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EDITOR Charles V. Cummins 



BUSINESS MANAGER Don Pruitt 



THE NINETEEN 




HUNDRED FORTY 



MISTURA 



VOLUME VII 



PUBLISHED BY SENIOR CLASS 

INDIANAPOLIS COLLEGE 

OF PHARMACY 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 




FOREWORD- 



THE 



M I S T U R A 




In this book we have striven to put these happy 
years of college life on record. In years to come may 
familiar surroundings and likeness of old friends 
herein retained — bring back pleasant memories. 

May the Mistura encourage a friendly interest in the 
profession of Pharmacy and the Indianapolis College 
of Pharmacy. 



DEDICATION 



TO 
EDWARD H. NILES 

DEAN OF OUR COLLEGE 

THE MEMBERS OF THE SENIOR 
CLASS AFFECTIONATELY DEDI- 
CATE THIS VOLUME. FOR HIS 
HELPFUL GUIDANCE AND KIND- 
LY I NTEREST Wl LL THESE YEARS 
OF ASSOCIATION BE LONG RE- 
MEMBERED. 



Page six 



DEDICATION 




Page seven 



HE M I S T U 



SCHOOL 



The Indianapolis College of Pharmacy has 
been in existence since 1904. Since its organ- 
ization, 1150 students have been graduated. 
It is a member of the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy, an organization which 
establishes the high standards maintained by 
its members. The curriculum of I. C. P. is one 
of high scientific standards and practical value. 
The degree. Bachelor of Science, is conferred 
upon each student upon completion of the four 
year course. The many advantages offered tc 
a student of I. C. P. have established our Alma 
Mater as one of the leading Colleges of Phar- 
macy in the United States. As an institution 
of professional learning, I. C. P. has gone far 
in the advancement of the pharmaceutical arts 
and sciences. 



Page eight 



HE M I S T U 



TO THE READER 



As editor of the 1940 Mistura, I wish to take 
this means of expressing my appreciation to faculty 
and students for the fine cooperation which has met 
the efforts of the staff in compiling this record. 

To the Mistura staff and those who helped so 
efficiently, especially do I wish to express my grati- 
tude. They have taken my hurried, jumbled direc- 
tions and my vague explanations of the work they 
were to do, and they have done much better than 
I had hoped. This year book is the creation of the 
whole group, each doing his appointed task. The 
aid of student members in producing this annual 
was indispensable. 

The 1940 Mistura is yours. I hope you will see 
in it an accurate picturization of the persons and 
events which made the past college year one of the 
most successful in the history of I. C. P. 

Charles Cummins 



Page ten 



CONTENTS 



VIEWS 



FACULTY 



SCHOOL 



ACTIVITIES 



FEATURES 




f 



Page eleven 



HE M I S T U 



WE SENIORS 



Well we've made it now, We're almost through 
We've finished the job, That's so hard to do. 
For four long years we've sweat and toiled. 
We've burned the candles and the midnight oil. 
But now it's finished. Now we can say too 
We're done, We've made it. We're almost through, 
We Seniors! 

To you. Freshman, grim and shy 

The road is long, the peak is high. 

There's many an exam you've yet to pass; 

Keep up your head with the rest of your class. 

Then one of these days you can say too. 

We're done. We've made it. We're almost through 

We Seniors! 

Then to the sophomores, sad and worn, 

We know it's tough, the load you've borne. 

You're on the hump, now start back down 

You'll make it now — Wipe off that frown. 

Then one of these days you can say too 

We're done. We've made it. We're almost through, 

We Seniors! 

To the Juniors comes the best of all 

The senior class, it's yours, we leave these halls. 

Take up the standard, hold it high 

For on your shoulders the burden lies. 

Then in a short while you can say too 

We're done. We've made it. We're almost through 

We Seniors! 

Now comes the time we bid adieu 

We've finished the job — Now we're through. 

It grieves us deeply to say we're done 

But just the same, we've had some fun. 

And now we can say as they said too 

We're done. We've made it. We're almost through 

We Seniors! 



Page fourteen 



HE M I S T U 



HAPPY DAYS AT I. C. P. 

(Tune, Original Air) . 

In the heart of Indiana, 

In a city large and fair, 
Proudly stands'our Alma Mater, 

Happy days are those spent there. 
But days like these must pass away, 

Though ne'er forgot will they be; 
So we'll sing, dear Alma Mater, 

All hail to the I.C.P. 



SCHOOL SONG 



Page sixteen 




DEAN NILES 

Everyone familiar with the activities of I.C.P. is ac- 
quainted with EDWARD H. NILES, Dean of our College. Dur- 
ing the past many years his influence and instruction have 
been the "guiding light" to hundreds of I.C.P. students. Dean 
Niles is a fitting example for young men and women, and a 
teacher of rare ability. 

He is well informed in the fields of Pharmacy, Medicine 
and Literature. Dean Niles has always held an individual 
friendship with each member of the student body and these 
years of study and preparation under his guidance will always 
be remembered. 



FACULTY 



Page seventeen 



FACULTY 



PROFESSOR JONES 

Biology and 

Pharmacology Department 




PROFESSOR MICHENER 
Chemistry Department 



Page eighteen 



FACULTY 



The Indianapolis College of Pharmacy, with 
a faculty of fourteen, now has the largest 
teaching staff in the history of the school. A 
constant enlargement in the student body has 
necessitated an increase in the faculty in re- 
cent years. This has made possible better in- 
struction with smaller classes, and a closer con- 
tact with individual students. 

This college offers a four-year course in 
Pharmacy with various electives for students 
desiring advanced work. Each course is di- 
vided into a number of laboratory and lecture 
hours, the fulfillment of which gives the stu- 
dent a definite number of credit hours. The 
college curriculum includes courses in Phar- 
macology and Biology, Pharmacy, Chemistry, 
and Academic subjects with various electives. 

Edward H. Niles has been Dean of the col- 
lege for the past twenty years. Dean Niles 
has a degree of Doctor of Pharmacy and Bache- 
lor of Science at this college, also a Bachelor of 
Arts degree from Butler University and has 
completed additional work at Indiana and Chi- 
cago Universities. Besides acting as general 
advisor to all instructors and to the students 
themselves, he teaches courses in Mathema- 
tics, Economics, and various electives. Hos- 
pital Pharmacy has been added in the past 
year and is taught by Dean Niles with Profes- 
sor Ambroz instructing in the laboratory work. 

Professor Ambroz is in charge of courses in 
pharmacy, assisted by Professor Jeffries. Pro- 
fessor Ambroz has Ph.G. and B.S. degrees from 
State College of South Dakota and an M.S. 
degree from the University of Tennessee. He 
has also completed additional work at Uni- 
versity of Florida. 



SAMPSON F. JEFFRIES 

Instructor in Chemistry and 
Pharmacy 



ARTHUR A. HARWOOD 
Instructor in Chemistry 



WILSON T. PATTERSON 
Instructor in Chemistry 





INSTRUCTOR PRETTYMAN 
Biology Department 

Dispensing Pharmacy and Advanced Phar- 
macy lectures and laboratory are supervised 
by Professor Ambroz. Professor Jeffries 
teaches Theory of Pharmacy, Manufactur- 
ing, Pharmaceutical Latin, and Pharmaceu- 
tical History. Professor Jeffries has a Ph.G. 
degree from this college and a B.S. degree 
from Butler. He has also done graduate 
work at the University of Michigan. Com- 
mercial Pharmacy is taught by Professor 
Borst, and Pharmaceutical Law by Professor 
White. 

Courses in Pharmacology and Biology are 
taught by Professor Jones and Professor 
Prettyman. These include lecture and lab- 
oratory work in Pharmacology, Materia 
Medica, Bacteriology, Toxicology, Pharma- 
cognosy, and Public Health by Professor 



H. J. BORST 

Lecturer on Commercial Pharmacy 

Jones. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees from 
Ohio State University and has completed 
work at Muskingum College. He is assisted 
by Professor Prettyman, who also instructs 
in Physiology and Zoology courses. Profes- 
sor Prettyman has A.B. and M.A. degrees 
from Butler University. Dr. Schaefer and 
Dr. Robertson lecture in Physiology and Hy- 
giene. 

Professor Swanson of the Lilly Laborato- 
ries lectures in Biological Assay. Professor 
Schumacher of Butler University instructs 
classes in English. 

The Chemistry Department offers four 
years of work in the various courses re- 
quired. This department is in charge of 
Professor Michener. He instructs princi- 



E. E. SWANSON 

Lecturer on Biological Assay 



PROFESSOR SCHUMACHER 
English Department 




FACULTY 



pally in Chemical Analysis. Professor Michen- 
er has an A.B. from the University of Ne- 
braska and a M.A. from Ohio State University. 
He is assisted by Professor Patterson who 
teaches Bio-Chemistry, Inorganic, and Chem- 
istry Review. Professor Patterson is a grad- 
uate of this college and has an A.B. degree 
from Franklin College, in addition to work at 
Indiana University. 

Professor Harwood of Valparaiso was added 
to the faculty in September, 1 939 as instructor 
in Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry and 
in various laboratory work. Professor Har- 
wood has Ph.D., B.S. and M.S. degrees from 
the University of Wisconsin. 

Mr. May was added to the staff in charge 
of the Library last year. He has an A.B. degree 
from Indiana University. 

Mr, Muse, a graduate of this College and 
now employed at the City Hospital, supervises 
apprentice work of the students at the hos- 
pital. Mr. Muse, after serving in this capacity 
for nine months, has been promoted to the 
position of Assistant-Pharmacist at the City 
Hospital. February 1, Ray Ulrich of the class 
of 1939, was added to the hospital staff to 
succeed Mr, Muse. Mr. Ulrich has taken up 
the supervision of student apprentice work at 
the hospital. Mr. Navin, Chief Pharmacist at 
the hospital, also assists in the supervision of 
student apprenticeship, a course which has 
been added to the college curriculum this year. 

C. R. SCHAEFER, M.D 
Physiology 

WM. C WHITE 
Law 



J. MUSE 

R. ULRICH 

C. NAVIN 
HOSPITAL PHARMACY 




HE M I S T U 



PLEDGE TO I. C. P. 



(Tune: Maryland, My Maryland). 

Oh I.e. P., we pledge to thee, 

Honor and Fidelity; 
Both now and in the years to be, 

Never failing loyalty. 
Oh I.e. P., thy name shall be 

Written high in Pharmacy. 
Now here with truth and faith give we 

Our pledge to I.C.P. 



FACULTY 



Page twenty-two 



THE 



M I S T U R A 



EDWARD H. NILES 
A.B., B.S., Phm.D., Dean 



WALDEN F. AMBROZ 
B.S., M.S. 



NATHAN L. MICHENER 
A.B., A.M. 



SAMPSON F. JEFFRIES 
Ph.G., B.S. 



ARTHUR A. HARWOOD 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 



EDWARD E. SWANSON 
Ph.C, B.S. 




Dean 

Indianapolis College of 

Pharmacy 



LEARNY F. JONES 
B.S., M.S. 



ROBERT L. PRETTYMAN 
A.B., M.A. 



WILSON T. PATTERSON 
A.B., B.S. 



HARRY J. BORST 
Ph.G. 



C. RICHARD SHAEFER, M.D. 



FACULTY 



WILLIAM G. WHITE 
LL.B. 



GEORGE A. SCHUMACHER 
A.B., M.A. 




JOHN R. MAY 
Librarian 



LI BRARY. . .. 



The College Library is one of the most improved departments of our 
school. In the fall of 1938, John R. May, a graduate of Indiana University, 
w/as placed in charge of the College Library. Much of the improvement of 
this branch of our college may be credited to the excellent work of our Libra- 
rian. Mr. May classifies and records all new books promptly upon their arri- 
val and keeps the room in proper order at all times. He assists students at all 
times in obtaining the desired books or magazines and keeps student records 
for all out-going books. 

During the past two years the library has been completely reclassified 
under the Dewey Decimal System of classification. A new card catalogue has 
been prepared, listing all books individually as to author, title, and subject. 
This is a very efficient filing method as any book may be located at a moment's 
notice. 



Page txoenty-four 



LI BRARY. . . . 



The Indianapolis College of Pharmacy has 
a very complete library containing a total of 
over 5000 volumes. The library has been in- 
creasing at the rate of more than three hun- 
dred books a year. It has a standing sub- 
scription of over one hundred magazines 
and trade journals. Thirty-six of these jour- 
nals are bound each year, including current 
issues of such publications as: Indiana 
Pharmacist, Annals of Medical History, Bio- 
logical Abstracts, American journal of Phar- 
macy, Journal of American Chemical Soci- 
ety, Franklin Institute, and many others. 

The library has a very complete selection 
of reference books in the fields of Pharmacy, 
Medicine, Bacteriology, Public Health, 
Chemistry, and related subjects. It has a 
wide selection of popular magazines, as well 
as books of current fiction, hobbies, religion, 
and social science. 

The literary contents in classical litera- 
ture include the complete works of such 
authors as Alexandre Dumas, 0. Henry, 
Browning, Dickens, Cooper, Milton and 
other classical and modern writers. Bound 
copies of the Harvard Classics, Indiana Year 
Book, Journal of Agricultural Chemists, and 
History of the World serve as valuable books 
for reference work. 



Modern magazines include Reader's Di- 
gest, News-Week, Hygeia, Commentator, 
and a variety of others. In addition to the 
library, the professors receive various copies 
of publications pertaining to their special- 
ized courses. 

The average daily attendance in the li- 
brary is forty-three, which is a thirty percent 
increase over last year's attendance. The 
library serves as a room for relaxation as 
well as a quiet room in which to prepare for 
classroom meditation. The library is general 
headquarters for Professor Patterson and 
members of The Capsule staff. It has also 
ser ved c apably as "office protem" for many 
long hours of extensive effort in the prepa- 
ration of this book. 

The room is properly adorned, containing 
pictures of our faculty members and large 
class pictures of hundreds of pharmacists 
who have gone on before us. The library has 
been constantly improved from year to year 
with some cost to the college. 

Underclassmen, you are very fortunate to 
have such an extensive and complete library 
at your disposal and we hope that you may 
use it to your greatest advantage. 




H 



M 



U 




Miss Lydia E. Koepper 
Secretary of the Indian- 
apolis College of Phar- 
macy 



For the past ten years, Miss Lydia E. Koepper has been Secretary of the 
Indianapolis College of Pharmacy. She has also served as personal secretary 
to the Dean during this time. She is in charge of all office records and the 
college book store. 

Miss Koepper renders much valuable service to the faculty and to the 
entire student body. She is never too busy to take a telephone message, to 
help a student find employment, to loan a pencil or look up an individual 
record for any student. We are proud of the efficient and capable manner in 
which she has always aided our class and the help she has given to the many 
students before us. 



Page twenty-six 



HE M I S T U 



THE FACULTY OF I. C. P. 

Asleep in my study it was sporty 

I visioned our faculty of 1940, 

And this wonderful school of Pharmacy, 

Hurrah! We salute you, I. C. P. 

First is Dean Niles we'll all agree, 
Knows his Pharmacy from A to Z ; 
The Dean — a wizard of our profession 
Never too busy to help with a lesson. 

Next let us mention Prof. Ambroz, 
With a method of teaching what he knows. 
He lectures well in drug Dispensing. 
And his Pharmacy is most convincing. 

Now Prof. Jones, he's a regular scout, 
His Materia Med. may make you pout. 
A friend of us all, or perhaps a lass. 
Squire of many a Pharmacog. class. 

Prof. Michener? Why he instructs Chem. 
Oxidation equations! He'll balance them. 
"Now let's begin, to start, to commence"; 
His Organic Chemistry is rather dense. 

To a class in Pharmacy next we go 
Prof. Jeffries is there, you know. 
He dictates History at a mighty rate; 
To hunt or fish he's never late. 

Prof. Patterson, praise to thee; 
Pat graduated from I. C. P. 
Is Bio-Chemistry his real joy, or 
The Senior-Class sitting on the floor? 

Now let us journey to Bacti. Lab. 
Prof. Prettyman no doubt we'll have. 
He's tall and handsome (quiet you mugs) 
He's a natural hunter of colored bugs. 



FACULTY 



Page twenty-seven 



HE M I S T U 



Prof. Schumacher of Butler realm, 
In Freshman English he has the helm. 
We all have learned and all agree, 
It's incorrect to say: "It's me". 

Prof. Harwood, his very first year. 
Has many friends as you shall hear; 
In Pharmaceutical Chem. he keeps tab. 
He's an eager helper in every lab. 

Dr. Schaefer is our skilled M.D. 
He lectures in Physiology. 
Don't bother to study, learn, or cram. 
You aren't supposed to pass that exam. 

Mr. White in Law knows his stuff, 
His Saturday lecture isn't enough. 
I challenge you to doubt me that. 
He has no love for a Democrat. 

Miss Koepper, secretary of our school; 
To help each student is her rule; 
She helps us all, I'm sure you'll agree, 
"Please, a bottle of ink or a lab key". 

Prof. SwansoR, teaches Bio-assay; 
I'll pass that exam, I hope, I pray; 
But won't all that stuff drive you silly? 
He's from the research Staff of Eli Lilly. 

Now Mr. May keeps the Library right. 
Yes you may enter, but please be quiet. 
There's many an article to study or read. 
He'll help you find the book you need. 

But let me awake, I've slept too long; 
Yes, this faculty is a happy throng; 
But, underclassmen, really they're grand; 
It's a top-notch College of the land. 

Carl Kyburz 

FACULTY 



Page twenty-eight 




SENIORS 



4 



HE M I S T U 



SEN lOR SONG 

(Tune Indiana) . 

Classmates, school will soon be over, O'er for you and me; 

Soon now we must part forever, far away we'll be; 
This is what will happen; again we'll seem to be 

Back there again in Indianapolis, and it seems that we can see 
Those old happy days of Pharmacy that are but a memory; 

The good old days, we can't forget them 
And the pranks we used to play; 

When we dream about the friendships and the teachers 
Then we long for that dear old I. C. P. 



SENIORS. ...'40 



Page thirty 



H 



M 



U 



HISTORY OF CLASS OF HO 



FRESH I ES OF 36-37 

On September 14th, 1936, seventy-one slightly bewildered students 
entered the mysterious realm of college life. They were representatives of 
five states, namely: Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Ohio, and South Dakota. Our 
freshman class, consisting of 64 men and 7 women, was heartily welcomed 
to the school by Dean Niles. 

We enjoyed the first week, since we were not interfered with by the 
all-important upper classmen as we tried to associate names with faces and 
subjects with professors. Our new life was soon oriented by finding a place 
of residence, becoming acquainted with classmates, getting jobs, and then 
buckling down to our routine of college work. 

We learned to appreciate Miss Koepper and her ability to answer all of 
our incidental questions. Plants and plant life began to have meaning as Pro- 
fessor Jones instructed us in Botany. Professor Jeffries introduced to us 
that famous old piece of apparatus peculiar to the profession of pharmacy, 
known as the mortar and pestle. The Dean instructed us in Pharmaceutical 
Mathematics after reteaching us how to make use of high school arithmetic. 



JOE MENDENHALL 
President 

ROBERT TODD 
Vice-President 

WILLIAM HUTCHIN- 
SON 
Secretary 

PAUL PORTTEUS 
Treasurer 




SENIORS. ...'40 

Professor Michener very ably instructed us in the use of chemical facts with everyday life and 
with our profession. Professor Schumacher, presented with the almost impossible task of teach- 
ing a group whose interests were elsewhere the correct usage and expression of the English 
language, directed the endeavors of the class in that direction. Physiology, presented to us by 
Dr. Schaefer, enlightened us about the make-up and functions of our bodies. 

Six weeks of college life passed quickly, and the excitement of those first examinations was 
over. Dean Niles explained how little we knew about studying. Many resolutions were made 
after the mid-semester grades were issued. Everybody was more or less classified as to the 
student type. 

Shortly thereafter, the class was assembled for organization and election of class officers. 
Out of a choice and worthy field, and a closely contested race, the following students were 
elected for the year: 

Jack Hill -- President 

Earl Fletchall Vice President 

Frank Fossmeyer „ Secretary 

Dean Ambroz..... - _ Treasurer 

Immediately we transacted our first business which was the selection of a class pin. 

The first vacation came at Thanksgiving and there was but one thought, "home". It was wel- 
comed by all, especially the out-of-state members of the class, many of whom had not been home 
since the beginning of the school year. Work was resumed intensively for a few weeks and then 
school was dismissed for Christmas vacation. 

After a few weeks back at school we swung into the second semester, which was a repetition 
of the first in that there were days of study, brightened now and then by amusing class room hap- 
penings, mistakes and all that goes to make a college career a part of one's self. On one occasion 
two of the girls were unable to obtain "powdered alcohol" from the stock room, and reported 
such. As the days passed on, our laboratory work was more interesting because theory was being 
applied and practical results were accomplished. 

A basketball team was organized and sincerely supported by the student body. Dixon, Belton, 
Battista and Ambroz played, making a fine showing. 

Some members, missing from the laboratory, could be accounted for in the recreation room 
playing ping pong. With the consent of the faculty, the sport became a part of our lunch hour. 

With the completion of the first year at hand we looked forward to the next year, when we 
should assume the all important role of sophomores. 

The year's work was a complete success and we parted for our vacation with the intention of 
returning again in the Fall, and with a feeling of gratitude toward the faculty for their efforts in 
helping us to lay the corner-stone of our great adventure. Pharmacy. 



SOPHOMORE 37-38 

Eager to avail ourselves again of the splendid educational opportunities presented by the 
Indianapolis College of Pharmacy, fifty-five members of our Freshman class returned to school. 

We welcomed three transfer students, William Hutchinson, Herman Roller, and Robert Atkins. 
Professor Prettyman, from Butler University, became a member of the faculty at this time. 
He will share the responsibilities of the Biology Department. 

The first few days were reconstruction days; laboratory desks were assigned and apparatus 
checked. During our spare moments we showed our authority as sophomores by making life 
miserable for the freshmen. The class being organized into two sections, the work proceeded 
smoothly, week after week going by, with a note of accomplishment on every hand. 

October found us with class officers elected and plans for social events underway. Through the 
leadership and guidance of Dean Niles all of the lady members of our class were initiated into the 
Lambda Kappa Sigma National Pharmaceutical Sorority, when Phi chapter was organized. This is 
the only chapter of this sorority in the state of Indiana. 

The monotony of the first semester was interrupted by the annual fraternity dance which was 
enjoyed by all. 

A little different type of work was taken up in which less theory and more laboratory practice 
occupied the curriculum. Many members of the class had located jobs which proved helpful in the 
class room and were encouraged by the college. 

Following the holidays, semester finals approached, bringing with them an atmosphere of sus- 
pense, fear, and wonder, according to the way in which we had conducted ourselves toward our 
preparation. 



Page thirty-two 



SEN IORS....'40 



On February 2nd, class work was resumed. The class was saddened when it heard of the death 
of Eugene Whitis, a very likeable class member and a good student. 

A few months of studying and standing in the laboratory gave us the idea that chairs were 
needed to aid in our comfort. The Dean came to our rescue, informing us the laboratory was a 
place to labor, and not to rest. Again we proceeded onward. 

As our leisure became noticeable, we anticipated heavier assignments from Professors Jeffries, 
and Michener, in their respective subjects. The Blue-Book grades show it is an established 
fact that Professor Michener's exams occur either before or after social events. 

What a relief that exams were soon over and work finished for the year. The class more than 
"welcomed this summer's vacation. 

The class of 1940 is at the halfway mark of its college career. We do not lay claim to any 
special achievement but we do feel proud of our ability to discern the true purpose of our training 
— to be of service to mankind. 



JUNIOR YEAR 1938- 1939 

The Fall of 1938 found students arriving with zest to begin their studies anew. A class of 
sixty students answered "here" to the roll call. 

We made new acquaintances with students transferring from other schools — James Mont- 
gomery, John Hemrick, Wayne Dunham, Ralph Thornburg, and William Rothwell. 

With the coming of the first month we began to feel as though we were really students and an 
intimate part of the institution. Organic chemistry was a popular subject, and how! Everyone 
worked in the laboratory, to his or her disgust at times, but Professors Michener and Patterson 
struggled to instill in our minds the belief that some day we would be real chemists. 

Many improvements and additions were made in the school. To the Junior class came the privi- 
lege of initiating new seats in the lecture room. Several offices were remodeled; and a new mimeo- 
graph was purchased. A fan system was installed in the pharmacy laboratory. A splendid im- 
provement in the library was made, when it was cataloged and reclassified by Mr. J. R. May, our 
new librarian. 

The college is very proud of the unusual display case built in the amphitheater. The case 
contains many rare and valuable collections pertaining to pharmacy. 

Our anticipation of a Thanksgiving vacation was preceded by a series of mid-semester exami- 
nations. We found many new "incompatibilities" besides those introduced by Professor Ambroz, 
our instructor in Dispensing Pharmacy. To the surprise of many, "pill-pipes" could not be ob- 
tained at the stock room. 

The sorority sponsored a dance at the Hoosier Athletic Club. It turned out to be a most color- 
ful and enjoyable occasion. 

After spending a few weeks back at school, after a delightful Christmas vacation, the second 
semester was upon us. 

The first weeks were spent like the first semester, in hard study, and we felt our time had not 
been spent in vain, and that pharmacy as a profession was going to be well worth the four years 
required to master it. 

Professors were beginning to expect us to know a little something now and then; and their 
language was becoming more and more professional as the days went by. As a whole we had 
learned when the occasion called for it, to function as a body. 

Bowling became a new activity, heartily supported by the student body. The tournament 
caused great excitement. 

We approached the end of the school year before we knew it. Our work kept us so busy that we 
allowed nothing of importance to happen that is worthy of being recorded here. 

We look forward to a reluctant parting at the end of the term, but we hope to return next 
September with higher ambitions and ideals than ever for the future. 

It is our desire to continue along these lines, and when we write the final chapter to our history 
in the year 1 940, may we say that the task is completed and well done. 



Page thirty-three 



SENIORS. ...'40 



SENIOR YEAR 1939- 1940 

On September 14, 1939, the senior class reassembled in the lecture room. There were sixty 
members in the class. We regretted the loss of three of our classmates, but this was compensated 
for by the entrance of three new students into our class. They were: Jane Smith, Gretchen Corey, 
and Melvin Wolf. 

Dr. Harwood, of Valparaiso University, became a member of the faculty at this time. He became 
a member of the Chemistry Department. 

Miss Koepper was in the office to welcome us back. She has proved our friend on many oc- 
casions. 

The first week was spent in the usual preliminaries, such as completing registration, first as- 
signments, and other organization work. The second week was the beginning of real school, 
consisting of lectures and laboratory work. Many of the students were mere novices at laboratory 
work, and their initial experience can now be looked upon with amusement. 

An air of dignity marked our carriage, but this seemed not to exempt us from many hours of 
study. 

This year we have the honor of initiating another course. Hospital Pharmacy, which has been 
added to our curriculum. It includes thirty-six hours of practical experience at the Indianapolis 
City Hospital dispensary under the supervision of Mr. Muse and Mr. Ulrich. Already this has 
proven very beneficial In our course of study. 

November 16th, mid-semester examinations began. The students seemed to realize the im- 
portance of these review exams, this being the last lap in our four lap course. 

Dr. KIrby, representing the Abbott Laboratories, presented a most entertaining lecture on 
"Detailing Your Doctor". 

Thanksgiving vacation offered us a short relaxation and everyone appeared more eager to work. 
The necessity of electing officers was felt. The following students were elected for the year: 

|oe Mendenhall..-- President 

Robert Todd Vice President 

William Hutchinson _ - Secretary 

Paul Portteus - Treasurer 

Professors Ambroz and |ones were elected class sponsors and faculty advisers. 

The class decided to issue an annual, which the Dean and class sponsors approved. After a 
stormy class meeting and much electioneering, Charles Cummins was elected editor; Don Pruitt, 
business manager; and Thomas Belton, advertising manager. They worked very diligently to 
make this annual a success. 

Christmas holidays were drawing near, and everyone was rejoicing to think they could forget 
beakers and mortars for a few days, to indulge in frolic and really get back to life. 

Semester finals caused much unrest and proved a short test for both knowledge and endurance. 
"A word to the wise is sufficient"; so we squared our shoulders and decided to make this year the 
most profitable. 

Due to the hospitality of the Eli Lilly Co., the senior class spent February 28, 1940, in a very 
enjoyable manner. The class visited the Indianapolis plant in the morning and was taken by the 
company to the biological laboratories at Greenfield, Indiana. In the evening, in the Travertine 
Room at the Hotel Lincoln, Mr. B. R. Mull was the principal speaker and gave' an interesting talk 
on "Drug Stores and Pharmacy". A show at a downtown theater followed the dinner. The trip 
was enjoyed by everyone and will long be treasured as a red letter day in our memories. 

The yearly enthusiasm for the Ping Pong Tournament was interrupted by a series of mid- 
semester exams; nevertheless, many games were witnessed by a large student body. 

Parke, Davis Co. extended an invitation to the senior class to visit their manufacturing 
plant and biological laboratories. We left Indianapolis, April 16th, traveling by train to Detroit, 
Michigan. That evening we enjoyed sight-seeing in the city. The next day was spent inspecting 
the plant and laboratories. Entertainment was provided for the group in the evening. It was a 
weary but happy crowd that returned to Indianapolis on the 1 8th. The trip was very educational 
and inspiring to every participant. 



Page thirty-four 



SENIORS. ...'40 



As this annual goes to press, the class as a whole is harried with those inevasible final examina- 
tions. June 3rd will see us in caps and gowns, acknowledging the reward that is ours in return for 
our four years of effort spent in this college. Even as we graduate we can see another black cloud 
hovering on the horizon of our ambitions in the form of the State Board Examinations. It is the 
wish of the class as a whole that each and everyone of us may successfully account for himself at 
that time in a manner that will be a credit to our Alma Mater, that has come to mean so much to 
us in these past four years. 

To our friends and fellow students we feel a debt of gratitude for the kindness and hearty co- 
operation they have extended. 

As we leave dear old I. C. P. we pause to say farewell to the faculty, all of whom have given 
generously of their time and knowledge that we might be better fitted to serve our new em- 
ployers, the public. 

DEAN AMBROZ. 



ALMA MATER 

(Tune, Annie Lysle) 

In the largest inland city, 

Dear to memory. 
Stands our worthy Alma Mater 

Great in Pharmacy. 
Raise the chorus, swell it onward. 

Loud our praise shall be; 
Hail to thee, our Alma Mater! 

Hail to I. C. P.! 



Page thirty-five 



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HAZEL ABDON 

"Babe" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Lambda Kappa Sigma; Mis- 
tura, Organization 



DEAN W, AMBROZ 

"Speedy" 
Wagner, South Dakota 

Kappa Psi; Mistura, Historian; 
Basketball; Freshman Treasurer 



R. DOYLE ARNOLD 

"Benny" 
Salem, Indiana 

Mistura, Humor; Bowling 




VIRGIL D. BAKER 

"Virg" 
Noblesville, Indiana 

Favorite c o u r s e — Hospital 

Pharmacy 



ANITA BATTISTA 

"Nita" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Lambda Kappa Sigma; Mis- 
tura; Alumni; Capsule, '39. 



JOSEPH BATTISTA 

"Joe" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Basketball; Kappa Psi; Bowl- 
ing; junior Treasurer 



y 



ROBERT M. ATKINS 

"Bob" 
Whitestown, Indiana 

Ping Pong; Favorite course- 
Dispensing 



JAMES BAGLEY 

"Jim" 
Daytona Beach, Florida 

Favorite course — Chemistry 



CARL C. BAKER 

"Bake" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Avocation — Music; Favorite 
course — Dispensing 





THOMAS N. BELTON 

"Tom" 
Greenwood, Indiana 

Mistura, Advertising; Kappa 
Psi; Bowling; Junior President 



ELWOOD A. BLOWER 

"Bobe" 
Terre Haute, Indiana 

Bowling 



ROBERT O. BLOWERS 

"Bob" 
Portland, Indiana 

Mistura, Art 



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Fage thirty-six 



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ACKY CARDARELLI 

"Card" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Kappa Psi; Junior Secretary 



THOMAS G. COERS 

"Tom" 
Shelbyville, Indiana 

Bowling; Avocation, Music 



H. TEFORD COOPER 

"White Doc" 
Westport, Indiana 

Wrestling 



GEORGE N. COREY 

"Nick" 
Terre Haute, Indiana 

Mistura, Humor; Bowling; 
Ping Pong 



GRETCHEN KLEE COREY 

"Gretch" 
Terre Haute, Indiana 

Lambda Kappa Sigma; Favor 
ite course — Chemistry 



CHARLES V. CUMAvAINS 

"Chuck" 
Paris, Illinois 

Kappa Psi; Sophomore Presi 
dent; Mistura, Editor 




MAYNEL W. DALBY, JR. 

"Bud" 
Muncie, Indiana 

Movie Fan 



JAMES L. DIXON 

"Curly" 
Bedford, Indiana 

Basketball; Bowling 



STANLEY DOBRONOVSKY 

"Dobby" 
Hammond, Indiana 

Favorite course — Pharmacog- 
nosy 



LEO A. DORN 

"Doc" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
Mistura, Art; Bowling 



WAYNE R. DUNHAM 

"Dunn" 
Nappanee, Indiana 

Senior Ping Pong Champion 



EARL H. FLETCHALL, JR. 

"Fletch" 
Poseyville, Indiana 

Freshman Vice President; Mis- 
tura, Circulation; Bowling 



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Page thirty-seven 



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FRANK E. FOSSMEYER 

"Frankie" 
Vincennes, Indiana 

Freshman Secretary; Bowling 



GEORGE M. FREIJE 

"Sammy" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Vice President; Avocation — 
Music 



ROSELENE FREljE 

"Rose" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Annual Staff; Lambda Kappa 
Sigma; Capsule Staff 



ROBERT GACKENHEIMER 

"Gack" 
Wabash, Indiana 

Bowling; Ping Pong 



GEORGE G. GRIFFIN 

"Grif" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Ping Pong; Bowling 



JOHN HEMRICK 

"Johnny" 
Peru, Indiana 

Favorite course — Dispensing 




ARTHUR HENSCHEN 

"Hench" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Ping Pong; Bowling 



JACK HILL 

"Hill" 
Hartford City, Indiana 

Mistura, Assistant Business 
Manager; Freshman President; 
Bowling 



WILLIAM F. HUTCHINSON 

"Hutch" 
Oakland City, Indiana 

Senior Secretary; Ping Pong 



GEORGE C. KIMBROUGH 

"Oscar" 
Logansport, Indiana 

Junior Vice President; Kappa 
Psi; Mistura, Prophecy; Ping 
Pong 



RUTH KNIERIM 

"Ruthie" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Mistura, Snap-Shots; Lambda 
Kappa Sigma; Sophomore Sec- 
retary 



KENNETH R. KRUWELL 

"Kenny" 
Seymour, Indiana 

Bowling; Golf 



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LUCILLE M. KUHN 

"Lucy" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Lambda Kappa Sigma; Mis- 
tura, Circulation 



CARL E. KYBURZ 

"Curly" 
Chatsworth, Illinois 

Kappa Psi; Capsule, '39; Mis- 
tura, Assistant Editor 



JOSEPH B. MENDENHALL 

"Jodie" 
Fowler, Indiana 

Senior President 



JAMES W. MONTGOMERY, 
JR. 
"Monty" 
Brook, Indiana 

Favorite course — Physiology 



RAYMOND E. NUSSMEYER 

"Pete" 
Evansville, Indiana 

Picture Committee; Bowling 



FORREST STANLEY PAULI 

"Pauli" 
Indiahapolis, Indiana 

Bowling; Favorite course - 
Economics 




ROBERT E. PIGG 

"Bob" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Mistura, Calendar 



PAUL A. PORTTEUS 

"Ans" 
Dunkirk, Indiana 

Senior Treasurer; Checkers 



WILHELM K. PRASUHN 

"Wheezer" 
Delmenhorst, Germany 

Bowling; Ping Pong; Mistura, 
Advertising 



DONALD Y. PRUITT 

"Stinky" 
Bridgeport, Indiana 

Mistura, Business Manager 



HERMAN WILBERT ROLLER 

"Hermie" 
Richmond, Indiana 

Favorite course — Chemistry 



WILLIAM JOHN ROTHWELL 

"Rocky" 
South Bend, Indiana 

Golf; Bowling 



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JUDSON A. SCHMIDT 

"Jud" 
Madison, Indiana 

Bowling; Ping Pong; Favorite 
course — Pharmacy 



JANE SMITH 

"Janie" 
Rochester, Indiana 

Mistura, Society; Lambda 
Kappa Sigma 



o 




RALPH W. THORNBURG 

"Thorn" 
Syracuse, Indiana 

Ping Pong; Tennis 



ROBERT H. TODD 

"Bob" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Senior Vice President 



ROBERT C. STAGGS 

"Budd" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Ping Pong; Bowling; Mistura, 
Society; Capsule 



GERALD EUGENE STUDLEY 

"Pop" 
Pendleton, Indiana 

Ping Pong; Bowling; Basket- 
ball 



FLORENE TAYLOR 

"Billie" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Lambda Kappa Sigma; Mis- 
tura, Art 



WILLIAM A. WILLIAMS 
"Bill" 




^^tmt 





RAY L. URICH 

"Ureca" 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Bowling 



OMER F. WAGAHOFT 

"Wag" 
Lake City, Illinois 

Golf; Baseball 



MELVIN JOSEPH WOLF 

"Wuff-Wuff" 
Chicago, Illinois 

Basketball; Ping Pong 



Indianapolis, Indiana 
Photographic Chemistry 



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Page forty 



SENIORS. ...'40 



RH YM I NOLOGY 

Hazel Abdon Dark hair, sparkling eyes, 

Like a goddess in disguise. 
Dean Ambroz Good manners and a smile, 

Things always worth while. 
Doyle Arnold Here's a bright, deserving lad. 

As fine a friend as you ever had. 
Robert Atkins A transfer student of one year past, 

We're glad he stayed until the last. 
James Bagley _ He who pushes shall reach his goal 

'Ere day is done to take its toll. 
Carl Baker Quiet in manner, always the same. 

He's headed on the road to fame. 
Virgil Baker Very dependable is he. 

He never shirks, as you can see. 
Joseph Battista _ Big cars, a nurse, a drug store, too. 

Assets that'll never make Joe blue. 
Anita Battista Vim, vigor and vitality 

Combined with personality. 
Tom Belton.- A likeable, intelligent lad, 

His success in life will make us glad. 
Elwood Blower Never caught with a solemn thought, 

A frown from him could not be bought. 
Robert Blowers "An artist, you say?" Just take a look. 

He designed the cover of this book. 
Acky Cardarelli If flunk we must. 

In God we trust. 
Tommy Coers _ After playin' in Joe Sanders' band. 

He chose to be a Pharmacy man. 
Teford Cooper Rare simplicity, soft in speech. 

But his "jitterbugging" is some technique. 
George Corey.-. With a big smile and a friendly way 

Nick goes on, day after day. 
Gretchen Corey _ _ To find success we all must work. 

To win this goal, I will not shirk. 
Charles Cummins : Smart as a whip and full of fun. 

Thanks to him, the Annual's done. 
Maynel Dalby He is bound to make you grin. 

It's the comical way about him. 
James Dixon _ Happiness, friends, and that's not all. 

He's mighty handy with a basketball. 
Stanley Dobronovsky Dignified of manner, sober of mind, 

Always polite, thoughtful and kind. 
Leo Dorn He week-ends south, so I've learned. 

There must be a gal concerned. 
Wayne Dunham ...Ping Pong wizard of the school. 

At this game he's no man's fool. 

Earl Fletchall ...An independent, happy chap. 

We're sure he'll land in Fortune's lap. 
Frank Fossmeyer "He walked into the lobby, twirled his stick. 

The girls all cried. He's sure some trick." 
George Freije When in class there's some uproar. 

Look for George, he's sure to score. 
Rose Freije She and George are twins you see. 

And a closer pair there couldn't be. 
Robert Gackenheimer ...Strong and silent, I would say. 

Once a track star, up Wabash way. 
George Griffin Always that twinkle in his eye. 

Never without the will to try. 
John Hemrick Well liked by all, watch this name, 

Few years 'twill take to bring it fame. 



Page forty-one 



SEN IORS....'40 



RH YMI NOLQGY 

Arthur Henschen In the classroom he always scores 

His favorite sidekick — Tommy Coers. 
Jack Hill- As serious as the day is long, 

You'll find he never does things wrong. 
William Hutchinson His togs are of definite scheme, 

His work is held in high esteem. 
George Kimbrough He makes light of favors while he plays life's game, 

Receiving while conferring, always the same. 
Ruth Knierim Best sense of humor in the class. 

Pretty and sweet, a charming lass. 
Kenneth Kruwell Kenny is liked by everyone. 

Time for work, time for fun. 
Lucille Kuhn Bright Irish eyes and fun galore. 

Her wit will sparkle, and never bore. 
Carl Kyburz--- He's a fine, deserving lad. 

Nothing ventured, nothing had. 
Joe Mendenhall _ Here's the President of our class. 

He's a worry for many a lass. 
James Montgomery Now here's a very likeable guy, 

A personality that will get him by. 
Raymond Nussmeyer Though a struggle, he does what's right. 

He'll push forward with all his might. 
Forrest Pauli _ Upon his studies he concentrates. 

But always has time to keep his dates. 
Robert Pigg Wi1-h a cheerful smile upon his face 

This boy would fit in any place. 
Paul Portteus Of pleasure he is not bereft. 

Then business if the time is left. 
William Prasuhn .- , Druggist by choice and we'll admit 

He couldn't have made a finer hit. 
Don Pruitt Don't take life too seriously 

Or it'll get you down quite mysteriously. 
Herman Roller One of those students well worth while. 

To all hard work he brings a smile. 
William Rothwell _ Born to be a "Woman's Home Companion," 

Such is the Senior Class's opinion. 
Judson Schmidt Flitting about just like a bee. 

Always busy, or is he? 
Mary Jane Smith Charming and pretty, vivacious, too. 

Favorite saying, "Rochester" anew. 
Robert Staggs Curly blond hair, light blue eyes. 

Now here's a gentleman, I surmise. 
Gerald Studley Always full of explanations. 

Eagerly waiting his vacations. 
Florene Taylor _ Her purpose is to do her best. 

Her skill will master every test. ' 

Ralph Thornburg You can always find this guy 

With his cronies from the "Y".. 
Robert Todd _.AII day long he sits and dreams, 

Not as sleepy as he seems. 
Ray Urich In the drug store many years. 

At dispensing has few peers. 
Omer Wagahoft An all around fellow from the start. 

He will not fail to play his part. 
Melvin Wolf He joined our class in thirty-nine. 

We've found him good in every line. 
William Williams He does his best, we all agree. 

We wish him well, it's plain to see. 



Page forty-two 




fA 



JUNI^KS 



CLASS OF '41 

JUNIOR CLASS HISTORY 

It was a bleak, typical September day In 1937 when the doors of the 
Indianapolis College of Pharmacy swung open wide and bade a cheery wel- 
come to fifty-four freshman students, most of them very recent high school 
graduates. To these fifty-four students just embarking on a long and hitherto 
unknown voyage, a college career seemed very necessary. It was with much 
zest and zeal that we assumed the title of "Green Freshies". 

Before many days had passed, we had become familiar with all our pro- 
fessors through their lecturing. Although we were not able to prepare a first 
class emulsion, we could make U. S. P. Simple Syrup after our first month of 
schooling, and we had a vague idea of how much water a 250 cc beaker would 
hold. 

Since no organization is complete without its executives, we held a 
caucus one day and proclaimed by secret ballot our class members for the 
positions as president, vice-president, secretary and treasurer. Professor Jones 
became our freshman class sponsor, assuming the task of guiding the plight 
of our ship through the deep, perilous waters leading us to our Sophomore 
year. During our freshman year, many students purchased class rings and pins, 
which were appropriately engraved with skull, crossbones and the letters 
I.C.P. 




Bledsoe President 

Pinella . . .Vice-President 

Webb Secretary 

Sheckell Treasurer 




CLASS OF Ml 



September, 1938, rolled around much too 
fast, but even so, we had repaired our hull 
and deck, fore and aft, mended the mainsail, 
and we were ready to lift anchor on the 
second portion of our scientific voyage. 
Most of our crew had returned from their 
summer months' vacationing, and by this 
time we had begun to realize the true sig- 
nificance and advantages of our course. So 
far on our journey we had encountered but 
little bad weather. But 'ere long we began 
to sight icebergs, atolls and huge animals 
in the form of Pharmacognosy, Chemical 
Analysis, and Manufacturing Pharmacy. 
Nevertheless, we were very willing to for- 
sake our former title of "Green Freshies" to 
be known as the "Saucy Sophomores". Pro- 
fessor Jones was again to be our class spon- 
sor, and a new group of class officers was 
installed by popular vote. It was about this 
time that we learned some of the more in- 
tricate phases of the pharmaceutical arts 
and sciences. As each day passed we gazed 
more optimistically at the horizon, for we 
knew that we soon would be half-way 
through our voyage. 

September, 1939, found our crew men- 
tally refreshed, and none the worse from 
our previous months of hard study. "Jolly 
Juniors" immediately became our nick- 
name, and jolly we were. Having passed 
our first two years of sailing the high seas 



of pharmacy with few mishaps, we were 
classed as upperclassmen. We began to 
assume the aspect of mature apprentice 
pharmacists, and we had profited immense- 
ly from our previous experience. Again we 
selected our class officials, Professor Jones 
still remaining our class sponsor and ad- 
visor. 

On the night of January 29, 1940, we 
Juniors held a class party, the first of our 
college career. Everybody present had a very 
enjoyable time. 

Each day found us all on the vigil for 
those nemeses of the sea. Organic Chemis- 
try, Materia Medica, and Dispensing Phar- 
macy, lest at some unexpected time they 
would pluck some unfortunate sailor from 
our midst. But diligent study and persever- 
ance have been ours for these last three 
years, and the remaining forty-four of our 
homeward bound class are pointing with 
anxious hands to that port of joy, accom- 
plishment and distinction — Graduation. 
Even though we still have one-fourth of our 
mythical sea venture remaining, we can 
fearlessly say that the final leg of any jour- 
ney always seems the longest, but often the 
most pleasant. 

R. Clay 
D. Aldrich 



Page forty-five 



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JUNIORS 



Darwin Aldrich 
Max Boyd Apple 
Jean Baker 
Jesse Benjamin 
Fred Bledsoe 
Bruno Bredy 
William Christoff 
Richard Clay 
Willard Cook 
Fred Comingore 
Robert Coryell 
Arthur Denison 
Eric Elson 
Louis Exiey 
Joseph Faccone 
Fred Freije 
William Garrett 
Joseph George 
William Craney 
Chester Hail 
Robert Hardy 
Joe lllingsworth 
Cicero Jones 
Thomas Kafoure 
Harold Kaplan 
Rupert Knierim 
George Kohlmeier 
Clifford Lantz 



Harold Latta 
Adele Lobraico 
Roger McGowan 
Cullen McKissick 
Deward Moody 
Harry Morehead 
Jack Norris 
Charles Pedigo 
Daniel Pielemeier 
Joseph Pinella 
Jack Poe 
Kenneth Rea 
Richard Reeves 
Quentin Ringenberg 
Hilda Sakas 
Robert Schneider 
George Sharp 
Donald Sheckell 
Ben Smith 
James Sullivan 
James Summerville 
Gale Taylor 
Richard Thomas 
Stephen Tilson 
Edward Treuchet 
Maurice Wagahoft 
Russell Webb 
Charles Weterich 



Page forty-six 



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AN ODE TO THE DRINKING FOUNTAIN 

From early morn till afternoon, 

Again between the classes, 

Around the fountain students mill 

In undistinguished masses. 

And thru the halls upstairs and down 

These thirsty students run 

Until too much of noise prevails 

And professors spoil the fun. 

Each person airs his pet dislike 

While waiting for his turn. 

The drinking fountain's quite the place 

The current news to learn. 

Byron Lucas 



Page forty-seven 



HE M I S T U 



COLLEGE DAZE 

When we study Pharmacog., 
Everything seems in a fog. 
Aloe, Ginger, Cocculus, 
About all these they make a fuss. 
But if there were no drugs to learn, 
And all the profs were cold and stern, 
You know right now where we would be; 
We'd say goodbye to I. C. P. 

In Chemistry are formulae 
We learn them but we wonder why. 
Beakers and flasks and graduates 
Solutions, salts, precipitates; 
Tests for Aluminum and Lead, 
To study these requires a head. 
The hardest blow it seems to me 
Is when we pay our breakage fee. 

And now we turn to Pharmacy 

From N. F. VI to U. S. P. 

Elixirs, powders, ointments, pills 

Spirits prepared in copper stills. 

Exams galore and mental strain. 

Doses to learn that tax your brain. 

Our only hope is looking toward 

The day we learn we've passed the Board. 

Adele Lobraico 



Page forty-eight 



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CLASS OF '42 

SOPHOMORE CLASS HISTORY 



During the early part of Septem- 
ber in 1938, the largest class of its 
time, totaling eighty-three students, 
entered the portals of the Indian- 
apolis College of Pharmacy for the 
first time — entering into the career 
and profession of Pharmacy. Four 
states of the union — Indiana, Il- 
linois, Ohio and Michigan — were 
represented by this record-breaking 
class. 

The first two weeks of school can 
truly be classified as "hectic" — new 
adjustments to be made, new sur- 
roundings, new teachers and new 
faces. Such terms as "Pharma- 
copoeia", "Sternocleidomastoid", 
"Parenchyma", etc. were mentioned 
and many of the students thought 
that these were the names of some 
of the instructors or perhaps the roll 




was being called. After the first two 
weeks though, each student was 
quickly becoming adjusted and ac- 
quainted with his new adventure. 

At last the big moment arrived — 
students would start laboratory 
work the next day. Everyone had 
been waiting for this moment, and 
now the chance had come. The lab- 
oratories were entered and here such 
things were discovered as, "Precipi- 
tation", "Theoretical Yield", "Levi- 
gation", and "Calci-nation". Also 
that glass was insoluble in the water 
running through the table troughs. 

Accounting for lecture work, new 
theories were discussed, chemical 
and botanical terms launched, and 
pharmaceutical math was entered 
into. The days were quickly passing 
by — class officers were elected, class 
pins ordered, bowling tournaments 
held, and Christmas vacation was 
now in sight. The two weeks' vaca- 
tion proved to be really restful, 
those first semester exams loitering 
in the offing. 



ROBERT ARROL 
President 

GLENN CHILDRESS 
Vice-President 

WARD SUMMY 
Secretary 

ROBERT PLUNKETT 
Treasurer 



SOPHOMORES 



CLASS OF '42 



These exams proved only another hurdle 
to be passed, and during the last few days of 
January the new term had begun. 

During the second term, the same course 
was continued with more interesting mate- 
rial boring farther and farther in. Bowling 
tournaments, basketball games, and class 
meetings were continually held and the first 
year had passed before most had really no- 
ticed. Finals were then held during the last 
of May and this was the last hurdle before 
the summer vacation. 

Came the fall of 1939, school had begun 
again and now these students were distin- 
guished sophomores. Perhaps a smaller class 
had returned, but what was lost in number 
was made up for in enthusiasm. The last 
part of September was spent in reorganizing 
and class officers were elected, basketball 
started and class parties planned. Everyone 
was busy in one way or another — Pharma- 
cognosy, Manufacturing Pharmacy, Qualita- 
tive Analysis, Pharmaceutical Latin, and 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Again the time 



was quickly passing, and Christmas vacation 
was a forgotten memory with final exams 
again staring into the faces of all. These 
were taken and the final lap of the Sopho- 
more year was started. 

Classes were nearly the same as they had 
been during the previous three semesters, 
with perhaps a few more breathing spells. 
Bowling tournaments, ping-pong tourna- 
ments, and basketball provided recreation 
during the last three months. 

The Sophomore Class wishes to express 
its sincere appreciation to the faculty, Dean 
Niles, Mr, May and Miss Koepper for their 
untiring efforts in bringing it closer to the 
goal of Pharmacy: we hope when the final 
chapters are written in 1942, that all work 
will lead to the ladder of success — 

For when that one Great Scorer comes 
To write against your name, 
He writes not that you won or lost 
But how you played the game. 

Robert Arrol 



THE 



M I S T U R 



SOPHOMORES 



David Adier 
Robert Arrol 
Charles Bare 
Harold Beaman 
Craydon Blue 
Harold Brickley 
Glenn Childress 
Harold Clark 
Robert Cossell 
Thomas Costello 
Michael Dugan 
Francis Ebbeler 
Lawrence Forster 
Robert Foster 
Joe Hancock 
Harold Hanna 
George Hardin 
Charles Hay 
William Henzie 
Charles Hinton 
Robert Holdeman 
Gerald Kruger 
William Lehmann 
Carl Leistner 
William Lillibridge 
Byron Lucas 



James Mason 
Lester Metcalf 
William Michel 
Robert Mills 
Hubert Morphew 
Charles Passo 
Charles Perisho 
Clyde Pfisterer 
Keith Pigg 
Max Piatt 
Robert Plunkett 
Donald Rogers 
Charles Rothkopf 
Charles Rozell 
William Rumbley 
Milburn Sallee 
Victor Scales 
Frank Schussler 
Ward Summy 
Victor Todd 
Omer Vornholt 
Marshall Waller 
Stephen Walsh 
James Wheatley 
William H. Williams 
Thomas Wood 



Page fifty-two 



PHARMACISTS 

IN THE 

MAKING 




HE M I S T U R 



MY UNCOLLECTED THOUGHTS 



How often I have traveled far 

In thoughts serene and new. 

And wondered what's in store for me 

When my school days are through. — 

I've thought about this future world 
And help that I could give, 
In making it a better place. 
For all mankind to live. — 

I've thought of aiding science, 
To banish and to clean 
Diseases from this earth of ours, 
So prevalent they seem. — 

I've thought of being very rich 
And never want for things, 
To care for just myself alone 
Like vain and idle kings. — 

I've thought I'd like to sail the sea 
My course set toward the sky; 
Or just to sit and dream of it 
And let the world go by. — 

I've thought and dreamed, planned and schemed, 

A million things or so, 

And pictured each and every one 

As only I will know. 

Hutchinson 



Page fifty-four 



H 



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U 



CLASS OF M3 



FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY 



On September 13, 1939, the now 
famous class of '43 was born. 
Ninety members, consisting of three 
girls and eighty-seven boys, made 
up the class. Four states and most 
of the counties of Indiana were rep- 
resented. 

The first week we were in a daze 
most of the time, what with strange 
surroundings, strange faces, and 
many a fond thought of home. We 
soon became acquainted among our- 
selves, however, and found that our 
professors were not the ogres of 
our imagination, but real human be- 
ings like ourselves. 

Due to the illness of Dean Niles, 
Professor Ambroz, who had met 
most of the freshman students dur- 
ing registration, introduced the pro- 
fessors to the freshman class. The 



professors in turn introduced us to 
the worlds of Botany, Chemistry, 
Pharmacy, English and Pharmaceu- 
tical Mathematics. 

Soon the need for organization 
arose and the following members of 
our class were chosen: Marvin 
Archer, President; Don Murphy, 
Vice-president; Joyce Roesch, Secre- 
tary; and Henry Kyburz, Treasurer. 

A committee was appointed to 
select our rings and pins. They 
were made specially with the school 
emblem in an attractive design. 

The Freshmen held their first 
class party December 18, 1939, in 
the school social room. Cider and 
doughnuts were served as refresh- 
ments and a good time was enjoyed 
by all. 




MARVIN ARCHER 
President 

DON MURPHY 
Vice-President 

JOYCE ROESCH 
Secretary 

HENRY KYBURZ 
Treasurer 



''^-wtm. . T^f^ 







FRESHMEN 



CLASS OF '43 



At noon on December 20, 1939, 
the class disbanded for Christmas 
vacation. On January 2, 1940, the 
class reassembled and began to pre- 
pare for final examinations. 

On January 29, the class, now 
made up of eighty-one members, be- 
gan second semester work with two 
new subjects, namely Chemical 
Mathematics and Physiology. 

During the month of February the 
class began planning a freshman- 
sponsored dance for the college to 
be held sometime in March. The 
dance was held on March 28, with 
a large attendance including most 
of the faculty. 

During March and April a ping- 
pong tournament was held in which 



the freshman class entered more 
members than any other class and 
made a good showing. 

In the latter part of April the Bot- 
any class went on a field trip to Fort 
Benjamin Harrison, for the purpose 
of coming in closer contact with 
plants in their natural environment. 

The class is now eagerly (?) 
awaiting the FINALS to be held in 
the latter part of May, hoping 
against hope that we will all return 
next September as Sophomores. 

Joanne Brown 

Harry Mills 

Richard Niles 



Page fifty-seven 



H 



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U 



R E S H M 



N 



Kent Agan 
Marvin Archer 
John Bannister 
Betty Barce 
Edward Bell 
Robert Bell 
Bernard Bennett 
Clarence Bowman 
George Bradford 
James Bradley 
Joanne Brown 
Paul Brown 
Louis Bumb 
Lee Burris 
jep Cammack 
Ross Carpenter 
James Cox 
Elmer Crozier, Jr. 
Wjncel Daugherty 
Donovan Davis 
John Daywalt 
Ben Dock 
Lester Dorris 
Ellsworth Eaton 
William Ellis 
Richard Frazier 
Hobart Free 
Don Cillaspy 
Harold Goodwin 
Robert Griffy 
Charles Hatley 
Duane Heiny 
Robert Hickman 
Frank Hood 
Robert Hoover 
Charles Jones 
Floyd Kaiser 
Sidney Kemper 
Roland Kennedy 
Robert Kichler 



Paul Kiewitt 
Fred Kirsch 
John Klujsza 
John Knox 
William Krogh 
Henry Kyburz 
Clifford Lemmon 
Martin Liddy 
Harold Mann 
Kenneth Mann 
Elbert Matchett 
Everitt Merritt 
Leroy Miller 
Harry Mills, Jr. 
James Mitchell 
Kenneth Moody 
Don Murphy 
Clarence Myers 
Richard Niles 
John Nimz 
Charles Orr 
Isaac Passo 
Stanley Redman 
Norbert Riedman 
Joyce Roesch 
Donald Schmink 
Harry Schwartz 
Linton Shonkwiler 
Charles Sides 
William Skelton 
Ralph Smith 
John Smitherman 
Don Staats 
Herman Steinkeler 
Henry Stickan, Jr. 
Clarence Trice 
Charles Voyles 
Louis Walker 
Edward Wilson 
Robert Yocum 



Howard Young 



Page fifty-eight 



HE M I S T U 



THE ROMANCE OF PHARMACY 



From the complicated science of pharmacy and chemistry as we know 
it today, we sometimes stop to wonder how this all began. As we delve into 
the matter we find it has a simple, yet a quite unbelievable, beginning. 

Physicians and pharmacists were formerly the same. Later, as the art 
of medication grew, a differentiation began. Alchemists sprang into being. 
Their occupation was called Alchemistry, and its origin has often been asso- 
ciated with early evidences of the importance attached to gold. In short, it 
was an attempt to turn all the baser metals into the noble metals. 

This later developed into the search of the Elixir of Life which was 
sometimes called the Philosophers' Stone, and was depicted as a panacea for 
all human ills, capable also of restoring youthfulness and prolonging life. Not 
only was it supposed to possess these qualities but also to change all base 
stones into precious ones and soften every kind of glass. 

The designations of the stone and the accounts of its appearance are 
innumerable. It was often assumed to exist in different orders or degrees of 
perfection. 

Through the centuries alchemy gradually was replaced by scientific 
chemistry as we know it today. The dying spark of the alchemic torch had 
lit the flame of a new chemistry, which arose Sphinx-like from the ashes of 
the old. 

T. Cooper 



Page sixty 



A 



FOR MY MISTURA 

To pay for my Mistura 

I've been scraping like a hyena 

Every penny, nickel and dime 

I'm saving until the time 

When the last installment's due, 

Then I'll have a yearbook, too. 

C. C. 



Page sixty-two 




-^ 



c 



/ 



/ 



l- 



/ 



/ 



/ 



^ 



s 




TH E STAFF 

Early in our senior year, Dean Niles expressed a desire that we publisin 
"The Mistura", the senior yearbook of progress. The Senior Class responded 
immediately and the faculty selected the skeleton staff to begin work at once. 
The important task of Editor-in-Chief was placed rightfully upon the capable 
shoulders of Charles Cummins. Don Pruitt was selected as Business Manager 
and Thomas Belton was placed in charge of advertising. 

These students were capably assisted by Carl Kyburz, Jack Hill, and Leo 
Dorn in their respective positions. This staff in collaboration with Dean Niles 
selected the remaining staff. These students were selected because of their 
individual interest and ability in their special field. We wish to thank the 
entire class, the faculty, and the student body for their splendid co-operation 
and assistance in helping to publish this book. 

Carl Kyburz 



The student gets the book, 
The school gets the fame. 
The editor gets the worry, 
The staff gets the blame. 



Page sixty-four 



MISTURA STAFF 



CHARLES CUMMINS CARL KYBURZ 

Editor Assistant Editor 



DON PRUITT 
Business Manager 



JACK HILL 

Assistant Business 
Manager 



DEAN AMBROZ 
Historian 



DOYLE ARNOLD 
Humor 



THOMAS BELTON WILHELM PRASUHN 



Advertising 
Manager 



LUCILLE KUHN 

Circulation 



GEORGE COREY 



ROBERT BLOWERS FLORENE TAYLOR 
Art Art 



JANE SMITH 
Society 



ROSELENE FREIJE 
Calendar 



ROBERT STAGGS 
Society 



GEORGE 
KIMBROUGH 



Prophecy 



Assistant 

Advertising 

Manager 



EARL FLETCHALL 
Circulation 



RUTH KNIERIM 
Snapshots 



LEO DORN 
Art 



HAZEL ABDON 
Organizations 



ANITA BATTISTA 
Alumni 




^sJm^ .liM Jl 



Page sixty-five 



T P 




HISTORY OF THE "CAPSULE' 



It was in the early spring of 1939 
when three persons combined their 
efforts and established "The Cap- 
sule", which was to become the of- 
ficial student publication of I.C.P. 
These persons were Dean Niles, Pro- 
fessor Patterson, and Darwin Aid- 
rich. The purpose of this paper is 
not only to describe the student 
and college activities, but also to 
create a friendly and cooperative 
spirit among the students. The task 
of editing it was placed mainly in 
the hands of the students. 

With these things in mind, the 
editors proceeded to select three re- 
porters from each class, and The 
Capsule was well on its way toward 
publication. 

The first issue of The Capsule 
appeared April 5, 1939, and it 
was received with much enthusiasm 
by the student body and faculty 
alike. For the first time in several 



years it became quite apparent that, 
in addition to the cooperative spirit 
among the student body, there was 
also ample and adequate literary 
ability among the students. 

Four issues were published during 
the remaining months of 1939 
spring quarter. Since its first issue, 
The Capsule, a four-page publica- 
tion, has shown a continual improve- 
ment with each issue. The editors 
believe that its primary purpose has 
been fulfilled, and that it has borne 
its duty well. We hope that The 
Capsule will always remain a part of 
the school life of I.C.P. 

The reporters for the year 1939- 
40 were: Robert Bell, Ross Carpen- 
ter, William Krogh, Robert Staggs, 
Roselene Freije, Craydon Blue, Har- 
old Clark, Byron Lucas, Richard 
Clay, Max Boyd Apple, Hilda Sakas, 
and Darwin Aldrich. 



Page sixty-six 



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^ Jk 




FRIENDS 

"Make new friends, but keep the old, 

These are silver, these are gold. 
Friendships that have stood the test, 

Time and change — are surely best. 
Brow may wrinkle, hair grow gray, 

Friendship never knows decay. 
For 'mid old friends, tried and true. 

Once more we our youth renew, 
Make new friends, but keep the old. 

These are silver, these are gold." 

H. H. 
R. Staggs 



CAPSULE 



Paffe sixty-seven 



HE M I S T U 



HISTORY OF LAMBDA KAPPA SIGMA 
SORORITY 



Lambda Kappa Sigma was organized under the name of Lambda Kappa 
Society at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, Boston, on October 14, 
1913. 

In 1916 the name was changed to Lambda Kappa Sigma and during the 
next year the local society took steps to nationalize the sorority, becoming 
Alpha Chapter, upon the organization of several chapters in other schools. 

The council of Alpha Chapter conducted the affairs of the Sorority from 
1917 until May, 1922, when a graduate Grand Council was organized. This 
council served the national sorority until 1926 when the first biennial was 
held in Boston. The constitution as revised in 1925 provided that at this 
convention there should be three members-at-large elected instead of four. 
At the 1932 biennial the constitution was revised to include the office of 
Editor and eliminate the six year member-at-large. 

The first copy of the "Blue and Gold Triangle" appeared at the 1926 
biennial and was published annually until 1930 when it was changed to a 
quarterly. All life subscriptions are placed in an endowment fund, the interest 
of which is to be used for publication of the Triangle. 

Successive biennials have been held in Chicago, 1928; San Francisco, 
1930; Philadelphia, 1932; Chicago, 1934; Boston, 1936. 

The flower of Lambda Kappa Sigma is the yellow chrysanthemum; the 
colors are old gold and blue. 

October 14 of each year is set aside as "Founder's Day" which is uni- 
versally observed. Each chapter provides a special program in commemoration 
of the founding of the sorority in 1913. Appropriate messages should be sent 
to each of the living founder members of the individual chapters. 

March 15 of each year is "Hygeia Day", when the first woman phar- 
macist, according to Greek Mythology, is honored. Hygeia was the goddess 
of health and daughter of Aesculapius, the god of healing who not only 
healed the sick and wounded, but even brought the dead back to life. The 
preparing of the medicine ordered was left to the charming Hygeia, who in 
works of art is portrayed as a youthful and beautiful woman, clad in long 
flowing robes in the act of feeding a serpent from a shell. A purely scientific 
and professional program is suggested for observance of Hygeia Day, includ- 
ing a reunion of graduate members. 



Page sixty-eight 



LAMBDA KAPPA SIGMA SORORITY 
PHI CHAPTER 



During the college year 1936-1937. the 
women students at the Indianapolis College 
of Pharmacy desired to form a chapter of 
Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority. Through 
correspondence, we learned that we must 
first have a well organized local sorority. 

In the spring of 1937, a meeting was 
held at the College of Pharmacy, and with 
the cooperation of Dean Niles the Cinchon 
Sorority was organized. A con- 
stitution and by-laws were 
adopted and the following offi- 
cers were elected: president, 
Ruth Knierim; vice-president, 
Roselene Freije; secretary, 
Florene Taylor; treasurer, Lu- 
cille Kuhn. The regular meet- 
ing day for the sorority was 
the third Thursday of each 
month. 

After the summer vacation regular meet- 
ings were resumed in October, 1937. It was 
decided to have two monthly meetings. The 
first meeting was to be on the first Friday 
of each month at the College and the second 
was to be held in the homes of the sorority 
members on the third Sunday afternoon of 
each month. 

The Cinchon Sorority then had a mem- 




bership of thirteen including ten active 
members. 

In January our sorority extended its ac- 
tivities and a publicity committee and an 
entertainment committee were appointed. 
The activities of the sorority continued 
throughout the year. The American Chemi- 
cal Society held a dinner in the Social Room 
of the college in which the sorority mem- 
bers helped serve. The Sorority 
gave a dance at the Hoosier 
Athletic Club and everyone en- 
joyed themselves. In April the 
sorority gave a dinner in the so- 
cial room of the college. One 
hundred fifteen attended. 

In April our secretary wrote 
to Mrs. Dirstine to ascertain 
the details for becoming a 
chapter of Lambda Kappa Sig- 
ma. Mrs. Dirstine was very cordial and help- 
ful. It was finally decided that installation 
should take place on June fourth and fifth. 
Mrs. William H. Collins of Chicago was our 
installing officer. We found her work to be 
very inspiring and impressive, and we were 
pleased to become a member of such a dis- 
tinguished sorority. Lambda Kappa Sigma. 
Our installation dinner was held at the 
Columbia Club. 









•Jl 1 



HE M I S T U 



LAMBDA KAPPA SIGMA 



This is the first chapter of this sorority to be installed in the state of 
Indiana. 

The first officers were: president, Lois Teeter; vice-president, Ruth 
Knierim; secretary, Florene Taylor; treasurer, Mrs. Richard Teeter, 

The past officers are: president. Hazel Abdon; vice-president, Roselene 
Freije; corresponding secretary, Anita Battista; recording secretary, Ruth 
Knierim; treasurer, Adele Lobraico. 

The newly elected officers are: president, Roselene Freije; vice-presi- 
dent, Lucille Kuhn ; corresponding secretary, Anita Battista; recording secre- 
tary, Florene Taylor; treasurer, Adele Lobraico. 

The officers and members of Phi Chapter are proud to be a part of such 
an outstanding national pharmaceutical Sorority. It is our desire to conduct 
our lives so as to be a credit at all times to the high standards and efficiency 
which its ideals have impressed upon us. 



Pacje seventy 



HE M I S T U 



DOING OUR PART 



For four years now, we've been to school, 
To gain our share of knowledge. 
In Pharmacy, and other things 
Of learning in this college. 

Each year we come and do our part. 
And then our friendships vary. 
At first, it's Tom, or Phil, or Joe, 
And next it's Lee or Larry. 

We sometimes had to look around 

On Prof's our fate befell. 

For some we thought were prudes or pains 

Really turned out swell. 

Each one of us must do our part. 

In this school's expectation; 

And fill our lot; where'er the spot; 

After graduation 



So now our days are numbered. 
In life we'll find a place, 
Where we can do our little bit; 
To help the human race. 



W. Prasuhn 



Page seventy-one 



^ 0" 1^ 



•^# -%#^ 



KAPPA PS I FRATERNITY HISTORY 



Kappa Psi Pharmaceutical Fraternity was 
founded at the Medical College of Virginia 
on December 1 5, 1 879. The organization 
was the first Creek letter society established 
in the colleges of pharmacy in the United 
States. It is a strictly pharma- 
ceutical fraternity with mem- 
bership limited to Colleges of 
Pharmacy. There are two 
classes of chapters, viz., col- 
legiate and graduate. The 
chapters of both classes have 
equal rights and privileges. The 
governing body, called "Alpha 
Chapter" or the Grand Coun- 
cil, is first on the chapter roll. 

Total Chapters: 89 (Colle- 
giate Chapters, 53 ; Graduate 
Chapters, 36). Total member- 
ship: 12,395. 

The fraternity is divided into fifteen 
provinces. It publishes its Constitution and 
By-Laws; The Agora, an esoteric publica- 
tion which contains the directory and which 
v/as published annually from 1903 to 1910, 
since then every five years: The Mask, a 




periodical, issued every month during the 
college years from 1903 to 1910, and since 
then issued quarterly; and a song book. 

The Fraternity is governed by "Alpha 
Chapter" or the Grand Council which has 
met in annual conventions 
from 1879 to 1908. until 
1922 biennially, and since 
then every four years. During 
the interim between sessions, 
the administration of the fra- 
ternity affairs is in the hands 
of the Grand Officers. The 
provinces meet in conventions 
during years other than na- 
tional convention years. 

The Fraternity colors are 
scarlet and cadet gray. The 
flower is the red carnation. 
The badge is diamond shaped, 
displaying a mask raised from the face 
on the black enamel center. The Greek 
letters "Kappa" and "Psi" appear one 
above and one below the mask. The eyes 
on the mask and the border of the badge 
may be jeweled. 



Page seventy-two 



THE MISTURA 

KAPPA PS I 
BETA UPSILON CHAPTER 

Beta Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Psi originated from a local fraternity 
called Psi Chi Psi which was founded in January, 1929, through the efforts of 
the faculty. Junior and Senior members of this school. On February 26, 1930, 
Psi Chi Psi was installed as Kappa Psi. Dr. Darbaker, of the University of 
Pittsburg, National historian of Kappa Psi, officiated with the aid of Mr. 
Painter from Louisville College of Pharmacy and our own beloved Professor 
Jones, who hails from Xi Chapter at Ohio University. 

There were twenty charter members of whom three were facultate, 
namely: Dean Niles, Professor O. G. Anderson, and our deceased brother, Pro- 
fessor Edward F. Wagoner. 

Officers for the first term were: Chas. R. Rogers, Regent; James A, Sul- 
livan, Vice Regent; Oliver G. Anderson, Secretary; and Larry Lamborne, Treas- 
urer. Under the guidance of these worthy men Beta Upsilon Chapter soon 
moved forward. New members were added and social activities were started 
consisting of banquets, parties and other forms of diversion. It was from this 
strong foundation that Beta Upsilon has grown to what it is today, one of 
Kappa Psi's outstanding chapters. 

At the beginning of the year 1931 Beta Upsilon organized a basketball 
team that was destined to hang up a great record for the Old Rose and Cadet 
Cray. 

In November, 1932, initiation was given to eight new members and 
Professor Ambroz transferred from Tennessee. A formal banquet was held 
in their honor at the Hotel Lincoln in the Lincoln Room. 

Many outstanding dinners and dances have been held since then which 
will long be remembered by everyone. 

Beta Upsilon has as its aim all that is good and honorable in Pharmacy 
and pledges its sincere support to the Indianapolis College of Pharmacy and 
all its projects. 

The officers for 1 939 were: president, Charles Cummins; vice-president, 
Tom Belton; secretary, George Kimbrough; treasurer, joe Battista; historian, 
Darwin Aldrich; sergeant-at-arms, Acky Carderelli; chaplain, Dean Ambroz; 
faculty advisor. Professor Jones. 

The present officers are: president, Robert Arrol ; vice-president, Dar- 
win Aldrich; secretary, Roger McCowan; treasurer, Richard Clay; historian, 
Harold Brickly; sergeant-at-arms, Robert Hardy; Chaplain, Willard Cook; 
faculty advisor. Professor Jones. 

The present membership stands at twenty-two. Three new members 
have been received since the start of the 1939-40 school year. There are five 
faculty members. Dr. Harwood being the latest faculty member to join our 
ranks. 

Beta Upsilon chapter has had a total of one hundred and sixteen mem- 
bers, which includes eighty-eight graduate members. 



Page seventy -three 



HE M I S T U 



A PHARMACIST IN THE MAKING 



Take four fine full grown school terms, see that they are thoroughly 
free from bitterness, rancor, flunked exams, and sleepless nights; cleanse them 
completely from all freedom and enjoyable evenings. In short see that these 
four years are freed from all the past — have them as fresh and clean as when 
they first came from the great storehouse of time. 

Divide all these months into twenty-eight or twenty-nine school days. 
Do not attempt to make up the entire batch at one time, as often the whole 
lot is ruined in this manner. But prepare one day at a time in the following 
manner: 

Into each day put twelve parts of study, eleven of work (some people 
omit this ingredient and spoil the flavor of the rest) , ten of Chemistry, eight 
of Pharmacy, nine of meditations of exams, seven of Biology, six of hope, five 
of fidelity, four of rest (omitting this is like leaving out the acacia from an 
emulsion) , three of prayer, two of desire to succeed, and one for good luck. 

If you have no conscientious scruples, add two grams of good spirits, one 
fluid dram of folly, forty grains of play and q.s. with good humor. Pour into 
a mortar ad libitum cum vigorous agitation. Percolate thoroughly with bril- 
liant heat. Garnish with smiles and a sprig of joy to cover disappointment and 
failures. Submit to trying examinations and the board of Pharmacy, serve 
with cheerfulness and the graduation of an earnest, willing Pharmacist is a 
certainty. 

C. K. 



Page seventy-four 



HIAWATHA GOES TO PHARMACY 
COLLEGE 

If you ask me, whence my story? 
Whence the legend of the druggist, 
With the odor of his drugstore, 
With the pills and salve of healing; 
With the sound of grinding mortars, 
And the herbs and roots he's gathered; 
With the druggist's work to aid you ; 
As with care his service renders. 

I should answer, I should tell you: 
From the forests and the prairies; 
From the cities across the ocean, 
From the legends of Greece and China; 
From the lore of ancient Egypt, 
From the skill of priests and doctors. 
Comes the oldest of the health arts, 
Comes our choice of all professions. 

Said the father — "Hiawatha 
Co ! My son, to Pharmacy School ! 
Seek for thee a trained profession. 
Mingle with the learned and learning." 
To our college he did hasten 
All alone walked Hiawatha. 
Proudly with his books and mortars; 
Proudly with his graduates and Arny. 

You shall hear how he, our hero 
Worked with care and with precaution; 
Learned the valence and the symbols 
Learned to balance his equations, 
Conquered his Math and Botany, 
Conquered his "heap big" U.S. P. 
He learned the dose of every drug. 
He learned their use; from whence they come. 

As Sophomores it was Quant, and Qual. 
Organic Chem. he loved them all; 
He studied plants and Pharmacog. 
Studied each native plant and herb. 
Learned the art of drug dispensing. 
Learned the skill of the Pharmacist. 
With his pills and powders folded, 
With his art of prepared tinctures. 

Our druggist is a Senior, now 
He has finished his Pharmacy, 
To these gray walls he says adeiu — 
State Board exam we have in view. 
By the effort of these four years. 
And by their joys and by their tears: 
Registered druggists we soon shall be 
Hiawatha left I. C. P. 

Carl Kyburz. 



Page seventy-five 



SOC I ETY 



Since we, as studious Freshmen, under- 
took to become ethical pharmacists, it has 
been our esteemed custom to have our time 
for play. It seems we did not outdo our pred- 
ecessors, but let it be known we were over- 
shadowed. To all those who made our so- 
cial calendar possible we extend our sincere 
appreciation. 

It was on the night of November 11, 
1936, that we showed our right to brag. 
The Indiana Vagabonds furnished very ap- 
propriate music for the dance held by Kappa 
Psi at the Hoosier Athletic Club. It was 
noted some of the boys had too much on 
their hips and became quite lippy, much to 
the amusement of others. 

December 1, 1936, started a series of so- 
cial gatherings in the school. Students were 
invited to come and spend those weary eve- 
nings. Card games and the now-outlawed 
Bingo were played by those attending. 

The highlight of this series was the 
gathering held before we wayward sons de-' 
parted for the Christmas holidays. Dean 
Niles furnished refreshments and prizes, 
and also added great dignity to the occasion. 



Dan Cupid started members of our class 
trotting to the altar on May 1 0, 1 937, when 
Virgil Baker and Rosemary Decker took the 
holy vows. The ceremony took place in the 
little gray church on the Monument Circle 
with the Rev. Powell officiating. 

On May 18, 1937, Kappa Psi gave 
a dance at the Hotel Washington for the 
survivors of the well-known "Hell-Week". 
The new members were further initiated 
into the mysteries of the fraternity while 
partaking of a sumptuous repast. Music 
was furnished by a String Ensemble. 

The saddest event of our school career 
was the death of Eugene Whitis, a beloved 
member of our class. Truly a credit to oui 
class, Eugene passed away on November 
3, 1937. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lee Whitis of Indianapolis, and a graduate 
of Washington High School of Indian- 
apolis. 

Due to restlessness of the students in 
general. Kappa Psi sponsored a gala dance 
at the newly decorated Hoosier Ath- 
letic Club on the night of November 17, 
1937. 



Page seventy-six 




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The student body was invited, as well as 
any alumni who wished to refresh old mem- 
ories. AM members of the handsome sex 
were decked out in their very best, and from 
the array of fair damsels one was reminded 
of a beauty contest. Jack Berry's Orchestra 
furnished the music to which one group in- 
sisted on doing the "Big Apple". 

"The little man who wasn't there" again 
stepped into our ranks taking into his fold 
of marriage Stanley Dobronovsky and Ida 
May Marsh. The new year was just twenty- 
two days old when he returned to his coup 
de grace. Where those stogies are is still a 
question unanswered. 

Newly initiated members of Kappa 
Psi were entertained at a dinner dance May 
12, 1938 in the Riley Room of the Claypool 
Hotel. Faculty members of the fraternity 
and alumni were among the guests present. 
Although not officially confirmed, it is said, 
we quote, "Certain frat brothers should be 
taught the difference between siesta and 
fiesta". 

While others were on vacation, William 
Hutchinson began a life of marriage with 
his bride, E. Bella Jones, at the Meridian St. 
Methodist Church on July 27, 1938. Miss 
Jones is a Hoosier imported from Oakland 
City. 

The newly organized Lambda Kappa 
Sigma Sorority, with Miss Lois Tetter as 
president, staged their first dance at the 
Hoosier Athletic Club on November 26, 
1938. The uniqueness of this affair will 
well be remembered. To the delight of the 
eyes of many a gentleman were the Rosalyn 
girls in their stunning dances and ah-so- 
shapely figures. Music was in the swing-and- 
sway rhythm of Art Berry's Orchestra. After 
the dance many a couple was seen at the 
rendezvous on the Pendleton Pike enjoying 
a snack or a snip. 

After bargaining and arguing as to where 
and when. Kappa Psi held a dance in the 
Cold Room of the Hotel Antlers on October 
6, 1938. As the slapping of that bass floated 
out of reach of our almost numb ears, 'twas 
the sweetie of Earl Roush who entertained 
the crowd with musical selections on the 
glass tumblers of an unbreakable variety. 
Earl's duck, it is said, possesses a mania for 
smashing glasses and we have come to the 



conclusion she is a distant relative of Carrie 
Nation, famous smasher of windows of the 
gay nineties. 

The aftermath of one of those so-publi- 
cised "Hell-Weeks" was held and celebrated 
on May 5, 1939 at a dinner dance in the 
Claypool Hotel. The newly elected mem- 
bers of Kappa Psi, six in number, enter- 
tained the guests by impromptu descrip- 
tions of the process of cleaning Monument 
Circle with a toothbrush. Walking Around 
the Monument backwards, and what have 
you, etc., etc. This delighted the members 
of Lambda Kappa Sigma, who were the 
guests of honor for the occasion. 

Ferris Corey, of the class of '37, being on 
the Pharmacy side of life, took one of the 
fairer members of our class, Cretchen Klee, 
to be his bride on June 1, 1939. It may be 
said they started the ball rolling for a very 
good season, as others in our midst followed 
shortly, before returning to the grindstone. 

As was predicted and whispered, "The 
little man" reappeared on June 1, 1939 to 
tie Gerald Studley and Evelyn Hancock to- 
gether with his famous and secret matri- 
monial knot. Even Stud does not remember 
how it was tied, nor does he care, according 
to informed circles. 

It may be said by some members of our 
class that a word well chosen brings the 
best results. As proof they give you the 
marriage of Omer Wagahoft and Mildred 
Lingeman which took place on August 31, 
1939. It may not be admitted by Waggle, 
but it is likely he was talked into his marri- 
age by certain old timers in our class. 

It came to pass on the night of October 
29, 1939 at the Hoosier Athletic Club that 
we, as seniors, lost to a very worthy oppon- 
ent in the art of whooping it up. We alibi 
that our four years have deprived us of that 
old ability to outdo both younger and older 
attendants at the dances of previous years. 
Our defeat was due mainly to certain mem- 
bers of the Freshman Class, being very ex- 
pert in the swingiest version of Jitterbugging 
two eyes could behold. It is time we passed 
unto you. Freshman Class, that famous Lov- 
ing Cup presented by the Lambda Kappa 
Sigma for the class with that old ability to 
swing. 



Page seventy-seven 



H 



M 



U 



One of the most enjoyable days we have 
spent in our entire school career was on Feb- 
ruary 28, 1940, when we were invited to 
visit the plant of Eli Lilly & Co. A special 
convoy of buses took us to the Indianapolis 
plant on that snowy Wednesday morning. 
At the plant we were most cordially wel- 
comed by Mr. Eli Lilly, president of the con- 
cern. The class was divided into small 
groups with individual guides to show us 
points of interest. At noon the class reas- 
sembled and a group picture was taken. 
Then, to our delight, we had dinner on the 
house in the dining room. Our bus convoy 
returned and took "we 60" to the biological 
plant at Greenfield, where demonstrations 
of methods of obtaining vaccines and anti- 
toxin were given. We then returned to In- 
dianapolis and vv'ere taken to the Hotel Lin- 
coln. At the banquet held in the Travertine 
Room, Mr. B. R. Mull was the principal 
speaker, and acting as toastmaster was none 
other than Mr. Eugene Beaseley, Indian-, 
apolis District sales manger for the Eli Lilly 



& Co. A theatre party followed at a down- 
town show. 

As this year goes gliding along, January, 
February, March, April, in the order named, 
we seniors look forward to two things. First, 
we have been invited to take a trip, not to 
see the country, but to go to Detroit and 
ramble through the large plants of Parke, 
Davis & Co. If all goes well April 17th is the 
day. To complete this picture of pleasure, it 
is with good will that we leave our Alma 
Mater to become wayward sons. 

So now we send our copy to be corrected 
by that old Simon Legree, the Editor-in- 
Chief. We've lost a few hairs, more sleep, 
and burned the midnight oil 'till three, try- 
ing to get this column done before the lash 
starts to swing. If there is anything left 
when he is through we can say it was Janie 
Smith and Robert Staggs who "done it". 

R. Staggs 
J. Smith 



SOLDIERS Gr SAILORS 

Soldiers and sailors all are we. 

Fighting life's battles and sailing life's sea. 

But marble to heroes and shafts to might, 

Reared unto beauty and passing sight, 

Tell not of valor oft worthy the more 

Than graven legend and bloody lore; 

Who conquers self — though no trump 

sound, 
Nor shaft arises — true fame has found. 

H.H. 



-'age seventy-eight 



BASKETBALL 



SCHEDULE 



Pharmics 18 

Pharmics 21 

Pharmics 31 

Pharmics 22 

Pharmics 23 

Pharmics 22 

Pharmics 30 

Pharmics 31 

Pharmics 23 

Pharmics 31 

Pharmics 30 

Pharmics 79 

Pharmics 39 

Pharmics 20 

Pharmics 31 

Pharmics 29 

Pharmics 25 

Pharmics 50 

Pharmics 24 



Indianapolis Bankers 27 

Hoosier State Commercial 33 

Dental College 39 

Indianapolis Art Academy 33 

De Molays 7 

Lincoln Chiropractors 26 

Dental College 22 

Indianapolis Bankers 25 

Indianapolis Art Academy 41 

Lincoln Chiropractors 13 

Dental College 22 

De Molays 21 

Lambda Nu Fraternity 35 

N. C. A. C. U 51 

McNiel's Lunch 18 

Hoosier State Commercial 21 

Weidemanns 32 

Dental College 26 

Men's Shop 40 

Won 1 Lost 9 





BASKETBALL 



Of the athletic program at I. C. P., bas- 
ketball plays the most important role. Any 
student interested in the game is entitled 
to strive for a position on the team, and all 
are urged to play. Students from each class 
played on the team for the past season of 
1939-1940. 

The "Pharmics" started out slow dur- 
ing the early part of the season, being 
stopped by the Indianapolis Bankers, Hoos- 
ier State Commercial, Indianapolis Art 
Academy, and the Dental College of I. U. 
Extension before gaining momentum to 
forge ahead. They came back strong, 
though, seeming to have hit mid-season 
stride by winning six of the following eight 
games. Some of the teams bowing to the 
Gold and Purples were the Indianapolis 
Bankers, Lincoln Chiropractor School, Den- 
tal College, Lambda Nu Fraternity, McNiels 
Lunch, and Hoosier State Commercial. 



Of the high-lights, the "Pharmics" met 
the N. C. A. G. U. Gymnastic College, but 
were turned back due to their superior oppo- 
sition, who demonstrated more experienced 
and more polished ball handling. 

Next came the City Tournament in which 
the "Rx's" won the first round but were 
defeated in the second round by the Weide- 
manns to the tune of 32-25. 

It can well be said that all members of 
the team entered into the "spirit of the 
game" and cooperated throughout to show 
that all of the playing was entirely for the 
love of the game. 

Thanks of appreciation must also be 
given to Bill Fink, coach, and Prof. Jones 
for their untiring effort of maintaining a 
team to measure up with the ones during 

the past now lost in the pages of 

yesterday. 



Page eighty 



H 



M 



U R 



PING-PONG 



Occasionally, in the course of diligent 
pursuance of the pharmaceutical arts and 
sciences, it becomes necessary in the eyes 
of most students to indulge in the slam- 
bang game of ping-pong or table tennis. So 
when March rolled around, we proceeded to 
dust off the tables and nets and prepared to 
engage in a few intramural games. 

We had not held a college ping-pong 
tourney since 1938 when Aldrich, then a 
mere freshman, took the honors by defeat- 
ing Ulrich, a senior ping-pongist. So we 
were all anxious to fight it out for the cham- 
pionship again this year. A total of 64 stu- 
dents, including one coed, signed for the 
tourney, and play began to determine the 
one student of those 64 who would reign as 
ping-pong champion for a year. 

To make it more interesting, each class 
held its own playoffs. The ultimate winners 
of each class then got together in a "tourna- 
ment of Champions" to determine the grand 
champion of 1 940. 

In the freshman class playoff, the favor- 
ites soon appeared to be Niles, Archer, Ben- 
nett, Krogh and Passo. Competition waxed 
stronger and stronger as the tourney pro- 
ceeded, and by the time the field was re- 
duced to two, the remaining players were 
Niles and Passo, the slight darkhorse. 
Passo proved his ability by defeating Niles 
in 3 of 5 close games for the freshman 
championship. 

The sophomore tourney found Jones and 
Adier fighting it out in the finals. Adier, by 
winning 3 of 4 games from Jones, was 
crowned the sophomore class champion. 

The junior tournament produced such 
players as Pinella, Clay, Knierim, George, 



Baker, and the defendingchampion, Aldrich. 
When this tournament had ended. Aldrich 
still remained the junior class champion by 
defeating Pinella in three straight games in 
the final match. 

Among the favorites in the senior class 
were Belton, Griffin, Wolf, Ambroz, Dun- 
ham and Arnold. Dunham and Belton met 
in the final match, and Dunham came 
through by virtue of 3 victories out of five 
games. 

Now for the big playoffs involving the 
four class champions. A glance at the four 
remaining exponents in the art of paddle 
wielding shows that Passo, Adier, Aldrich 
and Dunham met in the match which was 
to establish the I. C. P. champion. 

In the first match Dunham found Passo 
not resistant enough to his cross court 
slams, the result being 3 victories to one in 
favor of Dunham. 

In the second match, Aldrich and Adier 
fought for nearly an hour before Aldrich 
succeeded in winning 3 of the 5 closest 
games ever seen at I.C.P. 

Now we saw Aldrich, the Junior cham- 
pion and defending champion of I.C.P., 
matching his shots with Dunham, the driv- 
ing Senior champion and challenger. To the 
winner went honor and prize. To the loser, 
compliments and solace for his gallant 
showing and defeat. 

In the 40 minutes of brilliant play by 
both boys, Dunham took the lead 2 games 
to 1, only to lose the last 2 games by close 
scores. Thus another page in the history of 
ping-pong was written, with Aldrich the 
I.C.P. ping-pong champion of 1940, and 
Dunham, the runner-up. 



Page eighty-one 



HE M I S T U 



IN ASSAY LAB. 

To Assay Lab the Seniors go, 
Between the burettes row on row 
That mark our place while overhead, 
The ether fumes congest our head. 

Finish the sample 'ere you go; 
To you from failing hands we throw 
Methyl orange — be yours to try; 
If first you fail — be not dismayed 
For alkaloids must be assayed. 



Page eighty-two 



HE M I S T U 



FIGURE THIS OUT 



Theory — Senior Class of 1940 is the star class of I.C.P. 

Given — Fifty-nine Seniors. 

Prove — These form the star class in I.C.P. 



Proof: 



We the Senior Class: 



Have the best officers. Look up previous records. 

Have the largest graduating class. Ask any Senior. 

Are the most generous. Stroll around the office. 

before a make-up exan 

Are the best losers. Plenty of experience. 

Best inventors of perfect alibis. Ask the Faculty. 

Best class spirit. Yea! Gang, let's go. 

Most brilliant. Look at the grades. 

Cannot be equalled. Perfection at its peak. 

Ah heck you know it anyway so why go on. 

Therefore: Senior Class is the star class of I.C.P. 
No other suppositions possible. 



Page eighty-four 



FEATURES 



THE MASTER'S GIFT 

After sitting here for hours and using up 

the time, 
We find it isn't just a snap to write 

a little rhyme. 
It's more than putting words in place and 

taking out a few. 
It's more than thinking up a plot 



It's the Master's gift to you. 



Arrol 




Page eighty-five 



HE M I S T U 



SEPTEMBER 

Monday 1 1 — School begins. No classes. Much ado about registration. Dean 
Niles seems to have an ample supply of Freshies. 

Tuesday 12 — Last day of registration for Juniors and Seniors. Many students 
still arriving at I. C. P. 

Wednesday 13 — School begins for sure for the underclassmen. Professor 
Jones welcomed the Seniors back and introduced his subject, Bacteri- 
ology. 

Thursday 14 — Dr. Harwood, an addition to our Chemistry Department, was 
formally introduced today. He hails from Valparaiso College of Phar- 
macy. 

Friday 15 — School begins for sure, all the Seniors were present today. 

Saturday 16 — The class feels that they are going to get along very fine with 
Professor White; he says he doesn't believe in examinations. 

Monday 18 — Professor Prettyman gave an introductory talk in Bacteriology 
Laboratory. Everyone votes he knows his stuff. 

Tuesday 19 — Dean Niles has not returned to I. C. P. as yet, this semester, 
due to illness. Professor Ambroz introduced Dean Miles' Economic 
course. 

Wednesday 20 — Senior Notice: Pill rolling class lasts till 5:00 o'clock to-day 
— and every day. That's hard to swallow. 

Thursday 21 — Incidentally, jane Smith is back with us this year. We're glad 
to have your smiles, Janie. 

Friday 22 — The feminine sex is making a grand debut this year, thirteen 
Blushing Beauties. 

Saturday 23 — What is the Senior class so interested in to-day? I know, 
11 :50 A. M. 



CALENDAR 



Page eighty-six 



HE M I S T U 



Monday 25— The second week of school begins to-day. The seniors are 
beginning to get the swing now, like a rusty gate. 

Tuesday 26— Joe Battista has assumed the role of the "sleeping beauty" 
again this year, A case of Brawn versus Beauty. Beauty lost! 

Wednesday 27 — Rose Freije came decked out in a new bonnet to-day. Vege- 
tables can be worn as well as eaten. 

Thursday 28— Due to short laboratory period to-day the seniors are cat-nap- 
ping till time to go home. 

Friday 29 Miss Jane Smith brought her "out of town" boy friend to school 

to-day. Who is this new competition, Janie? 

Saturday 30 — Professor Michener gave the first exam, of the semester in Drug 
Assay. Seniors believe he means business. 

OCTOBER 

Monday 2 — Miss Adele Lobraico is coming along nicely now. She is recover- 
ing from injuries she received in an automobile accident last May. 

Tuesday 3 — Biochemistry examination. Whew! My molecules were never 
that complex. 

Wednesday 4 — Professor Jones considers putting beds in classrooms since a 
certain member of the class is unable to get his usual sleep. 

Thursday 5 — Professor Michener asked the class how a solution on his desk 
could absorb water. Chuck Cummins said it might rain. 

Friday 6 — Mr. Prasuhn gained consciousness in nothing flat to-day. The 
stimulus was an economics question. 

Saturday 7 — These Saturday morning classes are plenty tough for the Freije 
twins, it seems they can't get here (together) at eight o'clock. 



N D A R 



Page eighty-seven 



HE M I S T U 



Monday 9 — Bacteriology examination to-day. Tine girls are griping about 
Monday tests again.' Generosity at its best. 

Tuesday 10 — Dean Niles interrupted a perfect day by scheduling an Econo- 
mics examination. 

Wednesday 1 1 — The senior class has some photographers this year from the 
looks of those carrying candid cameras. 

Thursday 12 — Fire Department interrupted Dean Niles' Economic Class while 
trying to stop a small blaze in the coal yard behind the College. 

Friday 13 — Even though to-day was Friday, the 13th, Seniors had a Biochem- 
istry exam. The results confirmed the calendar. 

Saturday 14 — Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence class was small this morning. If 
you snore, stay at home. 

Monday 16 — Professor Prettyman informed his class that roll call at 1:00 
sharp doesn't mean "your dice" or "call your shot". 

Tuesday 17 — Todd, an habitual class sleeper, was awakened by Professor Pat- 
terson. Was his face red. 

Wednesday 18 — From the appearance of the make-up exams it seems that 
the price should be reduced to a "Party Rate". 

Thursday 19 — Professor Michener expressed his disgust for the Senior class 
by using the term "Phooey". Don't lose your dignity. Professor. 

Friday 20 — Miss Hazel Abdon underwent an emergency appendectomy to- 
day. This was a surprise to all the class as she was in school yesterday. 

Saturday 21 — The senior sorority girls are giving the boys the old song and 
dance about a "shindig" to be held soon. 

Monday 23 — It seems as though, wherever Florene is seen, we see Dean 



CALENDAR 

Page eighty-eight 



HE M I S T U 



Ambroz. Maybe it's romance! 

Tuesday 24 — Economics Examination invitation issued by Dean Niles. We 
accepted. 

Wednesday 25 — Senior Class meeting with election of new officers. Men- 
denhall elected President. 

Thursday 26 — Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority threw their "Rat-race". The 
Freshies won two out of three falls. 

Friday 27 — We wonder why Lucille Kuhn and Ruth Knierim aren't buzzing 
around with the I. C. P. boys anymore — somebody must have slipped in 
a ringer. 

Saturday 28 — Mrs. Gretchen Corey certainly doesn't waste any time on Sat- 
urday morning. Friend husband awaits in Terre Haute. 

Monday 30 — Little Leo a-Dorn-ed his Papa's new Buick to-day. 

Tuesday 31 — Halloween — but the only ghost around I. C. P. is Elmer, the 
skeleton in the Botany Laboratory. 



NOVEMBER 

Wednesday 1 — Dean Niles convinced most of the seniors that a great many 
items sold in a grocery store as food are really drugs. 

Thursday 2 — The class got a real Pep Talk on Drug Assay from Professor 
Michener. The topic of conversation was that word, "Why". 

Friday 3 — Senior Assay Lab. Procedure: Assay of Methenamine. Results: 
"We're Dancing with Tears in our Eyes". 

Saturday 4 — Biochemistry Lecture — New topic. Carbohydrates. Professor 
Patterson says, "Be sure to study your sugars over the week-end, boys". 



A L E N D A R 

Page eighty-nine 



HE M I S T U 



Monday 6 — Miss Abdon is back in school again after her appendectomy. 
Hazel said, "No special design, just a straight incision". 

Tuesday 7 — Dalby says, "Be specific in your lectures". Rothwell says, "No 
difference, I'll take down anything". 

Wednesday 8 — A new seating arrangement was observed during an examina- 
tion to-day — must be an efficiency test. 

Thursday 9 — What a mess! Sixty seniors all pouring Sulfuric Acid from a 
one gallon stock bottle. 

Friday 10 — Rain drenched all hope of class being dismissed in favor of the 
Shortridge-Tech football game. 

Saturday 11 — Mid-semester reports — 'nuff said. 

Monday 1 3 — Class was dismissed to-day so some of the Professors could go 
to the above mentioned football game. 

Tuesday 14 — A red letter day — if you know what we mean. 

Wednesday 15 — Who's the microbe that's retaining the ladies in Bacteriol- 
ogy Lab. of late? 

Thursday 16 — Dr. Kirby from Abbott Laboratories delivered an excellent talk 
to the Seniors and Sophomores. 

Friday 17 — First basketball game of the season was played by the I. C. P. 
Champs. They lost to the Indianapolis Bankers, 28-23. 

Saturday 18 — Class resolves to buy Barraster White a new coffee pot; he 
failed to show again to-day. 

Monday 20 — Class was held in a different lecture room, due to an interior 
decorating job which created a miniature dust storm. 



CALENDAR 

Page ninety 



HE M I S T U 



Tuesday 21 — First issue of the "Capsule" was distributed. Needless to say 
the Seniors made the front page. 

Wednesday 22 — Short classes to-day due to the Thanksgiving vacation. Port- 
teus is looking forward to the usual brass band and Mayor's personal 
greeting upon his arrival at Dunkirk. 

Thursday 23 — "Thanksgiving"! No school Friday and Saturday either. 

Monday 27 — Many vacant seats to-day. Maybe some of us fellas can't 
stand too many Thanksgiving "Hot-dogs ". 

Tuesday 28 — Had to chew paraffin in order to collect saliva for a Biochem. 
experiment. Some of the things we do! ! ! ! 

Wednesday 29 — Boys all decked out in their new clean cords. Clean did we 
say? But not for long. 

Thursday 30 — This is the day a Republic-can enjoy Thanksgiving. 

DECEMBER 

Friday 1 — A few little Indians stacked the chairs in the class room to-day — 
the result; a pow-wow lecture — on the floor. 

Saturday 2 — Professor White must have gotten that coffeepot. He surprised 
us all by being here on time to-day. 

Monday 4 — The Big Chief has plucked a few feathers from the Little Indians 
to-day. Little Indians heap 'shamed, too. 

Tuesday 5 — Our Mr. Griffin is asleep again. He is one fellow who can get 
more out of a lecture asleep, than awake. 

Wednesday 6 — Senior Class meeting to-day. General griping greeted the an- 
nouncement that dues would be fifty cents per month. Same to be ex- 
tracted (slow method) by the class treasurer. 



A L E N D A R 

Page ninety-one 



HE M I S T U 



Thursday 7 — Judson (Confucius) Schmidt say, "Better do your Christmas 
shopping to-day, who knows but what tomorrow will be Christmas". 

Friday 8 — George Corey and Frank Fossmeyer were aided by a few members 
of the class in getting their corduroys dirty. 

Saturday 9 — Professor Michener is still after those who are not up on their 
lab. work. Evidently the forty hour week is in effect. 

Monday 1 1 — "Pete" Nussemeyer has started a new fashion for men. He is 
wearing one blue sock and one green. Maybe "Pete" is color-blind. 

Tuesday 12 — Lucille Kuhn has taken up ice skating in a big way, so we hear. 
Who put those skids under you, Lucy? 

Wednesday 13 — Farmer Pruitt seemed sort of muley to-day; he spent most 
of the period backing his row of chairs away from the wall. 

Thursday 14 — Drug Assay Exam, and the class feels confident that Professor 
Michener has surely uncovered a new science. 

Friday 1 5 — From the looks of the review questions given by Professor Patter- 
son, the Seniors say the next Biochem. exam will be a "honey". 

Saturday 16 — It seems as though Arnold would like to teach the Drug Assay 
for Professor Michener, or is just guessing at the answers as usual. 

Monday 18 — Tommy Coers says, "One would think I'm the good earth, from 
all the foot prints on my yaller britches". 

Tuesday 19 — Only one more day of school left in good old "39". 

Wednesday 20 — Christmas Holidays begin at 5:00 P.M. Wonder what Pro- 
fessor Jones, Miss Abdon, and Miss Freije received from Santa Claus to- 
day in school? 



CALENDAR 

Page ninety-two 



HE MISTURA 



1940 



JANUARY 

Tuesday 2 — A New Year — seems the class has made a resolution to get here 
— and on time, too. 

Wednesday 3 — Class work was resumed after Professor Jones proceeded to 
awaken a few members of the class. Boy! Some guys are persistent. 

Thursday 4 — Class was interrupted when two cars had a street brawl outside 
the class-room. 

Friday 5 — Mr. Fletchall came to school dressed like Esquire to-day. You can 
leave out the "popped eyes", of course. 

Saturday 6 — Two senior girls learned that a pipette only holds so much, and 
you can't swallow the rest. 

Monday 8 — The lecture room was warm enough for the windows to be opened 
to-day. A paradise for a soap salesman. 

Tuesday 9 — Acky Cardarelli had on a new suede jacket to-day. He said it 
was a Christmas present from the "little lady". 

Wednesday 10 — The boys missed the girls to-day. Mr. Overly of the Better 
Business Bureau entertained them with a lecture, so it seems. 

Thursday 1 1 — Professor, "When you leave, pile your last night's work on the 
desk". Meaning, of course, our lab. book for the last couple months. 

Friday 1 2 — Miss Adele Lobraico, a Junior, is back in school after being absent 
for six months due to an accident. 

Saturday 13 — Carl Kyburz is back in class after an appendectomy. Carl says, 
"Suture self about the nurses". 



A L E N D A R 



ninety-three 



HE MIS T U 



Monday 15 — That 165 pounds of fighting wild-cat, Portteus, came to school 
with a bandaged hind paw this morning, 

Tuesday 16 — Good news Chillun; the final exams are about here!! What, 
no response?? 

Wednesday 17 — Dean Niles has included some Math, in his Economics 
course. A brilliant idea, Dean; we certainly need it. 

Thursday 18 — 4 below to-day. Students as well as daisies don't bloom out in 
this kind of weather. 

Friday 19 — Jane Smith and Cretchen Corey have formed a team to cry on 
each others shoulders about the number of semester hours they have 
to carry next semester. 

Saturday 20 — Professor Michener says, "All Seniors not up in their lab. work 
see me before to-day or take it over next year". 

Monday 22 — Bacteriology Final. Easy now, Professor, these microbes are 
delicate. 

Tuesday 23 — Biochemistry Final. Easy to swallow, but sorta hard to digest. 

Wednesday 24— Economics Final. All Democrats get 2% to start on. 

Thursday 25 — Drug Assay Final. We get three days vacation between semes- 
ters, if, and when, we get this final written. 

Monday 29 — Last semester of school started. Registration but no classes. 
Class is prepared for a lot of hard work. Junior Class gave a party at 
school. 

Tuesday 30 — Classes started right off the bat with Professor Michener wast- 
ing no time. He gave a laboratory experiment which lasted until 5:00 
P.M. 



N D A R 



Page ninety-four 



HE M I S T U 



Wednesday 31 — Professor Ambroz gave the class some pointers on what was 
expected of a Senior. Class felt that "A word to the Dumb was suffi- 
cient". Satan wasn't a half a mile away — phew!! 



FEBRUARY 

Thursday 1 — It seems as though Professor Ambroz's talk yesterday really 
affected the class. Everybody was on time and ready even if they didn't 
go anyplace. 

Friday 2 — Ambroz plus surprise exam equals "Blue World". 

Saturday 3 — Seniors had their first touch of Hospital Pharmacy by Dean 
Niles. Lab. started off by sealing ampuls. George Corey filled his stirring 
rod instead of his ampul. 

Monday 5 — Pledges of Kappa Psi are certainly supplying the student body at 
I.e. P. with candy and gum as a result of Hell Week which just started 
to-day. 

Tuesday 6 — Professor Michener for a change wanted to get rid of most of the 
class by 3:00 P.M. In order to check laboratory equipment with a few 
of the students he had Sammy Freije stay until 5:00 P.M. to keep him 
company. 

Wednesday 7 — Senior Party, everybody made mud pies out of their Cam- 
phorated Brown Plaster. Ho-Hum, social life is such a bore. 

Thursday 8 — Professor Michener says the hard way to clean a pipette is by 
"turning it inside out". Dean Niles gave a short summary of what the 
class may expect on the State Board. 

Friday 9 — Chem. review — the difference between red and yellow Phosphor- 
ous is that red is red and yellow shouldn't be worried about. Ho-Hum 
(again), must be the weather. 



N D A R 



Page ninety-five 



HE MIS T U 



Saturday 10 — We heard that a group of our Freshmen and one of the senior 
girls took a trip up to the Northern part of the state. Miss Anita Bat- 
tista wasn't in any of the classes, could it have been you, Anita? 

Monday 12 — School was excused since it was Lincoln's birthday. If you be- 
lieve this I'll tell you another one quick! 

Tuesday 13 — Unlucky day, school anyway. 

Wednesday 14 — Math, review. We hear Fossmeyer eats this math, stuff up; 
it ate the rest of the class up. Why don't we come out of this slump? . . 

Thursday 15 — Portteus made his debut with a shiner! Debut among the 
debris. How crude, my, my — ! 

Friday 16 — Class meeting. Plans open house for the laity — then we laity 
down to sleep through Chem. Review. 

Saturday 17 — "Danny Boy" Fossmeyer left his pants at the door (he was 
shooting craps with Wolfe) . The barrel was furnished through the cour- 
tesy of the Coca-Cola Bottling Works. 

Monday 19 — Prof. Ambroz: "You only have 26 question sheets so I'll hand 
out a few more to-day". 

Tuesday 20 — Freshmen subscribed for 51 copies of the Annual. Thanks to 
the Freshmen for their help. 

Wednesday 21 — Surprise! The lights went out during Prof. Ambroz's Ad- 
vanced Pharmacy Examination; it was so dark in the room that the class 
was dismissed. Quote — that was the one exam that I knew, such luck. 
Unquote. 

Thursday 22 — Economics examination. Prof. Ambroz said he hoped that 
the Dean would not have as much bad luck as he did yesterday. 

Friday 23 — The class certainly appreciates this: Prof. Jones "padding" his 



A L E N D A R 



Page ninety-six 



HE M I S T U 



Toxicology lectures to cover fifty minutes just to spoil a ping-pong 
game. 

Saturday 24 — Chuck Cummins pronounced "fiscal" as "physical" in reading 
a question in Economics. Chuck almost had Dean Niles on the wrong 
track. 

Monday 26 — Professor Jones announced that all Seniors must have their 
pictures taken by March 18th, 1940. He also mentioned in passing 
that this does not guarantee graduation. 

Tuesday 27 — Dobronovsky appeared in school minus his soup-strainer. 
Maybe his wife shaved it off while Dobby was asleep. 

Wednesday 28 — The class spent the day at Eli Lilly and Company, A great 
day! 

Thursday 29 — Dean Niles announced that the class is invited to visit Parke, 
Davis next month. Much favorable general discussion — Wonder who is 
going to swim the river this year? 

March 

Friday 1 — The month of March may be windy, but it won't stand up to a cer- 
tain group of seniors. 

Saturday 2 — It seems that the Saturday morning class should start at 8:15 
A.M., for the few who attended were late. 

Monday 4 — Michener was the only one to answer his roil call so he closed 
shop and went home in a huff. 

Tuesday 5 — Fletchall, Corey and Freije were run in for lecturing on the "Hog 
Law" at the corner of Illinois and Washington. 

Wednesday 6 — Dalby answered Professor Ambroz' question on the percent 
strength of aluminum chloride as follows: "People who smell like a goat 
on a radiator need to use a stronger solution". 



A L E N D A R 



Page iiivefy-seven 



HE M I S T U R 



Thursday 7 — The class was shown a movie on a new anesthetic — Pentosal 
Sodium through the courtesy of the Abbott Laboratories. 

Friday 8 — Tom Belton and Joe Battista didn't sit next to each other to-day — 
Who has got whose goat and can't get rid of it? 

Saturday 9 — Exam in hospital pharmacy — Quiet please, Mr. Thornburg is in 
room .050. 

Monday 1 1 — George Kimbrough demonstrated that one can get scales from 
a pill tile as well as from a fish, but not nice green iron scales. 

Tuesday 12 — "Kiss me again" Todd says, "these technicolor problems 
are nerve wracking; blonde one's aren't square and brunettes take me 
around in circles. 

Wednesday 13 — Most everyone had their pitchures took. 

Thursday 14 — Make-up exam in Drug Assay announced for the future — and 
he don't mean paint and powder. 

Friday 1 5 — Mr. Swanson of Eli Lilly & Co. started his series of lectures in Bio- 
Assay. 

Saturday 16 — Fossmeyer muscled into Economics class 35 minutes late and 
woke the rest of the class. 

Monday 18 — Chuck Cummins says, "these Monday exams sure tear into my 
weak-end". 

Tuesday 19 — Who's who. Professor Prettyman was auctioned into the 3.98 
club as Esquire. 

Wednesday 20 — Esquire, quote, "Put your Hart into this exam men, use your 
Schaefers, and I'll give you no bad Marx". 

Thursday 21 — Get out your Easter bonnets, with the ribbons eaten off it 
kids, and we will take a powder — I mean home for Easter .... 



A L E N D A R 



Page ninety-eight 



HE M I S T U 



Friday 22 — zzzzzz' *zz — Oh you blissful sleep; same for Saturday and Sun- 
day. 

Monday 25 — Mid-semester exams. 

Tuesday 26 — More exams. 

Wednesday 27 — Dr. Dadget of Merck and Co. gave a talk to the class on 
"Drug Containers". 

Thursday 28 — The class turns over a new leaf again. That completes our 
eighteenth volume. 

Friday 29 — Art Henschen took the old one-two-three to-day; Organic to the 
chin, Pharmacy to the plexus, and Organic again, right on the button. 

Saturday 30 — Anita Battista looks as fresh as a Daffydil this morning — could 
be. 

APRIL 

Monday 1 — April Fools' Day — but there is one consolation — that there will 
not be any exams for a couple of days. 

Tuesday 2 — Professor Michener says that he wants the class to bear in mind 
that sources of error in chemistry laboratory does not include dirty 
equipment and careless measuring. 

Wednesday 3 — Lambda Kappa Sigma Dinner and the chicken wasn't burned. 
It gets better every year. 

Thursday 4 — "A tared powder paper is not a torn one." — Michener 

Friday 5 — Just another hundred questions today — This racket had better be 
good when we are able to capitalize on the above. 

Saturday 6 — 8:00 class at 8:30 again. Even the Dean doesn't get here until 
8:15 anymore. Stick around Dean Niles, we'll start at 9:00. 



N D A R 



Page ninety-nine 



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Monday 8 — Professor Ambroz swears he will have to inject knowledge with a 
hypo-needle. Dumb aren't we professor? 

Tuesday 9 — Instructor Swanson demonstrated effects of barbiturates on 
rabbits. 



Wednesday 10 — We were informed that George Freije and several other 
members of the Class have figured out the exact number of minutes until 
graduation. 

Thursday 11 — Don Pruitt's definition for an Alterative is as follows: "An 
agent which promotes an unhealthy condition to a healthy condition". 

Friday 12 — ^Toxicology and Pharmacology exam followed by a Math. exam. 
It seems as though all the professors are trying to crowd exams in before 
the Class goes to Parke-Davis. Maybe they feel the Class will forget all 
they know after they have been to Detroit and back. 

Saturday 13 — It's rumored the girls won't cramp our style at P.D. 

Monday 1 5 — Poem- 



The Class is in an uproar, 

For from now on there will be no more; 

Tomorrow the Annual goes to Press, 

The Class's off to Parke-Davis for a two-day rest? 



m 




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A 




PROPHECY CLASS OF '40 



One day Dean Niles called me into his office and 
said, "Due to the fact that the class of 1940 has 
proven itself to be so unpredictable and utterly care- 
free, I wonder if you could prevail on the spirits to 
give a forecast of the future of each of the individual^ 
members of the class." Knowing that Dean Niles was 
in quite a quandary over the problem of who should 
graduate and who should not, I agreed to try to coax 
the spirits into a passive mood, through the medium 
of the crystal ball. 

So the plans were made, Dean Niles, all the anxious 
professors, and myself met at the college one excep- 
tionally dark night to do our deed. The rendezvous 
having been prepared, we took our places. I was to 
peer into the ball. Things happened that dark and 
mysterious night that I never thought possible. After 
many long hours of intense concentration and pleading, 
the destinies of the members of the class of "40" were 
revealed. 

At first the images appearing in the ball were too 
misty to be seen, but in time they became clearer, and 
the first objects to be seen were the figures — 1950, 
A. D. Then came the image of 

Joe Mendenhall trying vainly to fold a paper of pow- 
dered charcoal with one hand and at the same time 
drawing a glass of beer with the other. 

Next I saw Judson Schmidt still attempting to crash 
the sport pages just to have an excuse to get out of 
studying. 



through the door, with a man behind her urging her to 
hasten. Ruth seemed to have a diamond ring on her 
left hand. 

Jack Hill was shown in tails, tophat and white tie, 
selling livestock medicine to a farmer. He seemed to 
be doing pretty well at that. 

Carl and Virgil Baker were establishing an all-time 
record by having a continuous fire sale In their drug 
store for the past ten years. 

Lucy Kuhn was still hurrying from place to place. No 
wonder you didn't get any taller, Lucy. You are wear- 
ing yourself off at the bottom as fast as you grow on 
top. 

George Freije was still the little ray of sunshine. He 
entertained his drug store customers with drum solos. 

George Corey and Earl Fletchall were given the bene- 
fit of the doubt and shown to be the best of friends, 
even though they are now always at each others throats. 

Robert Todd was still recuperating from the sweat he 
had trying to get out of paying damages when he 
backed his Ford into some innocent motorist's nice new 



After much pleading, Joe Battista came forth dressed 
in a large checked suit, working in a modern drug store 
apparently his own, and spending the proceeds on the 
"big junkers". 



Upon asking as to the future of Ruth Knierim, there 
was a general "blackout", but it finally lighted up 
again. She was seen sweeping four tough years out 



Tom Belton was shown leading a very peaceful life, 
working day in and day out. It's not very exciting, but 
it sure is profitable, Tom. 



Page one hundred two 



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Two figures representing Paul Portteus and Robert 
Pigg were next seen arguing. The point seemed to be 
whether they should get a job or not. 

I saw "Pete" Nussmeyer down at Evansville doing a 
pretty good job at running a drug store. I thought he 
would still be up at the "Y" looking out the window. 
What do you suppose he saw out there? 

Frank Fossmeyer seemed to have given up Pharmacy 
and was trying to find something more profitable, and 
doing pretty well as an investor in ball pools and such. 

Maynell Dalby was shown in the pose of the 
"Thinker". He seemed to be trying to decide if his 
name was really Dalby or Dolby. 



William Prasuhn was still busy being the best soda 
jerker in the city of Indianapolis and the best listener- 
to-er of red hot dance bands broadcast by the local 
stations. 



After a blackout, I saw Ralph Thornburg still trying 
to corner a certain girl down at Bloomington. 

William Williams was having a very good time being 
the best dressed man on Indiana Avenue. 



George Griffin was shown not having done anything 
about the drug education that he got at I. C. P. All he 
did was think about "The Relation of Marriage to a 
College Education". 



The spirits had nothing to say about Cardarelli ex- 
cept — Achilloccia Cardarelli, Sodas and Drugs. 

Omer Wagahoft was still asking himself why hydro- 
gen explodes and why you must take off your pants 
after all the damage is done. This referred to the little 
incident way back when we all were a bunch of incau- 
tious freshmen. 

The spirits were very unkind to "Rosy" Freije and 
showed her working very contentedly in a drug store 
and asking herself why they taught her all the stuff 
about chemistry, pharmacognosy and such, when she 
was a student at old I. C. P. 



Bob Blowers had given up the art of Pharmacy and 
set himself up in a studio, drawing pictures for twice 
the money he'd ever got in Pharmacy. 

Teford Cooper, the smallest man in the class of 1 940, 
believe it or not, had grown to be quite a robust indi- 
vidual. 



I saw Doyle Arnold with eight class graduates in front 
of him, and in great jubilation. He had spent the last 
ten years trying to combine music with the art of com- 
pounding drugs. He can now play the scale by striking 
eight partially filled graduates with a stirring rod. 

Carl Kyburz and Kenneth Kruwell were supposed to 
own a drug store in partnership. They can now sit all 
day and play that little game in which you use four 
lines in this way ----#. 

Don Pruitt was shown with a drug store on horse- 
back, traveling around the countryside. Don gets along 
nicely with farmers. 



Gerald Studley was still maintaining supremacy in 
the art of giving wrong answers to very simple ques- 
tions. 



Jim Dixon, Leo Dorn and Robert Gackenheimer were 
still trying to figure out how they could all get into that 
old model "A" and still be comfortable. 

Melvin Wolf was shown trying to better an almost 
perfect game with the galloping dominoes. 

Dean Ambroz was doing great experimental work on 
the subject of why a minor explosion occurs when con- 
centrated sulfuric acid is poured into distilled water. 



James Bagley was shown in his big drug store up on 
Indiana Avenue. 



Elwood Blower, that high pressure salesman, was 
shown selling his own preparations. His most profit- 
able item was his former hair grower; it was then being 
sold as a depilatory preparation. 

At this point I thought that the spirits had left us, 
because as I looked mto the ball it seemed to take on 
the appearance of water. My fears were soon forgotten 
because I saw a shark swimming in the ball chasing 
a mermaid. The shark had a face like that of Bill 
Rothwell. 

After the foregoing picture faded into nothing I saw 
the image of Tommy Coers, that genial gentleman of 
swing, offering a saxophone solo as a side attraction in 
his very prosperous drug store. It's nice work if you 
can get it. 



PROPHECY 



Page one hundred three 



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Arthur Henschen was pictured as a very prosperous 
wholesaler, sitting back in his easy chair selling us 
suckers our supply of drugs. 

Stanley Dobronovsky was shown having spent the last 
ten years perfecting a cigar especially designed for 
druggists. This one won't go out when laid down. 

Herman Roller was working in a drug store, whether 
his own or not I'll never know. He seemed contented 
enough though, because as usual he was as quiet as a 
mouse. 

Bill Hutchinson was doing very nicely playing in a 
riverfront honkytonk with his Tin Pan Band. He never 
seemed to have gotten into the drug business. 

Robert Atkins was shown as chief butcher in a 
slaughter house. I wonder how he overcame his horror 
at the sight of blood. 

Hazel Abdon was shown as a first class playgirl. 1 
only tell things as I saw them. 

John Hemrick had joined the Anti-Soot League and 
was seen offering a speech from a soap box rostrum. 

Robert Staggs was still patting himself on the back 
for his wonderful imagination. He seemed to be saying 
that he didn't need a microscope to draw all those silly 
things in Bacteriology. 

Gretchen Corey was asking herself if it was necessary 
for her to go to Pharmacy School to be a good house- 
wife. 

Anita Battista, represented by an attractive figure, 
was shown keeping tab on all the boys at the Pharmacy 
School. 



Janie Smith, ten years after graduation, was still 
recuperating after that strenuous senior year at the 
Indianapolis College of Pharmacy. 

Ray Urich was arguing for the return of the barber 
shop bath tubs and the right to sing in them. 

Wayne Dunham was enjoying a position as ping pong 
coach on the faculty of the Indianapolis College of 
Pharmacy. 

Forest Pauli was shown as a very jovial individual 
with an excessively large abdomen and a very bald 
head, whistling while he works in his little drug store. 

James Montgomery was shown to own everything 
in the thriving little city of Brook, Indiana, except 
the drug store. 

Charles Cummins was looking forward with great 
anticipation to editing a record of the activities of the 
class of 1940. He seemed to have forgotten all the 
trouble he had editing the annual when he graduated. 

Just as the last of the prophecies were given, the 
dawn was breaking through and as the sun came up, 
the ball gave one last burst of color and then became 
dull and oqaque. From this I surmised that the spirits 
had left us. Dean Niles seemed very pleased that none 
of us were destined to disgrace the field of Pharmacy, 
even though some of the forecasts were not as good as 
he would have liked. If better goals are to be your lot, 
you are the ones to choose your paths. Maybe these 
forecasts are true, maybe not, only time will tell. 

Time is time and students are few. 
Time will change and so will you. 
Spirits come only in crystal balls, 
May you have success with very few falls. 



Florene Taylor was in charge of the prescription 
department in her husband's drug store. 



PROPHECY 



Page one hundred four 



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SENIOR HIT PARADE 



Abdon — "An Apple for the Teacher." 

Ambroz — "I Got to Be Where You Are." 

Arnold — "Yodelin' Jive." 

Atkins — "You'd Be Surprised." 

Bagley — "Dreamin', Just Dreamin'." 

Baker, C. — "Beer Barrel Polka." 

Baker, V. — "I Wish I Was Single Again." 

Battista, A. — "I Need Lovin'." 

Battista, ]. — "Small Fry." 

Belton — "For the Love of K. K. G." 

Blower, E. — "Gone with the Wind." 

Blowers, R. — "Careless." 

Cardarelli — "Down by the Winnie-gar Works." 

Coers — "Me and My Old Saxophone." 

Cooper — "I Been Working on the Avenue." 

Corey, George — "The Gangster's Warning." 

Corey, Gretchen — "Smarty." 

Cummins — "Little Man, You've Had a Busy Day." 

Dalby — "A Man and His Dreams." 

Dixon — "In My Solitude." 

Dobronovsky — "Hungarian Rhapsody." 

Dorn — "Dorn that Dream." 

Dunham — "Ping Pong the Witch Is Dead." 

Fletchall — "Ma, She's Making Eyes at Me." 

Fossmeyer — "Those Little White Lies." 

Freije, G. — "Crazy People." 

Freije, R. — "Rosie the Redskin." 

Gackenheimer — "On the Banks of the Wabash." 

Griffin — "Lazybones." 

Hemrick — "If I Knew Then What I Know Now." 

Henschen — "I Went Down to St. Vincent's Infirmary." 

Hill — "Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea." 

Hutchinson — "Just Plain Bill." 

Kimbrough — "It's Love in Bloom." 

Knierim, R. — "Lohengrin's Wedding March." 

Kruwell — "The Little Brown Jug." 

Kuhn, L. — "Oh, Johnny, Oh." 

Kyburz — "How They Gonna Keep Me Down on the 
Farm?" 



Mendenhall — "Just a Kid Named Joe." 

Montgomery — "When My Wifey Smiles at Me." 

Nussmeyer — "Sweet Adeline." 

Pauli — "Meet Me Tonight in Dreamland." 

Pigg — "Why Don't You Practice What You Preach?" 

Portteus — "I Wonder Who's Kissmg Her Now." 

Prasuhn — "Liberstraum." 

Pruitt — "Silver Threads Among the Gold." 

Roller — "Hesitation Waltz." 

Rothwell — "Scatterbrain." 

Schmidt — "Take Me Out to the Ball Game." 

Smith, M. J. — "The Ail-American Girl." 

Staggs — "I Cried for You." 

Studley — "Just Molly and Me and Baby Makes Three." 

Taylor, F. — "Whispering." 

Thornburg — "Margie." 

Todd — "Old Rockin' Chair's Got Me." 

Urich — "The Prisoner's Song." 

Wagahoft — "Chicken Reel." 

Wolf — "Little Joe from Chicago." 

Williams — "Between 18th and 19th on Chestnut 
Street." 



Professors' Theme Songs 

Professor Michener — "The Indian Love Call." 

Professor Ambroz — "Just a Worryin' for You." 

Professor Jones — "Moon River." 

Professor Jeffries — "Down by the Old Mill Stream." 

Professor Prettyman-;-"These Little Microbes Went 
to Market." 

Professor Harwood — "My Time Is Your Time." 

Professor Patterson — "Got No Time." 

Miss Koepper — "When Day Is Done." 

Dean Niles — "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" 

Doctor Schaefer — "I Ain't Got No Body." 

H. J. Borst — "Storedust " 

G. A. Schumacher — "Aintcha Comin' Out?" 



one hundred fivt 



WOMEN IN THE FIELD OF PHARMACY 



Pharmacy, the science which treats of the 
art and practice of compounding drugs, of- 
fers a new and interesting field for women. 
While to the laity "Pharmacy" usually con- 
veys only the routine work of the pharmacy 
or corner drugstore, the profession em- 
braces many closely allied sciences, such as: 
chemistry, bacteriology, and materia medi- 
ca. A few branches of these sciences in- 
clude the manufacturing of cosmetics, per- 
fumes, proprietary remedies and galenicals; 
the collection and identification of crude 
drugs; tests and assays for purity; and pre- 
paration of serums and vaccines. Thus 
there are many opportunities other than 
those offered to the retail druggists for 
women who pursue pharmaceutical educa- 
tion. The medical and pharmaceutical pro- 
fessions are alike open to her and await her 
successful achievement. 

There are sixty-seven schools of phar- 
macy in the United States of which the ma- 
jority require a minimum course of four 
years, leading to the Degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Pharmacy. In order to be a regis- 
tered pharmacist, the candidate must pass 
an examination before one of the State 
Boards, the requirements varying somewhat 
throughout the country. 

Women looking toward success in this 
field must be intelligent, neat, accurate, 
conscientious, honest in carrying out the 
technical requirements of their work, and 
tactful in their dealings with the public. As 
a class, women have been found to possess 
the objective measures of physical capacity, 
longevity, vitality, and endurance, to a 
marked degree; and are also gifted with a 
remarkable development of sympathy, intui- 
tion, and insight. These are all qualities in- 
dispensable in the modern struggle for rec- 
ognition in the professional world. 

One disadvantage in the admission of 
women to the practice of pharmacy has been 
the confinement during long hours, but this 
condition is rapidly being bettered due to 
the fact that many states have barred the 
employment of women after certain hours. 
Imagination of pharmacy suffering by en- 
trance of women into this field is wrong. If 
drugstores would employ more women phar- 
macists, much of the drug and cosmetic 
trade that the department store now enjoys 
would be turned to the smaller pharmacy. 



Women constitute over three-fourths of 
the shoppers, and those of the more refined 
classes will always prefer to buy personal 
items from women. 

All hospitals employ one or more trained 
pharmacists in the dispensary and many 
women are holding positions in this field as 
well as in diagnostic laboratories. Here the 
working conditions and hours are favorable 
to women. One qualification possessed by 
the majority of women, and of greatest im- 
portance in the dispensing pharmacy, is thei'r 
patience in compounding accurately. Wo- 
men pharmacists are particularly adapted to 
fill the positions in the hospitals. The 
pharmacy is often one of the show places 
of this institution and under the supervi- 
sion of a woman it usually is in more per- 
fect order, is more scrupulously clean and 
in better "showing" condition. The de- 
mand for women pharmacists in hospitals is 
increasing and is greater than the supply. 

Many department stores maintain drug 
departments, offering an opportunity for 
women pharmacists to fill managing posi- 
tions, inasmuch as it is required by law that 
a registered pharmacist be in charge of such 
divisions. When seeking a position in the 
department store pharmacy, she must meet 
the competition of saleswomen whom the 
manager can employ for a third of the 
amount that she asks, or in the prescription 
department of the store must often over- 
come the prejudice of the manager who 
seriously objects to women associates. 

Pharmaceutical manufacturing plants 
have many divisions in which women may 
find employment. The analytical depart- 
ment and the pharmacy department offer 
many opportunities. Women all over the 
United States today are concentrating their 
energies in the routine work of various lab- 
oratories. The opposite traits of men and 
women are both necessary in the scientific 
laboratory. Although the members of the 
pharmaceutical profession have been rather 
conservative in the employment of women, 
they are rapidly awakening to the realiza- 
tion that here, as in many lines of work, the 
logical distinction should be among indi- 
viduals in reference to ability, and not be- 
tween the sexes. 

ROSELENE FREIJEand 
FLORENE TAYLOR. 



Page one hundred six 



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EPHEDRI NOLOGY 



The winter months are over. Cone are 
the hard wracking coughs of bronchitis; the 
painful, wheezy breathing of asthma; the 
sneezy sniffles of a head cold. But after all, 
what has been one of the great benefactors 
— some magic substance in nose drops, nasal 
jellies, liquid or capsule form to give us re- 
lief. Would I be wrong in mentioning Ephe- 
drine as this remedy? How familiar are you 
with this drug? Who discovered the 
source? What is the history of Ephedrine? 
Therapeutic properties? Where obtained? 

Ephedra or Ma Huang is the herb of Ephe- 
dra sinica, which has been used by Chinese 
physicians for ever 5000 years. It was one 
of the drugs which is said to have been 
tasted by Emperor Shen Nung, who placed 
it in the "medium class". Probably even 
Confucius had something to say about Ma 
Haung. The Chinese used this herb chiefly 
as a circulatory stimulant, diaphoretic, anti- 
pyretic and cough sedative. In America a 
number of the Ephedra plants were used by 
the Indians for various purposes. The Coa- 
huila Indians made a cooling beverage from 
E. nevadensis and the Panamint Indians 
made bread from the ground roasted seeds 
of the same plant. 

In 1887 Nagai isolated the principle 
Ephedrine from Ma Huang while Chen, 
since 1 923, has given the drug and its active 
principles such extensive study that it is 
now one of our most popular medicaments. 
In 1924 Chen and Schmidt initiated a wide- 
spread distribution of literature listing all of 
Ephedrine's therapeutic values. It included 
its use as a stimulant to the respiratory cen- 
ter, dilation of the bronchi, palliative in hay 
fever, nasal catarrh and also used to prevent 
the fall of blood pressure that might occur 
in spinal anaesthesia. 



China was very enthusiastic over the use 
of Ma Huang in the manufacture of Ephe- 
drine. Probably this was due to the dra- 
matic circumstance that the traditional faith 
of the Chinese in one of their ancient reme- 
dies was justified by Western science. The 
natives were proud of the summer blossoms 
of their Ma Huang fields. They made a very 
efficient and productive cultivation. Then 
came the war clouds. These fields were 
seized like everything else by the greedy Ja- 
panese. No longer were the shipments of Ma 
Haung in neat compact bales. Adulteration 
increased more and more. The production 
and cultivation was careless. Many of the 
Japanese shipments of Ma Huang were re- 
fused by various pharmaceutical firms. 

In America there was much investigation 
being carried on with Synthetic Ephedrine. 
Work of this kind was important because in 
the first place should the synthetic form 
prove valuable therapeutically, it would 
greatly facilitate the question of supply, for 
now the production of the natural drug was 
inadequate to meet the demand for clinical 
uses. Secondly it was desirable to determine 
whether or not the natural and synthetic 
products had equal activity since most of 
the levo-rotary isomers are more powerful 
pharmacologically than the racemic form. 
Today a synthetic ephedrine is supplied by 
E. Merck of Darmstadt, Germany and by 
Merck & Company, Rahway, New Jersey. 

Today all of these pharmacological ques- 
tions have been answered. Qualitatively, 
quantitatively and clinically the synthetic 
form possesses all the characteristics of the 
natural ephedrine. Due to the untiring work 
of the men of science, the United States 
can now manufacture enough synthetic 
ephedrine to supply its needs. 

Robert Todd 



Page one hundred seven 



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Teford Cooper: "Dorn, did you 
take a bath this morning?" 

Leo Dorn: "No; is one miss- 
ing?" 



Stranger: "Is it an offense to catch fish 
here?" 

Jeff: "No; it's a miracle." 



Cummins (golfing) : "Con- 
found it, you nearly hit my girl, 
friend over there." 

Prof. Jones: "Did I? Well, 
have a shot at mine over here." 



Cardarelli: "Don't you think 
this full dress suit is a perfect 
fit?" 

Winnie: "Yes; almost a con- 
vulsion." 




Abdon: "Can you type?" 

Staggs: "Yes; I use the Co- 
lumbus system." 

Abdon: "What's that?" 

Staggs: "I discover a key and 
then land on it." 



Prof. Ambroz: "Cleopatra is 
one of the remarkable figures 
in history." 

Nussmeyer: (Pause.) "Is or 
had?" 



Beggar: "Have you got enough money 
for a cup of coffee?" 

Prasuhn: "Oh, I'l! manage somehow. 
Thank you." 



Dean Niles' distinction between prosperity and de- 
pression: "In prosperity we have wine, women, and 
song; and in depression we have beer, mama, and the 
radio." 



Clerk: "This book will do half your work. 
Hemrick: "I'll take two, please." 



Anita Battista: "We are in a 
pickle." 

Lucy Kuhn: "A regular jam." 

Florene Taylor: "Heaven pre- 
serve us." 



Page one hundred eight 



Jones: "This golf course is terrible, caddy." 

Rothwell; "It isn't the golf course; you got off it an 
hour ago." 



Chuck: "Did you ever read proof?" 
Hutch: "No; who wrote it?" 



Kimbrough: "It's nonsense to say brown eyes denote 
one thing and blue eyes denote another." 

Portteus: "Anyway, black eyes denote something." 



Prof. Schumacher: "If I saw a boy beating a donkey, 
and stopped him from doing so, what virtue would I 
be showing?" 

Gackenheimer: "Brotherly love." 



Prof. Schumacher: "What are the two parts of a 
sentence?" 

Dean Ambroz: "The subject and predicament." 



Kenny Kruwell said, "Pretty soft," as he scratched 
his head. 



Prof. Michener: "Did you hear about the girl and 
boy that met in the revolving door?" 

Wagahoft: "No; what happened?" 

Prof. Michener: "They started going around to- 
gether." 



Studley (at the stock room) : "Gimme fen good pill 
pipes." 

Arrol: "How many?" 

Studley: "Ten; one for each pill." 



Arnold (boasting) ; "An awful lot of girls are stuck 
on me." 

Portteus: "They must be an awful lot." 



Prof. Ambroz: "What do you know about turpen- 
tine?" 

Freije: "If you spill it on you, it feels just like a 
spirit." 



Prof. Ambroz: "Mr. Dalby, give the official defini- 
tion for prepared suet." 

Dalby (after about a two-minute pause) : "Did you 
say Doby or Dalby?" 





Prof. Jeffries: "I am now demonstrating a most dan- 
gerous experiment. If 1 am not careful, it may blow 
me to kingdom come. Draw. up just a little closer so 
you can follow me better." 



Pauli: "Is my face dirty, or is it my imagination?" 

Schmidt: "I don't know about your imagination, but 
your face is clean." 



Prof. Jeffries: "I think I'll raise some chickens this 
year." 

Hutch: "Kinda late in life for that, isn't it? You're 
no spring chicken any more." 



Dentist: "Do you want laughing gas or the needle?" 
Dobronovsky: "I gas I'll take the needle." 



Dalby: "How do they get those holes in Swiss 
cheese?" 



Prof. Patterson: "Take several warped holes and 
vrap cheese around them." 



Joe' Battista: "I don't think the photographer does 
me justice." 

Kyburz: "You want mercy, not justice." 



Prof. Jones: "Which of the pines have the longest 
and sharpest needles?" 

Hill: "The porcupine." 



Mrs. Harwood (as the ambulance took the professor 
away) : "I knew if he kept that old chem book around 
here I'd get it mixed with the cook book." 



Prof. Prettyman: "What time of year do 'the leaves 
egin to turn?" 

Atkins: "Just before exams." 



Prof. Jeffries: "Didn't you miss my last class?" 
Lucille Kuhn: "No, not in the least." 

Prof. Patterson: "What do you know about nitrates?" 
Todd: "They're lots cheaper than day rates." 



Prof. Harwood: "Waiter, are you sure this ham is 
cured?" 

Waiter: "Yes, sir." 

Prof. Harwood: "Well, it's had a relapse." 



H 



M I 



U 



A 



Judge: "Do you challenge the jury?" 

White: "Well, I think I can lick that little squirt on 
the end." 



Prof. Ambroz: "The gas in this cylinder is deadly 
poison. If it was to escape, what steps would you 
take?" 

Montgomery: "Long ones." 



Prof. Ambroz: "How many grains in a gram?" 
Blowers: "I 5.4." 

Prof. Ambroz: "How many make a million?" 
Blowers: "Very few." 



Prof. Jeffries: "How do you find the molecular 
weight of a compound?" 

Cooper: "Look in the back of the book, of course." 



Dean Niles: "What is a debtor?" 

Student: "A man who owes money." 

Dean Niles: "What is a creditor?" 

Cardarelli: "A man who thinks he is going to get it 
back." 



Prof. Michener: "Do you know why the little black- 
berry was crying?" 

Henschen: "No; why?" 

Prof. Michener: "Because its mother was in a jam." 



Tom Coers: "Who was that ladle I saw you with last 
night?" 

Tom Belton: "That wasn't a ladle, that was my 
knife." 



V. Baker: "I see the jury acquitted the guy that 
killed his employer, on the grounds of insanity." 

C. Baker: "Yes, and quite right too. Anyone who 
would kill an employer these days is certainly crazy." 



Florene Taylor: "Can this coat be worn in the rain 
without damaging it?" 

Saleslady: "Lady, did you ever see a skunk carry an 
umbrella?" 



Policeman: "How did you knock him down?" 

Pigg: "I didn't, I pulled up to let him cross and he 
fainted." 



Y. M. C. A. Sec: "Do you want the desk man to call 
you in the morning?" 

Nussmeyer: "No; I awaken every morning at 7:00 
sharp." 

Y. M. C. A. Sec: "Then would you mind calling the 
desk man?" 



Hutch: "Waiter, call the manager; 1 can't eat this." 
Waiter: "It's no use; he won't eat it either." 

Dean Niles: "Did you have the car out last night, 
son?" 

Dick: "Yes, dad. I took some of the boys for a 
spin." 

Dean Niles: "Well, tell the boys I found one of their 
silk lace handkerchiefs." 



Prof. Michener: "Elwood, do you know why the 
Scotch like basketball?" 

Blower: "No; why?" 

Prof. Michener: "Because of the free throws." 

Dean Niles: "What is political economy?" 
Pruitt: "Splitting your vote, I guess." 



Prof. Patterson: "When water changes to ice, what 
is the greatest change that takes place?" 

Thornburg: "The price." 



Dr. Schaefer: "If you don't give up drinking and 
smoking you won't live another year." 

Pruitt: "That's what you told me five years ago." 

Dr. Schaefer: "Well, I'm bound to be right sooner 
or later." 



Dunham: "Professor, taste this powder and tell me 
what you think it is." 

Prof. Michener: "It tastes like sodium bicarbonate 
to me." 

Dunham: "The label says 'Rat Poison' though." 



o 



K 



Page one hundred eleven 






u 












"^^W_ 



K.B^ 



^^^^^ 













HOSPITAL PHARMACY 



The shriek of a siren is heard, mad crunching brakes sound above the ever 
constant noise of a busy street corner. Soon after an ambulance stops at the 
entrance of a hospital. A patient is admitted, hovering betv^een life and 
death. His fate lies in the hands of three distinctly different individuals, a 
doctor, a nurse, and a pharmacist. Though they are all working for the same 
purpose, that of alleviating the suffering of the patient, yet their duties can 
not be overlapped. The doctor vi/ill diagnose the patient's case, give instruc- 
tion to the nurse, and send prescriptions to the hospital pharmacist. The 
nurse will administer the prescribed drugs and carry out the physician's or- 
ders. The pharmacist has prepared the medicaments ordered in a scientific 
manner, backed by years of training and education. It is with this latter in- 
dividual that we shall pause, and consider his importance in a hospital phar- 
macy of today. 

Why do modern hospitals employ the full time services of registered 
pharmacists? To answer this, let us investigate the requirements of a phar- 
macy department in hospitals. 

The dispensary should operate for two purposes: 

1. To render service not only to the patients but also to physi- 
cians, internes, nurses, and other members of the staff. 

2. For economy to the hospital. 

To meet the first requirement, a registered pharmacist renders service 
to the patients by filling their prescriptions with professional skill. He 
serves the physicians by being well informed on new drugs or medicinal prep- 
arations placed on the market almost everyday; knowing their constituents, 
therapeutic uses, sources, doses, etc. 

He serves internes in much the same way, but in addition is careful to 
note their prescriptions more carefully. He is a source of information on all 
official preparations, new and nonofficial remedies and standard stock solu- 
tions used in the hospitals. 

Analyzing these and many other services of an efficient pharmacy de- 
partment, hospitals have come to realize the urgent need of a registered phar- 
macist in charge at all times. 

To meet the second purpose a registered pharmacist is trained to eco- 
nomically prepare stock solutions of commonly used preparations in the dif- 
ferent departments of a hospital. He can purchase supplies, equipment, etc., 
for the better maintenance of his department and other departments, often 
at a worthwhile saving to the institution. 

A registered pharmacist is educated in Bacteriology permitting him to 
prepare sterile solutions, properly store biologicals, test sterility of prepara- 
tions, and prepare antiseptics and disinfectants. 

He is also trained in Chemistry, enabling him to recognize incompatibil- 
ilies and how to overcome them. He knows solubilities, tests for purity of 
drugs, and if necessary can even make an analysis on preparations to deter- 
mine constituents and amounts present. 

A registered pharmacist's course in Materia Medica gives him a knowl- 
edge of Pharmacology, Pharmacodynamics, quality, habitat, sources, alkaloidal 
contents, and other plant principles of chemicals and drugs used in the art 
of healing. 

These are but a few of the qualifications which enables a pharmacist to 
maintain the functions of a first class, efficient hospital pharmacy department 
at a relatively low cost. 

Anita Battista. 



Page one himdred thirteen 



H 



M 



U 




With much respect we present here a list of alumni 
dating from 1932. It is intended that these names will 
bring back as many pleasant memories to those who read 
them as they have to us who have compiled them. 

We regret, fellow alumni of years previous to 1932, 
that lack of space does not permit printing a complete list 
of the eleven hundred and fifty graduates of the Indian- 
apolis College of Pharmacy since its beginning in 1904. 



Page one hundred fourteen 



HE MISTURA 



Howard Abdon, Indianapolis - ] ^37 

Adalbert S. Albright, Madison - 934 

Robert P. Alexander, Rome, Georgia qdI 

Herman N. Amick, Columbus 1 934 

|ohn W. Archer, Indianapolis I 936 

joe Aufderheide, Indianapolis 1938 

Michael Autore, Lynch, Kentucky - 1 938 

Peter P. Bagnuolo, Oak Park, Illinois 1932 

Albert Bailey, Ossian..- 1933 

Alfred H. Baker, Sparta, Wisconsin '935 

Anthony J. Barone, Chicago, Illinois 1932 

Donald E. Bastian, Indianapolis 1 934 

Gene E. Battershell, Rossville, Illinois - 1935 

Philip Bell, Chicago, Illinois 1933 

W. Bennett Bellville, Indianapolis _ 1 936 

)ohn Bennett, Indianapolis 1932 

John W. Bever, Rushville... 1932 

Howard W. Billeisen, Indianapolis - 1 932 

Marion M. Blass, Indianapolis 1 932 

Kenneth Bogart, Rossville, Illinois 1 933 

William Bonebrake, Cutler 1934 

Harris Bontrager, Wakarusa 1938 

Bernard Bouse, Silver Lake ' 937 

Herbert L. Bradley, Marshall, Illinois 1932 

Rex Brock, Trafalgar 1937 

Neville V. Brodie, Sullivan 1 932 

Larue Brown, Terre Haute 1 932 

Oscar Brown, Indianapolis - 1 935 

Theodore H. Brown, Connersville 1 932 

John Bruner, Burket - 1936 

Dale Brunner, Wolcott - 1937 

Joseph C. Bryan, Ladoga 1 932 

Richard T. Buhrman, Kokomo - 1 934 

William Z. Burns, Indianapolis - 1 936 

William A. Butler, Indianapolis - 1 936 

Irvin Cain, Indianapolis - 1937 

Kenneth Carney, Chatsworth, I llinois — 1 937 

Ha r ley Chastain, Campbellsburg - 1933 

Spurling Clark, Nashville, Tennessee 1 937 

Marion Coffman, Indianapolis 1 938 

Joseph Cornelia, Indianapolis 1 938 

William Conner, Brownstown 1 938 

Anthony Coppi, Royalton, Illinois 1 937 

Ferris Corey, Terre Haute 1 937 

Vernard Coryell, Indianapolis - 1 937 

Amon B. Cox, Indianapolis 1 933 

Roland Creager, Indianapolis - 1 937 

Glenn Crider, Greenfield 1 938 

Lee Cromwell, Clay City - 1 937 

Homer Daubenspeck, Indianapolis 1 933 

Sydney H. Davidson, Indianapolis 1 934 

Harold L. Deckard, Sullivan '. - 1 932 

Richard Defibaugh, Indianapolis - 1937 

Jacob DeMoss, Noblesville 1938 

Bruce Dodd, Monon... ; 1933 

C. James Donnelly, Terre Haute - 1932 

Robert Depp, Indianapolis 1938 

Garold H. Echelbarger, Marion 1 936 

Arnold P. Ewing, Paris, Illinois 1932 



ALUMNI 



Page one hundred fifteen 



HE M I S T U 



Jack Figler, Chicago, Illinois _ '... 1 935 

Clifford Fiscus, Spencer _ 1938 

Emerson Fisher, Ridgeville _ 1 938 

Nathan R. Fishman, Evansville -■ _ 1 932 

Cecil M. Fitzer, Walton : 1 935 

Perley A. Ford, Hazelton _ 1 936 

Norman Fossmeyer, Vincennes 1 937 

Cecil Foster, Indianapolis '. 1 938 

Robert Fox, BicknelL. 1938 

Howard J. Fry, Greensburg _ 1 932 

Henry J. Gajkoski, Chicago, Illinois 1932 

Harold E. Gaskill, South Bend : - 1934 

Robert L. Gates, Zionsville _ 1 932 

George Ginther, Lawrenceville, Illinois _ 1 933 

Richard C. Goerlitz, Boonville 1 932 

Ernest L. Goff, Delphi 1 932 

Royal Gould, South Bend 1 933 

Fred J. Grove, Indianapolis _ 1 936 

Robert R. Gullett, Washington _ 1 934 

Harlow Hancock, Indianapolis 1 933 

Melvin Hanlin, Portland _ 1937 

Lawrence Harrison, Kalamazoo, Michigan _ I 932 

Frank Hartenstein, Indianapolis 1 932 

Eugene Hayes, Campbellsburg 1 937 

Richard Heater, Urbana, Illinois. 1 938 

Louis F. Heid, Jr., Indianapolis _ 1935 

William J. Henderson, Indianapolis ^ 1934 

Raymond Hepler, Nappanee 1 937 

Charles S. Hinshaw, Elwood... ; : 1 932 

Lehman Holzhause, Osgood .'. 1 932 

Donald W. Homeier, Indianapolis 1 935 

Edmund C. Horst, Indianapolis 1 936 

Ralph Howard, South Bend : 1 935 

Jesse F. Hudson, Indianapolis 1 935 

Robert S. Hutto, Kokomo 1 933 

Horace G. Jackson, Pendleton _ 1 933 

Eston James, Crawfordsville , 1 936 

W. Robert Jewell, Indianapolis 1 935 

H. Paul Johnson, Covington. 1 935 

George W. Jones, Indianapolis 1 935 

Solomon E. Kahn, Chicago, Illinois 1934 

Ralph Karns, Urbana 1938 

Bernard T. Kearns, Fort Wayne 1933 

Howard H. Keister, North Manchester 1932 

Robert S. Keller, Indianapolis 1 934 

Robert Keltsch, Fort Wayne....... : 1 937 

John Kennington, Indianapolis 1 937 

Thomas Kent, Jr., Indianapolis 1 935 

P. G. Kern, Fort Wayne _ 1933 

Robert Kerr, Indianapolis _ 1938 

Lawrence G. Kiewitt, Indianapolis - 1 936 

Albert J. Kircher, Freeport, Illinois 1932 

William W. Kirkham, Waukegan, Illinois 1932 

Harold F. Knarzer, Indianapolis 1 936 

Byron Knierim, I ndianapolis 1 936 

W. H. Kook, Peoria, Illinois _ 1935 

Maurice Korshak, Chicago, I llinois 1 933 

Joseph C. Kriner, Indianapolis 1935 

Frank E. Krueger, Indianapolis I 936 



ALUMNI 



Page one hundred sixteen 



HE M I S T U 



Thomas Kuhn, Indianapolis.- -. 1938 

Roy M. Lagenaur, Austin _ 1 936 

Verling P. Landis, North Manchester 1932 

Anthony Laurino, Chicago, Illinois _ 1 932 

Du Fae Lee, Clinton 1 938 

Lyell Lehman, Wakarusa _ 1938 

Fred Lieberman, Gary 1 938 

Edward Light, Indianapolis _ 1 937 

William F. Link, Paris, Illinois 1935 

John R. Lockwood, Carbondale, Illinois -. 1932 

Edward Luessow, Indianapolis 1 936 

Joseph Lyons, Indianapolis.- _ 1 937 

A. Arthur Mabel, Sycamore, Illinois 1932 

John Mann, Speedway City - -- 1 937 

William Mann, Chicago, I llinois - 1 933 

Nathan A. Mantel!, Chicago, Illinois 1932 

Lawrence Massey, Franklin --. 1 932 

Robert L. Matthews, North Vernon _ 1936 

T. Lou Maxey, Indianapolis 1 935 

C. H. McCarty, Attica _ 1 932 

Walter A. McCaughna, Bottineau, North Dakota 1932 

Thomas McConahay, Indianapolis - - 1 938 

C. Dave McKay, Indianapolis - -- 1 935 

James L. Mead, Indianapolis - 1 934 

R. Lawrence Merkel, Freeport, Illinois 1935 

Marlowe P. Miles, Franklin, Illinois 1932 

Samuel J. Mirsky, Chicago, Illinois 1932 

Ernest E. Moody, Tilden, Illinois - 1936 

Paul K. Morgan, Indianapolis : 1 936 

Wayne F. Morris, Akron _ 1 932 

Sam B. Moxley, Jr., Shelbyville, Kentucky 1934 

Charles G. Mueller, Jr., Indianapolis _ 1932 

Roger Murr, Washington 1934 

John Muse, Acton _ 1938 

Orgle E. Myers, Petersburg _.. 1 932 

Elmer Niedermeier, Evansville 1 935 

Harry E. O'Brien, Indianapolis 1 935 

Richard Oehler, Chicago, I llinois 1 933 

Albert H. Passo, Indianapolis 1 935 

Wilson T. Patterson, Franklin..;...._ 1 936 

Rex Peacher, Indianapolis 1938 

Willard C. Pegg, Richmond. _ 1 934 

Benjamin Perlman, Chicago, Illinois 1 932 

James W. Perry, Indianapolis 1 936 

Frank W. Petranek, Kankakee I 932 

John L. Petranek, Kankakee 1 932 

R. Eugene Phares, Richmond 1 936 

Samuel Pickman, Chicago, Illinois 1 932 

Wayne M. Pierce, West Baden 1932 

Richard C. Pryor, Washington 1 932 

H. L. H. Rademacher, Huntingburg 1932 

Merle V. Rawson, Kendallville 1 932 

John Ray, Madison 1 932 

Chester F. Redding, Indianapolis 1 935 

Norman P. Reeves, Knightstown _ 1 936 

Paul Reichel, Indianapolis 1938 

Arthur W. Reid, Martinsville 1 935 

Gilbert M. Reitz, Evansville 1 932 

Harold W. Repass, Carmel _ 1 936 



ALUMNI 



Page one hundred seventeen 



HE M I S T U 



George Riemenschneider, Winamac - 1933 

Ralph Ringer, Sheridan 1938 

Lou Robins, Chicago, III inois 1 932 

Rudolph Roehl, Indianapolis 1938 

Jerry Roesch, Indianapolis '. 1938 

Harry Royer, Linton _ 1 938 

Dennis R Rumble, Hazelton 1 934 

Robert S. Russell, Hannibal, New York .' 1935 

Paul E. Sallee, Greensburg 1 932 

Edgar H. Schafer, Indianapolis _ 1 935 

Leonard Schatz, Indianapolis 1 937 

William L. Scheerer, Huntington 1 934 

Delbert F. Scheigert, Indianapolis 1 934 

Edward K. Schmidt, Fort Wayne 1933 

Howard A. Schmidt, Dillsboro _... 1 935 

Reuben L. Schwartz, Chicago, Illinois 1932 

John E. Scott, Coldwater, Michigan _ '. 1932 

Richard T. Scott, Akron.. - 1 932 

Cleve Shackle, Greenfield _ 1938 

Ledgar Shank, Angola 1933 

F. B. Sharpe, Waveland... - 1 932 

Louis L. Simon, Chicago, Illinois 1932 

Ralph Simpson, Indianapolis _ 1 937 

Marjorie Smith, Rochester 1 935 

Beatrix Spohr, Indianapolis 1 937 

Walter A. Sprandel, Fort Wayne 1936 

Charles E. Stephens, Urbana, Illinois » 1935 

Arthur C. Stevenson, Napoleon 1 932 

James Stewart, Lebanon : 1 938 

Marvin L. Stewart, I ndianapolis 1 936 

Garland F. Stickler, Columbia City 1932 

Fred Stotelmyer, Newcastle - 1938 

Glenn Strafford, Indianapolis 1938 

Leo A. Sturm, Indianapolis _ 1 934 

Richard Sunkel, Paris, Illinois _ 1 938 

Lionel Takiff, Chicago, I llinois 1 933 

Donald H. Talbott, Linton 1 932 

Emmett Taulman, Crothersville _ 1 934 

Aimee Teeter, Indianapolis 1 938 

Lois Teeter, I ndianapolis _ 1 938 

R. Brandon Teeter, Anderson 1 932 

Willis Thum, Indianapolis 1937 

Milford E. Toopes, Huntington 1 935 

James C. Tyler, Urbana, Illinois 1935 

Furl P. Van Deventer, Richmond 1933 

Keith Waite, Fortville ' 1937 

Edward G. Walz, Indianapolis 1 936 

Henry A. Walz, Indianapolis 1 934 

Francis Weddle, Indianapolis 1 938 

John Weinbrecht, Indianapolis _ 1 938 

Mitchell Weinstein, Chicago, Illinois 1932 

Theodore Wheaton, Shelbyville 1 938 

John R. Whitecotton, Terre Haute 1934 

Albert C. Wilkins, Tiskiliva, Illinois 1932 

Von Wi Ison, I ndianapol is. -... 1 932 

Thomas Wimsatt, Evansville _ 1938 

Edward Wolfgang, Evansville 1 938 

Harry Wood, Indianapolis 1937 

Phil Zeitz, Chicago, Illinois 1 932 



ALUMNI 



Page one hundred eighteen 



HE M I S T U 



1 939 ALUMN I 

Kenneth Anthony, Economy Drug Store, Connersville 

Glenn Baker, Laboratory Assistant, Indiana School of Medicine, Indianapolis 

Robert Baxter, Muir Drug Company, Gary 

Irvin Berkowitz, Koehler Drug Company, Indianapolis 

Joe Berry, Traveling Representative, Pitman-Moore Drug Company, New 

York City 
Robert Brookshire, Proprietor, Brookshire Drug Company, Indianapolis 
Debert Carroll, Gv\/inn Drug Store, Anderson 
John Delbauve, Delbo Pharmacy, Indianapolis 
Robert Doerr, Registered Pharmacist, Evansville 
Frank Emge, Woods Drug Company, Evansville 
Jack Erdman. McCord Pharmacy, Indianapolis 
Lawrence Ertel, Pantzer Pharmacy, Indianapolis 
Keith Flory, Binkley Pharmacy, Indianapolis 
Albert Foullois, Michel Pharmacy, Indianapolis 
Eugene Gerbinsky, Morton's Drug Store, Menasha, Wisconsin 
William Gifford. Post Graduate Courses, Butler University, Indianapolis 
John Graf, Schultz-Weinland Drug Company, Brazil 
Leery Hunt, Rural Pharmacy, Indianapolis 
Charles Jones, Walgreen Drug Company, Gary 
Edv/ard Kaminski, Assistant Manager, Muir Drug Company, Gary 
George Krack, Proprietor, Krack Pharmacy, Indianapolis 
Roy Lakin, Hook Drug Comany, Indianapolis 
Raymond Lerch, Bartlett's Drug Store, Lafayette 
Marvin Lewallen, Michel Pharmacy, Indianapolis 
John Lischke, Crescent Pharmacy, Indianapolis 
Victor Market, Pantzer Pharmacy, Indianapolis 
Robert Melville, Haag Drug Company, Indianapolis 
Alfred Merz, Merz Drug Company, Indianapolis 
Murry Miller, Maxy Pharmacy, Indianapolis 
Luther Reck, Elliot Drug Company, Connersville 
Keith Roudebush, Muir Drug Company, Gary 
Earl Roush, Francis Drug Company, Evansville 
Clark Russell, A. C. Fritz Drug Company, Indianapolis 
Joe Shaughnessy, Registered Pharmacist, Detroit, Michigan 
Owen Traylor, Schoener Drug Store, Indianapolis 
Ray Ulrich, City Hospital, Indianapolis 

Mike Voivodas, Assistant Manager, Haag Drug Company, Indianapolis 
Ray Walton, Patterson Drug Store, Indianapolis 
John Williams, Williams Drug Store, Washington, Indiana 



ALUMNI 



Page one hundred nineteen 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



The staff wishes to acknowledge its in- 
debtedness to the following who have contrib- 
uted to the success of the 1940 Mistura. 

PORTER'S NATIONAL STUDIO 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
Photography. 

FRANK JONES STUDIO 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
Photography. 

CHARLES C. BELL 
Indianapolis, Indiana 
Photography. 

INDIANAPOLIS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

Indianapolis, Indiana 

Engraving. 

THE BENTON REVIEW SHOP 
Fowler, Indiana 
Printing and Binding. 



Page one hundred twenty 



AUTOGRAPHS 




Page one hundred ttventy-one 



OUR FRIEND THE ADVERTISER 

In passing slowly throught the pages of this book, kindly 
remember our friends, our Advertisers. Through their valuable 
assistance has this book been made possible. Our advertisers 
are a select group. They are interested in You and they want 
to serve You. 

May the names of the following firms be a constant reminder 
to you when obtaining your needs. To our Advertisers and their 
friends, the Senior Class wishes to show its sincere appreciation. 




NEHI BEVERAGE CO. 

LI. 2101 — 1420 NORTH SENATE — INDIANAPOLIS 



In Business 65 Years 

BALLARD ICE CREAM CO. 

Makers and Distributors of all kinds 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 

delivered to your door daily 



"NONE B E T T ER" 

Exclusive Manufacturer and Distributor 

of 

Eskimo Pie Products 

Oldest House in the State 



"None Better" means just that 



BALLARD ICE CREAM CO., INC. 



)15-317 No. Ala. St. 
Tel. Li. 2526 



KOSKEY CANDY 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



COMPANY 



4606 No. Keystone 
Hu. 3996 



Keenes Prescription 
Center 

"The Prescription Store" 

Meridian and Ohio St. 



"WHOLESALE 
CANDIES" 



Stores also located at 

Delaware and Ohio Sts. 

811 N. Delaware St. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Vj/i± XX^iij XjLJilVjAA E 


Compliments 


"Just across the street from School" e [ 


of 


I I 


a 


Good Food Soft Drinks \ \ 


Friend 



John Adams, Prop. 



To 
The Class of 1940 



We tender our best congratulations for past 
achievements, and sincere hopes that our paths may 
often cross in the future. 



MOONEY MUELLER WARD CO. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



Stokes Pharmacy 
Company 

"The Prescription Stores" 

226 N. Meridian St. 
449 N. Penn. St. 

606 Hume. Mansur Bldg. 



Jos. T. Stokes, president 
Harvey R. Belton, secy.-treas. 



KUNZ DRUGS 

E. Washington at State St. 
Li. 2581 Indianapolis 



REGARDS TO 

Dean Niles and all the 

Students 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



LEE REMMETER 

Prescription Store 



SILVER SPOT 

— •— ■ 

RESTAURANT 

1006 E. Washington St. 



PHONE: Ri. 2113 

960 E. Washington St. 

Indianapolis 



We Wish You Success 

Upon Graduation, and have 

Appreciated Your Patronage 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



PORTER NATIONAL STUDIO 

Photographers Since 1909 



. 3rd Floor, Illinois Bids 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



RUTH PORTER, Mgr. Ri 9114 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

FURNAS-VELVET ICE CREAM 

The Largest Selling 

ICE CREAM 

In Indiana 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



CONGRATULATIONS 



L. E. SMALLWOOD 



DRUGS and SUNDRIES 



901 Indiana Ave. 



SENIORS 

WURSTER 
PHARMACY 

Arlington at E. 10th St. 



1840 1940 

A CENTURY OF SERVICE 

The progress of men and business always goes hand in hand. 

— another Commencement milestone has passed 
for you. 

— another year of service and co-operation for 
us. 



The fruits of our ripe experience, business skill and judgment 
are always yours to command. 



• • 



KIEFER-STEWART CO. 

Wholesale Druggists Since 1840 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



WILLIAMSON'S 



'Well Made" Candies 



For Sale by the Druggist 



CONGRATULATIONS 

SENIORS 

May your success equal that of 




HOMER J. WILLIAMSON 

Incorporated 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



Indiana's 

Largest SelKng 

5c Cigar 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 

THE SENIOR CLASS 

OF 1940 



FRITZ DRUG CO. 

4101 E. Mich. St. 
4627 E. 10th St. 
Z801 E. 10th St. 
SlOl E. 10th St. 



"To Serve You Well" 



ROSSITER'S 
Cut Price Drugs 

2236 E. 10th St. 

No prescriptions filled unless 

written in 
Spanish, Greek, French, 
English, German or Latin 




New Research and Pharmaceutical Laboratoi'ies of 



PITMAN-MOORE COMPANY 

Dix'isioii of Allied Laboratories, Inc. 
INDIANAPOLIS 



COMPLIMENTS. 
OF 

HAAG DRUG 
COMPANY 



CITY BOTTLING 
WORKS 

ROYAL GUARD BEVERAGES 

"For All Occasions 
at your nearest 

Independent Dealer" 



815 So. Illinois St. 
Li. 4848 




GLASCO PRODUCTS CO. 




CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



BEST WISHES TO 



-"the future Pharmacists 
of Indiana" 



COMPLIMExNTS OF 




L. W. Simons, D.D.S. 



CENTRAL INDIANA 
DRUG CORP. 

227 S. Meridian St. 
Indianapolis 



1706 E. Washington St. 




THE PAUSE THAT REFRESHES 
...AND COOLS 

Raise a frosty bottle of Coca-Cola to your lips and get the feel 
of refreshment. Coca-Cola . . . cold, ice-cold . . is ready in familiar 
red coolers everywhere. Pause there and be refreshed. ..for only 5c. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



L. M. BASS 

1027 No. Oakland 
Ch. 6208- W 



Your Friendly Drug 
Store 



"Remodeling Drug Stores 
My Specialty" 

Back Bars Cabinets 

Soda Fountains 



WARRICK'S 
PHARMACY 

3965 Blvd. PI. 
Hu. 3900 



COMPLIMENTS OF \ 


j CONGRATULATIONS 


LAMBDA KAPPA 


1 SENIORS 


SIGMA 


1 


SORORITY 


1 DORN'S DRUG 


PHI Chapter \ 


STORES 


Located at i 


\ 


Indianapolis College | 
of 1 


I 572 Mass. Ave. 


Pharmacy j 


1 1301 No. Penn. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



NATIONAL WINDOW 
DISPLAY CO. 



236 So. Meridian St. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



'Your Window Dressers for the Last 15 Years" 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



LYONS 
DRUG STORE 



LEWIS D. HEID 



DRUGGIST 



Rural Street 

at 

Michiofan Avenue 



4001 E. Tenth St. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

SENIOR CLASS OF 1940 



Success to the Class 
of 1940 



P. ANDERSON 
TUCKER 



DEMREE PHARMACY 

INC. 



Registered Pharmacist 



2101 East Michigan 

Pendleton Pike at the 
Franklin Road 



3901 East Tenth Street 
at Denny 
IR. 8391 

Don Demree 

I. C. p. '25 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



COMPLIMENTS 



JOHN P. FRITZ 

Drugo-ist and Pharmacist 



RURAL PHARMACY 

Prescription Druggist 



641 A'irginia Avenue 

Corner 

Stevens Street 



2801 East Michigan Ave. 
Ch. 1187 



Just a Big "Hello' 



from vour friend and instructor in 



Commercial Pharmacy 



HARRY J. BORST 



970 N. LaSalle 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



HAMILTON-HARRIS 
AND COMPANY 



TEETER 
PHARMACIES 



302 West South Street 
Ri. 7395 



6301 W. Washington 

1802 Madison Ave. 

30th and Sherman Drive 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



Jilltam (§, ^\]xh 

JVttnrneg at |£a6i 
^nbianapolis 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

THRASHER 

SUNDRIES 

CO. 

G. H. Thrasher 

5536 Carrolton 

Br. 1585 

Sundries - Novelties 

Distributor for 

Julius Schmidt Co. 



COMPLIMENTS OP 



FERTIG ICE CREAM CO. 



205 No. Noble St. 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



WITH BEST WISHES FOR THE 

SUCCESS OF THE 

CLASS OF '40 



FREIJE'S 
PHARMACY 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



IVERSON'S DRUGS 

Chris J. Iverson, Prop. 

30th and Northwestern 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



Registered : 

C. J. Iverson, I. C. P. '25 
C. J. Friedman, Purdue 



2101 N. Hardinc 



Apprentice : 

Robert Todd, I. C. P. '40 
Wilbur Mounts 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the Class of 1940 

and to the 

Indianapolis College of Pharmacy 

MICHEL 
PHARMACIES 

2202 Shelby St. 
1857 Shelby St. 
2602 Shelby St. 
2177 S. Meridian 
2143 Prospect 



Prescription Service 



THE SANBORN 
ELECTRIC CO. 

WHOLESALE 

Electrical Supplies 

G. E. Mazda Lamps 

Lighting Fixtures 

Contracting Engineers 

See us for a GE 
Mazda Lamp Agency 



309-311 N. Illinois St. 

INDIANAPOLIS 

Ri. 9584 



COMPLIAIENTS OF 



M. C. LANG 

Manufacturing Jewelers and Stationers 

Fraternity Jewelery - Class Pins 

Medals - Cups and Club Pins 



Write for Catalog 

7th Floor, Test Bldg. 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



KAPPA PSI FRATERNITY 



BETA UPSILON CHAPTER 



at 



Indianapolis College of Pharmacy 



802 E. Market St. 



JOIN OUR FUR COAT CLUB 
$5.00 Is All You Need! 

BUY NOW FOR NEXT YEAR! 

New 1941 Fashions are now on display! 
Choose yours and have it paid for by Fall! 

Styled by 

Indiana Fur 
Co. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



PANTZER'S 



DRUG STORES 



DAVIDSON BROS, 

29-31 East Ohio Street 

Come In! We have Indiana's 
Largest and Smartest selections 
of Spring Fur Fashions, too! 

Furriers for 
More than SO Years ! 



1601 S. East 
2224 Shelby 



Dependable Drug Stores 

A Hoosier Institution Serving 
Indiana for Over 40 Years 

Hook's Stores are Located in foUowino- Indiana Cities : 



• Bedford 

• Bloomington 

• Colum1)us 

• Connersville 

• Elkhart 

• Frankfort 



• Gar)' 

• Hammond 

• Kokomo 

• Lafayette 

• Marion 

• Mishawaka 

• And Indianapolis 



• New Castle 

• Richmond 

• Terre Haute 

• Anderson 

• Muncie 

• South Bend 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Brown's Pliar 



niacy 



Frank Lobraico '24 



Clifton Pharmacy 

3342 Clifton St. 



2401 No. Illinois 
Ta. 0924 



Lobraico Pliar 



macy 



1201 X. West St. 



Joe Battista, Mgr. 





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