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Full text of "Missouri Botanical Garden bulletin."

Missouri 
Botanical 
Garden 



§ 




JANUARY/ 
FEBRUARY 
1991 



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VOLUME LXXIX 



Inside 
This Issue 



FJ Arboretum Master Plan 
mi Is Unveiled 

Improved education and visitors facili- 
ties will preserve the natural integrity of 
the Arboretum. 

() Capital Campaign 
imm Exceeds Goal 

The support of the St. Louis community 
made the campaign a success and 
enhanced facilities at the Garden. 

JO Home Gardening 

^■H Landscaping for energy- efficiency pays 
off year-round. 

Ask the Answer Service 

^H Timely tips for the cold winter months. 

J 2 Calendar of Events 

^H The Orchid Show, members' days and 
Black History Month highlight January 
and February. 

J^J From the Membership Office 

^H The members' travel program for 1991 
features an extraordinary natural history 
tour on the trail of Lewis and Clark. 

Jg Henry Shaw Medal 

^■1 William Doyle Ruckleshaus was honored 
at the 1990 Henry Shaw Dinner. 

J 7 Trustee Profile 

■H John K. Wallace has served the Garden 
for ten years. 

20 Tributes 

l^m Family and friends are honored with a 
gift to the Garden. 



On the cover: Yatsuhashi bridge in the 
Japanese Garden, Seiwa-en. 

— Photo by King Schoenfeld 



1991 Missouri Botanical Garden. 

The BULLETIN (ISSN 0026-6507) is published bi-monthly 
by the Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove 
Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110. Second class postage paid at 
St. Louis, MO. 

The BULLETIN is sent to every Member of the Garden 
as one of the benefits of membership. For a contribution of 
as little as $40 per year. Members also are entitled to: free 
admission to the Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special events and receptions; 
announcements of all lectures and classes; discounts in the 
Garden Gate Shop and for course fees; and the opportunity 
to travel, domestic and abroad, with other Members. For 
information, please call (314) 577-5100. 

Postmaster; send address changes to Susan Caine, edi- 
tor, BULLETIN, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis. MO 63166. 



Comment 



1990— A Year of Accomplishments 






printed <»/ recycled paper 




This past year 
has been filled with 
challenges, and we 
can look back over 
the last twelve 
months and feel 
invigorated at what 
we have accom- 
plished together. 
Thanks to an extraordinary show of 
support from the St. Louis community, 
the Capital Campaign was completed and 
exceeded our goal (see page 9.) The 
renovated Climatron opened to thousands 
of members in the Spring along with the 
Shoenberg Temperate House. The Kem- 
per Center for Home Gardening, 
encouraged by warm weather throughout 
much of the Fall, made substantial gains in 
construction and will be ready to open the 
middle of this year. The article in the 
National Geographic about the Garden 
focused the attention of readers through- 
out the world on the mission of the Gar- 
den and its critical importance as we look 
toward the future and grapple with seri- 
ous environmental issues. 

The Garden also invested considera- 
ble effort in learning how St. Louisans 
perceive the Garden and what it can do to 



better understand the community. The 
results of this extensive survey will allow 
the Garden to revise and adjust programs 
and services during 1991 to reach under- 
served areas. We are committed to this 
assessment endeavor and see 1991 as a 
year in which we will be able to learn and 
make changes that will reach out into the 
community. 

Most importantly, we have made 
major strides in informing citizens about 
the environmental crises by providing 
information that will help people learn 
what they can do to lessen the serious 
risks facing the environment. And we 
look forward to continuing this responsi- 
bility throughout 1991 and beyond. 

Our membership continues to grow 
and as each individual supports the Gar- 
den, at any level, the Garden's ability to 
do more and reach more people 
increases. Our growth and our respon- 
siveness to environmental concerns is a 
direct result of each member's commit- 
ment and interest. We remain genuinely 
appreciative of your support. 



\ujJJU- /r.vjC 



cu/ev^y 




HARDEN ON CNN — Marc Levenson, field correspondent for CNN, visited the Garden in 
September to interview Dr. Nancy Morin on the Flora of North America project. The crew 
spent the day shooting in the Climatron and throughout the Garden for a news story that 
aired on CNN's weekend Science & Technology program in October. 




^ A rare native plant with agricultural potential is Texas wild rice, 
Zizania texana. Itgroivs only in a single stream in Texas, and is 
threatened by water pollution and grazing by introduced rodents. 
Fortunately it survives in cultivation and is being used in breeding 
experiments to produce new crops resistant to heat and drought. 



Mi: 



GARDEN LIBRARY. 



Together the Garden and the CPC will form 
one of the most important centers of plant 
conservation and research in the world. 



Center for Plant Conservation 
Comes to the Garden 



On October 24, 1990, the Garden announced that 
the nationally renowned Center for Plant Conserva- 
tion (CPC) would move from Boston to St. Louis as 
part of a new cooperative agreement. The CPC will 
become a part of the Garden and will open its new 
headquarters here at the Garden in 1991. 

Founded in 1984, the CPC is the largest organiza- 
tion in the world dedicated exclusively to the protec- 
tion of endangered plant species, specifically native 
American plants. It is the first program of its kind in 
the world. Together with the Garden's worldwide 
research and conservation programs, including the 
Flora of North America (see next page), the collabo- 
ration will make St. Louis one of the most important 
centers for plant conservation in the world. 

Plant conservation is of critical importance among 
today's environmental concerns. According to 
research conducted by the Center, more than two- 
thirds of all endangered native plants are close rela- 
tives of economically important plants used for 



agriculture, medicine, industry, or horticulture. Loss 
of even a few species depletes the genetic diversity 
of plants, weakening their ability to adapt to changes 
in location, climate, or diseases. More research is 
needed as plants are threatened by many factors, 
including development of their natural habitats for 
housing, industry, or other human activities. 

The CPC has pioneered innovative methods of 
preserving endangered plants. The first goal is to 
identify and find the threatened species, a task the 
Center carries out in collaboration with public and 
private scientific institutions, conservation organiza- 
tions like The Nature Conservancy, and federal and 
state agencies. Working with these groups in a pro- 
gram of "integrated conservation,' ' the Center helps 
to study and protect plant populations in the wild. 
' 'The survival of species in their natural ecological 
and evolutionary state is ultimately the test of any 
conservation program," says Donald A. Falk, direc- 
tor of the CPC. continued on next page 



"Our goal is to prevent any further extinctions of 
native American plant species. With hard work we 
are confident that this is an attainable goal. " 

—Donald A. Falk 



Peter H. Raven, director of the Garden (left) and Donald A. 
Falk, director of the Center for Plant Conservation, examine 
a rare heart-leaved plantain at the announcement on 
October 24. 




BULLETIN I JANUARY KKBRUARY 1991 1 




Running buffalo clover, Trifolium stoloniferum, recently 

became the first endangered species propagated at the Missouri 
Botanical Garden to be reintroduced to the wild (see the Bulletin, 
November-December 1990). Horticulturists report the new 
populations are thriving. 



Of the 20, 000 plants native to the United States, 
more than 3, 000— about 15%— are endangered in 
the wild. 700 species are faced with extinction in 
the next 10 years. 




The Center, through a network of 20 participating 
botanical institutions (see map), collects endangered 
plants and brings them into protective cultivation for 
propagation and research. This forms the Center's 
National Collection, which has saved several species 
in each region from extinction. The Collection pro- 
vides the opportunity to conduct research on rare 
plants, to learn how to propagate, cultivate, and uti- 
lize them, and how to encourage their survival in the 
wild. The protected populations are backed up by a 
low temperature seedbank maintained as part of the 
National Plant Germplasm System of the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture and at several of the 



regional gardens. 

The National Collection is the heart of the CPC 
program. The living plant materials, consisting of 
stored seeds, rooted cuttings, growing plants, or 
other forms, are grown at the garden in the region 
where the species is native. Each participating insti- 
tution is responsible for the rare flora of its region. 
The network provides centers for the research, edu 
cation and conservation programs coordinated bv the 
CPC. 

The collaboration of the Garden and the Center 
will benefit the cause of plant conservation in a num- 
ber of ways. Research programs at the two institu- 



MAKV NKWKI.I.Dl I'AI.MA 



One of the nation 's rarest orchids is the 
small whorled pogonia, Isotria 
medeoloides. Although widely dis- 
tributed throughout the Northeast, it is 
found in only very small numbers wher- 
ever it grows. 



"We may think we can ignore the loss of this 
diversity, but it is the key to the survival of 
agriculture to support 10 billion people in the 

next Century." -Peter H. Raven 




4. 



Participating Institutions of the Center for 
Plant Conservation: 

1) The Berry Botanic Garden 

2) University of California Botanical Garden 

3) Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden 

4) Red Butte Gardens and Arboretum 

5) Desert Botanical Garden 

6) The Arboretum at Flagstaff 

7) Denver Botanic Gardens 

8) The Nebraska Statewide Arboretum 

9) Missouri Botanical Garden 

10) The Holden Arboretum 

ID The New York Botanical Garden 

12) Garden in the Woods 

13) The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University 

14) The North Carolina Botanical Garden 

15) Bok Tower Gardens 

16) Fairchild Tropical Garden 

17) Mercer Arboretum 

18) San Antonio Botanical Garden 

19) National Tropical Botanical Garden 

20) Waimea Arboretum and Botanical Garden 



\BULLET1N JANUARY FEBRUARY 1991 




Nine rare kinds of 
meadowfoam of 

the genus Lim- 
nanthes are found 
only on the West 
Coast. Meadow- 
foams are a promis- 
ing source for 
high-quality indus- 
trial oils found in 
their seeds. 



tions are complementary, and will enhance and assist 
each other. The Center is already developing an 
active program of applied rare plant research aimed 
at solving problems for land management agencies 
and increasing knowledge about uses and propaga- 
tion of endangered plants. The Garden, with its inter- 
national research program, has strong ties to the 
academic community and conservation organizations 
worldwide. 

Both institutions are leaders in the creation of 
plant information systems and computer databases. 
The Center maintains BG-BASE, one of the most 
extensive databases on rare U.S. plants, and has 
developed information management systems in use 
at botanical institutions around the world. The Gar- 
den's TROPICOS system is in use to coordinate 
research in North and South America, Asia, and 
Africa. The combined computer capabilities will pro- 
vide unmatched service to the field of conservation. 

In addition, the collaboration will increase the 
opportunities for public awareness and education 
about plant conservation. As the economic uses of 
endangered species become increasingly important, 
the need for informed public support will increase. 
The Garden and the Center will provide a resource of 
unsurpassed expertise on these issues. 

The cooperative agreement between the Garden 
and the CPC will increase the efficiency and effec- 
tiveness of plant conservation nationally and abroad. 
It will also benefit each institution. 

The CPC will remain a separately chartered 
organization with its own Board of Trustees and 
by-laws. The Garden will provide an umbrella of 
support resources including offices, technical 
support, personnel, accounting, development, 
education and communications. The move to 
St. Louis will help the Center to concentrate its 
resources on its conservation programs, rather than 
on supporting a separate organization. The Garden's 
international research program and its role as head- 
quarters for the Flora of North America will be 
enhanced by the Center's strong national program. 

Dr. Peter H. Raven, director of the Garden, said, 
"We have participated with the CPC's conservation 
program since 1984 and are delighted they now will 
be a part of the Garden.' ' ■ 




The Flora of North America Editorial Committee met at the Garden October 
7 and 8 to discuss progress on Volume I, publication of which is expected in 
late 1991. Pictured, front row, left to right: Rahmona Thompson, George 
Argus, Luc Brouillet, Leila Shultz, David Whetstone, Nancy Morin, Robert 
Kiger. Back row, left to right: Marshall Johnston, John Packer, Alan Smith, 
John Thieret, Richard Spellenberg, Ronald Hartman, Theodore Barkley, 
John Strother, David Boufford, Gerald Straley, and Grady Webster. 



The Flora of North America Project 

The Flora of North America project is a collaborative, bi-national 
effort of more than 20 major botanical institutions to compile the first 
comprehensive description of all plants growing spontaneously in the 
United States and Canada. The Missouri Botanical Garden serves as 
the organizational center. 

Twelve volumes will be published over 12 years by Oxford Univer- 
sity Press. In addition, all the information will be contained in a com- 
puterized data base, called TROPICOS. The database will be 
constantly updated and maintained as a permanent resource. The Flora 
will be useful not only to scientists but also for practical use and general 
reference in biology, conservation, wildlife management, forestry, hor- 
ticulture, environmental sciences, and agriculture. 

In order to identify a plant species as endangered, conservation 
groups, such as the Center for Plant Conservation, The Nature Con- 
servancy, and others, require reliable and thorough information about 
that species. It is crucial that one reference be available as a landmark, 
a common point of reference, and the Flora of North America will fill 
this need. 

The project will draw on the expertise of botanists throughout the 
world. The Flora will be written and reviewed by a large segment of 
the systematic botanical community and will draw on all of its 
resources. 

The Flora of North America project has thus far received major 
funding from the National Science Foundation, the Pew Charitable 
Trusts, the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, the Chase Garvey 
Foundation, the Hewlett Foundation, and the National Fish and Wildlife 
Foundation. It continues to seek funds. 



Hl'LLETlS JANUARY FEBRUARY 1991 1 



Arboretum 
Master Plan 
Is Unveiled 

Changes over the 
years will preserve 
the natural, 
unspoiled beauty 
of the site. 




THIS PAST FALL the Garden's Board of Trustees approved 
a detailed Master Plan for the future development of Shaw 
Arboretum, capping a two-year effort by Garden and Arbo- 
retum staff with the assistance of Environmental Planning and 
Design (EPD) of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. "We are very excited 
about the prospect of increasing the educational and scientific 
opportunities at the Arboretum," said Dr. Peter H. Raven, direc- 
tor of the Garden. ' 'At the same time we are committed to 
preserving the natural beauty and integrity of the site.' ' 

The plan is a series of flexible guidelines for gradual develop- 
ment over the next five to ten years. Attendance over the next 20 
years is expected to reach 200,000 visitors per year, and education 
enrollments will double. To accommodate these demands and 
increase visitors' enjoyment of the Arboretum, improvements to 
existing facilities are of vital importance. 

EPD under took a thorough analysis of the use of land at the 
Arboretum and in the surrounding areas. Prospects for future 
growth in adjacent highways, business and industrial develop- 
ments were considered. All improvements were planned to 
enhance, not alter, the natural beauty of the site. 

All existing structures will be utilized to keep costs down and 
reduce the environmental impact of new construction. Energy 
efficiency will be stressed. 

Exhibits and Education The ultimate goal of all improvements 
will be to further the Arboretum's mission of educating visitors 
about the plants, animals, and ecosystems of the region. Three 
6. 

W^m BULLETIN JANUARY FEBRUARV 1991 



major zones in the Arboretum will play a part: the Preserve, the 
Environmental Exhibits, and the Collections. 

Preserve The Preserve is already well developed with trails. It 
includes all the areas in the Meramec River landscape— the oak- 
hickory woods, limestone cliffs, glades, floodplain forest and the 
gravel bars. Development in the Preserve will be limited to 
improvements in the trail system and interpretive materials. 

The Arboretum will also preserve single plants as a participant 
in the program of the Center for Plant Conservation. If it is appro- 
priate, additional populations of a particular plant might be estab- 
lished in environments in the Arboretum open to the public. 

Environmental Exhibits The Environmental Exhibits form the 
bridge between the Preserve, which is maintained as a natural 
area, and the Collections, which are horticultural. Because the 
Preserve will not have introduced plants, environments such as 
the prairie, which do not occur naturally on this site, need to be 
shown elsewhere. The Environmental Exhibits will be a mosaic of 
Missouri environments such as the prairie, a woodland stream, or 
a wet savannah, where plants of Missouri and the region can be 
planted and featured. 

Within the Environmental Exhibit area will be plantings 
selected to attract wildlife, and in particular, birds and butterflies. 
These, once again, would not be developed as discrete intensive 
gardens, but rather as part of broader landscapes located and 
interpreted along a part of the path system. 

One Environmental Exhibit that will be garden-like in design is 



the Wildflower area, located adjacent to the proposed Visitor Cen- 
ter Complex. This exhibit will incorporate a variety of environ- 
ments in order to grow a complete range of herbaceous plant 
species, including wetland, shade and glade prairie environments. 
The Wildflower Garden has been made possible by a family gift 
from Mr. and Mrs. Blanton J. Whitmire. 

Collections An important purpose of the Arboretum is to have 
collections of trees and shrubs hardy in the St. Louis area, com- 
plementary to the collections of the Garden and Tower Grove 
Park. Careful attention will be given to collecting plants from areas 
with similar climatic and environmental conditions and to collect 
them from known native sources. The decision to collect any par- 
ticular plants will be coordinated with other arboreta to coordinate 
collecting efforts and avoid duplication. The emphasis will be on 
collecting species and developing genetically adequate samples. 
A very select number of cultivars might also be included when 
appropriate. 

Some "high impact" collections will be featured for their 
unusual ornamental interest, and will be clustered around the main 
public paths and roads. Other collections will be of scientific inter- 
est and will not be accessible to the general public. 

Education The number of students served by the Arboretum 
will probably double in the next twenty years. Education focusing 
on the natural world will continue to be emphasized, and the pro- 
posed improvements will greatly enhance the Arboretum's pro- 
grams. The new Earth Keeper overnight education facility will 
consist of a series of log buildings adjacent to the existing Adlyne 
Freund Education Center, and will provide a site for a variety of 
overnight classes. 

Conceptual Master Plan A new entrance will be constructed to 
the west of the present entrance to alleviate traffic congestion and 
provide access to the new Visitors Center Complex at the Brick 
House site (see map). Eventually there will be parking for 300 
cars and five busses, to be constructed as needed. 

The Visitors Center will be located between the collections and 



the environmental exhibits and will provide equal access to both 
areas. The ridge that separates the Brush Creek valley from the 
Meramec valley marks the end of the environmental exhibits and 
the beginning of the Preserve, which encompasses all the steep 
wooded land that runs down to the Meramec. Most of the activity 
will be concentrated on the western side of the site. The eastern 
portion of the site, which becomes progressively more remote, is 
reserved for other collections, some Preserve in the Meramec 
valley, and the Earth Keepers facility, which needs some isolation 
from the public areas. 

The different areas are tied together by the existing loop road, 
which will serve as a tour vehicle route, and by a series of pedes- 
trian loop trails that will emanate from the Visitors Center. 

The general layout preserves the existing forested areas and 
takes advantage of open fields for exhibits between these areas. 
Surrounding the site is a minimum one hundred foot buffer of 
woods. The buffer and the natural tree cover in the valleys are 
connected by a network of woods throughout the site to provide 
animal corridors for small animals and birds, and to leave a frame- 
work within which plants and environmental exhibits can be dis- 
played. 

The area to the south of the Meramec River will be closed to 
the public. As the need arises, the land can be used for tree collec- 
tions, being careful to preserve the pastoral qualities of the long 
views from across the river. 

Visitors Center Complex The Visitors Center Complex is laid 
out around the historic Brick House which will continue to domin- 
ate the site and set the tone for future development. The new 
buildings are arranged to take full advantage of the wonderful long 
sweeping views into the interior of the site. 

The group of buildings consists of the Brick House; a Recep- 
tion Center; the main Visitor Center; and a picnic shelter. The 
buildings will be of stone and wood and the detailing will be simple 
and elegant and of the same high quality as the Brick House. 

The Brick House is to be repaired and then renovated in the 




sitors inspect 
p Brick House 
ring a tour. 





Future displays will follow the natural plan of the Pinetum. 



The Arboretum will remain a special place 
to enjoy and learn about nature. 



BULLETIN 'JANUARY FKKRUAKY 1991 1 



ARBORETUM continued 

early phases to include a ground floor meeting/reception space 
with period furnishings and an exhibit on historic farming practices 
and their effect on the land and the landscape. The upstairs will be 
closed to the public and used for offices for the Visitors Center 
operation. 

Behind the Brick House will be the Reception Center. This 
building will resemble a carriage house in appearance and will con- 
tain the reception desk, the main restrooms, and an exhibit space. 
Visitors will enter this building and then will be directed out into 
the site or to the other buildings. The tour vehicle will stop in front 
of the Reception Center on the main turnaround. Creating the 
Reception Center as a separate building breaks up the total mass 
of the buildings and allows the construction of the Visitors Center 
Complex to occur in phases. 

The main Visitors Center will be built into the hillside and ori- 
ented to take advantage of the major views out to the south and 
the Prairie in the far distance. The building is entered on the upper 
level and a main lobby is flanked by a gift shop and a small food 
service facility oriented to the view. The lower level contains a 
multi-purpose room and its support facilities and classrooms 
which open onto outdoor terraces and then to the fields beyond. 

It is a main objective to design the Visitors Center to incor- 
porate energy and water conserving features such as berming 
against the building, a solid north wall, suntraps and window walls 
to the south, natural venting through the roof, supplemental wood 
heat, compact fluorescent lighting, and water saving toilets. 

The picnic shelter with restrooms is located conveniently adja- 
cent to the parking lot, but well screened from it, and looks out 
over its own fields. During the week this will serve the needs of 
school groups, providing not only a place to picnic under cover, but 
also a place to run and blow off steam removed from the main vis- 



"We will be able to pass on a greater 
understanding and appreciation of 

the natural WOrld" -JohnBehrer, manager, 

Shaw Arboretum 



8. 




itors areas and within easy reach of the school busses. 

Circulation Eventually, no cars will be allowed to circulate 
through the site as they do now. The Visitors Center Complex will 
be the main tour vehicle stop and the starting point for hiking 
trails. The existing loop road will become the main route through 
the site accommodating a tour vehicle, pedestrians, and service 
and emergency vehicles. 

The trail system begins at the Visitors Center and is arranged 
into three major loops through the three different landscape types 
at the Arboretum. All the trail loops are designed with cut off trails 
to shorten the distances. There are regular spots to stop and sit 
and to pause and look out at the landscape. 

The Preserve The Preserve includes all the steep wooded 
slopes of the Meramec valley and the bottomland forest along the 
river. The main loop trail through the Preserve will begin at the 
Trail House and follow the existing trails. It will traverse the glade 
on a new boardwalk, run through the floodplain by the ' 'landing 
field,' ' and return to the Trail House along a portion of the Labadie 
Trace. There will be rustic benches near areas of interest: in the 
glades, at the gravel bar and the landing field, along the wildflower 
trail, and at the existing locations in the prairie and at the bluff 
overlook. 

The Environmental Exhibits The Environmental Exhibits are 
located between the Collections and the Preserve, between the 
purely horticultural landscape and the untouched native landscape. 
Native Missouri plants from all over the state can be assembled in 
these environments for display and teaching purposes. The Walk 
Through Missouri loop trail will tie these exhibits together. 

The Collections The Collections are located mostly at the 
north end of the property and also south of the Meramec. They 
are set up as a series of openings framed by native woods. The 
design of the Pinetum, the only presently existing collection, will 
serve as the prototype for the development of future plantings. 
They would be designed as groves of a single species around 
expanses of open field. Long views would be preserved and the 
spaciousness of the site respected. 

Administration and Education Facilities Eventually the admin- 
istration and educational offices and facilities will move to the 
existing Visitors Center building. The education department will 
take over the existing Visitors Center space for offices, and the 
basement below will be used for storage. 

The Maintenance and Production Complex The maintenance 
and production facilities will remain in their present location, but 
with several major improvements to the production facilities to 
serve the collections in the future. A twelve acre site has been 
reserved along Robertsville Road for a nursery and for the main- 
tenance of threatened and endangered plants from the Center for 
Plant Conservation program. This area will not be open to the 
public. 

Utilities In all areas, the utilities will be upgraded to serve the 
new facilities. Care will be taken to minimize the environmental 
impact, with city water where available, underground electric and 
telephone lines, and up-to-date septic systems. 

In order to make sure that newly planted trees survive periodic 
droughts, there must be irrigation water available before any area 
is planted. The Master Plan calls for quick coupler irrigation to be 
available in all the collection areas and the nursery. The irrigation 
system would use city water. 

John Behrer, manager of the Arboretum, said, "The idea is to 
have a guide for improvements as they are needed over time. We 
want to plan as well as we can to protect the natural balance and 
beauty of the Arboretum, while increasing the public's under- 
standing and appreciation of the natural world.' ' — This report 
was edited, in large part, from a report compiled by Environmental 
Planning and Design. 



\Bl 7 LETIN I JANUARY KEBKIAKY 1991 




SUPPORT FOR EXCELLENCE 

Capital Campaign Exceeds Goal 

The Campaign for the Garden closed on December 31, 1990, having attained a 
total of more than $20.3 million. Through the campaign a number of Garden facilities 
were renovated, replaced, or constructed, most notably the Climatron, Shoenberg 
Temperate House, Brookings Interpretive Center on the Tropics, and William T 
Kemper Center for Home Gardening. 

Robert Kresko, the Campaign Chairman, extended the appreciation of the 
Board of Trustees to all participants: "We are deeply grateful that the community 
has recognized the Garden's record of consistent achievement and has chosen to 
support that excellence in the future through the results of this drive. Every mem- 
ber of the Garden's family has our thanks for their help, but I would be remiss if I 
did not single out for special recognition the William T Kemper Foundation; 
Harriet Spoehrer and Sydney Shoenberg of our Board; the Kresge Foundation; 
and the corporate members of the Civic Progress organization, especially the 
Monsanto Fund, Emerson Electric Company, Southwestern Bell Foundation, and 
the McDonnell Douglas corporate and personnel foundations." 

Peter Raven added, ' 'At a time when the national agenda has a heavy environ- 
mental emphasis, an enormous public demand has arisen for the kinds of expertise 
the Garden can offer. This Campaign has provided the physical facilities on which 
to build creative, quality public programs encouraging each of us to contribute to 
the solution of pressing problems." 




The Climatron complex: the 
new Shoenberg Temperate 
House, the new Brookings 
Interpretiee Center, and the 
renovated Climatron. 




TEMPERATE HOUSE HONORED— 
The Shoenberg Temperate House 
(pictured above) received an award 
for its innovative design from the 
American Institute of Architects 
(AIA) Design Awards Competition at 
the AIA Central States Regional 
Conference in Kansas City, Missouri 
on October 12. The Temperate House 
and its companion structure, the 
Brookings Interpretive Center, were 
designed as part of the new Clima- 
tron complex by The Christner 
Partnership, Inc., of St. Louis. 



The William T. Kemper Center 
for Home (hardening. 



BULLETIN JANUARY FEBRUARY 19911 



Recently I had to remove 
four large persimmon trees 
from the north side of my 
house. Planted too close to the 
house, they cracked the plas- 
ter wall and filled the gutter 
with leaves. Aesthetically, they 
were wonderful; functionally, 
they were a disaster. Had they 
been positioned on the south 
side shading the house, I 
would have kept them, but 
they were the wrong trees for 
the wrong place. In this case, 
screening against wind on the 
north side was more important 
than providing shade, or creat- 
ing privacy. 

According to the American 
Association of Nurserymen, 
properly placed plantings can 
save 10, 30, or as much as 50 
percent on your home energy 
bill. Shading in the summer 
and blocking cold winds in win- 
ter are important to energy- 
efficient planning for your 
home. I replaced those persim- 
mons with Canadian hemlocks 
for energy efficiency, and 
here's why. 

ENERGY LOSS 

Heat gain and loss from 
your home can be controlled 
through careful selection and 
positioning of landscape plants. 
For those of us with leaky 
cracks around doors and win- 
dows, sealing the holes will 
help enormously. However, 
diverting the winds by planting 
trees and shrubs will decrease 
the air pressure difference 
between indoors and outdoors, 
decreasing the energy loss. 

Heat is also gained or lost 
directly through the building 
materials of your house. Insu- 
lation and creating tight air 
spaces will help. But no matter 
what you do, there will always 
be some heat conduction just 
through the wood, brick and 
mortar. Plants properly placed 
in the landscape can reduce the 
temperature differences 
between inner and outer wall 
surfaces, reducing the net 
transfer of heat. 

Similarly, direct sunlight 
hitting the roof and sides of the 
house, while beneficial in the 



Home Gardening 



Energy Landscaping 



winter, causes a great demand 
for cooling in summer. Trees 
and shrubs can provide the 
shade to retard this effect. 

SUMMER LANDSCAPING 

The first step to energy 
efficient landscaping is map- 
ping your property in relation- 
ship to the sun's direction. In 
summer, the sun rises in the 
northeast and moves at a steep 
angle to an overhead position 
at mid-day. Most heat gain 
occurs when the sun is at a low 
angle in the morning, between 
8 a.m. and 11 a.m. Fortunately, 
because of overnight cooling, 
the morning heat is not a sig- 
nificant factor. 

After 11 a.m. the sun will 
deliver maximum heat to the 
southeast corner of the house. 
This is a good place to locate 
one or two medium to tall 
deciduous trees to intercept 
the radiation. Good choices 
would include white ash, red 
buckeye, Kentucky coffeetree, 
amur corktree, hackberry, 
European hornbeam, iron- 
wood, basswood, cucumber- 
tree, Norway maple, red 
maple, Japanese pagodatree, 
sourwood, tuliptree and Jap- 



anese zelkova. 

Most people think of the 
south wall as the most suscep- 
tible to heat gain. However, 
around noon the summer sun 
is high in the sky. This means 
that the southern walls are not 
receiving a direct exposure to 
sunlight and the heat gain is 
much less that you might 
expect. In winter, when the 
sun's position is much lower on 
the horizon, the heat gain on 
the south wall is much greater 
than in the summer. Of course, 
in winter this is very desirable 
for warming the house. 

Overall, tall trees are not 
needed for shading southern 
walls. It might seem desirable 
to provide some shade for the 
roof in summer, but the angle 
of the summer sun is so great 
that tall trees would need to 
overhang the roof in order to 
do much good. This would 
present maintenance prob- 
lems. The best plan would be 
to locate small trees and 
shrubs in the south exposure 
to cool the lawn areas and 
walks. 

In early afternoon, around 
1 to 2 p.m. , the angle of the 
sun is lowering. This is the 



time when maximum heat gain 
can be expected on the south- 
west corner of the house. A 
couple of well positioned tall 
trees should be planted here to 
intercept the sun. 

Because of the steep angle 
that the sun still maintains, you 
should choose a pyramidal to 
oval-shaped (taller than wide) 
tree, permitting it to be planted 
closer to the foundation to gain 
maximum shading of the wall 
and a portion of the roof. A 
tree growing tall and narrow is 
better than one growing tall 
and wide because of the poten- 
tial for roof overhang and phys- 
ically crowding the house. 
Good choices here include: 
ginkgo, goldenrain tree, iron- 
wood, katsura tree, bald 
cypress, European larch, willow 
oak, sourgum, and tuliptree. 

If there is one place to posi- 
tion plants, it is on the west 
side where the sun hits the 
house in the late afternoon. As 
the afternoon proceeds, the 
sun will reach maximum heat- 
ing capacity between 3 and 
5 p.m. The angle is as low as 
the morning sun, but the out- 
side air is hot, offsetting the 
cooling effects of the night. 

Ideally, you should plant a 
series of medium-sized ever- 
green trees about 25 feet away 
from the outside wall. You 
might choose Austrian pine, 




10. 



\BULLETIN JANUARY FEBRUARY 1991 



shortleaf pine, white pine, Nor- 
way or blue spruce. Closer to 
the foundation, plant a decidu- 
ous or evergreen hedge to 
intercept the low angle rays 
and create a boundary of cool 
air shaded by the trees. As an 
alternative, you could con- 
struct a wire or wooden trellis 
positioned slightly away from 
the wall and grow deciduous 
vines like clematis, grapes and 
climbing roses. Creating a 
space away from the wall 
allows for air circulation, 
reducing humidity and mois- 
ture which will destroy paint 
and mortar. Plants such as 
English ivy, Boston ivy, Vir- 
ginia creeper or euonymous 
will climb the wall by them- 
selves, but the moisture and 
lack of air will cause physical 
deterioration of the wall. 
These evergreen vines should 
only be used where shade and 
screening is desired all year 
long, such as on a north wall. 

Few people think of the air 
conditioner as a place for 
plants. A tremendous amount 



of heat needs to dissipate from 
the outside unit, assisted by the 
fan. Using plants to shade the 
unit will aid the conditioner's 
cooling capacity and prolong 
the life of the compressor. 

Construct a trellis for ever- 
green vines over the unit leav- 
ing the sides open. Planting 
small trees and shrubs to pro- 
duce shade will do the same 
thing. Most often the air condi- 
tioner is located on the north 
side, close to the house. Plant- 
ing evergreen trees and shrubs 
will provide shade in summer 
and will screen the unit from 
view and give north wind pro- 
tection during winter. 

WINTER LANDSCAPING 

There are two important 
landscaping energy strategies 
to be considered for winter. 
One is to allow as much solar 
radiation to reach the building 
as possible and the other is to 
screen cold winds. During this 
time, there is little sun to reach 
the east and west walls. 
Therefore, the trees that you 



planted to screen the summer 
sun on the south side should 
allow winter sun to shine 
through. This is why decidu- 
ous trees are recommended. 
Choose the trees with the 
fewest branches and those 
which lose their leaves early. 
Pin oak and shingle oak trees 
would not be good choices, as 
they frequently retain their 
leaves into the winter months. 

Cold winds present the 
greatest challenge to energy 
savings in winter. In our area 
the winter winds come from 
the west and north. Wind- 
breaks positioned perpendicu- 
lar to the prevailing wind can 
reduce wind velocity by up to 
20 percent and give a zone of 
protection extending well 
beyond the screen. Wind- 
breaks should be located about 
40 to 50 feet from the founda- 
tion of a one-story home to 
divert the wind up and over the 
roof line. Evergreen plants are 
ideal for windbreaks on the 
north and west sides, planted 
in a series of staggered rows to 



create density. If you prefer 
deciduous plants, choose spe- 
cies with a dense branching 
pattern that extends to the 
ground, and plant them in 
groups. 

A second strategy to 
reduce heat loss in winter is to 
nestle the foundation with 
shrubs. This creates a dead air 
space between the plants and 
the walls, reducing the loss of 
heat much the same way ther- 
mal windows function. Again, 
the prime choice is to use 
evergreen shrubs that provide 
this benefit all year long. You 
might consider red cedar, 
white cedar or American 
arborvitae, Japanese holly, 
mugo pine, bird's nest spruce 
or yews. 

Overall, landscaping for 
energy-efficiency makes good 
sense. Analyzing the property 
and strategically placing plants 
pay off in conservation of 
energy resources and lower 
energy bills all year round. 



-Steven D, Cline, Ph.D. 



Timely Tips from the Answer Service 



Do you have a plant question? Call the 
Horticultural Answer Service, Monday 
through Friday, 9 a.m. to noon, at 
577-5143. 

January Tips 

■ Old Christmas trees can be recycled 
in a number of ways. Limbs can be 
removed and laid over garden perennials 
or bulb beds to serve as an insulating 
mulch. The whole tree can be placed out- 
side in the garden to serve as a sheltered 
roost for birds. Decorating the tree with 
seed-impregnated suet cakes or garlands 
of popcorn or other fruits will further 
enhance its value to wildlife. 

■ Before purchasing fresh garden 
seeds, run a germination test to deter- 
mine the viability of older seeds. Roll 
about 20 seeds in a damp paper towel, 
place in a plastic bag and keep warm. 
Check in a week. If less than half of the 
seeds sprout, buy fresh stock to ensure 
success. 

■ Many houseplants suffer from low 
humidity levels indoors during winter. 
Avoid locating plants near heat ducts, 



radiators or fireplaces. Grouping plants 
close together helps elevate local humid- 
ity. Pots can also be placed on trays of 
moist gravel. Keep water on the gravel, 
but lower than the bottoms of the pots. 

■ Calcium chloride should be used in 
place of sodium chloride to melt driveway 
and sidewalk ice. Sodium salts can 
severely damage ornamentals if they 
migrate into the root zones of these 
plants. 

■ Fireplace ashes can be applied spar- 
ingly to lawns or vegetable and annual 
beds. Do not apply ashes to acid-loving 
plants such as azaleas and hollies. Heavy 
use of wood ashes will raise soil pH and is 
only recommended for soils testing acid in 
a pH test. 

■ Check garden plants for "heaving" 
during thaws. Plants whose roots become 
exposed should be carefully pressed back 
into the soil before damage can occur. 

February Tips 

■ Take advantage of warm spells. If the 
soil is dry enough to work, prepare a row 



or two in the vegetable garden for the first 
crops of peas and spinach to be planted 
later this spring. 

■ Fruit trees and deciduous ornamental 
trees can be pruned in February. Apply 
dormant oil sprays to control mites, 
aphids and scale. Oils are best applied on 
calm, windless days when the tempera- 
tures are expected to remain above freez- 
ing for 24 hours. Apply oil sprays before 
buds break dormancy and show color. 

■ Seeds of hardy annual flowers such as 
larkspurs, shirley poppies, cornflowers, 
California poppies and cleome can be 
sown outdoors in late February. 

■ For an interesting addition to a win- 
dowsill herb garden, purchase a plump 
ginger root from the produce section of a 
grocery store. Plant the root just under 
the surface of a well-drained soil mix in an 
8 inch pot. Grow on a warm, sunny win- 
dow sill. Keep slightly damp until shoots 
appear, then water and fertilize regularly. 
Harvest the root when the shoots die 
next fall. 

—Chip Tynan, The Answer Service 



11. 



Bl'LLETlS I JANTARY FEBRUARY 1991 1 



Missouri Botanical Garden 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

January -February 1991 




JANUARY 19-FEBRUARY 17 / Orchid Show 



9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Orthwein Floral Display Hall. The tropics of Central and South America 
come to the Garden. Enjoy a stroll through a shady courtyard colonnade filled with a profusion 
of colorful tropical palms, ferns, ficus trees, crotons, and a display of an astonishing variety of 
epiphytic and terrestrial orchids including Cattleyas, Dendrobiums, Vandas, Phalaenopsis, and 
Oncidiums in a blaze of mid- winter color. Free with regular Garden admission. Members' 
Preview— see January 18. 



JANUARY 22/ Members' Day 
"Conservation— A Global 
Perspective" 

2 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. A lecture by 
Dr. Peter H. Raven, director of the Garden. 
Free, for members only. Limited seating. 



FEBRUARY 19 /Members' Dey 
"Spring Gardening" 

1:30 and 7:30, Shoenberg Auditorium. A lec- 
ture by Julie Minner, co-owner of Minner 
Nursery, on preparing the garden with an 
emphasis on perennials. Free, for members 
only. Limited seating. 



GARDEN WALKERS BREAKFAST 
Every Wednesday and Saturday 
7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. 

The popular Garden Walkers Breakfast program continues 
with the Garden opening early on Wednesday and Saturday 
mornings. The mileage of various paths around the grounds will 
be available at the ticket counter. Health and nutrition programs 
will be offered in cooperation with the American Heart Associa- 
tion. The Gardenview Restaurant will offer its ' 'heart healthy" 
breakfast buffet of cereals, fruit, juice, and yogurt. (Coffee only 
will be available Wednesday, January 9.) The greenhouses will 
not open until regular opening hours at 9:00 a.m. Admission is 
free before noon every Wednesday and Saturday. 



JANUARY 



3*4 



THURSDAY 
& FRIDAY 



Garden Gate Shop Is Closed 
For Inventory 

Shop will reopen at 9 a.m. Satu: 
January 5. 



7*8 



MONDAY 
& TUESDAY 



January Clearance Sale 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Garden Gate 
Shop. Members receive 20% o: 
everything in the Shop, includir 
clearance merchandise. 



7-11 



MONDAY- 
FRIDAY 



Gardenview Restaurant Is 
Closed 

Restaurant will reopen on Satur 
January 12. 



18 



FRIDAY 



Members' Preview of 
Orchid Show 

5 to 8 p.m. , Ridgway Center. 
Brighten up a cold winter evenii 
with a colorful trip to the tropics 
Entertainment, cash bar. Dinne 
buffet available in Gardenview F 
taurant. Garden Gate Shop will 
open. For Members only. 

Orchid Sale 

5 p.m. to 8 p.m. January 18; 9 a. 
to 5 p.m. daily through Februan 
Garden Gate Shop. Members 
receive 20% off all orchid plants 
accessories. 



I and *«"«"* ^Guides fota 
jom* eGat nrts featuring 

*« art ' arC Zre of *e Garden. 
» dhorU l Set counter >" *e 

Meet at * e "* Free *>* 




Missouri Wildlife Artists 
Exhibition 

9a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through S 
day, February 17, Ridgway Cent 
Wildlife and nature paintings anc 
sculpture by members of the Mi 
souri Wildlife Artists Society. Fi 
with regular Garden admission. 



12. 



I HI 'LLET1N I JANUARY FEBRI AKY IWI 



E B R U A R Y 



SATURDAY 

iuri Wildlife Artists Society 
nstration Day 

p.m., Ridgway Center. Join 
of Missouri's finest artists as 
emonstrate techniques of oil 
itercolor painting and wood- 
g. Raptor Rehabilitation and 
nation Project will provide 
s as models. Free with regu- 
rden admission. 

SUNDAY 

lis Is a Lady's Slipper, 
j's the Prince?" 

p.m., Ridgway Center and 
ron. A day for children to 
ibout orchids and other tropi- 
nts in a variety of fun-filled 
ies. Tours of the Climatron 
-chid Show just for kids, led 
dents of the Henry Shaw 
my. Each participant will 
e an Orchids coloring book, 
kith regular Garden 



FEBRUARY 



Black History Month- 1 'On Road to the Dream" 

The Garden hosts a series of programs in celebration of the history and accomplishments of African- 
Americans. February events include: 



3 



SUNDAY 



"Celebrate the Gospel" 

2 to 5 p.m. , Shoenberg Auditorium 
and Ridgway Center. Gospel choirs 
from the St. Louis area perform 
music by African-American artists. 
Musical selections feature a range 
from early familiar pieces to recent 
contemporary works. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 



9 



SATURDAY 



Children's Day 

1 to 4 p.m. , Ridgway Center. A day 
of storytelling and crafts workshops 



will celebrate the legacy of African- 
Americans in science and agricul- 
ture. Co-sponsored by the Girl 
Scout Council of Greater St. Louis. 
Free with regular Garden admission. 



24 



SUNDAY 



Community Beautification 
Awards Reception 

6:30 p.m., Ridgway Center. The 
Garden will honor members of the 
African-American community who 
have made significant contributions 
to efforts to beautify area neighbor- 
hoods. By invitation only. 



Z7 



WEDNESDAY 



Lecture: "Ntozake Shange and 
Syllable" 

7 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. A 
distinguished poet, playwright and 
novelist, Ntozake Shange is one of 
America's most lyrical black voices 
and a major force in American fic- 
tion. She is the author of the criti- 
cally acclaimed Broadway play "For 
Colored Girls Who Have Consid- 
ered Suicide/When the Rainbow Is 
Enuf". An autograph session and 
reception will follow the lecture, 
which focuses on the power of lan- 
guage. $3.50 members, $4 non- 
members. Tickets available at Ridg- 
way Center beginning Monday, 
February 11. 



WEDNESDAY 

Seminar 

.m., Botanical Room, Ridg- 
enter. An informal way to 
ibout gift planning through 
; and discussion with estate 
ig experts. Free, but reserva- 
ire required: call 577-9532. 

lior League Presents 
St. Louis Flower Show 

riends and members of the Garden 
)ok forward to a wonderful display of 
erica's Gardens: Then and Now," at 
unior League of St. Louis national 
•r show January 31 through February 
he Kiel Exposition Hall. The show is 
sored by the St. Louis Convention 
Visitors Commission, and will feature 
ays and seminars led by noted 
rts. 

he Garden will participate with an 
ational exhibit featuring the Center 
[ome Gardening. Horticulture staff 
naster gardeners will be on hand at 
nes to answer questions. Dr. Mar- 
Crosby, assistant director, will speak 
Shaw's Garden Then and Now,' ' and 
s Henrich, acting director of hor- 
ure, will discuss "The Iris Family". 
h for more information, or call the 
r League at 997-3407 or 569-3117. 



From the Garden Gate Shop 



Shop Closed for 
Inventory 

The Garden Gate Shop will be closed 
for inventory Thursday and Friday, Janu- 
ary 3 and 4, and will reopen at 9 a.m. 
Saturday, January 5. 

January Clearance 
Sale 

Monday and Tuesday 
January 7 and 8, 1991 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Bonus savings! Members receive 
20% off everything in the Shop, plus a 
selection of clearance items, during the 
sale. 

Orchid Show and Sale 

The annual Orchid Sale kicks off with 
the members' preview of the 1991 Orchid 
Show on Friday evening, January 18, and 
continues until February 24. Members 
receive 20% off all orchids, orchid bark 
and fertilizer, and wire accessories. 



Valentine's Day 

Remember your sweetheart with a 
colorful blooming plant or one of our 
charming collection of romantic gifts and 
cards. The Tower Grove Rose, specially 
created for the Garden by the Boehm 
Porcelain Studios, says you care all year 
long. It is exclusive to the Garden Gate 
Shop, $175. 

Remember Feathered 
Friends In Winter 

Don't forget that the Garden Gate 
Shop has a wide variety of bird feeders, 
bird houses, bird seed and bird books, 
tapes and videotapes. 

Plan Ahead For Spring 

Pick up your seeds, windowsill green- 
houses, peat pots and seed-starting 
accessories. The Shop is also featuring 
the "Garden Planning Kit," a vegetable 
garden planner with a garden planning 
grid, 1800 reusable full-color peel and 
stick plants and complete garden planting 
instructions. 



13. 



BULLETIN I JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1991 1 



From the Membership Office 



MEMBERS' TRAVEL PROGRAM 

Lewis and Clark Trail 
Nature and History Tour 

MJUNE 14-27, 1991 

"Travels through Natural History" invites you to follow in 
the footsteps of Lewis and Clark's famous "Corps of Discov- 
ery" expedition of 1803-06 along the Missouri River to the 
northwestern territories. The tour is sponsored by the Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden, University of St. Louis Continuing Edu- 
cation Program, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Dr. 
Nancy Morin and Df. Marshall Crosby of the Garden, and Dr. 
Ray Breun of the Riverland Association are your tour hosts and 
lecturers. Highlights will include: 

■ Orientation lecture and tour of the historic St. Louis and Old 
St. Charles locations where the expedition began. 

■ Barge tour of the lower Missouri River. 

■ Travel by motorcoach to Independence, Fort Osage and St. 
Joseph, Missouri, studying Indian history and the fur trade. 

■ Travel to Fort Atkinson at the mouth of the Platte River. 
Continue to Pierre, South Dakota, and on to Bismarck, North 
Dakota, visiting the grave of Sitting Bull and a monument to 
Sacajawea. Lectures focus on the expedition's relationship with 
Indians. 

■ Visit the restored Mandan Indian Village and museum and 
the expedition's 1804-05 winter quarters at Knife River Indian 
Villages. 

■ Travel through the North Dakota Badlands to Fort Union 
Trading Post National Historic Site, and along the Yellowstone 
River to Billings, Montana. 

■ The arid shortgrass prairie gives way to forests of ponderosa 
pine and douglas fir as you enter the Rockies and stop at the 
128-year old Sacajawea Inn, an historic landmark on the banks 
of the Missouri Headwaters. 

■ Travel by barge through the Gates of the Mountains, study- 
ing the changed environment and the spectacular scenery of 
the "Missouri Breaks" in the region near Great Falls, 



Montana. 

■ Follow the expedition's path over the Bitterroot Range and 
Continental Divide, along the Lochsa, Clearwater and Snake 
River valleys, and back to arid prairie of the Nez Perce National 
Historic Park. Study the changing vegetation and the exploita- 
tion of the region based on the discoveries of Lewis and Clark. 

■ Follow the Columbia River and the Willamette Valley to Port- 
land. Turn north to Fort Vancouver and Mount St. Helens, 
staying at the lovely Shilo Inn at Seaside, Oregon, overlooking 
the Pacific. 

■ Tour the historic sites of the area, including the expedition's 
restored winter quarters at Fort Clatsop with actors in living 
history displays, and Fort Canby, where Lewis and Clark actu- 
ally reached their goal— the Pacific Ocean. 

The tour returns to St. Louis by air from Portland. Two 
hours of optional graduate credit are available from U.M. St. 
Louis Continuing Education at an additional fee. Reservations 
are due by May 1, 1991. For a complete itinerary and informa- 
tion, call the Membership Office at (314) 577-9517. 



Coming in 1991: 



■ A GARDEN TOUR OF CHINA-May 15-31, 1991 

Co-sponsored by the Garden and University of Missouri- 
St. Louis, this tour will be led by Juliana Yuan Burch, lecturer in 
Asian art history. 

■ MADAGASCAR-Odober 1991 

Watch your mail or call Brenda Banjak at 577-9517 for details 
on this exciting trip! 

Flowers And Candy For Your Valentine 

This Valentine's Day send a year of flowers with a Missouri 
Botanical Garden membership and a box of Fannie May Candy 
to your special valentine. Use the order form below or call 
577-5118 to order your Valentine membership. Gift recipients in 
the St. Louis metropolitan area will receive your unique Valen- 
tine gift delivered to their doorstep on February 14th. 



Gift Membership Order Form— Please mail at least three weeks prior to occasion: 



□ Valentine's Day fl Birthday □ Other. 

Gift to: (Please print) Name 

Address 

City State 



.Zip. 



Gift from: Name. 

Address 

City 



.State. 



.Zip. 



Telephone. 



Please sign card: Date needed by: 

Regular membership: $40. Contributing membership $75. 



□ My check for $ 

is enclosed. 

□ Please charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard 
Amount: $ 



Account No. 

Name on card:_ 
Expiration date:. 
Signed: 



Detach and mail to: Missouri Botanical Garden 
P.O. Box 17419 
St. Louis, Missouri 63178 

Call 577-5118 for more information. 



14. 



I BULLETIN I JANUARY FEBRUARY 1991 



ED U CATION DIVISION PLANS EXPEDITION 

Amazon Rain Forest of Peru 



■ JULY 13-20, 1991 

The Amazon River Basin is a region of 
unequaled biological diversity, with some 
3,000 species of birds, 4,000 species of 
butterflies, and 2,000 species offish. This 
summer, an extraordinary travel experi- 
ence led by Garden education staff will 
stimulate and educate participants about 
the natural wonders of the Earth and the 
vital role the Amazon plays in global 
ecology. 

The river and jungle adventure will 
explore the rich Peruvian section of the 
Amazon River and surrounding river 
basin. Travelers will stay in secluded river 
lodges in the dense tropical rain forest. 
Local guides with extensive knowledge of 
the plants and animals indigenous to the 
Amazon will accompany the Garden 
group along rain forest trails and canoe 
journeys on the Amazon River and its 
tributaries. Expedition participants will 
also have opportunities to meet with 
natives of the region. 

Anyone interested in participating in 
the trip should contact Glenn Kopp or 



Barbara Addelson, Missouri Botanical 
Garden Education Division, (314) 
577-5140. 




Travelers in the Amazon explore the River 's 
natural beauty from dugout canoes. 



Tropical Rain Forests 
Summer Workshop for 
Teachers 

Once again the Garden is offering a 
summer workshop on the nature and 
value of tropical rain forests, the social 
and economic factors contributing to their 
destruction, and the methods for their 
preservation. The course will be held at 
the Garden, June 17-28, in ten sessions 
from 9 a.m. to noon. 

The course is designed to prepare 
teachers of grades K-12 to teach about 
deforestation in their classrooms and will 
provide them with materials, strategies 
and resources. Two graduate or under- 
graduate credit hours in biology or educa- 
tion from the University of Missouri- 
St. Louis will be awarded upon comple- 
tion. Instructors will be Garden staff and 
area specialists. 

The workshop will correlate with the 
upcoming Smithsonian Institution Travel- 
ing Exhibition Service (SITES) exhibit, 
"Tropical Rain Forest: A Disappearing 
Treasure,' ' which will be in St. Louis Janu- 
ary 11 -April 5, 1992. The workshop was 
originally developed through funding by a 
grant from the John D. and Catherine T. 
MacArthur Foundation. 

For more information call 577-5140. 



1991 Members' Days 

The coming year features an exciting 
calendar of special monthly events just 
for Garden members. 



January 22 


"Conservation: A Global 




Perspective," lecture by 




Peter H. Raven 


February 19 


"Spring Gardening," lec- 




ture by Julie Minner 


March 20 


Hard Hat Tour of Center 




for Home Gardening 


April 25 


Azalea Walk 


May 17 


Purple Martin Evening 


June 28 


Members' Musical 




Evening 


July 11 


Moonlight Stroll 


August 17 


Early Morning Stroll 


September 21 


Fall Gardening Lecture 


October 9 


Fall Foliage/Cider Walk 


November 14 


Tour of the Greenhouses 


December 14 


ITC Theater 




NEWS FROM THE HENRY SHAW ACADEMY 

Stream Ecology Program Studies 
Upper Meramec River 



Last October a group of 13 and 14-year old students and their instructors explored 
the upper Meramec River on a chilly, exciting two-day float trip. The group traversed 
beaver dams and cold spring fed water, observing fish and wildlife, while collecting 
chemical samples and other data. Their information was used to help build a national 
database on rivers through the Missouri Department of Conservation Stream Team 
project, a nationally recognized environmental stream preservation program. Data 
also was furnished to TERC (Technology Education Resource Centers), an interna- 
tional global ecology database. 

Stream Ecology is an innovative new program offered by the Henry Shaw 
Academy (HSA). It provides exceptional opportunities for 13-14 year olds interested 
in science, research, technology and adventure based in a canoeing and camping pro- 
gram. Classes held before and after the field trips demonstrate research methods, 
map reading, and analysis of data. The course will continue in the winter, spring and 
summer as the group researches the springs, caves and water life of the Meramec all 
the way to Onandaga Cave. In the future Stream Ecology will research additional 
rivers and streams throughout Missouri. 

A limited number of spaces are still open for interested and committed students. 
Some scholarships may be available. The next field trip is January 5-6, 1991. To apply 
for the program call Jeff De Pew, HSA Coordinator, 577-5135, as soon as possible. 



15. 



BULLETIN i JANl'ARV FRBRI'ARY 1991 I 




Pictured at the Henry Shan Pinner, left to right: Kenneth Piddington; Peter Raven; William Ruckelshaus; 
Robert Kresko, president oj the Board o) Trustees: and William Maritz. 

William Ruckelshaus Receives Henry Shaw Medal 

The Henry Shaw Medal for 1990 was awarded to William Doyle Ruckleshaus at 
the annual dinner on Thursday, October 25 at the Adam's Mark Hotel. William D. 
Maritz, chairman of the award committee and a Garden Trustee, presented the 
medal. 

Mr. Ruckelshaus was honored as the first director of the Environmental Protection 
Agency, which he served in 1970-73 and again in 1983-84. In 1973 he was appointed 
acting director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and in the same year was 
named Deputy Attorney General of the United States. Today he is chairman and chief 
executive officer of Browning- Ferris Industries, Inc. of Houston, Texas, one of the 
nation's largest waste disposal companies. He also serves on the board of the Conser- 
vation Foundation/ World Wildlife Fund. He writes and speaks often on the challenge 
of formulating policies that promote sustainable development in a world of limited 
resources. 

Also speaking at the dinner was Kenneth Piddington, director of the Environmen- 
tal 1 )epartment of the World Bank. A slide presentation on the Garden's role in the 
global environmental movement, prepared with the aid of Maritz, Inc., was another 
highlight of the evening. 

Paul Brockmann: 20 Years at the Garden 




"Over the past 20 years the Garden 
has achieved the reputation as a forerun- 
ner in setting the standard for botanical 
garden excellence," says Paul Brock- 
mann. He should know; Brockmann came 
to the Garden in 1970 and has participated 
in the changes as they occurred. 

Paul joined the horticulture division 
under Alfred Saxdal in 1970 after earning 
his B.S. degree in forestry from the 
University of Missouri at Columbia. 
' 'The Lehmann Building was just starting 
construction," he remembers. "We still 



had a cord-and-plug switchboard for the 
telephones, and advanced technology 
was an adding machine. My job was 
pretty varied— mowing grass, digging the 
beds, planting, and repairing equipment." 
In 1976 Dr. Raven appointed Brock- 
mann as director of General Services. His 
responsibilities include safety, security, 
and maintenance of all Garden structures; 
he supervises shipping and receiving, and 
manages all Garden construction 
projects. It is a diverse job, with a variety 
of new learning experiences. "It has 



Daylily Society Honors 
Ed and Mary Schnarr 

The West County Daylily Society has 
presented the Garden with $7,000 raised 
from the sale of divisions of plants from 
the Jenkins Daylily Garden. The donation 
was made in honor of Ed and Mary 
Schnarr, whose dedication and devotion 
made the display what it is today. 

The Schnarrs volunteered their serv- 
ices at the Garden for many years, and Ed 
is a past president of the Daylily Society. 
They were instrumental in planning the 
Jenkins Daylily Garden's planting scheme 
and in acquiring all of the plants through 
donations or purchases. Together with 
the members of the Society, the Schnarrs 
gave countless hours of care and attention 
to the planting and care of the display. 

A plaque will be installed in the south 
end of the Daylily Garden commemorat- 
ing the Schnarrs' achievement. The sur- 
rounding plantings will feature daylilies 
produced by Missouri hybridizers. The 
Garden is deeply grateful to Mr. and Mrs. 
Schnarr and the members of the Daylily 
Society for their splendid contribution. 

been to my advantage to be able to incor- 
porate my engineering background with 
actual hands-on experience with the facili- 
ties here," he says. 

In supervising the design and construc- 
tion of all of the new buildings at the Gar- 
den, Brockmann works closely with the 
contractors and architects. "We probably 
are more demanding than many clients," 
he says, "but it pays off in the long run. 
We are constantly searching for the most 
beneficial blend of technology and ecolog- 
ical consciousness in order to preserve 
our commitment to excellence.' ' 

Paul pioneered the Garden's use of 
computers to schedule routine preventive 
maintenance. Staff productivity is also 
enhanced by Broekmann's insistence on 
using consistent, standardized equipment 
and utilities systems whenever possible. 
The historic buildings are a special chal- 
lenge, and the Garden's archives are 
often consulted for original plans and 
specifications. 

"Twenty years ago some of our brick 
maintenance sheds had dirt floors. A lot 
has changed, but we're still using a dump 
truck and a front end loader from the late 
1960s," Paul points out. "Perhaps the 
most satisfying things about this job are 
the unique opportunities for learning and 
growth that arise out of the various 
demands of Garden daily life, and of 
course being able to see the beauty all our 
efforts help to create." 



16. 



\BULLET1N JANUARY FEBRUARY 1991 



Trustee Profile 




John K.Wallace 

John K. Wallace first became inter- 
ested in the Garden early in 1980 during 
the Ridgway Center capital campaign. As 
he became involved with the Garden, he 
was amazed to learn more about its mis- 
sion and how much the Garden does 
beyond its displays. He found Garden 
efforts in tropical research astounding and 
exciting. 

Mr. Wallace joined the Board of Trus- 
tees in 1982. "I became committed to 
help the Garden in whatever way I could. 
It is so much more than an attractive place 



to visit," he said. 

Serving presently as an officer on the 
Board of Trustees, Mr. Wallace com- 
mented that the greatest challenge during 
his nearly ten years of service has been 
his role in the recent capital drive. "As 
Chairman of the Special Gifts Committee, 
I have been intimately involved in assist- 
ing in the development process and have 
found working with new prospects and 
presenting the Garden to them to be an 
extremely rewarding assignment. It is a 
delight to introduce people to the Garden 
and give them a better understanding of 
the Garden's entire mission." 

In thinking about the Garden's future, 
Mr. Wallace said that while it is amazing 
how far the Garden has come in the last 
ten years, we must not be lulled by that 
progress because there is still much to be 
accomplished. "The institution is grow- 
ing and at no time can the Trustees afford 
to be complacent. There will be many 
more challenges ahead as the Garden pre- 
pares for the year 2000.' ' 

A native St. Louisan, Mr. Wallace 
presently serves as Chairman and Chief 
Executive Officer of Imperial Products 
Corporation. His civic responsibilities 
beyond the Missouri Botanical Garden 
include serving as a Trustee at Wash- 
ington University, and a Director at the 
St. Louis Municipal Opera. Wallace 
received his undergraduate degree from 
Yale and his Masters in Business Adminis- 
tration from Washington University. He 
and his wife Ellen have three children. 




On October 24 the Garden hosted a dinner in honor of Kwoh-Ting Li, senior economic advisor 
to the president of Taiwan, Republic of China. The Garden is collaborating with scientists on 
Taiwan in studies of biological diversity. Shown here, left to right, are Dr. Peter H. Raven, 
K.T. Li, and Mayor Vincent Schoemehl, a Garden Trustee. 



Spink Gallery Adds 
New Sculptures 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 
recently presented the Garden with fif- 
teen rare and exquisite pieces of Boehm 
porcelain sculpture to be added to the col- 
lection already on display in the Ridgway 
Center. Mr. and Mrs. Spink gave the gal- 
lery and presented the collection to the 
Garden in 1982 in memory of Blanche and 
Taylor Spink. 

The new acquisitions include an intri- 
cate orchid centerpiece and a Bald Eagle 
once owned by President John F. 
Kennedy. The Spink Gallery is one of the 
world's finest exhibits of birds, flowers 
and fish from the Boehm Porcelain 
Studios. 

MBG Calendar 
Receives Support 

Mrs. William H. Schield of St. Louis 
has once again contributed generous 
financial support for the printing of the 
Garden's Calendar. A devoted member 
for many years, Mrs. Schield derives spe- 
cial pleasure from sharing the beauty of 
the Garden in a lasting way with friends in 
St. Louis and around the world. 

The 1991 Garden Calendar is a breath- 
taking collection of large full color photo- 
graphs by Jack Jennings that capture the 
Garden's landscape throughout the sea- 
sons. The calendar is available through 
the Garden Gate Shop. The Garden is 
deeply grateful to Mrs. Schield for con- 
tinuing to make the popular Calendar 
possible. 

INMEMORIAM 

Clifford E. Rhoads 

One of the Garden's original Answer 
Man volunteers, Cliff Rhoads, died 
October 19, 1990 at the age of 95. Mr. 
Rhoads had been a volunteer at the Gar- 
den since 1955, and in 1986 he was 
honored for 40 years of service to the 
Garden. He was a member of the St. 
Louis Garden Club, a skilled cabinet- 
maker and a devoted, knowledgeable gar- 
dener. He helped to lay out and plant the 
rose garden, and in 1960 he helped to 
establish the Garden's Answer Service. 

Mr. Rhoads served in the Army Air 
Service in World War I as a mechanic, and 
worked on the airplanes of Charles Lind- 
bergh and James Doolittle when they 
were flying the mail into St. Louis. Later 
Mr. Rhoads became an automobile parts 
and service manager, retiring in the 
mid-1960s. 



17. 



BULLETIN JANUARY FEBRUARY 1991 1 



Gift Planning 



New Seminar Series 

A new series of seminars will be 
offered this spring in response to many 
requests. Gift planning concepts will be 
discussed in informational seminars that 
provide an informal and easy way to learn 
about gift planning ideas and techniques. 

The first session will be an evening 
seminar on February 27, 1991 at 6:30 
p.m. in the Botanical Room at the Ridg- 
way Center. This session will cover the 
importance of a valid will and the steps 
necessary to ensure having one. 

On April 4 there will be a morning ses- 
sion on the same topic at 9 a.m. in the 
Garden Room. This will be followed one 
week later on April 11, also at 9 a.m. in 
the Garden Room, with an expanded pro- 
gram about additional techniques that are 
available to make sound financial plans for 
the future. While the morning sessions 
arc a two part series, it is not necessary 
to attend both. 

The seminars are offered free of 
charge. However, a reservation must be 
made in advance to ensure seating and 
materials. For more information or to 
make reservations please call Ernestina 
Short at 577-9532, or write to her at P.O. 
Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166-0299. 



Pat Rich Is New Head of 
Arts and Education 
Council 

.^^ Patricia E. Rich, 

' former director of 
development at the 
Garden, was named 
president of the Arts 
and Education Coun- 
cil of Greater St. 
Louis, effective Nov- 
ember 1, 1990. Rich 
was on the staff of the Garden for six 
years, first as special assistant to Dr. 
Raven, then as director of planning and 
development. In 1987 she formed her 
own management consulting firm, 
Patricia Rich Associates, specializing in 
fund raising and planning for nonprofit 
organizations, and continued to serve 
the Garden in addition to a number of 
St. Louis cultural institutions. Her 
projects for the Garden included oversee- 





On October 29 a dinner was held at Spink Pavilion to welcome a delegation from Xanjing, 
China, in honor of its sister city relationship with St. Louis. Pictured left to right are: 
Dr. Chingling 7ai, Teng Heling, Jing Yuanhu, Dr. Peter Raven, Mayor Wang Rongbing, 
Song Peiming, and Wang Jianling. 




(Left to right) Antoine Solomon of the Guyanese Society of St. Louis is shown presenting a 
painting to Dr. Marshall Crosby, assistant director, and Dr. W D. Stecens, manager of 
research. The painting depicts a typical Amerindian scene in the rain forest of Guyana, with 
the Mazaruni River in the foreground. It was presented to the Garden by the Guyanese Soci- 
ety of St. Louis on behalf of the mayor and citizens of Georgetown, Guyana, in celebration of 
their sister city relationship with St. Louis. 



ing the development of the membership 
program and the Ridgway Center. 

The Arts and Education Council, 
formed in 1963, is a nonprofit association 
providing financial assistance to over 140 
member organizations in the metropolitan 



area through an annual fund drive and the 
bi-annual CAMELOT auction. 

"We congratulate Pat on her achieve- 
ment and look forward to her continued 
contributions to the St. Louis cultural 
community," Dr. Raven said. 



IS. 



\BULLETIN JANUARY FEBRUARY 1991 



Raven Awarded Major Prizes For Environmental Work 

Dr. Peter H. Raven, director of the Garden, has received three prestigious 
national and international scientific and environmental awards. 

On November 9 the National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT) presented 
Raven with their Distinguished Service Award for major contributions to biology. The 
award was presented at the NABT 1990 convention in Houston. 

On November 10 His Royal Highness, Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands, con- 
firmed Raven as an Officer in the Order of the Royal Ark, a society established in 1971 
to honor individuals for outstanding work in the preservation of nature. 

On December 3 the Council of Scientific Society Presidents (CSSP) presented 
Raven with its 1990 Award for the Support of Science. The CSSP confers this award 
each year to honor ' 'an individual who merits recognition for dedicated support of sci- 
ence, free science communication, science research, and public understanding of sci- 
ence." The award was established in 1983. Past recipients include C. Everett Koop, 
Surgeon General of the United States; Roland W. Schmitt, Chairman of the National 
Science Board; William Carey, Executive Officer of the American Association of the 
Advancement of Science; and Erich Bloch, Director of the National Science Foun- 
dation. 



Raven Serves on Panel 
for St. Francis Prize 

The first International St. Francis 
Prize for the Environment was presented 
on October 20 in Assisi, Italy. Dr. Peter 
H. Raven served on the panel of 12 jurors 
making the awards, which are sponsored 
by the Franciscan Center of Environmen- 
tal Studies in Rome and the Sacred Con- 
vent of St. Francis in Assisi. A 1987 papal 
proclamation named St. Francis the 



Moving? Please Remember 
To Send Us Your New Address. 

To avoid missing any of your membership 
mailings, you must give us your new 
address at least three weeks before you 
move. Please enclose the mailing label on 
the back cover of this Bulletin, and mail to: 
Membership Office, Missouri Botanical 
Garden, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166. 



patron saint of ecologists. 

The "Canticle of All Creatures" prize 
is awarded to persons or institutions that 
have distinguished themselves at the 
highest international level to the harmoni- 
ous relations of human beings within their 
environment. The 1990 awards were pre- 
sented to the National Geographic Soci- 
ety, and to Professors Maurice Aubert 
and Amintore Fanfani. 

Richardson Honored by 
University of Naples 

Dr. P. Mick Richardson, manager of 
graduate studies at the Garden, was 
recognized as an "Honorary Botanist' ' by 
the Botanical Garden of the University of 
Naples, Italy, while participating in the 
85th Congress of the Italian Botanical 
Society last October. Richardson was a 
visiting professor at the Botanical Garden 
in 1987-88. 



STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP MANAGEMENT AND 
CIRCULATION (Required by 39 U.S.C. 3685) 1. Title of 
publication: BULLETIN. Publication No. 0026-6507. 2. 
Date of filing: October 1, 1990. 3. Six times a year, bi- 
monthly in January, March, May, July, September and 
November. 4. Location of known office of publication: 2345 
Tower Grove Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110. 5. Location of 
the headquarters or general offices of the publishers: P.O. 
Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166. 6. Names and complete 
addresses of publisher and editor are: Publisher— Board of 
Trustees, Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, St. 
Louis, MO 63166. Editor-Susan VV. Caine, P.O. Box 299, 
St. Louis, MO 63166. 7. Owner: Missouri Botanical Gar- 
den, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166. 8. Known bond- 
holders, mortgagees and other security holders owning or 
holding 1 percent or more of total amount of bonds, mort- 
gages or other securities: None. 9. The purposes, function 
and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt sta- 
tus for Federal income tax purposes has not changed during 
the preceding 12 months. Authorized to mail at special rates 
(section 432.12 DMM). 10. Extent and nature of circulation: 
A. Total no. copies printed. Average no. copies each issue 
during preceding 12 months 27,283. Actual no. copies of sin- 
gle issue published nearest to filing date 28,500. Paid Circu- 
lation: 1. Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors 



and counter sales. Average no. copies each issue during 
preceding 12 months -0-. Actual no. copies of single issue 
published nearest to filing date -0-. 2. Mail subscription: 
Average no copies each issue during preceding 12 months 
26.044. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to 
filing date 27,104. C Total paid circulation: Average no. 
copies each issue during preceding 12 months 26,044. 
Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to filing 
date 27,104. D. Free distribution: Average no. copies each 
issue during preceding 12 months 868. Actual no. copies of 
single issue published nearest to filing date 1,033. E. Total 
distribution: Average no. copies each issue during pre- 
ceding 12 months 26,912. Actual no. copies of single issue 
published nearest to filling date 28,137. F Copies not dis- 
tributed: 1. Office use, left over, unaccounted, spoiled after 
printing: Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 
months 371. Actual no. copies of single issue published 
nearest to filing date 363. 2. Return from news agents: 
Average no. copies each issue during preceding 12 months 
-0-. Actual no. copies of single issue published nearest to fil- 
ing date -0-. G. Total: Average no. copies each issue during 
preceding 12 months 27,283. Actual no. copies of single 
issue published nearest to filing date 28,500. I certify that 
the statement made by me above is correct and complete. 
(signed) Susan W. Caine, Editor and Manager of Publications. 




Forero Receives National 
Excellence Award 

Dr. Enrique Forero, the Garden's 
director of research, has been awarded 
the National Excellence Award in Natural 
Sciences by the Alumni Association of the 
National University, Bogota, Colombia, 
the most important center of higher edu- 
cation in the country. Dr. Forero received 
his undergraduate degree in botany from 
the National University in April of 1965 
and went on to receive a Ph.D. degree 
from the City University of New 
York/New York Botanical Garden in 1972. 
He has been with the Missouri Botanical 
Garden since 1986. The National Excel- 
lence Awards were presented this year 
for the first time, and Dr. Forero was 
among twenty recipients that included a 
former President of Colombia and other 
outstanding personalities in science, edu- 
cation, the arts, engineering, medicine, 
and other fields. 



Behind the Scenes 



Robert Bowden Named 
Director of Atlanta 
Botanical Garden 

Robert Bowden, former director of 
horticulture at the Garden, has been 
named executive director of the Atlanta 
Botanical Garden, effective January 1, 
1991. Bowden came to St. Louis in 1988 
from Old Westbury Gardens in Long 
Island, New York. 

The Atlanta Botanical Garden is a 
30-acre facility dedicated to display, edu- 
cation and research. It is considered one 
of the finest of a new generation of botani- 
cal gardens in the U.S. , with a staff of 48 
and nearly 9,000 members. Its new dis- 
play facility, the Dorothy Chapman Fuqua 
Conservatory, drew 200,000 visitors last 
year. 

As executive director, Bowden will 
supervise all operations, from plant col- 
lections to fundraising. 



19. 



BULLETIN JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1991 




i* *,$£." 



Flocking To See the Sheep 

A flock of lifelike sheep created by the 
noted French sculptor Francois-Xavier 
Lalanne has appeared on the grassy hills 
just south of the Center for Home 
Gardening site. The sculptures, crafted 
of bronze and epoxy stone, are grazing at 
the Garden on long term loan from the 
Greenberg Gallery of St. Louis. Persons 
interested in taking one home may call 
the Greenberg Gallery at (314) 361-7600. 

"This art delights everyone, young 
and old," said Marshall Crosby, assistant 
director of the Garden. "Lalanne's work 
brings warm smiles to visitors who hap- 
pen upon the sheep while strolling 
through the Garden." 



Tributes 



September -October 1990 



In Honor Of 



Mr. Claude Abrams 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 

Miss Rosemary Armbruster 

Mrs. Elma T. Chapman 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Benecke 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Perry 
Dr. and Mrs. Michael Pozsgay 
Mr. and Mrs. James Rehg 
Barbara and Lawrence 

Biondo 
Weingartner Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Willy Brandt 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Katz 
Mr. and Mrs. Dwane Busse 
Bill and Jean Bohs 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. 
Byrnes 

Mr. Jay A. Epstein 

Mrs. Virginia Epstein 

Mrs. Alma Winkler 

Mrs. Marie Tobin Carlin 

Julia H. Otto 

Bill Clark 

Bryan, Cave, McPheeters and 

McRoberts 
.lames and Elizabeth 

Cunningham 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Remmert 
Mrs. Sara W. Davidson 
John Davidson 
Woody Davidson 
Mary McWilliams 
Audrey and Dick Deglman 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Frank 

Family 

Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Dow ling 
Mrs. Bo Axelrod 
Mrs. Richard T. Williams 
William C. Edgecombe 

Mr. Rick Halpern 



Mrs. Jack R. Eidelman 

Mrs. Henry L, Freund 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Marion 
Engler 

Mr. and Mrs. John Gardner 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Horan 
Mr. and Mrs. Max Erlich 
Mr. and Mrs. Don L. Fleming 

Jane and Scott Fehl 

Marie and Mark Weingartner Family 
Ms. Cathy Frank 
Dr. and Mrs. Alvin R. Frank 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Geile 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin A. Weinhold 
Mrs. Alice S. Gerdine 
Andrew S. Meyer 
Dr. and Mrs. John Strauch Meyer 
Philip S. Meyer 
Caroline and Bill Sant 
Mrs. Ralph Goldsticher 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Ettman 
Mr. and Mrs. Ruby Goodman 
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Feinstein 
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Rosenbloom 
Mrs. Marie Zukoski Haar 
Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fogarty 
Mrs. Whitney Harris 
Ellen and Henry Dubinsky 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. 
Harte 

Dolores and Winnifred Fiege 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Hillebrand 
Mrs. Bess Frederick 
Mr. and Mrs. James M. 
Hoffmann 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Bland 
Prof. Koichi Kawana 

Adachi School of Ikebana 
Dr. and Mrs. Yoshio Akiyama 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur K. Cho 
Mr. and Mrs. George T. Ishizuka 
Mabel Kitsuse 
Kim Maeda 



A. and G. V. Nishizawa 

Mr. and Mrs. Ken Yamamoto 

Mrs. Sheryl Lauter 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Weil 

Mr. Morris Lefton 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren J. Gelman 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Budd 

Lewin 
Mrs. Frances Sears 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin S. Strassner 
Nicholas E. Magnis 

Joanne and Scot Boulton 
Rick, Nancy, John, Dave 

Tana and Andy McKerrow 

Mrs. Maria J. Weingartner 

Mrs. Melvin Mednikow 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Morton Isaac- 
Mr. Dean Mefford 
Susan and Glen Walter 
Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin 

Milder 
Mr. and Mrs. David Lipman 
Mr. and Mrs. I.E. Millstone 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin F. Guth 
Florence Stern 
Nora and Walter Stern 
Ms. Julia K. Murray 
Sally A. Harris 
Carol E. Willman 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ring 
Mrs. William H. Schield 
Marjorie and Kenneth Robins 
Mrs. Roblee McCarthy 
Ruth Rogers 
Mrs. G. K. Robins 

Mr. Alan Ross 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ullman 

Mr. and Mrs. S. I. Rothschild 

Mrs. Peggy R. Hellman 

Edward Ruprecht 

Dan and Betsy Breckenridge 



Lisa and Jeff Sass 

Laura Mae Cassel 

Ed and Mary Schnarr 

Missouri Botanical Garden Day Lily 

Association 
Dr. and Mrs. Howard 

Schneiderman 
Dr. and Mrs. David M. Kipnis 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Walk 
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron 0. 

Schucart 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Halpern 
Mary Lee and Edward See 
Mrs. Julius A. Gewinner 
Mr. Joseph Simpkins 

Mrs. Florence G. Stern 
Harriot Smith 

Bryan. Cave. McPheeters and 

McRoberts 
Dr. Oscar Soule 
Dr. and Mrs. Milton J. Deitch 
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Fischer 
Mr. Michael D. Moore 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Prince 
Mrs. Ruth Schwartz 
Mrs. Samuel Soule 
Mrs. Alan E. Goldberg 
Mrs. Ben H. Senturia 
Mr. and Mrs. Don 

Stukenbroeker 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Martin 

Eugene C. Sunnen 

Mrs. Eugene C. Sunnen 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Tasch 

Mr. and Mrs. William F Means 

Mrs. Velma M. Tierney 

Miss Helen Novak 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Tucker 

Dr. and Mrs. Maurice J. Keller 

Mrs. Nadja Watts 

Mrs. Elizabeth Jacobs 
Dr. Thomas Weiler 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Barken 



20. 



I HI 1.LET1S JAM ARY FKHRl AKV 1991 



Mr. and Mrs. Leroy H. 
Weinhold 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin A. Weinhold 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Weinhold 
Mrs. Thomas White 
Dr. and Mrs. James T. Chamness 
Mr. Arthur E. Zbaren 

Mrs. Doris M. Kloeppner 
Mr. Charles F. Zukoski 

Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fogarty 



In Memory Of 



Mrs. Emily Ackermann 

Edward P. Burke Family 

Mr. Al Adam 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Sauer 
Mrs. Eolin Ahlert 

St. Louis Horticultural Society 

Mr. Al Ahner 

Dr. and Mrs. Jack Tippett 
Mrs. Sophie Albert 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Menteer 
Mr. and Mrs. Emil Zeilmann 

Mr. Bill Albright 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Ritchie 

Mr. Sydney I. Asher 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Early 

Mrs. Freda Azbill 

Mr. and Mrs. Melroy Hutrick 

Mrs. Isabel A. Baer 

Dr. and Mrs. Murray E. Finn 
Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson L. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings 

Smith 
Dr. James W. Bagby 
Mrs. George W. Skinner 
Mrs. Eleanor W. Baker 

Mrs. Nancy Burke 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. George 
Mr. and Mrs. William G. Heckman 
Mr. and Mrs. John Holmes 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. Lortz 

Anna Mae Ballard 

Mrs. J. Paul Biesterfeldt 

Mr. Francis C. Gorman 

Dr. and Mrs. Samuel E. Guyer 

Family 
Mr. and Mrs. August H. Lamack 
Beatrice S. Mosher 
Mrs. Bertie Mae Perkins 
Margaret Ruschill 
Mrs. Donald Strominger 

Miss Beckerle 

Esther Bauer 

Mr. and Mrs. Orville F. Huster 

Mrs. Lydia Biegeleisen 

Nancy Sachs 

Mr. Charles Bierman 

Mrs. Kitty Johnson Family 

Mr. Christopher Biraben 

Mrs. Jack A. Jacobs 
Mrs. Meriel Bockrath 

Mr. and Mrs. August H. Lamack 
Henry P. Bruemmer 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Bruemmer 
Mr. Michael Golden and Cvndee 

Hahn 
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Guise 
Lucille Guise Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hackmann 
Ms. Deanna M. Michaels 



Mrs. Alice Bruns 

Mrs. Gloria M.Jones 
Pasadena Garden Club 
Mr. William H. Burch 

Mrs. Marie Grzesiowski 
Mrs. Frances Chalfant 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Goessling 
Maurice R. Chambers 
Mrs. George H. Capps 
Mrs. Thomas W. Shields 
Mr. and Mrs. David R. Smith 
Lt. Gregory R. Cobb 

Friends of Laura Cobb 
Mrs. Shirley N. Coin 
Ms. Carolyn B. Pratt 
Mr. Enrico Coladonato 

Richard Wile Family 

Evelyn M. Collins 

Mrs. Leonard L. Davis Jr. 

Mrs. Susan Hammel Crutcher 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Wenzel 
Mrs. Thomas B. Curtis 

Mr. and Mrs. James G. Conzelman Jr. 
Mrs. Virginia H. Heitert 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. Lyle S. Woodcock 
Mrs. Rose Cyran 
Missouri Botanical Garden- 
Library Staff and Volunteers 
Miss Juanita Davis 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Nussbaum 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin S. Taylor 
Iva B. Dearing 
Mr. and Mrs. Warner Simons 

Col. JohnS. Denvir(Ret.) 

Mrs. Robert Bard 

Mrs. Audrey Dickson 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Power 

Alma Duhan 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Jones 

Christopher Eames 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin S. Fitzgerald 

Mrs. Eunice Eilermann 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard P. Wunderlich 

Mother of Susan Elwood 

Ms. Ellen Braverman 

Jill Enochs 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Enochs 

Mr. Donald Faerber 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Ritchie 
Mrs. Pearl Fechter 

Dr. Donald Flanagan 
Mr. Mark Firestone 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Allen 
Mrs. CeilFleisher 

Mr. and Mrs. Merlin Lickhalter 

Mrs. Ann Forquer 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Blake 

Mrs. L. Franz 

Mrs. Paul W. Crow 

Mr. Melville Friedman 

Mrs. Raymond J. Freed 

Mary Anne Frueh 

Mr. Steven W. Katich 
Mr. James T. Fuchs 

Mr. Richard Zoernig 

Joseph and Mary Gasparich 

Ms. Loretta G. Kovar 
Grandson of Mr. and Mrs. 
Benjamin Gelber 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Zemmel 



Mr. Francis L. George 

Ms. Carolyn B. Pratt 
Mr. Paul Goessling 
Mrs. James Lee Johnson 
Mr. Mitchell Grzeseowski 
Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Munn 
Willis D. Hadley 

Mrs. James Lee Johnson 

Mr. Maurice Handler 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven Grodsky 
Arthur Paul Hartman 

Mr. Paul Hartman 

Mrs. Ceil Haspiel 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald F. Roth 
Mr. William Haverstick 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth H. Bitting Jr. 

Mrs. William Bixby Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Blanke Jr. 

Mr. Clark V. Graves 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 

Mrs. E. R. Hurdjr. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Max Lippmanjr. 

Mrs. George W. Skinner 

Miss Clara Herbert 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Atwood 
Mr. Ron Higginbotham 
Mrs. Cory Hartung 
William Hill 

Mr. Stephen Toedebusch 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen M. Wuller 

Miss Polly Hitchcock 

Mrs. Frank Sheldon 
Mrs. Lucy A. Hoefel 

Don and Shirley Rumer 

Mrs. Bess Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew S. Wolfson 
Mr. Joseph C. Hopewell 

Mrs. Charles W. Kehoe 

Mr. A . Clifford Jones Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Elliot Benoist 
Ms. Catherine B. Haskins 

Mr. Edward D. Jones Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Frank 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Max Lippmanjr. 
Mrs. Polk Withers 

Ralph William Jones 

Mrs. Mary Ann Barclay 

Mr. Ken Kalmer 

Jerry Kelley 

Pat Schmiz 

Mr. J. Warren Kane 

Mrs. Mary Sherman 

Dr. Koichi Kawana 

Dr. and Mrs. Yoshio Akiyama 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mrs. Florence Morris Forbes 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Fujioka 

Chimie Hashimoto 

Miss Rose E. Honda 

Eiko Iwata 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Maeda 

Janice Matsutsuyu 

Mr. Sam M. Nakano 

Mrs. Ronald Prince 

St. Louis Japanese American 

Citizens League 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Terasaki 
Mrs. Betty Kid well 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Anderson 

Sandra Schoenberg Kling 

Edith and ' Ray Graber 
Mr. Harry G. Koerber 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hallett 



Mr. Paul Kratz 

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Henderson 
Mrs. Frederick Kraus 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Franklin Rassieur 
Alfred F. Krueger 

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace Sr. 

Mr. Jack D. Kuykendall 

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald K. McGregor 
Mrs. George Lay 
Mrs. Arden Fisher 
Mother of Kathryn Lee 

Carolyn and Leon Ullensvang 

Charles E. Leonhardt 

Jack and Benta Brummer 
Olga and Roger I )unbar 

Mrs. Helga Levy 

Martin and Louise Smith 
William Lewis 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Heath 
Mr. Bradford N. Locke 
Mr. and Mrs. Perry W. Locke 
Christopher T. Love 
Dr. and Mrs. Murray E. Finn 

Mr. Henry Lowenhaupt 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 

Dr. and Mrs. Murray E. Finn 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F Ruwitch 

Mrs. Selma G. Seldin 

Mrs. Earle E. Maricle 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth H. Bitting Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Brodhead Jr. 

Mrs. James Lee Johnson 

Mr. James Mclntyre 

Belle Coeur Garden Club 

Russell S. McMahan Sr. 

Rebecca L. Barnard 

Mrs. Dorothy Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Lortz 

Samuel Miller 

David and Jill Belsky 

Charlie and Joyce Brendt 

Jeff and Katie Brodsky 

Mueriel Carp 

Jim and Karen Favia 

Amy and Steve Gallant 

Harriet and Larry Glazer 

Charles Goldman 

Jim and Sharon Greenstein 

Paula and Barry Holtzman 

Jeff and Renee Kanefield 

Liz Kutten 

Melanie and Tom Litz 

Arthur and Laura Lueking 

Debbie Mehlman 

Arthur and Thelma Muskin 

Joe and Susan Nehmen 

Carl and Marcy Ranger 

John Roos and Kathleen Gravot-Roos 

Maria Rubeck 

Barbara and Donald Rubin 

Kathy Segal 

Barbara and Richie Shapiro 

Noreen Silzer 

Nancy and Robbie Smith 

Regina and Ted Smith 

Michelle and Steve Wexler 

Mrs. Arthur R. Niemoeller 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Niemoeller 
Roy Niemoeller 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Bland 
Frank J. Novoson 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Davidson 

continued on next paff 



2\. 



HI l.I.ETIX JAN1AKY KKHRl ARY 1991 I 



Tributes 



continued 

William D. Oberbeck 

Virginia Adami 

Mr. Richard L. Barteau 

I*aul Bartholomew 

Sam Bass 

Mary R. Bellon 

Mr. and Mrs. John Brangle 

Mr. Daryl Buddemeyer 

Chris Bugnitz 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman B. Champ Jr. 

Mr. Sam B. Clark 

Mrs. Mildred Cohn 

Mr. James K. Costello 

Rose Marie Cunningham 

Mrs. Patricia Degener 

Mr. Larry E. Dumsey 

Ms. Carol Feutz 

Mr. Duane Louis Frey 

Ms. Peggy L. Fritz 

Mr. Richard Gaddes 

Jon Goeders 

Suzanne Goell 

Margaret T. Grant 

Dr. and Mrs. Neville Grant 

Ed Hall 

Mr. John M. Harney 

Mr. Leo J. Ingrande 

Ellen C. Kessinger 

Mr. Rooney Q. Kinard 

Mr. Russell R. Lawson 

Mary Lee 

Stephen Lee 

Betty Levin 

Mr. Richard Lewis 

Mr. William E. Maples 

Irene C. McCann 

Mr. Ken A. Miesner 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Millman 

Mr. Steven Mortimore 

Thomas C. Moyle 

Use von Muehlen 

Ms. Joyce C. Mullins 

Shannon 0' Dougherty 

Mr. Thomas M. O'Malley 

Dr. Robert C. Packman 

Sanford Paskar 

Dr. Frederick D. Peterson 

Mr. William Julius Polk Jr. 

Don J. Riehn 

Ms. Virginia H. Robinson 

Mr. Dennis E. Rose 

Joan Rosen 

Mrs. Georgia Sauer 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Sax 

Bob and Pat Schauster 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Schlapp 

Russ Schnepf 

Mr. Gene P. Schultz 

Mr. Martin Schweig Jr. 

Landon C. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Soule and 

Mrs. Caren Morton 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph St. Cyr 
Mr. and Mrs. Leon R. Strauss 
Mr. John Sullivan 
Ms. Erika Suter 
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Teldon 
Elzada Vinson 
Ann Walburn 
Mr. Robert C. Watkins 
Barry Weingast and Susan Cohen 
Mrs. Helen M. Weiss 
Mr. Charles 0. Young 



Mr. Paul Ortleb 

Mr. and Mrs. Larry McVey 

Mr. James D. Penick 

Charles E. Williams Family 

Leda J. Peters 

Mr. and Mrs. William D. Harrell 
Mr. and Mrs. William E. Kaufman 
Mr. and Mrs. George P. Whitelaw Jr. 
Mrs. Goldie May Pike 
Mrs. Hazel F. Edick 

Louis Pokres 

Mrs. Kitty Johnson Family 

Mrs. Sarah Chambers Polk 

Mrs. Howard H.Hubbell 
Mrs. Florian S. Reilly 

Mrs. Oliver Abel 

Joan and Claude Abrams 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald L. Aylward 

Mrs. Alice Barton 

Mr. and Mrs. William V Beach 

Belle Coeur Garden Club 

Barbara S. Blaine 

Burdt Family 

Ms. Pam Burger 

Colony Place Residents 

Anita Cooper and Mike McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis C. Donnelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Rodman H. Durfee 

Mr. Bill Eastman and Ms. Cynthia 

Garnholz 
Dr. and Mrs. James Fletcher 
Miss LaVerne Frederich 
Mrs. Gloria Galluzzo 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Gatson 
Ms. Rita Gentilcore 
Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Germanese 
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Haas 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Chris Herrington 
Mrs. Helen J. Hilliker 
Mr. Mark Hillis 
Mrs. Patricia Hillis 
Mrs. David M. Johnson 
Mr. E. Madison Jones 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Kehrer 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kelley 
Mrs. Frank G. Kirtz 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman H. Lane 
Mrs. Doris M. Lawrence 
Sally and Net Lemkemeier 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert A. Mack 
Mr. and Mrs. James C. Mclntyre 
Ms. Peggy J. McKnight 
Mr. and Mrs. Brian J. McNamara 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh McPheeters 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond W. 

Meckfessel 
Missouri Botanical Garden Guides 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Moore Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Perkinson 
Jane Ettari Reilly 
Mr. John F. Reilly 
Mr. and Mrs. Victor Reilly 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Reinneck 
Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Scherrer 
Mr. Arthur B. Shepley Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. James W. Sherby 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sherby 
Mr. and Mrs. James Stevens 
Mr. Edwin S. Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Thurmond 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Van Cleve 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Walsh 
Kurt, Marilyn, Sondra Weffelmeyer 
Mrs. Burton K. Werner 
Dave and Joan Zaun 
Mr. and Mrs. James Zaun 



Irwin E. Reimer 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Howell 

Mr. Ralph Rheinecker Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Sterling 
Mr. and Mrs. S. I. 
Rothschild Jr. 

Mrs. Ben H. Senturia 

Mrs. Julian G. Samuels 

Mrs. Jack A.Jacobs 

Mr. Russel L. Savage 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Blanke Jr. 

Miss Dorothy Schaperkotter 

Alma and Myra Simms 

Dr. Hy Senturia 

Mr. and Mrs. Myron Glassberg 
Mrs. Sally Kushins 

Herman Shapiro 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 
Mr. Norman Shoults 

Jacquline Dawley 
Clara LaVoise 

Mrs. Victoria C. Simmons 

Mrs. W T illiamH. Biggs 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Bryan Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar J. Conrad Jr. 
Mrs. Arthur Dunn 
Mr. and Mrs. James B. Finn 
Grass Roots Garden Club 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Hall 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard T. Heintz 
Ms. Dorothy Holscher 
Catherine F Hoopes 
Dr. and Mrs. William S. Knowles 
Mr. and Mrs. Guy C. Lamson Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Langenberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Loy W. Ledbetter 
Mrs. Sears Lehmann Jr. 
Virginia Murray 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Tooker 
Town and Country Speakers Club 
Mr. and Mrs. William E. Wiese 
Rabbi and Mrs. Zeev Smason 
Baby Girl 

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Gersten 
Mr. Richard Smith 

Mr. Frank R. Chamblin 
Killark Electric Mfg. Co. 
Killark Accounting Department 
Ralph and Mary Jane Miller 
Mrs. Alberta Monroe 

Mr. Erwin Somogyi 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Darby- 
Mrs. Milton J. Scott 

Mr. Arch Spradling 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wakefield 
Mary Catherine Starr 

Mr. and Mrs. Pete Koronis Family 

Mrs. RuthW. Steffan 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvard K. Hecker 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Sutter 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. Baumann 
Mr. Norman Sylvester 

Mr. Cornelius P. Alwood 

Ms. Rosemary Armbruster 

Mr. David Becher 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Biedenstein 

Mr. Dennis S. Bozzay 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Grabel 

Carl and Edith Henke 

Miss Eugenia Henke 

Mr. Charles R. Jacoby 

Hank and Peter Klepacki 

Lee-Rowan Company Friends 



Mr. and Mrs. Leslie F. Loewe 

Mr. John R. Loomis 

Mrs. Rosemary C. Luebkert 

Ms. Sheila Nabil 

Ms. Virginia Nolte 

Cdr. and Mrs. R. J. Radeackar 

Becky Rhodes 

Ms. Ginny Scheele 

Doug and Ann Stafford 

Edwin and Bonnie Stark 

Mr. Maurice E. Torrence 

Mary E. Uhlenbrock 

Dr. Charles Fumito Taketa 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin S. Izumi 

Mr. Irving Talcoff 

Nancy Sachs 

Susan Sachs 

Mr. and Mrs. Morton Singer 

Mr. Roman Tansil 

Missouri Botanical Garden— 

Members Board 
Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 
Miss Margery Telthorst 

Louise Taussig 

Mrs. William Bixbyjr. 
Mrs. Carroll Scullin 

Katherine Thomas 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen F. Bowen Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Tschudy 

Bruce Thompson 

Cottleville Community Fire 

Protection District 
Mr. and Mrs. Ned Doelling 
Mr. and Mrs. Kirk Schmidt 
St. Charles County Fire Academy 
Harold Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Thompson 

Rose Tureen 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Tureen 

Mr. W. Gail Twyman 

Liz Alexander 

Liz Allison 

Twink Baker 

Bonnie Bale 

Ballas Courts Subdivision 

Kathy Beilein 

Fo Belz 

Sen. and Mrs. Christopher Bond 

Tina Borchert 

Mrs. Marlene K. Brennan 

Kate Clarkson 

Julie Cobaugh 

Karen Condie 

Pat Derickson and Kathy Lanser 

Dr. and Mrs. Douglass T. Domoto 

Kathy Dorr 

Lula Mae Durbin 

Ellen Friedman 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Gebhard Family 

Susie Holloran 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Horan 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Koster 

Laura McCarthy, Inc. 

Ray and Martha Lindner 

Carole Loebner 

Ann Lohr 

Jill Malley 

Nancy Mills 

Mr. and Mrs. Larry Morgan 

Shurl Murch 

Patty Pruellage 

Candy Reeder 

Carol Ryan 

Jo Ann Sandler 

Susan Sandweg 



22. 



I HI 1 1 ETIN I JANUARY FKBRI ARY 1991 



Sharon Schweiss 

Karen Seigel 

Carole Snyder 

St. Louis Visitors Center 

Mrs. A. Buford Twyman 

Betty Von Doerslen 

Carol Wellman 

Jane Wright 

Carol Zehrt 

Ray Ziegler 

Mrs. Jean Segelbohm Vann 

Dr. and Mrs. Seymour Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul T. Johnson 
Mrs. Bernard P. Levin 
Mr. Vossmeyer 

Mr. Lawrence P. Badler 
Mrs. Mary V. Walk 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Bland 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rutledge 
Mr. Wayne Ward 

Mr. Clarence J. Siebert 

Mrs. Carl A. Wattenberg Jr. 

Mr. Charles D. Drew Jr. 

Mr. Edward D. Weakley 

Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Alexander Jr. 

Mrs. Jean Andrews 

Mrs. Alexander M. Bakewell 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin S. Baldwin 

Ms. Kathryn S. Banashek 

Mrs. Nancy C. F. Bardenheier 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Bates 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew H. Baur 

Richard W. Bayers 

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick J. Behan 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Behan Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Belz III 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Bender 

Mrs. Susan H. Benedict 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Elliot Benoist 

Mrs. William Bixby Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Van-Lear Black III 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Boos 

Mrs. William J. Bramman 

John and Marie Brauer 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Allen Brinkmeyer 

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Burkemper 

Ms. Cassandra Carr 

Miss Adelaide Cherbonnier 

Mrs. Robert Cochran 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Crunden Cole 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Cole 

Mr. and Mrs. George K. Conant 

Mr. Stephen A. Cooper 

Clyde E. Craig 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Crawford Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold M. Cutler 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Darnall 

Mrs. Jane Dean 

Mr. and Mrs. John 0. Dozier 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Erker 

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis 

Mr. Daniel B. Feinberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucien R. Fouke Jr. 

Mrs. Nancy B. Francis 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Freeman 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin E. Gait 

Garden Club of St. Louis 

Mr. and Mrs. John Gardner 

Gateway to Gardening Association 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Glik 

Mr. Clark V. Graves 

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Hadley Griffin 

Mrs. Sue Haden 

Mr. and Mrs. A. William Hager 

Mrs. Ellen S. Hager 



Mrs. Susie S. Hall 

Mr. Albert H. Hamel 

Ms. Janet W. Haskins 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Hawes 

Mr. and Mrs. Timothy G. Hennessey 

Henry Company, Realtors 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Hensley Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver W. Hickel Jr. 

Higginbotham Bros., Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Hoagland 

Mr. and Mrs. George K. Hoblitzelle 

Mrs. Meredith Holbrook 

Mrs. Ann Holton 

Mrs. Lotsie Holton 

Shirley and Rawlins Horlacher 

Mary Kay Horton 

Ms. Stella B. Houghton 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Howe III 

Miss Grace W. Imbs 

Janet McAfee Inc. 

Janet McAfee Inc.— 
Frontenac Office Agents 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen G. Jansen 

Mrs. James Lee Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold T. Jolley Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Jones 

Hope D. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones Jr. 

Mrs. Dee A. Joyner 

Carol W. Kenny- 
Mr. and Mrs. John Kistner 

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart J. Krawll 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Lammert IV 

Dr. and Mrs. Daniel K. Lane 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Langsdorf 

Laura McCarthy, Inc. 

Mary Ann and Desmond Lee 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Limberg 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Max Lippman Jr. 

Robert M. Lobrano 

Mrs. Carolyn Losos 

Mr. Douglas B. MacCarthy 

Betsy B. Mackey 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Martyn 

Mary Institute 

Mr. and Mrs. Neil F. Maune 

Mrs. Frank Mayfield Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lansden McCandless Jr 

Mr. and Mrs. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. McMillan 

Mr. and Mrs. David D. Metcalfe Jr. 

Ms. Judith B. Miller 

Missouri Foundation for Women's 
Resources, Inc. 

Mrs. Eleanor J. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph A. Morriss II 

Mrs. Dessa Anne Morrow 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward B. Mower 

Mr. Grove N. Mower 

National Association of Realtors- 
Real Estate Board of Metropolitan 
St. Louis 

Edward J. and Ellen O'Brien 

Mrs. Joyce K. Pass 

Rita and Gene Pearline 

Rev. Roy Pfautch 

Mrs. Nancy M. Pool 

Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence T Post 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Quenon 

Mrs. Mary V. Rassieur 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Reck Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene M. Reese 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Remington 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Rice 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Roberts 

Mr. and Mrs. George R. Robinson 

Mrs. Amey Rodgers 



Mr. Lawrence K. Roos 

Mrs. Lynne S. Rosenfeld 

Phoebe and Chris Ruess 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Ruprecht 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Schlapp 

Mrs. Syble M. Schlosser 

Dr. and Mrs. William G. Sedgwick 

Mrs. Shirley Shannon 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. and Mrs. John Shepley 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Singer 

Mr. and Mrs. David R. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings 

Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom K. Smith 
St. Louis Forum 
Dr. and Mrs. Alfred Sudholt Jr. 
Mrs. Ann M. Tegethoff 
Mr. and Mrs. Whitelaw T Terry Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwards L. Thaman 
Mr. and Mrs. Edmonstone F. 

Thompson 
Mrs. Georgia X. Tobias 
Mrs. John C. Tobinjr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Tooker 
Mr. Floyd C. Warmann 
Mr. and Mrs. David W. Welch 
Mrs. Ann B. Wetzel 
Mr. and Mrs. Rolla K. Wetzel 
Mr. and Mrs. George P. Whitelaw Jr. 
Mrs. Ann Whittemore 
Mr. and Mrs. Randolph C. Wohltman 
Women's Forum of Missouri 
Mr. F. Lee Zingale 
Mrs. Pauline Webster 
Mrs. Doris M. Kloeppner 

Frits W. Went 

Netherlands Society of Saint Louis 
Mrs. Powell Whitehead 

Mrs. Newell A. Augur 
Mrs. James Lee Johnson 
Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace Sr. 
Mrs. Dorothy Willi 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Atwood 
Mr. Richard T. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman W. Cordes 

Family 
Jay Epstein 
Virginia Epstein 
Alma Winkler 
Robert L. Williams 
Mr. and Mrs. Don Williams 
Ms. Elizabeth Williams 
Mr. Truman Williams 
Mr. and Mrs. Wendell Davis 
Mrs. Leonard R. Duerbeck 
Mr. Jerome Korach 
Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Loeb 
Mabel Wilson 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Hopkins 

Johnnee Wofford 

Raymond and Amanda Garlick 
Mrs. Leonard Woods 
Mrs. Jean-Jacques Carnal 
Mr. and Mrs. F. Crunden Cole 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. White IV 
J. Clifford Woody 
Friends at Contel 
Mrs. Ida Zimmerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Morris Disner 
Judy Zimmerman 

Mrs. Naomi Soule-Moses 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Soule 
St. Louis Association for the 
Education of Young Children 



Board of Trustees 

Mr. Robert E. Kresko 

President 

Rev. Lawrence Biondi, S.J. 

Mr. Stephen F. Brauer 

Mr. William H.T. Bush 

Dr. William H. Danforth 

Mr. Samuel B. Hayes III 

Mr. Robert R. Hermann 

Rt. Rev. William A. Jones, Jr. 

Mr. David W. Kemper 

Mr. Charles F. Knight 

Mr. Charles E. Kopman 

Mr. William E. Maritz 

Mr. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. Thomas 0. McNearney, Jr. 

Mr. Lucius B. Morse III 

Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr. William R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Mrs. Vemon W. Piper 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

Mr. Douglas K. Rush 

The Hon. Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. Andrew C. Taylor 

Mr. Jack E. Thomas 

Dr. Blanche Touhill 

Mr. John K. Wallace, Jr. 

The Hon. George R. Westfall 

Mr. 0. Sage Wightman III 



EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mr. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. John H. Biggs 

Mr. Jules D. Campbell 

Mr. Henry Hitchcock 

Mrs. Anne L. Lehmann 

Mr. Joseph F Ruwitch 

Mr. Louis S. Sachs 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. Tom K. Smith, Jr. 

Mr. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Harriet Spoehrer 

Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Dr. Mildred Mathias 
Prof. Phillippe Morat 

DIRECTOR 

Dr. Peter H . Raven 

MEMBERS' BOARD 

Mrs. RudyardK. Rapp 

President 

Mrs. Antonio I. Longrais 

Mrs. Walter F. Ballinger 

Mrs. Fred S. Kummer 

Mr. Donnell Reid 



BULLETIN I JANUARY- FEBRUARY 1991 1 



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Center for Home Gardening Moves Indoors 

Warm November weather helped workmen to complete most of the 
exterior construction on the Kemper Center. This winter work will continue 
to finish the interior. Opening is scheduled for Summer 1991. 



MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN -0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST. LOUIS, MO 



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Botanical 
harden 



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OLUME LXXIX 
IUMBERTWO 





Inside 
This Issue 



4 
5 

6 



Corporate Philanthropy 

A profile of the Anheuser-Busch 

Charitable Trust begins a series. 

New Doors in the 
Ridgway Center 

Automatic sliding doors make the 
Garden accessible to all visitors. 

Education News 

The Magnet School Program; a new 
collaborative program for Catholic 
schools; and maple sugar making 
at the Arboretum. 



g Horticulture News 



9_ 

10 

12 

14 
17 
19 



Computers make it easier to keep tabs 
on the Garden's collection of 24,000 
living plants. 

From the Library 

The Shoenberg Conservation Center 
elevates book preservation to a fine art. 

Home Gardening 

Spring is a good time to begin thinking 
about testing your soil. 

Calendar of Events 

The Spring Flower Show and Gardening 

by Design headline a busy season. 

From the Membership Office 

New officers and Board members. 

Trustee Profile 

Buzz West fall joins the Board. 

From the Garden Gate Shop 

The Spring Sale and a new mascot are 
featured. 



On the cover: Azaleas arc inglorious 
bloom in April. Join us for the Members' 
Day Azalea Walk, April 25. 

Photo by Pal Watson 



Missouri Botanical Garden. 

I he BULLETIN (ISSN 0026-6507) is published bi-monthly 
b) the Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 To we i Grove 
Avenue, St.hmis. MO 63110. Second class postage paid at 
St. Louis, MO. 

The HI ILLETIN is senl to every Member ol the Garden 
.is (me Dt tlu' benefits ol membership. For a contribution of 
as little as $40 pei year, Members also are entitled in: free 
admission to the Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special events and receptions; 
announcements ol all lectures and classes; discounts in the 
( iarden ( late Shop and foi course fees; and the opportunity 
to travel, domestic and abroad, with other Members. For 
information, please rail (314) 577-5100. 

Postmaster: send address changes u< Susan Caine, edi- 
tor, BULLETIN, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166. 



Comment 



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.SOU* 



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printed on >crv< /< d papt > 



An Exciting Spring Season <**©«* ° 6 ^ 




In approximately 

U three weeks, spring 

1991 will officially 
begin and everyone 

is, no doubt, anx- 
iously awaiting its 
arrival. March typi- 
cally brings with it a 
dramatic increase in 
gardening activities and this year the (Iar- 
den will be offering a variety of programs 
to satisfy this interest. 

The Garden by Design lecture series, 
the Spring Gardening Fair cosponsored 
by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, increased 
education activities, and the Spring 
Flower Show that opens to the public on 
March 9, guarantee wonderful ways to 
celebrate spring. 

This year, as in past years, the (iarden 
will continue to concentrate its efforts in 
providing environmental education 
through greater public awareness. The 
completion of our capital fund drive, 
which made possible the Climatron reno- 
vation, the construction of the Brookings 
Interpretive Center, the Shoenberg Tem- 
perate House, and the Kemper Center for 
Home Gardening pavilion, opened up new 
avenues to present information on the 
environment and ways in which we can 
use the earth's natural resources wisely. 
The Center for Home Gardening pavilion , 




with its opening scheduled in early June, 
is a dynamic opportunity to gain insight 
about gardening that should make it more 
productive, successful, and environmen- 
tally sound. 

As was reported in the January/Feb- 
ruary issue, the Center for Plant Conser- 
vation has officially become a part of the 
Garden this year. The task ahead for the 
Garden and the Center is to create a coor- 
dinated effort at saving rare and endan- 
gered native American plant species. We 
are seeking a partnership with individuals 
and organizations who are committed to 
this mission. Garden members will be 
informed each step of the way as the Cen- 
ter is integrated into the Garden and I 
hope that you, as our strongest sup- 
porters, will assist us in efforts to expand 
the programs so that plant extinctions, 
and the resulting loss of biodiversity, can 
be stopped. 

Please join us for the Spring Flower 
Show and all the activities planned over 
the next few months, and watch for your 
special invitation to the 1991 "Bed and 
Breakfast" happening again this spring— 
this time to help support the efforts of the 
Garden and the Center for Plant Conser- 
vation. My best to you this spring. 



CPJLk #.(*< 



(Xu<~^> 



Seeing Things? 



This winter an Eastern Screech Owl 
took up residence in the historic yel- 
lowwood tree that grows along the east- 
ern wall of the (iarden, just south of the 
Spink Pavilion. Screech owls have 
either reddish-brown (red phase) or 
gray plumage, and this red phase owl 
could be glimpsed roosting during the 
day in a cavity of the tree. These owls 
are common in suburban areas with 
mature trees where they can roost, hut 
they are often overlooked. They are 
nocturnal, or active mostly at night, 
and their plumage is well camouflaged. 
—Barbara Addelson , 
ECO-ACT Coordinator 



BARBARA PFA1 II 



Joard of Trustees 
Iolds Annual Meeting 



New 

Officers 

Elected 



rHE GARDEN'S BOARD of Trustees held its 
annual meeting on Thursday, January 24 and 
elected 0. Sage Wightman III as its new presi- 
•nt, John K. Wallace, Jr. as first vice-president, and 
illiam H. T. Bush as second vice-president. Special 
cognition was paid to outgoing president Robert E. 
resko. 

Mr. Kresko joined the Garden's Board in 1981 and 
sumed the presidency in January, 1989. For the past 
ur years, he has chaired the Garden's highly suc- 
issful capital drive, the Campaign for the Garden, 
hich concluded at the end of 1990 and exceeded its 
itial goal by $4.4 million. During his last meeting as 
;ad of the Board, Kresko emphasized the generosity 

the Trustees throughout the campaign: "The 
'ustees are the Garden's strongest and most dedi- 
ted supporters. Their combined energies helped 
ise our sights and their own personal commitments 
:count for 39 percent of all funds raised. It is this 
credible dedication of the Trustees and the Gar- 
m's continually growing membership that has made 
y term as president so rewarding.' ' 

He expressed appreciation to each Trustee and 
ive special tribute to Mrs. Harriet Spoehrer, the 
rgest single donor to the campaign. The William T. 
smper Foundation, the Shoenberg Foundation, and 
ie Civic Progress group of corporate community 
aders provided significant outstanding support and 
ere recognized. 

In 1986, when Kresko assumed the chairmanship 
the $16 million capital drive, he said that the Garden 
id well over $25 million in capital and renovation 
jeds. "Those other needs still exist and it is my 
)pe that we can go beyond our goal so that we can 
eet some of these other demands." W T ith his expert 




New president of the Board, (). Sage Wightman III (left), with retiring president 
Robert E. Kresko. 




Mrs. Harriet Spoehrer was honored as the largest single donor to the capital 
campaign. 




continued on next page 



The capital campaign steering committee (standing left to right): William 
Orthwein, Robert Hermann, Clarence Barksdale, Lucius Morse. John Wallace, 
Warren Shapleigh, O. Sage Wightman. (Seated, left to right): ('. ('. Johnson Spink, 
Margaret Oberheide, Nora Stern, Robert Kresko. 



:\. 



BULLETIN I MARCH APRIL 1991 



TRUSTEES continued 



guidance and support, the Garden 
exceeded its goal. 

0. Sage Wightman III, the incoming 
president, recognized Kresko by com- 
menting on the significant achievements 
of the past two years. "Not to mention 
the completion of the capital campaign, 
the Garden saw steady increases in atten- 
dance and support, with membership 
growth of almost 5,000 households," said 
Mr. Wightman. He also cited the Gar- 
den's first-time participation in a debt-for- 
nature swap with the government of 
Ecuador, which has led to the expansion 
of botanical research in that country; the 
outstanding article in the August issue of 
National Geographic; the agreement with 
the Soviet Academy of Sciences to estab- 
lish a Flora of the U.S.S.R.; and the 
development and approval of the Master 
Plan for the future management of the 
Shaw Arboretum as other significant 
accomplishments during Krosko's term. 

Mr. Wightman, the new president, 
joined the Board of Trustees in 1983. He 



became increasingly committed to the 
institution as he witnessed the exemplary 
leadership of Dr. Raven in furthering a 
greater comprehension of the environ- 
mental concerns facing the world. "It is 
our hope that the Garden will continue to 
grow as a significant contributor to the 
world's scientific community," added 
Wightman. "Dr. Raven and his staff con- 
duct vital research that is having a direct, 
positive impact on how we can manage 
the environment of our planet. As presi- 
dent of the Board, I want to participate in 
ways that help the Garden continue to 
advance as a world-class research insti- 
tution." 

Wightman provided leadership during 
the capital drive in his capacity as co- 
chairman of the Membership Gifts Com- 
mittee. He has also served as chairman of 
the Annual Giving drive for several years. 
Mr. Wightman said, "The annual giving 
effort was an excellent way in which each 
individual could help the Garden. The 
most gratifying part of efforts such 



as annual giving and the capital drive 
was working with the volunteers who 
gave of their time so willingly and 
enthusiastically.' ' 

Wightman, Senior Vice-President of 
Stifel Asset Management Company, 
becomes the 17th president of the Gar- 
den's Board of Trustees. 

Peter H. Raven thanked Kresko for 
his dedication to the Missouri Botanical 
Garden and the St. Louis community. 
Raven said, "Robert Kresko's hard work 
and professionalism inspired all those 
associated with the Garden. His leader- 
ship and energy moved the Garden into 
the 1990s with confidence and direction." 

Also at the January meeting, the Trus- 
tees elected Richard J. Mahoney, chief 
executive officer of the Monsanto Corpo- 
ration to the Garden's Board, and re- 
elected Charles F. Knight, chairman and 
chief executive officer of Emerson Elec- 
tric Company, and James S. McDonnell 
III, vice-president of the McDonnell 
Douglas Corporation. 



Corporate Philanthropy Profile 



EDITOR'S NOTE-Over the years the 
extraordinary commitment of area corpo- 
rations has enriched the lives of all 
St. Louisans with contributions of funds, 
services and goods to nonprofit institu- 
tions. Corporate citizenship has helped the 
Garden to improve its services to the entire 
community in many ways. Most recently, 
corporate financial support was indis- 
pensable to the success of the $18 million 
Campaign tor the Garden, accounting for 
one-third of the $20.4 million raised in 
the drive. 

The top five corporate contributors to 
the Campaign for the Garden were the 
Anheuser-Busch Companies, the Emer- 
son Electric Company, the McDonnell 
Douglas Corporation, the Monsanto 
Company, and the Southwestern Bell Cor- 
poration. During 1991 this series of pro- 
files will highlight the charitable activities 
of each of these companies. 



The Anheuser-Busch 
Charitable Trust 

"When you think about charitable giv- 
ing, Anheuser-Busch, through its Foun- 
dation and Charitable Trust as well as 



through corporate funds, is one of this 
nation's foremost philanthropic compa- 
nies," reflected Robert E. Kresko, recent 
president of the Garden's Board of Trus- 
tees and chairman of the Campaign for 
the Garden. "Almost daily, we see exam- 
ples of Anheuser-Busch's generosity to 
the community and worthy groups in 
need." 

In 1989, Anheuser-Busch, through its 
Foundation and Charitable Trust as well 
as through corporate funds, contributed 
in excess of $25 million to nonprofit 
organizations located throughout the 
country. 

As the company's headquarters loca- 
tion, St. Louis and its many nonprofit 
institutions benefit substantially from the 
company's civic-mindedness. Indeed, 
without the assistance of the Anheuser- 
Busch Charitable Trust, the face of the 
Garden might look vastly different. Over 
the past decade alone, the Anheuser- 
Busch Charitable Trust contributed 
toward the construction of the Ridgway 
Center and more recently made its 
largest gift to the Garden, $750,000 
toward the various building projects in the 
just completed Campaign for the Garden, 
including the renovation of the Climatron. 



In addition to its support for the arts 
and for civic and public affairs, the funding 
priorities of Anheuser-Busch, the 
Anheuser-Busch Charitable Trust and 
the Anheuser-Busch Foundation address 
this country's most pressing needs: 
higher education, social services, health 
care, environmental protection and medi- 
cal research, including research into alco- 
hol abuse prevention among youth. 
Emergency relief is also a central con- 
cern, such as the Anheuser-Busch Foun- 
dation's immediate pledge of $2 million to 
aid recovery from the 1989 San Francisco 
earthquake. 

"We are happy to support institutions 
like the Garden, which add greatly to the 
quality of life for our community," said 
JoBeth Brown, chairman of the Contribu- 
tions Committee for Anheuser-Busch. 

"Corporate citizenship is crucial to 
the continuing health of the not-for-profit 
sector in America," observed Dr. Peter 
H. Raven, the director of the Garden. 
"The Garden provides services to this 
community that would be difficult, if not 
impossible, to replace, and we absolutely 
could not accomplish this without the 
backing of donors like the Anheuser- 
Busch Charitable Trust." 



\HVU.ET1\ M \h\ II M'K'II 1991 




New Doors 
Open Garden 
to All Visitors 



In late December visitors to the Garden were greeted by new 
automated sliding doors at both entrances to the Ridgway Cen- 
ter. The electronically-activated doors provide easy access to the 
grounds for disabled visitors. The installation of the doors was 
made possible by a generous gift from Janet M. Johnston. 




The ramp leading from the upper entrance of the Ridgway Center to 
the Garden grounds was constructed in 19H2. 



Above and at left: 
Robert Hapka- 
Tracy, (left) and 
Stuart E. Falk. 
independent living 
specialists 
representing Para- 
quad, enter the 
Ridgway Center. 
Paraquad, a not- 
for-profit organiza- 
tion serving people 
with disabilities in 
the St. Louis area, 
has recognized the 
(iarden for its 
efforts to provide 
access for disabled 
visitors. 



The Garden has long had a commitment to make its display 
areas and facilities easily accessible to people with disabilities. 
Last year the Climatron complex was designed and renovated to 
be fully accessible, and the new Kemper Center for Home 
Gardening employs a full-access design utilizing ramps, level 
thresholds, automatic doors and elevators. With the installation 
of the Ridgway Center doors, visitors now can tour more than a 
mile of unobstructed pathways and display greenhouses. Special 
features include the Scented Garden, installed in 1983 with 
raised beds and plants available to touch and smell, and the 
Sciuto drinking fountain at the far end of the Japanese Garden, 
installed in 1988. 

' 'It is important to make this beautiful resource available to all 
of our citizens," said Dr. Raven. "We are dedicated to providing 
access to disabled persons so they may enjoy the wonders and 
beauty of the Garden. We are deeply grateful to Mrs. Johnston 
for helping to make this possible.' ' 



BCLLETIX MARCH AI'KII. 1991 



K I) V C A T I N DIVISION N E W S 



Making Science 
Come Alive 



The Garden's Magnet School Program 
Builds for the Future 



YOU have to teach them the 
words— then make the words 
come alive!" 
When Alicia Ivory House teaches sci- 
ence to children, her face lights up. That 
enthusiasm is contagious for the students 
she works with as the Garden's magnet 
school instructor. 

Since the mid-1970s the Garden has 
worked in cooperation with St. Louis 
Public Magnet Schools at the Stix and 
Mason Investigative Learning Centers 
(ILC). These schools offer students a 



strong academic program that empha- 
sizes inquiry, investigation and analysis 
through courses in natural sciences, 
mathematics and computer science. 
These basic approaches are used in the 
complete curriculum to develop stu- 
dents' skills at problem solving and 
productive thinking skills. The curricu- 
lum features enrichment programs 
offered by the Garden, the Zoo and the 
Science Center. 

Science education has always been a 
major part of the Garden's mission. "We 




.1 third grade class from Stix ILC with teacher Alicia Ivory House in the Vlimatron. 

6. 



hear a lot today about the problems with 
science education in this country,' ' says 
Larry De Buhr, director of education at 
the Garden. "We're working hard to do 
something about it. The magnet program 
at Stix and Mason is just one of our pro- 
grams, serving about 300 students annu- 
ally, and we're seeking to expand it." 

Alicia works closely with the teachers 
at Stix and Mason to structure the Gar- 
den's classes to fit the schools' curricu- 
lum. Programs offer enrichment in 
botany, horticulture, ecology and 
environmental science. "Visiting the 
Garden, actually seeing and touching 
plants, is a vital part of learning for the 
children," says Alicia. "Science can be 
just a lot of dry, abstract concepts unless 
you can visualize it. We emphasize the 
scientific method as a way to help stu- 
dents approach any subject, to organize 
their thinking. When they can define the 
problem, gather information, verify facts, 
and reach conclusions, they can learn 
anything!" 

Regular weekly classes at the Garden 
are another advantage for the magnet 
program. "Each class builds on the one 
before," Alicia explains. "The sequen- 
tial, hands-on approach creates a sense 
of excitement for the students. We work 
with children from Stix ILC in grades 3, 
4, and 5, and with students from Mason 
ILC in grades 6 and 8. Many of these chil- 
dren come back year after year, building 
on what they have learned.' ' 

Classes for 3rd, 4th, and 5th grades 
are eleven-week programs covering 
topics from seeds and germination to 
photosynthesis to plant propagation. In 
each session students collect or make 
something to take home; for instance, 
they may plant a terrarium or make a 
map. Older students keep lab journals, 
study uses of plants, and visit the Gar- 
den's herbarium and research facilities. 
The 6th grade program for next year will 
focus specifically on the tropical rain 
forest. 

St. U)uis magnet schools bring 
together students from all parts of the 
city and county. Cooperative learning is 
a major component of the program. ' 'I 
have the students work in teams," Alicia 
explains. "They may not be paired with 
their best friends, but they learn to work 
together with respect, to help each other 
and learn from one another. 

' 'A good teacher is a performer,' ' 
Alicia goes on. "It's up to me to make 
science exciting, to share my knowledge 
in a way that will encourage students to 
learn more. One of the things we do is to 
talk about different careers in science. It 
motivates children to realize that there 
are lots of ways to make use of their 



\BULLETIN MAKi'll AI'KII. 1991 



nterests; you don't have to be a Nobel 
rYize winner to love science." 

' The love of science and learning is 
vhat we are trying to give to students,' ' 
idds Larry DeBuhr. "The future of our 
society depends on strengthening the 
quality of our science education, and 
encouraging students from all back- 
grounds to pursue it throughout their 
ives. Alicia's work goes a long way 
oward making that happen." 

Catholic Schools 
Benefit from 
New Program 

In the 1990-91 school year local 
•ultural institutions launched a unique 
:ollaborative education program in 
injunction with St. Louis City Catholic 
khools, with funding from Adelaide and 
Dan Schlafly. Mr. Schlafly is a Garden 
[Yustee. 

The Missouri Botanical Garden, the 
5t. Louis Zoo, the Missouri Historical 
Society, the St. Louis Science Center, 
ind the Cahokia Mounds Museum are 
vorking together to provide a series of 
nulticultural experiences for St. Louis 
"atholic school children in the 4th, 5th, 
ind 7th grades. Each 4th grader from a 
jredominantly black school is assigned a 
jartner from a school with a predom- 
nantly white population. The students 
lave the opportunity to experience a 
;eries of six enriching programs with that 
;ame partner at the Garden, the Zoo, and 
he History Museum. The Garden pro- 
vides a follow up tour for the 5th grade, 
seventh grade students participate in a 
■imilar field trip series at the St. Louis 
science Center and the Cahokia Mounds 
Museum. 

The theme for the joint programs is 
'Living in a Changing World.' ' The goal 
5 to bring together students from 
liverse backgrounds to explore coopera- 
ively a changing world through scientifi- 
ally and historically enriching 
■xperiences. Program topics include food 
hains; nature awareness; animal adapta- 
ions, characteristics, and relationships; 
istronomy; the physics of motion; 
>t. Louis history; and Native American 
listory. 

"This program presents an excellent 
>pportunity to break down racial barriers 
ind provide positive multicultural experi- 
;nces for our students,' ' said Sister 
vlary Ann Eckhoff, superintendent of 
education for the Archdiocese of 
>t. Louis. 



THIS SPRING AT SHAW ARBORETUM 



How Sweet It Is! 



It's a cold, sunny day with snow on 
the ground; the clanking of buckets can 
be heard through the woods. In the dis- 
tance by the old barn, steam is rising 
from the large evaporator pan. Images of 
New England come to mind, but the 
steam is enveloping the education staff of 
Shaw Arboretum as they work with 
elementary school students to boil down 
collected sap of the sugar maple, Acer 
saccharum, until it becomes golden 
brown syrup. 

When the leaves appear, every tree 
becomes a sugar factory. Through the 
chemical process of photosynthesis, 
chlorophyll in the leaves captures the 
energy from the sun enabling carbon 
dioxide from the air and water brought up 
from the roots to make sugar. This sugar 
is used by the tree as a source of energy 
to make new leaves and wood. The tree 
produces surplus sugar which is con- 
verted to starch and stored in the tree 
during the winter. As the days grow 
longer in late winter the stored starches 
are changed back to sugar and are circu- 
lated throughout the tree as sap. It is this 
sap that is drawn off when the tree is 
tapped. 

The collecting season is usually two 




Students strain maple sap into a collection container. 



to four weeks long and the old saying, 
"warm, sunny days and cold nights" is 
very accurate in determining when the 
sap will flow. Maple syrup programs at 
the Arboretum run from mid-February 
through the first week of March. 

Equipment is sterilized and the trees 
are selected. Holes are drilled into the 
tree 2 inches deep and at a slight upward 
angle and metal spouts, called spiles, are 
inserted into the holes. Buckets are then 
hung from hooks on the spiles and the 
sap is collected each day to prevent fer- 
mentation. It's not unusual to find the 
three gallon buckets filled to the top. 
Students arrive each day bundled 
from head to toe and full of enthusiasm. 
Through a series of activities led by the 
education staff, the students gain a better 
understanding of photosynthesis and the 
water cycle, the two natural processes 
that make maple syrup possible. As the 
group approaches the tapped trees, an 
excited student cries, "There's a 
bucket!" — and off they go. 

After a brief demonstration on how to 
collect the sap, the students are off with 
their partners, going from bucket to 
bucket. One often hears shouts of "Wow, 
this bucket's overflowing!" or "Look, 
it's dripping right from the spout, 
just like the kitchen sink!" 

The sap is collected and poured 
into a large pan called an evapora- 
tor, which sits over a roaring fire. 
The sap is about two to four per- 
cent sugar. Only after most of the 
water in the sap has evaporated 
and the temperature reaches 219 °F 
do we have finished maple syrup— 
a saturated sugar solution that is 
about 67 percent sugar. 

Once the students have made a 
batch of maple syrup it's easy to 
understand why it is so expensive 
to buy in the store. Producing 
syrup takes a lot of physical effort, 
as well as approximately 40 gallons 
of sap and 1.3 cords of firewood to 
make one gallon of pure maple 
syrup. A more fitting name for the 
syrup might be "liquid gold." But, 
oh, how sweet it is! 

—Lydia Toth 

Education Coordinator, 

Shaw Arboretum 



BULLETIN i MARCH-APRIL 1991 



Keeping 
Track of 
24,000 
Plants 



EDITOR 'S NOTE— It is astonishing to 
realize that just eight years ago the Gar- 
den's Plant Records Office maintained its 
information on a file of 20,000 index 
cards. The office is part of the horticulture 
division and is responsible for keeping 
records on every living plant growing on 
Garden grounds or in the display and 
production greenhouses. 

In 1983 two volunteers, Kay Sofian 
and Paul McClinton, began the enormous 
task of transcribing the data to computers. 
The job took three years, and today Kay 
and Paul continue to work on the plant 
records together with longtime volunteers 
Joyce Broughton and Adrienne 
Biesterfeldt. 

The use of computers has been of 
critical importance to horticulture at the 
Garden, permitting detailed study and 
accurate management of the entire 
living plant collection. With increasingly 
sophisticated applications, the Garden's 
computers can generate lists of plants and 
their precise locations on the grounds. 



in 



Have you ever wondered how many 
different types of plants are cultivated at 
the Garden? This would be difficult to 
determine if the Garden did not have up- 
to-date computer records on the plants in 
the living collection. A search of the 
records indicates that the Garden's living 
collection consists of about 11,000 differ- 
ent plant taxa belonging to 262 plant fami- 
lies. The collection includes 2,900 orchid, 
950 daylily, 650 iris, and 210 rose varie- 
ties. The Climatron alone contains over 
1,300 kinds of plants representing 156 
families. 

More than 14,000 plants are on display 
to the public, and the rest are in research 
or production facilities. In addition to the 
plants listed in the living collection com- 
puter data base, the research green- 
houses contain over 1,400 species plus 
about 400 plant types that have not yet 
been definitively identified to the species 
level of classification. 

Having all of this information on 
computers is enormously helpful to horti- 
culturists and researchers. Lists can be 
generated of all the plants at the Garden 
from a certain plant family or genus, all 
plants native to a particular geographic 
region, or even all the plants collected by 
an individual, to name just a few 
examples. 

New Mapping System With over 
14,000 plants on display on the grounds or 
in the public conservatories, how does 
the Garden keep track of where these 



These maps were computer 
generated on the Garden's 
AutoCAD system. At left, a 
closeup of the Tower Grove 
House and Mausoleum area, 
showing all oak trees. Below, a 
map of the Garden showing the 
50-foot grid system. 




1 44 I', 46 4? 48 41 'J '.; V 'j\ 'i< "i 56 •■ 



plants are located? The answer is the 
Garden's grid system, which has recently 
undergone refinement to make it 
extremely precise. This precision, along 
with a new computer mapping system, 
enables the Garden not only to locate its 
plants, but to plot their locations on cus- 
tom maps. 

The backbone of the system is an 
imaginary grid pattern, in use here for 
many years, that divides the Garden's 79 
acres into 50-foot squares. The squares 
are defined by numeric north/south coor- 
dinates and alphabetic east/west coor- 
dinates. Each plant's coordinates are part 
of its computer record and describe each 
plant's location on the grounds to within 
50 feet. 

Although these 50-foot grids would 
make it easy to find larger specimens or 
those in sparsely planted areas, locating a 
small plant in a densely planted area such 
as the English Woodland Garden could 
still be a problem for anyone not familiar 
with the plant and the area. In 1989 this 
problem was solved by horticulturist Don 
Mee, who surveyed the grounds as part 
of an Institute of Museum Services grant. 
Mee initiated the technique of dividing 
each 50-foot square into tenths to identify 
each plant's location to within five feet. 
For example, a plant that was previously 
described as having coordinates 13-M 
might now be identified as 13.3-M.7. All of 
the large woody trees and shrubs have 
been assigned decimal coordinates, and 
the task is nearly complete for all of the 
perennials. 

The locations of plants in the Clima- 
tron are also described by a similar coor- 
dinate system, but it is based on a 
ten-foot grid pattern without decimal indi- 
cations. 

Mee further improved the Garden's 
plant locating ability by installing and mak- 
ing customized programs for the 
AutoCAD mapping system. AutoCAD, a 
computer package used extensively by 
engineers and architects, has been in use 
at the Garden for the past year. It allows 
the Plant Records Office to plot the loca- 
tion and, in some cases, the relative sizes 
of plants on a map of any portion of the 
Garden. The maps can be printed in up to 
six colors, and can include bodies of 
water, buildings and walks, and utilities. 
The AutoCAD maps are enormously use- 
ful for planning new garden areas and for 
helping visitors to find specific specimens 
on the grounds. 

—Greg Wieland, 
Garden horticulturist 



\BULLETIN MAKCH APRIL 1991 




BOOK CONSERVATION AT THE GARDEN 

Where Work is a Pleasure 



EDITOR 'S NOTE - The bindery in the 
Garden library was established in the 
mid-1960s, creating one of the few librar- 
ies in the United States with a separate 
facility devoted to preserving books. Gener- 
ous support by the Shoenberg family made 
possible significant expansion and 
improvements in the Center, which was 
named the Shoenberg Conservation 
Center in their honor in 1986. 

The Garden 's library is one of the 
world 's finest collections of botanical liter- 
ature, and many of its acquisitions are 
old, fragile, rare or difficult to replace. 
The Shoenberg Conservation Center is 
dedicated to the physical preservation of the 
collection, and to ensuring that all of the 
books and materials are functional and 
serviceable for years to come. 

All work at the Center is performed by 
hand or with hand operated machines. 
The techniques used are similar to those 
used in the 17th century for bookbinding, 
and require meticulous craftsmanship. 
The results are a tribute to the work of 
Garden conservator Vicki Lee and her 
staff of dedicated, enthusiastic volunteers. 



Some people are fortunate enough to 
combine their work with pleasure. Such is 
the case with Vicki Lee, Conservator for 
the Garden library. Book conservators 



must be skilled in the craftsmanship of 
their profession and often use their 
talents in hobbies or handicrafts. Conser- 
vation work requires creativity in choos- 
ing materials and binding styles, as well. 




Conservation Center volunteers (left to 
right): Ginny Tiirner, Jane Thomas, Arrnyn 
Spies, conservator Vicki Lee. f'atrick Kegin, 
Paula Brooks. Robert Buck. 



about environmental conditions; planning 
for damage prevention and recovery in 
case of an emergency; keeping statistics; 
writing reports; assisting with the prepa- 
ration of grant proposals; and carrying out 
special projects. 

Vicki enjoys training and working with 
the conservation center's volunteers, and 
certainly her volunteers enjoy working 
with Vicki. Jane Thomas, who gives two 
days each week to conserving the Gar- 
den's collections, says "Completing the 
projects is challenging and satisfying. It's 
like going to arts and crafts every day. 
And it's fun to work with all the wonderful 
equipment and tools in the Conservation 
Center." Patrick Kegin, who also gives 
two days per week to the Center, says 
that his attraction to working in the library 
is his basic love for books. He adds that it 
is wonderful to work for Vicki, who is so 
competent at teaching crafts that will 
endure long after we are gone. 

Vicki began her career as an art his- 
tory and English literature major and dis- 
covered her talent for book conservation 
while she was a library assistant at the Art 



Exacting craftsman- 
ship is required to 
repair, restore, and 
preserve the Garden 's 
valuable collection. 



Vicki says, "Work for me is a pleasure. 
All conservators share a love of reading, 
as well as an appreciation of the book as a 
valuable object in itself.' ' 

When pressed, Vicki will concede that 
while her job is pleasurable, it is not play. 
As conservator it is her responsibility to 
plan, coordinate, and carry out activities 
that result in books that are functional and 
serviceable to the library's patrons. 
These activities include book repair, 
bookbinding, and restoration; advising 



Institute of Chicago. She received her 
advanced bookbinding diploma in 1989 
from the North Bennet Street School, a 
highly respected crafts institute in Bos- 
ton. Vicki joined the Garden library staff 
in late 1989 and immediately set to work 
organizing conservation center activities, 
producing fine work, training volunteers, 
and providing a place where coming to the 
office can be a real pleasure. 

— Constance P. Wolf, 
Garden Librarian 



BULLETIN MARCH AI'KII. 1991 



It is an article of faith for 
many home gardeners that a 
springtime application of 
10-10-10 all purpose fertilizer 
will solve all of our soil prepa- 
ration needs. It would be nice if 
it were that simple! Unfor- 
tunately, indiscriminate use of 
fertilizers may pollute ground- 
water and cause buildup that 
can actually damage your 
plants. 

Good growing conditions 
require a balanced interaction 
among soil type, nutrients, pH 
level, organic matter and 
water. A soil test is the best 
way to understand what your 
soil really needs for the plants 
you want to grow. 



WHAT'S IN A SOIL TEST? 

Typically, a soil test will 
give you recommendations for 
amounts of nutrients to be 
applied. The interpretation of 
the recommendations can be 
confusing. laboratories com- 
monly deal with farm crops and 
report test values in pounds 
per acre or parts per million. 
Neither of these has much 
meaning to the common 
homeowner or backyard gar- 
dener. Also, the reports 
include a lot of numbers and 
seem complex; rarely will you 
see one that explains whether 
the level of a nutrient is in an 
acceptable range or not. I 
found this out recently when I 
sent portions of a single soil 
sample to six different public 
and private laboratories to 
compare their results. The labs 
all came up with approximately 
the same numbers, but their 
recommendations differed, and 
some labs did not do all of the 
tests requested. 

Despite the frustration it is 
important to take the time to 
understand the recommenda- 
tions. For example, if a phos- 
phate application is not 
suggested, do not apply it, 
even if you have a fertilizer that 
includes phosphate with 
recommended nutrients. It 
may seem like a lot of trouble 
to buy ingredients separately 
and mix them to get the right 



Home Gardening 



Soil Testing: 
Why, When & How 



blend for the job, but it is bet- 
ter to do this than to waste fer- 
tilizer and risk buildup than can 
burn plant roots. 

A good soil test will include 
several factors that will help 
you to evaluate what needs to 
be done. These factors are: pH 
level, which measures acidity 
or alkalinity; the percentage of 
organic matter; levels of avail- 
able phosphorus, potassium, 
magnesium and calcium. Nitro- 
gen levels are not usually 
included in a soil test, because 
nitrogen must be replaced 
annually. 

pH LEVEL 

The pH level indicates the 
acidity or alkalinity in the soil. 
A measurement of 7.0 is neu- 
tral, and optimum pH for most 
growing sites is between 6.0 
and 6.8. When the soil is too 
alkaline, or greater than 7.5, 
elements such as iron, zinc, 
copper and manganese are 
locked up in the soil and are no 
longer available to plant roots. 
A similar situation exists when 
soils are too acidic, or below 
5.0, although certain plants like 
rhododendrons, blueberries 
and potatoes do much better in 
acidic soil of 5.2 to 5.8. 

Generally speaking, most 
soils in the local area register a 
pH in an acceptable range for 
growing plants. Adding lime to 
make the soil "sweeter" or 
more alkaline should not be a 
standard practice and is very 
rarely called for. If the pH is 
around 5.8, some liming can be 
done to raise it. However, it 
should be done in stages of 
application to avoid burning the 
plant's roots. 

ORGANIC MATTER 

Most gardeners who are 
serious about growing plants 
recognize the value of adding 
organic matter to planting beds 
to improve drainage, soil com- 
paction, aeration and moisture 



10. 



levels during drought condi- 
tions, especially in heavy clay 
soils. Vegetable gardeners 
commonly work in organic 
materials every 7 year and levels 
here often exceed ten percent. 
Organic matter is an excellent 
source of nitrogen, supplying 
'A to % pound for every one 
percent of organic matter in 
the soil. If you are planting 
perennials or turfgrass, take 
the time to prepare the beds 
by thoroughly incorporating 
organic material before you 
plant. Later on, surface mulch- 
ing is the only way to affect the 
organic matter content of the 
soil once it is planted. 

PHOSPHOROUS 

Phosphorous is important 
to energy systems and primary 
root growth. When it is applied 
as fertilizer it stays in the soil 
for long periods, so it is often 
not necessary to use fertilizers 
containing phosphate every 
year. The soil may already 
have sufficient levels if some 
fertilization has been done in 
the last three to five years. 
Extreme pH levels (below 5.0 
and above 7.5) and cold soil 
temperature will inhibit plants' 
ability to absorb phosphate, so 
early plantings of vegetables 
and newly seeded turfgrass 
should be accompanied by a 
starter fertilizer containing 
phosphate. A phosphate test 
should register in the area of 6 
pounds per 1000 square feet, a 
desirable range for most crops. 

POTASSIUM 

Potassium supports many 
functions in plants, including 
strengthening cell walls and 
regulating water. Potassium 
levels in the soil drop as 
vegetables are harvested and 
grass clippings are removed. If 
grass clippings are left on the 
lawn, as the Garden recom- 
mends, you will seldom need 
to fertilize with potassium. 



Soil test levels around 10 
pounds per 100 square feet are 
desirable. If your soil tests 
lower than this the level should 
be built up, but be careful not 
to burn plants. Each application 
should not exceed 1.5 pounds 
of potassium fertilizer, applied 
four to six weeks apart. 

CATION EXCHANGE CAPACITY 
(CEC) 

Magnesium and calcium are 
rarely ever deficient in soils, 
but their levels reflect the 
capacity of the soil to deliver 
nutrients. Each soil holds on to 
nutrients to some degree, and 
if the supply of nutrients is low, 
the chemical grip is tighter, 
making it hard for plant roots to 
absorb nutrients for growth. 
When magnesium and calcium 
are measured in the soil, a 
number is generated which is 
referred to as the cation 
exchange capacity (CEC). This 
tells you how well soil delivers 
nutrients to plants, depending 
on the amount and type of clay 
and organic matter present. 
The CEC provides some 
assessment of how much fer- 
tilizer you should use. 

WHEN TO TEST YOUR SOIL 

Most people do not think 
about fertilizers and soil testing 
until the spring. This is fine, 
except that you should be pre- 
pared to wait several weeks for 
the results, as laboratories are 
typically very busy with sam- 
ples submitted by farmers. For 
turfgrass this is no problem, 
because fertilizer applications 
should not begin until May, 
with the heaviest amounts 
being applied in the fall. The 
only other drawback to spring 
testing is that if you plan to use 
a purely organic approach to 
fertilizing your vegetable gar- 
den, there is not much time 
between incorporation and 
planting for the material to 
decompose and supply nutri- 
ents to the soil. Decomposition 
depends upon warm soil tem- 
peratures above 60 ° F. 

If you are planning to use 
organic techniques for supply- 
ing nutrients, plan to test your 
soil later in the season. Allow 



\BULLET1N MAkYII APRIL 1991 



ample time for organic 
materials to break down over 
the winter and early spring to 
liberate nutrients. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

The soil test report should 
tell you how much phosphorus 
and potassium to till into the 
soil. Once in the soil they are 
relatively immobile, so you do 
not have to worry about 
repeating the application in 
spring. For best results, potas- 
sium and particularly phos- 
phorous should be scratched 
into the root zone of plants or 
crops. During the latter part of 
the season, when plants are 
beginning their dormancy, they 
are less likely to suffer root 
damage from incorporation. 

The soil test will also indi- 
cate if the soil's organic matter 
content is low. Adding organic 
matter in the fall helps to aer- 
ate the soil and improves its 
texture, making it less suscep- 
tible to compaction from snow 
and ice. Organic material also 
improves water drainage so 
soil dries out more quickly in 
the spring, and it contributes 
nutrients to the soil as it 



decomposes. Most soil test 
reports do not give recommen- 
dations for how much organic 
matter to add. Generally 
speaking, a six-inch layer 
incorporated into the soil will 
raise the organic content by 
about one percent. 

FERTILIZERS 

There are two broad 
categories of fertilizers: inor- 
ganic and organic. Inorganic 
fertilizers are made from non- 
living materials, such as rock 
or mineral deposits. Some are 
produced through chemical 
reactions. The nutrients in 
inorganic fertilizers are usually 
readily available shortly after 
application and are absorbed 
during active plant growth. 

Most organic fertilizers are 
derived from animal and plant 
remains. However, some 
organic fertilizers are syntheti- 
cally made from carbon-based 
chemicals. The term 
' 'organic' ' means that carbon 
forms the basic chemical struc- 
ture of the fertilizer. If you are 
an organic grower, then classi- 
cally you are interested in fer- 
tilizers of plant and animal 



origin only. These materials 
usually release nutrients 
slowly, reducing the potential 
for fertilizer burn. 

The biggest difference 
between the two types of fer- 
tilizers is the way in which they 
affect the physical properties of 
the soil. Organic fertilizers not 
only supply nutrients, they also 
supply organic matter, which, 
as we have seen, benefits root 
growth by improving soil aera- 
tion, water and nutrient hold- 
ing capacity and soil texture. 
Inorganic fertilizers do not 
improve the physical proper- 
ties of the soil to any great 
extent. But you should under- 
stand that ultimately the nutri- 
ents supplied to the roots are 
the same regardless of 
whether they were derived 
from inorganic or organic 
sources. 

WHO TESTS SOILS? 

In Missouri, most soil test- 
ing is done by University 
Extension. There is an Exten- 
sion office located in every one 
of the 114 counties in the state. 
In certain other states, like 
Illinois, most testing is done by 



independent laboratories. In 
either case, the fees generally 
are reasonable and range from 
about $5 to $20 depending 
upon what is requested. The 
basic test should include a 
measure of pH, phosphorous 
and potassium, but you should 
check on this before submitting 
your sample. You should also 
request recommendations. 
Some laboratories do not auto- 
matically supply this informa- 
tion and there may be a 
separate charge. 

In June the Missouri Botan- 
ical Garden will begin to accept 
soil samples for testing. This is 
part of a new program through 
the Center for Home Garden- 
ing aimed at helping people 
understand more about grow- 
ing and maintaining plants in 
and around the home. A packet 
of information on soil testing 
and soil sample bags will be 
available at the Center, and for 
a small fee, samples will be 
tested. The Center will pro- 
vide recommendations for all 
plants, soils and growing condi- 
tions, based on test results. 
—Steven D. Cline, Ph. D. 



Timely Tips from the Answer Service 



Do you have a plant question? Call the 
Horticultural Answer Service, Monday 
through Friday, 9a.m. to noon, at 
577-5143. 

March Tips 

■ Now is a good time to repot any 
crowded houseplants. Pot in containers 
that are only one size larger. Prune any 
spindly shoots. Begin fertilizing as new 
growth appears. 

■ Not only is Forsythia welcome for its 
spring flowers, but it also serves as a 
fairly reliable indicator plant. Gardening 
lore holds that when this shrub blooms, it 
is time to apply crabgrass preventers to 
the lawn (mid-March to mid-April). Rose 
growers look to this bush as a reminder to 
begin spring pruning and to start gradually 
pulling back mulches (late March or early 
April). 

■ If weather permits, summer and fall 
blooming perennials may be divided now. 



■ Inspect the garden pond for water 
clarity. If brown, murky water and bottom 
sediments are present, drain and clean 
the pool before growth begins. 

■ Finish pruning apple and pear trees. 
Grape pruning should also be completed. 
Remove winter killed canes from 
brambles. 

April Tips 

■ Cut back ornamental grasses. These 
can also be fertilized at this time. 

■ Fertilize perennials as growth begins. 
Use a complete formulation low in 
nitrogen. 

■ When planting trees, forget the old 
rules about adding large amounts of 
organic matter to the soil. In heavy clay 
soils this will only encourage the roots to 
stay inside the hole rather than infiltrating 
the surrounding soil. New guidelines sug- 
gest a hole wide enough to easily accom- 
modate the root ball but only as deep as 
the ball's height. Backfill with the native 



soil and loosen the soil around the plant- 
ing hole to a diameter five times the width 
of the root ball. Organic matter can be 
added to the loosened soil surface as a 
mulch and renewed annually. The tree 
roots will grow into the loosened soil 
area. 

■ Set out plants of broccoli, cauliflower 
and cabbage by mid- month. 

■ Prune back early spring flowering 
shrubs as soon as their blossoms have 
faded. 

■ Aerify, lightly fertilize and overseed 
patches in winter damaged bluegrass and 
fescue lawns. 

■ Prune peaches and other stone fruits 
just before they bloom. 

■ Avoid cultivating too deeply in the 
asparagus bed. Damage to the shoots will 
result in deformed spears. 

■ Plant hardy lilies and other hardy 
aquatics outdoors in the pond. 

—Chip Tynan, The Answer Service 



11. 



BULLETIN MARCH APRIL 1991 



I: 



)V 



\ „ 




>\ 



'/ 



ml 

Missouri Botanical Garden 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 






March-April 1991 







Jr', 









MARCH 9 APRIL 7 /Spring Flower Show 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Orthwein Floral Hall. An 
enchanted ' 'cottage-in-the-woods' ' is surrounded by 
beautiful spring flowering trees, bulbs, annuals and 
perennials. Take a fairy tale stroll through this won- 
derland and enjoy all the beauty and promise of 
springtime. Members ' Preview—see March 8. 



MARCH 20/MEMRERS'DAY 
"Sneak Preview" Tour 

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. , Kemper Center for Home Garden- 
ing. Continuous guided tours give an advance look at 
the Center, scheduled to open June 9. Free, for 
members only. 

APRIL 25/MEMRERS' DAY 
Azalea Walk 

10 a.m. to 3 p.m., continuous guided tours, grounds. 
Enjoy one of the early displays of springtime 
splendor, the azaleas. Receive a free flyer on the 
planting and care of azaleas. Free, for members only. 



MARCH 



MARCH 5, 12, IS, 26 

Gardening by Design Lecture Series 

Four Tuesdays, 1 and 7 p.m. This popular lecture series features 
well known horticulturists and landscape designers. Available by 
subscription for the afternoon and evening series, $15 members, 
$18 non-members. Afternoon and evening tickets cannot be 
mixed in a subscription. Single tickets are available at the door, 
only if the series has not sold out; $5 members, $6 non-members. 









"Uk 










2-3 



SATURDAY 
& SUNDAY 



Spring Gardening Fair 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Ridgway Center. 
Co-sponsored by the St. Louis 
Post-Dispatch, this event will fea- 
ture a lecture series on gardening 
topics and displays by local nursery- 
men and floral societies. Advance 
registration is required for the lec- 
tures which will run from 10 a.m. to 
3:45 p.m. on Saturday, March 2 and 
from 12:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m., Sun- 
day, March 3. Displays will be open 
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 577-5125 for 
additional information. Regular 
(iarden admission. Advance reser- 
vations are required for lectures, $5 
per person. 



■§ M N D A Y 

Plant Clinic 

9 a.m. to noon, Ridgway Cent 
Bring us your tired, sick plant: 
yearning to be green. The St. 
Master Gardeners will examin 
recommend ways of improvinj 
health of your house, garden ;i 
landscape plants. Samples of s 
plants are welcome and eneou 
to help gardeners diagnose pi? 
problems. Free. 




5 



TUESDAY 



Gardening by Design Lectui 
"The Front Garden" 

1 and 7 p.m., Shoenberg Audi 
rium. Gardening writer Mary 
Smith discusses ways to impr 
the appearance of your home. 
highlight for details. 



8 



F R I I) A Y 



Members' Preview of 
Spring Flower Show 

5 to 8 p.m., Orthwein Floral L 
Enjoy a first glimpse of spring 
Also get a preview of an exhib 
watercolors, oil paintings, and 
ings featuring the Garden by 
St. Louis artist Jerry Thomas 
Entertainment, cash bar. Dinr 
buffet will be available in Gard 
view Restaurant. Free, for me 
hers only. 



9 



SATURDAY 



Jerry Thomas Exhibit Open 

9a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through 
7. Ridgway Center. Sixty-five 
watercolors, oils, and drawing 
St. Louis artist Jerry Thomas 
ture the Garden. Concurrent 
exhibits at Norton's Fine Art 5 
dios and the Art Gallery at Ho 
low will feature additional wor 
Thomas and will comprise the 
largest collection of artworks i 
Garden ever produced. Free \ 
regular Garden admission. 



12. 



\BULLETIN UAKt H APRIL L99] 




TUESDAY 

ling by Design Lecture: 
looks Garden" 

p.m., Shoenberg Audito- 
aithor Shepard Ogden intro- 
lew crops and growing 
ues, and some new ideas 
he traditional vegetable gar- 
« highlight for details. 



SUNDAY 

.ecture: "Outdoor 
isionist Style" 

Shoenberg Auditorium, 
lis artist Jerry Thomas dis- 
how to paint landscapes out- 
Works from his exhibit on 
in Monsanto Hall will be fea- 
Free with regular Garden 
ion. 



MONDAY 

Clinic 

to noon, Ridgway Center, 
irch 4 for details. 




TUESDAY 

ling by Design Lecture: 
inials and Wildf lowers in 
ck Garden" 

p.m. , Shoenberg Audito- 
'anayoti Kelaidis, curator of 
:k Alpine Garden at Denver 
: Gardens, demonstrates 
create year-round interest in 
ck garden. 



21 



THURSDAY 



Preview Lecture: "Lewis and 
Clark Natural History Tour" 

11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m., Shoenberg 
Auditorium. Join tour leaders 
Dr. Nancy Morin and Dr. Marshall 
Crosby of the Garden, and Dr. Ray 
Bruen of the Riverlands Associa- 
tion, for a preview of the tour 
coming up June 14-28. See page 14. 
Free, for members only. 



MONDAY 

Plant Clinic 

9 a.m. to noon, Ridgway Center. 
See March 4 for details. 

*| THURSDAY 

Estate Planning Seminar 

9 a.m., Ridgway Center. See page 
19. Free, reservations required: call 
Ernestina Short at 577-9532. 



5 



FRIDAY 



Arbor Day Celebration 

Times and locations to be 
announced. The Garden will host a 
series of tree plantings in St. Louis 
city and county parks, in honor of 
Arbor Day. All are invited to attend 
these special neighborhood tree 
plantings. Call 577-5125 for informa- 
tion on locations and times. 



6 



SATURDAY 



Children's Arbor Day Celebration: 
"Treasure Hunt at the Arboretum 

10 a.m. to noon, Shaw Arboretum. 
Attention, MoBots! Bring your 
whole family and a picnic lunch. 
Take a beautiful one-mile spring 




hike along the Wolf Run Trail and 
locate ten varieties of trees on your 
MoBot tree map. Enter the drawing 
located in the Visitors Center for a 
very special birdhouse. Free, for 
members only. 



10 



W E D N E S D A Y 



Lecture: "The Evolution of a 
Garden in Northern Quebec" 

1 and 7 p.m., Shoenberg Audito- 
rium. Frank Cabot describes the 
evolution of his family's 20-acre 
garden over the past 65 years. 
Cabot has been a member of the 
Board of Managers of The New 
York Botanical Garden and recently 
founded the Garden Conservancy, a 
national organization dedicated to 
preserving exceptional private 
gardens for posterity. Free. 



11 



THURSDAY 



Estate Planning Seminar 

9 a.m., Ridgway Center. See April 
4 for details. 



15 



MONDAY 



Plant Clinic 

9 a.m. to noon, Ridgway Center. 
See March 4 for details. 



GARDEN WALKERS BREAKFAST 

Every Wednesday and Saturday, 7 to 10:30 a.m. 

The Garden opens early on Wednesday and Saturday morn- 
ings. The mileage of various paths around the grounds are 
available at the ticket counter. Health and nutrition programs will 
be offered the last Saturday of each month in cooperation with 
the American Heart Association; call 577-5125 for information. 
The Gardenview Restaurant offers its "heart healthy" breakfast 
buffet of cereals, fruit, juice, and yogurt. The greenhouses do 
not open until regular opening hours at 9:00 a.m. Admission is 
free before noon every Wednesday and Saturday. 



26 



TUESDAY 



Gardening by Design Lecture: 
"The Cutting Garden" 

1 and 7 p.m., Shoenberg Audito- 
rium. Bill Snyder, superintendent of 
gardens and grounds at Stan Hywet 
Hall and Gardens, Inc. will offer tips 
on how to create a source for fresh 
and dried flower arrangements in 
your own backyard. See highlight for 
details. 



20 



SATURDAY 



Meg Webster Exhibit 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through May 
19, Ridgway Center. The Garden 
and Laumeier Sculpture Park spon- 
sor a collaborative exhibit of two- 
dimensional works by environmen- 
tal sculptor Meg Webster, including 
photographs and documents of past 
projects, and descriptive plans for 
the upcoming Laumeier Sculpture 
Park Prairie Project. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 



20-21 



SATURDAY 
& SUNDAY 



Bonsai Society Show 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Ridgway 
Center. A display of exquisite exam- 
ples of the art of bonsai. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 



25-28 



THURSDAY 
-SUNDAY 



Spring Plant Sale 

9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Thursday and 
Friday; 9a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday 
and Sunday; Garden Gate Shop. 
Members receive 20% discount on 
all merchandise! See page 19. 




BULLETIN ! MARCH APRIL 1991 



From the Membership Office 



New Officers and Board Members Elected 




At the annual meeting January 14, 1991, the Members ' Board eleeted as offieers (left to 
right): Jane Tschudy, second rice president; Sue Rapp, president; Ted At wood, treasurer; 
Mary Longrais, first rice president; Susie Schulte, secretary. 




Members elected to the Hoard (standing, left to right): Dr. Thomas Yager, Jean Crowder, Dale 
Whit ten. (Seated, left to right): Ann-Marie Clarke; Robert Kresko, retiring president of the 
Hoard of Trustees; Linda Whitacre. 



Special Preview Lecture 
for Lewis and Clark Tour 

On Thursday, March 21, join tour 
guides Dr. Nancy Morin and Dr. Marshall 
Crosby of the Garden and Dr. Ray Bruen 
of the Riverlands Association for a lecture 
at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. in Shoenberg 
Auditorium. The lecture highlights many 
of the wondrous natural and historical 
sights you will encounter on the Garden's 
co-sponsored tour June 14-28. You will 
follow in the footsteps of Lewis and 
Clark's famous "Corps of Discovery" 
expedition of 1803-06 along the Missouri 
River to the northwestern territories. 
Tour itineraries will be provided. You 
won't want to miss this exciting pre-tour 
lecture. Free, for members only. 

Coming in May: 
A Garden Tradition 

Mother's Day Luncheon 

at the Garden 

This popular celebration has become 
an annual spring event of the Garden. 
Mark your calendars now for Friday, May 
10, 1991. Watch your April mail for a spe- 
cial members' invitation. 

A Tribute to Family 
and Friends 

You can recognize your family and 
friends at special times— birthdays, wed- 
dings, anniversaries, births, personal 
accomplishments, and as expressions of 
sympathy. When you make a tribute 
donation, a personalized acknowledg- 
ment of your gift, without reference to 
the size of the gift, is sent to the individual 
or family honored. In addition, both you 
and the honoree will be listed in the 
' Tributes' ' section of the Bulletin. 

The donations to the Tribute Fund are 
a vital source of financial support for the 
Garden. You will receive a receipt for your 
records and each gift is tax deductible. 

To make a donation, you may use the 
form at right. For more information about 
the Tribute Fund, or if you would like trib- 
ute remittance envelopes sent to you, 
please call our membership office at (314) 
577-5118. Also, you can charge a tribute 
on your Visa or MasterCard. 



14. 



\BULLET1N MARCH APRIL 1991 




NEWS FRO M T W E R GROVE HOUSE 

Restoration Project Continues 



The magnificent carved canopy bed in 
the northwest guest bedroom in Tower 
Grove House has recently been com- 
pletely restored. The bed was a gift to 
Tower Grove House from Mrs. L. Wade 
Childress in 1954. Although it is not 
marked, it is believed to be the work of 
Prudent Mallard, a renowned cabinet- 
maker established in New Orleans in 
1838. Mallard was famous for his bed- 
room furniture. He introduced the style of 
a half-tester bed with magnificent carv- 
ing, of which the bed in Tower Grove 
House is a splendid example. 

The finish of the bed was restored by 
The Furniture Works, a St. Louis com- 
pany. Martha Grimm, an expert textile 
conservator, replaced the deteriorating 
silk canopy, fringe, and dust cover after 



meticulous research. The bed restoration 
project was funded by the Tower Grove 
House Auxiliary. 

The refurbished bed is just the latest 
part of the ongoing restoration of the 
upstairs bedrooms. An extensive analysis 
of the rooms' original paint has revealed 
that the door frames were painted to 
resemble stone, with "false grain" 
mahogany and oak finishes on the doors. 
The Historical Committee will use the 
findings of the paint analysis in planning 
future phases of the restoration. 

Thank You, Volunteers! 

The lovely Victorian Christmas deco- 
rations that beautified Tower Grove 
House in December were the work of 



The Mallard bed 



dedicated volunteers. Deepest apprecia- 
tion goes to the Tower Grove House Aux- 
iliary; the St. Louis Herb Society; the 
Members' Board of the Garden; the 
Grass Roots Garden Club; the Twenty- 
Five Gardeners, Kirkwood; the Fleur de 
Lis Garden Club; the Four Winds Garden 
Club; the Ladue Garden Club; Joan 
Abeln, Bernadine McNeary, and the 
Tower Grove House staff. 

Tower Grove House is decorated 
annually for the holidays. The participa- 
tion of these organizations and individuals 
makes it a very special time for all. 

Advance Admission 
Tickets Available 

The Ticket Counter at the Kidgway 
Center has admission tickets available for 
purchase in advance. Adult admission is 
$2 for persons ages 13 to 64; senior 
citizen admission is $1 for ages 65 and 
over; and children age 12 and under are 
admitted free, as are Garden members. 
The Garden is open every day of the year 
except Christmas, and admission is free 
to all on Wednesdays and Saturdays until 
noon. 

The tickets can be used on any future 
date, and make wonderful gifts. They can 
be purchased in person or by written 
request if a check or money order is 
enclosed. Send requests to: Ticket Coun- 
ter, Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 
299, St. Louis, Missouri 63166-0299. 
Admission for groups should be arranged 
by calling (314) 577-5124. 



Tribute Fund PLEASE PRINT: 

The enclosed contribution to the Missouri Botanical Garden is given 

In Memory of Mr. /Mrs. /Ms. /Miss 

In Honor of Mr. / Mrs. / Ms. / Miss 

Occasion 



Notify: Mr. / Mrs. / Ms. / Miss. 

Address 

City 



.State. 



_Zip_ 



From: Mr. /Mrs. /Ms. /Miss. 

Address 

City 

Please sign card: 



.State. 



.Zip. 



□ My check for $_ 
is enclosed. 

D Please charge: 
Amount: $ 



□ VISA □ MasterCard 



Account No.. 



Name on card:. 



Expiration date:. 
Signed: 



Detach and mail to: Missouri Botanical Garden 
Tribute Fund 
P.O. Box 299 
St. Louis, Missouri 63166-0299 



15. 



BULLETIN MAkCH-AI'KIL 1991 



RESEARCH I) I V I S I N N E VV S 




In October, HMO, Harden research staff and visiting research scholars posed for a group 
portrait. A similar picture taken ten gears ago had about a third this number, a tribute to the 
growth of the Garden '» research program. (Front row, left to right): Nancy Morin, Fred 
Barrie, Ihsan Al-Shehbaz, (Gloria Sousa-Andrade, Charlotte Taylor, Rog Gereau, Gordon 
Mcl'herson, Jim Miller, Enrique Forero, Robbin Moron, Lois Brako. (Second row, left to 
right): Flsa Zardini. I'eter Goldblatt, Mario Sousa, Bill D'Arcy, Jon Lovett, Henk van der 
Werff Bill Haber, Bill Ihi, Ron Liesner. (Third row. left to right): David Neill, George 
Yatskievgch, Dale Johnson, Jim Solomon, Dan Harder, Gerrit Davidse, Al Gentry, Paul 
Berrg, David Smith. Marshall Crosby. (Top row, left to right): Jim Zarucchi, Jeremy Bruhl, 
Fernando Zuioaga, Job Kuijt, W. Douglas Stevens, Mick Richardson, I'eter Hoch, John 
MacDougal, Ti>m Croat, Bruce Allen, George Schatz, Bob Magill. Sousa and Zuioaga are 
MBG postgraduate fellows; Bruhl is a postdoctoral fellow; Harder is a MBG research 
associate; Sousa-Andrade is a visiting researcher. 




(I,eft to right): Dr. P. Mick Richardson, manager of graduate studies at MB(i; Carolina Israel; 
Mrs. James A. Breckenridge; German Carnevali; and Dr. Victoria Sork, director of graduate 
studies in biology at IM-St. Loui8. 

Garden Clubs Support Graduate Students 



The Federated Garden Clubs of Mis- 
souri, represented by Mrs. James A. 
Breckenridge, recently gave scholarship 
awards to two of the graduate students in 
the Missouri Botanical Garden/Univer- 

NSF Awards Grant to Flora of 

The National Science Foundation 
(NSF) has awarded $600,000 in a three- 
year grant to the Flora of North America 
project. Flora of North America, whose 
organizational center is here at the Gar- 
den, involves hundreds of botanists in 
North America in the production of the 



sity of Missouri-St. Louis joint program. 
The recipients were Carolina Israel, a 
native of Peru studying tropical forest 
soils, and German Carnevali, a native of 
Venezuela who studies orchids. 

North America 

twelve-volume, illustrated work and an 
associated database. The Hunt Institute 
for Documentation in Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania, is the bibliographic center. 

The current NSF grant supports work 
of editors at their home institutions, 
administrative activities, and writing of 



Garden To Be Major Force 
at African Botany 
Congress 

The Missouri Botanical Garden will be 
a major presence at the Kith Congress of 
the Association for the Taxonomic Study 
of the Flora of Tropical Africa (AETFAT) 
(Association Pour 1' Etude Taxonomique 
de la Flore d Afrique Tropicalel to be held 
in Zomba, Malawi, April 2-11, 1991. 
Through the generosity of two donors, 
Mrs. Clark Gamble and the Monsanto 
Fund, the Garden will be able to send five 
of its botanists to the Congress and fund 
the travel of five additional African 
botanists from their home countries. 

AETFAT was founded in London in 
1950. Its membership is open to anyone 
who is interested in the flora and vegeta- 
tion of Africa. Of its 800 members, some 
300 are expected to attend the Malawi 
Congress. In the 40-year history of the 
organization, this will be the first time that 
an AETFAT Congress will be held in tropi- 
cal Africa. The most recent meeting was 
held in 1985 at the Missouri Botanical 
Garden. 

"This is the most important meeting 
of botanists and ecologist working in trop- 
ical Africa," said Dr. Peter Goldblatt, 
B. A. Krukoff Curator for African Botany 
at the Garden. "It is the only time that 
these people can get together to 
exchange information, renew old acquain- 
tances, make new contacts, and get all 
fired up about botany.' ' 

Mrs. Clark Gamble's donation will be 
used to fund the travel of Garden research 
staff. The Monsanto Fund donation will 
go toward the travel of the African 
botanists. 

Garden botanists who will attend are 
Robert Magill, Roy Gereau, and Goldblatt 
traveling from St. Louis; Porter P. Lowry 
II, who coordinates the Garden's 
Madagascar research program, traveling 
from Paris; and Jon Lovett, the Garden's 
resident botanist in Tanzania. Since 1970, 
the Garden has been the designated cen- 
ter for the study of African botany. 

The African botanists will be traveling 
to Malawi from Cameroon, Gabon, 
Ghana, Ivory Coast, and Tanzania. 

some treatments. Flora of North America 
received its initial funding from The Pew 
Charitable Trusts in 1986. The National 
Science Foundation awarded the project a 
grant of $300,000 for two years in 1987; 
the current grant represents renewed 
funding for the project. 



L6. 



\BULLETIN MARCH Al'kll. 1991 



Trustee Profile 



Buzz Westfall 




Buzz Westfall became a member of 
the Garden's Board of Trustees in Janu- 
ary when he assumed the position of 
St. Louis County Executive following the 
November election. Both the St. Louis 
County Executive and the Mayor of the 
City of St. Louis serve as ex-officio mem- 
bers of the Garden's Board. "I am 
enthusiastic about this appointment and 
believe that the Garden is a fantastic asset 



to the metropolitan area," said Westfall. 

A resident of St. Louis County since 
childhood, Westfall attended parochial 
schools and graduated from St. Louis 
University Law School in 1969. Following 
the completion of his education, he 
became an Assistant Professor in the 
St. Louis County Prosecutor's Office 
from 1969-1977. In 1978, Westfall was 
elected St. Louis County Prosecuting 
Attorney and served in that capacity until 
the present. 

Among this top priorities as County 
Executive Westfall has stressed his com- 
mitment to maintaining a tough stand on 
crime, working for greater protection of 
our environment, and keeping St. Louis 
County's economy strong by retaining 
jobs and attracting new ones to the areas. 
"It is imperative that we take an active 
role in preserving our environment for 
our own survival and in order to make the 
world a better place for future genera- 
tions. Working with the Missouri Botani- 
cal Garden, I anticipate having a great 
opportunity to create cooperative pro- 
grams between the county and the 
Garden that will be beneficial to the entire 
area," Westfall said. 

Westfall and his wife, Laurie reside in 
DesPeres with their three children: 
Mark, Steve, and Kristin. 



N E W S FROM THE HENRY SHAW ACADEMY 



Spring Programs Focus on Gardening, 
Outdoor Adventures 




The Academy programs this spring 
will offer extraordinary opportunities in 
gardening, exploring various natural com- 
munities, and outdoor studies. Classes on 
Saturdays and Tuesday afternoons 
include butterfly gardening, endangered 
species, weather forecasting, cave explo- 
rations, "planting trees for wildlife 
cover," Shaw Arboretum wildflower 
treks, "planting a prairie," the Stream 
Ecology spring field trip down the Mer- 
amec River, and much more. For more 
information about the Henry Shaw 
Academy and current programs for ages 



7-14, call the instructional coordinator, Jeff 
DePew, at 577-5135. 



Moving? Please Remember 
To Send Us Your New Address. 

To avoid missing any of your membership 
mailings, you must give us your new 
address at least three weeks before you 
move. Please enclose the mailing label on 
the back cover of this Bulletin, and mail to: 
Membership Office, Missouri Botanical 
Garden, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166. 



Archives Receives 
NHPRC Grant 



The Garden library has received a 
grant for $80,096 from the National 
Historical Publications and Records Com- 
mission (NHPRC) with the approval of 
the Missouri Historical Records Advisory 
Board. The purpose of the grant is to 
develop the Garden archives program for 
non-current records, and to begin a 
records management program for current 
records. 

All aspects of the Garden are reflected 
in the archives, which includes publica- 
tions, records, blueprints, photographs, 
and persona] papers. Taken together, 
these archival materials tell the story of 
the growth and building of the Garden. 
The grant project includes appraisal and 
preparation of permanently valuable 
records for transfer to the archives; 
arrangement and description of records; 
placement of records descriptions into an 
automated database; and publication of a 
guide to the archives collection. 

The archives preserves only a small 
percentage of the Garden's non-current 
records. Fortunately, not everything 
needs to be saved, considering the enor- 
mous amount of paper that modern insti- 
tutions generate. Records management 
through records scheduling allows timely 
destruction of those records that are not 
permanently valuable, so that space and 
equipment once used to store outdated 
records can be more efficiently used. 
Records scheduling also insures that per- 
manent, inactive records are preserved 
and transferred to the archives; this 
transfer releases prime office space. 
Records schedules are made by collecting 
data on the Garden's records in a records 
survey and recording decisions made by 
department heads and the archivist on 
how long these records will be kept. 

This project will be carried out Janu- 
ary 1, 1991 to December 31, 1992 by the 
Garden archivist, Martha Riley, with the 
assistance of grant supported staff mem- 
bers Suellyn Lathrop and Mary Stiffler. 

Congratulations, 
Climatron! 

The new telephone directory white pages 
for St. Louis features the Climatron on its 
cover. Our thanks to Southwestern Bell! 



17. 



BULLETIN I MARCH APRIL 1991 



Project ReDirectory Aims To Save 18,000 Trees 




Above: At the Project ReDirectory announce- 
ment held at Spink Pavilion at the Garden, 
students from Ferguson Middle School 
K.I. N.I). (Kids in Nature's Defense) Club and 
(iirl Scouts from Troops 141 and 386 stacked 
32 telephone directories to underscore the 
high priority school-aged children place on 
environmental efforts. Recycling a four-foot 
stack of phone books saves one 10-year old, 
60-foot high Southern Pine tree. Pictured 
left to right are: Jamina Randall, Stephanie 
Kilcrease, Cedric Johnson and Adam 
Koeneman. 

Southwestern Bell Telephone Com- 
pany announced its ReDirectory tele- 
phone book recycling program for the 
St. Louis area at a news conference held at 
the Garden on January 16. The St. Louis 



effort is the largest phone book recycling 
project ever undertaken in the midwest. 
Douglas Arnold, the Garden's public rela- 
tions manager, served on the steering 
committee of environmental organiza- 
tions and area corporations that helped 
Southwestern Bell organize the project. 
The coalition includes BFI Waste Sys- 
tems, General Motors Corporation, 
Henry Transportation, Inc., St. Louis 
Area Girl Scout Council and the St. Louis 
Post-Dispatch. 

Between March 23 and April 13, 
St. Louisans can bring their old telephone 
books to one of over 100 collections sites 
all over the metropolitan area. Collection 
sites include the lobby of every Dierbergs 
Family Market, every McDonald's res- 
taurant listed in the St. Louis Yellow 
Pages, every St. Louis City firehouse, 
and the City's Operation Brightside 
Circus Recycling Center at 1600 South 
Kingshighway. 

The outdated books will be shredded 
and recycled to make paper towels, bath- 
room tissue, building, insulation and 
drywall. Among the paper companies 
recycling the phone books is Fort Howard 
Paper Company of Muskogee, Oklahoma, 
from whom the Garden purchases the 
recycled paper towels and toilet tissue it 
uses in all its receptacles. 

Southwestern Bell expects to save 
nearly 18,000 trees and 3,465 cubic yards 
of landfill space this year by collecting and 
recycling 600,000 area phone books, or 30 
percent of the 2 million books distributed 
yearly. ■ 



Flower Festival Is April 27 and 28 



A little-known bequest by the Gar- 
den's founder Henry Shaw has grown to 
become the annual Flower Festival at 
Christ Church Cathedral (Episcopal) in 
St. Louis. The Festival is held the last 
weekend of April each year. This year's 
dates are April 27 and 28. 

Henry Shaw attended Christ Church 
Cathedra] for many years and was a per- 
sonal friend of Bishop Charles F. Robert- 
son. Shaw's funeral was held at the 
Cathedral on August 31, 1889. In his will, 
Shaw bequeathed money annually to the 
Bishop of the Missouri Diocese to pay for 
a minister of his choice to preach a ser- 
mon each year in the Cathedral "on the 
wisdom and goodness of God as shown in 
the growth of flowers, fruits, and other 
products of the vegetable kingdom.' ' 



The first "flower" sermon was 
preached in the Cathedral on Sunday, 
May 18, 1890. A sermon has been deliv- 
ered each year since then except 1950 
and 1951. Over the years many famous 
preachers have delivered the annual ser- 
mon, as have the laity, including directors 
of the Garden. 

Church members began bringing 
flowers to decorate the Cathedral on 
Flower Sundays in 1902. The Missouri 
Botanical Garden has provided flowers to 
decorate the Cathedral since 1937, when 
it donated some 200 plants. Today the 
Garden donates over 1,000 plants, coordi- 
nated by Garden horticulturist Steve 
Wolff. 

Flower Sunday turned into a Flower 
Festival weekend, starting with a street 



fair, in 1974. Highlights of the weekend 
include booths from the parishes of the 
Missouri Diocese: foods, crafts, games, 
books, flowers and plants, gardening sup- 
plies, balloons, clowns, and music. Spe- 
cial concerts are presented in the 
Cathedral both Saturday and Sunday. 
Other attractions for this year are still in 
the planning stage. 

Each year the proceeds from the 
Street Fair benefit a worthy cause. In 
1990 the Gateway to Gardening Associa- 
tion was one of the recipients. This year 
The Hunger Fund, administered by the 
Task Force on Hunger and Homelessness 
of the Episcopal Diocese of Missouri, will 
be the recipient. All money received by 
The Hunger Fund is used to buy food for 
the hungry in Eastern Missouri. 

This year marks the 150th anniver- 
sary of the Episcopal Diocese of Mis- 
souri. This year's festival theme is "150 
Years of Caring and Sharing.' ' The public 
is invited to attend any of the events of the 
Flower Festival and view the outstanding 
display of flowers provided by the Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden. For further 
details, call Christ Church Cathedral at 
231-3454. ■ 



Energy Efficiency Loan for 
Ridgway Center 

The Garden has received a loan from 
the Missouri Department of Natural 
Resources to upgrade the energy sys- 
tems of the Ridgway Center under the 
Local Government Revolving Loan Pro- 
gram. The program was established to 
improve energy efficiency in public facili- 
ties. The low interest loan of $175,964 will 
be repaid from the savings generated by 
the improvements. 

The Ridgway Center was opened in 
1982 with heat pumps using a hydraulic- 
water loop system. Over the years it has 
become apparent that certain control fea- 
tures of the building could be improved. 
The upgrade plan has three components: 
a computerized management system for 
the building's existing heat pumps; varia- 
ble speed controls on fans for air circula- 
tion in the Orthwein Floral Hall; and 
motorized solar shades for the skylights 
in the floral display area. 

"These improvements will certainly 
help to reduce the amount of energy we 
use at the Ridgway Center," said Paul 
Brockmann, director of general services. 
"That is an important part of our ongoing 
efforts for environmental responsibility.' ' 



18. 



\BULLET1N MARCH AI'KII. 1991 




Metasequoia 

Hamel Family Gift To Protect 

The three children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ellis H. Hamel have made a substantial 
family gift for the protection and preser- 
vation of the Garden's dawn redwood tree 
collection. The gift in memory of Ellis and 
Lessie Hamel will be used to care for the 
eight magnificent trees on the east side of 
the Lehmann Building. Last fall one of the 
trees was struck by lightning, and the gift 
will cover installation of a system of light- 
ning rods to protect the entire group. 

The dawn redwoods, Metasequoia 
glyptostroboides , are some of the most 
beautiful and intriguing trees at the Gar- 
den. In 1941 the species was identified 
from fossils and was thought to be extinct 



glyptostroboides behind Tower Grove House. 



Dawn Redwoods 

until 1946 when specimens found growing 
in a remote mountain area of China were 
identified. The Garden's dawn redwoods 
grew from seeds that arrived here in 1947. 
They were germinated and the seedlings 
were planted in their present location in 
1952. The oldest known Metasequoia has 
lived about 420 years. The largest trees 
reach over two meters in trunk diameter 
and stand over 50 meters tall. 

Lessie Hamel served as a guide in 
Tower Grove House for many years and 
had a deep and abiding affection for the 
Garden. Her children's gift will help 
ensure that these lovely trees will 
endure. 



Gift Planning 



Estate Planning Seminar 

In your estate plan, you can be the 
director— you can decide the disposition 
of your property. You can provide for your 
spouse and children, put aside funds for 
your children's education, establish trusts 
for the care of adults who are— or who 
you suspect may become— incapacitated 
due to age or illness. There are also meth- 
ods by which you can include your favor- 
ite causes in your estate plan, reducing 
and in some cases eliminating gift and/or 
estate taxes. 

The concepts of estate planning and 
providing for the people and institutions 
you love will be the focus of the two-part 
seminar that will be held at the Garden on 
April 4 and April 11, 1991, at 9 a.m. in the 
Garden Room at the Ridgway Center. 
The programs will be presented by Mat- 
thew G. Perlow, attorney with Peper, 
Martin, Jensen, Maichel and Hetlage; 
Mary Key Schumacher, financial planner 
with IDS Financial services; and Sonja 
Nelson, manager-personal trust market- 
ing of Commerce Bank. Each expert will 
provide a distinctive viewpoint about the 
benefits of financial and gift planning. 

While the morning sessions are a two- 
part series, it is not necessary to attend 
both, but a reservation is necessary. If 
you have questions or wish to make a 
reservation, please call Ernestina Short 
at 577-9532. 



From the Garden Gate Shop 



Spring Is Just Around 
the Corner! 

As you plan your spring garden, be 
sure to include a trip to the Garden Gate 
Shop. Choose from the Shop's vast 
assortment of gardening books, including 
the complete sets of Ortho and Brooklyn 
Botanic Garden publications. The Shop 
has just the right tools, gardening equip- 
ment, seeds, statuary and outdoor gift- 
ware to make the most of your garden and 
patio this season. 

Easter Is Early 

This year Easter will be celebrated in 
March— the 31st! The Shop has Easter 
cards, candy, blooming plants and charm- 
ing Easter decorations, everything you 
need to make your holiday special. 



Mb 



Jb4 



New at the Shop 

The Shop has its own mascot— an 
exclusive tree frog design, a gentle 
reminder of the endangered tropical rain 
forests and the fragile life within. 

The whimsical frog decorates the 
Shop's handsome neckties, leather 
trimmed button-on suspenders, and 
ceramic mugs. The poly-silk ties are 
available either in a conventional style or 
as a self-tie bow tie. All items have a deep 
cobalt blue background highlighted by the 
bright green frog with his red eyes, yellow 
toes and tiny smile. The mug also displays 
the Garden logo, and all make splendid 
gifts. 



Annual Spring 
Plant Sale 

April 25-28, 1991 

Thursday & Friday: 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 

Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

On Thursday, opening day, the Shop 
will offer a special feature for members 
only, on a first-come, first-served basis: a 
selection of special and unusual plants cul- 
tivated from the MBG living collection by 
Garden horticulture staff. Enjoy 20 per- 
cent savings on all merchandise in the 
Shop, all four days, especially the huge 
selection of bedding plants, perennials, 
roses, begonias, geraniums, azaleas and 
herbs. Take advantage of a special pur- 
chase of Rapid-gro plant food: buy one, 
and get one free. The sale opens to the 
public on Saturday, April 27. Come early! 



19. 



BULLETIN MARCH APRIL 1991 



IN MEMORIAM 




Howard A. Schneiderman 

1927-1990 

Dr. Howard A. Schneiderman, a Gar- 
den Trustee since 1981, died December 
5, 1990. He was chief scientist and senior 
vice president of research and develop- 
ment at Monsanto Company. Dr. 
Schneiderman joined Monsanto in 1979, 
and under his leadership the company 
built its Life Sciences Research Center 
for biotechnology research in Chester- 
field, Missouri. 

Dr. Schneiderman was an internation- 
ally renowned scientist. He came to Mon- 
santo from the University of California, 
Irvine, where he was dean of the school of 
biological sciences and director of the 
center for pathobiology. He was 
appointed to the National Science Board 
by President Reagan in 1987, held seven 
honorary degrees, received numerous 



national and international awards, pub- 
lished more than 200 scientific papers, 
and served with distinction on many 
boards of directors and professional 
associations, including the National 
Academy of Sciences. He was a graduate 
of Swarthmore College and earned his 
master's and doctoral degrees from Har- 
vard University. At the time of his death 
he was an adjunct professor of biochemis- 
try' and biology at Washington University 
in St. Louis. 

Dr. Schneiderman brought his scien- 
tific brilliance and leadership to his serv- 
ice at the Garden. On joining the Board of 
Trustees in August, 1981, he said, 
"Quite apart from civic reasons, I have a 
very deep interest in the preservation of 
resources and genetic diversity. The 
Garden is a place where strategies for 
the future will be made; it's one of the 
world's most important institutions. 
Being a member of the Board will pro- 
vide an opportunity for me to work with 
members of the community on matters 
that are important to the community and 
beyond it." 

Dr. Peter H. Raven said, "Howard 
Schneiderman was an unfailing optimist 
who infected everyone with whom he 
came into contact with his cheerfulness, 
his devotion to science and to the truth, 
and his students and colleagues, both in 
universities and later at Monsanto 
benefited from his special qualities." 




Sam 7 C. Davis 

1910-1990 

Friends and staff of the Garden were 
saddened by the recent death of Mr. 
Sam'l C. Davis, a longtime member of the 
Garden's Board of Trustees. Mr. Davis 
was elected to the Board in 1960 and 
served until 1977, when he was named 
Emeritus Trustee. He followed his father 
Samuel C. Davis, who served on the Gar- 
den's Board from 1920 to 1940. 

Mr. Davis, a native St. Louisan, 
retired as an executive vice president 
from the St. Louis Union Trust Company 
in 1969. He began his career with the 
company in 1935. Mr. Davis was active on 
the Garden's Board as a member of the 
business committee, and he made a sub- 
stantial contribution to the Garden's pro- 
gress during his tenure. He will be deeply 
missed. 



Tributes 



November -December 1990 



In Honor Of 



Mrs. Tteel Ackerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Schweizer II 
Mr. and Mrs. Adrian N. 

Baker II 
Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorsl 
Almira Baldwin 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry O.Johnston 
Philip E. Bauer 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. BaichJy 
Mr. and Mrs. John R. Belz 

Mr. and Mrs. James K. Schneithorsl 

Dr. Harry Berland 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold M. Cutler 
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard 
Bierman 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Barken 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bobrolf 

Mis. Laura Mae Cassel 

Dr. James Bobrow 

Dr. and Mrs. M. Kenton Kin^ 

Ruth E. Buerke 

Mary Armani rout 

Gerry Hall 

Mary Bromnielhorst 



Mary Dowling 

Ellen Hogan 

Gen Kammien 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Callanan 

Mrs. Betty Wamble 

Dr. and Mrs. David Caplin 

Dr. and Mrs. John Hirsch 
Mrs. Joseph Chasnoff 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 
Cindy and Doug 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Prince 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
Courtois 

Ms. Karen Heege 

Mr. Toichi Domoto 

Dr. and Mrs. Douglass T. Domoto 

and Alyson 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dubinsky 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Movers 

Mrs. Mildred Eisenkramer 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Halpern 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Curtis Engler 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Kathie and George Euson 

Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Monahan 
Cherie and Bert Finkelstein 

Mark E. and Maria J. Weingartner 



Mr. and Mrs. William 
Firestone 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 0. Losos 
Four Seasons Garden Club 

Anonymous 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Fox 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 
Ms. Nancy Frauhiger 

Ms. Christine Gott 

Mrs. Audrey Friedman 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Rosenbloom 
Mr. and Mrs. Christopher 
Gilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd W. Hager 

Mr. and Mrs. Courtney A. 
Gould 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Barken 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Grote 
Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 
Pat Gruenewald 
Dr. Harvey Rhoads 
JoAnn Von Bergen 
Steve Wells 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. 
Hermann 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 



Mr. Fielding L. Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Holmes 
Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney G. 
Holthaus Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Dr. and Mrs. S. J. Hotze 

Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Hentschke 
Mrs. Ann Husch 
Louise and Fred Goldberg 
Ms. Linda Hutson 
Ms. KathrynG. Ellis 
Mr. and Mrs. Jay Israel 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Lynn Boardman 
Mrs. Stanley F. Jaekes 

Mr. Stanley Mulvilnll 

Miss Constance Franchot 
James 

Mrs. Edward W. Fordyce 
Bruce and Rosemarie 

Kaemmerlen 
Garden Appreciation Club 
Mrs. Toby Katz 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard H. Sirkin 



20. 



\HI LLET1N MARCH APRIL 1991 



Dr. and Mrs. Maurice Keller 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 0. Losos 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Van Beuren 
King 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Koshner 
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Carlson 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kravin 

Dr. and Mrs. Milton Kardesch 
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Krings 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Kringsjr. 

Sally Leavitt 
John Salmon 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Baizer 
Mrs. Ceceila Lefkowitz 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 
Mrs. Lainey Lortz 

Morton and Mary Bearman 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. George 

Mr. Eugene Mackey 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond W. Peters II 

Mrs. Helen Malevan 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 

Mrs. William Margaretten 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 
Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Matthews 
Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Mrs. James McDonnell III 

Mr. and Mrs. John Holmes 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 
Mrs. Francis Mesker 
Mrs. Henry C. Lowenhaupt 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fusz Ring 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold E. 
Mitchell 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Hermon 

Mai and Erline Monahan 

H. 0. and Evelyn Monahan 
Mrs. Betty Neill and David 

Mrs. Marianne Daniel 

Dr. Mathew Neuman 

Dr. and Mrs. David E. Perkins 

Max New man 

Larry and Susi Boxerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Noel 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Robert Novak 
Barbara Vanta 

Jack and Ann Oxlev 

Mr. Robert Orchard 

Mr. and .Mrs. Brent Stansen 
Orchid Greenhouses 
Bob Gordon 
Robert Nagel 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. 
Orthwein 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 
Dr. Roy Osterkamp 

Dr. and Mrs. David E. Perkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Phelps 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 

Pokrefke 
Mrs. Elizabeth Boyce 
Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Potter Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 
Ronald Prince 
Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 



Dr. Peter H. Raven 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Schonwald 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Ring 
Dr. and Mrs. Leigh Gerdine 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Robins 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew H. Baur 
Mrs. Janita Schoening 
Rob Rosborough 

Mr. and Mrs. George S. Rosborough 
Jr. 

Mrs. Nonie Sacchi 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter E. Sargent 
Mrs. Kathleen Sale 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Singer 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald W. 
Samuels 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Bushman 

Emma Schield 

Mrs. Carl Otto 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Schlafly 

Mr. and Mrs. Kimball R. McMullin 
Susie Schulte 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 

Bert Schweizer 

Mrs. Teel Ackerman 
Mr. Martin 0. Israel 
Nancy H. Senturia 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Singer 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. 
Shock 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Mrs. John M. Shoenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Schneithorst 
Dr. William Sims Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 
Mrs. William A. Sims Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Dr. Benjamin F. Smith 

Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fogarty Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. David Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Dr. Ross Sommer 

Dr. and Mrs. David E. Perkins 

Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 

Barbara and Oscar Soule 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Tasch 

Robert and June Henke 

Sharon and Olivette Moran 

Harold and Lucille Nullmeyer 

Clifford and Lucile Rebbing 

Dale and Arlene Smith 

Mrs. Whitelaw T. Terry Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones Jr. 

The Edgewood Program 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Ms. Sandy Thompson 

Ms. Christine M. Gott 
Mr. Shelton Voges 

Dr. and Mrs. Maurice J. Keller 

Miss Carter Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry 0. Johnston 
Lynda and Bill Webster 

Harriot and Parker Smith 

Helen Wetterau 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Steinman Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. 
Wilkinson 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 



Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
Winkler 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Oertli 

Natalie Wolfe 

Clayton Garden Club #4 
Daniel Jeramy Wolff 
Mrs. George J. Amitin 
Mrs. Frank Wolff 

Mr. and Mrs. Sol Morton Isaac 



In Memory Of 



Mr. Sylvan Agatstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 

Commercial Image, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman W. Drey Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rick Halpern 

Mr. and Mrs. Sol Morton Isaac 

Mrs. Sally Kushins 

Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 

Mrs. Doris V. Albers 

Dr. and Mrs. Harry Burack 

Mrs. Agnes R. Gervais 

Sophie Albert 

Beatrice Hill 

Dottie Zeilmann 

Jeffery Arst 

Cissy and Steven Nissenbaum 

Mrs. Isabel Baer 

Mrs. Martha N. Simmons 

Dr. Drennan Bailey 

Marlyn Adderton 

Mr. Joseph Bacino 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bamburg 

Central Radiology Group, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. William P. Chrisler 

Mrs. R. W. Chubb 

Mr. Frederick Z. Clifford 

Mr. Russell A. Court 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Crowder 

Allen and Alva I tiering 

Jean and Bob Donegan 

Mr. and Mrs. Quintus L. Drennan 

Dr. and Mrs. Birkle Eck 

Mr. and Mrs. John N. Ehlers 

Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fogarty Jr. 

Mrs. Clara A. Foust 

Mrs. Eugene C. Gartland 

Marion Z. C.ibbs 

Ms. Maylene Gibson 

Dr. and Mrs. James G. Jannej Jr. 

Mr. Wallace G. Klein 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Koch 

Miss Helen Krichbaum 

Mrs. Jack E. Krueger 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Desmond Lee Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Lively 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard E. Lord 

Mr. Fred Mohr 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles A. Molden 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Nicolai 

Nancy and Jim O'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. David F. Orwig 

Dr. and Mrs. Roy W. Osterkamp 

Mrs. Nancy McMillan Peggs 

Jean M. Pennington 

Cindy and Lee Peterson 

John and Kristen Peterson 

Dr. and Mrs. John Pirolo 

Marylee Pratt 

Mrs. Julia A. Rail 

Mrs. A.J. Ravarino 

Bill and Nancy Reed 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester P. Schaum 



Lisette Schaumburg 

Dr. and Mrs. George Scheer 

Peggy Jean Schnurr 

Dr. and Mrs. James C. Sisk 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard G. Sisson 

St. Louis-Clayton Orthopedic Group, 

Inc. 
Alice Sterkel 

Dr. and Mrs. George F. Thoma 
Mr. Craig Williamson 

Glenn D. Baker Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn 1 1. Barker 

Mrs. Pauline Baker 

Mrs. Julius A. Gewinner 

Anna Mae Ballard 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Ray Pienaar 

Harry Bartel 

Tom and Jeanne George 

Nellie Bender 

Mr. and Mrs. Harland S. Herrin 

Mrs. Vesa Bogdanovich 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Boettcherjr. 

Mrs. Edw. W. Boverie 

Mr. and Mrs. Lyle S. Woodcock 

Mrs. Irene Boyd 

Mr. and Mrs. Sheridan Burleigh 

Mr. Arthur M. Branch Jr. 

Mrs. E. R. Bradley 

Miss Sara Gervich 

Mrs. RuthK. Breitzka 

Mrs. Joseph L. Hackney 

Max Brody 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh McPheeters 

Barbara Victoria Brown 

Debra A. Hillgartner 

Mrs. Cecelia Brown 

Reed School Parents Assoc, 

Emma Brown 
Laurence Brown 

Alma Rapue 

Mrs. Leola Bryant 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Garbarini 

Mr. John R. Caulk Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace Sr. 
Maurice R. Chambers 

W. L. Behanjr. Family 

Mr. Burton E. Clark 

Mrs. Virginia H. Heitert 

Mrs. P. C. Clements 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan B. Kaufman 

Sidney and Sadie Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Gabriel Jr. 

Mr. David Cumberworth 

Mr. Frederic G. Maurerlll 

Mrs. Helen Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Deppe 

Mr. Sam'IC. Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin S. Baldwin 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis W. Baldwin Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence C. Barksdale 
Mrs. Carol C. Bitting 
Boatmen's Trust Company 
Mrs. Robert Cochran 
Mr. and Mrs. George K. Conant Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Culver Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. Ford 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Freeman 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Hall 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Hanser 
Mr. and Mrs. Hord Hardin II 

continued on next page 



21. 



BULLETIN MARCH AI'KIl. 1991 



Tributes 



continued 

Mr. and Mrs. John Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert MeK. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Levis 

Mrs. Carl E. Lischer 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Mae Carlhy 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Mauze 

Mr. and Mis. James S. McDonnell III 

Mrs. Eleanor J. Moore 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Neiner 

Audrey Wallace Otto 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Rich 

Rev and Brenda Roesch 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Mr. Arthur B. Shepleyjr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Shepley 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings 

Smith 
Miss Beatrice Thake 
Mr. Glenn Thoma 
Mr, and Mrs. John K. Wallace Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace Sr. 
Mis. MahlonB. Wallace Jr. 
Mahlon B. Wallace III 
Mr. and Mrs. Rolla K. Wetzel 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene F. Williams Jr. 
Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher Jr. 
Mrs. Betty Denny 
Henry and [lene Ordower 
Catherine S. Dittmann 

I )r. and Mrs. John S. Skinner 

Mrs. Dougherty 

Barbara M. Lawson 
Mrs. Mabel Dudley 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen F, Bowenjr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Tschudy 

Charles Elhreder 

Louis and Lurice Kilo 
George and Barbara Renseh 

Mrs. Petronella Elzer 

Dr. and Mrs. James A. Willibrand 

Violet Engelbach 
Sheran Cronin 

The Johnsons 
The Kers 
Shirley Quello 

Mai ilia Ruenze 
The Sauers 
Jan Schuster 

Mr. Robert Engelbreit 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald I'. Nies 

Mrs. Hazel Erler 

Mrs. Gloria M.Jones 

Mrs. Thelma Faintich 

Donna Gnagi 

Mr. Richard A. Fitzgerald 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Drew Jr. 
Mr. Robert Foster 

Mr. and Mrs. Oreille Richardson 

Mrs. Edward Fredrickson 
Mrs. Virginia Albrecht 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Blankejr. 

Lois, Robert, Susan Daniels 

Mrs. Elaine W. Ernst 

Mr. Rumsev Ewing 

Dr. and Mrs. Philip 11. Haley 

Mrs. Walter Heimbuecher 

Marion Herbst 

Mi and Mrs. John T. Killeen 



Mrs. Gerald B. Lahey 
Mrs. Dorothea F. McAnulty 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Miltenberger 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Mooney 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Mudd 
Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 
Residents of Overbrook Dr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald F. Pauley 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Robert Pommer 
Jeffrey and Sarah Quilter 
Mis. Virginia H. Weber 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray F. White Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence T. Wilson 

Mr. Don Gabris 

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Beatty III 

Grandchild of 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Gelber 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schraibman 

Dr. Otto R. Gestring 

Dennis and Susan Brunner 

Dr. Jules and Bernice Brunner 

Paul Brunner 

Mr. William H.Giese Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Marion Engler 

Ben Goldblatt 

Larry and Susi Boxerman 

Mr. Arthur S. Goodall 

Miss Alma D. Simnis 
Miss Myra Simms 

Frank Griffith 
The Ressler Family 
Mr. Joseph A. G" Sell 

The Kocot Family 

Mr. George W. Haeuber 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert McQuitty 

Ellis H. Hamel 

Lessie A. Hamel 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert H. Hamel 
Mr. and Mrs. James F. Jewett 
Mrs. Nancy H. Wahab 
Mrs. Sylvia Hammond 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. George 
Mr. Paul Hail man 
Ms. Nancy hammers 

Hazel E. Heidenreich 

Dr. and Mrs. Timothy J. Fowler 
Mr. Jerome Helein 

Don and Melissa Palmer 

Mr. Thomas E. Hennesey 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Most 
Mr. Art Hiatt 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Shiff 

Mr. William H. Hill 

Thorn Hurley 

Don and Melissa Palmer 

Frank Si, mo 

Mr. Curt R. Hoeferlin 

Jim, Andrea, Derek Hoeferlin 

Mrs. Dorothy Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Mitchell 

Mr. Dennis Schmidt Holbert 

Miss Beatrice Obermeyer 

Audrey Hollenbeck 

Friends at Andersen Consulting 
Mrs. June M. Huelsing 
Mr. and Mrs. James W. French 
Mrs. Judith Huss 

Miss Mary L. Sunderman 
Alma J. Irwin 

Mr. Raymond R. Irwin 



Mr. Stanley F. Jackes 

Mr. Stanley Mulvihill 

Mary Jackson 

Cherry Hills 9 Hole Ladies Coif 

Group 
Bob and Kathy Egan 
Jeanette M. Forquer 
Mrs. Betty Cray 
Mr. and Mrs. Win. L. Green 
Ed and Anna Morgan 
Richard and Peggy Weinberg 
Mr. Michael Jacobson 
Kelly, Lauren, Boyd Bermel 
Mrs. Stella G. Janis 
Gary and Debbie Ober 
Anne and Allan Salvatori 
Mr. A. Clifford Jones Jr. 
Ann B. Helton 

Dr. and Mrs. John B. Shapleigh 
Mrs. Clara Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond W. 

Armstrong 
Mr. and Mrs. Julien 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael P. Fogarty 

Miss Katherine Jungk 

Mr. Robert E. Funk 

Mrs. Freddie Kaplan 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. Morris Kaplan 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Peai Iman 

Prof. Koichi Kawana 

Mr. and Mrs. T D. Buettell 
Mrs. H. M. Engelhorn 
Mr. George K. Hasegawa 

Mrs. Audrey Marsh King 

Hon. John J. Kelly Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan B. Kaufman 

Mr. James M. Kirk Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Carnie Family 
Mary Kirk 

Feel Ackerman 
Martin 0. Israel 

Mrs. Saundra Kling 

Ms. Abigail Twombly 

John W. Kouri 

Mr. and Mrs. George P. Huber 

Hilda Krausz 

Mrs. Grace M. Baldwin 

Miss Cynthia Kurtz 

Rosalind Salniker 

Mr. Ralph Lange 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer C. Kiefer 

Mrs. Minnie Lee 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Koehn 
Mr. Charles Leonhardt 

Mrs. Robert H. Kittner 

Mrs. Mary R. Letterman 

Mrs. Laura M. Ellis 

Mrs. Helen Levora 

Mrs. Gloria Luitjens 
Mr. Robert Lewis 

Mrs. Raymond Werle 
Mrs. L. M. Lippman 
Mr. George P. Steinmetz 
Mrs. Donald Long 

Miss Kathleen A. Quinlan 

Mr. Henry Lowenhaupt 

Mr. and Mrs. Marcus A. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. Jules Chasnoff 
Dr. and Mrs. Harold M. Cutler 
Mrs. Norman W. Drey- 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman W. Drey Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Mellitz 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Prager 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprechl 
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Seharff II 
Mrs. Ben H. Senturia 
Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 
Friends of the St. Louis Public 

Library 
Mrs. Henrietta Sussman 

Josephine Louis MacDonald 

Mr, and Mrs. Stilel W.Jens 

Ms. Justine Maier 

Mrs. Suzie Heimburger 

Miss Sally J. McKee 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry I. 

Marder 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephan A. Locker 
Mrs. Mabel Mason 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis A. Stroble 
Mr. Frederick E. May 

Harriet May, Ronald, Lisa Jean, Paul 

Linda. David 
Mrs. Ida Mae McClain 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. KirtZ 

Mr. Bernard A. McDonald 

Bruce and Lisa Aydl 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry J, Aydl 

Mr. and Mrs. James Aydt 

Ken Baker 

Marty Bell 

Mary Ann Bracketl 

Arthur and Jane Brandt 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn A. Brinkmann 

Charmane Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony S. Cina 

Miss Barb DePalma 

Maria Earnhart 

Robert Eigenrauch 

Mrs. Lee Walker Falk 

Mrs. Dorcas L. Farrell 

Florissant Valley Memorial Post of 

the American Legion 
Joe Gantner 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Gantner 
Cheryl and David Gutting 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hoops 
Jolene Klingenberg 
Mr. Ronald L. Koehler 
Mrs. Esther Kozhoff 
Jean and John Kustura 
Mr. and Mrs. Brad Layton 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael McDonald 
Mary Beth and Mike Mclnnis 
Mr. John E. Moriarty 
Mrs. Jean Neuman 
Mr. and Mrs. Sam J. Passen 
Mr. and Mrs. Gregory C. Poelker 
Robbin Rader 

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Reimer 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry K. Sandhagen 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Schallert 
Lisa Schulte 
Irma Stroer 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Sullivan 
Marsha J. Toll 
Gayle Uvalde 
Donee VanVorst 
WICS-T\ r 20 

Mr. and Mrs. Elroy Zimmerman 
Chris Zollinger 
Mr. Harold McQuade 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Hall 

Mr. William J. Meisburger 
Jr. 

Miss Marion Bock 



'22. 



I BULLETIN I MARCH APRIL 1991 



Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Merrill 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Die Family 
Mr. Guy Robert Miles 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Kettig 
Mrs. Margaret Huttig Mudd 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Cornwell Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Goessling 

Mr. and Mrs. James F. Mauze 

Mrs. Helen H. Powers 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. White IV 

Mrs. Mildred B. Mueller 

Mrs. Donald Finger 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Jacobsmeyer 

Joan Murphy 

Mr. and Mrs. Manuel L. Route 

"Sugar" Murphy 

Maria A. Murphy 

Theodore Myers 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hetlage 
Ms. Venita Archer Lake 
llene G. Wittels 
Mr. Phillip Naggi 

St. Mary's Health Center-Main Lab 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Nelson 

Mr. and Mrs. George Shannon 

Mrs. Clara New mark 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Barken 
Mr. and Mrs. Burt Wenneker 

Mrs. Emily Lewis Norcross 

Mrs. H. M. Engelhorn 

William D. Oberbeck 

Mr. Charles E. Beech 

Mr. Joseph A. Carbone 

Dr. John N. Keethler 

Barry A. I.andes 

Mr. Jon Prel 

Mr. Charles C. Savage 

E. C. Varley 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Zibit 

Mrs. Catherine O'Neill 

Mrs. Gloria A. Luitjens 

Mr. Charles Orner 

Mr. Charles J. Reichardt 

Mr. William Pagenstecher 

Mr. and Mrs. James C. Coe 

Mrs. E. Smiley Foster 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Higginsjr. 

Miss Phyllis McPheeters 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. 'looker and 

"Hobbes" 
Mrs. Loretta Piel 
Mrs. Claire Hoener 
Mrs. Nancy Pipkin 

Dr. and Mrs. Leonard L. Davis Jr. 

Mrs. Sara Chambers Polk 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom P. Kletzker 
Mr. Eliot F. Porter 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Higgins 
Mrs. Albert Prel 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold M. Cutler 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Ettman 

Mrs. Bebe Rand 

Mr. and Mrs. Brent Stansen 

Miss Isabell Reames 

Mr. and Mrs. Ken Pohlmann Family 

Mrs. Bonnie Lee Reid 

Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Krout 

Mrs. FlorianS. Reilly 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bassett 

Marie Bone 

Michael Clear 

Joseph and Mary Jo Colagiovanni 



Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fogarty Jr. 

Cindy and Paul Herrin 

Mr. and Mrs. Harland S. Herrin 

E. Perry Johnson 

Dr. and Mrs. Victor A. Mungo 

Reynolds Metals Company 

Employees 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Rosenthal 

Mrs. Aline R. Reynolds 

Dr. and Mrs. Warren H. Green 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Ivis Johnston 
Mr. and Mrs. James K. Mellow 
Vivian Remerd 

Mrs. Jack Reynolds 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Diggs 

Clifford Rhoads 

Clifford and Marjorie Lecoutour 

Missouri Botanical Garden- 
Horticultural Answer Service and 
Master Gardeners 

Norma Robinson 

Larry and Susi Boxerman 

Son-in-law of 

Gen. Martin F. Rockmore 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Barken 

Mrs. Genevieve Rodes 

Dr. and Mrs. Leonard L. Davis Jr. 

Mrs. Charles Rose 

Mr. Charles I. Rose 

Martin Rosenberg 

Mr. and Mrs Alfred Kahn 
Mr. Joseph J. Rosso 

Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fogarty Jr. 
Mr. Sam Rotenberg 

Mr. Melvin S. Barad 
Mr. Jim Schneithorst 
Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 

Mrs. Lena Rowland 

Mrs. Augusta Feehan 

Mr. William T. Ruff 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Drew Jr. 

Mr. Wally Ruwitch 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Fedders 
Judge Milton Saitz 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. LaMear 
Mrs. Ada Sakowsky 
Mrs. Charles Schwartz 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen C. Smith 
Julian and Birdie Samuels 
Helen C. Maurer 

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Sanborne 

Susan and Larry Boxerman 
Mr. Bill Sarzendorf 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur B. Carter 
Mrs. Marge Schall 

Ms. Jackie Hayes 
Ms. Peggy Lowe 

Howard Sehneiderman 

Drs. William and Christine Saigh 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Dan Schopp 

Tiffany Community Association 

Father of 

Mrs. H. R. Shampaine 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Barken 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Shannon 

Mr. and Mrs. George Shannon 

Victoria Simmons 

Mr. Joe Boston 

Mr. Chesley Sims 

Mr. Thomas Sehr 



Miss Margaret Soehlig 

Miss Dena Soehlig 

Mr. Erwin Somogyi 

Ms. Barbara J. McQuitty 

Dr. Samuel Soule 

Dr. and Mrs. Michael M. Karl 
Miss Ruth Stegmeier 
Dr. and Mrs. James A. Willibrand 
Miss Edith Sterling 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Ferrell 

Robert Sterling 

Edith R. Ferrell 

Miss Miriam Stith 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. LaMear 

Steve Sudduth 

Mr. Paul Hranicka 

Mr. Irving Talcoff 

Donald and Nancy Steele 

Louise Taussig 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Shillington Jr. 

Mrs. Ingeborge G. Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin F. Guth 
Bruce Thompson 

Mary A. McDonald 
Mrs. Betty Tucker 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 
Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Fred and Louise Goldberg 

Mr. Jack L. Turner 

Mrs. Jack L. Turner 

Mr. Albert Villa 

Judd and Susan Belson 
Mrs. Pauline Wamsley 

Mr. and Mrs. James Rittenbaum 
Mrs. Cloey Washburn 
Mr. and Mrs. Fnos S. McClure 
Mr. Jack Watts 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Rettig 
Mr. Edward D. Weakley 

Mrs. Nancy B. Francis 
Carol E. S. Gatch 
Ms. Ann Holton 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. McKinney 
Mr. and Mrs. Chris Mower 
Mr. and Mrs. Scott Seyfried 
Dr. and Mrs. John B. Shapleigh 
Mr. and Mrs. Ted Thornhill 
Mrs. Mildred Whipple 

Miss Christine Ransom 

Mrs. Doris Crane White 

Mrs. Nancy W. Welton 

Mrs. Olive K. Wiese 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Bosley 

Mrs. Rita Thenhaus Wilfert 

Mrs. Janet Kuda Amann 
Truman W. Williams 
AARP Jefferson County Chapter 147 
Gertrude Williamson 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger McGuire 
Mrs. Victoria Willman 
Mr. Howard F. Baer 
Dr. W. E. Woelbling 
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Kille 

Mary Woodruff 

Mr. and Mrs. James Bright 

Mrs. Violet Yard 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Smith 
Mrs. Claylain Zienty 

Mrs. Laura M.Ellis 



Board of 
Trustees 

Mr. 0. Sage Wight man III 

President 

Rev. Lawrence Biondi, S.J. 

Mr. Stephen F. Brauer 

Mr. William H.T Bush 

Dr. William H. Danforth 

Mr. Samuel B. Hayes III 

Mr. Robert R. Hermann 

Rt. Rev. William A. Jones. Jr. 

Mr. David W. Kemper 

Mr. Charles F. Knight 

Mr. Charles E. Kopman 

Mr. Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. Richard J. Mahoney 

Mr. William F. Maritz 

Mr. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. Thomas 0. McNearney. Jr. 

Mr. Lucius B. Morse III 

Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr. William R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

Mr. Douglas K. Rush 

The Hon. Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. Andrew C. Taylor 

Mr. Jack E. Thomas 

Dr. Blanche Touhill 

Mr. John K.Wallace. Jr. 

The Hon. George R. Westfall 

EMERITI S TRUSTEES 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mr. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. John H. Biggs 

Mr. Jules I). Campbell 

Mr. Henry Hitchcock 

Mrs. Anne L. Lehmann 

Mr. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. Louis S. Sachs 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. Tom K. Smith. Jr. 

Mr. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Harriet Spoehrer 

Mr. Harry F. Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 
Dr. Mildred Mathias 

Prof. Philhppe Morat 

DIRECTOR 

Dr. Peter H. Raven 

MEMBERS' BOARD 

Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 

President 

Mrs. Antonio I. Longrais 

Mrs. Robert P. Tschudy 

Mrs. Robert Schulte 

Mr. Frederick H. At wood III 



23. 



BULLETIN \1\RCH AI'K'IL 1991 



M^HH 



m it - 



k lf> TTm 









* -- 



,^TW>^a.iI 



<***OTr1 



■^ 



a > '— 



u* 






Chilly Scenes of Winter 

Inside, the Climatron sheltered a warm tropical rain 
forest, but outside, the Garden was locked in ice and 
snow throughout December and January. It's nice to 
know that spring is just around the corner. 

- Photo by King Schoenfeld 



vw3JJM 




MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN -0026-6507) 

10. Box 299 

taint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST LOUIS, MO 



ft 




rOLUME LXXIX 
JUMBER THREE 









^^ 




Inside 
This Issue 



A Kemper Center for 
■■ Home Gardening 

This new building opens in June with an 
exciting array of facilities, features, and 
displays. 

g Master Gardeners 

^H The St. Louis Master Gardener Pro- 
gram brings the touch of a green thumb 
to projects throughout the community. 

7 Corporate Philanthropy 
b Profile 

The Emerson Electric Company 
Charitable Trust benefits St. Louis with 
generous support. 

Q Home Gardening 

^H Roses are every gardener's favorite. 

JQ Plants Promise New 
^m Medicines 

The Garden works with drug discovery 
programs to identify useful plants. 

19 Calendar of Events 

^H Roses, purple martins, concerts and 
more! May and June herald the start of 
summer. 

1 A From the Membership Office 

■■ Lord & Taylor invites St. Louis to a fete 
in honor of the Garden. 

1g Volunteer Profiles 

^H A salute to Katherine Chambers and 
Hazel Loewenwarter. New Garden 
Guides and volunteer instructors are 
welcomed. 

21 Trustee Profile 

^H Richard J. Mahoney joins the Hoard; 
Blanche Touhill receives a permanent 
appointment. 



On the cover: The beautiful interior of 
the Kemper Center seems to brintf the 
outdoors inside. 

— Photo by Richard Benkof 



1991 Missouri Botanical Garden. 

The BULLETIN (ISSN 0026-6507) is published bi-monthly 
bj the Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove 
Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110. Second class postage paid at 
St. Louis, MO. 

The BULLETIN is sent to every Membei of the Garden 
.is one of the benefits of membership. For a contribution of 
as little as ^40 per year. Members also are entitled to: free 
admission to the Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Orove House; invitations to special events ami receptions; 
announcements of all lectures and classes; discounts in the 
( ..mien Gate Shop and for course fees; and the opportunity 
to travel, domestic and abroad, with other Members. For 
information, please call (314) 577-5100. 

Postmaster: send address changes to Susan Came, edi- 
tor. BULLETIN, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166. 



Comment 



A Fanfare for Spring and Summer 



® 



printed on recycled paper 




Gardens bring 
forth the greatest 
enjoyment, satisfac- 
tion, and beauty dur- 
ing spring and early 
summer when the 
fruits of any gar- 
dener's labor be- 
come obvious. For 
the past several months, Garden staff 
have been working against the clock to 
prepare for the opening of the new Kem- 
per Center for Home Gardening, the first 
step in giving St. Louisans the largest and 
most varied home gardening resource in 
the country. Amateur and professional 
gardeners alike will find practical informa- 
tion available on almost every gardening 
topic when the Center opens on June 9. 
Members will be among the first to see 
the Center at the preview on June 8. 

Among the exhilarating features of 
spring and summer are the traditional 
Garden events. The Mother's Day lunch- 
eon planned with Dillard's for May 10 
offers a delightful afternoon at the Garden 
(see page 15). Rose Evening, one of the 
most enjoyable spring traditions for 
decades, gives members the opportunity 
to talk with the Garden's horticulture staff 
about growing roses and other plants (see 
page 12). In late June, the ever-popular 
musical evening attracts all ages to a per- 
formance under the stars on Spoehrer 
Plaza. 

This summer, three unprecedented 



activities will be launched, two that will 
hopefully become part of the Garden's 
traditional events. On the 4th of July, the 
Garden and Tower Grove Park are host- 
ing an "Old Fashioned 4th" for St. Louis. 
If you are looking for the perfect day to 
enjoy family and friends, food and good 
patriotic music and bands, then plan to 
join us on the 4th. 

For years August has been the month 
of the Japanese Festival. This year we are 
presenting an exciting new program, the 
Festival of Festivals, featuring a different 
country each weekend. Ethnic food, 
music, cultural exhibits, and performances 
from Japan, England, Greece and the 
Caribbean will highlight each weekend 
starting on August 1. Watch for additional 
information about the festivals soon. 

Finally, the Garden cordially invites 
you to join in welcoming the new Lord and 
Taylor Department Store to the St. Louis 
Galleria at a Benefit for the Garden on 
Wednesday, July 24. A fabulous party with 
the opportunity to be the first to shop at 
Lord and Taylor, wonderful entertainment 
and special gifts are just a few of the sur- 
prises for the evening. Make your reser- 
vations early so you can be in on the fun 
(see page 14). 

I look forward with enthusiasm to 
your participation in the months ahead. 




COMING IN AUGUST— "Festival off Festivals" 

This summer the Garden will celebrate the cultures of Japan, England, Greece 
and the Caribbean in a month-long gala. Four exciting weekends will bring enter- 
tainment, music, folk dancing, games, crafts, displays, lectures, food and more, 
with each weekend devoted to a different country. From Scottish bagpipers to 
Greek folk dancers to steel drum musicians to Japanese kite makers, there will be 
something for everyone. Mark your calendars now and watch for more details! 




A Dream 
Fulfilled 



A year and one month after the 
first shovelful of earth was turned, five months ahead of 
schedule, the William T. Kemper Center for Home 
Gardening will open to the public on Sunday, June 9 . . . 



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HI'U.KTIN I MAY-JUNE 1991 






Preceding page: Members ' Board president 
Sue Rapp and Steven D. Ciine, manager of 
the Center, greeted members at a special 
preview on March 20. The photographs for 
tins story were taken that day; when the 
Center opens in June, all displays and 
facilities will be in place. 




CENTER FOR 
HOME GARD ENING 

Above: The residential 
style of the architecture 
gives the Center a home- 
like feeling. This cozy 
fireplace nook will be a 
comfortable reading area 
for perusing catalogs of 
gardening supplies. The 
eastern exposure will 
feature appropriate 
houseplants. At left: a 
young visitor inves- 
tigates the completely 
equipped demonstration 
kitchen on the lower 
level. 



\HUU.ETIN I MAY Jl'NK 1991 



THE WILLIAM T. KEMPER 
CENTER is the final achievemen 
of the recently completed capital 
fund drive and the realization of a dream 
that began in 1973 with the Garden's 
Master Plan. 

"There is no other facility like this in 
the United States," said Steven D. Cline 
manager of the Center. "What we're 
doing has never been attempted on this 
scale." 

The Center for Home Gardening will 
be a comprehensive teaching facility for 
home gardeners. The beautiful 
residential-style building, designed by 
Louis R. Saur & Associates of St. Louis, 
houses an exciting array of displays and 
demonstration facilities in a dynamic liv- 
ing space. Visitors will receive direct 
one-on-one attention and practical advice 
from the staff and Master Gardeners, 
plus access to a huge selection of up-to- 
date information on general gardening. 
Eventually the new building will be sur- 
rounded by 20 outdoor display gardens. 

"We are delighted and deeply gratefuj 
that so many good friends, through their 
generous gifts, have joined us in making 
the Kemper Center a reality," said Peter 
H. Raven at the groundbreaking 
ceremony May 8, 1990. "In addition to 
the William T Kemper Foundation, we 
wish to acknowledge the magnificent 
support of other major donors, including 
the Monsanto Fund, Mr. and Mrs. Henn 
Hitchcock, Dr. and Mrs. Walter Moore, 
the James S. McDonnell Foundation, 
Mrs. James S. McDonnell, the Stanley 
Smith Horticultural Trust, the Spencer 
T. and Ann W Olin Foundation, and the 
Federated Garden Clubs of Missouri." 
Raven added, "Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Jackes, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bascom 
Mrs. Albert Blanke, Jr., Times Mirror, 
Mosby-Year Book, Inc., Mr. and Mrs ' 
Herbert Condie, Jr., KTVI, The Sportinj 
News, and Mrs. Thomas Shields also 
made significant contributions to 
the Center." 
Facilities 

Visitors entering the upper level of 
the Center will feel that they have 
entered a lovely private home. Just inside 
the main entrance is an area for display- 
ing current catalogs of gardening sup- 
plies, comfortably arranged in a living 
room-style nook with windows flanking a I 
fireplace. The central atrium will feature 
seasonal displays of plants, changing eacl 
month. A book reference area, also on 




Above: Answer Man Chip 
Tynan (left) mans the 
phone at the Plant Doctor 
desk. Glenn Kopp, coor- 
dinator of adult educa- 
tion and the Master 
Gardener program, looks 
on. The Plant Doctor 
desk will be staffed by 
Master Gardeners, and 
will have a bank of video 
screens above. The 
demonstration potting 
room and the Center's 
energy efficient green- 
house are located nearby. 
The greenhouse (at right) 
commands a sweeping 
view of the grounds to 
the south and will be 
used to propagate plants 
for use in demonstrations. 




CENTER FOR 
HOME GARDENING 



the upper level, will give gardeners 
access to a complete selection of up-to- 
date horticultural information, including 
computerized directories of plants, plant 
societies, area nurseries, and a catalog of 
books available at the Center and for pur- 
chase in the Garden Gate Shop. 

Descending the stairs to the next 
level, gardeners will discover a beautiful 
greenhouse ' 'garden room' ' that doubles 
as a propagation facility. The Plant Doc- 
tor desk, demonstration potting room, 
and more living displays complete the 
center level, which also has direct access 
to the outdoor garden areas. 

The lower level of the Center houses 
a large demonstration kitchen/classroom 
with space for 75-100 people. The room 
is equipped with video projectors and a 
screen and can be used as a television 
studio for filming demonstrations. 
Energy Efficiency 

The entire building is designed to 
take advantage of energy efficient tech- 
nology ideal for homes. The greenhouse 
can act as a solar collector that traps 



What the Garden is 
doing has never been 
attempted on this scale. 



warm air in winter to be vented into the 
rest of the building. To reduce solar radi- 
ation and heat in summer, the green- 
house is equipped with shade cloths on 
tracks. An additional shade system is 
provided by exterior louver panels in the 
upper clerestory windows. The shading 
and venting systems are all tied into the 
building's automated environmental 
monitoring system designed to regulate 
heating and cooling efficiently. 
Displays and Programs 

In addition to its rotating seasonal dis- 
plays of living plants, the Center features 
permanent exhibits of indoor plants 
growing in north, south, east, and west 
exposures. All displays will include wall 
panels, signs, and informational hand- 
outs. "Three Months at a Glance" 
calendar wall panels provide timely 
gardening tips. 

The Plant Doctor desk has three rear 
projection video screens mounted over- 

5. 

Fit 'LLETIN I MAY JUNK 1991 ^M 



Master 
Gardeners 
Rienette Diller 
(left) and John 
Stephens at a 
recent Plant 
Clinic. 




St. Louis Master Gardeners 



THE St. Louis Master Gardeners 
make an extraordinary commit- 
ment of time, energy and exper- 
tise to gardening projects throughout the 
community. In 1990 the 109 active Mas- 
ter Gardeners volunteered 11,300 hours 
of service to schools, homeowners, com- 
munity organizations and senior citizen's 
groups. 

One of the Master Gardeners' most 
ambitious projects is the School Garden- 
ing Program, a collaborative venture of 
the Garden, Gateway to Gardening 
Association, and St. Louis Public Schools 
Partnership Program. It provides 
elementary school students with an 
opportunity to raise a vegetable garden 
at their school. The 600 participating 
students learn how plants grow, what 
conditions they need to flourish and how 
we are all dependent upon plants. They 
also experience the beauty of plants and 
the joy and satisfaction that can be had 
through gardening. 

Master Gardeners are assigned to 
schools where they help classes to 
organize and implement a series of 
activities throughout the school year, 
culminating in a harvest of their crops 
in June. The program is coordinated 
by Master Gardeners Maxine Schuler 
and Helene Holwerda, assisted by 
Kitty Hoblitzelle. 

In The "Don't Bag It" Program, 
Master Gardeners work one-on-one with 
homeowners to encourage people to 
leave grass clippings on their lawns. 
The results in 60 demonstration lawns in 
St. Louis County have helped to reduce 
solid yard waste and created healthier 
grass as well. 

Master Gardeners also teach classes 
and act as speakers for the Samuel D. 
Soule Center for Older Adults, nursing 
homes, retirement centers, and senior 
citizens' clubs. They have an on-going 
project to maintain and develop the land- 



scaping at the Stupp Memorial Center in 
Tower Grove Park. 

Master Gardeners serve as 
troubleshooters at Plant Clinics, fielding 
over 28,000 questions annually for the 
Garden's Horticultural Answer Service. 
They also staff the University Extension 
Lawn and Garden Hotline. All these 
services are free to the public. Plant 
Clinics offer expert advice of professional 
gardeners from the Garden, University 
Extension, city, county, and state agen- 
cies, assisted by Master Gardeners 
supervised by John Stephens and 
Marshall Magner. 

Master Gardeners must complete 
45 hours of training to earn Level I 
status. In 15 3-hour sessions they study 
plant growth, gardening techniques, lawn 
care, and how to grow indoor plants, 
fruits, flowers, trees and shrubs. 

Level II certification requires an addi- 
tional 45 hours of study on diagnosis and 
treatment of plant problems. Bi-monthly 
seminars keep the graduates up-to-date. 

The program is coordinated and train- 
ing is provided by instructors from the 
Garden and University Extension. A 
steering committee of six elected Master 
Gardeners meets monthly with Garden 
and Extension coordinators. The pro- 
gram was begun by University Extension 
in 1981, and in 1983 it was organized as a 
joint program with the Garden. Since that 
time, 173 volunteers have been trained. 

Glenn Kopp, the Garden's coordinator 
of adult education, and John Whelan, hor- 
ticulture specialist at the University 
Extension's St. Louis office, supervise 
the Master Gardener Program. "It's 
a privilege to work with the Master 
Gardeners," said Kopp. "Their commit- 
ment of energy, time, and expertise is 
extraordinary. We couldn't accomplish 
our programs without them, and they 
have fun doing it! " ■ 



A Dream Fulfilled 

continued from page 6 

head. The screens will show a continu- 
ous series of short programs on 
gardening topics, weather information, 
and seasonal updates. The video displays 
can be interrupted with views of material 
under the Plant Doctor's microscope or 
live demonstrations taking place else- 
where in the Center. The video displays 
can be remote controlled by the build- 
ing's central computer system. Interac- 
tive computerized displays will be added 
in the future. 

Master Gardeners will staff the Plant 
Doctor desk, providing technical informa- 
tion and a regular schedule of clinics. The 
Demonstration Potting Room provides 
space for small classes to get "hands 
on" experience mixing soils, pruning, 
fertilizing and potting plants grown in the 
greenhouse. 

The Center also will offer a compre- 
hensive soil testing program. It will fur- 
ther serve as a central facility for many 
adult education classes. 

A Gardening Coalition 

The Center for Home Gardening is 
staffed jointly by the Missouri Botanical 
Garden and University Extension. Mas- 
ter Gardeners, who volunteer thousands 
of hours each year, (see box at left) will 
provide substantial support. University 
Extension exists in all 50 states to make 
agricultural and horticultural research 
readily available to the public. In Mis- 
souri, University Extension has an office 
in every county, and is administered 
through the University of Missouri 
System and Lincoln University. 

Together with the Gateway to 
Gardening Association (GTGA), which 
promotes the Urban Gardening Program 
in St. Louis (see the Bulletin, November- 
December 1989), the Garden and 
University Extension will form an Urban 
Gardening Coalition with extensive out- 
reach into the community. In the near 
future, the GTGA administration also will 
be located here at the Garden, and 
together the coalition will provide a 
newsletter and cooperative programs. 

Saturday, June 8 will be a special all- 
day preview of the Center just for Mem- 
bers. "We hope that the entire St. Louis 
community is as excited as we are about 
the Center," said Dr. Cline. "Realizing 
this dream would not have been possible 
without the support of the membership. 
We're looking forward to helping every- 
one take a bit of the beauty they see her< 
home to their own gardens.' ' ■ 



6. 



I BULLETIN I MAY JUNK 1991 



Corporate Philanthropy Profile 



The Emerson Electric 
Company Charitable trust 

In 1987 Emerson Electric Company, 
through its charitable trust and directly 
from the corporation, contributed more 
than $6,920,000 to non-profit organiza- 
tions nationwide. As Emerson's world 
headquarters location, St. Louis has 
benefited inestimably from the com- 
pany's longstanding record of philan- 
thropy. 

0. Sage Wightman III, president of the 
Garden's Board of Trustees, observed, 
"Emerson is a national corporate leader 
in its commitments to higher education, 
social services, and civic and public 
affairs, and in encouraging its employees 



to be philanthropists by means of its 
matching gifts program. I think it espe- 
cially important to point out that Emerson 
makes substantial contributions, totaling 
11.2 percent of its grants budget, almost 
exclusively to arts and humanities institu- 
tions in the St. Louis area. The impact on 
our quality of life is tremendous. Backed 
by this kind of investment, the St. Louis 
community can continue to build on its 
strengths and market itself as a highly 
desirable place to live." 

Since the late 1960s, when the Garden 
embarked on the Master Plan that still 
guides its physical development, Emer- 
son Electric has been an important part- 
ner in the Garden's success. "It has been 



my good fortune to work directly with the 
leadership of Emerson Electric through 
the years in achieving a number of the 
Garden's most important goals," 
remarked Peter Raven. "The company 
contributed $150,000 toward the con- 
struction of the John S. Lehmann Build- 
ing, one of the finest facilities for 
systematic botany in the world; $210,000 
toward the construction of the Ridgway 
Center, by means of which we serve 
more than 800,000 visitors a year; and 
with its latest magnificent gift of $750,000, 
has helped us renovate the Climatron and 
install an ambitious, pacesetting facility 
for public horticulture information, the 
Kemper Center for Home Gardening.' ' 



NEWS FROM THE GARDEN LIBRARY 

Banks' Florilegium Is Complete 



The publication of Banks ' Florilegium, 
consisting of 743 engravings of plants col- 
lected on Captain James Cook's first voy- 
age, has finally been completed. 

Altogether, the project took more than 
25 years to complete and may represent 
the most ambitious, large-scale, fine-arts 
printing venture ever. Because they are 
remarkably detailed and botanically 
accurate, the engravings are useful in the 
study of plants; at the same time, their 
beauty makes them useful for aesthetic 
purposes. The Missouri Botanical Gar- 
den Library is fortunate, indeed, to have 
one of the 110 sets published. 

The story of Banks' Florilegium 
began more than 200 years ago in 1768, 
when Sir Joseph Banks, a young botanist, 
embarked on a voyage of circumnaviga- 
tion on the Endeavour with Captain 
Cook. The crew included Daniel Carl 
Solander, a naturalist, and Sydney Parkin- 
son, an artist. On the trip, Banks and 
Solander collected some 3,607 species of 
plants, with more than 1,400 species 
entirely new to science. 

Toward the end of the voyage, Sydney 
Parkinson died at the age of 25. He had 
completed 280 out of more than 900 
drawings. The remaining drawings were 
completed later in England from Parkin- 
son's sketches, under the supervision of 
Banks and Solander and with the aid of 
written observations and pressed speci- 
mens. Banks hired 18 master engravers 
to make fine-lined copperplates from the 
drawings, recording in impeccable detail 




Metrosideros excelsa, gathered New Zealand, 
October 1769-March 1770. Line engraving, 
plate 445 from Banks' Florilegium. 

743 of the plants collected on the voyage. 

Banks' intentions to publish the plates 
within his lifetime were not realized. 
Rather, Alecto Historical Editions, in 
association with British Museum (Natural 
History), both of London, undertook the 
enormous task that included planning the 
project, cleaning and printing the plates, 
and publishing the plates along with a 
monumental Catalogue. 

The Garden's acquisition of a com- 
plete set of Banks ' Florilegium was made 
possible in part by the generosity of a 
number of donors. In addition to those 
who prefer to be anonymous, we wish to 
thank the Sidney S. and Sadie M. Cohen 



Foundation, Mr. Charles F. Cook, the 
Harry Edison Foundation, the Ladue Gar- 
den Club, Miss Carol L. Littmann, the 
John Allan Love Charitable Foundation, 
the Constance A. & Harry B. Mathews 
Jr., Foundation, the Mathews Founda- 
tion, the Morton J. May Foundation, the 
Metropolitan St. Louis African Violet 
Council, Pamela A. Pirio, the Steinberg 
Charitable Trust, and Mr. and Mrs. Lyle 
S. Woodcock. Tribute gifts to support the 
acquisition were given in the name of 
Lawrence John Pirio, James E. Brophy, 
Fred Dreher, and Carla Lange. 

—Constance P. Wolf, 
Garden Librarian 





■ ,»*»»"■ 




11:01 






* 






Banksia ericifolia, plate 741, is pulled by 
the printer. 



HI 'LLETIN MAY-JUNK 1991 



Spectacular, fragrant and 
showy, roses are perhaps the 
ultimate garden flowers. Cen- 
turies of breeding have 
produced an astonishing array 
of shapes, sizes and colors to 
appeal to every gardener. 

The genus Rosa, with 150 
species, exists in nature from 
Alaska to northern Africa. 
Roses have been cultivated for 
thousands of years, probably 
beginning in China several hun- 
dred years before the birth of 
Christ. However, it wasn't 
until the late 18th century that 
cultivated roses were intro- 
duced into Europe from China. 
These cultivated roses were 
repeat or ' 'perpetual' ' 
bloomers, making them 
unusual at the time and of par- 
ticular interest to hybridizers. 
The Chinese plants were bred 
with native European roses to 
select for hardiness and a long 
blooming season. Most mod- 
ern roses can be traced to this 
ancestry. 

ROSE TYPES 

Gardeners can choose 
roses from three broad types: 
species and shrub roses; old 
garden roses; and modern 
roses. 

Species roses are those 
that grow naturally in the wild. 
These plants have a tendency 
to grow into large shrubs, 
some over eight feet high. 
They typically require little 
maintenance or pruning and 
are the hardiest of all roses in 
cold climates. 

Shrub roses are produced 
by cross-breeding different 
species roses to produce 
hybrids specially selected for 
garden culture. Shrub roses 
sometimes are difficult to dis- 
tinguish from species roses 
because of their close genetic 
relationships, and they share 
the same desirable character- 
istics. 

Old garden roses include 
all members of a specific group 
of roses developed before 
1867. This date marks the 
introduction of the first hybrid 
tea rose, 'La France.' Old gar- 
den roses are noted for won- 



Home Gardening 




Roses 



derfully fragrant blooms, 
disease resistance and cold 
hardiness. These nostalgic 
favorites are enjoying a current 
resurgence in popularity. 

Modern roses include all 
rose groups developed after 
1867. Modern roses come in an 
extraordinary variety of 
shapes, colors, and growth 
habits. The four main groups, 
typically found at the local 
nursery, are hybrid teas, poly- 
anthas, floribundas, and gran- 
difloras. Other recognized 
garden forms include minia- 
tures, tree roses, and 
climbers. 

LANDSCAPING WITH ROSES 

The wonderful variety in 
roses makes them adaptable to 
any garden. Low growing 
hybrid teas, floribundas, 
creepers and miniatures can be 
used as edging plants around a 
garden border or walkway. The 
taller shrub and species roses 
are well suited as background 
plantings and can be displayed 
against foundations, along 
fences or walls. Climbers can 
be trained over a fence or wire 
trellis to hide structural fea- 
tures or create enclosed 
spaces. Miniature roses can be 
potted and placed on patios or 
lined in rows around outdoor 
living spaces. They also can be 
grown indoors for exterior 
flower production. 

All of this means that the 
roses you choose to grow 
should be determined in part 
by your garden design. Many 
gardeners concentrate roses in 
one area with a formal or sym- 
metrical arrangement. This 
idea is very popular and has 
the advantage that all main- 
tenance and cultural activities 
for roses occur in one place. 



On the other hand, roses can 
be scattered throughout the 
landscape alone or in combina- 
tion with other plants. If you 
intend to raise a cutting gar- 
den, plants should be spaced 
far enough apart to allow you 
to move freely between them 
without compacting the root 
zone. 

CHOOSING THE PLANTING SITE 

Growing roses is really 
very easy. However, you will 
be wise to choose a site with 
the following characteristics: 
six hours or more of full sun- 
light, preferably morning sun; 
some protection from wind; 
well-drained soil with high con- 
tent of organic matter and 
slightly acidic pH of 6.0 to 6.8. 

It is helpful to sketch the 
layout of the landscape to scale 
before you choose your plants. 
Note the sizes of neighboring 
plants. When choosing your 
roses, allow for their mature 
size. In turn, the size of the 
plant will depend upon the 
length of the growing season, 
pruning, and extremes of tem- 
perature to which the plants 
are exposed. When in doubt, 
give plants plenty of room. 
This will improve air circulation 
and disease control, access for 
maintenance and plant compe- 
tition for water and nutrients. 

PLANTING 

Roses can be planted at any 
time of year, but spring is pre- 
ferred as it gives plants plenty 
of time to establish them- 
selves. This is especially true 
for roses purchased with bare 
roots. Container plants can be 
planted successfully into 
summer. 

After purchasing bare root 
plants, soak them in a bucket 
of water for several hours if 



they are to be planted immedi- 
ately. This will rehydrate the 
roots. If you cannot plant for a 
day or two, do not soak them. 
Instead, store the plants in a 
cool place with some wrapping 
material around the roots to 
prevent moisture loss. They 
can be kept for several days 
this way. 

When digging the planting 
holes, refer to your scale plan. 
Space floribundas and hybrid 
tea roses two to three feet 
apart; grandifloras, shrub and 
old roses three to five feet 
apart; and climbers eight to ten 
feet apart. 

Several days before you 
purchase the plants, prepare 
the planting site by applying a 
four-inch layer of leaf compost, 
peat moss, or aged manure 
over the surface of the site. 
Dig this material into the soil, 
mixing thoroughly to the 
proper planting depth. 

Generally, the larger the 
planting hole, the better the 
results. Dig the hole at least 18 
to 20 inches wide and 12 to 16 
inches deep with straight sides 
and a flat bottom. For bare 
rooted plants mound the soil in 
the bottom of the hole and 
spread the root system over 
the mound so when the hole is 
filled, the stem will be buried 
about two inches below ground 
level. Modern roses are 
grafted onto a hardy root stalk 
and this will protect the graft 
union. 

Next, fill the hole with soil 
about half way, covering and 
packing to stabilize the root 
system. Fill the hole with a gal- 
lon or more of water and let it 
drain away, then finish mound- 
ing the soil so that the canes 
are buried to about six inches. 
Water well and let settle. 
Mulch up to the stem with 
chipped bark or leaf mold but 
do not cover the stem. It is 
ideal to form a water basin with 
the mulch to catch the water 
and direct it downward. 

Planting container roses is 
much the same as bare root 
plants. Remove the container 
carefully when you are ready 
to plant. 



8. 



\BULLETINI MAY Jl'NK 1991 



CARE AND MAINTENANCE 
Watering 

A simple rule of thumb for 
watering is to do it deeply and 
slowly to prevent run-off. Light 
waterings should be avoided. 
Also guard against watering 
the foliage, as this promotes 
leaf and cane diseases. If this is 
not possible, then water in the 
early morning so that water on 
the foliage can dry quickly. 

Fertilizing 

Modern roses are heavy 
feeders and need some fertili- 
zation during the season. 
Ideally, a soil test should be 
run to determine accurately 
the levels of phosphate and 
potassium already present in 
the soil and establish the pH. 
Recommendations from these 
tests should be followed 
closely so that excess fer- 
tilizers are not applied. 

The first fertilizer applica- 
tion should be made after the 
last threat of frost. Pellet fer- 



tilizers which are particularly 
high in phosphate can be used. 
Select 5-10-5, 4-8-4, or a gen- 
eral garden fertilizer like 
10-10-10. Use about one heap- 
ing tablespoon per plant evenly 
distributed around the base of 
the plant or about three 
pounds of 5-10-5 per 100 
square feet spread over the 
bed. Thereafter, make another 
application about every six 
weeks through the month of 
July. 

Pruning 

Pruning procedures vary 
for different types of roses. 
Minimize pruning for first year 
plants. Thereafter, when cut- 
ting flowers, remove only the 
length of stems you need on 
the blooms, leaving at least 
two complete leaves below the 
cut. For modern roses like 
hybrid tea, floribunda and 
grandiflora roses, at the end of 
the season prune the canes 
about 18 inches long so that 



the winds do not catch and 
damage the plants. In the 
spring when temperatures 
have warmed up, finish pruning 
by cutting the canes back into 
the living tissue leaving a four 
to six inch stub. 

Old roses and shrub roses 
need very little maintenance 
pruning. These should receive 
a light spring pruning to shape 
the plant. Climbers should be 
pruned after flowering. Old 
canes should be removed at 
the base of the plant. This will 
stimulate the development of 
young, vigorous canes. 

ALL AMERICAN ROSE 
SELECTION (AARS) 

To ensure that new rose 
selections have desirable quali- 
ties, All American Rose Selec- 
tion, Inc. has established 24 
testing sites throughout the 
U.S. to evaluate new roses. 
The Missouri Botanical Garden 
is one of those sites. Each year 
AARS tests over 20 new selec- 



tions. Information is collected 
over a two year period on each 
plant, evaluating its vigor in the 
local climate, disease resis- 
tance, foliage and flower qual- 
ity, growth habit, bud and 
flower form, opening and 
finishing flower color, fra- 
grance, and stem qualities. 
The program scores rose 
selections compared with 
other roses and standard plants 
in the same test plot. The 
scoring system reflects the 
consumer demand for beautiful 
and easy-to-grow roses. When 
you buy your roses, look for 
the AARS tag. It symbolizes 
excellence to rose growers 
everywhere. 

For further information 
about roses, come to the Cen- 
ter for Home Gardening when 
it opens in June. We'll have dis- 
plays and additional information 
on roses. 

— Steven D. Cline, Ph.D. 

Manager, Center for 

Home Gardening 



Timely Tips from the Answer Service 



Do you have a plant question? Call the 
Horticultural Answer Service, Monday 
through Saturday, 9a.m. to noon, at 
577-5143. 

May Tips 

■ Fertilize azaleas after blooming. Use a 
formulation which has an acid reaction. 

■ Don't remove spring bulb foliage 
prematurely or next year's flower 
production will decline. Bulbs can be 
moved or divided as the foliage dies. 

■ Trees with a history of borer problems 
should receive their first spray now. 
Repeat twice at three week intervals. 

■ Pinch back mums. 

■ Slugs will hide during the daytime 
beneath a board placed over damp 
ground. Check each morning and destroy 
any slugs that have gathered. 

■ Growing lettuce under screening 
materials will slow bolting and extend har- 
vest into hot weather. 

■ Place cutworm collars around young 
transplants. Collars are easily made from 
cardboard strips. 



■ Control caterpillars on broccoli and 
cabbage plants by handpicking or biologi- 
cal sprays such as B.T. 

■ Don't spray any fruits while in bloom. 
Refer to local Extension publications for 
fruit spray schedules. 

■ Keep bluegrass cut at 1.5 to 2.5 inch 
height, mow tall fescues at 2 to 3.5 inch 
height, and mow zoysia lawns to 1.5 inch 
height. Cut grass in shaded areas to 
higher recommendations. Remove no 
more than one-half inch at each mowing. 
Leave clippings on the lawn to reduce 
yard waste and gain fertilization benefits. 

■ Birds eat many insect pests. Attract 
them by providing good nesting habitats. 

■ Watch for fireflies on warm nights. 
Both adults and larvae are important 
beneficial predators, so avoid over- 
collecting them. 

■ Herb plants in average soils need no 
extra fertilizer. Too much may reduce fla- 
vor and pungency at harvest. 

June Tips 

■ Apply organic mulches as the soil 
warms. These will conserve moisture, 



discourage weeds, and enrich the soil as 
they decay. 

■ When night temperatures stay about 
50 °F, bring houseplants outdoors for 
the summer. 

■ Early detection is essential for good 
control of vegetable pests. Learn to iden- 
tify and distinguish between pests and 
beneficial predators. 

■ To minimize diseases, water with 
overhead irrigation early enough in the 
day to allow foliage to dry before nightfall. 

■ Thinning overloaded fruit trees will 
result in larger and healthier fruits at har- 
vest time. Thinned fruits should be a 
hands-width apart. Prune and train young 
fruit trees to eliminate poorly positioned 
branches and to establish proper crotch 
angles. 

■ Renovate strawberries after harvest. 
Mow the rows; thin out excess plants; 
remove weeds; fertilize and apply a mulch 
for weed control. 

■ Spray trunks of peach trees and other 
stone fruits for peach tree borers. 

— Chip Tynan, The Answer Service 



BULLETIN MAY JUNE 1991 



9. 



Center for Plant Conservation 




Left to right: 
Don Falk, 
Michael O'Neal, 
Peggy Olwell, 
Greg Wieland. 



Staff Organized in St. Louis 

Don Falk, the director and co-founder 
of the nationwide Center for Plant Con- 
servation, is enthusiastic about the move 
of the Center's headquarters from Bos- 
ton to the Missouri Botanical Garden last 
February. "Being associated with one of 
the outstanding scientific institutions in 
the world will add immensely to CPC's 
stature," he says. 

Falk, who has a Master's degree in 
environmental policy from Tufts Univer- 
sity, was challenged as a graduate student 
to seek alternative strategies for preserv- 
ing species. While working as Energy 
Director of the city of Cambridge, Mas- 
sachusetts, a post he held from 1980 to 
1984, he was motivated to begin putting 
the initial funding together for the Center 
for Plant Conservation. As Energy Direc- 
tor, he saw a strong link between soci- 
ety's excessive consumption of natural 
resources and its impact on the 
environment. 

Working with Peter Ashton, then- 
director of the Arnold Arboretum, and 
Jonathan Shaw, director of the New Eng- 
land Wildflower Society, and a partner, 
Frank Thibodeau, Falk put together the 
concept and strategy for the Center. Late 
in 1982, he called a very enthusiastic 
Peter Raven. The Missouri Botanical 
Garden became one of CPC's first 
affiliated botanical gardens. 

The Center for Plant Conservation 
opened its doors on April 4, 1984, with 
key start-up grants from the Andrew W. 
Mellon Foundation and several Boston- 
area individuals and families; subsequent 
grants came from the William and Flora 
Hewlett, George Gund, David and Lucille 
Packard, W. Alton Jones, and John D. and 
Catherine T. MacArthur Foundations, the 
Pew Charitable Trusts, and the National 
Science Foundation. 

The Center is the only organization 
focused exclusively on plant conserva- 
tion. In its seven years of existence, the 
Center has pioneered the development of 



integrated conservation strategies for 
plants. This approach weaves together 
land acquisition and management, ecolog- 
ical restoration, legal protection, conser- 
vation collections, and reintroduction of 
species. The Center not only supports 
efforts to protect plant habitats, it plays its 
own key role to protect the plants them- 
selves by harboring and nurturing them in 
botanical gardens around the nation, and 
eventually reintroducing them into the 
wild. 

Besides Falk, two other CPC staff 
members moved to St. Louis from Bos- 
ton. Peggy Olwell, director of conserva- 
tion programs, manages and administers 
the Center's national network of 21 
botanical gardens and arboreta that 
houses the Center's National Collection 
of Endangered Plants. Olwell also coor- 
dinates the Center's integrated conserva- 
tion program. She worked for the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service's Office of 
Endangered Species in Albuquerque, 
N.M. for six years before joining CPC. 

Michael O'Neal, information system 
manager, joined CPC in 1989 after four 
years at the Chicago Botanic Garden. He 
is responsible for the design, installation, 
and support of the Center's computer 
network database programs. 

After a national search, CPC found its 
National Collection Coordinator right in 
its own back yard. Greg Wieland moved 
to CPC from the Garden's horticulture 
division, where as Plant Recorder he 
managed the Garden's horticultural data- 
base, including records on the plants 
maintained by the Garden for CPC. As 
National Collection Coordinator, Greg 
works with the 20 botanical gardens and 
arboreta tracking the national collection of 
about 400 taxa. 

For Falk, CPC has moved closer to his 
ultimate goal of ensuring survival of 
endangered plants in the wild. "With the 
move to the Garden, we now think that 
we are in a position to get a step ahead of 



the endangerment problem," says Falk. 
"It is within our grasp to prevent further 
extinction of plant diversity in the U.S. 
and eventually worldwide.' ' 

New May Scholars 

The Garden has awarded May Schol- 
arships to three outstanding young Latin 
American scientists, Dr. Hilda Maria 
I^onghi-Wagner and Dr. Tarciso Filgueiras 
from Brazil, and Dr. Nelson Ramirez 
from Venezuela. They are expected in 
St. Louis in July and will be guests of the 
Garden for several months. The May 
Scholarships are supported by a generous 
grant from the May Department Stores 
Company and its Famous-Barr Division to 
enable scientists from rain forest coun- 
tries to study at the Garden. 

Dr. Longhi-Wagner is a Professor of 
Botany at the Federal University of Rio 
Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre. She has a 
Master's degree from the same univer- 
sity, and in 1986 received her Ph.D. 
degree from the University of Sao Paulo. 

Dr. Filgueiras is a researcher with the 
Division of Environmental Studies of the 
Brazilian Institute of Geography and 
Statistics (IBGE) in Brasilia. He holds a 
Master's degree from Oregon State 
University and was awarded his Ph.D. 
degree by the University of Campinas, 
Brazil, in 1986. 

Both Brazilian May Scholars are spe- 
cialists in the grass family (Gramineae), a 
very important family of vascular plants 
and the source of many useful products. 
They will be collaborating with Dr. Gerrit 
Davidse of the Garden's scientific staff. 
Dr. Longhi-Wagner will be studying 
grasses native to Brazil and Paraguay and 
preparing taxonomic treatments for the 
Flora of Paraguay. Dr. Filgueiras will be 
completing a checklist of the grasses of 
central Brazil using the herbarium, library 
and computer facilities at the Garden. Dr. 
Filgueiras is a member of the Steering 
Committee of an international project to 
study the grasses of the new world, and 
both he and Dr. Longhi-Wagner will 
attend meetings concerning this project in 
San Antonio, Texas, and in St. Louis. 

Dr. Ramirez is an Associate Professor 
of Botany at the Universidad Central in 
Caracas. He received his degree from the 
Universidad Central in 1990. Dr. Ramirez 
is a specialist in another economically 
important plant family, the Leguminosae 
or bean family. While in St. Louis he will 
be collaborating with Dr. Paul Berry of 
our staff on several projects having to do 
with tropical legumes, particularly in the 
field of reproductive biology. 



10. 



I BULLETIN MAY JUNE L991 



Plants Show 
Promise for 
New 
Medicines 

By James S. Miller, Ph.D., 
MBG Research Staff 

WHY is the World Health Organi- 
zation (WHO) so interested in 
sweet wormwood, Artemesia 
anna, and the National Cancer Institute 
(NCI) in the Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia? 
The answer is that these two plants con- 
tain natural compounds that show prom- 
ise as new medicines. 

Sweet wormwood produces the 
chemical compound artemesin, which 
may be effective in treating malaria, and 
the Pacific yew yields taxol, which is 
effective against the ovarian cancer that 
claims 12,000 lives a year. More than 25 
percent of the medicines currently used 
in the United States come from plants, 
and even more of our synthetic drugs 
were developed from the study of natural 
products. The best known is aspirin, 
which has its origins in the bark of willows. 

Malaria today is primarily a disease of 
tropical regions, where it afflicts 200-400 
million people each year, a scale difficult 
for those of us in industrialized countries 
to comprehend. Two million of these peo- 
ple die every year; malaria is responsible 
for 25 percent of the deaths of African 
children aged 1-4. Currently, the most 
widely used antimalarial drug is Chloro- 
quine, a synthetic drug that is chemically 
similar to quinine. 

Quinine comes from the bark of the 
South American cinchona tree, and was 
the first effective medicine for malaria. It 
is still the most effective medicine, but 
causes serious side effects, including liver 
and hearing damage. Chloroquine is a 
safer synthetic compound that is modeled 
on the original natural product. Natural 
products research gives us detailed 
knowledge about how drugs actually 
work. Researchers use that information 
to guide the development of synthetic 
drugs. Without the discovery of quinine, 
medical researchers would never have 



discovered Chloroquine. 

However, some strains of malaria 
parasites have developed resistance to 
Chloroquine, so this drug is no longer 
effective in all situations. The WHO is 
currently taking a great interest in 
artemesin because the compound works 
in an entirely different manner from qui- 
nine and Chloroquine and thus may be 
effective against Chloroquine-resistant 
malaria. The chemical structure of 
artemisia could never have been 
predicted from the study of quinine. 

Natural products chemistry has 
produced a large proportion of our phar- 
maceuticals, most of them derived from 
higher plants and fungi. Some drugs come 
directly from the plants and are large, 
complex molecules that cannot be syn- 
thesized. An example is reserpine, a com- 
pound used in high blood pressure 
medicines. It is derived from a species of 
Rauwolfia from southeast Asia. 



As the tropical forests 
disappear, so do thousands 
of species of plants that 
could provide new medicines 
for generations to come. 



The alkaloids vincristine and vin- 
blastine, derived from Catharanthus 
roseum, the rosy periwinkle of Madagas- 
car, are used to treat childhood leukemia 
and Hodgkin's disease. The Garden main- 
tains an active program of conservation 
and research in Madagascar, where 
three-quarters of the island's natural 
vegetation has already been destroyed. 

Other drugs, including many of our 
most important medications, are "second 
generation" synthetic compounds that 
have chemical structures similar to natur- 
ally occurring substances. As in the case 
of quinine and Chloroquine, when a 
natural substance shows effectiveness 
against disease, researchers may be able 
to modify its structure or synthesize mol- 
ecules with similar structure and activity. 

Research botanists at the Missouri 
Botanical Garden are actively involved in 
several drug discovery programs with the 
National Cancer Institute and the Mon- 
santo Corporation. According to Mon- 
santo's Bioproducts Chemistry Manager, 
Stephen Brewer, the twenty top-selling 
medicines in the United States net six bil- 
lion dollars in sales annually and all owe 



their existence in some way to natural 
products research. Of these, two are der- 
ived directly from natural sources, three 
are semi-synthetic, and eight are syn- 
thetic drugs which have replaced the 
original natural chemical because of 
superior performance. The remaining 
seven best-sellers were not discovered 
directly as natural products, but did have 
their mechanism of action defined by 
natural products research. The antihista- 
mines are examples of this: without 
understanding histamines, a natural sub- 
stance originally isolated from ergot, a 
fungus that grows on wheat, researchers 
would not have discovered the two 
classes of antihistamines used to treat 
motion sickness and gastric ulcers. 

Botanists from the Garden are cur- 
rently collecting 1,500 sample a year of 
African plants from Gabon, Tanzania, and 
Madagascar for the National Cancer Insti- 
tute's drug discovery program. Far 
greater numbers of both plant and soil 
samples are collected for their content of 
fungi and bacteria in the Garden's pro- 
gram with Monsanto. Yet despite these 
efforts, only one to two percent of the 
world's 250,000 higher plants have been 
thoroughly studied for useful pharmaceu- 
ticals. At the same time, more than 150 
square miles of tropical rain forest disap- 
pear each day, an area larger than Rhode 
Island every week. 

The tropical rain forests contain the 
earth's greatest diversity of life, with 
more than half of the world's plant and 
animal species living in less than ten per- 
cent of the world's land area. Many of 
these species remain unknown to scien- 
tists, still waiting to be discovered. Yet 
the handful of tropical plants studied so far 
have yielded medicines for the treatment 
of high blood pressure, glaucoma, child- 
hood leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, and 
malaria. It was a tropical vine, Chon- 
drodendron, used by South American 
Indians as an arrow poison, that provided 
the compound that originally allowed 
anestheologists to paralyze the human 
diaphragm, and thus made open heart 
surge ry possible. 

As these tropical forests disappear, so 
do the thousands of unstudied species of 
plants that could provide new medicines 
for generations to come. Each species of 
plant, containing hundreds of complex 
chemical compounds, can be thought of as 
a volume in a library. The effect of their 
extinction on medical research is analo- 
gous to the burning of unopened, unread 
volumes from the world's medical 
librarv— an incalculable loss. ■ 



11. 



BULLETIN MAY JINK 1991 



Every Ta ;* v .00P- in -. r 



^ 




Missouri Botanical Garden 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

May-June 1991 



MAY 25-30/Everything's Coming Up Roses 

A week of events celebrating America's favorite flower. 



25-28 



SATURDAY 
& SUNDAY 



Rose Society Show 

Noon to 5 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m. to 
5 p.m. Sunday, Ridgway Center. A 
magnificent display by the Greater 
St. Louis Rose Society. Free with 
Garden admission. 



25-30 



SATURDAY 
- THURSDAY 



"Roses" Film Festival 

1 p.m. and 7 p.m., Shoenberg 
Auditorium. Free with Garden 
admission. Limited seating. 
Sat. May 25 - Broadway Danny Rose 

Sun. May 26 - Rosemarie 
Tues. May 28 - The Rose Tattoo 
Wed. May 29 - The Subject Was Roses 
Thurs. May 30 - The Purple Rose 
of Cairo 



ZI 



MONDAY 



A Rose Is a Rose Is a Rose 

9 am. to 8 p.m. All ladies with the 
first name ' ' Rose' ' will receive free 
admission to the Garden. 



28 



TUESDAY 



Designer Roses 

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. , Ridgway Center. 
A display of flower arrangements by 
local floral designers. At 11 a.m., 
Pat Scace, assistant exhibit 
designer at MBG, will provide ideas 
on using roses in floral arrange- 
ments for special occasions. Free 
with Garden admission. 



28 



WEDNESDAY 



"How Does Your Garden Grow?" 

10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Gladney and 
Lehmann Rose Gardens. Master 
Gardeners will be on hand to answer 
your questions and provide garden- 
ing tips. The MBG horticulture staff 
will be at work in both gardens. Free 
with Garden admission. 



30 



THURSDAY 



"Ring Around the Rosey" 

10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Ridgway Center. 
A fun-filled day for kids, with 
storytelling, craft workshops, 
games and surprises. Workshops 
require a fee and reservations: call 
577-5125 beginning Monday, 
May 13. 




MAY 31 /Rose Evening 



5:30 to 8:30 p.m., grounds. Don't miss this very special Mem- 
bers' evening, featuring our beautiful rose gardens. Garden Hor- 
ticulture staff will answer questions on rose care. Other delights 
include music, a free rose care brochure, film on the growing and 
care of roses, and an optional buffet supper. Special attendance 
gift. Watch your mail for more information. For members only. 



MAY 17/MEMBERS' DAY 

Celebrate the 10th Anniversary of 
Purple Martin Evening 

6:30 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium and grounds. It's a traditk 
Welcome these popular birds back with a lecture, film, and s 
show in the Auditorium, followed by a stroll through the Gan 
Purple Martin neighborhood. Led for the 10th year by W. As 
Gray III. There will be a drawing for a Purple Martin house, 
anniversary cake. Cash bar; no reservations required. Free. 
Limited seating. 




MAY 27 Memorial Day / Summer Hours Beg 

9 a.m. to 8 p.m. through Labor Day, September 2. Enjoy 
extended evening hours and visit the Garden for a tranquil 
twilight stroll. 



MAY 



*§ SATURDAY 

Day of Asian Dances and 
Costumes 

1:30 and 3:30 p.m., Shoenberg 
Auditorium. In celebration of 
National Asian Pacific American 
Heritage Month, the Coalition of 
Asian Americans presents a pro- 
gram of Thai classical dance, 
Taiwanese and Filipino folk dance, 
and fashions from China, Thailand, 
Taiwan and the Philippines. The 
day's events are sponsored by 
Anheuser-Busch Companies, 
St. Louis Center for International 
Relations and the Garden. Call 
454-1744 for more information. 



4-5 



5 A T U R D A 

6 S U N D A 



African Violet Show 

Noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, 9 ai 
p.m. Sunday, Orthwein Flora 
37th annual juried show, disp 
sale sponsored by the Metro 
St. Louis African Violet Cour 
From micro- minis through lai 
standards in white, pink, red 
and purple. Come enjoy and 
about these popular flowers, 
with Garden admission. 



continued on m 



12. 



\BULLETIN MAY JUNE 1991 



continued 



MONDAY 



18-19 



SATURDAY 
& SUNDAY 



Clinic 

to noon, Ridgway Center, 
expert advice and trouble- 
ng for your plant problems, by 
r Gardeners. Samples of sick 
are welcome. Free. 



SUNDAY 

Br St. Louis 
jciety Show 

:o 5 p.m. , Orthwein Floral 
l juried show and display of 
cular blooms in all shapes and 
. Free with Garden 



TUESDAY 

( and Travels of a 
ical Sculptor" 

m., Shoenberg Auditorium, 
e by Patrick O'Hara, noted 
culptor of ceramic flowers. 
Hara will discuss the many 
aces and flowers he has stud- 
America, Europe, Asia and 
and the resulting sculptures. 



MONDAY 

Clinic 

to noon, Ridgway Center, 
[ay 6 for details. 

WEDNESDA Y 

n June 

) 9:00 p.m., Cohen 
itheater. The popular summer 
■t series returns with four 
*sday evening performances 
ng nationally known jazz art- 
;might: Saxophonist Butch 
as. Lawn seating; blankets or 
hairs are encouraged and pic- 
jpers are welcome. Cash bar; 
)holic beverages may be 
it onto Garden grounds. Free 
nbers; $2 non-members, 
s go on sale Monday, May 20 
Ridgway Center ticket 



Horticulture Society Show 

Noon to 5 p.m. Saturday; 9a.m. to 
5 p.m. Sunday, Orthwein Floral 
Hall. Vegetables, wildflowers, cut 
flowers and more are judged and 
displayed. Free with Garden 
admission. 



20 



MONDAY 



Plant Clinic 

9a.m. to noon, Ridgway Center. 
See May 6 for details. 



25 



SATURDAY 



Robert Stolz Exhibit 

9a.m. to 5 p.m., Monsanto Hall; 
through June 23. Paintings by 
St. Louisan Robert Stolz feature 
botanical studies and landscapes 
of western Colorado. Free with 
Garden admission. 



25-27 



SATURDAY- 
MONDAY 



Dahlia Society Plant Sale 

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, Ridgway 
Center. Dazzling color, consistent 
blooms and healthy foliage will grow 
from the varieties offered by the 
Greater St. Louis Dahlia Society. 
Free admission to the sale. 



JUNE 



8 



SATURDAY 



Greater St. Louis 
Iris Society Show 

See May 12 for details. 



12 



WEDNESDAY 



Jazz in June 

7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Cohen 
Amphitheater. Ronnie Burrage 
Ensemble from New York. See June 
5 for details. 



15-16 



SATURDAY 

& SUNDAY 



Lily Society Flower Show 

Noon to 8 p.m., Saturday; 9 a.m. to 
8 p.m., Sunday, Ridgway Center. 
Mid-America Regional Lily Society 
(MARLS) presents a display of 
beautiful blooms. Free with Garden 
admission. 




JUNE 8 & 8/Kemper Center for Home Gardening 

June 8 : Members ' Preview Day 9a.m. to 5p.m. 
June 9: Public opening noon to 5p.m., 
ceremony at noon 

Come celebrate with a special preview just for Members all day 
on Saturday, and the ribbon cutting ceremony on Sunday. Festivi- 
ties will include tours of the Center, a lecture and book signing by 
John Wilson of PBS' ' 'Victory Garden,' ' cooking demonstrations, 
and more! Kids will love the Purina Mills, Inc. petting farm. 
Adults will enjoy the display of live birds and a wild bird product 
booth including a free analysis of St. Louis area birds and how 
and what to feed them. There also will be drawings for gardening 
equipment and supplies. 

JUNE 28/MEMBERS DAY 
Members' Musical Evening 

5:30 to 9:00 p.m., Spoehrer Plaza; concert begins at 7:30 p.m. 
Listen to the sounds of the Gateway City Big Band, a Garden 
favorite. Bring a picnic supper if desired, and lawn chairs and 
blankets for seating. Cash bar available. Free, for Members only. 



17 



MONDAY 



Plant Clinic 

9 am. to noon, Ridgway Center. 
See May 6 for details. 



19 



WEDNESDAY 



23 



SUNDAY 



West County Daylily Society Show 

Noon to 8 p.m. , Ridgway Center. 
Come enjoy a lovely display of 
these summertime favorites. Free 
with Garden admission. 



Jazz in June 

7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Cohen 
Amphitheater. Tayammum Falah 
Quartet featuring Kansas City 
saxophonist Ahmad Alaadeen. 
See June 5 for details. 



26 



WEDNESDAY 



Jazz in June 

7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Cohen 
Amphitheater. Malachi Thompson 
Quartet from Chicago. See June 5 
for details. 



GARDEN W* LK / R " B "turdW 7 to 10:30 a.m. 

E «ery Wednesday and » atur * and Saturd ay mom- 
The Garden opens early on Wedneso y ^ 

ings . The nuleage of vanous patf* ^und t J^ 
available at the ticket counter Health » ^^ w th 
be offered the last Saturday of each ^m ^ informatlon 

the American Heart Assoc***, can 57/ .. breakfot 

The Gardens* Restaurant offers £ ^ ^ s do 

buffet of cereals, fruit, juice and yg ^^ , s 



BULLETIN MAY JUNE 1991 



From the Membership Office 



XH 



*■ 




Reservation Form — "A Salute to the Missouri Botanical Garden" 

Tickets are $100 per person. Payment may be made by VISA, MasterCard by calling 577-9500, or by check. Make check payable to: Missouri Botanical Garden. 



RESERVATIONS ARE LIMITED. A confirmation will be mailed in June. 



Name(s). 



Address. 
City 



State. 



.Zip. 



Number of tickets $100 each. 
Total payment 



1 cannot attend, but will make a contribution of:. 



$75 of each $100 ticket is tax deductible. 

Additional information: Brenda Banjak, Membership Coordinator, 577-9517 



Mail to: "Salute to the Garden, Missouri Botanical Garden, 
P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166-0299. 



14. 



\BULLETIN MAY JINK 1991 



Dillard's and the Garden 
"Focus on Mom" 

"Focus on Mom" is the theme of the 
Garden's luncheon in honor of Mother's 
Day, sponsored by Dillard's. Held on Fri- 
day, May 10, 1991, this "Pre-Mother's 
Day" luncheon will feature attendance 
drawings, spring and summer fashions by 
Dillard's and a festive luncheon served 
under the outdoor party tent at the Ridg- 
way Center. 

Reservations are $35 per person for 
members and $45 per person for non- 
members. Reservation deadline is May 7. 
See the invitation mailed recently to all 
members, or call 577-9500. 

Make Your 

"Bed and Breakfast" 

Reservations Today! 

Members have just until May 10 to 
make reservations for the 1991 "Bed and 
Breakfast" event at the Garden. For a 
$35 donation you can help sponsor one 
year's care of a plant bed containing one 
of four endangered American plant spe- 
cies grown at the Garden as part of the 
national Center for Plant Conservation 
network. To thank you for your help, you 
will receive: 

■ A complimentary buffet breakfast for 
you and one guest on either of two dates: 
Wednesday, May 15 or Saturday, June 1 
and 

■ An attractive personalized certificate 
declaring your support for Running 
buffalo clover, Lucy Braun's eupatorium, 
Decurrent false aster, or Missouri blad- 
derpod. 

See the letter mailed in March to all 
members or call 577-5118 to make your 
reservation today! 

T W E R GROVE HO U S E 

Auxiliary Seeks New 
Members 

Interested persons are invited to join 
the Tower Grove House Auxiliary. The 
Auxiliary is active in a number of activities 
to benefit Tower Grove House through- 
out the year: members operate the Tea 
Room, organize the Christmas Candle- 
light Tour, and sponsor a celebration of 
Henry Shaw's birthday in July. For more 
information please call 577-5150. 

New Guides Are Needed 

Tower Grove House is searching for 
volunteer tour guides to escort visitors 
through Henry Shaw's country home. 
The House is a beautifully restored Vic- 



THIS SPRING AT SHAW ARBORETUM 



Burning Restores Woodland Habitats 



Visitors to the Arboretum during the 
spring of 1991 may have noticed, with 
surprise, the two burned areas in the 
woods near the Trail House. These con- 
trolled woodland burns were carried out 
by Arboretum staff in early March. The 
total area burned was about 20 acres. 

Most people accept the idea of 
burning as routine in prairie manage- 
ment, but the woodland burns aroused 
considerable interest because of their 
unfamiliarity. While a woodland wildfire 
can be very destructive, controlled, cool- 
season burns are now regularly used by 
the Missouri Department of Natural 
Resources, the Missouri Conservation 
Department, and The Nature Conser- 
vancy for woodland habitat management 
throughout the state. 

Before European settlers came, all of 
Missouri's vegetation was subject to peri- 
odic fires. Cool, moist valleys burned 
infrequently, while slopes and uplands 
burned every 1-15 years. After the acqui- 
sition of the Louisiana Purchase, U.S. 
government surveyors described virtually 
every square mile of what is now Mis- 
souri, including accounts of the vegeta- 
tion. According to surveyor reports, 
the dense upland thickets and wood- 
lands found today were a relative rarity at 
that time. 

About 30 percent of the state was 
prairie, and another 30 percent was an 
open woodland-grassland mix called 
savanna, barrens or park land. These 
areas were dominated by broad-crowned 
trees and clumps of brush, which became 
established during wet spells when no 
fires passed through for several years. 
Between the trees a complex of grasses 
and wildflowers existed that closely 
resembled that of the treeless prairies, 
but also had a small number of unique 
species. Many animal species, including 
the fox squirrel, eastern bluebird, most 
flycatchers and the great spangled fritil- 
lary (a butterfly) were savanna species. 

Studies in progress by The Nature 
Conservancy and Arboretum staff reveal 
that much of what is now upland woods at 



the Arboretum was originally savanna, 
and that glades were more extensive in 
the past. Selective clearing, especially of 
eastern red cedars, and periodic burning 
of our savannas-turned-woods and cedar- 
choked glades are the preferred strate- 
gies for bringing back these endangered 
natural plant communities. 

The results of the first two burns are 
of interest. The burns were conducted 
after the surface leaf litter dried out, but 
while the material beneath the leaf litter 
was still cool and moist. The moist humus 
and even some small green plants 
remained unscathed after passage of the 
fire. The staff noticed many crows, 
robins, bobwhite and other birds feeding 
in the burn areas the following day, taking 
advantage of the relatively easy bug- 
hunting afforded by the removal of leaf 
cover. Above ground, many small 
saplings and some larger specimens of 
fire-sensitive trees such as cedars and 
sugar maples were killed. Only a small 
fraction of the larger oaks and hickories 
were even singed by the fire and these 
species are known to survive significant 
fire scarring. 

Burning of surface litter releases 
mineral nutrients into the soil. Where 
saplings and cedars are killed, increased 
sunlight and earlier warming of the 
ground are expected to encourage sun- 
loving wildflowers and native grasses. 
The careful observer may see butterflies 
and other small animals lapping up the 
mineral-rich ash after a rain. The staff 
observed numerous earthworm castings 
after burning in one area; apparently the 
worms were at the surface getting their 
mineral supplements. 

The burning is carefully controlled, 
and the program will proceed gradually as 
the results are monitored. The beneficial 
trends of increasing biological activity and 
diversity are expected to continue as fur- 
ther burning and clearing restore the 
florid beauty of the savanna and glade 
communities at the Arboretum. 

—James C. Trager, 
Arboretum Naturalist 



torian mansion that attracts visitors from 
around the world. Guides need to have a 
love of history and the ability to present 



the furnishings and cultural details of the 
House and Victorian society. Call 
577-5187 for more information. 



15. 



BULLETIN MAY-JUNE 1991 







Volunteer Profiles 



Katherine Chambers and 
Hazel Loewenwarter 



Katherine Marie Pfeifer Chambers and Hazel Schulein Loewenwarter have been 
Garden Guides together for 13 years, but they have been best friends for 75 years, 
"since 1916, the first day at Central High School," Katherine says. 

"We were undergraduates at Washington University together, too," Hazel con- 
tinues. "We graduated in 1923. 1 went on to earn a master's degree in French at the 
University of Wisconsin in 1925, then lived in New York for 48 years before I moved 
back to St. Louis. Katherine and I had always remained friends, and in 1978 I per- 
suaded her to volunteer with me at the Garden." Hazel had been a Garden Guide 
since 1976. She also serves on the Board of the Miriam School. 

In addition to her work as a Guide, Katherine has been a volunteer instructor at 
the Garden since the program's inception in 1982. She earned a M.S. in zoology and a 
Ph.D. in education from Washington University and was a teacher of science at Soldan 
High School for 25 years. She went on to serve the St. Louis Public Schools as a 
supervisor of programs for gifted students in science and mathematics and was a pro- 
fessor at Harris Teacher's College for ten years before retiring in 1971. In retirement 
she has been just as active, serving the Science Center, Washington University, the 
International Institute, the St. Louis Nature Study Society, the Audubon Society, the 
Missouri Native Plants Society, the Webster Groves Nature Study Society, and the 
Archdiocese of St. Louis. 

Katherine brings her extraordinary achievements as a teacher of science to her 
work as a volunteer instructor at the Garden. She has taught 30 different classes, and 
last summer she served on a team of instructors who designed a course on the tropi- 
cal rain forest including a narrated slide show. "I always give my students an assign- 
ment to be completed by the end of class," Katherine explains. "I have found that is 
one of the best ways to focus their attention and help them to remember what they 
see here." 

Hazel and Katherine have seen a number of changes at the Garden in the past 15 
years. "When I began as a Guide, there was no Japanese Garden, no Ridgway Cen- 
ter,' ' Hazel said. ' 'The number of Guides has increased too, which has helped us to 
reduce the size of our tour groups. That's a great improvement, because sometimes 
it's hard for everyone to hear, especially in the Climatron, with all the waterfalls going!" 

"It's easier for the children to see what we're looking at, too," Katherine 
explained. "Most of the school children are in second or third grade, so they're pretty 
lively! We carry bags of props to 'show and tell;' they really understand a cork tree, 
for instance, if you can hold up a piece of cork and let them touch it.' ' 

The two friends enjoy taking "busman's honeymoons" together as well, vacation- 
ing in out of the way places such as India and the Galapagos. ' 'We're going to Alaska 
in May," Hazel said. "We like to go where we can study the natural beauty and wildlife." 

These two lifelong friends have enriched the lives of countless children and adults 
who visit and work at the Garden. Their indefatigable efforts and generous gifts of 
their time and talent are deeply appreciated. 



Katherine Chambers (left) and Hazel 
Loewenwarter at the Orchid Show. 



New Volunteer Guides 
and Instructors 



This past winter two groups of dedi- 
cated volunteers entered intensive train- 
ing programs to become Garden Guides 
or Volunteer Instructors. The 19 new 
Guides and four new instructors com- 
pleted their courses April 9 (pictured at 
right). 

The Garden's education programs 
serve thousands of school children each 
year, thanks to the help of volunteers. In 
1990, 62 active Guides and 20 instructors 
provided tours and classes for 30,434 of 
these students. 

The Garden Guides was founded in 
1968 to give tours of the grounds. The 
Guides have always stressed the educa- 
tional aspect of these tours. They receive 
an intensive ten-week training course in 
botany and natural sciences along with 
history of the Garden, its architecture and 
sculpture. Extra attention is paid to inter- 
preting special displays, such as the 
Climatron, Desert House, and Japanese 
Garden, to emphasize their special sig- 
nificance. The Guides keep their knowl- 
edge current with regular seminars. They 
are among the most dedicated and 
knowledgeable volunteers at the Garden. 

The Volunteer Instructors program 
was established in 1982 to help meet the 
demand for school visits to the Garden. 
The instructors teach classes of all ages 
with supervision by Garden staff. Their 
eight-week training course examines sci- 
ence topics in depth and includes hands- 
on workshops, lectures and tours. After a 
period of team teaching, the volunteers 
handle classes on their own. 

"We rely on these volunteers' enthu- 
siasm, creativity, and skill to enhance 
each child's visit," said Sandra Rode, 
manager of educational services at the 
Garden. "With their help we offer not 
only a field trip to a beautiful place, but a 
new way of looking at science and the 
natural world. We are delighted to have 
them all." 



L6. 



\BULLETIN MAY JINK 1991 








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2 


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w. 



New Garden Guides, front left to right: 
Sue Allan, Robert Smith, Irene Francisco, 
Susan Hall, Susan Fry, David Barnum, Fran 
Pollvogt, Marlene Poger, Barbara O'Halloran, 
Pat Winkelmann, Barbara Huning, Elsie 
Marziotti, KathyLupo (training program 
leader), John Viviano, Ann Yiviano. Back 
row, left to right: Mary Jane Kirtz (training 
program leader), Jackie Johnson, Kanza 
Easterly, Sandra Rode (MBG education 
staff), Jane Goode, Judy Horan. Not pictured: 
Jacqueline Mitchell. 



New volunteer instructors, left to right: 
Mary Doerr, Roberta Hoffman, Monica 
Clapper, Janet Ludewig. 



Neighborhood Garden Named in Memory of Paul Kohl 



On May 20, 1991 the Garden will dedi- 
cate a new neighborhood garden in 
memory of Paul A. Kohl, a long-time hor- 
ticulturist at the Garden who died in 1985. 
The Paul Kohl Memorial Garden will be 
located on a lot at the corner of Shaw 
Boulevard and Tower Grove Avenue, 
opposite the Garden. 

The garden's simple and elegant land- 
scape is designed to enhance the neigh- 
borhood as a tranquil place for sitting 
and strolling. The green carpet of grass 
is accented by two berms, one through 
the center and one along the west and 
north sides. The plantings will consist of 
red oak (Quercus rubra), kousa dogwood 



(Cornus kousa), arrowwood viburnum 
(Viburnum dentatum), and fragrant 
sumac (Rhus aromatica 'Gro-Low'). 
These plants have been chosen for their 
diverse types of flowers, interesting sum- 
mer and fall foliage, and growth forms for 
winter appeal. 

Paul Kohl graduated from the Henry 
Shaw School of Gardening in 1917 and 
began working for the Missouri Botanical 
Garden in 1920. His association with the 
Garden continued for 65 years. He began 
as a floriculturist and is best known for 
growing the plants and designing and 
staging the lovely floral displays that 
appear at the Garden four times a year. 



In 1982 Kohl was honored with the 
Henry Shaw Medal, which recognizes 
those who have made a significant contri- 
bution to the Garden, botanical research, 
horticulture, conservation, or the 
museum community. 

The Garden acquired the property 
in 1982 with an eye toward the future. 
"We think this pocket garden will be a 
nice amenity for the neighborhood," said 
Marshall R. Crosby, assistant director of 
the Garden. "It will also be a nice intro- 
duction to the Garden for visitors coming 
in from Shaw Boulevard and Tower 
Grove Avenue." 



17 





Pictured with Dr. Peter H. Raven, the Garden's director (center), are Larry Schmidt (left), 
head ofRanken 'a Auto/Body Department, and Alan Davenport, assistant head of the 
Automotive Department. 

Utility Vehicle Gets A Face Lift 

One of the Garden's Cushman utility vehicles recently received a complete over- 
haul by the staff and students at Ranken Technical College of St. Louis. The cart was 
rebuilt, repaired and repainted as an educational training project, with the work 
donated to the Garden. 

Ranken is an 83-year-old, private, non-profit institution offering Associate of Tech- 
nology degrees in nine programs and certificates in three others. W. Ashley Gray III, 
vice president of development for the College, says, ' This project provided good, 
real life, practical experience for our students. We are delighted to provide a service 
to the Garden." 



Partnership Program 
Studies Energy Efficiency 

On February 14, students from 
St. Louis city and county high schools 
came to the Garden for seminars in 
energy use. Small groups conducted 
"Energy Building Audits" on three dif- 
ferent buildings at the Garden to survey 
which structures were most energy effi- 
cient. Students were encouraged to 
examine their own homes, schools and 
personal habits to increase awareness of 
efficient energy use and conservation of 
natural resources. 



At left: Students examine the Desert House 
with guide Mauri ta Stueck. 




HENRY SHAW 

ACADEMY 



Dances With Wolves 

' 'I strained my ears and was rewarded 
with a faint, ghostly howl that grew louder 
and seemed to split into many barks and 
yips ... It is really hard to explain the feel- 
ing that this caused. I couldn't help but 
smile. I was mentally as well as physically 
tingling. I felt almost like the wolves had 
given us a gift by sharing this emotional 
experience." 

These were the reactions of students 
in the 1991 Henry Shaw Academy 
Explorers Field Study Program who trav- 
eled to Alligator River Wildlife Refuge in 
North Carolina to observe and study the 
reintroduction of red wolves into a large 
wild habitat. 

This exceptional program was the 
result of a year of planning by Jeff DePew, 
coordinator of the Henry Shaw Academy, 
and Gary Schoenberger of the Wild Canid 
Survival and Research Center (WCSRC) 
in Eureka, Missouri. It involved the col- 
laboration of Washington University, the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, WCSRC, and 
the staff at Alligator River Wildlife Refuge. 
The project was funded, in part, by a 
scholarship fund from the St. Louis Com- 
munity Foundation. 

The seven students and their instruc- 
tors DePew and Schoenberger spent two 
days working with the U.S. Fish and Wild- 
life service. Students participated in radio 
tracking, track and scat analysis, an aerial 
survey of plant and animal habitats of the 
refuge, and many discussions of the 
importance and mechanics of endangered 
species reintroduction and restoration 
projects. 

Continuing their studies closer to 
home, the students spent a day at the 
WCSRC in Eureka. They studied wolf 
behavior, reintroduction programs, and 
the basic genetic identification research 
that Washington University pioneered 
with "true" red wolf (Canis rufus) 
species. 

Washington University researchers 
used their genetic studies to determine a 
pure strain of red wolf from coyote and 
dog crossed animals. The red wolves that 
were authenticated have been rein- 
troduced into the wildlife refuge in Alliga- 
tor River. The relevance and significance 
of reintroducing endangered or ' 'extinct" 
species into wild areas has long term 
benefits for the biodiversity and strength 
of ecosystems. 



18. 



\BULLETIN MAY JUNE 1991 



The MBG Symbol 



Have you every wondered about the 
meaning of the Garden's handsome sym- 
bol? It was designed by Chip Reay of 
Hellmuth, Obata, and Kassabaum, Inc. of 
St. Louis. 



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yuc 




^7 



suit. 
35 




m 



The genesis of the 
mark is the folk symbol 
for man. 

Compounded to 
become men (mankind) 
abstracted to become 
plant form (botanical) . 
Reflecting the Garden's 
dual concerns for man 
and the natural world. 
The inseparable nature 
of both and, most 
importantly, their 
"oneness." Also the 
process of research. 

A seed pod. 

Germinating. 

. Seeking the com- 
mon denominator in 
the plant kingdom, the 
point at which most 
things look alike, so as 
to represent the entire 
kingdom and not one 
part . . . newness . . . 
growth. 

The two forms 
brought together . . . 
and divided, symboliz- 
ing in their separate- 
ness plant and man, in 
their symmetry or 
reflection the inter- 
dependence of one 
upon the other to 
create a whole, a 
mutual reinforcement. 
Again, "oneness." 

The curved lower line: 
the garden as holding, 
cradling, nurturing the 
whole: the earth. 



From the Garden Gate Shop 



Mother's Day Is May 12 

The Shop has a lovely selection of 
gifts and jewelry to honor your favorite 
Mom. Celebrate Mother's Day with a 
beautiful flowering plant, choosing from 
begonias, kalanchoes, azaleas, hydran- 
geas, Persian violets, gerber daisies, and 
many more. If Mom is an avid gardener, 
she will enjoy a gift from the Shop's 
extensive selection of outdoor gardening 
equipment and lawn ornaments. 

Tee Shirts 

Now that warm weather is here, 
everyone will enjoy a spiffy new tee shirt 
from the Shop's extensive selection. 
There are "Save the Rain Forest" shirts, 
the World Wildlife Foundation's "Endan- 
gered Species" shirts, and more. Just for 
kids is a charming new shirt featuring 
"Friends of the Garden." 



■g9 If)^ g-j 




Dig In! 

A charming new item in the Shop is a 
five-piece set of stainless steel flatware 
called "Dig In's." The knife, forks and 
spoons are shaped like gardening tools, 
and make the perfect whimsical gift for 
the gardener ' 'who has everything." 





Ip^wJL. ^^ 



Award winners pictured at the Garden (left to right): Marguerite (ihant; George Kirkland; 
Rosa Little; Lois Williams; John Bieller, forester, Union Electric Company; Irene Frison; 
O. Sage Wightman III, president, MBG Board of Trustees. 

Community Beautif ication Awards 

The Garden, in cooperation with Union Electric Company, presented the 1991 
Community Beautification Awards at a ceremony and reception held at the Ridgway 
Center February 24, 1991. The celebration was part of the Garden's Black History 
Month activities. 

The 1991 awards winners were recognized for their contributions to improving 
neighborhoods throughout the St. Louis metropolitan area. Award-winners were 
nominated by individuals throughout the Greater St. Louis area. Nominees were 
evaluated by a committee of representatives from Operation Brightside, Operation 
ConServ, the Urban League, Better Family Life, Gateway to Gardening, Neighbor- 
hood Housing Services, Union Electric and the Missouri Botanical Garden. 

"Each action taken to improve our world helps everyone in our world,' ' said 
Dr. Peter H. Raven, director of the Garden. "And there is no better starting Doint 



IN MEMORIAM 



David N. Smith 

1945-1991 




Dr. David N. Smith, assistant curator 
in the Garden's Research Division, died in 
La Paz, Bolivia on February 7, 1991. He 
had been stationed in Bolivia since early 
1990, where he was directing a project to 
survey and inventory the tree flora of the 
Serrania de Pilon Lajas, in collaboration 
with the National Herbarium of Bolivia. 

A native of Portland, Oregon, Smith 
came to the Garden in December 1989 
from Iowa State University, where he 
received his Ph.D. in botany in 1988. His 
association with the Garden dates from 
1982 when he became a research associ- 
ate. From 1982 to 1986 he carried out 
botanical field work in various regions of 
Peru, developed a project to survey the 



flora of the Huascaran National Park, 
Peru, and collaborated with the Garden in 
its Flora of Peru project. Dr. Smith first 
became involved with the Latin American 
scientific and conservation community as 
a result of his years in Guatemala with the 
Peace Corps. 

Dr. Smith was respected by his col- 
leagues and co-workers for the quality of 
his botanical research and his dedication 
to the conservation of botanical resources 
in the Andean region of South America 
through research, promotion of public 
awareness of conservation issues, and 
education of local scientists. He will be 
greatly missed. 



William L. Brown 

1913-1991 




Friends of the Garden were saddened 
to learn of the death of William Lacy 
Brown on March 8, 1991. The Garden 
honored Dr. Brown with the Henry Shaw 
Medal in 1986 in recognition of his 
achievements in plant breeding and 
genetics. 

As a research scientist and as presi- 
dent and chief executive officer of Pioneer 
Hi-Bred International, Brown directed 
breeding programs for maize, sorghum, 
soybeans and wheat. World food produc- 
tion has benefited enormously from his 
research and the company's development 
of improved agricultural crop plants. 



While investigating the genetics of corn, 
Brown pioneered the exploitation of 
exotic germplasm for the crop's improve- 
ment. Hybrids from tropical plants led to 
significant improvements in domestic 
corn crops, and Brown's monographs on 
corn are standard references and models 
for commercial breeding research. 

Brown became a research fellow at 
the Garden in 1937, earning his M.S. and 
Ph.D. degrees from Washington Univer- 
sity. He joined Pioneer Hi-Bred in 1945. 
Upon his retirement in 1984 the company 
established the William L. Brown Post- 
doctoral Fellowship at the Garden. 



Art Christ 

1906-1991 




"Art Christ was a magical individual," 
said Peter Raven, "who inspired hun- 
dreds of people because he loved to share 
his great enthusiasm for plants." 

Staff, volunteers, and all friends of 
the Garden were saddened by the death 
of Art Christ on February 17. Christ grew 
up near the Garden and worked here as a 



gardener for several years after high 
school. He volunteered at the Garden 
and Arboretum for many years and was 
one of Missouri's most accomplished 
amateur botanists. He amassed an ency- 
clopedic knowledge of the plants of Mis- 
souri and was often consulted by Garden 
researchers for help identifying plants. 

' 'Art was a real storehouse of informa- 
tion for me," said George Yatskievych, 
editor of the Flora of Missouri project. 
"He could tell me exactly where things 
grow in this state. Art Christ was a 
gold mine, and he had a story about 
every plant." 

Christ taught eighth grade general 
science for 18 years. He was a member 
of the Webster Groves Nature Study 
Society for 31 years and worked enthu- 
siastically with a number of conserva- 
tion groups. 

Art's knowledge was developed in 
weekly explorations of Missouri's natural 
areas, and what he loved most of all was 
taking people on his walks and introducing 



them to the plants along the way. He 
amassed a collection of hundreds of dried 
plant specimens, which has been donated 
to the Garden. 

Dr. Raven said, "Art Christ devoted 
his life to sharing knowledge with others. 
He made thousands of advocates and con- 
verts to the Missouri natural scene. He 
enriched all our lives, and we will miss 
him." 



Orchid Collection 
Enhanced 

Many new and exciting orchid plants 
have recently been added to the Garden's 
collection as a result of a generous dona- 
tion from Mrs. Paul P. Mueller in memory 
of her mother, Mrs. Helen Dieckmeyer 
Koerner. Marilyn LeDoux, the Garden's 
orchid horticulturist, is delighted with the 
opportunity to enlarge and diversify the 
orchid collection. The Garden is very 
grateful to Mrs. Mueller for this support. 



20. 



Uil'l.I.ETIN I MAY JUNE 1991 



Trustee Profile 




Richard J. Mahoney 

On January 24, the Missouri Botanical 
Garden Board of Trustees elected 
Richard J. Mahoney, chief executive offi- 
cer of the Monsanto Corporation, to the 
Garden's Board. "Having Mr. Mahoney 
join our Board of Trustees will help the 
Garden in many ways," said Peter H. 
Raven, director. "His leadership in the 
St. Louis community is extremely valua- 
ble and his tenure with Monsanto will cer- 
tainly benefit our research and scientific 
mission." 

Mr. Mahoney became associated with 
Monsanto Company in 1962 as product 
development specialist. Subsequently he 



has held numerous positions throughout 
his years with the firm. He became 
executive vice-president in 1977, was 
elected to the Board in 1979, and elected 
as president in 1980. Soon after, he 
assumed the additional duties of the chief 
operating officer, and was appointed to his 
present position as chairman and chief 
executive officer in April of 1986. 

A graduate of the University of Mas- 
sachusetts with a degree in chemistry, 
Mr. Mahoney has maintained his commit- 
ment to his alma mater by serving as a 
member of the Chancellor's Executive 
Council and the Development Com- 
mittee. He has also taken on numer- 
ous responsibilities in the metropolitan 
St. Louis area and is presently a member 
of the Advisory Board at St. John's Mercy 
Medical Center, a member of the Univer- 
sity of Missouri-St. Louis CEO's Council, 
a Trustee at Washington University- 
St. Louis, and a vice-president of the 
Board of Managers at the Central Institute 
for the Deaf in St. Louis, to mention a few. 

' T am delighted that Mr. Mahoney has 
found it possible to join us as a member of 
the Board of Trustees and know that his 
continuing interest in the Garden's scien- 
tific endeavors will be of benefit to every- 
one," said 0. Sage Wightman III, the 
Board president. 

Mr. Mahoney and his wife, Barbara, 
have three children. 



Touhill Named New Chancellor of UMSL 



Dr. Blanche Touhill recently was 
named chancellor of the University of 
Missouri-St. Louis. She had served as 
interim chancellor since August 1990. Dr. 
Touhill had been a member of the Gar- 
den's Board of Trustees by virtue of her 
office, and her recent appointment 




ensures that the Garden will continue to 
benefit from her expertise. Dr. Raven 
said, "We are delighted to have Dr. Tou- 
hill continue to serve on our Board. She is 
a distinguished educator, and we con- 
gratulate her on her appointment.' ' 



FLORA OF NORTH AMERICA is putting 
the finishing touches on Volume I, scheduled 
for publication in 1991. Volume I will 
contain introductory chapters, ferns, and 
gymnosperms. Recently some of the 
contributors to the project spent several 
weeks at the Garden editing introductory 
chapters. Shown in the Garden library (left 
to right): Nancy Morin, MBG; Theodore 
Barkely, Kansas State University, 
Manhattan; Luc Brouillet, University of 
Montreal; and Rich Spellenberg, New 
Mexico State University. Not pictured: 
David Whetstone, Jacksonville State 
University. 



Tributes 



January -February 1991 



In Honor Of 



Mrs. Dorothy Anderson 

Friends at Lee-Rowan Company 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bobroff 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 
Mr. and Mrs. John Bottchen 
Mr. and Mrs. Blaine A. Ulmer 
Mr. Paul Brockman 
Mr. and Mrs. William R. Orthwein Jr. 
Daniel Elliot Bronson 
Mr. and Mrs. George J. Amitin 

continued on next page 



Gift Planning 



The Last Word... 

How would you like a chance to tell 
everyone exactly what to do? You can do 
that with a Will. Through your Will you 
can direct how your estate is to be dis- 
tributed at your death. 

If you don't have a Will your estate will 
be settled according to the state's laws of 
descent and distribution— impersonal 
laws, that have no regard for what you 
may have had in mind. 

The Garden is offering a free booklet 
that can answer many of the questions 
you may have about Wills: "Your Will, 
Your Way . . . Why and How.' ' This com- 
prehensive publication explains why you 
need a Will, how to prepare to meet with 
your legal advisor, what items to include 
in your Will, and more. For your free copy 
call 577-9532. 



Moving? Please Remember 
To Send Us Your New Address. 

To avoid missing any of your membership 
mailings, you must give us your new address at 
least three weeks before you move. Please 
enclose the mailing label on the back cover of 
this Bulletin, and mail to: Membership Office, 
Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, 
St. Louis, MO 63166. 

Name: 

Old Address: 




Tributes 



continued 

Audrey E. Claus 

Anita Wegener 
Doris Wegener 
Marion M. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Friedman 

Harold Cook 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul T. Putzel 

James Cuidon 

Associated Garden Clubs of Clayton 

Mr. Irvin Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Barken 

Mrs. Marcia Epstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Epstein 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. 
Frank 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Deglman 
Mr. Robert N. Hagnauer 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard I. C. 

Muckerman 
Mrs. Robert Friedman 
Mr. and Mrs. I. Heifetz 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert 
Friedman 

Mr. and Mrs. I. Heifetz 

Jane Goldberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 
Mr. and Mrs. Barnett 
Goodman 

Mrs. Sally Kushins 

Ms. Deena Goran 

Cissy and Steven Nissenbaum 

Jerry Hannibal 

Ozark Region, Men's Garden Clubs 

of America 
Cleo and Alex Heinrich 
Mrs. Lester H. Jasper 
Ms. Marilyn Heneghan 
White Pines Garden Club 

Mrs. Maxine Hirsch 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald Ross 

June Hutson 

Ozark Region, Men's Garden Clubs 

of America 
Mrs. Jack A. Jacobs 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Susan Lammert 

Mississippi Valley Nurserymen's 

Cooperative 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Liebrum 

Concord Extension Club 

Mrs. Ernest Loewenwarter 

Mrs. Belle G. Levin 
Mr. and Mrs. Lester L. Lowenstein 
Mr. Benjamin Lowell 
Mrs. Florence G. Stern 
Dr. John MacDougal 
Ozark Region, Men's Garden Clubs 
of America 

Meredith McKee 

Mr. Michael Sork 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Moll 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Schute 

Jean Richardson 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 
Mr. Herbert M. Sayers 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 



Mrs. Emma Schield 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Frank 

Mrs. Frances F. Schiele 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 

Mrs. James A. Singer 

Miss Frances J. Levis 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin B. Meissner Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mrs. Ben H. Senturia 

Jenny N. Strauss 

Mrs. Samuel Soule 

Mrs. Alan Goldberg 

Chip Tynan 

Ozark Region, Men's Garden Clubs 

of America 
Mrs. Patsy Chandler Walker 
Dr. Willard B.Walker 
Grandson Zachary 

Mr. and Mrs. Larry H. Boxerman 



In Memory Of 



Mrs. Rita Ahner 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton J. Canis 
Isabel Aloe Baer 
Mr. and Mrs. Fristoe Mullins 
Dr. Drennan Bailey 
Esther J. Bissell 
Anna Mae Ballard 

Kathy Boswell 
Patty Buersmeyer 
Joanne Callahan 
Sue Eaton 
Karen Fedchak 
Penny Foley 
Mary Hackworth 
Kaly Hessel 
Kris Keane 
Carolyn Kuehl 
Mary Jo Lehmann 
Ann Leonard 
Trish Madden 
Gus McGowan 
Diana Moreland 
Helen Peng 
Parn Pinter 
Diane Pruellage 
Meg Redden 
Dana See 
Corinna Sih 
Bobbie Sharp 
Carol Smith 
Shirley Waldrup 
Pam Wisnewski 

Glenn D. Barker, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn D. Barker 

Mrs. Charles F. Bates II 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter F. Ballinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Bender 

Mr. and Mrs. P. Taylor Bryan III 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Crunden Cole 

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Cornwell Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Marion Engler Sr. 

Finn Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucien R. Fouke Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Goessling 

Mr. Clark V. Graves 

Mrs. James Lee Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Gale F. Johnston Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard van Buren King 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Limberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Scharff II 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Mr. and Mrs. John Shepley 

Gene and Tom Smith 



Mr. and Mrs. H. Parker Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. White IV 
Mrs. Berniece Baudendistel 
Mr. Robert E. Hansen 
Philip E. Bauer 
Mrs. Alice Ramsey 
Mrs. Ruth Begeman 

Ms. Nancy Craig 

Father of Suzy Besnia 

First Congregational Pre-School 

Board 
Father of Mrs. Blumeyer 

Craig Mold Family 
Mr. Herman Bowmar 
Mrs. Herman Bowmar 
Samuel J. Bronstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Barken 

Mrs. Gladys Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Parker Smith 

Mr. Lawrence C. Bulus 

Judge and Mrs. Drew Luten Jr. 

Miss Jane Sutter 

Dr. and Mrs. George E. Thoma 

Richard Bushman 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Brooke Hoey 

Missouri Botanical Garden Guides 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Niemoeller 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert Vanderpearl 

Mr. Arthur Christ 

Marvin E. Boisseau 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Higgins Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Siegmund 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Tooker 

Dr. and Mrs. James K. Turner 

Mr. and Mrs. Blanton Whitmire 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Wiese 

Mrs. Cornelia Cummings 

Mrs. Jean Schneider 
Mrs. Rose Dankner 
Mrs. George J. Amitin 
Mother of Gretchen Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Brent Stansen 
Mr. Sam'l C.Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mr. Adrian DeYong 

Joyce and Duane Patterson 
Mrs. Pauline Diamond 
Mr. and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 
Mr. Fred W. Dierberg 

Mrs. G. P. Plaisance 
Mrs. Flora Diesem 
Benson, LaMear and McCormack 
Mrs. Margaret Dobbs 

Miss Margery Telthorst 

Mrs. Helen Duffy 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Palmer 
Mrs. Hilda Duncan 
Delmar Garden Club 
Mr. James M. Entwistle 

Mrs. Natalie T Dohr 
1 'Aunt Esther' ' 

Jane Goz Goodman 

Mrs. Raymar Etheredge 

Mrs. Mary Sherman 

Mr. Robert Farmer Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Elliott Jr. 

Robert Feldman 

Mrs. Ruth Schwartz 

Mrs. Grace Fessler 

St. Louis Horticultural Society 



Mr. Michael Foerstel 

Mr. Don Heil 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Fahrion 

Dr. Stuart Forster 

Dr. and Mrs. Michael Rumelt 

Mr. Harry Forward 

Gardenville Thursday Daytime 
Bridge 

Mrs. Ingrid Fournier 

Mr. and Mrs. Lindsay Hillbrick 

Mrs. Gloria Franey 

Mrs. Virginia Rehme 
Commander Harry K. Frank 
Mr. and Mrs. Erwin R. Breihan 
Mrs. Edward Fredrickson 
Mrs. Allie C. Conway 
Raymond Galligher 

Joyce Family 

Mr. Goodrich Gamble 

Mrs. Charlotte Ballard 
Mr. Louis Gibson 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Kerwin 

Mrs. Nellie Gillett 

Mrs. Arleen Weimann 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Grimm 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Fangmann 
Ryan Guilliams 

Rodgers Family 

Mr. Thomas Hadley 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Bowsher 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Chapman 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Crites 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Frenz 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lansing 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard McBryan 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Piper 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Pleis 

Mark Robert Hansen 

Bobby and Jerry Cox 
Mim Kittner 
Missy and David Kittner 
Uschi and John Kittner 
Jean and Jim Peterson 
Mary Helen and Don Winsby 
Mr. Ken Harris 
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Wolf 
Mrs. Solon Harris 

Dr. and Mrs. James C. Sisk 
Mr. H. Robert Haury Jr. 
Mr. Stephen P. Mullin 
Mr. Nelson Heithaus 
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald L. Phelan 
Mrs. Mildred J. Henning 
Mr. Hans Henning 
Mr. Edward Henry 
Ms. Lynn K. Silence 
Mrs. Ann Hensley 

Mr. and Mrs. Melville J. Dunkelman 
Ladue Garden Club 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Max Lippman 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Reck Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edmonstone F. 

Thompson 
Mr. Russell W. Hermann 
Mr. and Mrs. J. John Brouk 
Mrs. Raymond L. Gross 
Mrs. George W. Skinner 
Mrs. Katherine M. Hosmer 
Mr. and Mrs. James K. Mellow 

Douglas Bruce Hudson 

Dr. Scott C. Jones 



22. 



{BULLETIN i MAY JUNK 1991 



Mr. Robert Humber 

Mr. Don J. Riehn 
Mrs. Frank Huey 

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde S. Gudermuth 

Kimberly Ann Hussey 

All Staff of NICU St. Louis Children's 

Hospital 
Mr. Ted Jones 
Mrs. Roy R. Rehme and Family 
Larry Kaempfe 

His Friends and Monsanto Company 

Mother of Henrietta Kaiser 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kibler 

Mr. Herbert F. Kalbfleisch 

Mr. Joseph M. Arndt II 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Nicolai 

Mrs. Jo Kaltenrieder 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd B. Wente 

Mr. Sym Kurtz 

Mr. and Mrs. Myron Glassberg 

Mrs. Lorraine Franciscus 

LaFarge 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Hensley Jr. 
Mother of Roxie Leutwiler 
Mr. and Mrs. Brent Stansen 
Mrs. Max Lippman Sr. 
Miss Adelaide Cherbonnier 
Tom Loeb 
Joyce Lanzerotti 
Ms. Justine Maier 
Mr. and Mrs. Rob Barnard 
Friends of Justine Maier 
Woodswomen 
Mrs. Ruby May 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Power 
Mr. Hugh McCall 

Ethel and Marian Herr 
Mr. and Mrs. Angelo Maltagliati 
Mrs. Arva McCloud 
Mrs. Elaine W. Ernst 
Bernard McDonald 

Colleen Maginn Baker 

Lucy Garesche 

Man- Susan Garesche 

Dennis Maginn 

Katie Maginn 

Susan McDonald Maginn 

Mr. Milton Mill 

Mr. and Mrs. E. William Bergfeld 

Carolyn B. Pratt 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 

Dorothy B. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. George Leontsinis 

Mr. Frank Miller 

Ethel and Marian Herr 

Mr. Ed Morganstern 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Vesper and Family 

Mother of Lydia Mower 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom K. Smith Jr. 

Florence N. Myers 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin B. Meissner Jr. 

Catherine Nicholson 

Nancy Hollingsworth 
Dr. Robert Nussbaum 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold M. Cutler 

Dr. and Mrs. I. Jerome Fiance 

Mr. Jerome A. Gross 

Mrs. Sally Kushins 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Nussbaum 

Dr. and Mrs. Alfred S. Schwartz 

Richard Wagner 



William D. Oberbeck 

Robert A. Dvorak 

Mrs. Albert J. O'Brien 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 
Mrs. Olshwanger 
Phyllis and Steve Smith 
Miss Sarah E. Owen 
Evelyn Braden 
Martha Orr Foley 
Susan Orr Martens 
Barbara Ringwald 
Theta Sigma Association 
Mother of Ona Porter 

Mr. and Mrs. Brent Stansen 

Ted Prott 

Ann C. Lockhart 

Yuppie Landscaping Group, Inc. 

Mr. John Reid 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 

Mrs. Queenie F. Schiele 

Mrs. Florian L. Reilly 

Ms. Diana L. Burdt 

Clifford E.Rhoads 

Mr. James Lawrence 

Mrs. Marie Riley 

Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 

Mrs. Ritchie 

Miss Marilyn L. Wind 
Walter G. Rodenroth 
Mrs. Crystal B. Bruening 
Ms. Mary F. Freidewald 
Mr. and Mrs. Mel Lischer 
Mrs. Alice Rollins 
Mr. and Mrs. Claude B. Martin 
Mrs. Dorothy Sapin 

Mr. and Mrs. George B. Hagee 

Mrs. Alberta S. Kalish 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Rosenheim 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ullman 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Woolsey 

John Sares 

Mr. Jerome A. Gross 

Mr. Edgar R. Satterfield 

Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher Jr. 
Vadie Schneider 

Tina Weyman 

Gracie Schultz 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe F. Evans 
Ms. Elizabeth K. Laird 
Ms. Marie Roessler 
Charlotte Seibel 
Mary V. Roach 

Mr. Robert F. Seifert 

Mrs. Lillian Biggs 

Brown Family 

Bruce Bryan 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Buck 

LaVerne C. Cannon 

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Corder 

Erickson Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan David Glass 

Glass Family 

Hildebrandt Family 

Hill Family 

Mrs. Gemma Hoerber 

Jost Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Math A. Kaemmerer 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Kannapell 

Aubert and Grace Kettenbrink 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Kettenbrink 

Koenig Family 

Mrs. Irwin V. Kuehling 

Anke and John Meyers 



Ms. Jeanne Neuner 

Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Patten 

Mr. and Mrs. William Pedley 

Rapp Family 

Mr. and Mrs. James T Thorp 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Watel 

Marian Watson 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Woelfer 

Mr. and Mrs. Sander B. Zwick 

Mr. Everett Shaw 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Remmert 

Mrs. Mary Shea 

Mr. Thomas A. Shea Jr. 
Mrs. Beatrice Sigoloff 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Krasnoff 
Mr. and Mrs. Erv Steinberg 
Mrs. Marilyn Werner, Jean, Susan, 
Ken 

Mrs. Marie Sikora 

Mr. and Mrs. Allan John Ross 

Dr. David Smith 

Miss Theresa Moyer 
Jessica Ventimiglia 

Dr. Samuel D. Soule 

Mrs. Samuel I). Soule 

Ms. Sue Middleton-Spann 

Mr. and Mrs. Art Croci 
Charles Symington 
Mr. and Mrs. Fristoe Mullins 
Mr. James Tabor 

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Montoia 

Barbara Neville Tarker 

Mrs. Roland O'Bryen 

Mrs. Josephine Grana 
Tichacek 

Mrs. Mary Ellen Haack Hetenyi 
Mrs. Andrea McDonald Thaler 

Father of Mr. Leon 
Ullensvang 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Lee Jr. 
Mrs. Pearl Voelpel 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Rettig 

Ethel M. Watkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Anderson 

Mr. Eugene Weiss 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Watel 

Dorothy Willi 

Mrs. Emily M. Dreher 

Mr. Clark Williams 

Kelly, Boyd, Lauren Bermel 

Mr. John T. Williams 

Lynn K. Silence 

Frederick G. Wilson 

Herbert A. Mack 

Mr. James H. Wilson 

Mrs. E. R. Hurdjr. 

Mrs. Nellie Wilson 

Josephine McDonald 
Mr. Eldred H. Wittmaier 
Mr. Garret F. Meyer Jr. 
Mrs. Richard Wolfheim 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mrs. Audrey Smith Deglman 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack E. Edlin 

Mr. Robert N. Hagnauer 

Mrs. Peggy Hellman 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Marshall 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin M. Meinberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 

Mrs. Leonard Woods 

Mr. and Mrs. William Guy Heckman 



Board of Trustees 

Mr. 0. Sage Wightman III 

President 

Rev. Lawrence Biondi, S.J. 

Mr. Stephen F. Brauer 

Mr. William H.T Bush 

Dr. William H. Danforth 

Mr. Samuel B. Hayes III 

Mr. Robert R. Hermann 

Mr. David W. Kemper 

Mr. Charles F. Knight 

Mr. Charles E. Kopman 

Mr. Robert E. Kresko 

Dr. John P. Mahoney 

Mr. Richard J. Mahoney 

Mr. William E. Maritz 

Mr. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. Thomas 0. McNearney, Jr. 

Mr. Lucius B. Morse III 

Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr. William R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 

Rev. Hayes H. Rockwell 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

The Hon. Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. Andrew C. Taylor 

Mr. Jack E. Thomas 

Dr. Blanche Touhill 

Mr. John K. Wallace, Jr. 

The Hon. George R. Westfall 

EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Mr. Howard F Baer 

Mr. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. John H. Biggs 

Mr. Jules D. Campbell 

Mr. Henry Hitchcock 

Mrs. Anne L. Lehmann 

Mr. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. Louis S. Sachs 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg. Jr. 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. Tom K.Smith, Jr. 

Mr. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Harriet Spoehrer 

Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Dr. Mildred Mathias 
Prof. Phillippe Morat 

DIRECTOR 

Dr. Peter H. Raven 

MEMBERS' BOARD 

Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 

President 

Mrs. Antonio I. Longrais 

Mrs. Robert P. Tschudy 

Mrs. Robert Schulte 

Mr. Frederick H. At wood III 



23. 





4TH OF JULY 

A CELEBRATE WITH FAMILY & FRIENDS 

NOON TO 7 P.M. 

Presented by 

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN & TO W E R GROVE PARK 

Bring the whole family and enjoy a fun day with the Scott Air Force Starlifter Band, 
the Compton Heights Band and other music groups, plus food, clowns, carriage rides, a 
barbershop quartet, the "MoBot Express" Garden tour for children, pony rides, 
hands-on activities for children, and other delightful entertainment. 

Picnic in Tower Grove Park and the Missouri Botanical Garden. 

Free admission all day long. 



MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN -0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST. LOUIS, MO 



Missouri 
Botanical 
Garden 



VOLUME LXXIX 
NUMBER FOUR 




Inside 
This Issue 



11 
12 
14 
17 
20 



Salute to the Members' Board 

Outstanding achievements and dedi- 
cated service keep the Garden growing. 

Corporate Philanthropy 

The Monsanto Fund is profiled. 

Center for Home Gardening 
Is Open 

A ribbon-cutting ceremony welcomes 
the public. 

Home Gardening 

Hows and whys of using mulch. 

Center for Plant Conservation 

An update on running buffalo clover, and 
a profile of Ijjcile McCook. 

Festival of Festivals 

August brings a month-long celebration 
of international scope. 

Calendar of Events 

July and August include "For Kids' 
Sake" programs and other delights. 

From the Membership Office 

A trip to Madagascar is coming in 
October. 

Trustee Profile 

The Reverend Earl E. Nance, Jr. joins 
the Board. 

Tributes 

Friends and family are honored with a 
gift to the Garden. 



Comment 



® 



printed on recycled paper 



On the cover: Koi, the carp, are a 
popular feature of the Japanese garden. 

— Photo by King Schoenfeld 



199] Missouri Botanical Garden. 

The BULLETIN (ISSN 0026-6507) is published bi-monthly 
by tin- Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove 
Avenue, St. buns. MO 63110. Second class postage paid at 
St. Louis, MO. 

The BULLETIN is sent to every Member of the Garden 
as one of the benefits of membership. For a contribution of 
as little as $40 per year, Members also are entitled to: free 
admission to the Garden. Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special events and receptions; 
announcements of all lectures and classes; discounts in the 
( iarden Gate Shop and for course fees; and the opportunity 
to travel, domestic and abroad, with other Members. For 
information, please call (314) 577-5100. 

Postmaster: send address changes to Susan Caine. edi- 
tor. BULLETIN, P.O. Box 299. St. Louis, MO 63166. 




A Landmark Summer 

The opening of 
the William T. Kem- 
per Center for 
Home Gardening 
was an historic occa- 
sion and 4,500 M em- 
bers were among 
the first to tour the 
facilities on June 8. 
The Center has been on the drawing 
board for almost 20 years, since the Gar- 
den adopted the 1973 Master Plan that 
guides our remaining physical develop- 
ment through the end of this century. We 
were delighted with the interest and 
enthusiasm shared by so many who joined 
us for the Members' Preview. We are 
confident that Members will find the Cen- 
ter packed with valuable information 
about plants and about how this store of 
knowledge can be applied so that people 
may improve their lives, whether that be 
for aesthetic purposes, for food self- 
sufficiency, or to promote the health of 
one's immediate environment. 

The Garden's Members' Board coor- 
dinated the activities for the Members' 
Preview of the Center and their organiza- 
tional talent and leadership made the 
opening a delightful experience. The 
Members' Board involvement in special 
members activities, such as the Center 
for Home Gardening Preview, has signifi- 



cantly strengthened the membership pro- 
gram over the past several years. 

For another first of its kind, the Gar- 
den and Tower Grove Park, under the 
outstanding leadership offered by the 
Garden's Members' Board and the 
Friends of Tower Grove Park, are poised 
for the "St. Louis Old Fashioned Fourth" 
excitement. We invite you to join us for a 
delightful afternoon featuring entertain- 
ment, a wide array of speciality foods, and 
a taste of old fashioned fun. 

The "Festival of Festivals" should 
encourage you to visit at least once during 
August. Each weekend the Garden will 
celebrate the culture of a different coun- 
try with the traditional Japanese Festival 
taking place the first weekend of August, 
followed by a wonderful celebration of 
Greek, English, and Caribbean cultures 
(see page 11). This revised format from 
the former 10-day Japanese Festival 
offers varied programs and entertainment 
each weekend so that the exciting cul- 
tures of a wide range of countries can be 
experienced. 

Come and visit the Center and enjoy 
the other festivities throughout the 
summer. 




PAUL KOHL MEMORIAL GARDEN 






MISSOURI BOTANICAL^ARDEN 



• ■ 
- 





MI KOHL MEMORIAL GARDEN— On May 20, 1991, Garden Trustees, staff and friends 
dedicated the new park at the northwest corner of Shaw Boulevard and Tower Grove Avenue 
in the memory of Paul A. Kohl, long-time Garden horticulturist. Pictured at the ceremony are 
members of the Kohl family (left to right): Julia Kohl; Paul R. Kohl; Susan Waldron; Barbara 
Van de Reit; Rosalie Buckley; O. Sage Wightman III, president of the Board of Trustees; Peter 
H. Raven, director; Peggy Mehan. 



IN MEMORIAM 



Anne Lionberger Lehmann 



1894-1991 



The Garden lost one of its oldest 
friends on May 21 with the death of Mrs. 
Anne L. Lehmann. She and her husband, 
the late John S. Lehmann, enrolled in a 
botany course at the Garden in the spring 
of 1931, and their interest and involve- 
ment with the Garden grew and lasted a 
lifetime. 

Mr. Lehmann, who was president of 
Petrolite Corporation, became a member 
of the Board of Trustees in 1940 and 
served until 1958. He was president of the 
Board of Trustees from 1953 to 1958, and 
served briefly as acting director of the 
Garden. He became an Honorary, or 
Emeritus Trustee, in 1965. Following Mr. Lehmann's death in 
1967, Mrs. Lehmann continued his long tradition of devotion to 
the Garden. 

Peter Raven said, ' 'The Garden would not be what it is today 
without Mrs. Lehmann's many activities and financial contribu- 
tions. She helped reshape the Garden and make it the active, 
beautiful place we all enjoy so much." 

She was instrumental in forming the Women's Committee of 
Shaw's Garden and served on the Women's Executive Board of 
the Friends, both early efforts to increase community aware- 
ness of and participation in the Garden and its activities. Both of 
these bodies have been absorbed into our present, successful 
Members' organization. 

Her substantial contribution to the Garden's first capital cam- 
paign, begun in late 1967, helped make possible the construction 
of the research building, the John S. Lehmann Building, opened 
in May 1972. The presence of this beautiful and still-modern 
facility has allowed our important research and exploration 
activities to expand greatly in the nearly twenty years of its exis- 
tence. A major renovation of the Lehmann Building completed in 
1986 was also helped by Mrs. Lehmann's generosity, and she 
supported ongoing research activities by the staff as well. As the 
Lehmann Building was being completed, it was realized that 
additional greenhouse space would be needed for the expanded 




research programs, and Mrs. Lehmann 
contributed funds to construct this facility 
near the Lehmann Building. To honor her 
contributions to the research program, 
The Unseen Garden, a beautiful publica- 
tion describing these programs, was dedi- 
cated to her in 1987. 

Continuing Mr. Lehmann's long 
interest in roses, Mrs. Lehmann helped 
substantially with the establishment of 
the large rose garden that now bears her 
name. This garden, displaying over 
4000 roses, was dedicated in 1976, and 
its continued development won it the 
1983 Ail-American Rose Selections 
Public Rose Garden Award. 

Another display area in which Mrs. Lehmann was active is 
Tower Grove House. After 1889, the House was used as the 
director's residence and for other administrative functions. It 
was not open to the public until Mrs. Lehmann helped form a 
committee that raised funds to refurbish the House, and it was 
opened to the public in 1953. Mrs. Lehmann's interest in the 
House continued through the years, and she served on the 
Historical Committee, which continues in the ongoing restora- 
tion and maintenance of the House. 

To honor Mrs. Lehmann's support and activities, the Gar- 
den's Board of Trustees presented her its highest honor, the 
Henry Shaw Award, in 1981. She was the first woman to receive 
this award. In 1984, the Garden's Board of Trustees took the 
unprecedented step of electing her an Emeritus Trustee. No 
other person has been so elected without first having served as 
an active member of the Board. 

Mrs. Lehmann's financial contributions were enormous. Yet 
she was modest about them. After being thanked for a contribu- 
tion in 1981, she wrote the director, "I don't think I deserve any 
thanks, as the little I have done for the Garden has come back to 
me many times in dividends of pleasure.' ' 

— Marshall K. Crosby, Ph.D. 
Assistant Director 




The lehmann Rose Garden was dedicated 
June 4, 1976. Mrs. Lehmann is shown 
standing in the garden that was named in 
her honor that evening. 






Off, 



**T4/|; 



'ICal 



*ftflfly 



is 



tm 



>99l 



•Breakfast With Tiffany's" was a highlight of the 1988 
Fragrance Festival, chaired by Nora Stern. 




President of the Executive 
Board of the Members 

Mrs. RudyardK. Rapp 
Past Presidents 

Mrs. James Alfring 
Mrs. William Bixby 
Mrs. Oscar J. Conrad, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 
Mrs. Landon V. Jones 
Mrs. Robert H. Kittner 
Mrs. Shadrach F. Morris 
Mrs. Charles W. Oertli 
Mrs. Walter G. Stern 




Ted At wood, 
treasurer, with his 
daughter Kate at a 
Halloween MoBot 
Fun Day. 




Purple Martin Evening celebrated its 10th anniversary in 
1991. Every year hundreds of members turn out to wel- 
come the return of these popular birds. Chairwoman Jane 
Tschudy (left) and Purple Martin Curator \Y. Ashley Gray III 
chat with Zapper, the star of the evening. Mot pictured: 
co-chairman Ann Bowen. 



A Salute 




Extraordinary commitment 
by dedicated individuals 
j builds a thriving Garden 

T0 TyLP, for the community. 

Members 9 Board 

"Without our Members and the leadership provided by the Board, the 
Garden could never be the wonderful place it is today,' ' says Brenda Banjak 
membership coordinator. "The Board Members give extraordinary service 
to the Garden and to the community. They are a dynamic group to work 
with, and someone is always coming up with a great idea — the only probler 
is keeping up!" 

The past few years have seen tremendous achievements and unparallele 
activity by all of the members of the Board. Pictured here are some high- 
lights and some of the men and women whose efforts have strengthened th< 
Membership Program and enhanced the Garden for the entire community. 



Sue Rapp (left), president of the Members ' Board, leads 
the Festivities at the 1990 Mothers ' Day luncheon. Chair- 
men were Patty Arnold and Mary lx>ngrais. 



"Gardening and Entertaining with Martha Stewart," held 
at the Adam's Mark Hotel, was one of the most popular 
events of 1990, raising $38,000. The committee, shown at 
the home of chairman Barbara Cook, were (top row:) Sue 
Rapp, Mary Umgrais, Nora Stern, Peggy I^nts, Suzy 
Grote. Middle row: Holly Blumeyer, Sue Oertli, Ellen 
Dubinsky, Barbara Cook, Isabelle Morris, Mim Kittner, 
Susie Schulte. Front row: Ann Bowen, Ginny Senkosky, 
Holly Brigham, June hummer, Mary Randolph Ballinger. 



I BULLETIN I JULY AUGUST 1991 




The Membership Services Desk in the Ridgway Center 
has been extraordinarily effective in making visitors feel 
welcome. Fifty-one volunteers at the Desk sold 29 per- 
cent of all new memberships in 1990, giving 2,286 hours 
of service. Garden membership increased by eight per- 
cent, to an all-time high of 27,386. Shown here, Polly 
Raith (right) signs up another new member. 





Mini Kittner, left, with volunteer coordinator Jeannie 
McGilligan, at Volunteer Evening 1989. Mim accepted a 
special recognition award on behalf of the volunteers at 
the Membership Services Desk. 



Rose Evening is an 
annual tradition that 
becomes more popular 
every year as members 
and their families fill the 
Garden to picnic and 
enjoy the rose gardens. 
Pictured here, Patty and 
Todd Arnold present 
guests with a long 
stemmed red rose. 



The 1990 Safari Party 
celebrating the reopen- 
ing of the Climatron in 
late March featured zoo 
animals, Caribbean 
music, fanciful decora- 
tions and an enormous 
crowd. Chairman Sue 
Oertli (left), in safari 
attire, is shown with her 
daughter Gale Judd. 




Carriage rides 
were popular at 
the celebration of 
Henry Shaw's 
Birthday, July 24, 
1989. 





The 1990 Garden Tour chairmen were (left to right): Ann 
Bowen, Mary Randolph Ballinger, and Ellen Dubinsky. 
The tour highlighted nine private gardens and raised 
over $25,000. 



"Encore! A Garden Gala with Bobby Short" was a high- 
light of the summer of 1989. Chairman Nora Stern, shown 
here with Bobby Short, helped to raise over $120,000 
for the Garden. 




4 PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE BOARD shown at the 50th Anniver- 
sary Reception October 19H9 (left to right, front row): Mrs. James 
Alfring (Man Ella), Mrs. William Bixby (Helen), Mrs. Henry W. 
Dubinsky (Ellen), Mrs. Landon Y. Jones (Ellen). lA'ft to right, back 
row: Mrs. Walter G. Stern (Mora), Mrs. Shadraeh F. Morris (Isabelle), 
Mrs. Charles W. Oertli (Sue), Mrs. Robert H. Kittner (Mini). 



MEMBERS' 

BOARD 

continued 




Members ' Days are popular 
monthly events just for 
members. Many Members ' 
Days events are lectures and 
programs held in Shoenberg 
Auditorium (left). The Early 
Morning Stroll and other 
special tours bring out mem- 
bers of all ages and interests 
(above, right). Members ' 
Musical Evening (right) is a 
highlight of summer. 




The Monsanto Fund 



Corporate Philanthropy Profile 



Monsanto Company recognizes its 
responsibility to be a good corporate 
citizen by enhancing society's vitality and 
quality of life. In doing so, it seeks to earn 
acceptance and respect as an effective, 
caring corporate citizen everywhere it 
operates around the world. 

For more than two decades the Com- 
pany has relied upon Monsanto Fund, the 
Company's philanthropic arm, to help 
enrich the communities of which Mon- 
santo is a part and to help the Company 
earn its place in society. 

This year, Monsanto Fund will con- 
tribute more than $16 million to non-profit 
organizations in the United States and 
around the world. Additional donations of 
equipment, in-kind services, and loaned 
executives will represent several hundred 
thousand dollars more. 

"In Monsanto's philosophy, the health 
of a corporation is very much tied to the 
health of the communities in which it 
operates," observed 0. Sage Wightman 
III, president of the Garden's Board of 
Trustees. "Monsanto is genuinely con- 
cerned with the quality of life in its operat- 
ing locations, both here and abroad, and 
because of this concern it has been 
instrumental in creating that very quality 
of life. I can think of no better example 



than St. Louis, the company's headquar- 
ters, which has benefited inestimably 
through the years from Monsanto's 
involvement. 

"Monsanto and the Missouri Botani- 
cal Garden share more than St. Louis as 
our home," John L. Mason, President, 
Monsanto Fund, said. "We share an 
interest in world class science. At Mon- 
santo, we value not only the beauty the 
Garden brings to thousands of people, but 
the discipline and professionalism with 
which the Garden undertakes meaningful 
projects. Monsanto Fund values the per- 
sonal partnerships with the Garden that 
have resulted from more than 20 years of 
collaboration." 

Monsanto Fund places a heavy 
emphasis— nearly 40 percent of all grants 
awarded— on science education, where 
the need for programs of depth and excel- 
lence, at all scholastic levels, is essential if 
America is to remain internationally com- 
petitive in the next century. The Fund is 
keenly interested in supporting "cata- 
lyst" programs, that is, those yielding 
measurably increased or enhanced 
results. 

Social services, at about 30 percent of 
total awards, also are very important to 
the Fund. The balance of grants made are 
in the areas of arts and humanities, 



health, and youth and community 
projects, as well as through employee 
matching gifts. 

Remarked Peter H. Raven, "The 
Garden plays a number of roles— as a cul- 
tural, educational, and research 
institution— and we have been extremely 
fortunate for Monsanto's long-standing 
work with us in each of these sectors. We 
have received Monsanto support for our 
research and education efforts since the 
1970s, most recently in the form of a 
major contract to locate plants with sub- 
stances of potential medicinal use. 

"The Fund has also been a generous 
supporter of several very important con- 
struction drives over the past 25 years. 
With the Fund's help, we have built and 
renovated the John S. Lehmann Building, 
our research facility; built the Ridgway 
Center, with its main barrel-vaulted 
space, Monsanto Hall; and built the Wil- 
liam T. Kemper Center for Home Garden- 
ing, in which Monsanto supported the 
entrance gallery. 

"We are absolutely delighted to be 
associated with such a fore sighted organi- 
zation and look forward to many more 
years of their colleagueship in learning 
and transmitting important information 
about our environment and the scientific 
aspects of our world.' ' 



I ill ■I.I.ICT1N I JULY AUGUST 1991 




1^ 

WILLIAM T. KEMPER CENTER FOR HOME GARDENING 

GRAND OPENING 



A beautiful summer weekend welcomed crowds of members and visitors to the 
members' preview on June 8 and the dedication ceremony June 9, 1991, for the 
Kemper Center. Speaking at the ceremony on Sunday were Peter H. Raven, 
director; Joan Kelly Horn, U.S. Representative, 2nd District; 0. Sage Wightman 
II, president of the Board of Trustees; Michael D. Fields, executive director of the 
William T. Kemper Foundation; John L. Mason, president, Monsanto Fund; Louis 
^. Saur, architect for the Kemper Center; Rufus Jones, chair, research director 
ind administrator, University Extension; John F. Bass, Missouri State Senator, 
1th District; Thomas P. Stoff, Missouri State Representative, 64th District; and 
Stephen J. Conway, Alderman, 8th Ward, and Geraldine F. Osborn, Alderman, 
5th Ward, City of St. Louis. 

In his remarks, Dr. Raven said, ' 'In future decades it will be increasingly essen- 
ial that we properly manage the natural resources found in our own backyards, 
ust as we seek to conserve those deemed part of the public birthright ... A great 
lumber of members, friends, corporations, and foundation made the Kemper Cen- 
er possible through their generous gifts and enthusiastic support. [They J have not 
imply given us a building— [they] have given us the means to serve the broadest 
iossible spectrum of groups in our community as we seek to enrich our daily lives 
nd deal kindly with our Earth.' ' 






Visitors crowded into the Center to 
enjoy and learn from exhibits, living 
plant displays, resource materials, 
video displays, the Plant Doctor, 
Master Gardeners and more. 





Above: Crowds lined up to enter the 
Kemper Center both Saturday and 
Sunday. Left: Applauding the cutting 
of the garland of vegetables, flowers 
and greenery are (left to right): Peter 
Raven; O. Sage Wightman III; Michael 
Fields; John Bass; Rufus Jones; 
Steven D. Cline, manager of the 
Center; Louis Saur; John Mason; Joan 
Kelly Horn; Tom Stoff; Geraldine 
Osborn; Stephen Conway. 




KEMPER CENTER HOURS: 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., seven days 
a week. Master Gardeners will 
be available Monday through 
Saturday only. 



Traditionally we think of 
mulch as material used to pro- 
tect plants during winter. But 
mulch also conserves mois- 
ture, improves the soil, and is a 
means of recycling yard waste. 

Forests go through a 
natural process of providing 
their own mulch. Leaves, 
evergreen needles and bark 
layer the forest floor to provide 
a covering of rich organic 
materials. This plant debris will 
decay over time recycling 
nutrients back into the soil, 
insulating it from heat and cold, 
conserving soil moisture and 
acting as a weed barrier. When 
we mulch our gardens, we sim- 
ply follow nature's practice and 
receive all the benefits. 



ORGANIC MULCHES 

The most common organic 
mulches include peat or 
sphagnum moss, wood chips 
and shavings, sawdust, shred- 
ded or chipped bark, straw, 
hay, lawn clippings, pine nee- 
dles or limbs, corn cobs, paper 
and newsprint, and leaves. 
Garden centers offer a wide 
assortment of different types 
of packaged organic mulches 
as well as some regional 
specialities such as rice hulls, 
walnut shells, peanut hulls or 
cocoa bean shells. 

In summer, organic 
mulches keep the ground 
cooler in the daytime and 
warmer at night. In winter, 
they keep the ground warmer 
and less subject to heaving. 
The greatest value of organic 
mulch is a continual addition of 
organic matter to the soil, 
which improves soil structure 
and the quality of the rooting 
zone by opening up air spaces 
and stabilizing the soil mois- 
ture. At the end of the season 
organic mulches can be left in 
place. Alternatively, synthetic 
mulches should be taken up 
after each growing season. 



Home Gardening 




Mulches 



SYNTHETIC MULCHES 

Synthetic mulches include 
clear or colored polyethylene 
plastic films and spun or woven 
polypropylenes, more com- 
monly known as landscape fab- 
rics. You could also include in 
this category carpet pieces and 
heavy duty aluminum foil, 
which some people continue to 
use. These can be quite effec- 
tive in suppressing weeds and 
conserving moisture. 

In contrast to organic 
mulches, synthetic mulches 
tend to keep the soil even 
warmer in summer because 
they magnify and trap heat. 
The degree of heating depends 
upon the type of synthetic 
mulch and its color. Clear plas- 
tic raises the temperature the 
most. Temperatures may reach 
about 10 degrees higher than 
bare soil in summer. Black 
plastic will raise the soil tem- 
perature about five degrees, 
while other materials listed as 
synthetic mulches only elevate 



soil temperatures by one or 
two degrees. 

Dark colored plastic 
mulches will enhance weed 
suppression and may increase 
yields of heat-loving crops like 
peppers, tomatoes, and 
melons. They also retain more 
moisture than other mulch 
materials, and they are conve- 
nient to acquire and use. 

However, plastic mulches 
have some important disadvan- 
tages. They make it hard to 
regulate soil moisture, and the 
plastic traps air and water and 
does not allow roots to 
breathe. Plastic should only be 
used as a short-term mulch 
between rows of vegetables or 
around small fruit trees. It 
should always be removed at 
the end of the growing season, 
and this may be difficult as UV 
light from the sun makes plas- 
tic brittle if it has not been cov- 
ered with a light surface mulch. 

As an answer to these 
problems, a new synthetic 



TEN BENEFITS OF USING MULCH 

1) Helps control weeds. 

2) Regulates soil temperatures. 

3) Retains moisture. 

4) Reduces soil erosion. 

5) Reduces plant diseases and fruit rot. 

6) Adds nutrients to the soil. 

7) Improves soil tilth. 

8) Reduces heaving of soils from frost. 

9) Protects against soil compaction. 

10) Improves the appearance of any planting site. 



material made from polypropy- 
lene or polyester has been 
developed. This material is 
permeable to air and water, but 
blocks light so that most broad- 
leaf weeds are suppressed 
with the exception of very 
aggressive grasses and nut- 
sedge. Landscape fabrics can 
be used around perennial plant- 
ings because they allow more 
air exchange in and out of the 
soil. They generally last for 
many years provided that they 
are covered with some other 
materials like bark chips or 
rock. Fertilizers can still be 
applied by traditional methods 
and move through the fabric 
without difficulty. However, 
they generally cost more than 
plastic films. 



INORGANIC MULCHES 

A layer of gravel or pebbles 
is often applied in areas where 
the most durable mulch is 
required. These materials 
make it difficult to work in soil 
amendments and they do not 
control weeds well, but they 
are relatively inexpensive and 
should be considered as a per- 
manent mulch for woody plant- 
ing beds. 



APPLYING ORGANIC MULCH 

Organic mulches should be 
placed around annuals only 
after the soil has warmed up in 
the spring. If they are applied 
too early, they will block the 
sunlight and the soil will remain 
cold, slowing plant growth. 
The best time to apply organic 
mulch is after mid-May in the 
St. Louis area. 

Generally a three-inch layer 
of compost, chipped or shred- 
ded bark or peat moss is suffi- 
cient to protect against 
moisture loss and temperature 
fluctuations in the summer. If 
hay or straw is being used, 
increase the layer depth to four 



\1U l.l.l/llS JULY AUGUST1991 



to six inches. This material 
tends to be loose and packs 
down with time. 

Grass clippings must be 
mixed with coarser materials, 
as they tend to pack down and 
repel water. Mix grass clip- 
pings with leaves, wood chips 
or some other brown plant 
debris and let age for two to 
four weeks. Watch out for clip- 
pings that have been treated 
with broadleaf herbicide. They 
may affect the plants you 
mulch, especially tender and 
actively growing vegetables. 

Apply mulch to perennials 
after the first frost about mid- 
November. Whole strawberry 
plants should be covered with 
four to five inches of straw in 
the fall. Rose canes cut back to 
18 inches in the fall should be 



covered to a depth of about 
eight inches with straw or sim- 
ilar material to protect the 
crowns. 

APPLYING SYNTHETIC MULCH 

Plastic layer mulches 
should be laid down at or 
before planting time. The real 
value of plastic is that it can 
warm a spring soil very 
quickly. This allows you to 
plant early in the season if the 
tops of your plants are pro- 
tected in some other way. 
Before applying a plastic 
mulch, the soil should be ferti- 
lized and tilled. Once the plas- 
tic layer is in place, fertilization 
and soil moisture is more diffi- 
cult to regulate. Small cuts in 
the plastic may solve the prob- 
lem. Water the area and watch 



where the water collects in low 
areas. This is where the cuts 
should be made. Secure the 
edges of the sheet. 

Some gardeners may wish 
to cover the entire planting 
surface prior to transplanting. 
In this case, holes must be 
punched in the sheeting with a 
knife in order to plant. 

Landscape fabrics are typi- 
cally woven and need not be 
replaced annually. It is best to 
cover the fabric with rock, 
straw, or wood chips so that 
UV light will not make it 
brittle. 

MULCH TYPES FOR 
DIFFERENT CROPS 

Organic mulches tend to 
keep the soils relatively cool in 
the spring and these work best 



for cool-season crops such as 
beets, broccoli, cabbages, car- 
rots, cauliflower, kohlrabi, let- 
tuce, onions, peas, potatoes 
and spinach. Synthetic 
mulches tend to warm the soil 
and are best used with warm- 
season vegetables such as 
tomatoes, peppers, squash, 
okra, peppers, pumpkins and 
eggplants. 

The mulch you choose for 
each gardening purpose should 
be readily available for 
reasonable cost. Also consider 
whether the mulch needs to 
last for more than one season. 
Those which are more durable 
can be used with perennials 
and woody ornamentals. 

—Steven D. Cline, Ph.D. 

Manager, Center for 

Home Gardening 



Timely Tips from the Answer Service 



Do you have a plant question? Call the 
Horticultural Answer Service, Monday 
through Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon, at 
577-5143. 



July Tips 

■ Provide water in the garden for the 
birds, especially during dry weather. 

■ Keep weeds from making seeds now. 
This will mean less weeding next year. 

■ Keep deadheading spent annual 
flowers for continued bloom. 

■ Apply no fertilizers to trees and 
shrubs after July 4th. Fertilizing late may 
cause lush growth that is apt to winter 
kill. 

■ Don't pinch mums after mid-July or 
you may delay flowering. 

■ Summer pruning of shade trees can be 
done now. 

■ Blossom-end rot of tomatoes and pep- 
pers occurs when soil moisture is uneven. 
Water when soils begin to dry; maintain a 
two to three inch layer of mulch. 

■ Water lawns frequently enough to pre- 
vent wilting. Early morning irrigation 
allows turf to dry before nightfall and will 
reduce the chance of disease. 



■ While spraying roses with fungicides, 
mix extra and spray hardy phlox to pre- 
vent powdery mildew. 

■ Fertilize container plants every two 
weeks with a water soluble fertilizer. 

■ Prune climbing roses and rambler 
roses after bloom. 

■ Hot, dry weather is ideal for spider 
mite development. Damage may be 
present even before webs are noticed. 
With spider mite damage, leaves may be 
speckled above and yellowed below. 
Evergreen needles appear dull gray- 
green to yellow or brown. 

August Tips 

■ Deadhead annuals and perennials as 
needed. 

■ Roses should receive no further nitro- 
gen fertilizer after August 15th. 

■ Divide bearded iris. 

■ Annuals may appear leggy and worn. 
They can be cut back and fertilized to pro- 
duce a new flush of bloom. 

■ Evergreens can be planted or trans- 
planted now to ensure good rooting 
before winter arrives. Water both the 
plant and the planting site several days 
before moving. 



■ Prune to shape hedges for the last 
time this season. 

■ Zoysia lawns can receive their fall fer- 
tilizer application. 

■ Dormant lawns should be soaked now 
to encourage strong fall growth. 

■ Soak shrubs periodically during dry 
spells to a depth of eight to ten inches. 

■ Feed mums, asters and other fall- 
blooming perennials for the last time. 

■ Sow seeds of beans, beets, spinach & 
turnips now for the fall garden. Spinach 
may germinate better if seeds are 
refrigerated for one week before planting. 

■ Compost or till under residues from 
harvested crops. 

—Chip Tynan, The Answer Service 




BULLETIN I JULY-AUGUST 1991 



Center for Plant Conservation 



EDITOR 'S NOTE: This report on the 
Garden 's work with the Center for Plant 
Conservation is the first in a series by 
Dr. Lucile McCook, who joined the staff 
in February as horticultural taxonomist. 
The Garden is one of 20 botanical institu- 
tions participating in the Center's 
National Collection. 




Running buffalo 
clover, Trifolium 
stoloniferum 



You Can Run, But You 
Just Can't Hide 

By Lucile McCook, Ph.D. 

The saying is true, at least, for the 
running buffalo clover, Trifolium stolonife- 
rum. Once widely distributed and abun- 
dant in Missouri, this species had not 
been found in our state since the turn of 
the century. However, this spring six 
plants were discovered in the yard of the 
botanist who is writing the new Flora of 
Missouri! 

Dr. George Yatskievych, a botanist 
with the Missouri Department of Conser- 
vation, conducts his work on Missouri 
plants in the research department of the 
Garden and lives in the Shaw Neighbor- 
hood. Last year, George bought a load of 
topsoil to enrich his clay-filled flower 
beds. As he was spreading the topsoil and 
pulling out a number of "weeds' ' that had 
come up in the load, he noticed several 
small clovers that looked different from 
the common species he would have 
expected to find. Luckily for us, George 
left them in place until they bloomed in 
late April, and he positively identified 
them as Trifolium stoloniferum, the only 
known population of running buffalo clo- 
ver in the state. 

And so the search was on. After learn- 
ing that the topsoil had come from a site 



along the Meramec River in Jefferson 
County, a search party was assembled 
from the staff of the Garden and the Mis- 
souri Department of Conservation. Two 
days were spent combing the area, but no 
plants were found of this clover that had 
once occurred in abundance from Okla- 
homa to West Virginia. 

In the absence of a viable population of 
running buffalo clover, how can we explain 
the six seedlings? Possibly, the soil con- 
tained seeds in its "seedbank" that only 
germinated when the soil was disturbed 
and the seeds were exposed to heat and 
light. The seeds could have been washed 
in from a population farther upstream, 
where we know the clover once existed. 

At any rate, the six seedlings are 
already being used to further our efforts 
to save this endangered species. A single 
leaf from each plant was sent to Dr. James 
Hickey and his colleagues at Miami 
University in Ohio for genetic analysis. 
Their data are being incorporated into a 
plan to reintroduce the running buffalo 
clover into historical sites in Missouri. 

Running buffalo clover has been in 

P • R ■ • 



protective cultivation at the Garden for 
three years, through our affiliation with 
the Center for Plant Conservation. Last 
summer, 14 mature plants were placed in 
three sites by the Department of Con- 
servation to test a reintroduction pro- 
gram (see the Bulletin, November/ 
December 1990). 

The Garden is continuing to work with 
a "Recovery Team" for the reintroduc- 
tion of endangered plants to the wild. The 
project includes people from the Missouri 
Botanical Garden, the Missouri Depart- 
ment of Conservation, the U. S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, and the U. S. Forest 
Service. It is an exciting venture, with all 
these groups working together to provide 
the resources and expertise that are 
unique to each organization. 

In addition to propagating endangered 
plants in our living collection, the Garden 
is also working with researchers and wild- 
life managers to incorporate genetic data 
into the reintroduction and management 
plan. It is our hope to remove running 
buffalo clover from the Endangered Spe- 
cies List in the future. 



I • L 




Lucile McCook 

Horticultural Taxonomist 

"I love telling people about plants," 
Lucile McCook says with enthusiasm. 
"My work here at the Garden is a won- 
derful opportunity to combine botany, 
horticulture and education." 

Lucile manages the Plant Records 
Department, which keeps track of all the 
plants on the grounds and in the green- 
houses. She prepares signs and interpre- 
tive exhibits and is responsible for 
bringing native Missouri plants into 
propagation at the Garden. She also man- 
ages the Garden's collection of endan- 
gered plants for the Center for Plant 
Conservation, which includes non- 



destructive collecting of plants in the 
region, growing threatened species here 
at the Garden, and cooperative work with 
the Department of Conservation and U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service. 

Lucile joined the staff in February 
after completing a postdoctoral fellowship 
at the Smithsonian's Museum of Natural 
History, doing research on orchids. She 
earned her Ph.D. in systematic botany 
from Cornell in 1989, working at the Lib- 
erty Hyde Bailey Hortorium. She 
received her undergraduate degree in 
horticulture and worked as a grower at 
the Louisiana Nature and Science Center 
in New Orleans. "I'm floored by the rich- 
ness of Missouri's flora," Lucile says 
enthusiastically. "It's incredibly rich and 
interesting." 

"Coming to the Garden is a tremen- 
dous opportunity," she continues. "It's a 
privilege to work with the horticulture 
staff — they're great professionals, 
extraordinarily knowledgeable. And the 
Garden itself is a visionary institution, not 
afraid to be first to try new things, to use 
imagination to stretch our resources. I'm 
delighted to be here, and I'm excited 
about helping to educate people about our 
plants." 



10. 



\BULLETIN /JULY AUGUST199) 



FIRST WEEKEND: AUGUST 2-4 
Japanese Festival — "Living Arts" 

The 17th Annual Japanese Festival celebrates Japan's 
strong cultural heritage of passing art forms from genera- 
tion to generation. Performers and artisans will share a 
broad spectrum of the arts, including bonsai demonstra- 
tions by a master instructor, martial arts and cooking 
demonstrations, the Candyman from Epcot Center, a 
kimono fashion show, and the return of the popular San 
Francisco Taiko Drummers. Four artists will present 
"Daido Gei" Japanese street festival performances. There 
will be morning tours of the Japanese Garden, and the 
popular candlelight walks will be held in the evening. There 
will be a $1 fee for performances in the auditorium. 



SECOND WEEKEND: AUGUST 9-11 
Greek Festival— "A Celebration of Life" 

Friday and Saturday evenings Spoehrer Plaza will be 
transformed into a Greek taverna, where food, music and 
dance take center stage. The Shoenberg Temperate House 
will be open and lighted, its Mediterranean courtyard filled 
with the music of the bouzouki, a traditional Greek instru- 
ment. On Saturday and Sunday visit the "Plaka," a market- 
place featuring the arts and crafts of Greece. Throughout 
the weekend the festival will host performances by out- 
standing Greek entertainers: the Levendia Folkdance 
Troupe from Tampa, Florida, and the Grecian Keys musical 
ensemble from Youngstown, Ohio. There will be traditional 
Greek fashion displays, art exhibits, storytelling, trave- 
logues, cooking demonstrations and more. Some children's 
workshops will require advance reservations. 




Festival/Festivals 

It's new, it's exciting, it's a month-long gala in August at the Garden! Make your plans now 
to celebrate the cultures of four different countries, Japan, Greece, England, and the Carib- 
bean, on four different weekends. There will be something for everyone, with music, arts and 
crafts, food, entertainment, exhibits and more. 

Each weekend's celebration begins on Friday, 6 to 10 p.m., continues Saturday 11 a.m. to 
10 p.m., and concludes on Sunday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Regular Garden admission will be 
charged. The Garden will open at 9 a.m. daily as usual. 

Support for the Festival of Festivals has been assisted by a challenge grant from the Fannie 
May/Coleman Foundation. Other sponsors will be announced. 



THIRD WEEKEND: AUGUST 16-18 
English Festival: "Henry Shaw's 
England" 

The weekend opens Friday and Saturday evenings with 
candlelight walks through the English Woodland Garden, 
featuring strolling musicians and actors in period costume. 
The festival will feature performances by Peter Bellamy, 
visiting from Manchester, England, who presents the 
poetry of Rudyard Kipling accompanied by music. Other 
performers will be the St. Louis English Country Dance 
Society, Morris dancers, films, storytelling, and demon- 
strations of English crafts including lacemaking, weaving, 
musical instrument makers, barrel makers and more. 



FOURTH WEEKEND: AUGUST 23-25 
Caribbean Festival: "Colors of 
the Caribbean" 

Take a fanciful trip to the U.S. Virgin Islands and the 
Bahamas. Experience the excitement of colorful Caribbean 
parade groups, steel drum bands, folk dancers, a stilt 
walker, straw craft demonstrations, and more surprises. 



Festival Hotline opens Monday, July 29. 

Call 577-5125 for schedules and information. 



11. 



BULLETIN I JULY-AUGUST 199] 



at *« carder. pwith 

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Express! he Gard en 

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suieto^^l 

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tour otthe gr fctory 

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Me6tat Tenet F«e «.* 



MONDAY 

"Lillies of the Garden" Exhibit 

9 a.m. to 8 p.m., daily through July 
28, Ridgway Center. St. Louis pho- 
tographer Chuck Dresner displays 
color pictures of water lilies taken at 
the Garden, which were featured in 
Audubon Magazine. Regular 
Garden admission. 



3 



.ok 



^S7 



Missouri Botanical Garden 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

July-August 1991 




JULY 4/ "An Old Fashioned 4th of July" 

Noon to 7 p.m., Tower Grove Park and Garden grounds. Bring 
family and friends for a celebration with bands, food, carriage 
rides, barbershop quartet, pony rides, and more fun activities for 
all ages! Picnic in Tower Grove Park and the Garden; free admis- 
sion all day long. 



JULY 



i / 1 



SUNDAY 






Kids in Konzert 

11 a.m. to 4 p.m., grounds. A vari- 
ety of music, song, and dance per- 
formed by children. Regular Garden 
admission. 



10 



WEDNESDAY 



Children's Film Festival: "The 



Little Mermaid" 

See July 3 for details. 






W E I) N E S D A Y 



Children's Film Festival: 
"Peter Pan" 

11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Shoenberg 
Auditorium. Doors open 30 minutes 
before show time. Tickets go on 
sale June 17 at the Ticket Counter, 
or will be sold at the door. $1 mem- 
bers, $2 non-members. 



JULY 11 / MEMBERS DAY Moonlight Stroll 

9 to 11 p.m., grounds. Come enjoy a beautiful summer 
night complete with a full moon. Stroll the lighted grounds— 
but bring a flashlight for easy rambling. The Climatron will 
be open; cash bars available. For members only. 



15 



MONDAY 



Folklore & Legends ' 

9a.m. to 4 p.m., Shoenberg A 
rium and Ridgway Center. Stoi 
ling featuring ethnic folk tales 1 
Jackie-Torrence, Bobby Norfol 
the St. Louis Gateway Story te 
Dolls and artifacts from arounc 
world are on display in Monsai 
Hall. Events in the auditorium 
$1 per person. Tickets go on s 
June 17 at the Ticket Counter. 
Events outside the auditorium 
free with regular Garden admi 

Alt 



17 



W E D N E S D A 



Children's Film Festival: 
"Dr. Doolittle" 

See July 3 for details. i 



18 



V/ 



THURSDAY 



Puppets Galore 

11 am. to 4 p.m., Ridgway Ce 
and grounds. Puppet shows 
throughout the day by Krame 
Marionettes, Paul Mesner Pu 
and Hystopolis. Lifesize costu 
puppets will roam the ground; 
puppetry workshops will be h 
Call 577-5125 for more inform 
and workshop registration. R< 
Garden admission, plus $1 pe 
son for auditorium performan 
and $5 per person for worksh 
Tickets for auditorium perfor- 
mances go on sale June 17 at 1 
Ticket Counter. 




20 



S A T U R D A Y 



Parenting Fair 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Ridgway Ce 
Eighth annual event showcas< 
exhibits, activities and semin; 
all ages, presented by KMOX 
Radio, St. Louis Post-Dispatcl 
KSD-TV to benefit Kids In th 
die. Sponsored by Chex Cere 
Monsanto, Pet, Inc., and Pro* 
Gamble. Storytelling, clowns 
toon characters, musicians, ft 
learning activities. Admission 
to noon: $2 adults, $1 childre: 
under 12. Admission betweei 
and 5 p.m.: $3 adults, $1.50 c 
under 12. 



12. 



I BULLETIN I JULY AUGUST1991 



SUNDAY 

iciety Rhizome Sale 

i. f Ridgway Center. The 
ir St. Louis Iris Society holds 
lual sale of surplus rhizomes 
he Garden's displays; all pro- 
benefit the Garden. Come 
as supplies sell out quickly! 





24 



W E D N E S D A Y 



Henry Shaw's Birthday Celebra- 
tion/"For Kids' Sake" Day 

11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Ridgway Center 
and grounds. Celebrate the 191st 
birthday of the Garden's founder, 
Henry Shaw, with magic shows, 
"Double Dutch" jump rope demon- 
strations, a special "Garden Rap" 
by St. Ixiuis Magnet School stu- 
dents, and more surprises. From 10 
a.m. to 2 p.m. Tower Grove House 
Auxiliary will sell cookies, lemonade 
and iced tea on the lawn of Shaw's 



country home, to benefit Tower 
Grove House. Regular Garden 
admission. 

Children's Film Festival: 

"MHO&OtiS" X [fyr 



See July 3 for details. 



N 1 



31 




W E I) N E S I) A Y 



Children's Film Festival: 
"Ducktales: The Movie" 

See July 3 for details. 



AUGUST 



ii 



Festival of Festivals" 



First four weekends. A joyous celebration of the cultures of four different countries with music, 
food, entertainment and more. Regular Garden admission. Call Festival Hotline at 577-5125 
starting Monday, July 29 for schedules and information. See page 11 for more details. 



FRIDAY- 

l SUNDAY 

ese Festival: "Living Arts" 

p.m. Friday; 11 a.m. to 10 
aturday; 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
y; Ridgway Center and 
Is. See page 11 for details, 
'light walks in the Japanese 
1 Friday and Saturday 
gs. 



THURSDAY 

cape Photography Lecture 

p.m., Shoenberg Audito- 
ohn Smithers, award-winning 
tker and authority on wild- 
and landscape photography, 
;es his work. $18 members, 
n-members. Limited seating; 
e registration requested. Call 
1512. 



9-11 



FRIDAY- 
SUNDAY 



Greek Festival: "A Celebration 
of Life" 

6 to 10 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m. to 10 
p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Sunday; Ridgway Center and 
grounds. See page 11 for details. 
Garden grounds and Temperate 
House will be lighted for strolling 
Friday and Saturday evenings. 



3-4 



SATURDAY 
& SUNDAY 



Landscape Photography 
Workshop 

6:30 to 10:30 a.m., Shaw Arbore- 
tum, 5 to 7:30 p.m., MBG; both 
days. Join John Smithers for a com- 
prehensive workshop in wildflower 
and landscape photography. 
$150 members, $175 non-members, 



BREAKFAST 



lRDE N WALKERS ■"-"££; 7 to 10 :30 a.m. 
ery Wednesday and ***£*, and Saturday morn- 
The Garden opens early on «»' ds are 

, s . The mileage of various P^°~ e « Restaurant offers 
a,lab.e at the ticket counter Th ^rde .^ and 

■■heart healthy" breakfast buffed ce g 

pgurt . The greenhouses don* £«»£ J^ day and 

9-00 a.m. Admission is tree oeiu red bythe 

luly Call 577-5125 for information. Sponsore 
merican Heart Association. 



16-18 



FRIDAY- 
SUNDAY 



English Festival: "Henry Shaw's 
England" 

6 to 10 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m. to 10 
p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Sunday; Ridgway Center and 
grounds. See page 11 for details. 
Candlelight walks in the English 
Woodland Garden, Friday and 
Saturday evenings. 



includes lecture on August 1. 
Advance registration required, 
reservations are limited. Call 
the Arboretum at 1-742-3512 for 
more information. 



23-25 



FRIDAY- 
SUNDAY 



Caribbean Festival "Colors of 
the Caribbean" 

6 to 10 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m. to 10 
p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Sunday; Ridgway Center and 
grounds. See page 11 for details. 



31 



SATURD A Y 



Henry Shaw Cactus Society 
Show 

9 a.m. to 8 p.m. through Labor Day; 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. through September 
8. Orthwein Floral Hall. A magnifi- 
cent display of rare, unusual, and 
interesting plants. Regular Garden 
admission. 



AUGUST 10 /MEMBERS' DAY 
Early Morning Stroll 

5:10 (sunrise) to 9 a.m. Watch the sun come up and 
savor the early morning peace of the Garden in summer- 
time. Free coffee will be provided. For members only. 




13. 



BULLETIN JULY AUGUST 1991 



From the Membership Office 



MEMBERS' TRAVEL PROGRAM 

Madagascar: Spiny Desert and 
Rain Forest 

October 18 to November 1, 1991 

The Garden's tour of Madagascar takes you to a spectacular island in the Indian 
Ocean that contains one of the world's richest and most threatened tropical floras. 
Nearly three-quarters of this island's 10,000 plant species are found nowhere else in 
the world, including almost 1,000 orchids and a tremendous range of beautiful and 
bizarre succulents. The Garden is assisting the Malagasy people and the international 
community in a last-ditch effort to save one of the world's great wonders, the rain 
forest of the Masoala peninsula. Join Garden botanists Dr. Porter P. Lowry II and 
Dr. George Schatz in a two-week visit of some of Madagascar's most spectacular 
areas. Learn what the Garden is doing to help science and conservation in this 
enchanting faraway land. A partial itinerary 7 includes: 

■ Optional two-day pre-tour in Paris, featuring a day's outing to the celebrated 
"Gardens of Paris," including Versailles and Monet's Giverny. 

■ In Madagascar, travel to Ft. Dauphin at the extreme southern tip of the island, a 
charming town that has changed little since it was settled in the 1600s. 

■ Drive to Berenty Reserve, traversing one of the most remarkable vegetation tran- 
sitions in the world. Travel from rain forest to spiny desert, and spend the night in 
bungalows on the edge of the forest. 

■ Visit the Special Reserve of Perinet, observing chameleons, lemurs, and over 100 
species of birds. 

■ Fly to Maroansetra, headquarters of the Garden's conservation project on the 
nearby Masoala Peninsula, which contains some of the country's largest remaining 
tracts of undisturbed rain forest. 

■ Picnic on the island of Nosy Mangabe in the Bay of Antongil, a reserve created 
to protect perhaps the strangest of Madagascar's 30 species of lemurs, the 

continued above 

Lord & Taylor Galleria Opening Benefits the Garden 

Come to a gala reception to preview the new Lord & Taylor store at the St. Louis 
Galleria on Wednesday, July 24, 1991, black tie. The party begins at 7:00 p.m. Return 
the form below or call 577-9500. 



nocturnal ' 'aye aye.' ' 
■ In capital city of Antanarivo, visit the 
Museum of Art and Archaeology, with an 
afternoon at Tzimbazaza Botanical Gar- 
den and Zoological Park. 

Call Brenda Banjak at 577-9517 for 
registration information for this fabulous 
adventure. 

Henry Shaw Committee 
Recognized 

The Garden's Board of Trustees, 
meeting on April 17, received a report 
from John K. Wallace, Jr. , chairman of the 
Henry Shaw Committee, on the results of 
the Committee's 1990 campaign. Mem- 
bers of the Committee were recognized 
for their hard work and dedication to this 
year's successful fund raising effort. In 
addition to Mr. Wallace, the 1990 Com- 
mittee included Patrick Ackerman, 
Frederick Atwood, Clarence Barksdale, 
Stephen Brauer, Jules Campbell, Samuel 
Hayes, Scott Jones, David Kemper, 
Douglas MacCarthy, James Mauze, Nora 
Stern, Walter Stern, Andrew Taylor, John 
Thiebauth, Robert Tschudy, 0. Sage 
Wightman III, Kay Wren, and Hal Wuer- 
tenbaecher, Jr. 

The Henry Shaw Committee plays an 
invaluable role in acquiring financial sup- 
port for the Garden's programs and serv- 
ices. These funds provide necessary 
revenue for Garden operations. Funds are 
also made available from tax support 
through the Botanical Garden Subdistrict 
of the Metropolitan Zoological Park and 
Museum District, membership support, 
admission fees, and grants from founda- 
tions and corporations. 



Reservation Form — "A Salute to the Missouri Botanical Garden" 

Tickets are $100 per person. Payment may be made by VISA, MasterCard by calling 577-9500, or by check. Make check payable to: Missouri Botanical Garden. 
RESERVATIONS ARE LIMITED. A confirmation will be mailed in June. 

N;mie(si __ 



Address. 
City 



State. 



.Zip. 



Number of tickets $100 each. 
Total payment 



I cannot attend, but will make a contribution of:. 



$75 of each $100 ticket is tax deductible. 

Additional information: Brenda Banjak, Membership Coordinator, 577-9517 



Mail to: "Salute to the Garden, Missouri Botanical Garden, 
P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166-0299. 



11. 



\BULLETIN 'JULY AUGUST 1991 



Volunteer Service 
Recognition 




Charlotte Mandel, honored for 30 years of 
service to the Garden. 





JAPANESE BOAT BASIN — Visitors to the Japanese Garden may have wondered about the 
striking new installation on the north shore of the lake. The handsome sculptured stone 
basin, designed by the late Koichi Kawana, is a gift of the Jones-Weakley family and friends 
in memory of Edward D. Weakley and A. Clifford Jones, Jr. The boat basin, sculptured of gran- 
ite, is unusual in this country and remarkable for its size: seven feet in length, weighing four 
tons on a three-ton base. When complete, the setting will be enhanced by a bamboo and wood 
water spout, Watanga ebony boulders, Mexican Black Beach pebbles and Beaver Creek 
border stones. Boat basins symbolize the god of good fortune. 



At a ceremony on April 24, 1991, the Garden paid tribute to the volunteers who have com- 
pleted milestones of service to the Garden. Honored for 30 years as a Garden volunteer was 
Charlotte Mandel (at left), who was unable to attend the award ceremony. Pictured above at 
the ceremony (front row, left to right): Carolyn Yassallo, 10 years; Catherine Schumann, 20 
years; Rena Gross, Mary Ann Pelot, and Ethel Herr, all 10 years. (Back row, left to right): 
Elmer Wiltsch, Joy Last, Betty Nellums, and Terry Conway, all 10 years; Norma Hill, 20 
years; and Marshall Magner, Doris Johnston, Ruth Jonas, Alfred Loft us, and Nancy Weith, all 
10 years. Not pictured: 10-year honorees Albert Baeyen, Charlotte Baeyen, Joanna Turner 
and Jean Zinsmeyer. 

Sturtevant Papers Added 
to the Archives 

The Garden recently purchased addi- 
tional personal papers of Edward Lewis 
Sturtevant (1842-1898), including more 
than 200 letters, 63 documents, 6 photo- 
graphs, and a small trunk. These items 
date from the period of the 1850s through 
the 1890s and provide interesting infor- 
mation on Dr. Sturtevant 's life, the gift of 
his library to the Garden, and the Civil 
War period. The Garden Archives already 
had a number of Dr. Sturtevant's botani- 
cal notes and correspondence. Dr. 
Sturtevant was a benefactor of the Gar- 
den, having given his Prelinnaean Library 
to the Garden in 1892. Prelinnaean refers 
to works published before 1753, the publi- 
cation date of Carl Linneaus' Species 
Plantarum, the work that signaled the 
beginning of modern botanical nomencla- 
ture. In a 1892 letter to William Trelease, 
the Garden's director, he wrote, "For 
some time it has seemed to me that my 
library of early botanical literature would 
be more used at the Missouri Botanical 
than elsewhere as your institution will 
become interested in the history of plants 
and their development.' ' 

The new Sturtevant materials were 
purchased through the generosity of Gar- 
den members who contribute to the 
library's special collections fund, and they 
are available to researchers. 

— Constance P. Wolf, Garden Librarian 



15. 



BULLETIN JULY AUGUST 1991 




GRANT SI PPORTS ENERGY EFFICIENCY— Rex Knoles (right), manager of car control for 
Union Pacific Railroad, presented a check for $30,000 to Peter Raven in June. A $60,000 
grant from I'nion Pacific Foundation, payable in two installments, supplements the energy- 
efficiency improvements to the Ridgway Center (see the Bulletin, March-April 1991) 
supported by a low-interest loan from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. 
"The I ; nion Pacific grant will allow us to realize substantial savings on our energy costs 
even sooner than anticipated," Dr. Raven said. "This means we can devote those resources 
to serving growing numbers of visitors. We are very grateful to I 'nion Pacific for their 
generous support." 

Botanical Garden Subdistrict Elects New Officers 

and Robert H. Orchard, 



At the annual meeting of the Commis- 
sion of the Botanical Garden Subdistrict of 
the Metropolitan Zoological Park and 
Museum District of the City of St. Louis 
and St. Louis County held at the Garden 
on May 22, 1991, the commission elected 
new officers for 1991-92. They are Sandra 
H. Bennett, chairman; Theresa Love- 
less, vice chairman; Homer E. Sayad, 



treasurer; 
secretary. 

The Subdistrict is comprised of ten 
members, five each from St. Louis City 
and County. The commissioners serve as 
the public body responsible for receiving 
and disbursing funds acquired through the 
property tax support approved bv voters 
in 1983. 



THIS SUMMER AT SHAW ARBORETUM 

New Wetlands Area Is Created 



An exciting new natural display is 
being developed at Shaw Arboretum. 
Construction began in May for a five acre 
pond marsh wetland area on the flood 
plain of Brush Creek near Gray Summit 
Road on the east side of the Arboretum. 
A second three acre area will be con- 
structed in the spring of 1992. 

Wetlands areas, which include 
marshes, fens bogs, sedge meadows, ox 
bow sloughs, potholes, and swamps, have 
long been considered undesirable 
wastelands. The rapid loss of natural wet- 
lands areas to development in recent 
years has brought overdue attention to 
their importance in the ecosystem. Wet- 
lands provide a natural cleansing system 
for waterways and vital habitats for wild- 
life and plants. 

The Arboretum's new wetlands 
environment will contain a diverse display 
of native Missouri aquatic plants, and will 
provide a habitat for muskrats, mink, 
salamanders, newts, chorus frogs, spring 
peepers, a variety of turtles and snakes, 



and many species of birds. Educational 
courses and interpretive materials will be 
developed to increase understanding and 
appreciation of these dynamic aquatic 
systems. 

A trail leading to the site begins at the 
northeast corner of the experimental 
prairie and is visible from the Trail House 
Loop Road. Eventually a board walk and 
viewing platform will be constructed to 
provide visitors a closer look at the plant 
and animal life in the wetlands area. 

The wetlands project is supported by 
a $4,000 grant from the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service, technical assistance 
from the Franklin County Branch of the 
U.S. Soil Conservation Service, and 
generous gifts from Mr. and Mrs. August 
Homeyer and another environmentally 
concerned family that prefers to remain 
anonymous. The staff of the Arboretum is 
grateful for their support and for the 
opportunity to acquaint visitors with the 
beauty and importance of wetlands areas. 



Garden Explorer Patches 
Awarded 

One hundred and fifty Girl Scouts 
from River Bluffs Girl Scout Council 
received patches in a ceremony in the Jap- 
anese Garden on May 18, 1991. The 
ceremony celebrated the Garden 
Explorer Patch Program, which has been 
developed by Garden and Girl Scout staff 
and volunteers over the past three years. 
The Scouts receiving the patch had com- 
pleted the pilot program between April 
1990 and May 1991. They were the first to 
earn the patch. 

The Garden Explorer is a folder filled 
with educational activities based on dif- 
ferent areas of the Garden. Published in 
1989, it was written by Nancy D'Arcy, a 
St. Louis Public School teacher working 
at the Garden. The project was made 
possible by a generous gift in honor of 
Barbara Z. Cook, a Garden Guide. 

The Scouts earned patches based on 
two of the activity sheets, which they 
completed while visiting the Garden. The 
patches are called "Garden Explorer", 
based on the history and purpose of the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, and "Seiwa- 
en: The Japanese Garden". More patches 
are planned. 

The Garden Explorer Patch Program 
was coordinated by Mary Griggs and 
Catherine Robinson of the River Bluffs 
Girl Scout Council and Pamela Pirio of the 
Stupp Teacher Resource Center at the 
Garden. The program is designed for chil- 
dren of all ages, not just for Scouts. Edu- 
cators and youth group leaders who 
would like more information may call Pam 
Pirio at 577-9501. 

IMS Awards Garden 
$75,000 

The Institute of Museum Services 
(IMS), a federal agency that offers gen- 
eral operating support to the nation's 
museums, has awarded the Garden 
$75,000 to assist in basic services and 
programs. The grant was one of 432 
awarded this year through a nationwide 
competition that evaluates all aspects of 
the museums' operation. Applications 
were received from 1,390 museums of all 
types from throughout the country. 

The Institute of Museum Services 
provides the only federal source of gen- 
eral operating support for the nation's 
museums. It was established in 1976 by 
Congress as an independent federal 
agency to assist museums in their efforts 
to preserve the nation's cultural, historic, 
and scientific heritage. 



16. 



\BULLET1N JULY AUGUST 1991 



Trustee Profile 




Rev. Earl E. Nance, Jr. 

The Reverend Earl E. Nance, Jr. 
joined the Garden's Board of Trustees as 
an ex-officio member upon his election as 
president of the St. Louis Board of Educa- 
tion this spring. Nance, a native St. Loui- 
san, has been co-pastor of the Greater 
Mount Carmel Baptist Church since 1979. 
Appointed to the School Board in 1987 to 
fill an unexpired term, he then ran suc- 
cessfully for the position in 1989 at which 
time he began serving a six-year term. 

Prior to accepting his post as co- 
pastor, Nance taught elementary school 
in the St. Louis Public Schools. 



Dr. Raven noted that Reverend 
Nance's breadth of experience and 
involvement in the St. Louis region offers 
much to the Garden ' 'At a time when we 
are diligently undertaking new programs 
and activities to expose the Garden to a 
much broader audience, Reverend 
Nance's insights and leadership in St. 
Louis will serve as a valuable asset in 
assisting us in these important 
endeavors," said Dr. Raven. 

"The Garden is a wonderful institu- 
tion and the St. Louis Public Schools have 
benefited over the years from the part- 
nership formed with the Garden. Its com- 
mitment to the improvement of science 
education is laudable and I anticipate 
many future opportunities to strengthen 
the ties with the Missouri Botanical Gar- 
den during my tenure as a Trustee,' ' com- 
mented Nance. 

Reverend Nance has maintained a 
serious commitment to create a strong 
alliance between the city schools and the 
St. Louis community. He has also served 
on boards and commissions on the local 
and state level including an appointment 
to the 22nd Judicial Commission, the 
United States Bicentennial Constitution 
Commission of Missouri, and the Com- 
munity Advisory Committee of the St. 
Louis Board of Education. 

Nance and his wife, Viola, and their 
daughter live in St. Louis City. 




•FOUR SEASONS" DEDICATED— On April 19, 1991, the Garden dedicated "Four Seasons," 
a sculpture of white Georgia marble by St. Louis artist Marie Taylor. The sculpture, four 
interconnected figures depicting the seasons, is a gift of Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson Carpenter III. 
It has been placed in the Hosta Garden. Pictured at the dedication ceremony are (left to 
right): Marie Taylor, Peter Raven, Mrs. Clarkson Carpenter, Clarkson Carpenter, and 
Mrs. Thomas W. Shields, donor of the Hosta Garden. 




wmmm 



IN MEMORIAM— DAVID BARON: Friends of 
the Garden were saddened by the death of 
David Baron on April 11, 1991. Mr. Baron, a 
native St. Ix>uisan, had practiced law in 
St. Louis since 1916. In 1979 he presented to 
the Garden the beautiful bronze Mother and 
Child, by Marcel Rau, that stands near the 
path on the west side of the Knolls. In 
addition to his generosity to the Garden, 
Mr. Baron was a leader in the Jewish 
community, a life member of the Jewish 
Federation and a past president of the 
Jewish Community Centers Association. 
He will be deeply missed. 



Oscar Arias Sanchez (below, right), past 
president of Costa Rica and a winner of the 
Nobel Peace Prize, visited the Garden on 
May 16. He toured the herbarium with assis- 
tant director Dr. Marshall Crosby (left) and 
discussed the Garden's Flora of Costa Rica 
project. 




17. 



BULLETIN I JULY AUGUST 1991 




The director of the National Park Service and his regional directors and other support staff 
visited the Garden on May 9. They were introduced to the Flora of North America project and 
the Center for Plant Conservation's programs, followed by a tour of the Garden. Front row, 
left to right: Jill York O'Bright; Nancy Morin, MBG; L. Lorraine Mintzmyer; Sean Bursell; 
Gerald Patton; Geraldine Smith; Robert Baker; Charles Odegaard; John Reynolds; Peggy 
Olwell, MBG. Middle row, left to right: Marshall R. Crosby, MBG; David Wright; Robert Stan- 
ton; John Moorehead; Jerry Rogers; James Ridenour; Donald Castleberry; James Coleman; 
Denis Galvin; Edward David. Back row, left to right: Boyd Evison; Jerry Schober; Eugene 
Hester; Stanley Albright; John Cook; Gary Easton; Herbert Cables, Jr. 




On May 3, 1991, the Center for Plant Conservation Trustees held their first board meeting 
here since the Center moved to St. I Amis early this year. Pictured are (left to right) Donald A. 
Falk, director of C PC; Grace Padberg, administrative assistant; Michael O'Neal, manager, 
information systems; Dr. Robert E. Bruenig, Trustee; Dr. Peter H. Raven, director of the Gar- 
den; Polly Pierce, Trustee; Richard D. Phippen, Trustee; Janet M. Poor, Trustee; Henry R. 
Norweb, Jr., Trustee; William A. Truslow, Trustee; Marilee Poulter, senior administrative 
assistant; William Robertson IV, Trustee: Peggy Olwell, conservation programs manager; Dr. 
William Hugh Bollinger, Trustee; Dr. Robert E. Cook, Trustee; Dorothy Wallace, Trustee; and 
Jonathan Shaw, Trustee. 



Graduate Students 
in the News 

NSF, OTS and Garden Club 
Awards 

Students working toward advanced 
degrees at the Garden have received 
numerous awards and honors recently. 

Jennifer Talbot has been awarded a 
National Science Foundation Graduate 
Fellowship, which will pay her stipend and 
tuition for three years and will also include 
some travel funds. Jennifer has also won a 
place on the Organization for Tropical 
Studies (OTS) course "Tropical Biology: 
An Ecological Approach" in Costa Rica 
this summer. 

Carolina Israel has been selected for 
the OTS course "Tropical Managed 
Ecosystems", also in Costa Rica this 
summer. Ricardo Rueda has just returned 
from the winter OTS course. Oliver Phil- 
lips has been awarded a $5,000 grant from 
the Garden Club of America for his field- 
work in Peru. 

All of these awards are highly com- 
petitive, and the Garden congratulates 
the students on their honors. 

National Geographic Article 
Includes Fay 

The work of J. Michael Fay, a Ph.D. 
candidate at Washington University, was 
extensively described in the cover story 
"Elephants" in the May 1991 issue of 
National Geographic magazine. Mike's 
work in the Central African Republic con- 
cerns the ecology and feeding behavior of 
lowland gorillas, and in the process of 
studying them he has become an expert 
on the habits of elephants as well. An 
anthropologist by training, Mike is 
extremely knowledgeable about the 
plants eaten by the animals he studies, 
and the effects of animals' feeding habits 
on the ecosystem. He is currently com- 
pleting his doctoral dissertation, for which 
Dr. Raven is his advisor. 



Falk Is Elected to AAAS 

Don Falk, director of the Center for 
Plant Conservation, recently was elected 
a fellow of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science (AAAS). 
Founded in 1848, AAAS is a private, 
independent organization that facilitates 
cooperation among scientists, educators, 
and scientific organizations. It has more 
than 134,000 members and 300 affiliated 
organizations. Since 1900 AAAS has pub- 
lished the weekly journal Science, which 
was established by Thomas Edison in 
1880. 



L8. 



I BULLETIN / JULY AUGUST1991 



From the Garden Gate Shop 



New MBG Tie 

The Shop is featuring a wonderful gift 
item, a handsome new Missouri Botani- 
cal Garden men's tie. Woven of a silk 
polyester blend in an attractive herring- 
bone pattern, the tie is a deep blue 
accented with thin stripes of gold and teal 
or gold and red, accented with the Gar- 
den logo. The ties are made exclusively 
for the Garden, priced at $22.50. 



Gardening Books Galore 

The Gate Shop has the finest selec- 
tion of gardening books in the St. Louis 
area. Now that the height of the summer 



growing season is here, come in for a 
fresh crop of tips and ideas. Some new 
titles: 

Garden Smarts: A Bounty of Tips 
from America 's Best Gardeners, by Shel- 
ley Goldbloom, The Globe Pequot Press, 
320 pages, $12.95 paperback. A compul- 
sively readable book of nearly 1,200 
invaluable gardening tips, harvested by 
the author from 200 amateur and profes- 
sional gardeners with bright green 
thumbs. Shelley Goldbloom is a freelance 
gardening writer and a producer-host for 
a National Public Radio member station. 

You Call That a Farm? Raising 
Otters, Leeches, Alligators, Weeds, and 
Other Unusual Things, by Sam and 



Beryl Epstein, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 
64 pages, $12.95. Engagingly written text 
with photographs takes children on a tour 
of unusual farms to meet farmers who 
dared to try something new. 



Beneficial Insects for Sale 

To assist gardeners who want to 
reduce the use of chemical pesticides, 
the Shop is offering beneficial insects that 
prey on garden pests. Available are lady- 
bugs, 1500 for $5.95; green lacewings, 
1000 eggs for $18.95; and trichogramma 
eggs, 1000 for $18.95. 




GRANT AWARDED— Donald H. Streett, 
chairman of the Board of Directors of the 
St. Louis Community Foundation (right), 
presents a check for $5,000 to O. Sage 
Wightman III, president of the Board of 
Trustees. The funds support the recent In- 
completed Community Perceptions Study 
conducted by the Garden. The St. Ix)uis 
Community Foundation supports local 
not-for-profit organizations in their efforts 
to improve the quality of life for all citizens 
of the St. Louis metropolitan area. 




DISTINGUISHED VISITORS— Dr. Neil R. Chalmers, director of The 
Natural History Museum, iMndon, is pictured (above, left) at a din- 
ner given in his honor May 23, 1991. Dr. Chalmers visited the Gar- 
den to discuss current and proposed collaborative research 
projects. Shown with Dr. Chalmers is O. Sage Wightman III, presi- 



dent of the Board of Trustees. Above right: Also attending the din- 
ner May 23 were (left to right) Dr. William Tai, coordinator of the 
Flora of China project at the Garden; Dr. Sun Hong-lie, Dr. Zhang 
Xin-shi, and An Jian-ji, all of the Academia Sinica, Beijing. 



19. 



BULLETIN JULY AUGUST 1991 



IN MEMORIAM 

Walter Rodenroth 

Staff and friends of the Garden were 
saddened by the death November 20, 
1990, of Walter Rodenroth, a long-time 
volunteer in the herbarium. Mr. Roden- 
roth, who was a pharmacist in South St. 
Louis for over 50 years before his retire- 
ment, began volunteering at the Garden 
in January, 1975. 

In the herbarium, Walter worked daily 
for over ten years at the enormous job of 
sorting mountains of plant specimens by 
genus and species. He was extremely 
knowledgeable about plants and their 
medicinal uses, and he enjoyed sharing 



his knowledge with colleagues. His kind- 
ness and good nature will be deeply 
missed. 

Raven Awarded Gregory 
Medal 

The Bishop Museum, the State 
Museum of Natural and Cultural History 
in Honolulu, Hawaii, awarded the Her- 
bert E. Gregory Medal to Dr. Peter H. 
Raven on May 27, 1991. The Medal is 
given approximately every four years, on 
the occasion of the Pacific Science Con- 
gress, and recognizes Dr. Gregory's role 
as founder of the Pacific Science 
Association. 



Candidates for the award are selected 
on an international basis for distinguished 
research contributions in anthropology, 
botany, geology, or zoology of the Pacific. 



Moving? Please Remember 
To Send Us Your New Address. 

To avoid missing any of your membership 
mailings, you must give us your new 
address at least three weeks before you 
move. Please enclose the mailing label on 
the back cover of this Bulletin, and mail to: 
Membership Office, Missouri Botanical 
Garden, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166. 



Tributes 



March -April 1991 



In Honor Of 



Mrs. Lester Adelson 

Mrs. Saul A. Dubinsky 
Mr. and Mrs. Steve Alper 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard H. Sirkin 
Mr. and Mrs. James C. 

Anderson III 
Mr. and Mrs. John Dudley 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond H. 

Banker 
Mrs. Virginia Epstein 
Mr. Bernard Bearman 
Mrs. Lilly Ann Abraham 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward 

Bearman 

Mr. and Mrs. Morton Singer 
Mrs. Dorothy Beezley 

Mrs. William J. Beezley 

Mr. and Mrs. John Biggs 

Mrs. Milton Mill 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Biggs 

Polly Kaith and Jane (iuess 

Mrs. Rich ma ti Bry 

Mr. and Mrs. Harris J. Frank 

Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 

Ruth E. Buerke 

Mar\ Armantrout 

Gerry Ball 

Mary Brommelhorst 

Man Dowling 

Ellen Hogan 

Gen Kammien 

Miss Jennifer Paige 

Carpenter 
Dr. A. Weldon Schorl 
Danna M. Schorl 
Mrs. Mary Ann Chulick 
Floribunda Garden Club 
Dr. and Mrs. Alex Cole 

Ms. Elma T. Chapman 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Cretin 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Schmich 
Mr. Martin Deutsch 
Mr. and Mrs. H. F Helmkampf 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard I). 
Dunlop 

Mr. and Mrs. .1. William Flaig 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Thilking 



Dr. John Edstrom 

Mr. Robert N. Hagnauer 
Ashley Seudder Engler 
Mr. and Mrs. William Guy Heckman 
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Esrock 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Fletcher Sr. 

Marian L. Hen- 
Sheila Flom 

Fran and Norman Leve 
Myrna and Jay Meyer 

Mrs. Judy Fogerty 
Mrs. Joy Wilcox 

Mrs. James C. Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Clyde 
Freeland 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Jerome Freeland 
Mr. and Mrs. Stan Friedman 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard H. Sirkin 

Mrs. Pearl Fuhrer 

Mrs. Ruth Schwartz 
Granddaughter of Dr. and 
Mrs. Bernard Garfinkel 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 
Mrs. Pauline T. Gers 

Gers Family 

Kruvand Family 

Janice and Stanley Gitt 

Laura, Bob, Patty, Mary, Ricky 

Miss Emma Herd and 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Metzger 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Moll 
Mrs. John Hood 

Webster Groves Garden Club 

Group 4 
Mrs. Jane Jacobs 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis R. Putzel 
Dr. and Mrs. Llewellyn Sale Jr. 
Mrs. Ben H. Senturia 
Rosemary Woodworth 

Mrs. J. Eugene Johanson 

Mrs. George W. Achuff 

Mrs. Peggy Jones 

Irene Holmes 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Kaplan 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 
Mrs. Margaret Keil 

Mr. and Mrs. Donn H. Lipton 



Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kessler 

Mrs. Laura Mae Cassel 

Mr. and Mrs. Grant 
Knoblauch 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Fischer 
Arlene Kram 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard H. Sirkin 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. 

Kresko 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 
Carolyn and Chuck Lange 
Pat Brock 
Farl Hopper 
Diane Murrey 
Frank Quiring 
Loretta Silvermintz 
C. T. Lange 
C. B. Yoder 

Ms. M. W. McCormick 
Mr. and Mrs. John A. 
Leschen II 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. E. Desmond Lee Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lindy 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Friedman 
William R. MacGreevy 
Maritz Inc. Law Department 
Mr. Steven Maravich 

Yuppie Landscaping Group, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Mayer 

Mrs. Virginia Jasper 
Mrs. Catherine Nehring 
Mr. and Mrs. John W. 
Metzger 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Moll 

Mrs. Irene Minkoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley M. Cohen 

Missouri Botanical Garden 
Education Dept. Instructors 

Mrs. Beatrice A. Perrin 

Mr. Bill Montgomery 

Ms. Francie M. Futterman 
Mr. Leighton Morrill 
Mrs. Alexander M. Bakewell 
Mrs. Jeanette Neuner 

Mrs. Dorothy Fgenriether 



Ninomiya Family 

Angelo and Joanna Maltagliati 

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin H. 
Nissenbaum 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Rosenbloom 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
Ohlendorf 

Mrs. Betty Boyce 
Mrs. Walter J. Fines 

Connie Orchard 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert H. Friedman 

Mr. Robert Orchard 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert H. Friedman 

Mrs. John M. Parato 

Miss Nicoletta F. Parato 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald I. Pass 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mrs. Richard Prager 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F Ruprecht 
Mr. and Mrs. Millard Pryor 
Mrs. Peter H. Husch 
Catherine Pundmann and 
Paul Niedner 

Mr. and Mrs. William Mullins 
Mr. Al Raben 

Bernie and Jocey Barken 

Mr. Homer Reiss 

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Amitin 

Dr. John Roberts 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Roger 
Mr. Carl Rohne 

Mae Rohne 

Bert and Ruth Rosen 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Stein 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Ruda 

Mr. and Mrs. Bei nhard A. Funk 

Mr. Sterling J. Ryan 

Mrs. Sterling J. Ryan 

Mr. and Mrs. Gene Schneider 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Rosenbloom 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Schulze 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Rogers 

Mrs. H. C. Seldin 

Suzy Seldin 

Mrs. Jim Seldin 

Suzy Seldin 

Irvin and Mignon Shanfeld 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Hochschild 



20. 



\BULLET1N JULY AUGUST 1991 



Dr. Charles Sherwin 

Miss Gerry Barnholtz 
Miss Marian Barnholtz 

Mrs. James A. Singer 

Dr. and Mrs. Llewellyn Sale Jr. 
Queenie Schiele 
Mr. James A. Singer 
Queenie Schiele 
Berkeley Sloan 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Moulton Jr. 

The late Thomas W. B. Smith 
Alberta W. Smith 

Mrs. Alberta W. Smith 

Mrs. Perry Sparks 

Mrs. Henry C. Griesedieck Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. James M. Henderson 
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Smith 
Mrs. Katherine Stark 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin S. Strassner 
Mr. Benjamin Uchitelle 
Yuppie Landscaping Group, Inc. 

Mona Van Duyn 

Bernetta Jackson 

Mrs. Alyce K. Walther 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Walther 
and Sons 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Waltman 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Scherrer 
Mrs. Josephine Weil 
Dr. Lynne Kipnis 
Dr. Steven M. Rothman 
Mr. Lyman Weisenstein 
Mr. and Mrs. Melroy B. Hutnick 

C. Robert Wells 

Rowena Clark Garden Club 
Mr. Norman Wielansky 

Mr. and Mrs. Melroy Hutnick 
Mrs. Dorothy Yare 

Miss Gerry Barnholtz 
Miss Marian Barnholtz 



In Memory Of 



Irene Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Kienker 
Mrs. Rose Albert 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren J. Gelman 
Mr. and Mrs. Monte Lopata 
Mrs. Ann Aurlayne Althoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 

Mr. Floyd T. Arnold 

Jaffe Lighting & Supply, Inc. 
Missouri Botanical Garden- 
Members Board 
Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 
Dr. Charles D. Short 
Mrs. Ernestina Short 
Mr. William H. Arnold 
Ms. Celeste Kocot 
Madeline Arpe 
Mrs. Charles B. Deibel 
Dr. Drennan Bailey 

Mary Alice Beetham 

Michael Baldridge 

Mr. Clark Becker 

Miss Mary Susan Wheeler 

Sister of Lester Bamberger 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 



Mr. Harold C. Barnhart 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Siegmund 
Mr. David Baron 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Kratz 
Mr. Joseph Barretta 
Rosalie and Jim Cooper 
Mr. Charles Baskowitz 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Golde 
Mrs. Charles F. Bates III 
Mr. and Mrs. William G. Heckman 
Mr. Edward B. Mower 
Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace Sr. 

Mr. Houston Beatty 

Mrs. Richard C. Bradley 
Father of Sandy Becker 

Helen and Gene Kornblum 
Cola Beckermann 

Edith Beckermann Quick and Family 

Mr. J. Paul Bedel 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul W. Reime 
Mrs. Paul Berland 

Mrs. CeliaJ. Agatstein 
Mr. Bud Berman 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 
Mrs. Hyman R. Senturia 

Mrs. PaulBerwald 

Dr. and Mrs. David M. Berwald 

Edith F. Binder 

Mr. and Mrs. George Bishop 

Mr. and Mrs. Vance P.Braxton Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Chasnoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 

Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Dunkelman 

Dr. and Mrs. Alvin R. Frank 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Gitt 

Mrs. Jane Kahn 

Rita, Irving, and Susan Keller 

Annetta P. Larson 

Rose Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 0. Losos 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. McCadden Jr. 

Mrs. James H. Meredith 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Michelson 

Mrs. Brenda Morlock 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard I. Muckerman 

Margaret M. Planck 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Rosenheim 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Samuels 

Amanda Schonhoff 

Mrs. Shirley Schweitzer 

Mrs. Hyman R. Senturia 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Shapiro 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin G. Shifrin 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Shifrin 

Mr. and Mrs. Morton Singer 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Steiner 

Margery B. Steiner 

Ms. Jane H. Steinman 

Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Tobin II 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ullman 

Mr. and Mrs. Shelton C. Voges 

Dr. and Mrs. Helmar C. Wasserman 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Webber 

Mr. and Mrs. Sander B. Zwick 

Mr. PaulE.Birdsall 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Crowe 
Helen Blanke 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Symonds 

Mrs. Mary Bone 

GlennaB. Mell 

Joseph J. Bordenet 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald R. Diehl 



Mrs. Pearl Borowsky 

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Gersten 

Mrs. Astrid W. Kaiser 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Sauer 

Mrs. Lois Bredin 

Bahn Family 

Marissa Strathearn Family 

Mr. Lucas Brennecke 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Schubert 

Mrs. Hazel Brogdon 

Dr. and Mrs. William P. Darby 

Mr. Royal Brown 

Mrs. Charles B. Deibel 

Dr. and Mrs. Helman C. Wasserman 

Mr. Russell E. Burlis 

Mr. and Mrs. James N. Gimblett 
Mr. and Mrs. James R. Gimblett 
Mrs. Gertrude Hemphill 
Mrs. Evelyn Montague 
Mr. and Mrs. Lyle S. Woodcock 
Dr. Harvey R. Butcher Jr. 
Mrs. H. K. Butcher Jr. 

Mrs. Lucille Woods Butler 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Bertelson 
Mr. and Mrs. William R. Orthwein Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin G. Russell 
Mrs. A. Wessel Shapleigh 
Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Taylor Jr. 
Mrs. Mary Dudding Butler 
Mr. and Mrs. Sandy Buchheit 
Mrs. Dorothy H. Callahan 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Rafferty 
Mr. Richard Carney 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. 

Kriegshauser 
Mr. Clifford Cecil 
Bethel Lutheran School 
Mr. Arthur Christ 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Biesterfeldt 
Mrs. Gerome Chambers 
Trudy Collmeyer 
Marjorie L. Feuz 
Mrs. W. J. Frein 
Albert and Karen Haller 
Adele C. Hill 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Menke 
Dr. Lillian J. Nagel 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert 0. NelJums 
Mrs. Georgia L. Phillips 
Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 
Rowena Clarke Garden Club 
Mr. and Mrs. James L. Ruschill 
C. Robert Wells 
Mrs. Mary I. C. Christ 
Adele C. Hill 
Dear Aunt of Mr. and Mrs. 

Hanley Cohn 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerome L. Goodman 

Mrs. Clara Colley 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex Hawksbee 
Mrs. Maud F. Connoyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Kent B. Westerfield 
Mrs. Belle Adams Copeland 
Leamon R. Barbro Family 
Lt. Tom Costen 
Ms. Charlotte Glessmer 
Ms. Irma Glessmer 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. Krueger 
Mrs. Helen Cremins 

Mr. and Mrs. William W. Burcke 
Mr. and Mrs. Rick Halpern 

Mrs. Thomas B. Curtis 

Monsees Family 



Mrs. Janice D. Darnall 

Mrs. Martha P. Hardin 

Mr. and Mrs. Rolla K. Wetzel 

Mrs. Ada M. Demaroff 

Mr. and Mrs. George Deshano 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Holen 
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hulber 

Mr. Martin Deutsch 

Mr. and Mrs. Burton Follman 
Ms. Susan E. Prytherch 
Mrs. Eileen Dingman 
Mr. Richard Wagner 
Catherine Dittman 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Menke 
Earnest R. Doty 

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Bryan 

Mr. Steven Doyle 

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Poche 
Mrs. Josie B. Drane 
Mrs. M. W. Drane 

Mr. Henry T Drane 

Mrs. Louise M. Dubail 

Miss Mary K. Clucas 

Mr. Arthur J. Duemler 

Mr. and Mrs. John Torrey Bergrr Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Brittain 

Eric Dunbar 

Mrs. Ilene Osherow 

Mr. Richard E. Durnell 

Mrs. Virginia H. Heitert 

Mrs. Patricia A. Ohmer 

Readers Service Staff 

LynnK. Silence 

Jack and Pat Wilson 

Mr. Will Eddy 

Mr. and Mrs. Truman Bailey 
Harold and Edna Waldron 
Mrs. Julie Edgerton 
I )ave Ganz and Norma 
Mr. Charles Elbreder 
Mrs. Katherine Elbreder 
Mrs. Emily Eppenberger 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Coyle 

Sylvia Epstein 

Mr. and Mrs. David G. Dimit 

Patricia Martin Freund 

Mrs. Edwin C. Ernst Jr. 

Ms. Gabriele DeWitt 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Horan 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin M. Meinberg 

Mrs. Mina W. Evans 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Henkle 

John S. Failla 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Failla 

Mrs. Marie Farmer 

Mr. and Mrs. James Welsh 
Mr. Louis Fehlig 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Sauer 
Miss Arline Clara Fischer 

Miss Helen Novak 

Mrs. Lassie Frager 

Judy Bean 

Mrs. Sara Frager 

Jerome Gross 
Mr. Pete Frankenberg 
Missouri Botanical Garden- 
Volunteer Instructors 
Mrs. Edward Fredrickson 
Mrs. John H. Haley 

continued on next page 



21. 



BULLETIN JULY-AUGUST 1991 



Tributes 



continued 

Sylvia Epstein Freund 

Barbara Katz Abrams 
Missouri Botanical Garden— 

Members Board 
Mr. and Mrs. Lee H. Wagman 

Mr. Joseph A. Froehly 

Mrs. S. A. Weintraub 
Mr. D. Goodrich Gamble 
Dr. and Mrs. George A. Mahe 
Mr. Myron Glassberg 

Lark and Barbara Katz Abrams 
Mr. and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 
Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Carlson 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Effinger 
Dr. and Mrs. Jerome Fiance 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 
Dr. and Mrs. Gunter Schmidt 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Singer 
Mrs. Samuel I). Soule 

Mr. Alan Godlewski 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Baldwin 

Mr. Harold Goodman 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald F. Roth 
Mr. Oliver Rudolph Grawe 
Mrs. Oliver Grawe 
Mrs. Green 

Mr. and Mrs. George B. Hagee 

Mrs. Grisham 

James H.Jones 

Mr. Rudolph F. Haffenreffer 

Mr. and Mrs. Kdmonstone F. 

Thompson 
Mrs. Bernice Hahn 

Mrs. Susie Wightman 

Mr. William M. Hall 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Theiss 

Mr. Donald Hansen 

Mr. Jim Moore 

Mr. Fred J. Rock 

Mrs. Mary W. Harrison 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Sauer 

Ms. Rosalie Hein 

Clayton Lamkin 
Linda and Walter Lamkin 
Ro and Jack Lamkin 
Melissa and Tom O'Connor 

Mrs. Hazel Henderson 
Ms. Lin Dempsey 
Dr. Aaron Hendin 

Dr. James R. Criscione Si. 
Mrs. Ann Hensley 
Mr. Edward B. Mower 
Mrs. George W. Skinner 
Patricia Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W. kienker 

Mr. David E. Horn 

Joan Corwin 

Mrs. Doris K. Grattendick 

Mattie Greenherg 

Horn Family 

Mrs. Elizabeth McReynolds Rozier 

VA Medical Center— Jefferson 

Barracks Div. 
Paul M. Houston 

Mrs. Paul M. Houston 

Mrs. Dorothy Y. Howell 
Mr. Henry W. Endres 



Mr. Robert A. Humber Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Torrey Berger Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. DonellJ. Gaertner 

Mr. Peter H. Husch 

Teel Ackerman and Martin 0. Israel 

Mrs. Marlyn Adderton 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Auerbacher 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

John and Laurie Baumann 

Janet Becker 

Mrs. Irvin Bettman Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Brod 

Linda K. Carter 

Dr. and Mrs. Jerome D. Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. James G. Conzelman 

Helen Davis 

Mrs. Jane Dean 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo A. Drey 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 

Mr. and Mrs. Melville J. Dunkelman 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Edison 

Mrs. Sylvia D. Ehrmann 

Mrs. Edwin D. Franey 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Frankel 

Sidney and Rosalie Franklin 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Freedman 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Gillerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Gittelman 

Fred and Louise Goldberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred E. Goldman 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Grand-Jean 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald K. Greenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Greensfelder 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Grossman 

W. Alfred Hayes and Company 

Mrs. Peggy R. Hellman 

Mrs. Zena Hellman 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip N. Hirsch 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Hochschild 

Mrs. Peter H. Husch 

Mrs. J. A.Jacobs 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy W. Jordan 

Dr. and Mrs. Maurice J. Keller 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. King 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Kopman 

Ms. Rhonda K. Leifheit 

Mrs. Lois Levin 

Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer S. Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark I. Litow 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley L. Lopata 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger E. Lord Jr. 

Wilma E. Messing 

Dr. and Mrs. Jule P. Miller Jr. 

Marjorie C. Ouellet 

David Owens Family 

Ed and Judy Presberg 

Corinne Reif 

Irene G. Rifkind 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Rochman 

Mr. Lawrence K. Roos 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Rosen 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Rosenheim 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Rosenthal 

Mr. and Mrs. S. I. Rothschild Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Samuels 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Scharff 

Mrs. Henry Scherck 

Ms. Harriet R. Schneider 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Schulein 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Schwab Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Alfred S. Schwartz 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Henry Schweich 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Schweizer II 

Miss Jan Scott 

Mrs. Hvman R. Senturia 



Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Shapiro 

Rep. S. Sue Shear 

Monte Silverblatt 

Mr. Daniel E. Singer 

Dr. and Mrs. Marc Singer 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard G. Sisson 

Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 

St. Louis Yoga Teachers Association 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Stein 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome M. Steiner 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry S. Stolar 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Gordon Tiger 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Tucker 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Uchitelle 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ullman Jr. 

Charles E. Vincel Family 

Mrs. Robert G. Watel 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Wylan 

Mrs. Kimiko Ishizaki 

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Helfrich 

Mrs. Hazel Keethler 

Mr. and Mrs. 0. C. Steffens 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Trowbridge 

Mr. Terry Jackson 

Mrs. Maxine E. Coffman 

Mr. Clifford E. Jett 

Amanda and Ray Garlick 

Mr. William Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Arndt Jr. 

Renee Joyce 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Smith 

Helen and John Joynt 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Boettcher Jr. 

Mr. Nick Kappa Sr. 

Mr. Steve Roth 

Mr. Thomas E . Kavitski 

Mr. and Mrs. David J. Lehleitner 

Mrs. Jennie Keating 

Madeleine Tufts 

Beloved Mother of Dr. and 

Mrs. M. J. Keller 
Mr. and Mrs. William W. Collinger 

Mr. Elzy Knotts 

Aikido Club 
Lenore Kobacker 

Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Gabriel Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Schneider 

Mrs. Frank A. Krewet 

Frontenac Garden Club 
Miss Ann Krishtalka 

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald D. Gersten 
Mr. William S. Lakamp 
Dr. Ferdinand B. Zienty 
Mrs. Jean M. Lashly 

Mrs. Gaylord C. Burke 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Dee 

Mrs. E. L. Dehner 

Dr. and Mrs. Jonathan Dehner 

Mrs. Charles D. DePew Jr. 

Miss Ann II. Ferriss 

Bill Eastman and Cindy Garnholz 

Edith and Bud Hartmann 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard Hiatt 

Ms. Robin Hinshaw 

Mrs. McFarland Kehl 

Mr. and Mrs. F. G. Langenberg 

Elizabeth D. Lashly 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Liberstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Norbert S. Mason 

James A. McDowell 

Mis. Marjorie Pollock 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul B. Rava 

Mr. and Mrs. Boyd Rogers 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard Scharnhorst 



Mrs. Margaret C. Schmidt 

Mrs. Charles E. Scott 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Scott 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. De Stinson 

Ms. Audrey M. Thaman 

The Family Center Staff 

Robert and Donna Thomas 

Gertrude M. Wolfe 

Mrs. Eleanor C. Leek 

Miss Georgia Bauer 

Mrs. Kay Lewis 

Ms. Elizabeth Nohl 

Mrs. Vance C. Lischer Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin R. Breihan 

Mrs. Del K. Luecke 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe J. Curtis 
Eleanor Luecking 

Mrs. Fred Wulfing 

Mr. Herman A. Lueking 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Abbott 
Mrs. Bernard Blomberg 
Mrs. Richard C. Bradley- 
Diane and Paul Gallant 
Mr. and Mrs. 0. P. Hampton III 
Jennifer and Tom Hillman 

Mrs. Grace Lumaghi 

Mr. and Mrs. Keith Phoenix 

Ms. Justine Maier 

Ms. Janet K. Poppen 

Mrs. Use Mansbacher 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Zibit 
Mr. John F. Marica 
Mr. Richard II. Kirchhoff 
Mrs. Douglas V. Martin III 

Mr. and Mrs. David J. Lehleitner 

Dorothy A. Neuhoff 

Mr. Phillip Mass 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin S. Barad 

Mrs. Peggy Hellman 

Mrs. Man,' Francis Hopkins 

Mrs. Alfred Sudholl 

Mr. James H. McCall Jr. 

Paula Bowmar 

Mr. Archie McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Lyle F. Sieinei 

Bernard McDonald 

Josephine McDonald 

Susan McDonald and Barry Kozloff 

Mark and Pam McDonald 

Josie and Bill Garesche 

Katie Maginn 

Colleen Maginn Baker 

Susan McDonald Maginn 

Dennis Maginn 

Lucy Garesche* 

Mary Susan Garesche 

Miss Monica McEvilly 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert A. Seppi 

Mr. Ted E. McVay 

Mr. and Mrs. Steven Hargis 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Richardson 

Mrs. Florence Meagher 

Mrs. Sally A. Hopson 

Mr. Milton Mill 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Blanke Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen F Bowen Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Drew Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Menke 

Mrs. Carolyn Myers 

Mrs. Margery S. Nax 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Russell 

continued on next page 



22. 



\BULLET1N JULY AUGUST 1991 



Mrs. George W. Skinner 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence T. Wilson 

Mr. Gordon A. Miller 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry A. Uhlemeyer 

Mrs. Bessie Moeller 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Jones 

Mr. Wellbourne Moise 

Mrs. Gerald Plaisance 

Toni Moran 

Sharon M. Home 

Steven Robert Home 

Mrs. Burnie Mueller 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Otto 

Mrs. Dottie Norris 

Susan, Jeanenne, Judy, Joe Morice 

Dr. Robert Nussbaum 

Larry and Jane Kahn 

Dr. and Mrs. Conrad Sommer 

Dr. and Mrs. Helman Wasserman 

William D. Oberbeck 

Mrs. Sharon Goeders Kouri 
Mr. Dana Mitchell Milonski 
Mrs. Sally Olshwanger 
Dr. and Mrs. Stephen F. Bowen Jr. 

Margaret V. O'Neill 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Bottini 
Mrs. Lois Page 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl E. Reitz 
Mrs. Perry Paplanus 
Mr. and Mrs. Lyle F. Siemer 
Mrs. Wanda Perry 

Mr. Don J. Riehn 

Mr. Braxton Pollard 

Mrs. George W. Skinner 
Mrs. Carmen Pope 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Carlson 
Brother of Mrs. Robert Power 

Mr. and Mrs. Lyman C. Josephs 

Mr. Kelsie 0. Pylant 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Lambert 
Miss Nancy Ellen Raisher 
Miss Diane M. Woepke 
Mrs. Marie Rammel 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kautzman 

Mrs. Lea M. Reardon 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred W. Fangmann 
Mrs. Florian S. Reilly 
Dr. John V. Reilly 
Mr. Edward F. Reiske 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Barken 
Bowen Rexrad 
Millie Marx Family 
David A. Riassetto 
Mrs. Joanne Riassetto 
Mrs. Hazel Rodefeld 
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Richardson 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. 
Roesler 

Mrs. Sterling J. Ryan 

Mr. Walter Rogers 

Gene and Shirley Orf 

Mrs. Esther R. Rosenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 
Mr. Manny Rosenberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Schwartz 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Zucker 
Mrs. Rozansky 
Mr. Jerry Naunheim Jr. 



Mr. Andrew Schleicher 

Dorothy McKinley 

Mrs. Morris Schlessinger 

Washington University School of 
Medicine-Departments of 
Microbiology and Genetics 

Dorothy Levy Schmitz 

Mrs. Myron Glassberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen W. Skrainka 

Mr. Donald M. Schuessler 

Dr. and Mrs. David M. Kipnis 

Mrs. Yolanda Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Walther 

Mr. Carl W. Schulte 

Mrs. Earnest R. Doty 
Gracie Schultz 

Marilyn Pollack 

Mother of Dr. Kathleen 
Schwarz 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Woolsey 
Mr. Hyman Senturia 

Dr. and Mrs. Nathan M. Simon 

Mrs. Marlene Shapiro 

Jack and Dianne Schwartz 
Blanche Shaw 

Ted and Mary Faith Green 

Gertrude L. Shaw 
Harry L. Shaw 

Kimberly Adler 

Daniel 0' Mara 

Marilyn 0' Mara 

Mrs. Ruth Lydia Shoss 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. McFarland 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Webb 
Mrs. Louise Smith 
Richard and Evelyn Ressler 
Mrs. Muriel Smith 
Ms. Joan Esposito 
Miss Margaret Soehlig 
Miss Dena Soehlig 

Mrs. Frances Glasser 
Solomon 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lane 

Mrs. Dorothy Sophir 

St. Louis Horticultural Society 

Mr. Charles Stack 

Mr. and Mrs. David J. Lehleitner 
Mr. Walter Stahl 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Sauer 

Mrs. Alma Clark Stifel 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Walther 

Mr. Theodore W. Stixrud 

Mr. Jonathan F Cox 
Mrs. Leona Stock 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo E. Eickhoff Jr. 

Mr. Keith Strom 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Perkins 
Mrs. Betty Suppiger 
Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Yaeger 
Mrs. Loretta M. Thieme 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Schwartz 
Mr. A. Paul Thompson Sr. 
Mr. Don J. Riehn 
Mrs. Vester J. Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Russell 
Mrs. Louetta Tiemann 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Reitz 



Miss Dorothy Timmerhoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Irvin H. Landwehr and 
Family 

Mrs. Dorothy Trautwein 

Cynthia Biddick 

Liz Biddick 

Jane Pope 

Marvin Stewart 

Mr. Robert S. Turner 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Henkle 

Elliot Von Rump 

Azalea Garden Club 

Mother of Ed Wallace 

The Mandlemans and Geg 
Mr. James Eugene Wallace 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Votaw 
Mrs. Mildred M. Warden 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Walther 
Mr. Edward D. Weakley 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Scott Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Wilkinson 

Kenneth L. Weaver 

Mrs. Roberta L. Campbell 
John and Kim Jackson 

Mrs. Gertrude M. Weiss 

Robert L. Krekeler Family 
Mrs. Ruth Wemhoener 
Mr. Charles F. Wemhoener 
Mrs. Mary Weyerich 

Dr. and Mrs. James Wessely 

Mr. Arthur D. White 

Mrs. Arthur A. Dunn Jr. 

Robert Wichard 

Ms. Lynn K. Silence 

Mrs. Pauline Wiersema 

Mrs. James E. Hanick 
Mrs. C. J. Williams 
Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Griffin 
Mr. Richard J. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Desmond Lee 

Mrs. Frances E. Winters 

Mr. Paul U. Bettman 
Nancy Kline Wolfheim 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Epp 
Michael and Linda Peterson 
Rosalind and Harry Salniker 
Thelma Yurock 
Miss Beatrice Obermeyer 
Mrs. Rose Zajicek 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael McDonald 

Albina C. Zub 

Mr. and Mrs. Julian K. Beisman 
Boatmen's Trust Company-Officers 

and Employees 
Miss Jean G. Brumback 
Bruce Calvin 
Mary M. Domes 
Ms. Linda Gelner 
Mr. Gilbert Gottschalk 
M argot Grant 
Mr. Fred Heidom 
Bill Horner 
Jane Langa 
Marion Mezines 
Corinne K. Roedel 
John Paul Sinestera 
Ms. Susan Veidt 

Mr. Robert Zub 

Bruce Calvin 

Jane Langa 

John Paul Sinestera 



Board of Trustees 

Mr. 0. Sage Wightman III 

President 

Rev. Lawrence Biondi, S.J. 

Mr. Stephen F. Brauer 

Mr. William H.T. Bush 

Dr. William H. Danforth 

Mr. Samuel B. Hayes III 

Mr. Robert R. Hermann 

Mr. David W. Kemper 

Mr. Charles F. Knight 

Mr. Charles E. Kopman 

Mr. Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. Richard J. Mahoney 

Mr. William E. Maritz 

Mr. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. Thomas 0. McNeamey, Jr. 

Mr. Lucius B. Morse III 

Rev. Earl E. Nance, Jr. 

Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr. William R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 

Rev. Hayes H. Rockwell 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

The Hon. Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. Andrew C. Taylor 

Mr. Jack E. Thomas 

Dr. Blanche Touhill 

Mr. John K. Wallace, Jr. 

The Hon. George R. Westfall 

EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mr. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. John H. Biggs 
Mr. Jules D. Campbell 
Mr. Henry Hitchcock 
Mr. Joseph F. Ru witch 

Mr. Louis S. Sachs 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. Tom K. Smith, Jr. 

Mr. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Harriet Spoehrer 

Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Dr. Mildred Mathias 
Prof. Phillippe Morat 

DIRECTOR 

Dr. Peter H. Raven 

MEMBERS' BOARD 

Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 

President 

Mrs. Antonio I. Longrais 

Mrs. Robert P. Tschudy 

Mrs. Robert Schulte 

Mr. Frederick H. Atwood III 



23. 



BULLETIN I JULY AUGUST 1991 




Festival/Festivals 



August 1991 



It's new, it's exciting, it's a month-long gala in August at the Garden! Make your plans now 
to celebrate the cultures of four different countries, Japan, Greece, England, and the Carib- 
bean, on four different weekends. There will be something for everyone, with music, arts and 
crafts, food, entertainment, exhibits and more. 

Each weekend's celebration begins on Friday, 6 to 10 p.m., continues Saturday 11 a.m. to 
10 p.m., and concludes on Sunday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Regular Garden admission will be 
charged. The Garden will open at 9 a.m. daily as usual. A Festival Hotline opens Monday, July 
29. Call 577-5125 for schedules and information. See page 11 for details. 

Support for the Festival of Festivals has been assisted by a challenge grant from the Fannie 
May/Coleman Foundation. Other sponsors will be announced. 



MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN -0026-6507) 
P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST. LOUIS, MO 






Botanical 
Garden 



■PTEM 

rroBE 






' '":ikf- 



LUME LXXIX 
IMBER FIVE 



Inside 
This Issue 



£ Research News 

^H Alwyn Gentry is named a Pew Scholar; 
Flora of Chile is the Garden's newest 
flora project; Flora of Chirm receives 
support; May Scholars are honored. 

g New Director of Horticulture 

■H Shannon Smith joins the Garden staff. 

7 Horticulture in Missouri 

^H Glade restoration at the Arboretum. 

Q Volunteer Evening 

■H Garden volunteers of outstanding 

achievement received awards in June. 

Q Corporate Philanthropy 

■■ McDonnell Douglas and its employees 
support education and other important 
causes. 

JQ Home Gardening 

■H Water gardens are both beautiful and 
easy to grow. 

19 Calendar of Events 

^H A Food Festival, the Urban Gardening 
Fair, and special events for members 
kick off the autumn season. 

1 A From the Membership Office 

■M A trip to Madagascar will be a fall 
highlight. 

Jg An Old-Fashioned 4th of July 

^B Neighbors, families and friends enjoyed 
a delightful celebration. 

20 TVibutes 

■■ Friends and family are honored with a 
gift to the Garden. 



On the cover: The drum bridge, 
Taikobashi, in the Japanese Garden. 
— Photo by Kintf Schocnfeld 



L991 Missouri Botanical Garden. 

The BULLETIN (ISSN 0026-6507) is published bi-monthly 
by ihc Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 'lower drove 
Avenue. St.Louis, MO 63110. Second class postage paid at 
St.Louis, MO. 

The Bl'I.LETIN is sent to every Member of the Garden 
as one ot the benefits of membership. For a contribution of 
as little as $40 per year. Members also are entitled to: free 
admission to the Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitalions to special events and receptions; 
announcements of all lectures and classes; discounts in the 
Garden Gate Shop and for course fees; and the opportunity 
to travel, domestic and abroad, with other Members hoi 
information, please call (.ill) 577-5100. 

Postmaster: send address changes to BULLETIN, Susan 
Caine, editor, P.O. Box 299, St . Louis, MO 63166. 



Comment 



Involvement and Participation 



® 



printed on recycled paper 




In reflecting on 
the last several 
years, one can only 
conclude that the 
Garden's accom- 
plishments are 
indisputably phe- 
nomenal. The Mem- 
bers and staff, who 
represent the strongest base of support 
that any institution could conceivably 
desire, have served as the crucial ele- 
ments in the Garden's continuing pro- 
gress and its success. 

This summer, the outstanding 
assistance from both members and staff in 
orchestrating a magnificent Old- 
Fashioned Fourth of July with Tower 
Grove Park and the fun filled "Festival of 
Festivals," kept several hundred volun- 
teers busy throughout June, July and 
August. The results were obvious and 
astonishing and every member who 
volunteered and every staff person who 
gave additional time and energy to these 
efforts is to be commended. If adequate 
financial support can be secured in 
advance, we hope to continue these 
delightful summer events next year. 
Aside from all of these festivities, July 



also featured the opening benefit of Lore 
& Taylor at the Galleria, which was giver 
in honor of the Garden. We extend oui 
warmest welcome and thanks to the new 
department store, a division of Ma> 
Department Stores Company, a longtime 
Garden benefactor. 

Looking ahead, members can enjo> 
the distinctive beauty of the Garden in the 
fall by participating in the events sched- 
uled for September and October, includ- 
ing a Food Festival featuring nutritious 
foods and examples of the interrelated- 
ness of nutrition, fitness and the environ- 
ment (see page 12). Members' events 
will help you anticipate winter with lec- 
tures on fall planting and preparing your 
plants for the change of seasons. The 
Urban Gardening Fair and a trip to Shaw 
Arboretum for a fall foliage walk are 
among the other special happenings com- 
ing up soon. 

Your involvement and participation in 
the Garden are essential. Please join us 
this fall and enjoy what you have made 
possible. 



(Z^Lc- 11. Qe 




The granite boat basin was dedicated in Seiwa-en, the Japanese Garden, on July 10, 1991. 
Designed by the late Koichi Kawana, designer of the Japanese Garden, the boat basin 
represents Kawana 's last work in his ongoing vision for the 14-acre Japanese garden. The 
sculpture is a gift of the Jones-Weakley family and friends in memory of Edward I). Weakley 
and A. Clifford Jones, Jr. Pictured at the dedication ceremony are (left to right): Mrs. Edward 
D. Weakley, The Hon. A. Clifford Jones, Janet Jones Horlacher with Murphy Horlacher, and 
Irene Clifford Jones. 



RESEARCH DIVISION NEWS 




The Garden's 
Computer System 
Acquires "State of the 
Art" Technology 

The IBM RISC 6000 mini-computer exceeds the 
former computer's memory over a hundred 
times, in a space the size of a suitcase. 



WE were like kids at Christmas!" said Dr. Nancy 
Morin, head of the Garden's department of botanical 
information management. Morin's enthusiasm was 
shared by her staff when the Garden's new computer arrived 
early this summer. On June 20-24 a team of computer experts 
transferred all of the Garden's research data to a new IBM 
RISC 6000 mini-computer, opening the door for dramatic new 



4 Christine McMahon inserts a magnetic tape into the RISC 6000. 
Each tape in the old system was the size of a stack of a dozen 
long playing records. 



The 

Cutting 

Edge 



Missou Rl 



*^/V/G 



.-; 






6 1 39J 



advances with the Garden's database system, TROPICOS. 

' 'This new computer is ideal for our needs,' ' said Christine 
McMahon, systems manager. "It allows us to access the huge 
resources of mainframe computers at other institutions, while 
still being able to work directly with colleagues using small per- 
sonal computers (PC's). Biological research relies on the work 
of individuals gathering data, often in isolated areas, so we had 
to keep our system accessible to PC users. With the RISC 6000 
we're on the cutting edge of computer technology. It's a high 
speed, high volume, multiple user system that positions us per- 
fectly for growth in the future.' ' 

With 500,000 names now in TROPICOS, the Garden's 
research program had outgrown the ADS-Mentor computer in 
use since 1986. This rapid growth is even more dramatic 
considering that the Garden has only been using computers 
since 1981. 

The new IBM computer, made possible in part by a gener- 
ous gift from the late Anne L. Lehmann, is one-third the size 
of the Mentor, but it doubles the number of people who can use 
the system simultaneously, while increasing the speed of their 
work with 128 megabytes of RAM memory to the Mentor's 
single megabyte. This increased power, together with the 
IBM's advanced UNIX operating system, allows researchers 
to communicate easily with other systems over the Internet 
System, a worldwide scientific computer network. Streamlined 
programming permits faster and more creative information 
management, facilitating collaboration on major projects such 
as the Flora of North America, Flora of China, Flora 
Mesoamericana, and others. 

"Modem connections through telephone lines allow us to 
communicate directly with other computers," Dr. Morin 
explained. "This new system doubles the number of phone 
lines we can handle. The Garden Library will be part of the 

continued on next page 



BULLETIN SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 19911 



RESEARCH DIVISION NEWS 



COMPUTERS continued 

network, as are the research departments and libraries at other 
botanical institutions. 

' 'All of this means that we will be able to make much faster 
progress in utilizing the information in TROPICOS," Morin 
continued. "We will be able to develop geographical information 
systems, maps that will tell us where plants are distributed and 
what that means for conservation and land use purposes." 

The switch from the Mentor system with its PICK operating 
system to the IBM/UNIX system will take about a year, 
McMahon predicts. "Everything is in the IBM already," she 
explained, "and the two systems are running concurrently. 
This allows users time to retrain using the UNIX system, and 
gives us time to redesign TROPICOS to utilize the new system 
fully. We're working on a modular approach with The New York 
Botanical Garden and teams of researchers representing each 
group of users. This allows us to customize the software for the 
maximum utility for everyone. It's an ideal solution to a multi- 
user system." 

"We've come a long way in a very short time,' ' said 
McMahon. "This is due to the fine work already done by 
Dr. Robert Magill, Dr. Morin and others who developed the 
Garden's database system. Our new equipment means we can 
move ahead, taking advantage of the most current technology 
now and in the future." 



R • 



I 




* 



Christine 
McMahon 

Systems Manager, 
Botanical Information 
Management 



WHEN Christine McMahon applied for a job in Botani- 
cal Information Management at the Garden, she did 
so out of curiosity. "I couldn't imagine what the 
Garden would need with a computer database," she said. 
"Was I ever surprised!" 

Christine began her work at the Garden in March, 1991, 
coordinating the transfer to the new IBM RISC 6000 computer. 
The project involves redesigning the software for the new UNIX 
operating system, rewriting the training manuals, and solving all 
of the individual problems for each research application. 

With her previous experience working on airplane flight 
controls, or avionics, at Emerson Electric and McDonnell 
Douglas, Christine had extensive background in computers. 
She earned her bachelor of science degree in industrial engi- 
neering from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale in 
1987, and is currently working toward a master's degree in 
management at Webster University. 

"Industrial engineers study technical systems and how they 
work together,' ' Christine explained. ' 'That has been a good 
background for redesigning the Garden's database system to 
accommodate the needs of all of its different users. 

"When I realized the worldwide scope and significance 
of the Garden's research program, I was amazed," Christine 
continued. "I am very excited to be able to work on a project 
of this importance." 




- Dr. Alwyn Gentry 
in his office at 
the Garden. 



Alwyn Gentry Is Named 
Pew Scholar 

DR. Alwyn Gentry, senior curator in research at the 
Garden, has been awarded a prestigious grant for his 
work in conservation by the Pew Scholars Program in 
Conservation and the Environment. Gentry was one often indi- 
viduals to receive the $150,000 three-year grant this year. 
"The 1991 Scholars represent an ideal balance of scholarship 
and environmental activism," said James E. Crowfoot, director 
of the Pew Scholars Program. "Not only are the grant 
recipients outstanding scientists, they also are aggressive 
problem-solvers who are tackling global environmental prob- 
lems at local, national, and international levels." 

The Pew Scholars Program was established in 1988 by the 
Pew Charitable Trusts, one of the nation's strongest supporters 
of environmental projects. The ten scholars selected for the 
1991 awards are the second group of Pew Scholars. While they 
come from widely divergent backgrounds, they all share a 
common interest in the preservation of biological diversity. 

Gentry was honored as one of the world's leading experts 
on tropical plant taxonomy and as a leader in training indigenous 
tropical conservationists in Latin America. Gentry is also a 
leader of Conservation International's Rapid Assessment 
Team, a "SWAT" team for biodiversity surveys. Gentry, who 
has been on the Garden staff since 1972, plans to use his grant 
to pursue his multi-disciplinary approaches to tropical forest 
conservation, including further investigation of developing 
sustainable uses of forest products. 

The Pew Scholars grants are virtually unrestricted so long 
as the Scholars apply them in some fashion to their professional 
endeavors. It is hoped that the awards will free the Scholars to 
pursue new avenues of inquiry, develop creative approaches to 
problem-solving and inquiry and take risks that may have 
equally high probability of success and failure. "The Scholars 
Program in Conservation and the Environment seeks to provide 
outstanding individuals with the flexibility to take their knowl- 
edge and skills and apply them to some of the world's most 
pressing environmental issues," said Rebecca W. Rimel, 
executive director of the Pew Charitable Trusts. 



\BULLETIN SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 1991 



RESEARCH DIVISION NEWS 



New Flora of Chile 



LAST September Charlotte Taylor joined the Garden's 
research staff as an assistant curator with the task of 
directing the Garden's work with the New Flora of 
Chile. The Garden has been invited by the Chileans to help 
coordinate and expedite this project, which represents a new 
initiative for the Garden. 

Chile's deserts, temperate rain forests, and "Mediterra- 
nean' ' zone are unique in South America. Running from the 
world's driest desert to the glaciers of Tierra del Fuego, Chile 
resembles more the west coast of North America from Baja 
California to northern Alaska than the steamy jungles of the 
rest of South America. Chile's territories are isolated from the 
rest of the world by cold oceans and high mountains, and as a 
result its plants and animals are highly unusual. Many are found 
only here. Some are living representatives of ancient groups 
that once lived in Antarctica and Australia as well, when these 
were cool wet continents. Others show surprising links with 
North America. Chile and Argentina together form the ' 'South- 
ern Cone' ' of South America. This is an area distinct from the 
tropical areas of South America where Garden researchers 
have long been active. 

The preparation of a flora is a huge undertaking, a compre- 
hensive study of all the plants of a particular region that 
requires years of painstaking effort. Chile's first flora— the first 
complete flora for a South American country— was written in 
1845-1850. Since then thousands of new plant species have 
been described and many new areas explored. Botanists at the 
University of Concepcion in southern Chile have begun the 
New Flora of Chile project by publishing a checklist-style inven- 
tory of all of Chile's vascular plants and a complete 600-page 
bibliography. 

Collaboration among botanists from many different institu- 
tions is essential to provide the breadth of expertise required. 
The New Flora of Chile project is a cooperative effort of the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, the University of Concepcion, 
Chile, Ohio State University, and the University of Munich in 



Germany. More than 50 scientists from various countries will 
participate in this work. The Garden's expertise in botanical 
research in Latin America, fundraising, administration, and as a 
liaison will help significantly to bring this new project to com- 
pletion. 

The New Flora of Chile will be published by the University 
of Concepcion Press. It will serve not only as a stimulus for 
research and an aid to training a new generation of scientists, 
but will also provide a framework for conservation efforts and 
informed management of Chile's abundant natural resources. 

"It is very exciting to be involved in this flora project,' ' 
Charlotte Taylor said. "The Garden has a fine reputation 
for working with colleagues in Latin America, and scientists 
in Chile have already made enormous progress. This is a 
very important project, because many of Chile's forests are 
threatened by pressures of population growth and industry.' ' 
Taylor, who earned her degrees in botany from the Univer- 
sity of Michigan and Duke University, came to the Garden 
from the University of Puerto Rico. 




Dr. Charlotte 
Taylor in her office, 
with a copy of the 
Flora of Chile 
checklist. A map 
of Chile is on 
the wall. 



Starr Foundation Awards Flora of China $250,000 



THE Flora of China project has 
received a five-year, $250,000 
grant from the Starr Foundation. 
Flora of China is a landmark scientific 
collaboration between botanists in the 
United States and the People's Republic 
of China. The Missouri Botanical Garden 
serves as the U. S. headquarters for the 
project under the direction of Dr. William 
Tai. American and Chinese botanists are 
working to produce the first modern 



synthesis of information on the plants of 
China, a condensed revision and transla- 
tion into English of the existing compre- 
hensive description of the 28,000 species 
of plants in China. The 12-year project 
will produce a computer database and 
will be published in 25 volumes. 

The Flora of China project is of enor- 
mous international importance. Many of 
the plants in China are found nowhere 
else in the world, and many are of great 



economic and medicinal value. Making 
information on these plants accessible to 
researchers, educators, horticulturists, 
and scientists around the world will 
have far-reaching results. 

Peter H. Raven, who serves on the 
Flora of China editorial committee, says, 
"No work completed for over a century 
will have treated as many species of 
plants, nor as many as important to the 
world. We are deeply grateful to the 
Starr Foundation for its support." 



BULLETIN I SEFI'KMRER-OCTOBER 1991 I 



RESEARCH DIVISION NEWS 




Seated, left to right: Hilda Maria Umghi-Wagner, Renee Fortunato, 
Tarcisco Filgueiras, Nelson Ramirez. Standing, left to right: Enrique 
Forero, Jerome T. Ixwb, Peter H. Raven. 

May Scholars Honored 

The Garden hosted a luncheon on August 14 to recognize 
The May Department Stores Company for its timely support 
of the May Scholars Program and to honor current visiting 
scientists. Representing the May Company were: Jerome T. 
Loeb, vice chairman and chief financial officer; James Abrams, 
vice president, corporate communications; and Joni Sullivan 



Baker, manager, corporate communications. Attending from 
the Garden were Dr. Peter H. Raven, Dr. Enrique Forero, 
director of research, and Marcia Kerz, director of development. 

The May Scholars are Dr. Hilda Maria Longhi-Wagner and 
Dr. Tarciso Filgueiras from Brazil, Dr. Nelson Ramirez from 
Venezuela, and Ms. Renee Fortunato from Argentina. The 
first three were profiled in the May issue of the Bulletin. 
Renee Fortunato received her degree in 1980 from Universidad 
de Moron in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where she is currently 
an associate professor of botany. She is also a research assis- 
tant of CONICET (National Council for Scientific and Technical 
Research) working on the staff of the Institute of Biological 
Resources (INTA) in Buenos Aires. While at the Garden, she 
will be studying various genera of the Fabaceae, or bean family, 
for the Flora of Paraguay and completing taxonomic treatments 
of other Neotropical members of the family. 

The May Scholars Program enables botanists and graduate 
students from rain forest countries to study in St. Louis and 
to take advantage of the Garden's extensive resources, 
including the herbarium and library. Training scientists from 
rain forest countries is an integral part of the Garden's program 
in tropical botany. 

In October 1990, a $40,000 grant from The May Department 
Stores Company Foundation established the program at the 
Garden. May Scholars are selected on the basis of their cur- 
rent and past significant achievements in botanical research 
and future plan of work. 



Behind the Scenes 



Shannon Smith Is New Director of Horticulture 



Dr. G. Shannon Smith has joined the 
Garden as director of horticulture. His 
appointment was effective August 1. 

Before coming to St. Louis, Dr. Smith 
was the director of research and develop- 
ment with Lone Star Growers of San 
Antonio, Texas. At Lone Star he directed 
operations to introduce new ornamental 
and native plants into industry and 
worked with international pharmaceutical 
companies and universities to develop 
commercial production of medicinal 
plants. 

"The Garden's work in exploration, 
evaluation and introduction of new orna- 
mental species is an exciting opportunity 
to pursue one of my major professional 
interests," Smith said. "Botanical gar- 
dens have always been my first love, and I 
am absolutely delighted to be associated 
with a facility of the Garden's caliber. I am 
looking forward to developing the educa- 
tional aspects of our horticulture pro- 
gram, especially with the Kemper Center 




bringing in so many new visitors." 

"Shannon's professional experience 
is extensive and ideally suited to the 
needs of the Missouri Botanical Garden," 



said Dr. Peter H. Raven, director. "We 
are quite excited at his arrival and know 
that he will bring the knowledge, experi- 
ence and skills necessary to maintain and 
enhance the beauty and floral displays 
here at the Garden." 

At the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical 
Society, Dr. Smith served as president 
and C.E.O. from 1980 to 1985. He worked 
to create a new 66-acre botanical garden 
in Dallas and managed the general 
administration and development of the 
Society. Dr. Smith has served on the fac- 
ulty and has been a lecturer at the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee at Knoxville; Massey 
University, Palmerston North, New 
Zealand; and the University of Florida, 
Gainesville. 

Dr. Smith holds a Ph.D. in soil sci- 
ences and plant physiology from the 
University of Florida and M.S. and B.S. 
degrees in ornamental horticulture from 
the University of Tennessee. Dr. Smith 
and his wife have two sons in college. 



6. 



\BULLETIN SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 1991 



Horticulture in Missouri 



Glades Restoration at the Arboretum 



A Unique Missouri 
Environment 

By Lucile McCook, Ph.D. 

At first glance, a rocky piece of land 
ringed by scraggly-looking trees may not 
appear as interesting as a verdant 
woodland— but look again. These areas, 
known as glades, are home to unique 
assemblages of plants and animals, many 
of which are specialized for coping with 
the difficult environmental conditions of 
glades. 

Glades are areas of land where the soil 
is thin and the bedrock is close to the sur- 
face; often, large slabs of rock jut from the 
soil. In summer, glades are extremely 
hot, sunny and dry— conditions less than 
ideal for the extensive roots of most trees 
and shrubs, or for deeply rooted herbs. 
But a surprising number of grasses and 
herbs can tolerate the desert-like condi- 
tions of glades. Some of these plants have 
succulent leaves or hairy leaf surfaces 
that minimize water loss. 

Other species, such as the Missouri 
bladderpod Lesquerella filiformis , occur 
exclusively on glades and have specialized 
life-history traits for dealing with the 
harsh glade environment. Seeds of the 
bladderpod, a diminutive member of the 
mustard family Brassicaceae, germinate 
in the fall, instead of spring, and grow into 
a tiny rosette of leaves that can survive 



the ice and snow of winter. In early 
spring, the rosettes send up yellow 
flowers that will produce swollen, inflated 
fruit if they are pollinated, hence the 
name "bladderpod." By the time the 
heat of summer has arrived, the plants 
have shriveled and died— but their seeds 
have dropped and sit safely in the hot, dry 
soil. So, the Missouri bladderpod deals 
with the desert-like glade conditions by 
avoiding them! 

As clever as this life-history strategy 
seems, it works only as long as the spe- 
cial habitat exists. The Missouri bladder- 
pod, which is grown at the Garden as part 
of our work with the Center for Plant 
Conservation, is threatened with extinc- 
tion largely because the limestone glades 
where it lives are becoming scarce. It has 
been estimated that 400,000 acres of 
glade habitat existed in Missouri before 
Europeans settled here. At that time, the 
state had great expanses of prairies, 
glades and savannah woodland, and 
natural fires commonly burned in all these 
areas. Native Americans also burned 
vegetation because the rich, succulent 
plant growth following a fire would draw 
the large grazing mammals that they 
hunted. As the European settlers built 
farms, they suppressed fire and many of 
these habitats changed. If glades are not 
burned, several tree species can slowly 
become established over time, shade the 
habitat, and alter the glade environment 
such that other plant species can move in 




and crowd out the unique glade plants. 
Because of the difficult growing condi- 
tions, trees surrounding and invading 
glades are generally slow-growing and 
often gnarled and stunted. Some trees, 
like cedar Juniperus virginianus , are so 
characteristic of glades that we call these 
habitats cedar glades or cedar barrens. 

All glades, however, are not alike. Six 
types occur in the state based upon the 
underlying rock. There is a dolomite 
glade, named for the underlying rock, 
dolomitic limestone, at Shaw Arboretum 
located south of the Field House along the 
Wildflower Trail. Cedars have become 
established in the glade, so the Arbore- 
tum staff has started a glade restoration 
program that simulates presettlement 
conditions through careful burning and 
removal of cedars. This management plan 
should permit the reestablishment of the 
unique flora of a dolomite glade. The plans 
for the new Native Plant and Wildflower 
Garden at Shaw Arboretum include estab- 
lishing several types of glades so that vis- 
itors can see the diversity of glade 
habitats. The new wildflower garden is a 
family gift of Mr. and Mrs. Blanton J. 
Whitmire. 

To learn more about glades and where 
they occur in Missouri, as well as infor- 
mation on other interesting plant commu- 
nities, read The Terrestrial Natural 
Communities of Missouri by Paul Nelson 
(1985 by The Missouri Natural Areas 
Committee). 



Clearing invasive cedars 
out of Long Glade. lA?ft to 
right: James Trager, 
naturalist; Kevin Reed, 
summer intern. Center 
for Plant Conservation; 
Sproule Love, intern, 
Shaw Arboretum. 



OH<3 .©Il^Du 



THE OPEN AREA, AHEAD ISA GLADE. 
THIS NATURAL AREA'iS CAUSED BY THL 
WGfiCjf PORUS MAGNESfUh SJ€5TOt€-( c .?3£'- 
EXTREMELY DRY SUMMER CONDITIONS PRCWfif 

TH OF TREES -TYPICAL PRAIRIE 
V,v;s ARE ^OUND'HERE. . • **" ' 



BULLETIN SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 1991 













' ' ' r 1 

i 




Volunteer Instructors (standing, left to right): Natl Day, Betty Not pictured: Dorothy Hitt, Pauline Jaworski, Mary Ix>ire, Beatrice 

Licklider, Monica Clapper, Sonia Chetta, Maurita Steuck, Alyce Perrin, (jerry Steinhart, Mary Doerr, Judy Garfinkle, Janet Ludewig, 

Hildebrandt, Irene Weisenhorn, Katherine Chambers. Seated, left to Kay Harlan and Ellen Mayer, 
right: Mary Ely and Jean Wrisley, with Dr. Peter Raven, director. 




THURSDAY, June 27, 1991, the 
Garden paid tribute to the more 
than 700 men and women who 
give so generously of their time, talent 
and energy as Garden volunteers. Dr. 
Peter Raven presented awards to several 
individuals who were recognized for 
extraordinary contributions: 

A Special Achievement Award 
went to Billie Beyer for her work with 
the Master Gardeners. Billie organized 
the 1990 Urban Gardening Fair, a major 
annual event demanding long hours coor- 
dinating the efforts of many people. 
Billie's administrative skills are invaluable 
and she performed her huge task with 
warmth and enthusiasm. 

The Special Service Award honors 
volunteers who give time above and 



beyond their regular volunteer commit- 
ment. This year a Special Services 
Award was presented to Arden Fisher 
and Joan Murphy, who have coordinated 
the Tribute Gifts Program for the 
Development Office since 1982. Joan and 
Arden developed the program, which 
matches prospective donors with gift 
opportunities at the Garden. Arden and 
Joan are a team of goodwill ambassadors 
whose tact and compassion are invalua- 
ble. They routinely make themselves 
available from home to answer inquiries 
on days they are not at the Garden, and 
the program has blossomed under their 
skilled organization. 

The Commitment Award honors a 
volunteer who conscientiously performs 
a job every week, even though the tasks 



may not be glamorous or exciting. This 
year Robert Martens was recognized 
for his hours of faithful service in the edu- 
cation greenhouse. Bob tends the plants 
used by the more than 18,800 school chil- 
dren who come to the Garden for classes. 
Bob works year-round, coming in to help 
prepare plants for classes and giving extra 
days when the schedule is especially 
busy. 

The Group Award for 1990 was pre- 
sented to the Volunteer Instructors, 
who work with the thousands of school 
children who visit the Garden for classes 
each year. In 1990 the volunteer instruc- 
tors gave 3380 hours of service assem- 
bling classroom materials and teaching. 
The instructors have years of classroom 
experience. They assist the education 



\BULLETIN I SK1TKMHKR (KTOBKR 1991 



Corporate Philanthropy Profile 



The McDonnell Douglas 
Foundation and the 
McDonnell Douglas 
Employees' Community 
Fund-East 

The McDonnell Douglas Corporation, 
the country's largest defense contractor 
and second largest manufacturer of com- 
mercial aircraft, and the McDonnell 
Douglas Foundation, its philanthropic 
arm, contributed more than $8.5 million in 
1990 to non-profit organizations based in 
its operating locations and nationally. 
Almost one-half of the Foundation's 
annual contributions go to education. Sig- 
nificant beneficiaries are colleges and 
universities, focusing on engineering and 
technology programs and particularly 
those encouraging minority enrollment. 
The Foundation also supports math and 
science education at primary and secon- 
dary school levels. In addition, the Foun- 
dation matches McDonnell Douglas 
individual employees' gifts to their gradu- 
ating colleges and universities, thus dou- 
bling the impact of their gifts; in 1990, 
these matching gifts amounted to 
$600,000 of the Foundation's total giving. 

The balance of the Foundation's dol- 
lars go to civic, government, interna- 
tional, and business causes; health and 



human services; arts and culture; and the 
environment, an emphasis area destined 
for steady increases in support in coming 
years. 

Working in tandem with the corporate 
foundation is the Employees' Community 
Fund-East, one of six such funds based 
around the nation and largely represent- 
ing the St. Louis metropolitan area. This 
plan, the administrative expenses of 
which are covered by McDonnell Douglas 
but which derives its funds from volun- 
tary employee payroll deductions, con- 
tributed about $4 million in 1990 to 
primarily local non-profit institutions 
(more than $11 million was disbursed 
nationwide). 

Although the employee plan and the 
corporate foundation frequently col- 
laborate on team gifts to cases of common 
interest, the Employees' Community 
Fund defines its own philanthropic focus, 
with the corporation's encouragement. In 
recent years, support has gone to causes 
dealing with education, the elderly, hun- 
ger and homelessness, youth at risk, and, 
increasingly, the environment. 

"It is an exceptional company that not 
only supports its own corporate founda- 
tion but also supports and encourages its 
personnel to establish their own philan- 
thropic effort," observed O. Sage Wight- 
man III, President of the Garden's Board 



of Trustees. "This type of partnership is 
truly a model for the future, as our coun- 
try confronts a variety of social and 
environmental needs." 

Added Peter H. Raven, "Over the 
past two decades, the Foundation and 
Employees' Community Fund have been 
steadfast supporters of the Garden's 
most important projects. Their generous 
investments have enabled the construc- 
tion and partial renovation of the John S. 
Lehmann Building research facility, the 
construction of the Ridgway Center 
visitor facility, and the several improve- 
ments just completed through the 
Campaign for the Garden. Most recently, 
we received a team grant for a documen- 
tary film project we are undertaking on 
tropical forest areas. We are truly grateful 
to have such committed colleagues to the 
Garden's work." 

According to Walter E. Diggs, Jr., 
President of the McDonnell Douglas 
Foundation, "The corporate and employ- 
ees' funds are moving forward in making 
environmental issues a priority. We real- 
ize the significant contributions the 
Missouri Botanical Garden makes on 
these issues— locally, regionally, nation- 
ally, and internationally— and we are 
delighted to lend our support to these 
necessary efforts." 



staff with course development and take 
programs to school classes that cannot 
visit the Garden. 

Dr. Raven said, "Without our volun- 
teers the Garden would be a very differ- 
ent place, a mere shadow of what it is 
today. . . . Your combined contributed 
service of 70,000 hours has allowed us the 
time and resources to develop the Gar- 
den's Master Plan. Your spirit has sup- 
ported us in the difficult times and 
rewarded us in the good times. You have 
taught us and offered us friendship and 
there are no words that I can say this 
evening that can adequately express how 
grateful we are to you, but I hope these 
awards that we present tonight will, in 
some way, convey our deepest thanks." 




Other honorees, left to right: Joan Murphy and Arden Fisher; Peter Raven; Billie Beyer and 
Robert Martens. 



BULLETIN SEPTEMBER OCTOHKK 1W»1 I 



A water garden in the land- 
scape can bring an immediate 
sense of tranquility, transform- 
ing an ordinary outdoor living 
space into an oasis. 

Ancient Egyptians and Far 
Eastern cultures were the first 
to develop water gardens. They 
have long been common in 
Europe, and are fast becoming 
a favorite hobby for experi- 
enced and novice gardeners in 
this country as well. A water 
garden can be quite sophisti- 
cated, with a series of water- 
falls and pool levels. Or it can 
be as simple as a small pond in 
the corner of the yard or a 
wooden barrel filled with float- 
ing plants and small water lilies. 

POOL TYPES 

The most popular type of 
water garden installed today 
uses a synthetic liner to form 
the sides and bottom. The 
liners are quick and easy to 
install because these materials 
are lightweight, portable and 
adaptable to a variety of shapes 
and sizes. For an even easier 
installation, select a preformed 
fiberglass pool. Simply exca- 
vate a hole of the same approx- 
imate size and shape before 
you begin to fill it with plants. 

The details of selection and 
installation of pools can be han- 
dled by a water gardening 
products dealer. It might be 
best to start there if this is 
your first water garden. 
Planting and stocking the pool, 
however, is a personal choice. 

PLANTING AND STOCKING 

Overall, the real key to 
water gardening is to establish 
a balance of plants and wildlife. 
Too many fish and too many 
plants or certain types of plants 
will cause the balance to shift, 
leading to algal "blooms." It is 
essential to balance the pond 
by selecting the right types of 
plants. Functionally, there are 
four types to consider planting; 
deep water plants, bog or mar- 
ginal plants, oxygenators and 
floating plants. 

DEEP WATER PLANTS 

Perhaps the most spectacu- 
lar of the deep water plants is 
the hardy water lily, Nymphae. 



Home Gardening 




Water Gardening 



The color selection is broad, 
from white to many shades of 
pink and red. These plants can 
be quite fragrant and easy to 
care for. Blooms float on the 
pool's surface or several 
inches above and may last for 
four to five days, closing every 
night and opening during the 
morning hours. It is not 
unusual to get a succession of 
bloom that lasts for months. 
Most water lilies require a spot 
with full sunlight and at least 
five hours of direct light each 
day to keep flowering. They 
also should be placed in still 
water and away from pool filter 
currents and fountains. 

Although there are many 
sizes of water lilies, the most 
frequent mistake is to plant 
them in containers that are too 
small. A soil depth of six to 
eight inches is sufficient. How- 
ever, the roots spread laterally 
and the larger the diameter of 
the container, the better. 
Select a pan which is 12 to 14 
inches wide to accommodate 
most small to medium-sized 
water lilies; 18 to 24 inches for 
larger selections. The planting 
depth will also vary; larger 
lilies will need to be planted in 
water deeper than 24 inches. 
Also note that water lilies are 
heavy feeders and should be 
fertilized on a monthly basis 
with pelleted fertilizer pushed 
into the soil. 

Tropical water lilies offer 
more fragrant and vibrant col- 
ored blooms, come in more 
colors and bloom more often 
than hardy water lilies, but 
they are more susceptible to 
winter injury. Therefore, tropi- 



cal plants must be removed 
from the pond and wintered 
indoors. Hardy water lilies can 
remain in the pond year round 
provided the rootstock does 
not freeze. 

Lotus, Nelumbo, is a rela- 
tive of the water lily, but grows 
larger with blooms extending 
as much as 10 inches above the 
water surface. The bloom sea- 
son is considerably shorter 
than water lilies, but the lotus's 
distinctive leaves and seed 
pods are commonly used in 
flower arrangements, making 
them very attractive. Most are 
hardy and can remain in the 
pond over the winter. Because 
of their large container require- 
ment and wide leaf span, lotus 
are better suited to larger 
ponds. 



BOG OR MARGINAL PLANTS 

Plants which grow at the 
edge of the pond are known as 
bog or marginal plants. Bog 
plants grow in mud or in water 
up to six inches deep. Plants 
in this category include the 
cattails, irises, bamboos, 
rushes, horsetails and tall 
grasses. They can be planted 
on a shallow shelf just below 
the water line in containers. 
These plants will transform an 
ordinary pond into a more 
natural-looking aquatic habitat 
and will provide protection and 
seclusion for visiting animals 
and aquatic insects and 
amphibians. Some plants, such 
as cattails, will do well in partial 
shade, and others, such as 
irises, must have several hours 
of full sun in order to flower. 



OXYGENATOR AND SUBMERGED 
PLANTS 

Because water gardens 
generally are small and self- 
contained, there is not a 
regular, natural exchange of 
fresh flowing water other than 
rainwater. Water oxygen can 
become depleted, especially 
during the heat of summer, 
and algae may begin to grow, 
causing the pond to become 
stagnant. To help avoid this 
problem, a group of plants 
which remain submerged just 
below the surface can be added 
to the pond to replenish the 
oxygen supply, adsorb carbon 
dioxide, add nutrients and pro- 
vide food for fish plus a place 
for them to spawn and hide. 

A few of the most com- 
monly used oxygenator plants 
include elodea, Anacharis; fan- 
wort, Cabomba; horn wort, 
Ceratophyllum; and parrot's 
feather, Myriophyllum. These 
are relatively inexpensive and 
will multiply in the pond to the 
point where you may need to 
harvest them periodically. They 
also are quite winter hardy. 

FLOATING PLANTS 

Using floating plants in your 
water garden can also help 
limit the growth of algae by 
covering the water surface, 
reducing the sunlight that algal 
growth requires. Floating 
plants do not need soil. They 
simply adsorb nutrients directly 
from the water and are very 
easy to grow. This group 
includes fairy moss, Azolla; 
water hyacinth, Eichhornia; 
frogbit, Hydrocharis; water 
lettuce, Pistia; and duckweed, 
Lemna. 

FISH 

When pond fish are added 
to a pool, it takes on another 
dimension of beauty. Ecologi- 
cally, fish can be quite useful 
for eating excess foliage from 
overgrown plants, consuming 
mosquito larvae and other 
aquatic insects. 

The two most popular 
choices are pond-bred goldfish 
and Japanese Koi. Both are 
very hardy and survive winters 
by hibernating at the bottom of 



10. 



UiUU.ETIN I SKITKMHKH OCTOBKK 1991 



the pond. Goldfish can become 
very large, growing to a foot or 
more in length and requiring a 
larger pond. Koi can also 
become quite large fish, 
growing to two or three feet 
in length. 

Avoid overcrowding when 
stocking your pond. Allow one 
square foot of water surface 
area for each inch in length of 
your fish. When introduced 
into a new pond, fish will need 
to be fed until some of the plant 
materials and algae have grown 
large enough to be eaten. In 
winter, fish do not require 
food. 

Plants should be introduced 
into the pool during the grow- 
ing season and allowed to grow 
for five to six weeks before you 
stock the pond with fish. 

CARING FOR THE WATER 
GARDEN 

Generally, a water garden 
requires minimal care. How- 
ever, you should expect to 
clean it periodically, removing 
leaves and debris so that 
organic sediment does not 
build up on the bottom and 
make it necessary to drain it 
more often than every five 



years. 

Immediately after installa- 
tion and in the spring, algae 
will flourish and cloud the 
water. The algal growth is 
promoted by the warming 
effect of sunlight on the water. 
Once the aquatic plants cover 
at least 75 percent of the pool's 
surface, it will be less subject 
to algal growth. Filters will 
assist in removing organic par- 
ticles from the water, further 
reducing algal growth. Algicide 
can be used, but care should 
be taken to use a product that 
will not harm fish. Also, avoid 
stirring up the bottom sedi- 
ment which contains nutrients 
that stimulate algal growth. 

Maintain the water level at 
the top of the pool. This is 
especially important during 
the summer, when evapora- 
tion is rapid. Top off the pool 
every few days, rather than 
letting the water level drop 
for an extended period and 
refilling all at once. Pools 
maintained properly will help 
the plants and aquatic wildlife 
to remain healthy. 

When the pond has been 
well stocked with a good bal- 



ance of plants, fish will have 
plenty to feed on from the 
developing community of pond 
organisms. Ponds that become 
overcrowded with plants will 
become stagnant. To prevent 
this, start new plants, keep the 
foliage healthy and divide when 
they become overgrown. Mar- 
ginal plants growing on the 
pond's edge should be divided 
every two to three years while 
submerged plants like water 
lilies can be divided every 
three to four years. Plants will 
differ in growth and main- 
tenance requirements, so 
become familiar with the plants 
you have and their needs. 

As winter approaches, you 
will want to clean the debris 
more regularly to keep falling 
leaves from decaying in the 
bottom of the pool and upset- 
ting the oxygen balance. If leaf 
fall becomes especially heavy, 
the pool can be covered with a 
screen or net. 

Ponds in very cold climates 
may need to be closed for the 
winter. This can be done 
simply by removing the filter 
system and letting the pond sit 
until spring. Hardy water lilies 



should be moved to the 
deepest part of the pool. If 
the pond is likely to freeze 
completely, then plants and 
fish should be removed and 
stored in their containers at 
temperatures above freezing. 
Tropical plants and water lilies 
should be taken indoors. 

Preventing a pond from 
freezing can be accomplished 
with use of a heater. As long as 
the rootstock of plants does 
not freeze, most should over- 
winter very well. The same 
goes for most pond-bred fish. 
If ice covers the surface for 
more than two weeks, it 
should be removed to allow air 
exchange. Fish enter a state of 
dormancy where body func- 
tions are reduced to a mini- 
mum. They do not require 
feeding during winter. 

Water gardens require only 
a small investment of time and 
effort. You will be rewarded 
with an intriguing and beautiful 
addition to your landscape. 

—Steven D. Cline, Ph.D. 

Manager, Kemper Center for 

Home Gardening 



Timely Tips from the Answer Service 



Do you have a plant question? Call the 
Horticultural Answer Service, Monday 
through Saturday, 9a.m. to noon, at 
577-5143. 
September Tips 

■ Herbs such as parsley, rosemary, 
chives, thyme and marjoram can be dug 
from the garden and placed in pots for 
growing indoors this winter. 

■ Except tulips, spring bulbs may be 
planted as soon as they are available. 
Tulips should be kept cool in the refrigera- 
tor until planting in late October. 

■ Begin readying houseplants for winter 
indoors. Prune back rampant growth and 
protruding roots. Check for pests and 
treat if necessary. Houseplants should be 
brought indoors at least one month before 
the heat is normally turned on. 

■ Perennials, especially spring 
bloomers, can be divided in late Septem- 
ber. Enrich the soil with peat moss or 
compost before replanting. 



■ Divide peonies now. Replant in a 
sunny site and avoid planting deeply. 

■ Pinch off any young tomatoes that are 
too small to ripen. This will channel 
energy into ripening the remaining full- 
size fruits. 

■ Begin fall seeding or sodding of cool 
season grasses. Seedbeds should be 
raked, dethatched or core-aerified, ferti- 
lized and seeded. Keep newly planted 
lawn areas moist, but not wet. 

■ Cool season lawns are best fertilized 
in fall. Make up to three applications 
between now and December. Do not 
exceed rates recommended by the fer- 
tilizer manufacturer. 

■ Lawns may be topdressed with com- 
post or mil-organite now. This is best 
done after aerifying. 

■ Newly seeded lawns should not be cut 
until they are at least two or three inches 
tall. 



October Tips 

■ Continue watering, especially ever- 
greens if soils are dry. 

■ Transplant deciduous trees once they 
have dropped their leaves. 

■ Plant tulips at the end of the month. 

■ The average first frost usually arrives 
in St. Louis about October 15-20. 

■ Place wire guards around trunks of 
young fruit trees for protection against 
mice and rabbits. 

■ Broadleaf herbicides can be applied in 
mid-month to control cool season weeds 
such as chickweed and dandelion. 

■ Continue mowing lawns until growth 
stops. 

■ Keep leaves raked off lawns to prevent 
smothering grass. 

—Chip Tynan, The Answer Service 



11. 



BULLETIN, SEITEMBER OtTOHKR 1W1 



Kemper Center for Home 

Plant Doctor avatobte 10 a^m. to 
,u to 3 pm. Monday 

Sat Gardenadnuss.cn. 
Tower Grove House Tea 

"°S1 for luncheon Monday 

Call 577-5150. 
Garden Walkers' 

»^Sa.ni.,everyWed. 
nesdTyandSat^^- 

m Kv the Amencan Heari 
sored by the a for 

Association, tall on 
informatior^^ — . — " 

Every T«e» 00 p.«". 

' and S unaa * den Guides for a 
Join the Oara nng 

to«° f,he rie> 8tD 2 

* eart ' ar tureoi *e Garden. 

and horticulture tetl nthe 

Mee» l * et "erVvee** 



W 



Missouri Botanical Garden 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

September-October 1991 



SEPTEMBER 28/SATURDAY 

Food Festival 1991: "Earthly Delights" 

8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Ridgway Center, Kemper Center and grounds. 
The St. Louis Chapter of the American Heart Association teams 
up with the Garden to show that nutrition, fitness and environ- 
mentalism go hand-in-hand. Demonstrations and samples include 
breads, herbs, exotic fruits and vegetables plus lean and luscious 
desserts. Master Gardeners will lead heart-healthy walks 
through the Garden. Special activities for children. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 



SEPTEMBER ID 

Special Members' Lecture: 
"Magic in Snail Places" 

7:30 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. Linda 
Yang, noted author and lecturer on 
gardening, discusses making the most of 
containers and gardens that are limited in 
size. Meet Linda following the lecture, 
when she will autograph her new book, 
The City Gardener's Handbook: From 
Balcony to Backyard (Random House). 
Lecture is free. Limited seating. 




SEPTEMBER 21 /MEMBERS' DAY 

Lecture: "Put Tour 

Garden To Bed" 

10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Shoenberg 
Auditorium. A member of the Garden's 
horticultural staff will discuss fall planting 
and tell you how to prepare your gardens 
and yard for next spring. Free, for mem- 
bers only. Seating is limited. 

September 27 through October 6, 1991 is Australia 
Week in St. Louis. For more information or to 
request a calendar of events, please call 576-0727. 



S E P T E M B 



1-8 



SUNDAY- 
SUNDAY 



Henry Shaw Cactus Societ 
Show 

9a.m. to 8 p.m. through Labc 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily thereafl 
magnificent display of unusua 
plants, some of which are for 
Free with regular Garden 
admission. 



14 



SATURDAY 



Exhibit: "Emerging Legacy 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through 
October 20, Ridgway Center, 
nal sculptures, paintings and \ 
in other media by African-Am 
women artists from Missouri 
sponsored by Portfolio, a non 
visual arts organization. Free 
regular Garden admission. 



14-15 



S A T U R I) 

S U N D 



Greater St. Louis Men's Ga 
Clubs Show 

Noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, 9 a. 
p.m. Sunday, Ridgway Centei 
juried show, open to any amal 
gardener. Includes displays ol 
types of plants and flowers, n 
vegetables, fruits, house plan 
cacti, even home canning. Fr< 
regular Garden admission. Er 
will be judged on Saturday mc 
Call 721-5429 for more inforrr 



15 



SUNDAY 



Daylily Association Sale 

10 a.m., Ridgway Center. Thi 
souri Botanical Garden Daylil 
Association offers extra plants 
sale from the Garden's colled 
All proceeds benefit the Gard 
Come early, as supplies go qu 



16 



MONDAY 



Plant Clinic 

9 a.m. to noon, Kemper Cent 
Master Gardeners are on han 
diagnose your problems with 
dens, house plants, tree and 1; 
care, and to suggest solutions 
pies of sick plants are welcom 
Free with regular Garden 
admission. 



12. 



\BULLET1N SEPTEMBER OCTOBKR 1991 



!Z 



THURSDAY- 
SUNDAY 



lb Sale 

rs' Pre-Sale 9 a.m. to 6:30 
mrsday and Friday; public is 
) a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday 
day: Orthwein Floral Hall 
den Gate Shop. Thousands 
7 blooming bulbs will be on 
luding lilies, irises, tulips, 
. and hyacinths. Members 
20% off all merchandise, all 
s. 



U N D A Y 



21-22 



SATURDAY- 
SUNDAY 



Urban Gardening Fair 

Noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, 9a.m. to 5 
p.m. Sunday, Kemper Center for 
Home Gardening. Ninth annual fair 
includes displays and presentations, 
a juried show, and activities for chil- 
dren. Entries will be judged on 
Saturday morning. See story below. 



OCTOBER 



28-29 



SATURDAY- 
SUNDAY 



Greater St. Louis Dahlia Society 

Noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. Sunday. A spectacular display 
of blooms in all sizes and colors. 
Free with regular Garden 
admission. 



ia Week Lecture: 
tjinal Cave Art" 

Shoenberg Auditorium. A 
:ture by David Talonn, who 
\ustralia in 1990 with Earth- 
) document the rock painting 
the Wardaman people. Free 
[ular Garden admission. 



3 



SATURDAY- 
SUNDAY 



iy West Gesneriad 
1 Show 

5 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. to 
iunday, Ridgway Center, 
ig plants of the popular 
violet family. The show is 
;d to Lois Russell, a founder 



OCTOBER 0/MEMBERS' DAY 

Arboretum Fall Foliage Walk 

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. , Shaw Arboretum. Drink a 
cup of cider while you walk through the 
Arboretum and enjoy its beautiful fall coat of 
vibrant colors. Free, for members only. 




and devoted member of the society. 
Call 644-3398 for more information. 
Free with Garden admission. 



nnual Urban Gardening Fair At Kemper Center 



The Ninth Annual St. Louis Urban 
rdening Fair will be held September 21 
d 22 at the Kemper Center for Home 
rdening. The first major event to be 
Id in the Center, it is co-sponsored by 
; Garden, University Extension, and 
; Gateway to Gardening Association, a 
t-for-profit group whose goal is to help 
aple with limited income produce their 
n food from gardens within their own 
immunities. 

The Urban Gardening Fair is an annual 
ent for community gardeners to 
lebrate their accomplishments and 
ills in gardening in the Midwest. It is 
mprised of a juried competition of gar- 
n produce combined with gardening 
tures and demonstrations. The Fair is 
all-volunteer event: St. Louis Master 
rdeners, who are trained by the Gar- 
n and University Extension, will pro- 
le assistance in many facets of the Fair. 



' This year's Fair will be a more inten- 
sive educational experience, compared 
with previous years,' ' said Michael Adrio, 
Executive Director of Gateway to 
Gardening. "With the Fair being held in 
the Kemper Center, the programs will be 
more focused on gardening. Participants 
will be able to learn not only from the pro- 
grams at the Fair but from the displays at 
the Center as well." 

Participants in the Urban Gardening 
Fair can enter the produce from their gar- 
dens, fresh or canned, in the Fair. Entries 
must be received at the Ridgway Center 
between 7 and 9 a.m. on Saturday, Sep- 
tember 21. Judging will take place 9:30 
a.m. to noon on September 21. 

Lectures and demonstrations will be 
presented on a variety of gardening 
topics, including "How to Compost" and 
"Canning Your Harvest Produce." Hours 
for the fair are noon to 5 p.m. on Septem- 



29 



SUNDAY 



Boomerang Exhibitions 

11 a.m., 12:30 p.m., 2 p.m. and 
3 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. A 
special treat for Australia Week! 
World champion indoor boomerang 
thrower Dr. Barnaby Ruhe demon- 
strates his art. Sponsored by the 
St. Louis Boomerang Club and 
Return to Sender Boomerangs. 
Free with regular Garden 
admission. 



ber 21, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on September 22 . 
For further information call the Gateway 
to Gardening Association at 832-0380. 

Saturday Gardening 
Demonstrations 

St. Louis Master Gardeners present a 
variety of gardening programs on Satur- 
days in the Kemper Center for Home 
Gardening at the Garden. The demon- 
strations take place at 1:00 p.m. and are 
repeated at 2:00 p.m. 

Topics include "Revitalizing your 
Hanging Baskets," "Keeping your Lawn 
Green," "Air Layering Techniques," 
"Creating Holiday Decorations from Your 
Garden" and "Putting Your Roses to 
Bed." The schedule of topics has been 
set through December 28, and the pro- 
gram will continue in 1992 . The Saturday 
demonstrations are free with regular Gar- 
den admission. For more information on 
the demonstrations, call the Center at 
577-9440. 

Wilderness Wagon Rides 
Again 

This fall the Arboretum will again offer 
narrated tours of the beautiful Ozark 
countryside on the open-sided Wilder- 
ness Wagon on Sundays from September 
15 through November 3. Depending on 
the season, visitors may see delicate 
wildflowers, the tall grass prairie, fall 
foliage, many species of birds, or with 
luck, deer or wild turkey. The Wagon 
leaves the Visitor Center on an hourly 
schedule and stops at the Trail House. 
Visitors may spend time walking on the 
woodland trails and return to the Visitor 
Center on a later trip. 

The Wilderness Wagon also may be 
reserved by groups Monday through Fri- 
day from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. For more 
information on the Sunday tours or group 
rentals, please call the Arboretum at 
1-742-3512 or 1-742-0850. 



13. 



BULLETIN SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 1991 I 



From the Membership Office 



MEMBERS' TRAVEL PROGRAM 

Madagascar 

OCTOBER 18 TO NOVEMBER 1, 1991 

Madagascar, an island off the east coast of Africa, is one of the world's biological 
treasures. It is home to 10,000 plant species, three-quarters of which are unique to 
the island. Many of the island's extraordinary plants and animals have never been 
seen or studied by scientists. 

However, deforestation has already destroyed 90 percent of the country's forests. 
Many of its plants and animals are extinct or threatened with extinction in the next 20 
to 30 years. 

The Garden has been working in Madagascar since 1972, conducting research 
and assisting Malagasy scientists in developing research and conservation programs. 
The Garden has collaborated with Malagasy government agencies to plan and secure 
funding for Tsimbazaza Botanical and Zoological Park and for a 1200-square mile 
national park on the Masoala Peninsula, the island's only remaining virgin rain forest. 
The national park is a landmark project combining land preservation with local 
economic development. 

The tour for Garden members will be led by Dr. George Schatz, the Garden's 

resident research botanist in Madagascar, and by 
Tamra Engelhorn Raven. Mrs. Raven, wife of the 
Garden's director Peter H. Raven, earned a 
master's degree in biology from Stanford Univer- 
sity in 1972. A world traveler who works closely 
with the Garden's research program, Mrs. Raven 
has written and lectured widely on the crisis of 
tropical deforestation. 

This tour offers Garden members an extraordi- 
nary travel experience. Observe at first hand the 
Garden's work in preserving the Earth's precious 
biological heritage for future generations, led by 
knowledgeable guides. For more information on 
this exciting adventure call Brenda Banjak at 

Mrs. Peter H. Raven (314) 577-9500. 





The Bay ofAnton/fil, seen from the Masoala Peninsula of Madagascar. 



Membership Dues To 
Increase in 1992 

Membership dues for regular level 
members at the Garden will increase from 
$40 to $45 in 1992. There will be no 
increase for older adults 65 years of age 
and over. That membership will remain at 
$40 and will include the same benefits as a 
regular membership. Benefits for a regu- 
lar membership are: 

• Free admission for two adults and chil- 
dren under the age of 18. 

• More than 20 invitations during the year 
to special Garden events including four 
"members only" flower show pre- 
views, 12 members' days, and four or 
more major members' events. 

• A 10 percent discount at the Garden 
Gate Shop. 

• Free subscription to the bimonthly 
Bulletin. 

•Free reciprocal admission at other 
botanical gardens throughout the 
country. 

• Discounts on education classes and 
facility rentals at the Garden. 

• Travel opportunities through the Mem- 
bership Travel Program. 

The new dues structure will take 
effect January 1, 1992. Members renew- 
ing prior to that time can renew at the $40 
level. 



Moving? Please Remember 
To Send Us Your New Address. 

To avoid missing any of your membership 
mailings, you must give us your new address at 
least three weeks before you move. Please 
enclose the mailing label on the back cover of 
this Bulletin, and mail to: Membership Office, 
Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, 
St. Louis, MO 63166. 

Name: 



Old Address: 


City 


State 


Zip 




New Address: 


(Date effet 


tive: ) 


City 


State 


Zip 





11. 



I BULLETIN I SEPTEMBER Oe"lt)BKK 1991 




Left to right: Committee chairmen Ellen and Henry Dubinsky, Nora and Walter Stern, Kathy 
and Sam Hayes, Marshall Hilsberg and Pat McAllister. 

Lord & Taylor Salutes the Garden 

Wednesday, July 24, 1991, Lord & Taylor at the St. Louis Galleria was the setting 
for a spectacular premiere party celebrating the opening of the store. Lord & Taylor 
chose the Garden to be honored by the benefit, and the beautiful decorations were 
inspired by features of the Garden's landscape: the Gladney Rose Garden, the Milles 
sculptures and the water lily pools, the Climatron, and the Japanese Garden. Party 
goers at the black tie affair were serenaded by musicians throughout the store, dined 
at elegant buffets, and received complimentary gifts from Lord & Taylor. 

We are grateful to the May Department Stores Company and to Marshall Hilsberg, 
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Lord & Taylor, for hosting this lovely evening 
in honor of the Garden. We also extend special thanks to: Arthur Andersen & Co.; 
The Boatmen's National Bank of St. Louis; Enterprise Leasing Company; Mr. and 
Mrs. Sam Fox; Jefferson Smurfit Corporation; and Mercantile Bank of St. Louis N.A. 



A Golden Anniversary 
Cooking School 

In honor of the St. Louis Herb Soci- 
ety's 50th anniversary, preparation of a 
festive celebration dinner will be demon- 
strated by members of the Society at the 
Laclede Gas Kitchens, 4118 Shrewsbury 
Avenue on Wednesday, September 25, 
10 a.m. to noon. The presentation will 
feature recipes suitable for the upcoming 
holiday season and will use a variety of 
herbs. Preparation of a complete menu of 
appetizers, salad, a main entree, vegeta- 
bles, bread and dessert will be illustrated. 
You will come away with wonderful ideas 
for your holiday entertaining! Samples of 
appetizers and holiday breads will be pro- 
vided along with a refreshing herbal 
punch. Recipes for all samples and 
demonstration items will be supplied. 
There is a fee of $15 for members, $18 for 
non-members, per person. Advance 
registration is required and reservations 
are limited. Call 577-5140. 




From the Garden Gate Shop 



Fall Bulb Sale 

Members ' Pre-Sale 
Thursday and Friday 
September 19 and 20, 1991 
9:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 

Public Invited 
Saturday and Sunday 
September 21 and 22, 1991 
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Visit Orthwein Floral Hall for spring 
blooming bulbs including species, 
hybrids, naturalizing and indoor forcing 
bulbs, plus hardy mums in Fall colors. The 
Garden Gate Shop features gardening 
tools and accessories, gifts, books, and 
stationery. Members will receive a 20 
percent discount on all merchandise, all 
four days. 



1992 Calendar Featuring Photographs by 
Jack Jennings 

The spectacular new Missouri Botani- 
cal Garden Calendar for 1992 is now avail- 
able in the Shop. It is printed in full color 
on recycled paper. 

The 16 x 12 inch poster-size calendar 
features photographs of the Garden taken 
by Jack Jennings. A native of St. Louis, 
Jack began photographing the Garden in 
1978. He takes thousands of slides every 
year, in all seasons and types of weather. 
The 1992 Calendar is his eleventh, and 
his beautiful photographs are cherished 
by all who love the Garden. The 1992 Cal- 
endar is available in the Shop or by mail 
(see form at right) at $10.95. 



Halloween Fun at the Shop 

Attention all goblins, ghosts, witches, warlocks and bats! The Garden Gate Shop has 
gifts and decorations to make your Halloween celebration a real treat! 



1992 Calendar Order Form 

Please send me Missouri Botanical 

Garden Calendars at $10.95 each (plus $2.75 post- 
age- and handling). 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY 

TELEPHONE 



STATE 



ZIP 



J Enclosed is my check for $_ 



Payable to: Missouri Botanical Garden 

Please charge: 

VISA/MC No. 



Expiration date 

Name as it appears on card: 



Mail to: Missouri Botanical Garden 
Garden Gate Shop 
P.O. Box 299, St. I.ouis, MO 63166 



15. 



BULLETIN SKITKMBKK OCTOBER 1991 




An Old-Fashioned Fourth 



Forty thousand St. Louisans— family and friends, young and old— came to the Garden 
Tower Grove Park for an old-fashioned Independence Day celebration and picnic, and a gc 
time was had by all. 

The event was co-chaired by Nora Stern, a Trustee of the Garden and a member of th< 
Members' Board, and Ann Auer, representing Friends of Tower Grove Park. Our special 
thanks go to the committee and to the more than 250 volunteers and staff who helped to i 
the day a success. We also are very grateful to the sponsors of the event: Amoco Oil Corr 
Coin Acceptors, Inc., Coleman/Fannie May Candies Foundation, Commerce Bank of St. 1 
Cupples Company Manufacturers, Pepsi-Cola, Shop N'Save, Southwestern Bell Corpora 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Kresko, Mr. William K. Orthwein, Mrs. Marion K. Piper, and the 
St. Louis Post-Dispatch. 



Hi. 



iBULLETIN SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 1991 



- - i 




RICHARD BENKOF 



"On the 4th of July 1991 
we stopped, 
as a nation, 

to celebrate our freedom. 
It was my fortieth fourth. 
From childhood to parenthood 
they have all been different. 
Some quiet, some wild. 

This one, for me, 

the most meaningful. 

This independence day I spent with 

my family and my neighbors 

in Tower Grove Park 

and the Missouri Botanical Garden 

who produced an ' 'Old-Fashioned 

Fourth of July". 



(July 



taps friends and neighbors said it best: 

'I just had to drop you a note and tell you how much our family 
yed the Old-Fashioned Fourth of July celebration that you and the 
> at Tower Grove Park put on. It truly was a good old-fashioned 
The planning and organization were excellent, the activities/ 
rtainment were just right, and everything ran so smoothly, 
is a relaxing, family-oriented day and we enjoyed everything 

— The Eichwald Family, Richard, Jill, Maggie, Tom 



That day, 

there was an elegance of spirit, 
all around. 
A simple, joyful, 
sense of community. 
No hype, no hustle, no bravado. 
Just a gentle coming together 
in a beautiful, peaceful setting 
to commend our liberty. 
A glimpse of America I long to 
feel again." 

— Walter F. Gunn, 
Resident, City of St. Louis 



Hl'U.ETIN SKITEMBER OCTOBER 1991 I 



17. 



Center for Plant Conservation 



CPC Assisting in Biocontrol 



A number of federal agencies, state 
agencies and university groups are 
involved in the biological control of vari- 
ous exotic, introduced weeds. One of the 
more pervasive of these weeds is leafy 
spurge (Euphorbia esula L.), a deep 
rooted perennial member of the Euphor- 
biaceae family. A native to Eurasia, its 
introduction into North America in 1872 
has caused serious problems for ranchers 
in western and mid-western states. 
Infestations in the Midwest and western 
states appear to be unrelated to the east- 
ern infestations and are thought to have 
originated in eastern Europe from impor- 
tations of grain and grass seed contami- 
nated with the weed seed. 

Leafy spurge is an aggressive peren- 
nial which tends to displace other vegeta- 
tion in pasture and rangeland habitats. 
Reductions of forage from 10 percent to 
100 percent have been observed. Leafy 
spurge currently infests more than 1.2 
million acres in North Dakota alone. 
Agricultural economists at North Dakota 
State University estimate that the weed 
results in annual losses of nearly $9 mil- 
lion in North Dakota. The impact of leafy 
spurge upon the native flora remains 
largely unknown. 

Biological control of weeds usually 
involves the use of insects and/or patho- 
gens to attack and control the density and 
dispersal of the weed. The classical form 
of biological control utilizes biological con- 
trol agents collected from areas where the 
weed is native. Biological control agents 
are closely screened prior to release to 
insure that they do not attack economi- 
cally important plants or native plants, 
especially native plants which are consid- 
ered threatened or endangered. 

It is with this last point that the Center 
for Plant Conservation has been assisting 
various researchers around the world in 
their search for effective and safe biologi- 
cal control agents of leafy spurge. 

Through a contract and cooperative 
agreement with the United States 
Department of Agriculture, Animal and 
Plant Health Inspection Service, the CPC 
through its affiliated botanic gardens has 
collected and propagated various native 
Euphorbia species. Following collection 
and/or propagation by the participating 
botanic gardens, the plant materials are 
shipped to the USDA, Mission Biological 
Control Laboratory, Mission, Texas, 
where additional numbers are propagated 



from the original stock material. 

These plant materials are then pro- 
vided to biological control researchers at 
the USDA, Agriculture Research Service 
at Bozeman, Montana, Frederick, Mary- 
land and Rome, Italy. Living plants and 
seed are also provided to the Interna- 
tional Institute of Biological Control in 
Delemont, Switzerland. All of these vari- 
ous groups utilize the plants in a screen- 
ing process to help insure that new 
biological control agents, whether they be 
insects or disease pathogens, will not 
have an adverse effect on our native 
spurges. 

The CPC has been instrumental in 
coordinating the collection and propaga- 
tion activities with various botanic gar- 
dens within the United States. Plant 
materials for the weed biological control 
programs have been provided by the San 
Antonio Botanic Gardens, Bok Tower 
Gardens, the University of California 
Botanic Garden, Garden in the Woods, 
and the Holden Arboretum. 

—Paul E. Parker 

Assistant Laboratory Director 

United States Department of Agriculture 

Mission Biological Control laboratory 
Mission, Texas 

From Plant Conservation, Summer 1991, Vol. 6, 
No. 1. Published by the Center for Plant Conserva- 
tion, reprinted by permission. 



Mellon Grant Continues 
Support 

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation 
has announced a two-year grant of 
$300,000 to the Center for Plant Conser- 
vation for the years 1991-1992 . The grant 
is the foundation's largest ever to the 
Center for operating purposes, and will 
support the organization's continuing 
efforts to build a strong network of Gar- 
dens maintaining the National Collection. 

"This grant represents an extraordi- 
nary expression of confidence in the Cen- 
ter," says CPC Chairman, William A. 
Truslow. "We are deeply honored by the 
continued support and encouragement by 
this Foundation for our efforts to pre- 
serve the native flora of the United 
States." 

The Center is presently completing a 
challenge grant from the Foundation, 
which matches contributions to the Plant 
Conservation Fund to support the main- 



tenance of species in the National Collec- 
tion. For information on how to sponsor 
an endangered species, please call the 
Center's offices at 314-577-9450. 



Volunteers Needed 

Rapid growth in the Garden's programs 
has created an urgent need in several 
departments for volunteers with special 
skills and interests. If any of these jobs is 
of interest to you, please call Jeanne 
McGilligan at 577-5187 immediately. 
Volunteer Instructors 

Energetic people who love children 
and plants are needed for weekly day- 
time programs for school groups from 
kindergarten through sixth grade. There 
will be eight training sessions at the 
Garden in late September and October. 
This is a challenging opportunity to 
gain knowledge and give children some- 
thing very special. Call 577-5187 before 
September 12. 
Arboretum 

The implementation of the Master 
Plan has the Arboretum staff working on 
dozens of new projects. Glade restoration 
work is described on Page XX, and the 
July Bulletin discussed the new wetlands 
construction. There is a continuing and 
growing need for volunteers to work with 
ecological management, education, his- 
tory and archives, horticulture, main- 
tenance, and as naturalists. 
Plant Records 

The March Bulletin described the 
Plant Records office and its work main- 
taining an accurate computer record of 
every living plant on the Garden grounds 
and in the greenhouses. The work 
requires experience with computer data- 
bases, and is a chance to be part of a hard- 
working team. 

Rental Facilities Available 
A Year In Advance 

Garden members and people in the 
community are aware that many of the 
Garden's beautiful facilities can be rented 
for meetings, private parties and wed- 
dings. Shoenberg Auditorium, Monsanto 
Hall, the Spink Pavilion, and some out- 
door locations are available, with full 
catering and support services. 

A new policy for booking these facili- 
ties recently has been implemented. Now 
rentals can be arranged up to one year in 
advance of the date of your event. For 
assistance in making your reservations 
and arrangements, call Facility Rentals at 
577-5126. 



18. 



\BULLETIN SEPTEMBER (KTOBKR 1991 



Trustee Profile 



Dr. Helen E. Nash 




Dr. Helen E. Nash became a member 
of the Garden's Board of Trustees in 
June, 1991. A long-time member of the 
Garden, Dr. Nash has been a dedicated 
participant in Garden activities for many 
years. 

Originally from Atlanta, Dr. Nash 
came to St. Louis to complete her intern- 
ship at Homer G. Phillips Hospital in 
1945. She has remained in St. Louis since 
that time and established a private prac- 
tice affiliated with St. Louis Children's 
Hospital in pediatrics. 

A dedicated child advocate, she has 



served as the president of the St. Louis 
Children's Hospital Staff Association and 
has been active on several hospital com- 
mittees. She is presently a professor of 
clinical pediatrics at Washington Univer- 
sity School of Medicine. Concerns about 
health care and the general welfare of chil- 
dren encouraged Dr. Nash to become 
actively involved with the St. Louis Chil- 
dren's Hospital Staff Society and other 
organizations such as the Health and Wel- 
fare Council of Metropolitan St. Louis. 
She also has demonstrated a strong com- 
mitment to better understand and provide 
support systems for the mentally retarded 
and disabled population and served as 
president of the Board of the Mentally 
Retarded and Developmentally Disabled. 

Dr. Nash is also a member of the 
Board of the Saint Louis Symphony and 
has been a longstanding supporter of it. 
An avid traveler, Dr. Nash travels widely 
and has devoted time volunteering in 
other countries. 

"Helen's outstanding interest and 
expertise plus her wonderful love of the 
Missouri Botanical Garden will be an 
enormous benefit to the Garden's effort. 
We are so pleased that she agreed to 
serve," said Sage Wightman, Board 
president. 

Dr. Nash has lived in St. Louis since 
1945. 




Garden Guides Elect New Officers 

Newly elected officers for 1991-92 are (above, left to right): Doris Schulte, co-chair; Helen 
Hilliker, tour schedules; Florence Hoey, co-chair; Catherine Schumann, secretary-treasurer. 
The Garden Guides are a dedicated group of 87 men and women who lead tours of the 
grounds and educate visitors about history, horticulture, research, sculpture, architecture, 
and natural sciences at the Garden. They attend monthly classes to keep their knowledge 
current and offer tours seven days a week. 



IN M E M R I A M 

Mrs. William H. Schield 

A dear friend of the Garden, Emma 
Schield, died July 6, 1991 at the age of 92. 
Mrs. Schield was a longtime Garden 
member and for many years her generous 
annual gifts helped to underwrite the cost 
of the highly popular Garden calendar. 

Mrs. Schield was especially pleased 
that the calendar reached thousands of 
people throughout the world, depicting 
the unique beauty of the Garden. Each 
year the calendar features some of the 
loveliest views of the Garden, in all 
seasons. 

In addition to the Garden, Mrs. 
Schield was deeply committed to several 
other St. Louis cultural institutions, 
including the Saint Louis Symphony, Saint 
Louis Zoo, Saint Louis Art Museum, and 
Opera Theatre of St. Louis. According to 
her family, Mrs. Schield maintained an 
active and keen interest in these institu- 
tions throughout her life and encouraged 
them to do the same. 

Mrs. Schield 's generous support for 
the Garden's calendar project benefited 
many people. She will be remembered 
with fondness for her special role in 
recording the Garden in such an inspiring 
and lasting way. 



Gift Planning 



WTiat is gift planning? Why would a 
botanical garden have a program devoted 
to money and estate issues? The Gar- 
den's gift planning program is a service to 
its donors, providing financial and tax 
information that could be useful to anyone 
who is considering a gift. 

The federal tax laws have long recog- 
nized that charitable institutions, like the 
Garden, are making significant contribu- 
tions to this society, often relieving the 
government of the burden of those activi- 
ties. Therefore, the law includes many 
provisions to make charitable giving 
attractive by encouraging private support 
of charitable institutions. These laws cre- 
ate tax advantages or tax deductions that 
are available under particular conditions. 
Benefits may be related to income taxes, 
gift taxes, or estate taxes. 

We are grateful to our friends who 
support the work of the Garden. Gift 
planning is a service that we provide to 
facilitate that support. For more informa- 
tion about the program or about our free 
publications please call Ernestina Short at 
577-9532. 



19. 



BULLETIN SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 1991 




^ Dr. H. Carroll Parish, adoptive 
father of Koichi Kawana. 



Memorial to Koichi Kawana Is Dedicated 



July 10, 1991, friends of the late Koichi 
Kawana gathered for a private ceremony 
at the Garden to dedicate a granite stele 
placed at the east entrance to the Jap- 
anese Garden. Professor Kawana 
designed Seiwa-en, the "garden of pure, 
clear harmony and peace," and super- 
vised its development until his death last 
year. 



The small granite column, chosen to 
be in harmony with the landscape, dis- 
plays the Kawana family crest, Koichi 
Kawana's name, and the legend "Garden 
of the Little Prince," an affectionate nick- 
name for Prof. Kawana. The Japanese 
characters on the stele were carved from 
calligraphy executed by the Rev. Kanshu 
Ikuta, a prominent Japanese calligrapher. 



Library Receives IMS 
Grant 

The Garden Library has received a 
grant of $2,162 from the Institute of 
Museum Services for materials to pro- 
vide conservation treatment for 2,150 
books in the Ewan Collection. The Ewan 
Collection, purchased by the Garden in 
1986, includes the research materials, 
personal papers, and 5,000 books col- 
lected by Joseph Ewan, an eminent 
historian of natural history. The conserva- 
tion work will be carried out by Vicki Lee, 
library conservator, and four volunteers: 
Paula Brooks, Robert Buck, Patrick 
Kegin, and Jane Thomas. Because the 
grant funds cover only a portion of the 
conservation needed in the Ewan Collec- 
tion, the library will continue to seek 
funds to complete the conservation of this 
important collection. 

Constance P. Wolf, 
Librarian 



Tributes 



May -June 1991 



In Honor Of 



"A Friend" 

Mrs. Mary S. Orr 

Mrs. Jeanne Adelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Sol Morton Isaac- 
Mrs. Ceci Lowenhaupt 
Mrs. A. L. Netterjr. 
Mrs. Walter Sears 
Mr. Rudolf Baum 

Mrs. Riette L. Frank 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer V. A. 
Bayer 

Ms. Judy A. Bayer 
Tom Benner 

Mrs. Rose Anne Davis 
Ms. Jean Bloch 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Stein 
Mr. and Mrs. Vincent 
Bommarito 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Walther 
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce R. Yoder 
Elaine Breckenridge 
Kary and Ryan Matthews 
Mrs. Charlene Bry 

Mr. and Mrs. Melville J. Dunkelman 
Dr. and Mrs. Alvin R. Frank 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald K. Greenberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Al S. Loeb 

Mrs. Josephine Davis 

Mrs. Rose Anne Davis 
Dr. Larry De Buhr 

Temple Israel Sisterhood 

Jean Donnelly 
Michael Roberts 

Mr. and Mrs. George F Heege III 



Harry 



Mr. and Mrs. 
Driemeier 

Miss Mary L. Sunderman 
Henry W. Dubinsky 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Dyer 

Paul Koebbe Family 
John Oefelein Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Eiseman Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Francis Jr. 
Mrs. Myrtle Euler 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Halpern 

Prof. Joseph Ewan 

Mr. Francis H. Cabot 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry N. D. 
Fisher 

Mrs. I. F. Fausekjr. 

Godwin Lane Bridge Club 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Fletcher 

Bob and Nancy Heinze 

Nada Fremder-Krauss 

Jessica Friedlander 

Mr. Al Friedman 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 

Mrs. Mary Garvey 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan B. Kaufman 

C. B. and Emily Gebhard 

Friends and Family 
Mr. David Guarraia 
Fred and Louise Goldberg 
Berkeley Gunther 
Kary and Ryan Matthews 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred M. 

Hannebaum 
Mr. Roger H.Volk 



Mr. and Mrs. Lewis T. Hardy 

Mr. and Mrs. George Barnes Jr. 

Miss Iris Guenther 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin F. Guth 

Mr. and Mrs. Otway W. Rash III 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Stolz 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Harmon 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Schorr 

Mrs. Trude Heiman 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Freund 

Mr. and Mrs. George 

Hellmuth 
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Hall 
Mr. Paul Gordon Henderson 
Miss Cynthia Kay Steinback 

Mrs. Samuel J. Freund 
Idie Herzmark 

Mr. and Mrs. John Torrey Berger Jr. 

Laird Hetlage 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Sher 
Mrs. Gerda Hill 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger H. Volk 

Peter Hoffman 
Constance Orchard 

Mrs. Audrey Senturia 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Hoffmeister 

Mr. and Mrs. Kyrle Boldt Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kyrle Boldt Sr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Brauer 
Mr. and Mrs. Philip K. Marblestone 
Mr. and Mrs. John W. Marsh 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Reese 
Ruth Homeyer 

A. H. Homeyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hoppe 

Jim and Linda Reed 



Mr. and Mrs. Sandy Israel 

Jeff Balkin 
Randee Blum 

Jack Jennings 

Hermann Garden Club 
Mr. Roy W. Jordan 

Mr. and Mrs. Quintus L. Drennanjr. 
Mr. Bill Kaplan 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 

Peggy Keegan-Crockett 

Ryan Matthews 

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Kienzle 

Theresia, Jo, Emma Bumm 
Betty Anne King 
Philip Joseph Tocco 

Mark and Maria Weingartner 
Mr. and Mrs. Rich Klein 

Neil and Carol Schneider 

Mrs. Susan Korsmeyer 

Jessica Friedlander 
Mrs. Merline B. Kovacik 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl H. Barthold 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Kramer 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold M. Goldman 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. 
Kruse 

Mr. and Mrs. Westell A. Neu 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. 
Kuhlmann 

Mr. and Mrs. George Barnes Jr. 

Richard Lahann 

Mrs. Rose Anne Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. L. T. Lawless 

Mrs. O. R. Bailey 
Mrs. John V. Ellison 
Mrs. Sewell T. Kauffman 



20. 



\BULLETIN I SKITKMBKK OCTOBKR 1991 



Mr. Robert Lewin 

Mr. Lou Ettman 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. Harvey Shapiro 

Ms. Jeanne Liberman 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Francis Jr. 
Mrs. Marilyn Lipton 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur I. Auer 

Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Bearman 

Charlene and Richie Bry 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Byers 

Norman Davis and Suzy Seldin 

Mr. and Mrs. Melville J. Dunkelman 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred C. Einstein 

Dr. and Mrs. Alvin R. Frank 

Mrs. Sue Gallop 

Mr. and Mrs. Tilford Hearsh 

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. John Isaacs III 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Jacobs 

Mr. and Mrs. Craig M. Kaminer 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Levis Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. AI S. Loeb 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Loeb 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Lux 

Dr. and Mrs. Carl Lyss 

Louise and Barry Mandel 

Nancy Meyer and Marc Weiss 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Prince 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Samuels 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Scherck Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harlan Steinbaum 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tober 

Joan and Buddy Turner 

Mr. and Mrs. Sanford W. Weiss 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Richard Wyman 

Mrs. Marjorie Loeb 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 

Miss Jennifer C. Lortz 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Desmond Lee Jr. 

Nancy Lyon 

Robert Zahnweh 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Evans Crosby 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mass 

Mr. and Mrs. Macy S. Abrams 
Margaret and Diane Hurwitz 
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. C. 
Matthews Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 
Robin and Fred Max 

Mrs. Nancy Present 

Tom and Molly McConnell 

Friends and Family 

Mrs. Bernard McDonald 

Her children, their spouses, 
and her grandchildren 

Miss Patricia L. McLaughlin 

Bill and Shirley Smith 
Dr. Brenda Melson 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Becker 
Steve and Elsie Milla 

Their children and their families 
Mr. H. Leighton Morrill 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvard K. Hecker 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 

Dr. Susan Nelson 

Jessica Friedlander 
Mr. Eric P. Newman 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Scharff II 
Mr. and Mrs. Art Oliver 

Mrs. M. J. Grzesiowski 



Our Lady of Lourdes School 
Students, Especially the 

Class of '98 

Mrs. Doris Grattendick 
Mr. and Mrs. Heino Pull 
Dr. Peter H . Raven 

Missouri Botanical Garden- 
Members Board 
Dr. and Mrs. Stephen L. Post 

Carl and Polly Reitz 

Ruth Heinicke 

Mr. Charles I. Rose 

Mr. and Mrs. John T Loire 
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 

Roth-Roffy 
Mr. and Mrs. Milton J. Canis 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. 

Ruebel 
Mr. and Mrs. Melvin A. Oelze 
Mrs. Lili Sachar 
Jessica Friedlander 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Scott Jr. 

Barb Berger 

Cindy Maritz 

Terry Morrow 

Ann Scott 

Jean Varker 

Pat Shipley 

Kary and Ryan Matthews 

Mr. Sydney M. ShoenbergJr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Margaretten 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond W. Peters II 
Dr. and Mrs. Llewellyn Sale Jr. 
Nancy and Barry Sanders 
Mrs. Henry Scherck 
Mrs. Florence G. Stern 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Silverman 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 

Jeffrey Silverstone 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold N. Kravin 

Mrs. Carolyn Singer 

Mr. Jim Singer 

Jeff, Bo, Michael, Thomas Demerath 

Mr. James A. Singer 

Mrs. Max Hellman 

Miss Frances J. Levis 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin B. Meissner Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Dr. and Mrs. Llewellyn Sale Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Morton Singer 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Francis Jr. 

Mr. Leonard Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Zemmel 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Sokolik 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip N. Hirsch 
Mr. and Mrs. Milton I. Moldane 
Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 
Dr. and Mrs. Oscar H. Soule 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 

Spitzfaden 
Mr. and Mrs. William Schorr 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Walz 

Dr. and Mrs. Franz Steinberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan B. Kaufman 
Miss Melissa G. Stern 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Halpern 
Russ Stone 

Kary and Maury, Ryan and Walker 
Matthews 

Miss Marie Taylor 

Mrs. J. Sheppard Smith Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. Jay H. 
Teutenberg 

Velda E. Crews 
(iretchen Gilles 
Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Thies 

Mr. and Mrs. William Thies 

Mrs. Patty Towle, and the 
late Dr. Joseph Towle 

Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Drozda Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Tribble 

Marcia and Walt Carpenter 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tripodi 

Mr. and Mrs. William Cullinane 

Twentieth Century Art Club 

Mr. Paul U. Bettman 

Sue and Ben Uchitelle 

Bernard and Sally Stein 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin S. Taylor 

Dr. Monica Ultmann 

Jessica Friedlander 

Mr. and Mrs. David Victor 

Mr. and Mrs. Melroy Hut ruck 

Mr. T. Mitchell Wall 

Ms. Ellen F. Harris 
Mr. David Wallace 
Mr. and Mrs. Jeff L. Shear 
Mr. Carl T. Warner 

Mrs. Ruth I. Schury 

Mr. and Mrs. Steve 
Wasserman 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Stone 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Weinstock 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Francis Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John W. Marsh 

Eugene and Sylvia Weissman 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Freedman 
Lance Corp. Orrin S. 

Wightman IV 
Mr. and Mrs. John Brodhead Jr. 
Dr. Max Wolfrum 
Miss Patricia McCormick 
Mary and Louis Zorensky 
Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Freedman 



In Memory Of 



Dr. Morris Abrams 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry A. Uhlemeyer 

Mr. William Albrecht 

Jo McDonald 

Mr. Norris Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Ettman 

Mrs. Mary Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren R. Kunstman 

Mr. Ray Anderson 

Ms. Melissa Vance 

Mr. Greg Ziegenfuss 

Mrs. Marie Aronson 

Ms. Jannelle Evans 
Mrs. J. Arthur Baer 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald K. Greenberg 

Mrs. David R. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. White IV 

Mrs. Minnie Bahle 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack R. Bodine 

Father of Dr. Carl Baker 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kibler 



Glenn D. Barker Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Gee 

Mrs. Oneta Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Dale Spencer 

Mrs. Lois Barnett 

Rosalie and Jim Cooper 
Mr. David Baron 
Neighbors and Residents of 

Oak Park Drive 
Mrs. Dorothy Orthwein Bates 
Mr. and Mrs. George Budke 
Mrs. Lucille Beall 
Scott Beall Family 

William T. Bebermeyer 

Richard Bebermeyer 
Mrs. Bernice Hilgendorf 
Mr. and Mrs. William N. Kelley 
Mrs. Marian R. Meyer 
Robert and Doris Monzyk 
Mrs. Ethel Murphy 
Mrs. Shirley A. Parker 
St. Louis Children's Hospital- 
Pharmacy Staff 
Randolph Tibbits 
Nathalie Berwald 
Dr. and Mrs. Max Deutch 
Mrs. Henry Lowenhaupt 
Jane and Albert Steinman 

Fred Beuckman 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Brooke Hoey 

Marie and Walter 
Blankschaen 

Mrs. Linda W. Jones 
Jerry Blase 
AT&T Friends 
Cindy Kaye 
Patricia Komlos 
Beverly Lorenzo 

Mrs. Marion Niedringhaus 
Block 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Kresko 
Mrs. Carol G. Stan- 
Mr. Leo Bogler 
Ms. Georgia Kahrhoff 
Mrs. Corinne Botta 
Margaret Harmon 
Patricia Kromer 

Mr. Harold Brackey 

Mrs. Ruth Schwartz 
Mrs. Mildred Brady 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore W. Fivian Sr. 

Mr. Walter L. Brady Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Drew Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin F Guth 

Mr. and Mrs. H. I vis Johnston 

Dr. Henry Bratkowski 

Mr. Fred J. Rock 

Father of Gigi Brightman 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Woolsey 

Mrs. Berenice Brinker 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Sullivan 

Mr. John A. Burke 

Mr. and Mrs. William P. Haviluk Jr. 

Mr. Frank Bush 

Mr. and Mrs. Leamon R. Barbro 

Mr. and Mrs. Carlisle Kinyon 

Mrs. Mary Leyhe 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Pflueger 

Mrs. Louise Calloway 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Pisani 

continued on next page 



BULLETIN SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 19911 



21. 



Tributes 



continued 

Arthur Christ 

Louise Langbein 

Mrs. Elizabeth Cisco 

Miss Genevieve M. Spencer 
Mr. Dan L.Clark 
Paraquad, Inc. 
Mrs. Florence Clark 
Mrs. Nancy R. Burke 
Mr. Lloyd Clay 

Mr. and Mrs. Dean Kales 

Miss Kathleen Clune 

Mr. and Mrs. John Bauman 

Bertha Collie 

Missouri Botanical Garden- 
Members Board 
Mr. Mike Constance 
Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Basinski 
Mrs. Chris Bauman 
Mr. Robert Dankenbring 

Kelly, Lauren and Boyd Beimel 

Mr. Tom Dawson 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Elbert 

Mr. John Kiske 

Mr. Albert DeBrecht 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray J. Hammer 

Mr. and Mrs. Raul Pisani 

Mrs. Dorothy Divert 

Ms. Kathleen Clucas 

Mr. Duncan C. Dobson 

Mr. and Mrs. James G. Alfring 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew H. Baur 
Dr. and Mrs. James T. Chamness 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Elliott Jr. 
Mrs. Eleanor C. Johnson 
Mrs. Daniel Upthegrove 
Mrs. Rose Etta Drury 
Mr. Peter A. Postal 
Sara Durrani 
I toris Marner 

Mrs. Audrey Edmonds 

Mrs. Jean M. Bussard 

Mrs. Esther Schneider Epp 
Mrs. Geraldine Epp Smith 
Ms. Jeanette Epstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 

Mrs. Sylvia Epstein 
Mrs. Blanche J. Freed 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Kratz 

Mr. Charles Erwin 

M. and Mrs. Jack Brummer 
Mr. Joseph B. Fisher 
Mr. and Mrs. David Zuckerman 
Mrs. Mary M. Floerke 
Mrs. Florence S. Guth 
Josephine Francisco 
Mr. and Mrs. G. Brooke Hoey 

Mr. Benet F. Friberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin R. Breihan 

Mrs. Edyth Friedman 

Geraldine Brink 

Jane Glover 

Eveline Kaercher 

Wilhelmina Linberg 

Audrey Maher 

Mr. Joserh H. Fritts 

Mrs. Marie K. Grzesiowski 



William and Mary Jane 
Gallagher 

Dr. Sheila Golden 

Jane Kaopuiki 

Ms. Ellen Knoernschild 

Mrs. Betty B. Gardner 

Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Palmer 

Mr. Rob Garner 

Sarah and Lee Zeve 

Mr. Gerald M. Gaynor 

Mrs. Louise A. Gaynor 
Mr. Albert Gerber 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Harper 
Mrs. Dorothy Gerding 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Greaves 

Mrs. Lucille Gew inner 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Bedell 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Burke 

Mr. and Mrs. King Graf 

Donald A. Hiller 

Joan B. Hiller 

Mrs. John A. Holscher 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward B. See 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard N. Thoelke 

Miss Mary Frances Gildehaus 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Piper 

Elaine Glick 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Francis Jr. 

Mr. Frederick L. Goebel Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin M. Meinberg 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Russell 

Mr. Morey Goldstein 

Dr. Ira Dubinsky 

Dr. Lynn C. Dubinsky 

Mrs. Ralph Green 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Voellinger 

Mr. Al Gremaud 

Mrs. Joan Esposito 
Victor Gruer 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Berlman 
Mr. and Mrs. 0. Klostermeier 

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Klostermeier 
McEvoy Sons and Families 

Mr. Edward T. Haase 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Walther 
Mr. Rudolf Haffenreffer III 
Mrs. Carol C. Bitting 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter H. Bunce 
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Cornwell Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Singer 
Mrs. Leonard Hall 
Mr. Howard F. Baer 
Mrs. Ruth Hall 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald F. Barr 
Miss Helen Hausner 
Marie and Fran Bergmann 
Mrs. D. Goodrich Gamble 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hoops 
Miss Lucile Quernheim 
Mr. Floyd Heil 
Mr. and Mrs. Don Hoehne 
Mr. Carl R. Helms 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin Jr. 
Mrs. Theresa Harris Hinnant 
Mr. and Mrs. John Chapman 
Mr. Orlen 0. Hungerford 
Mrs. Glendolyn Hungerford 
Mr. Peter H. Husch 
Richard and Vera Falk 
Andy, Mary, Keri, Ellie, Brian 
Goldberg 



Mrs. Mary K. Greensfelder 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice R. Shulman 

Jenny N. Strauss 

Mrs. Elizabeth Jesionowski 

Ms. Deborrah Paradowski 

Mr. Mark Paradowski 

Mr. Thomas Joyce 

Lynne Badolato 

Barbara Bowen 

Sally Cowan 

Linda Dybus 

Peggy Gierer 

Caryn Pennington 

Judi Profeta 

AnnRafferty 

Carol Rincker 

Terry Rombauer 

Kim Vaughn 

Bridget Whitson 

Mr. Norman Jung 

Ms. Jean Muetze 

Mr. Charles M. Kanne Sr. 

Barb Hagerman 

Susan Morice 

Sue 0' Grady 

Julie Watt 

Mr. Edward Kanter 

Mr. William Kanter 

Mrs. Elizabeth Kelley-Mohr 

Ms. Audrey M. Maher 

Mrs. Francis Day Kenton 

Mr. and Mrs. Quintus L. Drennanjr. 
Miss Marybelle Kimball 

Dr. and Mrs. John S. Skinner 
Willard van Beuren King 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Angst 

Beyer, Hippe & Michael 

Dr. and Mrs. James T. Chamness 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Gillis 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald K. Greenberg 

Suzy and Dick Grote 

Mr. and Mrs. William Guy Heckman 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 

Mrs. Eleanor C. Johnson 

Mrs. Jane S. Macrae 

Mrs. Frank Mayfield 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Orthwein Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ernest T. Rouse 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 

Mr. Arthur B. ShepleyJr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace Sr. 

Mrs. Alicia P. Withers 

Mrs. Ruby Kirschman 

Mrs. Patricia Kramer 

Alleen Pummill Klippel 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernhardt Klippel Jr. 

Mr. Alvin Kohler 

Mr. and Mrs. Dale W. Fillers 

Mr. John Krauss 

Mr. and Mrs. E. William Bergfeld 

Robert Kroupa 

Hensley Construction, Inc. 

Dr. Charles Lapp 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Carlson 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan B. Kaufman 

Ms. Jean McCrory Lashly 

Edward E. Kindley 

Margot Kindley 

Mr. Mark Robert Lawton 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson Carpenter III 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hunstein 



Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Pettusjr. 
Mrs. Lucille Ross 
Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecherjr. 
Mr. Arthur B. Leavens Jr. 
Mrs. Ruth E. Scott 
Father of Brian LeDoux 
Mr. and Mrs. Ervin Pfeiffer 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. Siegerist 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Stern 

Mrs. John S. Lehmann 

Mrs. Alexander M. Bakewell 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Bakewell Jr. 

Boatmen's Trust Company 

Mrs. Jean-Jacques Carnal 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar J. Conrad Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ian Cramer 

Natalie R. Dohr 

Mrs. Arthur A. Dunn Jr. 

Mrs. Pauline Pitzman Eades 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul C. Hagemann 

Mrs. Leslie Hawksbee 

Mr. and Mrs. George K. Hoblitzelle 

Mrs. Richard I). Hughes 

Mr. and Mrs. Landon Y. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh M. F. Lewis 

Mrs. Carroll S. Mast in 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben M. Morriss III 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Orthwein Jr. 

Mrs. A. Timon Primm III 

Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar W. Rexford 

Mrs. A. Wessel Shapleigh 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. Arthur B. ShepleyJr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Shepley 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings 

Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. C. C.Johnson Spink 
Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace Sr. 
Charles E. Leonhardt 
Mrs. Jean Leonhardt 
Mr. Martin Luedloff 
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Steffens 
Miss Kristin S. Lumpe 
Mr. and Mrs. Loren W. Lumpe 
Ms. Justine Maier 
Mr. Wm. Patrick Gibson 
Ms. Jane Siedhoff 
Use Mansbacher 

RuthK. Brown 

Mr. Steven Dottheim 

Ms. Fanny Fein 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome L. Goodman 

Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Haas 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter J. Heiman 

Doris Hey man 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney N. Hurwitz 

Ms. Annette Kalishman 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry A. Links 

Mr. David Pasternak 

Frances and David RabinovitZ 

Mr. and Mrs. Maury Rich 

Mr. and Mrs. Larry Rogul 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Roman 

Lisa B. Wallis 

Mrs. Betty Martin 

Mrs. Marie K. Grzesiowski 

Mrs. Anna Mattas 

Voss Family 
Winheim Family 
Bernard McDonald 

Bernard and Barbara McDonald 



22. 



\BULLETIN SEPTEMBER OiTOHKR 199] 



Mrs. Muriel McKeon 

Helen L. McKay 

Mrs. Florence McQuater 

Ms. Edna Heman 

Mr. Robert R. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Al DeGreeff 
Heather Heights Home Owners 

Assoc. 
Mr. and Mrs. Vern Henke 
Cynthia M. Heyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph G. Kelly 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Klinger 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom McMahon 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Meyer and 

Family 
Mr. John Pierce 
Dean C. Purdy 
Michele Ruesler 
Carol Simeone 
Daniel R. Simeone 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Spence 
Ms. Paula Stacy 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Gene Walburn 
Mrs. Ruby Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. Dale W. Ehlers 
Mrs. Ruth Milton 
Jack Ansehl 
Suzanne Lasky 
Marie Antoinette Litzow 

Montgomery 

Miss Doris Allen 
Dr. and Mrs. Carlo Caciolo 
Mrs. Florence Cole 
Conway School Teachers- 
Debbie Aliperti 

Judy Bachman 

Bob Bredin 

Kate Brunn 

Steve Bunton 

Cathy Field 

Carol Frank 

Dorothy Franklin 

Vivian Graves 

Susan Hausdorf 

Cathy Hay 

Norma Heuer 

Kathy Limbert 

Jean Lovegreen 

Rae Meyer 

Jeri Rabi 

Janet Reichmuth 

Steve Schmidlap 

Dee Scott 

Diann Sheahan 

Carole Stafford 

Karen Van Buren 

Nancy Walther 

Faye Wright 
Dr. John F. Donovan Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Forsman 
Dr. and Mrs. Albert Gnade 
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Grommet 
Joel E. Harrod 
Mr. John Hunt 
Phil and Bunny Hunt 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Johnson 
Dr. and Mrs. Louis Litzow 
Dr. Peter L. Litzow 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Lowery 
Mr. and Mrs. F. W. McCalpin 
Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Mueller 
Dr. Daniel F. 0' Sullivan 
Mrs. Virginia H. Proctor 
George, Jean, Ed Saunders 



Dr. and Mrs. Charles Silverberg 

Dr. Sylvia A. Steiling 

Dorothy M. Tietze 

West County Radiological Group, Inc. 

Dr. and Mrs. Newton B. White 

Mr. Al Moushey 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Rettig 

Mr. Charles Nash 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Wicks 

Father of Jan Newhouse 

Emily and Mike Grady 
Mrs. Kay Noble 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Bingaman 
Emily Lewis Norcross 

Mr. Marion Lowndes 

William D. Oberbeck 

Joan M. Gilboy 

Mrs. Augusta Obst 

Ms. Vera A. Obst 

Mrs. EdaOster 

Ms. Kathleen R. Schmidt 
Mrs. Ella Ottersbach 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Kustura 

Mrs. Jane Parsons 

Mrs. Duncan Pritchard 

Mrs. Dorothy Rosebrough 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry A. Uhlemeyer 

Mrs. Nadine Penno 

Mrs. Edna Goerisch 

Dr. George A. Seib 

Mr. Louis Perrill 

Miss Mary L. Hoevel 
Mr. Louis G. Perry 

Mrs. Marilyn Edmiston 
Mrs. Eloise Pommer 

59'ers Investment Syndicate 

Mr. and Mrs. George Bishop 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Blanke Jr. 

Mrs. Nancy R. Burke 

Gammon Syndicate 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Horan 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Lortz 

Mrs. Julia F. Morrison 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 

Mr. and Mrs. Otway W. Rash III 

Mrs. Philip Vierheller 

Mr. Clement Powers 

Mr. and Mrs. William V Rabenberg 

Mrs. Mary Jane Pullaro 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray T. Eddins 

Mr. John Rader 

Ms. I.aura Nissenbaum 

Mr. Eston Randolph Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Fischer 

Mrs. Marjorie Rawsen 

Dr. and Mrs. Andres J. Valdes 
Mrs. Florian S. Reilly 

Mr. and Mrs. G. William Weier 

Mr. Walter Rodgers 

Gene and Shirley Orf 
John C. Roock 
Richard and Linda Jones 
Miss Kimberly Rudsinski 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bendorf 
Mrs. Harold D. Russell 

Rita Helfrich 

Louise Kraus 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence F. Minth 

Mrs. Joseph A. Richardson 



Mr. Donald 0. Schnuck 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Frank 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Holton 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Strathearn II 
Marjorie Ratz Schoknecht 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred D. Fales 
Ms. Jane J. Ratz 

Mr. and Mrs. Kurt H. Schoknecht 
Mrs. Tillie Schraudner 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Anderson 

Mr. Don Schuessler 

Ms. Marilyn Werner 

Mrs. MaealSchulz 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Horan 
Mr. and Mrs. Stuart M. Mertz 
Mrs. George W. Skinner 
Dr. Earl Shepard 
Miss Mary L. Sunderman 
Mr. George Shoji 
Mrs. George Shoji 

Linda Sloan-Peterson 

Mr. Harold B. Sloan-Peterson 

Mrs. PegStakenas 

Robert Stakenas Family 

Mrs. Roberta Stamm 

Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr. Adrian Steel 

Mrs. Jean Hepper 

Mr. Arthur Storiak 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Catherine Sullivan 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Hemmer 

Mr. Jack Temple 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Neuner 

Mrs. Jean Bascom Theopold 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson Carpenter III 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh A. Hamilton 

Mary and Arthur Wahl 

Mrs. AdeleThym 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Boettcher 

Mr. Ned Ude 

Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Meek 

Elliott Von Rump 

Missouri Botanical Garden Guides 

Mr. Charles Walker 

Mr. Steve Roth 

Mr. Charles R. Weissgerber 

Mr. Robert N. Hagnauer 

Mrs. Nell Wild 

Margaret Harmon 

Mrs. Doris M. Kloeppner 

Patricia Kromer 

Patricia Winkler 

Ken Arnold Family 

Bernard J. Wise IV 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernie Wise 

Mr. John Woehrle 

Mr. and Mrs: Paul Pisani 
Mrs. Rose Wool 

Dr. andMrs.EIliot Wool 

Charles Wuller 

Thorn Hurley 
Frank Siano 

Mrs. Rose Yaker 

Miss Ruth Cornelius 
Albina and Robert Zub 

Ed and Sue Wilson 
Sandy Zub 



Board of Trustees 

Mr. 0. Sage Wightman III 

President 

Rev. Lawrence Biondi, S.J. 

Mr. Stephen F. Brauer 

Mr. William H. T. Bush 

Dr. William H. Danforth 

Mr. Samuel B. Hayes III 

Mr. Robert R. Hermann 

Rt. Rev. William A. Jones, Jr. 

Mr. David W. Kemper 

Mr. Charles F. Knight 

Mr. Charles E. Kopman 

Mr. Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. Richard J. Mahoney 

Mr. William E. Maritz 

Mr. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. Thomas 0. McNearney, Jr. 

Mr. Lucius B. Morse III 

Rev. Earl E. Nance, Jr. 

Dr. Helen E. Nash 

Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr. William R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

The Hon. Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. Andrew C. Taylor 

Mr. Jack E. Thomas 

Dr. Blanche Touhill 

Mr. John K. Wallace, Jr. 

The Hon. George R. Westfall 

EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Mr. Howard F Baer 

Mr. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. John H. Biggs 
Mr. Jules D. Campbell 
Mr. Henry Hitchcock 
Mr. Joseph F. Ru witch 

Mr. Louis S. Sachs 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. Tom K. Smith, Jr. 

Mr. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Harriet Spoehrer 

Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Dr. Mildred Mathias 
Prof. Phillippe Moral 

DIRECTOR 

Dr. Peter H. Raven 

MEMBERS' BOARD 

Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 
President 

Mrs. Antonio I. Longrais 

Mrs. Robert P. Tschudy 

Mrs. Robert Schulte 

Mr. Frederick H. Atwood III 



2'A. 



BULLETIN SEPTEMBER OCTOBER 1991 




Available Now In The Garden Gate Shop! 



The spectacular 1992 Garden Calendars are here. Featuring all new full 
color photographs by Jack Jennings and a poster highlighting the Garden's 
research program and the Araceae family, the 1992 Calendar is printed on 
recycled paper. See page 15. 



MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN -0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST. LOUIS, MO 



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LUME LXXIX 
MBERSIX 



Inside 
This Issue 



<1 Research Division News 

■■ Work in Africa for the National Cancer 
Institute; projects in Gabon, Madagas- 
car, and Ecuador; distinguished visitors. 

g Home Gardening 

^■1 Chrysanthemums make an excellent 
addition to the home garden. 

G From the Answer Service 

■■ Timely tips for helping your plants make 
the transition into winter. 

1 A Behind the Scenes 

^H James E. Corbin is named executive 
assistant director; Warren Douglas 
Stevens is the new director of research. 

^ 2 Calendar of Events 

■B The Fall and Holiday Flower Shows lead 
off a gala season. 

1,1 From the Membership Office 

^H The 1992 Members' Travel Program 
offers exciting opportunities to visit 
Spain, China and the American West. 

J^ FJ From the Garden Gate Shop 

^H The holidays are here and gift giving is a 
delight with the Shop's wonderful selec- 
tion and two sales. 

Jg Horticulture in Missouri 

■■ ' A State of Euphorbia' ' describes the 
ever popular poinsettia and its family. 

lg The 1992 Henry Shaw Medal 

■■■ Dr. Jose Sarukhan Kermerz, distin- 
guished Mexican botanist and educator, 
is honored. 

JQ Center for Plant Conservation 

■■I A task force meeting in Puerto Rico tar- 
gets priorities for threatened species. 



On the cover: Winter in the Japanese 
Garden . — Photo by King Schoenfeld 



1991 Missouri Botanical Garden. 

The BULLETIN (ISSN 0026-6507) is published bi-monthly 
by the Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove 
Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110. Second class postage paid at 
St. Louis, MO. 

The Bl LLETIN is sent to every Member of the Garden 
as one of the benefits of membership. For a contribution of 
as little as $40 per year, Members also are entitled to: free 
admission to the Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special events and receptions; 
announcements of all lectures and classes; discounts in the 
Garden Gate Shop and for course fees; and the opportunity 
to travel, domestic and abroad, with other Members. For 
information, please call (314) 577-5100. 

Postmaster: send address changes to BULLETIN, Susan 
Caine, editor. P.O. Box 299. St.Uuis, MO 63166. 



Comment 



Working Together for the Future 



® 



printed on recycled paper 




The past year 
has been marked by 
great progress in a 
number of areas, and 
one major disap- 
pointment. 

As you know, the 
Garden formulated a 
plan that would 
involve expansion of the grounds, and that 
plan, following four weeks of reaction, 
was rejected by the community and 
immediately withdrawn. 

Because you, as a member, are so 
important to the growth and stability of 
this institution, I wanted to share with 
you the information about the proposal 
(See Page 3). My hope is that you will 
read it and gain a better understanding of 
an extremely complex and highly publi- 
cized issue. If during this process, you 
were offended personally by what you 
heard, please accept our deepest regret. 
There also have been a number of sig- 
nificant achievements during the past 
several months. 

First and foremost, the members, 
volunteers, and staff continue to perform 
miracles in making the Garden and its var- 
ious parts one of the best in the world. 

On June 9, we opened the William T. 
Kemper Center for Home Gardening, 
which gives us a magnificent structure to 
house a new program of education and 
environmental awareness. We owe a deep 
debt of gratitude to the Kemper Founda- 
tion, the Monsanto Fund, Mrs. James S. 
McDonnell and the James S. McDonnell 
Foundation, and so many others whose 
contribution made the Center possible. 



The Fourth of July celebration, the Fes- 
tival of Festivals, and the Urban Garden- 
ing Fair brought thousands and thousands 
of vistors to the Garden throughout the 
summer months. 

Perhaps the most significant develop- 
ment of 1991 was the arrival of the Center 
for Plant Conservation, the world's first 
national effort to conserve rare and 
endangered plants and reintroduce those 
plants into natural habitats. The Center's 
move to the Garden creates an exciting 
number of possibilites for joint 
venturing— and in basic and applied 
research, in public education, in building 
data bases of rare and endangered plants, 
and in formulating new knowledge of how 
to preserve and reintroduce particulary 
valuable or interesting plant species. We 
welcome the Center and its Executive 
Director, Don Falk, to membership in the 
Garden's family and look forward to work- 
ing together closely in the years ahead. 

The St. Louis community and the Gar- 
den suffered a loss on May 21 of this year 
when Mrs. Anne Lehmann, whose 
60-year deeply mutual love affair with the 
Garden ended when she died. No 
benefactor has done more to help this 
institution achieve greatness and she will 
be fondly remembered. 

As we prepare for the conclusion of 
1991, I ask sincerely for your continued 
involvement as we work together to 
improve our natural environment for our- 
selves and future generations. 




TWENTY YEARS OF SERVICE HONORED— At a Garden staff meeting on August 28, 1991, 
Dr. Peter H. Raven was honored for his 20 years of service as director. A mound of cards, 
letters and congratulatory telegrams was piled on the stage of Shoenberg Auditorium, where 
Dr. Raven was presented with gifts from colleagues. A sculpture of a plant press, a gift from 
the staff, was presented to Raven by Dr. Marshall R. Crosby, assistant director (at right). 







Expansion Plan Withdrawn 



The Missouri Botanical Garden recently presented a public pro- 
posal that involved the purchase of properties immediately north of 
the grounds. Our objective was to provide room to expand already 
crowded facilities and ensure space for future services to our mem- 
bers and the public, and improve access to the area. 

This proposal sought to build a partnership with the community: 
it focused from the outset on working with our neighbors to learn if 
they were in agreement with the plan. If there was agreement, the 
Garden's plan would have offered residents a compensation package 
that would have been more than fair. 

Our intention was to extend the $50 million investment that has 
been made in new facilities and programs during the last 20 years 
and attempt to alleviate the strains placed on the Garden by an enor- 
mous expansion in visitors, membership and public activities. After 
four weeks of intense public discussion and controversy, the plan 
was withdrawn on September 17 when it became clear that further 
negotiations were not in the best interest of the neighborhood or the 
Garden. 

It was impossible to find a common ground. We believe the plan 
offered benefits for everyone involved. This report is designed to 
bring our membership and friends up to date and to outline the pro- 
cess that led to our decision. 

The Garden— working with political leaders, civic development 
organizations and others— took the first step by presenting the 
expansion plan to the Garden's Board of Trustees for their approval. 
This plan was initially considered because of the unique opportunity 
offered to finance the project through the issuance of bank-qualified 
bonds available to nonprofit institutions through the Land Clearance 
for Redevelopment Authority, a public agency. The use of the rev- 
enue from the sale of the bonds made it possible financially to con- 
sider the expansion plan for the first time. 

The Garden recognized fully that the expansion called for a thor- 
ough public process and would require the support and cooperation 
of many individuals and groups, especially the residents of the two 
blocks directly affected by the expansion. 

The Garden met with the neighborhood leaders immediately 
after Board approval was received to learn of their interest, and the 
initial reaction encouraged the Garden to move ahead. 

The Garden felt obligated to inform every affected owner and 
renter of the plan and, in order to assure that every individual 
learned of the plan at the same time and not through other secon- 
dary sources, a personal letter was hand delivered to each resident 
announcing the plan and the Garden's intention to make a fair offer 
to purchase their properties. Each resident was informed that the 
offer would include an acquisition and relocation plan, which was 
mailed shortly thereafter. We felt the plan was solid and generous, 
and offered fair market value for each property (determined by two 
independent appraisals) and other financial incentives for renters 
and owners that encouraged reinvestment in the immediate neigh- 
borhood. 



The proposal was publicly announced on August 16 after all resi- 
dents were informed. The Garden's Director, Peter Raven, said the 
plan could only work if the residents were willing to consider an offer. 

Two issues of importance to the future of the Garden were 
addressed in the plan: accommodation of our ever-increasing vis- 
itors, who will exceed two million annually by the year 2000, and 
access to and from Interstate 44 through an improved ramp system 
presented by the City of St. Louis to the State Highway 
Department. 

Several factors prompted the Garden to approve the expansion 
plan. 

• Attendance at the Garden is growing at a rate of ten percent annu- 
ally. In 1981, Garden attendance was 362,756: in 1990 attendance 
was 834,428. By 1995, attendance is estimated to be 1,343,800 and 
by the year 2000, the number of visitors attracted to the Garden 
will be 2,164,000. 

• Membership has grown from 12,013 in 1980 to 29,182 as of July 1, 
1991. 

• Presently, the Garden can handle 545 automobiles and 14 buses. 
On hundreds of occasions each year the lot becomes filled to 
capacity. This occurs on festival weekends and during other spe- 
cial public and Member events and frequently on Wednesday and 
Saturday mornings when the Garden is free to the public. 

• Safety and security are critical issues for the Garden. Elderly vis- 
itors and families with small children having to cross streets and 
move about in the heavy traffic conditions are at particular risk. 

• Alternative expansion solutions were considered. Underground 
systems, high-rise garages and satellite lots did not satisfy the two 
primary issues of adequate accommodation of two million visitors 
by the year 2000, and better and more direct access to the Garden 
and the neighborhood through revised Interstate 44 ramps 
designed within the present state highway rights of way. The 
financial impact of alternative solutions far exceeded the proposed 
plan. 

The investment the Garden has made in the community since 
1859 has been immense. We have worked with our neighbors, civic 
and political leaders, individuals and corporations to strengthen our 
facilities and programs. This growth has resulted in adding nearly 
250 new jobs to the St. Louis economy, making the Garden the 
largest non-polluting employer in the immediate area. 

As an internationally recognized institution, the Garden will con- 
tinue to offer significant benefits to St. Louisans and its many vis- 
itors from throughout the world. 

No alternative expansion plan has been developed. The Garden 
will continue to study the problems associated with growth and 
attempt to find a solution that resolves these problems, and that is 
satisfactory to the neighborhood in which the Garden plays a major 
role as a neighborhood anchor, a significant educational resource, 
and a major tourist attraction. 



BULLETIN I NOVKMBER DEC HMBEK 1991 I 



3. 



RESEARCH DIVISION NEWS 



Garden To Continue Work With National Cancer Institute 



ON September 1, 1991 the Garden was awarded a new five- 
year contract with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) for 
the collection of plant samples in continental tropical Africa 
and the island of Madagascar. The Garden had just completed a 
similar five-year contract with NCI, collecting 7,153 plant samples 
from Cameroon, Central African Republic, Tanzania, Gabon, and 
Madagascar. 

Dr. James Miller, who directs the Natural Products Research 
Program at the Garden, said, ' 'This is a tremendous opportunity 
for our research program. We are delighted to be able to continue 
our collaboration with NCI, and it gives us the opportunity to 
expand our work in Africa. We plan to explore and collect in a num- 
ber of new areas." 

For many years NCI has gathered large numbers of plant sam- 
ples and screened them for antitumor and AIDS-antiviral activity. 
Over the past 30 years NCI has developed a number of clinically 
active drugs derived from plants. 

Before 1986, when the Garden's first contract with the agency 
began, most of the samples NCI tested were collected from acces- 
sible temperate areas of the world. Since 1986, the emphasis has 
been on collecting plants from tropical, primarily rain forest, 
regions. NCI works with The New York Botanical Garden collect- 
ing samples in tropical Central and South America, and with the 
University of Illinois and the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard Univer- 
sity collecting in Southeast Asia. 

Collecting plant samples for NCI involves enormous logistical 
planning, as it is no simple matter to travel to many of these remote 
parts of the world. Communications with remote camps are often 
difficult, and the volume of plant material collected creates problems 
of preserving and transporting the samples. Extensive coordination 
with local governmental and scientific institutions is critically 
important. Every plant sample must be identified and duplications 
avoided. 

Drying, processing, labelling, and preparing the plant samples 
for transport and storage is often challenging, especially under 
primitive conditions at some of the remote sites. Electricity is 
often expensive and unavailable in some countries, and wet condi- 
tions can make sun-drying impossible. The collectors use 
ingenuity and resourcefulness to dry their samples, often modify- 
ing facilities and using butane, kerosene, or solar heaters to create 
a warm, low-humidity space in which to dry the samples. 

Many people have participated in the Garden's project since 
1986. Garden staff included Enrique Forero, who served as principle 
investigator, and Amy Pool, who was project coordinator. Duncan 
Thomas collected in Cameroon, J. Michael Fay in Central African 
Republic, Jonathan Lovett and Roy Gereau in Tanzania, Gordon 
McPherson in Gabon, and James Miller, George Schatz, James 
Zarucchi and Amy Pool collected in Madagascar. Porter P. Lowry II, 
who directs the Garden's overall research and conservation 
program in Africa and Madagascar, assisted in negotiations with 
Malagasy officials. The collectors collaborated with or were assisted 
by local personnel in each country. 

W. Douglas Stevens, the Garden's director of research, said, 
' 'We are very pleased to be able to continue our work with NCI. 
The Garden has the opportunity to contribute its expertise to a 
project that promises great potential benefit to mankind.' ' 

Above, top: Malagasy graduate student Armand Kandrianasolo with 
Ann Pool, collecting Nepenthes madagaseariensis at Mandena near 
Fort-Dauphin. Center: The Garden vehicle, loaded with plant sam- 
ples, at the ferry crossing near Ambilia-I^emaitso. Bottom: The port 
at Fort-Dauphin. 



A Collecting Trip to Madagascar 

From May 1 to June 14, 1991, associate curator Dr. James 
Zarucchi and herbarium assistant Amy Pool of the Garden's 
research staff collected plants for the National Cancer Institute 
(NCI) on the island of Madagascar. It was Jim and Amy's first trip 
to Madagascar, working with the Garden's program that has been 
active there for many years. The trip was made possible by agree- 
ments between NCI and Madagascar's Centre National de 
Recherches Pharmaceutiques (CNRP) and between CNRP and 
the Pare de Tsimbazaza, as well as the long-standing agreement 
between the Pare and the Garden. 

Working in collaboration with Malagasy scientists, Jim and 
Amy's aim was to obtain the widest possible range of plant speci- 





I HI 7 / /• 77.V ■■' NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1991 



RESEARCH DIVISION NEWS 



MADAGASCAR continued 

mens, especially endemic species, those that live nowhere else on 
earth. Madagascar is a biological marvel, a treasure house of 
unique plants and animals. It is estimated that 80 percent of the 
plant species in Madagascar are endemic. Many of the species on 
the island are severely threatened or in danger of extinction from 
deforestation and population pressures. 

This summer's field trip concentrated on the eastern and cen- 
tral parts of the island near the capital of Antananarivo, the south- 
west near Tulear, and the southeast near Fort-Dauphin. Many of 
the forest areas where samples were collected had been heavily 
disturbed, but still contained many extraordinary plants. 

The trip yielded approximately 1,500 pounds of dried plant 
material, enough to fill a minivan. This huge volume of samples 
was processed and labeled at the CNRP facilities. Low tempera- 
ture drying was accomplished with a solar assisted forced air flow 
system. 

"This was my first field trip," said Amy, who has worked at the 
Garden for ten years. ' As project coordinator for the NCI project, 
I have been maintaining the computer database with field reports 
from all of the collecting trips. It was very interesting to participate 
in the work first hand." 

"We didn't have to camp out a lot," said Jim. "We were able to 
take advantage of the accommodations in various locations, 
which gave us much more time to collect samples." 



NSF and AID Support 
Projects in Africa 

WITH the largest collection of African plants in North 
America, the Missouri Botanical Garden is a major cen- 
ter for research in African botany. Recently Garden 
scientists received awards to support projects in Gabon and 
Madagascar under a joint effort by the National Science Founda- 
tion (NSF) and the U. S. Agency for International Development 
(AID). Each three-year award supports research on ecosystems 
and species in developing countries, where the wealth of the 
earth's biodiversity is concentrated. 

"These projects are of enormous scientific importance," said 
Dr. Peter H. Raven. "They will benefit the countries involved and 
will further the understanding of their priceless natural heritage.' ' 



Gabon 



Dr. Gordon McPherson will study the plants of Lope-Okanda 
Game Reserve in central Gabon, a rich tropical rain forest. Gabon 
is a country the size of Colorado and straddles the equator on the 
west coast of Africa. Dense rain forest covers about 85 percent of 
the country. Gabon's rain forest has a species diversity comparable 
to Southeast Asia or tropical South America. Perhaps one third of 
the plant species in Gabon are endemic, growing nowhere else in 
the world. 

Despite Gabon's rich plant diversity, its flora is inadequately 
understood and an insufficient number of specimens have been 
collected from its forests. McPherson, assisted by Gabonese 
botanists, will collect intensively during four three-month periods 
spread over two years to ensure a complete sample. The Lope- 
Okanda Reserve, with its central location and accessible trails, is a 
particularly rich representative of tropical African rain forests. 

In addition to collecting and preserving plant samples, the 
project will provide training for Gabonese botanists. Information on 




Gordon McPherson 

the plants collected 
will be entered into 
the Garden's 
TROPICOS data- 
base in the field on 
i- ' -<••'*' laptop computers 
and used to prepare a checklist, or inventory, of the plants of the 
Reserve. The information will aid in the preparation of the Flora of 
Gabon begun in 1961 by the Museum of Natural History in Paris. 
The project will also help to develop Gabon's National Herbarium 
in Libreville, establishing a computer database there and improving 
services and facilities. 

Madagascar 

Dr. George E. Schatz will head the preparation of a conspectus 
of the vascular plants of Madagascar, an area the Garden has stud- 
ied extensively for many years. Madagascar, an island off the east 
coast of Africa, is home to over 10,000 plant species. Schatz will be 
collaborating with Dr. Porter P. Lowry II, head of the Garden's 
Africa and Madagascar Department, and with scientists at the two 
Malagasy herbaria, Pare de Tsimbazaza and FO.F1.FA. (National 
Center of Applied Research in Rural Development). As well as 
with the Museum of Natural History in Paris. 

The conspectus will assemble for the first time a complete, 
computerized listing of all vascular plant species in Madagascar. In 
addition, the conspectus will compile, synthesize and summarize 
all known information on the flora of Madagascar, including distri- 
bution of species and their status as endangered or threatened 
with extinction. The conspectus will make this valuable data read- 
ily accessible, constituting a powerful tool for conservationists and 
government planners as well as scientists. 

The information will also be valuable for the ongoing prepara- 
tion of the Flore de Madagascar, being prepared at the Museum of 
Natural History in Paris under the direction of Prof. Philippe 
Morat, an honorary Garden Trustee. 

Schatz will divide his time between St. Louis, Paris, and 
Madagascar. Two Malagasy technicians will be trained in the use of 
TROPICOS here at the Garden. They will then work to computer- 
ize the herbaria in Madagascar, creating a "living database" that 
can be continuously updated in the future. The Museum in Paris 
will also have a full time technician working on the project. Armand 

Randrianasolo, a 
Malagasy graduate 
student studying at 
the Garden, will 
participate in the 
preparation of the 
conspectus. 



George E. Selnitz 




BULLETIN I NOVKMHKK DECEMBER 1991 1 



RESEARCH DIVISION NEWS 




38th Annual Systematics Symposium 



Participants in the Symposium (left to 
right): James R. Estes, National 
Science Foundation; Jean E. Nash, 
University of Utah; Theodore M. Bark- 
ley, Kansas State University; Peter H. 
Raven, MBG; Arlene E. Luchsinger, 
University of Georgia; Stanley A. 
Morain, University of New Mexico; 
Nancy R. Morin, MBG; K. W. Bridges, 
University of Hawaii. 



ON October 4 and 5, 1991, 300 biologists from seven 
countries gathered at the Garden to discuss "Knowl- 
edge Brokering: The Mechanics of Synthesis," the 
issues, problems, and challenges of computer-based data 
management systems. 

The vast volume of scientific information being generated by 
biological research today makes old-fashioned libraries and 
museum collections inadequate. Data must be sorted, made 
easily available, and most important, synthesized in ways useful 
to scientists and the public. The Missouri Botanical Garden has 



taken a leadership role in developing relational botanical 
databases. 

Seven papers were presented by experts from institutions 
that included the National Science Foundation, the Smithsonian 
Institution, the Garden, and universities around the country. 
Since 1953 the Symposium has been a driving force in sys- 
tematic botany, pointing the way toward future issues and deal- 
ing with current concerns. It has been funded annually since 
1954 by the National Science Foundation. 



Scientists from Latin America 

AS part of the active collaborative research and training pro- 
grams that the Garden has with Latin American countries, 
several botanists have visited St. Louis during the past 
months. Together with the Latin American students at the Garden, 
they attended a dinner hosted by Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven on 
August 19, 1991. 

Specialists in the grass family, Poaceae, were in St. Louis to 
attend a planning session of the project "Grasses of the New 
World." They were Tarciso Filgueiras, from the Instituto 
Brasileiro de Geografi'a y Estadfstica of Brazil, Hilda Longi-Warner 
from the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul of Brazil, 
Oscar Mathei from the Universidad de Conception of Chile, Oscar 
Tovar from the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos of 
Peru, and Fernando Zuloaga, from the Instituto de Botanica Dar- 
winion of Argentina. The project, which will be a cooperative effort 
between United States and Latin American institutions, will use 
TROPICOS to produce a computerized checklist of the 3,500 esti- 
mated species of grasses of the New World followed by a compre- 
hensive flora which will have maps, illustrations and comparable 
descriptions. 

Also attending the dinner were German Carnevali of 
Venezuela, Francisco Lorea of Mexico, I von Ramirez of Venezuela, 
Carlos Reynel of Peru, and Ricardo Rueda of Nicaragua, students 
in the Tropical Ecology Program. This is a collaborative program 
between the Missouri Botanical Garden and the University of 
Missouri-St. Louis. They will obtain their advanced degrees in dif- 
ferent fields of tropical botany. The students live in St. Louis and 
travel to the tropics as part of their research program. They plan 
to return to their native countries after finishing their training. 




Shown at the dinner (left to right): German Carnevali, Ricardo Rueda 
Ivdn Ramirez, and Francisco Ix>rea. 



Peter Raven (left) 
greets E train 
Freire, a visiting 
botanist from 
Ecuador. 




6. 



\BULLETIN NOVKMBKK DECEMBER 1991 



RESEARCH DIVISION NEWS 



UPDATE: Debt Swap Pays Off in Ecuador 



Pacific 
Ocean 




DavidNeill 



THE Missouri Botanical Garden has been actively studying 
the extraordinary plants of Ecuador since the 1970s. With 
ten percent of the world's vascular plant species growing 
in an area the size of Colorado, Ecuador has a concentration of bio- 
logical diversity unequalled in the world. The tropical rain forests 
and other habitats in the country are considered by conserva- 
tionists to be among the world's highest priorities for protection. 

In 1989 the Garden collaborated with the World Wildlife Fund 
and The Nature Conservancy in the largest ' 'debt-swap-for- 
nature' ' at that time, a transaction that benefitted Ecuador and its 
scientific community. The three conservation organizations 
assisted Ecuador to restructure $9 million of its foreign debt, con- 
verting the debt to Ecuadorean currency bonds that pay interest 
for eight years. The funds are reinvested in Ecuador, supporting 
conservation and scientific programs. 

Two Garden curators, Dr. David Neill and Dr. Calaway Dodson, 
live and work in Ecuador supervising the Garden's research efforts 
and acting as advisors to Ecuador's Museum of Natural Sciences, 
which administers the debt swap funds. They work to promote 
conservation in Ecuador by helping to develop its scientific infra- 
structure, including training local botanists, and building and 
endowing institutions. 

The debt swap funds have made a dramatic difference in the 
progress of these efforts. The National Herbarium of Ecuador, 
founded 15 years ago as part of the Museum of Natural Sciences in 
Quito, was struggling to work with little staff or equipment. With 
debt swap funds, plus a contract with USAID, in one year the her- 
barium has grown to a working collection of 50,000 mounted plants 
with a staff of 15 Ecuadorian botanists and foresters. The expanded 
staff mounts and files 2,000 specimens a month, maintains the 
computer databases, answers queries, and prepares publications. 

All of this assists the Garden in its research. David Neill has 
worked for the Garden in Ecuador since 1985, and Calaway Dodson 
has been active there over the past 30 years. The two scientists 
supervise a floristic inventory project involving field studies in 
several regions of Ecuador, including the Amazon basin and both 
sides of the Andes. A staff of Ecuadorian botanists assists Neill and 
Dodson in the field studies. 

Debt swap funds have allowed the field studies to expand into 
critical new areas of the Pacific slopes in northwestern Ecuador. 
Through an agreement with the Indian Federation, the Garden 



researchers will be able to collect on the Awa Indian Reserve on 
the border between Ecuador and Colombia, a little known and 
botanically important region with many species previously 
unknown to science. The scientists will include traditional useful 
and medicinal plants of the Indians in the study. 

David Neill also serves as director of the Jatun Sacha Biological 
Field Station and Foundation, a private non-profit foundation char- 
tered by the Ecuadorian government in 1989. Jatun Sacha, which 
means "Big Forest" in the Quichua Indian language, works closely 
with the Missouri Botanical Garden to carry out research, educa- 
tional and conservation programs. The reserve of 435 hectares in 
the Napo province serves as a catalyst for conservation in Ecuador. 
It preserves tracts of primary forest, trains young Ecuadorian biol- 
ogists, provides environmental education for the general public, 
and develops sustainable land use projects for the local rural 
populace. 

David Neill visited St. Louis this past summer with a number of 
his Ecuadorian colleagues. "The progress we have made, thanks 
in part to the debt swap funds, is truly exciting,' ' he said. "For a 
small investment, we are getting enormous rewards." 




Almir de Souza (left) and Wanderbilt Duarte de Barros at the Garden 
in August. 

Delegation from Brazil 

DR. Wanderbilt Duarte de Barros, director of the Rio de 
Janeiro Botanical Garden, along with Dr. Almir de Souza, 
chief administrator of that botanical garden, and Marcus 
de Lucena of IBM Brazil visited the Garden's extensive computer 
facilities August 4 to 7, 1991. 

The Rio de Janeiro Botanical Garden has received assistance 
from IBM Brazil in building their computer capabilities and setting 
up a network of botanical information. The Missouri Botanical Gar- 
den is a leader in botanical information management and has rela- 
tionships with botanical institutions throughout Brazil. The 
Brazilian delegation met with the botanical information staff at the 
Garden and received a general overview of the Garden's activities. 

Dr. de Barros is a renowned Brazilian botanist. He has served 
as the general director of crop and cattle management for Brazil's 
Ministry of Agriculture, head of several national parks, and was 
several times president of the Brazilian Foundation for the Conser- 
vation of Nature, a leading conservationist organization he helped 
to found. 



BULLETIN I NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1991 1 



Chrysanthemums or 
' ' mums' ' are one of the most 
popular fall perennials for the 
garden. Numerous varieties are 
available today and can be 
selected to bloom from late 
summer throughout the fall. 

The genus Chrysanthemum 
belongs to the daisy family and 
consists of over 200 species 
including annuals, perennials and 
small shrubs. Native to the Far 
East, chrysanthemums were 
introduced to America in the late 
1700s. By the early 1900s 
hardier varieties were being 
grown, and with the introduction 
of Korean hybrids, mums 
became quite popular as a gar- 
den plant. These Korean hybrids 
became the breeding stock for 
most hardy chrysanthemums 
available today. 

Garden mums are vigorous 
clump-type plants with strong, 
upright or sprawling stems that 
often can become woody. The 
leaves are slightly aromatic. 
Mums are quite easy to grow in 
the garden, but some are hardy 
only in mild climates and freeze 
when planted beyond their zone 
of winter tolerance. In general, 
chrysanthemums are short-day 
plants, meaning that the flower- 
ing response is triggered by the 
shortening days of late summer. 

MUMS IN THE GARDEN 

There are many places 
where hardy chrysanthemums 
can be enjoyed in the garden. 
Because of their shallow rooting 
habit, plants can be dug with a 
spading fork and easily moved to 
new locations. This is a particu- 
lar advantage because mums can 
be grown for most of the season 
in a sunny location, then moved 
to partially shaded border areas 
after they have developed flower 
buds. They will come into full 
bloom and last longer because of 
the coolness of shade. 

In the fall potted mums can 
be transplanted to the garden to 
fill in bare spots in the flower 
bed. Mums also lend them- 
selves well to containers and 
hanging baskets, which can be 
moved to any sunny location 
around the landscape. Although 
they require slightly more inten- 
sive care, cascade mums 



Home Gardening 



Chrysanthemums 



present the opportunity to cre- 
ate a spectacular floral display. 
Cascades make up a group of 
mums which have a weeping or 
trailing habit. These plants can 
be trained to grow over wire 
supports, up or down fences or 
walls, and generate a tremen- 
dous number of blooms from a 
single plant. 

PLANTING LOCATION 

Chrysanthemums require 
well-drained soil and full sunlight 
to grow and bloom successfully. 
This means generally six hours of 
sunlight or more each day during 
the summer period. Plants grown 
with less light will become weak, 
spindly and produce few flowers. 
Avoid locations exposed to 
street or porch lights, as this will 
interfere with the flowering 
response to shortened days. 
The best location is a southeast- 
ern exposure, preferably against 
a foundation or wall that provides 
additional protection from frost. 
Improve the drainage before 
planting by elevating the bed 
with a good mix of garden loam 
and compost. 

SOIL PREPARATION AND 
PLANTING 

Any garden soil that is good 
for growing vegetables will be 
satisfactory for growing mums. 
For clay soils add organic matter 
like peat, composted leaves, rot- 
ted manure or straw to improve 
the drainage and aeration. Con- 
tainerized plants should be 
planted at the same depth at 
which they were grown. Do not 
bury the root ball. This will pro- 
mote a lack of root aeration and 
root rot caused by fungal patho- 
gens. Chrysanthemums are 
shallow-rooted and do best if 
planted high. This means that 
frequent watering may be neces- 
sary during times of high heat 
and little rainfall. Space plants 
about 18 inches apart. 

PINCHING 

To generate a plant full of 
flowers and control growth, 



chrysanthemums require some 
pinching of the tips. This 
encourages branching and more 
compact growth. It also will 
stimulate more flower produc- 
tion. Pinching involves removal 
of about an inch of the tip of each 
branch or shoot. This is snapped 
off with the thumb and index fin- 
ger. The first pinch should be 
done when the plant is six to 
eight inches tall and repeated 
when new branches become six 
inches tall. A third pinch may be 
necessary on fast-growing varie- 
ties. If plants are not properly 
pinched they will become tall, 
leggy, easily blown over by 
winds and have few flowers. 

The most important thing to 
keep in mind is the timing of the 
last pinch. For early flowering 
varieties which bloom in mid- 
September, the last pinch should 
be around the middle of June. 
Varieties which flower in the 
early part of October should be 
given a last pinch on July 1. Later 
flowering varieties should be 
pinched for the last time no later 
than July 15. Overall, about 
three months is required 
between the last pinch and 
blooming. 

FERTILIZATION 

Most mums will require fer- 
tilization several times during 
the spring and summer. Fertiliz- 
ing stimulates good growth, pro- 
duces thick stems and maintains 
a healthy green color. 
Chrysanthemums are not heavy 
feeders like vegetables, so it is 
best to use a dilute fertilizer 
applied several times prior to 
bud set. 

Nitrogen has the greatest 
effect on flower production and 
general growth. If too much is 
applied, vegetative growth will 
be hard to control, fewer flowers 
will be produced and flowering 
will occur later in the season. 

Before planting a bed in the 
spring, about four pounds of 
5-10-5 per 100 square feet can be 
worked into the soil to a depth of 



six inches. This gives about one 
quarter pound of nitrogen per 
100 square feet. A second appli- 
cation around August 1 may be 
beneficial, especially on poorer 
soils. Apply about two table- 
spoons of 10-6-4 or four table- 
spoons of 5-10-5 fertilizer spreai 
over a two foot circle at the bast 
of the individual plants. No more 
than about a tenth of a pound of 
nitrogen should be applied at thi 
time. 

GENERAL CARE AND 
MAINTENANCE 

During the early part of the 
summer, a layer of mulch mate- 
rial should be applied to the soil 
after it has warmed up. Mulchinj 
helps to conserve and regulate 
moisture to these shallow-rooted 
plants. Besides the benefits of 
water control, mulch protects th( 
bed from erosion, compaction 
and retards weed seed germina- 
tion. Use a two to three-inch 
layer of coarse peat, leaf mold, 
compost, nut hulls or lawn clip- 
pings mixed with leaves. 
Mulches composed of chipped 
wood, sawdust and straw may 
consume nitrogen fertilizer and 
rob the root system. If you use 
these materials as mulch, doubh 
the fertilizer applied to the bed. 

If your plants become too tal 
and begin to drop over, then som< 
support may be necessary. Use 
wire frames or upright stakes. 
Wire peony or tomato frames 
work well and should be put in 
place before they are needed, oi 
they will be difficult to position 
without damaging the plant. 

After the plants have flow- 
ered, the stems should be cut of 
close to the ground. Leaf, flowei 
and stem debris should be col- 
lected and composted if they are 
free of diseases or insects. 
Infested plant debris should be 
composted separately. 

WINTER PROTECTION 

Often chrysanthemums 
listed in catalogs are noted as 
being winter hardy, meaning tha 
the plants will survive the winte: 
and grow the following season. 
Gardeners should be cautious; 
many mums are not reliably 
hardy, depending upon the 
climate conditions, and even 



8. 



I BULLETIN I NOYKMBKK DECEMBER 1991 



the hardiest varieties may not 
make it through the winter. 

During flowering the root 
system will begin to grow a new 
set of underground shoots. 
These shoots, often referred to 
as suckers, are the parts of the 
plant that will overwinter and 
produce the next year's flower- 
ing plant. Varieties that produce 
many suckers and shoots are 
more hardy than those that pro- 
duce few. 

Many mum selections will 
survive the winter if the plants 
gradually become frozen and 
remain that way until spring. 
Deep snow cover will assist this 
and protect the frozen soil if it 
remains intact throughout the 
winter. Unfortunately, that is not 
characteristic of the conditions 
in the St. Louis area and plants 
must be able to stand the freez- 
ing/thawing fluctuations that 
typify our climate. 

The best defense against 
adverse weather conditions is to 
provide good drainage so that 
water does not accumulate 
around the plants and form ice. 
After the first frost, mound a 
few shovels of soil forming an 
eight-inch layer around the base 
of each plant. Cut the branches 
back to ten inches above the soil 
line and apply a two to four-inch 
mulch layer as soon as the soil 
surface freezes. Use loosely 
layered evergreen branches, 
straw, or other lofty materials 
around the plants. Avoid using 
materials like leaves which will 
pack down and retard emer- 
gence of leafy shoots in the 
spring. After the last danger of 
frost has past, mulch and soil can 
be removed. If leafy growth has 
already started and the possibil- 
ity of frost is still present, apply 
another layer of loose mulch to 
protect the growth. 

As an alternative to overwin- 
tering plants in the bed, they can 
be dug and placed into cold 
frames. For the more tender 
varieties it is often the only way 
to keep plants from one year to 
another. 

SELECTED CULTIVARS: 
GARDEN MUM OR FLORIST MUM 

There are hundreds of excel- 
lent chrysanthemum varieties 



TYPES OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

The most common method of classifying garden mums is based upon the flower form. 
The Chrysanthemum Society has identified 13 flower forms: 




1. Irregular Incurve: Largest of 
mum varieties. The flower is rather 
loose and informal looking; the outer- 
most petals are curved downward and 
drooping. (October). 




2. Reflexed: Large flowers which 
need to be staked. All petals fold out- 
ward away from the center of the 
flower; the outermost petals are 
curved down towards the main stem. 
(September to October). 




3. Regular Incurve: Sometimes 
referred to as a football mum. All 
petals fold inward towards the center 
keeping the head very compact. Plants 
may need staking. (October). 




4. Decorative: Produce a flattened 
full flower with numerous petals most 
of which curve outward and slightly 
downward. These mums are good for 
cut flowers, but plants may need to be 
staked. (September to October). 

and the process of selection can 
be challenging. Often you will 
hear the words "garden mum" 
or "florist mum." These terms 
are used to talk about hardiness. 
Generally, garden mums are 
hardy in the areas sold. How- 
ever, florist mums are not and 
are produced for use as a flower- 
ing indoor pot plant. Without 
extra protection, they will be dif- 
ficult to overwinter outdoors. If 
you want to give a flowering 
mum and want to plant it outside 




5. Intermediate Incurve: Petals 
remain loosely incurved towards the 
center of the flower head. Plants may 
need support. (September to 
October). 




6. Pompom: Mass of flowers on 
each plant. Petals are short and tightly 
packed together to form a button or 
large ball. Good for cut flowers. 
(October). 




7. Single: Daisy-like blooms with 
several rows of long petals radiating 
from a flat center. (October). 




8. Anemone: Similar to a single 
type mum, but with long petals sur- 
rounding short deeper colored petals 
forming a broad center. (October). 



when the flowers are past, then 
choose a garden mum. 
PESTS AND DISEASES 

Aphids, spider mites, cater- 
pillars, leaf miners, leaf hoppers 
and plant bugs can challenge the 
mum gardener. Generally these 
pests can be controlled if time is 
taken to inspect plants for signs 
of feeding injury. Spider mites 
are perhaps the most difficult to 
control because their small size 
makes discovery of the problem 
dependent upon symptom 




9. Spoon: A daisy-like flower with 
long reflexed petals curled and spoon- 
shaped at the ends. The center of the 
flower forms a flat cushion. (October). 




10. Spider: Petals are long, thread- 
like and tubular with curled ends. The 
most exotic of the mum types. 
(October). 




11. Quill: Similar to the spoon type 
mum except that the ends of the tubu- 
lar petals are not flattened. (October). 




12. Brush/Thistle: Broom-shaped 
flower pointing upward. Good filler for 
arrangements. (October). 

13. Exotic: This category is for 
more unusual flower forms. 



development. By that time, the 
infestation is harder to manage. 
A number of diseases plague 
chrysanthemums including Sep- 
toria leaf spot, powdery mildew 
and virus diseases. Avoiding 
overcrowded and shaded condi- 
tions will help in reducing the 
incidence of disease. Under 
such conditions moisture is 
likely to remain on the leaves 
providing good conditions for 
diseases to get started. 

— Steven D. Cline, Ph.D. 



BULLETIN i NOVKMBKK DKCKMBKR 1991 1 



Timely Tips from the Answer Service 



Do you have a plant question? Call the 
Horticultural Answer Service, Monday 
through Friday, 9a.m. to noon, at 
577-5143. 

November Tips 

■ Till under any unused, finished compost 
to improve garden soils. 

■ Root crops such as carrots, radishes, 
turnips and Jerusalem artichokes store best 
outdoors in the ground. Just before the 
ground freezes bury these crops under a 
deep layer of leaves or straw. Harvest as 
needed during winter by pulling back the 
protective mulch. 

■ Fall-tilling the vegetable garden exposes 
many insect pests to winter cold, reducing 
their numbers next year. 

■ Keep mulches pulled back several 
inches from the base of fruit trees to pre- 
vent bark injury from hungry mice and 
other rodents. Commercial tree guards or 
protective collars made of 18-inch-high 
hardware cloth will also prevent trunk injury 
from gnawing animals. 

■ Fallen, spoiled or mummified fruits 
should be cleaned up and buried. 



■ Newly planted broad-leaf evergreens 
such as azaleas, boxwoods, and hollies 
benefit from a burlap screen for winter wind 
protection. Set screen stakes in place 
before the ground freezes. 

■ Roses should be winterized after a 
heavy frost. Place a six to ten inch deep 
layer of mulch over each plant. Topsoil 
works best. Prune sparingly, just enough to 
shorten overly long canes. Climbers should 
not be pruned at this time. 

■ This is the ideal time to plant trees and 
shrubs. Before digging the hole, prepare 
the site by loosening the soil well beyond 
the dripline of each plant. Apply a 2 " to 3 " 
mulch kept several inches away from the 
trunk. Keep the soil moist, not wet, to the 
depth of the roots. 

■ Mulch flower and bulb beds after the 
ground freezes, to prevent injury to plants 
from frost heaving. 

December Tips 

■ Now is a good time to collect soil sam- 
ples to test for pH and nutritional levels. 

■ Reduce or eliminate fertilizer on house 
plants until spring. 



■ Be sure to shut off and drain any outdoor 
water pipes or irrigation systems that may 
freeze during cold weather. 

■ To prevent injury to turf grasses, keep 
leaves raked off the lawn. The leaves can be 
plowed under directly to enrich garden soils 
or allowed to decay slowly in large piles. 

■ A final fall application of fertilizer can be 
applied to bluegrass and fescue lawns now. 

■ Be sure the root zones of azaleas and 
rhododendrons are thoroughly mulched. 
Any organic material will do, but mulches 
made from oak leaves, shredded oak bark, 
or pine needled are preferred. 

■ Holiday poinsettias need sunlight for at 
least half the day. The soil should dry only 
slightly between thorough waterings. Dis- 
card the drainage. Be sure to punch holes in 
decorative foil wraps to prevent soggy con- 
ditions. 

■ On cold nights, move houseplants back 
from icy windows to prevent chilling injury. 

■ Water houseplants with tepid water. 
Cold tap water may shock plants. 

—Chip Tynan, The Answer Service 



Corporate Philanthropy Profile 



The Southwestern Bell 
Foundation 

In 1984, the Southwestern Bell Corpo- 
ration, one of this country's most dynamic 
utilities in the fields of telecommunications 
and information technologies/services, 
formed the Southwestern Bell Foundation. 
Through support for tax-exempt organiza- 
tions addressing education, economic 
development, social needs and culture, the 
Foundation strives to improve quality of life 
in communities served by Southwestern 
Bell Corporation companies. Most of its 
support is focused on the Corporation's 
core region of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, 
Oklahoma, and Texas. 

In 1989, total charitable disbursements 
approached $15.6 million, including more 
than $750,000 to match employee and 
retiree contributions to educational and cul- 
tural institutions. The Foundation empha- 
sizes education, community economic 
development, health and welfare, and cul- 
ture. Special areas of interest include res- 
tructuring public education, teacher 
education, stimulating local economies 
through business retention and expansion, 
and expanding public access to arts and 



culture. 

"In making our grants, we are project- 
specific and guided by a number of 
criteria," noted Larry J. Alexander, the 
Foundation's President. "Our key focus 
areas are education and community eco- 
nomic development. 

"In education, we concentrate our 
efforts on programs that emphasize student 
participation in the learning process. Stu- 
dents must learn to think, not just repeat 
what they have been told. Of course, for 
this to be successful there also must be new 
teaching methods, which is why we also 
support innovative teacher education 
programs. 

"In economic development, we have 
two main thrusts: first to support existing 
businesses so they prosper and, second, to 
promote the community's quality of life. 
Being a good place to live is an important 
factor in attracting new business investment. 

"Finally, we try to promote quality of 
life by helping to take the arts to the people 
through arts and crafts programs for chil- 
dren, professional training, broadcasting, 
traveling exhibits, and touring. 

' 'To address all these issues, we are just 
as likely to fund a young, small organization 



—or even to help in establishing one— as to 
support a large, old, venerable institution. 
While we feel a deep responsibility to fund a 
number of United Way campaigns, we also 
favor projects that provide services 
directly.' ' 

0. Sage Wightman III, President of the 
Garden's Board of Trustees, adds this com- 
ment: "The Southwestern Bell Corpora- 
tion and Foundation have been steadfast 
friends of the Garden for many years. In the 
last two decades, we have benefited from 
their support for the construction and reno- 
vation of the John S. Lehmann Building, the 
Ridgway Center, and several building and 
renovation projects completed through the 
recent Campaign for the Garden. The 
Foundation participated in our 1989 Centen- 
nial Benefit and co-sponsored our very 
successful "Old Fashioned Fourth" 
celebration this past July. Many of the Gar- 
den's members are also Bell employees, 
who designate close to $20,000 annually in 
matching gifts that support our programs 
and services. These generous investments 
ensure the Garden's continuing ability to 
serve growing numbers of community resi- 
dents, for which we are deeply grateful." 



L0. 



\BULLETIN NOVKMUKK DECEMBER 1991 



Behind the Scenes 




James E. Corbin 



Executive Assistant Director Named 

James E. Corbin, former commander and district engineer of 
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Louis District, has been 
selected by Dr. Peter H. Raven to serve as executive assistant 
director for the Missouri Botanical Garden. 

The position of executive assistant director is new to the Gar- 
den. The job was created recently due to the increasing number of 
programs and operational growth of the institution. The executive 
assistant director reports to the director. Corbin's responsibilities 
include strategic planning and organizational structure issues. Dr. 
Marshall Crosby continues to serve as assistant director working 
with Raven and Corbin in a senior management team. A botanist 
and researcher, Crosby is increasingly called upon to provide addi- 
tional scientific and research leadership to the Garden. 

Corbin retired on August 31, 1991, from his post as commander 
and district engineer of the St. Louis District, U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers, after an illustrious career spanning over 25 years that 
carried him to assignments throughout the world. He has earned 
the admiration and respect of conservationists throughout the 
Metro area and state for his work with the Corps of Engineers. 
The St. Louis Post-Dispatch has entitled Corbin the "Green Colo- 
nel" due to his commitment to environmental projects benefiting 
the area. 

As District Engineer, he worked to develop, rehabilitate and 
restore our ecological infrastructure in this section of America 
while overseeing the construction of the largest single on-going 
project in the Corps and in the Mississippi Basin, the $1 billion Mel 
Price Lock and Dam Project. As an example of his environmental 
activism, he created a 1,200 acre reclaimed wetland, the Environ- 
mental Demonstration Area, adjacent to the Mel Price Project, 
that has won regional and national acclaim. The project entails 
reclaiming wetlands from farm fields and carefully populating them 
with appropriate wet prairie grasses and other plants to attract 
tremendous numbers and varieties of birds and other wildlife. The 
area has been featured in the Post-Dispatch, Philadelphia Inquirer, 
Audubon magazine, the Missouri Conservationist and will soon be 
featured in the National Geographic. Corbin also pioneered the 
reintroduction of endangered species such as the false aster and 
peregrine falcon into the area, a first such effort for the Corps. 

Corbin has pioneered other significant environmental efforts 
such as Riverlands 2000, an attempt to manage in a proper fashion 
the 43,000 acres of riverlands along the Mississippi and Illinois 
Rivers within the St. Louis District. This area had received no 
attention for the 50 years prior to his arrival in St. Louis. He also 
aggressively moved forward with the Environmental Management 
Program during his tenure. On his arrival, the district had no 
projects completed as part of this $191 million effort. On his depar- 
ture, two have been completed (Clarksville and Dresser Island) 
and 20 others have been started and are in some stage of comple- 



tion at this time. 

Corbin has made truly extraordinary contributions to improving 
the environment in the 27,000 square miles of Illinois and Missouri 
that were under his purview, and in introducing new environmen- 
tally sound policies. He has become known as one who is uniquely 
able to reconcile effectively the goals of the economic, conserva- 
tion and environmental communities while bringing together civic 
and political leaders and various governmental agencies at the fed- 
eral, state and local levels. 

Corbin has been recently honored by the Missouri Conserva- 
tion Federation as Conservationist of the Year and by the Audubon 
Society. On August 15, 1991 he received the Greensfelder Medal, 
the Missouri Botanical Garden's highest honor for commitment 
and service to conservation. "I am delighted to become a part of 
this world-class institution," said Corbin. "I fully support the 
superb work done by Dr. Raven and his staff here in St. Louis and 
around the world. I believe I can help advance the Garden's hor- 
ticulture, research and educational programs that serve so many 
people in so many ways." 

Corbin earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the 
University of Washington in 1966 and a master's degree in civil 
engineering from Stanford University in 1971. He and his wife Judy 
are the parents of three children. 




IV. Douglas Stevens 



New Director of Research 

On September 12, 1991, the Garden announced the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Warren Douglas Stevens as director of research. Dr. 
Stevens succeeds Dr. Enrique Forero, who resigned. 

After receiving his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 
1976, Dr. Stevens joined the Garden staff in 1977 as the B. A. 
Krukoff Curator of Central American Botany and was immediately 
dispatched to Nicaragua to prepare the first flora of that country. 
He lived in Nicaragua until 1986, establishing a National Herbar- 
ium, training a group of young Nicaraguan botanists, and oversee- 
ing the first intensive botanical collections there. Since returning to 
St. Louis, he has continued working toward the publication of the 
flora, which is nearing completion. The flora, written in Spanish, 
describes about 7,000 species of plants. 

Dr. Stevens became research department head in 1988 and is 
well respected for his leadership and research skills. In addition to 
his administrative responsibilities, Dr. Stevens has been the 
organizer of the Garden's Annual Systematics Symposium and 
served four years as secretary-treasurer of the Association for 
Tropical Biology. He is the current treasurer of the St. Louis- 
Georgetown Sister City Committee. 

Dr. Raven said, ' 'We are confident that Dr. Stevens will con- 
tinue to make substantial contributions to the Garden in his new 
role. We salute Enrique Forero for the splendid job he did as direc- 
tor of research, and we look forward to continuing to work with 
Doug Stevens." 



11. 



BULLETIN NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1991 1 



WALKING TOURS 
Every Tuesday, Saturday 
and Sunday 1:00 p-m. 

Join the Garden Guides for a 

tour of the grounds, featuring 
the art, architecture, history 
and horticulture of the Garden^ 
Meet at the ticket counter in the 
Ridgway Center. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 



Kemper Center for Home 

Gardening 

Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. 

Plant Doctor available 10 a.m. to 
noon and 1 to 3 p.m. Monday 
through Saturday. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 
Tower Grove House Tea 

Room », A 

Open for luncheon Monday 

through Friday, 11:30 a.m to 1 
cm, February through Novem- 
ber plus special Holiday Lunch- 
eons in December; advance 
reservations only. Call 577-5150. 

Garden Walkers' 

Breakfast 

7 to 10:30 a.m., every Wed- 
nesday and Saturday. Restau- 
rant and grounds open early; 

free admission until noon. Spon- 
sored by the American Heart 

Association. Call 577-5125 for 
information. 



V 






^K 



v$7 



Missouri Botanical Garden 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

November- December 1991 




NOVEMBER - DECEMOER 1 Fall Rower Show 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Orthwein Floral Hall. A charming early 20th 
century American garden with white picket fences is filled with a 
glorious array of chrysanthemums, celosias, ornamental grasses, 
and more. Members' Preview— see November 8. 




DECEMOER 7 - JANOADY 1 Holiday Flower Show 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Orthwein Floral Hall. A spectacular display of 
unusual and seasonal plants, including blue flowering coleus, nico- 
tiana, chenille plants, polka dot plants, cyclamens, stargazer lilies, 
begonias, hoya wreaths, boxwoods, pink peppermint poinsettias, 
and more. Members ' Preview—see December 6. 



N0VEM0E0 14 /MEMBERS' DAY 

Garden Greenhouses Tour 

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Continuous tours starting from 
Ridgway Center. Get a look behind the scenes at 
the beautiful plants being prepared for upcoming 
flower shows and next spring's plantings on the 
grounds. Horticulture staff will be on hand to 
answer your questions. Free, for members only. 



DECEMBER 14/ MEMBERS' DAY 

"The Nutcracker and the 
Mouse King" 

11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. The 
Imaginary Theatre Company of the Repertory 
Theatre of St. Louis performs a dramatic adapta- 
tion of this beloved holiday folktale. Due to 
limited seating, tickets are required and will be 
available at the Ticket Counter beginning Decem- 
ber 11. Free, for members only. 



N O V E M B I 



FRIDAY 

"Spirit of the Ozarks:" 
Photography Exhibit 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily througl 
December 1 , Ridgway Cente 
David Burt captures the natu 
beauty of the Ozarks with his 
ning color photographs. Free 
Garden admission. 



8 



FRIDAY 



Fall Flower Show 
Members' Preview 

5:00 to 8:00 p.m., Ridgway C 
The first flower show of the s 
is a charming display of color 
scent. Entertainment, cash b 
Dinner buffet will be available 
Gardenview Restaurant and t 
Garden Gate Shop will be ope 
members only. 



16 



SATURDAY 



Deck the Halls 

2:30p.m., Shoenberg Audito 
Local floral designers share ic 
and tips for holiday decoratinj 
Free, limited seating. 



16-17 



S A T U R D 
S U N D 



Best of Missouri's Hands 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Ridgway Ce 
Some of Missouri's most skil 
artisans display their work fo 
featuring handmade furniture 
tery, toys, ornaments, and je 1 
Sponsored by Missouri Artis; 
Business Development Asso< 
Free with Garden admission. 



20 



WEDNESDA 



"Spirit of the Ozarks": Lec 

7 p.m., Shoenberg Auditoriur 
Photographer David Burt and 
bers of The Nature Conserva 
provide a closer look at the fk 
featured in the exhibit in Mon 
Hall. Free, limited seating. 



23 



SATURDAY 



Deck the Halls 

2:30 p.m., Shoenberg Auditoi 
See November 16. 



12. 



\BULLETIN NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1991 



L Victorian Holiday at Tower Grove House 



Tower Grove House will be decorated 
■ the holidays and will be open to visitors 
>m Tuesday, December 3, through Tues- 
y, December 31, (except for Christmas 
ly) from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The last 
lr of the day begins at 4:00 p.m. 

andlelight Tour 

The Ninth Annual Candlelight Tour, 
:msored by the Tower Grove House Aux- 
ry, will be held on Tuesday, December 3, 
?1, from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Reserva- 
ns are necessary and are limited; they 
ly be made by mailing the form at right 
th your check. The fee includes a candle- 
lit tour of Tower Grove House plus 
"reshments in the Tea Room. Enter at 
45 Tower Grove Avenue, where your 
me will be registered. The path will be 
ited from there to Tower Grove House, 
rking is available across the street at 



Tower Grove Baptist Church. For additional 
information, please call Tower Grove 
House, 577-5150. 

Holiday Luncheons 

The Auxiliary will have special lunch- 
eons on Thursday, December 5, Friday 
December 6, Monday, December 9, Tues- 
day, December 10, Thursday, December 
12, and Friday, December 13. Reservations 
by phone will be accepted beginning Wed- 
nesday, November 13, between 9 a.m. and 
12 noon and also at the Tea Room between 
9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Checks must be received 
no later than Wednesday, November 27. 
Please call 577-5150. 

Tea Room 

Luncheons are available by advance 
reservation throughout November, Monday 
through Friday. Please call 577-5150 to 
make reservations. 



1991 Candlelight Tour 



Please make. 



reservations for the 

Candlelight Tour, Tuesday, December 3, 1991, at 
Tower Grove House between 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. 

Enclosed is my check for $ , at $6.00 

per person. Please make checks payable to: 
Tower Grove House Auxiliary. Check must be 
received no later than November 22, 1991. 

NAME 



ADDRESS.. 



CITY. 



STATE. 



.ZIP. 



PH O N E 

Mail to: Tower Grove House, 
P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166 




DECEMBER 



' U E S D A Y 

irove House 
light Tour 

7:30 p.m. , Tower Grove 
$6 per person. Reserva- 
e necessary and limited: call 
0. See above. 



H U R S D A Y 



f Luncheon 

m. to 1 p.m., Tower Grove 
rea Room. Advance reser- 
are required: please call 
0. See above. 




6 



FRIDAY 



Holiday Flower Show 
Members' Preview 

5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Ridgway Center. 
Catch the first glimpse of the spec- 
tacular Holiday display. Entertain- 
ment, cash bar. Dinner buffet 
available in the Gardenview Restau- 
rant. The Garden Gate Shop will be 
open. For members only. 

Holiday Luncheon 

11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tower Grove 
House. See above. 



§ S ATURDAY 

Christmas Celebration 

11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Ridgway Center 
and grounds. Celebrate with Santa 
and enjoy other festive delights. 
Regular Garden admission. See back 
cover. 

Deck the Halls 

2:30 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. 
See November 16. 



8 



SUNDAY 



Chanukah Celebration 

11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Ridgway Center 
and grounds. Celebrate with folk- 
dancing, lectures, storytelling, 
traditional kosher cooking demon- 
strations and more. Regular Garden 
admission. See back cover. 



9 



MONDAY 



Holiday Luncheon 

11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tower Grove 
House. See above. 



10 



TUESDAY 



Holiday Luncheon 

11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tower Grove 
House. See above. 



12 



THURSDAY 



Holiday Luncheon 

11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. , Tower Grove 
House. See above. 



13 



FRIDAY 



Holiday Luncheon 

11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tower Grove 
House. See above. 




25 



WEDNESDAY 



Christmas Day 

The Garden is closed. 



28 



SATURDAY 



Kwanzaa Celebration 

11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Ridgway Center 
and grounds. Storytelling, a fashion 
show, craft workshops, singing, 
dancing and more. Regular Garden 
admission. See back cover. 



13. 



BULLETIN I NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1991 1 



From the Membership Office 



El Alcazar 



1992 MEMBERS ' TRAVEL PROGRAM 

Gardens of Andalusia-M^ ? n « «* 

Garden Members are invited to join Mrs. Peter H. Raven and Patrick Bowe on a 
delightful tour of the gardens of Andalusia, Spain. This trip is specially designed by 
Mr. Bowe, noted Irish architect, garden designer, and garden historian, for Garden mem- 
bers. Mrs. Raven and Mr. Bowe will lead the tour though some of Spain's most beautiful 
cathedrals, palacios, castles, villas, and private gardens. 

The introduction to Andalusia begins in Seville, where the terraced gardens of the 
Alcazar are embellished with reflecting pools and fountains in the traditional Islamic style. 
The group will visit the Palacio de los Duenas, home of the Duchess of Alba. The tour will 
travel to Cordoba for two days of exploring magnificent Moorish palaces and nearby coun- 
try estates, including a visit to Palacio la Moratella at the invitation of the Duke of Segorbe. 
Granada is the next destination, home of the world famous Alhambra and a Generalife. 
The group will drive into the mountains to Ronda before journey's end, then spend two 
nights at the famed Marbella Club, set amidst one of the most beautiful gardens on the 
Costa del Sol. 

We hope you will be able to participate in this exceptional and exciting garden trip. 
Please watch your mail for details, or call Brenda Banjak at (314) 577-9517. 

A Garden Tour of China-MAYissi. m 2 

Co-sponsored by University of Missouri-St. Louis and Missouri Botanical Garden. 
Details and reservation information on this tour will follow in the next Bulletin, or call 
Brenda Banjak at 577-9517. 

Natural History Tours 

Lewis & Clark— june 12-25, 1992 
Sante Fe Trail— july 19-27, 1992 



The Garden sponsored Members' Tour to Madagascar was canceled due to the 
current Malagasy political situation. We are rescheduling the trip for October 
1992. Please call Brenda Banjak at 577-9517 for additional information. 




Give the Gift that Lasts 
All Year 

A membership in the Missouri Botanical 
Garden brings unlimited visits in all sea- 
sons, flower shows, members' only events, 
gift shop discounts, the Bulletin and much 
more. At $40 per membership, it's the easi- 
est shopping you'll do this holiday season. 
Special discounts are available when you 
order two or more memberships: 
$75 for 2 memberships 
$105 for 3 memberships 

Each gift recipient will be sent a limited 
edition Missouri Botanical Garden 
Christmas Tree Ornament and a holiday 
greeting from you. To ensure prompt deliv- 
ery, please order by December 9. 

Call 577-5118 and charge your gift mem- 
berships or clip and send in the application 
below. $21 of each $40 Membership is tax 
deductible. For tax information on other 
levels of Membership, call 577-5118. 



Holiday Gift Membership Order Form 

Gift to: (Please print) Name 

Address 

C ity State 



-To ensure prompt delivery, please order by December 9. 

□ My check for $ 

is enclosed. 



.Zip. 



□ Please charge: □ VISA □ MasterCard 
Amount: $ 



Day Telephone 

Gift from: Name. 

Add re s s 

City 



State. 



.Zip. 



Account No. 

Name on card:_ 
Expiration date:. 
Signed: 



Day Telephone. 



.Date needed by: 



Please sign card: 

Regular membership: $40. Contributing membership $75. 



Make checks Missouri Botanical Garden 

payable and P.O. Box 17419 

mail to: St. Louis, Missouri 63178 

Call 577-5118 for more information. 



14. 



\BULLETIN NOVKMBKR DECEMBER 1991 



From the Garden Gate Shop 



Holiday Preview Sale 

Wednesday, November 6: 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Thursday & Friday, November 7 & 8: 

9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

Shop early for the holidays! Members 
receive a 20 percent discount on all mer- 
chandise, all three days. Refreshments will 
be served, and the Shop will be open dur- 
ing the members' preview of the Fall 
Flower Show. 



Holiday Plant & 
Gift Sale 

Thursday & Friday, December 5 & 6: 

9 a.m. to 8 p.m. 
Saturday, December 7: 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Fill in those last minute items on your 
holiday list, with a 20 percent discount for 
members all three days. Refreshments will 
be served, and the Shop will be open dur- 
ing the preview of the Holiday Flower 
Show. 



Gifts Galore 



The Plant Shop has kits for growing 
plants, a delightful gift idea. Kits include 
"Grow Your Own Christmas Tree,' ' 
"Home Hydroponic Gardening," and chil- 
dren's kits with seeds for flowers and 
vegetable gardens. 

The Shop features the finest garden 
tools that are sleek, functional, and beauti- 
ful; they would be cherished by any gar- 
dener, as would a weather station with 
clock, thermometer and hygrometer all in 
one. 

Celebrate the season with gorgeous 
winter blooming camellias in red, pink, and 
white, or choose from a wonderful array of 
poinsettias, Christmas cactus, small live 
decorated trees, and more. 

A splendid gift is the Tower Grove 
Rose, an exquisite sculpture created exclu- 
sively for the Garden Gate Shop by the 
Boehm Porcelain Studios, $175.00. 

The Shop has something for everyone, 
with mugs, ties, wreaths, toys, T-shirts, 
decorations and accessories. Proceeds 
from the Garden Gate Shop support 
Garden programs and operations. 




1991 Holiday Card 



1991 Holiday Card 



The 1991 Missouri Botanical Garden Holiday Card is on sale now. This year the card 
features a hand-painted photograph of the Climatron by St. Louis artist Patti Gabriel. 
Printed on recycled paper, the cards are shrink-wrapped 10 to a package with an extra 
envelope. Inside is a message from Peter Raven, director of the Garden, with the verse 
' 'Wishing you peace, joy, & a bright New Year.' ' The cards sell for $9.50 

1992 Garden Calendar 

The perfect gift shares the beauty of the Garden all year long. The 1992 Garden Cal- 
endar, with glorious color photographs by Jack Jennings, features a full color poster on the 
Garden's research on the Araceae family. The calendar is 16 x 12 inches, printed on recy- 
cled paper, for $10.95. 

Books: BirdS Of MisSOUri Their Distribution and Abundance 



by Mark B. Robbins and David A. Easterla 

Illustrations by David Plank 

University of Missouri Press 

456 pages, available December 1991. $59.95 

This beautiful book is resplendent with 
maps, charts, photographs and illustra- 
tions, many in full color. A treasure for all 
bird lovers, this landmark study is the most 
comprehensive treatment of birds recorded 
in Missouri since European settlement. It 
provides a historical perspective, as well as 
an up-to-date assessment of each species 
recorded in the state. It will be of special 
value to conservation organizations that are 
concerned with protecting Missouri's 
environment. 




15. 



BULLETIN I NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1991 1 



THIS FALL AT SHAW ARBORETUM 



Master Plan Takes 
Shape 

THIS past summer the initial phases 
of the Arboretum's Master Plan 
were put into development. The 
Native Plant and Wildflower Garden, a family 
gift of Mr. and Mrs. Blanton J. Whitmire, is 
under construction in an area near the 1879 
Brick House. When complete, the Wild- 
flower Garden will feature a network of 
trails connecting a variety of habitats, 
including a prairie, a glade, limestone and 
sandstone rock outcrop areas, a spring pool 
and acid seep, a small marsh and a large 
woodland area. These diverse areas will 
support a wide variety of plants, from wild- 
flowers to shrubs and understory trees. 
The area will be accessible to people with 
disabilities. 

Work has also begun on a new ten-acre 
nursery that will provide new plants for the 
Arboretum, the Garden, and Tower Grove 




The site of the new Native Plant and Wildflower Garden, with the Brick House in the 
background. 



Park. It will also provide a protected area 
for growing plants designated as threatened 
or endangered by the Center for Plant Con- 



servation. The nursery area was made pos- 
sible by the generosity of the Edward K. 
Love Conservation Fund. 



Horticulture in Missouri 



The Holidays— A State Of Euphorbia 



JOEL ROBERTS POINSETT would probably be surprised, 
and elated, to visit the Holiday Show at the Missouri Botan- 
ical Garden— or, for that matter, to attend almost any public 
or private function during the holiday season. As the U.S. Minister 
to Mexico from 1825 to 1829, Poinsett was also an avid amateur 
horticulturist who regularly sent unusual plants to his home coun- 
try. Robert Buist, a horticulturist in Philadelphia, received one of 
Poinsett's Mexican plants— a brilliantly-colored Euphorbia; he 
commenced to grow, propagate, and sell the new plant, which he 
called "poinsettia" after its North American discoverer. The sci- 
entific name, Euphorbia pulcherrima (Latin for "most beautiful"), 
was not designated until 1836. 

Although poinsettias are sold in flower shops, the colorful parts 
that are prized are not actually flowers. Brilliant colors are produced 
on leafy bracts that sit below the flowers. The real flowers are tiny, 
unisexual, and are bound together in small green bundles, or 
cyathia. These floral bundles are easy to identify because each has 
a bright yellow gland on the side that produces large quantities of 
nectar. In the wild, nectar from the gland attracts flies; while 
gathering the nutritious nectar, the flies pollinate flowers of the 
poinsettia. 

Poinsett's original Mexican plants had bright red bracts, but 
pink, white, and variegated forms are now available. At the Hobday 
Floral Display in Orthwein Floral Hall at the Garden (see page 12), 
many different colors and kinds of poinsettias will be on view. 

The poinsettia is a member of the spurge family, Euphorbia- 
ceae. With over five thousand species, this family occurs in the 
most tropical areas of the world, as well as many temperate ones. 
In Missouri, we have about thirty native species in the family; one 
of these, the beautiful Euphorbia marginata, is called snow-on- 



the-mountain because the bracts are snowy white. 

However, it is the hot, dry tropical areas of the world where 
the spurge family is best represented. To get a feel for the unusual 
diversity of this family, visit the Desert House, just south of the 
Climatron, and search the plant labels for the family name, 
Euphorbiaceae (all family names end in "-aceae"). Many spurges 
bear a striking resemblance to the plants in the cactus family; this 
resemblance is reflected in the common names, such as can- 
delabra cactus or pencil cactus. But don't be fooled! The cactus 
family is quite distinct from the spurge family in many ways, for 
instance, in the kind of flower each produces. If you continue to 
browse through the Desert House, you will see many plant families 
represented. These species, no matter the family, tend to resem- 
ble each other by their fleshy stems or leaves, and tough or hairy 
exteriors— features which help conserve water. When distantly 
related plants come to resemble each other due to similar environ- 
mental pressures, this is called convergence. 

The spurge family contains many economically valuable spe- 
cies, as well. Products such as rubber (Hevea) and tung oil 
(Aleurites) are produced from plants in this group, as well as castor 
oil, Ricinus communis. Familiar cultivated plants in the Euphorbia- 
ceae include crotons, Codiaeum and Croton; chenille plant, 
Acalypha; and crown-of-thorns, Euphorbia milii. And, of course, 
the poinsettia. Happy Holidays! 

—Lucile McCook , Ph.D., Horticultural Taxonomist 

Garden research scientists Michael J. Huft and Gordon McPherson 
specialize in the study of the Euphorbiaceae. In 1989 the Garden 
hosted an international conference on the family. — Editor 



L6. 



\nru.rn.M novkmbkk deckmbkk 1991 



EDUCATION DIVISION NEWS 



Garden Hosts Parent Teacher Organization 




ore than 100 elementary school 
principals and officers of the 
St. Louis Parent Teacher Organi- 
zation (PTO) visited the Garden on Septem- 
ber 30 when the Education Division held an 
evening open house for parents and edu- 
cators. 

Starting with a narrated tram tour, vis- 
itors got the opportunity to see the Gar- 
den's facilities. The group then assembled 
in Shoenberg Auditorium where they heard 
a short presentation on science education at 
the Garden. Dr. Larry DeBuhr, education 
director, provided insights on the need for 
greater emphasis on science education in 
the elementary curriculum. The PTO offi- 
cers and school principals were introduced 
to the many educational services provided 
by the Garden to public and private schools, 
as well as to parents. 

"The Garden provides a great number 



of programs in the area of environmental 
education, multicultural experiences, field 
studies and outreach activities," said Dr. 
Peter H. Raven, director. "In 1991 the Edu- 
cation Division served more than 125,000 
children and adults in a wide variety of 
programs." 

Following the presentation in Shoenberg 
Auditorium the Garden hosted an Informa- 
tion and Activity Fair in the Beaumont 
Room, evening tours of the Climatron and a 
visit to the Stupp Teacher Resource Cen- 
ter. Visitors experienced hands-on exhibits 
and activities designed to stimulate elemen- 
tary students about the sciences. Teacher 
resources — books, portable science equip- 
ment and activity planners— were displayed. 

The Garden serves as an important 
educational facility for science study provid- 
ing thousands of hours of instruction to chil- 
dren. The Garden develops and offers 




Rebecca Young of the Garden's Education 
staff demonstrates "Mystery Boxes" to 
LaVaunt Maupin, principal oflMweli 
Elementary School. 



professional opportunities for teachers and 
provides quality educational programs for 
senior citizens, as well. 



Garden Tour Visits the Amazon 



PINK and gray river dolphins bounding through the water, 
an iguana diving from an overhanging limb into the river, 
jumping fish and equatorial showers. These were just some 
of the highlights of the Garden's adult education tour to the Peru- 
vian Amazon. 

Explorama Lodge, located on the Amazon River two and a half 
hours downstream from Iquitos in the Peruvian interior, was the 
group's base for eight days of adventure. From there the group, 
led by Barbara Addelson and Glenn Kopp of the Garden's educa- 
tion staff, explored the surrounding virgin rain forest with expert 
local guides. Mornings began at first light with a boat ride to search 
for birds on the misty Amazon, or a walk in the rain forest. During 
morning and afternoon hikes the group learned about the ecology 
of the forest and the wide range of uses for local plants as medicines, 
food and construction materials. Visiting several small villages 
gave the group a glimpse of everyday life in the forest and along 
the multitude of rivers, large and small, that make up the Amazon 
Basin. In the evenings, after dining by kerosene lantern on exqui- 
sitely prepared local food, the group ventured out on the river in 
search of nocturnal birds and mammals, hiked in the forest to find 
the insects and amphibians whose calls enrich the night, or 
gathered to listen to local music. 

A highlight of the trip was the group's three day excursion to a 
more remote campsite, located four hours from the lodge on the 
Napo River. Though more primitive than the lodge, accommoda- 
tions at the camp were very adequate. The local flavor and the 
sense of truly experiencing the jungle made it everyone's favorite 



part of the trip. Other highlights were as individual as the par- 
ticipants: 

Ann Case fell in love with the rain forest. "I've been in the 
Climatron hundreds of times," noted Ann, a volunteer Garden 
Guide, "but the experience of being in the tropical rain forest was 
utterly fantastic. The leaf cutter ants had me thoroughly capti- 
vated. I'm looking forward to the time when I can return.' ' 

For Barbara Addelson the birds were of particular interest. 
' 'The wealth and diversity of bird life is astonishing,' ' she said. 
"There are almost as many species of birds in the small area we 
visited as there are in all of the United States." 

For part of the group eight days was not enough. They 
travelled to the Andean highlands and Machu Picchu to experience 
present day life in Peru and to learn about ancient Incan society, its 
remarkable culture, building techniques and agriculture. "Machu 
Picchu, one of the world's real treasures, is not to be missed," said 
Glenn Kopp. "Seeing and understanding life in the economically 
impoverished highlands is crucial to understanding the migration 
pressures that continue to threaten the Peruvian rain forests. The 
causes of deforestation are complex and interconnected. Taking 
people to Third World countries to experience their natural 
wonders and to see how 90 percent of the world's inhabitants live 
is exciting. This is what Garden adult education trips are about- 
experiencing and learning to appreciate the diversity of life and 
cultures around us." 

—Glenn Kopp, Adult Education Coordinator 



17. 



BULLETIN I NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1991 1 



Jose Sarukhdn Awarded 1991 Henry Shaw Medal 



DR. Jose Sarukhan Kermez, rector 
of the Universidad Nacional Auto- 
noma de Mexico (UNAM), re- 
ceived the 1991 Henry Shaw Medal at the 
Garden's annual Henry Shaw Dinner on 
October 14 at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel. Dr. 
Sarukhan, a renowned plant ecologist and 
educator, was honored for his groundbreak- 
ing scientific research on plant population 
biology and his role in inspiring future 
generations of Mexican biologists. 

Since 1989, Dr. Sarukhan has served as 
rector of the 350,000-student university, 
one of the most important institutions in 
Mexico. UNAM is the Garden's close col- 
laborator of the Flora Mesoamericana 
project, together with The Natural History 
Museum in London. Flora Mesoamericana, 
whose first volume is due to be published at 
the end of 1991, will describe all plants 
growing from southern Mexico to Panama. 
Dr. Sarukhan did his graduate studies at 
the University College of North Wales and 
was one of the first researchers to apply 
demographic methods to the study of plant 
populations. His analysis of population con- 
trols of temperate grassland weeds is a 
landmark in the history of ecological sci- 
ence. He has used plant population biology 
to analyze the dynamics of tropical forest 
systems and, together with his students, 
has made notable contributions to evolu- 
tionary theory with his interpretations of 
the ecological costs and benefits of plant life 




Dr. Jose Sarukhan accepts the Henry Shaw Medal from O. Sage Wight man III, president of 



the Board of Trustees. 

cycles. 

Dr. Sarukhan's influence in Mexican sci- 
ence extends far beyond his own research 
and teaching. As President of the Academia 
de la Investigation, director of the Instituto 
de Biologfa, as well as rector of UNAM, he 
has played a powerful role in strengthening 
science in Mexico. 

' 'Jose Sarukhan is not only a world fig- 
ure in botany and conservation but an 



important political figure in Mexico as 
well," says Dr. Peter H. Raven, director of 
the Garden. "We are delighted to bestow 
this honor on him." 

The Henry Shaw Medal has been 
awarded intermittently since 1893. It hon- 
ors those who have made a significant con- 
tribution to botanical research, horticulture, 
conservation, the Missouri Botanical Gar- 
den, or the museum community. 




Henry Shaw Academy Fall 1991 Classes 



The Henry Shaw Academy at the Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden offers students aged 
7 to 13 many exciting ways to investigate 
the world around them. This unusual pro- 
gram is for students who are interested in 
exploring the world of science, ecology and 
natural history. As Academy students, par- 
ticipants can select from a variety of 
courses throughout the year as well as a 
summer science camp. These "hands on" 
experiences offer students opportunities to 
deepen their understanding and apprecia- 
tion of the natural world. 

Courses and activities are designed to 
build on science taught in area schools. The 
Academy strives to offer science motivated 
students classes that are not available in 
their schools, to supplement the learning 
that is taking place there. Our experience 
oriented classes are meant to be fun, excit- 



ing and fulfilling for each individual student. 

The Academy will start a new program 
focusing upon introducing new students to 
HSA classes. "Bring a friend for free' ' is an 
invitation for HSA student members to 
bring a friend of the same age and interest 
to any HSA class so indicated. We look for- 
ward to seeing lots of new faces with HSA 
members. 

HSA November and December classes 
are listed below. Call 577-5140 for a course 
brochure, and enroll soon, as class sizes are 
limited. 

Ages 7-9: 

Habitats and Herps, November 9, 

9 a.m. to 12 noon. 

Nature's Engineers, November 23, 

10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Arboretum. 
(Bring A Friend for Free.) 



Ages 10-12: 

Observing Plant Forms, November 16, 

9 a.m. to 12 noon. 
Bonsai for Breakfast , November 23, 

9 a.m. to 12 noon. 
Adventures from Dawn to Dusk, December 

7; 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Arboretum. 

(Bring A Friend for Free.) 

Ages 9-12: 

' 'Tuesday Topics' ' After School Program: 
Gardens of Microbes, 
November 1, 19, 26; 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. 

Special Wreathmaking Class for neighbor- 
hood students ages 7 to 16 years old: 
December 21; 10 a.m. to 12 noon. 

HSA Wreathmaking Class for All Ages, 
December 14 and 21; 10 a.m. to 12 noon. 



18. 



iBULLETIN NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1991 



Center for Plant Conservation 



Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands Task Force Meeting 



by Marie M. Bruegmann, 
Conservation Projects Coordinator 

On September 17-19, 1991, the Puerto 
Rico Department of Natural Resources 
hosted the second Puerto Rico/Virgin 
Islands (PR/VI) Priority Region Task Force 
meeting in San Juan in cooperation with 
Fairchild Tropical Garden and the Center 
for Plant Conservation (CPC). Thirty-three 
people from 23 organizations working in 
Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands attended 
the meeting, including Peggy Olwell, the 
CPC manager of conservation programs, 
and myself. 

Puerto Rico is one of the five priority 
regions of the CPC. The varied habitats of 
these regions make them home to the 
broadest diversity of plants. For this rea- 
son, CPC is focusing on Puerto Rico, along 
with Florida, Texas, California, and Hawaii, 
for its conservation efforts. 

Three of the people attending the Task 
Force meeting represented 130 years of 
combined experience in Caribbean botany: 
George Proctor of the Puerto Rico Depart- 
ment of Natural Resources, Roy Woodbury, 
an eminent teacher of botany, and Henri 
Alain Liogier of the University of Puerto 
Rico Botanic Garden. These distinguished 
scientists shared their vast store of knowl- 
edge with the next generation of Caribbean 
botanists at this meeting. It was also excit- 
ing to see the flow of information from 
botanists working in other regions to 
botanists who have spent more time in 
Puerto Rico. 

The meeting reviewed the list of priority 
species compiled at the first PR/VI Task 
Force meeting in 1989 and assessed the 
biological priorities for rare plant species in 
Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Of the 



62 species previously identified as priority 
A, which could possibly go extinct within 
the next five years, 48 were determined to 
still be priority A at this meeting. Eighteen 
species were added to the priority A list. 

Some species have become more rare 
since Hurricane Hugo hit the islands shortly 
after the last meeting in 1989. Other recur- 
ring threats to rare plants are development, 
mining, low plant population size, and lack 
of regeneration of many populations. The 
results of this meeting will be used to assist 
CPC to set priorities for adding species to 
the National Collection. CPC will also make 
recommendations to various government 
agencies and institutions to do more studies 
on the lack of regeneration of many of the 
plant populations and to do further surveys 
to determine more accurate distributions of 
these species. 

The third day of the task force meeting 
was devoted to a field trip to Guajataca 
Gorge in the Isabela area. Here we got a 
wonderful view of the northern coast of 
Puerto Rico and saw some beautiful coastal 
forest on the limestone cliffs. We saw some 
of the important species discussed during 
the meeting, including Ottoschulzia rhodox- 
ylon, which is no longer known to set seed. 

During the trip Peggy Olwell had several 
meetings with local university and govern- 
ment institutions to work on cooperative 
relationships. Currently Fairchild Tropical 
Garden in Miami is collecting and maintain- 
ing specimens of some of the top priority 
Puerto Rican species for the CPC National 
Collection. The Center, Fairchild, and the 
botanists of Puerto Rico agree that this col- 
lection should be housed in Puerto Rico, 
and Peggy was searching for institutions to 
work with CPC. 




Mark Richardson, curator of living collections at the Australian National Botanic Gardens 
in Canberra, visited the Garden at the end of September as part of a tour of the U.S. On 
September 27 he gave a lecture at the Kemper Center on ' 'Diversity and Conservation of 
the Australian Flora." Richardson is a co-founder of the new Australian Network for Plant 
Conservation, a national program modeled on the Center for Plant Conservation here at the 
Garden. Left to right: Don Falk, director of CPC; Mark Richardson; Steve Cline, manager of 
the Kemper Center. 



The week following the meeting George 
Proctor and Roy Woodbury led Carol Lip- 
pencott of Fairchild Tropical Garden, 
Richard Moyroub of Gemini Garden, and 
me to locations of several priority species. 
We were amazed that George and Roy were 
able to guide us unerringly to the spots 
where these plants grow, although in some 
cases they had not visited the site for over 
thirty years. Of the twenty species Carol 
was interested in collecting for the Center's 
National Collection, we failed to find only 
three. For example, neither George nor 
Roy knew of a current location for Cordia 
rupicola. Our trip to Puerto Rico was a very 
successful meeting and collecting trip, 
made so by the expertise and cooperation 
of all the people who attended. 



Gift Planning 



Estate Tax Guidebook 

It is often said that only two things are 
certain: death and taxes. When these two 
are joined together, the result is estate tax. 
In the fall of the year, in anticipation of the 
year-end financial analysis that so many of 
us must do, the Garden tries to cover tax 
issues in the Heritage gift planning news- 
letter and in this column to assist our 
friends and members. 

The Estate tax is a transfer tax imposed 
by the federal government on the act of 
transferring assets to heirs at death. This 
tax can range from 18 percent to an effective 
60 percent of a taxable estate. (While there 
is an estate tax in both Missouri and Illinois, 
it is considered a "pick-up" tax and is 
included in the total amount of the federal 
tax as a credit, therefore it will not increase 
the total tax burden). 

The best way to minimize the amount of 
estate tax, and preserve more for one's 
heirs, is to plan ahead carefully. Where 
appropriate, assets can be transferred 
before death, and be removed from the tax- 
able estate. In addition, there are a number 
of exclusions and deductions that can be uti- 
lized within a properly drafted Will, and 
charitable gifts can be instrumental in 
reducing estate taxes. 

The Garden is offering a comprehensive 
booklet entitled The Estate Tax Cuidebook. 
This excellent publication describes the 
estate tax in complete yet understandable 
language and includes provisions that are 
useful to discuss with a financial advisor as 
one prepares an estate plan. For your free 
copy of the booklet, or if you would like 
to be on the quarterly gift planning news- 
letter mailing list, call Ernestina Short 
(314) 577-9532, or write to Missouri Botan- 
ical Garden P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 
63166-0299. 



19. 



Bl LLET1N N( >\ EMBER DEC HMBFR 1991 I 




The Isabel A. Boer Memorial Garden 



Visitors strolling east past the Linnean 
House will notice a lovely new garden area 
just north of the Scented Garden. Given in 
memory of Isabel Aloe Baer by her hus- 
band, Garden Trustee Howard Baer, the 
new garden space and fountains were 
designed by Chip Reay of St. Louis in con- 
sultation with Geoff Rausch of Environmen- 



tal Planning and Design, Pittsburgh. 

The Baer garden is a study in contrasts. 
Its exquisitely proportioned space is paved 
with smooth French limestone in delicate 
bands of soft rose and blue grey. At one end 
a pair of natural boulders of Missouri granite 
provide a graceful seat overlooking the cen- 
tral fountain, a circular pool of bubbling, 



(I a' ft) The boulder bench in the Isabel A. Baer 
Garden has been temporarily removed. 

swirling water surrounding a central bowl of 
still water that reflects the sky. A second 
fountain stands at the opposite end, a tall, 
slim column of hand chased bronze with 
water sliding over its polished surface to 
represent the river of life. The bench and 
two fountains form strong symbols of the 
natural elements Earth, Air and Water, 
poised together in harmony. 

Enclosed by an aerial hedge of pleached 
trees, azaleas, and beds of colorful annuals, 
the Baer garden forms a special outdoor 
"room" with its entrance on the central 
axis from the pergola. It is open to view 
from all sides. 

"The design of this garden is meant to 
capture the beauty and contrasts of Mrs. 
Baer's personality," Chip Reay explained. 
"It reflects her grace and inner calm and 
her love of nature. It is meant to be an island 
of serenity amid the passing seasons.' ' 

Dr. Raven said, "Isabel Baer was a 
lovely person and a wonderful friend. This 
beautiful garden seems to embody her very 
special personality, and we are absolutely 
delighted to be able to share it with visitors 
to the Garden." 



Tributes to Raven Support 
Research 



This past summer Garden Trustees, led 
by a $350,000 three-year gift from the Dula 
Foundation, gave a total of $650,000 in 
honor of Dr. Peter H. Raven's 20th anniver- 
sary as director. This tremendous show of 
support pays tribute to Dr. Raven's leader- 
ship and dynamic development of the Gar- 
den as an institution serving both St. Louis 
and the international scientific community. 

The Trustees' gift will support the 
development of the research database sys- 
tem at the Garden, including the Floras of 
North America and China. These landmark 
projects are revolutionizing the use of 
botanical data for scientific research, educa- 
tion, ecological studies, and conservation 
efforts throughout the world (see the Bulle- 
tin, September-October 1991). 

O. Sage Wightman III, president of the 
Board of Trustees, said, "It is typical of 
[Peter's] foresight, energy, and devotion 
that the Garden has taken the lead in this 
effort, inspiring international respect and 
cooperation ... I can think of no better way 
to honor Peter and Tamra and thank them 
for the many contributions they have made 
through the years." 



Garden Honors African- American Scientist with 
Scholarship Program 



The Garden will award a $5,000 renewa- 
ble college scholarship in 1992 in honor of 
noted scientist Dr. Ernest E. Just. This is 
the first scholarship program created by the 
Garden. This annual program has been 
initiated to help local college undergradu- 
ates with their study of science. 

The Just Scholarship is open to St. Louis 
area students. The preferred recipient will 
be a St. Louis African-American studying 
science. The award is based upon academic 
record and extracurricular activities per- 
taining to science. Undergraduates who 
have successfully completed their college 
sophomore year will be eligible for the 
award. The scholarship will be funded 
through the financial support of Daniel and 
Adelaide Schlafly of St. Louis. The Schlaflys 
have provided support to a wide array of 
minority education programs throughout 
the metropolitan community. 

"Tomorrow's scientists are being edu- 
cated in today's world," said Peter H. 
Raven, director. "The Garden wants to 
give to the St. Louis community something 
that has a positive effect on our hometown 
and the world. This scholarship helps a 
deserving student move toward the dream 
of someday becoming a professional within 
the scientific community." 



Dr. Just, an African-American, was an 
outstanding research biologist who lived 
from 1883 to 1941. As a child he moved from 
Charleston, South Carolina to New York 
City. At Dartmouth College, he was 
inspired by a biology professor, and excelled 
as a student. He was the only magna cum 
laude graduate of his class, and was also 
elected to Phi Beta Kappa. 

As a scientist at Howard University, Dr. 
Just devoted a lifetime to the study of the 
structure and function of cells. He wrote 
two major books, including "The Biology of 
the Cell Surface,' ' published in 1939. In addi- 
tion, he published more than 60 scientific 
papers. Howard University has named 
a science building to honor the memory of 
Dr. Just. 

In 1915, Dr. Just was awarded the Spin- 
garn Medal, the highest award given by the 
NAACP to the person having done the most 
during the year to advance the progress of 
African-Americans. 

Those interested in more information on 
the Just Scholarship should write immedi- 
ately to the Scholarship Committee, Educa- 
tion Department, Missouri Botanical 
Garden, P. O. Box 299. St. Louis, Missouri 
63166-0299, or call 314-577-5140. 



20. 



\BULLETINI NOVKMHKR DKCKMBER 1991 



Tributes 



July -August 1991 



In Honor Of 



Mr. Harold Abrams 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Abrams 
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Brown 

Jules Abrams 
Melvine Hyken 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Hieken 
Mr. Bud Agatstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald F. Roth 

Craig Austin 
Lisa Knese 

Mrs. Marie Leibengood 
Mr. Keith Barrons 
Mrs. Keith Barrons 
Mr. and Mrs. John R. Gannett 
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne 

Bennetsen 
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Heinrich 

Dr. Virgil Bleisch 

Mrs. Alice Wendt 

Mrs. Carol Bodenheimer 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Ettman 
Bonnie Bruenger 
Mrs. Irma W. Merrill 
Robert Bry 
Darlene Fleming 

Mr. and Mrs. David R. Smith 
Mrs. Joseph Carafiol 
Mrs. Doris M. Thomas 
Mr. Samuel Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 

Dorothy and Alex Cole 

Ms. Dolores A. Miller 
Connie and Peter 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ullman 

Mrs. Heather Joy Harrington 
Crawford 

Dr. and Mrs. L. Kent Harrington 
Jim Cuidon 

Family and Friends 

Mr. Henry Dubinsky 

Dr. and Mrs. Maurice J. Keller 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert N. Schulte 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
Elliott Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth E. 
Floro 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Krings 

Mrs. Ruth Freedman 

Mrs. Philip N. Hirsch 
Mrs. Sally Kushins 
Mrs. Edward Scallet 
Lisa Friedman 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen C. Smith 
Nina and Tom Grote 
Dr. and Mrs. M. W. Friedlander 
Mrs. Mary Guze 

Mr. and Mrs. Ken Wagner 



Fred and Corrine Hammer 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Elsperman 
Mrs. Patricia Kromer 
Ruth M. Homeyer 
Rev. Charles Homeyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. 
Kelly Jr. 

Mrs. L. William Dorr Sr. 
Mrs. Margie Klearman 

Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Feinstein 

Wallace Klein 
Norma Varra 

Mrs. Genevieve Entwistle 
Dr. Dorothy J. Jones 

Mr. Theodore Komen 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Rosenthal 
Rita and Bill Kottmeyer 
Dr. and Mrs. Ralph B. Woolf 
Mrs. John Kourik 

Mrs. Rae Carafiol 

Mrs. Virginia Clark 

Mrs. Margaret Gold 

Mrs. Doris Thomas 

Thelma and Russell LaBoube 

Mr. and Mrs. William Vit 

Daniel Leake 

Lewis and Clark Teleflora Unit 
Mr. and Mrs. Lawton Levy 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Nussbaum 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Scharff 
Mr. and Mrs. David Shores 
Mrs. Marilyn Lipton 
Mrs. Irvin Bettman Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Brod 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Dalton 
Mrs. David Eiseman III 
Mrs. Barbara B. Goodman 
Mr. and Mrs. Sid Grossman 
Mr. and Mrs. Jay Henges 
Doris Liberman 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Marshall 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Rosenthal 
Mr. and Mrs. David Sherman Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. James E. 
McKee Jr. 

Mrs. James E. McKee III 

Mrs. A. L. Netter Jr. 

Teel Ackerman 
Martin 0. Israel 

Harriet Newport 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark I. Bronson 

Dr. Thomas J. Olsen 

Internal Medicine House Staff, 

St. Louis University Medical School 

Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Orchard 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Rosenheim 
Mrs. Carl Otto 

Mrs. Charles W Lorenz 
Our Lady of Lourdes 
School-Class of '98 

Ms. Mary Rose Heil III 



Mr. and Mrs. Marvin 
Pleimann 

Mrs. Elenor Strauss 
Miss Joanne Strauss 

Mrs. Genoma Pope 

Mrs. James C. Anderson 
Mrs. Edgar Bland 
Mr. Allen Portnoy 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Rosenbloom 

Dr. Shale Rifkin 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Smith 
Goldye and Sam Rosen 
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Smith 
Mrs. Ronald Ross 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Scallet 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Roth 

Mrs. Lesley Coburn 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Sachs 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 
Mr. Louis Schukar 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Halpern 
Mrs. Dianne Schwartz 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Cohen 
Mrs. Colleen Shen 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark I. Bronson 
Wally and Marcia Pankowski 

Mr. Sydney Shoenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Schukar 

Mrs. Ruth Smith 

Barbara and Ralph Lowenbaum 
Mrs. Sandy Smith 
Dr. and Mrs. Harry T. Duffy 
Mr. and Mrs. William B. 

Smith III 
Dr. and Mrs. Harry T. Duffy 
SelmaH. Soule 
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Fischer 
Mr. and Mrs. Perry Sparks 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Stone 

Mrs. E. Daniel Liberman 

Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford E. Fischer 
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. Baumann 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Alvin Tolin 

Mrs. Raymond E. Lange 
Mr. Pietro Traina 

Ms. Ginny Woehrle 

Mrs. Joseph Tucker 

Mrs. Alberta S. Kalish 

Mrs. Jesse S. Myer Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Rosenheim 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ullman 

Judy and Steve Wasserman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Fuchs 

Mr. and Mrs. Gene Weissman 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill Eastman 

Mr. and Mrs. Faville 
Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. Baumann 



Mr. Leon Zeve 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen R. Burstein 
Mr. and Mrs. William Cohen 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul T Putzel 



In Memory Of 



Dr. Morris Abrams 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard Carlin 
Fehrenbacher Sisters 
Brother of Cathy Alvarez 
Dr. and Mrs. Michael B. Gutwein 
Mrs. Thelma Aponte 
Mrs. Chris Billmeyer 
Godar Bender & Associates 
Greg Johnston 
Mylee Digital Sciences, Inc. 
Anna Mae Ballard 
Washington University Dental Wives 

Club 
Rosemary Barker 
Alice Hausner 

Mrs. Lucille Beall 

Scott Beall Family 

Mr. William Bebermeyer 

Mr. Richard Bebermeyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Erwin J. Kappelmann 
Mrs. Marian R. Meyer 
Robert and Doris Monzyk 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger J. Morgan 
Mrs. Ethel Murphy 
Mrs. Shirley A. Parker 
St. Louis Children's Hospital- 
Pharmacy Staff 
Mr. Randolph K. Tibbits 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Wilkinson 
Marie Becher 
Gene and Shirley Kern 
Mr. Brian Bender 
Mr. Bradley Shanker 
Nathalie Berwald 
Friends and Family 
Dr. and Mrs. Maurice J. Keller 

Mr. Paul Berwald 

Mrs. Myron Glassberg 

Mr. William Binder 

Mr. and Mrs. Van-Lear Black III 
Mr. Carl F. Bloss 
Charles A. Iselin 
Mr. Joseph E. Wuller 
Felix and Virginia Boldt 
Mrs. Janet Racen 

Mr. Mark S. Bornholdt 

Mrs. Helen B. Gross 
Mrs. Ruth E. Scott 
Mr. Ray Briesacher 

Wayne Drees 
Charles A. Iselin 
Mr. Earl Rosen Jr. 
Mr. Joseph E. Wuller 

continued on next page 



21. 



BULLETIN! NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1991 1 







Mrs. Agnes Elze 


Mrs. Barbara Holman 






Tributes 1 






continued 


James J. May Sr. 




Mr. and Mrs. G. Padgitt 


Louise C. Lewis 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles Smiley 




Mrs. Jeanette Epstein 


Mrs. Dorothy Hurd 


Marjorie C. McCormick 


Susie Brown 


Mrs. Natalie E. Freund 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Rich 


Orchid Society of Greater St. Louis 


Mr. and Mrs. John Boland 


Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 


Mr. Peter H. Husch 


Mr. Bernard A. McDonald 


Mrs. Ilii/t'l Bush 


Mrs. Delancey Everitt 


Mrs. Mathilde K. Cohen 


Mrs. Bernice A. McAnany 


Mrs. Kathryn Funk 
Dorothy C. Busking 

Robert W. Busking Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Ebeling 


Mr. and Mrs. John G. Goessling 


Mr. and Mrs. Tom Rothschild 


Mr. Allen E. Meschke 


Mr. and Mrs. John Holmes 


Mrs. Agnes McCarthy James 


Jane Gremaud 


Mrs. Peggy Fehrman 


Judge and Mrs. Roy W. Harper 


Paul Meier 


Mr. and Mrs. Warren R. Kunstman 


Mrs. Shirley Folkers 


Bonnie M. Wanner 


Mrs. Mildred Hoffman 


Mrs. Olivia Fischer 


Jovanovic 


Mrs. Audrey Mohr 


Mrs. Armand Kuntz 


Mr. and Mrs. William W. Burcke 


Ms. Joyce Drechsel 


Charles A. Iselin 


Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Sacket 


Mrs. Ruth Frankle 


Mr. Donald Keck 


Joseph E. Wuller 


Mrs. Mary Lou Butler 


Rosalind Solniker 


Mr. and Mrs. William F. Fialka 


Mr. Jack A. Morisette 


Frank Chross 


Mr. Herbert Dean Freer 


Mr. John G. Kiske 


Mr. and Mrs. Fred Fangmann 


Ms. Deb Lueckerath 


Mrs. Raymond W. Baehr 


Charlie Schmidlack 


Mr. Samuel C. McCluney Jr. 


Mr. Ben Rankin 


Mr. Milton Freund 


Mrs. Betty Anne Koralchik 


Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin Jr. 


Robert Butler 


Mrs. Myron Glassberg 


Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 


Robert R. Miller 


Mr. and Mrs. Norman Schute 


Mrs. Sally Kushins 


Mrs. Norman J. Kraemer 


Donald G. Purdy Sr. 


Thomas R. Cahill 


Mr. and Mrs. James L. Watel 


Mr. and Mrs. Paul W. Reime 


Mrs. C. Lawrence Mueller 


Mr. and Mrs. John H. Ferring III 


Mrs. Jeanette Gamble 


Mr. Wendell J. Kuhl 


Mr. and Mrs. Ralph K. Soebbing 


Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Higginbotham 


Mr. Howard F. Baer 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 


Mrs. Mildred Mueller 


Dr. and Mrs. A. C. Truebloodjr. 


Mr. J. Barry George 


Mr. Barry A. Landes 


Mr. Bernard Mabry 


Mrs. Stella Camden 


Charlotte Glessmer 


Mr. Richard Brantley 


Elvera M. Mullen 


Dr. and Mrs. Harry Bozoian 


Irma Glessmer 


Donn Gillespie 


Kathryn L. Allen 


Maude Chouris 


Mrs. Margie King 


Mrs. Martha C. Gundel 


Mrs Calvin Burkhardt 


Margaret Joyce 


Mrs. Lucille Gewinner 


Joe Heckman 


Mrs. Walter Hennis 


Mr. Arthur Christ 


Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fogarty Jr. 


Charlie Iselin 


Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Niemoeller 


Mrs. Helen J. Hilliker 


Mr. and Mrs. Russell A. Kupferer 


Chuck Jarman 


Bernice Schwegler 


Miss Nancy Clifton 

Mrs. P. J. Rapp 

Mr. Samuel L. Coffin 

Mrs. Charles Coffin 


Mrs. E. B. Murer 
Mrs. Marge Purk 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger W. Shaw 


Mr. and Mrs. George Ker 
Michael Perry 
Joseph E. Wuller 


Mr. and Mrs. Carl Stumpf 

Mrs. Irma Wick 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Wilshire 


Mrs. Maureen Golaszewski 


Mrs. Anne Lehmann 


Mr. and Mrs. Paul R. Young 


Sandy and Ray Eddins 


Mr. Louis Dickinson 


Mr. Kurt Nathan 


V 11.11 It 3 1\ . V l '11 111 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gerfen 


Mrs. Fran Goldberg 


Mr. and Mrs. Frederick A. 


Mr. and Mrs. John F. Young 


Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. Krueger 


Mrs. Rosalyn Stein 


Hermann Jr. 


Mr. Howard Nemerov 


Henri and Dorothea Renard 


Mrs. Bernice Gossel 


Mrs. Marjorie Levin 


Mrs. Dee W. Eades 


Ruth and Janis Roddy 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Levin 


Ms. Susan M. Kummer 


Mrs. Margaret C. Noonan 


Mrs. Julius A. Seidel 


Mr. Harry Gough 


Miss Rosa una N. Licklider 


Mrs. Anne N. Niesen 


Mr. Granville J. Cooke 


Mr. and Mrs. James M. Canavan 


Missouri Botanical Garden- 


Mrs. Geraldine Noyes 


Mr. and Mrs. I>eamon R. Barbro 


Stephen Graflage 


Volunteer Instructors 


I.eonard and Priscilla Davis 


Family 


His Caring Friends 


Mr. Roy A. Lieder 


Mrs. Olgal. O'Hara 


Mrs. Frances Coombs 


Ms. Marie Nemnich 


Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 


Mr. and Mrs. G. Padgitt 


Mrs. Lillian H. Biggs 


Mr. Neil Guffey 


Dorothy Mae Linsin 


Elizabeth Davenport 


Sue Cunningham 


Mr. and Mrs. George W. 


Seth Barbanell 


Palowski 


Nancy, Peggy and Margaret Marr 


Kriegshauser 


Sally Petito 


Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Scharff 


Elda Curtis 


Mrs. Pearl Haefner 


Mr. Lawrence Lohe 


Mother of Russell Parker 


Dr. and Mrs. Josey M. Page Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Erwin R. Breihan 


Mrs. Josephine A. McDonald 


William V. Rabenberg Family 


Mr. Peter J. Danna Sr. 


Mrs. Helen Hall 


Mrs. Rilla Lovin 


Mrs. De lores Pedrotti 


Mr. and Mrs. Harvey A. Hofmeister 


Mr. and Mrs. Dean Garner 


Mr. and Mrs. H. Don Dallas 


Ms. Glenna Thurman 


Mrs. Mabel H. Davis 


Harry Harris 


Mr. Herman Lueking 


Mrs. Darlyne Tipolt 


Mrs. Miriam F. Krausman 


Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Gundaker 


Mr. Myron Dymtryszyn 


Mrs. Maria Peikarian 


Mrs. Anthony DeCarlo 


Irvin S. Harris 


Mr. and Mrs. Peter E. Sargent 


Mrs. Yolanda Taylor 


Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Hemmer 


Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Gundaker 


Steven Machalow 


Mrs. Irma Pfeffer 


Mrs. Rosemary DeLuca 


Helen Hausner 


His Friends 


Ms. Vera A. Obst 


Mrs. Pat Hanick 


Emna Brohr 


Mrs. Thomas F. Maher 


Mr. E. Raymond Pienaar 


Mr. Robert F. Dubose 


Alice Hausner 


Ms. William H. Bixbyjr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Allen 


Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. Burke 


Gertrude H . Vogel 


Mother of Ann Mandelstamm 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. 


Gus Dudeck 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert r. Zohner 
Mr. Lome Dunkelman 

Dr. and Mrs. Alvin R. Frank 

Mr. and Mrs. Jay Henges 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Rosenheim 


Mr. William R. Heidbreder 


Mr. and Mrs. Ilene Follman 


Babington Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin Jr. 
Robert and Susie Schulte 


Mrs. Use Mansbacher 

Jewish Family & Children's Service 


Ken and Fran Baker 
Mrs. Kenneth C. Baker 


Mr. Carl Helms 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. 
Kriegshauser 


Mrs. Emily Marner 

Mrs. Paul C. Langenbach 
Mr. James Marshall 


Ms. Emma Behrens 
Bracken Clan Garden Club 
Mr. and Mrs. James M. Canavan 
Ms. Minerva C. Canavan 


Mrs. Ruth Durham 


Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Hendel 


Mr. and Mrs. Peter E. Sargent 


Mr. and Mrs. Richmond W. Coburn 


Dr. and Mrs. Edward F. Berg 


Mrs. Ethel Eckles 


Mr. Albert Matusofsky 


Mrs. Frank E. Dolson 


Dr. and Mrs. James T. Chamness 


Mrs. Ruth G. Hey 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard Halpern 


Edith D. Heeter 


Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace Sr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Elmer W. Pounds 




Mrs. John A. Holscher 



22. 



IBULLETIN NOVKMBKK DECEMBER 1991 



Mrs. Arthur C. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Nix 

Ms. Cecelia L. Orr 

Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Priesmeyer 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Pyle 

Dorothy Stuber 

Miss Angela M. Pilla 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Davis 

Mr. C. Robert Pommer 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Bowen 
Miss Mary Jane Fredrickson 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. Lortz 
Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence T. Wilson 
Father of Mrs. Rochelle 

Popkin 
Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Wielansky 
Mr. Michael Raines 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Murray 
Mrs. Jane B. Reid 
Mr. Stephen P. Mullin 
Mrs. Reilly 

Ms. Sally Kilpatrick 

Mrs. Florian Reilly 

Mr. John F. Reilly 

Mrs. Phillip H. Reither 

Mr. and Mrs. L. William Don- 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Frank 

Mrs. C. C. Richards 

Miss Myrl Manring 
Mrs. Sue B. Robinson 
Mrs. Gaylord C. Burke 
Mr. and Mrs. Clark Driemeyer 
Father of Terrie Rollings 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin R. Breihan 

Mrs. Harry Rosenbaum 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Allen 
Mr. Howard F. Baer 
Sunny Glassberg 
Dr. and Mrs. Morton E. Smith 

Bess Rosenbloom 

Mrs. Norma Nissenbaum 

Mrs. Anne Rubin 

Frank, John, Sylvia Eirten 
Mrs. Lois Russell 

Orchid Society of Greater St. Louis 

Mr. John Sanders 

Ms. Ann Ferriss 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Edgar Withrow 

Caroline Sansone 

Mr. and Mrs. Blaine A. Ulmer 
Mrs. Ida Schermer 

Mr. and Mrs. James Henderson 
Mrs. William Schield 

Don and Beverly Abrams 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester P. Ackerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Arenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Arndt Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Auerbacher 

Mr. J. A. Baer II 

Mrs. J. Eugene Baker 

Mrs. Kenneth C. Baker 

Mrs. IrvinBettmanJr. 

Mrs. Norman Bierman 

Mr. and Mrs. J. John Brouk 

Mr and Mrs. Leo Brownstein 

Mrs. Oscar J. Conrad Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold M. Cutler 

Dr. and Mrs. Max Deutch 

Mr. James Drey 



Mr. and Mrs. Leo A. Drey 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Drey Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Melville J. Dunkelman 

Mr. S. E. Freund 

Mrs. Samuel J. Freund 

Mrs. Calvin Gatch 

Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Gittelman 

Mr. Clark V. Graves 

Mrs. Mary Greensfelder 

Mrs. Kenneth B. Hannigan 

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Sol Martin Isaac 

Mr. and Mrs. Gene Jantzen 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Johnson 

Miss Martha E. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. James R. Kirby 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Landsbaum 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Langsdorf Jr. 

Mrs. C. B. Lears 

Mrs. J. Melvin Levi 

Mrs. Benjamin Loeb 

Mrs. Harry W. Loeb 

Dr. Virgil Loeb Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 0. Losos 

Barbara and Ralph Lowenbaum 

Mrs. Margaret Marsh 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Marshall 

Dr. and Mrs. Bruce McClennan 

and Ross 
Dorothy Moog 
Mrs. Marion Moss 
Nina Moss 
Mrs. Elise Myer 

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Nussbaum 
Mr. and Mrs. William R. Orthwein Jr. 
Mrs. Betty W. Ott 
Mrs. Carl Otto 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Prager 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Prince 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis R. Putzel 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fusz Ring 
Mr. Lawrence K. Roos 
Mr. Earl Rosen Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Rosenheim 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Sachs 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Samuels 
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Scharff II 
Dr. and Mrs. Gunter Schmidt 
Mr. and Mrs. James L. Schwab Jr. 
Mrs. Helen G. Shifrin 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Singer 
Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Sprung 
Mrs. A. Ernest Stein 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Steiner 
Mrs. Lawrence M. Steiner 
Mary Frances Sudholt 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Thompson Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Tucker 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul UUman 
Dr. and Mrs. Helman C. Wasserman 
Mr. and Mrs. James L. Watel 
Mrs. Alicia P. Withers 
Mrs. Helen G.Wolff 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Wolff Jr. 

Mr. Edgar G. Scharr 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Ziemann 
Mr. Donald Schnuck 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence T. Wilson 

Marjorie Schoknecht 

Mr. Kent Schoknecht 
Mrs. Mayme Schreiber 

Mr. and Mrs. Dean Garner 



Mrs. Jane Schwend 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Ahner 

Mrs. Rachel Scott 

Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher 
Miss Edith Seltzer 
Mrs. Geraldine Epp Smith 
Mr. Nate Shapiro 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Krekeler 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 
Emily Sheldon 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Mykrantz 

Father of Allen Sherman 

Bill Eastman 
Cynthia Garnholz 
Victoria Simmons 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Mykrantz 

Ms. Leba Stern 

Ms. Lynne A. Benish 

Mr. Samuel Story 

Missouri School for the Blind 
Linda VanEck-Niedringhaus 
Mr. Henry J. Stout 

Mrs. M. J. Grzesiowski 

Mr. William Streck 

Mrs. Pat Hanick 

Mr. Edgar L. lay lor Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace Jr. 
Mr. Abe Tepper 

Ms. Elizabeth Reinhardt 

Audrey Faust Wallace 

Mrs. Leicester B. Faust 
Barbara N. Kaiser 
Mrs. Gloria Wallace Karoll 
Mr. Victor Wallace 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Weinstock 

Mr. Herbert Wallis 

Mrs. Oscar G. Korte 
Mr. Russell Wallis 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Rich 

Judge Noah Weinstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Bromberg 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Singer 

Mr. Ray Weissgerber 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Munn 

Mrs. Betty Chappell White 

Ms. Lori Calcaterra 

Miss Lorraine Wiemer 

Mrs. D. M. Cuendet 
Edwina Smith 
Patricia Winkler 

Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth J. Arnold 
Ms. Pamela R. Gempel 

Mrs. Frances Woelfel 

Mr. Bernard Mabry 
Raymond B. Wolk 
Ryuko Koyama Wolk 

The Wolk Family 
Mrs. Rose Yaker 

Stephen and Joyce Best 



Board of Trustees 

Mr. 0. Sage Wightman III 

President 

Rev. Lawrence Biondi, S.J. 

Mr. Stephen F. Brauer 

Mr. William H.T. Bush 

Dr. William H. Danforth 

Mr. Samuel B. Hayes III 

Mr. Robert R. Hermann 

Rt. Rev. William A. Jones, Jr. 

Mr. David W. Kemper 

Mr. Charles F. Knight 

Mr. Charles E. Kopman 

Mr. Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. Richard J. Mahoney 

Mr. William E. Maritz 

Mr. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. Thomas 0. McNearney, Jr. 

Mr. Lucius B. Morse III 

Rev. Earl E. Nance, Jr. 

Dr. Helen E.Nash 

Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr. William R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

The Hon. Vincent C. SchoemehJ, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. Andrew C. Taylor 

Mr. Jack E. Thomas 

Dr. Blanche Touhill 

Mr. John K.Wallace, Jr. 

The Hon. George R. Westfall 

EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mr. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. John H. Biggs 
Mr. Jules D. Campbell 
Mr. Henry Hitchcock 
Mr. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. Louis S. Sachs 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. Tom K.Smith, Jr. 

Mr. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Harriet Spoehrer 

Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Dr. Mildred Mathias 
Prof. Philippe Morat 

DIRECTOR 

Dr. Peter H . Raven 

MEMBERS' BOARD 

Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 

President 

Mrs. Antonio I. Longrais 

Mrs. Robert P. Tschudy 

Mrs. Robert Schulte 

Mr. Frederick H. At wood III 



23. 



BULLETIN NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1991 I 




Holiday Celebrations at the Garden 

Come share the joys of the season with a trio of holiday celebrations of different cultures, 

especially for families. Reservations are required for some workshops; 

call 577-5125 starting November 11. 



Christmas 



Saturday, December 7, 1991 
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Santa in his sleigh will be on hand 
to greet visitors on the first day of 
the Holiday Flower Show. For a 
small fee have your child's picture 
taken with Santa at the Spink Pavilion 
and enjoy hot cider, cocoa and cook- 
ies. Cooking demonstrations of holi- 
day treats, secrets for seasonal 
decorations from noted floral 
designers, the Garden Gate Shop 
Plant & Gift Sale, carollers and musi- 
cians, and more surprises will all be 
part of the holiday delights. 




Chanukah 



Sunday, December 8, 1991 
11 a.m. to 5p.m. 

Traditional Jewish folk dancing, 
storytelling, music and a lecture on 
the meaning of Chanukah. A chil- 
dren's singing group will perform, 
and craft workshops will help young- 
sters create draidels and menorahs. 
Cooking demonstrations will feature 
traditional kosher foods. Co-sponsored 
by the Jewish Community Centers 
Association and the Central Agerfcy 
for Jewish Education. 




Kwanzaa 



Saturday, December 28, 1991 
11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

A ceremony and feast demonstra- 
tion honor the traditions of Kwanzaa, 
from the Swahili word meaning "the 
first." Kwanzaa celebrates kinship, 
African harvest customs, and the cul- 
tural and social history of African- 
Americans. Storytelling, cooking 
demonstrations, a fashion show, chil- 
dren's craft workshops, dancing and 
singing will all be part of the 
celebration. 



MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN -0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

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AT ST. LOUIS, MO 



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fOLUME LXXX 
IUMBERONE 



Inside 
This Issue 

£ Research Around the World 

^H The global scope of the Garden's 

research program is profiled. 

g "The Great Silk Route" 

^H A trip to Kazakhstan with Garden 
researchers. 

7 Botanical Beauty 

■M The new Flora of Missouri will feature 
exquisite illustrations. 

g An Adventure in Learning 

HB The Henry Shaw Academy makes 
science exciting and fun. 

g A Window on the World 

MB A new nature study center is estab- 
lished in St. Louis County. 

JO Home Gardening 

■■I Winter is a good time to plan next year's 
perennial display. 

22 Calendar of Events 

■■■ The annual Orchid Show, Black History 
Month, and special programs on tropical 
rain forests brighten winter days. 

J4_ From the Membership Office 

■■■ 1992 Travel and Members' Days are 
featured, plus a salute to the Member- 
ship Services Desk volunteers. 

2 5 Special Programs on the 
■■■ Rain Forest 

Special programs at the Garden comple- 
ment a major exhibit at the Science 
Center. 

2$ Center for Plant Conservation 

^H Annual meetings of the affiliated botani- 
cal institutions and the National Council 
are held in St. Louis. 



On the cover: Winter in the Japanese 

Garden. 

— Photo by Kitix Schoenfeld 



L992 Missouri Botanical Garden. 

The BULLETIN (ISSN 0026-6507) is published bi-monthly 
by the Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove 
Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110. Second class postage paid al 
St. Louis, MO. 

The BULLETIN is sen! to every Member of the Garden 
as one of the benefits of membership. For a contribution of 
as little as $40 pel year, Members also are entitled to: free 
admission to the Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special events and receptions: 
announcements of all lectures and classes; discounts in the 
Garden ( late Shop and for course fees; and the opportunity 
to travel, domestic and abroad, with other Members. For 
information, please call (314) 577-. r >100. 

Postmaster: send address changes to HI ILLETIN, Susan 
Caine, editor, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO 63166. 



Comment 



Looking Back, Looking Ahead 



® 



printed on recycled papet 



|PRIKT(0 WIIH 

SOY INK 




As we look back 
over 1991, lam mind- 
ful of the excellent 
year the Garden 
enjoyed and the won- 
derful support we 
received from our 
many members. 
During the year, 
the Garden s exciting role with the Center 
for Plant Conservation and the opening of 
the William T. Kemper Center for Home 
Gardening offered two significant examples 
of major strides that will certainly have a 
momentous impact for years to come. The 
interest and enthusiasm generated by these 
important milestones has been deeply satis- 
fying to all of us. As this Bulletin goes to 
press, we are especially pleased to learn 
that the Kresge Foundation of Troy, Mich- 
igan has awarded the Garden a $500,000 
challenge grant toward the renovation and 
expansion of facilities to house the Center 
for Plant Conservation and other Garden 
programs in a new Conservation Center 
building on the Garden grounds. Watch for a 
major story on this development in the next 
issue. 

The opening of the Center for Home 
Gardening in June fulfilled years of planning. 
The Center is one of the most important 
resources in the community, and possibly 
one of the most comprehensive facilities in 
the world, for helping people to enjoy and 
work with plants at home. The Kemper 
Center served 160,000 people in its first 
four months of operation through its dis- 



plays, library materials, diagnostic stations 
and personal contacts with Garden staff an( 
volunteers. I do hope that you will have ; 
chance to visit the Center often. 

The completion of an extensive audi 
ence survey covering the entire metropoli 
tan area represents another majoi 
accomplishment following more than a yeai 
of research. This survey has given us infor 
mation about how audiences throughout St 
Louis perceive us and how they choose tc 
use their leisure time. This valuable infor 
mation, utilized fully, provides a blueprint t( 
guide us in designing and presenting activi- 
ties that St. Louis residents have told ut 
they want and would support. We have 
already begun to utilize the extensive data, 
converting it into new ideas and long tern- 
action. 

As in previous years, our membership 
continues to grow and as each individual 
supports the Garden, at any level, the Gar- 
den's ability to do more and reach more 
people increases. We are excited at the 
prospect of celebrating the enrollment ol 
the 30,000th Garden member very soon 
and hope that in 1992 and beyond, we will 
continue to see an expanded Garden family 
working together to support efforts that will 
help resolve the environmental dilemma 
facing all of us. 

Thank you for your continuing support 
and best wishes during the new year. 



(jtt+ }^(2< 



CUrC-^s 




Ghillean T. Prance, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (shown above, left, with Peter 
Raven), visited the Garden in October, 1991, for the meeting of the Board of Trustees of the 
International legume Database and Information Service (ILDIS), an international project 
with which the Garden has been involved since 1985. During his visit Prof. Prance consulted 
the herbarium's holdings, especially Costa Rican collections of Chrysobalanaceae, and dis- 
covered among the materials a genus, Parinari, new to Costa Rica. 



RESEARCH DIVISION NEWS 




PACIFIC OCEAN 



A LANDMARK STUDY IN 1992 

Flora Mesoamericana 

TEN years in the making, the first volume of Flora Mesoamericana, the first major 
regional flora ever written in Spanish, will be published in early 1992. This ambi- 
tious project is a collaborative effort of the Missouri Botanical Garden, the National 
Autonomous University of Mexico and the Natural History Museum in London. It 
describes, for the first time, all the vascular plants growing from southern Mexico to the 
Panama Canal. 

"The publication of this volume is extraordinarily important for the Garden and its 
cooperating institutions," says Dr. Peter H. Raven, director of the Garden. "Congratula- 
tions are in order to the hundreds of scientists around the world whose collaboration has 
made it possible." 

In all, seven volumes will be published between now and the year 2000. In addition, all 
the information is being entered into TROPICOS, the Garden's computer database. 

Flora Mesoamericana was the idea of Peter Raven, who first began promoting it in 
1972. In 1980 the first organizational meeting was held, and actual work began in 1981. 

Since plants pay no attention to political borders, "regional flora projects can more 
accurately reflect natural patterns of plant distribution than projects restricted to a single 
country," says Gerrit Davidse, senior curator at the Garden and co-organizer of the 
project. 

The Central American region described in Flora Mesoamericana is extremely diverse 
and interesting. It includes not only rain forests, but dry forests, alpine areas, and grass- 
lands as well. Researchers estimate that 18,000 plant species occur in the 800,000 square 
kilometer region. The project involves intensive plant collecting efforts as well as writing 
and editing. Since the formal initiation of the project two new plant families have been 
described, plus over a dozen new genera, and hundreds of new species. 

One of the most interesting discoveries of the project involves a tiny threadlike plant 
from southern Mexico. Discovered by Esteban Martinez of the National Autonomous 
University of Mexico, this plant turned out to be absolutely unique among the quarter mil- 
lion plant species known to science. Named Lacandonia schismatica and classified in its 
own family by its discoverer, it is the only plant ever discovered in which the orientation of 
the sex organs is reversed; the stamen arises within several rings of pistils. 

Flora Mesoamericana will provide much useful information about the plants of the 
region: scientific and common names, technical botanical descriptions, distributions, taxo- 
nomic notes, and identification keys. 

p-R-0-f-i-l-e Gerrit Davidse 

Flora Mesoamericana has been a long labor of love for editor and organizer Gerrit 
Davidse. He has been involved since the first organizational meeting in 1980, and has spent 
the majority of his research time since then on the project. 

Davidse's major research interest is the Poaceae, or grass family, particularly tropical 



American grasses. The basic cereal crops 
are grasses: corn, rice and wheat. 
"Grasses are by far the most important 
plant family in the world," says Davidse. 
"Without grasses," he says without exag- 
geration, "human civilization would not 
have evolved." 

In addition to Flora Mesoamericana, 
Davidse soon will become involved in a 
project that involves grasses exclusively. 
Grasses of the New World will provide a 
modern, detailed, comprehensive, com- 
puterized floristic inventory of the grasses 
in the Western Hemisphere. Like Flora 
Mesoamericana and many other Garden 
projects, it is an international collaborative 
effort. Seven volumes will be produced, 
one every year or two between 1994 and 
2006. Strong emphasis will be placed on 
providing opportunities for Latin American 
grass researchers to study in the U.S. , help- 
ing to train their students, and upgrading 
facilities at their herbaria. 

Davidse came to the Garden in 1972 
after earning his Ph.D. at Iowa State 
University. While he spends as much time 
as possible researching grasses, he has had 
a number of other major responsibilities 
during his tenure at the Garden. He 
organized the Annual Systematics Sympo- 
sium each year from 1972 to 1988. In addi- 
tion, he edited the Annals of the Missouri- 
Botanical Garden from 1975 to 1982. He 
has managed to wedge in extensive field 
studies as well. 

After 20 years at the Garden, Davidse 
says, "The Garden is a vibrant institution 
that provides essential support for botanical 
research. I couldn't think of a better place 
to work." 




Gerrit Davidse 



BULLETIN JANUARY FEBRUARY 1992 



Garden Projects Worldwide 

The Garden's research division is dedicated to increasing and 
disseminating knowledge about plants and their vital roles in sus- 
taining life on Earth. It concentrates primarily on learning about 
the many thousands of species found in rapidly disappearing trop- 
ical habitats of Africa and Latin America. This map highlights the 
countries in which the Garden conducts research. Without 
exception, the Garden's activities are performed in collaboration 
with local institutions in those countries. 

North America 

Flora of North America, with its organization center at the Garden, 
is a major collaborative project that will provide a long-needed synopsis 
of the plants of the United States and Canada. The Center for Plant Con- 
servation, headquartered at MBG, continues its work to prevent the 
extinction of plants native to the U.S. 

Missouri: The Flora of Missouri project is a jointly sponsored effort of 
the Missouri Botanical Garden and the Missouri Department of Conser- 
vation to produce a revised edition of former Garden curator Julian A. 
Steyermark's Flora of Missouri, first published in 1963. 

Central America 

Flora Mesoamericana, one of the most ambitious floristic projects 
ever undertaken (see p. 3), is an international collaborative effort of the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de 
Mexico and the Natural History Museum (British Museum) to catalog all 
plants of Middle America— from southern Mexico to Panama. The first 
volume will be published in early 1992. 

Nicaragua: The Garden's comprehensive botanical inventory of Nicaragua, once the most 
poorly known country in Central America, is soon to be published as a Spanish-language 
manual. 

Costa Rica: A field-oriented plant manual useful to the many biological researchers work 
ing in Costa Rica is being produced in collaboration with the Museo Nacional de Costa Rica 
and the Field Museum of Natural History. 

Panama: Botanical exploration of Panama, the first tropical country in which the Garden 
conducted field research, continues with collecting trips to remote areas. 



*M±y^z 



South America 

Venezuela: A monumental 40-year inventory 
of the fascinating flora of the Guayana Highlands, 
or "Lost World" region, of southern Venezuela 
is nearing completion. Over 150 botanists out- 
side the Missouri Botanical Garden have con- 
tributed to this project. The first two volumes 
are set to go to press in 1992. 

Colombia: The Garden's collaboration with 
Colombian colleagues continues with a variety of 
plant collection efforts. The Garden works in 
mutually beneficial collaboration with institutions 
throughout the country. Amazonian Colombia is 
being studied in the Documentation of Neotropi- 
cal Plant Diversity and Biogeography Project. 
This project, funded by the MacArthur Founda- 
tion, will establish inventory plots for further 
study by zoologists and ecologists after mini- 
floras of the sites have been written. 

Ecuador: In 1989 the Garden participated in 
the Ecuadorian "debt for nature" swap coordi- 
nated by the Nature Conservancy, World Wildlife 
Fund, and the Fundacidn Natura of Ecuador. 
The Garden's portion of the debt purchase is 
being used to support botanical fieldwork and 
development of botanical institutions in Ecuador. 

4. 

■■■■ BULLETIN I JANUARY FEBRUARY 1992 



Peru: The Flora of Peru project, originally 
focused primarily on completing the publication 
of the Flora of Peru, has expanded to include 
ecological inventory and a study of economically 
useful plants, as well as general collecting and 
the preparation of a computerized checklist of 
the flora. 

Bolivia: The Garden is sponsoring general 
floristic inventory work in Bolivia, which is 
botanically one of the most poorly known coun- 
tries in South America. In addition, Garden 
researchers are working on an inventory of trees 
from the Serrania de Pilon Lajas and providing 
training in the study of trees for Bolivians. 

Chile: The Garden is working with the Univer- 
sidad de Concepcion, Chile, in preparing a new 
Flora of Chile. Chile has a high degree of plant 
endemism in its biogeographically diverse 
regions. The new Flora revises a work com- 
pleted in 1854 and will be written with the help 
of more than 40 collaborators from around the 
world. Completion is expected in about 12 years. 

Argentina: A five-year agreement of scientific 
cooperation was signed between the Garden and 
the Consejo Nacional de Invesdgacion Cienhfica y 
Tecnologica (CONICET) in 1991. The agreement 




establishes permanent cooperation and exchan. 
of information between the two institutions for 
the study of the flora of Argentina. 

Paraguay: Garden researchers are working 
on the Flora of Paraguay, an international 
cooperative program coordinated by the Cons 
vatoire et Jardin Botaniques de Geneve and 
jointly edited and published by the Garden anc 
Geneva. As part of the Flora, the Garden beg 
an intense program of floristic inventory. Col- 
laborative agreements aimed at strengthening 
and consolidating the local herbaria and buildir 
scientific capabilities for botanical research ha' 
been signed with the Ministerio de Agricultun 
Ganaderfa, the Universidad Nacional, and the 
Jardin Botanico y Zoologico. 



RESEARCH DIVISION NEWS 




nca 

ibon: A two-year botanical inventory of the 
)e-Okanda Reserve began this year, in con- 
ction with the staff of the Herbier National du 
Don. The information will assist researchers 
rking on the Flora of Gabon, which has one of 

richest floras in central Africa. In addition, 
earchers have been collecting in Gabon for 

National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1989. 

>ntral African Republic: The tropical 
ssts of the Central African Republic are 
ong the areas in which the Garden is most 
ive and interested. Botanical exploration 
:his botanically poorly known part of Africa 
ingoing. 

»ngo: In 1991 the Garden signed a new col- 
orative agreement with The Congo Republic, 
ibling it to develop a program in this floristi- 
y rich and underexplored area. 

lire: The Garden is beginning a new three- 
ir project sponsored by USAID to collect 
irmation on indigenously used plants within 
endemic-rich Zambezian woodland area of 
Shaba province. Garden researchers, in col- 
:iration with scientists at the Centre Regional 
)tudes Nucleaires de Kinshasa, will attempt 



to quantify the levels of human dependency and 
impact on specific vegetation types in south- 
eastern Zaire. National Cancer Institute collect- 
ing will be conducted in Zaire as well. 
Tanzania: A collecting program has been 
established in Tanzania, with the Department of 
Botany at the University of Dar es Salaam. Col- 
lecting continues for the NCI program in con- 
junction with botanists from the University and 
the Traditional Medicine Research Unit. 

Southern Africa: The mosses and irises of 
temperate and subtropical southern Africa are 
the subjects of ongoing investigations. 

Madagascar: Researchers are conducting 
general botanical inventories throughout 
Madagascar, with intensive work in four priority 
protected areas. A new project, funded by the 
National Science Foundation, will produce a 
computerized conspectus of the approximately 
10,000 species of Malagasy plants, in collabora- 
tion with the Museum National d'Histoire 
Naturelle of Paris, the Pare Botanique et Zoolo- 
gique de Tsimbazaza and the Centre National de 
la Recherche Apliquee au Developpement 
Rural. The Garden's activities in Madagascar 
are designed to increase botanical collections 
from the country's many underexplored areas, 
especially the rain forest, and to assist and train 
Malagasy scientists. 







Asia 

China: The Garden is the coordination center for 
the Flora of China project, a joint Sino-American 
project to publish for the first time in English a 
revised Flora based on Flora Reipubluae Populans 
Sinicai . A total of 25 volumes is planned; the first is 
scheduled for publication in 1992 . The whole project 
is expected to be completed in about 15 years. 

Republic of China (Taiwan): The Garden will 
be U.S. headquarters for the Botanical Inventory of 
Taiwan, a new binational collaborative project 
between botanists from the United States and the 
Republic of China. The project aims to build upon 
and go beyond traditional floristic studies. 



BULLETIN I JANUARY- FEBRUARY 1992 



RESEARCH DIVISION NEWS 




INDIA 



Collecting Mosses Along 
the "Great Silk Route" 

by Robert E. Magill, Ph.D. 
Cu rator ofBryophytes 

In July of 1991 a team of Garden research scientists visited the 
Republic of Kazakhstan at the invitation oflsa Baitulin, vice 
president of the Kazakhstan Academy of Sciences. In September and 
October the Garden in turn hosted a visit by Dr. Baitulin; Dr. Sergei 
Bedaren, director of the Kazakhstan Institute of Botany; and 
Ms. Saule Abdulina, scientist in charge of computers at the Institute. 

Dr. Baitulin and Dr. Bedaren worked in the herbarium and 
went on field trips in Missouri, Illinois and Iowa, collecting seeds 
of plants that can be successfully grown in Kazakhstan. They were 
interested in plants for agriculture and ornamental horticulture, 
both for direct introduction and for breeding with native Kazak 
plant species. 

Ms. Abdulina studied the Garden's computer system and 
exchanged information with TROPICOS, the Garden 's computer 
database. She returned home with a copy ofpcTROPICOS, which 
will allow the Institute in Kazakhstan to continue to exchange botan- 
ical information with the Garden. 

On their trip in July, the Garden scientists collected bryophytes, or 
mosses, in the remote mountains and other regions near Alma-Ata, 
the capital of Kazakhstan. The rich flora in the mountains behind 
Alma-Ata provided an important collection of bryophytes from this 
remote area, the only specimens available in the West for almost 
95 years. The following is an account of their visit.— Editor 

ETWEEN the Middle East and China lie the boundless 
! Sary Arki Steppes and Kara Kum Desert of the Republic of 

Kazakhstan. This central Asia republic is the second largest 
in land area of the old Soviet Union, containing over 2.7 million 
square kilometers and maintaining a population of over 15 million 
people. The Republic contains much of the country's oil and has 
impressive agricultural potential. The isolation imposed upon the 
area by the Central Government has made the people of this ethni- 
cally diverse culture unduly suspicious of western visitors. How- 
ever, when the native Kazakhs and the more recent Russian 
emigrants speak of their new dream of opening markets to the West 
and their pride in what they have been able to accomplish, they 
quickly reveal their true hospitality. In fact, celebrations of our visit 
featuring massive feasts and canisters of Kazakh brandy or Russian 
vodka were a weekly occurrence. 




The rich heritage of the region had its beginnings with the 
numerous nomadic tribes that once roamed the steppes of central 
Asia. As the population grew, clusters of huts coalesced into towns 
and villages. Serving as centers of arts, crafts, and sciences, the 
towns that arose along the natural route from the East became 
'Ancient City States" that thrived throughout medieval times. As 
early as the 7th century the main road from China to the Middle 
East ran through southern Kazakhstan. The region's major cities of 
the modern era represent these ancient centers of trade and res- 
pite along what is known as the "Great Silk Route." The caravans 
laden with silk and oriental spices bound for Byzantium and Rome 
enriched the culture as they traveled along this once famous trade 
route. Permanent agriculture developed in the region during the 
10th and 12th centuries to support the route, ushering in a Golden 
Age of power and prestige. 

The 13th century brought Ghenghis-khan's armies, and, with 
his catastrophic campaigns, the decline of urban settlements. By 
the 16th century the "Great Silk Route" had lost its former sig- 
nificance, and most of the ancient cities had ceased to exist. 

Our expedition to Alma-Ata included three scientists from the 
Garden: myself and Dr. Bruce Allen, both bryologists in the Divi- 
sion of Research, and Dr. Alan Whittemore, a post-doctoral 
researcher for the Flora of North America project. We traveled 
nearly two days before a six-hour flight from Moscow deposited us 
almost exactly halfway around the world in Central Asia. The base 
of operations for our collecting expedition was Alma-Ata. Once a 
medieval settlement along the "Great Silk Route," the city unfor- 
tunately was the first to be razed during Ghenghis-khan's cam- 
paigns. Because of the beauty of the setting and amiable weather, 
the city was reestablished in the 18th century and later became the 
capital of Soviet Kazakhstan. Today the modern Soviet industrial, 
scientific and educational infrastructure developed at Alma-Ata 
stands in stark contrast to the empty stores and long lines of frus- 
trated people. 

The diverse topography of the area around Alma-Ata allowed us 
to collect in arid, sand deserts one day and explore for mosses 
around a glacier as snow fell the next. The collections gathered on 
this trip will provide important floristic and phytogeographical infor- 
mation for the bryophyte flora projects currently underway in North 
America and China. The new era of cooperation between the Gar- 
den and the Kazakh Academy of Sciences will permit further explo- 
ration along the "Great Silk Route." 




Visitors from Kazakhstan at the Garden (left to right): Bob Magill, 
MBG; Isa Baitulin, Saule Abdulina, and Sergei Bedaren. 



\ftOU.ETIS I JANUARY FEBRUARY 1992 



A REPORT FROM THE FLORA OF MISSOURI 



e tulip tree or yellow poplar, 

iodendron tulipifera, is 
iely planted as a street 
e in Missouri, but 
)ivs natively on rick 
oded slopes 
linly in the 
ttheastern 
'nerofthe 
te. 




The cucumber tree, Magnolia acuminata, 
is a native of southern Missouri. Large speci- 
mens of this showy species are cultivated at 
the Garden and in Tower Grove Park. 



botanical Beauty 



by George Yatskievych, Ph.D. 




=T Phyllis Bick 



Scrub pine, Pinus 

virginiana, is native to the 
eastern U.S. . but is widely 
grown in Missouri, and 
has escaped from cultiva- 
tion in a few areas. 



How do you dress-up a flora? When asked what they liked best about Steyermark 's Flora of Mis 

\ri, most professional and amateur botanists remarked that they enjoyed having illustrations for 

:h species. With this in mind, the Flora of Missouri project workers have been putting a lot of time 

;ly into the preparation of an entirely new set of pen-and-ink drawings for the revised edition of Missouri's 

istic manual, slated for completion in late 1995. The first edition, published in 1963, already contained draw- 

s for many of the species. However, the large number of plants newly discovered to grow in Missouri during 

: past 30 years, the generally poor condition of the existing originals, and the desire to improve the quality of 

ny of the renderings made it imperative to ' 'start from scratch.' ' The Garden has been extremely fortunate 

have received financial support for this important work from the following individuals and groups: the late 

s. John S. Lehmann, the Academy of Science of St. Louis, the Missouri Department of Conservation, the John 

en Love Foundation, and the Wednesday Club of St. Louis, as well as a portion of the contributions made to the 

rden in honor of the late Mr. A. Timon Primm. 

A dozen talented artists are presently working freelance on various families of Missouri plants. Thus far, they have 

npleted about 200 of an estimated 500 full-page plates, illustrating over 1000 of the nearly 2600 total species in 

: flora. All of these artists have other jobs, but they have spent long hours on this labor of love. For example, 

yrllis Bick, of St. Louis, is a graphic designer by training, but became interested in botanical illustration when 

i visited a botanical garden in England. Linda Ellis, who lives in Kansas City, worked for the University 

tension Service for several years and is now involved in graphic design and illustration. Ellen Lissant 

s a botany professor in the St. Louis area for many years before retiring to Clever, Missouri, south- 

st of Springfield, where she teaches and draws. ^ 

The wonderful new art work will greatly improve the beauty of the "well-dressed" new edition, 

i hopefully make it easier to use as well. The illustrations on this page will all be included in the 

thcoming Flora. 



hite oak, Quercus 
a, is one of Missouri 's 
<st common oak species, 
d is an important tint- 
' tree. Both deeply and 
illowly lobed leaves may 
tear on the same tree. 




The common dandelion, Taraxacum 
officinale, is a familiar weed in lawns 
and disturbed soil. The name dandelion 
is adapted from the French dents de lion, 
teeth of the lion, referring to the jagged 
leaf margins. 



dlis Bick 





Linda Ellis 



George Yatskievych is Curator of Missouri 
Plants at the Garden and a botanist with the 
Missouri Department of Conservation . He 
directs the Flora of Missouri Project. 

7. 

BULLETIN I JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1992 ■■■ 




THE HENRY SHAW ACADEMY 

An Adventure In Learning 



«w 



f ow, this is really neat!" 

Students in the Garden's Henry Shaw Academy 
(HSA) have that reaction to their classes all the 
time, even when they are standing up to their ankles in mud on a 
chilly gravel bar. 

HSA students are learning science firsthand through an innova- 
tive program begun at the Garden in 1986. The program offers moti- 
vated youngsters the opportunity to build and expand on their 




MM 

JeffDePen with HSA students 




Stream Ecology canoe trip 

classroom studies. Under the leadership of Jeff DePew, coordinator 
of the program, students experience the wonder and beauty of the 
natural world, and discover the mysteries of science by touching, 
looking, listening and seeing. 

"We try to give each age group an experience that will excite 
them about learning science," said Jeff, whose enthusiasm is conta- 
gious. "As children move up through the program they find that 
each level builds on the one before, creating a clear set of steps to 
developing scientific understanding. Each student keeps a journal 
of his work in each class, which will include a bibliography and 
projects for further study. This gives them something to take away 
that keeps the learning process alive.' ' 

Jeff's commitment and dedication have paid off. The HSA has 
grown from a small group of classes for ages 7 to 13 plus a float trip 
for older children to a wide variety of courses offered throughout 
the year. Preschoolers ages 4 to 6, together with their parents, can 
experience the Pitzman Nature Study Program; ages 7 to 12 have 



Summer Science Camp, after school programs, and weekend 
classes. Ages 13 to 14 can take a year-long program in Stream Ecol- 
ogy, and ages 14 to 18 can take the year-long Explorers Field Study 
Program plus a summer apprenticeship program with the Garden's 
Horticulture staff. 

"Students in Stream Ecology or the Field Study Program work 
directly with active research programs," Jeff explained. "Many of 
these students are interested in a career in science, and we give 
them a chance to see professional scientists in action. We take 
advantage of the research facilities here at the Garden, and also at 
the Zoo, Science Center, Washington University, Missouri wet- 
lands, the Raptor Rehabilitation Center, the Wild Canid Survival and 
Research Center in Eureka, the Ozark Underground Laboratory, 
Great Smoky Mountain National Park, Alligator River Wildlife Ref- 
uge in North Carolina, and Hofstra University Marine Lab Site in 
Jamaica. Stream Ecology students supply research data to the Mis- 
souri Department of Conservation Stream Team Project, a nation- 
ally recognized environmental stream preservation program, and to 
TERC (Technology P2ducation Resource Centers), an international 
global ecology database." 

The Stream Ecology Program is DePew's newest innovation. 
Students explore the upper Meramec River on weekend canoeing 
field trips, collecting water samples and data on wildlife, erosion, 
and biological health of the ecosystem. The two-day float trips pro- 
vide a "total experience" for 48 hours of close contact with nature, 
building leadership and teamwork skills. Students follow up with 
experiments and further study, and see their data utilized for ongo- 
ing research. All HSA staff are certified in first aid, water safety, and 
canoeing skills. 

"We try to provide a challenging experience that is also fun," 
said Jeff. "We want to help children get excited about science and 
stay excited about learning all their lives.' ' 

HSA Winter Classes for 1992 

Interested parents, teachers or students may call the Garden's 
Education Division at 577-5135 or 577-5140 for a course brochure 
or registration information. 

Upcoming HSA Spring Programs 

Bonsai classes with the Bonsai Society 
Spring Canoeing and Caving 
Planting a Butterfly Garden 
Stream Ecology 
Wildlife Ecology 
Trees for Life 

Watch for HSA Summer Science Camp Brochure 
in March! 

Classes will include: 

For 4-6 year olds: 

The Pitzman Natural History Program 

For 7-9 year olds: 

Creations From the Earth, Puzzles of Life, and Garden Discoveries 

For 10-12 year olds: 

River Ecology, Our Water Planet, and Camping at the Arboretum 

For 14-17 year olds: 
Garden Apprenticeships 



\BVU.ET1N I JANUARY FEBRUARY 1992 



EDUCATION DIVISION N E W S 




NEW NATURE STUDY CENTER 



A view of Deer Creek 



Window on the Natural World 

A QUIET valley, surrounded by deep woods, is filled with the rustle of wind in the 
grasses and clear notes of birdsong. A meandering stream sparkles over the 
gravel bar. This natural retreat is found not in a distant wilderness but in the heart 
of the St. Louis metropolitan area. 

This past September approval was granted for a new nature study center to be oper- 
ated by the Garden in St. Louis County. The Litzsinger Road Ecology Foundation, formed 
by a private anonymous donor, will provide and maintain a 34-acre tract for ecological and 
environmental education programs to be managed and conducted by the Garden. The spe- 
cial use permit, granted by the Ladue City Council after approval by the Zoning and Plan- 
ning Commission, allows small groups to visit the facility under supervision by Garden 
staff. The nature center is not open to the public. 

"The property is ideally suited for this purpose," said Dr. Larry DeBuhr, director of 
education at the Garden. "It is largely undeveloped, with a creek, bottomland, grassland, 
and woods. It presents a wonderful opportunity to teach students in an 'open air class- 
room.' The Center's close proximity to the Garden and to area schools means that we can 
schedule these kinds of programs more easily, and take advantage of the opportunity to 
enrich science education in St. Louis." 

William Davit, a former staff naturalist at Shaw Arboretum, has been named manager 
for the center. Although the property will remain undeveloped, Bill has been hard at work 
with projects planned to enhance and protect its ecological diversity. 

Ten acres of tallgrass prairie have been established. Bill planted it with wildflower 
seeds from the Arboretum and a variety of grasses, including big and little bluestem, 
Indian grass, eastern gama grass, rosinweed, yellow coneflowers, purple bergamot, and 
Maximilian sunflowers. He plans to introduce as many native species as growing condi- 
tions will permit. 

The woods are a treasure trove of trees, including hackberry, walnut, pawpaw, syca- 
more, cottonwood, river birch and box elder. Wildflowers will thrive in the rich bottomland 
soil, especially trillium, Virginia bluebells, sweet cicely, green dragon and sweet William. 
But first, Bill says, "we're working to control the invasive species that have taken over 
some areas: Euonymous, bush honeysuckle, and Japanese hops." 

Bill is also working in consultation with the Missouri Department of Conservation and 
the Soil Conservation Service to find the best means to manage the stream bank erosion 
threatening portions of Deer Creek, which runs through the property. 

The acreage is home to a surprising variety of wildlife, considering its location. Bill 
reports seeing deer, raccoons, and wild turkey, as well as the more common squirrels and 
opossums. He has had reports of fox, and the prairie attracts a wide variety of birds. 

"We are absolutely delighted to have the opportunity to work with the Litzsinger Road 
Ecology Foundation on this project," said Dr. Peter Raven. "This is a splendid gift to the 
people of St. Louis and we look forward to the challenges it provides.' ' 



School Partnership 
Program Combines 
Art and Science 

"Botanical Illustration and Writing," a 
special course offered by the Garden, 
brings together art and science students 
from city and county schools. Instructor 
Nicola Hellmuth-MacPherson visits stu- 
dents at middle and high schools for an 
introductory lecture; then the classes visit 
the Garden for a workshop on drawing 
plants and writing about them. The stu- 
dents also have an opportunity to visit the 
Garden's herbarium, where they observe 
the work of Garden illustrator John Myers. 

The course emphasizes looking at plants 
through the eyes of a scientist and an artist, 
and discussing the differences in the two 
approaches. Botanical illustration is a very 
old art that evolved in answer to the need 
for scientifically accurate descriptions of 
herbal medicine. The decorative approach 
to drawing plants is more interpretive and 
often idealized, sacrificing some details to 
enhance the design of the page and convey 
the beauty of the plant. These two 
approaches are used in writing about plants 
as well. 

"Students are encouraged to see the 
beauty, discipline, and merits of each 
approach, and to consider ways that they 
can complement one another," said Mac- 
Pherson. "We find that it is an exciting way 
to introduce them to some new ways of 
looking at the world." 




Nicola Hellmuth-MacPherson (top) and John 
Myers (bottom) worked with middle school 
students from city and county schools in a 
workshop in November. 



BULLETIN I JANUARY FEBRUARY 1992 



Finding time to garden is an 
important consideration today, 
yet everyone wants the garden 
and landscape to look as if there 
were a full time gardener on 
duty! In light of this, perennials 
are a good place to start planning 
next year's garden, as these 
plants generally require lower 
maintenance and care. 

To create a colorful display 
of perennials from April until 
September is a very challenging 
undertaking in the St. Ix>uis 
area. Every gardener wants to 
choose plants that have excep- 
tionally long flowering periods, 
remain disease and pest free, 
and are hardy in our local 
climate. Some top performers 
arc described below. They all 
require a location in full sun. 

EARLY 

In a warm site, basket-of-gold, 
Aurinia saxatilis, displays its 
bright yellow flowers early in 
April and is a welcome sight, 
especially when combined with 
red and yellow tulips. Also begin- 
ning in April and extending into 
June is rock cress, Arabis caucas- 
ica. Its gray green foliage should 
be cut back after the floral display 
is over. 

Other early bloomers are 
moss pink. Phlox subulata, and 
edging candytuft, Iberis semper- 
virens. The moss pink produces a 
dense evergreen ground cover 
and bears its magenta, pink, or 
white flowers from mid-April to 
mid-May. Candytuft displays its 
rounded heads of pure white 
flowers in early spring, and these 
should be sheared back when 
faded. Common aubrieta, 
Aubrieta deltoidea, carries hun- 
dreds of mauve to deep purple 
flowers which cover this mound- 
like perennial from late April to 
June. The flowers should be cut 
back to improve the compactness 
of the gray green foliage. 

Cushion euphorbia, Euphorbia 
epithymoides, and myrtle euphor- 
bia, Euphorbia myrsinites, are 
two easy-to-grow plants primed 
for an early spring show. Their 
charming two-month display 
comes from their showy yellow 
bracts. 



Home Gardening 




Perennials 



MAY 

From May onwards, bugloss, 
Anchusa azurea, displays its 
striking gentian blue flowers on 
rather coarse foliage. It is a short- 
lived perennial, but propagates 
itself by self-sown seedlings. For 
a neat edging, common thrift, 
Armaria maritima, is hard to 
beat, with its grass like cushions 
of bright green foliage with lightly 
packed heads of pink flowers. 

Blue wild indigo, Baptisia aus- 
tralis, is a fine substitute for 
lupines in our area, with attractive 
blue-green foliage and indigo blue 
flowers. Once the plant is mature 
do not try to relocate, as it has a 
deep taproot. Cottage pink, Dian- 
thus plumarius , needs an alkaline 
soil for optimum performance; you 
will be rewarded with generous 
quantities of single to semi-double 
rose flowers with a clove-like 
fragrance. 

Geranium endressii, known 
as wargrave pink or Pyrenean 
crane's-bill, makes an excellent 
ground cover with its incised 
foliage complemented by a gener- 
ous display of rose-pink flowers. 
It starts flowering in May, then is 
spotty throughout the summer. 
Perennial flax, Linum perenne , 
has graceful and slender stems 
with arching tips that carry pow- 
der blue flowers in a continuing 
display for two months. In late 
summer, it is a good cultural prac- 
tice to reduce the foliage by half 
to prevent plant exhaustion 
through over-blooming. 

The longevity label applies 
totally to Chinese peony, Paeonia 
lactiflora. They may grow suc- 
cessfully in a thoroughly prepared 
location for a century. Chinese 
peonies thrive in the St. Louis area 
and come in a myriad of colors. 

JUNE 

To herald in June snow-in- 
summer, Cerastium tomentosum, 



is a good choice, though when its 
sprays of white flowers have 
faded, its grey- woolly leaves 
should be severely cut back to 
curtail its invasive nature. There 
are numerous campanulas, but 
two that perform consistently are 
clustered bellflower, Campanula 
glomerata, and peachleaf bell- 
flower, Campanula persicifolia . 
Clustered bellflower has deep vio- 
let flowers; 'Joan Elliott' is an out- 
standing cultivar. Peachleaf 
bellflower has violet flowers, a 
particularly good cultivar is the 
white 'Snowdrift.' 

The terminal white flower 
spikes of the gas plant, Dictamnus 
albus, have a lemon fragrance, as 
do the leaves. Once established, 
the gas plant does not tolerate 
disturbance because of its deep 
root system. Lance-leaved 
coreopsis, Coreopsis lanceolata, 
is native to North America, long- 
lived, and flowers from early June 
to September. Daylilies, Hemero- 
callis, are no longer the Cinderella 
of the plant world. These hardy 
favorites have been hybridized in 
recent years resulting in numer- 
ous outstanding cultivars that are 
splendid for successional bloom- 
ing. Siberian iris, Iris sibirica, is a 
beardless type iris flowering from 
June to early July. It favors a rich, 
moist soil. 'Caesar's Brother,' 
with deep purple flowers, 
deserves a plant Oscar. 

Catmint, Nepeta mussinii, 
makes a vigorous ground cover 
with its small silvery-gray leaves 
and lavender colored flowers. If 
the foliage is cut back by half after 
flowering, you will be rewarded 
with another floral flush. 

Missouri primrose, Oenothera 
macrocarpa, bears its five-inch 
primrose yellow flowers from 
mid-June to August. It demands a 
well drained and alkaline soil. 
Another excellent and long 
blooming plant is Oenothera tetra- 



gona, with one and a half-inch 
flowers that are lemon yellow an 
cup shaped. 

Balloon flowers, Platycodon 
grandiflorus , are slow to break 
dormancy in the spring but they 
flower from mid-June to August. 
The blue "puffed" flower buds 
open up to two and a half-inch 
saucer-shaped stars, much 
admired by the Japanese. Ballooi 
flowers do not tolerate distur- 
bance once they are established. 

JULY 

We begin July with what is 
considered one of the ten best 
perennials, threadleaf coreopsis, 
Coreopsis verticillata. Its golden 
yellow flowers last for two 
months and it is very accom- 
modating with an attractive mass 
of filmy foliage. Purple cone- 
flower, Echinacea purpurea, is 
native to the United States and 
is very drought tolerant. The 
daisy-like petals are reflexed and 
have a cone shaped mahogany 
center. 'White Lustre' is a desir- 
able hybrid. 

Plume poppy, Macleaya 
microcarpa, has large and beauti 
ful leaves, grey green above anc 
grey white below, giving it an 
almost tropical appearance. The 
leaves are terminated with a 
branching plume of flesh-colored 
Huffy flowers. It can be invasive 
so be careful to grow it in an 
open area. 

Small globe thistle, Echinops 
ritro, has striking and deeply 
lobed foliage. This plant is com- 
plemented by unusual spherical 
shaped metallic blue flowers thai 
provide color even before they 
open up, with contrasts beauti- 
fully with white or pink Phlox 
paniculata. Obedient plant, 
Physostegia virginiana, is so 
named because the purplish ros< 
flowers have hinged stalks that 
"stay put" when bent. Obedien 
plant flowers from early July to 
September. 

July would not be complete 
without including coneflower, 
Rudbeckia fulgida , which bears 
its vivid yellow flowers in profu- 
sion as late as early October. 
The cultivar 'Goldsturm' is a 



10. 



\BULLETIN JANUARV FKHKUAKV 1992 



lust for everyone's garden, 
irge or small. 

UGUST 

To herald the arrival of 
.ugust we will include a plant 
ative to Kansas, Kansas blazing- 
tar, Liatris pycnostachya . The 
3sy lavender flowers of this 
nique plant open up first at the 
)p of the spike. Include the 
slated Liatris spicata on your 
wish" list. 

The peacock blue flowers of 
hinese plumbago, Ceratostigma 
nllmottianum, are comple- 
lented in early fall by foliage of a 
ronze cast. This is a top choice 
)r the front of perennial bed or 
order as it may still be in flower 
i early October. 

Live forever, Sedum specta- 
ile, with its fleshy glaucous grey 
:aves, is beautiful throughout the 
jmraer. Each stem terminates in 
flat topped mass of tiny rose 
ink florets that are much loved 
y butterflies and bees. A particu- 
rly outstanding clone is 'Bril- 
jnt' with raspberry red flowers. 



Common sneezeweed, 
Helenium autumnale, is one of 
the parents of a wide range of 
hybrids that display yellow, 
orange and brown shades from 
August to October. 'Coppelia' 
(deep copper orange) and 
'Moerheim Beauty' (reddish 
brown) are but two of the hybrids 
and all associate well with creamy 
white flowers. 

Joe-Pye weed, Eupatorium 
purpureum, grows up to six feet 
tall and is an imposing native 
American demanding a fairly large 
garden to display its fuzzy pur- 
plish rose flowers. The blooms 
will outshine most others from 
mid-August through early 
October. 

SEPTEMBER 

Arriving in September we turn 
to the many colors of chrysanthe- 
mums, which may be planted in an 
empty space available in the 
perennial beds or borders. A 
mum species is Nippon daisy, 
Chrysanthemum nippomcum, one 
of the last flowers to open. The 



blossoms are a pure white and 
must be seen to be appreciated. 
The asters are becoming more 
popular recently and certainly 
provide one an opportunity to 
display their showy blooms late in 
the season. The Oregon hybrids 
are short, 10-15 inches in height, 
so require no staking. 

None of the grey-leaved plants 
such as wormwood, Artemisia 
'Powis Castle,' have been 
included here. However, they 
should at least be mentioned 
because they act as a color cata- 
lyst for all of the other perennials. 
Also, no perennial bed will be 
absolutely complete without 
some annuals to add timely color 
when few perennials are in bloom. 
One good choice is Cleome, which 
performs so well during the heat 
of mid-summer when many of the 
perennials may look "tired." 

This article was written by Brian 
Ward, Garden horticulturist, and 
Steven Cline, Ph.D., manager of 
the Center for Home Gardening. 



NEW! 

Master Composter 

HOTLINE 

314/577-9555 

9 a.m. to noon, Monday through 
Friday; after hours leave a mes- 
sage and your call will be 
returned. 

The Garden has established the 
Master Composter Program to 
help the community respond to 
the prohibition of yard waste in 
landfills as of January 1, 1992. 
This community education pro- 
gram includes speakers, demon- 
strations, a video, and 
instruction by specially trained 
Master Gardeners. 

Watch for more information in 
the March issue of the Bulletin. 
The Master Composter Pro- 
gram is supported by the Mon- 
santo Fund. 



Timely Tips from the Answer Service 



Do you have a plant question? Call the 
Horticultural Answer Service, Monday 
through Friday, 9 a.m. to noon, at 
577-5143. 

January Tips 

■ Gently brush off heavy snows from tree 
and shrub branches. To reduce injury, allow 
ice to melt naturally from plants. Attempting 
to remove ice may damage plants further. 

■ Use sand, bird seed, sawdust or vermic- 
ulite to gain traction on icy paths. Avoid salt 
or ice melters as they may injure plants. 

■ Some plants are sensitive to the fluorine 
and chlorine in tap water. Water containers 
should stand overnight to allow these gases 
to dissipate before using on plants. 

■ Allow tap water to warm to room tem- 
perature before using on houseplants. 

■ Quarantine new gift plants to be sure 
they do not harbor any insect pests. 

■ Try sprouting a test sample of leftover 
seeds before ordering new seeds for 
spring. Roll up 10 seeds in a damp paper 
towel. Keep moist and warm. Check for 
germination in a week. If fewer than half 
sprout, order fresh seed. 



■ If you didn't get your bulbs planted 
before the ground froze, plant them 
immediately in individual peat pots and 
place the pots in flats. Set them outside 
where it is cold and bury the bulbs under 
thick blankets of leaves. Transplant them 
into the garden any time weather permits. 

■ Cakes of suet hung in trees will attract 
insect-hunting woodpeckers to your 
garden. 

February Tips 

■ Store wood ashes in sealed, fireproof 
containers. Apply a dusting around lilacs, 
baby's breath, asters, lilies and roses in 
spring. Do not apply to acid-loving plants. 
Excess ashes may be composted. 

■ Check all fruit trees for evidence of 
rodent injury to bark. Use baits or traps 
where necessary. 

■ Begin pruning fruit trees. Apples and 
pears should be pruned first. Peaches and 
nectarines should be pruned just before 
they bloom. Dormant sprays can be applied 
to fruits now. 



■ Don't work garden soil when it is too 
wet. Squeeze a handful of soil. It should 
form a ball that will crumble easily. If it is 
sticky, allow the soil to dry further before 
tilling or spading. 

■ Dormant sprays can be applied to 
ornamentals now. These are best applied 
on a mild day when the temperatures stay 
above freezing. 

■ Sow seeds of larkspur, sweet peas, 
shirley poppies and snapdragons outdoors 
now. These plants must sprout and begin 
growth well before warm weather arrives 
to bloom best. 

■ Check bulbs in storage and discard any 
that show signs of rot. 

■ Begin to fertilize house plants as they 
show signs of new growth. Plants that are 
still resting should not be fertilized yet. 

■ Now is a good time to repot any root- 
bound house plants. Choose a new pot that 
is only one or two inches larger in diameter 
than the current container. 

—Chip Tynan, The Answer Service 



11. 



BULLETIN , JANUARY FEBRUARY 1992 



MEMBERS 
EVENTS 



January 9 

Members' Gardening 
Lecture: "Backyard 
Composting" 

I p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. A 
demonstration lecture by Dr. Steve 
Cline, Manager of the Kemper Cen- 
ter for Home Gardening. Learn how 
to deal with yard waste so you can 
comply with the new state law 
eliminating yard waste disposal in 
landfills. Free, for members only. 
Limited seating. 

January 21 
Members' Day 
"Orchids: Jewels of 
the Rain Forest" 

II a.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. 
Slides and talk depicting the travels 
and studies of lady slipper orchids in 
Central and South America by Dr. 
Lucile McCook, Garden Horticul- 
tural Taxonomist. 

1:30 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium 
American Orchid Society video: 
"Potting and Mounting Orchids: 
Warm to Intermediate Tempera- 
tures". Marilyn LeDoux, Horticul- 
turist for the Garden's orchid 
collection, will be available to 
answer your questions. Free, for 
members only. Limited seating for 
lectures. 

February 11 
Members' Day 
"Secrets of the 
Rain Forest" 

7:30 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. 
Join Dr. Walter H. Lewis, Professor 
of Biology at Washington Univer- 
sity, for a National Geographic 
Explorer video on the Jivaro Indians 
and medicinal plants of the Amazo- 
nian rain forest. Dr. Lewis will set 
the stage for a lively and fascinating 
discussion. Free, for members only. 
Limited seating. 



K$y 



12. 



Missouri Botanical Garden 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

January- February 1992 







January 18 - February 16 
Orchid Show 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Orthwein Floral Hall. In the midst of winter, 
step into a tropical paradise! An exotic rain forest setting is filled 
with the vibrant colors of thousands of blooming orchids in an 
astonishing array of species, surrounded by ferns, bromeliads and 
other tropical plants. Free with regular Garden admission. Members' 
Preview— see January 17. 



"Orchids of Gold" Display 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily during the Orchid Show, in the foyer of Orth- 
wein Floral Hall. Mickey A. Nax presents a collection of nearly 100 
orchid sculptures of 14-18 carat gold, cast from living flowers and 
perfect in every detail. The collection includes extremely rare and 
unusual orchids, some cast from the only known plant in cultivation, 
Blooms range in size from Vi inch to 3V2 inches. Free with regular 
Garden admission. 



11 



J A N U A R 



SATURDAY 



Exhibit: "The Plant Hunt 
A Portrait of the Missour 
Botanical Garden" 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily thiol 
February 23, Ridgway Cent 
Spectacular color photograr 
National Geographic staff pi 
tographer James P. Blair tat 
the August 1990 issue of Nt 
Geographic magazine. Free 
regular Garden admission. 



17 



F R I I) A Y 



Members' Preview: Orchi 

5 to 8 p.m. , Ridgway Centei 
tainment, cash bar. Garden 
Shop will be open. Dinner b 
available in Gardenview Res 
For members only. 



28 



TUES I) A Y 



Curator's Talk: "Madaga: 
A Disappearing Paradise' 

7:30 p.m., Shoenberg Audit 
with Garden researcher Dr. 
E. Schatz. See page 15. $2 ; 



door. 




Final Fridays 

"Spotlight on Rain Forest Research" 

January 31, February 28, March 27 

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. , Climatron and Brookings Interpretive Center. Join 
members of the Garden's research staff for first hand demonstra- 
tions of the collection and preparation of plant specimens, the basis 
of botanical research. Look through a microscope, operate a plant 
press, examine dried plants, and learn how they are preserved for 
future study. Regular Garden admission. 



Every ■*•«* V . 0P.«»- 

a „dSund»V uidesf( 

the art, »\f the Gas 

^ eetat Center. Free ^ 

R ^ r,rdenad^ss^ 
feg^arGatdeu- _ 



I HI LLETIN I JANUARY FKBRUAKY 1992 



iEASURES OF THE CLIMATRON 

dving Rain Forests of Latin America, Africa and Asia ' 

rience rain forest regions around the globe! Each month a special day-long event celebrates the culture of a different region with 
>its, tours, and music in the Climatron and films, lectures, and workshops in the Ridgway Center. See page 15. Free with regular 
en admission. 



N U A R Y 



Sunday Living Rain Forests of Latin America 



to 5 p.m. 

, Film: The Emerald Forest. 
xcture: "Keepers of the 
' with producer Norman 
n, who will feature his award 
; documentary with a follow- 



SATURDAY- 
S U N D A Y 

Society Annual Show 

i 5 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. to 
Sunday, Ridgway Center, 
ssouri Orchid Society holds 
al display and sale of hun- 
f orchids in bloom. 

a U N I) A Y 

\ for Orchids 

to 4 p.m. , Ridgway Center. 
s from the Garden and the 
iri Orchid Society present 
ctures, an orchid arranging 
lop, and activities for chil- 
forkshops require reserva- 
ld a materials fee: call 
!5. 

r U E S D A Y 

r's Talk: "Adventures of a 
cal Collector" 

m., Shoenberg Auditorium, 
irden researcher 
3mas B. Croat. See page 15. 
le door. 

SUNDAY 

ron Tours 

.m., Climatron. Special 
>r children, led by members 
fenry Shaw Academy. 

TUESDAY 



r's Talk: "Tropical 
s: Cradles of Life" 

n., Shoenberg Auditorium, 
irden researcher Dr. Alwyn 
try. See page 15. $2 at the 



up lecture and discussion. The 
documentary focuses on the 
destruction of the Lacandon jungle 
in southern Mexico and the con- 
trasting sustainable agriculture 
practiced by the Lancandon people. 



FEBRUARY 



29 



SATURDAY 



Living Rain Forests of Africa 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

11 a.m. Film: Baka: The People of 
the Rain Forest. 



FEBRUARY 



Black History Month 

'From Dreams to Reality 



"From Dreams to Reality" Wednesday Film Series is cosponsored 
by the North St. Louis Arts Council. For middle to senior high 
school students. For reservations, times and additional information 
call 577-5125. 



5 



WEDNESDAY 



"From Dreams to Reality— A 
Tribute to Minority Inventors" 

Narrated by Ossie Davis, this film 
shows the enormous contributions 
made by African-Americans in the 
fields of science, technology and 
medicine. 

"Didn't We Ramble On: 
The Black Marching Band" 

The spirit and soul of the West Afri- 
can people has been passed down, 
generation by generation, through 
the black marching band, from 17th 
century Europe to today's football 
fields of America. Dizzy Gillespie 
introduces the skillfully orches- 
trated maneuvers of the Florida 
A&M Marching Band, the direct ful- 
fillment of an ageless ancestral idea. 



12 



WEDNESDAY 



"Benjamin Banneker: The Man 
Who Loved the Stars" 

A biography of American's first 
' ' Black Man of Science.' ' 



19 



WEDNESDAY 



"Zajota and the Boogie Spirit" 

This colorful animated film traces 
the saga of black people from their 
origins in Africa to their present life 
in America. The folk tale of the god- 
dess Zajota incorporates African 
rhythms and dance in portraying a 
people in harmony with the Boogie 
Spirit that is their soul. 

"The Black Artists" 

In this film, three contemporary 
black artists discuss their 
philosophy of art as they work. 
Featured are Dr. Samella Lewis, 
painter, William Pajaud, water- 
colorist, and John Riddle, sculptor, 
ceramist and teacher. 



26 



WEDNESDAY 



"Two Dollars and a Dream" 

A biography of Madame C. J. 
Walker, the child of slaves freed by 
the Civil War, who became 
America's first self-made million- 
airess. By interweaving social, eco- 
nomic and political history, the film 
also offers a view of black America 
from 1867 to 1930s. 



COMING 
IN MARCH 



Living Rain Forests of Asia 

Watch for more information in the 
March Bulletin. 



9 



SUNDAY 



Celebrate the Gospel II 

3:00 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. 
Join some of the area's finest choirs 
as they celebrate the rich cultural 
heritage of black gospel music from 
the past to the present. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 



16 



SUNDAY 



Second Annual Community 
Beautif ication Awards 

6:00 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. 
Five African-Americans will be 
honored for their contributions to 
neighborhood and/or community 
beautification efforts. Co-sponsored 
by Union Electric. Call 577-5125 for 
nomination forms; call for reserva- 
tions beginning February 3. 



22 



SATURDAY 



"Linkage to the Land" 

10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Ridgway Center. 
As African-Americans contemplate 
the past, a strong linkage to the land 
is evident. To connect the past, 
present and future of African- 
American history with Mother 
Earth, this day of activities for chil- 
dren, adults and families will feature 
tours of African plants in the Clima- 
tron, terrarium and recycling work- 
shops, African dance, community 
and residential gardening programs 
and a special puppet show that will 
highlight the relationship between 
Henry Shaw and John Feugh, an 
African-American who worked with 
Shaw during the 1800s. 



13. 



BULLETIN ! JANUARY- FEBRUARY 1992 



From the Membership Office 



1992 MEMBERS' TRAVEL PROGRAM 



MAY 7 TO 19, 1992 



Gardens of Andalusia- 

Garden Members are invited to join Mrs. Peter H. Raven and Patrick Bowe on 
a delightful tour of the gardens of Andalusia, Spain. Please call Brenda Banjak at 
(314) 577-9517 for tour details and reservation information. 

Lewis and Clark Trail-juNEi 2 m25,m 2 

Last year's tour retracing the rugged route of Lewis and Clark was such a success that 
we are repeating the tour again in 1992! Join hosts Dr. Ray Breun of the Jefferson National 
Expansion Historical Association and Alan Brant of the Missouri Botanical Garden as they 
guide their intrepid expeditionists into the "frontier," studying the flora and fauna along 
the route which in many places is just as it was when the original expedition took place 
200 years ago. The motorcoach tour will leave St. Louis on Friday, June 12, and travel 
through cities along the trail including St. Joseph, Sioux City, Ft. Pierre, Billings, Great 
Falls, and Missoula, to Portland. Stops along the way will once again feature state and 
national parks and historical sites of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. 



Santa Fe Trail 



-JULY 20 TO 29, 1992 



Explore the old Santa Fe Trail which opened up the "Indian Territory" to traders and 
later to settlers, between the years 1821 and 1880. Led by Dr. Ray Breun of the Jefferson 
National Expansion Historical Association and Dr. Marshall Crosby of the Missouri Botani- 
cal Garden, this tour in natural history will expand your knowledge and understanding of 
the trials and tribulations faced by the early explorers and settlers as you retrace their 
steps and wagon trails and cross the ocean of prairie in the center of the country. The 
motorcoach tour will leave St. Louis on Monday, July 20. Stops along the trail include Ft. 
Osage, Independence, Baldwin City, Council Grove, Great Bend, Ft. Larned, Dodge City, 
Garden City, La Junta, Taos, and Santa Fe, returning through Amarillo, Oklahoma City and 
Tulsa. Historic sites along the trail will be visited and perhaps you will see the wagon ruts 
that still remain at places along the trail! 

For a complete itinerary and information on these trips, call the Membership Office 
at (314) 577-9517. 



1992 Members' Days 

Jan. 21 Orchids— ' ' The Jewels of the 
Rain Forest 

Feb. 11 ' 'Secrets of the Rain Forest 

Mar. 11 Film/Lecture— "Rain Forests: 
Our Threatened Heritage 

Apr. 4 Arboretum Jonquils & Dogwoods 

May 15 Bats & Purple Martins 

June 26 Members ' Musical Evening 

July 14 Moonlight Stroll 

Aug. 13 Fun with Herbs 

Sept. 19 Gardening Lecture/ 
Demonstration 

Oct. 18 Garden Autumn Leaves & Cider 

Nov. 14 Climatron Tropics— 
A Winter Tour 

Dec. 19 Holiday Program 



Flowers and Candy for 
Your Valentine 

This Valentine's Day send a year of 
flowers with a Missouri Botanical Garden 
Membership and a box of Fannie May 
Candy to your special Valentine. Call 
577-5118 to order your Valentine member- 
ship. Gift recipients in the St. Louis 
metropolitan area will receive your unique 
Valentine gift delivered to their doorstep on 
February 14. 



Membership Services 
Volunteers Are 
Honored 

A luncheon honoring the Membership 
Services Desk volunteers was held on Fri- 
day, November 22, in Spink Pavilion. Spe- 
cial recognition awards were presented to 
Larry Thilking and Gene Spradling, for 
most hours volunteered; to Mim Kittner 
and Pat Becklean, for most memberships 
sold; and to Lib Walbaum, for most gifts dis- 
tributed. Lillian Biggs was honored for most 
gifts distributed in one morning. 

The desk volunteer program is chaired 
by D'Arcy Elsperman and Jean Crowder 
under the guidance of Members Board 
President, Sue Rapp. Last year 51 volun- 
teers donated 2,286 hours at the Member- 
ship Services Desk and sold 29 percent of 
all new Garden memberships that year. 
Congratulations, one and all! 




(left to right) Membership Services Desk volunteers: Mim Kittner, Put Becklean, Larry 
Thilking, Lib Walbaum, Sue Rapp, D'Arcy Elsperman, Lillian Biggs, and Jean Crowder. 



11. 



I HI 1 Lh TIN I JANUARY FKHKUAKY L992 



A SPECIAL THREE-MONTH EVENT 



Rain Forest Exhibit Comes to St. Louis 



"Tropical Rainforests— A Disappearing 
Treasure," is a major traveling exhibition 
from the Smithsonian Institution coming to 
St. Louis this January. The Missouri Botani- 
cal Garden, St. Louis Science Center and 
St. Louis Zoo are cooperating in the presen- 
tation of this important national exhibit, 
which will be on display at the St. Louis Sci- 
ence Center from January 11 through April 
5, 1992. The exhibit was developed by the 
Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibi- 
tion Service (SITES), in cooperation with 
the World Wildlife Fund. 

For more information about the exhibit 
or Science Center hours, call 314/289-4400. 
For information about group reservations, 
call 314/289-4424. 

Special activities at the Garden that are 
related to the exhibit include: 

Treasures of the Climatron 

Living Rain Forests of 

Latin America, Africa and Asia 

During the Smithsonian exhibit, visit 
the Garden's own living tropical rain forest 
in the Climatron for three special one-day 
events highlighting the culture of three dif- 
ferent rain forest regions around the world. 



Demonstrations, tours, exhibits, music and 
more will give visitors a glimpse of the spe- 
cial plant diversity and customs of each 
region. Additional programs will be held in 
the Ridgway Center, including films, lec- 
tures, a display of "grocery store botany," 
puppet shows, terrarium workshops, and 
more. All events are free with regular 
Garden admission. 

Sunday, January 26, 1992 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Living Rain Forests of Latin America 

Saturday, February 29, 1992 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Living Rain Forests of Africa 

Saturday, March 28, 1992 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Living Rain Forests of Asia 

"Final Fridays" 

January 31, February 28, March 27, 1992 

10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Climatron and Brookings Center 

Join members of the Garden's research 
staff on the last Friday of the month for an 
exciting glimpse of the daily work of botani- 
cal research. Demonstrations in the Clima- 



MacArthur Foundation Supports Education Activities 
on the Rain Forest 

The Garden and the St. Louis Science 
Center have received companion grants 
from The John D. and Catherine T Mac- 
Arthur Foundation to support educational 
and public outreach programs in conjunction 
with the Smithsonian exhibit "Tropical 
Rainforests: A Disappearing Treasure." 
The Garden has taken the lead in the 
development of educational materials for 
schools, targeting both students and 
teachers. 

In 1989 the Garden, through an earlier 
grant from the MacArthur Foundation, 
developed a nationally distributed Suitcase 
Science Kit on tropical rain forests and a 
summer tropical rain forest teacher training 
course. The course was offered through 
U.M.-St. Louis in 1989 and 1991 and will be 
repeated in the summer of 1992. It will be 
followed by a trip to the Peruvian Amazon. 

This past fall a series of workshops for 
teachers was held at the Zoo, Garden and 
Science Center to prepare teachers to visit 
the Exhibition and familiarize them with 
tropical rain forest resources at the three 
institutions. 500 copies of the exhibition's 
teacher manual were also duplicated and 
are being distributed through the Garden's 
Stupp Teacher Resource Center. Ten addi- 



tional kits of the Tropical Rain Forest Suit- 
case Science Kit are being assembled to 
make rain forest curriculum, props and 
materials available to a greater number of 
area teachers. Teachers will also benefit 
from activity kits Education staff are assem- 
bling which will bring some of the Garden's 
existing rain forest classes to three different 
age groups of school children. A 20-minute 
slide program, presented by Garden volun- 
teers, discussing tropical rain forests and 
the exhibition, is being made available to 
school and community groups. 

Dr. Peter H. Raven, director of the Gar- 
den, will lead a panel of distinguished 
experts in a discussion in March on the 
complex issues, "What Will It Take To Save 
the Tropical Rain Forests?" 

Additional activities and events will be 
offered through the Science Center and Zoo. 



tron and Brookings Interpretive Center will 
feature the collection and preparation of 
plants for future study, including the use of 
microscopes, plant presses, and dried her- 
barium specimens. 

Curators' Talks 

Don't miss these special lectures by 
Garden researchers who are among the 
world's foremost rain forest scientists. 

' 'Madagascar: A Disappearing Paradise 

Dr. George E. Schatz, Assistant Curator of 

Madagascar Project 

Tuesday, January 28, 1992 

7:30 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. 

Dr. Schatz went to Madagascar as the 
Garden's resident research botanist in 1987. 
In addition to his botanical exploration he 
has worked with Malagasy officials to pro- 
tect the island's endangered forests and to 
train local scientists and conservationists. 

Madagascar is home to many plants and 
animals found nowhere else on the planet. 
Come learn about the geography, unique 
treasures and culture of this disappearing 
paradise. 

' Adventures of a Botanical Collector" 

Dr. Thomas B. Croat, 

P. A. Schulze Curator of Botany 

Tuesday, February 4, 1992 

7:30 p.m. , Shoenberg Auditorium 

Indiana Jones, move over! Dr. Croat has 
been collecting plants for 30 years, and 
most of that time has been in search of new 
species of the Philodendron family, 
Araceae, in Central and South America. 
During his work, he has weathered several 
lifetimes of exciting and harrowing experi- 
ences. 

"Tropical Rain Forests: Cradles of Life" 
Dr. Alwyn H. Gentry, Curator 
Tuesday, February 18, 1992 
7:30 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium 

Dr. Gentry has spent a lifetime studying 
tropical rain forests. Few people on Earth 
share his breadth of knowledge of these fas- 
cinating and valuable resources. In his talk, 
he will make the forest come alive as he 
explains why these unique and beautiful for- 
ests are truly the cradle of life on Earth. 



I7i 



-An Enchanted Ram Forest 

St. Louis Science Centen* ^ ^ Samt Uuis Zoo. 
Garden, St. Loms Sac 
Watch your mail for a 



5 sclent - r e nter 

St-^L^Sed invitation. 



BULLETIN I JANUARY FKBRIARY 199L' 



15. 



Garden Orchid Display Takes Top Honors 



A 50-square-foot exhibit of orchids 
designed by Garden staff garnered 34 
awards, including the top honor, at the Mid- 
America Orchid Congress Show held in 
Louisville, Kentucky, October 28-30, 1991. 
The exhibit was given 92 points out of 100 
by the American Orchid Society judges, 
winning the highest award, the American 
Orchid Society Gold Medal Certificate. It 
also won the A.O.S. Show Trophy, the 
Orchid Digest Show Trophy, and Show Tro- 
pin lor all Open Competition classes. 

The three-panel exhibit, designed spe- 
cifically for this show, displayed some 40 
orchid plants. It was designed by Brian 
LeDoux, the Garden's exhibit designer. 
The orchid plants were grown by Marilyn 
LeDoux, the Garden's orchid grower. 

Individual plants in the exhibit received 
six Special Awards and Show Trophies, nine 
first-place ribbons, five second-place rib- 
bons, and nine third-place ribbons. 

Forty-eight plant exhibits were entered 



in the show by commercial growers, orchid 
societies, and individuals from the Mid- 
west, South and Canada. 

The Garden has one of the largest and 
finest orchid collections in the United 
States. The collection consists of over 
10,000 plants, representing approximately 
250 natural and hybrid genera and over 
3,500 different species and hybrids. The 
oldest species in the collection, Epiden- 
drum ciliare, dates from 1895. 



Garden Floral Designer 
Honored 

Pat Diehl Scace, floral designer for the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, has been 
accepted for membership in the prestigious 
American Institute of Floral Design 
(AIFD), after a rigorous, two-phase qualifi- 
cation process. The AIFD accreditation 
process can take up to three years. 



From the Garden Gate Shop 



Shop Closed for 
Inventory 

The Garden Gate Shop will be closed 
for inventory Thursday and Friday, January 
2 and 3, and will reopen at noon Saturday, 
January 4. 



January Clearance Sale 

Wednesday and Thursday 
January 8 and 9, 1992 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Bonus savings! Members receive 20% 
off everything in the Shop including previ- 
ously reduced merchandise. 

Orchid Show and Sale 

The annual Orchid Sale kicks off with 
the members' preview of the 1992 Orchid 
Show on Friday evening, January 17 and 
continues until February 16. Members 
receive 20% off all orchids, orchid bark and 
fertilizer, and wire accessories. 



Valentine's Day 

Remember your sweetheart with a 
colorful blooming plant or one of our 
charming collection of romantic gifts and 
cards. The Tower Grove Rose, specially 
created for the Garden by the Boehm Por- 
celain Studios, says you care all year long. 
It is exclusive to the Garden Gate Shop, 
$175. 

Birds and Books 

Don't forget that the Garden Gate Shop 
has a wide variety of bird feeders, bird 
houses, bird seed and bird books, tapes 
and videotapes. We also have The Birding 
Game, a new board game based on the field 
guides of Roger Tory Peterson. A must for 
birders, $39.95. A delightful book to enjoy 
this winter is Yardening by Jeff and Liz Ball, 
the complete reference book for everyone 
who doesn't consider him-or herself a gar- 
dener. Macmillan, 256 pages with illustra- 
tions and photographs, $24.95. 

Plan Ahead For Spring 

Pick up your seeds, windowsill green- 
houses, peat pots and seed-starting acces- 
sories as you plan your spring garden! 



The American Institute of Floral Design 
was founded in 1967 to provide recognition 
for its members as skilled, professional art- 
ists, to offer members symposia and other 
learning experiences, and to help lead and 
establish professional design trends for the 
floral industry. There are 14 AIFD mem- 
bers in Missouri. Scace will be the third 
member in the St. Louis metropolitan area. 

"I've always associated AIFD with peo- 
ple of superior talent and I'm thrilled to be 
accepted as a member," says Scace. 

Garden and Catholic 
Schools Team up for 
Science Education 

This past July a team from St. Louis was 
one of 20 teams competitively chosen to 
attend the National Science Resource 
Center Summer Institute at the 
Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. 
The team was composed of two staff 
members from the Garden, Pamela Pirio of 
eduction and Dan Harder of research, and 
two educators from the Archdiocese of 
St. Louis, Alan Winkelmann and Vera 
Cooper. They developed a Comprehensive 
Science Plan for improving science 
education in the entire Archdiocesan 
system of 167 schools, a groundbreaking 
partnership between a school system and a 
museum institution. 

The plan has been accepted by the 
Catholic Education Office, and emphasizes 
implementation of two specific hands-on 
science teaching programs developed by 
the University of Hawaii, known by the 
acronyms FAST and DASH. These 
programs stress use of the inquiry/discovery 
approach, involvement of students in 
research, developing basic concepts, and 
exploring the interrelationships among 
science technology, environmental issues, 
and society. Implementation will be aided 
by a ten-year, $2 million grant to the 
Archdiocese from the Monsanto Fund. 

The Garden is also working to develop a 
Visiting Scientists Program, which will 
introduce students to science as a 
profession. Classroom visits by working 
researchers and field trips to local 
laboratories and institutions will help to 
demystify science and make it a familiar 
part of daily life. 

"This landmark collaboration between a 
cultural institution and a school system is an 
exciting development," said Dr. Peter H. 
Raven, Garden director. "We are dedicated 
to serving the St. Louis community by 
making the resources and expertise of the 
Garden available to educators seeking to 
improve the quality of science education." 



16. 



\BULLETIN JANUARY l-'KBKUAKY 1992 



Horticulture in Missouri 




THE LIVING LIBRARY 



Garden Plants as Tools for Research 



If you visited the Garden on November 
7th while snow was on the ground, you may 
have seen two people up in a tree in a 
cherry-picker in sub-freezing weather. A 
little crazy? Perhaps. But one of those peo- 
ple had waited over two years for the 
opportunity to study and collect the seeds 
of this tree. 

The tree is a golden larch, Pseudolarix*, 
from eastern China. Golden larch is consid- 
ered rare in China and few specimens have 
been introduced to the United States. The 
tree climber was a graduate student from 
the University of California, Nancy Gooch. 
Nancy is a paleobotanist, a scientist who 
studies fossil plants. She visited the Garden 
to examine and collect material from our liv- 
ing golden larch in order to gain insight into 
the biology of its fossil relatives. Our tree, 
and several others in St. Louis county, rep- 
resent a treasure to this researcher; 
geographically, they are the closest seed- 
producing specimens to her home base in 
California! 

Our golden larch, a gift in 1953 from The 
Federated Garden Clubs of America, is situ- 
ated at the north end of the Museum Build- 
ing along the eastern wall of the Garden. 
When the tree was donated, the Garden 
Clubs knew the tree was rare and valuable, 
in both a horticultural and an educational 
sense. But how could they have guessed 
the value the tree would hold for research 
nearly forty years later? 

Visitors to the Garden will readily agree 
that the collection of living plants on display 



is immensely valuable for its beauty; to 
realize the aesthetic value, one need only 
visit the Garden in the height of spring, 
view the roses or water lilies in bloom, or 
stroll through the green of the Climatron in 
mid-winter. But many of the plants in the 
Garden represent much more to a 
researcher. The living collection is, in many 
ways, like a library; we never know what 
kind of plant, or book, we may wish to study 
in order to gather information. 

The living collection has many potential 
uses in research. Taxonomists from around 
the world request leaves, stems, or flowers 
of a particular species in order to study 
structure or anatomy. The results of those 
studies can be used to describe or clarify 
species, or to understand evolutionary rela- 
tionships. Recent advances in molecular 
biology allow isolation of genetic material 
(DNA) from leaves that can then be com- 
pared for the same purposes. One tax- 
onomist who visited the Garden collected 
over fifty different kinds of plants in the lily 
family, Liliaceae, for a comparative genetic 
analysis of that group. 

Plant breeders are looking to living plant 
collections and botanical gardens for the 
raw material of their trade— genes. Using 
the techniques of genetic engineering, a 
plant breeder can isolate a gene that holds a 
particular genetic trait in one kind of plant, 
and then insert it into another plant. Mod- 
ern plant breeding in crops such as pota- 
toes, tomatoes, and corn rely on genes 
from wild relatives; "wild-type" genes can 



Ben Chu of the MBG horticulture staff and 
Nancy Gooch use the lift to reach unshat- 
tered cones of the golden larch, Pseudolarix 
amabilis. 

confer a desirable trait such as large fruit 
size or disease resistance. 

Pharmaceutical companies are screen- 
ing a wide range of plant species in the hope 
of developing drugs to fight disease. For 
example, the rosy periwinkle from 
Madagascar, Catharanthus roseus, is the 
source of vincristine and vinblastine, drugs 
shown to be highly effective against child- 
hood leukemia and other cancers. Our living 
plant collection at the Garden includes the 
rosy periwinkle and other species of 
Catharanthus from Madagascar; the other 
periwinkle species are potentially valuable 
as sources of similar drugs, or as store- 
houses of closely related genes that can be 
inserted into the genetic material of the 
rosy periwinkle using genetic techniques 
mentioned above. 

And now, conservation biologists are 
counting on botanical gardens to propagate 
and maintain endangered species. At the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, we have living 
collections of over 21 species of endangered 
plants from North America through our 
involvement with the Center for Plant Con- 
servation. We also grow over 100 rare or 
endangered plant species from other parts 
of the world. Any of these plants can be 
studied by researchers to learn more about 
the species, or could be utilized in breeding 
or reintroduction programs. 

The Missouri Botanical Garden cur- 
rently maintains a living botanical library of 
more than 10,000 different kinds of plants. 
Which plant will be needed for research 
next week? Next year? Only the future will 
tell . -Lucile McCook .Ph.D., 

Horticultural Taxonomist 

The single species of Pseudolarix has been called 
both Pseudolarix amabilis and P. kaempfert. It was 
recently decided, at the International Botanical 
Congress, to use the name P. amabilis. 



Volunteers Needed in 
the Library 

The Garden library is seeking 
volunteers to process archival collections. 
Processing entails organizing and cleaning 
documents and photographs as well as 
creating a description of the collection to aid 
researchers. Training will be provided by 
Library staff. For more information call 
Jeanne McGilligan at 577-5187. 



17. 



BULLETIN I JANUARY FEBRUARY 1992 



Address by Henry Shaw Medalist Jose Sarukhan 



On October 14, 1991, Dr. Jose Sarukhan 
Kermez was awarded the Garden 's Henry 
Shaw Medal at a dinner at the Ritz-Carlton 
Hotel (see November-December Bulletin,). 
On that occasion Dr. Sarukhan delivered 
the following address: 

The effects and influences of the vision- 
ary decision of Henry Shaw more than 130 
years ago, when founding the oldest botani- 
cal garden in the United States, have largely 
transposed the Tower Grove and Magnolia 
Avenues in St. Louis. 

Indeed, along its history, but particu- 
larly in the last two decades, the interest 
and presence of the M.B.G. has increas- 
ingly become ubiquitous on the face of the 
Earth. 

Under the splendid leadership of its 
present director, the M.B.G. has extended 
its activities well beyond the purely plant 
collecting activities to multifaceted studies 
which geographically cover all the conti- 
nents and thematically encompass from 
classical plant taxonomy and floristics, to 
molecular plant genetics, passing through 
botanical historiography. 

More remarkable still in this internation- 
alization of the Garden's work has been the 
consistent effort to associate with other 
academic institutions, particularly those 
located in the different countries. 

I will explain why this is remarkable. 
First, because a large number of academic 
institutions often visit foreign countries, 
especially those which are in a developing 
process, without any or very little contact 
with their colleagues in that country, an atti- 
tude which besides being in want of civility, 
precludes the academic interchange among 
colleagues. But second and most impor- 
tant, because the M.B.G. has followed a 
philosophy of interacting as intensely as 
possible with local institutions, not just out 
of politeness, but with the conviction that 
they want to interact with their foreign col- 
leagues and if necessary— and this is often 
the case in many developing countries- 
help to strengthen or build local capacities, 
both individual and institutional. 1 may also 
add that, at least in my experience, such 
interaction is carried out in a way which 
gives its proper place to the academic abili- 
ties and expertise of the local colleagues 
and institutions, making the most of mutual 
capabilities and resources. 

This has certainly been the case with 
the Flora Mesoamericana project, one of 
the two or three most important floristic 



surveys now underway in the world. The 
project is being carried out on the basis of 
an equal partnership between the National 
University of Mexico (UNAM), the Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden and the British 
Museum. Ever since Dr. Raven first sug- 
gested to me the possibility of putting the 
project together, the dominant attitude has 
been one of mutual academic respect and 
full collaboration. As a result we will be 
presenting to the public the first volume of 
the Flora. It will be simultaneously another 
first: the first time that a major floristic 
study in the world will be published in Span- 
ish. This is not an act of academic eccentric- 
ity. It results from the recognition of the 
role played by UNAM in the project, as well 
as from the need to attract interest in the 
Latin American countries covered by the 
project and stimulate the development of 
their academic communities and increase 
their sensitivity to preserve the biological 
richness in their territories. 

You may ask, "Why am I telling you all 
this?" Surely because I want to underline 
the international role of the M.B.G. and the 
basic philosophy to carry this out. But also 
for another reason. And this is the crucial 
importance of that kind of international 
cooperation which has profound conse- 
quences on strengthening a country's 
capacity to develop its own "intelligence" 
about its physical, social and cultural reali- 
ties, potentials and limitations. On being 
able to find for itself the answers to the 
problems that it faces, to resolve to better 
the life of its society, and to progress eco- 
nomically and culturally. 

This point is in my opinion of medullary 
importance and will be more so in the 
present day scenario of increasing globaliza- 
tion of almost all aspects of the life of socie- 
ties. It will certainly be the case when 
Canada, the United States and Mexico 
reach the Agreement for a Free Trade 
Area. Although the F.T.A. contemplates 
only— or mostly— trade issues, it is quite 
clear to me that the long term viability of 
such an agreement will depend very much 
on the adequate understanding among the 
societies of each of the countries, and the 
reaffirmation of their individual cultures. 
This will only be possible when clear efforts 
are made to increase the cultural and educa- 
tional relations among our countries, to help 
us understand and appreciate each other's 
values and characteristics much better than 
we do now. 

And this is why I have stressed the role 



which the M.B.G. has played in its interna- 
tional activities: namely, the advancement 
of universal knowledge through the interac- 
tion and strengthening of our national scien- 
tific and cultural structures. 

I have left to the end the portion of the 
speech in which one thanks for the distinc- 
tion received. Not because I am of an 
ungrateful nature, but precisely because of 
the contrary: I am a bit at a loss to find the 
right words beyond saying that receiving 
the Henry Shaw medal is a distinction which 
honours me deeply. I feel I have achieved 
very little to deserve it, with all due respect 
to the good judgment of the Board of the 
M.B.G., and I feel proud to join the list of 
very illustrious names of past recipients of 
the medal. 

At this point I recall the case of the 
Ambassador of a small nation to the 
UNESCO, who in circumstances similar to 
mine at this moment, always had two 
speeches, ready to deliver either one, 
depending on the circumstances. One was 
very short and the second longer. The 
short one was "Thank you;" the longer 
one was "Thank you, very much." I will 
use a third version, which is fifty percent 
longer than the second version of the 
Ambassador, and will say to the members of 
the Board of the Missouri Botanical Gar- 
den, to Peter Raven and Tamra, and my 
good friends at the Garden Thank you, 
thank you very much! 



Support for Flora of 
North America 

The Surdna Foundation has awarded the 
Flora of North America project a three- 
year, $150,000 grant to help cover the 
expenses of the project's organization cen- 
ter at the Garden, including coordination, 
outreach, and computerization activities. 

In addition, the ARCO Foundation has 
awarded the Flora of North America project 
a $25,000 grant to help fund the production 
of computer-generated maps for the first 
volume of the series. 

Flora of North America is a massive 
binational project to gather and make avail- 
able information on all plants growing with- 
out cultivation in North America north of 
Mexico. It is the first reference work ever 
that brings together information on all 
North American plants. 



1«S. 



I III 'LLETIN JANUARY KKKRUAKY 1992 



Center for Plant Conservation 




Members of the 
National Council 
(left to right): Janet 
Poor, Judy Freeman, 
Angela Campbell, 
Anne Chatham, Nell 
Scott, Mary Patterson, 
Sally Squire, Nancy 
Brewster, Sadie Gwin 
Blackburn, Don Falk, 
Mary Ann Streeter, 
and Hattie Purtell. 



Annual Meetings Held in St. Louis 



by Greg Wieland, National Collection Coordinator 



For the first time since moving to its 
new headquarters at the Garden, the Cen- 
ter for Plant Conservation (CPC) held its 
annual meetings in St. Louis. On October 
26-29, 1991, the 21 botanical gardens and 
arboreta that manage the CPC's National 
Collection of Endangered Plants held their 
Annual Meeting of Participating Institu- 
tions. The meeting was followed by the 
Annual Meeting of the CPC National Coun- 
cil, October 30 through November 2. 

The 1991 Annual Meeting of Participat- 
ing Institutions consisted of three gather- 
ings: a one day meeting of the directors of 
the gardens and arboreta in the Center's 
consortium, two days of meetings during 
which the directors were joined by the 
botanists or horticulturists who implement 
the Center's conservation programs at the 
institutions, and finally an all-day workshop 
on seed management. The purpose of 
these meetings was to evaluate the growth 
that has taken place, to identify potential 
problems and discuss solutions, to help 
develop policies, and to address needs and 
identify future directions. 

The 65 participants made great pro- 
gress in the development of guidelines that 
are critical to the conservation of our 
nation's rare and endangered plants. The 
guidelines discussed included appropriate 
uses of the National Collection, reintroduc- 
tion of plants back into the wild, and seed 
management. 

Seed banking is often the best way of 
preserving plant material genetically sim- 
ilar to that in the wild population. An entire 
day was devoted to presenting the latest 
ideas, methods, and technologies for 
managing the seed in the National Collec- 
tion of Endangered Plants. The Seed 
Management Workshop, the first such 



workshop the Center has sponsored, 
involved presentations and demonstrations 
by some of the world's experts on seed 
biology and seed storage. Representatives 
were present from the USDA National 
Seed Storage Laboratory; Wakehust Place, 
the seed storage facility for the Royal 
Botanical Gardens, Kew, in England; the 
USDA Agricultural Research Service's 
Germplasm Resources Information Net- 
work; and the Center for Reproduction of 
Endangered Wildlife. The workshop ended 
four fruitful days of discussions among the 
Center's network of gardens. 

George Briggs, director of the newest of 
the Participating Institutions, the North 
Carolina Arboretum, said, "Our work with 
the CPC has helped us to establish a much 
stronger rapport with conservation efforts 
in our region. That, in turn, helps us in our 



work of preserving endangered plants. 
Sometimes, educating people and making 
them truly care about an issue are two dif- 
ferent things. Our affiliation with CPC 
strengthens and helps to validate all of our 
programs.' ' 

These ideas were echoed by Linda 
McMahan, director of the Berry Botanic 
Garden of Portland, Oregon. Linda, Bill 
Brumback of Garden in the Woods, and 
Brian Parsons of Holden Arboretum, who 
have all worked with CPC since its begin- 
nings, explained that CPC has worked hard 
to build a sense of partnership with other 
conservation organizations throughout the 
country. 

"Moving to St. Louis has been a won- 
derful boost for the CPC," Linda said. "We 
all feel a renewed sense of commitment, a 
sense that our organization has matured and 
is ready to move ahead in our efforts to con- 
serve the native flora of the United States.' ' 

Then the annual meeting of the Center 
for Plant Conservation's National Council 
commenced. The National Council dele- 
gates, who like the Center itself represent 
all regions of the country, met from October 
31 to November 2. They outlined their 
work with the Center and its Participating 
Institutions, including the Missouri Botani- 
cal Garden, to spread the word of the Cen- 
ter's work, to develop a membership 
program, and to keep donors informed of 
the conservation work being done with the 
endangered plants they have sponsored. 
Sally Squire, president of the National 
Council, said, "Big goals start with small 
actions. We're excited about putting our 
plans into action!" 




I 41 I 

Directors of CPC affiliates (left to right): Dr. Peter S. White, The North Carolina Botanical 
Garden; Dr. William Theobald, National Tropical Botanical Garden; Dr. Linda R. McMahan, 
Berry Botanic Garden; Dr. Peter H. Raven, MBG; Lee Ann Toles, Mercer Arboretum; Dr. 
George Briggs, The North Carolina Arboretum; Wayne A. Hite, The Arboretum at Flagstaff; 
Dr. Robert G. Breunig, Desert Botanical Garden; Mary Pat Matheson, Red Butte Gardens and 
Arboretum; Dr. Arthur Ode, The Nebraska Statewide Arboretum; Dr. Simon Linington, man- 
ager of the Seed Bank at Wakehurst Place, Kew; and Donald A. Falk, director of CPC. 



19. 



BULLETIN I JANUARY FEBRUARY 1992 



Herb Society Celebrates 50th Anniversary 

' 'Spice is the variety of life."— Terry Doughty 

The St. Louis Herb Society capped a 
year-long celebration of its golden anniver- 
sary with a dinner at Spink Pavilion on 
November 16, 1991. The Society was 
founded in February, 1941, at the Garden to 
promote "the use and knowledge of herbs" 
and it became the first volunteer group to 
maintain a special interest plant collection at 
the Garden. With staff cooperation, the 
Society designs, plants, and maintains the 
exquisite fenced Victorian garden behind 
Tower Grove House. 

The year-long celebration, chaired by 
Pat Leigh, featured a series of sold-out lec- 
tures and demonstrations with proceeds 
benefitting the Garden. These programs 
included lectures on herb lore and propaga- 
tion, a workshop on making herbal topiaries 
and wreaths, and the preparation of an 
herbal holiday dinner. In June, Joyce Nie- 
woehner, president of the Society, pre- 
sented Dr. Raven with a check for $5,000 in 
honor of the anniversary. Part of the gift 
was used to sponsor a presentation 
by Garden researcher Dr. Mick Richardson 
at a horticultural conference at Kew Gar- 
dens, London. 

The Herb Society holds programs every 
year in cooperation with the Garden's Edu- 
cation division and the Speakers' Bureau. 
Members have produced two books, How 
to Grow Herbs in the Midwest and The Lore 
and Legend of Culinary Herbs and Spices. 
The books, plus a special curry powder 
created by Society members, are for sale in 
the Garden Gate Shop. 



Membership in the St. Louis Herb Soci- 
ety is limited to 60 active members whose 
interests range from propagating and grow- 
ing herbs, cooking with herbs, herb garden 
design, historical uses of herbs and herbal 
love, to cooking, dyeing, and making deco- 
rations and crafts with herbs. 

"The activities of the Herb Society 
have enriched the Garden immeasurably," 
said Dr. Raven. "We are indebted to the 
members for making the Garden a more 
delightful place, and look forward to another 
50 years of collaboration! 

Garden Establishes 
Cultural Diversity Council 

On November 20, 1991, the Garden's 
Board of Trustees adopted a resolution 
establishing a new Diversity Council at the 
Garden, which "will act to eliminate racial 
and ethnic polarization and will increase 
multi-cultural representation and participa- 
tion in programming, audiences, member- 
ship, employment, volunteers, contracts 
and purchasing." 

O. Sage Wightman III, president of the 
Board of Trustees, said, "Under Peter 
Raven's leadership, Missouri Botanical 
Garden has long had a strong affirmative 
action and equal opportunity employment 
program." Dr. Raven added, "as we seek 
to carry out the Garden's mission in a spirit 
of excellence and equity, we want the Gar- 
den to take advantage of potentially enor- 
mous benefits in problem solving, creativity 
and marketing to our diverse commu- 
nity. . .toward that end I have asked Sue 



Volunteer Profile 



Henry Bowman 




Sometimes a volunteer becomes so 
much a part of the Garden it is impossible to 
imagine how the place would function with- 
out him. Henry Bowman has been a daily 
volunteer in the production greenhouses 



since 1977, and the staff has learned to rely 
on his dependability and inventiveness. 

"If we need to figure out a new way to 
do something, Henry invents a solution," 
said Tina Pey, staff horticulturist. "He is 



Wilkerson, our director of Human Resource 
Management, to organize a committee that 
will be staffed by blacks and whites, manag- 
ers and non-managers." 

Sue Wilkerson said, "The effective 
management of diversity offers a competi- 
tive business advantage and increasingly 
will have a significant impact on an organiza- 
tion's success. 1990 census figures show 
that African-Americans comprise 48% of 
the City and 14% of the County." Wilker- 
son, who earlier organized a two-day 
retreat on behalf of the St. Louis Area 
Museum Collaborative (SLAMC) added, 
"Minority representation in the SLAMC 
institutions is disproportionate to the popu- 
lation. On average, 7% of board members 
and about 20% of museum employees are 
African-Americans. SLAMC has been 
working steadily throughout the community 
to increase minority participation in local 
cultural institutions. We are indebted to our 
volunteer advisory board for their contribu- 
tions: Zella Harrington of the American Red 
Cross; Wyndel Hill of Wyndel E. Hill & 
Associates; Lee Jeffries of Pepsi-Cola Bot- 
tling Company; Clyde Orr of Metropolitan 
St. Louis Sewer District; Ronald Pointer of 
Saint Louis University; and Sheila Bouie- 
Sledge of Goodwill Industries." 

In conclusion, Wilkerson commented 
that the Garden committee will be estab- 
lished and fully in place by January, 1992. 

In its resolution, the Garden's Board of 
Trustees pledged to "commit to achieving 
the full pluralistic potential of the Missouri 
Botanical Garden by embracing the diver- 
sity of our society and by reflecting it in all 
activities and at all levels." 



always coming up with tools and techniques 
for displaying and maintaining the plants 
indoors and out." 

Henry was born in 1903 and has lived in 
St. Louis all his life. After a 3V2 year stint in 
the Navy he worked as a pipefitter and 
welder with Union 562 for 55 years. He has 
received honors for his Garden service, 
including a ten-year recognition award in 
1987 and the Special Services award in 
1982. He faithfully gives six or seven hun- 
dred hours a year to the Garden. 

In September the Garden Writers 
Association of America held their annual 
meeting at the Garden, and photographer 
Liz Ball took this photograph of Henry 
after he showed her the orchid collection. 
Henry says that the only other time he had 
his picture taken was at the police station, 
and that one wasn't worth publishing. We 
doubt it, Henry! 



20. 



\BULLETIN ' JANUARY FKBRUAKY 1992 



President of Chinese Academy of Sciences Visits Garden 




Prof. Zhou 
(left, with 
Peter Raven) 
at a dinner at 
the Garden on 
November 4, 
1991. 



Professor Zhou Guang-zhao, president 
of the Academia Sinica, Beijing, People's 
Republic of China, visited the Garden in 
November. Academia Sinica is one of the 
highest science policy-making institutions 
in China and is one of the largest scientific 
research organizations in the world, encom- 
passing over 300 research institutions, a 



university, graduate school, and Science 
Press, publisher of the Flora of China. 

The Academy provides important sup- 
port for the Flora of China project, a joint 
venture headquartered here at the Garden. 
Dr. Zhou is one of the highest ranking Chi- 
nese ever to visit St. Louis. He has 
appointed Dr. Peter H. Raven, director of 



the Garden, to serve as a co-chairman of an 
international committee for the protection 
of biodiversity in China. 

Tower Grove House 
Holiday Decorations 

The beautiful Victorian decorations in 
Tower Grove House at the holidays were 
installed by dedicated volunteers as a gift to 
the Garden and the community. We are 
deeply grateful for the efforts of the 
following organizations and individuals. 

Very special thanks go to Mrs. Fred W. 
Wenzel. Our appreciation also is extended 
to the Four Winds Garden Club, Garden 
Club of St. Louis, The St. Louis Herb 
Society, Grass Roots Garden Club, The 
Members' Board of the Garden, Ladue 
Garden Club, Fleur de Lis Garden Club, 
The Historical Committee of the Garden, 
The Tower Grove House Auxiliary, and Joan 
Abeln. 



Tributes 



September - October 1991 



In Honor Of 



Mr. and Mrs. Donald Altvater 

Mr. and Mrs. William T. Dooley Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Frank 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Key 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Turner Peters 

Mr. and Mrs. William V. Rabenberg 

Dr. Carl Baker 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernie Kunitz 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Balmer 

Miss Rosemary Armbruster 

James and Dawn Bartel 

Mr. Stephen R. Mullin 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Beckermann 

Mrs. Catherine N. Nehring 
Mr. and Mrs. Wayne 
Bennetsen 

Ken and Leslie Kotiza 
Mrs. Elsie Markwort 
Mr. and Mrs. Lester Rauscher 
Mr. Bob Boland 

Dr. and Mrs. Jerrold L. Vesper 

Mr. and Mrs. Norvell Brasch 
Sam and Jacob 

Mrs. Ray Magidson 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
Bromberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip N. Hirsch 

Bela S. Denes 
Kiku Obata 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart K. Nakano 
Carol and Pat Donelan 
Ellen and Henry Dubinsky 
Mrs. Melanie Fathman 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles King 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Frank 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 



Mrs. Milton Frenkel 

Michael and Sue Katz 

Alice Gerdine 

Katharine Wagner 
Helen and Bill Gilbert 

Nancy and Jack Lampert 
Karen and Mont Levy 
Lee and Barbara Wagman 

Mrs. Zeena Goldenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold N. Kravin 
Cathy Goldstein 
Carl Schwarz 

Linda and Jerry Meyers 

Helen and Earl Greb 

Joyce and Wayne Winter 
Mr. and Mrs. T. Haimann 
Mrs. Audrey Senturia 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert 

Harrison 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Halpern 
Mr. Marcus Hirsch Jr. 
Mrs. Harold W. Dubinsky 

Mrs. Florence Hoey 

Mrs. Lois Friedman 
Julie and Glenn 

Mildred Mellman 

Mrs. Barry Kayes 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert M. Talcoff 
Hedie Keller 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 

Mr. Harold Kessler 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 
Norma and Wally Klein 

Bernice K. Rubinelli 

Mr. Robert Lewin 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 
Mrs. Selma Mayer 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Schweizer II 



Mrs. Mildred Nolan 

Kathleen Clucas 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. 
Oertli 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 
Dr. G. Charles Oliver 

Dr. and Mrs. Llewellyn Sale Jr. 

Mr. Ronald S. Prince 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald F. Roth 
Dr. and Mrs. Oscar H. Soule 
Mr. Michael Rad 

Dr. and Mrs. James T. Chamness 

Craig and Jackie Reiss 

Lana and John Yunker 
Mrs. Boyd Rogers 

Ms. Marjorie M. Robins 
Mr. Joseph Ruwitch 

Dr. and Mrs. Max Deutch 

Ann R. Husch 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Ruwitch 

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Scharff II 

Mrs. Ben H. Senturia 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Singer Jr. 

Mr. Ralph Sachs 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Schweizer II 

Mrs. Marion Schoenfeld 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert M. Talcoff 
Mr. Louis M. Schukar 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. and Mrs. Gil Schumacher 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold A. Baumann 
Mrs. Sylvian Segal 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 
Sally Seldin 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Lowenbaum 
Evelyn and Dan Simon 

Larry and Flo Meyer 

Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 

Mrs. Ben H. Senturia 
Mrs. Ida Steinberg 

Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Meyers 

Mrs. Molly Strassner 

Mr. and Mrs. Brent Stansen 



Orrin Sage Wightman III 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Schneithorst 



In Memory Of 



Ms. Dora B. Aberle 

Mr. Dennis E. Rose 
Grandmother of 
Ellen Abramson 

Cissy and Steven Nissenbaum 
Mrs. Josephine Rempe Ameln 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard G. Ressler 

Mr. Joseph J. Anton 

Comprose- 

Andrea Huegatter 

Candace Shaw 

Brad Truman 

Beth Vorwerk 

Neil Wallerstein 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold E. Cox 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. Hoehn 
Kromm, Rikimaru & Johansen, Inc. 
Ms. Doris M. Meyerott 
John and Leigh Patterson 
Steven and Jan Podolsky 
Mr. and Mrs. Kent Ragsdale 
Ms. Julie Simon 
Southwestern Bell- 

Bernie 

Chuck 

Dave 

Kirk 

Laura 

Laverne 

Mike 

Phyllis 

Sath 

Susan 

Terri 
Western Supplies Company 

Employees 
Mr. and Mrs. John Wysocki 

continued on next page 



21. 



BULLETIN I JANUARY FEBRUARY 1992 



Tributes 



continued 



Mrs. Thelma Aponte 

Sonia Colon Melendez 

Vivian Argo 

Olga Frentrop 

Hugo Schueren 

Mr. Joseph A. Austin 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Graves III 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Rosenthal 

S. Charles Baer 

John Kiske 
Lynn Pinson 
Jack A. Bain 

Laura Bain and Matthew Janes 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic L. Beattie 

Mr. and Mrs. James Gannaway 

Mr. and Mrs. Fd Gerling 

Frna and Carl Hermann 

Hyatt Legal Services 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Kohler 

Mrs. Marion I>ewis 

Mr. Joseph P. Logan 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Loire 

MagueTek Century Electric, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Mann 

Mrs. Margaret W. McCormick 

RitaM. Mueller 

Margaret F. Murrell 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Shewmake 

Transitional Living Services, Inc. 

Mrs. Betty R. Will 

Mrs. Lucille H.Beall 

Dr. and Mrs. M.Scott Beall Jr. 

Thomas Bell 

Mr. and Mrs. John Pollaci 

Mr. Peter Bellamy 

Dr. Marc Singer 
Mrs. Pamela J. Singer 

Mrs. Lorine Bentzinger 

Norman and I>ois Hansen 
Mrs. John Torrey Berger 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Flsperman 
Mrs. Robert A. Humber 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Singer 
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Steger 
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce R. Yoder 
Mrs. Esther Bibb 
Mr. and Mrs. Phil S. Chew 
Mrs. Louise Bickel 
Mr. and Mrs. Phil S. Chew 

Mr. William A. Binder 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Bender 
Mr. and Mrs. John Brodhead Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Danforth Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Quintus L. Drennan Jr. 
Lynn Hagee 

Dr. and Mrs. Wm. A. Sims Jr. 
Dr. Loren Blaney 
Mrs. Raymond Werle 
Theodore J. Boehning Sr. 

Bill, Carol and Stacy Boehning 
Bob and Carol Boehning 
Marilyn and Craig Boehning 
Ted and Lois Boehning 
Bob, Linda, Nichole, Erin and 
Brian Buchheit 



Claire and Greg Counts 
Bill Givens 

Gary and Cindy Givens 
Elvira and Joseph Kern 
Elmer and Alice Lindo 
Mark, Deb, Dustin and Kara 

Waldschmidt 
Wayne and Joyce Winter 
Bob, Laura, Zack and Adam Zobrist 
Harry T. Brown 
Phebe L. Lashmet 
James Richard Bryant 
David and Bonnie Butler 
Julie Butler 
Rusty Butler 
Mr. and Mrs. Scott Butler and 

Virginia 
Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Davis 
Billy and Doris Robinson 
Mr. Bobby D. Robinson 
Tom, Steve, Susan Robinson 
The Head Nurse Council 
V.A.M.C. 

Friends and Staff 

Building 50 

Jefferson Barracks 

Mrs. Marilyn 0. Burcke 

Agnew Family 

Kathleen Glass 

Mary K. Reedy 

Mrs. Jill M. Schroer 

Rick, Amy, Dorothy Schuler 

Linda Whitten 

Mrs. Walter X. Busking 

Mr. and Mrs. J. V. Jackson 

Mrs. Janett Y. Callahan 

Mr. Jerry Callahan 

I,ouise Meyerpeter 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Nehmen 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Riley 

Dr.Jo-EUynM. Ryall 

Mrs. Mary Cavatoe 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Deeba 

Mr. R. E. Chambers 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Pharr Brightman 
Joann Clark 
St. Louis University Hospital- 
Emergency Department Physicians 

Mr. Staley Clarke 

Mrs. Howard H.Hubbell 
Paul Cordia Sr. 
Olga Frentrop 
Hugo Schueren 
Mr. Peter Danna 
Ms. Frances B. Kroeger 
Mr. Nicholas DeRienzo 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Blake 
Father of 
Richard Doepper 

Mrs. Elizabeth T Robb 
Mother of 
Margaret Doepper 

Mrs. Elizabeth T. Robb 
Lawrence J. Dorn 

Mr. and Mrs. David Aldrich 

Becvar Family 

Bruno Family 

Mrs. Gertrude Champagne 

Mrs. Mary Frances Clark 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Dobbins 

Mr. William J- Doran 



22. 



Dr. and Mrs. Alfred F. Goessl 

Dolores and Carl Goller 

Harold J. Hellwig Family 

Miss Mary Louise Hoevel 

Mr. Charles R. Jacobi 

Milton and Evelyn Jury 

Jim and Pat Lane 

Mrs. W. L. Mange 

Arthur Mayer 

Arthur Mayer Jr. 

Jane Mayer 

Rev. and Mrs. Howard F. Park III 

Estelle Sargent 

Fred and Virginia Sassmanshausen 

Susan Snelling 

Lisa Teczar 

UMSL-Department of Modern 

Foreign Languages 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry A. Walter 
Weaver Family 
Janice Williams 
Mrs. Balfour Dunn 
Dr. and Mrs. Josey M. Page Jr. 
Mrs. Ruth Durham 
Mrs. James Lee Johnson 

Mrs. Marie Ebner 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald G. Mueller 

Mr. Robert Entzeroth 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen F. Bowenjr. 
Mrs. Mary Ernst 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund A. Luning 

C. Robert and 
Mildred Farwell 

Friends at Andersen Consulting 
Mrs. Al Fehrman 
Mr. and Mrs. George R. Bakker Jr. 
Mrs. Ann Johansen Flynn 

Sally and Pat Braxton 

Mr. David M. Diener 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Human H. Fingert 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Singer 

Dr. Cletus Fresnell 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence T. Wilson 

Mr. Bengt Friberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin R. Breihan 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin L. I^evinson 
Mrs. David Friedland 
Mrs. Jack A. Jacobs 
Dr. W. Dale Frost 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Cornwell 
Mrs. William E. Fuetterer 

Mrs. Herbert K. Moss 

Mrs. Clark Gamble 

Mr. and Mrs. Wylie Todd 

Maurice Gaynor 

Louise Gaynor 

Matt Steffens 

Daniel Glascr 

Mrs. Jane Lending 

Mrs. AlmaGoddel 

Miss Eula M. Hawn 

Ms. Laurie Drosten Goding 

Ms. Frances B. Kroeger 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 

Mrs. Henry Griesedieck 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Hoffman 

Mrs. Elizabeth Hahn 

Ms. Marian Bamholtz 



Wesley Grant Hayman 

Jas Moore 
Fred Rock 
Miss Betty Haynes 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin Jr. 

Mrs. Pat Heaton 

Mrs. Beverly Martin 

Mrs. Sue Hefele 

Shirley Alexander Hefele 
Clarence H. Heitman 

Mrs. Martin A. Beffe 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Boettcher 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Cornwell 
Dr. and Mrs. James L. Donahoe 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Neil Huber 
Dr. and Mrs. John L. Morris 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Hugh Rogers 
Mr. and Mrs. Dale E. Ruthsatz 
The Sentinel Club 

Mr. Carl Helms 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Smith 

Ruth M.Hill 

Ixtretta Muessig 

Safety National Casualty Corporatioi 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Shillingtonjr. 

Dave and Mary Jo Wilson 

Mr. Jeff Holowiak 

Steve, Darlene and Jennifer I^sicko 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Ritchie 

Mrs. Ruth V. Huck 

Mr. and Mrs. H. I vis Johnston 

Dr. Adolph Inruh 

Mr. Fred Rock 

A. Clifford Jones Jr. 

Wesley McAfee Jones 
Janet M. Weakley 

Mr. Fred Kaim 

Jim Hoeferlin 
Lee Kirk 

Mr. Timothy Kempfer 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Deeba 

Mrs. Mickey Kernabeck 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Shurig 
Mr. Harry G. Koerber 

Mrs. John Hallett 

Mr. William T. Kolva 

Mr. Roger A. Bell 
Suzanne Kristanich 

Celia Bouchard 
Cathleen Desroche 

Christine Kristanich 

Celia Kroll 

Personal Performance Consultants, 

Inc. 
Mrs. Lois Stauffer Lake 
Mrs. Rosemary Meacham 
Mr. Edward Lamont 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Strathearn 

Mr. Barry A. Landes 

Mr. Andrew J. Barnajr. 
Mrs. Vlasta Barna 
Robert R. Bousman 
Betty A. Boyd 
Gloria Branson 
Stephen Carmichael 
Beverly Conaway 
Mr. Charles A. Conlee 



I 111 'LLETIN I JANUARY FKKRUARY 1992 



Cranbrook Association 

Deeann Dopp 

Wayne Drees 

Larry E. Dumsey 

Mary Elizabeth Elrod 

Gloria J. Fay 

Dr. Gerald J. Fivian 

Robert W. Follis 

Peggy L. Fritz 

Jack Gilster 

Dr. Menachem Givon 

Mr. Harry Glenn 

Jon J. Goeders 

Mary Ann Griot 

Rodney S. Hartman 

John J. Hartmann 

Gordon I. Herzog 

Jim Hoeferlin 

David A. Hoffmann 

Marietta Huitt 

Mrs. Ken Jones 

Judyjosephson 

Alex N. Katz 

Charles E. Kerr 

Lee Kirk 

OUie A. Kuberski 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Larimore 

Mr. Guy S. Little Jr. 

Mr. John R. Mareing 

Ruth E. Miller 

Mr. Leo F. Mooney 

Mr. Thomas P. Oakley 

Mrs. Marguerite Oberbeck 

Edward Parker 

Charles B. Parrish 

June A. Peppas 

Paul Piinegar 

Judith A. Pilat 

Darryl K. Redhage 

Ann Remmers 

Don J. Riehn 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Ritzheimer 

Ernest R. Rohay 

John Russell 

Roger K. Schmid 

Russell W. Schnepf 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Schnitker 

Jim Shelton 

Frank J. Siano 

Joyce Smith 

Donald Soutiea 

Ms. Erica Suter 

Larry I). Thomas 

Marion Tyner 

Mr. Terry Vaughn 

L. Ann Walburn 

Dorothy M. Wilson 

Renae Youngberg 



Mrs. Lula Browne Law 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Bertelson 
Mrs. William H. Giese Jr. 
Mrs. Alicia P. Withers 
Mrs. Lickhalter 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester L. Cohen 

Mrs. Judy Lister 

Benson, LaMear& McCormack 
Mr. Sherman Logan 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert D. Hoehn 

Mrs. EmmaLudwig 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Hugh Rogers 



Steve Machalow 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hembrow 
Mr. John L. Kopman 
Jeanne R. Vogel 
Mr. Gregory G. Markway 

Mrs. George W. Skinner 

Marjorie W. McCammon 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin C. Gilbert 

Claude McElwee 

Mrs. George Murray 
Mr. Harold McTeer 

Ms. Betty Jane Kramer 
James R. Meador 

Clayton Garden Club #4 

Kent Fullmer Meyer 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Bedell 
Mr. Paul F. Meyer 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Deppe 
Mother of Don Millar 
Charles and Sara Yates 
Mother of Liz Momson 
Mr. and Mrs. Brent Stansen 

Mrs. Robert D. Moses 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Schwab Jr. 
Elvera Mullen 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Atteberry 
Mr. Richard J. Mullen Jr. 
Mr. W. Scott Mullen 

Ralph E. Myers 

Mr. Larry Badler 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. LaMear 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Sauer 

Mrs. Elizabeth Naeger 

BUI and Bette Thies 

Mr. Jim Nordman 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Millar 

Esther Novik 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Ahner 

Mrs. Jane Pettus 

Mrs. James Lee Johnson 

Mr. Charles Pfingsten 

Dr. Ann Johanson 

Mrs. J. Eugene Johanson 

Mrs. Eleanor Pisani 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Pisani 

Mr. C. Robert Pommer 

Mrs. Nancy R. Burke 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Vigus 

Mr. John Ponciroli 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hosea 

Dr. Jacob Reby 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Frankel 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 

Mr. Leroy Renfro 

Mrs. Leroy Renfro 

Mrs. Patricia Rischert 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald P. Luning 

Mr. Allen W. Roberson 

Mrs. Nina Fisher 

Mrs. Frances Roper 

Mr. George R. Durnell 

Alfred Von Rohr Sauer 

Mrs. Elizabeth T. Robb 

Mr. Carl Scheidher 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. LaMear 

Mrs. Emma Schield 

Mrs. Henry L. Freund 

Mrs. Julia Schmidt 

Ms. Helen Goertz 



Leonard Schrewe 

Mr. and Mrs. Keith Neu 

Mr. George Gifford Scott III 

Mrs. Ruth E. Scott 

Dr. Louis R. Sey fried 

Sally Seyfried Hanger 
Ixiuis Seyfried 
Patricia Seyfried 
Scott Seyfried 
Mr. Ben Shapiro 
Robert and Susie Schulte 
Mrs. Celeste Shifrin 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Losos 

Mr. Taylor Simpson 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Hickman 
Mr. James Curris Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Hostetter 

Warren Stover 

Elbert and Edna Chapman 

LB and Anne Chapman 

Mr. Edgar L. Taylor Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Bascom 

Dr. and Mrs. James T Chamness 

Mr. and Mrs. Bertram B. Culver Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 

Mrs. James Lee Johnson 

Mrs. Jane S. Macrae 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Smith 

Mrs. Whitelaw T. Terry 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. White IV 

Mr. Harry Terril 

Steven J. Nissenbaum Family 

Mrs. Harold Thomas 

Mrs. Patricia A. Ohmer 

Mrs. David Tierney 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Lambert 

John Tocco Jr. 

Olga Frentrop 

Hugo Schueran 

Mr. Wallace Tuttle 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Russell 

Mr. William T. Van Cleve 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. Floyd H. Vogel 

Ms. Rose Vogel 

Ms. Jane Campbell Vogler 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fusz Ring 
Mr. Alfred C. Waldemer 

Mr. and Mrs. L. William Dorr 
Mrs. Mahlon B. Wallace Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T Hensley Jr. 

Mrs. James Lee Johnson 

Mrs. George W. Skinner 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Smith 

Mr. Edward J. Walsh 

Mrs. Alexander M. Bakewell 

Mrs. John Macrae 

Edward D. Weakley 

Wesley McAfee Jones 

Janet M. Weakley 

Mrs. Mabel DeHaven White 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rich 

Mrs. Denise P. Wilier 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Schweizer II 

Mr. George Wilson 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Woolsey 

JaneH. Witt 

Lynn K. Silence 

Mr. Kenichi Yamada 

Mr. Ronald G. Vinyard 



Board of Trustees 

Mr. 0. Sage Wightman III 

President 

Rev. Lawrence Biondi, S.J. 

Mr. Stephen F. Brauer 

Mr. William H.T. Bush 

Dr. William H. Danforth 

Mr. Samuel B. Hayes III 

Mr. Robert R. Hermann 

Rt. Rev. William A. Jones, Jr. 

Mr. David W. Kemper 

Mr. Charles F. Knight 

Mr. Charles E. Kopman 

Mr. Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. Richard J. Mahoney 

Mr. William E. Maritz 

Mr. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. Thomas 0. McNearney, Jr. 

Mr. Lucius B. Morse III 

Rev. Earl E. Nance, Jr. 

Dr. Helen E. Nash 

Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mr. William R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

The Hon. Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. Andrew C. Taylor 

Mr. Jack E. Thomas 

Dr. Blanche Touhill 

Mr. John K.Wallace, Jr. 

The Hon. George R. Westfall 

EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mr. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. John H. Biggs 
Mr. Jules D. Campbell 
Mr. Henry Hitchcock 
Mr. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. Louis S. Sachs 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. Tom K. Smith, Jr. 

Mr. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Harriet Spoehrer 

Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Dr. Mildred Mathias 

Prof, Philippe Moral 

DIRECTOR 

Dr. Peter H. Raven 

MEMBERS' BOARD 

Mrs. RudyardK. Rapp 

President 

Mrs. Antonio I. bMigrais 

Mrs. Robert P. Tschudy 

Mrs. Robert Schulte 

Mr. Frederick H. Atwood III 



23. 



BVU.ET1N I JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1992 



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ARSENAL 



Kingshighway Viaduct Closing 

The Kingshighway Viaduct, bridging a span of roadway from immediately 
north of McRee to just south of Manchester, will be closed by the City of 
St. Louis in the spring of 1992. The entire structure will be dismantled and a new 
viaduct will be constructed. City engineers estimate the project will take approx- 
imately two years to complete. Members, volunteers, employees and visitors to 
the Garden will need to find new alternate routes as illustrated in the map above. 
Please save this map for future reference. The City will announce the date of the 
closing of Kingshighway in early 1992. Watch the newspapers and broadcast 
news for information on the specific dates. The Garden regrets any incon- 
venience members and visitors may experience during this period. 




MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN -0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST. LOUIS, MC 



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Botanical 
Garden 



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Inside 
This Issue 



6 



Rescuing the Rain Forest 

KMOV-TV makes a documentary in 
Puerto Rico, a cooperative project of the 
Garden, the St. Louis Science Center 
and the Saint Dtuis Zoo. 

Exhibits Planned for 
Brookings Center 

A National Science Foundation grant 
supports development of exciting educa- 
tional exhibits. 



7 Facing Tough Times 

10 



The Garden deals with budget con- 
straints and cutbacks. 

Profile of Dr. Thomas B. Croat 

The Garden is a world leader in aroid 
research. 



12 
14 

17 

18 
19 



Home Gardening 

Rhododendrons and azaleas are a chal- 
lenge to grow but well worth the effort. 

Calendar of Events 

Spring is a busy season. 

From the Membership Office 

New officers, board members, travel, 
and special thank you's. 

Research Division News 

Grants from the A. W. Mellon Founda- 
tion support graduate studies and 
research activities. 

Horticulture in Missouri 

Gypsy moths are hitchhikers that cause 
destructive environmental pollution. 

TVustee Profile 

Dr. George E. Thoma joins the Board. 



On the cover: Springtime in the 
Japanese Garden. 

Photo by King Schoenfeld 



1992 Missouri Botanical Garden. 

The BULLETIN (ISSN 0026-6507) is published bi-monthly 
by the Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove 
Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110. Second class postage paid al 
St. Louis, MO. 

The Bl II 111 N is sent to everj Member of the Garden 
as one of the benefits of membership. For a contribution of 
.is little as $40 pel year, Members also are entitled to: tree 
admission to the Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special events and receptions; 
announcements ol all lectures and classes; discounts in the 
( iarden Gate Shop and tor course fees; and the opportunity 
to travel, domestic and abroad, with other Members. For 
information, please call CUD 577-5100. 

Postmastei ; send address changes to BULLETIN, Susan 
Came, editor, P.O. Box 299, St.Luns, MO 63166. 



Comment 



Spring Events 



® 



printed mi recycled pupo 



PRINTED WITH 

SOY INK 







The extremely 

mild winter season 
has not lessened our 
anticipation of spring 
and the beautiful gar- 
den displays that 
never cease to delight 
us. In addition to the 
always colorful garden 
displays, many exciting events and projects 
have been planned throughout spring that 
warrant your participation and awareness. 
With a great deal of enthusiasm, 1 want 
to call your attention once again to the 
Smithsonian Institution's traveling exhibit, 
"Tropical Rainforests: A Disappearing 
Treasure", now on display through April 5 
at the St, Louis Science Center. We are 
pleased to have joined with the Science 
Center, the Saint Louis Zoo, and KMOV-TV 
Channel 4 to sponsor this extraordinarily 
meaningful exhibit. I encourage you to take 
advantage of the many companion programs 
at all three institutions planned in conjunc- 
tion with the exhibit. In particular, if you 
have wondered about our collection of plant 
specimens, and how these plants from 
throughout the world are preserved for 
research purposes, meet Garden research 
staff on March 27— Final Friday— in the 



Climatron and Brookings Interpretive Cen- 
ter for an informative demonstration. You 

will be fascinated! 

News of the $500,000 challenge grant 
from the Kresge Foundation for the new 
Conservation Center is most welcome 
indeed! This award is a marvelous boost to 
our efforts and will certainly help us move 
forward in a productive manner. The 
Kresge Foundation has been a substantial 
friend of the Garden through several signifi- 
cant development projects. The Founda- 
tion's investment in this current effort (see 
page 'A), along with the commitment and 
support by our members, will make it possi- 
ble to complete the Conservation Center 
within the next 12 to 18 months. 

Please join us for activities planned over 
the next few months. The popular "Gar- 
dening by Design" lecture series each 
Tuesday throughout March, the Members' 
Preview of the Spring Flower Show on 
March 6, the April Members' Day at Shaw 
Arboretum, informal spring wildflower 
walks during April and May at the Arbore- 
tum, are just a few of the many reasons to 
turn your attention to spring at the (iarden. 



). 



/, 



jtj^ 




Dr. Alwyn H. Gentry (left) was honored at a Garden stuff meeting on January 29, 1992 for 
twenty years of service at the Garden. He is congratulated here by Dr. Marshall K. Crosby, 
assistant director, who presented Gentry with a framed print by artist Margaret Mee. 







' !&:. 



; 



ANEW Conservation Center at the Missouri Botanical Garden is closer to realiza- 
tion thanks to a $500,000 challenge grant made by The Kresge Foundation of 
Troy, Michigan. 

The new 11,300 square-foot Center, resulting from the renovation and expansion of a 
small existing structure, will house the Garden's horticulture division and the national 
headquarters of the Center for Plant Conservation (CPC), the United States' first and 
largest organization devoted exclusively to the preservation of endangered native plant 
species, which relocated at the Garden in early 1991. In addition, the Conservation Center 
will provide facilities for community groups dedicated to gardening and environmental 
management, such as St. Louis Gateway to Gardening. Plans call for construction to begin 
this spring and conclude within a year. 

The Kresge Foundation's award, designated for construction, is part of a larger two- 
year, $3.38 million drive triggered by the CPC's move to the Garden. Under the terms of 
the Kresge grant, by June 1993 the Garden must still raise an additional $1 million for the 
building project and $575,000 in CPC operating and endowment funding. 

"We deeply appreciate this generous grant to help us provide superior space for staff 
and colleagues working in plant science and environmental conservation," said Dr. Peter 
H. Raven, director of the Missouri Botanical Garden. "The Kresge Foundation has issued 
a very important vote of confidence in our ability to succeed, which will be instrumental as 
we work with our Members and donors during the challenge period." 

"Fund raising is moving ahead on both fronts, but we still require significant support 
for the construction effort," added Marcia Kerz, the Garden's director of development. 
"We urgently need to reach our goals by the June 1993 deadline in order to receive the 
$500,000 award. 

"In the past fifteen years, Garden Members and St. I>ouis community residents have 
played key roles in three other successful Kresge Foundation challenges: for the 
construction of the Ridgway Center, the renovation of the John S. Lehmann Building, and 
the recent renovation of the Climatron. We very much hope we can count on their positive 
response to this need as well. We have set a Members' participation goal of $139,000 and 
will be sending a letter in March that explains the project and asks for their support." 

The Kresge Foundation is an independent, private foundation created in 1924 by the 
personal gifts of Sebastian S. Kresge. It is not affiliated with any corporation or organiza- 
tion. Since the Foundation's creation, more than $800 million have been distributed to 
thousands of deserving organizations to assist them in raising funds for projects involving 
facilities construction, renovation, or the purchase of major capital equipment or real 
estate. 



Kresge Foundation 
Awards $500,000 
Challenge Grant 
for New 
Conservation 
Center 



MISSOURI BOTAWCAt 

MAY 6 1992 

GARDEN LIBRARY 



Above: An artist 's rendering of the proposed 
building to be constructed west of the 
Ridgway Center. 

3. 

BULLETIN I MARCH APRIL 1992 ■■■ 





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Above: \ irgin ruin 
forest in the 
Caribbean National 

Forest, Puerto 
Rico. Right: 
Charlotte Taylor 
prepares a plant 
specimen. 



By Charlotte Taylor, Ph.D. 



Rescuing the Rain Forest 

The St. Louis Connection 



IN the dark undergrowth of the Caribbean rain forest, only a 
rustle of leaves betrayed the presence of Larry Conners, 
KMOV-TV news anchorman. Executive producer Al Frank and 
videographer Tom Newcomb peered through the lush vegetation 
trying to spot him. 

"Arc you okay?" Al Frank called. 

"Just fine, although there's a big black snake by my foot," Larry 
replied. "But he doesn't seem to be going to bother me, so let's go 
ahead with the filming." 

The KMOV-TV Channel 4 team was on location in the tropical 
rain forest of Puerto Rico for the preparation of an hourlong 
documentary "Rescuing the Rainforest: The St. L>uis Connec- 
tion,' ' which will air in prime time during late February or early 
March. This documentary is a cooperative project among Channel 4, 
the Garden, the Saint Louis Zoo, and the St. Louis Science Center. 
It will be broadcast to complement the Smithsonian Institution's 
travelling exhibit "Tropical Rainforests: A Disappearing Treasure" 
on view at the Science Center through April 5. The television 
program highlights the activities of local St. Louis institutions in 
tropical conservation. 

And the activities of our local institutions are significant. 
St. Louis is a nationally recognized center for scientific research and 
education, including tropical biology and conservation. The Garden 
is one of the world's most active institutions in tropical botanical 
research. The Saint U)uis Zoo is an important center for captive 
breeding of endangered tropical animals. Both institutions 
collaborate closely with programs of graduate study at Washington 
University, Saint Louis University, and the University of Missouri- 
St. Louis (UMSL), including the new graduate program in Tropical 
4. 

^mm BULLETIN MARCH APRIL 1992 



Conservation Biology at UMSL. And the St. D>uis Science Cente 
is a unique facility for education of both the general public and sch< 
classes in issues related to science, including the importance and 
plight of tropical rain forests. 

Although tropical rain forests cover only seven percent of the 
Earth's surface, they contain more than half of the world's plant ai 
animal species and are disproportionately important in moderating 
the world's climate and atmosphere. Under current human pressi 
the rain forests are being destroyed rapidly, with an area the size < 
Illinois eliminated every year. This will result in their virtual disap- 
pearance—along with their plants and animals— by the year 2050. 

The KMOV-TV team was accompanied to Puerto Rico by 
Dr. Jim Miller and Dr. Charlotte Taylor of the Garden, and Zoo 
Deputy Director Roger Birkel. Jim Miller coordinates the Garden' 
natural products research programs, and has made two previous 
trips to the island collecting for the Garden's collaborative progran 
with the Monsanto Company, searching for new plant derived met 
cines. Charlotte Taylor was a professor of botany at the University 
of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras before coming to the Garden. During t 
four days of taping, the team visited the Caribbean National 
Forest— the only tropical rain forest in the National Forest system, 
and an international center for research and conservation and 
several of Puerto Rico's Commonwealth Forest Reserves. 

Tropical forests provide the world, including St. Louisans, with 
many important products. "About 25 percent of currently markete 
pharmaceuticals are derived from plants,' ' Jim Miller says, ' 'and in 
developing countries— mostly tropical— reliance on plants is much 
greater. Ninety percent of Africans depend only on the forest for 
their health care. And while people may realize that the plants and 




rials are threatened, they seldom think of the tropical soils: when 
forest is eut, the nutrient-poor soils become hardened and 
rile, and unable to sustain the growth of plants or micro- 
anisms. In addition to the importance of plants as food and 
rmaceuticals, about 9,000 medicines currently marketed in the 
. are derived from micro-organisms." 

Tropical rain forests moderate the world's climate, both temper- 
re and atmosphere; when they are destroyed, the vegetation that 
laces them is much less effective. And, in addition to medicines, 
Dical forests provide us with timber and many of our daily foods, 
h as coffee, tea, sugar, and citrus fruits. As the rain forests disap- 
r, potential new foods and medicines disappear with it. 
KMOV-TV's documentary will focus on the nature and impor- 
ce of rain forests, and on what steps St. Louisans can take to 
are the preservation and continued existence of the tropical rain 
>sts. Teacher's Guides for school study programs to accompany 
Smithsonian exhibit and the documentary will be available 
mgh the education departments of all three collaborating institu- 
te. Interested educators may call 577-5140 for more information, 
the rain forests continue to be destroyed at an alarming rate, we 
leed to act so that their beauty, marvels, and economic potential 
be enjoyed by future generations. 



Left; A view at the edge of Torn Negro Commonwealth 
Forest Reserve, showing private land cleared from the 
rain forest for pasture. 





Above: Occasional 
residential dwellings 
appear in forested areas. 
lA:ft: Rio Turabo, one of 
many mountain rivers 
in the region. 



iven Receives Honorary Degree from Argentina 




Dr. Raul Matera, 
Secretary of Sci- 
ence of Argentina 
(left), with Dr. 
Peter H. Raven. 



During a visit to Argentina December 
.-11, 1991, the Garden's director, Dr. Peter 
I. Raven, received a Doctor Honoris 
"ausa degree from the Universidad 
■Jacional de La Plata. The University pre- 



sents the degree to outstanding individuals 
in the fields of science, culture or educa- 
tion. Former recipients include Abdus 
Salam and Carlo Rubbia, past winners of the 
Nobel Prize in Physics, and the well known 



North American paleontologist George G. 
Simpson. 

The Universidad Nacional de La Plata 
was founded at the beginning of this century 
and has the greatest concentration of scien- 
tists in Argentina. Dr. Angel Plastino, presi- 
dent of the University, presented the 
honorary degree to Raven at a public 
ceremony where Raven delivered an 
address titled "Biological Extinctions: A 
Global Crisis." 

During his visit to Argentina Dr. Raven 
was made corresponding member of the 
Academia Nacional de Ciencias Exactas, 
Ffsicas y Naturales in a ceremony at the 
Institute Darwinion, one of the leading 
botanical institutions in Latin America. 
Raven also met with Dr. Raul Matera, 
Argentina's Secretary of Science, to discuss 
topics of mutual interest and to sign a 
cooperative agreement between the 
Garden and Argentina, a major new under- 
taking. Watch upcoming issues of the 
Bulletin for more on this project. 



5. 



BULLETIN MARCH APRIL 1992 




Abo\ e: Explore the 
rain forest from for- 
est floor to the top 
of the canopy with 
lighted murals, 
models of plants 
and animals, sights 
and sounds. 
Right: Investigate 
ways that plants 
and animals inter- 
act in a living 
display of ants and 
acacia plants. 



Exhibits Planned for Brookings Center 



THE National Science Foundation has awarded the Garden a grant c 
$731,000 for preparation of educational exhibits in the Brooking 
Interpretive Center on the Tropics in the Climatron complex 
Already underway, the new exhibits will be installed by the spring of 1994. 

' 'There has never been an exhibit like this at a botanical garden before,' 
said Dr. John MacDougal, manager of the Climatron. "We are designing i 
to help people understand the interrelationships of plants and the naturc 
world. Visitors will learn more about rain forests and plants that they see i 
the Climatron, plus desert and temperate habitats, and how they all relat 
to the natural sciences." 

The exhibits are being developed by MacDougal and Dr. Larry DeBuhi 
director of education at the Garden, in consultation with Krent/Paffet 
Associates of Boston. Dr. Lucile McCook, the Garden's horticultural tax 
onomist, was involved in the preliminary planning and will assist with thi 
design and final evaluations of the exhibit. Members of the Garden' 
research division are also collaborating on the project. 

The Brookings Center, which links the Climatron to the Shoenberj 
Temperate House, was constructed through the support of relatives of tin 
late Robert Somers Brookings, the prominent 19th century St. Loui 
businessman and philanthropist. In recognition of this critical funding, eacl 
of the Center's seven principal exhibit areas will be dedicated to a famil; 
group. 

Visitors entering the Interpretive Center will be greeted by the existinj 
diorama display of tropical forest destruction. As visitors walk clockwis< 
into the Center they will enter a magical world that moves from one nature 
habitat to another. 

A desert biome, or biological area, will be followed by a tropical rain for 
est biome featuring exhibits and panels that transport the visitor into th< 
different layers of the rain forest understory and canopy. Water column: 
compare rainfall in tropical and temperate areas, and a colony of living ant: 




I BULLETIN I MARCH AI'KII. 1992 



EXHIBITS continued 

and acacias illustrates the interactions of 
plants and animals in the forest. 

A large area will be devoted to global 
ecosystems, demonstrating the roles 
played by climate and geographical factors. 
Seasons, ozone depletion, global warming, 
acid rain and the greenhouse effect all will 
be presented. Global weather patterns will 
appear on "This Hour's View," a big 
screen satellite down-link that shows cloud 
patterns live from around the world. 
Exhibits on temperate biomes will highlight 
biodiversity and the differences and similar- 
ities between temperate forests and the 
tropics. Trees will be featured as ' 'oxygen 
machines and water pumps," and the 
unique features of tropical forest soils will 
be explained. 

An exciting feature of these exhibits will 
be live demonstrations and educational 
activities. Education staff will be able to 
make science come alive for children and 
adults with interactive demonstrations and 
equipment mounted on three portable 
carts, made possible in part by a generous 
grant from the McDonnell Douglas Founda- 
tion. This project will be featured in an 
upcoming issue of the Bulletin. 

"The Tropical Rain Forest at Risk" 
exhibit area explains the causes and conse- 
quences of deforestation, featuring a "Rain 
Forest Countdown." A "Botanist's 
Tableau" will portray the history of rain for- 
est study and plant exploration and the roles 
of researchers in today's environmental cri- 
sis. Students will see what botanists actu- 
ally do, and investigate career opportunities 
in science. 

Perhaps the most important section of 
the exhibit is titled "What You Can Do." 
Interactive displays show the impact of each 
individual's personal actions on the local 
environment and how small steps can help. 
The emphasis of these exhibits is on posi- 
tive solutions: sustainable use of resources, 
successful conservation programs, and 
changing attitudes. 

The Brookings Center exhibits are 
being carefully designed in modules to make 
them easy to update. "Every year we plan 
that at least 10 percent of the exhibit will be 
fresh and new," said MacDougal. "There 
will always be something different to see 
and learn." 

Dr. Peter H. Raven, director of the Gar- 
den, said, "We are very enthusiastic about 
enlarging the educational opportunities for 
all visitors to the Garden. We are very 
grateful to the National Science Foundation 
and we look forward to opening this facility 
in 1994." 



Facing Tough Times 

The financial climate during the past year has been difficult for almost everyone locally 
and nationally. As we enter 1992 , we face tighter finances at home and in business. This 
has brought tough choices in every area of our lives: plans have had to be postponed, and 
dreams have not come true as quickly as we hoped. 

As a member of the St. Louis community, the Garden faces the same pressures and 
constraints. Often this is hard to understand and appreciate, for the Garden continues to 
announce regular progress with its programs, and to visitors the grounds continue to look 
impressive and beautiful. Elsewhere in this Bulletin are stories about large grants the 
Garden has received to pursue its projects. 

But the actual financial situation at the Garden is more complex. Large grants from 
major national foundations and government agencies are awarded primarily to support 
specific scientific or educational projects, not general operations. An institution as large as 
the Garden requires constant care, and many of its programs do not receive outside 
support. In 1992 the Garden's director, Dr. Peter H. Raven, faced with the compelling 
challenge of increased interest and use of Garden programs and slower growth in 
general operating funds, mandated a significant decrease in the operating budget of all 
Garden divisions. 

For an institution that already operates as efficiently as possible, this means cutting 
needed programs and services. The effects will be felt by everyone who visits the 
Garden. "We have made a commitment not to cut staff," said Dr. Raven. "The budget 
cuts will not reduce the quality of the 



For our efforts in 
research and education, 
additional support 
is essential. 



Garden's programs, but they will affect the 
quantity and scope of what we can do.' ' 
In education, division director Larry 
DeBuhr agreed that the Garden will not be 
able to offer as many programs, and 
outreach programs will not be able to serve 
as many students. The cutbacks also make 
it completely unrealistic to handle the 
•^ ■■^^^^^^^■^MI^^^^^^^B increased demand from school classes. 
Presently, 50 percent of the education class requests are turned away due to lack of funds 
and space to handle them. It will remain difficult to undertake any special projects. 
Specific additional cutbacks include Science & Technology Week activities, the Parent 
Teacher Organization open house, upkeep on the Suitcase Science kits, and mailing 
requested educational materials to teachers. 

The horticulture division is facing some of the most visible effects of a tight budget. 
Dr. Shannon Smith, director of the division, estimates that the harsh early winter of 
1991-92 damaged many plants, especially roses, and there are no funds to replace them 
this year. There are no funds for emergency tree maintenance, or for employee training. 
The Kemper Center may not be able to mount any displays for several months, and 
the number of adult education courses may be curtailed. Flower shows may be scheduled 
to run fewer days, to save the cost of replacing expensive display plants. 

In research, the situation is always critical. For eveiy large grant received, a dozen 
other projects remain unfunded. The critical nature of the Garden's role in the world 
environmental crisis means that more work is always needed. "We do everything we can 
with the money we can raise, and it's still a drop in the bucket,' ' said Dr. W. Douglas 
Stevens, director of research. "The tropical forests are disappearing faster than we can 
explore and study them, and all of those plants and animals are lost to us forever.' ' 

Marcia Kerz, director of development for the Garden, says, "It is hard to say to our 
members and the people of St. Louis that we need more money— we look very 
successful, and the Garden is successful. But it also is hard to tell people that we can't 
provide everything they are used to getting from us, and the fact is, we cannot. We are 
doing everything we can to ensure the quality of the Garden's programs, but there is not 
enough financial support to cover program needs.' ' 

Kerz continued, ' 'We continue to need the help and support of the members and the 
community. We are truly at a crossroad. To maintain this institution as a world-renowned 
botanical garden and to respond to the serious need for greater efforts in research and 
education, additional support is essential." 



7. 



BULLETIN i MARCH APRIL 1992 



R • 



Dr. Thomas B. Croat, P.A. Schulze 
Curator of Botany 




Tom Croat in the greenhouse with the Araceae collection. 



The Araceae, or Philodendron family, 
is an extremely large, diverse, and 
poorly known group. Some of the 
plants, known as aroids, are very familiar as 
houseplants, including caladium, anthu- 
rium, dieffenbachia, calla lily and philoden- 
dron; the colorful poster in the Garden's 
1992 calendar featured this family. The 
Garden's senior botanist, Dr. Thomas B. 
Croat, who was the major contributor to 
the poster, is one of the world's leading 
experts on Araceae. Thanks to him, the 
Garden has the largest resource in the 
world for the study of Araceae. 

Croat joined the Garden staff in 1967 
after receiving his Ph.D. in botany from the 
University of Kansas. At that time he was 
one of only four botanists at the Garden; 
today the number is closer to 50. From self- 
styled quarters in the unfinished basement 
of Henry Shaw's old townhouse addition, 
now the Administration building, he has 
moved to the modern Lehmann Building, 
along with most of the Garden's research 
staff. While he misses the uninterrupted 
study time of the old days, he is pleased with 
the expansion of the Garden's research 
program. "Without question we have a lot 
more prestige now," he says. 

In 1970 he moved to Panama to work on 
the Flora of Barro Colorado Island. The 
Flora, published by Stanford University 
Press in 1978, was hailed as a model for 
future flora writers. While in Panama he 



helped found the Garden's field station and 
herbarium at Summit Garden, where he 
served as curator. 

Thanks to Torn, the 
Garden has the largest 
resource in the world 
for the study of Araceae. 

It was in Panama that Croat became 
interested in the Araceae family. There 
were no experts on this complex family 
and the information available was very 
confusing. Even after decades of study on 
his part, "it is unquestionably the most 
poorly known family of its size of any plant 
family in the tropics," he says. 

Croat attributes the lack of specialists in 
Araceae to the difficulty in studying the 
plants. They tend to be very large and often 
grow high up in trees, making them more 
difficult to collect and describe. Also, aroids 
are generally succulent and fleshy, which 
makes it difficult to prepare useful 
herbarium specimens, since the plants look 
very different when pressed and dried. To 
deal with the problem, Croat has built a 
huge collection of living aroids that are culti- 
vated in the Garden's research green- 
houses. 



This requires a lot of field work. Croat 
has averaged over two months in the field 
every year for the past 25 years. He 
collects not only dried samples but fresh 
stem cuttings as well. These he transports 
back to the Garden for cultivation and future 
study. The live specimens provide a much 
broader opportunity for scientific research. 
For instance, Croat can study the flowers of 
a live specimen that may not have been in 
flower when it was collected. Croat has 
collected over 72,000 numbers and his 
living collection includes about 6,000 plants, 
the largest aroid collection of its kind in the 
world. 

When doing field work, Croat frequently 
works alone. "I find that working alone in 
the field is much more efficient," he says. 
"There are fewer distractions and fewer 
interruptions." It is this quest for efficiency 
that led him to invent the world's only port- 
able plant dryer. 

When working in Madagascar in 1975, 
he became frustrated with driving back and 
forth to the capital to dry plant specimens. 
With materials available in the capital, he 
rigged up a propane-fueled plant dryer in 
the back of his rented Land Rover. Unfor- 
tunately, his new dryer tended to burn 
plants. 

When he returned to the U.S. Croat built 
a more elaborate and effective fire-proof 
portable plant dryer in the back of his pick- 
up, using parts as diverse as an old refriger- 
ator and a bicycle chain. He has driven it, in 
one form or another, from the U.S. to 
Panama and back several times, collecting 
all the way. 

Croat shared this and other adventures 
of his 30 years of plant collecting with 
Garden members at a curator's talk in 
February. 



Annals Honored for 
Excellence 

Annals of the Missouri Botanical 
Garden, the Garden's leading scientific 
journal, won the Award of Excellence for 
typography in a competition held by the 
National Composition and Prepress Associ- 
ation, a group of the Printing Industries of 
America. The entry was submitted by Allen 
Press, printer of the Annals. Out of fifteen 
national awards, journals produced at Allen 
Press won nine of them. 

"We are very proud and honored to 
receive this award," said Amy Scheuler, 
managing editor of the Annals. 



iBULLETIN I MARCH APRIL 1992 




Master 

composter 

Program Supported by 
Monsanto Fund 

In response to the statewide ban on yard 
waste, effective as of January, 1992, the 
Garden has begun a Master Composters 
program to teach back yard composting and 
yard waste management techniques to St. 
Louis area residents. The program has 
trained an initial group of 51 Master 
Composters, and more training sessions 
are planned. The volunteers will in turn 
teach area residents how to manage yard 
waste, encourage composting, and use 
compost and mulch to enhance their own 
landscapes. 

The program is being supported by the 



Monsanto Fund and is modeled after a 
successful program in Seattle, Washington. 
Master Composters speak, give demon- 
strations to community groups and staff a 
Hotline, (314) 577-9555. Callers may ask 
questions during Hotline hours, 9 a.m. to 
noon, Monday through Friday, or else leave 
a message and their calls will be returned. 
In addition, the Kemper Center for Home 
Gardening has completed a video on com- 
posting, available for a $25 donation to the 
Master Composter Program. Three 
demonstration sites in the county are 
planned, as well. 

Yard waste is second only to paper as a 
component of solid waste in landfills. 
Fortunately leaves, grass clippings and 
wood can find ready use in gardens, parks, 
or along public roads. "Composting is actu- 
ally easier than bagging yard waste for pick 
up," said Steve Cline, manager of the 
Kemper Center. "It's a great way to begin 
the recycling habit, which will be of 
increasing importance as future laws 
become even more restrictive." 

More information on the Monsanto 
Fund's participation in the Kemper Center 
for Home Gardening will be featured in a 
future issue of the Bulletin. 



HEW! 

Master Composter 

HOTLINE 
3141577-9555 

,„noon Monday through 

sage and your call W!U be 

returned. 
TheGardenhasf^be 

Master Composter Progr 
Help the commun,tyjesP in 

the prohibition of yard * 
tendffllsasofJanua^U^ 
This community ed">o"P mon _ 

gramincludess^ on 

tlSy^d Master 
&* volunteers. 
Mate plans to attend the special 

7 e pm Seepage 12 for details. 



Center for Plant Conservation 



Falk Is Co-Editor of Conservation Guide 



Donald A. Falk, director of the CPC, and 
Kent E. Holsinger, assistant professor of 
biology at the University of Connecticut, 
are co-editors of a resource guide for plant 
conservationists: Genetics and Conserva- 
tion of Rare Plants, published by Oxford 
University Press. It is available in the 
Garden Gate Shop. 

"Genetics and Conservation of Rare 
Plants is the first book length treatment of 
the subject of rare plant biology and conser- 
vation," said Dr. Peter H. Raven, director 
of the Garden, who wrote the introduction. 

"The book provides a panorama of 
some of the most important tools that we 
have available for conserving plant species. 
It represents an important achievement for 
the Center for Plant Conservation as well as 
the Missouri Botanical Garden." The book 
summarizes current knowledge of the 
genetics and population biology of rare 
plants and integrates it with practical 
conservation recommendations. It features 
discussions on the distribution and 
significance of genetic variation, manage- 
ment and evaluation of rare plant germ- 
plasm and conservation strategies for 
genetic diversity. Case studies focusing on 



specific problems offer important insights 
for today's challenges in rare plant conser- 
vation. 

The book was the result of a national 
conference held at the Garden in 1990 that 
focused on the biology and conservation of 
rare plants. 

Comic Strips and Songs 

The Center for Plant Conservation has 
announced support from some unusual and 
delightful sources. CPC is one of four 
organizations that will receive proceeds 
from the sale of items from "The Great 
Doonesbury Sellout," a mail-order cata- 
logue featuring merchandise based on char- 
acters from the "Doonesbury" comic strip 
by Garry Trudeau. The products include 
clothing, accessories, toys, books and other 
items. The fact that the controversial 
cartoonist has gone commercial— although 
to benefit four of his favorite causes— has 
received attention from newspapers across 
the country. 

Paul Hawken, CPC trustee and founder 
and CEO of Smith & Hawken Inc. , the mail- 
order catalogue for gardeners, assisted 



Trudeau in developing the Doonesbury 
material. Smith & Hawken is committed to 
selling only environmentally sound products 
in their catalogues. The company is a 
pioneer in supporting environmental 
groups. In a two page spread in its fall 1990 
edition of Bulb Book, Smith & Hawken 
featured the Center for Plant Conservation 
and the plight of endangered plants. 

CPC also will receive proceeds from the 
sale of "In the Garden," an instrumental 
recording by national artists Eric Tingstad 
and Nancy Rumbel, available on compact 
disc and audio-cassette. 

The artists, who call themselves 
"environmental troubadours," have played 
at national environmental conferences, 
including the 75th anniversary of the Inter- 
national Symposium of the National Park 
Service and the National Audubon Society, 
and have performed a series of interpretive 
shows at Yosemite National Park. Their 
recordings are heard on National Public 
Radio. 

The foreword for "In the Garden" was 
written jointly by Paul Hawken and Don 
Falk. Call the CPC at (314) 577-9450, for 
more information about the Doonesbury 
catalogue or "In the Garden." 



BULLETIN I MARCH APRIL 1992 



Azaleas and rhododendrons 
belong to an old group of plants 
in the family Ericaceae. Fossil 
records show that rhododen- 
drons have been around for at 
least 50 million years and have 
changed very little. Today we 
recognize about 1,000 combined 
terrestrial and epiphytic species. 
These vary from tiny matlike 
plants to large trees growing 
over 60 feet tall. 

Taxonomically, all azaleas and 
rhododendrons are classified as 
belonging to the genus 
Rhododendron, a point of confu- 
sion for many people. The name 
' 'azalea' ' is commonly used to 
distinguish deciduous plants, 
which lose their leaves at the 
end of the season and have 
funnel-shaped flowers with five 
stamens. Rhododendrons, on 
the other hand, are considered 
to be larger, evergreen, shrub- 
type plants with bell-shaped 
flowers and ten or more 
stamens. There are exceptions 
to these rules. Many garden 
azaleas retain their leaves all 
year long, depending upon 
where the plant is located and 
the climate conditions. 

Growing rhododendrons is 
fairly easy if you choose hardy 
varieties and follow a few simple 
rules. Rhododendrons are 
mostly woodland and alpine 
plants and do best in humid, cool 
conditions. They require acid 
soils and protection from cold 
and wind. Azaleas tolerate more 
exposure to the sun and drier 
conditions than rhododendrons 
and are easier to grow for the 
average gardener. 

LOCATION 

The Missouri climate is not 
ideal for growing rhododendrons 
and azaleas because of the hot 
summers and potentially cold 
winters. Special consideration 
should be given to location. The 
plants do best in protected areas 
away from prevailing southwest 
winds and direct afternoon sun. 
The best site would be on the 
east or north side of the home 
where morning sun is good and 
the hot afternoon sun is 
screened out. Contrary to 
common wisdom, rhododen- 
drons and azaleas do not fair well 



Home Gardening 




Rhododendrons and Azaleas 



in shade; filtered sunlight is 
best. 

A WELL-DRAINED SITE 

A sloping site is ideal 
because good drainage is critical 
for these plants. Also, most soils 
in our landscapes are too heavy 
and full of clay. Root systems of 
azaleas and rhododendrons 
cannot penetrate heavy soils and 
are fairly sensitive to changes in 
temperature and soil moisture. If 
water in your planting bed does 
not drain out readily, enlarge the 
planting hole to twice the size of 
the root ball or consider a raised 
bed. Fill beds with well drained, 
amended soil. 

CORRECT FOR ACIDITY 

Rhododendrons and azaleas 
are acid-loving plants, meaning 
that the soil needs to be slightly 
acidic to optimize growing condi- 
tions. Submit at least two cups 
of soil from the planting site to a 
soil testing laboratory before 
planting. The Kemper Center 
for Home Gardening will 
process your samples at minimal 
cost and make recommendations 
for amendments. 

Every two to three years a 
soil test should be repeated to 
check that the soil acidity 
remains in the desirable range of 
5.0 to 5.5. After the initial prepa- 
ration of the bed, additional 
applications of sulfur or iron 
sulfate may be necessary but 
amounts should be carefully 
monitored. Over-application of 
sulfur may lead to burning of the 
leaves. Apply only about one- 
half pound of sulfur per 100 
square feet at any one time to 
avoid burning. Wait six weeks 
before applying more if required. 

PREPARING THE SOIL 

The planting hole should be 
dug out several weeks in 



advance of purchasing the 
plants. This will give some time 
for the soil to be prepared, 
amended and allow for some 
settling of the mixed soil. 
Rhododendrons and azaleas will 
thrive in soils heavily amended 
with organic matter including 
compost and peat moss. In 
heavy clay soils, spend extra 
time to mix plenty of organic 
matter with the native soil. 
Avoid using compost which has 
not broken down to a dark- 
colored, medium-graded mate- 
rial. Mixing the soil with coarse 
leaf mold will only mean that the 
soil mix and plant will settle into 
the hole as the leaf mold breaks 
down. 

The soil mix should consist 
of about 50 percent organic 
matter, 25 percent native soil, 
and 25 percent sand or 
expanded clay. The latter ingre- 
dients will promote better soil 
drainage. When mixing, add 
sulfur to lower the pH according 
to the soil test results. 

PLANTING 

Rhododendrons and azaleas 
are typically purchased as either 
container or balled-and- 
burlapped plants. For container 
plants, tap the soil ball out of the 
container and gently tease the 
soil ball apart, exposing some of 
the roots. Do not completely 
disrupt the soil ball and avoid 
pulling the roots out. Balled-and- 
burlapped root balls can be 
planted intact. However, remove 
any twine used to hold the ball 
together and tied to the main 
stem. 

There are two different 
methods of planting: in-ground 
and raised beds. But before you 
begin to dig the hole, plan to 
space the plants about three to 



10. 



four feet apart. This will allow 
room for growth over time and 
some space to get in and around 
the plants for maintenance. 

IN-GROUND 

The diameter of the planting 
hole should be dug to about one 
foot larger than the diameter of 
the soil ball. The wider the hole, 
the better chances of success. 
This is because these plants are 
shallow rooted and develop a 
root system that grows laterally 
instead of deep. The depth of 
the planting hole should be no 
deeper than necessary to posi- 
tion the plant so that the soil ball 
is about two inches higher than 
the surrounding soil to allow for 
settling. The only time you may 
need to dig the hole deeper is if 
there is poor sub-surface drain- 
age, especially on a flat site 
where water can collect. 
Loosening the soil in the bottom 
of the hole should correct this. 

RAISED BEDS 

Because planting in heavy 
clay soil can be a real problem 
for growing rhododendrons and 
azaleas and considerable effort 
will go into improving these 
soils, planting on top of the soil 
surface in a raised bed is a good 
alternative method. To make a 
raised bed, simply position the 
root ball on top of the native soil 
surface and fill in around the 
plants with a soil mix as 
described above. Over time, the 
soil will settle so additional 
materials should be applied 
keeping close watch that the 
root system does not become 
exposed. 

Until the plants have formed 
a good root system extending 
into the amended soil, they will 
be unstable and might shift. In 
areas where wind or foot traffic 
is a problem, plan to stake the 
plants. Do not put a raised bed in 
a low area where water collects. 

MULCHING 

Keeping the root ball high in 
the planting site means that 
plenty of mulch should be used 
to cover the root system above 
the soil surface, especially 
following planting. To do this, 
mulch around the plant with 
about four to six inches of leaf 



I BULLETIN I MARCH APRIL 1992 



mold. Oak, maple leaves and 
pine needles are acidic materials 
which will help keep the soil acid 
if used before they are 
completely decomposed. Other- 
wise, just use half composted 
leaf mold and half wood chips of 
any source. Maintain this mulch 
throughout the year to protect 
the crown against freezing and 
thawing. 

WATERING 

Overwatering is the leading 
cause of difficulties for 
rhododendrons and azaleas. 
Since they are shallow-rooted, 
they require a steady supply of 
water. Follow a regular watering 
schedule of one inch per week 
through the summer. For well- 
drained beds, this should be 
sufficient. 

Frequently, gardeners 
complain of leaves dropping and 
wilting in spite of apparently 
adequate water supply. In poorly 
drained sites, when the root 
system becomes waterlogged, 



leaves will fold up and droop 
downward as if they are dry. 
This promotes the temptation to 
begin watering, which further 
aggravates the problem. Root 
systems sitting in water become 
devoid of oxygen and fail to take 
water up, leading to a water 
deficit. If this condition prevails, 
it can lead to root rot and overall 
decline. The remedy is to start 
with a well drained site and if 
these symptoms occur, dig down 
into the soil to check whether 
excess water has collected as 
evidenced by the heavy smells 
of decaying organic matter. 

For rhododendrons and ever- 
green azaleas, it is best to begin 
withholding water about early- 
October so that plants will start 
to harden off in preparation for 
winter and colder temperatures. 
If the fall has been excessively 
dry, it is helpful to water after 
the first killing frost to make 
sure that some water is available 
for plant uptake. On cold, sunny, 
windy winter days, the root 



system will need to replace 
water evaporating from the 
evergreen leaves to prevent 
scorch. Fall watering can begin 
about mid-November. 

FERTILIZATION 

Rhododendrons and azaleas 
do not require much fertilizer. 
Over-fertilization can be a 
problem, especially if done at 
the wrong times. Water-soluble 
fertilizer should be applied in 
May after flowering. Slow- 
release fertilizers, including 
organic forms, can be applied 
earlier. Plants should not be 
fertilized after June. 

PRUNING 

Generally, rhododendrons 
and azaleas do not need much 
pruning except to correct form, 
maintain good flowering from 
season to season and remove 
diseased portions. Prune only 
after flowering has ceased. 
Deadhead spent blossoms and 
flower stems with a clean hand 
pruner. Do not remove more 



than necessary, or you will affect 
next year's flowers. 

WINTERIZATION 

The most common symptom 
of cold exposure in evergreen 
varieties is rolled up leaves that 
droop downward. This is quite 
normal and should be expected 
during winter. However, sun and 
wind will cause water loss from 
the leaves and stems. The only 
way to prevent this from having 
a real impact upon the plant is to 
protect it with barricades of 
evergreen branches, burlap 
screens, snow fence or other 
materials. 

OTHER INFORMATION 

Overall, rhododendrons and 
azaleas have few pest and 
disease problems. Consult the 
Kemper Center's guide on 
Rhododendrons and Azaleas for 
more information on desirable 
varieties and on all of the topics 
in this article. 

—Steven Cline, Ph.D., 

Manager of the Kemper Center 

for Home Gardening 



Timely Tips from the Answer Service 



Do you have a plant question? Call the 
Horticultural Answer Service, Monday 
through Friday, 9a.m. to noon, at 
577-5143. 

March Tips 

■ Delay planting if the garden soil is too 
wet. When a ball of soil crumbles easily 
after being squeezed together in your hand, 
it is dry enough to be safely worked. 

■ Fertilize the vegetable garden as the soil 
is being prepared for planting. Unless 
directed otherwise by a soil test, one to two 
pounds of 12-12-12 or its equivalent per 100 
square feet is usually sufficient. 

■ To control iris borers, clean up and 
destroy the old foliage in your iris beds 
before new growth begins. 

■ Heavy pruning of trees should be com- 
pleted before growth occurs. Trees should 
not be pruned while the new leaves are 
growing. 

■ Fertilize bulbs with a "bulb booster" 
formulation broadcast over the planting 
beds. Hose off any granules that stick to the 
foliage. 

■ Dormant mail order plants should be 
unwrapped immediately. Keep the roots 



from drying out, store in a cool protected 
spot, and plant as soon as conditions allow. 

■ Trees, shrubs and perennials may be 
planted as soon as they become available at 
local nurseries. 

■ Summer and fall blooming perennials 
should be divided in spring. Apply a bal- 
anced fertilizer such as 6-12-12 to perennial 
beds when new growth appears. 

■ Two handsome houseplants that provide 
fragrant blossoms indoors this month are 
the Confederate jasmine (Trachelospermum 
jasminoides) and Japanese pittosporum 
(Pittosporum tobira). Both thrive in average 
home conditions and are easy plants to 
grow. 

April Tips 

■ Plastic films can be used to pre-heat the 
soil where warm season vegetables are to 
be grown. 

■ April 15 to April 20 are the dates of the 
average last frost for the St. Louis area. 

■ Winter mulches should be removed 
from roses. Complete pruning promptly. 
Remove only dead wood from climbers at 
this time. Cultivate lightly, working in some 
compost or other organic matter. 



■ Groundcovers can be mowed to remove 
winterburn and tidy plants up. Raise 
mowers to their highest settings. Fertilize 
and water to encourage rapid regrowth. 

■ Examine shrubs for winter injury. Prune 
all dead and weakened wood. 

■ When crabapples are in bloom, hardy 
annuals may be transplanted outdoors. 

■ Enjoy but do not disturb the many wild- 
flowers blooming in woodlands throughout 
Missouri. 

■ When buying bedding plants, choose 
compact, bushy plants that have not begun 
to flower. 

■ Break off rims from peat pots when 
transplanting seedlings, otherwise they act 
as a wick to draw moisture away from the 
roots. 

■ Mount a rain gauge on a post near the 
garden to keep track of precipitation so you 
can tell when to water. Most gardens need 
about one inch of rain per week between 
April and September. 

■ Apply crabgrass preventers before April 
15. Do not apply to areas that will be 
seeded. 

—Chip Tynan, The Answer Service 



11. 



BULLETIN I MARCH-APRIL 1992 



March 1 - April 5 
"Tropical Rainforests: 
A Disappearing 
Treasure" 

A traveling exhibit by the Smith- 
sonian Institution is on display at 
the St. Louis Science Center, spon- 
sored jointly by the Garden, the 
Science Center and the Saint Louis 
Zoo, co-sponsored by KMOV-TV 
Channel 4. Call the Hotline for 
special activities and programs at all 
three institutions: (314) 995-2000. 

MEMBERS' 
EVENTS 

March 11 
Members' Day 
Film Series: 
'The Living Planet" 

7 p.m. , Shoenberg Auditorium. 
Learn about environmental issues 
with "The Jungle" and "Our 
Threatened Heritage." Dr. James 
Solomon, head of the MBG herbar- 
ium, will answer questions. Free, 
limited seating. For members only. 

March 18 

Members' Gardening 
Lecture: "Backyard 
Composting" 

7 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. A 
demonstration lecture by Dr. Steve 
Cline, manager of the Kemper Cen- 
ter for Home Gardening. Learn how 
to deal with yard waste so you can 
comply with the new state law 
eliminating yard waste disposal in 
landfills. Free, for members only. 
Limited seating. 

April 4 

Members' Day 
Jonquils and 
Dogwoods Walk 

10 a . m . to 3 p. m . , Shaw Arbore- 
tum. Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy 
a family outing surrounded by the 
early-blooming stars of spring. 
Receive a free tree seedling in 
honor of Arbor Day. Free, for 
members only. 



^57 



Missouri Botanical Garden 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

March-April 1992 



- 



u 



H - 

' $* ■-... !p 



■ 



■ 










Five Tuesdays in March 

"Gardening by Design" Lecture Series 

A popular lecture series by experts in landscape design and horticulture. 
Tickets are available by subscription for the afternoon series at 1 p.m. or 
the evening series at 7 p.m. $20 members, $24 nonmembers. Afternoon 
and evening tickets cannot be mixed in a subscription. Single tickets are 
$5 to members, $6 to non-members, and are available at the door only if 
the series is not sold out. Call 577-5125 for information. 

MARCH 7 - APRIL 5 / Spring Flower Show 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Orthwein Floral Hall. Free with Garden 
admission. See March 6 for members' preview. 



MARCH 



3 



T U E S I) A Y 



Amazon Jungle Expedition 
Preview 

7 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. 
Video and slide presentation. 
Preview next July's trip to the rain 
forests of Peru with MBG education 
staff. See page 16. Free, limited 
seating. 

Gardening by Design Lecture: 
"Environmental Gardening" 

1 and 7 p.m., Shoenberg Audito- 
rium. Laurence Sombke discusses 
home gardening techniques that 
don't harm the environment. 
See highlight. 



6 



FRIDAY 



Members' Preview of 
Spring Flower Show 

5 to 8 p.m., Ridgway Center. Catch 
the first glimpse of springtime! 
Entertainment, fashions by Episode 
of the Galleria, cash bar. The 
Garden Gate Shop will be open. 
Dinner buffet in the Gardenview 
Restaurant. For members only. 



8 



S U NDAY 



2nd Annual Child's Global Village 

Noon to 5 p.m., Ridgway Center. 
What do people in Brazil eat? What 



does an African Pygmy bow 
arrow look like? Come disco 
diverse cultures of the worlc 
educational fair co-sponsore 
Garden and the Greater St. ] 
Returned Peace Corps Volur 
Call 577-5148 or 577-5149 foi 
information. Free with Gardi 
admission. 



10 



T U E S I) A Y 



Gardening by Design Lect 
"The Evening Garden" 

1 and 7 p.m., Shoenberg Au 
rium. Cathy Wilkinson Bara: 
shows you ways to enjoy yoi 
garden after the sun goes dc 
See highlight. 



12-14 



T H URS1 
S A T II R 



All-City Middle School 
Science Fair 

9a.m. to 5 p. m . , Ridgway C 
Students from St. Louis city 
schools, grades 6 to 8, will d 
science projects with the ob 
of promoting self-esteem am 
dence in scientific research. 
Cosponsored by the Garden 
St. L>uis Public Schools, an 
Regional Science and Techrw 
Career Access Center (RCA 
(314) 577-5140 for more infoi 
mation. Free with Garden adi 



17 



TUESDAY 



Gardening by Design Lecti 
"Innovative Uses of Perer 

1 and 7 p.m.. Shoenberg Au< 
rium. Cole Burrell demonstr 
up-to-date suggestions for lu 
combinations of flowers and i 
See highlight. 



24 



T U E S I) A Y 



12. 



Gardening by Design Lecti 
"Strategies in Urban 
Gardening" 

1 and 7 p.m., Shoenberg Auc 
rium. Gardening columnist P 
Hagan is a selftaught "Greer 
Guerrilla" in New York City, 
olfers strategies for coping w 
difficulties of city gardening. 
See highlight. 



Mil'U.ETIS MARCH APRIL 1992 



CH continued 

WEDNESDAY 

e Eating" 

. , Kemper Center. A cooking 
istration by the American 
Association features delicious 
o eat for good health. Free 
arden admission. 

FRIDAY 

Friday: Spotlight on Rain 
t Research 

i. to 2 p.m., Climatron and 
ings Interpretive Center. See 



botanists at work, collecting, 
preparing and preserving plant 
specimens for scientific study. Free 
with Garden admission. 



28 



SATURDAY 



Treasures of the Climatron: 
"Living Rain Forests of Asia" 

10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Climatron and 
Ridgway Center. Discover the 
beauty and diversity of people, 
plants and animals of the Asian rain 
forests. Films, lectures, a puppet 



show, "Grocery Story Botany," 
terrarium workshop, and special 
activities. Free with Garden 
admission. 



31 



TUESDAY 



Gardening by Design Lecture: 
"Garden Design with Foliage" 

1 and 7 p.m. , Shoenberg Audito- 
rium. Judy Glattstein shows you 
how to extend the beauty 
of your garden after blooming 
season with colorful foliage and 
textures. See highlight . 




EDN 



lant Hunters: A Portrait of 
uri Botanical Garden 

to 5 p.m. daily through April 
lgway Center. Exhibit of pho- 
hs by James P. Blair, taken for 
'al Geographic magazine, 
nth Garden admission. 



Arbor Day Celebration 

9 a.m., Ridgway Center. In honor of 
Arbor Day, the first 500 Garden 
visitors will receive a free tree 
seedling, with care instructions, 
courtesy of the Missouri Depart- 
ment of Conservation. 



C I A L EVENT AT SHAW ARBORETUM 




Kemper Center for Home 

Gardening 

Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily- 

Plant Doctor available 10 am. to 

noon and 1 to 3 p.m. Monday 
through Saturday. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 

Tower Grove House 

Tea Room 

Open for luncheon Monday 

through Friday, U:30 a.m to 1 

pm February through Novem- 
ber ' plus special Holiday Lunch- 
eons in December advance 
reservations only. Call 577-51bU. 
Garden Walkers' 

Breakfast 

7 to 10:30 a.m., every Wed- 
nesday and Saturday. Restau- 
rant and grounds open early; 
free admission until noon. Spon 
sored by the American Heart 
Association. Call 577-5125 for 

information 



23-26 



THURSDAY- 
S U N D A Y 



Garden Gate Shop Sale 

9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. , Thursday and 
Friday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday 
and Sunday. Garden Gate Shop and 
Orthwein Floral Hall. Members 
receive 20% discount, all four days. 
See page 20. 



COMING I 



29 



W E D N E S D S A Y 



"I Love Eating" 

11 am., Kemper Center. See March 
25 for details. 



MAY 



THURSDAY 

»cape Photography Lecture 

) p.m. , Shoenberg Audito- 
John Smithers, award-winning 
taker and authority on wild- 
• and landscape photography, 
;ses his work. $18 members, 
m-members. Limited seating; 
ce registration is requested, 
haw Arboretum at 1-742-3512. 



25-26 



S A T U R D A Y - 

S U N D A Y 



Landscape Photography 
Workshop 

Two sessions daily: 6:30 to 10:30 
a.m. at Shaw Arboretum; and 5 to 
7:30 p.m. at the Garden. Join John 
Smithers for a comprehensive 
workshop in wildflower and land- 
scape photography. $175 members, 
$200 non-members, includes lec- 
ture on April 23. Reservation are 
limited, advance registration 
required. Call the Arboretum at 
1-742-3512 for more information. 



APRIL 30, MAY 1-2 

13th Annual Storytelling Festival: 

"Sparks by the River: Dreams and Destiny" 

The Garden will host storytelling sessions open to area schools and the 
public sponsored in conjunction with the University of Missouri- 
St. Louis. Thursday, April 30, and Friday, May 1, festival is open to 
schools by reservation only; Saturday, May 2, festival opens to the pub- 
lic at 2 p.m. Featuring some of the country's best known storytellers 
and popular regional performers. Call for reservations beginning March 
6: 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. , call 553-6161; after 1:30 p.m. call 553-5948. 
Free with Garden admission. 



WALKING WM* „ Sunday 1:00 p.m. 

regular Garden admission. 



BULLETIN MARCH Al'KII. 1992 



13. 



From the Membership Office 



New Officers and Board Members Elected 




The Garden Members ' Hoard appointed new members at the annual meeting January 13, 
1992. Shown left to right: Mania Trulaske, Donna Walker, Joe Curtis, Minnie Perry and 
Jean Richardson. Not pictured: Herbert Jones, Mar} Langenberg, and Anne Tao. 



r M *? 'a 




Also elected at the meeting were 1992 Garden Members ' Board officers. Shown left to right: 
Susie Schulte, first vice president; Mary lA>ngrais, president; lA?slie Dimit, secretary; and 
I'atty Arnold, second vice president. Not pictured: Bill Gilbert, treasurer. 



Garden Clubs Support 
MBG 

Florence Forbes, a member of the 
Garden Members' Board who serves as our 
representative to the state Federated 
Garden Clubs, initiated a program last year 
to encourage the clubs' financial support for 
the Garden. State garden clubs contributed 
over $13,700 to various Garden fundraising 
efforts in 1991. We express our sincere 
gratitude to Florence and to all of the 
garden clubs who so generously responded 
to her appeal. 



A Special Thank You! 

We gratefully acknowledge GE Lighting 
and Mr. Gary Faust, regional manager, for 
their generous donation of tree lights for 
the 1991 Holiday Members' Tree last 
December. We also would like to thank 
Holbrook Travel of Gainesville, Florida, for 
donating a trip to Costa Rica as an atten- 
dance prize for the party, "An Enchanted 
Rain Forest," in January. 




Sue Rapp Is Honored 

Sue Rapp, outgoing Hoard president, 
was honored at the January 13 annual 
Members' Board meeting for two out- 
standing and enthusiastic years of leader- 
ship. She was honored again by the 
Trustees on January 15, and is shown above 
with 0. Sage Wightman III, president of the 
Board of Trustees. 



Flower Festival Is 
April 25 and 26 

In his Will, Henry Shaw, founder of the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, made a special 
bequest to the Bishop of the Missouri 
Diocese for a sermon by a minister of his 
choice to be delivered each year in Christ 
Church Cathedral "on the wisdom and 
goodness of God as shown in the growth of 
flowers, fruits, and other products of the 
vegetable kingdom." Known affectionately 
as the "Flower Sermon," the talk has been 
delivered every year since 18<S9, except 
1950 and 1951. The Garden has provided 
flowers to decorate the Cathedral since 
1937, and today it donates over 1,000 plants. 

"Flower Sunday." as the annual event 
came to be known, turned into a Flower 
Festival weekend in 1974. The festival 
generates funds used to benefit many 
worthy causes. In 1991 the proceeds went 
to The Hunger Fund, administered by the 
Task Force on Hunger and Homelessness 
of the Episcopal Diocese of Missouri. 

This year the Flower Festival will be 
held the weekend of April 25 and 26. On 
Saturday, there will be a service at 11 
a.m., followed by a street fair 12:15 to 3 p.m. 
and concerts in the Cathedral at 1 and 2 
p.m. On Sunday the Flower Sermon will be 
preached at services at 9 and 11 a.m. Call 
231-3454 for more information. 



14. 



\BULl 1-1 i\ MARCH APRIL 1992 



1992 MEMBERS' TRAVEL PROGRAM 

Lewis and Clark Trail 

JUNE 12 to 25, 1992 

Call now to reserve your place on this popular tour retracing 
the rugged route of the Lewis and Clark expedition. Join hosts 
Dr. Ray Breun of the Riverlands Association and botanist Alan 
Brant of the Missouri Botanical Garden on this fascinating 
motorcoach tour. 

Trip Preview Lecture: Tuesday, May 5, 7:30 p.m., 
Shoenberg Auditorium. 



Santa Fe Trail 

JULY 20 TO 29, 1992 

Join hosts Dr. Ray Breun of the Riverlands Association and 
Dr. Marshall Crosby, assistant director of the Garden, as they 
guide you in an intriguing exploration of the American West, rich in 
history, lore and legend! Retrace the steps of the pioneers and 
expand your knowledge of natural history on this motorcoach tour. 

Trip Preview 7 lecture: Thursday, May 7, 7:30 p.m., 
Shoenberg Auditorium. 

For a complete itinerary and information on these 
trips, call the Membership Office at (314) 577-9500. 

THIS SPRING AT SHAW ARBORETUM 




Directors of the Garden, Science Center and Zoo enjoy the party: 
from left, Peter Raven, Dennis Wint and Charles Hoessle, 

An Enchanted Rain Forest 

On January 10, 1992, over 1,000 members of the Garden, 
St. Louis Science Center and Saint Louis Zoo attended a delightful 
preview party at the Science Center featuring the Smithsonian 
exhibit "Tropical Rainforests: A Disappearing Treasure." The 
event was planned and co-sponsored by all three institutions. 
Proceeds from the event will be used to encourage the public to 
visit this exciting exhibit on display at the Science Center through 
April 5, 1992. 

In addition, programs of educational and entertaining activities 
related to the display will be presented at the Garden, Science 
Center and the Zoo throughout the exhibition. Call the special 
Hotline for a schedule of events: (314) 995-2000. 



Spring Wildf lower Walks 

Seven Tuesdays: 

April 7, 14, 21, 28 and May 5, 12, 19 

9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 

Study and enjoy the awakening of the 
wildflowers of the Ozarks. The Arbore- 
tum's excellent trail system winding 
through upland and bottomland forest is the 
ideal place. These informal Tuesday walks 
are led by expert wildflower naturalists. 
Wear comfortable hiking clothes and bring a 
sack lunch. Meet at the Shaw Arboretum 
Visitor Center. No reservations necessary. 
$1 members, $2 non-members. 

Wildflower and Landscape 
and Workshop 

Lecture: 

Thursday, April 23, 1992 

7 p.m. to 10 p.m. 

Shoenberg Auditorium, Ridgway Center 

John Smithers, award-winning film 
maker and authority on wildflower and land- 
scape photography, shows slides and 
discusses his work. Advance registration is 
required and seating is limited. $18 
members, $20 non-members. 



The Loop Road and 
the Wilderness Wagon 

From April 1 through November 4 the 
Trail House Loop Road will be open to 
vehicles from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Wed- 
nesdays and Thursdays. For safety rea- 
sons, visitors are asked to stop and register 
at the Visitor Center. 

The Arboretum will also offer narrated 
tours on the popular Wilderness Wagon, an 
open-sided vehicle that can accommodate 
28 people. The Wagon will run on Sunday 
from April 12 through June 21 and 
September 13 through October 25. 
Depending on the season, visitors may see 

Photography Lecture 

Workshop: 

Saturday & Sunday, April 25-26, 1992 
2 sessions each day: 
6:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Shaw Arboretum 
5 to 7:30 p.m. at Missouri Botanical Garden 
Join John Smithers for a comprehensive 
workshop on wildflower and landscape 
photography. Reservations are required and 
limited. $175 members, $200 non-members 
(fee includes Thursday night lecture). Call 
Shaw Arboretum for information and reser- 
vations at 1-742-3512 or 1-742-0850 (toll 
free from St. Louis). 



thousands of daffodils, delicate wildflowers, 
the tall grass prairie, fall foliage, many 
species of birds and, with luck, deer or wild 
turkey. The Wagon leaves the Visitor 
Center on an hourly schedule and stops at 
the Trail House. Visitors may spend time 
walking the woodland trails and return to 
the Visitor Center on a later trip. 

The Wilderness Wagon may also be 
reserved for tours, Monday through Friday. 
A naturalist will accompany you on the 
three mile drive around the Trail House 
Loop and, if you wish, will lead your group 
on a short walk along one of the trails where 
you may see hundreds of flowers in bloom. 
For more information, please call the 
Arboretum at 1-742-3512 or 1-742-0850. 
Both calls are toll free from St. Louis. 



The St. Louis Flower Show 

The St. Louis Flower Show, sponsored 
by the Junior League of St. Louis, will be 
held this year on April 23-26, 1992, at 
Queeny County Park. The Garden will be 
one of the participants, with an exhibit on 
home gardening to be staffed at certain 
hours by experts who can answer gardening 
questions. The theme of the show this year 
is "English Gardening," inspired by 
London's famous Chelsea Flower Show. 
Proceeds from the event support projects 
sponsored by the Junior League. Call 
997-3407 for program information. 



15. 



BULLETIN, M.AKUI APRIL 1992 



EDUCATION DIVISION NEWS 



Expedition to Amazon Jungle 

It is to be an educational travel experience unlike any other. When the Missouri Botan- 
ical Garden embarks on its second expedition to the remote Amazon rain forests of Peru, 
July 18-25, 1992, participants will learn the vital role the Amazon region plays in global 
ecology. Join us for a free video and slide show preview Tuesday, March 3, 7 to 9 p.m. , in 
the Shoenberg Auditorium, Ridgway Center. 

The Amazon Basin is a place of unequalled species diversity. The group will observe 
some of the 3,000 species of birds, 4,000 species of butterflies, and 2,000 species offish, 
more than man has recorded in the entire Atlantic Ocean. 

The fascinating river and jungle adventure will explore the rich Peruvian section of the 
Amazon river and surrounding river basin. Travelers will stay in secluded river lodges in 
the dense tropical rain forest. 

The trip, to be led by Garden education division staff, is designed to stimulate and 
educate participants about the natural wonders of the Earth, particularly the plants, wild- 
life, and inhabitants of the Amazon. 

Local guides with an extraordinary knowledge of the plants and animals indigenous to 
the Amazon will accompany the Missouri Botanical Garden group along rain forest trails 
and boat journeys on the Amazon River and its tributaries. Expedition participants will 
also have opportunities to interact with natives of the Amazon. These cultural exchanges 
go far towards supporting conservation by kindling among local inhabitants a pride in 
safeguarding the plants and animals that are their natural heritage. 

The group will also venture up into the rain forest canopy on a newly constructed 
canopy walk to observe the remarkable plants and animals which inhabit this area. The 
Garden was instrumental in the construction of the walk. 

Anyone interested in joining the Garden on this expedition of discovery to the Amazon 
should contact Glenn Kopp or Barbara Addelson, Missouri Botanical Garden Education 
Division, (314) 577-5140. 



NEWS FROM THE HENRY SHAW ACADEMY 




Spring Academy Classes 



The Henry Shaw Academy at the Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden offers students ages 
4 to 18 exciting ways to investigate the 
world around them. This unusual program 
is for students who are interested in 
exploring the world of science, ecology and 
natural history. As Academy students, 
participants can select from a variety of 
courses throughout the year as well as a 
Summer Science Camp. These "hands- 
on" experiences offer students opportuni- 
ties to deepen their understanding and 
appreciation of their natural world. 

Ecological discovery and science 
oriented classes this spring will include: 

Pitzman Nature Study Classes 
for ages 4 to 6: 

April 18 and 25, May 16 and 23 
Session A: 10:30 a.m. to 12 noon 
Session B: 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. 

Classes for ages 7 to 9: 

Trees for Life 

April 4, 9 a.m. to 12 noon 
Bonsai for Breakfast 

April 18, 9 a.m. to 12 noon 



Field Class at the Arboretum 

April 11, 10a.m. to 2 p.m. 
Family Class at MBG 

April 25, 9 a.m. to 12 noon 

Field Classes for ages 9 to 12: 

Spring Canoeing and Caving 
May 2, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Tuesday/Thursday Afterschool 
Topics at The College School and 
MBG for ages 9 to 12: 

Creations from the Earth 
April 9, 16, 21, 3:30 to 5 p.m. 

Field Classes for ages 10 to 12: 

Special Program: Micro-Worlds 

May 9, 16, 9 a.m. to 12 noon 
Family Class at the Arboretum 

May 30, 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. 

For more information on Henry Shaw 
Academy, Spring and Summer science/ 
natural history classes call 577-5135 or 
577-5140 for a course brochure or registra- 
tion information. 



Tropical Rain Forest 
Summer Workshop 
for Teachers 



Once again the Garden is offering a 
summer workshop on the nature and value 
of tropical rain forests, the social and 
economic factors contributing to their 
destruction and the methods for their 
preservation. The course will be held at the 
Garden, June 15-26 in ten sessions from 9 
a.m. to noon. 

The course is designed to prepare 
teachers of grades K-12 to teach about 
deforestation in their classrooms and will 
provide them with materials, strategies and 
resources. Two graduate or undergraduate 
credit hours in biology or education from 
the University of Missouri-St. Louis will be 
awarded upon completion. Instructors will 
be Garden staff and area specialists. 

For more information call 577-5140. 



Elderhostel Programs at 
the Garden 

Elderhostel provides adventures in 
learning and travel for adults over 60. 
Cultural centers, colleges, universities and 
conference centers throughout the world 
host weeklong non-credit programs. Each 
week includes field trips and classes 
centered on three courses of study. 
Participants share all levels of formal educa- 
tion and possess an inquiring mind. 
Instructors are enthusiastic, knowledgeable 
communicators. 

This year the Missouri State Elder- 
hostel will offer programs at Camp Wyman, 
an environmental education center in 
Jefferson County offering pleasant retreat- 
style accommodations. The programs will 
feature some classes taught at the Garden 
by Garden staff, including a course in March 
on "Seiwa-en: Symbolism and Philosophy 
in Japanese Gardens.' ' Companion courses 
offered by Camp Wyman will treat environ- 
mental meteorology and nature and travel 
photography. Courses to be offered at the 
Garden in September will include "Historic 
Missouri Landscapes" and "Endanger- 
ment in the Tropics and Our Own 
Backyard." 

Tuition for Elderhostel programs is very 
reasonably priced and includes field trips, 
classes, lodging and meals. Commuters 
may enroll for slightly lower fees. Call (314) 
553-5911 for more information. 



16. 



I Hi l.l.E 1 "IS MARCH AI'RII. 1992 



R E S E ARCH DIVISION NEWS 



Mellon Foundation Supports Research 



The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has 
awarded the Garden two grants to support 
various projects of the research program. 
The first award, $750,000 for three years, 
will support the ongoing development of the 
computer system and botanical database, 
TROPICOS; initiation of a checklist project 
for the flora of Ecuador; and continuing field 
work in Peru. 

Computerization has become an essen- 
tial tool of modern botanical research world- 
wide. The Garden's department of 
Botanical Information Management (BIM), 
under the supervision of Dr. Nancy Morin, 
is working to make data and programs avail- 
able through national and international 
networks. The database system, 
TROPICOS, is being redesigned to take 
advantage of up-to-the-minute technology. 



BIM is working to integrate computers at 
the Garden, linking the library catalog, 
research databases, the Garden's living 
plant inventory, and the Center for Plant 
Conservation. The Garden also will be able 
to increase its collaborative efforts with 
other institutions, working together to 
design computer systems that will be useful 
to all. In addition, BIM will begin to add 
Geographical Information System tech- 
nology and imaging to its capabilities, 
allowing sophisticated analysis of plant 
distributions, a powerful tool for 
researchers and conservationists. 

Under a previous grant from the Mellon 
Foundation, the Garden has been active in 
Peru since 1989. Under the coordination of 
Dr. Alwyn Gentry and Dr. John Pipoly, six 
Peruvian botanists gathered over 100,000 



plant specimens. Aided by technicians in 
St. Louis, a checklist of Peruvian plants is 
well underway. The current grant, under 
the supervision of John Pipoly, will allow the 
work to continue, concentrating on areas of 
special importance. 

The checklist of Peru serves as a model 
for a checklist of the flowering plants of 
Ecuador, to be prepared under the super- 
vision of BIM in collaboration with the 
University of Aarhus, Denmark, and insti- 
tutions in Ecuador. The Garden has been 
active in Ecuador for several years; the 
flora is even richer than Peru, and not so 
well documented. There is considerable 
overlap in the plants of the two countries, 
and data from the Peru checklist will 
contribute significantly to the Ecuador 
project. 



Graduate Program Expanded 

A grant of $600,000 from The Andrew 
W. Mellon Foundation will permit the 
expansion of the graduate program at the 
Garden. The Garden currently trains fifteen 
Ph.D. students in systematic botany in 
conjunction with Washington University, 
St. Louis University, University of Mis- 
souri-St. Louis, and Southern Illinois 
University, Edwardsville. The new grant 
will provide funding for six additional 
students for the six-year program with 
Washington University. 

"The Garden has been training 
botanists for more than one hundred 
years," said Dr. Mick Richardson, head of 
the graduate study department. 'As natural 
habitats around the world are destroyed at 
an ever increasing rate, the need for 
botanists becomes ever more urgent. 
Besides the loss of potential food and 
medicinal plants, the extinction of species 
before we can catalogue and study them 
makes it increasingly difficult to understand 
the evolution of life on earth." 

Today fewer and fewer universities 
maintain the herbarium and taxonomic 
library essential for training taxonomists. 
Students in the Garden's program benefit 
from a well rounded program of both theo- 
retical and practical training in all aspects of 
plant systematics, including herbarium 
work, molecular studies, cladistics, and 
morphology, plus cytology, nomenclature, 
library studies, scientific publication, and 
field studies. The faculty at Washington 
University, together with Garden re- 
searchers, many of whom serve as adjunct 
professors at the University, provide unsur- 
passed supervision. 



The first students under the grant will 
begin their studies in July, with an annual 
stipend of $13,600, plus tuition. 

"We are very honored to receive this 
magnificent support from the Mellon Foun- 



dation," said Dr. Peter H. Raven, director. 
"The grants mean we can continue and 
expand our research programs at a time 
when they are urgently needed, and we are 
deeply grateful." 




Dr. Peter H. Raven is greeted by His Holiness John Paul 11, who granted an audience to 
participants in the St. Francis Prize and endorsed their goals of ethical use of global 
environmental resources. 

Raven Participates In International St. Francis Prize 



The second annual International 
St. Francis Prize for the Environment was 
presented October 26, 1991, at the Basilica 
of St. Francis in Assisi, Italy. Dr. Peter H. 
Raven served on the panel of 12 jurors 
making the awards, which are promoted by 
the Franciscan Center of Environmental 
Studies and the Sacred Convent of 
St. Francis in Assisi, and sponsored by the 
government of Italy. A 1987 papal proclama- 
tion named St. Francis the patron saint of 
ecologists. 

The "Canticle of All Creatures" prize 



is awarded to persons or institutions that 
have distinguished themselves at the 
highest international level to the 
harmonious relations of human beings 
within their environment. The 1991 awards 
were presented to Professor Salvatore 
Furia, Dr. Thomas Francis Malone, and 
the Republic of Costa Rica. 

The awards ceremony was part of an 
international seminar held in Assisi October 
23-25. Participants discussed ethical and 
moral concerns relating to environmental 
issues. 



17. 



BULLETIN MARCH APRIL 1992 



Horticulture in Missouri 



Gypsy Moths: Biological Pollution 



Don't pick up hitchhikers! The sage 
advice of your mother is particularly true 
when it comes to gypsy moths. This little 
moth was brought to the United States from 
France in the 1860s for use in silkworm 
breeding projects. Some moths escaped 
near Boston in 1869, began feasting on the 
leaves of trees, and soon their offspring 
were hitching rides farther and farther from 
Boston. The fact that they have established 
populations in more than fourteen states 
and Canada is particularly interesting, espe- 
cially since the gypsy moth is unable to 
travel far on its own. Although the cater- 
pillars can move for short distances, adult 
female moths have wings but cannot fly. 
Truly, gypsy moths have hitchhiked, in that 
their eggs have been inadvertently carried 
by humans. Unfortunately, a few have 
arrived in Missouri. 

The gypsy moth provides an interesting 
natural history story about the ability of a 
species to colonize an area. However, this 
insect is also an example of biological 
pollution, and illustrates the immense 
damage that an introduced species can 
cause on a landscape. In their native 
habitat, population growth of the gypsy 
moth is curtailed by naturally occurring 
predators, parasites, and diseases. Intro- 
duced onto this continent and lacking 
checks on population growth, large 
numbers of gypsy moths can completely 
defoliate trees and are now a major pest of 
hardwood forests; over 13 million acres of 
forested land was defoliated in the United 
States in 1981 alone. It is estimated that 
federal and state agencies spent over $20 
million in 1990 in attempts to suppress 
gypsy moth outbreaks. 

By understanding the several stages in 
the life cycle of the gypsy moth, we can take 
steps to prevent their further spread. 
Through winter and into spring, the moths 
exist as eggs in a hairy, brown or tan egg 
mass that is one to one and a half inches 
long and can contain up to 1,000 eggs. When 
trees leaf out in the spring, the eggs hatch 
into their larval, or caterpillar, stage. The 
caterpillar climbs the nearest tree and 
eats . . . and eats . . . and eats. The hairy, 1 l h 
to 2 x k inch long caterpillar is easily identi- 
fied by the eleven pairs of spots running 
along its back; the five pairs of spots 
nearest its head are blue, while the rear six 
pairs are brick red. Use a stick when 
examining caterpillars since many, including 
that of the gypsy moth, can sting. By mid- 



June or July, the caterpillars pupate, and 
then the adult moth emerges. Mating and 
egg-laying occur in July and August, and the 
cycle begins again. 

Attempts to control the gypsy moth by 
spraying pesticides or viral agents have met 
with limited success, and can have 
damaging environmental side effects; our 
native insects are often killed, as well. 
Gypsy moths have also developed resis- 
tance to many of these agents. Some of the 
brightest news for the control of the gypsy 
moth may be a fungus that is destroying 
entire populations of the caterpillars. The 




fungus was introduced in 1911 as a measure 
to control the insects, but it has only 
recently begun to affect the populations. 

In Missouri, there are approximately 
20,000 square miles of forested land that 
could be damaged if an infestation occurs. 
Oak trees are a particular favorite of the 
caterpillars, but most of our tree species, 
including conifers, are susceptible. 
Although gypsy moths are not currently a 
problem here, several have been trapped in 
the St. Louis area. The moths probably 
arrived here via truck and camper axles and 
on nursery trees shipped from the 
Northeast. 

In the meantime, all of us can do a few 
things to help prevent an infestation in this 
area. First of all, learn to identify the 
various stages in the life cycle of the gypsy 
moth. Secondly, inspect the underside of 
your car or camper when you are traveling, 
so that you are not spreading the gypsy 
moth. Also, look for the egg masses when 
you are in your yard or taking a walk this 



Research Division Is 
Reorganized 

Dr. W. Douglas Stevens, director of 
research, has announced the creation of 
three new departments in the research divi- 
sion at the Garden. 

The new departments are Neotropical 
Floristics, headed by Dr. Bob Magill; 
Neotropical Taxonomy, headed by Dr. Henk 
van der Werff; and Africa and Madagascar, 
headed by Dr. Porter P. Lowry II. Neotrop- 
ical Floristics will encompass all the 
Garden's flora projects in Central and South 
America. A flora is the study of all the plants 
within a specific region. Neotropical 
Taxonomy will include researchers 
describing and naming specific groups of 
plants, regardless of where they occur. The 
program in Africa and Madagascar will 
perform all of these functions for the 
African Tropics and Subtropics and will 
work to extend the scope of the Garden's 
exploration and collaboration in this part of 
the world. 

The other departments in the division 
are Botanical Information Management, 
headed by Dr. Nancy Morin; Graduate 
Studies, headed by Dr. Mick Richardson; 
the Herbarium, headed by Dr. James C. 
Solomon; and Scientific Publications, Amy 
Scheuler, managing editor. 



spring. Ixiok on tree bark or in fissures in 
the bark, under lawn furniture, in your 
woodpile or on a stone fence. If you find the 
brown, hairy gypsy moth egg masses, pry 
them off and drop the entire mass into a jar 
of rubbing alcohol or fingernail polish 
remover. If you have an oak tree in your 
yard, tie a loose burlap skirt around the tree 
about five feet above ground; gypsy moth 
caterpillars will crawl up the tree and rest 
under the burlap. Check your trap in the 
late afternoon, and carefully remove any 
that have accumulated. By the way, birds 
may beat you to the caterpillars! 

You can learn more about the gypsy 
moth, how to prevent its spread, and how to 
protect your trees by asking for pamphlets 
and talking to the staff at the Kemper 
Center for Home Gardening this spring and 
summer. Also, the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture has published several 
informative booklets. Write to the U.S. 
Government Printing Office, Washington, 
D.C. 20402 and ask for the free booklet, 
The Gypsy Moth Handbook, Home and 
Garden Bulletin No. 227. 

—Lucile M. McCook, 
Horticultural Taxonomist 



18. 



MU'U.ETIN I MARCH AI'KII. 1W2 



Trustees Hold Annual 
Meeting 

The Board of Trustees held its annual 
meeting on January 15, 1992. 0. Sage 
Wightman III was elected to serve as presi- 
dent for a second year term. Also elected 
for another year were John K. Wallace, Jr., 
first vice president; and William H. T Bush, 
second vice president. 

New Term Trustees elected at the 
meeting were Parker B. Condie, formerly 
president of Leppert Roos Fur and Apparel 
Company, and M. Peter Fischer, a partner 
in Fischer and Hawker, attorneys at law. 
Margaret B. Oberheide and Marion K. 
Piper were named Emeritus Trustees. 
Mrs. Oberheide has served on the Board 
since 1984, and Mrs. Piper joined the Board 
in 1981. 

Michael S. Olson, the Garden's con- 
troller, is secretary to the Board, and 
Cheryl B. Mill is assistant secretary. Also 
named as an officer was Frank P. Wolff, Jr., 
who was named Counsel to the Board. 

Frank Wolff Named Counsel 

Frank Wolff has represented the Garden 
since 1971. In fact, he began his work the 
same day Peter and Tamra Raven joined the 
Garden. Wolff has been principally respon- 
sible for the Garden's legal affairs since 
1980. He is a partner with the St. Louis law 
firm Bryan Cave. 

A native St. Louisan, Wolff graduated 
from Middlebury College in 1968 and from 
University of Virginia Law School in 1971. In 



his twenty years representing the Garden 
he points out that "I have had the good 
fortune to sit with the Board of Trustees 
and to work closely with each of the Board 
presidents. I am particularly proud that 
during this period the Botanical Garden 
Subdistrict was established, ensuring the 
Garden's long range financial welfare. It has 
also been a special privilege to work with 
the terrific Garden staff, both past and 
present, assembled by Peter Raven, 
including Bill Klein, Rick Daley, Alan 
Godlewski, Charles Orner, Pat Rich, 
Marshall Crosby, Paul Brockmann, Nancy 
Morin, Marcia Kerz and Sue Wilkerson, 
Mike Olson and most recently Jim Corbin, 
to name only those with whom I have 
worked regularly.' ' 

He concluded, "Representing the 
Garden has always been a special pleasure 
for me. I am deeply honored by the Board's 
action." 




SAFETY AWARD— Garden employees were honored by SAFECO Insurance with a Loss 
Control Achievement Award last fall for efforts to make the Garden grounds safer. Taking part 
in the award ceremony were (left to right}: John Shaw, Northeast region commercial lines 
underwriting manager; Michael Olson, Garden controller; Paul Brockmann, Garden director 
of general services; Rick Halpern, SAFECO agent; Tom King, safety/security manager for the 
Garden; and Don Sekarski, loss control manager. 





Trustee Profile 



George E. Thoma 

In January, Dr. George E. Thoma 
was appointed to the Garden's Board of 
Trustees as an ex-officio member. Thoma is 
the new president of the St. Louis Academy 
of Science, named to the post in December 
1991. Under the terms of Henry Shaw's 
Will, the president of the Academy and his 
successors are to serve on the Garden's 
Board by virtue of their position. 

The St. Louis Academy of Science, 
established in 1859, seeks to educate and 
inform the public about science. Thoma has 
been active in the Academy for ten years, 
and succeeds Thomas 0. McNearney, Jr. as 
president. 

A graduate of the University of Dayton 
with a B.S. in chemistry, Thoma earned an 
M.D. from St. Louis University. He has 
held several posts at St. Louis University 
Medical Center where currently he is 
Professor of Hospital and Health Care 
Administration. "I am delighted by the 
appointment to the Garden's Board and I 
look forward to serving with a number of 
persons with whom I share similar inter- 
ests," Thoma said. 

Dr. Peter H. Raven, director, said, "We 
are certainly pleased to include Dr. Thoma 
as a Garden Trustee. With his distinguished 
background in the fields of medicine and 
science, he will add much to our deliber- 
ations.' ' 

Thoma has lived in St. Louis County 
since 1943. He is active in many local and 
national organizations, including the United 
Way of Greater St. Louis, Independence 
Center, Mark Twain Summer Institute, 
Midtown Medical Center Redevelopment 
Corporation, Missouri State Board of 
Health, and American Medical Association. 
Thoma was a founding editor of The Journal 
of Nuclear Medicine and a founder of the 
St. Louis Technology Center. 

In addition to his professional pursuits, 
Dr. Thoma is an avid herb gardener. 



BULLETIN MARCH APRIL 1992 



19 




Glover Stewart (left) and Charisse Jackson, students at Harris-Stowe State College, ha\ e 
been hired to work at the Garden under a new internship program funded by Adelaide and 
Dan Schlally. Each year two sophomore or junior level students from Harris-Stowe will spend 
20 hours a week at the Harden each semester, working with Garden staff on projects related 
to their studies. Glover is planning to teach elementary and middle school math and science, 
and Charisse will earn her degree in middle school science education. 



From the Garden Gate Shop 



Spring Plant Sale 



Members' Pre-Sale 

Thursday & Friday. April 23 & 24, \992 

9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 

Public is united 

Saturday & Sunday, April 25 & 26, 1992 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

The Shop and the Orthwein Floral Hall 
will be filled with a glorious display of the 
latest selections for your home and garden. 
Members enjoy 20% savings, all four days, 



on herbs, perennials, bedding plants, 
roses, begonias, geraniums, azaleas and 
summer blooming bulbs. Come early! 



Easter Shopping 

Easter falls on April 19 this year, so the 
Shop will be brimming with colorful bloom- 
ing plants for spring and summer, just in 
time for your holiday celebration. The Shop 
also will have a huge selection of lovely 
[{aster decorations and delightful toys. 



James S. McDonnell 
Foundation Grant 
Received 

In December 1991, the James S. Mc- 
Donnell Foundation awarded a $100,000 
three-year grant to the Garden's Flora oj 
China project. The announcement came in 
recognition of Dr. Peter H. Raven's 20th 
anniversary as director of the Garden (see 
November/December Bulletin). 

The Flora of China is a joint Sino- 
American project to publish for the first 
time in English a revised Flora based on 
Flora Reipublicae Popularies Sinicae. 
Twenty-five volumes are planned, with the 
first volume scheduled for publication later 
this year. It is anticipated the entire project 
will be completed in about 15 years. 

In making the award, the Foundation 
cited the Flora of China project as a very 
important international initiative. Dr. Raven 
acknowledged the Foundation's donation 
was a substantial boost to the effort and 
added, "I deeply appreciate the Founda- 
tion's generous financial assistance and 
commitment to join with the Garden to 
underwrite this timely project." 

As reported in the November/December 
issue of the Bulletin, Garden Trustees 
responded enthusiastically m recognizing 
Dr. and Mrs. Peter 11. Raven's 20th 
anniversary at the Garden, (iifts totalling 
$1.5 million were received to mark the mile- 
stone, earmarked to support the further 
development of the research database 
system at the Garden, including the Floras 
of North America and China. 



Tributes 



November -December 1991 



In Honor Of 



Mr. Lester Adelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Ix'stcr Bamberger 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack E. Edlin 
Mr. and Mrs. Mint Isaac 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Scharffjr. 
Mrs. Alexander McN. 
BakeweU 

Mr. and Mrs. II. Leighton Morrill 

Mrs. Betty Barclay 

Jane Barclay 

Cedge and Nini Barksdale 

Mis. Faege M. Takacs 

Jack and Janet Baumstark 

Mr. and Mrs. Hud Steinberg 

J.Robert and Elizabeth Benny 

Mr. Ken Kohoutek 

Ms. Susan Thomas 



Mr. M.J. Bluestein 

Jocey Barken 

Virginia Bin me 

Missouri Botanical Garden 
Members' Hoard 

Carol Caruthers 

Albert J. Rose Jr. 
Peper, M. irlin. Jensen, Maichel ai 
Hetlage 

Christopher 

Jane E. Brownstone 
Mrs. Sylvia Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 
Mrs. Katherine Chambers 
Mrs. Marguerite Adelbrechl 
Mrs. Alice Chasnoff 

Mrs. Willard 1.. Mange 
Joe and Barb Sander 
Mr. Irvin Davis 
Bernie and Jocey Barken 



Mr. and Mrs. Anthony 
DeFilio 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Colmo 
Robert Dierberg 

Albert J. Rose Jr. 

Peper, Martin, Jensen, Maichel and 

Hetlage 
Dr. and Mrs. Clarence Eckert 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore J. Eckerl 
Florence Forbes 
H.i! bara Cook 
Joyce Heiman 
Phyllis Woollen 
Mrs. Natalie Freund 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprechl 
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Schweizer II 
Dr. and Mrs. Bernard T. 
Garfinkel 

Dr. and Mrs. Arnold M. Goldman 



Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. 

(ioerss 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Remmert 

Samuel R Goldstein 

Albert S. Rose Jr. 

Peper, Martin, Jensen, Maichel and 

Hetlage 
Mrs. Martha B. Grace 
Ms. Marilyn A. Falkowski 
Helen and Earl Greb 
Joyce, Wayne andJo\ Winter 
Mrs. Virginia Hay 
Mrs. Wanda A. Webei and Family 
Elise llaynes 
Mrs. BelleG. Levin 
Linda Hulbert 
Kent Rissman 
Stephanie J. Ackerman 



20. 



\BULLET1N MARCH APRIL 1992 



Tributes 



continued 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert H. 
Hutsell 

Mr. and Mrs. Lyle S. Woodcock 

Mr. S. Morton Isaac 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 
Aron Katzman 

Albert J. Rose Jr. 

Peper, Martin, Jensen, Maicheland 

Hetlage 
Mrs. Barry Kayes 
Ellen Dubinsky 
Mrs. Eleanor Kehl 
Mr. Liny Badler 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Koshner 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur K. Carlson 
Ted Krakover 
DickSher 
Alberl S. Rose Jr. 
Peper, Martin, Jensen, Maicheland 

Hetlage 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Manlin 
Mrs. Helen Henschel 
Mr. and Mrs. Philip N. Hirsch 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Marcus 

Mr. and Mrs. Morton Singer 

Robert G. McGough 

Albert S. Rose Jr. 

Peper, Martin, Jensen. Maicheland 

Hetlage 
Mrs. Erline Monahan 
Mrs. Evelyn L. Monahan 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Neuner 
Mrs. Dorothy Egenriether 
Ms. Ilene Osherow 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold N. Kravin 

Mrs. Louise Pailet 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin S. Strassner 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Perry 

Ms. Anita Pozsgay 

Ellen Pozsgay 

Ms. Anita Pozsgay 

Mrs. Eddie Rosenheim 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark M. Driemeyer 

Mrs. Edward Ross 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert M. Talcoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Jay Rovak 

Mrs. Edward A. Dubinsky 

Mr. Joseph Ruwitch 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Singer 
Mrs. Sophia Sachs 

Mrs. Mvra Blumenthal 
Mrs. Helen Henschel 
Mrs. Louis W. Rubin 
Mrs. Sue Sale 

Mrs. Harold W. Dubinsky 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin S. Strassner 

Adelaide Schlafly 

Mr. and Mrs. Kimball R. McMullin 
Mrs. Jean Schneider 
Dr. and Mrs. Sidney Jick 
Martin Schneider 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Wolff 

The Shafer Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry 0. Johnston 



Ruth Sherwin 

Miss Gerry Barnholtz 
Miss Marian Barnholtz 

Mrs. John M. Shoenberg 

Mrs. Florence (i. Stern 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. Allan Siegel 

Mr. and Mrs. Merlin Lickhalter 
Dr. Bernd Silver 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin I.ipsitz 
Mrs. Samuel Soule 

Dr. and Mrs. Oscar H. Souk' 

Bettie Steffan 

Ms. Anita Pozsgay 
I)r. and Mrs. Sidney Stoller 
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Karoll 
Swiss American Importing 
Company 

Alberts. Rose Jr. 

Peper, Martin, Jensen, Maicheland 
Hetlage 

Diana Torlina 

Julie Kavy 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard Walters 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Ziegler 
Mrs. Jean Weinstock 

Mrs. Mvra Dubinsky 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Ettman 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin S. Strassner 

Dr. and Mrs. Ralph B. Woolf 

Mrs. Liz Welch 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerome M. Sterner 

Mrs. Adelle Whelove 

Miss Elizabeth Ruck 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Wickens 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Atwood 
Elmer W. Wiltsch 

His Children 

Mrs. Denver Wright 

Ms. Rosemary Woodworth 



In Memory Of 



Mr. Walter E. Ackermann 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Sterling 
Mr. Joseph Anton 

Mr. Ken Dosenbach 

Miss Michelle Dosenbach 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hohmeier 

Mrs. Ruth Kresko 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul H. Marsh 

Mr. and Mrs. John Reznick 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Shields 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Smart 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Twiehaus 

Mrs. Lillian Ventimiglia 

Mr. Leonard Atkins 

Mr. and Mrs. James R. Gimblett 

Mrs. Gertrude Hemphill 

Mrs. Mary Helen Auble 

Mrs. Robert H. Kittner 

Mr. James Austin 

Mrs. Joseph J. Anton 

Mrs. Agnes Friedman Baer 

Mrs. Fdith B. Schiele 

Jack A. Bain 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Nutt 
Mrs. Anna Mae Ballard 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore W. Dettmann 



Dr Joseph Bauer 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Scott III 
Sarah Emily Baynes 
Delma and Jerre Baynes 
Mr. William Bebermeyer 
Dr. Robert L. Lamberg 
Rev. Fred L. Beck 
Norman and Vicki Lionberger 
Thomas Bell 

Mr. and Mrs. John Pollaci 

Mrs. Lorine Bentzinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Praechter 
Bill Binder 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman B. Champ Jr. 

Mr. Frank Binswanger Sr. 

Mrs. Harold W. Dubinsky 
Mr. Harry Bobroff 

Mrs. Helen Henschel 
Mrs. Mildred W. Schaeler 

Mr. Kyrle Boldt 

Mrs. Mane K. Drain 
Mrs. Marian Bond 
Ms. Marty Frentrop 
Mr. Hugo F. Schueren 
Herbert Brodsky 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 

Mrs. Edith T. Brumback 

Ms. Jean G. Brumback 
Mr. Gay Carraway 

Mr. Robert Webb Boyd Jr. 

Mr. Alan Cohen 

Deborah and Timothy Dee 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Dunkins 

Clara Webb Kinner 

Leadership St. Liuis 

Laura E. Levin 

Mrs. Carolyn L>sos 

Mr. William W. Millaway 

Susan G. Murray 

Mrs. Wanda A. Rapp 

Geraldine Ann Rauch 

RFJ1S Commission 

Mrs. John M. Rolwing 

Esther P. Rothman 

Rubinstein Environmental Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Rubinstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Smith 

Abe and Dorothie Spector 

St. L>uis Building Inspection Division 

Mrs. Virginia Christman 

Miss Rosalie Smith 

Mrs. Jody Smith Clark 

Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fogartyjr. 
Mrs. Virginia Coerver 
Frontenac Garden Club 
Sadie and Sidney S. Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Gabriel Jr. 
Mr. Copeland 
Friends and Neighbors on 

Saddlebrook 
Mrs. Lloyd Crump 
Mrs. H.A. LiBarr 
Mrs. Geneva Epstein Cutler 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Abrams 
Mrs. Morris Abrams 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Anschuetz 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Amdt Jr. 
Mr. Andrew N. Baur 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Berger 
Mrs. Norman Bierman 
Mrs. Vilray P. Blair Jr. 
Bowne of New York City, Inc. 



Mr. Dudley A. Bragdon 
Mr. and Mrs. Marcus A. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Brownstein 
Mrs. Benjamin H. Cohen 
Mrs. Dudley J. Cohen 
Dr. and Mrs. Max Deutch 
Mrs. Norman W. Drey 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman W. Drey Jr. 
Mrs. Melvin Feist 
Mr. and Mrs. Willard Fonarow 
Dr. and Mrs. Alvin R. Frank 
Mrs. Ina B. Freund 
Anne Gagen 
Mrs. Myron Glassberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Goldberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Grand-Jean 
Mrs. Mary Greensfelder 
Ann and Herman Heyman 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 
Mrs. Sylvia Hopper 
Betty and Kurt Horn 
Mr. and Mrs. Mort Isaac 
Mrs. John Isaacs Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones Jr. 
Mi. and Mrs. Roger M. Katz 
Dr. and Mrs. Maurice J. Keller 
Diane, Jerry, Susan, Gary Kopp 
Mrs. Melvin Levi 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen H. Loeb 
Dr. Virgil Loeb Jr. 
Mrs. Henry C. Liwenhaupt 
Mrs. Willard L. Mange 
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Mellitz 
Mr. and Mrs. William R. Orthweinjr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Liuis R. Putzel 
Gerald A. Rimmel 
Dr. and Mrs. Donald Ross 
Mrs. Frances Rothman 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F Ruwitch 
Dr. and Mrs. Llewellyn Sale Jr. 
Amy and Paul Schottland 
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold H. Schwab 
Mrs. Audrey Sentuna 
Mrs. Ben H. Sentuna 
Mrs. Hymen Shifrin 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard G. Sisson 
Verna Green Smith 
Mrs. Samuel I). Souk- 
Sylvia Stern 

Mrs. John P. Stupp and Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Thompson Jr. 
Percy Tucker 

Dr. and Mrs. Helman C. Wasserman 
Marilyn Wechter 
Mrs. Jean S. Weinstock 
Mr. Francis H. Wielandy 
Mrs. Shirley Wittcoff 
Women's Literature Book Club 
Dr. and Mrs. Ralph B. Woolf 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Zwick 
Mr. William Thomas Davey 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Williams 

Mr. Sam'l C. Davis 

Miss Beatrice Thake 

Mrs. Catherine Dohr 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bannister 
Lawrence J. Dorn 
Mr. and Mrs. R.B. Chapman 
Whit, Judith Ehrler and Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Reiter 
Mis. Emily Riemer 
Mother of Jody Dorr 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert N. Schulte 

continued on next page 



21. 



BULLETIN MARCH-APRIL 1992 



Tributes 



continued 



Harry Driemeier 
Faculty and Staff of 

School of Business Administration 
University of Missouri— St. Louis 
Mr. Greg Duello 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Evans 

Mr. Bill Duerbeck 

Mrs. Benjamin I,oeb 
James D. Dunsmore Jr. 

Carol Butler 
Mag Moedritzer 
Rory and Ered Ortlip 
Karen and {"at Samson 
Matt Zahragka 

Mrs. Frances Eisenberg 

Dr. and Mrs. Andres J. Valdes 

Mrs. Irene Elder 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Buettner 
Mildred Elsas 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 
Father of Barbara English 
Dr. and Mrs. Stephen F. Bowen Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Joseph K. McKinney 
Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 
Mrs. Delancey Everitt 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvard K. Hecker 
Mr. Eugene H. Fahrenkrog 
Sr. 

Mr. Rick Halpern 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Harmon 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald M. Koch 
Mr. Donald Feeney 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Blake 
Mrs. Helen Fehlig 
Andrea, Derek, Jim Hoeferlin 
Mrs. Joyce Feiner 

Helen and Gene Padgitt 

Alfred Fleishman 

Jerome A. Gross 
Mrs. Ann Flynn 

Mrs. David Q. Wells 
Mr. Phil R. Ford 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard E. Prater 

Mrs. Mabel Frazer 

Mr. John C. Abbott 

Mrs. Julia M. Funsch 

Mrs. Carolyn B. Pratt 

Mrs. Henrietta Goldstecher 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Shapiro 
Mr. Albert Gray 

Mr. and Mrs. George Barnes Jr. 

Mrs. Grace Guest 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Power 
Mr. Theo Haimann 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart B. Dunsker 
Mrs. Myron Glassberg 
Mrs. Ben H. Senturia 

Mr. Otto Hasek 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Fischer 
Parents of Linda Hermelin 

Marjorie Ivey 

Frances Slusher 

Mr. George Hibbert 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Scott III 



Miss Muriel Hibbets 

Miss Use Arndt 
Mrs. Howard L. Stark 
Mrs. Ruth Hill 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen M. Borucke 
Mr. and Mrs. O.P. Hampton II 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Rosenthal 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Taylor 

Mrs. Florence Hohmann 

Miss Irene Steinman 

Mrs. Oneida Vigno 

Mr. Norbert Hotop 

Leonard and Priscilla Davis 

Mr. Alonso Huff 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Schneider 

Mrs. Bea Hughes 

Mrs. Mary Sherman 

Sister of Trudy Hutchison 

Tower Grove House- Wednesday 
Hostess and Volunteers 
Arthur Isaac 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Ruwitch 
Father of Charles Johns 

Mrs. Emily Lazarus 

Mrs. Margaret Johnson 

Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 

Joseph Elmo Jones 

Steve and Terry Anderson 
Jim and Cindy Baker 
Mr. and Mrs. W.L. Beaver Jr. 
Bon Coeur Garden Club 
Mrs. Brown 
Elizabeth A. Clark 
Katie E. Clark 
Thomas E. Clark 
Mark and Jennifer Dillon 
Ben and Fransina Dixon 
Toni Donnelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard C. Fels 
Paul and Janice Foder 
Jim and Rocky Gatlin 
Sandra Glowoski 
Mrs. Gregg 
Bill and Shirley Johns 
Jim and Nancy Katy 
Mrs. Robert H. Kittner 
Estella P. McDaniel 
Missouri Botanical Garden- 
Members' Board 
Glen and Carla Morelli 
Mr. and Mrs. David E. Nothstine 
Dr. and Mrs. G. Charles Oliver 
St. Louis County Garden Club 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Thilking 
Norma and Peter Villari 
Vineyards Garden Club 
John and Susan Walters 

Betty Kahn 

Mr. and Mrs. James Henderson 
Koichi Kawana 

Rose E. Honda 
Mabel Kitsuse 

Mr. Francis Kenney Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen R. Burstein 
Mr. Robert Kleine 

Friends and Neighbors on 
Saddlebrook 

William Koontz 

Jan and Larry Finck 

George W. Kriegshauser Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger L. Eschbacher 
Patricia Kromer 



Suzanne M. Kristanich 

Celia Bouchard 
Cathleen Desroche 
Christine Kristanich 
Mrs. AlKuhn 

Mr. and Mrs. FW. Fangmann 
Mother of Mary Jo La ka in p 

Dr. Ferdinand B. Zienty 

Jeanne C. Lalumondiere 

Tracey Bash 

Rachel Berget 

Roy Comeaux Jr. 

Kenneth Daye 

Diana Dugas 

Jane Durkin 

William Fetter 

Frank Gilmore 

E.J. Gordon 

Ronald Henefeld 

Hydrite Chemical Company 

Alice Johnson 

Marsha Kirley 

Linda Ann Lewis 

Ana Martinez 

Michael McAdams 

Diane Meyers 

Anna Miko 

Carol Morgenstern 

Marlene Natalini 

James Randall 

Bruna Riccobon 

Leesa Shady 

Mark Sinclair 

Leslie Veshio 

Christopher Vita 

Mary Wisniewski 

Mr. Barry A. Landes 

Dave Brown 

Mr. Dennis Goeders 

Beverly Lutz 

Ruth Ann Meyer 

Mark Pauley 

Dr. Frank Glasgow Lane 

Mrs. Mary L. Kerwin 

Mr. John Leavitt 

Mr. and Mrs. Bud Steinberg 
Mr. Ben Lieberman 

Marjorie Ivey 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 

Frances Slusher 

Dr. Oscar Lipschultz 

Mr. J. Russell Bley Jr. 
Monsanto Company— Law 
Department 

Augusta and Edgar Littmann 

Miss Carol L. Littmann 
Mr. John A . Lucks 

Mr. Stephen P. Mullin 
Mrs. Edna Wall Lurie 

Residents of Broadmoor Bldg. 3 
Yuppie Landscaping Group, Inc. 
Janet Blanke MacCarthy 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Max LippmanJr. 
Mr. and Mrs. James S. McDonnell III 
Dr. and Mrs. George E. Mendelsohn, 

Bill and Trudy 
Mrs. Eleanor J. Moore 
Mr. and Mrs. Reuben M. Morriss III 
Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 
Mr. and Mrs. Rolla K. Wetzel 
Mr. John Maness 
Toshi and Sue Doi 
Ben and Fusa Wakasa 
Joe and Ellen Younger 



Mr. and Mrs. Wilton 
Manewal 

Mr. and Mrs. J. John Brouk 
Mr. Robert N. Hagnauer 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Hellmuth 
Dr. and Mrs. Richard I.C. 

Muckerman 
Mrs. Christeen Mason 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald P. Nies 
Mrs. Elinor C. Mazzoni 
Dr. and Mrs. August H. Homeyer 
Mercantile Bank of St. Louis 
Mr. and Mrs. Rudyard K. Rapp 
Bernard McDonald 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Roehm 

Elise Mendelsohn 

Ellen Binder 

David Moskowitz 

Mr. Joseph Michaelree 

Mr. George P. Steinmetz 

Mr. Alfred G. Miller 

Mr. Robert C. Camp 
Mr. H.Bill Miller 

Mr. Andrew Bettman 

Mr. Robert R. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Stevens 

Bernice Mitchell 

Brentwood Garden Club #5 

Mrs. Sylvia Mold 

Mr. and Mrs. Gary Sextro 
Mr. David Moore 
Mrs. J. Maver Feehan 
Mr. Ed Morfield 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Olson 

Mother of Jennifer Morgan 

Gloria Karoll 

Dr. Alfred A. Morioka 

Mrs. Beatrice A. Perrin 
Mr. D.R. Niederlander 

Ann Q. Niederlander 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Nix 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Sisler 

Two Aunts of 

Mr. and Mrs. Noblitt 

Mrs. Allen R. Burstein 

James and Marge Nordman 

Dr. and Mrs. William H. Fogarty 
James F. Nordman 

His Nieces and Nephews 

Marguerite Grolton Nordman 

Her Nieces and Nephews 

Miss Eileen Ohmoto 

Toshi and Sue Doi 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben S. Wakasa 

Mr. Phillip Ojile 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Deeba 

Mrs. Robert Otto 

Dr. and Mrs. James T Chamness 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Goessling 

Kathleen Caldwell Parriott 

Mr. and Mrs. David D. Wilson 

Mrs. Jane Lammert Pettus 

Mr. and Mrs. M.M. Alexander Jr. 

Mrs. Newell A. Augur 

Mrs. Alexander M. Bakewell 

Mr. and Mrs. J.H. Bascom 

Miss Mary E. Bascom 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Maffitt Bates 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew H. Baur 

Belz Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Bertelson 

Mrs. Carol C. Bitting 



22. 



I BULLETIN I MARCH APRIL 1992 



Mr. and Mrs. John Brodhead Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. P. Taylor Bryan III 
Miss Adelaide Cherbonnier 
Mr. and Mrs. William P. Chrisler 
Mr. and Mrs. Crunden Cole 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Collins 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Collins Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander M. 

Cornwell Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John M. Drescher Jr. 
Mr. George W. Ewing 
Mrs. Joseph Farley 
Mr. and Mrs. John 0. Felker 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. Fordyce 
Elizabeth S. Foster 
Mr. S.E. Freund 
Mr. and Mrs. David L. Gardner 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Goessling 
Mrs. Samuel F Gordon 
Hager Family 
Mr. Robert N. Hagnauer 
Mr. and Mrs. F. Lee Hawes 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Hawes 
Mrs. Harvard K. Hecker 
Mr. and Mrs. George K. Hobhtzelle 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Horan 
Mrs. Stella B. Houghton 
Mr. and Mrs. James H. Howe III 
Mr. and Mrs. Gales F. Johnston Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold T. Jolley Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin S. Jones 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Limberg 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Max Lippmanjr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bert Lynch 
Mrs. Frank Mayfield 
Mrs. Glenroy McDonald 
Mr. and Mrs. Jefferson L. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Leighton Morrill 
Mr. Edward B. Mower 
Dr. and Mrs. D. Elliott O'Reilly 
Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Remington 
H.S.T. Rodgers 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin G. Russell 
Mrs. James R. Searles 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Shelton 
Mr. and Mrs. Parker Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Brookings 

Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom K. Smith Jr. 
Mrs. Lloyd C. Stark 
Mr. and Mrs. Edmonstone 

Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Thompson Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. White IV 
Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher 

Rosetta Phillips 

Mr. and Mrs. Courtney Shands Jr. 
Mr. Edward Raymond 
Pienaar 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Richard Walker 
Mr. John Ponciroli 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Collins 
Linda, daughter of Mr. and 

Mrs. Roy Preusser 
Mrs. Norma M. Silber 

Rhoda Raben 

Bernie and Jocey Barken 

Floria S. Reilly 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Sherby 

Mrs. Sadie Reznik 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Arenberg 
Father of Mr. and Mrs. Joe 
Riebold 

Mrs. Belle G. Levin 



Dr. Daniel P. Roman 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver DeGarmo 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Parks 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth J. Wulfert Jr. 

Mrs. Charles Rose 

Mr. Charles I. Rose 

Mr. R.R. Rosenthal Jr. 

Bud and Ida Steinberg 

Mr. G. Andy Runge 

Dr. and Mrs. Leonard L. Davis Jr. 

Mrs. James Salomon 

Mrs. Robert H. Kittner 

Mrs. Delores E. Sarfaty 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert A. Seppi 

Mrs. Jack Savage 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Munn 
Miss Carolina A. Schaefer 
Miss Virginia D. Schaefer 
Mrs. Emma Schield 

Mrs. David Q. Wells 

Mrs. Warrene Schlapp 

Miss E. Joan Esposito 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Frank 

Mrs. Stella B. Houghton 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Limberg 

Mrs. Glenroy McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Courtney Shands Jr. 

Mrs. John C. Tobin Jr. 

Mr. Paul Schmid 

Mrs. A. Wessel Shapleigh 

Howard A. Schneiderman 

Audrey M. Schneiderman 

Marjorie Ratz Schoknecht 

Wilfred and Sylvia Fales 
Jane J. Ratz 
Kent Schoknecht 
Kim Schoknecht 
Kurt Schoknecht 
The Ballus Family 

John E. Schwarz 

Laverne B. Ivery 

Mrs. Betty Scott 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray T Eddins 

John A Semmelmeyer 

Mr. Edwin S. Baldwin 
Henry J. Serth 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles Gebhard 
Mrs. Evelyn Gerdes 

Benjamin P. Shapiro 

Mrs. Harry Salniker 

Mr. Ethan A.H. Sheplev Jr. 

Mrs. Arthur R. Bertelson 

Mrs. Robert Cochran 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hitchcock 

Mr. Earl Rosen Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rolla K. Wetzel 

Celeste Wittelshofer Shifrin 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 
Mr. Arthur J. Shurig 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Sommer 

Miss Trieste Signorino 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Pisani 

Mrs. Charles M. Skinner 

Mrs. George W. Skinner 
Mrs. Mildred Smith 

Gerry Barnholtz 

Marian Barnholtz 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Carlson 

Marjorie Chadwick 

George E. Foltz 

Dr. and Mrs. Douglas Frost 

Jerome A. Gross 



Mrs. Jerome C. Horner 
Ms. Virginia A. Keck 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack E. Morris 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Nutt 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Shanks 
Mr. and Mrs. Allan Shontz 
Helen W. Stevenson 
Annette Wortman 

Dr. Samuel Soule 

Dr. and Mrs. Michael M. Karl 

Mrs. Inez 0. Stallard 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Henkle 
Mrs. Martha Hinck 
Mrs. Irene Standley 

Mr. and Mrs. William Wolfe 

Mabel Staten 

M. Ray Routh 

Mrs. Bessie Statler 

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar C. Crider 

Mrs. Doris M. Kloeppner 

Fred Stein 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Salniker 

Janet Stein 

Missouri Botanical Garden Guides 

Mr. Harry Steiner Jr. 

Mrs. Harry Salniker 

Dr. Alvin Sullivan 

Mr. Earl Rosen Jr. 
Mr. Edgar Taylor 

Mrs. Judy Allen 
Mrs. Fay Taylor 

Mrs. Bernice Kranson 

Nicholas Teare 

Dr. and Mrs. Joel S. Koenig 
Aunt of Miss Helen Terpstra 
Gallaudet School Staff 
Dr. Leonard J. Tolmach 

Dr. and Mrs. William M. Fogarty 

Mrs. Florence Trimble 

Mrs. Edward X. Boeschenstein 
Mrs. Blanche Turner 

Mrs. Linda Eckert 
Mrs. Bernice Kranson 

Jack L. Turner 

Mary S. Turner 

Mrs. Frances Vaughan 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Ashton 
Mr. Edward J. Walsh Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James G. Alfring 
Mr. and Mrs. Rumsey Ewing 
Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Hickman 
Mrs. James Lee Johnson 
Sen. A. Clifford Jones 

D. Jane Walther 

Marilyn R. Brinks 

Mrs. Katherine Watson 

Janet Koleson 
Nancy Macklin 
Mrs. Ruth Weber 

Mrs. Harold W. Dubinsky 

Mrs. Alma Wells 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin Jr. 
Mr. Russell Yungbluth 

Jim Hoeferlin 

Lee Kirk 

Mrs. Helen Zeppenfeld 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen F Bowen Jr. 
Mrs. Hugo H. Davis 
Dr. and Mrs. Jozeph K. McKinney 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Tschudy 



Board of Trustees 

Mr. 0. Sage Wightman III 

President 

Rev. Lawrence Biondi, S.J. 

Mr. Stephen F. Brauer 

Mr. William H.T. Bush 

Mr. Parker B. Condie 

Dr. William H. Danforth 

Mr. M. Peter Fischer 

Mr. Samuel B. Hayes HI 

Mr. Robert R. Hermann 

Rt. Rev. William A. Jones, Jr. 

Mr. David W. Kemper 

Mr. Charles F. Knight 

Mr. Charles E. Kopman 

Mr. Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. Richard J. Mahoney 

Mr. William E. Maritz 

Mr. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. Lucius B. Morse III 

Rev. Earl E. Nance, Jr. 

Dr. Helen E. Nash 

Mr. William R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

The Hon. Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. Andrew C. Taylor 

Dr. George E. Thoma 

Mr. Jack E. Thomas 

Dr. Blanche Touhill 

Mr. John K. Wallace, Jr. 

The Hon. George R. Westfall 

EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mr. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. John H. Biggs 
Mr. Jules D. Campbell 
Mr. Henry Hitchcock 
Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 
Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 
Mr. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. Louis S. Sachs 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Warren M. Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. TomK. Smith, Jr. 

Mr. C. C. Johnson Spink 

Mrs. Harriet Spoehrer 

Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Dr. Mildred Mathias 
Prof. Philippe Morat 

DIRECTOR 

Dr. Peter H. Raven 

MEMBERS' BOARD 

Mrs. Antonio I. Longrais 

President 

Mrs. Robert Schulte 

Mrs. Todd D. Arnold 

Mrs. David Dimit 
Mr. William A. Gilbert 



2'A. 



BULLETIN I MARCH APRIL 1992 






MEMBERS' PREVIEW 




Spring 



FLO WE R SHOW 



|\ Friday, March 6, 1992 



5:00 TO 8:00 P.M. 
RIDGWAY CENTER 



Step out of winter and into springtime! Meandering paths lined 

with dogwoods, redbuds and forsythias lead to a charming old mill 

and mill pond. Violets, jaek-in-thepulpits, astilbes. delphiniums, 

bleeding hearts, shooting stars, hostas and more fill the air with 

color and scent. Entertainment, fashions by Episode of the Galleria. 

cash bar. The Garden Gate Shop will be open. Dinner buffet will 

be available in the Gardenview Restaurant. For members only. 



MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN BULLETIN (ISSN -0026-6507) 

P.O. Box 299 

Saint Louis, Missouri 63166 



SECOND CLASS 

POSTAGE 

PAID 

AT ST. LOUIS, MO 



noij 




LUMELX 
IMBER THREE 



Inside 
This Issue 



4. A-Mazing Improvements 

^B The Kaeser Maze, a perennial favorite 
with visitors, is better than ever. 

5 Monsanto Supports 

hh Kemper Center 

A new internship program and 
composting classes are made possible 
by Monsanto Fund. 

g McDonnell Douglas Funds 
^m Eco-Carts 

The McDonnell Douglas Foundation 
makes possible portable science 
demonstrations for the Climatron 
complex. 

Q Home Gardening 

^H The proper planting techniques give 
your landscape a head start. 

1Q Calendar of Events 

■■ We celebrate summer with Purple 
Martins, Rose Evening, concerts, 
flower shows and extended hours. 

12 Gift Planning 

HH Bequests to the Garden benefit the 
giver as well. 

JQ Japanese Beetles 

^H These voracious pests have arrived in 
St. Louis. Be prepared! 

lg Henk van der Werff, Ph.D. 

^H A profile of the Garden's expert on the 
Lauraceae family. 

JQ Center for Plant Conservation 

■■ The Science Advisory Council held its 
annual meeting at the Garden. 



On the cover: A rose is a rose . . . 
especially on Rose Evening. See the 
Calendar of Events, page 10. 



1992 Missouri Botanical Garden. 

The BULLETIN (ISSN 0026-6507) is published bi-monthly 
by the Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Tower Grove 
Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110. Second class postage paid at 
St. Louis, MO. 

The Bl 'I.I.KTIN is sent to every Member of the Garden 
as one of the benefits of membership. For a contribution of 
as little as $40 per year, Members also are entitled to: free 
admission to the Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special events and receptions; 
announcements of all lectures and classes; discounts in the 
Garden Gate Shop and for course fees; and the opportunity 
to travel, domestic and abroad, with other Members. For 
information, please call (314) 577-5100. 

Postmaster: send address changes to BULLETIN, Susan 
Caine, editor, P.O. Box 299, St. I>ouis, MO 63166. 



Comment 



Welcoming Spring and Summer 



® 



printed an recycled paper 



with] 
NK 




Struggling with 
a few false starts 
and some confusion, 
spring finally arrived 
and the Garden 
grounds weathered 
the transition well. 
The plantings through- 
out the various gar- 
dens are lush and green. 

The beauty of spring and summer at 
the Garden ushers in a host of activities. 
The traditional events for members, Pur- 
ple Martin Evening, the Mother's Day 
luncheon, and Rose Evening, are always 
popular and delightful. (See page 10.) In 
addition, this summer we are hosting the 
first Rosy Periwinkle Festival, a celebration 
of plants that have benefitted society with 
their medicinal value (see back cover). 
And I encourage you to bring your favorite 
child to the marvelous "Bug's Eye View" 
exhibit in the Brookings Interpretive 
Center (see page 13). 

The Garden wishes to congratulate 
KMOV-Channel 4 for its efforts in helping 



everyone better comprehend the effects of 
the loss of the rain forest. I do hope you 
were able to view the Channel 4 March 
documentary "Rescuing the Rain Forest: 
The St. Louis Connection." It was an infor- 
mative presentation about what the 
Garden, the Science Center, and the Zoo 
are doing and listed helpful tips on how each 
individual can participate in helping to 
"Rescue the Rain Forest." A special 
congratulations to the producer, Al Frank. 

As the Garden approaches a record- 
breaking membership of 30,000 families, it 
is imperative to thank you for your gracious 
assistance and support. It is because of 
your involvement that we have been able to 
move ahead and provide more valuable 
information about plants and plant diversity, 
and offer a beautiful and serene setting for 
visitors throughout St. Louis to enjoy. 

We hope to see you at the spring and 
summer events. 



). 



W- 



Lk ;v 2 



ojo^ 




•MORE THAN YOU'D IMAGINE "—A recent television campaign highlighted the Garden's 
contributions to the community in education and research and the importance of plants 
to society. In one spot, pictured above, Judy Diesel and her daughter I^acey of Millstadt, 
Illinois, explained that Lacey is being successfully treated for childhood leukemia with a 
drug developed from the rosy periwinkle plant. The Garden works closely with the 
National Cancer Institute to find plants that may someday successfully be used to treat 
the world's deadliest diseases. 



IN MEMORIAM 



Charles Claude Johnson Spink 



1916-1992 



On March 26, the Garden's Board 
of Trustees lost a longtime friend and 
colleague, C.C. Johnson Spink. From 
his appointment to the Board in 1974 
and, especially, as Board President 
1982 through 1984, Mr. Spink pro- 
vided important leadership during the 
Garden's most significant period of 
expansion in facilities and services 
since its founding in 1859. 

"Johnson Spink served the 
Garden with enthusiasm and affec- 
tion. It would have been unthinkable 
for him to treat a cause in which he 
believed in any other way,' ' observed 

0. Sage Wightman III, current President of the Board of Trustees. 
"His talents and energy were especially evident during his tenure 
as President, when a number of highly significant projects were 
launched or concluded." 

Two of these projects were destined to have tremendous impact 
on the future of the Garden. The construction and 1982 dedication 
of the Ridgway Center, the Garden's 60,000 square-foot main 
entrance and visitor center, enabled the Garden to serve an atten- 
dance now approaching one million visitors annually through 
exhibits and events, education programs, and the Garden's gift 
shop and restaurant. A special feature of the Ridgway Center is the 
Spink Gallery, which displays on a rotating basis one of the world's 
finest collections of porcelain birds, flowers, and other natural 
history subjects from the studios of Edward Marshall Boehm. The 
Gallery, the porcelain collection, and their upkeep were a generous 




MISSOURI 80TANICA. 

MAY 6 1992 

GARDEN LIBRARY 



personal donation to the Garden from 
Mr. and Mrs. Spink. 

Mr. Spink was also at the Garden's 
helm during the successful 1983 
campaign for voter approval to enter 
the Garden as a subdistrict of the 
St. Louis Metropolitan Zoo-Museum 
District, a unique property taxing 
district encompassing St. Louis City 
and County to support several local 
museums. Subdistrict funding has 
made it possible for the Garden to 
reduce admission fees while 
broadening the range of community 
programs and services. 
A contribution from Mr. and Mrs. Spink permitted the Garden to 
renovate its original entry, the beautiful, intimate Flora Gate, into a 
facility for meetings and events. It was reopened in 1989 as the Edith 
and Johnson Spink Pavilion, dedicated to Blanche and J. G. Taylor Spink 
and Isabel and William Jenkin, Mr. and Mrs. Spink's late parents. 

"Johnson Spink's name is synonymous with the highest degree 
of philanthropy and community service, to which he was devoted 
throughout his life," said Dr. Peter Raven, the Garden's director. 
"The sale of The Sporting News, the Spinks' venerable old family 
business, to the Times Mirror organization in 1977 enabled Johnson 
to retire and focus even more on efforts to benefit our community. 
Besides his service to the Garden, he was a magnificent patron of 
the arts and was active in nearly every major cultural organization in 
our community, as well as the American Red Cross and the Church 
of St. Michael and St. George. St. Louis has truly lost a great friend 
and benefactor.' ' 



HI 'LLETIN I MAY JUNE 199^1 




Far left: The new- 
entrance benches. 

l^eft: The refurbished 
gazebo and gates. 



THE JENNIE LATZER KAESER MEMORIAL MAZE 



A-Mazing! 



IN the 1860s Henry Shaw constructed a 
Victorian maze in Tower Grove Park. 
These charming constructions, beloved 
of English gardeners for centuries, are 
recalled today in the splendid Kaeser maze, 
which stands on the southeast side of 
Tower Grove House. 

The Jennie Latzer Kaeser Memorial 
Maze was made possible by a bequest from 
Mrs. Kaeser and a gift from Mr. and Mrs. 



Vernon W. Piper, Mrs. Kaeser's daughter. 
The maze was dedicated in 1987 and has 
been a popular feature with visitors ever 
since. 

This past fall some significant improve- 
ments were undertaken to further enhance 
the beauty and function of the maze. All of 
the walkways were laid with handsome 
brickwork, and a pair of benches were 
placed at the entrance. Planters to accom- 
pany the benches are on order from Eng- 
land. All of the gates and the gazebo in the 
center have been painted green to blend 



with the tall hedges, and the gates have 
been altered so that their positions can be 
fixed and changed from time to time, mak- 
ing it more challenging to find the path 
through the maze. 

The alterations and improvements to 
the maze also were made possible by the 
generosity of Mr. and Mrs. Piper. All vis- 
itors are charmed by the maze, and 
whether one wanders through it slowly for 
spiritual refreshment or races through to 
solve the puzzle, the riddle of the maze is a 
delight to all. 




Cultural Diversity Council 
atMBG 



Staff members serving on the Garden's 
Cultural Diversity Council (front row, from 
left: Mike Mosley, Sandra Rode, Brenda 
Banjak, Marcia Kerz, Mary Middleton, 
Mary Lawrence. Second row, from left: 
Douglas Arnold, Deborah Graham, 
Sue Wilkerson, Donna Bruner, Amada 
Gonzalez, Susan Smith, Audrey Sanders. 
Third row, from left: Chris DePalma, 
Dorothy Clay, Jeanne McGilligan, 
Ken Barnes, Mike Olson, Paul 
Brockmann, Ben Chu, John MacDougal, 
Ishan Al-Shehbaz. Back row, from left: 
Larry DeBuhr, Peter Raven, Walter 
Nichols. Not pictured: Alicia Ivory House, 
Barbara Addelson, Tina Short, Cheryl Mill, 
Debbie Kama. 



\BULLETIN MAY Jb'NK 1992 



Monsanto Fund Supports New Programs at 
Kemper Center for Home Gardening 



A THREE-YEAR, $200,000 grant from Monsanto Fund has 
made it possible for the William T. Kemper Center for 
Home Gardening to develop and implement two new serv- 
ice programs: one to teach community residents how to manage 
their yard wastes through composting, and the other, an internship 
program for Lincoln University minority students who are interested 
in exploring careers or advanced study in horticulture, botany, and 
related fields. With this grant, Monsanto Fund continues and 
expands its support for the Center. A generous $750,000 gift from 
Monsanto Fund in 1987 played a major role in the building's con- 
struction. 

The program grant spans the period September 1991 into 1994. 
It reflects the commitment of Monsanto Fund to projects addressing 
environmental concerns and science education, direct corollaries of 
the company's mission. 

"The Garden has traditionally offered people at all levels of 
study, from casual visitors to professional botanists and biologists, 
singular opportunities to understand plants and their crucial place in 
the natural world," observed Dr. John L. Mason, Vice-President, 
University Relations and Equal Employment for Monsanto Company 
and President, Monsanto Fund. ' The Center for Home Gardening, 
which epitomizes that breadth of service, is an important investment 
for us. We are proud to have provided support integral to the con- 
struction of the Center and to expand our relationship by sponsoring 
these new programs.' ' 

The Master Composter Program is truly a timely offering, as the 
state's Solid Waste Law banning yard wastes from landfills took effect 
on January 1. Based on a successful Seattle model, the Garden's 
program trains volunteer Master Composters to give community 
residents the knowledge, skills, and materials to manage their yard 
wastes in environmentally productive ways. The Master Com- 
posters accept speaking engagements, offer in-person advice at the 
Center for Home Gardening, staff the Center's telephone compost- 
ing hotline, and conduct classes at demonstration sites being estab- 




lished in parks and other public settings around the St. Louis area. 
To date, 110 Master Composters have been trained and two 
demonstration sites have been set up, in downtown Kirkwood and 
Carondelet Park in south St. Louis City. A third demonstration site 
for the public is now being developed on property owned by Mon- 
santo Company in West St. Louis County. At this site, local Mon- 
santo employees will also have the opportunity to get composting 
training, a potential model for other Monsanto operating locations. 
The grant has also made it possible for the Center to produce a 
composting training video, suitable for either commercial broad- 
cast or consumer use and soon to be available from the Garden. 
The Lincoln University Intern Program targets minority under- 
graduate students enrolled in its Agriculture Department, with the 
goal to better acquaint them with career options in the botanical and 
horticultural sciences and to stimulate interest in pursuing 
advanced degrees in these or related fields. Commented Dr. Peter 
Raven, the Garden's director, "As environmental problems mount, 
the sciences must be able to call on the broadest base of new intelli- 
gence and talent to help develop solutions. That women and ethnic 
minorities have traditionally been discouraged from entering the 
sciences is no longer simply a historic disgrace, it is a situation that 
cannot be tolerated if we are to face the future with any degree of 
confidence. The Lincoln intern program joins a number of similar 
efforts at the Garden to make learning opportunities accessible to 
qualified yet disadvantaged individuals." 

Under the program, interns will be recruited in their freshman 
year and spend each of four summers through graduation as full- 
time temporary employees of the Garden. Academic requirements 
met during this time will also gain them college credit hours. One to 
two new freshmen will be recruited each year, ensuring that all aca- 
demic levels are ultimately represented and that older students will 
develop leadership skills by serving as mentors, if not supervisors, 
of newer arrivals. From the first year spent in gaining horticultural 
experience, students will rotate into other Garden departments, 
such as research, education, public rela- 
tions, public events, and development. This 
will allow the students to devote in-depth 
time to career areas of particular interest 
relative to their emerging academic goals. 
"The Center for Home Gardening has 
been on the drawing board for more than 
two decades, and words cannot describe 
how good it feels to finally be involved in 
developing and presenting programs to the 
public," concluded Dr. Steven Cline, the 
Center's manager. "Monsanto Fund has 
our deepest gratitude for helping us realize 
these long-held dreams." 



Chip Tynan of the MBG Horticultural 
Answer Service (center) leads a class in 
composting at the Kemper Center. 



BULLETIN I MAY JUNE 19921 



McDonnell Douglas Foundation Funds 
Eco-Cart Science Demonstrations 



THE McDonnell Douglas Foundation 
has agreed to support the Garden's 
interactive science education pro- 
gram for kindergarten through grade 12, 
with a grant of $150,000 over three years. 
The grant will provide for development of 
three carts to be used for science demon- 
strations for groups visiting the Climatron 
and Brookings Interpretive Center. The 
carts are scheduled to be ready by the 
opening of the new educational exhibits in 
the Brookings Center in 1994 (see the 
Bulletin, March-April 1992). 

The McDonnell Douglas Foundation, in 
a joint $750,000 gift with the Employee 
Charity and Community Services Plan of 
McDonnell Douglas St. Louis, was one of 
the largest contributors to the recent capital 
campaign that renovated the Climatron and 
built the Brookings Center. The current 
grant extends that investment in environ- 
mental education to benefit the St. Louis 
community and beyond. 

"The McDonnell Douglas Foundation, 
the Corporation and its employees have 
been steadfast friends of the Garden for 
many years," said Dr. Peter H. Raven, 
director. "This generous support will help 
us to move ahead with our program to assist 
in improving science education." 

Cousteau Visits the Garden 



Dr. Larry DeBuhr, director of education 
at the Garden, added, "Children and adults 
find the displays in the Climatron much 
more meaningful when we can actually 
demonstrate the scientific concepts por- 
trayed. The carts will contain supplies and 
materials for interactive activities and can 
be moved to appropriate locations within 
the Climatron complex. We will have 
printed materials for use by teachers in the 
classroom as well." 

Ten topics will be developed by Garden 
education staff. The demonstrations will be 
tested with school children throughout the 
process. The topics are: 

Decomposition and Nutrient Cycling— 
the role of microorganisms in the environ- 
ment and how soil is produced. 

Energy: First and Second Laws— basic 
physical science concepts that have impor- 
tant applications to global energy flows, 
including global warming and the high cost 
of world energy resources. 

Changes in Matter: Chemical Reactions 
—interesting chemical reactions will help 
illustrate acid rain or the polymerization of 
latex into rubber products, for example. 

Plant and Animal Adaptations— The 
relationships among the structure of organ- 
isms, the habitats they live in, and the 




Jacques Cousteau (right) and Peter Raven filming for the television special. 



This past March, Captain Jacques Yves 
Cousteau, undersea explorer and naturalist, 
visited the Garden to interview Dr. Peter H. 
Raven for an upcoming television special on 



the world summit on the environment to be us to far off and exotic worlds, worlds filled 



held in Rio de Janeiro this summer. 

"It is a special opportunity for the 
Garden to welcome such a visitor as Capt. 
Cousteau," said Dr. Raven. "He has taken 



niches they occupy, is a fundamental sci- 
ence concept in biology. 

Photosynthesis— how plants are able to 
convert light energy into chemical energy, 
and thereby produce food for all other 
organisms. 

Food Chain— an important ecological 
concept that can be presented in relation to 
the fish tank in the Climatron and the ' 'Ant 
and Acacia" exhibit planned for the Brook- 
ings Center. 

Changes in the State of Matter— The 
change from solids to liquids and gasses 
helps explain many important biological and 
ecological concepts and helps to illustrate 
weather and climate. 

Heat Transfers: Convection, Radiation, 
and Conduction— The three ways that heat 
is transferred are important concepts for 
understanding global climate patterns and 
global warming. 

Water Cycle— how matter cycles in the 
environment, how clouds form, how rain 
condenses from water vapor, evaporation 
and condensation. 

Changing Seasons— the relationship 
between the tilting and rotation of the Earth 
on its axis, the revolution of the Earth 
around the Sun, and the changing seasons. 

The Eco-Cart Demonstrations will be an 
exciting innovation in science education and 
the Garden is deeply grateful to the 
McDonnell Douglas Foundation for making 
the program possible. 



with creatures and life rare and splendid." 

The film crew spent the day shooting 
scenes in the Climatron of endangered 
plants and tropical flowers. The interview 
focused on the environment and what 
scientists are doing to help influence the 
world's governments to act in defense of 
the planet. Capt. Cousteau will be inter- 
viewing other prominent international 
scientists to present a variety of viewpoints 
from scientific leaders throughout the 
world. The television special will air in late 
June or early July on the Turner Broad- 
casting cable network. Watch local listings 
for exact time and date. 

Although Capt. Cousteau has not been 
actively pursuing adventures on the high 
seas, the Cousteau Society continues to 
work on exploration and discovery projects 
all over the world. This year is the 50th 
anniversary of the launching of the Calypso, 
Capt. Cousteau's famed exploration vessel. 
Capt. Cousteau received the World 
Ecology Medal from the University of 
Missouri-St. Louis during his stay in 
St. Louis. 



\BULLET1N MAY JUNK 1992 




From left: Dr. David Mahan, superintendent of St. Louis Public Schools; Dr. Larry DeBuhr, 
MBG director of education; Alicia Ivory House, MBG education staff; Melva Ware, RCAC 
co-director; Charles Sims, assistant superintendent for middle school education. 

ALL CITY MIDDLE SCHOOL gcjgy^ p^y 



E 



FFECTS of Acid Rain" . . . "Anti- 
biotics Versus Bacteria" . . . "Chro- 
matography.' ' These are just a few 
of the student projects displayed at the first 
annual All City Middle School Science Fair 
held at the Garden March 12-14, 1992. 

Co-sponsored by the Garden and 
St. Louis Public Schools in conjunction with 
the Regional Science and Technology 
Career Access Center (RCAC), the science 
fair is a new program designed to encourage 



urban science students in grades 6-8. Three 
projects per school were chosen by 
teachers, with 26 schools participating. 

"Many students and teachers have not 
had an opportunity to visit a science fair or 
to learn how to develop good projects,' ' said 
Alicia Ivory House of the Garden's educa- 
tion staff, coordinator of the fair. "The 
judges evaluated every project on a number 
of criteria, from appearance to scientific 
accuracy, and students received their evalu- 



ation scores and comments. At the awards 
ceremony every student received recogni- 
tion for his or her efforts, with the most rib- 
bons going to projects that were successful 
on many levels. The top ranked student 
from each school received a trophy, and 
their teachers were recognized as well.' ' 

On March 13 enthusiastic students from 
25 of the 26 participating schools visited the 
Garden to view the Science Fair and the 
work of their classmates. "It was a top notch 
production," said Edward P. Ortleb, sci- 
ence supervisor of St. Louis Public Schools. 
"I am sure that there are many students 
and parents who are walking a little bit taller 
because of this science fair experience." 

Charles W. Sims, assistant superinten- 
dent for middle school education, said, 
"Also... we recognize the contributions of 
middle school administrators and teachers 
...responsible for assisting in planning and 
carrying out... the first All-City Middle 
School Science Fair.' ' 

Projects represented 12 categories: 
biochemistry, botany, chemistry, computer 
science, Earth and space science, engi- 
neering, environmental science, mathemat- 
ics, medicine and health, microbiology, 
physics, and zoology. The 13 judges and the 
committee of 15 educators were drawn 
from St. Louis public schools, colleges, 
universities, and the Garden staff. 

"We are especially grateful to Melva 
Ware, co-director of RCAC at University of 
Missouri-St. Louis," said Dr. Larry DeBuhr, 
the Garden's director of education. "With- 
out their support the Science Fair would not 
have been possible.' ' 



Community Beautification Awards 




Shown at the awards ceremony (front left): Deborah Graham, Manager of MBG Public 
Programs and Public Events; Patricia Barrett, Vice-President Corporate Communications, 
Union Electric; and award winners Reginald Williams, Frances Byrd, Donna Ransom, 
Eula Toney Jones, and Vera Strong. 



Five local African-Americans were 
recognized for their significant contribu- 
tions to local beautification projects in a 



ceremony and reception on Sunday, 
February 16 at the Garden. The Awards 
were sponsored by the Garden and Union 



Electric Company. This is the second year 
the two organizations have teamed together 
to present the awards program as part of 
the Garden's Black History Month activi- 
ties. The winners beautified their neighbor- 
hoods through clean-up, gardening, and 
reforestation. 

The 1992 winners were: Frances Byrd, 
Fairground Neighborhood; Eula Toney 
Jones, Ville Neighborhood; Donna Ransom, 
West End Area; Vera M. Strong, Jeff Vander 
Lou Neighborhood; and Reginald A. 
Williams, Wells-Goodfellow Neighborhood. 

Representatives from the following 
organizations served on the selection 
committee: Gateway to Gardening Asso- 
ciation, Human Development Corporation, 
Neighborhood Housing Services, Operation 
Brightside, Operation ConServ, the Urban 
League of Metropolitan St. Louis, Union 
Electric Company, the Garden, and the 
1991 Honorees. 



RVU.ETIS MAY Jl'NE 19921 



PURCHASING PLANTS 

Trees and shrubs are avail- 
able from suppliers in four ways: 
bare-root, container grown, 
balled-and-burlapped (B & B), 
and potted. 

Bare-root plants, as the 
name implies, are without soil. 
They are generally available 
only in early spring. It is best to 
plant as soon as possible once 
received. Soak the roots for six 
to twelve hours before planting. 

Container grown plants have 
been grown in containers. They 
are available spring to fall and 
can be planted if kept watered 
and protected from extremes of 
weather. When planting, remove 
the plant from the container 
even if it is a "plantable" 
container. Slice down each of the 
four sides of the root ball about 
one inch deep to cut circling 
roots and encourage new root 
growth. 

Balled-and-burlapped and 
potted plants are field grown, 
then dug and wrapped with 
burlap or placed in a pot. They 
have a reduced root system but 
if properly root pruned at the 
nursery will have many small- 
feeder roots in the soil ball. 
They can be planted any time 
they are available; generally 
spring through fall. Remove the 
burlap if it is the plastic type. 
Fabric burlap need not be 
removed, but cut and remove all 
ropes or wire and roll down the 
burlap so it is completely 
covered by soil. 

WHEN TO PLANT 

Most trees and shrubs are 
planted in early spring but 
summer and fall planting can also 
prove successful. Planted in 
early fall, plants establish new 
roots before the ground freezes 
and continue in spring before top 
growth begins. Plants subject to 
winter injury such as rhododen- 
drons, evergreen azaleas and 
needled evergreen should not be 
planted too late in the fall as 
damage from drying winter 
winds can result. Providing a 
burlap wind break can help. 



Home Gardening 




Planting Trees and Shrubs 



SUMMER PLANTING 

Busy gardeners rarely have 
the time to get their planting 
done on time and ' 'by the 
book." So, frequently summer 
planting is needed. It is more 
challenging but with care plants 
purchased balled-and-burlapped, 
potted or container grown can 
be brought through with excel- 
lent success. The plant's water 
demands are very high at this 
time so special care is needed to 
prevent the plant from drying to 
a crisp before you realize it. To 
help assure success follow these 
steps. 

At planting time, spray the 
foliage with an antitranspirant 
such as Wilt-Pruf. Antitran- 
spirants reduce water loss from 



the leaves and buy extra time 
while the plant develops new 
roots. Follow label directions 
carefully and spray the entire 
leaf surface, both top and 
bottom. 

For added protection of 
tender plants, construct a 
barrier around the plant from an 
old sheet to shade the plant and 
protect it from drying winds. 
Spray the plant and sheet peri- 
odically with water until the 
plant is established. Water as 
needed to keep the soil moist. 
Turning on a sprinkler can 
reduce moisture loss and cool 
the plants during hot dry 
weather. 

Mulching and watering is also 
very important. Follow the 
directions given below closely. 




PLANTING METHOD 

Until recently, common 
wisdom for planting trees and 
shrubs has been pretty standard 
—dig a hole six inches wider and 
deeper than the root ball, mix 
copious amounts of organic 
matter into the bottom of the 
hole and the soil removed 
from the hole, plant the tree or 
shrub and back fill with the 
amended soil. 

Recent research is challenging 
the wisdom of this method. 
Trees planted in the old method 
often settle into the soft bottom 
soil resulting in the root system 
being too deep. Trees and 
shrubs should not be planted 
deeper than they were growing 
in the nursery. This level can be 
determined by locating the color 
change on the trunk of the tree. 

The old method has also 
resulted in delayed rooting into 
the unprepared soil surrounding 
the planting hole. In effect the 
plant grows in a 'container' in 
the ground because the roots fail 
to leave the well prepared soil. 
The plant thrives for a short 
time and then develops slowly 
or dies. 

Because of these problems, 
planting recommendations are 
changing. The new method 
advocates that the hole be dug 
only as deep as the root ball is 
high and the soil be loosened to a 
depth of twelve inches in an area 
at least four to five times as wide 
as the root ball. Work soil 
amendments into this entire 
area, not just close to the root 
ball. If the tree is to grow and 
flourish it must develop roots 
beyond the planting hole. Your 
goal should be to facilitate this 
process. Either prepare the 
whole area or do not amend the 
soil at all. 

This "total area" improve- 
ment method has been the 
standard recommendation for 
shrub, perennial and annual bed 
preparation for many years. If 
anything, research is reinforcing 
the need for this practice. 



I BULLETIN I MAY JUNK 1992 



MULCHING 

After planting, mulch the 
entire spaded area with three to 
four inches of organic mulch 
such as shredded bark, compost 
or leaf mold. Mulch keeps the 
soil cool, retains moisture, adds 
nutrients as it decomposes and 
prevents competition from 
grass. Do not mound mulch 
around the trunk. This can 
result in disease, insect and 
rodent damage. Instead keep 
the mulch three to four inches 
away from the trunk. 



WATERING 

Water the entire soil area 
well. Check water needs regu- 
larly. Newly planted trees need 
frequent watering in hot, dry 
weather. When the plants begin 
to establish, gradually reduce 
the frequency of watering to 
once every ten days to two 
weeks depending upon rain fall. 
Do not keep the soil soggy. 
Water the entire mulched area to 
encourage lateral rooting. 

STAKING 

Most newly planted trees 



and shrubs do not need staking. 
Some top movement of the plant 
is beneficial for the development 
of a strong trunk and root 
system. Staking should only be 
done if the plant is at risk of 
being toppled by wind. If this is a 
danger, supply minimal support 
for the first year until the plant is 
established. Be sure the support 
does not cut into the trunk of the 
tree. 

PLANTING EXCEPTION 

The new method of planting 
has many advantages but there 



are still times when the old 
method can or should be used. 
The old method is a necessity 
when growing small plants which 
require a special soil mix, such 
as azaleas. These plants, with 
special soil requirements, would 
not survive in unamended soil. 
For these plants, prepare a hole 
large enough to contain the root 
system of the mature plant and 
amend the soil to meet the 
plant's requirements. 

—Glen Kopp, Coordinator of 
Adult Education Programs 



Timely Tips from the Answer Service 



Do you have a plant question? Call the 
Horticultural Answer Service, Monday 
through Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon, at 
577-5143, 



May Tips 

■ Pinch azaleas and rhododendron blos- 
soms as they fade. 

■ If spring rains have been sparse, begin 
irrigating, especially plants growing in full 
sun. 

■ Begin planting gladiolus bulbs as the 
ground warms. Continue at two week 
intervals. 

■ Begin planting warm-season annuals 
and begin fertilizing them. Continue at 
regular intervals. 

■ Bulbs can be moved or divided as the 
foliage dies. 

■ Set out tomato plants as soils warm. 
Place support stakes alongside at planting 
time. 

■ Begin planting sweet corn as soon as 
white oak leaves are as big as squirrel ears. 

■ Keep bluegrass cut at 1.5 to 2.5 inch 
height. Mow tall fescues at 2.5 to 3.5 inch 
height. Mow zoysia lawns at 1.5 inch height. 
Remove no more than one-half inch at each 
mowing. Zoysia lawns may be fertilized 
now. Apply no more than one pound of 
actual nitrogen per 1,000 square feet. 



June Tips 

■ Deadhead bulbs and spring flowering 
perennials as blossoms fade. 

■ Most houseplants brought outside pre- 
fer a bright spot shaded from afternoon sun. 
Check soil moisture daily during hot 
weather. 

■ Rhizomatous begonias are not just for 
shade. Many varieties, especially those 
with bronze foliage, do well in full sun if 
given plenty of water. 

■ Apply a balanced rose fertilizer after the 
first show of blooms is past. 

■ Trees and shrubs may still be fertilized 
before July 4th. Softwood cuttings can be 
taken from trees and shrubs as the spring 
flush of growth is beginning to mature. 
Pruning of spring flowering trees and 
shrubs should be completed before 
months's end. 

■ Plant pumpkins now to have Jack-o- 
lanterns for Halloween. 

■ Late in the month start seedlings of 
broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower. These 
will provide transplants for the fall garden. 

■ Soaker hoses and drip irrigation sys- 
tems make the most efficient use of water 
during try times. 

■ To maximize top growth on asparagus, 
after harvest apply two pounds of 12-12-12 
fertilizer per 100 square feet, water well 
and renew mulches to conserve moisture. 



■ A mailbox mounted on a nearby post 
makes a handy place to store any small 
tools, seeds, labels, frequently used in the 
garden. 

—Chip Tynan, The Answer Service 



Garden Floral Designer 
Named Illinois Designer 
of the Year 

Pat Diehl Scace, floral designer for the 
Missouri Botanical Garden, was named 
"Designer of the Year" at the annual con- 
vention of the Illinois State Florists Associa- 
tion, March 1, 1992. 

The Designer of the Year is the florist 
who receives the highest cumulative total of 
points in a three-category floral design com- 
petition. Scace received three firsts and one 
third, with the highest point total. As 
Designer of the Year, Scace will participate 
on a design panel at the 1993 convention, 
performing with two other designers at 
design sessions at the convention. 

"This distinction, coupled with last 
year's AIFD acceptance, brings great 
honor to the Garden," said Shannon Smith, 
the Garden's director of horticulture. 
"We're very proud of Pat." Scace was 
accepted into the prestigious American 
Institute of Floral Designers in 1991. She 
will be inducted at that organization's annual 
meeting in July 1992 . 



BULLETIN I MAY JUNE 1992 I 



MAY 



Missouri Botanical Garden 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

May-June 1992 



2 



SATURDAY 




Monday, May 25/Memorial Day 

Slimmer HOUrS Begin From now through Labor Day 
enjoy extended Garden hours until 8 p.m. daily. 



13th Annual Storytelling Festival 
"Sparks by the River: 
Dreams and Destiny" 

2 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. 
Nationally recognized storytellers 
Elizabeth Ellis, Gayle Ross and 
Twelve Moons Storytellers share 
tales of Native America and the 
Appalachian Mountains. Free with 
Garden admission. 

Ernst Haas Exhibit 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Ridgway 
Center. Floral works produced 
especially for the Missouri Botan- 
ical Garden by the late world 
renowned photographer Ernst 
Haas. Free with Garden admission. 



2-3 



SAT 

S U 



U R D A Y - 

N I) A Y 




African Violet Council Show 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Orthwein 
Moral Hall. The Metropolitan 
St. Louis African Violet Council 
hosts its 38th annual juried show 
celebrating "100 Years of Violets." 
Displays of all sizes, colors and 
planting arrangements, plus educa- 
tional, membership, and sales 
booths. Free with Garden 
admission. 



5 



T U E S I) A Y 



Friday, May 29 /Rose Evening 

5:30 to 8:30 p.m., grounds. This very popular and lovely event 
features the beautiful Lehmann and Gladney rose gardens. Garden 
horticulture staff will be on hand to answer questions on rose care. 
The evening includes music, a free rose care brochure, a film on 
growing and care of roses, and an optional buffet supper. Special 
attendance gift. Watch your mail for a special invitation. For 
members only. 

WALKING TOURS «.nn«m 

Every Tuesday, Saturday and Sunday 1:00 p.m. 

Join the Garden Guides for a tour of the grounds, featuring 

the art, architecture, history and horticulture of the Garden 

Meet at the ticket counter in the Ridgway Center. Free with 

regular Garden admission. 



Lewis & Clark Trail Tour Preview 

7:30 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium. 
Join Dr. Ray Breun of the River- 
lands Association for a lecture on 
the tour coming up June 12-25, 
1992. Call 577-9500 for information 
on this exciting trip. Lecture is free. 



/ THURSDAY 

Santa Fe Trail Tour Preview 

7:30 p.m., Ridgway Center. Join 
Dr. Marshal] Crosby, assistant 
director of the Garden, for a lecture 
on the tour coming up July 20-29, 
1992. Call 577-9500 for information 
on this exciting trip. Lecture is free. 




/ THURSDAY 

Benefit for Seacology Foun 

5:30 p.m. cocktail reception; 
p.m. film and discussion; Ridj 
Center. The Garden hosts tin 
American premiere of "Nafar 
Saving the Samoan Rainfores 
film by the Seacology Founda 
(see page 14). $30 per persoi 
Call 577-9500 for reservation 



8 



FRIDAY 



"Bouquets to Mom" 

Noon, under the outdoor ten 
Ridgway Center. (Seating bej 
11:50 a.m.) A pre-Mother's I 
luncheon co-sponsored by Sa 
and the Garden. A day of flov 
fragrance and fashion for you 
bed, bath and table. Special g 
and attendance prizes from C 
Body Results, Tiger's Eye, F 
Paris, Sallie, and Gerber Lam 
$35 members, $45 Non-men 
Call 577-9500 for reservation 

"Nafanua: Saving the Sam 
Rainforest" 

2 and 7 p.m. , Shoenberg Aud 
rium. A film featuring the woi 
the Seacology Foundation. $^ 
person, to benefit Seacology 
dation. 



9 



SATURDAY 



0'Fallon Iris Society Show 

Noon to 5 p.m., Orthwein Fk 
Hall. A juried show featuring 
300 entries in seven classes. 
with Garden admission. 

"Nafanua: Saving the Sam 
Rainforest" 

2 p.m., Shoenberg Auditoriur 
See May 8. 



10. 



MWU.ETIN I MAY JUNE 1992 



ontinued 




r St. Louis 
ciety Show 

) 5 p.m., Orthwein Floral 
spectacular array of both 
:ments and individual flowers 
displayed and judged. Free 
irden admission. 



TUESDAY 

ial Planning Panel 
sion 

to noon, Spink Pavilion. Join 
5 in estate planning. Discus- 
free, but reservations are 
d: call 577-9532. 



WEDNESDAY 

i June 

m., Cohen Amphitheater. 
>pular outdoor concert series 
s some of the area's finest 
ads. Lawn seating; blankets 
'n chairs are encouraged. 
t's concert features the 
enowned East St. Louis 
i High School Jazz Band. 
• Garden members, 
-members. 



WEDNESDAY 

i June 

-n. Featuring The Black 
Society Jazz Ensemble 
ig Lillian Vann. 
e3. 



WEDNESDAY 

i June 

m. Featuring the Eddie Fritz 
lintet with vocalist Asa 
and clarinetist Scott Alberici. 
te 3. 



16-17 



SATURDAY- 
SUNDAY 



St. Louis Horticulture 
Society Show 

Noon to 5 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m. to 
5 p.m. Sunday, Orthwein Floral 
Hall. Vegetables and flowers are 
among the categories to be judged 
and displayed. Free with garden 
admission. 



23-24 



SATURDAY- 
SUNDAY 



Rose Society Show 

Noon to 5 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. Sunday, Orthwein Floral 
Hall. The Rose Soceity of Greater 
St. Louis will display hundreds of 
roses grown especially for this 
juried show. Free with Garden 
admission. 

Everything's Coming Up Roses 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Ridgway 
Center and grounds. Films, lectures 
and tours of the rose gardens high- 
light this annual celebration of 



JUNE 



20-21 



SATURDAY- 
SUNDAY 



Lily Society Show 

Noon to 8 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. Sunday, Orthwein Floral 
Hall. The Mid-America Regional 
Lily Society (MARLS) hosts its 
annual show. Both arrangements 
and individual flowers will be 
judged. Free with Garden 
admission. 



21 



SUNDAY 



Showtime at the Garden 

6:30 and 8:30 p.m., Shoenberg 
Auditorium. A city-wide talent 
show. Cash bar. Tickets are $3 
members, $5 non-members, with 
children age 12 and under half price. 
Tickets may be purchased at the 
Ridgway Center Ticket Counter. 



24 



WEDNESDAY 



Jazz In June 

7:30 p.m. Featuring the swinging 
band sounds of The Jazz Edge with 
vocalist Denise Thimes. See June 3. 



America's favorite flower. 
Free with Garden admission. 



24-25 



SUNDAY- 
MONDAY 



Dahlia Society Plant Sale 

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, Orthwein 
Floral Hall. The Greater St. Louis 
Dahlia Society offers an exciting 
selection of limited new cultivars 
and treasured favorites, varieties 
that consistently produce quality 
blooms and healthy foliage. Regular 
Garden admission. 




27 



SATURDAY 



Children's Art Exhibit 

9a.m. to 8p.m., daily through June 
26, Ridgway Center. "Children of 
the World Paint in a Single 
Language' ' is the theme of this 
exhibit by Paintbrush Diplomacy, 
featuring 77 pieces representing 38 
countries by children ages 4 to 16. 
The works demonstrate the rich- 
ness of the world's cultural diver- 
sity with themes including war and 
peace, festivals, animals, family and 
friends, and people at work. Free 
with Garden admission. 



28 



SUNDAY 



West County 
Daylily Society Show 

Noon to 8 p.m. , Ridgway Center. 
Enjoy a colorful blooming array of 
these summertime favorites. Free 
with Garden admission. 



MEMBERS' 
EVENTS 

May 13 Members' Day 
"Purple Martin 
Evening" 

6:30 p.m., Shoenberg Auditorium 
and grounds. The 11th annual 
celebration features a lecture and 
film followed by a stroll through the 
Garden's Purple Martin neighbor- 
hood. There will be a drawing for 
a Purple Martin house. Cash bar. 
No reservations are required, but 
seating for the film is limited. Free, 
for members only. 

June 26 Members' Day 
"Members' Musical 
Evening" 

5:30 to 9 p.m., Spoehrer Plaza. 
Bring a picnic supper if desired, and 
lawn chairs or blankets for seating. 
The popular Gateway City Big Band 
will perform your favorite songs and 
instrumentals. Concert starts at 
7:30 p.m., limited concert seating 
will be provided. Cash bar available. 
Free, for members only. 



Kemper Center for 
Home Gardening 

Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. 
Plant Doctor available 10 a.m. to 
noon and 1 to 3 p.m. Monday 
through Saturday. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 
Master Composter 
Hotline: 314/577-9555 

Tower Grove House 
Tea Room 

Open for luncheon Monday 
through Friday, 11:30 a.m. to 1 
p.m., February through 
November, plus special Holiday 
Luncheons in December; 
advance reservations only. 
Call 577-5150. 

Garden Walkers' 
Breakfast 

7 to 10:30 a.m., every 

Wednesday and Saturday. 
Restaurant and grounds open 
early; free admission until noon. 
Sponsored by the American 
Heart Association. Call 
577-5125 for information. 



11. 



BULLETIN I MAY JUNE 1992 I 






Special gift techniques 
not only create a lasting 
tribute, they can offer 
significant tax advan- 
tages as well. 




< A family gift that made possible the Brookings 
Interpretive Center on the Tropics included the 
Charitable Remainder Trust of Audrey F. Wallace 



Herbarium specimens 
been acquired through 
Testamentary Fund of 
Julian A. Steyermark 



GIFT* PLANNING 

A Lasting Memorial 

Ever since Henry Shaw endowed the Missouri Botanical Garden 
in his Will, the Garden has grown and flourished through the 
thoughtful bequests of caring individuals. From features on the 
grounds and education programs that serve the community, to 
research efforts that benefit the world, planned gifts to the 
Garden create a wonderful living memorial. 



As a service to its members, the Garden provides 

information on estate planning. To learn more about the 

opportunities available to you, attend the free Financial 

Planning Panel Discussion at the Spink Pavilion 

May 12, 1992, 9 a.m. to noon. Call 577-9532 for reservations. 



1'itzman Nature Study Program, funded annually by tin 
Testamentary Fund of Frederick I'itzman T 





A Renovation of the Climatron entrance, 

Bequest of Marion Graves in memory of Margaret Emilw Wright 



Bequests to the Garde 
research program hel t 
scientists to study am 
protect the biological 
diversity of the world 
plants, which may hoi 
the keys to cures for 
cancer, AIDS, or worl 
hunger. 

A Azalea/Rhododendron Card: 
Bequest qt Eyvonne Huch 




A Pipe Bonsai Collection, B 
of Mr. and Mrs. Edward I 



Support for the Garde 
education programs 
strengthens science 
education throughout 
St. Louis. 



The beauty of the 
Garden 's grounds and 
displays is a joy and 
delight to visitors. 



UWU.ETIN I MAY JUNK 1992 



Japanese Beetles 



by Chip Tynan, 

MBG Horticultural Answer Service 

As though area gardeners didn't have 
enough insect pests to worry about, it 
appears that we now have the dubious 
honor of adding Japanese beetles (Popillia 
japonica) to our already impressive list of 
gardening foes. Handsomely colored, these 
V2 inch long beetles are a beautiful metallic 
green with coppery bronze wing covers and 
a fringe of white dots along the sides and tip 
of their abdomen. 




Having arrived in America as stow- 
aways in soils of plants imported from Japan, 
by 1916 a small population had become 
established in a nursery in Riverton, New 
Jersey. Since then, the beetles have spread 
and infested most of the Eastern United 
States. 

First discovered in St. Louis in 1934, 
with the exception of a few isolated "hot 
spots," Japanese beetles have never been 
numerous here until recently. Common as 
nearby as northern and eastern Illinois, 
their numbers are now increasing in the 
metropolitan area. Adults beetles begin to 
appear in late June and reach peak levels 
during July and August. By Labor Day, their 
numbers have dwindled sharply. Adults 
feed on approximately 300 species of 
plants, mostly deciduous fruits, shade 
trees, shrubs and garden flowers — 
especially roses. Few vegetables are eaten, 
though corn and soy beans may be 
attacked. Female Japanese beetles lay eggs 
throughout their active period, preferring 
grassy sites with sandy, loamy soils and 
abundant moisture. Golf courses and well- 
watered lawns make ideal habitats. The 
eggs hatch into a white grub that feeds on 
grass roots until cold weather sets in. In 
large concentrations these grubs can inflict 
serious injury to the roots of turfgrasses. In 
spring the mature grubs feed again for a 
short time, pupate, and then emerge as 



adults, completing their one year life cycle. 

There is no one method that will provide 
complete control of Japanese beetles. 
Where only a few are encountered, hand 
picking is most effective. Japanese beetles 
are gregarious insects, preferring to feed 
among their own kind. Several traps are 
available commercially, utilizing either 
pheremones (sex hormones) or floral 
scents as attractants. These work so well, 
however, they may attract more beetles to 
your garden than would normally occur. 
Studies have shown that plants within 30 
feet of beetle traps have suffered greater 
injury than plants not near traps. For this 
reason, it is advised to place traps well away 
from and downwind of any plants you are 
trying to protect. 

The most vulnerable stage of develop- 
ment in the life cycle of the Japanese beetle 
is the newly hatched grubs. Their cycle 
roughly parallels the life cycle of the 
Southern Masked Chafer, or annual white 
grub, which is by far the most common 
white grub found in area lawn grasses. 
Therefore, any insecticide used to control 
the annual white grub, will also prove effec- 
tive against Japanese beetle grubs. These 
insecticides are generally applied during the 
first two weeks in August. A biological 
control for Japanese beetles is milky spore 
disease. This naturally occurring bacterium 
is available under several trade names. It 
takes about three years to build up to effec- 
tive levels in the soil but remains viable for 
years as long as there is a steady supply of 
infected grubs to serve as a host. It must be 
noted, however, that milky disease infects 
only Japanese beetles and does not control 
annual white grubs. A more recent biolog- 
ical innovation is the use of beneficial nema- 
todes which prey on all white grub species. 
At the present time, however, these have 
not yet proven to be as effective as current 
chemical insecticides. 

It is too early to predict how numerous 
and widespread the Japanese beetle will 
become throughout the region. Two things 
are certain however. They have arrived and 
are here to stay; and they are sure to have a 
detrimental impact on our gardens in the 
years to come. 

Biological controls and traps for 
Japanese beetles are available in the Garden 
Gate Shop. Gardeners may bring live 
specimens or freshly trapped beetles to the 
Plant Doctor, Kemper Center for Home 
Gardening, for positive identification. 




Enjoy a "Bug's Eye View" 
May 30 - August 23 

9 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily, Brookings Interpre- 
tive Center. Experience a thrilling exhibit 
where the world is seen from an insect's 
point of view. Huge leaves, flowers, and 
insects create a wondrous environment that 
will enhance your understanding of the 
Earth's most diverse and successful life 
form. Insects have survived for 300 million 
years, number 30 million species, and have 
affected every aspect of life on our planet. 
Learn why spiders, millipedes, ticks, sow 
bugs and centipedes are not classified as 
insects. Make your own insects by working 
with an assortment of different legs, body 
parts, antennae and wings, test a pair insect 
wings, take a robotic insect for a walk, build 
a beehive, design a butterfly wing and 
discover new strategies for keeping harmful 
insects under control. 

Special events include: 

June 10, 17 and 24: Children's Tours 

A fun look at the world of insects. Tours 
leave from the Ridgway Center lobby at 
9:30 a.m., 11 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. 
June 16: Pollination Pals 

10:30 a.m. Children ages 9-11 will learn 
how plants and insects have formed an 
interdependency that keeps the Earth 
green and growing. Children will make a 
pollination model to take home and visit the 
Bug's Eye View exhibit. Reservations are 
required, $1.50 per child. Call 577-5125 
beginning June 1, 1992. 

"Bugs Eye View" is jointly sponsored by 
the St. Louis Science Center, Zoo, and the 
Garden. The exhibit is part of the second 
National Science Foundation sponsored 
Exhibit Research Collaborative and was 
designed by the Oregon Museum of 
Science and Industry. Free with Garden 
admission. 



13. 



BULLETIN I MAY -JUNK 19921 



From the Membership Office 



It's Purple Martin Time Again 




warn 

Ashley Gray sprucing up the purple martin houses. 

On May 13 Garden members can spend a delightful evening with the Garden's Purple 
Martin Curator, W. Ashley Gray III, and learn how to attract America's most wanted bird 
to your own yard. 

Purple martins feed only on flying insects including mosquitoes, flies, and other pests. 
The birds are graceful in flight and demonstrate interesting behavior traits. They are a 
semi-domesticated species that prefers to live near human activity and if nesting condi- 
tions are proper they will return to the same nesting place year after year. 

Join us at 6:30 p.m. for one of the Garden's most popular annual celebrations. 

Garden Hosts Film to Benefit Seacology Foundation 



May 7, 1992 at 5:30 p.m. the Garden will 
host the American premiere of the film 
"Nafanua: Saving the Samoan Rainforest" 
to benefit the Seacology Foundation. The 
benefit premiere includes a cocktail recep- 
tion before the film is shown at 6:30 p.m., 
and it will be followed by a discussion with 
Bo Landin, the film's producer, and Dr. Paul 
Alan Cox, founder of Seacology. 

Tickets for the benefit are $30 per 
person, and the proceeds go to the 
Seacology Foundation. Reservations may 
be made by calling (314) 577-9500. (See the 
Calendar of Events, page 10-11.) 

The Seacology Foundation was formed 
with the mission of preserving the rain 
forests, coral reefs and ancient cultures of 
Polynesia. To accomplish this, Seacology 
works with the indigenous villages, building 
needed schools, hospitals and water 
supplies. In return, the villages form rain 
forest and marine reserves which they 
control, manage and protect. 

Fluent in Polynesian languages, 
Seacology scientists have been instrumen- 



talin protecting over 65,000 acres of rain 
forest, by building three schools and one 
hospital. "Nafanua: Saving the Samoan 
Rainforest" is a joint production of Scan- 
dinature Films (Sweden), ITV-4 (England), 
and the Australian Broadcasting Corpora- 
tion. The film shows the creation of the first 
of these reserves in Falealupo village, 
Western Samoa. 



Reciprocal Garden 
Memberships 

When planning your summer vacation, 
consider visiting the Fairchild Tropical Gar- 
den in Miami, Florida, and any one of 57 
other botanical gardens and arboreta 
throughout the country. You will receive 
free admission and special privileges, just 
as their members do when visiting the Gar- 
den. Call the Membership Office at 
577-5118 for eligible gardens in your vaca- 
tion area. 



Marching Flowers Debut in 
May Parades 

The Missouri Botanical Garden March- 
ing Flowers will participate in the Annie 
Malone Parade beginning at 1:00 p.m. on 
Saturday, May 16, and in Shaw's Together- 
Fest Parade in the Shaw neighborhood area 
beginning at 11:00 a.m. on May 30. 

We want to take this opportunity to 
express our sincere gratitude to the dance 
group Rhythm Review U.S.A. and their 
director, Gerri Stretz. The group will per- 
form as the Garden Marching Flowers in 
1992 parades. 



Moving? Please Remember 
To Send Us Your New Address. 

To avoid missing any of your membership 
mailings, you must give us your new address at 
least three weeks before you move. Please 
enclose the mailing label on the back cover of 
this Bulletin, and mail to: Membership Office, 
Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, 
St. Louis. MO 63166. 

Name : 

Old Address: 



City. 



State. 



.Zip. 



New Address: (Date effective: 



City. 



State. 



-Zip. 



14. 



Mil'l.l.ETlN I MAY JUNE 1992 



Horticulture in Missouri 



The Remarkable Neem Tree 



THIS time of year, we often can 
predict the inquiries that will come 
to us over the phone or from 
visitors to the Garden. Are the tulips and 
rhododendrons in bloom yet? Should I 
protect my plants tonight? Were the 
magnolias damaged by the freeze? This 
spring, another question has been just as 
common: Have you heard of the neem tree, 
and does the Garden have one? 

The neem tree, Azadirachta indica, is 
originally from India and Burma, but was 
exported to other parts of Asia and to Africa 
long ago because it was known to be a 
remarkably useful plant. Recently, interest 
was fueled by the release of a report on 
neem from a study sponsored by The 
National Academy of Science. In that 
report, neem was described as "a tree for 
solving global problems." One national 
news magazine termed the furor over the 
neem tree as "Neemania." 

By studying neem, the modern scien- 
tific community is taking a cue from the 
knowledge that people have accumulated 
and utilized for centuries. In India, dried 
leaves from the neem tree have been placed 
in cupboards and drawers to repel roaches, 
moths, and other insects. African tribes 
know that smoke from burning neem wood 
will deter biting insects. Workers in this 
century observed plagues of locusts obliter- 
ating and devouring everything in their 
path— except neem trees! Perhaps the 
same observation was made hundreds of 
years ago, and led to the use of neem as an 
insecticide. Modern researchers have 
isolated compounds from neem leaves and 
fruit that disrupt growth of some insects, or 
that prevent other insects from feeding. 
And even more important, while neem 
extracts can be toxic to some pests, most 
other organisms appear not to be affected. 

Many people in India have excellent 
teeth and gums, although they have no 
access to modern dental care. They claim 
that neem is responsible; for generations, 
twigs from neem have been chewed. 
Laboratory experiments show that neem 
bark contains antiseptic extracts which 
destroy bacteria, the main cause of tooth 
decay. Other compounds found in neem 
hold promise as birth control drugs as well 
as for anti-inflammatory and blood pressure 
medications. 

So, why the sudden fuss over a tree that 




Modern scientists are taking 
a cue from knowledge people 
have accumulated and 
utilized for centuries. 

has been known for centuries to contain 
useful natural compounds? Professor 
Eugene Schultz of Washington University, 
who headed the panel reporting on neem, 
explained that the excitement is due to the 
unusually large number of compounds found 
in neem, and in the range of their uses. 
Also, many of the compounds appear not to 
be extremely toxic. Neem has other advan- 
tages, as well. It is a fast-growing tree of the 
mahogany family (Meliaceae), and is able to 
withstand dry conditions. In some parts of 
Africa, the plant is used for soil stabilization 
and much-needed firewood. Needless to 
say, research labs and chemical companies 
all over the world are suddenly quite 
interested in neem. 

Of course, many plants have compounds 
that can be used by humans. The first 
medical doctors were herbalists, and native 
peoples from all over the world have prac- 
ticed folk medicine through their knowledge 
of plants. Approximately one quarter of all 



prescriptions written in the United States 
contain at least one plant-derived product. 
Aspirin, or salicylic acid, was first discov- 
ered in the bark of the willow tree (Salix) 
but is now synthesized in a laboratory. The 
commonly cultivated rosy periwinkle is the 
source of two important drugs that are now 
successfully fighting childhood leukemia 
and Hodgkin's Disease. Both cortisone and 
birth control drugs were first derived from a 
wild yam. 

Is neem the tree to solve global prob- 
lems? Only time and a great deal of research 
and development will tell if the compounds 
from neem are as consistently effective and 
as safe as they appear to be. How many 
other wonder plants hold important agents 
for curing disease, improving health, and 
providing more effective and safer agricul- 
tural practices? At this moment, the human 
race is in danger of loosing two of our most 
valuable possessions for our future: Plant 
species diversity and the accumulated 
knowledge of indigenous peoples all over 
the world. 

And, before I forget— Yes, we do have a 
neem tree. Look for it in the Climatron on 
your next visit. 

—Lucile McCook , Ph.D. 
Horticultural Taxonomist 



Garden Explorer Patch 
Program 

Parents looking for a new and different 
activity for children ages 6 to 18 may wish to 
consider the Garden Explorer Patch Pro- 
gram at the Garden. 

This focused field trip seeks to make 
children enthusiastic, lifelong visitors of the 
Garden by exposing them to some of the 
more outstanding features of this world 
renowned cultural institution. Children who 
complete a series of interactive tasks during 
the course of a visit to the Garden receive a 
triangular cloth patch. 

All children who earn the patch must be 
led by an adult who has been trained in a 
workshop prior to the visit to the Garden. 
Costs for the activity are minimal. The 
patch is $1.50. Workshops are $3.50 for the 
first, $1.00 for succeeding ones. 

For additional information about the pro- 
gram, call Pam Pirio, Education Division, 
577-9501. 



15. 



BULLETIN I MAY-JUNK 19921 



Henk van der Werffin his office at the Garden. 




R • 



I • L • E 



Henk van der Werff, Ph.D. 



ONE of the world's most important 
tropical plant families, Lauraceae, 
happens to be one that many 
botanists shun. Dr. Henk van der Werff, 
associate curator and head of the depart- 
ment of Neotropical Taxonomy at the 
Garden, is one of only a handful of botanists 
worldwide who are experts in this family of 
trees, and the leading expert on the 
neotropical Lauraceae. "It has a reputation 
for being an unpleasant family," explains 
van der Werff. "The trees are very tall and 
the flowers inconspicuous, and herbarium 
collections are poor. Yet it's a very impor- 
tant component of wet tropical forests. I 
find it very interesting.' ' 

Van der Werff received his Ph.D. in 1978 
from the State University of Utrecht in The 
Netherlands, his native country. When he 
came to the Garden in 1982 he decided to 
switch from the study of ferns to Lauraceae, 
at the suggestion of Peter Raven, director of 
the Garden. "The family was so poorly 
known and so important that from an 
institutional standpoint Dr. Raven felt the 
Garden should have a Lauraceae specialist. 
I'm glad he gave me the encouragement 
and the freedom to learn all I can about it," 
says van der Werff. 

The Lauraceae family includes such 
economically important plants as avocados; 
cinnamon, bay leaves, camphor, and other 
spices; plants, such as rosewood, whose 
aromatic oils are used in perfumes and 
soaps; and hardwood trees used for 
construction and furniture making. 



Van der Werff is contributing greatly to 
the body of knowledge about Lauraceae 
with a project he has begun with botanist 
Bernie Hyland of Australia to examine the 
relationships between genera of Lauraceae 
worldwide. Because good collections are 
scarce and the choice of characters used to 
recognize genera is poor, the genera of the 
family are not well defined. This worldwide 
study of the relationships among the 
genera, which should take several years, 
will give botanists a definitive classification 
of the family. 

But van der Werff doesn't spend all his 
time on his botanical research. He wears 
two very important administrative hats at 
the Garden as well. Earlier this year he was 
appointed head of the newly organized 
Department of Neotropical Taxonomy 
within the Division of Research, super- 
vising the curators who work primarily on 
revisions and monographs. In 1991 he was 
named editor of the Annals of the Missouri 
Botanical Garden, the Garden's scholarly 
quarterly journal. "The Annals is one of 
the best botanical journals in the United 
States, and I'm very honored to have been 
named editor," he says. His success as 
editor is all the more impressive given that 
English is not van der Werff's native 
language. 

When asked to reflect on his 10 years at 
the Garden, van der Werff is very compli- 
mentary of the Garden's research staff 
members. ' 'The Garden is a very nice place 
to work because of the atmosphere of 



collaboration and support among its staff 
members," he says. "The Garden provides 
its scientists tremendous freedom to work, 
which fosters a very pleasant work 
environment." 

MBG Videos Are A Hit! 

With more than 5,000 sets sold to 
schools throughout the United States, the 
Garden's educational videos are a hit with 
students and teachers alike. The videos, 
developed by Herb Halpern Productions in 
cooperation with the Garden's education 
division, teach topics in natural sciences to 
elementary school children. 

The first series of six videos on habitats 
and ecological topics has been available for 
just over a year. This spring a second set of 
six videos is in production and will be avail- 
able this summer. The new series focuses 
on the biology of plants, featuring "Life 
Cycles," including seed germination, 
growth, and flowering; "Structure and 
Function," or the roles of roots, stems and 
leaves; "Pollination;" "Seeds on the 
Move," the various methods of seed dis- 
persal; "Plant Adaptations," the specific 
ways desert and rain forest plants survive; 
and "The Role of Plants in the Ecosys- 
tem," a synthesis of topics from both series 
of videos. 

A teacher from Alaska writes, "The 
tapes enhanced what we had been study- 
ing. They are clear, with a good scientific 
approach, a wonderful review, and they are 
fun!" Students write, "I like them because 
I learned something," "They are neat" and 
"the tape is interesting!" 

For more information on the videos or to 
order, call 1-800-927-9229. 

MBG Will Train 
Master Gardeners 

The Missouri Botanical Garden and the 
University of Missouri Extension are seek- 
ing experienced gardeners to participate in 
the Master Gardener volunteer program. 

Program volunteers are trained to take 
part in gardening education programs 
including diagnosing gardening problems, 
giving gardening lectures, and organizing 
"growing" experiences for area school 
children and older adults. 

Candidates must be experienced 
gardeners able to volunteer at least one day 
a week on a regular basis. For additional 
information and to receive an application 
form, call the Garden at (314) 577-5140. 
Training will begin in October 1992 and run 
for 15 weeks. Application forms must be 
received by Friday, June 26. 



16. 



{BULLETIN I MAY JUNK 1992 



THIS SPRING AT SHAW ARBORETUM 

Expanded Woodland Burning 



VISITORS to the Shaw Arboretum 
during the spring of 1991 may have 
noticed, with surprise, several 
burned areas in the woods, in addition to 
the usual prairie burns. In 1992, even more 
acreage of woodland was burned, in some 
cases by simply allowing prairie burns to 
proceed through the woods to preexisting 
fire breaks such as Brush Creek or the 
Loop Road through the Preserve. This les- 
sens the amount of staff time necessary to 
prepare arbitrary fire breaks, an advantage 
in itself, but also has interesting and benefi- 
cial ecological effects. 

Previous to the arrival of European set- 
tlers to the midwest, the resident Native 
Americans set carefully timed fires to fields 
and prairies in the fall to late winter. The set 
fires reduced the danger of wildfires near 
their villages and opened up the vistas to 
enable them to spot game or see arriving 
friends or foes. It also had profound effects 
on the vegetation. People today are gener- 
ally familiar with the openness of the 
sweeping midwestern grasslands, but it is 
less well known that the woodlands of the 
area were much more open than is typical 
today. As a result of periodic fires, trees 
grew isolated or in clumps.with sunny 
spaces populated by prairie grasses and 
flowers between them. Dense, shady for- 
ests of the sort we consider typical every- 
where in Missouri today, occurred only in 
the moist valleys and river bottoms a little 
over a century ago. 



By allowing the prairie fires to extend 
into the woods, the Arboretum staff hopes 
to recapture in a small way the character of 
the presettlement vegetation of Missouri. 
As a result of years of fire suppression, 
there has been a large accumulation of burn- 
able material in the woods. The first few 
woodland burns should consume most of 
this excess fuel. As the program of burning 
continues, experience in other eastern Mis- 
souri natural areas shows that in some 
years, the fuel loads will be too low or too 
wet in the shadier areas for the fire to con- 
tinue into the woods from the prairie. In this 
way (even in the midst of the annually 
burned prairie), nature itself maintains the 
woodlands, which would eventually disap- 
pear if they burned every year. 

Another advantage of periodic woodland 
burning is the killing or at least partial con- 
trol of invading woody species. The non- 
native privet and honeysuckle bushes 
aggressively invade the Arboretum wood- 
lands, shading out the native wildflowers 
and even preventing the regeneration of the 
native oak and hickory trees. Even some 
native plants such as elms, sugar maples 
and red cedars may invade the unburned 
woods and shade out the characteristic spe- 
cies of the fire-adapted woodlands. In a 
curious twist, this "natural" succession 
leads to a loss of biodiversity right in our 
own backyard, where we can most easily 
prevent it! 

—James C. Trager, Arboretum Naturalist 





James Trager supervises a controlled burn at the Arboretum. 



"Growing Vegetables and 
Cultivating Friends" 

If the Gateway to Gardening Association 
(GTGA) needed a motto, this might do. The 
primary goal of the volunteer group is to 
encourage community vegetable gardens in 
St. Louis, but an important side benefit is 
the good feeling that GTGA ignites among 
gardening neighbors as well as for the 
GTGA itself. 

The Gateway to Gardening Association 
was founded in 1984, a not-for-profit organi- 
zation that would provide leadership, educa- 
tion and assistance in creating community 
and school vegetable gardens. At least 47 
community gardens and 16 school projects 
in north and south St. Louis will be produc- 
ing food this spring. 

The Missouri Botanical Garden is an 
enthusiastic partner of the GTGA, provid- 
ing Garden-trained Master Gardeners to 
advise the growers and a site for an annual 
Urban Gardening Fair, among other 
services. 

In the early years the GTGA volunteers 
worked out of their homes, under the direc- 
tion of Kitty Hoblitzelle, but the success of 
the program led to the hiring of a full-time 
director, Michael Adrio, in March 1991. The 
GTGA budget was increased from $25,000 
to $93,000 as requests for gardening 
assistance multiplied. 

Last fall the favorable impact made 
by GTGA volunteers was recognized by the 
St. Louis Board of Alderman and as result 
the Community Development Agency 
awarded GTGA a block grant of $22,000 for 
neighborhood betterment. Substantial addi- 
tional help was sought from corporate, 
foundation and government sources. 
Among the major contributors were the 
Monsanto Agricultural Co. and the William 
T Kemper Foundation. 



17. 



BULLETIN MAY-JUNK 19921 




The check wax presented at a party hosted at the Garden in February. Pictured are (from left): 
John Dill, Mosby-YearRook; Rich Rlock, World Wildlife Fund; Peter Raven; George Johnson. 

World Wildlife Fund Recevies $35,045 Gift 
from Raven and Johnson 



Dr. Peter H. Raven and Dr. George 
Johnson have presented a check for $35,045 
to the World Wildlife Fund, representing a 
portion of the royalties from sales of Under- 
standing Biology, Edition 2, published by 
Mosby-Year Book, Inc. of St. Louis. Raven 



and Johnson are co-authors of Understand- 
ing Biology. The Mosby text is used exten- 
sively by biology students in colleges and 
universities all across the nation. 

"The World Wildlife Fund actively pur- 
sues conservation measures in the United 



Rueda and Gentry Receive 
NSF Grant 



Ricardo Rueda, a graduate student at 
the Garden and his advisor Dr. Alwyn H. 
Gentry have been awarded a $9,550 grant 
from the National Science Foundation. 
Rueda is a doctoral candidate in the joint 
program of the Garden and the University 
of Missouri-St. Louis, where he was named 
the first Peter H. Raven Fellow. 

Rueda has completed his M.S. degree 
on the genus Clerodendrum and now is 
studying the genus Petrea, both in the 
Verbena family. He will use the NSF grant 
for a trip to the Amazon region of Brazil. 
Upon his return he will complete his 
doctoral thesis and then return to the 
Universidad Nacional Autonoma de 
Nicaragua-Leon, where he has been a pro- 
fessor since 1983. 



States and throughout the globe," said 
Raven. "I am delighted that each student 
purchasing this text contributes to bettering 
our world while using the text to better 
understand our environment." 



From the Garden Gate Shop 



Book Review 



Sustainable Harvest and 
Marketing of Rain Forest 
Products 

Edited by Mark Plotkin and Lisa 
Famolare, Conservation International, 
320 pages, available mid-June 1992, 
$20 paperback, $40 hardcover. 

Based on a June 1991 Conservation 
International conference in Panama that 
involved scientists, indigenous peoples, 
and business leaders, this book brings 
together the world's leading experts on 
rain forest development and sustainability, 
including Richard Schultes, Harvard Botan- 
ical Museum; Alwyn Gentry, Missouri 
Botanical Garden; and Gary Nabhan, 
University of Arizona and Native Seed 
Search. The authors present alternatives 
that are technically feasible, financially 



attractive, and— most important- 
compatible with the often competing goals 
of ecosystem conservation, cultural sur- 
vival, and community development. 

Mark Plotkin is vice president for the 
program in plant conservation, and Lisa 
Famolare is a program associate at Conser- 
vation International, an organization dedi- 
cated to the conservation of ecosystems 
and biological diversity worldwide. 



Don't Forget! 



This year Mother's Day Is May 20, and 
Father's Day Is June 21. Get the perfect gift 
for your special someone at the Garden 
Gate Shop. Choose from the wide array of 
gifts, books, jewelry, stationery, gardening 
tools, and flowering plants. Gift certificates 
are available. 




The Subject Is Roses 

Especially in honor of Rose Evening, 
May 29, the Shop will feature a marvelous 
selection of gift items on the theme of our 
favorite flowers. You are invited to the pre- 
miere of "La Rose de Beaute, ' ' a very spe- 
cial package especially for the Garden by 
Nicole Beaute, New York. This lovely per- 
fume is a blend of roses from Morocco and 
France, available in a 1.5 ml. vial with a 
charming sachet, for $7.50. 



18. 



I HI 'LLETIN I MAY JUNK 1992 



Center for Plant Conservation 



CPC Science Advisory Council Holds Annual Meeting 




Science Advisory Council members (from left) Robert A. DeFilipps, Ph.D., Smithsonian Insti- 
tution; Robert Mohlenbrook, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University; Norton Nickerson, Ph.D., 
Tufts University; Christopher Tbpik, Ph.D., U.S. Forest Service; Barbara A. Schaal, Ph.D., 
Washington University; Richard W. Lighty, Ph.D., Mt. Cuba Center for the Study of 
Piedmont Flora; and Larry E. Morse, Ph.D., The Nature Conservancy. 



NEWS FROM THE GARDEN LIBRARY 



A Complete Collection 

The Missouri Botanical Garden Library 
is widely recognized as having one of the 
world's most complete collections of taxo- 
nomic and floristic literature. The Garden 
library now has the opportunity to further 
enrich its already outstanding collections by 
filling in titles that are not in the collection 
with copies from the Inter Documentation 
Company (IDC) Microfiche Collection. 

With the assistance of Frans Stafleu, a 
world renowned botanist, IDC chose 6,156 
titles of major botanical works and placed 
them into the microfiche format. Of these 
6,156 titles, the Garden library already has 
at least eighty-five percent that are wanted. 
The other fifteen percent, or 952 titles, will 
be purchased, thereby giving the collection 
even greater strength. The titles will be 
purchased from IDC at half-price in return 
for cataloging them into OCLC, an interna- 
tional database that contains more than 23 
million records and is used for cataloging by 
more than 12 thousand libraries. 

Friends or members of the Garden who 



are interested in helping to support the cost 
of acquiring the IDC collection may call 
Constance Wolf, Missouri Botanical Garden 
Librarian, at 577-5156. 




The Center for Plant Conservation's 
Science Advisory Council (SAC) held its 
annual meeting February 9-10 at the Mis- 
souri Botanical Garden. 

The SAC consists of a distinguished 
group of plant scientists who are committed 
to ensuring that, consistent with current 
research and conservation biology practice, 
the Center's programs meet the highest 
scientific and technical standards. 

At the meeting, the SAC reviewed 107 
accession proposals and approved 57 new 
taxa to be brought into the Center's 
National Collection during 1992. The new 
taxa will bring the National Collection to a 
total of 450 species. 

Other items discussed include the 
criteria for the inclusion of new taxa into the 
Collection , criteria for the inclusion of new 
institutions into the network of Participating 
Institutions, uses of the National Collection 
and the procedures for revising the 1988 
Endangerment Survey. 

The SAC also elected Barbara A. 
Schaal, Ph.D. , professor of botany at Wash- 
ington University, as chairperson of the 
SAC. She succeeds John J. Fay, Ph.D. of the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 

Dr. Schaal was previously a professor of 
biology at Washington University and is a 
research associate at the Missouri Botani- 
cal Garden. 

In addition, the SAC recommended a 
candidate to receive the Catherine H. Beat- 
tie Fellowship. The Fellowship is awarded 
annually by The Garden Club of America to 
a graduate fellow recommended by the 
CPC. The Fellowship funds research that 
contributes to the discovery and under- 
standing of endangered plants of the south- 
eastern LInited States. 



Linda Oestry Joins 
Library Staff 

On March 2, 1992, Linda Oestry began 
work as the Garden's Curator/Bibliographer 
of Botanical Literature. She is responsible 
for managing the library's acquisitions pro- 
gram, as well as providing reference serv- 
ices to library users. Linda received her 
M.S. in Botany from the University of 
Illinois. Urbana, in 1976. She currently is a 
Ph.D. candidate in biology. 



Linda Oestry 



19. 



BULLETIN I MAY-JUNE 19921 



IN MEMORIAM 




Hubert Hyland (left), 198S St. Imuis Man of the Year, presents the 
WH9 award to Peter Raven. 



Robert F. Hyland, Jr. 

The Garden and St. Louis lost a longtime friend with the death 
of Robert Hyland on March 5, 1992. Mr. Hyland, who was 71, was 
senior vice president of CBS Radio and general manager of the 
network-owned KMOX, which he joined in 1951. A native St. Loui- 
san, he was a leader in St. Louis civic, philanthropic and business 
affairs throughout his career and was named 1988 St. Louis Man of 
the Year. 

In 1983 Mr. Hyland was awarded the Garden's Henry Shaw 
Medal for his contributions to the St. Louis community, most espe- 
cially for his work as chairman of the successful Zoo-Museum Dis- 
trict campaign earlier that year. As a result of that campaign the 
Garden now receives direct tax support, for the first time in its 
history. 

Dr. Raven said, "Robert Hyland gave extraordinary leadership 
to St. Louis and to its cultural institutions, and we are grateful for 
his friendship and his legacy' ' 



Marguerite Ross Barnett 

Dr. Marguerite Ross Barnett, former 
chancellor of the University of Missouri- 
St. Louis 1986-90, died of complications of 
cancer on February 26, 1992. She was 49. 

Dr. Barnett was the first chancellor of 
UM-St. Louis to be named to the Garden's 
Board of Trustees. She played a major role 
in establishing the joint Ph.D. program in 
biology with the Garden and UM-St. Louis 
in 1989 and established the Peter H. Raven 
Fellowship in Tropical Botany in honor of 
the Garden's director. 

Peter Raven said, "Dr. Barnett was a 
marvelous person, one of the most effec- 
tive and appreciated African-American 
leaders in St. Louis history. It is tragic that 
such a talented person would die so young. 
She made a lasting contribution to educa- 
tion and to the Garden, and we are grateful 
that we had the opportunity to work with 
her and benefit from her energy and 
counsel." 

Dr. Blanche M. Touhill, who was named 
chancellor of UM-St. Louis following Bar- 
nett and who is currently a Garden Trustee, 



Behind the Scenes 




said, "As the fifth chancellor of the Univer- 
sity of Missouri-St. Louis, Dr. Barnett 
made outstanding contributions to the vital- 
ity and development of this campus. These 
remain her lasting legacy to our campus and 
our city. In addition to her distinguished 
record as an educator, Dr. Barnett was an 
internationally recognized scholar, the 




author of much admired books and essays in 
the political science of developing nations 
and American higher education issues. The 
death so young of any friend brings great 



sorrow, and our sadness is deepened at the 
loss of a friend and colleague of such talents, 
accomplishments, and virtually boundless 
potential for continued achievement." 

C. Peter Magrath, president of the 
National Association of State Universities 
and Land-Grant Colleges, said, "Mar- 
guerite was a person of exceptional 
integrity, intelligence and imagination. Her 
leadership, vision and extraordinary 
insights into the role that public higher edu- 
cation fulfills in our society will be sorely 
missed by all of us. I am tremendously sad- 
dened by the loss of a good friend.' ' 

At the time of her death Dr. Barnett was 
president of the University of Houston. 
Before joining UM-St. Ix>uis she was vice 
chancellor for academic affairs at City 
University of New York. 

In her memory, UM-St. Louis has 
established the Marguerite Ross Barnett 
Fund to help endow a professorship or 
scholarship. Contributions may be sent to 
the Office of University Relations, 426 
Woods Hall, 8001 Natural Bridge Road, 
St. Louis, MO 63121-4499. 



Wilkerson Named President Elect of HRMA 



The Human Resource Management 
Association of Greater St. Louis (HRMA) 
has elected Sue L. Wilkerson, the Garden's 
director of Human Resource Management, 
as president elect for 1991-92. 

HRMA is a nationally-affiliated society 
of professionals in personnel management. 
Wilkerson has been affiliated with HRMA 
for 12 years and wrote the first strategic 
plan ever developed for the organization. 
With 350 members, HRMA is the largest 
human resources organization in St. Louis, 
with members from both the corporate and 
non-profit sectors. 



In her work at the Garden, Ms. Wilker- 
son has provided strong leadership in devel- 
oping the Cultural Diversity Committee and 
in responding to the complex needs of the 
345 person staff. "The Garden is at the 
forefront of innovation in dealing with 
today's workplace in such matters as health 
care, family and personal issues, sexual 
harassment and cultural diversity,' ' said Dr. 
Peter H. Raven, director. "We are very 
proud of Sue and the direction she so ably 
provides in making the Garden a model 
employer.' ' 



20. 



\BULLETIN I MAY JUNK L992 



Tributes 



May -June 1992 



In Honor Of 



Gayle Ackerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Shear 
Mr. Lester Adelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Bueli 

Mrs. Max Deutch 

Mrs. Henry C. Lowenhaupt 

Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 

Dr. and Mrs. Helman C. Wasserman 

Mr. Phillip Brumbraugh 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Barken 

Esther Bryant 

Friends and Staff of 50 NI Jefferson 

Barracks 
Mr. Anton Budding 
Mrs. Lilly Abraham 
Mrs. Jean-Jacques Carnal 
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Cornwell Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Max Lippman Jr. 

Mr. John W. Demmitt 

Matt and Beth Demmitt 
Dorothy Dubinsky 
Ellen and Henry Dubinsky 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Forshaw III 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Horan 
Mr. and Mrs. E. Franke 

Mrs. Ruth C. Kuhlmann 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Freber 

Don and Darlene Freber 

Natalie Freund 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Weinstock 
Mrs. Lois Friedman 
Mr. and Mrs. I. Heifetz 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert 
Friedman 

Mr. and Mrs. I. Heifetz 

Ms. Carill Gill 

Mr. Stuart Oelbaum 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Hall 

Kathleen Desloge 
Mr. and Mhs. Frank L. Key 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom P. Kletzker 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Schlafly 
Mrs. Mary von Brecht 
Mr. Maurice Handelsman 
Mrs. Florence G. Stern 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman 

Heitner Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Svenson 

James E. Henrich 

Janine Adams 
Barb Addelson 
Brenda Banjak 
Pat Bastable 
Diane Bauer 
Walter Behrendt 
Alan Boefer 
Donna Bruner 
Michael Bruner 
Ben Chu 
Tom Croat 
BillD'Arcy 
Nancy DArcy 
Bill Davit 
Joyce Davit 
Chris DePalma 
Tad Dettmann 



Ellen Dunn 

Ruth Eagan 

Larry Enkoji 

Arden Fisher 

Richard Harrison 

Julie Hess 

Peter Hoch 

Sue Hunter 

June Hutson 

Craig Isaak 

Marcia Kerz 

Bob Kost 

Sharon Little 

Jacklyn S. Maciekowicz 

Petra Malesevich 

Lucile McCook 

Scott McCracken 

Gordon McPherson 

Mary Merello 

Ann Mertens 

Mary Middleton 

Cheryl Mill 

Missouri Botanical Garden— 

Daylily Association 
Joan Murphy 
Tina Pey 
Kathy Pickett 
Peggy Pomeroy 
Amy Pool 
Linda Raming 
Sandra Rode 
Patti Salomon 
Pat Scace 
Amy Schueler 
Mary Smith 
Chip Tynan 
Brenda Ward 
Brian Ward 
Deanne Wernle 
Randy Wichman 
Greg Wieland 
Steve Wolff 

Mrs. Marilyn Higgins 
Bennett Hills Garden Club 

Mr. Morton Isaac 

Mrs. Frank P. Wolff Sr. 

Mrs. J. A. Jacobs 

Miss Rosemary Woodworth 
Dr. Michael Kass 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Schneider 

Mrs. P. Kretchmar 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Weigert 
Mr. and Mrs. Forrest G. 
Kunkel 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Senkosky 
Mary Frances Sudholt 

Mrs. Edna Lander 

Mrs. Margaret Hurwitz 

Marge Levine 

Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Krout 

Mrs. Hazel Loewenwarter 

Mrs. Blanche J. Freed 

Mrs. Joy Melman 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert M. Talcoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman 

Meltzer 
Ruth Richman 
Miss Heidi Morris 
Mr. and Mrs. Brant Stansen 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Peters 
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Fischer 

Mrs. Hannah Pollack 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter E. Sargent 
Mr. Louis Putzel 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 



Mr. and Mrs. Oliver G. 
Richards Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mathieu 

Mr. Bernard A. Ross 

Mrs. Florence G. Stern 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Scharff 

Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 

Jack and Diane Schwartz 

Linda and Jerry Meyers 

Mrs. Marjorie M. Senior 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack E. Edlin 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Shapiro 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry F. Doyle 

Sydney M. ShoenbergJr. 

Mrs. Florence G. Stern 
Mrs. Sylvia Spector 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Halpern 

Eric and Sue Stanley 

Mr. Jeff Hangartner 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Talcoff 

John and Anna Lee Brown 

Mother of 

Mr. and Mrs. Clay Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Witt 

Mrs. Margaret Wagner 

Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Krout 
Mrs. Kathy Wansing 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph M. Graves 
Mr. Norman Wielansky 
Mr. and Mrs. Melroy B. Hutnick 
Amy Yetkeman 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Witt 



In Memory Of 



Mr. Albert Ackermann 

Mr. and Mrs. Mac McClenahan 

Mr. Joseph Anton 

Greg and Susie Brown 

Mrs. Elizabeth Archer 

Marty Frentrop 
Lynda Stair 

Mrs. Mildred Bard 
Dr. and Mrs. J. Carrier 
Mrs. Dorothy Barker 
Garden Appreciation Club 
Mrs. Ruth W. Spicer 
Mrs. Emilie Barnes 
Timmie and Jim W T iant 

Mr. Joseph Charles 
Barzantny 

Mrs. Howard H. Hubbell 
Mr. George K. Bates 

Mr. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. Paul Bensinger 

Town and Country Garden Club 

Tillie Bien 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul W. Reime 
Rupert A. Biggerstaff 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Schlafly 
Mrs. Nettie Birkhead 
Mr. Jim Goodman 
Mrs. Frank Block 

Mrs. Stella B. Houghton 

Mr. and Mrs. Erwin M. Meinberg 

Mr. Harry Bobroff 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 
Mr. Kyril Boldt 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Weinstock 
Mrs. Tina Borchert 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Aronson 



Father of Judith Boyd 

Mr. and Mrs. William N. Bean 
Toby and Jeff Shear 
Warren Bray 

Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Gann Jr. 
Malcolm P. Breckenridge 
James A. Breckenridge 
Dorothea Seibel 
Ann Clark Brewer 
Ben and Joan Doerr 
Mr. Alfred Brilliant 

Joan Esposito 

Ron and Fran Schlaprizzi 

Mrs. Olga P. Bronczyk 

Ms. Olga Frentrop 

Hugo Schueren 

Mrs. Martha E. Brooks 

Sue Rogovich 

Mr. Ellis L. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Frank 

Missouri Valley Nurserymen's 

Cooperative 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. White IV 
Esther Bryant 
Billy and Doris Robinson 

Mr. James J. Bryant 

Associated Clayton Garden Club #4 

Mr. Gay Carraway 

Dr. Lea Ceria 

Mr. Frank Hamsher 

Dee and Gary Hayes 

Pal and George Schriro 

Martin and Rhoda Schwartz 

Ms. Phyllis Young 

Mr. Thomas J. Carter 

Jim Moore 

Mr. John Casey 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Bennetsen 

Mr. Charles Caspari 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew H. Baur 

Mr. William Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 

Mr. Ray Cole 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl F. Ritchie 
Mrs. Josephine Cutaia 
Anheuser-Busch, Inc., 

Brewing Technical Services 
Geneva E. Cutler 

Dr. and Mrs. H. Marvin Camel 

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Feinstein 

Dr. and Mrs. Raymond G. Slavin 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Teldon 

Mr. Hugo H. Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Kehoe 

Mr. George DeBonnaire 

Mrs. Clara LaVoise 

Sister of Mary Lou Demille 

Margaret Joyce 

Josephine Desimone 

Mrs. Edward J. Robson 
Dr. Max Deutch 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester R. Adelson 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward F. Ruprecht 

Dr. and Mrs. John S. Skinner 

Mrs. Minnie Dill 

Don and Dorothy Freukes 

Cousin of 

Mary Jane Donzelot 

Margaret Joyce 

continued on next page 



21. 



BULLETIN I MAY-JUNK 19921 



Tributes 



continued 

Mother of Barb Dowling 

Mr. and Mrs. Marc Seldin 
Mr. Brookes Drake 
Dr. and Mrs. Antonio I. Longrais 
Aunt of Mrs. Helen Dry 

Mr. and Mrs. James Wiant 

Mother of Mrs. Helen Dry 

Dr. and Mrs. James R. Wiant 

James M. Dunlap 

Mrs. Eloise S. Wagner 
James D. Dunsmore Jr. 

Carol Butler 

Mag Moedritzer 

Rory and Fred Ortlip 

Karen and Pat Samson 

Matt Zahragka 

Mr. R. James Dutson 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Marshall Magner 

Mr. Penco Dzundzev 

Dra Bozovich and Family 

Ms. Jannelle Evans 

Mrs. Lorraine B. 

Eschenroeder 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Ivis Johnston 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Schmid 
Brendan Feely 
Shauna Feely, David, Zachary and 

Ian Holtzman 

Mr. George Martin Fischer 

Mr. Robert C. Camp 

Mrs. Rosalind L. Fishbein 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Bernard Seelig 

Dr. Fitzgerald 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald K. Hemmer 

Mr. Earl Foley 

Mr. and Mrs. George Armenta 

Ronald J. Foulis 

Mrs. Weldon Canfield and Family 

Hazel Freise 

Ralph, Marilyn, Christy Borgmann 
Mrs. Hans Friedrichs 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Carlson 
Mrs. Almetta Gardner 
Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Schreiber 
Louise H. Genovese 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Deeba 
Mr. Michael F. Gerson 
Miss Megan Sargent 
Mrs. Ralph Goldsticker Sr. 
Mrs. Blanche J. Freed 
Mrs. Dorothy Good 
Dr. and Mrs. John A. Carrier 
Dr. Oliver Grawe 

Mrs. Sarah C. Grawe 

Mrs. Virginia R. Haase 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael C. Walther 
Mrs. Virginia N. Haley 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 

Mrs. Sarah Halpern 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Stern 
Mrs. Marion Bullard Harris 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Thompson Jr. 

Daniel J. Hefele 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Hefele 
Mr. Clarence Heitman 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Weilbacher 



Carl Helms 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Martin 
Mr. Henderson 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul T. Putzel 
Mr. Jack R. Hennessey 

Mrs. Evelyn Gerdes 

George E. Hibbard 

Cindy Curley 
Friends of Tibet 

Father of Dr. Scott Hickman 

Mrs. Jess Stern 

Mr. Wilfred Hoffmann 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Rimmer 

Mrs. Estella Hoik 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bendorf 
Gertrude Hollingsworth 

Ronald Weil Family 

Mr. Cletus Hulling 

Bermel Family 

Mr. Leo Ingrande 

Mr. Earl Rosen Jr. 
Mr. Tom Jackson 
Rick Halpern 
Helen Johnson 

Monsanto Company, Washington and 

St. Louis, Public Policy Staff 
Melburn E. Johnston 
Doris P. Johnston 
Mrs. Selma L. Jones 
Dr. and Mrs. A. C. Trueblood Jr. 
T. C. Kaemmerlen 
Garden Appreciation Club 

Dr. Koichi Kawana 

Raymond Francis Jurgens 

Mrs. Emma Lewis Thomas 

Mrs. Chris Kinman 

Mrs. Marilyn Borgmann 

Mother of Nancy Kleekamp 

Rick Halpern 

Mrs. Mary K. Eddy Klein 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom S. Eakin Jr. 

Mrs. Stella B. Houghton 

Mr. George T. Pettus 

Mrs. John C. Tobin 

Herbert W. Kolkmeyer 

Mrs. Lorraine Cockran 

Mrs. Paula Iacona 

Mrs. Edith Mathis 

Mr. Joe Kopman 

Mr. and Mrs. Al Loeb 
Mrs. Peggy Kraft 

Timmie and Jim Wiant 

Mr. George W. 
Kriegshauser Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Chivetta 
Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Chivetta 
Dr. and Mrs. Antonio I. Longrais 
Mr. and Mrs. Chris Mower 
Mr. Albert D. Krueger 
Mr. and Mrs. J. John Brouk 
Mr. and Mrs. Rolla K. Wetzel 
Mrs. Maria Kullenberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Herbert A. Symonds 

Mr. Barry A. Landes 

Mr. Oliver Gramlich 

Jim Rhode 

Garry Williamson 

Mr. Lloyd Leigh 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard R. Kantor 

Mr. Angelo Licata 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Glaser 



22. 



Mr. Vern Lilian! 

Dr. and Mrs. Harry Burack 

Mrs. Edna Lurie 

Robert and Judy Ciampoli 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter B. Krombach 
Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Puleo 
Phyllis M. Woollen 

Janet Blanke MacCarthy 

Marilyn Adaire 

Advanced Nursing Services 

Margaret and Ted Baldwin 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mrs. William L. Behanjr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Blanke Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Bush Jr. 

Mr. Donald Claus Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo P. Cremins Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel C. Davis Jr. 

Mr. Ted Dugan 

Mrs. William L. Edwards 

Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Foreman 

Charles W. Freeman Family 

Mrs. S. W. Freeman 

Greenbriar Invest. Syndicate— 

Turley Martin 
Mrs. W. Alfred Hayes 
Mr. and Mrs. W. Alfred Hayes Jr. 
Mrs. George Herbst 
Ladue Garden Club 
Mr. and Mrs. E. Desmond Lee 
Nancy D. Linn 
Mrs. Russell E. Lortz 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. Lortz 
Mr. and Mrs. John P. MacCarthy 
Mr. and Mrs. Claude B. Maechling 
Mr. and Mrs. James F. Mauze 
Mrs. James S. McDonnell 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 0. 

McNearney Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack W. Minton 
Mrs. Audrey W. Otto 
Mr. Roy Pfautch 
Mr. and Mrs. Otway W. Rash III 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur A. Scharff Jr. 
Mrs. Franklin F Seyfarth 
Mr. and Mrs. David R. Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Lynch Steiner 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert E. Suter 
Systems Service Enterprises 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. VanCleve 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Wesseling 
Mrs. Fern K. Wetzel 
Mrs. Robert Wunsch 
Mary MacDonald 

Tim, Ruel, Joan Murphy 

Mrs. Jean W. Mason 

Warren and Jane Shapleigh 

Mr. Russell McDonnell 

Mrs. Robert H. Kittner 

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Remmert 

Mr. Howard H. McGee Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur F. Boettcher Jr. 

Mr. Frank Miler 

Ann Mandelstamm 

Mr. Robert G. Mills 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen Bowen Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John Kristmann 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Tschudy 

Julia Deremiah Morrison 

Steve Adams and 

Enterprise Leasing Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Todd Arnold 
Brenda and John Banjak 
Patsy Bartels 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew H. Baur 



Holly Blumeyer 

Dr. and Mrs. Stephen F. Bowen Jr. 

Brentwood Alteration & Tailoring 

Ms. Barb Buhrman 

Florence and Frank Bush 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Case Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Corbett 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Cook 
Dolores Courtney 

Bee Deutsch 

Jeanne and Bob Devlin 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Diggs 

Mrs. Charles A. Dill 

Mr. and Mrs. John Dillon 

Mr. and Mrs. Deride Driemeyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Dubinsky 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce English 

Mrs. Allene Evans 

Laura Ferguson 

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Fiala 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Finger 

Janet and John Ford 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley A. Freerks 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Frerichs 

Mrs. Mary V. Gaines 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. George 

Sophia Goetemann 

Good Buy Syndicate 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank N. Gundlach 

Mr. and Mrs. R.A. Hebrank 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold F. Helrnkampf 

Mr. and Mrs. Wells A. Hobler 

Kathy Hoffmann 

Mrs. Jerome W. Israel 

Mary I). Jones 

Jean Kautzman 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy A. Lieder 

Karen Mackey 

Mr. and Mrs. Don McKinley 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph K. McKinney 

Missouri Botanical Garden- 
Members Board 

Monsanto Company— Financial 
Communications I )epartment 

Mr. and Mrs. Reuben M. Morriss III 

Hazel C. Muenter 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Nies 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph I). Nolan 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Oertli 

Old Warson Bridge Club 

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Parke 

Marian and Jim Phelps 

Sophie Potocnjak 

Mrs. PhiloJ. Rapp 

Mrs. Bernice Rarick 

Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Rauscher 

Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 

Mrs. Elda Rebstock 

Mrs. Edward J. Riley Jr. 

Marcella Kuhlman Ruddv 

Dr. and Mrs. William H. Sheffield 

Clare V. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Smith 

Marianne Soutiea 

The Puckett Group 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Tschudy 

Mrs. Charlotte Twenhafel 

Mrs. J. Vitt 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Weber 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene S. Williams 

Jim and Fay Wuest 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce R. Yoder 

Mrs. Rose Naumann 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Graves III 

Rachel and Clint Neill 

Oneta Ruppert 



\BULLET1N i MAY JUNE 1992 



Mr. Melvin Newmark 

Ms. Susan E. Prytherch 
John Knox Nimock 
Mr. and Mrs. Roger W. Shaw 
Ida Steinberg 
Mrs. Dorothy M. Nix 
Mrs. Earnest R. Doty 
Mr. Elmer Oechsle 
Mrs. J. Maver Feehan 
Mr. Edward Oesterlei 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Dill 

Mr. Charles Orner 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Reichardt 

Mrs. Jane Pettus 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Frank 

Rosetta C. Phillips 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lotton 
Gordon A. Pilkington Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence P. Badler 
Dr. and Mrs. Murray E. Finn 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Frank 

Mr. Michael Platke 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Shear 
Brother of Peggy Post 

Margaret Joyce 

Neoma Pratte 

Roger, Donna, Cheryl and Lisa Eime 

Rose Puleo 

Dr. and Mrs. Antonio I. Longrais 
Mrs. Rhoda Raben 
Mr. Dudley A. Bragdon 
Joel Mark Rad man 

Mrs. Gloria Luitjens 

Mr. Tory Raniero 

Mrs. Tony Raniero 
Richard Reher 

John D. Kenney Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Reim 

Rich and Carol Wagner 
Mrs. Helen Kirkpatrick 
Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis W. Baldwin Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bates 

Mr. and Mrs. John Biggs 

Mrs. William Bixbyjr. 

Mrs. Harold H. Cabe 

Mrs. Arthur A. Dunn Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Frank 

Dr. and Mrs. John Fries 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Carr Gamble Jr. 

Mr. Robert E. Grote Jr. 

Mrs. James H. Grove 

Judge and Mrs. Roy W. Harper 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Horan 

Mrs. Stella B. Houghton 

Mr. and Mrs. Landon Y. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Boardman Jones Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Krone 

Susan Lammert 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver M. Langenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Limberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Limberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger E. Lord Jr. 

Mrs. William M. Love 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert A. Lynch 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry N. McCluney 

Mrs. Glenroy McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart M. Mertz 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Ford Morrill 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Orthwein Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Anderson Payne 

David W. Riesmeyer 

Nancy S. Riesmeyer 



Mr. and Mrs. Edwin G. Russell 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel L. Schlafly 
Eleanor L. Schlafly 
Mr. Henry T. Schlapp 
Mr. McLeod Stephens 
Mrs. John C. Tobin Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Weinstock 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Richard Wyman 
Dr. Daniel P. Roman 
Anderson Consulting 
Phyllis R. Bennet 
Carl Fischer Family 
Mr. and Mrs. Clark S. Hall 
Mrs. Maria R. McVey 
Olga R. Meisterling 
Monsanto Chemical Company- 
Detergents & Phosphates Division 
Joan, John, Shannon 0' Dougherty 
Mr. Irwin A. Page 
Mrs. Elizabeth Reinhardt 
Mrs. Ruth Richman 
Alice Sacco 

Alyce and Rael Trembley 
Dr. Ferdinand B. Zienty 
The Rev. C. G. Russell 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Padgett 

Richard Sander 

Mr. and Mrs. John Warakomski 
Mr. Gerhard Schaal 
Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 
Mr. Frederick C. Schlueter 

Olga Frentrop 
Hugo F. Schueren 

Mrs. Julia Schmidt 

Miss Deborah Stein 

Mrs. Margaret A. Schultz 

Mr. and Mrs. James Bright 

Mrs. Ethel Scott 

Clinton Bopp 

Ralph and Norma Bopp 

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Folz 

Christine Foreman 

Ella Gayer 

Bob Kahler 

Ginny Lake 

Dana and Debbie Lillick 

Phil and Patty Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Wittich 

Sam Youngblood 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Zork 

Mrs. Sophie Shankman 

Mrs. Blanche J. Freed 

Ethan A. H. Shepley Jr. 

Mr. Howard F Baer 

Mr. and Mrs. P. Taylor Bryan III 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Lee Hawes 

Mr. Peter L. Simpson 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Higgins 
Dr. Wayne A. Simril 
Dr. and Mrs. John S. Skinner 
Bella Skup 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Sheinbein 
Mildred Smith 
Dr. Max G. Menefee 
William Lester Snyder 
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Huff 
Joan L. Snyder 

Dr. Samuel D. Soule 

Dr. and Mrs. Oscar H. Soule 
Mrs. Samuel D. Soule 

Mrs. Inez 0. Stallard 

Men's Garden Club of Webster 
Jeanne Weber 



Mrs. McLeod Stephens 

Mrs. Stella B. Houghton 
Mother of Roberta Sterling 

Margaret Joyce 

Mrs. Lucy Stith 

Bill and Bette Thies 
Mrs. Anes Thomas 
Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Ziemann 
Mr. Jack Traub 
Myrtle E. Taus 
Mrs. Sarah Trivers 
Ms. Alma Kessler 
Mrs. Sheila Michaels 

Mrs. Lilian Ungerman 

Mr. Barry LaPlant 

Mrs. Eloise Johnson Vaughn 

Mrs. John Macrae 

Mrs. Jane Walsh 

Frontenac Garden Club 

Mr. and Mrs. Preston F. Ryan 

Miss Dorothy Jane Walther 

Mrs. Joseph O'Rourke, Jr. 

Mr. William Leroy Ward 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Pharr Brightman 
Mr. and Mrs. John R. Brightman 
Dr. and Mrs. Sidney Goldring 
Dr. and Mrs. Peter H. Raven 
Dr. and Mrs. Henry G. Schwartz 
Sylvia Stern 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. Tucker 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Voellinger 

Mr. Carl Wegener 

Olga Frentrop 
Hugo Schueren 
Mr. Ray Weigel 

Olga Frentrop 

Hugo Schueren 

Dr. Robert Weinhaus 

Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Shear 
Mr. Edward W. Warner 
Mrs. Joseph L. Werner 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Danforth Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Max Lippman Jr. 
Ms. Ada Weld Osborn 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Thompson Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wallace Sr. 

Mr. Al Wheeler 

Jim Moore 
Fred Rock 

Mrs. Janet H. White 

Mr. and Mrs. George Robinson 
Chadwick T. Wieser 

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Jones 

Mr. Norman R. Winkler 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Oertli 
Miss Dorie Worsham 
Mr. Don Heil 
Mr. Jim Weirich 
Mrs. Bettv Wulfing 
Mr. and Mrs. David I). Wilson 
Mr. Jerry D. Young 
Kathleen Westerfield 

Mrs. Patricia K. Zahnweh 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Lambert 
Marjorie Close Taylor and Family 

Mrs. Helen Zeppenfeld 

Mr. and Mrs. George Robinson 
Mother of Mrs. Elliott Zucker 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Adelson 



Board of Trustees 

Mr. 0. Sage Wightman III 

President 

Rev. Lawrence Biondi, S.J. 

Mr. Stephen F. Brauer 

Mr. William H.T. Bush 

Mr. Parker B. Condie 

Dr. William H. Danforth 

Mr. M. Peter Fischer 

Mr. Samuel B. Hayes III 

Mr. Robert R. Hermann 

Rt. Rev. William A. Jones, Jr. 

Mr. David W. Kemper 

Mr. Charles F. Knight 

Mr. Charles E. Kopman 

Mr. Robert E. Kresko 

Mr. Richard J. Mahoney 

Mr. William E. Maritz 

Mr. James S. McDonnell III 

Mr. Lucius B. Morse III 

Rev. Earl E. Nance, Jr. 

Dr. Helen E. Nash 

Mr. William R. Orthwein, Jr. 

Mrs. Lucianna Gladney Ross 

The Hon. Vincent C. Schoemehl, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter G. Stern 

Mr. Andrew C. Taylor 

Dr. George E. Thoma 

Mr. Jack E. Thomas 

Dr. Blanche Touhill 

Mr. John K.Wallace, Jr. 

The Hon. George R. Westfall 

EMERITUS TRUSTEES 

Mr. Howard F. Baer 

Mr. Clarence C. Barksdale 

Mr. Joseph H. Bascom 

Mr. John H. Biggs 
Mr. Jules D. Campbell 
Mr. Henry Hitchcock 
Mrs. Fred A. Oberheide 
Mrs. Vernon W. Piper 
Mr. Joseph F. Ruwitch 

Mr. Louis S. Sachs 

Mr. Daniel L. Schlafly 

Mr. Warren M . Shapleigh 

Mr. Sydney M. Shoenberg, Jr. 

Mr. Robert Brookings Smith 

Mr. Tom K. Smith, Jr. 

Mrs. Harriet Spoehrer 

Mr. Harry E. Wuertenbaecher, Jr. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

Dr. Mildred Mathias 
Prof. Philippe Morat 

DIRECTOR 

Dr. Peter H. Raven 

MEMBERS' BOARD 

Mrs. Antonio I. Longrais 

President 

Mrs. Robert Schulte 

Mrs. Todd D. Arnold 

Mrs. David Dimit 
Mr. William A. Gilbert 



23. 



BULLETIN 1 MAY JUNE 19921 



■ 















C OM I N G J U LY 1 2 , 1992 




Rosy Periwinkle 
Celebration 

Watch for more details on this salute to the Rosy 
Periwinkle the plant source for the cure for 
childhood leukemia and Hodgkin 's Disease 

h nn us for a day of activities and events that focus on the Rosy Periwinkle 
and the role plants play in providing modern medicines. From collection 
by botanists to studies and manufacture by pharmaceutical companies 
to use by doctors and their patients, you will gain a deeper appreciation 
of the uses of plants. 




ssouri 
Botanical 
Garden 




IULY/ 

AUGUST 

992 



OLUME LXX: 
UMBER FOU. 




Inside 
This Issue 



A Lehmann Curators Named 

■■I Gerrit Davidse and Nancy Morin are 
named to new curatorships in honor of 
Mr. and Mrs. John S. Lehmann. 

PJ Flora of North America 

■■ Profiles of a landmark project and of its 
convening editor, Nancy Morin. 

A Four Millionth Specimen is 
■m Added to Herbarium 

The research program attains another 
milestone. 

C Horticulture in Missouri 

^H Purple loosestrife is just one example of 
a beautiful species that can invade and 
dominate an ecosystem. 

1 Q Home Gardening 

^H Some unusual suggestions for beautiful 
and fragrant woody plants for St. Louis 
gardens. 

J 2 Calendar of Events 

^■1 July is Childrens' Month, and August 
brings the Festival of Festivals. 

1 g Volunteers Are Recognized 

■■ The Garden pays tribute to volunteers 
with anniversaries for 10 or 20 years of 
service. 

Jg Peter Goldblatt, Ph.D. 

■■ A profile of the B. A. Krukoff Curator of 
African Botany on his 20th anniversary 
at the Garden. 

lg Profiles 

■■i Parker B. Condie is elected to the Board 
of Trustees; Dr. Roy Jerome Williams is 
elected to the Botanical Garden Subdis- 
trict Commission. 



On the cover: The Shapleigh fountain 
delights visitors of all ages on hot 
summer days. 

—Photo by King Schoenfeld 



1992 Missouri Botanical Garden. 

The BULLETIN (ISSN 0026-6507) is published bi-monthly 
by the Missouri Botanical Garden, 2345 Town Grove 
Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110. Second class postage paid at 
St. Louis, MO. 

The BULLETIN is sent to every Member of the Garden 
as one of the bcut'fiis.of membership. For a contribution of 
as little as $40 per year, Members also arc entitled to: free 
admission to the Garden, Shaw Arboretum, and Tower 
Grove House; invitations to special events and receptions; 
announcements of all lectures and classes; discounts in the 
Garden date Shop and for course fees; and the opportunity 
to travel, domestic and abroad, with other Members. For 
Information, please call (314) 577-5100. 

Postmaster: send address changes to BULLETIN, Susan 
Caine, editor, P.O. Box 299, St. buns. MO 63166. 



Comment 



® 



printed on recycled paper 




Summer Celebrations 

Japanese, Greek, 

t Native American, and 

Italian traditions will 
0tfmm be featured in the 
second Festival of 
Festivals throughout 
August (see the back 
cover). The Garden 
has coordinated these 
focused weekends with local organizations 
and we wish to extend our appreciation to 
them for their efforts. The St. Louis 
Japanese Chamber of Commerce, Japan 
America Society, Japanese American 
Citizens' League, Japanese Language 
School of St. Louis, Japan Society, Suwa 
Sister City Committee, and the Consul 
General of Japan-Kansas City are key to the 
success of the Japanese Festival. Assump- 
tion Greek Orthodox Church has been 
instrumental in assisting with the Greek 
Festival, as has the Cahokia Mounds 
Historical Site and the American Indian 
Center of Mid-America Inc. in planning and 
organizing the Native American Festival. 
The concluding Italian Festival has received 
significant support from the Civic Italian 
American Organization (CIAO) and we are 
most grateful for their sponsorship. Due to 
limited financial resources, it was essential 



to work cooperatively in planning and 
funding these festivals and the magnificent 
involvement and support from community 
organizations is gratefully recognized. 

We offer our personal welcome to the 
Tebeau Family, who became the Garden's 
30,000th members in May of this year, and 
we are delighted with the growth in 
membership that has been evident at the 
Garden for the past several years. 

Finally, the Earth Summit in Rio de 
Janeiro this past month heightened public- 
awareness about the environment and the 
meaning and importance of biodiversity, a 
topic the Garden has pursued vigorously for 
the past several years. Your continued 
interest and commitment provides the 
necessary backing for us to pursue efforts 
in furthering the understanding of biodiver- 
sity through our botanical research and 
environmental education programs. 
Increased understanding and awareness of 
biodiversity is vitally important to our 
future. Your involvement as a Member 
ensures our joint progress toward this goal. 

Thank you. 




NEW CONSERVATION CENTER UNDERWAY— Interior demolition has begun on the Park 
liuilding, the first phase in renovating and expanding that structure to create the ( onserva- 
tion ('enter. The expanded (enter will house the division of horticulture, the staff of the 
Center for Plant Conservation, the Horticultural Answer Service, the Gateway to Gardening 
Association of St. Louis, and space for Garden staff to work internationally with colleagues 
dedicated to conservation through horticulture and environmental education. A $500,000 
challenge grant from The Kresge Foundation has stimulated donor support at a level permit- 
ting project completion by Spring 7.9.9.7. 




Garden Welcomes Its 
30,000th Member! 

On Saturday, May 23, 1992, the Garden officially announced that its membership had 
reached 30,000 families, one of the largest memberships of any cultural institution in 
St. Louis and of any botanical garden in the nation. 

The 30,000th member family, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Tebeau of South St. Louis County, 
were welcomed at a celebration at the Garden. The Tebeaus and their son Christopher 
enjoyed a ride through the grounds in a horse drawn carriage, followed by luncheon 
outside at Tower Grove House with Mary Longrais, president of the Garden's Members' 
Board, her husband Tony, Garden director Peter H. Raven and Mrs. Raven. 

The Garden's membership program began in 1939 and celebrated its 50th Anniversary 
in 1989. In 1971 the membership numbered about 2,000, and reached 20,000 in April, 
1987. It has increased to 30,000 in just five years. 

' The enthusiasm of our members and their unwavering support make all the differ- 
ence to the Garden," Raven said. 'As we seek to serve the needs of the entire St. Louis 
community we are delighted to welcome new members who help us to meet those goals.' ' 



Shown with the horse 
drawn carriage in 
front of Tower drove 
House are (from left): 
7i>ny Longrais, Mary 
Longrais, Christopher 
Tebeau, Lois Tebeau, 
and Ralph Tebeau. 



WS80UW BOTANIC* 

JUL 01 1992 

gftRDEM LIBRARY 



BULLETIN JULY AUGUST 19921 



NEW CURATORSHIPS HONOR LEHMANNS 

Davidse and Morin Are Named 
Lehmann Curators 




'■*">.-■ 




Gerrit Davidse with "Corn and Millet" by Hertuch of Germany, 
printed 1792-1802, an original hand-colored copper engraving which 
iras presented to him at the ceremony. 

AT a ceremony on April 9, 1992, Dr. Gerrit Davidse was 
named John S. Lehmann Curator of Grasses, and Dr. Nancy 
Morin was named Anne L. Lehmann Curator of North 
American Botany at the Garden. 

Dr. Davidse is an expert in the Poaceae, or grass family, particu- 
larly tropical American grasses. He is co-organizer of the interna- 
tional Flora Mesoamericana project. This long-term, collaborative 
project, a description of the plants growing from southern Mexico to 
Panama, is the first major regional flora ever written in Spanish. It is 
being conducted in cooperation with the National Autonomous 
University of Mexico and the Natural History Museum in London. 

Dr. Morin is an expert on North American Campanulaceae, the 
bellflower family. She is head of the Garden's department of Botani- 
cal Information Management and serves as the convening editor of 
the collaborative, international Flora of North America project, the 
first formal cataloging of the plants growing in the wild in the United 
States, Canada, and Greenland. 

The curatorships are named in memory of Mr. and Mrs. John S. 
Lehmann, who were major benefactors of the Garden's research 
program. John lehmann was a Garden Trustee from 1941 until his 
death in 1967, serving as President of the Board 1953-1958 and 
briefly as acting director during that time. Anne Lionberger Lehmann, 
who died May 22, 1991 at age 97, carried on her husband's devotion 
to the Garden and in 1981 became the first woman to receive the 
Henry Shaw Medal, the Garden's highest honor. 

1 )r. Davidse came to the Garden in 1972 after earning his Ph.D. 
at Iowa State University. He has been involved with Flora 
Mesoamericana since its inception in 1980. The first volume of the 

4. 

m^m nan: 1 1\ juu augusti992 



Nancy Morin icith a print of Iris douglasiana by Henry Evans which 
teas presented to her at the ceremony. 



flora will be published this summer. In addition to Flora 
Mesoamericana, Dr. Davidse will soon participate in a project that 
involves grasses exclusively. Grasses of the New World will provide a 
modern, detailed, computerized floristic inventory of the grasses of 
the Western Hemisphere. 

Dr. Morin came to the Garden in 1981, as administrative curator 
of the herbarium and editor of the Annals. She received her Ph.D. 
from the University of California at Berkeley and was a post- 
doctoral fellow in the botany department of the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion in Washington, D.C. She has been instrumental in building the 
Garden's botanical database, TROPICOS, into a powerful tool used 
by all research projects at the Garden and by many researchers 
around the world. In addition to her role as convening editor of the 
Flora of North America, she is on the editorial board of the Flora of 
China project, a joint Sino-American project to translate into English 
and revise the massive Chinese-language Florae Reipublicae 
Popularis Sinicae, a catalog of the plants growing in China. 

"Honoring two such outstanding scientists with these curator- 
ships seems a fitting tribute to their achievements and to Mr. and 
Mrs. Lehmann," said Dr. Peter H. Raven, director of the Garden. 
"Support such as that of the Lehmanns is the lifeblood of a private 
institution such as the Missouri Botanical Garden. The lehmanns 
are part of a whole line of benefactors, from Henry Shaw to the 
present, to whom we owe a great debt of gratitude.' ' 

Gerrit Davidse and the Flora Mesoamericana project were profiled in 
the January- February 1992 issue of the Bulletin— Fditor. 



R • 




Nancy R. Morin, Ph.D., 
AnneL. Lehmann Curator of 
North American Botany 

ANCY MORIN has worn many hats since she came to the 
Garden in 1981 . She worked for five years as curator of the 
herbarium and editor of the Annals, then assumed leader- 
ship of the Flora of North America Project in 1986. In 1988 the 
Garden created the department of Botanical Information Manage- 
ment, and Morin was named head of that as well. 

This would be an extraordinary achievement for any scientist, but 
Morin did not pursue a career in science immediately. "I grew up in 
California, a wonderful place for plants," she says, "and I studied 
liberal arts and worked as a legal secretary for a while. In the early 
1970s I began taking some botany courses at San Francisco City 
College and was hooked. I went on to the University of California at 
Berkeley, which has a splendid program in taxonomy and botany, 
where I earned my doctorate. After a one-year fellowship at the 
Smithsonian Institution, I came to the Garden. I think that all of my 
experiences have enriched my work as a scientist.' ' 

Information management using computers has made great 
progress at the Garden in recent years, thanks to the fundamental 
work by Dr. Robert Magill and Dr. Marshall Crosby. Morin says, 
"We are very excited about the new possibilities opened up by 
computerization. It makes the data easier to use, and it is becoming 
possible to use information in important new ways. Our database is a 
tool for understanding the underlying relationships between plants 
and their environment, for learning to manage our natural resources." 



FLORA OF 
NORTH AMERICA 

A Landmark Project for the 
21st Century 

continental flora has ever tried to do all of the things 
we're doing," said Nancy Morin, convening editor of the 
Flora of North America. "We will have all parallel descrip- 
tions, plus illustrations and maps. The accompanying database will 
eventually contain all of the published information plus even more 
extensive and detailed data. We also have a database at the Hunt 
Institute for all references and sources, which is being used to pro- 
duce the bibliographies. There has never before been one place to 
obtain all of this information.' ' 

As the first volume of the Flora of North America (FNA) nears 
publication, it represents the culmination of ten years of work, and a 
milestone in efforts that began 160 years ago with John Torrey and 
Asa Gray's attempt to produce a comprehensive flora of the conti- 
nent. The Flora of North America has built upon regional floras, 





monographs, and previous efforts to produce a comprehensive flora. 
"It has been designed to draw upon the expertise of the entire sys- 
tematic botany community and to make the best possible use of the 
literature and herbarium specimens that are essential resources for 

the project A continental flora provides a catalog of the plant 

resources available within the area and their status— it can be used as 
a gauge to assess environmental change and as a tool to help manage 
these resources in the future.'"* 

Volume I of FNA will be published in late 1992 or early 1993 by 
Oxford University Press. It will treat ferns and gymnosperms and 
will include all of the introductory material for the project: discus- 
sions of climate, geology, the history of vegetation and its current sta- 
tus; expeditions and research; and discussions of overall 
classification and how to use the book. FNA describes all plants 
growing wild in the United States and Canada. 

"We have conquered the hardest phase, establishing how to 
make the project work," Morin said. FNA is working on many plant 
groups simultaneously, and subsequent volumes will appear approxi- 
mately every year for the next twelve years. Missouri Botanical 
Garden is the organizational center for the project, which is a col- 
laborative effort by more than 20 major botanical institutions in the 
United States and Canada. 

Nancy Morin said, ' The cooperation among all of the participants 
has been wonderful. There has been a synergy created by the col- 
laboration that has been exciting and extraordinary. It's a privilege to 
be part of it." 

* History of the Flora of North America Project, by Nancy R. Morin and Richard 



Spellenberg, 1992. 




Dr. Armando T. Hunziker, left, visited the (iarden in June. Dr. 
Hunziker is director of the Flora of Argentina project at the I niver- 
sidad Nacional de Cordoba for CONICET and is an international 
authority on the Solanaceae (tomato) family. He is shown in (he 
(Garden's herbarium with Dr. Peter H. Raven. 



BULLETIN JULY-AUGUST 1992 



Four Millionth Specimen Is Added 
to the Herbarium 



AT a ceremony in the John S. Leh- 
mann Building on May 20, 1992 , a 
woody vine from the rain forests of 
central Africa became the 4,000,000th num- 
bered specimen in the herbarium collection 
at the Garden. What may prove to be an 
undescribed species of a poorly known Afri- 
can and Asian genus, Ancistrocladus , was 
collected in Congo by Missouri Botanical 
Garden botanists under a contract with the 
National Cancer Institute to obtain samples 
of African plants for screening for phar- 
macological activity. Preliminary testing 
indicates that this species may have proper- 
ties of interest to researchers working on 
potential treatments for HIV. 

The four millionth specimen was 
mounted on archival quality, acid-free paper 
during a meeting of the Garden's Board of 
Trustees, with the assistance of Dr. James 
Solomon, manager of the Herbarium, and 
Jean Digby, one of the Garden's 20 plant 
mounters. "The Missouri Botanical Garden 
has been collecting and studying botanical 
specimens for more than 125 years," said 



Dr. Peter H. Raven, director. "We are 
delighted to make this specimen number 
4,000,000, as it is symbolic of mankind's 
limited knowledge of the biological diversity 
occurring with us on Earth and the potential 
benefit which may be derived from this 
plant— and from thousands more yet undis- 
covered in the tropical rain forests.' ' 

The Garden's herbarium is one of the 
four largest in the United States, and has 
worldwide representation of mosses, 
ferns, gymnosperms, and flowering plants. 
The nucleus of the Garden's collection was 
the Johann Jakob Bernhardi herbarium con- 
taining approximately 62,000 specimens 
purchased in 1857 for Henry Shaw by 
George Engelmann, a St. Louis physician 
and one of the foremost botanists of the 
19th century. 

The Bernhardi Collection, assembled 
during the late 18th and early 19th centu- 
ries, contains many important historical 
specimens from South America, Asia, 
Africa, and Europe. George Engelmann's 
private herbarium of about 100,000 speci- 




Shown at the ceremony for the four millionth herbarium 
specimen are (from left) (). Sage Wightman III, president 
of the Hoard of Trustees; plant mounter Jean Digby; and 
Dr. Deter //. Haven. At right: Regions of Africa where 
Ancistrocladus occurs, and the two locations where this 
species has been collected. 



mens, was donated by his family to the Gar- 
den in 1890, and contained major collections 
from many of the 19th century exploring 
expeditions to western North America and 
northern Mexico. From this beginning the 
Garden's herbarium has developed into an 
outstanding international research resource 
with a major emphasis on the New World 
and African tropics and North America. 

Given proper care, herbarium speci- 
mens will last for centuries. The Garden's 
collection contains plant specimens col- 
lected by George Boehmer from the 1740s, 
by Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander, who 
accompanied Captain James Cook on his 
first voyage around the world in 1768-71, 
and by Charles Darwin on his voyage with 
H.M.S. Beagle, 1831-36. These specimens 
are as useful to botanists today as they were 
when they were gathered. 

More than 250,000 kinds of vascular 
plants inhabit the earth. Botanists base 
much of their knowledge of these organ- 
isms on dried specimens that have been 
carefully labeled, mounted, and stored in 
herbarium collections. Several thousand 
new species of plants are discovered and 
described by researchers worldwide every 
year from herbarium collections. The speci- 
mens often come from parts of the world 
previously unexplored by botanists, but a 
surprising number are found in areas which 
have already been visited many times. 

Botanical research is an international 
endeavor which depends on close collabo- 
ration between the world's herbaria and 
botanists to effect progress. As a result of 
the Garden's active collecting and specimen 
exchange program, the herbarium is mount- 
ing and adding an average of 105,000 speci- 
mens per year to the collection. Specimens 
are then made available for study by 
researchers throughout the world as loans 
(averaging 40,000 specimens annually), as 
well as through many thousands of gift 
specimens sent to specialists for their 
authoritative examination and identification. 
In addition, more than 500 visiting 
researchers work in the herbarium and 
library each year. 



6. 



\BULLET1N JULY AUGUST 1992 




ECOLOGY FOR TEACHERS 

Learning by Doing 



A WARM, sunny spring day in April 
found 30 teachers and several staff 
from the Garden's Education Divi- 
sion in canoes on a stretch of the Meramec 
River. The trip's purpose, to familiarize the 
teachers with stream ecology, placed the 
educators in the role of explorers. They 
tested the water quality of the river and 
adjacent creeks and collected aquatic 
organisms to see what plants and animals 
lived there, making the correlation be- 
tween the type and quality of a habitat and 
the animals it supports. With nets in hand 
the participants were excited and enthu- 
siastic as they caught tadpoles, crayfish and 
dragonfly nymphs. 



This trip was part of a year long gradu- 
ate level course, "Ecology for Teachers" 
for educators of grades 4 through 8. Funded 
by the National Science Foundation, the 
"Ecology for Teachers" program is 
designed to give participants a strong back- 
ground in ecology and environmental sci- 
ence and to provide them the opportunity to 
create ecology curriculum for use with their 
own students. Nearly 90 teachers will have 
completed the course when the 1991-92 
school year ends. The teachers, in turn, 
reach thousands of students each year, mul- 
tiplying the impact of the course. 

Using the Garden and Shaw Arboretum 
as bases, the teachers gathered for ses- 



Garden Classes and Tours Are a Hit with Visitors 



"The Garden is always so hospitable to 
us," a teacher writes. "I cannot suggest 
any improvements. Thank you!" 

These kinds of warm responses are 
typical of comments on evaluation forms 
returned to the Garden's education divi- 
sion. Since September 1991 the education 
staff have asked leaders of classes and tour 
groups visiting the Garden to respond to a 
questionnaire about the quality of the expe- 
rience. About 90 percent of responses were 
completely positive, and others made minor 
suggestions for changes to improve the visit 
for students and volunteers alike. 

Sandra Rode, manager of the educa- 
tional services, said, "We have always 
known that our volunteer guides and 
instructors do a first rate job. Now we have 



very positive evidence from teachers and 
parents that our visitors think so, too.' ' 

"The guides and instructors are to be 
commended for their leadership in 
requesting evaluations from visitors," said 
Dr. Larry DeBuhr, director of education. 
' 'We value their willingness to look continu- 
ally for ways to improve our programs.' ' 

The education staff continues to survey 
visitor responses to its programs to learn 
which aspects to emphasize in teacher 
training and how better to meet visitors' 
needs. "The activities and handouts were 
excellent," another teacher said. "Our 
instructor was very warm, happy and 
knowledgeable. She gave dignity to each 
student and his/her comment or question. 
Thank you very, very much!" 



Teachers investigate the ecology of the 
Meramec River. 



sions in October and November, as well as 
in April. They experienced the concepts 
they were to learn through varied activities 
that they could, in turn, take back to their 
own classrooms. Each teacher selected two 
ecology concepts to focus upon, and 
designed learning cycles, an innovative and 
effective hands-on teaching strategy, based 
on each concept, which they implemented 
with their students. 

The teachers found the learning cycle 
instructional strategy to be effective with 
their students and appreciated the 
exposure to many different resources in 
addition to their own increased knowledge 
and understanding of ecology. One par- 
ticipant commented, "I found this to be a 
very helpful course in expanding and 
enriching my resources for classroom 
instruction. I felt that I was involved with a 
select group of high caliber teaching profes- 
sionals and we learned a great deal from 
each other." 

The thirty teachers from this year's 
session will reconvene for a final meeting in 
June, during which they will share informa- 
tion with one another about their projects, 
useful resources they discovered along the 
way and the highlights of their teaching 
experiences in the program. As one par- 
ticipant stated: "I truly grew from this 
experience. I feel as if I'm a part of the team 
(instructors and teachers taking the course) 
that is putting its energies where they are 
needed. I'm interested and excited to con- 
tinue to grow in this area.' ' 

—Barbara Addelson 
MBG Instructional Coordinator 



Missouri Botanical Garden* 

To minimize postage 
and printing costs, 

the 1991 Annual Report 
is available on request. 

To obtain a copy please stop in or 

write The Development Office, 

Missouri Botanical Garden, RO. Box 

299, St. Louis, MO 63166- 0299, or 

call (314) 577-5120. Your 1991 Annual 

Report will be sent to you. 



BULLETIN I JULY-AUGUST 1992 I 



Horticulture in Missouri 




Purple Loosestrife on the Loose 

R 



ECENTLY I saw an aerial photo- 
graph of a marsh in Minnesota that 
[showed acres of brilliantly colored 
lavender-pink blossoms. At first glance, the 
marsh was beautiful. However, a closer 
inspection was unsettling; the marsh vege- 
tation was composed almost entirely of a 
single exotic species called purple loose- 
strife, Lythrum salicaria. Instead of the 
dazzling richness of vegetation typical of a 
freshwater marsh— with grasses, sedges 
and other aquatic plants that servo as home 
and food for large numbers of birds, insects, 
frogs, mammals and other aquatic 
organisms -this photograph illustrated how 
a single, exotic species can invade and com- 
pletely dominate an entire ecosystem. 

Purple loosestrife is just one of many 
plants termed exotic because they are non- 
native, and invasive because they have 
characteristics that allow them to reproduce 
and quickly establish populations outside 
then home territory. Invasive species often 
can tolerate a wide range of environmental 
conditions, and may take advantage of hab- 
itat disturbances. An exotic species often 
lacks biological controls, such as parasites, 
predators or diseases, that hold their popu- 
lations in check within their native habitat. 

Population expansion of exotic plants 
and animals can result in severe environ- 
mental problems. For example, the gypsy 
moth (see the MBG Bulletin, March-April 
1992), is an exotic insect that is causing 
extensive damage to forest trees in North 
America. Kudzu vine, Pueraria lobata, has 
completely covered and choked out entire 



landscapes in the southeastern United 
States. During a field trip to inspect glade 
habitats in southwestern Missouri, I was 
stunned to see how many of the glades 
were being overrun by introduced species 
of brome grass, or Bromus. 

Gardeners need to be aware of purple 
loosestrife because we are often the agent 
of dispersal for this exotic pest, and we can 
help to control its spread. Originally from 
Europe and Asia, seeds arrived in north- 
eastern North America from Europe in the 
early 1800s. Some seeds were in soils used 
as ballast in sailing ships, while other seeds 
were probably imported on sheep or in raw 
wool. Populations must have established 
quickly, because Asa Gray and John Torrey 
saw enough loosestrife to suggest it was 
native in A Flora of North America pub- 
lished in 1840. In this century, Lythrum 
salicaria and L. virgatum, another exotic 
species, have been valued for their beauty 
in the garden, and many cultivars of these 
handsome plants were developed. 

Purple loosestrife, a member of the fam- 
ily Lythraceae, is an herbaceous perennial 
plant that can send up over thirty stems 
reaching two meters in height. Each stem 
can produce hundreds of flowers, and each 
flower can produce up to 100 seeds. In one 
study, purple loosestrife produced an aver- 
age of 2,700,000 seeds per plant! Also, the 
stems of loosestrife can root and quickly 
establish new plants through vegetative 
reproduction. In other words, this species 
has the capability to produce many new 
plants by both seed and vegetative 



reproduction— one of the traits common to 
invasive plant species. 

Unfortunately, loosestrife has virtually 
no value for marsh inhabitants; it displaces 
native plants, is a poor source of food, 
modifies microhabitats and colonizes nest 
sites. One estimate suggests that purple 
loosestrife costs $45 million annually in 
control measures, costs to wildlife and 
agriculture, and clogging of waterways and 
drainage ditches. 

In response to the spread of purple 
loosestrife, many states, including Mis- 
souri, have enacted laws that prohibit the 
sale, propagation and planting of this inva- 
sive species. Several loosestrife cultivars 
were believed to be sterile and were omit 
ted from the list of banned plants. However, 
recent research has shown that the so- 
called "sterile cultivars" will produce seed 
when they come in contact with naturalized 
populations. All cultivars are also capable of 
vegetative reproduction. It is nearly impos- 
sible to distinguish one cultivar from the 
next, and several cultivars appear to be 
hybrids between Lythrum salicaria and L. 
virgatum. With this in mind, most states are 
strongly discouraging the planting of either 
of these species or their cultivars. 

At the Garden, we have chosen to 
remove all of our loosestrife, with the 
exception of several plants in the perennial 
beds in front of the Linnean House. We will 
keep these plants so that our visitors can 
learn about loosestrife and how to identify 
it. The horticulturists will monitor vegeta- 
tive growth and cut off any flowering heads 
before they go to seed. At the Arboretum, 
the staff has worked for several years to 
eliminate the naturalized population of 
Lythrum salicaria that grew around Pine- 
tum Lake. 

For the gardener, other beautiful 
perennials can replace purple loosestrife in 
your flower beds. Blazing star (Liatns), 
vervain {Verbena) and bellflower {Campan- 
ula) are just a few. Hut, please do not mis- 
take any of our lovely native perennials for 
exotic loosestrife. 

The Missouri Department of Con- 
servation wants to know about populations 
of purple loosestrife, which are easily 
identified during their blooming season 
from late June through August. You can 
request information or send them loose- 
strife localities by writing to: Purple 
Loosestrife Alert, MDC, P.O. Box 180, 
Jefferson City, MO 65102. 

—Lucile McCook 
Horticultural Taxonomist 



\BULLETIN JULY AUGUST 1992 




Students Help To Create New Wetlands Area at 
Shaw Arboretum 



This past May, the large new Wetlands 
Area at Shaw Arboretum was planted with 
assistance from students participating in the 
Henry Shaw Academy (HSA) Program. In 
early May the students collected native 
wetland plant materials from the Mingo 
Swamp Wildlife Refuge in southern 
Missouri. These specimens, plus an addi- 
tional 12,500 wetland plants, were added to 
the new Arboretum area on May 23. 

"The students are learning more about 
the importance of America's wetlands while 
making a significant contribution to the 
Arboretum," said Jeff De Pew, coordinator 
of the Henry Shaw Academy. "In the past 
20 years more than 11 million acres of 
wetlands have disappeared from the nearly 
100 million acres of wetlands that were in 
America as late as the mid 1970's." 

The work being done by the HSA 
students will be available for all to enjoy for 
generations to come. 

During a two-day field project that 
included an overnight excursion to the 
Mingo Swamp Wildlife Refuge, high school 
students participated in a boardwalk 
journey through the swamp, and examined 
aquatic and terrestrial plant life characteris- 
tics and adaptations to the permanent 
wetland. Field trips are an important part of 
the HSA program, allowing students to 



actually experience the ecosystems they 
study. 

May is American Wetlands Month. 
Wetlands are vital to flood control, erosion 
prevention, fish and wildlife habitats and 
outdoor recreation. The Garden is a recog- 
nized sponsor of Wetlands Month and is 



actively involved in canoe trips, trash clean- 
up programs, wetlands restoration and 
dissemination of educational materials. A 
wide coalition of groups are working to 
increase public awareness of productivity to 
wetlands through the nation. 

The wetlands area at the Arboretum will 
be accessible to the public upon its comple- 
tion later this spring. For more information 
about the Henry Shaw Academy contact Jeff 
DePew at 314-577-5135. 




Henry Shaw Academy students at 
Mingo Sirarnp. 



Jeff DePew (left) and students plant wetlands area 
at the Arboretum. 



Center for Plant Conservation 



Plant Sponsorship: a Personal Commitment to Plant Conservation 



For some people, the terms "plant 
conservation" and "preservation" are 
merely concepts. But for Mrs. Judy 
Freeman of New Orleans, these words 
have special meaning. Mrs. Freeman 
spearheaded the Zone IX Garden Club of 
America project to sponsor Price's potato- 
bean (Apios priceana) in the Center for 
Plant Conservation's National Collection of 
Endangered Plants. The garden club 
members join a growing number of other 
groups and individuals who are taking an 
active role in preventing the extinction of 
U.S. plants. 

"The goals of the Garden Club of 
America and the Center for Plant conserva- 
tion are closely aligned," said Mrs. 
Freeman. "Zone IX members accepted the 
challenge of plant sponsorship as an effort at 
furthering plant conservation." 



The National Collection consists of living 
plant samples of endangered species. The 
plants are non-destructively collected from 
the wild and represent to the greatest 
extent possible the genetic diversity found 
in natural populations. 

The Center's 25 Participating Institutions 
stock and maintain the Collection. Locally, 
the Missouri Botanical Garden has 16 species 
in the Collection. Price's potato-bean is one 
of two plants sponsored at the Garden. 

The expenses of establishing and main- 
taining the Collection include field collecting 
and surveys, seed preparation, storage, 
documentation, and the living plants in 
cultivation. Plant sponsorship offsets 
these expenses. 

"Sponsoring a plant in the National 
Collection requires making a personal 
commitment to saving our native flora," 



said Don Falk, CPC director. "Protective 
cultivation is the only means of ensuring the 
survival of many threatened or endangered 
plants." 

One-fifth of the 20,000 species of plants 
in the United States is endangered. Approx- 
imately 800 of those plants may become 
extinct within 10 years. 

Plants may be sponsored by individuals, 
garden clubs, corporations and family foun- 
dations, among others. Sponsors select a 
preferred species from a list of current 
accessions available from the Center. They 
receive a botanically accurate watercolor by 
noted artist Bobbi Angell, a Certificate of 
Sponsorship and recognition in Center 
publications. 

For more information about how to 
sponsor a plant in the National Collection of 
Endangered Plants, call the CPC at (314) 
577- 9450. 



BULLETIN JULY AUGUST 19921 



NEW IDEAS 

Rather than focusing on the 
familiar fragrance plants such 
as roses, scented viburnums, 
lilacs, and mockoranges, a 
glance at some less common 
trees, shrubs and vines will 
serve as an introduction to new 
ideas for St. Louis gardeners. 

In any other year a discus- 
sion of fragrance would have to 
include the many magnolia 
species and hybrids that form 
the backbone of our gardens. 
It is painful to see the havoc 
wreaked upon them by frost this 
year. It will take careful pruning, 
some tender loving care and the 
passage of much time for their 
full recovery. It is interesting to 
observe that the magnolia least 
fazed by our variable weather is 
the native "Cucumber tree,' ' 
Magnolia acuminata. It serves 
as a reminder of the value of 
including native, hardy species in 
our gardens. 

WINTER 

A walk through a fragrant 
garden need not be confined to 
the summer months. The 
calendar year begins with 
January and on mild, sunny days 
at that time of year, the native 
Ozark witch hazel, Hamamelis 
vernalis, first blooms, spreading 
its sweet musty scent far and 
wide on light breezes. By the 
end of February its blossoms are 
spent, but not before it is joined 
in bloom by the hybrid witch 
hazel, H. x intermedia. These in 
turn are followed by the Chinese 
witch hazel, H. mollis. Witch 
hazels often develop a 
picturesque spreading branch 
habit and their bright yellow fall 
color is an added bonus. 

Another winter bloomer 
is the Korean abelialeaf 
Abeliophyllum distichum, also 
known as the "white forsythia." 
Often flowering in February or 
early March along with the first 
snowdrops and winter aconite, 
its honey-scented flowers draw 
foraging bees at a time when 
few other plants bloom, bite 
February and March bring the 
delightfully lemon-scented 
winter honeysuckles, lj>nicera 
fragrantissima and L. standishii, 
into flower. These old-fashioned 




Fragrant Woodies 



shrubs open their flowers over a 
long season as the weather 
obliges. Often described as 
coarse, the winter honeysuckles 
have a somewhat graceful, 
arching habit, providing they are 
not crowded by their neighbors. 

EARLY SPRING 

Mid-April brings the native 
dwarf fothergilla, Fothergilla 
gardenii, into bloom. Related to 
the witch hazels, fothergilla has 
an interesting white flower spike 
that resembles a small bottle- 
brush. A versatile shrub for 
sunny areas as well as wood- 
land settings, its autumn leaves 
turn a brilliant yellow in shade 
or orange-scarlet in sunnier 
locations. 

With the onset of warmer 
weather in early May, the fringe- 
tree, Chionanthus virginicus, 
unfolds its extraordinary long, 
fleecy flowers that give rise to 
its other common name ' 'old 
man's beard." The sweet, 
refreshing blooms are effective 
up to three weeks in cooler 
springs. One of our loveliest 
native trees, the fringetree can 
be planted as a single specimen 
or in groups. Its flowering period 
parallels that of another 
outstanding native, the pagoda 
dogwood, Cornus alternifolia. 
Rarely mentioned in books on 
fragrant plants, its sweet, agree- 
able scent is especially notice- 
able on warm evenings. Perhaps 
the finest attribute of the pagoda 
dogwood is the strong horizontal 
habit of its branching pattern, 
which lends a great deal of 
interest to the winter garden. 

Also flowering in early May 
is the crossvine, Bignonia 
capreolata, a climber unfamiliar 
to most gardeners, though it 
is an easily grown native. The 
trumpet-shaped flowers, 
colored a brownish-orange with 
yellow tubes, are attractive to 



migrating hummingbirds. The 
scent bears a hint of chocolate 
and is best detected from close 
range. The foliage is evergreen, 
though it may appear worn by 
spring. New leaves grow quickly 
by late May, at the end of the 
flowering period. 

A non-native climber also 
flowering in early May is the 
Chinese kiwi, Actinidia 
kolomikta. Its small white 
blossoms bear a heavy 
fragrance, but the scent lingers 
at the open flower, to be discov- 
ered only by the adventurous 
nose. Fragrance aside, the main 
attraction in this vine is the 
showy foliage. Once the green 
leaves expand, they develop an 
unusual variegation with up to 
half of each leaf turning first 
white and then pink. As the 
summer wears on, the leaves 
revert to green. 

SUMMER 

Moving into late May, the 
native Virginia sweetspire, Itea 
virginica, sends up long 
racemes of white flowers 
bearing a sweet, clean perfume. 
It is joined in bloom by the 
similar Japanese sweetspire, 
Itea japonica . These plants 
bloom at a time when few other 
shrubs flower and an added 
bonus is their late fall color in 
bright, reddish shades. 'Henry's 
Garnet' is a native sweetspire 
selected for its outstanding 
autumn coloration. About mid- 
June, when the sweetspires are 
going past, the bottlebrush 
buckeye, Aesculus parviflora , 
opens its foot-long spikes of 
white, lightly scented blossoms. 
Few summer bloomers, much 
less other woodies, compare to 
the sight of a large clump of this 
shrub in flower. Slow to 
become established, this south- 
eastern native is worth the 
wait, once it matures. 



Perhaps the most versatile of 
all garden shrubs is the summer- 
sweet, Clethra alnifolia . Native 
to the eastern U.S., this shrub 
will grow in sun or shade, in wet 
or dry sites, and also tolerates 
clay soils. What more can be 
asked of a June-flowering plant 
so generous with its sweet spicy 
fragrance that homeward-bound 
whalers detected its scent far 
out at sea, earning it the name 
"Sailors' Delight?" Another 
plant capable of exuding 
fragrance over a large area is a 
linden tree. There is a huge old 
bigleaf linden, Tilia platyphyllos, 
on the Knolls at the Garden that 
perfumes the western Shaw 
neighborhood when it flowers 
each June. The native linden, or 
basswood, Tilia americana, 
produces a nectar that bees 
gather to produce honey of the 
finest quality. 

One of the weediest plants I 
will ever recommend is also one 
I would never be without. The 
sweetautumn clematis, Clematis 
paniculata, is a rampaging vine 
native to Japan. Thriving on 
neglect, as long as you 
remember it often enough to 
occasionally curtail its exuber- 
ance with some timely pruning, 
it won't quite succeed in 
enveloping your entire garden. 
The battle is forgiven and 
forgotten for that two- week 
stretch in August when it instead 
envelops your garden with a 
sweet vanilla scent that lingers 
both day and night. 

AUTUMN 

As the gardening year winds 
down through autumn one final 
fragrant delight awaits as the 
leaves begin to fall and the first 
snaps of frost are in the air. This 
is the time when the eastern 
witch hazel, Hamamelis 
virginiana, blooms with its char- 
acteristic scent, the last woody 
to do so. Usually effective for 
two to four weeks, in some years 
the blooms last long enough to 
be joined in fragrance by its 
fellow native the Ozark witch 
hazel as it passes the torch to 
the new year and the cycle 
repeats again. 

—Chip Tynan, 
MBG Horticulturist 



10. 



I BULLETIN I JULY-AUGUST 1992 



Timely Tips from the Answer Service 



Do you have a plant question? Call the 
Horticultural Answer Service, Monday 
through Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon, at 
577-5143. 

July Tips 

■ Perennials that have finished blooming 
should be deadheaded. Cut back the foliage 
to encourage a tidier appearance. 

■ Remove infected leaves from roses. 
Pick up fallen leaves. Continue fungicidal 
sprays as needed. 

■ Newly planted trees and shrubs should 
continue to be watered thoroughly, once a 
week. 

■ Prune climbing roses and rambler roses 
after bloom. 

■ Spray hollies for leaf miner control. 

■ Divide and reset oriental poppies after 
flowering as the foliage dies. 

■ Fall webworms begin nest building near 
the ends of branches of infested trees. 



Prune off webs. Spray with B.T. if defolia- 
tion becomes severe. 

■ To minimize insect damage of squash 
and cucumber plants, try covering them 
with lightweight floating row covers. 
Remove covers once plants flower. 

■ Cover grape clusters loosely with paper 
sacks to provide some protection from 
marauding birds. 

■ Water turfgrass frequently enough to 
prevent wilting. Early morning irrigation 
allows turf to dry before nightfall, reducing 
the chance of disease. 

August Tips 

■ Continue spraying roses that are sus- 
ceptible to black spot and other fungus dis- 
eases. Roses should receive no further 
nitrogen fertilizer after August 15th. 

■ To grow big dahlia blooms, keep side 
shoots pinched off, water and fertilize 
plants regularly. 



■ Order bulbs for fall planting. 

■ Pinch the growing tips of gourds once 
adequate fruit set is achieved, to direct 
energy into ripening fruits rather than 
producing vines. 

■ Plant lettuce and radishes for fall at 
mid-month. 

■ Spray peach and other stone fruit trees 
to protect against peach tree borers. Culti- 
vate strawberries. Weed preventers can be 
applied immediately after fertilizing. 

■ Monitor plants for spider mite activity. 
Hose off with a forceful spray of water. 

■ Watch Scotch and Austrian pines for 
Zimmerman pine moth damage. Yellowing 
or browning of branch tips and presence of 
pitch tubes near leaf whorls are indicative. 
Prune and destroy infected parts. 

■ Hummingbirds are migrating through 
gardens by mid-month. 



—Chip Tynan, The Answer Service 




UNION PACIFIC SUPPORTS ENERG Y 
EFFICIENCY— Robert L. Barley (left), 
assistant vice president, data centers, for 
Union Pacific Railroad, presented a check 
for $30,000 to Peter Raven in June. It 
represents the final installment of a $60,000 
grant from Union Pacific Foundation to help 
support energy efficiency improvements to 
the Ridgway Center. "Union Pacific's 
generous support will allow us to complete 
these improvements by the end of 1992," 
Raven said. "This allows us to devote more 
of our resources to serving the community." 



OPERATION CLEAN STREAM CELEBRATES 25 YEARS— The 25th annual Operation 
Clean Stream will be held August 22. Volunteers remove debris from the Meramec River 
(shown above) to help maintain the region 's waterways. For more information or to volunteer 
please call Shaw Arboretum at 1-742-3512 (toll free from St. Louis). 



11. 



BULLETIN I JULY AUGUST L992I 



"Kids In Bloom" 

July is Children's Month 

at the Garden 

Throughout July join us as 

we present events especially for 

children and their families. 
"Kids in Bloom" is sponsored 
by KMOV-ChanneU and their 
Family Works partners Dier- 
bergs and Missouri Baptist 

Medical Center. 

There will be a special 
MoBot Express tram tour espe- 
cially for children whenever a 
Kids in Bloom event is held 
Fare is $.50, and adults must be 

accompanied by a child. 

Tickets for some Kids in 
Bloom programs in Shoenberg 
Auditorium wiU go on sale June 
IS 1992 at the Ridgway Center 
Ticket Counter. Call 577-5125 
for further information on 

events. 



Kemper Center for 

Home Gardening 

Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. 

Plant Doctor available 10 am. to 
noon and 1 to 3p-m. Monday 
through Saturday. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 

Master Composter 
Hotline: 314/5779555 

Tower Grove House 

Tea Room 

Open for luncheon Monday 

through Friday, U:30 a.m. to 

lorn., February through 
November, plus special Holiday 

Luncheons in December; 
advance reservations only. 

Call 577-5150. 
Garden Walkers' 

Breakfast 

7 to 10:30 a.m., every 

Wednesday and Saturday. 
Restaurant and grounds open 
early; free admission until noon 
Sponsored by the American 

Heart Association. Call 
577-5125 for information. 



v$/ 



Missouri Botanical Garden 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 



July-August 1992 




July — August 23 / Bug's Eye View 

9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. daily, Brookings Interpretive Center. Experi- 
ence a thrilling exhibit where the world is seen from an insect's 
point of view. Huge leaves, flowers and insects create a wondrous 
environment that enhances our understanding of Earth's most 
diverse and successful life form. Jointly sponsored by the Saint 
Louis Zoo, St. Louis Science Center and the Missouri Botanical 
Garden. 

SPECIAL TOURS: July 1, 8, 15, 22, 19, and August 11, 25; tours 
leave from Ridgway Lobby at 9:30 and 11 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. 
Exhibit and tours are free with regular Garden admission. 




Sunday, July 12 /Rosy Periwinkle Celebration 

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. , Ridgway Center and grounds. A salute to the 
Rosy Periwinkle, the plant source for the cure for childhood 
leukemia and Hodgkin's Disease. Join us for a day of activities and 
events that focus on the Rosy Periwinkle and the role plants play in 
providing modern medicines. From collection by botanists to studies 
and manufacture by pharmaceutical companies to use by doctors and 
their patients, you will gain a deeper appreciation of the uses of plants. 

Festival <?/ Festivals 

August 1 & 2; 8 & 9; 15 & 16; 22 & 23 

See back cover for details. 



JULY 



WEDNESDAY 



r , 



i 



Children of the World Paint 
Single Language 

9 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily through 
26, Ridgway Center. Exhibit b 
Paintbrush Diplomacy include 
art works by children ages 4 t< 
from 38 countries. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 

Children's Film Festival 
Jetsons: The Movie 

11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Shoenl 
Auditorium, every Wednesday 
July. Doors open 30 minutes t 
showtime. $1 for members an 
dren, $2 non-members. Ticke 
all films go on sale June 15, 19' 
the ticket counter. Seating is 
limited. 



4 SATURDA Y 

Home Irrigation Systems 

12:30 to 2:30 p.m., Kemper C 
Display and demonstration by 
Master Gardeners. Regular G 
admission. 



6 



MOM) A Y 



Folklore and Legends 

11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Shoenberg 
Auditorium. Storytelling with 
Norfolk, Janet Kiefer, Blake 1 
and Young Audiences perforn 
Chris Limber and Ruthilde Kn 
All sessions free with regular 
Garden admission. 

Plant Clinic 

10 a.m. to noon, Kemper Cei 
Bring your plant problems foi 
expert diagnosis and advice; 
samples are suggested. Spon 
by MBG Master Gardeners, 
Missouri Department of Con 
tion, University Extension, 
St. Louis County Soil and Wa 
Conservation District, and St 
County Department of Barks 
Recreation. Free with regula 
Garden admission. 



\BULLETINIJVU AUGUST1992 



7 continued 
WEDNESDA Y 

ren's Film Festival 
teat Muppet Caper 

\. and 1:30 p.m. See July 1 for 



SATURDAY 

ting the Right Mulch 

to 2 : 30 p. m . See July 4 for 



WEDNESD A Y 

en's Film Festival 
almatians 

.. and 1:30 p.m. See July 1 for 




S A T U R D A Y 

Jugs! 

i. to 3 p.m., Ridgway Center 
ounds. A delightful day 
ing craft and plant workshops, 
t shows, life-size bugs 
lg the grounds and more 
ies highlighting the "Bug's 
iew" exhibit in the Brookings 
retive Center. Free with 
r Garden admission. 

Gardening 

to 2 : 30 p. m . See July 4 for 



MONDAY 

Clinic 

. to noon. See July 6 for 



WEDNESDAY 



en's Film Festival 
Chit t y Bang Bang 

. and 1:30 p.m. See July 1 for 




Henry Shaw's Birthday Party— 
KMOV-Channel 4 Family Works 
Day 

11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Ridgway Center 
and grounds. Celebrate the 192nd 
birthday of the Garden's founder 
with one of America's favorite 
entertainers, David Parker, the Pied 
Piper of Sign; singer-songwriter 
David Williams; clowns, costumed 
characters, stiltwalkers, an organ 
grinder, and much more. KMOV 
personalities will be on hand to help 
with the celebration. Free with 
regular Garden admission. 



25 



SATURDAY 



Tomato Disorders 

12:30 to 2:30 p.m. See July 4 for 
details. 



SATURDAY 

Pumps for Fountains and 
Waterfalls 

12:30 to 2:30 p.m. See July 4 for 
details. 



3 



MONDAY 



Workshop: Pollination Pals 

10:30 a.m., Ridgway Center. Chil- 
dren ages 9 to 11 explore the 
fascinating world of pollinators and 
learn how plants and animals have 
formed an interdependency that 
keeps the earth green. Reserva- 
tions are required and enrollment is 
limited; call 577-5125. $1.50 per 
child. 

Plant Clinic 

10 a.m. to noon. See July 6 for 
details. 



26 



SUNDAY 



Iris Society Rhizome Sale 

11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Ridgway Center. 
The Greater St. Louis Iris Society 
will hold its annual sale of the 
surplus rhizomes grown at MBG. 
All proceeds support the iris collec- 
tion at the Garden. Free admission. 



28 



TUESDAY 



Puppets Galore 

11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Ridgway Center. 
Puppet shows by Kramer's Marion- 
nettes, The Dallas Puppet Theatre, 
Hystopolis, and Earth Mirrors, plus 
roaming life-size puppets to delight 
children of all ages. Tickets to 
performances are $1, and go on sale 
June 15, 1992 at the ticket counter. 
Seating is limited. 



29 



WEDNESDAY 



Children's Film Festival 
Honey, I Shrunk the Kids 

11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. See July 1 for 
details. 



AUGUST 



8 



SATURDAY 



How to Harvest and Dry Flowers 

12:30 to 2:30 p.m. See July 4 for 
details. 



15 



SATURDAY 



Fall Vegetable Planting 

12:30 to 2:30 p.m. See July 4 for 
details. 



17 



MONDAY 



Plant Clinic 

10 a.m. to noon. See July 6 for 
details. 



22 



SATURDAY 



Lawn Grasses for St. Louis 

12:30 to 2:30 p.m. See July 4 for 
details. 



MEMBERS 
EVENTS 



July 14 
Members' Day 
Moonlight Stroll 

9 to 11 p.m. 

Back by popular demand and 

featuring a ' 'real' ' full moon! 

Cash bar. Free, for members 

only. 



August 13 
Members' Day 
"Herb Day" 

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
Members of the St. Louis Herb 
Society guide tours through the 
Herb Garden behind Tower 
Grove House and answer ques- 
tions. Purchase a variety of herb 
products produced locally by 
Herb Society members. Free, 
for members only. 



29 



SATURDAY 



Container Gardening 

12:30 to 2:30 p.m. See July 4 for 
details. 

Henry Shaw Cactus Society 
Show 

9 a.m. to 8 p.m., daily through 
September 7. Orthwein Floral 
Display Hall. Free with regular 
Garden admission. 

$ I MONDAY 

Plant Clinic 

10 a.m. to noon. See July 6 for 
details. 

WALKIHGTOORS ^ 

**£ Snds, featuring 
tour of the iP ; history 

* e3rt ' ar tureo the Garten. 
andhorueuture inth e 

Meeta "cenS Free «* 



BULLETIN I JULY AUGUST 19921 



From the Membership Office 



iU'Ui COMWG EVENTS 

p'^Missoun Country Affair" 

>::■::' FR ,DAZ OCTOBER 9 ** 

fe.::: A pony to benefit the Garden. 

and 

m "Best of Missouri Market 

«** «£2£r*- 

«*"■■■■::•. . , c 



%«■■■■" 

■■■■■ l 
■■■■■■ 

!■■■■ 

!■■>■>! 

!■■■»' 



>J 



iTH t 



1 



The Missouri Botanical Harden Marching Flowers participated in the Shaw Neighborhood 
Ihgetherfest Parade, Saturday, Mag 30 (above). Made up of a group of children from the 
St. Louis ana, the Marching Flowers also performed in the Annie Malone Parade, 
Sunday, Mag 17. 



Garden Is Named Network 
Center by Alliance for 
Environmental Education 



The Missouri Botanical Garden, 
through its Education Division, has been 
designated a Network Center by the Alli- 
ance for Environmental Education. 

Network Center status is achieved only 
after the programs at an institution are 
determined to meet the qualifications of the 
Alliance in four areas: 1) Professional 
Teacher Development; 2) Community 
Outreach, 3) Curriculum, Program and 
Materials Development and Dissemination, 
and 4) Research and Evaluation. 

At present, 131 other Network Centers 
have been designated, with most located in 
the United States. About two-thirds of 
these are located at colleges and universi- 
ties. The Garden is the only Network 
Center in Missouri. "Being named a 
Network Center is a reflection of the nature 
and quality of the environmental programs 
at the Garden," said Dr. Larry DeBuhr, 
director of education. "We are very happy 
to have achieved this honor.' ' 



Garden Awarded $75,000 
by Institute of Museum 
Services 

The Institute of Museum Services 
(IMS), a federal agency that offers general 
operating support to the nation's museums, 
has awarded the Garden $75,000, its 
maximum award, to support basic services 
and programs. 

The grant was one of 443 awarded this 
year through a nationwide competition that 
values all aspects of the museums' opera- 
tion. Awards are made to museums that 
have demonstrated excellence in all areas of 
museum operations. Applications were 
received from 1,428 museums of all types 
from throughout the country. 

The Institute of Museum Services 
provides the only federal source of general 
operating support for the nation's 
museums. It was established in 1976 by 
Congress as an independent federal agency 
to assist museums in their efforts to 
preserve the nation's cultural, historic, and 
scientific heritage. 



11. 



\BULLETIN JULY AUGUST 1992 



Special Thanks to Our Volunteers 




Seated, left to right: Joe Meis, Gert Pappert, Arden Fisher, Dorothy Olson, director Peter H. 
Raven, Sue Reisel. Standing, left to right: Laura Riganti, Lorraine Hatscher, volunteer coor- 
dinator Jeanne McGilligan, Dorothy Hitt, Kay Sofian, Betty Sims, Frank Enger, Helen 
Hilliker, Pauline Jaworski, Pauline Kittlaus, Mary Jane Kirtz, Susan Schreiber, Margaret 
Abbott, Marian Herr, Joan Murphy, Sallie Wood. 



From the Garden Gate Shop 



"Choose Your Own" Bulbs 

This fall you can have a collection of 
flowering bulbs tailored to your landscape. 
The Shop has catalogues and order blanks 
and the bulbs will be shipped direct to your 
home. 

For more information call 577-5152. 

A New Buyer 

With the retirement of Inez Bender, a 
longtime buyer for the Garden Gate Shop, 
the staff welcomes new buyer Lynn Yaeger. 

Christmas in July 

Come by the Shop for a preview of the 
exciting Holiday season coming up. While 
you're there, enjoy the bright summer colors 
of casual table settings, patio furnishings, 
paper ware, and garden statuary, and place 
your order for the 1992 limited edition 
Brockman Musical Greenhouse. 

Donella Meadows Visits 
the Garden 

On May 29, 1992, Donella H. Meadows 
visited the Garden to deliver a lecture and 
sign copies of her book Beyond The Limits, 



Chelsea Green Publishing. Dr. Meadows, 
who coauthored the book with Dr. Dennis 
L. Meadows and Dr. Jorgen Randers, is an 
adjunct professor at Dartmouth College in 
the Environmental Studies Program. She 
has written or cowritten nine books and 
writes a nationally syndicated newspaper 
column, "The Global Citizen." Beyond the 
Limits is a sequel to the international best 
seller The Limits to Growth. It makes 
powerful arguments for the urgency of 
reducing population growth and material 
consumption to avoid global collapse. The 
book is available in the Garden Gate Shop, 
$19.95. 



Flower Festival Honors 
Stephen Wolff 

On Saturday, April 25, 1992, The Epis- 
copal Diocese of Missouri honored Stephen 
Wolff of the Garden's Horticulture Division 
at a service celebrating the annual Flower 
Festival. Henry Shaw provided for a special 
service in honor of plants in his Will in 1889, 
and every year the Garden presents 
hundreds of blooms to decorate the Christ 
Church Cathedral. 

For 22 years Stephen Wolff has super- 
vised the preparation of the beautiful 
flowers donated to the church in memory of 



On April 22, 1992, the Garden paid 
tribute to volunteers who have completed 
ten or twenty years of service, at a special 
luncheon in their honor. Celebrating 
twenty years were Alice Coleman, Nan 
Day, Phyllis Dixon, Mary Jane Kirtz, 
Pauline Kittlaus, Joseph Meis, Anita Sieg- 
mund, Betty Sims, Joanna Werner, and 
Mary Wind. Celebrating ten years were 
Margaret Abbott, Neva Buss, Barbara 
Cook, Frank Enger, Arden Fisher, Wilma 
Hanks, Lorraine Hatscher, Anne Heisler, 
Marian Herr, Helen Hilliker, Dorothy Hitt, 
Pauline Jaworski, Laverda McDonald, 
Gloria Mills, Beatrice Mosher, Joan 
Murphy, Dorothy Olson, Gertrude 
Pappert, Sue Reisel, Laura Riganti, Vicki 
Roberson, Susan Schreiber, Judy Shinkle, 
Kay Sofian, Warren Tabachik, Sallie Wood. 
The Garden is deeply grateful to all of its 
volunteers, and is delighted to be able to 
say "thank you" to all of those celebrating 
anniversaries this year. 



Henry Shaw. 

Mr. Wolff began his career as an intern 
at the Garden 24 years ago during his last 
semester at Lutheran High School South. 
He continued to work at the Garden while 
earning his degree in horticulture from 
Meramec Community College in Kirkwood. 
Today he is the production horticulturist at 
the Garden. 




Dr. Mark J. Plot kin, vice president of plant 
conservation for Conservation Interna- 
tional, visited the Garden in May to consult 
the herbarium. Dr. Plotkin is internation- 
ally recognized for his research on rain 
forests and their contributions to medicine. 
He was visiting St. Louis to deliver The Jane 
and Whitney Harris Ecology Lecture at the 
International (enter for Tropical Ecology, 
University of Missouri-St. Louis. 



15. 



HI 'LLETIN I JULY AUGUST 19921 




A meeting of the I :S. editorial committee for the Flora of China 
project teas held at the Garden April 10, 1992. Shown clockwise, from 
top: Dr. Ihsan Al-Shehbaz, MBG; Orbelia Robinson, California 
Academy of Sciences; Bryan Dutton, Arnold Arboretum; Dr. Bruce 
Bartholomew, California Academy of Sciences; Dr. Nancy Morin, 
MBG; Dr. Laurence Skog, Smithsonian Institution; Michael Gilbert, 
MBG; Dr. Peter H. Raven, MBG; Dr. William Tai, MBG. Attending 
but not pictured: Dr. David Boufford, Harvard University. 





R ■ 



I • L 



I Peter Goldblatt, Ph.D., 



B.A. Krukoff Curator of African Botany 



THE Iridaceae (Iris) family contains 
many beautiful flowering plants 
familiar to St. Louisans: iris, gladi- 
olus, crocus, freesia, among others. But the 
plant family also contains many exotic 
plants. Garden scientist Peter Goldblatt 
studies the Iridaceae of Africa, where two- 
thirds of the family's 1,700 plant species 
grow. 

After receiving his Ph.D. from the 
University of Cape Town in 1970, Goldblatt, 
a native of South Africa, came to the 
Garden in 1972, one of the first group of 
botanists recruited by Peter Raven. Though 
his research up to that time had concen- 
trated on Iridaceae, he was actually hired to 
study poppies in the Middle East. He 
completed that study in three years and 



returned to his study of the Iris family. 

In 1975 Goldblatt was named B.A. 
Krukoff Curator of African Botany. Among 
North American botanical institutions, the 
Garden is the center for the s