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Full text of "Minutes of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America"

BX 8951 .A3 

Presbyterian Church in the 

U.S.A. General Assembly. 
Minutes of the General 



MINUTES 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY 



OP THE 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 



APPENDIX 



NEW SERIES, VOL. YIII., AD. 1884. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

I*R.ESBYTE:RI^lSr BOARD OF PXJBLIC ACTION. 

BY THE STATED CLERK. 

McCALLA & STAVELY, PRINTERS. 
18 8 4. 



OFFICERS. 



Rev. GEO. P. HAYS, D.D., Moderator. 

Rev. WILLIAM II. ROBERTS, D.D., Stated Clerk and Treas. 

Rev. WILLIAM E. MOORE, D.D., Permanent Clerk 

Rev. DAVID S. JOHNSOIT, D.D., \ 

Rev. JOSEPH E. NASSAU, D.D., ( Temporary 

Rev. JOHN M. BAUGH, ( Clerks. 

Mr. ELIAS RIGGS MOXFORT, / 







THSOLOGICALj 




^» ^ i t^ lt ' <nr*^' 



MINUTES, 

ETC. 



The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in 
THE United States of America met, agreeably to appointment, 
in the First Presbyterian Cliurch of Saratoga Springs, New York, 
on Thursday, May 15, 188-4, at 11 o'clock A.M., and was opened 
with a sermon by the last Moderator present, being a Commissioner, 
the Eev. Henry Harris Jessup, D. D., from Isaiah 43 : 5, 6 ; and 
Matthew 28 : 19-20 : "Fear not: for I am with thee : I will bring 
thy seed from the East, and gather thee from the West ; I will say 
to the North, Give np ; and to the South, Keep not back ; bring my 
sons from far, and my daughters from the ends of the Earth ;" 
and, " Go ye therefore, and teach all nations ; and lo ! I am with 
you alway, even unto the end of the world." 

After the sermon, the Assembly was constituted with prayer. 

The Committee of Arrangements presented its report, which 
was adopted, and is as follows : 

The Committee of Arrangements recommend — 

That the Assembly meet each morning at 9 o'clock, and spend 
the first half-hour in devotional exercises. 

That they adjourn at 12 o'clock, and meet again at 3 P.M. 

That they adjourn at 5.30 P.M., and, when an evening session is 
held, it be at 7.30 o'clock. 

That the Lord's Supper be administered at 7.30 this evening ; 
that the Rev. Henry H. Jessup, D.D., preside ; the Rev. David 
Dimond, D.D., administer the bread; and the Rev. Charles S. Robin- 
son, D.D., the cup. Also, that Elders John W. Easby, Thomas 
Kane, John J. Glenn, H. D. McCarty, J. C. Maxwell, Edward 
Gridley, Elisha Taylor, Wilford L. Wilson, William C. Wilson, 
Charles H. Langdon, John T. Nixon, Edward C. Walker, 
Hooper C. Van Yorst, Harvey J. King, Louis Chapin, Samuel 
Field, Elias R. Monfort, Henry W. Williams, Thomas R. Stock- 
ton, and John Robertson, aid in the distribution of the elements. 

That a meeting be held to-morrow, Friday evening, in the in- 
terest of sabbath -schools, the Rev. Henry H. Jessup, D.D., to pre- 



MINUTES OF THE 



[May 15tb, 



side and addresses to be made by tbe Rev. Simon J. McPberson, 
D.D., George S. Grabam, Esq., and tbe Rev. James A. Worden, D.D. 

Recess till 3 o'clock P.M. 
Closed witli prayer. 



THURSDAY, May loth, 3 o'clock P.M. 
Tbe Assembly met, and was opened witb prayer. 

The Committee on Commissions presented its report, wben the 
following persons were recognized as duly appointed Commissioners, 
and their names were entered on 

THE ROLL OF THE ASSEMBLY. 



PRESBYTERIES. MINISTERS. ELDERS. 

I. SYXOD OF ATLANTIC. 



Atlantic, 

Catawba, 

East Florida, 

Fairfield, 

Knox, 

Yadkin, 



Jolin C. Simmons, 
Robert P. Wyche, 
William K. Tully, 
John C. Watkins, 
Ennals J. Adams, 
Reuben H. Armstrong (2), 
William A. Scott (2), 



Robin H. Richardson. 

Ellas Bomer. 

Abram O. Blanding, M.D. 

Allison E. Reid. 

C. W. Winkfield. 

Guy H. Leach, 

Luther Hubbard (2). 



II. SYNOD OF BALTIMORE. 



Baltimore, Joseph Nelson, 

George T. Purves, 

2few Castle, Henry Y. Yoorhees, 

William C. Alexander, 

Bio de Janeiro, John B. Howell. 

Washington (7%, James G. Craighead, D.D. 
Peter H. Burghardt, 



Prof. Charles W. Ely, 
John D. Durkees. 
Henry H. Brady, 
James M. Yandegrift. 

Com. John W. Easby, 
James H. Merri wether. 



Canton, 

Ningpo. 

Peking. 

Shanghai. 

Shantung. 



III. SYNOD OF CHINA. 
Benjamin C. Henry. 



lY. SYNOD OF COLORADO. 



Boulder, Joseph N. Boyd, 

Denver, George P. Haj'^s, D.D., 

Ounnison, Walter S. Rudolph, 

Pueblo, George M. Darley, 

Santa Pe, Maxwell Phillips, 



John Baird, 
Lucian H. Ralston. 
Louis Boisot. 
George H. Stewart. 
Prof. John Robertson. 



A.D. 1884.] 



GENEEAL ASSEMBLY. 



PRESBYTERIES. 



illNISTERS. 



ELDERS. 



Idaho, 
Oregon, 

Puget Sound, 



V. SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA. 



Alexander Adair. 
Edward R. Geary, D.D., 
Robert Robe, 
George F. Whit worth. 



Ebin T. Albert, 
Addison R. Flint. 



YI. SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



Alton, David Dimond, D.D., 

Thomas Gordon, 
Bloomington, John W. Dinsmore, D.D., 

Charles H. Little (12), 
Cairo, Robert C. Galbraith, 

John M. Robinson, 
Chicago, Thomas M. Gunn, 

James G. K. McClure, 

George Dnnlap, 

Simon J. MePherson, D.D., 
Freeport, Samuel M. Crissman, 

Thomas S. Scott, 
Mattoon, Oliver S. Thompson, 

Harvey S. Jordan, 
Ottawa, Thomas Gait, 

Feoria, Samuel L. Allison, 

William H. Pumphrey, 
Rock River, Meade C. Williams, D.D., 

Thomas R. Johnson, 
Schuyler, Abram Steed, 

Samuel C. Palmer, 
Springfield, Henry Y. D. Nevius, D.D., 

David S. Johnson, D.D., 



H. B, Douglas, 
James Sproul (2). 
Samuel L. Hawkes, 
William T. Hamilton. 
Robert Reid, 
John H. Wilson (2). 
Thomas Kane, 
Amos H. Briggs, 
Charles S. Holt, 
Ephraim Banning. 
John Forby, 
James II. Robinson. 
C. A. Hite (2), 
Noah Amen. 
George Guy. 
Josiah Morrow, 
Calvin F. Buckman. 
Samuel D. Cleland (3), 
John B. Moderwell. 
Hon. John J. Glenn, 
Charles N. Irwin, M.D. 
John N. Wilson, 
Holland W. Diller (2). 



Allahabad, 

Furrukhubad. 

Kolapoor. 

Lahore. 

Lodiana, 



YII. SYNOD OF INDIA. 
William F. Johnson, D.D. (2). 

Edward P. Newton. 



YIII. SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



Crawfordsville, 

Fort Wayne, 
Indianapolis, 

Logansport, 
Muncie, 
New Albany, 

Vincennes, 
W7dte Water, 



Loyal Y. Hays, 
Thornton D. Fyffe, 
Reuben S. Goodman, 
Lawrence G. Hay, D.D., 
Hanford A. Edson, D.D. 
Robert Beer, 
William H. Ziegler, 
Madison E. McKillip, 
William J. Frazer, 
Edward P. Whallon, 
Isaac M. Hughes, D.D., 



Alexander M. Scott, 
Isaac M. Coen. 
Jeremiah C. Boyer. 
William M. MePherson, 
George W. Demaree. 
Joseph Pierce. 
Samuel U. Huffer. 
John Kennedy, 
Elias P. Leavenworth. 
John D. Mitchell, M.D. 
Henry M. Palm. 



IX. SYNOD OF IOWA. 



Cedar Rapids, 



Edward R. Burkhalter, 
Robert A. Condit, 



Eliab A. Yaughn, 
Edwin P. Welles. 



MINUTES OF THE 



[May 15th, 



PRESBYTERIES. 

Council Bluffs, 

Dea Moines, 

Dubuque, 

Fort Dodge, 

Iowa, 

Iowa City, 
Waterloo, 



MINISTERS. 

George R. Carroll, 
liussell A. McKinley, 
•Jolni M. Baugh, 
Samuel Ollereushaw, 
Heber Gill, 
John McAllister, 
Harris G. Rice, 
George N. Luccock, 
Beii-Ezra-Stiles Ely, 
.J. Edmund Kearus, 
Eugene A. Walker, 
George Earliart, 
William Bryant, 



ELDERS. 

Hon. Tlios. R. Stockton, 
Frank H. Keys. 
Henry H. Dewey, 
Ciiarles Crane. 
William Graham, 
Cornelius Bayless. 
George Gregg, 
George M. Taggart. 
John B. Coulter, 
AndreAV Singer. 
Isaac V. Watterman. 
William Francis, 
Gardner A. ShurtlefE. 



X. SYXOD OF KANSAS. 



Emporia, 

Highland, 
Indian Territory, 
Earned, 
Neosho, 

Osborne, 
Solomon, 

Topeka, 



John F. Hendy, D.D., 
James R. McQuovvn, 
Joseph Mayou, 
William P. Haworth, 
Albert E. Tliomsou, 
Jolm Elliott, 
E. Smith Miller, 
John A. Hahn, 
Heminway J. Gaylord, 
John A. Pinkerton, D.D. 
William Campbell, 
Albert F. Hale, 



Thomas V. McConn, 
Zarah McClung. 
Hugh D. McCartv, LL.D. 
William L. Sciuier (2). 
James Henderson. 
James W. Bruce. 

William R. Ragsdale. 
Amor W. Wakefield, 
W. G. Kennedy. 
Edmund Russell (2), 
Rupert G. O'Brien. 



EJbenezer, 
Louisville, 
Transylvania, 



XI. SYXOD OF KEXTUCKY. 



.John X. Ervin, 
Edward L. Warren, 
Levins Eddy, 



H. Clay Rainey. 
Henry M. Lyle. 
John C. Maxwell, M.D. 



XII. SY^XOD OF MICHIGAN. 



Detroit, 

Grand Rapids, 

Kalamazoo, 
Lansing, 
Monroe, 
Saginaw, 



James F. Dickie, 
George F. Waters, 
Luther M. Belden, 
Harlan Page Welton, 
William S. Buck, 
Edward P. Joiinson, 
Joseph B. Little, 
John T. Oxtoby, 
Henry M. Curtis, 



John A. Berry, 
Elisha Taylor. 
Enoch K. Robinson, 
Christian L. Streng. 
Robert S. Tracy. 
AVilliam Boyd. 
Jesse B. Sutton. 
Henry McCrae, M.D. 
Harlan P. Clu'istie. 



XIII. SYXOD OF MINNESOTA. 



Aberdeen, 
Central Dakota, 
Dakota, 
Mankato, 
Northern Pacific, 
Pembina, 
Red River, 
Saint Paul, 

Southern Dakota, 
Winona, 



James H. Clark, 
Robert B. Farrar, 
Daniel Renville, 
George C. Pollock, 
Henry A. Newell, 
William Cobleigh. 
Robert N. Adams, 
Robert F. Maclaren, 
-James Rodgers, 
Harlan Page Carson, 
Silas Hazlett, 



Frank H. Hagerty. 
David J. Darrow (2). 
Wyllis K. Morris. 
Myron G. Willard. 
Edwin H. Dickson (4). 

Frank J. Burnliam. 
Wilford L. Wilson, 
AVilliam H. Putnam. 
James H. Slierrill. 
Carlos W. Baldwin. 



A.D. 1884.] 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



PRESBYTERIES. 



MINISTERS. 



XIV. SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 



Osage, 

Ozark, 

Palmyra, 

Platte, 

Saint Louis, 



Hastings, 
Kearney, 
Nebraska, 



TimorhyHill, D.D., 
Charles P. Blauey, 
George H. Williamson, 
Edward Vincent, 
James S. Reed, 
Benjamin D. Luther, 
James H. Shields, 
Edwin Parker Keach, 



George W. Cnmmings, 
Charles W. Nesbit. 
William H. Delzell. 
Alex. McKay. 
Arthur C. Burbank, 
William Donaldson. 
AVilliam C. Wilson, 
Andrew Grassley. 



XV. SYJfOD OF NEBRASKA. 



Omaha, 

Corisco, 
Elizabeth, 

Jersey City, 

Monmouth, 

Morris & Orange, 

Newark, 

New Brunswick, 

Newton, 
West Jersey, 

Albany, 

Binghamton, 

Boston, 

Brooklyn, 

Buffalo, 

Cayuga, 

Champlain, 
Chemung, 



William F. Ringland, 
George T, Crissman, 
Enocli Benson, 
Albert B. Irwin, 
William E. Kimball, 
Samuel B. Xeilson, 



Walton II. Chadwick. 
Harvey T. Swarthout. 
Frederic G- Miles, 
Angus McLeod (2). 
Joseph F, Woods, 
Henry T. Clark. 



XVI. SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 



Graham C. Campbell. 
Wm. Charles Roberts, D.D., 
Kneeland P. Ketcham, D.D., 
William Imbrie, 
Laurens T. Shuler, 
Benjamin T. Phillips, 
Oliver A. Kerr, 
Theodore F. White, D.D., 
Albert Erdraan, D.D., 
Thomas Carter, 
Elijah R. Craven, D.D., 
Charles E. Knox, D.D., 
Martin F. Hollister, 
Samuel M. Hamill, D.D., 
Samuel T. Lowxie, D.D., 
AYm. Luke Cunningham (2), 
William Thomson, 
Charles P. Glover, 
Franklin D. Harris, 
Heber H. Beadle, 



Charles H. Langdon, 
Robert B. Crowell. 
Jeremiah H. Halsey, 
John B. Pudney. 
Derrick G. Perrine, 
Jacob B. Tallman. 
Smith E. Hedges, M.D. (4), 
Joseph F. Randolph, 
James H. Bruen. 
Thomas McGowan, 
Samuel L. Pinneo, 
Caleb S. Ward. 
Hon. John T. Nixon, LL.D., 
Robert P. Stoll, 
Richard H. Wilson, 
Frank C. Easton, 
Samuel Johnson. 
Thomas B. Stratton, 
George W. Swing. 



XVII. SYNOD OF NEW YORK. 



David Lyon, 
David M. Reeves, D.D., 
Charles H. Baldwin, 
John L. Taylor, 

Charles C. Wallace, D.D. 
James W. Flagg, 
Samuel T. Spear, D.D. , 
Charles H. Taylor, D.D. , 
T. Ralston Smith, D.D. , 
Martin D. Kneeland (2), 
Anson J. Upson, D.D., 
William H. Allbright, 
Peter J. H. Myers (2), 
Franklin S. Howe, 
George D. Meigs, 



John McEwen, 
Richard Taylor, 
James L. Northup. 
Henry A. Seymour (2), 
Moses Lyman (2). 
Robert Gilchrist, 
Ebenezer M. McPherson. 
John Aikman, 
Henry L. Butler. 
Chauncey G. Talcott, 
James S. Fowler. . 
Richard H. Bloom, 
George C. Turner. 
Reuben Whallon. 
Tvler H. Abbev. 



MINUTES OF THE 



[May 15th, 



PRESBYTERIES. 

Chili, 

Columbia, 

Oenesee, 

Oenesee Valley, 
Geneva, 

Hudson, 

Long Island, 
Lyons, 
Nassau, 
New York, 



Niagara, 
North River, 

Oroomiah. 
Otsego, 

Rochester, 



St. Lawrence, 

Siam. 

Steuben, 

Syracuse, 

Troy, 
Utica, 
Westchester, 



MINISTERS. 

Alexander M. Merwin. 
George A. Howard, D.D. (5), 
Joseph E. Nassau, D.D., 
Edwin Allen, 
Robert K. Watkins, 
Hiram II. Kellogg, 
Edgar P. Salmon, 
Theron Brittain, 
Henry E. Decker, 
SamueHVlialey, 
Warren II. Landon, 
Adolplius E. Wanderer, 
S. Irenajus Prime, D.D., 
Charles S. Robinson, D.D., 
Joseph J. Lampe, 
Stealy B. Rossiter, 
George Alexander, D.D., 
Henry J. Van Dyke, Jr., 
Edward P. Marvin, 
Fenwick T. Williams, 
R. Howard Wallace, 

James H. Robinson, 
Charles K. McHarg, 
Theodore W. Hopkins, 
Edward Bristol, 
Newton H. Bell, 
James S. Root, ' 



John Waugh, 

Alexander McA. Thorburn, 
James S. Riggs, 
Garret L. Roof, D.D., 
Charles D. Kellogg, 
Charles E. Havens (2), 
Jolm McK. Brayton, 
Charles H. Van Wie, 
Stanley B. Roberts, 
J. Aspinwall Hodge, D.D., 
John lieid, 
Washington Choate, 



ELDERS. 



Robert E. Austin. 

Hon. Edward C. Walker, 

William R. Halbert. 

Samuel L. Fi.sh, M.D. 

Firman R. Rappleye, 

Herman D. Eastman. 

Winthrop S. Gilman, Jr., 

Hon. Seth B. Cole. 

Daniel H. Buckingham. 

Jeremiah Greene (3)- 

James Pay an. 

Robert Jaffray, 

Hon. Hooper C. Van Vorst, 

James Bayles, 

Walter Carter. 



Oliver P. Scovill. 
Edward Gridley, 
John L. Westervelt. 

Justus Van Deusen, 
Hon. Robert Beates. 
Louis Chapin, 
George W. Canfield, 
George C. Buell. 
Robert Mark wick, 
D. Alton D wight (2). 

Martin Higgins. 
Hon. Israel S. Spencer, 
Schuyler Bradley. 
Harvey J. King, 
George H. Flagler, 
Joseph H. Knight (5). 
Allen L. Blue, 
William P. Williams, 
J. Hart Case (4). 
Edward Wells, 
Nathan C. Pond (2). 



XVIII. SYNOD OF OHIO. 



AtJiens, 


Charles D. Curtis, 


Bellefontaine, 


James E. Alexander, 


Chillicothe, 


James G. Galbreath, 




Henry VV. Biggs, D.D. , 


Cincinnati, 


Charles F. Mussey, D.D., 




Alexander B. Morey, 




Clarence E. Hills, 


Cleveland, 


John G. Hall, D.D., 




Arthur J. Waugh, 


Columbus, 


William E. Moore, D.D., 


Dayton, 


James R. Hughes. 




Charles E. Walker, 


Huron, 


D. Dwight Bigger, 


Lima, 


John C. Watt, 


Mahoning, 


Joseph C. Kreusch (2), 


Marion, 


Thomas Hill, 



Joseph D. Longstreth. 
Roswell L. Chase. 
Strawder J. Parrett, 
Frederick Druhot. 
John Roberts, 
Elias R, Monfort, 
John E. Smith. 
Reuben F. Smith, 
Andn w Richardson. 
William J. Hodges. 
John McGregor, 
Peter Maxwell. 
Isaac N. Keeler. 
Daniel A. McComb. 
Charles F. Ricks (2). 
Lyman B. Vorhies, M.D. 



A.D. 1884.] 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



PRESBYTERIES. 

Maumee, 

Portsmouth, 
St. Clair sville, 

Steubenville, 

Wooster, 

Zanesville, 



Benicia, 
Los Angeles, 

Sacramento.^ 
San Prancisco, 



San Jose, 



MINISTERS. 

James A. P. McGaw, D.D., 

James Quick, 

Maurice Waller, 

Thomas K. Crawford, D.D., 

Samuel W. Pringle, 

Alexander M. Reed, Ph.D., 

Samuel M. Davis, D.D. (2), 

William W. Anderson, 

John Kellj', 

J. Frank Ilamilton, 

Adolph Lehman, 



Medary D. Maun. 

John W. Blair. 
Thomas M. McConahey, 
Easton W. Daniels. 
William T. Cope, 
Martin L. Miller. 
T. Wilson Hanna, 
Caleb Be Vier. 
Jolm S. Boyd, 
Matthew Newkirk. 



XIX. SYNOD OF THE PACIFIC. 



Francis M. Dimmick, 

Robert Strong, 

John W. Ellis, 

George W. Lyons, 

Asa S. Fiske, 

Samuel P. Sprecher, D.D., 

JohnT. Wills, D.D. , 

James M. Newell, 



Augustus H. Buehren. 
* William G. Case, 
I. Butler Chipp. 
James II. Mayes (2). 
Charles L. Kellogg, 
George W. Amies, 
Frederick A. Berlin. 
Hon. Joseph R. Weller. 



XX. SYNOD OF PENNSYLVANIA. 



Allegheny, 

Blair sville, 

Butler, 
Carlisle, 

Cluster, 

Clarion, 
Erie, 

Huntingdon, 

Kittanning, 

Lackawanna, 

Lehigh, 

Northumberland, 

Philadelphia, 

Phila. Central, 

Phila. North, 

Pittsburgh, 



Isaac N. Hays, D.D., 
Joseph T. Gibson, 
William F. Kean, 
Jacob L. Ti.'ompson, 
James H. Marshall, 
J. Agnew Crawford, D.D., 
John K. Demarest, 
William R. Bingham, D.D., 
William P. Patterson, 
James M. McCurdy, 
Samuel J. M. Eaton, D.D., 
J. Allen Maxwell, D.D., 
Robert F. Wilson, 
John Junkin Francis, 
Franklin Orr, 
David II. Sloan, 
Henry H. Jessup, D.D., 
Stephen P. Gates, 
John P. Ilarsen, 
William W.McNair, 



Boyle I. McClure, 
William H. Seaman. 
Henry Wiester, 
Francis L. Stewart. 
Jolni T. Bingham. 
William G. Reed (2), 
Joseph C. Holler. 
ZibaLamborn, 
Nathan G. Tiionips()n,M.D. 
Robert II. Porterheld (4). 
Samuel S. Spencer, 
Charles W. lleydrick. 
John A. Crawford, 
John N. Moore. 
Simon P. Townsend. 
Samuel S. Caldwell. 
Frederick Fuller, 
Bradley W. Lewis, 
Hon. S. B. Chase (2). 
Hon. Cyrus L. Pershing (2), 
Henry E. Lubken. 
William J. Wood, 
Jacob Schuyler. 



Alexander D. Moore, 

Charles K. Cantield, 

Philander Camp, 

Alfred Nevin, D.D.,LL.D., Samuel Field, 

Charles A. Dickey, D.D. , Robert C. Ogden, 

Henry C. McCook, D.D. (5), George C. McConnell. 

Robert D. Harper, D.D., Joseph M. CoUingwood, 

Alexander G.McAuley,D.D., George S. Graham, 

Samuel A. Mutchmore, D.D. , James Hogg. 

M. Lowrie Hofford, James Van Home, 

Gershom II. Nimmo, William H. Matthews, 

Richard Montgomery, Cyrus Vanartsdalen. 

Wm. G. Taylor, D.D., Samuel D. Jennings, M.D., 

Henry T. McClelland, Hon. Vincent Miller, 

John M.Smith, John F. Loy. 



♦Died, Kansas City, Mo., May Jl. 1884. 



10 



MINUTES OV THE 



[May 15th, 



PRESBYTKUIES. 

Redstone, 

Shenanrjo, 

Washington, 

Wellsboro, 
West Vv'ginia, 
Western Africa. 
Westminster, 



MINISTERS. 

Sylvester 8. Bergen, 
Aiitliony A. Mealy, 
DivvidA. Ciuininsliani 
William H. Lester, 
Clark B. Gillette, 
William O. Phillips, 

Joseph D. Smith, 
William G. Cairnes, 



ELDERS. 

John A. Stevenson. 
John G. Hunter. 
D.D., Stephen L. Blackley, M.D. 
Josepli R. McLain. 
Hon. Henry W. Williams. 
Frank Burt. 

James S. Patterson, 
James H. McConkey. 



XXI. SYNOD OF TENNESSEE. 



Solston, John W. C. Willoughby, 

Kingston, Donald McDonald, 

Union, Legh Uichmoiid .Tanes (3), 



Hon. Henry R. Brown 
Thomas M.' Brown (2). 
A. A. Barnes (2). 



XXII. SYNOD OF TEXAS. 



Austin, 
North Texas, 
Trinity, 



Montana, 
Utah, 
Wood River, 



William Howell Buchanan, 
Henry S. Little, 
Henry B. Burr, 



James W. Ratcliford. 
William A. Knott (2). 
R. M. McClung (2). 



XXIII. SYNOD OF UTAH. 



Eiko J. Grceneveld, 
George W. Martin, 
Edward M. Knox. 



James W. Strevell. 
Frederick W. Blohm. 



XXiy. SYNOD OF WISCONSIN. 



William D. Thomas (2), 
E. William Garner, 
Samuel W. Chidester, 
Samuel F. Bacon, 
Arthur J. Brown, 
Wisconsin River, Oliver W. Winchester, 
Daniel E. Bierce (2), 



Chippeica, 
Lake Superior, 
Milwa ukee, 
Winnebago, 



Sylvester D. Ilusted. 
Joseph Kirkpatrick. 
Frederick S. Eldred. 
Isaac Loper, 
P. C. Claflin. 
Gustavus A. Paddock 
Samuel Ramsay, M.I>, 



(2), 



DELEGATES FEOM CORRESPONDING BODIES. 

General Assembly of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United 
States Rev. .Joseph B. Stratton, D.D. 

General Synod of the Reformed 

Church in America Rev. Cornelius Brett. 

CORRESPONDING MEMBERS. 

Board of Home Missions Henry Kendall, D.D., 

William C. Roberts, D.D. 

Board of Foreign Missions Frank F. EUinwood, D.D., 

Mr. William Rankin. 

Board of Publication William E. Schenck, D.D., 

James A. Worden, D.D. 

Board of Church Erection Henry R. Wilson, D.D. 

Board of Education ... Daniel W. Poor, D.D. 

Board of Relief George Hale, D.D. 

Board of Missions for Frbbdmen Richard H. Allen, D.D. 

Board of Aid for Colleges and Acade- 
mies Hervey D. Ganse, D.D. 

Committee on Systematic Beneficence .Anson Smyth, D.D. 

Committee on Tesiperance William Y. Brown, D.D. 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 11 

The Rev. Geo. P. Hays, D.D., of the Presbytery of Denver, was 
elected Moderator. 

The Rev. David S. Johnson, D.D., of the Presbytery of Spring- 
field, the Rev. Joseph E. Nassau, D.D., of the Presbytery of 
Geneva, the Rev. John M. Baugli, of the Presbytery of Des Moines, 
and Elder Elias R. Monfort, of the Presbytery of Cincinnati, were 
chosen Temporary Clerks. 

The Rev. William Henry Roberts, D.D., was chosen Stated 
Clerk. 

The Rev. William Eves Moore, D.D., was chosen Permanent 
Clerk. 

The Rev. Hugh W. Torrence, was chosen Treasurer. 

The Rules for Judicatories, appended to the "Form of Govern- 
ment," were adopted as the Rules of this Assembly. 

The Rev. T. Ralston Smith, D.D., William E. Moore, D.D., S. 
Irenasus Prime, D.D., and Elder Hooper C. Van Vorst, were ap- 
pointed a Committee, to prepare a suitable minute on the death of 
the Rev. Edwin Francis Hatfield, D.D., the late Moderator and 
Stated Clerk of this Assembly. 

The Stated Clerk was directed to print the Roll of the Assembly. 

Pending the discussion of a Resolution, that a Committee of ten 
be appointed, to receive all the papers relative to the Revised Book 
of Discipline, and report to this body, what action shall be taken 
in the premises — 

The Assembly adjourned, and was closed with prayer. 



THURSDAY, May 15th, 7.30 o'clock P.M. 

The Assembly met according to appointment, and united with a 
large number of Christian people, in the celebration of the Lord's 
Supper. 

Adjourned until to-morrow, at 9 A.M., and closed with prayer. 



FRIDAY, May 16th, 9 o'clock A.M. 

The Assembly met, and spent the first half-hour in devotional 
exercises. 

The calling of the Roll was dispensed with. 

The minutes of yesterday's sessions were read and approved. 



12 MINUTES OF THE L^^^Y l^th, 

The Resolution, under consideration when the Assembly ad- 
journed, being the Resolution with reference to the Committee on 
the Answers of the Presbyteries to the Overture on the Revised 
Book of Discipline, etc., was adopted. 

It was Resolved^ That a Committee, consisting of one Minister 
and one Elder from each of the Synods in the United States, be 
appointed to consider the Answers of the Presbyteries to the Over- 
ture on Reduced Representation, sent down by the last Assembly, 
and that all papers on the subject of Representation, be referred 
thereto, and that the Committee report not later than next Wednes- 
day morning. 

The Moderator announced the 

STANDIJs^G COMMITTEES. 

1. Bills and Overtures: 

Ministers— HQYiYY H. Jessup, CD., Meade C. Williams, D.D., Hanford 
A. Edson, D.D., Theodore F. White, D.D., James R. Hughes, John 
A. Pinkerton, D.D., Joseph T. Gibson, William H. Buchanan. 

Elders — John J. Glenn, Reuben F. Smith, Cliarles W. Ely, John 
Robertson, John D. Mitchell, M.D., Christian L. Streng, Charles W. 
Nesbit. 

2. Judicial Committee: 

Ministers — William Charles Roberts, D.D., Alfred Nevin, D.D., Charles 

C.Wallace, D.D., Henry W. Biggs, D.D., Samuel T. Spear, D.D., 

Robert Beer, Oliver Kerr, Richard Montgomery. 
Elders — Edward Wells, Edward C. Walker, Jacob B. Tallman, John 

L. Westervelt, Hon. Robert Beates, John A. Crawford, Jacob 

Schuyler. 

3. Polity or the Church: 

Ministers — T. Ralston Smith, D.D., J. Aspinwall Hodge, D.D.. Samuel 
T. Lowrie, D.D., Alexander G. McAuley, D.D., Theodore W. Hop- 
kins, John Juukiu Francis, Robert C. Galbraith, Robert F. Mc- 
Laren. 

Elders — Hon. Israel S. Spencer, Hon. Joseph R. Weller, James Hogg, 
Samuel D. Caldwell, William J. Wood, John S. Boyd, Addison R. 
Flint. 

4. Home Missions: ^ 

Ministers — Simon J. McPherson, D.D., Edward R. Geary, D.D., 

Timothy Hill, D.D., John M. Smith, Robert Strong, George T. Criss- 

man, George W. Martin, Henry S. Little. 
Elders — John E. Smith, John A. Berry, Robert Gilchrist, Joseph R. 

McLain, Richard H. Wilson, James H. Sherrill, John C. Maxwell, 

M.D. 

5. Foreign Missions: 

Ministers — David A. Cunningham, D.D., Henry J. Yan Dyke, Jr., 
Charles E. Knox, D.D., Benjamin C. Henry, Ilenry V. D. Nevius, 
D.D., Edward P. Newton, Maurice Waller, Ennals J. Adams. 

Elders — Walter Carter, John W. Easby, Amos H. Briggs, Hon. 
Thomas R. Stockton, Lucian H. Ralston, Hon. Vincent Miller, 
Samuel L. Pinneo. 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 13 

6. Education : 

Ministers — Samuel P. Sprechei', D.D., Samuel J. M. Eaton, D.D., 

Robert F. Wilson, Thomas Hill, Robert B. Farrar, Loyal Y. Hays, 

Albert E. Thomson. 
Elders — William C. Wilson, William Graham, Abram O. Blanding, 

M.D.,Ebin T. Albert, Samuel D. Jennings, M.D., Thomas D. McConu, 

George H. Stewart. 

7. Publication: 

Ministers — George Alexander, D.D., Robert D. Harper, D.D., Charles 
H. Taylor, D.D., John G. Hall, D.D.. James G. Craighead, D.D., 
David H. Sloan, John T. Wills, D.D.. Heber H. Beadle. 

Elders — George S. Graham, Samuel o. Spencer, Martin L. Miller, 
Samuel Ramsay, M.D., John B. Coulter, Charles W. Heydrick, 
Walton H. Chadwick. 

8. CnuRCH Erection : 

Ministers — John W. Diusmore, D.D., Charles F. Mussey, D.D., Thomas 
Carter, George M. Darley, William H. Pumphrey, George W. Lyons, 
William C. Alexander, George C. Pollock. 

Elders — John Baird, Samuel U. Huffer, Frederick G. Miles, John F. 
Loy, Jeremiah S. Halsey, Charles Crane, Rupert G. O'Brien. 

9. Theological Seminaries : 

Ministers — Charles A. Dickey, D.D., Samuel M. Hamill, D.D., Charles 
S. Robinson, D.D., William F. Kean, Alexander B. Morey, Samuel 
M. Crissman, Asa S. Fiske, Alexander McA. Thorburn. 

^?d!frs— Charles S. Holt, Chauncey G. Talcott, Robert P. StoU, John 
Roberts, Henry M. Lyle, Charles L. Kellogg, James Bayles. 

10. Ministerial Relief : 

Ministers — S. Irenseus Prime, D.D., Lawrence G. Hay, D.D., Reuben 

S. Goodman, William F. Ringland, Luther M. Belden, Anthony A. 

Mealy, William J. Frazer, Albert F. Hale. 
Elders — James Vanliorn, John D. Durkees, Lyman B. Vorhies, M.D., 

William R. Ragsdale, John B. Moderwell, Edwin P. Wells, James H. 

Bruen. 

11. Freedmen: 

Ministers — Isaac N. Hays, D.D., Samuel A. Mutchmore, D.D., Albert 

Erdman, D.D., Russell A. McKinley, Walter S. Rudolph, Clarence 

E. Hills, Silas Hazlett, John C. Simmons. 
Elders — Samuel Field, Winthrop S. Gilman, Jr., Joseph Kirkpatrick, 

William T. Hamilton, Allison E. Reid, Andrew Singer, T. Wilson 

Hanna. 

12. College Aid : 

Ministers — John F. Hendy, D.D., James G. K. McClure, John T. 

Oxtoby, William H. Lester, John W. Ellis, Robert A. Condit, J. 

Allen Maxwell, Joseph D. Smith. 
Elders — George C. Buell, Jason W. Sti'evell, George W. Armes, John 

B. Pudney, Ephraim Banning, James W. Bruce, Roswell L. Chase. 

13. Correspondence: 

Ministers — Alexander M. Reed, Ph.D., Henry T. McClelland, Edward 
P. Keach, D. Dwight Bigger, Samuel L. Allison, George F. Whit- 
worth, Alexander Adair, Franklin D. Harris. 

Elders — Henry McCrae, M.D., William H. Putnam, George W. Cum- 
mings, Andrew Grassley, Thomas B. Stratton, Joseph C. Hofler, 
Robin H. Richardson. 



14 MINUTES OF THE [^^7 16th, 

14. Benevolence: 

Ministers — Kiieelaiid P. Kett-hani, D.D., Thomas Gordon, Madison E. 
McKillip, Edward TJ. Biuklialter, Heminway J. Gaylord, John N. 
Ervin, Arthur .1. Waugh, Jolm L, Taylor. 

Elders — Thomas Kane, Andrew Richardson, I. Butler Clapp, John Mc- 
Gregor, Henry A. Seymour, Samuel T. Fisher, M.D., Myrbli G. "Wil- 
lard. 

15. Narrative: 

Jtfmis<ers— Beu-Ezra-Stiles Ely, William G. Taylor, D.D., John Kelly, 
George W. Luccock, John A. Ilahn, Harlan P. Carson, William S. 
Buck, James S. Reid. 

Elders — Harvey T. Swaithout, Derrick G. Perrine, Richard Taylor, 
Joseph D. Longstreth, Francis S. Stewart, John G. Stewart, Sylves- 
ter D. Husted. 

16. Temperance : 

Ministers — James A. P. McGaw, D.D., John Elliott, Peter H. Burg- 

hardt, Oliver S. Thompson, Heber Gill, William Campbell, Samuel 

W. Pringle, Jacob S. Thompson. 
Elders — Joseph F. Randolph, Enoch K. Robinson, William M. Mc- 

Pherson, Frank Burt, John A. Stevenson, Joseph F. Woods, Frank 

J. Burnham. 

17. Leave of Absence : 

Ministers — George T. Purves, Franklin Orr, Edward P. Whallon, Wil- 
liam E. Kimball, George H. Williamson, Benjamin T. Phillips, Max- 
well Phillips, Albert Irwin. 

Elders — Harvey J. King, Frederick W. Blohm, Frederick Fuller, 
Samuel L. Hawkes, Alexander M. Scott, Eliab A. Vaughn, William 
Boyd. 

18. Mileac4e: 

Elders — Louis Chapin, Boyle I. McClure, William T. Cope, -^esse B. 
Sutton, Wilford L. Wilson, William R. Halbert, Josiah Morrow. 

19. Finance: 

Elders — Robert Jaffray, Robert C. Ogden, Charles N. Irwin, M.D., 
Bradley W. Lewis, Noah Amen, William Francis, Robert B. Crowell. 

The Moderator also announced the 

COMMITTEES ON SYNODICAL RECORDS. 

1. Atlantic, . . Ministers — James M. McCurdy, J. Agnew Crawford, 

D.D., William P. Patterson; i^ZcZers— Isaac M. 
Keeler, William P. Williams. 

2. Baltimore, . Ministers — GeorgeEarhart, Harlan P. Welton, James 

S. Riggs; Elders— James L. Northup, Henry L. 
Butler. 

3. China, . . . (No Records). 

4. Colorado, . . Ministers— Franklm S. Howe, Robert R. Watkins, 

Gershom H. Nimmo; Elders — Richard L. Bloom, 
James Payan. 



A.D. 1884.] 

5. Columbia, . . 

6. Illinois, . . 

7. India, . . . 

8. Indiana, . . 

9. Iowa, .... 

10. Kansas, . . . 

11. Kentucky, 

12. Michigan, . . 

13. Minnesota, . 

14. Missouri, . . 

15. Nebraska, . . 

16. New Jersey, . 

17. Neav York, . 

18. Ohio, .... 

19. Pacific. . . . 

20. Pennsylvania, 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



15 



Ministers — Joseph J. Lampe, James H. Robinson, 
William Cobleigh ; Elders— Rohext E. Austin, Jere- 
miah C. Beyer. 

Ministers — Fen wick T. Williams, Donald McDonald, 
Arthur J. B^o^^^l; Elders — Oliver P. Scovill Hon. 
Seth B. Cole. 

Ministers — Isaac M. Hughes, D.D., William G. 
Cairnes, Edward P. Marvin ; Elders — Hfenry H. 
Dewey, Herman D. Eastman. 

Ministers — William O. Phillips, John K. Demarest, 
Adolph Lehman ; Elders — Easton W. Daniels, Al- 
len L. Blue. 

Ministers— WHliain Thomson, William H. Allbright, 
Philander Camp ; Elders — Frank C. Easton, John 
N. Moore. 

Ministers— Hdhert N. Adams, Edward P. Johnson, 
John P. Harsen ; Elders— Cyrus T. Vanartsdalen, 
Isaac V. Watterman. 

Ministers — James F. Dickey, James H. Clark, Charles 
P. Blaney ; Elders— Alexander McKav, Henrv T. 
Clark. 

Ministers — David ;M. Reeves, D.D., James W. Flagg, 
Edwin Allen; Elders — Daniel II. Buckingham, 
Robert Markwick. 

Ministers — Benjamin D. Luther, Charles H. Baldwin, 
William W. Anderson ; Elders — John T. ]3ingham, 
James W. Ratchford. 

Ministers — Clark B. Gillette, Enoch Benson, Levins 
Eddy, J^ZcZers— Frederick S. Eldred, William A. 
Knott. 

Ministers — Stephen P. Gates, James Quick, Charles 
II. Van Wie; Elders— George II. Flagler, Peter 
Maxwell. 

Ministers — Sylvester S. Bergen, George D. Meigs, 
Edward Vincent; ^?cZers— William A. Dalzell, 
Reuben Whallon. 

Ministers — William W. McNair, Alexander D. Moore, 
Charles P. Glover; Elders — Henry E. Lubkeji, 
Augustus Buehren. 

Ministers — James H. Marshall, Adolphus E. Wan- 
derer, Henry H. Burr ; Elders — Isaac Loper, 
Simon P. Townsend. 

Ministers — Charles D. Kellogg, Charles K. Canfield, 
Samuel Ollerenshaw ; Elders — Gardner A Shurt- 
lefl, James Henderson. 

Ministers — John W. C. Willoughby , John McAllister, 
William Brvaut : Elders — Tyler H. Abbey. John 
Forbv. 



16 MINUTES OF THE [May 16th, 

21. Tennessee, . 3fmist€rs—M. Lowrie IIofford,SamuenV.Chidester, 

James E. Alexander; Elders — James S. Patterson, 
Thomas M. McConaliey. 

22. Texas, . . . J/iu/sifrs— Samuel F. Bacon, William K. Tully, Rob- 

ert P. Wyche ; Elders— John ^V. Blair, John K. 
Wilson. 

23. Utah, .... Ministers— ChixrleH D. Curtis, J. Frank Hamilton, 

John C. Watkins; Elders— llenvy 11. Brady, Elias 
P. Leavenworth. 

24. Wisconsin,. . Ministers — JohnEeid, Joseph B. Little, Samuel Wha- 

ley ; Elders — James M. Yandegrift, George M. 
Gregg. 

Resolved, That the congratulations of this Assembly be sent to 
the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States, now in session at Vicksburg, Miss.; and, also, to the Gen- 
eral Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, now in session 
at Philadelphia, Pa. The Rev. S. Irenasus Prime, D.D., was ap- 
pointed to carry out the above resolution. 

The Rev. Robert W. Beer, the Rev, James H. Marshall, and 
Elder Ebenezer M. McPherson, were appointed a Committee on 
Commissions. 

The Committee of Arrangements recommended, that the even- 
ing of Thursday, the seventh day of the Session, be assigned to a 
popular meeting in the interest of the Board of Church Erection. 

The fifth Standing order of the General Assembly was changed, 
so as to read, "Church Erection, second Thursday, at 3 P. M.; 
Benevolence, second Friday, at 10 o'clock, A. M." 

The Rev. George P. Safford, D.D., was heard in the interest of 
the American and Foreign Christian Union. 

The Records of the Synods were presented on the calling of the 
Roll. 

The Annual Reports of the Boards of Home Missions, Foreign 
Missions, Education, Publication, Church Erection, Ministerial 
Relief, and Missions for Freedmen, the Committees on Syste- 
matic Beneficence and Temperance, the Trustees of the General 
Assembly, the Trustees of the Presbyterian House, the Treasurer 
of the General Assembly, and the Theological Seminaries, were 
called for, and referred to the appropriate Standing Committees. 

The Statistical Reports, Narratives, Overtures, Memorials, Ap- 
peals and Complaints, with other papers, from the Presbyteries, 
were called for, and placed in the hands of the Stated Clerk for 
reference to tlie appropriate Committees. 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 17 

The subject of Judicial Commissions was referred to the follow- 
ing Committee: Ministers — William K. Bingham, D.D., Anson 
J. Upson, D.D,, Eugene A. Walker, J. Agnew Crawford, D.D., 
William F. Johnson, D.D., and Charles E. Walker; Elders — Henry 
N. Palm, Ephraim Banning, Henry A. Seymour, James H. Sher- 
rill, John F. Loy and Hon. Cyrus L. Pershing. 

The Committee on Concerts of Prayer was announced by the 
Moderator, as follows : The Rev, Anson J. Upson, D.D., the Rev. 
S. Miller Davis, D.D., and Elder John T. Bingham. 

The Assembly adjourned and closed with prayer. 



FRIDAY, May 16th, 3 o'clock P.M. 
The Assembly met, and was opened with prayer. 

The Stated Clerk reported, that the following telegram had been 
sent to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States, and the General Conference of the Methodist Episco- 
pal Church : 

The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America sends fraternal greetings and congratu- 
lations. Read our united prayer for you, in Eph. iii, 14-21. 

Geo. p. Hays, Moderator. 

Wm. H. Roberts, Slated Clerk. 

The Committee on Elections reported the names of the following 
Commissioners, who were duly enrolled : 

Ministers — Reuben H, Armstrong and William A. Scott, of the 
Presbytery of Yadkin ; William F. Johnson, D.D., of the Presby- 
tery of Allahabad ; Charles H. Little, of the Presbytery of Bloom- 
ington ; Joseph H, Kreusch, of the Presbytery of Mahoning ; Charles 
E. Havens, of the Presbytery of Troy ; William Luke Cunningham, 
of the Presbytery of New Brunswick ; Martin D. Kneeland, of the 
Presbytery of Buffalo; Peter J, H. Myers, ofthePresbytery of Cham- 
plain ; William D. Thomas, of the Presbytery of Chippewa ; S. 
Miller Davis, D.D., of the Presbytery of Steubenville ; Daniel E. 
Bierce, of the Presbytery of Wisconsin River. 

Elders — Gustavus A. Paddock, of the Presbytery of Wisconsin 
River ; Nathan C. Pond, of the Presbytery of West Chester ; R. M. 
McClung, of the Presbytery of Trinity ; D. Alton D wight, of the 
Presbytery of St. Lawrence ; David J. Darrow, of the Presbytery 
of Central Dakota ; Moses Lyman, of the Presbytery of Bingham- 
ton ; John H. Wilson, of the Presbytery of Cairo ; Rolland W. 
2 



18 MINUTES OF THE [May 16, 

Diller, of the Presbytery of Springfield ; James H. Mayes, of tlie 
Presbytery of Sacramento; William L. Squier, of the Presbytery 
of Indian Territory ; Charles F. Ricks, of the Presbytery of Mahon- 
ing; Hon. Cyrus L. Pershing, of the Presbytery of Lehigh; Ed- 
mund Russell, of the Presbytery of Topeka ; Hon. Henry R. Brown, 
of the Presbytery of Holston ; Hon. S. B. Chase, of the Presbytery 
of Lackawanna ; C. A. Hite, of the Presbytery of Mattoon ; William 
G. Reed, of the Presbytery of Carlisle ; Arthur C. Burbank, of the 
Presbytery of Platte ; Angus McLeod, of the Presbytery of Ne- 
braska City ; William A. Knott, of the Presbytery of North Texas ; 
James Sproul, of the Presbytery of Alton ; Henry A. Seymour, of 
the Presbyter}^ of Binghamton ; A. A. Barnes, of the Presbytery of 
Union; T. M. Brown, of the Presbytery of Kingston; and Luther 
Hubbard, of the Presbytery of Yadkin. 

A Committee consisting of the Rev. John W. Ellis, the Rev. 
John T. Wills, D.D., and Elder I. Butler Clapp, was appointed to 
prepare a minute in reference to the death of Elder Wm. G. Case, 
a commissioner to this General Assembly from the Presbytery of 
Los Angeles. The same Committee was directed to prepare a 
minute of condolence with Elder Addison R. Flint, whose wife died 
on her way to attend the meeting of the Woman's Foreign Mission- 
ary Society. 

Overtures, Memorials and other papers were received from the 
various Presbyteries, and referred by the Assembly to the appro- 
priate committees. 

The Committee appointed to prepare a minute on the death of 
the Rev. Dr. Hatfield, reported the following, which was adopted : 

The General Assembly hereby records the tribute of its respect 
for the memory of the Rev. Edwin F. Hatfield, D.D., the Stated 
Clerk of this body since the reunion of the two branches of the 
Church in 1870, and its Moderator in 1883, It recognizes the 
great value of his labors, as the executive officer of the Church, 
the suavity and tact with which he discharged his duties, and the 
impress which his clerical skill and fidelity have left upon the ad- 
ministration of our Ecclesiastical affairs. 

Sincerely sorrowing for the loss which it has sustained, the 
Assembly rejoices that it bestowed upon him the highest proof of 
its regard and affection, and it hereby tenders its hearty condolence 
to his family in their bereavement, and its sympathy to a sorrow- 
ing Church. 

Resolved^ That a copy of the foregoing minute, attested by the 
Moderator, and the Stated and Permanent Clerks, be furnished to 
the family of Dr. Hatfield. 

After announcements of the meetings of Committees 
The Assembly adjourned and closed with prayer. 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 19 

SATURDAY, May 17, 9 o'clock A.M. 
The Assembly met, and spent halfan hour in devotional exercises. 

The minutes of yesterday's sessions were read and approved. 

The Moderator announced the following Committee on Reduced 
Representation : 

Ministers — Samuel A. Mutchmore, D.D., of the Synod of Penn- 
sylvania ; William E. Moore, D.D., of the Synod of Ohio ; Charles 
E. Knox, D.D., of the Synod of New Jersey ; Edward R. Geary, 
D.D., of the Synod of Oregon ; S. Irenaeus Prime, D.D., of the Synod 
of New York ; Isaac M. Hughes, D.D., of the Synod of Indiana ; 
Ben-Ezra-Stiles Ely, of the Synod of Iowa ; James H. Shields, of 
the Synod of Missouri; David Dimond, D.D., of the Synod of Illi- 
nois; John A. Pinkerton, D.D., of the Synod of Kansas; Levius 
Eddy, of the Synod of Kentucky ; Oliver W. Winchester, of the 
Synod of Wisconsin ; Joseph N. Bo3-d, of the Synod of Colorado ; 
Joseph Nelson, of the Sjaiod of Baltimore ; Reuben H. Armstrong, 
of the Synod of Atlantic ; Francis M. Dimmick, of the Synod of the 
Pacific ; Donald McDonald, of the Synod of Tennessee ; Edward M. 
Knox, of the Synod of Utah ; William F. Ringland, of the Synod 
of Nebraska ; Daniel Renville, of the Synod of Minnesota ; Henry 
M. Curtis, of the Synod of Michigan; Henry R. Burr, of the Synod 
of Texas. 

ii7o?ers— Elias R. Monfort, of the Synod of Ohio ; William G. 
Reed, of the Synod of Pennsylvania ; Hon. Henry R. Brown, of the 
Synod of Tennessee ; Nathan C. Pond, of the Synod of New York ; 
Joseph F. Randolph, of the Synod of New Jersey ; James H, Merri- 
wether, of the Synod of Baltimore ; Guy H. Leach, of the Synod 
of Atlantic ; Hon. John J. Glenn, of the Synod of Illinois ; Isaac M. 
Coen, of the Synod of Indiana ; Frederick A. Berlin, of the Synod 
of the Pacific; Edward Russell, of the Synod of Kansas; H. Clay 
Rainey, of the Synod of Kentuck}^ ; Elisha Taylor, of the Synod of 
Michigan ; Arthur C. Burbank, of the Synod of Missouri ; William 
A. Knott, of the Synod of Texas; Samuel Ramsey, M.D., of the 
Synod of Wisconsin; Jason W. Strevell, of the Synod of Utah; 
Angus McLeod, of the Synod of Nebraska ; James Sample, of the 
Synod of the Columbia ; George M. Taggart, of the Synod of Iowa ; 
David J. Darrow, of the Synod of Minnesota; Louis Boisot, of the 
Synod of Colorado. 

The following action was taken with reference to the apportion- 
ment and limitation of time in the consideration of the Reports of 
Boards and Committees, and in the proceedings of the Assembly : 

Resolved^ 1, That the Standing Committees on Home Missions 
and Foreign Missions have each two and a half hours ; and those 
on Education, Publication, Church Erection, Ministerial Relief, 
Freedmen and Temperance, have each one and a half hours. . 

2. That the Secretaries, and the Chairmen of the Special Com- 



20 MINUTES OF THE [May 17, 

mittees, be requested to make their statements within the limits of 
half an hour. 

An Overture, from the Stated Clerks of the Synods, on the sub- 
ject of the reception by the Assembly, of printed instead of written 
Minutes of Synods was referred to the Committee on the Polity 
of the Church. 

The Order of the Day was taken up, being the Report of the 
Standing Committee on Ministerial Relief. 

The Report was presented and accepted. The Assembly was 
then addressed by the Rev. Geo. Hale, D.D., the Secretary of the 
Board of Relief, and others. 

The Report was adopted, and is as follows: 

The Standing Committee, to whom was referred the Twenty- 
ninth Annual Report to the General Assembly of the Board of Re- 
lief for Disabled Ministers, and the Widows and Orphans of 
Deceased Ministers, beg leave respectfully to report : 

That while the subject itself is of sad and pathetic interest, the 
facts are such as to command our gratitude and praise. 

The cause, always near the heart of the Church, rises in its 
affections year by year, and, as the gifts of the Church and of 
individuals testify, the past year has been more abundant than any 
one preceding it. The number of churches giving to the cause 
has increased, the amount of money given has increased, and the 
number of families cared for has increased. More requires more, 
and as the number of those asking for aid has increased, so has 
God inclined the hearts of His children and given them the means 
to minister to those who, in the service of the Church, have come 
to want. 

The whole number on the roll during the year from April, 1883, 
to April, 1884, was 498; namely, 205 ministers, 262 widows of 
deceased ministers, and 31 from orphan famihes. These have been 
reached in 141 Presbyteries scattered throughout the Church. Fifty- 
five of the number were new applicants, including 32 ministers, 18 
widows, and 5 orphan families. Of the 32 ministers, one was laid 
aside at 38, and another at 42 ; and there were three between the 
ages of 50 and 60, seven between 60 and 70, fourteen between 70 and 
80, five between 80 and 90, and one in his 91st year. 

Two ministers and three widows, after having declined to ask 
help for two or three years, have been constrained by necessity to 
apply again for assistance, and their names have been replaced on 
the roll. 

Three ministers have regained their health by means of the aid 
obtained from the Relief Fund, and have within the year resumed 
preaching. 

The receipts from all sources, including balance from last year, are 
$112,875.82. 

The Report put into our hands contains an earnest appeal to 



A.D. 1884.] GENEllAL ASSEMBLY. 21 

eacli and every Church, to make an annual collection to this most 
interesting and important object. And why not? Is there a min- 
ister or ruling elder who does not recognize the privilege and the 
obligation of supporting in their infirmities those who have given 
their health and strength to the Church, and now are neither able 
to work for the Church nor themselves? Common humanity 
forbids to turn out an old horse to starve ; our higher Christianity 
teaches us to love and to honor our fathers and brethren whose 
gray hairs are as a crown of righteousness. 

There is a remarkable difference between the contributions and 
the drafts of some of the Presbyteries ; they draw out far more 
than they pay in! It may well be that some Presbyteries, with 
little wealth, may have a number of disabled ministers, and re- 
quire more money than they can contribute ; and into some of the 
wealthy Presbyteries disabled ministers make their way and gain 
residence, for the purpose of getting larger appropriations. But 
this only in part explains the fact that some very able Presbyteries, 
pay in but little and make large drafts on the treasury of the 
Board. Freely ye have received, freely give. The Eeport shows 
the amount contributed and the sum received by each Presbytery, 
and the Report is sent to every minister, and to all others who wish 
to see it. 

The most grateful fact mentioned in the Report, is the opening, 
in October last, of the Presbyterian Ministers' House, at Perth 
Amboy, N. J. It is the ancestral mansion of Dr. Alexander M. 
Bruen, of the City of New York. He gave it, with eleven acres of 
lawn and garden and grove, to be a Saints' Rest for the worn and 
weary soldiers of the Cross ! It is a beautiful gift and the blessings 
of God's poor will rest on the donor's head. Eighteen aged gen- 
tlemen and ladies are now enjoying its hospitality. If a minister 
loses his health, and believes that a few months of repose is what 
he needs to recruit him for further service, its doors are open to 
him, and he finds there the tonic and the quiet he requires. It 
has been open only a few months, and already it has restored some 
of our exhausted ministers to fields of usefulness. 

Your Committee bear testimon}^, without any drawback, to the 
efficiency, prudence and economy with which tliis trust is adminis- 
tered, and earnestly hope that every Church will feel it a solemn 
duty and a sweet privilege to support this Board. No man knows 
what he may come to himself, and this is a Providential opening 
to which every minister may gratefully look as the days come 
nigh, when he shall say I have no pleasure in them. 

The term of service of the following members of the Board ex- 
pires with the present Assembly : 

Ministers — Villeroy D. Reed, D.D., Thomas J. Shepherd, D.D. 

Laymen — John C. Farr, and William G. Moorhead. 

The Committee recommend their re-election. 

The Standing Committee on Ministerial Relief presented also an 



22 MINUTES OP THE [May 19, 

additional Report recommending that the Special Committee on 
Ministerial Supj^ort appointed by the last Assembly be continued. 
The Report was adopted. 

A letter from the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, was laid before the Assembly, and referred to the Com- 
mittee on Correspondence. 

The Committee' on Elections reported the following additional 
names of Commissioners, who were duly enrolled : 

Minister — Legh Richmond Janes, of the Presbytery of Union ; 
Elders — Samuel D. Cleland, of the Presbytery of Rock River; 
Jeremiah Greene, of the Presbytery of Lyons. 

Resolved^ That a Committee of fifteen be appointed, to consider 
the advisability of establishing some plan of insurance for ministers, 
with instructions to report at the next General Assembly. 

A Committee consisting of the Rev. Henry H. Jessup, D.D., the 
Rev. Hanford A. Edson, D.D., the Rev. Charles H. Little, the 
Hon. Cyrus L. Pershing, and Andrew Grassley, was appointed, to 
which was referred the subject of Sabbath Observance, to report 
to this Assembly. 

The Assembly adjourned until Monday, at 9 o'clock A.M., and 
closed with prayer. 



MONDAY, May 19th, 9 o'clock A.M. 

The Assembly met, and spent half an hour in devotional exer- 
cises. 

The minutes of Saturday's sessions were read and approved. 

The following telegram was read by the Stated Clerk : 

"ViCKSBUEG, Miss., May 17th, 1884. 
To the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States of America. 

The General Assembly at Yicksburg cordially responds to the 
fraternal greetings of the Assembly at Saratoga. See Numbers 
vi : 24, 25. 

T. D. WlTHEKSPOON, Moderator. 

Joseph R. Wilson, Stated Clerk. ^^ 

The Committee on Elections, made an additional Report, which 
was adopted, and is as follows : , 

The Committee on Elections, respectfully report, recommend- 
ing— 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 23 

1. That the Presbytery of Chili, in South America, be received, 
and taken under the care of the General Assembly, in connection 
with the Synod of New York, satisfactory proof having been made 
of the organization of said Presbytery, in accordance with the Act 
of the General Assembly of 3879. (See Minutes, p. 620.) 

2. That the Kev. Alexander M. Merv/in, being duly commissioned, 
be enrolled as the Commissioner representing said Presbytery in 
this General Assembly. 

They also recommend, that the following persons be duly en- 
rolled as members of this Assembly : 

Elders — Edwin H. Dickson, of the Presbytery of Northern 
Pacific; Robert Porterfield, of the Presbytery of Clarion; Smith 
Hedges, M.D., of the Presbytery of Morris and Orange. 

It was made the order of the day for to-morrow, at 3 o'clock 
P.M., to hear the Report of the Standing Committee on Aid for 
Colleges and Academies. 

A statement accompanied with a memorial to Congress, in ref- 
erence to the case of Charles M. Blake, Chaplain in the United 
States Army, was referred to the Committee on Ministerial Relief. 

The Committee on Finance made a Report, which was amended 
and referred back to the Committee for further action. 

The Standing Committee on Freedmen presented its Report, 
which was accepted, and, pending a motion to adopt, addresses were 
made by the Rev. Richard H. Allen, D.D., Secretary of the Board, 
and others. 

The Assembly adjourned and closed with prayer. 



MONDAY, May 19th, 3 o'clock P.M. 
The Assembly met, and was opened with prayer. 

The discussion of the Report of the Standing Committee on 
Freedmen, was resumed. The Report was adopted, and is as fol- 
lows: 

Your Committee having very carefully considered the Nineteenth 
Annual Report of the Board of Missions for Freedmen, the minutes 
of their meetings during the past year, and all other information 
within our reach bearing upon this subject, are very deeply im- 
pressed with the richness and hopefulness of the field committed to 
the care of this Board. 

In its cultivation no seas are to be crossed, no caste to be broken 
down, no idol temples or false religions to be displaced. A field 
from which more than six millions of souls are to be gathered is 



24 MINUTES OF THE [May 10, 

at our very door, waiting the reaper's sickle, and the abundance of 
the harvest can only be measured by the means and labor we are 
willing to bestow upon it. 

"We noticed also the very interesting fact that the wliole Church 
seems to be waking up to a fuller realization of her duty and re- 
sponsibility in this regard. 

The last year has been the most prosperous one this Board has 
ever enjoyed. There have been 372 more contributing churches, 
and some thirteen thousand dollars more contributed to the general 
work of this Board this year, than ever before, the whole amount 
being $102,077. 

One year ago this Board was in debt $539, now it has to its 
credit $3703. The number of contributing sabbath -school and 
missionary societies were then 167, now 218. 

But what is especially interesting to us, is the fact that the 
colored churches and schools themselves are so nobly coming up to 
their own support. Their contributions this year reach the round 
sum of $20,335, more than seven thousand dollars above what 
they were a year ago ; and what is still more encouraging is the 
fact, that nearly all their well organized churches are beginning to 
contribute to the other Boards of the Church, according to their 
ability. 

All these facts are very significant and encouraging, and show 
most conclusively, that before long many of these churches will not 
only be self-sustaining, but do their part to help in the support of 
others. 

Then again, if we look at the spiritual results attained, we see 
very solid ground for encouragement. No less than thirteen new 
stations have been occupied during the past year ; eleven churches 
have been organized, and some fourteen hundred names added to 
the communion rolls in these churches, or seven to each organized 
Church and thirteen to each minister of the Gospel in the field ; 
most of which additions have been from the world ; making a 
total membership of nearly 13,000, with about an equal number 
in their sabbath-schools. 

But the special object of interest to your Committee is the edu- 
cational interests which are cared for and fostered by this Board. 
We must recollect that when this Board entered upon its work 
only a few years ago, it did not find a field ready for the harvest, 
but rather a desert, we had almost said a thicket without the mark 
of the axe, much less the plow upon it; and a people without knowl- 
edge of even the alphabet of purity and moral honesty, much less 
sober, heartfelt piety. The very foundations had to be laid before 
the superstructure could be commenced. Not only had book 
knowledge to be imparted, but the very elements of that practical 
training needed in every day life, both in relation to this world 
and that which is to come; and hence the necessity for schools, and 
schools of every grade, and with reference to each of the felt 
necessities of those for whom they had to be established. 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 25 

These this Board has provided, and they are being carried for- 
ward with remarkable success. 

Among them we find, first of all, Biddle University, at Charlotte, 
N. C, with its 187 pupils, 124 of whom are professedly pious, and 
54 of whom are preparing for the Gospel ministry, and in which 
institution more than 5000 persons have, to a greater or less ex- 
tent, been educated. 

This institution is only open to young men, but it takes them 
from the very rudiments of an education up, so as to fit them 
for whatever position they may be called to occupy, whether 
as mechanics, school-teachers, catechists, or preachers of the 
Gospel. 

In connection with this school, there is also a boarding depart- 
ment carried on largely by students, and in connection with which, 
they receive that healthful training which will tend to enable them 
to make the best of this world, as well as of that which is to come. 

The buildings at this place are large and commodious, and well 
adapted to their intended purpose, some forty thousand dollars 
having been expended during the last year in their enlargement 
and completion. 

Next in importance is the Scotia Seminary or girls' school, at 
Concord, N. C, with its 243 pupils, of whom 162 are professing 
Christians. 

In this school, the girls are taught, not only in the ordinary 
branches of an English education, but in all the departments of 
home industry, including cooking, chamberwork, cutting, fitting 
and making their own dresses, under the instruction of experienced 
teachers — in a word, to become worthy companions in a true 
Christian household. The buildings here are not pretentious, but 
well suited to their purpose and are worth about $30,000. 

Then we have the mixed day school at Charleston, S. C, called 
Wallingford Academy, with its 650 pupils ; the Brainard Institute 
at Chester, S. C, with its 278 pupils; the Fairfield Institute at 
Winnsboro, S. C, with its 350 pupils, many of whom are pro- 
fessing Christians, and some 25 of whom are studying for the 
ministry ; and the school at Franklinton, N. C, with its 366 pupils, 
all of which are doing a noble work for both sexes. 

In all of these schools the pupils are trained to habits of indus- 
try, some in the mechanical arts, others in practical and scientific 
farming, gardening, etc., and others still in both the theory and 
practice of teaching, while all are' soundly indoctrinated and taught 
in the great principles of our holy religion. 

As a result of this training, I am sure it will be interesting to this 
Assembly to know, that the principals at the head of the public 
schools, both in Charlotte and Columbia, are graduates of Biddle 
University. 

Then, besides these older schools, we have those just commenced 
at the newer stations. As for example, the one at Baxter Springs, 
Kansas, and others in the Indian Territory, for the former slaves 



2"6 MINUTES OF THE [May 19, 

among the Choctaws and Creek nations, all of which are doing 
well, and promising, at no distant day, good results. 

Your Committee has been wonderfully impressed with the mag- 
nitude of this work, the variety of the interests involved, the mani- 
fest difficulty in their practical adjustment, and the amount of self- 
sacrificing zeal and energy necessary in order to carry it forward. 
We are guilty of no exaggeration when we tell you that there is, 
at this moment, not less than a quarter of a million worth of 
property now under the care of this Board, and you can imagine 
the amount of thought and effort required in locating these schools, 
building these houses, selecting the material to be educated, to de- 
termine the character of the education required, and then the best 
use to be made of this material when the training process is over. 
The work is simply colossal in its proportions, and the magnitude 
of the interests involved will only be known when the last day 
shall reveal them. 

In view of the magnitude of the financial interests thus involved, 
we would have this Assembly recommend the Board, now that it 
is incorporated, to be exceedingly careful to secure these valuable 
properties to the Presbyterian Church, under good and sufficient 
guarantee titles, and commend the existing habit of keeping its 
buildings fully insured. 

Your Committee would also recommend the adoption of the fol- 
lowing Eesolutions, viz. : 

1. We do most heartily approve and commend the fidelity, wis- 
dom and self-sacrificing zeal, with which this Board has looked 
after and cared for the complicated details of the work committed 
to its care, and bless God for the richness of the results already 
gathered. 

2. That we recommend this Board to push on its work, as far 
and as fast as the means placed at its disposal will allow, especially 
in the State of Mississippi, where the need is so pressing, and from 
which the cry for help is so importunate. 

3. We do most earnestly commend this cause, not only to all our 
churches, contributing and non-contributing, but to all the friends 
of this down-trodden race, and suggest, whether our Christian 
women, without multiplying their organizations, could not do much, 
very much, for the 3,000,000 of their less fortunate sisters, in the 
way of providing for their education through the endowment of 
scholarships, supporting teachers, etc., especially when they remem- 
ber how hard they are trying to meet ovir expectations as Christian 
mothers and American citizens. 

4. The following are recommended for election as members of 
the Board of Missions for Freedmen, viz. : Ministers — E. E. Swift, 
D.D., James Allison, D.D., S. J. Fisher, John M. Richmond, E. P. 
Cowan, D.D., H. T. McClelland; Elders— J sunes B. Lyon, R. C. 
Totten, John C. McGombs, Robert S. Davis, W. C. Aughinbaugh 
and Charles W. Hubbard. 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 27 

The following additional Resolution was adopted : 
Whe7-eas, There are one million and a half of colored .children, 
most of whom are not provided with religious instruction, there- 
fore: 

Resolved^ That it be recommended to the sabbath-schools of our 
churches to take up the work among the Freedmen, and that they 
be urged to contribute liberally to this cause. 

In response to communications from the Rev. Drs. Nelson and 
Mitchell, and Elder George H. Shields, the delegates to the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, it was 

Resolved^ That this General Assembly hereby determines to con- 
tinue correspondence with the General Assembly of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States by Delegates, and that this 
Resolution be telegraphed to that Assembly. 

The Special Committee on the Answers of the Presbyteries to 
the Overtures on the Book of Discipline, presented its Report, 
which was adopted, and is as follows : 

The Committee to whom was referred the Answers and Over- 
tures of the Presbyteries on the Overture of the last Assembly pro- 
posing for adoption the Revised Book of Discipline, and the Revis- 
ion of Chap. X of the Directory for Worship, unanimously and 
respectfully report : 

There are in connection with this Assembly 189 Presbyteries, of 
which number the least majority is 95. 

Your Committee have had placed in their hands the attested 
Answers of 167 Presbyteries, of which 131 are affirmative and 36 
negative. 

The Presbyteries voting in the negative are as follows : 

Albany, Allegheny, Baltimore, Buffalo, Butler, Carlisle, Cayuga, 
Cedar Rapids, Chester, Cincinnati, Clarion, Dubuque, Fort Wayne, 
Genesee, Genesee Valley, Hastings, Hudson, Huntingdon, Kittan- 
ning, Lehigh, Long Island, Los Angeles, Louisville, Nebraska 
City, Newton, New York, Philadelphia North, Pittsburgh, Red- 
stone, St. Lawrence, Steubenville, Transylvania, Utica, Wellsboro', 
Westminster, West Virginia — Total 36. 

Of the 131 affirmative Answers, 100 are without exception, 
being a majority of the whole number of possible Presbyterial 
votes. The Presbyteries so voting are as follows : 

Aberdeen, Alton, Austin, Benicia, Binghamton, Blairsville, 
Bloomington, Boston, Boulder, Brooklyn, Cairo, Champlain, Che- 
mung, Chicago, Chillicothe, Chippewa, Cleveland, Columbia, Co- 
lumbus, Council Bluff's, Crawfordsville, Dakota, Dayton, Denver, 
Des Moines, Detroit, East Florida, Ebenezer, Elizabeth, Emporia, 
Erie, Fort Dodge, Freeport, Geneva, Gunnison, Grand Rapids, 
Highland, Holston, Huron, Idaho, Indianapolis, Indian Territory, 
Jersey City, Kalamazoo, Kearney, Kingston, Lake Superior, 
Lamed, Lima, Logansport, Lyons, Mankato, Marion, Mattoon, 



28 MINUTES OF THE [May 19, 

Maumee, Monmouth, Monroe, Montana, Muncie, Nassau, Neosho, 
New Albany, Newark, New Brunswick, North River, North 
Texas, Northumberland, Omaha, Oregon, Osage, Osborne, Otsego, 
Ozark, Palmyra, Pembina, Philadelj)hia Central, Platte, Pueblo, 
Red River, Rochester, Saginaw, St. Paul, San Jo?e, Santa Fe, 
Schuyler, Solomon, Springfield, Steuben, Topeka, Troy, Union, 
Utah, Vincennes, Washington, Whitewater, Wisconsin River, 
Winona, Wood River, Yadkin, Zanesville — Total 100. 

The Presbyteries voting affirmatively, but each making one or 
more exceptions, are as follows: 

Athens, Atlantic, Bellefontaine, Central Dakota, Iowa, Iowa City, 
Lackawanna, Lansing, Mahoning, Milwaukee, Morris and Orange, 
New Castle, Niagara, Ottawa, Peoria, Philadelphia, Portsmouth, 
Puget Sound, Rock River, St. Clairsville, San Francisco, St. Louis, 
Shenango, Southern Dakota, Syracuse, Washington City, Water- 
loo, Westchester, West Jersey, Winnebago, Wooster — Total 31. 

The exceptions taken cover a wide range. The sections except- 
ed, and the number of Presbyteries excepting to each one, are as 
follows 

Sections 3, 4, 6, 11, 24, 38, 46, 66, 72 (first clause), 84, 91, 99, 116, 
are excepted, each one, by one Presbytery. 

Section 48 by three Presbyteries. 

Section 18 by four Presbyteries. 

Section 5 by five Presbyteries. 

Section 65 by sixteen Presbyteries. 

Section 26 by twenty-seven Presbyteries. 

It will be perceived that the greatest number of exceptions is of 
Section 26, namely, twenty-seven, which substracted from vhe whole 
number of affirmative votes, 131, leaves the whole number of Pres- 
byteries voting for that Section, 104. Your Committee according- 
ly report that the entire Revised Book of Discipline, with the Revis- 
ion of Chapter X of the Directory for Worship, have been adopted 
by a constitutional majority of the Presbyteries. 

Your Committee further report that almost the entire opposition 
manifested by the returns has been to Sections 26 and 65. The 
former of these has been excepted by twenty-seven Presbyteries 
voting affirmatively, and the latter by sixteen. In addition to 
these exceptions, six of the Presbyteries that voted affirmatively 
for the adoption of the Book without exception, have recommended 
by Overture, in reference to each of these Sections, that should the 
entire Book be adopted the Assembly should take measures to se- 
cure its amendment. 

The Presbyteries so recommending in reference to both Sections 
26 and 65, are Chillicothe, Ebenezer, Indianapolis, Monmouth, four 
in all; and additional in reference to Section 26, Alton and Chip- 
pewa ; and in reference to Section 65, Erie and Rochester ; six in 
reference to each. 

It should be noted that even had these Presbyteries excepted the 
Sections mentioned, there would still have been a majority 'in 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 29 

favor of the entire Book, even Section 26 being adopted by ninetj- 
eiglat Presbyteries. But at the same time their expressed wish 
should be respected. 

And still farther : of the thirty-six Presbyteries returning a 
negative answer to the Overture, fifteen declare that their sole or chiet 
objections are to the Sections indicated, one or both, and express 
their satisfaction, in the main, with the Revision. 

The Presbyteries so declaring in reference to both Sections 26 
and 65, are Allegheny, Carlisle, Cayuga, Genesee, Genesee Valley, 
Los Angeles, Newton, New York, Redstone, St. Lawrence, Utica, 
West Virginia ; in reference to Section 26, Hudson; in reference 
to Section 65, Buffalo and Nebraska City. The Stated Clerk of 
Kittanning reports, without specification, "There was an expression 
of general approval of the new Book, and the negative was in view 
of a few features deemed objectionable." It is believed by your Com- 
mittee, that but for the presence of these Sections in the Revision the 
Presbyteries just mentioned would have returned affirmative an- 
swers; some of them, possibly, making exception to other Sec- 
tions. 

In view of these facts, your Committee deem it to be but right 
that these Sections should again be submitted, directly and inde- 
pendently, to the judgment of the Church, and they recommend 
the adoption of the following : 

Resolved^ That the following Overtures be sent down to the 
Presbyteries, with the direction that they shall vote "Aye" or 
" No " on each of them, and return their answers to the Stated 
Clerk of the General Assembly on or before the first day of the 
next meeting of the Assembly. 

1. Shall Section 26 of the New Book of Discipline be amended 
by substituting in its place. Chapter 4, Section 21, of the old Book, 
the word judicatory being substituted for court, as follows : 

No professional counsel shall be permitted to appear and plead 
in cases of process in any of our ecclesiastical judicatories. But if 
any accused person feel unable to represent and plead his own 
cause to advantage, he may request any minister or elder, belong- 
ing to the judicatory before which he appears, to prepare and 
exhibit his cause as he may judge proper. But the minister or 
elder so engaged, shall not be allowed, after pleading the cause of 
the accused, to sit in judgment as a member of the judicatory? 

2. Shall Section Qb of the new Book of Discipline be omitted? 
The Committee further add their own opinion that the Overtures, 

if adopted, would in no respect disturb the harmony of the provis- 
ions of the Book. 

Your Committee farther recommend that in view of the terms 
of the Overture of the last Assembly to the Presbyteries, encourag- 
ing those voting in the affirmative by Overture to recommend a 
further revision of the same, and in view also of the expediency 
and desirableness that, at the inauguration of our Revised system, so 
far as possible every section excepted by at least three Presbyteries, 



30 MINUTES OF THE [May 19, 

should be submitted to tlie direct and independent vote of all, an 
Overture be prepared, submitting to the independent vote of the 
Presbyteries each amendment excepted by at least three Presby- 
teries, which does not disturb the general harmony of the provisions. 

In case of the approval of the last recommendation of their Report 
the Committee would report that in addition to Sections 26 and 
65, Sections 5, 18 and 48 would come under the rule established. 
(The amendment of Section 18, it should be remarked, would re- 
quire a slight modification of Section 46.) 

In such case they would recommend the adoption of the follow- 
ing, in which the Overtures recommended under the former Eesolu- 
tion are, for the sake of unity, embodied : 

Resolved^ That the following Overtures, the adoption of which 
will not disturb the general harmony of the Book, be sent down 
to the Presbyteries with the direction that they shall vote " Aye" or 
" No" on each of them independently, and return their answers to 
the Stated Clerk of the General Assembly, on or before the first 
day of the next meeting of the Assembly. 

1. Shall Section 5 of the new Book of Discipline be amended by 
substituting in its place the following, viz. : 

All children born within the pale of the visible Church are 
members of the Church, are to be baptized, are under the care of 
the Church, and subject to its government and discipline, and when 
they have arrived at years of discretion, they are bound to perform 
all the duties of Church members ? 

2. Shall Section 18 of the new Book of Discipline be amended by 
the omission of the words " and acting Ruling Elders," so that the 
first period then shall read, " original jurisdiction, in relation to 
ministers, pertains to the Presbytery, in relation to others to the 
session ; and shall Section 46 be amended so as to read : " 46. In 
process by a session against a Ruling Elder or a Deacon, the provis- 
ions of this chapter, so far as applicable, shall be observed ?" 

3. Shall Section 26 of the new Book of Discipline be amended by 
substituting in its place Chapter 4, Section 21 of the old Book, the 
word "judicatory" being substituted for "court," as follows: 

26. No professional counsel shall be permitted to appear and plead 
in cases of process in any of our ecclesiastical judicatories. But if 
any accused person feel unable to represent and plead his own 
cause to advantage, he may request any minister or elder, belong- 
ing to the judicatory before which he appears, to prepare and 
exhibit his cause as he may judge proper. But the minister or 
elder so engaged, shall not be allowed, after pleading the cause of 
the accused, to sit in judgment as a member of the judicatory. 

4. Shall Section 48 of the new Book of Discipline be omitted? 

5. Shall Section 65 of the new Book of Discipline be omitted ? 
And your Committee further recommend that, in case of the 

adoption of the preceding resolution, or any part thereof, the Board 
of Publication be directed not to incorporate the new Book of Dis- 



A.D. 188-4:.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. , 31 

cipline with any volume containing the entire Constitution, but to 
publish a pamphlet edition thereof sufficient for present use ; and 
that the said Board be directed to publish in connection with such 
pamphlet edition a copy of the preceding Eesolution, together with 
the Overtures ; and that the said Board be also directed to send 
gratuitously by mail two copies of said pamphlet to every pastor 
and stated supply upon the roll of ministers, and one copy to every 
unemployed minister and vacant church. And it is also recom- 
mended that it be enjoined upon every pastor and stated supply, 
upon the reception of the two copies indicated, to lay one of them 
before his session. 

And they also recommend, that it be recommended to the next 
Assembly, in case either Sections 48 or 65 should be omitted, or 
both, to order a corresponding change in the numeration of the sec- 
tions following : 

Respectfully submitted in behalf of the Committee. 

The Eev. Elijah R. Craven, D.D., Chairman of the Committee on 
the Revision of the Book of Discipline, asked that the Committee, 
having performed the task assigned it, be now discharged. The 
request was granted with the unanimous thanks of the Assembly. 

The Moderator then made a formal declaration that the Revised 
Book of Discipline, with the Revision of Chap, X of the Form of 
Government had been adopted, and were now a part of the Con- 
stitution of the Church. 

The following Overture was directed to be sent down to the 
Presbyteries for their action : 

Shall Section 84 of the Book of Discipline be amended, by strik- 
ing out the words " or by any other reputable person, or persons," so 
as to read, " A complaint is a written representation, made to the 
next superior judicatory by one or more persons, subject, and sub- 
mitting to the jurisdiction of the judicatory complained of, respect- 
ing any delinquency, or any decision, by an inferior judicatory." 

The Standing Committee on Correspondence reported that the 
credentials of the Rev. Joseph B. Stratton, D.D., a Delegate from 
the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United 
States, to this General Assembly, had been put in their hands and 
found in order. 

The Committee recommended that the first order for Thursday 
morning next, be the reception of Delegates from Corresponding 
Bodies, and that the time of considering the subject of Education be 
made half past ten o'clock, instead of ten o'clock. Also, that the 
letter of fraternal greeting, from the General Conference of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, in the United States, be read at that 
time, in connection with the hearing of the Delegates from Corre- 
sponding Bodies, 

The recommendations of the Committee were adopted. 



32 MINUTES OF THE [May 19, 

Resolved^ That this Assembly has learned, with sorrow, of the 
death of the Hon. Cjtus H. McCormick, and recognizes the loss 
which the Church has sustained, in the departure of so devoted 
and munificent a friend of Christian and Theological education, of 
missions, and of every good work. 

The Standing Committee on Bills and Overtures reported : 

Overtures 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7, from the Presbyteries of Steubenville, 
Huntingdon, Baltimore, Kittanning and Clarion, asking the General 
Assembly to take action with reference to criticisms, in the press, 
and otherwise, upon the action of Church judicatories, while cases 
are in process of trial. The Committee recommends the following 
answer : 

That the General Assembly, while appreciating the embarrass- 
ment to the Courts of the Church, arising from such criticism, and 
deprecating the same on the part of both ministers and people, as 
tending to disturb the peace and unity of the Church, respectfully 
refers the Presbyteries, as to their rights and immunities, to No. 
38 of the General Rules for Judicatories, giving all judicatories the 
right to sit in private ; and as to offences against the harmony and 
unity of the Church, to the powers given in the Book of Discipline, 
for the removal of offenses. 

Overture No. 8, from the Presbytery of Otsego, in respect to 
intercollegiate contests in athletic sports. The Committee recom- 
mend the following answer : 

While the Assembly recognizes the value of athletic exercises, 
where judiciously practiced, and deprecates the evils resulting from 
their abuse, and the excessive rivalry between the students of differ- 
ent colleges and universities, it regards the practical regulation of 
such exercises, as properly belonging to the authorities of our 
Literary Institutions, and to the parents and guardians of the stu- 
dents therein. 

The recommendations of the Committee were adopted. 

A paper on the condition of the Aborigines of this country, was 
referred to the Standing Committee on Foreign Missions. 

The Report of the Special Committee appointed by the last 
General Assembly (See Minutes, p. 686), to whom was referred 
the Overtures from certain Presbyteries on Mission work in the 
Indian Territory, and among the Chinese in our cities, was made 
the order of the day for Wednesday, at 4.30 o'clock P.M. 

The Special Committee appointed by the last General Assem- 
bly (See Minutes, pp. 674 and 686), to consider the question of a 
permanent place, and of an Assembly Hall, for the Annual Meet- 
ings of the General Assembly, made a report, which was accepted 
and laid on the table for the present. 

The Committee on Elections, reported an additional name ; that 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 33 

of Elder J, Hart Case, of the Presbytery of Utica, wlio was duly 
enrolled. 

The Report of the Committee on Theological Seminaries was 
made the order of the day for Thursday, at 4.30 o'clock P.M. 

The Assembly adjourned, and closed with prayer. 



TUESDAY, May 20th, 9 o'clock A.M. 

The Assembly met, and spent half an hour in devotional exer- 
cises. 

The minutes of yesterday's sessions were read and approved. 

The sessions for to-day and to-morrow were ordered to be ex- 
tended to 12.30 P.M. 

The Committee on Elections reported, recommending the enroll- 
ment of the Rev. Henry C. McCook, D.D., of the Presbytery of 
Philadelphia ; and of the Rev. George A. Howard, D.D., of the Pres- 
bytery of Columbia. The report was adopted. 

The Standing Committee on Finance reported as follows : 

Resolved^ That the of&ce of Treasurer of the General Assembly, 
as a separate office, be discontinued, and the duties thereof imposed 
upon the Stated Clerk, who shall receive therefor the additional 
sum of one hundred dollars per annum, and who shall give bonds 
in the sum of five thousand dollars, to be signed by himself, and 
two sureties to be approved by the Board of Trustees of the General 
Assembly. 

Resolved^ That the action of this Assembly, in abolishing the 
office of Treasurer, in no way reflects upon the ability and integrity, 
or Christian character, of the Rev. Mr. Torrence, the late Treasurer, 
but is taken only to simplify the current financial transactions ot 
the year, and this Assembly hereby declares its confidence in, and 
respect for, Mr. Torrence. 

The report was adopted. 

The Special Committee on Sabbath Observance, submitted the 
following report, which was adopted. 

The Special Committee on Sabbath Observance would call the at- 
tention of the churches and people, connected with this Assembly, 
to the full and explicit, and emphatic action of the Assembly of 
1882, sitting at Springfield, 111., and would recommend the follow- 
ing Resolutions for your adoption. 

1. Resolved^ That the Assembly aflfectionately admonishes all our 
people, to bear in mind, that God has, by positive, moral and per- 
petual law, designated one day in seven, as sacred time, that He 
3 



34 MINUTES OF THE [Maj 2(ii\\ 

" hallowed " the Sabbath, " sanctified it," and set it apart from com- 
mon to sacred purposes. Hence, to use it, or any part of it for 
things inconsistent with its sanctity, is sinful. 

2. Resolved, That we urge upon all our churches, to guard against 
real violation of the Fourth Commandment, and to aid in dissemi- 
nating sound views of the sacredness of the Sabbath, among our 
youth, and among the populations coming to our shores. 

3. Resolved, That we urge it upon our ministers, in the pulpit, 
and in their pastoral labors, to present this subject in season, in all 
its serious importance, as related to the welfare of the whole people, 
and the glory of God. 

4. Resolved, That, inasmuch as prominent among the forms of 
Sabbath desecration prevalent in our times, are those to which 
many railroad and steamboat companies, and publishers of Sun- 
day newspapers are addicted ; the Assembly earnestly counsel all 
our people, not to be, as owners, managers or employes of such 
companies, or as shippers, or passengers on the Sabbath, or as pub- 
hshers, patrons, or writers for Sunday newspapers, partakers in the 
guilt of these flagrant forms of Sabbath breaking. 

The following additional Kesolution was adopted : 
Resolved, That we disapprove of the habit of taking mail matter 
from the Post-Office on the Sabbath. 

The Standing Committee on Home Missions presented its Report, 
which was accepted. The Assembly was then addressed by the 
Rev. William C. Roberts, D.D., one of the Secretaries of the Board 
of Home Missions, and by others. The Report was adopted and is 
as follows : 

The Standing Committee on Home Missions respectfully report, 
that they have carefully examined and considered the Fourteenth 
Annual Report of the Board, which, as a gratifying and stimulating 
exhibit of evangelical work, they commend in all its details to the 
study of our churches, and that they now call the particular atten- 
tion of the Assembly to the following points which they deem of 
special importance at the present juncture. 

First of all, humble and hearty praise should be rendered to the 
Great Head of the Church for peculiar manifestations of His Divine 
favor during the year. The officers and, with one notable excep- 
tion, the members of the Board, have been spared to carry on their 
noble work on behalf of God and man. We are called upon to 
lament the death of George W. Lane, who, after nearly twenty 
years of wise and faithful work as an esteemed member of the 
Board, has suddenly been summoned to leave his post and be re- 
ported for promotion to the King. 

Thirteen devoted missionaries have also been given their final 
reward. They rest from their labors, and their works do follow 
them. Servants of God and the Church, they, like their fellows who 
remain, lived generous and self-sacrificing lives, which deserve our 



A.D. 1884,] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 35 

appreciation and emulation. "We reverently thank our lieavenly 
Father for their disinterested work, and we earnestly invoke the 
outpouring of the Holy Ghost upon the whole Church, that we 
may all awaken to the needs and merits of the great army of mis- 
sionary workers whom they left behind them on the battle-field, and 
that these living soldiers of the Cross may be far more adequately 
honored and sustained in their self-denying service. 

Another cause for special gratitude is found in the conspicuous 
increase of liberality throughout the Church. The income of the 
Board amounted to the grand total of $620,428.22, an increase of 
$115,633 over the receipts of last year, and an advance of $229,743 
beyond the amount received five years ago. At the beginning of 
the year, there was a debt of $45,000, which had increased by 
the first of February to the alarming sum of $190,000. At that 
point, the humiliating cry of retrenchment had to be raised, and 
this led inevitably to discouragement among the workers, and to 
some inevitable curtailment of the work. But at the end of the 
year there remained a debt of only $12,000. The necessity for 
announcing any such backward movement is always injurious. 
Even where the danger is subsequently removed, as in this case, the 
onward movement is somewhat arrested on the field, and the re- 
sponse to subsequent appeals of the Board on the' part of contrib- 
uting churches is likely to be somewhat less prompt and cheerful. 
The money eventually paid into the treasury of the Board, how- 
ever, is most encouraging, not only in view of its unprecedented 
amount, but because it indicates so large an increase of gifts from 
living contributors. The sum received from legacies was $152,000, 
$49,000 more than the preceding year, and $100,000 more than 
the average amount received from bequests during the five years 
last past. Just this sum, $100,000, was received from the estate 
of the late Edwin D. Morgan, whose executors considerately paid 
over the bequest several months before the time required by law, 
in order to relieve the embarrassment of the Board. But it should 
move our hearts to special thankfulness that the gifts from the liv- 
ing amounted to $80,000 more than they were last year ; and to 
the praise of Christian women let it be known, that nearly one- 
half of this advance came from their societies. 

On account of this enlargement in the receipts, the work itself 
has been greatly enlarged and the percentage of expense reduced. 
The cost of administration has been about four per cent of receipts. 
1458 missionaries are now in the service of the Board, an increase 
of 71 during the year ; 135 churches were organized ; 2065 adults 
and 3958 infants were baptized ; 6216 communicants received on 
profession of faith, and 6566 by certificate, making the total mem- 
bership 71,333 ; 339 sunday-schools were organized, making the 
entire number of sunday-schools under the care of missionaries of 
this Board, 1825, with a membership of 121,742 ; 131 churches 
were erected ; 44 churches became self-supporting ; church debts 
were cancelled to the aggregate amount of $141,519, raising the 



36 MINUTES OF THE [May 20th, 

value of property belonging to the home missionary congregations 
to about $-l:,000,000 — the splendid fruitage of many toils and tears, 
prayers and self-denials. For all these abundant favors let us call 
upon our souls to magnify and bless the holy name of the Lord. 

But at the same time we must remember that the favors of the 
past bind us fast to the obligations of the future. Grace must be 
met by duty. We may take no step backward. We dare not 
neglect the urgent needs of the growing work. The rustle of the 
white fields calls on every breeze day and night for the sickles of 
new hosts of harvesters. 

How much owest thou unto my Lord ? Can not we, who are 
alive, without depending upon extraordinary gifts from the dead, 
increase the income of the Board by 5 per cent? Then must 
$650,000 be raised. In view of the prevailing financial depression, 
the impending political excitements, the probable diminution in 
legacies to be received, this may seem a very large sum to raise ; and 
the fact must fairly be faced that, to secure any absolute advance 
over the gifts of last year, churches and individuals will in all likeli- 
hood be required to increase their contributions from one-fifth to 
one-fourth. But it is a question of consecration to the Crucified 
Redeemer and to dying souls ! It is a question of patriotism, and 
of fidelity to our historic Church ! Shall these supreme motives 
challenge us in vain? 

What we do ought to be done quickly. The population of our 
newer States and of our Territories continues to increase with 
astonishing rapidity. It must be rapidly assimilated if our land is 
to be held for Christ. Taken in connection with our blessed 
national policy of peace and liberty, with the exhaustless material 
resources of our still new country, and with the prevalence in some 
sections of superficial education, this unique fusion of races and be- 
liefs in our population, demands all the resources of all the Chris- 
tian teachers and preachers that we can maintain. The general 
tendencies towards materialism can be met and mastered only by 
the religion of Jesus Christ — the great Teacher. 

This seems apparent in every special quarter that may be 
examined. 

1. It is preeminently true of our large cities. Agricultural 
nation, though we may be, the tide of migration sets strongly 
towards the populous centres. It is probably true that one-fifth of 
our inhabitants now reside in towns and cities. This tide is chiefly 
made up of young men, strong, eager, active, who are to be the 
human masters of State and Church within twenty years. Amidst 
the strong temptations of city life, very many of the young men 
lapse into carelessness, if not into infidelity or immorality. We 
.are bound to follow them with the Gospel of Him who is immortal 
as a man at the age of three and thirty. Holding these views, 
your Committee observe, with much gladness, that the Board is 
alive to this new necessity. In Portland, Oregon, where three 
years ago there was only one Presbyterian church, there are now 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 37 

five, with two more in prospect, and two of the five are self-sup- 
porting. In Kansas City, on both sides of the state river, there 
are six strong new mission churches ; in Omaha, there are three, 
and if the necessary money were forthcoming, there would be two 
more. In Minneapolis, there are six, four of which were organized 
within the last three months. These are examples both of our 
unprecedented opportunities, and of our Board's alertness and 
fidelity in seizing them according to the measure of abihty which 
the churches give it. 

2. Similarly, a wide open door greets this Assembly from the 
South. The Presbyterian Church has never given up its national 
character. Her efforts are neither quickened nor retarded by the 
points of the compass. Opportunity is the measure of her duty, and 
the spur which prompts her to preach the Gospel wherever men 
will hear. Northward there comes to us a Macedonian cry. The 
small proportion of Presbyterian churches in the South, the large 
proportion of vacant churches in our sister Assembly, show us the 
great work to be done, and remind us that if it is to be done at all 
in the present generation, we must go down and help our brethren. 
In one Synod of 191 churches, for example, there are fifty-five va- 
cancies, and out of some 400,000 church members within the bounds 
of one Synod, the Southern Church has 669, Since they are fired 
^vith the same kind of zeal for Christ that actuates us, the fact 
that they are not doing all the work demanded, shows that they 
cannot do it alone. Notwithstanding apparent difficulties, we ought 
to share with them this vast responsibility. Moreover, the multi- 
plying fraternal deliverances of their Presbyteries, together with 
the fact that the majority of our adherents in that section are of 
Southern birth, and the fact that some of their most worthy minis- 
ters seek employment in our Presbyteries, establish a special claim 
on our cooperation in their great work. Besides, there are large 
numbers of our own Church drifting into the South. Shall they 
be lost to us ? 

But more urgent still is the little recognized fact that people out 
of every nation are rapidly emigrating thither. Whole counties 
are settled by Germans. There are large colonies of English, 
Welsh and Scotch Protestants, and communities composed of 
French, Italian and Mexican Roman Catholics. If we do not 
reach them "svith Christ's Gospel, then not to speak of the loss of 
foreign Presbyterians, we will be overrun with rationalism and Ro- 
manism. We therefore recommend that, following the new im- 
petus recently given to the work in the South, it still be further 
pushed there as elsewhere, and all the more because that ripe field 
has been so much neglected by us in the past. 

3, An urgent call reaches us just now from the old East. If 
ever our Presbyterian denomination had good reasons for dis- 
countenancing any special effort to establish churches in New 
England, these in our judgment are now no longer in force. There 
is not only open to us a great opportunity, but, others being 



38 MINUTES OF THE [May 20th, 

judges as Avell as ourselves, there is also laid upon us a necessity 
which we cannot longer overlook, if we would obey the commis- 
sion of Jesus Christ. A great change has taken place in the 
population, particularly through the cities, of New England, during 
the past thirty years. In nearly all the larger places, Presby- 
terians can be counted by the thousand, who are constantly coming 
from Scotland, Ireland and the Provinces of British America, as 
well as from sister States of the Union. As things now are, they 
find, with rare exceptions, that they must seek a Church home in 
some other denomination, or, as is too often the case, cease attend- 
ing Church altogether. 

We submit that this matter has an indirect but important bear- 
ing on the whole country. To our knowledge, hundreds of young 
men in one line of business alone, who first settled as immigrants 
for a few years in Boston and other Northeastern cities, are to-day 
eminently successful business men in almost every other city of the 
country. If our Church fails to welcome such as these when they 
arrive in a humble condition, how can we expect to see them, when 
prosperous, caring for our Church or for Christ ? 

We would not seek to antagonize sister denominations already 
on the field, but only to aid them by taking care of those who 
naturally belong to us, and by opening a suitable door to others 
who may prefer our settled orthodox Creed and Form of Govern- 
ment; especially in these times of sad departures, in some quarters, 
from the good old ways. 

This important work can hardly be accomplished, without in- 
volving considerable cost in money, and obtaining able tind conse- 
crated men ; but with faith in God and by His blessing upon the 
use of wise means, it is likely to be made manifest at no very dis- 
tant day that this oldest settled part of our country, although now/ 
needing the assistance of our Boards, will become a power in our 
Church, and will regard it as a privilege to vie with other Presby- 
terian centres in sending the Gospel to others. We therefore 
heartily commend the efforts now making by our Board of Home 
Missions to secure a suitable missionary to supervise the field, be- 
lieving that great good will result from the service of one specially 
adapted to the work. 

4. Your Committee note with satisfaction that the Board is still 
intent upon using special efforts in behalf of the Germans. Pour- 
ing into our country as they are by tens of thousands, they are 
certain to exercise a vast influence over its future. They are in- 
dustrious and frugal, and generally law-abiding citizens. They 
appear naturally to favor both our republican forms of national 
government and the ecclesiastical polity of our Presbyterian 
Church. Many of them would prefer our Church to any other. 
It is consequently incumbent upon us to use our great influence 
with them both in correcting their antagonism to our American 
Sabbath, and in displacing their forms of infidelity, by the simple 
faith and faithfulness of the Gosoel. The Board testifies to the 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 39 

favor with whicli this people hear Gospel preaching and to the ease 
with which sabbath-schools and congregations may be gathered 
among them. Besides their poverty and their ignorance of the 
grace of giving, the great obstacle is the scarcity of German 
preachers. We need to educate ministers for them in our own 
country. Therefore, in the interest of Home Mission work, we 
wish urgently to indorse the excellent institutions for German- 
speaking students at Bloomfield, New Jersey, and at Dubuque, 
Iowa. They need both money and students. Let pastors, churches 
and individual Christians cordially respond to the appeals which 
are made for these most needful and useful seminaries. 

5. Again would we call attention to the pressing demands made 
in the name of Christ by the exceptional populations among us, the 
Mormons, the Spanish-speaking Mexicans, and the Indians who 
a^re committed to this Board. In this connection your Committee 
would record their profound sense of the earnest, faithful and 
efficient service of the women of the Church during the past year 
through their Home Missionary Societies, and their gratification 
with the valuable results that have been obtained through their 
labors. The total number of Societies in existence at the end of 
the year closing March 31st, 1884, was 1435 so far as then reported. 
The total value of contributions made by these Societies, in cash 
and boxes of clothing, etc., was $149,388.05. Of this amount there 
was paid in cash into the treasury of the Board of Home Missions, 
including gifts from sunday-schools, the sum of $101,000. The 
estimated value of contributions of clothing, etc., forwarded to the 
families of home missionaries is $30,471.16, and to missionary- 
schools $9762.42. The number of these schools now in operation 
among the Indians, Mexicans and Mormons is 71, and the number 
of missionary-teachers employed and sustained during the year 
is 144. 

The Committee notes with much satisfaction the evidecce fur- 
nished in the Report of the Woman's Executive Committee of 
Home Missions, which has been submitted to us, of an increasing 
interest upon the subject of Home Missions among the women of 
the Church, and particularly in respect to that department of it so 
largely committed to their charge. New societies have been or- 
ganized, zeal has been quickened, faith has been enlarged, and con- 
tributions to the good work have been increased. 

The Committee gratefully and heartily commend the women of 
the Church who have been so earnestly engaged in this labor of 
love, and express the hope that the indications presented, that it 
will still be carried on with increasing interest and faithfulness, 
may, by the blessing of God, be abundantly fulfilled. 

(1) The work among the Mormons is making headway. Recent 
failures in the .attempts to cure this disease in the body politic, serve 
to emphasize the conviction that the only sure remedy is found in 
the panacea of the Gospel of Christ. The ladies, hke their sister mis- 
sionaries in the Zenanas of India are accomplishing a great work. 



40 MINUTES OF THE [May 20th, 

These 65 missionary teachers, working with those of four other 
evangehcal denominations, are helping to disintegrate the vicious 
system. Relatively, however, the work is only just begun. Out 
of 46,000 children under 8 years of age, in Utah, only about 6000 
are under Christian influence. Of these our own Church has 
2000. New fields are there inviting us. Old fields are training 
Christian teachers and candidates for the ministry. Five such 
teachers and four such candidates, all converted Mormons, are already 
well advanced in their preparation. The Collegiate Institute at 
Salt Lake City is doing excellent work. But at least two acade- 
mies are needed to prepare pupils for our own colleges and to pre- 
vent pupils of our primary schools from graduating into Mormon 
institutions. Eight ministers and 20 teachers are required at once 
to fill vacancies and to take new fields. May God graciously move 
His people to hasten on this great work of healing the open sore 
of America. 

(2) The Spanish-speaking people in New Mexico, Arizona, Colo- 
rado, Texas, and California, constitute a most important mission 
field. As a mass they are ignorant and debased, but they are ac- 
cessible to Christian influence through personal preaching, with 
Bible and tracts, and above all in school work. As they are 
American citizens, the welfare of the republic demands that the 
coming generation be educated and Christianized. There are indi- 
cations of awakening among them more marked now than ever be- 
fore, and similar to the awakening in Old Mexico. They are 
breaking loose from priestly control and are beginning to appreciate 
not only the advantages of education, but to some ei^tent the 
power of the simple Gospel. The work among them is yet in its 
beginning, but it has been so marked in its effect wherever it has 
been fairly in operation, that it calls for an expression of gratitude 
for the past and present, and zealous endeavor for the future. To 
prepare the way for the organization of churches and the regular 
work of the ministry, the teacher and Bible reader should in all 
cases accompany, if not precede, the preacher of the Word. 

The work undertaken among the Indians of Oregon, Washington 
Territory and Alaska, is in a generally promising condition. That 
in the Indian Territory needs especially to be prosecuted with, 
prompt vigor. Besides 10,000 negroes, mostly citizens of the 
tribes, there are over 75,000 Indians in that Territory, many of 
whom are civilized and Christianized. The Cherokees, Creeks, and 
Choctaws, in particular, are calling for men "like the old mission- 
aries," and for schools "like the old mission schools." The few 
churches which we now have among them have been blessed during 
the past year with the presence of the Holy Spirit. Even among 
the wild tribes, which have no missionaries, there are scattered 
persons who have been educated at Carlisle and elsewhere, some of 
whom are members of the Presbyterian Church. They are like 
sheep among wolves, with no shepherd to care for them. 

In all parts of the Territory are white men, whose number is 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 41 

continually increasing. They come as miners, herdmen, mechanics, 
licensed traders, and renters of land. Legally prohibited from set- 
tling there, they still persist in coming, and their influence over the 
Indians is sometimes of the most deleterious character. The white 
people cannot send their children to the Indian schools, and these 
grow up in ignorance and irreligion. Frequently they intermarry 
with Indians or half-breeds that they may obtain a legal status, and 
be regarded as becoming a permanent portion of the population. All 
these various elements are now rapidly crystallizing into a fixed 
form, and what we do for the Indians must be done at once. The in- 
dications of Providence seem remarkably plain and clear, that our 
Church ought at once to greatly increase its force of missionaries 
and schools. Let not the despairing wail of the Indians reach the 
ears of the Lord of Sabaoth, in continued testimony against our 
injurious treatment of them. 

The increased amount of the contributions to the Sustentation 
Department over that given last year, indicates that the scheme has 
a strong hold on the hearts of the people ; and in the class of 
churches for which it was originally designed, namely, those 
situated in the midst of a growing population, its operation has 
been attended with gratifying results. But many, if not most, of 
the needy churches in the older and stronger Synods, are suffering 
from a slow process of depletion through emigration from their 
bounds. In such fields, and in those of very slow growth in popu- 
lation, the requirements of the Sustentation Department are found, 
after years of trial, too rigid to be complied with. 

Instead of increasing in numbers so as to be able to reach and 
maintain the requisite rate of support per member, these churches 
are gradually diminishing through force of circumstances, or in 
other cases, advancing so slightly as to fail to come under the pro- 
visions of the scheme. 

In view of these facts, and the difficulty of devising any scheme 
of sufficient flexibility to meet the diversities of so wide a field as 
that of the whole Church, we are constrained to favor the adop- 
tion of such plans of synodical sustentation as may be found ex- 
pedient and suitable to the condition of weak churches within the 
limits of the Synods referred to. If any plan introduced should 
prove deficient, it might be modified ; and thus, after a few trials 
and modifications, we are of opinion that the best method of opera- 
tion would be ascertained, if not at once, at least in due time. 

The Committee most heartily commend all such attempts of 
Synods to solve the problem, provided their plans are so carefully 
guarded as not to trench on the contributions which should go into 
the regular channels of the Board. 

The two Overtures referred to your Committee, both petitioning 
the General Assembly to amend the Constitution of the Board of 
Home Missions so that, on the recommendation of the Presbyteries, 
it should be lawful for the Board to appropriate funds for the sup- 
port of unlicensed evangelists to labor in unsupj^lied fields within 



4^ MINUTES OF THE [May 20th, 

our mission territory among our exceptional populations, have been 
carefully considered, and your Committee recommends, that in view 
of the flexibility already guaranteed by the policy of the Board, no 
action is required on the matter referred to in these Overtures. 

Finally, your Committee makes the further recommendations 
following, for adoption by the Assembly. 

1. "We return devout and most joyful thanksgiving to the Lord 
Jesus Christ for a yesLT of unprecedented success in the great work 
of evangelizing our own country ; and, in His name, we heartily 
commend and indorse the rare courage and energy, the devoted care 
and fidelity of our Board of Home Missions, its officers and those 
in its service. 

2. The eager desire to take no step backward, and the growing 
urgency of the great work, alike demand from our Church, during 
the ensuing year, an outlay of $650,000, and we pledge ourselves, 
and earnestly call upon all our brethren, to do our utmost towards 
paying this amount into the treasury of the Board. 

3. We cordially indorse the excellent work of the Woman's Ex- 
ecutive Committee of Home Missions, and earnestly recommend 
that Presbyteries and Synods, which have not already appointed 
committees of women for Home Missionary work, appoint such 
committees at their next meeting ; and we urge upon all .Chris- 
tian women in our churches the privilege of cooperating with this 
blessed work. 

4. Gladly recognizing the skillful management which has so soon 
secured to The Presbyterian Home Missionary a circulation of 
28,000 copies, and so certainly rendered it necessary to ei^ery one 
that would have an intelligent comprehension of our Home Mission 
work, we believe that it can now be made self-supporting. Ac- 
cordingly, the Board is instructed to advance the minimum sub- 
scription price of The Presbyterian Home Missionary to fifty cents 
per annum. 

5. We recommend the appointment of Theodore W. Dwight, 
LL.D., as a member of the Board, to fill the unexpired term of the 
lamented George W. Lane ; and we recommend the reappointment, 
for the term of three years, of the members of the Board whose 
term of office expires with this Assembly, viz. : 

Ministers : Jonathan F. Stearns, D.D. and Wilson Phraner, D.D. 
Laymen: Robert Lenox Kennedy, John Taylor Johnston and 
John E. Parsons. 

The Assembly adjourned and closed with prayer. 



TUESDAY, May 20th, 3 o'clock P.M. 

The Assembly met, and was opened with prayer. 

The Report of the Committee on Judicial Commissions was 
made the order of the day for 4.30 o'clock this afternoon. 



A.D. 18S-i.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 43 

The Committee on Foreign Correspondence reported the follow- 
ing answer to an invitation to the Assembly to attend the unveil- 
ing of the statue of Luther. 

To the Rev. J. G. Butler^ D.D,^ for the Luther Statue Association^ 
Washington^ D. G. 

The General Assembly regrets to decline your kind invitation. 
With congratulations in Christ. 

Geo. p. Hays, Moderator. 
Wm. H. Roberts, Stated Clerk. 

Also, that the Rev. Cornelius Brett is present, as a duly accredited 
Delegate to represent the General Synod of the Reformed Church 
in America, in this Assembly. 

The Report was adopted. 

The Standing Committee on the Board of Aid for Colleges and 
Academies, presented its report, which was accepted. The Assem- 
bly was then addressed by the Rev. Hervey D. Ganse, D.D., Secretary 
of the Board, and others. The Report was adopted, and is as fol- 
lows : 

The Standing Committee on the Board of Aid for Colleges and 
Academies respectfully presents to the General Assembly the fol- 
lowing report: 

This youngest of all the Boards of the Church appears for the 
first time before this venerable body to render an account of its 
stewardship during the past ecclesiastical year. The Church at 
large has watched with deepest interest the organization and the 
incipient labors of this new and important Board. The General 
Assembl}^ to-day accords to it a generous and welcome hearing upon 
this floor. 

Of all the subjects engaging the attention of the last Assembly, 
none seemed to enlist more profound and general interest than that 
of higher Christian education. The masterly presentation of the 
whole subject by the able committee having the matter in charge, 
wherein was set forth its vital importance to our denominational 
life and prosperity ; the imminent perils confronting us in the great 
and expanding fields of the West ; and the imperative need of a 
special and definite agency to superintend and prosecute the work 
in the future ; these facts, as set forth in that report, commanded 
the unanimous and hearty approval of the Assembly. 

Certainly the subject has lost none of its importance during the 
year that has since elapsed. It may not come before us now, 
arousing our enthusiasm to the extent that it did twelve months 
ago, but its profound and vital importance is none the less ap- 
preciated by every thoughtful person who devotes to it even a par- 
tial study. 

No man at all conversant with the vast and illimitable field ly- 
ing in the Southwest, can question for one moment the urgency of 



44 MINUTES OF THE [May 20th, 

the call now made upon the Church, to enter and occupy that in- 
viting field with every form of evangelistic agency. Argument is 
not needed to convince the Presbyterian Church, that along the line 
of effort in higher Christian education there is the largest and most 
hopeful outlook. New, but rapidly growing communities, now in 
their formative and plastic stage, offer to us the most cogent appeal 
to do our part in shaping their character and destiny for all future 
time. The simple question is: Are we prepared to respond to 
these appeals? Will this great and wealthy Church show that 
now, as in all her past history, she is equal to this new emergency ? 
Will she reinforce each of her other successful agencies, by planting 
in strategetical points the college and academy to be centres of in- 
fluence and power? This is the question now submitted to the 
Presbyterian Church, and upon it we confidently rely for a most 
favorable decision. 

Your Committee have with care and deepest interest considered 
the able report submitted to this body — The First Annual Keport of 
the Board of Aid for Colleges and Academies. We heartily con- 
gratulate both the Board and this General Assembly upon the 
favorable exhibit of the work undertaken and accomplished by 
this new agency. 

It will be noticed that the work of perfecting the organization 
of the Board, for various reasons, was not completed until about 
the close of the year of 1883. 

The Eev. Hervey D. Ganse, D.D., who was chosen to fill the place 
of the Secretary of the Board, has entered upon the active discharge 
of his duties, and has continued to prosecute them with his well- 
known zeal and energy. 

In response to the appeals of the new Board, the gifts of the 
Church began to flow into the treasury, slowly indeed, at first, 
but in increasing volume, as the people of God became better ac- 
quainted with the nature and needs of the work ; so that while the 
receipts on the 1st of January, 1884, amounted to only the small 
sum of $278.24, by the close of the ecclesiastical year, April 30th, 
they aggregated the handsome amount of $28,987, of which sum 
$14,912 came directly to this Board, and $14,074.87 indirectly — 
but all, according to the purpose and wish of the donors, falling 
within the scope of this Board's work, and, therefore, properly in- 
cluded within its receipts. These, then, are the actual results of 
four brief months of labor. They afford us well grounded assurance 
that the Presbyterian Church has not erred in establishing this 
new agency; and. we are warranted in the hope that, with an en- 
tire year of effort now opening before the Board of Aid, largely 
increased receipts may confidently be anticipated. 

We call the special attention of the Assembly to the fact stated 
in this Report, that almost the entire expense of agency and ad- 
ministration was voluntarily borne by a few generous and devoted 
friends, mostly resident in Chicago and St. Louis. It followed 
from this provision, that only a small part of the contributions re- 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 45 

ceived from the churches was required to supplement the deficiency 
in the matter of administration. 

It will be observed that by far the largest gifts bestowed by the 
Board were confined to four institutions, viz : (a) " Salt Lake Colle- 
giate Institute," located in the very centre of Salt Lake City, Utah; 
{b) " The College of Emporia," founded two years ago by the 
Synod of Kansas, and located about the centre of the eastern por- 
tion of that important State ; (c) " The Presbyterian University 
of Southern Dakota," founded at Pierre, by the Presbytery of 
Southern Dakota, in the spring of 1883 ; and (d) " The College of 
Montana," belonging to the Presbytery of Montana, and located at 
Deer Lodge, in that Territory. 

To these four institutions the Board has contributed the liberal 
sum of $9592, thus enabling each and all of them to attain a 
position of usefulness and promise that otherwise it would have 
taken long years to reach, if ever reached at all. Remembering 
that these four institutions are planted in commanding centres of 
influence, and that their appeals for help were fortified by the heartiest 
endorsements of their respective Presbyteries or Synods, this Com- 
mittee is prepared to approve what we consider the wise policy of 
the Board, in lending the largest assistance at a time when the call 
seemed so imperative. 

It is only to be regretted, that a considerable number of other 
mstitutions, some of them, too, giving signs of largest usefulness, 
could not have been aided to the fullest measure of their needs. 
The hope is cherished that with ampler means at its command in 
the coming year, the Board may be able to bestow upon these 
worthy appHcants that material aid which shall impart new vigor 
and efficiency in the face of their trials and discouragements. 

Your Committee desire to commend and emphasize the policy 
of the Board, which requires all communities seeking help in the 
matter of higher Christian education, to first employ every efibrt to 
attain self-support before applying for help. Let the Church at 
large understand that the settled purpose of this Board is to help 
only those who first generously help themselves. 

We desire further to commend the wise caution shown thus far 
by this Board in giving its endorsement only to institutions of un- 
questioned merit, that ask for special fields in which to obtain per- 
manent endowment. Your Committee are asvsured, that such an 
endorsement can only be obtained from this Board after the most 
careful scrutiny, so that the Church at large will be justified in re- 
garding these endorsements as expressing to thQ fullest extent the 
mind and wish of this Board. 

In the judgment of your Committee, the special attention of in- 
dividual donors should be directed to that judicious provision in 
the action of the last Assembly, establishing this Board, by which 
it is authorized " to assign to those institutions seeking endowment 
the special fields open to their appeals, that clashing between them 
may be avoided, and to discourage all independent appeals to the 



46 MINUTES OF THE [May 20111, 

Church at large." If this great work is to be prosecuted system- 
atically, economicalh^ and with the largest measure of success, the 
individual members of our Church must cooperate in this respect 
heartily with the Board, and frankly discourage applicants that 
come to them, not bearing the sanction of regular and constituted 
authority. 

In view of these facts your Committee recommend the adoption 
by your body of the following Resolutions : 

1. That the thanks of this General Assembly are due, and are 
hereby tendered, to the officers and members of the Board of Aid 
for Colleges and Academies, for the wisdom, fidelity and zeal with 
which they have organized and prosecuted the important work con- 
fided to their care, 

2. That we do anew commend this vast and hopeful work of 
planting and fostering Christian schools and colleges, as now sys- 
tematically organized by our Church, to the prayerful sympathies, 
confidence and generous gifts of all our churches and people. 

3. That in order to obtain the highest efficiency and success in 
the working of this scheme, the General Assembly does hereby 
discourage all independent appeals made outside the bounds of that 
Presbytery or Synod in which a particular institution may be located. 

4. That churches which have not as yet arranged to take collec- 
tions for this Board be advised, as far as practicable, to take such 
collections in the month of February. 

5. That the Stated Clerk of the General Assembly be directed to 
provide for this Board a statistical column in the Annual Minutes. 

6. Two memorials on the matter of furnishing aid to feinale col- 
leges having been referred to this Committee, we offer for adoption 
the following Eesolution : 

That it is desirable to make appropriations to institutions in- 
tended exclusively for the education of women, so far as may be 
consistent with the general necessities of the Board's work. 

7. That it be recommended to the Board of Aid, to carefully 
consider the propriety of so securing all moneys given from its 
treasury or under its commendation to increase the property of 
an institution, that in the event of the institution's dissolution, the 
funds so given shall revert to the treasury of the Board. 

8. The terms of office of the following members of this Board hav- 
ing expired, we respectfully present their names for re-election : 

Ministers— 3 o\\u Hall, D.D., William P. Breed, D.D., S. J. 
Nicolls, D.D., J. H. Worcester, Jr.; Laymen — Henry W. Johnson, 
John S. McDonald, William O. Hughart, Dexter A. Knowlton. 

The name of Elder Joseph H. Knight, of the Presbytery of 
Troy, was added to the roll, on the recommendation of the Com- 
mittee on Elections. 

Tlie following letter was laid before the Assembly, read and or- 
dered to be spread upon the minutes, and referred to the Committee 
on Correspondence for an answer : 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 47 

To the General Assemhly of the Presbyterian Churqh^ in session at 
Saratoga Springs, New York, May, 18S4- : 

Dear Fathers and Brethren : 

The General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in 
session in the City of Philadelphia, Pa., May, 1884, unanimously 
adopted the following Resolutions, to wit : 

1. That the Bishops and Delegates of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, in General Conference assembled, do hereby send fraternal 
greeting to your honorable body, and do invoke the Divine Bless- 
ing upon your labors to save souls, and to win the world back 
to God. 

2. That the Secretary of this Conference be, and is hereby in- 
structed to furnish your honorable body with a copy of these 
Resolutions. 

With great pleasure I forward to your honorable body, a copy 
of the same. 

David S. Monroe, Secretary. 

The Special Committee on Judicial Commiasions reported. Their 
report was accepted, amended and re -committed to the same Com- 
mittee. The time for hearing the Report was fixed for Friday, at 
10.30 o'clock A. M. 

A proposed amendment to the Book of Discipline was offered 
by the Rev. James H. Shields, and referred to the Standing Com- 
mittee on Bills and Overtures. 

Amendments to the Book of Discipline offered by the Rev. 
Robert Beer, were ordered placed upon the docket. 

The Assembly adjourned and closed with prayer. 



WED:N^ESDAY, May 21st, 9 o'clock A. M. 

The Assembly met, and spent half an hour in devotional exer- 
cises. 

The minutes of yesterday's sessions were read and approved. 

It was made the order of the day for Friday, at 9.30 A. M., to 
hear the Report of the Committee on Reduced Representation ; 
and for 4.30 P. M., to hear the Report of the Committee on the 
Polity of the Church. 

The Standing Committee on Bills and Overtures reported — 
Overture, No. 1, from the Presbytery of Dayton, with reference 

to the growth of unsound views concerning the Sacred Scriptures, 

the Atonement and the Future State, 



48 MINUTES OF THE [May 21st, 

In view of the clear teaching of our standards upon these subjects 
(See Confession of Faith, Chaps. 1, 8, 32 and 33), and the abundant 
powers of the judicatories of tlie Church, with regard to offenses, 
your Committee deem it unnecessary to take further action. 

Overture No. 2. From the Presbytery of Washington City, asking 
the Assembly to define the relative duties and authorities of the 
Freedmen's Board and the Presbyteries, in relation to the Freed- 
men churches under their care. 

Your Committee recommend : That all operations of the Board, 
within the bounds of any Presbytery, should be originated and 
conducted with due recognition of the Presbytery and its agencies, 
according to the following specifications : 

1. While appropriations of aid to churches are to be made on 
the recommendation of Presbyteries, the Assembl}'^ regards the 
Board as having the right to refuse or modify such appropriations ; 
but in every case of refusal or modification, the Board shall 
promptly present to the Presbytery a written statement of the 
reasons for so doing. 

2. In questions touching the organization of churches, or the 
character of ministers, the Board, in case of differences between the 
Presbytery and itself, should abide by the final judgment of the 
Presbj^tery. 

3. In the establishment and maintenance of schools, the Board 
should carefully consider the recommendations of the Presbytery ; 
but should act finally on its own judgment. 

The recommendations of the Committee were adopte-jl. 

The Committee on Ministerial Relief, reported — 

Overture No. 1. From the Presbytery of Philadelphia, Central, 
asking the Assembly to alter and amend Rule 1 of the " Rules of 
the Board of Ministerial Relief," to read as follows : 

All appropriations must be made on the recommendation of 
that Presbytery, or its Committee on Ministerial Relief, to which 
the applicant, if a minister, belongs, and so long as received, be 
charged to the credit of said Presbytery ; if the widow, or children 
of a deceased minister, on the recommendation of that Presbytery, 
or its Standing Committee, of which the minister was a member 
at the time of his death, and so long as received, continue credited 
to said Presbytery. Only members of Presbyteries, in connection 
with the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States of America, and the families of those who were at 
their death in such connection, are entitled to aid. 

The Committee recommend that the Overture be referred to the 
Board with authority so to amend the Rule, if in its judgment 
the change is desirable. 

The recommendation was adopted. 

Overture No. 2. From the Presbytery of Philadelphia, North, 
asking that the Assembly would appoint a Committee, who shall 



A.D. 1884.] GENEEAL ASSEMBLY. 49 

take into consideration the subject of Ministerial Support, on the 
basis of an equal dividend from a General Fund for Ministerial Sup- 
port. 

Your Committee recommend that the Overture be referred to 
the Committee on Ministerial Support, appointed last year, and 
now continued. 

Resolved, That it be recommended to the Board of Ministerial 
Eelief, to found a Library at the Home for Presbyterian Ministers 
at Perth Amboy ; that the Board of Publication be authorized to 
present it with its publications, at its discretion, and that the Kev. 
Eobert D. Harper, D.D., be requested to act as a Committee to see 
to the carrying out of these recommendations. 

The Standing Committee on Foreign Missions, presented its Ee- 
port, which was accepted. The Assembly was then addressed by 
the Eev. Frank F. Ellinwood, D.D., one of the Secretaries of the 
Board, and others. Pending a motion to amend the Eeport, 

The Assembly adjourned, and closed with prayer. 



WEDNESDAY, May 21st, 3 o'clock P. M. 

The Assembly met, and was opened with prayer. 

The Committee on Correspondence reported a telegram from the 
Eev. Moses D. Hoge, D.D., a Delegate from the General Assembly 
of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, announcing his 
inability to attend. The Committee was directed to send a suitable 
reply in the name of the Assembly. 

The Stated Clerk was directed to publish in the Appendix, the 
Statistics of our Sabbath -schools for the year, as prepared by the 
Secretary of Sabbath-school Work, 

The Standing Committee on Publication presented its report 
which was accepted. A Minority Eeport from the same Commit- 
tee was received. The Assembly was then addressed by the Eev. 
W, E, Schenck, D.D., the Corresponding Secretary of the Board, 
and by the Eev. James A. Worden, D.D., the Secretary of Sabbath- 
school Work. The recommendations were taken up seriatim, and 
adopted. Pending a motion to adopt the Eeport as a whole, the 
Minority Eeport was taken up, and pending a motion to amend it, 

The Assembly adjourned, and was closed with prayer. 



THURSDAY, May 22d, 9 o'clock A. M. 
The Assembly met, and spent half an hour in devotional exer- 
cises. 

The minutes of yesterday's sessions were read and approved, 
4 



50 MINUTES OF THE [May 22d, 

The order of the day was taken up, being the Reception of Dele- 
gates from Corresponding Bodies. The Chairman of the Commit- 
tee on Correspondence, introduced the Ecv. Joseph B. Stratton, 
D.D., the Delegate from the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church in the United States, and the Rev. Cornelius Brett, the 
Delegate from the Reformed Church in America, who severally 
addressed the Assembly. The Moderator responded in behalf of 
the Assembly, to their fraternal salutations. 

It was made the order of the day for 10 o'clock A. M., on Satur- 
day, to hear the report of the Standing Committee on the Board of 
Education. 

The unfinished business was taken up, being the Report of the 
Standing Committee on Foreign Missions. Pending its discussion, 

The Assembly adjourned, and was closed with prayer. 



THUESDAY, May 22d, 3 o'clock P. M. 

The Assembly met, and was opened with prayer. 

It was made the order of the day, for Saturday, at 9.30 A.M., to 
hear the Report of the Standing Committee on Finance. It was made 
the order of the day for Monday, at 9.30 A. M., to hear the Letter 
from the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and the Standing Committee on Correspondence was directed to 
prepare an answer, to be read at the same time. 

Resolved^ That the Assembly hold a business session this evening. 

The Resolution to appoint a Committee of Fifteen on Ministerial 
Life Insurance, was reconsidered, and in place thereof it was 

Resolved^ That the Special Committee appointed by the last 
Qeneral Assembly, on Ministerial Support, be increased, by the 
addition of two ministers, and two elders, and that to it be referred 
the subject of Ministerial Life Insurance. 

rA Communication from the Woman's Executive Committee of 
Home Missions, was referred to the Standing Committees onFreed- 
men and on Home Missions. 

'• The Standing Committee on Church Erection, made its Report, 
which was received. The Assembly was then addressed, at the re- 
quest of Rev. Henry R. Wilson, D.D., Secretary of the Board, by 
the Rev. John Gillespie, D.D., a member of the Board, and others. 
The Report was adopted, and is as follows : 

The Standing Committee on Church Erection respectfully sub- 
mit the following Report : 

The Committee, first of all, take pleasure in congratulating the 
General Assembly, and the entire Church, upon the gratifying pro- 



A.D. 1884.] GENEEAL ASSEMBLY. 51 

g^ess in every department of the Board's work, "wliick has marked 
the year just closed. 

The receipts, the grants, the number of congregations contribu- 
ting, and the number aided, have all been larger than in any pre- 
ceding year in the history of the Board. 

The amount of money received from the churches, during the 
year, exceeded that of the preceding year by $4583 ; and in the 
number of contributing congregations there has been a gain of 4(14. 

During the year 3424 congregations remembered their Board, 
and the sum realized from the ofi'erings of all of them was $53,131. 

This comparatively meagre amount, however, was much more 
than doubled by individual contributions, legacies, sales of churches, 
grants returned, interest, and from various other sources of income, 
so that the entire working capital for the year has been $138,285. 

The number of churches aided, during the year, is 236, in thirty- 
seven States and Territories, and under the care of ninety -three 
Presbyteries. By the helping hand of this beneficent agency, at 
least so many feeble and widely scattered flocks have been sheltered, 
and that too without the embarrassment of debt. 

In all this we thankfully recognize the gracious spirit of our 
God, kindling the interest and enlarging the liberality of our people 
in behalf of this Board, and its important work. 

And yet, our congratulations in view of the expanding work of 
the Board, must be qualified by the somewhat humbling confession, 
that 2600 of our congregations have, during the last year, sent 
nothing to this Board. 

Many of these delinquent congregations are small, weak and 
without pastors, that they should be forgetful is not remarkable. 
But not a few of them are large, wealthy and prosperous, that these 
should be delinquent is somewhat remarkable. Some of the largest 
congregations under the care of the Assembly have given nothing, 
during the past year, to this Board, others next to nothing, and 
others still far less than might reasonably be expected of them. 

The Committee feel called upon to note with regret, that some 
of our older Presbyteries in wealthy and populous sections of the 
Church, have, during the year, drawn from the Board more than 
they have given to it. Some Presbyteries also, it appears, are 
working, in whole or in large part, upon an independent plan, the 
plan of each Presbytery doing its own Church Erection work, and 
turning its contributions, not into the Assembly's Board to be 
distributed according to the Assembly's plan, but into the treasury 
of the Presbytery itself, to be used exclusively within the limit of 
its own field. In the judgment of your Committee, this is a mis- 
take, at once in principle and in policy. It is to ignore the unity 
of the Church, to disregard the Apostolic injunction that the strong 
are to bear the burdens of the weak, and practically to discredit 
the wisdom of the methods approved by successive General As- 
semblies for many years, and by the general experience t>f the 
Church. Surely this cause, if it can get a fair hearing, can vindicate 



52 MINUTES OF THE [May 22d, 

its claims to a place scarcely second in interest and importance to 
any other that lies near the heart of the Church, 

Those who are at all acquainted with the condition of things, 
in the interior and western portions of our country especially, do 
not need to be convinced that the grand work being done by our 
Board of Home Missions, is practically dependent for permanent re- 
sults on the accompanying or swiftly following work of our Board 
of Church Erection. 

The little flock gathered on the prairie or in the mountain, needs 
a place of shelter, and needs it at once. The newly organized con- 
gregation has ordinarily no guarantee of stability, until the church 
edifice is provided. Commonly, at the time of greatest need and 
the heaviest strain, the people are unable to provide for themselves 
even the plainest sanctuary without encouragement and assistance. 
The promise of this Board — the promise which it may be said, with 
pardonable pride, never fails of prompt fulfillment, nerves and braces 
hundreds of feeble flocks to do what, without that promise, they 
would not have the heart to undertake. The substantial growth of 
our beloved Church, on all that magnificent domain towards the 
Mississippi, and beyond may be measured quite as accurately by the 
ability of this Board to encourage and aid feeble congregations in 
securing houses of worship, as by any other criterion. 

If the aggressive and rapidly expanding work of our noble 
Home Mission Board is to be followed up, and if large and endur- 
ing results are to be realized from it, it is of prime importance that 
this Board be vigorously administered and liberally supphed with 
means. 

An Overture regarding Home Mission Manses was by the last 
General Assembly referred to this Board. The Board, in its Report, 
while expressing hearty sympathy with the purpose of the Over- 
ture, confesses its inability to do much, with its present means, to- 
wards furthering that purpose. Your Committee can see but two 
methods of accomplishing this object. One is, to place manses and 
church buildings on the same level before the Board, and require 
the Board to use its funds for both alike, and upon the same terms 
and conditions. This appears to be entirely impracticable, and for 
obvious reasons. 

The alternative is to call for a separate collection, and create a 
separate fund, out of which congregations shall be aided in provid- 
ing manses. This, also, your Committee judge to be, at the present 
time, inadvisable. We would, moreover, take leave to recommend 
that in the newer settlements, especially where land is easily ob- 
tained by gift and purchase, it would be well for congregations, as 
far as practicable, to secure suitable ground, on which, in the future, 
a house for the minister may be erected. We are not without hope, 
that the day is not remote, when our great Church may be ready 
to undertake this work also. 

The great care taken by the Board in respect of titles and insur- 
ance, in order to guard against the alienation or loss of property 



A.D. 1884.] GENEEAL ASSEMBLY. 53 

secured by the benefactions of tlie Cliurcli, cannot be too highly 
commended. 

The same is to be said of the policy of the Board, in declining 
to make appropriations out of its treasury, to aid in the erection of 
expensive buildings. 

The following recommendations are respectfully submitted : 

1. That this Board is entitled to the thanks and commendation 
of the General Assembly for the diligence, fidelity and sound judg- 
ment, which have marked its administration of the trust confided 
to it. 

2. That in view of the great and pressing claims upon this Board 
— claims far in excess of the means in hand to satisfy them — the 
General Assembly calls upon the Church for the sum of $200,000 
for this year, to be placed in the treasury of this Board. 

3. That all Presbyteries and congregations under the care of the 
General Assembly, be affectionately exhorted to cooperate, heartily 
and loyally, in the work of this Board, as by the Assembly estab- 
lished, and, after long trial, approved. 

4. The term of office of the following members expires at this 
time : John Hall, D.D., Samuel D. Alexander, D.D., Erskine N. 
White, D.D., John Gillespie, D.D., Ministers ; Stephen 11. Thayer, 
Benjamin F. Dunning, Wm. W. Crane, Elders. 

The Committee recommends their re-election. 

The Standing Committee on Theological Seminaries made its 
Eeport, which was accepted, and, after discussion, adopted. 

Tlie Committee on Theological Seminaries begs leave respectfully 
to report : 

The General Assembly has under its care, in all, thirteen Theo- 
logical Seminaries and Schools, viz. : Princeton, Western, Auburn, 
Union, Lane, Northwest, San Francisco, Blackburn, Danville, Ger- 
man Theological School of Newark, German Theological School 
of the Northwest, Lincoln and Biddle Theological Departments. 
We have received full and satisfactory reports from twelve. Black- 
burn University, alone, has failed to report. 

An examination of these reports reveals the following general 
statements : 



I. STATISTICAL, STATEMENT. 

Whole number of Professors 55 

" " Other Teachers 7 

" " Students 516 

" " New Students 231 

" " Graduates 129 

" " Post Graduates 24 

" " Volumes in Libraries reported 178,246 

" " New Books 11,555 



54 



MINUTES OF THE 



[May 22d, 



These Professors, Students and Books are divided among the 
Seminaries as follows : 



]. Princeton 

1'. Auburn 

3. Western 

4. Lane 

5. Union 

6. Danville 

7. Northwest 

8. Blackburn 

9. San Francisco 

10. German Theol. School 

Newark 

11. German Theol. School 

Northwest 

12. Theological Department, 

Lincoln 

13. TheoloKical Department, 

Biddle University. . . 



Professors. 



5 
5 
6 
7 
1 
6 
No report. 
4 



Other 
Teachers. 



Students. 



142 
45 
59 
38 

124 

1 

59 



New 
Students. 



231 



Graduates. 



1 
2 
3 
3 
4 
129 





Post Graduates. 


No. of Vols, in 
Libraries. 


New Volumes 

(not including 

pamphlets). 


1. 


Princeton 


4 


41,934 

1.5,260 
22.722 
13,000 
48,9.30 
10,000 
10,000 

6,000 
1,900 

'6,000 ' 
2,500 


1,930 
670 
150 

'7,355' 




s 




8 




4 










11 




8 






7 








8 






"500" 
500 




9. 
10. 
11 


San Francisco 

German Theological School, Newark. . . . 
German Theological School, Northwest. . . 

Theological Departnifnt, Lincoln'. 

Theological Department, Biddle University. 


1 




1 ' 




13. 


450 




24 


178,246 


11,555 





II. FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 





Real 
Estate. 


Endow- 
ment. 


Scholar- 
ships. 


General. 


Income. 


Expense. 




$374,000 

No report 

150,000 

337,908 

750,000 

30,000 

343 600 

No report 

37,000 

15,333 

14,590 

No report 
60,000 


$861,000 
486,034 
244,989 
135,4 '8 
950 000 
1.59,169 
212,318 

' 66,000 

22,056 

15,000 

40,000 
6,000 


$197,924 


$72,000 


$66,398 

20,205 

24,173 

20.815 

58,000 

9,785 

82,973 

No report 

3,996 

7,589 

4,177 

2,468 
No repoit 


$64,652 




27,434 


.3. Western 


82,608 
37,592 
84,000 
11 000 
24,668 

4,250 

2.800 
6,000 


78,000 
132,00 
2 '742 

1,165 


2,5,418 
23,000 




68.000 


6. Danville 


3,528 


7. Northwest 


109,575 


8. Blackburn 




9 San Francisco 

10. German Theological School, 


2,763 
7,989 


11. German Theological School. 


3,785 
6,400 


12. Theological Department, Lin- 

coln. ... 

13. Theol. Department, Biddle. . 


• 


2,112,43ll 3,198,014 450,S42' 285,907 


306,579 342,544 



A.D. 1884.] GENEEAL ASSEMBLY. 55 

The financial statement wliicli we liave just exliibited, reveals 
the grand total : 

Total value of Real Estate $2,112,431 

" Endowment 3,198,014 

" Scholarship Fimd 450,842 

" General Funds 285,907 

" Income 306,579 

" Expense 342,544 

So far as reported, we present the probable or determined desti- 
nation and immediate work of this noble company of young men, 
given to the Church, and to the ministry, by our Seminaries during 
the past year. Princeton reports eight men for the work in foreign 
lands ; Auburn, two ; Western, five ; Union, two. These seven- 
teen encourage us to believe that the missionary spirit is strong in 
our Seminaries. Doubtless others are going from Seminaries which 
have not reported. When the world is so made ready, and the call 
of our Foreign Board is so pressing, it is to be hoped that the com- 
ing year will reveal a large increase of the missionary spirit. 
Many students are reported ready for work in the new and remote 
fields under the care of our Board of Home Missions. The Board 
has work ready for many more than the Seminaries can supply. It 
is gratifying to learn that our older vacant churches eagerly lay 
hold of our young men, and press them into pastoral work and 
preaching. JBut it is to be regretted that the demand of the more 
settled parts of the Church is so great, that our young men are de- 
prived of the advantage of an experience in missionary work, and 
our mission fields are deprived of the service of those who could so 
well meet the demands of our Home Mission Board. Let it be 
sounded loud, and through all the Church, that the kingdom of 
Christ is in great need of consecrated ministers, 

A comparison of the reports of the past year, with those pre- 
sented to the General Assembly of 1883, reveals many encourage- 
ments. But it is to be regretted that the reports from the Seminaries 
do not show a larger increase of candidates for the ministry. The 
tide seems to have turned. The encouragement is indicated. The 
dreaded depletion, it is hoped, will not prevail. There are some 
good signs of a forward move. The whole number of students re- 
ported is sixteen less than the number reported last year. But we 
discover an increased number of new students. Allowing for 
Union, which did not report the students matriculated last year, 
it is probable that there has been an increase in the number of new 
students of not less than fifty. The whole number of new students 
reported is 223. The Seminaries have given 130 men to the minis- 
try — four less than last year. The figures seem unfavorable. But 
a close study of facts encourages good hopes. 

The San Francisco Seminary, sustained by the zeal and faith- 
fulness and self-sacrifice of a few, still labors to give the Church, 
on the Pacific coast, a ministry to meet the pressing demands of 
the remote locality which it represents. When we remember at 



56 MINUTES OF THE [Maj 22d, 

what a great cost students would be sent East for a theological 
education, and consider the teaching ability available at home, it 
becomes us to acknowledge the services already given, and to 
recommend this Institution to the liberality of the Churgh. 

In view of the fact that the condition and relations of Danville 
Seminary, have been referred to a Special Committee to report to 
this Assembly, we do not feel called upon to make any suggestions 
in this report. 

We deem it unnecessary to present the details of the reports of 
our Theological Seminaries. The several reports will be published 
in the Appendix to the Minutes of the General Assembly. 

Union Seminary is to be congratulated. By the gifts of gener- 
ous friends, it is to be provided with a new home. The elegant 
buildings, which are to crown Lenox Hill, will be at once a great 
blessing to the Seminary, and the monument of many faithful and 
generous men. 

The Seminary of the Northwest has inaugurated its new Pro- 
fessors, Drs. Johnston and Marquis, and, sustained by increasing 
endowments, has assurance of prosperity. 

Lane Seminary reports no changes. The Faculty is full, and 
the good work done the past year, is the promise of better work 
for the year to come. 

Auburn has enriched its teaching power by the election of Rev. 
James S. Riggs as adjunct Professor of Biblical Greek, and new 
strength has been given to the Seminary by the gifts of generous 
friends. 

Princeton has inaugurated Dr. Paxton, whose election has been 
already announced. He has taken hold upon his work, and brought 
a large pastoral experience as a gift to Princeton. 

Western Seminary secured the service of Dr. S. J. JSTiccolls, who 
brought from his pulpit and pastoral work, a course of lectures 
which were most helpful to the Seminary in its time of distress. 
The vacancy in the Chair of Pastoral Theology and Church 
Government has been filled by the election of Dr. Thomas H. Robin- 
son, for many years a pastor at Harrisburg, Pa., and the service 
of Rev. Robert D. Wilson has been secured, as an Instructor in 
Church History, 

These appointments all indicate a healthy sentiment in our Semi- 
naries. The choice of men, who have had experience as preachers 
and pastors, is to be commended. While special scholarship is de- 
sirable, and while its attainment should be, in every proper way, 
encouraged, the mahing of preachers should be the conspicuous 
purpose of our Seminaries. Young men should be impressed more 
with the need of the world, with the power of the Gospel, and be 
encouraged to attain preaching gifts. They should be made to 
feel that the conversion and care of souls are more important 
than criticism. They should, with the learned Apostle, count it 
their greatest privilege, and their best distinction to know Christ 
and Him Crucified, and to use, with effect, the sword of the 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 57 

Spirit, and preach with prevailing power the Gospel which is the 
power and -wisdom of God. We therefore rejoice in the spirit, so 
manifest ; and hope for blessed results, when the students in our 
Seminaries begin to draw strength from these men, fresh from the 
pulpit and pastoral work. 

Your Committee would call special attention to the endeavor of 
the Church to reach our large and increasing German population 
with the Gospel, to impress them with the doctrines and life of 
Presbyterianism. "We have under our care two Seminaries, having 
this special object in view. In the East, the German Theological 
School, of Newark ; in the West, the German Theological School 
of the Northwest, located at Dubuque, Iowa. These Institutions 
have both made full and encouraging reports. It is manifest that 
they deserve the confidence, sympath}^ and support of the Church. 
The following report has been prepared by the Chairman of the 
Sub-Committee on German work, the Rev. Dr. S. M. Hammill. 

The German Theological School, of Newark, N. J,, reports 24 
students, of these, six (6) are in the Theological Department, two 
graduate this year. 

The income for the year amounted to the sum of, . . $7,589 22 
The expenses were, 7,989 30 

Leaving a deficiency of, 400 08 

This Seminary is doing a very important work, and there is a 
constant demand for the men who are trained by it. The growing 
German population in New York, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, and 
other great cities, call loudly for more ministers who can preach 
the pure Gospel in the German language. 

The German Theological Seminary of the Northwest, located at 
Dubuque, Iowa, reports 19 students, eight of these are in the Theo- 
logical Department, three graduate this year. 

The receipts for the year are, $5,567 12 

The expenditures are, 4,785 57 

Leaving a balance in hand of, 781 55 

The examinations are reported as being very satisfactory, and 
the students as characterized by marked excellence and industry. 

These Institutions for the training of young men for the work of 
the ministry, among our rapidly increasing German population, de- 
mand (or should have) the liberal aid and warm sympathy of the 
whole Church. There is an interesting class of German youth who 
are members of our American churches, and who, brought up under 
these happier American auspices, are more likely to be free from 
the mixed influences of the Church life of continental Europe. 
Then there are those who are Germans in respect to language, mental, 
social, and domestic habits, and yet who, deeply sensible of the 



58 MINUTES OF THE [May 22d, 

religious necessities of their countrymen, will be specially adapted 
to successful labor among the Germans. These should be sought 
out and have their attention directed to the importance of this 
work. 

We earnestly call upon the pastors and churches within our 
bounds to give this recommendation the consideration it demands. 

Last, but not least, we submit the special claims of Lincoln and 
Biddle, the two noble Universities, which, in their Theological De- 
partments, are educating ministers to labor for the spiritual eleva- 
tion of the Freedmen. Both are needed. The one is the supple- 
ment of the other. This race, so long oppressed and neglected, 
does not belong to a section. This race has both a North and a 
South. It will press us in every part of the land. We must im- 
press it with discrimination. Lincoln meets a demand that Biddle 
cannot supply. Biddle meets a demand that Lincoln cannot supply. 
Both cannot meet the urgent demands of this needy and rising race. 
We owe it to the Freedmen to do what we can to satisfy their 
thirst for knowledge. We should strive to redeem for Christ the 
race we so long enslaved for ourselves. 

The facts which appear in the reports of these two Institutions 
are most encouraging. They express the zeal and faithfulness ot 
those who have special charge, as also of the self-sacrificing men 
who are devoting themselves to the work of instruction. Seventy- 
five students are looking forward to the ministry in Lincoln Uni- 
versity, who are still in the Collegiate Department. These, to- 
gether with those who are already engaged in theological studies, 
make the total number of ministers, likely to be given to the race, 
one hundred and twelve (112). The Theological Department of 
Lincoln very urgently needs the endowment of a Chair of Hebrew. 
To mention the want suggests the necessity. These ministers will 
meet objections which they should be trained to answer. 

Another great need is the endowment of Scholarships for the 
aid of Theological students. These men are generally very poor 
and none more need such assistance. The time is short. We have 
wasted much. Let us not compel them, to work their own way 
into the service of a Church that owes them a debt. Almost 
everything said concerning the needs and claims of Lincoln, can be 
said concerning the needs and claims of Biddle. Biddle has a new 
and substantial building. At a cost of $4:0,000 comfortable quar- 
ters have been provided. This excellent workshop will turn out 
better work. Biddle represents this great work in the very heart 
of the great field. 

It is a fact to be noted that the latter Institution has the re- 
spect, the confidence, and, to an extent, the support of Southern 
Presbyterians. The people of the South are not blind to this bless- 
ing which we have sent as an olive branch. The Freedmen, who 
once separated us, seem to promise, in the Providence of God, to 
be the link to unite us. We can, with this spade, dig the deepest 
grave for our differences and prejudices. Working together for 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 59 

Christ we will meet in Christ, and make His glory our common 
cause, by bringing a race to His service and towards His likeness. 
Even Scotland reaches a helping hand across the sea, and sends.Bid- 
dle $6000 to educate men as missionaries for Africa. 

In view of the new and adequate buildings now provided for 
Biddle University, and also because this institution was originally 
organized for the special purpose of preparing young men to preach 
the Gospel, we recommend to the Assembly to instruct the Freed- 
men's Board to give greater prominence to the Theological De- 
partment, with a view to its greater enlargement and efficiency. 

The attention of your Committee has been called to a special re- 
port, adopted by the Assembly of 1879, and to the instructions 
which were suggested to our Theological Seminaries. The report 
regards the use of scholarships, the amount of aid to be given to 
students, and the assistance to be expected from the Board of 
Education. (See Minutes of 1879, page 562.) 

We think it sufficient to recommend to this General Assembly 
to repeat the suggestions and requests which were then made to our 
Seminaries regarding these matters, viz. : 

1 . " Th at the Theological Seminaries be earnestly requested to con- 
tinue their diligent attention to the whole subject of appropriations 
to students ; that special care be taken that no one shall receive more 
than is requisite for necessary expenses ; that the sum to be appro- 
priated to the several students shall be determined by a separate 
vote of the Faculty on each case ; and that a record of the appro- 
priations thus voted be made by the Faculty and reported at the 
end of each term to the Board of Trustees." 

2. "That each Theological Seminary be respectfully requested to 
report annually to the General Assembly, how many students have 
been aided by scholarship funds; how many of these have also re- 
ceived aid from the Board ; and what is the maximum that has 
been given to any one student." 

It is to be hoped that our Seminaries will heed these instructions, 
make full and explicit reports, and thus contribute to the harmony 
and good feeling among our Seminaries, which are so ardently de- 
sired. 

Presenting these facts and submitting these suggestions, we would 
give praise to God, for the great generosity that sustains all our 
Seminaries, for the blessings He has bestowed throughout the years 
that have passed, for the continued hope of a consecrated ministry, 
and lastly, for the peace that is within our walls, for, upon the re- 
ports which we have carefully searched, we cannot find even the 
shadow of a danger that should disturb the Church. 

IN MEMORIAM. 

Death has deprived our Seminaries of two devoted Professors, 
and ten Directors. It is fitting to record the faithfulness of these 
worthy men, to strive to imitate their example, and to bear in 



60 MINUTES OF THE [May 22d, 

grateful remembrance their fidelity in their sacred trusts, and in 
sustaining, by their labors and liberality, the institutions which 
they served. 

The blow has fallen most heavily upon the Western Seminary 
in the loss of Professors Rev. Wm. H. Hornblower, D.D., Rev. 
Samuel J. Wilson, D.D., LL.D., and of Mr. Theodore H. Nevin, for 
many years a faithful treasurer. 

The Northwestern Seminary mourns the loss of its friend and 
benefactor, Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick. 

Lane Seminary, the loss of two faithful friends, Mr. A. H. 
Hinkle and Mr. Ezekiel Ross. 

Union has had a triple blow, Rev. Edwin F. Hatfield, D.D., Mr. 
Norman White, and Mr. George W. Lane. 

Princeton, with the whole Church, which they adorned, laments 
the loss of Rev. John C. Backus, D.D., LL.D., and Rev. Samuel 
Miller, D.D. 

Lincoln has lost a faithful friend, Rev. Samuel Dickey. 

" These all died in faith." " Their works do follow them." 

It was made the first order for this evening to hear the Report of 
the Special Committee on the Missionary Publications of the Boards 
of the Church. 

The Assembly adjourned, and closed with prayer. 



THUKSDAY, May 22d, 7.30 o'clock P. M. 
The Assembly met, and was opened with prayer. 

The Chairman of the mileage Fund made a partial report, ask- 
ing permission to pay the Mileage account of the Commissioners in 
full. The request was granted. 

The Special Committee on the Missionary Periodicals of the 
Church presented its Report, which was accepted and adopted, and 
is as follows : 

In response to an Overture from the Synod of the Pacific, the 
last General Assembly appointed this Committee to take into con- 
sideration the whole subject of the Missionary Periodicals published 
by the Boards, to report to this Assembly. The broad terms of the 
appointment, and the grave bearing of the subject upon the efficient 
working of the Boards, suggest a brief reference, at the outset, to 
two or three rudimental considerations. 1st. The work of the 
Church is one, however many its working departments. As a con- 
sequence, all of the Boards, whatever the relative place and func- 
tion of each, are of equal importance and value to the harmonious 
and successful working of the body. 2d, As the work is one, so 
the constituency of the Boards is one and identical. Hence the 
work of each Board rightly claims the interest and helpful care of 



A.D. 1884.] GENEEAL ASSEMBLY. 61 

the entire bodj of the Church membership. In plainer words, re- 
sponsibility for cooperation in the support of every one of the 
Boards rests upon each individual of the great constituency of 
organically allied churches. 3d. One of the vital and therefore 
imperative conditions of personal interest and cooperation in the 
worJi of the Boards, is the furnishing, in attractive and readable 
form, of incident and information, as well as of suggestive quicken- 
ing thought, bearing directly upon the work of each. Until this 
essential condition is measurably met and this reasonable demand 
is supplied, the Boards, especially those of limited scope, and least 
appreciated results, will continue to be feebly supported and their 
work imperfectly done. 

These simple considerations sufficiently indicate both the need 
and the true uses of publications respecting the work of the Church 
in its various departments. The practical questions next arise : 
How is the vital condition referred to now met ? Are the existing 
arrangements sufficient to supply the reasonable and imperative 
demand of thoughtful Church members who desire to be active 
Christian workers ? 

Apart from the three or more organs of the Women's Auxiliary 
Societies, we have two admirably edited monthlies, furnished re- 
spectively by the Home and Foreign Boards, the former of recent 
creation, the latter of long standing ; magazines that have grown 
out of the absolute necessity of a thoughtful and impressive hear- 
ing by the supporting constituency. Beside these, there is a 
monthly journal, bearing the comprehensive title. The Presbyterian 
Monthly Record. Of the former two magazines, the Home Mis- 
sionary issues about 25,000 copies, with an expenditure in excess of 
receipts of $1700, and the Fortiyn Missionary issues about 18,000 
copies with a like expenditure of $1245. The monthly issue of 
the Record is 8600 copies, of which only 600 are paid for. The 
deficiency in the cost of the Record amounts to $8326, which is 
paid pro rata by all of the Boards. The entire deficiency upon 
the three monthlies reaches the sum of $6271 ; a costly advertise- 
ment of which the Boards do not complain, but are thankful for 
even the small returns. 

The fair inference from these facts, in a broad view of the matter, 
is that practically there is little or no reading of the existing journals 
by the constituent membership, and but little sifting of their contents 
by ministers in the interest of that membership. Many pastors, 
indeed, when besought to use eflbrt for the wider circulation ot 
these valuable magazines, frankly reply, "We cannot ask our people 
to subscribe for three or more monthlies ; they will neither pay 
for them nor read them." And some pastors add, " We cannot 
undertake to sift so many periodicals. Give us one compact 
monthly journal, covering one whole grand work, with fresh thoughts 
as well as facts bearing upon every department, and we can use and 
circulate it." Furthermore, the officers and members of six Boards, 
in their hearts, are of opinion that the causes they represent have 



62 MINUTES OF THE [May 22d, 

an inadequate presentation in the scant pages of the Record. In 
this connection, it seems proper to add that your Committee, as a 
help to its dehberations, sought the judgment of the several Boards 
with reference to a single magazine, with a responsible editor, to 
be issued either weekly, bi-monthly or monthly ; and that replies 
were received from the Boards of Church Erection, Freedmen, 
Ministerial Relief, Education, and Aid for Colleges, approving a 
single monthly magazine as the organ of all the Boards. 

If your Committee deemed it wise to propose any measure for 
the present Assembly's adoption, we would recommend the estab- 
lishment of a Presbyterian monthly of about 80 pages, under 
charge of a salaried editor, which, besides the matter furnished 
from the rooms of the several Boards, should be supplied with the 
best procurable thought and incident in condensed form, but strictly^ 
limited to the work of the Church ; and should also include such 
prominent facts in the current history of Synods, Presbyteries and 
churches, as calls for and are worthy of permanent record. We 
believe such a magazine would be welcomed, read and recommended 
by pastors and the large body of thoughtful working church 
members, and would meet its own expenses. 

But in the view of your Committee, any present action seems to 
be premature. The subject matter has too vital a bearing upon 
the future of our growing Church work to be hastily decided in 
favor of any proposed plan. We believe the existing arrange- 
ments can be greatly improved. But we are of opinion that 
whatever change of method is to be attempted should be deter- 
mined, as far as practicable, by the deliberate judgment of the 
whole body of presbyters. And we believe that a general and 
thorough discussion of the subject would lead to the eventual 
adoption of some plan, in which all interests might be harmonized 
and provided for. Such wide discussion, too, must have a greatly 
beneficial effect meanwhile upon the existing periodicals, while it 
would lead to the discovery, on the part of many ministers and 
church members, of a grave personal obligation to acquaint them- 
selves with the whole great work in which Christ has made them 
actual participants. 

In conformity with these views, your Committee present a single 
recommendation. It is that the Committee be continued and in- 
structed to bring this subject before the Presbyteries, through their 
Stated Clerks, with request for some definite judgment in the mat- 
ter ; and that report be made to the next General Assembly, and, if 
deemed advisable, the details of a plan be submitted for its con- 
sideration. 

The Rev. Wm. H. Roberts, D.D., was, on request, excused from 
further service on the Committee. 

A Resolution was offered that the Assembly memorialize Con- 
gress to take up, out of its order, a Bill now pending, for the relief 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 68 

of Chaplain Charles M. Blake. After fall discussion the Eesolu- 
tion was laid on the table. 

The Assembly adjourned, and closed with prayer. 



FKIDAY, May 23cl, 9 o'clock A.M. 
The Assembly met, and spent half an hour in devotional exer- 
cises. 

The minutes of yesterday's sessions were read and approved. 

The following telegram was received and read : 

Detroit, Mich., May 23d, 1884. 
Rev. Geo. P. Hays^ D.D.^ Moderator of the General Assembly of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America. 
The Baptist National Societies, holding their Anniversary at 
Detroit, Michigan, and assembled to the number of more than six 
hundred, from all parts of the Union, to the General Assembly of 
the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America, holding 
its sessions at Saratoga Springs, New York, send Christian salu- 
tations, in the language of Ephesians i : 3-12, inclusive. 

(Signed) E. H. Sawyer, | /..^^,v,,. 

G. W. Lasher, f ^^^^^«««- 

The telegram was referred to the Committee on Correspondence, 
to prepare a suitable reply. 

The Special Committee on the Eeduction of Representation, 
presented its Report, which was received, and made the order of 
the day for Saturday, at 11.30 A.M. 

The Standing Committees on Freedmen and on Home Missions, 
to whom was referred a communication from the Woman's Execu- 
tive Committee, presented their joint Report, which was received 
and adopted, and is as follows : 

Whereas^ The last Assembly commended the work among the 
Freedmen to the sympathy and aid of the women of the Church, 
and urged them to take hold of it with the same spirit with which 
they have taken hold of other departments of Church work, but 
suggested no plan of operation ; and 

Whereas^ There are those within the knowledge of your Com- 
mittee who are willing and anxious to do what they can to carry 
out the wishes of the Assembly, but are in doubt as to the best 
mode of procedure under existing circumstances, and desire this 
Assembly to devise some plan of action; and 

Whereas.^ It is thought undesirable either to interfere with what 
is now being done in other departments of Church work, or to kdd 
to existing organizations, therefore 



64 MINUTES OF THE [May 23d, 

Resolved^ 1, That this Assembly recommends the Woman's 
Executive Committee of Home Missions to permit such societies, 
under its care, as may desire to do so, to contribute according to 
their pleasure to the cause of tlie Freedmen, and send the results 
to the Woman's Executive Committee, to be forwarded to the 
Treasurer of the Board of Missions for Freedmen. 

Resolved^ 2. That the Board of Missions for Freedmen be directed 
to provide means by which the necessary information as to the needs 
of the Board, methods of operation, etc., can be furnished to these 
societies when desired, keep a separate account of what is thus ac- 
complished, and report the same to each General Assembly. 

The Standing Committee on Benevolence presented its Eeport, 
•which was received. The Assembly was then addressed by the 
Eev. Kneeland P. Ketcham, D.D., and others. The Eeport was 
adopted, and is as follows: 

In introducing to the Assembly the Eeport of your Permanent 
Committee on Systematic Beneficence, your Standing Committee 
desire, first of all, to urge upon the members of the Assembly a 
thoughtful study of that Eeport, and to bear in mind, meanwhile, 
the far reaching import of its facts and recommendations as affect- 
ing the deepest interests of the Church. 

It is evident, that the entire interest and hope of all the great 
Boards and benevolent organizations of the Church are centred in, 
and founded upon, the personal contributions which ibrm, primarily, 
the concern of this Committee. 

A splendid and various mechanism, for our own health and for 
the " healing of the nations," we have in our Boards and Societies, 
but this will be operated in all vanity of result and waste of vital 
forces, unless the original sources, the springs of individual liberality, 
are reached, developed, utilized. A stately beacon tower, costly 
in erection, elaborate in construction, but shedding dim and fitful 
light, from neglect of oil in its vessels with its lamps, would be but 
a fitting picture of any and all organizations of our Church, without 
supreme regard for the vital supply of 'personal contributions. 
And it is the province, the high, sacred province of this Per- 
manent Committee to stand between these organizations of the 
Church, in their possibilities of efficacy, and actualities of necessity, 
between these and the sources of vital supply in personal gifts, and 
urge for the life of the one, the development of the other. 

Your Committee takes peculiar pleasure in calling the attention 
of the Assembly to the gratifying increase in the contributions of 
the past year. 

It is believed that the record indicates, not only larger contri- 
butions in the aggregate, than during any one year of the Church's 
previous history, but a larger advance beyond the previous year 
than ever before, the increase being 18 per cent, against 11 per 
cent of last year. As will be seen, the increase to the Board of 
Home Missions is $114,249 : Foreign Missions $44,819 ; Education 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY, ;65 

$4194 ; Publication $5046 ; Church Erection $29,222 ; Relief Fund 
$16,337 ; Freedmen $19,844 ; Sustentation $1104 ; Aid for Colleges 
$28,987 ; Total gain $259,908. 

The gain of the old Boards is the more remarkable because of 
the contributions to the new Board for Colleges, In 1881 the 
increase was $85,662. In 1882 $125,775. In 1883 $171,167. In 
1884 $253,508, and there is no reason to doubt that this steady and 
at last remarkable increase, is i^ no small measure due to the wise 
and faithful efforts of your Permanent Committee. And to quote 
from the report of that Committee: 

" We would be ungrateful to God to complain or murmur 
concerning the record of the year. To have raised nearly 
$2,000,000, for our benevolent work in a year not specially pros- 
perous — to have seen the large desires of our two great Boards, 
expressed to the last Assembly, realized — to have received over 
$600,000 for the home, and nearly $700,000 for the foreign work 
— to have made an increase in collections for every cause — to 
record that the Women's societies gave to the Foreign Board last 
year $203,754, and the year before, $192,729 — to have found that 
these societies gave the Home Board $97,167, as against $78,520 — 
to have seen a new Board collecting $28,000 from the churches with- 
out decreasing the gifts to others — these are strong reasons for praise. 
Who are we that we should be able to oft'er after this sort? Of 
Thine own have we given Thee. We are not our own. May we 
show our gratitude to our Redeemer by abounding more and more 
in this and every grace !" 

And yet, when we remember that, after all, these apparently 
large sums represent but $3.06 as the annual oft'ering of each mem- 
ber of our Communion, when we reflect how little of true earnestness 
of purpose, true self-sacrifice, true consecration are represented to 
an average American Christian in $3.06 a year, we are filled with 
a sense of humiliation and regret, relieved only by the vast possi- 
bilities in Christian giving, which these facts after all indicate. If 
so much is done by so little as $3.06 a year per member, what a 
matchless vision of glorious results is before us, when the disciple 
of Christ everywhere in the Church shall be brought to give "ac- 
cording as the Lord hath prospered him !" Ah, if all the individuals 
of the Church, to honor Christ and extend the Gospel, gave with 
the same entire. New Testament consecration with which a few 
individuals give, the world would soon be won for Christ ! Six- 
teen hundred and twenty-two churches gave nothing to Home 
Missions, and -2451 (388 more than last year) nothing to Foreign 
Missions ! 

In view of all this your Committee cannot forbear to urge upon 
the members of the Assembly, and through them the members of 
the Church at large, the importance of intelligent purpose in giv- 
ing on the part of every Church member; and that special ser- 
mons be preached, and religious literature bearing upon this sub- 
ject be disseminated, that in the family and the sabbath-school, 
5 



66 MINUTES OF THE [May 23d, 

our children should be educated to systematic and liberal giv- 
ing. And in this connection your Committee would call attention 
to the publications mentioned in the Permanent Committee's Re- 
port, as also to their suggestions regarding proportionate giving. 

We recommend no one plan of systematic contributions, but 
earnestly hope that each church and each member will adopt some 
definite plan of contributions, in which and by which the spirit, 
the desires, the obligations of a true consecration may find a 
fitting, a full expression. 

The Overture from the Presbytery of Cleveland, as to an 
amendment to the Directory for Worship, which shall provide for 
giving, as a distinct act of public worship, has been referred, by 
order of the Assembly, to the Committee on the Polity of the 
Church. 

The Committee recommend the following as members of the 
Permanent Committee on Systematic Beneficence for the ensuing 
year: Rev. Charles S. Pomeroy, D.D., Chairman, Rev. I. Williams 
Cochran, Rev. Francis A. Horton, Rev. Edward C. Ray, Rev. David 
R. Breed, D.D., Rev. Edward P. Whallon, Rev. Rollo Ogden, Rev. 
Anson Smyth, D.D., Corresponding Member and Acting Secretary; 
Elders — Dan. P. Eells, Secretary, Thomas Kane, Walter Carter, 
Archibald McClure, William Bakewell, Thomas Lord, Reuben F. 
Smith. 

It will be proper here to state, that the nam-j of Rev. Arthur 
Mitchell, D.D., who has hitherto rendered such invaluable service 
as Chairman of the Permanent Committee, does not appear here for 
the reason that he has peremptorily resigned, in consequence of his 
contemplated removal to another field and position in the Church. 

As to the whole Permanent Committee of the past year, your 
Standing Committee cannot too warmly express their sense of the 
obligation of this Assembly, and of the whole Church, to them, for 
their constant, unselfish fidelity in the discharge of their duties. 

Finally, your Committee recommend that the bill of the Perma- 
nent Committee for printing and clerk hire, amounting to $140, be 
paid. 

The Rev. Joseph B. Stratton, D.D., Delegate from the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, ap- 
peared in the Assembly and took leave with tender and affectionate 
words, which were responded to by the Moderator. After which 
the Assembly was led in prayer by Dr. Stratton. 

The Standing Committee on Correspondence reported an answer 
to the telegram from the Baptist National Societies, which was 
directed to be forwarded, and is as follows : 

To the Baptist Associations^ in session at Detroit^ Michigan : 
In reply to your telegram of congratulation this Assembly sends 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 67 

congratulations and salutations of grace, mercy and peace, and refers 
you to I Thessalonians ii : 3, 4. 

Geo. p. Hays, 

Moderator. 
Wm. H. Egberts, 

Stated Clerk. 

The Committee appointed by the last Assembly on Cooperation 
with the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, in the 
United States (see Minutes, p. 591), made its report, which was 
unanimously adopted by the following Resolutions : 

1. Resolved, That this General Assembly does hereby heartily 
approve of the action of the Committee on Cooperation as pre- 
sented in its report ; and it also adopts the concurrent Resolutions 
presented therein. 

2. Resolved, That the Stated Clerk be directed to inform the 
other Assembly of this action. 

The Report is as follows : 

The Committee appointed by the last General Assembly to 
confer with a similar Committee from the General Aa^embly of 
the Presbyterian Church in the United States, in regard to plans 
and methods of cooperation, would respectfully report the result 
of their deliberations to this Assembly. 

The Committee met on the 1st day of November, 1883, in the 
city of Louisville, Ky., all its members being present. 

At the request of Dr. Niccolls, Dr. Humphrey, who had been 
originally appointed Chairman of the Committee by the General 
Assembly, but declined on the ground of ill health, was again, by 
vote of the Committee, placed in the position to which he was 
originally appointed by the Assembly. 

The Committee from the Southern Church being present, the 
two Committees met together in joint session, and Rev. Dr. Hum- 
phrey, on motion of Dr. Smoot, was elected Chairman. 

The meetings of the Committees, save such as were necessary 
for special conference, were held in joint session. And it is but 
proper to say, that there was, during all our conference, the mani- 
festation of the spirit of brotherly regard, and of an earnest desire 
to secure cooperation between the churches. The intercourse of 
the brethren with each other, was characterized by frankness, 
and by a spirit of fraternal affection. The measures, also, which 
were agreed upon to be proposed to the two General Assemblies, 
were adopted by the well-nigh unanimous consent of both Com- 
mittees. 

Among the subjects referred to the consideration of the Joint 
Committee by the Assembly, was the following : 

Resolved, That should a Committee be appointed by the South- 
ern Assembly at Lexington, Ky., to confer with the Committee 
already appointed by this body in regard to cooperative work, by 
the two branches of the Church, the question of the joint occupancy 



68 MINUTES OF THE [May 23d, 

of the Danville Seminary should be made a matter of considera- 
tion by tlie Committees in conference. And this Assembly would 
express its earnest hope that an adjustment may be made, which, 
while securing every legal right, shall have high regard to those 
fraternal relations which have been so happily established. 

In accordance with this Kesolution your Committee suggested, as 
a basis of adjustment of the question of the Danville Theological 
Seminary, the following : 

1. An equal joint use and occupancy of the Seminary by the 
two branches of the Church (Northern and Southern), by the ap- 
pointment of an equal number of Directors and Trustees from each 
branch, and giving to the Southern branch at least an equal num- 
ber of Professors. 

2. Should additional funds be raised for the further endowment 
of the Institution, each body shall have absolute control of the 
funds raised by itself, using only the income from such funds for 
the support of the Seminary. Should this basis of adjustment be 
acceptable to our brethren of the Committee of the Southern 
Assembly, it will open the way for considering the details of the 
means by which the object may be effected. 

To this the following reply was presented by the Committee 
from the Southern Church : 

" The Committee of the Southern Assembly, in response to the 
proposition from the Committee of the Northern .Assembly touch- 
ing Danville Theological Seminary, respectfully report, that we 
are willing to recommend to our Assembly the acceptance of their 
offer of joint use and occupancy of Danville Seminary, according 
to the terms of that offer, and on condition that this occupancy 
be in perpetuity, and that the Seminary be removed to Louis- 
ville, Ky. The Committee, however, are of the opinion that the 
prosperity of the Seminary would be more certainly secured and 
more largely advanced by being in full control of the Southern 
Church." 

To this action, Dr. Smoot, Chairman of the Southern Commit- 
tee, dissented, and his dissent was placed upon record on the 
minutes of the Joint Committee, 

Your Committee replied to this communication as follows : 

In relation to the proposition touching the joint occupancy of 
Danville Seminary — we ap})rove of the two conditions in the 
report from the other Committee, viz. : That the occupancy be in 
perpetuity, and that the Seminary be removed to Louisville ; and 
furthermore, we agree to recommend the proposition as thus 
amended to our General Assembly for its 'adoption. 

After approving the terms for the joint occupancy of the Semi- 
nary, the Joint Committee adopted the following, in answer to 
the dissent of Dr. Smoot, which objected to the proposed occupancy 
on the terms mentioned, on the ground, " that it would involve 
the becoming a mere tenant at will, in the occupancy of the prop- 
erty, as the property of another ; " 



A.D. 1884.] GENEKAL ASSEMBLY. 69 

Resolved^ That it is the sense and meaning of this Joint Com- 
mittee, that in the proposition as to that Seminary, it is not a 
tenancy at will, that was offered and accepted, but a permanent 
joint-tenancy as to the occupancy, as set forth in the resolutions. 

The Joint Committee also discussed various measures with refer- 
ence to cooperation in the work of Home Missions, and the adjust- 
ment of such difficulties as might arise with reference to the 
occupation of fields occupied by both churches. 

The following Resolution was agreed upon to be recommended 
to the several Assemblies for adoption : 

As to cooperation in Home Missions, your Committees, recogniz- 
ing that no specific direction can be made to cover every case that 
may arise, would recommend the adoption of the following con- 
current resolutions : 

This Assembly, while asserting its right to labor in every part 
of our common country, would most earnestly enjoin those charged 
with the direction of Home Mission work, that they see that 
nothing be done through strife or vain glory; that in prosecuting 
this work the interests of the other Assembly already in occupancy, 
either with an organized church, or missionary labor, shall be 
most carefully respected ; and that the matter of consolidating 
feeble churches, and cases of disagreement, threatening the dis- 
turbance of fraternal relations, shall be referred to a Joint Com- 
mission of the Presbyteries having jurisdiction. 

The paper on the subject of Comity in the matter of discipline 
referred by the Southern General Assembly to the Committee of 
Conference, was considered, and the following concurrent Resolu- 
tion was unanimously recommended by the Committee for adop- 
tion : 

Resolved^ That this General Assembly, as a matter of Comity 
between our own Church and the Southern Presbyterian Church, 
growing out of the fraternal relations so recently established, enjoins 
upon our Church Sessions, Presbyteries and Synods, that they have 
due regard for the discipline of all the Sessions, Presbyteries and 
Synods of that Church, (and mutatis mutandis). 

Other points with reference to cooperation in the work of 
Foreign Missions, and also that of the Board of Publication, were 
suggested by your Committee, to the Joint Committee, but no defi- 
nite conclusions were reached, nor did the Committee from the 
Southern Church feel prepared to take any action in these direc- 
tions. 

After a careful consideration of all the difficulties in the way of 
cooperation, which was participated in by the brethren of the 
other Committee in a most frank and fraternal manner, your Com- 
mittee proposed to them the following : 

The undersigned, representing the Northern Church in this Com- 
mittee, after considering the many difficulties in the way of co- 
operation, deem it proper to say to the Joint Committee, that we 
feel constrained to report to our Assembly, that in our judgment, 



70 MINUTES OF THE [May 23d, 

tlie only effectual method of removing tliese difficulties is through 
organic union between these two branches of the Presbyterian 
Church, We would, therefore, respectfully ask our brethren rep- 
resenting the Southern Church in this Joint Committee to make a 
similar representation to tlieir General Assembly. We do this 
with the hope that both Assemblies may take such action as will 
lead to organic union. 

Signed, 0. Beatty, E. P. Humphrey, T. J. Lamar, S. M. Moore, 
W. B. Negley, Samuel J. Niccolls, Edward B. Wright. 

To this the Committee of the Southern Church made the fol- 
lowing reply : 

"By the action of Assembly as stated on page 57, of minutes of 
Assembly of 1883, we feel constrained to say, that we are estopped 
from making any recommendation, and from considering the mat- 
ter of organic union. 

Signed, R. K. Smoot, Robert P. Farris, Rutherford Douglass, Wil- 
liam Henry Dodge, Patrick Joyes, Theo. H. Roe. 

Such, in brief, is the result of the conference of the Committees, 
which we respectfully submit for the consideration of this As- 
sembly. There is, also, accompanying this report, a certified copy 
of the minutes of the Joint Committee, which we desire to place 
before the Assembly. 

The order of the day was taken up, being the Report of the 
Committee on Judicial Commissions. The Report was received. 
A minority Report of the same Committee was also presented and 
received. 

Pending discussion the Assembly adjourned, and closed with 
prayer. 



FEIDAY, May 23d, 3 o'clock P.M. 
The Assembly met, and was opened with prayer. 

It was made the order of the day for Saturday, at 3 o'clock 
P.M., to take up the Report of the Committee on Judicial Com- 
missions. 

The Standing Committee on Temperance presented its Report, 
which was received. The Assembly was then addressed by the 
Rev. Wm. Y. Brown, D.D., Chairman of the Permanent Com- 
mittee. The Report was amended and adopted, and is as follows : 

The Standing Committee on Temperance submits the following 
report : 

Your Committee have had under consideration the Third Annual 
Report of the Permanent Committee on Temperance. The report 
shows that this Committee, with limited means at their disposal, 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 71 

have done a large amount of work during the past year, and their 
diligence and faithfulness are worthy of high commendation. 

They have during the year issued and distributed among the 
Synods, Presbyteries and churches four important documents. The 
jBrst, Tract No. 6, is a Summary of the Deliverances of the Gen- 
eral Assembly on the subject of Temperance from 1812 to 1883, a 
valuable document for reference, showing that for more than 
seventy years the General Assembly has borne repeated and em- 
phatic testimony against the sin of intemperance and the traflGic in 
intoxicating liquors. 

The second is a circular letter to the Synods and Presbyteries, 
prepared by Eev. Dr. Aikman, calling their attention to the im- 
portance of appointing in each of these bodies a Permanent Com- 
mittee on Temperance, as in other departments of Church work. 
This tract is re-published in the annual report of the Assembly's 
Permanent Committee, and the attention of Sjmods and Presbyteries 
is hereby called to its recommendations, and they are urged to act 
in accordance with them. 

The third is a plan for organizing the temperance work in sab- 
bath-schools. This paper is also re-published in the annual report. 
It contains valuable suggestions and should receive attentive con- 
sideration. At a time when the State is beginning to turn its at- 
tention to giving special instruction to the youth on the subject 
of temperance, the Church must not lag behind in the work. The 
importance of instilling into the minds of our young people right 
views and principles on this subject cannot be overrated. 

The fourth is a circular concerning the Temperance Narrative, 
designed to secure from each Presbytery a statement of facts con- 
cerning the temperance work in churches and communities. A 
comparatively small number of Presbyteries have forwarded tem- 
perance narratives, and many that have done so have sent them 
too late to be of use in preparing the annual report. The narra- 
tives which have been received generally indicate interest and 
activity in the temperance cause. It is earnestly hoped that here- 
after every Presbytery will forward a carefully prepared narrative 
on this subject. In order that these narratives may be digested, 
and the facts contained in them be embodied in the annual report 
of the Permanent Committee, they should be sent immediately 
after the Spring meetings of Presbyteries, 

The Permanent Committee have shown commendable diligence in 
corresponding with other ecclesiastical bodies. The results of this 
correspondence are embodied in the annual report, and are deserv- 
ing of special attention. The cheering fact is brought out that 
most of the leading evangelical Churches of our country, have taken 
decided ground against the sale and use of intoxicating liquors as a 
beverage, and in favor of the most vigorous measures for the com- 
plete suppression of the traffic. It is as certain as anything in the 
future can be that the Churches of America, including our own, 
will never go back from the advanced position which they have 



72 MINUTES OF THE [May 23d, 

taken on this subject. They have reached this position after mature 
deliberation, thorough discussion, devout study of the Word of God 
and the indications of Divine Providence, and earnest prayer for 
the guidance of the Holy Spirit. They are now prepared to say 
of the traffic in intoxicating liquors, as Abraham Lincoln said of 
another evil, if this traffic be not wrong, nothing is wrong. 

We cannot believe that this attitude of the Churches of our 
country is the result of fanaticism. We cannot believe that the 
Spirit of God has given over His people to a delusion upon this sub- 
ject. We are compelled to believe, that in coming up to the high 
plane of total abstinence from all intoxicating liquors as a beverage, 
and of determined and irreconcilable hostility to the drinking-saloon, 
as the sworn foe of all that is best and purest in our civilization, 
the Church of Christ is simply following the standard of her Divine 
Leader. She can take no step backward. She hears in the Word 
and in Divine Providence, the command, " Speak to the Children 
of Israel, that they go forward ;" and with unwavering courage and 
inflexible determination, she will go forward to glorious victories 
over the great foe of God and man. 

The Permanent Committee has also done good service in gather- 
ing statistics concerning the evils resulting from the sale and use of 
intoxicating drinks, and the progress of the temperance cause. It 
is a prime maxim in war not to underestimate the strength of the 
enemy. The statistics gathered by the Permanen^ Committee, give 
some idea of the power in money and influence of the baleful traf- 
fic in strong drink. The overthrow of this giant foe is not to be 
the work of an hour or a day, but of a long-continued and persist- 
ent effort. It is not to be accomplished by a feeble, half-hearted 
or divided exertion of the temperance forces, but by an earnest, 
united and determined movement, all along the line of all the friends 
of temperance and humanity. The demon of intemperance that 
has so long held possession goeth not out but by prayer and fasting, 
and it need not be thought surprising that as he goes out he should 
seek to rend and destroy. 

Tlie statistics, further, give unmistakable indications of the most 
effective methods of dealing with this monster iniquity. In Maine, 
where the policy of prohibition has had the longest and fairest trial, 
the statistics show that a smaller government revenue, in proportion 
to the population, is collected from the sale of distilled and fermented 
liquors than in any other State in the Union. The average rev- 
enue from this source for each member of the population of the 
Union, is $1.71 ; the average in Maine is four cents. The statis- 
tics of other prohibitory States point in the same direction. No 
form of crime is wholly suppressed by law. It is not to be ex- 
pected that all drinking and drunkenness will be entirely suppressed 
by the most stringent laws. Nevertheless, the statistics show that 
where the temperance sentiment is strong enough, to secure the 
enactment of statutory or constitutional prohibition, this form of 
legislation is the most effective ever devised for dealing with the evil 



A.D. 1884'.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 73 

of intemperance. So far, therefore, as the evil is to be dealt with 
by law, we should keep steadily before us the ultimate end of secur- 
ing, as speedily as possible, such legislation as will aim at the anni- 
hilation of the traiftc. The best methods of attaining this consum- 
mation, most devoutly to be wished, may be safely left to the good 
judgment of those whose hearts are enlisted in the work. 

The statistics gathered and the narratives of the Presbyteries 
show that the cause is making encouraging progress. So far as the 
prevailing sentiment and practice of the ministers and members of 
our Church are concerned, the narratives show that they are over- 
whelmingly in favor of total abstinence, from the use as a beverage of 
intoxicating liquors, and of suppressing the traffic by law. In every 
part of our country the temperance sentiment is growing in strength. 
The adoption and enforcement of constitutional prohibition in Kan- 
sas, the adoption of statutory prohibition in Iowa, more than three 
hundred and twenty thousand counted votes in Ohio for constitutional 
prohibition, the large vote in the Legislature of New York in favor 
of submitting to the people a prohibition amendment to the State 
Constitution, the adoption by New York, New Hampshire, Ver- 
mont and Michigan, of a law providing for the education of the 
youth in all the public schools as to the nature of alcohol and its 
effects upon the human system, the overwhelming defeat in Con- 
gress of the bonded whisky bill, all show that public opinion 
against intemperance and the traffic that leads to it is gaining in 
force every day, and awaken the hope that the day may not be far 
distant, when the great curse of strong drink shall be placed under 
the ban of public opinion, and of laws intended to secure its com- 
plete suppression. May the Lord hasten the day. 

Many of the narratives speak in the highest terms, of the thor- 
ough organization and efficient work of the Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union. Many of the noble women of our Church are do- 
ing eft'ective work in connection with this oro;anization. No other 
organization devoted to the cause of temperance, is doing more to 
create a wholesome public sentiment, and to secure the enactment 
of needed legislation against intemperance than the Woman's 
Christian Temperance Union, and we bid it God speed in its good 
work. 

Your Committee recommend the following Resolutions for adop- 
tion : 

1. That this A&sembly re-affirm the uniform testimony of 
past Assemblies, from the year 1812 down to the present time, 
against intemperance and the liquor traffic, emphasizing and adopt- 
ing, as its own, the deliverance of last year, that, " in view of the 
evils wrought by this scourge of our race, this Assembly would 
hail, with acclamations of joy and thanksgiving, the utter ex- 
termination of the traffic in intoxicating liquors as a beverage, by 
the power of Christian conscience, public opinion, and the strong 
arm of the civil law." 

2. That it be recommended to all our Synods and Presbyteries 



74 MINUTES OF THE [May 23d, 

to appoint Standing Committees on Temperance; that Presbyterial 
Committees be recommended to arrange for the holding of temper- 
ance conventions and institutes, and to prepare and forward 
promptly to the Permanent Committee, distinct temperance nar- 
ratives, giving the facts pertaining to the state of the cause in their 
respective localities. 

3. That ministers be urged to preach on the subject of Temper- 
ance, and in all suitable ways to endeavor to rouse the consciences 
of the people, and to create and foster such a public sentiment as 
will discountenance drinking customs, and lead to the enactment 
and enforcement of laws for the complete suppression of the traffic 
in intoxicating drinks. ^ 

4. That this Assembly rejoices to learn that in four States of 
our Union, laws have been enacted, requiring that, in all schools 
sustained by public funds, instructions be given on the nature of 
alcohol and its effects upon the human system, and recommends 
the people under its care to cooperate with other friends of temper- 
ance, in the effort to secure such legislation in all the States. 

5. That the Assembly commends the diligence and fidelity of its 
Permanent Committee in doing the work assigned to it; that 
cordial thanks are due, and are hereby tendered to Rev. William 
Y. Brown, D.D., for his admirable and comprehensive report of the 
work of the Committee, and of the state of the temperance cause, 
in its financial, legal, moral and spiritual aspects. , 

6. That the Assembly gratefully recognizes tne power of the 
press, both religious and secular, in moulding public opinion and 
stimulating to right action on this subject, and recommends the in- 
creased use of this agency in meeting local issues, and in the dis- 
semination of facts and principles which are suited to advance the 
cause. 

7. That Rev. William Y. Brown, D.D., Rev. Jeremiah Petrie, 
and Messrs. Walter Carter, William N. Crane and Andrew Blair, 
whose term of service expired at this meeting, be re- appointed to 
serve for three years ; and that Rev. Robert D. Harper, D.D., and 
Elder Daniel W. Fish be appointed to fill the vacancies occasioned 
by the resignation of Rev. Nelson Millard, D.D., and Hon. Jona- 
than Ogden, to serve for two years. 

8. That this Assembly re-affirms the action of the last Assembly, 
recommending the Permanent Committee to appeal to the churches 
for funds to defray its expenses. 

The Chairman of the Mileage Committee was directed to pay 
the Entertainment Fund to the Treasurer of the Assembly. 

The Standing Committee on the Polity of the Church, reported : 
Overture^ No. i, from the Synod of Minnesota, asking that cer- 
tain of its Presbyteries be set off", and erected into a new Synod ; 
also, No. 2, on the same subject, from the Presbytery of Southern 
Dakota. 

The Committee recommends that these requests be complied 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 75 

with, and that the Synod of Dakota be hereby constituted, to in- 
clude all that part of the Territory of Dakota lying south of the 
4:6th parallel of north latitude, and to consist of the Presbyteries of 
Aberdeen, Central Dakota, Dakota (including all the ministers and 
churches among the Dakota Indians), and Southern Dakota, now 
in connection with the Synod of Minnesota ; and that the said 
Synod of Dakota convene at Huron, on Thursday, the ninth day of 
October, next, at half-past seven o'clock P.M., and be opened with 
a sermon by the Kev. Walter S. Peterson, or, in case of his absence, 
by the senior minister present, who shall preside until a Moderator 
be chosen. 

Overture^ No. 3, from the Northern Pacific Presbytery, and No. 
4-, from the Presbytery of Pembina, asking for the erection of a 
new Synod, to be called the Synod of North Dakota. 

While fully appreciating the reasons assigned for the creation ot 
such a Synod, the Committee recommends that it be judged inex- 
pedient to take any action in the premises at the present time, for 
the following reasons : that the proposition has not been submit- 
ted to the Synod of Minnesota, to which these Presbyteries belong ; 
that the erection of the new Synod would involve the formation of 
another Presbytery, which could be done to better advantage by 
the Synod of Minnesota ; and that no serious embarrassment is 
likely to result from delaying the proposed action for another 
year. 

Overture, No. 5, from the Synod of Iowa, requesting permission 
to keep its records hereafter in printed, instead of written form ; 
and No. 6, from the Stated Clerks of several of the Synods, pre- 
senting a similar request, and asking that some uniform plan be 
adoy)ted for the guidance of the Synods in this matter. 

The Committee recommends that any Synod, which shall so elect, 
be authorized to keep its minutes in printed form, and to dispense 
with written records, provided : 

(1) That such printed minutes be complete and accurate in all 
details. 

(2) That they be uniform as to size of page with the Minutes of 
the Assembly. 

(3) That the copy submitted by each Synod to the Assembly 
for review, be attested by the certificate of the Stated Clerk of the 
Synod in writing ; and that blank pages be left at the end for re- 
cording any exceptions that may be taken. 

(4) That at least two additional copies of each and every issue 
be transmitted to the Stated Clerk of the Assembly, and two de- 
posited in the Library otthe Presbyterian Historical Society. 

Overture, No 7, from the Presbytery of Baltimore, asking the re- 
peal of the Standing Rule in the Minutes of the Assembly for 1870, 
p. 90, which limits the right of petition or overture to the Presby- 
teries and Synods, and thus " deprives the Church at large of the 
inalienable right of petition." 

The Committee recommends, that as the rule referred to does 



76 MINUTES OF THE [May 23d, 

not deny the right of petition, but only prescribes an orderly 
method of action, and saves the Assembly from unnecessary de- 
mands upon its time, the Overture be answered in the negative. 

Overture^ No. 8, from the Synod of Michigan, asking that the 
Presbytery of Lake Superior be transferred to its care, from the 
Synod of Wisconsin ; No. 9, from the Officers of the Synod of Wis- 
consin, No. 10, from the Presbytery of Winnebago, and No. 11., 
from the Presbytery of Lake Superior, severally opposing the pro- 
posed transfer. 

After conferring with persons interested on both sides of this 
question, and having assurance of their willingness that the subject 
be postponed for the consideration of anotlier Assembly, and to 
give farther time for fraternal conference, the Committee recom- 
mends that no action be taken. 

Overture.^ No. i^, from the Presbytery of New Brunswick, re- 
lating to ministers of this Church who are pastors in other denomi- 
nations. The Committee recommends the following answer : 

1. The General Assembly hereby directs the Presbyteries under 
its care to require all ministers whose names may be on their rolls, 
but who have identiJBed themselves with other denominations as 
communicants, or as pastors, or as stated supplies for three years, to 
take letters of dismission to the denomination with which the par- 
ticular churches to which they minister may be connected; or, if they 
neglect to do so, then, on sufficient evidence of ; uch identification, 
their names shall be dropped from our rolls. (See Digest, p. 169.) 

2. The Stated Clerk of the General Assembly is hereby directed 
to omit, hereafter, the letters P. C. after the names of ministers in 
the statistical tables in the Minutes of the Assembly. 

Overture., No. 13, from the Presbytery of Washington City, ask- 
ing that an Overture be sent down to the Presbyteries for an 
amendment of the Confession of Faith, by striking out from Chap. 
XXIV, Sec. 6, the words, " or such willfiil desertion as can in no 
way be remedied by the Church or civil courts." 

As there is no evidence of a general desire for the proposed 
change, and as a compliance with the request would practically be 
for the Assembly to assume the initiative in this matter, the Com- 
mittee recommends that no action be- taken, in the direction sug- 
gested by the Overture; but that the Assembly, at the same time, 
express its profound conviction that the Church should, by every 
means at its disposal, rcvsist the growing laxity of legislative and 
judicial action in respect to divorce. 

Overture, No. 14-, from a minister of our Church in India, in- 
quiring whether, in a supposed case, a Ghurch member would be 
justified in carrying his grievances before a civil tribunal, whose 
judge is a Mohammedan; and asking for an interpretation of 
I Cor. vi : 1. 

The Committee recommends that as no actual case is presented, 
and as it is not customary for the Assembly to judge of questions 
presented in ihesi, it is inexpedient to return any answer. 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 77 

Overture^ No. 15^ from the Presbj^tery of Baltimore, asking the 
Assembly to submit to the Presbyteries an amendment to the Form 
of Government, Chap. X, Sec. 8, adding the words, " and ruling 
elders " after the word, " ministers," and making the required 
verbal changes in Chap. XIII, in order to give to the Presbytery 
the same oversight and jurisdiction in the examination, ordination, 
installation, and trial of ruling elders as in the case of ministers. 

The Committee recommends that this Assembly judge it inex- 
pedient to take such action. 

Overture^ No. 16^ from the Presbytery of Los Angeles, request- 
ing that the Stated Clerks of Presbyteries be directed to add to aU 
letters of dismission given to ministers, the dates of birth and or- 
dination of the ministers so dismissed ; and requiring the Board of 
Publication to provide for this in future issues of their blanks. 

The Committee recommends that the Assembly judge it inex- 
pedient to require the proposed action. 

Overture^ No. 17^ pro})osing the following question : Does 
Chap. X, Sec. 8, of the Form of Government, defining the powers 
of the Presbytery, give the Presbytery the right to exercise con- 
trol over the location of church buildmgs within its bounds, both 
in the case of new organizations expecting to build, and of old 
congregations proposing a change of location. 

The Committee recommends that the question be answered in 
the affirmative. 

Overture^ No. 18, from the Presbytery of Philadelphia Central, 
and No. 19, from the Presbytery of Carlisle, asking tiie Assembly 
to divide the Synod of Pennsylvania into several Synods. 

The Committee recommends the following answer: Inasmuch as 
the Assembly has but lately consolidated the Synods, and this 
change in the constitution has not fully been tested by experience; 
and as the Synod of Pennsylvania has not been consulted in regard 
to the proposed division, the Overtures be answered in the nega- 
tive. 

Overture, No. W, from the Presbytery of St. Lawrence, asking 
the Assembly " to enjoin upon candidates for the Ministry to re- 
tain their connection with the Presbyteries to which they naturally 
belong by residence and Church membership; also to enjoin 
Presbyteries not to receive such candidates unless they have re- 
ceived dismission from the Presbyteries to which they naturally 
belong, as above specified ; also to enjoin the Board of Education 
carefully to examine into any such cases, and only in extreme in- 
stances to allow the funds of the Board to be paid to candidates 
who do not receive such funds through the Presbyteries to which 
they naturally belong. 

The Committee recommends the Assembly to call the- attention 
of the Presbyteries to the Constitution of the Church and to the ac- 
tion of the Assembly of 1872, and to urge them to a more careful 
observance of the principles then laid down, in order, as far as' pos- 
sible, to secure the ends contemplated in the Overture. 



78 MINUTES OF THE [May 23d, 

Overture^ No. '21^ from the Presbytery of Pittsburgh, asking 
that the Stated Clerks of Presbyteries be instructed, in making out 
their rolls for the General Assembly, to designate, by suitable 
initials, the Chairmen of the Committee on Vacant Churches and 
Unemployed Ministers. 

The Committee recommends that the Assembly judge the pro- 
posed action to be inexpedient. 

Overture^ No. 22^ from the Presbytery of Kittanning, asking this 
Assembly to appoint a Committee with instructions to prepare an 
outline of topics, with appropriate questions or suggestions, to serve 
as a basis for Church Narratives ; the same to be printed in proper 
form by the Board of Publication, and furnished to the Presby- 
teries and churches with other ofl&cial forms and blanks. The ob- 
ject of the proposal is to secure fullness and uniformity to the Nar- 
ratives, and to facilitate the labors of Committees in collating them. 

The Committee recommends that the Overture be answered in 
the affirmative, and that a Committee of three ministers and two 
elders be appointed by the Moderator, to report on this subject to 
the next Assembly. 

Overture, No. 23, from the Presbytery of Lansing, asking the 
A&sembly to provide a plan for the more convenient change of 
place for the meeting of a Synod, when it proves to be impractica- 
ble for it to meet at the place to which it stands adjourned. 

The Committee recommends the following ant *^er : 

Whenever, from any cause, it shall be necessary to change the 
place of the regularly appointed meeting of a Synod, its Stated 
Clerk shall, at the request of the Stated Clerks of at least three- 
fourths of its Presbyteries, be authorized to secure another place of 
meeting, and to issue his oflficial call for the meeting of the Synod, 
accordingly. 

Overture, No. 2^, from the Synod of Pennsylvania, requesting 
that the foreign Presbytery of Zacatecas, in the EepubHc of Mexico, 
be attached to that Synod. 

The Committee recommends that the General Assembly hereby 
recognize the Presbytery of Zacatecas, and place it under the care 
of the Synod of Pennsylvania. 

Overture, No. 25, from certain persons connected with the Pres- 
byterian Church in Chippewa county, Michigan, requesting action 
with a view of determining the Synodical relations of churches now 
existing, or hereafter to be formed, in several counties of the State 
of Michigan. 

In view of the action before proposed in the matter of the trans- 
fer of the Presbytery of Lake Superior, the Committee recommends 
that it be considered inexpedient at present to grant the request. 

The recommendations of the Committee were severally adopted. 

The Assembly adjourned, and was closed with prayer. 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 79 

SATUEDAY, May 24th, 9 o'clock A. M. 

The Assembly met, and spent the first half hour in devotional 
exercises. 

The Standing Committee on Finance presented its Eeport, which 
was accepted and adopted, and is as follows : 

The Standing Committee on Finance would respectfully report 
that the following named papers have been placed in their hands, 
to which they have given careful attention. 

1. The Annual Report of the late Stated Clerk and Treasurer 
of the General Assembly, made up to October 27th, 1883, show- 
ing a balance to the credit of the Treasurer of $579.70. The 
account, with vouchers accompanying the same for all the expendi- 
tures, has been examined and found correct. 

2. A Report received from Rev. W. H. Roberts, D.D., Stated 
Clerk and Treasurer pro tem.^ covering the period from October 
27th, 1883, to May 15th, 1884, showing a balance to be paid to 
the Stated Clerk and Treasurer, newly elected, of $331.32. The 
account, with vouchers accompanying it, has been examined and 
found correct. 

8. The Annual Accoant for the year ending May 9th, 1884, of the 
Treasurer of the Presbyterian House as follows : 

Balance on hand May 1st, 1883, $623.90 ; amount received from 
various sources, $15,266.91 ; total receipts, $15,890.81. 

Of this sum, $6233.16 has been paid to various trusts; $9000 
has been reinvested; leaving a balance in hand of $657.65. 

The invested funds of the House now amount to $113,083, an 
increase of $5300 over last year. 

The Account of the Treasurer is accompanied by the report of 
an Auditing Committee, consisting of John C. Farr and Charles 
A. Dickey, verifying the same, and stating that they have seen the 
securities in the hands of the Treasurer, and that they are all 
registered in the name of the corporation. No details are given 
as to the nature of the securities in which these fands are invested. 

4. A Report from the Trustees of the Presbyterian House 
stating that they have accepted the trust of five thousand dollars 
($5000), bequeathed by Charles Macalester, late of Philadelphia, 
deceased, to the Macalester Memorial Church, Torresdale, under 
the care of the Presbytery of Philadelphia North, the principal to 
be invested, and the net income thereof to be paid over towards 
the support of the pastor for the time being of said Church and 
congregation forever. 

They also call the attention of the General Assembly to the fact 
that the term of ofl&ce (2 years) of the following Trustees expires 
during the present sessions of the Assembly, namely : 

Charles M. Lukens, Treasurer, Alexander Whilldin, T. Charl- 
ton Henry, Villeroy D. Reed, D.D., and Charles A. Dickey, D.D. 

The Committee nominate these persons for re-election, 

5. The Annual Report of the Trustees of the General Assembly, 



80 MINUTES OF THE [May 24tll, 

in a somewhat condensed form, giving a tabular statement of the 
total present investnieuts of the Trustees to March 81st, 18b4, 
aggregating $319,007.47, an increase from last year of §1765. 
The cash receipts for the year have been as follows : 

Balance from lastyear $609 38 

luconie from Investments 10,090 84 

Keceived from sale of United States Bonds and Camden and Am- 

boy Bonds 10,895 00 

Mortgage paid up 9,400 00 

Legacies 2,045 00 

Total Receipts $39,040 22 

The payments were as follows : 

Beinvestment of Permanent Funds $10,500 00 

Paid to Sundry Trusts 10,;547 35 

Leaving a Casli Balance carried forward to next year 12,198 87 

$39,046 22 

The correctness of the above statement is certified to by the 
Finance Committee and the Committee on Accounts of the Board 
of Trustees. The defalcation of Mr. Woodward, late Treasurer, 
has been made up by his friends. 

Your Committee recommend the approval of these Financial 
Eeports and Accounts herein referred to, and that they be pub- 
lished in the Appendix to the Minutes of this General Assembly. 

We recommend that Eev. W. 11. Koberts, D.D., be paid the 
usual compensation for performing the duties of Stated Clerk and 
Treasurer, from the death of liev. Dr. Hatfield to the opening of 
the present Session of the General Assembly, 

We also recommend, that, hereafter, no transfer be made from 
the Entertainment Fund to any other fund, until all bills for enter- 
tainment are paid, and that the Stated and Permanent Clerks be 
an Auditing Committee, to audit the entertainment bills of the 
Committee of Arrangements. 

In conclusion, the Finance Committee regret to announce that 
the following bills of the last General Assembly remain unpaid : 

Bills for Entertainment $1 ,010 02 

Bills for Printing, «kc 1,048 91 

Bills of Sundry Committees 708 45 

Bills of Committees yet to be presented, estimated at 250 00 

$3,017 38 
To meet which, there is now in the Treasury 911 02 

Leaving a debt amounting to $2,706 36 

The Committee understand, however, that in consequence of the 
great saving in railroad fares to members of this Assembly, a re- 
duction of about $2200 has been eftected, leaving $500 yet to be 
raised, to meet, in fiill, the above bills, and we trust that the As- 
sembly will promptly raise this sum. 



A.D. 1884:.] GENEEAL ASSEMBLY. &B 

A Eesolution on the Nez Perce Indians was made tlie order of 
the day for 7.30 o'clock tliis evening. 

The Standing Committee on Bills and Overtures reported — 
Overture^ No. 10. — Concerning a proposed alteration of Sections 
3 and 4 of the Eevised Book of Discipline. The Committee rec- 
ommend, that in the judgment of the Assembly, it is not ex- 
pedient to recommend the alterations requested. Adopted. 

The same Committee submitted the following recommendations : 
The Committee would request that all Presbyteries, Synods 
and Individuals, sending Overtures to the General Assembly be 
directed to have them legibly written with ink, on full sheets of 
paper, and that not more than one Overture be written on one 
sheet. Adopted. 

Whereas^ The Assembly tlirough its Board of Church Erection, 
and Committee on Freed men, has expended large amounts of money 
in the purchase of Real Estate, and the erection of churches and 
school buildings, for the work of Missions among the Freedmen, 
previous to the chartering of the Board of Missions for Freedmen, 
therefore. 

Resolved^ That this Board be directed to investigate, and trace 
the titles to all properties for which any of these funds have been 
used, that they be required to keep an abstract of all titles to such 
property already secured, or that may be secured, in the office of 
the Board. And, that the Board be required to report the results 
of their investigations to the next General Assembly, and that the 
Rev. Samuel C. Logan, D.D., be added to the Board of Freedmen, 
for this purpose. Adopted. 

The same Committee, also recommended the adoption of 
Standing Rule, No, 7, viz. : — All Special Committees appointed 
by one General Assembly to report to the next Assembly, shall 
be ready to present their reports on the second day of the ses- 
sion. Adopted. 

Resolved^ That a Special Committee of four be appointed, con- 
sisting of the Moderator, Stated Clerk, Permanent Clerk, and the 
Rev. David C. Marquis, D.D., of Chicago, to report to the next 
General Assembly, such additions, and amendments to the " Rules 
for Judicatories," as they may deem needful. 

The Special Committee on Sabbath Observance reported the 
following, which was adopted : 

Resolved.^ 1. That this General Assembly calls the attention of 

the United States Government, to the violation of the Sabbath, by 

the Postal Department, in forwarding, and distributing the mails on 

that day ; and. also to the fact that such violation of the Sabbath, 

6 



82 MINUTES OF THE [May 24th, 

is also a violation of the personal rights guaranteed to every citizen 
by our Constitution, inasmuch as it compels employees of this De- 
partment to either violate the Sabbath, or relinquish their position 
under Government. 

Resolved^ 2. That inasmuch as soldiers at various military 
posts, in the United States, are compelled to parade, on the Sab- 
bath, to the violation of conscience and the degradation resulting 
therefrom, and, also, the demoralization of the communities where 
such posts are stationed, and to the great distress of conscience, and 
the convictions of both soldiers and citizens, and the violation of 
their guaranteed constitutional rights ; and inasmuch as it is not 
necessary thus to parade and drill on the Sabbath in time of peace ; 
therefore, we, the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 
of the United States of America, respectfully ask, that steps be 
taken by our Government to forbid such parade and drill, on 
the Sabbath, except at times when it may be imperatively de- 
manded by military necessity. 

Resolved, 3. That the Hon. William Strong and Commodore 
John W. Easby, of Washington, be requested to transmit these 
Eesolutions to the United States Postmaster General, and the Sec- 
retary of War, respectively. 

The Standing Committee on Mileage presented its Report, 
which was adopted, with special thanks to Elder Louis Chapin, for 
his faithful discharge of the duties of his trust. "The Report is as 
follows : 

The Committee- on Mileage would respectfully report the follow- 
ing as the result of their labors : 

Received on Mileage Assessments $27,703 00 

" "Entertainment 10,09128 

Disbursements $37,794 28 

Paid on Mileage claims $23,236 87 

" Entertainment to Treasurer 10,09128 

" Clerk hire 50 00 33,378 15 

Balance to Treasurer $4416 13 

Our roll of Presbyteries has been increased eight in the past 
Assembly year, not including Alaska and North Laos, which have 
not reported. The Presbytery of Grand Forks has been disbanded, 
making our present number 188. 

Payments have been made in full by one hundred and forty-nine 
Presbyteries for their apportionments to both funds. The Pres- 
byteries following neither paid to nor drew from either fund : 

For Mileage. Eutertalnment. 

Bellefontaine $137 25 $54 90 

Nassau 122 90 49 16 

Logansport 153 15 61 26 

The Presbytery of Huron has paid $38.40 to the Entertainment 
Fund, but nothing on the $98.80 assessed for Mileage. 



A.D. 188i.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 83 

Eight Presbyteries, Columbus ,Erie, Kalamazoo, Lehigh, Marion, 
Shenango, West Jersey and Wooster paid their assessment for 
Mileage in full, but nothing on Entertainment, which amounted to 
$676.52. 

Twenty-one Presbyteries are exempt from assessment. Sixteen 
of these are in foreign countries. Corisco paid $15.30 to the Mileage 
Fund. Six of these are represented by one minister each who have 
drawn for Mileage $136.47. 

The five Freedmen Presbyteries are represented by six ministers 
and six elders. They contributed $202.11 to, and drew from the 
Mileage Fund, $545.40. 

Eight Presbyteries, after deducting their own expenses, have 
paid as follows, on account of the Mileage Fund : 

Assessed. Paid. 

Chester $277 10 $151 00 

Cincinnati 376 75 249 45 

Freeport 261 94 62 81 

Fort Wayne 144 45 40 60 

Lima 129 65 63 65 

Lyons 130 70 110 08 

New Castle 268 60 50 00 

Zauesville. 288 58 58 00 

The whole amount of assessments unpaid is $1491.48 for Mile- 
age, and $1498.46 for Entertainment, amounting in all to $2989.94. 

A comparative view of our financial affairs shows tha^ we have 
collected this year, $1056.19 more on Mileage, and $464.49 on En- 
tertainment than was realized in 1883, and that our Mileage ex- 
penses are $4885.36 less this year than last, thus bettering our 
financial affairs, $6406.04. 

The Committee feel constrained to call the attention of the As- 
sembly to the fourth rule on page 821 of Minutes of 1883, that 
Commissioners shall as early as the fourth day of the session of the 
Assembly, pay in the the apportionment of each Presbytery to the 
Standing Committee on Mileage, and furnish a bill of their neces- 
sary traveling expenses, rules which, if observed, might have les- 
sened the time consumed, at least two days. 

"We have 572 Commissioners present, six more than in 1883. As 
an evidence of the conviction among our Presbyteries that our 
Assembly is unnecessarily large and expensive, we are informed 
that four Presbyteries have each sent two Commissioners, and others 
one Commissioner less than their quota. 

Your Committee have further to report, that Elder William G. 
Case, a Commissioner from the Presbytery of Los Angeles, was 
stricken down by death at Kansas City on the 11th inst., while on 
his way to attend the meeting of this Assembly, that it was esti- 
mated that his expenditures had been about $150, which they did 
not pay. They therefore recommend that our Stated Clerk be 
authorized to settle with his estate when an administrator or duly 
authorized person shall present the claim. 



8-i MINUTES OF THE D'^^Y 24th, 

We offer tlie following : 

Resolved, That the apportionment for the ensuing year of the 
present 7)er capita rate of apportionment shall be four cents for Mile- 
age, one and one-half cents for Contingent, and one and one-half 
cents for Entertainment expenses. 

Resolved, That the Chairmaj;! of the Mileage Committee is hereby- 
directed to pay to William H. Roberts, 1).D., Treasurer of this 
Assembly, the balance of $4416.13 money in his hands. 

The Standing Committee on Education presented their Report, 
"which was received. The Assembly was then addressed by the 
Rev. Daniel W. Poor, D.D., Secretary of the Board of Education, 
and others. The Report was adopted, and is as follows : 

The Committee on Education respectfully report : 

Our Church is to be congratulated upon manifest increase of in- 
terest in her work of Education. The Board reports an encourag- 
ing advance in contributions from our Churches and a very grati- 
fying increase in the number of candidates for the ministry. 
These results are attributed to the unusual interest excited at the 
last Assembly by the discussions attending the establishment of the 
new Board of Aid for Colleges. The enthusiasm of that Assem- 
bly was carried like a spreading fire throughout the Church, illus- 
trating the fact so often insisted upon that lack of interest in any 
of our Church work, is due to lack of information among the peo- 
ple more than to anything else ; and that in proportion as our min- 
isters become interested in any cause, and so qualify themselves to 
speak to the people, in that proportion the resources of our Boards are 
increased, and their work facilitated and enlarged. We are con- 
strained to believe that the utmost needs of this Board, both of 
men and money would be supplied by our Churches, if our pastors 
were habitually as enthusiastic in disseminating information and 
dwelling upon its importance as they are at times. For a number of 
years there had been a steady decline in the number of candidates 
for the ministry in our colleges, and in the number receiving aid 
from this Board, This state of things was dwelt upon at the last 
Assembly, and this year the Board reports an increase of 91 in 
the number of candidates entered upon their list. This increase is 
so large as to have been entirely unexpected, and consequently the 
contributions of our churches, though larger than ever before, 
have not been sufiicient to meet the expense incurred by this great 
influx of students. The Board has therefore been compelled to in- 
cur a debt of $10,912.30. 

Your Committee believe that our Church is more than willing 
to enable the Board to balance its accounts, without obliging it to 
turn any of these applicants away, or to reduce the value of the 
scholarships the coming year, and would recommend the follow- 
ing : 

Resolved, That the General Assembly learns, with gratitude to 
God, of the large number of young men- presenting themselves to 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 85 

•our Board as candidates for the ministry, and earnestly requests our 
churches to make special efforts during the coming year to increase 
their contributions to this cause, and especially desires every 
church to make some contribution however small. 

The total receipts of the Board for the past year are $67,100.41, an 
advance of $3,600.85. The number of churches contributing was 
larger by 109 than ever before in the history of the Church. And 
this in spite of the fact, that many churches divided their contri- 
bution to education between this Board and the new Board of Aid 
for Colleges. 

During the year, 577 students have been under the care of the 
Board; in theological seminaries, 216; in colleges, 262; in the pre- 
paratory stage, 99. Sixty -eight complete their studies this year. 
The recent increase of candidates will of course have no effect upon 
the number of graduates this year. It gives promise for future 
years, and encourages the hope that better days are before us. But 
while all this should be acknowledged with thanksgiving, we must 
not flatter ourselves that we are meeting the demands which are 
pressing upon us. By referring to the report of the Board, it will 
be seen that we have now 1859 more churches than ministers. 
Making every possible allowance for churches which have only a 
nominal existence, and for churches combined so as to be served 
by oije minister, and counting all of our ministers who can by any 
probability be supposed to be available for active service, and still 
there is an excess of 532 churches. 

The aggregate of students as presented in the catalogues of our 
Theological Seminaries for the past year has increased, yet the 
prospect for supply of ministers from this source for the next three 
years is only 144 per year. These (if even all of them enter our 
ministry), are insufficient to supply our vacant churches, our home 
missions and foreign missions, and to replenish the ranks thinned 
by death and dismissal. We hear sometimes, expressions of alarm 
at the great number of ministers coming into our Church from 
sister denominations. The Board calls attention to the fact that 
but for these sources of supply, the net increase of our ministry 
last year would have been only 11 against an increase in churches 
of 99. What should we have done for the supply of these new 
churches but for the 64 borrowed ministers ! 

But even if we could be satisfied with the supply from these 
sources it is not sufficient. Plainly a crisis is before us, and the 
Board may well say, "there is no subject which demands of our 
Church more earnest consideration and more determined action." 
The supply of ministers must be increased or disaster is near at 
hand. From whence is this supply to come ? The standard of 
educational requirement must not be lowered. It should rather be 
elevated. Half educated ministers are no match for our times. 
The demands of the age are imperious. The general diffusion of 
intelligence, the high standard of education maintained even for 
the masses, render it absolutely necessary that ministers should be 



86 MINUTES OF THE [Maj 24th, 

well armed and equipped, with the weapons of learning and culture, 
as well as with the gifts and influences of the Spirit. An adequate 
supply of such ministers cannot be expected from the ranks of those 
who are rich in this world's goods, and able to provide for their 
own education. The Church must lay her hand upon the multi- 
tude of poor young men, who are otherwise qualified and called 
and ready to respond to the call, but for the lack of means. 

It is often urged that the ministry should be put upon a level 
with other professions, and men compelled to struggle into it as 
they do into the professions of law and medicine. The sufficient 
answer is that there are multitudes of young men who would be 
lawyers and physicians, but are deterred for want of means to 
secure the requisite education. These secular professions can spare 
such ; but the ministry cannot spare them as our statistics year by 
year demonstrate. It is not true that all men of spirit who desire 
to enter other professions succeed in gaining an adequate education. 
Poverty is an insuperable barrier to many ; but the Church should 
leave no obstacle, which she can remove, in the way of young men 
who desire to enter her ministry. The ministry can never tempt 
men with the hope of worldly gain. It is well that it cannot, 
for it would become corrupt if it did. The great majority of those 
who fill its ranks must always be drawn thither by the spirit of 
self-sacrifice, of love to Christ and love to men. There is need of 
all who come with such spirit from both classes; the rich and the 
poor. 

We would call the attention of the Assembly to the fact stated 
in the Report of the Board, that in the course of the past year 
fifteen students were dropped for low scholarship. If ever the 
Church's beneficiary system is wrecked it will be upon this rock. 
There is evidently great carelessness or lack of judgment among 
pastors and sessions, and Presbyteries and colleges in recommending, 
approving and continuing candidates for the ministry who are 
mentally unfit. It is a lamentable fact that in one year fifteen 
students who have been pursuing their studies in our colleges, we 
do not know for how many years, should have to be dropped for 
low scholarship. We do know that such students are often con- 
tinued in college for years after their incompetency has been ap- 
parent. College professors are often at fault here. And in most 
cases the pastors and sessions who first recommend the candidates, 
and the Presbyteries who approved them might, by the exercise of 
ordinary discretion, avoid such mistakes. When it is remembered 
that the Board never drops a student for low scholarship if he be 
possessed of compensating gifts, such as literary or oratorical ability, 
it becomes apparent that sessions and Presbyteries often violate 
the Apostle's injunction "to lay hands suddenly upon no man." 

At the conclusion of its Report, the Board calls attention to the 
necessity for " some system by means of which its unemployed yet 
available ministers may be set at work, its vacant churches be 
more speedily supplied, and those which are hopelessly feeble and 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 87 

promise no growth, be combined with others of our own or other 
denominations, so that thej can be regularly supplied with the 
means of grace." 

It has been found in the experience of the Board, that one of 
the greatest obstacles in their way is the fact that there are so 
many unemployed ministers. People point to these and say, " we have 
too many ministers now." If all these unemployed ministers were 
in active service, there would still be a great dearth. But as many 
of them are unfit for service, that fact should be made to appear. 
Such a system would also greatly increase the efficiency of our 
ministry and churches, and would remedy the one great weakness 
of our Church polity. Various plans have been suggested and 
some of them tried with marked success, notably the plan of the 
Presbytery of Emporia. 

Your Committee would recommend the following : 

Resolved^ That all our Presbyteries be requested to take this 
matter into consideration, and devise some plan, each for itself, 
whereby its vacant churches may be speedily supplied, and its un- 
employed ministers brought into active service. 

It will be observed that the accounts of the Board are not 
audited. Very satisfactory explanations of this fact have been 
made to your Committee by Mr. Samuel Field, Auditor, and by 
the Secretary, Rev. Dr. D. W. Poor, and we are unanimously of 
the opinion, that the affairs of the Board are very ably and care- 
fully managed. 

An overture has been placed in the hands of the Committee 
from the Synod of Baltimore, expressed in the following liesolu- 
tions : 

1. That, as the funds of the Board of Education are contributed 
with at least the implied understanding that they are to be used 
for the education of young men in the Institutions of our own 
Church, those funds ought not, except in extraordinary cases, to 
be used to sustain men in Institutions that are not in harmony 
with both the faith and the order of our Church. 

2. That Presbyteries be enjoined to see, as far as possible, that 
students under their care, receiving aid from the Board of Educa- 
tion, pursue their studies in Institutions that are in harmony with 
both our doctrines and polity. 

Your Committee recommend the adoption of these Resolutions. 
The term of office of the following members of the Board of Educa- 
tion expires by limitation : 

Ministers : Thomas J. Shepherd, D.D., N. S. McFetridge, D.D., 
and James M. Crowell, D.D. 

Laymen : Fulton W. Hastings and Horace W. Pitkin. 

Your Committee recommend their re-election. The place of 
Franklin Baker, resigned, is to be supplied. We recommend that 
George W. Barr, of Northminster Church, Philadelphia, be chosen 
to fill this vacancy. 



88 MINUTES OF THE [May 24tli, 

The order of tlie day, the Eeport of the Special Committee on 
Reduced Representation, was taken up. Pending its consideration, 

The Assembly adjourned, and closed with prayer. 



SATUKDAY, May 24th, 3 o'clock P. M. 

The Assembl}^ met, and was opened with prayer. 

A Resolution on the relation of the Session to Church Music, 
was refierred to the Committee on the Polity of the Church. 

The subject of Reduced Representation, was further discussed, 
and postponed, to take up the order of the day, viz.: the Report of 
the Special Committee on Judicial Commissions. The Minority 
Report from said Committee was taken up as an amendment, and 
lost. 

The Majority Report was then amended, and adopted, and is as 
follows: 

The Committee appointed to consider the subject of Judicial 
Commissions, and present a plan of action to this Assembly, re- 
spectfully report : 

The practice of appointing Judicial CommissioJs by the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, is an inheritance from the 
Church of Scotland. And, although the power to appoint such 
Commissions was not embodied in our Constitution, yet the prac- 
tice has continued by consent of parties, in the absence of constitu- 
tional authority. 

At different periods of the Church's history, attempts have been 
made to give constitutional authority to this principle, which has 
been found so useful in the trial of judicial cases, but without suc- 
cess. 

A Committee Avas appointed, Avith instructions to prepare an 
amendment to the Book of Discipline on this subject. This Com- 
mittee reported the result of their labors to the Assembly of 1877. 
On their report, the whole matter was referred to the Committee 
on the Book of Discipline. Owing to the action of the Assembly 
of 1881, the Committee on Revision, in reporting the Revised Book 
to the Assembly of 1883, left this matter where they found it. 
That Assembly, feeling the importance of some relief from our 
present embarrassment, referred the subject to this Assembly ; on 
that reference, the present Committee was appointed. 

We have taken the matter intrusted to us into careful considera- 
tion, and have agreed to recommend the Assembly to send down 
the following Overture to the Presbyteries for their approval : 

Firsts Shall the following section be added to the Book of Disci- 
pline: 

The General Assembly, and each Synod under its care, shall have 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 89 

power to appoint a Judicial Commission, from their respective 
bodies, consisting of ministers and elders, in number not less than 
a quorum of the Judicatory appointing. 

All judicial cases may be submitted to this Commission, and its 
decisions shall be final; except in matters of law, which shall be re- 
ferred to the appointing court, for final adjudication; and also, all 
matters of Constitution and Doctrine, which may be reviewed in 
the appointing body, and upon final adjudication by the General 
Assembly. This Commission shall sit at the same time and place 
as the body appointing it ; and its finding shall be entered upon the 
minutes of such body. 

Second^ Shall the following be added to Chapter XI, Section 4, 
of the Form of Government : 

Provided^ that in the trial of judicial cases the Synod shall have 
power to act by Commission, in accordance with the provisions on 
the subject of Judicial Commissions in the Book of Discipline. 

And, shall Chapter XII, Section 4, be amended, by inserting at 
the close of the first sentence, the following : 

Provided^ that in the trial of judicial cases, the General Assem- 
bly shall have power to act by Commission, in accordance with the 
provisions on the subject of Judicial Commissions, in the Book of 
Discipline. 

The Rev. Elijah R. Craven, D.D., and the Rev. Wm. H. Roberts, 
D.D., were appointed a Committee to prepare a statement in ref- 
erence to these Overtures, when sent down to the Presbyteries, 
and to determine their place in the Book of Discipline. 

The Report of the minority of the Standing Committee upon 
the Board of Publication, was taken up, and after discussion, the 
previous question was called, and it was lost. 

The unfinished business being the Report of the Standing Com- 
mittee on the Board of Publication, was taken up, and adopted, 
and is as follows : 

Your Committee have examined with care and interest, the 
Annual Report of the Board of Publication, and find evidence that 
the past year has been a year of prosperity and progress in every 
department of the work which this Board has in charge. The 
diligence and fidelity with which the trust has been administered 
deserve the hearty commendation of the Assembly. 

The interests involved are so diverse and complicated that it is 
exceedingly difficult for the Committee, in the limited time at their 
command to gain an adequate conception of the work, and scarcely 
less di (ficult to make a concise and intelligible statement of their 
conclusions. 

By means of this single agency, our Church is carrying on the 
business of a publishing house, a newspaper office, and a bookstore 
wholesale and retail, in addition to supervising the work of colpor- 
tage and determining, so far as they may, the organization and in- 



90 MINUTES OF THE [May 24tll, 

struction of 6476 Sabbath-schools, in which nearly 600,000 pupils 
are receiving relijsrious influence and training. These several 
interests are so interlaced that it is impossible in our report to 
separate them entirely. 

The business department, which has for its function the publica- 
tion and sale of religious books and periodicals, does not appeal to 
the benevolence of the churches, but depends for its maintenance 
upon the proceeds of the business, which employs, according to the 
report, a capital of more than half a million of dollars. 

The exhibit which the Board makes of its publications for the 
past year is very gratifying. When informed that they have 
printed during the year the aggregate number of 15,195,866 copies 
of various works, such as library and general reading books, hymns, 
hymnals, tracts, lesson-helps for both teachers and scholars, and 
weekly and monthly papers for both old and young, we begin to 
see something of the vastness and value of their work for the 
Church. 

Among the issues of bound volumes are some of rare and per- 
manent value. It is but a just tribute to our Christian women to 
note the fact that of the 21 new volumes published last year, 12 
were the product of their ready pens. 

Of the 13 new tracts issued in the English language, one is by 
the Rev. Edwin F. Hatfield, D.D., whose death occasioned such 
widespread and profound sorrow. Its title, " Thv) Outlook of Pres- 
byterianism, " is touchingly suggestive of his affection for the 
Church in whose service he spent his days, while it also comes to 
us like a bequeathment of his unfaltering confidence, in the perma- 
nent and progressive usefulness of this branch of the Church uni- 
versal. 

The large re-issue of former publications on the subject of tem- 
perance is also worthy of gTateful mention. In addition to these, 
the Board is now publishing under the title of the " Westminster 
Cheap Series," some of the most apt, telling and effective treatises 
on religious topics, that have ever appeared in the English language. 

The publications in the interest of the Sabbath-school, varying 
in form and characteristics to meet the needs of old and young, are 
worthy of the highest commendation. 

The Assembly of 1882, in adopting the carefully prepared report 
of a Special Committee on Publication, appointed by the preced- 
ing Assembly, gave to the Board the following instructions (See 
Minutes, p. 77) : " The Board shall present to the General Assem- 
bly a yearly statement of the expenses of the Publishing Depart- 
ment, and also a statement of its profits, in such a manner that it 
shall be made to appear (1), whether any reduction in the price 
of its publications is practicable, and (2), what sum this depart- 
ment may yield year l^y year for sabbath-school work and col- 
portage, or other missionary purposes. 

These instructions have not been complied with in the report 
submitted this year. It is impossible to determine from the finan- 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 91 

cial statement whether the business of the year has heen conducted 
with profit or loss. Consequently we cannot judge whether any 
reduction in the price of its publications is practicable. 

The missionary fund of the Board, to which the churches are 
asked to contribute, sustains the two-fold work of colportage and 
sabbath-school organization. 

During the past year the number of colporteurs has been con- 
siderably increased, and new fields have been occupied by them 
in the sparsely settled and spiritually destitute portions of our 
country ; 108,699 volumes have been distributed by sale pr gift, 
and 6,692,882 pages of tracts and periodicals; 87,112 families 
have been visited, and 151 ■ sabbath-schools organized. It is 
gratifying to notice that the Board has, to a considerable extent, 
availed itself of the unpaid service of pastors and other volunteer 
helpers, in securing the dissemination of their publications. In 
many parts of our land no agent can do this work so judiciously 
and efi'ectively as the preacher, provided that he is not constrained 
to become a mere book peddler. Grants have also been made to 
missionaries laboring in various foreign lands. We rejoice that the 
results attained have been greater than in previous years. Yet 
considering the ability of our Church, and the great need which 
exists in many sparsely populated regions, and among the Freed- 
men of the South, it is not to our credit that we have had in the 
work of colportage only an equivalent for the full time of thirty- 
six men, and that the net value of the literature gratuitously distrib- 
uted during the year is only $12,434. Certainly there is an ur- 
gent call for broader plans and more generous gifts, if we are to 
embrace the opportunities which Providence affords us in these 
days, when the printed page is so potent a factor in forming public 
opinion, and determining the drift of our civilization and religious 
life. 

The Report of the Secretary of Sabbath-school Work indicates 
so clearly the progress made in that department that comment is 
unnecessary. The value and importance of this work cannot be 
over-estimated. The zeal and earnestness with which it has been 
pushed forward should receive grateful recognition, and should 
enlist the cooperation of Presbyteries, pastors and sessions, through- 
out the entire Church. ■• 

Your Committee recommend action as follows : 

1. The Assembly express their appreciation of the service ren- 
dered by this Board to the Church and to the cause of Christ, and 
commend the fidelity displayed in the prosecution of its difficult 
task. 

2. The attention of the Board is invited to the action of the 
Assembly of 1882, already referred to, which requires from it 
annually, a clear and definite statement of the expenses and profits 
of the business department. 

3. That this Assembly appoint a Committee, consisting of one 
minister and two elders, which shall be charged with the duty of 



92 MINUTES OF THE [Maj 24th, 

making a thorougli examination of the assets and accounts of the 
Board of PuLlication, with instructions to employ an expert ac- 
countant, to be paid by the Board, and that said Committee report 
to the next General Assembly. In the judgment of your Commit- 
tee such examination should be made at least once in two j'^ears. 

4. The Board of Publication is instructed to amend its By-Laws 
as follows: Sec. 5, Art. III. — A. So as to read, " lie shall be ex- 
officio a member of the Missionary Committee." Sec. 5, Art. III. — 
B. So as to read, " He shall be ex-officio a member of the Publish- 
ing Committee." Sec. 10, Art. III. — C. So as to read, "He shall 
be ex-officio a member of the Sabbath- school Committee.". 

It appears from the By-Laws as now framed that each Secretary 
is made ex-officio a member of all permanent Committees except 
the Auditing Committee, and that the number required to con- 
stitute a quorum of such Committees is five or in some cases six. 
These provisions enable the three Secretaries and two or three 
other members of the Board to form a quorum of any Committee, 
and thus give to the Secretaries undue power. In the judgment of 
your Committee each Secretary should be a member of the Com- 
mittee most closely related to his own office and duties. For that 
reason, the above recommendations have been made, which if 
adopted will so amend the laws that the Corresponding Secretary 
will be ex officio a member of the Missionary , Committee ; the 
Editorial Secretary, a member of the Publishing Committee; and 
the Secretary of Sabbath-school Work a member of the Sabbath- 
school Committee. As all the Secretaries are members of the 
Board, it seems improper that each of them should have a vote 
upon every Committee. 

5. The Assembly express their appreciation of the labors per- 
formed by the Secretary of Sabbath-school work, and commend 
him to the confidence and cordial co-operation of the churches. 

6. In order to increase the efficiency of this Department the 
Board is recommended to consider the propriety of employing a 
clerk who shall be under the direction and control of the Secretary 
to assist him in the discharge ot his duties. 

7. While heartily commending the use of the leaflets and other 
lesson helps provided by the Board, as aids to Bible study, the 
Assembly is constrained to bear testimony against the growing 
practice of making them a substitute for the Bible in the sabbath- 
school. The Bible in its entirety should be the text-book, and it 
is desirable that each scholar should possess and use his own Bible. 
In furtherance of the same general object the Board is requested 
to consider whether it may not be advisable to prepare a lesson leaf 
from which the Scripture text shall be omitted. 

8. Pastors and sessions are urged to supervise more carefully 
their sabbath-school work, to encourage in every way the thorough 
preparation of teachers, to secure as far as possible the attendance 
of the children upon the services of the Church, to steadily aim at 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 93- 

their early conversion to Clirist, and their intelligent attachment to 
the Church of their fathers. 

9. The Presbyteries are exhorted to organize the sabbath- 
school work within their bounds, and to assist the eflbrts of the 
Secretary. 

10. The Assembly approves the diligence of the Board in en- 
larging its work of colportage, and expresses the hope that it may 
be much more widely extended, especially in the regions where re- 
ligious privileges are meagre. 

11. To make this enlargement of the Missionary work possible, 
churches and sabbath -schools are urged to contribute more liberally 
to the Missionary fund of the Board, so that the sum of $75,000, at 
least, may be devoted to this work during the coming year. 

12. In view of the peculiar necessities of the churches on the 
Pacific slope, the Board is recommended to establish a new deposi- 
tory in the city of San Francisco. 

13. To fill the vacancy in the Board occasioned by the lamented 
death of the late Judge Sharswood, your Committee recommend 
the appointment of George S. Graham, Esq. 

The term of service of the following members expires at this 
time. 

Ministers : Kev. George F. Wiswell, D.D. ; Rev. John W. Dulles, 
D.D.;'Rev. William E. Jones, D.D.; Rev. Willard M. Rice, 
D.D. ; Rev. J. Addison Henry, D.D. ; Rev. Matthew Newkirk, 
D.D. ; Rev. William D. Roberts and Rev. Samuel J. Niccolls, D.D. 

Laymen: E, A. Rollins, Joseph Allison, LL.D., Henry N. Paul, 
John H. Watt, William L. Mactier, John D. McCord, Edward P. 
Borden and Joseph M. Colling wood. 

Your Committee respectfully recommends their re-election. 

Several Overtures have been submitted to your Committee for 

consideration. 

1. An Overture from the Presbytery of Lake Superior asks, that 
the Board be directed to publish in the Scandinavian language , 
all such publications as are now issued by them in German. It is 
recommended that the Board be requested to fulfill this petition 
when, in their judgment, it is practicable to do so. 

2. An Overture from the Presbytery of Oregon requests the 
Assembly to urge upon the Committee in charge sundry changes 
in the International Sabbath-school Lessons. 

Your Committee recommend the following answer : That the 
General Assembly is satisfied with the International system of 
Sabbath- school Lessons as they are set forth in our series of West- 
minster Lesson Helps. 

3. An Overture from the Presbytery of Platte asks, that the 
Sabbath-school Work be separated from the Publishing Depart- 
mcQt, and placed under the care of a distinct Committee. It is 
recommended that the overture be answered as follows: This 
Assembly regards the proposed change as undesirable, but urges 



94 MINUTES OF THE [Maj 24th, 

the Board of Publication to give to its Sabbath-school Committee 
and Secretary, as much freedom of action as possible. 

4. Overtures from the Presbyteries of West Jersey and New 
Brunswick, have been referred to your Committee, which urge the 
Assembly to take such action as shall secure an earlier issue of the 
Assembl3^'s minutes. 

It Avould be unreasonable to require from the Stated Clerk, just 
elected, as much expedition as if he had been able previous to the 
meeting of the Assembly, to make definite arrangements for the 
publication ; but to remedy as far as possible the inconvenience 
experienced in former years, your Committee recommend the fol- 
lowing action: 

The Assembly directs that all matter required for publication 
in the Minates of the Assembly, or the Appendix, be lodged in the 
hands of the Stated Clerk, on or before the closing day of the 
Session, and that the Stated Clerk is directed to proceed, not later 
than June 1st, to the printing of the Minutes, without reference to 
documents which may be delayed beyond that date. With the 
discretion, however, accorded to him of printing such documents 
in a supplement. 

An Overture from the Presbytery of Crawfordsville, requesting 
the General Assembly to instruct the Board of Publication to print 
an edition of its sabbath-school papers, lesson lea res and helps, on 
cheaper paper, was, on recommendation of the Standing Committee 
on Publication, referred to the Board of Publication for such action 
as may be deemed wise. 

The subject of the relations of the Boards of Home and Foreign 
Missions to the work in the Indian Territory, and among the 
Chinese in the United States, was taken up, and referred to these 
two Boards, as a joint committee, to report to the next Assembly. 

That part of the Report of the Standing Committee on the Board 
of Foreign Missions, which deals with the work among the Chinese 
and the Indians in the United States, was referred to this Joint 
Committee. 

The Report of the Standing Committee on the Board of Foreign 
Missions, was then amended, and adopted, and is as follows : 

The Lord Jehovah has said, " Look unto Me, and be ye saved,' 
all the ends of the earth'; for I am God, and there is none else." 
He has also said to His Church, " The abundance of the sea shall 
be converted into Thee, the forces of the Gentiles shall come unto 
Thee." Christ said to His disciples, " The field is the world." And 
again, "Go ye into all the world, and preach the Gospel to every 
creature." 

We come to-day to ascertain how far we have been carrying out 
this Divine commission. While we are to strengthen the stakes of 
our beloved Zion at home, we must not forget to lengthen her 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 95 

cords, until we have embraced tlie whole world. Let us briefly 
look over the record of the Board's work for the last twelve months, 
that we may have a quickened love and gratitude to Him who 
has " crowned the year with His goodness." 

1. THE FINANCES. 

The Standing Committee on Foreign Missions has received the 
Forty-seventh Annual Report of the work under the care of the 
Board, for the year ending April 30, 1884. We find that an im- 
mense amount of work has been carefully and judiciously done by 
the Board and its officers, work which the Church at large can 
never fully appreciate. The whole Church owes a debt of grati- 
tude to these men, who have so faithfully executed the trust com- 
mitted to them. 

The accounts of the Treasurer show that the receipts of the 
Board from all sources, from April 30, 1883, to April 30, 1884, 
have been $693,122.70. Its expenditures for the same period, in- 
cluding the payment of the debt x)f $13,382.96 from last year's ac- 
counts, were $703,845.72. This leaves a debt at the end of this 
year, of $10,723.02. The deficiency is so much less than was 
feared in the later months of the year, that it is viewed almost with 
a feeling of relief. The receipts of the year proper, exceeded its 
expenses $3382.96. 

The gifts of departed friends, though not so large in amount as 
those of last year, saved the treasury from heavy embarrassment. 
The gifts of the churches, sabbath -schools. Women's Boards, and 
individual donors exceeded those of any former year, and were 
$53,475.52 over the sum received from the same sources in the pre- 
ceding year. This general statement is a cause of thanksgiving to 
the Head of tlie Church, who enabled and inclined His people to 
devote this large sum to the grand work of sending the Gospel to 
the heathen nations. 

The receipts from the various Women's Poards and Societies 
amounted to $203,754.74, a fact which shows a healthy and steady 
growth in this department of Foreign Mission Work. Since these 
Auxiliary Societies of the women came into existence, during the 
past fourteen years, they have contributed $1,707,484.70. But the 
gain has not been so much in money, as in creating a sympathy, 
diflusing knowledge on the subject, arousing enthusiasm and call- 
ing forth the prayers of God's people, for otA- missionaries and their 
work. Even the youth and the little children in their mission 
bands, are being instructed to love and pray and labor for the con- 
version of heathen children ; and the heart of our Presbyterian 
womanhood has been quickened as never before, to give the Gos- 
pel speedily to the millions of heathen women and children. 

The Committee would acknowledge with especial thankfulness 
the noble work which has been done by the women of the Pres- 
byterian Church through their Boards and Societies. These are 



96 MINUTES OF THE [May 24th, 

not in any sense detached and independent organizations. They 
stand in closest and most vital relations to the Church. As aux- 
iliaries of the Board, they are practically in connection with the 
Assembly. They deserve the cordial sympathy and support of all 
the Synods, Presbyteries, and churches. And it is greatly to be 
desired, that their organization and influence could be extended 
into those Synods where they have as yet done little. Surely there 
are generous and earnest Christian women in these Synods who 
are both willing and able to take an active share in this grand 
work. 

2. SUMMARY VIEW OF OUR FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

"We have in the field 163 American ministers ; 108 ordained 
native ministers ; 143 native licentiates ; 23 American men, and 
281 American women as lay missionaries ; and 786 native lay mis- 
sionaries; there are 19,218 communicants, and 25,914 boarding 
and day scholars. 

The Missions of our Board are among ten tribes of the North 
American Indians, they are in Mexico, Guatemala, South America, 
Africa, India, Siam, China, and among the Chinese in this country, 
they are in Japan, Persia, and Syria. Thus we see, they reach 
portions of all the continents of the World. 

3. WHAT HAS BEEN THE PROGRESS, AND WH>T IS THE NEED 
FOR THE IMMEDIATE FUTURE. 

The year has been one of marked progress in additions to the 
mission churches, in educational efforts, in the preparation of a 
native ministry, and in the increase of laborers, native and foreign. 
The accessions to the Church in the foreign field in proportion to 
the nvimber of laborers, have been far beyond that in our own 
country. In the Presbytery of Shantung, China, the additions to 
the membership of the Church were 672, being an increase of 
nearly 50 per cent over last year. The Board has continued its 
usual contribution to the evangelical churches in the Papal lands 
of Europe. This money is given directly to the native agencies 
which are already established on the ground. It is conveyed to 
them without charge for collection or disbursement, and thus it 
reaches the fields for which it was intended undiminished. The 
Committee would call attention to this, and suggest that our Board 
will cheerfully receive ^nd distribute all contributions from our 
churches for the evangelization of Papal Europe. 

The Committee would notice with gratitude the continued use- 
fulness and prosperity of the work of the Board among the Indian 
tribes of this country. For fifty years our Church has been labor- 
ing for the enlightenment of this pagan darkness and barbarism at 
our very doors, and while a large work in this field still remains to 
be done, we have reason to be thankful for the great results already 
accomplished. The civilization and at least partial Christianiza- 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 9^ 

tion of many tribes, are due under God to the faithful and success- 
fal labors of the Foreign Board. And still the good work goes 
quietly and steadily forward. The schools are active and pros- 
perous, particularly among the Dakotahs. With fewer missionaries 
in the field than last year, there is an increase in the number of 
additions to the Church and the total number of communicants is 
now 1453. All these we ma}^ regard as direct gains from a 
Paganism which is none the less gloomy and pitiable because it 
exists so near us, and we thank God for these pledges of future and 
larger victories. We also rejoice in the steps taken by our govern- 
ment in favor of a better civil condition of our Indian tribes. 

The work among the Chinese who are brought by purely secular 
causes to our coasts, and cast, in all their heathen blindness, upon 
the missionary conscience of the Church, has a peculiar and power- 
ful interest. In rescuing these souls from the humbling influences 
of a false religion, we are setting in operation forces which will 
surely be most potent for good, even beyond the Pacific, for the 
converts who are made here will, and do carry the grace of the 
Gospel back with them to their own land. During the year that 
is past, this department of the Foreign work has been blessed more 
than ever before. There has been an encouraging increase in the 
churches and schools, and in the benevolent contributions of the 
converts. One thing we trust will be clear to aU intelligent and 
earnest minds, whether the Chinese must go or stay, the}^ must be 
Christians. 

Never was the work of our missions in all its details in such a 
healthy condition, and what is needed is a thorough appreciation 
by the whole Church of her duty and her relation to it. To sus- 
tain the advancing work, greater means must be supphed. The 
Church has the ability, may she have the grace to come up to the 
demands of her Divine Head, and the requirements of the cause in 
the different missions. 

One great aim in the Foreign Mission work, is to train a native 
ministry, and if the Church at home will only continue to give the 
needed support, the time is not so far distant, when China, and 
India, and Japan, and Siam, and Africa, and South America, will 
have their John Knoxes, John Calvins, Archibald Alexanders and 
Charles Hodges, to be the teachers of theology in their respective 
countries ; and a mighty army of ministers and teachers will, by 
the Word, and Spirit, and Grace of God, be trained to carry for- 
ward this glorious work. But in order to bring about these stu- 
pendous results, the Church must not grow weary in well doing, 
she must not faint or halt, she must continue to hold out a helping 
hand, she must give her sons and daughters, her wealth and her 
prayers, her time and her strength, her choicest gifts, whatever 
they may be, in the service of the Lord. While we pray, " Thy 
Kingdom come," we must faithfully use the means to bring about 
this end, and "the Kingdoms of this world shall become the King- 
doms of our Lord and of His Christ." 



98 MINUTES OF THE [May 24th, 

The Board of Foreign Missions completes, with this General 
Assembly, fifty years of history. The first missions of our Church 
were begun in Liberia, Africa, at Lodiana, India, and among the 
American Indians, in the year 1833-34:. 

It is inspiring to think of the grand advance of Christianity 
during this half century. The adherents to the Christian system 
have multiplied. The converts have sent rapidly upwards the 
Christian percentage in the world's population. The institutions 
of Christian learning have increased in mighty power, and the 
central forces for promoting a future advance were, never so strong 
as to day. 

In this sublime movement our own Church has had an impres- 
sive part. We have groups of missions and centres of wide power 
in each of the five great divisions of the earth's surface. Beginning 
with the sunrise land, we follow these nerve-centres around the 
globe. Japan is grasping after Christian knowledge and Christian 
institutions. Corea is feeling blindly towards the light. China 
yields to the Christian teacher and preacher. The Court of Siam 
opens to the Christian physician, and the authorities of that country 
acknowledge their indebtedness to Christianity. India, Persia and 
-Syria, are centres of educational power for great races of people. 
Africa, through growing results, from either coasts, east and west, 
-opens long vistas of new opportunity. Access to Papal Europe and 
Papal South America is easily obtained. Wonderful opportunities 
for the overthrow of systems of error, offer themselves in Roman 
Catholic countries on our own continent. And China and Japan 
touch us again here on this continent across its whole breadth, and 
cluster under the very shadow of our home churches. 

All the grand results won in the past fifty years, rise to new 
means of efficiency in the ten colleges and theological schools, in 
the dispensaries and hospitals, in the ample and varied Christian 
literature, through which missionaries and converts are propelhng 
the vitalities of Christian truth, and in their organization into two 
Synods and fourteen Presbyteries. 

The tokens of God's favor which have been so richly enjoyed 
by our faithful and devoted missionaries in their various fields, and 
the marked ingatherings which have taken place, call for gratitude, 
enlarged faith, renewed vigor, stronger petitions for richer blessings 
and more generous giving on the part of the churches. As an As-. 
sembly, we stand on a high position in regard to Foreign Missions. 
The outlook is a grand one. Half a century has brought us up to 
a point from which we can get a glorious view. 

The piteous cry which comes from our laborious missionaries for 
more helpers on the great harvest fields, ought to be enough to 
melt the heart of the whole Church. Let us hear one (out of many) 
of these aj^peals, which comes from the Presbytery of Rio de Janeiro 
to the Assembly, for ten more men to be sent as soon as possible, 
to aid in the evangelization of Brazil : 

" God, in His mysterious providence, has reduced our number until 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 99 

there are only twelve ordained ministers in our Presbytery to for- 
ward the work among twelve millions of people, equal to the popu- 
lation of the States of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania ; 
while the three Synods in these States enroll 2262 ministers. 

"In all Brazil there are only three Evangelical ministers to each 
milUon of inhabitants. We send you, therefore, the old Macedonian 
cry : ' Come over and help us.' 

"In the city of Kio de Janeiro, the largest city in South America 
and the Southern hemisphere, we have three missionaries, and in 
the second city in size in the empire, there is only one. In one 
province, larger than France, and with a population of one million 
and a half, we have two native ministers, and these are the only 
evangehcal ministers in the Province. 

" What can plead more eloquently than such facts ? You need 
not be told that the evangelization of this immense empire is too 
great a work for so small a number of laborers. Our request for 
ten more men is exceedingly moderate, and we urge it upon you, 
not only by the needs of the field, but also by ' The mercies of 
God,' by the love you bear to our Redeemer, by the sacredness of 
His last command and by the awfulness of eternity." 

Can the Church resist such appeals ? 

What we all need now — Churches, and ministers, and institu- 
tions of learning — is a fresh, glorious baptism of the Holy Spirit ; 
then shall we begin to comprehend the magnitude of the work be- 
fore us, and have the heart and power to do it. Let the fire of the 
Holy Spirit and the love of Christ enter into all our agencies, and 
the Church will soon come with a blessed harvest song upon her 
lips. 

We need greater consecration. The devoted Mary Lyon used to 
say : " In the great work of saving souls, let us first give up our super- 
fluities, then if God still calls, our conveniences, when that is done 
if souls are still unsaved, and if the door is kept open by Divine 
Providence, let us, last of all, give up our necessities to the infinite 
need of saving souls." Let every man, woman and child in the 
Church seek to possess the spirit of Harriet Winslow, who said : 
" While these hands can work, and the heathen perish because the 
Gospel is not sent to them, my hours and days shall be employed 
for them." 

• We shall need, during the coming year, a more general difi'usion 
of missionary intelhgence ; the missionary publications of our 
Board must be more generally read ; Foreign Missions must be 
faithfully preached from the pulpit ; systematic and proportionate 
giving must be insisted upon ; all the men as well as the women 
must help in this work ; every Church, whether weak or strong, 
should have the opportunity of making an offering ; " all the tithes 
must be brought into the storehouse." These things being secured, 
glorious results must follow. 

To you who "know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that 
though He was rich, yet for your sakes He became poor, that ye 



100 MINUTES OF THE [May 24tll, 

througli His poverty miglit be rich," further appeal is unnecessary, 
"and to all others it will be unavailing. For we must "freely 
receive," before we shall be moved to "freely give." But when we 
have freely received then the Christian motive becomes potent — 
almost omnipotent, and will urge us at any sacrifice and by every 
effort to speed forth the Gospel of salvation on its message of 
mercy to mankind. 

In view of the opening fields before us, and the imperative cry 
which comes to us from perishing millions, we offer the following 
Resolutions : 

1. That we call upon the Church to so far increase her offerings 
as to furnish the Board with at least $750,000 for the ensuing- 
year. 

2. That pastors and sessions seek to inspire their people with a 
greater interest in the monthly concert of prayer for the conversion 
of the world. 

3. As knowledge lies at the foundation of all intelligent efforts, 
the pastors and sessions are urged to secure a more extensive circu- 
lation of missionary literature, especially the Foreign Missionary^ 
which Dr. Christlieb saj^s "is one of the leading missionary maga- 
zines of the world ;" and we would commend to our Presbyterian 
women and their societies the wisdom of having but one woman's 
magazine, besides Children's Work for Children^ in order to pro- 
mote unity of purpose and action. "» 

4. As most gratifying and hopeful are the efforts and achieve- 
ments of the different organizations throughout our Church which 
contemplate Woman's Work for Woman, as no recent movement 
of the Church has equaled this in practical efl&ciency and Christian 
success, and as its influence upon the coming of Christ's Kingdom 
is destined to be still more wonderful, we therefore urge that every 
encouragement be given to the Women's Auxiliary Societies, in their 
earnest and efficient work for the Master in the spread of the ever- 
lasting Gospel ; and that we also commend the holding of annual 
conventions in the interest of Foreign Missions, as far as prac- 
ticable in every Presbytery and Synod. 

5. That we have heard with pleasure that the Synod of India is 
to meet the coming autumn to celebrate the fiftieth year of the 
Mission. In connection with this event the following minute was 
passed by the Mission : " Resolved^ That we ask Dr. John C. Lowrie, 
founder of the Lodiana Mission, to visit the Mission, so as to be 
present at our semi-centennial celebration, proposed to be held at 
Lodiana in 1884." 

The Board has granted him leave to do so, if health and strength 
will permit, and many friends of the Senior Secretary hope that 
he will be able to take part in this commemorative service, and we 
ask that the prayers of the Church and the blessing of God may 
accompany him. 

The Committee would also report that they have examined the 
written minutes of the Board, and find them to be neatly and 



A.D. 188-1.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 101 

correctly kept, and all the business transacted in an orderly and 
satisfactory manner. 

We also recommend tlie election of tlie following members- of the 
Board : 

Ministers. — Charles K. Imbrie, D.D., George Alexander, D.D., 
James P. Wilson, D.D. 

Laymen. — David Olyphant, and Henry Ide. 

Pending the consideration of the Report of the Judicial Com- 
mittee, 

The Assembly adjourned, and closed with prayer. 



SATURDAY, May 24th, 7.30 o'clock P.M. 

The Special Committee on Civil Government and Industrial 
Schools in Alaska, to whom was referred the case of the Nez 
Perce Indians, reported verbally. 

The Assembly was addressed by Rev. George L. Spining, D.D., 
a member of the Committee, and others. 

. Pending a Resolution with reference to the Nez Perc6 Indians, 

The Assembly adjourned, and closed with prayer. 



MONDAY, May 26th, 9 o'clock A.M. 

The Assembly met, and spent half an hour in devotional exer- 
cises. 

The minutes of Saturday's sessions were read and approved. 

The following telegram was received from the General Assembly 
of the Presbyterian Church in the United States : 

ViCKSBUEG, Miss., May 24th, 1884. 

To the Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church : 
The Assembly has just determined to adhere to the action of the 
last Assembly, which is to correspond by letter, 

T. D. WiTHERSPOON", Moderator. 
Joseph R. Wilson, Stated Clerk. 

The Standing Committee on Correspondence presented the Let- 
ter from the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, which was read by the Stated Clerk. The Committee 
then presented their answer thereto which was adopted, and the 



102 MINUTES OF THE [May 26th, 

Letter and Answer directed to be published in the Appendix to 
the Minutes. 

The Eeport of the Special Committee on Reduced Representa- 
tion %vas taken up, and is as follows : 

Your Committee of forty-four, to which was assigned the duty of 
devising a plan for the reduction of the ratio of representation of 
the Assembly, would respectfally report, that they have given the 
subject the most unwearied attention, and have vRed every possible 
means within their reach, to comprehend the subject in all its com- 
plicated and perplexing bearings. 

They have examined, by sub-committees (of which Drs. Geary 
and Moore acted as chairmen), the reports of the Presbyteries on 
the Overture sent down to them last year, and the Overtures from 
the Presbyteries referred by the Assembly, With reference to the 
latter we report that four of the Presbyteries, Ebenezer, Dayton, 
St. Louis and Marion, ask for synodical representation; one of them, 
Bellefontaine, asks synodical representation, but with every Pres- 
bytery represented ; one of them, Logansport, asks for synodical rep- 
resentation on the basis of one minister and one elder for every fifty 
ministers, provided that each Presbytery shall have one delegate ; one 
of them, Oregon, asks that the present ratio be changed from two for 
twenty-four to two for thirty-six ministers ; four of them. Highland^ 
Clarion, Newton and Blairsville, wish the pres'\nt plan retained, 
merely striking out the representation of fractions over twenty-four 
ministers. One of them, Des Moines, suggests pastors instead of 
ministers as the basis of representation. One, Baltimore, makes the 
same suggestions as to substituting pastors for ministers, upon the 
basis of representation suggested in the plan of this Committee, 
dropping the fractions less than twelve. Two, Alton and Chester, 
recommend equal representation by two Commissioners from each 
of the Presbyteries, large and small. Thus it appears that fifteen 
only out of 188 Presbyteries have sent up any Overture propos- 
ing a specific plan for reduced representation, and these fifteen 
suggest seven different plans — no one of these plans having more 
than four (less than one-third) in its favor. It was, therefore, the 
opinion of the sub-committee, 1st. That no evidence had been laid 
before them of any general desire on the part of the churches to 
reduce the size of the Assembly. 2d. That there was abimdant 
evidence that the Church does not demand reduction, all the plans 
submitted by the Assembly, year after year, having been rejected 
by the Presbyteries, 

The Overture of 1883 shows the following results : 

Affirmative. Negative. 

Presbyteries voting in the 87 70 

Synods undivided 4 2 

Synods divided 16 16 

Churches represented by vote of Presbyteries 2,637 2,60-5 

Members represented by vote of Presbyteries 231,000 292,000 

It is noticeable here that the large churches which would have 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 103 

suffered most by tliis reduction are in the majority. A like com- 
parison shows the standing of ministers for and against the Over- 
ture, Af&rmative 2349, Negative 2280 ; and if we apply the same 
comparison to the benevolent fands of the Church we find it to be 
$550,000, $1,032,000. 

Showing the benevolent wealth of the Church to be against the 
Overture, which throws light upon the the causes of its defeat, and 
also indicates that where the Overture reduces most, those Presby- 
teries so affected have been most generous, for the vote stands 32 
• to 31. 

The plan of 1883, the figures of which show so much in its favor, 
is singularly like that which your Committee propose for your 
consideration. You will observe that in the affirmative of that 
year, there were 87 votes, and in the negative 70. The effect of the 
Overture of 1883 is a reduction of 140 Commissioners. When 
compared with the plan now proposed by your Committee it will 
show a difference of four — two ministers and two elders. The dif- 
ferent results between 1883 and 1884 will appear in the fact that 
Allegheny remains imaffected, as does Washington, but by the plan 
of 1883 each would have lost two Commissioners. The failure of 
the plan of the last Assembly, after all that has been said, shows 
that the Church does not appear to be united in favor of reduction, 
or upon any plan, the subject having been before all the Presby- 
teries during the year past, and only 15 out of the whole number 
having overtured for a reduction. 

But if the Assembly does not take this view of the subject, and 
considers it desirable to make a reduction, then- your Committee 
suggest that the Assembly send down to the Presbyteries the fol- 
lowing Overture, the effect of which, will be to reduce the number 
of Commissioners 136. Chapter XII, Section 2, of the Form of 
Government, reads now, " The General Assembly shall consist of 
an equal delegation of bishops and elders from each Presbytery in 
the following proportion, viz. : Each Presbytery consisting of not 
more than twenty-four ministers, shall send one minister and one 
elder, and each Presbytery consisting of more than twenty-four 
ministers, shall send two ministers and two elders, and in the like 
proportion for every twenty-four ministers in any Presbytery ; and 
these delegates, so appointed, shall be styled Commissioners to the 
General Assembly." Shall this Section be so amended as to read : 

" The General Assembly shall consist of an equal delegation of 
bishops and elders from each Presbytery, in the following propor- 
tion, viz. : Each Presbytery consisting of not more than twenty -four 
ministers, shall send one minister and one elder, and each Presby- 
tery consisting of more than twenty-four ministers, shall send one 
minister and one elder for each additional twenty-four ministers, or 
for each additional fractional number of ministers not less than 
twelve, and these delegates so appointed, shall be styled Commis- 
sioners to the General Assembly ?" 

In order to obtain the greatest possible light on this subject and 



104 MINUTES OF THE [May 26th, 

that unanimity of action which only consideration can give, your 
Committee acting upon the suggestion of our Moderator, not only 
examined all Overtures from the Presbyteries on the subject of 
representation, but invited all who had plans or suggestions on the 
subject, to lay them before us, and asked all such to explain their 
plans to the complete understanding of the Committee. Each mem- 
ber of your Committee was also called upon to give his own views, 
and the views of his Presbytery as far as he understood them upon 
the Avhole subject, after which there was a unanimous agreement 
to the foregoing Overture. 

To this was added the following as a further amendment to 
Chapter XII, Section 2, of the Form of Government to be sent down 
as a separate Overture, " Provided that no Presbytery hereafter to 
be constituted, shall be entitled to send commissioners to General 
Assembly, until it shall consist of at least twelve ministers and one 
elder from each congregation within its limits, except in foreign 
Presbyteries and the territory of Alaska." 

Your Committee found itself in all its deliberations environed by 
difficulties. The majority would have preferred leaving the Assem- 
bly as now constituted. Habit has woven its meshes about its 
present form, and history and its reminiscences bind us to it. It 
has so well served the Church in its growth and onward march, 
that a painful reluctance stood in the way of any change, like the 
smiting off" the J^oung branches from a tree in whv>se culture all had 
toiled to bring it to life, strength and beauty. The yearly Assem- 
bly has been a great educational instrumentality to the Church 
and country for more than a century, where for ten days or more 
the best results of life have been felt and imparted, nor could your 
Committee be alarmed by any impending danger from its present 
size. Nor had we any traditions or warnings in the past to awaken 
fears, but on the other hand its watchful care and moderation in all 
times and on all subjects of danger, forbade the harboring of dis- 
ordered fancies. Nor could we overlook the great moral impres- 
sions which this Assembly has made in communities and over the 
whole world, and the enthusiasms by which it has raised the pulsa- 
tions of our heart-life, through the years succeeding its meetings, to 
the glory of God, in increased piety and its effects in the great 
works of benevolence. We could not but be impressed by the 
power of its deliverances on all moral and religious questions, 
through its magnitude and centered intelligence. Nor did the 
burden of expense connected therewith seem so great, when we con- 
sidered the fact that through the efforts of our new Stated Clerk, 
the expenses incident to transportation to and from the Assembly 
have been reduced this year by about $10,000 through favorable 
terms made with the railroads. And now with two such clerks, 
at centres so advantageous in this respect, we may hope for still 
more concessions in this direction. 

Your Committee would also call attention to the fact that no 
complaint of the expense to the churches has come to us from any 



AD. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 105 

of tlie larger Presbyteries, which by reason of their situation have 
drawn most hghtly upon the fund to which they have largely con- 
tributed. But withal the fact could not be disguised that a large 
part of the Church is determined to have reduction, and we could 
only set our efforts in this direction, in compliance with the wish 
so often expressed, even in the disharmonies of the Church's efibrts to 
obtain it. There are dangers to which even partiality to our old 
ways dare not close our eyes. One is that the present constitution 
of the Assembly militates against her deliberations in the efl&cient, 
just and equitable exercise of her judicial functions, which argu- 
ment is, however, of as great weight when applied to an Assembly 
of 300, as to one of the present size. Difficulties also have been 
and will be experienced in finding places for meeting, where the 
Assembly can have the comforts and facilities necessary for her 
work, within the reach of the present financial basis for the sup- 
port of her members, which would neutralize many of the good 
effects above stated as resulting from its present constitution. The 
facts also of experience prove that dangers gather around such 
bodies, meeting continuously in one localit}'', which would tend to 
the loss throughout the Church of her best moral and religious 
impressions in her yearly sessions, upon the communities affected 
by her migrations. Nor can the clamorous facts be omitted that 
there have been dissatisfactions and even almost scandals in the 
use of the Mileage Fund, which, if true, would hardly stand the 
scrutiny of charity. And these impressions are widely dissemi- 
nated, endangering the continuance of the Mileage Fund, and the 
good name of the Assembly — the loss of both of which, or either, 
would be a calamity to the Assembly and churches. Your Com- 
mittee understood that it was appointed to give the best plan within 
its ability for the removal of these unpleasant facts — and as having 
no discretion between acting and not acting — and were compelled 
to do the best they could under the circumstances. The plan 
known as the "Synodical," had few advocates, neither did the one 
by which the Assembly was to be composed of an equal delega- 
tion of one bishop and one elder from each Presbytery, meet their 
approval. While many were impressed that the theory is Presby- 
terial, they could not fail to see that it would violate all practical 
principles of equity. Other plans being rejected by the Assembly, 
the Committee had but narrow bounds within which to move in its 
endeavor to meet your wishes, and even these were further circum- 
scribed, because any plan that we could devise w^ill most affect 
those Presbyteries from which the Churcli must draw her supplies 
for subsistence and progressive work. So that we had to deal with 
both heart and extremities, to conserve life, as well as to quicken 
its action at the extremities. 

In order to avoid comj^laints that representation is often obtain- 
ed by counting those beyond the bounds of the Presbyteries, who 
sometimes are laboring in connection with other denominations, or 
are secularized, or are in Presbyteries, under whose care they 



106 MINUTES OF THE [May 26tla, 

ought to place themselves, we would respectfally urge the duty 
upon the Assembly of admonishing all Presbyteries to enforce the 
rule contained in the Revised Book of Discipline (Section 111), 

The Standing Committee on the Narrative of the State of Ee- 
ligion within the bounds of the Church, for the past year, presented 
its Report. The Necrological Record for the year was read by the 
Stated Clerk, after which the Assembly engaged in devotional 
services. 

The Narrative with the Necrology were ordered printed in the 
Appendix. 

The Standing Committee on Bills and Overtures presented a 
final Report, which was adopted and is as follows : 

The Committee deem it a duty to call the attention of this As- 
sembly to the action of our Church concerning the powers and 
duties of the Committee of Bills and Overtures. 
1710 p. 17, In 1710 the Presbytery (there being at that time no higher 
^'^' ^' ^^^' Court) appointed "Mr. Henry, Mr. Anderson and Mr. Wade a 
Committee to prepare and bring in Overtures to the Presbytery and 
also to take cognizance of whatever may be laid before them to 
prepare it for the Presbytery," 
1769 p. 393, In 1769 the Synod, in answer to the question concerning the 
^'^' ^' ^^"' duties and powers of the Committee of Overtmfes proposed last 
year, said : " That Committee is intended to introduce business 
into the S3niod in an orderly manner, that they may give advice 
concerning either the matter or manner of Overtures brought to 
them, but have not power to suppress anything that comes regu- 
larly before them from Inferior Judicatures according to our known 
rules, or such Overtures and petitions as Inferior Judicatures or 
particular persons desire to have laid before this Synod," 
^ n89p.^8, The General Assembly of 1789 declared : "The General Assem- 
' " " ' bly, at every meeting, shall appoint a Committee of Bills and 
Overtures to prepare and digest business for the Assembly." 
1822 p. 42, The Assembly of 1822 enacted as follows: "Petitions, questions 
'^' ^' ' relating to doctrine, or order, and usually all new propositions tend- 
! ing to general laws, should be laid before the Committee of Bills 

and Overtures before they be offered to the Assembly." 
1870 p. 90. The Report of the Joint Committee on Reconstruction adopted 
Dig. p. 547. i^y .|.|^g General Assembly of 1870, said : " It is recommended 
i that the Assembly order that hereafter Bills and Overtures come 

up only from Synods or Presbyteries ; yet, that this may not pre- 
vent any Committee of Bills and Overtures from bringing before 
the House, of its own motion, upon a two-thirds vote of the Com- 
mittee, any matter which they may deem of sufficient importance 
to engage the attention of the Assembly." 

In view of these deliverances which, so far as we can find, have 
never been changed, it seems to be plain that the Committee of 
Bills and Overtures is the proper business Committee of the Assem- 



A.D. 1884.] GENEEAL ASSEMBLY. 107 

blj, and that it belongs to this Committee to receive and to con- 
sider all Bills, Overtures, Petitions, etc., before they are laid before 
the Assembly, and to recommend the proper disposition or refer- 
ence of the same. 

That the action herein described has been the historic practice 
of the Assembly up to a comparatively recent date, is, we believe, 
undisputed. 

More recently, however, it has become customary for the Stated 
Clerk to receive and consider such documents as are to be laid be- 
fore the Assembly, and to recommend the proper reference and dis- 
position of them.* 

Your Committee believe this practice to be an error, and for 
these reasons : 

1. It is a departure from the established order and the historic 
practice of the Church. 

2. It practically concentrates, to a large extent, the powers and 
duties of the Committee on Bills and Overtures in a single person, 
the Stated Clerk, who usually is not a member of the Assembly. 

3. It partly defeats the object for which the Committee on Bills 
and Overtures was appointed, viz. : " To prepare and digest business 
for the Assembly." And it is manifestly impossible for any one 
person to give to the documents which come before the Assembly 
such consideration as they deserve. 

The Committee therefore recommend " that Standing Order No. 
6 be changed so as to read : Rule 6. The Stated Clerk shall receive 
all Memorials, Overtures and other papers addressed to the General 
Assembly, shall make record of the same, and shall then deliver 
them to the Standing Committee on Bills and Overtures." 

The Judicial Committee reported : 

Paper^ No. i, is a complaint of Sadie Hall against the Synod of 
Ohio, for refusing to investigate certain charges against the Faculty 
of the University of Wooster, charged by the complainant with 
allowing certain students to slander complainant and her friends ; 
such refusal of the Synod being placed on the ground " that the 
matter and the form of the complaint are beyond the jurisdiction 
of the Synod." 

In such decision, your Committee are unanimously of the opinion 
that the Synod was right ; and they therefore recommend that the 
complaint be dismissed. Adopted. 

Paper^ No. 2, is an appeal of the Rev. Jared M. Chavis, a mem- 
ber of the Presbytery of Atlantic, from the decision of the Presby- 
tery, upon charges brought against him for alleged immorality. 

From the certified copy of the decision, sent up by the Presby- 
tery, it appears that the charges were not investigated on the 
merits, but failed of trial, because of the refusal of witnesses to 
attend and testify ; and for this cause the Presbytery decided to 
drop the case against the Rev. J. M. Chavis as charged in the in- 
dictment. But in the recital of the charge, and the facts grounding 

*See Minutes, 1878, p. 67. 



108 MINUTES OF THE [May 26th, 

the decision, the Presbytery insert an opinion in the following 
words: * * ^ 

Your Committee are of the opinion that the Presbytery erred 
in incorporating such an opinion in their decision, in the absence of 
all testimony to justify the same. 

Your Committee are of the opinion, that the appellant has shown 
a sufficient reason for bringing this Appeal to the General Assem- 
bly, without first going to the Synod of Atlantic. 

After discussion, the Assembly directed that the case be referred 
to the Synod of Atlantic, with instructions to take the proper 
action in the premises. 

In the examination of the Appeal of Mr. Chavis, it has appeared 
that great irregularities of administration and discipline exists in 
the Presbytery of Atlantic, and in some of its churches, which re- 
quire investigation and correction ; and, to that end, your Com- 
mittee beg leave to recommend the following : 

Resolved, That the Rev, E. E. Swift, D. D., the Rev. James 
Allison, D.D., the Rev. R. H. Allen, D.D., James B. Lyon, Esq., and 
John C. McComb, Esq., officers and members of the Board of Mis- 
sions for Freedmen, be, and they are hereby appointed a Commit- 
tee, and are instructed to visit the Presbytery of Atlantic, and the 
churches thereof, to inquire into their condition, and any irregu- 
larities of practice or discipline, which may exist therein; and to aid 
with their advice in correcting the same, and, so far as possible, to 
strengthen and encourage the churches, pastors and missionaries 
in the bounds of said Presbytery; and that the Committee make 
report of their doings to the next General Assembly. 

Resolved, That the necessary expenses of the Committee be 
audited by said Board, and be paid out of the Treasury thereof. 
Adopted. 

Paper, No. 3, is a Memorial of the Presbytery of Furrukhabad, to 
the General Assembly, dated, February 21st, 1884, asking that the 
Resolution of the last General Assembly, censuring the said Presby- 
tery, and directing it to reconsider its action in restoring Rev. John 
S. Woodside to the ministry (see Minutes page 628, 4), be revoked, 
and that the case be referred to the Synod of India for final adjudi- 
cation. 

1. Your Committee find that said action was taken upon a com- 
plaint of the Presbytery of Saharanpur against the Board of Foreign 
Missions, for employing Mr. Woodside while under sentence of dep- 
osition by said Presbytery of Saharanpur. 

2. That the Presbytery of Furrukhabad was not complained of, 
nor even named or referred to in said complaint. 

3. That the Presljytery of Furrukhabad was not notified of the 
presentation of said complaint, nor was it cited to appear in answer 
to the same, nor to give reasons for its action ; it had no representa- 
tive in the Assembly, and its records were not before the Assembly 
or its Committee ; and the Presbytery, therefore, had no opportunity 
to defend itself, nor to justify its action before the General Assembly. 



A.D. 188-i.] V GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 109 

All the facts in respect to the deposition and restoration of Mr. 
Woodside, took place in India, and the Synod of India, being on 
the ground, has means and facilities for examining the case, and 
reaching a just and fair decision upon all the merits of the question 
at issue, between the Presbyteries, which it is difficult, if not im- 
possible, for the General Assembly to avail itself of; and to that 
Synod the whole matter should, in the opinion of jour Committee, 
be remitted for determination subject to final review in a regular 
■way by the General Assembly. 

Your Committee, therefore, recommend the following Resolution : 

Resolved^ That the Resolution of the last General Assembly 
(Minutes p. 628, -i), in respect to the action of the Presbyter}' of 
Furrukhabad, in restoring John S. Woodside to the ministry, and 
the direction there given to the Presbytery, be, and they are hereby 
revoked, and that the whole case be, and the same is herebv re- 
ferred to the Synod of India, for its review, examination, and adjudi- 
cation, according to the Constitution of the Church. Adopted. 

The Permanent Committee on the place of meeting of the next 
General Assembly presented its Report, which was adopted, and is 
as follows : 

The Permanent Committee on the place of meeting of the next 
Assembly respectfully report that they have received invitations 
from the First Church and the Ministeral Association of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, from the First Church of Asbury Park, N. J., from the 
Westminster Church, Minneapolis, Minn., from the First Church 
of Saratoga Springs, N, Y., and from the New York Avenue 
Church, and the pastors and elders of Washington, D. C. 

The General Assembly is to be congratulated upon the increasing 
interest in its deliberations, witnessed to by these cordial invitations 
from churches and Church oflB.cers in widely separated parts of our 
great land. The size of the Assembly does not appear to be a limit 
to the generosity of the Church. 

While appreciating, however, the kindly spirit which charac- 
terizes all the invitations extended, your Committee, having in view 
the great moral influence which the Assembly wields through its 
meetings in large commimities, such as Minneapolis or Cincinnati, 
and having especially in mind the state of the Treasury, which 
seems to forbid the acceptance of the invitation to meet in the first- 
named city, do unanimously recommend the First Church, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, as the place of meeting of the General Assembly of 1885. 
The Session of said Cliurch, through the pastor, the Rev. Francis 
C. Monfort, D.D., agrees, if the invitation is accepted, to entertain, 
" free of charge, two hundred commissioners, and as many more at 
^1.00 each, per day, as may be present." 

We also recommend that the following Committee of Arrange- 
ments be appointed : Ministers — Francis C. Monfort, D.D., J. P. £. 
Kumler, D.D., George C. Heckman, D.D., Alexander B. Mbrey ; 
Elders — William McAlpin, William Howard Neff", Robert S. 



110 MINUTES OF THE [May 26th, 

Fulton, Hugh Stewart, Thomas MacDougal, Wilham Ernst, Henry 
H. Finch ; and that said Committee have power to add to their 
numbers. 

MVe further recommend that the Stated Clerk acknowledge with 
thanks the reception of the invitations extended to the General 
Assembly, by all the churches named in the Eeport. 

Resolved^ That the matter of securing reduction of Eailroad fares 
for the Commissioners to the General Assembly be placed in the 
hands of the Committee of Arrangements for the meeting of the 
next Assembly, and that the Stated Clerk, the Rev. "W. H. Roberts, 
D.D.. be added to the Committee. 

The Assembly adjourned, and closed with prayer. 



MONDAY, May 26th, 3 o'clock P. M. 
The Assembly met, and was opened with prayer. 

The Rev. John G. Hall, D.D., in behalf of himself and others, 
offered the following Protest, which was received, and ordered to be 
put on record : 

The subscribers do respectfully protest against the action of the 
Assembly, on last Saturday, on the Report of the* minority of the 
Committee on Publication, requesting the action proposed by the 
said minority; and for the following reason in general, the fact 
that the minority was entirely unheard before the Assembly, in 
explanation and justification of their Report; and also for the fol- 
lowing particular causes : 

1. The Chairman of the minority making the Report, was absent 
from the Assembly, by reason of sudden and violent sickness. 

2. The Rev. Dr. Harper, the other clerical member of the minority, 
was absent from the Assembly, having been summoned, by telegraph, 
to the sick bed of his daughter. 

3. The elders on the minority were prevented from being heard 
by the prevalence of the motion to take the "previous question." 

For these reasons we protest against the aforesaid action of the 
Assembly, upon the said minority's Report, and desire that the 
minority be heard in a simple statement by the Chairman of the 
minority. 

Signed, John G. Hall, T. R. Crawford, J. R. Hughes, James 
Quick, B. D. Luther, J. G. Hunter, A. J. Waugh, J. E. Alexander, 
Peter Maxwell, J. E. Smith, C. D. Curtis, I. S. Spencer, Alfred 
Nevin, J. B. Coulter. 

The unfinished business was taken up, being the Resolution upon 
the Isez Perce Indians, which was unanimously adopted, and is as 
follows : 

Besolved, That this Assembly respectfully petitions Congress to 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. Ill 

pass the Bill now pending, for the relief of the Nez Perce Indians, 
as present in the Indian Territory. 

The Paper offered by the Eev. Robert Beer, proposing certain 
amendments to the Book of Discipline, was taken up, and laid upon 
the table. 

The following Paper was adopted with reference to the Revised 
Book of Discipline : 

" The General Assembly does hereby declare that no process 
heretofore commenced should abate by reason of the adoption of 
the Revised Book of Discipline, and all judicatories, before which 
such process is now pending, are hereby advised to issue and deter- 
mine such cases in accordance with the mode of procedui'e, and 
under the provisions of the Revised Book of Discipline." 

The Special Committee on Concerts of Prayer presented its 
Report, which was adopted, and is as follows : 

The Special Committee on Concerts of Prayer would respect- 
fully recommend : 

1. That the week beginning ^nth the first Sabbath (4th) of 
January next, be observed by all our congregations as " a "Week 
of Prayer" for the conversion of the world ; and that in its observ- 
ance, our churches be requested to follow, so far as may be practi- 
cable, the series of subjects published by the Evangelical Alliance. 

2. That the last Thursday of January next be observed by all 
our churches and literary institutions, as a day of prayer for the in- 
fluence of the Holy Spirit upon our colleges and seminaries and 
schools; that our youth gathered therein may be converted to 
Christ, and more completely consecrated to His service, and that 
larger numbers of our young men may be inclined to seek the work 
of the ministry. 

The Standing Committee on Theological Seminaries presented 
an additional report with reference to the Directors elected in cer- 
tain of the Seminaries during the year. The Report was accepted, 
and is as follows : 

The Standing Committee on Theological Seminaries report to 
the General Assembly the names of the following persons elected 
Directors of the Seminaries herein specified : 

Princeton Theological Seminary. — John Maclean, D.D., LL.D., 
Henry J. Van Dyke, D.D., Ebenezer Erskine, D.D., Robert Russell 
Booth, D.D., George Alexander, D.D., Rev. Henry J. Van Dyke, 
Jr., Levi P. Stone, Esq., Latimer Bailey, Esq., William A. 
Wheelock, Esq., and in place of John C. Backus, D.D., LL.D., de- 
ceased, James T. Leftwich, D.D., in place of Hon. George Shars- 
wood, LL.D., deceased, James McCormick, Esq. 

Western Theological Seminary. — Robert Alexander, D.D., David 
Hull, D.D., Carroll Cutler, D.D., Henry B. Fry, D.D., Rev. John 
Kerr, Thomas A. McCurdy, D.D., David A. Cunningham, D.D., 



112 MINUTES OF THE [May 26tll, 

William Bakewell, Esq., George A. Berry, Esq., Thomas Wight- 
man, Esq. 

Theological Seminary of the Northwest. — Samuel J. Niccolls, 
D.D., Thomas D. Ewing, D".D., Kobert F. Sample, D.D., Rev. Josiah 
Milligan, John W. Dinsmore, D.D., Henry Phelps, Esq., Wm. H. 
Swift, Esq., Thomas A. Gait, Esq., Hon. John Coats, H. T. Clarke, 
Esq., and in place of Rev. Albert J. Berger of the Class of 1885, the 
Rev. John N. Freeman. 

Resolved^ That the Resolutions referring to the keeping of the 
Sabbath, and the preservation of the rights of conscience as guar- 
anteed by our Constitution, as passed by this General Assembly, be 
transmitted to our sister ecclesiastical gatherings now in session or 
soon to be, with request to concur in the same or similar Resolu- 
tions, which shall be sent to the respective United States authori- 
ties named therein. 

The Special Committee with reference to the death of Commis- 
sioner William G. Case, presented the following Resolution, which 
was adopted : 

Whereas^ We have learned that Elder Wm. G. Case, a Commis- 
sioner to this Assembly, from the Los Angeles Presbytery, while 
on his way, was stricken down with apoplexy, and died at Kansas 
City, May 11, 1884, therefore, 

Resolved^ That in the death of Elder Case, this Assembly real- 
izes the loss of one of its members, and hereby extends to the be- 
reaved family its sympathy, and in prayer seeks the presence and 
blessing of Him who is able to comfort and sustain the hearts and 
lives of those so suddenly bereaved. Further, we would extend the 
condolence of this Assembly to Elder Addison R, Flint of the Pres- 
bytery of Oregon, who, while on his way to this Assembly as a Com- 
missioner, was bereft of his wife by death. 

We recommend that this Report be put upon the Minutes ot 
the Assembly, and a copy sent to the surviving companions. 

The Standing Committee on Correspondence presented its final 
Report, which was adopted, and is as follows : 

Your Standing Committee on Correspondence submits the fol- 
lowing report : 

The Committee has introduced to the Assembly, duly accredited. 
Corresponding Delegates, Rev. J. B. Stratton, D.D., from the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, and 
Rev. Cornelius Brett, from the General Synod of the Reformed 
Church in America. These Delegates have been heard by the 
Assembly. 

According to your direction, the Committee has transmitted tele- 
grams to the Luther Statue Association, Washington, D. C, to 
Rev. Moses D. Hoge, D.D., Richmond, Ya., and to the Baptist 
National Societies now convened in Detroit, Mich. 

The Committee, also has prepared according to your order, ans^vers 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 113 

to the Eesolutions, and to the Letter of fraternal regard transmitted 
to this Assembly by the General Conference of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church in the United States, These answers have been 
adopted by your action. 

Under instruction of the Assembly, your Committee of Corres- 
pondence makes the following nominations of two ministers and 
one elder, viz.: Rev. John Hall, D.D., of New York, Rev. W. E. 
Moore, D.D., of Columbus, Ohio, and Elder Ormond Beatty, LL.D., 
of Kentucky, to constitute a Committee to have charge of the 
matter of correspondence by letter with the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States, and to report to the next General Assembly. 

The Committee was discharged. 

The Committee on the Polity of the Church reported: 
Overture No. 26, from the Stated Clerk representing the Presby- 
tery of Boulder, inquiring 

1. Wherein consists the distinction between an " informal " meet- 
ing of a Session, and a " regular " meeting ? 

2. Ought the acts of informal meetings to be entered on the 
records before they have been ratified in a regular meeting? 

8. Is it regular to receive members to the Church, especially on 
a profession of their faith, or to appoint delegates to the Presbytery 
or the Synod, at such informal meetings of Session ? 

4. Ought not the validity of an elder's seat in the superior judi- 
catories to be determined by the record of his due appointment at 
a regular meeting of the Session ; and in the absence of such a 
record, might not an elder, in a test case involving important issues, 
be denied his seat constitutionally ? 

5. Ought a Session to send up its Records for review v/ithout first 
reviewing them itself, and formally ratifying any informal acts at 
a regular meeting? In particular, is it proper that the last entry 
should be a memorandum acted upon at an informal meeting, 
which can be approved only after the Presbytery has adjourned ? 

The Committee recommends the following answer : 
The Acts referred to in this Overture are properly Official Acts, 
which the Judicatory is competent to perform only when regularly 
convened, and making due record of its proceedings. (See Form of 
Gov. Chap. IX, Sections 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8.) While the act of opening 
and closing the meetings of a Session with prayer is not enjoined 
by the Constitution, this Assembly, in accordance with the views 
expressed by the Assembly of 1877, judges it to be in harmony 
with the spirit of the Constitution, and the prevailing usage of the 
Church, to observe this solemnity at all meetings of record, except 
that the opening prayer may properly be omitted after a Divine 
service. 

Overture, No. 37, from the Presbytery of Cleveland, asking the 
Assembly to amend the Directory of AVorship, so as more distinctly 
to enumerate the benevolent offerings among the enjoined acts of 
public worship, and to make a more adequate statement of the 



114: irLN"UTES OF THE [Maj 26th, 

present duty of the Church, under the call to conquer the world 
for Christ. 

It is recommended that the Overture be referred to the Perma- 
nent Committee on Systematic Beneficence. 

Overture, No. 28, from the Presb3'terj of Cairo, asking 

1. Is the election of female members of the Church, to the office 
of Deaconess, consistent with Presbyterian polity ? 

2. If proper to elect them, should they be installed; and if in- 
stalled, should it be done by the regular form for the ordination of 
deacons, or otherwise? 

3. Does the Presbyterial Action, authorizing the election and in- 
stallation of elders for a limited term of service, apply also to 
deacons ? 

The Committee recommends the following answer : 

To questions 1 and 2 : The Form of Government, Chap. XIII, 
Sec. 2, declares that " in all cases the persons elected, must be male 
members." In all ages of the Church, godly women have been 
appointed to aid the officers of the Church in their labors, especially 
for the relief of the poor and the infirm. They rendered important 
.•service in the Apostolic Church ; but they do not appear to have 
•occupied a sej)arate office, to have been elected by the people, or 
to have been ordained and installed. There is nothing in our Con- 
;Stitution, in the practice of our Church, or in any present emer- 
gency, to justify the creation of a new office. ' 

To question 3 : The Form of Government gives no authority for 
the election of deacons for a limited term of ser\dce. (See Minutes 
ofl883, p. 626.) 

Overture, No. 29, inquiring whether the action of the last As- 
sembly annuls the election of deacons chosen to serve for a term 
of years. 

The Committee recommends the following answer : That as there 
is no pro^asion in the Constitution for limiting the service of dea- 
cons, those who have been chosen to that office cannot be divested 
of it at the expiration of any designated term, unless by their 
own resignation, or according to the provisions of the Constitu- 
tion, 

Overture, No. SO, from the Presbytery of Erie, asking the fol- 
lowing questions : 

1. Is a Presbytery right in confirming the action of congrega- 
tions which elect Ruling Elders for terms of four and five years ? 

2. Must the term of service of elders be only three years ? 
The Committee recommends the following answer : The Form 

of Government, Chap. XIII, Sec. 8, provides that Ruling Elders 
may be elected for '• a limited time in the exercise of their func- 
tions * * * provided the full term be not less than three 
years, and the Session be made to consist of three classes, one of 
which only shall be elected every year." The provisions of this 
Section cannot be carried out should the elders be elected for a 
longer or shorter term than three years. 



A.D. 1884,] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 115 

Overture^ No. 31^ asking that an amendment to Section 115 of 
the Revised Book of Discipline be submitted to the Presbyteries, 
in the following form : 

Shall Section 115 of the Revised Book of Discipline be amended 
by striking out the words "If a parent of a baptized child or 
baptized children be dismissed, the words ' with his or her baptized 
children ' shall be included in the certificate of dismission," and 
substituting the following: 

" The names of the baptized children of a parent seeking dis- 
mission to another Church, shall, if such children are members of 
his household and remove with him, and are not themselves com- 
municants, be included in the certificate of dismission." 

The Committee recommends that the Assembly adopt this 
Overture, and transmit it to the Presb^^teries for their action. 

Overture^ No. 32, from the Presbytery of Schuyler, as follows : 

Is reordination necessary in the restoration of a deposed minister 
to the sacred office ? And in view of the provisions of the Revised 
Book of Discipline will reordination be necessary in the restora- 
tion to the ministry of those by whom the office has been de- 
mitted ? 

The Committee recommends the following answer : 

It is the judgment of this General Assembly that when a minis- 
ter is deposed his office is taken from him, he becomes a layman, 
and according to the New Book of Discipline, Sec. 44, he is to be 
enrolled as a communicant in a particular Church. Should he be 
recalled to the ministry, therefore, he should be reordained. 

The same course ought to be adopted in the restoration of one 
who has demitted the ministry ; inasmuch as the Book of Disci- 
pline, Sec. 51, describes one who has demitted the sacred office as 
returning "to the condition of a private member of the Church." 

Overture, No. 33, asking the Assembly to reaffirm the action of 
the Assemblies of 1845 and 1858, on the relations of the Church 
Session to the music as a part of the worship of God. 

The Committee recommends the following answer : 

This General Assembly hereby re-affirms the action taken by the 
Assemblies of 1845 and 1858, as follows : 

Whereas, By our Constitution (Form of Gov., Chap. IX, Sec. 
6, and Directory for Worship, Chap. IV, Sec. 4) the whole internal 
arrangement of a Church as to worship and order is committed to 
the minister and Session, therefore 

Resolved, That this Assembly do not feel themselves called upon 
and obliged to take any further order on this subject, but leave to 
each Session the delicate and important matter of arranging and 
conducting the music as to them shall seem most for edification, 
recommending great caution, prudence, and forbearance in regard 
to it. 

The Assembly adjourned, and was closed with prayer. 



116 MINUTES OF THE [May 26th, 

MONDAY, May 26th, 7.30 o'clock P.M. 
The Assembly met, and was opened with prayer. 

The Rev. Joseph E. Nassau, D.D., one of the Temporary Clerks, 
was empowered by unanimous consent, to cast, in the name of the 
Assembly, a ballot for the election of Trustees of the Board of 
Church Erection for three years, and the following were elected : 

Ministers — John Hall, D.D., Samuel D. Alexander, D.D., Erskine 
N. White, D.D., John Gillespie, D.D.; ^7c^ers— Stephen W. 
Thayer, Benjamin F. Dunning, William W. Crane. 

Eev. Joseph E. Nassau, D.D., w^as also empowered, by unanimous 
consent, to cast, in the name of the General Assembly, a ballot for 
the election of Trustees of the Presbyterian House ; and the fol- 
lowing persons were duly elected : 

Ministers — Villeroy D. Reed, D.D., Charles A. Dickey, D.D. ; 
Elders — Charles M. Lukens, Alexander Whilldin, T. Charlton 
Henry. 

The Standing Committee on Synodical Records severally re- 
ported, and on their recommendation the Minutes of the following 
Synods were approved : 

Atlantic, Columbia, Illinois, Michigan, India, Indiana, Iowa. 
Missouri, Ohio, Nebraska, Kansas, Kentucky, iNew York, New 
Jersey, Pacific, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Wisconsin, Utah. 

The Committee on the Minutes of the Synod of Baltimore, re- 
ported as follows : 

That they have not been able to do any work for the reason that 
no certified copy of said Minutes has been present at the As- 
sembly. 

The report was accepted, and the Synod of Baltimore was 
directed to send a certified copy of its Minutes to the next As- 
sembly. 

The Minutes of the Synod of Minnesota were approved, with 
the following exceptions : 

1. In several instances the written minutes merely state that re- 
ports are made, which reports were received and adopted, while 
the minutes show that such reports contained important recom- 
mendations, or resolutions. 

2. Synod adjourned without the reading and approval of the 
minutes of the last day of the session. 

The following Resolutions were adopted : 

1. Resolved^ That the Assembly has heard with profound satis- 
faction, a proposal to erect, in the City of Washington, a statue in 
honor of the illustrious Reformer John Calvin ; that we regard 
it as eminently fitting and just, to the memory of the man whose 
name will be identified through all time with the system of Religious 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 117 

truth which we hold with intelhgent admiration and love ; and 
that we commend to all the members of our churches to contribute 
something to the accomplishment of this interesting and noble 
design. 

2. Resolved^ That the Moderator be authorized to appoint a suit- 
able Committee to have the charge of the undertaking ; the Com- 
mittee to have power to fill vacancies, and to add to their number. 

The Committee on Leave of Absence would report, that thej 
have endeavored faithfully and diligently to discharge the duty 
imposed upon them by the Assembly ; and, after careful considera- 
tion, have granted leave to the following persons to be absent from 
the Sessions of the Assembly on the days respectively mentioned : 

On and after May 19th : 

Minister — Stealy B. Rossiter, of the Presbytery of New York. 

Elder — William H. Matthews, of the Presbytery of Philadel- 
phia, North. 

On and after May 20th : 

Elders — Robert C. Ogden, of the Presbytery of Philadelphia; 
Frank J. Burnham, of the Presbytery of Red River. 

On and after May 21st: 

Minister — Charles H. Van Wie, of the Presbytery of Utica. 

Elders — Charles W. Ely, of the Presbytery of Baltimore ; James 
W. Bruce, of the Presbytery of Neosho ; James Van Home, of 
the Presbytery of Philadelphia, North ; H. Clay Rainey, of the 
Presbytery of Ebenezer. 

On and after May 22d : 

Elders — Enoch K. Robinson, of the Presbytery of Grand Rapids ; 
John T. Bingham, of the Presbytery of Butler; Roswell D. Chase, 
of the Presbytery of Bellefontaine ; Henry A. Seymour, of the 
Presbytery of Biughamton ; George M. Taggart, of the Presbytery 
of Fort Dodge. 

Afternoon of May 22d : 

Elder — Frederick S. Eldred, of the Presbytery of Milwaukee. 

On and after May 23d : 

Ministers — Alex. M. Merwin, of the Presbytery of Chili ; 
Charles S. Robinson, D.D., of the Presbytery of New York ; D. 
Dwight Bigger, of the Presbytery of Huron ; Franklin S. Howe, 
of the Presbytery of Chemung; Stanley B. Roberts, of the Pres- 
bytery of Utica. 

Elders — Angus McLeod, of the Presbytery of Nebraska City ; 
Cyrus L. Pershing, of the Presbytery of Lackawanna ; Edward 
Gridley, of the Presbytery of North River. 

Afternoon of May 23d : 

Ministers — J. E. Kearns, of the Presbytery of Iowa ; Wm. 
Imbrie, of the Presbytery of Jersey City ; Hanford A. Edson, 
D.D., of the Presbytery of Indianapolis ; Edgar P. Salmon, of .the 
Presbytery of Geneva ; Albert F. Hale, of the Presbytery of 
Topeka. 



118 MINUTES OF THE [May 26tll, 

Elders — Henry H. Brady, of the Presbytery of New Castle 
Joseph F. Woods, of the Presbytery of Omaha ; Martin Higgins 
of the Presbytery of Steuben ; Isaac V. Watterman, of the Pres 
bytery of Iowa City; John McEwen, of the Presbytery of Albany 
Jeremiah Greene, of the Presbytery of Lyons ; E. M, McClung, of 
the Presbytery of Trinity ; Sylvester D. Husted, of the Presbytery 
of Chippewa. 

On and after May 24th : 

Ministers — Joseph Nelson, of the Presbytery of Baltimore ; 
George M. Barley, of the Presbytery of Pueblo ; Wm, H. Ziegler, 
of the Presbytery of Muncie ; George C. Pollock, of the Presbytery 
of Mankato ; Henry A. Burr, of the Presbytery of Trinity ; George 
D. Meigs, of the Presbytery of Chemung ; Eobert D. Harper, D.D., 
of the Presbytery of Philadelphia, Central ; Newton H. Bell, of the 
Presbytery of Rochester ; Jas. S. Riggs, of the Presbytery of Syra- 
cuse ; Wm. K. Tully, of the Presbytery of East Florida. 

Elders — Louis Boisot, of the Presbytery of Gunnison ; Alex. 
M. Scott, of the Presbytery of Crawfordsville ; Sam, J. Fisher, of 
the Presbytery of Genesee Valley ; Hooper C. Van Vorst, of the 
Presbytery of New York ; Isaac M. Keeler, of the Presbytery of 
Huron ; John Baird, of the Presbytery of Boulder ; James H. 
Robinson, of the Presbytery of Freeport ; George Guy, of the 
Presbytery of Ottawa ; Samuel U. Huffer, of the Presbytery of 
Muncie ; John Kennedy, of the Presbytery of Ntiw Albany ; Eliab 
A. Vaughn, of the Presbytery of Cedar Rapids ; Fred. G. Miles, 
of the Presbytery of Nebraska City ; E. M. McPherson, of the 
Presbytery of Boston ; Robert E. Austin, of the Presbytery of 
Columbia ; Daniel H. Buckingham, of the Presbytery of Long 
Island ; Boyle I. McClure, of the Presbytery of Allegheny ; John 
Robertson, of the Presbytery of Santa Fe ; Amos H. Briggs, of 
the Presbytery of Chicago ; Wyllis K. Morris, of the Presbytery 
of Dakota ; Robert Gilchrist, of the Presbytery of Boston ; George 
C. Turner, of the Presbytery of Cayuga ; Charles L. Kellogg, of 
the Presbytery of San Francisco ; Joseph Kirkpatrick, of the Pres- 
bytery of Lake Superior ; Rolland W. Diller, of the Presbytery of 
Springfield. 

Afternoon of May 24th : 

Ministers — Martin D. Kneeland, of the Presbytery of Buffalo ; 
Robt. R. Watkins, of the Presbytery of Genesee Valley ; Asa S. 
Fiske, of the Presbytery of San Francisco ; Samuel P. Sprecher, 
D.D., of the Presbytery of San Francisco ; Jas. M. McCurdy, of the 
Presbytery of Clarion ; Legh R. Janes, of the Presbytery of Union ; 
John C. Simmons, of the Presbytery of Atlantic; Wm. A. Scott, 
of the Presbytery of Yadkin ; John W. Dinsmore, D.D., of the Pres- 
bytery of Bloomington ; H. V. D. Nevius, D.D., of the Presbytery 
of Springfield ; John F. Hendy, of the Presbytery of Emporia ; 
Joseph Mayou, of the Presbytery of Highland ; James H. Clark, of 
the Presbytery of Aberdeen ; Edwin Allen, of the Presbytery of 
Genesee ; Edward Bristol, of the Presbytery of Rochester ; John 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 119 

McK. Brayton, of the Presbytery of Utica ; John Eeid, of the Pres- 
bytery of West Chester. 

Elders — Myron G. Willard, of the Presbytery of Mankato ; 
James H. Merriwether, of the Presbytery of Washington City ; 
Henry M. Palm, of the Presbytery of White Water; Robert H. 
Porterfield, of the Presbytery of Clarion ; Henry W. Williams, of 
the Presbytery of Wellsboro ; Robin H. Richardson, of the Pres- 
bytery of Atlantic ; John Forby, of the Presbytery of Freeport ; 
Amor W. Wakefield, of the Presbytery of Solomon ; Frank H. 
Hagerty, of the Presbytery of Aberdeen ; Caleb S. Ward, of the 
Presbytery of Newark; Reuben Whallon, of the Presbytery of 
Champlain ; James Bayles, of the Presbytery of New York ; John 
A. Crawford, of the Presbyter}'^ of Huntingdon ; Wm. J. Wood, of 
the Presbytery of Northumberland. 

On and after May 26th : 

Ministers — Wm. L. Cunningham, of the Presbytery of New 
Brunswick ; Maxwell Phillips, of the Presbytery of Santa Fe ; 
Henry A. Newell, of the Presbytery of Northern Pacific; Thomas 
Gordon, of the Presbytery of Alton ; Robt. A. Condit, of the Pres- 
bytery of Cedar Rapids ; Wm. Cobleigh, of the Presbytery of Pem- 
bina ; Geo. A.Howard, of the Presbytery of Columbia; A. E. 
Wanderer, of the Presbytery of Nassau ; E. Smith Miller, of the 
Presbytery of Neosho ; Wm. R. Bingham, D.D., of the Presbytery 
of Chester ; Adolph Lehman, of the Presbytery of Zanesville ; 
James M. Newell, of the Presbytery of San Jose; Jas. G. K. 
McClure, of the Presbytery of Chicago. 

Elders — John S. Boyd, of the Presbytery of Zanesville ; Samuel 
L. Hawkes, of the Presbytery of Bloomington ; N. G. Thompson, 
of the Presbytery of Chester ; Lucian H. Ralston, of the Presbytery 
of Denver ; Geo. H. Stewart, of the Presbytery of Pueblo ; James 
Sproul, of the Presbytery of Alton ; Wm, Boyd, of the Presbytery 
of Lansing ; A. C. Burbank, of the Presbytery of Platte ; Edwin 
H. Dickson, of the Presbytery of Northern Pacific; Geo. W. Cum- 
mings, of the Presbytery of Osage ; Smith E. Hedges, of the Pres- 
bytery of Morris and Orange ; Frank C. Easton, of the Presbytery 
of Newton ; James Pa3^an, of the Presbytery of Nassau ; Joseph C. 
Hoffer, of the Presbytery of Carlisle ; Joseph R. McLain, of the 
Presbytery of Washington ; Allen L. Blue, of the Presbytery of 
Utica ; Edward C. Walker, of the Presbytery of Genesee ; Wm, 
P. Wilhams, of the Presbytery of Utica ; Zarah McClung, of the 
Presbytery of Emporia ; George W. Demaree, of the Presbytery of 
Indianapolis; George W. Armes, of the Presbytery of San Fran- 
cisco ; Lyman B. Vorhies, of the Presbytery of Marion. 

Afternoon of May 26th : 

Ministers — Peter H. Burghardt, of the Presbytery of Washing- 
ton City ; George N. Luccock, of the Presbytery of Fort Dodge ; 
Timothy Hill, D.D., of the Presbytery of Osage ; Henry J. Van 
Dyke, Jr., of the Presbytery of New York ; Theodore W. Hop- 
kins, of the Presbytery of Rochester; James S. Root, of the 



120 MINUTES OF TUE [May 26th, 

Presbytery of St. Lawreoce ; Wm. H. Lester, of the Presbytery of 
Washington; S. A. Mutchmore, D.D., of the Presbytery of Phila- 
delphia, Central; II. II. Jessup, D.D., of the Presbytery of Lacka- 
wanna ; Henry W. Biggs, of the Presbytery of Chillicothe; Graham 
C. Campbell, of the Presbytery of Corisco ; George Dimlap, of the 
Presbytery of Chicago ; A. B. Irwin, of the Presbytery of Nebraska 
City ; Daniel Renville, of the Presbytery of Dakota ; David Diraond, 
D.D., of the Presbytery of Alton; Benjamin C. Henry, of the Pres- 
bytery of Canton; Thos. R. Johnson, of the Presbytery of Rock 
River; Reuben S. Goodman, of the Presbytery of Fort Wayne; 
Wm. J. Frazer, of the Presbytery of New Albany ; Geo. R. Carroll, 
of the Presbytery of Council Blufl's ; Heber Gill, of the Presbytery 
of Dubuque; Harris G. Rice, of the Presbytery of Fort Dodge; 
John Elliott, of the Presbytery of Neosho ; Silas Hazlett, of the 
Presbytery of Winona; George T. Crissman, of the Presbytery of 
Kearney; Samuel B. Neilson, of the Presbytery of Omaha; David 
M. Reeves, D.D., of the Presbytery of Albany ; Jas. G. Galbreath, 
of the Presbytery of Chillicothe ; J. Frank Hamilton, of the Pres- 
bytery of Zanesville ; Henry C. McCook, D.D., of the Presbytery 
of Philadelphia; Sylvester S. Bergen, of the Presbytery of Red- 
stone; Wm. 0. Phillips, of the Presbytery of West Virginia ; Edw. 
R. Burkhalter, of the Presbytery of Cedar Rapids; E. W. Garner, 
of the Presbytery of Lake Superior ; 0. S. Thompson, of the Pres- 
bytery of Mattoon; D. E. Bierce, of the Presbytt.*ry of Wisconsin 
River ; Harvey S. Jordan, of the Presbytery of Mattoon ; W. F. 
Ringland, of the Presbytery of Hastings; W. W. McNair, of the 
Presbytery of Lehigh ; Thomas Carter, of the Presbytery of Morris 
and Orange; Levius Eddy, of the Presbytery of Transylvania; 
Geo. H. Williamson, of the Presbytery of Ozark ; H. P. Welton, of 
the Presbytery of Grand Rapids ; Stephen P. Gates, of the Presby- 
tery of Lackawanna ; Charles K. Canfield, of the Presbytery of 
Northumberland; Loyal Y. Hays, of the Presbytery of Crawfbrds- 
ville ; Thos. Gait, of the Presbytery of Saginaw ; Heminway J. 
Gaylord, of the Presbytery of Solomon ; John L. Taylor, of the 
Presbytery of Binghamton, 

Elders — Charles S. Holt of the Presbytery of Chicago ; Wm. R. 
Ragsdale, of the Presbytery of Osborne ; Jeremiah H. Ilalsey, of the 
Prcf^bytery of Jersey City ; Jonn B. Pudney, of the Presbytery of 
Jersey City ; Sam'l D. Jennings, of the Presbytery of Pittsburgh ; 
Stephen L. Blackley, of the Presbytery of Washington; Jesse B. 
Sutlon, of the Presbytery of Monroe; George S. Graham, of the 
Presbytery of Philadelphia, Central ; Jason W. Strevell, of the Pres- 
bytery of Montana ; Sam'l Johnson, of the Presbytery of Newton ; 
C. W. Baldwin, of the Presbytery of Winona; Seth B. Cole, of the 
Presbytery of Hudson ; John N. Wilson, of the Presbytery of 
Springfield; Wm. M. McPherson, of the Presbytery of Indianapolis; 
Joseph Pierce, of the Presbytery of Logansport ; George M. Gregg, 
of the Presbytery of Fort Dodge; Andrew Singer, of the Presby- 
tery of Iowa ; Wm. Francis, of the Presbytery of Waterloo ; Harlan 



A.D. 188-4.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 121 

P. Christie, of the Presbyter}^ of Sagiuaw; David J. Darrow, of 
the Presbytery of Central Dakota; Wm. H. Putnam, of the Pres- 
byterj^ of St. Paul ; Harvey T. Swarthout, of the Presbytery of 
Kearney ; James L. Northup, of the Presbytery of Albany ; Joseph 
H. Knight, of the Presbytery of Troy ; Strawder J. Parrett, of the 
Presbytery of Chillicothe ; Medary D. Mann, of the Presbytery of 
Maumee ; Caleb Be Vier, of the Presbytery of Wooster ; Wm. H. 
Leaman, of the Presbytery of Allegheny ; Frederick Fuller, of the 
Presbytery of Lackawanna ; Bradley W. Lewis, of the Presbytery 
of Lackawanna ; John A. Stevenson, of the Presbj'tery of Redstone; 
Sam'l Ramsay, of the Presbytery of Wisconsin River; H. B. 
Douglass, of the Presbytery of Alton ; C. A. Hite, of the Presbytery 
of Mattoon ; Jas. C. Maxwell, of the Presbytery of Transylvania ; 
D. A. McComb, of the Presbytery of Lima ; Henry R. Brown, 
of the Presbytery of Holston ; Wm. J. Hodges, of the Presbytery 
of Columbus ; Jacob Schuyler, of the Presbytery of Northumber- 
land ; Henry McCrea, of the Presbytery of Saginaw ; Derrick G. 
Perrine, of the Presbytery of Monmouth ; Isaac M. Coen, of the 
Presbytery of Crawfordsville. 

The Stated Clerk was authorized to publish the Minutes of this 
Assembly, with the customary Appendix, in the usual form. 

The Treasurer was directed to pay the usual Bills and Salaries. 

Resolved^ That the Stated Clerk forward a copy of the printed 
Minutes of this Assembly to every elder who is a Commissioner 
therein, provided the elder forward his P. O. address, and that the 
Presbytery which he represents has paid in full its quota to the 
Mileage Fund. 

Resolved^ That the Stated and Permanent Clerks be a Commit- 
tee to report to the next General Assembly, upon the advisability 
of reprinting any or all of the Minutes of the General Assembly, 
between the years 1835 and 1869, said Committee to serve without 
expense to the Assembly. 

The Moderator announced the following Committees, which he 
had been directed to appoint : 

Special Committee on Ministerial S'lpj^ort, Life Insurance^ etc.: 
Ministers — William M. Paxton, D.D., Henry A. Niles, D.D., S. A. 
Mutchmore, D.D., Henry M. Field, D.D.; Elders — William A. 
Wheelock, Levi P. Stone, Henry M. Alexander, Ephraim Banning, 
Robert Patterson. 

SjJecial Committee on the Board of Publication : Minister — S.J. 
M. Eaton, D.D. ; Elders— Ron. J. P. Sterrett, Hon. J. T. Nixon. 

Sjyecial Committee on BlanJcs for Narratives : Ministers — T. 
Ralston Smith, D.D., William H. Roberts, D.D., Meade C. AVilHams, 
D.D. ; Elders — J. S. Fowler and Samuel C. Perkins. 



122 MINUTES OF THE [May 26th, 

Special Committee on John Calvin Memorial: Ministers — John 
Chester, D.D., J. T. Leftwich, D.D. ; Elder— Ron. William Strong. 

The following Resolution of thanks was adopted, unanimously, by 
a rising vote : 

Resolved.^ That the thanks of this General Assembly are due, and 
are hereby presented to the Rev. Dr. George P. Hays, for the able, 
impartial, efficient andsatisfactory manner in which he has presided 
over this body, and we humbly pray, that in the good Providence 
of God, he may be returned to his important field of labor richly 
laden with the blessings of the Gospel of Peace. 

Additional Resolutions of thanks were also passed as follows : 

1. That the other officers of the Assembly, by their fidelity, cour- 
tesy and kindness, have commanded the respect and esteem of the 
Assembly, and are entitled to its cordial thanks. 

2. That the Committee of Arrangements, by their judicious and 
hospitable care for the members, have won our sincere gratitude, 
and as gratitude has been defined to be " a lively sense of favors to 
come," we hope to experience a repetition of their kindness at 
some future day. 

3. That the thanks of this Assembly are hereby extended to the 
Church and congregation of the First Presbyterian Church of Sara- 
toga Springs, for the use of their house of worship. 

4. That the small pecuniary return we have made to the families in 
which we have been entertained, does not release us from the obliga- 
tion to express to them our sincere thanks for the kind attentions 
they have shown us, making our sojourn among them exceedingly 
agreeable, and our brief visit will be a pleasant memory during the 
residue of our lives. 

5. That the various railroad and steamboat companies which have 
granted a reduction of fares to the members, amounting to the sum 
of $10,000, and in particular, the Joint Executive Committee, its 
officers and its agent, Mr. D. F. Drew, are entitled to our thanks 
for their liberality , and that the Stated Clerk, by whose agency 
these reductions were secured, is requested to accept our thanks, 
and to do so again. 

6. That we are greatly indebted to the Mt. McGregor railroad for 
pleasant excursions over that remarkable road to the summit of 
the mountain, giving us wide and picturesque views of the goodly 
land in the midst of which we have been sojourning, and also of 
the land that is afar off. 

7. We also present our thanks to the Supervisor of the town, Mr. 
Joseph Baucus ; the trustees of the village ; Mr. George T. Church, 
Superintendent of Schools ; and the Water Commissioners, Messrs. 
Melon and Gale, for their kindness in providing rooms for our use in 
the Town Hall, and other facilities that we have enjoyed. 

8. That the newspapers of Saratoga, by their remarkably faithful, 
full and able reports of the proceedings are specially entitled to our 



A.D. 1884.] GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 123 

thanks, and that we recognize in these village papers a model of 
healthful, pure and judicious journalism. 

9. That we have enjoyed the delightfal climate of Saratoga, and 
its unrivaled mineral waters, making it the only place in the coun- 
try, in the words of another, where " the more a man drinks the 
more sober he feels," and that we attribute to them, in part at least, 
that abundant measure of health which we have enjoyed through- 
out these laborious sessions, and that we return our thanks to the 
proprietor of the ^^celsior Spring, for the free supply of its waters 
during our sessions. 

10. That while we recognize the hand of God in the death of one 
of our members (but not by accident) while on his journey hither, 
our hearts should rise in gratitude to our Father in heaven for the 
health and safety and enjoyment we have had in our travels and 
our residence here, for strength to discharge our duties, for the 
unbroken harmony that has prevailed through every hour of our 
deliberations, and with our gratitude we join in prayer that He who 
holds our lives in His hand, will bring us in peace to our several 
homes, and finally will grant us entrance into the General Assembly 
and Church of the First Born, which are written in heaven. 

The several Standing Committees having no further business to 
submit, were discharged. 

The Eoll was called, and the names of Commissioners who were 
absent without leave were ordered to be entered on the minutes, 
and are as follows : 

SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA. 

PRESBYTERIES. MINISTERS. ELDERS. 

Oregon, Kobert Robe. 

SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 
Mattoon, Noah Amen. 

SYNOD OF INDIANA. 

Indianapolis, Lawrence G. Hay, D.D. 
Ifeto Albany, Madison E. Mcliillip. 

SYNOD OF KANSAS. 

Emporia, Thos. S. McConn. 

Indian Territory, William C. Haworth, Wm. L. Squier. 

Solomon, W. G. Kennedy. 

SYNOD OF MICHIGAN. 
Grand Rapids, Luther M. Belden. 

SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 

Osage, Charles TV. Nesbit. 

Ozark, Wm, H. Delzell. 

Palmyra, Edward Vincent. 

SYNOD OF NEBRASKA. 

Nebraska City, Enoch Benson. 



124 


MINUTES. 


[May 26th, A.D. 1 




SYNOD OF NEAV 


YORK. 


PRESBYTERIES 


MINISTERS. 


ELDERS. 


Binghajnton, 




Moses Lyman. 


Chemung, 




Tyler H. Abbey. 


Geneva, 




Herman D. Eastman. 


Hudson, 




Winthrop S. Gilman, Jr. 


Niagara, 


Edward P. Marvin. 




Otsego, 




Justus VanDeusen. 


St. Lawrence, 




Robert Mark wick. 


Troy, 


Charles E. Havens, 


Harvey^. King, 
Geo. H. Elagler. 



Athens.^ 

Cleveland, 

Zanesville, 



Benicia, 



BlairsvilU, 
Chester, 

Huntingdon, 

Lackawanna^i 

Pittsburgh, 

Shenango, 

Wellsboro, 

Westminster, 



Holston, 
Kingston. 



Chippewa, 
Winnebago, 
Wisconsin River, 



SYNOD OF OHIO. 

Joseph D. Longstreth. 
Andrew Richardson. 
Matthew Newkirk. 

SYNOD OF THE PACIFIC. 
Francis M. Dimmick, Augustus H. Buehren. 

SYNOD OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

Henry Wiester. 
Wm. P. Patterson. 

Robt. F. Wilson. 



Anthony A. Mealey. 
Clark B. Gillette. 
Joseph D. Smith. 



Hon. S. B. Chase. 
John F. Loy. 



SYNOD OF TENNESSEE. 

Jno. W. C. Willoughby. 

Donald McDonald, Thomas M. Brown. 

SYNOD OF WISCONSIN. 

William D. Thomas. 

Oliver W. Winchester. 



P. C. Claflin. 



The minutes of to-day's sessions were read and approved. 

After solemn praise, thanksgiving and prayer, the business of the 
Assembly having been completed, and the vote taken for the dis- 
solution of the Assembly, the Moderator declared the Assembly 
dissolved, and required another General Assembly, chosen in the 
same manner, to meet in the First Presbyterian Church of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, on the third Thursday of May, 1885. 

Closed with prayer and the apostolic benediction. 

WILLIAM EYES MOOKE, Permanent Glerk. 

WILLIAM HENRY ROBERTS, Stated Glerk. 



APPENDIX. 



I. Nairatibe, ©ftituarj) anlr Jfrateinal 



ANNUAL NARRATIVE 

or THE STATE OF RELIGION WITHIN THE BOUNDS OF THE 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES 

OF AMERICA, MAY, 1 884. 



The past year, to the Church at large, has been one of great 

MATERIAL PROSPEKITY. 

Church edifices have been erected, Church debts removed, and in most 
instances the salaries of ministers have been promptly paid. 

It is safe to say, that the financial condition of the Church has never been 
better, and that slie has never been more thoroughly equipped and furnished 
with the temporalities necessary to the accomplishment of her great work. 

BENEVOLENCE. 

With scarcely an exception the Narratives of the Presbyteries indicate 
growth and development in Christian benevolence. 

Tiie subject of systematic Christian giving is receiving greater attention 
than at any period in the previous history of the Church. The principle of 
giving intelligently and systematically, " as the Lord has prospered them," 
is becoming more thoroughly understood and generally practiced, and minis- 
ters are realizing the necessity of instructing the congregations, under their 
care, in this matter. 

CHRISTIAN WORK. 

There is every indication that the undeveloped resources and latent power 
residing in the laity, are being more fully appreciated and utilized. Chris- 
tians are realizing their individual responsibility, for the talents intrusted 
to them, and the necessity, not only of giving, but of personal effort for ad- 
vancing the interests of Clirist's Kingdom. The friends of Christ are enter- 
ing into fuller sympathy with Him, whose mission it was " to seek and save 
that which waslost," and are realizing, more and more, that holiness, in a very 
essential sense, means helpfulness. This spirit of helpfulness manifests it- 
self, in the organization of City Missions, Schools for the Chinese and 
Indians dwelling in our midst, and other kindred enterprises, but more 
particularly in the rapid growth and increased activity in our 



126 NARRATIVE. [Maj, 

SABBATH-SCHOOLS. 

During the past year the number of teachers and scholars has been greatly 
multiplied, the gain over the preceding year being 62,470. Activity in this 
department of Church work is seen, not only in the increase of numbers, 
but in the organization of teachers' meetings and institutes ; Normal and 
Bible classes; the employment of other means of preparing teachers for 
their duty ; and rendering the schools more effective. All the Narratives 
speak most encouragingly of the Sabbath-school Work. 

Whilst it is to be regretted that the Shorter Catechism is not more univer- 
sally taught in our families and schools, it is encouraging to know that there 
is a revival of interest in this blessed compendium of Divine truth and sym- 
bol of our faith. 

The Church is becoming more alive to the importance of instructing 
and interesting the young. Many of the churches report the organization 
and existence of Young Peoples' Meetings, Associations and Societies, with 
beneficial results. A disposition is wisely manifested to protect the young 
from the allurements of the world, and participation in doubtful or unlaw- 
ful amusements, by furnishing them with useful and pleasing employment 
and amusement, within the social circles of the Church. Aside from faithful 
instruction in Christian duty and a proper exercise of parental authority, 
no better method can be employed, to protect the young from doubtful plea- 
sures, than to provide better things to occupy their time and attention. 

woman's work. 

From all parts of the land, the Narratives, with scarcely an exception, 
testify to the extension, usefulness and success of Woman's Work. Numer- 
ous societies have been organized in the interest of Home and Foreign Mis- 
sions and for other benevolent purposes. Such has been the success attend- 
ing the labors of the Christian women of our Church, that congregations and 
Church enterprises are seekiiig their help. 

One promising feature of Woman's Work, which has been attended with 
good results, is the organization of mission bands, and bands of willing 
workers among the children. By these, the children are instructed and in- 
terested in missions, and learn the duty and privilege of Christian benevo- 
lence. 

SPIRITUAL STATE OF THE CHURCH. 

Some of the indices by which the spiritual condition of the Church is in- 
dicated, are the faithfulness with which the Word of God is preached, the 
diligence with which the means of grace are used, the number ^f additions 
to the Church, its peace and unity and the tone of its piety. 

The Narratives of the Presbyteries show that peace and unity have pre- 
vailed ; that the Word of God has been faithfully proclaimed, and that the 
attendance upon prayer meetings and Sabbath services within the bounds 
of most of the Presbyteries has increased ; though there is a very general 
complaint that Sabbath evening services are not as well attended as is 
desirable. Loose opinions and practices, in reference to the observance of 
the Sabbath, are assigned as the cause of this. 

Whilst no general or wide-spread revival of religion is reported, many 
have been added to the Church, indicating the continuous presence of the 
Holy Spu'it with His people in the regular means of grace. In some sections 
of the country, and notably within the bounds of the Synod of Illinois, 
special times of refreshing from the presence of the Lord are reported. 
Throughout the entire Church, so far as heard from, the increase in the 
number added to the Church, in excess of the preceding year, is about 
13,000. 

MORALITY. 

Judging from the means of information afforded, the standard of Chris- 
tian morality has not lowered. We cannot remain silent, however, in 
reference to the fact that from many portions of our land complaint is made 



A.D. 1884.] XARRATIVE. 127 

of worldliness, Sabbath desecration, inordinate love of pleasure and riches. 
There exists, what, for want of a more definite word, may be termed an 
inordinate spirit of mercantilism. A disposition to determine the moral 
quality of an act by a standard of pecuniary loss or gain. The claims of 
business are deemed a sufficient justification for violations of the moral law 
and Christian duty. Sunday papers are read, mails opened and examined, 
railroads operated, and in some instances the work of factories carried on, 
upon the plea that these things are allowed by the interests of business and 
commerce. The sanctity of the Sabbath may it seems be disregarded, if its 
observance requires pecuniary sacrifice. 

Another demoralizing evil, which in many parts of the country is attain- 
ing to gigantic proportions, is that species of commercial gambling known 
as dealing in options. Many in making haste to be rich by this method, 
have made shipwreck of their fortunes and Christian character, bringing 
reproach upon the cause of religion. 

Against all forms of immorality, whether sanctioned by custom or not, 
the Church should bear testimony. Faithfulness to moral obligations, is of 
the very essence of Christian life. The Gospel reveals its power in the purer 
morality to which it leads. 

TEMPERANCE. 

The Narratives show a universal and increasing interest and activity m 
the temperance work. The standard of temperance universally maintained, 
is total abstinence. The Church is not only bearing testimony agamst in- 
temperance, but she is affirming, that if eating meat, or drinking wine, 
causes a brother to offend, it is the part of Christian charity to eat no meat 
and druik no wine, while the world stands ! She is saying to the world, 
"Woe unto him who putteth the bottle to his neighbor's lips." 

■Though differences of opinion exist as to the method by which the end 
is to be attained, there is great unanimity in the belief that the sale of in- 
toxicating liquors, as a beverage, should be abolished. This is notably the 
case in the State of Iowa, in whicli,the people, largely through the influence 
of the various churches, have reaffirmed their adherence to prohibition, and 
have passed a stringent law, which takes effect on the Fourtli of July next 
ensumg. 

In reviewing the year and surveying the entu-e field, there is abundant 
occasion for praise and thanksgiving to Almighty God. The year has been 
one of great increase in material prosperity, benevolence, Christian activity 
and numerical strength. 

NECROLOGY. 

After surveying the field and the engagements of the year, it is customarj- 
to call the roll of those who have fallen at their post of duty, as good soldiers 
of Jesus Christ ! 

Of these, there have been ninety-three ministers, and many loved and 
honored elders, who, having fought the good fight, having ke'pt the faith, 
having finished their course, have gone to receive the crown, that the Lord, 
the righteous Judge, will give them at His appearing. Standing under the 
shadow of death, through tears of sorrow, and in heart-felt sympathy with 
the bereaved, we look by faith upon the innumerable company of those 
who have washed then- robes and made them white in the blood of the 
Lamb, confidently expecting to see those whose death we are called upon to 
record. Though they have gone, as we confidently hope, to join the General 
Assembly and Church of the First Born, whose names are written in heaven, 
their names are still cherished in the Church upon earth. Being dead, they 
yet speak to us by their godly lives. Christian character and the blessed re- 
sults of their earnest labors. They rest from their labors and their works do 
follow them. " The Lord giveth and the Lordtaketh away : blessed be the 
name of the Lord. " 



128 



NAERATIVE. 



[May, 



MINISTERIAL, OBITUARY. 



Name. 



Aitken, Thomas, 
Alexander, Samuel R., 
Allen, Arcaiibald C, 
Baker, Al vin, 
Baker, William M., D.D., 
Barnes, Nathaniel H., 
Bartlett, Alexander, 
Back us, John C.,DD.,LL.D., 
Bell, James R., 
Benson, Henry, 
Betts, William R. S., 
Blodgett, Charles L., 
Bonham, Benj. B., M.D., 
Bovell, Stephen J., 
Caldwell, John, M.D., 
Caldwell, Samuel, 
Cardy, John J., 
Cope, Edward, 
Corliss, Albert H., 
Crittenden, Samuel W., 
Crocker, Charles, 
Davis, Joseph R., 
Dickey, Samuel, 
Diefendorf, Sanders, D.D., 
Dillon. Samuel P., 
Eaton, Horace, D.D., 
Emersou, D. Hopkins, D.D., 
Ewinjf, William F., 
Fox, Matthew A., 
Fuller, Albert C, 
Gibson, William J., D.D., 
Golliday, Peter H., 
Goodale, Montg'ry T., D.D., 
Gould, David, M.D., 
Gray, Thomas M., 
Hatfield, Edwin F., D.D., 
Halliday, Ebenezer, 
Heberton, Edward P., 
Harmon, Silas, 
HelBenstein, Jacob, D.D., 
Hornblower, Wm. H., D.D., 
Johnson, Leroy R., 

Knox, William E., D.D., 

Latta, William W., 

Leite, Antonio P. de C, 

Lyle, Joseph G., 

McColl, Dugald D., 

McOoll, Joseph, 

McDouiill, Joseph B., 

McGowan, John Hall, 

McKee, David D., 

McNab, WilliHm, 

Martin, John W., D.D., 

Mateer, Joseph, D.D., 

Matthews, John D., D.D., 

Merritt, James L., 

Miller, Samuel, D.D., 

Mills, Cyrus T., DD., 

Moore, Okra B., 

Morris, George, 

Morrison, Andrew A., 

Norton, Augustus T., D.D., 

Ogden, Joseph M., 

Offer, Cyrus L., 

Pentzer, Jacob, 

Piatt, James M., D.D., 

Platter, J,)mes E., 

Pratt, Elizur H., 

Priest, James M., 

Kendall, John, 

BiKRs, C,vrus C, D.D., 

Riggs, S. K., 1>.D., LL.D., 

Robb, Edwin F., 

Rowlett, James, 

Scott, George, 

Scribner, William, 

Selleck, Charles G., 



OCCDPA- 
TION. 



P. Em., 
H. R., 
H. R., 
W. C, 
W. C, 
W. C, 
S.S.& Pf. 
p. Em., 

Ev., 
H. R., 
Ev., 
Ev., 

s. s., 
s. s., 

H. R., 

s. s., 
s. s., 

Ev., 
H. R., 
W. C, 

Ev., 

w. c, 

Prin., 

S. S., 

s. s., 

Ev., 
P. 

P. 
P. 

H. R., 
H. R., 
P. Em., 
W. C, 
S. S., 
Sec, 

w. c, 

w. c, 

S. Prin.. 
H. R., 
Prof., 

S. S., 

;p.. 

Ih. r., 

JF. M., 

P. 

P. 
iH. R., 

;w. C, 

iP., 
jH. R., 

H. R., 
iW. C, 

|H. R., 
W. C, 
P., 

Prin., 
S. S., 
H. R., 
H. R., 
S. S., 
H. R., 
S S., 
H. R., 
P. 
P. 
Ed., 
S. S., 
F. M., 
H. K., 
F. M., 

P-, 
H. R., 

S. S., 
H. K., 
H. R., 



Prbsbttert. 



Rochester, 
Vincennes, 
Indianapolis, 
Los Angeles, 
Philadelphia, 
Buffalo, 
Kingston, 
iBaltimore, 
jSchuyler, 
Binghamton, 
North River, 
Buffalo, 
Sacramento, 
Mattoon, 

Northumberland, 
Pittsburgh, 
Idaho, 
Otsego, 
Utica, 

Philadelphia, 
Buffalo, 
Los Angeles, 
Chester, 
Wooster, 
Clarion, 
Lyons, 

Philadelphia, 
Redfrtone, 
Wisconsin RiT«r. 
Jersey City, 
Huntingdon, 
Whitewater, 
Albany, 
Cincinnati, 
West f^hester, 
JNewYork, • 
Los Angeles, 
'Phlla. Central, 
San Francisco, 
Phila. North, 
'Allegheny, 
Yadkiu, 
Chemung, 
Philadelphia, 
Rio de Janeiro, 
Washington, 
Genesee, 
Lehigh, 
Louisville, 
New York, 
New Albany, 
Lackawanna, 
Phila. North, 
Clarion, 
North Texas, 
St. Clairsville, 
Monmouth, 
San Francisco, 
Fairfield, 
Wooster, 
SoUimon, 
1 Alton, 

Morris & Orange, 
jbinghamton, 
Iowa City, 
Steuben, 
Emporia, 
Brooklyn, 
Western Africa, 
Schuyler, 
Allegheny, 
Dakota, 
Utica, 
Steuben, 
Allegheny, 
Elizabeth, 
Eaet Florida, 



Place or Death. 



North Sparta, N. T., 
Vincennes, Ind., 
Indianapolis, Ind., 
San Lorenzo, Cal., 
South Boston, Mass., 
Hillsdale, Mich., 
Maryville, Tenn., 
Baltimore, Md., 
Elvaston, III. 
Jamestown, N. Y., 
Shokan, N. Y., 
Hartford, Conn., 
Pomona, Cul., 
Ashmore, 111., 
Elysburgh, Pa., 
Allegheny, Pa., 
Summerville, Oregon, 
Oneonta, N. Y., 
Cambridge, N. Y., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Arkansas City, Kan., 

Neath, Pa., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Hayesville, 0., 
Nickelsville, Pa., 
Palmyra, N. Y., 
Philadelphia, Pa., 
Minneapolis, Minn., 
Oregon, Wis., 
Norwood, N.'J., 
Duncausville, Pa., 
Harrisop, 0., 
Amsterdam, N. Y., 
Linwood, 0., 
Salem Centre, N. Y., 
Summit, N. J., 
Orange, Cal., 
Waldo, Fla., 
Berkeley, Cal., 
German own. Pa., 
Allegheny, Pa., 
Greensboro, S. C, 
Blue Mount Lake, N.Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa., 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 
Wheeling, W. Va., 

J.eroy, N. Y., 

Titusville, Pa., 

Anchorage, Ky., 

New York, N. Y., 

Hanover, Ind., 

Tomah, Wis., 

Norristown, Pa., 

New Bethlehem, Pa., 

Dallas, Texas, 

Athens, Ohio, 

Mount Holly, N. J., 

Mills Seminarv, Cal., 

Winnsborough, S. C, 

Baltimore, Md., 

Salina, Kansas, 

Alton, 111., 

(niatham, N. J., 

Virgil, N. Y., 

Arlton J unction, 

Bath, .N. Y., 

Winfield, Kansas, 

Durham, N. Y., 

Greenville, Liberia, 

Madura, India, 

Beaver b'tills, Pa., 

Beloit, Wis., 

Oswego, N. Y., 

Bradford, N. Y., 

Tarentum, Pa., 

Plamfleld, N. J., 

New Smyrna, Fla., 



Mar. 11, 
Feb. 17, 
Aug. 28, 
Dec. 31, 
Aug. 20, 
Sept. 9, 
Nov. 19, 
Apr. 8, 
Sept., 3, 
Aug. 7, 
Sept. 28, 
Apr. 27, 
Jan. 28, 
Dec. 8, 
July irj, 
July 1 , 
July 1, 
May 10, 
Nov. 10, 
Mar. 1, 
Aug. 7, 
Jan. 1.5, 
Jan. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Aug. 16, 
Oct. 21, 
July b, 
Dec. l."), 
Oct. 23, 
Feb. 9, 
Oct. 5, 
Dec. 16, 
Mar 7, 
May 17, 
Dec. 24, 
Sept. 2<, 
Apr. 3, 
Aug. 20, 
Dec. 3, 
Mar. 17, 
July 16, 
Oct. 9, 
Sept. 17, 
Sept. 5, 
Aug. 31, 
Apr. 11, 
Oct. 2, 
Apr. 15, 
Nov. 26, 
Nov. 26, 
Jan. 17, 
Feb. 11, 
June 12. 
Oct. 11, 
Mar. 7, 
Aug. 23, 
Oct. 13, 
Apr. 20, 
Feb. 26, 
Dec. 16, 
Oct. 16, 
Apr. 29, 
Fel>. 1.3, 
Oct. 23, 
May 12, 
Apr. 13, 
June 12, 
July 4, 
May li^, 
June 19, 
Aug. 29, 
Aug. 24. 
Oct. 20, 
Mar. 29, 
July 28, 
Mar. 3, 
Jan. 28, 



A.D. 1881.] 



FRATERNAL LETTER. 



129 



Name. 



Sessions, John, 
Smiley, George W., D.D., 
Smith, Courtney, 
Sneath, George, 
Spilman, Abram T., 
Sprole, William T., D.D., 
Stanley, Hannibal L., 
Stratton, William 0., 
Van der Gyp, Kryn, 
Walker, John W., 
Walsh, John J., D.D., 
Welch, Edward P., 
Wilson, S. J., D.D., LL.D. 
Wood, James W., D.D., 
Wood, Samuel M., 
Wray, John, 



Occupa- 
tion. 



H. R., 

P. 

P. 

P. 

W. C, 

Ev., 

s. s., 

Ev., 
Ev., 
W. C, 
H. R., 
W. C, 
Prof., 

H.R., 
H. R., 



Peesbttert. 



San Francisco, 

Lehigh, 

Genesee Valley, 

Puget Sound, 

Transylvania, 

Detroit, 

Chicago, 

Mahoning, 

Winnebago, 

Blairsville, 

North River, 

Wooster, 

Pittsburgh, 

Lehigh, 

Winnebago, 

Clarion, 



Place of Death. 



Honolulu, Haw. Is., 
Pottsville, Pa., 
EUicottsville, N. Y., 
Snohomish, W. T., 
Harrodsbarg, Ky., 
Detroit, Mich., 
Lake Forest, 111., 
Warren, O., 
Alta, Wis., 
Gordonsville, Va., 
Amenia, N. Y., 
Martinsburgh, 0., 
Sewickley, Pa., 
Allentown, Pa., 
Omro, Wis., 
Brockwayville, Pa., 



Date. 



Apr. 6, 
I June 29, 
Feb. 22, 
Aug. 20, 
Apr. 30, 
June 9, 
July 12, 
Jan. 27, 
Dec, 
Apr. 5, 
Feb. 7, 
Aug. 
Aug. 17, 
May 5, 
July 5, 
Aug. 16, 



1S84. 
1883, 
1SS4, 
1883, 
1883, 
1883, 
18S3, 
1884, 
1883, 
1884, 
1884 
1883, 
1883, 
1884, 
1883, 
1883, 



WM. HENKY EGBERTS, 

Stated Cleric. 



GEO. P. HAYS. 

Moderator. 



FRATERNAL LETTER 



FBOM THE 



GENERAL CONFERENCE OE THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL 

CHUKCII. 



TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE 
U. S. OF AMERICA, IN THE NAME AND IN BEHALF OF THE METHODIST 
EPISCOPAL CHURCH OF THE UNITED STATES, GREETINGS AND CHRIS- 
TIAN SALUTATIONS, IN THE NAME OF THE LORD JESUS, THE GREAT 
HEAD OF THE CHURCH. 

Dear Fathers and Brethren in Christ : 

It is with unfeigned satisfaction tliat we send you this epistle, though a 
very incompetent one, as expressive of our fraternal regard, and our joy in 
you and your work, as a member of the great Houseliold of Faith, laboring to 
bring in the reign of righteousness upon tlie earth. As for all the members 
of Christ's mystical Body, we cease not to pray that your prosperity may 
abound more and more, that peace and unity may serenely dwell in all your 
borders, and tliat great grace and glory may crown all your endeavors to es- 
tablish the Kingdom of God among men. We have watched with Chris- 
tian anxiety your progress in all that pertains to the work of the Lord, and 
have not failed to render sincere thanksgivings of heart for every step of 
advancement you have made in the Master's work, for every enlargement 
of your field of toil, for the additional intensity whicli your Church life re- 
veals in all her activities, from year to year, and for every success you 
achieve for the Truth and Him who is its Divine Author. There is noth- 
ing involving your welfare that is alien to us. The Household is one, 
though the members are many. 

Permit us to congratulate you upon the testimony that you, as a Church, 
still continue to bear to all those truths which we regard as vital to Chris- 
tianity, and the preaching of which Christ committed to His Church, to be de- 
clared in all lands and among all peoples. The times through which we are 
passing are peculiar as to their religious tendencies, and testing to the 
Church as the Divinely appointed guardian of revealed truth. An egotism 

9 



130 FRATEENAL LETTER. [May, 

tliat calls itself philosophy, and a criticism that arrogates to itself the essen- 
tials of scientific certainty, are endeavoring to undermine many of those 
doctrines that liave given strength and comfort to Cliristian hearts in all 
times, and have overtlirown the faith of many and emptied the faith of 
more of its saving contents. And, what is more to be deplored among those 
who are engaged in this work of destruction, unwittingly — our charity will 
not allow us to doubt — are some whose hearts are in deep sympathy with 
the cause of Christ, and who imagine they are rendering that cause a service by 
injectmg doubts into the public mind touching the authority and nature of 
the Holy Scriptures. While they have stimulated a more thorough study of 
the Word by their attacks upon its integrity, and thus have added to its de- 
fenses, yet, there can be no doubt, but their labors have been productive of 
much evil. But in this, as in so many other historical instances in which 
the faith seemed about to suffer, the good Hand of our God has been seen 
overruling evil for good. 

In all these contentions which have arisen, our faith has not been dis- 
turbed in the outcome, neither have our hopes gone into eclipse as to the 
hastening of the triumphs of Him wiio is the Truth. Under all conditions 
we be firmly persuaded that the counsel of the Lord shall stand. We have 
walked about Zion and marked her bulwarks and counted her towers and 
returned to our altars assured. We have there offered sacrifices of thanks- 
giving that her defenders so abound and are inspired with the spirit of 
courage and fortitude, and be so well able to go up against her foes. We 
feel confident you will not suspect us as dealing in flattery when we say, that 
we hold the Presbyterian Church as one of the stanchest bulwarks of the 
faith, one of the towers most difficult to capture, ^nd her sons as among 
the most able and skillful leaders of the Lord's Hosts, We thank God in 
behalf of our common cause for the deliverances of your General Assem- 
blies, committing your Church to sound doctrine ; for your institutions of 
learning, which have stood in unbroken line to stay the' floods of unbelief ; 
for your scholars, so many, so learned and so trvie, who have not hesitated 
to consecrate their varied accomplishments to a resistance of the literary 
fashion of the day in dealing with God's Word ; and for your periodicals, so 
thoroughly devoted to the enforcement of sound doctrine and evangelical 
instruction, without which true and beautiful Christian life and character 
can scarcely be formed. jSTo branch of God's Church has done or is doing 
better service in this regard than the one of which you are the worthy repre- 
sentatives. 

It is with much satisfaction that we remember between you and us there 
is no great doctrinal gulf fixed, dividing us in sympathy and shutting us olf 
from fellowship. AVe do not pretend that there are no differences of belief, 
that the symbols of doctrine of the one are the symbols of both, but it is 
permitted us to believe that in all fundamentals we are at one. The points at 
which we diverge are more metaphysical than doctrinal and do not prevent 
our hearty and fraternal co- working in the vineyard of our Master. It is 
true that these divergencies have occasioned hot intellectual strifes in other 
days, as though they were of the essence of doctrinal differences, but these were 
doubtless needed to purge the vision of the parties and bring out the true 
nature of the matters in dispute, and reveal the firm, broad basis of evan- 
gelical truth, which rests beneath us, as well as you, and which, when dis- 
covered, invites to fraternal and loving occupancy those already of one 
spirit in Christ Jesus. 

With you we believe in God the Father, Son and Holy Ghost, three Per- 
sons making the Godhead complete and constituting one ever olessed and 
eternal Trinity in Unity. You believe in the Deity of Christ and the Holy 
Ghost ; to us these are precious truths. You believe in the vicarious offer- 
ing of Jesus Christ, thus making atonement for the sins of the world ; in this 
is our only hope. You believe in the Holy Ghost, the Convincer of sin, the 
Comforter of the Church, the Sanctifier of souls; from the first we have 
held to these truths, and never more firmly than now. You believe that it 
is by grace through faith we are saved ; this is the experience of all Method- 
ists. You believe in the eternal awards of the judgment ; so do we. You 
believe in the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ ; we are looking, and hasten- 
ing to His appearing. You believe in the resurrection of the dead ; we cease 



A.D. 1884:.] FRATERNAL LETTER. 131 

not to preach it day nor night. Surely with such a basis of conviction com- 
mon to us both, there need be no strife between Presbyterian and Methodist 
herdsmen, but only a generous rivalry as to which shall feed their respec- 
tive flocks the better, bring in the greater number of the lost sheep and de- 
velop the most perfectly those qualities which the Great Shepherd delighteth 
to behold in His sheep. And let God be thanked ! there is no strife between 
them. 

It is with hopeful, grateful hearts that we testify to your zeal and efficiency 
in evangelistic labor. A large portion of our country is occupied by the dis- 
persed ones to whom the Gospel must be carried, as of old, by angels of the 
Church passing to and fro, announcing the message of peace and calling 
upon men every where to repent. It was said by one of the most distinguished 
Presbyterians that " Methodism is Christianity in earnest," referring, in 
part at least, to her readiness and effectiveness in occupying new fields that 
were lying waste. We are willing to believe that the opinion of Clialmers 
was not wholly unmerited, and that it would not be wholly misplaced if ap- 
plied to us now. But it is with Christian joy we recognize, tliat, in culti- 
vating the waste places, we find in you, not rivals, not competitors, but 
hearty co-laborers in the Lord. On the frontiers, Presbyterian pastors are 
found side by side with their Methodist brethren, both intent upon the same 
result, the conversion of men and their final salvation. Both build churches 
in which to worship God ; both organize sunday-schools in which to instruct 
the children ; both establish institutions of education that learning and 
science may occupy then- rightful place as adjuncts of faith ; both together 
are striving to lay firm foundations for Christian civilization in new em- 
pires ; and, both are engaged in a holy contention as to who will do the 
most to reach the end which each has in view. In all tliis we tliiuk the 
true unity of the Churcli finds its best illustration, and the prayer of Christ, 
that His Church may be one, its fittest and divinest realization. Xot in 
sameness of machinery, not in uniformity, shall that memorable prayer, 
which should never be forgotten, but ever held as a most sacred command, 
attain its most perfect expression, but in the great w(n-k which the Church has 
before her, and that Christly spirit which should inspire her in carrying on her 
Divine mission. No ditficulty do we experience in together sowing the field, 
in together reaping the harvest. That that we sow is the AVord of God ; we 
reap souls for our harvest. We simply invite you to join us in more ex- 
tended labors, in a more exemplary industry, in a purer zeal, in fuller con- 
secration, and shall ask the favor of being allowed to rejoice in your pros- 
perity and mourn over your adversity, if that at any time be appointed you. 

Another point upon which we congratulate you, and your Christian 
brethren as well, is the care you are taking to fulfill the last command of our 
Saviour. Xothing can be more touching than His remembrance of men, those 
that were far oil as well as that were nigh, even to the moment of His 
ascending up on high. As He had died for all men, so He commanded it to 
be told to all men. As His atonement was comi)lete for the sins of the 
whole world, so He ordered a proclamation of its virtue to be made to the 
whole world. As the propitiatory offering of Himself was satisfactory to 
the Father, laying a basis broad and firm enougli for the redemption of the 
race, and pardon for every soul of man, so He coidd not return to the Glory 
which He had left till He had given the command which knows no repeal : 
" Go, preach my Gospel to every creature." This command has not fallen 
lifeless upon the consciences of Presbyterians. You are among the foremost 
of the churches in missionary enterprise and your example is stimulating 
to us. You have ears keen to hear the Macedonian cry, and hearts sympa- 
thetic to heed its call, and open hands to meet the wants which prompt its 
utterance. Your missions, and your benevolence in their support, attest 
the presence of the Spirit of the Master with you, and to all Christendom 
are an inspiration to Christian duty and heroism. We thank God in our 
own behalf and in behalf of the entire houseliold of faith, upon your zeal 
and great success in preaching the Gospel in the regions beyond you, not 
boasting in another man's line of things, made ready to your hand. We 
claim your achievements as ours, for " one is our Master, even Christ." . 

We bear witness also with great pleasure to your activity and efficiency 
in all other departments of religious work. Yoiu" sunday-schools flourish, 



132 FRATERNAL LETTER. [May, 

your literatiire abounds, your benevolences are multiplied and your enlarge- 
ment is sure and steady. May you increase more and more. 

We trust "we sliall not be treading upon forbidden ground if we breathe a 
hope for tlie Presbyterianisni of America, tlie fulfillment of which, it seems 
to us, would honor God and greatly advance His cause. Like Methodism, 
you are many. As with us, so with you, contentions have arisen, and 
divisions followed which mar the beauty and symmetry of tlie Body of 
Christ. As with us. so with you, where doctrinal unity prevails organic 
unity has been interrupted. This has led to coldness and deficient sympathy, 
and, in many cases, to unseemly strife. We sympathize with you in this, 
for we too feel its evil influence. As a few years ago you set an example to 
all, full of commendation, by cementing a union between the old and the 
new, so we indulge the hope that soon you will renew the illustration you 
then gave of the power of Christian fellowship, by bringing together the 
separated Presbyterianisni of the North and Sovith. Such an event would 
be one that our country would hail with patriotic delight, and the churches 
with thanksgiving to God. We are glad to believe that you are advancing 
towards that consummation. 

There is a point of unity between Presbyterianism and Methodism, to 
which we may refer, that is to us a matter of unfeigned satisfaction. It is 
the testimony which both bear against an ecclesiastical evil which is of long 
continuance, and which, notwitlistanding its absurdity, still lives and flour- 
ishes. We refer to Prelacy and the claims that spring therefrom. The 
advancement of knowledge, and a sounder luidersl^anding of the New Testa- 
ment, and a better acquaintance with the writings of the early Church, have 
not rendered a protest unnecessary against all heretical teachings that im- 
port a priesthood into the Christian Church, other than that that makes all 
members of one Body of Christ priests, as well as kings, unto God. No heresy 
more vicious, no schisTii more fatal, than to interpolate any one between the 
individual soul and God, save the Eternal Son, the divinely appointed Me- 
diator between God and man. He is the Great High Priest who, in offering 
Himself, has made the altar forever approachable to the chief of sinners. 
Your Church order, your ministerial orders, forbid any other view. So do 
ours. You have no prelates , we have none. Of Prelacy you have nothing ; 
neitlier have we. You have your presbuteros-episkojws ; so have we. We 
have our episTcopos-presbuteros ; so have you. Ilere we are at one again, as 
well as in those fundamental doctrines to which we have before referred. 
And M'e propose to continue with you our protest against encumbering 
the Church with ministerial orders, not known to the Apostles and their 
times. 

We fear our letter is already too long, but beg leave to add one thought 
more. AVe feel that vast responsibilities rest upon the Church of to-day, 
and that the times through which we are passing are critical. Human 
wisdom cannot meet the exigencies that are upon us, " Not by might nor 
by power, but by my Spirit, saith the Lord." In order to worthy achieve- 
ments, the same Spirit that came upon the Apostles on the day of Pente- 
cost, must still rest in His fullness upon us. Nothing so needed, always so 
needed, as the perpetual baptism of the Holy Ghost. With you we will 
ever pray that the Promised Comforter may abide with the Church, en- 
riching it with all the benedictions of the Godhead, convincing the world 
of sin, of righteousness and of judgment, and sanctifying tlie Church, thus 
presenting her to the Father without spot or wrinkle or any such thing. 
Thus will we pray till the cloud appears upon which our Lord shall come, 
the second time, to make an end of sin. 

Praying tliat the blessing of God, the Father, the Son and Holy Ghost, 
may remain with you, making you to abound more and more in good works 
and all holy living. 

We are yours most truly in the fellowship of the Gospel and the bonds of 
Jesus Christ. 

ALFKED WHEELEK, 

Clmirman Committee of Fraternal Correspondence. 



A.D. 1884.] FRATERNAL LETTER. 133 

EEPLY TO THE FRATERNAL LETTER. 

TO THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 
OF THE UNITED STATES, FROM THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, GREET- 
INGS AND SALUTATIONS. 

Fathers and Brethren Beloved in Clirist: 

The General Assembly gathered in Saratoga have heard, with Christian 
joy, your letter of fraternal regard and good cheer. We have attended to 
your words. They have struck responsive chords of high esteem and deep 
affection for you in our breasts. Let us thank God and take courage on 
this behalf, for we may know thereby that you and we have passed from 
death unto life because we mutually love the bretliren. 

Upon our part we recognize, in the tone and contents of your epistle, good 
reason for glad yet humble thanksgiving to the God of our salvation for 
His grace to us as a denomination, in that lie has enabled us to let our 
light so shine that you, seeing our good works, have glorified our Father in 
heaven. 

We hasten to bear testimony, in return for that you have been pleased to 
declare concerning us, that through sovereign grace your light has not been 
imder a bushel, nor your city other than that wliich is our common heritage, 
the heavenly Jerusalem, the city of the living God built upon Mount Zion, 
a city that cannot be hid. 

You have been pleased, in your letter, to refer at length to your record and 
to ours in the past. AVe judge it, therefore, to be unnecessary to recall in 
extended review the lines of coincidence which have been discovered in 
your and our order, spirit and work for the Lord Jesus Christ. Glorious 
progress has been made in drawing these lines since you on tliis American 
Continent in 1784 became a General Conference, and we in 1788 became a 
General Assembly. 

Since tliese dates it has become more and more evident that with mutual 
burdens and sorrows, Methodist and Presbyterian have sent up like petitions 
to the throne of grace; that with a common heritage of iionor, Methodist 
and Presbyterian have taught their children the same great names as house- 
hold words ; that with a common ground for praise and joy Methodist and 
Presbyterian liave sung with the spirit and witli the understanding also, the 
same psalms, hymns and si)iritual songs, precious legacies to the Church 
universal ; with a common Gospel and tlie same commission, your ministers 
and ours, at hoihe and beyond the seas, have preached Christ and Him 
crucified as the only hope of a lost race. 

Methodist and Presbyterian have held fast the form of sound words, which 
declares that " except a man be born again he cannot see the kingdom of 
God;" that "faith without works is dead." These, and like to these, are 
the glorious commonplaces of our common religion. By such truths and 
origins and conseciuences which they involve, the crowns shall be placed 
upon the head of Immanuel in the day when He sliall see of the travail of 
His soul and shall be satisfied. 

And now permit us to refer in gratitude to matters in which your example 
stirs us to emulate you most vigorously. Not long since you were observed 
as a denomination to beckon us to follow you on in the great sabbath-school 
interest of the times, and in devising ways and means for the better educa- 
tion of the great mass of the people, notably in fostering schools of an 
advanced grade for the youth of both sexes belonging to your constituency. 

We are constramed to add that if there were such a passion as righteous 
envy, Ave sliould seek to be possessed by that when we consider your great 
success in finding a work for every man and a man for every work. We see 
that when you name churches you name ministers, that you do not fail to 
feed the flock over which the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers. 

Nevertheless, Brethren, you cannot but hold with us that, if this, ex- 
change of brotherly regard end in mere expression of our mutual admira- 
tion and esteem, we have lost the time spent in preparing, adopting, and 
hearing these letters. We must forget the things which are behind. Per- 



13i FRATERNAL LETTER. [May, A.D. 1884. 

fection is not yet attained. Victory is not yet won. We are on the field of 
conflict. The battle is but fairly initiated. True, great armies are organ- 
ized and equipped. The orders of our Captain, thanks to the continued de- 
monstration of the Spirit, are well understood. The battle-cry of all true 
soldiers of the cross is one: ''The World for Christ." The preliminary 
skirmishes of our age, of these last times, appear to be well over. Com- 
manding positions everywhere are occupied by the armies of the Lord of 
hosts and the word is "Forward." How clearly do we hear such exhorta- 
tions as these: "Strike to the heart of sin. Overthrow the bulwarks of 
error, the subterfuges of lies. Set light in the dark places. Prepare the 
way of Jehovah. Make His patlis straight. Give deliverance to the op- 
pressed. Set the captives free." But remember with humble confidence that 
though Paul may plant and Apollos water, God gives tlie increase. " This is 
the victory that overcometh the world even our faith. Not by might nor by 
power, but by my Spirit saith the Lord." 

In the day of the appearing of Christ, our common wonder and mutual 
joy shall be not in what has been accomplislied in the good fight by Method- 
ist or by Presbyterian, but in what our God hath Avrought throvigh instru- 
mentalities which sliall appear as earthen vessels in that day. 

We are glad to read in your letter cordial mention of the encouraging 
fact that throughout the world your ministers and people are living in 
mutual helpfulness with ours. We desire to move you to emphasize by all 
your prayers, deliverances and lives, as we would emphasize by oiu"s the 
imperative, instant and constant necessity that, until the day dawns and 
the shadows fiee away, the great body of spiritual unity which is represented 
by the Methodist and Presbyterian names, present an unbroken front to re- 
sist to tlie death the appalling evils of our times. 

First of all we are likely to be confronted and hindered by those who, 
wearing the external badge of our profession, are moved to activity by 
personal ambition and organized rivalries, rather than by undivided conse- 
cration to Him who saved others, Himself He could not save. We are 
liable to be decoyed into indiiference to, or to be swept away by the power 
of that carnal heart which wars against the sanctity of the Sabbath, the 
purity of domestic life, the lovely amenities of Christian society, the honor 
of the State which ought to be inviolate toward all classes and conditions 
of men, all which if restored and preserved, must be preserved and restored 
largely through the moral power of the grace which is sufficient for you and 
for us. Against the world, the flesh and the devil, now as ever the voice of 
Jesus speaking as never man spake, to you and to us cries " Watch ;" and the 
commission of the old prophets comes down to our ministry, " Cry aloud and 
spare not." 

Let us recognize, however, that the real strength of the body, depends not 
upon forms and dogmas held as intellectual truth and proclaimed with 
tongues of fire, but upon the fullness of life in all the members. The most 
convincing, the utterly irrefutable evidence of Christianity, that is suited to 
this practical age, is Christlike living. That truth is in order to holiness we 
will agree. Therefore the most efficient army service in the Church mili- 
tant will be tliat in which there is the greatest proportion of renewed hearts 
and consecrated lives, talents, possessions, for the honor of Christ in the 
saving of men. 

As the work of our respective denominations advances more and more to 
this end of the perfection of individual Christian character, our essential 
imity will become unmistakably apparent even to the world, and bring con- 
viction to the ends of the earth, of that everlasting love which hath be- 
stowed upon you and us "one Lord, one faith, one baptism." 

" Finally, brethren, farewell. Be perfect, be of good comfort, be of one 
mind, live in peace ; and the God of love and peace shall be with you. The 
grace of the Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God, and the communion of 
the Holy Ghost be with you all." Amen. 

H. T. McClelland, 
Secretary Committee on Correspondence. 



II ©Ticolocjical ^aninavies^ 



I. PRINCETON SEMINARY. 



1. Annual Report or the Directors. 

The Board of Directors of Princeton Theological Seminary present the 
following as their Seventy-second Annual Report. 

Since the date of their last Annual Report, the following sixty-seven new 
students have been matriculated, viz. : 



John H. Boyd, 
Alfred J. Cheatham, 
David S. Clark, 
Frederick G. Coan, 
Daniel M. Countermine, 
Charles E. Craven, 
Henry W. Cross, 
Morvin Custer, 
Henry Dickie, 
John Dunla]), 
Charles E. Edwards, 
Chauncey T. Edwards, 
George Edwards, 
Edmund M. Fergusson, 
John M. Fergusson, 
William P. Finney, 
George H. Fracker, 
John P. Gerrior, 
William M. Eraser, 
Alexander Hall, 
Dwight C. Hanna, 
John E. Harris, 
Albert K. Harsha, 
John H. Herbener, 
John G. Hibljen, 
Benjamin L. Hobson, 
John M. Hughes, 
Henry Hulst, 
Alexander M. Irvin, 
Robert Jones, 
Charles J. Junkin, 
George N. Karner, 
Paul F. Langill, 
Evan M. Landis, 
Edson A. Lowe, 
James L. McKee, 
William H. McMurray, 
William McNair, 
George N. Makeley, 
David M. Marshman, 
Paul Martin, 
Joseph A. Milburn, 
David Millar, 
William H. Miller, 



a graduate of South Western ITniversity, Tenn. 

" Arkansas College. 

" Mt. Union, Ohio. 

" Wooster University. 

" Union College. 

" College of New Jersey. 

" Hope College, Mich. 

" Ursinus College, Pa. 

" Dalhousie, N. S. 

" College of New Jersey. 

" Hanover College, Ind. 

" Hanover College, Ind. 

" College of New Jersey. 

" University of Pennsylvania. 

" University of Edinburgh. 

" College of New Jersey. 

" Wooster University, 

not a graduate, 
a graduate of Dalhousie, N, S. 

" Trinity College, Dublin. 

" Wooster University. 

" Trevecca, Wales. 

" College of New Jersey. 

" Hampden Sidney, Ya. 

" College of New Jersey. 

" Central University, Kentucky, 

not a graduate, 
a graduate of Hope College, Mich. 

" Central College, Ky. 

" Trevecca, Wales. 

" University of Pennsylvania. 

" College of New Jersey. 

" Queens College, Canada. 

" College of New Jersey. 

" Columbian, D. C. 

" Centre College, Ky. 

" Westminster College. 

" Rutgers College. 

" Williams College. 

" Wooster University. 

" College of New Jersey, 

not a graduate, 
a graduate of Glasgow University. 

" Lafayette College. 



136 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [Maj, 

James C. Oehler, a graduate of Davidson College, N. C. 

Ford C. Ottmau, " Lafayette College. 

Thomas R. Paden, " College of New Jersey. 

Robert J. Phipps, " Lafayette College, Pa. 

William S. Red, " Austin, Texas. 

Benjamin P. Reid, " Davidson College, N. C. 

Peter Robertson, " 

James C. Russell, " College of New Jersey. 

Prancis E. Smiley, " University of Pennsylvania. 

Henry W. Smith, " Williams College. 

Robert S. Stevenson, " University of Indiana. 

Charles A. Stonelake, not a graduate. 

Prank R. Symmes, a graduate of College of New Jersey. 

John G. Touzeau, " Washington and Jefferson College. 

Hartley T. Updike, " College of New Jersey. 

Benjamin G. Van Cleve, " Washington and Jefferson College. 

Geerhardus Yos, " Gymnasium at Amsterdam, Holl'd. 

William A. Waddell, " Union College. 

Charles Wadsworth, " University of Pennsylvania. 

Milton N. Wagner, " Dickinson College. 

Albert M. West, " Western University, Pa. 

Arthur S. Wright, " Union College. 

David W. Woods, " College of New Jersey. 

Of these there were received from the Western Theological Seminary at 
Allegheny, Messrs. Coan, C. E. Edwards, C. T. Edwards, Lowe, Marsh- 
man, West, and D. W. Woods. Prom Union Seminary, New York, Mr. 
Pracker. Prom Union Seminary, Ya., Messrs. Cheatham, Herbener and 
Hobson. Prom Lane Seminary, Mr. Cross. Prom Bangor Seminary, Maine, 
Mr. GeiTior. From the General Assembly's College, Belfast, Ireland, Mr. 
Hall. And from the Seminary of the IloUand Reformed Church, Grand 
Rapids, Michigan, Mr. Yos. Seven names of those matriculated do not 
appear on the Seminary Catalogue. Mr. Dunlap was called home almost 
immediately by the death of his father, hoping to return next year. Messrs. 
Oehler, Red and Wadsworth withdrew on account of health. Messrs. 
Robertson and Hulst also withdrew very early in the session. Mr. Milburn 
was matriculated after the Catalogue was issued. 

The whole number in actual attendance during the session has been : 

Graduate Students (including Hebrew Fellow), . 3 

Special Students, ...... 4 

Senior Class, ...... 44 

Middle Class, 46 

Junior Class, ...... 45 

Total, 142 

Many of the students have been actively engaged in evangelistic work 
during the session. 

Of the graduating class, eight are expecting to go on Foreign Missions 
this year or the next. Eight are going to Home Mission fields, and others 
are inquiring about stations. Fifteen have been called to be pastors of 
churches. Three expect to study in Germany, and, of the rest, all have 
more or less definite expectation of immediate engagements. 

The Stone Lectures have not been delivered' this year because Dr. Seelye 
found it necessary to request a further postponement, and it proved impos- 
sible to procure a substitute in the short time that remained. 

Tlie followmg forty-three students have received certificates of their grad- 
uation, viz. : 

Charles P. Bates, James B. Clark, 

Robert P. Boyd, Charles E. Edwards, 

Lewis P. Brown, Chauncey T. Edwards, 

James I. Campbell, Edwin M. Ellis, 



A.D. 1884.] PRINCETON SEMINARY. 137 

Henry rorman, Donald C. McLaren, 

George H. Tracker, Alexander McTavlsh, 

James R. Gibson, David M. Marshman, 

Caspar E. Gregory, W. F. D. Meikle, 

Alexander Hall, William J. Mewhinney, 

Edward M. Haymaker, William Miller, 

John James Henning, John Adams Muir, 

Samuel I. Hickey, Willis Edwards Parsons. 

George M. Hickman, Eobert B. Patton, 

James S. Hillhouse, William K. Preston, 

Frank C. Hood, Clarence G. Reynolds, 

Robert H. Hoover, Henry Schlosser, 

Samuel G. Hutchison, Josiah Still, 

Thomas E. Inglis, Paul Van Dyke, 

C. A. Rodney Janvier, John C. Willert, 

John B. Kolb, David Wills, Jr. , 

Walter Laidlaw, Matthew C. Woods. 
Thomas R. McDowell, 

Mr. Wilson Gaines Richardson was given a special certificate of attend- 
ance for two years. 

The Rev. William M. Paxton, D.D., of New York City, who was last 
year elected Professor of Ecclesiastical, Homileticaland Pastoral Theology, 
was duly inaugurated on Tuesday evening. May 13th, 1884. 

The following Directors have been elected to fill the places of those whose 
term of office expires in May, 1884, viz. : 

John Maclean, D.D., LL.D., Levi P. Stone, Esq., 

James McCosh, D.D., LL.D., Latimer Bailey, Esq^ 

Heni;y J. Van Dyke, D.D., Wm. A. Wheelock, Esq. 

Ebenezer Erskine, D.D., 
Robert Russell Booth, D.D., 
George Alexander, D.D.. 
Hemy J. Van Dyke, Jr., D.D., 

The Rev. James T. Leftwich, D.D., was elected to fill the vacancy caused 
by the death of the Rev. John C. Backus, D.D., LL.D., whose term of 
office would have expired in May, 188(5. 

James McCormick, Esq., was elected to fill the vacancy caused by the 
death of the Hon. George Sharswood, LL.D., whose term of office would 
have expired in May, 1885. 
All of which is respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM E. SCHEXCK, 

Secretary of the Board. 

FACULTY. 

Rev. Alexander T. McGill, D.D., LL.D., Emeritus Professor of Eccle- 
siastical, Homiletic and Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. William Henry Green, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Oriental and 
Old Testament Literature. 

Rev. James C. Moffat, D.D., Helena Professor of Church History. 

Rev. Caspar Wistar Hodge, D.D., Professor of New Testament Litera- 
ture and Exegesis. 

Rev. Charles A. Aiken, D.D., Archibald Alexander Professor of Orien- 
tal and Old Testament Literature and Christian Ethics. 

Rev. Archibald Alexander Hodge, D.D., LL.D., Charles Hodge 
Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theology. 

Rev. Francis L. Patton, D.D., LL.D., Stuait Professor of the Relations 
of Philosophy and Science to the Christian Religion. 

Rev. William M. Paxton, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Ecclesiastical, 
Homiletic and Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. William H. Roberts, D.D., Librarian. 

Henry W. Smith, A.M., J. C. Green Instructor in Elocution. 

Rev. John D. Davis, A.M., J. C. Green Instructor in Hebrew. 



138 THEOLOGICAL SEMINAllIES. [^^ay, 

DIRECTORS OF THE SEMINARY. 

William D. Snodgrass, D.D., President. 
JoHX Maclean, D.D., LL.T)., 1st Vice-President. 
Abraham Gosman, U.D., 2d Vice-President. 
William E. Schenck, D.D., Secretary. 

Ministers. Term expires, 1885. Elders. 

William T>. Snodgrass, D.D., Kobert Carter, 

Kobert Hammill, D.D., Hon. Jolni K. Findlay, 

Joseph T. Smith, B.D^ James McCormick. 

Abraliam Gosman, D.D., 
James O . M urray , D . I) . , 
Everard Kempshall, D.I)., 
George T. Purves, 

Term expires, 1886. 

William C. Cattell, D.D., LL.D., George Junkin, Esq., 
Elijah R. Craven, D.D., Bennington F. Randolph, 

William E. Schenck, D.D., Hon. John T. Nixon, LL.D. 

John Hall, D.D. , 
William Irvin, D.D., 
William Brenton Greene, 
James T. Leftwich, D.D., 

Term expires, 1887. 

John Maclean, D.D., LL.D., Levi P. Stone, 

James McCosh, D.D., LL.D., William A. Wheelock, 

Henry J. Van Dyke, D.D., Latimer Bailey. 

Ebenezer Erskine, D.D., 
Robert Russell Booth, D.D., 
George Alexander, D.D., 
Hemy J. Van Dyke, Jr., D.D., 



2. Annual Report of the Trustees. 

The Trustees of the Theological Seminary at Princeton, New Jersey, re- 
spectfully present to the General Assembly their Fifty-ninth Annual Report. 

Since the last Report, the Seminary has received, from various friends of 
the Ssminary, eleven liundred dollars in aid of the Library ; six hundred and 
fifty dollars in aid of students; from Rev. H. C. Stanton, one hundred dol- 
lars for the increase of the Stanton Fund ; through Rev. Dr. Wm. M. Pax- 
ton, one liundred and sixty dollars, for preaching in Seminary course ; and 
from Miss H. A. Lenox, five thousand dollars to meet the deficiencies in the 
Contingent Fund. 

The Library has been increased by the addition of 1930 volumes, and 500 
pamphlets ; and now contains 41 ,939 volumes and 10,500 unbound pamphlets. 

The receipts for the year from all sources were $66,398.52. 

The disbursements were $64,652.39. 

These disbursements were for salaries of seven Professors, Librarian, 
Elocution Instructor, Hebrew Instructor, Assistant Treasurer, Scholarships, 
and various contingent expenses. 

Tlie Scliolarships founded by generous friends of the Seminary remain as 
at last report. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

In behalf of the Board , 

A. GOSMAN, Secretary. 
Princeton f New Jersey, May 14th, 188 4. 



A.D. 1884.] - PRINCETON SEMINARY. 139 



OFFICEKS OF THE BOARD. 

Samuel H. Pennington, M.D., President. 
Eev. Samuel, M. Hamill, D.D., Vice-President. 
Eev. Abraham Gosman, B.D., Secretary. 
Jacob D. Vermilye, Treasurer. 

TRUSTEES OF THE SEMINARY. 

John r. Hapreman, Matthew Newkirk, D.D., 

Samuel H. Peiiumgton, M.D., John ]>. Wells, D.D., 

Daniel Price, Levi P. Stone, 

Hon. Edward W. Scudder, Hon. Caleb S. Green, 

George Hale, D.D., William Libbey, 

Samuel M. Hamill, D.D., Charles E. Green, 

Eobert Lenox Kennedy, Henry M. Flagler, 

Samuel D. Alexander, D.D., James O. Murray, D.D., 

Abraham Gosman, D.D., Augustus P. Studdiford, D.D., 

Jacob D. Vermilye, Hon. John Scott, 
F. Wolcott Jackson. 

George H. Niebuhr, Assistant Treasurer and Superintendent of 
Grounds and Buildings. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

1. Le Roy Scholarship, ) both founded by Mrs. Martha Le Roy, of New 

2. Banyer Scholarship, S York. 

3. Lenox Scholarship, founded by Robert Lenox, Esq., of New York. 

4. Whitehead Scholarship, founded by John Whitehead, Esq., of Burke 
County, Ga. 

5. Charleston Female Scholarship, founded by the Congregational and 
Presbyterian Female Association of Charleston, S. C, for assisting in the 
education of pious youth for the Gospel ministry. 

6. Scholarship, founded by the first class in the Seminary in 1819. 

7. Nephew Scholarship, founded by James Nephew, Esq., of Mcintosh 
County, Ga. 

8. Woodhull Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Hannah Woodhull, of Brook- 
haven, Long Island, New York. 

9. Scott Scholarship, founded by Mr. William Scott, of Elizabethtown, 
New Jersey. 

10. Van Brugh Livingston Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Susan U. Neimce- 
wicz, of Elizabethtown, New Jersey. 

11. Augusta Female Scholarshi)), founded by the Ladies of Augusta, Ga. 

12. Keith Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Jane Keith, of Charleston, S. C. 

13. Gosman Scholarship, founded by Robert Gosman, Esq., of Upper Red 
Hook, New York. 

14. Wickes Scholarship, founded by Eliphalet Wickes, Esq., of Jamaica, 
Long Island, New York. 

15. Othniel Smith Scholarship, founded by Mr. Othniel Smith, of Jamaica, 
Long Island, New York. 

16. H. Smith Scholarship, founded by Mrs. H. Smith, of Carmel, Miss. 

17. Anderson Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Jane Anderson, New York. 

18. Kennedy Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Anthony Kennedy, of Frank- 
ford, Pa. 

19. Colt Scholarship, founded by Roswell L. Colt, Esq., of Baltimore, Md. 

20. John Keith Scholarship, founded by Mr. John Keith, of Bucks Coun- 
ty, Pa. 

21. Boudinot Scholarship, founded by the Hon. Elias Boudinot, LL.D., 
of Burlington, New Jersey. 

22. ED Scholarship, founded by Mr. Robert Hall, and his sister, Marion 
Hall, of Newburgh, Orange County, New York. 

23. Kirkpatrick Scholarship, founded by William Kirkpatrick, Esq. , of 
Lancaster, Pa. 



140 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. V^^^Yi 

24. Fayette Scholarship. 

25. Senior Class, 1819, Scholarship. 

26. S(;holarsliip. 

27. Senior Class, 1828, Scholarship. 

28. Senior Class, 1820-21, Scholarship. 

29. Harmony Scholarship. 

30. King Scholarship, founded by Mr. Gilbert King, of Newburgh, Orange 
County, New York. 

31. Ralston Scholarship, founded by Robert Ralston, Esq., of Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

32. Benjamin Smith Scholarship, founded by Mr. Benjamin Smith, of 
Elizal)ethto\vn. New Jersey. 

.33. Rankin Scholarship, founded by Mr. Henry Rankin, of New York. 

34. Sweetman Scliolarship, founded by the Rev. Joseph Sweetman, of 
Charlton, New York. 

35. Deare Scholarship, founded by Miss Mary Deare, of New Brunswick, 
New Jersey. 

36. Mary Hollond Scholarship, founded by Miss Mary HoUond, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

37. Huxam Scholarship, founded by Miss Elizabeth Huxam, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

38. Female Scholarship, of the Presbytery of Orange. 

39. Peter Massie Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Sarah Massie,of Elizabeth- 
town, New Jersey. 

40. Peter Timothy Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Ann Timothy. 

41. Bulkley Scholarship, founded by Mr. Chester Bulkley, of Wethers- 
field, Ct. 

42. Sarah Stille Scholarship, founded by Miss Sarah Stills, of Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

43. Catherine Naglee Scholarship, founded by Miss Catherine Naglee, of 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

44. John liofE Scholarship, founded by Mr. John Hoff, of Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

45. Auchincloss Scholarship, founded by Mr. Hugh Auchincloss, of New 
York. 

46. Henry Young Scholarship, founded by Mr. Henry Young, of New 
York. 

47. Henry Day Scholarship, founded by Henry Day, Esq., of New York. 

48. Robert McCrea Scholarship, founded by R.L. & A. Stuart, of New York. 

49. .Janet McCrea Scholarship, " 

50. Kinloch Stuart Scholarship, " 

51. Agnes Stuart Scholarship, " 

52. Robert L. Stuart Scholarship, " 

53. Mary Stuart Scholarship, " 

54. Alexander Stuart Scholarship, " 

55. The Alexander Scholarsliip, " 

56. The Smith Family Scholarship, founded by Isaac R. Smith, Esq., of 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

57. The James Harper Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Eliza Harper, of New 
York. 

58.' The Charles H. Dod Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Caroline B. Dod, 
of Princetfon, New .Jersey. 

59. The Robert McClellan Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Robert 
McClellan, Es(i., of New York. 

60. John James Irvin Scholarship, founded by Mr. Richard Irvin, of New 
York. 

61. George Potts Scholarship, founded by Mr. John Crosby Brown, of 
New York. 

62. T^atimer Scholarship, founded by a la<ly of I'liiladelpliia, Pa. 

63. Fowler Scholarship, founded by William C. Fowler, of New York. 

64. Dayton Scholarship, founded by George Dayton, of Peekskill, New 
York. 

65. Arthur Pemberton Sturges Scholarship, founded by Mr. Jonathan 
Sturges, of New York. 



A.D. 188-i.] AUBUEN SEMINARY. 141 




68. Susan Hamilton Thorn Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Mrs. 
Susan H. Thorn, of Carlisle, Pa. 

69. Edwin Emerson Scholarship, founded by the Rev. Edwin Emerson. 

70. Sutphen Scholarship, founded by a legacy of William T. Sutphen, of 
Freehold, N.J. 

71. Elliott Scholarship, founded by the Rev. Jared L. Elliott, of AVashing- 
ton, D. C. 

72. Smith Family Scholarship, No. 2, founded by Mrs. Caroline E. Smith, 
of Philadelphia, Pa. 

73. Henry A. Boardman Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Miss Harriet 
Hollond, of Philadelphia, Pa. 

74. Stephen Collins Scholarship, No. 1, founded by a legacy of Dr. 
Stephen Collins, of Baltimore, Md. 

75. L. B. Ward Scholarship, founded by L. B. Ward, Esq., of Morris- 
town, New Jersey. 

76. Amos Fuller Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Amos Fuller, Esq., 
of Peekskill, New York. 

77. Stephen Collins Scholarship, No. 2. 

78. Mary A. ]ioardman Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Miss Mary A. 
Boardman, of Philadelphia, Pa. 

79. Elias Boudinot Scholarship, No. 2. 

80. Elias Boudinot Scholarship, No. 3. 

81. Cortlandt Van Rensselaer Scholarship. 

82. Solomon McNaii- Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Mrs. Fanny S. 
McNair. 

83. James N. Cobb Scholarship, founded by INfrs. Amelia A. Cobb. 

84. Ann Anderson Scholarship, founded by a bequest of Ann Horton. 

85. Mary Hollond Scholarship, No. 2, founded by Harriet Ilollond, of 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

86. Sarah W. Arms Scholarship. 

87. Cooper Scholarship, foimded by a bequest of Archibald Cooper, Esq. 

88. William Shippen Scliolarshii), founded by a bequest of William Ship- 
pen, M.D., of Philadelphia, Pa. 

89. Persian Scholarship, founded by a bequest of Rev. James L. Merritt, 
of South Amherst, Mass. 

90. Musgrave Scholarship, founded by a bequest of Rev. George W. Mus- 
grave, D.D., LL.D., of Philadelphia, Pa. 



II. AUBURN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 
Annual Report of the Trustees. 

The control of the Seminary is vested in a Board of Trustees and a Board 
of Commissioners. The Trustees have the immediate care of the Seminary, 
and the management of its estate, both real and personal. The Board or 
Commissionei-s is composed of a representation of two clergymen and one 
layman from each of the Presbyteries in what were formerly the Synods of 
Albany, Central New York, Geneva, and Western New York ; namely, the 
Presbyteries of Albany, Bingliamton, Buffalo, Cayuga, Champlain, Che- 
mung, Columbia, Genesee, Genesee Valley, Geneva, Lyons, Niagara, Otsego, 
Rochester, St. Lawrence, Steuben, Syracuse, Troy and Utica. The Com- 
missioners fill the places of the Trustees as they become vacant ; appoint the 
Professors; and, with the concurrence of the Trustees, fix the salaries and 
make all necessary appropriations of funds. Each Commissioner holds his 
office three years ; one going out of office and the Presbytery supplying his 
place by a new election, each year. Vacancies occasioned by removal are 
filled by the Presbyteries as they occur. The appointments of Professors 



142 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. , [^ayi 

are reported to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Chnrch. A Com- 
mittee of Visitors to the Seminary is appointed by the -Synod of New York. 
The Examining Committee, on tlie part of tlie Connnissi<mers, is com- 
posed of those members who are serving their thu-d year of office. 

The Officers of the Board of Commissioners for the ensuing year are : 

Hon. James H. Loomis, Attica, N. Y., President. 
Rev. C. C. Heminway, Auburn, N. Y., Stated Clerk. 
Kev. J. AV. Jacks, Itomulus, X. Y., \ ruvi-it 

llev. H. C. CiiADSEY, East Pembroke, N. Y., J ^'«^'^*- 

The BoAKD OF Trustees is as follows : 

Eev. Albert T. Chester, D.D., President. 
Rev. Samuel H. Gridley, U.D., Vice-President. 
James Seymour, Jr., Auburn, Is . Y., Secretary. 

Class whose term of office expires in 1885 : 

Eev. Albert T. Chester, D.D., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Rev. Charles E. Robinson, D.I)., Rochester, N. Y. 
Hon. Charles C. Dwight, LL.D., Auburn, K. Y. 
Rev. Charles Hawley, D.D., Auburn, N. Y. 
Rev. J. Jermain Porter, D.D., Phelps, K. Y. 
Of these, Dr. Robinson was elected in place of Rev. James B. Shaw, D.D., 
who resigned, after twenty-six years of acceptable service. 

Class whose term of office expires in 1886 : 

Rev. Samuel H. Gridley, D.D., Waterloo, N. Y. 
Richard Steel, M.D., Auburn, N. Y. 
Rev. Levi Parsons, D.D., Mount Morris, N. Y. 
Edward C. Selover, Esq., Auburn, N. 1 . 
Robert A. Nelson, Esq., Auburn, N. Y. 

Class whose term of office expires in 1887 : 

Sylvester Willard, M.D., Auburn, N. Y. 

Rev. Timothy Stiilman, D.D., Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Hon. Israel S. Spencer, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Rev. Henry Darling, D.D., LL.D., Clinton, N. Y. 

Henry A. Morgan, Esq., Aurora, N. Y. 
Dr. Darling was chosen in place of Rev. S. G. Brown, D.D., LL.D., who 
declined re-election. He had acceptably served the Seminary for twelve 
years. 

prudential committee. 

Sylvester Willard, M.D., Robert A. Nelson, 

Richard Steel, M.D., * Rev. Cliarles Hawley, D.D., 

Edward C. Selover, Hon. Clias. C. Dwight, LL.D. 

examining committee. 

Principals. Alternates. 

Rev. Levi Parsons, D.D., Rev. S. H. Gridley, D.D., 

Rev. Henry Darling, D.D., Rev. Chas. E. Robinson, D.D., 

Hon. C. C. Dwight^ LL.D., Hon. I. S. Spencer. 

Treasurer, James Seymour, Jr., Auburn, N. Y. ; Auditor, Richard 
Steel, M.D. ; Financial Secretary, Rev. Alfred M. Stowe, Canandai- 
gua, N. Y. 



A.D. 1884.] AUBUEN SEMINAEY. 143 

During the past year the Faculty has been constituted as follows : 

Kev, Samuel M. Hopkins, D.D., Hyde Professor of Ecclesiastical History 
and Church Polity. 

Kev. Ezra A. Huntington, D.D., LL.D., Taylor, Seymour and Ivison 
Professor of Biblical Criticism. 

Kev. Willis J. Beecher, D.D., Professor of Hebrew Language and Lit- 
erature. 

Rev. Ransom B. "Welch, D.D., LL.D., Richards Professor of Christian 
Theology. 

Kev. Anson J. Upson, D.D., LL.D., Bellamy and Edwards Professor of 
Sacred Rhetoric and Pastoral Theology. 

Forty-five students have been in attendance diu'ing the year. Of these 
the following nineteen were received since our last Report : 

TO THE senior CLASS: 

Orville Reed, a graduate of Yale College, on dismission from the Union 
Theological Seminary of New York, and 

Charles Sumner Hoyt, a graduate of Hamilton College, who completed 
the Middle year in this Seminary in 1880. 

TO the junior CLASS : 

Albert Jay Abeel, a graduate of Hamilton College. 

James Richard Breaks, a graduate of Wabash College. 

Angus Hugli Cameron, a graduate of Pictou Academy. 

Wilbur Oscar Carrier, a graduate of Albion College. 

William Hart Dexter, a graduate of Rochester University. 

George Kenneth Eraser, a graduate of Hamilton College. 

Melancthon Joseph Getman, a graduate of State Normal School, Albany. 

Corydon Merriman Hulett. 

George Wesley Luther, a graduate of Hamilton College. 

Daniel James Many, Jr. , a graduate of Hamilton College. 

Alexander Cameron McKenzie. 

John Calvin Mead, a graduate of Hamilton College. 

Charles Ragbir, a student of Queens Royal College, Trinidad. 

George Valentine Reichel. 

Charles Scott, a student of Hobart College. 

Henry Myron Tyndall, a graduate of State Normal School, Albany. 

John Samuel Willdridge, a student of Hackettstown Seminary. 

Mr. Breaks was dismissed to Lane Seminary, January 1884. 

The following eleven members of the Senior Class have received the 
usual diplomas of graduation : 

Duncan Cameron, James Witherell Seel ye, 

Harold James Frothingham, Arthur Willis Spooner, 

Charles Sumner Hoyt, Frederick Gordon Stuart, 

William Henry Kelley, Alfred Tennyson Yail, 

John Calvin Lenhart, Hugh Kelso Walker. 
Orville Reed, 

Of the graduating class, two are under commission as Foreign Mission- 



pastoi 

About 670 volumes and 474 pamphlets have been added to the Library 
during the year, about 400 volumes being a legacy of the late Hon. E.G. 
Richards, of books from the library of the Rev. James Richards, D.D., 
formerly Professor of Theology in this Seijiinary. 

To this Report is appended the blank provided by the General Assembly, 
with answers to the questions therein asked. 



144 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [Ma J, 

The scholarship funds there reported include the following scholarships, 
ranging in amoinit from $500 and upward : 

1. Cotton Skinner Scholarsliip, founded by a legacy of Cotton Skinner, 
Esq., of Moravia, N. Y. 

2. Sliepard and Cobb Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Sophia N. 
Shepard, of Canandaigua, and Alfred Cobb, Esq., of Syracuse, N. Y. 

3. Delavau Scholarship, founded by Edward C. Delavan, Esq., of Albany, 
N. Y. 

4. Downs Scholarship, founded by Miss Sarah Downs, of Downsville, 
Otsego Co., X. Y. 

5. William M. Semple Scholarships (2), founded by Mrs. M. G. Semple, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

0. llardenbergh and Bevier Scholarship, founded by John Herring Har- 
denbergh, Esq., and Matthew Bevier, Esq., of Auburn, N. Y. 

7. Louisa Powis Scholarship, founded by Miss Louisa Powis, of Geneva, 
N. Y. 

8. Scott Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Margaret Scott Wood, of Albany, 
and Mrs. Elizabeth Scott Brayton, of Watertown, N. Y. 

9. Wade Scholarship, founded by Nicholas Wade, Esq., of Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 

10. The Munford Scholarship. 

11. Kiggs Scliolarship, founded by Ira Biggs, Esq., of Niles, N. Y. 

12. Bates Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Mrs. Sarah Bates, of Ithaca, 
N. Y. 

13. Hungerford Scholarships (5), founded by a legacy of Hon. S. H. 
Hungerford, of Westfield, N. Y. 

14. James Scholarship, founded by William James, Esq., of Albany, 
N. Y. 

15. The Ladies Scholarship. 

16. Seymour Scholarship, founded by James S. Seymour, Esq., of Au- 
burn, N. Y. 

17. Ferry Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Herman Ferry, Esq., of 
Utica, N. Y. 

18. The Goble Scholarship. 

19. WoliUeben Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Mrs. Bable Wohlleben, 
of Philadelphia, Pa. 

20. Loomis Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Nancy J. L. Bayne, of Medina, 
N. Y. 

21. East Bloomfield Scholarship, founded by the Congregational Church 
of East Bloomtleld, N. Y. 

22. Dey Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Anthony Dey, Esq., of New 
York, N.Y. 

23. Arden Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Mrs. Charlotte B. Arden, 
of Morristown, N. J. 

24. Benjamin Woodruff Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Mrs. Char- 
lotte B. Arden, of Morristown, N. J. 

25. Hobbie Scholarship, founded by John Hobbie, Esq., of Cazenovia, 
N.Y. 

20. Manwaring Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Mrs. Smith Kellogg, 
of Le Roy, N.Y. 

27. Corwiu Scliolarship, founded by the Rev. Gabriel S. Corwin, M.D., of 
East Pembroke. N.Y. 

28. Michael Baldrich Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Michael Bald- 
rich, Esq., of Romulus, N. Y. 

29. Oren Johnsou Scholarship, founded by a legacy of the Rev. Oren 
Johnson, of Beaver Dam, Wis. 

30. Robert Scholarships (9), founded by Christopher R. Rqbert, Esq., of 
New York. 

31. Brinkerhoff Scholarship, founded by James S. Seymour, Esq., of Au- 
burn, and Henry Ivisoii, Esq., of New York. 

32. Beebee Scholarship, founded by F. D. Beebee, Esq., of Brockport, 
N. Y. 

33. Home Mission Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Miss Mary Tour- 
nier, of Syracuse, N. Y., the income of this scholarship to be given, at the 



A.D. 1884.] AUBURN SEMINARY. 145 

close of each Seminary year, to some member (or members) of the graduat- 
ing class, going at once into the Home Mission Field. 

34. Mitcliell Scliolarship, founded by George N. Mitchell, Esq., and his 
wife, of Rochester, N. Y. 

35. Fourth Presbyterian Church of Albany Scholarship, founded by the 
Fourth Presbyterian Church of Albany, N. Y. 

36. Arnold Scholarship, founded by B. W. Arnold, Esq., of Albany, 
N. Y. 

37. Folsom Scholarship, founded by Alexander Folsom, Esq., of Albany, 
N. Y. 

38. John Davenport Scholarship, founded by the Eev. Peter Lockwood, 
Mrs. Matilda Davenport Lockwood, Miss Mary E. Lockwood, and Miss 
Theodosia Davenport LockAvood, all of Binghamton, IST. Y. 

39. Cliarles E. Hale Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Sarah E. Beard, of 
Fayetteville, N. Y. 

40. Maxwell Scholarship, founded by T. C. Maxwell, Esq., and brothers, 
of Geneva, ]N. Y. 

41. Brooks Scholarship, founded by the Rev. Lemuel Brooks, of Church- 
ville, N. Y. 

42. Scovel Scholarship, founded by Mrs, Elmira Scovel, of Marcellus, 
N. Y. 

43. Otis Allen Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Mrs. Amelia A. Cobb, 
of New York, N. Y. 

44. Roseboom Scholarship, founded by Miss Catherine Roseboom, of 
Cherry Valley, N. Y. 

45. Le Conte Scholarship, founded by Miss Mary Le Conte, of Lodi, 
N. Y. 

46. Wheeler Scholarship, founded by the Hon. William A. Wheeler, of 
Malone, N. Y. 

47. C. P. Smith Scholarship, founded by a legacy of C. P. Smith, Esq., of 
Springfield, Otsego Co., N. Y. 

48. Smith Kellogg Scholarship, founded by a legacy of Smith Kellogg, 
Esq., of LeRoy, N. Y. 

49. Brown Scholarships (4), founded by a legacy of Horatio J. Brown, 
Esq., of Auburn, N. Y. 

During the year, the Seminary has received the following amounts from 
legacies : 

From the Estate of Smith Kellogg, late of Le Roy, for a Scholar- 
ship, $3,000 00 

From the Estate of H. J. Brown, late of Auburn, for Scholar- 
ships, 21,089 73 

From the Estate of Josiah Smith, late of Auburn, . . 3,351 18 

From the Estate of Fred'k Starr, late of Rochester, . . . 2,900 00 

$30,340 91 
It has received as gifts : 

For Prof. Perm. Fund, from Wm. E. Dodge, of ISTew York, . $1,000 00 
For Scholarsliip purposes, from four individuals, . . . 364 00 

For General Permanent Fund, from twenty-two individuals and 

chui-ches, 861 24 

$2,225 24 

At their meeting. May 8, 1884, the Commissioners appointed the Rev. 
James S. Riggs, of Fulton, N. Y., adjunct Professor of Biblical Greek. 
Mr. Riggs has accepted the appointment, and it is hereby reported to the 
General Assembly. 

Respectfully submitted to the General Assembly, by the governing Boards 
of the Seminary. 

S. WILLARD, Secretary. 

10 



1-16 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. 



[May, 



III. WESTERN SEMINARY. 
1. .Annual Report of the Directors. 

The Board of Directors of the "Western Theological Seminary, Allegheny, 
Pa., present to the General Assembly the following as their Fifty-seventh 
Annual Kt'port : 

Since the last Annual Report, the following twenty students have been 
admitted to the Seminary by matriculation : 



Otterbein University. 

"Westminster College. 

"Wabash College. 

"Washington and Jefferson College. 

University of "Wooster. 



"Western University. 

u a 

University of "Wooster. 
Richmond College. 
Allegheny College, 
University of Wooster. 



Western University. 
College of New Jersey. 
University of Wooster. 
Lincoln University. 



John J. L. Resler, 
William P. Stevenson, 
Absalom Toner Aller, 
J. Pliilander Anderson, 
Samuel L. Boston, 
Walter Lowrie Breckenridge, 
David Ghormley Collins, 
George Patterson Donehoo, 
Prank Pish, 
Thomas Jefferson Gray, 
Hubert Rex Johnson, 
Jolm Hoffman Miller, 
Howard Cassidy Morledge, 
William Lee Notestein, 
Franklin N. Riall, 
H. Howard Stiles, 
Oliver Newton Verner, 
Mindo C. Vulcheff, 
Boyd F. Williams, 
Henry B. Wilson, 

Of these, eighteen entered the Junior Class, one the Middle, and one the 
Post Graduate Class, 

In the latter part of the Summer of 1883, the Institution exeprienced a 
severe bereavement in the death of two of its Professors, Rev, "William H, 
Ilornblower, D.D., who occupied the Chair of Sacred Rhetoric, Pastoral 
Theology and Church Government, died, July 16th. While he was a man 
of extensive and varied learning, he was uniformly courteous in all relations 
of life. He was stricken with paralysis at the close of a Sabbath morning 
service, wliich he had been conducting in one of the churches of Pittsburgh, 

Rev. Samuel J, Wilson, D,D., LL.D., Avas a graduate of the Institution, 
Having been retained in it as an instructor, in a short time he was elected 
a Professor, in which position he had been honored with the highest testi- 
monies of the Church's confidence and affection. His death, the result of 
typhoid fever, occurred August 17th, in the 56th year of his age. He had 
served the Seminary for twenty-five years with signal efficiency. 

The loss of these two Professors and the uncertainty, for a time, as to 
arrangements for carrying on the work of the Institution, caused an unusual 
reduction in the number of students. 

Charles E, Edwards, Chauncey T, Edwards, Daniel M. Marshman, Fred. 
G. Coan, Albert M. "VVest, Edson A. Lowe, and D, W, Woods, were dis- 
missed to the Princeton Theological Seminary, 

John T. Hopkins, Christian S. McElhinny, James M. Patterson, Milton 
E. Todd, Samuel E, Ware, William I. Palm, and Ernest M, Snook, were 
dismissed to the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of the Northwest, at 
Cliicago. 

John R. Grosser was dismissed to the Union Theological Seminary, New 
York city. 

The whole number of sti;dents has been fifty-nine. Of these, eight have 
been in tlie Post Graduate Class ; seventeen ui the Senior ; sixteen in the 
Middle; and eighteen in the Junior Class, 

While the Professors, in meeting the exigency, have fulfilled much more 
than the service commonly expected, they liave been assisted by the follow- 
ing : Rev. W. O, Campbell, who has given instruction in Homiletics ; Rev, 



A.D., 1884.] WESTERN SEMINARY. 147 

J. Walker Miller, in Hebrew ; and Prof. Sleath, of Pittsburgh, who has given 
daily instruction in Elocution. 

In accordance with arrangments made by the Board of Directors, Eev. 
Dr. S. J. Niccolls, of St. Louis, delivered, during the session, ten lectures on 
the subject of Pastoral Theology, which were listened to with evident high 
appreciation, both by the students and by many ministers of the cities and 
suburbs. Rev. Dr. William Speer, of Washington, Pa., also gave a course 
of four excellent lectures, of an evangelistic cl)aracter, on the Kingdom of 
God. Tliis course *ras also arranged by the Committee of the Board of 
Directors. 

We are thankful to be able to report, that the health of both students and 
professors, since the beginning of the session, lias been unusually good. Xo 
serious cases of sickness liave occurred. The several classes have prosecuted 
their work with commendable diligence. 

TJie past year has been marked by an evident increase of the missionary 
spirit. Tlie Missionary Society, which had heretofore met monthly, has held 
its meetings this year every week. Five of tlie Graduating Class, or, one- 
thud of their number, have offered themselves as laborers for the foreign 
field. Besides these we are glad to note, that the Jlev. M. E. Beall, of 
Bridgeport, Ohio, of the Class of 1882, has this spring been sent out by our 
Board of Foreign Missions. 

The following students, having completed the course of study prescribed, 
were granted the usual diploma : 

David D. Allen, Calvin C. Hays, 

Lewis W. Ban, Archibald J. Herries, 

Joseph H. Barton, L. Finley Laverty, 

Isaac Boyce. John S. Plumer, 

William P. Chalfant, Egon Wachter, 

William M. Devor, A. Franklin AValker, 

Clarence J. Forsyth, Quillin L. Young. 

At a meetuig of the Board of Directors, held November 20th, 1883, Eev. 
Thomas H. Robinson, D.L)., of Harrisbuig, Pa., was chosen, unanimously. 
Reunion Professor of Sacred Rhetoric, Ciuu-ch Government, and Pastoral 
Theology; and, on Wednesday evening, April l(Jth, 1884, during the spring 
meeting of the Board, he was inaugurated according to tlie regulations 
prescribed by the General Assembly. 

At the meeting of the Board, November 20th, 1883, Rev. Robert Dick 
Wlison, A.M., of Indiana, Pa., a graduate of the Seminary, was elected 
Instructor in Sacred and Ecclesiastical History. He entered upon his work 
with the commencement of the year 1884. 

The following changes have taken pUice in the Board of Directors : Rev. 
James M. Shields, of Orrville, Ohio, was elected in place of Rev. Sylvester F. 
Scovel, D.D., who had resigned; Rev. David H. Barron, D.D., of Holidays- 
burg, Pa., was chosen in the place of Rev. Thomas H. Robinson, D.D., who 
had resigned ; Rev. David Hall, D.D., of Indiana, Pa., was elected in the 
place of Rev. John W. Bailey, D.D., whose term of service had expired. 

The Class of 1884 was re-elected and made the Class of 1888. 

FACULTY. 

Rev. William H. Jeffers, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Old Testament 
Literature, Ecclesiastical History, and the History of Doctrines. 

Rev. Samuel H. Kellogg, D.D., Professor of Didactic and Polemic Theol- 
ogy, and Lecturer on Comparative Religions. 

Rev. Benjamin B. Warfield, D.D., Professor of New Testament Litera- 
tiu'e and Exegesis. 

Rev. Thomas H. Robinson, D.D., Reunion Professor of Sacred Rhetoric, 
Church Government, and Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. Robert Dick AVilson, A.M., Instructor of Hebrew, Chaldee, and 
Old Testament History. 

Prof. George M. Sleath, Instructor in Elocution. 

Rev. John A. Launitz, Librarian. 



148 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [May, 



DIRECTORS. 

Eev. George Hill, D.D., President. 
Eev. James I. Brownson, D.D., 1st Vice-President. 
Hon. KoBERT McKnight, 2d Vice-President. 
Rev. Elliot E. Swift, D.D., Secretary, 

Class of 1885 : 

Rev. William O. Campbell, Rev. James D. Moffat, D.D., 

Rev. S. J. M. Eaton, I).D., Rev. John M. Richmond, 

Rev. B. L. Agnew, i>-DM l^ev. James M. [Shields, 

Rev. Moses A. Hoge,D.D., Jasper M. Thompson^sq., 

James C. Lewis, Esq., Andrew W. Wilson, Esq. 

Class of 1886 : 

Rev. James Allison, D.D., Rev. David H. Barron, D.D., 

Benjamin R. Bradford, Esq., Rev. Elliot E. Swift, D.D., 

James Laughlin, Jr., Esq., Rev. A. A. E. Taylor, D-D-, 

Rev. William M('Kil)bin, Rev. Edward P. Cowan, D.I). 

Robert B. Mowry, M.D., Rev. Robert B. Walker, D.D. 

Class of 1887 : 

Rev. John M. Bamett, Rev. Robert Hays, D.D., 

Rev. A. M. Reid, Ph.D., Rev. George Hill, D.D., 

Rev. James I. Brownson, D.D., Hon. Robert McKnight, 

William B. Isregley, Esq., Rev. Charles S. Pomeroy, D.D., 

Joseph H. Gray, Esq., Rev. John Robinson, D.D. 

Class of 1888 : 

Rev. Robert Alexander, D.D., Rev. Carroll Cutler, D.D., 

Rev. David Hall, D.D., Rev. Henry B. Fry, D.D., 

William Bake well .Esq., Rev. John Kerr, 

George A. Berry, Esq., Rev. Thomas A. McCurdy, D.D., 

Rev. David A.Cminingham,D.D., Thomas Wightman, Esq. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE HILL, President. 
Elliot E. Swift, Secretary. 
Allegheny, May 9th, I884. 

2. Annual Report of the Trustees. 

The Trustees of the Western Theological Seminary, respectfully present 
their Thirty-seventh Amuial Report, to the General Assembly of the Presby- 
terian Church in the United States of America. 

officers of the board. 

William Bakewell, President. 
Rev. John Kerr, Vice-President. 
David Robinson, Treasurer. 
John A. Renshaw, Secretary. 

TRUSTEES. 

Class whose term expires 1885 : 

Rev. J. J. Beacom, D.D., James Laughlin, Jr., 

Rev. John C. Irwin, David McK. Lloyd, 

Hon. Thomas Ewing, Joseph Albree, 

Thomas A. Rex, M.D. 



A.D., 1884.] WESTEEJsr seminaky. 149 

Class whose term expires 1886 : 

Rev. Isaac N. Hays. D.D., George A. Kelly, 

Rev. Wm. J. Holland, Oliver McClintock, 

George Wood, LL.D., David Robinson, 

John R. McCune. 



Class whose term expires 1887 : 

Rev. John Kerr, William Bakewell, 

Rev. W. G. Taylor, D.D., John A. Renshaw, 

John S. Slagle, A. F. Brooks, 

M. B. Suydam. 

Two vacancies have occurred in the Board by death : 
Hon. James K. Moorhead, deceased, March 9th, 1884 and Theodore H. 
Nevin, Esq., deceased, April 30th, 1884. 

The following changes have been made in the Board, and approved by the 
Board of Directors : 

Rev. W. G. Taylor, D.D., in the place of Rev. Beniamin L. Agnew, D.D.; 
resigned ; John R. McCune, in the place of Hon. J. K. Moorhead, deceased . 
Thomas A. Rex, M.D., in the place of William G. Johnson, resigned; M. B. 
Suydam, m the place of Theodore H. Nevin, deceased. 

The following Scholarship has been founded suice the last Report : 
The James McCord Scholarship, founded by a gift of John D. McCord, 
Esq., of Philadelphia. 

David Robinson, Esq., has donated to the contingent Fund of the Semi- 
nary, $3000, to be expended upon repairs and alterations in the Professors' 
houses. 

The Librarian reports ihe following additions to the Library during the 
year : 

Sixty-two volumes by purchase, 144 volumes by donation. 

The total number of bound volumes now on the shelves is, 22,722, total 
number of unbound books, 429. 

The library of Rev. Dr. Wilson has been placed on the shelves and will be 
ultimately secured to the Seminary. 

The accompanying sheets show the condition of the finances up to date of 
April 1, 1884. 

Statement of Endowment Funds of Western Theological Seminary, Alle- 
gheny, Pa., April 1st, 1884. 

Endowment Fvmd, $144,989 51 

Scholarship " 82,608 61 

Contingent " 50,468 19 

Library " 13,610 00 

Sustentation " 4,345 50 

Reunion Memorial Fmid, 100,000 00 

Lectureship Fund, 3,331 09 

Elocution " 5,905 25 

Real Estate " 13,500 00 

$418,758 15 

During the year ending April, 1884, the Endowment Funds have been in- 
creased $14,713.22. 
All the above, excepting $4208.15, has been invested m good securities. 



150 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [May, 

Table showinfr Balances to Debit and Credit of Income from Endowment 
Funds, April 1, 1884. 

OVERDKAFTS. 

Endowment Fund, $1,-500 13 

Contingent " 7,173 82 

I>ibrary " 881 20 

Elocution " 310 CO 

Cash Balance due Treasurer, 1,980 09 

$11,845 24 

CREDITS. 

Scholarship Fund, $3,407 94 

Eeunion MeniorJal Fund, 2,375 74 

Lectureship Fund, 990 38 

Keal Estate, 8H3 03 

Amount Cash Uninvested, 4,208 15 

$11,845 24 

Statements of Balances, Receipts and Expenditures of Income arising from 
Invested Funds of Western Theological Seminary, to April, 1884. 

Endowment Fund, f 144,989 51. 

Amount on hand April, 1888, . . . . $2,918 09 
" received " 1884, .... 7,706 78 
" overdrawn April, 1884, .... 1,50013 $12,12500 

Amount expended April, 18&4, .... 12,125 00 

Scholarship Fund, $82,608 61. 

Amount on hand April, 1883, . . . . 173 90 

" received " 1884, .... 5,151 04 5,324 94 

Amount expended to April, 1884, . . . . 1.917 00 

" on hand April, 1884, . . . . 3,407 94 5,324 94 

Contingent Fund, $50,468 19. 

Amount overdrawn April, 1884, . . ' . . 7,173 82 

" received " 1884, . . . 2,646 39 9,820 21 

Amount overdraft April, 1883, .... 6,191 55 

" expended " 1884, .... 3,628 66 9,820 21 

Sustentation Fund, $4,345 50. 

Amount received to April 1, 1884, . . . 283 10 

Amount expended to April 1, 1884, . . . 283 10 

Library Fund, $13,610 00. 

Amount overdrawn April, 1884, . . . . g81 20 

" received to " 1884, . . . 499 57 1,380 77 

Amount expended to April, 1884, . . . .1,216 95 

" overdraft " 1883, ... 163 82 1,380 77 

Beunion Memorial Fund, $100,000 00. 

Amount on hand April, 1883, ,. . . . 1,629 74 

" received to April, 1884, . . , 6,834 00 8,463 74 

Amount expended to April, 1884, .... 6,088 00 

" on hand April, 1884, .... 2,375 74 8,463 74 

Lectureship Fund, $3,331 09. 

Amount on hand April, 1883, .... 800 32 

" received to April, 1884, ... 190 06 990 38 

Amount on hand April, 1884, .... 990 38 



$310 00 

228 00 

90 00 

448 00 


$538 00 
538 00 


297 95 

635 00 

69 92 

863 03 


932 95 
932 95 



A.D., 1884.] WESTERN SEMINARY. 151 

Elocution Fund, $5,905 25. 

Amount overdraft April, 1884, .... 

" received to April, 1884, . 
Amount expended to April, 1884, 

" overdraft April, 1883, . 

Beal Estate Fund, $13,500 00. 

Amount on hand April, 1883, .... 

" received to April, 1884, . 
Amount expended to April, 1884, 

" on hand AprU, 1884, 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

1. The McXeely Scholarship, founded by Miss Kancy MciSTeely, of Steu- 
benville, Ohio. 

2. The Dornan Scholarship, founded by James Dornan, of Washington 
County, Pa. 

3. The O'Hara Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Harmar Denny, of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

4. The Smith Scholarship, founded by Eobin Smith, of Allegheny County, 
Pa. 

5. The Patterson Scholarship, founded by Robert Patterson, of Burgetts- 
town, "Washington Countv, Pa. 

6. The Ohio Smith Scholarship, founded by Robert W. Smith, of Fairfield 
County, Ohio. 

7. The Dickinson Scholarship, founded by Rev. Richard W. Dickinson, 
D.D., of New York City. 

8. The Jane McCrea Scholarship, founded by Joseph Patterson, of Pitts- 
biu'gh,Pa. 

9. The Hamilton Scott Easter Scholarship, founded by Hamilton Easter, 
of Baltimore, Md. 

10. The Cornmg Scholarship, founded by Hanson K. Corning, of Kew 
York City. 

11. The Emma B. Corning Scholarship, founded by her husband, Hanson 
K. Corning, of Kew York City. 

12. The Susan C. Williams "Scholarship, founded by her husband, Jesse 
L. Williams, of Fort Wayne, Indiana. 

13. The Mary P. Keyes Scholarsliip, No. 1, founded by herself. 

14. Tlie Mary P. Keyes Scholarship, No. 2, founded by herself. 

15. The James L. Carnaghan Scholarship, founded by James L. Carna- 
ghan, of Sewickley, Pa. 

16. The A. M. Wallingford Scholarship, founded by A. M. Walliugford, 
of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

17. The Alexander Cameron Scholarship, founded by Alexander Cameron, 
of Allegheny. Pa. 

18. The " First Presbyterian Church of Kittanning, Pa V' Scholarship. 

19. The Rachel Dickson Scholarship, founded by Rachel Dickson, of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

20. The Isaac Cahill* Scholarship, founded by Isaac Cahill, of Bucyrus, 
Ohio. 

21. The Margaret Cahill Scholarship, founded by Isaac Cahill, of Bucyrus, 
Ohio. 

22. The"H. E. B." Scholarship, founded by Rev. Charles C. Beatty, 
D.D., LL.D., of Steubenville, Ohio. 

23. The "C. C. B." Scholarship, founded by Rev. Charles C. Beatty, 
D.D., LL.D., of Steubenville, Ohio. 

24. The Koonce Scholarship, founded by Hon. Charles Koonce, of Clark, 
Mercer Co., Pa. 

25. The Fairchild Scholarship, founded by Rev. EliasR. Fairchild, D.D., 
of Mendham, New Jersey. 

26. The Allen Scholarship, founded by Dr. Richard Steele, Executor, 
from the estate of Electa Steel Allen, of Auburn, N. Y. 



152 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. 



[May, 



27. The "L. 11. M. B." Scholarship, founded by Rev. Charles C. Beatty, 
D.D., LL.D., of Steubenville, Ohio. 

28. The '' M. A. C. B." Scholarship, founded by Rev. Charles C. Beatty, 
D.D., LL.D.. of Steubenville, Oliio. 

29. The Sophia Houston Carothers Scholarship, founded by herself. 

30. The J*Iarg:aret Donahey Scholarship, founded by Margaret Donahey, 
of AVa.shingtou County, Pa. 

31. The Melancthon W. Jacobus Scholarship, founded by will of his 
deceased wife. 

32. The Charles Burleigh Conkling Scholarship, founded by his father, 
Rev. Nathaniel W. Conkling, D.D., of New York City. 



IV. LANE SEMINARY. 

Annual Report of the Trustees. 

The Board of Trustees of the Lane Theological Seminary respectfully re- 
port to the General Assembly as follows : 

trustees. 

Rev. G. M. Maxavell, D.D., President. 

H. W. Hughes, Esq., i 

Preserved Smith, Esq., > Vice-Presidents. 

Peter Rudolph Neff, Esq., ) 

Rev. J. P. E. KuMLER, D.D., Corresponding Secretary. 

Rev. J. G. Monfort, D/D.J^Li.J)., Recording Secretary. 



E. R. Monfort. Esq 



Rev. Addison Kingsbury, D.D. 
Rev. E. P. Pratt, D.D., . 
Hon. C. W. Potwin. . 
Rev. I. W. Andrews, D.D., . 
Rev. J. F. Tuttle, D.D., . 
Hon. Stanley Matthews, LL.D. 
Hon. Chauncey N. Olds, LL.D 
H. F. West, Esq., . 
G. W. McAlpin, Esq., 
Antrim R. Forsyth, Esq., 
H. F. Kemper, Esq., . 
Rev. W. E. Moore, D.D., 
Thornton M. Hinkle, Esq., 
Truman P. Handy, Esq., 
Dan. P. Eells, Esq., . 
Rev. J. M. Bishop, . . . 
Rev. J. King Gibson, . 
Alexander McDonald , 



LL.D. 



Treasurer. 

Marietta. 

Portsmouth. 

Zanesville. 

Marietta. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Washington, D. C 

Columbus. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Greensburg, Ind. 

Cincinnati. 

Columbus. 

Cincinnati. 

Cleveland. 

Cleveland. 

Rockfield, Ind. 

Troy. 

Cincinnati. 



During the year the Seminary has suffered a gi'eat loss in the death of two 
members of the Board of Trustees, viz : A. H. Hinkle, Esq., and Ezekiel 
Ross, Esq. The former a Trustee for twentv-flve years, and the latter 
for forty-nine years of active and useful service. 



FACULTY. 

Rev. Llewelyn J. Evans, D.D., Professor of New Testament Greek and 

Exegesis. 
Rev. Edward D. Morris, D.D., Professor of Systematic Theology. 
Rev. Henry P. Smith, D.D., Professor of Hebrew and Old Testament 

Exegesis. 
Rev. James Eells, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Practical Theology. 



A.D. 1884.] LANE SEMmARY. 153 

Rev. Jonx De Witt, D.D., Professor of Biblical and Ecclesiastical History. 
Rev. Robert W. Pattersok, D.D., Lecturer on Apologetics and Christian 

Evidences. 
Prof. Virgil A. Pinkley. Instructor in Elocution. 
Prof. Henry P. Smith, Librarian. 

During the year there have been in attendance thirty-eight students. Of 
this number the following have completed the full course of instruction, 
have been graduated, and are to enter upon ministerial work : 

"William A. Ervin, Cincinnati, Ohio, "Worcester University, 1871. 
Hamilton Archibald, Hunter, Jackson, Ohio, Ohio University, 1881. 
T. Edmunds Lewis, Pomeroy, Ohio, Marietta College, 1881. 
David Thomas, Oak Hill, Ohio, Ohio "Wesleyan Univei-sity. 
John W. Wilson, Collinsville, Illinois, Blackburn University, 1882. 

The following students have been added to the Middle Class : 

William T, Gibson, Cincinnati, Ohio, Belfast Assembly College, 1867. 
James G. Orr, Covington, Ky., Ohio Medical College, 1875. 
Charles F. Wilson, Cmcinnati, Ohio, Blackburn University, 1883. 

The following students have been admitted to the Junior Class : 

L. R. Banks, Cherry Grove, O., National Normal Univ. 

H. E. Butler, Cincinnati, O., Northwestern Univ. 

Edward E. Clark, Steubenville, O., Marietta College. 

Rees Edwards, Portsmouth, O., University of Wooster. 

Charles J. Godsman, Wichita, Kan., Park College. 

Burt Estes Howard, Collamar, O., ■ Adelbert College. 

W. F. Layport, Deersville, O. Franklin College. 

W. F. McCauley, West Salem, O., National Normal Univ. 

Alexander W. McConnel, Fairpoint, O., Franklin College. 

Charles McKanney, Cleveland, O., St. "Vincent College, Pa, 

Asa H. Morton, Princeton, Ind., "Wabash College. 

James Revennaugh, High Hill, O., Muskingum College. 

Henry A. Sawyers, Woodsfield, O., Franklin College. 

Nelson A. Shedd, Mt. Gilead, O., Marietta College. 

Asa F. Whitehead, IMaryville, Tenn., Maryville College. 

J. Wood Pogue, Maysville, Ky., Special Student. 

The diligence, faithfulness and success of the Faculty and students have 
been such as to meet the highest wishes and approbation of the Trustees and 
Examiners. 

finances. 

The Endowment, including Library and Scholarship Funds, consists of 
the following assets, viz. : 

1. Buildings and Grounds, $297,607 50 

2. Library, 10,000 00 

3. Real Estate, 29,324 97 

4. New Building, 10,975 94 

5. Leases, 120,178 93 

6. Bills Receivable, 3,270 00. 

7. Bonds, 12,000 00 



$483,357 34 



The Income last year, derived from the above Endowment Funds, was 
credited to the Incomes of the following Funds, viz. : 

Income Library Funds, $396 00 

" Scholarship, 2,255 00 

" Alumni Lectureship Fund, .... 27 60 

" General Fund, 18,136 72 

$20,815 85 



15-± THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [Maj, 

The probable income for the coming year is $21,272.00. The expenses of 
the past year :$23,000.()0 They have Ix^en increased by extensive repairs to 
Professors' houses, and in improvins tlie grounds. The Professors' houses 
are now all in good order, with modern improvements, and the campus and 
portions of the groiuuls devoted to Seminary purposes are inclosed with a 
good fence and are handsomely improved. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

1. Sawyer Scholarship. 

2. Yandis Scholarship, founded by David Yandis, of Indianapolis, Ind. 

3. Ward and Condet (2) Scholarships. 

4. WoodberryScholax'ship, founded by D. T. Woodberry, Columbus, Ohio. 

5. Preserved Smith Scholarships (7), founded by Preserved Smith, of 
Dayton, Ohio. 

6. Columbus Scholarship, founded by Second Presbyterian Church, Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. 

7. Brown Scholarship, founded by Robert Brown, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

8. D. Howe Allen Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Prof. Allen. 

9. Lafayette Scholarship. 

10. Kipley Scholarship. 

11. Rockville Scholarship. 

12. Stage Scholarship, founded by B. F. Stage. 

13. Aletta Whitlock Scholarship, founded by Aletta Whitlock. 
1-1. Fairchild Scholarship, founded by Rev. E. R. Fairchild, D.D. 

15. S. Whitlock Scholarship, founded by Stephen Whitlock. 

16. Sliedd Scholarship, founded by Rev. Henry Shedd, D.D. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. M. MAXWELL, 
J. G. MoNFORT, Recording Secretary, Fresident. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Y. UXIOX SEMIXARY, NEW YORK. 

The Board of Directors of the Union Theological Seminary, in accord- 
ance with the plan proposed by them, and adopted by the General Assembly 
of 1870, beg to present to the General Assembly now in session at Saratoga 
Springs, New York, their Fourteenth Annual Report. 

I. DIRECTORS. 

The lamented death, on the 22d of September, 1883, of the Rev. Dr. Edwin 
Francis Hatfield, who had been a member of the Board for thirty-seven 
years, caused a vacancy, which has since been filled by the election of the 
Rev. Dr. Edward L. Clark, of New York City. We have now to report the 
death of Mr. Norman White, whose resignation was reported two years 
ago. This vacancy has at length been filled by the election of Mr. Heber 
R. Bishop, of New York City. Two vacancies remain to be filled. One 
has been caused by the resignation of the Rev. Dr. William M. Paxton, 
now a Professor in the Seminary at Princeton. The other has been caused 
by the death of Mr. George W. Lane, whose loss is deeply felt. The Board 
is now organized as follows : 

Charles Butler, LL.D., President. 

John Crosby Brown, Vice-President. 

Ezra M. Kingsley, Treasurer, Becorder, and General Secretary. 

Class I. — Term expires January ISth^ 18S5. 

Vacancy, Charles Butler, LL.D. 

Rev. Erskine N. White, D.D., Ezra M. Kingsley, 

Rev. James D. Wilson, D.D., Heber R. Bishop. 
Rev. Charles H. Parkluust, D.D., 



A.D. 1884.] • UNION SEMINARY. 155 

Class II. — Term expires January 18th, 1886. 

ilev. Joseph Fewsmith, D.D., John Crosby Brown, 

rlev. John Hall, D.D., John Taylor Johnston, 

►iev. Charles Cuthbert Hall, D.D., David H. McAlpm, 

William E. Dodge. 

Class III. — Term expires January ISth, 1S87. 

Rev. James P. Wilson, D.D., Alfred C. Post, M.D., LL.D., 

Rev. Robert Russell Booth, D.D., Morris K. Jesup, 
Rev. Edward L. Clark, D.D., Vacancy. 

Class IV. — Term expires January 18th, 1888. 

Rev. R. D. Hitchcock, D.D.,LL.D., William A. Booth, 
Rev. Jonathan F. Stearns, D.D. , D. Willis James, 
Rev. Marvin R. Vincent, D.D., Henry Day, Esq., 

Rev. Charles A. Dickey, D.D., Hem-y Ivison. 

II. FACULTY. 

The teaching force of the Seminary consists of : 

Rev. RoswELL D. Hitchcock, D.D., LL.D., President, and Washburn 
Professor of Church History. 

Rev. William G. T. Shedd, D.D., LL.D., Roosevelt Professor of System- 
atic Theology. 

Rev. Philip Schaff, D.D. , LL.D., Baldwin Prof essor of Sacred Litera- 
ture. 

Rev. George L. Prentiss, D.D., Skinner and McAlpin Professor of 
Pastoral Theology, Church Polity, and Mission Work. 

Rev. Charles A. Briggs, D.D., Davenport Professor of Hebrew, and the 
Cognate Languages. 

Rev. Thomas S. Hastings, D.D., Brown Professor of Sacred Rhetoric 
and Secretary. 

Rev. Francis Brown, A.M., Associate Professor in the Department of 
Biblical Philology. 

Professor Charles Roberts, Jr., continues to give instruction in Elo- 
cution, on the Harkness Foundation. 

Rev. Charles R. Gillett, A.M., Fellow of the Class of 1880, has en- 
tered upon his duties as Librarian. 

III. STUDENTS. 

The Catalogue, published in February, reported 2 Fellows, 11 Graduates, 
33 Seniors, 37 Middlers, and 41 Juniors ; in all, 124. Of the thirty-one who 
graduated, one (William S. Dodd), who omitted Hebrew, received only a 
certificate. The Graduates were : 

Samuel G. Anderson, James F. Garvin, 

William S. Barnes, Harvey Hostetler, 

Henry G. Birchby, Eugene F. Hunt, 

George W. Borden, Daniel H. Martin, 

Charles E. Bronson, Albert C. McAuley, 

Jesse W. Brooks, Archibald McLaren, 

Joseph D. Burrell, Edwin K. Mitchell, 

George H, Burrill, Edward C. Moore, 

Augustus H. Carver, Milton G. Pond, 

Thomas C. Clark, William E. Renshaw, 

William F. Cooley, James G. Rodger, 

William S. Dodd, Henry G. Smith, 

Charles E. Dunn, Charles B. Stover, 

Charles A. S. Dwight, Robert J. Thomson, 

John Y. Ewart, Josiah A. Wood, 
Andrew S. Zimmerman. 



156 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [Maj, 

The Fellowship of the Class was given to Edward C. Moore, of Columbus, 
Ohio, and a graduate of Marietta College, who proposes to pursue in Ger- 
many the study of Biblical and Church History. His alternate was John 
y. Ewart, of Victoria, Illinois, and a graduate of Knox College. Mr. 
Dwight goes as a missionary to Turkey, and Mr. Garvin to Chili m South 
America. A large number will go to tlie newer States of the West. Several 
propose to undertake mission work in Cities. And several are intending to 
spend anotlier year in study. The Class is one of exceptional excellence, 
and good promise. They have done their sliare towards making our last 
year in the old home a year of tender interest, and of great profit. 

IV. LECTURES. 

Dr. Daniel B. St. John Eoosa gave Hygienic Lectures on the Willard 
Parker Foundation. The death of the Founder, which was impending at 
the time, enhanced tlie impression of tlie service. Practical Lectures on 
the Work of the Ministry were given by Dr. Cliarles H. Parkhurst, and Dr. 
Marvin R. Vincent, of New York City. 

V. LIBRARY. 

There have been added during the year 7.3.55 volumes, and 5535 pamphlets, 
making the whole number of books 48,9.30, and of pamphlets 45.978. There 
are also 164 manuscripts. From the Library of the late Dr. Hatfield we 
have received 6829 volumes, and 4889 pamphlets, for which we are deeply 
grateful. 

VI. FINANC'ES. 

The Real Estate of the Seminary is valued at about $750,000; the General 
Endowment Fund at $4-50,000 ; the Scholarship Fund at $84,000 ; the Lec- 
tureship Fund at $22,000 ; the Library Fund at $60,000 ; the Professorship 
Fund at $-500,000; and the Harkness Elocution Fund at $.50,000 ; total, 
$1,916,000. Eleven years ago, in 1873, before the munificent gift of Mr. 
James Brown, the total was $603,871. The income for the year just closed 
has been about $58,000, and the expenses have been about $68,000. 

VII. REMOVAL. 

The new buildings on Lenox Hill are now nearly completed. The group 
consists of four buildings, on Park Avenue, between 69th and 70th streets, 
surrounding a hollow sciuare. On Park Avenue, fronting Eastward, are tlie 
Adams Chapel, the Morgan Library, and .Jesup Hall. In the rear, rumiing 
from street to street, is the Dormitory, erected by D. Willis James, calcu- 
lated to accommodate about 160 students. Otiier lots, adjoining the ten 
occupied by tliese buildings, are owned by the Seminary, and can be put to 
any use that may be desired. Tlie new year, which will be the forty-ninth 
in the history of the Seminary, will begin in the new home. 

Respectfully submitted, 

By order of the Board of Directors, 

ROSWELL D. HITCHCOCK, President of the Faculty. 

New York City, May 15th, I884. 



A.D. 188-i.] DANVILLE SEMINARY. 157 

VI. DANVILLE SEMINARY. 

1. Annual Eepokt of the Board or Directors. 

The Board of Directors of the Danville Theological Seminary respect- 
fully present to the General Assembly their Thirty-first Annual Eeport as 
follows : 

I. DIRECTORS. 

The Board of Directors consists of thirty members, half of whom are 
Ministers, and half Ruling Elders, divided into three classes ; one-third of 
the whole being elected every year. 

The present organization of the Board is as follows : 

Rev. Archer C Dickerson, D.D., President. 

i?iKo"jTEkl':D.b., \ Vice-PresiOents. 
Rev. E. A. Johnstone, Secretary. 

Ministers. Elders. 

Class whose term expires April, 1885 : 

H. IT. Allen, D.D., O. Beatty, LL.D., 

G. J. Ree, D.D., , G.E.Wiseman, 
Wm. Torrence, J. M. Crawford, 

R. Christie, D.D., W. H. Averill, 

Chas. Hutchinson, D.D., Wm. H. NeflE. 

Class whose term expires April, 1886 : 

A. C. Dickerson, D.D., D. J. Curry. 

J. T. Lapsley, D.D., W. H. Kinnaird, 

Thos. J. Lamar, J. W. Scott, M.D., 

L. Fay Walker, J. I. Landes, 

Frederick E. Sturgis, H. C. Lyle. 

Class whose term expires April, 1887 : 

E. P. Humphrey, D.D., LL.D., G. W. Welsh, 

T. H. Cleland, D.D., J. C. Maxwell, M.D., 

E. Pratt, D.D., A. J. Grundy, 

P. M. Bartlett, D.D., Geo. Denny, 

J. Jones, D.D., F. B. Trussell. 

II. FACULTY, ETC. 

In the last Annual Report, the General Assembly was informed that we 
did not deem it expedient to fill the three Professorships then vacant, and 
that instruction in the various branches of Theology would be given the 
succeeding year to as many students as might be matriculated under the 
rules of the Seminary, by tlie Professor still remaining in oftice. Only one 
student has been receiving instruction under this arrangement, and he in 
only a part of the course, viz. : Mr. Bruer, a candidate for the ministry 
under the care of West Lexington Presbytery. 

In May of last year, after the presentation of our Report, for that year, 
the General Assembly appointed a Committee to confer with a like Com- 
mittee appointed by the Southern General Assembly in regard to cooperative 
work by the two branches of the Church. To these Committees was re- 
ferred the consideration of the question of the joint occupancy of the Dan- 
ville Seminary by the two branches of the Church, " with the expression of 



158 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [May, 

an earnest hope that an adjustment may be made, which, while securing 
every legal riglit, sliall have high regard to those fraternal relations which 
have been so happily established." It is understood that these Committees 
have agreed to reconmicnd to the two Assemblies the joint occupancy of 
this Seminary. It remains to Ix; seen what the action of the two Assemblies 
will be. It may be proper, however, at this stage of the proceedings, for 
this Board to express its hearty concurrence in wliat our General Assembly 
has already done in relation to the cherislied Institution committed so 
directly to our guardianship ; and further, that we will most cheerfully 
acquiesce in whatever the Assembly may, in its wisdom, see fit to do at its 
approaching sessions, with reference to this joint occupancy. We may be 
permitted to remark, however, that the welfare of the Institution is so vital 
to the interests of our Church in this section of the country, and especially 
in the Synod of Kentucky, that we cannot but feel the deepest solicitude in 
the question at issue. 

Any action of the General Assembly looking toward a transfer of this 
Seminary to any other body would not only be an infringement of our legal 
rights, but would work disaster to all the interests of our Cliurch in Ken- 
tucky, and would tend to render permanent the division, now so unhappily 
existing. We would gladly welcome our Southern brethren to a fair and 
equal enjoyment of all the privileges of this Seminary, if they will cordially 
unite with us on equal terms in its support and control ; otherwise, we urge 
the Assembly to acquiesce in the present policy of the Board, to husband 
its resources, and add, from year to year, the income to the principal of its 
funds, until God in His Providence shall clearly indicate the time for man- 
ning it again, fully and efficiently. 

In the present posture of affairs, the Board considers it unwise to make, 
or attempt to make, any change in the internal condition of the Seminary, 
and has therefore determined to allow the present arrangement to remain, 
for the present, in statu quo. 

The Librarian Reports that a few volumes and pamphlets have been 
added by donation to the Library. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

By order of the Board of Directors, 

ARCHER C. DICKERSON, President. 
R. A. Johnstone. Secretary. 

Danville, Ky., April 16th, 188 J^. 

2. Annual Repokt of the Board of Trustees. 

First. The state of the Funds, viz. : 

General Funds : 

Corporate Bonds, $74,100 00 

Bank and Gas Stocks, 22,950 00 

McNulty Estate, 3,125 00 

Louisville City Leases, 2,^00 00 

Scott Memorial Fund, 1,300 00 

Private Loans, 11,400 00 

Professors' Houses, 7,000 00 

$122,475 00 
Theological Fund of Centre College, . . . 5,705 00 

Synod's Theological Fund, 26,989 68 

Total, $155,169 68 

Scholarship Fund, 11,000 00. 

$166,169 68 

Income from all sources, "$10,343 03 

Expended, 3,523 14 

Invested, $6,819 89 



A.D. 1884.] SEMINARY OF THE NORTHWEST. 



159 



The BoAKD OF Trustees, as constituted, consists of the following per- 
sons : 

, Ministers. Laymen. 

Eobert A. Johnstone, G. W. Welsh, Sr., 

A. A. Hogue, A. E. McKee^ M.D., 

William J. McKnight, D.D., O. Beatty, LL.D., 

George J. Reed, D.D., Hon. Geo. Denny, 

W. H. Kinnaird, 
J. C. Maxwell, M.D., 
J. Barbour, 
J. J. Craig, 
G. E. Wiseman, 
J. W. Scott, M.D., 
J. B. Kinkead, 
H. V. Loving, 
J. B. Temple. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

GAVIN E. WISEMAK, President. 

R. A. Johnstone, Secretary. 
Danville, Ky., April 16th, IS84. 



VII. SEMINARY OF THE NORTHWEST. 

The Board of Directors of the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of the 
Northwest present to the General Assembly, about to meet in Saratoga 
Springs, N. Y., the following as their Twenty-fifth Annual Report: 

I. DIRECTORS. 

The Board of Directors, at their annual meeting, re-elected, without 
change, the entire Class whose term of office expired in 1884. Rev. John 
N. Freeman, of Milwaukee, Wis., was appointed in the place of Rev. A. J. 
Berger, of the Class of 1885. 

The Board appointed as an Honorary Director (entitled to sit with the 
Board and take part in its discussions), of the Class of 1888, John S. Mc- 
Donald, Esq., of Fond du Lac, Wis. 

The present constitution of the Board is as follows : 

Rev. Thomas H. Cleland, Jr., D.D., President. 

Hon. Henry T. ChAiUiE, Vice-President. 

Rev. Alexander G. Wilson, D.D., Secretary. 

Ministers. Elders. 

Class of 1885 : 

James D. Mason, Davenport, la., Hon. S. M. Moore, Chicago, 111., 
John N. Freeman, Milwaukee, Wis., C. H. Mulliken, Chicago, 111., 
Robert Beer, Valparaiso, Ind., Chas. J. Merritt, Chicago, 111., 

T. H.Cleland, Jr., D.D., Keokuk, la., John C. Grier, Peoria, 111., 
D. S. Gregory, D.D., Lake Forest, 111., Hon. J. L. Williams, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Class of 1886 : 

Wm. S. Curtis, D.D., Rockford. 111., Hon. R. B. Mason, Chicago, 111., 
Samuel Hodge, D.D., Hopkinton, la., Jacob S. Farrand, Detroit, Mich., 
Alex. G. Wilson, D.D., Lake Fore-st, C. C. Brown, Springfield, 111., 

111., 
J. F. Magill, D.D., Washington, Pa., Samuel Harvey, LaPorte, Ind., [Ind. 
Daniel W.Fisher ,D.D.,Hanover,Ind., Hem-y W. Johnson, Michigan City, 



IGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [May, 

Class of 1887 : 

W. 11. Priestly, Decatur, 111., Henry J. Willing, Chicago, 111., 

John Crozier, Olney, 111., Thomas Dent, Chicago, 111., 

S.J. McPlicrson, D.D.. Chicago, 111., Thus. D. Foster, Ottumwa, la., 
ArtluuT.Pii'rs()n,D.D., Philadelphia, Henry G. Miller, Cliicago, 111., 
"VVni. W. Ilarsha, D.D., Jacksouville, C. B. Nelson, Chicago, 111. 
111. 

Class of 1888 : 

S. J. NiccoUs, D.D., St. Louis, Mo., Henry Phelps, Lewiston, 111., 
Thos. D. Ewing, D.D., rairfield, la., Wm. II. Swift, Chicago, 111., 
R. F. Sample, D.D., Minneapolis, Thos. A. Gait, Sterling, 111., 

Minn., 
J. Milligan, Princeton, 111., Hon. John Coats, Freeport, 111., 

J. W. Dinsmore, D.D., Bloomington, II. T. Clark, Bellevue, JSTeb. 

111. 

Special Director : Hon. Cyrus H. McCormick.* 

Honorary Directors : Rev. M. C. Williams, D.D., until 1885; Rev. 
John E. Chapin, and Charles A. Ewing, Esq., until 1886; Rev. John H. 
Barrows, D.D., Rev. David R. Breed, D.D., Rev. Matthew B. Lowrie, Rev. 
Calvin C. Ilerriot, and Henry W. King, Esq. , until 1887 ; John S. McDonald, 
Esq., vmtil 1888. 

The Board arranged for the formal inauguration of Professors Marquis 
and Johnson, to take place during the Sessions of the Annual Meeting. Tlie 
exercises connected with their induction into the offices to which they had 
been chosen, took place in the Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chicago, 
Thursday evening, April 3d, 1884. 

II. FACULTY. 

At the opening of the Seminary year, in September, 1883, Rev. David C. 
Marquis, D.D., previously elected Professor of New Testament Literature 
and Exegesis, and Rev. Herrick Johnson, D.D.,LL.D., elected Professor of 
Sacred Rhetoric and Pastoral Theology, entered upon the discharge of the 
duties of tlieir respective Professorships. Rev. Edward L. Curtis, A.B., 
has been continued, for another year, as Associate Professor of Old Testa- 
ment Literature and Exegesis. 

The Faculty now consists of:' 

Rev. Leroy J. Halsey, D.D., LL. D., Professor Emeritus, and in charge 

of Church Government and the Sacraments. 
Rev. Thomas H. Skinner, D.D., Cyrus H. McCormick Professor of 

Didactic and Polemic Theology. 
Rev. Willis G. Craig, D.D., Professor of Biblical and Ecclesiastical 

History. 
Rev. David C. Marquis, D.D., Professor of New Testament Literature 

and Exegesis. 
Rev. Herrick Johnson, D.D., LL.D., Professor of Sacred Rhetoric and 

Pastoral Tlieology. 
Rev. EuAVARD L. Curtis, A.B., Associate Professor, for the ensuing year, 

of Old Testament Literature and Exegesis. 

During the past year, the students have had the benefit of a course 
of lectures, inaugurated by the Faculty and delivered in the Chapel, by 
ministers from Cliicago and other cities. In the judgment of the Faculty, 
as soon as expedient a fund should be established by the Board of Directors 
to remunerate such services. The Faculty report unusual satisfaction in 
view of tlie consistent deportment of the students, and of their diligent 

* Deceased. 



A.D. 1884.] SEMINARY OF THE NORTHWEST. 161 

application to the studies of the course. Daily morning prayers have been 
instituted, conducted by the students in turn in the presence of the Faculty, 
at which all the students are required to be present. The weekly confer- 
ence and prayer meeting, led by the Faculty, has also been continued, evinc- 
ing a spirit of earnest and consecrated piety among the yoiuig men. 

III. STUDENTS. 

Since the date of the last Annual Report, there have entered the Institu- 
tion the following students : 

Albert A. Kerberg, not a graduate. 

Abel Armstrong, not a graduate. 

Enos Pomeroy Baker, a graduate of Lake Forest University. 

Edward P. Baldwin, " University of Minnesota. 

William B. Boomer, " Yale College. 

George W. Baxter, " Greenville and Tusculum College. 

Alexander J. Coile, " Greenville and Tusculum College. 

WiUiam C. Dodd, " Parsons College. 

Robert Dobson, " "Williams College. 

William J. Foxe, not a graduate. 

George Taylor Gibson, not a graduate. 

John A. R. Gass, a graduate of Greenville and Tusculum College. 

Gardiner 8. Gregory, a student of University of Wooster. 

John T. Hopkins, a graduate of Parsons College. 

Barnabas C. Ha worth, " Westfield College. 

David M. Heltinstine, " Parsons College. 

Samuel Q. Helfinstine, " Parsons College. 

Wm. Murphy Hindman, " Park College. 

John F. Hinkhouse, " Parsons College. 

Wm. Wesley Jewett, " Park College. 

Fred. Henry Jewett, " Lake Forest University. 

David Scott Kennedy, " University of Wisconsin. 

Lowell M. McAfee, " Park College. 

Neal A. McAulay, not a graduate. 

Edwin S. McClure, not a graduate. 

William G. McClure, a graduate of Parsons College. 

Christian S. McEIhinny, " Parsons College. 

Allan McKay, not a graduate. 

Charles Mancliester, a graduate of Park College. 

John William Millar, " Lake Forest University. 

Ezra B. Keweomb, a student of University of Minnesota. 

Alton Blair NichoUs, a graduate of University of Wooster. 

Worden P. Nicholas, " Centre College, Ky. 

Abram A. Pratt, not a graduate. 

William J. Palm, a graduate of University of Wooster. 

James M. Patterson, " LTniversity of Wooster. 

Earnest McCune Snook, " Parsons College. 

Charles G. Sterling, " University of Wisconsin. 

George Brown Sproule, not a graduate. 

Milton Emmett Todd, a graduate of University of Wooster. 

Wm. Ezra Yoss, " Park College. 

Samuel Miller Ware, " Illinois Wesleyan University. 

James M. Wilson, " College of Kew Jersey. 

Of these, twenty-eight entered the Junior Class ; six, the Middle Class, and 
nme, the Senior Class. Into the Senior Class on dismissal ad eundem, from 
other Seminaries, J. A. R. Gass, from Lane Theological Seminary ; J. T. Hoi>- 
kins, C. S. McEIhinny, W. J. Palm, J. M. Patterson, M. E. Todd, and S. M. 
Ware, from the Western Theological Seminary ; W. E. Yoss, from Dan- 
ville Theological Seminary. Into the Middle Class, on similar dismissions, 
G. W. Baxter and A. J. Coile, from Lane Theological Seminary ; Robert 
Dobson and W. M. Hindman, from the Union Theological Seminary ; E . 

11 



162 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [May, 

M. Snook, from the "Western Theological Seminary, and S. Q. Ilelfinstine, 
from the Tlieological Institute of the Christian Church, at Stanfordville, N. 
Y. Into the Junior Class were admitted, Messrs. Baker, Baldwin, Boomer, 
Dodd, Foxe, Gregory, D. M. Ilelfinstine, Iliukhouse, Jewett, Kennedy, 
!McAfee, McAulay, McKay, W. G. ^IcClure, Manchester, Millar, Newcomb, 
Nicholas, Nicholls, Sproule, Sterling, and Wilson. Messrs. Armstrong, 
Haworth and Pratt, were not received until January. Mr. McKay did not 
pursue the study of Hebrew. The following non-graduates were allowed to 
pursue a partial course : Messrs. A. Kerberg, Gibson and E. S. McClure. 
Messrs. F. S. and F. H. Jewett, have been enrolled as special students. Kev. 
A. S. Bates and Messrs. Gerrit Snyder and F. C. Thyholdt (the last two 
graduates of this Institution), pursued their studies as Resident Graduates. 
The entire number of students in attendance during the session was flfty- 
nine, including special and post-graduate students, which Ls more than 
double the number of last year and more than thrice that of the year previous. 
The following twelve students were awarded the usual diploma of the 
Seminary, as having completed the course and satisfactorily sustained the 
examination : 

John A. R. Gass, William J. Palm, 

John T. Hopkins, James M. Patterson, 

Samuel M. Johnson, Wm. R. Reynolds, 

Reuse H. Joldersma, Milton E. Todd, 

Christian S. McElhinny, Wm, E. Voss, 

Samuel J. McKinney, Samuel M. Ware. 

A certificate of having completed the prescribed course, with the excep- 
tion of the Hebrew and Greek, was granted to James M. Belding. 

IV. LIBRARY. 

There have been added to the Library, during the year, by purchase, 39 
volumes ; and by donation, 61 volumes. 

V. FINANCES. 

The care of the finances of the Seminary is intrusted by the Board of 
Directors, to a Board of Trustees immediately responsible to the Directors. 
This Board consists of nine members. It is at present constituted as follows : 

Hon. Cyrus H. McCormick,* President. 

Hon. RoswELL B. Mason, Vice-President. 

Rev. Alexander G. Wilson, D.D., Secretary. 

Cyrus H. McCormick, Jr., Treasurer. 
Horace A. Hurlbut, W. C. Goudy, 

James Otis, Thomas A. Gait, 

James M. Horton. 

The following is a summary view of the financial condition of the Semi- 
nary, as presented in the Annual Report of the Board of Trustees and in 
other documents. 

The Permanent Funds and Peal Estate now consist of — 

The Professorial Endowments, — 

Loans on Real Estate and Stocks, . . . $125,953 50 

Houses for Rental, 59,139 96 

Cornell Block, 16,000 00 

Cash and Accounts, 11,224 97 

Total, $212,318 43 

* Deceased. 



A.D. 1884.] SEMINAEY OF THE NOETHWEST. 163. 

Real Estate, 25 acres in Chicago, estimated, . $200,000 00 

Buildings for Seminary Instruction, . • . 100,000 00 

Four Professors' Residences, .... 43,600 00 

Sctiolarship Endowments, 24,668 11 

Library Endowments, 2,742 72 

Total, $371,000 83 

$583,319 26 

Beceipts and Liabilities for the Past Year. 

Treasurer's Account, Summary : 
Cash Balance, March 15th, 1883, 
Received from all sources during the year, . 



Total, . 
Disbursements, 



Cash Balance, March 15th, 1884, 

1. Professorial Account : 

Income from Endowment Funds, 
Expenses incurred for Instruction, 

Deficiency paid by Loan from C. H. McCormick, 

2. Scholarship Account : 

Income, 

Expenditures on Student Account, 

Cash Balance, March 15th, 1884, 

3. Contingent Fund : 

Income, 

Expenditures, 

Deficiency, paid by Loan from C. H. McCormick, 

4. Library Account : 

Income from Library Endowments, 
Expenditures, 

Cash Balance, March 15th, 1884, 

5. Liabilities from Deficiencies, etc. : 

Against Professorial Fund, 

Against Contingent Fund, .... 

Against other accounts, .... 

Total, . $16,602 18 

A large portion of the above deficit has been Incurred in the withdrawal 
of funds from loans on real estate and stocks, in order to invest them in 
houses for rental, on Seminary lands. This was done by the Trustees under 
orders from the Board of Directors, and for the purpose of increasing the 
prospective income of the Seminary. 

Donations During the Year. 

The Board are happy to be able to announce that the year has brought to 
the Institution unusually large additions to its property. 

George Griffith, of Philadelphia, has given $3000 to found the George 
Griffith Scholarship. The Trustees of the Jane Dorr Fund, Springfield, 
Illinois, have given $2300 to establish the " Jane Dorr Scholarship." Thomas 
O. Foster, of Ottumwa, Iowa, has given $3000 to establish a scholarship to 
bear his name. Jesse L. Williams, of Ft. Wayne, Indiana, has made fur- 
ther payment upon his scholarship. Miss Ann Brehmer, of Peoria, Illinois, 
has given $4920 to erect a memorial house, on the Seminary grounds, the in- 



$3,815 09 
105,760 57 




$109,575 66 
99,777 38 




$9,798 28 


$9,309 66 
15,608 30 






$6,298 64 


$1,448 90 
1,351 91 






$96 99 


$1,685 52 
4,958 41 






$3,272 89 


$225 32 
191 25 






$34 07 


$6,298 64 
3,272 89 
7.030 65 





lO-i THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [^^Ji 

come of which is to be applied to the endowment of a scholarship, which is 
to bear the name of her father. In addition to these gifts, other contribu- 
tions for various objects liave been received, amounting to over §2(100; 
also pledges for $2.)00 toward furnishing the new dormitory. There have 
been completed, since tlie last annual meeting, four elegant residences for 
Professors, toward the erection of whicli, Hon. C. H. McCormick, contrib- 
uted §36,000 ; Professor Skinner, $3389 ; and Professor Craig, $2000 ; mak- 
ing a total of $41,389. In addition to the above generous gifts, Hon. C. H. 
McCormick has made another munificent donation of $60,000 for a new dor- 
mitory, which will lie completed Ijefore the opening of the next Seminary 
year, and which will accommodate sixty students. Appropriate action was 
taken by the Board, and the privilege requested of placing a tablet on the 
building with the hiscription, "McCormick Hall." The gifts of Mr. 
McCormick to the Seminary for all purposes, amounting up to the present 
time to more than 8oO<J,000, have reared a memorial to his fidelity and 
devotion to the cause of Christ in the Presbyterian Church, which will en- 
dear his name to the coming generations. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Scholarships endowed in full or in part, are as follows : 

1. Mason Scholarship, founded by Hon. Roswell B. Mason, Chicago. 

2. Powers Scholarship, founded by Orlando Powers, Decatur, 111. 

3. Bowen Scholarship, founded by Dr. A. M. Bowen, New York, X. Y. 

4. Proctor Scholarship, founded by Wm. Proctor, Lewistown, 111. 

5. Alumni Scholarship, founded by the Alumni, only partially endowed. 

6. Phelps Scholarship, founded by the late L. P. Phelps, Macomb, 111. 

7. Thornton A. Mills Scholarship, founded by Rev. R. Lillie, Champaign, 
Illinois. 

8. Lillie Scholarship, founded by Rev. Robert Lillie. 

9. Gait Scholarship, founded by Thos. A. Gait, Sterling 111. 

10. Morris Scliolorship, founded by Rev. Geo. Morris, Baltimore, Md. 

11. Walter Collins Scholarship, founded by Mrs. Sarah A. Collins, 
Chicago. 

12. Sarah A. Collins Scholarship, founded by Mrs. S. A. Collins. 

13. Leroy J. Halsey Scholarship, founded by Mi'S. S. A. Collins, only par- 
tially endowed. 

14. Jane Dorr Scholarship, founded by Trustees of the Jane Dorr Fund, 
Springfield, 111. 

15. Thomas O. Foster Scholarship, founded by Thomas O. Foster, 
Ottumwa, Iowa. 

16. Jesse L. Williams Scholarship, partially endowed by Jesse L. Wil- 
liams, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

17. George Gritiith Scholarship, founded by George Griffith, of Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

18. Brehner Scholarship, founded by Miss Ann Brehner, to be invested in 
Memorial House. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. H. CLELAND, Jr., President. 
Alexander G. Wilson, Secretary. 
Chicago, III., May 5th, I884. 



Yin. BLACKBURN UNIVERSITY. 

Blackhurn University has had another year of prosperity, and of 
tokens of the Divine favor and blessing. Notwithstanding there has not 
been the special and marked outpouring of the Holy Spirit as durhig last 
year reported, yet the fruits, and in good measure the continuance of that 
gracious visitation have been manifested, in some souls converted, and in a 
better development of spiritual life, and of Christian work than in any pre- 
ceding year. 



A.D. 1884.] SAN FEANCISCO SEMINAKY. 165 

The religions organizations and bands of the institution, as the Society of 
Religious Inquiry, the organizations for Bible study, and for Cliristian 
Avork among the colored people, at the Almshouse, and in sunday-school and 
mission work, where the students have no pecuniary compensation, have 
been in successful operation. A daily prayer meeting is constantly main- 
tained, and evidence has been very manifest that as the result of the out- 
pouring of the Spirit of God a year ago, and of the continued presence of 
that Spirit, there is more of a tone of devoted piety, and that more and more 
of the students are " walking with God." 

Although the distinct department of Tlieology is not so separated in this 
institution as explained in previous reports, as to render a special and dis- 
tinct statistical report of the Theological Department necessary or feasible, 
yet we can say in general terms, that one cheering fact as the farther fruit 
of the gracious visitations of last year, is that the prayer to the Lord of the 
harvest to send laborers into his harvest, is being answered in the increased 
numbers, and better promise both in piety and talents of those young men 
who are studying for the ministry. Twenty-one young men in this institu- 
tion are studying for the Gospel. 

Others who commenced their studies here are completing them in the dif- 
ferent Theological Seminaries. 

It is expected that we can soon report unusual facilities for doing our 
special work. The institution is safeh' endowed, so as to run safely within 
its income, yet needs greatly increased facilities to do better and larger 
work. An increased work occasioned by more and more German students 
for the ministry, who will take their entu-e Theological course here, is a mat- 
ter of new prayer and interest. 

In behalf of the Board, 

E. L. HURD, President. 



IX. SAX FRANCISCO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY. 



The Directors respectfully report to the General Assembly of 1884, that 
the following named Ministers and Ruling Elders elected by the Synod of 
the Pacific are — 

TuE Board of Directors. 

Ministers. Elders. 

William A. Scott, D.D., LL.D., Hon. James D. Thornton, 

Aaron L. Lindslev. D.D., Stephen Franklin. 

William Wallace Brier, Robert J. Trumbull, 

Nathaniel B. Klink, Elijah Bigelow, 

James Matthews, D.D., Nathaniel Gray, 

Frederick E. Shearer, John W. Stewart. 

Samuel P. Sprecher, D.D., 
Henry H. Rice, 
James S. MacDonald, 
Clement E. Babb, D.D,, 
Thomas Eraser, 
A. S. Fiske, 

The Board of Trustees annually elected by the Directors are now : 

William A. Scott, D.D., LL.D., President, 
Stephen Fraxklin, Secretary and Treasurer, 
Hon. James D. Thornton, 
Elijah Bioelow, 
Nathaniel Gray. 



166 THEOLOGICAL SEMINAKIES. [^I^J, 



FACULTY. 

Rev. William A. Scott, D.D., LL.D., Professer of Mental and Moral 
Science and Systematic Theology. 

Eev. Georoe Burrowes, D.D., Professor of Hebrew and Greek Exege- 
sis and Special Introduction. 

Rev. William Alexander, D.D., Professor of Church History and Gov- 
ernment and General Introduction. 

, Professor of Rhetoric, Pastoral Theology and 

Apologetics. 

The vacancy in the Faculty the Directors have not thought it expedient 
to fill for the want of sufficient endowment. 

The duties of the vacant cliair are discharged, at present, by the other Pro- 
fessors. The regular term opened first Thursday of Septeml)er last, and 
closed the last Tluu-sday of April, 1884. Tlie usual examinations of three 
days were held in the parlors of the Seminary Buildhig, conducted by the 
Faculty and Committees ai)pointed by the Directors and by some of the 
Presbyteries. These Committees report : 

" That in the various departments of study, the instruction during the past 
year lias evidently been faithful and thorough. Tlie Professors have per- 
formed their duties with marked ability and extraordinary self-denial." 

" They were highly pleased with the evidences of diligence on the part of 
the students. They all appear to be earnest, devoted young men, givmg fair 
promise of usefulness in the ministry of the Word." 

The Treasurer's annual Report, which is herewith submitted to you, ex- 
plains our financial condition. 

Our Library has been increased by the present of about three hundred 
volumes. Our Seminary Building at 121 Haight street, has now a cable 
road to the ocean beach, an eligible and healthful location. The building is 
well furnished with rooms for students with water and gas, besides the 
library and lecture-rooms. 

The Anniversary was held in St. John's Presbyterian Church, San 
Francisco, 24th of April, 1884. The congregation was large, and the exercises 
well received. The address to the Alumni Association was delivered by 
Rev. C. D. Merrill, of Centi-eville, California, and the annual address before 
the Seminary by Rev. Samuel P. Sprecher, D.D., of Calvary Presbyterian 
Church of this city. 

Seven students were present during the term. 

POST GRADUATE. 

Rev. .1. P. Rich, of the Congregational Pacific Theological Seminary, 
Oakland, California. 

senior class. 

Andrew Barclay Meldrum, graduate of Knox College, Toronto, Canada, 
and for two years student in the Theological department of the same Col- 
lege. Mr. Meldrum has received the usual certificate of graduation, and he 
and Mr. Rich have been ordained to the whole work of the Gospel ministry 
by the Presbytery of San Francisco. 

^ MIDDLE CLASS. 

Charles R. Kugent, graduate of the University of the Pacific. 

junior class. 

Josias Wilson Lundy, Queen's College, Belfast. 

John C. Campbell, Presbyterian College, Montreal, Canada. 

Charles C. McCarty, University of California. 

Franklin Rhoda, University of California. 

By the great mercies of our Heavenly Father, all our students have been 



A.D. 1884.] SAN FRANCISCO SEMINARY. 167 

preserved in good health, and all our Professors have attended regularly to 
the duties of their respective chairs. The Committee of the Directors to at- 
tend the examination said in their Report what it seems proper for us to say 
here: 

" That as in former years the whole income of the Institution for salaries, 
would barely support one Professor," but by consent this is divided among 
them all, which is a mere pittance for each. We greatly need scholarships 
for students and additions to our endowments for Professors, so that the 
vacancy in the Faculty may be filled, and all our chairs be occupied by Pro- 
fessors who may be able to give theii- whole time and strength to the work 
of instruction in the Seminary. Thus far and at present, some of our Pro- 
fessors have to live on salaries outside of the Seminary, from pastoral work. 
Our outlook for students next term is more encouraging than for any past 
year. We have had forty-nine students since our beginning, and nearly or 
quite thirty of these have graduated and are now preaching the Gospel, 
chiefly on this coast, tliough some are in England and Ireland, and in the 
Middle and Western States. 

Dear Bretlueu, having begun this great work, and carried it on for 
thirteen years by toil and self-denial, and yet in hope and faith, we cannot 
as a branch of the Church cease our efforts. Our interests as a denomina- 
tion, and the cause of Bible Truth on this coast, imperatively demand our 
strongest efforts to put this Seminary on a sure foundation and build it up. 
We earnestly ask the assistance of our brethren in the old and rich Synods, 
and the prayers of all who love the truth as it is in Jesus. 

Affectionately your brethren and fellow-laborers in the Lord. 

Approved and ordered to be sent to the Assembly. 

W. A. SCOTT, President. 
E. J. Trumbull, Secretary. 

April 24th, I8S4. 

Treasurer's Eeport. 

The San Francisco Theological Seminary in account with S. Franklin^ 
Treasurer. 

Cr. By Balance April 1st, 1883, $1214 69 

" Amounts received since, as follows : 

Interest on Bonds, &c., 2360 60 

" on Disston Subscription, 300 00 

Rents, Oakland Property, &c., 100 72 

From J. L. Woods for Endowment, .... 20 00 

Total, $3996 01 

Dr. To Disbursements as follows : 

For Coal and Gas, $129 90 

" Insurance, 187 45 

" Advertising 96 30 

" Taxes, .' 237 50 

" Sundry Expenses and Repairs, ... 112 23 

" Amount Paid Professors, . . . 2000 00 

Total, $2763 38 

Cr. By Balance on hand, $1232 63 

E. & O. E. S. Franklin, Treasurer. 

San Francisco, April 3d, I8S4. 



168 THEOLOGICAL SEMINAEIES. [May, 

X. THE GERMAN THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL OF NEWARK, N. J. 

Fifteenth Annual Report. 

The Presbytery of Newark, under whose care is " The German Tlieolog- 
ical School of Newark, N. J.," makes the following Annual Report in re- 
spect to that Institution : 

the directors. 

The Board of Directors consists of twenty-one jjersons and is elected by 
the Presbytery of Newark, but the members are not required to be from 
within the Presbytery. The Officers and Classes are as follows : 

Rev. Jonathan F. Stearns. D.D., President. 
Rev. Charles E. Knox, D.D., Secretary pro tern. 
Mr. F. WoLCOTT Jackson, Treasurer. 

Ministers. 1882—1885. Elders. 

Joseph Fewsmith, D.D., Hon. Amzi Dodd, LL.D., 

"William C. Roberts, D.D., Levi P. Stone, 

Charles E. Knox, D.D., William Rankin, 

William S. Ward, M.D. 

1883—1886. 

Jonathan F. Steams, D.D., F. Wolcott Jackson, 

George C. Seibert, Ph.D., D.D., Moses M. Bradley, 

Archibald Alexander Hodge, D.D., LL.D., Henry Koehler, Jr. 
John U. Guenther, 

1884—1887. 

James P. Wilson, D.D., Philip Doremus, 

Elijah R. Craven, D.D., James P. Dusenbury, 

Edward W. French. D.D., Samuel L. Pinneo. 
Charles A. Briggs,D.D., 

THE FACULTY. 

The Faculty now consists of the following persons : 

Rev. Charles E. Knox, D.D., President and Professor of Homlletics, 
Church Government, and Pastoral Theology. 

Rev. George C. Seibert, Ph.D., D.D. , Professor of Biblical Exegesis and 
Theology. 

Rev. Immanuel Casanowicz, Instructor In Hebrew and Hebrew Exe- 
gesis and in Church History. 

Harry E. Richards, M.D., Professor of Mathematics and of Natural 
Science in the Academic Department. 

Herman L. Edeling, A.B., Instructor in the classical languages in the 
Academic Department for 1883-84. 

Rev. William C. Piderit, Assistant Instructor in the Academic Depart- 
ment for 1883-84. 

Professor Richards has given instruction only in the Natural Sciences, 
two hours each week and without compensation. 

Rev. Philip A. Sciiwarz lias also generously given the younger students 
Biblical Instruction tln'oughout the year without compensation. 

The following gentlemen have kindly given valuable instruction in 
lectures upon special subjects. 

Rev. William H. Ward, D.D., two lectures on Oriental Inscriptions. 

Rev. Howard Crosby, D.D., LL.D., on Modern Discoveries in the 
East. 

Rev. James F. Riggs, one lecture on the Suez Canal and its Relations to 
Commerce. 

Rev. Samuel W. Duffield, six lectures and readings on English 
Literature. 

Rev. Nicholas Bjerring, one lecture on the Greek Church. 



A.D. 1884.] NEWAEK GERMAN THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL. 169 



THE STTJDENTS. 

The number of stitdents in both Departments is twenty-three, six in the 
Theological Department, and seventeen in the Academic. One resident 
graduate, who had completed his course at the Drew Seminary, has also 
been in attendance in the Theological Department, making the whole num- 
ber twenty -four. Two students were graduated at the Annual Commence- 
ment on June 13th, 1883. Eight new students have been received, two from 
Germany and six from America. Six students have withdrawn during the 
year. 

The demand for suitable German ministers has been constantly urged 
upon us throughout the year by the Gennan Missionarj^ of the Board of 
Home Missions, who more easily finds fields for churches, than men for the 
pulpit. The chief difficulty is now, or it has been, to obtain proper students 
for our special object. It is most desirable that the subject of the increase 
of students should be kept constantly before the M'hole Church. There are 
several points, which need to be emphasized before the Assembly, the Pres- 
byteries, the churches, the pastors, the elders, the sunday-school superin- 
tendents and Sunday-school teachers. 

1. The American churches, which have in their sunday-schools or Mission 
Sunday-schools, German boys or German young men, should direct them 
to our German Presbyterian Institutions. This soiirce of supply is too im- 
portant to be overlooked, and in respect to it the Directors would repeat 
and re-emphasize their representation of last year, viz. : "Such young men 
ought to be among those best fitted to stand as mediators between the 
American and the German people. Trained in the siiiritual infltxence of 
American churches, they are likely to be freed from the mixed impressions 
of a Continental habit of Church life. On the the other hand, Germans of 
the Germans in respect to language, mental, social and domestic haljits, 
they should be filled with a deep sense of the religious need of their country- 
men. Such young men, therefore, should liave a special two-fold adaptation 
to the German pastorate. We earnestly request the attention of our Ameri- 
can pastors and Church ofiicers to this subject." 

2. The German churches should be fully informed by our German pastors, 
in respect to the great need of consecrated and godly pastors for the German 
people, in respect to the grave distinctions between the Continental concep- 
tion of the ministry and our own, and in respect to the obligation of Chris- 
tian parents to dedicate their sons to the ministry. 

3. The Preparatory Department, in the form of a German Gymnasium, is 
now open for the reception of other students than those studying for the 
ministry. The teaching force can or will instruct a much larger numlter 
than the present number. The spiritual power of the Institution should be 
such that some of these additional young men, AA'ould be, by Divine grace, 
converted and guided to the ministry, and so the gymnasium become an 
increasing " feeder " to the Seminary proper. Then also young men whose 
hearts are not moved to the ministry or who may find that they are unsuited 
to the ministry, may still become valuable supporters of German churches 
and assistants to our German pastors. 

The attentive interest and the earnest prayers of these two special por- 
tions of our Church are earnestly requested to this most important subject. 



THE FINANCES. 

The Endowment. — The General Endowment, including aU 
Endowment Funds, is $41,640 32 

The Loan or Debt. — The Loan made to the Current Account 
from the above General Endowment Fund, was on April 1st, 
1878, $10,771 45 

The amount of this Loan now paid is 10,144 09 

Leaving still due from valid subscriptions .... $627 36 



170 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES, [May, 

The N'ewark Professorship. — This is considered as consisting of three 
parts : 

First, the portion of tlie above General Endowment contrib- 
uted to this professorship or so designated by the Board of Di- 
rectors, $21,739 36 

Second, the unpaid balance of the above Loan to the Current 
Account, 627 36 

Tliird, unpaid subscriptions for the increase of this Endow- 
ment, 1,700 00 

§24,006 72 

The Hehrexo Professorship. — The German churches of the 
East have made some progress in the execution of their plan 
to ol)tain, from German sources, Five Tliousand Dollars towards 
the Endowment of a Hebrew Professorship. Although their 
progress lias not been so rapid as their anticipations suggested, 
they have already in the bank under the care of their own 
Treasurer, $875 14 

Two or three small sums for this ol)ject have came into our 
own Treasury (included in the above General Endowment) . 29 10 

Making for this Professorship, a collection of . . . $904 24 

The Scholarships. — The endowed Scholarships are two : 

1. The Mary Crane Scholarship, $3,000 00 

2. The second Scholarship, 1,250 00 

$4,250 00 
Both these Scholarships are included in the General Endowment Fund. 

Current Income and Expense. — The total amount paid out — not including 
the amount paid through the Treasury by the Board of Education— has 
been , . . . $7,989 30 

The total income — not including the amount from 
the Board of Education— has been .... $7,568 63 

Balance from last year, 20 59 

$7,589 22 

Deficit, $400 08 

The Salaries and Bills remaining unpaid, are as follows : 

Salaries, $2,395 00 

Bills, 342 67 

Total Current Indebtedness on April 30th, 1884, . . $3,137 75 

The German churches, however, have been released from collections for 
the current fund — in order that they might the better begin the execution 
of their Endowment plan. 

The total amount received from all sources, durmg the year has been: 

For the Endowment Account : 

Payment on the subscription of the Bloomfield property, . $5 00 

The Newark Professorship, 375 00 

The second Scholarsliip, 500 00 

Payment on the Loan, 238 00 

The Hebrew Endowment, 904 24 

$2,022 24 
For the Current Account, 7,508 63 

Total received, $9,590 87 

There has been also a sum of between one and two hundred dollars re- 



A.D. 1884.] DUBUQUE GERMAN THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL. 171 

ceived from the public lectures, which has been expended for the renovation 
of the lecture-room, etc., the account of which has not passed through the 
Treasurer's hands. The bills are not fully paid, but the lectures of the 
Summer term will no doubt meet the remainder due. 

For the first time during the history of the Institution, the Professors 
have not been absent from their classes for the collection of funds. The 
Committee of the Svnod of New Jersey, of whom the Rev. Albert Erdman, 
D.D., and the Rev. Joseph S. Yan Dyke, D.D., have been specially active, 
have given valuable relief, in the work of communicating with the churches. 

The tabular reports prepared for the catalogue, show a decided increase in 
the membership of the churches and the sunday-schools. 

They exhibit, also, in connection with the above endeavor to raise the 
Hebrew Endowment, the following groups of encouraghig facts : 

1. The German churches imder the care oj our Alumni mily, contributed 
for all objects— including their own congregational objects— during the 
year 1882-83, $36,427. 

2. Tlie statement was made last year that churches under the care of the 
fourteen Alumni of the first two classes, had contributed from 1874 to 1882 an 
increase of $46,187. 

The increase under the same Alumni from 1874 to 1883 has advanced to 
$59,809. 

This is gain to the Church from German Presbyterian sources. It is a re- 
turn to the Church, in the erection of churches, support of sunday-schools, 
pastors' salaries, in all the appliances for preaching the Gospel among the 
Germans and for benevolent objects, of that which the Church contributed 
to educate these young men as her servants. 

3. The German Endowment, though not large, amounting in this beginning 
to only $904, has its chief value in the formation of the liabit of vohmtary 
systematic beneficence, and in the increase of attachment to the Church 
with which our German brethren have connected themselves. 

We have reason to believe also that there is an increase of prayer on the 
part of our German churclies for the Institution and its noble work. 

The Directors bespeak a wider union of sympathy, of prayer and of cor- 
dial support, on the part of all our American Presbyterians with their Ger- 
man brethren, and look for the blessing of God upon a growing increase in 
the future. 

JONATHAN F. STEARNS, 

President of the Board of Directors. 
Newark, N. J., May 12th, ISS4. 



XI. GERMAN THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL OF THE NORTHWEST. 

Annual Report of the Board. 

The Board of Directors of the German Theological School of the North- 
west, at Dubuque, Iowa, respectfully offer to the General Assembly the fol- 
lowing Report for the year ending April 30, 1884 : 

board of directors. 

Rev. Ambrose C. Smith, President. 

Mr. Thomas Foster, Secretary. 

Rev. Adalbert J. Schlaeger, Treasurer. 

Charles O. Waters, M.D., Oor. Secretary and Business Manager, 

No. 394 West Washington street, Chicago. 

Class whose term expires in 1885 : 

Ministers. Elders. 

Adam W. Ringland, John G. Budde, 

Ernst Schuette, D.D., John Berger, 

Godfrey Moery. Myron H. Beach. 



172 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [^^'IJ, 

Class whose term expires in 1886 : 

Ambrose C Smith, Philip "Wetter, 

Henry Sclmiitt, John Boell, 

John Leierer, C. Helming. 

Class whose term expires in 1877 : 

Davifi J. Burrell, D.D., Gen. William Yandever, 

Jacob Conzett, William Camp, 

Helmer T. Schmitt, Thos. Foster. 

FACULTY. 

, Van Vliet Professor of Systematic Theology. 

Rev. Adalbert J. Schlaeger, Camp Professor of Oriental and Biblical 
Literature. 
Rev. Adam McClelland, Professor of Chm-ch History. 

STUDENTS. 

Theological Department. 

Middle Class. Junior Class. 

Peter Henry Dickman, Christian A. Berger, 

J. "William Rosenau, Lubertus Hayenga, 

Hem-y Schmitt, Ferdinand Lemme, 

H. A. Yan Griethuyden, 
Frederick "Wolters. 

Collegiate Department. 

John Everds, Samuel Berger, 

Christian Gravenstein, Richard Yan der Las, 

Wm. Dickhoff, J. "Wm. .Jungeblut, 

Ernst Boell, E. J. "Witte, 

Jacob Roelse, R. Hamon. 
John Bradley, 

FINANCES. 

statement of Receipts and Disbursements from April 17, 1883, to April 
23,1884. 

Beceipts. 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, April 17, 1883, $224 75 

Received for Incidental Expenses, .... $3,203 01 
Collected Principal of Notes, 720 75 

" Interest of Notes, 253 61 

Received for the Library, 165 00 

" " E. and E. Camp Professorship, . . 1,000 00 

5,342 37 

Total, $5,567 12 

Disbursements. 

Salaries (Professors, Business Manager, Janitor), . . . $3,225 00 

Insurance for three years, from 1884, 135 00 

Invested on Mortgage, 1,000 00 

Sundry Incidental Expenses, 425 57 

Cash in Treasurer's hands, April 23, 1884, 781 55 

Total Disbursements, $5,567 12 



A.D. 1884.] LINCOLN UNIVEESITY. 173 

General Statement of Balances on the Treasurer's Books on April 24tli, 
1884: 

Bills Eeceivable, ^^n'^Io m 

Incidental Expense Acct., o'n^n ^^^^ 

Investment Acct., 2,960 00 

Seminary BuUding, 14,590 06 

W. L. Green, ^24 56 

Treasurer, '^^ ^^ 

§40,793 87 

Bills Payable, f l.OOO ^^ 

Endowment and Building Fund, 38,615 ^ 

J. Liesveld ....••••••• 1" " 

E. and E. (^anip Professorship, 1,000 00 

Library Fund, 1^^ ^ 

$40,793 87 

At a Special Meeting of the Board in June last, the Eev. Adam McClel- 
land, D.L)., then of Brooklyn, N. Y., was elected to the Chair of Church 
History. Dr. McClelland accepted the Professorship thus tendered him, 
and entered upon his duties within a few weeks of the opening of the term. 

At the last meeting of the Board, the Rev. W. K. Mimdlienke, Professor 
of Theology, offered iiis resignation, which was accepted. A Special Com- 
mittee, of which the President of the Board is Cliairman. was appointed to 
obtain a suitable person for this vacant chair, subject to the approval of the 
Board. At the same time the Rev. Godfrey Moery was elected to the posi- 
tion of Instructor in the School. 

Nineteen students have been in attendance during the year, of whom, 
eight are in the Theological department ; of these, three will graduate next 
year. 

The Faculty report that the students have been uniformly diligent and 
studious. The Examining Committee informs the Board tliat the exanuna- 
tions of the Classes in the various branches of study evinced such marked 
excellence that especial commendation is due both to the Faculty and the 
students. Dr. C. O. Waters, our Business Manager, has labored diligently 
and with a good degree of success during the past year. We ask for hun, in 
behalf of the School, the generous sympathy and assistance of the Church in 
his work for the year to come. The Board also expresses its gratitude to 
those friends of the Institution, who have heretofore contributed to its 
support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

AMBROSE C. SMITH, President. 
Galena, III., May 13th, I8S4. 



XII. THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT OF LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 

Annual Report of the Faculty. 

The Faculty of Theology, in Lincoln University, respectfully present to 
the General Assembly the Thuteenth Annual Report of the Theological 
Department of Lincoln University. 

The Board of Trustees consists of the following members : 

Rev. William R. Bingham, D.D., President. 
Rev. Samuel Dickey,* Treasurer. 

♦Deceased. 



174 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. 



[May, 



Eev. Charles A. Dickey, D.D., 
Kev. Andrew B. Cross, 
Alexander "Whilldin, Esq., 
Rev. Calvin W. Stewart, D.D., 
Ravaud K. Ilawley, Esq., 
Hon. Josepli Allison, LL.D., 
Rev. Isaac N. Rendall, D.D., 
Rev. James Roberts, D.D., 
George E. Dodge, Esq., 



Rev. George S. Mott, D.D., 
Rev. Stephen W. Dana, D.D., 
Adam C Eckfeldt, Esq., 
Rev. Thomas McCauley, 
Rev. Henry E. Niles, D.D., 
Rev. Henry W. Wells, 
Rev. Natlian G. Parke, 
James A. Beaver, Esq., 
Henry B.. Essick, Esq. 



The Board of Trustees has met with a sore bereavement in the death of 
the Rev. Samuel Dickey, Treasurer of the Board since 1860, and a member 
of the Board since 1872. Mr. Dickey had been for many years disaljled from 
the fuU work of the ministry by physical infirmity. He never lost his deep 
interest in the work of the Church, and counted it a pleasure to promote 
that work in all ways within his power. He was President of the National 
Bank of Oxford, Pa. ; and in this and in other positions of responsibility he 
gave conspicuous illustration that true piety is no disqualification for legiti- 
mate business, and that diligence in business is no detriment to piety. He 
was born April 24tli, 1816. lie died suddenly on the 14th of January, 1884, 
from disease of the heart. 

The Standing Committee on the Theological Department consists of the 
Rev. Calvin W. Stewart, D.D.,the Rev. Stephen W. Dana, D.D., and Elder 
Alexander Whilldin. 

FACULTY or THEOLOGY. 

Rev. Isaac N. Rendall, D.D., President and Professor of Christian 

Ethics and Apologetics. 
Rev. Gilbert T. Woodhull, D.D., Avery Prof essor of Hellenistic Greek 

and New Testament Literature. 
Rev. Thomas W. Cattell, Ph.D., Professor of Sacred Geography and 

Biblical Antiquities. 
Rev. Benjamin T. Jones, William E. Dodge Professor of Sacred Rhetoric. 
Rev. E. T. Jeffers, D.D., John C. Baldwin Professor of Theology. 

The Chair of Tlieology, made vacant by the death of the Rev. Edwin R. 
Bower, has been filled by the appointment of Rev. E. T. JefEers, D.D., sub- 
ject to the confirmation of this Assembly. By special arrangement one of 
the Professors lias been enabled to carry on the work of instruction in 
Hebrew and (Jld Testament Literature ; and another of the Professors has 
given instruction in Church History. It lias become very desirable that all 
the Chairs of Instruction in the Theological Department should be perma- 
nently endowed and occupied. Previous Assemblies have commended such 
an endowment to the benevolence of the churches. The time appears to be 
near at hand, when enlargement of the accommodations, and the establish- 
ment of all the Chairs essential to the full equipment of a Theological Semi- 
nary in the Presbyterian Church, must be secured in this Institution ; or we 
will be obliged to dismiss the candidates for the ministry from the course of 
preparation to wliich we have invited them. 

The steady progress of the candidates now in the lower classes of the 
University will bring into the Theological Department about seventy-five 
students in four years. There are now ninety-two candidates for the minis- 
try in the preparatory courses of study, and twenty in the Tlieological 
course, making a total for the current year of one hundred and twelve. No 
increase oE nuinljers in the Theological Department can take place without 
enlargement of our accommodations, except by diminishing the lower classes. 
The rooms for students are filled to their utmost capacity. We are now 
straitened in accepting applications of candidates for admission for the next 
Academic year. Lincoln University looks to the General Assembly for 
approval of tliis phase of its work, and to Christian philanthropists of the 
Presbyterian Churcli for tlie signal to advance. A great enlargement of our 
work is urgently called for by its unstimulated development. The conserva- 



A.D. 1884.] LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 175 

tive influence of Presbyterianism can be brought powerfully to bear upon the 
condition of the Africo- American. The progress of the Board of Missions 
for the Freedmen uidicate that these influences are welcomed among them, 
and experience shows that the harvest of Presbj1;erian workers is limited 
only by the number of agents employed, and by the means invested. 

The following students have received instruction in the several classes : 

SENIOR CLASS. 

James W. Lavatt, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pranklin T. Logan, Greensboro, N. C. 

Oliver T. Logan, Horntown, Ya. 

Horace G. Miller, Lincohi University, Pa. 

Henry C. Moyer, Salem, N. C. 

Ishmael Till, Oxford, Pa. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

"William F. Brooks, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Yorke Jones, Media, Pa. 

William H. Lee, Richmond, Ya. 

Eobert A. Mahoney, Washington, U. C. 

Thomas H. Roberts, Monrovia, Liberia. 

Samuel S. Sevier, Marshall, Liberia. 

James W. Wilson, Cape Mount, Liberia. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

William D. Anderson, Darien, Ga. 

Tilghman Brown, Centreville, Md. 

Edward F. Eggleston, Richmond, Ya. 

Robert D. King, Marshall, Liberia. 

Charles Lawton, St. Louis, Mo. 

William R. Lawton, St. Louis, Mo. 

William H. B. Yodery, Baltunore, Md. 

The Annual Sermon to the students was preached in the Cliapel on Sab- 
bath, the loth day of April, by the Rev. John C. Caldwell, D.D., from Jolm 
xvi: 9, " Of sin because they believe not on Me." 

The commencement exercises took place on Tuesday the 15th day of April. 
Messrs. James W. Lavatt, Franklin T. Logan, and Henry C. Moyer, having 
completed the full course of instruction received from the Board of Trustees 
the degree of S. T. B. ; and Messrs. Horace G. Miller, Oliver T. Logan, and 
Ishmael Till, who had been excused from some partsof study, were awarded 
certificates in testimony of their attendance and faitlifulness. Mr. Samuel 
S. Sevier, a member of the Middle Class, and one of the ten Native Africans, 
sent to Lincoln University, in 1872, by the Presbytery of West Africa, to be 
educated, asked to be permitted to close his preparatory couree with a view 
to his return to his native land. His request was granted, and a certificate 
of his attendance and faithfulness was awarded to him. He is under ap- 
pointment, by the Board of Foreign Missions, as a missionary to Africa, 
subject to tlie recommendation of the Presbytery of Chester, at its next 
meeting. Henry C. Mabry, of the previous Senior Class, has been ordained 
by the Presbytery of Yadkin. 

We have the pleasure to report to the General Assembly, that, since the last 
report, the University has received several valuable contributions to its funds. 
The family of the late Rev. Lemuel Brooks, who had previously founded a 
Scholarship in the sum of $2000, in accordance with the wish of Mr. Brooks, 
expressed while living, conveyed to the LTulversity a contribution ot $5000. 

A bequest of $2800 from the late Dr. Barker, of New Castle, Pa., to fomid 
the Dr. Barker Scholarship, has been paid in to the Treasurer, and has been 
permanently invested. 

The executors of the estate of Sarah 01iphant,of Lewistown, N. Y., have 
paid to the Treasurer a bequest of $200. 



176 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [May, 

Mrs. Kittridge, of Owego, N. Y., has paid to tlie Treasurer $1500, to 
found a Scholarship, to be called the Kittridge Scholarship of Lincoln 
University. 

Information has come to the authorities of Lincoln University that $3500 
has been bequeathed to the University by the late Mr. Watson, of Chestnut 
Level, Pa., to found a perpetual Scholarship for the education of a student 
of Theology. 

With gratitude to God, we report another season of precious revival. Out 
of a total of 'I'la students, during the current year, 51 were not professors of 
religion. Believing students seemed early in the Academic year to grow 
earnestly prayerful, watchful and concerned for the souls of unbelieving 
companions. They went to their rooms, talked with them on the subject of 
religion, and prayed with them. The daily prayer meeting received an in- 
crease of attendance. On Monday, the 28th day of January, 1884, the in- 
terest was so manifest that the Literary Exercises were suspended, and the 
whole day given to prayer, praise, instruction, and guidance of inquirers in 
the way of life. It was a day of the right hand of the Most High. The 
professing Christians met in one of the class-rooms. They had a season of 
heart searching, aud of renewed consecration; and wrestled with the Lord 
ui importunate prayer. In the chapel a meeting was held in which the Pro- 
fessors and Theological students sought to lead sinners to faith in a Crucihed 
Redeemer. As one student after another found the Saviour, and rose to 
testify of His grace, there was presented a scene long to be remembered. 
Thiiiy-four have during the year made profession of faith in Christ. 

The Income from the Endowment Eund for the year, since the last report, 
is as follows : 

The William E. Dodge Professorship, $900 00 

The John C. Baldwin Professorship, 1400 00 

The Mary Warder Dickey Presidency, 1502 UO 

The Charles Avery Professorship, 1075 00 

The Reuben J. Elick Professorship, 907 00 

The Duulap Scholarship, 1(38 00 

$5952 00 

Of these Endowments, only the William E. Dodge, and the John C. Bald- 
win Professorships are by the founders distinctively dedicated to the Theo- 
logical I>epartment of om* work. But under the action of the Board of 
Trustees, and with the approval of the General Assembly, several of the 
Professors, wlio occupy Chairs of Instruction in the Collegate Department, 
give instruction to the Theological Classes. 

Encouraged by many tokens of God's favor, we take fresh courage in the 
work upon which He is pleased to set the seal of His approbation. 
Respectfully submitted. 

By order of the Faculty, 

I. N. RENDALL, President. 
Lincoln JJniversity ■, Pa., May IMh, J8S4. 



XIII. THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT OF BIDDLE UNIVER- 
SITY, CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

Annual Report of the Faculty. 

The Faculty of Theology of Biddle University respectfully present to the 
General Assembly their Annual Report for the year ending April 30th, 1884. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Rev. Samuel Loomis, President. 

Rev. Samuel J. Beatty, Secretary. 

Rev. Stephen Mattoon, D.D., Treasurer. 



A.D. 1884.] BIDDLE UNIVERSITY. 177 

Kev. Luke Dorland, Robert S. Davis, Esq., 

Rev. Amos S. Billiiigsley, Rev. John H. Shecld, D.D., 

Rev. Willard Richardson, Rev. Robert M. Hall, 

Rev. Thomas Lawrence, D.D., Rev. Daniel J. Sanders, 

Rev. James Allison. D.D., Rev. William R. Coles, 

John C. McCombs, Esq., E. Nye Hutchinson, M.D., 

James B. Lyon, Esq., Rufus Barringer, Esq. 

FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 

Rev. Stephen Mattoon, D.D., President and Professor of Theology, 
Ecclesiastical History and Church Government. 

Rev. Thomas Lawkexce, D.D., Professor of Homiletics and Biblical 
Exegesis. 

Rev. Samuel J, Beatty, Professor of Hebrew. 

Since the last report, Wm. A. Alexander, Edward H. Garland, Thos. A. 
Attles and Morris Seabrook have completed the regular course of study. 

The following students have attended the course of instruction in the 
several classes : 

senior class. 

I. D. Davis, S. C, Geo. S. Leeper, N. C, Wm. E. Partee, N. C, 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

David Brown, N. C, Wade H. Coleman, S. C, G. S. White, S. C. 

During the past year a Boarding Department, modeled on the idea of a 
Christian home, has been established for the accommodation of students from 
abroad. 

A new college building has just been completed at a cost of $40,000. It 
is 98 X 67 feet, three stories high, with an aunex for chapel 60 x 45 feci. 
The whole is of substantial brick, of pleasing ai>pearance, furnishing twelve 
recitation rooms, each 34 x 24 feet, two society halls, an audience chamber 
capable of seating 600, and roomy and well ventilated halls, with abundance 
of light throughout. 

Candidates for the ministry, and young men of promise receive such aid 
as their necessities and the resources at command will allow. Friends in 
Scotland have established a fund of over $6000, the interest of which is to be 
used for preparing young men for Mission work in Africa. 

The University is located at Cliarlotte, N. C, and stands in close relation 
to the General Assembly, being under the auspices of the Presbyterian Board 
of 3£issions for Freedmen. 

The object of the Institution is the education of colored teachers and 
preachers. 

It stands at the terminus of six railroads, in the midst of a dense and 
comparatively intelligent colored population, occupying a commanding site 
of twenty-four acres in the suburbs of the city. It is situated in the very 
heart of the Synod of Atlantic, which embraces the whole South Atlantic 
States, having 161 colored churches, 96 ministers, 66 young men preparing 
for the ministry, with a large number of schools and academies under its 
care. These schools and churches must be furnished Avith intelligent Chris- 
tian teachers and preachers, wlio must be largely educated on the field and 
in contact with the people among whom they are to labor. Such a training 
is less expensive than if had elsewhere ; it gives the student the best oppor- 
tunities for a liberal education, and affords him the refining influence of a 
Christian home, and, at the same time, keeping him in contact and sympathy 
with his people. 

The student looking towards the ministry is employed on the Sabbath, 
durmg his college and seminary years, in doing the work of a catecliist or 
evangelist in some of the numerous churches organized' by the Faculty in 
the adjacent regions of North and South Carolina. 

12 



178 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. [May, A.D. 1884. 



No institution under the care of tlie Presbyterian Church has a wider 
field or greater opportunities. Its students are scattered in their school and 
cliurch work through all the South Atlantic States, and as far west as Texas, 
It has the strongest possible claims upon the prayei-s and benevolence of the 
Church. It is fa.st becoming a temler bond of union between Northern 
Presbyterians ajid their Southern brethren. In proof of the estimation in 
•which it is held by prominent Southern men, see the following extract from 
a letter of Hon. Z. B. Vance, United States Senator from North Carolina : 

" CnARLOTTE, Sept. 28th, 1882, 

" * * I am well acquainted with Biddle University, and think it better 
circumstanced to do good than any other institution of the kind in the 
South. The whole people of this region are fully in accord with its objects," 

Rev. Dniry Lacy, D.D., late President of Davidson College, N. C, writes : 

" I flrmlv believe that Biddle University is doing a greater work for mis- 
sions, foreign and domestic, than any mission at home or abroad." 

The Institution is consecrated to the glorj' of God, and the welfare of a 
needv race. It stands as the only representative of its kind in the South, of 
our Presbyterian Church ; and it certainly is one of the most important 
agencies in the hands of the Church for the accomplishment of good among 
the six millions of Freedmen in the South. It commends itself to the 
prayers and gifts of all good men. 

Respectfully submitted. 

THOS. LAWRENCE. 



SUMMARY. 

NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN PRESB. THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES. 





'70. 


.7t.l 


'72. 


'73. '74. 


'75. 


•76. ; 


77. 


'78. 


79. 


'80. 


'81. 


'82. 


'S3. 


'84. 


Princeton 


1181 124 


110 


lisl 103 


116 


121 


114 


116 


116 


117 


112 


127 


125 


142 


Union 


117| 113 


120 


12u 113 


117 


143 


142 


145 


120 


1441 127 127 129 


124 


AUeglieny 


76' 74 


83 


86 


82 


74 


85; 


901 82| 


83 


921 93, 931 74 


59 




38 33 
43 35 


42 
42 


41 
45 


56 
37 


48 
47 


38: 

481 


29 
44 


23: 
43 


30 
50 


34 39 38 36 


38 


Auburn 


45l 451 48 


45 


45 


DanviUe 


lOi 6 


9 




2 


12 


20! 


22 


15 


14 


8 


§ ^ 


7 


1 


Northwestern 


35 


38 


23 


23 


29 


20 


24 


49 


39 


43 


31 


26 17 


27 


59 








4 
433 


6 
439 


V 
429 


6 

450 


487! 


9 
499 


8 
471 


9 
465 


11 
482 


71 4 


6 
449 


7 


Totals 


437 


423 


457 


463 


475 











SEMINARY GRADUATES. 





'73. 


•74. 


'75. 


'78. 


'77. 


•78. 


'79. 


'80. 


'81. 


'82. 


'83. 


'84. 


Princeton 


36 


28 


31 


30 


38 


31 


31 


29 


28 


41 


28 


43 


Union 


40 


as 


4i 


.% 


46 


40 


39 


36 


35 


32 


38 


31 


Allegheny. . . . 


20 


39 


14 


18 


22 


28 


28 


15 


21 


34 


19 


14 


Auburn 


18 


8 


9 


13 


14 


16 


13 


12 


17 


20 


18 


11 


Lane 


5 


19 


12 


15 


9 


4 


11 


6 


13 


14 


11 


5 


Danville .... 




1 


9 


2 


4 


5 


5 


3 




1 


4 





Jforthwestern . . 


5 


6 


2 


5 


14 


12 


17 


12 


6 


3 


10 


12 










3 


3 


4 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


1 












Totals 


124 


134 


118 


121 


112 


141 


147 


117 


125 


146 


130 


117 



Note. — See, also, Minates, p. 54. 



III. 3Soaitrsanlri3crmanent Committees 



I. BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 

OFFICERS. 

Eev. John Hall, D.D., President. 

Rev. Henry Kendall, D.D., } Carre^nonclina Sen-etarie^ 
Rev. William C. Roberts, D.D., S ^^''^^^^Ponrtmg i^ecietanes. 

Oliver D. Eaton, Treasurer. 

Oscar E. Boyd, Becording Secretary and Assistant Treasurer. 

The term of service of the following expires in May, 1885 : 

Ministers. Laymen. 

Rev. John Hall, D.D., George W. Lane, 

Rev. Henry M. Booth, D.D., George R. Lockwood. 

Rev. John R. Faxton, D.D., 

The term of service of the following expires in May, 1886 : 

Re V . Thomas S . Hastings , D . D . , Joseph F . Joy , 

Rev. Alfred Yeomans, D.D.^ Jacob D. Vermilye, 

Walter M. Aikman. 

The term of service of the following expires in May, 1887 : 

Rev. Jonathan F. Stearns, D.D., Robert Lenox Kennedy, 

Rev. Wilson Phraner, D.D., John Taylor Johnston, 

John E. Parsons. 

OFFICE OF THE BOARD, 

Presbyterian Mission House, 23 Centre Street, New York, N. Y. 

P. O. Box 1938. 

Abstract of the Fourteenth Annual Report. 

The Board of Home Missions hereby presents to the General Assembly 
its Fourteenth Annual Report since the reorganization of the Board at re- 
union, and the eighty-first since the organization of the Board of Domestic 
Missions, which is a constituent element in the present Board of Home 
Missions. 

With gratitude to Almighty God for Divine guidance during the year past, 
we acknowledge His blessing on our work, which has been carried on with 
quietness, peace and success. Very many missionaries at the close of the 
year have sent in their reports with rejoicing and thanksgiving for opportu- 
nities of uninterrupted and prosperous labor and the ingathering of many 
souls. The statistical summary will show the aggregate numbers received 
to the missionary churches on profession of their faith and by certificate, 
and also encouraging growth in other directions. 

But we are called on to record with great sorrow the sudden death of 



180 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [Maj, 

George W. I.ane, a most faithful, wise and worthy member of this Board. 
Mr. Lane had been enjiai^ed in this work nearly twenty years, and, as a 
member of tlie Board and of the Finance Committee, his counsels were al- 
ways received with much favor. 

Death lias also invaded the ranks of the missionaries, and thirteen have 
been called away. Their names are as follows : 

Rev. Samuel Donaldson, Rev. S. L. Hobbs, 

Rev. J. M. Spangler, Rev. Jas. R. Bell, 

Rev. John J. Cardy, Rev. Cyrus L. Offer, 

Rev. Hannibal L. Stanley, Rev. Kryn Vander Gyp, 

Rev. George Scott, Rev. Albert C. Fidler, 

Rev. George Sneath, Rev. Joseph R. Davis. 
Rev. Samuel P. Dillon, 

Number and Distribution of Missionaries. 

There have been engaged in the work, during the whole or a part of the 
year past, 1458 missionaries, and they have labored in the following States 
and Territories in numbers as indicated below, namely, in 

Alabama 1 Missouri 78 

Alaska 3 Montana 8 

Arizona 3 Nebraska 81 

Arkansas 2 New Hampshire 2 

California 66 New Jersey 52 

Colorado 32 New Mexico 19 

Dakota 82 New York 91 

Delaware 6 Nevada 3 

Florida 10 North Carolina 1 

Idaho 4 Ohio 71 

Illinois 85 Oregon 26 

Indiana. 43 Pennsylvania 102 

Indian Territory 13 Rhode Island 2 

Iowa 122 Tennessee 22 

Kansas 135 Texas 26 

Kentucky 18 Utah 16 

Louisiana 1 Virginia 3 

Maryland 21 West Virginia 12 

Massachusetts 1 Washington Territory 23 

Michigan 05 Wisconsin 52 

Minnesota 53 Wyoming 2 

Growth of Our Work. 

Among the most marked evidences of the Divine favor do we count the 
growth and expansion of our work. During the last seven years the num- 
ber of our missionaries has steadily increased from 997 to the present time, 
when we have 1458. We have missionaries in all the States and Territories 
of the Union, except Maine, Vermont, Connecticut, Georgia, and South 
Carolina. 

It is noticeable that the expansion of our work has not been in the older 
or Eastern States, but in the new States and Territories, or at least in such 
as have been made accessible by new railroads. Five years ago we had but 
fifty-one ministers and ninety-one churches in Nebi-aska ; now one hundred 
and twenty-nine ministers, and one hundred and ninety-eight churches, of 
which twenty-two have been organized during the past year. Five years 
ago we had one hundred and thirty-five ministers and two hundred and 
nineteen churches in Kansas. Now we have one hundred and eighty-eight 
ministers and three hundred and twenty churches. Five years ago we had 
but four ministers and eight cliurches in Dakota, except among the Indians. 
Now we have eiglity ministers and one hundred and twenty cliurches, be- 
sides the Indian Presbytery with ten churches and twelve ministers. In a 
word, beyond the Missouri River, embracing the eastern portion of Dakota, 



A.D, 1884:.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 181 

with a strip of land in northwestern Minnesota not hitherto occupied, dur- 
ing the past five years there liave been organized two Synods and sixteen 
Presbyteries. Within these limits we have placed more than two hundred 
missionaries, and have organized more than four hundred churches. That 
is, where we had but four hundred and sixteen ministers we now have six 
hundred and thirty-five, and against five hundred and fifty-three churches 
five years ago, we now have more than nine hundred and sixty. 

We have sent more than thirty missionaries into the Synod of the Colum- 
bia during the last two years. The completion of the Northern Pacific Rail- 
way opens to speedy settlement a vast empire. The mineral wealth, the 
wheat fields, the timber, the coal fields and fisheries along the Columbia 
River and about Paget Sound are attracting and will amply support hun- 
dreds of thousands in the near future. 

The work has taken on a new impetus at the South. There we have been 
trying to adjust ourselves to a new condition of things. The population is 
much more sparse in the South than in the North. But railroads are now 
penetrating the country in every direction. Our Church has six Synods 
and twenty-five Presbyteries in the South ; and these mostly old organiza- 
tions ; and within their bounds we are trying to do our legitimate work. 
Our churches in Kentucky and Tennessee, distracted and weakened by the 
war, have been learning what was necessary to the work of evangelization 
within their own limits. But they have now entered on a new and more 
earnest effort to carry the Gospel to all the people. In like manner our num- 
ber of churches and ministers has more than doubled during the last few 
months in Florida. The railway system in Texas has also been greatly ex- 
tended during the last five years, 4000 miles having been added to what had 
been built before. All these States and Territories, thus made accessible 
by these railroads, have great attractions for the young and enterprising 
men of our own country — our own sons and daughters; but nearly 4,000,000 
of foreigners have come to us during the five years past. 

Home Missions in Cities. 

But we should do injustice to our work if we did not call attention to a 
special feature of it which is growing in importance ; we refer to the need 
and growing numbers of churches in our cities, especially the growing cities 
of the West. The tendency of the American people to settle in cities is a 
growmg tendency, it demands increasing attention, and the people who go 
West, whether they settle in the city or the country, are generally people of 
limited means. 

In Denver, Col., we have now two prosperous self-sustaining churches, 
and three prosperous missionary churches, just building, or just having 
built, houses of worship. We have three such missionary enterprises in 
Kansas City, where we also have two strong self-supporting churches. In 
Omaha we have tlu-ee such enterprises, one of which is German. In Min- 
neapolis we have six. In Portland, Oregon, we have two self-sustaining 
organizations, and tlu-ee missionary churches, and an urgent call for an- 
other. 

The Work Among the Germans. 

We gave notice to the General Assembly last year of a new departure in 
missionary work among the Germans. We have had in our service the Rev. 
P. A. Schwarz as a general missionary among this people. His labors have 
been both acceptable and fruitful. But we encounter two great difficulties : 

(1 ) The scarcity of preachei-s. The German people seem disposed to listen 
to the Gospel, it has not been difficult to gather congregations and sabbath- 
schools, we could organize many churches among them if we could find 
preachers. We have only two institutions where German-speaking students 
are prepared for the ministry; one at Bloomfield, New Jersey, and the 
other at Dubuque, Iowa. 

(2) The other difficulty is of a pecuniary character. German congrega- 
tions, like any others, need houses of worship. But the utter poverty of the 
Germans we have been able to reach seems in most instances to preclude any 
chance for self-help in this direction. 



182 BOARDS AXD PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 

WoKK IN New England. 

There has been a jriowing conviction in the last few years, that our 
Churcli has been neglecting golden opportunities in New England, and grave 
duties in regard to the people of our faith, in that part of the country. 
Large numbers of Presbyterians from Scotland and Ireland, and probably 
more from Canada, are settling in New England. Eoud calls have come to 
the Board for missionaries, and for means for their adequate support. 

Our Finances. 

The Treasurer's Keport shows that our income from all sources during the 
vear, is $620,428.22. For the Home Missionary Department, $487,480.55 ; 
for the Sustentation Department, $20,146.15 ; for the School Department, 
$112,801.52. But our financial condition Avas a source of the greatest solici- 
tude during a large part of the year. Unfortunately and unexpectedly to 
ourselves we began the year witli a debt of $45,000. This has been a burden 
that was additional to all the ordinary burdens of the year. In some former 
reports we have spoken of the lack of uniformity in our receipts. 

When our debt was reported February 1, at $190,000, it was alarming to 
the Board and to the missionaries. In fact, we reached a point where it 
seemed Inexpedient to borrow any more. We laid the case before the 
churches through our own magazine, by the religious press generally, and 
by leaflets and appeals sent forth broadcast over the land. The responses 
were most encouraging ; but, best of all, the executors of the will of ex- 
Governor E. D. Morgan, seeing the emergency, very kindly came to our. 
aid, and paid over a bequest of $100,000, which they were at liberty to with- 
hold several months longer. 

An Increase or Interest in the Work. 

The increase of contributions from the living during the year, which has 
not been generally prosperous in business, is evidence that there is a deeper 
interest in the work of Home Missions than ever before. Two or three 
causes have contributed to this result : 

1. The Presbyterian Home Missionary. 

This periodical contains maps, geographical and historical sketches of our 
States and Territories that are full of interest to every American, detailed 
and graphic accounts of the great tides of immigration, the opening of new 
settlements, the discovery of mines, the building of railways, temperance 
reforms and educational advancements, in their relation to the highest pro- 
gress and evangelization of this coiuitry. No such paper can pay its 
monthly visit to 28,000 families in our Church without a marked effect on 
its members, and no intelligent Christian family can well afford to do with- 
out this periodical. 

2. Home Missionary Conventions. 

Another cause of the increased interest in Home Missions has been the 
fact that at different times and in different States a series of conventions, 
not extending beyond two days, and carried through two or three weeks in 
succession, well arranged and well advertised, and provided with good 
speakers, have been held at small centres with most excellent effect. The 
experiment has been so successful that the demands for the same kind of 
Home Missionary conventions became numerous, could not be met, and had 
to be postponed to another year. 

The Needed Increase of Funds. 

None of us believe there is any lack of ability to do the work that seems 
to the Board necessary to be done. But how shall we secure an increase of 
funds ? 

The diffusion of information the past year by the methods already named 
has been so fruitful of results, showing so clearly a large advance in contri- 



A.D. 1884.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 188 

butions to our treasury, that we must persevere. For the need of more 
funds becomes more apparent when we look at 

The Great Work Still Before Us. 

Great as the advance has been the last few j^ears, such advance seems not 
to have satisfied, but to have increased the demand. 

From Iowa we have a list of twenty-six fields, many of them not new, 
that need missionaries. Kansas calls for twenty men for new places that 
promise good results. Kentucky, with its revived Presbyterian life, needs a 
number more. Texas has need for thirteen men . We have a similar appeal and 
descriptive list from Wood River Presbytery, for eleven men. The new 
railroads, the Oregon Short Line, the Utah Northern and Northern Pacific, 
have just opened the way into this territory that hitherto had been almost 
shut against immigration. Eight men are needed for Utah and eight for 
Montana. Southern Dakota enumerates and describes twenty fields calling 
for supplies. Fifteen more men are called for in Northern Dakota, and fif- 
teen for Minnesota. Other missionaries are beginning to write for helpers 
in their respective fields. Mr. Hill, of the Synod of the Columbia, says he 
wants twenty-five men for the spring campaign, and most of them at once. 
Nebraska also asks for eighteen men. Missouri wants fourteen men. " Old 
towns are taking upon themselves new growth, and new ones are here and 
there springing into existence. Never before in the history of the Presby- 
terian Churchln Missouri, was the work so bright or were the omens for 
the future so full of blessed promise." 

What shall we do with such requests before us ? 

And yet there are other parts of the field not yet heard from : Colorado, 
New Mexico, Arizona, California, Iowa, Wisconsin and Michigan. What 
shall Ave say to these things ? 

The Employment of Undergraduates in our Seminaries. 

Our observ'ation is that these young men, as a rule, do most excellent ser- 
vice. They are faitliful, hard-working, and very acceptable to the people. 
This opinion is confirmed by the Si/nodical Missionary in Iowa, who says : 
" Among the first tilings done, twelve undergraduates from the seminaries 
were secured, by the consent of the Board, to spend the summer, supplying 
for the time twenty-two of our new and vacant fields. These men did excel- 
lent work almost without exception, and stopped the cry and confusion 
coming from so many people hungry for the Gospel, and gave me a little 
time to look into the needs of the many more vacancies, and help secure 
men to fill them. Of the twenty-two places supplied by these middle-men 
for the summer, all but three have since been permanently supplied, and 
these three have not lost the force of zeal inspu'ed by the summer's work, 
and are pressing hard for a man." 

THE SUSTENTATION DEPARTMENT. 

No change has been made by this Board in the working of the plan of 
Sustentation. But some Synods and Presbyteries have construed the action 
of the last Assembly as a permission to adopt plans of their owti, looking to 
the support of all the missionary work in their own bounds under the head 
of Sustentation. These plans are not wholly harmonious ; but at first, they 
are supposed to be tentative, and probably it is wise to allow large liberty 
in making experiments, supposing that the best plan will so be indicated 
and adopted. No changes are likely to occur m the working of the scheme 
beyond a few of the Eastern Synods, unless their experience suggests and 
commends to the General Assembly and the whole Church, some more ex- 
cellent way. 

We are glad to see that contributions to this department this year ex- 
ceeded the amount given last year. This shows plainly that the cause has 
not lost its hold on the churches, and when the Synods and Presbyteries 
have matured their arrangements to give it greater efficiency, we are sure it 
will accomplish more than in previous years. 



184 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 

THE SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

The work of the women in behalf of Home Missions during the year has 
tended towards greater unification and efficiency. The school work has been^ 
pushed to the extent of the means furnished. 

Mexicans. 

The work in IN'ew Mexico is constantly gaining ground and making a 
secure place for itself. A thousand miles of railroad built there within five 
years are working great clianges, where hitheito for two hundred years 
there has been very little change. New people are settling in the Territory, 
new ideas have been introduced, and the spirit of inquiry is aroused ; but 
we have been imable to do the work that has come to our hands. 

We have been longing for the time to come when the ripened harvest 
would open before ns among the Spanish-speaking people in New Mexico as 
it has in old Mexico. We are not sure but it has now come. There seems 
to be a wide-spread spirit of inquiry among all these people, and increased 
readiness to listen to the reading of the Bible and the preaching of the Gos- 
pel, and an earnest desire that we would establish more schools and churches 
among them. In a word, we regard these people as in a most hopeful con- 
dition. 

Indians. 

School work among the Indians is more promising and pressing than ever 
before. The Indian Department at Washington is doing everything in its 
power to promote the education of the Indian childien in all the tribes. The 
appeals that come to us from the Indians, and for them, are most importu- 
nate. 

At Albuquerque we opened the Central Industrial Boarding School for 
all the Pueblos, December 15, 1880. Here are taught the general branches 
of education, as well as the truths of the Bible. The pupils are fed, clothed 
and taught household work, gardening and some of the mechanical arts, 
and generally how to take care of themselves. This institution bids fair to 
rival the great schools at Carlisle and Hampton. 

Indian Territory. 

The Rev. Timothy Hill, D.D., writes as follows : " The Indian Territory 
is a field by itself, unlike any other in the whole land, full of difficulties, yet 
full of encouragement. There never was a time when our Church could do 
as much there as at this day, and the work should be pushed with redoubled 
force along these principal lines." 

The Lord has greatly blessed the work, especially in Fort Gibson and 
Tahlequah, and we should this year double our force in that Territory. 

Alaska. 

In Alaska, the mission at Fort Wrangel was begun in the fall of 1876, by 
an Indian named Philip Mackay. On the 10th day of August, 1877, Rev. 
Sheldon Jackson, D.D. , and Mrs. A. R. McFarland arrived in Fort Wrangel, 
and opened the present mission and school for girls, with Mrs. McFarland 
in charge, she being the fii'st American missionary in that new country. 
Amid many trials she has heroically stood at her post. Shortly after this 
the need of a place of refuge for young girls was so apparent that she under- 
took this in addition to her other duties. The work has grown until now 
tliis girls' home is full, and a large day-school of sixty pupils is maintained. 

We liave begun work among the Mission Indians of Southern California, 
and we hope to make of this and the school among the Papagoes and Pimas 
large and influential industrial training-schools like the present school at 
Albuquerque, New Mexico. It is also hoped that schools will soon be 
opened among the Pueblos of Isletta, Santa Domingo, San Juan and others 
in New Mexico. 

Other enterprises are contemplated, but are not yet far enough advanced 
to state them. 



A.D. 1884.] BOARD OF HOME MISSIONS. 185 



Mormons. 

The work among the Mormons is equally imperative. Legislation, thus 
far, seems to accomplish very little. But the Word of the Lord will prevail. 
There is large demand for more schools, and more teachers and preachers. 
The great evil of Mormonism grows ; it spreads itself out into the surround-, 
ing Territories. Its attitude becomes more and more defiant and threaten- 
ing every day. 

But we have doubled the number of ministers and churches in that Ter- 
ritory during the last five years, and nearly all our school work has grown 
up during that time, till we have now thirty-five schools in successful opera- 
tion, and more than fifty teachers at work. The M'ork is hard, for the field 
is hard. But we are not disheartened. In spite of all opposition from the 
Mormon authorities, we can plant many more schools among them if we can 
but find the means for their support. 



Missionary Teachers. 

During the past year 144 Missionary teachers have been employed as fol- 
lows : 

Among the Indians, 53 

" " Mexicans, 26 

" " Mormons, 65 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 

"We condense the main f eatm-es of the year's work into the following state- 
ment : 

Number of Missionaries, 1,458 

" " Missionary Teachers, .... 144 

Years of Labor 1,081 

Additions on Profession of Faith, . . . . 6,216 

" " Certificate, 6,566 

Total Membership, 71,333 

" in Congregations, 129,547 

Adult Baptisms, 2,065 

Infant Baptisms, 3,958 

Sunday-scliools organized, 339 

Number of Sunday-schools, 1,825 

Membership of Sunday-schools, .... 121,742 

Church Edifices (value of same, $3,640,466), . . 1,307 
" " built during the year (cost of same, 

$343,055), 133 

Church Edifices repaired and enlarged (cost of same, 

$71,275), 243 

Church debts canceled, $141,519 

Churches self -sustaining this year, .... 44 

" organized, 135 

Numberof Parsonages (value, $318,274), ... 240 

By order of the Board, 



H. KENDALL, \ ;j,,,,,„^.,, 

WM. C. ROBERTS, } Secretaries. 



Ifeiv York J N. Y., May 15th, I8S4, 



186 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 

II. BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS. 

Abstract of the Fobty-seventh Annual Report. 

receipts, expenditures and statistics of the missions. 

The receipts of the Board from all sources from April 30th, 18&3,to April 
30th, 18S4, were $093,122.70. Its expenditures for the same period, includ- 
injr the payment of the debt of $13,3H2.96 from last year's accounts, were 
$703,845.72. This leaves a debt at the end of this year of $10,723.02. The 
receipts of the year proper exceeded its expenses $3382.96, but the debt of 
last year is added to the current expenses of this year. Toward its payment 
the handsome sum of $10,000 was received in June, from a liberal friend of 
the cause r otherwise the debt of this year would have been larger by that 
amount. The Board regrets deeply to report any deficiency, and yet the de- 
ficiency is so much less than was feared in the later months of the year 
that it is viewed almost with a feeling of relief. As the case stands, 
thanksgiving and praise should be given to God for the great liberality of 
the Church to this cause. The gifts of departed friends, though not so 
large in amount as those of last year, saved the treasury from heavy em- 
barrassment. The gifts of the churches, sabbatli-schools. Woman's Boards, 
and individual donors, exceeded those of any former year, and were $53,- 
475.52 over the sum received from the same sources in the preceding year. 
Is not the Cliurch called upon to bless God for the grace of giving imparted 
to its members, and for their noble support of this cause ? 

The Board also acknowledges, with thanks, liberal grants of funds and 
books, sent to some of the missions direct by the Board of Publication, the 
American Bible Society, and the American Tract Society; and it makes 
grateful mention also of funds contributed to the support of schools imder 
its care among the Omahas and Chippewas by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
and among the Ci-eeks, Seminoles and Choctaws by the Councils of these 
tribes. These grants of funds are not included in the report of the Treas- 
urer, but only such payments, in all cases, as were made from the general 
funds of the Board. 

The Expenditures, grouped generally in this Abstract of the Annual Re- 
port, and the Statistics of the Missions, for the last year, are as follows : 

For missions among 11 tribes of Indians, with which are con- 
nected 17 American and 9 Indian ministers, 12 Indian 
licentiate preachers, 2 American laymen and 34 women, 13 
native assistants, 1453 communicants, and 455 scholars, of 
whom 217 are in boarding-schools, $29,068 39 

For missions to the Chinese in this country, with stations in 
New York, San Francisco, Oakland and other places, 3 min- 
isters, 6 female teachers, unsalaried teachers not enumer- 
ated, 9 native assistants, 287 communicants, 480 scholars, 
not including scholars in sabbath-schools related to the mis- 
sion, but not aided by its funds, 15,938 94 

For missions in Japan, at 4 stations and several outstations, 
11 ministers, 10 native ministers, 7 native licentiate preach- 
ers, 2 American laymen and 23 women, 34 native assistants, 
1390 communicants and 651 scholars, 41,675 97 

For 3 missions in China, with 10 stations and several outsta- 
tions, 33 ministers, 16 native ministers, 34 native licentiate 
preachers, 5 American laymen and 46 women, 134 native 
assistants, 3302 communicants, 2092 scholars, of whom 256 
are in boarding-scliools, 98,240 49 

For 2 missions in Siam and Laos, at 3 stations and several 
outstations, 7 ministers, 4 native licentiate preachers, 2 
American laymen and 19 women, 8 native assistants, 380 
communicants, 301 scholars, of whom 72 .are in boarding- 
schools, 33,074 14 



A.D. 1884.] BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS. 187 

For 3 missions in India, at 19 stations and 17 outstations, 33 
ministers, 18 native ministers, 2 native licentiate preacliers, 
2 American laymen and 58 women, 170 native assistants, 
893 communicants, 10,40o scholars, of whom 291 are in 
boarding-schools, $126,621 35 

For 2 missions in Persia, at 4 stations and 81 outstations, 10 
ministers. 30 native ministers, 34 native licentiate preachers, 
5 American laymen and 23 women, 127 native assistants, 
1768 communicants, and 2577 scholars, of whom 150 are in 
boarding-schools, 68,974 91 

For mission in Syria, at 5 stations and 43 outstations, 14 minis- 
ters, 3 native ministers, 33 native licentiate preacliers, 1 
American laymen and 21 women, 168 native assistants, 
1155 communicants, and 7290 scholars, of whom 193 are in 
boarding-schools, 62,140 46 

For mission in Liberia, Africa, at 8 stations, 3 ministers, 6 
teachers, all Americo-Liberians except one native, 262 com- 
municants, and 141 scholars, 4,099 71 

For mission at Gaboon, etc., Africa, at 4 stations and several 
outstations, 7 ministers, 2 native ministers, 3 native licen- 
tiate preachers, two American laymen and 13 women, 21 
native helpers, 421 communicants, and 91 scholars, of whom 
74 are in boarding-schools, 26,598 73 

For mission in Brazil, at 9 stations and several outstations, 8 
ministers, 5 native ministers, 13 American women, 36 native 
assistants, 1,355 communicants and 399 scholars, of whom 
58 are in boarding-schools, 52,690 42 

For mission in Chili, at 4 stations, 7 ministers, 7 American 
women, 3 native assistants, 361 communicants and 269 
scholars, of whom 20 are in boarding-schools, . . . 17,602 20 

For mission in U. S. Colombia, at 1 station, 2 ministers, 3 
American women, 3 native assistants, 52 communicants 
and 57 scholars, of whom 7 are boarders, .... 3,880 43 

For mission in Guatemala, at 1 station, 1 minister, 1 native 

minister, 3 American women and 40 scholars, . . . 6,702 43 

For two missions in Mexico, at 7 stations and several outsta- 
tions, 7 ministers, 14 native ministers, 13 native licentiate 
preachers, 9 American women, 21 native assistants, 6812 
communicants and 666 scholars, of whom 22 are boarders, 73,629 66 

For missions in European Papal countries, Belgium, France, 

Italy, etc 4,621 00 

For Home Expenses — printing, salaries, miscellaneous, . . 24,833 53 
Debt of 1882-3, 13,382 96 

Total payments in 1883-4, $703,845 72 

Total receipts, 693,122 70 

Debt, April 30, 1884, $10,723 02 

NOTICES OF MISSIONARIES — SUBJECTS PRESENTED. 

The Report gives the names of 12 ministers, 6 American laymen and 29 
women sent out as new missionaries, of whom 5 were physicians ; and of 8 
ministers and 12 women returning to their stations, 3 of them under reap- 
pointment, making the number sent out in all 67. The death of three mis- 
sionaries is reported — the Rev. James M. Priest, of Liberia; Rev. O. P. 
Stark, of the Choctaw Mission ; and Mrs. G. L'. Deffenbaugh, of the Nez 
Perce Mission. 

It is plain that more ministers are needed in many of the missions — in 
some urgently, to maintain existing work, and in others to enter on ne\V 
work. The need of well-trained native laborers is almost everywhere press- 
ing, and in several missions training schools are giving special instruction 
to candidates for the ministry. This instruction is, indeed, one of the most 
important features of the work of missions ; without well-qualified native 



183 



BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. 



[Maj, 



ministers, educated amongst their own people, the spread of the Gospel will 
be long delayed. 

The Report treats of many subjects connected with the missions of the 
Board, such as the organization of Presbyteries, connected witli our General 
Assembly, in Mexico, Cliili, and the Laos country; the ordination of six- 
teen native ministers in different fields ; tlie unusual religious interest mani- 
fested in various places, resulting in tlie addition of luuidreds of converts 
to tlie communion of the churches ; and a large array of information as to 
many tilings for which reference must be made to the Report itself. No- 
body who reads it will doubt that God has been with His people during the 
last year, blessing this work of tlieir hands and of their hearts. Among the 
special topics briefly discussed is the question of transferring to other hands 
the Indian and Chinese missions of the Board, on which its views are 
carefully stated ; and also the embarrassment created in the Gaboon and 
Corisco mission in Africa by the new rules of the French Government as to 
schools, which, however, may be overruled for good to the cause of Christ 
ill that dark land. On a general view of this department of the work of the 
Church, at home and abroad, the friends and supporters of these missions 
may well thank God and take courage. The world is full of sin, suffering 
and death ; but the Gospel of the grace of God brings forgiveness, peace and 
life unto all who believe in Christ Jesus our Lord. Providence is opening 
many doors, and shutting none. And the Spirit and the bride stUl say, 
Come. 

MEMBERS AND OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

1882-1885.— Charles H. Parkhurst, D.D., Marvin R. Vincent, D.D., Hon. 
Hooper C. Van Vorst, George S. Coe, Robert L^nox Kennedy. 

188.S-1886.— AVilliam M. Paxton, D.D., LL.D., John D. Wells, D.D^ 
Robert Carter, William A. Booth, Ezra M. Kingsley. 

1884-1887.— Charles K. Imbrie, D.D., James P. Wilson, D.D., George 
Alexander, D.D., David Olipiiant and Henry Ide. 

Executive Officers. — Rev. William M. Paxton, D.D.,LL.D., Presi- 
dent; 'Rev. John D. Wells, D.D., Vice-President; Rev. John C. Lowrie, 
Rev. David Irvmg, D.D., Rev. Eraiik F. Ellinwood, D.D., Rev. Arthur 
Mitchell, D.D., Corresponding Secretaries; William Rankin, Esq., Treas- 
urer. 

Office.— Mission House, 23 Centre Street, New York ; New York Post- 
office Box, 2009. 

By order of the Board, 

JOHN C. LOWRIE, 1 

DAVID IRVING, Secretaries 

FRANK F. ELLINWOOD, | '^^<^^^^'^'r^^s. 

ARTHUR MITCHELL, J 
New York, N. Y., May 15th, IS84. 



III. BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Rev. J. Frederick Dripps, D.D., President. 
Bev. Robert M. Patterson, D.D., Vice-President. 
Rev. Daniel W. Poor, D.D., Co^-responding Secretary. 
Mr. J. Wilson, Treasurer. 



Ministers. 

Thomas J. Shepherd, D.D., 

James M. Crowell, D.D., 

J. Frederick Dripps, D.D., 

Edward B. Hodge, 

Samuel A. Mutchmore, D.D., 

John H. Munro, 

Robert M. Patterson, D.D., 

J. S. Mcintosh, D.D., 

Nathaniel S. McFetridge, D.D., 



Laymen. 

Samuel Field, 
Robert N. Willson, Esq., 
Fulton W. Hastings, 
James F. Gayley, M.D., 
George S. Graham, Esq., 
William Few Smitli, 
Charles H. Mathews, Esq., 
Horace W. Pitkin, 
George W. Barr. 



A.D. 1884.] BOAED OF EDUCATION. V8& 

OFFICE OF THE BOARD, 

Ko. 1334 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Abstract of the Sixty-fifth Ankual Eeport. 

"With grateful acknowledgment of the Divine favor towards it during 
the past year, the Board of Education herewith presents to the General As- 
sembly its Sixty-fifth Annual Report. 

Three of its members have resigned their positions in it — one, the Rev. 
G. H. Duffield, in consequence of his removal to Detroit, in place of whom 
the Rev. J. S. Mcintosh, D.D., has been elected, to serve until the meeting 
of the Assembly ; and the other two. Elders Joseph Harvey and Franklin 
Baker, in consequence of inability to attend the meetings. In place of Mr. 
Harvey, Mr. George S. Graham has been elected to serve until the meeting 
of the Assembly. 

Encouraged by the awakened enthusiasm evinced at the last Assembly in 
the cause of ministerial education, the Board, early in the year, ventured to 
raise the amount of scholarships for the Collegiate and Seminary students 
$10 each, putting them at $130. It was fair to expect an increase of con- 
tributions to warrant this. Nor has this expectation been altogether disap- 
pointed. The contributions from all sources have advanced by the amount 
of $3600.85. But this incre;ise has been more than counterbalanced by the 
unexpectedly large number of candidates receiving aid, making a net in- 
crease on our list of 91. The appeal made for more ministers seems to have 
touched the hearts of the young men who heard it. more forcibly than it 
did the hearts of contributors. And this, Ave have reason to believe, is 
largely owing not to the lack of liberality in the Church, but to a lack of 
infonnation as to the needs and merits of the cause. The aid promised the 
students has, indeed, all been given punctually, but it has been by incurring 
a debt which we regret to say amounts to the sum of $10,912.30. This debt, 
it is to be feared, will oblige the Board either to diminish tlie value of the 
scholarships the coming year, and thus to pinch and dishearten the students, 
if not compel them to suspend their course of study ; or else to decline 
many applications. Either of which measures would be injurious to the 
cause. The question is, will the Church help the Board to balance its ac- 
counts without resorting to either of them. 

CANDIDATES AIDED. 

The Candidates under care of the Board for the past year amounted, in 
all, to 577, an excess of 91 upon those of the previous year. They are dis- 
tributed along three departments of their course. Those in Theological 
Seminaries number 216 ; in Colleges, 262 ; and in the Preparatory stage, 99. 
This last class includes Germans and colored students, who are allowed by 
the rules. The exceptional cases number 21, who came to us strongly rec- 
ommended, and were accepted only after careful inquiry as to their promise 
and needs. Several applications, however, were declined, because furnish- 
ing no special reason for aid. 

Classified according to their nationality or race, 36 are Germans ; 5 Bul- 
garians ; 45 Negroes ; 2 Spanish ; 2 Chinese ; 1 Hindoo ; and 1 Indian. The 
remainder are of our own immediate kith and kin. 

In point of scholarship, 53 are marked high, not a few occupying the fore- 
most rank in their classes for intellectual ability and Christian influence ; 
91 are graded above medium ; and only 5 are marked below that grade, who 
are nevertheless retained because of fair promise in other particulars and by 
advice of their Presbyterial Committees. The failures are mostly in the de- 
partments of Hebrew and Greek. 

In the course of the year one, a colored student, Avas dropped for marrying, 
fifteen for low scholarship. One has died. 

Candidates in connection with the Board who complete their studies this 
year number, in all, 68 — a worthy contribution, we hope it will be found, to 



190 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [^aj, 

the working force of tlie Church, justifying the outlay made upon them, by 
successful labors in every field to which they may be called. Of these, 25 
are graihiates from rriuceton, 9 from Union, 9 from the Western, 3 from 
Auburn, 5 from Lane. 10 from the Northwestern, 2 from the German school 
at Newark, 1 from tlie Hartford Theological beminary, 3 from Lincoln 
University, and 1 from Biddle University. 

CONTKIBTJTIONS. 

The sum total of the receipts of the Board for the last year is $67,100.41. 
This is a gratifying advance upon that of the previous year by $3600.85. 
The gain in direct contributions from the churches amoimted to $2049.35, 
and the number of cliurches contributing was larger than ever before by 
109. This would hidicate a growing appreciation of the importance of the 
cause throughout the Chm-ch, and a greater fidelity on the part of the 
ministers in presenting it. Moreover, there is reason to believe that the m- 
come woukl have been still larger had it not been that a special effort has 
been made by some of the churches to throw their full strength, or at least 
a large portion of it, in support of the new Board of Aid for Colleges on its 
first starting. For tliis, however, no complaint is made. It is in point, 
nevertheless, to remind the churches that t]\ough the two Boards come 
under the general head of Education, their splieres are distinct ; and giving 
to the one does not compensate for withholding from the other. Rather, so 
far from having conflicthig interests or claims, each furnishes an additional 
reason for helping more largely the other. Tlie call for more ministers de- 
mands the extension of our Collegiate and Academic institutions ; and on 
the other hand the extension of these institutions will serve to expand the 
field from which applications will come to the Board of Education for as- 
sistance. Both the Boards should be sustained adequately, and a great mis- 
take will it be for the churches to divide their ordinary contributions for the 
cause of Education between the two Boards, as some have been doing, or 
to withhold altogether from the one in order to give to the other. The 
Church now needs both the Boards in vigorous operation. 

THE CASE AS IT NOW STANDS. 

The Minutes of the Assembly for the year ending 1883 show a net in- 
crease of 75 in our ministry over that of the previous one. That is to say, 
after filling all tlie gaps made in our ranks by death, amounting to 89, and 
those made by dismissal to other bodies, amounting to 22, we count a sur- 
plus of 75. Of these, it seems that 64 came to us from our sister denomina- 
tions, leaving a balance to our credit of only 11. We received 42 more than 
we gave. Here we have one conclusive proof of the much contested fact 
that our Church has not been developing out of its own body adequate sup- 
plies for its pulpits, and the proof magnifies when we see that while we 
raised only a net increase of 11 ministers, that of our churches amounted 
to 99 ! 

On the other hand , it is cheering to observe a considerable increase in the 
number of candidates reported over those of the previous year. But this 
increase, it must be remembered, is of candidates far back in theu' course. 
The turn of the tide is in mid-ocean, and will not be likely to reach the 
shore and prove available for filling our pulpits for some years to come. 
The scarcity is still far from being relieved. 

How far we are still behind in meeting the demands of our rapidly ex- 
tending Church, and how much must yet be done before the want is prop- 
erly supplied, may be learned from the following statistics. They are taken 
from the Assembly's roll, with errors corrected, as given by one who has 
carefully examined it in detail. Our churches number in all 5847 ; our 
ministers, 5231. Deducting from these numbers the churches and ministers 
reported from the two foreign Synods of China and India, and from the five 
foreign Presbyteries of Corisco, Orooraiah, llio Janeiro, Siam and West 
Africa, and we have left in this country 5730 churches and 5094 ministers. 
Of the latter 877 must be regarded as unavailable for more than occasional 
supplies of vacant pulpits, viz., 392 who are honorably retired ; 190 engaged 



A.D. 1884.] BOARD OF EDUCATION". 191 

in instruction; 34 editors; 23 wlio are installed over Congregational 
chiu-ches ; 95 Secretaries and^ Treasurers ; and 120 who are agents for various 
causes. This would bring down our working force to 4217. But there are 
still two classes to be taken under consideration, viz. : 236 who are marked 
as Evangelists and 456 who are without charge, in all 692, or in round num- 
bers 700. What proportion of these would accept the pastorate or even the 
position of stated supply, or how many of these are disabled only by tempo- 
rary sickness, or are acceptable as preachers, or are not disqualified for the 
pursuit of their calling by engagement in secular business, it would be im- 
possible to state without more examination. It would, however, be safe to 
put the number at one-half, leaving 346 more to be counted out for various 
reasons. This reduces our whole available force to 3871 ministers for 5730 
churches all told— an excess of 1859 churches. Of these a good many are so 
combined as to be served by one mmister. A still larger number, estimated 
at over 300, are regularly supplied by ministei-s of other denominations. De- 
ducting these there still remain 1147 marked vacant. Of these, 16 report 
an income of over $4000 ; 13, an income from this to $3000 ; 26, an income 
fiom $30(J0 to $2000 ; 66, an income from 62000 to 1000 ; 118, an income from 
$1000 to $-51)0. In all there are 259 churches that either alone, or with a little 
help could support a pastor, and want one. And these incomes, it must be 
remembered, are reported while the churches are vacant. Many of them 
would naturally be larger were -the churches properly supplied with minis- 
ters. And many a Church reporting an income less than $500 would, no 
doubt, develop greater pecuniary strength were its pixlpit tilled. 

Again, rated according to their number, 37 churches report a membership 
of 200 and over ; 32, a membership of from 150 to 200 ; 66, a membership of 
fi-om 100 to 150 ; 72, a membership of from 75 to 100 ; 141, a membership of 
from 50 to 75 ; and 270, a membership of from 25 to 50. In all there are 
532 churches which, judged by tlieir size, appear deserving of care. How 
many of these might be greatly enlarged, and others still smaller be brought 
into more flourishing condition by proper care we can only surmise. There 
are 48 Presbyteries that have of these vacant churches 10 apiece and up- 
wards. One has 20. 

Moreover, in order to make the show of want complete, we must take into 
account the aimnal increase of churches, which netted last year 99. Such 
is the condition of our churches as they are made to appear in the minutes 
of the Assembly of 1883. 

A glance must now be taken at the supplies which our Seminaries are 
promising us for the next three years. The aggregate of students, as pre- 
sented in the catalogues of the Seminaries sent to us for the past year, in the 
3 classes, is 432, an excess upon those reported last year of 21. Dividing by 
three, and counting iipon all as intended for our Church, the recruits for 
our ministerial force to fill the gaps made in it by death and dismissal, and 
to supply our vacant churches and our new organizations at home and to go 
as missionaries abroad, average 144 per year. How insufficient is our supply 
may be seen at a glance. Instead, our Seminaries ought to graduate every 
year at least 175 candidates ready furnished for every good work. 

In the above estimate the colored churches and students have been left 
out of the account for the same reason that the foreign mission churches 
and missionaries have been left out. It takes away all cause or pretext tor 
regarding our condition as really better than the above statement shows. 

This survey indicates several things. One is that the Presbyterian Church 
is not yet furnishing an adequate supply of ministers for its existing churches 
and for its future enlargement, nor is it likely to furnish them for some years 
to come. Another is that it has no efficient system for projperly utilizmg 
the ministers it has trained, and tolerates an appearance of waste which 
deters many from entering the ministry. Another is that while it proffers 
to its ministers a great number of vacant fields to be occupied, quite a large 
proportion of these fields present no good openings for labor and no sufficient 
means of support ; and this, too, operates as a dissuasive from entering the 
sacred callmg. Yomig men naturally desire a kind of work which affords 
some scope for their energies and yields some fruit of labor, and this is 
what they expect that the Church which calls for their service will in some 
way furnish. "We respectfully suggest, therefore, that if the Presbyterian 



192 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [Maj, 

Church would have a free, unincumbered development of its ministry, its 
judicatories should devise and enforce a system hy means of which its un- 
employed, yet available, ministers may be set to work, its vacant churches 
be more speedily supplied, and those which are hopelessly feeble, and prom- 
ise no growth, be combined with others of our own or other denominations, 
so that tliey can be regularly supplied with the means of grace. In our 
opinion there is no subject which demands of our Cluirch more earnest con- 
sideration and more determined action than this. While some of our sister 
churches that enforce a wise policy in these matters have no difhculty in 
obtaining candidates for their pulpits, we are suffering for the lack of it. 

For the Board, 

D. W. POOR, Secretary. 



IV. BOARD or PUBLICATION. 



OFFICERS. 



President. — Rev. William P. Breed, D.D. 
Vice-Presidents.— Hon. Joseph Alljson, LL.D. 

Rev. Thomas J. (Shepherd, D.D., 

Rev. J. Addison Henry, D.D. 
Corresponding Secretary.— liev. William E. Schenck, D.D. 
Editorial Secretary.— Uev. John W. Dulles, D.D. 
Secretary of Salhatli-school T^orfc.— Rev. James A. Worden, D.D. 
Business Superintendent. — John A. Black. 
Recording CYerfc.— Rev. Willard M. Rice, D.D. 
TreasMrer.-— Samuel D. Powel. 

members. 

Term to expire in May., 1885. 

Ministers. Laymen. 

William P. Breed, D.D., Charles H. Biles, 

William E. Schenck, D.D., Henry C. Blair, 

Roger Owen, D.D., Archibald Mclntyre, 

Charles A. Dickey, D.D., George F. Wiggan, 

John Henry Sharpe, Samuel C. Perkins, 

Thomas J. Shepherd, D.D., W^illiam Brockie, 

S. A. Mutchmore, D.D., Robert N. Willson, 

Loyal Young Graham, Robert C. Ogden. 

Term to expire in May, 1886. 

Robert M. Patterson, D.D. , Theodore W. Baker, 

Thomas Murphy, D.D., Gen. William F. Raynolds, 

William T. Eva, D.D., George W. Mears, 

James A. Worden, D.D., WiUiam Wood, 

William Greenough, William L. Dubois, 

Herrick .Johnson, D.D., LL.D., Robert H. Hinckley, 

John S. Macintosh, D.D., George S. Graham, 

John S. Sands, John Scott. 

Term to expire May, 1887. 

George F. Wiswell, D.D., Edward A. Rollins, 

John W. Dulles, D.D„ Joseph Allison, LL.D., 

William E. Jones, D.D., Henry N. Paul, 

Willard M. Rice, D.D., John H. Watt, 

J. Addison Henry, D.D., William L. Mactier, 

Matthew Xewkirk, D.D., John D. McCord, 

William D. Roberts, Edward P. Borden, 

Samuel J. NiccoUs, D.D., Joseph M. CoUingwood. 



A.D. 188J:.] BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 193 



DIBECTIOlSrS FOB CORRESPONDENCE. 

Letters relating to the general interests of the Board, to donations of 
books and tracts, to tlie appointment of colporteurs, and all reports, orders, 
and other communications from colporteurs, to be addressed to the Rev. 
William E. Schenck, D.D., Corresponding Secretary. 

Manuscripts, and communications concerning matter offered for publica- 
tion, to the Rev. John W. Dulles, D.D., Editorial Secretary. 

Reports of sabbath-schools and letters relating to sabbath-scliool work, to 
Rev. James A. Worden, D.D., Secretary of Sabbath-school Work. 

Remittances of money and contributions to Mr. Samuel D. Powel, 
Treasurer. 

Orders for books, and business correspondence, except from colporteurs, 
and all orders and payments for periodicals, to Mr. John A. Black, Busi- 
ness Superintendent. 

All to 1334 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Abstract of the Forty-sixth Annual Report of the Presby- 
^ terian Board of Publication. 

The Presbyterian Board of Publication respectfully presents to the 
General Assembly this its Forty-sixth Annual Report. 

With gratitude and hope it acknowledges the goodness of God in the 
abundant mercies vouchsafed to it during the year past, and in the pros- 
perity and success with which He lias crowned its work. Never, m the years 
of its past history, has it been more completely exempted from reverses, or 
enabled to make larger advances in every department of its work. In all 
these blessings and prospects the Board would devoutly recognize the good 
hand of the great Head of the Church, and would gird itselt up to under- 
take the work of the coming years with confidence and joy. 



the fiscal year. 

The year reviewed in this Report extends from April 1, 1883, to April 1, 
1884, inclusive. 

issues of the year. 
The Board has published during the past year : 

Copies. 

23 New Books, 91,000 

1 Sabbath-school Hymnal, 61,000 

1 Sabbath-school Hymns 50,000 

1 Lesson Questions, . • 17,000 

1 Sabbath-school Requisite, 4,000 

6 lOmo Tracts, 24,000 

3 18mo " 12,000 

3 32mo " 12,000 

1 Church Blank, 8,000 

1 French Tract, 2,000 

4 German Tracts, 8,000 

1 Spanish Hymn Book, 2,000 

1 Spanish Tract, 11,000 

Total of new publications, .... 302,000 
Reprints of former publications, ' . . . 1,487,500 

Total number, 1,789,500 

13 



104: BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 

Of Periodicals tliere have been printed : 

Westminster Teacher 560,084 

Westminster Lesson Leaf , 3,377,318 

Sabbath-school Visitor, 2,179,302 

Sunbeam, 4,335,751 

Westminster Qnarterly, 585,193 

Westminster Primary Lesson Leaf, . . . 800,696 

German Lesson Leaf , 91,627 

Forward, 303,988 

Morning Star, 1,060,785 

Monthly Record, 105,122 

Total of periodicals, 13,399,866 

Annual Eeport of the Board, .... 6,500 

Aggregated publications of the year, . . 15,195,866 

Periodicals. 

The combined lists of the periodicals show an increase of over one hundred 
thousand subscriptions during the past twelve months, a growth that is every 
way gratifying, as the same advance was made during the year before that. 

The large reduction in prices made in 1883 undoubtedly contributed to the 
increase in the cu'culation of the periodicals of the Board. The List in- 
cludes : 

The Westminster Teacher, the Board's monthly magazine for 
teachers and officers in the sabbath-schools. It gives full expositions and 
illustrations of the International Bible Lessons, prepared during the past 
year by the Rev. J. R. Miller, D.D., aided by the Rev. J. A. Worden, D.D., 
and Mrs. Gr. R. Alden, as well as articles bearing upon all the branches of 
this important department of Church work, by able and popular writers. 
It is furnished at 60 cents a year to single subscribers, and 50 cents where 
six or more copies are addressed to one person. 

The Westminster Question Book.— Though called a "Question 
Book," it is a complete manual for the study of the International Bible 
Lessons of the year. The Shorter Catechism is given in it systematically, 
one question for each Sabbath, as in the other periodicals of the Board. It 
is intended for use in Bible-classes and the senior classes of the school. 
Price, $15 per hundred, net. 

The Westminster Quarterly is a help to the study of the Bible 
lessons, adapted to use by the more intelligent classes of our sabbath-schools. 
It is published in the form of an octavo of thirty-two pages. The increase 
in its circulation is the best evidence of its approval by our churches. Single 
subscription, 20 cents ; school subscriptions, to one address, 15 cents each 
per annum. 

The Westminster Lesson Leaf.— This " Leaf " fills the place of an 
" intermediate leaf." It is issued monthly, but- is so arranged that the les- 
son for each Sabbath occupies the two sides of one leaf. Price, $6 per hun- 
dred copies. 

The Westminster Primary Leaf, for the youngest classes studying 
the International Bible Lessons, is still prepared by Mrs. G. R. Alden 
(" Pansy"), and has largely increased in its circulation. 

The German Lesson Leaf is doing a good work in meeting the wants 
of our German congregations, to whom it proves a valuable help in the 
study of the Bible in the sabbath-school. The price has been reduced to $6 
per hundred copies. 

Westminster Lesson Questions. — This is a new publication. It 
consists of leaves with six questions on each lesson and spaces for answers 
to be written by the scholar. Is is put up in packages for six months, Jan- 
uary to June, five cents a package, net; July to December, at the same rate. 

The Sabbath-school Visitor. — This oldest periodical of the Board 



A.D. 1884.] 



BOAKD OF PUBLICATION. 



195 



holds its own. The Visitor is published twice a month, that is, on the first 
and third weeks of each month, at the following terms per year : 



Single Subsceiptions. 



Once a month, 
Twice a month, 



25 cents. 
40 " 



School Subscriptions. 



To one address, at the rate of 
$12 per 100 copies, once a month. 
24 " " twice a month. 



Or, at the rate of one cent for each copy. 

The Morning Star. — Equal to the Sabhath-school Visitor in every re- 
spect, but of one-half its size, yet with more than one-half the amount of 
reading. It is published on the second and fourth weeks of each mouth, at 
the following rates per year : 



SlNClLE SCB8CRIPTI0N8. 



Once a month, 
Twice a month, 



10 cents. 
20 " 



School Subscriptions. 

To one address : 

$ 6 per 100 copies, once a month. 
12 " " twice a month. 



Or, at the rate of half a cent for each copy. 

The Sunbeam continues to be wonderfully popular with its constantly 
increasing army of young admirers. It is a weekly illustrated paper, adapted 
to the very little ones of the home and school. It also carries help on the 
International Lessons for the primary classes and the little ones at home. 
Single subscriptions, 30 cents ; school subscriptions at the rate of $25 per 
hundred, a year. 

Forward is an illustrated monthly paper, sixteen pages quarto, designed 
to meet the wants of that class of our young people who have outgrown 
the " children's papers," and who demand something more mature. It is 
made attractive by pictorial illustrations, whilst its articles constantly keep 
in view the tastes and wants of those for whom it is prepared. The rates 
have been reduced, and are now : one copy to one address, 40 cents ; five or 
more copies to one address, 25 cents each, per year. 

The Presbyterian Monthly Record.— This organ of the As- 
sembly's Boards and Committees continues to be published, in octavo 
pamphlet form, by the Board of Publication, but only as publisher for the 
Assembly's Boards and Committees, the control of its pages resting entirely 
with the several organizations represented. The monthly circulation of the 
magazine has been about nine thousand, including the copies sent gratui- 
tously to each of the ministers of the Church. The loss incurred by its 
publication and distribution is shared by the Assembly's Boards in the ratio 
of the space occupied by each. 

the bookstore or the board. 



The publications of the Board now number over 2500, of which about 
1500 are volumes ; the remainder are tracts and pamphlets. They contain 
a wide and valuable variety of works on the doctrine and polity of the 
Church, on religious experience and Christian duty, on Church history, 
missions, and every other religious topic. They are adapted to help the un- 
converted soul, the Christian believer, and the minister of the Gospel. They 
are suitable for the sabbath-school or the Church library, or for family use. 
In addition to its own publications, the Board offers in its bookstore a large 
variety of the issues of other publishing houses. And an order for any book, 
if not in the store, will be filled, if possible, by procuring it from other 
sources for the customer. 

Sabbath-school libraries may here be selected with every assurance that 
nothing objectionable will be included in them. Should any book be pur- 
chased which, on closer examination, is found objectionable, it may be re- 
turned with a written statement of the objections, and either its price or 
another volume of the same price will be sent to the purchaser. 

Sabbath-school workers may find in the bookstore a great variety of maps,' 



196 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 

charts, blackboards, minutes, records, class-books, librarian's books, and all 
other facilities needed for the proper and convenient working of a sabbath- 
school. 

An excellent assortment of Bibles and Testaments, commentaries and 
theological books, may always be found liere, and if any particular khid is 
not on hand, it will be promptly procured from the publisher or elsewhere, 
and furnished at the lowest practicable price. 

We sometimes hear the assertion, even from Presbyterians, that the 
Board's books are not sold as cheap as those of other publishing houses. 
Careful comparisons made between its prices and those of many other houses 
have satisfied the Board that on a fair comparison its books are sold as low 
as those of most publishing houses, and cheaper than those of many of them. 
Within the last two or three years the prices of a large proportion of the 
books on its catalogue have been greatly reduced. The entire list of 18mo 
and 32mo publications, covering about 450 volumes, has been reduced in 
price fully 30 per cent, no book of this class now costmg more than GO cents, 
retail price ; or to sabbath-schools 45 cents. Many of these publications 
have as much reading matter in them as the ordinary $1 and $1.25 volumes, 
and if made m the other size would readily sell at those prices. 

OUR NEW DEPOSITORIES. 

By direction of the General Assembly of 1882 the Board established a 
depository at Chicago. It may be found at No, 137 Wabash Avenue, and is 
under the care of Mr. C. H. Whiting. From it may be procured any of the 
publications of the Board, as well as the books of other publishers. 

A second depository was established at St. Louis, in charge of the Kev. J. 
W. Allen, D.D., at No, 1107 Olive Street. It has begun to do a large and 
important business, and will, it is believed, meet the wants of a wide region. 

ARRANGEMENTS ELSEWHERE. 

During the past two or three years the Board has been constantly extend- 
ing and making more liberal its arrangements with booksellers in the larger 
cities of our country and of Canada. By means of these arrangements the 
Board's issues can now be easily obtained in nearly all the principal centres 
of the book-trade in these countries. 

RECEIPTS AND SALES. 

The receipts into the treasury during the year from all sources, including 
the balance of $28,681.93 from last year, were $308,393.68, and, exclusive of 
that balance, $279,711.75. 

The entire expenditures of the year have been $287,216.69. 

The balance in the treasury at the end of the year, March 31st, 1884, is 
$21,176.99. 

The aggregate of sales (including those made to the Missionary Depart- 
ment) has been $199,950.58. This aggregate does not agree with the Treas- 
urer's account, because it includes credit sales, while tliat account exhibits 
only cash received. Particulars of receipts and expenditures may be found 
in the Treasurer's report and statements, further on in this Report. 

THE MISSIONARY DEPARTMENT. 

Directions for Correspondence. 

Letters relating to grants of books and tracts, the appointment of colpor- 
teurs and the general interest of the Board, to be addressed to the Rev. 
"William E. Schenck, D.l)., Corresponding Secretary. 

Remittances of money and contributions to Mr. S. D. Powel, Treasurer. 

Parties desiring copies of the Secretary's annual circular for distribution, 
or to place in their pews when about to take up a collection, can obtain them 
by addressing the Corresponding Secretary and stating the number desired. 



A.D. 1884.] BOARD OF PUBLICATION". 197 

FORM OF BEQUEST. 

The Board of Publication is incorporated under the laws of Pennsylvania, 
under the style of " 7'he Trustees of the Presbyterian Board of Publication.''^ 
Bequests are respectfully solicited, and should be made as above designated. 
All bequests are applied to the uses of the Missionary Fund, unless other- 
wise directed by testators. 

The Missionary Department of the Board has passed through the year 
without incurring any indebtedness, and closes the year with a balance to 
its credit. It has thus been enabled to do more work than in many of the 
past years, and to do it with more freedom and efficiency, than when it was 
doae in the face of a deficiency it was all the time in danger of imprudently 
enlarging. 

Applications for the appointment of colporteurs and for the bestowal of 
grants have been incessant and have come from all parts of our Church. 
So far as practicable these requests have been favorably responded to. Some 
former colporteurs have retired from the Board's service, but a considerably 
larger number have been commissioned. In every new appointment the 
greatest care has been taken to obtain full and reliable information con- 
cerning the persons appointed, not only through a personal correspondence 
between them and the Corresponding Secretary, but also through testimo- 
nials from ministers and others who were able to vouch for their qualifica- 
tions for the proposed work, in a physical, intellectual, and spiritual point of 
view. Before receiving an appointment, every applicant has had a copy of 
the Board's printed Instructions to colporteurs placed in his hands and 
been required to give his pledge to obey carefully all their directions. And 
especially has the Board been careful to issue no commission to any person 
to labor within the bounds of any Presbytery unless first recommended to 
do so by that Presbytery or its Publication Committee. To secure persons 
in all respects well qualified to perform the arduous and often delicate 
duties of the colporteur and to sift out such from among applicants, many 
of whom are entirely unfit for the service, is no easy thing. But through 
the exercise of great and constant care it is believed that very few mistakes 
have been made, that the Board's band of colporteurs to-day as a body are 
unusually well qualified for theu' work and are doing it well. In the whole 
of the year past not more than two or three expressions of doubt or fear in 
regard to any one of our colporteurs have come to us from any part of the 
wide field. Their reports and correspondence have undergone a close ex- 
amination, and directions and exhortations such as seemed to be needed 
have been sent to them from time to time. They have been urged to give 
special prominence in their work to visitations from house to house, with 
religious conversation and prayer wherever practicable, to making enlarged 
distributions gratuitously of books, tracts, and papers, and to the perform- 
ance of vigorous sabbath-school work among the spiritually destitute. 

NEW FIELDS OCCUPIED. 

During the past year not only has the number of colporteurs been largely 
increased, but many of those newly appointed have been sent to occupy 
new, distant and very needy fields in New Mexico, Arizona, California, 
Oregon, Washington Territory, Montana, ISTevada, Idaho, Colorado, and 
Dakota, while the force of laborers has been enlarged in many other fields. 
Everywhere tliey have been received with respectful attention and often 
with gladness, while the printed truth they scatter is nearly everywhere 
accepted with good promise of its being read and pondered. How un- 
speakable a blessing would it be to the Presbyterian Church to have a col- 
porteur actively at work in every Presbytery throughout her wide extent, 
distributing publications which would state, illustrate, and defend the 
teachings of her pulpits and of her standards, as well as counteract the 
floods of trashy and often immoral literature which are deluging the land. 
We pray and trust that the time is not far off when no Presbytery will feel 
that it is fully equipped for the work of the Lord until it has such a laborer 
busy within its bounds. 



■^96 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 



NEW WORK OF THE YEAR. 

The number of colporteurs at work rluring the whole or portions of the 
year just ended has been 84, who have labored in 20 Synods and 95 Presby- 
teries. These have distributed by sale 34,032 volumes ;" while 73,767 volumes 
(making a total of 108,699 volumes) and 6,692,882 pages of tracts and period- 
icals have been gratuitously distributed by them, and the Missionary Com- 
mittee, acting through large numbers of voluntary, unpaid, and uncommis- 
sioned laborers. 

The commissioned colporteurs have visited 87,112 families, with a large 
majority of which they have held religious conversation and prayer, ac- 
companied in very many cases with the reading of the Holy Scriptures. They 
also report having held 2478 prayer-meetings and other religious services as 
opportunity was offered. This is a large and most encouraging advance on 
the work last year reported. Details respecting it may be found in the 
tables printed further on in this report. 

A larger use than ever before has been made of pastors, missionaries and 
other voluntary helpers in securing a wider diffusion of the Board's publica- 
tions wherever it could judiciously be done, especially among the poor, the 
destitute, and the irreligious. Grants have been sent freely to those who 
have offered such help in every part of the wide field. They have also been 
sent, on application, for use by our foreign missionaries in China, Japan, 
India, Syria, Persia, Western Africa (including Liberia), South America, 
Guatemala, Mexico, and among our North American Indian tribes. 

A larger number of volumes have been distributed than in former years 
for the same money, because the Board has placed a choice selection of its 
doctrinal and practical books in a very cheap form in paper covers, within 
easy reach of its Missionary Department. These are arranged in its cata- 
logue under the head of "Westminster Cheap Series," and have been ex- 
tensively used in supplying colporteurs and in making grants. Additions 
to this Cheap Series will probably be made from time to time, and it is 
likely to be exceedingly helpful to the Board's missionary work. 

The large amount of pure religious truth disseminated in the ways above 
stated, if followed by the prayers of God's people, and especially by the be- 
nign and almighty influences of the Holy Spirit, may secure blessings beyond 
conception to vast numbers of souls ready to perish, as well as to the Church 
itself. We are not usually pei'mitted to see the fruits from the seed we sow, 
yet enough precious evidences come to us from the field to show that the 
Holy Spirit does attend and bless this work, and that the good seed will 
assuredly produce a bountiful harvest. Not only the colporteurs themselves, 
but pastors and others who closely observe this work and its results, bear 
ample and delightful testimony that the truth disseminated by the Board 
is accompanied by a Divine, converting and sanctifying iwwer. 

OUR COLPORTEURS AND SABBATH-SCHOOLS. 

Prominent among the duties of our colporteur is that of organizing new 
sabbath-schools in destitute places wherever he finds it practicable, and giv- 
ing them needed help. It is also his duty to visit and encourage, so far as 
he can, all sabbath-schools, especially such as are feeble, and to supply them 
with the library books, catechisms, lesson helps, papers and other facilities 
published by the Board. This part of his work grows in importance every 
year. In cases not a few the way has thus been prepared for a demand for 
the preaching of the Gospel, and in the end for the organization of a perma- 
nent Presbyterian Church. 

During the year now reported on the colporteurs have organized 151 new 
schools in such destitute localities. They have also visited and encouraged 
1755 schools, into many of which they have infused new vigor, and in some 
very marked instances have prevented their extinction. Very many chil- 
.dren have thus begun to be made acquainted with the blessed teachings of 
the word of God, and to experience the benign influences of Christianity. 

Nine years ago this sabbath-school work was begun by our colpor- 
teurs. Since that time they have organized 863 sabbath-schools, and have 



A.D. 1881.] 



BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 



199 



visited and aided 12,512 schools. More than 25,000 children have in this 
way been drawn to the study of the Bible and to learn the way of life eter- 
nal', instead of being left to lives of ignorance of Christ, to sabbath-break- 
ing, to lawlessness and to ruin. 

GOOD WORK FOR SABBATH-SCHOOLS. 

The great majority of our Presbyterian sabbath-schools enjoy ample 
facilities for instruction in sacred knowledge. They have Bibles, and 
libraries, and papers, and everything needed for their advancement and 
comfort. Will not these schools, so lai-gely blessed, gladly help this Board of 
Publication to furnish, through its Missionary Department, similar advan- 
tages and supplies to the many thousands of poor and needy children found in 
every part of the land ? While Presbyterian sabbath-schools raise every 
year in the aggregate a very large sum of money, it is a very painful fact 
that very few of them send contributions to the Missionary Fund of this 
Board to help it in this Branch of its good work. As we have done in 
former years, so now we earnestly appeal to them again for their help. We 
also respectfully entreat pastors and sabbath -school superintendents to pre- 
sent our work to the minds of their pupils and secure their contributions. 
The children and youth will gladly do this if they are shown the work and 
its needs. The General Assembly has many times recommended that this 
should be done. Tlie last General Assembly emphatically declared that in 
its judgment sabbath-schools should "always and especially remember the 
sabbath-school missionary work of the Board of Publication," in their con- 
tributions. 

SABBATH-SCHOOL WORK. 

The Eev. James A. Worden, D.D., Secretary of Sabbath-school Work, sub- 
mits the following as his report of that work during the past year : 

The following tabulated statement will show at a glance the advance 
made in the sabbath-school work of our Church during tlie past five years : 





Sabbath- 
schools. 


Officers 

and 

Teachers. 


Scholars. 


Total. 


TTsing Total circulatioa 
Westminster , of S. S. Periodi- 
Helps. cals. 


1878. .. 
1883. .. 


5869 
6476 


74,935 
82,970 


524,947 

580,795 


599,882 
663,765 


354,020 8,527,5.54 
575,700 11,940,819 


Gain . . 


607 


8,035 


55,848 


63,883 


221,680 


3,413,265 



During these five years the total additions to the Communion of the 
Church on examination were 142,892. It is impossible accurately to state 
what number of these had been members of the sabbath-school previous to 
their coming into full membership in the Church, but doubtless the pro- 
portion was large. 

These figures will aid the thoughtful mind to appreciate tlie burden rest- 
ing on those whose duty it is to systematize, direct and develop this great 
work. They are full of encouragement, as they evidence constant and solid 
progress. The increase in the number of our sabbath-school members using 
the WestmiiLster Lesson Helps is especially gratifying. 

Presbyterian Doctrine in Presbyterian Sabbath-schools. — Our statistical 
reports show that more attention is given to tlie study of the Shorter Cate- 
chism than at any former period. The unwillingness of our sabbath-school 
workers to use any lesson helps not giving prominence to this " form of sound 
words " is a healthy indication. If the Catechism is neglected in any school, 
the blame should be borne by the Session of the Church, whose duty it is to 



200 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [^ay, 

see that it is taught. No scholar in a Presbyterian sabbath-school should 
fail thoroughly to commit to memory the Shorter Catechism. 

Closely related to this subject is the 

Supervision and Control by the Church Sessions of the sabbath-school work 
of our congregations. The great majority of our schools, according to the 
oft-repeated instructions of tlie General Assembly, are " under the direction 
of the pastor and session." In certain portions of our Church there is still 
necessity for urging the duty of yielding to these wholesome instructions : 
and in other parts, of pressing the duty of sessions to exercise watch and 
care over their sabbath-schools. 

Reports of Presbyterial Sabbath-school work. — The Presbyterial form of 
government is peculiarly adapted to foster Bible teaching in the sabbath- 
school. This work not only requires the sympathy and help of the Church, 
but also its authoritative control. This is furnished by our Cliurch Sessions. 
Equally adapted to supervise and extend this work is the Presbytery. What 
body of men could be better fitted to understand the needs of sabbatli- 
schools and to provide the help wliich they require? The progress of 
Christ's kingdom, the success of our Clmrch and sabbath-school work, in a 
large degree, hangs on the fidelity and wise leadership of our Presbyteries. 
This Presbyterial leadership and supervision is delegated to the Sabbath- 
school Committees of the Presbyteries. To an extent not fully recognized 
this great sabbath-school work depends on these one-hundred and sixty 
Presbyterial Committees. Many of them are performing inestimable ser- 
vice for the Church. Special mention may be made of the Sabbath-school 
Association of the Presbytery of Cincinnati. All our Presbyteries are rec- 
ommended to organize similar associations. 

Presbyterial Institutes. — Many of these committees, by authority of Pres- 
bytery, hold institutes for sabbath-school workers, who report their labors, 
compare and discuss plans of work, and provoke one another to love and 
good works. The elements of systematic instruction are also introduced. 
Time is given to lectures on topics connected with the work. Specimen les- 
sons are given, and class-drills and criticisms upon them. Practical diffi- 
culties are freely discussed. By means of such gatherings the sabljath- 
school workers of a Presbytery are brought into closer sympathy with each 
other, and are filled with a love and an intelligent enthusiasm for their own 
Church, its doctrine, polity and work. Our faithful teachers feel the need 
of encouragement and instruction. The Presbytery that provides for these 
needs by institutes, conventions and other wise measures holds its workers. 
If the Presbytery fails to do this, there is danger that the workers, seeking 
elsewhere for these things, will be led under outside and un-Presbyterian in- 
fluences. 

The Secretary of Sabbath-school "Work during the past year attended 
such meetings with the Presbytery of Utica, at Utica, IsT. Y.; with the 
Presbytery of Monmouth, at Bordentown, IST. J.; with Binghamton Pres- 
bytery at McGrawville, N. Y.; with Cleveland Presbytery, at Cleveland, 
Ohio ; with Mahoning Presbytery, at Youngstown, Ohio ; with the Presby- 
tery of Wooster, at Mansfield, Ohio ; with the Presbytery of Columbus, at 
London, Ohio; also meetings at Philadelphia, Pa.; Kansas City and St. 
Louis, Mo.; Atkinson, Kansas, etc., etc. He also attended and labored in 
the Lakeside Encampment, near Sandusky, Ohio, July 25 to August 5 ; in 
the Chatawiua Sabbath-school Assembly, August 6 to 20 ; and in " the New 
England Sabbath-school Assembly," at Framingham, Mass., August 25 to 
28, 1883. He also represented the Presbyterian Church on the International 
Lesson Committee, meeting at Montreal, Canada, February 21 and 22, 1884. 
Presbyterial Statistical Eeport.— By order of the General Assembly it is 
made the duty of the Secretary of Sabbath-school Work to collect sabbath- 
school statistics. This has been accomplished with increasing success. 
Without such statistics our plans for increased efficiency will be based on 
theories and suppositions instead of facts. Tiie experience of all workers in 
every department of Cliristian effort, confirms us in the conviction that, 
other things being equal, spiritual power and success will be in proportion 
to the thoroughness of our organization. Such organization can only be 
based on accurate statistical reports. The Sabbath school Committees of 
eighty-four Presbyteries have collected, tabulated and transmitted sta- 



A.D 188^.] BOARD OF PUBLICATION. 201 

tistical reports of the sabbath-schools under their care. (See Tables in Sup- 
plement). 

Bible Correspondence School. — This new enterprise, in the interest of the 
higher training of sabbath-school teachers, was begun May 8, 1883. It was 
approved by the General Assembly, May 23, 1883. A complete outline of 
the plan in circular form was widely distributed throughout the Church, 
and was received with great favor. JDuring the term from November, 1883, 
to March, 1884, the course of study embraced the three missionary journeys 
of Paul, and the Epistles of James, First and Second Thessalonians, Gala- 
tians, First and Second Corintliians and Romans, in the New Testament, 
and the lives and wi'itings of David and Solomon in the Old Testament. 
Besides these Bible lessons, twenty-four practical lessons on methods of 
sabbath-school teaching were studied. The total number of members at 
present is 5300, representing nearly all our States and Territories and the 
Dommion of Canada. Not the least of the results of this Bible Correspon- 
dence School is the enthusiasm developed for the more thorough and sys- 
tematic study of the Bible. The second term will hegin November 1, 1884, 
when it is expected that many thousands will enter its course of study. 

The Secretary of Sabbath-s'chool Woi-k has been cordially welcomed by 
the professors of the Princeton Theological Seminary and of Lane Theologi- 
cal Seminary, to whose students he delivered a brief course of lectures on 
sabbath-school work. He had the pleasure during the past year of laboring 
for one hundred and ten days (exclusive of Sabbaths) in institute and 
assembly work, of preparing one hundred and twelve lessons for sabbath- 
school workers, and of reaching five thousand three hundred each week for 
six months in the Bible Correspondence School, of addressing four Synods 
and many Presbyteries, and of conducting a large correspondence concern- 
ing Bible study and Bible teaching, 

GRAXTS MADE. 

During the year the Board has freely made grants to parties needing and solic- 
iting aid. Such grants of books, tracts and sabbath-school papers and helps 
have been given to pastors, to missionaries, to hundreds of sabbath-schools, 
to charitable institutions, and to individual applicants in almost every part 
of the land. A very large proportion of these grants have been given to 
mission and feeble sabbath-schools in the Westena States and Territories. 
Some have been sent to the Freedmen's churches and sabbath-schools in the 
South. And, as has been already stated, some have been sent on applica- 
tion of our foreign missionaries to help them in their noble work in other 
lands. 

COLPOBTAGE A NECESSITY. 

The ever-growing waves of immigration, and the steady diffusion of 
population over the vast and hitherto unoccupied portions of our land, bring 
to us every year more and more imperious calls for the work of the colpor- 
teur. Our Presbyterian churches and people need to have a good Chris- 
tian and Calvinistic literature placed in their hands and their homes. They 
need our Church standards themselves, and many are not likely ever to have 
or read them unless caiTied to their homes by the colporteur. Tliey need 
also, in these days of wide-spread and vigorous error, to have works exhibit- 
ing, illustrating and defending the doctrmes, and government and history 
of their Church. 

No matter how faithful and industrious pastors may be, they cannot fully 
reach and care for all the irreligious and non-church-going multitudes 
who surround their churches, and are even mixed among their people. 
But the colporteur with his books and tracts may enter the homes of these, 
thus reaching gieat numbers ready to perish within easy reach of the 
preached Gospel. 

But what else or better can be done for those millions in our land who are 
living and dying beyond the sound of the church-going bell, than to send to 
them the colporteur with his books and tracts ? Except in this blessed 
agency there is absolutely no visible human hope or help for multitudes of 



202 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 

those dwelling in the widely-scattered homes of the West, of the South and 
of the great Northwest. Ministers enough are not obtainable, nor at the 
present rate of increase in the ministry will there be enough in many long 
years to come, to carry to these scattered millions the preached Word of Life. 
Send the Gospel to their homes upon the printed page, or vast numbers will 
surely perish for the lack of it. 



NEEDS OF THE NEXT YEAR. 

If the benevolent work of this Board shall continue to grow and expand 
during the coming year as it has done during the past one, its Missionary 
Fund ought to receive from tlie churches and sabbath-scliools at least 
seventj'^-five thousand dollars ($75,000). For this sum we earnestly appeal. 
And we respectfully ask the General Assembly to recommend the churches 
to give us this amount. The Board can then send forth its colporteurs in 
increasing numbers, and send grants of its publications to those who need 
and ask for them, without stint and without the constant apprehension of 
havmg its missionary department incur a debt. The Assembly of 1881 did 
recommend the churches " to attempt to raise for this work for the coming 
year at least seventy-five thousand dollars." Bat it was not done. Can it 
not be done during the year now before us ? If pastors and sabbath-school 
superintendents will make an earnest effort, it can easily be done. 



The Annual Collection. 

The First Sabbath in May has been designated by former General As- 
semblies as the most suitable time for the churches to take an annual collec- 
tion for the Board's Missionary Fund. Except where some other preferred 
arrangement has been made for this cause, every pastor and stated supply 
is earnestly requested on that day to present this important object to his 
congregation and solicit their liberal aid. 

All money given to the Board's Missionary Fund, whether by churches 
or individuals, or received from legacies, is wholly and carefully expended 
in carrying forward the Board's missionary or benevolent work. Notwith- 
standing the repeated announcement of this fact in former Annual Reports, 
in various circulars, in the Monthly Record and in other ways, there is a 
strange confusion in the minds of many persons in regard to the matter. 
Will each minister, therefore, when about to take his collection for this 
cause, oblige the Board by stating distinctly that the Board of Publication 
sustains its publishing and bookselling department wholly by its sales, and 
that all contributions of churches and individuals are put into the Mission- 
ary Fund, and are used exclusively in carrymg forward the Board's mission- 
ary and sabbath-school work, m supporting the colporteurs, in paying for 
books and tracts given away, and in defraying such expenses as belong 
legitimately to this benevolent branch of the Board's work ? 

During the year now under review 2350 churches have contributed to the 
Board's Missionary Fund. This is an increase of 81 over the number which 
contributed last year. Should each Church which has this year given 
nothing send next year even a very small contribution, it would enable the 
Board to make a large advance in its benevolent work. 



The American Bible Society. 

That noble institution, the American Bible Society, which is a fountain 
of blessing to the whole world, has again, as in former years, sent to our 
missionary department generous grants of Bibles and New Testaments, in 
various languages, for the use of its colporteurs, who have thus been enabled 
gratuitously to place the Word of God m thousands of homes before with- 
out it. 



A.D. 1884.] BOAED OF PUBLICATION. 203 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES FOR THE BOARD'S 
MISSIONARY WORK. 

Beceipts. 

The receipts of the Missionary Fund during the year were 
as follows : 

Balance in hand April 1, 1883. . . . . $T,905 45 
Total from churches, 
Individual Contributions, 

Legacies, 

Interest on Invested Funds, . 
Final payment on devised Missouri 
lands sold, 



Profit made by the colporteurs on 
their sales, 



$33,209 63 
4,055 99 
4,401 02 
4,311 44 




1,146 49 


47,124 57 




4,122 05 



$59,152 07 



Expenditures. 

1. For compensation to colporteurs of the Board 

engaged in the distribution, by means of per- 
sonal efforts and solicitations, of a sound re- 
ligious literature in accord with the views of 
our Church, $19,772 20 

2. For traveling and other expenses of colpor- 

teurs, 5,625 19 

3. For freights on publications forwarded to col- 

porteurs, and on grants by committee, . . 1,315 19 

The retail value of the publications sold 
through this agency has been $32,897 32, while 
the colporteurs have at the same time been per- 
forming very large and purely benevolent 
services in religious visitation from house to 
house, in holding religious meetings, and in 
organizing and visiting sabbath-schools. 

4. For net value of publications given away by the 

Missionary Committee and its colporteurs (the 

retail price of which was $17,222 58), . . 12,434 33 

5. Expenses of sabbath -school work, including sal- 

ary and traveling expenses of the Secretary of 
Sabbath-school "Work, printing and inci- 
dentals 4,461 10 

6. For salaries, share of Annual Report, postage, 

boxes, stationery, printing, incidental and 

other expenses not included above, . . 5,003 52 

7. For commissions paid to the St. Louis Deposi- 

tory, 1,346 12 

8. Share of deficiency of Monthly Record charge- 

able to Missionary Fund, .... 253 65 

Total expenditures, 50,211 30 

Balance in favor of the Missionary Fund, April 1, 1884, $8,940 77 

For the Board, 

WILLIAM E. SCHENCK, Corresponding Secretary. 
Philadelphia, Pa., May 15th, I884. 



204 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. U^^Jt 



Y. TRUSTEES OF THE PRESBYTERIAIN' HOUSE. 

Ministers. Laymen. 

Thomas J. Siiii:piierd, D.D., Sec^y, Samuel C.Perkins, Esq., Presic?enf, 
Yilleroy D. Reed, D.D., Charles M. Lukens, Treasurer, 

Charles A. Dickey, D.D., Alexander Whilldin, 

WUliain Y. Brown, D.D., John C. Farr, 

Thomas L. Janeway, D.D., T. Charlton Henry. 

OFFICE OF THE BOARD, 

No. 1334 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Thirtieth Annual Eeport. 

The Trustees of the Presbyterian House respectfully report to the Gen- 
eral Assembly that the receipts and expenditures of the past year, as shown 
ty the report of their Treasurer, duly audited and herewith submitted, have 
been as follows : 

Total receipts including balance, .... $15,890 81 
Total expenditures, $15,283 16 

Balance on hand, $057 65 

The Trustees report further that they have accepted the trust of five 
thousand dollars ($5000), bequeathed by Charles Macalester, late of Phila- 
delphia, deceased, to the Macalester Memorial Church, Torresdale, under 
the care of the Presbytery of Philadelphia, North, the principal to be in- 
vested and " the net income thereof to be paid over "towards the support 
of the pastor for the time being of said Church and congregation forever." 
The term of office (two years) of the following Trustees expires during 
the present sessigns of the Assembly ; namely, Mr. Charles M. Lukens, 
Treasurer, Mr. Alexander Whilldin, Mr. T. Charlton Henry, Rev. Villeroy 
D. Reed, D.D., and Rev. Charles A. Dickey, D.D. 
Respectfully submitted. 

By order of the Trustees, 

THOMAS JAMES SHEPHERD, Secretary. 
Philadelphia, Pa., May 6th, I8S4. 



VI. BOARD OF CHURCH ERECTION. 

officers. 

Rev. Joseph Fewsmith, D.D., President. 

Frederick G. Burnham, Vice-President. 

Rev. Henry R. Wilson, D.D., Corresponding Secretary. 

Rev. David Magie, D.D., Becording Secretary. 

Rev. Henry R. Wilson, Jr., Treasurer. 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Ministers. Elders. 

Term to expire in May, 1885 : 

David Magie, D.D., Hezekiah King, 

David R. Frazer, D.D., Richard S. T. Cissel, M.D. 

Samuel M. Hamilton, D.D., John Sloan. 

Charles T. Haley, 



A.D. 1884.] BOARD OF CHURCH ERECTION. 205 

Term to expire in May, 1886 : 

Joseph Fewsmith, D.D., Frederick G. Burnliam, 

Elijah R. Craven, D.D., Beiniington F. Randolph, 

C. Cuthbert Hall, John Sinclair, 

Edwin F. Hyde. 

Term to expire in May, 1887 : 

John Hall, D.D., Stephen H. Thayer, 

Samuel D. Alexander, D.D., Benjamin F. Dunning, 

Erskuie N. White, D.D., William N. Crane. 
John Gillespie, D.D., 

OFFICE OF THE BOARD, 

Presbyterian Mission House, No. 23 Centre Street, New York, N". Y. 

Abstract of the Fourteenth Annual Report. 

In presenting to the General Assembly, and through it to the Church at 
large, our Fourteenth Annual Report, Ave are thankful to be able to speak 
oi progress in every department of our work. Our meetings have been regu- 
larly held and faithfully attendexl. It is worthy of notice that during the 
fourteen years since the organization of the Board, we have never failed to 
hold our regular meetings, and always have had more than a quorum present. 
This speaks well for the fidelity of our members. 

As in previous years, our work has extended from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific coast, and from Canada to Florida. New fields have been opened 
up to us in the West and South of unusual promise. Aid has been given to 
twenty-three churches for Freedmen — some of these are within the limits of 
the Indian Territory, where but a few yeai-s since they were the slaves of 
the Indians. It is an interesting fact, that in this field where the devoted 
Kingsbury, Byington, Wright, and others, who gatliered the firet Presby- 
terian churches that were organized among these Indian tribes, but which 
were broken up and scattered by the Rebellion — this field is again being 
brought mider Christian culture— churches and schools reorganized by some 
of the former missionaries, driven from the field eighteen or twenty years 
ago, but now returned to resume their work. Twenty-three churches and 
chapels among the Mormons have been aided by and tlirough this Board 
during the year. Among the different Indian tribes twelve cliurches have 
been built during the year. Aid has been given in tlie erection of ten Ger- 
man Presbyterian churches and to five Spanish-speaking churches in New 
Mexico and California. 

Nothing has so much tended to strengthen and render permanent, our 
evangelistic work as the erection of these bulwarks of our beloved Zion. 
We hope the time may come when the demand for means, with which to shel- 
ter the poor of Christ's flock, sliall not so far exceed the supply, as at pres- 
ent ; but this is not likely to be the case, so long as emigration continues to 
pour its hundreds of thousands upon our shores, pushing westward the in- 
crease of our home-born population. We have been trying to overtake the 
planters and the reapers with our church garners, but as fast as some are 
sheltered we hear the Macedonian cry from "over there "for help. Will 
not the Church rally to the support of the Board in this effort ? 

RECEIPTS. 

We commenced the year with the small balance of $373 in hand, a pitiful 
sum with which to face the formidable work before us at a season when so 
little contribution is to be expected, but when the work of building is most 
pressing. 

During the year we have received from 3424 churches the sum of $53,131. 
Small as is this amount, it is an increase over that of the preceding year 
by $4533 in amount, and 404 in the number of contributing churches. Many 



206 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. D^^J, 

of these Church collections are exceedingly small. We are thankful for the 
" widow's mite,'' when given by the widow and with her spirit of consecra- 
tion ; but when churches that would be offended if called jjoor^ and that give 
to other objects hundreds of dollars, send us the pitiful sum of two dollars, 
or perhaps four dollars, we know not how to apply the Master's plaudit : 
"Well done, good and faithful servants;" especially if those 
churches had in former years been the beneficiaries of this Board, as is proba- 
bly the fact. Nor 'do we know how to reconcile it with faithfulness in 
Christian stewardship, when some of our largest and most wealthy Presby- 
teries vote to apply all the money contributed by their churches for Church 
Erection, to the liquidation of the debt of some one of their own churches, 
and thus give nothing (or next to nothing) to help the Board to carry the 
heavy burden of Church Erection tliroughout the entire bounds of the Gen- 
eral Assembly. Surely such Presbyteries cannot appreciate the importance 
of the work which the General Assembly has connnitted to our hands. 

"The Board has not shared with others in the large bequests of some of 
our wealthy men who have ended their stewardsliip during the last year. 
We are the more surprised at tliis, when we consider the security with which 
these gifts to the Church are guarded, and the ^jermanent benefit received 
from them through our mortgage and perpetual msurance plan. For many 
long years after the donors of such legacies have passed away, these monu- 
ments of their generosity remain to do their blessed work in the worship of 
God. 

As shown by the Treasurer's Report, a considerable sum has been realized 
from the sale of old Church property. To this we have given special 
attention. We venture the suggestion that this is the appropriate duty of 
the Standing Committees of Presbyteries, by attending to which much waste 
may be avoided and no small amount added to our treasury. 

APPLICATIONS. 

During the year 336 applications, formal and informal, have been received, 
calling for $208,500. Tlie greater number of these appeals came after the 
applicants had exhausted their own limited resources, and asked for small 
sums to aid in building very plain and inexpensive structures. Others, 
however, asking for larger amounts than the state of our treasury would 
admit, and to secure buildings at a cost of from $10,000 to $15,000, we felt 
compelled to decline, as our means were inadequate, nor do we suppose that 
the money entrusted to us was intended by the donors for such expensive 
buildings. If in this judgment we are wrong, we are very willing to be set 
right by the Assembly. Some of these applications were declined for want 
of satisfactory titles to the lots. Our rules say : " No grant shall be made 
where the lot is not held in fee simple and free from all incumbrance." In 
some cases the ground was generously donated to the congregation, with a 
clause of reversion in the title in case the property ceased to be used for 
Presbyterian worship. Such a clause vitiates the title and renders the 
mortgage which we are required to take utterly useless. It would prevent 
disappointment if all applicants understood and bore this in mind. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

Grants have been made during the year to 236 churches, amounting in the 
aggregate to $101,200. This is an increase of twenty -one over the appropria- 
tions of last year, or of any preceding year in the history of this Board. A 
glance at the out-line map will show how these grants have been distributed 
over the country. Utah has received a larger number than any other 
State or Territory, for much it needs the cleansing influence of Christianity 
to save it from moral putrefaction. In Michigan we have aided in the 
erection of 11 churches; in Missouri, 10; in Iowa, 14; in Dakota, 16; in 
Nebraska, 18 ; and in Kansas, 22. If to these 236 we add the forty churches 
on hand, but not completed at the beginning of the year, it will be seen that 
the Board had under its care during the last twelve months the wants of 
276 chm'ches, amounting in the aggregate to$120,933. Appropriations have 
been paid during the year to 216 churches, amounting to $107,572. Grants 



A.D. 188-i.] BOARD OF CHURCH ERECTION. 20T 

made to nine churches, amounting to $6775, have been withdrawn in con- 
sequence of the conditions not having been fulfilled within the specified 
time. Some of these grants have been renewed upon new applications hav- 
ing been made. We have the money in readiness to pay all the appropria- 
tions made, so soon as the conditions are fulfilled. We are glad to be able 
to say, that during the last fourteen years, no Church that had furnished 
the papers required has been kept in suspense /or a single day from lack of 
promptness on our part. 

INSURANCE. 

We have learned from reliable sources that during the year there have 
been twenty-two Presbyterian churches injured or destroyed by fire to the 
extent of §268,385. Insurance on the same, $71,957. Loss for want of in- 
surance, $196,428. Of the above, seven were churches aided by this Board, 
to the amount of $3070, all of which has been received from the ditferent 
companies, so that no loss has been sustained, nor, indeed, have we sustained 
any loss during the last twelve and a half years since the adoption of this 
plan of insuring the money given by the Board. We hold nearly 1400 poli- 
cies, amounting to $1,150,500 ; of these policies, 392 have been issued in the 
last twelve months, the face of which amounts to $277,984, and protecting 
property worth $1,200,000. Some of these policies are renewals, the first five 
years having expired. The churches insured are always notified of the ex- 
piration of their policies, and reminded of their promise of renewal; but 
many neglect and some absolutely refuse to send the money, thus violating 
one of the conditions upon which they received aid. We respectfully ask 
the Presbyteries to look into this matter, as it is certainly to the interest of 
their churches to do so. 

As tornadoes have of late years been so frequent and destructive, we have 
arranged with some of the best companies to include such risks in their 
policies, at an additional cost of one per cent for five years. 

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNS AND PLANS. 

Some years since, for the exclusive benefit of our own weak churches, we 
had a few designs of cheap buildings carefully prepared, with workmen's 
plans and specifications to correspond. These were very acceptable and useful 
to those unable to employ an architect. But other churches and of various 
denominations have, for the sake of economy, applied to us for these plans, 
and asking a variety of questions as to size, cost, capacity, estimate of 
quantity, etc^ etc., until the demand has far exceeded our time and ability 
to meet it. For information we say that Ave have in pamphlet form some 
fifty-three designs of church buildings, sabbath-school rooms and manses, 
which we will send by mail to any one who sends us fifty cents. To corre- 
spond with some of these designs, we have sets of plans or drawings 
showing ditferent segments of the buildings, which we will send by mail on 
receipt of $5, if we are told what Church makes the application. Sliould the 
applicant prefer any of those designs for which we have not the plans, we 
will put him in correspondence with the architect. Beyond this we can- 
not go. 

OUTLOOK FOR THE COMING YEAR. 

We closed this year with a balance of $3008 in the Treasury. Nearly all 
of this came m at the very close of the year. For several months our 
receipts fell far short of the demand. One hopeful sign is the increase of 
404 in the number of contributing churches. Still this leaves probably 2550 
churches that have given nothing to this Board. Some of these are among 
our largest and most wealthy churches, as will be seen on the list of Church 
collections. Others of the delinquents are weak and poor, but for this very 
reason they should give, that they " may receive at the Lord's hand double," 
and realize the truth of God's Word — " that there is that scattereth and yet 
increaseth." We look forward to the labors and results of the year upon 
which we have entered with stronger confidence than ever before. , The 



208 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [Maj, 

progress of this Board from year to year ; the expressions of approval and 
promises of support whicli have come up to us from all parts of the Church 
within the last few months, have assured us that this cause shall not only 
continue to live, but mightily to grow, as a power for good throughout all 
om- borders, " to make glad the city of our God." 
By order of the Board, 

H. R. WILSON, Corresponding Secretary. 
New York, N. Y., May I5th, I8S4. 



VII. PRESBYTERIAN BOARD OF RELIEF. 

OFFICERS. 

Rev. ViLLEROY D. Reed, D.D., President. 

A. Charles Barclay, Vice-President. 

Rev. George Hale, D.D., Corresponding Secretary. 

Rev. Charles Browx, Becording Secretary and Treasurer. 

members of the BOARD. 

Ministers. Laymen. 

Henry E. Niles, D.D., George Junkin, Esq., 

Robert D. Harper, D.D., A. Cliarles Barclay, 

J. II. Mason Knox, D.D., Jacob Wilson, 

J. Frederick Dripps, D.U., John A. Linn, 

Villeroy D. Reed, D.D., John C. Farr, 

Thomas J. Shepherd, D.D., William G. Moorhead. 

OFFICE, 

No. 1334 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

This has been the most prosperous year ever known in the history of this 
cause, even though the funds contributed for cun-ent use have been for at 
least three times exhausted, in consequence of extraordinary demands on 
the Treasury. 

There has been an increase in the number of Presbyteries issuing recom- 
mendations for aid, in the number and value of boxes of clothing, in the 
additions to the Permanent Fund by donation and legacy, in the amount of 
funds received for current use, in the number of families on the roll, and in 
the sum total of moneys expended for the benefit of those who are under 
the care of the Board. Besides, the Presbyterian Ministers' House, at 
Perth Amboy, New Jersey, has been fitted up, partly furnished and set in 
operation. 

Appropriations have been made to all who have been properly recom- 
mended, and, with very few exceptions, the payments have been in the exact 
sums asked for by the applicants and approved by the Presbyteries. 

In no case has the Board ventured to run into debt, by borrowing funds 
either from private individuals or of banking institutions. 

THE ROLL. 

The whole number on the roll during the year, from April 1, 1883, to 
April 1, 1884, was 498, namely, 20o ministers, 2(52 widows of deceased minis- 
ters and 31 from orphan families. These have been reached in 141 Presby- 
teries, scattered throughout ihe length and breadth of the Presbyterian 
Cliurch. Fifty-five of this number were new applicants, including 32 min- 
isters, 18 widows and 5 orphan families. Two ministers and three widows, 
after having decluied to ask help for two or three years, were constrained 



A.D. 1884.] BOARD OF RELIEF. 209 

by pressing necessity to apply again for assistance, and their names have 
been replaced on the roll. . , , . 

Three ministers have regained their health by means of the aid obtamed 
from the Relief Fund, and have within the year resumed preaching, one 
of them having been for a few mouths a guest at the Presbyterian Mmis- 
tors' H0U.S6. 

The mortality, so far as reported, has been greater the last year than at 
any former period. Thirty have died being heads of families, that is, 22 
ministers and 8 widows of mmisters, more than two-thirds of them having 
reached a good old age. 

CHEERFUL GIVING. 

Several churches have greatly enlarged their collections, and liberal 
contributions have come fiom warm-hearted individuals, friends of the 
cause. 

Sabbath-schools have sent in their gifts. One connected with a prosper- 
ous Church, after a special address by one of the teachers, raised a generous 
sum for disabled ministers. The infant class of another has not failed for 
a score of years to present its annual offering. The sabbath-school in still 
another contributes yearly to all the Boards, this Board receiving its share, 
and an interesting sabbath-school has recentlv given one hundred dollars to 
furnish a room in the Presbyterian Ministers' House. 

The claims of the Relief Fund have been recognized by the Church of 
Campos, in Brazil, and continue to be remembered by churches in the Pres- 
byteries of Corisco and Western xVfrica, and by those of the Freedmen in 
tlie Southern States ; and it is worthy of mention that the churches on the 
Pacific coast are manifesting a growing liberality to the fund. Thank- 
offerings have been presented by those who are under the care of the Board 
or by their friends, bearing testimony to the advantages derived from the 
appropriations, which have been to them like springs of water in the desert 
and " the shadow of a great rock in a weary land." Ministers and widows, 
in numerous letters from year to year, have dwelt in strong terms on the 
blessed effects, to themselves and their families as to both mind and body, 
off the relief extended by this Board. They know full well that every grant 
is a matter of justice and a recompense in part for faithful service, and yet 
they recognize the fact that the gifts of the Christian people of the Presby- 
terian Church are the free-will offerings of generous hearts, and they cease 
not to give thanks and to invoke the richest blessings of heaven on the 
donors. 

A disabled minister says, " May my sons be enabled in the course of time 
to prove their deep gratitude towards your valuable Board ;" and another 
recipient writes, '' 1 wish to add my thanks to the Board for furnishing me 
this money. It has been conscientiously used, and, God granting me time 
and strength, it shall be returned to the Board that it may help some one 
else as it has helped me." 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The entire operations of the Board for the fiscal year may be represented 
by the following statement : 

I. Permanent Fund : 

Donations. Miss Mary A. Leslie, Geneva, O., .... $1,22012 

Anonymous, Germantown, Pa., .... 2,000 00 

Rev. Joseph Piatt, Kansas City, Mo., . . . 1,000 00 

George's Creek Church, Redstone Presbytery, . 100 00 

Bequests. Mrs. M. A. Grier, Pottstown, Pa., .... 475 00 

Mrs. Margaret A. Mitchell, Morristown, K. J., . 3,000 00 

Rebecca Whipple, Logan, O., 100 00 

Mrs. Jane T. Craven, Hartsville, Pa., ... 500 00 

George Wishart, Bedford county. Pa., . . . 250 00 

DavidE. Small, York, Pa., 500 00 

14 



210 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [^aj, 

Bequests. Mrs. Sarah H. Jacobus, Princeton, N. J., . . $3,000 00 

Mrs. C. C. Courtney, Sliarpsburg, Pa., . . 285 00 

Frank F. McNair, New York, 6 75 

liev. George Scott, Allegheny, Pa., . . . . 50 00 

Mrs. Mary C. lliggs, Beaver Falls, Pa., . . . 200 00 

AVilliam Helming, Waucon, Iowa, ... 50 00 

Mrs. Lydia M. Dawson, Wyoming County, Pa., . 701 78 

Chauncey Dewey, Cadiz, O., 50 00 

Gustavus S. Benson, Philadelphia, Pa., . . . 3,000 00 
Mrs. Eliza AVarford.IIarrisburg, Pa.(cash, $2,184.45; 

Lehigh Valley, 122 shares, (w $.50, $G,1U0), . 8,284 45 

$24 773 10 

II. Boxes of Clothing, 11^000 00 

III. Funds for current use : 

Receipts since Aprill, 1883, . . .$97,130 20 
Balance April 1, 1883, .... 15,745 61 

■ 112,875 82 

Total, $148,648 92 

BOXES OF CLOTHING. 

The work of the year is estimated at eleven thousand dollars. It has been 
a labor of love on the part of many Christian ladies, and beyond doubt it has 
brought its reward in spiritual blessings. The much needed gifts have been 
gratefully accepted by many happy houseliolds with the invocation of a 
benediction on these kind friends. The sincere thanks of the Board and of 
the whole Church are due to these ladies for their hearty sympathy. 

Special mention sliould be made of the contribution of seventeen new 
overcoats sent free of charge to seventeen disabled ministers, by the people 
of the First Presbyterian Church, of Trenton, N. J. 

"WHAT THE PASTORS HAVE DONE. , 

The Board takes pleasure in recording the well-directed efforts of pastors 
to acquaint their churches with the design and operations of this Relief 
Fund. Such cases of fidelity are worthy of commendation and imitation. 

Will not each pastor and stated supply throughout the Church preach a 
special sermon on this subject at least once a year, and give it a place often 
in the prayers of the sanctuary and social meetings ? Will not the PresbJ^- 
teries take order in the matter, and, moreover, adopt some definite plan by 
which the vacant churches may be visited and duly instructed so that they 
may enjoy the privilege of giving. Persistent, thorough work in every sec- 
tion of the Church will yield abundant fruit. 

THE PRESBYTERIAL STANDING COMMITTEES. 

The fidelity of these Committees on Relief deserves particular notice. This 
has l)een shown not only in the care, discretion and tenderness exercised in 
the investigation of cases of application for aid, but in tlie pains taken to 
stimulate tlie delinquent churches to take part in this sei-vice, and to encour- 
age the contributing churches to bestow larger gifts. These committees are an 
important part of the machinery of this branch of Church work. Without 
zealous and vigilant cooperation with the Board in cultivating the several 
portions of this extended field, the interests of Ministerial Relief would lan- 
guisli and suffering would ensue. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN MINISTERS' HOUSE. 

Since April 1st, 1883, the committee, consisting of Wm. G. Moorhead, 
Esq., Dr. James H. Mason Knox, and A. C. Barclay, Esq., appointed to 
put in order and furnish the building for occupancy, have performed that 



A.D. 1884:.] BOARD OF MISSIONS FOR FREEDMEN. 211 

duty to entire satisfaction at a cost of a little over twelve thousand dollars. 
Miss M. L. Bower was appointed superintendent, and the house opened for 
guests on the first day of September, 1883, and a more formal opening Avith 
appropriate exercises was held on the ninth day of October following. 

The undertaking has been successful. It has been shown that the build- 
ing and grounds are adapted to tlie purpose for which they were given, and 
to which they have been dedicated by the Board. 

Special funds are still needed to improve the premises, to put the furni- 
ture into all the rooms and to provide a library. It is the intention of the 
Board to neglect no improvement necessary to the health and convenience 
of the occupants. It is hoped that all needed facilities will be provided 
for musing and medical attendance in order to restoration to health, 
and for giving such care as they should have who seek for rest in their de- 
clining years. A grateful Church cannot and will not decline to supply the 
means necessary to minister to the wants of the deserving men who have 
consecrated tlieu' lives to the Christian ministry. 

Most of those under the care of the Board are assisted where they are. 
There are large families which should not be broken up while the children 
are in their minority. It is also not to be forgotten that this building can- 
not accommodate more than five per cent of the two thousand persons who 
look for support in whole or in part to this Board. There are, however, 
cases of such as have no home, who have outlived those who knew them in 
their youth and riper years, who have no friends to be responsible for their 
care or maintenance, and who could not be made comfortable among stran- 
gers. For the extremely aged, helpless, and homeless such a house as this 
is desirable and almost indispensable. It is also well to have always ready 
a place of retreat thorougldy equipped, to whicli a minister, suddenly break- 
ing down in his Avork, can betake himself for rest and recuperation — where, 
free from care and expense, he may attend to the work of repairing his 
wasted strength until he may be able to resume the work of tlie ministry. 
It is believed that, when the merits of this new feature of the Board's opera- 
tions are known, the Presbyterian Church will endorse it, and will hail with 
gladness and thanksgivings this providential opening to make more comfort- 
able the men who have served her well; and, as years pass away, slie will 
doubtless cherish an ever growing interest in its prosperity, evinced by 
ample donations to ensure its permanence. 

By order of the Board, 

GEORGE HALE, Secretary. 



Till. BOAED or MISSIONS FOR FREEDMEN. 

Ministers. Laymen. 

Elliot E. Swift, D.D., President. John C. McCombs, 
Richard H. Allen, D.D., Cor. Secretary, Robert C. Totten, 

James Allison, D.D., Treasurer, William C Aughinbaugh, 

John M. Richmond, James B. Lyon, 

Samuel J. Fisher, Charles W. Hubbard, 

Edward P. Cowan, D.D., Robert S. Davis. 
Henry T. McClelland, 

OFFICE OF THE BOARD, 

No. 116 Market Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Abstract of the Nineteenth Annual Report. 

There has been an increase of 372 to the list of new contributing churches, 
and the entire receipts for the year, including the amount received and ex- 
pended on the field, have been $121,521.00, against $102,789.59 last year. 
The year was commenced with a debt of $539.92 against the Board, and 
though the work has been greatly enlarged, the contributions from the 



212 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 

clmrclies have enabled the Board to make all the payments promptly, with 
a balance in the Treasury of $3,703.75. There have been expended for mis- 
sions during the year $90,016.11, against $83,207.18, an increase of $6,748.93. 
The number of sabbath-school and missionary societies contributing last 
year was 167, tliis year 218, an increase of 51. 

It will be noticed, also, that the colored churches and schools under the 
care of the Board have advanced over last year's contributions more than 
seven thousand dollars, having contributed $20,335.07 against $12,881.52 last 
vear, an increase of $7,453.55. To this may be added $182.34, raised for the 
Boards of Foreign and Home Missions, and" Ministerial Relief, and consider- 
able other sums for building school-houses and repairing their churches not 
reported to this office. Their contributions for the other Boards are in- 
cluded in the amounts received and expended on the field. From these 
facts it is very clear that our colored brethren are gradually advancing 
toward the point of self-support, which is especially gratifying when it is 
remembered that their contributions are made out of deep poverty. 

AMOUNT OF INCOME. 



Collections for — 

The general work, " $74,013 52 

Special, 21,334 41 

From Freedmen's churches and schools, . . . $20,335 07 

From coupons, and interest on mortgages, . 275 53 



$95,347 93 



$20,610 60 



Bequests, 5,562 53 

From State School Funds, 891 50 



$122,412 56 



SOURCES OF INCOME. 



Number of White churches contributing, 2,425 

" Sabbath-schools and missionary associations contrib- 
uting, 218 

" White churches not contributing, 3,272 

" Freedmen's churches contributing, .... 169 

" " " not contributing, .... 10 

PERMANENT FUNDS. 

There have been placed in the hands of the Board, in the past few years, 
for permanent investment, as follows, viz. : 

For the general work, $1,000 

" Scotia Seminary, Endovnnent Fund, 1,000 

" Biddle University, Endowment Fund, 4,000 

" Biddle University, African Scholarship Fund, from the United 

Presbyterian Church, Scotland, 6,120 

" Biddle University, toward endowment of President's chair, . 2,000 



$14,120 



MISSIONARIES. 



These are preachers, catechists and teachers ; and in the work under care 
of the Board the present year — including assistants in schools — the number 
is as follows : 

Ordained ministers, of whom 78 are colored, . . . . 91 \ qr 
Licentiates, " 3 are " . . . 4 / '''' 

Catechists, 9 all " 9 

*Teachers, males, of whom 37 are " . . . 41 \ ,/^^ 

females, " 36 are " .... 59/ ^"" 

163 204 



A.D. 1884.] BOARD OF MISSIONS FOR FREEDMEN. 213 



CHURCHES. 

Organized during the year, 11 

Whole number under care of the Board, 179 

Communicants added on examination, .... 1,199 > , .f^^ 

certificate 202 ^ ^'^"^ 

Average on examination, to each Church, nearly, .... 7 
" " " minister, nearly, .... 13 

Whole number of communicants, 12,968 

Baptized — adults, 530 } , a^o 

infants 892^ ^'"^^ 

Marriages reported, 286 

Wliole number of sabbath-schools, 169 

" " scholars in sabbath-schools, 12,058 

SCHOOLS. 

Whole number of schools, 67 

" " pupils in these, 7,388 

" " teachers, 133 

BiDDLE University, Rev. S. Mattoon, D.D., President.— This Uni- 
versity is located at Charlotte, N. C, and receives its name in memory of 
the late Major Henry J. Biddle, of Philadelphia, whose widow, Mrs Mary 
D. Biddle, has been one of the first and most liberal supporters. It is 
chartered by the Legislature of the State, and under the auspices of the 
Presbyterian Board of Missions for Freedmen. 

The object of the institution is the education of colored teachers and 
preachers. 

Buildings.— These comprise the homes of the President and of the three 
Senior Professors, a large boarding home, and the new University building. 
This structure, just completed at a cost of $40,000, is 98 x 67 feet, three 
stories high, with an annex for chapel 60 x 45 feet. The whole is of sub- 
stantial brick, of pleasing appearance, fuiTiishing twelve recitation rooms, 
each 34 x 24 feet, two society halls, an audience chamber capable of seating 
600, and roomy and well-ventilated halls, with an abundance of light through- 
out. 

A Boarding House, modeled on the idea of a Christian home, has been 
established for the accommodation of students from abroad. This is under 
the care of Prof. Geo. L. White and his efl&cient wife, assisted by the three 
Junior Professors. 

Wants.— 1st. " Permanent Endowment Funds for the adequate support 
" of the Professors, is an imperative necessity.''^ Five thousand dollars have 
been secured for the endowment of the President's chair. 2d. We shall be 
compelled during the present year to make certain improvements. It will 
be necessary to purchase twenty-five acres or more of land, in addition to 
the present campus, in order to prevent encroachment upon our premises. 
The two old dormitories, to which reference has been made, must he repaired 
and refurnished. We are also desirous of organizing a Labor Department, 
where the young men may be taught the elements or industry and the use 
of tools. In the accomplislunent of these and other necessary improvements, 
$10,000 could be judiciously expended. 3d. Scholarships. The establish- 
ment of $100 Scholarships to enable needy and promismg students in the 
higher departments to pursue theu- studies, continuously, through the Col- 
lege year. In addition to this, a few hundred dollars to be placed in the 
hands of the Faculty, to be used at its discretion, in aiding needy and 
worthy students, is a great desideratum. 4th. Donations of Clothing, for 
distribution among needy students, are eai-nestly solicited. 5th. Useful 
Books for the library are much needed. Works of reference, biography, 
history and science are particularly desired. A Library Fund is much 
needed, that there may be purchases made from time to time of new and 
valuable books. For a " working " library, such a fund in the hands of the 
Librarian is an imperative want. 



214 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 

Scotia Seminary, Rev. Luke Douland, PrfsicZent.— Scotia Seminary 
is located at Concord, Cabarrus County, N. C. Its desifjn, as expressed in 
its charter, is "to educate colored girls in religion, and in tlie arts and 
sciences usually taught in seminaries of a high order ; and in those domestic 
duties which belong to the highest type of wife, mother, and teacher." 

Buildings. — These consist of a large brick building, in the form of a T, 
three stories above the basement, together with the old Seminary building, 
the Home, the Library and Store-room, which are small but useful build- 
ings. The entire property of the Seminary, including the grouuds and 
about $1500 endowment fund, is estimated at $26,000. 

Wants. — 1st. Scholarships at $45 eacli, and partial scholarships. The de- 
mand for these is constantly increasing with the increase of the number of 
pupils. As a rule, orphans and pupils from large families must be aided, or 
an education must be denied to some of the most promising and enterprising 
of their race. Tuition is free, and $45 will furnish boarduig, fuel, and light 
for one pupil for the entire term (year) of eight months. " Patrons," says 
the superintendent, " have been a double blessing to their wards by their 
correspondence. Some of the most promising girls have been thus led to 
the Saviour." 2d. Clothing. — Boxes of good second-hand wearing apparel 
are always in demand, to be worn as sent, or cut and fitted by the pupils 
themselves. Also remnants of calico, muslin, and flannel, etc., for the Sew- 
ing Department. 3d. Endowment. — This Institution should be permanently 
endowed. At present it has but $1500 for this purpose. Would not the 
completion, furnishing, and endowing of this Institution — established for 
the special pui-pose of lifting the daughters of this lowly people to their 
proper place and influence among their own race, by means of a good Chris- 
tian education — be an appropriate undertaking for the ladies of our Church, 
to be accomplished both by individual gifts and organized effort ? 

Wallingford Academy, Rev. Thos. Grove, Principal. — This In- 
stitution is located in Cliarleston, South Carolina. It reports as eni'olled, 
during the past year, 651 pupils — 9 more than were reported for the preceding 
year. Paid by pupils for tuition, $526. 34. 

Brainerd Institute, Rev. S. Loomis, PWijajjaZ.— Brainerd Institute 
is located in Chester, an important and growing railroad centre in upper 
South Carolina, a town of about two thousand inhabitants, the whole county 
embracing twenty-five thousand, of whom sixteen thousand are colored. 
In this and the three adjacent counties — York, Lancaster and Union — their 
numbers reach nearly forty thousand, and this is the only school within 
these boundaries above the grade of primary. Around the Institute are 
clustered the nine churches that have constituted Brainerd Mission, and on 
every hand public and sabbath-schools, instructed by Brainerd scholars. 

Departments. — Since the public school authorities of Chester united with 
the Board in sustaining some branches of the work, the Institute has been 
reorganized, and a graded course of study adopted in three departments- 
Primary , Grammar and High School — all so arranged as to give a very 
thorough, symmetrical and complete English and scientific education. 

Normal Department. — This department of the Institute continued in dif- 
ferent forms now for a number of years, which has supplied this region of 
country with day and sabbath-school teachers, and done much to raise the 
standard of education in the county, will be continued with still better 
facilities, and receive greater attention in the years to come. The pros- 
perity of the people — material, social, moral and religious — is so largely an 
outgrowth of what the public school teachers are and do, we can scarcely 
give too great prominence to this branch of our work. 

Industrial and Agricultural Department. — But the most important meas- 
ure of the past year, making progress in the right direction, has been the 
inauguration of an Industrial Department of the Institute, and to some ex- 
tent the formation of plans for its successful operation. The design is to 
enable students to aid tliemselves in obtaining an education ; to develop the 
strength and hardihood that come from self-help ; to maintain and promote 
habits of industry ; to counteract the danger of sickness and disease so often 
the result of sedentary occupation ; to provide more wholesome living from 



A.D. 1884.] BOAED OF MISSIONS FOR FREEDMEN. 215 

orchard, farm and garden ; and to impart a practical acquaintance with im- 
proved systems of agriculture, now the all-important need of this Southern 
country. As a beginning of tlie Industrial Department, one hundred acres 
of land have been obtained by the Institute, at a convenient distance from 
the to^vn, with about thirty acres woodland, well situated for cultivation, 
improvement and instruction. 

Fairfield Ikstittjte, Winnsboko, S. C, Rev. Willakd Richard- 
son, Principal. — This school reports 350 pupils enrolled, 84 prof essoi-s of re- 
ligion, 25 studying for the Gospel ministry, and over 100 fitting themselves for 
teaching in this country and in Africa. It is strictly a religious school, and 
pupils are training to religious activity and Christian work. There are five 
weekly prayer meetings — a general prayer meeting, and one for young men, 
one for young ladies, one for boys, and one for girls, and they all learn to 
pray with scarcely an exception before they leave the school. The great 
need is scholarships of from twenty to fifty dollars, which commends itself 
to the benevolence of those who believe in the rapidly opening possibilities 
of the Negro in Africa. Winnsboro' is a growing village of nearly 2000 in- 
habitantsrand all the buildings erected during the year have been built by 
colored mechanics educated at this school. AH the mechanical trades are 
represented here, and agriculture receives its due attention. The students 
are educated towards, and not from these vocations. 

STATISTICS. 

The five institutions just referred to have each sent up statements for the 
past year, which combined give the following : 

Whole number of students enrolled, 1,770 

Num1)er of these professoi-s of religion, .... 485 

Number of these in the Presbyterian Cliurch, . . . 295 

Whole number studying for the Gospel ministry, . . 91 

AVhole number of these that are Presbyterians, ... 77 

Number who have acted as catechists, .... 20 

Taught school part of the year, 153 

Whole number of months tauglit by all, this year, over, . 450 

Whole number of pupils in all their schools, about, . . 9,120 
Amount of pay received, in cash and board, by all about, . $8,788 

Number who superintended sabbath -schools while teaching, 76 

Whole number of scholars in these sabbath-schools, . 4,313 

In considering the figures of these tables, it should be remembered that 
those pertaining to students for the Gospel ministry, catechists, and super- 
intendents of sabbath-schools came from but four of the five institutions 
named, as Scotia Seminary is for girls only. 

ENLARGEMENT OF THE "WORK. 

Thirteen new missions have been opened, and eleven new churches 
organized during the year. Six of the new missions are in the Indian Ter- 
ritory, among the Freedmen once owned as slaves by the Indians, five in 
the Choctaw, and one in the Creek nation. This is an entirely new field, 
and heretofore unoccupied, but it is one of peculiar promise. The Freed- 
men in the Territory are, in some regards, in a better condition than those 
in many parts of the South, having, as members of the nation to which they 
belong, the privilege of cultivathig as much land as they choose, and need 
find no difficulty in supporting themselves and their families. They mani- 
fest, also, a willingness to aid in the support of churches and schools, of 
which they have been sadly destitute heretofore. In all their applications 
for schools, they have offered to build the school home if we would send 
them the teachers. Those in the Creek nation, to whom the Board has sent 
two lady missionaries, have built a school-house, and also a house for the 
missionaries. From these indications we have good reason to expect that 
these missions will become self -sustaining in a very few years. Two young 



216 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 

men have been sent to Biddle University, and five girls to Scotia Seminary 
from our missions in the Territory, to be educated as teachers for their 
people. 

We have new work also at Baxter Springs, Kansas, among some 1200 
Preedmen, who came from tiie South and have settled at tliis point. This 
mission was opened some few years ago, by Miss Julia A. Wilson, an earnest 
Christian woman, who has devoted her life to the work of elevating the 
Freedmen. In October last the mission was turned over to our Board, and 
Miss Wilson, and Miss Johnston, her assistant, taken under its care. AVe 
have here a good sized double house with three lots of ground. The house, 
however, is not entirely finished, but we hope to enlarge and finish it during 
the year. Into this house Miss Wilson has taken twenty-four little girls, 
mostly orphans, who live with her and are constantly under her control. 
The care and teaching of these girls in books and house-work is only a part 
of her work. She does constant and laborious missionary work among the 
families of the Freedmen. She has a large sabbath-school in the morning, 
and a Bible meeting for adults in tlie afternoon, together with a week-night 
school for adults, and a semi- weekly sewing school for women. 

In addition to the new missions and churches above referred to, the Board 
has greatly enlarged the work at Scotia Female Seminary and Biddle Uni- 
versity. 

An Industrial Department has been added to Scotia, in which the girls 
are taught to cut and make dresses, to mend, darn, and to do all kinds of 
plain sewing. Two Christian ladies, who are professional dress-makers, 
have been placed over this department, their support being assured from 
the Slater fund through Rev. Dr. Haygood. 

This enlargement of the woi'k, undertaken at the suggestion of the last 
Assembly, has of course greatly increased tlie liabilities and responsibilities 
of the Board, and we must look to the churches to sustain us in this, and 
still further enlargement for the present year. 

THE NEEDS OF THE BOARD. 

1st. The woi'k of the Board, though considerably enlarged, is still confined 
to really only four of the Southern States, with a few missions in four others. 
The great States of Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana and 
Missouri, with a colored population of 2,460,381, have not been touched yet. 
Many nrgent and toucliing appeals are made to us from these States, not 
only by tlie colored people, but by brethren of the Southern Church, who 
express a cordial willingness to cooperate with us in the work. In the In- 
dian Territory there are five small churches, remnants of organizations 
which existed before the war, that are reaching out their hands to us and 
asking for preachers and teachers. For years they have been served by an 
old, pious, but uneducated colored man, with preaching now and then from 
white brethren. The States above mentioned, and this part of the Indian 
Territory should be occupied at once. There are devoted men and women 
who are ready and anxious to go to these fields, but the Board has not the 
means to send them. The harvest is ripe and plenteous, and the Lord's 
reapers are ready to enter the field and gather it, if the churches are ready 
to send them. Should the Board determine to occupy only the most promis- 
ing and needy of the fields now open to us and begging for Church and 
school privileges, the sources of income for the present year must be largely 
increased. 

2d. The Board needs additional funds for building chapels and school 
houses. The Board of Church Erection has generously helped us in this 
direction as far as it could ; but its rules require those applying for aid to 
raise two-thirds of the amount necessary to build a chapel, and this the 
Freedmen, in most cases, are too poor to do ; so that aid from this quarter 
is practically beyond their reach. Our colored brethren, therefore, are con- 
tinually making application to our Board for aid directly from us, or to 
allow tliem to appeal to our churches in the North. To the former we are 
compelled to say no, for we have not the funds ; and to the latter we can- 
not consent, for, in that case, we should soon have the churclies flooded with 
appeals from them, and pastors would complain, as some have already done, 



A.D. 1884.] BOARD OF AID FOR COLLEGES. 217 

when we have permitted special needy cases to be brought before them. The 
consequence is that these poor brethren are practically shut out from the 
avenues of help, and their work seriously hindered for want of houses for 
Church and school purposes. They are ready and willing to help themselves, 
as they have done in many cases, but in their deep poverty tliey are not able 
unaided to put up the necessary buildmgs. They do not ask that we build 
their chapels and school-houses, only to help them to do it. And this we 
must do, for they are an imperative necessity to the successful prosecution 
of the work. Some of the most important points which we have occupied 
are at this time suffering most seriously from the want of suitable buildhigs. 
In many localities a very neat chapel, which could be used for Cliurch and 
school purposes, can be built for $800. Many of our larger Presbyteries 
could do a most important work for the blessed Lord and His lowly poor, if, 
in addition to their regular contributions to the Board, each of them would 
build a chapel for the Negroes in the South, where the preaching of the 
Word would be continually sheddhig its gracious influence on the race, and 
leading them from darkness into light. 

Submitted to the General Assembly at Saratoga Springs, New York, 
May 15th, 1884. 

ELLIOT E. SWIFT, President. 

KICHARD H. ALLEN, Corresponding Secretary. 



IX. BOARD OF AID FOR COLLEGES AND ACADEMIES. 

OFFICERS. 

Rev. Herrick Johnson, D.D., LL.D., President. 

Hon. Homer N. Hibbard, Vice-President. 

Rev. Hervey D. Ganse, D.D., Corresponding Secretary, 

137 Wabash avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Charles M. Charnley, Treasurer, 

241 South Water street, Chicago, 111. 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

Ministers. Elders. 

Term to expire in May, 1885 : 

Geo. D. Baker, D.D., Hon. Samuel M. Breckinridge, 

John N. Freeman, D.D., Dan P. Eells, 

Abbott E. Kittredge, D.D., *Cyrus H. McCormick, 

Robert F. Sample, D.D., Otis D. Swan. 

Term to expire in May, 1886 : 

Herrick Johnson, D.D., LL.D., Claudius B. Nelson, 

S. J. McPherson,D.D., Charles M. Charnley, 

John W. Dinsmore, D.D., Hon. Homer N. Hibbard, 

Thomas H. Cleland, D.D., Hon. Robert McClellan. 

Term to expire in May, 1887 : 

John Hall, D.D., John S. MacDonald, 

Wm. P. Breed, D.D., Wm. O. Hughart, 

S. J. Niccolls, D.D., Henry W. Johnson, 

J. H. Worcester, Jr., Dexter A. Knowlton. 

The Board of Aid for Colleges and Academies entered upon its duties 
with natural solicitude. It was a new agency for a work that was new, at 
least in form. For its means it was to depend chiefly upon the gifts of the 
churches ; and since these were not aware that such a Board was to be 



218 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 

created, many of them liad prepared their schedules of the year's collec- 
tioiLS in such way as to leave no room for tlsis new cause. Even tljose pas- 
tors and elders wlio had watched with most interest the stei)3 Ijy which 
recent Assemblies had been approaching tlie result now reached, could not 
be aware beforehand of the form in wliich tlieir cooperation was to be asked ; 
so that, however warm their sympatliy witli the object of the Board, they 
mijfht not be prei)ared to render it immediate support. In addition to all 
this, the year was half gone Ijefore tlie organization of the Board for work 
became complete. A general statement of its aim was early issued, accom- 
panied w itli an earnest call for help. But it was not till in December that 
Avith its room in order, and its newly appointed secretary somewhat ac- 
quainted with liis task, it was prepared to make formal appeal to the 
churches. Accordingly by the flrst of January it had received into its 
treasury only $278.24. 

There was, however, one definite encouragement ; a few friends of the 
cause within the Board, or in the neighborhood of Chicago, had taken it in 
hand to provide for the first year's expenses of administration outside of the 
gifts of the ciiurches. This purpose has been to a good degree fulfilled, as 
will appear from the treasurer's statement of the special gifts so made. 

For rent nothing lias been paid. The very commodious room wliich the 
Board occuyiies on Wabash avenue, Chicago, is generously furnished to it by 
Mr. C. II. Wiiiting, who represents in that city the sales department of the 
Board of Publication. 

In January the Board, by means of a circular letter very extensively sent 
out among the pastors, made request for February collections. The same i-e- 
quest was made in the denominational papers ; and to the very kind assist- 
ance which the editors have rendered the Board, is largely due the measure 
of success which has attended this first year's work. This form of assist- 
ance has been the more valualjle by the fact that the officers of the Board 
did not feel at liberty to diminish the uncertain income of their first year 
by sharing in tlie sjjace and the cost of the Monthly Eecord. 

In February it began to appear that the request for collections had been 
heeded ; and the stream of gifts from chiu'(;lies and individuals lias from 
that time flowed very steadily down to the first of May. At tliat last date 
the total of receipts into the treasury of the Board was $14,912.11. To 
these, however, is to be added the total of gifts which the donors have sent 
direct to institutions, but which they have regarded as falling within the 
scope of the Board's work, and have wislied to have presented in this report 
to the General Assembly. Their amount is $14,074.89. The aggregate of 
contributions reported in th&se two classes is $28,987. 

Nearly 400 churches had contributed when the books closed — a large pro- 
portion under the circumstances above recited. Only about an eighth of 
these had received any S'^-^'-ial knowledge of the new Board by means of 
the presence of their pa.' s in the last Assembly. 

The Board further notices, with pleasure, that sympathy with its work 
has not been limited to any part of the Church. Nor does the statement of 
gifts by any means indicate tlie measure of that sympathy. Very many 
letters have been sent, especially from the older parts of the Church, pledg- 
ing for the next year the contributions which could not be arranged for in 
this. 

The means received have been distributed among nine Institutions, the 
gi'eater part, by far, having been divided among four of them. The reason 
for this is as follows: The Board soon after it came into being a year ago, 
was met with some applications of tlie most pressing nature, which, if post- 
poned, would have been in eifect rejected. These were taken up, one by 
one, as tliey were presented, and were passed upon in the terms which the 
Board thought necessary for securing the interests at stake. In this way 
definite i)roniises of help were carried as far as a prudent estimate of the 
first year's receipts appeared to warrant. The latest of these appropriations 
was made in September. In October other applications came in, wdiich 
were acted upon at the first subsequent meeting, in December. In its re- 
sponses to these, the Board made statement that the positive appropriations 
already made would first be paid, and that upon this second list there should 
be distribution jpro rata out of such means as should remain for that purpose. 



A.D. 1884.] BOARD OF AID FOR COLLEGES. 219 

Of the institutions first applying, and receiving definite promise of help, 
one had been established for some years ; the other three were new. 

1. Salt Lake Collegiate Institute is located in the heart of Salt Lake City, 
where it has a very desirable property, worth from $16,000 to $18,000. The 
school was begun in 1875. It owes its existence to the zeal and self-sacrifice 
of the local Presbyterian church, which, out of its small resources, has con- 
tributed and collected $-5,300, nearly one-half of the money that has been 
put into the property, besides bearing a constant and heavy burden of in- 
terest. The Church at the East has contributed to the property $5700. The 
Institute is successfully doing the most hopeful kind of work that is 
done upon the Mormon population. Only about one-third of the pupils 
are so-called "gentiles." In the school so made up fifty-seven scholars 
have since its commencement, nine years ago, made profession of their faith. 
Four young women are already teaching in the Utah schools of the Home 
Board. Six more are now in training in the Institute for that work. Four 
young men are studying for the ministry ; and of all these a large propor- 
tion are of Mormon origin. The whole school now numbers two hundred 
and forty-two pupils ; the academy about fifty. The Board was early in- 
formed in detail of the history, work and needs of the Institute. It was 
asked to meet a deficit of $2,500 that must occur in the expense account of 
the current year. It promised, and has paid $2,000. 

The new institutions which the Board has thus far helped are all colleges. 
A new Presbyterian academy, indeed, has been brought into being, in 
Geneseo, 111., by liberal gifts, which would never have been directed toward 
the educational work of our Clmrch but for the Board's engagement to pay 
the salary of a principal. This engagement has since been limited to the 
amount of $1500, which has not yet become payable. 

The three colleges wliich the Board has helped to found may serve to- 
gether as a striking illustration of the scope and need of the work which 
our Church has now undertaken. Tliey are so far apart, that if tliey were 
similarly related in Europe they might serve the needs of three great na- 
tions. The College of Emporia is near the middle of eastern Kansas. The 
Presbyterian University of Southern Dakota, at Pierre, is in the middle of the 
region from which it takes its name, and, in a straight line north-north-west, 
is distant from Emporia about four hundred miles. The College of Montana 
is at Deer Lodge City, in the middle of western Montana, a little north of 
west from Pierre, and, in a straight line, about five hundred miles farther 
west. 

A notice of these institutions one by one will show that the first requisite 
in any claim to the Board's attention has been the vigorous efforts of the 
applying community to found its own school. 

2. The College of Emporia grows out of the action of the Synod of 
Kansas. After deliberation and negotiation it was aiTanged between the 
Synod and the citizens of Emporia, that the city should furnish for the institu- 
tion a suitable site and $35,000 for the erection of buildings; the Synod en- 
gaging to raise, within five years, an endowment of $50,000. The land so 
secured has been visited by the secretary. It is a beautiful eminence of 
thirty-eight acres, its graceful slope and sweeping view meeting the very 
ideal of a college site. The College was opened in temporary rooms on the 
first of last November. That lateness of opening naturally diminished the 
number of pupils, which, for this year, has been but seventeen. The next 
year is expected to bring not less than seventy-five students, some of them 
in college classes. The synodical work of endowment has made a vigorous 
beginning, and meets such favor that its completion is hoped for far within 
the specified period. Both the plans and the means are ready for an im- 
posing building, the erection of which will begin this summer. In the small 
number of students already gathered, one is in purpose committed to the 
ministry. The whole outlook of the institution is exceedingly hopeful. 
Down to this time— that is, within one year of the Assembly's establishment 
of this Board, $52,000 has iDeen secured in Kansas, in land, cash and trust- 
worthy notes or subscriptions, under a movement which would never have 
been made but for the inspiration of this denominational action. The current 
expenses of the first year have not required the whole sum named in the 
Board's vote, which set a limit of $3,500. The College has received $3,892. 



220 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [May, 

3. The Presbyterian University of Sontheni Dakota was located and 
named by the Presbytery of Southern Dakota, at its spring session of 1883. 
The City of Pierre, on the Missouri River, has the promise of future conse- 
quence beyond any other city in all that region. There are two Methodist 
schools about one hundred and fifty miles away. There is no other similar 
institution within two hundred miles, the other denominational and terri- 
torial colleges being located in the eastern portion of the Territory. When 
the aid of the Board was asked, the Presbytery had pledged $20,000; the 
City of Pierre had given a site, and had subscribed $80,000 more toward 
buildings ; one building had been erected. The institution was to open in 
September ; and the Board was asked to help in the current expenses of the 
first year by the amount of $1,700. The appropriation was made, and has 
been paid. Thirty-six students have been in attendance, the dormitory ac- 
commodating but twenty. There are clear indications of more than twice 
the number for the ensuing year, and effort is making to put up a building, 
at the cost of $30,000, that shall meet the present needs of the institution. 
Six of the first year's students have the ministry in view, three of them 
being already candidates under care of their Presbyteries. 

4. To the establishment of the College of Montana several distinct agen- 
cies have contributed. First of all, the building and its site were the property 
of a number of gentlemen, who, being desirous of furnishing their com- 
munity the means of higher education than the school system of their Terri- 
tory would supply, were scarcely less intent upon keeping their institution 
quite separate from all religious influence. After some years of discourag- 
ing experience in various forms, the owners made offer of their property, 
by that time burdened with some debt, to our Presbytery of Montana, on 
condition that the debt, with accrued interest, be paid, the premises be put 
in order, and the institution be opened in the fall of 1883, and thereafter be 
maintained for its purpose of higher education. This offer had attracted 
the attention of Mr. Alanson Trask, a member of the Reformed Church on 
the Heights, Brooklyn, who, as residuary legatee of Mr. F. Marquand, had 
at his disposal means for such Christian uses. It resulted that about the 
end of June, 1883, while this Board, then newly formed, was considering the 
application made from Deer Lodge for help, Mr. Trask solved the greatest 
difficulty in the problem, by offering, on certain practicable conditions, to 
pay the debt accrued of $6,395. The Board thereafter voted the institution 
$3,000 for the year beginning September, 1883, and thus enabled the trustees 
to provide instructors and to receive classes at that time. Mr. Trask added 
to his former benefaction the offer to pay for three years the salary of Rev. 
D. J. McMillan, D.D., as President of the Institution, now become the Col- 
lege of Montana. To these great kindnesses he afterward added a contri- 
bution of $1,500 toward the current needs of the College. By the choice of 
all the parties, receipts for all these benefactions have been given by our 
Board, and they are entered in its account. Very liberal contribution to 
the same Institution was also made by Mr. W. H. Murray, of the Second 
Church, of Chicago, whose gift of $2,300 was made to our treasury for the 
purpose of meeting in full, not only tlie pledge that our Board had already 
made, but some further deficiencies of which we had been made aware. It 
thus appears that the general fund that has come into our treasury from the 
Church's collections for the Board has paid toward the establishment of 
this outpost of Presbyterian learning only $1000. The present enrollment 
is forty-seven. All these are expected the next year, and twenty more appli- 
cations have been made. Already one student has committed himself to 
study for the ministry. An effort is making, with very hearty local encour- 
agement, to erect a dormitory, which here, as at the other two new colleges, 
seems to be indispensable to the accommodation of students from the sur- 
rounding country. 

The Treasurer has the receipts of the above four Institutions for the aggre- 
gate sum of $9,592, paid upon the Board's appropriations. 
The appropriations described as conditional, were made as follows : 
To Park College, at Parkville, Missouri, which applied for $500, to be 
used in payment of salaries, the Board voted that amount, under the con- 
ditions that have been named. 



A.D, 1884.] BOARD OF AID FOR COLLEGES. 221 

To Princeton Collegiate Institute, at Princeton, Kentucky, which simi- 
larly asked for $1000, that sum was voted. 

Parsons College, at Fairfield, Iowa, having asked for $4,000, was voted 
$2,000. 

Lenox Collegiate Institute, at Lenox, Iowa, having asked for $2,000, was 
voted $1000. 

The Academic and Collegiate Departments of the German Theological 
School, at Dubuque, Iowa, having asked for $2,000, were voted $500. 

The Board regrets its inability to pay to each of these Institutions the 
full amount which it conditionally promised. It believes the Church will 
share in that regret. 

To these last-named Institutions the Board has kept its promise by pay- 
ing out to them the entire residue of this year's income. Its Treasury, 
therefore, but for gifts coming in in May will be absolutely empty. It is 
hoped that some of those churches and individuals who have interest in this 
work will show their approval of the complete distribution thus made, by 
sending early contributions to our Treasurer. The amount so distributed 
is $1,392.36. 

The Board, in not a few instances, has been the channel through which 
churches and individuals have made their ^ifts to objects selected by them- 
selves. And reference has been made to gifts which their donors have sent 
directly to the Institutions. Chief among these latter are the large bene- 
factions of Mr. Trask to the College of Montana, $8,395 ; and of Hon. Cyrus 
H. McCormick to the College of Hastings, Nebraska, $5,000. But a con- 
siderable part of this special giving, it will be seen, has been done by the 
churches in the application of their Sabbath collections. In regard to this 
matter, the Assembly and the churches will see how important it is to the 
Board's success that contributions should be made to its general Treasury. 
Local interests will always exist, and in every part of the Churcli ; so that 
the whole Church will always have local motive for giving special direction 
to every gift made to this cause. No doubt such motive ought often to be 
decisive, as has been true of gifts thus directed this year. But there can be 
no doubt of the importance of increasing to the largest measure the means 
that may avail for the general work of the Church through the Board. 

One of the very important duties committed by the Assembly to the 
Board is " to assign to those Institutions seeking endowment the special 
fields open to their appeals, that clashing between them may be avoided ; 
and to discourage all independent appeals to the Church at large." 

It will not be claimed that this delicate part of the Board's duty has been 
discharged, or ever will be, with faultless wisdom. But one year's experi- 
ence is enough to show that a scrutiny just like this ought to be intrusted to 
some candid'judgment. If the day shall ever come in which this Board 
shall be wise and trusty enough to give no papers that ought not to be given, 
and the Church shall be wise enough to deny all applications that are not 
made with the Board's approval, the Church's work of extending her 
Christian education can be done with a confidence, an economy and a power 
as yet scarcely dreamed of. 

Some colleges, intended exclusively for the education of women, have 
asked assistance from the Board. No expression of the Assembly having 
been made in regard to the province of the Board in this direction, such ex- 
pression is now requested, the Board's belief being that it is desirable to 
make appropriations to such institutions, so far as may be consistent with 
the general necessities of the work. 

The experience which the Board has had of its new work has greatly 
deepened its sense of its incalculable importance. What God through the 
piety, foresight and self-sacrifice of the Cliristian fathers of this people has 
done for all our seaboard soil, in making Christian learning its common 
growth, we must be doing, with God's help and with our might, for all our 
soil, or a "Towth will possess it that will forestall faith and piety. The 
Christian College, m whose presence and under whose universal influence 
this generation was born, was no more a natural or national thing than the 
Church itself. It was a product of grace ; and it is propagated by grace. 
The learning that has another parentage has another quality. Such a learn- 
ing is attracting the attention and applause of our people. On our newer 



222 



BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. 



[May, 



soil it is spreading fast, aiul it shows its parentage in its own offspring. If 
the fathers had left the nation to create the schools of highest power, no 
good thing in all the nation, sacred, social, or civil would have been what 
it now is. They were fathers to the America of 50,000,000. To the America 
of 100.000,000, soon to be, botli men and God will count us fathers, with re- 
sponsibilities no less, but, by our experience of American things and by our 
immense increase of means, immensely larger than those of the founders of 
Yale, Princeton, Williams, and the rest. It is a simple sum in proportion. 
As was tlieii' duty in regard to wliat they saw and could do, so is our duty 
in regard to what we see and can do. But these are proportions which no 
man can measure. They belong to things infinite, and tliey run into eter- 
nity. It is a good sign for our country and for the coming generations of 
mankind that the Presbyterian Church, in the United States of America, 
has put her conscience and her hand to such a task. 

treastjeer's report. 

1884. Dr. 

April 30. To cash received to date : 

From Churches, Sabbath-schools, and Indi- 
viduals, $12,887 11 

From Special Subscription of Individuals 

to the Expenses of the Board, . . 2,000 00 

1884. Or. 

April 30. Cash paid to date ; expended as follows : 

Paid to Institutions, $12,164 57 

Corresponding Secretary — 

From Special Subscription, . 
Traveling Expenses, 
Fitting and Furnishing of Room, 

Office Boy, 

Printing and Stationery, 
Postage and Stamped Envelopes, 
Discount and Exchange, 

Fuel, 

Fees for Incorporation, 

$14,912 11 

By order of the Board, 

H. D. GANSE, Secretary. 



$14,912 11 



2,000 00 


96 95 


267 22 


66 00 


144 85 


149 02 


5 00 


15 50 


3 00 



Chicago, III., May 7th, ISSS 



X. COMMITTEE ON SYSTEMATIC BENEFICENCE. 

Ministers. Elders. 



Charles S. Pomeroy, D.D., CJiairman, 
I. Williams Cochran, 
Francis A. Horton, 
Edward C. Hay, 
David R. Breed, D.D., 
Edward P. Wimllon, 
Hollo Ogden, 

Anson Smyth, D.D., Corresp. Memh. 
and Act. Sec, 



Dan. P. Eells, Secretary, 
William Bakewell, 
Thomas Kane, 
Walter Carter, 
Reuben F. Smith, 
Archibald McClure, 
Thomas Lord. 



A.D.1884.] COMMITTEE ON SYSTEMATIC BENEFICENCE. 223 



Abstract of the Fifth Annual Eeport. 

The members of your Committee, have, during the last year, held frequent 
meetings for the furtherance of the trust committed to their charge. As 
the members of your Committee reside at points all the way fi'om New 
York to Chicago, it is not expected that they all will be present at each 
meeting held in Cleveland ; and it therefore 'has become necessary that the 
local members act in the character of an Executive Committee. 

At the meeting of the general Committee, held one year ago at Saratoga 
Springs, it was " Resolved, that for the coming year this Committee will not 
request from the churches separate statistical reports, but will rely on those 
made to the Stated Clerks of the Presbyteries and to the Boards of the 
Church." The efforts of your Committee during the year have been direct- 
ed rather to the purpose of stimulating the churches to activity in matters 
of beneficence, than to prescribing particular modes of action and forms of 
reporting. At a meeting held in Cleveland in December, it Avas directed 
that the reports of the Committees on Systematic Beneficence of the Synod of 
Illinois and the Presbytery of Morris and Orange, N . J. , be printed, and a copy 
of the same sent to each minister of our Churcli ; and that a sub-committee of 
three be appointed to procure and send these reports, accompanying them 
with an address to all the ministers. The brethren resident in Chicago, 
Messrs. Ray, Kane and Lord, were appointed said Committee, and promptly 
performed ihe duties of their appointment, and how well these duties Avere 
executed need not be particularly stated in this lleport, for the record thereof 
has already been read by thousands throughout the Cliurch. 

It was proposed by your Committee last year, through the liberal offer of 
one of its members, to print and circulate gratuitously, at the call of pastors 
and sessions, copies of the statistics of eacli Presbytery as found in the As- 
sembly's Minutes. It was thought that the distribution of these figures in 
the pews of our churches would greatly aid the cause. The arrangement 
failed, however, through the fear of the late Stated Clerk, that the stereo- 
typing of the mmutes would involve the Assembly in additional expense. 

We cannot, in this Rei)ort, go into particulars in regard to the progress 
made, and the necessities for renewed and increased exertion ; nor need we, 
for the reports of the several Boards of the Church abound in information 
upon these points. We take great pleasui-e in calling attention to a few 
illustrative examples. 

The Chairman of the Committee for the Presbytery of Cedar Rapids, 
says: " The ministers of this Presbytery are very generally adopting the 
plan of giving one tenth of their income, and many of the people are follow- 
ing their example. One lady Avho had ivdopted this plan while her income 
was small, having received this last year a gift of a few thousand dollars, 
immediately gave 6300 to Home Missions." If her giving to the other 
Boards of the Church was proportionate, it would not require a large num- 
ber of such mothers in Israel to equal the amount now received by all our 
Boards. 

A letter a few days since received from the Chairman of the Committee 
on Beneficence for the Presbytery of Westchester, N. Y., illustrates the 
value of fixed purposes as to the amounts which shall be raised Avitliin the 
year for the Boards of the Church. Last autumn they resolved to make 
earnest efforts to raise for the several Boards, during the year ending April 
1st, 188-4, the following sums : For Home Missions, $G,000. They actually 
raised $12,508, outdoing their purpose by more than one hundred per cent. 
For Foreign Missions the mark at which they aimed was $7000, but the 
mark whicli they reached was $9,704. They would give the education cause 
$1000. They did give it $1,171. 

While nearly every Presbytery from which we have heard has made satis- 
factory advances upon its contributions in former years, we are pained to 
find one marked exception to this fact. A large and wealthy Eastern Pres- 
bytery, Avliich contributed to the Boards of the Church in 1883, $29,606, in 
1884 gave but $23,314, a net decrease of $6,202. Of this amount $4,-508 was 
the falling off in contributions to Foreign Missions. More than two-thirds 
of this decrease is chargeable to a single church, which in 1883 gave $7;677, 



224 



BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. 



[May, 



and in 1884 but $2,949. The average in the whole Presbytery per member 
to tiie Boards was in 1883, i54.ii8, in 1884, $3.32. 

The Chairman of the Preshyterial Committee, who makes this Report, 
and wlio is very faithful in his work, says : " The large decrease is partly 
attributable to the special gifts and legacies of last year. But the regular 
contributions are not much in advance of those of 1881, and less than those 
of 1880. Fifteen cliurches show a decrease." Tiiis case shows us the im- 
portance of adopting such principles as will insure constancy in giving. 

Of the thirty churches in the Presbytery of Peoria, twenty-one report 
large increase of funds given over previous years. 

It is a most encouraging fact that in many of our western Presbyteries 
there has been a noticeable increase in contributions to our Boards. In 
1882 the total contributions of Dubuque amounted to $3,876, in 1883, $4,940, 
and in the year just closed, $5,193. If the contributions of our western 
brethren are not large, we must remember that many of their churches are 
weak in numbers and in pecuniary ability. In many cases it requires their 
best endeavors to sustain the preaching of the Gospel within their own 
bounds. In illustration of this fact we call attention to the Presbytery of 
Palmyra, in the Synod of Missouri. The Chairman of the Standing Com- 
mittee on Beneficence writes us as follows : " Our Presbytery is a peculiarly 
difficult field, and the task of bringing up our people to an intelligent appre- 
hension of the claims of systematic and proportionate beneficence, requires 
constant care and effort. We have, in this Presbytery, 34 churches and 13 
ministers. Of all the churches, mine is the only one in the Presbytery that 
is able to support a pastor unaided. Many of our churches are so isolated 
as to render it impossible to group them, or to supply them separately, and 
hence we usually have from 12 to 17 vacant churches. Still we are work- 
ing away and improving our methods, and are awaking to the conviction 
that loyalty to Christ demands that we adopt some definite plan in regard to 
giving. We urge the plan of weekly giving, proportionate and systematic, 
and the distribution of funds to each of our Boards as each has need. " Who 
sliaU say that the mites contributed by these poor churches, are not, in the 
sight of God, greater expressions of consecration than are the thousands 
contributed by other churches of their abundance. 

Your Committee regard it as a sign of great promise that an increasing 
number of Presbyteries are printing and distributing tabulated annual state- 
ments of their practical benevolence, showing what each Church has, dur- 
ing the year, contributed to our Boards, and to miscellaneous and congre- 
gational purposes. Some of them exhibit the increase of the last year over 
previous years, and the amount given per member, and in this way they 
provoke one another to good works. 

The particulars respecting the receipts of each Board are furnished in 
their respective Reports. We present certain facts, simply tabulated, as 
furnished us by the Secretaries of the Boards. 

TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE BOARDS. 



Net gain to the Boards in 1883-4, $253,508. 





1883. 


1884. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 




$480,033 
648,303 
73,500 
42,078 
109,063 
105.566 
101,677 
18,742 


$600,282 
693,122 
67,100 
47,124 
138,28) 
121,903 
121,5Jl 
10,146 
18,987 


$114,249 
44,819 

* 6,046 
29,222 
16,3.37 
19,844 
1,404 
28,987 










$6,400 


Publication (Missionary Department) 

Churcli Erection 


Relief Fund 








For Colleges 






$1,584,962 


$1,838,470 


$2.59,908 


$6,400 



This surpasses the gain of 1883 over 1882 by $82,341. There has been a 
constant and beautiful ascent in the amount given to the Boards in the last 



A.D. 1884:.] COMMITTEE ON SYSTEMATIC BENEFICENCE. 



225 



four years. In 1881 the increase was $85,662; in 1882, $125,775 ; in 1883, 
$171,167 ; in 1884, $253,508. 

This period about covers the time of your Committee's existence in its 
present form. 

The above table shows what the Boards have received during the year 
from all sources, including gifts in permanent funds, income from invested 
funds and legacies. 

AMOUNTS RECEIVED FROM CHURCHES AND INDIVIDUALS. 





1883. 


1884. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Home Missions 


$347,840 
521,370 
51,723 
30,894 
65,846 
73,746 
82,8 6 
18,692 


i"428,573 
574,844 
55,917 
37,264 
80,558 
81,768 
95,347 
19,839 
28,987 


$80,733 
53,474 

4,194 

6,370 
14,712 

8,022 
12,511 

1,147 
28,987 




Education. . 

Publication (Missionary Department) 




Relief Fund , . 
























$1,192,847 


81,403,097 


*210 150 





The gam under this head is $210,150. Last year it was only $128,203. 
Each Board shows a considerable increase, while last year three sliowed a 
loss. Every Board reports an income from Church collections exceeding 
that of the preceding year. 

This liberality has enabled the Boards of Relief, Church Erection, Publi- 
cation, Freedmen, to close with balances in their treasuries from $3000 to 
$11,000. Most of these will simply be sufficient for a fair start on a new 
year. But in spite of the great advance made, Home Missions reports a debt 
of $12,089 ; Foreign Missions, of $10,723 • Education, $10,912, The debts of 
the Home and Foreign Boards are less than at the close of last year. 

Each one of these objects should receive a larger amount during this 
coming year. The Temperance Committee has not been included among 
them. This worthy cause received only $619 from Churches and individu- 
als last year, while it could use ten times that sum. 

CONTRIBUTING CHURCHES. 







1883, 


1884. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Non-contri- 
buting. 


Home Missions 

Foreign Missions 


4141 
3795 
2438 
2269 
3020 
2864 
2533 
1523 


423S 

.3407 
2547 
2350 
3424 
£805 
2594 
1475 
400 


95 

109 
81 

404 

' 61 
400 


388 

'59 

'48 


1622 
2451 
3311 


Publication 

Church Erection 

Kelief Fund 


3508 
2434 
3053 




3264 


Sustentation 


43S3 








22,583 


23,238 


1,150 


495 


24,026 



Net gain ; 6.55 collections, or 255, if the new Board is left out. 

This table shows us where increased contributions might come from. It 
reminds us that our fields are not half cultivated ; 1622 chm-ches failing to 
give to Home Missions ; 2451 (388 more than last year) giving nothing to 
Foreign Missions ; 24,026 opportunities to give neglected — surely we should 
be ashamed of such a record. 

It is worthy of note that two Presbyteries in the Minutes of 1883 report 
every column filled — New Brunswick and Butler. More correctly they re- 

15 



226 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [Maj, 

port no blanks. We would remind them and all, that it is one thinf? to put 
a few drops in a vessel and quite another to fill it. The Foreign Missionary 
Presbytery of Corisco, in Africa, has no blanks, except in the case of two 
recently organized churches. If each of our non-con tril)uting churches had 
given $5 to eveiy object omitted, the total gifts would have been increased 
by over $120,000. The power of littles was illustrated recently in the Christ- 
mas dime offerings of our sabbath-schools for Foreign Missions, which 
amounted to $8503. 

While our gifts seem large in the aggregate, they amounted last year to 
less than $3.00 a member to all the Boards, including permanent funds, and 
legacies, and not allowing for increased membership during the year. This 
is less than a cent a day. 

But we would be ungrateful to God to complain or murmur concerning 
the record of the year. To have raised nearly two millions of dollars for 
our own benevolent work in a year not especially prosperous ; to have seen 
the large desires of our two great Boards, expressed to the last assembly, 
realized; to have received over $600,000 for the Home, and nearly $700,000 
for the Foreign work ; to have made an increase in collections for every 
cause ; to record that the Women's societies gave to the Foreign Board last 
year $203,754, and the year before $192,729 ; to have found that these societies 
gave the Home Board $97,167, as against $78,520 ; to have seen a new Board 
collecting $28,000 from the churches without decreasing the gifts to others ; 
these are strong reasons for praise. " Who are we that we should be able 
to offer after this sort ? Of Thine own have we given Thee. We are not 
our own." May we show our gratitude to our Redeemer by abounding 
more and more in this and every grace I 

We would emphasize again these principles : 

1. The need and the value of instructing the people on this subject. We 
have abundant evidence that great good has been done by sermons, by 
addresses at meetings of Presbytery, and especially by the circulation of 
tracts prepared by Elder Thomas Kane, of Chicago, a member of this Com- 
mittee. These may still be had for gratuitous distribution in our churches 
by application to him. The lectures of Dr. John Hall, of New York, on 
" The Proper Use of Wealth," have been stereotyped by your Committee, 
and may also be had on application to Mr. Thomas Kane, at the bare cost 
of printing ($2 per 100). 

2. As giving is a grace, it ought to be brought into close' connection with 
the worship of God. " Bring an offering and come into His courts," was 
the Lord's command to His ancient people. There is very little recognition 
of this in our Directory for Worship ; and on this account an Overture, sug- 
gested by a member of this Committee, has been sent to this Assembly by 
the Presbytery of Cleveland. 

3. We believe that proportionate giving is the essence of this whole mat- 
ter. We believe that every Christian should obey the Apostolic rule and 
" lay by him in store as the Lord has prospered him," before he uses any- 
thing for himself. We may differ as to whether we have Divine warrant for 
any tixed proportion, but the principle of proportionate giving is revealed, 
enjoined and illustrated in God's Word. 

We ask that the small bill for printing and clerk hire for the Committee 
be paid. All other expenses have been borne by the members themselves. 

ARTHUR MITCHELL, Chairman. 
Anson Smyth, Acting Secretary. 

Cleveland,0., May I6th^ I884. 



X. COMMITTEE OK TEMPERANCE. 



OFFICERS. 



Rev. William Y. Brown, D.D., President. 
Mr. David M. Stiger, Secretary and Treasurer., 

58 Bcirclay St., New York City. 



A.D. 1884.] COMMITTEE ON TEMPERANCE. 227 

MEMBERS. 

Mmisters. Elders. 

Term to expire in 1885 : 

John Hall, D.D., David B. Ivison, 

Robert D. Harper, D.D., David M. Stiger, 

Daniel W. Fish. 

Term to expire in 1886 : 

Edward W. French, D.D., Edward P. Durant. 

Theodore L. Cuyier, D.D., 
Robert Aikman, D.D., 
Francis H. Marling, 

Term to expire in 1887 : 

William Y. Brown, D.D., Walter Carter, 

Jeremiah Petrie, William N. Crane, 

Andrew Blair. 

Abstract of the Third Ankual Report. 

The Permanent Committee on Temperance respectfully presents 
to the General Assembly its Tliii-d Amiiial Report, together with the minutes 
of its meetings ; and records with devout thanksgiving the evident tokens 
of the Divine favor upon the work. 

At its meeting on the 13th of June, 1883j it distributed the work among 
its members by the appointment of committees on the following subjects : 
On Publications, on Correspondence with other Religious Bodies, and on 
Synods and Presbyteries. It also appointed an Executive Committee, con- 
sisting of the officers of the Permanent Committee, and Mr. Walter Carter, 
who should have the immediate oversight of the details of the work, with 
power to employ whatever clerical assistance might be found necessary. 
And, in this connection, it gratefully acknowledges its obligations to the 
Rev. Wm. E. Honeyman for the valuable assistance which he has rendered 
to the Committee for a nominal consideration. 

Publications. Tract No. 6 is a Summary of the Deliverances of the 
General Assembly on the subject of Temperance, from A.D. 1812 to 1883 in- 
clusive. Of this tract eleven thousand copies have been printed during the 
year, and distributed among the churches. There is ample testimony that 
this tract has been of invaluable service in communities in which it has been 
freely circulated. 

No. 7 is a Circular Letter to the Synods and Presbyteries. It was pre- 
pared by Rev. Robert Aikman, D.D., the Chairman of the Committee to 
wiiich this subject was assigned. Five thousand copies of this circular were 
distributed among the pastors and cimrches. It is believed that it has 
greatly aided in perfecting the organization of the Temperance w'ork in the 
Synods and Presbyteries. 

No. <? is a plan for organizing the Temperance work in sabbath-schools. 
This plan gives satisfaction in the churches. 

No. S is a circular to the Presbyteries concerning the Temperance Nar- 
rative. Five thousand coi)ies of this circular w^ere printed and distributed. 

Other Ecclesiastical Bodies. The correspondence with other eccle- 
siastical bodies has been conducted by Rev. Francis H. Marling, and he 
has collected much valuable mformation on the subject. In 1883 we were 
able to report the utterances and proceedings on the subject of Temperance 
of several churches in Britain— Presbyteiian, Episcopal, Methodist, Congre- 
gational, and Baptist. 

We now present further reports of this cause in the American Churches, 



228 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [^^aj, 

of wliich, last year, we could speak only of the Protestant Episcopal, Metho- 
dist Episcopal, and Baptist bodies. 

This year we report the favorably action of seven prominent American 
Cliurches, viz. : The Southern Presbyterian, Reformed Dutch, Keformed 
Episcopal, Cumberland Presbyterian, Keformed Presbyterian, Congrega- 
tional, and German Keformed Churches. It is evident that the subject 
forces itself upon the attention of all, and is becoming more and more 
prominent from year to year. Even those bodies that have hitherto scarcely 
touched it are constrained to utter themselves ; and such as liave always 
been outspoken advance to stronger positions. In fact, the Church of 
Christ in this land, as all over the world, is tlie stronghold of the Temper- 
ance Reform. The deliverances show how far the way is open for coopera- 
tive effort among the various Churches. This Committee is ready for such 
a joint movement, when it promises practical results. And it specially 
recommends that iocai cooperation already practiced in so many communities. 

Statistics. It is made the duty of your Committee "to gather and re- 
port such statistics as may be of value and interest to the Church." 

Out of a great mass of statistics that might be given, it ventures to make 
the following selections. The United States Internal Revenue Receipts 
from Taxes on Distilled and Fermented Liquors for the fiscal year ending 
June 30th, 1883 showed that the liquor interest pays $81,260,890.01 to tlie 
United States Government. This enormous amount is, of course, i-epaid 
to them by the consumers, and is a direct loss to the latter. 

The destruction of bread-food is also a matter worthy of serious thought. 
It amounts to 18,644,787 bushels ; and 2,373,106 gallons of molasses, in the 
production of distilled spirits alone, exclusive of mjilt liquors. 

The consumption of liquors and wines, annually, is simply appalling. 
During the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1883, it was as follows : Distilled 
spirits, 76,762,063 proof gallons; malt liquors, 552,375,654 gallons; wines, 
estimated, 25,885,492 gallons. These frightful figures need no comment. 

Cost. — The question is often asked, What does the beverage in distilled 
and malt liquors and wines cost the consumers, annually, in the United 
States ? Your Committee has carefully weighed this question, and it has 
come to the deliberate conclusion, that in the matter of dollars and cents, 
the consumption of distilled, malt, and various liquors, as a beverage, costs 
the consumers, annually, in the United States, not less than eight hundred and 
thirteen millions of dollars. 

Pauperism and crime.— The relation of the liquor traffic to pauperism 
and crime, is that of cause and effect. Hon. Judge Noah Davis said re- 
cently in New York, " that twenty years' experience as a judge had taught 
him that of all the causes of misery, destitution, crime^nd death, intoxica- 
ting liquor stood forth the unapproachable chief." The statistics on the 
general subject of criminals and paupers are not very reliable. 

But if the State of Pennsylvania is a fair average for the United States, it 
will appear that the well-to-flo people of the country pay, in taxes, upward 
of $13,000,000 on account of county prisons and State penitentiaries, and 
more tham fifteen millions of dollars for the support of the poor, a very large 
percentage of whom are made paupers by rum. The liquor trafiic, there- 
tore, forces upon the people the consideration of questions of political econ- 
omy, as well as moral accountability. 

Surely these are matters wliich demand the attention of the political 
economist and statesman, as well as of the philanthropist and the Cliristian. 
It is a question of protection. Disentangled from all other matters, the 
issue is — the American Home vs. the Saloon. 

Happily there is nothing in the Federal Constitution to prevent the people, 
in the exercise of their sovereign right, to give tlie Home whatever protec- 
tion they may see fit to decree. The Supreme Court of the United States, 
in the case of the Beer Co. vs. Mass. (7 Otto, 92 U. S. 25), a decision since 
the adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment and reaffirming the decision in 
IJartemyer vs. Iowa (18 Wall, 129), decides that a State law prohibiting the 
manufacture and sale of uitoxicating liquors is not repugnant to any clause 
of the United States Constitution. 



A.D. 1884.] COMMITTEE ON TEMPERANCE. 229 

ExisTixG Laws axd their Enforcemext. — Your Committee has 
felt called upon, to make some inqury in relation to " the strong arm of the 
civil law. " And it gladly reports that correspondence with persons in every 
State in the Union, and an examination of the existing laws in many of 
the States, afford ample evidence that "the utter extermination of the 
traffic in intoxicating liquors as a beverage," is within the power of the 
people in a large part of the country under existing laws. What is wanted 
is the " Christian conscience" that will enforce the laws. There is ample 
room for Law-and-Order Leagues, and an imperative demand for their ex- 
istence and work. 

Temperaxce Edtjcation.— The State of ISTew York has come grandly 
into line with Vermont, New Hampshire and Michigan, on the Temperance 
educational scheme, by the passage of the following bill, which is now the 
law of the State : 

" The people of the State of New Tork, represented in Senate and Assembly, 
do enact as follows : 

" Section \. Provision shall be made by the jiroper local school authorities 
for instructing all pupils in all schools supported by public money, or under 
State control, in physiology and hygiene, with special reference to the effects 
of alcoholic drinks, stimulants and narcotics upon the human system. 

" Section 2. No certificate shall be granted any person to teach in the 
public schools of the State of New York, after the first day of January, 
1885, who has not passed a satisfactory examination in physiology and 
hygiene, with special reference to the effects of alcoholic drinks, stimulants 
and narcotics upon the human system." 

The above facts are simply specimens of the current legislation on the 
subject. 

Suggestions. — It is made the duty of your Committee " to mature and 
report action on the subject to the General Assembly." 

1. It has occurred to it that the consolidated Synods, especially those 
whose boundaries are conterminous with State lines, are admirably adapted 
for organizing the Temperance wofk within their bounds. The Permanent 
Committees of the Synods understand better than most others the local 
issue in their several States, and by their impact upon the Presbyteries 
through the Presb)i;erial Committees, and through them upon the churches 
— are in a position to crystallize the temperance sentiments of the State into 
the best possible agencies for promoting the cause, both in its spiritual and 
civil aspects. 

2. It seems to your Committee that Christian people through the regular 
Church channels, or by combming together in Law-and-Order Leagues, or 
other associations for the purpose of enforcing existing laws against the 
liquor traffic, might create a strong "public opinion" in this direction, 
wiiich would be of invaluable service to the cause. Laws are useless unless 
backed by the power of " public opinion " which will compel their enforce- 
ment. 

3. The Temperance educational scheme, by which the pupils in all schools 
supported by public money shall receive instruction in physiology and 
hygiene, with special reference to the effects of alcoholic drinks, stimulants 
and narcotics upon the human system, is a matter on which all phases of 
temperance seutunent can unite ; and it is of such magnitude and import- 
ance as to demand united and concentrated effort in all our churches to 
secure its ingrafting mto the laws of all the States in the Union, and its en- 
forcement when enacted. 

4. The Temperance issues are now so prominent in all parts of the country, 
and the work of the Permanent Committee has become so extended and im- 
portant, that it will need at least six thousand dollars the coming year to do 
its work properly, and it ventures to suggest action in this direction in so 
far, that it be cordially commended to the churches, by the Assembly,. for 
this amount. 



230 BOARDS AND PERMANENT COMMITTEES. [^aj, 

Synods and Presbytekies. — Tlie Chairman of your Committee has 
been in correspondence with tlie Stated Clerks of all the Sj'nods, and most 
of the Presbyteries, with a view to the ai)i)ointment of Permanent or Stand- 
ing Committees on the subject of Temperance, and the systematic organiza- 
tion of the work within their resi)ective bounds. He also visited the Synods 
of New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, during their sessions in 
October last, and presented the claims of the Committee to each of these 
bodies, in all of which, both the cause and the representative of the Com- 
mittee, received the most respectful hearing. 

And it is gratifying to report that the Synods gave the subject of Temper- 
ance serious and prayerful consideration at their last sessions, and most of 
them adopted well digested and elaborate papers on the subject, and ap- 
pointed Permanent Committees who should have the immediate oversight 
of the work within their bounds. 

The Temperance Narratives. — The last General Assembly directed, 
" That the Presbyteries prepare a distinct Temperance Narrative at their 
spring meetings, and forward the same to the Permanent Committee ; and 
that the Committee consider and report on the same to the next Assembly." 

The happiest results are anticipated from this action of the Assembly, 
because it brings the subject authoritatively before every Presbytery, creates 
discussion, and leads to comparison of methods and results which must be 
of lasting benefit to the cause. AVhilst your Committee has been somewhat 
disappointed in the number of the Temperance Narratives which have been 
received, it has been greatly cheered by the high character, comprehensive- 
ness, and devotion to the cause, of those which have been received. The 
salient features of the Narratives may be grouped under the following 
heads : 

Organization. — There is a cordial response on the part of many to the 
recorhmendation of the General Assembly to appoint Standing Committees 
on Temperance, and to bring the work under Presbyterial and ecclesiastical 
supervision and control. 

Others again, acting on the principle that the Church is jure divino., a 
Temperance society, carry on the work directly, by the officers of the Church, 
without any additional machinery or organization. " The Church," says 
the Presbytery of Lackawanna, "is God's organization. As such, her min- 
isters and members are expressly qualified and equipped for the front rank 
in the Temperance reform." 

Preach the Word. — Your Committee reports with unfeigned pleasure 
that, judging from the Narratives received, the practice of preaching 
frequently upon the subject of Temperance is well-nigh universal through- 
out the Church. This is a hopeful sign. 

Local Work. — Whilst in some Presbyteries there is just cause for com- 
plaint on account of the apathy of the churches, yet, in the main, the Nar- 
ratives are very encouraging, showing a degree of activity, earnestness and 
success which is very inspiring. " We never have had as many members in 
both houses of Congress, who are ready to stand up as the stalwart friends 
of Temperance and boldly face the foe, as to-day." It is cheering to learn 
that in the National Capital there is a " Committee of One Hundred, com- 
posed of the prominent members of the different Churches and Temperance 
societies," to watch the liquor legislation in Congress, and whose influence 
was sensibly felt in defeating the Bonded Whisky Bill. 

The Presbytery of Elizabeth reports a very remarkable Temperance revival 
within its bounds, the most extensive of which has been in Plainfield, N. J., 
where 3200 have signed the pledge — and a reform club has been organized 
with a membership of 750. 

The Presbytery of Chester reports a Presbyterial Temperance Conven- 
tion, or " Institute," at Kennett's Square, held under the direction of the 
Standing Committee on Temperance, at which " practical topics pertaining 
to this vital issue were discussed." 

The Presbytery of Clarion rejwrts that Temperance lesson books are used 
in the schools m one of its important towns (Oil City). 

There has been a genuine Temperance revival at several points within the 
Presbytery of Lackawanna. " At Carbondale 1613 have signed the pledge, 



A.D. 1884.] 



COMMITTEE ON TEMPEEANCE. 



231 



and over 700 more have agreed in writing to stand by the Mayor in his 
efforts to suppress intemperance." 

Chicago sends a ringing and cheerful report, being responses from thirty- 
one chiu'ches, two of which have distinctive Church Temperance organiza- 
tions. 

Among the ministers and Church members both sentiment and practice 
are overwhelmingly in favor of total abstinence in the individual. Four- 
fifths of the Presb}i;eries express themselves distinctly on this point. Long 
Island reports that ' ' Every minister on our roll is a total abstainer. " Three 
words indicate the line of Temperance work within its bounds : " Educa- 
tion, prevention, prohibition. " These words voice the prevailing sentiment 
of all the Narratives. 

Beformafion of Inebriates.— One-fourth of the Presbyteries speak of some 
success in this direction. 

Women^s Christian Temperance Union.— Two-fifths of the Presbyteries 
speak in the highest terms of the thorough organization and efficient work 
of the Women's Christian Temperance Unions, with which the women of 
the churches are largely identified, and who constitute, often, the control- 
ling minds. 

treasurer's report. 

Received, $651 49 

Paid — Balance due Treasurer, last Report, . . . $95 60 
Printing Tracts, Circulars, and Letters, . . . 104 00 
Stationery and Envelopes for Tracts, S. S., . . 2125 

Postage on more than 5000 Enclosures, . . .55 24 
Expenses of Committee, and Traveling Expenses of 
Chairman, Dr. Brown, visiting Presbyteries, and 

Synods, 156 34 

Clerical Assistance, 150 00 

Printing Report, . . . . • . . . 136 60 



Balance due Treasurer, 



$710 03 
$07 54 



Eor the Committee, 

WILLIAM Y. BROWN", President. 
David M. Stiger, Secretary and Treasurer. 
New York, JSf. T., May 15th, I8S4. 



SUMMARY. 

FINANCIAL EXHIBIT OF THE BOARDS, 1883-84. 



Boards. 


Debt, 
1883. 


Balance, 
1883. 


Keceipts. 


Expenditures 


Balance, 

1884. 


Debt, 

1884. 


Home Missions 


$45,106 75 


" $13,.'i38 23 

99 70 

7,905 45 

623 90 

67,644 73 

21,367 94 


$591,282 07 

20,146 15 

693,122 70 

67,100 41 

59,152 07 


$558,265 29 
21,811 80 


*11.672 58 


$12,089 97 


Foreign Missions. . . . 
Education 


13,382 96 


703,845 72 . . 

75,544 41 

50.211 30 8.940 77 


10,723 02 
ll,0t)8 00 






15,890 81 15,223 16l 657 65 








138,285 02 202,921 49 


3,008 26 




Board of Relief .... 




121,900 30 105,616 57 
121,521 06 117,817 31 


16, 83 73 
3,703 75 




Freedmen 


539 92 




Totals 


$59,029 63 


$110,979 95 


$1,828,400 59 $1,851,257 05 $44,266 74' $33,880 99 



IV. Cfjc Jfinanct^. 



(( u 



(( C( 



I. THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY IN ACCOUNT WITH EDWIN F. 
HATFIELD, TREASURER, FOR THE YEAR 1883. 

Dr. 

May 29. To paid Mileage to Commissioners (Miimtes p. 6ol), . $28,132 23 
" " Entertainment of Commissioners, . . 6,155 80 

" " Salaries: 

Stated Clerk, and Expenses, . $619 65 

Treasurer, .... 100 00 

Permanent Clerk, and Expenses, 330 99 

1,050 64 

" " Stationery: 

Ivison, Blakeman & Co., . 35 72 

Printing Minutes, etc. : 
CM. Green Printing Co., . $2,500 00 
W. H. Roberts, D.D., . . 20 00 

Hon. Wm. Strong, . . . 20 10 

2,540 10 

Postage, etc. : 

Mr. O. D. Eaton, . . . $600 00 

Telegrams, .... 13 65 

613 65 

" " Traveling Expenses : 

Education Committee, . . $109 00 

Home Mission Committee, . 40 40 

Ministerial Support Committee, 66 60 

Delegates to General Assembly, 

South, 95 70 

311 70 

Draft on Treasurer Presbytery of Brooklyn, returned, . . 178 43 

Balance in City Bank, New York City, 579 70 

$39,597 97 
1883. Cr. 

May 15. By Balance on hand, $1,800 87 

" Apportionments : 

Mileage, $26,646 81 

Entertainment, .... 9,626 79 

36,273 60 

" Donationof W. A. Wheeloek, Esq., . . . 1,354 00 

" Mileage returned, 40 00 

" Sale of Minutes, 129 50 

1883. $39,597 97 

Oct. 24. By Balance to new account, 579 70 

New York, JSf. Y., Oct. 24th, IS84. 



May, A.D. 188i.] the finances. 233 



II. THE GEI^ERAL ASSEMBLY IX ACC0U:N'T WITH WIL- 

LIAM H. ROBERTS. PERMANENT CLERK AND ACTING 
TREASURER, FOR THE YEAR ENDING MAY 15,1884. 

1884. Dr. 

May 15. To paid Expenses Permanent Clerk, . . $58 17 

" " Postag:e on Minutes : 

O. E. Bovd $172 00 

W.H. Roberts, .... 2265 

194 65 

" " Cartage Minutes, 9 00 

" " J. E. Peters, 14 50 

" Balance in hand, 331 32 

$607 64 
Cr. 

May 15. By Returned Mileage, $11 50 

" Sale of Minutes, ^l' ^^ 

" Balance Mileage Presbytery of Brooklyn, . . 178 43 

§607 64 

May 15. Balance to new account, 331 32 

Princeton, JV^. /., May 15th, IS84. 

III. THE REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE GENERAL 

ASSEMBLY. 

(1) The following amounts of Principal stand to the credit of the respective 

Trusts named : 

Permanent Missionary Fund, $15,682 70 

Permanent Fund Theological Seminary, 10,720 07 

Permanent Fund for the Indians of North America, ... 127 05 

Boudinot Missionary Fund, 5,020 07 

Joseph Eastburn Bequest, 6,999 83 

Fund for the Conversion of the Jews, 160 42 

Professorship Synods of New York and New Jersey, . . . 10,525 14 

Professorship Synods of North and South Carolina and Georgia, 9,57^ 85 

Professorship of Oriental and Biblical Literature, . . .. 1,656 46 

Jane Keith Scholarship, 1,346 81 

Gosman " 1,346 82 

Othniel Smith " 1,346 82 

Anderson " 1,747 31 

Boudinot " 1,352 21 

E. D. " 1,346 82 

Kirkpatrick " 1,438 11 

King " 1,346 82 

Ralston " " 1,313 01 

Fayetteville " 486 73 

The " ...... 1,178 81 

Senior Class of 1819 " 1,230 63 

Senior Class of 1823 " 581 12 

Senior Class of 1820-21 " 833 78 

Nephew " 2,500 00 

Mary Hollond " 2,500 00 

Le Roy and Banyer " 4,747 20 

Colt " 2,500 00 

Chester Bulkley Bequest, 2,813 36 



234 



THE FINANCES. 



[May, 



Harinonv Scholarship, 

Wliiteljt'ad 

Cluirlestou Female " . . 

WoodhuU " 

Scott " 

Van Brugh Livingston " . . 

Kennedy " . . 

H. Smith " 

Augusta Female " . . 

Wickes " . . 

Students' Fund, 

Boudinot Library Fund (Pastors), 
Permanent Fund, Presbyterian Board of Relief 
Boudinot Library Fund, .... 
Trustees of General Assembly, 
Professors! lip Synod of Philadelphia, . 
Seamen's Fund, 



Total, 

(2) For which the following Cash and Investments are held 



1. 


Bond and Mort 


2. 


(( 


(( 


3. 


a 


(( 


4. 


(I 


a 


5. 


u 


(( 


6. 


a 


11 


7. 


(( 


a 


8. 


ii. 


u 


9. 


li 


(( 


10. 


It 


(( 


11. 


11 


(( 


12. 


it 


(( 


13. 


u 


(( 


14. 


u 


u 


15. 


(( 


C( 


16. 


(C 


(( 


17. 


(( 


(( 


18. 


(( 


u 


19. 


u 


(( 


20. 


u 


(( 


21. 


(( 


(( 


22. 


u 


C( 


23. 


u 


a 


24. 


■ u 


u 


25. 


u 


u 


26. 


u 


u 


27. 


u 


a 


28. 


a 


u 


29. 


a 


u 


30. 


u 


(( 


31. 


a 


u 


32. 


li 


(C 


33. 


a 


C( 


34. 


a 


u 


35. 


(( 


C( 


36. 


u 


u 


37. 


a 


u 


38. 


a 


u 


39. 


a 


11 


40. 


(( 


u 


41. 


u 


u 


42. 


Ground Rents, 



East Bradford, Chester Co, 
on Philadelphia City Property, 



Pa 



$922 55 
1,480 29 
1,480 68 
1,480 31 
1,480 29 
1,565 72 
1,513 51 
1,942 28 
1,372 40 
1,346 82 
9,131 66 
27 07 
180,943 55 
9,639 22 
2,251 73 
9,527 44 
475 00 

$319,007 47 



$6,000 00 
2,000 00 
6.000 00 
2,200 00 
3,400 00 
9,450 00 
2,000 00 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 
2,500 00 
1,500 00 
6,000 00 
7,500 00 
2,000 00 
6,000 00 
10,000 00 
12,000 00 
8,500 00 
5,000 00 
6,000 00 
9,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
4,500 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
4,000 00 
10,000 00 
12,000 00 
3,000 00 
4,500 00 
5,000 00 
4,000 00 
8,000 00 
14,000 00 
10,000 00 
6,300 00 
5,000 00 
12,000 00 
13,500 00 



A.D. 1884.J 



THE FINANCES. 



235 



43. Bond and Mortgage on Philadelphia City Property, 

44. United States Bonds, 4-per cent Loan, . 

45. Pennsylvania Kailroad General Mortgage Bonds, 
Temporary Investments, Trustees, .... 

Board of Relief , 



$3,000 00 
2,000 00 

40,000 00 

2,775 00 

687 49 



Cash, Balance not invested, 11,694 98 

Total, $319,007 47 

(3) The Beceipts were as follows : 

Balance from last year,. $609 38 

.Joseph Eastbnrn's Bequest, Rents, and Interest, . . . . 539 22 

Contingent Fund for the Jews, 4 60 

Presbyterian Board of Relief, 9,118 70 

Professorships, 1,668 88 

Scholarships, 2,200 84 

Students' Fund, 507 38 

Contingent Fund, Theological Seminary, 536 00 

Contingent Missionary Fund, 816 59 

Contingent Fund, Boudinot Missions, 213 30 

Fund for Books for Pastor's Libraries, 225 00 

Contingent Fund, Trustees, 266 33 

Permanent Fund Legacy, Mary A. Leslie, N. Y., 

" " " M. A. Grier, Pottstown, 

" " Mortgages, .... 

" " Camden and Amboy Bond, . 

" " Premium on Bond, 



«620 00 

1,425 00 

9,400 00 

3,000 00 

195 00 

United States Loan, 7,700 00 



Total, 



$39,046 22 



(4) The Payments were as follows : 

Joseph Eastbnrn's Bequest for sundries, 
Presbyterian Board of Relief, 

Professorships, 

Scholarships, 

Students' Fund, 

Contingent Fund, Theological Semmary, 
Contingent Fund, Boudinot Missions, 
Contingent Missionary Fund, 
Funds for Pastors' Libraries, . 
Contingent Fund, Trustees, 
Permanent Funds, Bonds and Mortgages, 
" " Legacy, M. A. Grier, 

Balance carried forward to next year. 



$114 01 


8,827 62 


1,619 73 


2,192 94 


492 17 


522 52 


213 30 


792 00 


300 00 


798 06 


10,500 00 


475 00 


12,198 87 



Total, 



$39,046 22 



The Committee on Accounts, having examined the Bonds and Mortgages, 
Bonds and Cash in the hands of the Treasurer, and the vouchers for the 
moneys paid by him, find the same to be correct, leaving a cash balance in 
the hands of the Treasurer of twelve thousand one hundred and ninety- 
eight dollars and eighty-seven cents ($12,198.87). 

The Bonds and Mortgages and Bonds all stand in the name of the Cor- 
poration. 

Alex. Whilldin, j) Committee 
Samuel C. Perkins, > on 
William T. Eva, ) Accounts. 

All of which is respectfully submitted by the Trustees. 
GEO. JUNKIN, President. 
JAMES T. YOUNG, Treasurer, Pro Tern. 
Philadelphia, March 3 1st, I884. 



236 THE FINANCES. [May, 

The Finance Committee, in compliance with tlie first item of Article 
Fourth of the By-Laws, respectfully report to the Trustees of the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Churcli in the United States of America, the 
state of investments, as is set forth in the foregoinj? table. 

The Investments are all made in the name of the Corporation or by a 
special resolution of the Trustees. 

Samuel C. Perkins, "j Committee 
Gko. Junkin, > on 

V. 1). Reed, J Finance. 

(5) Trustees of the General Assembly. 

Georoe Juxkin, Esq., President. 

llev. William E. Sohenck, D.D., Vice-President. 

Rev, ViLLEROY D. Reed, D.D., Corresponding Secretary. 

Rev. Thomas L. Janeway, D.D., George Junkin, Esq., 

Rev. George Hale, D.D., Alexander Whilldin, 

Hon. William Strong, LL.D., John C. Farr, 

Hon. Joseph Allison, LL.D., Samuel C. Perkins, Esq., 

Rev. Thomas J. Shepherd. D.D., James T. Young. 

Rev. William T. Eva, D.D., Four vacancies. 

* Mr. James T. Young, is the Treasurer, Pro Tern., 

Office, No. 1334 Chestnut Street, Phila<lelphia, Pa. 



IV. THE TRUSTEES OF THE PRESBYTERIAN HOUSE IN 
ACCOUNT WITH CHARLES M. LUKENS, TREASURER. 

1884. Dr. 

May 1. To Cash Paid Sundry Trusts : 

Josiah P. White Trust, $718 36 

Board of Publication, 1,612 70 

Board of Relief, 2,078 61 

Board of Home Missions, 880 08 

Board of Foreign Missions, 490 00 

Macalester Memorial Fund, 122 50 

Sundry Expenses, 330 91 

Reinvestments, 9,000 00 

Balance in Treasurer's hands, 657 65 

$15,890 81 

Cr. 

By Balance from last Report, $623 90 

Interest paid in, 6,506 91 

Cash Macalester Memorial Fund, 5,000 00 

Mortgages paid off and reinvested, 3,700 00 

$15,890 81 

The following amounts are now mvested for the purposes mentioned, viz.: 

John C. Baldwin Fund, $34,975 00 

Income ^ Disabled Ministers, f Publication. 
John W. Irwin Fund, 7,850 00 

Income to Home Missions. 



A.D. 1881.] THE FIXAXCES. 237 

D. T. Woodburj^ Fund, $2,000 00 

Income to Publication. 

Ministerial Relief Fund, 13,450 00 

Income to Disabled Ministers. 

Starkweather Fund, 7,400 00 

Income to Sunday-school purposes. 

Josiah P. White Fund, 11,000 00 

Jonas Guthrie Fund, 1,408 00 

Macalester Memorial Fund, 5,u00 00 

Benjamin Fund, 30,000 00 

$113,083 00 
CHARLES M. LUKENS, Treasurer. 

The undersigned have examined the Treasurer's accoimt, compared it 
with the vouchei's, and find it correct. Balance in the Treasurer's hands 
$657.65. They have also seen tlie securities in his hands amounting to 
$113,083, and compared them, and find them all in the name of the Corpora- 
tion. 

John C. Farr, \ Auditing 
Chas. a. Dickey, J Committee. 
Philadel2jhia, Pa., May 9th, I884. 



V. iHiscellancous* 



I. THE MILEAGE AND CONTINGENT FUNDS. 

Special attention is called to the Mileage and Contingent System adopted 
by the General Assembly of 1870, and amended by the General Assemblies of 
1875 and 1877. As amended it is as follows : 

" The Connnittee to whom it was referred to consider and report a uniform 
system of Mileage, whereby full provision may be made for the traveling 
expenses of the Commissioners to our General Assemblies, and to meet the 
contingent expenses of each Assembly, respectfully report : 

" It is affirmed, Form of Government ^ Chap, xxii, Section 3, that, 'in order, 
as far as possible, to procure a respectable and full Delegation to all our ju- 
dicatories, it is proper that the expenses of ministers and elders, in their 
attendance on these judicatories, be defrayed by the bodies which they re- 
spectively represent.' 

" The principle is thus established, that provision should be made for the 
payment of the traveling expenses of Commissioners to the General Assembly . 
This provision should be made by the Presbyteries. As far as possible, the 
feebler Presbyteries should be aided in this matter by the stronger. It ap- 
pears just and reasonable, and so has been found by experience, that the 
estimated contingent expenses of each Assembly, and the traveling expenses 
of the Commissioners in coming to and returning from the Assembly, should 
be fully met by tlie apportionment of the whole amount among the several 
Presbyteries, according to the number of their communicants respectively. 

" It is, therefore recommended — 

"1. Tliat the Standing Committee on Mileage, annually appointed, be in- 
structed to present an estimate of the probable amount that will be needed 
by the next General Assembly, in order to meet their contingent expenses 
and the traveling expenses of tlieir Commissioners, with a statement of the 
per capita rate, based on the number of communicants, that will be needed 
to secure the amount. 

"2. That the Presbyteries, at their Stated Meeting next following the 
adjournment of the General Assembly, apportion the amount required of 
their churches as they deem best. 

"3. That the churches be instructed to pay over their respective appor- 
tionments at the Stated Meeting of their Presbyteries next preceding the 
meeting of the General Assembly, — tlie whole amount due from the Presby- 
tery to be forwarded to the Assembly by their Commissioners. 

"4. That, as early as the fourth day of the sessions of tlie Assembly, the 
apportionment of each Presbytery be paid in full, and a bill of the necessary 
traveling expenses of its Commissioners be presented to the Standing Com- 
mittee on Mileage. — N.B. It is understood that Commissioners, both in com- 
ing to and returning from the Assembly, will avail themselves of any commu- 
tation of fares tliat may be offered in season ; and that in other cases they 
are to take, when practicable, tlie most economical route ; no allowance to be 
made for extra accommodations on the way. Also, that no one will charge 
for return expenses unless he intends to go back to his field of labor ; and that 
no one on a business tour, or excursion of pleasure, will make a convenience 



May, A.D. 1884.] miscellaneous. 239 

of the meeting of the Assembly and expect payment of his traveling expenses 
from the Mileage Fund. Also, that Commissioners, as soon after their ar- 
rival as practicable, are to report themselves to the Committee of AiTange- 
ments, and have their respective places of abode assigned them. 

" 5. That the Mileage Committee, after appropriating from the whole sum 
an amount sufficient to meet the estimated contingent expenses of the Assem- 
bly, be instructed to audit these bills and pay them pro rata (if found in ac- 
cordance with the preceding regulations), as far as the funds will permit. 

"6.. That, in order to avail themselves of the proceeds of this fund, the 
Presbyteries must contribute their full proportion to it according to theper 
capita rate. 

"7. That every minister, and every vacant Church contributing to this 
Fund, connected with the Tresbyteries thus complying with the provisions 
of this plan, be entitled to a copy of the Annual Minutes of the General As- 
sembly. 

"8. That the Commissioners from Presbyteries in foreign lands receive 
their necessary traveling expenses, pro rata, from thek place of residence in 
this country. 

"The Committee further recommend, that the General Assembly enjoin 
upon the Committee of Arrangements for the respective meetings of the As- 
sembly, the importance of making early announcements (not later, if prac- 
ticable, than the first week of May) in respect to commutation of railroad 
and steamboat fares." 

In accordance with this system, every Presbytery is reqiiested to pay in full, 
next year, to the Stated Clerk of the General Assembly, a sum equal to four 
cents for Mileage, and one and one-half cents for Contingent Expenses, or in all 
five and one-half cents for every communicant under the care of their churches, 
as determined by their Statistical Eeport, herewith printed. This will en- 
title tlieir Commissioners to a full share in the apportionments for necessary 
traveling expenses. It is expected that these expenses will be fully met, if 
the Presbyteries comply with the recommendations of the Assembly. 

They are expected, also, to provide for an 

ENTERTAINMENT FUND. 

In addition to the Mileage Fund, the Assembly of 1877 made provision 
for a " Supplemental Contingent Expense Fund," to "be used for the pur- 
pose of meeting the expense of entertaining such Commissioners as are not 
otherwise provided for. " Each Presbytery is requested to contribute to this 
Fund a sum equal at least to one and one-half cents\)eY Church member, and 
to forward it with the Mileage Fund, to the Stated Clerk of the Assembly. 
It is to be disbursed by tlie Committee of Arrangements, whose bills for en- 
tertainment the Stated Clerk, as Treasurer, is authorized to pay, after they 
have been approved by an Auditing Committee. 

^° See, also, Minutes of 1883, pp. (552-653. 



II. THE ANNUAL MINUTES. 

The Minutes for 1884 will be supplied at One Dollar per copy, postage 
included. A copy will be sent, without charge, to the Stated Clerk of every 
Presbytery, and of every Synod ; also (in the case of every Presbytery that 
has paid its full apportionment to the Mileage Fund of the Assembly) to 
every ordained minister, and to the Session of each contributing Vacant 
Church, whose address is known; also to every ordained Missionary of the 
Foreign Presbyteries. 

III. SYNODICAL EEPOETS. 

A Statistical Report is to be forwarded to the Assembly by the Stated Clerk 
of every Synod ; in which are to be stated the number and names of the 
Presbyteries within their bounds ; the changes which may have been made in 



2-iO MISCELLANEOUS. [^'lay? 

tlie number or arrangements of their Presbyteries; the names of the Stated 
Clerks of the Presbyteries ; the place and hour of the next Annual Meeting ; 
and tlie names of the M(xlerator and Stated Clerk of the Synod. A blank 
Avill be sent to the Stated Clerk of every Synod, near the close of the calendar 
year, whicli sliould be filled up, and forwarded, without delay, to the Stated 
Clerk of the Assembly. 



IV. PRESBYTERIAL REPORTS. 

It is required of every Presbytery to prepare and forward to the General 
Assembly : 

1. A titatistical jBej^orf, according to the form exhibited on page 243 of the 
present Appendix ; of which a printed blank will be furnished in due season, 
by order of tlie Assembly, to the Stated Clerk of every Presbytery. This 
Report should, if possible, embrace all the changes in the Presbytery previous 
to the tirst day of April. 

2. A narrative of the State of Religion within the bounds of the Presbytery, 
for the year ending April 1st. Tuese JSfarratives should specify facts in 
regard to the particular churches, their state, trials, encquragements, and 
prospects; how many of them, and which, have enjoyed revivals of religion 
through the year ; in which of them the Catechisms are taught, sabbath- 
schools and Bible-classes organized, with the number of scholars and teach- 
ers. Also , the various arrangements of the Presbytery for Chui"ch extension ; 
stating the number of their ministers, and the particular manner in which 
they are employed ; the number of theu- churches, and how they are supplied ; 
the number of new chiu'ches organized, and new houses of woi"ship erected ; 
what itinerant arrangements have been adopted for preaching the Gospel ; 
what and how much agency has been employed ; together with all such otlier 
facts and suggestions as will show, from year to year, what has been accom- 
plished, and what may need to be undertaken, to bring all the churches to a 
proper degree of effort to promote the kingdom of Christ. By order of the 
Assembly of 1880, a blank tor a Tabulated Statement of facts will annually 
be forwarded to the Stated Clerk of each Presbytery, to be filled properly, 
and duly reported to tlie Assembly. As the J^arrati ves are not to be publicly 
read, less care may be given to their style, and more to the detail of par- 
ticulars, sucli as will aid the Committee of the Assembly in preparing their 
Annual General Narrative of the State of the Chui-ch. 



Y. STATED CLERKS OF PRESBYTERIES. 

In preparing the Statistical Report, let the following RULES be strictly 
observed : 

(1) Carefully copy the blank form and order of columns, etc., on page 
1^ 243, if a blank has not been received. 

(2) Record Ministers in the order of their mustisterial age, with their 
Christian names in full, without abbreviations, and their address on the 
same line, in the adjoining column. 

(3) 1^ Place the name of every Church and Mission Chapel opposite the 
name of its Pastor, or Staled Supply ; never opposite the name of any other 
minister ; if the Church is Vacant, place it at the foot of the roU..^ 

(4) Place, after the name of every minister, an abbreviation, denoting his 
occupation; e.(/.. P., for a Pastor; P. E.,for a Pastor Elect ; C. P., for a 
Colleague Pastor; A. P.,for an Associate Pastor ; S. S. for a Stated Supply ; 
H. M., for a Home Missionary ; D. M., for a District Missionary; C. M., 
for a City Missionary ; T. M., for a Tract Missionary ; S. M. for a Synodical 



A.D. 1884.] MISCELLANEOUS. 241 

Missionary ; S. S. M., for a Sunday-school Missionary ; P. M., for a Presby- 
terial Missionary ; P.M., for a Foreign Missionary ; Pres., for tlie President 
of a College ; Chan., for a Chancellor ; Prof., for a Professor of a College or 
Theological Seminary ; Prin., for the Principal of an Academy, etc. ; Sec, 
for a Secretary, and D. Sec, for District Secretary of a Benevolent Institu- 
tion ; Ag., for an Agent of do. ; Ch., for a Chaplain ; Tea., for a Teacher ; 
Ed., for an Editor; Ev., for an Evangelist; H. R., for a Minister honorably 
retired; Col., for a Colporteur; Com., for a Commissioner; Supt., for a 
Superintendent; Libr., for a Librarian; and W. C, for other Ministers 
without charge. 

(5) Place after the name of every Churchthe abbreviations, P., for one 
that has a Pastor; P. E., for one that lias a Pastor Elect ; S. S., for one that 
has a Stated Supply; and Y., for one that is Vacant. 

(6) If a Church fail to report, let the '• whole number " of communicants 
be given as reported to the Synod, or to the last Assembly, with an asterisk 
(*) in the column of communicants, denoting the fact. 

(7) In the Additions to the Cliurch, distinguish between those on examina- 
tion and those on certificate ; in the Baptisms, between the adults and the 
infants ; and be careful to observe the order of the columns m which these 
particulars are recorded. 

(8) In the report of " Funds " contributed, observe the order of the col- 
umns, and the directions of the Assembly of 1871 (p. 589) as modified by the 
Assemblies of 1873, 1874 and 1883, as follows : 

1. Home Missions. To include all moneys collected for the purpose, 
whether for the Board, or for any Home Missionary operations, including 
Mission Schools, carried on in connection with the Presbyteries. 2. Foreign 
Missions. To include all contributions for the spread of the Gospel in foreign 
lands. 3. Education. To include all that is given f»r the education of Can- 
didates for the Ministry, whetlier to the Board or otherwise; for Theologi- 
cal Seminaries, Presbyterian Colleges, Academies and Parochial Schools. 4. 
Publication Missionary Fund. To include all moneys contributed to the 
Board for their Missionary work, and for Synodical and Presby terial Deposi- 
taries. 5. Church Erection. To include all contributions for Church Erec- 
tion, outside of the congregation, whether through the Board or otherwise. 
6. Belief Fund. To include all moneys contributed for the support of dis- 
abled Ministers, and to aid the families of deceased Ministers. 7. Freedmen. 
To include all moneys contributed to the evangelization and education of 
Freedmen, whether through the Board or otherwise. 8. Aid for Colleges. 
All given for Presbyterian Colleges and Academies, whether established for 
the education of males or females. 9. Sustentation. Contributions to the 
Board of Home Missions for Pastoral Sustentation. 10. General Assembly. 
To include all given for Ecclesiastical expenses. 11. Congregational. To in- 
clude all moneys contrilnited for the congregation, the salary of the minis- 
ter, the support of the Parish Sunday-school, the relief of the poor of the 
congregation, building and repairing churches, liquidation of debts, and 
cxirrent expenses. 12. Miscellaneous. To include all other collections, for 
Bible and Tract Societies, etc., and for genei'al benevolence. 

Be sure to omit the fractions of the dollar, except in the General 
Assembly column. 

(9). The names of the Licentiates are to be recorded immediately after the 
list of Ministers, in the same column, with their Address in the next column ; 
but of the Candidates — including all who are studying for the ministry under 
the care of the Churches of the Presbytery — the mwiber only is to be given. 

(10) i^ADD UP"^ and verify every column of figures, and Authen- 
ticate the Report with your signature. 

(11) Annex a Statement of the number of licensures, ordinations, installa- 
tions, dissolution of pastoral relations, organizations, reception and dissolu- 
tion of Cliurches ; also, any changes in the names of Churches ; and the de- 
cease (with age, date and place) of Ministers since the last Annual Report. 

(12) Avoid erasures and interlineations, make names and numbers 
distinctly legible, and punctuate properly. 

16 



242 MISCELLANEOUS. [May, 

(!.") Affix no extraneous matter, such as memoranda, explanations, or 
orders for the delivery of the printed Minutes of tlie Assembly ; let these be 
given on a separate sheet ; also, every Overture to the Assembly. 

Revise your Report, and find out its defects. Put in the commas and 
periods that are wanting ; fill out the abbreviations ; supply the Christian 
name of every minister (an initlnl letter is not a name) ; and see that every 
name and figure is perfectly legible. 

i^^'If an}i:hing should prevent the forvs^arding of the Statistical Report in 
time for the meeting of the General Assembly, let it be sent as soon as pos- 
sible — not later than June 1st — by mail, to the Stated Clerk of the 
General Assembly, Princeton, New Jersey. 



A.D. 1884.] 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



243 



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MINISTERS, 
LICENTIATES, 

AND 
CANDIDATES. 


John Smith, D.D., P. 
Richard Roe, S.S. 
Timothy Brown.lI.R.— 3. 

Licentiates. 

Edward Jones, S.S. 
John Ciilvin, Tea. 
Thomas Williams, Ag. — 3. 

Candidates, 3. 



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MISCELLANEOUS. 



[Maj, 



yi. SUCCESSION OF MODERATORS. 



1789—1837. 



A.D. NAME. 

1789, *John Rodgers, D.D., of 

1790, *Robert Smith, D.D., 

1791, *John Woodhull, D.D., 

1792, *John King, D.D., 

1793, * James Latta, D.D., 

1794, ^Alexander McWhorter, D.D., 

1795, *Jolm McKnight, D.D., 

1796, * Robert Davidson, D.D., 

1797, *William Mackay Tennent, D.D., 

1798, *John Blair Smith, D.D., 

1799, *S. Stanhope Smith, D.D., LL.D., 

1800, * Joseph Clark, D.D., 

1801, *Nathaniel Irwin, 

1802, *Azel Roe, D.D. , 

1803, *James Hall, D.D., 

1804, *James Francis Armstrong, 

1805, * James Richards, D.D., 
180G, *Samuel Miller, D.D., LL.D., 

1807, *Archibald Alexander, D.D., 

1808, *Philip Milledoler, D.D., 

1809, *Drnry Lacy, 

1810, *John Brodhead Romeyn, D.D., 

1811, *Eliphalet Nott, D.D., LL.D., 

1812, *Andrew Flinn, D.D., 

1813, *Samuel Blatchford, D.D., 

1814, *James Inglis, D.D., 

1815, *William Neill, D.D., 
1810, *James Blythe, D.D., 

1817, *Jonas Coe, D.D., 

1818, * Jacob Jones Janeway, D.D., 

1819, *John Holt Rice, D.D., 

1820, *John McDowell, D.D., 

1821, *VVilliam Hill, D.D., 

1822, *Obadiah Jennings, D.D., 

1823, *John Chester, D.D., 

1824, *Ashbel Green, D.D., LL.D., 

1825, *Stephen N. Rowan, D.D., 

1826, *Thomas McAuley, D.D., LL.D., 

1827, *Francis Herron, D.D., 

1828, *Ezra Stiles Ely, D.D., 

1829, *Benjamin Holt Rice, D.D., 

1830, *EzraFisk, D.D., 

1831, *Nathan S. S. Beman, D.D., LL.D. 

1832, *James Hoge, D.D., 

1833, *Wm. Anderson McDowell, D.D., 

1834, *Philip Lindsley, D.D., 

1835, *William Wirt Phillips, D.D., 

1836, *Jolm Witherspoon, D.D., LL.D., 

1837, *David Elliott, D.D., LL.D., 



PRH8BTTEKT. 

New York, at 
New Castle, 
N. Brunswick, 
Carlisle, 
New Castle, 
New York, 

a 

Carlisle, 

Philadelphia, 

Albany, 

N. Brunswick, 

u 

Philadelphia, 
New York, 
Concord, 
N. Brunswick, 
New York, 

Philadelphia, 

New York, 

Hanover, 

New York, 

Albany, 

Harmony, 

Columbia, 

Baltimore, 

Albany, 

W. Lexington, 

Columbia, 

Philadelphia, 

Hanover, 

Jersey, 

Winchester, 

SteubenviUe, 

Albany, 

Philadelphia, 

New York, 

u 

Ohio, 

Philadelphia, 
Hanover, 
Hudson, 
,Troy, 
Columbus, 
Charleston, Un. 
W. Tennessee, 
New York, 
Harmony, 
Ohio, 



PtAOE. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Carlisle, " 

Philadelphia, " 

Carlisle " 

Philadelphia, " 



Winchester, Ya. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Pittsburgh, " 
Philadelphia, " 



A.D. 1884.] 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



245 



1838 1869. 



1. (O. S. BRANCH.) 



PRESBYTERY. 



*Wm. Swan Plumer,D.D.,LL.D., of East Hanover, at Philadelphia, Pa. 
*Joshua Lacy Wilson, D.D., Cincinnati, " " 

*William Morrison Engles, D.D., Philadelphia, " " 

*Rob'tJ.Breckinridge,D.D.,LL.D., Baltimore, " 

*John Todd Edgar, D.D., Nashville, " 

^Gardiner Spring, D.D., LL.D., I^ew York, " 

*George Jnnkin, D.D., LL.D., Oxford, Lonisville, Ky. 

*John Michael Krebs, D.D., New York, Cincinnati, O. 

*Charles Hodge, D.D., LL.D., New Brunswick, Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Jas. H. Thorn well, D.D., LL.D., Charleston, Eichinond, Va. 

Alex'r T. McGill, D.D., LL.D., Ohio, Baltimore, Md. 

^Nicholas Murray, D.D., Elizabethtown, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

*Aaron W. Lelaud, D.D., Charleston, Cincinnati, O. 

Edw. P. Humphrey, D.D., LL.D., Louisville, Saint Louis, Mo, 

*John Chase Lord, D.D., Buffalo City, Charleston, S. C. 

*John Clark Young,*T).D., Transylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. 

*nenry Augustus Boardman, D.D., Philadelphia, Buffalo, N. Y. 

*Nathan Lewis Rice, D.D., Saint Louis, Nasliville, Tenn. 

*rrancis McFarland, D.D. , Lexington, New York, N.Y. 

*Cortland Van Rensselaer, D.D., Burlington, Lexington, Ky, 

Wm. Anderson Scott, D.D., LL.D., California, New Orleans, La. 

*William L. Breckinridge, D.D., Louisville, Indianapolis, Ind. 
*John William Yeomans, D.D., Northumberland Rochester, N. Y, 

*Jno. Cliester Backus, D.D., LL.D., Baltimore, Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Charies C. Beatty, D.D., LL.D., Steubenville, Columbus, O, 

* John Hunter Morrison, D.D. , Lodiana, Peoria, 111. 

* James Wood, D.D., Madison, Newark, N. J, 
John Cameron Lowrie, D.D., New York, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Robert Livingston Stanton, D.D.,Chillicothe, Saint Louis, Mo, 

*Phineas Dinsmore Gurley, D.D., Potomac, Cincinnati, O. 

*Geo. W. Musgrave, D.D., LL.D., Phila. Central, Albanv, N. Y. 

*M. W, Jacobus, D,D., LL.D,, Ohio, New York,N.Y, 



2. (n. s. branch,) 



at Philadelphia, Pa, 



*Samuel Fisher, D.D., of Newark, 

*Baxter Dickinson, D.D,, Cincinnati, 

*William Wisner, D.D., Ithaca, " " 

*AnselDoanEddy, D.D., Newark, " " 

*Samuel Hanson Cox, D.D. , LL.D., Brooklyn, " " 

*PhilipCourtlandt Hay, D.D., Tioga, " " 

David H. Riddle, D.D., LL.D,, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Mich, 
*Albert Barnes, Philadelphia, 4th,Utica, N. Y. 

*William Adams, D.D., LL.D,, New York, 4th, Wasliington,D,C 

*Diarca Howe Allen, D.D., Cincinnati, Buffalo, N, Y. 

*Thomas H. Skinner, D.D., LL.D.,New York, 3d, Pliiladelphia, Pa, 

*Wm. Carpenter Wisner, D.D. , Niagara, Saint Louis, Mo, 

Laurens P. Hickok, D.D., LL.D. Troy, New York,N,Y. 

*Sam. Ware Fisher, D.D., LL.D., Cincinnati, Cleveland, O, 

Matthew L, P, Thompson, D.D., Buffalo, Chicago, 111. 

Robert Wilson Patterson, D.D. , Chicago, Wilmington,Del. 

*Thornton Anthony Mills, D.D., Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, Pa, 

*Jonathan Bailey Condit, D.D., Cayuga, Syracuse, N. Y. 

*George Duffield, D,D„ Detroit, Cincmnati, O, 



246 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



[May, 



PRESBYTERY. 



l.SGM, *IIenvy B. Smith. D.D.,LL.D., of X(nvynik,4tli,atPhil;Klelpliia,Pa. 



1KG4, *Thonias Braineid. D.T)., 
IS'io, James Bovlan Shaw. D.D.. 
18Gfi, Samuel ^filo Hopkins, D.l). , 

1867, ITeiiiv Addison Nelson, D.D., 

1868, Jonathan French Stearns, D.D. 



rhiladelphia,4th,i:>ayton, O 
]?oehester, Brooklyn, N. Y 



Caynjra, 
Saint Louis, 
Xewark, 



1869, *Philemon Halsted Fowler, D.D., Utica, 



Saint Lonis, Mo. 
Rochester, N.Y. 
Harrisburs, Pa. 
New York, N.Y. 



1870—1884. 



1870 
1871 
1S72 
1873 
TS74 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 

I87n 

1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 



J. Trumbull Backus, D.D.,LL.D. , Albany, at Philadelphia, Pa. 

*Zeph. Moore Humphrey, D.D., [of Piiiladelphia, Chicago, 111. 

Samuel J. Niccolls, D.D., Saint Louis, Detroit, Mich. 

Howard Crosby, D.D. , LL.D., New York, Baltimore, Md. 

*Samuel J. Wilson, D.D., LL.D., Pittsburgh, Saint Louis, Mo. 

Edward David Morris, D.D., Cincinnati, Cleveland, O. 

Henry Jackson Yan Dyke, D.D. , Brooklyn, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

James EellsD.D., LL.t).. San Francisco, Chicago, 111. 

Francis L. Patton, D.D., LL.D., Chicago, Pittslnirgh, Pa. 

Henry Harris Jessup, D.D., Lackawanna, Saratoga, N. Y. 

Wm.M. Paxton, D. D., LL.D., New York, Madison, Wis. 

Henry Darling, D.D., LL.D., Albany, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Herrick Johnson, D.D., LL.D., Cliicago, Springfield, 111. 

*Edwin Francis Hatfield, D.D., New York, Saratoga, N. Y. 

Geo. P. Hays, D.D., Denver, Saratoga, N. Y. 



YII. SUCCESSION OF STATED 
CLERKS. 

1789 1837, 

1789, *George DufTield, D.D., 

1790, *Ashbel Green, D.D., LL.D., 
1803, *Philip Milledoler, D.D., 
1806, ^Nathaniel Irwin, 

1807^ *Jacob Jones Janeway, D.D., 
1817, ^William Neill, D.D., 
1825, *Ezra Stiles Ely, D.D., 
1836, *Jolin McDowell, D.D. 

1838 1869. 

1. (O. S. BRAKCH.) 

1838, *John McDowell, D.D., 
1840, *Wm, Morrison Engles, D.D., 
1846, Willis Lord, D.D., LL.D., 
1850, Jolm Leyburn, D.D., 
1862, Alex. T. McGill, D.D., LL.D. 

2. (n. s. branch.) 

4.338, *Erskine Mason, D.D., 

1846, *Edwin Francis Hatfield, D.D. 

1870 1884. 

1870, *Edwin Francis Hatfield, D.D., 
1884, William Henry Roberts, D.D. 



VIII. SUCCESSION OF PERMA- 
NENT CLERKS. 

1789-1837. 

1802, ^Nathaniel Irwin, 
1807, *John Ewing Latta, 
1825, *John McDowell, D.D., 

1837, *John Michael Krebs, D.D. 

1838-1869. 

1. (O. S. BRANCH.) 

1838, *John Michael Krebs, D.D., 
1845, *Robert Davidson, D.D., 
1850, Alex. T. McGill, D.D., LL.D., 
1862, Wm. Edward Schenck, D.D. 

2. (n. s. branch.) 

1838, *Eliphalet W. Gilbert, D.D., 
1854, Henry Darling, D.D., LL.D., 
1864, J. Glentworth Butler, D.D. 

1870-1884. 

1870, *Cyrus Dickson, D.D., 

1882, William Henry Roberts, D.D. , 

1884, William Eves Moore, D.D. 



A.D. 1884.] MISCELLANEOUS. 247 



IX. STANDING ORDERS. 

• 

1. The General Assembly meets invariably on the third Thursday of May, 
annually, at 11 o'clock A.M. 

2. The credentials of Commissioners and Delegates are to be presented at 
a previous hour of the same day, or of the preceding day, according to public 
notice, to the Stated and Permanent Clerks, acting as a Permanent Com- 
mittee on Commissions. 

3. The Lord's Supper is to be celebrated by the Assembly on the evening 
of Tluu'sday, the first day of its sessions. 

4. The evenings of the days of session are assigned to popular meetings in 
the following order : 

The evening of Friday, the second day, to the sabbath-school interests of 
the Church. 
The evening of Monday, the fourth day, to Missions among the Freedmen. 
The evening of Tuesday, the fifth day, to the Home Mission Work. 
The evening of Wednesday, the sixth day, to the Foreign Mission Work. 
The evening of Friday, the eighth day, to the cause of Temperance. 

5. The reports of the Standing Committees shall be considered at the times 
herein designated, viz. : 

Ministerial Relief, Saturday, at 10 o'clock A.M. 

Freedmen, Monday, at 10 o'clock A.M. 

Home Missions, Tiiesday, at 10 o'clock A.M. 

Foreign Missions, Wednesday, at 10 o'clock A.M. 

Publication, Wednesday, at 8 o'clock P.M. 

Education, second Thursday, at 10 o'clock A.M. 

CluH-ch Erection, second Thursday, at 3 o'clock P.M. 

Benevolence, second Friday, at 11 o'clock A.M. 

Temperance, second Friday, at 3 o'clock P.M. ' 

Aid for Colleges and Academies, second Saturday, at 10 o'clock A.M. 

6. The Stated Clerk sliall receive all Memorials, Overtures, and other 
papers addressed to the General Assembly, shall make record of the same, 
and then deliver them to the Standing Committee on Bills and Overtures. 

7. All Special Committees appointed by one General Assembly to report 
to the next Assembly, shall be ready to present their reports on the second 
day of the session. 



248 



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1-1 1-H 


CHURCHES. 


Olivet, S.S. 
Mount Pleasant, S.S 

James Island, S.S. 
Edisto, S.S. 
Salem, S.S. 
Rivers Chapel, S.S. 
VVallingford, S.S. 
Bethel, S.S. 
Zion, S.S. 
Hebron, S.S. 
Summerville, S.S. 
Mount Lisbon, S.S. 
Harm'y Chap., S.S. 
Bethlehem, S.S. 
Melina S.S. 
Consiruity, S.S. 
Trinity, S.S. 
Friendship, S.S. 
Goodwill, S.S. 
Ebenezer, S.S. 


t/3 

w 

K 
P 






Charleston, S.C. 

Bluffton, 
Charleston, " 
Edisto Island, " 

Charleston, " 
Sumter, " 


Mayesville, '• 
Sumter, " 




LICENTIATES, 
AND CANDIDATES. 


H 

< 



Q 


CO 
1— i 


10 


Thomas A. Grove, S.S. 

J. Douglass Robertson, W. C. 
H. Hampleton Hunter, S.S. 
Ishmael S. Moultrie, S.S. 

Elias Garden, S.S. 
Job Jackson, S.S. 


John C. Simmons, S.S. 
Charles S. West, S.S. 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF ATLANTIC. 



251 



t- — c- ■* ic ts cs 
O'J CO CO th Jr- 




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00 




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w CO Tt< o »c 

tH 


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th CO (M tH C<J 


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tH 


eo-«t«eoeoeOTtiTi<eOTH 


■* TjHCOCO 


Tramanuel, S.S. 
Hopewell, S.S. 
Aimwell, S.S. 
St. Michael's, S S. 
St. Paul, S.S. 
Calvary. S.S. 
St. Andrew's, S.S. 
Beaufort, Salem, S.S 


■j5 . 

a ., 


CO 
CO 

C 

c 

D 

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Mills River. S.S. 
Emanuel, S.S. 
Concord, S.S. 
Bethpage, S.S. 
Dutchman's Creek, 
Caldwell, S.S. [S.S. 


Philadelphia, S.S. 
St. Paul, S.S. 
Salem Hill, S.S. 
Mt. Zion. S.S. 
Love's Chapel, S.S. 


McClintock, P. 
Mt. Olives, P. 
Davidson Coll., S.S. 
Huntersville, S.S. 


tn" 


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: 








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252 



SYNOD OF ATLANTIC. 



[May, 



snoenvi 

-1908IW 










am ot- ODO osic-^o^cicciocco cocociooo 
ooco cjt- -<»'-<i' owriio — — icooco cc-HTft-rri- 


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00 th CO jo T-l T-t CO th •* •<* o -* 00 CO lo — 1 o ■* ■* •* CO ^ t- ffi 

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CO T-l T-l T-l T-l 


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00 

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s Pi Sg g| .S S^ ^ ^2 |>^|^ 
t»4 ^w pqp:^ ti 4p5 < H 4 ^.^^s 


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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF ATLANTIC. 



253 





o 

LO 


OtP 




OJ CO o o 


eo 


1750 
200 


o 
o 


O O IC O IC o 

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l-H l-H O l-H 


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T-OO 

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l-H 


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£> tH tH l-H T-l 










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1-1 <N 










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Mary 
Rave 






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Jacks 
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254 



SYXOD OF ATLANTIC. 



[May, 



1 sooon«[ 




ot-os 


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CO 






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55 


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A.D 1884.] 



SYNOD OF ATLANTIC. 



255 





CO 


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04 JO 


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T-l 


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OOOO 0000 JOI>00 wo JO 0<M JO JO 
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256 



SYNOD OF ATLANTIC. 



[May, 





O^CQ« 


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New Hope, S.S. 
St. James, P. 
Holbrook St., S.S. 
Ebenezer, S.S. 
Chapel Hill, S.S. 
Wilson, S.S. 


Laurinburgh, S.S. 
Church St., S.S. 
Gold Hill, S.S. 
Oakland. S.S. 
Catawba River, S.S. 
Fayetteville, S.S. 
Friendship, S.S. 
Anderson Creek, 
St. Paul, S.S. [S.S. 
Lexington, S.S. 
Thomasville, S.S. 
Carthage, S.S. 
Cool Spring, S.S. 
Blue's Crossing,S.S 
Mocksville. S.S. 
Mt. Zion, S.S. 
Shiloh, S.S. 
Chadbourn, S.S. 


[S.S. 
Company's Shops, 

Mt. Vernon, V. 

r KQ 


i 


CO 

w 


Greensboro, N.C. 
Danville, Va. 
New Berne, N. C. 
Laurinburgh, " 


Salisbury, " 
Bear Poplar, " 
Fayetteville, " 

Louisburgh, " 
Lexington, " 

Carthage, " 

Mocksville, " 

Goldsboro, " 
Chadbourn, " 
New Berue, " 


2 a 




MINISTERS AND LICENTIATES. 


Edward H. Garland, P. 
]\Iagager G. Hoskins, S.S. 
Allen A. Scott, S.S. 
George Carson, S.S. 


Francis C. Potter, S.S. 
John G. Murray, S.S. 
Eli Walker, 

Reuben H. Armstrong, S.S. 
Lewis D. Twine, S.S. 

Henry D. Wood, S.S. 

James H. Crawford, S.S. 

Clarence Dillard, S.S. 
Henry C. Mabry, S.S. 
John A. Savage, W. C— 25. 


GO ^ 
^ 02 

1 'S 1 


5 

i 

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5 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF BALTIMORE. 



257 



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262 



SYNOD OF BALTIMORE. 



[May, 



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eoeo 
t- to 

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A.D. 1884.] 



SYXOD OF CHINA. 



26;) 






ci 

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§ 




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10»0C0THOOt-C0C5 

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O 00 CO o 
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5 10 

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CO 


"^ O 
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ioooooe4-*eoo4oo 

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■«* c^ 00 




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SVXdJi OF CHINA. 



[^r^y, 









§53 ^ « 


§ 


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i-t 00 a 

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1-1 


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30 TfMrH CQO«i-l<MC« (M ^ cq 




CHURCHES. 


Shik lung, l.'^t, S S. 
Lin po, fst, S.S. 
Canton, 2d, P.— 7. 

Yu-Yiao, P. 
Bao ko tah, P. 
Flangchow, P 

Tstu-Ong. P. 
Fu-saen, P. 
Saen-poh, P. 
Ningpo, P. 
Kao-gyiao, P. 

Sing-z, P. 

Zoug-Yu, P.E. 
Dziang oz, V. 
Out-station.— 12. 


1 

ADDRESS, 

Canton, China. 

SanWui City, " 
SanFrancisco, Cal. 
London, Eng. 

Ningpo, China. 

FTangcliow, " 
Ningpo, " 

Uangchow " 

Ningpo, " 
Tong-Yiang, " 


CO 

< 

^ . 

w 

iz; 
«: 

CO 


U. Lik-kan, 8.S. 

Kwan Loy, P. 
Lai-Po-tsuri, Ev. 
Daniel Vrooman, 
Varnum D. Collins. — 10. 


2. P)-esb. of Ningpo. 

Zia Ying-tong, Ev. 
Bao Kwong hyi, P. 
Uoh Cong-Eng, P. 
Tsiang Nving Kwc, P 
John Butler, F. M. 
Loll dong-wo, Ev. 
Yiang ling-tsiao, P. 
Lu Cing veng, P 

Zi Kyu6 Jing, P. 

Pao Kong-Kyuo, W.C. 
William J. McKee. F.M. 
Junius H. Jud.son, F.M. 
Yi Zong.toh, P. 
Frank V. Mills, F.M. 
Yi Yin-coh, P.E.— 15. 

Licentiates. 


.ic a 

7-1S3 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF CHINA. 



265 









CO 


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C-OOOt- c- 








































































































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1-1 




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100«00 U3 
1-1 tH 




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CO 


CO -*(NM 
CO rH 




00 






360 


i-iOOG<lOOiH 
CO 








tH 


to 


i-( ec eo 1-1 o 
eo t-ioi-i-* 

rneo 1-1 








1-1 


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■i-i 




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i-iOO(N OOiH 

tH-* t-( 

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2m 



SYNOD OF COLORADO. 



[May, 






•raoBKV 

•nopnj 
-nejsng 

•s.lioo 

•nam 
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•noil 
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« c © CO o 

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CO C4tHt-I 



£- so C-O CO 



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t80(UOO«OjaOfc<c80 

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to "5 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF COLORADO. 



267 



ooo 

00 lO 


CO 




O iO 

in 04 


o «o 

iO04 


in 

00 

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o 


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9886 

1133 

13,781 

1668 


t-l-l 

t» CO 
CO 


oo 


OS 
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CO 

in 

CO 


oo 

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1-1 1-1 


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10 93 
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1 75 


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to 


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lo eo 
coin 


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00 U3 00 
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SYNOD OF COLORADO. 



[May, 



snoamix 
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jo; pvv 
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■OK 
aioqAi. 



SOOlfflOOTtlOSCOSDiOi-ieOi-HTHOOSQOTH 
CIt}<CJC*tH •^Ci CiTHCiCOi-Hd 



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pappv J ^ 



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-tH so CO-<*<K> 00 Cl 50 i-H 







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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF COLORADO. 



2Cd 





CO 
CO 






s. 

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o 
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CO tH 












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oo 

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1-1 1+1 eo eo 1-1 


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270 



SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA, 



[May, 







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MINISTERS AND LICENTIATES. 


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; O .- O ='._-«-, ryj .a .PhK i."^ S ~ 







A.D. 1384.] SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA. 271 

do"cc i?i'^«o eol^ eo 00 c- ^h th its 





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9 70 



SYNOD OF THE COLUMBIA. 



[May, 



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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



273 



157 


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18 



274 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



[May, 



snoaaci 
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l«J9U0jr) 

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■8.II00 
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o wi — o m -f c-j o o o o lo o cc o ic ic o o 

c£ o t- ic 00 CO o '-I o o 1.- -^ ic c o <?> t- ^ rr 

TT i.-; 1- x:' OC l~ IC iC CO CO ■* O C -^ CO d C< C5 <M 



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£- 00 50 <D T-1 OS eo eo CO lo CD o* 



Ot-iooot-oioiOio'ot-ioioooir^oooo 

0SOCDl0C0O<MC0t-<M00C<0"»OC0«0t-T-IC0 
CQ O* tH (N -^ t-i »H 03 ©J C4 rH 



tHOOCO -"^iOCOCO CilO THrtiCjT-li-l-^-^ 



I 00 -* CO lO IN 00 O 



CO CO 1-1 



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A.D. 1884] 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



275 





a 


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^a^o-s 'H 

> 2 o ^ >-. e3 

o a — J r-) tH 

§al-^ " 

^O— a — ~: 

>H (D eS "-I 'O 

^9 a ^^ > 



w 

CD'S a* 

>^-t: o 

is- 

hH e3 O 



a.«: 



a.^ 
'a $ 
■c.pL, 



« 



oa 



276 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



[May 



f<n03D1ll 




— ir; ■?» 








§ 

1-1 


o 


O IO 
r1 e» 


s § 


•1«,ibS 
■9jSuo3 




TO o o o 
-r i-r o o 

C2 T«l 05 CO 
t- CO 




C5 O C>J 

o o lo 

CO o -^ 

COt-I 


00 o o o o 
OD lO O lO o 
CO C5 lO 1-1 


00 IO 
1—1 1-1 


CO CJ CO o 

CO -* coo 

1-1 00 00 00 
tH 1-1 r-t 


-<tl-OOOCOrHO 
r- lO O O O S5 CO IO 
COTjtQOOQOt-COOS 

T-I rH 


massv 
I»jan90 

nopnj 
-ndjsng 

JOJ ptv 


5 


o o o o 

lO •<* O iO 
-* O«0Q0 




ooo 
oo to 

OOJTt* 


s§s§s 


o o ooo o o 

05 CS ■* O t- !-■ o 
C? li* T-I t- C- ■* t- 


OOCOOOOO 

coeocsooiooo 
oi ■* « eo o ■* o 

1-1 rH 




IS 

1-1 








o 

tH 


coeo 

1-1 


o 


IO 




o 




CD 




^ 




t- 




•nam 
-paaij 
•pniia 
.latiaa 




O WO) 










oo 

1-1 


oi th o eo 

THi-Ol 


00 CD 




O »OC-<3» 




—< 00 

eo i-H 


(M 


1-1 (N 




1-1 O 1-1 

tH 1-1 « 


rH IO 
rH 


qjjtiqa 


o 


O CQCO 
»0 t-ItH 




■*10<3S 




S« 


00-^ 


lOQO loeo 

TH 1-1 1-1 


00 O* 00 


noijua 




CO 




t-(MCO 

I-H 




1-1 


CO 00 


Oi-i 
1-1 I-l 


c- ■>* 


-non 
-■Bonpa 

•ssiK 
nJSisao^ 


to 






05 iO o 




OlOi-l 

eo 


ooo 

T-I 


rH OS IO »-" 

CO 1-1 


JO <N >0 


03 


05 




COO lO 
CO 


00 


eo 


»OCJ 

I?? 


OJ-* IO(M 
lOO* ■* ->* 

tH 1-1 1-1 


IO eo • -*ooo* 
CO eorHco 

rH 


•sstK 
aniOH 


CO 


(NCOOO 
00 




C- O CO 

CO T-H 

CO 


T-t 


C~CO Oi 

cs 


T,M CO lO »0 C5 o c- 

lo o 1* -^ t- CO 

OJ 1-1 


-i*io-*cot-ooi;-co 

IO CO IO 


•raopi 

•s-s 


o 


oo oo 

l> lO CO cc> 

■^ 1-1 1-< 




^ lo <ri 

OiiO 
CO 1-1 T-I 


o 
eo 


»o IO 


o 00 
1-1 ©J 


IO o o o 

CQ 05-^0 
tH rid 


OS IO t- o o t- 
-* C- JO OOSOO 

rH rH r- 


•dua 

sinujni 




O 05 




(M (M eo 




O 1-1 


00 


04 IO 1-1 


co CO eo eo 


•dug 
^VinpV_ 

•OK 
atoitM. 


O r- 

* 


W T-iCO 




(M lO iO 

1-1 




0<?4i-i 


o 00 
1-1 


^ ^ ^ 


TH040 tHJ> 


03 (M C- O 


* 


rH O lO 
OOCO 


oo O ^ tH 

la la to T-I 
CO 


o -^ 1-1 o JO 1— 1 CO 

IO -* 1-1 C- CS T)< 00 

1-1 T-I 1-1 tH 


a»i>oooioiocoio 

05-*eOrHCOC^CDO 
rH 1-1 rH 


•jaO no 
pappv 


(M 


CO l-lCO 
CO T-i 




004-* 


Oi 


CO CO 
1-1 


o o 


eo -ti -^ 

T-I T-I 


eo eo IO oi rH « 04 


•xauo 
pappv 


t- 


QiQiOlt- 




05 1-100 
1—: tH 1-1 


''"' 


1-1 C- tH 


eo c- 


IOCS CO 1-1 

T-I 


o«oo-<* loeo <M t- 

JO 


Sn,D'B9(I 


« 


CO (M 




CO CO OO 


1-1 


<M (M 


eooi 


rH 


rH CO 


•sjapia 


03 


00 CO CO CO 




eo-*io 


<M 


Tico eoeo 


CO ■* <M « eo JO o 

1-1 


coooso'«*<coeoeor}< 


CHURCHES. 


C-i 

.t: czj ,g '-'^ ^. rt 

^ a 3 ^ 1 § 

S ^ S -^ o ^ 


rt C3 02 2 

0) J o o 


C/2 

CO 




t* S 2 o S ^S 
^ <u mrj o a.i5 

tUraosHom 


fl 5 g ^-Sg d> 

O ^ g g -43 rt g o 




— :: 


^ * - - 


;; 


Z Z Z Z 


: 




: : 




:3^": : : : : : : 



M 


>i 


a 


.■S oT 


o 


or= 


< 


■'- > 




3i 




PhO 



a - 



a 0^ a:;3 ^ ^ tu 

-J g /H <-• en r^.— fc^ 



^ o-r ^ 






g ee a 
^xi o 
QOOQ 



bX) O c 
eS B a> 

OM PQ 



S.33§|nfe 
j3 o •- cc 'ti g a 

<us <= =^° a-- ^^3 



o . 

c o S 
" a ° 



y S a 



T3 03 =2 



ePn 

o ^ 



a.'s 



-a « 
— ^ O 

(u a a 
1^1-5 a 

= 2 a 
s a^ 

O) o 



P-i 

a? .a" 

ccPh-E 

• ^ 13 
03 fi^ ~ 



!- .5?. 



■is ^"PLh 

P^ bo 



CO . 



> CO 

Q a 

• o 

-id 



Ph»2 






1-^ 3 



ffi a 
'^ o 

a to to 



rQ ^ ^ 



^ 



t-5>-50^pH 



5 S3 






Fife: fe^ n 



^ U^ <^>^ 



« - 
ecQ 

CO a*^ 
<u on. 

*^ CO I^H 

a rf 03 
03 aw 

-a c3 
03 :3 a 



Ph '-' 



aPH ^ 

>H'ci;^ 

o3 t« :-" CO 



•* 



CO 
02 



2 a- 

03 .a o 

.§^§ 

b» ^ '-I 



g^pH^ 

P=i a • 0* 

^ <» « !-, oO 

<-i • OS o a> 
fePnWp^O 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



277 







CO 
00 
00 


o 
l?i 






^ 


«0 -^ iffl o c- o 
CO OJ CO lO (M CJ 

«5 05tH OtH 
tH 


IT* 


CO 
o 

00 


o 


o 
o 


o 

OS 
CO 
1—1 


ooo 
CO eoeo 


oooooooooo 

OOC*(?*T-100iCUOOO 
eOl>T-l03C5TH-<*C-COff« 


1-1 

o 

00 

CO 


o 
o 

cs 




o 

CO 

eo 


10 78 
4 18 
7 59 


CDi-ii-l 


CO 


(M 




CO 


'^ 


1-1 T-l 


1—1 


t- 


lO 


CO 

""eo" 


CO 


CQ T-l -r-H 


00 


00 


o 
eo 


ooo CO 


OS T-l t-l CO 


u 


CO 


§ 


eo 


00 ec* 


t- rH 1-1 


o 

CO 


t- 


1—1 


eo 


i>(M lO 


eo 1-1 th 


1-1 


-* 


»o 


•^ 


«r5(M ■* 


1-1 1-1 T-l 

1-1 


00 

1-1 
CO 


OS 


lO 


eo 


Citacn 


«0 (NOSi-lO 
tH OtH (>i 


CO 


CO 


o 


t- 


so 1-1 


O O CO 1-1 O <M CQ 
e» r-l CO T-( 1-1 


1-1 


CO 
Si 


1-1 
eo 


CO 

00 


la 


1-1 CO 00 


>0 lO oo t-o 

eo 05 1*1 o io -* 

1-1 tH 


00 

00 


o 

iH 


o 

1-1 


^ 


WOCD 
thOOO 

1-1 1-1 


©J (M i-i<N 




1-1 


<N 




1-1 <rj th 


eo 1-ti-i 


00 


1-1 




eo 




lO eo rH 


«000(MC010CQOOOCO«DODOC5 

-t»Oi-l(MOO«10eOOti«COi-n-ii-i 

* 1-1 * * * 


->* 


i-ii-i 00 


CO 


^ 


Otji CO 
1-1 


0« CO 




OS 


<M 


■^ 


eo 


1-1 eo 


O CO 1-1 <M 


00 

1-1 


OS 

(?* 

CO 


la 


OS 


o* 


1-1 1-'^ 

1-1 tH 


coth eoi-i « 


o 
to 


^^ 




<M 


i-ieo<M 


COtH «. -^jH (M rji eo 


<N 


OS 

CO 

1-1 


'Sf 


'^ 


"* 


lata-rf 



> 



> >. 









OQ 

o 

c3 

B 



GO 

S 



c3 



O s o 



c3 



<» a «--^ 







0) ;s "S TS 






27.^ 



SYi^OD OF ILLINOIS. 



[May 



-I908JW 


<MOO 

CO «n lo 


OTjfOOO 
rH O T-t O 






lOrH 


lO o o o o . 

t- C« « CO <M 


lO o 

rH OJ 


-ajSaoo 


o »c oo 
oo oo 

T-t r-( 


oooo^oeoioo 
oooor-oici^io<=> 

eOOCOO OOC- rH 
«i-( T-t 04 


o 
o 


CO oeo 

CO 7t 

T^ rH 




O ?0O lO 

-<r GO 




•raess-y 


OOOOO 

<?> o 00 ■* 


t- CO ■* 00 IC 1-1 00 o 

0Oi-(e<3OC-C5rH 

■^ — OOOOOr^CM 


Jfl Tj< O C5 lO O T»< 

lO O CD O TT 00 t- 

JO CO 10 O rH CO 


COOrHOrHCOOOrHO 
OO^COOCOOrHOCOSO 

OJ-rjtiocooiiorHcoweo 


•non«j 
-najstig 


eoio 


CO coco 00 






©?■* 




OS-* - 




•8.1100 


lO « « 


« ctco 

00^ 

CO 






o 

rH 




la r-> 




'nam 
-padjj 


•* eoooo 


lO t- t- 1« O 30 

(M T-ti-i 


^ 




<?1 rH 




t~ rH 

■T-< 


rH 


•pnni 


C-j- r)< O 


CO-* 00-* 00 00 
rH 


rH 
rH 




Ol c- 




CO rH ©JIO 




•n laaji 


C- r->OC- 


c- rjt CO eo CO oo 


CO 




<M •* 




CO ■* CO ^ 





qajnqo 
•aoii«o 

•notj 

-BDiipa 



9S1HI 

nSiejoj 
araog 



00 C5 K> t- 

c> aTioob"^ 



lo W) m CO 00 



to O lOOOO 



00M0£-0-*0 

t-oiooojci-n<o 

rH CJ OJ rH (M 



CO ■* CO CO 



r-< »-* (?? Oi'T 



e? rH rH 



rH CO 00 04 



lOQ no 
Vappv 
"xg no 

pappy 



CO Cl T-l 



£> CO CO Ci CO rH 



<yj ■* -*oi 



sn,0B9(i 



CO 01 CO a 



rH C^ C* CCi (M 



CO lO ■* <M 



rH rH Si 



■sjapia 



*l -* CO CO CO -* rH lO (?J »G> lO »0 -* <M CO <M CO CO M CQ ■<* rH CO'* 



m 

oJro oPh 

(H eg fcxj 
§ ci C .2 

OOC QPh 



Ph'cc PM 

d^ .t/5 . a 

•2 2 cT . . P^ CO 2 

rS ,1^ ■> OJ . ^Zi S D 

ap- rt «c 03 Qj p > 
^ ^iz;fo<aCiqco^ 










•5 >^^ = 2 



-si 



o 



.s" >; ^■' > ^ 



^ <u 

,,\ a '=' 



O" (S tH 






o 
:P3 S 






o o 2 
a CM 

O (-1 o 



'-'Qcd 

.02 



5H 3 

WH C3 C» 

a rt 9 
^ a o 
o o^ 



P5q 

o & ?* a 
q o ? S 

a g-c-o 



a g .to 

S^3 3 



PL, 
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P 



(H 

A 
1^ 



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CO • 

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P^ 

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02 

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S3 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF ILLIXOIS. 



279 



lOOOO 

t-Oi-i 

■l-l 








OS 
1— 1 




O t-QO t- 

1-1 


o 

a) 






1-1 

C0~ 


1400 


T-l 


o o 

CO o 

T-H 






CO 

o 

CO 


o 

o 


ot 


00 
CO 


lO 


CO 






(M 


1-1 


CO 

CO 


eo-* 


CD 
■I-H 


CO 


00'"* 


CO 


■-- «...:■: 


<N 


OS 

o 

T-l 


o 

T-l 


eoio 








ao 

T-l 


o 


o ta 


o 

CO 




. 


CO 
00 


tH 


tH 


CO 


00 
US 


OOStJ< 

T-l T-l 


ta o 

tH O 






co 


§ 


e» 


?^ 


CO 


Tl 








00 


1-1 




th 
CO 

07 


CO 


1O04 


OS 


•«*• 


<M 




lO 


CO 


CO 










1-1 T(H lo eo T-< <M -^ 


CO 

CO 

tH 


T^ 






1-3 t; 

So 






>:t- 



Q3> 



.s" 



tAa? 



5 -n . 

^ o a .s a 






§Sb-S.a 



3 a 
_ .. o *• 
■a a.a fc« 



a-' 

WO » 

a o o 
g o bO 



2 S ?n 

ari. tD 

0-3.3 



: a 



o 



WO 



CO p _t,r 
« .. fcca 

£S o~c2 






a; 



tt; a ^ 
(U I-HQ3 

o St? 



K 



O oj « g 
3 O 05 CO 

do ca 



age 

tn o3 
>- Ir-I 

Ph 
. t>> 

^^ 

P5h:1 



O 



.O 



P-i 

ego 
aJ ? a 

a occ 

.ao . 

_; --I ^ 
,. o o 



|Od 

<-4 ? o 
*^02 O 

.2 ^-fe 
a.a a 



d 



■S^S-a 

^ fl r: i* 
a a g"c3 



280 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



[May, 



Bnoen«i 



o» ta 

(M<M 



i-< (M 



■rt t- 



CO 1-1 






000 
woo 
t-woo 






t> 1-1 



o 10 
00 eo 



100 

com 



massy 



j^nejsng 

•8,1100 
joj piy 

•nein 
-paa-ij 
•pnnj 



C- 00 






•not} 
■Bonpa 



ti^iajoj 



CO OS 



■B8IIV 

etnog 



«s CO 

Jffl o 

C5 a 



•ni8K 

•S'S 


00-* 

T-H CO 


eooi 
0? 


T-l 


5C iO 

i-o 

■rneo 


^ 


10 

co 


00 

oc- 
eo (M 




lata 
la :£> 
la 


■dBg 
sjn'Bjni 

~^d^a 

snnpv 


(?4 

tH 


10 OS 
■<t 


(M 


t- 


TH 
■1-1 


« 


1000 


-*?D 


JOIO 

■1-1 




«eo 
eo 


«o 


1-1 £- 


10 


^ 


50 

T-l T-l 


« 


w 


■on 
eioqAV 


00 -*o 

rj( J>CS 


eoco 


JO 
■r-l 


t-eo 

OSl-H 
tH 


©4 

00 

eo 




1-1 

T-l eo 


50C- 


000 

t-os 


•aeo uo 
pappv 


OS 


■rH -* 


■* 


-I-H 


-<ii 


«o 


eoo 

tH oj 


eoc- 


eo 

JO 


■xa no 
pappy 


eoo» CO 


Ot-I 




T-l 


r-l 1-1 


s 


10 
1—1 


M>eo 
eo^ 


eoiM 


CO-* 

■1—1 


sn, 080(1 


<M 


t- 








0^ 


to 




joe? 


•sjepia 


eo 03 eo 


OitO 

1-1 


Iffl 


■«lieo 


10 


■^ 


oos 


co«o 


® Si 




CO PL, 



CO s- o 



,-^ ^_ CO 



02 0.^ 

d 



H 



Pho 

f^ g 

O 

Ph . 



o -^ 

So 



Ph g 



-:^^ 



Ph 



S a 



sa 



a> a 



be 



CO ,-, 



Qcc O 



0.2 




do 

bO-i^ 



OiJ 



Ph 

§ ad 



2, ^ 



'^1— I a 



S : ^z: : - 



a> 



2 O 

WO 



to 
-.5 22 a f^ 



^ o a a o o 

^j^^^iCQO 



a 



.P d « S^ = « 



g O 00 M « o 

-5 -3 o) a ;:: : .te 

S ,a in — O UH 

>-3 O O EiH t-s S 






Ph a i3 
QcBQ 



to 

o'.S d" 

be— bX) 

=S 5^ ^ 

o w o 

■3 -a 'a 

5^3 





1^ (<-; 


(^ 









^IhPh 


■^ 


m fc- 





C3 (!> 


<1 


P,«" 


M 


.>• 


« 


r^ 


Eh 


:;^ 






Iz; 


^ *> 




■^3 sj 


S 


WPh 



CO 

■ li ii Ph' a 
ado^ 

- «-§ 2 
p! .a o a 

t* O c4 ?3 



Ph . 

-O .-O 

1 OJ I— I 
bC . 

OJ O) p 






(^(i:^.p^, 

,mM aO- 
Q bcEf^a 

. « 2 (H 

a "n 2 o 
oOrx o 

'-= 9 a-2 






rPHpLi-r: 



Ph ~ 



Ph 

. M o 

I— ; !- 

t- t- a 
&;^ X 

02 si « 

^' ^^ O ^ rt ■ — ' hifc *~1 









c3 P 



bC g 



;h 




a 


^c»0 







S 


^ 


c 


cq 




t-l 










a 






,a 


<u 


d 



•s S tJ '^ s 



:^ 



,3 02 



■ o a — 

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« 






^ ^ a 

as 
2^ 



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02 



,p^ 

^ 2 • 
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J^w; 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



281 



c? c- 

Ci «0 CO -^ - Ci tH t-i 



CIS 



O OD CC O"? C' o o o 

o ■* o « in o o cQ 

OCSCCCSCO-i-^OOCO 
1-1 t- IC CO „- 10 tH 



O 00 

■— CO 



O W5 O 05 O 

o t~ o o t- 
o t- o o CO 



lO »o Ci CO CD 



O iO 1-1 ■«*< 



^: 



■>* CO «5 1-1 

T-H CS 



0-* t- «C '^ 



C0-I-HC5OO -^o^cs 
-<* -rtl t- CQ Cf T-I 



t~ 01 oi ccs^ C500-i-< 

OOt-GO§ T-lOr^C 
■?— 1 1— I T— -^ r^ -I— I 



JO T-H O^ CO 5S CO th 



WOOit-CS-r-OJO 
■rH(MlOC0-rt<lCC--i-l 

CO lyj'* 



C5COOOOOCOOO 

t-07C5«0»0-^00 
1-1 CO C- (N <M O CO (M 



CQ ic io (N »n lo T-I 



•>* CO lo «o e* 

C5 -1-1 

« 

— < »n lo 1— I <M 
CO c"? c* t- CO 



O CS <M O CO O 
O CD O ■* t- CO 
<M CO tH tH tH 



T}< (M tn lo-^ 



O T-H T-I O 



CO OS-* <M CO 



05 CC O O O? O W I- LO 

e? th CO o 3c -^ 'i^ »r: x» 

rflCOCICOt-T-i-r^ T-I 



Oi CC CO ■* CO" O 00 "oi"ob 

lo cj T-I CO CO 



-<i<ooobs50»o-<tiio 

-* CO CO -* Oi tH <?» 



"* o JO o CO lo 



00t-it-iio««tHt-iO 

t-T-t-OOlOlftT-llO 
T-1 LT <N C>J » TH T-I 



:^ 



CO OS 



« 



OS C5 CQ »0 CO 
-* CO CD 00 »0 

tH-* 



O t- tH 



t- OS ec ©* CO •* CO 



CO CO 



00t->OlO<MCO»C-*CO 



«-^O»Ct-00-*(M 



-^ t--^ CO OJ 



*^- •- . t,- Ph Ph «• 

« CO E •— *J rv ^r 
•^ bcPtH bJ) 



Fr 






o5|S' ^ 






-So s 



<iP-iO 



CQ 



cccc 



02 CO S „ 

ODWO 






- - « 2 3 



C o" (g oV'= o" 

£ bC 1^ btPH bo 
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OdKHH4w>^P5Wo^e^W^ci;i.Q§^w^f2P?^<i^<l^<!oow^ 



282 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



[May, 



-X90BJW 



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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS, 



283 



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T-l 


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lO 


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1-1 T-l CJtHi^J 1-1 


eo 80 lo o -<* 

tH 


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OS (TJ ■* ■<* 1-1 rl 


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osioQOoooso<Ni»ioeo»oooo-<roo»oeO'*oe»wt--<<* 
o -tp OS t- t- 00 io I-' th 1-1 oj 00 lo o CO o eo 

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a a to 1-1 d T-l 


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284 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



[May, 









'mossy 



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CiJfr-TH coio 



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smog 



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lad CO ici CO lo lo Ci CO CO oa CO 



« »0 •* iO O CO CO CO c« 

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CO CO o ic ■^ ■'C 



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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF, ILLINOIS. 



285 



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280 



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[May, 



raoen«i 



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ri G f ^ ii g n-. gj ni «» ni ~. w iTi u^ .^ i_ -^ tu :^ a> TO 1^ i-j i-i — —H fc« ai fcH ^— ►" ■— ; "-^ ■— •— ' CO 

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HW »i^»^^H^W<<^^^^S^Sc^J2^-<<1HHc2^ ^O 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



[May> 



8n09O«[ 




CO 

CO 

1-1 


Oio o<M oeoioo 
00 lo loeo cjth m 


\VAv8 


J2 "* 

00 




iJ5oo'?TOco^o-. 0'*o->* 

OS — t-MOCO:£XOi-(t-iN 

I- CJ -<1< 1-1 -H 


-massy 
IvisvtaQ 


o o o 

O t- 00 
<M OS 


o 


oooooooooooo 

occ»'*cjooow"<toooo 

<N»0 t-lO©»0000i-it-(M 

o* 1— 1 1-1 c} 1-1 1-1 


•nopuj 
-najsng 




CO 

00 


OS JO 1-1 « t-« 

1-1 


•s.Hoo 




t- 


«oo Tj< OS 

T-l O IPH 

1-1 


nam 




cs 
CO 


1-1 1—1 N th 1-1 CO 


•pnnj 






eo«Dc< 1-1 1-1 loco o 

(Mi-i CQ C<» tH -r-i 


•n,5D8Ja 
qoanqo 




OS 

OS 


oot-<N »oioot-eo 000? 

tH oI 1-1 1-1 1-1 




o 

OS 

CO 


lot-in oco c-<M 

©JO -TH 

T-l 


noi} 

•BSTipa 


»o 


a 


(MO 00 r-l 1-1 


•ssiM 


CO 


in 


-^;CCO l-0010CO(Na>-* 
OC- CC>10?00S— < 1-1 

tH T-l T-l T-l 


•sstM 
emoH 






00t-O0^»O«5051O'*=0OC0 
OOOth Ot-iO£-i-i 1-1 

M< T-l C>J 1-1 


•S'S 

•dBg 

s?n'Bjni 


o o 


CO 

OS 
T-H 


iOT*ooi-io»oo»noiflso o 
c« o -* (M ire T-l lo T* 00 -^ 00 CO 

1-1 (N 1-1 1-1 (M (M tH 


T-l 


03 

1—1 
1—1 


(Ml-H T-lT-lO?-*t-©J iOO* 

• 1-1 


•dsg 
snnpy 


^ 




COi-i(MCOO (M t-itH 

T-l 1-1 


•Oil 


O^ O-rH CO 00 

* * * 


CO 

CO 


QOWCOT^CMOCQt-t-QOiOOCO 
t-COi-lTHOS00(?J00C-T-l«5-*TH 

TH 1-1 T-l Ol 1-1 1-1 


•aeO no 

pappy 




1-1 


OilO (MO-<t«CO (M 

T-( TH 


xg no 
pappv 


c- 


OS 

1—1 


« OSC0©»S0«O(N OCO CO <© 
(MCO 1-1 


sn^oBaa 




1—1 

CO 


« CO 04 


•s-iapia 


OJ CO 


OS 


joeoi-i<N?o-^50«oeoc<icooieo 


a 

IS 


2 "^ai 


« 

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< 


biillfip JiB=l|lli=|oi|ilJ 


CO 

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13 
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CO 
Oi 
Ed 
E-i 

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CO 

■1 is- 

Pdg 




1 it^-ii|il.t| ills 1 1 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



289 



OQO 
1-1 tH 


th OS O »0 O OS 

T-l c- -i-H <?} CO 


JO 

T-l 


o 

TH 


OS 
(M 


CO 

00 




^wocooooioocioocoooicoo 

OOCOlOCC-rHO»-OCiOT-iQOiOO:OCQ» 
1-1 CO T-l Oi 


lO o o 

CO O iO 

T-l CO 


o 
o 
o 

tH 


00 
OS 
CO 

OS- 
CO 




oooooooooooooooooooooooo 

QOeOCQO*(MOOOtOOOO»000>OC5-*THGSQOOiOlO 

o««o-^'«*TH«rt<-*ifflt-i:-eocoooeooo(r«cQ»oois>eo 

T-l tH « tH 


s 


00 

T-l 

JO 

00 




OS 




CO 


lO T-l 


CO 




JO 




^ 


o « 
i>- 1— 1 


m 


CO CO 

• 




CO 


T— 1 

OS 

OS 




OS CO 


CO'* 


JO <yj 


C-CO iO CO 


00 CO 


JO 


CO 
00 
CO 




1-1 


i>T-| 
T-l 


«D->*»0 


c- loeo OS 


oeo 




<N 

OS 




o 

T-l 


CO-* »o 


ocot- 


«0<M T-l^ 


CO CO CO 


JO 


00 

T— 1 




o 

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CO 


-* CO 


OS T-< 




CO 


JO 
OS 




t- CO 

CO 


iO 


-*<M00 


t- IN CO T-l 


<M 




o 

CO 




co«o 


CO t- 
<M 


T-l 


^^^"^ 


c-c- 


-* 

tH 


CO 

T-l 




100-*«000010QO(MOSCO 


O CO OS O CO 

T-l T-l T-l 


00 CD OS 


JO 


00 
CO 

->* 




T-l 


eosooooiooio 

la-r-ltaSi-r-imiOtfi 

TH T-l (M T-l 


lO O T-l lO CJ 
O C- C- C^ CO 

^ T-l 1-1 


00 lOO 
00 C-"* 


CO 
00 


CO 

CD 

CO 




CQ (M(M 


T-l 


t-oeOTHT-iiHTHT-ieo 

T-l T-l 


CO 




CD 
00 




00 


T-l 


O «0 T-l !0 TH T-l 






OS 




T(<OiMOSi0^tOt-»OOiOOT-iO»0-*-*riOt-0»00 

«o®(r*cOi-<icicoo«t-c-eo0 5oeoos->*-<i*«Oi-t?DeoT-< 

tH tH Ci -r-l 4: 


o 

JO 


g 

§ 




CO (MO* 


£- 


00-<* C-00 


CO lo CO T^ 


tH 


^ 


JO 

o 




■.HOS 
CO 


tH 


OS lO T-l -<1< T-l CO iM CQ«Ot-i 


(M 


T-l 


(N 








(M laao 




T-l 




00 

T-l 




eo-*«(M-*-«*'coc4?o»oeoeo-«}<»oso-<4<«o©»eocoTt<cQ 


->** 


CO 

T— 1 





^ >% 



3 ;3 - ai o 

43 .o P^a lu 



-a 


ns 


TS 


bU 





C^ 




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:^l2 oiaii ^5 s-s 2 s s^ s J o-g^g 






to ^ 




a^ 








yton, 
Sterl 
nmou 
mcy, 
comb. 








0! *j O 3 03 




OS^S^O"^ 




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•o^ « -;;i 




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1 ^ -^ o « 
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1 




tii 


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Ph - 
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1-5 1-5 



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^^ 

CO H-^ 

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19 



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CO • JO 

« tc a 

a a^ 



290 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS, 



[May, 



sno9a«i 






■massy 



O lO •^ T-i CO CO O Tt< o: O O 
00510iOi-lOOi-iO»CO 

03 00 t^ eo I- eo eo I- o lo eo 

■^ TH 1— I 



■r-ii0OC5OOQO0iOI0OOOi-t 
»fflC1Cv(COOOOOi-iO«-OOiO«0 
CJ<MW(Nt-t--<t'NQ0CO-^»-H'r-i,H-rH 
T-i tH tH r-l -^T-HT-iT-ii-i 



•OilOJCOOOC-JOl- 



•noi}«4 
•najsng 

aoj p!v 
•uain 

•pnnj 



•noi}BO 

■nop 
-■Bonpgr 



1-1 CO »0 CO <N tH (M CO 



lO iO (?« lO t- S« CQ 02 CO O »o O C? 



•SSII4 

nSiaaoj 



OTr--* (Mojiocoeo 



OOJ-r-icCCOCO'^WWCJOlC-CO CD 
■* OS i>rH00T-il-CO:O(M-* ■^ 
K) C^ 1-1 T-H 



•sstjii 
eraoH 



•ni8j\[ 

•S'S 



j>coooi»oco<Mmoc>?io 

»Ol-»005100COt-COT-iC- 
Oi tH r-l 1-1 1-1 



OOWOOOOlOOO'^Oi-llOO 
CO«Oi-llO-^C3005CO»0-*0-r-li-IOOCO 
TH T-I tH tH C>J 0> OT tH 1-1 



•dBg 

sinejni 

■dug 
•OK 



t-I»OtH -"^-rH-^Oi-* 



« 1-1 «0 lO JO JO 



OOt-COCOJO«i-l-r-IQOQOOOlCJO 
OO-^OOW-^OCOCCiOOSOOSO-^JO 

1-1 1-H i-H 10 1-1 SC 1-1 



•JSO no 
pappv_ 
■xa no 

pappy 

sn.o'Ead 



T-C -^ (N CO 



CO 1-1 eo 00 00 CO CO T-i th 



■^ 1-1 1- 00 CO OS 00 



T)< <N 00 <M CO t- "<** <N (W 



•saapta 



c* JO CO -<* -* JO -^ CO eo -<* c« -^ ■«*< eo th t- •«* jo C4 os co co o jo « oo 












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CO 



tlCC 



O p aj 

ffiCH 



pH CPQ O Q g-j ffi )-:i 



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if 

Sp:3faoO'Sao^^O'WOO;^B^pg<JW 



aj- ^^S.t:: fo ,.S 



^ b^T: S-T-% t: ^ > <=« c3 1: ::: S r '' ^- 



P o-'T- S 



•^ fH 






ceo 



Pnpq 



.5: sj *i 



. 5:=^ a & 
c > a o 83 . 
a _^ o ■*-' <» 
a-^ y >-. ^ 



d 
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Ph 

a 

03 
O 



dJ 'I' 

Htc3 2 

m a S 

oj 5 a 

g § c 






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t-5 


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;^ 



02 

p^cd 



H .rt 



CD 
CO 

P^ |q^ 

a' ^ O ^ 

i^ »^ 

^ . =« • 



-<Wt 



Oh 'C - 

oT^S o 
ffi •'^ 

^'Sa 
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CO 

^Ph 

d g 



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rt Sii-o » 



g£ 



« s fc 

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CD 
CD 
-^ 

■aj § 

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Q- tH- - .Ph 

Pm oi .2 Ph - 
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oS c3 aj o a 

•OCO -"^ 

§ s ^ ^ a 

a g o 'c^r 

*< 02 W W F 



02 



^ 

M 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



291 



CO so 

T-H 










o 

T-I 


o 

o 

T-I 


■^ O CO CO eO CO 00 CQ -r-l t-i t-I w 
■p-( 


o 
t- 

co 

CO 


T-I 


450 
7000 


OO'^lOOt-iOOO'rHOCOOOOOQOO-^Oas 
t-QOiCi£-iOO^t-OOTHCOC?OOt-«500CO 

C010O<M«0C»«0t-( (Mt-hcOCOi-HtH Oi-i-i 


o 

tH 




CO 

CO 
o 

CO 


§ 

CO 


OOOO 
OOOOOO 


CO 


T-I (?i •«*< tH tH t-I 








CO 
CO 

T-I 


CO-* 

T-I 


>o^ 


oo 




^o 


T-I CO iO -<*i <M tH 










lo OS CO 


JOtH 


ci eo eo (M (?« c<KN 








l» 
00 


T-i 


JO CO 


CO CO <M »0 T-I IN 








lO 

CO 


JO 05C0 

T-I 


tH jo 


a lO Oi iO y-t a 








o 

T-< 


OS CO 


« »o 


Ci CO CO -* <?« W (M 

T-I 








CO 


OtJItJI 

OtH 

tH 


OW (M T-H lO 00 lO CO CO 

■I-ITfi -iH tHOO 


00 

t~ 

GO 

T-I 


JO 


C<* lO 00 CO 

T-I OilXM 

T-I T-I 


ooo 1-4 00 












oo « t- 

•<* C5 lO tH 




lO OS OJ CO 00 00 lO Oi T-I «D 


!5 






o 

CO 
CO 


00 
CO 


ocoo 

OOJO 

T-I T-I 


(M 


(N(M tH 








»o 


CQ lO <M 


tH 


->* »0 tH 










-* IN 


r-QOc-ooioc©ci)ioooooO'^«oooot-Oi-i 
1-1 * * * 


05 

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CO 
CO 


00 
CO 


■>* IOOtH 

-* 00 lO JO 


tH iO 00 « 


CO 

o 


CO JO JO 


eo-<* (M »o-r-i 1-1 

T-I T-I 


tH 


O CO T-I 

T-I T-I 


C0tJhiOi-i»O COt-i tH 


o* 




d 




T}i CO CO 


«T*(jj-^Tt^eo<MT-i«oeO'*«oieoTH 


(M COINIMiM 




T-I 


(N^eoeo 



OQGO 

a^ ^ o ^ — ■ 

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S O 03 O « P 



t^-g 



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CEiH cq O |2; pq W PtH 



o 



a 2 
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a^ o 



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rooks, 

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Ayers 

ter, H. 


s 


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siah Poi 




tH 

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O "i:^ 03 O 



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292 



SYNOD OF ILLINOIS. 



[May, 





i- 






00 lO lOOW* O 


o 

T-( 




tato (M 








»0 C- 005 

<?» CO o o 

O It C OJ 

i-H o lo ;o 


o o -*■* « 

O t- I- 00 o 
O lOCO 05-* 

T-l 1—1 


CO 


o»ooiocoooioot- 
^ ;c LO cj CO lo o (N lo CO 

Ti CO l.O 1-1 Oi O «0 lO rH OJ 

<>J C>t CO Tl TH 


O lO O CO 00 
JO o o o t- 
OSOOiO CO"<* 


eorp 




-masR-y 
[Bjaaao 


00 » o as 

■^ 00 00 t- 

cj coco 


10 000"<tOO-<*<OQOCO»OQOOOOO 
CJC<O©OCD00«>Q0iOrH00OO<?»-<* 

cscs»ooeOT-(T-(t-co(»«OQO-*'«*i-ioo 

T-t 1-1 -I-H 


« •^ « '* o 
c--^ t- coo 

00 c- -^ oi CO 


00 lO 




•najsng 


CO ICQO 


o 

th 






■^ 








OS 






•9. IPO 
ioj p!V 


<M<?i 




<M 






^ 




lO 








nam 


COlOlOO 

•l-H 


00 
<M 


•^^^ 




CO 






lO 


lO 






■pnnj 


C-05CT> 


OQO Wi-H 

T-H ,-1 (M 




o 

T-l 


OS io«o 

ICtI 




lO 


t- 






■n.paia 
qoanqo 


»o C> IC w 

-<t Ci t- 

T-l 


JO 






T-( <M 00 OS «0 i-ilO 

CO T-l T-l 




lO 


oeow 

tH «0 







•UOIJ'BD 

•not} 
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•SSTH 

nSiajo j 



W CO (M 



CO OS O CO 

W CO l-H 

OJ CO w 



•ssijn 
amoij 



lo t~ o o^ 
t- o o^ 



lOTfcOO-^ 

0*tH T-l 



•oiaK 

•s -s 



CQ CO o »o 

00 tH lO l^ 

CO CO c? 



LO t- O IC CO 00 o 
C7 O 00 !> TH CO CJ 

O* « l-H tH t-l 



•dBg 

•Oil 
aioqM. 
•J90 no 

P3PPV_ 

xg no 
pappy 



■^ tH O^ t}i 05 



<M Ol lO 00 
t- E- t- I- 



T-cOOOTHt-iOOOO00C0TH0»»0C0ff*lO£-»OC0C00JC0OO»0iM 

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T-> T-l T-< Oil T-i T-l Ol T-l T-l * T-l T-l :^ T-l T-l * * * 



0> OS QOO 



CO 00-<*<tH 0000 tH OiOl-^COCO 



tH CO CO th 



sn.o'Bad 



Cv? tH CO lO CO o^ 



CO 00 CO tH tH CO <n 



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CO iO CO t- CO lO Tfi «0 tH CO 04 CO lO CO iO -*-<*< C* (M ""t JO CO (M t-h CO CD JO 




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0^<rj;>CiHcgg^^ CO ^4: P 

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I 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF INDIA. 



293 



JO 


« 

OS 
00 


t-r-l 


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<M 1-1 


CO 












■i-i 


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1—1 
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CO 


lo oo o 

t- COtJ* o 
CO 1-1 


to 






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t- JO 

CO 






<M 


T-l 

00 


CO 10-* 


1-1 






CO<M 


00 




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05 


1-1 tH 


w 






Oi-i 
1-1 


tH 




O 


co 


1-1 C0 1-1 CO 

-^ Tj* (M 1-1 


1-1 
1-1 






1> JO TH 

1-1 


CO 




■I-I 












eo (M 


JO 




eo 

(M 


1 


Cv» <M OJ 


CO 






-<*eOTH 


00 
1-1 




tH 


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1-1 tH 1-1 


CO 










TO 




eo (Mth TH 


t- 






eoi-i ^ 1 
1 



PhCO 
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03 



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t-s 


a ^a 
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03 t:^ 


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lilaiJelphia 

llahabad, 

tawah, 

llahabad. 


las a .:g 

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a* tT 

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294 



SYNOD OF INDIA. 



[May, 



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296 



SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



[May, 



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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



297 



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298 



SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



[May, 



snosa«[ 

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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



299 



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SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



301 





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SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



303 



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SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



306 







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306 



SYNOD OF INDIANA. 



[May, 



8noen«i 



uiassy 



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A.D. 188-i.] 



SYNOD OF IOWA. 



307 





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o 
1—1 


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308 



SYXOl) OF IOWA. 



[Maj, 



•8,1100 
jo; pty 
■naoi 
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•ii,}D9ja 

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oioqA\. 
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pappy 
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pappy_ 

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A.D. 1884.] SYNOD OF IOWA. 309 



OS 

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956 




CO iO 

T-l 


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T-H T-l tH tH tH 


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00 CO CO 05 t- C<i 
tH (M C^J 


c« 

CO 
CO 


c lo lo lo cj o o -^ 

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COt--*OOCO-<tCOiO 

T-l T-l tH 


oo 

OS iO 


o lo o io o 

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t-COC-T-IOS 

1-t 


05 CO O CO -* O 00 
05 N O t- O tH Ci 

T-l o o T-l c- cj c<i 

T-i tH T-H tH T-H 


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oi -<*i cj o '^i I- 

CO -^ O CO tJh C<i 

T^ CO 


05E-C0C0iOOOO-<*Ol.NiC000Ttl 
OT-100C-iO-*0-*0-*ClCOTH10 

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C< T-l T-l 


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tH CD CO T-l CO tH 

T-t 


04 




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T-l 


T-H 




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T-l 


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tH tH 
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tH (N tH 


^■^ 


CO -* o* ■* 


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CO Clio CO CO Oi 


55^ 


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t-co 


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coco 

T-l 


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T-l T-l T-l T-l 


OCO iCOO o 
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r-t T-l 


CO 


CO CO CO Ti "-ii 


T-l 


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<N10 


cooj coth loeo 


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OS 


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T-l 


CO CO T-l CO O O TH ^ CO CO CO CO 

tH T-l T-l T-l tH CO 


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T-l iO tH 


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CO T-l 


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CO T^ T-i T^ CO 


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CO CO COCO(M 


10-* CO CO 


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trTrn 




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f^ 



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310 



SYNOD OF IOWA. 



[May, 









L- CO I.-? -rf »- 1J O O O) -^ 
CI CT ^ i.-T O rt O :0 i-O O 

COCOi-H 00C»-CJ00OM 



oo 
o o 



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stnoH 



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pappy 

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<^«L^Soo3<uc;=5M^S,2=o'-t5^ 
lp.^j;2;^QQQbd<!QOO^SOOfeF-^ 



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A.D. 1884.] 



SYXOD OF IOWA. 



311 



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o ci CI CO CO CO (?j cj 1-1 CI 



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c:! t- 00 cc 



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in 


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iC CO <M T-l CO 



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lC-*-*00t-Q0«>OJ»OU-3 



Til CO-* OCO-r-ICOOJ 



CO Cl 

tH t-I 


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T-I T-H T-< rH tH 


CO 

T-t 


o 

00 


T- i^ lO o o t- 
ooo ?o o t- t- 




t- -TH ® Til TH L3 


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T-I T-t 


CO o 


lOt-O-^O-^-^OSOC^CQCKO-^CJOOSGOOOOiOOlfflOt-OlTHT-icSTHioirtO 

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T-t *:):* ***** 


1-1 


00 50 OJ O OJ o ^ •* 

tH T-t 


Tft 


OJ 


T-t ■* 


T-t 


th CO o w CO T- T-t i>-*os 

T-1 T-t 


^ 


CO 


CO tH 




oj CO T-I CO 




T-I C^ 


tH CJ « -* T-I 


«-r-l 


co-*TH-*eoco-*coT-iT-i(M 


04 CO (M -* T-ilO CO ■* CO CO CO T-i(M tH (M »0 tH t-i CO 



tH <u O 



cc" 

h' a, 






•r d? -5 f^ 



;(^'^( 



^ _r a> t- 






^ cac. 



o 



^ o .22 ^ cs 



o .:=.S 



a a 



w _3 



•i: '-'i oj 
<»3 - 



a „ 



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ai 



^ 



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^-3-ccuO[^ad>-:J 



s a 

c 

So 



- --a S> S.2 «^^c5^v « 



.tS ^3 S - -3 oj aj a H -w o 






o-^ a a 



> a-a 
M a 3 

a-T! 






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. a 

CO S 



.- S 



a -Si S Ji . 
'^'~ 0.22 ^ 



tc P ~ 



i:^ 



=:Q«S 



a a-s^^ 



P5 J: 3 



5^a K CL, eq < jja3CLiQ^Qjj^ 



«? <u a "oj . :=! .3 



a a 

5 o 
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QO 



o Ma" 



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03 






booj^ .a „ .. t> iZ -^ 



r- e3 c3 > 

a 



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a a 



a <u"S;2 S a « ^i?^ a^^^.a© 
K!zii-qOOt-:]CuaSc»tiSSQO 



^ 



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od 



P^ ^"(^ 

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p . M rH t; Ph 



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312 



SYNOD OF TOWA. 



[May, 



BTtOeOBI 

-leosiH 




CO 


o o o io o c- eo o -" o icio oso 

th«Di-<(MO»0 Ol-O i-iOO 
1- 00 


••jgnoo 






oo-r^io CO ot- cicio oo oso 
loocccj T^ cjc* O'TJJO Oio eoio 

1-1 <?J <M ^^ iCi-i t-l-lg -<1<(M T-t- 


'messy 
l«iea3{) 




o 
o 

'^ 

CO 


oicoo o oo oooo oo oo 

O-^t-O O ICOO OOthO OlO OSi-l 

icccT-i-«j< t-l cT-i-H ccX'-rHiM »c-* coco 


•non«1 
-najsng 
" -8,1100 ~ 
joi piy_ 
•uum 
-peajj 


CO 


CO 00 »o o 


ec 


ONCO O -rH 
1-1 (M I-* 






O O »COO (Nth O »0 

T-l tH -r-l io tH O 


■pnnj 
J9UaH 




CO 

tH 


COCO C4 (N iO to U5 0404 00 »0 






05 
CO 


Odd THiO 0100*04 004 
TH 04 tHOO 


•noi^BO 
-liqnd 




CO 0> iO O IO 04O 

T-H IO CO 


•noi^ 
-■BDtipa 




00 

T-l 


CO th TH tH CO OO IO 04 OJ lOOJ 
■iH iH IO tH 04 ■^ 

tH -^ 






05 


CO tH »o 00 0)05 CO 04 O IO 

CO 04 1-1 CO C5 04 O 

tH CO 04 


■SPIH 
emoH 




00 


CO-r-i -<* 04 O404 JOlO-ri^O •>* CO IO •<* 
T-l 04 OS-* O 04C4 

o 


•man 

•S 'S 

•dBa 




CO 
CO 


10-* O CO tH io O O oo (J4 io 
■*00 t- Ti OS t-THlO -* »0 OOt-i 

T-l tH tH t- 0^ 




tH tH 00 o4eo O t- lOOO 

T^ T-l 


•d«a 

8?inpy 




f-l 


tH COt-* io T-l 

T-l 


•OK 
eioqAV 


(NO-* 

■i-l tH * 

* * 


CO 


-*-*-<*i»0 '^ 10(X) ir-0 04CO OCO-*THt- 

COCOt-ICO tH Ot-i -<*CsOt- -* 04 t- tH 

T-l th T-1-* 04 


•jeo no 
peppv 


CO 


r^ th tH tH coco tH CO 
tH CO 


•xg no 
jpgppy 

sniOBaa 




-* 


THCO04 •* -*THt- T^ ->*»0 
-* 


J§ 


CO T-l CO CO ■* 04 CO 


•wapia 


T-' T-l 


-* 

T-l 


o4-*04eo ■>* coco cojoeooo 04 04 th -<*h eo 


w 

o 

K 
u 


|lS sill 1 II fe||| i»i|| 


xn 

K 
P 
ft 


^. - ^. . p ^ 

1—1 )_( 1— 1 ^ o 

-^ -gj ^« g -S . . » .S . ^- S S a . o 
111 1 f|lllfl=J|.||ll:r||2| 


H 

fi 

■< 

E-i 
to 






S ^ PPL, ^Pr4pg d .(^'SPglir fl . 
'^ S»-j<1o2i-, |^<|Hi-it^ P5 h-s 1-5 K P -< t>»-s 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF IOWA. 



313 



1-1 


«> 
^ 


»o 

T-l 






eo 


1—1 


o 


lO 




o 

1-1 


1CC0OOOOQ0-* 

JO T-l -^ «0 O T-l t- 
T-1 






o 

T-l 


1-1 
t- 

1—1 

oo" 




o 
o 

C5 


oo 

00 


lO 


ooooooooo 

OOC-OWTj^T-iCOOi-i 


o 

o 

rjl 




o 

£- 

1-1 


Oi 

o 


lO 


00 


-* 




iO-<H 


T-l 








50 


<M 


o 
1-1 


-* 




o 

T-l 


eoco 








o 

CO 




<r* 




eo 




T-l T-l 






■'"' 








o 


JO lOO 

T-l tH 


T-l lO 






T-l 


o 

o 




CQ 




iO 


(M«0 


TH T-l 






<M 


CO 


CO 


00 


Tjl 




lOTi* 


tH 






T-l 


1—1 


(M 


•*"" 




00 o} oi 






1-1 




<« 


o 


ocQio 

TH T-l 1-1 

1—1 


<MeO"* 




O 

T-l 


T-l 


o 


eo 


00 

T-l 




-<* 


-*oc5 00i>(Mt-eo«o 
w CO eo 


o 


CO 


tH 


CO 
o 
1-1 


o 

tH 


co 


<>* 

T-l 


th 


l>0 (N 00»OO»O 
00 O 00 lO (N lO -^ 

1-1 1—1 






O 


1-1 


o 
CO 


T-l 


CO 
CO 


o~ 


t~-<ji eo 


»HCO (M 






eo 


00 


£- 


^ 


la 


■^ 


ricieo 


T-l 








05 




§ 


t-QO'*»0-<*QOCOlrtOt-0?C50QOC>0 

-rjiOT»feoeo->*-^oi* eoeoi;;«<?*-^ 
1-1 * * * * 


lO 


CO 


CO 


^ 


00 


eo eo 


Oi-l 








^ 


« 


T-l 


TJ4 



o 

1-1 


T-l 


Ui 


a 
o 


o 
eo 


T-l 


T-l 


e* 


(M lO tHi-i 




eo 


eo T-l 


eo 


<M(MTHOi(M(MTlH(M(jcj 


« 


OS 


c> 


CO 


eo 






,Ph 






,Ph 



«2 A 



>^. 



;-! fl ^ _X 'Jw.^ t,. 
03 Si '^^ a <u S 

i2 e 5 -2 =s <u >-' 



- .iiT o >• t> kI 

gCLiOi-:iSSK 






2 Q 



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v 



Q> 



„ _ d 

(U a> II ij- >-i 

^-Q-^ .Bo cJ; 

, jH ^ Qi Q <u .a 73 
Jo 8 c,-^ ^ Si > 

S=^sa5i^§5^^='a^^^5 



a vT a a o 

ca a c^a o 



tc p C 



OI K 

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fcC 



PO 



^ : S o S g i^^ i S " £ 5 o .i 
■S -S t; C'^tS a "t^fS - fc: 3 



o . 
02 ?i a o 

r— 1 'p -*J _^ 



C^ 



a a D o 



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oi 1^ i-j .a 



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copq 

■ • 03 o3 >^M 

jS ."^ ."^ S o3 



acLi '. 
^- .«? 

a riCC 

13 s'o 

ia ai 






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oT 
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'p d 

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a'grt 8 



si « g g S 

a 7; r=i a « 



314 



SYNOD OF IOWA. 



[May, 



Bno9n«f 

-199BIHI 



■diSao2) 



massy 
X^jeaaic) 



-itqnj 



00 -* 
£- CO 



CO (M cs «o OS «c> a 



o o i« -^ o »c i.o o 

O IC I- £- O I- t- Tt< 

•^ T^ Tl T-( T-l <M 



O iOOO 

o t-ooo 



i-H O (M Ot 1- -rH t- C- CI 



O OOOO OO O O O OO OO OO lOOO 

o oxjcoio i-iL-t-ooo-*ooioc-oeo<MC» 



-* ^ 10 T-H 



' WIO T-i 00 tH 



-ne)sns 






CO 


CO 


*J CM 




CI 




(M 


•8.IIO0 


00 






lO 


CO 










nam 

-P88JJ 


QOO 

■r-l tH 


CO 

i-H 


T-H 


o 


C<JCO <M 




GO 


« 


(Mi-( 
tH 


•pnnj 


1—1 




T-ieoo* 


1-1 


(M CO 




Ci 




CO 


n.jaaja 


OJ rj* 


« 


coco lo 


■I-H 


(M lOQO 


00 CO 


^co 


■^ CO "^ 


CO 


•noijBD 


t- O 


"* 


1-1 CO 


CO 


« CO -* 


CO 


eo 




<M 



•sstjt 



•S8IJ4 

aniOH 



■inan 

•S 'S^ 

sjnBjnj 



OS(M^COIOCO-^-^COOCl 



^ 



t- fr- lO Oi LO 



T-l-i-l CO-"** CO Ot tH CO 



•dua 



CO <M T-i CO 



C3 Tj4 coc-co 



COODCCO OGOC-Oi-HCO t- C5OC0iCC0f-iOC0ir5OC-0^C0t--rH0DCSOC- 

oiia r^ (^t c-Tti-i-ioot-co lo ioi-"*-i-i T-icoy-^citooiGi-r-iT-ieoa^T-icOT-t 

■1-1 *tH t-It-It-I *** 



uao no 
pappv^ 
"xa no 



C5 CJ 00 Ci 



CO lO O CS T-1 



C5lOCOlOT-IQ0W00-**JCO-r-l 



SU.DBad 



•wapia 



CO eo 04 CO CD (M CO CO » OJ iO t- CO ->^ <?« TH CQ CO TH (M CO Tt* tH CQ T-l (M T-l tH iO 01 



0500 









S WO 

o9 









PLh 




't^^s3i»<B(UcSOO'73C.S;33~OJ:;5j4j 

)-;00'g1cq p -i^>-qtfOWPHcqrj^O ^jQ Ph o pq 



^1 



o -- •^ 
o 



00 



P '^ t^ 3 3 e3 



Q - O . 









D, a 
o o .ts • 
- o 



;^.' 



fcX) 



a o £^.0 g s 

e3aj^a8!»a)«icSOO'0^t-.3gcs2a53.:; 



a -f j t< - o 



n . ^/ H^ 

^ o . 

'^'^ a 



a 



O Oh 

2 a-a 

a S"S 

a — '3 



• e . 
.02 S-o 

. . . a o a;^^'^ 



GQ 

















f) 







^ 


OJ 




^ 


^ 


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^ 





M 


01 





a 
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3 




n 


-1 


C 


H; 


TJI 



^ 






a a 




0) 




X3T3 


03 


^(S 





: 


W 


al 


a 


CS !-. 


s3 






^ ^ 


1:3 



CO 
02 



faO 

a 



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03 .2 o 



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W 



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A.D. 1884.] 



SYXOD OF IOWA. 



315 



o 


o 

T-l 


ir: 








o 

T-l 


00 


177 


1750 
1800 

125 


O ICO QO o o 
O t- «0 -rt O CO 


o 


o 




o 


in 


o « 
o c- 




OOOOCIOOO 
t-i,-iCOICC0t-H03CO 




<?i O QO 
C? « 1- 




o 
o 


o 

T— 1 


X 


^ x> 


o 




CJ 


o 








CJ 






1—1 


C5 


(M 



o 
in 


00 












(M 


CO 


i-iO 






■* 


CO 


T-l 








CO 


r^ 


CTt-I 


^ 




Qi 




1— 1 








o 


T-l 


in c- 


c* 


IC OS iO ©i«s«o-* 




CO 




'^ 


Ut 5^1 


in 


o 
o 


^ o o 
eoeo 


o 


oo o o 

1-1 1-1 


ooo 

IOCStH 






o 






^ 


CO 

CO 

CO 


«coo 

t-ItH 


Tl OS 


CO T-l 




T-l so 












t-00 




1 th <m 


to CO 


y-i 


« 








-* 


00 

00 


oieo 




i-iOC50oosocoio-*t-'*oir>ooiC30-*!0(r»-* 

T-l01i-i*5(MTHC0rJ<TH-r-l0-iOT-(CJi-li-li-lr-li-l»J 




T-l (TJ 


o 


»0 OJ 00 


50Tt-C0 

■l-l 1—1 


T-l 


CO « 




T-l 


00 


o 

T-l 


OS 


C-OJ 





CO . oi o eo th «c to 

T-l 




to 


^ 

« 


T-< 




« 1-1 






l?i 




ojeo-*(McoT-iCjeo<MTHeoiCT-i<MT-iojT-iTH 


T-l 


T-t 


CO 


eo to 


to 



CZ2 OQ 



>»-? 



W 



o — "^ t- 



> c 



a -' 
o .2 



'^> 



m _^ ;;f -H 



c =5 



o o a 



^TJ 



F ?5 Q PL, S^ i^ ue 'X' ^. Pi > P.. ^^aQa- 



2-^ 



Ma 



a; 




ai 


OD 


a? Ph 


QD 


>• . 






(U 




^ 


Z> ^ B 


> 


".2 s 


.Hi 




s 



m .£ P5 b § 



3 



Glidden, 

Scranton, 

Mapleton, 

Rippey, 

Vail, 

Paton, 

Moingona, 

Arcadia, 

Breda, 

Churdan, 

Spirit Lak 

Dacotah, 

Esthervilh 


o 









§51 g 






C &H pq Eq S ^ fc C E- O O 



S3 

O 



s s-T 



-So 



P3. 



•a: 



I- ^fe - 
o a>'=^ • . • 

^- j3 _! w w CO a 

s^ "- ij a, t- c o 
Bs 1^ S aj a « *^ 

. t^»-: o^ oS 



S 



^[^ .2 ^ 'S 



316 



SYNOD OF IOWA. 



[May, 



enoanBX 






taassy 



•no!?t!} 

■8,I[00 
joj p!v 



ssiu 



eraoji 



■tnau 



O lO O »0 UD O JO 
1-1 K> a O 



OOlOOCOOOOO 
OOt-»OCJOOOO 
CI CO C* T-i(N tH Oi lO 



CJ <?} o t- o 

T-c O CO 00 o 
O (M "* O 0« 
1-1 CO iO (M 



i-iOO OCC-rHiOiOCIOOOOOJ 






t-os-r-it-iNi>eooio 



oooooooooo 

OCJOOOICOCSOOOO 

»CC?«0-r-l005C7eOCDO 
T-l C>} T-t ir-l T-l 



•r-l CO T-( 



•neni 


CO T-l Tl Tl (N CJ 


JO 


lO OJ CO O lO 
CO CCJOCO 


O T-l 1-1 

CO 


eoooo 


CO (N JO JO ■* 


•pnnj 
J9U3a 


d CO i-H T-l 


'^ 


10->* -*C30 

1-1 t- tH 


CO 1-1 tH 


CO CO -TH 

tH 


rj< JO eo CO (M CO 


n,paj3 


CO CO 1-1 CO T-l 




JO Tjl t- Tjl -* 
T-l T-IO"^ 


C5 tH T-l 


CO t-o 

tH 


<?« CO « CO C« JO 


•no^Ba 


« T-t 


CO 


tH jo 


CO C^ T-l 

T-l 


eo-i-io 


tH CO CO CO (?« TjH 


•nojj 

-BDtipa 


C* W 1-1 T-l tH 


05 


^MIOStH JO 
CJ C^T-I 
tH 


05 1-1 1—1 

1-1 


COtHOCOJOCQJOJO-* 



CO ■<+i T-l ■* CO CO CO -^ 



05 CO^ 03 C5 

00 c- o 
1-1 JO -* 



CO CO (?« c- JO CO CO 



I CO CO 

I tH -r-l 

coo* 



C^ CO 



JO T-l CD (M CO CQ JO CQ 00 



JO o o CO -^ 



•dBg 

BJU'Bjnj 



(M CO <M-^ O 



t- t- CO « tH <M 



•dug 

sjitipv 


OJt-I CJ CO 

tH 


T-l CO tH 05 


co 




t- CO T-l 


•ON 


OOJOCQ^'^^C^OO 

-*COT-IJOTHJOCOt-TH 
T-l 


JO C- CO G5 O 
CO C? CO t^ C5 
tH CQ CO CO 


OiCiCi 


OQOJOWOOGOOOOO 
0->*'*THt-COOCO'*CD 

tH T-l 


•J90 TIO 

pappV 


CO T-l « Tjl Tji lO 


t- tH tH t- C3 

T-l T-l T-l 


o 

T-l 


c- joeo 


T-l a 


•xg no 
peppv 


T-l t-IC0 03tH-^000 

tH T-l 


T-l COCO^ 


CO 


OJ CO 


tH t-T-H CD 
TH 


8n,0'B9(I 


CO T-l <N « 


CO CO Ci -^ 


» 


coco 


« CO 


•sjapia 


eocoejo«cocoe«(M-5*i 


jothcdoo t- 


t'-* OJ 


10^COiM(?iCO'*JO'*<M 



I 0202 



CL, 



Ah 



:p- 



^.ai-0. f^[ 



'^oi'SS^ 

o .— t-H q 
a g tp ^ c3 
?? 3 3 S .3 



as 

fl.S 

O !-l 

mp-i 



03 

P02 






n 




r/^ 


or! 


C/J 










cS 


n 


ap 




^ 


OJ 


1^ 


o 


Q 


^ 


a; 


faC 


^ 


2 


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;S|l^-|2o2'^ 
S oj o p P 

^ fc^ z; r'-'. -^ 



OQ 



OQ 



^ 42 ^ W ^CQH^ 



oT S 
q; h 




1-0 

a 



Ph 



^ 



*S S W ro 

S g-bcg 

bcHO 2 
a =3^:' 



boa 

a 03 

WO 

P s 

.-a 



P-i 



o - 



^.2 ^ 
jr> a ^ «i 

a ^^ > ^ 



Ph fi; CO 

a" - ^ 
gp^P^^ 

MrS'^ a 15 
'-' r2 a o •'' 
S^„^^ <» o a 

P^S^02^ 
i-s <^ <1 <s^ W 



p; '. 

Ph *i-^ 
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S &2 
ra n .a 
o o o 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF IOWA. 



817 



CO 






^ 



a 






4 "-x-tn 






1^ 






CQ 





o 


o 








CO 

T-l 

c- 

T-l 






o o 


o »o CO 

iO Tfl T-l 






CO 

T-l 






00 

o 


00 

CO 
Oi 






IO o 

OSO 


ooo 
o oo 

O 005 

"ttlT-l 




t-o 

0? Tt< 


o 
o 






05 


lO 

o 

o 






oo 

OSO 

O CO 


28 60 

11 60 

8 10 




T-l 

CO 

T-l 






OS 








lO 




T-l 


00 


OS 




T-l 


corf 

T-l 


^ "^ 




T-l 








w 


CO 




<M 


T-l 


§ 


■I-l 


o 
eo 




©J 


©eo 

T-l 




ec 


t- 


o 

tH 




T-l 








t- 


OS 

00 




T-l 


tH 


? 










(M 


OS 
eo 


»o 

CI 




0* 


O IO 

T-l 


eOT-i<M 

OS T-l T-l 




■I-l 


iO 




(M 


T-l 


T-l 

CO 

T-l 




<N 


IO CO 

CJt-I 


IO C-iO 

O T-l 

T-l 




o 

00 


o 
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to 

lO 


i 

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o 


«o 

iO 


oo 
CO 00 


OOO 

©00 1- 
co 


■^ 


OS 

o 

T-l 


t- 


<M 


T-l T-l 


coco 1-1 
















00 


T-l 


eo 




oc- 
* 


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818 



SYNOD OF IOWA. 



[May, 



snoen«i 






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C- O -rH CO CO IC lO 
tH tH 


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03 ^ S oT P 


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B. Fleming, 
1 H. Parvin, 
Cooper, S.S. 


s N. Buchan 
s H. Candor 
8 C. McFarl 
ton D. Whit 
ry W. Thorn 1 


a 
a 

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David 
Samue 
M. M. 


Thoma 
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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF IOWA. 



319 





00 


lO OS 


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CO 


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T-l 


T-lOO 

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eo 

T-l 


O O O LO O O LO o o o o o o 
OIOIOOODLOX-Ot-loOOO 

-^o^ooocii-i^T-HLoeocco 

T-l T-l T— 1 tH T— 1 CI 


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00 lO IS t- 

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T-l CO 
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ooooc-oosoeococooo 

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05 

T-l 


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^V.\<.))i oK KANSAS. 



[May, 



snoaavx 
-teosiH 


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JO 


eo 

CO 

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oo o 
o t» o> 

T-l 


"tnassv 


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t-ithcj «oeOTH(M-«* 


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1—1 




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■t-H 


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T— 1 


TH O T-l 


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T-l 




TJH (M 




coo ka 


CD 
00 

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00 


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T-l 




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T-l 


araou 


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CO 
CO 


CO-^tH-^ OOCOOiC-TH 

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in 
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1—1 


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t- O lO »0 -^ O O CO li? 

T-l CO ci »o eo th 04 -^ 


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pappy 


COtH^ tH 


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1—1 


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■xa no 
pappv 


Ci ©« <?4 CO 


la 

CQ 

T-l 


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T-l tH 00 


T-l T-l 04 04 -* 


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02 

o 

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02 

^02 . g^.^ >: ^ «? 02 . . . .« 

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--J-tfrc -^^ S':3f^t> Ot> fl, • ., GO'S . (B '^ - ., .d3 

Oa20p:Q^pqo^pH^H*^t3^ QW02O p^f^g^Q 


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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



321 



o 
P 



P4 



bO 

a 



3 









00 
lO 

CO 






o 

JO 


o 

JO 


t- IO 

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T-H 


O lO lO o o o 
O 00 OT O O C35 
t-l tH (M 00 CO LO 


t~ O O I- o 

O O »0 lO o 
TlC't COtH 
C« r-1 


o 

JO 

o 


O lO IO JO o o o 
00 t- 00 t- O O 00 
■r^ T-l r-t tH O* 
tH t-H 


« O JO 
050CO 

CO JO 

T-l 


T-l 




o eo CO 1-1 ■* 

10 50 00 t- 
1-1 (N OiiO 

T-l O^ 


« JO O CO 00 
tH O th t- JO 

T-l CO T-l tH CO 


JO 


OOOOOOSIOOSt-hJOOOO 
O05'*T-iOt-<N00J0O 

T-l tH Tjl CO IO T-l CO CO CO 

T-l tH 




t- 






TH 




T-l 


CQ l?4 0i 




t- 








00 


o 






JO 




t- 


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CO 


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00 

T-< 


tH 


o 


^ (M (M 


cs 


c- 


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OJ 


lO 


(NOC0-* 
iH T-l 


00 JO 
tH 


(M 


o 

T-l 


t- JO JO 


00 
CO 


o t-co 

tH 


CO 






T-l 






T-l 

tH 


tH (N (M 


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T-l 


c- 


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loeo 

1—1 


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CO O IO o 

(N TH tH 


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d 
CO 


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t-co 


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CJ 00 


tH (M OJTJI 




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Ci 




00 




T-l -* '^ 








T^ CO 


CQ JO 


T-H Tit 


o 


00 


•^ »0 00 1-1 C- (M 

T-4 ©» tH CO (N Irt 
T-l (?? 


tm coo loco 

OS IO T-l tH OJ 


CO 


IOOS-*OCO-*COCOOOLO£-CO 
t-T-HW<*CO0O!M JOJStHt-i 


(N 


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1—1 


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T-l CO 
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CO 


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CD JO -* 


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CO 

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Marion, Kans. 
El Dorado, " 
Peabody, " 
Emporia, " 
Burlington, " 
Hartford, " 
Emporia, " 
Waverly, " 
El Dorado, 
Emporia, " 


S-l 

o 


Winfield, 
Augusta, " 
Emporia, " 
Caldwell, " 


CO 

3 
P 


Elkliart, Ind. 
Antioch, Kans. 
Wichita, " 
Lyndon, " 
Osage City, " 
Burlington, " 


o 
o 

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a" 
_o 

bO 

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Wellington, " 
Arkansas City, " 
Parkerville, 






02 

02 

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qiH<u2'»'CS±fe.- k2 
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322 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



[May, 



■aiSuoQ 



iO-^i-<wooTro;cicoooooo c-o r-iico o 

iO<?}03i-iOOJ7-'OiCi-iiO"i*OOJ'^iO OO OOW-* lO 

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1-1 •<* tH -i-h t-1 ti 



r- Lo lo 50 CO <w}< x- o "M »« i> CT OT c- t- ift (?■> •Tt* o eo 

£-C^Oi-i05OO05«CC0Gi-i-^G0C5C0l:~e0lO5J«> 



lO tH tH i-H tH C« 



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CD CO T-* CO 



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la 1-1 "i* a CO a CO oo 



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O 00 iO O O 00 •* t- <M O »0 « CO 



•mam 

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P8PPV„ 

"xa no 
p8ppV_ 



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Joc-csooool~ot-■^<^^(^J(^^oo•«*<cooJ(^^oo5mJO<^»oeooJ«o 

T-HTt'THt-JO-^lMCOTHTtiOOOJOOCOOOCiT-l-i-HCJO'^TH-^O-^ o 

■1-1 T-t * tH * 1-1 



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r* ^"^ nl T^ 



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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



323 



T-l 


oo 


T-l 

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324 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



[May 



8n091I«{ 


o 
1-1 


05 


t-e* eoiocD CO 00 t- 
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eo io wt- T-l w o 

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oo O O JO O £- O "* 
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«o 
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Tic^ weo'* « CO T-l 


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aioqM. 


C5 OCi t~ 

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C5 
00 


Tj< o eo c- 1- (M 00 CO (?* 00 

coco th CO CO T-l (Mt-i CO eo 


-.180 no 
pappV 


ICW 


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1-1 


■^ tH t-I jo jo eo "<J4 
tH 


•xano 
pappv 


1 -«f 


coco <M O 00 O JO T-l JO 

T-l T-l eo 


SU,D'Ba<I 


IC 1-i Tl 


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coco tH « (M T-l t-ItH CO « 


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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



325 



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■1-1 


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T-l O ->*< 

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c- 03 o t- CO o 

IO <M CO OS T-l 


OO OO 
O CD OJ CJ 

eo !M T-l T-l 


O O 

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T-l CO 




c- 


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1-1 


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cocjos 




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tH (M 

tH 


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O CO O OJ CQ T-I 05 

T-l iH tH -p-I CO 


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326 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



[May, 



snoanvi 
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l-H 


00 ^00 o 

T-H tH W 




§ 


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CO tH 


o 
o 


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O O O O l-O 

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■nejsng 

ioj p!v 




(N 


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tH 






CO 


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•ponj 
jauaa _ 

qojnqO 




CO 


(M CO lo n< 






d »o 00 t- -^ CO 

l-H 






00 00 OS 00 OJ 

tH 


noxj'Ba 




CO tH <S 00 CD 


•noil 
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Oi 04 (N O 00 

T^ CO 


nSiaio^ 






CO O O C- 05 OS Tjf 

th »o eo 


emog 




CO 
CO 

l-H 


o T-H ioth CO o 00 -* io<n 

tH tH t- Oi CO 


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o >c CO t- t- eo 

T-H -iH (M -r-i 


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snnpv 




JO 

l-H 


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CD «0 «0 «0 C- lO lO 

T-l TH 

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CO 
05 


coco CO l> CO tH OS lO O T-H CO CO no CO c- o 

04 o» CD eo -i-H -T-H o oj o CO CO oi ■<*■•-< eo 1* 

* tH*t-H*t-I*** 


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pappv 


J5 

T-H 


CO W C-CD lO iOCO 00 o 


•xa no 
pappv 




CD 


04 »0 no -* 00 


gnjCBad 




CO 1 rH CO Oi tH <M tH tH CO 0* 


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T-l T-H -tH 1—1 


CO 


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a 
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a 




03 

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S ii W .9 ^j ^ Si^^^ooa 9'oi; 

W OWHWh^^PhF^ W Ft-j Its i-s t> 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



327 







oo la 

»oo 

tH 


oo 
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(M 


ooos o 

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o 

T-l 


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T-l 


ic lo o o o t- 

(Ti OT O O iO 05 
■^ £- tH tH CO CO 


o o 

lOO 
(NO 
tH t-I 


r-t 


o 
o 

T-l 


00 0> O O «: O 
O C5 » O OJ O 
in CD <M (M (M oo 


(M CO 

CO 


O CO o 
CO t- O'J 

tH lO T-l 
T-l 


O CD lO 

eo 00 o 

CO (MCO 


o 

CO 


o 

T-l 


oo oo 
o^ CO t- 


OO 

t- T-l 

tH O 
tH t-I 


O 
O 

o 

T-l 


o 

Ci 
00 


o oooo 

CO CO O O lO 

la th (M CO ■* 


o o 

O £> 

CO 


ooooooooo 

CD^OiOCS-^COQOCO 

THTHTHOT-ieoco(MO» 

T-l 






T-I(M <M 


J> c- 


CO 




(M ^ 




t- -* 


TH(Meo 






(MC« 


O lO 

CO 










(M 


(M(MO 

T-t 


T-( 




OTtH-* 


T-l O 


eo 


OS 






CO T-l 00 CO 


(Mcoeo 


T-l 
T-t 




eo(M'* 


T-liO 


CO 


o 

T-l 


T-l CO 




00 (M C- lO 


<Meoo 

T-l 


§ 


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T-l 


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(MtH 


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T-l 


CO 

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05 


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s 

T-l 


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T-l T-< 




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lO CO 

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CO-* CO-* 




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328 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



[May, 



Bnoanwi 
-laosut 


o t- eoo o o 

t~ iH tH O C>^ O 
CO CQ 








t-C~ O O OOOOCJOOOO 

(N(M OS -,}<T-(T-ll-HOJl-l 






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najsns 


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T-iT-< eo CJ cj 1-1 ,H (M eo eo (M T-i 


o 

rH 
CO 




-i-HtH COOiiO 


00 




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JOJ piv 


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CO 




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T-H tH CO th CO 


s 




■pnnj 


j-iT-t e* <M<MlO 


T-H 




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t-o -<i< eo«oocoeo 


T-l 




■notj-BO 


tHt-I ojco 


CO 




•nop 
-•Eanpa 


T-<T-I ->* 


1-1 

CO 
r-t 




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nSiaao^ 


?D CO OD OJ -* t- 


^ 

s? 




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araoH 


COC- « O ©iCO-rH COCOOO »0 
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00 




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CO 




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SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



329 





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SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



381 



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SYNOD OF KANSAS. 



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SYNOD OF KENTUCKY. 



333 



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SYNOD OF KENTUCKY. 



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lOOCO-^ 10-^SOrH^O-^(M»ntOW(Ml.'5QO'* 

t- t- lO -^ T-H lO o PS -^ eo T-1 1- CO CO eo eo w CQ th 



eo 00 05 ©» <0 ■^ (M tH CD CO 



tH Od CO Oi T^ 



« o too 



00-* CO tH ?d «o 



88tJ^ 



•8S1M 

9nioH 



•raau 

•S'S 



o (?■« o -* 



eo 05 -<* CO JO «o 
-* CQ t- CO «o 
to ta 



o o 
o t- 



O^iftOlOOODOOOO 
'^CSWC-t-QOi-HOlOOOO 
■rH W C* 1-1 



-* »oO(M«eo 



•d^a 

eioqA\. 

•J93 no 
papPV 
xg uo 
pappVL 



«0 « lO tH t- ■>* 



00 Ci «0 CO 



i> -«^ to eo c^ o T-i cQ th o5 CO 00 t- o m -rj* o 00 to o T-i 

i-ltO O-^OitO (M-^Ot— t--*C<JOlOO»OCOCOCOCQ 
»0 T-H CJ CO (?* rH tH 



CO to CO T-l t- 



00 to CQ 00 1-4 to tH 



to ■* CO ■* ■* 



05 T-i ■>* CO eo ©J T-i ■* CQ o« •<* CO th 



•wapia 



fr- eo ■* lO ■* to 00 00 T-l ©J rj< CO tH C< <M <M -<i* eo CO (N CO 



-02 



-:^ s 



q >-> tn 

a> a o 
f =s o 

t^' - • 
M- - ■ 
a 

bC"j-. . 



o 



CO c> 

'3 .a 

O (H 

)-:iPh 



g gi^ « 

-^ - ^ - 

OS ^;=! 
aj :z: ,^ :s 



Ph' Pm n] ai cL; cc 
- .'^ cc -"CO 

S.^2^:ip^«5 

aj O gov .(» 
!=!^.& S=C2 ? . 

r*^ fe: f; .9 -9 ^ « 
O !>• O a ►^ 53 o 
« « > & a,:5-c 

» - - o O 3 c3 



> 



> 



^^ 



<L> 1^ QJ 

PhOO 









.2 s" 



^^ > 



P s o 3 .S 
O a> o o^ 



§^3.9 



o J2 - - - ^ 

cc > 

a CO 

^ o 

Oh-:! 



> :;3 






^ CD . 

13 "3 
^ o 



j3 j_r oj" « 



g 


c3 


a 


'> 




o 








'3 
o 


PMQ 


lii CO 






V 



^1 

.s a 
wc3 



^ 



a. 



hJ . 

rcjQ 
Rod 

O CO 

>>a 



Ph 



P5 
W 

a^ 






^ ^ = 0-5;^ 



<1 



1^ 

p^ a 



Q 
KM 

a. -I 



Ph .2 
r *-> 

b^ oTGO X -• 

f^S .f-lpH fccb ."^ 

n, CO — 



Ph 



ti 3 CO '^ CO 

CO 1^ J O O 03 
a; h- 1 „ 'w' .^ 

ffi a acd 

«SS9^^ 



PhccI 

P^ H«2 

t. h iJ , 



fined 



Q 



^^ 



I— 1 ,_l I— 1 , 



p^-c^ 



s ^ ^^ 

- fe *> 



S.=f 



es ^H 



a^^ 






A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF KENTUCKY. 



335 





o 


o ^ 

Ot-I 
T-l !M 








o 

o 

T-l 






to 
t- 

05 

eo" 
eo 


05 O 
iC 05 

t~ T-l 

(MtH 


o 

o 

JO 


s 

eo 

T-l 




o 
o 




-^ TjH r-l t- JO -^ iO 
tH tH T-l 


tH 


CO to 
CJtH 


o 

T-l 






o 
o 

eo 

eo 




T-l 


^ 


o 

tH 








o 






to 

00 




T-l 




CO 


o 


JO 






to 




T-l 


00 
C<8 


§ 


iO 






to 




c* 


C5 


o 

JO 


lO 






iO 




T-t 


OS 


T-l 


CO 






»o 




T-l 


1-1 


to 


eo 






o 

CO 




« 


00 

"* 

1-1 


?§ 

« 


o 


o 




»o 




CO 


T-l 

00 

<^^ 

CO 


oj o 

tH O 
t-TH 


o 


T-l 




T-l 




o 

03 


T-l 


« CO 

T-t 


lO 

CO 


o 
»o 




lO 
CO 






ta 


T-l 


tH 


T-l 




tH 




o* 


o 
to 


CO 


Oi 










OOC-OOOlOOO 
W WtHtH * * 






T-l 

T-l 


00 

CO 

T-l 


tH 


OCO 

CO »o 

* Tl 


eoeo 0* 
* * 


1—1 




8 


wco 

T-l 


T-l 


CO 








CO 


tH 


O iC 


T^ 


'^ 






00 


CQ tH 






00 o 


-* 


m 


CJ 


CO 




-* «tH 


tH 


to 

OS 


00 c- 


lO 


t- 


Ol 


eo 


<?* 



03 a'^ o § ^ S 
o S ^ ,2 tt' c* " 

Ph OP gj Pm gLi ;C Ph 



8 bO 

w 5 



« a3 



CO . 
orJCQ 



_4ja2 OQ 



.-CO 2 



a - "^ 



PSh^) CO 



a S 



? ° s 

(-1 —• -^^ 

t-l !5 OQ 

aj ^ OS 






<u 3 « t, o ^ 

;x< pg jz; p^ pg oi fa 



o 
1-5 






S 0:=: 

w Q ro <u 



S3 ,r" ..r 






,2 a ^5 a 

C ^ D CS 

OGP5Q 



•* bO „r 

fc- 3 C ^. 



P5 



s 



pP5Q 



o r3 c: 
00 






o 



d^ 



czj r 



- c 



H .-. i "^ ^w«l 



o 



.5 ST- -g 






co<tipq 



■ cs 

a 



^ «- 

CO bD ^1 

S '*J o 






^.5S 



^§ 



OS o <i^ c t?- 

t-5 l-S l-il Hj F 



GO 
oj — S 

t, o o) 

>- ^2 O) 
3"y »;; 

a M g 



.7 

.Ps^' 
.02 .'*! 



.2§ 






336 



SYNOD OF MICHIGAN. 



[May, 



snoanvi 

-I9081H 




o 


oo 

taia 

T-l 


-ajanoO 


o 
o 

T-l 






•raessv 
ivjaaao 


lO 


00 

in 


OO 

OC- 

CO(N 


•notj'81 
-natMiig 
•s.lloo 
JO} PIV 
■aain 
-P»»jj: 




to 

1-1 












§ 




•panj 
J»H»a 




o 




■n.ioaaa 
TlDinqo 

•notiDD 




o 






CO 




•noil 
-■Banpa 




tH 




•S8tw 
n;8iajoj 


^ 


00 
CO 


o-^i< 


•ssim 

araoH 


c-»ooo o 


07 

Oi 

o 

1—1 


00 CO 

T-l 


■raam 

•s S 


^ 




OJOO 


•d^a 


(M -* 


1—1 




■d^a 

8}inpv 


00 


o 


T-l 04 


•OS. 
apq^ 


C<80i-OiOOOO<0000-r-iCX)iOOO 

OJ lO ■* el's lO '^ <M O Xl Ot> tH -r-l C>J ■TO T-l 

************ 


o 

C5 
CO 

T-l 


la CO 
o CO 


•jeo no 
pappv 
•xa no 
pappv 




1-1 


»o 


iH iO O T-l 

T-l 


CO 


•r-l CO 


BUfiV9(X 


CO oi 


)0 

CO 




•saapia 


"^ CO CO tH 


^ 


CO(N 


03 

a 

o 

K 

B 




Q 

O 


a iJ 

^^ . /;3 aa ^ 


El 

iz; 

ft 

< 

« 

Eh 

g 


1 = 
^ 1 

1— 




►^ cTj ^ 1^ * -i-H i-T> O ►-^ * ^- 



A.D. 1881.] 



SYNOD OF MICHIGAN. 



337 



oo 

C3 O 

CO t- 



o o io «i o o 
Lo o ^ o o t- 
o >o t- lo CO CO 



I- O O O i-H 

o C5 lo o c; 

00 tH CX) '^ -^ 

C- T-lC'l 



O O O '^i 
lO O O T-( 
t-O O tH 
CO 5<J tH CQ 



o lo »o o 00 c« o go 

05 C5 lO t-H <M t- Tt< 00 
-I-H Ol t- Ci 





oo o o o 
oo^-* o 

O O 00 lO -<* 




G8 00 

6 03 

23 00 

16 47 


■^ 00 eo lO 
coo 00-* 

oo 30 t-00 

eo c? 1-1 


OOOOS oooo 
T-l CO CO 00 LO -* 

C5 C? C7 f-l O lO 

T-l tH T-l -<*< 


£-0 

JO CO 

CO t- 

co 




eo 




CO o-* 

O l-l■r^ 

-I-H 


ooco 

■l-H 






■<* eo 

tH 00 


eo 




in 


« 




tH 






tH 






, Oi «5 CO 
■pH CO 


"* 


O T-H O -* 
t~ l-l -I-H 

1—1 


^o 

CJ 


00 

T-l 


o 

1-1 


00O1-* 
T-l(MCO 


00 

00 




O lO 

T-l CI 


eo 


I-H OJ O 1-1 

O 1-1 CI 

T-l 


CO lo 

-I-H 


T-l 

r-l 


o 
1-1 


LO e« 

I-H OS 


LO 






(M 


fr- 005 

CO tHC* 


CJ CO 
■pH 


iO 


lO lO o 
1-1 CI 


CO 




■l-l 


w 


Ttl CJ O -^ 

CO t-H 1-1 


■* wcooo 


lO 


coo -* 

tH tH T-l 

tH 


OS 
03 



•<# CJ Oi-i 



O t-OJ 
'^ 00 



o o »o O O o 

LO CO t- 1- CO ira 

Cl CO tH 



oo CJOO 
lo lo 00 LO no 
th -^ eo ■* 



O t-o o 
0-* -* »o 

ej CO T-l c> 



eo CO o eo ■* 



O CO 1-1 no o o 
O CO o CJ »o o 

t- 1-1 d CO lO T-l 



1-1 C- 1-1 



1— 1 1- 1— 1 1-H 1— I eo 



O tH lo OCJ o 

LO o 1-1 CO -* »o 

CJ LO tH 



CJOi-iOSOO-*OOC-'* 

eoj>coooosTHio-^oOT-i 

t- CJ tH * ■<* CO Cl 



• lO OS Cl -^ 
i-JP cj-«f CO 



•<Ji 00 ^ LO O 

CO lo c> o eo 

CO * T-l * 



»oos o eocieouo-^eo 



OS lO tH o 



00 -^ Cl t- LO 



lO t- t- -* CD 00 



CO 00 eo CO oi CO d 00 eo CO -^ c-oscojo cocooojc^oo co oo 



,G a 
.'HZ a .„ 

f*i Eh ^ 



o rf3 

<U -^ (U 



cc . cdnip; ^ CO p:,^^^ ^ ^ 

^ ^ a S,'^ 3 ^ o § o o o « >;-2 o S 5 o , ^ S 2 -S O ^ 

5 f^tP a ^"^ v2^-^ °^^>2§ ^2^5,2^ ° ^AE^o 



p<1 



«-« 



og-2 5 - 



cc <J 



c .ts 



•53 ^j; d bCc i3 
>-itgO-alMfaQ 






^ 3 g t>>-2 o 

&I OJ o o o 9^ 

>^ O B M P-iQ 



. o V 



a 
o 



CO 



wQ 






-OGOf 

22 






02 

CO 



3 o a 2i g o -5 

3 ~ 3 s 3 -2 ^ g 

;^H^^PwKe 



Pi CO 

o 

.-a 
> 

IS 



CO 
02 

Ph . ^- 

c3 o 2 

pq oO 

. Q • 

>► .Ph 

OPW 



02 
CO 

P-i . d 

J QJ tn 



■ W 



ag| 



PH_d02 
oHcd 

•^ S ^■ 



^S 



ci 

P^ n' 

S 2 =: ffi plh ^ 

ss|a«-p 



:=! d 
o .2 

^OP^^^^Ih^FW^Oh^P 



338 



SYNOD OF MICHIGAN. 



[May, 



8noen«i 

•I90S1K 


I- 


If 






C'j 1-1 o «o 

C>» O CO Ol 
O SS COt-i 

I- 


S 

of 


00 UC oc 
lO 0*0 

T-l Tl 


■massv 


QO O OCX) 

o I- so I- o 

coo » CI i-H 

CO T-4 


lO 
Ol 

GO 


g §8 

CO 00 

T-l 


•na^sng 




1-1 
CO 


1-1 


•8.1100 

10} piv_ 

■neuj 

-P93JJ 




eo 


ta 


ei3 «2> 

■I-l 

y-l 


1-1 

CO 


lO .o 


•pnti^ 
jansH 


O^O CD 
O JO 


CO 
iO 


o> IC 


•n.jaaaa 
qojnuo 

■nqnj 


o 

1 


CD 

o 


com 


00 

1-1 


eo 


OJ 


■not} 
-■BDnpg 


in lo o 

01 


lO 

o 

tH 


01 


•ssiH 
nJSiaao^ 


iO CO O CX) «o 
O lO CJ 

1-< 

th 


CO 
CO 

1-1 

C5 


O (MO? 

tH 1-1 CO 


BtnoH 


»o o o o o 

« (M 0? 1-1 lO 

o 

T-l 




Ol COO 

1-1 ocjeo 


•niaj\[ 
•S 'S 


»0 0*0 
OJ50 
OJtH 


C5 


O lOO 

m t- 1-1 

tH 1-1 


•dBa 


« 


Ol 

1-1 


'^ 


•d«a 

snnp\r 


T-l 


OS 

00 


-* OJ 


■on 


t- O O l^ lO ?o o> O IC o« o* 

coTt<oc5ooiT-ieoTHH! * 

* * CO * * 


o 

lO 

CO 


o -*>« 

CO 1-100 

1-1 


•J80 UO 

pappv 


1-1 


o* 


1-1 OOJ 

1-1 tH 


•xa no 
pappV 


tH OJ 




CO eo 

tH 


8n;0B9Q 


1—1 


C5 


Od Oi 


•sjapia 


iO 50 -5j< Tl< tH 


1-1 


^ -*'* 


tn 




W 

o 

< 


:3. ::::::::::::: : 

g- ffi .2 2 3 fen 'S.'S =3 a 


CO 

o 

•/-J 

K 

H 
r/J 

!<; 


1 




. do 1 

•1 ^ .Ph .w ^^^-d 1 

«: -S -^ ^x- S =s > LT •;:'"' 5 !=B^ - C'T? 
« S W t^^w q « "« S t, .2a S 'H S3 « ? »r! 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF MICHIGAX. 



339 





tH t- 


o 

LO 


1-1 








o 

(M 








CO 

o 
t- 




OS 

1-1 


CO 00 O Lt o o 
O O? O £- » O 
t- CO O T-1 tH O^ 
(Mr-1 e-"* 


1-1 o 

OS 1-1 

1-1 


o 


o 
o 

(M 

1— 1 


it:^ o o o o 

C- O LI o o 

(M t-co io 


g 

00 






OS 

o" 

(M 




oo 


oooo o o 

OS O Ci CO o o 

'^ o ^ th in 


o oo oo 
COO'* coo 

O^ OS CO 1-1 lO 


o o o o o o o 

O !M lO O O -^ lO 
»0 L-? 1-1 03 -^ 0>^ 1-^ 


o 

00 






o 

OS 

o 

CO 








1—1 


tH 


iO 














1—1 

CO 






lO 






t- eo 


T-f 


(M CO 


-* 


1-1 












eo 




Oi-( 


(N OOIOtH 

eo 


c- 


CM CO 

tH 




(M 












CO 

CO 

1-1 




1-1 T-H 


10 


o? 


CO 


00 


(M 


-* 


m 








CO 
o 

T-l 




1-1 


lo CO 


1-1 


>>* eo 




1-1 


00 










00 
(M 






00 o* 


o 


O tH-"* 

1-1 




1-1 


lO 










OS 




05 


COlO O tH 

OS-rH-rH 




oo 

COl-H 


1—1 
1-1 




o 


lO 






CO 

o 




o 

1-1 


1-- ■* O lO (N »o 

lO -«*l -rH T-( 
(Nt-I 


eo coi-i 


o 

1—1 


(MO 


(MO 


o 
1-( 


o 






o 

o 

(X) 




ooo 

00 OS 


o w o o o o 


O lO W >» Ci 

o c- 1- 1- o 

1-1 1-1 1-1 


<MOO OO 

i« t-co^-* 


ooo 
OS coo 






-* 
t- 
(>^ 




1-1 


QOIOCO c» 


CO 


Oi-I 


r-ieo 


00 


eo 


Oi-i 












OtH 


OOt-1 


1-1 


eo« 


(N<M 


to 

1-1 


1-1 1-1 










OS 




T-H-QOOSlO-rHCacOlO 
lO-rH-rHCSC-lOi-l-i— It- 


C4 o t-o o; 

'^l-KMl-l t- 


O "* O O <M O LI 0>i 

oo-*i-i(Moo<r»THi-i 


CO 

T-l 


Tt< ooo cj 

1-1 * (M OJ 

* * * 


00 




00 lO 


^ ■rf CO 
CO 


CO T-i 


ooo 

1-1 


CO CO 


S?"= 


1-1 «c 


(M 








o 

T-l 




Oi-IQOClOOCQ-r-lOO 
tH T-H T-H (N 


O Oi-( 
1-1 


c--* 


JO 

eo 


i-<-r}<i-. 


(?J1-I 








00 




(?4 


Tt^ 


o 




1-1 


eo 


1-1 eo 






(M 




CI 




O-i-i<MQ0-«*'*T-li-(l0 


coo (MtH o 


CO-* CO-* 0<Mi-i(M «(?*«-<*■<* 


1-1 





cocc 

cocc 



(S ^ 

^ o 



Ph 

o c 



w 



- en 



03 s- O 



CO 


CL, 


m 


a 




0) 


>. 


k 




c3 


^ 


-^ 


a> 


Tf 




n 


>> 


c3 






CQ 


C^' 



CO 



'^ . tococd 



2 o 



♦J CO c •— 2^ 



.CO 

^co 

c3 



c .. 






> 



^ ^VyA"^ 



>1 fcJD 



<? C- vi' fc- C3 



S2 2 .o ;5 a 



0^ >-U' 



^ o!^ 



CO CO 

c3 c! 



1^ -^ 7i V 
en G ^ ,-* 






OO 






' O ^ C3 >H 



^ fe — 



Oh sa Ci 



03 £'''2 
^"2 I 



W 






^ .--^ s 






'Vh^ 



a p.i: fc 



03 






'^ 03 53 






JIB 



Til 
CO 

aCD 



^ o 

II 



CO 



Ph 

Ph <u . 



S CO S3 " 
«^ e3fe- O 



CO 



.o 

5 -^ S o 



5 ^ • 

rS (t. t-< 



Ph-^ 



r-d w si 3 
i- n a := .2 

a O r- --- !h 



^^ I 

CO ^^ o 

.9 "So 
& k fci 






a 3 a> 

P fl *=! 



340 



SYNOD OF MICHIGAN. 



[May, 



snoan«i 



massy 

•noij«J 
-naisng 
■s.lioo 
joj piy 
•nam 
-paaaj 
•pnnj 

•noij'BO 

■notj 
-■BDnpa 

•ssiiff 

aniofi 
•mam 

•s-s 

•dT!a 

siitipv 

■ON 

•jaO Tto 
pappv 
•xa no 
pappv 



<M -^ Cl OS 1-1 d Ol •^ 00 



T-l t- 



W tH 



w < 



CO o 

th lO 

csoo 



o o 
o o 

00 CO 



~in o o o 6i c -* ci5^ cS'o" 

Ift OlOOJiOCOODOO 

O eOr-(OOS<MOi0100 

tH tHtHtH rHr-t (Ni-l 



O00-^t--*-t'*Ot- 



lO lO (N Its T-i -<t 



CO tH »c »0 ' 



"c^OO»0003(M»r»00-* T-iiO 

c» CO «> »o to OS (N 00 CO T-i 



iOiOOOOt~Ot-iO 
OSC«C-OOCOO(3500 

tH 1-1 tH CJ T-H T-I 



« CO CO OS ■ 



« o eo 



^' 



p CO 



05 »r5 (N t- tH T-i OQ w -^ 



(M ^ <?« 00 ^O C* 



Bn,0B9(I 



CO Ci (M T-i 



^ 



I ->* eoc- '«i< o 



(Miooioeo-<*50iNeocoo 



a2 cd^-i 
- *- « 

S =3 9 
c3 






CLh 



CO 

ai g 

5 g 

o c3 



o 

(2; 






fcC 



oi P^ 



^ 



> 







oi a c -«2P5 - 

.-D-ie3^C .to© 

_p_H ^ e^ X' d' S o ^ kn^ 



bD 



9- -^ 



.-,, 'I <U 53 



PPM 



— o 



> o 
"S «.>; 



P ^ J3 go:; 

g S O « a ^ „ 

fi.Ma2pqE-PW 



a^ 



5K 

wo 



bjo a 

ct ^ bo 

o '3 c Ph .,r OB a 

O g bc2 bJj^-S 

II ^ 2 g g -g 



■ o3 a 






w 






I ^ 

I CO ^ 
'C " ■ 

a -cc 
^ ^cd 

is S3 - 
r«3 rt a 

li; o o 






a;. 



^00 



ap S bxj^ 
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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF MICHIGAN. 



341 





^^ 




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500 
1000 


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2100 
1800 


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aM^aS-ga^Hfl^acQ^oggp;^ 

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342 



SYNOD OF MICHIGAN. 



[May, 



9no8a«i 


CC 


2 S^J2 


00 
10 

CO 


CO 

1-1 
eo 




?2 


C0-<i<^if?i--*ooO-*0000 o 
t-00COO5 — C(OOirtt-OC<« JO 

■.-iGot-.-<oooi--ooa>,-ii-i 

CO (M tH OJ C>J 


CO 
10 
oo_^ 

i-T 




r-t OCO 
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i-T 
1-1 


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r-l «5C<> O f- OJ O OJO O to O (N 
OOi-iC-00<7'»iOOC-i-cTfO 30 

'-ooooooweoco->*-<}<c>i5'jco i-i 


<2 


000 

COi^lO 
OS TlrHi-i 


•noijBj 
-n9i9ng 


1-1 


oeo CDio 




10 


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CD 


in CO t- 


1-1 


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1 




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1— 1 


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1-1 


10 »o»o 


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00 


in <N 


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T-l 


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10 


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tH CO -^ t- O CQ OS CO 
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00 




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araoH 


^ 


"^i CO r^ O O CO Tji OS lO « t- 

t- 00 lO 00 1-1 1-1 

1-1 « 


CO 


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c? cj 1-1 oi 1-1 


10 


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01 


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coo5c>-HC<j-^oio-ri<oeo<Mc>ooDco 
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10 


t- lOi-H 


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t- CO CO OS C* as O lO '^ 00 i-l(M (M CO 1-1 



00 


l?«-l-ll-l 




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ADDRESS. 


aT 
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ri r^ >-i, ^ ^ (V r^ - oj^aJiS - 
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W H ^ <1 <l 02 Ht Ph 



A.D. 1884.] SYNOD OF MICHIGAN. 0-43 



IC 


^ 


^1 


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C5 


o in 

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CQ CJ 1-1 1-1 1-1 


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tH Tt< lO CO 

*>co ^ 


12 
ire 


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1 60 

f) 40 
4 00 


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-* ire -<*< ire 

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CO 


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1-1 »H 1-1 


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tH 


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CO CO 


-<*<e.ico<Mi-(-*ireoo 


«oiC50eoco 


tH CO CO CO 


ireeoeocQ 



CO 






gig i^ll-llg- g lis il^.s- i-5l 

■^.^O 'S«ar>^'^— ^Si o-S.^^M CMOS S£ajO 

q;«8;3 ,^0(-i3S:-^rt— ._ -\2 *jc3 .Si^eSeS O-— 031- 



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344 



SYNOD OF MINNESOTA. 



[May, 



Bno»n«i 
-leoBiK 


1» 


OS 




•TV«» 
•«jano3 


8^8 88 ^ § • S §§ 

^ ■«*< o» ec T-i CO th 


5 

CO 

CO 

in 




'mossy 
iwanao 


ooo oo o ooo o o 


o 




•non«l 
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"•8.1100 

10} piy 

'nam 

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^ 






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T-l 




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S5 

1—1 




•pnnj 


CDCd 


CO 

a 

tH 




•u.paja 
qojmo 

•nonBo 

_-nqnj 

-non 
-Bonpa 

•ssij^ 
nSioioi 

•8SIW 

eraoH 
■raaM 

•s -s 


OStH rH «0 






00 


1-1 






T-l 

rH 




g*= -^ 


O 
1-1 




Ci-* CO (M IC OS (M 


->* 




O OOOOOO lO OlO 

c^ oioco ocot- 1-1 OS (M 


o 
1-1 

T-l 
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■d^a 

B^n'Bjni 


T-( Nt-I T-l '^ <» 


00 
00 




•dBg 
B^npy 


T-H CO W (M 1-1 


04 




■OM 


l>QOOOOi>i-H-<tC500-^COOOOOOSt-C50COSO 
■M-^COCOlOCi-^T-lOOCOC^iCJtO* T-H T-l* COi-H 


00 

o 




•J90 uo 
pappy 


04 tH T-l lO <0 


o 

CO 
1—1 




•xg no 
pappy 


<M CO lO tJ< 00 

1—1 


eo 

00 

1—1 




SU.D'Bad 


T-H T-l lOCOCO 1-1 tH (M tH 05 


-* 




■BJapia 


««oco-*»ococQeo-<*<-<*coco(NT-tTHT-ieoo«coo« 


CO 

1-1 




w 
W 
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CD >► „•- lO 

Ill Sills ip nil 1511 


ai 

CO 

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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF MINNESOTA. 



545 



o 


o 


oo 

1-1 T-l 


©J 

T-l 


o 

lO 


O 


OOSlffl 
OOOi-l 

woo 

1-1 


O 

T-H 


oo 

tH O 
tH 


o CO 
t-l 




CO 

o 
o 


o: ic 

CI-"*! 


oooo 
00 c^j lO 

C5 T-l 

T-l 


00 lO 
GO©:j 

■<d<T-l 
T-l 


O £- tH 

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CO ©JO 


1-1 
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oo Ci 

CI CI TH 


o 


■* ©I 

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T-l T— 1 


o 




lO 








o 






o 


<M10 




to ©I 
©? 


O 
50 




lO 




CI 

T-l 


CO CO 


»o 


lO 


T-l 


tH 




eo 


(M 


eo 


oco 

T-l 


^ 










o« 




<M 


T-l 




tH 


c- 






LO 






1» 


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tH 
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T-l 
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CO 


o 

o 

T-l 


« eo «o lo 


in 


ocow 

CJ 1-1 


w 


to 


-<4< »c« 


O lO 

T-l 


©I Tjl T-H O t- T-H 

©■J o 


o 


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O O LO O 00 o 

CO o ©1 C5 t- JO 


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in 

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©i 


T-ITtI 


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1-1 


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T-l T-l 


T-l 




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tH C} « ^ 

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^ 




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.02 
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Clarke 
Richar 
Robert 


«<1 


Henry 

Walter 
George 
Thoma 


a 02 

^ 2 





346 



SYNOD OF MIXXESOTA. 



[May, 



•noanei 




TH 


00 CO (M t- 00 

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tH 

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-aaanoo 


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t-T-HO ot~c; 00 oso 

01 rH T-H Ci l-H T-l 


C5 
CO 
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-massy 
Xwanag 


O CJ 00 « -^ Tf o 

^ C-. » ?t -^ ~¥n 


•* 


CI T-l O' I- C: CO I- 

L-? L-r -<i< 1- 1- -* »~ ct CO 


?2 


HOIJUJ 

-najsns 
•8.1100 
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CO 


so 




10 


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CO 




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O OS M O"* C« 50 
rH T-( tH 


01 

07 


CO -^ t- 




•xa no 
pappv 


Tt< Ol O^-i-H 


CO 


CO -^ -^ tH -* 1-* 05 05 
CQ T-l 


CO 


sn.ouaa 


CO CJ 


»o 


cj OS c^ c? cj CI CI th cj 


OS 

tH 


•siapia 


eo<McOTHT-<coco-*so 


^ 


CO •<* CO '^ CO ■* T-l T-l C4 




CO 


W 

a 

D 
H! 






III, ilfgai i^^fii<n&i I 
I|ili2ili|i iiiigiii|iiio i 


CO 

» 

-<! 

< 

« 

E-> 

22 

2: 

s 


CO 
1—1 



^ ^ "i 

bo e J: 
a -e ?: 

•Ji fe 

1 . ^ 
1 t 

a 


CO 


M CO 

s ^ ^ . 1 

■S g A >^ . . Ph ^ - ?5 P 2 ^ V 

,? as-2^.2^Sa'Sot^g'S-2 a 





A.D. 1884.] SYXOD OF Minnesota. 347 



ot- o L-r -.-iccooaDT-io a^ <z> oo t~ ts 





c 







1--? »0 LT 

X' <?"( Oi iC X> X 

r; ic ■?! c; o X 


010000 

^ X X t- c: 

« w i> X cc 


■:>> 


CI 


10 i.t) 

T-lO 

eoi-i 




IS 


^ 




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CJ 










g 


'"' 


i^ 


■>* CO 


X 




t~ 1.- 




' ■' 






1- 


« 




cc* « 





T-l t- 









'^ to 


■^ 




t- -* 10 ic 

tH 1— 


1» 




JO'* 


t- 






■^ ta 


10 




T-i -rH 


Lt 


eo 


c--* 10 


W 






T-l 


■^^ 




eoeO(N t- 


« 




coee 








OitO 


"'"' 




COO JOX 

1-1 T-l 





10 

CO 


T-ICO 

T-l 


Tf 


J 




SI 








0x0 00 100 
cc tt -^ i- -r? 


JO 


CJt-i 

T-l 



0? 








LC 


- 


c? CO 
X T-i 1-1 10 


W JO 

•t-l 


JO 


oco t- 

05« 


CO 


■* 


«ox 


^3? 


JO 
0? 


t- 


CS 10 Tf* 
10 05 t- •?? 1-1 

■JO T-l T-l 


05L0J0?0i-lO-*J0 

JO (?■> X JO eo -* -* 

1-1 T-l 1—1 


OS 



JO 

JO 


« 


70 




1-1 Tl T-l 


JO 




tH 01 






CI 



XX CO « -Ht-io-*c;rH«> T-ioiOcix^ocs-rjocowcoTi^t- 

lO-r-l CO -rj* COSCCOt-iC-M— ' (Mt-I»JOC7t— X— -T^Jt-i COt-iO 

CJ T-iT-i :i:*:t::t:*4: 





xco 


JO 


CO 


(?^0? 


T-H -* 


c- 


JO 


T-l 


« 




eo-ti* 


« 


c? 


OCS 


1-1 JO 




-"t (NOT 







coc'j *? CO rrco«o>»T-ico i-iso-^o«eoO'i«Oi-iTHTH thcioovh 



348 



SYNOD OF MINNESOTA. 



[May, 



snosn*! 

IM8IW 




-* 


§ S§ S^ ^!2 g 

CO 


-ej^aoQ 

'massy 
iwjsnao 

"noiiBj 
-najsng 

jo; piy 




OS 


coo OO'* irtoeooo 00 
000 oo^^ loesoso ICOO 

»Ct-(tH «OC<t L--*-*rH TH04O 

(?j thoj T-(rH eo 







0000 0000 00 
-^ ««oeoo ioOioco mia co 

(M eo M CI tH l-3 tH CO t-i t-i t-i c» 

T-l 1—1 



CO 






^ 

w 




■nam 
-paajj 
•pnnj 

;au9a 




g 


Ot lO OJ 




^ 




•n.jDajg 
qwnqo 

•notjtJD 




00 


CO c- 1- 00 eo 

Ci -r-l TH T-H 


CO 
CO 


c* eo 

T-l 


■noi} 
-•Bonpa 

u3tajo^ 












00 


COO laiaoi. 

0J!0 tH tH 


•ssjn 
aniOH 

"s -s 

•dug 
sinujni 






1-H 


OSCOIO-^ lOCDC^O i>O«De0 OOtH 00 
T-l 1-i 0< CO -i-i tH 1-1 1-1 1-1 




CO 

CO 


JO OiO OOJO OiOOO OJOO i«o 

io coo o»cco cciot-eo loioeo ooco 

eo T-l 1— ! 




T-l 


CO T-l T-l T-l Ti 1- 

T-l CJ 


•d^a 
snnpv 




10 


CO -"Ji iO T-l JOt-I 


•Oil 
eioqM, 
•J93 no 
pappv 


o o 
* 




00 


ICOOOOO 00 50 O-*00C>OJOClOCSOt- 
■^CJ CO COCOCIt-I C-t-ICOt-iCOt-ICIt-I COd 

T-l T— 1 * T-l 




CO 


C5 00 T-l 00 d CO •* 0> C» T-l •<*i 

T-l CO tH C4 T-l T-l 


•xa no 
pappv 






cj d c- 00 TH ic eo 

1-1 


8n,0'B9(I 


CS 




•BJapia 


tH 






"neoweo lorjiffi cj coc4 <mcNt-i coco 


1 

o 

« 

a 


? . 02 - ,»■■ • rD C P^ c/o • CC -'-' rO c3 r/-) &, ,»; "O 


m 

03 

H 

« 
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S .fi c = s « S ^ S « .-2 3 .22 .2 


w 

S5 
O 

CO 

Eh 


s 


) 


.<4 <>:■ H^ 

^ cti . 6: . S „, : Ok* .Smi^' a* 

^4 OK ;i:-l2;ffio^^-^5HO 



A.D. 1884.1 



SYNOD OF MINNESOTA. 



349 







o 
1^ 




o 

T-l 




c 

CO 












CO 

o 

CO 

co" 


Tf 




L- O O C5 O LO 

T- « rS <M « T-l 
T-l OI 


11 

■r-t 


§ 


O CO 
o Ol 
t- CO 


so LO 
CO t- 
LO Oi 


tH 


o 




do 




X LO -* O 

X eoco »o 


CO-r-i 


o 


o 

X 


T-l T-l 


00 
00 

T-l 






iS 








■^ 


















T-l 




C« 












OS 


JO 








c> 


CO 












lO 




<M T-l 




o> 












00 


o 




''"' 




00 


o 

T-l 




th (M(M 


CO 




T-H 


'"' 




^ 




« 












o 

T-l 


o 




''"' 


^^ 


<?J 












c5 






O OTt-i 

tH tH 


tH lO !■- 


o 


(NO» 








CO 


ScS 


00 -* CJ LO CO (M t- O 

tH tH 


CJ 


eoco 


coi-eo 


o 

T-l 




tH 


L"? 




CO I- ic o ;o 
TH CO c- oco 

T-l 




o o 
loeo 


o 

05 


>*eo 


t- LO LO 

eococQ 


1-1 




C5 




OOtJIO Ot-i 00 


00 


'^ 


t- 


'^os 


tH»0 






C5 

T-l 






T^ 






'^ 


1 




lO 


*18 


CO 

T-t 

00 


oot-J»T-ioot-«-^t-a»t-t-os 

tHt-It-I THCOCOSOt- COtH 


^^ 


oos 

dT-l 


CO 00 T-l 


u 


T-l 


O <M lot- 

T-l 


tHOT 




«C5 

r-t 


CDC« 

1-^ th 


T-l 


IOC-tH 


o» 


i: 


CO T-l 




CO W-* t- 




CO 


1-1 tH 

tH 


CO 


thCS'* 


»o 








W CO 


CO 




»o 






-* 


CO 


ot 


i: 


eo<MeOTH«<Moio*ec 


tHCOCQ 


T-l 


T-IC« 


t-i-*tH 


©t 



^3 



02 






CO 



02 GO c .S; . c . 



= fcC^f=H 



pillll 

c fc. tH o o oj o) 

M *^ O ^ ca Ui PL, 



I .o: 

"So 



CO 

XCD 

K 3 



sss^ 



rr^^ 




00 


W 


xr:^- 




.o: 


P^ 


n 




a5 bo? 


o 


6 a 






"C 








frt 


ttCfl 




^ecd- 


>A 




r 


.M . - w 




. - 


OS - 


OS - - - 


- 




O 


O 





^< 



§11 



h^ rT 1-^ 



;r .s "2 ':; .o 

c3 c c c3:=v, •;:;£■, =s 

p:t^p.OgMO'Co 






Op-- 



C O en cS *=*?; 

_H6S^S-gs|_S.9 
ri O a P2 IX td fi ^jgp^Mbfi J 







rr 


« 


CO 




•s 


CO 


(/J 


>c> 






1 


cq| 


<u 

-2 

o 


•^ 


o 


Ph 


rO 


CJ J 


r^ 


« 


co<1 




^ 


c c 






o o 


•n 


CO 


t-5t-5 


< 



CO 



a:: 

CO 



oQadpn' c 



CO _ >- • — 

E= >^ •=! n & 

<^ *— <"> L^ — ' 



SCO 

.2 c 



'5 M "S . • fa s o '■; 



O 

Occ 

^ as 






2 !-, c E fe 4= 



K<i^! 



<^o 



CJ O c3 

a >;=; 



b"S a = 

53 3 CO .S 

CQ O ■ 






a ^ 



- H 






\4 



O 



350 



SYNOD OF MINNESOTA. 



[May, 



Isnoaatti 
-laosiK 

•«iSao3 




^ 




o 
I- 






?: 

o 

o 


OOirrOOOOOO o 

O i.T i~ != O O O O O -<1< 

O-^CC'^COt-htO tH 






'inassv 
l«jando 






oooooo o oooo 

C 00 IS T-H :C O O O 00 CO Si 


CO 




•nojj'B} 
-najens 
•e.lioo 
10} p!V 

nam 

__-pa8JI 

■pnnj 




as 1 '^ tH -rl 

1 


«o 






CO ©JOO(M O 

o* CO • 

■--1 


1-1 






th 


ic -Tt* so i-i 


eo 

1-1 




o 


lo eo i-H 


c» 




■n.paja 
qajnqo 


CO 


« CO 04 C- O -* -.-1 

1-1 


eo 




noijuo 

noi} 
-Bonpa 

•ssiM 
o^Siajoj 

•ssiw 
einoH 


M' 


CO CT 1-1 


!0 






o 

T-l 


W -* 1-1 


o 

1-1 






T-H 

tH 


§g § ^ 


1-1 

Oi 

tH 




c- 


?2 


Ol CO <M tt> r-i O « CO C>^ O? 1-1 
i-i-* 1-1 


s 




•uiani 

•S'S 




CO 


OOt-OC^iOOOiO iOlOO Gl 
CO lO O t- -^ »0 -* -* "* COCO'* -* 
tH 


CO 

00 




•<i«a 

s^npy 

■OS. 
oioqAv 


o? 


1-1 

05 


CO i-ie»co i-ieoi-i i-ii-i 
1-1 






o 
1-1 


(M tH CO CD 


(M 




CO T—f CO 
* 




i>0 0«COQO(?«5DOSO -rHOS-^COO 
0"JIOC<J»C5C3r-li-ieO -^ t-Ht-(IO 


oo 

CO 




•J80 no 
psppv 
•xg no 
pappv_ 

su.DBad 


oo 


00 

00 


ict- «oi-t-i-ii-i(yjo> i-i-^oi 






iO 00 


oi CO lo -<j< CO rH 1-1 c- eo -<J< 00 


^ 




CO 


CO 


eo 




wapta 


^ 


1-1 Ol Cil TH •* »0 CO CO <N lO <M CO eo CO 


CO 




& 

B3 


.9-2 o -? 8 a Sj Sh*" n ^h5 p o -3 o S 


09 
H 

» 


.a-.- d da CbHfl 
03-- a ::::::::raq:::: a. a- 

^S'o -1 ^ § o ?c^ br,§ ga o;>;5t: > f^j-^fl 


E-i 

< 
» 

« 

izi 

CD 

M 

CO 
S 






^ « 1 




Q r«8 

"^ § 1 a ■§ 

l" to _» CO 

06 ^PjcQ 



A.D. 1884.] SYNOD OF MINNESOTA. 351 



OCO 00 O»«00 O O IC ooooo oo 

-!r IK kci 00 ioicict-i o -^ c^ 0:000 00 

■^«CQ<MtH00»OC'! GOOO-rHOf-l lO(M 

«> o o" -^ JC<C ^ 

T-l (M 

o (M J> o ko « :e~oo Co CI CO 00 o51S <yj c- 1 

o-*"* o 'CO -^ o eo « -^ o i» 00 CO cd-<*- 





00 

CO 


i 


i 


10 


CD 
■1-1 






i 


J§ 






05 


C5 CO (M 

00 
t-l 


00 




CO 


CI 


CO 



(?) 


10»-i 









00 CO 


la 


00 (M 


(M 


CO 


iO 


JO 


t- 





1—1 


eooj 

CO 


i? 


CDtH 


CO 

tH 






CJ 


CO ec 

T-l £> 


t- 


tH 


1-1 (M 

CO 


tH 


t- <?? 


tH 






CO 


T-< 


05 




"* (MCO 
OCO 

CO 


CO 

tH 


T-l OS tH 
T-l T-l 









00 

T-l 


tH 





CO 


1-1 10 CO 
CO rH 

to 



0* 


00 
T-l T-l 


§ 








CO CO CO <M 

T-l th CO 


<M 


^ 

^ 


OCO uo 
t- »o 

CO 


10 



T-l 


tH 

w* 

CO T-l 








-* 



CO 




tH 


"<* 10 
tH t- ICO 

T-l tH CO 


in 100 
«-*eo 


Ci 


0^ 


CD 


T-l !>-* 








-* 


t- CO CO 00 


<M 


->* 


»ceo 


CO 

T-l 


CO . 


<M 






CO 


CO T-ITt< 







<NJ>CS 

CO 






W CO00C5 
T-l C-CO 


i 







T-l 


tH 


CO was 10 

0OCO->* th 
CO 


CO OCO 

CO 0» 


CO 

CO 


CO 


s 


COt-i 

T-l 


-* 

T-l 




C5 


^. 


CO t- OJ T-l 

(>j(Neo 


-* 


00 
I— I 


00 t-eo 

T-l 


^ 


cooi ©J'* 
1-t 


00 




T-l 


tH 




CO 




CO 


T-l 


CO CO tH 


(M 






<M 


CO 




00 


00 T-l'* 





th T-l (M 


-* 


■'"' 


(M 


-* 


coco cot' 


COeOr-l 



^tDar^P- ^rr ^zn 2rZ rn ^ r: - - iS „;i3: 









Hod S PHMnDaD S O S op OS co i-JaoO 






5 OJ. «C 3 



-So 

r'^OOQ OQ ^-L- -S • " r/^ 

fl := -iS '-^_ c. a -^ 1^ =-32 cg-o-s fc §-£.£'^- c oPh':::-S .-o g 5i o^r"^^ £ 

l-l^sil&l^g Ills giilS||s^bi|§'lloi^ 1 



352 



SYXOD OF MINNESOTA. 



[May, 



snoan'Bi 



•rassgy 

■noi)tn 
-najsns 

Joj pty 
■naoi 

•puna 



X rH tH 1-1 



:5 



ooioo tais Lcooo 
o in io lo 05 so cj o o o 

O* » rH 1-1 l> r-t '71 m 



O 30 O O 
05 50 
O (— LO (?J 



»«o 



00 tH t-i 



tH <M tH « 



i-H t-0><M 



•^ l-H l-H T-H 



gW^^ 



TH tH T-t T-H -^ 



tH tH 1-1 tH T}< 



•n.joaia 
qDjnqo 

•noT} 



UDSOrHOO tOSOi-li-lT-tT-im 



O C<8 T-I W 



O CQ TH OJ 



•SSIJ5 

nSiajoj 



■ssiH 
9tnoH 



OO O<M00 



Id CO -^ -^ -^ »o t- 



•ni9i\[ 

•s -s 



eooQOot- o ioio -^ ooo oo 

O-^COOD-* O t-50 t- lOOOJ lOlO 

CJ tH tH CJ OT Tj* tH CJ 



(M M -^ CO lO 



O ^ tH O (M 



•Oil 
aioqjW 



•J30 no 
pappv 
•xg; no 

pappy 



(N LO O » O t-H t- 



su. DBad 



•gaapia 



oco<M«o at a T-i T-( T-t a CO (Nco-^-<*>o th 



eo (?j o4 th th TH <ji 






uO - a ad 

"^ 'C 'O 









- a. 

03 OpH 



:Ph 



« 



C =* S C-i -S 

a; P_l ,— . f^ CO 



Ph .2" 



■Spq 






gcocoad 

o o t^ -. 



;=S>^!>, 



g-pMja,g 



ts a n 






a a^i 



>.^l 



S ^ 



a 



a 
o 

a « 
♦J 3 



03 J- 

<& a 

^o- 2 



s o 



: : : : .f£.a. 

.2" •- .-" 

rt a^"9 ^« ^ 
a ■"" tc " a 



bo 

a 

P2 



1^ 
00m 



Ph 



. o 

t> a 



.0 ^ 



CO 



m 



a> 



w 

a •:^ 

t< a 
pq o 

^ a 

. c 

HiP3 






°Z: ' 

S^ « 
-So 

ea§ 

,2 CO a 
>- « o 

sag 



■ ^ 2 tf 

•Ha -9 

a Ss > 



Hoi 



CO 





Ph* 



a" g^ 

S «! O tH W 

c3 a tco > 

2 ■ am 

^^^■^^ 

a^: 2 a « 
^ c3 o ^ ^ 



s 



a*? 
o I 

8 
tn " 

S 2 
HcQ 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF MINNESOTA. 



353 





in 
CO 

00 

CO 


JC tH CO 


d! 


o 
1—1 


LOO 


CO 

co" 

00 


00 o lo 
CO cs ot 
1-1 o? CO 


»c 00 o o o 

C- O iO CO 

o CO ej 

1-1 


t-l-l 

1-1 c- 

coi-1 


ooo CO 

JO -^ o CO 

1-1 M CO 


JO 


■>-( 00 o X) CO cc c- 

CO -* -* CO O CJ c~ 

1-1-^ iH OJ T-l 


o 
in 

L- 


M<0 (MO 

X' Ci 1-1 CO 

CO 1-1 CC CO 


00 M CO O 00 

CO CO OS 00 c^? 
1-1 1-1 CO Tj< 0* 


00 -* ooo CO 

CO 00 -* 00 CO 

1-1 T-l 


e«OQ0 
CO 00 CO 

t-I-<*tH 


CO 




C5 


■^ 


CO 






^ 




tr 


o 


JO 




1—1 
00 
lO 


T-l T-i 


CO 






JO 


<M 


<M 


l-ll-l (?« 


lO 






OS 


o 


Oi 


00 


(?«i-i lO^* 


a> lo to 






T-l 

eo 




■r-t 


1-1 (M 


CO 






CO 


w 


00 

Ci 


tH <M 


1—1 






T-t 




m CO 




C>J <M CO 


(M LO O 


JO 




JO 

eo 


OOt-i 

1-1 


T-C 


o (?i CO c^ 

1—1 tH 


t- 1-1 CO o JO 

tH T-l 


-^ eo 


O CD 

T-l 


(N 

OS 


ooo 

coco 


^ 


CO 
OS 
CO 


o oo 

lO CO CO 


O 05 O lO 
•* tH 1-1 ■* 

1-1 


CO JO -^ JO 

CO eo coo* 


JO 00 1-1 T- 
CO CO t- "^ 


OS 


T-H 


CO 


tH 00-* <?* 


eo 


<s 


(M 




1-1 


(?i 


(M 


1-1 tH 




CO 


CO "^ O ^ 05 i> 00 
(M CO OT <M rH 


cc 


o oe«o 
CO 1-1 CO JO 


OOCO Ot»< <M 


JO-* CC COCO 

eo 1-1 1-1 1-1 


c<j o <M eo •* ^- 
1-1 w th eo 1-1 (M 


00 


©i 


CO 

t- 


CO 


CO o -H 1-1 
1-1 1-1 


T-l CO« 1-1 


(MO> 00 

irH T-l l-< 


s 

T-4 






I- 

00 

CO 


OS 


CO JO (M 


T-l 1-1 T-l 


T-l CO 


OS 






CO 


OJ 




eo 




JO 

eo 


eoeC(NiN 


iMl-H 


1—1 


CO '^ CO 


T-l CO <NtH 


(MtHt-i 


T-l <M th el « eo 






>, 



Ph 



'O T3 



" 5 S*^ S 9 "-I 

^ O r 3 .5 3 O 



CO 

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o — 



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boo 



OQ 



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03 



CSO 



^ ;/3 "^ t- ^ i; 



-^5 5 5 = 



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CS :* £ti t^ " ^ _r 
15 S o O « ^=1 

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a o 

IS 



03 a> cS ^ 

J:Si:MS^aro « 

n t>-»5^C3CJ*203 ^ 

M >■ f^ ^ vj rj} cc ^ Ql, 



^ OQ 

03,55 
■1-3 fe 

C » 
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c:.2 

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f^ 



23 



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aod 

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a a 

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CO « 






354 



SYNOD OF MINNESOTA. 



[May, 



^ Oi-t CO 

00 CO r-l CO 



8noen«i 



•rasssy 






§ 



o o o o o o w 

»0 O O CO O O £- 

1^ T-H T-i CO t- tH 



o o o o o c* 
O O O O o: CT 



00 to O CO 



o 1-1 ec cj 









t- 


>o 


■* 




lO 






•8,1100 


§ 






CO 












'UdUI 




o» 


o 

1-1 


(Mt- 


cow 


<M 


CDIO 










c-oo 


00 


«co 


eoQO 

-l-H 


lO 


t- 


CO 








CD 


00 


lOt- 


cocoio 


CO 


co 


CO 




•nonBD 




>o 


to 


QiiO 


t--«* 


0« 


l-H 
1-1 






•uon 
-•Bonpa 




en 


00 


CO 


OOtJI 


CO 


CO 







SSIJV 
9niOJ£ 



•s -s 



CO C<) o 



■* CD 05 osoo 



■dvQ 

ailPPY 

•ON 

•J80 no 
pappv 
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pappv 

sn.D'BaQ 



OS CO 1-1 rH t-H 



00 CO C4 Tf< t- lO CO tH 

CO C* TH -^ CO T-l Iffl CO 

T-l * 



t- 04 IftOOO ©00 wo COCOC- lO lO 

o* CO eot--<*TH CO 1-1 oj CO !-• 1-1 th 

T-l * * 



CO CO iH lO -^ 



•sjapia 



CO tH 1-1 .c d 04 1-1 



OiCO CDTtiCOOl 04 04 •* 04 i-( iH 04 



OQ CO 

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i^t ffi Q <! g >_] ^_; a 



fa^a 






02 OQ 

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2 2'" « 

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V u o ^[5 2 



=sK2 g"5 « a o o 



a 
a ; 



p; a 






a 


c 
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CO 


tJpisi 



Sh-^ .-S 



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a 03 O c3 



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j-qffi__^i ffl kJ 1^ o O Ci3 



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a ^ 



^:5 ^ 



CO 

cdai 
cd^ 

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a 2J 



P5 
W; 
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gpnCOcO 
-TS'CO 

S3 a„^P5 

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PL, 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF MISSOUEI. 



355 



o 


00 
Gi 


CO ITS -^ 
0* 00 


o o 
00 eo 
1-1 


CO 

00 


oocoocoooci to 

lOOt-OOii-iOCO -^1< 

T- CO oQ so »o lo CO lo w 


o o -* o o 

-* 0O00O6 (M 
00 <M CO T^ 


00 


C^00«T-iCOOi<NCD»O'* 
C^OCClO-rHlOe^COT-lr-l 




C4 


JO 




CO 
CO 


i 


1— ( 


CO 




00 rt 


CO 1 -* «o ec CO »o T-H 
^ 1 2 


T-l 


CO 


"ti lO ta Oi 

00 


T-H 




eoeo ■<*-* 




00 
eo 


eoT-( (McoTt< t- 


10CQ5CI 


00 


00 1-1 rH 00 lO 00 eo to 
tH 00 <m 

CO 


Tjl 


©J 


tH tH i-I -^ <m 


O 03 O O lO lO 
-^ O CO C« CO CO 

tH 


t- 

l-H 4 


OO O -*C-CiOO 

th o (?i o o; -^ eo o 

1-1 tH 1-1 jo (M 


Ol(M -* 


00 


eo OTttT-i cooith 
■t-l 


(N Tl 


CO 


"■ii coco i-lT-KMOO 


CCC--*tCS>JOCSOO 
OiO(M-*t-(COt-i,-(,-( 

T-l * 


GS 
01 


■^cDt-ioeoiooscoosco 
eoTj<cocooocooo^i-no 


ta lo 


5 


CO (M eo CO CO 00 CO T-l ■* 
th oi CO e» 


U5 i-t lO tH T-H 




t-OOCO to Oi to to y-t Oi 
tHCO 


CO 0*^ 


T-l 


i-ii-i «(M OirllTi* 


■^ <M ri <M 1-1 eo IM 


CO 


<Neo(M(M'*»oeoioe(io* 



CO 



t> 



> 






'i' >^ a ^ r-; ^ 



-^ o 






ccco 
coco 

O O 



CO 

ai aire CO 

CO 



oT § IT'S 

a "^ " 
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r cfl 






CO t^ai >; 

cj M ^ en 

> C g g 

a> si J; ej 



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bS 






pcoCuatCLiJa!" 



o o 

2 > 

S o 

to o 






S ^ O ^ O 



i^iJrj'^eiT^f"Bi'Dai to O <o 



.2 > al3 fl 

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o e 



^ <^ 



j- a fl 

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^, 



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cS O 53 ai 

l-Sl-sKjI-s 



p-Qw*;o 

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ppoW«^.o 
S^ 3'^ mO 

a J .-= a 2 a 

02 O !> E^ t-S !/2 



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& 03 1^" r-l 



, .'C0< 

O M V 
ri to 9 



W5 



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CO 



- ,, 1=1 

<u,a.. o 



356 



SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 



[May 



snoeLKi 








JS§^ 








So 


^ 








eo 


CO 


•I8081K 








^ 








eo 






















eo o ic o o i-H o 


IC 


O T-H 


t-o 


Wrt< t- 


I«(N 




« 


oo o 


-91SU0Q 








ooo t~ lo OS eoo 


e- 


O 00 00 CO 


th lO 00 


th 


tH 




r^ 


O W I- 








T-l tH -^ CO Iffl O J- 


o 


OSCO (N05 


eoo5i-i 


eooo 






w* 








CO 1-H 


1— 1 T-l TH 


»o 






tH 


TH 


















00 O W 05 CJ IC OJ 


Q 


•«4<th 


00 o: O 


coo lO CD lO-^ 




00 loeoecooo 


'ai8S8v 








1-1 T-H CJ <M CD W CO 


eo 


t-COCOOS tH 


00£-OSOtH 




oo t- 1- 1- OS 


iwanaa 








e» OS eo 00 i-H lo •»*i 


CO 


>« (M 1-1 CO (N 


(N t-THl-H 


00 






ec th <?* ©} 


•nonn; 
-ns^sng 

'iiem 


— 


~ 




tH 


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T-l 




















CO CO 


O lO 

tH 






T-H tH 










eo 







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oo 


T-l 




<M 


TH tH 


C4 












S°° 


1-1 




C* 


th Ol th 


(M 










1-1 th 


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■pnn j 








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OS 00 




00 <M 


TH O 1-1 


<M 










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jausa 










T-l « 






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CD to a c^ -^ 00 to 




(N 


tH(M(M 


eo io 






O CS 


coco 










CD 


T-l 1-f 














T-l 






qoanqo 








tH 






























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(Nth CO T-l 


<M CO 










C<t (M 








o<>* 


O 




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CO in o 








o> 


eoeo 












CO 








1- 












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t-Q0(MC<iOS O 


o 


CO CO tH CO 1-1 


■^vn CD 






OCO 


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ssiH 








OOl-H 


<y! T-l 


t- 












tH 






nSiaao^ 








tH 






























O O lO ITS T-i ■«* O 


^ 


CO CO eo lo -^ 


■^ CO OS "^ 




tHO t- 


©io ec 


SS!TJ( 








t-CO 


cot-©* 


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T-l tH 


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th tH 




1-1 


T^ 






auioH 






































t- o o o CO o lo 


ta 


O O O lO 


OOO 


-* oooeo 


OS 


tnapi 








t- lO O -rj* CD O OJ 


t~ 


■^ -* -* t- 


t-coco 


THOt-OS 


c- 


■s -s 








(MtH-i-H 


1-1 CO T-l 


1-1 


1-H 




T-l 












■d^g 








CO t-TH 


T-l OS lO CO 


<M 


CD CO tH 


CO t! 




CO 






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00 CO 


CO tH 00 T-l 


Oi 


CO tH OJ 


C* T-I(M <M 


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TH 




1-1 th 


_L'I"PT_ 








T-l 


T-t T-l 








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00 00 OS CO OS CO CO 


00 


OOOOOOJCJDCDOS-^-^t^CQ^QOQOCOt-CDOOC 










o -"Ji -^ lo ■* c<j t- 


00 


OOCOe4t-(M(NrtiOSCOCQOS(?JiO->*THCOT}<i-iTH 


8I0TJAV 










tH T-l 


1-1 
















* 


•J80 no 








^ 00 WC^'*^ CD 


■,— ( 


■^ CO 


■* 


■^ CD CD lO 


t- »o eo 




tH tH Tj( CC 


peppy 








1— 1 


t-l CQ 


T-l 




T^ 


l-H T^ 












•xa no 








CO -I-H tH Tjl Tfl -^ 1-1 


00 


C< lO Tti lO 


(?joscoi>e«o;c<ic<i 




OQ ©ICO ©1 










-<*' (M 




















peppV 






































CO oj ©* ^ 


Oi 


"* <M 


« (MOJ(M tH 


\n 




COC3 1-I (NO* 


Sn^D'BdQ 






































lO CO CO CO ■«*< (N -^ 


la 


CO CO a« eO CO tH ©i CD CO -^ CO GQ CO tJH (M C<8 -<*i cc 


■sjapia 








































Ph'W 


W 




p4 


CO CO 


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cc 


P-i«2co • a^cd 






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b 

cc 
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a 


cc 

CO ^ 

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c 9 

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t>.CC! CO '^ • ^- 
co<c|(»PHWOaQ&- 


bl 
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a 
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cc 

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d 


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, 


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r 


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u 


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a 


^ 


c3 
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N 

a 

C2 


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a" to - 

(D CS 

2 a 

C c3 
WW 


a q CO 

a 03 a 


. o 

a S 

2'§ 
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|o 

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w§ 
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to 

a 

0) 

;h 










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H 
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CO 

El 
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do 
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a ^ 

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d 

a 


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CO •„• 
a 3i . 

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^^ 2 d 3 


WW 


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CO 
CO 

O 

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bO 










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5 S "=^ 


^? 


^ OS 


Pi 


o 











A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 



357 



« 

■^ 




O w o o o 
<>» o 00 LO to 

CO CO T-( 1— 1 


1-1 




o 

T-i 


o 

o 


O'^ooo'^ojioco 

i-HJCOOiOOiMOQff* 
(MtHCO-i-hOSQOCOWOO 


o CO 


OO OO lOO 

051000-^0 

l-H 1-1 tH 00 


to 
CO 


CO 

to 
1— 1 


O^QOXi^tOOJCOO 

OOCMCJCJG5C0O00 

CO « io lo -* «> t- cQ 
0* CO 


CQ CO 

T-l CO 

CO CO 


00 C4 CO 00 00 CO 
-* OS lO CO C»Oi 

CO 1-1 1-1 i-l(N CO 






<M TH 




CO 


CO 




to 
t- 


<M l-H lo T-i(M eo 




« 


T-H 


Its 


l-H tH >0 CO W CO 
tH CO CO 


(M 


03 eo 


« 


to 

CO 

CO 


CO 


coco 


OICO 




CO 
OS 


<M (M tH 00 T-iJO JO 
<M -i-l 


CO 


la 


CO 


00 

l-H 


CO eo T-H CO -^ eo o? 


l-H 


04 CO eo 






o 


eoiO(M^-rHO(??o 

•t-H »0 tH tH »0 


eo 


COCO ■* 




CQ 


OCSt-(Mi-HC-C*^0 
tH tH CO 00 rH t- 


OJ-* 


OJ c- «o 


iO 


o 

CO 

la 

CO 

« 


looioooocot-coc* 

COOC-lOCOCOt-1-iQO 


»oco 


»o O O Oi w o 

(M 00 IC 1-1 04 1-1 
1-1 OJi-l 




1-1 T-l CO t- 05 Ti OJ ■* 




1-1 T»< 




l-H 


«-* (Mt-coo eo 


CO 


o 

T-« 


m oD a t^ 
* * 


:o 
* 


ao 

OJ 


i.OOtH'^WQOOJOOCO 

dCOiOiCi-HCDt-T-IO 

0« 04 


ooo 

T-< CO 


tH OSOOCS U50 
04 T-l T-i T-l £- 




to 
00 


iOT-i(J«-<*00(MC-C- 
T-l (M <M 




04 00 

T-l 






e005 0QO-i-iiO(M«0 

1-1 T-t 


lO 


04 






T-KMrHe^COCOi-H-^ 


(M 


iH 04 iH 1-1 04 


CO 


tH 


(MOlCOCJ-^-^-^fMCO 


CO CO 


1-1 eo th 1-1 th 04 






« O S -! S 

omcaHM 



S -- i2 ^ 2 I' 

O S =5 ►" 03^ 



Phcc 



CO 



.2 ^ 



OD ai aj oQ .^^ 



S CO a >,: 



"O 



02 



SCQ 



« 2 -^ ri''^ " 
o tc a 'fl X3 ^ 
cj OJ ci — « a 

t^ S-l -■ tH [-a. O 



a> 



05 



03 O 






2^- 2 

3 -s « .-s ' 

c c a a 



h^,5 S " " 

. '3 "n a ^ 

32 l> CO GO 



I ^.2 



o 
a 



- 03 - 



rr^._^ 



[> 



3 O „ 



2 



^ ^ fci — 



^S 03g 

TJ T^ O CJ f- 

^ '^^ bi^ a o 

1« 3 5 a - -;; -S 
-; o ;- !- 3 ::r « 



'-a .a 



O. 



"k^ 



PM 

O 

.is! o o S t:^ 
t- -r ai ;3 j:2 
ss -*»:;: as 






o< 



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2^02 ., a 



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pm a 



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^^ 



^cc a 
bc^-:s 

a ts tn 

o ^ a 
fio<1 



m a -^ 
'^^r: a a 

ail ^=^5 



358 



SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 



[May> 



snoenv] 






^ § § 


00§ C?i§ O ^§ OT 
OJ W 1-1 CO 02 


o 

CO 
00 
QO" 


CO -^ O JO O lO 
CO -V OJ 00 "<* Cl 


•inosBv 
IBJonao 

■non^i 
-na)sns 


OOO lOQO O'* OO 00 

c? oj T-i ,1 oj -<i< CI ec (M w 


1— I 
00 

CO 
1—1 


oooooo 
oj T lo ci o^ o 

CJ CO O ■<*< Ti Oi 




1-H 


tH 


"s.IfoO 
JOJ piv 


1 




CO 

00 


OlrH 


•nora 
-poojj 


T-l O 


to 


-r-t «0(M 


•pnnj 






lO 
C5 


THTHt-TH 


•n,pojj 
qojnt(o 


■rH CO 




o 

JO 


<MCQ«0 JO 


•nOT?BD 

•noij 
-«onpa 




CO 


tH IOtH 






■iH oeo 


nSiaioj 

aniojj 

•more 
8S 

•dug 

s?inpy 

•OK 
OIO^M 

•JOQ no 
pappv 
•xano 
pappv 

sn^oBad 


<M (ft 

T-1 




?2 

CO 


eo<Meoco th 

CO 


t- OJ Jffl CO o -^ »o 


05 
lO 


COOJOJflO <M 
JO 


oi t- 1-1 ■rfi th T-i lo TJ4 eo oj 




04 




l> JOi-HOO JO 
CO Tl< CO JO ©» c« 


TH 




JO 




-^ CO 1-1 


tH ^ rH 




to 

CO 




tHt-itJ< <M TH 
1-1 


50t--t-{>»oQOi-imt-oc4'^-rj<ejcoo5co-* 

* * * 1: * * 


CO 
CO 


t- t- OJ o o> CO 
oco (n ■* ^ <?« 

l-H 


£-aOT-i«)Tt<<M T-4 (M 


JO 


THr-«(N 


O"* t-It-( CO OJ 


1 


o 
o 




t-cocoe* th 

©4 


C^l-lT-l rH T-i (M Oi 




CO 

CO 




CO JO (M -rH 


•Bjapia 


>OiOT-t(MC0rH<?jTHr-<->* Ti<COi-l CI 


CO 




TH CO ■'t CO tH tH 


TO 

w 

« 

w 


.^ CO 








P4 CO 

H > ^ c3 c b< 


CO 
ft 

n 


. i=».2 fc^ ^"^ b'5 o >> t« 

^|^^^-?gl»-|^^2.-gl2S| 








:^/ - - - 

to" 

^oS caw 


O 

13 

<! 

w 




■F-H 

a 
o 

a 


CO 

1 I 

c 

c 


1 

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s 
o' 


— Ci Q . 
B^V =* o • 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 



359 





00 


OO 

1—1 i-( 




00 

00 


g 


00 










o 

lH 


T-1 


eoo> 


O O O 0C50 

o o o oi eoeo 
O CO«i-i »oco 


o o o 50 c- 
oo »o^ lo 

CDCOtH 0« CO 


o oco 

lO'* eo 

rH<M 


1-1 






>o 


to 
1-1 


■ o 


o 

CO 
CO 


C5« 


ooooooooooooooooo 

looc-owojoojoofyjio-^ioot-cc*- 

O'* eo 00 (N CO cs »o o? io ■<* th CO t- -i-H CO 
eo 


iH 


OO 

OOO 

1-1 T-C 




l> 00 

0?1-I 


o 


o» 




<M 


1-4 
















s 






(M 


o 






















1-1 


O 
tH 


w 














^ 






?o 


O (M 


OS 




T-ICQ 










g 








OtH 

CD 


JOt- 




tHIO 










CO 

eo 






"* 


O 


»o 














CO 




<M 


00 


OtH 


00 


(M 


1-IC5 










00 






l-H CO 

eo 


CO CO -rH 


oco 

tH 


(M « 


(M<M 










ta 
00 

CO 






s^-* 


THOocoTttoooaxaxMOJwo 


eo 


ife 








i 




s 


1-1 


oc- 


^00-* 


OOOOC<»OOiO-*» 

0»OTl<0 0»««DOOCO-* 


s 


^ 




OOO 
iTDi-i 


OS 

T-l 




■<*< 




i> 


us 


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eo t- <M CO 00 ■* i-H lo -^ <M -iH 00 oj eo CO ca ■rt 1-1 c^ cj th 

* * * 


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g 


00 


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ijO"^i-i<Meoeoeo«o-«!i<T-ieoTHeOT-ico«eoo4Cii-if-ieoeo«eo 


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SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 



[May, 





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o ooooooo 







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050 CO 100 




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t- 


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A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 



361 



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to T-l T-l 


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coo O <M 05 
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CO 00 th 00 »0 OJ ri< 

eo lo ->* CO CO th T-l 


'^COCOOCOTHCOCOOO'^CS^OOt-OOT-nOlOOSOWOCi 
. «0 TH eO T-l Ti <M tH -^ . T-l CO CO CO ■^ th C- CO OJCOtHt-ItH 


CO 
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cocoeOT-iT-icOT-icQ(M<Neoeo«Deo 


■^ 


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co 

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Zt^O^^'r—^iSi^ •o3"OoSk^Oo3>C1!::'3 



>^ "^ -'5 rr A-< hH ;r ^ > M ^ br .^ hH . ^ 



c,fl E " '=' o 
o E H w rr X 



03 



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k— I 

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362 



SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 



[May, 





0<M 

1-1 TH 


1781 

2200 

10,710 


T-l O 

00 CO 


-*o 
t- t- 


393 
2500 
1103 


■ai988T 


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1-1 t- 


1-1 CO 


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1-1 


1 69 

19 37 
10 14 


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lO 


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A.D. 188-i.] SYNOD OF MISSOURI. 363 





s 


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■r-l04 lO 


eo i-i<M 


c-o 
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T-l CJ 


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T-H o cc t- CO 

Ci-r-l 






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cs 
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1—1 


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so O 01 a t- 

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00 

1—1 


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O CO T-l C« JO « OJ T-l T-l CO T-l 



^OOJeOJ005■<^<^o^-eoo « o 

0> WtHtfH (Mt-ICOtH 



Iffl <M O lO O O O « T-l O O «D O T-H I- C~ T-l JO O 00 O JO 

00 TH O ->* JO JO JOOOIN-^CO tH 00 00 jo CO jo 00 £- C4 CO 00 

T-l CO OT O T-l T-l 

T-Ti-i o^^i eo oos T-l CO th ^ CO d oi th cq i-l t-i e* t- 



OS tH T-l O* CO « o 



oTo o 00 JO ^i eo o» tc i-i"o"^1o^^ co'o^eo t- "^ o cj t-^ob jo' Jb os cb o co c "t-T ob co o 

o«ocdt}i©i OS co»o^cQt-i»o T-<GOosjoojD5coeoJOcoT-iT-i-<i<e'jcicOT-JOT-iTH t-i 
t-icjt-i 4: eo T^ CJ***** 

CO OJ ed « ^ T-l T-l JO eo^o'o* ^^ « ^-Teo^i-i c'Vc^ 



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lOCOCOOJOO eo ■«»<MrHT-lTH T-l CO eo tH « <M <M <N N T-t T-l ei «M Cil OS W T-l tH « 1-1 T-i tH 






^.^l"!,. .4 lis 

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36-4 



SYNOD OF NEBRASKA. 



[May, 



8noan«( 




00 








eorjfoec o oc-»o o 

r-l QO Ol to 


-masflv 




00 


Wt-l-C5'*-* IOCS 
1-1 (M Ci '7^ tH tH r-l i-t 






!0 




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in 


eO rH 0« 


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in 


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qojnqo 






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-tiouBa 


2 




-non 
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-S8IK 




o 

C>1 


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araoH 






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5 


o oo la ooio o o 
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8 


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evflvad 




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1-1 


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1— I 


■rH(MT-li-i OJ Cd <N <N tH -* T-l tH (M CO r-l 04 


09 

a 
o 


Moselle, V. 
Ozark, V. 
Pacific, v.— 51. 

Orleans, S.S. 
Harmony, S.S. 
Verona, S.S. 
Union, S.S. 

Bloomington, S.S. 
Fairview, S.S. 

Red Cloud, S.S. 
Riverton, S.S. 
Catherlon, S.S. 
Ayr, S.S. 

Spring Ranche, S.S. 
Glenville, S.S. 

Kenesaw. S.S. 
Heartwell, S.S. 

Superior, S.S. 
Alma, P.E. 
Blue Hill, P.E. 


m 

1/} 

« 
p 


Moselle, Mo. 
Ozark, " 
Pacific, " 

Ayr, Neb. 
Edgar, " 
Orleans, " 

Aurora, " 

Hastings, " 
Bloomington, " 

Nelson, " 
Red Cloud, 

Hastings, " 

Scandia, Kas. 
Kenesaw, Neb. 

Beaver City, " 
Superior, " 
Alma, " 
Blue Hill, 


O 

o 

»> 

M 






XV. Synod op Nebraska. 

1. Presb. of Hastings. 

John Fleming, H.R. 

Alvin M. Dixon, D.D., H.R. 

David Waggoner, S.S. 

Henry M. Giltner, S.S. 

•Joseph L. Lower, Ag. 
Thomas A. Hamilton, S.S. 

Henry M. Corbett, H.R. 
John K. Harris, S.S. 

Albinus S. Powel, S.S. 

John Woodruff, S.S. 
Arthur Folsom, S.S. 

Herbert K. Bushnell (intr.), 
Samuel P. Herron, S.S. 
William Marshall, P.E. 
Edward Cornet, P.E. 



A.D. 1884.] 



SY^rOD OF NEBRASKA. 



365 





o lo la lo 
ci o* t-oi 




c 

Oi 








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T-I-* eo 


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1-1 T-l 


c 


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o 


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00 
CO 
00 
C5 


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O C5 o oc o 
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T-l r-l T-l 


o o 

OJt-I 


9 12 
15 62 

4 56 
3 36 

2 40 
8 16 


o to o 
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T-l Oi^ 


00 

T— 1 






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eo 

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O OO OO 

ooc- c- o o 
CO 05 tr- 


i-l 


la 




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05 




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00 




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05 


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Oi 






COO?00-*Oi-iC3D»00>OOD-^t-eO-rH 

eorH,-,i.-oio-<*oiOieooc»-H oii-i 
1-1 * * 


ioC5-*-«i*oeo»ceo 

COr-lT-ieOCOT-IOiOi 

* * * * 


Ci 

o 

T-l 


eo T-l t- CO jc eo eo 

T-l T-l CO O lO T-l T-l 
T-l * 


CS CO 


T-l eo 00 o Oi o 

T-l T-l 


T-l 


Oi Oi 






1 CO 
Ci 


t-eo loeo-^ 

T-l 


Oi 


O -* T»< Tjt T-l C- Ci 


CO 


^00 






§ 


T-l T-l th C- Cd 




T-l ;s T-l Oi Oi 




Oi T-l 


eooi 


c« 


Oi 


T-l T-l Oi TH lO 


■<*e4ooeoioeoeoeooieoeoo»oioicoT-ieo-<i<T-i(No«T-iT-iT-i 


00 


00 CO CO ^< "^ tH 






CO 






T 

^ 



t>- 



p^ 



A- ^ 

1^ -CP 

2 g c fe g S ^ 

<i rx) o M c K jg ; 









« 


O) 


bl) 


r^ 




CJ 


o 




ej 


f^^O 



'^itzjoi 

• • Oi 

pq tc ^ § 
CO .S ;::; o 

s s ^ 

-Q :;; r:; « 






fJ; 



> 



Oi-5 



^^ - 

.0,1-^ « 

a « fc- o3 

.s 3 '^ ?^ 



366 



SYNOD OF NEBRASKA. 



[May, 



8no»avi 

-I908JM 


«^ o 


th 

T-l 




<?*iooo»c ooo oicio o eooooi-io 

T-l 


TH 

CO 

00 


'inassy 

•non«j 
-nsjsng 
•8,1100 
Joj piy 

-poaaj 
•pnnj 
jauaa 


1-1 -rH i-H r-i -<t T-H T-l T-l rH TH T-l O lO T-H (J» r-1 (M ©» 




Oi 
OT 

c© 










»o 




(» 

tH 


■n,}oaaa 
qojnqo 

•nonBO 

•nqnd 


lO T-l (NOT OOOT 


^ 






•noil 
-Bonpa 


<?4 





•ssiM 
nSiaJoji 


CQCO Tji 

T-l lO 


OT 


■ssiK 

9010 H 


(N OTJOt-ICOCO « OT«>(MSQ T-l TlC*OT«0 OT 

T-l O 


JO 


•s -s 


(M50 O O OO OOiO 0-* 
CO-^ lO ■<* ■>*!:- ■<1<'*(?* lO CO 

T-l 1-1 


10 



T-l 


•d^a 

■dua 
snnpv 

■Oil 
aiotiM 

•jaO uo 
pappy 
•xa no 
pappy 

SHjOUaQ 


OT T-l -I-H T-l 


tH 
tH 


M <»T-I 



tH 


'CsO<Mt-0-*OOT-ii-lO>005»005THC<J-«»ICi7iOOSO-rHO«C>OQOt- 

T-i OT T-l 1-1 T-l "<* th T-l ej T-l eo T-l th th ri (?j •<* t- *» CO (N ■* CO * * 


<3J 

in 

(30 


T- 05(??C0tJH 0C(NOSt-»O^ 

T-l T-l 


50 



tH 


t-OT lO OT (NCOCJtHCM « OT C4 04 tH 
tH t-I 


OT 
(30 


e* (M tH CQ OT 


§ • 


•sjapia 


(MOT 0:8 10(MiM(M(MTti(NOTr1(MOT(MOT(J«OT(M-«*(?S 


c- 


CO 

o 


02 CO . "^.rn^n ^ ^ 02 CO . ^• 

II iii^i ills ^i^?i rii^iiii^ N 


OB 

w 

p 
p 
<1 


"A 

If ^ - 
-Si 1 i ^ > ^1 ^^ 1 


CO 

H 
<1 

O 

l-H 
P 

<1 

CO 

W 
pq 


^co 02 ^^ 

•C.3 S ^1-5.^ cc^aj- 
tJ . t* ^ Eo f^ 3 --^ t-l 





A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF NEBRAvSKA. 



367 



o 


t-oo 

JOt-I 




S i§ s 




JO 

00 
1-1 


i 




to 


o 
o 


O JO o 
JO c-o 


o o 

JO JO 


O O Q 05 JO c* o 
JO JO O to OT « O 
tH I-l T-l CO iO JO 


o 

00 


OTC- « 


oo 
o JO 

^ OJ 


Oi 
JO 

tH 


o 
o 


O JO o 
O !M JO 

■I-l 


JO o 
Qi lO 

C-T-l 


O JO JO JO o 
Oi> £> « lO 

JO CO CO CO o 

T-l 


JO 

00 


00e> JO JOO 
iO O t- T-l JO 

T-l JO eo CO -* 

T-l 


JOO 
t- lO 


eo 

1-1 

o 

T-l 




0* . 








<s> 






to 




-* 












8 


c- 




«oco 




<M 


T-l 


to 




05 
O} 


o 

T-l 




>o^ 




JO 


to 


00 




CO 


o 

tH 


CD 


CDrtt 




■^ eo 00 


lO 


o 

T-l 


eo-«ai to 


eo JO 

JO 


tc 




com 






to 


t- 


c- 


o* 


JO 




to^ 




o 

T-l 


-* 




00 


JO 


o 

T-l 




JO t- 

JO 


CO 


CO(M Oi 


T-l 


os 

T-l 
T-l 


eo 


(M JO 
JO 

1-1 


to 


o 

1-i 


JO CO 
iOi-l 


JO« 


-* ■* JOO*T-I 

1-1 04 


Oi 


■^ o eo eo JO JO 

tOT-l tH 


Oi lO 
OJ 

TH 


T-l 


g 


O 05 
OSJ> 


g 


JOOSO 
JO «* -^ 

T-l 


o 

JO 


T-l 


§g § 


oo 

^ JO 

eo 


to 
to 

T-l 


■I-l 


1-1 O T-l 


JO 


<M 


to 


1-1 


"* (Mt-i 


eoo 

T-l 


00 


s 


Tt<eo 




T-l 




T-l 


T-l T-l 


T-t 




CO 


CQ J0»0 

00 JO T-l 


eOOOJOWt-QOiOOOrJIO 
i-iOi-i CO <M (M (M » C- 


Ti JOOOiOCJO 

OS eo »i !M to T-l 


T-O 

o> eo 


to 

00 


JO 


C-"* to 


-* 


Ol(M JO-«* 




(M oeooi 05 <M 


g 


to 

T-l 


JO 


T-l oios 

I-l 


(M 


eo th 


eo 


■* 


<MtH tH 


eo-<d< 

rH 


<M 


(M 




eo I-l 


« I-l 


<M 






Cv» 




:.i 


CO Oi I-l 


eOTHeo(Moji-ieo-* 


eo 


CO eo 1-1 JO -^ th 


toeo 


00 






02 

aid a 



125 



3 






„- CO a2 • 

= 2f02^" 

03 S >- -^ 
rS^ 03 CD 



?> 



o 2 



hJflH 






03 A 



'3at"ot3^-;5=«S'cgi2 



05 w 

a o a 



g^ a 



- 0) 



a 



';= a > 



rt 3 



c3 a 
PlhP 



a o 



,a bo 

a.S 

2 5 a " 

^^ « ^ > 
Tj o3 a '-I "— I 

oqAhMOW 



, o 
'B. 3 



J'C 









CO 



OQ oJ od .^ . 



,0 W„- (D 

tTcC . 

rf ^ a^ 

^ a 0.2 
so- ^ H S > 



Ph •<> 

S a! 



- - ^-a-c a t^ 



02 
02 



02 
02 



a -a 



<D a'S jjS'-'d 

O pq f.^ O <J ^^ »^ 



S Ph 



I CO 

a ° 

02 H 



02 

02 

02-0 

• cc'3 

,&■ . o 

o a o 

O .oQ 

03 •» 03 ^ 



o 

_P CO g |1h h ^ Ph Ph o5 



02 
02 



^9 

00 'O 

'3,p 



CU ^"02 Ph 



03 . . rt^ 

mpQ^lo 

a a a;^^ 
^fl flr=;i^ 
o o ot>- . 






a 

*- w - o 

Sa§i 



03^ 






Wl-5t-itH 



368 



SYNOD OF NEBRASKA. 



[May, 



snoanvi 

-1908IH 











l-H 


cj «eoiO 






1-1 

10 











T-i 22 




oo 

CQ i-H 








1 


oO'-'Ooe-oooicifl 

OCC(MO»0Oif5O(NffJ« 

■* IC .-1 00 CS OS OJ »0 rH 1-1 

TH i-( tH 




^os*^©* 








10 ic c< — 
t- 0-* d 

<C(Mt-i -^ t-OJ 


•niassv 
Xwanao 


00 o 

ooo 








s 


eooooGooooocoocoococoo 

THlCOOOOOOOlOOlOi-ilOi-ltOCJ 

»0 ^ W l-l CJ CO W C7 (M tH rl 10 
*} 1-1 •-H tH 



10 








CO uo 00 CO QO lO 

TH CO xi sc 00 cj 

-1*1 tJh eo cc 'T'J CO 

1-1 


-neisng 
•8,1100 
10} p!V 












<N <M eo rH 10 1-4 








<M 








1-1 -* 












i->eo<M 
















T-H 


•nam 
-paajj 


Ol 








<M 


1-1 IOt-KNCO 1-1 

1-1 1-1 








C< 








<MtHC4 01"<* 




<?* 








(?» 


iH « 1-1 1O-* 00 
<M 1-1 






<N 

1-1 


CO 








<MCOC0 0<?J iO 


•n.ioaaa 
qojnqo 

•non«3 

-nqnj 


CO 








Tf 


Tji 0»(Mi*0»0« 






T-I05 


-* 








CO "* (M SQ «0 00 l> 












T-l 00 rH-* tH 

1-1 








<?* 








<?i CQ W 1-1 LO T}< 


•noij 
-tanpa 


eo 








CO 


1-1 1-1 TT -* 50 t- 

iH 






1-1 










CO c/o* weo 


•BSIK 

nSiajoj 


lO 








CO 


eo -r-ccoo — 00 loco 

10 CO CO 1-t T-l !?» 




10 

1—1 










c; o< c< CO :c 

TH 


amoH 


o to 

r1 








■T-l 

CO 


« CO GO X. C< l^ »C 
TH Irt 1-1 CO ■* <?J 1-1 






1-1 Tf 10 CD 

1-1 








TT -^ CS( TT t- t- ?0 
1-1 


■maH 

•S'S 










§ 


000 =^ 
<rj 1-1 -H 


,2 IC 


s 




JO 








00 t- CJ 

00 

T-l 1-11-1 


•d^a 










00 


»« CO 00 CQ !-> CO -Tji ^} 1-1 
1-1 


il< 




JCiCO 


1-1 








r-1 i-iOO 


•d^a 
snnpv 


CO 










■^ C* (M T-l 1-1 (>< 






'"' 


C5 








1-1 T-l 


•OS. 
aioqM. 


tota 








CO 


Tfiosicoocoo-^OTfjoc-ooocsiooocooooirscjcooioc- 

i0^t-C5-^CCOlC10CQ»-H i-li-i i*i-iT-i* (NCOr-ii-l»Ot-T-l 

tH -H 1-1 * * 


•jao no 
pappv 


1-1 










X CJ C5 tH -<J- ^ C5 1-1 « 

<M T-l 1-1 






'^ 


tH 








« CO T-l t-<M 


•xauo 
pappv 


»o 








<?* 


?0 Oi IN ■* C^ C© •* 1-1 






1-1 CO 


eo 
1-1 








<M 


80,0^8(1 


CO 








'"' 


1-1 -^ 






-* 










ao^ eo« 


•sjapia 


eoci 








(>■* 


CiOlCS^iQCliaCOOiCiOi 




«o Neo 








T-l eo CO 1-1 T»i Tji (M 


03 

n 
W 
o 

D 
W 


02 OQ 
OQOi 

t, a 

E ^ 

COO- 










a> 


> 

OQ • P-i ^ - . 

a g .Si a -3 S £ = c -= ^. ^ _'K 

S«icso^'2?^':;i:a ^^ '^ -^ c: -= 
fSc<uociareCrtrt2-jr£30curt 


§2 
a 

3 >> 

:2^ 


,• >; t>>'t^^^- 
„- 5.5 a a a'-= a 
o.'^Tr-isSag 

E& '2 — -^ X H CW 


OS 
M 

P 
P 
-«1 


a 


- - a D 

«i Si 

!z;tr:o<; 








: 












«i.--SiU<ucs3s3aKe«5 

32<1a2CaE-'fea-&--<S-H02 




- - bo- - - 

■-" 2 Q « !B 


"aj 




&H ^x E <! 02 M 


CO 

H 

HH 

» 
O 

P 

m 

< 

OQ 

Eh 
OS 

S 


02 

02 

a' 
o 

a 

o 
O 

.2 

o 


02 
OQ 

OS '/-. s: 5i 

c- = 

03 C CS 
Hjl-5>-5l-j 


1 

B 3 oj ai — n" — W 

■ u a u ^tju . _ r:) 

^^pqea "^<^ S a 
















S" 
1 
1 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF NEBRASKA. 



309 





CO 




T— 1 






C- T-l 




T-l 


l-H 
-<* 

oo" 




o o o o o 

O (J* OT CO t- 


lOO 
tH 




ooooo 

O CD O T-l lO 

CO T-l d T-l 






1-1 

07) 

00 




oooooo 


o o 

■t-l 


o 

CO 


ooooo 

00 t- LI LO O 

Ctl T-l tH lo 


OO 




00 

0-3 




'^ 






00^ T-l c? 






GO 




lO 






T-l 






o 


03 


CO 






•^ CO CO T-l CO 


T-l CO 




'^ 


-* 


lO . 






CO CO tH CO 


^ 


O 


to 


(M 


o CO 


c^oi c> 


t- 


i« CO T-l -^ 


Ct(M 


<^? 


00 


T-C 


■* 






eo COC4 T-l eo 


thCJ 




r-( 


to 


CO 






i« eo oi T-l "^ 


<M 




00 

CO 


GO 


CO t--<* '^ 

T-l 






CDOO'^O 

T-< T-H T-l 


eo 


*«2 


C5 

00 


<?* 


<M C5 o 00 ur> 


<M CO -^ to 


^eo 


CI CD O T-l LO 

tH T-l TH 


(M-^ 




C5 

T-l 


CO 


lOO i-iO o 

lo eoiOTt< CO 


^ CO "^ CD 


>OCD 


O lO O JO o 
O CD CO 0?-* 


o o 
eo JO 








T-l 


<M 




0^1 t- TH 


eo CO 




S 


C5 




eo 




T-l <M<M 




CO 00 iO t- O (M 
rH Tjt -rt T-l 

* * * * 


-<* 

JO 


50 

«o 


CO CO 00 rH 00 00 
-rH T-l C^ Tl T-l 


LO IC CO CO T-l o 

T-l T-l T-l T-l CO •^ 

* 


O O 


■*0 iO lOO 
■^T-i <Nt-i JO 


JO 00 
•t-l tH 


<M 


00 
l.O 


T-l 


■* T-l 00 o 


CD CO 


o 

T-l 


—1 T-. OS tH « 
l-H T-l 






i6 


o 


CO T-l T-l 

T-l 


T-l eo 


to 


■<* «-* TH 


T-l 


1 lO 
1^ 






(M CO 




■^ 


eo 


tH tH 


T-l 


eo 


<M CO CTd 


CO (N (M eo eo CO 


eo 


TtKMOJ (MCD 


CO 












a> : 



« s § 



>> == 



7i 

02 
of 

g 






Q.O t, 
ri r^ 



n t^. 



«0 . - 



y2 



CO 



-Ph o — 
o 



3 O 



t:' ^ .. „ 
.Ph cs o 



T- ^ tiO «; 



. goo; 



w. 
xn 



ceo - g'^ 

fl a 2 >,- 



^ ^H 

o ►^ 
rH C3 

'H S 

OPh 






a*i 



^^i 



c3^ 






> d 



02 

02 . 

^02 

IH .. 

r^ a 
a o 
a '^ 

hi Sh 

— O 



45 



o 






c3 a> 
OCQ 



24 



fH --.SOh" 
., CO tf - 

5 '2 2 8 
a a^ a 

« rt rf 5i ^0 



O 



Ph" 

2 CO 

"S ~ 

CO ^ 

a a 



y-!'-: »-s»-5 



P5 
a 



QQ 



CU ^ 



o 



-H 53 

O-^ 

?. a 

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W02 



^ O 

0.) l-H 



=°Ha2 

c^ ^•' a 
f — « . 

r- I S 

a=: M 
o o a 

t>«a'-' 



SYXOD OF NEBRASKA. 



[May, 



8noon«i 

-I80SIW 






•niossv 

•noij«} 

^■8,1100 

Jt>j ptv_ 

-nam 

-paajj 

•pnnj 



" c: i;? o o O O 



o o 
ta CO 



in o c: o o o o 

t- JO a: O to C5 --H 
■^ D3 5C O O t- 



ec ci 1> TjH f t- 1-1 



cc CO cc :s 



qo.uiqo 
•noi]t!o 

not) 
-Bonpa 



« ^ o cc 



CO o -1-1 



0(M«00 00 



i> JC* O CO 



« iO 



nSiajoj 



•SSTJH 

enioH 



»C lOiCOiOO^CCt--^ 



■r^ .CO 



•man 



•dBg 



T-l CO J> CO £- 1-1 • 



O^ ■i-l-^-i-l-«*iCOi-lCOCO 



CO CO C<J CO -^ 



O ^ CO <M CO -* 



■p-i (N CO 






jao no 
pappv^ 
"xg no 
JPSPPVL 

Bn,0'B8(I 



00 £- O 



|-TlH-<!tlCC-Ti<i-IOOiO-* 



Tt< :o CO CO £~ 



Oi 00 ^ oi :s ■>* lO t- -^ Ci 



CO T-i (M 



•BJapia 



CO sfs cioi niio 1-1 c* OS CO CO 1-1 eo (N CO CO oj CO 1-1 



aco a iO 



2-S 

7^ 4> 



PM 






OC 



3 5^0^ cfPn'' 



c/3 a 



02 „ 






F— < CC 

O O 



C c C 



Pi 






£; « rH 

a 

PhO 



§ - f^ "3 rt k!: 



^- 5 ' 

■n ^ 'C <u a S 









> 









o ^ 5 c 



OC 



<u a 

C OS 
c <U 



S^ c3 



Sa'SWSoS't:t-"rta;2o:r~ 



1.S aj, 



S. '" 



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P- G 



?^^ 



o a 

s -^ 

ceo 



o; ™ 

oT g 03 2 -^ W 

0-3 a 2*^ o 
k>~ o a ^ o 
i-3ZP-,OccM 



■- o o - 



a 

o -• „ u 

S <U e« ^^ a r; ^ 



03 - 

r^ Cw 

a ^ 



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p c; 



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^ o CO ,a^ c t^ 
G CQ Oh >< Pm (i. 






►iSPH 



Jf^v 



Pti 



PU S3 

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5 ^5:3 



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<U tH o 



CC 



a K 
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.0 := 



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03 



c/i ■^"'ee a" 



O 



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p^ ■ 

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fep:i J 
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ra r^.- 



ss S ^ iJ 
s -^ a a 



S a a 



02 » 

02 "I 

gj 02 

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i^ 03 t- :;; 

t« a "--"S 
o) a a-" Ci. 

a 2 as 



A.D. 18S4.] 



SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY, 



371 



to 












w 


o 


5D O 

CO o 


C4 


05 




OJOO 
1-1 (M 


o 
o 








s 






o 


lO O 

oc c> 

or o 


(M 


eo 


£- 




o 
1-1 






o 
1-1 


0(M 






o 
1-1 


WO 

^ SO 


«o 


eo 


05 




o 




00 


o 

1-1 


o t- 


o 


■«*< 


00 




o 

1-1 




GO 

CO 


o 


Tfl-i 


e* 


eo 


c- 




o 
1-1 






tH 


ot- 

O 1-1 


w 


« 


t- 




o 






tH 


^"^ 


« 




o 




° 




CO 


O 
1-1 


oeo 


o 


c- 


«5 








!0 

1-1 


CO 


-^eo 

«oo» 


1— 1 


(M 


O 
1-1 




o 
eo 






§ 


CO L-5 
O t- 


o 


g 






o 
o 

1-1 






1-1 

1-1 


OC5 
00 1-1 


l-H 




tH 


eo« 


eo 


§ 


<M 


<M0O 


^ 




eoi-i 


1-1 


1-H 


CO 




eo 


eoi-i 


1-1 


C- 


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to 




1-1 


m OS 
r^ t— 

<M l-H 














5 


'*©» 


o 




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A.D. 1884.] 



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A.D. 1884.] SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 375 



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in 


c; o « ■* 


c eo o CO (M oi 
•* 1-1 


Tfi-rl 


o ■* m in 


CO-*-* 

T-l 


o c> o o 


o 
eo 


O 


o 


c; lO * J CO 
CO o 


O X r-l<M CO O 


<M 1-1 


o o"* in eo 

T-H 


X CI CO 


I- i« i> t- 

i> o as 

CO-* 


Iff 

1-1 


eo 


tH 


5>^ LO O t- 

t- <?i 1-1 1-1 

CI CO ^ 


eo inoso ox 

in rf O 1-1 1-1 

T-l 1-1 


o o» 


t- CO o* 1-1 


CI ox 

Xth 


C5 0-* '^> 

T-l CO CO 






lO 

th 


rt CO 35 00 
t- 1-1 CJ 1-1 

•?> 1-1 eo 


O t- X « I- (M 

eo coi-i « 
eo 


meo 


in eo oeo 
in 1-1 (M 

tH 


m 00 LO 
OS 


o o m o 

T-( T-l T-l 


eo 


o o 
eo 1-1 


1-1 


o o c- 
lO t- in 

CO CO 


o o lo eo o 

t-os xin o 

eo 


t-XO(MOOCJOOC0O00 

ooeOTHTi<TjiLot-cocjest- 

1-1 (M 1-1 th 00 


(MCO «0 


^ 


loec 


C? 


CO (N O 
1-11-1 o? 


i-<eo in <M 1-1 




tH OOt-i <?* 

T-l 


in CI 


CO ,-1 T-l n< 


« 


«o 




c> eo in 


eo in V 




O T-I<N IN 

tH 


-* c^ 


c- cs LO o 

CTCC 00 <o 

1-1 tH 


« 

^ 


o o 
o o 
eo th 


O 

eo 


o o CO t- 
00 o inT-! 
CO CO *■> 


o 1-1 eo T- cox 
oj 00 o in T-l -"ii 

(M CO 


o-«*ixmo5inc?cQCQOXO 
•^■i-i©jOTi<incooii-i'*eoc> 

1-1 1-i Oi 


lO J> CO 


T-l 
T-l 


o 


t- 


■^ in (M 

1—1 


■^ in eo CO 


Tji 


t-1-i C* 


CJCJ c^ 

tH 


1-1 


>-< 
1-1 


05-<l< 


■^ 


O C-OQO 


t- X -^ 




a 1-1 o o 

1-1 tH 1-1 


O CI C? 


<M 


a 


1-1 (M 




OS « 1-1 


-* <M 


Cl 


(N « i?J « 


OJ 


« C0 50(M 


t- 


OO 


« 


00 o eo "^ 


■<*<MC-(N <M 


ea T-l 


eo eo '^ "^ 


r-l t- 1-1 1-1 



p^ p: (X CQ 




c fe f^ of bed; 



^^So^y o cs o M.2 2 o « rt =2 S 5 






6ii5 




SYNOD OF 


NEW JERSEY. 


IJ 


aay 


e-aosnvi 

■190STK 


«oeo 


OJ 




c 
eo 


o 


o osoo 
I- 1- « 
-* eo 


^ 


■OiSaoQ 


5 o 5 

T-t y-Cr-l 


o o o 
eo oo» 

t- 00 t- 


8 S 

t-l ir? 


oc* 


o o 

1-1 


O C <N •* O 
O lO 1-1 I- <M 

eo o 00 T-l 


cs 


•massy 


■C Ol- 
00C5 w 

C5 IC cc 
01 •>-■ 


O 00 

T-l C- 

o c? 


O 
05 


GC 

o 
1-1 


c5 


ooooo 

t- OSM- CO o 
CO (M t- O OJ 


o 
o 

OS 


•nOTJ'B? 

-nejsng 


Tl t- 




o 


o 

OS 


lO 


C- « O t- 

. -* cot- 


o 
1-t 


•9.1100 

joj p!v 


IS 


OS 


o 


1-1 lO 


LO 


•vam 
-paajj 


05 iO 


<N 


o 




t- CO 


•* O <N O t- 

coi-i eo 00 


o 

T-l 


•pnnj 




(M CO 


C5 

eo 


00 


to t- 


cooo to t- i~ 

>* 00 IO t- 


o 
1-1 


qojuqo 


T-l^ 

1-1 


T-l 


o 




CO 


co o 1-1 o? o 

CD 1-1 CO -* 


o 

T-l 


■UOpBD 

-iiqfdt 


1—1 »-< 


<M 


OS 

1-1 


CO 


-* 


OS 1-1 ■* O lO 

eo <N iO 


o 

T-l 


•noil 
-«onp3 


1-1 


«o o? 


c- 

-* 


1 


CO 


00i-hO 0<M 

CO '^f* o »o 


o 

T-t 


•B81K 
uSl8J0j[ 


oooot- 

tH CO (N 


(MOCO 


00 
1-1 


OS 

CO 


O CO 


OOCO O OS 
lO 1-1 lO »o OS 
CO ^ CO 
1-1 


in 
oo 


•SSTJJ 

etnoH 


QOO 


eo 1-1 IO » 

T-l 


eo oci 

1-1 00 


CO 
1-1 

OS 


t- CO IC 

^ eo 


LO 1-1 -^ o o 

tH 1-1 -^ T-i OS 

CD coo 


CO 


•man 

•s -s 


o 

00 


eo ITS QOO 


oc>j 00 


CO 


1» o 

o o 


IO IO LO OS o 
t- eo IO CO o 
1-1 1-1 eo c? 


«o 

CO 


•d^a 


C<J « 


1-1 


CO 


1-1 


OS 


(M lOO CO 

T-l 


T-t 


•d^a 

Biinpv 


« 


tH * 




o 

CO 


<?» eo 


T-<-* -<1< 0? 




■oji 
oioqM. 


t- 1-1 OS 




IC OS c- 

1-1 eo 05 
1-1 


o 

OS 

oo 


O tH 00 
OCOO 
0-! 1-1 


o:; O^-J .^ t- M< 

CO eo CO cQ 1-1 
ej ^ lOi-i 


o 

OS 


•190 10 

peppy 




1-1 1-1 

1-1 




i 


<M 


OOl-l OCO r-l 
tH tH 


T-l 


■xa no 
pappy 


Ol tH 


1-1 Oi 

1-1 


CD 


eo 
1—1 


t- eo 


eoc-ooos eo 


T-t 


sn.o'BaQ 




m 


1—1 


IC 


W (MCO 


•sjapia 


O ■* «>"? 


<M « o -^ 


eo ■«*< 


CI 


ococo 


"^ "^ t- t* eo 


IO 


CHDRCHES. 


•j:3 Sffi 


CD m 

Qf5 -02 

« a s^ 

cS o C o 


XII 

■ m Lo 

CO a fe- 
ci o a> 

PQh-5m 




1^ 


p— 1 

A ~. - ^ 
9 bO.-ti (D s 

g s g bc § 

'JZ'^ r^ G a 

ii t^ d c3 c;i 


i-T 


o 
•< 




.9 
0. 




H : : : : 

> co" 
? ° 


: : : : — t>^^: 

Z; g.£ g bc5g^ ifli^ 
'-kSkS S »-i srr >-ja 



p^pj 






C3 rC 



1.-; aipH 
^ ^ of c -5 



o (S 






• Ph ^' 
m 



Ph 

JPh 

Si '^ '^ "^ 

^PP^Q 



o > P-^ 

- rO 
a ** r; 

Pt^f§ 



0^ PL^ 

• — (/)—-» 



O 



CCCC' 



> OJ fl •— 5 

ohKw 



-.1= m" 

O _ • 
. cs m 

=«ia 



d^t^ 



A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 



87 



IC !» »»»0 


-<*< »o 


o o 


tH l-H (M l> t- 


"*« 




OS ?0 tH 


o 


T-H 1—1 



lo 05 CO ec o CO C4 eo c: 

Ol 00 O CO lO <M t- t- QO 

o ;s c\i CO CO T-i th » 



O O O O O O CC O O T-H C5 in O OT l~ 

woio lomoco C0O-* <M cioooo 

'^os-* t-QO-*'* Si a a a ^ t-i^ oi 

Ti a a T^ a t-icoi-hoi-i 



; oooo o 

S t- 00 CO C5 -<*! 


oo 


o c 


o o o 

o m o 


o o c 

CS X' T}< 


moo 
T-i oc ■* 


o 


oooo 

to L- CO -^ 


< iri t> CO fr- lo 

> CO in C^ 01 


■J^T-l 




L-? t- c; 


■■-1 c^ 


•?? es 


o 


« -* 'X Ct 

CC T^ CO 1— ' 





T-I 

1—1 


05 


LO »0 


oo 
oj CO 


"* »0<M 


CO 


lO « 




1-HOSO 




LO 




g 


^ 


05 

eo 




o 




CO 




O so »0 00 
O goi <M 


§"= 


o t- 
o t~ 

T-I •r^ 


ioioeo 


CO CO o 
1—1 




CO 
T-H 


Ci,ait-Ci 

a' CO 

i-H 


CO 


O CO LO l-H Ci 
O CO OirH CO 

CO T-( 


O LO 

T-H 


o cc 

o< CO 


t-OOCO 


Cs O 

CO l-H 


X IC iO 




O S5 rH 

-* 00 


CO 

T-H 


O to O CO (?» 

O T-H C* tH 


CO 


tH 


o loeo 

(MtH 


(M OOO 

CO 


LO-* CQ 

O-rH 




t- »o O— 1 

O CO —1 

l-t tH 


CO 

T-( 


O LO T-I «o -^ 

^ 05tH tH 

T-H 


xo 

■1-1 tH 


o o 

LO 


tH iO 1-1 


<MCO 


O (M 


o 

l-H 


<M iO O 
(M <M 



X CO -* lOOO 

CO IO 



CO O T<t T- 

^ (N Oi Oi 

CO CO 



C- O O CO IO oo T-I ^ 

t~ -^ -* th OS coco coo 

l-H O IO T-H CO CQ CO 
00 Ci 



t- o t- 

T-H t- IO 

""^ 00 



8 

T-I 


eo CO OS o OS 

OS O lO T-HTJH 
Ci^Ci CO 


CO tH 
CO OS 

Si 


CO St 
t~ CO 
SI o 






CSOO 

T-I tH fH 
T-H 


t- LO t- OS 

Si TH 


■T)< J> CO 

T-I CO (M 
tH 


CO 
X 


OOtHCO 
IO IO OS IO 

-* l-H 00— < 


O 

CO 


O CO O IO o 
LO o to lO o 
00^ OJ CO 


o 

LO 

T-H 


S 2 






OS LOOO 

aoc>^ IO 

T-H tH 


oosos o 

CO CO t- OS 

T-H 07 T-H 


tHOO 
tHt-iOO 

tH tH 




T-tCO tHO 
CO t- « OS 

eo CO 


-^ 


■* OS X eo CO 


C- LO 


CQ -^ 






t-;tj<oo 


T-I 


<M tH 


CO 


1— 1 


iO 


T-H to T-H eo 


-* 


T-H 






« 


CQ T-H T-H 


(MiO 


(M 


T-I <M 


o 
eo 


C-CO^OtH 
O f .- Tti 00 o 

CO »ocQ « 


Si T-H 


Ct lO 
CO 05 


LO ■* o o^ IO 

^ tH IO 00 OS 

* * T-H 


CO lO^ lO 

t-o; Lo^ 

Si T-I 


o osos 

•>* OJ t- 

T-H l-H 


OS 

o 


-* OS 1- T-H O 

tH Tf T-H 00 tH 
CO T-H -TtH ,-t 


o 


T-i OOTficO (M 


oco 


IO -* 








T-l-<t CO OS 


(M CD 




00-* O (M 



tH tH <?) T-H 



05iOC-<MC0 O-lTt* lOOO 



t- CO th CO 



'ilH 


0.-J CO -* 




(M 


OS CO 


t- (NCO 


<M 




(M CO 


t- 


'^csco loco 


cot- 


OS OS 


CO^(M 


cccc co-«i< 


IO t- eo 


in 


00 CO CO-* T-H 



Mill 



PLI 



Ph 

^- >i 

■rH ^^ 

a 5 



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CQPh PL,] 

M IS 1^* o ^ 

C - c3 i 



'OQ 



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a o cs - 
.2 iS o a> 

pH&HP3ga 



c3 . _^ 3 'h 
5 JS r^ S Ph 



•^ CO • 

Ph.j;«2 
CO c e; o( -^ 

bO . 



c4 C c 3 fcO 

-» — ri 

-< — ^ 



t-l — 
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>5^ 



D P oj 
O =? c5 



'a 









ca o 



fcDpH s>c.H2 



a £ 



2coJg|^l 






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P5;^- 



^r 









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*— * e '^ ^^ -^5 " G d "c ^ "-I 



bO 

a : 



K 03 0* o ^ « 

. ^ja bC ;i cS ^ ^ ,a Eiu 



•30 a.2 ri-^ 



c o i: 3 o c ^.a ^ y rt S ^ o ^ 






^ -" .02 a 

d . a CO - . o 



f^ ^1-3; 









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: — bfl 



:w. 



^ - - 

OQ 2 • 

M a a 

!="GgSa~~aS!23«^XPi:" 
§2^£2gg-a^g|agSt^| 



'C Q^ -a 



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cdpH 



Ph 

sPhS.- .3^^bbo .^I'E'qa; g 
^ .-c-H bc> 6c;C a^.d ».S^- .- J3 
JKfe:.ii<riMO^."F^ _-Sa)aa)2g 

53 • a i-^ >-5 ^ -^ . _ • _ rv, 



a - -S-:: .'c — < 



Of^ Of^H 



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"ap5' 
a 



cea5Da^^wa"«^5^ajga( 
;-5c=3^g>5a.iiWo55^g 



378 



SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 



[May, 



-1909511 


I- 


I- 


X !-■? O IS O 00 05 
rH eo O X <=>->» o» 
CO 00 IS cj o t- eo 


•I«jbS 


C5 


O 

Q0~ 

OS 


00 CO O CI o o t- 
Cl T- CC IS O T-1 c- 

C? CO t- o oo o 
00 Ls t-eo eOgj- « 

T-l 


'massy 
Tuaado 


o 
o 

cs 


eo 


o ■ c; oc t-o o 
O O ODi- w »o o 

c. c; c> CO Ls o t- 
•<*< cj CO c* T^ CO e» 


-Qoisng 
joj pjv 




^1 


S S CO CO 




cs 


CO 


■nam 
jpaajj 
•pnnj 


o 


to cs c; o^ >o 

00 IS CO 00 OD 
1- CJ — ' 


Ci 


3< 

2 


00 T-l C5 O ■ CO lO CJ 
CO LS so O ir- 00 1-1 

CO 






o 

X) 


i-< Tf< joec cjjo 00 
CO cj CO CO t- T-H 

»S Ci cs IS 1-1 

CO CO 






s 


^ O cs IS OS o 

o Ci eo Ci CO •># 


•noij 
-Bonp3 




•r-l 
CO 


1-1 O Ci CO C» cs C4 

Ci CO coco -d^'* -<i< 

CO Ci Ci CO X OS 


•SBIK 


o 
1-1 


CO 


-* o 1-4 1- ox CO 

Ci I— Ci « 50 -* Ifl 

CO CO eo CO ■-- c: i-* 

1—1 1—1 


•ssjitt 
araofl 


o 


s 

s 


IS CO Ci c- o 00 X 

O cs O Ci CO o -* 

o Ci CO X CO 


■ni8H 

■ss 


Ol-H 

IC o 




Ci IS Ci o o t- X 

eo Ci c: c «s X »s 
^ '^ -^ Ci -* eo c- 


•dBg 
sjWBjni 


CCl-H 


c? 


t- T-< Tfi « CO eo CO 

Ci 1-1 OS 


•dBCT 
siitipv 


l-H 


Ci O CO CJ 1-1 1-1 
t- 


•on 


^ 00 


t- 


t- O C! Tj* XX ■* 
O 00 coo '^^ CO 

iS Ci CO Ci ^ CO eo 


•J90 no 
pappy 


(^8 1-. 


CI 


lo JS eo eo eo is la 

T-l T-l 


•xgno 
pappy 


C<»-r-l 


«P CO t- X-* xco c- 

gj « - ^ 


su.o^aa 


OJ 


■1-1 

CO 


o 1-1 eo 


•Bjapia 


i-ltO 


« OClCiCO XCO-* 


W 
S 

& 


• • a ^" cu cJ • • qJ 


ai 

CD 

W 

O 

< 


aT & c 

S 93 SOO^SJWO 05033^0) OTSiW 

ca ^2; c^!zc2^^^ ^^jlo^ S SI2; 


m 
ia 
E- 

CO 
S3 
CO 


p.; 

O 

^72 


1 





A.D. 1884.] 



SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY. 



379 



CI 


O X- ^ t- 

o « o CO 

C7 CO ^ 


CJ^ 

^< tH 

00 


1-^ o 
JO 1-1 
JO CI 


JO 


1* c: CO o O O 

Tl^ CO Tj( 00 o o 

1—1 1-1 


CD 

X 

CI 

CI 


1 

-i- 

i 




o 
so 

00 


lo CO o o 

CO «5 t-O 


^ o 
00 t- 

JO»^ 

tH 


CS o 
JO tH 


aoQO 

CO CO 

T-ICJ 


JO ^ OS GO O O: 
LO 00 o 1* o Tji 
c- o JO JO 00 OS 
1-1 JO cj 1-1 




so 
o 


00 OOiO -* 
CO ■* t- CO 

CO L-O -J ^ 


lO CO 

^ CO 

L-C lO 


— =2 


c"»ao 

JO o 
CI 


O O O CI OS CO 
00 t- JO ^ CI i-< 

^ o CO t- ^ 00 

1-1 CI 1-1 


CI 
CI 


o 

CO 

co 






lOi-t 


1-100 

-* 1-1 




JO 


CO jo^ 00 
1-( 


-* 


1-1 

o 

CO 




1:3 


JO CO 


co 






CO 00 


CI 


CO 

8 




00 

CO 


Oi £> CO O 
t- OS 


JO-* 

CO CI 




o 


-* CO JO o 

1-1 


LO 


-^ 


o 

o 


00 00 JO '-H 

■rH 00 


CO 

00 




JO 

TH 


joco OS 
1—1 


o 


CO 


o 


coooo^ 


CO 
OS 

'^ 

CI 




JO 


th cod 00 lo 

CO rl 


LO 

CO 
1-1 


CO 




CO 


<M-^ CO 

to 

1-1 


O QO 

CO 1-1 


o 


JO 


1-iCO JO 
1-1 1-1 

1-1 


CO 


CO 

CO 




C