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Full text of "The Missouri cook book. Proved recipes"

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The 



Missouri 



Cook Book 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 



Shelf ...FLZ 1 



UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 






THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



'O woman 1 enthroned by your visions elate 
In temples of learning, and chambers of State, — 
Politician, or lawyer, or doctor so wise, 
Go bottle your tears and pickle your sighs ; 
For descend you must to every day life 
And enter the ranks of the housekeepers strife. 
You may settle like Darwin, the monkey's sad fate. 
You may settle all questions of kingdom or S:ate, 
But no art of persuasion, witty or wise. 
Will settle the coffee or make the bread rise, 
No doctrines nor creed since eating began 
Were known to regale a right hungry man, 
Your doctrines, affinities, destinies dim, — 
Even total depravity 's nothing to him, 
A judge's decision may turn in a dish. 
Or a doctor's prescription be found in a fish. 
Great thoughts gleam in gravy, and nations are tost 
On billows of soup, — and finally lost. 
Then do not rebel, but with good common sense, 
Submit to the stomach's omnipotence. 
Like the ghost of poor Bancjuo, you always must meet 
That unsettled, old (juestion, ' O what shall we eat ? ' 
And another close follows — ' O what shall we cook ? ' 
That question is answered in this little book." 



THE 



MISSOURI 



Cook Book 



PROVED RECIPES, 



COLLECTED AND ARRANGED BY 



THE LADIES OF THE BAPTIST CHURCH, 



¥1 



FAYETTE, MO. 

IT , 



ST. LOUIS: 

FARRIS, SMITH & CO. PRINT. 

919 OLIVE STREET. 




<-k^ 



A"' 



f^'A 



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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 18S7, by 

THE LADIES OF THE BAPTIST CHURCH, OF FAYETTE, MO. 

In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington 



PREFACE. 



When we first thought of compiling and selling these recipes, the 
amount that would thus be brought into the Lord's treasury was our 
paramount object, but as we have studied how to be most helpful to 
those who will patronize us, our solicitude to give back to them 
value received, has almost overwhelmed every other idea, for we 
would bring no reproach upon the cause to which our efforts are 
dedicated. We claim no originality for our work. Like the bee 
that sips the sweetness of every flower, we have gathered suggestions 
wherever we could find them. The recipes we offer have been used 
by the best house-keepers, in our own and other communities, and 
we bespeak for them a kindly reception and fair trial. 

As the book goes forth to stranger and friend, our work is 
done. We have bn^ught our loaves and fishes to the Master. May 
His hand direct the distribution, and bless the offering that we lay 
down at His feet. 



We do most sincerely express our thanks to the many ladies who 
have contributed their recipes, and also, to the advertisers who have 
so kindly aided in accomplishing our work. 

Mrs. Wm. C. Arline. 

Mrs. E. W. Bedford. 



DIRECTIONS. 

Ao-ate, iron, or porcelain kettles should be used for 
making soups. Meats for soups should be put to cook 
in cold water, boiled gently, and the required quantity 
of salt added at first, to extract the juices of the meat, 
and cause the scum to rise. AHow one quart of water 
and a teaspoon of salt for each pound of meat. Remove 
all the scum carefully before the vegetables are added. 
All grease should be removed before putting in the 
vegetables. It is well to cook the meat the day before 
the soup is wanted, that the grease may cool and be re- 
moved. It can readily be removed while the soup is 
hot by adding a little cold water to the liquor. 

BI.ACK SOI :P. 

Cut the meat from beef shank-bone. Mash the bone 
and simmer all slowl}^ in two gallons of water. Six 
hours. Set away to get cold. Next day skim off all 
the grease that has risen. Put liquor on, with vege- 
tables, two turnips, as much cabbage, one small onion, 
carrots and tomatoes, well chopped ; boil till vegetables 
are tender, then strain through a colander, add a tea- 
spoonful of powdered cloves, and boil all a few moments. 
— Mrs. Jeannette Leonard, Fayette, Mo. 

iviiiTE sorp. 

Simmer for an hour in three quarts of chicken or veal 
stock, parsley, onion or celery. Cut in small pieces, 
with a blade of mace. Strain and thicken with two 
ounces of liour. Boil two minutes. Add half pint of 

9 



10 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

sweet cream. Season with salt and pepper. "When 
about to boil stir in the well-beaten yolks of three eggs. 
Serve. — Mrs. H. Everett, Council Bluffs , Iowa. 

ToiiATo sorp. 

One quart fresh milk, one pint tomato juice, three table- 
spoonfuls melted butter, one tablespoonful flour, two tea- 
spoonfuls salt, one teaspoonful black pepper, one tea- 
spoonful soda. Let the milk come to a boil, then add 
the juice, in which the soda has been well dissolved; 
stir the flour, salt and pepper in the butter, and also 
add. Boil a few minutes and pour over crackers, and 
serve. — Ilrs. Mamie White Chinri, Franklin., Mo. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

To one quart of water add the contents of a quart can 
of tomatoes ; boil iwenty minutes, then strain through 
a sieve ; add one pint of cream, or rich milk ; lump of 
butter the size of an egg, and tablespoonful of flour, 
rubbed together. Add this to soup, and boil five min- 
utes. One-half nutmeg grated in, salt and pepper to 
taste. Then ready for the table. — 3Irs. H. Emrett., 
Council Bluffs, loioa. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

To one gallon of water use half a chicken ; let boil 
half an hour, then add two large tomatoes, or one cup of 
canned; one cup of rice. Just before taking up j^ut in 
a cup of cream and a small lump of butter ; salt and 
pepper to your taste. — Mrs. T. J. Payne, Fayette, Mo. 

GERMAN FRITTER SOUP. 

To one chicken take three quarts of water; boil two 
hours and a half; take three tablespoonfuls of flour, 
four eggs, one cup of sweet milk ; mix into a thin batter 
and make into griddle cakes. The cakes should be 
baked as thin as a leaf; cut in small strips and put into 
a bowl ; season with a little mace and nutmeg ; salt and 
pepper to taste. — Mrs. Joseph Memmel, Fayette, Mo. 



SOUPS. 11 

OYSTER SOUP. 

One can of oysters, two tablespoonfals of butter; 
strain the liquor from tlie oysters, add to it the milk ; 
set it over the fire in a vessel ; set in a pot of boiling 
water; when it is near boiling add the butter, salt and 
pepper, then add the oysters and let them stew until 
they ruffle on the edge. This will be in about five min- 
utes. I like it best with a few crackers broken in it, 
just before taking it from the fire. Serve just as soon as 
done. The crowning excellence in oyster soup is to 
have it cooked just enough. — 3f?'S. EUzcibetli Major, 
Fayette^ Mo. 

BEEF SOIP. 

Secure a good sized soup bone and put it in one gallon 
of cold water, with a teaspoonful of salt; more water 
can be added later on if necessary ; skim when needed ; 
while boiling keep it well covered, and boil slowly for 
four or five hours. An hour before using add one can 
of tomatoes, or eight good sized ripe tomatoes, also two 
or three small potatoes, sliced thin, and one teaspoonful 
black pepper and one tablespoonful of salt. To one 
e^^, well beaten, add fiour enough to make very stiff; 
roll very thin and let dry for an hour ; then cut in thin 
strips, and drop in soup fifteen minutes before serving; 
also one tablespoonful of fiour, mixed in a little cold 
water, and add it the last thing just before taking from 
the fire. — Mrs. Margaret Unriili., Fayette., Mo. 

BEEF SOI P. 

For one gallon soup pare six or eight good sized pota- 
toes, slice thin and boil tender ; take same number 
large, ripe tomatoes, one large teacup dried okra, one 
teaspoonful soda, three-quarters cup sugar, a little rice, 
if preferred. Boil each in separate vessels, till tender, 
then all together and boil twenty minutes. A medium 
sized beef bone will season sufficiently. Add salt to 



12 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

taste. Some think cabbage chopped fine and added an 
improvement; many do not. — Miss Jennie Key ser, FQ.y- 
ette, Mo. 

MOCK OYSTER SOUP. 

One pint tomatoes, well stewed ; one quart boiling 
water ; })ut in a teaspoonful of soda. When it has done 
foaming add one quart boiling milk; a piece of butter, 
size of an egg. Salt and pepper to taste. Pour upon 
three soda crackers, to suit taste. — Mrs. Samuel Co2^p, 
St. Louis. 

BEEF BOX IIELE. 

Take the face of the rump and put it on to boil about 
four hours ; after it has been on half an hour skim it 
well ; then add carrots and turnips, cut up fine ; roast 
one onion brown on the coals, stick it with cloves 
and put it in ; add half a tumbler of red wine (port is 
better,) a little tomato, or other catsup, cayenne, or any 
other good thing. Before serving take out some of the 
gravy in a teacup, and cut up a pickled cucumber into 
slices and pour over the beef. — Mrs. Samuel Treat, St. 
Louis. 

GREE^ PEA SOUP. 

Take one quart of peas, cover with about three quarts 
of water; season with salt and pepper. When almost 
done add a teacupful of rich cream. Serve. — Mrs. T. R. 
Betts, Fayette, Mo. 

BROIVIVED FI.OITR. 

Put a pint of Hour in a saucepan ; stir constantly 

with a wooden spoon until it is a dark brown. Put 

away in a covered jar, and use it in soups or gravies. 

More of this is required to thicken with than of un- 

browned flour. 

CARAMEE. 

Caramel, for coloring soups, is made by putting a 
tablespoon of sugar and a pinch of salt in a diy sauce- 
pan, over the fire ; stir constantly until it is slightl}^ 



SOUPS. 13 

burnt. When very dark brown pour in less than a tea 
spoon of water; keep stirring and gradually add a cup 
of water. Be sure the sugar is all dissolved. 
a ricli color and is better than browned flour 



This gives 



FOR COI.OKIXC; SOI PS. 

For an amber color use grated carrot ; for hrown nse 
caramel, or browned Hour ; for reel use the pulp and 
juice of ripe tomatoes; for white soup use white vege 
tables ; for thickening use rice, pearl, barley or mac- 
caroni. 




TISI[^lI\'B*OTSTBrvS; 



HINTS. 

Notice that the body of the fish is firm and the eyes 
full and the gills red. Almost every kind of fish is 
either boiled, broiled, or fried. Any small fish of the 
size of a smelt, or smaller, is better fried tljan prepared 
in any other way. Fish, like salmon-trout, are best 
when baked, and some fine sauce poured over them. A 
cup of diluted cream, in which is stirred two tablespoon- 
fuls of melted butter and a little chopped parsley makes 
an excellent sauce for salmon-trout. Before broiling 
fish rub the gridiron witli a piece of fat, to prevent its 
sticking. Lay the skin side down first. The earthy 
taste often found in fresh water fish can be removed by 
soaking in salt and water. Most kinds of salt fish 
should be soaked in cold water for twenty -four hours ; 
the fleshy side turned down in the water. 

TO BOIL FISH. 

Fish should be scaled and thoroughly cleaned, well 
salted and put in a cold place until time to cook. Boil 
in a fish kettle, with water enough to cover it, or wrap 
and tie in a cloth, and boil in any cooking vessel ; if 
the fish is large it can be doubled in the cloth ; cover 
with more than two inches of boiling water, adding a 
teaspoonful of salt and a tablespoonful of vinegar to 
every pound of fish. A good sized fish will cook in half 
an hour. Be careful not to break in taking out. 

Sauce. — Stir into a pint of milk, boiling, a piece of 
butler the size of an eg^g, mixed with Hour, and a hard 
boiled idgg^ cut up fine ; pour this over the fish or serve 
in a sauce-boat. — Mrs. 8. P. Si7?ipso7i, St. Louis, 1875, 

14 



FISH AND OYSTERS. 15 

BAKED FISH. 

Clean and wipe the tish dry ; tie a string round tlie 
head and dredge with flonr, pepper and salt ; bake in a 
pan, witli butter and lard, and baste it often while 
baking; a good size fish should cook three-quarters of 
an hour. If desired it can be stuffed with the same 
dressing used for turkeys, onl}^ more highly seasoned. 

FRIED FISH. 

Clean the fish well ; cut up into pieces about two by 
four inches ; lay around in a colander, skin down, and 
sprinkle with salt. Let stand an hour, or half a day, if 
need be. Have the fat hot in a ftying-pan. Roll in 
corn meal ; fry slowly and cook a long time, till thor- 
oughly done through. If desired it can be then dij)ped 
in well beaten egg and rolled in crackers after frying, if 
preferred. — 3Its. E. Major. 

ISOII.FD PIKE WITH EGO SAFCE. 

Any llsh will do ; after it is dressed, la}" it in the form 
of a circle, b}^ putting its tail into its mouth, and take a 
stitch with a darning needle in its head and tail ,to hold 
it in place. To two quarts of water put half a cup of 
vinegar, a teaspoon of whole cloves, same of whole 
pepper, a bay leaf. Half a lemon sliced is a nice addi- 
tion, and a tablespoon of salt. Put over in cold water, 
and boil till the tins fall off easily, then the skin can be 
easily removed, if desired. Serve with egg sauce, made 
by adding hard boiled eggs, cut up in small pieces, to a 
white sauce. Pour the sauce inside the circle of tish. 
Lay a sprig of parsley on top of one side of the tish, and 
a few slices of lemon at the side of the platter. 

BAKED FISH WITH CREA^fl SAl €E. 

Take a tablespoon of butter and a tablespoon of flour, 
mix in a saucepan over the Are; add either milk or 
water, till a pint has been used; season with salt and 
pepper. Take any kind of baked fish, remove the bone 



10 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

and skin, put in a baking dish, cover with the sauce and 
dust witli cracker dust. Bake a delicate brown. 

BROILED FISH. 

To broil a shad, or aii}^ other fish, grease the bars of 

the broiler well. Put the inside to the lire first. The 

backbone can be removed by running a knife along 

under it, and the long bones can be loosened and taken 

out, one, or more, at a time, with a little knife, after the 

backbone is cut away from them. Let brown without 

burning, till the flakes separate. Turn the skin part to 

the fire long enough to brown. Season either before or 

after cutting. 

SHEI.I. FISH— CXAMS. 

To judge whether clams and oysters are fresh, insert 

a knife, and if the shell instantly close firmly on the 

knife the oysters are fresh. If it shuts slowly and 

faintly, or not at all, they are dying, or dead. When 

the shell of raw oysters are found gaping open they are 

not good. 

FRIED CXAMS. 

Take large soft-shell clams, dry them in a cloth, and 

dip them first in beaten Qgg and then powdered cracker 

or bread crumbs, and fry in sweet lard or bu<:ter, or 

both, mixed. 

FRIED FROGS. 

Scald the hind quarters in boiling water, rub them 

with lemon juice and boil for three minutes ; wipe them, 

dip them first in cracker dust, then in a mixture of two 

beaten eggs in half a cup of milk, seasoned with pepper 

and salt ; then again in cracker crumbs. When they 

are well covered with crumbs, fry in a mixture of hot 

lard and butter. 

TR ASK'S SEI.ECT SHORE MACKEREI.. 

Take a mackerel, put it in soak over night in a pan of 
water, skin side up ; take it out and wipe it dr}^ with a 
towel, then fry it in butter, and serve hot. If preferred 



FISH AND OYSTERS. 17 

broil it, and put on hot butter; or if preferred it can be 

boiled in a pan of water, and then served with drawn 

butter. 

CODFISH AXI> C'REA:*!. 

Freshen the codfish to taste ; turn off the water ; add 

milk and butter, and a small quantity of thickening; 

stir well ; break in two eggs, and serve wlien cooked. 

< OWFISII BATil.S. 

Boil and mash potatoes, and keej) Avarm for mixing 
with the codfish ; freshen the codfish, taking care not 
to freshen too much ; add to the codfish double amount 
of potatoes ; put in pork fat for seasoning, and milk 
enough to soften ; roll into balls, and fiy in hot pork fat 
until entirely brown. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Strain off the liquor and dry the oysters well in a 
towel ; beat light the yolks of two eggs ; add one half 
teacup of cream ; season with pepper and salt; dip in 
rolled crackers, then in the egg, and again in the crack- 
ers ; drop in boiling lard, and fry until a light brown ; 
garnish with slices of lemon. — 3Irs. Jt P. Williams^ 
Fayette, Mo. 

BROILED OYSTERS. 

Drain select o^^sters in a colander; dip them one 

by one into melted butter, to prevent sticking to the 

gridiron, and place them on a wire gridiron ; broil over a 

clear fire ; when nicely browned on both sides, season 

with salt and pepper, and plenty of butter, and lay 

them on buttered toast, moistened with a little hot 

water. Serve very hot or the}' will not be nice. Oysters 

cooked in this way and served on broiled beefsteak are 

nice. 

OYSTER (ROQl ETTES. 

Take the hard end of the oyster, leaving the other end 
in nice sluipe for a stew or soup ; scald them ; then choj) 
fine, and then add an equal weight of potatoes, rubberl 



18 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

through a colander ; to one pound of this add two 
ounces of butter, one teaspoonful of salt, half a tea- 
spoonful of pepper, half a teaspoonful of mace, and one 
half gill of cream ; maL-e in small rolls ; dip in egg and 
grated bread ; fry in beef lard. 

FRICASSEED OYSTERS. 

Drain the liquor from a quart of oysters; strain half 
a pint and put in a porcelain kettle, and when it boils 
put in the oysters ; have a tablespoonful of liour rubbed 
well into two tablespoonsful of butter; when the oys- 
ters begin to swell stir in the butter and Hour ; cook 
until the oysters are white and plump, then add a gill 
of cream, and pepper and salt. 

FRIEI> OYSTERS. 

Take large oysters, wash and drain ; dip them into 
flour; put in a hot frying-pan, with plenty of lard and 
butter; season with salt andpe23per ; fry brown on both 
sides. Fried in this way they are similar to broiled 
oysters. 

C'HICKEBT AND OYSTER PIE. 

Parboil a chicken, cut up and place in a pie dish ; 

cover with oysters, and season to taste; add two hard 

boiled eggs, cut into slices, with piece of butter, size of 

an egg. in the center; dust the whole with liour, and 

pour on one half pint of milk ; put on a puff paste crust, 

and bake about three-quarters of an hour in a moderate 

oven. 

SCAEEOPED OYSTERS. 

Cover the bottom of a baking dish with crackers, 
rolled, or stale light bread ; then a layer of oysters, 
with butter, pepper, and salt ; a layer of crumbs again, 
and so on until the dish is full. Having the last layer 
crumbs, pour over the oyster liquor, and if that is not 
sufficient to moisten well add milk. Bake about three- 
quarters of an hour. — 3frs. E. Major, Fayette, Mo. 



FISH AND OYSTERS. 19 

STr.A:»iEn otstkrs ix the siiei.i.. 

Wash well and lay in a steamer. When they are 
cooked enough the shell will open. They may be 
turned into hot dishes, or served in the shells ; to be 
seasoned by the consumer. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 

Line small patry-pans with puff paste, into each pan 
pat six oysters, bits of batter, pepper and salt, sprinkle 
over a little flour and hard boiled eggs, chopped, (allow- 
ing about six eggs for six patties,) cover with an upper 
crust, notch the edges and bake. Serve either in the 
pans or remove to a larger platter. 

OYSTER A EA POl EETTE. 

Scald a dozen oj^sters in their own liquor, salt and 
remove the oysters, add a tablespoonful of butter, the 
juice of half a lemon, a gill of cream, and a teaspoonfal 
of flour ; beat up the yolk of one e^g while the sauce is 
simmering ; add the egg and simmer the whole, until it 
thickens. Place the oysters on a hot dish, poar the 
sauce over them, sprinkle a little chopped parsley on 
the top and serve. 

O ASTER EEAYOR. 

A German cook has discovered a way to have oyster 
flavor all the year round. Take fresh, large, plump oys- 
ters, beard them, and place them in a vessel over the 
fire for a few moments in order to extract the juice, then 
put them to cool, and chop them fine with powdered bis- 
cuit, mace, and finely minced lemon peel ; pound them 
until they become a paste; make them up into thin 
cakes, place them on a sheet of pai)er in a slow oven 
and let them bake until they become quite hard ; pound 
them directly into powder, and place the powder in a 
dry tin box. well covered ; keep in a dry place and it 
will be very much appreciated when the true oyster 
flavor is imparted to flsh, sauce and dishes. This makes 
a delicous sauce for fresh cod. 



iULiV 



'*TSs^ 



DIRECTIONS. 

Fresh meats should always be cooked in boiling 
water, and kept constantly boiling, if not, the meat 
will soak up the water. If more water is needed 
be careful that it is boiling water ; remove the scum 
when it hrst begins to boil ; allow twenty minutes for 
each pound of fresh meat. Salt meat should be boiled 
in cold water, allowing twenty hve minutes to every 
pound. The more gently meat boils the more tender 
it is. 

ROAST BEEF. 
The sirloin and standing rib pieces are the best ; 
have the butcher take out as much of the bone of the 
latter as possible ; skewer it to keep it in shape ; sprin- 
kle with salt and pepper ; pour a little water into the 
pan to keep the meat from burning; allow twenty min- 
utes to the pound for rare beef, one half hour when to 
be well done ; when done, put the meet into a platter 
and keep warm ; pour oif the drippings, and with the 
dark remaining prepare your grav}^ by a few dishes of 
brown flour, a little water, the whole brought to a boil. 
Send to the table hot. 

BOAST POBK. 

Season well and roast slowly at hrst, allowing fully 
half an hour to a pound ; put some water in the pan, 
and baste often. Cook thoroughly. Fried cabbage is 
very nice with pork, also any tart sauce ; canned vege- 
tables, or turnips, are nice; celery is always admissible. 
20 



MEATS. 21 

ROAST I.EG OF I.AMB. 

Roast it ill the usual nianuer. When about done, 
and a light brown on top, make a dressing in this way : 
Put into a skillet one large kitchen spoonful of lard ; 
when hot pour into it this batter: One pint of butter 
milk, one handful of meal, two handfuls of flour, one 
egg, half teaspoon of soda, teaspoonful of salt, a little 
sage, and one small onion. Stir constantly until done. 
Cut the roast several times across the top, and spread 
the dressing on over the top and sides ; return to the 
oven and brown. This is veil/ nice. — 3Irs. Louisa Se- 
bree, FayeMe., Mo. 

ROAST I.ITTI.E PIG. 

The pig should be three weeks old, well cleaned, and 
stuffed with a dressing of this proportion : Two large 
onions, four times the quantity of bread crumbs, three 
teaspoonfuls of chopped sage, two ounces of butter, half 
a salt-spoonful of pepper, one salt spoonful of salt, and 
one egg. or it may be filled with veal force-meat stuffing, 
if preferred, or, it may be stuffed with hot, mashed pota- 
toes. Sew it together with a strong thread, trussing its 
fore legs forward and its hind legs backward. Rub the 
pig with butter, flour, pepper, and salt. Roast it at 
flrst before a very slow Are, as it should be thoroughly 
done ; or, if it is baked, the oven should not be too hot 
at first. Baste it very often. When done (in about 
three hours,) place a cob or a potato in its mouth, 
having put something in at flrst to keep it open. Serve 
it with apple- sauce or tomato sauce. — Mrs. Henderson'' s 

Cook Book. 

cha:»ii»agm: iiA.n. 

When boiling liani add one quart of strong vinegar, 
one half hour before taking ott'. This cuts the grease in 
the ham and imparts a peculiar, sharp, and pleasant 
flavor. When done put the ham into the oven to bake ; 
flrst lay three or four little sticks on the top of the i)an. 



22 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



on tliem put your ham ; this allows all the grease to 
drop down in the pan, and leaves tlie meat very dry. • 
Bake in a slow, cool oven an hour. — M7~s. J. Kinney, 
Fraiiklin, Mo. 

BAKED HAM. 

Make a thick paste of flour (not boiled,) and cover the 
ham with it, bone and all ; put in a pan one or two 
pieces of large wire, or any thing that will keep it an 
inch from the bottom. Bake in a hot oven. If a small 
ham, fifteen minutes for each pound ; if large, twenty 
minutes. The ham should be placed in the pan, the 
skin side down. The paste forms a hard crust around 
the ham, and the skin comes off with it. — 3£rs. Lucy 
Boone, Jefferson City, Mo. 

BOIIiEO HAM. 

Put the ham to soak over the night, then wash and 
cleanse well, and put it in to boil, with cold water 
enough to cover it. Bring to the boiling point and place 
on the back of the stove to cook slowly until tender, 
when pierced with a fork ; be careful to keep the water 
at the boiling point ; turn the ham over once or 
twice. A very good rule is to allow twenty minutes to 
the pound in boiling. When done take up and put into 
a baking pan, and then dip the hands in cold water and 
take the skin between the fingers, and peel. When 
cool, and ready for baking, either rub white sugar into, 
it well and bake until brown, or take one %^g and beat 
it well, then add a little salt and pepper, and cracker 
crumbs all over the top, and brown. 

DRESSi:^0 FOR BAKED HAM. 

Boil tender, then remove the skin, set in the stove to 
bake twentj^ minutes, then spread on a batter of one 
^^^, a tablespoon of sugar, the same of buttermilk^ and 
a little soda, mixed. Set in the stove to brown. Stick 
cloves over it before putting in the oven. — M. C. Burton. 



MEATS. 23 

BOII.El> BKKF TOXCirE. 

Wasli clean, jnit into jxM with water to cover, a pint 
of salt, and a small pod of red pepper; if the water 
boils away add more; be careful to keep it covered 
until done; boil until it can be pierced easily with a 
fork ; take out, and if needed for present use, take oft' 
the skin, and set away to cool ; if to be kept some days 
do not peel until wanted for the table. Salt tongue, 
boil the same way, only leave out the salt; or a nice 
seasoning is to take a saucepan, with one cup of water, 
one half cup vinegar, four tablespoons of sugar ; cook 
till liquor is evaporated. 

BEEFSTEAK S:!IOTIIERED IX OMOXS. 

Slice the onions thin and drop in cold water; put 
steak in pan, with a little lard. Take out the onions 
and add to steak. Season with pepper and salt, cover 
tightly, and put over the fire. When the juice of the 
onions has dried up, and the meat brown on one side, 
remove the onions, turn the steak, replace onions, and 
fry till done, being careful not to burn. 

FRIEI> BEEFSTEAK. 

Pound and sprinkle well with llour , season with salt 
and pepper : lay in a frying-pan, with hot lard or butter. 
Turn frequently until done. 

BROIEEB BEEFSTEAK. 

Lay a thick, tender steak, upon a gridiron well 
greased with butter, or beef suet, over hot coals : when 
done on one side have ready the warmed phitter, with a 
little butter on it. Lay the steak, without pressing it, 
upon the platter, with the cooked side down, so that the 
juices which have gathered may rnu in the platter; 
quickly place it on the gridiron and cook the other 
side. When done to liking put on the platter again ; 
spread lightly with butter, season with salt and pepper, 



24 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

and keep where it will keep warm (over boiling steam 
is best) for a few minutes, but do not let butter become 
oily. Serve on hot platter. Many prefer to sear on one 
side, turn immediately, and sear on the other, and finish 
cooking, turning often; garnish with fried sliced pota- 
toes, or with browned potato balls, the size of a marble, 
piled at each end of platter. 

MITTOX CHOPS. 
Place in a dripping-pan, season well, and set in a hot 
oven. This is the nicest way we have ever cooked mut- 
ton chops. The gravy may be thickened, or not, just as 
you prefer. It is not necessary to turn them. 

VEAT^ CITTI^ETS. 

Fry until pretty well done, then take out and dip into 
beaten egp;, and tlien in rolled cracker, with salt stirred 
in, and fry again, turning so as to get a nice brown on 
each side. JSIake a gravy of water and a spoonful of 
flour, in the frying-pan, and pour over. Season, if not 
salted enough ; tomatoes are nice, served with cutlets. 

PORK TEXDEREOI^. 

Have the spider hot, grease it with a bit of lard, and 

fry both sides brown, but do not cook them through ; 

cover with boiling water, and stir twenty minutes or a 

half hour ; thicken the gravy, and season with pepper 

and salt. The meat will taste like chicken, and is every 

bit as good. 

MOCK DUCK. 

Prepare a good dressing, such as you like for turkey 

or duck. Take a round steak, pound it, but not very 

hard, spread the dressing over it, sprinkle in a little salt, 

l^epper, and a few bits of butter. Lap over the ends, 

roll the steak up tightly, and tie closely ; spread two 

large spoonfuls butter over the steak after rolling it up, 

then wash with a well beaten egg; put water in a bake- 

pan, lay in the steak so as not to touch the water, and 



ME A 2;s. 25 

bake as you would a duck, bastinf^ often. A half hour 

in a brisk oven will bake. Make a blown grav}', and 

send to table hot. 

BAK£D ]IA:fI. 

Slice as for frying, put in hot skillet, cover, put in 
oven and bake. Will require little more time than to 
fry. — 3Ilss JVannit lup.ser, Fayidte^ Mo. 

SAISAGE. 

One hundred pounds of meat, ground fine, two and 
one-half pounds of salt, ten ounces of black pepper, 
eight ounces of sage. Mix well. You can use a little 
red pepper, if you like; one-half dozen nutmegs is a 
gieat improvement. — Mrs. M. Pile., Fayette., Mo. 

BEKF HASH. 

Equal ciuantities of meat, and potatoes, a small onion, 
slice of breakfast bacon, or lump of butter. Boil an 
hour. Pour a little cream in a few minutes before 
taking from the stove. Season, of course, with salt and 
pepper. — Mrs. Odon Guitar, Columbia., Mo. 

BAKED HASH. 

Chop the meat fine, sejison with salt and pepper, and 
a piece of butter size of an ^gg, a small onion, chopped 
line ; put in a tin baking pan ; n, layer of meat and a 
layer of biead crumbs ; i)our over the whole a cuj:) of 
cream, or rich milk ; put in the oven, and bake slowly, 
until a nice brown. — JSlllie Keyscr, Fayette., Mo. 
BEEF C ROQl ETTES. 

Use cold roast beef; chop it line ; season with pepper 
and salt; add one-third the quantity of bread crumbs, 
and moisten with a little milk. Have your hands 
floured; rub the meat into balls; dip it into beaten 
^%g, then into line pulverized crackers, and fry in but- 
ter; garnish with paisley. To pulverize the crackers 
roll them with the rolling-pin on the bread board, and 
sift them. 



26 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

SWEET-BREAI>S. 

Veal sweet-breads are best. As they spoil ver}^ soon, 

they should as soon as brought from market be put in 

cold water and left to soak an hour; then lard them, 

and put them in boiling water, or stock, and let them 

boil twenty minutes. They will be white and firm. 

Remove the skin, and put in a cool place until ready to 

cook again. 

FRIED SWEET-BKEADS. 

Parboil them, as just explained; cut them in even 
sized pieces ; sprinkle over pepper and salt ; egg and 
bread crumb them, and fry them in hot lard. 

VEAE EOAF. 

Six Boston crackers, three eggs, one tablespoonful of 
salt, pepper, and sage, or summer savory ; three pounds 
of veal. The veal must be raw, and chopped fine ; mix 
all well together and pack it hard in a deep tin pan; 
bake slowly for one hour; a tablespoon of butter im- 
proves it. This is a nice relish for tea, and should be 

sliced thin when cold. 

OPOSSIM. 

Clean like a pig, scrape, not skin it. Chop the liver 
fine ; mix with bread crumbs, chopped onion, and pars- 
ley, with pepper and salt ; bind with a beaten egg, and 
stuff the body with it. Sew up, roast, baste with salt 
and water. In order to have it crisp, rub it over w^ith a 
cloth, dipped in its own grease. Serve with the gravy, 
made of brown flour. Serve it whole on a platter, and 
put a baked apple in its mouth. — Judge, T. R. BeAts-, 
Fay Me, Mo. 

BABBIT STEW. 

Skin, clean, and cut in small pieces two rabbits. Let 
them stand in cold salt water for an hour ; then put 
on to cook, in enough cold water to cover them, and 
boil till tender. Season with salt and pepper, and stir 
one tablespoon of butter, made smooth, with two table- 
spoons of flour, into the gravy. 



MEATS. 27 

SOUSE. 

Having cleaned the pigs' feet perfectly, and removed 
the skin and bones, chop line ; season with salt, pepper, 
and a little sage. Mould in a pan. When cold it can 
be sliced, and vinegar poured over it. 

MGS' FEET. 

Boil them until done thoroughly, then split the claws, 
and fry them in batter; just dipped into the batter. 
Batter. — One-half pint of milk, one egg, little salt, flour 
enough to make it a little thicker than flapjacks ; fry 
them in hot lard. 

BEEFSTEAK BAEES. 

One and a half pounds of round steak, chopped flne ; 
two eggs, one tablespoon of flour, two tablespoons of 
milk ; salt and pepper to taste ; drop in spider and fry 
until done. — Jliss Cora Jones, Sf/racuse, N. Y. 

TO PICKEE OXE HEIM^DRED POEXDS OF BEEF 
OR TOAGEE. 

Sprinkle the bottom of tub, or flrkin, with salt. Four 
pounds of brown sugar, four ounces of saltpetre, four 
quarts of flne Liverpool salt. Mix well together, and in 
packing sprinkle evenly over the meat. The dissolving 
of salt and juice of meat will be sufficient to pickle. 
Keep the meat closely pressed together with a good 
weight. — Mrs. Nettie Gannett, Fayette, Mo. 

TO CERE BAC'OX. 

For every three hundred pounds of pork use fourteen 
pounds of common salt, and one pound each of brown 
sugar and saltpetre. Rub them into the meat, and let 
it lie for three weeks, rubbing and turning it occasion- 
ally. Then wipe dry, rub again with flne salt, wrap it 
in a thick cloth, or paper; hang in cool place to dry. 



j>Aiuij.uvj^^_l (Jli^im^Ai V. 



-^^'.^ & ]: \ . \' ,\-^ h I I h' ^ A I I':: A 1 S;^5^ 



OYSTER SAICE FOR TURKEY. 

Drain tlironoh a colander. The liquor s boiled and 
skimmed ; thickened with butter and Hour, (one large 
tablespoon of butter, and a scant one of llour,) add a 
trifle of mace and chopped parsley, then the oysters, 
stirrino- constantly until done. — 3Ir.s. R. P. Williams, 
Fayette, Mo. 

MIKT SArCE FOR EAMB. 

To one cup of hot vinegar add two tablespoons of 
sugar, one of butter, and one of chopped pe{)permint. — 
Mrs. J. Kinney, Franklin, Mo. 

MIXT SAFCE FOR I.A:fIB. 

Vinegar, one half pint ; sugar, four tablespoonfuls ; 
chopped mint, six tablespoonfuls. Let it stand two 
hours, and serve in sauce-boat.- JbTr.s. R. P. Williams, 
Fay(dte, Mo. 

TOMATO SAF€E FOR ROAST BEEF. 

Put a pint of tomatoes, three cloves, three all- 
spice, pepper and salt, one small onion (sliced,) a 
sprig of parsley, in a stew pan, "and after cooking 
twenty minutes strain through a sieve; put in this 
a scant tablespoon of butter, rolled in flour; cook Ave 
minutes, and serve. — Mrs. R. P. Williams, Fayette, Mo. 

IVIIITE, OR SIET PI DDENG. 

To one cup of chopped suet add three cups of flour; 
season well with salt and pepper; put this dry into a 
bag about four inches wide, and eight or ten long, as 
tight as you can, and sew up the end, and steam for two 

28 



SAUCES FOR MEATS. 29 

hours. Tins is a very nice dish, with turkey or meat. — 
3Irs. J. Kinney^ Franldin, Mo. 

TdlATO SAIJCE. 

One quart can of tomatoes, or one dozen whole ones, 
add two cloves, two sprigs of parsley, one bay leaf, a 
few slices of onion, and one cup of stock. Cook to- 
gether half hour. — Mr.s. L. 31. Flndley., 8t. Louis, 3£o. 

MISTARD. 

Three teaspoonfuls of mustard, one of salt, and one 
half of pepper, two tablespoonfuls of brown sugar ; 
mix with hot vinegar. — Mrs. R. P. Williams, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

OYSTER STLFFIXG FOR BAKED FISH. 

One quart of bread crumbs ; soak in cold water to 
soften ; two tablespoons of butter ; salt and pepper to 
taste; one can of oysters ; mix all well together. — 3frs. 
Maria Schotte, Fayette, Mo. 

MUSTARD SAFCE FOR BOILED FRESH SAI.MOX. 

Two cups of water, two tablespoons of batter ; let 
come to a boil. Mix two teaspoons of brown flour in a 
little cold water, two tablespoons of prepared mustard, 
one halt teaspoonful of salt; cook for a few minutes. — 
3Irs. Maria ScJiotte, Fayette, Mo. 

CRA^fBERRY SAICE. 

Put cranberries into a sauce-pan ; pour boiling water 
over them, and set on the front of the stove. Stir in 
half teaspoon of soda. Let stand a few seconds, and 
pour off, and add just enough boiling water to cover 
well. Let them cook till done, then drain and run 
through a colander, and sweeten to taste ; the water 
they are cooked in will make jelly, by adding same 
weight of sugar as water ; it will jelly in a few seconds 
after the sugar is well dissolved. — ^Irs. Dr. T. J. 
Smith, Fayette, Mo. 



30 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

CRA^fBERRY SAUCE. 

Add one teacup of cold water to a quart of cran- 
berries, and put them on in a porcelain kettle ; after 
cooking ten minutes add two heaping cups of sugar, and 
cook about ten minutes longer, stirring constantly from 
the time the}^ are put on ; pour out into a bowl, and 
when cool it can be removed as jelly from a mould. — 
Mrs. H. A. Norris, Fayette, Mo. 

CRAWBERRY SAUCE. 

Pour boiling water over cranberries, and let them 
stand over night. Then to one-half gallon of berries 
add one pound of sugar ; boil about one-half or three- 
quarters of an hour. — Mrs. E. Major, Fayette, Mo. 




DIRECTIONS. 

All poultry should be carefully picked, and the liair 
singed off by holding the bird over a lighted piece of 
paper. Take care in removing that the gall bag and the 
gut joining the gizzard are not broken. Open the giz- 
zard, first take out the contents, and detach the gall 
bladder from the liver. If poultry is brought from 
market frozen, do not hasten to thaw it out before it is 
wanted for use ; till then put in a cold place, and let it 
remain frozen. When you thaw it use only cold water. 
Any frozen poultry, or meat, thawed in warm water, 
will most certainly spoil. Food of any kind, which has 
been frozen, requires a much longer time to cook. 

ROAST TURKEY. 

The secret of having a good roast turkey is to baste 
it often, and to cook it long enough. First, then, after 
the turkey is dressed, season it well, sprinkling pepper 
and salt on the inside : stutf it, and tie it well in shape ; 
sprinkle it well with pepper and salt. It is well to allow a 
turkey to remain some time stuffed before cooking. Pour 
a little boiling water into the bottom of the dripping-pan. 
If it is to be roasted, do not have the oven too hot, right 
at first, until it gets well heated through, then gradually 
increase the heat. The excellence of the turkey de- 
pends much upon the frequency of basting it. Make a 
dressing of cold bread crumbs, mixed with one-half 
pound of butter; use no water in the dressing, and 
season iDtll with pepper and salt. After stuflfing the 
turkey well put some of the dressing in the pan, so as 

31 



32 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

to make a richer gravy. Put in the pan with the tnrkey 
the giblets, also, to which add a little more than a pint 
of water. Oysters may be added to the dressing, if 
preferred. A turkey weighing fourteen pounds should 
be cooked fou7' hours. — Mrs. 31. Heudrlx. 

ROAST TURKEY. 

After the turkej is dressed, season it well, sprinkling 
pepper and salt on the inside. Put the turkey in a 
large meat pan, almost half full of water. Let cook 
about two hours, turning occasionally. Then take it 
from the stove and stuff it with dressing, prepared as 
above. A little sage is an impiovement. Sprinkle 
well with pei)per, salt, and Hour. Place it in the oven 
and cook about two hours. If dinner is to be served at 
one o'clock, the turkey should be put on to cook at 
nine o'clock. — 3£rs. Elizabeth 3fajoi\ Fayette, Mo. 

BAKED CTUCKEX. 

If the chickens are young boil about twenty minutes. 
Prepare the dressing the same as for turkey, and bake 
in the same manner. Slice two hard boiled eggs in the 
gravy. — 3Irs. 31. Bridges, Fayette, 3Io. 

FRIED CHICKED. 

Clean, wash, and cut to pieces a couple of spring 
chickens ; soak in salt water more than one hour, wipe 
dry, season with pepper, and dredge with flour. Then 
fry in hot lard, until each piece is a nice brown on both 
sides. Take up, drain, and set aside in a hot, covered 
dish. Pour into the gravy left in the frying-pan- a cup 
of milk, half cream is better ; thicken with heaping 
spoonful of flour, and tablespoonful of butter ; cut pas- 
try, rolled thin in squares, or strips ; fry a nice brown, 
and lay on dish with chicken, and pour gravy over all. 
Serve. — Mrs. J. Keyser. 



SAUCES FOR MEATS. 33 

SMOTHERED CHICKEX. 

For smothered chicken, the fowl must be split down 
the back, washed, and wiped dry. Lay it breast up- 
ward in baking pan ; pour over it a ]3int and a half of 
boiling water, in which has been dissolved a heaping 
tablespoonful of butter ; cover with another pan that 
fits exactly. Cook slowly for half an hour, then baste 
plentifully with the butter water in the pau ; cover, and 
leave about twenty minutes. Baste again, and once 
more in another quarter of an hour. An hour and a 
quarter is long enough for a 3^oung fowl. Baste the 
last time with a tablespoonful of butter, cover, and 
leave in the oven about ten minutes longer. It should 
be of a tine yellow brown all over, not crisped any- 
where. Thicken the gravy with a tables]30onful of 
browned tiour, and pour over the chicken. The Hour 
should first be wet with a little cold milk, or water, and 
rubbed smooth. — Ilrs. Jacob Keyser, Fayette, Mo. 

PRAIRIE CmCKEXS— STEAMED OR BAKED. 

Stuff them, after cleaning, with a dressing of bread 
crumbs, and seasoning of pepper and salt, and mixed 
with melted butter. Sage, onion, or summer savorj^ 
may be added, if liked. Secure the fowl firmly Avitli a 
needle and twine. Steam in a steamer until tender; 
then remove to a dripping-pan ; dredge with fiour, pep- 
per, and salt, and brown delicately in tlie oven. Baste 
with melted butter ; garnisli with parsley, and lumps 
of currant jell}^ Prairie fowls may be stewed, or 
broiled, the same as other birds. — From Mrs. Owens'' 
Coolc BooTi. 

ROAST DICKS. 

Ducks should be cooked, and the dressing the same 
as chicken or turkey. If the ducks are tender, they 
will not require more than an hour and a half to roast. 
The giblets should be chopped fine, and added to the 
gravy, with a chopped shallet, and a spoonful of browned 
flour. 



34 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

QUAItS WITH TOAST. 

After dressing, split the quails down the back ; le.t 
them soak in salt water half an hour, or more, then put 
in the meat pan. Season with salt, pepper, and butter ; 
about a pint of water ; baste often ; toast bread, cut in 
squares, a light brown ; lay toast on meat dish. Place 
the quails, after they have cooked, and are browned 
nicely, on the toast, and pour gravy over all. 

CHICKEX PIE. 

First cut the chicken up, and stew in a sauce-pan 
until almost, or quite done; then have a deep dish, or 
pan, lined with pastry ; put in a layer of chicken, sea- 
soned with butter, pepper, and salt , then cut strips of 
pastry, and lay across ; put another layer of chicken, 
seasoned ; put a cover of pastry, notched, round the 
edges, and cut a cross in the center. — Mrs. E. 3Iajor, 
Fayette, Mo. 

€HICKEX OR TEAL. CROQUETTES. 

Two cups of cold meat, minced very tine, add a cup of 
hot boiled rice, mix together with a fork ; beat the yolks 
of two eggs, stir in two tablespoons of soft (not melted) 
butter to a smooth paste ; then add a teaspoonful of 
salt, a tablespoonful of Worcestershire sauce, and the 
beaten whites of the eggs, mix well with the meat and 
rice, and mould into croquettes. Beat two eggs, and 
pour over the croquettes, then roll them in cracker 
dust, seasoned with pepper and salt. Boil until a light 
brown, in lard, which should be quite hot, and deep 
enough to cover them. Serve with French peas, heap- 
ing the peas in the center of the platter, and arranging 
the croquettes around the edge. — Miss Jos epliine Har- 
rison., Denver, Col. 

QIJENXEI.S OR CROQUETTES. 

This recipe can be used for only cold meat, but is nice 
when made from turkey or chicken, chopped very fine. 
Pick out all little pieces of bone or gristle. Add one 



SAUCES FOR MEATS, 36 

sweet-bread, which has been parboiled, season with nut- 
meg, cinnamon, red pepper, and salt. Roll out crackers 
into dust, then work into the mixture until you can 
mould into rolls ; then fry like crullers. — Mrs. J. Kin- 
nej/^ Franklin, Mo. 

CIIICKEX C'ROUIIETTKS. 

(For one dozen medium sized croquettes.) Boil your 
chicken tender, and chop it very fine. Add one set of 
brains, previously boiled in salted water. Two minutes 
is long enough for the brains to boil, then throw them 
right in the cold water, and skin them, one -half cup 
suet, chopped fine, one-half small onion, and two sprigs 
of parsley, chopped together very fine, juice of half a 
lemon, mix all together, and add enough cream to shape 
into croquettes. Be careful not to have it too soft. If 
you mould them pear shape, add a clove in one end, 
and a small sprig of parsley in the other. This is done 
after they are cooked. They must be rolled in eggs or 
cracker crumbs, and fried in boiling lard. Serve with 
tomato sauce. — Mrs. Lizzie Findley,, St. Louis, Mo. 




^SAUBS*StSlDi*l)lSHES5a> 



Boil a tender chicken, and when cold separate the 
meat from the bone. Cut it into little square blocks, or 
dice ; do not mince it. Cut white, tender stalks of 
celery into a bowl, three-quarters inch length, then stir 
them well together. Make a dressing of the yolks of 
two eggs, beaten thoroughly, one level teaspoon salt, 
one of pepper, two of white sugar, two teaspoons pre- 
pared mustard, one tablespoon butter ; stir in the mix- 
ture four tablespoons best vinegar, put dressing into a 
stew-pan, set it into a kettle of hot water, and stir con- 
stantly, till it thickens ; set away, and when cold mix it 
with the celery and chicken, leaving a portion of the 
sauce to pour over the top. Stick a little bouquet of 
celery leaves in the center of the salad ; then a row 
around it. — Mrs. J. F. Williams, Macon City, Mo. 

CHICKEN SAIiAD. 

Take a pair of fowls, boil them, (saving the water for 
soup next day.) When entirely cold, remove all the 
skin and fat, and disjoint them ; cut the meat from the 
bones, in very small pieces. Wash and split two large 
heads of celery ; put the white part into pieces ; mix 
chicken and celery together, and chop line with hash 
knife. For the dressing, take eight hard boiled eggs, 
(I use only the yolks,) add to the eggs a teaspoon of 
fine salt, teaspoon of pepper, one-half gill made mus- 
tard, one and one-half wine-glass French vinegar ; skim 
off the grease from the top of the water in which the 
chickens have been boiled. Use enough of this to moisten 
36 



SALADS AND SIDE DISHES. 37 

well. We prefer it ro olive or sweet oil. Mix all these 
ingredients thoroughly, stirring them a long time till 
quite smooth. After you pour it on the chicken and 
celery mix the whole well together with a silver fork. — 
3Irs. Dr. Tom. Smitli, Fayette, Mo. 

CHICKEN SAI.AI>. 

The meat of two cold boiled chickens, the same 
bulk of chopped celery, yolks of three hard boiled 
eggs, yolks of two raw eggs Avell beaten, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, one of mustard, two teaspoonfuls of 
white sngar, one-fourth teaspoonful black and red pep- 
per, four tablespoonfuls olive oil, one teacup vinegar, 
and one of cream, one medium sized Irish potato, 
mashed, and put through a sieve. Cut the meat and 
celery into dice, about three-eights of an inch square, 
mix them, sprinkle with dry salt, toss up lightly with a 
fork, and put in a cool place while you prepare the 
dressing. Rub the yolks of the eggs to a powder, add 
the pepper, salt, sugar, mustard, and potato, then 
the oil, stirring well, and adding only a little at a 
time. Next beat the raw eggs into the dressing, 
and lastly, the vinegar. Put the dressing in a cool 
place until you are ready to use the salad, and then stir 
the cream into the dressing, pour over the meat and 
celery, mixing thoroughly, and serve at once. Garnish 
your salad dish with parsley, lettuce, or celery leaves. 
This will make sufficient salad for sixteen persons.— 
Mrs. John Shafrotli, Denter, Col. 

POTATO SAIvAl>. 

Takf four or five good sized boiled potatoes, mash, 
and add one-half teacup of cream, beat until light ; sea- 
son with salt, pepper, celery seed, and one small onion, 
chopped fine. Put one teacup of vinegar in sauce-pan, 
and when nearly to boiling point stir two well beaten 
eggs. Stir constantly until it thickens, and pour over 



38 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

the potatoes, beating all well together. Put in salad 
dish, and around the edge lay celery leaves, or parsley. 
— 3£rs. W. C. Arline, Fayette, Mo. 

POTATO SAIiAD. 

Boil in salt water three large potatoes, until thor- 
oughly done. Beat lightly four eggs, add one cup of 
vinegar, one tablespoonful of sugar, one teaspoonful 
mustard, one celery seed. Butter, the size of a walnut ; 
pepper and salt to taste. Put this mixture on the stove, 
and stir constantly, till it thickens. Then slice the 
potatoes', and put in layers, with the dressing. — Mrs. 
Carrie Morrison., Fayette., Mo. 

SAI.MOX SAIiAD. 

Nine hard boiled eggs, one can of salmon; chop 
whites of eggs and salmon together, very line ; with a 
fork cut yolks of eggs smooth, and mix well with oil 
from salmon, one teaspoon salt, one of pepper, one of 
mustard, one small cup of vinegar ; pour this over the 
chopped salmon, and mix well. — Mrs. L. S. Frosser, 
Fayette, Mo. 

SAI.MO:Sf SAIiAD. 

One can of salmon, fresh ; four bunches of celery ; 
chop as for c?iicken salad ; mix with the salmon, and 
pour the dressing over it. Dressing. — Take half a 
pint of vinegar, and let it get hot, then beat up two 
eggs, half a tablespoon of flour, half a tablespoonful of 
sugar, one teaspoonful of mustard, and a little salt and 
pepper, four tablespoonfuls of melted butter ; stir this 
into the vinegar, and let boil until it thickens, then pour 
over the salad ; garnish with the leaves of celer3^ — 3frs. 
O. Bower, Fayette, Mo. 

OYSTER SAIiAD. 

Pour off the liquor of one can of oysters, chop the 
oysters flne, add six crackers ; roll them with rolling- 
pin, add chopped pickle and celery seed to taste ; then 



SALADS AND SIDE DISHES. 39 

pour over all a sauce made of two eggs, tablespoon of 
mustard, two spoons of butter, a little sugar and salt, 
and one-half cup of good vinegar ; thicken this over the 
fire before adding to the oysters, and best to let it cool. 
I think hard boiled eggs, chopped tine, is an improve- 
ment. Some use the oyster liquor, and add more crack- 
ers, but I like it best without. — 3Irs. M. E. Jackson, 
Fayette, Mo. 

OYSTER S AliAD. 

One can cove oysters, six hard boiled eggs, one cup 
chow-chow, or chopped pickle, vinegar, mustard seed, 
celery seed ; salt and pepper to taste. — Mrs. Lizzie 
FlsTier. Fayette, Mo. 

I.OBSTER SAI.AD. 

Two lobsters, picked line, four heads of fresh lettuce, 
cut fine ; put in a dish in layers, with the lobsters ; boil 
your eggs, mash the yolks, add three tablespoons of 
melted butter, a teaspoon of mustard, cayenne pej)per 
and salt ; two tablespoons of sugar, two caps of vine- 
gar ; heat together, and pour over when served. 

SUMMER BREAKFAST SAI^AD. 

Prepare two chickens as you would for salad (using 
the heart, or liver.) Stir in the above two strained Irish 
potatoes, and make a dressing in this way : Take the 
yolks of four hard boiled eggs, and the white of one, 
(chopped fine.) Rub to a smooth paste, with salt, to 
taste, one-fourth teacup of melted butter, a little pepper 
and mustard. (A few spices is an improvement.) Put 
one-half cup of vinegar in a sauce-pan, and when ready 
to boil, stir in two well-beaten eggs, stirring constantly, 
until thick. Mix this with the above, thoroughly, j)ack 
in a bowl, and set on ice. When ready to turn out 
cover with one sliced lemon, and the juice of one. — Mrs. 
Charlie Smith, Fayette, Mo. 



40 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

OYSTERS— A liA CHAMBORD. 

One-half head of cabbage, chopped line ; season with 
salt and pepper, and set in a cool place. Take two 
whole eggs, or tlie yolks of tiiree, two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, fonr of vinegar, saltspoon of salt, same of mus- 
tard. Put this in a sance-pan. set it on the lire, stirring 
constantly, until it thiclvens ; add a piece of butter, size 
of a walnut. Let it get perfectly cold before putting on 
the cabbage. Mix well with a fork, and form in a loaf 
shape. This can all be prepared several hours before 
dinner. Wlinn leady to serve take large OA^sters, 
nicely dried, and bi-eaded, and fr}^ in boiling lard. 
Have a large platter, very warm. In the center place a 
thickly folded napkin, and in it place your loaf of 
slaw, pntting on the top of it some fresh sprigs of pars- 
ley, and aronnd it bard boiled eggs ; cut in dice. And 
in the dish, all around it, the fried oysters. — 3Irs. J. Ji. 
Findley^ St. Louis., Mo. 

POMMES— A I.A GRxiTIX. 

Have some j)otatoes boiled in their jackets, when 
cold, peel and cut in small dice, or marble shape ; put 
them in a pudding dish. Put a pint of rich milk on the 
lire ; when at the boiling point, add a tablespoonful of 
flour, dissolved in a little millv, a pinch of salt, and a 
cn^^ful of grated cheese. Let all cook about iive min- 
utes ; pour this mixture over the potatoes, and bake in 
oven until brown on top. — Mrs. J. R. Findley^ St. 
Louis, Mo. 

CHICKEX CHEESE. 

Boil two chickens till tender, take out all the bones, 
and chop the meat fine ; season to taste with salt, pep- 
per, and butter ; pour in enough of the liquor they are 
boiled in to make it moist. Mould in any shape you 
choose. When cold turn out, and cut into slices. This 
is especially nice for lunch. — Mrs. H. A. Norris, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 



SALADS AXD SIDE DISHES. 41 

A FAVORITE I>ISII. 

One cup of bread crumbs, two cups fresh milk, one 
cup dry cheese, broken in small pieces, three eggs, well 
beaten, one tablespoonful of butter ; salt and pepper to 
taste. A very little soda, dissolved in hot water, and 
stirred in the milk. Soak the crumbs in the milk ; 
beat into these the eggs, the butter, peeper and salt, and 
then the cheese. Butter a neat baking dish, pour the 
pudding into it, and bake in a quick oven, until brown. 
Serve immediately. — Miss Lizzette Herndon, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

SL.AW. 

One large head of cabbage, half teacup of sugar, four 
eggs, well beaten, one teaspoon of mustard, one of celery 
seed, half teaspoon of turmeric. Mix this all well, then 
have ready one pint of Vinegar, pour it on the season- 
ing, and let it boil until it is the consistency of cream, 
then pour hot over cabbage ; seasoned with salt, and 
pepper, — Mrs. Solon Smith, Fayette, Mo. 

HOT SLAW. 

Four eggs, one and a half teaspoons of Coleman's 
mustard, one teaspoon of celery seed, a scant half tea- 
spoonful of turmeric, half cup of white sugar, and a 
small teacup half full of cream, or a tablespoon of 
butter, melted ; beat the eggs till light, then mix in the 
other ingredients ; then pour in slowly, while stirring a 
pint of boiling vinegar ; then return this to the fire ; 
keep stirring well till it is the consistency of cream. 
Have the cabbage chopped fine, and seasoned with salt 
and pepper. When the dressing is done add at once to 
the cabbage, mix well, and keep closely covered. — 3£rs. 
Dr. T. J. Smith, Fayette, Mo. 



^TICmEIJ 



^ ■:::.:: .. : ; : -^, 



MASHED POTATOES. 

Pare and boil the potatoes ; when done, drain off the 
water ; let them stand a minute in the stove to let all 
the steam escape; add the salt and butter, and mash 
them free from lumps ; add sweet cream, or milk ; beat 
like cake batter, the longer the better, until nice and 
light ; serve in a covered dish. 

POTATO CAKES. 

Make cold mashed potatoes into fiat cakes, flour them, 

and fry in jiart lard and part butter, until they are a 

light brown. 

TO BOIIi 5fEW POTATOES. 

Scrape the skins from new j)otatoes, and lay them in 
cold water for a while, put them into a saucepan, and 
cover them with water ; cover them, and boil for about 
half an hour ; try one, and if done, drain the water off; 
make a sauce of hot milk, thickened with flour, and 
seasoned with butter, salt and pepper ; pour over the 
potatoes, and serve hot. 

SARATOGA POTATOES. 

Pare, and cut into thin slices, on a slaw cutter, four 
large potatoes (new are best,) let stand in ice cold salt 
water while breakfast is cooking ; take a handful of 
the potatoes, squeeze the water from them, and dry in a 
napkin ; separate the slices, and drop a handful at a 
time into a skillet of boiling lard, taking care that 
they do not strike together, stir with a fork till they are 
a light brown color, take out with a wire spoon, drain 
well, and serve in an open dish. They are very nice 
served cold. 

42 



VEGETABLES. 43 



TO BAKE POTATOES. 

The potatoes must be of equal size. Put them into a 
hot oven, and bake until tender. It requires about an 
hour to bake a large potato. Serve immediately ; if 
left to stand they are not good. 

FRIE1> POTATOES. 

Peel, and cut the potatoes in thin slices, as nearly the 
same size as possible ; put into a frying pan some lard, 
or butter, and when quite hot put in the potatoes, fry 
on both sides until they are a nice brown. AVhen they 
are crisp, and done, take them up; place them on a 
cloth before the fire to drain the grease from them, and 
serve very hot, after sprinkling with salt. 

POTATOES BAKED IVITH BEEF. 
Pare potatoes of equal size, and put them into the 
oven in the same pan in which the beef is baked. In 
basting the beef the potatoes should be basted also. 
Serve them around the beef. 

POTATO CROQIETTES. 
Season cold mashed potatoes with pepper, salt, and 
nutmeg. Beat to a cream, and to every cup of potato 
put a tablespoonful of melted butter. Bind with two or 
three beaten eggs, and add some minced parsley. Roll 
into oval balls, dip into beaten egg, then in bread 
crumbs, and fry in hot lard, or drippings. Pile in a 
pyramid on a flat dish, and serve. 

POTATO PUFFS. 
To two cups mashed potatoes put two spoons melted 
butter ; beat until creamy. Then add two well beaten 
eggs, and a cup of cream, or milk, a little salt ; beat 
well ; pour into a baking dish, spread butter over the 
top, and bake quickly, a delicate brown. 

BAKED SWEET POTATOES. 
Take large potatoes and put them on to boil, or 
steam ; when nearly done, take out and peel ; slice not 



44 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

quite half an inch thick. Put in a baking pan, with a 
very little water; sprinkle white sugar thickly over 
them, and spread each slice with butter ; set them in 
the stove to brown. A longer time is required for cook- 
ing sweet potatoes than Irish potatoes. 

TO BAKE SWEET POTATOES. 

Select those that are nearly of a size, not too large; 
wash them, and put in a hot oven, and bake until done; 
it requires about an hour to bake a medium sized 
potato. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 

Peel the tomatoes by pouring boiling water over 
them, until the skin will slip, cut out the stem end, set 
them in a baking pan ; season with salt, pepper, butter 
size of an egg, and sugar; sprinkle over them a good 
handful of bread crumbs ; bake slowly for forty-five 
minutes. 



The following recipe is given by Mrs. Martha Jack- 
son, by which tomatoes may be so preserved that they 
may be sliced and served as fresh tomatoes : 

Take the imperfect tomatoes, put in a tin or porcelain 
kettle, let come to a boil, mash well, run through a 
colander, then take the juice, place on the fire, put in 
whole tomatoes, if not too large, if so, cut in half ; let 
them get entirely heated, put in cans ; seal while hot. 

STUFFED TOMATOES. 

Select enough large, smootli tomatoes, to fill a baking 
dish ; cut a piece from the top of each, scoop out the 
pulp, without breaking the skin ; make a dressing by 
adding to pulp bits of cold beef, or mutton, chopped 
fine, bread crumbs, salt, pepper, and onion ; after put- 
ting sugar, and small piece of butter in the skins, fill 
them with this dressing, replace the tops, and bake 
until done. — 3Irs. R. P. Williams, Fayette, Mo. 



VEGETABLES. 45 



FRICASSEED CHICKEIT. 

Cut fresh corn from tlie cob, put in a pot, and just 
cover with boiling water ; let it boil half an hour ; mix 
in a half pint of cream, a tablespoonful of l)utter. one of 
sugar, a little salt, and pepper, and let boil a few 
minutes. 

GREEX CORX PI DDIXG. 

One dozen ears of green corn, grated from the rob, or 
sliced off, then take the knife and scrape the cob for the 
sweetest part of the corn ; beat up well three eggs, add 
a pint of sweet milk, half cup of butter, one spoonful of 
sugar, pepper, and salt, stir in the corn, bake in a pud- 
ding pan, in a well heated oven. — MiS. J. D. Tolson. 

TO BOIIi CORX 03f THE COB. 

The corn is boiled in the husks, which imparts sweet- 
ness and havor, and keeps it moist and tender. The 
unhusked corn is put into salted boiling water, and 
when done drain well. Remove the husks before send- 
ing to the table. 

PEAS. 

First boil the pods, which are sweet and full of flavor, 
in a little water ; skim them out, and add the peas, 
which boil until tender; add then a little butter, cream, 
pepiDer, and salt. Time to cook, about half an hour. 

CABBAGE TO BOII^. 

Cabbage is best boiled, and served with corned beef; 
otherwise boil a piece of pork with it. Always boil 
with it a piece of red pepper. Remove the outside dam- 
aged leaves, and cut the cabbage into halves, or, if very 
large, into quarters, so as to better cook the inside stalk ; 
put it into the boiling water, with the corned beef, or 
pork, and the small red pepper. It will take from half to 
three-quartei s of an hour to be well cooked. Drain the 
cabbage well, serving it with meat, in the center of the 
dish. 



46 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

CABBAGE PUDDIXO. 

Chop cabbage, and boil till tender, in clear water, 
with salt enough to season ; when done drain off the 
water, put in a pudding dish a layer of bread and cab- 
bage, alternately ; season with butter, pepper, and 
cream, or rich milk; put in oven, and bake to a light 
brown. This makes a most delicious and delicate dish 
of cabbage. — Miss Nannie Keyser, Fayette,^ Mo. 

TO COOK CABBAGE aUICKI.A\ 

Cut up your cabbage tolerably line, then put it in 
real hot lard; then cover with water, and let boil ; sea- 
son with pepper, and salt. Before serving stir in a 
little bit of soda, and a teaspoon of liour. — Mrs. W. F. 
Tieman., Fayette, Mo. 

SOUTHERX CABBAGE. 

Scald cabbage in salt water until tender; drain, and 
just cover with cream ; when cream boils, sprinkle a 
tablespoon of Hour; then stir in an egg well beaten, and 
two or three tablespoons of sugar ; add all of the butter 
you can spare, only allow it to boil an instant after the 
Q^g is in, and as you take it from the stove pour in half 
a teacup of vinegar, more or less, according to strength, 
and a little pepper. — Mrs. John Tippett, Keytesmlle, 
Mo. 

BOIEED CABBAGE. 

Pick a nice firm head ; chop as for slaw ; put in a 
stew-pan, and pour on boiling water, but do not let the 
water come to the top of cabbage ; put teaspoonful of 
salt, and cover closel}/ ; boil till tender, then drain off 
all the water, and add one tablespoonful of butter, two 
of cream, a little pepper ; return to the oven, and cook 
a few moments longer. — Mrs. H. A. Norris, Fayette, Mo. 

FRIED CABBAGE. 

Slice thin, or chop fine; put into a frying-pan, with 
some salt pork gravy, and a little water; season with 



VEGETABLES. 47 



salt and pepper ; cover closely ; cook slowly on top of 
stove. When done add lialf cup of vinegar, if liked. 

SOLTIIKRN RICE. 

To one teacup of rice put one quart of water, and one 
spoonful of salt ; cook until the grains are done, but not 
soft, or broken, which will take about twenty minutes ; 
drain off all the water, and set on the back of the stove. 
Keep it tightly covered, and do not stir at any time, as 
stirring breaks the grains, and makes it sticky. If 
properly cooked when turned into the dish, each grain 
will be whole, and will not stick together ; it is much 
better than when all in a musli. — Mrs. M. J. Brealcer, 
Fayette, Mo. 

I.IMA BEAXS. 

Boil about an hour ; p^ur the water off; season with 
salt, pepi)er, and butter; send to the table hot. Dried 
Lima beans must be soaked over night, and boiled two 
hours, or until they are soft, and should have some 
cream added to the dressing. 

BAKED PORK AXD BEANf!i. 

Boil with one quart of dry beans a pound of salt 
pork. Put them on in cold water and boil until beans 
are tender, but not mashed. Place the beans in a 
baking dish ; lay the pork in the center, on top of 
beans. Bake in a slow oven till all are nicely browned. 

MACAROXI. 

Bake a quarter of a pound of macaroni until tender. 

To two well-beaten eggs add a little more than a pint of 

sweet milk, tablespoonful butter, pepper, salt, a quarter 

of a pound grated cheese. Pour over the macaroni, and 

stir all well together. Put into a baking dish, and bake 

until brown. 

SICCOTASII. 

One quart of Lima beans, put on in two quarts of cold 
water, while boiling cut the corn from a dozen ears, 



48 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

and boil cobs for a few minutes with the beans ; when 
the beans are done stir the corn with the beans, and add 
one cup of cream, one tablespoonful of butter, one tea- 
spoonful of sugar, salt, and pepper to taste ; the corn 
should cook twenty minutes. A small piece of salt 
pork, cooked with the beans, is a great improvement. 

BOII.£I> BEETS. 

Wash, without breaking the skin; put to cook in 
boiling water; boil till done. Slice and season with 
butter, salt and pepper. Do not put on the vinegar, as 
many prefer them without. 

TURNIPS. 

Peel, and cut in slices ; boil with a piece of fresh 
pork, or beef. When done take out with a wire spoon, 
mash well, and season with salt, and pepper. 

PARSNIPS. 

Scrape them clean, cut in slices, lengthwise, and boil 
with a few slices of salt pork in a stew-pan, or skillet, 
till tender. Serve in a vegetable dish. 

\ EGETABI.E OYSTER. 

Cut into small pieces, and let stand in cold water a 
short time ; boil until done ; drain the water off, and 
pour over milk, or cream. Season with butter, pepper, 
and salt. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Get the stalks of equal length ; tie up ; boil in salted 
water about half an hour; lay on buttered toast, and 
pour melted butter and cream over it. 

BOII.ED OaflOBfS. 

When peeling onions keep them under water, and all 
weeping of the eyes will be avoided. Put to cook in 
boiling water. Boil a few minutes, then drain off the 
water, put on more water, and boil again ; and still a 
third, where they may remain till tender. This renders 



VEGETABLES. 49 



them mild in flavor. When the last water is poured off, 
add a cup of milk, and seasoning of butter, pepper, and 
salt. Boil up, and serve. The milk helps to relieve 
them of their offensiveness. Onions are very healthful, 
and it would be better for the generality of people if 
they ate them oftener. — Mrs. Owens- Cook Book. 

FRI£I> EGG PliA^fT. 

Pare, and cut in slices half an inch thick ; sprinkle a 
little salt on each side, and press down, for an hour ; 
then rinse in clear water, and dry well with a towel ; 
dip in egg and rolled cracker, and fry a nice brown. 

BOIIiED CARROTS. 

Wash and scrape well, and lay in cold water half an 
hour; if large, split them; boil until tender; butter 
well, and serve hot. 

BOIIiED HOMIIVY. 

Soak over night in cold water ; next day put it into a 
pot, with at least two quarts of water to a quart of 
hominy, and boil slowly three or more hours, until 
soft ; drain in a colander, and stir in butter, pepper, and 
salt. In cold weather a large quantity can be boiled, 
and used when needed. 

TO BOIIi STRIXG BEAXS. 

Put a piece of salt pork, or bacon, in cold water; 
when it boils, skim ; put in beans, and boil about two 
hours. 

SCAIiliOPEB TOMATOES. 

Put in a buttered baking dish a layer of bread, or 
cracker crumbs, seasoned with bits of butter ; then a 
layer of sliced tomatoes, seasoned with salt, pepper, 
and sugar, if desired ; then a layer of crumbs, and so 
on till the dish is full, flnishingwith the crumbs. Bake 
about three-quarters of an hour. 



50 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

PARS:RfIPS, SAU TED. 

Parboil tliem, after cutting lengthwise ; place in a 
baking dish, with sugar and butter — a layer of the 
slices ; then the butter and sugar ; then slices ; so on 
until the dish is full. Pour in water enough to make a 
syrup, and bake. — Hiss Lou Smith, Fayette, Mo. 

SAI.SIFY. 

Having scraped the salsify roots, and washed them in 
cold water, parboil them ; then take them out ; drain 
them ; cut them into large pieces, and fry them in butter. 
Salsify is frequently stewed slowly till quite tender, and 
then served up with melted butter ; or it may be first 
boiled, then grated, and made into cakes, to be fried in 
butter. Salsif}^ must not be left exposed to the air, or 
it will turn blackish. 

CAlTI^IFIiOWER. 

Trim off the outside leaves, and put the cauliflower 
into well salted boiling water. Be careful to take it out 
as soon as tender, to jDrevent it dropping into pieces. 
Make in a saucepan a white sauce, in this way : Put 
butter the size of an ^^^ into the saucepan, and when 
it bubbles, stir in a scant half teacupful of flour ; stir 
well until cooked, then add two teacupfuls of thin 
cream, some pepper and salt ; stir it over the fire until 
perfectly smooth ; pour the sauce over the cauliflower, 
and serve. 



-»-'i',U!is", 



riH)i{j';.D.MUiA,i; 



o:fiKi.ETTi:. 

Five eggs, pint of sweet milk, four tablespoons of 
flour ; season with salt and pepper. Beat tlie yolks of 
the eggs until very light, then add pepper and salt. 
Take from the pint of milk a teacupful, into it stir until 
smooth the four tablespoons of flour ; stir this with the 
other milk into the eggs, and lastly, the whites beaten 
to a stiff" froth. Have skillet hot, and grease well with 
lard, or butter ; when slightly brown turn one half over 
the other. Serve on oval-shaped meat dish. — Mrs. E. 
Major, Fayette^ Mo. 

OMELETTE. 

For a small family, take six eggs, beat the yellows 
and whites separately. Put the eggs together, and 
beai for a few minutes ; add a little salt and pepper, if 
you like. If 3^ou have cold boiled ham at any time, 
chop some flne, and put it in ; it makes the omelette 
very nice. Cook in a stewpan well greased with butter. 
—Mrs. E. W. Bedford. 

OMEEETTE. 

In the flrst place, be sure your eggs are fresh, or you 
will fail. Break them into an earthen dish, and beat 
just enough to mix the whites and yolks together 
nicely, then add a tablespoonful of sweet milk, or 
cream, for every egg, and then beat thoroughl}^ as you 
would for sponge cake. Have your pan perfectly dry, 
and hot enough to melt, but not to brown your butter ; 
turn in your omelette, and place over the fire at once, 
but be careful it does not burn. Take a thin-bladed 
knife and run carefully under the bottom, to let what is 

51 



52 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

not cooked get below. Do not cook the whole mass 
solid, or you will have it hard and dry, as its own heat 
will cook it some time after it is taken up ; commence 
at one side and carefully roll over and over until the 
whole is in a roll. Let it brown a nice brown. Turn 
out on a hot dish, and serve. Do not put on a grain of 
salt while cooking, or it will be tough and flat. The 
butter, if well salted, will make it salt enough. — Mrs. 
L. Coolc, Fayette, Mo. 

CHEESE OMEIiETTE. 

Six eggs, one cup <>f grated cheese, pepper and salt 
to taste ; beat all together about one minute. Have a 
bright, smooth frying-pan ; let it heat well, and put in 
a piece of fresh butter, size of half an e,gg ; now pour on 
your beaten eggs ; stir from one side to the other with a 
spoon, until they are set. It is then ready to serve. 
With a quick movement of the cake lifter, throw one 
half over the other, then slide on a warm platter, and 
eat while hot. — Mrs. J. R. Findley, St. Louis., Mo. 

SCRAMBIiED EGGS. 

Six eggs beaten hard a few minutes ; a good pinch of 
salt and pepper ; a half teacup of rich milk ; a table- 
spoon of melted butter; have your skillet quite hot, 
and well greased ; pour in the mixture, and begin stir- 
ring at once ; keep stirring well from the bottom, till it 
is well set, which will be in a few seconds, then empty 
into a warmed dish, and keep closely covered. It 
should be prepared just before going to table. — Miss 
Lou Smith., Fayette, Mo. 

BAKED EGGS. 

Put a little butter in pan, when warm, put in the eggs, 
(be careful not to break the yolks,) salt and pepper. 
Bake in the oven till the whites are hard. — Mrs. Mum- 
power, Fayette, Mo. 



EGGS AND COOKED GRAINS. 53 

POACHED £OOS. 

Break the eggs into boiling water, and sprinkle salt 
over them. When the white is well set, take them out ; 
pour over a little melted butter ; season with pepper . 
Serve on buttered toast, if you prefer. 

SCRAMBL-ED EGGS. 

Beat six or eight eggs very light ; add a little salt ; 
put them into a warm frying-pan, with butter, or lard ; 
stir until they are well thickened, but not hard; season 
with pepper. 

TO FRY EGGS. 

Melt a piece of butter in a frying pan ; put the eggs 
in carefully, so as not to break the yolks ; sprinkle with 
salt, and as soon as the whites are set, serve on a hot 
dish. The butter should not be allowed to get too hot, 
and only a couple of eggs should be fried at a time. A 
small frying-pan should be used. 

TO PREPARE EGGS FOR lilJNCH. 

To boil the eggs, put them in cold water, which will 
prevent them bursting, as they would if they were put 
in hot water to boil. When done put them in cold 
water, so the shell will come off nicely. Cut them in 
halves, lengthwise ; remove the yellows ; mash them 
up, and season with butter, pepper, salt, celery seed and 
a little vinegar. Put the yellows back into the whites, 
and put the halves together. You have a very pretty 
dish if you will tie around each one a piece of narrow 
blue ribbon. 

OYSTER OMEIiETTE. 

Beat six eggs to a thick cream ; season with pepper 
and salt ; have ready one dozen large oysters ; cut them 
in half; pour the eggs in a pan, with hot butter in it; 
drop the oysters over it as carefully as you can ; fry a 
light brown, and serve hot. 



54 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

STUFFED FOGS. 

Boil the eggs hard; and cut them in two ; take out 

carefully the yolks, which mash well, adding a little 

finely minced onion, chopped parsley, pepper, and salt. 

Mash also double the quantity of bread, which has 

been soaked iu milk ; mix bread, yolks, etc., together ; 

then bind them with a little raw j^olk of egg ; taste to 

see if they are seasoned properly. Stuff the eggs with 

the mixture, so that each half has the appearance of 

containing a whole round yolk; smooth the remainder 

of the mixture on the bottom of a pie pan ; arrange the 

halves symmetrically in this bed ; brown a little in the 

oven. 

TO KEEP EGGS. 

Put a two inch layer of salt in bottom of stone jar ; then 

a layer of fresh eggs, small end down ; then salt, then 

eggs, and so on till jar is full, with a layer of salt at 

top ; cover and put in a cool place, but not where they 

will freeze. This is a simple, easy, and inexpensive 

way, and has been tested for years. 

CRACKED WHEAT. 

Rinse thoroughly with cold water; two teacups of 
wheat ; add four cups of cold water ; place the pan in a 
pan of water, and cover closely. In half an hour or so 
stir, and salt to taste. Let it steam four or five hours, 
stirring once or twice. Nice, hot or cold, for breakfast. 
Serve with cream. 

OATMEAIi PORRIDGE. 

To three parts of boiling water add one part oatmeal. 

Cover closely, and cook slowly for half hour. Do not 

stir it if you would prevent it being sticky. Serve with 

sugar and cream. 

HOMIXY. 

Wash in two waters one cup of hominy ; then stir it 

into one quart of boiling water, with a little salt, and 

boil sixty minutes. Be careful that it does not burn. 



EGGS AM) COOKED GRAINS. 55 



HOMIWY FRITTERS. 

One egg, one half cup of sweet milk, one tablespoonful 
of flour, one quart of boiled hominy, a pinch of salt ; 
roll into oval balls, witii floured hands ; dip in a well- 
beaten egg, and then in dried bread crumbs, and fry in 

hot lard. 

TO COOK IIOMLXY. 

To one quart of hominy use five quarts of water ; 
cook slowly. When soft, skim out into a crock, and set 
it in a cool place. To prepare for the table, to one 
quart of cooked hominy use one spoonful of butter, 
or lard, that has been heated. Add half teacupful of 
cream, or rich milk ; salt to taste. 

OITCII C HEESE. 

Take, a crockful of clabbered milk, and set it on the 
stove to heat; when the wliey and clabber separate, 
put it into a jelly bag, and hang it up where it will 
drain dry. Season ; serve with cream. 




j®^ 



L.IOHT BR£AD. 

One quart of flour; two tablespoons yeast; one small 
tablespoon lard ; one teaspoon salt ; mix up with cold 
water and knead the dough well ; when the dough is 
risen very light, knead the second time, and make into 
loaves and light rolls, and let rise again. Bake one 
hour. — Mrs. Dr. Snelson, St. Joseph, Mo. 

TO MAKE YEAST AXD I^IGHT BREAD. 

Boil two or three small potatoes; mash them; add a 
pint of flour, and scald it with the water in which the 
potatoes were boiled ; then stir to a stiff batter, and 
when cool, add more water, until thinner; then add 
your baker's yeast, or soak a cake of dry yeast and 
put in a warm place to rise ; do not use the yeast as 
soon as it rises to the top of the bowl, but wait until it 
falls again, then it is ready for use ; one cup of this 
yeast will be sufiicient to make a pan of rolls or a loaf 
of bread. You can either keep this yeast fresh on ice, 
or make it into dry yeast-cakes, hy adding enough 
cornmeal to make stiff", cool and cut in square cakes ; 
dry thoroughly, then put in a sack and keep in a dry 
place. When you want to make light bread, make a 
sponge over night, of a pint or more flour, with luke- 
warm water, and add one or two cold potatoes, mashed 
fine, add either a cup of fresh yeast or a cake of dry 
yeast, soaked ; set in a warm place and let rise. The 
next morning early, make up your bread ; take a quart 
or more flour, teaspoon of salt, tablespoon of lard, and 
make a stiff" dough with either lukewarm water or sweet 

56 



BREAD. 57 

milk ; knead well about five minutes and set to rise ; as 
soon as light, make into loaves and put in pans. Bake 
in a hot oven. — Mrs. W. F. Tieman, Fayette, Mo. 

lilGHT BR£AI>. 

To two quarts of flour, add two tablespoons of 
lard, teaspoon of salt, one-half teacup of white sugar, 
one cofFeecup of yeast; mix with lukewarm water; 
knead until smooth. Grease a large earthen bowl well ; 
put the dough in, then turn it over; the grease on the 
top will prevent a crust forming on top ; set in a warm 
place to rise. To have rolls for tea, make up the bread 
early in the morning, and at four o'clock make out the 
rolls. (In making out the rolls or loaves, never add 
any more flour, it will make the bread tough). Set in 
some warm place to rise. In baking, put a pan of 
water on the grate to keep them from browning too 
quickly on top. 

For the yeast, take about three good-sized potatoes ; 
peel, and boil until done; take out of the water and 
mash until smooth ; mix small teacup of flour with 
potatoes; pour the water in which the potatoes were 
boiled into this, and beat until smooth ; put over the 
fire and cook as you would starch, stirring constantly ; 
only requires a few minutes to cook. Dissolve a cake 
of National yeast in a little cold water, and stir into the 
above when cold. This yeast makes better bread a day 
or two after it is made. — Mrs. E. Major, Fayette, Mo. 

ISAI.T-RISIX<a BREAD. 

Take one-half teacup of sweet milk; let it come to 
boiling heat; then stir in meal to the consistency of 
mush ; let it stand in a warm place over night, then 
make a stiif batter of flour and warm water or milk ; 
add the meal, a pinch of sugar and salt; let stand in 
warm water until it rises ; don't have the water too 
warm ; make your bread of the rising and warm milk 



58 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

or water and tablespoon of lard and a little salt ; I 
always take the same quantity of milk as rising; work 
well, and then mold in pans. Don't bake in a very 
hot oven. — 3frs. Hampton L. Watts, Fayette, Mo. 

SAI.T-RISIAG BREAD. 

Over night, take one teacup of milk, and heat to boil- 
ing heat ; stir in a large tablespoon of cornmeal, set 
aside till morning, and pour in boiling water until luke- 
warm, add one teaspoon of sugar aud pinch of salt; 
stir in tiour until it makes a thick batter, and set in 
warm place to rise; take two quarts of tiour, and table- 
spoon of lard, teaspoon of salt, tablespoon of sugar, 
teacup sweet milk and warm water sufficient to make 
dough stiff enough to mould into loaves ; knead well 
and set to rise, and bake in a moderately warm oven. — 
Mrs. Laiikford Cook, Fayette, Mo. 

BOSTON BBOWX BREAD. 

One cup of sour milk, one cup of cornmeal, one cup 
of Graham Hour, half a cup of molasses, half a teaspoon- 
ful of salt, half teaspoon of soda; pour the batter into 
a covered mold and set in a large vessel of boiling- 
water ; place a weight upon the mold to keep it steady, 
do not allow the water to stop boiling, and in replen- 
ishing, take care that the water does not reach the top 
of the mold ; boil three or four liours, then turn the 
bread out of the mold, and dry it in the oven for ten 
minutes. — Josephine Harrison. Denver, Col. 

BROWX BREAD. 

One cup of cornmeal, four cups of Graham Hour, three 
cups of sweet milk, one cup of molasses, one teaspoon 
of soda ; put into the molasses, a little salt ; steam three 
hours. — Mrs. Mary Gay, Fayette, Mo. 



BREAD. 59 

BROWN BREA». 

Three eggs, two cups of milk, one sour and one 
sweet, (if you haven't the sweet milli, use strong coffee) 
one cup of Orleans molasses, two cups of Graham flour, 
one of cornmeal, teaspoon of baking powder, small 
teaspoon of soda; salt to taste; pour this into two or 
three quart cans, set in your steamer and steam three 
hours. — 3frs. Bettie Tutt Dimaway, Oswego, Kan. 

CIirXAMOX ROI^I^S. 

Take a part of the dough that you have prepared for 
rolls, and roll it out till it is the thickness of biscuit; 
take two tablespoons of cinnamon, one of butter, four 
of sugar, and stir them well together ; then spread on 
your dough, turn over, and spread the mixture again ; 
then roll the dough together and cut in thin slices ; put 
them in a pan to rise again; bake about half an hour. 
The same can be done with biscuit dough. — Mrs. Fan- 
nie Everett, Fayette, Mo. 

WAFFLES. 

One e^g beaten light, one quart of fresh buttermilk, 
one quart of flour, teaspoon of soda, teaspoon of salt. 
Beat thoroughly.— Jfr6'. Wilson SmitJt, Fayette, Mo. 

MFFFIXS. 

Two eggs beaten separately; one quart of flour; not 
quite a quart of buttermilk, teaspoon of soda, teasjioon 
of salt; add whites last; beat until light. The batter 
for muffins should be thicker than for waffles ; have 
irons hot ; grease well ; bake in quick oven ; as soon 
they rise, put on the top or upper grate to brown. 

MUFFI^fS. 

Three cups of flour, three cuj^s of sweet milk, three 
eggs, butter, half the size of an egg, one teaspoonful of 
yeastpowder, a little salt. Bake in a quick oven. — Mrs. 
H. K. Givens, Fayette, Mo. 



60 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

SODA BISCUIT. 

One quart of flour, one-half teaspoon of soda and one 
of salt, mixed in the flour ; lump of lard or butter, th e 
size of an egg ; one-half pint of clabber or buttermilk ; 
have a soft dough, as soft as can be rolled out, and 
stick with a fork. Bake in quick oven. — Mrs. Joseph 
Tolson, Fayette, Mo. 

SODA BISCUIT. 

One quart of flour, one pint of buttermilk, one half 
teacup of lard, one level teaspoon of soda, one level 
teaspoon of salt ; sift the soda in the flour ; mix the lard 
well with the flour; add the milk, and work until 
smooth ; cut out as rapidly as possible, and bake in a 
quick oven. — Mrs. M. J. Breaker, Fayette, Mo. 

YEASTPOWDER BISCUITS. 

One quart of flour, two heaping teaspoons of baking- 
powder, lard, size of an egg, one teaspoon of salt ; milk 
enough to make a soft dough. Mix just before baking, 
and bake in quick oven. — Mrs. E. R. Hendrix, Fayette, 

Mo. 

BEAT BISCUIT. 

One pint of flour, teaspoon of salt, a small teacup 
half full of rich, sweet cream ; beat till smooth and 
light. — Mrs. Wilson Smith, Fayette, Mo. 

FBEWCH BISCUITS. 

Two quarts of flour, three eggs, beaten separately ; 
little more than a pint of warm, sweet milk ; teacup of 
sugar, teacup of yeast, large iron spoon of lard, and a 
little salt. Make into dough, and work well. Let it 
rise. If you want the biscuit for tea, make up early in 
the morning, and about four o'clock work again. Roll 
out thin, and cut into biscuits ; lard on one side, and 
lay another on that already greased with lard ; let 
them rise again. Bake in rather a quick oven. 



BREAD. 61 

Our cook would often give me the proportions, as I 
would write this recipe off for friends, and after she had 
finished, she would say : " JVow please put down, ' and 
if you do it right, it's no trouble nuther.'' " — Mrs. E. 
Major, Fayette, Mo. 

INDIAN BREAD. 

Three cups of rye flour, three cups of Indian meal, 
two- thirds of a cup of sugar, four and one-half tea- 
spoons of baking powder ; salt ; with sweet milk, like 
Johnny-cake. Steam three and one-half hours, and 
brown in the oven. — Miss Cora Jones, Syracuse, N. Y. 

RECIPE FOR CORN BREAD. 

Take one pint cornmeal, pour in sufficient boiling 
water to scald it well, let cool, then add a teaspoonful 
of salt, a piece of lard as large as a walnut, and one or 
two eggs, and beat thoroughly ; put in a little sweet 
milk to make it brown nicely ; bake in gem pans, or 
put in a stove pan, in spoonfuls. Bake in quick oven. 
—Mrs. J. R. Estill, Estill, Mo. 

FRITTERS. 

Two eggs, one cup of milk, pinch of salt, one and a 
half cups of flour, with one teaspoon baking powder. 
Serve with powdered sugar, or maple syrup. Fry in 
hot lard, as you do crullers. 

CORN BATTER BREAD. 

One quart of clabber, three eggs, one tablespoon of 
butter, or lard, one tablespoon of sugar, one half tea- 
spoon of soda. Stir in meal enough to make a thin 
batter. To make good bread have the batter thin. 
Have the pan well greased, and hot. Put in the oven 
and bake one hour. 



62 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

EGG BREAD. 

One egg, beat well ; add one pint of buttermilk, one 
level teaspoon of soda, one of salt. Stir until it foams, 
then add one pint of meal, and one teaspoon of melted 
lard. We prefer an iron skillet for agg bread ; have 
hot, and well greased. Bake in hot oven. 

cob:^ batter cakes. 

Two eggs, beaten separately, one pint of buttermilk, 
one level teaspoon of soda, one of salt, one pint of meal, 
one-half teacup of sweet milk ; add the whites last. 
Have griddle hot, and well greased. 

CORX MIIFFIXS. 

Muffins are made by the above recipe by adding a 
teaspoon of melted lard. Bake in muffin irons, hot, and 
well greased. 

PI.AIX €ORX BBEAD. 

With a light quart of meal mix well one teaspoon of 
soda, one half teaspoon of salt, and one pint of fresh 
buttermilk. Bake in a moderate oven. 

PEAIX CORX BBEAD. 

One quart of meal, teaspoon of salt. Mix with cold 
water. Make in small loaves. Have the skillet hot. 
Sprinkle meal in skillet, to prevent the bread sticking. 

One teacup of yeast, one pint warm sweet milk, a 
piece of butter size of hen Qgg, two pints of flour, two 
eggs, one tablespoon sugar. When ready to put to rise, 
work in one-half teaspoon of soda. 

SAIiliY I.lJ:RfX. 

Rise the dough as you would for rolls. When it is 
well risen, do not take it out of the bucket till you add 
one cup of sugar, three eggs, one half cup of butter ; 
work all together with the liand, till the eggs and sugar 



BREAD. 63 

are thoroughly mixed, then pour into a warm, greased 
pan, and rise as 3^ou would rolls. 

PUFFET^ FOR TEA. 

Three eggs, one cup sugar, two- thirds of a cup of 
butter, three pints flour, three teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder. Bake in muffin rings, and serve warm. — 3Irs. 
M. Bridges, Fayette, Mo. 

MOOXSHOE TOAST. 

Take what bread you want to use for toast, and soak 
it a few minutes in sweet milk. Take it out and put it 
in a stove pan ; cover with milk. It will soon be a nice 
brown, then take each piece and butter it while it is 
hot, and lay two together.— Jfr^. T. J. Payne, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

FRE:SfCH TOAST. 

Beat two eggs in a dish ; put in a half pint of sweet 
milk, a little pepper, and a pinch of salt ; slice some 
cold light bread : have your skillet hot, with equal 
parts of lard and butter. Dip the bread in the milk and 
eggs half a minute ; turn over, and ivj until a light 
brown. An excellent way to use stale bread. — Mrs. 
John Mc Crary, Huntsmlle, Mo. 

BREAD CAKES. 

Soak over night, in a little warm water, dry bread 
enough to make a quart. Drain off the water in the 
morning. To one cup of flour add a teaspoon of baking 
powder. Mix well ; beat up the soft bread with some 
milk ; add to this two well-beaten eggs, a teaspoonful 
of salt, then the flour and baking i)owder, and last of 
all, a tablespoonful of melted butter. The butter should 
flow easily from the spoon ; rub a bit of salt pork on 
the griddle, hot, and drop a spoonful of batter for each 
cake. 



64 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK, 

BR£AKFA!ST CAKES. 

Mix one quart of buckwheat flour, and a little salt, 
with as much water, warm, as will make a thin batter ; 
beat it well, then add the yeast, and a very little syrup. 
When well mixed set it in a warm place to rise ; as 
soon as it is very light, add half teaspoonful of soda. 
Have the griddle hot, and well greased, and bake the 
cakes to a delicate brown. Pour over them melted 
butter, and serve hot. — Mrs. E. Major., Fayette., Mo. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

Make a dough, the same as for soda biscuit; roll it 
thin, the size of your jelly -cake pans, and when done, 
open the cakes, and butter both the inside and outside 
layers ; have your strawberries nicely picked, and 
sugared, before you prepare the dough, in order to 
have plenty of juice; spread your berries in both the 
upper and lower layer, putting one layer on top of the 
other ; set it again in the oven for a few minutes, not 
long, to cook the berries. — From My Mot7ier''s CooTc 
Book. 




->-;I':^T):l)T^"^rs: 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS. 

If a pudding is to be boiled or steamed, always have 
the Avater boiling before the j)udding is put in. Do not 
allow it to stop boiling for an instant while the pudding- 
is cooking. Puddings are boiled in cloths, or in moulds, 
tied in cloths : they should be tied tightly, and the 
moulds be buttered before the puddings are put in 
them. A pudding cloth should be made of thick twilled 
muslin, and alwaA^s before using it, wash it out in clean 
water, and flour it well before pouring in the pudding, 
allowing room for the pudding to swell. Puddings are 
much nicer and lighter steamed than boiled. Have the 
steamer hot before putting in the j)udding. All pud- 
dings in which berries are used, require more flour than 
those without ; audit must be remembered, fruit (dusted 
with a little flour) should always be added the last thing. 
All puddings, of the custard kind, require a very gentle 
oven. Those made of batter should be put into one suf- 
ficiently brisk to raise them quickly, without scorching 
them. Such as contain suet and fruit, must have a well 
heated, but not fierce oven. Always be sure and butter 
the dish well, before the pudding is turned in. 

FRIIT PIDDIXCJ. 

One coffee cup of beef suet, chopped ver}^ fine, one 
coftee-cup of molasses, one of buttermilk, one of raisins, 
seeded and chopped, one of currants, washed and dried, 
three of flour, well sifted, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, 
one half teaspoonful of cloves, also of mace, one grated 
nutmeg. Mix all well. Pour in a well greased pudding 

65 



66 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

mould, and steam four hours. — Mrs. Dr. Thomas Sinitli^ 
Fayette, Mo. 

SUET PUDDIXG. 

One cup of molasses, one of sweet milk, one of chop- 
ped suet, two of raisins, three of Hour, one teaspoon of 
soda, a little salt, cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg, to your 
taste. Boil two and a half hours. — Mrs. Dr. J. D. 
Smith, St. Joseph, Mo. 

SUET PUDDOG. 

One cup of molasses, one of sweet milk, one of suet, 
chopped fine, one of raisins, one of currants, two and 
one half cups of Hour, one half teaspoon of soda, one 
half teaspoon of clove, same of allspice, one teaspoon 
cinnamon, and a half nutmeg. Mix well, and steam 
two and one-half hours. — Mrs. W. M. Robertson, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

DOVER PUDDIXG. 

Three coffee cups of fiour, one teacup of finely chop- 
ped suet, one teacup of milk, two-thirds cup of molasses, 
one teaspoonful of soda, one cup of chopped raisins, one 
teaspoonful of cloves, a small nutmeg, and a little salt ; 
first mix two cups of the fiour with the suet, add the 
milk, soda, and molasses, then the third cup of flour; 
lastly, the raisins. Steam in a mould five hours. — Mrs. 
Enelina Carson, Fayette, Mo. 

BOIUED BAISIX PUDDING. 

Take one pint of sweet milk, five eggs, one teacup of 
seeded raisins, well fioured ; enough fiour to make a 
stiff batter ; put in a sack, and drop in boiling water. 
Boil one hour and a half.— J/r^. T. J. Payne, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

Mix well together one half coffee-cup of molasses, one 
fourth cup of butter, one half cup of milk, one and one 
half cups of Graham fiour, one <d^^, one half teaspoon of 



PUDDINGS. 67 



soda, one cap of raisins, or currants ; spices to taste. 
Steam four hours. — 3Irs. JY. 0. Jones, Syracuse, N. Y. 

W001>F0RI> PUI>1>I\'G. 

Three eggs, one teacup of sugar, one half teacup of 
butter, one half teacup of flour, one teacup of jams, or 
preserves, one teaspoon of soda, dissolved in three tea- 
spoons of sour milk ; cinnamon and nutmeg, to taste. 
Mix all together, and bake slowly in pudding pan. — 
Mrs. Rebecca Ford, Kansas Clty^ Mo. 

A SPICED APPL.E PIJDDIXG. 

Three teacupfuls of bread crumbs, three teacupfuls of 
apples, chopped, one teacupful of sugar, one quarter of 
a pound of raisins, perhaps a little citron, two table- 
spoonfuls of brand3^ one tablespoonful of ground cinna- 
mon, half teaspoonful of ground cloves, one teaspoonful 
of mace, two or three eggs, beaten separately. Cook the 
bread crumbs a few minutes with a pint of milk, before 
adding the other ingredients ; add the whites of the 
eggs the last tiling before baking. Bake half an hour, 
if the oven be quite hot. Serve with any sweet sauce. — 
From Mrs. Henderson's Cook Book. 

TAPIOC.i PlDI>I\0. 

Peel, core and cook, until quite done, six large 
apples ; drain otf the water ; and beat well with one tea- 
cup of sugar. Add the tapioca, which has been in soak 
several hours. Stir all well together. Flavor with nut- 
meg, or lemon. Bake in baking dish about three-quar- 
ters of an hour. Serve with cream, or solid sauce made 
of sugar and butter, beaten together until light, and fla- 
vored Willi wine. Peaches (fresh or canned) may be 
substituted, and are an improvement. — Mrs. E. Major, 
Fayette, Mo. 

TAPIOCA PIOWIXO. 

Soak over niglit one teacupful of tapioca ; add tlie 
yolks of four well-beaten egg.s, one cup of sugar, one 



68 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

pint of cream, and lastly, the whites, and a cup of 
stoned raisins. Bake in buttered pan. Serve warm, 
with brandy sauce. If eaten without sauce you must 
add to the above one half cup of butter. — 3frs. Charlie 
Smitli, Fayette, Mo. 

COCOANIIT PITDDIXG. 

Whites of nine eggs, one pound of pulverized sugar, 
one half pound of butter, one cocoanut, grated. Cream 
the butter and sugar. Add the whites of the eggs, 
beaten stiff; then the cocoanut milk and cocoanut.— 
Miss Eliza Payne, Nebraska City, Neh. 

COCOANIIT PlIDDIXG. 

One qaart of milk, four eggs, one cup of grated bread 
crumbs, (cake crumbs are better,) one cup of sugar, one 
grated cocoanut, salt and flour. Bake an hour. — Mrs, 
W. C. Arline, Fayette, Mo. 

COCOAXUT PllDDIIVG. 

One quart of milk, half a cocoanut, grated, four eggs, 
a little salt and sugar, to taste ; bake in a quick oven, 
about thirty minutes. Serve with a sauce. 

MOIJXT ilX DEER PUDDOG. 

One quart of sweet milk, one half cup of sugar, four 
eggs (yolks,) one half cup rolled crackers, one grated 
cocoanut. Bake one half hour ; take the whites of the 
eggs and meringue the top, and bake till a delicate 
brown. To be eaten Goldi.— -Mrs. J. H. Pearson, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

Three-quarters of a pound grated cocoanut, one quar- 
ter of a pound of butter, one pound of sugar, one half 
pint of cream, nine eggs ; stir the butter as for cake ; 
add tne eggs, well beaten ; grate the cocoanut and stir 
in, with butter and eggs. Put in the other ingredients, 
and bake with, or without a crust. It requires three- 



run DINGS. 69 



quarters of an hour for baking. Some persons grate in 
stale rusk, or sponge cake. — Mrs. Dr. T. J. Smitli, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

DEI^MO^ICO PUDDOO. 

One quart of milk, four eggs, using the white of one 
only ; three tablespoonfuls of sugar, two tablespoons of 
corn starch, one cupful of cocoanut, a little salt. Put 
the milk on the lire to scald ; wet the starch in cold 
milk ; beat the eggs and sugar, and stir all into the scald- 
ing milk ; add the cocoanut, and pour the whole into a 
pudding dish. Beat the three whites with three table- 
spoons of sugar ; flavor with vanilla ; bake a light 
brown. Serve with sauce. 

SPONGE PlIDDIXG. 

Butter six or eight slices of sponge cake ; place them 
in the pudding dish ; make a custard of four eggs to a 
quart of milk ; flavor, and sweeten to taste ; pour over 
the cake, and bake one half hour. The cake will swell, 
and flU the dish. 

ORANGE PUODIXG. 

Take four good sized oranges, peel, seed, and cut in 
small pieces ; add one cup of sugar, and let it stand. 
Into one cup of nearly boiling milk, stir two tablespoons 
of corn starch ; mix with a little water, and the yolks of 
three eggs. When done, let it cool, and mix with the 
oranges. Make a frosting of the whites of the eggs, and 
half a cup of sugar ; spread over the top of the pud- 
ding. Brown in the oven. — Mm. J. L. Morrison, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

CORN STARCH PLI>I>ING. 

One pint of rich milk, two tablespoonfuls of corn 
starch, a scant half cupful of sugar, whites of three or 
four eggs, a little salt, flavoring. Beat the eggs to a 
stiff froth. Dissolve the corn starch in a little milk. 
Stir the sugar into the remainder of the milk ; which 
place on the Are. When it begins to boil add the dis- 



70 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

solved corn starch. Stir constantly for a few moments, 
when it will become a sraootli paste ; now stir in the 
beaten whites of the eggs, and let it remain a little 
longer to cook the eggs. Flavor with vanilla ; pour 
into a mould. This pudding is improved by adding 
half a cocoanut, grated. Season with whipped cream. 
— Mrs. J. L. Morrison, Fayftte. Mo. 

Two quarts of milk, five eggs, one teacup of white 
sugar ; flavor with vanilla. Dissolve the starch in one 
quart of milk ; beat the yolks of the eggs with the 
sugar, until light, and add the other quart of milk ; 
pour this into the milk and starch, which has been 
heated to boiling ; boil until thick. Flavor after taking 
from the fire. When cold spread the meringue overtop. 
Place in the oven until a light brown. Serve with 
cream, or sauce. — Mrs. Martlia Elliott, Estill, Mo. 

SXOW PlIDDIXG. 

Cover one third of package of gelatine with cold 
water ; stir in a pint of boiling water ; add one cup of 
sugar, the juice of two lemons, or a half cup of wine. 
When cold, and beginning to thicken, add the beaten 
whites of three eggs. Beat all well together, and pour 
into moulds. Serve with boiled custard, made with the 
yolks of three eggs, one pint of milk, and half cup of 
sugar. — Mis Romeo Hughes, Fayette, Mo. 

GEI.ATIWE PUDDING. 

Separate the whites and yolks of four eggs ; with the 
yolks make a boiled custard, (with a pint of milk, and 
sugar, to taste.) Set a third of a box of gelatine to soak 
a few minutes in a little cold water ; then dissolve it 
with three-fourths of a cup of boiling water. When the 
custard has cooled, add the gelatine water and the whites 
of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth ; flavor with vanilla. 



PUDDINGS. 71 

Stir all together, and put it into a mould, or moulds. It 
will settle into three layers, and is a very pretty pud- 
ding, tasting very much like a Charlotte riLsne. A pretty 
effect can be obtained by using Cox's jxink gelatine.— 
From Mrs. Henderson's Coolx, Book. 

ORAXGE ROI.EY POI.EY. 

Make a light pastrj-, as apple dumplings ; roll in 
oblong sheets, and lay oranges peeled, sliced, and 
seeded, thickly all over it ; sprinkle with white sugar ; 
scatter over all a teaspoon or two of grated orange peel, 
and roll up, folding down the edges closely, to keep the 
syrup from running out ; boil in a cloth one and one- 
half hours. Serve with lemon sauce. — Buckeye Cookery. 

BROH x\ BETTY. 

Put a layer of sweetened apple-sauce in a buttered 
dish; add a few lumps of butter; then a layer of 
cracker crumbs, sprinkled with a little cinnamon ; then 
a layer of sauce, etc., making the last layer of crumbs. 
Bake in oven, and serve with cold, sweetened cream. — 
3Irs. Fratie Knickerbocker, Fayette, Mo., 186 1^. 

QIIEEX OF PIDDIXOS. 

To one pint of bread crumbs, add one quart of sweet 
milk, one cup of sugar, yolks of four eggs, the rind 
of a fresh lemon, grated line, a piece of butter the size 
of a hen Q^g. Bake till done. Beat the four whites to 
a stiff froth, adding one teacupful of sugar ; stir in the 
juice of one lemon. When the pudding is baked, spread 
a layer of acid jelly over, then the meringue. Set in the 
oven, to brown slightly. Serve with cold cream. — Mrs. 
Nannie Lay, Jefferson City, Mo. 

BICE PLDBIXG. 

To a cup of boiled rice, while warm, add a pint of milk, 
in which a little corn starch has been dissolved, and boil 
again ; add the yolks of two eggs, beaten, with half a 



72 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

cup of sugar. Stir well together ; and lastly, add the 
juice and grated rind of one lemon. Place in a dish, 
and bake slowly in the oven. When done, spread over 
the top the whites, beaten, with two tablespoons sugar, 
and brown in oven. A cup of raisins may be added 
just before baking. Serve with cream sauce. 

COTTAOEIPITDDING. 

One cup of sweet milk, one half cup of sugar, one 
tablespoonful of butter, one egg, one teaspoonful (level 
full) of soda, two of cream of tartar. Flour to make a 
thick batter. Flavor with nutmeg. Serve with sauce. 

SIMPI.E PlIDDIXG. 

Two eggs, one cup of sugar, one cup and a half of 
sweet milk, two tablespoons of butter, one quart of 
flour, two teaspoons of baking powder. Flour to taste, 
— 3fiss Sall'ie Warden, Fayette, Mo. 

VIRGINIA PlIDDI»fG. 

Five eggs, reserving three whites for sauce, one pint 
of milk, one gill of cream, or an ounce of butter, three 
tablespoons of flour, a little salt. Bake one half hour. 
Sauce. — Beat three whites, with one half pound of 
sugar. Flavor with wine, or lemon. Pour on pudding 
just before serving. ^J//.s.? Bessie Gay, Fayette, Mo. 



^SACGES^fdE 



Bl TTER SAUCE. 

Three-quarters of a cup of butter, one and a half 
cupfuls of powdered sugar, four tablespoonfuls of 
boiling hot starch, made of flour or cornstarch ; use 
wine, lemon, vanilla or any flavoring preferred ; stir the 
butter with a fork to a light cream ; add the sugar and 
continue to beat it for one or two minutes ; just before 
serving, stir in with an egg- whisk, the boiling starch 
and flavoring. 

BUTTER SAUCE WITH EGGS. 

Dissolve a pint of sugar, in a little water ; cream a 
teacup of butter, and the yoYks of two eggs ; then add 
the sugar; set on the stove to boil slowly, stirring 
almost constantly ; use any flavoring preferred. 

A PI.AIXER SAUCE. 

One coffee cup of clarified broioii sugar ; a Inmp of 

butter, size of an eg^, one level tablespoon of flour, 

(dissolved in a little cold water); mix well together; 

then stir in a coffee-cup of boiling water ; let boil till 

the consistency of cream ; flavor with either nutmeg or 
lemon. 

WU\E SAUCE. 

Beat a cup of butter until creamy, then gradually 
beat into it, two cups of powdered sugar ; add a gill of 
shtrry by spoonfuls ; beat the mixture until it becomes 
a smooth, light froth ; then set the bowl in a basin of 
boiling water, and stir for a minute and a half; have 
3^our sauce-bowl heated by means of boiling water; 
when the sauce is finished, empty the bowl of water, 
and put the sauce into it ; grate nutmeg over the sauce 
and send to the table hot. 

73 



74 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

FOAM SAUCE. 

Beat up as for hard sauce ; white sugar with butter, 
until very light in the i^roportion of half a cup of but- 
ter to one cup of sugar ; flavor with essence of lemons 
or bitter almonds ; fifteen minutes before serving, set 
the bowl in a pan of boiling water on the stove, and 
stir it till hot ; it will raise in a white foam to the top 

of the bowl. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

One teacup powdered white sugar, scant half teacup 

butter, half teacup rich cream : beat butter and sugar 

thoroughly, add cream ; stir the whole into half teacup 

boiling water ; place on the stove for a few moments, 

stirring it constantly ; take it off, and add flavoring. 

STRAWBERRY SAUCE. 

Half a cupful of butter, one cupful of sugar, the beaten 
white of an egg, and one cupful of strawberries (mashed), 
rub butter and sugar to a cream ; add the beaten white 
of the egg, and the strawberries thoroughly mashed. 

COED CREAM SAUCE. 

Beat together one cup of sugar and half cup of butter; 
add a cup of rich cream. Stir all to a cream, flavoring 
with vanilla or lemon, and place where it will get very 
cold before serving. 

PEAIX CREAM SAUCE. 

One pint of cream, three tablespoons of sugar, and 
half a small nutmeg grated. 

WHIPPED CREAM SAUCE. 

One pint of rich cream sweetened to taste and flavored 
with wine ; skim off the top as it is whipped and place 
in sauce bowl, or it makes a very pretty dish to place 
it around the pudding. 

SAUCE. 

One cup of butter, two cups of light brown sugar, 
one cup of cream cooked together. 



^PIESse- 



PASTRY. 

Pastry for seven pies ; three uncovered ; three pints 
of Hour, one pound of butter, and a heaping cujd of 
lard ; wash the butter in ice-water to extract the salt ; 
set the pan in which you mix the pastry, in a pan of 
ice-water; mix very lightly the flour and lard and 
butter. — From My Mother's Cook Book. 

PASTRY. 

One pound of flour, sifted three or four times ; half 
pound lard, one-fourth pound of butter ; cut up the lard 
with the flour and mix it with icewater ; handle as little 
as possible with the hands ; roll thin and spread with 
thin slices of butter; then dredge with flour; roll up 
and slice in about three or four pieces ; roll out again, 
and again; spread with butter and dredge with the 
flour as before ; roll up and stand on end ; dredge with 
flour ; roll out thin and place in pans. — 3Irs. Dr. T. J. 
Smith, Fayette, Mo. 

MIXCEMEAT. 

Two pounds of lean, tender beef; after it is cooked 
and chopped, half pound of butter, one pound of suet 
chopped flne, three pounds of apples chopped flne, three 
pounds of raisins, seeded and cut, two pounds of cur- 
rants, half pound citron, one pound of flgs, two pounds 
of brown sugar, one ounce of cinnamon, half ounce of 
clover, half ounce of allspice, one-fourth ounce of mace, 
juice of four oranges, and three lemons, four nutmegs 
grated, one pint of good brandy, one gallon of sweet 
cider ; mix well and keep well covered. — Mrs. Mlttie 
C. Burton, Fayette, Mo. 

75 



76 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

" TEMPERANCE " MIXCEMEAT. 

Five pounds of meat cooked and chopped line, two 
pounds of suet, four pounds raisins seeded and cut, 
eiglit oranges, juice and pulp, four pounds of apples, 
half pound of citron, one ounce each of cinnamon, 
allspice and nutmeg, two pounds of brown sugar. — Mrs. 
D. 0. Morris, Fayette, Mo. 

MINCEMEAT. 

Two pounds of lean beef, boiled tender, and chopped 
fine ; two pounds of sugar, two pounds of raisins seed- 
ed and cut, two pounds of apples cut fine, one pound of 
citron, one tablespoon of powdered cinnamon, table- 
spoon of powdered cloves and one of ginger, one tea- 
spoon of grated nutmeg ; mix all together and set on 
the stove ; let simmer till well mixed ; when cold, add 
one quart of brandy. — Mrs. H. K. Glvens, Fayette, Mo. 

MOCK MINCEMEAT. 

Two cups of warm water, half cup of butter, two- 
thirds cup of vinegar, two cups of raisins, one cup of 
bread crumbs or crackers, one cup of sugar, one of 
molasses ; spices to taste. Bake with two crusts. — 
Mrs. Minnie Pile, Fayette, Mo. 

EEMON PIES. 

Take three lemons, cut them up fine ; two cups of 
molasses, one of sugar, four eggs ; mix well together 
and make two pies, in the following manner ; take deep 
pie pans, line the bottom with a crust ; put in one-fourth 
of the mixture into each pan, lay on another crust ; put 
in the rest of the mixture and cover with a crust. — Mrs. 
Dr. T. J. Smith, Fayette, Mo. 

I.EMON PIE. 

Six eggs ; one teacup of butter, two of sugar, teaspoon 
level full of "citric acid," dissolved in a little hot 
water, tablespoon of extract of lemon ; beat the yolks 



PIES. 11 

of eggs and sugar together until liglit ; add butter, then 
extract and acid, and lastly the wliites beaten to a stift' 
froth. Line pans with pastry and bake before putting 
in tlie tilling. — Mrs. 8- C. Major, Fayette., Mo. 

liEMOX PIE. 

Two lemons, two cups of sugar, two cups of water, 
two tablespoons of Hour, four eggs, half cup of butter; 
add all together and beat well ; grate the outside of the 
lemon peel in with the other ingredients ; reserve the 
whites and beat to a stiff froth, adding nearly a cup of 
sugar; put over the pies when done, and brown lightly. 
— Mattie Frazier. Fayette., Mo. 

EEMOX PIE. 

Put three large lemons in the oven and heat them ; 
squeeze out the juice; boil the rind in half pint of 
water; then add juice and water to the following mix- 
ture : two cups of sugar, one tablespoon of cornstarch, 
dissolved in milk ; one of butter, yolks of six eggs ; 
bake in crust ; beat the whites with half cuj^ of sugar ; 
sj^read over pies and brown slightly. This quantity 
makes two pies. — Mrs. D. 0. Morris, Fayette, Mo. 

EEMOX PIE. 

Six eggs ; leaving out the whites of three ; one ahd a 
half cups of sugar, juice of two lemons, one tablespoon 
of butter, warmed till soft, but not oily; beat three 
whites, with half teacup of sugar for meringue. — Mrs. 
Wm. Turner, Glasgow, Mo. 

EEMOX PIE. 

The yolks of three eggs ; one cup of sugar, half cup 
of milk, one teaspoon of cornstarch, grated rind and 
juice of one lemon ; juice put in last ; meringue — whites 
of three eggs and three tablespoons of sugar. — Mrs. J. 
A. J. Rooker, Fayette, Mo. 



78 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



I.EMOX PIE. 

Five eggs, one and a half cups of sugar, four table- 
spoons of flour, one teaspoon of " citric acid," dissolved 
in a little warm water ; tablespoon of lemon extract ; to 
three whites of eggs beaten to a stiff froth, add one tea- 
cup of sugar ; place on the top of pies, and brown 
slightly. — 3Irs. Solon SmitJi, Fayette., Mo. 

TRAXSPAREXT PIE. 

Two tablespoons of butter, four of sugar, one of flour; 
cream the butter and sugar, and add the yolks of four 
eggs ; then the flour ; teaspoon of lemon extract ; line 
pans with pastry and bake ; then pour in the mixture ; 
when done, cover with meringue, made of the four 
whites, adding a tablespoon of sugar to each ^^^g. Re- 
place in the oven and brown slightly. — Mrs. George 
Holley.. Armstrong, Mo. 

CHESS PIE. 

Five eggs, three-fourths of a cup of butter, one cup 
of sugar; beat the yolks and sugar together until very 
light ; add the butter after it has been creamed ; flavor 
with vanilla; when done, cover with meringue, which 
should be a delicate brown. — Mrs. Romeo Hughes, 
Howard county. Mo. 

CREAM PIE. 

Four eggs, one teacup of sugar, one j^int of cream, 
half cup of flour; beat the eggs and sugar together 
until very light, then add the flour ; place the pan in 
which 3^ou boil the milk, in a pan of boiling water ; 
when the cream comes to a boil, pour it over the mix- 
ture, stirring all the while, to prevent scorching; cook 
this till it is the consistency of custard; when cool, 
flavor with vanilla ; have two pans lined with pastry ; 
bake and All with the custard. If meringue is used, 
the whites of four extra eggs are required. — Mrs. Roio- 
ena W. Woods, Fayette Mo. 



riKS. 79 

A NICE FII.I.IXG FOR PIE. 

Take prunes enough for one pie ; stew and stone 
them ; sweeten to taste ; add the wliites of two eggs 
beaten stiff, beat with prunes until well mixed; bake 
with two crusts ; or if you have rich cream, whip it and 
use in place of top crust. 

MOI.ASSES PIE. 

Two cups of molasses, one cup of sugar, three cups 
of water, one cup of flour, one-third cup of vinegar; 
mix together well, and let come to a boil; let it cool, 
and flavor to taste ; add one tablespoon of butter. This 
makes two pies. — 3£rs. Lanford Cook, Fayette, Mo. 

APPI.E CUSTARD PIE. 

Three cups of stewed apples ; nearly a cup of white 
sugar, six eggs, one quart of milk ; beat the eggs until 
light and mix with the apj)les ; season with nutmeg ; 
then stir in gradually the milk, lastly add the whites ; 
use only one crust. — Mrs. W. F. Potts, Fayette, Mo. 

APPL.E CFSTARD PIE. 

Prepare apples as you would for apple-sauce ; sweet 
en to taste ; add two eggs well beaten, and one cup of 
milk, teaspoon of melted butter ; flavor with nutmeg ; 
bake in one crust ; the whites may be left out for frost- 
ing, if preferred. — Mrs. Louisa Sebree, Howard county, 
Mo. 

GREEN APPLE PIE. 

Stew the apples and run through a colander ; sweeten 
to taste and flavor with nutmeg. Bake with two crusts. 

BAKEI> APPLE Wir^IPLINClS. 

Peel and core six acid apples ; All the holes with 
sugar and butter; have ready a nice short crust; roll 
in small round pieces ; enclose the apples in them ; 
place the dumplings in a deep pan (not crowding them) 
pour over them one pint of sugar and piece of butter 



80 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

(half teacnpful) and warm water enough to nearly 
cover them ; bake nearly an honr, or until the apples 
are cooked and the dumjjlings are brown (a light 
brown) ; if the water cooks down too low, fill up with 
boiling water. They are very nice without any addi- 
tional sauce, but some prefer a sauce of butter and 
sugar beaten until light ; cream butter, before mixing 
with sugar. — Mrs. John Farrington, Howard county 
Mo. 

BAK£D APPI.E BOI.Ii. 

Roll a nice short crust in the form of a large square 
spread over with apples chopped fine, sprinkle over 
with sugar and nutmeg ; roll the crust and put into a 
baking pan. Then put over it sugar, pieces of butter, 
and water. Bake slowly. Serve with sauce. Fruit of 
any kind may be used instead of apples. 

APPL.E COBBIiER. 

Fill an earthen pudding dish two-thirds full of tart, 
juicy apples, peeled, quartered, and cored, and the 
quarters cut in two. Put, in a cup of water and sprinkle 
with sugar ; cover with a paste of rich cream biscuit 
dough. Bake nearly one hour. Serve from the dish in 
which it is baked. Peach cobblers are made similarly. 

DRIED APPI.E PIE. 

Soak the apple until soft; then stew till soft enough 
to go through a colander. Season with lemon ; add 
sugar to taste, and one beaten egg for every two pies, 
and a teaspoon of butter to each pie. Mix and bake 
with two crusts. 

FRIED APPI.E PIE. 

Make a nice pastry; roll thin about the size of a pie- 
plate ; put in a spoon of nice dried apples, sweetened, 
and flavored with allspice ; turn the crust over; cutout 
with the edge of a saucer to shape it nicely ; and fry in 
hot lard like dousrhnuts. 



PIES. 81 

CHERRY ROn^. 

Make a nice pastry; roll it out into a thin sheet; lay 
the cherries thickly upon the pastry, strew sugar over 
them ; and, commencing at the side, roll carefully till all 
the fruit is enclosed ; pinch the edges together at the 
ends, and tie in a strong cotton cloth, then drop into a 
pot of boiling water. Serve with sauce. 

TIFFEY PFDIHXG. 

Half pound apples pared and chopped line, yolks of 
live eggs, juice and grated rind of one lemon, three 
ounces of melted butter, quarter of a pound of sifted 
white sugar. Butter to be added after the other ingre- 
dients are mixed. Bake in a paste like a tart. Have 
ready the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth and 
mixed with a little sifted white sugar, and flavor with 
lemon. When pudding is done, put the meringue on 
the top and brown slightly. — Mrs. Dr. T. J. Smith, 
Fayette, Mo. 

PIE PI.AXT PIE. 

Peel the stalks ; cut into one-half inch pieces. Pour 
boiling water over and let stand till cold ; sweeten well, 
and add several pieces of orange peel. Boil until done. 
Bake with two crusts. 

STRAWBERRY CREAM PIE. 

Line a dish with pastry, and fill with fi-esh straw- 
berries made very sweet with powdered sugar; cover 
with pastry, but do not pinch down at the edges. When 
done, lift the top crust, pour over the berries the follow- 
ing, after it is perfectly cold. One small cup of milk 
(or part cream) heated to boiling, whites of two eggs, 
beaten and stirred lightlj^ in the boiling milk, one 
tablespoon of white sugar, half a teaspoon of corn 
starch wet with milk ; stir all together and cook three 
minutes. Replace the top crust, and sprinkle sugar 
over the top before serving. — Mrs. H. K. Hinde, How- 
ard, College, Fayette, Mo. 



82 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

IRISH POTATO PIE. 

Four eggs well beaten, two cups of sugar, two large 
potatoes boiled and well beaten, half cup of rich cream, 
piece of butter size of a walnut, flavor with nutmeg and 
brandy. This makes two pies. — Helen Georgie Carson, 
Fayette, Mo. 

IRISH POTATO PIE. 

Two good sized potatoes, boiled and well beaten ; 
butter size of a walnut ; half cup of cream, and half cup 
of sweet milk ; yolks of two eggs, good half cup of sugar ; 
flavor with nutmeg and one tablespoon of brandy. This 
makes one pie. For meringue use the whites of the 
eggs and one heaping tablespoon of sugar to each Qgg. 
— Mrs. Margaret TJnrvli, Fayette., Mo. 

SWEET POTATO PIE. 

One pound nearly of sweet potatoes, the firm yellow 
ones are best ; half cup of butter, fourth cup of white 
sugar; one tablespoon of cinnamon; one teaspoonful 
nutmeg; four eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, 
one lemon, juice and grated rind, and wine glass of 
brandy. Boil the potatoes and mash them ; cream the 
batter and sugar; add the yolks, the spices and lemon ; 
beat the potatoes in by degrees and until light, then 
the brandy and stir in the whites. Bake in dishes lined 
with good pastry, without cover. 

PIJMPKIX PIE. 

One quart of pumpkin (after it is stewed and strained); 
six eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately ; one 
quart of milk ; one teaspoon of cinnamon, and one of nut- 
meg ; one cup and a half of white sugar; flavor with two 
tablespoons of wine or brandy. Beat all well together, 
and bake in crust without cover. 



PIE^. S3 

FRl IT PI DDIAG. 

Five eggs, one cup of butter, two cups of sugar, one 
cup of sweet milk, one and one half cups of fruit ; any 
kind of fruit ; damsons are best. Line your pans just 
as you wonld for custard pies. 

COCOAXIJT PIE. 

Grate oiie cocoanut, beat live eggs with sugar to taste, 
until they are quite light; then beat in your cocoanut 
milk with about one pint of sweet milk; then mix all 
together; and make pies in pans lined with pastry. — 
Mrs. Dr. T. J. Smith, Fayette, Mo. 

PIE FOR DYSPEPTICS. 

Four tablespoonfuls oatmeal, one pint water, two 
large apples, one cup of sugar, a little salt ; letoatmea 1 
stand in water a few hours till it is swelled ; add app'es 
pared and sliced, then sugar. Mix all well together ; 
put in a buttered dish, and bake till oatmeal is dont\ 
Makes a most delicious pie. which can be eaten with 
safety b}^ sick or well. — Nannie Keyser. Fayette, Mo. 



(g^^^'CX)^' 



^NIGE^DIJSSJiET 



\j 



RUSSIAN CREAH. 

Let one quart of milk boil ; then add the yolks of 
four eggs and a cup of sugar beaten together (as if for 
custard) ; take this off the stove and immediately add 
the well beaten whites with four tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, stirring rapidly a few momenrs ; then add a box 
of Cox's gelatine dissolved in a pint of warm water, and 
a tablespoonful vanilla. — Mrs. B. C. Clark, Fayette, Mo. 

VEI.VET CREAM. 

One box of gelatine, well dissolved ; whites of three 
eggs; one quart of cream, sweetened, and flavored with 
sherry wine to suit taste. The gelatine when dissolved, 
must be left to cool before using ; stir into it the three 
whites ; whip the cream ; take off the whip and stir 
into the gelatine and eggs, stirring constantly till all 
the cream is used ; pour into moulds and leave to 
harden ; used with whipped cream. — Mrs. Dr. C. Darby, 
St. Joseph, Mo. 

CHARL.OTTE RUSSE. 

Dissolve one ounce of gelatine in one pint of milk by 
boiling ; beat the yolks of four eggs (sweetened) and 
stir them in while the milk is on the fire ; when it is 
cooked to the consistency of custard, strain into a 
bowl, stirring constantly; season one-half gallon cream 
with wine ; whip to a stiff froth and beat it in, just as 
the custard (which should be flavored with vanilla) 
begins to congeal; have ready a glass bowl lined with 
sponge cake ; over which pour the custard. 

84 



NICE DESSERTS. 85 



Pour eggs; whites and yolks beMten separately ; one 
teacup of sugar, one of tlour, one teasjDoon of yeast- 
powder, one tablespoon of ice-water; bake in biscuit 
pans ; when done, spread with jelly and roll while hot ; 
serve with wine sauce. — Mrs. Wni. Turner, Glasgow, 
Mo. 

BL.AXC MANGE. 

One quart fresh milk; a pinch of salt, four table- 
spoons of cornstarch, four tablespoons of white sugar; 
dissolve the cornstarch in a little of the milk, stir the 
sugar and salt in the remainder of the milk, place it 
over the lire, let it come to a boil and pour it on the 
dissolved starch ; place it over the tire again and boil 
three minutes, stirring constantly ; remove from the 
fire ; let it stand a moment or two, then flavor with 
vanilla or lemon and pour it in moulds to cool, having 
flrst dipped the moulds in cold water and let them drain 

a moment. 

AMBROSIA. 

Slice oranges or pine apples in a glass bowl ; sweeten 
well ; have a layer of the fruit and a layer of grated 
cocoanut, and so on, until the bowl is full ; grate cocoa- 
nut on top. 

APPL.E MEBIXGUE. 

Boil tart apjDles after they are pared and cored ; run 
the pulp through a colander, and sweeten to taste; to 
a pint of the soft pulp, stir in lightly the whites of three 
eggs beaten to a stiff froth ; flavor with grated rind and 
juice of lemon or vanilla; serve with cream. — 3frs. M. 
C. Burton, Fayette, Mo. 

APPLE FI.OAT. 

To one quart of apples, partially stewed and well 
mashed, put the whites of three eggs, well beaten, and 
four heaping tablespoons of loaf sugar; beat them 
together for fifteen minutes, and eat with rich milk and 
nutmeff. 



86 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

HEX'S :\EST. 

se plain blanc mange recipe on cornstarch package; 
take half a dozen or a dozen egg shells and fill with the 
blancmange while warm; when cold, take out of the 
shells and place in a glass dish ; cut small strips of 
lemon peel and boil in a clear syrup till tender; place 
them around the egg-forms, and make a boiled custard 
and pour over all. (Very pretty and very good). — From 
Mrs. Oweri's Coolc Boole. 

ORAXGE ICE. 

Make a syrup of one pint of water, one and a half 
pounds of granulated sugar; add enough cold water to 
make three quarts of mixture ; into this squeeze the 
juice and most of the pulp of six oranges and three 
lemons; taking care to remove all seeds; put into 
freezer, and when beginning to freeze, stir in whites of 
six eggs, well beaten. — Mrs. L. S. Frosser, Fayette, Mo. 

PRETTY" DISH.— PIWEAPPIiE. 

Dissolve a box of gelatine in half a pint of cold 
water ; add half a pint of boiling water ; sweeten to 
taste ; fiavoi- with any extract you may prefer ; let the 
gelatine come to a boil. Take three or four bananas, peel 
and slice them round or lengthwise ; lay in a deep fruit 
dish ; sprinkle some sugar over them ; then pour the 
gelatine over them, let it harden. Oranges may be 
used in same way. 

TUTTI FRUTTI. 

Sweeten and flavor one gallon of rich cream, and when 
partly frozen, add one can of grated pine-apple, citron, 
raisins, a few figs, candies and fruits of all kinds, 
chopped finely. There should be one and one-half 
quarts of fruit. Freeze hard and mould. Angels' food 
(cake) is delicious served with this cream. — 3£7's. R. P. 
Williams, Fayette, Mo. 



MCE DESSERTS. §7 



CHOCOLATE CREAM. 

One quart of cream, one pint new milk, two cups 
sugar, two eggs beaten very light, five tablespoonfuls 
chocolate rubbed smooth in a little milk; heat the milk 
almost to boiling, and pour by degrees in with the 
beaten eggs and sugar; stir in the chocolate; beat well 
three minutes, and return to the inner-kettle ; heat until 
it thickens well, stirring constantly. Take from the 
lire and set aside to cool. Many think a little vanilla 
an improvement. When the custard is cold, beat in the 
cream and fieeze.— J//.v5 Bll^a Payne, Mhraska City, 
Mb. 

PEACH ICE-CREAM. 

Prepare your cream as for plain ice cream; and when 
partly frozen, add to one gallon of the cream, about one 
dozen soft fresJt peaches which have been nicely chopped 
and sweetened. (Delicious.)— J/r^. J. D. ToUon, 
Fayette, Mo. 

BAXAXA CREAM. 

Prepare five ripe bananas, take off the skin ; pound 
the iruit in a mortar, with five ounces white sugar, to a 
pulp. Beat up half a pint of good cream to a stiff" froth ; 
add the pounded bananas, andhalf a glass of brandy, and 
the juice of one lemon ; mix well together, then add half 
an ounce isinglass dissolved in a little boiling water, 
gently whip in and freeze.— Jir6. John Morrison, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

ICE-CREAM. 
Take rich cream ; sweeten to taste ; use any flavoring 
30U like. We prefer vanilla. When it begins to 
freeze, beat until very light. Remove the inside frame 
of the freezer, and set aside to mould. When ready to 
serve, set the freezer for an instant in a bucket of hot 
water, and turn into a boat or dish. 



THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



ORAW<iiE ICE. 

Eight oranges, one potiiid of sugar, one lemon, one 
quart and a cup of water. Make a S3a'up of the s ugar 
and water; skim it well; cool ; add the juice of the 
oranges. Boil up the rinds and strain the water into the 
syrup, and add the juice and rind of a lemon same way. 
Freeze. 

STRAWBERRY ICE. 

Allow a pound of sugar to a quart of berries ; let 

stand an hour or two; put through a strainer; add an 

equal quantity of water, and when partly frozen, add 

the stiffly beaten whites of three eggs to each quart of 

the mixture. 

PINEAPPEE ICE. 

Make a syrup of one pint of water, and one and a half 

pounds of sugar, (granulated). When quite clear, pour 

it boiling hot on a can of pineapple, either grated or 

cut in very fine pieces ; add enough cold water to make 

one gallon of mixture ; then the juice of two lemons. 

Pour in freezer, and when just beginning to freeze stir in 

the whites of three eggs well beaten. — Mrs. Russel 

Caples, Glasgow, Mo. 

Pi:SfEAPPEE ICE. 

One can of grated pineapple; pour into a clean 
napkin and squeeze all the juice out jou can, throwing 
the pulp away; add to juice two cups sugar, and the 
juice of two lemons (a teaspoonful of tartaric acid will do 
in place of lemons). Pour over all one quart of boiling 
water ; after it cools, freeze ; add the whites of five eggs 
well beaten, after it begins to freeze. — Mrs. John Far- 
rington, Fayette. Mo. 

EEMOIV ICE. 

Two quarts of water ; two good pints of sugar and 
the juice of eight large nice lemons ; when almost frozen 
add the whites of three eggs well beaten ; you may add 
the juice of three oranges or one pint of grated pine- 
apple. — Mrs. Charlie T . Smith, Fayette, Mo. 



NICK DESSERTS. 89 

T.E^IOX ICE. 

Three lemons to a quari of water; six teaspooiifuls of 
wliire sugar ; pare the 3 ellow peel from the lemons, un- 
less you make to use right away, as the peel gives a 
bitter taste ; slice and squeeze the lemons on the sugar; 
add a very little water and let stand fifteen minutes ; 
then fill up with water and let stand fifteen minutes ; 
strain and freeze as you would cream. 

DEI.MOXICO. 

Yolks of six eggs, beaten very light ; one large teacup 
of granulated sugar, stirred in the eggs ; half a box of 
Cox's gelatine dissolved in half a teacup warm water ; 
steep one-fourth of a vanilla bean in half pint cream 
(do not let boil.) Then add the gelatine ; then beat 
with the eggs ; whip one quart of cream, stir all to- 
gether, and pour in the freezer ; freeze quickly, for the 
gelatine is apt to congeal before it freezes. 'Tis best to 
prepare the freezer before you get the ingredients 
ready. This quantity makes one gallon. You can use 
extract of vanilla. — Mrs. Settle Tutt Dunawat/, Oswego, 
Kansas . 

PIXEAPPIiE ICE. 

Take one quart can of pineapple, (grated.) add one 
cup of sugar, and the juice of two lemons; then pour 
over it one quart of boiling water, let it cool ; then put 
it into freeze. When it begins to freeze, then add the 
whites of three eggs, beaten to a stiff froth. — Mrs. E. 
W. Bedford, Fayette, Mo. 

PI^EAPFLiE SHERBET. 

One can of pineapple chopped fine ; three lemons, 
using juice and pulp; sweeten to taste; pour over this 
a quart of boiling water and let it soak over night or 
several hours ; when it begins to freeze, stir in the 
whites of five eggs, that have been well beaten to a stiff 
froth. — Mattie Frazier, Fayette, Mo. 



90 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

PI5rEAPPI.E SHERBET. 

One pineapple, (or can,) one pint of sugar, one pint 
of water, one tablespoonful of gelatine ; add the juice to 
the water and sugar ; dissolve the gelatine two hours in 
cold water enough to cover it, a half cup boiling water 
to be added, stir altogether and put on ice. — Mrs. I. P. 
Ryland., Tascosa., Texas. 

PINEAPPIiE JEEIiY. 

Pour the juice off of two cans of pineapple, having as 
much as a pint of juice; take the pineapple after get- 
ting the juice all out, and put a pint and a half of water 
and a little sugar over it, and boil to get the flavor all 
out; soak half a box of gelatine in a pint of water, 
until it is well dissolved ; then add it to the boiled pine- 
apple ; then the s\veetened juice; strain it and set aside 
to congeal. Serve with whipped cream. — Mary Jack- 
son, Fayette, Mo. 

Pi:»fEAPPIiE GEEATIXE. 

Pour over one box of Cox's gelatine, one pint of cold 
water and let it stand several hours ; flavor with one 
teacup of white sugar and half teaspoon of citric acid ; 
pour over this one pint of boiling water and add one 
pint of grated pineap2)le. 

WIWE JEEI.Y. 

Pour over one ounce of gelatine, a pint of cold w^ater ; 
let it stand three-fourths of an hour; then add two 
pints of boiling water, two pounds of crushed sugar, 
juice of two lemons (lemon extract and citric acid can 
be used if you can't get lemons) ; half pint Madeira 
wine, and a wdne glass of brand}^ ; strain in a mould ; 
cold water should be poured in the mould and emptied 
3 us t before using; it hardens much quicker on ice. or 
the coolest place you can And ; dip the moulds in warm 
water just a minute befoie taking out the jelly. — Mrs. 
S. C. Major, Fayette, Mo. 



NICE DESSERTS. 91 



liEMOX FOAM. 

Beat the yolks of six eggs, with one cup of sugar ; 
one cup of milk; dissolve one-third box of gelatine in 
a little warm water; let the mixture b(nl, then add the 
juice of three large lemons and cook until it begins to 
jelly ; pour in a mould and set in a cool place or on ice 
for an hour; beat the whites of six eggs with half a 
cup of powdered sugar and pour over the top. — Ada B. 
Beck, Fayette, Mo. 

BOIT.i:i> CUSTARD. 
• Set a tin vessel containing half gallon of sweet milk 
in a pot of boiling water ; beat the yolks of ten eggs, 
with one tablespoon of flour ; three spoonfuls of flour 
with cold milk; strain this in the milk as soon as it 
boils, stirring constantly ; sweeten to taste and flavor 
with vanilla ; whip the whites of Ave eggs to a stiff 
froth ; cook by pouring boiling water over them ; lay 
on custard after taking up.— i^fr.v. H. K. Givens, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 




iKJiS 



GENEEAL DIRECTIONS. 

In making cake it is quite necessary that the 
materials be of the best quality. Sweet butter, fresh 
eggs and good flour are the first requisites. Never al- 
low the butter to oil : put it in an earthen dish and add 
your sugar; beat them to a cream, add the yolks of 
eggs well beaten, then the milk, and lastly the beaten 
whites of the eggs and flour. Spices and liquors may 
be added after the yolks of the eggs are put in, and the 
fruit put in with the flour. 

For small cakes the oven should be pretty hot; for 
larger cakes a moderate one. To ascertain if a large 
cake is sufficiently baked, pierce it with a broom straw 
or knitting needle, if done, the straw will come out free 
from dough ; if not, the dough will adhere to it. To 
prevent the cake browning too soon, have a paste-board 
with a few holes made in it (with a fork), lay on the 
top of the pan. Newspaper will not answer, being too 
light and inflammable. If it is necessary to turn or 
move the cake in the oven, do it very gently. If the 
oven is too hot, do not leave the door open, but lift one 
of the stove lids off a little way, for a short time. Never 
put the cake away until cold. 

ICINO BOIL£D. 

One pound of the nicest white sugar, crushed or 
crystalized, not 'powdered. Four very large spoon- 
fuls of water. I use a large kitchen spoon. Boil until 
the water is all out. Then pour slowly on the whites of 
92 



CAKES. 93 

four eggs that have been beaten to a stiff froth. Flavor 
with extract of lemon or almond if you prefer. Add a 
drop of blueing vrater ; and if you wish the icing to dry 
quickly a little pulverized citric acid. 

If cake is well dredged with tiour after baking, and 
then carefully wiped before the icing is put on, it will 
not run, andean be spread more smoothly. The cake 
after being iced should be set in a cool, dry place to dry. 
Mrs. Dr. T. J. Smith. Fayette. Mo. 

ICIWG COI.D. 

Beat whites of two eggs to a stiff froth ; add gradually 
half a pound of best pulverized sugar ; beat well for at 
least half an hour; flavor with lemon juice, (some add 
tartaric acid, as both whiten the icing). To color a 
delicate pink, use strawberry, currant or cranberry ; 
the grated peel of an orange or lemon, moistened with 
the juice and strained through a thin cloth, will give it 
a handsome yellow. This amount will frost one large 
cake.— Jlfr^. H. A. Norn's. 

CHOC'OIiATE ICIXG. 

One teacup of grated chocolate, two cups of white 
sugar, half a cup of sweet milk. Boil until it ropes ; 
then beat until cool the whipped whites of four eggs 
into it.— Mrs. E. P. Williams, Fayette, Mo. 

ICOO WITHOUT £GGiS. 

To one heaping teaspoonful of corn starch, with just 
enough cold water to dissolve it, add a little hot water, 
and cook in a basin set in hot water, till very thick. 
Stir in two and two- third cups of pulverized sugar, while 
the starch is hot ; flavor to taste, and spread on cake 
while it is hot. This will never crumble in cutting.— 
Mrs. J. H. Firiks, Salisbury, Mo. 



94 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

One and a half pounds of flour, the same of butter, 
and the same of sug^ar. One dozen eggs, two pounds of 
best raisins, the same of currants and citron. Sprinkle 
all well with flour. Two nutmegs, two lablespoonfuls 
of powdered mace, cinnamon and cloves. One wine 
glass of brandy ; half a wine glass of rose water ; citron 
put in last. This makes two large cakes. — Mrs. H. A. 
Norris, Fayette, Mo. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound of sugar ; one pound of butter ; one pound 
of flour; twelve eggs; three pounds of raisins; one 
pound of citron ; three nutmegs ; two tablespoonfuls of 
powdered cinnamon ; dessertsj)Oonful of mace; a small 
teaspoonful of cloves ; two wine glasses of French 
brandy ; one of claret. — Helen Oeorgie Carson, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

FRUIT OR BLACK CAKE. 

Twelve eggs, one pound of sugar, one pound of butter, 
one pound of flour, four pounds of raisins, two pounds of 
citron, heaping tablespoonfnl of cinnamon, half a tea- 
spoon of cloves, dessertspoon of allspice, three nutmegs, 
teaspoon of mace. All these spices mixed in a large 
goblet of whiskey. The last thing put in a teaspoon of 
soda mixed in a half a teacup of cream. 

Rub the butter and sugar together ; then add the 
yolks of the eggs, part of the flour, and the whites of 
the eggs well beaten ; then add the remainder of the 
flour, and the whiskey with spices. Mix all thoroughly 
together ; cover the bottom and sides of cake pan with 
white paper, well buttered. The fruit well dredged 
with flour must be added just before pouring into the 
pan. Bake four hours. — Mrs. I. P. Hockaday, Colnm- 
hia, Mo. 



CAKES. *-'o 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound of llour, one pound of sugar, half pound 
of butter, whites often eggs, one teacup of cream, two 
teaspoons of baking powder, mixed well in the flour. 
Cream butter and sugar together; then add the cream. 
After beating the eggs to a stiif froth, add them al- 
ternately with the flour to the above mixture. Lastly 
add two pounds of raisins, and half pound of citron, 
well dredged with flour.— il/'r.s. R. C. Clarli, Fayette, Mo. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

Whites of twelve eggs, three cups of pulverized sugar, 
five cups of flour, one of butter, one of sweet cream, one 
teaspoonful of soda, and two of cream tartar, or three 
teaspoons of baking powder. Flavor with vanilla, or 
what you like ; add one pound of sweet and two ounces 
of bitter almonds blanched ; one pound of citron cut 
fine; one grated cocoanut ; beat the almonds in a 
mortar with a little rose water. Flour all the fruits 
well with a small portion allotted to the recipe. Bake 
slowly.— Jfr5. /. L. Morrison, Fayette, Mo. 

SPICE CAKE. 

Two cups of brown sugar, yolks of seven eggs, one 
cup of molasses, one of butter, one of sweet milk, four 
of flour, tablespoonful each of cinnamon, cloves, nut- 
meg and baking powder. 

Whites of seven eggs, two cups of sugar, one of butter, 
one of milk, one teaspoonful of baking powder, and 
three cups of flour. Mix alternately with the above.— 
Mrs. Carrie Morrison, Fayette, Mo. 

HICKORY XUT CAKE. 

Three cups of flour, two of sugar, one of milk, two 
eggs, two tablespoons of butter, one large spoon of 
baking powder, one pint of hickory nuts cut fine, flavor 
with vanilla or bitter almonds.— Jtfr-s. J. L. Morrison 
Fayette, Mo. 



96 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

PRWrCE OF WAIiES CAKE. 

The whites of seven eggs, two cups of sugar, one cup 
of butter, one of sour cream, four cups of flour, half 
teaspoonful of soda, flavor with lemon. The yolks of 
seven eggs, two cups of brown sugar, one cup of butter, 
one of malasses, one of sour cream, flve of flour, three 
tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, one of spice, one nutmeg, 
half a teaspoonful of soda, and one of whiskey. The 
white part marbled with the dark. — Mrs. Ccesar 
Ferguson, Fayette, Mo. 

POUBfD CAKE. 

One pound of flour, one of sugar, three-fourths of a 
pound of butter, eight eggs. Cream the butter, and 
then add the sugar; stir until very light; then break 
in two eggs, and sift in a handful of flour. Mix well, 
then put in two more eggs, and more flour, so on until 
all are used. Flavor with rose water. Two teaspoon- 
fuls baking powder in the flour. — Mrs. A. J. Herndon, 
Fayette, Mo. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Whites of twelve eggs, one pound of sugar, three- 
quarters of a pound of butter, two pints of flour, sifted 
twice, one teaspoonful of baking powder. Flavor with 
lemon. Cream the butter and sugar together, until v^ery 
light ; then add the whites of eggs, beaten to a stiff" 
froth ; after these are well mixed, add flour with the 
baking powder. — Mm. J. H. Crump, Fayette^ Mo. 



WHITE CAKE. 

One pound of flour, one pound of sugar, one- half 
pound of butter, the whites of twelve eggs, three table- 
spoons of cream, one and a half teaspoons of Price's 
baking powder. — Mrs. Nettie Gannett, Fayette, Mo, 



CAKES. 97 

WHITE CAKE. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, three-fourths 
of a pound of butter, the whites of sixteen eggs, one 
teaspoon of Price's baking powder.— /Mm Georgie 
Carson, Fayette, Mo. 

WHITE €AKE. 

Four cups of white sugar, whites only of sixteen eggs, 
one even cup of butter, half cup of sweet milk, one tea- 
spoonful baking powder, five even cups of Hour, sifted 
five times ; cream butter and sugar, add a little of the 
whites, which must be well beaten ; then add the liour, 
then milk, after stirring well, add the baking powder, 
which must be sifted lightly into the batter ; flavor with 
almond and use cut-loaf sugar. — Mrs. Lucy A. Boone, 
Jefferson City, Mo. 

GOIiI> CAKE. 

Yolks only of sixteen eggs, two even cups of sugar, 
one and a half cups of butter, one cup of sweet milk, 
four even cups of Hour, two teaspoons of baking powder. 
Cream butter, beat yolks lightly with sugar, add eggs; 
beat until light; add Hour and powder, then milk; put 
paper in pans and grease well. The two recipes make 
four cakes. 

CHOICE FIG CAKE. 

A large cup of butter, two and a half of sugar, one of 
sweet milk, three pints of ilour, with three teaspoons 
baking powder, whites of sixteen eggs; one pound and 
a quarter of figs well floured and cut in strips like 
citron ; no flavoring. — " Bualieye Cookery.'''' 

WHITE TEA CAKE. 

The whites of four eggs, two cuj^s of sugar, one cup 
of butter, one cup of sweet milk, four cups of flour, one 
teaspoonful of baking powder, sifted in the flour: flavor 
as you please. — Mrs. Leland, Wriglit, Boonville, Mo. 



98 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

SII.VER BUXX CAKE. 

One good pound of flour, one good pound of sifted 
white sugar, one-half a pound of butter, whites of ten 
eggs, one teacup of cream, two small teaspoonfuls of 
cream of tartar, one of soda; stir the butter into the 
sugar, put soda into milk, add it to butter and sugar 
after it is well mixed ; put cream of tartar into tlie flour. 
After beating the whites of the eggs to a stifli" froth, add 
them alternately with the flour, to the above mixture ; 
flavor as you please. This is a never failing receipt.— 
Mrs. Dr. T. J. 8mitTi, Fayette, Mo. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Whites of twelve eggs ; three cups even full of sugar, 
five cups of flour, one of butter, one of sweet cream, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder. — Mrs. Dr. U. 8. Wright, 
Fayette, Mo. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Three cups of sugar, one cup of butter, one cup of 

cream, iive cups of flour, three teaspoons of baking 

powder, whites of twelve eggs. — Mrs. John Ricketts, 

Fayette, Mo. 

AiSTGEES' FOOD. 

Whites of eleven eggs ; one and a half tumbler sifted, 
granulated sugar, one tumbler sifted flour, one tea- 
spoonful of vanilla, one teaspoon cream of tartar ; sift 
flour four times, then add tlie cream of tartar and sift 
again, but measure before putting in the cream of tar- 
tar ; sift tlie sugar and measure it; to the eggs add the 
sugar lightly, then the flour, then vanilla, beating con- 
stantly till put in the pan. Bake forty minutes in 
moderate oven, on a pan that has never been greased. 
The tumblers must hold two and one-fourth gills. — Mrs. 
Sides, St. Louis, Mo. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Whites of six eggs; one and one-fourth cups of 
sugar, three-fourths cup of butter, (light) two cups of 



CAKES. 99 

flour, one teaspoonful of yeastpowder; flavor with, 
lemon extract; cream butter well and mix flour with 
ii. ; oeai whices to a stl^ fiOt/u, and add sugax grduual- 
ly; add sugar and whites to flour and butter. — Mrs. 
Nannie Lay, Jefferson City, Mo. 

DOI.L.Y V.IRDEX CAKE. 

One cup of white sugar, half a cup of butter, whites 
of three eggs, one small cup of milk, flour enough to 
make it tlie consistency of cup cake ; two teaspoonfuls 
of Price's baking powder, one teaspoonful almond 
flavoring. Bake in square tin pans. Icing : Yolks of 
three eggs, one teaspoonful |,'iilvei"i^^*3. starch, whipped 
into the eggs thoroughly ; add pulverized sugar till it 
is as stiff as icing ; one teaspoon lemon extract ; spread 
smoothly on cake and put it in a cool place. — Mrs. I. 
H. Rearson, Fayette, Mo. 

SPOXGE CAKE. 

Seven eggs ; one pint of sugar, one of flour ; beat 
yolks of eggs and sugar together till very light, then 
add the whites of eggs, then stir in flour very lightly ; 
flavor with teaspoon of vanilla or lemon extract. — Mrs. 
E. Major, Fayette, Mo. 

SPOXGE CAKE. 

Nine eggs ; one pound of sugar, nine ounces of flour, 
juice of one lemon. — Miss Jessie Payne. 

DRIED APPIiE CAKE. 

One cup of dried apples, one of molasses, one of 
sugar, two and a half of flour, one- third cup of butter, 
one ^%^, one teaspoon of soda, one-half cup of sour 
milk, one teaspoon of cloves ; soak the apples over 
night, then simmer for two hours in the molasses ; mix 
the ingredients, putting in the apples and molasses 
last; bake in a cake mould. — Mrs. Dr. J. J. Watts, 
Fayette, Mo. 



.IiJiS^/>- 



HASH CAKE. 

One pound of silver biinn cake, baked in layers. 
Filling. — One pound of almonds blanched and pounded; 
one pound of pecans, powdered ; half a pound of 
raisins, seeded ; one-fourth of a pound of citron, the same 
of figs, juice of two oranges, juice of one lemon ; make 
icing of whites of five eggs and one and a half pounds of 
sugar ; chop the fruit fine, stir in two-thirds of icing, 
then add nuts and fiavoring ; spread in tliick layers ; 
use the remainder of icing outside, ornamenting the top 
of cake with some of the almonds reserved. — Mrs. M. O. 
Burton, Fayette, Mo. 

CARAMEIi CAKE. 

Make layers of au}^ nice white cake. Filling. — Three 
cups of coff'ee C. sugar, one cup of butter, one and a 
half cup rich cream ; boil until quite thick, stirring 
quite frequently ; then spread thickly between the 
layers of white cake and also over the top. It ought 
to boil ten or twelve minutes. After taking from the 
fire, pour into a bowl and beat till thick, just as you do 
icing. — Mrs. J. R. Findley, St. Louis, Mo. 

RAISIN CAKE. 

One teacup of butter, two of white sugar, four of flour, 
two teaspoonfids of baking powder ; whites of eight 
eggs ; teacup of seeded and chopped raisins, rolled in 
flour, and then mixed well in the batter ; flavor with 
lemon. Bake in jelly pans and put icing between the 
layers. — Mrs. Fannie Boone, Fayette, Mo. 

100 



LAYER CAKES. 101 



BOW TOW CAKE. 

Whites of ten eggs ; two cups of sugar, three of flour, 
three-fourths cup of butter, two teaspoons of Price's 
baking ])owder. 

Filling. — One and a half pounds of raisins, seeded 
and cut flne; one pound of figs, cut flne ; put into a 
pan and add one-half pint of good brandy, with enough 
water to make it soft enough for a jelly ; put on the 
fire and mix well with your hand while it is warm. — 
Miss Gable Darby., Hotoard county, Mo. 

CHOCOLATE FII.MXG FOR CAKE. 

Half cake of Baker's chocolate sifted, one pound of 
white sugar, one cup of sweet milk, one-fourth of a 
pound of butter, one teaspoonful of vanilla flavoring. 
Put tlie sugar, milk and butter in a small kettle and let 
it come to a boil, stirring it occasionally ; then add the 
chocolate and let it cook until thick enough to spread 
nicely ; add the vanilla after it is taken from fire. — Mis. 
J. W. Kllpatrlck. 

liEiUOW BUTTER. 

Dissolve one cupful of sugar in the juice of a large 
lemon ; beat three eggs very light, mix well with the 
sugar ; butter the size of a walnut and added to the 
mixture ; boil till very thick, stirring constantly ; place 
between layers of cake flavored with lemon. — Mrs, 
Wllcoxon, Fayette., Mo. 

L.EMOW FIL.EIXG. 

One cup of sugar, one ^%^., one large apple grated; 
the inside of one lemon, half the rind grated in; cook 
after mixing; let it get cold before using. — Mrs. John 
L. Morrison^ Fayette, Mo. 

I.E:fIOX FIIililXG. 

Four eggs, two cups of sugar, two large lemons, put 
in the oven and baked until soft ; squeeze the juice into 
the sugar and eggs. Set the stew pan in a pan of hot 



102 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



water and cook till very thick, stirring frequently. — 
Miss Pensie Darhy, Howard county, Mo. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of Hour, one-half 
pound of butter, one-half cup of sweet cream, whites of 
ten eggs, one teaspoonful of baking powder, mixed well 
with the flour ; cream sugar and butter until very light, 
then pour in the cream, add the flour and eggs. Bake 
in layers. 

Filling. — Make boiled icing of one pound of sugar 
and the whites of two eggs ; into this squeeze the juice 
of two oranges and one lemon, using the grated rind of 
one orange and one-half of the lemon ; then stir in pul- 
verized sugar until thick enough to spread nicely. — 
Mrs. R. C. Clark, Fayette, Mo. 

FRENCH CREAM CAKE. 

One cup of sugar, and three eggs, beaten together till 
very light ; one and three-fourths cups of flour, two tea- 
spoons baking powder, well mixed with the flour by 
sifting several times ; four tablespoonfuls of boiling 
water. Bake in two cakes. 

Custard or Cream. — Take nearly one pint of milk ; 
when nearly boiling add two tablespoonfuls of corn- 
starch, moistened with a little cold milk ; two eggs, 
nearly one cup of sugar beaten together well. While 
cooking, stir constantly, till it will drop from the spoon 
without running. Take from the stove ; add half a cup 
of butter, melted ; flavor to your taste. Turn cakes out 
on a moulding- board, and when cold, split with a sharp 
knife, and spread the cream between. — Nannie Keyser, 
Fayette, Mo. 

CREAM CAKE. 

Three eggs, one cup of sugar, three tablespoonfuls of 
water, one and a half cups of flour, one heaping tea- 
spoonful of yeast powder. 



LA YER CAKES. 103 



FllliRg. — Two eggs, one cup of sugar, one pint of 
sweet milk, three tiiblespoonfuls of flour stirred in a 
little cold milk. Put eggs, sugar and milk together and 
when at boiling point, stir in thickening, and boil until 
stift' enough to drop from spoon without running. Take 
off, and stir into this one tablespoonfiil of butter. 
Flavor with vanilla. — Mih. Nannie Lay, Jefferson City, 
Mo. 

WHITE MOIIXTAIX CAKE. 

Two cups of pulverized sugar, half a cup of butter, 
beaten to a cream ; add half cup of sweet milk, two and 
a half cups of Hour, two and a half teaspoonfuls baking 
powder in the flour ; whites of eight eggs. Bake in 
jelly tins and put together with icing. 

Icing. — Boil a half teacup of water, and three teacups 
of sugar till thick; beat the whites of three eggs well, 
and pour over it ; beat all together till cool. Sprinkle 
each layer thickly with grated cocoanut, and also upon 
the outside icing. — Mrs. John Henry, Jefferson City, 
Mo. 

CUSTARD CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, four of flour, yolks of Ave eggs, 
one cup of cold water, pinch of salt, one teaspoon of 
soda, two of cream of tartar. 

Filling. — Two eggs, one cup of sugar, one pint of 
milk, one tablespoon of flour. Flavor with vanilla. — 
Mrs. H. A. Nor r is, Fayette, Mo. 

VEtVET SPOXGE CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, six eggs, (leaving out the whites 
of three,) one cup of boiling water, two and a half cups 
of flour, one tablespoon of baking powder in the flour. 
Beat the yolks a little; add the sugar, and beat fifteen 
minutes ; add the three beaten whites, and the cup of 
boiling water, just before the flour; teaspoon of lemon 
extract, and bake in three layers, putting between them 



104 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

icing made by adding to the three whites of eggs, beaten 
to a stiff froth ; six dessertspoons of pulverized sugar to 
each Qgg. Flavor with lemon. — Mrs. W. C. Arline, 
Fayette, Mo. 

CHOCOL.ATE CAKE. 

The whites of eight eggs, two cups of sugar, one cup 
of butter, three full cups of flour, one of sweet milk, 
three teaspoons of baking powder. Beat the butter to 
a cream ; stir in the sugar; beat until light; add the 
milk; then the flour, and beat in whites. When Avell- 
beaten, divide into equal parts ; into half grate a cake 
of sweet chocolate. Bake in laj^ers, spread with custard, 
and alternate the white and dark cakes. 

Filling. — To one pint of milk add a tablespoonful of 
butter ; when come to a boiling heat, stir in two eggs 
beaten with one cup of sugar ; add two teaspoons corn- 
starch dissolved in a little milk. — Mrs. W. T. Boioling., 

Fayette, Mo. 

ICE-CREAH CAKE. 

One cup of sugar; two and a half cups of flour ; whites 
of four eggs, beaten to a stiff froth ; half a cup of butter, 
two-thirds cup of sweet milk ; two teaspoons baking 
powder. Bakeinjell_y tins. 

Filling. — Dissolve one cup of sugar in water, boil till 
brittle; add the whites of two eggs beaten well; beat 
till cold ; then teaspoon of tartaric acid, place between 
cakes. — Mrs. L. N. JacJison, Monroe City. Mo. 

jLEMON JEIiEY CAKE. 

One cup of butter, three of sugar, five of flour, one of 
sweet milk, two teaspoons of baking powder, whites of 
eight eggs. Bake in jelly cake pans. 

Filling. — Yolks of eight eggs, one cup of butter, one 
and a half cups of sugar, three tablespoons of flour, 
one-half cup of water, juice of two lemons, and grated 
peel of one. Boil this until thick and place while warm 
between the cake. — Mrs. Dr. J. J. Watts, Fayette, Mo. 



LAYER CAKES. 105 



RIBBOX CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup of milk, four 
cups of flour, four eggs, one teaspoon cream of tartar, 
one-lialf teaspoon of soda. Have ready two tins alike ; 
put one-tliird of the mixture in each, and bake. To the 
other third, add three teaspoons of molasses, one cup of 
currants, and citron and spices to suit the taste ; and 
bake in a tin the same as the others. When done put 
alayerof the light cake, then spread with jelly; tlien 
the dark cake; jelly and the light cake on to^.— Mrs. 
H. K. ITincle, Howard College, Fayette, Mo. 

PRINCE OF WAI.es cake. 

1. BlacTi Part.— OwQ cup of brown sugar, half cup 
butter, half cup sour milk, two cups of flour, one of 
chopped raisins, one teaspoon soda, one tablespoon of 
molasses, yolks of three eggs, one tablespoon of cinna- 
mon, one of nutmeg, half a one of cloves. 

2. White Fart.— One cup of flour, one of butter, half 
a cup cornstarch, half a cup of sweet milk, one cup of 
sugar, one tablespoonful of yeast powder, whites of three 
eggs. Bake both in jelly tins, put together with icing.— 
Mrs. Dr. T. J. Smith, Fayette, Mo. 

AI.MOXI> CAKE. 

Whites of eight eggs, two cups of sugar, one of butter, 
three cups of flour, one of sweet milk, three teaspoons 
of baking powder. Beat butter to cream ; stir in the 
sugar; beat until light; add the milk, then the flour, 
beat in whites. 

jrniinf/.— One pound of sweet almonds (blanch and 
chop them), one cup sour cream, one cup sugar, one 
tpaspoonful of vanilla. Beat all together and put be- 
tween lnyevs.—Mrs. John Noland, Independence, Mo. 



-^fui:x*gae:.es 



COFFEE CAKE. 

Two ciij)s of brown sugar, one of butter, one of 
molasses, one of strong coffee, as prepared for the table, 
four eggs, one teaspoonful of soda, two of cinnamon, 
cloves and grated nutmeg, one pound of raisins, one of 
currants, four of flour. Bake slowly at first, bake two 
hours.— Mrs. E. W. Bedford, Fayette, Mo. 

CUP CAKE. 

One coffee-cup of sour cream, one of butter, two of 
sugar, four of flour, five eggs, small teaspoonful of soda. 
Beat the butter and sugar together until very light; 
then add yolks of eggs, well beaten ; then the other in- 
gredients. — Mrs. J. D. Tolson, Fayette, Mo. 

GIXGER BREAD. 

. Beat a cupful of buttermilk until it is creamy, add to 
it two cupfuls of brown sugar, one of New Orleans 
molasses, one tablespoon of cinnamon, one of ginger, 
one nutmeg grated, add three well beaten eggs, a cup- 
ful of cream or milk, in wliich a teaspoonful of soda 
has been well dissolved. When all the ingredients have 
been well mixed add five cupfuls of sifted flour. Beat 
vigorously, then stir in a pound of currants.— Jir^. 
Juliette Flndlay, Lexington, Mo. 

SOFT GIXGEB BREAD. 

One and a half teacups of brown sugar, the same of 
molasses, one cup of butter or lard, four cups flour 
(heaping), four eggs, one teacup sour cream, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, ginger to taste. — Mrs. George Bough- 
ner, Fayette, Mo. 

106 



PLAIN CAKES. 107 



OI]VO£R BREAD. 

Half a cup of butter, the same of brown sugar, the 
same of molasses, one cup of sour milk, three eggs, two 
and a half cups of flour, one teaspoonful of soda, one 
and one-half teaspoonfiils of ginger, half a teaspoonful 
of cloves. Beat hard and long.— Josephine Harrison, 
Denver, Col. 

OIXO£R CAKE. 

One pound of flour, half a pound of sugar, three- 
fourths of a quart of molasses, half a teacup of sour 
cream, with half a teaspoon soda dissolved in cream, 
Ave eggs, half a pound of butter, heaping tablespoonfui 
of ginger, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, one of black 
pepper. — Mattie Frazicr, Fayette, Mo. 

GIXG£R CAKE. 

Two cups of New Orleans Molasses, one cup of boiling 
water, half a cup of melted butter, one tablespoonfui 
ground ginger, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Flour to make a thin batter. — Mrs. L. M. Findley, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

SOFT GIXGER BREA1>. 

One-half pint of molasses (sugar-house is best,) one 
cup of sugar, white or brown ; half pound of butter, 
three eggs well beaten, one teaspoonful of soda in our, 
one tablespoonfui of ginger. Make stiff" as pound cake ; 
bake in a moderate oven. — Mrs. Dr. T. J. Smith, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

Oi:WOER CAKES. 

One quart of molasses, one cottee-cup of sugar, one 
pint sweet lard, three eggs, beaten separately, one very 
small cup of ginger, half a cup of cinnamon, two table- 
spoonfuls of soda put in flour. Flour enough to make 
them roll out easily. We use only half this quantity. 
Mrs. J. W. Kilpatriclc. 



108 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. • 

Gi:srGER SWAPS. 

One pint of molasses one of butter, tablespoonful of 
ginger, teaspoonfnl of cloves, one of soda. Put all over 
the fire together, let it come to a boil. When nearly 
cool add llour enough to roll, roll thin, cut and bake. — 
Mrs. Miller Reed, Fayette, Mo. 

SCOTCH CAKES. 

Put three quarters of a pound of butter into one 
pound of sifted flour, mix in a pound of sifted white 
sugar and a large tablespoonful of cinnamon ; mix it in 
a dough with three well-beaten eggs. Roll out very 
thin, cut into round cakes and bake in a quick oven. — 
Mrs. Dr. T. J. Smith, Fayette, Mo. 




^GOOKIES?^ 

SWEET CAKES. 

Three cnps of brown sugar, one of lard, one of butter, 
one of butter- milk, three eggs, teaspoonful of soda, five 
pints of flour, half a wine glass of whiskey. Flavor with 
imtmeg.— Mrs. E. Major, Fayette, Mo. 

COOKIES. 

One egg, beaten with one cup of sugar, butter size of 
a goose Qgg, small cup of cream, (sour), one teaspoon- 
ful of soda. Lemon and nutmeg for flavoring.— ^/r^Z/e 
Smith, Fayette, Mo. 

SWEET €AKES. 

Two cups of sugar, two eggs, four tablespoonfuls of 
thick sour cream, three cups of butter, one teaspoonful 
of soda; sufficient flour to make them roll; flavor with 
nutmeg. Bake in a quick oven.— Mrs. Nettie Gannett, 

Fayette, Mo. 

CRUEEERS. 

One pound of sugar, five eggs, one-fourth of a pound 
of butter, one teacup of sweet cream, half teaspoon of 
soda, one teaspoon of cream of tartar ; flour enough to 
roll nicely ; fry in hot lard ; when done sprinkle over 
them powdered sugar and cinnamon mixed.— l/r.s. Row- 
ena W. Woods, Fayette, 3Io. 

EEP KUCIIEX. 

Take one-half gallon of sorghum molasses, one-half 
cup each of allspice, cinnamon, cloves and ginger; two 
nutmegs, two pounds of raisins, one-half pound citron, 
three pounds of pecans, one pint of sour milk and one- 

^ 109 



110 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

half cup of soda, one quart of melted lard ; add flour 
enough to make dough stiff" enough to roll; take enough 
of the dough to cover your pan and roll one-fourth of 
an inch thick. Bake and then cut in squares, and ice 
while warm. — Mrs. Klatt., Fayette., Mo. 

GERMA^f COOKIES. 

Two and a half pounds of lioney, one and a half 
pounds of sugar, two and a half pounds of flour, one 
pound of almonds, (pounded) one and a half pounds of 
citron, (cut flne) half a glass of brandy, two ounces of 
cinnamon, half ounce of cloves, juice and pulp of two 
lemons (cut fine) ; mix well, and bake slowl}^ ; sprinkle 
sugar on while hot. These will keep a long time. — 
Mrs. M. C. Burton, Fayette, Mo. 

DROP CAKES. 

One pint and a half of flour, half pound of butter, 
quarter of a pound of sifted white sugar, one handful of 
currants, two eggs, a large pinch of soda. This recipe 
will make about thirty cakes. Drop them out of a 
tablespoon on a buttered tin, or stove pan and bake in 
a moderate oven. Dredge currants with flour before 
putting them in the mixture. — Mrs. T. J. Payne, Fay- 
ette, Mo. 

APIE CAKES. 

Yolks of eight eggs ; one pound of pulverized sugar ; 
half a pound of butter ; one teaspoonful of soda, in four 
teaspooiifuls of sour cream ; add flour enough to i oil 
easily ; sprinkle sugar and cinnamon over tops of cakes 
before baking. — Mrs. Carrie Morrison, Fayette, Mo. 

I^ITTEE CAKES. 

One coffee-cup of buttei-, two of sugar, two eggs, tea- 
spoonful soda, in a small cup of buttermilk ; nutmeg. — 
Mrs. J. W. Kiljxttrieli. 



COOKIES. Ill 



juilbi.es. 

Four cups of sugar, two of butter, oue of milk (but- 
termilk) one teaspoonfiil of soda, four eggs, one nutmeg, 
flour to roll very lightly ; roll sugar on top with rolling- 
pin.— J//-6-. Mattle Frailer, Fayette, Mo. 

SMALIi XUT CAKES. 

Whites of six eggs, beaten to a froth, one pound of 
pulverized sugar, one pound of hickory nut kernels; 
beat eggs and sugar together for three-quarters of an' 
hour, then add the kernels. Bake on well greased and 
well floured biscuit pans, in a tolerably hot oven ; drop 
them out of a large kitchen spoon. This recipe makes 
seventy- five or eighty. You can use any other kind of 
kernels if you wish. Flour the pans after greasing.— 
Mrs. J. W. Kilpatrick, Fayette, Mo. 

MACAROO^fS. 

One pound of sugar, granulated, one pound of shelled 
almonds, whites of four eggs ; put the almonds into hot 
water until the skins will slip off easily, then dry and 
beat them to a paste, with a little rose-water, or oil of 
lemon to prevent their oiling; beat the eggs till perfect- 
ly dry and light, then add the sugar and almonds. 
Bake in small "cakes in slow oven.— Jfr^. Ma.mie White 
Chinn, FranTclin, Mo. 

BOSTON CREAM CAKES. 

One pint of water, one-half pound butter, three- 
fourths pound of flour, ten eggs ; boil the butter and 
water together; stir in the flour when boiling; when 
cool, add the eggs and soda, the size ,of a pea ; drop by 
the spoonful on a buttered baking pan, leaving space 
so that the cakes will not touch wiieu risen. Bake in a 
very quick oven, about ten minutes ; when cold, make 
an incision at the side, and fill with the following cream :' 



112 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

Six gills of milk, one and a half cups of flour, two cups 
of sugar, six eggs ; beat the flour, sugar and eggs 
together, and stir into milk while boiling; flavor with 
lemon. — Mrs. John Shajfroth, Fayette, Mo. 

DOUGHWUTS. 

One-fourth of a pound of butter, one-half a pound of 
sugar, five eggs well beaten, one teaspoonful of soda, 
two of cream of tartar, half a cup of sweet milk ; flour 
enough to make them roll out nicely ; flavor as you 
please ; roll out and cut in different shapes ; fry in hot 
lard. — Mrs. M. Bridges, Fayette, Mo. 

DOrCiH^UTS. 

To one cup of good yeast, add one pint of milk, one 
and a half cups of sugar, one-fourth cup (large measure) 
lard, saltspoon salt, a little nutmeg and cinnamon, stir 
in flour until stiff enough and let it rise, then add a 
Half teaspoonful soda, dissolved in milk; mix stiff 
enough to roll and cut out to suit your taste. These 
require a little more time to cook than those without 
yeast. Fry in hot lard, and when done, sprinkle with 
powdered sugar and cinnamon. — Mrs. Anne Shaffroth, 
Fayette, Mo. 

CREAM DOUGHNUTS. 

Beat one cup each of sour cream and sugar and two 
eggs together, add a level teaspoon of soda, a little salt 
and flour enough to roll ; fry in hot lard ; flavor with 
nutmeg. — Mrs. E. Major, Fayette, Mo. 

KNICKERBOCKER CRUI.I.ERS. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, four eggs, half 
teaspoon soda, little salt and nutmeg, small cup of 
milk; flour to make stiff; roll x&cy thin; use cruller- 
cutter in making cakes about three inches square, with 
slits. Frv in hot lard. 



COOKIES. 113 



SUGAR KISSES. 

Whites of live eggs well beaten; add one pound of 
pulverized sugar, one teaspoon of lemon extract ; drop 
on white paper, and bake about twenty minutes in a 
moderate oven. 

SCOTCH WAFERS. 

Take one pound of sugar, half a pound of butter, one 
pound of Hour, two eggs, two teaspoonfuls of cinna- 
mon ; roll thin, and bake quickly in wafer irons. 




GENERAL DIEECTIONS FOR CANDY MAKING. 

G-ranulated sugar is preferable. Candy should not 
be stirred while boiling. Cream tartar should not be 
added until the syruj) begins to boil. Butter should be 
put in when the candy is almost done. Flavors are more 
delicate when not boiled in the candy. 

VAWII.I.A CREAM CAXDY. 

Three cups of sugar, one and one-half cups of water, 
one-half teaspoon of cream tartar, butter size of a wal- 
nut; flavor with vanilla; boil until it begins to thread, 
or until the drops are somewhat brittle if dropped in 
cold water; pour into buttered platters, and when suffi- 
ciently cool, pull. 

If chocolate flavoring is desired, grate it over the hot 
candy, or place some melted chocolate in it before pull- 
ing. A pretty variety may be made by pulling the 
vanilla and chocolate candies together a few times ; 
thus leaving it striped. 

CREAM FOR BON BONS. 

Three cups of sugar, one and a half cups of water, 
one-half teaspoon of cream tartar; flavor with vanilla; 
boil until drops will almost keep their shape in water; 
then pour into a bowl, set in cold water; stir steadily 
with a silver or wooden spoon until cool enough to bear 
the hand ; then place on a platter and knead until of 
even texture ; if too hard, a few drops of warm water 
may be stirred in ; if too soft, it must be boiled again. 

114 



CONFECTIONERY. 115 



This is the general foundation of Cream Bon Bons ; it 
may be flavored witli chocolate, by adding a tablespoon 
of melted chocolate while the synii) is hot. 

TAFFY. 

Two cups of ])rown sugar, one-half cup of butter, four 
tablespoons of molasses, two tablespoons of water, two 
tablespoons of vinegar; boil until it strings; cover the 
bottom of a dish with nuts, and pour the candy over, 
and let it harden. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

Three pounds coffee A sugar, fourth pound butter, 
half teaspoon cream tartar, eight drops extract of 
lemon ; add as much cold water as will dissolve the 
sugar; boiling without stirring till it will easily break 
when dropped in cold water, and when done add the 
lemon ; have a dripping pan well buttered and pour in 
one-fourth inch thick, and when partly cold, mark off 
in squares. If pulled when partl}^ cold till very white, 
it will be like ice cream candy. 

COCOAXVT CARAMEIiS. 

One pint milk, butter size of an egg, one cocoanut 
grated fine, three pounds of white sugar, two teaspoons 
lemon; boil slowly until stiff, (some then beat to a 
cream) ; pour into shallow pans, and when partly cold 
cut in squares. 

HICKOBTSflJT MACAROONS. 

Take meats of hickorynuts, pound fine, and add 
mixed ground spice and nutmeg; make frosting as for 
cakes ; stir meats and spices in, putting in enough to 
make it convenient to handle ; flour the hands and make 
the mixture into balls the size of nutmegs ; lay them on 
buttered tins, giving room to spread. Bake. 



116 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



WAL.NUT CAWDY. 

Three cups of brown sugar, one cup of cream, butter 
size of a walnut; boil until bubbles are large; liave 
walnuts cut line in dish, and pour candy over them. 
Beat until waxy, and cut in squares. 

One egg, one cup sugar, one half cup of butter, one- 
half cup milk, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one-half of 
soda, flour enough to make a stiff dough ; drop on tins 
and sprinkle over with powdered sngar. Bake in a 

quick oven. 

CA^DY. 

One pound sugar, one and a half cup water, three 
tablespoons rose water ; boil twenty minutes, then pull. 

COCOA:SflIT CAXDY. 

Two teacupfuls of white sugar, one -half teacup of 
sweet cream, butter the size of a walnut; let it boil 
lifteen minutes ; then stir in as much cocoanut as you 
think best. Flavor to taste. 

cocoA:RfrT ca:xi>y. 

One large cocoanut, one and a half pounds of coffee 
sugar. Wet sugar with cocoanut milk ; when thorough- 
ly dissolved, put in the grated cocoanut; boil until it 
ropes; stir till it begins to grain; spread on platters. 
If boiled too hard, add a little water, and repeat pro- 
cess. — Marie Howard, Batama, N. Y. 

PEANUT CANDY. 

One cup of molasses, one cup of sugar, piece of butter 
the size of an egg. Boil a long time, until it will harden 
quickly when put in a saucer ; then put in the nuts and 
pour in a buttered pan. 



CONFECTIONERY. 117 

FIG, DATE AND XUT CAXDY. 

Take the white of one large ^gg, and an equal 
quantity of cold water; put them together in a bowl 
(without beating the Qgg), and stir in confectioners' 
sugar, until thick enough to knead like bread dough; 
then flavor as desired, and mould in any shape wished. 
If not stift' enough after adding flavoring, put in a little 
more sugai-. The cream for the chocolates is made in 
the same way, "'Bitter Almond " being the best flavoring. 
Grate the chocolate and put in a pan which is set over 
the steam of a teakettle; when melted, drop the balls of 
cream in it, and when they are coated take out with a 
fork. Put them on the bottom of a tin pan, (that is, turn 
the pan upside down,) and put in a cool place ; a sharp, 
thin knife will remove them easil3^ The nut candy uses 
the same cream, mixing the nuts in it; and with the 
maple sugar candy, adding the grated maple sugar. 
Roll some of the cream balls in cinnamon. They are 
very nice. — Mrs. Mamie White Chinn., Howard county, 
Mo. 

SUGAR CAXDY. 

To six cups of sugar, take three cups of soft water, six 
teaspoons of vinegar ; stir until well dissolved before it 
is put on to cook. Let it cook until a little dropped in 
cold water will snap. Do not stir at all. When ready 
turn out on buttered plates, put in a cool place ; it can be 
handled in about Ave minutes. Pull quickly with the 
fingers, not with the hands. When it is white and be- 
gins to get brittle, stretch on a mixing-board and cut in 
lengths. If any essence is desired, put it in as it is cool- 
ing ; vanilla is best. — Mrs. B. F. Ferguson, Fayette, Mo. 

TO SVGAR OR CRYSTAtlZE POP-COR\. 

Put into an iron kettle one tablespoon of butter, three 
tablespoons of water, one teacup of white sugar; boil 
until ready to candy; then throw in three quarts of 



118 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



corn, nicely popped ; stir briskly until the candy is 
evenly distributed over the corn ; set the kettle from the 
lire, and stir until it is cooled a little, and you will have 
each grain crystalized with sugar. Care should be 
taken not to have too hot a fire, lest you scorch the corn. 
N^uts of any kind may be treated the same way. 

SAIiTED PEAXrXS. 

Shell them; remove the skins; put them into a 
dripping pan, with just enough butter to make them 
glossy ; shake the pan frequently to make them brown 
evenly. When the nuts are brown, sprinkle with salt. 
Salted almonds are prepared the same way, except that 
their skins do not rub off so easily, but must be blanched 
by pouring boiling water over them. 



^r;S^^i^S^^ 



DIRECTIONS. 

Use pure cider vinegar for all pickles. Cook in porce- 
lain or stone. Keep pickles in glass or stoneware . Look 
them over once a month. Throw in a handful of sugar 
to every gallon. At this time if any are soft, throw them 
out and pour off vinegar ; scald it and pour over while 
hot. Keep pickles well covered with vinegar. If you 
use ground spices, tie them up in thin muslin bags. 

CUCUMBER PICKI.E. 

Three gallons of vinegar, one pound of brown sugar, 
one pound of horseradish, one-half pound of race ginger, 
one pound of mustardseed (white), one ounce of mace , 
one ounce of nutmeg, one ounce of tumeric, one ounce 
of spice, two ounces of celery seed, one-half teacup of 
salad oil, one box ground mustard, handful of whole 
black pepper and cinnamon each ; add onions. — Ifrs. 
Odon Guitar, Columhla, Mo. 

CUCUMBER PICKI.E. 

Two gallons of cucumbers (small). Three and a half 
quarts of strong apple vinegar, two pints granulated 
sugar, six tablespoons of ground mustard, six of white 
mustard, six of cloves and spice, each, four tablespoons 
of celery seed and tumeric, each, two tablespoons black 
pepper (unground). Boil vinegar with seasoning hfteen 
minutes, then pour over cucumbers and tie up while 
hot. — Mrs. Mamie Chirm, Howard county, Mo. 

119 



120 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



PEPPER MAXGOES. 

To twenty-four large bell peppers, add one cabbage 
head, and four onions, chopped line ; two ounces mustard 
seed, and one ounce, each, mace and allspice. Cut a slit 
in each pepper, take out seed, and let stand in cold 
water twelve hours; then place in kettle (lined with 
vine leaves) ; pour on boiling salt water, let stand two 
days ; then repeat after four days; drain and stuff with 
the above ingredients ; sew or tie up ; place again in 
kettle, cover with vinegar ; let come to a boil ; then pack 
in jars and cover with cold vinegar. Nutmeg melons 
may be prepared in same way, with addition of small 
cucumbers, string beans, horseradish, etc., etc., for fill- 
ing. — Mrs. Julia A. Pearson, Fayette, Mo., 1851. 

SPAXISH PICKIiE. 

One gallon green tomatoes, sliced ; one gallon cab- 
bage, chopped fine ; one quart onions, quartered ; one- 
half pint green pepper ; one pint grated horseradish ; 
one gill salt ; let stand all night ; then drain thoroughly, 
and add one gallon of good vinegar; one pound sugar, 
one ounce cloves, one ounce cinnamon, one ounce black 
pepper, grains; one-fourth pound each of white mustard 
seed and ground mustard ; one-half ounce each of mace 
and tumeric. Boil till clear; stir well. — Miss SalUe 
Warden, Fayette, Mo. 

CHOPPED TOMATO PICKI.E. 

Two gallons of green tomatoes, chopj)ed fine ; three 
quarts of good vinegar, one pint chopped onions, one 
pound blown sugar, five tablespoons mustard seed, two 
tablespoons each of salt, spice and ground pepper, one 
tablespoon of cloves; boil altogether; stir often; cook 
till thick. Excellent.— J/f6'. N. C. Eiibanli, Fayette, 
Mo. 



PICKLES. 121 

CABBAGE PIC KI.E. 

Three poinids brown siigai ; oiie-lialf poinul each 
cliopped onions and liorseradish ; one-half pound each 
white race ginger and white mnstard seed; one-fourth 
pound ground cinnamon; one eighth pound mustard; 
one-half ounce each of mace and tumeric; one table- 
spoon black pepper ; one-half bottle salad oil; three nut- 
megs ; nine cabbage heads, quartered. Let cabbage 
stand in salt-water twenty-four hours, drain and put 
out to d] y ; when dry, place in weak vinegar, to which 
the half ounce tumeric has been added ; let stand two 
or three days, pour off; pour boiling water over ginger, 
let stand twenty-four hours, slice thin and dry; scrape 
horseradish and dry. Dissolve the brown sugar in two 
gallons good vinegar; pour out the other things to make 
into paste with the salad oil. Mix altogether; cover 
close. — Mrs. TTieodore Woods, Fayette, Mo. 

YEEEOW PICKEE. 

One peck quartered cabbage; place in vessel, with 
layer ol cabbage, one of salt; let stand all night; 
squeeze out, add four onions, cover with vinegar; boil 
one hour ; then add two pounds brown sugar, two ounces 
black pepper, two ounces celery seed, one ounce 
tumeric, one-half ounce mace, four tablespoons ground 
mustard, one of allspice, a few pieces of ginger, a few 
cloves ; boil another hour, use when cold. — Mrs. Louisa 
A. Smith, St. Agnes' Hall, Macon county, Mo. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

Two large heads of cabbage, six onions, twelve 
cucumbers, cut in small pieces; i)ut in vessel with 
layers of salt alternately, over night; then drain 
thoroughly and add one gallon good vinegar; two 
pounds brown sugar, one of grated horseradish, one-half 
pound each of white mustardseed and ground mustard, 
four ounces of ground black pepper, one ounce each of 



122 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



celery seed, ground cinnamon and tumeric; set over a 
slow fire two hours. — Mrs. L. A. Smitli, St. Agnes'' 
Hall, Macon county, Mo. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

One large head of cabbage, twelve cucumbers, one- 
fourth peck green tomatoes, six onions, one-half pint 
grated horseradish ; half pound white mustard seed ; 
two tablespoons of celery seed ; half teacup brown 
sugar ; fourth teacup each of tumeric, cinnamon and 
ground pepper. Cut cabbage, cucumbers and onions 
in small pieces; pack in salt over night, drain thor- 
oughly ; mix all ingredients together; pour vinegar over 
them boiling hot, for three mornings. The third 
morning mix a small box of mustard with a pint of 
olive-oil, and add while pickle is hot, and seal. — Mi's. 
John Noland, Independence, Mo. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

Two gallons cucumbers, out of brine ; soak two days 
in water; two heads of cabbage ; thirty-six onions, 
chopped up, and soaked in weak brine over night. 
When these are ready drain well and dvy in sun. 
When dried, cut cucumbers in small strips. Then take 
two gallons good vinegar, one box (50 cts box) Cole- 
man's Mustard, one and one-half pounds sugar, two 
ounces tumeric, two ounces celery seed, two ounces 
white mustard seed ; let come to a boil, add cucumbers 
and cabbage and one large bottle of salad oil. Boil 
five minutes, tie up tight. — Mrs. Nettie Gannett, 
Fayette, Mo. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

One quart large cucumbers, chopped fine and peeled ; 
one quart small cucumbers, whole; one quart white 
onions ; one quart green tomatoes, chopped fine; one 
quart green beans, broken in small pieces and cooked 
tender ; one quart celery, cut in small pieces ; one quart 



PICKLES. 123 

cauli-tlower or good sized cabbage, cliopped line; six 
green peppers. Mix ingredients; let stand in weak salt 
water twenty -fonr hours, then scald in some water till 
cabbage is done, then drain well. Take one small cup 
of liour, one and one-half cup of white sugar, six 
tablespoons ground mustard, one of tumeric, one of 
celery, mix well ; add two quarts cider vinegai', and boil 
till the flour is cooked ; seal immediately. In measuring, 
a quart means after it is chopped. — Bettie Tiitt Duiia- 
nay, Oswego, Kan. 

CHILI SAUCE. 
Thirty-six large size tomatoes ; four large onions, 
chopped line ; six green peppers (seed taken out), and 
then chopped ; one-fourth pound white mustard seed, or 
ground mustard ; one and one-fourth pounds brown 
sugar ; three pints cider vinegar ; one ounce each, allspice 
and cinnamon and cloves. Peel tomatoes; cook well; 
strain through a colander ; add two tablespoons salt and 
the other ingredients, and cook one hour. — Mrs. John 
D. Tolson, Fayette, Mo. 

EYE-OPENER CATSUP. 

To one peck of green tomatoes, add one dozen onions ; 
cover with vinegar ; boil till tender. Rub through a 
sieve ; add spice to taste; also more vinegar; return to 
kettle and boil to the consistency of catsup. If pre- 
ferred, two-third pepper catsup and one-third tomato 
catsup makes a good catsup.— J/V,?. H. A. JVorris, 
Fayttte, Mo. 

RIPE TO^ttATO CATSUP. 

Cut up one bushel of ripe tomatoes ; salt down twelve 
hours ; boil until done ; strain through a tine sieve ; return 
to kettle and cook till thick ; add two ounces each, 
cinnamon, allspice and cloves, three grated nutmegs, 
one ounce mace, one quart brandy when cold. — Mrs. 
Martha Elliott, Howard County, Mo . 



124 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



TOMATO CATSUP. 

One peck ripe tomatoes, skinned ; boil soft; press 
through a colander; add one-half ounce race ginger; 
two tablespoons ground pepper; one spoon each, 
powdered allspice and cloves ; boil slowly two or three 
hours After taking from fire, add one- third cup ground 
mustnrd put into a little of the mixture ; then stir in tlie 
whole ; add pint of vinegar ; stir well ; bottle and seal. — 
Mrs. L. 8. Prosser, Fayette, Mo. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

To one gallon ripe tomatoes, add one 'quart chopped 
onions, five small green j^eppers; eight tablespoons 
sugar; one of ground ginger; one of cinnamon, two of 
salt ; one teaspoon cloves; one half gallon vinegar ; boil 
thick; seal hot.— J/r.s. N. C. Eubank, Fayttte, Mo. 

GREEX TOMATO SWEET PICKIiE. 

Eight j)Ounds of tomatoes, chopped fine ; four pounds 
brown sugar ; boil three hours, then add one quart good 
vinegar ; one teaspoon each, mace, cloves and cinnamon ; 
boil fifteen minutes; let cool ; put in jars. — Mrs. M .E. 
Jackson, Fayette, Mo. 

WATERMEI.OX SWEET PICKI.E. 

Melon rind, two pounds, boil in clear water till tender, 
drain well ; make a syrup of two pounds of white sugar, 
one quart good vinegar, one ounce cinnamon, one ounce 
each of mace and white ginger; boil syrup thick ; pour 
over melon, repeat this three days, and it is ready for 
use. — 3frs. John E. Ryland, Lexington, Mo. 

FIG SWEET PICKI.E. 

To seven pounds of figs, take four pounds of sugar; 
one quart of vinegar, one ounce of stick cinnamon, a 
little mace. (Cloves are nice but they make the pickle 
dark). Let the figs soak in cold water for twelve hours. 



PICKLES. 12 

then drain off tlie water, and. after you have boiled the 
syrup till done, then drop the ligs in, and remove from 
the lire at once. Let the pickle stand several days 
before using. — Miss Enna Dams, Fayette, Mo. 

PEACH SWEET PICKIiE. 

Peaches, one peck; scald in weak lye till onter skin 
rubs off easily. Make a syrup of seven pounds of 
sugar and one cup of water ; drop peaches in and boil 
till done to seed ; take out peaches and boil syrup till 
thick ; add one quart of apple vinegar or brandy and 
spice to taste. — Mrs. H. A. Norris, Fayette, Mo. 

TO PICKI.E PEARS, PI^VMS, GRAPES AXD CRAB- 

APPI.ES. 

Ten pounds fruit (pare pears); four and one-half 

pounds white sugar ; one quart cider vinegar ; one ounce 

each, mace, cinnamon, cloves and race ginger. Lay 

fruit in sugar over night ; if plums or grapes prick them. 

Next morning put all together, cook till done. Take 

out fruit; boil sugar thirty minutes ; pour over fruit' 

seal \\ot.—MTS. M. C. Burton, Fayette, Mo. 

TO PICKI.E CHERRIES. 

Fill a glass jar with large ripe cherries on the stems ; 
fill up with best cold vinegar ; do not cook.— Mrs. M. C. 
Burton, Fayette, Mo. 



GENERAL DIEECTIONS. 

To insure success in preserving, the fruits must be 
carefully selected. Care should be taken to remove all 
bruised or decayed parts, as they would darken the 
syrup. Fruit requiring to be pared should be laid in 
water to preserve the color after paring. The best sugar 
is the cheapest. The usual proportion in making pre- 
serves is a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit; but in 
fruits not very acid, such as peaches, apples and pears, 
three-quarter of a pound to a pound of fruit is sufficient. 
The syrup should always be boiled and skimmed before 
putting in the fruit. Fruit should be cooked in brass 
kettles or those of bell metal. Modern kettles, lined 
with porcelain, are much used for this purpose. Never 
use tin, iron or pewter spoons as skimmers, as they will 
injure the color of the syrup and impart a very un- 
pleasant flavor. Glass jars are best for preserves, as 
the condition of the fruit can be observed more readily. 
They should be kept in a dark place, for the chemical 
action of light will aff'ect the quality of the preserves 
when perfectly air-tight. 

PRESERVED PEACHES. 

Weigh the peaches, and allow three-quarters of a 
pound of sugar to every pound of fruit. After they have 
been pared and the stone removed, sprinkle sugar over 
the fruit, and let it stand over night. In the morning 
drain off the syrup from the fruit; add the rest of the 
sugar, and let that come to a boil. Put the peaches in, 
and let them boil until you can stick a straw through 
them. 

126 



FRUITS. 127 

PRESERVED PEARS. 

Preserved pears aie put lip precisely as are peaches. 
Cut in halves and remove the core ; they can be more 
easily pared if boiling water is poured over them, and 
let stand for a while. 

PRESERVED QUIXCES. 

Use a pound of sugar to each pound of quinces, after 
paring, coring, and quartering ; take half of the sugar 
and make a thin syrup ; boil In this a fev7 of the quinces 
at a time till all are linished. Make a rich syrup of the 
remaining sugar, and pour over them. 

PRESERVED APPEES. 

Apples are preserved just the same as peaches, ex- 
cept when the fruit is added put in two or three pieces 
of race-ginger and several pieces of orange peel, cut in 

strips. 

PRESERVED CRAB APPEES. 

Wash and pick blows off, but leave stems on your 

crab apples. Take as many pounds of sugar as there 

are pounds of fruit ; add a little water to dissolve; put 

in part of fruit at a time; when the apples begin to 

crack, skim out into a jar ; when all are done boil syrup 

a few moments, and skim; then pour over fruit, keep 

dry and cool. 

PRESERVED C'lTRO!^. 

The citron can be pared, cored and sliced, or cut into 
fancy shapes with cutters which are made for the pur- 
pose. To six pounds of citron use six pounds of sugar, 
four lemons, and a quarter of a pound of ginger root. 
Put tlie slices of lemon into a preserving kettle and boil 
them for half an hour, or until they look clear in a little 
clear water ; then drain them ; save the water, and put 
the slices into anothei dish with a little cold water; 
cover tliem, and let them stand over night. In the morn- 
ing wrap the ginger root (bruised) in a thin muslin 



128 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



cloth ; boil it in three pints of clear water until the water 
is highly flavored, when take out the bag of ginger. 
Having broken up the loaf sugar, put it into the pre- 
serving kettle with the ginger water. When the sugar 
is all melted set it over the fire ; boil and skim until no 
more scum rises ; then put in the pieces of citron and 
the juice of the lemons. Boil them in the syrup till all 
the slices are quite transparent. Do not allow them to 
break; when done put them into the jars, pouring the 
syrup carefully over them. If one desires to imitate the 
West Indies ginger preserve, the slices of lemon may 
not be added; yet they are a pretty addition. — From 
Mrs. Henderson^ s Cook Book. 

TOMATOE PRESERVES. 

Choose little red, plump-shaped tomatoes, if red pre- 
serves are desired; and the small yellow ones for yellow 
preserves. Peel and prick them with a large needle ; 
boil them slowly for half an hour in preserving syrup, 
with the juice of one lemon to every two pounds of 
tomatoes; add also a little bag of ginger root; then 
skim out the tomatoes; let them remain two or three 
hours in the sun to harden. Put the white of an Qg^ 
into the syrup ; boil and skim well, and pour it over 
the tomatoes. The old rule is a pound of sugar to a 
pound of fruit. I prefer three-quarters of a pound of 
the former to a pound of the latter. The yellow tomatoes 
are preferable. 

GRAPE PRESERVES. 

Squeeze with your fingers the pulp from each grape. 
Put the pulps on the fire, and boil them until they are 
tender ; then press them through a colander, so that the 
seeds may be taken out; now add the skins to the pulps 
and juice. Put a cupful of sugar to a cupful of fruit, 
and boil all together until of a thick consistency. Green 
grape preserves are also nice. In managing the green 



FRUITS. 129 

grapes, halve them, and extract tlie seeds with a small 
knife. Pnt also a cup of sugar to a cup of fruit. Many 
prefer the green to the ripe grape preserves. 

STRAWBERRY PRESERVES. 

Select the berries as you would for the table. Allow 
one pound of sugar for each pound of berries ; add to 
the sugar just enough water to dissolve it well; let 
come to a boil ; then add the fruit, which must be boiled 
about half an hour; then lift the berries out, spread 
them on a dish, and, when the syru^D has boiled until 
thick, pour over the berries. Set them in the sun as you 
would jelly until cold. Put in glass jars and seal. — 
Mrs. Cyrus Tlioinpson, Belleville, 111. 

STRAWBERRY PRESERVES. 

Put the berries and sugar, pound for pound, into a 

preserving kettle, and heat slowly till the sugar is 

melted; then boil rapidly for twenty minutes and seal 

up hot. 

CAXDIED FRIITS. 

Boil peaches, pears, apricots, cherries, or almost any 
fruits dressed, in a thick syrup, made with a teacup of 
water to each pound of sugar, until tender. Let them 
remain two daj^s in the syrup ; then take them out, 
drain them, and sprinkle sugar over each piece sepa- 
rately. Dry them slowly in the sun or in an oven not 

too warm. 

RASPBERRY JAM. 

Use three-quarters of a pound of sugar to one pound 

of berries. Put sugar and berries in preserving kettle ; 

stir together and mash until there is syruj) enough to 

prevent burning. Let boil till, by takiug some out 

on a plate to try it, no juice gathers about it. Then 

put away in glass jars, or stone jar.s are very nice. 

BLACKBERRY JAM. 

You make exactly as raspberry jam. 



130 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

MARIttAIiADES. 

To make marmalade, very ripe fruit should be 
chosen. For peach, pear, green grape, pine-apple, 
quince or plum, allow three-quarters of a pound of 
sugar to a pound of fruit. If the fruit is not very juicy 
add a little water. Stir almost constantly ; when the 
whole begins to look clear, and becomes thick b}^ cool- 
ing a portion of it on a plate, it is done, and must be 
put into jars at once. 

BRANDY PEACHES. 

Use cling-stone peaches ; yellow ones we like best. 
Peel them and cut around them to the stone, but not 
enough to divide them. Make a syrup with half a 
pound of sugar to each pound of fruit, and half a tea- 
cup of water for each pound of sugar ; skim as it boils 
as long as the scum rises ; then put in the peaches and 
boil until tender. Take them out carefully ; remove 
the syrup from the tire, and add one-half pint of best 
brandy to a pound of peaches. Pour this over the 
peaches. Seal in glass jars. 

PEACH BrTTEB. 

One peck of peaches, two quarts of boiled cider ; 
reduce by boiling one gallon of sweet cider to one-half 
its quantity ; pare and cut soft peaches, put into the 
preserving kettle with the cider; boil until they are 
reduced to a pulp, stirring constantly ; if not sweet 
enough, add a little sugar ; cover tight in jars. 

APPI.E JEttA . 

Take juicy apples (Ramboes are best), take the stem 
and top off and wash them nicely ; then cut up in quar- 
ters and put cold water on them, just enough to cover 
them ; boil them soft afterward ; strain them through a 
jelly bag; then take two pints at a time with two 
pounds of crushed sugar ; boil twenty minutes, then do 



FRUITS. 131 

tlie same with the other juice, to be economical; pare 
and core the apples ; don't strain so close but that you 
can, by adding- a little more water, use the apples for 
sauce or pies. 

APPI.E JEL.L.Y. 

Take nice green apples that will cook nicely ; quarter 
the apples without paring; put them in a pan or kettle 
and cover over with water, and keep them covered ; let 
them boil slowly until entirely done, then strain through 
a tlannel bag; just let it drip, do not squeeze them. 
To a pint of j nice put a pint of sugar. If the apples are 
not very acid, use a little citric acid. 



SIBERIAN CRAB APPLE JEI.IiY. 

Crab apple, gooseberry, quince, plum and apple, are 
all made in the same way ; some add less sugar to 
sweeter fruits. After having freed the fruit from all 
blemishes, put them in a preserving kettle with only 
enough clear water to keep them from burning ; let them 
boil slowly until quite soft ; then, putting them into a 
flannel cloth, press from them all the juice possible; 
strain the juice two or three times through a clean 
cloth, then return to a clean preserving kettle, adding 
a cup of sugar for every cup of juice, and the beaten 
white of an egg for the wiiole. The rule is to boil the 
syrup (without stirring) very rapidly for twenty 
minutes, not counting the minutes before it begins to 
boil. The surest way is to boil it until it runs a little 
thick upon the spoon, then let it run through the jelly 
bag without pressing it ; put the jelly into glasses, and 
after it has become quite firm, cut out little papers to 
fit the tops, which should be dipped in the whites of 
eggs ; press the edges against the sides of the glasses 
to exclude the air. 



132 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

CURRAXT JELIiY. 

Weigh the currants ; do not wash them, but carefully 
remove leaves and whatever may adliere to them. To 
each pound of fruit allow half the weight of granulated 
or pure loaf sugar ; put a few currants into a porcelain- 
lined kettle, and press well, so as to secure sufficient 
liquid to prevent burning them; add the remainder of 
the fruit, and boil freely for twenty minutes, stirring 
occasionally to prevent burning ; strain through a flan- 
nel bag, into an earthen vessel, as the action of the 
acid on tin materially affects both color and flavor; 
when strained, return the liquid to the kettle without 
the trouble of measuring, and let it boil for a moment 
or so, and then add the sugar. As soon as the sugar is 
entirely dissolved, the jelly is done. Pour into glasses. 
Cut papers a little larger than the top, dip in whites of 
eggs ; press the edges against the sides of the glasses 
to exclude the air. 



iT^aXs^^s^x 



TO CAN TO:?I.iTOES. 

They must be fresh. Pour scakling water over them 
to aid in removing the skins. After the tomatoes are 
skinned, put them into a porcelain preserving kettle ; 
add no water to them ; let them come to boiling jjoint, 
or be well scalded through. The cans should be heated 
by filling them with boiling water, and allowing them 
to stand while the tomatoes are boiling. Pour out this 
water, fill the cans and seal while hot. Always have 
cans soldered if you can conveniently do so, but if you 
should have to use the wax, be very careful to perfectly 
exclude the air. There will be juice left after the toma- 
toes are canned. This can be seasoned and boiled 
down for catsup. 

CAKXED CORX. 

To seven pounds of corn, put three pints of water; 

let come to a boil, then add one ounce of tartaric acid ; 

stir it in well ; let it boil hard, and can while boiling. 

When you go to cook for table use, pour off the water 

that may be with it, and add fresh water or milk, and 

boil it also; to each quart can add ^a teaspoouful of 

soda, salt, butter, and a little sugar. — Mrs. H. A. Norris^ 

Fayette, Mo. 

TO CAX CORX. 

Mrs. Henderson says : " I have found in a Supreme 
Court decision, Mr. Winslow's receipt for canning corn, 
as follows : 

" Fill the cans with the uncooked corn (freshly gath- 
ered) cut from the cob, and seal them hermetically ; 

133 



134 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

surround them with straw to prevent them striking 
against each other, and put them into a boiler over the 
tire, witli enougli cold water to cover them ; heat the 
water gradually, and when you have boiled an hour 
and a half puncture the tops of the cans to allow the 
escape of gases; ilien seal them immediately while 
they are still hot; continue to boil them for two hours 
and a half. In packing, tlie cut corn in the can, the 
liberated milk and juices surround the kernels, forming 
a liquid, in which they are cooked. This process, 
patented hj Mr. Winslow, is by far the best one for 
preserving the natural flavor of green sweet corn." — 
From, Mrs. Heitdersoii'H Cook Boole. 

TO CA:sr PEACHES. 

Pare, halve and stone them. Put them in a preserv- 
ing kettle; cover with water; add about a teacup of 
sugar; let them boil until peaches are clear; then take 
them carefully out of this water and put into cans ; 
pour over them a rich syrup, made of granulated sugar, 
and just enough water to dissolve well. Have them 
soldered while hot. 

Pears and apricots are canned in the same manner. 

CAXXED CHERRIES. 

Stone tlie fruit; weigh it ; and for every pound of fruit, 
take half a pound of sugar ; after putting the fruit into 
the syrup, let it scald (not boil hard) for ten or fifteen 
minutes, and then can and seal. This method is excel- 
lent for use, with all small fruits. 



-^^rAMIlY^^BWEKAGESs^ 



TEA. 

Two things are necessary to insure good tea. First, 
that the water should be at tlie boiling point when 
poured on the leaves ; water simply hot not answering 

he pui'pose at all. And second, that it should be 
served freshly made. Tea should never be boiled. So 
particular are the English to preserve its first aroma, 
that it is sometimes made on the table two or three 
times during a meal. In France, little silver canisters 
of tea are placed on tlie table, where it is invariably 
made. One teaspoonful of the leaves is a fair portion 
for each person. Tea is better made in an earthen tea- 
pot, which tea connoisseurs are particular to have. 
They also drink the beverage without milk, and with 
loaf-sugar merely. 

Water at the boiling point is generally considered 
better for tea or coffee, and in fact, any kind of cooking 
which requires boiling water. — From Mrs. Henderson^s 

Cooli Book. 

COFFEE. 

One mill full of coffee. When ground, put in coffee- 
pot, break into it one whole ^%^\ mix well with a little 
cold water ; then pour on boiling water, sufficient to fill 
an ordinary sized pot, three parts full ; set it back 
where it will simmer gently for fifteen minutes ; then 
set it where it will boil briskly about five minutes. Do 
not allow to boil over, stir it down and add a few drops 
of cold water. 

135 



136 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

The best coffee is made by mixing two- thirds Java 
and one-third Mocha. Use, if you can, the Old Domin- 
ion coffee-pot. Serve with very thick cream. — 3Irs. Dr. 
T. J. SmitJi, Fayette, Mo. 

CHOCOIiATE. 

Scrape the chocolate and let it soak a little while in 
about a tablespoon of milk to soften it ; stir until 
smooth ; when the milk, sweetened to taste, is boiling, 
add it to the dissolved chocolate, a little at first, until 
thin, then pour altogether, and let boil just a minute; 
stir well, and serve immediately. Have cream whipped, 
sweetened and flavored with vanilla, is a great improve- 
ment; a dessert spoonful to each cup. 

BliACKBERRY COBDIAE. 

Make a syrup of a pound of sugar to a pint of water ; 
boil it until it is rich and thick, and then add a pint of 
blackberry juice to every pound of sugar; put half a 
grated nutmeg to each quart of syrup ; let it boil fifteen 
minutes, then add one-half pint of brandy for every 
quart of syrup. When cold, bottle for use. — Mrs. John 
Mrmn, Fayette, Mo. 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAt. 

To one quart of blackberry juice, add one pound 
white sugar, one tablespoon each of cloves, allspice, 
cinnamon and nutmeg. Boil altogether fifteen min- 
utes ; add one wine glass brandy or whiskey. Bottle 
while hot; cork and seal. — Mrs. E. Major, Fayette, Mo. 

BliACKBERRY WIXE. 

Bruise the berries, and to every gallon add one quart 
of boiling water ; let stand twenty-four hours, stirring 
it occasionally. Strain off the liquor into a cask, add- 
ing two pounds of sugar to a gallon of syrup; cork 
tight. Let stand till October, then it will be ready for 
use. — Mrs. N. C. Eubank, Fayette, Mo. 



FAMIL Y BE VERA GES . 137 

ORAP£ WIXE. 

To twenty pounds of grapes, put four quarts of boil- 
ing water; when cool, press the juice from the grape 
well, then cover over and allow them to stand about 
three days; strain the juice from the grapes, and add 
ten pounds of sugar; let stand in the jar for a week; 
then skim and strain into a cask or bottles, and seal. — 
Mrs. J. Dickerson, Fayette, Mo. 

CrRRANT WIAE. 

To two quarts of currant juice, (after the currants are 
pressed) add one quart of water and three and a half 
pounds of sugar. Let it stand in an open jar until it 
stops fermenting; then draw it off carefully. Bottle 
and cork it securely. 



I— ^r^=^-^f^=i^^fe-^ 



MlDIGIT^Als 



CURE FOR FEI.0:N. 

This remedy has never been known to fail if applied 
in time. Take a handful of Mayapple root, with water 
enough to cover ; boil until all the strength is out, then 
dip out the roots and boil down until it is thick like 
candy ; apply this candy on the affected part, and let 
it remain twelve hours, (or longer if necessary) this will 
draw it so you can easily pick it with a needle to let 
the coiruption out. When you take the Mayapple off, 
apply a poltice made of white beans, to draw out the 
poison. — Mrs. E. M. Woods, Fayette, Mo. 

REMEDY FOR WOUNDS. 

A correspondent of the Country Gejitleman, gives 
the following remedy for painful wounds. Take a pan 
or shovel with burning coals, and sprinkle on them 
common brown sugar, and hold the wounded part in 
the smoke ; in a few minutes the pain will be allayed 
and recovery rapidly proceed. 

REMEDY FOR BEE STIXGS. 

The juice of a red onion is a perfect antidote for the 
sting of bees, wasps, hornets, etc. The sting of the 
honey bee, which is always left in the wound, should 
first be removed. — Mrs. Mary Oay. 

BEE STING. 

The sting of a bee or wasp may be almost instantly 
relieved by applying lean raw meat. It is said to cure 
the bite of a rattlesnake, and to relieve erysipelas. 
138 



MEDICINAL. 139 



JLTi EXCEIil^E^T SAIiTE. 

Take a piece of wax, yellow or wliite, size of walnut; 
same of resin, and same of fresh butter (before it has 
been salted) and melt in a tin cup; set in a pot of 
water ; stir until cold. 

A SURE CURE FOR CJRAVEI.. 

Take one pound of anvil dust, pound it up fine, sift 
it through a piece of gauze, then take half as much 
horseradish, scrax)e it line; then put both in half gal- 
lon of strong vinegar; put in a stone jug. Shake well 
before using; dose teaspoonful every three or four 
hours. — George Frazier. Aug. 13, I8J4O. 

COUGH MEDICOE. 

One tumbler of good vinegar ; two tumblers of white 
sugar, twenty grains of ipecac, a lump of resin, as 
large as a lilbert. Let all come to a boil, when cool, 
add a dessert spoonful of laudanum. Dose, a teaspoon- 
ful three times a day, or oftener if the cough is trouble- 
some. — Mrs. Fratie KnicTierhoc'ker, Dec. i^, 1863. 

COUOII SYRUP. 

Take elderberries when ripe, pick off the stems and 
press the juice from them ; put on the fire and boil as 
you would for jelly ; when done, strain the juice from 
the berries, and to each pint of juice, add a pint of 
sugar. Boil down to a rich syrup ; when cool, add a 
tablespoonful of good whiskey or brandy. Dose, a 
teaspoonful every two or three hours.— J/r.9. Avne 
Shafroth. 

REMEDY FOR BURXS. 

Take best castile soap ; scrape fine with a knife ; add 
water in small quantities to make a smooth paste; 
spread upon linen; and applied to a burn quickly 
relieves the pain. Turpentine applied is also good for 
burns. 



140 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

FOR SORi: THROAT. 

Cut slices of salt pork or fat bacon ; simmer a few 
moments in liot vinegar, and apply to throat as hot as 
possible. When this is taken off, as the throat is 
relieved, put around a bandage of sofc flannel. A 
gargle of equal parts of borax and alum, dissolved in 
water is also excelleuu, 

TO REMOVE DISCOIiORATIOlf FROM BRUISES. 

Apply a cloth wrung out in very hot water, and 
renew frequently until the pain ceases. 

MUSTARD PI.ASTER. 

Mix together equal parts of mustard flour with wheat 
flour, and enough water or vinegar to make a moist paste 
of them ; spread it on a piece of old muslin twice the size 
wanted, leaving about an inch clear on the edge, and. 
double the othei. half over it. It must never raise a 
blister, only leave on long enough to redden the skin. 
After it is removed, put on a rag, spread with cold 
cream or lard. 

CURE FOR CHAPPED HAXDS. 

One ounce of glycerine, one of gum camphor, one- 
half pound of mutton tallow. Make into a salve. 



To keep the hands nice and smooth, use the follow- 
ing preparation each time they are wasiied. Three 
parts of rosewater to two parts of glycerine, well mixed, 
and kept in a bottle ready for use. For those who can- 
not use glycerine, equal parts of lard and white of egg 
thoroughly beaten together, and scented according to 
choice, is an excellent remedy for chapped or rough 
hands. 



^ri,ujj,)*inj!:^TJiJkc>iGKse^ 



BEEF TEA. 

Cut a pound of best lean steak in small pieces ; place 
in glass IVuiu Jar (a perfect one), cover tighily and set in 
a pot of cold water; heat gradually fo boil, and con- 
tinue this steadily three or four hours until the meat is 
like white rags, and the juice thoroughly extracted; 
strain from the jar as you want to use it. It is best to 
set kettle off stove and let cool, before removing the 
jar, and in this way prevent breakage. When ready 
to use, pour into a small saucer, heat, and season with 
salt and pej^per. 

MUTTOX AXD VEAL. BROTH. 

Boil a piece of mutton till it comes to pieces ; then 
strain the broth and let it get cold, so that the fat will 
rise, which must be taken off, then warm it ; and jiut in 
a little salt. Veal broth may be made in the same 
way, and is more delicate for sick persons. 

CHICKEX BKOTII. 

Take the iirst and and second joints of a chicken; 
boil in one quart of water till very tender, and season 
with a very little salt and pepper. 

SWEET CIDER SOUP. 

Boil one pint of cider; add one teaspoonful of flour, 
dissolved in a little water; one teaspoonful of sugar; 
pour this over the well beaten yolk of an egg; put the 
beaten white on the top. This is pleasant and very 
strengthening. 

141 



142 THt: MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



RTE MUSH. 

This is a nourishing and light diet for the sick, and 
is by some preferred to mush made of Indian meal. 
Four large spoonfuls of rye flour, mixed smooth in a 
1 ittle water, and stirred in a pint of boiling water ; let 
boil twenty minutes, stirring frequently. Nervous per- 
sons who sleep badly, rest much better after a supper 
of corn or rye mush, than if they take tea or coffee. 

CORX GRUEIi.' 

Mix two spoonfuls of sifted cornnieal in some water ; 
have a clean skillet with a pint of boiling water in it ; 
stir it in. and when done, season it with salt to yoar 
taste, or sugar if you prefer it. 

O ilTHEAI. GRlJEIi. 

Mix two spoonfuls of oatmeal, with as much water as 
will mix easily, and stir it in a pint of boiling water in 
a saucepan, until perfectly smooth ; let it boil a few 
minutes ; season it with sugar and nutmeg, and pour it 
out on a slice of bread, toasted, and cut up. If the 
patient should like them, you may put in a few raisins, 
stoned and cut up. This will keep good a day, and if 
nicely warmed over, is as good as when fresh. 

PAX AD A. 

Put some crackers, crusts of dry bread, or dried rusk, 
in a saucepan with cold water, and a few raisins ; after 
it has boiled half an hour, put in sugar, nutmeg, and 
half a glass of wine, if the patient has no fever. If you 
have dried rusk, it is a quicker way to put the rusk in 
a bowl with some sugar, and pour boiling water over it. 
If the patient can use nothing but liquids, this makes a 
good drink when strained. 

BOIEED CrSTARD. 

Beat an egg with a heaped teaspoonful of sugar ; stir 
it into a teacupful of boiled milk, and stir till it is 



FOOD FOR THE SICK. 143 

thick ; pour it in a bowl on a slice of toast, cut up, and 
grate a little nutmeg over it. 

EGG-XOG. 

Beat the yolk of an egg- with a tablespooiiful of 
sugar, add about a tablespoonful of brandy, stirring 
well as it is poured in ; tablespoonful of cream, a little 
nutmeg, and the well beaten white of the egg last. 

THICKEXED MII.K. 

Boil a pint ; dissolve one teaspoonful of cornstarch in 
a little cold milk ; add to the boiling milk, stirring con- 
stantly, until thick enough ; take from the fire ; sweeten 
and flavor with nutmeg. In boiling milk, always set 
your saucepan in which you boil the milk, in a pan of 
boiling water. 

Many of the articles under " desserts " are nice for 
the sick. In preparing food for the sick, much care 
should be taken, and it should be presented in the most 
inviting way, always the nicest china and silver used. 




144 



AD VERTISEMENT. 



ABSOLUTE PERFECTiON IN BAKING! 

AND ALL- 
MEATS ROASTED IN THEIR OWN 
JUICES, BY USING THE 

WIRE GAUZE OVEN DOOR 



FOUND EXCLUSIVELY ON THE 




MARVELOUS RESULTS 



LOSS IN SHRINKAGE OF MEATS. 

Vpry few ppople know that the Shrinkage of Meats 
roasted iu a close ovoa is from thirty-tive to forty per 
cent. All meat contains seventy-tive percent, of w.iter 
and only twenty-five per cent, of solid matter, and the 
Joss that is made iu the roasting is made in theevapo. 
ration of the juice, which is the vit al pabtof meat 

Effect of the SOLID OVEN Door- 

A TEN pound Sirloin, medium or well-done, will be 
BEDUCED to SIX pounds and four ounces of Roasted 
meat, showing a loss of three pounds and twelve ounces 
of juice. While the loss is 37J-2 percent, of the total 
wei-ht, it shows the enormous Loss of Eiftx pes 

CE.MT, OF THE JUICEj 

Effect of "WIRE GAUZE OVEN Door. 

A TEN pound Sirloin, medium or well-done/will be 
reduced to nine pounds and eight ouucesof Konsted 
maat, enowinga lossof eittlit ounces of juice, Wliila 
this loss is five per cent, of the total weight, it shows 
the very small Loss of but seven 'jr.B, cent, of JL'ICE. 

Send for Illustrated Circulars and Price Lists. 



MEASURE. 146 



TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



4 cups wheat flour make I pound. 

3M cups of cornmeal make I pound. 

2 large coffee-cups granulated sugar make i pound. 

2 large coffee-cups dry brown sugar make i pound. 

iH cups firm butter pressed down, make I pound. 

2 cups raisins make I pound. 

10 eggs make i pound. 

I white of egg makes i ounce. 

1 yolk of egg makes i ounce. 

16 ounces make I pound. 

4 teaspoons make i tablespoon. 

4 tablespoons make ^ gill- 

8 tablespoons make i gill. 

2 gills make, ^ pint. 

2 pints make i quart. 

4 quarts maki I gallon. 

8 quarts make I peck. 

A cup of flour means, a cup of unsifted flour. 



^MISGEXXAI^EOUS^^ 



.>- 



RECIPE FOR HARD SOAP. 

Ten pounds of soda ash. five pounds of unslacked 
lime, ten gallons of soft water; boil two hours; adding 
water as it boils down, so as to have as much water 
when done boiling as you had when you commenced. 
Let it stand over night. Drain off in a clean kettle ; 
then add thirty pounds of clear grease, if you have it, 
if not, and it is trimmings, add a few pounds more. 
Boil one hour ; let stand till cold. Cut out in bars, and 
let ducj before putting away. 

TO MIX WHITEWASH. 

Pour a kettle of boiling water on a peck of unslacked 
lime ; put in two pounds of whiting, and one-half pint 
salt ; when all are mixed together, put in one-half ounce 
of Prussian blue, finely powdered ; add water to make 
it a proper thickness to put on a wall. 

WHITEWASH FOR BU HIDINGS OR FEXCES. 

Put in a barrel one bushel of best unslacked lime ; 
pour on it two buckets of boiling water ; and when it is 
mixed, put in six pounds of fine whiting ; fill up the 
barrel with water : stir it well and keep it covered from 
the rain ; let it stand several days before you use it ; 
then stir it up ; thin it with milk as you use it, and put 
one-half a pint of salt to each bucketful. This makes a 
durable wash for a rcingh cast or frame house, or for 
fences ; the salt prevents it from peeling off. 
146 



MISCELLANEOUS. 147 



ECONOMICAIi PAINT. 

Skim milk, two quarts; fresh slacked lime, eight 
ounces; linseed oil, six ounces; white burgundy pitch, 
two ounces ; Spanish white, three pounds. The lime to be 
slacked in water, exposed to the air, mixed in one-fourth 
of the milk ; the oil in which the pitch is previously 
dissolved, to be added a little at a time ; then the rest 
of the milk, and afterwards the Spanish white. This 
quantity is sufficient for twenty square yards, two coats, 
and the expense not more than twenty-live cents. 

TO STOP CRACKS IX IRON VESSEIiS. 

Mix wood ashes and salt into a paste with a little 
water ; apply whether the vessels are cold or hot. 

ce»ie:\t. 
Three parts ashes, three parts clay, and one sand, is 
said to make a cement as hard as marble, and imper- 
vious to water. 

CEMENT FOR CHINA. 
Take plaster of Paris and mix it with liquid gum 
arable into a paste. This is said to be excellent. 

TO REMOVE MII.DEW. 

Soak the parts of the cloth that are mildewed in two 
parts chloride of lime to four parts of water, for about 
four hours, or until the mildew has disappeared ; then 
thoroughly rinse it in clear water. 

CI.EANSING FMJIO. 

Four ounces of ammcmia. four ounces of white castile 
soap, two ounces of alcohol, two ounces of glycerine 
two ounces of ether. Cut the soap up fine ; dissolve in 
one quart of soft water over the ^re ; then add four 
quarts of cold water. When nearly cold add tne other 
ingredients. This will make almost eight quarts. 



148 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

HAIR WASH. 

Take su^ar of lead, lac sulphur, of each one and a half 
drachms or teaspoonfuls ; bay rum, one-fourth pint; 
glycerine, two ounces. 

HAIR WASH "ErREKA." 

One ounce of borax, one ounce lac sulphur, one 
ounce of sugar lead, two ounces of bay rum, three pints 
of rain water. 

WASHING COMPOIJXD. 

One-half pound of super- carbonate soda, one-half 
pound unslacked lime, one gallon boiling water; boil 
twenty minutes. Pour off the top after letting it stand 
to settle ; then bottle. Sort your clothes, soap them, 
and then soak over night. In the morning wring out ; 
soap, if more is needed, and put a teaspoonful of the 
fluid to a boiler of clothes; boil one-half hour. They 
will need but little rubbing. This does not injure the 
clothes. 

POWDER FOR SCENT BAGS. 

One ounce each of coriander seed, orris root, rose 
leaves, lavender flowers, and sweet calamus; one 
drachm of mace and allspice. Mix and put in your 
bags, or between the covers of your handkerchief-box 
lid. 

TO PREVEBfT RUSTIXG. 

To prevent metals from rusting, melt together three 
parts lard and one of resin, and apply a very thin coat- 
ing. It will preserve Russia-iron stoves and grates 
from rusting during summer, even in damp situations. 
The eff'ect is equally good in brass, copper, steel, etc. 

TO POMSH TIXWARE. 

First rub the tin with a damp cloth; then take dry 
flour and rub it on with your hand ; take an old news- 
paper and rub the flour off", and the tin will shine as 



MISCELLANEOUS. 149 

well as if half an hour had been spent in rubbing with 
brick dust or powders. 

TO RESTORE FURNITURE. 

Make a mixture of three parts of linseed oil, and one 
part spirits of turpentine ; put it on with a woolen cloth, 
and when dry, rub with a woolen cloth or chamois. 
Good for cleaning picture frames and restoring furniture 
marred or scratched. It covers the disfigured surface, 
and restores wood to its original color, leaving a lustre 
upon the surface. 

SCOIIRISTG L.IQIJID FOR BRASS. 

Oil of vitriol, one ounce; sweet oil, one-half gill; 
pulverized rotten stone, one gill; rain water, one and 
a half pints. Mix well and shake as used. Apply with 
a rag, and then polish with buckskin or old woolen. 

SPOTS OIV VARXISHED FURXITURE 

Are readily removed b}^ rubbing them with essence of 
peppermint, or spirits of camphor, and afterwards with 
furniture polish or oil. 

TO CI.EAX SILTER. 

Wash silver in very hot, clear water, wipe dry with a 
soft towel, and you will have no need for any prepara- 
tion. 

TO REMOVE A OI^ASS STOPPER 

From a bottle, hold a lighted match to the neck of the 
bottle, and the heat will cause the neck so to expand 
that the stopper will loosen. 

FOR TAKING OCT GREASE SPOTS. 

Gasoline is splendid for cleaning grease out of any- 
thing, from a piece of point lace to a carpet. Wash 
lace or silk handkerchiefs in it; rub larger things with 
a sponge ; but it is explosive, and so must be kept far 
from the fire. 



150 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

TO EXTRACT INK. 

To extract ink from cotton, silk and woolen goods, 
saturate the spot witli spirits of turpentine, and let it 
remain several hours ; then rub it between the hands. 
It will crumble away without injuring either the color 
or texture of the article. 

TO TAKE INK OUT OF lilXEN 

Dip the spotted part in pure tallow, melted ; then wash 
out the tallow and the ink will disappear. 

TO REMOVE TAR. 

Rnb well with clean lard, afterwards wash with soap 

and warm water. Apply this to either hands or 

clothing. 

STOVE POI.ISH. 

Stove lustre, when mixed with turpentine and ap- 
plied in the usual manner, is blacker, more glossy, and 
more durable than when mixed with any other liquid. 
The turpentine prevents rust, and when put on an old, 
rusty stove will make it look as well as new. 

TO WASH OIL-CIiOTH. 

Oil-cloth ma}^ be made to have a fresh, new appear- 
ance, by washing it every month with a solution of 
sweet milk, with the white of one beaten egg. Soap, in 
time, injures oil-cloth. A very little "boiled oil," 
freshens up an oil-cloth. Very little must be used, and 
rubbed in with a rag. Equal parts of copal varnish, I 
put; it gives a gloss. 

SWEETENING STONE JARS. 

"Having some stone jars in which lard had been 
placed until they became unfit for use, I made perfectly 
sweet by packing them full of fresh earth, and letting it 
remain two or three weeks. I suspect this course would 
be equally effective in any case of foul earthen or stone- 
ware." 



MISCELLANEOUS. . 151 



RANCID BUTTER 

May be remedied by patting in a saucepan and scald- 
ing; ilien put in a piece of toasted bread which will 
absorb all the bad part of the batter ; pour oif carefally 
into a clean dish, from the dark sediment which will 
be found in the bottom of the saucepan. 

A IJSEFIJI. DRUO. 

Ammonia, or as it is generally called spirits of harts- 
horn, is a powerful alkali, and dissolves grease and 
dirt 'with great ease. For washing paint, put a tea- 
spoonful in a quart of moderately hot water ; dip in a 
flannel cloth and then wipe off the woodwork; no 
scrubbing will be necessary. For taking grease spots 
from an}^ fabric, use the ammonia nearly pure; then 
lay white blotting paper over the spot; then iron it 
lightly. In washing lace, put about twelve drops in a 
phit of warm suds. To clean silver, mix two teaspoon- 
fuls of ammonia in a quart of hot suds. Put in your 
silverware and wash; using an old nail brush or tooth 
brush for the pui-pose. For cleaning hair brushes, etc., 
simply shake the brushes up and down in a mixture of 
a tablespoonful of ammonia to one pint of hot water ; 
when they are cleansed, rinse them in cold water and 
stand them in the wind or in a hot place to dry ; and 
for taking out the red stains produced by the strong 
acids in blue and black cloths, there is nothing better 
than ammonia. 

TO CI.EAN HAIR BRUSHES. 

Do not use soap, but put a tablespoon of hartshorn 
into the water, having it only tepid, and dip up and 
down until clean; then dry with the brushes down, and 
they will be like new ones. If you do not have ammo- 
nia, use soda ; a teaspoon ful dissolved in the water will 
do very well. 



152 THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 

Nails dipped in soap, will drive easily in hard wood. 

Mica windows in stoves, when smoked, are readily 
cleaned by taking out and thoroughly washing with 
vinegar, a little diluted. If the black does not come off 
at once, let it soak a little. 



White clothes may be whitened in washing, by boil- 
ing a teaspoonful of turpentine with them. 

A little borax put in the water in which scarlet 
napkins and red bordered towels are to be washed, will 
prevent them from fading. 

A small quantity of diluted vitriol will take stains 
out of marble. Wet the spots with the acid, and in a 
few minutes rub briskly with a soft linen cloth till they 
disappear. 



m !^ % 1 ^ 00 *§*'""^"'^* 



LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS, 



Mrs. W. C. Arline, Fayette. Mrs. 

" E. W. Bedford, Fayette. " 

Miss Ada B. Beck, Fayette. " 

Mrs. T. R. Betts, Fayette. 

Judge T. R. Betts, Fayette. Miss 

Mrs. Lucy Boone, Jefferson City. Mrs. 

" George Boughner, Fayette. " 

" G. Bower, Fayette. " 

" W. T. Bowling, Fayette. " 

" M. J. Breaker, Fayette. Miss 

" M. Bridges, Fayette. Mrs. 

" Mittie C. Burton, Fayette. " 

" Russel Caples, Glasgow. " 

" Evelina Carson, Fayette. Miss 

Miss Helen Georgia Carson, Fayette. Mrs. 

Mrs. Mamie White Chinn, Franklin. " 
" R. C. Clark, Fayette. 

" Lankford Cook, Fayette. Miss 

" Samuel Copp, St. Louis. Mrs. 

" J. H. Crump, Fayette. " 

" Dr. C. Darby, St. Joseph. " 

Miss Gabie Darby, Howard Co. Miss 

*' Pensie Darby, Howard Co. " 

Miss Emma Davis, Fayette. Mrs. 

Mrs. J. Dickerson, Fayette. " 
" Bettie Tutt Dunaway, Oswego, Ks.Miss 

" Martha Elliott, Howard Co. " 

" John Ervin, Fayette. '' 

« J. R. Estill, Estill. Mrs. 

" N. C. Eubank, Fayette. " 

'* Fannie Everett, Fayette. " 
" H. Everett, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

Miss Mattie Frazier, Fayette. " 

Mrs. John Farrington, Howard Co. " 

" CcJesar Ferguson, Fayette. " 
" J. R. Findley, St. Louis. 

" Juliette Findley, Lexington. " 



L. M. Findley, St. Louis 
J. H. Finks, Salisbury. 
Lizzie Fisher, Fayette 
Rebecca Ford, Kansas City. 
Bessie Gay, Fayette. 
Nettie Gannett, Fayette. 
Mary Gay, Fayette. 
H. K. Givens, Fayette. 
Odon Guitar, Columbia. 
Josephine Harrison, Denver, Col. 
M. Hendrix, Fayette. 
John Henry, Jefferson City. 
A. J. Herndon, Fayette. 
Lizzette Herndon, Fayette. 
H. K. Hinde, Howard Col., Fayette. 
L P. Hockaday, Columbia. 
George Holley, Armstrong. 
Marie Howard, Batavia, N. Y. 
Romeo Hughes, Fayette. 
L. N. Jackson, Monroe City. 
M. E. Jackson, Fayette. 
Mary Jackson, Fayette. 
Cora Jones, Syracuse, N. Y. 
N. O. Jones, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Jacob Keyser, Fayette. 
Jennie Keyser, Fayette. 
Nannie Keyser, Fayette. 
Nellie Keyser, Fayette. 
J. W. Kilpatrick, Fayette. 
J. Kinney, Franklin. 
J. M. Kinney, Franklin. 
Klatt, Fayette. 

Fratie Knickerbocker, Fayette. 
Nannie Lay, Jefferson City. 
Jeannette Leonard, Fayette. 
Elizabeth Major, Fayette. 
S. C. Major. Fayette. 

163 



154 



THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



Mrs, John McCraty, Huntsville. Mrs. 

" Joseph Memmel, Fayette. " 

" D. O. Morris, Fayette. " 

" Carrie Morrison, Fayette " 

" J. L. Morrison, Fayette. " 

" John Morrison, Fayette. " 

" Mumpower, Fayette. " 

" John Noland, Independence. Miss 

" H. A. Norris, Fayette. " 

" Eliza Payne, Nebraska City, Neb. Mrs. 

Miss Jessie Payne, Fayette. " 

Mrs. T. J. Payne, Fayette. " 

" J. H. Pearson, Fayette. " 

" JuHa A. Pearson, Fayette. " 

" M. Pile, Fayette. " 

" W. F. Potts, Fayette. 

" L S. Prosser, Fayette. " 

" Miller Reed, Fayette. " 

" John Ricketts, Fayette. Miss 

" W. M. Robertson, Fayette. Mrs. 

" J. A. J. Rooker, Fayette. 

" I. P. Ryland, Tascosa, Texas. " 

" John E. Ryland, Lexington. " 

" Maria Schotte, Fayette. " 

" Louisa Sebree, Fayette. " 

"■ Annie Shaffroth, Fayette. " 

" John Shafroth, Denver, Col. " 

" Sides, St. Louis. " 

" S. P. Simpson, St. Louis. " 



Charlie Smith, Fayette. 
Dr. J D. Smith, St. Joseph. 
Dr. Tom Smith, Fayette. 
Dr. T. J. Smith, Fayette. 
Louisa A. Smith, Macon Co. 
Solon Smith, Fayette. 
Wilson Smith, Fayette. 
Lou Smith, Fayette. 
Birdie Smith, Fayette. 
Dr. Snelson, St. Joseph. 
Cyrus Thompson, Belleville, IlL 
W. F. Tieman, Fayette, 
John Tippett, Keytesville. 
J. D. Tolson, Fayette. 

" Treat, St. Louis. 
Wm. Turner, Glasgow. 
Margaret Unrah, Fayette. 
Margaret Unruh, Fayette. 
Sallie Warden, Fayette. 
Dr. J. J. Watts, Fayette. 
Hampton L. Watts, Fayette. 
Wilcoxon, Fayette. 
J. F. Williams, Macon City. 
R. P. Williams, Fayette. 
E. M. Woods, Fayette. 
Rowena W. Woods, Fayette. 
Theodore Woods, Fayette. 
Leland Wright, Boonville. 
Dr. U. S. Wright, Fayette. 



STEPHENS COLLEGE, 

FOR YOUNG LADIES, 
COMIMMA^ - ^ MISSDTJBI. 

Rev, T, W. Barrett. A. M., Pres't, 

W. POPE YEAMAN, D. D., President of Board of Curators. 

UNDER CONTROL OF 

The Mo. Baptist ^mm\ A^^ociatioii. 

A Broad and thorough literary course, embracing Classics and Modern Lan- 
euaees. Superior advantages in Music, Art, Elocution and Hook-keei)mg. An 
Ixptrienced faculty trained in the best schools of Kurope and America. A course 
of lectures by distinguished educators ; extensive and beautiful grounds , large 
and well furnished rooms, lighted with gas; moral and religious influences un- 
surpassed. For Catalogue address, 

REV, T, W. BARRETT, 



-OrO TO- 



C, ROSENBAUM & SONS 



ro BUY ALL YOUR 



DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, HOSIERY, 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, AND CLOTHING. 



CREWS & CARSON 

Keep on hand a nice line of 

FRESH GROCERIES, 

ALL KINDS OF PRODUCE BOUGHT AND SOLD. 

In Bell Block, FAYETTE, MO. 




MOST PERFECT MADE. 

Prepared with strict regard to Purity, Strength, 
and Healthfulness. Dr. Price's Baking Powder 
contains no Ammonia, Lime, Alum or Phosphates. 
Dr. Price's Extracts, Vanilla, Lemon, Orange, etc., 
flavor deliciously. PRICE Baking Powder Co. 

0HI0-A.C31-O- ST. XjOXJIS- 



INDEX, 



7 
145 
153 



Preface 

Table of Weights and Measures 

List of Contributors 

Soups. 

Mock Oyster 12 

Beef Bouille 12 

Green Pea '2 

Browned Flour 12 

Caramel '2 

For Coloring Soups '3 



Directions 9 

Black 9 

White 9 

Tomato 'O 

German Fritter 10 

Oyster n 



Beef.. 



Fisli and Oysters. 



Hints 14 

To Boil Fish H 

Baked Fish 15 

Fried Fish 15 

Boiled Pike with Egg Sauce 15 

Baked Fish with Cream Sauce 15 

Broiled Fish 16 

Shell Fish— Clams.. 16 

Fried Clams 16 

Fried Frogs 16 

Trask's Select Shore Mackerel 16 

Codfish and Cream 17 



Codfish Balls 17 

17 

17 

17 



Fried Oysters 

Broiled Oysters 

Oyster Croquettes 

Fricasseed Oysters 18 

Fried Oysters 18 

Chicken and Oyster Pie 18 

Scalloped Oysters 18 

Steamed Oysters in the Shell 19 

Oyster Patties '9 

Oyster a la Poulelte '9 

Oyster Flavor '9 



Meals. 



Directions 20 

Roast Beef 20 

Roast Pork 20 

Roast Leg of Lamb 21 

Roast Little Pig 21 

Champagne Ham. 21 

Baked Ham 22 

Boiled Ham 22 

Dressing for Baked Ham 22 



Boiled Beef Tongue 23 

Beefsteak Smothered in Onions.... 23 

Fried Beefsteak 23 

Broiled Beefsteak 23 

Mutton Chops 24 

Veal Cutlets 24 

Pork Tenderloin 24 

Mock Duck 24 

Baked Ham 25 

157 



168 



THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



Meats.— Coiitiniied. 



Sausage... 25 

Beef Hash 25 

Baked Hash 25 

Beef Croquettes 25 

Sweet-Breads 26 

Fried Sweet-Breads 26 

Veal Loaf. 26 

Opossum 26 I 

Sauces for Meats. 



Rabbit Stew 26 

Souse. 27 

Pigs' Feet 27 

Beefsteak Balls 27 

To Pickle One Hundred Pounds of 

Beef or Tongue 27 

To Cure Bacon 27 



Oyster Sauce for Turkey 28 

Mint Sauce for Lamb 28 

Tomato Sauce for Roast Beef. 28 

White, or Suet Pudding 28 

Tomato Sauce 29 

Mustard 29 



Oyster Stuffing for Baked Fish 29 

Mustard Sauce for Boiled Fresh 

Salmon 29 

Cranberry Sauce 29 

Cranberry Sauce 30 



Directions 31 

Roast Turkey 31 

Roast Turkey 32 

Baked Chicken 32 

Fried Chicken 32 

Smothered Chicken 33 

Roast Ducks 33 



Poultry. 

Prairie 



Chickens — Steamed or 

Baked 33 

Quails with Toast 34 

Chicken Pie 34 

Chicken or Veal Croquettes 34 

Quennels or Croquettes 34 

Chicken Croquettes 35 



Naiads and Side Dishes. 



Chicken Salad.. 36 

Chicken Salad 37 

Potato Salad 37 

Potato Salad 38 

Salmon Salad 38 

Oyster Salad.... 38 

Oyster Salad 39 

Lobster Salad 39 



Summer Breakfast Salad 39 

Oysters — a la Chambord 40 

Pommes — a la Gratin 40 

Chicken Cheese 40 

A Favorite Dish , ... 41 

Slaw 41 

Hot Slaw 41 



Mashed Potatoes...., 42 

Potato Cakes 42 

To Boil New Potatoes 42 

Saratoga Potatoes 42 

To Bake Potatoes 43 

Fried Potatoes 43 

Potatoes Baked with Beef. 43 

Potato Croquettes 43 

Potato Puffs 43 



Vegetables. 

Baked Sweet Potatoes 43 

To Bake Sweet Potatoes 44 

Baked Tomatoes 44 

Stuffed Tomatoes 44 

Fricasseed Chicken 45 

Green Corn Pudding 45 

To Boil Corn on the Cob 45 

Peas 45 

Cabbage to Boil 45 



INDEX. 



159 



Cabbage Pudding 46 

To Cook Cabbage Quickly 46 

Southern Cabbage 46 

Boiled Cabbage 46 

Fried Cabbage 46 

Southern Rice 47 

Lima Beans 47 

Baked Pork and Beans 47 

Macaroni 47 

Succotash 47 

Boiled Beets 48 

Turnips 48 



Parsnips 48 

Vegetable Oyster 48 

Asparagus 48 

Boiled Onions 48 

Fried Egg Plant 45 

Boiled Carrots 49 

Boiled Hominy 49 

To Boil String Beans 49 

Scalloped Tomatoes 49 

Parsnips, Sauted 50 

Salsify 50 

Cauliflower 50 



Eggs and Cooked Grains. 



Omelette 51 

Cheese Omelette 52 

Scrambled Eggs 52 

Baked Eggs 52 

Poached Eggs 52 

Scrambled Eggs 53 

To Fry Eggs 53 

To Prepare Eggs for Lunch 53 

Oyster Omelette 53 



Stuffed Eggs 53 

To Keep Eggs 54 

Cracked Wheat 54 

Oatmeal Porridge 54 

Hominy 54 

Hominy Fritters 54 

To Cook Hominy 55 

Dutch Cheese 55 



Bread. 



Light Bread 56 

To make Yeast and light Bread.... 56 

Light Bread 57 

Salt-Rising Bread 57 

Salt-Rising Bread 58 

Boston Brown Bread 58 

Brown Bread 58 

Cinnamon Rolls 59 

Waffles 59 

Muffins 59 

Soda Biscuit 59 

Soda Biscuit 60 

Yeastpowder Biscuits 60 

Beat Biscuit 60 

French Biscuits 60 



Indian Bread 61 

Recipe for Corn Bread 61 

Fritters 61 

Corn Batter Bread . 61 

Egg Bread 61 

Corn Batter Cakes 62 

Corn Mufifins 62 

Plain Corn Bread 62 

Sally Lunn 62 

Buffets for Tea 62 

Moonshine Toast 63 

French Toast. 63 

Bread Cakes 63 

Breakfast Cakes 63 

Strawberry Short Cake 64 



Puddiiigjji. 



General Directions 65 

Fruit Pudding 65 

Suet Pudding 66 

Dover Pudding 66 

Boiled Raisin Pudding 66 



Graham Pudding 66 

Woodford Pudding 67 

A Spiced Apple Pudding 67 

Tapioca Pudding 67 

Cocoanut Pudding. 68 



160 



THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



Puddings.— Continued. 



Mountain Deer Pudding 68 

Delmonico Pudding 69 

Sponge Pudding 69 

Orange Pudding 69 

Corn Starch Pudding 69 

"Dandy" Pudding. 70 

Snow Pudding 70 

Gelatine Pudding 70 

Sauces for Pudding-s. 



Orange Roley Poley 71 

Brown Betty 71 

Queen of Puddings 71 

Rice Pudding 71 

Cottage Pudding 72 

Simple Pudding 72 

Virginia Pudding 72 



ButterSauce 73 

Butter Sauce with Eggs 73 

A Plainer Sauce 73 

Wine Sauce 73 

Foam Sauce 74 

Cream Sauce 74 ' 

Pies. 



Strawberry Sauce 74 

Cold Cream Sauce 74 

Plain Cream Sauce 74 

Whipped Cream Sauce 74 

Sauce 74 



Pastry 75 

Mincemeat 75 

"Temperance" Mincemeat 76 

Mincemeat 7^ 

Mock Mincemeat.. 76 

Lemon Pies 76 

Lemon Pie... 77 

Lemon Pie 7^ 

Transparent Pie yS 

Chess Pie 7^ 

Cream Pie 7^ 

A Nice Filling for Pie 79 

Molasses Pie 79 

Apple Custard Pie 79 

Green Apple Pie 79 



Baked Apple Dumplings 79 

Baked Apple Roll 80 

Apple Cobbler 80 

Dried Apple Pie 80 

Fried Apple Pie 80 

Cherry Roll 81 

Tiffey Pudding 81 

Pie Plant Pie 81 

Strawberry Cream Pie 81 

Irish Potato Pie 82 

Sweet Potato Pie 82 

Pumpkin Pie 82 

Fruit Pudding 83 

Cocoanut Pie 83 

Pie for Dyspeptics 83 



Xice Desserts. 



Russian Cream 84 

Velvet Cream 84 

Charlotte Russe 84 

Sponge Roll 85 

Blanc Mange 85 

Ambrosia 85 

Apple Meringue 85 

Apple Float 85 

lien's Nest 86 

Orange Ice 86 



Pine Apple 86 

Tutti Frutti 86 

Chocolate Cream 87 

Peach Ice-Cream 87 

BananaCream 7 

Ice-Cream 87 

Orange Ice 88 

Strawberry Ice 88 

Pine-Apple Ice 

Lemon Ice 88 



INDEX. 



161 



IVice Desserts.— Continued. 



Lemon Ice 89 

Delmonico 89 

Pineapple Ice 89 

Pineapple Sherbet 89 

Pineapple Sherbet 90 



Pineapple Jelly 90 

Pineapple Gelatine 90 

Wine Jelly 90 

Lemon Foam 91 

Boiled Custard 91 



Cakes. 



General Directions 92 

Icing Boiled 92 

Icing Cold 93 

Chocolate Icing 93 

Icing Without Eggs 93 

Fruit 94 

Fruit or Black 94 

White Fruit 95 

Spice 95 

Hickory Nut 95 

Prince of Wales 96 

Tiayer 

Hash 100 

Caramel. 100 

Raisin icxd 

Bon Ton loi 

Chocolate Filling for Cake loi 

Lemon Butter loi 

Lemon Filling loi 

Orange. 102 

French Cream 102 

Cream 102 



Pound ,96 

White 96 

Gold 97 

Choice Fig 97 

White Tea 97 

Silver Bunn 98 

White 98 

Angels' Food 98 

Dolly Varden ,, 99 

Sponge 99 

Dried Apple 99 

Cakes. 

White Mountain 103 

Custard 103 

Velvet Sponge 103 

Chocolate 104 

Ice-Cream , 104 

Lemon Jelly 104 

Ribbon 105 

Prince of Wales 105 

Almond 105 



Plain Cakes. 



Coffee 106 

Cup 106 

Ginger Bread 106 

Soft Ginger Bread 106 



GingerCake 107 

Soft Ginger Bread 107 

Ginger Snaps 108 

Scotch Cakes 108 



Cookies. 



Sweet Cakes 109 

Cookies 109 

Crullers 109 

Lep Kuchen 109 

German Cookies no 

Drop Cakes. no 

Apie Cakes no 

Little Cakes no 

Jumbles 1 1 1 



Small Nut Cakes ni 

Macaroons ni 

Boston Cream Cakes ni 

Doughnuts... 112 

Cream Doughnuts n2 

Knickerbocker Crullers . n2 

Sugar Kisses n3 

Scotch Wafers ii^ 



162 



THE MISSOURI COOK BOOK. 



Confectionery. 



Directions for Candy Making 114 

Vanilla Cream Candy 114 

Cream for Bon Bons 114 

Taffy 115 

Butterscotch , 115 

Cocoanut Caramels...., 115 

Hickorynut Macaroons 115 

Walnut Candy 116 



Kisses 116 

Candy 116 

Cocoanut Candy 116 

Peanut Candy 116 

Fig, Date and Nut Candy 117 

Sugar Candy. 117 

To Sugar or Crystalize Pop-Corn... 117 
Salted Peanuts 118 



Pickles. 



Directions 119 

Cucumber 119 

Pepper Mangoes 120 

Spanish 120 

Chopped Tomato 120 

Cabl^age 121 

Yellow 121 

Chow-Chow 121 

Chow-Chow 122 

Chili Sauce 123 

Eye-Opener Catsup 123 



Ripe Tomato Catsup 123 

Tomato Catsup 124 

Chili Sauce 124 

Green Tomato Sweet Pickle 124 

Watermelon Sweet Pickle 124 

Fig Sweet Pickle 124 

Peach Sweet Pickle 125 

To Pickle Pears, Plums, Grapes 

and Crab-Apples 125 

To Pickle Cherries 125 



Fruits. 

General Directions 126 | Candied Fruits 129 



Preserved Peaches 126 

Preserved Pears 127 

Preserved Quinces 127 

Preserved Apples 127 

Preserved Crab-Apples 127 

Preserved Citron 127 

Tomato Preserves 128 

Grape Preserves 128 



Raspberryjam 129 

Blackberry Jam 129 

Marmalades 130 

Brandy Peaches 130 

Peach Butter 130 

Apple Jelly 130 

Apple Jelly 131 

Siberian Crab-Apple Jelly 131 



Strawberry Preserves 129 1 Currant Jelly 132 

Canning. 



To Can Tomatoes 133 

Canned Corn 133 

To Can Corn 133 



To Can Peaches 134 

Canned Cherries 134 



Family Beverages. 



Tea 135 

Coffee 135 

Chocolate 136 

Blackberry Cordial 136 



Blackberry Wine 136 

Grape Wine I37 

Currant Wine I37 



INDEX. 



163 



Medicinal. 



Cure for Felon 138 

Remedy for Wounds 138 

Remedy for Bee Sting 138 

Bee Sting 138 

An Excellent Salve I39 

A Sure Cure for Gravel I39 

Cough Medicine '39 

Food for 

Beef Tea Hi 

Mutton and Veal Broth 141 

Chicken Broth 141 

Sweet Cider Soup. 141 

Rye Mush 142 

Corn Gruel '42 



Cough Syrup 139 

Remedy for Burns 139 

For Sore Throat 140 

To Remove Discoloration from 

Bruises 140 

Mustard Plaster 140 

Cure for Chapped Hands 140 

tlie Siclt. 

Oatmeal Gruel 142 

Panada 142 

Boiled Custard 142 

Egg-Nog 143 

Thickened Milk I43 



Mis^cellaneou!^. 



Recipe for Hard Soap 

To Mix Whitewash 

Whitewash for Buildings or Fences. 

Economical Paint 

To Stop Cracks in Iron Vessels.. . 

Cement 

Cement for China 

To Remove Mildew 

Cleansing Fluid 

Hair Wash 

Hair Wash " Eureka " 

Washing Compound 

Powder for Scent Bngs 

To Prevent Rusting 

To Polish Tinware 



146 
146 
146 
147 
147 
147 
147 
147 
147 
148 
148 



148 



To restore Furniture 149 

Scouring Liquid for Brass 149 

Spots on Varnished Furniture 149 

To Clean Silver 149 

To Remove a Glass Stopper 149 

For Taking Out Grease Spots 149 

To Extract Ink 150 

To Take Ink Out of Linen 150 

To Remove Tar 150 

Stove Polish 15° 

To Wash Oil-Cloth 150 

Sweetening Stone Jars 150 

Rancid Butter 151 

A Useful Drug 151 

To Clean Hair Brushes 151 



ALWAYS READY FOR PASSENGERS WITH 

BUGGIES, CARRIAGES & HORSES, 



STABLE EAST OF HOTEL HOWARD. 



DRACE^~BUsPr> CO., 



-DEALERS IN- 



Canned Goods, China and Queensware. 

ALL KINDS OF PRODUCE TAKEN. TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 



BOUGHNER, TOLSON & SMITH, 
o-ieocEiBs 



ifii 



Also all kinds of Farm Machinery, and Agricultural Implements, 
Buggies, Spring Wagons, Sewing Machines, etc. 



S'lOULD ALL TAKE THE 
It is a neat. Instructive little paper. A great help to new housekeepers. 



RESTAURANT p.^" BAKER, 

CAKES. CANDIES, NUTS AND CIGARS. OYSTERS IN EVERY STYLE. 

EAST SIDE OF SQUARE. FAYETTE, WIO, 



BF»OOI!x BIEaK 

EMBROIDERY AND KNITTING. 

ANY THREAD UNDER CORTICELLt BRAND IS 

ABSOLUTELY UNEQUALED. 

Tf|e Tngg Merfcantsile Compani], 

BOOmVinEiE., - MISSOUKI, 

CARRY AT ALL TIMKS THK MOST EXTENSIVE STOCK OF 

Dry Goods, Carpets and House Furnishing Goods 

IN 

(SE.RITRArA MISSOURI. 



" THE BOSS GROCERY HOUSE " 

KEEP ON HAND THE NICEST LINE OK 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES, 

Canned Goods, Etc. 

FAYETTE, - - - - MISSOURI. 



KEEP A NICE LINK OF 

BOOKS, STATIONERY, NOTIONS. 

MONTHLY MAGAZINES FOR SALE. FA YE I TEy IVIOa 



IMBAlLIij 



iBiiiiiiiiSift 






-DEALERS IN- 



Paints, Oil, Stationery, Etc. 

Prescriptions Carefully Filled. 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, 

Office over Tindall & Smith's Drug Store, 



.iL._ a"_ IFXJI^IK &: (OC).. 



-DEALERS IN- 



I^eal E^Me and In^uiiance Bu^ine^^. 

Abstracts of Titles Made for Tliose Desiring to Invest in Howard 
County Land, or Loan Money on Same. 



IP-iL-^-ETTE. 



IbvCISSOTJil^I- 




WATKHMiKER, 

AND DEALER IN 

STATIONERY, MUSICAL AND 
FANCY GOODS. 

All Sporting Goods a Specialty. 

SUPPLIES FOR ALL MACHINKS. 

h^ Repairing of all kinds done at Sltor 
^^^ Notice. 

FAYETTE.; MO. 



Of all Varieties and at the NIost Reasonable Prices, 

CAN np. TKOCURED FKMM THE 

INDEPENDENCE, MO. 

Roses, Pansies, Verbenas, Geraniums, Colein, &c., and all the choice new varie- 
ties of Plants, sent by Express. Express charges are light. Illustrated 
Catalogue mailed free. Address, 

N. S. GRIFFITH, Independence, Mo. 



PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY FILLED AT ALL HOURS. 

^$-EA5T SIDE OF PUBLIC SQUARE-$S> 



<ID. 0. M0RR1SI> 



-DEALER IN- 



Laths, Shingles, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Lime, Hair, Cement. 



-AND ALL KINDS OF- 



HARDWARE FOR BUILDERS. 

OFFICE AND YARD NEAR THE DEPOT. 

TFRMS STRICTLY CASH. FAYETTE, MO. 



Fine Dr^ij (Jood?, Hotion^, Cloal^?, lyjillinei^y, M$$ lqo:d? 

TOYS, GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, AT THE LOWEST PRICES, 



-VISIT THE- 






^;7^. IP, IPOTTS, 

DEALER IN 

Clocks, Watches, Jewelry, Solid Silver & Plated Ware. 

FINE WORK A SPECIALTY. 

-m-Ml KINDS OF REPAIRING AND ENGRAVING DONE ON SHORT NOTICE.H^ 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

House Furnishing Goods, Carpets, Stoves, Tinware, etc. 

FURNITURE REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. FAYETTE, MO. 

W, F, MITCHELL, - - Proprietor, 

rAYETTE, MO. 

Leaders of MILLINERY. DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, HOSIERY, ETC. ALSO 5 
AND 10 CENT DEPARlMENT. 



THE OLD RELIABLE SHOP 



-KEEPS ON HAND- 



BUGGIES, SPRING WAGONS, also MANUFACTURER of the FAYETTE WAGON. 



T. lEiiEiKiKinsr^. 



-DEALER IN- 



FINE CIGARS, TOBACCO, PIPES, &c, 



ONE DOOR SOUTH OF POST-OFFICE. 



^OSELPFI MEIMMELIL, 

BLACKSMITH & WAGON MAKER. 

ALL KINDS OF REPAIRING DONE NEATLY AND ON SHORT NOTICE. 



The AheriCan Baptist puBLi^Tiopl ^dCietV. 

GENERAL THEOLOGICAL AND SUNDAY SCHOOL 

SUPPLY STORE. 

- — ^^^Ci A -N/ns-r .-rrea S^:asTT ^'IStEE -UTClSr .£i.T=:E'XjXC-A.TI02:T.,-^ — ^ . 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



TRASKS 




CHEAPEST EATING ON EARTH. 

Ask Your Grocer for them. 

IE THE ORIGINAL 
ONLY GENUINE! 



TRASK'SVH 



A copy of this Superb Work of Art will 

ke no other Brand. i^q mailed to any address on raceipt of 
TKASK FISH CO.. ST. LOUIS, MO. ten cents. 



Thos. J. Payne, Pres't. 



R. P. Williams, Vice-Pres't. 



E. W. Bedford, Cashier. 



PAYNE & WILLIAMS' BANK, 

FAYETTE, MO. 



I^_ C. CIL-i^ieiE^. 



FAYETTE, MO. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



■"""'"III "II llllllillllllnmilji 

011 791 787 3 



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