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OF THE 



(SMission High School 



A Record of 
the Activities of 
the Students 






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Spring Term 



NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-EIGHT 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



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Willidin J. '^re^w 



OUR PRINCIPAL 



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"T THE CLOSE of another scmesrer 
we arc looking forward to being 
gathered together, under one roof. 

as one big loyal family in our beautiful 

new building. 

True enough we have only the very 
happiest associations of our dear old Park 
bungalows which arc now to go. But mem- 
ories of the joys and pleasures will be with 
us for many a day. 

The "Old Grads" wander back and 
marvel at our commodious new quarters, 
but they cast a glance at thehumblebunga- 
lows that were their school-home for a few 
years past. But all must make way for the 
Path of Progress. 

Again we have come to another mile- 
stone and arc saying farewell to our gradu- 
ates of June 1 928, the largest class in the 
annals of Mission High. We are looking 
ahead for them on the Golden Path of 
Progress. We see them stepping out proud- 
ly on this path and we see the golden light 
of success, a glorious beacon for them in 
the Distance of the Future. Ever mindful 
of the beauty of the loyalty to their Alma 
Mater, may our graduates of June 1928. 
cherish the sentiment so wonderfully ex- 
pressed by the Bard of Avon. 

"The friends thou hast and their adoption tried. 
Grapple them to thy soul with hooks of steel." 



6 T H H M 1 S S 1 O N 



The Faculty of the Mission High School 

MR. Will 1AM J. DREW, I'nncpul 

MISS A. G. KHI.I.Y. Vice- Principal MR. J. B. NRWMAN. Vice Principal 

(Dean of Girls) (Dean of Boys) 

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 



MISS S. McD. W 


RABOURN. //,.;./../ Department 


MISS B ANDRIAVS 


MISS 1 . L McQL'AID 


MR i:. H. barki:r 


MISS 1 A. NHl.SON 


MISS M. M. BIRO 


MISS n. C. PETERS 


MRS. D del UCi;. and Drama 


MRS. 1. T. PRYOR 


MISS A \' DONALDSON, and Drama 


MISS L. B. ROUARK 


.MRS 1' lOWARDS 


MISS P. N. SMITH, and Debating 


MRS. M. GARDNIiR 


MRS. M. K. SCHALLER 


MISSS. HILL 


MISS M. H. STANLEY 


MISS H. r. MAGUIRE 


MRS. L. B. SWANSON 


MISS J. M. MCGLOIN 


MISS A. WHITAKER 



MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT 

MISS A. G. KELLY. Head of Department 



MISS B. K. ACHESON. Algebraic Theory 
MISS R. M. BYRNE. Algebraic Theory 
MISS L G ISHAM. Algebra. Geometry 
MISS W. MIKLAL', Algebra. Geometry 
MR. H. MCDONALD. Algebra 
MR. E. D. GALLAGHER. Algebra 



MISS M OAKHS. Algebra. Testing 
MISS C. POPPIC. Algebra 
MISS G. M. SIMON. Algebra 
MISS B. M. TAYLOR. Algebra and 
Geometry 



SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

MR. A. H. SMITH. Head o/ Department 



MR. G. R. ALBERS. General Science 
MR. L. J. CAMPBELL. Physics 
MR. C. E. CRANE. Physics 
MISS F. deGHETALDI. Zoology 
MR. E. D. Gallagher. General Science. 
Mathematics 



MR. C. E. OVERMAN. General Science 
MRS. L. SCHOTT, Physiology 
MR. T. J. TERRY. Chemistry 
MRS. M. M. THOMAS, Botany 
MR. E. WAGNER. Physiology 



HISTORY DEPARTMENT 



MR. D. N. BARKER 
MISSC. C. CHALMERS 
MR. A W. JOHNS 
MISS M K. K IRWIN 
MISS L. M. MORRILL 
MR. C, S. YOUNGQUIST 



MISSC. E. PETERSON 
MR. L. PHILLIPS 
MRS. B. E. HILLIARD 
MR. W. A. WIEI.AND 
DR. G. E. NUNN 



MODERN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT 

.MISS L. H. I'LCHIN, Head ../ Depann„nt 



MISS N. ACED. Spanish 

MISS B. BOUGHTON. 1 atin I rcnch 

MISS B. A. BRIU. Italian 

MISS E. I RLDIRICKS. I rench 

MR. O. GAILNO. Spanish 

MRS. I. MYERS. I rench 

MISS A. NEWMARK. German 



MR. D NORRIS. Spanish 
MISS R W PRICE. German 
MISS C. RAIl O. Italian. Spanish 
MISS A 1 RL'.MAN. Spanish 
.MISS H VII I Al I'ANDO Spanish 
MISS L. WILSON. Spannh 



T H E M I S S 1 O N 7 

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ART DEPARTMENT 

MRS. M. Y. HOBAR T. Head of Deparimeni 
MISS E. C. ANTONOVICH MISS C. P. SIMON 

MISS E. J. MICHHI S MR. A. TIESSEI.INCK 

MECHANICAL DRAWING DEPARTMENT 

MR. J. PARKIN, //(W ul Department 
MR. ,) i; BALI MR. G. L. GARDNER 

MR. C E. BARKER DR I I UNDGREN 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

MISS N. K. KENDRICK. Ih-aJ ul Department 
Stenography -Secretarial Training 

MR. E. S. AND1:RS0N. BookkecpinK MISS O. K. HOERING. Stenography 

MR. J. E. BARNES. JR.. Business I raining. MRS. E. KliiNNEDY. Bookkeeping. Business 

Typewriting Training. Typewriting 

MISS E. M. BECKMAN, Typewriting MRS. E. D KOHLWEY. Bookkeeping, 

MISS .J. G. CLARKF;. Typewriting Business Training 

MISS M. A. CLAY. Typewriting MRS. A. LIGH TNER. Business Training. 

MISS M. C. DALY. Typewriting Bookkeeping. Typewriting 

MISS I'. EINNEGAN, Business Training. MRS. O. C. MARTIN. Comptometry 

Typewriting MISS M. M. MONTGOMERY, Attendance 

MRS. A. R. ERAN7. Stenography MISS E. C MURPHY. Bookkeeping. 

MISS A. M. GRAY. Stenography. Office Typewriting 

Practice MISS M. WESTBIE. Salesmanship 
MISS L. R. HEUSSLER. Typewriting 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

MR. GEO. INGRAM. Glee MR. H. E. 0\VI;N. Orchestra. Music. History. 

MR. M, E. DRIVIiR. Piano, Harmony Sight Singing 

HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

MISS C. C. MacLAUGHLIN. Design and MISS M. C. PHILLIPS. Clothing 

Clothing MISS E. WALKER. Clothing. Millinery 

MISS C. E. LYNN. Clothing MRS. N. OWENS. Eoods 

MECHANIC ARTS DEPARTMENT 

.\IR, C. L. RL'S I . lleaJ ul Deparimeni 

Pattern Making and Mill Cabinet Work 
MR i: V. CLEARY. Automobile Shop MR. G. SWARTZ. Electric Shop 

MR. J. CROCKER. Mill Cabinet Work MR. W. E. WANTZ. Machine Shop 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
BOYS 
MR. L. M. ELDER MR. G. R. HAAS 

MR. A. J. EAGIN MR. C. D. GRASSLE 

MR. E. H. HARRIS MR. H. B. SI URGEON 

GIRLS 
MISS I.. B. DAVIDSON MISS B. I. POWELL 

MISS J. R. CONROY MISS M. M. STEEEEN 

MISS K. R. LEAMAN MISS H. THOMAS. Hygiene 

R. O. T. C. DEPARTMENT 

CAPTAIN W I I I OOD SERGEANl W. H. DOUGLAS 

.MR. r. J. KENNEDY. Band Ma'.ler 

LIBRARY 

MISS I S HYDE MISS V. A .MAKI 



8 1 H 1: M 1 S S 1 O N 



"The Days of Gold" 



II WAS a S'i'-i day for the littli' town ot lani.iha. I he ni.iin street was 
ihronyeJ with curious people anxiously awaiting the sound of oncoming 
music. Turning the bend in tlu- street tlie village band struck up tlie stirring 
notes ol the Star Spangled lianner. The flag on top of the courtliouse was raised 
as the last notes died away. Then, carried away by the intense excitement of the 
occasion, the populace gave three cheers. 

"The Pony Express, hurray!" f-or that was the cause of the celebrating. Two 
years had passed since the gold rush had swelled the population of Tamalta to 
such an extent that it was no longer a trading post with only a hotel and general 
merchandise store. In two years California had become the pot of gold at the foot 
of the rainbow ot fortune seekers from the East and South. Around the Horn, 
across the Canal, over the mountains, into the desert, they came. Miners on 
horseback, families in groups. Mexicans. Chinese and Indians, all had become 
enthralled with the magic word "Gold!" 

The peace-loving don and senorita were caught up and carried away by this 
human whirlwind c^f advancement. X'illages. towns, settlements and camps had 
sprung up like mushrooms wherever the magic word "Gold" had been spoken. 
Towns had grown into cities and trading posts into towns. Just so had Tamalta 
grown. 

And here was the fulfillment of Tamalta's dream. A Pony Express station 
had been established in the town. Foresighted citizens, two years previously, had 
written to the President and asked for the station. After two years of ceaseless 
effort the station had materialized. 

The Pony Express meant contact with the outside world. Twice a week a 
galloping horse and a dauntless rider would bring coveted news and letters. No 
wonder the cheer was given — "Pony Express, hurrah'" 

"Josh" Edwards, the guiding light of lamalta. made the main speech of the 
day. His beady eyes twinkled as he ran his hand through the while thatch of hair 
which kept Killing over his lace. He spoke enthusiastically. 

"1 amalta will not forget this day. We all know what the Pony Express has 
done for California. We know what it will do for Tamalta. And Scott Burton 
is going to help us pui Tamalta on the map as being the liveliest station in the 
Union." 

With this. Scott Burton, the rider of the Pony Express, stepped forward. Full 
of zest, he easily held the interest of his audience while he told them of the bravery 
of some of the original Pony Express riders. "To be on the T!xpress is a trust and 
an honor. I realize the danger entailed in the position but also 1 know the value of 
such a job to the government. May Tamalta Station of the Pony Express have 
all the luck in the world." Amid a thunderous burst of applause, he took a letter 
from "Josh" Edwards' hand. It was the first letter to be sent from the new sta- 
tion to the Presidio Post in San Francisco. 'Tlie contents were a word of greeting 
Ironi Tamalt.i I hen "Josh" Edwards hantled him a small package. 



THEMISSION 9 

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The ceremonies over, the inhabitants departed to the outskirts of the town to 
end the celebration with a barbecue. Scott and "Josh" went into the shining new 
office of the station. There was explained the contents of the package. "Josh" 
spoke, "I didn't hke to make the fact known pubHcly but this package contains 
valuable information concerning that stir of trouble they had over at Usada 
when those Indians and Spanish along with Indians all quarreled over, what it 
seemed like, nothing. We think we've caught the fellow who caused all the 
trouble but need to verify our information with facts from the 'Frisco Post. The 
letter is only an excuse for you to go. The rest of Tamalta must not know of the 
package. Under no circumstances must you fail. It is vital that our message is 
received. Petty quarreling has been going on for some time across the border of 
California and jMexico. And. if you succeed, further complications will be 
avoided." 

Scot! Burton rode into the noon-day sun with his message of trust safely hid. 
As he reached the end of the main street, where road faded into foot-trail, he 
tied his pony to the fence of the house which set back in the trees and walked up 
the path leading to a porch. Standing in the doorway was a fair young girl. 

Calilornia's sun had tanned her cheeks to an Indian hue. But strangely con- 
trasting was her red-gold hair. Stretching out her hands in welcome, we led liim 
into the house. He explained his mission to San Francisco. During the conversa- 
tion it was revealed that the way to his destination was long and difficult. Two 
days of rapid riding over rough mountain paths and tumultous streams. Desert 
sun and Indian bullet endangered the way. As the station at Tamalta was new 
the trail would be fresh. No well-beaten path would help the pony's journey. 
The rider's ability as a horseman would be put to the caustic test of continuous 
travel. Noon-day sun had faded to mid-afternoon sun when the messenger started 
again on his way. 

As he speeded down the hillside, he saw a figure waving to him. With her 
words of well-wishing in his mind, he was sure of success for the new Pony 
Express Station of Inmnlta. 

Two nights had passed since a riderless pony had speeded into the town of 
San Francisco. The inhabitants, recognizing the pony as the breed used by the 
Express, had led him to the Presidio Post. A small packet was fastened to the 
saddle wiih ,i hast\' scrawl. "Government lest." written across the top. The 
message was received but where was the messenger.'' 

Indian scouts and private citizens were sent out in search. No news was 
brought in. and the matter soon was forgotten. Not that these early settlers were 
torgettui or cold-hearted. 1 hey were hardy and lived for the present. In their 
scan of being today was important. Necessity kept them constantly on the guard 
tor today's trials. Pony Express riders were expected to be brave. It was tradition. 



10 1 11 1: M 1 S S 1 O N 

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In ilii' p.ist they had died Idr the cause of advancement of civili/.ation. The present 
and the future were no difTerent than the past. Already Scott Burton's place was 
filled by another just as brave, just as hardy and just as young. 

In the days of old. the days of gold, the days of '49 " bravery was the rule, 
not the exception. So. added to the list of Pony I:xpress riders who had disap- 
peared was that of Scott Burton. At the San Francisco station was written. "Scott 
Burton. Tamalta Rider, disappeared in service, cause unknown. In Frisco it 
was just a name and soon forgotten. No so in Tamalta. 

Constant search was made for the missing rider. Three weeks had passed since 
he had vanished. "Josh " Fdwards and Nancy Lee. who was the last to have seen 
Scott Burton, were earnestly talking in the office of the Pony Express. The girls 
voice could be heard. "But if he were dead someone would have found his body. 
As it is. no trace near Tamalta or San f-rancisco can be found that he was killed. 
The very fact that he wrote on the packet shows he must be alive." 

"Well enough." answered the elderly man. "there's still some hope. Really 
doubting his own remarks, he attempted to comfort the girl. "There has been too 
much searching near at hand and not enough in the questionable parts of the 
country. Has anyone thought to hunt near Usada' " 

A month had come and gone since the disappearance of the valiant rider, l.ven 
'Famalta had given up hunting and "Josh" openly admitted that he thought the 
rider was "gone for good. " Nancy was not to be swayed in her opinion that he 
had only disappeared. 

Today the Pony Express would be in and all lanialta turned out for news 
and letters. Would the pony carry any parcels of gold dust.' Had there been any 
gold discovered up San Jacinto way.'' Was there any chance of the Sacramento 
overflowing this spring.'' Could Tamalta have an invitation to the Red Rodeo.' 
Were the "chinks " still flocking to San Francisco as they had been the previous 
winter.' Tamalta was all agog for news from the outside world. 

Gathered in front of the courthouse where old "Josh " would tell the news, the 
oldest and the youngest were waiting anxiously, curiously for the glimpse of 
rising dust in the distance which would loretell the coming of the rider. I here it 
was! A shout rang out as the pony became visible. The rider slackened the pace 
of his animal and waved his hand in greeting. Around the bend of the road he 
came. 1 hen up the main street. As he drew near the onlookers recognized some- 
thing foreign in his manner. Dismounting from his horse and nodding his head 
in an unfamili.-r way. he puzzled them. (Aiming up to the courthouse th.ey hailed, 
not the regular rider, but Scott Burton himself! 

If the earth had opened and swallowed 'I'amalta into its bosom the inhabitants 
could not have been more surprised. "Josh" Edwards greeted him with genuine 
affection and as for Miss Nancy Lee. her joy was overwhelming. In front of the 
total population of Tamaha she announcetl. "I knew he wasnt dead. I knew he 
woulcJ come back. 

That night arnimi the cosy hearth stone of Miss Nancy's house at the end ot 
the road "Josh" and the girl heard the siorv. The nunintain path hati been sleep 



T H E M I S S 1 O N 11 

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and as he had followed the sure-footed pony around the edge of a precipice, the 
earth had given way and he had slipped. Injured so badly from the fall that he 
could not continue, he sent the pony on with the packet. 

"I managed to crawl to a point where the trail from Usada to San Jacinto 
crossed the trail from Tamalta to 'Frisco. The next day, when the Usada mes- 
senger speeded by he found me there and carried me on the back of his pony to 
Usada. In Usada where the border trouble had just cooled down I thought it 
best to keep my identity a secret. It was almost three weeks before 1 was able to 
ride again. As soon as I recovered I went to F-risco. found they had received the 
message and here I am. " 

His story was so simple that "Josh" could not fathom the reason that search 
had not been conducted around Usada. it's the last place on earth we would 
have looked for you. I ime to turn down the lights so III be on my way home. 
Goodnight Miss Nancy. Coming Scott.''" 

The Pony Express has been running for a year and changes can be seen in 
Tamalta. The main street is wider and smoother. A new courthouse and general 
store has been built. The excitement which first followed the gold rush has dis- 
appeared and a respectable "established" air scents Tamalta. Again there is a 
crowd assembled around the courthouse. Today is not the day for the Pony 
Express to come speeding home. What is the cause of the public interest? 

Another parade" Yes. and the Star Spangled Banner sounds through the 
streets. Again the flag on top of the courthouse is raised and again a cheer is 
heard. It must be a great occasion which would cause as much feeling in 7 amalta 
as the day the Pony Express was dedicated. What do the cheers say.' 

"The Pony Express! Scott Burton, hurray! Mrs, Nancy Burton, hurray!" 

Jeannette Quast. 

The Hand — The Heart — The Mind 

The hand, and the heart and the mind are one: 

The trinity of my soul: 
7 he hand for the deed, and the mind for thot. 

And the heart as a crown to the whole: 
But each in fetter is closely bound 

To the prison of worldly strife: 
Oh, God! that I had the courage 

To live, at will, my life! 
To roam thru fields with flowers so wild. 

And sing with the birds so free: 
To torget the dust and darkness of earth 

In the midst of such gaety: 
To sleep neath the sky in the open. 

With the grass as my pillow of down. 
And the stars above as my blanket — 

The blessings of God newly found: 
To breathe with the breeze that wafts on the ItjII: 
Is draining my life of its every thrill! 

H. r. 



12 T H E M 1 S S 1 O N 

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A Real American Tragedy 



J 



I 'I and his lovely Maria — she with her bambino in her arms, he carrying 
UkRo, the monkey — -stepped from the gang plank. At last they had 
leached America. 



Months pass. Maria and the bambino, spending their days in the unhealthy 
air of a crowded tenement house, lost the healthy bloom of their cheeks. Accus- 
toined to the clear sunshine and the balmy air of native Italy. Maria faded and 
died. Her bambino soon followed. 

Jocko the monkey was all that was left to the sorrowing Joe. After a time Joe 
got enough money to buy an old hand organ and to deck C5ul" Jocko in a red 
cap and a jacket with bells. 

"My monk." said Joe to a woman who stood watching, "he a fine monk. 
I bring him all the way from sunny Italy, and on the boat he play all day with 
my bambino. She in heaven now." 

The woman looked unbelievingly at Joe and said with a cruel smile to her 
companion. "These foreigners always have some story to tell. Ill wager he never 
had a bambino." 

Joe was hurt and discouraged, but tor the sake of his beloved bambino, he 
resolved to keep on trying. He still had .Jocko. 

A vKindow across the street opened and a child tossed a small coin to Jocko. 
It fell in the middle of the street. Joe let Jockti's rope out and soon the coin re- 
posed safely in the pocket of the little red jacket. Just then a huge limousine came 
along, and quick as a flash, before Joe could even think, the heavy wheels had 
crushed the life out of poor Jocko. The kind driver wished to stop and apologize 
to the sorrowing Italian. "Drive on. it ums on\\ an animal, said the owner of 
the car. "You know that I am already late tor the reception." With that, she 
threw a bill of a small denomination in Joe's direction. Scorning the money but 
picking up the crushed body of his beloved Jocko, he stood in the street mutter- 
ing in Italian, while hot tears fell on Jocko's fur. 

Early the next day. a body was found floating on the water near a wharf. 
"Oh. it's only one of them Italians." said the policeman carelessly. "They arc 
always killing themselves or one another." 1 he\- laid the body indifferently on 
a cold marble slab at the morgue and tagged it "L'niDIN Hill D. " 

Vincent Whelton. 



THEMISSION 13 

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The Greatest Thing on Earth 

THIS STORY begins way up North where only the fittest can survive. To 
be exact, it was in the town of Dawson, that city long noted lor its lure 
of gold. Three men were talking at the bar of an old "desolate saloon." 
The topics of the day. such as wine, women, song, and gold being rather worn 
and frayed, they started talking about what "the greatest thing on earth" could be. 

"Well, boys." said Old Bill, a master of the trail, "the greatest thing on earth 
to me IS wealth. Just look at what it can buy. It can buy power and make you 
the envy of men. Wealth can buy you heart's desire." 

"I disagree with you thar." said Tom. who was ailing from the coldness of 
the snows. "Health is the greatest thing on earth. What good is power and all 
that tliar stuff it vou are always sick and ailing. Why you can't get anything 
out of life without the hcahli of life." 

"I cawn'i seem to see it either of your ways. " said the third member of the 
party, a little old wizened Englishman, a veteran of the storm. "The greatest 
thing on earth is glory and fame. Why. think of the world bowed at your feet. 
The great and tlie small paying homage to you and . . . ." 

1 he door opened and in walked a woman. A white woman. 1 he three stared 
and stared. Her hair was like the sunshine of the California fields, her eyes like 
the blue of southern skies, and as she spoke her voice was like the ripple of the 
mountain stream. "Can you tell me where I can find Jack Timers.''" 

But ignoring her c|uestion. Old Bill put forth the c|uestion loremost in their 
minds. "What brings you up here Madam, in this land of snow and ice.'" 

She sort of looked him over wondering whether she should tell him or not. 

At last she said. "I guess it doesn't matter whether you hear my story or not but 

I'll go ahead." She told of their meeting, and of the liking that grew to love day 

by day. But fate had interfered and they had drifted apart, "^'ou see. " she said. 

"I love him — that's all I can say. 

After she had gone to find her man. Old Bill spoke up and said, "Boys I think 
we made a mistake. The greatest thmg on earth is Love." 

RoBKRT Ash. 



14 r H I: M 1 S S 1 O N 

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I 



>W:i-J»-' 



The West Wing Court 



THE MISSION 15 

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ABERNETHY. ROM UT 
ANDERSON. ROBERT 
ARNAUDO. MICHAP.I. 
ARTESEROS. LAWRENCE 
ASHTON. STANLEY 
BOUSQUET. ALFRED 
BRUNING. WILFRED 
BROWN. CHARLES 
BURTON. ROBERT 
BUSCHMAN. WILLL\M 
CALSON. ROBERT 
CARLSON. ELMER 
CAMERON. DUDLEY 
CARI SON. ARTHUR 
CLARK. .JAMES 
COBURN. DELAX 
CONNELL. GEORGE 
CORNELL CLINTON 
CURR. JOHN 
DALMAS. PAUL 
DELEE. ALFRED 
DONALD. ELMER 
DRAKE. WILLIAM 
EISEN. DAVID 
ENMARK. ALBERT 
ENNIS. WILLIAM 
EISENHUT, GEORGE 
ESOLA. DANIEL 
EXLEY. JACK 
EAIRGRIEVE. DONAl 1> 
FITZPATRICK. JOE 
FLEGAL. FRANK 
FRY. RAYMOND 
GAFFNEY. FRANK 
GARIBALDI. FRANK 
GROEZINGER. THEODORE 
HAUCK. WALTER 
H\RD[.\L\N. KER.MIT 



Senior Class 

BOYS 

IIEBRANK, WILLIA.M 
HENRY. CHARLES 
HOLTZ. ELWOOD 
HOOD. GILBERT 
HOOVER. LEONARD 
HUNTER. WILI IA.\1 
IVICEVICH. NICHOLAS 
JACOBSON. HARRY 
JAUCH. JOSEPH 
JODOCY. CLEMENT 
JOHNSON. EL.VIl-.R 
KAUER. MAURICE 
KEEN.SAMUEL 
KELLY. MILTON 
KENNEDY. MARTIN 
KING. WILLIAM 
KORN. HARRY 
La TORRES. LESLIE 
l.AVOIE. WILLIAM 
LAMBERT. FRANCE 
LAMBERT. FRANCIS 
LEE. DONALD 
LEGAKES. JOHN 
LOCKE. ARTHUR 
LOVETTE. FRANKLIN 
MCLAUGHLIN. EARL 
MARTIN, ROBERT 
MAYER. JAYNHS 
MILES. DONALD 
MOORE. THEODORE 
MUELLER. JOHN 
MULCAHY. RICHARD 
MURPHY. WILLIAM 
OFARRELL. EDWARD 
PARKER, CHESTER 
PETERS. HENRY 
PEPPI. FRANK 
PERSSON. EARL 



PHILPO I. JAMES 
POTTER. JACK 
PRITCHARD, STEWART 
RAE. ERNEST 
RISSO. ROLAND 
ROBERTS. THOMAS. 
ROESCHEISE. RAYMOND 
ROSENBLUM. HARRY 
ROSS. MALCOLM 
ROSSI. JOHN 
SAXON. OTTO 
SCHENK. HORACE 
SCHICK. LOUIS 
SHUFLIN. FRANCIS 
SI.VION. MARVIN 
SI.VIPSON. E.Vl.METT 
S.MITH. PHILIP 
SNAIDER. DAVID 
SPRINGER. RALPH 
STOFFEL. LEO 
STOKER. ROBERT 
STOLTZ. HOWARD 
SUVANTO, EDDIE 
TANZER. ROBERT 
THOMAS. NOVA 
THO.MPSON. WILLIAM 
THORNTON. LAWRENCE 
THORPE. LLOYD 
TOUS. ALFONSO 
VERDUCCI. JOSEPH 
WILSON. JOSEPH 
VANN. MELVIN 
WARD. BERNARD 
WELLMAN. RICHARD 
YAWMAN. RAYMOND 
ZANOTTI. EMILIO 
ZLATUNICH. STEVEN 



16 1 11 h \1 1 S S 1 O N 

- < - < ■ < <<<<<<<<<<< < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ << ■ < ■ < << < ■ < <<<<<<<<<< << ■ < -■ < - <<< <<<<<<< 



Senior Class 



GIRLS 



ANDliKSON. DONNA 
BAINES. FLORONCE 
DAI.LEN. DOROTHY 
DARLOW. MARY 
DERGER, EUNICE 
BERGES. MARY 
DERALDO. JOSEPHINE 
DIRNBAUM. RUTH 
BUERG. RUTH 
BURKE. ALICE 
BURKE. SYLVIA 
BUTTERWOOD. ALICE 
CADDY. DOROTHY 
CALDEN. ALICE 
CALLEN. EMMA 
CARROLL. JU ANITA 
CONNORS. ELOISE 
CORDELL. DOROTHY 
COWAN. AILEEN 
CUCCHI. FLORENCE 
CUNIFFE. AGNES 
CUSLIDGE. LORETTA 
DAY. DOROTHY 
DEAN. MARJORIE 
DEANER. GERTRUDE 
DIELING. ANN 
DRAGO. EMMA 
EWERS. VELMA 
FERROGGIARO. ERMINIA 
FALKNER. TIIELMA 
GILFETHER. CECILE 
GISEN. MARTHA 
GLEASON. GERTRUDE 
GOLDSTEIN. LENA 
GREALISH. HONORA 
GREGSON. DORIS 
GRIFFIN. MARJORIE 
GRIFFIN. MARY 
HAMILTON. ALICE 



IIASSELBROCK. GERTRUDE 
HAYES. .MILDRED 
HOFF. ELSIE 
HOLLE. VIOLA 
INBERG. LILLIAN 
JACKSON. LOIS 
JACOBS. SARAH 
JENSEN. DOROTHY 
JOHNSON. EDITH 
KAVANAUGH. AGNES 
KELLY. ANN 
KIl.ASPA. SELMA 
KLINGER. VERYL 
KRAMP. ELEANOR 
LANGLEY. HELEN 
LAVEAU. INEZ 
LEBEDEFF. BARBARA 
LEVIN. GERTRUDE 
LINCOLN. JESSIE 
LIPSCOMB. LAURAINE 
LOORYA, ANNA 
LUDWIG. ELSIE 
LUMSDEN. VIRGINIA 
LYNCH. .MARIE 
MAHLER. MARIAN 
MALONE. RUTH 
MARIANI, ALVERIA 
.MARTIN. ELEANOR 
MARTY. GEORGETTE 
MCINTYRE. RAMONA 
MERRITT. THELMA 
MICLO. LOUISE 
MIHALCIK. HELEN 
MITCHELL. FRANCES 
MORRISSEY. BLANCHE 
MORRISON. ANNIE 
MULLEN. LUCILC 
.VIUNROE. MARJORIE 
MURRAY. HERA 



NICHOLAS. IDA 
NIELDS. LILLIAN 
PETERSEN. ALICE 
PETERSON. ANN 
PETERSON. OLGA 
PHILLIPS. MARIAN 
PINKERTON. EMMA 
POLLAK. ARMINDA 
PRUDDEN. HELEN 
QUAST. JEANNETTE 
RATTO. MELBA 
READ. EVELYN 
REEDER. ROSALIE 
REINGOLD. STELLA 
ROBERT. LUCIENNE 
RUBENSTEIN. FREDA 
SAGER. EVELYN 
SENNER. BERNICE 
SCHU.MACHER. CHARLOTTE 
SAXON. CHRISTINE 
SCHAEFER. .MARIE 
SERTORELLI. IDA 
SHEDWELL. VIRGINIA 
SMITH. ROSE 
STEELE. HAZEL 
STEVENTON. ETHYL 
STEWART. ANNE 
TRAPP. MARIAN 
TURNER. MARJORIE 
VALLERGA. LOUISE 
VOLPATTI. AL.MA 
WAGNER \\\R\ ALICE 
WALSH. ALICE 
WAR NOCK. IRENE 
WRENN. FLORENCE 
WINN. GERTRUDE 
WOLFISBERG. ROSELYN 
WREDEN. ELEANOR 
ZEISS. FRANCES 



THEMISSION 17 

■>■> »»>>>> ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



Class Officers 




potti:r. jack 


I URNCR. MARJORU; 


You can always lell a senior by the 


"Our noblest and best. — diligent and 


noise he makes." 


capable u;ith a good disposition blest 


QUAST. JKANNETTE 


RAE. ERNEST 


A merru heart goes all the day." 


"Come all and pay your dues." 



18 T H E M 1 S S I O N 

<<<<<< < - < - < - < ■ < ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 




I4A1NES. FLORENCE 

"There is no Wisdom like frankness. " 

REEDER. ROSALIE 

"Fair was she lo behold — 
This maiden of seventeen summers. 



li01,LE, VIOLA 

"Oh. this learning, what a ihing it is." 

HOPE. ELSIE 

Winsomeness none could forget." 



BIRNBAUM. RUTH 

"Everything she does she does well." 

BARLOW MARY 

"Just as sweet as any girl could be." 



WOLI ISBERG. ROSELYN 

"With honest smile she wins as friend 
All who near her come." 

CADDY. DOROTHY 

"She speaks naught but the truth. 



JENSEN. DOROTHY 

"To have happiness we must share it." 

.VlcINTYRE. RAMONA 

"Thy nature is full ot human kindness. 



S ILWART. ANNE 

"Mighty sweet and mighty wise. 
The fun lust twinkles in her eyes." 

Kll.ASPA. SEL.MA 

"Ready for service, loyal to friends." 



THE MISSION 19 

>■ > ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



ROBERTS, TOM 

"Good hetillh and good senae are two of 
lite' a blessings. " 

SIMON. MARVIN 

"A good friend and loyal icith a 
knowledge of what is excellenl." 



DELEE. ALFRED 

"We hate to lose you. we're so used to 
you now." 

ENMARK. ALBERT 

"Ambition has no risk." 



CLARK. JAMES 

"Leave no stone unturned." 

GARIBALDL LRANK 

"Act well thy part : there all thy honor 
lies." 



TANZER. ROBERT 

"Farewell! a word that must be. and 
hath been — 
A sound which makes us linger: — yet 
— yet — farewelll 

KENNEDY. MARTIN 

"With malice towards none, with 
chanty for all." 



FITZPATRICK. JOSEPH 

"Plough deep while sluggards sleep." 

PEPPL FRANK 

"Swift and straight as an arrow, when 
there is a race to be won." 



CURR, JOHN 

"The more understanding the fewer 
works. 

ASHTON. S lANLEY 

"For he's a jolly good fellow." 




20 THE MISSION 




STFiVRNTON. iriHYl. 

"Graceful and uncrul in all she Joes, 
Blessing and bU-sl where'er she goes.' 

MAlll IR MARIAN 

" Graduation is a rosu dream." 



RATIO MlilBA 

"Mild and aenllv and quiel ol mien." 

HAY1;S. Mil DRHD 

"Smiling ever, u'eeping never. " 



MIRRI IT. THEI.MA 

"Gentle in manner, firm in realilu-" 

COWAN. AILEEN 

"Always cheerful and gay. she goes on 
her way." 



ANDERSON. DONNA 

,4 sweet and gentle lassie." 

I L'MSDEN. VIRGINIA 

"A sweet, attractive kind of grace.' 



C.II.F ETHER. CECILE 

"The very flower of youth." 

UKU 1 IX, M.\RY 

'7/ IS the mind that makes the hinly rich. 



Ml I CM! I 1 . i RANCi;S 

What a sweet delight 
A quiet life affords." 

ROBERT. I.UCIENNE 

'A tender heart, a will infle.\.ible.' 



THE MISSION 21 

» ■>■>■ »> >>>>>> >>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ »>>>> ■ > ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



l.AMliliR r. f'RANCIS 

All that IS great and gnoj is done by 
patient truing." 

Mll.i;S. DONALD 

"Then iL'ho laugh — a'in. " 



HARDEMAN, KERMIT 

"He hax a ilaunlless spirit." 

KHl.l.Y. Mil. TON 

" I'lain without pomp, great without a 
show." 



ABERNETHY. ROBERT 

"Condemn the fault and not the actor 
of It." 

KORN. HARRY 

"Our thoughts and <u/r conduits are our 
own." 



LeVOIE. Wll 1 lAM 

"The hand that /d/Zhii's intellect can 
achieve." 

JACOBSEN. HARRY 

"/ am always happy, so worry not." 

MURPHY. WILLIAM 

"Act well thy part: there all thy honor 
lies. 

YAWMAN. RAYMOND 

"With an honest, manly heart 
iVo man was worth regarding. 



CALSON. ROBERT 

"A proper man as one shall see." 

CORNELL. CI INTON 

"T(» learn is to know." 




11 I H I: M 1 S S 1 O N 

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TRAPP. MARIAN 

"The milJesi munrurs uilh the hrafeil 
mind." 



CiRnCSON. DORIS 

Alu'aya ivilling. ever hind. 



CARROLL. JUANITA 

Merit will always he rewarded. 

Kl INCiLLR. VLRYI. 

Always cheerful and gay. 
She goes on her way." 



BURKE, SYLVIA 

"Tis grievous parting with good 
iompany." 

CONNORS. LLOISL 

"Just as sweet as any girl could be.' 



DAY. DOROTHY 

"The language of truth is simple." 

MARTIN. ELEANOR 

"A true lass of spirit always the same." 



CALDEN. ALICE 

"Smiling ever, weeping never." 

POI I AK ARMINDA 

"And now my task is smoothly done.' 



LLBEDErr. BARBARA 

Making the best of lite, that's all." 

PETERSON. OI.GA 

"Her air. her manners, all who saw 
admired." 



THEMISSION 23 

>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ > ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> > ->»■ > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ > ■ 



OFARRELL. EDWARD 

"Patience is the hesl remedy. " 

THORPE. LLOYD 

The only competition iL'orthy a wise 
man is himself." 



ENNIS. WILLIAM 

"With a heart as good as gold." 

CARLSON. ELMER 

■■/( IS the mind that makes 
the body rich. ' 



SHL'l LIN. LRANCIS 

"Nothing great was ever achieved 
without enthusiasm." 

HOLTZ. ELWOOD 

'Of good and virtuous nature." 



JODOCY. CLEMENT 

■■\Visi' fo rt'.5o/L'e. patience to perform." 

HAUCK. WALTER 

"A little nonsense now and then. 
Is cherished by the wisest men." 



STOLTZ. HOWARD 

"My tonaue within mi/ lips I rem. 
For who talks much must talk in vain." 

RISSO. ROLAND 

"To make the world a friendly place, one 
must show It a friendly face." 



KEEN. SAMUEL 

"Much study is a weariness to the flesh. 

BRUNING. WII.ERED 

"Friendship tried is ever true.' 




24 T H E M 1 S S I O N 

<<<<<<<<<< ■ < ■ < ■ < - < - <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ << ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 



SI K lORI III, IDA 

' ' / here is no thirty so queertly as 
kindness. " 

lUilNGOI.D. STEil.l.A 

"Nane kneu' her hut tit lin'e her." 



SMITH. ROSE 

"And mistress of herself, thouyh China 
fall." 

I ALKNIiR. THM MA 

"Speech was given to a Woman to 
disguise her thoughts." 



MORRISON. ANNIE 

Happu. happy the whole day thru. 
Radiant and bright her friendship true." 

.sc;hl:macher. charlotte 

"Always quiet and reserved." 

PRUDDEN. HELEN 

"She IS often seen but not heard, though 
little she says, she means ecery word." 

wARNOCK. iri;ni: 

"Her eyes were deeper than the depth of 
water stilled at evening." 



I OORYA. ANNA 

"She thinks lor hersell." 

\AI 1 HRGA. LOUISE 

I or a modest, graceful mien, 
f he like I have never seen." 



NICHOLS. IDA 

"She II shine in any classroom." 

MORRISSEY. BLANCHE 

"She was ever in a thoughtful mood. 




THE MISSION 25 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



SCHICK. LOUIS 

"For I'm as merry us the day n Umq." 

SMITH, PHILLIP 

"His tongue could make the Wursl appear 
better reason. " 



PRITCHARD. SI LWART 

"Shall I, u.'asting in despair, — Die. 
because a a'oman's fair." 

HOOD. GILBERT 

"A trusty triend is rare to Hnd." 



LOVETTE. FRANKLIN 

"Common sense is not a common thing. 

SPRINGER. RALPH 

He is at no end of his action blest. 
Whose ends icill make his greatest and 
not best." 



CARLSON. AR THUR 

"Ecer in cheerful mood art thou." 



DONALD. LLMI R 

"Great deeds will not die." 

STOFFEL. LEO 

"A day for toil, an hour for sport. 
But for a friend is life too short.'" 



KING. WILLIAM 

"U'f can't judge a man by the noise lie 
makes. 

JOHNSON. ELMER 

"Be true to your u.ork. and your word, 
and your friends." 




26 1 li 1: \1 I S S 1 O N 

< ■ < ■ <<<<<< ■ <<<<< ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 




i)i;an. marjoru; 

"/ haw lu leace. hul I mual qo." 

KRAMP. K LEA NOR 

"/ hate the prostitution of a nairn' ol 
friendship to signify modish and 
u.'orlJ(ii alliances." 



I 1 \'IN, (.1 R IRUDE 

"Just because you're you." 

IMiRGES. MARY 

"Assenousa little luJu as oneiould find. 



SHEDWELL, VIRGINIA 

"/ am not of that feather to shake off 
My friends when they most need me." 

CL'CCllI I I ORENCE 

"In her lonque is the law ol kindness. " 



JACKSON, LOIS 

"A quiet little girl with a iiuiet little 
way. " 

GLLASON. GERTRUDE 

■■ "Tis only noble to be good." 



WALSH, ALICE 

"A maid with sweet thoughts laden, 
a friendship Well Worth while " 

CM LLN. EMMA 
"Ever alert." 



LINCOLN. JESSIE 

"Wi.sdom IS better than ruhie\ 

WREDEN. ELEANOR 

"Not dreaming, but thinking of great 
things to come." 



THE MISSION 27 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ > ■ > ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



COBURN. DHLANO 

"He never n'ornes — it'hy should he'' 

PERSSON. EARL 

"Large was his bounty and his soul 



ROSSI. JOHN 

"Pulience is the best remedy." 

ROESCHIESE, RAY 

"Strong and mighty, lailhlul and 



DRAKE. WILLIAM 

"Be of good cheer." 

WOODS. PRANK 

"He. tor genius, uut and lore. 
Among the first is numbered. 



SUVANTO. EDDIE 

"All faults may be forgiien him icho has 
perfect candor." 

VERDUCCI. .lOSIPlI 

"A sport that winkled care derides 
And makes old Laughter hold his sides. 



BOUSQUET. ALFRED 

"A true and steadfast friend." 

MULCAHY. RICHARD 

"Whatever he did was always the same, 
he kept the rule and played the game." 



CONNELL. GEORGE 

"We .vuiy.'i little but thinks much." 

PARKER. CHESTER 

"High erected thoughts seated in a heart 
ot courtesy." 




28 111 1. \1 1 S S 1 O N 




MIIIAI.CIK. Hi;i.LN 

"AliCiiys tjiitt'i and reserved," 

PiriiRSON. ANN 

"I-or a friend — she is lUithout a peer. 



KAVANAUGH. AGNUS 

"She sings merrily as she goes on her 
u.'ay." 

RIAD, EVELYN 

"A smile a'tll go a long, long a'uy." 



JACOBS. SARAH 

"Each day n a smiling face.' 

BhRGER. EUNlCi; 

"Cheery and happii. hliibc and gay. 



CRII I IN. MARJORll: 

"She is a friend as good and true as 
steel." 

RUBENSTEIN. EREDA 

"Her voice a'u.s I'tvr low. soft and gentle, 
an excellent thing m woman." 

vol PATTE AEMA 

There is a soft and pensive grace. 
A cast of thought upon her face." 

WRENN. [FLORENCE 

"So pleasant and sweet. 
So fully complete 
She steals our alfections away." 



.Ml RRAV. HERA 

"Generous and free she always will he." 

DRACO. EM.MA 

"She speaks and behaves just as she 
lyught to." 



THE MISSION 29 




LEGAKES. JOHN 

"Right popular ifax he a'i(h all who 
hncLL' htm." 

OEANER. GERTRUDE 

"Ever ready to help her friends." 



ZANOTTI. EMIIIO 

"He has a huoyani disposition, always 
enjoying the present moment. ' 

SCHENCK. HORACE 

"The noblest mind the best contentment 
has." 

I YNCH. MARIE 

"Good-natured, faithful and sincere." 

ZEISS. FRANCES 

"Just as sweet and nice as the candy her 
father sells." 



BURTON. ROBERT 

"Music IS the finest of arts." 

MONROE. MARJORIE 

"She has a way of pleasing." 



WARD. BERNARD 

"A man of power, of valour, and of 
strength, he never fails in time of need. 

SN.MDER. DAVE 

/ am here to command." 



IVICEVICH. NICHOLAS 

"One who was born to command." 

MAYER. JAYNES 

"Music hath charms." 



)0 1 li L \1 1 b b I O N 




IMNKI K ION. EMMA 

"Well done is heller ihan well said.' 

GREALISH. HANORA 

"/ will. — / will, su there." 



MARIANI. ALVHRIA 

"She (s as Iruc a friend as one could 
wish for." 

PHILLIPS, MARIAN 

"Happy am I. from care I'm free. 
Why aren't they contented all like me.' 



CORDLI L, DOROTHY 

■ / am climbing the dilficult road" 

DILl.ING. ANN 

"With smiles for the joyful, wilh 
sympathy for the sad." 



I UDWIG. ELSIE 

" ller ways are of pleasantness, and her 
paths of peace. " 

NIII DS. LILLIAN 

"Oh. call it by some belter name, for 
friendship sounds too cold" 

BUTTERWOOD. ALICE 

"She works on. quietly but Well" 

BURKE. ALICE 

""With mirth and laughter I am on 
my way." 



LIPSCOMB. LAURAINE 

"E-^ercise is to the body what reading is 
to the mind." 

SAGER. EVELYN 

"^Speech i's.cireal. b"ul silence greater." 



THEMISSION 31 

>> >>>> >>>>>>> ■ > ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ 



HENRY. CHARLES 

"Laugh and the a'orW laughs with you. 

PETERS. HENRY 

"It is good to be honest and true." 



KAUER. MAURICE 

"But genius must be born, and necvr 
can be bought." 

MUELLER. JOHN 

"All the ivorld loves a fat man." 



LEE. DONALD 

"He was a vcrraii. parCit. gentil knight.' 

ZANOTTL HMILIO 

"He has a buoyant disposition, 
always enjoying the present moment. 



GROEZINGER. THEODORE 

"/ came. I saw. I conquered." 

ELEGAL. ERANK 

"There is only one proof of ability — 
action." 



MOORE. THEODORE 

"A hearty boy is liked by all." 

SAXON. OTTO 

"A true character is the only adornment a 
man can wear." 



LAIRGRIEVE. DONALD 

"Always cheery and happy." 

HOOVER. LEONARD 

"With skill in the making of phrases." 




M T H E M 1 S S 1 O N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ < ■ << ■ << ■ < ■ <<<<<<<< ■ «.<<<<<<< ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < - < - <<<<<<<<<<<< 




MICI.O. LOUISL 

"Most winning in her personatitxj. 

C.OIUS IlilN. LENA 

"Smiling her way through hie." 



MARTY. GEORGETTE 

"To be generous in all things, my 
motto " 

HASSHLBROCK, GERTRUDE 

Her smiling eyes with simple truth 
were stored." 



MULLEN. LUCILLE 

"Her eye was bright her manner cordial. 

I LRROGIARO. ERMINIA 

■VVlsc' fo resolce. patience to perform. 



STEELE. HAZEL 

"A laugh is worth a thousand groan\ in 
any market." 

BUERG, RUTH 

"She is as gentle as she is good." 



BALLEN. DOROTHY 

"A noble type of good, heroic 
womanhood." 

LWLRS. VELMA 

"Hers — a way to please where others 
failed." 



WINN. GERTRUDE 

"Her graceful ease and sweetness of pride 
Might hide her faults, tf she has faults 
to hide." 

INBERG. LILLIAN 

A sweet, attractive kind of grace." 



THE MISSION 33 

»>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>»>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ » 



VANN. MELVIN 

"With a smite and glad li'ord for 
everyone." 

ROSS. MALCOLM 

"He was a soldier Ht to stand by Caesar 
and give commands." 



GAFENF.Y. FRANK 

"For they conquer ivho believe that they 
can." 

BUSCHMAN. WILLIAM 

"Lite is an infinite opportunity." 



TOUS. ALFONSO 

"Be calm in arguing : for fierceness makes 
Error a fault, and trutfi discourtesy." 



artf:slros. lawrence 

"And ne'er a sentry as good as he." 

MARTIN. ROBERT 

"The secret of success is constancy to 
purpose." 



SIMPSON. EMMETT 

"Who faces the issues, andnever shirks. 
Who waits and watches and^hvays 
works." 

ANDERSON. ROBERT 

"A big man should claim big things." 



LaTORRES. LESLIE 

"His tongue could make the worst appear 
belter reason." 

THORNTON. LAWRENCE 

"Wise men say nothing in dangerous 
limes." 




34 I 11 1 \1 1 S S I O N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<< ■ << ■ < - < - < - < ■ < ■ < <<<<<<<<<<< 



I'l 1 I.KSON. ALICE 

"She has a voice of gladness and a smile.' 




WACmiR. MARY Al ICi: 

' linghl eiied maiden u/it'ai/s gay. 
Loving kindness is her way." 



BHROLDO. JOSEPHINE 

"The mildest manners and gentlest 
heart."' 

SliNNER liliRNICE 

"A song on her lips, a smile in her eyes.' 



IIAMII TON. ALICE 

/ want to succeed. " 

LANGI.EY. HELEN 

"/ am a part of all I have met." 



CUSLIDGE. LORETTA 

"She is never angry — if docs not pay.' 

KLLLY. ANN 

"She works on. quietly but well. " 



CUNIFFE. AGNES 

"Jesters do often prove prophets." 

C.ILSI;N. MARTHA 

"Contentment in happiness." 



SCHAEEER. MARIE 

"//it words are bonds, her oaths oracles: 
Her love sincere, her thoughts 
immaculate. " 

I AVEAU. INEZ 

"Of a aood and kindly disposition." 



THEMISSION 55 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ > • > - 



ZLA rUNlCK. STEVEN 

"Serious and n'ell behaved. 
Never any trouble gave." 

FRY, RAYMOND 

"Greal ihoughl comes from the heart. 



ROSENBl.UiVI. HARRY 

"/ am climbing the difUcuU road." 

ESOLA. DANIEL 

"A quiet, unassuming lad of sterling 
worth." 

CAMERON. DUDLEY 

"And still the wonder grew that one 
head could hold all he knew." 

WLLLMAN. RICHARD 

"We looks the world in the face 
/'or he owes not ami man." 



PHILPOT. JAMES 

"How slight chance may raise or sink a 
soul." 

THOMAS. NOVA 

"As nice a boy as one could find." 

STOKER. CHARLES 

"And I oft have heard defended. 
Little said is soonest mended." 
man can wear." 

GARRICK. ERANK 

"In the line, ready to go." 



ARNAUDO. MICHAEL 

"By diligence the way is won. 

Mclaughlin earl 

"Each day a smiling face." 




^6 1 II T: M 1 S S 1 O N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < ■ << ■ < ■ < ■ «««< <<<<<<< < <■ < - < ■ < -<-<-<■ << <<<<<<<<< 



HEBRANK. WILLIAM 

"Cice me my wau\ anj umi can hinc 
yours." 

SAXON, CHRISTINE 

"The grass stoops not. she treads on it . 
lightly." 



.lAUCH. JOSEPH 

"GooiI-natitrfJ . tuithful and sincere.' 

HUNTER. WILLIAM 

"Perseverance can move mountains." 



EISEN. DAVID 

"And noiv my task is smoothly done. 

MALONE. RUTH 

"A lithe and gladsome miss." 



SHICK. LOUIS 

"For I'm us merry as the day is long." 

DAI MAS. PAUL 

'Tis lolly to he wise." 



CARLSON. ELMI:R 

"It is themind that makes the body rich. 



WILSON. JOSEPH 

"A poel could not but be gay. 
In such a jocund company." 

JOHNSON. EDITH 

"A friend as it were, a second sell. 




THEMISSION 37 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



Class Prophecy 

"All Glory of the World," said Fate. 
Is Yours, June Class of '18!" 

In this year of '5^. 

We gaze into the past, and see 

A graduate class that rose to fame, 

It's list holds many a world known name. 

And then because ot brain and might 
That class gained greatness overnight. 
For Fortune smiled. Look! Now we see 
That Fate proves true to her Prophecy. 



As President of our fair land. 
Alfonso Tous has made his stand. 

Brilliant Lloyd Thorpe writes free verse. 
While Ted Moore takes care of the purse. 

Juanita Carroll and her family of three 
Are residing together contentedly. 

To Llmer Donald, world's champion, bring 
Laurels, for her is a golfing king. 

Give credit to our Billy Drake. 
He has learned how to Undertake 

Marjorie Dean is an organist rare. 
Her music is enjoyed everywhere. 

Reading books and improving her knowledge. 
Is Elsie Ludwig. a teacher in college. 

In San Francisco Dorothy Cordell 
Is society's most prominent bell. 

Stella Reingold. a writer of songs. 

Has gained the fame which to her belongs. 

Mid Egypt's pyramids, with the sheiks 
Gilbert Mood is hunting Freaks. 

Among the greatest is Albert Enmark 
For he is well-known as a Latin shark. 

Joseph Fitzpatrick as police chief 

"Is very successful. " the general belief. 

Frank Flcgal is a basket ball star. 

His shooting is always way above par. 

Fulfilling all our expectations 

Is Raymond Fry. the hope of the nations. 



Elsie HofT. a queen in her game. 

She sang and danced her way to fame. 

John Mueller is sailing to China 
As cook upon an ocean liner. 

Our Thclma Merritt so jolly and gay. 
Is an ofTicer's wife on the "Mandalay " 

Of booklore and knowledge none can be beat. 
Chester Parker, the author of How to Cook 
Meat. " 

Writing stories for girls and boys 
Is the work Alice Walsh enjoys. 

To see Francis Shufflin's "Follies. " they say. 
r-ifty dollars a seat is the least you can pay. 

Emilo Zanotti deserves a holiday. 

As a successful businessman he's had his way. 

Evelyn Sager as a young wife 
Leads a happy married life. 

\'irginia Shedwell a teacher to boys. 
Helps them with their manners and poise. 

Rose Smith has just been seen 

With the honor of "Miss America's Queen. 

Charles Stoker is known near and far 
For his accurate account of a certain star 

A chicken ranch owner is Howard Stoltz 
He takes care of the chicken when it molts. 

Louise Vallergo is very wise 

She always succeeds for she alwavs tries. 

Gertrude Winn is in society. 
Charm, to her success, is the key. 



38 T H H MISSION 



Joe Vcrdiiici ilu' husincss m.in. 

Is known lor suimns .mil helps whore he cm 



Doroihv Ii.illen runs .1 finishinR school 
Where eti(|ueile and formality is the rule. 



Lucicnnc Robert with all her grace 
Is a toe dancer at "Martin's" Place. 



A lecturer of intellectual mien, 

Dave niscn's the wisest you've ever seen. 



Irene Warnock's classical dancing, 

H.is proved lo he exceedingly entrancing. 



An importer of note is Erminia Fcrroquiro 
The ships bring in her valuable cargo. 



W'lUi.im Ihompson h.is cured many ills 
Will) his good quality ol sugar-coated pills 



As a mechanical genius Samuel Keen 
,\t an lingineer's school he is the Dean, 



Marian Trapp's orange marmalades 

Arc delicious, nutritious, and very well made 



I or Dorothy Jensen success is near. 
As she completes her business career. 



Baking all kinds of pastries and cakes 
Richard W'ellman. a wonderful salary makes. 



Lillian Inberg, sweet June bride. 
Whose the lucky man by her side.' 



Her life is lull of joy and song. 

As Roselyn W'olfisberg teaches all day long. 



lilwood Holtz is a traffic cop 
Telling folks when to start and stop. 



Robert Martin, now quite the rage. 
Has just completed the song. "The Sage." 

lor service and courtesy at the Dream 

Store. " 
Marie Schacfer. can offer no more. 

His newest brand of blowing gum. 
Nets Earl Persson quite a sum. 

Thelma lalknar travels round the world 
And visits wherever our flag is unfurled. 

As tennis champion. Charles Brown 
In Europe, he has gained renown. 

Ruth Birnbaum. a scholar is she 
In a European University. 

Alfred Bousquet. a musician great 
Is recognized in every stale. 

Donna Anderson has become known 
As an interior decorator of the home. 

Erancis Dolly" Carrick has become rich 
Inventing soft mattresses, he made his niche. 

Alice Bulterwood's English is superb. 
She teaches students the use of the verb. 

Bob Burton, on the saxophone 

Eor the King of England plays at home. 



A hostess fair is Georgette Marty. 
She shines supreme at a social party. 

An astronomer great is Leslie La Torres. 
I rom midnight till dawn he studies the 
stars. 

Who holds the world's record for tvping 

speed ' 
Whv 1 ranees .Miichcll is in the lead. 

James Philpot. his words flow full and free. 
As a lawyer, charges an exhorbitant fee. 

As Congresswoman. Ramona Mclntvre. 
Her eloquence sets the House on fire. 

Sousa's Band is no longer the greatest, 
lavnes Mavcr's new svmphonv is the latest. 

Ehree jobs and a half has James Clark. 
Taking complete care of Golden Gate Park. 

A lady of leisure is Cccile Gilfether. 
Her wealth and good-fortune go well 
together. 

A successful business for Gertrude Glcason, 
Her financial ability is the reason. 

Viola Holle is an engineer. 

The first ladv to enter that career. 



T H E M I S S I O N 39 



Martha Gisen as a Secretary 

To a successful business is necessary. 

Lena Goldstein, all profess 
Is an entertaining authoress. 

Civil-service statistics to compile. 
Alice Hamilton keeps the city's file. 

Doris Grcgson threw her hat in the ring. 
Now "Gregson for Governor " is what people 
sing. 

A famous doctor Martin Kennedy. 
For every pain he has a remedy. 

Robert Anderson, the Rifle Champ. 
Runs a Naval Training Camp. 

Robert Abcrnathv. exponent of in. 

Paints pictures that always touch your heart. 

The Palace Tea Rooms run by Sweet 

Ann Kelly. 
They're known for confections, tea and jelly. 

riorcnce Baines for the paper writes. 

Her "Heart Throb " column always delights. 

The famous aviatrix. Marjorie Munroc. 
Brings passengers to prize fights in Chicago. 

Jessie Lincoln has feathered her nest 
In a Valley way out West. 

Marion Mahler sails on an Ocean liner 
To buy precious jewels and silks in China. 

A cosmetician is Inez l.aveau. 

Her preparations are found wherever vou go. 

Diligent about her work 

Is our stenographer Sylvia Burke. 

Barbara I.ebcdefT in her home 

Has the finest antique collection in Rome. 

Cicrirvide l.cvin. a mansion designer. 
In that profession you'll find none finer. 

Llmer Johnson has gained renown 
As the best dressed man in town. 

George Connell made his fortune s link 
Inventing lavender fountain pen ink. 



As doctor. Clinton Cornell, decides 
What is wrong with your insidcs. 

Arthur Carlson has gained skill 
Promoting American National good will 

Inventor of a non-collapsible balloon 
Edward Courtney shall gain fame soon. 

William linnis fur trader at Nome. 
Has made that thriving city his home. 

Waller Hauk s paintings excell 

All ol the others displayed at Carmel. 

John Curr. rich as a reward for toil. 
Has invented a substitute for oil. 

Of fame. Paul Da'mas is on th. brink 
Tor he has found the missing link. 

Josephine Beroldi is a stenographer 
To an exceptionally famous photographer. 

As head of Publicity. Helen l.angly 

Is known for her charming personality. 

Alice Calden models frocks 
In the most exclusive shops. 

Mary Berges. authority on baseball. 
As newspaper writer exceeds them all 

Promoter of the I ashion Show 
Is enterprising Mary Barlow. 

1 ois .lackson is married. What's more 
Her husband is a countrv's Dictator. 

In Olvmpia Games, l.aurainc Lipscomb 
With athletic honors will soon be home. 

A charity worker is Marjorie Turner. 
Helping many a poor wage earner. 

Ruth Bucrg is an efhcicnt housewife. 
She's the joy of some man's life. 

Jack lixlev. bravest of the brave. 
Has perfected a Permanent Wave. 

Most skillful of all the lands. 
Joe Wilson as a plumber stands. 

In the .Mps and seeking W.ld game. 
Joseph lauch has made a name. 



40 T H E M I S S 1 O N 

« ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ < ■ << ■ <<<<<< ■ << < ■ < < < <<<<<<<<< 



\Vllli.ini Kelly is a ConKrcssman. 
Thi- boulder Dam boosting since his urni 
began. 

In Borneo now is our own Lee I.oyd 
Removing ihe heathens adenoid. 

In spite of airplanes. John Lcgakcs 
Makes a success of his chain of taxis. 

Arthur Red" Locke has now grown 
To be famous on the V'itaphonc. 

Franklin Lovette flies across the sea 
Carrying mail to Italv. 

Harry Jacobson. a taxidermist. 

Stuflfcd owls and monkeys arc on his list. 

President of the P.-T. A. 

In San Francisco is Anna Loorya. 

The joy and pride of some mans life. 
Is Eleanor Martin, fair housewife. 

Velma Ewers, teaches athletic. 
Chest expansion and calisthenics. 

Eloisc Connors as a society belle. 
Docs social service very well. 

Hark ' The Wedding Bells are pealing. 
For our classmate. Who.' Ann Dieling. 

Aileen Cowan keeps the earth 
Reverberating with her mirth. 

Emma Drags in a dcparlnicnt store 
Manages the silverware floor. 

Agnes Cuniflie is successful of late 
Buying and selling real estate. 

Michael Arnaudo is successful at Math 
Numerology and dates cover his path. 

Stanley Ashton now wc see 
A ranch owner in Guadaloupe. 

Clement Jodocy, a forest ranger. 
Watches out for fire danger. 

Maurice Kauer is an engineer 
Building bridges year by year. 



Charles Henry, dashing Romeo. 
Sculptures a second Venus de Milo. 

Frank Garibaldi now is in Spain 
1 ighiing pirates on the Main. 

A public lecturer. William Hebrank 
Teaches mothers not to spank 

Frank Gafl^ney now is in the air 
Sending radio messages everywhere. 

Gertrude Dcaner is known far and wide 
As the cleverest cook of the country side. 

Florence Cucchi's newspaper column 

Has never contained a word that is solemn. 

Traveling abroad is Dorothy Day 

In a business firm she's made her way. 

A ■ Runless Silk Hose " has brought fame 
And fortune to Loretta Cuslidge s name. 

Sarah Jacobs is famously 
Composing musical rhapsody. 

Mary Griflin is in royalty 

Wed to the Count of Willougbby. 

Dorothy Caddy true to her name 
Runs a Ladies Golf Club and teaches the 
game. 

A deep-sea diver is Delano Coburn. 
Of underwater monsters he must learn. 

Laurence Arteseros. a captain brave. 
Guides his ship across the wave. 

Wilfred Brunning conquers statics 
With his knowledge of Mathematics 

Flmer Carlson s factories hum. 
Manufacturing rubber chewing gum. 

Robert Calson in the East 
Has patented a bombing yeast. 

A College of Bacteriology stands 
In Dudley Cameron's Honor in Hawaiian 
Islands. 



THEMISSION 41 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ > ■>- »>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ >>>> ■ > ■ > ■ 



Emma Pinkcrton in her great act 
Is the reason the house is packed. 



Alveria Marani's famous "chapeau" 
Is worn by the best wherever you go. 



Raymond Rocschcisc. crew man is he. 
Now the Captain at U. C. 



Foremost of ail the statesman is he. 
The distinguished orator Alfred Delee. 



Freda Rubenstein. the painter, 'tis said 
Just finished the picture "Fair Co-ed." 



George Eisenhaut has made his way 

To the heights of fame by Bridging the Bay. 



Christine Saxon, the writer of prose. 
Looking for material, wherever she goes. 

Otto Saxon, known for his racing. 
Has just bought a horse that's great at 
pacing. 

Charlotte Schumacher is hunting gold 
In Africa's ancient caves of old. 

For the orchcstr.i Ic.idcr. oh! how ihcy 

cheer. 
For Bernicc Scnner now is here. 

Ida Serlorelli has tr.ivclcd far. 
In the invention of her new car. 

Marvin Simon receives his pleasures 

By going to Mexico and hunting treasures. 

Emmetl Simpson is our new mayor 
And as for politics, he sure is there. 

Eunice Bergcr models fine clothes. 
The latest in styles, she always knows. 

Ihe famous chain stores "White and Red" 
Are Marjoric GrifTin's now. 'tis said. 

Gertrude Hasselbrock has taught. 
Her services arc highly sought. 

Honora Grealish is noted for her book 
It's called. "The Modern Wav to Cook.' 

I amc has come to Mildred Hayes. 
Her career is writing plays. 

An authoress. Selma Kilaspa. 

She's hunting "atmosphere " in Alaska. 

A Beauty Shoppe has Alice Burke. 
She's famous for her skillful work. 



Cornwall Fvernian writ in History's pages. 
Is greatest diplomat of the ages. 

Donald I airgrieve is retired now 

Of a chain of banks he's at the prow. 

Theodore Groczinger has made his way 
As a Theatre owner on Broadway. 

Kermit Hardiman has gained fame 

As Bowling Champ he s made a name. 

Leonard Hoover has gained a prize 
Teaching the nation to "Hooverizc." 

William Hunter, a doctor of note 
Specializes in eye. ear. nose and throat. 

Bernard W'ard has reached his station 

He tells the world how to run each nation. 

Stewart Pritchard. the breaker of the arts. 
Is known as "The Wonder " at all stage arts. 

Mary Wagner, leader of her rank 

As she married the President of a bank. 

Laurence Thornton away out west. 
Known as an architect the best. 

Joseph Wilson is now doing dandy 
As a maker of first-class candy. 

Florence Wren, a nurse of great charm. 
Is now proprietress of a babv farm. 

Harry Rosenblum made his career 
Doing projects as a mine engineer. 

Dave Snaider and Malcom Ross's ambition 

fulfilled. 
Thev arc U. S. officers, clever and skilled. 



42 1 11 1. \1 1 S S 1 O N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < - < ■ < - < <<<<<< 



Robert T.in7cr. for ihi- I x.iniincr Society 

writes, 
And keeps the public posted on all the ^r.ind 

sights. 

Sightseeing through all the countries old. 
Evelyn Read is enjoying, so we arc told. 

Philip Smith the great oil king 
Joy and happiness to kiddies bring. 

Hthel Stevcnton a lady so fair 

Is known far and wide for her beautiful hair. 

Jcanctte Quast so jolly and gay. 

Is "Queen of the Movies." so they say. 

Wherever thief and robber roams. 
Frank Woods does his Sherlock Holmes. 

Harold Schenk no more docs toil. 

I-or fortune brought him wealth through oil. 

Known far and wide is Mclba Ratio. 
I-dr her delicious meals at 1 be Grotto." 

Ann Stewart is continuing with school. 
At present she s in college at Liverpool. 

Nova Thomas another classmate. 
Is Congressman of our state. 

Helen Pruddcn you may see 
Is President of a company. 

Thomas Roberts passed the best 
For chief executive in a test. 

Edith Johnson, now in Paris. 

To the latest fashions holds the key. 

A successful floor- walker is William la Voie, 
His disposition is the publics joy. 

Annie Morrison, opera soprano. 
Accompanies herself at the piano. 

Pictures that arc so cute and quaint. 
Alma Volpati now does paint. 

As a Senator from the West. 
Edward O'l'arrell is the best. 



Agnes Kavanaugh. the famed marccller 
You may be sure there's none to cxcell her 

Don Miles is now a soldier great. 
And is known, the finest in the state. 

Way out West in the canyons deep 
I. CO Stoefl^el is tending the sheep. 

As a lawyer in our own state 
Ralph Springer is doing first rate. 

Mel V'ann. known throughout town 
As a darling and witty circus clown. 

Raymond Yawman in the Court of the law. 
Is the fairest judge you ever saw. 

His soda drink of milk and honey 
Brings Harry Korn lots of money. 

Eleanor Klingler. a ukulele queen. 
Upon the Orpheum stage is seen. 

The three musketeers. Potter. Risso. and 

King. 
To thousands of orphans, joy and happiness 

bring. 

Rosalie Reedcr. the stenographer fair. 
Is now the wife of a millionaire. 

The second Paderewski has been found. 
In Louis Schick, of world renown. 

A farmerette is Hazel Steele. 

She'll cook you many a delicious meal 

A second John Barrymore is he. 
That famous actor. Donald Lee. 

Teaching tiny tots to spell. 
Eleanor Kramp is doing well. 

I-arl Mclaughlin's in Italy now. 

lies running the government, and How; 

In New York's most exclusive block. 
Ida Nicholas owns a Shoppc " 



THEMISSION 43 

>>>>>>>>>>> > >>>>>>>>> >>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



r.cidio Suvanlo, .\ clontisi well known. 
He drills, and he fills .ind Oh' how they 
moan. 



I.ucile Mullen has succeeded very far. 
Having graduated from Stanford, and 
admitted to the bar. 



A dentist's nurse. Ruth Malone. 

She tends the patients while they moan. 

William Bushman, journalistic light. 
Astounds us with his columns bright. 

When lirnic Rac the fullback goes by. 
All the ladies turn and sigh. 

Frances Zeiss, known for her grace. 
Is quite the rage at Livingstons place. 

For hats so chick, and very well made. 
By Olga Peterson, they never fade. 

John Rossi, the radio fan. 

We have yet to find another such man. 

V'cryl Klingler is known as the best 
Interior decorator in the west. 

France and Francis Lambert, they say. 
Have just completed a modern play. 

Virginia l.umsden is now the Prof. 
Of teaching Physics to the Soph. 

I.ouisc Miclo. the head of a firm 
Which is known in the east, as a large 
concern. 



The latest we heard from Charles McGuire. 
Was how he had succeeded as a chicken 

fryer. 

Flora Murray, we are glad to mention. 
Has just succeeded in another invention. 

Lillian Nields. the modern writer. 

No ones future could look any brighter. 

Alice Petersen is ready to do. 
Any dressmaking she can for you. 

Frank Peppi. a marvelous musician. 

Has recently acquired a very high position. 

Armanda Pollak very well known. 
Has just returned from the torrid 7one. 

Henry Peters a great magician. 

Was once known as a mathematician. 

Blanche Morrissey has reached her mark. 
As the manager's wife of Golden Gate Park. 

Ann Peterson is now in Spain. 
Warning the people when it will rain. 

Eleanor Wredcn sings with such soul. 
She's the highest soprano north of the Pole. 



Helen Mihalcik. now in France. 
And as a Countess, taking her chance 



Milton Kellv. a teacher of Gvm. 

Proud parents are always consulting him. 



Dick Mulcahy. big butter and egg man. 
Is well known as a "Follies " fan. 



As a financier. Nicholas Ivicevich 
Spends his spare time with the rich. 



JEANNETTE QUAST. 

Eleanor Wreden. 



••j^^-^^^f-^-^'-S"^^" 



44 T H E M 1 S S 1 O N 



CHARl IS Ul.NRY 



The Staff of the Mission 



Managing Editors 
DORIS GRLGSON 



JOSI;I'H MAHONHY 



FRANCE LAMBHRT 



Business Managers 
BERNARD WARD 



DON LEE 



ROSAIIl RLHDliR 



Subscription Managers 
JFiANETTK QUAS T 



HONORA GREAIISH 



ELSIE LUDWIG 
EMMA CALLEN 
JOSEPHINE NOON 
ALICE MCGRATH 
ELEANOR KRAMP 
LUCIENN ROBERT 
TRANCES MITCHELL 
AGNES CUNIFFE 
MARY GRIFFIN 
FRANCES ZEISS 
JESSIE LINCOLN 
GENEVA CALOF 
RALPH SPRINGER 
ELEANOR WREDEN 



Assistants 

ALICE BUTTERWOOD 

MARIA BAUMSTEIGER 

LEONORE McCRYSTLE 

MARY BIEDERMAN 

JEAN ARENTZ 
GERTRUDE WINN 

ELSIE HOFF 

LUCILE MULLEN 

ALICE HAMILTON 

BERNICE SENNER 

MELBA RATTO 

STEWART PRITCHARD 

LESLIE La T0RRI;S 

DAVID SNAIDLR 

STANLEY GUSTAFSON 



EDWARD OFARRELL 

GILBERT HOOD 

RICHARD OCONNOR 

EDDIE MAGGI 

MICHAEL ARNAUDO 

JOHN LEGAKES 

WALTER HAUCK 

THEO. GROEZINGER 

EMMET SIMPSON 

ROBERT TANZER 

FRANCES LAMBERT 

DUDLEY CAMERON 

CLEMENT JODOCY 

DOUGLASS HOLCOMB 



MISS S RABOURN 



Literary Critics 



MRS. I.. SWANSON 



MRS. M Y. HOBART 



Art Critics 
MISS E. C. ANTONOVICH 



MISS E. J MICHELS 



Treasurer and Censor 
MISS A. G. KELLY 



Assistant Treasurer 
.MR LEO J CAMPBELL 



THEMISSION 45 

>>> ■ >>>>>>>> >>>> >>>>>>>> > >>>>>»>>>>>» ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ > - > - > - >>>>>>> ■ > ■ > ■ > - > - > - > - > ■ > 




( liAlU i;S HENRY 
ROSALIE REEDER 
DONALD LEE 



JOl- .\L\llONEY 
DORIS GREGSON 
MANORAGREALISH 



FRANCE LAMBERT 
JEANETTE QUAST 
BERNARD WARD 



46 



1 H h MISSION 



<<<<<<< ^<<<<< < < . < . < . < . < . < . < .<. < . < . << . < - < . < . < - < - < .< - . ^ <^<<<<<<rf<^<<<<<^<rf^^< <. ^^rf 




DAVID SNAIDLR 
WIl.OA RATTO 
GtRTRUDi; WINN 
MARY GRII FIN 
II M III M'UINGER 



i l.ML l.LUWR. 
ELEANOR VVREDEN 
JOHN LEGAKES 
ALICE BUTTFRWOOD 
ALICE HAMILTON 



AGNES ILINIFFI; DOUGLAS llOLl OMU 

JOSEPHINE NOON ELEANOR KRAMP 

STANLEY GL^STAFSON BERNICE SENNI R 

IMMA CALLEN FRANl 1 S MIT( MM L 

\L\R1A UAUMSTEIGER EDWARD MAGl.l 



T H E M I S S I O N 47 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> - > ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ >>> 




LUCILE MULLEN 
STEWART PRHX HARD 
LEONORE MCi:RYSTLE 
MICHAEL AMANDO 
IDVVARDO FARRri L 



GENEVA CALOF 
THEODORE GROEZINGER 
JESSIE LINCOLN 
DUDLEY CAMERON 
MARY RlfcDENL\N 



JEAN ARENTZ 
EMMET SIMPSON 
LUCIENNE ROBERT 
ROBERT TANZER 
ELSIE HOFF 



ALICE MCGRATH 
RICHARD O CONNOR 
FRANCES ZEISS 
GILBERT HOOD 
WALTER HAUCK 



48 I H I: M 1 S S 1 O N 




T H li M I S S I O N 49 

> - >>>>> > >>>>>>>> ■ > ■ >>>> > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>» 



The Executive Committee of the 
Associated Students 



Spring Term, 1928 



MR WILLIAM I DRLAV. I'nnapal 
RICHARD MULCAHV President 

ELSIE HOEF Vice- President 

JOSEPH VERDUCCI Boys' FinancialSecrelary 

DOROTHY SKIiIILY Cirh' Pinanaal Secretary 

ROSALIE REEDER Recordmii Secretary 

RICHARD O'CONNOR lirsl Assistant Treasurer 

EARL Mclaughlin second Assistant Treasurer 

ROLAND RISSO Third Assistant Treasurer 

WILLIAM KING Boys' Alhleiu Manager 

ALICE HAMILTON Girls Athletic Manager 

ERANKCARRICK Custodian 

CHARLES MAURER Yell Leader 

DAVID SNAIDER R. O. T. C. Delegate 



Faculty Representatives 

MISS A G. KHLLY MR A W WILLAXD 

MISS L. P. DAVIDSON MR. H. A. I AGIN 



■^0 T H li M 1 S S I O N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 




3 

O 

U 



O 



THEMISSION 51 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> » ■ » ■ > ■ > 



The Girls' Council of the Mission High School 

A I rill opening of the term, meetings of the girls of ilie eight grades, a; 
H4. 1.4, H3. L3, H2. L2. Hi. 1,1. were called. Miss Kelly, the Vice- 
Principal and Dean of girls addressed each group of the girls, setting 



as 
'ice- 

forth the ideals and ambitions of the girls of the Mission High School and the 
functions and plans of the Girls' Council, the representative organization of the 
girls as a working unit of the school. 

Then the nominations were called trom the floor of the assembly and six dele- 
gates were elected to represent each of the eight groups of girls in the school. 
These delegates, forty-eight in number, with the Girl Student Body OfTicers 
compose the council of sixty members. The officers for this term are: 

President Elsie HofF 

Vice-President Dorothy Skclly 

Secretary Honora Grealish 

Treasurer I.ucile Mullen 

The following committees have been appointed to carry on the various lines 
of work planned out by the Council: 

The Social Service Committee, headed by Elsie HofF. This Committee assists 
in distributing neat clothing to needy members in the school. The names of the 
girls who need this assistance are kept in confidence by Miss Kelly and the work 
is absolutely confidential. 

The Good Cheer Committee, headed by Doris Chance, arranges that flowers 
or notes are sent to girls who are ill at home or in the hospital. 

The Poster Committee, under I.ucile Mullen, secures artistic posters to be 
placed about the school to encourage our pupils tci keep the school neat and 
orderly. 

The Thrift Committee, under Alice McGrath, is making plans for developing 
the habit of thrift among the students. 

The Social Committee, undei Flsie HolT. will make plans for entertainment 
at the close of the term. 

The Court and Grounds Committee, under L.auraine Lipscomb, is doing re- 
markable work in seeing that the Girls' Court is neat at all times. 

The Girls' Council is still in its infancv. but there are plans tor next year. 



52 I II I: M 1 S S I O N 




Upper — The Mission High Scholarship Federation 
Lower — The Commercial Honor Society 



T H E M I S S I O N 53 

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Upper — The Mathematics Honor Society 
Lower — The Latin Club 



54 THIiMISSION 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ <<<<<<<<<<*<<<< ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<*<<<<<<< 

MLMBER LIST 

MISSION CHAPTER No. 171 

CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP FEDERATION 



Spring Term 1928 



H-4 



El.SIfi LUDWIG 
MICHAIM. ARNAUDO 
hTHYL STEVENTON 
LUCILLE MULLEN 
ELSIE IIOFE 



DORoniV SKI I LIY 
KRAMIR ROHELEISCH 
JOSEPH MAIIONEY 



CAROLYN DOWNES 
ALMA HEPPEL 
ALICE VALLINO 
MARIE SC HLATRE 
WILLIAM DUNN 



ANITA PRUNTY 
RICHARD DASH 



DOLLY JOHNSON 
MARGARET HARBIN 
CATHERINE LEONl 
BERNICE DARRY 
MARIE IIANLY 



MARIE EICHNER 
BESSIE ABEND 
AMANDOCAMPI 



JIANLTTE QUAST 
RUTH BIRNBAUM 
JOi; VERDUCCl 
RUTH BUERG 
IDA NICHOLAS 



L-4 



NORA HUNTER 
DOROTHY BULLARD 
JACK DOWNER 
MYRON MOSKOWITZ 



H-3 



MARTIN SIVERTSEN 
BARBARA EITZHLL 
DURWARD NESBIT 
MARIANNE OCONNOR 
DOROTHY FARRAR 
II Sllli KNOTT 



L-3 



ALICE HEIM 
IRANCESKUNZ 
III! PNCASTAGNE 



H-2 



VK TOR REED 
GENEVA CALOF 
GRACE FISCHER 
MADELINE MCKENDRICK 
( ARMELITA LANE 
III I VI VAULA 



L-2 



MARY SHERMAN 
ANNA DUNN 
ETHEL NELSON 
RAYMOND JENSEN 



DUDLEY CAMERON 
VIOLA HOLLE 
MARJORIE TURNER 
ALICE BUTTERWOOD 



RICHARD OCONNOR 
LOIS OVERMAN 
ALBERT GOMMO 



I II EEN WOODS 
ANTOINETTE VALLINDRAS 
HELEN BOYLE 
MARGARET SULLIVAN 
DAVIDA WOERNER 



ALICE ORMOND 
GEORGE WELLMAN 



TENNESSEE KENT 
KATHERINEGRASSEL 
ELLEN (LASBY 
MARIl: SHI RRILL 
HERBERT SCHILLER 



EI.EANOK CADDY 
MAJORIE TRAEGER 
LUCILLE GARSON 



RUSSEI. MAYCOCK 
DORcn HEA MORRIS 
JUANITA MORIN 



H- 



ROSA GOEBN' "» 
ELSIE CHRISTIANSEN 
TERESA lACONA 



UDYTHE WALSH 
VIOLA IRELAND 
MOLLIE MINDLIN 



THE MISSION 55 

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■56 I H li M 1 S S I O N 

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TheR.O.T.C. 

Tm- Mission R. O. T. C. battalion has worked hard during the past 
term. It was the hope of the officers of the battalion that they might 
crown the nine years of hard labor of Captain Flood with an Honor 
School citation. In this hope we were disappointed. Despite the fact that Mission 
showed great improvement over the Honor School Inspection of 1927. we still 
failed to reach the high standard required for the Honor School citation. 

The battalion was handicapped at the Annual Inspection through the absence 
of two of the cadet captains, both of whom were out of school on account of 
sickness at this time. 



A cup has been donated to be awarded annually to the organization ot the 
Mission R. O. T. C. making the best showing in the Honor School Inspection. 
The cup was won this year by Company "A" under Captain Dave Snaider. The 
rules relation to future awards of the cup are such that if no organization 
reaches the standard set by the judges the cup will not be awarded that year. 



THEMISSION 57 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>»>>>>>>>>>>>>> 




Capi, Flood Scrnt. I>ougl.is 

Cjpt, Robt. Anderson C!jpt. Donald Let 

1st Lt, Theodore Groczinger lit Lt. Elmer Donald 

1st Lt Wm. Batterton 1st Lr Wm. Waniz 

2nd Lt Robert Stocker 2nd Lt. Floyd Davis 



Mjior M.ikoim A Ross 
C.ipt Robert Burton 
1st Lt, Chcitcr Parker 
2nd Lt David Rrid 
2nd Lt. StjnUy Gustafson 



:n.l (.1 Melvin Vjun 
2nd Lt Stewart Priichard 
I si Lt Bernard Ward 
1st Lt, Donald Milts 
("apt- David Snaidcr 



58 T H M I S S 1 O N 

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It is the confident hope and expectation of the entire R. O. T. C. organization 
that Mission will redeem itself in the Annual Competition at the Civic Audi- 
torium. Mission has never had the good fortune to be represented by a better 
drill platoon than the one in training for 1928. 

In the Individual Competition. Mission is very worthily represented. Probably 
the school has never sent down a stronger team of officers and of sergeants than 
the one representing us this year. 

Never before, in the history of the Mission Battalion, has the entire corps of 
officers been members of the graduating class. Some 19 officers will be members 
of this years class as a new standard of scholarship is being required in the 
R. O. T. C. for appointments as commissioned officers in the battalion. 

Malcolm Ross. Major. 



THEMISSION 59 

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T 



Mission High R.O.T.C. Band 

OR four consecutive years the Mission High Schoors R. O. T. C. Band 
has been successful in winning the Championship Cup at the annual 
ompetition held in the Auditorium. 



The officers are: 

Captain Robert Burton ( Drum Major) 
Lieutenant Jayncs Mayer (Cadet Band Leader) 
Second Lieutenant William Wantz 
Second Lieutenant Robert Stoker 
Second Lieutenant Melvin V'ann 



60 1 11 L M 1 S S 1 O N 

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The Rifle Team 



DL'l to J variety of causes the work of the Rifle Team during the past yeai 
has been exceedingly disappointing. After standing at the top for thret 
consecutive years this year Mission slumped to fourth place. There were 



year 
:ee 
i;re 
several reasons for this first, Captain Flood was away from the school for a large 
portion of the coaching time due to the fact that he was required to build up a 
rifle team at Galileo High School: secondly, the hold-overs from previous years 
in most cases failed to achieve their previous standards. Ihis resulted in the 
composition of a team consisting almost entirely of new men. This new material 
gave much more in the way of promise than was actually developed in perform- 
ance. The showing which they made, however, has given us very bright prospects 
for the year 1 929. 

As a set off against tiie slump which was taken by the rifle team. Mission offers 
an individual performance of unexcelled brilliance. In the National Rifle Associa- 
tion matches. Cadet Captain Robert Anderson made a record which it is believed 
will stand for an indefinite period. This cadet has developed under the coaching 
and tutelage of Captain Flood from a cadet of perhaps more than average promise 
into a shot holding several National Rifle Association medals and a world s record. 

The v\'ork of the rifle team in the near future can best be predicated upon that 
of the past. The Mission Rifle Team to date has won 75 per cent of the awarded 
trophies. Since charity begins at home, the battalion has decided it to be the duty 
of all future rifle teams to keep the percentage column .it 100 per cent to avoid 
disappointments. 

iVlALCOLNt Ross. Major. 



'1 HI; MISSION 



61 



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L ^., 



'^^S 





R. O. T. C. BATTALION 



62 



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1' H E MISSION 




Upper 

R. O. T. C. 

STAFF 

OFFICERS 




Louder 

ROBERT 
ANDERSON 

CHAMPION 
RIFLE SHOT 

OFU. S. 



THE MISSION 



63 



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T 



Drama Club Activities 

HIS Spring the drama club has been able to offer plays with costumes 
and stage settings and properties made in the school. The fine equipment 
of the auditorium has been fully utilized on the several occasions when 
the public has been entertained. 

Our first public performance was the three-act play, "To the Ladies." coached 
by Miss Donaldson. The interior set. designed by Miss Michel's stage-craft classes 
and made by Mr. Rust and his shop boys, was used for this play. The cast 
included: Charles Henry as Mr. Kincaid. President of the Kincaid Piano Com- 
pany: his wife. Mrs. Kincaid. a very domineering woman, interpreted by 
Eleanor Wrcden: Charles Golobic as Mr. Bebe. a struggling young newly-wed 
whose chief ambition is to obtain advancement of position: Mr. Henry striving 
for the same position as Mr. Bebe. played by Henry Barron: Mrs. Bebe. a 
fascinating and inspiring wife played successfully by Jeanette Quast : Ben 
Borden as Chester Mullen, the self-important pest: two burly truckmen inter- 
preted by Kenneth Lopez and Edgar Libby: the vampish secretary played by 
Rachel Wirtanen: ladies and gentlemen at the banquet in the persons of Sylvia 
Lerner and Gus Reichart. Marion Miller and George Hampshire. Doris Menne 
and Earl McLaughlin: with Remo \'alentino completing the cast, as a most 
elegant toastmaster. 



64 T H {•: M 1 S S I O N 

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A month later. I-cbruary 15, two one-act plays were given. The combined 
efforts of our two dramatic coaches. Mrs. de l.ucc ami Miss Donaldson produced 
"The Romancers" and "The Exchange. " The costumes, designed by Mis? 
Michel and her art students antl made by Miss Philips. Miss Walker and girls 
ol the sewing classt-s, were especially elaborate. The setting for "The Romancers" 
was picturesque, having an arch, fantastic trees and a wall over which the two 
romancers exchanged messages ol love. Designs were by Miss Michel's class and 
constructed by Mr. Rust's boys. The electric shop boys, under Mr. Swartz. dis- 
played much ingenuity m obtaining gathering dusk and moonlight effects as 
the play progressed. Kessler .\lacC~uIlough played Percinet. a young romancer in 
love with Barbara Fitzell as Sylvctte. a beautiful young dams^;!; Pascjuino! and 
Berganiin, two scheming old lathers, interpreted by Jack l.avin and Robert 
Tan/er: (Miarles Hewitt, the priilessional abductor. Stralorel. and his assistants 
Dorothy I-arrar. Mary Lawton and lidward McLaughlin. The other play. "The 
Exchange." had in its cast. Ben Borden, the very imposing judge of the Court of 
Human Misery; Emma Pinkerton. as the vain lady; Kenneth Lopez, as the poor 
man: Vernie Blair, interpreting the very wealthy but bored gentleman: and 
Byron Petersen as an amusingly quaint imp. completely captivated his audience 
with his antics. 

Three one-act skits, written and produced by Missionitcs under the super- 
vision of the drama teachers were given for the Sophomore reception on March 
23. One skit. "At the Station." written by Kessler MacCullough. was a comedy 
elopement. The cast included. Ethel Volpatti. the impatient runaway, and 
Edward McLaughlin the handsome Romeo, with Beth Murphy and Walter 
Anderson as a happy newly-wed couple. A second skit written by Vivian 
Crosby was a mystery story. Reva Addison, as a woman experienced in the 
arts of mummy embalming: Stella Rcingold and Ailecn Cowan as fascinating 
and beautiful sisters; and Elmer Garrigan. as a young swain who falls under 
the spell of Aileen's charm completed the cast. The third skit. "His Father's Son." 
written by Stella Reingold, told the story of father and son's relations in busi- 
ness. Eddie Burke played a golf-crazed youth; Joseph McBride interpreted a man 
burdened with work and trouble, and a second "Tiliie, the Toiler," appeared 
in the person of Vivian Crosby. A fourth skit written by Jeanette Quast had 
in its cast, the stern father played by Ben Borden, the sympathetic mother 
acted by Lorene Hittman: the vivacious daughter interpreted by Dorothy 
Sherwood: George Hamiishire as a handsome beau: and Mel Duffey as a most 
terrifying burglar. 

This year Mel Duffey and Cieneva Calof were chosen to represent Mission at 
the annual Shakespearean contest held in Berkeley. At the last minute, Elsie Hoff 
substituted for Geneva, who was ill. Stewart Pritchard. a Missionite. but repre- 
senting Commerce Evening High School, achieveii the honor of being chosen 
one of the three boys of Class A to read in the Greek 1 heatre in the second 
contest. On April 27. a Shakespearean contest between eight day and evening 



THEMISSION 65 

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high schools of San Francisco was held in Mission's Auditorium. Charles Golo- 
bic. our boy representative, won for Mission the first prize, a beautiful silver cup. 
Elsie Hoff, representing Mission, took one of the second prizes, a scholarship in 
a San Francisco dramatic school. 

As a contribution to our carnival given May 4. the Dramatic Club gave two 
different scenes from Shakespeare. The witches scene, taken from Macbeth, 
given in the afternoon, was the work of Mrs. dc Luce's classes. The setting was 
simple except for a cauldron; the stage was in darkness; thunder was furnished 
by Mr. Ingram's kettle drummers and lightnin gby Mr. Swartz's electric shop 
boys. The witches were Geneva Calof. Marjorie Dover. Catherine Grassle. Dolly 
Johnson. Sara Tharp. Monica Lawton, Ethel Volpatti, Reva Addison, Stella 
Reingold. Mary Lawton. Lurline Matson, Bessie Silver, and Hyacinth Giddings. 
Henry Barron appeared as Macbeth, in shining armor, helmet and sword. Miss 
Donaldson coached the scene for the evening performance. The scene was taken 
from "A Midsummer Night's Dream." The two comedy characters, Pyramus 
and Thisbe were played by Kessler MacCullough and Mel Duffey. Moonshine 
was interpreted by Edward Hock, with Fred Mack as the Lion: Charles Hewitt 
as the Prologue and Byron Peterson as the Wall completed the cast. 






My Nancy 

Nancy wears ribbons 
White silken ribbons 
Gay dainty ribbons 
On her wee shoes' toes 

Nancy wears ribbons 
Bright hair ribbons 
Sky blue ribbons 
Wherever she goes 

Nancy wears ribbons 

Blue and white ribbons 
Soft sweet ribbons 
On all her wee clothes. 



66 1 H E M I S S I O N 

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mm 







Debating 



Tm first important event of the spring term was the Public Speaking con- 
ust hold by the San Francisco High School Debating League on the night 
ot February "5. 1928. in the Girls' High School. Representatives Irom 
Lowell. Girls'. Polytechnic. Galileo, and Mission participated. Elsie Hoff. from 
Mission, won first speaker's place and was awarded S. F. D. L. gold medal. 

The first of the inter-scholastic debates took place February 24th. 1928. and 
was on the question: "Resolved: That the City and County of San Francisco 
should establish a Junior College. " Missions Affirmative. Henry Barron and 
Myron Moscowitz. defeated Galileo's Negative. Myron Moscowitz won first 
speaker's place. Mission's Negative. Leonard Hoover and Leslie Knott, lost to 
Lowell. 

The second debate was on the question; "Resolved: That the Intervention of 
the L'nited States in the Interna! Afl^airs of Nicaragua is Justified." Mission's 
AfTirmativc, Myron Moscowitz and Leonard Hoover, lost to Polytechnic on 
April 27. 1928. Mission's Negative. Leslie Knott and Henry Barron, defeated 
Galileo s Affirmative on April ^0. 19 28. Henry Barron won first speaker's place, 
and Leslie Knott tied (or second place. 

A great deal of inlerest'was centered in this last debate, for it determined the 
winning or losing of S.F.D.L. pin awards. Henry Barron came out victorious. 

Much interest is being displayed in the inter-class debates. The results to May 
1st are as follows: 



THE M I S S I O N 67 

»>>>> > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ >>>>>>>>> ■ > - » 

Much interest is being displayed in the inter-class debates. The results to May 
1st are as fallows: 

Albert Gommo and Kramer Rohflcisch. Low Seniors, defeated Jeannette 
Quast and Elsie Hoff. High Seniors. 

Richard O'Connor and Douglas Holcomb. Low Seniors, defeated Alfonso 
Tous and Dave Eisen, High Seniors. 

Alice Heim and Mildred Greenberg. Low Juniors, defeated Limb Lee and 
Louis Kruger. High Juniors. 

Joseph Couly and Frank Silverthorne. Low Juniors, defeated Don Crews and 
Clyde Pearson. High Juniors. 

Audrey Sterzreide and Betty F.mcrson. Lovs' Sophomores, defeated Jack Mc 
Auliffe and Henry Sanguinetti, High Sophomores. 

Bernice Darry and Thomas Foley. High Sophomores, defeated Anita Burton 
and John Walsh. Low Sophomores. 

Hiidrcd Richards and Stanley Kendell. High Freshmen, defeated Jessie Baker 
and Jene Ziemer. Low F-reshmen. 

Carl Zelkind and Dorothy Wick. High Freshmen, defeated Homer Jones and 
Kathleen Withey, Low Freshmen. 

On May 14. 1928. we start on our semi-final debates. The winning class will 
be awarded the John Hughes' silver cup given to Mission for the promotion of 
intcr-class debating. 

INTER-CLASS BEST SPEAKERS 

The best speakers in the inter-class debates were: Elsie Hoff. Albert Gomo. 
Alfonso Tous. Alice Heim. Limb Lee. Bernice Darry. Hildred Richards, and 
Carl Zelkind. 






War 

Ring out. O bugles! Ring out clear. 
So young and old the call may hear — 

To arms! To arms! 
Old Wotan gloats with wild delight. 
While mothers clasp their sons with fright. — 

To arms! To arms! 

L. S. 



68 T H L M I S S I O N 

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The Students Bank 

III "X L'RING this term Mission High School has made a reputation as the honor 
I J ^'8^ School for Thrift, winning the prize offered by the Anglo-Cali- 
III J fornia Trust Co.. for the largest number of depositors. Under a new sys- 
tem of saving, approximately four hundred Mission Students have deposited in 
the Students' Bank for the current term. A close race developed early in the term 
in the Thrift Competition. Polytechnic, our nearest rival, was out-distanced dur- 
ing the last three weeks of the race, and Mission has won the honor cup. 

Next term, we expect to make an even greater record. The plans for maintain- 
ing our excellent organization are well under way and with our true Mission Spirit 
we hope to make a wonderful showing. In these days oi extravagance, we will try 
to encourage the habits of thrift — "A penny saved is a penny earned" — our slogan 
will lead us on to victory. The officers of the Thrift -Campaign for the present 
term are: 



Elsie Hoff 
Doris Gregson 
Bcrnice Senner 
Jean Arentz 
Celestia Rose 
Alice McGraih 



Dave Snaider 
Donald Lee 
Ted Grozinger 
Sam Keen 
Alfred Delee 
Hd. Maggi 



Dudley Cameron 
Kramer Rohfleish 
Albert Gommo 
Bernard Ward 
Maria Baumsteiger 



THEMISSION 69 

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The Traffic Squad 



THH Traffic Squad is now an important organization in the compo- 
sition of Mission's efficiency. Establislicd two years ago by Sergeant 
Douglas and carried on by student leaders since then. Its place in the 
scliools system is gradually becoming more recognized by the Faculty and 
Students. 

The duty of the Traffic Squad is to relieve congestion in the halls between 
periods. Since its formation its tasks have grown to great magnitudes. 

The Traffic Squad wishes to thank the Faculty and students for the cooper- 
ation rendered throughout the term. 

The members of the Traffic Squad are: 



Dave Snaider 
Clyde Pearson 
Elmer Donald 
Chester Parker 
George Traeger 
Howard Martin 
Ferdinand Daniels 
James Hughes 
Albert Graff 
John Argain 
William Ennis 
Jack Cunningham 
Paul Dal mas 
August La Rosa 



Alfred Rouscjuet 
Clinton Clolliander 
Raymond Yaw man 
Bert Stephens 
William Batterton 
Harold Eckhardt 
Abraham Krug 
Frank Abernathy 
I'arl Pearson 
Harry Korn 
Edward Rhode 
Harvey Jones 
James Hansen 
Thomas Giovanola 



Walter Anderson 
Raymond Cerda 
Donald Lee 
William Harrigans 
Arnold Forest 
Raymond Ewille 
Leon Karp 
Bob Miles 
Louis NLirquis 
Evan Mellon 
Joe F-eldman 
Edward McLaughlin 
Bernard Ward 



70 THE MISSION 

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FIRST ORCHESTRA 




SECOND ORCHESTRA 



T H E M I S S I O N 71 

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The Dance Orchestra 

SpringTcrm ol 1928 comes to n close Mission finds itscll with 
best Dance Band it has had in years. Under the leadership of Bob 
-Burton, who has been in charge for the last year, a try-out was held 
at the beginning of the term. The following "jazz-hounds" were selected to give 
Mission its "jazz": 



A the be 
Riirrr,! 



Bob Burton . 
Al Mulhcbnck 
Charlie Nelson 
Evan Fabian . 
Dan Jones 
Max Beck 
Earl Ducklow 
Fred Smith 



FJ' Alio Sax. and Clar. 
Ei> Alto Sax. and Clar. 
B'' Tenor Sax. and Clar. 

I' rum pet 

Banjo 

Basse.'i 

Piano 

Drums 



As Bob Burton is the only one graduating and Fred Smith can be just as 
capable a leader the Dance Band should prosper for a long time to come. 

The boys, this term are not taking any credit for their work, but hope to be 
sporting a special Block "M" soon. 

Bob Burton. 



72 T H E M I S S I O N 

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Baseball 

lARTING this year with a team composed ol mostly sophomores and 
juniors. Coach Carl Grassle whipped into shape a team that was to play 
for the championship in the A. A. A. Only throe regulars of last season 
were left on which to build a new team. 

Our practice games were not much to speak of as we won only two games 
out of the seven played. We defeated St. Mary's "Fresh" and Fremont High of 
Oakland but lost to California "Frosh." Stanford "Frosh." Oakland "Tech." 
Berkeley, and McClymonds. These losses did nor me.in nuuh as we were trying 
out new combinations in the field and outfield. 

In our first league game, wc defeated Commerce by a score of 6-0. Then the 
team took Cogswell down the line by a score of 5-3. Silkitis pitched both of 
these games and had an easy time of it. Sacred Heart next lost to us 3-2. and 
finally we won our division by beating Galileo by a score of 3-2. Silverthorn 
chucked his best ball, as these teams were hard to beat. At this time Mission is 
waiting to play the winner of the other division for the championship. 



THEMISSION 73 

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Our Baseball Stars 



74 'in li MISSION 

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Unlimited Track 



D- 



E partly to thi- lack of material but mainly to our poor facilities. Mission 
ad a mediocre track team in the unlimited class. 



The fellows out for the squad were all capable men but there were too 
few to make a creditable showing in the A. A. A. They should be excused because 
every one of them was new to track work. 

Captain Jack de Michclis led out hurdlers and could be counted on for points 
in any meet. Jack Baat and Frank Skelly also ran the hurdles but were new to the 
sticks so little could be expected of them. 

Our most consistent point-getter was Will Fraser who ran the mile and 880. 
In every race his team mate. Leo Erkkila. was close behind. 

The sprinters, Al Fitzgerald. Charles Reddy and Homer Jones, gave a good 
account of themselves. They lack race experience, however, and should be good 
next season. 

The weights and javelins were taken c.irc ol by Rae. Clark and Pctrosky. All 
were new to the events but proved willing to learn. 

Baat and Skelly took on the pole vault assignment, lo Charles Henry went 
the task of upholding Mission in the 440 and the broad jump. He lived up to the 
task creditably. 



THEMISSION 75 

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It is not very often that a team scoring seven points takes a fourth place but the 
last A. A. A. Track Meet was one of those few times. Mission took fourth place 
with only seven points. 

Wc are under obligation to Fraser. Erkilla. and Henry for the fourth [ilacc. 

Will Frazer forced Heigan of Poly to equal the record to beat him in the mile. 
Bill was "'doped" for second and no one was surprised by his achievement. Leo 
Erkilla proved to be a sensation when he followed Fraser in. Erkilla was not 
figured at all. 

Charles Henry added the remaining two points by taking third in the broad 
jump with a leap of 20' 5". Henry, had he not fouled — his front spikes going 
over the board — would now be the possessor of the record. He jumped 22' ly^" 
only to be disqualified for fouling. 



Junior Track 



The Junior Track entered the Triple A Meet unheralded as to its possibilities 
and after the meet it was the most talked of squad. "With a little luck Mission 
might have beaten out Lowell for second place." declared a local newspaper when 
it was all over. 

As it was the team scored 33 points, a remarkable number considering that 
four boys were responsible for 27 of the total. 

Jimmy Shields, besides breaking the 220 record in the 1 10 class, won the 75- 
yard dash. Due mainly to Shields, the 1 lO's took third place in the relav. Jimmy 
consequently was responsible for 1 2 of the 33 points. 

Captain Lambert took two seconds adding six points to the team score. 
"Twin" was barely beaten in the 75, while in the high jump he forced Nyman 
of Lowell to break the record. 

Woo in the lOO's was running under a serious handicap, so for the first time 
this year he was forced into second places. Woo was responsible for the lOO's 
taking third in the relay. 

Joe Dunning surprised everyone by leaping 19' 3.' i" in the I 10 pound broad 
jump, taking first place and also running a good relay lap. 

The 130-pound relay team composed of Bihlcr. Lcgakes. Verza. and Norgaard 
took third place. These boys added two points to the Padres score. 

The 1 lO-pound team composed of Dunning. Garay. Bassi. and Shields took 
third place also. 

The lOO's composed of Woo. Banchero. Grosetti. and Sullivan to make it 
complete, took another third. 

Thus Mission took third place with 3 3 points and bid fair to make even a 
better showing next year. 

H. St.\nley. 



76 1 H E M I S S I O N 

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T 



Unlimited Crew 

hi; unlimited crew started the season by losing to Oakland High on 
ake Mcrritt. The men were severely handicapped, using oars to which 

they were unaccustomed, and rowing on a strange course. They put up a 
hard fight and lost by the narrow margin of a boat length and a half. Oakland 
High had perviously defeated Galileo by the same margin Mission was defeated. 
In a return race at Yacht Harbor the Mission crew won by detauli. 

Coach Sturgeon, aided by Captain Hood and a host of veteran oarsmen, has 
developed a powerful crew. 



The line-up for 


the A. A. A. regatta will probably be; 


Starboard 


/'or/ 


Roechiese . 


Stroke Rac 


Donlin 


"i Verdiicci 


Hauck 


4 Warden 


Curtin 


> Risso 


Hood (Cl 


2 Clark 


Taylor 


Bow Krohn 




Pilot— Kirby 




Coxswain — Feely 


Substitute 


s: ONeil. Cloke. L'pton. F'innegan. Duper and Koch. 



THEMISSION 11 




G 



The Lightweight Crew 



llli lightweight crew of Mission High defeated Oakland High on Lake 
Mcrritt April 23. 1928. by ten boat lengths. This was the first race 
this season for Mission's crew. 



The A. A. A. regatta was held on May 19, 1928. 
The lineup for the A. A. A. regatta was as follows 

SlarhoaTd 

Norgaard (C) . . . . 



Port 



. Stroke McFaddcn 

Stevens 5 Madigan 

Barnard 4 Kelly 

R. Spear 3 McGee 

Savanto 2 Campbell 

Want/. Bow Johnson 

Coxswain — Anderson 

Pilot — Brown 

Substitutes: Edgar. Lindquist. Spear. Landwchr, Mohr and Fcrgcson 

Al. Stfvkns. 



78 I II I. M 1 S S 1 O N 

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T 



Varsity Basket Ball 



HH practice season this year opened up with some iwcnty men reporting 
for the team of whom nine were members at last year varsity. 



The team had many practice games around the bav district defeating 
some of the best teams in the vicinity. 

Mission had the honor at starting in the A. A. A. basket ball tournament 
with one of the hardest schedules ever given to a San Francisco prep team, and 
although we did not do so well in the league this year, losing a majority of our 
games, two of them by the small margin of two points, we had a fighting team. 

The team was composed of: 
Captain George Sorenson. the most consistent scorer on the team; 
Milton Kelly, the best floorman Mission has ever seen; 
A. Dupper. a brilliant forward and star at the St. Ignatius game; 
Elmer Ciarrigan. second all star and our long shot boy: 
Harry Phillips, a block "M " and consistent scorer; 
George Pratt a hard man to stop; 
Hugo l^ispoli. a dead-eye on fouls; 
Ray Roeschise. he stopped all the big boys: 
Francis Gallagher, a Sophomore with two more years ol competition aheadof him. 

Francis J. Lambfrt. 



T H E M I S S I O N 79 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ > ■ > ■ >»>>>>>>»>>>>>>> ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 




130-Pound Team 

IE 1 30 pound team this year was composed of entirely new material 
with the exception of Louis Haas, a guard and member of last years 
30's." After making a wonderful showing in their practice games 
around the bay district, the team seemed to lose all of their teamwork, and scoring 
ability previously shown. I am sure that the "30"s" will contribute some valu- 
able material to next year's varsity team. 



T 



The lineup: 

Guard John Kasloff 

Guard Louis Haas 

Center Siggs 

Forward Holcomb 

Forward Dedominico 

Substitutes: l.ebedefT. William Lewis. Joe Mahoncy. 
Mickey Russell. Jack Lavin. 

Francis J. Lambert. 



80 r H i; MISSION 




OUR YELL LEADERS 



In the first meet held. Mission took third place. University and Fremont beat 
us out. while Oakland brought up the rear. All the fellows showed up well: 
Fraser, with two firsts, Fitzgerald, with two seconds, and de Michelis. with a 
second, were outstanding. 

Against Cogswell the team met defeat to the tune of 63 to 41. The only 
notable performance was the placing of the first three men in the mile and 
the half. 

PERSONNEL 

Sprinters Fitzgerald. Reddy and Jones 

Quarter Miler . . . Henry 

Half Miler Eraser and Erkkila 

Milers Fraser and Frkkila 

Hurdles I Capt. ) de Michelis, Baat and Skelly 

Broad .Jump Henry 

High Jump Skelly 

Shot Put Rae, Clark and Petrosky 

Discus Rae, Clark and Petrosky 

Javelin Rae, Clark and Petrosky 

Pole \'ault Baal and Skelly 

Fri D MiLBACn. 



THEMISSION 81 

>>>>>>> >> >>>->-v > >>>>>>>> >>>»»>» >>» ■ > •>■ > ■>->->■> > > > > > >» >>>>>>>> 




T 



The Mission Sea Scouts 

111 Sha Scouts, directed by Mr. Wicland. have been very active this 
past term. Besides taking many cruises around the bay. they have com- 
pleted the installation of a motor in their boat, and are now building a 

cabin on it so that they will be able to go on long cruises during the fall 

and winter. 

At the present time, there are about 25 boys enrolled in the Sea Scouts. leaving 
1 1 places open for boys who wish to join. Besides going on pleasure trips, the 
boys learn seamanship, navigation, and other useful things. 

The present officers of the Sea Scouts are: Mr. W'ieland. skipper: H. Taylor. 
first mate: H. Anderson, second male: and I.. Arteseros. chief yoeman. 

Harold Anderson. 



82 1 II 1: M 1 S S I O N 

<< ■ < ■ < <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ << ■ <<<< ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << ■ <■< 




The Junior Girls' Council 



The Junior Girls' Council is composed of girls in the first and second vears. 



CLAIRE BARROW 
ALICE O'CONNOR 
BERENICE DARRY 
JEANNE YOUNG 
ETHEL NELSON 
JESSIE EAKER 
DOROTHEA MORRIS 
LORRAINE HILTMAN 
RUTH DRAKE 
KATHLEEN FORD 
GENE ZEIMER 



GENEVA CALOF 
CATHERINE GRADDEl. 
DORIS CHANCE 
ANNA DUNN 
GRACE NELSON 
VIOLA IRELAND 
ROBERTA HESS 
l.EONORE MCCRYSTLE 
ORA PERRY 
THEL.MA BUHR 
Rl'TH LARSON 



MARGARET ROSE 
FRANCIS CONNOLLY 
VIOLET MARSH 
DOROTHY CUMMINGS 
THEODORE HALL 
FERN SAHLBERG 
ROSA COEBAIR 
LAURA DRAKE 
CARMEN MERTAIN 
EMMA WOOD 
SUSANNE MCGORVIN 



THE MISSION 83 





^, ^; A^ ft A^<-y »> r\ ^ Q 





The Senior Girls' Council 



The Senior Girls' Council is composed of girls in the third and fourth years. 



ELSIE HOFF 
ROSALIE REEDER 
DORIS GREGSON 
LUCILE MULLEN 
JEANNETTE QL'AST 
MARJORIE MONROE 
VELMA EWERS 
ELSIE LUDWIG 
JULIETTE MARTY 
IRENE HOFFMAN 
ETHYL STEVENTON 
EMMA CALLEN 
ROSE HOAG 
RUTH MARTIN 



MARY BIEDIMAN 
SUZANNE MCGORVIN 
ENSIE LINDEN 
CELESTIA ROSE 
ALICE VAN PELT 
ALICE WILLIAMS 
BARBARA FITZELL 
MARIAN O'CONNOR 
LOIS OVERMAN 
MARIE SCHLATRE 
JEAN ARENTZ 
VIRGINIA SIIEDWILL 
GERTRUDE HASSELBROCK 
MARIAN MILLER 
DORIS Ml NNE 



HANORA GREALISH 
LORRAINE LIPSCOMB 
BERNICE SENNER 
GERTRUDE WINN 
LILLIAN INBERG 
EVELYN NIELSON 
DOROTHY BULLARD 
DOROTHY SKELLY' 
MARGARET REHN 
ALICE HEIM 
MARIAN LEWIS 
AMARIE BAUMSTEIGER 
ALICE MCGRATH 
ELEANOR KRAMP 



84 I II I :.M 1 S S 1 O N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < ■ < - < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < < < < < < 




COURTS AND GROUND COMMITTEE 




»»viiriififi(o 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 



THE MISSION 85 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 




THE GIRLS' CHEER LEADERS 




GIRLS' ATHLETIC BOARD 



86 T H E M 1 S S I O N 




Girls' Crew 

A great many girls turned out for crew this spring. There was keen competi- 
tion for the positions on the first crew, because of the fact that the entire veteran 
crew was out again. Mission's first crew crossed the finish-line and won the 
championship at the last regatta, and the girls practiced hard this season in order 
to repeal their success. Miss B. 1. Powell and Kramer Rohfleisch coached the two 
crews. In view of the fact that nlniost all of the girls had rowed at least four 
terms, the Impe of victory was strong. 

Two of the girls have rowed for Mission eight terms. They are Captain 
Marjorie Munroe. and Alice Hamilton. Lournine Lipscomb has rowed seven 
terms: Elenor Wreden and Jeannette Quast have six terms to their credit. Juanita 
Carroll and Lucille Mullen have been out four. The graduation of thesj girls 
this term will make a big change in next term's crew. 



T H E M I S S I O N 87 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 





FRESHMAN VOLLEY BALL TEAM 



88 I HI: MISSION 

<<<<<<<< ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ <<<<*<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ < ■ <<< << ■ < ■ << ■ << ■ < <<<<<< 




Girls' Baseball 

/ hi' Mission Spinl 



Tin- girls ot Mission High School cooperated and responded with much 
enthusiasm to the call for baseball players. It is believed that the girls' 
new award system encouraged many new candidates to turn out as 
representatives of the girls' athletic activities of this spring term 1928. 

The Freshmen were well represented by a total of 56 candidates making up 
four complete teams with V. Sahlberg. K. Witney. F. Greene, and V. Brinkers 
acting as leaders until the preliminary games were completed. The Freshmen are 
under the direction of our new and very much welcomed gym teacher. Miss 
Leaman. The Sophomore class was the best represented of the four classes having 
a total number of 73 candidates, all interested in becoming baseball players. 
Under the able supervision of Miss Conroy, four teams have been organized and 
Anna Dunn, B. Roseman. Claire Roberts, and C. Scanlon chosen as temporary 
leaders. The Junior representatives, though only 26 in number, appear to be the 
baseball favorites; however, they arc going to have to play some fine baseball to 
outclass the other teams. The Juniors are under the guidance of Miss Powell. 
The Seniors have cause to be proud of the remarkable turn out of representatives 
this term for baseball. The candidates total up to 3 2 which is an unusual number 
taking into consideration the many other activities that occupy a Senior's time. 
The two Senior teams are under the skillful coaching of Miss Davidson and 
have A. Hamilton and II. Neilson acting as captains. 

After each of the twelve teams has played two preliminary games, the Inter- 
class games will take place. 1 aking into consideration the above facts, the Inter- 
class games are bound to be exciting, and well worth seeing. 

Geneva Calof. 



T H E M I S S I O N 89 

>»>>>^>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> > ■>■>■ » ■> >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 




Clubs and Celebrities 



90 T H E M I S S I O N 

■ < ■ < ■ < <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<«<<<< < ■ < ■ < ■ < <<<<<<<<<< < ■ < ■ < - < <<<<<< 




Clubs and Celebrities 



THEMISSION 91 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ >>>>>>>>>>> >>> ■ > ■ > - > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> > ■ > ■ > >>>>>> 

















1 



jBtfs 0/ Mission Life 



02 1 HI: M 1 S S 1 O N 




o 

o 






T H E M 1 S S I O N 93 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> > >>> >> ■ > ■>■ > ■ > >> ;>>>>> >>> > ■ > ■ > ■ > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 




o 

o 

c 

CO 



14 I H 1: \1 1 S S I O N 

<<<<<< < ■ < < < <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <« ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < - < - < <<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ <<<<<<<<< 



Horoscope 



\ 'iciim 

Aberncihy. Robert 
Anderson. Donn.i 
Anderson. Robcri 
Arnaudo. Michael 
Artcscros. Lawrence 
Ashton. Stanley 
Baines. Florence 
Ballcn. Dorothea 
Barlow. Mary 
Bcrger. Eunice 
Bcrges. Mary 
Beroldo. Josephine 
Birnbaum. Ruth 
Bousquet. Alfred 
Buerg. Ruth 
Burke. Alice 
[iurke. Sylvia 
Butterwood. Alice 
Brunning. Wilfred 
Brown. Charles 
Burton. Robert 
Buschmann. William 
Calson. Robert 
Carlson. I'lmer 
Cameron. Dudley 
Carlson. Arthur 
Clark. James 
Coburn. Delano 
Connell. George 
Cornell. Clinton 
Curr. John 
Caddy, Dorothy 
Calden. Alice 
Callen. I:mma 
Carroll. Juanita 
Connors. Eloise 
Cordcll, Dorothy 
Cowan. Eileen 
Cucchi. Florence 
Cuniffe. Agnes 
Cuslidge. I.oretta 
Carrick. Frank 
Day. Dorothy 
Delce. Alfred 
Dean. Marjorie 
Dcaner, Gertrude 
Donald Elmer 



lieselting Sin 

I lis hot sweater 

loud neckties 

Winning medals 

Mis smile 

His blue sweater 

Teasing Mr. O. 

Her girlishness 

I ler boy friends 

Athletics 

Her modesty 

Her manner 

Talking in 3° 

Good grades 

His wrist watch 

Her bashfulncss 

Giggling 

Her blonde hair 

Writing notes 

His natural marcel 

His hair comb 

His good nature 

Good grades 

Bottling magnesia 

His foolishness 

Scholarship 

Wearing a red sweater 

His bashfulncss 

His extreme modesty 

His hair comb 

His sweater 

His bashfulncss 

Her quietness 

Her sweetness 

Her chum 

Her voice 

Her long hair 

Her marcel 

Powdering 

Eng. VIII 

Bookkeeping 

liileen 

His innocent look 

I ler quietness 

Sam 

Being sedate 

Fler middies 

Ethel 



Occupation 

Coming late 

Drawing 

Sharpshooter 

Writing compositions 

Thinking 

Selling shirts 

Teasing her chums 

Solving Chem. p'blems 

Singing 

Smiling 

Calling her friends 

Learning to sing 

Studying 

Making speeches 

Dreaming 

Reading story books 

Sports 

Being helpful 

Doing Trig. 

Playing the saxaphone 

Leading the band 

Debating 

Struggling with Chem 

Playing 

Doing Eng. VIII 

Idling 

Throwing discus 

Playing basketball 

Talking 

Looking studious 

Blushing 

Smiling 

Working in library 

OfTicc messenger 

Learning to cook 

Collecting quarters 

Dancing 

Studying ( ?) 

Studying 

OfTice assistant 

Working 

Playing football 

Working hard 

Giving orders 

Playing the piano 

Seeking solitude 

Trying to sing 



I ulure liealily 

Harberdashcr 

Designer 

West Point Cadel 

Newspaper editor 

Sailor 

Store Manager 

Suffragette 

Toe Dancer 

Choir Singer 

Housewife 

Waitress 

Usherette 

Private secretary 

Musician 

Teacher 

Matron deaf £(dumbscbool 

Housewife 

Teacher in Alaska 

Physicist 

Orchestra leader 

Banker 

Professor 

Pharmacist 

Reporter 

Aviator 

Dean 

Office Manager 

Engineer 

Orator 

Economist 

Office Manager 

Housewife 

Cloak model 

Somebody's steno. 

Devoted housewife 

Secretary 

Actress 

Beauty Specialist 

School Marm 

Private secretary 

Owner of tea room 

Jciurnalist 

Housewife 

Soldier 

Teacher 

Bacteriologist 

Newspaper editor 



T H E M I S S I O N 95 

■>■ >> > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ > ■ » ■>■> > ■ » ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



Horoscope 



\ 'ictim 

Diollng. Anna 
D.ilm.is. Paul 
Drago. Emma 
Drake, William 
}-iscn. Dave 
Ewers. Velma 
Enmark, Albert 
Ferroggiaro. Erminia 
Ennis. William 
Eisenhut. George 
Exlcy. Jack 
Fairgricvc. Donald 
E'alkncr. Thclma 
Eitzpatrick, Joe 
Flcgal. Frank 
Fry. Raymond 
Gilfeather. Cecil 
Gaffney. Frank 
Gciscn, Martha 
Garibaldi. Frank 
Gleason. Gertrude 
Groezinger. Theodore 
Grealish. Honora 
Goldstein. Lena 
Gregson. Doris 
Honrv. Charles 
Griffin. Mary 
Griffin. Marjorie 
Hauck. Walter 
Hamilton. Alice 
Hood. Gilbert 
Hasselbrock. Gertrude 
Holtz. Elwood 
Hayes. Mildred 
Hunter. William 
Hoff. Elsie 
Hoover. Leonard 
Holle. Viola 
Hebrank. William 
Inbcrg. Lillian 
Ivicevich. Nicholas 
Jacobsen. Harry 
Jackson. Lois 
Jauch. Joseph 
Jacobs. Sarah 



Besclting Sin 

Her windblown bob 

His red sweater 

Quietness 

His black sweater 

Jabbering 

Her drawing 

His reserve 

Her hair cut 

His height 

His wavy hair 

Bright remarks 

His studiousness 

Forgetting homework 

His height 

Ted 

Witty jokes 

Donna 

His neatness 

Her smile 

His specs 

Her smile 

Learning Econ. 

Her sedatcncss 

Her sunny smile 

Wearing new dresses 

The fair sex 

Studying 

Her ways 

His car (?) 

Her striped jacket 

Sports 

Her recs. 

Physics 

Gentle manner 

His size 

Her elocution 

Being dignified 

Her cheerfulness 

His brother 

Her voice 

His reserve 

His slick hair cut 

Taking her time 

His rosy cheeks 

Lisllessness 



Occupation 

Typing 
Traffic Officer 
Typing 

Fixing his machine 
Debating 

Doing fancy work 
Dreaming 
Giggling 
Directing traffic 
Tagging little brother 
Learning Chem. 
Doing Trig. 
Talking 
Studying ( ?1 
Looking wise 
Eating 
Sketching 
Playing cello 
Dancing 

Doing homework ( .' ) 
Attending games 
'I'hinklng 

Getting journal ads 
Kidding 

Collecting bank money 
Being sociable 
Office aide 
Smiling 

Not yet discovered 
Helping everybody 
Being a good scout 
Gaining knowledge 
Looking at the clock 
Looking innocent 
Asking questions 
Winning contests 
Debating 

Making others happy 
Working 
Arguing with Lu 
Getting good grades 
Bookkeeping 
Discharging books 
Studying Physics 
Studying music 



Future Reality 

Stenographer 

Historian 

Companion 

Garage owner 

Politician 

Lady of leisure 

Globe trotter 

Business woman 

Policeman 

Tutor 

Iceman 

Architect 

Hairdresser 

Butcher 

Scientist 

Dog catcher 

Artist 

Musician 

Stenographv 

Banker 

Saleslady 

Philosopher 

Office girl 

Somebody s friend 

Secretary to the president 

Restaurant owner 

Social worker 

Somebody's pal 

Ambassador 

Governess 

Mathematician ( ? ) 

Head of girl's seminary 

Watchman 

.Missionary 

Scientist 

Stenographer 

Merchant 

Ideal wife 

Pharmacist 

A decorator 

Mining engineer 

Prohibition agent 

Librarian 

Inventor 

Music teacher 



96 1 HI. MISSION 



Horoscope 



\ 'nlim 

Jodocy. CIcmcni 
Jensen. Dorolhv 
Johnson. Hlmcr 
Johnson, 1 dilh 
Kaiicr. M.iuricc 
Kjvanaugh. Agnes 
Keen. Samuel 
Kelly. Ann 
Kelly. Milton 
Kilaspa. Sclm.i 
Kennedy. Martin 
KlinRcr. Vcryl 
King. William 
Kramp. l-leanor 
Korn. Harry 
Kermit. Hardcnfan 
Lipscomb. Lorraine 
La Torres. Leslie 
Laveau. Inez 
Lebedeff. Barbar.i 
La V'oie. William 
Levin. Gertrude 
Lambert. France 
Lambert F-rancis 
Lincoln. Jessie 
Lee. Donald 
Langlcy. Helen 
Legakes. John 
Loorya. Anna 
Locke. Arthur 
Ludwig. Elsie 
Lovettc. Franklin 
Lynch. Marie 
Lumsden. Virginia 
McLaughlin. Earl 
Mahler. Marian 
Martin, Robert 
Malone. Ruth 
Mayer. Jayncs 
Mariani. Alvcria 
Miles. Donald 
Martin. Eleanor 
Moore. Theodore 
Mullen. Lucile 
Murphy. William 



liesetliriii Sin 

His name 
I Icr meekness 
.loking 
Her smile 
Ihinking 
Her hair comb 
His disposition 
I-rankncss 
Being agreeable 
Her timidity 
His red hair 
Her charms 
.Making noise 
Her permanent wave 
His yellow sweater 
Has none 
Athletics 
His ability 
Her chatter 
Her complexion 
His seriousness 
Her goggles 
His twin 

His checkered sweater 
Her height 
F.asily embarrassed 
Anna 
Lhinking 
Laughing 
His disposition 
Her As 
Sleeping 5° 
Her winning smile 
Her innocence 
Inventing excuses 
Her disposition 
His stature 
Working hard ( .'I 
Getting class excuses 
Her wavy dark hair 
His pompadour 
Ha/el 

His cheerfulness 
Her independence 
His height 



Oicupulion 

Being nice 

Fixing her hair 

Waiting for her pard. 

Being happy 

Studying 

Being calm 

Looking for Al 

Making friends 

Being athletic 

OITicc work 

Playing tennis 

Buying new dresses 

Teasing girls 

Being witty 

Arguing 

Studying his lessons ( .' ) 

Directing 

Drawing 

Studying ( .' ) 

Writing Eng. Comp. 

Studying Eng. VIII 

Studying hard 

Collecting money 

Abusing his brother 

F'inding her pals 

Being good naturcd 

Studying 

Writing poems 

Learning something 

Going to meetings 

Getting rccs. 

Teasing the girls 

Drawing pictures 

Coming late to 7° 

Giving advice 

Being jolly 

Learning Eng. ( ?) 

Smiling 

Leading the band 

Worrying about credits 

R O. T. C. 

Working hard ( .') 

Joking 

Making dance bids 

Working in shop 



I ulurc Ri'ulilu 

Engineer 

Marccllcr 

Demist 

Modiste 

Discoverer 

Owner of tea room 

Real estate dealer 

Bookkeeper 

Life guard 

Filer 

Barber 

Banker's wife 

A clown 

Private secretary 

Supervisor 

Mechanic 

Playground instructress 

Cartoonist 

Tilly the Toiler II 

Housewife 

Archaeologist 

Stenographer 

Ad manager 

Jockey 

Kindergarten teacher 

Governor of Calif. 

Typist 

Bank president 

Housewife 

Olympian star 

Aviatrix 

Movie director 

Milliner 

Teacher 

Photographer 

Salesgirl 

Gardener 

Office girl 

Paul Whitemans successor 

Comptometer 

Forest Ranger 

Happy wife 

Owner of a theatre 

Writer 

Mechanic 



THEMISSION 97 

>> ■ » ■ > - > ■ >> >>>>> >>>>>>»> ■ >>> ■ >> >>>> >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



Horoscope 



Victim 

Marty. Georgette 
Mulcahy. Richard 
Mueller. John 
Mitchell. Frances 
Merritt. Thelma 
Murray. Hera 
Mclntyrc. Romana 
Mido. Louise 
Morrissey. Blanche 
Morrison. Anne 
Munroc, Marjorie 
Mihalcik. Helen 
Nicholas. Ida 
Nields, Lillian 
O Farrell, Edward 
Philpot. James 
Peterson. Alice 
Peppi. Frank 
Pollak. Arminda 
Peters. Henry 
Peterson. Olga 
Potter. Jack 
Pinkerton. Emma 
Pcrsson. Earl 
Pruddcn. Helen 
Parker. Chester 
Phillips. Marian 
Prilchard. Stewart 
Quast. Jcannettc 
Rae. Ernest 
Ratto. Mclba 
Risso. Roland 
Rcingold. Stella 
Ross. Malcolm 
Roberts. Lucienne 
Rosenblum. Harry 
Rubcnstcin. Freda 
Rossi. John 
Read. Evelyn 
Rocschiese. Ray 
Roberts. Tom 
Shiiflin. Francis 
Smith. Rose 
Saxon. Otto 
Scrtorclli, Ida 



lieselling Sin 

Her sweetness 
His politics 
Physiology 
Her neatness 
Civics 

Her quietness 
Her short stature 
Her friendliness 
Her petitcncss 
Her permanent wave 
That curly hair 
Marian 

Her wavy hair 
Her ambition 
His hair comb 
Carrying books 
Being good 
Talking 
Her hair 

Inconspicuousness 
Being pleasant 
His "cords" 
Her poise 
Loud sweater 
Coming late 
His uniform 
Her reserve 
His personality 
School spirit 
His bashfulness 
Her neatness 
His mischief 
Talking 
Hasn't any 
Her hair 
His specs 

Her sunny manner 
His blonde hair 
Blushing 
His complexion 
His stature 
Blushing 
Curly hair 
Studying Spanish 
Talking 



Oicupatti)n 

Doing French 
Playing tennis 
Cramming 
Talking to Eloise 
Talking 
Thinking 
Growing up 
Paying attention 
Struggling with Econ. 
Making friends 
Paddling her own canoe 
Studying history 
Hunting for Alma 
Doing homework 
Following Joe 
Arguing 
Hurrying 
Telling jokes 
Falking 
Cramming 
Studying 
Airing wisdom 
Being in plays 
Learning I .') 
Doing homework ( .' ) 
Drillling his company 
Falking to Evelyn 
Dramatizing 
Hurrying 

Acting collegiate (.') 
Being quiet 
Introducing new ideas 
Strumming her uke 
Winning honors 
Being sociable 
Plaving in the band 
Singing 
Drawing plans 
Being quiet 

Capt. of the football tean 
Eating 

Studying Eng. ( ?) 
Looking for rccs. 
Cracking jokes 
Working hard 



l-utiire Reality 

Traveller 
Broker 
Chemist 

Pres. of Women s Club 
Actress 
f armcretle 
Comedienne 
Fcacher 
Dressmaker 
Usherette 

I'irl lady traffic cop 
Stenographer 
Business woman 
Accountant 
President 
Politician 
Housewife 
I'rack star 
Felephone operator 
Broker 
Farmerette 
Deep sea diver 
Dramatics teacher 
Faxi driver 
Saleslady 

Capt. of the U. S. Army 
Feacher ( .') 
Mr. America 
Elocutionist 
Football hero 
Salesgirl 
Hikers' guide 
Entertainer 
Major in U. S. Army 
Manicurist 
Optician 
Opera singer 
Architect 
Secretary 
Big game hunter 
Radio announcer 
Lawyer 
Co-ed 
Druggist 
Companion 



98 I 11 h M 1 S S 1 U N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 



Horoscope 



Victim 

Simon. M.irvin 
Schacfcr. iVIjric 
Stoll/. Howard 
Saxon. Christine 
Suvanio. Hddic 
Stovcnton. I;thvl 
Schumacher Charlotte 
Scnncr Bernice 
Snaidcr. Dave 
Sagcr. ils'clyn 
Steele. Hazel 
Schenk. Horace 
Stuart. Ann 
Schick. Louis 
Simpson. Emmet 
Smith Phillip 
Springer. Ralph 
Stoffcl. l.co 
Shedwill. Virginia 
Stoker. Robert 
Reeder. Rosalie 
Tous. Alfonso 
Trapp. Marian 
Thorpe. I.loyd 
Thornton. Lawrence 
Turner, Marjoric 
Thompson. William 
Verducci. Joseph 
Vellegra. Louise 
Vann. Melvin 
Woods. Lrank 
Ward. Bernard 
Wellman. Richard 
Wagner. Mary Alice 
Warnock. Irene 
Walsh. Alice 
Wolfisberg. Roselyn 
Wrcden. l-.leanor 
Wilson. Joseph 
Wrcnn. Ilorcnce 
Yawman. Raymond 
Winn. Gertrude 
Zlatunich. Steven 
Zeiss, f'rancis 
Zanotli. I:milio 



fW'iftlinij Sin 

Cutting up 

Her sociability 

His brightness 

Her reserve 

His smile 

Her checrlulness 

Her long hair 

Selling novelties 

His wit 

Bill 

Her slimness 

Math.wiz. 

Her sociability 

Working ( .' ) 

His Icngthiness 

His looks 

His disposition 

His neckties 

Her perseverance 

Mel 

Dave 

Talking (.') 

Her timidity 

His shortness 

His lovely blue eves 

Taking pictures 

Joe 

His remarks 

Her cheery manner 

His smile 

His bashfulness 

Talking 

His quiet way 

Personality 

Modest ( ? ) 

Has none 

Her modesty 

Her popularity 

Studying ( i" ) 

Her knowledge 

His brightness 

Her sunny smile 

Knowing lessons ( f I 

Coming late to I ^ 

His mechanical ability 



Ociupaluin 

Carrying books ( ' > 
Learning to sew 
Getting As in Solid 
Being good 
Cramming ( ' ) 
Studying Salesmanship 
Gliding thru life 
Imitating Rube Woll 
Coaching battoon 
Being agreeable 
Playing tennis 
Learning his lessons 
Paying attention 
Has none 
Studying English 
Copying homework 
Working in ofTice 
Talking to girls 
Studying 

Playing the saxaphonc 
Helping Miss. K 
Working on R I 4 
Lending to business 
Making wise cracks 
Drawing 

Conducting Sr, meetings 
Shooting baskets 
Making speeches 
Working 

Lating . 

Playing soccer 
Broadcasting 
Studying ( ? ) 
Studying Leon. 
Acting funny 
Being innocent 
Being attentive 
Being in plays 
Looking for Bill 
Making witty remarks 
Getting good grades 
Being pleasant 
Grinning 

Wearing pretty clothes 
Working in auto shop 



iulurr lifulily 

Manager of theatre 

Dressmaker 

City Architect 

Head of Girls' Club 

Store keeper 

Secretary 

Seamstress 

Social butterfly 

General Pershing II 

Society belle 

Tennis champ. 

Civil Lnginecr 

Somebody's pal 

Straw boss 

Civil Engineer 

Usher 

Business manager 

Cowboy 

Teacher 

Orchestra leader 

Lady of leisure 

Orator ( ?) 

Confidential secretarv 

Poet 

Artist 

Interior decorator 

Electrician 

Circus strong man 

Saleslady 

Hotel chef 

Carpenter 

Ventriloquist 

Department store buyer 

Somebody's gal 

Manager of a cafe 

Housewife 

Teacher 

Lamous dramatist 

Detective 

Instructor of nurses 

Physicist 

Lady of leisure 

Globe troticr 

Coed 

Expert machinist 



T H E M I S S I O N 99 

>>>>>> > ->->->->->■>->■ > ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ » ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ »> >>>>>>>»>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



Miss 


Hoernig's Class- 


Room ii/ 


Charles Hamill 


Amelia Culberson 


Harriett Kaliski 


Bill Meuser 


Frances Di Pietro 


Eugenia Kelley 


Fred Marx 

Walter Nelson 


Josephine Fcrrara 
Theodora Franzi 
Helen Gallo 


Doris Kelso 
Josephine Lucas 


George Sale 


Wilhelmina Gross 


Edna May 


Cecile Alexander, 


Anna Grubisich 


Edith Moll 


Lucille Biedermann Rmh Hurwitz 


Marie O'Donncll 


Pansy Buck 


Bertha Johansen 


Solveig Wctteland 


Gladys Comaick 


Esielle Jones 


Anita Wnul 


Mr. 


Terry's Class — Room 312 




GIRLS 




Belvedere. Lillian 
Caillcux. \'vonnc 
Clark. Martha 
Hackctt. Doris 
Hastings, Eileen 


Kauppi. Allis 
MafTei. Amelia 
Martin. Ruth 
Rubinchik. Lthci 

BOYS 


Smith. Grace 
X'ailino. Alice 
Winder Voort. Elizabeth 
Woerner. Davida 
Wolf. Bern ice 


Parrott. Rosendo 


Kurinsky, Simon 


Berman. Bernard 


Rccd. Artliur 


Mahoney. Joe 


Bogle. Robert 


I'homas. Nova 


McWhinney. William Kruger. Louis 



100 1 H L M 1 S S 1 O N 



Mr. 


John's Class — Room 104 


Azaro. Hilda 


Foster. Blanche 


O'Heary. John 


Balling. Bcrnicc 


Cjcinincr, Kuih 


I'.irry, Alvin 


Bowman. Joseph 


Gilmour Howard 


Rock. Thomas 


Caffarelli. Frank 


McCarthy. James 


Russel. Floyd 


Carlson. Lconnrci 


Moralez. Mercedes 


Staff. Edna 


Collopy. James 


Mordno, Frank 


Switzer, Clarence 


Ciisemano. Tony 


Mooney, Albert 


Thode. Bill 


Dorn. Walter 


Nieto. Domingo 


Thompson, Marcellus 


Eickner, Marie 


Nydigger. Paul 


Walsh. James 


Fairchild, Louise 


O'Kane. Jack 


Walsh. John 


Miss N. K. Kendrick 


s Class 


Mary Barlow* 


Agnes Kavanaugh* 


Florence Rcganelli 


Evelyn Boysen 


Gertrude Kennedy 


Henrietta Sarrail 


Ruth Birnbaum* 


Violet Lind 


Marie Schlatre 


Fae Brower 


Lorraine Lynch 


Clara Seligman 


F'ranccs Campbell 


Gl.uiys Magce 


Arminda Smith 


Emma Drago* 


Hilda .Miller 


Rose Stolowitz 


Henrietta Durnin 


f-ranccs Mitchell* 


Emily Ujeck 


Marie Fabroni 


Marion O'Connor 


Ethel Steventon* 


Georgia Hern.inde? 


Alice Petersen* 


Alma Volpatti* 


*Hiyh Seniors. 





T H li M I S S 1 O N 101 

>>>>>>>»>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>» ■ » ■>■>■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>» 



Miss Elizabeth C. Murphy's 


Registry Class 


Rossi. John 


Donohoe. Doris 


Derham. Dorothy 


Mields. Lillian 


I .ynch. Frank 


Dunn. Anna 


Heinemeyer. Louis 


Canipi. Amando 


Guthershon. Grace 


Philips. Harry 


Corcoleotes. George 


Infeld. Dcna 


Grcenblat. Sam 


Cox, John 


Martinovich. Mary 


Fulmer. Helen 


Doming, Thomas 


McMichael, Frances 


Ghiotto. Alma 


Falconi. Virgil 


O'Brien. Frances 


Bargagliotti. Louis 


Giras, Peter 


Poncino, Lena 


Dubnoff. Hcrma 


Hagen. Henry 


Severs. Virginia 


Dupper. Albert 


Mayer. Arthur 


McEvoy, Frank 


Pryal. Eddie 


Winenow. Leroy 
Brabye, Vera 


Maki. Alice 




Mr. Driver's Class 




GIRLS 




Alice Caldcn* 




Grace Stone 


Edna Erickson 


Dorothy Jensen* 


Sarah Tharp 


Elsie Gilmor 


Josephine La Chapelle Irene Warnock* 


Bertie Green 


Rose Robinson 
BOYS 


Bertha Wilictt 


Joseph Ambcrger 


Max Beck 


Howard Pobjola 


Bray Asplund 


Albert Friedman 


Paul Showaltcr 


Telford Baungartner 


Harry Meyn 
Charles Nelson 


Fred Smith 


*High Seniors 







102 T H H M 1 b S 1 O N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < ■ < ■ <« < < ■ < < < <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 





Mr. Crocker's 


Cla 


SS 


William Aircr 


I.ouis Grozner 




Albert Mondani 


Grant Aitkcn 


Frank Hopkins 




Norman Noury 


Alfred Brunncr 


W'ilbcrt l.enikau 




CjerhartI Olson 


James Canncll 


Hugo Maas 
Charles Mannie 




Henry Sanguineiti 


Clinton Collianclcr 


Louis .Marquis 




Jack .Skinner 


Louis Corsiglia 


William .VLirtens 




Albert Taniimonaco 


Andrew Delec 


Walter Mathes 




Frank Wilson 


Warren Dixon 


Emil Mihalcik 




Walter ^'akovenko 


Miss 


Pechin's Class— 


-Ro 


om U3 


Buhle, Helen 






Bousquet. Alfred 


Bullard. Dorothy 


Hunter. Nora 




Clancey. John 


Marty. Georget 
Burkhardt. Madeleine 


e 


Lnnis. William 


Day. Dorothy 


Marty. Juliette 




Kennedy. .\!ariin 


Devlin. Ruth 


Palamy. Grace 




Macfarlan. Kenneth 


Glcason. Gertrude 


Robert. Lucienn 


e 


Pontacq. Fdward 


Hayes, Mildred 


Senner, Bern ice 




Snaider. Dave 



THE MISSION 103 



Miss 

Kenneth Cameron 
Albert Graf 
Charles Hartshorn 
Francis Kirby 

Evelyn Carstairs 
Rose Cecchini 
Grace Darbey 
Dorothy De Freitas 
Mary Del Carlo 
Ellen Ekberg 



Bird's Class — Room 42 1 

BOYS 



Loyd Martin 
Bobley Matihewson 
Herbert Mirnoff 

GIRLS 

Catherine Finn 
Josephine Foppiano 
Alma Garino 
Jean Harless 
Mary Harrell 



Leiand Robinson 
Richard Sibley 
Elvin Stendell 
James Waish 

Vernette I inn 
Blandy Minedew 
Isabella Orme 
Anna Rownd 
Lenore Seiberi 
Mabellc Stuhr 



Mr. Tiesselinck's Class Room 305 



BOYS 

Chester Armstrong Alfred Freibert 
Dorando Cevolani Carl l.undin 
Edward Eggers 
Dave Eisen 



Bcrniccc Brant 
Wilhclmina Ellisen 
Vclma Ewers 



Mortimer Mayes 
Hylas Murray 

GIRLS 

Clara Gomersal 
Lorraine Lipscomb 



Byron Peterson 
Edward Ruflin 
Frank Schivo 
Sam Wichiow 

Marjoric Munroc 
Marjorie Turner 
Alice Williams 



104 1 II I, MISSION 

< ■ < ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < - < ■ < ■ < <<< ^ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■■ < ■ << ■ << < 




Mr. Ingram's Class Room 40 1 
EXTENDS ITS GREETINGS 



Irene Bacci 
Norma Bacci 
Ruth Brandt 
Roberta Cairns 
Irene Campi 
Jennie Catella 
Lucille Crowley 
Lillian Goldstein 
Ldith Gudely 
Frances Hess 
Mabel Johnstone 
Anne Markus 
Muriel Maybury 



Ora Parry 
Lora Peters 
lileanor Peterson 
Helen Schauer 
Margaret Settlcmire 
Gladys McCarthy 
John Ahern 
Domenic Brasacca 
Salvador Cardinale 
William Carr 
Victor Catania 
Charles Deming 
Bernard Dcrwin 



Earl Ducklow 

John Glen 

Lloyd Grace 

Vernon Key worth 

Thomas Linncy 
Peter Lucich 
Ray Maxwell 
George Morales 
Andrew Murtagh 
George Noller 
Louis Rcggiardo 
Harold Ross 
Vence \'enturi 



T H E M I S S I O N 105 

>> ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ > >>>>>> > ■ > ■ » ■ > ->- > ■>- > ->■» > >> >>» > >>> >>>> >> ■ > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ 



Miss Heusslec 


's Class 


—Room 327 


Bohn. Helen 




Landau. Faye 


Collins. Eileen 




Lee. Doris 


Cranna. Dorothy 




LeGette. Beatrice 


Debbol, Grace 




Leoni. Catherine 


DeVilbiss. Vera 




McGrath. Alice 


Doel, Erma 




Milhalick. Helen 


Espillac. Raoul 




Morris. Rhea 


Giddings. Hyacinth 




Quartioli. Theresa 


Hahn. John 




Osborne. Ethel 


Janknowicz. Victoria 




O'Conneli. .John 


Klakowicz. Pauline 




O'Connor. Alice 


Trap. Marian 






Mr. N orris' 


Class — 


Room 315 


Borsi. Charles 




Anderson. Edna 


Canata. Leo 




Ashby. Thelma 


Fourcade, Henry 




Burger. Eileen 


Lawson. Alexander 




Campbell, California 


Morri. Guido 




Christensen. Leona 


Murray. George 




Durant. Dorothy 


Nelson. Carl 




Isola. Fosca 


Olson. Rudolph 




Langley. Hilda 


Silverman. Robert 




Marcusc. Dorothy 


Strazzarino. Joe 




Philips. Rose 


Verducci. John 




Slattery. Edna 


Zalkind. Carl 




Young. Georgia 



106 1 11 L MISSION 





Mrs. Martin's Class 


Josephine Beraldo 


Alveria Mariani 


Hazel Steele 


Anna Dciling 


Eleanor Martin 


Ann Stewart 


Rose Fenske 


Annie Morrison 


May Watson 


M.irthn Ciison 


Marian Penny 


Gertrude Winn 


Elsie Hofr 
Helen Langley 


Margaret Rice 
Olga Peterson 
Ida Nicholas 


Stanley Ashton 
Jack Exley 


Barbara l.ebedeff 


Charlotte Schumacher '^"'•^"^ Ciffney 


Marian Mahler 


Fred Mack 

Miss Clay's Class 


Hugh Hahn 


Adams. Bill 


Morton. Louis 


Eyleufeldt. Anita 


Anderson. Carl 


O'Dea. Everett 


Galligan. Eleanor 


Hawley, Willis 


Pastorini. Dante 


Jensen. Constance 


Hewlett. Edward 


Ruffino. Louis 


\'an Pelt. Alice 


Jenkins. Robert 


Talbot, r.dw.uii 


X'itali. Lucy 


Leary. James 


Winter. Edwin 


Wentzel. Lois 


Mahood. Arthur 


Anderson. Katbryn 


Williams. X'irginia 


Mathews. Kenneth 


Barbata. Betty 


Winn, Wmitrcd 


Mibach. Fred 


Caddy. Dorothy 


Slaywin. Betty 



T H E M 1 S S I O N 107 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ »>>>>>>>>>> 



Mr. M. L. Driver's 


Class — 


Room 424 


Amberger. Joseph 


Erickson. Edna 


Asplud. Bray 


Green. Bertie 


Baumgartncr. Talford 


Gi 


man. Elsie 


Beck. Max 
Friedman. Alfred 
Meyn, Harry 


Jensen. Dorothy 

La Chapelle. Josephine 


Nelson. Charles 


Ro 


binson. Rose 


Pobjola. Howard 


Stone. Grace 


Showaitcr. Paul 


Tharp. Sara 


Smith. Fred 


W 


arnick. Irene 


Calden. Alice 


Willett. Bertha 


Miss Milklau 


s Class- 


-219 


Emil Johnson 




Walter Grace 


George Gassman r'Cc2^ 


?K 


Albert Croci 


Emile. Jamart /C?TA" 


kA 


James Fanning 


Edwuard Mielenz \\\j[ 


MX) 


Andrew Magri 


Reynold Johnson ^ IJ~^^^ 


rU- 


George Soetje 


Martin Eagan ^T-V'^ 


Tcy 


John Bignotti 


Clifford Liner ^3 *| 


^/t^ 


^ Marler Dominey 


William Evans ^i^ll 




John Mot tram 


Jerome Kenney ^''^~*V 


\pjr 


Fred Miller 


Harold Jensen 


^ 


Dante Prandi 


Henry Dormstadt 




Edward Lewis 



108 T H E M I S S I O N 



Mr. Crane's Class 


Room in 


Charles Akiander 




Hugo Respoli 


Henry Barron 




Donald Rudnick 


Henry Cervau 




Gertrude Schlenkcr 


l.ct)nard Copelstone 




Eugenie Shaw 


l.uminato D'Antonio 




Warren Samozich 


Ernest Erickson 




George Sorenscn 


William Eraser 




John Suderman 


Fred Jensen 




William Thompson 


Herman Johnson 




Bernard Vaughan 


George l.uoisi 




John Edgar 


Mr. Wagner 


s Registry Class 


Anchick. Jack. H^ 




Peppi. Frank. H4 


Dcdomenico.Paskey.L4 




Reichart. Gus. L-4 


Muillcr. John. H4 




Whelton. Vincent. L4 



Brandenburg. Ruih, H3 
Button. Caasi. H3 
Deaner, Gertrude. H4 
Erney, Edna. HI 
Feyling. Louise. H3 
Nubuhr. limnia. IH 



Pepper. Sadye. H3 
Servetti. Lillian. LI 
Pullak, Arminda. H4 
Shcele, Ethel. L4 
Westerholm. Edna. H3 



THEMISSION 109 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ >>>>►> 




Compliments 

of the 

R. O. T. C 



110 T H li M 1 S S 1 O N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 



Miss 


Bouthton's Latin 


f Class 


Clyde Davis 


Otto Broger 


Lillian DM 


Jamos Phil pot 


Russel Nelson 


Wilhelmina Peck 


Alfonso Tous 


Chester Osean 


Anna Stevenson 


Richard O'Connor 


Ruth Hatcher 


X'irginia Parker 


William Haytor 


David Ludwigscn 


Virginia Reed 


Henry Hoppc 


George Well man 


Coy Cullcn 


Thomas Maguire 


Winsor Warden 


Laurence Marchant 


James Zuintas 


Myrtle Dunn 


Ada Vincent 


Mr. 


L. A. Phillips Registry 


Anderson. Claire 


Doherty. Agnes 


Misuraca. Josephine 


Atwood. Lucille 


Dower. Josephine 


Neilsen. Lvelyn 


Ballard. Marguerite 


Hdwards. Lottie 


Peterson. Ann 


Banna. Annie 


Heim. Alice 


Rehn. NLirgarct 


Bianucci. Angelina 


Hind. Dorothy 


Summer. F'rieda 


Cameron. Frances 


Hoffman. Irene 


Holt/, niwood 


Dahlstrom. Myrtle 


Kelly. Rosaline 


Rohrer. John 


Dalmas. Janet 


1 awson. Gladys 
Mayerson. Pearl 


■^'ahman. Raymond 



THE MISSION 111 



Mrs 


. Schott's Class — Room 209 


Arnescn. Howard 


Mclsaac. Walter 


Kearns. Vera 


Borgeson. Otto 


Murphy. Edward 


Koorsanes. Georgia 


Costcllo, Jjmcs 


Williams. Fred 


Mulrenin. Estelle 


Eisenhut. Charles 


Bailey, Thelma 


Peter. Sophie 


Hcimbockcl. C^harl 


;s 

Berner. Mary Margaret 


Prunty. Anita 


Hutchinson. Davie: 


Dean. Edna 


Simpson. Frances 


Jensen. Walter 


Fredrickson. Daisy 


Stine. Olive 


Kaiser. Merriliton 


Guaraldi. Mafalda 


Strom. Lillian 


Levin. Kenneth 


Hoffman, Bernice 


Winter. C^laire 


McBaine. Clarence 




Van Walleck. X'irginia 


Mr.C. 


E. Barker's Class-^ 


Room 203 


Andersen. Clarence Milam. I'red 


Quinn. Samuel 


Arteseros. John 


Murphy. William 


Randolph. Ander 


Bouska. George 


Mclnernev. Tim 


Rubenstein. Irwin 


Forcum. Forrest 


Nordgren. Herbert 


Saari. Ossian 


Gregson. Gordon 


Ossman. Stanley 


Stcinwav. Rciy 


Hemington, William IVt^rs. Richard 


Syrrell. I'red 


Kerkhof. Leo 


Price. Henry 


\'an Winkle. Robert 


Kreitzberg. Stanle 


y Preitzel. Harry 


Zanca. Peter 



112 1 11 L M 1 S S 1 O N 



Miss Stanley 


s Class 


Room 44 


Irving Addison 






Henry Manquering 


Will Beck 






George Mills 


Georgie Bougie 






Edna Ness 


Rudolph Busse 






Tony Norcia 


John Clark 






Chester Pal rone 


Francis Crowley 






Clifford Patrone 


Louis Ernst 






James Schweitzer 


Francis Furlong 






Bernice Sckera 


Josephine Hembly 






William Stark 


Lucille Heim 






Edward Stegeman 


Mildred Johnson 






Charles Swall 


Chester Laurin 






Dorothy Tremain 


William Lou 






Lillian West 


Jack iVlaguire 






Leslie Winant 


Charles Markis 






Henry Young 


Mrs. 


Kohlwey's 


Class 






BOYS 




Ben Bonnice 






Richard Mulcahy 


George Eisenhut 






Chester Parker 


Dan Galvin 






Cornelius Quinlan 


James Kirby 






Charles Rosso 


George Morse 




GIRLS 




Charlotte Carlson 






Edna Pugh 


Eloise Connors 






Celestia Rose 


Agnes Cuniffe 






Freda Rubenstein 


Louise Gimmel 






Marie Santos 


Fay Gershenson 






Alberta Schroder 


Marvina Hoffman 






Kathleen Smith 


Marian Lewis 






Hilma Soroli 


Dorothy McDonoL 


g'l 




Alice I'hompson 


Evelyn Pelyer 









T H E M I S S 1 O N in 



Mr.//. 


E 


. Owens' Class 


♦Robert Abcrncihy 






*MeIvin Vann 


W a relic Ayoob 






Rcva Addison 


Nick Dafnos 






*Emma Callen 


Bernard f-islier 






Marie Cxilling 


*Frank Garibaldi ^ 


^ 




^^^ Pauline C^ollison 


George Gilmore ^^ 






j^^^ Anita Conally 


* Harry Jacobscn ^r — 




t 


J^ ^^ Francis Conally 


*Elmer Johnson ^' ' 


'^, 


4 


H^ ujk *Thelma Faulknor 


*Willian King m '. ' 
George Kirk ^^^1^^ 


\ 


^^ 


^upji^ \ *Hanora Grealish 

PT^ 1 *Alicc Hamilton 

h H *\'eryl Klinger 


Walter Koehne B^^l 


1 


BC^Nb?^^ 


*Harry Korn I^^^H 


1 




\ ^J| *Eleanor Kramp 


♦William La Voie IjHIg 


B 


pi^h 


t£^^ffM Ruth Malone 


Fred Montague W™" 


■*« 


Mpfc^ 


*^^# Mildred Olsen 


George Prat ^j^?' 


'^^ 


,v 'SwS>Sk\ 


^'^%S3W 'Melba Ratto 


*l"om Roberts ^l^j^ 


% 


^^ '« 


^^i^r *Stella Reingold 


[■rank Silvcrthorn ^^ 


^ 


L ^...^ 


^^ * Evelyn Sager 


* Ralph Springer 


^ 




^ .Mildred ^Vlinck 


* Robert Stoker 








'^Those thus marked an' 


High Seniors. 


Mrs. Franz 


s 


Class- 


-Room 332 


Andren. William 






Lucy. Julia 


Arteseros. Josephine 






Menne. Doris 


Castagne. Helen 






Miller. Frances 


Cooper. Lena 






Miller, Marion 


Guslidge, Loretta 






Moskowitz. Myron 


Dunn, William 






Nannery. Bernice 


Egoroff. Zena 






Nelson. Irene 


Fellman. Beda 






Padilla Juliette 


Forrest. Olga 






Rogclia. Norma 


Fullerton. Donald 






Shaw, James 


Gallagher. Getrude 






Smith. Richard 


Goudal. Augustine 






Weiss. Sylvia 


Guardino. Mary 






Welch, Gerald 


Lendwehr. X'irginia 






Wilson, Gladys 



114 1 H h \l I S S I O N 

< ■ < . << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < ■ < ■ < ■ <<< <<<<<<<<< 





Miss May aire's 


Class 




BOYS 




Beroldo. Cliarli-s 


Johnson. Charles 


Molinari. Ernest 


Franzen. Nels 


JoliifTe. Charles 


Petru.<:ich, George 


Gray. Charles 


Kclliher. tugenc 


Quinlan. Frank 


Grcenwald. GeorRi. 


l.ebdefT. Leo 


Renz. Wilfred 


Grossetti. Sam 


l.achine. Frank 


Rollet. Charles 


Howard. Thomas 


Madrid. David 


Savio. William 


Hattrup. Clarence 


Myer. Walter 


Toepfer. Raymond 


Hirsch. Paul 


Maher. Joseph 


Toepfcr. John 


Hogan. John 


Moran. Thomas 
GIRLS 


X'ettcr. August 


Azzali. Inez 




Moss, Dorothy 


Rcdccker. Hlsie 


Buss. Doris 


Nixon. Myrtle 




Miss Taylor's 


Class 



Bassi. Bruno 
Cadigan. Laurence 
De Croupet. Peter 
Dougherty. Philip 
Edblad. Axel 
Evans. I hernias 
Gazzano. Raymond 
Germanani. MyrI 
Gregg. Albert 
1 lansen. Harold 
Johnson, Clarence 



Karp. Leon 
Kimble, Charles 
Mahoney. Jerry 
Marelich. Stephen 
.XUtivedefT. John 
Murphy Frances 
Miles, Bob 
Nelson, Oscar 
Rhoades. Oscar 
Sanford, George 
Stevens, George 
Stewart, Richard 



Thompson, Arthur 
X'erbrugge 
X'ercelli. Joseph 
Bafigo. Marion 
Carson. Lucille 
Cheli. Eleanor 
Lyon. Ruth 
Lichtenstein. Louise 
Manslelt. Mildred 
McLaughlin, Dorothea 
Sherman. \Lnry 



THEMISSION 115 

>> ■ >> > > > >>>>>>> > ■ > ■ »>> ■ »>> ■» > ■ > ■ > >^> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 




H LAREV 



Mr. Theodore Welden's Class — Room )28 



Virgina Kitticr 
Theodore Welden 
Marie Hausler 
Evelina Pozza 
Charles Bergman 
Mildred Stroheckcr 
Dorothy Cummings 
Angelo Dcrcnzi 
Matilda Martina 
Bernice Bishop 
Lloyd Snellgrove 
Emma Quintas 
Malcom Gee 

William 



Harold Bollinger 
Inez Perazzo 
Frances Stanich 
Mildred McKeon 
Erna Liebelt 
Margaret Wagstaff 
June MacMillan 
Helen McRae 
Fortunato Dagampat 
Jack Roberts 
Dolores Smith 
Ida Castellotti 
l.ihd Williamson 
Mezzetta 



116 I 11 li M I S S I O N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<< < ■ < ■ < < ■ << ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 



The Hiyhliyhts R 


oom 422 


President 




Joe Turturici 


Vice President 


Tennessee Kent 


Secn-liiry and Trvasurvr . 


. Myron Ramos 




BOYS 




Carl Bcrtucci 


James Hansen 


Harry Lindquist 


George Brossard 


William Hicks 


Joe McFarland 


Leo Burns 


Earl Jacobson 


Zavcn Taiarian 


Jack Cunningham 


Arthur Kaplanus 
Dan Kondeff 

GIRLS 


H.Trry Krohn 


Thclma Aiiingor 




Margaret McClelland 


F-rances Byrne 


\'era Forsberg 


Diana Piccini 


Carmcl Cuddic 


Doily Johnson 


Leona Sheideman 


Isaboll Hrncst 


Emma Johnson 


Cecelia Simonsen 


Miss 


Vallapando's Class — 5/(5 


Bergold, Evelyn 


Kanakaris. Tcsia 


Sherman. Rosalind 


Bessieres. Lucien 


Kendall. Stanley 


Speckman. Bernice 


Brown. James 


Klimek. Flora 


Sprugman. Bernice 


Christina Bowie 


McFarinnd. Kathleen Sprugman. Clavton 


Cahill. Theodore 


Mclver. Annie 


Stanich. John 


Dyer. Hazel 


McCarry. Julia 


Susocff. Augusta 


Edwards. Marjorie 


iMenicucci. Rita 


Taylor. Elmer 


Frank. Frieda 


Fed well. Eugene 


Venegas. Charles 


Fregosi, Alfred 


Riffe. Louis 


White. Hams 


Gracia, Elena 


Riordan. Peter 
Roccu. Anna 


Wyllie. Margaret 



THE M I S S I O N 117 

> - > ■ > ■ » ■ > >>>>>>> > ■ > ■ > ■ >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> » >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 




Miss Kirwin's Class — Room 226 



Arteseros. Lawrence 
Buschmann. William 
Carlson, Arthur 
Courtney. Edward 
Dalmas. Paul 
de Michclis. Jack 



l^uitcrwciod. Alice 
Cucchi. r-lorencc 
Goldstein. Lena 
Hollc. Viola 
Jackson. Lois 
Jolinson, Edith 



BOYS 

linmark. Alberl 
Henry, Charles 
Lambert. France 
Mayer. Jaynes 
Miles. Donald 
Peters. Henry 

GIRLS 



Ross. Malcolm 
Shuflin. I-rances 
Stoltz, Howard 
Suvanto, Eddie 
Verducci, Joseph 
Tanzer, Robert 



Ludwig, Elsie Shedwill. X'irginia 

Lynch. Marie Smith. Rose 

Mclntyre. Ramona Wagner. \Liry Alice 

Morrissey. Blanche Walsh. Alice 

Phillips. Marian Wrenn. Florence 

Read. Evelyn Zeiss, f-rances 



118 r H F^ M 1 S S 1 O N 

< < < < < ■ < < <<<<<<<<<<<<< < ■ « <<<< « :<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<*<^* 



Miss Morrill's Class — Room 228 


Antonio Abu.in Ben Stephens 


Victor Barbata Robert Stevens 


l.loyd Bloom Sylvia Blcckman 


Willis'Bruns Grace Clifton 


Dudley Cameron Carol Godfrey 


William Casey Rose Haag 


Milton C;ioke Dorothy Holland 


.loscp!-) Coiily Ida Icardi 


Joseph F-cldman Lillian Inberg 


Gunnar Hansen Helen Johnston 


Morris Harclik Frances Kunz 


Hans Niesing Helga Larson 


Ed ODonnell Gladys McNaughton 


Nason O'Hara Christina Park 


David Reid Dorothy Skcllcy 


Thomas Resnick Vivian Sleuven 


Olto Ronniger Frances Westlake 


Mr. Cleary's Class 






^/^U^ ' 1 John Dierke 


/ y^f /""V^ """^ John f-innegan 


/ Lty/ r^^ X Frank Gallagher 


/ /'^V lyl^ / Oakey Cunnerson 




/lA A •"/ / Louis Haas 




Jy/ r^ / Louis Harder 




^ iiJ f Fred Jung 




/U fy] 1 Malcolm Kerr 


VIaJ ^'i / F-rancis Lambert 


\\1 IA> 1 ^''^'^' '^l^-'l-'ii'S''''" 


V^ lAr Ed McLaughlin 


^yi IaJ John Minetta 


J^t^ ^V 'O'l Gene iMorris 


VI a ll*^ /^ Frank Skelley 


V vIT^CDriXr^rT ^n^fffV^K WilUam Ihompson 


V Vi/ViAU/\]/>U/>UAUA ^Y C^harles Iillman 


'»*^«— -J ^— '•— ' Jack \\ ehren 


Joseph Wilson 



THE MISSION 1J_9 

> >>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> . >> ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



Mrs. Pryors Class— 


Room 415 


Anninos. John 


Ruffatto. Mable 


Bihler, Otto 


Havvley, Annabelle 


Christenson. Leo 


Hclene. Lewis 


Chimpher, Edmund 


Lindsay, Jean 


Graff, Kenneth 


McCovern. Mary 


Hampsire. George 


McLaughlin. Ruth 


McBride. Joseph 


McLaughlin, Alcxina 


McCrackcn. Wilson 


Olsen, Alice 


Nevil. James 


Petrusich, Carolina 


Rentschler. Wilfred 


Smith, Jennie 


Stevens, Al 


Walitsch. Daisy 


Springer, Paul 


Ward, Harriet 


Yong. Chester 


Weales, Dorothy 


Berger. Inez 


Vallergo, Margaret 


Butterwood. Marion 




Miss I sham's Registry 


— Room 215 


Robert B, Asche 


Kenneth L. Waggoner 


Clarence Herold Bender 


Sophie Levine 


Fred Byron 


Rudolph Lindquist 


Loretta Corcoran 


*Anna Loorya 


Joseph Dapreda 


*Lucile Mullen 


John Doniin 


Elizabeth Ohnimus 


Doris June Freeman 


Arthur Oberleitner 


Raymond J. Geimer 


Lillian E. Pabst 


Mildred Green berg 


Earl Payne 


Herbert James Harman 


Henry Parolle 


Edwin Hoch 


Clair Roberts 


George L. Hoffman 


George Schmidt 


*Ann Kelly 


* Marie Schaefer 


Rene A. Vorbe 


*Ida Sertorelli 


Alice M. Winslow 




*High Seniors. 





120 T H E M 1 S S 1 O N 

<<<<<< < ■ < ■ < <<<<< ■ < ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 



'-/?^ 




Dr. Lundgren's Class 



Arthur Locke 
Harold Amslcr 
Bertram Bcrtclscn 
Wilfred Brunning 
lillsvvorth Dahlgrcn 
Gilbert Hood 
I-red Hoopes 
Joseph Jauch 
Maurice Kauer 



Jack Potter 
Milton Kelly 
Noel Larsen 
Edward Maring 
Marvin Simon 
Emmett Simpson 
George Traegcr 
George Upton 
limilio Zanotti 



THE MISSION 121 

■ >>>>>>>>>>>>> > >>>>> > >> >> ■ > ■ » ■ >>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>> >» ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ >>>>>> > > > 




Miss C. Chalmers Class- 


-Room 235 




BOYS 




Anderson. Robert 




Hortig. Francis 


Armenta. Anthony 




Hunter. William 


Burton. Robert 




Kardassakis. John 


Connell. George 




Leal. John 


Cornell. Clinton 




Miller. .John 


Daniels. Ferdinand 




Niederhaus. Edmund 


Drake. William 




OConnell, Joseph 


Duffee. William 




O'Farrell. Edward 


Fitzpatrick. Joe 




Smith. Alec 


Goobich. Arnold 




Smith. Philip 


Hoover. Leonard 


GIRLS 




Anderson. Donna 




Killpack. Catherine 


Bonn. Adrienne 




Linden. Ensie 


Burke. Svlvia 




McCarte. Susanne 


Cadigan. Lorraine 




O'Brien. Loretta 


Gilfcathcr. Cecilc 




Quick. Mac 


Kilaspa. Sclma 







122 I H U MISSION 



If 



-.^>^;, .t^.^^^^.iiKswii^m'is^r^^^^^m^ji^^m^^^ - - " 




Mrs. de Luce and Miss Donaldson, Teachers 

, ^ , Class Mates Sign Herh 

Irene Colona 
Geneva Calof 
Dorothy Sherwood 
Rose Marie Skoff 
Bessie Silver 
Kathleen W'ithey 
Emma Pinkerton 
Frances Storek 
Harry Rosenbluni 
Vernie Blair 
Frank Joesph 
Esther Offenbach 
Carl Hass 
Audrey Pollak 
Lorene Hittman 
Gertrude Titus 
Maisie Beckett 
Genieve Eckhardt 
Ann Thoreson 
Helen Prudden 
Mable Schonbacher 
Kessler MacCullough 
Edward McLaughlin 
Mariorie Dean 
Ethel Volpatti 
Jack I.avin 
Walter Anderson 
Beth Murphy 
Elsie Hallstrom 
Sylvia I.erner 
Claire Edwards 
Barbara Fitzell 
Charles Hewitt 
Dorothy Farrar 
Monica Lawton 
Edith Pollacheck 
Evelyn Coleman 
Stewart Prilchard 



T H E M I S S I O N 123 



Miss Gray's Class — Room 530 



Octavine BerglamI 
Vclma Craig 
Olga Del Monte 
Carolyn Downcs 
Malvina f-ried 
Vivian Goodrick 
Helen Grady 
Elizabeth Gray 
Helen Hoglund 
Dorothy Kaplan 
Anna Knick 
Kathryn Lolich 
Irene Mann 
Marguerite Marchand 
Madeline McKendrick 
Thelma Merritt 
Betty Moser 
Nina Nicholson 
Josephine Noone 
Bern ice Ostello 
Wilma Rasmussen 



Florence Rhea Margaret Sullivan 

Henrietta Rupprccht Marjorie Tracy 
Vivian Rupprecln Stella Trepidi 




X'iolet Srgi 
Audrey Smith 
Evelyn Sterner 
Jessie Sturke 



Rose lurdich 
Muriel Unruh 
Rachel Wirtanen 
Eileen Woods 



Mrs. E. Edwards Registry — Room 411 



Elizabeth Anderson 
Florence Ayrcs 
Ruth Ayres 
Harry Brennan 
Elizabeth Carberry 
Josephine Carlson 
Ellen Clasby 
Eli dayman 
lom Crowley 
Bernice Darry 



Marjorie Dover 
Fenton Field 
Thomas Foley 
Herman Fredrickson 
Katherine Grassel 
Margaret H.irbni 
Alice Hobbs 
\'ernon Howard 
William Kallio 
Joseph Kennedy 
Joe Marcellari 



Lurline Matson 
Lorene Orth 

Eddie Rhein 
Marguerite Rose 
Marie Sherril 
Herbert Shiller 
Grace Strominger 
Irma Turri 
Marie Louise L'rrcrc 
Katherine Wall 



124 T H E M 1 S S 1 O N 

<<<<<< < ■ < ■ < - < - < - < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ << ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ << ■ < ■ <<<< ■ < < ■ « ■ << ■ <<<<<<<< ■ <<<<<<<<<<< 



Miss F. N. Smith's Class 410 



Jack Baat 
Stanley Baroni 
Gerald Benson 
Maurice Callaghan 
Ray Cerda 
Harry Cummings 
Ray Doyle 
Paul Haltcrman 
George Hider 
Theodore Hillm.in 
Wesley Jobling 



Calir Barlow 
Doris Chance 
Mary Hendricks 
Jean Kliger 
X'iolet Marsh 
Geraldine Mills 
Hlgin Nelson 
Arlene Pallas 
Fannie Schwartz 
Bessie Sutton 
Louise Tracy 




Clive Logan 
Lmil Miller 
r.mmet Paul 
I rank Pellertis 
William Smith 



Del 



W 



Albert Staples 
George I omasello 
Salvador Vassallo 
Lawrence Vaughan 
Glarence Wise 
lods 



T H E M I S S 1 O N 125 

> - > - >>>>>>>>>>> >>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> - > . >>>>>>> . > . >>>>>>y>>>^ 




Miss Kelly and Miss Byrne. Teachers 



Michael Arnaudo 
Frank Carrick 
James Clark 
Alfred Dckv 
lilmcr Donald 
Frank FIcgal 
Raymond Fry 
Berkeley Fuller 
Albert Gommo 
Theodore Groeginger 
Stanley Gustavson 
Waller Hauck 



Philip Heins 
Douglas Holcomb 
Clement Jodocy 
Samuel Keen 
Donald Lee 
John Legakes 
Franklin Lovette 
Theodore Moore 
Harman Parks 
Frank Pechauk 
Frnest Rae 
Kramer Rohfleisel) 

OURK-37 



Otto Saxon 
Russell Spear 
Lloyd Thorpe 
Wing Tong 
Will Wantz 
Bernard Ward 
Richard Wellman 
Sigmund Zielmolsy 
Doris Gregson 
Jessie Lincoln 
1 ois Wood 



We leave the harbor soon to sail 
On Life's uncharted misty wave: 
We leave our ports to win or fail. 
The surging seas and storms to brave. 
Some ships will sink in winds that shift. 
And some will only lightly (.irift: 
Rich cargoes some shall bring to fame. 
And some shall win an honored name; 
But which are these, ah. none can tell. 
We leave, good friends, farewell, farewell. 

L. MORBY. 



126 I II 1, M I S S 1 O N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ << 



Miss M 


cQuaid's Class - 


Room i / i 


Djiuc l^ajjjjan.ini 


Gordon Jensen 


Margaret Cjallagher 


Jack Copeland 


Aaron Karp 


1 lelen Hallyburton 


Vasco Cristiani 


Joseph Layton 


Mane 1 lanley 


Stephen Curtin 


James Murphy 


Jcannette Jacobson 


Fred Ferrandu 


Melvin Myers 


Milda Jiisaitis 


Leon Hcrmitte 


Raymond Rehlelc 


Dorothy Leoni 


Dan Hirrill 


Simon Silkitis 


Wilma Schaeffer 


Philip Hirnll 


Robert Skinner 


Dorothy Liebreich 


Harold Holstcn 


Fred Wisherop 
Grace Fischer 


\Lary Welsh 


Mr. Anderson's Class— 


Room S^8 


r.lcanor Azzali 


Bernicc Mott 


Leo l.austen 


Elizabeth Colman 


Helene Schmidt 


Charles Reddy 


Lorreta Conlan 


Marie Stillwell 


Stanley Russell 


[;leanor Conley 


Margaret Yozsa 


Lee Schmidt 


Mary Grigsby 


Fddie Burke 


Ldward Spear 


Alice McClennan 


George Burton 


Plutarch Torres 


Louise Miklau 


Louis Curio 


Altred Biagi 



T H E M I S S I O N 127 

>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ > ■ > ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> » > 



GERMAN CLUB 
"Liederkranz" 

I^rcsident Werner Wadeixitz 

\'ice-President Elizabeth Ohnimus 

Secretari/ Ernestine Holzer 

Accompanist Gertrude Hasselbrock 

Librarian Anna Edel 

Chorus Leader Heine Wadewitz 

Faculty Advisors . . . Miss Price. Miss Newmark 


Compliments of 

Miss Peter's Registry 
Class 


With Best Wishes 

from 

Miss Walker's Class 

ROOM 236 


Compliments of 

Mrs. Schaller's Registry 

ROOM I 5 



128 I II 1: M I S S I O N 

< - < - < - < ■ < ■ < ■ < < < < < < <<< ■ < ■ < ■ <<<< < < < < < <<<<<<< <<<<<<<< << ■ <<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<r 







c 


^te 


\ 




M 


m 


JS^ V 


\ 


^ 


n 


Ij 


i 




) 


Dr. 


Nunn's 


Class 


— Room 


227 



Belford Brown 
Richard Brown 
Robert Burke 
Andrew Candalario 
Rinaldo Ciarraro 
Joesph Conroy 
Harold Dahlgrcn 
George Delucchi 
Janu's Dicrke 
Joseph Dillion 
Harold Eckhardt 
Alfred Girot 
Arthur Honig 
Edgar Jasqucs 



Wesley Keyworth 
Nicholas La Barbara 
Jack Levy 
John Lindbcrg 
Joseph Lynch 
Charles \Liurer 
William Murphy 
Roland Risso 
Harold Roscman 
Rene Rouquette 
Robert Skinner 
Paul Sundstrom 
Albert Zeller 



THE M I S S 1 O N • 129 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ » ■ » ■ > ■ > - >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ 



Compliments of 
Room 20 

BARTA MILLIARD. Teacher 



Compliments of 
Miss Breu's Class 

ROOM 42 



Compliments of 

Miss Raffo's Registry 
Class 

ROOM 56 



SPIRO'S 

FOR OUTING AND 
ATHLETIC GOODS 

2620 Mission Street 
Near 22nd Street 

Special Prices to Schools and Clubs on 
Athletic Goods 



Compliments of 
Mr. Gardner's Class 

ROOM 204 



Compliments of 

Mr. D. N. Barker's 
Registry Class 

ROOM 2 30 



Compliments of 

Miss De Ghietaldi's 
Class 



DR. JOHN CORNELL 

Dentist 

Phone 
Mission 5710 

Office 218 

2588 Mission Street 

San Francisco 



1 ^0 I H H M I S S I () N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ < ■ <<<<<<<<<<<< < - < - < ■ < ■ < ■ << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 




Telephone Operating 

Is a Desirable Vocation for 

High School Girls 

Paid while leartiing -t Interesting and permanent employment 

Attractive dining rooms < Comfortable rest rooms 

Opportunity for advancement 

Complete information may be obtained H a.m. to j p.m. 

The Employ.ment Department 
430 Bush Street, Roo.m 600 

The PACIFIC TELEPHONE and TELEGRAPH COMPANY 



T H E M I S S I O N 131 



By popular demand 



blue Kibbon Ice v^re 



am 



NATIONAL 
ICE & 



COMPANY 

of California 



) 



KANSAS and DIVISION STREETS 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone: Market 1 1 64 



n: r H K M I s s 1 o N 



Designers and creators of school 

and college jewelry, class pins and 

fraternity emblems. 



COLOR SKETCHES AND DESIGNS SUPPLIED 
WriHOUT CHARGE 



Granat Bros, 

60 Geary St. < 2390 Mission ' 923 Market 



Compliments 
of 

WHITTHORNE & SWAN 



T H E M I S S I O N 133 

>>>>>>> >>>>> > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ >>>>>>> ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ > ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



JOHN G. RAPP COL. J. G. l.ANGDON BHRT DAVIS CO, 

Telephone Hemlock 4y7 

CLOVERDALE CREAMERY 

C3RADH OF PASTEURIZED MILK 
BEAR VALLEY CERTIFIED MILK 

In Business For Your Health 

18I8-18:2 HOWARD ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

In appreciation of the 

STUDENT BODY'S PATRONAGE 

at the 



CO°OP 



(T^SJ-N*^ 



MYERS SODA WATER CO. 

2106 FIFTEENTH STREET 



I H T H E M 1 S S 1 O N 

<<<<<< < ■ <<<<<< <<<<<< ■ < < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < ■ < <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 



Mrs. C. E. Rust. Pres. Mrs J. S. Pinkerton. Cor. Secy. 

1354 11th Avenue 5855 2 Isi Street 



Mission High 
ParenUTeachers Association 

Has during the past year conducted a successful Study 
Class. 

Contributed approximately fifty dollars ($50.00) 
to the District Scholarship Fund. 

Maintained a Scholarship Fund of our own which 
has helped seven pupils to continue school. 

With more members we can do more. Do your parents 
belong.' 

Regular meetings — first Thursday of each school 
month, at 1:30 P.M. 



The 

Breton Hall Jr. Suit 

A smart college model with three buttons 

. . . " . can be worn buttoned up with high 

lapels, or with only one button 

and rolled lapels. 



$25.00 

7-Store Buying Power 



T H E M I S S I O N 135 

>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>> > >■ > ■ > ■ >>>>>>>>>>» ■ >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 



My Thrift Creed 



?? 



/ KNO W I want my future to be happy, prosperous and safe, I know 
these things ean only be brought about by eontinued effort ori my part 

AND so 

I BELIEVE in Thrift, in saving regularly for a definite purpose, in building a firm 

foundation for my success in business, contentment in my home, and an assured stand- 

mg m society. 

I BELIEVE a savings account is the best means of practising Thrift, for the interest 

paid on my deposits acts as an incentive to further savings, and, by laying aside a 

definite sum every week, I can see my power expand. 

I BELIEVE I should avoid delaying my success by wasting money that would have 

been working for me by earning interest, had I saved it in a bank. 

I BELIEVE it is worth while to deny myself some things now: not stingily, but sensibly. 

in order to build up this fund that later will assure so much greater happmess for me and 

my loved ones, and make my ambitions come true. 

JOIN NOW 

MISSION HIGH SCHOOL THRIFT^CLUB 

BANK DAY EVERY WEDNESDAY 

Sponsored by 

Anglo-Californl\Trust Ca 



COMMKRtlAl. 



TJUisT BOSn S^UT OKCOSIT DtPARrMENTb 



Trlie Ciiw-Wide Bank' 



ACME 

Ice Cream 




The real health Building Food 

is served exclusively at the 

Mission High Cafeteria and Bcanery 



n6 I 11 £2 M I S S I O N 

■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< - < ■ < ■ <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< ■ <<< ■ << ■ <<<<<< ■ <<<<<<<<<< 



H. P. FISHER 



'f^ 



We All Kno-w Him" 



HE TAKES OUR JOURNAL PICTURES 



165 Post Street »• 



Phone Kearny 341 



SAN FRANCISCO I ,A\¥ SCHOOL 



CO-EDUCATIONAL 




Organized i^og 

EVENING SESSIONS 

FALL TERM STARTS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST .,. 1928 

Annual Annonticement 

Outlining Complete Four-Year Curriculum 

will he mailed on request 

SEVENTH FLOOR ' CALL BUILDING 

74 NbW MONTCOMHRY StREET TELEPHONE KeARNV 425 I 



THEMISSION 137 

>>>>>> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ■ >>» ■ >>>>>> ■ > ■ » ■ > ■ >>>>>>>>> 











THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY lOTH. 1868 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidat ions with other Banks 




MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1927 

Assets .. $117,394,234.04 


Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund over $600,000.00, 

standing on Books at 1.00 


MISSION BKANCM Mission dnd 21st Streets 

FAKK-l>RESIDTO BRANCH Clenirnt St. .ind 7th Ave. 

HAK.Hr SIKEET BRANCH HaJKht and Belvedere Slicets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 


Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4^^) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 








MISSION HI PHARMACY 

3698 18th Street 

Complete lines of Telephone Underbill 1660 

STATIONERY U. S. SUB STATION 
DRUGS KODAKS SUPPLIES 
BEAUTY AIDS SODA FOUNTAIN 
I'lRST AID KITS CANDIES 
BOY SCOUT KITS 

Special rates to teachers and officers on all purchases. 

FREE — Full si7.e picture taken of all clubs and teams representing 

Mission High. 



]Mi T H E M 1 S S 1 O N 

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < < < < «<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 



Compliments of 

SPRECKELS 

CREAMERIES 

Inc. 

H05 MISSION ST. 


Student Attention! 

A REAL SPECIAL in 
CORDUROY PANTS 

Standard in Color. Style and make 
— a grade for which you have paid 
more money. 

In brief: They are of Dependable 
l:llery-Quality." priced for qual- 
ity distribution, and will be 
delivered anywhere for 

S3. 85 per P.iir 

Everything for the Sportsman 
and Athlete 

Athletic and Outing Catalogues are free 

THE ELLERY ARMS 
COMPANY 

585 MARKET STRLL 1 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 


HslMnhed 1868 

GOLDSTEIN « CO. 

THtATRICAL and MASQUERADE 

COSTUMERS for MISSION 

HIGH SCHOOL 

989 Market St. » Meadowbrook Bldg. 

SAN ERANCISCO 

Tclephom CarfiilJ Ii50 


CARLSONS 
LUSCIOUS PIES 

The Cafeteria Sells them 

CARLSON'S HOME MADE 
PIE BAKERY 

32 RANDALL STREET 
Phone A/is.5ion 3111 


Compliments of 

MA SPITA 

School Supplies < Candies 
Lunches 

CHURCH AT 17TH STREET 

I'hune Miirkcl <SSi 


Wholesale and Free Delivery 
Retail in City 

HELLMAN t^ FISSE 

Dealers in 
FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

We Supply the CAFE 

Dcpt. 225. Emporium Market 

Phoni- p,^rk 6924 S.\N Francisco 


Compliments of 

•MA" STUDDERTS 
PLACE 

QUALITY and QUANTITY 

School Supplies 
Candies, Lunches 
3684 I8rn STREET 



THEMISSION 139 



BEST WISHES 

from 

THE 

HENRY DUFFY 

PLAYERS 

ALCAZAR B PRESIDENT 
THEATRES 


Compliments of 

BERG BROS. 

6^8 CLAY STREET 


Compliments of 
ITALIAN AiMERICAN 
M A R K E T 

615 Cortland Avenue 
Phone Mission 4776 


Compliments of 

TABACKS STORES 

501 DOLORES STREET 
"5 800 EIGHTEENTH STREET 


WALTER N. BRUNT 

PRESS 

Printing and Publishing 

Badges and Buttons 

111 7th Street < Phone Market 7070 


Phone Markel 199 6 

GOLDEN GATE PIES 

GOLDEN GATE PIE CO. 

BUY THEM AT THE COOP 

2 50 Dorland Street Sin Francisco 


Compliments of 

LOUIS T. SNOW a CO. 

23 5 FRONT STREET 


Dress Well on Credit 
HOME CLOTHING CO. 

2500 Mission St. 


ELITE PRINTING CO. 

Printers H Bookbinders 

Phone Park 8S64 
540 Valencia Street San Francisco 


G. SCHOMAKER « CO. 

CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES 
4450 18th. Corner DougUs 

Phonr Morkel 6640 


Compliments of 

UNITED MILK CO. 

3201 16th Street 


The Best Lunch tor the Money 
by Demand 

ZOOKS BOX LUNCH 

402 Brv.int Street < Kearny 5^80 


DUNNIGAN'S PHARMACY 

Prescriptions a Specially 

Kodak Films. Developing and Printing 

18th a Guerrero Streets. San Francisco 

Phone Market 4 'wi 


Compliments of 

HOME MEAT MARKET 

47] C.\stro Street » Phone Market M82 


THE 
PULLMAN BOX LUNCH 

Has -IT" Every Day 

"Dunt Esk" for Box Lunch — 

Sou "Pullman" 



140 1 H 1. \M S S I O N 

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PHONES 

Grivitonc 202 7 
Gr^Vilonc 2028 



P. P. RATHJHNS 



IM ,RA IHJiiNSySONS 
Pork Packers 



Manufjcturcrs and 

Dealers in all kinds of 

SAUSAGES 



EXPOSITION FRANKKFURTERS 



I 33 II 345 PACIFIC STREET 
bet. Lrjvcnworlh And Hyde Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The Store that Sells 
Cruen Watches 

D.SrMP'^NCJ&SONS 

JEWELERS 

225 3 MARKET STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



.\ charge account if you wish 

Photic Mitlcl 5083 



Coniplimenti of the 

DAIRY DELIVERY 
COMPANY 

Suaesforf in Sdn francisco to 
MILBRAE DAIRY 




TRADE MARK P, 

THE MILK WITH MORE CREAM 

and 
THE CREAM OF QUALITY 

Phone Valencia Ten Thousand 



6at at 

TAITS 



\ 



Complimenis of 

M. ZEISS 

FINE CHOCOLATE A SPECIALTY 
ICECREAM » LUNCHEONS 

SIXTFTNTH STREET AT GUERRERO 
Phone Market 94 61 



THE M I S S 1 O N 141 

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i^oinplinnjiits ol 



TIk- c 



ommission 



cd ^'lliccrs 



AND THE 



l\!on=>^^oniniissioncd ^^lliccrs 



OF T! IE 



R. O. T. C. 



142 I 11 I \1 1 S S I O N 




DID HE GET THE POSITION.' 

Old gentleman engaging a chauffer — "I suppose I can wriic lo your lasi em- 
ployers for your character? " 

Chauffeur — "I am sorry to say. sir. each of the last {wo gentlemen passed away 
in my service." 

GOOD COMPANY 

Insane Asylum Warden (when asked if he liked his job answered): "Yes. 
everyone is just crazy about me." 

TAKING NO CHANCES 

Aunt Dinah (to her offspring): "Hcah you. chile, take date key outa yo 
mouf. do you want to get the lock jaw.'" 



T H E M I S S I O N 143 

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ASK FATHER 

Father's method of working hard Algebra problems — "Ask your mother — 
can't you see I'm busy?" 

JUST ACTING 

It was a death bed scene in a Shakespearean rehearsal. Coach — "Mel. come on. 
put more life into your dying." 

HIGH AND DEEP 

"Your answer reminds me of Quebec." 

"How so? " 

"It was founded on a bluff." 

Tom- — "And what is so rare as a day in June. Bill.'" 

Bill — "The 30th of February is rarer than the rarest day in June. I'll say. " 

CANDID 

Poet — "I put my whole mind into this poem. " 
Eddie — "Evidently — I see it is blank verse." 

DURING MUSIC WEEK 

Joe — "He looks like a musical sort of fish." 
Zoe — "Sure, he is a Piano Tuna'." 

Bill — "Those corduroys look a bit worn." 
Jack — "Yes. they're on their last legs." 

Jones — "They are making use of all kinds of skins, even of rat skins: but I 
want to know what they make out of banana skins. " 

Abe — "I know — they make slippers of them. " 

CAREFUL 

(The train was approaching the station. I "Shall I brush you off. suh.'. " said 
the helpful porter. 

"Not if I know it: I'll get off when the trains stop." was the reply. 

BELIEVE IT OR NOT 

IF all the zero's handed out by teachers were made ol sicel and forged together 
as a chain, it would serve to anchor the Leviathan in mid ocean. 

IF all the golf balls lost by our golf players were laid in single file they would 
be a silly, silly sight indeed. Enough spaghetti is consumed in the Cafe to make 
aerial for I64;'4 radio sets. " 

Jack — "Most men call a spade a spade, but when he starts to use it he calls it 
something else." 

"The most dangerous thing about a motor car is the driver. " 



144 T H E M 1 S S I O N 

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Compliments of 

The Bank of California N. A. 

Mission Branch 
SIX'I EENTH and JULIAN AVENUE 



From the Prcs;^ of the 

KtySTONE PRIiNTlNG COAUVXNY 



Bindins by the 

T. .1. CARDOZA CO.