cement, 

Fertilizer?s, &c., &c. 

SOT.E AGEKTS FOB 

Peacock and Collins Plows ; " World's" Reaper 
and Mower; "Tornado" and "Pitts" Thresh- 
ers; "Buckeye" Reaper and Mower; 
"Wheeler & Melick's" Threshers; 
"Victor" Cane Mills and 
"Cook's" Evaporators. 

" Willoughby" Gum Grain Drill; "Victor" Grain 

Drill; "Emerson's" Movable Toothed Saws, 

and all goods manufactured by the 

"American Saw Company;" 

"Obek's" Celebrated Fertilizers, 

and many other articles, 

All of which ive offer at Manufacturers' 
Prices and Freight. 

Letters of inquiry promptly Biisvvered. Farmers and dealers visiting 
the city are respectfully requested to call aiid examine our stock before 
purchasing. 

Last year we sold a largp number of Threshers, and in every instance 
they gave perfect satisfnction. Not a single one was returned, oe object- 
KU TO. Oil culars furnished free. 



68 jidverthements. 



hi Teonessee flpcultural Implemant Waiehouse, 

Gay Stree , Krioxville, Tenn. 

Manufacturers' Agents and Dealers in 

Agricultural Implements, Fertilizers, &c. 



To our customers of East Tennessee, Nortli ' arolina, and South Western Virginia, we 
tike great plensure in tendering our gratel'.il acknowlidgnients lor the very liberal pa- 
tronage extended to us during the p, st seas^on. and in renewing our pledges that no ef- 
fort sh ill be spared on our part to merit a continuance of the same. 

In order to be able to supply any art cle n-iiiiired by our trade, our Mr. 1Mc(!0RKIjE 
has attended several of the most prominent Agri' ultnral F-..irs, where we have secured 
the coutrol of none but Premium htaiidarfl Articles, to wit : 

The Exi'elsior Heaper and Mower, 1st premium and medal. 
The Kirby '• '• 2 medals and 1st premium. 

ThrfHherH. 
Westinghouse Thresher and Cleaner, Ist premium. 
Geisers " " " " 

■\Vheeler k Melick " '• '• " 

Carawel "s Improved Thresher and Cleaner 2 ist premiums. 

Hny, Straw ami Fodder Cutters. 
Sinclair's, Maryland Cutter, Gales Copper Strip, Smith's Lever, Telegraph, Utilley. 

Co -n Shelters. 
Sinclair's, Slade's Virginia, Smill. s, »\ hitson & Tulley. Maryland first premium. 

Wayutts. 
The Old Reliable Whitewater Wagon. (Warranted.) 
The Studebaker Wagon. 

Safes. 
Sole agents for Miller's Safe and Iron Works, Baltimore, Md. Every variety of the 
best Kire and Burglar Proof Safes, Banker's Chests, Improved Key and Cumbinatiuu 
Locks, Bank Vau.ts and Doors. 

Scales. 
Buffalo (U S. Standard ) Platiorni nnd (.loctrs. (Warrant d.) 
Wlieat Drills. 
Keller. The best. 
Willoughby. 
Bicklurd & Huffman. 

Rakes. 
Harmon. 
Ilageratown. 
Ithaca. All warranted. 
Revolving Uakes, of best quality. 
Plows. 
Collins', Ohio Monitor, Dodge's Perfect, Pleacook Calhoun, Routt's Improved Double 
Shovel and Ga'den Plows. Cultivators, Corn Harrows and Coverers, Corn Planters, 
Sulky Plows. 

Washing 3Iachines. 
Doty's Washer and Universal Wringer. 

Saw and Grist Mills. Wheat Fun , Smut and Cockle Machines, Stump Pullers, Corn 
Huskers, Shellers and Baggers. 

• e will fill orders for any article the farmers may want, whether in our line or not. 
Our facilities f'lr furnishing Ihe Farmer a d Merehant with every Implement neces- 
sary o the successful prosecution of Agriculture being complete, all we ask is an ex- 
amination of our stock before buying. 

McCOKKLE & BROWN. 

Gay street, Knoxvill«, Tenn. 
Calvin MoCoRKi.E. ■) 
JuuuG Geo. Bbown. j 



A.dvertisetnenf.s'. 69 



W. W. WOODRUFF & CO., 

KEEP CONSTANTLY ON HAND 

Houseb E ilders'' Har diTirar e^ 

Carpenters' Tools, 

Blacksmiths' Toofs, 

Tanne s' Tools, 

Cabinet-makers' Tools, 

Wa»Dn-inxk3r3' Supplies, Ciblnet-mikars' Sup- 
plies, Sadlers' Tools and Materials, 
Railroad Supplies. 

CmCtlLAB SAWS. 

OUPOBIT'S RIFLE AMD BLASTING PaWDER, 
FAIRBANKS' SCALES, 
And Every till ii(j Usually Kept in a 

First Glass Hardware Store. 

JDOWT FORGET THE MIGHT PLACE, 



W. W. AVOODRITFF & CO., 



60 Advertisements. 



Fall aai Winter Trj 
1869. 



Wholesale Dealers in Staj}le and Fancy 

DRY Q^OODS, 

lEoots^ Shoes and Hats^ 

CAY STREET, KNOXVILLE, TENNESSiE. 



We are in partial receipt, and will by the middle of August, have in 

Store tlie 

LARGEST STOCK AND GREATEST VARIETY 

OF 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Ever yet offered in one establishment, 

IsTOI^TS: OI^ SOTJTEI. 



Each Department 

Will maintain as perfect a character of completeness as if it were an in- 
dependent business. 

We offer to the Trad.? each and every article as low as it can be deliv- 
ered from any Jobbing House in New Yorii, Philadelphia or Baltimore. 

C.,>VAN, McCiXNG & CO. 



cidyertlsements. 6/ 



McEwen,Wiley & Co., 



MINERS AND DEALERS IN 



C. C. COAL. 



Agents for the Sale of 

Vulcan Works Iron, 

(Chattanooga, Tenn.) 

BEST ROLLED IRON IN THE UNITED STATES. 



OFFICE: 



'$ 



62 



^ (li ■irti.seiiients. 



Ramsd&Il Mori^y^a^f Oats. 

Each order is entered on our l)Ook as received, and the seed forwarded ns fast as we 
reach your name. We wish to lie jironipt. l)nt sometimes the hirge number of orders 
renders a, few days' delay unavoidable. ' lieu you can rai-e lOii hii^hels of O.its to the 
acre you are losing money to sow a kind that will nut give you over 35 bushels. 



What we Claim for Raaisdeli's Norway Oats. 

The important points of .superiority claimed for thi^i seed over the other varic-ties. and 
which are fully su.->tained by the voluntary statenit uts ol larmerg who purchased from 
us las year, are these : 

First, 'I hey will yield from iwice to three t mea as many bushels to the acre on the 
same soil and witii the same culture 

Second, That the t;rain is heavier in weijiht. has a larger berry and thinner hull, 
which makes them more nutricious and valuable for feedins 

'Ihird, They grow more vigor.'US and healthy, with straw sufficiently strong to pie- 
vent lodging on the richest soil and rendering thence less liable to disease. 

Fourth. The straw bears more foli ge and i bettei- for feeding. 

Fiitli. That it will grow and produce a profitable crop on ground where other oats will 
not grow to matnrity. 

Sixth, It requires less for seed, one bushel bein?^ ample for an acre. 

Seventh, To be cut greeu and useil for leediug, it is lifty per cent, better than '■orn. 



Card fr m Pmf. F. 
M t-irac ■■ 

E. T University,) 
Aug. 6 18;i9. j 

I take pleasure in 
certifying that I wit- 
nessed on last Tufs- 
day I he operation ol 
threshing the crop 
of Ramsdell Norway 
oats, prodnced on 
one acre of tlie farm /^ 
adjacent to the Uni- 
versity and kn -wn 
as the Agricultural 
College farm, and 
that the yitdd far 
exceeded anything 
which I have ever 
known in tlie his- 
tory of 8outh--rn 
agriculture i'he 

l.tml was good up- 
land, and has n <t 
been manured, that 
1 am aw ire of, for a 
number of years. I 
consider the seed of 
the Norway oat* a.s 
by far the best I 
have ever known. 
F. M. Grace, 
Prof. Eng Lang A 
Lit., K. T. Univer- 

bity 




TRADE MARK 
PItTCE ZIST. 



J T'Ttn" sef Far- 
rti'T Re^prmd^. 

Knoxville, ■) 
Aug 1 . 18t,9 ; 
I certify that I cul- 
tivated 31 acres of 
Norway Oats the 
jiresent season on 
my farm near Con- 
■iird 1 gave them 
isr 'he same cultivation 
W nd the same soil 
that I gaveniy blaik 
oats, and the result 
'K^ has bi en that t' e 
'1 anl^dell Norways' 
yielded more than 
double my black 
oats '1 he stalk* are 
^ery large and 
strong, and the 
l.ea ;8 yield more 
th n double the 
number of kernels 
of the ordinary va- 
rieties. I am of the 
o|iiuion these oats 
are wel' adapted to 
the soil and dim te 
ol the South gener- 
ally. * * I ghall 
cuhivute no other 
variety of oats on 
my farm 
Geo. W. M.iBny. 



Per Bushel 

P r Half nushel. 
Per Peel; 



.87 50 
.. 4 00 
.. 2 50 



Send your < rdera to e.tber of our stores nearest to your place. 

D. W . RAMSDELL A « , 2 8 I'earl-st., New York. 
1). " . RAMSDKLL A On, 171 Lake-st., Chicago.Ill. 
HOUGH & CI1UR<'H, Knoxville, 'enn. 



A.(irerfi,<ieme?its. 



63 



•%%% %vm. %m% ^pu\. 



SPENCBR MUNSON. 



CHARLES SEYMOUK. 



MUNSON & SEYMOUR, 

OrOce in Exchange anV Deposit Bank Building, 

CAY STREET, KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



Farms, r'ity Property, Mining and Timber Lands, sold on commission. 

Money invested, and Loans. etf'.cieii. Tax-paying, Collection and Con- 
veyancing, promptly attended to. 

We now have over 400 Farms for sale in East Tennessee, with valu- 
able Iron and Coal Lands, wh ch we are offering, with our exceedingly 
fine advantages, to both Northern and European customers. 

Pamphlets and Circulars about East Tennessee will be furnished on 
application, 



We refer as to our reliability and promptness in business to 
The First National Bank, Knoxville. 
Exchange and Deposit Bank, " 
People's B ink, " 

Knoxville Bank, " 

Facultv of the East Tennessee University, Knoxville, and tho profes- 
sional and business men generally of Knoxville' and East Tennessee. 



Correspondence is solicited from all who have business to attend to, or 
desire to make investments, either of money or to enter into business. 

Our facilities for Real Estate transactiins are equal to any in the coun- 
try, and we are prepared to attend to business in any part of the United 
Sta'es, through known reliable correspondents. 

No charges made for information furnished, but stamp should accom- 
pany communications requiring answers. 



61 



Advertisements. 



EAST TElESSffl CHIM HOOSE. 

R. IKE. DOIala £ CO., 

I]\. PORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

CHIM, GLASS, 

FOREIGN FANOY GOOBS, ET€., 
Iffo. 88 Gay Street^i 

Opposite Exchange and Deposit Bank, 

KlfOXVILZB, TENN; 



CONFECTIONERIES, 






FOR 



? 



I invite the attention of Country Merchants and the public in general to my largu 
and well selected stock of 

coHrECTioHEamsi 

Comprising 

Maisinst NtttHf Jt'if/s, PrunellSf Oranges, 

Lemons, Ot/stei's^Cocoa Kuts, Sardines, 

l*icJdes, 

And every variety of 

OA.nsrisrEiD in^^TJiTs, 

AIbo, 

0jeiii€y« of sill fetodst 

Most of which 1 manufacture myself, and sell as low as it can be imported from North- 
ern markets. 

CAKES V>'D CRA( KERS, of every descr -^ on. 

A. great vavietif of Toi/s, JPi fe- Cracker s. Torpedoes, Moman Candles, 
Skyrockets, Ac 

All of which 1 offer to sell aa low as any other house in East Tennessee. 

PETER KERN, 

(West side of Market Square,) Knoxville, Tenn. 



jLdvertisemertts. 



65 



P, M, W'MMAMB. 




FACTORY A'}ENT FOR SAIF OF 

ROCKFOBO COTTON YARNS, 

Sheetiny:©, Batti »^s, 

CARPET CHAIN, GRAIN SACKS^ PAPER, &c., 

CoTi.-signmeiits i^olicited of 

01 LARD, FLOUR, GRAIN, 

Tobacco, Feathers, Ileeswax, (iinsengr, Flax Seed, Ac, 

14IIMS ii.ii¥ABJUjffiii HM i^iiaee^i. 

One !Door So?ifh of Cowan, Mc Clung Jb Co,, 
QAY STREET, KNOXVIL.T^E, TENN. 



Successors to C<»FFIN, WILS N & MARTIN, 

COFFIN BLOCK, No 71, GAY ST.. 

Kepp a large and well assorted sto(:>k of GROCERIES, and sell to the 
Trade at lowest prices Abo. GRAIN BAGS, new and se'cond hand. 
CLOVEll, T[MOrHr and HERDS GRASS SEED. Kanawha and 
Saltville SALT. HYDRAULIC CEMENT, from Louisville. Ky 

Agpnts for HAZARD POWDER COMPANY. ROCKFORD 
YARNS always on hand, at Wholesale Prices. 

0E4LEBS IN PBODUCE GEKERfttLY; 

We solicit ennsigprnents of Tobacco, Flour, and all kinds of Grainf 
Bacon. Lard, Fruit, &c. 



66 cidvertisements. 



Prices Reduced. 

R^ YL ^ BOYD 

OFFER 

$1 50and|l 25 Poplins for %\ 00 

|4 BlkGros Grain Silk for |3 50 

75c. Chena Poplins for 50 cts. 

50c. Mohairs, for 35 cts. 

35c. Poul de Soies, for. 25 cts. 

25c. Dress Goods, for 20 cts. 

Linen C. H'dk'fs, for .,. 25 cts. 

New York Mills Shirt, for |3 00 

All Wool Merinos, for 1 00 

Ladies' Cloaks, |3 00 to 4 00 

Ladies' Shawls, |1 00 to 40 00 

ALSO, 

'Blankets, Flannels, Cassimers, Underwear, Carpets, (HI Cloths, etc., 

unusually louf. 

Orders Promptly Filled, One Price, and that one Cash. 

K. K. McCROSlKEY. N. J. HUFFAKKB. 

1869 1870 

I E. £. M'CBOSKEY&COmo 

I, KING'S OIjD COnNEH, f. 

2 Ztetail Dealers in. ilj 

I, JDTLlZr O-OOIDS, \ 

^ a Dress Goods, -Z ^ ■% Gloves, ^ 

1 1 Shawls, "i « 1 1 Hosiery, ^ 

It Shirts, ^ :S^ 3 Trimmings, 4 

I Ladies' Furnishing Goods, y 
f ^ Gent's Furnishing Goods, g* 

1 ^ Flannels, I|*|1i5 Blankets, p 

I ? White Goods, Ist*-'^'!^ Hats and Caps, t^ 

I I Boots, ^^UlUs Shoes, O 
I Boy's & Youth's Boots & Shoes, | 
•^ Groceries, Syrups. 4 
I E. E. McCROSKEY & CO., ^ 

^ Mnoaeville, Tenn. 



cidvertisetnents. 67 



R. S. PAYNE & CO., 

(New York Branch,) 

MANUFACTURERS AND JOBBERS OF 

FDR AiD WOOL HATS Al CAPS, 

Firs and Straw floods, 

CAY STREET, KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



WE would respectfully call the attention of Merchants to the aboTe Card. Onr con- 
nections are as follows: H. J. Cipperly &Co., 250 and 252 Canal, 98 Walker, and 
105 Elm street, New York City; A. G Atkins & Co , Brie, Pa ; J. H. L. Lenheart k Co., 
Meadrille, Pa ; Ask, Bard &, Co , Canton, Ohio. With this connection we profess to be 
the largest Jobbers of Hats in the United States. We will duplicate bills in Knoxville, 
bought in New York, Philadelphia or Baltimore, and you can save freights. We will 
keep on hand at all times a full line of the above goods, to suit the trade of this section. 
Merchants before going East will do well to examine our Stock and Prices. 

R,S> PAYNE &C0. 

Manufacturers of 

TIN AND SHEET IRONWARE, 

AND DEALERS IN 

TINHERS* BTOGK, STOVES, GRATES, 

Pumps, Cutlery, Brittania, Japanned, 
Plated Ware, &c., &c. 
All kinds of Job Work done, in the best style 
and on short notice. 

Best Material used in covering and guttering roofs. Orders from any 
quarter attended to promptly, and Goods packed carefully and shipped 
according to directions. 

West aide of Gay Street, Two Doors South of the People's Bank. 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

We avail ourselves of this opportuaity to return our thanks to our old friends and 
patrons, and bespeak a continuance of their favors. 
We invite the public generally to call and examine our Goods betore purchasing else- 



where. 



68 jidyertisemenfs. 



JNO. W. HOPE. F, MILLER. 

hope: «£ IMEIIiIiER, 

( Successofti to Sniith tH- l.yons^) 

Watehmakers & Jewelers, 

DEALERS IN 

Watches, Clocl(s. Jeweliy and Silver Plaied Ware, 

GAir STKEET NEXT I) OR TO FIRST S TIOXAL BANK, 

Jill "Worlc (Tione hy Experienzed 'Worhmerh and Wxrranted. 
JOHN S. RISTINE. EDWIN F. MAY. 

MmwmE S MAT, 

Manuiaftnx'ers and. 

liMiiMS ijii f uiiNillin% 

No. 120, Gay Street, Knoxville, Tenn. 

"Parlor, Chatnber ond IHvina Itootn Suitx, '>nll Suits, Hurenufi, Wfird- 
robes. Hat and Book RarkM, whttt - Xots, Sidehoo rdn, Ejctftisioa Ttihlen, 
lrn-Po}f TnM<'it, nanh Stands, Kedtdrads, Ro<dc Vanes, Fitllinff - Leaf' 
Tablets, Kitchen Tables, Chajrs of evei'jf description. Counter and Desk 
Stools, all kinda of Mattrasses, Provision Safes, Children's Carriages. 

TtJCKER'S PATENT BED SPHmCS. 

I SASa BLIND AIDOOR FACTOR!, 

! At his Factory, month of First Creek, ofTers at I-iwest rates, 8W,000 feet of Lumber, cf 
■ mU sizes, green and dry. Keeps constantly on h.ind all sizes of induws. Sash, Doors, 
'. Mouldings c. Window and Door irames, Brackets, Mantle-pieces, and, in short, ev- 
erythi'ig usually matte' in dr^t-class wobd«hup6, fiiruished at short notice. 

100,000 Satved Laths, $00,000 ^hinglea. Jiottses BuUt on Short Notice. 

Ui« ijiachille'ry being rUrt by water p'.wer, he c»n do work as cheap as t\ie cheapest. 
He has sonie ot the best workmen in the city. 



^dyertisements. 69 



O. B. SmiTH i£ CO., 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS TN 

BOOKS, STATIONERY AND FANCY GOODS, 



||fp0siioru of Ihc Im. ^undaii mljool inion, 

No. 91, GAY STREE:T, 

0. B. 'SMITH. j 

DEPOT FOn ALL THE PERIODICALS OF THE DAT, 



EAST TENNESSEE BOOK HOUSE, 

KNOXVILLE, TENN., 

WHOLESALE AXI) HETAIL DEALEItS IJUT 



MUSIC AND MUSICAL MERCH^NDISL. 
Maii0S« #%liliiel drgaa® ^ MeledeoaSf 

Orders Promptly attended to. TERMS, CASH. 

THOS. I. VAS OaOEB, 

WHOLKSALE AND KETAIL DEALER IN 

llafdware,Sa(l(llerf,Cu{leFf,llouse-furnisliiog Goods, 



D 

ALSO, MAX UFACTVItER OF 



ALL RINDS OF SADDLE TREES, 

Of the various Impfoi^ed .^(ttiei'tts, 



^9 
t^AU Ordt^s by Mail Attfhdf^ to ttfith Prottipinf'gg^ 



7(? A.dyertiseinents. 



W. E. CARTER. W. S. ODELL. 

GARTSR & ODBLiLi^ 

General Agents for WOEELER & WILSOX'S 

SEWmC MACBtNES, 

For East Tennessee. 

Having been engaged in the sale of Sewing Machines for a number of 
years past, we are somewhat acquainted with what the community needs 
in a Sewing Machine. We, therefore, make this extraordinary ofl'er — 
To any one desiring to purchase a Machine,who will write to us or leaTe 
word at our Salesroom, we will take a Machine to their homes — exhibit- 
ing its operation on their own materials. This will enable parties to de- 
cide intelligently as to their wants before purchasing. 

Salesroom in Smith's new Building, corner of Gay and Church Streets. 
Address, 

CARTER & ODELL, 

Knoxville, Tennessee. 
JVb. 2S, Market Square, Knoxville, Tenn,, 

m 

Lard, Flour, Dried Fruit, Green Fruit, 

FEATHERS, SALT, &c. 

Merchants and Traders should always call be- 
fore selling their Produce. 



uUIIiMi 




C. E. F^G^E, 



MANUEACTURER OP 




And. Dealer in 

Boots^ Shoes and Hats. 

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Fine Boots and Shoes made to measure. 
Particular attention given to orders. 

Opposite Cowan, McClung & Co.'s Wholesale Store, Gay Street, between 
JUain and Cumberland, 



Advertisements. 



7/ 



No* 48, Gay Street, Knoxville, Tenn,, 

Dr. Roger's old stand, Dealers in 



CHEMICALS, TOILET AND FANC! ARTICLES, 

Mosletter's Celebrated Stomach 'Bitters, Trusses, Supporters, and Shoul- 
der Braces, Glass, Putty, Paints, Oils,Varnishes, and Dye-Stuffs, Grass 
and Garden Seeds, Pure Wines and JAquora for Xedicinal Purposes, 
Carbon Oil, Tamps and Chimneys. 

Xedieines Warranted Genuine, and of the best Quality. Physicians' 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded. 

HENRY MILLER ^ CO., 

No, 95, Gay Street, 

STAPLE AND FANC! GROCERIES, 

Provisions and Country Produce. 

^INE ^HEWING ^OBACCO, i^IGAKS & ^NUrF. 



ALSO, 



Wooden and Willow Ware, of all kinds. 

All leading Articles in the CONFECTrONERY line coustantly on 
hand. 



AND 



SAVINCS mSTITUTM, 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE. 

Collections Made on all Accessible Points. 

ALL snmg of FIVE DOLLARS and over receiTed on deposit, and interest paid by 
special contntct on Savings Fund — making it an object to those desirous af pro- 
yiding for future necessities. 

J?(0. S. TAN 6ILDEB, President. 
P. L£i ROGERS, Cashier. 



72 Adyertisem,e7its. 



fhankiw house, 

Sliiiii Street, 0^)i)osite Court House. 



Terms, per Daj-, - - - S^ OO 

Single JVJeals, ... - 5Q 

OMNIBUSSES RUN TO AND FROM DFPOT. 

P. H, TOOMBY, Proprietor. 

OITCATED within a few stt'ps of the ' agsenger Depot. A new and elegant 

_ FIRST CLASS HOTEL, 

Well f^^lishe<l, and having every comfort and convftnieBce. 

Dm^EH HOtlSE 

For the Virginia .and Tennessee Trains. 

NO. 119, G VY STREET, KN» XVILLE, TENSES EE, 

WIIOZESAZE AXD BF.TAIZ. OJSAZKK IN 



READ! MADE CLOTHING, 

Hats, Gaps, Boots and Shoes, 

HOSIERY, NOTIONS, &C., &C. 



^Advertisements. 



PIEDMONT AND ARLINGTON 
OF RICHMOND, VA. 

Something for every iriari to seriously consider — 

IS YOUR LIFE INSURED ? 

It is an obligation of the most sf»rious and solemn eharaS';er resting 
upon every Husband and Father, and ever\' person with others depend- 
ent upon tliem. Should you soon and suddenly be (tailed to die, would 
that beloved wife, those dear children, or those dependent relatives, be 
thrown, by your death, on the cold eharity of the world? Or have you 
provided for them by a Policy of Life Assurance? If it is a man's duty 
to provide for his family while he lives, is it not equally so to provide 
for their care and culture after he is de eased, and they are left friend- 
less in the world? Dr. Franklin justly said, " A Policy of Life Assur- 
ance is the cheapest and safest mode of making certain a provision for 
one's family." 

Ponder these sugge=tions, and remember that " if a jnan provides not 
for his own, and especially for those of his own house, he has denied the 
faith, and is worse than an infidel". The 

Piidmont and Arlington Life Insurance Coinpany, of Riflimo d, Va., 

A HOME COMPANY, WITH 

Assets over $1^500^000 OO^ 

Offers advantages superior to manj^ equal (o any and surpassed hy none. 
It issued over 10,000 Policies in a little over two j'ears of active work. 
Its income for the same time was over $1,500,000 00; a succtess beyond 
precedent in the history of Life Assurance. It insures on Mutual, Non- 
Forfeiting and Return Premium plans. Dividends paid on whole Life 
Policies, 1st of April, 1869, Forty Per Cent. — which proves the economy 
of its management, and its careful selection of risks. Dividends de- 
clared on Policies where all cash is paid, at end of First Year. No un- 
necessary restrictions on travel or residence. 

W. C. CARRRINGTON. President, 

Rev. JOHN E. EDWARDS, Vice President. 

D. J. IIARTSOCK, Secretary. 
J. J. HOPKINS, Asst. Secretary. 

X. B, & J. G. EDWARDS, Gen, AfjimU, 

Knoxville, Tenn. 

Local Agents in all parts of East Tennessee. 

Active and luttlligcnt Agents Wanted Evcrywl.ere. . 



tIERMER PFEIFFER LIBRflRV 

Minutes, 1824-1939. 
C/R 18G9 



1 D^BD DDDblTEl 5 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room