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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE; 

OR. 

In which the most Ornamental Foreign Plants cultivated in the Open Ground, 

the Green-House, and the Stove, are accurately represented and coloured. 

To which are added, 

THEIR NAMES, CLASS, ORDER, GENERIC AND SPECIFIC CHARACTERS, 
ACCORDING TO THE SYSTEM OF LINNAEUS ; 

Their Places of Growth, Times of Flowering, and most approved 
Methods of Culture. 



CONDUCTED 



\y SAMUEL CURTIS, F. L. S. 



THE DESCRIPTIONS 



By Sir WILLIAM JACKSON HOOKER, K. H. 

LLD, F. R. A. and L. S. and Regius Professor of Botany in the 
University of Glasgow. 



VOL. X. 3 

OF THE NEW SERIES; 
Or Vol. Lxm. of the whole Work, 



" Nature, exerting an unwearied power, 
Forms, opens, and gives scent to ev'ry flower ; 
Spreads the fresh verdure of the field, and leads 
The dancing Naiads through the dewy meads." 



LONDON : 

Printed by Edward Coucbman, 10, Throgmorton Street ; 

FOR THE PROPRIETOR, SAMUEL CURTIS, 

AT THE 

BOTANICAi MAGAZINE WAREHOUSE, G I.AZENVVOOD, NEAR COGGESHAI.L, ESStX : 

Published also by Sherwood, Gilbert, & Piper, 23, Paternoster Row; J. & A. Arch, Cornnill; Blackwood, 

Edinburgh ; and in Holland, by Mr. Gt. Elelering, Florist, at Haarlem : 

And to be had of all Booksellers in Town and Country. 

1836. 



TO 

DR. FISCHER, 

COUNSELLOR OF STATE, 

DIRECTOR OF THE IMPERIAL BOTANIC GARDEN OF 
ST. PETERSBURG, &c. &c. &c. 

THE PRESENT VOLUME IS DEDICATED, 

IN TESTIMONY OF 
THE UNFEIGNED AND AFFECTIONATE 

REGARD AND ESTEEM OF 

THE AUTHOR. 

Glasgow, December 1, 1836. 




/'<//' hi/ I* Curtis, t.tiiurntr,',! ./■ tm ./tin" / /'*"'/>' 



( 3458 ) 
Cereus Napoleonis. Napoleon's Cereus. 

Class and Order. 

ICOSANDRIA MONOGYNIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Cacte^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Sepala numerosissima, imbricata, basi ovario adnata, in 
tubum elongatum concreta, exteriora breviora ealycinalia, 
media longiora colorata, intima petaliformia. Stamina nu- 
merosissima, cum tubo concreta. Stylus filiformis, apice 
multifidus. Bacca sepalorum reliquiis areolata, tuberculosa 
aut squamata. Cotyledones nullae ? — Frutices carnosi, elon- 
gate axi ligneo interne medullifero donati, angulis verticali- 
bus spinarum fasciculos gerentibus regulariter mzlcati. An- 
guli seu alae nunc plurimce, nunc paucisshiuz, rarius duce 
tantiim et tunc rami compresso-alati. Flores ampli e spi- 
narum fasciculis aut crenis angulorum orti. D C. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Cereus Napoleonis; ramis diffusis repentibus triangularibus 
rarissime articulatis repandis, tuberculis 4 — 5-spinosis, 
spinis rigidis patentibus. 

Cereus triangularis, var. major. Salm-Dyck. Otto, Alge- 
meine Gartenzeitung, 1833. 

Cactus Napoleonis. Hort. 



We received this plant at the Botanic Garden, Edin- 
burgh, from Mr. M'Kay, at Clapton, about ten years ago. 
It has repeatedly formed buds, but no blossomsVxpandcd 
till now (September, 1835). The flower opened in the morn- 
ing, and closed towards the afternoon; it is very like that of 
C. grandijlorus, and is slightly, not very agreeably, per- 
fumed. The far greater length of its joints, their different 
form, and the shape of the edges between the tubercles, 
prevent me from considering it a variety of C. triangularis. 

Descr. 

vol. x. R 



Descr. Stem much branched ; branches diffused, root- 
ing, very distantly jointed, light green, with three acute 
angles, and concave sides ; aiigles tubercled, with repand 
intervals, about an inch and a half long, tubercles with four 
or five rigid, stellate prickles (about four and a half lines 
long) having tumid bases. Flower (eight inches long, and 
when fully expanded six inches across) ascending; tube 
(three inches long, ten lines broad) green, furrowed, inter- 
vening ridges round, and having a few triangular sub- 
appressed deep-red scales, gradually enlarging upwards, 
and passing into the straw-coloured, lanceolato-linear, outer 
segments of the perianth, the inner segments of which are 
pure white, somewhat shorter, broader, spathulato-lanceo- 
late and crenate at the apex. Stamens numerous, yellow, 
declined, ascending at the apex, shorter than the perianth ; 
anthers erect, small. Pistil sub-exserted ; stigma yellow' 
multifid, segments subulate, spreading from their middle; 
style stout, cylindrical, ascending. Germen incorporated 
with the base of the tube of the perianth, one-celled. 
Ovules numerous, fixed to a long seed-stalk. Graham. 



\^,%. 



346 




( 3459 ) 

PlMELEA HISPIDA. HlSPID-FLOWERED 
PliMELEA. 

Class and Order. 

DlANDRIA MONOGYNIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Thymel^e^:. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium infundibuliforme, limbo 4-fido, fauce esqua- 
mata. Stamina duo fauci inserta, laciniis exterioribus op- 
posita. Stylus lateralis. Stigma capitatum. Nux corti- 
cata, rard baccata. — Frutices. Folia opposita (rard al- 
terna.) Flores capitati, terminates, foliis involucrantibus, 
saipe dissimilibus, interdum connatis, rariiis spicati vel axil- 
lares, quandoque dioici. Perianthii tubus in plerisque medio 
articulatus, articulo infer iore persistenti. Br. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Pimelea hispida; involucris tetraphyllis : foliolis ovatis 
marline simplici intus subsericeis capituli dimidio bre- 
vioribus, perianthii tubo dimidio inferiore hispido, foliis 
lanceolatis linearibusve. Br. 

Pimelea hispida. Br. Prodr. p. 360. Spreng. Syst. Veg. 
v. l.p. 92. Bot. Reg. t. 1578. 



This is assuredly the handsomest of this very pretty Aus- 
tralian Genus, whether we consider the beauty of its blos- 
soms or the great quantity of them produced by a single 
plant : of which one now before us, scarcely a foot high, is 
loaded with upwards of forty heads of flowers. It requires 
the usual treatment of those New Holland plants, which we 
derive from the Southern coast, where the present species 
was discovered by Mr. Brown. 

Descr. An erect shrub, with numerous, upright, slender, 
glabrous branches. Leaves opposite, broadly lanceolate, 

obtuse, 



obtuse, yellow-green above, paler and of a glaucous hue 
below. Peduncles terminal, solitary, in fact, a continua- 
tionj of the branches, bearing a single, rather large head 
of delicate, rose-coloured, hairy flowers; surrounded by a 
four-leaved involucre: its leaflets ovate, concave, often 
tinged with red at the margin. Flowers sessile. Perianth 
salver-shaped : its tube much elongated, slender, clothed 
below with very long, spreading hairs : limb of four spread- 
ing, oblong segments, beset with long spreading hairs on 
the under side. Filaments short, exserted . Anthers oblon°- 
deep orange. Germen oblong, green, furrowed, with a tuft 
of hairs at the base. 



Fig. 1. Flower: — magnified. 



3 k;o. 




( 3460 ) 
Coreopsis coronata. Crowned Coreopsis. 

Class and Order. 
Syngenesia Frustranea. 

( Nat. Ord. — Composite. ) 

Generic Character. 

Receptaculum paleaceum. Semina compressa, emargi- 
nata. Pappus bicornis. Calyx duplex uterque poly- 
phylliis. 

Specific Name and Character. 

Coreopsis coronata; annua, caule erecto debili flexuoso 
glabro, foliis spathulatis interns vel ternatim-pinna- 
timve-sectis integerrimis flaccidis basi ciliatis, infimis 
longe petiolatis, pedunculis elongatis, involucro inte- 
riore piloso, radii corollis profunde quadrifidis corona 
macularum atro-sanguinea, achenio bi- tripaleaceo. 



Seeds of this beautiful Coreopsis, gathered in Texas, were 
received from Mr. Drummond in the spring of 1835, and the 
plants raised from them blossomed copiously in the summer 
and autumn, those in the open air continuing to display their 
handsome flowers, remarkable for the circle of brown spots 
placed at a distance from the disk, till October, when they 
were cut off by the frost. Those sheltered in a frame 
continued much longer in perfection. Only one specimen, 
exactly corresponding with this, is found in Mr. Drummond's 
Mexican Herbarium, from which it may be inferred that the 
flowering season was passed when he discovered it. 

Descr. Root annual, small, and subfusifonn. Stem erect, 
but weak and flexuose, a foot to a foot and a half or two 
feet long. Leaves opposite, in remote pairs, spathulate, 
tapering much at the base, ..undivided, or cut in a pinnated 
manner into two, three, or tive segments, the ultimate lobe 
or pinnule the largest, the lower ones into long petioles, 

the 



the base ciliated : the rest quite glabrous and of a very 
flaccid texture. Peduncles much elongated, sometimes 
almost a foot long, each tipped with a large handsome deep 
y el low flower, bearing a circle or crown of deep brown or 
blood-coloured spots at a distance from the disk. Corollas 
of the ray neuter, large, cuneate, deeply four-fid, the two 
middle segments the longest and often emarginate : those 
of the disk (which is small,) infundibuliform. Anthers 
black, the appendage deep-orange. Achenia compressed, 
oblong-obovate, bearing two or three small lanceolate, 
white, chaffy scales. Involucre double : outer of about 
eight leaflets, which are linear, herbaceous, and glabrous ; 
inner, about as long as the outer, oval, membranaceous, 
clothed externally with white, succulent hairs. Receptacle 
scaly ; scales linear-subulate, chaffy, nearly as long as the 
flower. 



Fig. 1. Floret of the Ray. 2. Floret of the Disk, with a Scale of the Re- 
ceptacle : — magnified. 





^ 



( 3461 ) 

Veronica labiata. Fragrant white- 
flowered Speedwell. 

******************** 

Class and Order. 

DlANDRIA MONOGYNIA, 
( Nat. Ord. ScROPHULARINiE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 4-partitus, raro 3-partitus. Corolla subrotata. 
Tubus calyce brevior. Limbus 4-partitus, inaequalis, lobis 
indivisis. Stamina 2 antherifera, sterilia nulla. Capsula 
valvis medio septiferis, v. bipartibilis. — Herbs vel frutices. 
Folia opposita, quandoque verticillata vel alterna, scepe 
dentata vel incisa. Inflorescentia varia. Calyces ebrac- 
teati. Br. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Veronica labiata ; erecta, foliis lato-lanceolatis longe acu- 
minatis sessiiibus argute inaequaliter serratis, racemis 
axillaribus oppositis elongatis, corollis bilabial is pa- 
tentibus labio superiore indiviso, inferiore tripartite 
lobo medio minore. 

Veronica labiata. Br. Prodr. p. 434. Spreng. Syst. Veget. 
v. I. p. 74. 

Veronica Derwentia. Andr. Rep. t. 531. 

A very pretty species of Veronica, with leaves much 
acuminated at the extremity, and long axillary racemes of 
fragrant white flowers. It is a native of the Southern 
shores of New Holland and also of Van Diemen's Land, 
from which latter country it has been transmitted to the 
Glasgow Botanic Garden, where it grows in the greenhouse, 
by Ronald Gunn, Esq. 

Descr. Stevn two feet high, simple, nearly glabrous, 
under a lens are seen two opposite lines of hairs. Leaves 
opposite, three to four inches long, sessile, broadly lanceo- 
late, 



late, very much attenuated, glabrous, the margins sharply 
and unequally serrated ; the colour full green above, paler 
beneath, indistinctly nerved. Peduncles axillary, opposite, 
longer than the leaves, bearing a raceme of rather large^ 
white, fragrant flowers. Bracteas subulate, about as long 
as the pedicels. Calyx small, four-partite, segments lan- 
ceolate, acute, two of them a little smaller. Corolla rotate, 
formed of two spreading lips : the upper of one ovate seg- 
ment ; the lower of three of the same form, but of which 
the middle one is the smallest. Stamens two : filaments 
white: anthers purplish. Germen ovate, two-celled. Style 
tilitorm, declined. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Young Fruit with the Calyx -.-magnified. 



For the information of our readers, we take the opportunity of occu- 
pying a spare page, with brief descriptive characters of three unpub- 
lished species of the Genus of our present subject, recently discovered 
in ]\ew Zealand by Mr. Richard Cunningham. 

V. specwsa {R Cunn.MSS.) ; glaberriraa, racemis terminalibus bre- 
vibus erectis confertinoris, bracteis ovato-lanceolatis pedicello di- 
midio brevioribus lacmiis calycis ovatis acutiusculis tenuissime 
c hatis dimidium tubi corolla subaequantibus, foliis (opposes) 
planis obovatis conaceis decurrentibus, apiculo callo oTb tu 
SS* ™ °"> -le frut.oso^ 

Napuka ab Indigenis vulgo vocatur 

HAB 'iuxta ^rium'fln"- 1 ^ ^^^ « collibus arenosis 
juxta asstuanum fluvn Hokianga, ad oram occidentalem ubi in 
mense Decembn laute floret lR'tt /?;,.* n . ,u< J 1Lm » UDl m 

pure a Samxna exserta pistdlum squantia* ™ p Za IZtU 
biks , e hptma acumrnata, glabra, calyee duplo lonrior P 

those Islands, have made m Tacqua Z we kno vT^h IT!' 
be desired to enrich our colleetions-the lomeZ PlTJ , m ° K ° 
ready fully established in our gardens-tlSwfv \ "\7* ^ 

beautiful Speedwell; judging, Wwe do from L 7 remarkable and 

ofthe SS5 P^™ Spiedt *ESS ***•££ 

j Ft*.., win succeea, as well as its compatriot the Clianthus 

has 



has, in our open borders ; the elevated grounds, occupied by our 
Veronica in its native-land, being greatly exposed to the prevalent 
tempests of its weather-beaten coast, in nearly the same degree of 
southern latitude (about 36°), in which, we believe, the Clianthus has 
been lately found on the Eastern Coast. 

V. ligustrifolia ; racemis pedunculatis terminalibus pubigeris folium 
subsequantibus, bracteis oblongo-lanceolatis pedicello duplo bre- 
vioribus, laciniis calycis ovato-lanceolatis acutiusculis longitudine 
tubi corollse, foliis ovali- oblongis angusto-lanceolatisve obtusius- 
culis integerrimis glabris, caule fruticoso. 

Hab. In Insula septentrionali Novas Zelandias : in collibus sylvosis 
umbrosisve ad ripas fluminis Kaua-Kaua, Bay of Islands. 1833. 
Rich. Cunningham. 

Frutex gracilis bipedalis. Folia opposita, ovalia, vel attenuato-lanceo- 
lata, sessilia. Flores albidi, spicato-racemosi. Calyx persistens, 
laciniis asqualibus. Corolla? lacinice acutiusculas. 

Obs. V. angustifolia, A. Richard (Fl. Nov. Zel. p. 187 J, cui affinis 
differt : spicis gracilibus pedunculatis axillaribus folio duplo et 
ultra longioribus, laciniis calycinis obtusis tubo corollas duplo bre- 
yioribus, foliis linean-angustis acutis subtus glaucescentibus. 

V. diosmifolia ( R. Cunn. MSS.J ; corymbis axillaribus terminalibusve 
multifloris, bracteis ovatis pedicello duplo brevioribus, laciniis 
calycis ovalibus obtusis dimidium tubi corollas asquantibus, foliis 
decussatis petiolatis lanceolatis acutis integerrimis serrulatisve, 
serraturis simpliciter incisis remotis, supra concavis lasvibus subtus 
discoloribus, caule fruticoso erecto. 

Hab. In Nova Zelandia : in sylvis densis prope ortum fluminis 
Wycaddy; etiam circa cataractas prasruptas rivi Keri-Ken, ad 
sinum Bay of Islands dictum ; alibique in insula septentrionali. 
1834. Rich. Cunningham. 

Ah Incolis Piriti dicitur. 

Frutex gracilis virgatus 3-12 pedalis, cum habitu omnino Trachy- 
menes. Rami stricti, erecti, foliosi. Folia 9-lineas longa, avenia, 
subtus carinata. Flores albi. Capsula elliptica, acuta, compressa, 
bipartibilis, calyce ciliato triplo longior. 

With the above enumerated species, specimens were received of 

another, which appears identical with one originally discovered by 

Mr. Brown, in Van Diemen's Land : viz. 

V. calycina (R. Br.); racemis lateralibus pedunculatis paucifioris 
strictis folio multoties longioribus, foliis late ovatis subcordatis 
rugosis inaequaliter serratq-crenatis petiolatis cauleque hirsutis, 
calycibus pilosis ciliatis capsula longioribus. 

Veronica calycina. Brown Prodr. Ft. Nov. Holl 1. p. 435. Rom. 
et Schult. Syst. Veget. \. p. 119. 

Hab. In Novas Zelandia? ins. sept. : ad ripas amnis Keri-Ken, inter 
gramina. 1834. Rich. Cunningham. 

Caulis herbaceus elongatus (saspe 5-6 pedalis) in locis graminosis late 
repens v. decumbens. Folia opposita grosse serrata, subtus dis- 
colora, hispida. Calyx quadripartitus capsula longior, laciniis obo- 
vatis obtusiusculis nervosis. Capsula rotundata, compressa, emar- 
ginata s. obcordata polysperma, dissepimento contrario. A. C. 



( 3462 ) 

Troximon glaucum. Glaucous-leaved 
Troximon. 

***************** 

Class and Order. 
Syngenesia ^Equalis. 

( Nat. Ord. — Composite. ) 

Generic Character. 

Involucrum duplex : ext. e foliolis laxe imbricatis ovato- 
lanceolatis; int. e foliolis 10 — 12 sequalibus uniformibus 
infra medium coadunatis. Receptaculum planum, leviter 
foveolatum, subfimbriatum. Achenium oblongum, nunc in 
rostrum attenuatum. Pappus pilosus seu scaber, pluri- 
serialis. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Troximon glaucum; foliis lanceolatis inferne attenuatis 

glaucis integerrimis dentatisve, flore maximo flavo, 

corollas fauce valde pilosa. 
(«.) scapo involucrique foliolis patentibus hirsuto-tomen- 

tosis. Hook. Fl. Bor. Am. v. I. p. 300. 
Troximon glaucum. Nutt. in Frazer's Cat. 1813. Pursh } 

Fl. Am. v. 2. p. 505. Rich, in Frankl. 1st Journ. ed. 

2. App. p. 29. Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. 3. p. 633. 
(3.) scapo involucrique foliolis erectis glaberrimis. Hook. 

I. c. 
Troximon glaucum. Sims, Bot. Mag. t. 1667. 
Troximon cuspidatum ? Pursh, Fl. Am. v. 2. p. 742. 
Troximon marginatum ? Nutt. I. c. 



So different is the appearance of this handsome plant 
from that of Troximon glaucum of Dr. Sims in the Botan- 
ical Magazine, that were I not possessed of native speci- 
mens, exhibiting intermediate gradations, I should certainly 
have published it as a new species. But, as the original 

glaucum 



glaucum of Mr. Nuttall has a pubescent involucre, we 
must claim for that which is here represented, the right of 
being" considered the original type of the species, and, as we 
have already done in the Flora Boreali- Americana, consi- 
der Dr. Sims's plant (which has a flower scarcely half so 
large as this, a glabrous scape and involucre, of which the 
outer scales of the latter are erect and imbricated ; also 
having narrower and quite entire leaves) as a variety. 

Our plants, which are quite hardy, were raised from 
seeds gathered by Mr. Drummond in the prairies of the 
Rocky Mountains, during Capt. Sir John Franklin's Ex- 
pedition. It flowers from June to August. 

Descr. Whole plant abounding in milky juice. Root 
somewhat fusiform, perennial, sending out runners, by 
which the plant increases to a very great extent. Stem 
none. Leaves numerous, from the crown of the root, six to 
eight or ten inches long, and of a glaucous colour, thus 
forming very conspicuous tufts, lanceolate, more or less 
downy, acute, tapering below into a broad footstalk, the 
margin entire, or sometimes very distinctly but irregularly 
toothed. Scapes longer than the leaves, thick, striated, 
woolly, single-flowered. Flowers very large, of a bright 
but not deep yellow. Involucre of numerous scales, of 
which an inner series is composed of nearly equal, up- 
right, linear-lanceolate scales, united at their base, the outer 
of many lax, spreading, and broader scales, thickly clothed 
with white, woolly hairs. Receptacle minutely pitted, the 
margins of the pit obscurely fimbriated. Corollas ligulate : 
the tube long, slender, about the mouth, or the outside, 
very villous. Germen oblong, by no means rostrate: Pap- 
pus white, rough. Anthers narrow, linear, orange. 



Fig. 1. Floret : magnified. 



.•{»•«:*. 




( 3463 ) 

GlLIA TRICOLOR. THREE-COLOURED 
GlLIA. 

■•fr. .^i . ^r .^, ."fr . &- .^ &, d*. &. afc i^. A A', ate afe alt .^ afc 
VIS MS MS Vf»* MS MS Iff MS MS V MS MS VIS MS MS MS MS MS MS 

CZass and Order. 
Pentandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Polemoniacejs. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx campanulatus, 5-fidus, margine et sinubus raem- 
branaceis. Corolla infiindibuliformis vel subcampanulatus, 
limbo 5-partito, laciniis obovatis integris. Stamina ad 
faucem vel vix intra tubum inserta. Antherce ovato-subro- 
tundae. Capsular loculi polyspermi. — Herbae joliis alternis 
pinnatisectis, segmentis integris dissectisve, (vel oppositis 
palmatisectis, segmentis integris subulatis). Benth. in Bot. 
Reg. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Gilia tricolor ; caule erecto glabro folioso, foliis bipinnati- 
sectis, segmentis lineari-subulatis, corymbis 3 — 6- 
fioris virgato-paniculatis, corollis calyce subtriplo lon- 
gioribus. Benth. 

Gilia tricolor. Benth. in Bot. Reg.fol. 1622 (in the text). 
Hort. Trans. N. S.v.l. t. 18./ 3. Lindl. Bot. Reg. 
t. 1704. 



The lamented Douglas, during his excursions in Cali- 
fornia, had the satisfaction of adding no less than twenty- 
five new species to the hitherto comparatively very limited 
Order of Polemoniace^ besides those which have been 
detected elsewhere on the Pacific side of America. All of 
them are remarkable for gracefulness and beauty, and are 
well suited to ornament our flower-borders, to which, indeed, 
several have been introduced, through the medium of the 
Horticultural Society, by the same indefatigable Naturalist. 
An epitome of these, and a few others from the North-west 

coast 



coast of America, from Chili, and Peru, are given by Mr. 
Bentham in the Botanical Register, where they are with 
much skill and judgment, grouped into seven distinct and 
Natural Genera. Of these Genera, the most numerous is 
Gilia, comprising fourteen species : and of these, the 
present one is undoubtedly that which bears the palm for 
beauty. " Nothing can well be prettier/' observes Pro- 
fessor Lindley, " than this is, when thickly filling a bed a 
few feet in length and breadth." Thus cultivated in thick 
tufts, it flourishes as well in the unfavourable climate of the 
West of Scotland as in its native country, continuing for a 
long time in perfection during the summer mouths. * 

Descr. Root annual. Whole plant slightly pubescent 
Stem erect, a foot to a foot and a half high, erect, branched 
in a paniculated manner almost from the base Leaves bi- 
tnpnmatihd, the lower ones petiolated, upper ones sessile, 
the segments narrow, linear, subulate, somewhat fleshy 
and compressed. Flowers corymbose, almost capitate, six 
to eight or ten at the extremity of the branches of the pan- 
icle, extremely handsome. Pedicels short. Calyx of five 
deep, lanceolate, acute, erect segments, with the mar-ins 
scanose, not half so long as the corolla. Corolla infundi- 
bulltorm : the tube yellow ; the faux very dark purple the 
limb spreading, of five broadly cordate segments, white or 
nearly so at the base, tinged with bluish-purple towards the 
extremity. Filaments short, incurved, situated in the faux 
Anthers oval, pale blue. Style as loug as the corolla' 
Stigma trifid. 



\\ LI Mi 



346 i. 




( 3464 ) 

vesicaria grandiflora. large-flowered 

Vesicaria. 

******************* 

Class and Order. 
Tetradynamia Siliquosa. 

( Nat. Ord. — Crucifer^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Silicula globosa, inflata, valvis hemisphaericis. Semina 
plurima (ultra 8) saepius marginata. Petala Integra. D C. 

Specific Name and Character. 

Vesicarta* grandiflora; annua, stellatim pubescens, cauli- 
bus erectis flexuosis, foliis oblongis radicalibus sub- 
lyrato-pinnatifidis petiolatis caulinis sinuato-dentatis 
sessilibus, racemis elongatis multifloris, petalis rotun- 
datis patentibus brevissime unguiculatis, siliculis sub- 
stipitatis membranaeeis globosis glabenimis4 — 6-sper- 
mis stylo longioribus, stigmate capitate 



No less than three new species of Vesicaria were disco- 
vered^ by M. Berendier in Texas of Mexico, all of which 
are in my Herbarium, V. lasiocarpa, Hook. MSS., V. gra- 
cilis, and the subject of the present plate. Of these, the 
two last have been also found by Mr. Drummond. V. gra- 
cilis is n. 13. of Mr. Drummond's third Texas Collection : 
the present one (of which specimens are distributed in Mr. 
Drummond's first Texas Collection) is further known to us 
by seeds sent in the spring of last year, which produced 
plants in the summer, exhibiting a profusion of blossom and 
a brightness and size in the flower equalled by few plants of 
this Nat. Order, and which render the species most highly 

deserving 



* From Vesica, a bladder; on account of the bladdered fruit. 



deserving of cultivation, whether in the flower-border or 
on the shelves of a cool greenhouse. The almost sessile 
spreading and concave petals give it an appearance very 
unlike that of most cruciform flowers. The blossoms are 
long-lived, and the same plant will yield a succession of 
flowers from July to October. 

Descr. Root annual, subfusiforrn . Stems one or several 
from the same root, a foot or more high, erect, but flexuose 
and weak, so that it is desirable to prop them with a stick 
in cultivation ; clothed, as is the whole herbage, with short 
stellated down, but much less so than most of the known 
downy Vesicari^e. Radical leaves oblong, or almost spa- 
thulate, tapering below into a footstalk, pinnatifid and 
somewhat lyrate, the lobes obtuse ; cauline ones oblong, 
sessile, subamplexicaul, more or less sinuato-dentate; all of 
them paler and more downy beneath. Raceme, when fully 
advanced, eight or ten inches and not unfrequently a foot 
in length, bearing numerous large, bright-yellow flowers. 
Pedicels, in fruit, nearly an inch long. Calyx of five 
oblong-oval, hoary, spreading leaves. Corolla of five 
rounded, spreading, concave petals, scarcely unguiculate. 
Stamens six, tetradynamous, yellow: Filaments subulate : 
Anthers oblong. Pouch globose, membranous, glabrous, 
situated on a very short stalk, and longer than the style. 
Stigma capitate. Seeds geuerally about four or six in 
number. 



Fig. 1. Stamens and Pistil. 2. Petal. 3. Stamens. 4. Silicule :— mag- 
nified. 5. Root-leaf: — nat. size. 



( 3465 ) 

Pentstemon Cob^a. CoBjEA-FLOWERED 
Pentstemon. 

******************** 

Class and Order. 

DlDYNAMIA ANGIOSPERMIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Scrophularinje. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 5-partitus. Corolla bilabiata ventricosa. Rudi- 
mentum jilamenti quinti superne barbatum. Capsula bilo- 
cularis. 

Specific Character and Synonym. 

Pentstemon Cobcea; elatus puberulus, foliis oblongo-ovatis 
denticulatis nitidis, panicula terminali foliosa, pedun- 
culis 3— 5-floris, pedicellis bracteatis, corolla pubes- 
cente (magna) tubo inflate-, limbo bilabiato quinque- 
lobo, lobis 2—3 rotundatis patentibus intus lineatis, 
appendice intus barbato, calycis pubescentis laciniis 
oblongo-lanceolatis erectis. 

Pentstemon Cobaea. Nutt. PI. of Arkansa, in Amer. Phil. 
Journ. 1834,/?. 182. 



Handsome as is this species of Pentstemon, the native 
specimens gave me reason to expect a more splendid plant 
than that which is here represented, of which seeds and 
well-dried specimens were sent to Europe by Mr. Drum- 
mond in the spring of the past year (1835) from the interior 
of Texas*, about St. Austin. But, unfortunately, owing to 

the 



* The particulars respecting Mr. Drummond's journeys in the Southern 
States of North America, and in Mexico, have lately been given in the 
" Companion to the Botanical Magazine," a periodical Journal, 

. which, 



VOL. X. 



the lateness of the season, onr plants did not produce their 
blossoms till the period of the autumnal colds, and then do 
not appear to have obtained either the size of those on wild 
specimens, or the colour, as described by Mr. Nuttall, 
who called it P. Cobarn, on account of the magnitude and 
a sort of general resemblance in its flowers to those of 
Cob,ea scandens. Certain it is, that the flowers on some 
of our dried specimens are nearly twice as large as those 
here represented. It was first discovered by Mr. Nuttall, 

in 



which, we flatter ourselves, only needs to be more known in order to meet 
with still further encouragement; for it is expressly undertaken will) the 
view of recording such useful Botanical information, as is not suited to 
the pages of the Magazine. In the seven numbers which have now ap- 
peared, we may confidently refer to the following articles, many of them 
original communications prepared solely for the work, as being such, as 
will, we are sure, be read with interest even by those who are not deeply 
versed in Science :— Journal of an Ascent to the summit of Adam's Peak, 
Ceylon;— Account of Mr. Mathews' Journeys in the Peruvian Andes ;— 
Recursions in the neighbourhood of Quito, and towards the summit of 
Chimborazo, m 1830, by the late Colonel Hall ;— Notice respecting Dr. 
biEBOLD s residence in Japan ;— Mr. Watson on the Distribution of Trees 
and Shrubs m Britain, and towards the Arctic Regions ;— the same gentle- 
man s Remarks on the Numerical Proportions of the Natural Or3ers of 
British Plants at .different elevations;— Drummond's Letters from Texas 
in Mexico ;— Dr. Philippi on the Vegetation of Etna -.-Physical and Geo- 
graphical Observations made m Colombia, by Professor William Jameson 

SfthPnfr"n?n I? 1 ™" w tUre ° f J he Ve S etatlon of Chili ;-a Memoir 
ol the Life of the late Mr. William Jack, including many of the Letters 

™ r? CC ° mp S ? ed individual fl '°m Sumatra and the East Indies &c • 
— M. Durieu s Botanical Excursions in the Mountains of Asturias — 
Uv. Ioppigs highly interesting account of the Uses of Coca, a Dru ff 
which is to the Peruvians what Opium is to the Inhabitants of the East • 
-the same gentleman's Memoir of the Cinchona- (or Medicinal Bark-) 
districts at Huanuco, with the mode of collecting it. The above Wether 
vvith notices respecting Botanical publications!" the Contributions towards 
»nH I « x the - East ' ndies (by Messrs. Wight and Arnott,) of North 
and South America, of Britain, &c, with Memoirs communicated by various 
distinguished Botanists cannot fail to be acceptable to every man of science 

iitZ °l ! i e *f t° t late M i- David Dougl ^ £- S 

death in the Sandwich Islands excited so much interest and such deep 

sympa hy throughout the whole Botanical world, accompanied by a Por K 

SCl fr0 r n excellent original likeness £ the possession of 

Uawson lurner, Esq.,) is in a state of considerable forwardness Our readers 

ac tuated° n bv ST T *? ?£*& ° f thc WOrk > Mr ' Ct»Trt, ,s not 
momo e Ljf TS? m ltS ! P ubllCfttion 5 but mainly by a desire to 
b^ns tlfn/th , B °; any i Wh r *. 1S kn0wn that ™ ch monthly num- 
column 3\ th r/" tw ° cl0 ^ly-pnnted pages of letter-press, in double 
Is X; Z t a° P l a , teS u P n a ; tUllly colour «d) is offered at the low price of 
ioned tLt 11 Wlt i ?» M T ZmQ > ° r ls Gd - lf taken separately? It is 
cXl SS V f ^1° ° Ur B °? mCal fnends ' in behalf of a work so well 
calculated to further the cause of Science, will not be made in vain. 



in calcareous soil on the prairies of the Red River : and 
I have one of his own original specimens now before me. 

Descr. Root perennial. Stem two feet and more in 
height, erect, stout, roundish, or very obtusely angular, 
slightly downy, as is the whole plant. Leaves opposite' 
the upper ones oblong, or even oblongo-cordate, and semi- 
amplexicaul, the middle ones oblong, narrower at the base 
but sessile; the root-leaves oval-spathulate, petiolate, all 
of them somewhat glossy, denticulate at the margin. Pa- 
nicle terminal, leafy. Peduncles opposite from the axils 
of these leaves, bearing three to five large, downy flowers, 
the short pedicels bracteated. Calyx cut into five deep^ 
erect, oblongo-lanceolate segments. Corolla with the tube 
considerably inflated, pale, almost white tinged with pur- 
ple, the limb of five spreading segments, within white, 
slightly suffused with yellow and streaked with red. Fila- 
ments (fertile) four, included, two didynamous, curved : the 
anthers somewhat reniform. Fifth filament elongated, 
slightly clavate, furnished with long hairs internally at the 
apex. Capsule conical-ovate, acuminate, splitting open 
into two valves, whose margins are curved inwards. Seeds 
chaffy, attached to a central receptacle. 



Fig. 1. Flower, from which the Corolla is cut away. 2. Capsule, nat. 
size. 3. Capsule. 4. Capsule burst open, magnified. 



34«6. 




( 3466 ) 

Telekia speciosa. Large-flowered 
Telekia. 

Class and Order. 
Syngenesia Superflua. 

( Nat. Ord. — Composite. ) 

Generic Character. 

Radius uniserialis. Achenium line-are, elongatum, mnlti- 
costatum, exalatum, triqiietro-obcompressum., conforme. 
Pappus coroniformis, denticulatus, subcartilagineus et 
con form is. Corolla exalata, disco teres tuboque inferne 
sensim angustato. — Herbae procera in Europa media cres- 
centes, foliis scabris, integris, alternis, inferioribus amplis 
cordatis; involucris pluriserialibus, squarrosis, disco cequa- 
libus,foliolis ellipticis seu linear ibus ; lingulis radii angustis 
v. oblongo-ellipticis. Less. 

Specific Name and Synonyms. 

Telekia * speciosa. 

Telekia speciosa. Baumg. Enum. Stirp. Transylv. — Les- 

sing, Conipos.p. 209. 
Molpadia suaveolens. Cass, in Diet. Sc. Nat. v. 32. p. 400. 
Buphthalmum speciosum. Schreb. Ic. et Descr. Dec. 1. 

p. 11.*. 6. 
Buphthalmum cordifolium. Waldst. et Kit. Ic. et Descr. PI. 

Rar. Hung. v. 2. p. 117. t. 113. Spreng. Syst. Veget. 

v. 3. p. 605. 
Inula Caucasica. Pers. Syn. PL v. 2 p. 450. 
Inula macrophylla. Bieb. 

A 



* Probably so named in compliment to tome person with whose uaniu 
and merits I am unacquainted. 



A fine stately plant, better suited., however, to a shrub- 
bery than to the borders of a small garden, on account of 
its great size and luxuriant foliage. Although introduced 
into our gardens so long ago as the year 1739, when it was, 
according to the Hortus Kewensis, cultivated by Mr. Philip 
Miller, it has never been figured in any publication of our 
country. It is a native of woody places in the vallies of 
the Bannatian and Croatian Mountains : and I also possess 
specimens, through the kindness of Dr. Fischer, which 
were gathered at Guriel on the eastern shore of the Black 
Sea, a province of Georgia. It is quite hardy, and bears 
its copious blossoms in July and August. 

Descr. Root perennial. Stems herbaceous, many from 
the same root, erect, four to six feet high, simple, or pani- 
cled only at the top with the flowers, stout, hairy, rounded, 
obscurely furrowed. Flowers very large, often a foot in 
length, alternate, the lower ones cordate and petiolate, the 
upper gradually smaller, sessile and ovate, or even lanceo- 
late, all of them more or less acuminated, coarsely serrated, 
pubescenti-scabrous, dark green above, paler beneath, co- 
piously and reticulatedly veined. Peduncles long, thick- 
ened upwards, naked or bearing one or two small leaves. 
Involucre of many spreading, oblongo-lanceolate scales, the 
outer ones larger, leaf-like, and more or less reflexed. Re- 
ceptacle chaffy, with numerous subulate scales. Florets of 
the ray, undoubtedly not in a single, but in several (2 — 3) 
series, very numerous: Corollas narrow -linear. Florets of 
the centre tubular. Akenium (immature) oblong, crowned 
with a minute, jagged cup. 



Fig. 1. Central Floret. 2. Part of a Floret of the Circumference : magni- 
Jied. 



■5*67. 




f-Hbfry St . "■■■/■'/ l<?36 



( 3467 ) 

Lupin us subcarnosus. Fleshy-leaved 
Lupine. 

******************* 

Class and Order. 

DlADELPHIA DeCANDRIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Leguminos^:. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx profunde bilabiatus. Corolla papilionacea, vexillo 
lateribus reflexis, carina acuminata. Stamina monadelpha, 
vagina integra, antheris 5 parvis subrotundioribus prasco- 
rioribus, 5 oblongis serioribus. Stylus filiformis. Stigma 
terminate, subrotundum, barbatum. Legumen coriaceum, 
oblongum, compressum, oblique torulosum. Cotyledones 
crassae, per germin. in folia conversae. D C. 

Specific Name and Character. 

Lupinus subcarnosus ; herbaceus animus, caule pubescenti- 
sericeo, foliolis quinis obovato-lanceolatis subcamosis 
supra glaberrimis subtus (margineque praecipue) seri- 
ceis, stipulis elongato-subulatis, racemo pyramidali, 
pedicellis alternis longitudine florum, calycibus seri- 
ceis bibracteatis bilabiatis, labio superiore breviore 
bifido inferiore lanceolato apice tridentato dente inter- 
medio longiore, vexillo orbiculari intense caeruleo me- 
dio macula alba plica longitudinali divisa. 



An extremely beautiful, and, apparently, very distinct 
species, of which specimens exist in my Herbarium, which 
were collected at Bejar in Texas, by M. Berendier in 
1828. It has been again gathered most abundantly by Mr. 
Drummond, between Brazoria and San Felipe, particularly 
about the latter place. Seeds arrived in England from the 
last mentioned Naturalist, and have produced their hand- 
some flowers in July of the present year, 1835. 

Descr 



Descr. Root apparently annual. Stem eight to ten 
inches to a foot high, simple or branched, downy. Leaves 
upon long 1 petioles, of five obovato-lanceolate, singularly 
thick, and almost fleshy, retuse leaflets, those of the lower 
leaves the shortest and broadest ; ail of them quite glabrous 
on the upper surface, below slightly silky with scattered 
hairs ; the margin ciliated with white appressed silky hairs. 
Stipules half to three-fourths of an inch long, subulate, ap- 
pressed. Racemes terminal, pedunculated, pyramidal, com- 
posed of many extremely richly -coloured flowers. Peduncle 
downy, silky above. Pedicels about as long as the flowers, 
silky. Calyx silky, purplish -green, two-lipped, bearing a 
bractea ou each side near the middle. Standard bent back, 
especially at the sides, orbicular, deep rich blue, with a 
nearly quadrangular white or yellowish-white spot in the 
centre, which appears to be divided in the middle by a 
longitudinal fold : alee (combined by their lower margin, 
and wholly concealing the carina) oval, deep blue : keel 
white, much acuminated, purple-black at the tip. Legumes, 
in my native specimens, an inch and a half in length, linear- 
oblong, compressed, torulose from the four or five seeds 
contained within, and silky. 



Fig. 1. Inside view of the Vexillum. 2. Calyx with the Carina: — mag- 
nified. 



5468. 




( 3468 ) 

Collomia Cavanillesii. Cavanilles* 
collomia. 

******************* 

Class and Order. 
Pentandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Old. — PoLEMONIACEiE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx campanulatus 5-fidus vel sub 5-partitus, lobis lan- 
ceolatis linearibusve aequalibus iutegris. Corolla hypocra- 
teriformis, tubo tenui exserto, limbo patente 5-partito, 
laciniis oblongis iutegris. Stamina versus medium tubi 
inserta. Anther 'ce ovato-subrotundae. Capsular loculi 1 — 2- 
spermi. — Herbae, folia alterna, rarius inferiora opposita, In- 
tegra inciso-dentata vel rarius pinnatifida. Flores dense 
capitati, bracteis late ovatis integerrimis suffulti. Benth. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Collomia Cavanillesii ; foliis lanceolato-linearibus supremis 
ovato-lanceolatis integerrimis vel apice profunde 3—4- 
dentatis, calyce semi-5-fido, laciniis lato-lanceolatis 
obtusis, corollis calyce plus duplo longioribus, stami- 
nibus inclusis, capsulae loculis monospermis. Benth. 

Collomia Cavanillesii. Hook, et Am. Bot. of Beech. Voy. 
v. 1. p. 37, 1831. 

Collomia coccinea. Lehm. Hort. Hamb. 1832. Benth. in 
Bot. Reg. t. 1662. 

Collomia lateritia. Sw. Br. Fl. Gard. t. 206. 

Phlox linearis. Cav. Ic. v. 6. p. 17. t. 527. (not Collomia 
linearis, Nutt.J 



It is singular that two authors, who have described this 
plant, should both have overlooked the figure and descrip- 
tion of it in Cavanilles. Nuttall mistook them tor those 

of 



of his North American Collomia, quoting it indeed doubt- 
fully, but adopting the specific name;" whereas the two 
plants are totally distinct. It was introduced to our gar- 
dens from Chili by Mr. Cuming, and is a very desirable 
annual, flowering in Scotland in the latter part of the sum- 
mer. Professor Lindley observes, that if the seeds are 
sown in March, in the open border, the blossoms will 
appear in June; if again sown, shortly after that time, a 
second crop of flowers may be had in September and Oc- 
tober, seasons which suit it, rather better than the dog-days. 
In Chili it seems to be abundant. Cavanilles found it at 
Talcahuano ; Mr. Cuming at Valparaiso (n. 549 of his col- 
lection), and in the Cordillera (n. 221); Mr. Bridges at 
Los Ojos de Agua (n. 146), and in Valdivia (n. 611), and 
the officers of Captain Beechey's Voyage at Conception. 

Descr. Annual. Stem erect, a foot high, rounded, more 
or less branched and hairy, as well as the foliage, especially 
in the upper part of the plant. Leaves alternate, at the 
base only opposite, linear-lanceolate, entire, or incised at 
the extremity, those near the flowers broader at the base. 
Flowers umbellato-capitate ; pedicels short. Calyx gland u- 
loso-pilose, nearly half five-cleft. Corolla with a long, 
narrow, deep-yellow tube, which is slightly downy, and 
twice as long as the calyx ; limb of five spreading, narrow- 
ovate segments; of a dull, but rather deep red on the 
upper side, pale birch red at the back ; eye yellow. Cap- 
sule as long as the calyx, one-celled, three-valved ; valves 
obcordate. 



Fig. 1. Flower : — magnified. 



3 L6S 




/ vA 4y S. Cmii 



( 3469 ) 

Petrophila acicularis. Needle-leaved 
Petrophila. 

************************* 

Class and Order. 
Tetrandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Old. — Proteace^g. ) 

Generic Character. 

Periantkium quadrifidum, totum siinul deciduum. Squa- 
mce nullae hypogynae. Stylus basi persistente. Stigma 
fusiforme, apice attenuate. Strobilus ovatus. Nux lenti- 
cularis, hinc coinosa vel Samara basi barbata. — Pruticea 
rigidi. Folia glabra, varia, jiliformia v. plana, indivisa, 
lobata v. pinnatifida, quandoque in eodem frutice diversi- 
formia. Amenta ovata, vel oblonga, terminalia et axillaria, 
nunc aggregata. Br. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Petrophila* acicularis ; foliis filiformibus supra obsolete 
sulcatis, squamis strobili nervosis ovatis. 

Petrophila acicularis. Br. in Trans. Linn. Soc. v. 10. 
p. 69. Ibid. Prodr. Fl. Nov. Holland, p. 364. Roem. et 
Schult. v. 3. p. 338. Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. I. p. 459. 



This plant was raised at the Botanic Garden of Edinburgh 
from seed, having been communicated from King George's 
Sound, New Holland, by Col. Lindesay in 1830, under the 
name of Petrophila filij'olia, and specimens flowered in the 
greenhouse both last year and this, in April. 

Descr. Shrub erect ; branches erect, glabrous, yellowish- 
green. Leaves (three to six inches long) filiform, obscurely 

furrowed 



* From wETpo;, a stone, or rock, and QtXeo, to love : from the species in- 
habiting rocky or stony places. 



furrowed on the upper side, glabrous, mucronate, bright 
green, smaller and cartilaginous at the base. Capitulum 
terminal, receptacle densely covered with short white wool. 
Bracteas ovate, acute, the outer ones having a leaf-like 
apex. Perianth silky, deciduous, four-parted, concave and 
red internally in the apices of the segments. Anthers ob- 
long, yellow, sessile in the apices of the perianth ; Pollen- 
granules angular. Stigma articulate, the upper portion 
hairy, about twice as long as the green, glabrous, angular, 
turbinate lower portion. Style longer than the perianth, 
capillary. Germen sessile, every where covered with long, 
white, erect hairs, green, corticular, ovule solitary. Gra- 
ham. 



Fig. 1. Flower, with its Bractea. 2. Bractea. 3. Pistil : magnified. 



5470. 




( 3470 ) 

Potentilla atro-sanguinea ; hybrida, Russelliana. 

Mr. Russell's hybrid variety of the Deep 

Blood-coloured Cinquefoil. 

*********************** 
Class and Order. 

ICOSANDRIA POLYGYNIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Rosacea. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx decemfidus, segmentis alternis minoribus. Petala 
5. Pericardia receptaculo sicco affixa. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Potentilla atro-sanguinea ; caule erecto pubescente ra- 
moso, foliis ternis petiolatis superne sessilibus foliolis 
ellipticis profunde serratis subtus niveo-tomentosis, sti- 
pulis magnis ovatis, petalis obcordatis (atro-sangui- 

neis.) 

Potentilla atro-sanguinea. Lodd. Bot. Cab. t. 786. Don, 
Prodr. FL Nepal, p. 232. De Cand. Prodr. v. 2. p. 
579. Bot. Mag. t. 2689. 

Hybrida, Russelliana ; foliis subtus concoloribus, corollis 
maximis intense sanguineo-coccineis. Russell's Po- 
tentilla. Bot. Reg. t. U96.— Tab. nostr. (3470). 



Perhaps no plant, bearing the open air in our cli- 
mate, produces flowers of a richer hue than the present, 
which is an hybrid, said to have been first raised by Mr. 
Russell of Battersea, between P. atro-sanguinea and P. 
Nepalensis ; but far exceeding in the size and beauty of its 
blossoms either of its parents. It is perfectly hardy, brav- 
ing the severest winters of our island with impunity and 
flowering; during the summer and autumn. 



3471. 





( 3471 ) 
Trifolium reflexum. Buffalo Clover. 

********************* 

Class and Order. 

DlADELPHIA DECANDRIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — LeguminosjE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx tubulosus, persisted eglandulosus, 5-fidus, laciniis 
subulatis. Carina alis et vexillo brevior. Stamina diadel- 
pha. Legumen parvum vix dehiscens, saepius ovatum 1 — 2- 
spermum, calyce brevius et ab eo tectum rarius oblongum, 
3 — 4-spermum calycem paululum superans. — Herbae. Sti- 
pulae petiolo adnata. Folia palmatim 5- aut rarissime 5-Jb- 
liolata. P lores capitati aut dense spicati, bracteati, purpurei 3 
albi aut ochroleuci. Petala in quibusdam omnia inferne basi 
coalita. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Trifolium reflexum ; adscendens, foliolis rhomboideo-ova- 
libus denticulatis, capitulis globosis terminalibus, flo- 
ribus defloratis reflexis, calycis tubi brevissimo dentibus 
elongatis subulatis rectis corolla persistente brevioribus, 
alis vexillo obovato brevioribus carina apiculata lon- 
gioribus, legumine oblongo 3 — 4-spermo. 

Trifolium reflexum. Linn. Sp. PL p. 1079. Mich. Am. 
v. 2. p. 39. Pursh Fl. Am. v. 2. p. 477. Spreng. Syst. 
Veget. v. 3. p. 205. De Cand. Prodr. v. 2. p. 201. (not 
of Waldst. and Kit. nor of De Cand. I.e. p. 197.) 



This handsome species of Trefoil, though long- cultivated 
in the Southern States of North America, and even as far 
North as Kentucky, by the name of Buffalo-Clover, is very 
little known to European Botanists, nor are we aware that 
it has ever been raised in our gardens, though eminently 
deserving a place in every collection, until Mr. Drum mono 

sent 



sent seeds from Texas in the spring of 1835. Its flowers 
are in perfection in the open border in June and July. 

Descr. Stems herbaceous, decumbent, branched, six to 
eight inches in length, more or less hirsute, sometimes, as 
in our specimens, almost entirely glabrous. Leaflets ter- 
nate, oval, approaching to rhomboidal, the lower ones obo- 
vate,' denticulate, especially in their upper half, frequently 
spotted with brown and white ; petioles one to two inches 
long. Stipules obliquely cordate, acuminate. Peduncles 
terminal and lateral, two to three inches long. Heads large, 
globose, many-flowered, very handsome. Pedicels short. 
Calyx with a short cup-shaped tube and five upright, subu- 
late teeth much shorter than the petals. Corolla persistent, 
not withering. Vexillum broadly obovate, beautiful rose- 
red, the claw scarcely forming a tube. Wings white, at 
first straight, shorter than the vexillum, but longer than the 
mucronated, white keel. After flowering, the wings spread 
considerably and by slightly cohering with the sides of the 
alee, they cause it to dilate and to have the appearance of a 
white bird with its wings expanded. Stamens diadelphous. 
Germen linear. Style long. Legume oblong, stipitate, 
three to four-seeded, terminated by the long persistent style. 
Seeds greenish-brown, spotted. 



Fig. 1. Back view of a Flower. 2. Side view of ditto. 3. Keel. 4. Pistil. 
5. Fruit: — magnified. 




fill if S. Curtis utazcmcctd EsstE March 1 1838 



fwart St 



( 3472 ) 

Pentstemon Murrayanus. Mr. Murray's 
Scarlet Pentstemon. 

Class and Order. 

DlDYNAMIA ANGIOSPERMIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Scrophularin^. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 5-partitus. Corolla tubulosa, subventricosa, bi- 
labiata. Filament urn 5 sterile. Capsula bilocularis, bival- 
vis, dissepimento duplicato e marginibus valvarum inflexis 
demum bipartibili. Semina nuda. 

Specific Name and Character. 

Pentstemon Murrayanus ; elatus glaberrimusglaucus, foliis 
integerrimis oblongis inferioribus spathulatis superio- 
ribus sen bracteatis connato-perfoliatis, fioribus race- 
mosis, corollis glaberrimis, tubo subcylindraceo longi- 
tudine staininum, filainento quinto nudo. 



A native of San Felipe, in Texas: discovered by Mr. 
Drummond, in 1834, and by him sent to onr gardens, where 
it promises to be a very great acquisition, being remarkable 
for its stately growth, its singularly glaucous and large 
foliage, and for the number and size and rich colouring of 
the flowers. The seeds arrived rather late in the spring of 
1835, so that, in the Glasgow Botanic Garden, the autumn 
advanced rapidly upon us before the blossoms were gene- 
rally expanded. Under more favorable circumstances we 
may judge of the beauty of the plant, from the fact that, on 
one specimen, we counted eleven pairs of floral leaves, from 
the axils of which sprang two to four flower buds: and in 
one of the dried native specimens a single raceme had fifty- 
six blossoms. It will probably prove quite a hardy, her- 
baceous perennial. I am anxious it should bear the name 

of 

VOL. X. l) 



of the skilful Curator of our Glasgow Botanic Garden, who 
has been the means of rearing so many of Mr. Drummond's 
plants, and to whose undeviating kindness and friendship 
that zealous Naturalist was greatly indebted for much of 
the success that attended his exertions. 

Descr. Root perennial. Stem three feet high, erect, 
simple, rounded, purplish below. Leaves remarkably glau- 
cous, and all quite entire, large, opposite : the radical' ones 
six to seven inches long, spathulate, those of the lower part 
of the stem oblong, gradually becoming shorter and broader 
upwards and united at the base, till at length among the 
flowers (where they may be considered bracteas) they are 
remarkably connate, perfoliate, and cup-shaped, sensibly 
diminishing towards the extremity, so that the upper part 
of the stem forms a paniculated raceme, each pair of floral 
leaves bearing two, generally four, and often six, large, 
pedunculated, somewhat drooping, very handsome flowers! 
Peduncle as long as the space between the leaves. Calyx 
deeply cut into five, nearly equal, slightly-spreading, linear- 
oblong segments. Corolla an inch and a halfor more lon«r of 
a rich glossy scarlet especially at the base, slightly enlarged 
upwards: limb two-lipped; upper lip small, bifid; lower 
large, of three spreading, oval segments. The fifth abor- 
tive filament deep red, curved at the extremity, which is 
filiform and not at all bearded. Germen ovate, green, 
seated upon a glandular disk, tapering into a deep red' 
filiform style : Stigma obtuse. 



Fig. 1. Flower from which a portion of the Corolla is cut away, to show 
the btamen, the filth Filament, and the Styles -.—magnified. 




o-J-73 



( 3473 ) 

Linaria Canadensis. American Toad- 
Flax. 

******************** 

Class and Order. 

DlDYNAMIA AngIOSPERMIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Scrophularin^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 5-partitus persistens. Corolla personata, tubo in 
cornu producto : limbo bilabiato : lab. sup. erectum emar- 
ginatum aut bifidum lateribus reflexis; inf. palato eleva- 
tum, trilobum. Stamina conniventia. Antherce ovales, 
biloculares. Stylus filiformis. Stigma capitatum subbilo- 
bum. Capsula bilocularis, apice dentibus pluribus dehis- 
cens : dissepimento utrinque placentifero. Sernina com- 
pressa, marginata, vel solida. Spr. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Linaria* Canadensis ; erecta glabra glauca, foliis lineari- 
bus obtusiSj floribus racemosis, labio inferiore maximo 
palato obsolete, calcare subulato, stolonibus procum- 
bentibus. 

Linaria Canadensis. Spreng. Syst. Veg. v. 2. p. 797. 

Antirrhinum Canadense. Linn. Sp. PL p. 861. Pursh, 
Fl. Am. v. 2. p. 421. Elliott, Carol, v. 2. p. 113. 



Many Botanists object to the use of the names of coun- 
tries, as applied to the specific denomination of plants, on 
the ground that they may be, and are frequently, found 
in other localities besides that from which the species de- 
rives its appellation : and such is eminently the case with 

the 



* From linum, flax, which the leaves of this and many other of the 
species considerably resemble. 



the present individual, which, though called Canadensis, 
is not only found in all the temperate and warm regions of 
North America, but extends likewise through the greater 
part, if not the whole, of South America,* both on the 
Atlantic and Pacific sides ; so that few phcenogamous 
plants can boast so extended a range. If we exclude the 
very dubious Linaria tenella, Ph. (not Cav.) this is the 
only species indigenous to North America; and except 
the Linaria glabrata of Humboldt, there seems to be no 
other found in South America. The present species is 
remarkable for the very large lower lip of the corolla and 
the very slightly projecting palate : the faux, however, as 
Willdenow well observes, is not pervious, whence it dif- 
fers from the Genus Anarrhinum. 

Although a plant known since the days of Linnaeus, and 
even Gronovies, it does not appear to have been intro- 
duced to our gardens till the spring of last year, when 
Mr. Drummond sent seeds (as well' as specimens) from 
Texas, which produced flowering plants the ensuing sum- 
mer. It is a hardy annual, and, on account of its compara- 
tively large and delicate flowers, well worthy of beino- 
perpetuated in our gardens. 

Descr. Annual. Stems often several from the same 
root, erect, a foot or more high, simple or branched, throw- 
, ing out several procumbent stolones or barren shoots at 
the base, asm Linaria simplex, and especially L Pelisseri- 
anum. Leaves linear, alternate, and rather remote on the 
flowering-stems, on the procumbent shoots crowded, often 
ternate and quaternate, all of them perfectly glabrous 
entire, slightly glaucous. Racemes terminal, of several 
handsome, large, and extremely delicate, pale purple flow- 
ers, streaked with darker veins. Pedicels short. Calyx of 
five deep, glabrous segments. Corolla with the lower lip 
remarkably large and deflexed, cut into three truncated or 
retuse lobes the disk pale, slightly prominent, but present- 
ing no manifest projection or palate, yet closing the faux 
Capsule globose, compressed, scarcely longer than the ca- 
lyx, crowned with the short persistent style 



fVclV'nh KfTT { ' Wm Lunn ' m }\™> * athercd b * Mr Mathews; 
Irom Chili, by Mr. Crucksiianks and Mr. Cuming- irom Valdivia hJ 

,?,.L, , ! , 7 R '° Gran 5 lo c , do 8«1. by Mr. TWEEDIB : whilst Sellow 

fis \.v;°59i r parts of Soutii Brazii ' ■ ccorfin 8 «> c »« iss » ■ 



347-2 




( 3474 ) 

Coreopsis diversifolia. Various-leaved 

Coreopsis. 

Class and Order. 
Syngenesia Frustranea. 

( Nat. Ord. — Composite. ) 

Generic Character. 

Receptaculum paleaceum. Achenia compressa, emargi- 
nata. Pappus bicornis vel obsoletus. Involucrum duplex ; 
utrumque polyphyllum. 

Specific Character and Synonym. 

Coreopsis * diversifolia ; annua, hirsuta vel glabra, ramosa, 
foliis ternatis pinnatis etiam bipinnatis, foliolis rhom- 
beo-rotundatis obovatis obtusis integerrimis, pedun- 
culis elongatis glaberrimis unifloris, involucro utroque 
monophyllo suboctopartito, radiis apice 4-fidis, ache- 
niis ovalibus muticis subincurvis bine disco piano 
margine incrassato. 

Coreopsis auriculata; var. diversifolia. Elliott, Corol. v. 
2. p. 437. 



Sent from Texas by the late Mr. Drummond, who was 
much struck with its beauty, and who gathered it, not only 
upon the coast at Brazosia, but in the interior of the coun- 
try round San Felipe. Seeds which arrived in February of 
the past year (1835) produced plants, which displayed their 
large and bright orange-coloured flowers with a dark eye 
in the open air, in the month of July. So that it promises 
to be a hardy and most desirable annual. Its nearest 

affinity, 



* From xopi?, a bug, and g4k» a resemblance, from a fancied likeness in 
the fruit to that insect. 



affinity, as a species, is undoubtedly with C. auriculata, 
with which Mr. Elliott appears, though doubtfully, to 
have united it. It differs from that plant in its much 
smaller size, thinner, and usually more divided leaves, with 
broader and blunter segments, in its much larger flowers, 
and above all, the truly annual duration of the root. 

Descr. Root annual. Stem a foot, or a foot and a half 
high, branched, varying exceedingly in hairiness, sometimes 
thickly clothed with rather long, spreading hairs, at other 
times quite glabrous. Leaves generally glabrous, petio- 
lated, extremely variable, sometimes obovato-spathulate, 
and quite undivided, sometimes ternate, with the two late- 
ral segments or leaflets smaller, at other times pinnatifid, 
and not rarely even bipinnate, the leaflets obovate, or oval 
and very obtuse, those of the lowermost leaves almost orbi- 
cular. Peduncles terminal and axillary, long, slender, gla- 
brous. Involucre double, small ; both rnonophyllous and 
about eight-partite ; the outer lax with linear, green seg- 
ments : the inner with broadly-elliptic, brown, glossy, mem- 
branaceous ones. Florets of the ray eight, very large, 
obovate, spreading, bright orange, with a dark brown spot 
at the very base, neuter, cut at the extremity into five, 
large, unequal teeth, the two middle ones the longest. 
Germen compressed, abortive. Disc small ; its florets dark 
purple, black above, the anthers and styles and tips of the 
anthers alone orange. Germen ovate, compressed, slightly 
curved. Achenia oval, slightly curved, minutely dotted, 
the inner face with a depressed disk. Receptacle chaffy ; 
the scales long, lanceolato-subulate, dark purple-brown, 
pale below. 



Fig. 1. Floret of the Ray. 2. Floret of the Disk 3. Scale of the Re- 
ceptacle. 4. Achenia : magnified. 



d<t7i 




Jui. fa S, turbt i+laimmMtjLj&tMzr. M 



( 3475 ) 

Rosa centi folia, muscosa ; cristata. 
Crested var. of the Moss Rose. 

******************** 

Class and Order. 

IcOSANDRIA POLYGYNIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Rosacea. ) 

Generic Character. 

Cali/cis tubus urceolatus carnosus, achenia plurima hir- 
suta includens. Receptaculum villosum. 

Specific Character and Spnonj/ms. 

Rosa centifolia ; armis inasqualibus majoribus falcatis, folio- 
lis glanduloso-ciliatis, floribus cernuis, calycibus visco- 
sis^ friictu oblongo. Lindl. 

Rosa centifolia. Linn. Sp. PL p. 704. Lindl. Ros. p. 64. 

(/3.) muscosa; calycibus pedunculisque muscosis. Lindl. 
I.e. 

Rosa muscosa. Mill. Diet. n. 22. Sims, Rot. Mag. t. 69. 

(«.) cristata. (Tab. nostr. 3475.) 



The Moss Rose of our gardens, having been by Professor 
Lindley, in his excellent work above quoted, satisfactorily, 
as we think, referred to Rosa centifolia, we rank this plant 
as a subvariety of that well-known favourite of our gardens, 
and proceed to extract from Mr. Curtis's letter the remarks 
that accompanied the beautiful drawing, from the pencil 
of Miss Adams, daughter of Capt. Adams, R. N. of Witham, 
Essex. 

" This variety of the^Moss Rose, like many of the more 
novel sorts, was obtained from France. Independently of 
the curious mode in which the moss springs in tufts from 
the edges of its calyx, giving to the early buds a most 
remarkable appearance, this Rose, when fully expanded, is 

large, 



large, and of the loveliest hue, vying in beauty with any 
Provins Rose. In luxuriant plants the leaf-stalks are 
adorned with moss, and the foliage is very ample, rich, and 
of a lively green colour. Amongst the Roses which I cul- 
tivate here, to the number of more than a thousand dif- 
ferent kinds, this variety promises, when more generally 
known, to become the universal favorite. Its beauty and 
rarity will, I hope, plead an excuse for departing from the 
rule against figuring varieties in this work, the Moss Pro- 
vins Rose having already found a place ; but, to avoid 
repetition, it may be desirable to state, for the information 
of those who desire to possess the most eligible kinds 
of Moss Rose s that, among the newer sorts now cultivated, 
the White, the Scarlet or Tinwell, and the De Meaux, with a 
White Perpetual Moss Rose, which grows in a clustering 
manner, and resembles in habit the Quatre Saisons, are the 
most generally approved varieties. These are well worthy 
of a conspicuous place in every flower-garden, and their 
vigor is generally increased by budding them on the stock 
of the Dog Rose, whether it be desirable to keep them in a 
dwarf state, or to rear them into standards." & C. 



3470 




A,.*, fcj.l ' Curtis 6€ax*K*sed l?j,^Mar 



S-nan f* 



( 3476 ) 

Euphorbia bupleurifolia. Hare's-Ear- 
leaved Spurge. 

********************* 

Class and Order. 

MONCECIA MoNANDRIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Euphorbiace^;. ) 

Generic Character. 

Involucrum androgynuin 4 — 5-fidum, extus appendiculis 
glandulosis rotundatis v. bicornibus. Flores apetalis mas- 
culi peripherici. Pedicelli incerti numeri, singuli cum sin- 
gulis staminibus articulati. Antherce biloculares loculis 
discretis, sursum dehiscentibus. Germen pedicellatum cen- 
trale. Styli 3, bifidi. Caps, tricocca. Cocci bivalves. 
Sem. albuminosa. Spr. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Euphorbia bupleurifolia; caule bulbiformi tuberculato- 
areolato, foliis terminalibus fasciculatis lanceolatis in 
petiolum attenuatis, pedunculis axillaribus monoce- 
phalis, involucri universalis foliolis subrotundatis basi 
coadunatis. 

Euphorbia bupleurifolia. Jacq. Hbrt. Schoenbr. v. I. p. 55. 
t. 106. Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. 3. p. 787. 



Anions the many curious forms of this extensive and 
varied Genus which exist in Southern Africa, the present is, 
perhaps, the most remarkable, having a thick, succulent, 
bulbiform stem, marked all over with the scars occasioned 
by the falling away of the old leaves, giving a reticulated 
appearance to the surface, the areolae constituting tubercles, 
which are umbilicated in the centre. The whole foliage 
arises from the extremity of the stem. The Glasgow Bo- 
tanic Garden is indebted for its first possession ot this plant 

to 



to the Royal Gardens of Kew, where it has been long cul- 
tivated ; and very lately we have received living specimens 
through the liberality of Baron von Ludwig, which,, arriv- 
ing in the month of April, quite destitute of leaves, soon 
produced both foliage and flowers as here represented. 
The whole plant abounds with milky juice. 

Descr. Stem four to five inches high, and about three 
broad, oval or obovate, brown, greenish above, marked all 
over with the tuberculiform scars, arising from fallen leaves, 
of which the interstices exhibit a reticulated appearance. 
Leaves all terminal, clustered, erecto-patent, four to six 
inches long, lanceolate obtuse, with a few oblique veins 
from the costa, below tapering into a footstalk. From 
within these leaves the peduncles arise, two to three inches 
long, erect, bearing each only one capitulum or head of 
flowers. Germen : Involucre of two roundish or obcordate 
leaves, of a rather thick and coriaceous texture, united at 
their bases, within which, and quite sessile, is the partial 
involucre, cup-shaped, with five equal, nearly erect, round- 
ed, minutely crenated, fleshy lobes, and alternating with 
them are five smaller, somewhat membranaceous and fimbri- 
ated ones. Staminiferous flowers numerous. The pistillife- 
rous one had fallen away when this drawing and descrip- 
tion were made. But Jacquin describes the germen as 
smooth, and the stigma trifid, with the segments obscurely 
bifid. 



7>477 




( 3477 ) 

Anchusa versicolor. Changeable-flow- 
ered Alkanet. 

Class and Order. 
Pentandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Boragine^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 5-partitus, fructiferus erectus v. nutans, inflatus. 
Corolla infundibuliformis, fauce fornicibus erectis obtusis 
clausa. Stamina tubo adnata, inclusa. Stylus stigmate 
bilobo. Nuces turbinates, basi foveolatae. Spr. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Anchusa* versicolor; calycibus quinquefidis, fructiferis 
maxime inflatis cernuis, corollis aequalibus, foliis ob- 
longis obtusiusculis floralibus latioribus, caulibus pros- 
tratis, nucibus rugosis. 

Anchusa versicolor. Stev. Act. Mosq. p. 21. Roem. et 
Sch. v. 4. p. 93. 

Lycopsis rosea. Reich. Ic. Bot. t. 330. (excl. syn.J 



An exceedingly pretty annual, which we are surprised 
is not more known and more cultivated. The corollas are 
large, for plants of this family, at first sight resembling 
those of Convolvulus tricolor, and are remarkable for the 
striking change of colour which they undergo, being almost 
red in the state of the bud ; then, when expanded, reddish 
purple ; at length bright blue with a yellow eye, from which 
diverge several delicate rays of a pale yellowish-white 
colour. Reichenbach and Sprengel have strangely con- 
founded 



* From ayxo'jtrot, paint; the roots of one species, A. tinctoria, yield a 
red dye, which was formerly used to stain the face. 



founded it with the Anchusa rosea of Bieberstein, admira- 
bly figured in the Cent. Plant. Ross. Merid. t. 43, but that 
has much smaller, deep rose-coloured flowers, sharper teeth 
to the calyx, and acuminated leaves. A. versicolor is an 
inhabitant of the Caucasian Alps, about Chinalung and 
Kasbek. In the Glasgow Botanic Garden it flowers in 
July. 

Descr. Root annual. Stem weak and decumbent, 
branched, slightly angular, and moderately hispid. Leaves 
slightly hispid, entire, the radical ones spathulate, those of 
the stem oblong, the uppermost or floral leaves broader, 
inclining to ovate, all rather obtuse at the extremity. 
Racemes elongated, leafy. Flowers arising from the axil 
of each leaf or bractea, on a very short stalk. Calyx 
five-toothed, oblong, erect, at length singularly inflated and 
deflexed, slightly five-angled. Corolla large, salver-shaped 
rather than funnel-shaped : tube as long as the calyx : limb 
five-lobed, spreading, at first deep rose-red, then purple, at 
length blue with pale yellow rays. A little below the 
mouth of the tube are five small, rounded scales, hairy 
at the margin. Stamens with their filaments very short; 
the anthers oblong, dark coloured. Nuts (immature) five, 
ovate, compressed, much wrinkled, fixed by their base. 



Fig. 1. Section of the Calyx with young Fruit. 2. Corolla laid open. 
3. Scale of the Corolla. 4. Stamen : — magnified. 




7 JTrsa; Afar /ISJfi 



( 3478 ) 

Pereskia Bleo. Rose-coloured 
Pereskia. 

******************* 

Class and Order. 

ICOSANDRIA MONOGYNIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Cacte^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Sepala plurima ovario adnata et super fructum saepe per- 
sistentia foliiformia. Corolla rotata fere Opuntice. Stamina 
numerosa petalis multo breviora. Stylus filiformis. Stig- 
mata spiraliter aggregata. Bacca globosa aut ovata. Se- 
mina in pulpa nidulantia. — Frutices aut arbores, ramis 
teretibus. Aculei ad axillam foliorum solitarii aut in caule 
fasciculati. Folia distincta plana in ordine maxima. Flo- 
res subpaniculati solitarii ramulos terminantes aut sublate- 
rales. D C. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Pereskia * Bleo; foliis ellipticis acutis, aculeis axillaribus 
fasciculatis, pedunculis in axillis supremis 3 — 5-floris, 
petalis obovatis retusis demum reflexis. 

Pereskia Bleo. Humb. et Kunth, Nov. Gen. v. 6. p. 69. 
De Cand. Prodr. v. 3. p. 474. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 
1473. 



A very handsome stove plant, which few at the first sight 

with its large, glossy, nerved leaves, and spreading and even 

reflexed petals, would take for one of the Cactus family. 

It appears to have been discovered on the banks ot the 

rr Magdalen a, 



* In honour of Nicolas Fabricius Peireskius, Counsellor in Par- 
liament of Aix en Provence. " Son nom seul fait son doge, dit Tourxe- 
fort." — Theis. 



Magdalena, South America, by Humboldt, who retained, 
for its specific name, the uncouth appellation given to it by 
the natives of New Grenada. Mr. Tate introduced it to 
the stoves of this country from Mexico, and to him the 
Glasgow Botanic Garden owes the possession of it. With 
us it flowers in May and June. 

Descr. The specimen before us is scarcely a foot in 
length ; its stem rounded, fruticose, brownish-green, with 
several tufts of deciduous spines, two to five in number, 
from one-half to three-fourths of an inch long, imbedded 
in a dense mass of hairs, or soft bristles. Leaves alternate, 
four to six inches long, rather soft and fleshy, elliptical, 
acute, tapering at the base into a very short footstalk ; and 
bearing, in the axils which do not contain peduncles, similar 
tufts of spines and hairs. The upper axils bear peduncles, 
which are thick, rounded, and fleshy, about an inch or 
more long, with from three to five handsome rose-coloured 
flowers. Calyx fleshy, green, of several somewhat imbri- 
cated teeth, with a small leafy appendage at the extremity, 
the outer ones with a small dense tuft of hairs on each side 
at the base ; petals ten, in two series ; the outer smaller, 
greenish on the back ; the inner larger and deeper coloured, 
all obovate, more or less retuse, soon reflected. Filaments 
numerous, inserted upon the calyx. Anthers yellow. 
Style as long as the stamens. Stigma large, of five to six 
erect rays. 



5479. 




' Paint in II < 

I'll/- 



( 3479 ) 

Peristeria pendula. Pendulous 
Dove-Flower. 

******************** 

Class and Order. 
Gynandria Monandria. 

( Nat. Ord. ORCHIDEyE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium globosum. Sepala concava, subcarnosa, 
basi connata, ita calyx submonophyllus. Petala confor- 
mia paulo minora. Labellum carnosum, medio articulatura ; 
dimidio superiore erecto apice reflexo, inferiore lobo utrin- 
que dilatato. Columna basi petalorum adnata inferae pro- 
ducta et labello continua, utrinque in alam vel lobum 
producta. Anthera ecristata, bilocularis. Pollinia 2 pos- 
tice fissa, glandula sessili nuda. — Herba terrestris, pseudo- 
bulbosa. Folia plura } plicata. Scapus radicaiis vaginatus, 
pluriflorus. Flores speciosi, odorati. 

Specific Name and Character. 

Peristeria pendula ; scapo brevi pauci flora, column® alis 
seu lobis parvis porrectis, labelli basi disco cristato 
crasso, lobo superiore disco canaliculato ecristato. 



This fine plant unquestionably belongs to the curious 
Genus Peristeria, of which only one species (P. elata, 
Bot. Mag. t. 3116,) was hitherto known, and that is a 
native of Panama. The present one was imported with 
many other rarities from Demerara, by John Allcard, Esq. 
in whose stove at Stratford Green it flowered in January of 
the present year, and who kindly sent us the drawing here 
engraved, from the pencil of V. Bartholomew, Esq. Asso- 
ciate of Painters in Water Colours. 

Descr. Bulb oblong-ovate, grooved, partially sheathed 
with membranaceous scales, and bearing at its summit three 

to 

VOL. X. E 



to four lanceolate, wavy, striated, somewhat membrana- 
ceous leaves. From the base of this bulb descends a scape, 
six to seven inches long, clothed with membranaceous scales, 
and bearing about five large, handsome, globose, fleshy, fra- 
grantjlowers of a pale, greenish-white without, within tinged 
with blush, and sprinkled with purple dots. Sepals round- 
ish, rather obtuse, very concave, united at the base, espe- 
cially the two lower ones, under the lip : petals rather 
smaller, but similar in form and texture. Lip of a very 
remarkable shape, thick and fleshy, dingy white, spotted 
with purple, jointed in the middle ; the lower portion with 
a membranous, rounded lobe on each side, and its disk re- 
markably cristate, having a thick, elevated projection : the 
upper joint or lobe erect, ligulate, its disk deeply grooved, 
the apex recurved. Column semiterete, standing forward, 
with a horizontal lobe or wing on each side, singularly 
dilated downwards below, and gradually passing into the 
lip. Anther -case depressed. Pollen-masses obovate. 



Fig 1. View of the base of a Flower, to show the combined Sepals. 2. 
Front view of the Column and Lip, the floral coverings being cut away. 
3. Side view of ditto. 4. Side view of the same, the upper lobe of the Lip 
(fig. 5.) being removed. 6. 7. Anther. 8. 9. Pollen-masses.— Fig. 2 to 9 
more or less magnified. 




?tso. 






( 3480 ) 

Linum Berendieri. Berendier's Yellow- 
flowered Flax. 

********************* 

Class and Order. 
Pentandria Pentagynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Linens. ) 

Generic Character. 

Flores proportione partium quinaria. Sepala integra. 
Styli rarissime 3, cum petalis staminibus sepalisque 5. 

Specific Character and Synonym. 

Linum Berendieri; annuum monogynum multicaule ra- 
mosum, caule angulato, foliis alternis linearibus rigi- 
diusculis glabris mucronato-acuminatis- marginibus 
laevibus, floribus subcorymbosis, fructibus racemosis, 
sepalis bracteisque lanceolato-acurainatis marginibus 
serrulato-scabris, capsulis globosis acutis. 

Linum Plotzii. Hook. MSS. in Herb. Tex. 



An exceedingly beautiful and new species of Linum, 
first known to me by means of specimens in a small 
collection of plants gathered by M. Berendier, (at first 
erroneously supposed to be by M. Plotz,) in Texas. 
These specimens were from " Bejar," where they were 
found blossoming in March, 1828. By Mr. Drummond it 
was afterwards detected at Rio Brazos and San Felipe, in 
the same country, and introduced to our gardens in 1835. 
With us it has been kept in a cool frame, where it flowered 
in August ; but there is reason to think it will prove a 
hardy annual, and a most valuable acquisition to our 
gardens. 

Descr. Root annual, sending up from its summit many 
stems, which are more or less branched, especially up- 
wards ; 



wards; the branches angular. Leaves scattered, linear, 
three-fourths of an inch to an inch in length, mucronate, 
glabrous and quite entire at the margin, slightly glaucous. 
The flowers are, at first, before expansion, corymbose, 
afterwards the rachis is lengthened out, and in the state of 
fruit there is an elongated raceme, the pedicels half an inch 
long, pointing one way. Bracteas lanceolato-acuminate, 
aristate, as well as the sepals, which, have three to five pro- 
minent ribs, and are serrulate at the margin . Corolla large, 
yellow, deeper and almost orange at the base. Petals 
obovate, entire ; the claw at the very base hairy. Stamens 
five. Anthers sagittate. Germen globose. Style longer 
than the stamens, dividing at the extremity into five patent 
branches, each tipped with a globose stigma. Capsule 
globose, acute, five-celled, five-valved. 



Fig. 1. Calyx, including the Stamens and Pistil. 2. Petal. 



( 3481 ) 
Chjetogastra gracilis. Slender Ch^to- 

GASTRA. 

********************* 

Class and Order. 
Decandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Old. MELASTOMACEiE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calycis tubus turbinatus pilosus aut squamosus ; lobi 5 
persistentes. Petala 5 obovata. Staminum filamenta glabra; 
Antherce 10 oblongae consimiles porosae., connectivo basi 
producto nunc in calcar simplex aut bifidum nunc in tuber- 
cula 2 obtusa interdutn minima. Ovarium liberum, apice 
setosum et saepe denticulatum. Capsula 5-locularis. Semina 
cochleata. D C. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

ChjETOGAstra * gracilis ; herbacea, erecta subsimplex 
apice nuda, caule tereti-tetragono villoso, foliis sub- 
sessilibus lanceolato - linearibus acutis integerrimis 

3 5 nerviis villosis, pedicellis axillaribus 1-Horis et 

terminalibus ternis, calycis tubo ovato lobis lanceolatis 
acuminatis subaaquali. 

Ch^togastra gracilis. De Cand. Prodr. v. 3. p. 133. 
Chamisso in Linncea, v. 9. p. 407. 

Rhexia gracilis. Humb. et Kunth, Rhex. t. 52. 



An extremely beautiful Melastomaceous plant ; for dried 
specimens of which we are indebted to several travellers in 
Brazil, where the species appears to be common ; and for 
the seeds, from which our living plants were raised in the 



Glasgow 



* From x XiTri > a bristle, and ya.a?r»<; ; so named, I apprehend, from 
copious bristles which crown the ovary. 



the 



Glasgow Botanic Garden, to Mr. Tweedie, who collected 
them at Rio Grande do Sul, in South Brazil. It requires 
the heat of a stove, and blossomed with us in June. Cha- 
misso speaks of it as a very variable species, and is inclined 
to refer to it the C. strigillosa, hieracioides, repanda (Martius, 
Osbeckia, D C), and even C.fraterna and hirsuta, D C. 

Descr. Root perennial. Stem herbaceous, erect, nearly 
simple, rounded, or obscurely four-sided, clothed with long-, 
spreading, rigid hairs. Leaves lanceolate, or oblongo-lan- 
ceolate, patent, rather rigid, three-nerved, clothed on both 
sides, and ciliated, with copious, harsh hairs, or bristles. 
Upper part of the stem nearly bare of leaves, or the leaves 
are reduced to small, oblong bracteas. Panicle subspicate. 
Flowers large and handsome. Calyx ovato - turbinate, 
bristly, with five acute, spreading segments. Petals five, 
large, broadly obovate, approaching to cordate, spreading, 
concave, rose-lilac, deeper at the base. Stamens ten, 
declined, unequal. Filaments bright rose-red. Anthers 
long, curved, attenuated upwards, yellow, opening by a 
single pore ; the base with two rounded tubercles. Germen 
oval, crowned with a silvery tuft of hairs or bristles. Style 
about as long as the stamens, flexuose. 



Fig. 1 . 2. Stamens. 3. Calyx laid open to show the Pistil : — magnified. 




3482. 



k ffnin i d* ' 



( 3482 ) 

COOPERIA CHLOROSOLEN. GREEN-TUBED 
COOPERIA. 

*********************** 

Class and Order. 

Hexandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Amaryllide^i. ) 

Generic Character. 

Scapus cavus. Germen erectum. Perianthium tubo 
erecto cylindrico ore ampliato, limbo albo regulari \\ un- 
ciali sub sole patente. Filamenta decurrentia, subaequalia, 
apice ad faucem tubi libera. AnthertE subulato-lineares, 
(dein lineares) erectae, non versatiles, a tertia parte inferiore 
dorso affixae. Pollen difforme (quod in Zephyranthe acute 
ovale). Stigma crassum trilobum vix trifidum. Semina 
complanata testa tenui nigra. TV. H. 

Specific Character. 

Cooperia chlorosolen ; scapo ultra-pedali viridi, infra rubes- 
cente ; foliis sesquipedalibus, £ unc. latis, canaliculars, 
tortilibus, acutis, viridibus ; genuine sessili ; spatha \\ 
unciali tubata, apice fenestrato ; perianthii tubo 4^ 
unciali viridi limbo li unciali albo, sepalis viridi-api- 
culatis, extus viridi-lineatis; filamentis^ unciae liberis; 
stylo incluso semiunciam vel ultra tubo breviore. W.H. 



This singular plant, the second species of the Genus that 
has flowered in this country, was sent, as well as Cooperia 
Drummondi from Texas by Drummond. It flowered at 
SpofTorth in the greenhouse at the beginning of January, 
and differs from Cooperia Drummondi, which had bloomed 
in the autumn at Wentworth House, in having a much 
larger limb, the tube green, and the sepals lined with green 
on the outside, the leaves longer and wider, the filaments 

free 



free from the tube one-eighth instead of one-sixteenth, and 
the style shorter than the tube. They both differ from the 
Genus Zephyranthes, in having anthers subulate before 
their inversion, erect, and not versatile, and in the deformity 
of the pollen, which in Zephyranthes is acutely oval. The 
remarkable long tube which distinguishes these two species, 
is perhaps not essential to the Genus ; and Zephyranthes 
Candida (supra 2607) which refuses to breed with Zephy- 
ranthes, differing from it, and agreeing with Cooperia in 
the more important points, will probably be found to 
belong to another section of this Genus. Cooperia Drum- 
mondi has the leaves twelve or thirteen inches long, about 
one-twelfth wide ; the tube four inches and a half, red ; the 
limb five-eighths, lined with red on the outside ; the fila- 
ments free, one-sixteenth only; the style longer than the 
tube, shorter than the anthers. 

There is a third Cooperia amongst Drummond's bulbs, 
which has not yet flowered ; and it is uncertain whether it 
will prove different from C. chlorosolen or not. There is 
also a Zephyranthes, of which the flower is known by his 
specimens, which it is proposed to call Texana. 

Z. Texana, foliis viridibus, rectis, infra lineam latis, flore 
pedunculato luteo, extus cupreo. 

^ The Genus Cooperia is named, in compliment to Mr. 
Cooper, who has during a very long course of years had the 
superintendence of the rich collection of plants which he has 
brought together at Wentworth House, the seat of Earl 
Fitzwilliam, in Yorkshire. 

The point of the perianth was not naked at the first ap- 
pearance of the bud, as seems usual with Zephyranthes -it 
was yellowish before it acquired its full size, turning gra- 
dually to clear white. W. H. 



5. B^of^epal. % ^ 3 ' P ° ll6n ' wa * m >* 4 " Pet ^ and Stamen. 



\/lr-c 



3483. 













( 3483 ) 

Rhodanthe Manglesii. Captain Mangles' 
Rhodanthe. 

******************** 

Class and Order. 
Syngenesia ^Equalis. 

( Nat. Ord. — Composite. ) 

Generic Character. 

Capitulum multiflorum, homogamuin. Pappus unise- 
rialis, piliformis, plumosus, distinctus. Achenium erostre, 
lanatum. Receptaculum nudum. Lindl. 

Specific Name and Synonym. 

Rhodanthe * Manglesii. 

Rhodanthe Manglesii. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1703. 



A beautiful, hardy annual, drawn by Miss Maria Curtis, 
at her father's extensive nursery-grounds of Glazenwood, 
where it bears its brilliant rose-coloured and yellow blos- 
soms in the early summer months. In July, Professor 
Lindley observes, it becomes shabby, and, by the begin- 
ning of August, its seed is ripe, and its life departed. We 
are indebted for its introduction to Captain Mangles, R.N., 
who brought the seeds from the Swan River Colony, New 
Holland, to the gardens of Robert Mangles, Esq., Sun- 
ning Hill. The genus seems very nearly related to Po- 
dolepis, of which one species is figured at t. 2904 of 
this work. The involucre, however, is different, and the 
pappus is plumose in our present plant. 

Descr. Root annual. Stem (as is the whole plant) 
glabrous, rounded, slightly glaucous, branched in a dicho- 

tomous 



* So named by Professor Lindley, from po&r, a rose, and «»0o?, a fewer, 
in allusion to the colour of the flowers. 



tomous manner, with a leaf at the setting on of the 
branches. Branches wavy, slender, forming a sort of 
panicle upwards ; peduncles single-flowered, more or less 
drooping. Leaves oblong-obtuse, cordate, and amplex- 
icaul at the base, dark green above, paler beneath. In- 
volucre turbinate, much tapering at the base, formed 
below of numerous laxly imbricated, purplish-grey, mem- 
branaceous, ovato - lanceolate scales, gradually, as they 
proceed upwards, larger and longer, and of a fair rose- 
colour, toothed at the apex ; the uppermost forming a 
beautiful concave ray around the disk, which consists of 
numerous yellow, tu bular florets. Receptacle naked. Ache- 
nium very hairy. Hairs of the pappus feathery. 



348*. 




( 3484 ) 

Coreopsis senifolia. Six-leaved Co- 
reopsis. 

Class and Order. 
Syngenesia Frustranea. 

( Nat. Ord. — Composite. ) 

Generic Character. 

Receptaculum paleaceum. Achenium compressum, emar- 
ginatum. Pappus bicornis (quandoque obsoletus). Invo- 
lucrum duplex, utrumque polyphyllum. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Coreopsis senifolia; perennis, erecta, foliis oppositis sessi- 
libus ad basin usque tripartitis laciniis lanceolatis 
integerrimis rigidiusculis, floralibus plerumque indi- 
visis, radii flosculis integerrimis. 

Coreopsis senifolia. Mich. Am. v. 2. p. 138. Willd. Sp. 
PL v. 3. p. 2054. Pursh, Fl. Am. v. 2. p. 568. Ell. 
Carol, v. 2. p. 433. Spreng. St/st. Veget. v. 3. p. 614. 



A native of Carolina and Georgia, and introduced to our 
gardens by Mr. John Lyon, in 1812. Notwithstanding 
that it is peculiar to the Southern States of North America, 
where the summer heats are excessively great, it flourishes 
well in the open air, with us, even in Scotland ; flowering 
in the latter end of the summer and autumn. It is readily 
distinguished by its leaves being opposite, and each deeply 
three-partite, the segments generally spreading ; so that it 
appears as if there was, at every joint, a whorl of six leaves, 
whence the specific name. The species is certainly very 
variable in the breadth of the segments of its leaves, and 
in the whole plant being more or less downy, or quite gla- 
brous : hence, as it appears to me, Nuttall has lately 

constituted 



constituted two species, C. stellata and C. senifolia; the 
former being characterized by the broader leaves, and the 
whole plant being glabrous ; the latter, by the narrow 
leaves and downy plant. Thus the specimen we have given 
is destitute of hair, likeC. stellata, but has the narrow leaves 
of C. senifolia of this author. This species will probably 
unite with the C. tripteris, L. to form Lessing's Genus 
of Chrysostemma. 

Descr. Root perennial. Stem erect, straight, rigid, 
angled, glabrous, as is the whole plant in our specimens ; 
which, in other instances, is more or less downy : branched 
upwards in asubtrichotomous manner, the flowering branches 
forming a sort of corymb. Leaves opposite, deeply tri- 
partite, somewhat rigid, the segments lanceolate, (some- 
times broadly so,) spreading, entire, acute, the uppermost 
ones, among the flower-stalks, not unfrequently undivided. 
Involucre glabrous : outer of about eight linear, nearly 
erect, green leaves; inner of about as many ovate, membra- 
naceous, brownish ones. Radical florets about eight, spread- 
ing, oval, full yellow, abortive ; those of the disk greenish- 
yellow ; the fruit oblongo-cuneate, compressed, slightly 
winged at the margin, especially upwards. Pappus ob- 
solete; in the perfectly ripe fruit constituting a small 
bidentate membrane. 



Fig. 1. Floret of the Circumference. 2. Floret of the Disk .^magnified. 




3 185. 






( 3485 ) 
Nemophila insignis. Showy Nemophila. 

Class and Order. 
Pentandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Hydrophylle^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Cal. iuferus, persistens, 10-fidus; laciniis alternis reflexis 
Cor. campanulata, 5-!oba : lobis emarginatis. Nect. fove- 
o\d& 10 ad margin em faucis. Stam. brevia. Anther&limataz. 
Caps, unilocularis. Sein. unum supra alterum receptaculis 
duobus parietalibus inserta. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Nemophila* insignis ; foliis (superioribus) oppositis pinna- 
tifidis basi in petiolum angustatis lobis integerrimis 
1 — 2-dentatisve, calycis sinubus reflexis,, corollis calyce 
duplo lougioribus, ovariis multi-ovulatis. Benth. 

Nemophila insignis. Benth. in Hort. Trans, v. 1. N. S. p. 
479. BoL Reg. t. 1703. 



This, again, is one of the many highly ornamental plants 
of California, for the discovery and introduction of which to 
our gardens we are indebted to the exertions of the lamented 
Douglas. The flowers are large, and of so bright a blue, 
that no artificial colouring can do justice to them. It blos- 
soms in July and August. 

Descr. Root annual. Stem procumbent, branched, slen- 
der, hairy. Leaves alternate in the lower, and opposite in the 
upper, part of the stem, petiolate, pinnatifid, hairy, the seg- 
ments rather remote, oblong, one- to two-toothed. Pedun- 
cles 



* From Npac, a grove, and <p*tv, to love : from its place of growth, in 
woods or thickets. 



cles long, axillary, hairy, solitary, one-flowered. Calyx 
hairy, of five ovate, nearly erect segments, and as many 
smaller, lanceolate, reflexed ones, alternating with them. 
Corolla rotato-campanulate, deeply divided into five obcor- 
date lobes, of an intense blue within, paler externally : the 
tube hairy within at the base. Stamens inserted at the base 
of the tube, shorter than the limb : Anthers purple brown. 
Germen broadly ovate, very hairy, inserted upon a five- 
lobed, fleshy disk : Style as long as the stamens, bifid : 
Stigmas small, capitate. 



<Ni 










( 3486 ) 
Oncidium cornigerum. Horned Oncidium. 

**»****»»***«■&•&» 

Class and Order. 
Gynandria Monandria. 

( Nat. Ord. — Orchideje. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium explanatum. Sepala saepius undulata : late- 
ralibus nunc sub labello connatis. Petala conformia. La- 
helium maximum, ecalcaratum, cum columna continuum, 
varie lobatum, basi tuberculatum vel cristatum. Columna 
libera semiteres, apice utrinque alata. Anthera semibilo- 
cularis, rostello nunc abbreviate, nunc elongato rostrato. 
Pollinia 2, postice sulcata ; caudicula plana ; glandula ob- 
longa. — Herbae epiphytee, nunc pseudo-bulbosce. Folia co- 
riacea. Scapi paniculati vaginati, rarius simplices. Flores 
speciosi, scepius maculati, rarius albi. Lindl. 

Specific Character and Synonym. 

Oncidium cornigerum; pseudo-bulbis oblongis sulcatis mo- 
nophyllis, foliis ovalibus acutis sessilibus striatis scapo 
elongato paniculato multifloro brevioribus, sepalo 
supremo petalisque obovatis concavis undulatis obtu- 
sis, inferioribus minoribus angustioribus basi connatis, 
labelli lobis lateralibus linearibus cornutis intermedio 
obovato subrepando undulato, crista antice verrucosa 
truncata postice lamella crenata transverse cornuta, 
columna alis linearibus obtusis porrectis. Lindl. (pauc. 
verb, mut.) 

Oncidium cornigerum. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1542. Gen. et 
Sp. Orchid, p. 199. 



This plant, which, from our first knowledge of it, pro- 
mised, by its very few-flowered scape and the small size of 
those flowers, to be little deserving of attention on the 

score 
vol. \. p 



score of beauty, now, as cultivated in the collection at 
Wentworth, whence our fine specimen was kindly com- 
municated in August of last year, 1835, must be allowed 
to possess considerable beauty and gracefulness. Lord 
Fitzwilliam received the plant from the Hon. and Rev. 
W. Herbert of Spofforth, who imported it from Brazil ; 
and the scape here represented was produced by an offset 
of the same year's growth. 

Descr. Bulbs, or pseudo-bulbs, about three inches long, 
rounded, a little tapering upwards, furrowed, dark green ; 
bearing, at the extremity, a solitary, oval-obloug, dark 
green, striated, rather obtuse leaf. Scape from the base of 
the bulb, fourteen to sixteen inches long, slender, bearing 
a drooping, many-flowered panicle, or rather compound 
raceme. Perianth yellow, spotted with red. Sepals and 
petals obovate, concave, the two lower sepals the smallest : 
the upper one forming a kind of hood over the column. The 
lip may be called panduriform, with a horn-shaped lobe on 
each side at the base : the apex rounded and broad, emar- 
ginate, the disk below the apex with a sort of double crest, 
of which the lowest projects into a horn on each side at 
the base. Column short, with two projecting, elongated 
lobes or wings. Lip hemispherical, truncated in front. 
Pollen-masses pear-shaped, stalked. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Lip. 3. Column. 4. Apex of the Column, from 
which the Anther is removed, showing the Pollen-masses : magnified. 



( 3487 ) 

Senecio ampullaceus. Flask-flowered 
American Groundsel. 

*********************** 

Class and Order. 
Syngenesia Superflua. 

( Nat. Ord. — Composite. ) 

Generic Character. 

Anihodium multipartitum apice maculatum basi subinvo- 
lucratum seu bracteatum. Receptaculum nudum. Spreng. 

Specific Name and Character. 

Senecio ampullaceus; herbaceus, erectus, glaberrimus, stri- 
atus, foliis oblongis obtusis carnosis inferne praecipue 
dentatis basi subcordatis semiamplexicaulibus, infimis 
spathulatis, panicula corymbosa, involucris demum 
ampullifbrmibus nitidis, radiis paucispatentibus, ache- 
niis cylindraceo-attenuatis sericeo-pubescentibus stri- 
atis. 



A handsome, showy species, but too near perhaps, in the 
appearance of its flowers, to some of our larger European 
Groundsels, to become a general favourite. Its leaves, 
indeed, are very different from those of any species with 
which I am acquainted, and peculiarly thick and fleshy ; 
nor do I find any described Senecio that will accord with it. 
It is one of Mr. Drummond's discoveries in Texas, but he 
probably did not meet with it in a good state of flower ; for 
there are very few specimens in the herbarium, and those in 
a most indifferent condition, and with their lower leaves 
much more toothed than in the cultivated state. Nor do 
these specimens, probably owing to pressure, exhibit the 
remarkable contraction in the upper part of the involucre, 
which is so striking in the recent individual, giving the old 
flowers the form of the capsule of Splachnum ampullaceum. 

Descr. 



Descr. Root annual ? Stem one to two feet high, herba- 
ceous, erect, glabrous, as is the whole plant, striated, green, 
tinged with purple, branched upwards. Leaves three to four 
or five inches long, remote, oblong, obtuse, or the upper 
ones alone acute, semiamplexicaul at the base, of a thick 
and fleshy substance, the margin entire, or more or less 
toothed, particularly below the middle, the radical leaves 
spathulate. Branches panicled above, the branchlets corvm- 
bose. Pedicels with subulate bracteas at the base. Flowers 
rather large, handsome. Involucre cylindrical, of many 
closely-placed, linear scales, sharp and discoloured at the 
point, and with a few small scales or bracteas at the base. 
Florets of the ray six to eight, rather large, spreading : those 
of the disk twenty to thirty. Style and stamens considerably 
exserted : segments of the stigma revolute. Achenia oblong, 
attenuated upwards. Pappus copious, white. 



Fig. 1. Floret of the Disc. 2. Floret of the Ray. 3. Achenium : mag- 
nified. 



5488 




( 3488 ) 

COLLINSIA BICOLOR. TWO-COLOURED 
COLLINSIA. 

********************** 
Class and Order 

DlDYNAMIA AnGIOSPERMIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Scrophularinje. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 5-fidus, aequalis. Corolla bilabiata, tubo supra 
gibbo, limbo inaequali ; labio superiore erecto bifido in- 
feriore trifido. Stamina didynama. Capsula globosa, 4- 
valvis, oligosperma. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Collinsia* bicolor ; foliis ovato-acuminatis serratis basi 
subcordatis, nervis subparallelis, verticillis (infimis ex- 
ceptis) aphyllis. 

Collinsia bicolor. Benth. in Hort. Soc. Trans. N. S v. I. 
p. 480. Bot. Reg. t. 1734. 



A very handsome hardy annual ; detected in California by 
the late Mr. Douglas, and by him introduced to the garden 
of the Horticultural Society in 1833; whence it has been 
liberally distributed to other collections. Our plants flow- 
ered in August in the Glasgow Botanic Garden. 

Descr. The stems are upright, but weak and flexuose, 
slightly downy. Leaves opposite or ternate, sessile, ovate- 
acuminated, glabrous, serrated, somewhat cordate at the 
base, marked, with a few nerves which run nearly parallel 

with 



* So named by Mr. Nuttall, in compliment to Mr. Zaccheus Collins, 
a Botanist and Mineralogist of Philadelphia. 



with the midrib. Flowers arranged in several whorls, 
towards the extremities of the branches, large, and striking 
from the contrast of colour between the upper and lower 
lip : each whorl subtended by a pair of bracteas, which, in 
the upper ones, are obsolete, Calyx campanulate, five-fid ; 
the segments ovate-acuminate. Corolla with the tube white, 
swollen on the upper side. Lower lip large, pendent, pur- 
ple ; upper lip erect, white. 



( 3489 ) 

Jaborosa integrifolia. Entire-leaved 
Jaborosa. 

A'. A'. A*. A'. . v I / . A\ A'-. A'. A'. A '. A\ A'. A'. . s fc A^ A<. A/. r v K A/, .•■k .'i'. 
7f? 7f? vf. */t? */fr •/$»* m /£? vj\* vf> ■yfr vfr v|s vfr vf? v}? vj? vfr "/** Tfr Tf: ^fr 

Class and Order. 
Pentandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Solane^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx parvus, 5-fidus. Corolla tubulosa seu subcampa- 
nulata. Anther & subsessilia intra faucem. Stigma clava- 
tum 3 — 5-fidum. Bacca bi- (tri-, Commers.) locularis. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Jaborosa integrifolia ; acaulis, radice repente, foliis petio- 

lis ovalibus subintegerrimis, corolla longe tubulosa 

limbi laciniis valde acuminatis. 
Jaborosa integrifolia. Lam. Encycl. v. 3. p. 189. Illustr. 

t. 114. Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. \.p. 700. Hook. Bot. 

Misc. v. 1. p. 348. 



The Genus, which has derived its name from Jaborosa, 
or 'Jabordhh, the Arabic name for the Mandragora, to 
which our plant is allied, was founded upon the present and 
another species, (J. runcinata,) by Jussieu, in the Genera 
Plantarum, from specimens collected by Commerson, at 
Buenos Ay res. These plants, I apprehend, however, were 
little, if at all, known to Botanists till many years after ; 
when the late Dr. Gillies gathered them both in the same 
country, and added a third, which we had the pleasure of 
figuring and describing in the first volume of the Botanical 
Miscellany, and which he found in the Andes of Mendoza. 
The two original species have been again sent to us by Mr. 
Tweedie from the Pampas of Buenos Ay res, accompanied 
likewise by seeds, from which plants have been raised both 
at the Liverpool and Glasgow Botanic Gardens, and which, 

planted 



planted in the open border, and in a favorable situation, 
prove perfectly hardy, flowering in July and August. 

Descr. Root, or rather subterraneous stem, much creep- 
ing, rounded, about the thickness of a goose-quill, here and 
there sending out fibrous radicles from the underside, and 
leaves from the upper, which latter are solitary or two 
together, erect, four to six inches long, oval, obtuse, ob- 
scurely and distantly toothed, running down at the base 
into a rounded, purplish petiole. The surface of the leaf is 
distinctly marked with nerves, and is full green above, 
paler below. Peduncle from the base of a leaf, or be- 
tween two leaves, about as long as the petiole, rounded, 
erect, bearing a solitary, uprighty?ow?er. Calyx small, cup- 
shaped, five-cleft. Corolla large, externally pale yellow 
green, internally white. Tube long, rather thick, curved ; 
limb of five lanceolate, much acuminate, spreading seg- 
ments. Anthers five, oblong-ovate, acute, sessile, or rather 
the filaments are combined with the tube of the corolla. 
Germen small, ovato-globose. Style exserted, much longer 
than the tube : Stigma clavate, three to five-cleft : the seg- 
ments erect, green. 



Fig. 1. Calyx and Pistil. 2. Stamen. 



r> F90 




( 3490 ) 

Rosa microphylla. Small-leaved 
Chinese Rose. 

************************ 

Class and Order. 

IcOSANDRIA POLYGYNIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Rosacea. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calycis tubus urceolatus carnosus, achenia plurima hir- 
suta includens. Receptaculum villosum. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Rosa microphylla ; foliolis nitidis argute serratis, calyce 
aculeis densissimis muricata, sepalis brevibus late ova- 
tis apiculatis. Lindl. 

Rosa microphylla. cc Roxb. Fl. Ind. ined." Lindl. Ros. 
Monogr. p. 9. Bot Reg. t. 919. 



Whether the single-flowered state of this plant is in 
cultivation, I am ignorant. Certain it is, that the highly 
double blossoms, so much admired by cultivators, cannot 
be exceeded in delicacy of form, shadow, and colour- 
ing by any species of this highly-prized Genus : and no 
where, perhaps, is the present kind brought to so high a 
degree of perfection as in Mr. Curtis's extensive Nursery 
at Glazenwood, near Coggeshall, Essex, where the accom- 
panying figure was made. 

It is a native of China, and is stated to have blossomed 
for the first time in Mr. Colville's Nursery, about ten 
years ago. 

We are indebted to Mr. Curtis for the following remarks, 
which cannot fail to be acceptable, to our Horticultural 
friends. " Rosa microphylla is hardy enough to bear our 
mild winters without protection, but with very sharp frosts 
it is liable to be destroyed in the open ground, a circum- 
stance 



stance owing- to the tenderness of its roots : for when 
budded on the dog-rose stock, it becomes much more hardy. 
e: Those who are curious in Roses, should always have a 
few potted plants of the present kind reserved in a pit ; lest 
the severity of winter should destroy those in the open 
border. It is well adapted for a standard-rose on a lawn, 
since it flowers freely throughout the autumn, and has 
besides a graceful, drooping kind of growth. I have, how- 
ever, found it to succeed best when budded on the common 
blush China Rose, and placed against a wall. In such 
a situation it would seldom be injured, even by the hardest 
of our winters. It strikes freely from cuttings." 



vW;. 



3491 




( 3491 ) 

Leptosiphon androsaceus. Androsace- 
like Leptosiphon. 

*********************** 

Class and Order. 
Pentandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Polemoniace^:. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx tubuloso-campanulatus, aaqualis, semi- 5-lobus, 
lobis lineari-subulatis, acutis, sinubus membranaceis. Co- 
rolla infundibuliformis (hypocrateriformis); tubo longe ex- 
serto tenuissimo ; limbo campanulato (patenti) 5-fido ; lobis 
ovalibus obtusis integerrimis. Stamina fauce inserta : an- 
thercB oblongae, basi sagittatae. Capsulce loculi polyspermi. 
— Herbae annuce, basi glabra, apice pubescentes. Folia 
sessilia, opposita, palmatisecta, segmentis linearibus vel subu- 
latis. Flores dense corymboso-capitati, axi sublanato. Brac- 
teae imbricates, foliis conformes, segmentis ciliato-hirsutis. 
Bentham. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Leptosiphon * androsaceus ; foliis 5 — 7-fidis oblongo-linea- 
ribus, corollas tubo limbo 2 — 3-plo longiore, stamini- 
bus limbo corollae triplo longioribus. Benth. 

Leptosiphon androsaceus. Bentham, in Bot. Reg. fol. 
1622. Hort. Trans. N. S. v. It. 18./ 1. 



A Genus of five species, established by our valued friend 
Mr. Bentham in the work above quoted, all of which are 
remarkable for their graceful habit, slender foliage, and 
exceedingly pretty flowers, and which make a very hand- 
some 



* From Ajtrrof, slender, and <r«por, a tube, in allusion to the slender tube 
of the corollas. 



some appearance when planted thickly in an open border. 
It was remarked, however, by Mr. Bentham, how much 
better this Genus and the nearly allied one Gilia succeeded 
in our Glasgow Botanic Garden, than in the environs of 
London ; doubtless owing to our cooler temperature and 
moister climate. Professor Lindley indeed, observes of 
this plant, in the noble gardens of the Horticultural Society, 
that, ' c although it is perfectly hardy, yet it cannot bear our 
summer heats, and only nourishes in the spring, and more 
particularly in autumn, when the sun has lost its power, 
and the nights are cool with heavy dews." It should there- 
fore be sown either in the autumn, so as to flower early ; or 
in June, in order that it may be ready for blossoming in 
September. In our Scottish climate, it has been in its 
greatest beauty at the hottest season of the year (1835) the 
latter end of July, expanding its varied blossoms, white 
and various degrees of lilac, always with a black eye and 
deep yellow anthers and stigmas, to the full blaze of 
the sun. 

Descr. Root fibrous, annual. Stem eight inches to a 
foot high, throwing out sparingly axillary, opposite branches 
chiefly from near the base, which, as well as the stem itself, 
are spreading below, then erect, purplish-green, downy. 
Leaves opposite, hairy, deeply pinnatitid, or rather almost 
digitate, with from five to seven linear, acute, and almost 
cuspidate segments ; upper ones constituting bracteas to 
the head of flowers : lowermost ones with only one or two 
spreading segments at the base. Calyx tubular, with five 
subulate, erect, equal, hairy teeth. Corolla salver-shaped ; 
tube very long, slender, purplish : limb spreading, of five 
ovate segments, the faux almost black, with a pale yellow- 
ish circle round it. Filaments short, black, inserted just 
within the faux. Anthers oval-oblong, orange -yellow. 
Style exserted. Stigmas three-cleft. 



Fig. 1. Flower: magnified 



( 3492 ) 

Lupinus Texensis. Texas Lupine. 
******************* 

Class and Order. 

DlADELPHIA DECANDRIA. 

( Nat. Old. — LeguminosjE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx profunde bilabiatus. Corolla papilionacea, vexillo 
lateribus reflexis, carina acuminata. Stamina monadelpha^ 
vagina integra; antheris 5 parvis subrotundioribus praecoci- 
oribus, 5 oblong-is serioribus. Stylus filiformis. Stigma 
terminate subrotnndum barbatum. Legumen coriaceum 
oblongum compressum, oblique tomlosum. Cotyledones 
crassae, per germin. in folia conversae. — Herbae aut Suffru- 
tices. Stipu lae petiolo adnata?. Folia sapius foliolis 5 — 9 
digitatis constantia, rarius simplicia. Folia ante explic. 
aut per somnum complicata. Pedunculi oppositifolii termi- 
nates. Flores racemoso-spicati alterni, aut verticillati aut 
sessiles. Bractea sub pedicellis. Bracteolas 2 lateraliter 
calyci adnata caduca, aut nulla?. 

Specific Name and Character. 

Lupinus Texensis; herbaeeus, annuus, eaule pubescenti- 
sericea., foliolis quinis lanceolatis acutiusculis supra 
glaberrimis, subtus (margineque praecipue) sericeis, 
stipulis subulatis., racemo pyramidally pedicellis alter- 
nis longitudine florum, calycibus sericeis bibracteatis 
bilabiatis utrinque bractea parva, labio superiore bre- 
viore bifido., inferiore acuminato integeirimo, vexillo 
orbiculari intense caeruleo medio macula alba plica 
longitudinali divisa. 



Much and closely as this plant resembles the Lupinus 
subcarnosus figured at tab. 3467, it nevertheless appears to 
me to be really distinct. The habit is stouter, the leaves 

are 



are by no means fleshy, nor are their leaflets retuse, but 
acute : the flowers are deeper coloured, and the alae or 
wings of the corolla are more projecting. The lower lip 
of the calyx I find to be always entire. Equally with the 
L. subcarnosus, the L. Texensis is an inhabitant of Texas ; 
but the former is found near the coast, the latter at San 
Felipe in the Interior. Our present plant continues longer 
in flower, its blossoms are larger, deeper coloured, and the 
raceme is broader. The chief distinction is, however, cer- 
tainly to be looked for in the foliage. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Calyx : magnified. 






3493 







( 3493 ) 

POINSETTIA PULCHERRIMA. SHOWY 
PoiNSETTIA. 

Class and Order. 

MONCESIA MONANDRIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — EuphorbiacejE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Involucrum monophyllum, androgynum, basi 5-loculare, 
extus appendiculatum, nectariferum. Flores pedicellate 
nudi ; masculi bifariam in singulis loculis, monandri; fremi- 
nei solitariij germen trilobum, ovulum solitarium singulis 
lobis. 

Specific Name and Synonyms. 

Poinsettia* pulcherrima. Graham in Edin. New Phil. 

Journ. March, 1836. 
Euphorbia pulcherrima. Willd. Herb. ! 
Euphorbia Poiusettiana. Buist MSS. 



By whom this truly splendid plant was communicated 
to Willdenow's Herbarium, 1 am not informed, but it was 
again discovered by Mr. Poinsette in Mexico, and sent 
by him to Charleston in 1828, and afterwards to Mr. Buist 
of Philadelphia, who has within a very few years brought 
together a choice collection of plants, equally creditable to 
his enterprise, and promising, as a point from which will be 
diffused a greater knowledge of the vegetation of North 
America. Prom Mr. Buist it was brought by Mr. James 
M'Nab, to the Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, and to several 
other establishments in this country, in November, 1834, 
and from the information communicated by him it has since 
been imported into other British collections from Mr. Buist's 
garden. It flowered twice with us last year, but too imper- 
fectly to allow of its being figured. It subsequently flowered 
with Dr. Neill, Canonmills, and again with us this month 
(February, 1836). Nothing can be more ornamental in 
the stove. The rose-like whorls of bracteae which termi- 
nate 



* In compliment to Mr. Poinsette, who rediscovered the plant, and 
gave occasion to its introduction in a living state into Europe. 
VOL. X. G 



nate the branches,, have been seen on the large plants 
cultivated at Philadelphia as much as twenty inches across, 
and equal in colour to the finest tints of Hibiscus Rosa- 
sinensis. The structure seems to me to constitute a new 
generic type, though in several species of Euphorbia, as in 
E. splendens, there are the rudiments of the remarkable septae 
found in the involucre here. I have dedicated it, if not to 
its original discoverer, at least to one who has first brought it 
into cultivation, and into general notice among Botanists, 
and from whose exertions many additions to the plants in 
cultivation from Mexico are expected. The period of flow- 
ering both at Philadelphia and here seems to be in winter, 
or early in spring. I entirely agree with Sir W. J. Hooker 
that Euphorbia cyathophora, Bot. Reg. t. 765, will be found 
to be a member of the same Genus. •■ 

Descr. Shrub erect, ramous ; branches round, young shoots bluntly 
kmr-angled, green, glabrous, hollow. Leaves scattered, occasionally 
opposite, spreading, petiolate, ovato-elliptical, subacute, sinuated, vein- 
ed, soft and pubescent on both sides, bright green above, paler below. 
Petioles furrowed above. Bractece similar in shape to the leaves, but 
aggregated at the extremities of the branches, and of splendid vermilion 
colour, paler below. Cymes terminal, subtrifid, at length falling off at a 
joint in the common foot-stalk. Involucres on short, stout foot-stalks, 
articulated at the base, green, ovato-orbicular, toothed, marked b V five 
sutures on the outside, with which alternate, on the inside, five falcate 
Processes beginning with narrow extremities at the mouth of the invo- 
lucre and adhering to this with their backs, they become gradually 
broader below, passing inwards, and attached to an elevation in the 
centre, they divide the lower part of the involucre into five distinct cells 
and supporting on their edges erect fimbria?, they divide the upper part 

d e°i, b t C °7 lctel >7 teeth f n* wolucre numerous, coloured like 
the bract ete, woolly on the ins.de, connivent ; appendage single on the 
outside of he involucre towards the axis of the cyme, round entire 
peltate folded in the middle so as to appear two-lipped nectaifeW-' 

° P pe^ 
appendages. Male flowers about fourteen, in two rows in each locula 

^XVT£ ir ° m ltS ^ ereCt ' petiolate > nak ^, monandrou nnxed" 
with chaffs (abortive male flowers'') which are wnnlv »t IvwT I 

occasionally tinged red there. SUSftS^W^ 

SSSK2S a t e, ' S t r- 1 ° bed ' l ° beS d --^ed" g so t^t nol 
IZT T nex J each other in the tw ° rows overlap, opening at a deen 

jEZ sditfrtr Tf e - Pol ! m rjranules vellow len ' 2r " 

lobed ea h t L T ' T * IT' St ° Ut pedicd ' naked • 9^men three- 
lobe Thesl° b l enmrglnate i "f 6 a , Wantin ^ 0): Ovule solitary in each 
flowers ^ZSEm**** * descnbe as l ^ them, but the female 
Cohc£n OT ^\™ V ^ "T 3 enIar S ed > P r °J^ted beyond the 
S flowed • T dSe ^^ avvhlle > a small number of the 
this be^^ lng T PerfCCte f and Pr ° tmded be > ond the involucre, 
the\ooTS\f 7' L Dd S r ParatGd at the articulation near the base of 
^^0^?^°^ ^ S ° me time remai ™?' and then the whole 
2|°«*0PPedaUhe articulation in the common peduncle. Graham. 

five Sis'. T °M«1#> Vln'„ J he S l m * o Ht ^ le more adv anced. 3. Section of ditto showing the 
■i. Male Flower With ,ts Scale. 5. Female Flower, abortive: magnified. 




349 i 






( 3494 ) 

Physostegia truncata. Blunt-calyxed 
Physostegia. 

Class and Order. 

DlDYNAMIA GYMNOSPERMIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Labiate. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx per anthesin tubuloso-campanulatus, post anthesin 
inflato-campanulatus, obscure sub 10-venius, subaequaliter 
5-dentatus vel truncatus vix dentatus. Corolla tubo longe 
exserto, intus exannulato, fauce inflata, limbo bilabiato, 
labio superioresuberecto subconcavo integro vel marginato, 
inferiore pateute trifido, lobis rotundatis, medio majore 
emarginato. Stamina 4, sub labio superiore adscendentia, 
subdidynama, inferioribus emineutibus. Anthers approx- 
imatae, biloculares, loculis parallelis distinctis nudis. Stylus 
apice subaequaliter bifidus, lobis subulatis apice stigmati- 
feris. Achenia sicca,, laevia. Benth. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Physostegia truncata ; annua, calyce bilabiato, labio supe- 
riore latissime trilobo, inferiore bidentato segmentis 
omnibus cuspidato-acuminatis. 

Physostegia truncata. Benth. Lab. Gen. et Sp. p. 505. 



My first knowledge of this plant was derived from very in- 
different specimens in my Herbarium, gathered in Texas by 
M. Berlandier, the same as were described by Mr. Bentham 
in the admirable work just quoted. So conspicuous a 
plant could not escape the researches of Mr. Drummond, 
who, on visiting the same country in 1833 and 1834 found 
it abundantly about San Felipe de Austin, and communi- 
cated specimens and seeds to Europe. Our figures were 

drawn 



drawn from plants which flowered in the open borders of 
the Glasgow Botanic Garden. 

Descr. Root decidedly annual. Stem erect, eight or 
ten inches to a foot in height, branched in a brachiated 
manner, acutely four-angled., glabrous. Leaves oblong, 
or oblongo-lanceolate, serrated, glabrous. Flowers oppo- 
site on the racemes, leafless, but each with an ovato-acu- 
minate bractea at the base of the short slightly glandular 
pedicel. Calyx gibbous and downy at the base, two-lipped ; 
upper lip very broad, and cut into three rounded, spinuloso- 
acuminated lobes ; the lower much smaller, ovate, with two 
sharp teeth, the whole veiny and distinctly reticulated 
when dry. Corolla more than twice as long as the calyx, 
purple-rose-coloured, slightly downy ; the throat inflated. 
Upper lip convex, entire ; lower lip of three spreading, 
nearly equal, rounded lobes, the middle part white, spotted 
with purple. Filaments slightly woolly, rather distant, 
included. Anthers each of two rounded, almost black 
lobes. 



Fig. 1. Back view of a Flower. 2. Front view of a Calyx. 



( 3495 ) 

ESCHSCHOLTZIA CROCEA. Sa FFRON-COLOURED 
ESCHSCHOLTZIA. 

Class and Order. 

POLYANDRIA TeTRAGYNIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Papaverace^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Receptaculum ampliatum, hypocrateriforme, limbo ex- 
panso integro. Calyx mitraeformis, caducus. Corolla 4- 
petala, petalis unguibus fauci receptaculi insertis, stamini- 
feris. Capsula siliquaeformis, bivalvis ; Semina marginibus 
valvaruin affixa. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Eschscholtzia crocea ; caule ramoso folioso, foliorum seg- 
mentis linearibus, peduncnli cyatho infundibuliformi 
limbo maximo dilatato, calyce longe acuminata. 
Benth. 

Eschscholtzia crocea. Benth. in Hort. Soc. Trans, v. 1. 
N. S. p. 406. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1677. 



It has been remarked by several of my English friends, 
that the many beautiful, hardy, herbaceous plants which 
have been lately introduced to our gardens by the indefatig- 
able Douglas, succeed better in the humid climate of Scot- 
land, than in the vicinity of London ; they remain longer 
in perfection, the flowers are frequently larger, and the 
colours brighter. The present individual is a striking in- 
stance of the correctness of this remark : for beautiful as it 
certainly is, in every situation, I have no where seen it dyed 
with so brilliant a saffron hue as in the specimen here figur- 
ed from the gardens of Hamilton Palace. Together with 
the true E. crocea and Califomica, there came from the 

same 



same garden a third kind, (see fig. 2,) which was raised from 
seeds of the former species, but which produced flowers 
exactly intermediate between the two : the colour of the 
petals was neither so yellow as in E. Californica, nor so 
mucli inclining to red as in E. crocea ; and the limb of 
the cup was much smaller than in the latter species, but 
larger than in the former. Still, I agree with Mr. Bentham 
and Professor Lindley, that our crocea is a truly distinct 
species, (all the characters existing in the wild native speci- 
mens equally as in the cultivated ones) and further, that 
the variety just mentioned, though raised from seeds of 
E. crocea, was derived from a plant whose flowers had 
been fertilized by the pollen of E. Californica. As this last 
mentioned species is fully described at t. 2887 of this work, 
we deem any remarks on the present individual quite un- 
necessary, further than to say, in the words of its first de- 
scriber, that it is chiefly distinguished from that species ** by 
the widely expanded limb of the curious appendage of the 
peduncle beneath the insertion of the calyx, which is cha- 
racteristic of the Genus, and by the long attenuated point 
of the calyx ;"— which latter circumstance I do not find to 
be the case in our specimens. 



Fig. 1. Cup of the Calyx, including the Pistil, magnified. 2. Hybrid 
var. 



MM 



5496 




( 3496 ) 

Gentiana quinqueflora. Five-flowered 

Gentian. 

A'. A*. A. A, A'* A. A'. A'. A. A. .- I'j A'. A. A". A'^ A'- A- A- A, 

MS <T» MS 'T- MS MS MS MS MS MS MS MS M> MS M> MS ™ M> MS 

C7«ss and Order. 
Pentandria Digynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — GentianejE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 4 — 5-fida. Corolla subcampanulata, infundibuli- 
formis vel hypocrateriformis, basi tubulosa, gland, nect. 
destit. Styli saepe coherentes. Capsula 1-locularis, 2-valvuIa. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Gentiana quinqueflora; caule ramoso tetragono-alato ; flo- 
ribus congestis terminalibus ; calycibus brevissimis, 
acutis; corolla clavata, quinquefida, laciniis aristatis, 
fauce nuda ; foliis amplexicaulibus deltoideo-cordatis 
3 — 5-nerviis. 

Gentiana quinqueflora. Pers. Syfiops. Plant. 1. 285. 
Schultes Syst. Veget. 6. 150. Elliott, Bot. of S. Caro- 
lina et Georgia, v. 1. p. 341 ? Torrey, Fl. of Mid. et 
North Sections of United States, p. 288? Beck, Bot. 
of North and Mid. States, 239 ? 

Gentiana amarelloides. Pursh, Fl. Amer. Septent. v. 1. p. 
186. Nuttall Genera, 1. 172. 

This very pretty annual was raised at the Botanic Gar- 
den, Edinburgh, from seeds sent without name by Mr. 
Thomas Churnside, Nurseryman, of New York ; and flow- 
ered in the greenhouse in the end of October. It was seen 
by Mr. James M'Nab growing on the grassy banks of 
streams among the Alleghany Mountains, and his native 
specimens differ in no respect from those raised at the 
garden, excepting in having smaller flowers. One which I 
have from the collection of Mr. Beyrich, gathered on the 
Peaks of Otter, has flowers as large as the garden specimens. 

From the synonyms I have excluded Gentiana quinque- 
folia of Flora Danica, because, in the plant figured there, 
the leaves are ovate, the flowers axillary as well as terminal 
and much smaller, and because the identity of an Iceland 
and Virginian plant seems unlikely. I have likewise ex- 
cluded 



eluded the Gentiana quinquefolia of the various works of 
Linnaeus, and the Gentiana quinqueflora of Willdenow, 
Lamarck, and Sprengel; because reference is by them 
made to Flora Danica, and because the leaves are generally 
described as ovate or oblong, and the stem simple. I have 
abstained from quoting Gentiana amarelloides of Michaux, 
because he describes his plant as smaller than G. ama- 
rella, with oval leaves ; small, lateral as well as terminal 
flowers, of pale yellow colour; and having the segments of 
the limb lanceolate. In all these respects does our plant 
differ. I have quoted with doubt Elliott, Torrey, and 
Beck, on account of references they make, and because 
some parts of their descriptions neither accord with native 
nor cultivated specimens ; yet I think they must allude to 
the plant now described. In the other writers quoted, the 
references are, I think, sometimes mistaken, but the cha- 
racters are corrected. 

Descr. Root annual, dichotomously branched. Stem 
(nine to twenty inches high) single, erect, square, winged, 
branched ; branches decussating, spreading. Leaves stem- 
clasping, deltoideo-cordate, glabrous on both sides, palest 
below, three to five-nerved and obscurely reticulate, entire 
in the margin, slightly crisped, nerves prominent below. 
Flowers clustered at the extremity of the stem and branches, 
generally from three to five together, pedicellate, or if 
single in the axils of the leaves, it is only from the degene- 
ration of the branches ; pedicels erect. Calyx small, green, 
quinquefid, segments lanceolate, slightly spreading Corolla 
(before expansion of the limb ten lines long, three lines in 
its greatest diameter in cultivated specimens, in native spe- 
cimens often smaller) pale lilac: tube (seven lines and a 
half long) clavate ; limb five-parted, segments ovate, aris- 
tate ; throat naked. Stamens as long as the tube ; filaments 
adhering to the corolla as far as their middle, to which point 
they enlarge, and then gradually contract upwards, chan- 
nelled on their inner surface, unconnected with each other ; 
anthers small, leaden coloured, bursting on their outer sur- 
face; pollen pale, its granules nearly spherical. Pistil as 
long as the stamens : Stigmas small, acute : Germen linear- 
lanceolate, greenish-leaden-coloured. Graham. 

(This is undoubtedly the G. quinqueflora of the American 
Botanists, from whom I have received many specimens, and 
from Dr. Short, a beautiful drawing, which is that here re- 
presented. The dissections are from Dr. Graham's speci- 
mens.) 



Fig. 1. Flower, 2. The same laid op»n. 3. Calyx and Pistil. 



( 3497 ) 

RODRIGUEZIA BaRKERI. Mr. BARKER^ 
RODRIGUEZIA. 

******************* 

Class and Order. 
Gynandrta Monandria. 

( Nat. Ord. — Orchide^;. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium patens, subaequale, sepalis 2 lateralibus 
connatis labello suppositis. Labellum integrum,, unguicu- 
latum, basi cornutum, medio callosum ; ungue cum co- 
lumna parallelo. Columna teres, apice barbata. Anthera 
unilocularis, carnosa. Clinandrium nudum, retrorsum de- 
clive. Pollinia 2, postice excavata, caudicnla elastica. — 
Herbae epiphyta, subpseudobulbosce. Folia coriacea, velmem- 
branacea, plicata. Spicae secunda. Flores spicati. 

Specific Name and Character. 

Rodrtguezia Barkeri ; bulbis ancipiti-compressis oblongis, 
foliis lineari-Ianceolatis enerviis laevibus, perianthio 
undulato, sepalo inferiori (e duobus formato) fere ad 
medium bifido, segmentis patentibus, labello apice in- 
tesn*o. 



A Brazilian plant, imported from Brazil by George 
Barker, Esq. of Birmingham, and communicated to us in 
full flower, January, 1836, by Mr. Cameron of the Bir- 
mingham Botanic Garden. It is in many respects allied to 
the Gomeza (Rodriguezia, Lindl.) recurva, of Bot. Mag. 
t. 1748, and to the plant of the same name in Bot. Cab. 
t. 660 (Rodriguezia planijolia, Lindl.) ; from the former 
it differs in the smooth not striated and plaited leaves; and 
from both, as well as from R. suaveolens, Lindl. (Pleuro- 
thallis foliosa, Hoor. Bot. Mag. t. 2746.), by the very 

deep 



deep division., and, consequently, long segments, which are 
spreading, of the lower (combined) sepal. The whole 
flower, too, is of an uniform pale green colour, nearly desti- 
tute'of fragrance. 

Descr. Bulb three to four inches in length, oblong, 
compressed so as to be ancipitate, striated, having on each 
side a small leaf with a long compressed sheathing base, 
and below them three or four sheathing brown scales. A 
pair of leaves also terminates the bulb, they are linear-lan- 
ceolate, and except the costa, which is keeled at the back 
and depressed in front, have no nerve or plica whatever. 
Scapes two, one from the axil of the leaf on each side the 
bulb, curved so as to have the long spike of flowers droop- 
ing. Flowers numerous, directed to all sides, pale green. 
Sepals and petals spreading, linear-oblong, much waved, 
the two lateral sepals placed under the lip, combined for 
rather more than half their length, so as to represent one 
deeply cleft sepal. Lip ovato-oblong, at the base having 
two, erect, thin plates, and on the disk near the middle two 
prominent callous lines, where the lip becomes suddenly 
and singularly reflexed. Column semiterete, marked with 
a bright orange line round the stigma. Anther-case he- 
mispherical, with a little point. Pollen-masses nearly 
globose. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Lip : magnified. 



J498 










( 3498 ) 
Fuchsia discolor. Port-Famine Fuchsia. 

Class and Order. 

OCTANDRIA MONOGYNIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Onagrarie^;. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calycis tubus basi ovario adhaerens, superne productus 
in tubum cylindraceum 4-lobum post anthesin articulatim 
deciduum. Petala 4 summo tubo inserta lobis alterna, 
rarius 0. Stamina 8. Ovarium glandula urceolata coro- 
natum. Stylus filiformis. Stigma capitatum. Bacca ob- 
longo- aut ovato-globosa, 4-locularis, 4-valvis, polysperma. 
— Frutices. Folia scepius opposita. Pedunculi axillares 
\-flori, interdum ad apices ramorum racemosi. Flores sa- 
pius nutantes, rubri rarius albi, interdum b-fidi \0-andri. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Fuchsia discolor ; ramis brevibus densis compact is strict is, 
foliis ternis longiuscule petiolatis ovato-lanceolatis 
nitidis denticulatis subcomplicato-carinatis, floribus 
folio multo longioribus, staminibus exsertis, stigmate 
ovali. 

Fuchsia discolor. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1805. 

Fuchsia Lowei. Hort. 



The difficulty of discriminating those different kinds of 
Fuchsia, now so common in our gardens, of which F. flW- 
crostemma of the Flora Peruviana may be considered the 
original type, has been felt by every one who has turned 
his attention to the subject ; and this difficulty has been 
increased by cultivation and the skill of the horticulturist 
in fertilizing one kind with the farina of another ; so that 
what few characters were supposed to exist to entitle them 

to 



to rank as species, are, of necessity, obliterated. Closely 
allied as the present is to that which goes under the name 
of F. gracilis, (especially the 0. multiflora of Lindl., Bot. 
Reg. t. 1053) it will, nevertheless, I think, be found dis- 
tinct ; and possesses one strong claim to our attention, 
inasmuch as it is a native of the most southern portion of the 
world which has yet been visited by any Botanist, Port Pa- 
mine in the Strait of Magelhaens, whence seeds were pro- 
cured by Mr. Anderson, who accompanied Captain King in 
his late voyage, for the purpose of surveying the southern 
extremity of South America, Tierra del Puego and the 
Strait of Magelhaens. This able officer has given us, in 
the 1st vol. of the Journal of the Royal Geographical 
Society, the following interesting account of the vegetation 
of that singular country, in which out- Fuchsia is particu- 
larly alluded to. " At Port Famine, and in its neighbour- 
hood, the Evergreen Beech (Fagus betuloidcs) grows in 
the greatest abundance and reaches a very large size. 
Trees of this species, three feet in diameter, are abundant; 
of four feet there are many ; and there is one tree (perhaps 
the very same noticed by Commodore Byron), which mea- 
sures seven feet in diameter for seventeen feet above the 
roots, and then divides into three large branches, each of 
which is three feet through. Besides this, there are but 
few other trees in the Strait that can be considered as 
timber : such an appellation only belongs to two other 
species of Beech and the Winter's Bark. The last, which 
is also an evergreen, may be found, mixed with the first, in 
all parts of the Strait; so that the country and hills, from 
the height of two thousand feet above the sea to the very 
verge of the high water mark, are covered with a perpetual 
verdure which is remarkably striking, particularly in those 
places where the glaciers descend into the sea; the sudden 
contrast, in such cases, presenting to the view a scene as 
agreeable as it seems to be anomalous. I have myself 
seen vegetation thriving most luxuriantly, and large woody- 
stemmed trees of Fuchsia and Veronica, in England con- 
sidered and treated as tender plants, in full flower, within 
a very short distance of the base of a mountain, covered 
for two-thirds down with snow, and with the temperature 
at 36". The Fuchsia, certainly, was rarely found but in 
sheltered spots; but not so the Veronica, for the beaches 
of the bays on the west side of St. John's Island, at Port 
San Antonio, are lined with trees of the latter, growing 
even in the very wash of the sea. There is no part of the 

Strait 



Strait more exposed to the wind than this,, for it faces the 
reach to the west of Cape Fro ward,, down which the wind 
constantly blows, and brings with it a succession of rain, 
sleet, or snow; and in the winter months, from April to 
August, the ground is covered with a layer of snow from 
six inches to two or three feet in depth. There must be, 
therefore, some peculiar quality in the atmosphere of this 
otherwise rigorous climate, which favours vegetation ; for, 
if not, these comparatively delicate plants could not live 
and flourish through the long and severe winters of this 
region/' 

The author further remarks ; ff Whilst upon this sub- 
ject, there are two facts which may be mentioned, as illus- 
trative of the mildness of the climate, notwithstanding 
the lowness of its temperature. One is the comparative 
warmth of the sea near its surface, between which and the 
air, I have in the month of June, the middle of the winter 
season, observed a difference of 30°, upon which occasion 
the sea was covered with a cloud of steam. The other is, 
that parrots and humming-birds, generally the inhabitants 
of warm regions, are very numerous in the southern and 
western parts of the Strait ; the former feeding upon the 
seeds of the Winter's Bark, while the latter have been seen 
by us, chirping and sipping the sweets of the Fuchsia and 
other flowers, after two or three days of constant rain, 
snow, and sleet, during which the thermometer has been 
at freezing point. We saw them also in the month of 
May upon the wing, during a snow shower; and they are 
found in all parts of the south-west and west coasts as far 
as Valparaiso. I have since been informed that this species 
is also an inhabitant of Peru ; so that it has a range of 
more than 41° of latitude, the southern limit being bS\° 
south." 

It is possible that, like the humming-birds, the same 
species of Fuchsia may inhabit the valleys of the Chilian 
Andes, as well as the almost antarctic regions of Port 
Famine; and in such widely different latitudes it may put 
on different appearances. As may be expected, F. discolor, 
is the most hardy of its kind, growing in a short space of 
time into a dense bush, and putting forth numerous shoots, 
which are never injured by the winters even of Scotland. 
Our plants were received from Mr. Lowe of Clapton, who 
was the first to raise the species in this country. 



fl 3499 







( 3499 ) 

Oncidtum crispum. Crisped-flowered 
Oncidium. 

********************* 

Class and Order. 
Gynandria Monandria. 

( Nat. Ord. — Orchide,e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium explanatum. Sepala saepius undulata : late- 
ralibus nunc sub labello connatis. Petala conformia. La- 
bellum maximum, ecalcaratum, cum columna continuum., 
varie lobatum, basi tuberculatum vel cristatum. Columna 
libera, semi teres, apice utrinque alata. Anthera semibilo- 
cularis, rostello nunc abbreviate, nunc elongato rostrato. 
Pollinia 2, postice sulcata, caudicula plana, glandula ob- 
longa. — Herbae epiphyta, nunc pseudo-bulbosce. Folia cori- 
acea. Scapi paniculati vaginati, rarius simplices. Flores 
speciosi, lutei, scepius maculati, raro albi. Lindl. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Oncidium crispum ; pseudobulbis oblongis sulcatis rugosis 
diphyllis, foliis lanceolatis coriaceis acutis, scapo sirn- 
plici multifloro, sepalis recurvis undulatis obtusis, 
lateralibus semiconnatis, petalis duplo majoribus ob- 
longis undulatis unguiculatis, labelli lobis lateralibus 
cornuformibus recurvis nanis intermedio maximo un- 
guiculato subrotundo-cordato undulato, crista duplici 
serie deltoidea dentata, columnar alis rotundatis denti- 
culatis carnosis. Lindl. 

Oncidium crispum. Lodd. Bot. Cab. t. 1854. Lindl. Gen. 
et Sp. Orchid, p. 197. 



A large- flowered and very handsome species of Oncidium, 
a native of the Organ Mountains 111 the neighbourhood of 
Rio, Brazil, and first made known by Mr. Loddiges in his 

Botanical 



Botanical Cabinet. We are indebted for a drawing and 
specimen, to our often -mentioned contributor, Mrs. Hors- 
fall, of Everton, Liverpool, in whose rich collection it 
flowered in the autumn of 1835. 

Descr. Bulbs oblong-oval, rather compressed, deeply 
furrowed, bearing two oblong-lanceolate, dark green, cori- 
aceous, obscurely nerved leaves. Scape from the base of 
the bulb, a foot or a foot and a half high, with a simple 
raceme of large Ttaers at the extremity. Perianth spread- 
ing. Sepals more or less reflexed, oblong, acute, atten- 
uated below, the two lateral ones connate for some way up 
from the base, all of them waved, of a greenish-brown 
colour, spotted. Petals broadly obovate, obtuse, much 
waved and crisped, of a rich brown colour, the claw 
yellow, spotted with red above, beneath green. Lip much 
contracted at the base, where it has a thick double crest, 
yellow spotted with red, and bearing two small, yellow, 
horn-shaped lobes, the central lobe very large, roundish- 
cordate, much crisped, coloured like the petals. Column 
yellow, marked and spotted with deep red, expanding 
upwards into two deep serrated wings. Anther-case ovate, 
acuminated, but truncated at the apex. Pollen-masses 
oval, yellow, on a long and broad white caudicula, which 
has an ovate brown gland at its base. 



Fig. 1. Column. 2. Anther-case. 3. Pollen : magnified. 



( 3500 ) 

Dryandra pteridifolia. Fern-leaved 
Dryandra. 

******«**•&***•*•***** 

Class and Order. 
Tetrandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Proteace^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium quad riparti turn vel qiiadrifidum. Stamina 
apicibus concavis laciniarum immersa. Squamulce hypo- 
o-onse 4. Ovarium uniloculare biovulatum. Ovula post 
fecundationem cohaerentia. Folliculus ligneus. Dissepi- 
mentum ligneum semibifidum fructus maturi omnind simile. 
Receptaculum commune planum, floribus indeterminatim 
confertis ; paleis angustis, raro nullis. Involucrum com- 
mune imbricatum. — Frutices plerumque humiles. Rami dum 
adsint sparsi vel umbellati. Folia sparsa, pinnatifida v. 
incisa, plants juvenilis conformia. Involucra solitaria, ter- 
minating raro later alia, sessilia, foliis confertis, inter ioribus 
quandoque nanis obvallata, hemisphcerica, bracteis adpressis, 
in quibusdam apice appendiculatis. Stylus scepe perianthio 
vix longior. Br. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

( §. Aphragma. ) 

Dryandra pteridifolia ; foliis pinnatifidis caule abbreviato 
erectiusculo, vel propense decumbente tomentoso lon- 
gioribus : lobis elongato-liueanbus acutis, s. oblongo- 
linearibus obtusis mucrouatis, margine revolutis, peri- 
anthii laminis colorato-lanatis apice penicillatus, invo- 
lucri squamis exterioribus lato-ovatis spadiceo-tomen- 

tosis. . 

(«.) lobis foliorum obsolete nervosis basi dilatatis, caule 
erectiusculo. (Tab. nostr. 3500.) 

Dryandra 

vol. x. " 



Dryandra pteridifolia. Brown in Linn, trans, v. 10. p. 

215. Ejusd. Prodr. v. 1. p. 399. Rom. et Schult. 

Syst. Veget. v. 3. p. 447. 
((3.) lobis foliorum manifeste trinervibus, basi simplici, 

caule perquam humill, ramis floriferis praesertim pros- 

tratis. 
Dryandra blechnifolia. Br. in Linn, trans, et Prodr. 

necnon. Rom. et Schult. Sr/st. Veget. in locis citatis. 



When Mr. Brown published the first volume of his invaluable Pro- 
dromus, the plant here figured, which was discovered by that very 
eminent Botanist on rocky hills, at King George's Sound, was regarded 
by him, as possibly a distinct species from another named D. blechni- 
folia, of which specimens without fructification, and originally gathered 
also on the shores of the Sound, by our highly respected and venerable 
friend Mr. Menzies, in his voyage with Vancouver, were preserved 
in the Banksian Herbarium. A subsequent examination however, of 
more perfect specimens, has proved them to be but varieties of one spe- 
cies differing from each other chiefly in habit, and in some measure in 
the iigure ot the lobes of the leaves, although in some native specimens 
examined, there is manifestly a disposition to produce the two shapes of 
leaves upon the same plant. 

The present remarkable and variable subject was raised from seeds, 
collected by the late very indefatigable botanic- voyager, Mr.W. Baxter, 
during his first visit to the South-western shores of Australia, in 1823- 
and the specimens transmitted us from Kew, by the liberality of Mr' 
ArroN last spring, were taken from a plant, which we understand, is 
not only the first that has produced flowers in Britain, but is the only 
example oi the species at this time alive in Europe. It may here be 
added, that for its presence at all in our collections, as indeed for the 
introduction to England, of many others of the rarer and more beauteous 
ot Australian vegetables, cultivators of ornamental exotic plants are en- 
tirely indebted to the disinterested liberality of F. Henchman, Esq. 

jjescr. Our plant in cultivation exhibits the contour of a dwarf, 
bushy shrub, with short, flexuose branches, clothed with a whitish wool. 
Leaves exceedingly rigid, crowded, and pinnatifid ; lobes alternate, for the 
most part linear, an inch and a half to two inches long, terminated by a 
sharp, rigid mucro the margins revolute, base dilated, covered on the 
under side with a ferruginous tomentum and nerved, the nerves even- 
tually obsolete ; upper pagince of a very dark green and glossy. Floiccrs 
in terminal heads, surrounded by coloured leaves, of a faint honey-scent. 
Involucre closely imbricated, clothed with a very dense reddish-brown 
tomentum having the outer bractes elliptical, acuminate, very smooth 
within, and the inner scales linear, covered with orange-coloured appr 
td, rigid hairs, pencilled at the apex. Perianth deeply divided into 
our equal segments, invested with a pink-coloured, curled wool, barer 
towards the base: lamina linear, much longer than the unguis, tipped 
with a pencil-like tuft of soft, spreading hairs. Stamens four, inserted 
in the long, concave extremities of the Laminae. Anthers linear, apicu- 

lated. 



lated, bursting longitudinally. Style terete, obscurely sulcated, exserted 
longer than the perianth, very smooth, slightly subulate, thickened 
towards the base. Stigma simple. Hypogynous glands four, oblong, 
bilobed. 



The eager avidity with which spirited, liberal-minded gentlemen in this 
country, have, at various periods in the course of the last forty years, sought 
to possess and maintain in their collections living examples of the many 
Genera of Proteaceje, affords an abundant proof of the great interest 
they have excited, and of the high estimation in which plants of a family, 
possessing forms no less extraordinary than numerous, whether indigenous 
to the Cape of Good Hope, or to the arid shores of Australia, have been held. 

At one period, within, doubtless the recollection of some of our readers, 
not only the King's gardens atKew, and the rich Conservatories of George 
Hibbert, Esq. at Clapham, but the gardens of other gentlemen, and espe- 
cially the sale-collections of the more eminent nurserymen around London, 
could boast of many choice specimens of Cape Proteaceous plants, which, 
in the present day, are nowhere to be seen ; for having been urged by culture 
to put forth their showy flowers, they immediately afterwards, in many in- 
stances, exhibited, from some mistreatment, debility and sickness, and 
eventually dying, have ever since been lost to Britain. Since an ignorance 
at the time, of the proper mode of managing the plants of this family, whether 
natives of the Cape or of New Holland, doubtless led to the mortality that 
prevailed at periods not many years subsequent to their having been raised 
from the imported seeds, perhaps it may not be out of place in this work, to 
give our readers the substance of a few practical observations offered us, on 
the successful treatment of certain of the Order, as pursued at Kew by the 
principal very able cultivator in that garden, Mr. John Smith, to whose 
horticultural knowledge is superadded a critical botanical discrimination of 
plants generally, and especially of that numerous and beautiful tribe, the 
Filices, and to whose talents in these particulars, we are happy, in common 
with other Botanists in Britain and on the continent, especially attached to 
the study of Cryptogamic vegetation, to bear ample testimony. 

Adverting to the interesting pamphlet of Mr. Macnab, the excellent 
Superintendent of the Royal Botanic Garden at Edinburgh, on the propaga- 
tion and culture of Cape Heaths, which appeared in 1831, Mr. Smith 
observes, that he had pursued with success for some time antecedent to that 
date, the same mode of treatment of Proteace^e under his care, that is re- 
commended in that publication, with respect to the culture of Heaths, viz. 
in regard to shifting the plants into fresh and larger pots ; in the process of 
which, it is very important to afford, by means of potsherds, or fragments of 
half-baked pottery, a good drainage below, and especially to avoid deep pot- 
ting, by placing the plant, with its ball of earth round the roots quite entire, 
so as to be some two or three inches above the surface of the soil at the edge 
of the pot, which will have the effect of carrying off any superabundant 
moisture from the roots to the circumference, and thus prevent the chance of 
water becoming stagnant round the base of the stem ; by inattention to this 
latter circumstance, many a Banksia and Dryandra in other collections 
have been killed ; whilst a steady regard to free drainage, to an abundant 
circulation of air, and a low temperature, he has succeeded in preserving 
many fine proteaceous plants longer than is generally effected in other gar- 
dens in the neighbourhood of London. 

" Even in the present day," he observes, " there may be some few 
gardeners, who may object to the mode of potting certain plants here insisted 
on, on the ground that, by being thus raised in their pots above the soil at 
the edge, they have not a handsome look ; and this practice, now adopted and 

recommended 



recommended by Mr. Macnab with regard to Cape Heaths, &c, had its 
prejudice on his mind for years, for no other reason, as he himself tells us, 
" than that I fancied the plant looked as if it were ill potted, and, to my 
view, unsightly." " But we now see, how much other and more judicious 
management, founded on physiological principles, has overcome the preju- 
dices of former days, and the difficulties attendant on the culture of not 
simply these, but the plants of other tribes : — witness our orchideous Epi- 
phytes. 

" The soil," continues this intelligent cultivator, " which I use in the cul- 
ture of most of the Proteace.*;, is a good fresh loam, with which, if stiff, 
I mix a portion of sand, so as not to admit of its being retentive of water. 
In time, after being potted as already directed, the main roots next the stem 
of the plant will become uncovered : this circumstance I regard as favour- 
able to the health of the plant : there will be no danger of its dying suddenly, 
as I have known many to do, that have been buried alive, — in other words, 
been deeply potted I" 

" In the winter months, care should be taken not to saturate the earth with 
water, nor wet the leaves or stem more, than can be avoided. In dry weather 
however, during the summer season, water may be freely given to the plants 
about sunset, and a very essential point to be observed is, that, when they 
are placed out in the open air in groups, the sun's rays should not be 
allowed to fall directly on the sides of the pots, for if they are, all the feeding 
spongioles of the tender roots round the inner side of the pot, will assuredly 
be destroyed, and the life of the plant greatly endangered. Repeatedly have 
I known a Banksia to have been killed by the solar ray having been thus 
allowed to act on the side of the pot, which six months' afterwards retained 
so much of a life-like look — being kept yet in its pot — as to appear to the 
eye of a superficial observer, to be still alive, and in perfect vigour. The 
lowest greenhouse-temperature that can judiciously be allowed, to prevent 
the effects of frost, is sufficient for the generality of the family now in culti- 
vation in Britain, and no artificial heat is required for their preservation, 
excepting in severe frosty weather." He adds, with reference to pruning, 
that " as the rapid upright-growing species are, if left to themselves, shorter- 
lived, than others naturally more robust, the free use of the knife is recom- 
mended, and the growth of the plants checked, by keeping the luxuriant 
shoots cut back. This remark is especially applicable to those beautiful 
plants of the Order, with simple, straight, wand-like stems, such for example 
as Banksia Brownii and Dryandra Serra, Br., the former of which 
has been lost to several collections that could once have boasted of it, by its 
having been suffered to shoot up into exuberant growth, far beyond what 
the slender, tapering, thinly-fibred root could at all furnish sustenance. 
By heading these down somewhat, and thus reducing the ascending axis, 
or column of circulation, a more robust habit is induced, a growth of roots 
in their pots takes place, lateral branches are thrown out, and the plants thus 
treated at Kew, are now in the best possible health, with every indicative of 
being fully established in that garden". 

To the above observations of an intelligent and practical man, may be added 
a few very brief remarks on the habits, economy, and indispensable treat- 
ment, in cultivation, of a division of Australian Proteace.e, growing natu- 
rally on the sea coasts, or upon barren tracts within the influence of the sea 
air, in the tropical regions of that continent. The Genera hitherto observed 
on the equinoctial shores of New Holland are Grevillea, Hakea, Per- 
soonia, Stenocarpus, and Banksia, and these comprise a group collec- 
tively of thirty-three species, of peculiar constitution entirely governed in 
their growth, and general development, by the circumstances and modifica- 
tions of the climate in which they exist. 

It is a well-known fact, that what constitutes the change of season m 

intertropical 



intertropical regions, is not any approach to the winter of countries within 
the temperate zones, mucli less of those of the higher latitudes, in respect to 
any material difference of atmospheric temperature at opposite periods of the 
year, but (we are speaking of the climate of the sea coast) is due to that 
periodical, well-defined break-up, from great drought to extreme humidity, 
commonly called the dry and rainy seasons. With such perfect regula- 
rity do these changes of season take place on the N. W. coast, that our friend 
Capt. P. King, K. N., who was employed, during nearly five years on its 
survey, could look forward almost to the very day when the break-up of the 
easterly monsoon, and with it the period of drought, would oblige him 
peremptorily to stand off shore, and immediately to quit the coast. It was 
during the existence of that monsoon, which prevails between May and 
October, when the wind blows steadily off shore, that portions of that survey 
were annually conducted, and the Botanist of the voyage, although he landed 
almost daily from the vessel to pursue his researches, 'twas oftentimes but to 
behold vegetable life in a state of extreme langour, by the aridity of the 
atmosphere, and its uniformly high fervid temperature. 

The Gramine.e, and, indeed, herbaceous plants generally, had suffered 
in the early part of the season : these were all burnt up, and the more woody 
vegetables, the shrubs, arbusculae, and stunted timber trees bore the marked 
evidences of participation in the general distress. None were detected in a 
flowering state, whilst all were laden with their ripened fruits. The Acacias, 
of which every sandy beach and rocky islet furnished some species, bore 
their clustered pods on branches, in many species incrusted with a 
brittle concrete matter, that had exuded through the cuticle, which ap- 
peared by thus covering the bark, the phyllodia, and buds, to suspend for 
a time, the operation of their respective functions, and thus lull vegetable 
life into a state of quiescence. All nature wore an air of desolation, and the 
vegetable world assumed an aspect unusually gray and gloomy. But it was 
its season of rest — that period of repose which appears essential to vegetation 
generally in tropical countries, to enable it upon the return of the rains, to 
burst forth with a renovated strength into fresh life, and undergo with vigour 
that sudden and prodigious development of leaves and flowers, which con- 
stitutes the beauty and grandeur of the vegetables of warm countries. 

During the surveys of Capt. King just noticed, the seeds of no less than 
twelve species of Proteaceous plants, (and chiefly of Mr. Brown's last 
section of the Genus Grevillea,) were received at Kew. Plants of each 
were readily raised, which afterwards, with the treatment they received, grew 
to the stature of large shrubs, and some eventually flowered, to the admira- 
tion of all visitors. But these goodly plants were not destined to long life in 
the King's gardens, for, inattentive to the conditions under which alone, those 
lovelier forms of Australian vegetation exist on their native coasts, they were 
urged immediately after flowering, into anew and unnatural vigorous growth. 
In vain they looked for some short season of rest, by perhaps a dryer 
warmth, with but the slightest possible watering afforded, to sustain life — a 
treatment, to which their constitutions, inherited from their parents, ap- 
peared so fully adapted. They found none ; but debility resulting from 
forced culture, was followed by extreme exhaustion, and death closed the 
scene ! But we have yet to discover, in our future endeavours to cultivate 
the shrubby vegetables of the sands of the intertropical shores of that vast 
country, by what mode of treatment, plants delighting in a high atmospheric 
temperature, and subject to the extremes of drought and humidity at oppo- 
site periods of the year, can possibly be cultivated in Britain. It is to be 
hoped that our government may, ere long, be induced to re-establish settle- 
ments on the northern coasts of New Holland, whence the seeds of those 
beautiful plants, to which we have particularly referred, may be again 
obtained, and other methods of culture tried, in which their native habits 

should 



should be more consulted, than they were, some few years since, when one 
or two collections only, about London, could, for a short period, boast of pos- 
sessing living specimens. We will just observe, that these are considerations 
of vegetable life well worthy of the attention of the intelligent botanic gar- 
dener : it should ever be his business to imitate nature in the care and treat- 
ment of her vegetable subjects, by affording them, as far as practicable, the 
soil, the temperature, and situation in which they flourish in their native re- 
gions, when these can be ascertained ; and it should be no less the duty of 
the botanic-traveller to communicate these and other circumstances, in re- 
spect to the seasons of growth and cessation from it of plants of equinoctial 
countries, in which he may have extended his labours, as all such will greatly 
aid the skill of the intelligent cultivator. 




uinwecd . En 



( 3501 ) 

Tradescantia Virginica, fl. albo. Vir- 
ginian Spider- Wort, White-flowered var. 

*********************** 

Class and Order. 
Hexandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord.— Commeline^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx et Corolla profunde tripartitae. Filamenta plerum- 
que villosa. Capsula 3-locularis. Spr. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Tradescantia Virginica; caule erecto subsimplici, foliis 
oblongo-lanceolatis canaliculatis glabris, umbellis ter- 
minations, floribus congestis. 

Tradescantia Virginica. Linn. Sp. PL p. 411. Curt. Bot. 
Mag. t. 105. Willd. Sp. PL v. 2. p. 16. Spreng. 
Syst. Veget. v. 2. p. 116. Schultes, Syst. Veget. v. 7. 
p. 1173. Mich. Am. v. I. p. 195. 

(3\) flore albo. Schultes, L c. p. 1174. — (Tab. nostr. t. 
3501.) 



The purple-flowered and more usual state of the Virginian 
Spiderwort is not uncommon in our gardens. Mr. Curtis 
in his description of it, under our tab. 105, has alluded to 
the white-flowered sort, which we have now the pleasure of 
presenting : it is one of the numerous varieties which are 
raised from seed, and may be continued by parting the 
roots. Although the species was originally introduced from 
Virginia, as its name implies, to our gardens, " it bears the 
severity of a British climate uninjured," observes Mr. Cur- 
tis, " and being a beautiful as well as hardy perennial, is 
found in almost every garden." The white-flowered variety, 
which is generally tinged with purple near the base of the 
petals, is equally deserving a place in our collections, and 
is quite as hardy as the purple. 



( 3502 ) 

Acacia prominens. Conspicuous Acacia, 
or Nepean Wattle. 

******************** 

Class and Order. 

POLYGAMIA MONCECIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Leguminos^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Flores polygami. Cat. 4 — 5-dentatus. Pet. 4 — 5, nunc 
libera, nunc in corollam 4— 5-hdam coalita. Stam. numero 
varia 10 — 200. Legumen continuum exsuccum bivalve. — 
Frutices aut arbores, habitu etfoliatione valde varia. Spina? 
stipulares spar so? aut nulla. D C. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Acacia prominens ; glabra, phyllodiis (sesquiuncialibus) 
lineari-lanceolatis acutis paten tibus retrorso-falcatis 
rectisve uninervibus tenuissime ciliatis, mucrone sub- 
uncinato terminatis, margine antico versus basin uni- 
glanduloso, glandula leviter elevata, racemis termina- 
libus axillaribusve 6 — 10-cephalis phyllodiopaulolon- 
gioribus, capitulis (in racerno) solitariis geminisve 
pedicello brevioribus, floribus quinquepartitis, petalis 
ovato-oblongis subacuminatis, stylo staminibus parum 
longiore. Allan Cunn. 

Acacia prominens. Allan Cunn. MSS. (1817.) G. Don's 
Syst. of Gard. v. 2. p. 406. n. 67. 



A charming conservatory shrub, native of New South 
Wales, where it inhabits barren forest-grounds, in the 
immediate vicinity of the Nepean river ; and although it 
may, in its native regions, be truly said to be, like Gold- 
smith's village thorn, " unprofitably gay," — no one caring 
to receive it into his garden, it nevertheless seldom fails, 
even there, in the month of September, when decked with 

blossoms, 



blossoms, to commend itself to the notice and admiration of 
the passing, way-worn colonist, not less by the extreme rich- 
ness and profusion of its golden flowers, than by the delicious 
fragrance they diffuse around. It has been several years at 
Kew, where it flowers annually in the months of spring ; 
and our acknowledgments are due to Mr. Aiton for the 
opportunity now afforded us of publishing a figure of it. 

Descr. A tall, slender shrub, often ten feet high, of 
erect growth, numerously branched, the branches being 
smooth, greenish, and slightly angular. Phyllodia copious 
alternate for the most part, an inch and a half in length and 
two and a half to three lines in breadth, spreading, linear- 
lanceolate, acute, mucronated, mucro rather hooked, to- 
wards the apex often retrosely falcate, with several slightly- 
marked veins diverging from the midrib, on the upper edge 
near the base is a rather prominent gland. Flowers golden- 
yellow, very fragrant, formed in axillary and terminal ra- 
cemes, each raceme having from six to ten heads, generally 
longer than the phyllodia. Heads many-flowered, distinct, 
solitary or in pairs. Pedicels patent, very smooth, longer 
than the heads, having at the bases short, brown bractes. 
Calyx very short, five-parted. Petals five, ovate-oblong, 
subacute, erect or slightly spreading. Stamens numerous, 
shorter than the style. Stigma simple. 



The following closely allied, but very distinct species, may be character- 
ized as follows : 

A.fimbriata; villosa, phyllodiis (sesquiuncialibus) linearibus obtusis 
(cum mucronulo) erectis introrso-falcatis rectisve uninervibus, an- 
gulisqueramorum dense ciliato-fimbriatis, mucronulo recto, ma rgine 
antico versus basin uniglanduloso, glandula subimmersa, racemis 
axillaribus terminalibusve polycephalis phyllodio saepe duplo longi- 
onbus, capitulis (in racemo) plerumque solitariis pedicellos aquan- 
tibus, floribus quinquepartitis, petalis ovatis acutis, staminibus 
stylum subsequantibus. 
A. fimbriata. Allan Cunn. MSS. G. Don's Svst. of Gard v. 2. p. 
406. n. 68. * J 

Hab. In Nova Cambria Australi : secus flumen Brisbane, Moreton 
Bay, versus tropicum : praecipue ad margines petrosos aquaductuum in 
sylvis apertis aridis. Florens mense Septembri, 1828. Allan. Cunn. 

Arete affinis A. prominenti, sed frutex humilior (vix orgyalis,) ramis 
omnino villosis angulatis, angulis pnyllodiisque fimbriatis. Phyllodia 
angustiora recta vel interdum introrso-falcata, racemi etiam, fiexuosi 
graciliores: Capitula riorum numerosiora et confortiora pedicellos vix 
excedentes. 



3303 










( 3503 ) 

Passiflora kermesina. Crimson Passion- 
flower. 

******************** 

Class and Order. 

MONADELPHIA PenTANDRIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Passiflore*:. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 10-partitus, laciniis interioribus corollinis. Corona 
radiata perigyna. Nectarium in fundo calycis. Tubus 
staminifer stylum cingens. Stigmata 3 clavata. Pepo l-lo- 
cularis, placentatio parietalis. 

Specific Character and Synonym. 

Passiflora kermesina ; scandens glaberrima cirrhata, foliis 
cordato-trilobis obtusis integerrimis subtus discolori- 
bus, petiolo bi-triglanduloso, stipulis semicordatis 
magnis, pedunculo unifloro nudo, calycis segmentis 
uniformibus lineari-oblongis demum reflexis, corona 
erectiuscula, colurnna elongata. 

Passiflora kermesina. Hort. Berol. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 
1633. 



I regret to know nothing of the history of this ex- 
tremely beautiful Passion-flower, further than that it was 
received at the Glasgow Botanic Garden from that of 
Berlin, by favour of Mr. Otto, and under the name here 
adopted. It is, probably, a native of Brazil. It requires 
the heat of the stove, and bears numerous flowers during 
the summer and autumnal months, which open towards 
evening and close in the morning of the following day, not 
again to expand. 

Descr. Stems slender, branched, climbing to a consi- 
derable height. Leaves petiolate, cordate, three -lobed, 
glabrous (as is every part of the plant) : lobes nearly equal, 

oval, 



oval, obtuse, here and there gland uloso -dentate, green 
above, purplish beneath. Petioles slender, bearing two or 
three elongated, dark -purple glands : from the axil a sim- 
ple tendril arises, and from each side, at the base, a large 
semicordate, obtuse stipule, of the same colour and texture 
as the leaves. Calyx on both sides crimson-red, the seg- 
ments ten, uniform, narrow-oblong, at first horizontal, 
afterwards reflex ed, whitish at their base ; they are com- 
bined below into a short tube, swollen at the base : at the 
mouth of this tube is a filamentous crown of several series 
of nearly erect, dark-purple filaments, the outer ones paler 
at the extremity, within this is another and smaller circle 
of white filaments, united for the greater part of their 
length into a conical tube. Column much elongated. 
Stigmas club-shaped. 



( 3504 ) 

RODRIGUEZIA PLAN1FOLIA. EVEN-LEAVED 
RODRIGUEZIA. 

*4n vJC" vjC" "•k "VK "/jC" "/JS" "/fr "/t> */K ^ "#>" •4s" "viS" '#•" "/f»* "/T>" *^" vfc 

Class and Order. 
Gynandria Monandria. 

( Nat. Ord. — OrchidejE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium patens, subaequale, sepalis 2 lateral ibus 
connatis labello suppositis. Labellum integrum, unguicu- 
latum, basi cornutum, medio callosum ; ungue cum co- 
lumna parallelo. Columna teres apice barbata. Anthera 
unilocularis, carnosa. Clinandrium nudum, retrorsum de- 
clive. Pollinia 2, postice excavata; caudicula elastica. — 
Herbae epiphytce, subpseudobulbosce. Folia coriacea yel 
membranacea, plicata. Spicae secundce. Flores speciosi. 
Lindl. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Rodriguezia planifolia; bulbis valde compressis ovato- 
oblongis, foliis lanceolatis enerviis laevibus, perianthio 
undulato, sepalo inferior! (e duobus formato) apice 
solummodo bifido, labello apice integro. 

Rodriguezia planifolia. Lindl. in Hort. Trans, v. 7. p. 67. 
ejusd. Gen. et Sp. Orchid, p. 195. 

Gomeza recurva. Lodd. Bot. Cab. (not Bot. Mag.) t. 660. 



This deliciously fragrant plant, named Gomeza (Rodri- 
guezia, Lindl.) recurva by Mr. Loddiges, but distinguished 
from that species by Professor Lindley on account of the 
even (not striated) surface of its leaves, and the entire, 
not emarginate, lip, has been kindly communicated to us 
by Mr. John Campbell, of the Botanic Garden, Belfast, 
where it was imported from Brazil. It flowers in February. 

Descr. Bulbs clustered, scarcely more than two inches 
high, pale coloured, much compressed and sharp-edged, 

bearing 



bearing a pair of leaves at the extremity, which are lan- 
ceolate, even on the surface, and more or less recurved. 
Scape arising from the base of the bulb on one side, and 
from within a leafy sheath, short, bearing rather a long, 
drooping raceme of many fragrant greenish -yellow flowers, 
more remarkable for their scent than their beauty. Sepals 
oblong, waved, acute, the two lateral or lower ones com- 
bined together for nearly their whole length, the extremities 
straight, not in the least spreading. Lip broadly oblong, 
yellow, crested at the base with two crenate white mem- 
branes, and bearing two oblong tubercles near the middle, 
where the lip is very suddenly and much reflexed, the apex 
rather acute, entire. Column nearly white, semicylindrical, 
with a deep orange margin round the stigma. Anthers 
hemispherical. Germen clavate, subtended by a white, 
membranous, sheathing bractea 3 nearly as long as itself. 



Fig. 1. Flower: magnified. 



3<505 



V 




( 3505 ) 

Coreopsis filifolia. Thread-leaved 
Coreopsis. 

Class and Order. 
Syngenesia Frustranea. 

( Nat. Ord. — Composites. ) 

Generic Character. 

Receptaculum paleaceum. Achenia compressa, emargi- 
nata. Pappus bicornis vel obsoletus. Involucrum duplex ; 
utrumque polyphyllum. 

Specific Character. 

Coreopsis filifolia; glaberrima, caule erecto striato, foliis 
oppositis pinnatifidis bipinnatifidisque foliolis lineari- 
filiformibus subcamosis supra canaliculars, radii co- 
rollis 8 — 9 obovatis luteis, disco purpureo-sanguineo 



Of all the narrow and divided-leaved species of Coreopsis, 
this has unquestionably the narrowest foliage,, and which, if 
examined carefully, exhibits the most fleshy texture, the 
under side semiterete, and presenting no appearance of a 
nerve or costa, which indeed is only indicated on the upper 
side by the presence of a furrow. Its nearest ally is perhaps 
the C. tenuifolia ; but there, besides the difference in foliage, 
the disk is described as being of the same colour as the ray, 
and the florets of the ray are much narrower. Its seeds 
were sent by Mr. Drummond to this country from Texas, 
in the spring of 1835, and the plants flowered in the open 
air in August and September. The same species is distri- 
buted to the friends of Mr. Drummond's Expedition, marked 
" Texas, II. n. 101." 

Descr. Annual. Ste?n erect, but slender, branched, 
especially upwards, striated and glabrous, as is every part 
of the plant. Leaves opposite, pinnatifid or bipinnatifid, 

the 



the segments very narrow -1 in ear, almost filiform, entire, 
somewhat fleshy, convex or nearly semicylindrical on the 
under side, above marked with a furrow. Peduncles termi- 
nal, slender, single-flowered. Flower rather large, hand- 
some. Involucre almost globose : inner of six to eight 
somewhat imbricated, ovate scales ; outer of the same 
number of linear-subulate, spreading ones, arising from the 
base of the inner, and there forming one with them. Ray 
of eight to nine, obovate, irregularly three to five-toothed, 
spreading, orange-yellow corollas: their tube short: Ger- 
men linear, abortive, destitute of pappus. Corolla of the 
disk tubular, dark blood-coloured, glabrous. Anther-tube 
black, exserted. Pollen yellow. 



( 3506 ) 

Gaura parviflora. Small-flowered 
Gaura. 

Class and Order. 

OCTANDRIA MONOGYNIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Onagrari^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx tubulosus 4-partitus. Petala 4. Nux angulata 
1-sperma. Spreng. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Gaura parviflora; pubescenti-mollis, foliis lato-lanceolatis 
acuminatis remote-denticulatis, spica multiflora, peta- 
lis(parvis) obovatis erectis, stamina stylumque aequan- 
tibus, fructibus oblongo-fusiformibus. 

Gaura parviflora. Douglas, MSS. Hook. Fl. Bor Am. 
v. I. p. 208. 



This very distinct species of Gaura does not appear to 
be noticed by any writer on North American plants, not- 
withstanding that it has been found in two widely different 
parts of that vast continent. The specimens here figured 
were raised from seeds sent by Mr. Drummond from Texas ; 
and, on a careful examination, the plant proves to be iden- 
tical, as to species, with the G. parviflora (PI. Bor. Am.), 
which Mr. Douglas found on the banks of the Wallawalla 
River, on the North-west Coast of America. As an orna- 
mental plant it has, indeed, little to recommend it ; but 
when the flower is carefully examined, it will be found to 
be possessed of no little beauty. The habit and inflo- 
rescence are very similar to those of G. biennis, but 
the flowers, independent of the great difference in size, 
are widely different. In the latter, the calyx bursts on 
one side, the segments continuing combined at their ex- 
tremities, 



tremities, the petals are all directed to one side upwards, 
the stamens and style downwards, and both these latter, 
especially the style, are longer than the petals; the four 
lobes of the stigma are erect and close placed. In our 
plant, the four segments of the calyx are separate and 
reflexed, the petals are erect, the stamens and style equal 
to them in length, the four lobes of the stigma spreading. 
O. parvifiora is quite hardy, flowering in August and 
September. 

Descr. Biennial. Stems two to four feet high, erect, 
simple or branched, clothed with soft patent hairs. Leaves 
broadly lanceolate, the lower ones ovato-lanceolate, all of 
them sessile, acuminate, denticulate, more or less downy 
with soft hairs, especially at the margin and on the midrib, 
gradually becoming smaller and narrower upwards, till 
they pass into the small subulate and ciliated bracteas of 
the flowers. Spike elongated, many-flowered. Germen 
tusitorm, downy, sessile. Calyx-tube shorter than the mer- 
men, equal in length to the four linear, free, reflexed 
segments. Petals four, small, erect, deep rose-coloured, 
obovate, slightly clawed, of the same length with the erect 
stamens and style. Filaments rose-coloured, inserted below 
the middle of the back of the oblong dark purple anthers : 
Pollen yellow. Style red : stigma four-lobed, the lobes 
ovate spreading, white. Fruit fusiform, obscurely four- 
angled, constituting an indehiscent nucumentaceous cap- 
TJfrf lZ C tf: ^ ?" containin g one pendent, obovate 

lont sted stl ^ ^ "^ ° f the CeU b * a rather 
long seed-stalk : dissepiments thin, membranaceous. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Immature Fruit: magnified. 



( 3507 ) 

Cyrtopodium punctatum. Spotted- 
flowered Cyrtopodium. 

********************* 

Class and Order. 
Gynandria Monandria. 

( Nat. Ord. — OrchidejE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium explanatum, aequale, sepalis petalisque 
liberis. Labeltum unguiculatum, cum basi produeta co- 
lumnae continuum., tripartitum, explanatum, ecalcaratum. 
Columna semiteres. Anthera bilocularis. Pollinia 2, pos- 
tice biloba; caudicula lineari brevi, glandulaovata.— PJantas 
terrestres, fruticosce.. caulibus fusiformibus, carnosis ; foliis 
plicatis; scapis radicalibus, vaginalis; jloribus speciosis. 
Lindl. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Cyrtopodium punctatum ; bulbis elongatis, foliis lineari- 
lanceolatis tcnuiter aeuminatis, scapo paniculato, brac- 
teis magnis membranaceis, sepalis petalisque undulatis 
acutis maculatis, labello stipitato profunde trilobo, 
lobis lateralibus obovato-cuneatis incurvis intcrmedio 
late obcordato margine granuloso,, disco basi calloso. 

Cyrtopodium punctatum. Lindl. Gen. et. Sp. Orchid, p. 
188. 

Epidendrum punctatum. Linn. Sp. PL p. 1348. Wittd. 
Sp. PL v. 4. p. 116. Spreng. Syst. Veg. v. 3. p. 736. 

Helleborus ramosissimus cauliculis et floribus maculosis. 
Plum. Sp.p.9.t. 187. 



This superb plant, of which only a small portion is re- 
presented on our plate, flowered in the Glasgow Botanic 
Garden, in the spring of 1835. It was sent many years ago 
from Brazil by Wm. Swainson, Esq., and has never till the 

period 

vol. x. i 



period above mentioned shown any disposition to blossom. 
Dr. Lindley obliged us by naming it, or we should pro- 
bably have had a difficulty in determining it j the figure 
refered to in Plumier being in some respects, particularly 
in the bulb and foliage, considerably at variance with our 
specimen. It was originally discovered by Plumier, in 
Hispaniola, and Professor Lindley has specimens from the 
same country, collected by Charles Mackenzie, Esq. 

Descr. Pseudo-bulbs a foot and a half, or two feet long, 
cylindrical, or slightly compressed, tapering at each ex- 
tremity, clothed with pale brown, faintly-striated, acumina- 
ted, sheathing scales, and crowned with a tuft of six to eight 
long, linear-lanceolate, much acuminated leaves. Scape 
arising from the base of the pseudo-bulb, erect, including 
the panicle, nearly three feet high : spotted, as are the 
branches, with purple. Bracteas oblong, lanceolate, ex- 
ceedingly large, spreading, membranous, yellow, the upper 
ones chiefly spotted. Flowers large, handsome. Petals and 
sepals oblong, wavy, yellow, the latter chiefly spotted with 
red-purple. Lip stipitate, jointed upon the decurrent base 
ot the column, deeply three-lobed, yellow, two lateral lobes 
obovato-cuneate, incurved, with a broad red-purple margin ; 
intermediate one broadly obcordate, the margin granulated 
and dotted with purple, the disk at the base crested and dot- 
ted with purple. Column semiterete, singularly produced, 
at the base, between the two lower sepals, yellow-^reen. 
Anther-case almost nectari form, tapering at the back. 

»t!uT? a 7 S \T V^ " 0110 ™ 16 ' havirfg a deep furrow 
at the back, attached to a white, ovate gknd. Germen 
long, slender, slightly clavate, spotted. 



-ftiaa-ar t&zssijxssr 




%* 



•*' \ ■'• < . . 



Mj*m 




( 3508 ) 
Rheum Emodi. Officinal Rhubarb. 

Class and Order. 
Enneandria Trigynia. 

( Nat, Ord. — PolygonEvE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthum simplex, 6-partitum, persistens, laciniis al- 
ternis minoribus. Achenium triquetrum, perianthio majus, 
marginibus membranaceo-marginatis. Stigmata verrucoso- 
papillata. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Rheum * Emodi; foliis rotundato-cordatis scabriusculis, pe- 
tiolis lateraliter compressis pedunculisque sulcatis ver- 
rucoso-scabris, racemis compositer elongatis strictis. 
floribus minutis atro-sanouineis. 

Rheum Emodi. Wall. MSS^Cat. E. 1. C. Mus. n. 1727. 

Rheum Australe. Don, Prodr. Nep. p. 75. Sweet, Br. Ft. 
Gard. t. 269. Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. 4. (cur. post.) 
p. 156. 

The true officinal Rhubarb, long known in commerce, 
as one of the most valuable of drugs, had been considered by 
different writers and travellers, as the root of either Rheum 
undulatum, R. compactum, R. Rhaponticum, or in the opin- 
ion of the majority of authors, of R. palmatum ; but it does 
not appear that any one had ascertained the fact in the coun- 
try whence the Rhubarb had been imported, so that no de- 
pendance can be placed upon these statements. Indeed. 
being a native of the vast range of the Tliibetian and 
Himalaya mountains, it was scarcely possible that the plant 
itself could be known to Europeans, until that vast and 
interesting region was visited by Dr. Wallich and his 
collectors. There, at Emodus, a mountainous district of 
Gossam Than, by Dr. Wallich, and about Kamoun by 

Robert 



* From Rha, the river so called, now the Volga ; because the true Rhu- 
barb was supposed to be derived from thence. 



Robert Blenkworth, the present plant was discovered, 
and seeds of it sent by the former, in 1828, as the true 
officinal Rhubarb of commerce, to Mr. Lambert, in 
whose garden at Boyton House, Wiltshire, plants were 
soon raised and distributed. For it proves perfectly 
hardy, even in Scotland, where in common soil, it attains 
a height of seven and eight feet and recommends itself, 
independently of its commercial interest, by the large hand- 
some foliage and deep blood-coloured flowers, which are 
succeeded by conspicuous pendent seed - vessels of the 
same colour as the blossoms. The root used to be sent 
from China to Ormuz and Aleppo, thence by Alexandria 
to Vienna, and hence it obtained the name of Turkey, or 
Levant Rhubarb; now our vessels obtain it dried from 
Canton and Ormuz (in the Persian Gulf). But the best, 
Mr. Don assures us, " is what comes by way of Russia, as 
greater care is taken in the selection ; and on its arrival at 
Kiachta, within the Russian frontiers, the roots are all care- 
fully examined and the damaged pieces destroyed. This 
is the fine rhubarb of the shops." It is much to be regretted 
however, that we have as yet no authentic particulars re- 
specting the mode of collecting and preparing the roots by 
the natives. 

Descr. Stems six to ten feet high, much branched and 
sulcated, very thick below, gradually attenuated upwards 
into the large panicles, and there rough with minute warts 
or excrescences : the colour is yellow-green, streaked with 
red-brown. Leaves very large, but gradually smaller up- 
wards, roundish-cordate, entire, somewhat wavy, slightly 
rough upon the surface, and at the margin. Petioles thick, 
angled and furrowed, rough, embracing the stem by 
means of the large, bifid, sheathing membranous stipules, 
panicles, or rather compound racemes, terminal, very long, 
the branches erect, virgate, rough. Pedicels solitary or clus- 
tered somewhat verticillate, short, spreading, in fruit, de- 
flexed. Flowers very small, of a deep blood-red colour. 
Perianth of six spreading, ovate, deep segments, three alter- 
nate ones smaller. Stamens nine, shorter than the perianth. 
Filaments subulate, monadelphous at the base. Gcrmcn 
short, triquetrous, often abortive. Styles three, spreading. 
Stigmas large, warty. Fruit pendent, dark blood-coloured, 
shining, an achenium which is cordate, triangular, the angles 
sharply winged, covered at the base with the persistent pe- 
rianth, of which the three smaller segments are applied to 
the three wing ed angles. Seed ovato-triquetrous. 

Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Fruit :— magnified 




'SOS 



( 3509 ) 

SlSYRINCHIUM GRANDIFLORUM. L.ARGE- 
FLOWERED SlSYRINCHIUM. 

Class and Order. 

MONADELPHIA TrIANDRIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — IridejE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Spatha diphylla. Calyx o. Petala 6, subsequalia, plana. 
Filamenta coimata. Stylus!. Capsula trilocularis, infcra. 

Specific Character and Synonym. 

Sisyrinchium grandiflorum ; caule stricto compresso foliis 
erectis vaginantibus longiore, spatha biflora pedun- 
culos subaequante, perianthio late cainpanulato, fila- 
rnentis longissimis subulatis basi contracta solurnmodo 
connatis erectis demum patentibus. 

Sisyrinchium grandiflorum. Dougl. in Bot. Reg. t. 1364. 



A most lovely and graceful plant, remarkable for the 
large size and peculiarly bright purple colour of its flowers. 
The very long filaments, broad at the base, below which 
they are contracted and where alone they are combined, 
seem to be at variance with the characters of other species 
of Sisyrinchium, and may, perhaps, entitle the subject of 
our plate to rank as a distinct Genus. It was discovered 
by the late Mr. Douglas, on low hills of the Columbia, from 
the Great Falls to Oakanagan, in dry soils, flowering in 
May ; and introduced to the gardens of the Horticultural 
Society of London. Our wild specimens precisely accord 
with those here figured, only they are rather smaller and 
the flower is less drooping. It appears yet to be a rare 
plant in collections, and though stated by Professor Lindley 
to be perfectly hardy, the shelter of a greenhouse is afforded 
it at Glasgow, where it flowers in March. 

Descr. 



Descr. Roots truly fibrous, the fibres moderately slender, 
branched. Stem six to eight or ten inches high, simple, 
erect, compressed ; bearing, chiefly below, three or four 
leaves, which are erect, sheathing and shorter than the 
stein. Spatha terminal, of two unequal leaves, pale and 
membranous at the margin, two-flowered, though I find one 
flower only expanded at a time. Peduncle nearly as long 
as the spatha, slender, curved, as if from the weight of the 
flower, which thus droops. Perianth of six oblong slightly 
concave, obtuse, bright purple, moderately spreading sepals, 
faintly striated externally. Stamens three. Filaments erect , 
about as long as the sepals, white, broad and purplish below, 
quite distinct (except at the contracted base) eventually 
spreading. Anthers oblong, yellow. Germen, inferior, 
pyriform, obtusely trigonal. Style filiform, longer than the 
stamens. Stigmas three. 



Fig. 1. Pistil and Stamens. 2. Interior view of a Stamen '.—magnified. 



( 3510 ) 

Helianthus decapetalus. Ten-rayed 
Sun-flower. 

Class and Order. 
Syngenesia Frustranea. 

( Nat. Ord. — Composite. ) 

Generic Character. 

Achenium compressum, conforme, paleis magis minusve 
deciduis, binis pluribusve minoribus coronatum. — Herbae 
sape altissima, rarius frutices, America indigent, foliis op- 
posite vel alternis integris {vel fissis) asperis ; capitulis 
luteis solitariis et terminalibus vel corymbosis ; involucris 
polyphyllis imbricatis, rachi plana. Less. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Helianthus decapetalus; foliis oppositis (supremis brac- 
teantibus exceptis) subrhombeo - ovatis acuminatis 
grease serratis utrinque scabris supra basin tripliner- 
viis, involucri foliolis lineari-acuminatis squarrosis 
paleis integris radii corollissubdecem. 

Helianthus decapetalus. Linn. Sp. PI, p. 1277. Pursh, Fl. 
Am. v. 2. p. 571. Ell. Carol, v. 2. p. 425. 

(fr.)frondosus ; involucri squamis elongatis foliosis. 

Helianthus frondosus. Linn, and other authors. 



Pew plants are less understood by Botanists, or more 
ill denned in books, than the species of the Genus now 
before us; especially those which are natives of North 
America. And it is much to be regretted that Sir James 
Smith has not even noticed the Linnean species in Rees' 
Cyclopaedia, so that we are at a loss to distinguish accu- 
rately those whose names are the most familiar to us. As 
far as can be judged from description, the present is the 
H. decapetalus of the Species Plantarum, where its affinity 

with 



with H. multiflorus, (Bot. Mag. t. 227,) from which itprinci- 
pally'differs in the smaller flowers and much fewer rays, and 
in the lower leaves not being cordate, is noticed. It is a 
hardy perennial, an inhabitant of the northern and middle 
States of North America and of Canada, and blossoming in 
the autumn. ^ By*hixuriance the scales of the involucre are 
enlarged and become leafy, and, as it appears to me, have 
given rise to the Linnean H.frondosus. 

Descr. Stem four to five feet high ; much branched 
upwards, and there principally scabrous. Leaves all op- 
posite, (except the uppermost ones, which are smaller and 
narrower and less distinctly serrated, and which as arising 
from the flower-bearing stalks, may rather be considered 
bracteas,) ovate, but tapering below so as to be some- 
what rhomboidal, three-nerved above the base, acuminated, 
coarsely and distantly serrated, scabrous on both sides, of 
a rather lively green above, paler beneath, but scarcely 
at all downy, the lower one petiolated. Flowers about two 
inches across, slightly drooping. Scales of the involucre 
numerous, squarrose, linear-acuminate, ciliated at the mar- 
gin, especially below, where they are of a blackish colour, 
sometimes, in |3, becoming leafy. Receptacle slightly conical, 
chaffy : the scales linear, acute, usually quite entire, and 
nearly as long as the florets of the disk. Florets of the ray 
bright yellow, their germens abortive, destitute of pappus ; 
those of the disk, orange. Anthers purple-black : their 
germens compressed, with two soft, subulate, opposite 
scales, and sometimes, two or three other minute ones. 



Fig. 1. Floret of the Ray. 2. Floret of the Disk, with its accompanying 
Scale : — magnified. 



9511 




( 3511 ) 

Calliopsis tinctoria : var. atropurpurea. 
Dyeing Calliopsis; dark-flowered var. 

Class and Order. 
Syngenesia Frustranea. 

( Nat. Ord. — Composite. ) 

Generic Character. 

Achanium obcompressum., omnino calvum, intus curva- 
tum, apice truncatum, anguste bialatum, disco epigyno mi- 
nuto, alis concoloribuSj integerrimis. Stylus disci ramis 
truncatis apiceque solo penicillatis. — Herbae Boreall- Amer- 
icana, glabrae, foltis magis minusve sectis; capitulis geminis 
v. corymbosis, radio luteo basi macula atropurpurea notato 
v. roseo ; involucris biserialibus, serie inter iori gamophylla. 
Less. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Calliopsis * tinctoria ; caule ramosissimo foliisque glaber- 
rimis, radical ibus pinnatis foliolis spathulato-lanceo- 
latis, caulinis bi-tripinnatifidis summisque 3-partitis 
linearibuSj peduncnlis subcorymbosis., flosculis radii 
inciso-dentatis. 

Calliopsis bicolor. " Reichenb." — Spreng. Sust. Veget. v. 
3. p. 611. 

Coreopsis tinctoria. Nutt. Journ. Acad. Sc. Phil. 1821., 
p. 114. Sims, Bot. Mag. t. 2512. Bot. Reg. t. 846. 
Sw. Brit. Fl. Gard. t. 72. Bart. FL of N. Am. v. 2. 
t. 45. 

(3.) floribus atropurpureis, nunc limbo fulvo circumdatis. 
(Tab. nostr. 3511.) 

The 



* From kxMos, beauty, and ofy<, an appearance ; I presume, from the 
beautiful appearance of the blossoms. 



The ordinary state of this pretty plant is given at t. 2512, 
where it will be seen that the flower is a bright and full 
yellow colour, with a deep blackish-purple or blood-red 
eye. Cultivation shows that these colours are liable to 
vary, and has made us acquainted with a state of this plant 
of great beauty and richness as concerns the flower. In 
some specimens the whole of the ray is atro-sanguineous ; in 
others there is a tawny narrow margin, forming, as it were, 
a kind of limb around it. Mixed with the common yellow 
sort in large patches, they add greatly to the charms of a 
flower-garden. 

Our specimen here figured was from the garden of Mr. 
James Tait, Merry Flats, and was one of the twelve best 
species of hardy annuals which gained the prize at the 
September Meeting (1835) of the Glasgow Hoticultural 
Society. 



Fig. 1. Floret from the Disk:— Magnified. 



( 3512 ) 

Thunbergia alata; (albiflora). Winged 
Thunbergia ; White-flowered var. 

**************** 

Class and Order. 

DlDYNAMIA ANGIOSPERMIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Acanthace^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx duplex: ext. diphyllus ; int. subduodecim-den- 
tatus. Capsula bilocularis rostrata. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Thunbergia alata; pubescenti-sericea, foliis cordatis acutis 

angulatis, petiolis alatis, caule volubili. 
(a.) Corolla lutea. 
Thunbergia alata. Bojer MSS.—Hook. Ex. Fl. p. 177. 

Sims, Bot. Mag. t. 2591. 
(£.) Corolla alba. (Tab. nostr. 3512.) 



Thunbergia alata, is a plant discovered by Professor 
Bojer of the Mauritius in grassy places of Zanzibar and 
Pemba, two small islands on the eastern coast of Africa, in 
about the fifth or sixth degree of South latitude : and it was 
by the late Mr. Telfair sent to Mr. Barclay's collection 
at Bury Hill. Through his liberality, the buff-flowered 
variety is become general in the stoves of our collections, 
where it is greatly admired for its copious blossoms, marked 
with a deep purple-brown eye in the centre. The variety 
now figured, with a white limb to the corolla, forming a 
still greater contrast with the dark stain in the centre, is, 
we believe, much more uncommon, since we are only ac- 
quainted with it from plants given to the Glasgow Botanic 
Garden by the kindness of Mr. Lowe of the Clapton Nursery. 
It flowers during the summer and autumn months, and re- 
quires the same treatment as the buff-stained kind. 

Descr. 



Descr. Stems long, slender, twining, clothed, as well as 
the leaves and calyx, with short, pale, silky pubescence. 
Leaves opposite, cordate, or cordato -hastate, membranous, 
acute, angled at the margin more or less, particularly near 
the base, dark green above, paler beneath. Petioles about 
as long as the leaves, singularly winged on each side ; the 
wings broader towards the upper extremity. Peduncles ax- 
illary, solitary, opposite, longer than the petioles. Exte- 
rior calyx of two large ovato-cordate, inflated, membrana- 
ceous leaves : inner one small, cup-shaped, with several 
irregular teeth or segments. Corolla large ; the tube longer 
than the outer calyx, inflated upwards, black purple within, 
paler without : limb oblique, of five, nearly equal, somewhat 
obcordate, spreading lobes., buff-coloured in a, white in our 
var. 0. Stamen wholly concealed within the tube : Anther 
white, two-celled, ciliated. Germen ovato- globose. Style 
white, filiform : Stigma of two unequal lips, the lower one 
the broadest, and concave. 



Fig. 1. Outer Calyx (or bracteas). 2. Stamen. 3. Calyx and Pistil :— 
magnified. 



( 3513 ) 

Dryandra tenuifolia. Slender-leaved 
Dryandra. 

********************** 

Class and Order. 
Tetrandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Proteace^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium quadripartitum v. quadrifidum. Stamina 
apicibus concavis laciniarum immersa. Squamulce hypo- 
gynse 4. Ovarium unilocular^ biovulatum. Ovnla post 
fcecundationem cohaerentia. Folliculus ligneus : Disepi- 
mentum ligneum semibifidum fructus maturi omnino simile. 
Receptaculum commune planum., floribus indeterminatim 
confertis ; paleis angustis, rard nullis. Involucrum com- 
mune imbricatum. — F rutices plerumque humiles. Rami dum 
adsint sparsi vel umbellati. Folia sparsa, pinnatifida v. in- 
cisa, plantce juvenilis conformia. Involucra solitaria, termi- 
nalia, rard lateralia, sessilia, foliis confertis, interioribus 
quandoque nanis obvallata, hemisphcerica, bracteis adpressis 
in quibusdam apice appendiculatis. Stylus scepe perianthio 
vix longior. R. Br. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Dryandra tenuifolia ; foliis elongato-linearibus pinnatifidis 
subtruncatis subtus niveis basi attenuata integerrirtlfc 
petioliformi : lobis triangularibus decurrentibus divaii- 
catis margine recurvis, involucro longitudine florum : 
bracteis tomentosis : exterioribus ovato-lanceolatis, pe- 
rianthio stylum subrequante : unguibus basi lanatis 
supra cauleque glabris ; laminis subsericeis. Br. in 
Linn. Trans. 10. p. 215. ejusd. Prodr. I. p. 398. Rom. 
et Schult. Syst. Veg. 3. p. 447. 



A native of barren heaths on the shores of King George's 
Sound, where it forms rather a dense bush, flowering in the 

month 



month of January. In our conservatories, where, accord- 
ing to Hortus Kewensis, it has been an inhabitant since the 
year 1803, it usually puts forth its oval heads of flowers in 
March ; and continuing its blossoms during the two suc- 
ceeding months, is a most desirable plant "for greenhouse 
cultivation among other compatriots in our possession from 
the sterile shores of South-western Australia — a locality, so 
desert- like in aspect, yet so rich in the rarer and more 
diversiformed species of the great and splendid family to 
which our plant belongs. Beyond its remarkable habit, 
and the density of its extremely attenuated foliage, it holds 
out other recommendations to the care of the botanic culti- 
vator ; namely, its freedom of growth, and the readiness 
with which well-ripened cuttings take root. Our thanks 
are again due to our liberal friend, Mr. Aiton, for the spe- 
cimen furnished us last spring, by which, the means of 
publishing the first figure of so interesting a plant, has been 
afforded us. 

Descr. A robust shrub, usually about three feet high, 
very much branched ; branches smooth, densely clothed with 
leaves, spreading, often pendent. Leaves very linear, six to 
eight inches long, pinnatifid, truncated at the apex, smooth 
and dark green on the upper side, clothed with a white 
tomeutum beneath, very attenuated and entire at the base : 
lobes alternate, triangular, decurrent, spreading, apex acute 
and uncinated, the margins recurved. Involucre terminal, 
solitary, oval, formed of numerous, imbricated bractes ; the 
outer ones ovate, acute, inner oblong and bluntish, ciliated, 
and clothed with a thin adpressed tomentum. Receptacle 
chatty. Mowers numerous, bright-brown, included within 
the involucre. Perianth deeply divided into four parts ; 
each segment very linear, thinly clothed with spreading, 
white hairs towards the claws, which are themselves very 
woolly base, however, quite smooth. Lamina slightly 
silky btamens four, inserted in the concave lamina?. An- 
titers linear, apiculated, shorter than the concavities in which 
they repose. Style smooth, terete, enlarged somewhat at 
the base, and angular, the length of the perianth. Stigma 
simple. Ifypogynous scales four, each lanceolate, and 
attenuate. 



W e know not that we can do better in occupying another 
page, than by giving publication to a note furnished us 
«3y Allan Cunningham, regarding another subject of the 

highly 



highly interesting Order of the plant here figured ; namely, 
a species of Persoonia, of goodly arborescent stature, and 
moreover, the inhabitant of a country, in which the Genus 
has never been supposed to exist. 

It may be just premised, that as far as the Botany of the 
Islands of New Zealand has been investigated, from the 
days of Sir Joseph Banks and Dr. Solander in the first 
voyage of our great circumnavigator, down to the present 
period, Botanists have been made acquainted with but a 
solitary example of the family Proteace^e, existing on those 
Islands. In that individual, truly, the Order has there, a 
very noble representative, viz. Knightia excelsa, a large 
tree, often to be seen from sixty to eighty feet in height, in 
the drier forests. This observation of the bare existence of 
an Order on those Islands, so abundant in the neighbouring 
continent of Australia, is the more remarkable, since in the 
southern latitudes of this latter vast country, (in which is 
included Van Diemen's Land,) and in the same parallels in 
South America, which also intersect New Zealand, Emboth- 
rium as limited by Mr. Brown, and Lomatia of the same 
very eminent botanist, furnish several species ; which, affect- 
ing as they do cool regions, and rather humid localities, 
might reasonably be expected to hold a standing also, on 
the latter intermediate Islands. Neither the one Genus, nor 
the other, have yet been discovered there, but a species of 
Persoonia — a Genus hitherto limited in geographic range 
to New Holland and Van Diemen's Land, was observed at 
Wangaroa, in 1826, and may be thus defined : — 

P. Torn; foliis elongato-lanceolatis acutis basi attenuatis strictis sub- 
falcatisve obsolete trinervibus utrinque glabris nitidis, racemil axillaribus 
lateralibusve multifloris, pedunculis perianthiisque tomento ferrugineo 
tectis, ovariis glabris dispermis epedicellatis, caule arborescenti, cortice 
lsevi. 

Incolis Toru audit, unde nomen triviale. 

Hab. In Novod Zelandiae insula septentrionali : prope sinum Bay of 
Islands dictum ; et in montosis sylvaticis vicinia oppidulum Wangaroa, 
(altitudine supra oceanum 1000 circiter pedum); nee non in sylva 
primseva, (" Great Forest" dicta) versus flumen Hokianga ; alibique 
inter pagulos Indicos Wytangy et Keri-Kcri, in nemoribus. 

Lecta cum fructibus immaturis mense Novembri, et verosimiliter in 
mensibus Septembri, Octobrique, florens. 1826. All. Cham. 1833. 
b. Rich. Cunningham. 

Arbor sempervirens, viginti ad quadraginta pedes alta, potius gracilis, 
admodum venusta, et in habitu omnino aliquot specierum Acaciarum 
aphyllarum ; trunco erecto ad basin diametro 6-uncias ajquante, cortice 

lsevi, 



lgevi, sursum ramosissimo. Ramuli patentes, glabri, rugosi, cinereo- 
atri, lapsu foliorum cicatricibus prominentibus notati. Folia alterna, 
versus apices ramulorum confertiora, elongata, coriacea, valde glabra, 
supra nitidissima, veno-sa, ssepe sex uncias longa, et semunciam lata. 
Racemi plerumque axillares, erecti, multiflori tomento rubiginoso tecti : 
Flores (in specimine immaturi et nondum aperti) unibracteati. Ova- 
rium glabrum, dispermum, sessile, v. epedicellatum. Glandule hypo- 
gynce 4, brevissimse. Stigma depresso-capitatum. Drupa baccata, 
putamine biloculari. 

Obs. Affinis P. articulate, et inter hanc et P. longifoliam fere media. 
Folia longiora, angustiora quam in P. articulato, perianthiaque tomen- 
tosa. Inflorescentia P. longifolice, a qua differt, fokis latioribus, ovariis- 
que sessilibus. A. C. 



( 3514 ) 

Myanthus barbatus ; var. labello albo. Beardef 
Fj.ywort ; white-lipped var. 

Class and Order. 

GVNANDRIA MoNANDRIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Orchide,e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium explanatum. Sepala libera, aequalia, late- 
ralibus paululum adscendentibus. Petala conformia, au- 
gustiora, sepalo supremo supposita. Labcllum planum, 
obovatum, tridentatum, sepalis brevius. Columna erecta, 
teres basi bicirrhosa, postice ad cardinem antheiae longe 
producta. Antherce et pollinia Cataseti. — Epiphyta, Cata- 
seti omnino vegetatione. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Myanthus* barbatus; labello in pilissucculentis barbaefor- 

mibus dissoluto basi supra unicorni. Lindl. 
Myanthus barbatus. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1778. 
(/3.) labello albo. (Tab. nostr. 3514.) 



The Genus Myanthus was founded by Professor Lindley 
(see Bot. Reg. t. 1721,) upon a plant which I had referred, 
when I was ignorant of the Myanthus of Lindley, to Cata- 
setum (Catasetum trifidum, Bot. Mag. t. 3262,) from which 
it appears to me only to differ in the spreading, three-lobed 
lip. In his valuable " Genera et Species Orchidearum," 
the learned author remarks that, " Catasetum cristalum is 
intermediate between this Genus and Catasetum." The 
present plant is, however, by the same Botanist, in the 

Register, 



* From fjivnt, a fly, and *Ar, a flower. " The flowers look when dried 
very much like a pressed fly." 

VOL. X. K 



Register, referred to Myanthus, without any allusion to its 
exceedingly close affinity with his Catasetum cristatum, a 
similarity so great, that I was at first disposed to consider 
our plant with a white lip the same species, differing chiefly 
in being furnished with a spur or tooth-like process at the 
base of the lip. The two plants are indeed, I doubt not, 
specifically distinct ; but they cannot be separated generi- 
cally, and perhaps Professor Lindley will agree with me in 
thinking, that Myanthus should only form a section of 
Catasetum. 

Our kind friend, Mr. Allcard, imported the plant here 
figured, from Demerara ; and it blossomed in his collection 
at Stratford Green, Essex, in the month of May, of the 
present year (1836). The flowers, when the box was open- 
ed which contained the specimen, yielded an odour very 
similar to that of Juniper Berries. 

Descr. Bulb ovate, sheathed with large, broad, striated 
scales, which, in the upper part, bear several distichous 
obovato-lanceolate, striated and somewhat plaited,, mem- 
branous leaves, tapering at the base. Scape arising from 
the base of the bulb, in our specimen at once drooping, 
bearing a many-flowered raceme, green below, dark purple 
above. Flowers spreading. Petals and sepals narrow- 
oblong, grooved, dark green, spotted with dark purple 
within, with paler spots on the outside. The upper sepal 
and two petals meet together in a nearly erect position 
above the column ; the two lateral sepals, at first patent, 
become eventually singularly deflexed. Column elongated, 
semiterete, greenish-brown, with a long, acuminated point, 
beneath which the anther is lodged : in front, one on each 
side the stigma, are two deflexed setae. Lip deflexed, shorter 
than the sepals, linear-oblong, with a short, pale greenish- 
brown sack a little above the middle, fringed with numerous 
long, upright, white, fleshy hairs ; in the disk, at the base, 
is a long, white, curved, fleshy, horn-like process. Anther- 
case with a long, acuminated point. Pollen-masses as in 
Catasetum. Germen clavate, dark purple. 



Fig. 1. Column and Lip. 2. Anther-case. 3. and 4. Pollen-masses 
magnified. 



352J 




( 3515 ) 

Sarracenia rubra. Red Side-Saddle- 
Flower. 

******************** 

Class and Order. 

POLYANDRIA MoNOGYNIA. 

( Nat. Old. — SarraceniEjE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx persistens pentaphyllus, involucratus ; involucro 
triphyllo. Petala 5, decidua. Stigma magnum peltatum, 
5-angulare, persistens, stamina obtegens. Capsula 5-locu- 
laris, 5-valvis, polyspermism valvis medio septiferis. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Sarracenia rubra ; foliis scapo brevioribus, tubo an gusto 

superne sensim dilatato venoso, appendice ovato-acu- 

minata planiuscula erecta. 
Sarracenia rubra. Walt. Carol, p. 152. Ait. Hort. Kew. 

ed. 2. v. 3. p. 291. Hook. Ex. Fl. v.l.t. 13. (excl. 

the Syn. of S. psittacina). Lodd. Bot. Cab. t. 308. 



This truly beautiful Sarracenia is, we believe, rarely seen 
in this country, though the plant has, perhaps, been not 
unfrequently imported ; for it is a species of difficult culti- 
vation, and shy of flowering. Many roots were sent by Mr. 
Drummond from New Orleans, and from one of these, which 
flowered in the stove of the Glasgow Botanic Garden, in 
March, 1836, our figure and description are taken. The 
species seems wholly confined to the southern United States. 
The S. psittacina is totally different from this, and very 
little known to Botanists. Numerous plants of it have also 
been received from Mr. Drummond, collected in Louis- 
iana; but I have not heard that it has flowered in any col- 
lection. 

Descr. 



Descr. Leaves tufted, eight to ten inches and a foot in 
length, somewhat ensiform, broader upwards, the back 
dilated into a tube, very narrow for the greater part of the 
length, gradually enlarged towards the oblique mouth, 
which is terminated on the upper side by a nearly erect, 
ovato-lanceolate, slightly concave, acuminated appendage. 
Often the leaves are imperfect at the extremity, without 
tube, and without appendage. Scape, in our plant, two feet 
long, rounded, erect but wavy, curved at the apex so that 
the fine large flower is drooping. Involucre of three ovate 
leaves, pressed close to the flower. Calyx of five broadly 
ovate leaves or sepals, curved downwards at the extremity, 
the margins a little recurved, green, the base and sides 
red. Petals five, broadly-obovate, the base spreading, the 
rest suddenly decurved, flaccid, rich and deep red, greenish 
at the base. Stamens numerous. Anthers two-celled, yellow, 
each with a large opening at the extremity. Pistil : Ger- 
men roundish- ovate, green. Style short, dilated into an 
immense five-cleft, convex, membranous stigma, the seg- 
ments bifid, with a spur within, bent down : so that the 
whole covers the rest of the organs of fructification like a 
spread umbrella : the stigmatic surface being undermost, 
and slightly papillose. 



Fig. 1. Stamen. 2. Pistil. 



55*? 




( 3516 ) 

Streptanthus hyacinthoides. Hyacinth- 
flowered Streptanthus. 

Class and Order. 
Tetradynamia Siliquosa. 

( Nat. Ord. — Crucifer®. ) 

Generic Character. 

Cah/cis foliola erecta, colorata, basi saccata. FUamenta 
subulata. Antherce elongatae, acuminata?. Siliqua longis- 
sima compressa, utrinque linea dorsali subtetragona. Se- 
mina uniserialia, compressa, marginata. Cotyledones accum- 
bentes. — Herbae elatce, annua. Folia glaucescentia. Flores 
purpurascentes. 

Specific Name and Character: 

Streptanthus hyacinthoides; foliis oblongo-linearibus acu- 
minatis, petalis linearibus limbo reflexo, filamentis duo- 
bus coadunatis abortivis, floribus pendulis. 



There are perhaps few persons who would at the first 
sight of the inflorescence of this plant, in long racemes of 
pendent deep purple flowers, and much protruded stamens, 
suppose that it belonged to the Cruciferous family, but 
rather to some kind of Hyacinth, or still more to the Genus 
Uropetalum. Its real affinity is, however, soon detected, 
and notwithstanding some striking peculiarities its identity 
with the Genus Streptanthus : of which all the species that 
we yet know are confined to the southern part of North 
America. The present species is a native of Texas, and 
was discovered by the late Mr. Drummond at San Felipe de 
Austin. Seeds, as well as specimens, were sent to this coun- 
try, and the plants from which our figure was taken flower- 
ed in the greenhouse of the Glasgow Botanic Garden in 

August 



August of 1835. It will no doubt bear the open air ex- 
ceedingly well. 

Descr. Root annual. Stem two to three feet high, and, 
as well as the whole plant, glabrous and glaucous, rounded, 
branched in a somewhat paniculated manner, with the 
branches erect. Leaves oblongo-linear, sessile and semi- 
amplexicaul, acuminated, entire, or very obscurely toothed, 
the upper ones gradually narrower. Racemes elongated, 
bearing numerous powers on short pedicels, green at first 
in the bud, then drooping, and when the flowers are fully 
expanded almost wholly deep bluish -purple. Calyx-leaves 
ovato-acuminate, coloured greenish only at the apex, sac- 
cate at the base, two opposite ones less so than the other 
two. Petals linear : the claw straight, the limb wavy, 
slightly twisted and reflexed, pale at the apex. Stamens 
six, much exserted. Filameuts subulate, purple, pale below : 
of the two opposite pairs, one pair is short, combined into 
one, forked at the apex, and bearing each an abortive, 
linear anther: the two which are opposite to these are 
distinct, and the longest of the six : the two solitary ones 
intermediate in length, and as well as the two longest ones, 
bearing large, subsagittate anthers, of a greenish-purple 
colour with yellow pollen. Pistil shorter than the perfect 
stamens, linear. Style scarcely any, stigma obtuse. Pod 
long, slender, linear, compressed, with a dorsal line on each 
valve, but not tetragonous. Seeds compressed and mar- 
gined, similar to those of S. obtusifolius (Bot. Mag. t. 3317.) 



fi P^ b *? 0Wer \ 2 1 S ^P al a PetaL 4 - Stamen and Pistil. 5. Pistil. 
6. Pod (nat. size). 7. Seed—All but fig. 6, magnified. 



( 3517 ) 

Strobilanthes Sabiniana. Mr. Sabine's 
Strobilanthes. 

Class and Order. 

DlDYNAMIA ANGIOSPERMIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Acanthace^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 5-partitus. Corolla infundibuliformis. Anthers 
erectae, loculis parallelis. Capsula in medio tetraspermaad 
basin bilocularis v. brevissimo tantum spatio a basi clausa, 
tetragona. Retinacula in papillae formam contracta semina 
ferentia nee fulcentia. Semina parva scrobiculata. Nees. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Strobilanthes Sabiniana : herbacea (v. suffrutex), foliis 
ovatis acuminatis in petiolum attenuatis repando-sub- 
crenatis glabris, opposite minore, summis cordatis 
amplexicaulibus, spicis axillaribus terminalibusque 
laxiusculis viscido-pubeseentibus, bracteis orbiculatis 
basi cuneiformibus. Nees. 

Strobilanthes Sabiniana. Nees ab Esenb. in Wall. PL 
As. Rar. v. 3. p. 86. 

Ruellia Sabiniana. Wall. Cat. n. 2338. Lindl. Bot. Reg. 
t. 1238. 

Ruellia macrocarpa. Wall. Cat. n. 2348. ex parte. 

(/3.) argentea, Nees; spicis minoribus maxime pubescenti- 
bus viscidisque, foliis minoribus. 

Ruellia argentea. Wall. Cat. n. 2339. 



A very beautiful stove plant, a native of Nepal, whence 
it was introduced to our gardens by Dr. Waxlich, who 
named it in compliment to Joseph Sabine, Esq. to whom 
Horticulture, no less than Natural History in general, is most 

deeply 



deeply indebted. Its flowering season with us is the latter 
end of winter, when several of the numerous purple spikes 
have a succession of flowers ; two on each, never more, 
being open at one time. 

Descr. Stem two to three feet high, shrubby below, 
much branched ; branches erect, glabrous, the younger ones 
quadrangular. Leaves opposite, unequal, oval, much acu- 
minated, oblique, obscurely crenato-serrate, tapering at the 
base into a winged petiole ; often of a fine purple beneath, 
nerves oblique, united by reticulated nervelets, slightly 
prominent above, much so below. Spikes axillary and 
terminal. Bracteas imbricated, in four rows, broadly ovate 
or rounded, coloured, somewhat spreading, cuneate below, 
clothed with glandular down. Calyx in five deep-coloured, 
spathulate segments. Corolla funnel-shaped, the lower 
part of the tube yellow and much curved, the rest bright 
bluish-purple, pitted and reticulated : the limb of five nearly 
equal, rounded lobes. Filaments declined, hairy at the 
base on one side; the two longer ones reaching a little 
beyond the mouth. Style rather longer than the longest 
stamens. 



56 J 8 




Ja'JPMii del 



( 3518 ) 

Bletia patula. Spreading-flowered 
Bletia. 

A iV. .Sfc i&m A'- .St* 1 . &. A'. Af. A*. A'. A\ At. Af. .Sfc .SI". .Sfc .4". Af* .4"-. 
tfr Tfr vfr vj? */JS* tx? "SK 4* t|> 4- MS 4> 4» 4- 4» 4? 4< 4* 4- 4^ 

C/«ss aw«? Order. 
Gynandria Monandria. 

( Nat. Ord. — Orchtdejs. ) 

Generic Character. 

Sepala paten tia aequalia. Petala nunc patentia, nunc 
conniventia, sepalis aequalia. Labellum cucullatum, cum 
columna articulatum, nunc basi saccatum, trilobum, disco 
saepius lamellato vel tuberculato. Columna elongata, senii- 
teres. Anthera carnosa, 8-locularis. Pollinia 8 aequalia, 
caudiculis 4 pulvereis cohaerentibus. — Herbae subterrestres, 
foliis ensiformibus plicatis, scapis racemosis multifioris,jlo- 
ribus scepius speciosis. Lindl. 

Specific Name and Character. 

Bletia patula; foliis radicalibus lanceolatis plicato-nervo- 
sis, scapo elato subramoso, floribus patentissimis, sepa- 
lis lanceolato-ellipticis basi attenuatis subaequalibus 
patulis, labello cucullato, lobis lateralibus rotundatis, 
medio emarginato transverse plicato, disco lamellis 6 
subramosis inaequalibus. 



This handsome species was received at the Botanic Gar- 
den, Edinburgh, from Dr. Fischer, St. Petersburgh, in 
1830, without specific name, but marked as a native of 
Hayti. It has repeatedly since flowered finely in our stove. 

Descr. Bulb round, at first, when it pushes up the scape, 
very small, gradually enlarging to the size of a small 
orange ; in the second year green, shining, nearly smooth, 
and crowned by the withered bases of the leaves, marked 
with three or four circular bands, and furrowed at the apex 
when these fall, persisting for some years, and becoming 

gradually 



gradually smaller without shrivelling much ; young bulbs 
are formed at the base, or near the apex of those of the 
preceding year. Leaves arising from the apex of the bulb 
after the flowers, lanceolate, plicato-nervose. Scape (above 
three feet high) terminal, but from its appearing in the very 
young state of the bulb, seeming to be lateral, the N old bulb 
only being conspicuous, purplish and spotted at the base, 
with a few distant, sheathing scales, greener above, subra- 
mous. Raceme (above twenty-flowered) gradually elon- 
gating. Flowers large, very handsome, each springing 
from the axil of a small, acute bractea, of a nearly uniform 
reddish -lilac colour, only the base of the labellum and its 
ridges being white. Sepals (an inch and a half long) lan- 
ceolato-elliptical, nearly equal in size, the uppermost being 
rather the narrowest, all attenuated at the base and spread- 
ing. Lip much broader than the sepals, the lateral lobes 
erect, rounded, the central broad-linear, notched, plaited 
transversely ; disk with six waved, somewhat branched 
lamellae, those at the sides being the shortest, and passing 
into diverging veins. Column more than half as long as 
the sepals, projecting into the centre of the flower, some- 
what clavate, rounded on the upper, flat on the lower side, 
with a single tooth on each edge at its middle, a small ter- 
minal tooth, and two others on each edge immediately 
below the apex, the lower being rounded and decurrent. 
Anther-case rounded, notched at its apex, two-celled, each 
cell divided longitudinally. Pollen-masses four, parallel, 
each two-lobed, laid along a thin plate spread above the 
stigmatic surface. Germen (an inch and a half long) twist- 
ed, spreading at right angles to the rachis. Graham. 



7>51& 




( 3519 ) 

COTONEASTER LAXIFLORA. LOOSE-CLUSTERED 
COTONEASTER. 

******************* 
Class and Order. 

ICOSANDRIA DlGYNIA- 

( Nat. Ord. — Rosacea. ) 

Generic Character. 

Flores abortu polygami. Calyx turbinatus obtuse 5-den- 
tatus. Petala brevia erecta. Stamina dentium calycis lon- 
gitudine. Styli glabri staminibus breviores. Carpella 
2—3 parietalia calyce inclusa biovulata.— Frutices : foliis 
simplicibus integerrimis subtus lanatis, corymbis lateralibus 
patentibus bracteis subulatis deciduis, petalis parvis persis- 
tentibus. D C. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Cotoneaster * laxiflora ; cymis elongatis dichotomis pendu- 
lis nitidissimis sub lente pilosis, foliis oblongo-ovatis 
supra glabris nitidis subtus incano-tomentosis deciduis. 

Cotoneaster laxiflora. " Jacq.fil. in. litt. — Lindl. Bot. Reg. 
t. 1229. 



Like the Mespilus lobata, lately figured, the native coun- 
try of this plant is not known to us. It was introduced to 
our gardens through the Horticultural Society by means of 
seeds, which were sent from Vienna by Professor Jacquin, 
under the name here given. A species, indeed, nearly allied 
to this, has recently been discovoured by Ledebour in the 
Altai Mountains, and figured and described by that Author 
under the name of C. multiRora, Bunge, but our specimens 

of 



* Xamed from Cotoneum (xvSunoS), Gr., the Quince. 



of this plant have much thicker, broader, and rounder leaves, 
with generally a deep notch at the extremity. The inflo- 
rescence is extremely similar in the two. With us, the 
flowering season is May, when the pendent, reddish blos- 
soms, and the glossy leaves have at first the appearance of 
some Vaccinium, rather than a Cotoneaster. 

Descr. It forms an upright shrub, from four to five feet 
high, clothed with brown and glossy bark, the young branches 
only having a deciduous down. Leaves shortly petiolate, 
elliptical, or nearly oblong, frequently approaching to ovate, 
almost acute, entire, glabrous and shining above, pale and 
hoary with down beneath, but by no means so much so as 
in the more common species of our gardens. Cymes longer 
than the leaves, the terminating short branches of the pre- 
ceding (as is the case with the C. multifiora, described by 
Ledebour) much divided in a dichotomous manner, grace- 
fully pendulous. Peduncles and pedicels dark greenish-red, 
with minute bracteas, glossy, yet when seen under a micro- 
scope slightly hairy. Calyx glossy, glabrous, red, green 
on the side less exposed to the light. Petals concave, in- 
curved, delicately tinged with blush. 



Fig. 1. Flower: — magnified. 



( 3520 ) 

Begonia sanguinea. Blood-Red 
Begonia. 

Class and Order. 

MONCECIA PoLYANDRIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Begoniace^. ) 

Generic Character. 

Masc. Calyx o. Corolla polypetala. Petala plerum- 
que 4, inaequalia. F(em. Calyx o. Corolla petalis 4—9 
plemmqiie imequalibus. %/»3, bifidi. Capsula triquetra 
alata, tn I ocularis, polysperma. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Begonia sanguinea ; caule ramoso, foliis ina?qualiter cor- 
datis acuminatis conaceo-carnosis glaberrimis subtus 
sanguineis, margine crenulato revoluto, germinis alis 
tribus aequalibus. 

Begonia sanguinea. Radd. in Sprengel, Syst. Veget. v. 2. 
p. 625. Link et Otto, hones Plant. Rarior. Hort lie? 
Bot. Berol. p. 25. t. 13. " 



This plant, more remarkable for the colour and texture 
of its leaves than elegant in its form, was raised at the 
Botanic Garden of Berlin, from seed transmitted by M 
Sello, from Brazil, in 1823, and communicated to the 
Botanic Garden in Edinburgh in 1832. It flowers in the 
stove in April. 

Descr. Stems several from the crown of the root sub- 
ligneous, red, with scattered oblong paler spots. Leaves 
(four to six inches long, two and a half to three and a half 
inches broad) subpeltate, unequally cordate, acuminate 
the apex soon withering, leathery-succulent, perfectly gla- 
brous and shining on both sides, green above, blood-red be- 
low, 



low the ecke crenulate and revolute all round, nerves about 
ten ' radiating, the larger branched, the smaller subsimple. 
Petioles of very unequal length, round, resembling the 
stem. Stipules intra-foliaceous, large, ovate, acute, keeled, 
marcescent. Peduncle (ten inches long) terminal, becom- 
ino- axillary, tapered, similar to the stem but without spots, 
repeatedly dichotomous at the apex (primary blanches 
about one inch long, the others gradually shorter). Bracteas 
lanceolate-elliptical at each subdivision. Flowers white, 
rather small. Male flowers in the clefts of the cyme, or on 
the inner side, where the ultimate branches are reduced to 
two flowers (the outer being a female), or, occasionally, 
solitary on the ultimate branches. Petals four, the two 
outer subrotund, slightly crenate, the two inner linear- 
elliptical, very narrow, entire. Stamens numerous ; fila- 
ments free, excepting at the base, where they are mono- 
del phous ; anthers spathulate. Female flowers with five 
subequal petals, expanding later than the earlier of the 
males. Stigmas pale-rose coloured. Germen with three 
subequal wings. 

I was at some pains to ascertain the relative position of 
the male and female flowers when only these two were 
found at the extremity of the ultimate branch. It seems 
to me that the normal form is the conversion of the last 
dichotomous ramification of the cyme into the pedicels of 
1 wo female flowers, and that the male flower here, as else- 
where, is placed in the cleft ; the loss of the inner female 
flower being an illustration of the opinion, that internal 
parts, from pressure, more frequently abort than those 
which are external. As the common support of these two 
flowers generally turns half round on its axis, their true 
position may not be obvious unless examined when they 
are very young. Graham. 



( 3521 ) 

Fuchsia macrostema ; var. recurvata. 
Large-stamened Fuchsia ; recurved var. 

********************** 

Class and Order. 

OCTANDRIA MONOGYNIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Onagrari,e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calycis tubus basi ovario adhaerens, snperne productus in 
tuburn cylindraceum 4-lobum post anthesin articulatim de- 
cidiuim. Petala 4 snmmo tubo inserta lobis altema, rarius 
O Stamina 8. Ovarium glandula urceolata coronatum. 
Stylus filiforrnis. Stigma capitatum. Bacca oblongo- aut 
ovato-globosa, 4-locularis, 4-valvis, polysperma. — Frutices. 
Folia saipius opposita. Pedicelli axillares \-Jlori interdum 
ad apices ramorum racemosi. Flores scepius nutantes, rubri 
rarius albi, interdum bfidi, octandri. D C. 

Specific Character and Synonym. 

Fuchsia macrostema ; glabra, foliis oppositis ternisve petio- 
latis ovatis acutis denticulatis., floribus axillaribus 
solitariis, staminibus productis, stigmate 4-lobo. Don. 

Fuchsia macrostema. Ruiz et Pav. Ft. Peruv. v. 3. p. 88. 
t. 324. / b. 

Mr. Don includes the following Synonyms. 

(Thilco. Feuill. Per. 2. p. 64. t. 47.— F. discolor. Lindl. 

Bot. Reg. t. 1805. Hook. Bot. Mag. t. 3498. 
(/3.) conica. — F. conica. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1062. 
(y.) globosa. — F. globosa. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1556. Hook. 

Bot. Mag. t. 3364. 
{$.) gracilis. — F. gracilis. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 847. et t. 

1052. — F. decussata. Grah. Sims in Bot. Mag t 

2507.) 
(t.) recurvata; ramis pendentibus, floribus foliisque maiori- 

bus. (Tab. nostr. t. 3521.) 

Of 

VOL. X. L 



Of all the Fuchsias which we have yet seen in our Botanic 
Gardens, this strikes us as the most handsome,, whether we 
consider the graceful mode of growth, the delicate green of 
the large foliage, the deeply-coloured branches, or the size 
and form of the flowers, and their exceedingly rich hues. 
It was raised from seeds, probably of hybrid production, by 
Mr. Niven, at the Glasnevin Botanic Garden, Dublin, and 
sent to Mr. Murray at the Glasgow Botanic Garden, under 
the name of P. recurvata. 

I so entirely agree with Mr. Don in the view he takes of 
the Fuchsias above named, and considered by many Botan- 
ists as species, that I have here followed that author in the 
varieties and synonyms which he has referred to F. macro- 
sterna, adding to the list our present one, which indeed 
accords better with the original figure of Ruiz and Pavon, 
than with any of the other kinds. 



3S22 




■ tf/JTam <)cl r : 



( 3522 ) 

Vaccinium virgatum. Pale Greenish- 
flowered Whortleberry. 

*********************** 

Class and Order. 
Decandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — VacciniejE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 4 — 5-dentatus. Corolla urceolata seu campanu- 
lata, limbo 4 — 5-fido reflexo. Antherce bicornes vel muticae. 
Bacca 4 — 5-locuIaris. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Vaccinium virgatum ; ramis floriferis plerumque aphyllis., 
racemis subcorymbosis secundis nutantibus bracteatis, 
corollis subcylindraceis, calycibus erectis, foliis obo- 
vato-oblongis integerrimis utrinque acutis membrana- 
ceis deciduis subtus pubescentibus, germine semi- 
supero. 

Vaccinium virgatum. Ait. Hort. Kew. ed. 1. v. 2. p. 12. 
WiUd. Sp. PL v. 2. p. 353. Spreng. Syst. Veg. v. 2. 
p. 210. Andr. Bot, Rep. t. 181 ? (ramis floriferis folio- 
sis). 

V. virgatum, /3. var. Wats. Dendr. t. 34 (non 33.) 

V. corymbosum. Linnaeus. 



The excellent collection of American Whortle-berries 
possessed by the Glasgow Botanic Garden has given me an 
opportunity of studying their peculiarities, which few per- 
haps have enjoyed to such an extent : yet, I confess myself 
much at a loss to find characters to distinguish some of the 
species, which, even to a common observer, appear suffici- 
ently marked : and such is the case with the present indivi- 
dual, which goes by the name of V. virgatum in our gar- 
dens, and which, I have reason to believe, is the plant so 

designated 



designated by Aiton. Mr. Aiton's plant, however,, is now 
almost universally referred to the V. corymbosum, an opin- 
ion which I once entertained myself: yet a more accurate 
examination has led me to a different conclusion. But 
others must determine for themselves, and I will be content 
with giving an accurate figure and description of the plant 
in question. 

Descr. A rather small bush, three to four feet high, 
much branched in a straggling manner, clothed with smooth 
brown bark, the younger branches green and downy. Leaves 
an inch or an inch and a half long, obovato-oblong, entire, 
acute at both extremities, nearly sessile, above glabrous and 
shining, often tinged with brown, below paler and downy, 
especially when seen under a magnifier. Racemes corym- 
bose, on branches which are generally destitute of leaves, 
each of several flowers, pointing one way and drooping. 
Calyx-lobes nearly erect, tinged with rich brown. Corolla 
cylindrical, generally a little broader at the base, the mouth 
slightly contracted, with five reflexed teeth ; the colour a 
pale yellow green, on one side more or less tinged with red. 
Stamens as in V. corymbosum. Germen partly superior. 
Style included. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Pistil and Calyx :— magnified. 



3623 




( 3523 ) 

SOLLYA HETEROPHYLLA. VARIOUS-LEAVED 

SOLLYA. 

****************** 

Class and Order. 
Pentandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Pittospore^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Cat. 5-phyllus. Petala 5, patentia. Anthera conni- 
ventes, loculis apice dehiscentibus. Stigma obscure bilo- 
bum. Pericarpium biloculare, polyspermum, seminibus 
substantia carnosa nidulantibus. — Frutex Australasicus 
scandens. Pedunculi corymbosi, terminates vel laterales, 
oppositifolii. 

Specific Name and Synonyms. 

Sollya* heterophylla. 

Sollya heterophylla. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1466. Don, Brit. 

FL Gard. t. 232. Lodd. Bot. Cab. t. 1975. 
Billardiera fusiformis. Labill. Nov. Holl. v. I. p. 65. t. 

90. De Cand. Prodr. v. I. p. 345. Spreng. Syst. 

Veget.v. I. p. 792. 



This charming plant, which has been ascertained by Mr. 
Don, to be the Billardiera fusiformis of Labillardiere, 
was discovered by the Botanist now mentioned in Van 
Diernen's Land : but our native specimens were gathered at 
King George's Sound, New Holland, by Allen Cunningham, 
Esq. and by Mr. Baxter. It is undoubtedly a great acqui- 
sition to our gardens. We have seen it blossoming in the 
open air, even in Scotland ; and, in very high perfection, in 

the 



* So named in compliment to Richard Horsman Solly, Esq. author 
of a work on the use of the Microscope, and ardently attached to the study 
of Vegetable Physiology. 



the extensive and well-kept nursery-grounds of Mr. Mackie, 
Norwich : yet Mr. Curtis, who cultivates it with remark- 
able success at Glazenwood, where our drawing was made 
by Miss Adams, observes, that it cannot be considered 
a hardy plant, even when trained against a wall ; that it is 
with difficulty kept in a brick pit ; and that its proper situa- 
tion, and where it comes to the highest perfection, is the 
back wall or the trellis-work of a conservatory. 

Some difference of opinion exists in regard to the con- 
tinuance of Sollva as a Genus, Mr. Don remarking that 
the fruit is the same as that of Billardiera, while Dr. 
Lindley observes that the seeds are imbedded in a fleshy 
or pulpy substance, which circumstance, added to the inflo- 
rescence being opposite to the leaves, to the e( short, some- 
what campanulate corollas, short staments with the anthers 
adhering in a cone round the style, and opening by two 
pores at the points," would seem to constitute a distinct 
Genus. Mr. Allan Cunningham has described another 
closely allied Genus, under the name of Cheiranthera, (see 
Bot. Reg. sub fol. 1719,) having a dry and leathery pericarp 
and stamens, which bend to one side of the ovary, forming 
themselves into a slightly curved line, like the fingers of the 
hand. I possess another Australian plant, from the Swan 
River, with blue, corymbose flowers, similar to those of 
Sollya and Cheiranthera ; but having the stamens distant, 
the anthers curiously contorted, and opening by longitudi- 
nal clefts *. 

Descr. A twining shrub, three to four feet high. Leaves 
oblong, glabrous, entire, or rarely Bin ua to-serrate, shortly 
petiolate. Corymbs terminal, or axillary and opposite the 
leaves, of several patent, nearly campanulate, bright blue 
flowers. Calyx small, of five ovate acute segments. Petals 
oval, obtuse. Stamens : Filaments five, short ; Anthers sub- 
sagittate, connivent, opening at the extremity, bent for 
some way down by a long pore or short fissure. Germen 
oblong, tapering upwards, very silky : Style linear : Stigma 
obscurely two-lobed. 



* It maybe thus characterized: — Spiranthera. Sepala 5, acuminata. 
Petala 5, acuminatissima, patentia, vix unguiculata : Antherce libera, line- 
ares, spiraliter contortaj. Ovarium oblongum villosum, biloculare, intus 
pulposum. Pericarpium ? — Frutices scandentes ; foliis oblongis. Flores- 
terminates, corymbosi, ccerulei. 

1. S. Fraseri. Hab. Swan River, N. Holl. Mr. Fraser. 







Tut by S Curtis. 



( 3524 ) 

RODRIGUEZIA SECUNDA. SlDE-FLOWERED 
RODRIGUEZIA. 

*********************** 

Class and Order. 
Gynandria Monandria. 

( Nat. Ord. — OrchidejE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium patens, subaequale, sepalis 2 lateralibus con- 
natis labello suppositis. Labellum integrum, unguiculatum, 
basi cornutum medio callosum ; ungue cum columnaparal- 
lelo. Columna teres, apice barbata. Anthera uniloculars, 
carnosa. Clinandrium nudum, retrorsum declive. Pollinia 
2, postice excavata, caudicula elastica. — Herbae epiphytce, 
subpseudo-bulbosce. Folia coriacea, v. membranacea, plicata. 
Spicae secundce. Flores speciosi. Lindl. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Rodriguezia * secunda ; pseudo-bulbis compressis ovalibus, 
foliis lanceolatis apice emarginatis obliquis, spica cy- 
lindracea foliis longiore recurva, sepalo supremo forni- 
cato, petalis ovatis obtusis, labello abrupte deflexo 
disco calloso apice cuneato emarginato. Lindl. 

Rodriguezia secunda. Humb. Nov. Gen. et Sp. PL v. 1. 
t. 92. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 930. 

Rodriguezia lanceolata. Lodd. Bot. Cab. t. 676 (non Ruiz 
et Pav.J 

Pleurothallis ? coccinea. Hook. Ex. Fl. t. 129. 



A very beautiful Orchideous plant, native of Trinidad, 
also of the Province of Popayan near Carthagena, where 
Humboldt's original specimen was found, and of Demerara, 

whence 



* So named by Ruiz and Pavon in compliment to Emanuel Rodri- 
guez, a Spanish Botanist, and Apothecary to His most Christian Majesty. 



whence plants have been lately brought by Capt. Bispham, 
with several other rarities, to the garden of my valued and 
often-mentioned friend, C. A. Parker, Esq., Liverpool. In 
his stove this species has come to a much higher degree of 
perfection than I have ever seen before. It there too varies 
considerably in the length and breadth of the bulb, and in 
its surface being more or less deeply wrinkled, in the breadth 
of the leaves, and in the deeper or paler hue of the flowers. 
From the finest of them, drawn by Henry Sandbach, Esq. 
aided by specimens sent by Mr. Parker, the accompanying 
figure was made. 

Descr. Pseudo-bulbs, when fully formed, usually ellip- 
tical, much compressed, with a prominent line on each face 
and often wrinkled, bearing one or many leaves. Leaves 
linear-oblong, lanceolate, thick, coriaceous, nerveless, more 
or less keeled or complicate. Peduncles several on the 
same plant, at first nearly erect, with the flower -buds com- 
pletely distichous, so as to form a flattened spike, afterwards 
curved or drooping. Bracteas lanceolate, membranous, 
pale. Flowers sometimes twenty or more on a spike, con- 
stantly unilateral, of a deep rose colour. Sepals and petals 
erect. Upper sepal (as well as the petals) ovate, convex : 
two lower sepals combined into one, deeply carinated under 
the lip, gibbous at the base. Lip obovate-oblong, waved, 
emarginate, with two small lobes near the base which runs 
down into a kind of spur. Disk with a deeply furrowed 
tubercle : the colour of the lip is deeper than the rest of the 
flower, almost orange in the disk. Column rather short, 
cylindrical, pure white. Anther-case hemisphaerical, fixed 
to the back of the column. Pollen-masses two, pale co- 
loured, fixed to a filiform stalk, which has, at its base, an 
oblong gland. Germen clavate, red. 



Fig. 1. Side view of a Flower. 2. Lip, slightly magnified. 



3623 




■■ 



( 3525 ) 

SlLPHIUM TEREBINTHACEUM. TeREBINTHINE 

SlLPHIUM. 

Class and Order. 
Syngenesia Necessaria. 

( Nat. Ord. — Composite. ) 

Generic Character. 

Receptaculum paleaceum. Pappus marginato-bicornis. 
Involucrum squamosus. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Silphium terebinthaceum ; foliis inferioribus amplis cordatis 

profunde dentato-serratis longe petiolatis subtus mar- 

gineque scabris, paniculis bracteatis. 
Silphium terebinthaceum. Linn. Suppl. p. 383. Jacq. 

Hort. Vind. v. I. p. 16. t. 43. Mich. Fl. Am. v. 2. p. 

245. Pursh } Fl. Am. v. 2. p. 577. Ell. Carol, v. 2. 

p. 463. Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. 3. p. 629. 



A very fine and handsome species of Silphium, to which 
the specific name seems to be applied on account of a tere- 
binthine gum, which exudes from the plant, as in the Sil- 
phium gummiferum of Mr. Elliott, and probably in other 
species of the Genus, during the hot summers which are 
experienced in their native climates. But in our chilly 
and damp country, no such exudation is observable : though 
the sap yields a peculiar odour. It is a stately plant, re- 
markable for the great size of its lower leaves ; and though 
inhabiting the western mountains of Carolina and Georgia 
and the prairies of St. Louis on the Missouri, it bears the 
open air in England and even in Scotland, remarkably well : 
flowering in the autumnal months. 

Descr. Perennial. Stem herbaceous, four to six feet in 
height, quite glabrous, striated, branched, erect ; lower leaves 
ample, some of them a foot long, cordate, coriaceous, acute, 

smooth 



smooth above,, beneath and at the margin beset with numer- 
ous short bristles,, each seated on a small white callous point. 
Petiole very long, sometimes measuring a foot or a foot and 
a half, below dilated into a sheathing base. The leaves 
gradually become smaller and narrower and less stalked 
upwards, and among the flower-stalks they pass into brac- 
teas about an inch long, often spreading and with their 
margins involute. Flowers paniculate, large, handsome, 
yellow. Involucre globose, of several roundish, green, 
closely imbricated, glabrous scales, innermost ones smaller 
and longer. Corollas of the ray numerous, ligulate, entire 
at the apex, each bearing a pistil. Segments of the style 
long, filiform. Achenium obovate, flat, scarcely downy, 
bearing a small blunt awn. Florets of the disk each sub- 
tended by a blunt, linear-oblong scale. Corolla yellow. 
Anthers protruded, dark brown. Style linear, filiform, 
entire. Germen cylindrical, slightly downy, abortive. 



Fig. 1. Florets of the Ray. 2. Discal or abortive Floret, with its accom- 
panying Scale. 3. Achenium : — magnified. 



3 J £6 




( 3526 ) 
MONARDA ARISTATA. AwNED MoNAftDA. 

Class and Order. 

DlANDRIA MoNOGYNIA. 

( Nat. Ord.— Labiate. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx cylindricus 15-nervis subaequalis 5-dentatus, intus 
fauce villosus. Corolla tubo longe exserto, fauce subinflata, 
bilabiata, labiis suba3qualibus ; superiori erecto lineari in- 
tegro, inferior! patente trifido. Stamina fertilia % aseenden- 
tia, e labio superiori exserta. Antherce margine connexae, 
biloeulares, loculis divaricatis. Stylus apice subaequaliter 
bifidus. Achenia sicca laevia. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Monarda aristata ; canescens, foliis oblongo-lanceolatis 
basi angustatis, floralibus bracteisque exterioribus ses- 
silibussubcoloratis apice longe subulato-aristatis, caly- 
cibus striatis pubescentibus, fauce barbata, dentibus 
subaequalibus longe subulatis apice penicellatis, co- 
rollas tubo dentes calycinos vix excedente. Benth. 

Monarda aristata. Nutt. in Herb. Hook. — Coll. towards a 
FL of the Arkansas, p. 187. Benth. Lab. p. 318. 

Monarda citriodora. Cervant., ex Lag! Nov. Gen. et Sp. 2. 

Apparently first detected in the Arkansa Territory by Mr. 
Nuttall, from whom we long ago received specimens under 
the above name, though it has only lately been published 
in a valuable memoir by that author on the plants of the 
Arkansas, given in the American Philosophical Transactions. 
My collection also contains specimens found by M. Beren- 
dier, at Bejar and Rio de la Trinidad in Texas, and again 
it has been gathered about San Felipe, in the same pro- 
vince of Mexico, by Mr. Drummond, who likewise introduc- 
ed 



ed it into our gardens in the early part of the spring of 
the present year. It is quite hardy, flowering in July and 
August, and is a desirable acquisition to our borders. 

Descr. " Perennial and annual/' according to Mr. Nut- 
tall. Stem a foot or more long, very obscurely four-sided, 
downy. Leaves oblon go-lanceolate, remotely and acutely 
serrated, narrower and ciliated and tapering into a footstalk 
at the base, marked with several nerves which run almost 
parallel with the midrib. Whorls several, closely crowded 
in the axils of the upper pairs of leaves, and accompanied 
by several broadly ovate, strongly aristate, downy bracteas, 
forming a kind of involucre. Calyx downy, tubular, stria- 
ted, the mouth closed with dense white hairs: teeth subu- 
late, brown, nearly as long as the tube, bearing and termi- 
nated by a little tuft of hairs. Corolla pale rose-coloured. 
Upper lip arched, sharply keeled at the back, two-toothed 
at the apex : lower one trifid, with the sides much reflexed, 
the disk spotted with purple. Filaments of the stamens gla- 
brous. Cells of the anther narrow, spreading. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Calyx with the tuft of white hairs at the mouth : — 
magnified. 



3j'jy 




rtu Gla&ixmocd. / 



( 3527 ) 
Euphorbia Bojert. Mr. Bojer's Spurge. 

******************** 

Class and Order. 

MONGESIA MONANDRIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Euphorbiace^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Involucrum androgynum, 4 — 5-fidum, extus appendiculis 
glandulosis (petala vel nectaria aliorum) : peripherici pedi- 
celli incerti numeric singuli cum singulis staminibus articu- 
lati. Germen pedicellatum, centrale : Styli 3, bifidi. Cap- 
sula 3-cocca. Spr. 

Specific Character. 

Euphorbia Bojeri; fruticosa spinosa, foliis numerosis coria- 
ceis patentissimis obovato-oblongis retusis cum mu- 
crone basi utrinque spina valida patente, pedunculis 
axillaribus cymosis dichotomis, bracteis duabus semi- 
orbiculatis coloratis basi unitis concavis involucrum in- 
cludentibus, involucri glandulis 5 semiorbiculatis. 



A most beautiful plant, and better meriting the name of 
splendens than its near ally so called, which is represented at 
t. 2902, and which was, equally with the present, introduced 
from Madagascar to Mauritius and to Europe, through the 
indefatigable exertions of Professor Bojer. It seems to be 
a plant of humbler growth than E. splendens ; it has fewer 
spines, more coriaceous, more obovate and retuse leaves, 
richer-coloured bracteas, and simple filaments. It flowers 
in the stove of the Glasgow Botanic Garden, in the latter 
end of winter, and in early spring; and more or less through 
the greater part of the year. 

Descr. Stem woody, obtusely and irregularly angular, 

smooth, and of a pale gray colour. Leaves spreading, dark 

1 green, coriaceous, on short petioles, obovato-oblong, retuse 

with a mucro, quite entire. Each leaf is situated between 

two 



two spreading, strong spines. Peduncles axillary, dichoto- 
mously divided, subcymose. Each involucre is subtended 
by two semiorbicular, spreading, brick scarlet bracteas, 
united at their bases, within which the involucre is lodged, 
and sessile. This is cup -shaped, yellow-green, with five 
short, red, incurved segments, alternating with the hve 
orange yellow, waxy, semiorbicular, spreading glands. 
Male flowers several : Filaments simple ; Anthers dark pur- 
ple, of two globose distinct cells. Pistil or female flower on 
a short pedicel : Styles three, nearly erect ; Stigmas two- 
lobed. 



Fig. 1. Involucre (with one Bractea removed,) and from which the Male 
Flowers are protruded. 2. Section of the Involucre (one of the Bracteas 
being removed) ; showing the Female Flower : — magnified. 




'■//,)• "• 



//SJ6 



C 3528 ) 

Amaryllis psittacina, hybrida. Hybrid 
var. of the Parrot Amaryllis. 

Class and Order. 
Hexandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — AmaryllidE/E. ) 

Generic Character. 

Corolla 6-partita, regularis vel ringens, fauce nuda vel 
squamis coronata. Stamina declinata vel recta. Capsula 
trilocularis. Spr. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Amaryllis psittacina ; biflora subsemiringens, tubi mem- 

brana brevissima bicolori denticulata, staminibus in- 

clusis. 
Amaryllis psittacina. Ker, Bot. Reg. t. 199. Lodd. Bot. 

Cab. 1204. Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. 2. p. 50. 
Hybrida : 4-flora, perianthii laciniis angustioribus. 
Amaryllis psittacina- Johnsoni. Gowan in Hort. Soc. 

Trans, v. 5. p. 361 . (Tab. nostr. 3528.) 



For this truly splendid Hybrid, the offspring, it is re- 
ported, of Amaryllis Johnsoni (itself, I believe, a hybrid,) 
fertilized by the pollen of A. psittacina, the Glasgow Botanic 
Garden is indebted to the late Lord Caernarvon. The 
first notice we have of it is from Mr. Gowan, in the Horti- 
cultural Transactions above quoted, where he observes : — 

" It was given to Lord Caernarvon by my friend, W. 
Griffin, Esq., who raised it in his hothouse at South Lam- 
beth, previous to the year 1820. The knowledge of its 
parentage led me to form great expectations of its beauty, 
and to pay it particular attention. It has grown rapidly 
here, and a few days ago produced two scapes, which have 

just 

VOL. X. M 



just expanded their flowers. My expectations have been 
fully realized, and I think it may fairly be pronounced the 
most splendid individual of this splendid Genus. The co- 
rolla of the hybrid Amaryllis psittacina- J ohnsoni is nearly 
an inch longer than that of A. psittacina: and expands 
about an inch wider. The upper lacinia of the corolla of 
A. psittacina assumes a horizontal position, in the hybrid it 
is inclined upwards, and the laciniae are altogether more 
regularly and widely expanded, so that the flower shows 
itself to greater advantage. The faucial membrane of A. 
psittacina is minutely denticulated : in the hybrid, it is con- 
spicuously bearded. But the superior beauty of the sub- 
ject of our present plate arises chiefly from its colours ; for 
while in A. psittacina the crimson tint is confined almost 
entirely to a small terminal portion of the petals, and a few 
small streaks proceeding thence ; in the hybrid, the hue is 
not only much richer, but occupies a considerably larger 
space, being diffused over the whole margin of the laciniae, 
besides a most delicate pencilling of the same fine colour, 
which is streaked over the greater part of their surface with 
an inimitable richness of effect, much enhanced by a cream- 
coloured stripe, proceeding from the central green mass, 
and prolonged to their tips. But it is so difficult to convey 
in words an adequate idea of the complicated colouring of 
the flowers, that I must refer you to an actual inspection of 
it, and would only add, that the foliage differs materially, 
as might be expected, from that of its parents : but ap- 
proaches more nearly to the male than to the female parent : 
the leaves being rather broader than those of A. psittacina. 
Our plant produced four of its richly coloured blossoms 
on one scape, in the month of April, 1836. 



( 3529 ) 

CONVALLARIA OPPOSITI FOLIA. OpPOSITE- 

leaved Solomon's Seal. 

Class and Order. 
Hexandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Smilacin^b. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium campanulatum, vel tubulosum, limbo 6-fido. 
Stamina corolla breviora, Jilamenta tubo adnata ; antherce 
lineares, rectae. Stylus erectus. Bacca sphaerica, 3-locuIa- 
ris, loculis dispermis ; seminibus saepe abortivis. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Convallaria* oppositifolia ; caule tereti, foliis oppositis 
oblongis acuminatis nitidis breviter petiolatis, pedun- 
culis axillaribus umbellatis 3 — 10-floris nutantibus, 
perianthio tubuloso basi ventricoso. 

Convallaria oppositifolia. Wall, in Asiat. Res. v. 13. p. 
380. cum Icone. Lodd. Bot. Cab. t. 640. Hook. Ex 
Ft. v. 2. t. 125. 



A very desirable greenhouse plant; for though it has 
been now introduced from Nepal many years, by Dr. 
Wallich, I am not aware that it has been found sufficiently 
hardy to bear the open air of our fickle climate. It is of 
graceful growth, the leaves are of a bright and glossy green ; 
and the copious flowers, which continue for a long time in 
the latter end of the winter months, are elegantly marked 
with reddish lines. 

Descr. Stem a foot to a foot and a half high, erect, 
rounded, simple, green, tinged with red. Leaves copious, 

three 



* From convallis, a valley, in allusion to the place of growth of many of 
the species. 



three to five inches long, opposite, distichous, oblong, acu- 
minate, striated, of a glossy green colour, the petiole short. 
Flowers drooping at the back of the plant, copious, in axil- 
lary, almost sessile umbels of from three to eight or ten 
blossoms. Pedicels reddish, three-fourths of an inch long. 
Perianth nearly an inch long, tubular, greenish -white, 
marked with six lines of reddish dots : the tube swollen 
below, the throat contracted, the limb greenish, of six 
spreading segments. Stamens six, inserted near the middle 
of the tube. Filaments white, curved. Anthers arrow- 
shaped, yellow. Germen ovate, with three obtuse angles : 
Style included : Stigma trifid, villous. 



Fig. 1. Single Flower : — magnified. 




otUil. 



iait GUtumnUJmM*ir*rX13$6 



( 3530 ) 

RlBES SPECIOSUM. SllOWY CoOSEBEltRY. 

■•■I'. ■ v I / '. A'. A/. As. .*&■, A'- A', A'-, A', ."Vi A^ ~-V. A / < As. A/. .^■l / - A / . A". A\ 

•T- <V* 'I s 4 s 'K VjN V^S '/{S VjN /Js 4\ Vjs */Js Vjs V$N */^» *^N ijN VXS '/}» 

C/ass #rcd Order. 
Pentandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — GrossulariejE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 5-lobus, laciniis plus minusve coloratis. Petala b, 
parva, albida, lutea vel rubra. Stamina 5, rarissime 6, 
filamentis liberis. Stylus l, 2,3, 4-fidus. Bacca unilocu- 
laris, receptaculis lateralibus. Semina arillata (an in om- 
nibus ?) oblonga, compressa. D C. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Ribes speciosum ; ramis setosis, aculeis stipularibus rigidis 
tripartitis, foliis glabris trilobis incisis basi cuneatis, 
racemis nutantibus 2 — 5-fioris, calycibus tubulosis 
basi dilatatis, staminibus (plerumque 4) longissime 
exsertis. 

Rises speciosum. Pursh, Fl.Am. v. 2. Suppl. p. 731. De 
Cand. Prodr. p. 478. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 1557. Sw. 
Br. Ft. Gard. t. 149. 

Ribes stamineum. Sm. in Rees. Cycl. De Cand. Prodr. 
v. 3. p. 477. Hook. Fl. Bor. Am. v. 1. p. 229. 

Ribes fuchsioides. cc FL Mex. ined. Bcrland Mem. Soc. 
Phys. Genev. v. 3. t.3." 

Ribes triacantha. Menz. MSS. cum Icon, nitidiss. 



This fine Ribes, so remarkable for its leaves resembling 
those of the White-Thorn, and its flowers those of a Fuchsia, 
was first discovered by the venerable Menzies in California, 
during the voyage of Capt. Vancouver, and his beautiful 
drawing and description made on the spot, are now before 
me. It was introduced to our gardens by Mr. Collie, the 
surgeon of H. M. S. Blossom, in 1829. Our drawing was 

made 



made by Mr. William Curtis, at the extensive Nursery 
Grounds of Glazenwood. In native specimens, the leaves 
are smaller, aud the racemes only two-flowered. In England 
the plant seems to be perfectly hardy : in Scotland it re- 
quires the protection of a wall, or the flowers will effectually, 
in most years, be destroyed, by our fickle springs. Its 
flowering season is April and May ; its growth is rapid and 
vigorous during summer, and the plant is now becoming 
common. 

Descr. A shrub, three to five feet high, with sextose, 
red-brown branches, and at the base of each cluster of leaves 
a strong, three-forked spine. Leaves on short petioles, 
small, three-lobed and irregularly cut into sharp lobes or 
teeth ; the base cuneate. Racemes of from three to five 
flowers. Bracteas ovate, acuminate, much shorter than the 
piloso-glandular pedicels. Calyx deep scarlet, glandular, 
tubular, swollen at the base; segments straight. Petals 
included, red. Stamens twice or thrice as long as the 
flower, straight, red. Anthers ovate. Germen small, glan- 
dular. Style as long as the stamens : Stigma bifid. 



3551 




Rib ht; if.uiUjSUaenmmxt'EacE.JiretrWii- 



( 3531 ) 
Allium Cowani. Mr. Cowan's Onion. 

.-V". &- &- A'. .'V- &- ."I 7 - .^i i^- &- &, A*- .^T ffyw .'I'l A'- Aft A*, i^i A*, 
VJs *<J\ VJi, VJv VJ\ /Js VJv */Jn 'yl* VJv VJ\ VJ» Vf? Vj? 7j^ VJ\ VJ. '/J* Vjv /X\ 

CZass and Order. 
Hexandria Monogvnia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Asphodele^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Corolla 6-petala, patens. Filamenta vel aequalia peta- 
lorum basi inserta, vel basi dilatata subconnata, vel 3-cus- 
pidata. Capsula 3-locularis. Embryo excentricus. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Allium Cowani; scapo nudo semitereti, foliis lineari-lance- 
olatis longe attenuatis flaccidis, spatha monophylla, 
umbella multiflora, sepalis ovatis obtusis (albis), fila- 
mentis subulatis uniformibus. 

Allium Cowani. Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 758. Hort. Soc. Trans, 
v. 6. p. 98. Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. 2. p. 36. Roem. 
et Schult. Syst. Veget. v. 7. p. 1109. 

A native of elevated situations in Peru, according to 
Professor Lindley, whence bulbs were sent to the Horticul- 
tural Society of London by James Cowan, Esq. To that 
valuable Society, as well as to John Mac Lean, Esq. of 
Lima, we owe the possession of the plant in the Glasgow 
Botanic Garden, where it flowered in the stove in Septem- 
ber, 1835. 

Descr. The bulb I have not seen. Leaves all radical, 
linear-lanceolate, flaccid, attenuated into a very long point, 
keeled, in our plant much longer than the scape, the 
young ones obscurely ciliated. Scape a foot or a foot and 
a half high, semiterete, naked, bearing an umbel of many 
flowers. Spatha of a single, whitish membranous, pointed 
leaf. Pedicels two inches or more long. Sepals white, 
ovate, obtuse, concave, spreading. Filaments subulate, 
equal : Anthers oblong, green. Germen globose, three- 
lobed, lobes with a deep furrow. Style reaching about the 
length of the stamens. 

Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Pistil : — magnified. 




5S32 






■ 



C 3532 ) 

Begonia Fischeri. Dr. Fischer's 
Begonia. 

******************* 

Class and Order. 

MoNffiCIA POLYANDRIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Begoniacejs. ) 

Generic Character. 

Masc. Calyx o. Corolla polypetala, petalis plerumque 
4, iuaequalibus. 

F^m. Calyx o. Corolla petalis 4 — 9, plerumque inse- 
qualibus. Styli 3, bifidi. Capsula triquetra, alata, trilo- 
cularis, polysperma. 

Specific Character. 

Begonia Fischeri; caulescens, foliis oblongis acutis inaequa- 
liter cordatis dentato-serratis utrinque glabris nitidis, 
stipulis ovatis integerrimis, floribus masculis 4-petalis, 
petalis exterioribus rotundatis concavis marginibus 
plano-revolutis, floribus faemineis 6 -petalis petalis 
ovato-lanceolatis, alis germinis inaequaliter rotundatis. 

Begonia Fischeri. Otto, MSS. 



This plant, which has small flowers, but exquisitely 
beautiful foliage, was received at the Botanic Garden, 
Edinburgh from Berlin, in 1835, and flowered in the stove 
in February and March, 1836. 

Descr. Stem erect, branched, fleshy, swollen at the 
joints, red, shining. Leaves unequally cordate, acute, in- 
distinctly sinuated, slightly undulate, unequally dentato- 
serrate, glabrous on both sides, when young bright red 
behind, paler at the veins, and pink above, with a peculiar 
silvery lustre which continues on the old leaves, the colour 
being then beautifully delicate yellowish green, and the 
redness behind much less considerable; petioles nearly 

round, 



round, half as long as the leaves. Stipules large, ovate, 
acute, entire. Peduncles axillary, twice as long as the pe- 
tioles. Cyme twice or oftener forked ; branches divaricated. 
Male flowers in the forks of the cyme, four-petalous, the 
outer petals rounded, with a sinuosity on one side where the 
pedicel is attached, hollow in the centre, with flattened, 
slightly revolute edges, forming a perfect miniature of a 
barber's basin; inner petals obovato-cuneate, undulate. 
Stamens united only at their insertion. Female flowers 6- 
petalous, the petals ovato-lanceolate. Germen rather une- 
qually winged, the wings unequally rounded. Graham. 



( 3533 ) 

Vesicaria gracilis. Slender-stemmed 
Vesica ri a. 

******************** 

Class and Order. 
Tetradynamia Siliculosa. 

( Nat. Ord. — CruciferjE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Silicula globosa, inflata, valvis hemisphaericis. Semina 
plurima (ultra 8) saepius marginata. Petala Integra. D C. 

Specific Character. 

Vesicaria gracilis; annua multicaulis, caulibus filiformibus 
rigidis scabriusculis, foliis lanceolatis integris vel sub- 
angulatis inferioribus subspathulatis petiolatis omnibus 
nudiusculis, racemis elongatis, petalis patentibus ob- 
cordatis subsessilibus, siliculis globosis membranaceis 
glaberrimis tetraspermis stylum aequantibus. 



A native of the same country with our V. grandiflora 
(Tab. 3464), namely, Texas, and discovered at the same 
time by Mr. Drummond. It is less showy than the latter, 
but a lively and graceful plant, and well adapted for orna- 
menting rocks. It continues long in flower, during almost 
the whole summer ; and the blossoms are succeeded by the 
numerous, small, and exactly-globose seed vessels. Ano- 
ther and very similar Vesicaria is in my Herbarium, from 
Texas, gathered by M. Berlandier, in which the leaves 
and stems are rather thickly clothed with short, dense stel- 
lated pubescence. 

Descr. Root annual, sending from its upper extremity 
several stems, which are slender, filiform, wiry, branch- 
ed, minutely scabrous, more or less procumbent, from eight 
to ten inches long. Leaves remote, and chiefly at the base 
of the racemes : lanceolate, almost entirely glabrous, their 



margin 



margin quite entire or obscurely angled, narrow at the 
base and subpetiolate ; the lowermost ones decidedly so 
and spathulate. Racemes axillary and terminal, elongated. 
Flowers remote, bright yellow. Pedicels scabrous, with 
short, stellated hairs, considerably elongated after flower- 
ing. Calyx of four linear-lanceolate, appressed, glabrous 
leaves. Petals obcordate, scarcely clawed, very patent. 
Germen elliptical, stipitate, shorter than the style : Stigma 
capitate. When the fruit is ripe, the pedicels are almost 
horizontal, curved upwards at the extremity, and bearing 
the erect, exactly globose pedicellate silicula, or pouch, 
which is smooth and shining, membranous, and not larger 
than hemp seed. The fully-ripe fruit does not readily 
separate into valves Cells two, each containing about 
four, depressed, dark brown seeds. 



Fig. 1. Petal. 2. Stamens and Pistil. 3. Pistil. 4. Seed-vessel. 5. 
Ditto, from which one valve is removed, showing the four Seeds: — mag- 
nified. 




Pub. bt, 



( 3534 ) 

Epidendrum macrochilum. Large-lipped 
Epidendrum. 

********************* 

Class and Order. 
Gynandria Monandria. 

( Nat. Ord. — Orchides. ) 

Generic Character. 

Sepala patentia, subaequalia. Petala sepalis aequalia vel 
angustiora, rarius latiora, patentia vel reflexa. Labellum 
cum marginibus columnar omnino vel parte connatum, 
limbo integro vel diviso, disco saepius calloso, costato vel 
tuberculato ; nunc in calcar productum ovario accretum et 
cuniculum formans. Columna elongata; clinandrio mar- 
ginato, saepe fimbriato. Anthera carnosa, 2 — 4-locularis. 
Pollinia 4, caudiculis totidem replicatis annexa. — Herbae 
( Americanae) epiphytce, caule nunc apice vel basi pseudo-bul- 
boso, nunc elongato apice folioso. Folia carnosa, rarissime 
venis elevatis striata. Flores spicati, racemosi, corymbosi 
vel paniculati terminates vel laterales. Lindl. 

Specific Character. 

Epidendrum macrochilum ; bulbis ovatis rugosis diphyllis, 
foliis lineari-oblongis, coriaceis obtusiusculis, sepalis 
petalisque obovato-lanceolatis patentibus apicibus in- 
curvis, labello libero trilobo lobis lateralibus ovatis 
acutis columnam amplectantibus, intermedio maximo 
obcordato disco calloso ecristato lateralibus reflexis, 
columna aptera. 



A charming Epiphyte, introduced from Mexico, by 
Charles Horsfall, Esq., in whose fine collection at Ever- 
ton it flowered in June, 1836, when a drawing and speci- 
men of the handsome flowers were kindly communicated by 

Mrs. 



Mrs. Horsfall. In the general structure of the flower it 
resembles my Encyclia * patens (Bot. Mag. t. 3013.), that 
is, it has, like that, the lip distinct from, not united with, the 
column, and the two lateral lobes of the lip enfolding the 
column. The two species are, however, totally distinct, 
the flowers here being thrice the size of the other, and the 
lip of a totally different form and colour. 

Descr. Bulbs clustered, ovate, about the size of a 
pigeon's egg, the older ones wrinkled ; the younger ones 
bearing two leaves at the extremity about six to eight 
inches long, linear-oblong, rather obtuse, recurved, some- 
what coriaceous. Scape arising from between the two 
leaves, a span or more high, bearing a raceme of three to 
four large, handsome inodorous flowers. Sepals and side- 
petals uniform, spreading, obovato-lanceolate, or nearly 
spathulate, singularly incurved at the extremity, as well 
represented in Mrs. Horsfali/s drawing, of a greenish- 
brown, paler on the outside, and pale green at the base. 
Lip very large, of three lobes : the two side lobes, at the 
very base, ovate, acute (the apices reflexed) completely en- 
veloping the column, and even crossing each other on the 
upper side of the column, the middle one is very large, 
broadly ovate, or rather obcordate, having a deep notch at 
the base, the sides bent back : this lip is pure white (chang- 
ing to cream-colour in age), having a red purple spot at 
the base, where there is a flattened fleshy disk, and another 
near the middle. Column quite distinct from the lip, tri- 
angular, compressed, wingless. Anthers deep yellow, large : 
celts small, each containing two pollen-masses of a bright 



orange colour. 



* More correctly an Epidendrum, as suggested by Professor Lindley, 
and the E. odoratissimum of that author. 



Fig. 1. Lip. 2. Column. 3. Anther inverted. 4. Two of the Pollen- 
masses : — magnified. 






^'<#%i 




C 3535 ) 

Banksia occidentals. West-Coast 
Banksia. 

.•& .St". .St'. .Sfc .St'. A'. .SI'- jjfii ifc .Sfr. ■ v & / . .St*. .Sfc .Sli'. .Sfc jl". . V I / . .Sk .Sfc .Sfc .Sfr 1 . j^. .'K 
MS MS MS MS MS MS MS MS *ff MS MS MS MS MS MS MS " -IS MS MS MS MS My 

C/«ss «wrf Order. 
Tetrandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Proteace^e. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium quadripartitum (raro 4-fidura). Stamina 
apicibus concavis laciniarum immersa. Squamulce hypo- 
gynae 4. Ovarium triloculare, loculis inonospermis. Folli- 
culus ligneus : dissepimento libero, bifido. Amentmn flos- 
culorum paribus tribracteatis. Br. 

Specific Name and Character. 

Banksia occidentalis ; foliis linearibus extra medium spinu- 
loso-dentatis subtus aveniis, bracteis amenti apice gla- 
bris, perianthiis marcescentibus, unguibus basi intus 
barbatis, folliculis ventricosis tomentosis, apice com- 
pressiusculo nudo, caule fruticoso, ramulis glabris. 
Br. 

Banksia occidentalis. Brown, Linn. Soc. Trans, v. 10. p. 
204. Ibid. Prodr. p. 392. Ibid. Hort. Kew. ed. 2. 
v. I. p. 215. Roem. et Schult. Syst. Veget. v. 3. p. 438. 
Sprengely Syst. Veget. v. I. p. 484. 



This handsome species flowered in the greenhouse of the 
Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, in September, 1835. 

Descr. Shrub erect. Branches ascending, red, glabrous, 
when young augled and having a few adpressed hairs. 
Leaves (four inches long, two lines broad) verticillate, 
linear, glabrous above, covered with white tomentum and 
veinless below, revolute in the edge, beyond the middle 
distinctly spinuloso-dentate, terminated with three mucros, 

of 

vol x. x 



of which that in the centre is the shortest. Inflorescence 
terminal. Perianth dark red, but appearing leaden colour- 
ed from a covering of adpressed hairs, glabrous at the apex. 
Styles glabrous, reddish-purple, spreading horizontally, 
about three times as long as the perianth, connivent in 
double rows, and tipped with the yellow pollen. Graham. 




Pub. hu S. I urtis uLamwcoil EuexJJt 



( 3536 ) 

Broughtonia coccinea. Crimson- 
flowered Broughtonia. 

>V, >*/. Sh iSt'i "fr- ■St'- •"-V- iSt"- .St*- -St'- SV- ■Sl'- .Sfc iSfc Sfr*i .S^. -St'i .Ski -St'i .Sfc 
v]S" vf. VIS vf*' vf*" '^s* '/*>• vi-* vf> vf** ■/*>• vj>" v^* vf. 1 vf*' vf. 1 vf" vj." vf-' •;*>' 

CZass «wc? Order. 
Gynandria Monandria. 

( Nat. Ord. — OrchidejE. ) 

Generic Character. 

Sepala angustia, patentia, lateralia basi obliqua, cum 
labelli basi connata et decurrentia. Petala latiora. Label- 
lum indivisum, adscendens, basi columnar adnatum, in cal- 
care lineari mellifluo, ovario connato decurrens. Columna 
brevis, crassa, apice dilatata. Anthera 4-locularis, septo- 
rum marginibus membranaceis. Pollinia 4, caudiculis re- 
plicatis. — Herba epiphyta, pseudo-bulbosa ; foliis carnosis ; 
scapo terminali muUifloro. Lindl. 

Specific Name and Synonyms. 

Broughtonia sanguinea. 

Broughtonia sanguinea. Br. in Hort. Kew. ed. 2. v. 5. p. 

217. Lodd. Rot. Cab. t. 793. Spreng. Syst. Veget. 

v. 3. p. 734. Lindl. Gen. et Sp. Orchid, p. 118. 
Dendrobium sanguineum. Sw. Ft. Ind. Occ. v. 4. p. 1529. 
Epidendrum sanguineum. Sw. Prodr. p. 124. 
Viscum radice bulbosa minus, &c. Sloane, Jam. v. I. p. 

250.*. 121. f. 2. 
Satyrium parasiticum ; foliis paucioribus, &c. Browne, 

Jam. p. 324. 
(£.) foliis longioribus, petalis angustioribus. 
Broughtonia sanguinea. Hook. Bot. Mag. t. 3076. 



When the figure of Broughtonia sanguinea was given at 
tab. 3076 of this work, from the pencil of Mrs. Horsfall, I 
had not seen the usual state of the plant ; but now that this 
has blossomed in the stove of the Glasgow Botanic Garden, 

I 



I cannot but consider the former as a variety, having longer 
leaves and narrower petals; with a colour, very inferior in 
brilliancy, to that which we now represent, and which may 
indeed be reckoned among the handsomest, and certainly 
the most richly coloured of this splendid family. Their 
blossoms also continue for a considerable length of time in 
perfection. Though introduced to Kew from Jamaica since 
1793, it appears to be yet a rare plant in our gardens. Its 
blossoming season is May and June. 

Descr. Bulbs or pseudo-bulbs clustered, roundish-ovate, 
compressed, often richly stained with brown, and bearing, 
from the apex, one or two leaves, which are linear-oblong, 
three to four inches high, somewhat coriaceous. Peduncle 
also arising from the same point, eight to ten inches or 
more high, jointed and bracteated, and bearing a raceme of 
six to nine flowers at the summit, which are of a very rich 
crimson colour. Calyx of three equal, spreading, equi- 
distant, lanceolate sepals. Petals spreading ; two lateral 
ones broadly ovate, acute, slightly crisped ; lower one or 
labellum rotundato-cordate, obscurely two-lobed, waved 
and delicately crenate at the margin : the base beneath 
running down into a very long, adnate spur upon the scar- 
let germen. Column short, whitish. Anther-case smalls 
hemispherical : Pollen-masses, two compressed pairs, with 
the caudicles folded down upon them. 



Fig. 1. 1. Column, with the Germen and Spur. 2. Inner view of the 
Anther, containing the Pollen : — magnified. 




3J37 



( 3537 ) 

M ALVA MUNROANA. Mr. MlJNRo's MALLOW. 

Class and Order. 

MONODELPHIA PoLYANDRIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Malvaceje. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx cinctus iovolucro triphyllo rarius 5—-6-phyllo, 
bracteolis oblongis setaceisve. Carpella capsularia plurima 
in orbem disposita. De Cand. 

Specific Name and Character. 

Malva Munroana; herbacea glaucescens, foliis cordatis ob- 
tusis 3— 5-lobis lobis crenato-lobatis pubescentibus 
pilis brevibus stellatis, stipulis subulatis deciduis, pe- 
dicellis axillaribus solitariis vel binis 1-pauci-floris lon- 
gitudine florum, involucri foliolis subulatis longitudme 

calycis. 
Malva Munroana. Douglas' MSS.—Lindl. Bot. Reg. t. 

1306. 



A very pretty showy species, flowering in June in the 
greenhouse. It seems to be hardy in England, but its 
beauty suffers by exposure to the wet. Introduced by Mr. 
Douglas from the barren plains of the Columbia, North- 
West America. I was disposed at first to refer it to M. 
miniata, which it considerably resembles in the size and 
colour of its flowers : but I find, on a careful examination, 
that the leaves are shorter and more obtuse, and the pedun- 
cles are shorter and fewer-flowered. It blossoms during 
the summer months. t 

Descr. Stems weak and trailing, if not artificially sup- 
ported, rounded, glaucous, slightly downy. Leaves or 
petioles about equal to the blade in length, alternate, distant, 
cordate, very obtuse, glaucous, three to seven-lobed, and 

those 



those lobes again crenato-lobate, above, and below more 
so, clothed with short, inconspicuous, stellated down. Sti- 
pules small, subulate, soon falling away. Prom the upper 
leaves, in the axils, appear one or two pedicels rather more 
than half an inch long, each bearing one or more flowers. 
Calyx cup-shaped, quinquefid, hoary with stellated down. 
Involucre of three subulate bracteas, about as long as the 
calyx. The fruit I have not seen. 



Fig. 1. Flower: — magnified. 






553(9 







C 3538 ) 

Ornithogalum conicum. Pure-white- 
flowered Star of Bethlehem. 

&m &t ?V. jJA &• ^V. ^K &t ■ N l / . ."fr. &m jfc - V l / . lifc A ■'J', ifc .'l'. . V l / . 

C/ass <mrf Order. 
Hexandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Asphodele.^. ) 

Generic Character. 

Corolla 6-petala, patens. Filamenta basi dilatata recep- 
taculo inserta. Capsula triiocularis. Embryo axilis. — 
Flores racemosi. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Ornithogalum conicum; racemo conico, filamentis subula- 
tis, bracteis membranaceis (longitudine pedicellorurn), 
foliis lanceolatis planis ciliato-marginatis, sepalis (albis) 
lanceolatis. 

Ornithogalum conicum. Jacq. Coll. v. 3. p. 232. Ic. Rar. 
v. 2. t. 428. Roem. et Schult. Syst. Veget. v. 7. p. 514. 
Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. 2. p. 31. 



We are indebted for our knowledge of this plant to Baron 
Ludwig, who sent bulbs from the Cape of Good Hope 
to the Glasgow Botanic Garden, in 1835. Flowering spe- 
cimens were produced in the greenhouse in the summer of 
the same year. The flowers are large, handsome, pure 
white, the sepals acuminate, spreading, but never curled 
back as in O. revolutum, to which this plant, in other re- 
spects, bears some affinity. 

Descr. Leaves few and springing from the root, or from 
the base of the scape, lanceolate, plane, acuminate, bright 
but pale green, the margin white and delicately fringed ; 
the lower part is sheathing. Scape a foot high, terminated 
by a raceme of flowers, at first conical, afterwards more 
elongated. Pedicels an inch long, erecto-patent, having 

a 



a large ovato-acuminate, membranous bractea, about its own 
length. Sepals pure white, lanceolate, acuminate, spread- 
ing. Filaments much shorter than the sepals, and, as well 
as the anthers, yellow. Pistil (probably imperfect) yellow. 



Fig. 1. Portion of the Leaf, to show the margin : — magnified. 



5559 




■!0\.J)t 



( 3539 ) 

Isopogon Baxteri. Mr. Baxter's 
Isopogon. 

- N Z / . &. .^t -V. .S^. .St'. . v l y . &. aI'. . V l / . &. lI/. >l\ .S^. ■ V I / . . v fc &• ^k .4% /fr. ."fr. 

TfT "^ 7[? Vf* '^." 7p Vf> "/}? VJT VJT */Jv* VJ." v]k.* V^" V^ '$? VJ^' flff VJ..* Vf»" v^* 

C/ass «nrf Order. 
Tetrandria Monogynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Proteaces. ) 

Generic Character. 

Perianthium quadrifidum, tubo gracili, diutices persis- 
tente. Squama nulla? hypogynae. Stylus totus deciduus. 
Stigma fusiforme vel cylindraceum. Nux sessilis, ventri- 
cosa, undique comosa. — Frutices rigidi. Folia glabra, 
plana veljiliformia, divisa vel integerrima. Capitula termi- 
nalia, raro axillaria. Flores modo densissime imbricati; 
strobilo globoso, modo fastigiato, receptaculo communi pla- 
niusculo subinvolucrato, paleis deciduis, congestis. Br. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Isopogon Baxteri; foliis dilatato-cuneiformibus, fruticis 
adulti trifidis lobis incisis lacinia mucronatis, juve- 
nilis indivisis apice dentato, capitulis aggregatis, re- 
ceptaculo piano. Br. 

Isopogon Baxteri. Br. Prodr. Fl. Nov. Holl. Suppl. v. 1. 
p. 9. Grah. Descr. of Plants in Edin. Phil. Journ. 
for Jan., 1836. 



A handsome species, of which seeds were sent by Colonel 
Lindesay from New Holland to the Botanic Garden, Edin- 
burgh in 1830. It was raised the following year, and flow- 
ered in the greenhouse in March and April, 1835. 

Descr. Shrub erect, the specimen described two feet 
high. Stem round. Bark brown, densely covered with 
short, soft pubescence, mixed with longer hairs, on the 
branches red. Leaves hard, stiff, with glands on both sur- 
faces, 



faces, having pubescence and hairs similar to those on the 
stem, especially when young ; subglabrous when old ; 
strongly marked on both sides with elevated veins, which 
are generally trichotomously branched, once or twice trifid, 
cuneate and once or twice twisted at the base, edges placed 
vertically ; the segments terminated with long, pungent mu- 
cros ; the lower leaves undivided, rounded and toothed at 
the apex, the teeth terminating in pungent mucros. Heads 
of Flowers crowded at the termination of the stem] and 
branches. Scales of the Involucre pubescent and hairy, 
smaller inwards, acute, reflected, subdentate. Perianth 
soft, rose-coloured, darkest at the tip, densely covered with 
spreading, white hairs, tube very slender, segments of the 
limb reflexed. Anthers linear, yellow. Pollen granules 
roundish-triangular, shining, orange yellow. Style as long 
as the perianth, fusiform at the apex, below it turnid, and 
densely covered with yellow, reflected, crystalline pubes- 
cence. Stigmatic surface terminal. Graham. 



Fig. 1. Flower : — magnified. 




j.m°: : 



( 3540 ) 

Drosera filiformis. Narrow-leaved 
Sun-dew. 

As. A/. ■ v ! / - A', A / . ■ v I / . A'- A', A', A/. A / . A*. A / . -I^ A'- A / -fr As- ■ v l / - A~- 
7f? /$• /jv TIP /f» Vf» VJs" '/Jn VJ>. VJ\ "/J," VJ. •/}»■ V{s VJC vis •<$,' 9|P /J\ vj^ 

C7ass awrf Order. 
Pentandria Pentagynia. 

( Nat. Ord. — Droserace^i. ) 

Generic Character. 

Sepala petalaque 5 inappendiculata. Stamina 5. Styli 
3 — 5^ bipartiti. — Herbae in uliginosis sphagnosis crescentes. 
Folia ciliis glandulosis rubidis irritabilibus ornata. D C. 

Specific Character and Synonyms. 

Drosera* filiformis; scapis lateralibus, foliis lineari-fili- 
formibus glanduloso-pilosis, dorso glabris canalicula- 
rs, basi lanatis, staminibus 5, stylis 8 basi in paribus 
coalitis. 

Drosera filiformis. Rafinesque, in Need. Rep. 2. 360. Ibid, 
in Desv. Journ. de Bot. 1. 227. Pursh, Ft. Amer. 
Sept. 1. 211. Nutt. Gen. 1. 142. Roem. et Schult. 
Syst. Veget. 6. 763. De Cand. Prodr. 1. 1318. Tor- 
rey, Fl. of North, and Mid. Sect, of the United States, 
v.l.p. 332. Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. I. p. 955. Beck, 
Bot. of North and Mid. States, p. 42. 

Drosera tenuifolia. fVilld. Enumer. p. 340. Roem. et 
Schult. 1. 763. Bigelow, Plants of Boston, p. 124. 



This remarkable species was found by Mr. James Mac- 
nab, in a swamp about ten miles above Tuckerton, New 
Jersey, United States, and introduced by him into the 

gardens 



* From ifotror, dew. A pellucid fluid exudes from the glands of the 
foliage, whence the plant appears as if covered with dew. 



gardens about Edinburgh in 1834. It flowered freely in 
the stove at Dr. Neill's, also at Comely Bank Nursery, and 
with us. I cannot hesitate to agree with those who consi- 
der Drosera tenuifolia of Willd., as synonymous with D. 
Jiliformis of Rafinesque, which, being the earliest published 
name I retain. 

Descr. Primordial leaves deltoideo-subulate, glabrous; 
secondary leaves radical, linear, circinate, very woolly at 
their base, channelled and glabrous behind, in front round- 
ed and covered with spreading, greenish hairs, which sup- 
port, on their summit, a red gland, and exude a viscid, 
colourless juice. Scape lateral, with us always simple, 
green, glabrous, about as long as the leaves. Spike race- 
mose, unilateral. Pedicels, and five-cleft persisting calyx, 
covered with green, glandular hairs. Corolla glabrous, 
rose-coloured, more than twice as long as the calyx, mar- 
cescent ; petals five, obovate, claws greenish. Statnens 
five, scarcely longer than the calyx ; filaments colourless ; 
anthers erect, oblong, yellow. Pollen - granules round, 
yellow. Styles eight, spreading at their base in pairs, 
above erect and clavate, colourless. Germen round, green ; 
ovules numerous, oblong. Graham. 



3541 





( 3541 ) 

Verbena Tweedieana. Mr. Tweedie's 
Scarlet Vervain. 

*********************** 

Class and Order. 

DlDYNAMIA AnGIOSPERMIA. 

( Nat. Ord. — Verbenace;E. ) 

Generic Character. 

Calyx 5-fidus, dente unico subbreviore. Cor. limbus 
irregulariter 5-lobus. Stam. inclusa. Utriculus 4-spermus, 
cito°rumpens, ut maturi fructus caryopses sistant. Spr. 

Specific Character and Synonym. 

Verbena Tweedieana; pubescenti-hirsuta erecta suffruti- 
cosa ramosa, foliis ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis mem- 
branaceis grosse inaequaliter serratis basi cuneatis inte- 
gerrimis in petiolum gracilem attenuatis, spica eorym- 
bosa, calycibus cylindraceis 5-costatis tubo corollae f 
brevioribuSj limbo 5-lobo segmentis cuneatis emargi- 
natis subaequalibus. 

Verbena Tweedieana. Niven, in litt. 



The accompanying drawing, together with excellent 

dried specimens of this most lovely plant, were sent by the 

kindness of Mr. Niven, the able and zealous curator of the 

Glasnevin Botanic Garden, under the name here adopted. 

The same has been raised by Mr. Murray at Glasgow, and 

ill both cases from seeds sent by Mr. Tweedie. Our native 

specimens, corresponding with these, were collected by 

Mr. Tweedie in boggy places at Laguna de la Molina m 

the Banda Orientate, where, he says, what we can well 

conceive, that the plant makes a most splendid appearance 

with its large and brilliant heads of crimson flowers. We 

have also the same species gathered at Rio Grande do Sul 

bv M. Isabelle. 
J It 



It will be at once seen, that the species has much affinity 
with V. chamcedrifolia, Bot. Mag. t. 3333 (V. Melindres, 
Gill, in Bot. Reg. t. 1184) : but it is a tall, upright-growing 
plant, clothed with soft, downy hairs, of a much more deli- 
cate texture, especially in the leaves, which are considerably 
larger, more acuminate and serrated, more cuneate at the 
base, and decidedly petioled. The flowers are larger, and 
more inclining to rose-colour, ( f< rich rosy crimson,") in 
greater number, and the raceme more capitate. The same 
characters hold good in the native specimens in my Herba- 
rium as in the cultivated ones. 

Hitherto it has only been treated as a stove plant : but 
it will in all probability be found to bear the open air as 
well as V. chamcedrifolia. It flowered with Mr. Niven in 
September, 1836. 






INDEX, 






In which the Latin Names of the Plants contained in the Tenth 
Volume of the New Series (or Sixty-third of the Work) are 
alphabetically arranged. 






PI. 

3502 Acacia prominens. 

3531 Allium Cowani. 

3528 Amaryllis psittacina, var. hy- 

brida. 
3477 Anchusa versicolor. 

3535 Banksia occidentalis. 

3532 Begonia Fischeri. 
3520 sanguinea. 

3518 Bletia patula. 

3536 Broughtonia coccinea. 

3511 Calliopsis tinctoria, var. atro- 

purpurea. 
3458 Cereus Napoleonis. 

3481 Chsetogastra gracilis. 

3488 Collinsia bicolor. 
3468 Collomia Cavanillesii. 

3529 Convallaria oppositifolia. 

3482 Cooperia chlorosolen. 
3460 Coreopsis coronata. 
3474 diversifolia. 

3505 filifolia. 

3484 senifolia. 

3519 Cotoneaster laxiflora. 
3507 Cyrtopodium punctatum. 
3540 Drosera filiformis. 
3500 Dryandra pteridifolia. 

3513 tenuifolia. 

3534 Epidendrum macrochilum. 

3495 Eschscholtzia crocea. 
3527 Euphorbia Bojeri. 

3476 bupleurifolia. 

3498 Fuchsia discolor. 

3521 macrostema, var. 

recurvata. 

3506 Gaura parviflora. 

3496 Gentiana quinqueflora. 
3463 Gilia tricolor. 

3510 Helianthus decapetalus. 
3539 Isopogon Baxteri. 

3489 Jaborosa integrifolia. 

3491 Leptosiphon androsaceus. 
3473 Linaria Canadensis. 
3480 Linum Berendieri. 
3467 Lupinus subcarnosus. 

3492 Texensis. 



PI. 

3537 Malva Munroana. 
3526 Monarda aristata. 

3514 Myanthus barbatus, var. la- 

bello albo. 

3485 Nemophila insignis. 

3486 Oncidium cornigerum. 
3499 crispum. 

3538 Ornithogalum conicum. 

3503 Passiflora kermesina. 

3465 Pentstemon Cobaea. 
3472 Murrayanus. 

3478 Pereskia Bleo. 

3479 Peristeria pendula. 

3469 Petrophila acicularis. 
3494 Physostegia truncata. 
3459 Pimelea hispida. 
3493 Poinsettia pulcherrima. 

3470 Potentilla atro-sanguinea; hy- 

brida, Russelliana. 

3508 Rheum Emodi. 
3483 Rhodanthe Manglesii. 
3530 Ribes speciosum. 
8497 Rodriguezia Barkeri. 

3504 — ^— planifolia. 

3524 = secunda. 

3475 Rosa centifolia ; muscosa, 

cristata. 
3490 microphylla. 

3515 Sarracenia rubra. 
8487 Senecio ampullaceus. 

3525 Silphium terebinthaceum. 

3509 Sisyrinchium grandiflorum. 
3523 Sollya heterophylla. 

3516 Streptanthus hyacinthoides. 

3517 Strobilanthes Sabiniana. 

3466 Telekia speciosa. 

3512 Thunbergia alata (albiflora). 
3501 Tradescantia Virginica, fl. alb. 

3471 Trifolium reflexum. 
3462 Troximon glaucum. 
3522 Vaccinium virgatum. 
3541 Verbena Tweedieana. 
3461 Veronica labiata. 
3533 Vesjcaria gracilis. 
3464 — •* grandiflora. 



INDEX, 

In which the English Names of the Plants contained in the Tenth 
Volume of the New 'Series (or Sixty-third of the Work) are 
alphabetically arranged. 



PL 

3502 

3477 
3528 

3535 
3520 
3532 
3518 
3536 

3511 

3458 

3481 
3470 

3471 

3488 
3468 
3482 
3460 
3484 
3505 
3474 
3519 
3507 

3479 
3500 
3513 
3534 

3495 
3480 

3514 

3521 

3198 
3506 
3496 
3403 
3530 
3487 

3539 
3489 
3491 

3467 
3492 
3537 



Acacia, conspicuous or Ne- 
pean Wattle. 

Alkanet, changeable-flowered. 

Amaryllis, hybrid var. of the 
Parrot. 

Banksia, West-coast. 

Begonia, blood-red. 

Dr. Fischer's. 

Bletia, spreading-flowered. 

Broughtonia, crimson-flow- 
ered. 

Calliopsis, dyeing, dark-flow- 
ered var. 

Cereus, Napoleon's. 

Chsetogastra, slender. 

Cinquefoil, Mr. Russell's var. 
of the deep blood-coloured. 

Clover, Buffalo. 

Collinsia, two-coloured. 

Collomia, Cavanilles'. 

Cooperia, green-tubed. 

Coreopsis, crowned. 

six-leaved. 

thread-leaved. 

various-leaved. 

Cotoneaster, loose-clustered. 
Cyrtopodium, spotted-flow- 
ered. 

Dove-flower, pendulous. 

Dryandra, Fern-leaved. 

slender-leaved. 

Epidendrum, large-lipped. 

Eschscholtzia, saffron- coloured 

Flax, Berendier's yellow-flow- 
ered. 

Flywort, bearded, white- 
lipped var. 

Fuchsia, large- stamened re- 
curved var. 

Port-Famine. 

Gaura, small-flowered. 

Gentian, five- flowered. 

Gilia, three-coloured. 

Gooseberry, showy. 

Groundsel, flask-flowered 
American. 

Isopogon, Mr. Baxter's. 

Jaborosa, entire-leaved. 

Leptosiphon, Androsace-like. 

Lupine, fleshy-leaved. 

Texas. 

Mallow, Mr. Munro's. 



PL 
3526 Monarda, awned. 

3485 Nemophila, showy. 

3499 Oncidium, crisped-flowered. 

3486 horned. 

3531 Onion, Mr. Cowan's. 

3503 Passion-flower, crimson. 
3465 Pentstemon, Cobae -flowered. 
3472 Mr. Murray's 

scarlet. 
3478 Pereskia, Rose-coloured. 
3469 Petrophila, needle-leaved. 
3494 Physostegia, blunt-calyxed. 
3459 Pimelea, hispid-flowered. 
3493 Poinsettia, showy. 
3483 Rhodanthe, Capt. Mangles'. 

3508 Rhubarb, officinal. 

3504 Rodriguezia, even-leaved. 
3497 Mr. Barker's. 

3524 side-flowered. 

3490 Rose, small-leaved Chinese. 

3475 Moss, crested var. 

3515 Side-saddle-flower, red. 

3525 Silphium, terebinthine. 

3509 Sisyrinchium, large- flowered. 
3523 Sollya, various-leaved. 
3529 Solomon's Seal, opposite- 
leaved. 

3461 Speedwell, fragrant white- 
flowered. 

3501 Spider-wort, Virginian, white- 

flowered var. 

3476 Spurge, Hare's-ear-leaved. 
3527 Mr. Bojer's. 

3538 Star of Bethlehem, pure white- 
flowered. 

3516 Streptanthus, Hyacinth-flow- 

ered. 

3517 Strobilanthes, Mr. Sabine's. 

3540 Sun-dew, narrow-leaved. 

3510 Sun- flower, ten-rayed. 
3466 Telekia, large-flowered. 
3512 Thunbergia, winged, white - 

flowered var. 
3473 Toad-flax, American. 
3402 Troximon, glaucous-leaved. 

3541 Vervain, scarlet, Mr. Tweedie's 
3464 Vesicaria, large-flowered. 
3533 slender-stemmed. 

3502 Wattle, Nepean, or conspicu- 

ous Acacia. 
3522 Whortleberry, pale greenish- 
flowered. 



LATIN 

GENERAL INDEX, 



THE PLANTS CONTAINED IN THE FIRST TEN VOLUMES OF THE 

NEW SERIES, 

(Or from Vol. LIV. to LXIII. inclusive, of the whole Work,) 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



— >»«©»<«♦- 



Vol 

56 

61 

59 

60 

61 

60 

61 

59 

5G 

61 

54 

56 

54 

61 

G2 

63 

59 

62 

61 

62 

60 

58 

58 

59 

58 

55 

55 

59 

63 

59 

58 

61 

58 

61 

55 

58 

57 



No. 
2879 
3358 
3174 
3244 
3337 
3279 
3341 
3203 
2922 
3346 

2747 
2928 
2754 
3366 
3408 
3502 
3195 
3420 
3338 
3394 
3266 
3111 
3112 
3171 
3046 
2791 
2792 
3186 
3531 
3192 
3050 
3350 
3105 
&344 
2848 
31 MO 
3033 



Abronia mellifera. 
Acacia brevipes. 

cinerascens. 

decipiens, var. premorsa 

elongata. 

graveolens. 

hastulata. 

intermedia. 

lanigera. 

lineata. 

mucronata. 

Oxycednis. 

penninervis. 

plumosa. 

prensans. 

prominens. 

ruscifolia. 

tristis. 

umbrosa. 

undulaefolia. 

verniciflua. 

Achras sapota. 

Ibid. 

Acrotiche ovalifolia. 

Adamia cyanea. 

Adansonia digitata. 

Ibid. 

.Ecbmea Mertensi. 

Allium Cowani. 

Alpinia magnifica. 

Alstroemeria acutifolia. 



aurea. 

Neillii. 

oculata. 

ovata. 

pallida. 

psittacina. 



[Vol. 


I No. 


59 


3198 


61 


3313 


61 


3312 


61 


3311 


57 


2983 


63 


3528 


62 


3380 


63 


3477 


56 


2936 


60 


3286 


59 


3181 


62 


3376 


56 


2911 


56 


2912 


58 


3095 


57 


3017 


58 


3084 


59 


3129 


57 


2961 


60 


3284 


58 


3091 


57 


3021 


60 


3246 


61 


3331 


58 


3093 


59 


3177 


61 


3320 


58 


3073 


^ 


3092 


5!) 


3142 


a.'. 


2869 


55 


2870 


55 


2871 


55 


2833 


55 


2834 



Althaea rosea. 
Alyxia daphnoides. 
ruscifolia. 



Amaryllis aulica. 



var. platype- 



tala, glaucopbylla. 

psittacina, v. hybrida. 



Anagallis Monelh, car. Wilhno- 

reana. 
Ancbusa versicolor. 
Andromeda bypnoides. 
salicifolia. 



tetragona. 



Anemone vitifolia. 
Annona reticulata. 
Ibid. 

— squamosa. 

Anthericum bulbosum. 

? plumosum. 

semibarbatum. 

Anthocercis viscosa. 
AnthyUis Webbiana. 
Aphanochilus blandus. 
Arabis coUini. 



Arbutus mucronata. 

pilosa. 

tomentosn. 

Argemone grandiflora. 

Arracasia escnlenta. 

Artbrostemma nitida. 

Artocari>us incisa. 

Ibid. 

Ibid. 

Artocarpus integrifoUa. 

Ibid. 



INDEX. 



Vol. 


No. 


55 


2812 


54 


2/69 


58 


3101 


54 


2/07 


54 


2718 


57 


2995 


66 


2942 


59 


3193 


60 


3263 


60 


3268 


56 


2901 


60 


3239 


55 


2802 


59 


3160 


54 


2770 


58 


3060 


55 


2803 


58 


3120 



63 

58 

58 

54 

62 

60 

60 

55 

57 

63 

62 

62 

56 

57 

55 

57 

60 

63 

56 

54 

62 

59 

55 

57 

57 

56 

61 

60 

55 

60 

63 

61 

54 

55 

56 

57 

58 

60 

56 

62 

56 

63 

58 

58 



3535 

3052 

3121 

2777 

3413 

3272 

3213 

2849 

2 l MlG 

3532 

3387 

3444 

2900 

3001 

2846 

2962 

3225 

3620 

2920 

2723 

3455 

3155 

2817 

3011 

2976 

2892 

3304 

3240 

2818 

3217 

3518 

3319 

2719 

2865 

2926 

3016 

3098 

3229 

2878 

3451 

2877 

3536 

3076 

3069 



Arum campanulatum. 
Asarum Canadense. 
Asplenium Nidus. 
Aster acuminatus. 

fruticosus. 

laevigatas. 

salsuginosus. 

Astragalus alopecuroides. 

■ procumbens. 

vesicarius. 

Azalea ledifolia. 

ledifolia, var. /3, phseni- 

cea. 
Bseckia frutescens. 

saxicola. 

Banksia integrifolia. 

littoralis ? 

marcescens. 

media. 

occidentals. 



speciosa. 



Baptisia perfoliata. 
Barbacenia purpurea. 
Barosma crenulata. 
Beaufortia Dampieri. 
Beaumontia grandiflora. 
Begonia dipetala. 

diversifolia. 

Fischeri. 

geraniifolia. 

beracleifoba. 

insignis. 

longipes. 

papulosa. 

- — ■ picta. 

reuiformis. 

— sanguinea. 

semperflorens. 

undulata. 



Bellis integrifolia. 
Bidens striata. 
Bignonia Colei. 

grandifolia. 

Telfairiee. 



Billbergia cruenta. 

purpureo-rosea. 



Blechnum lanceola. 

longifobum. 



Bletia acutipetala. 

patula. 

— Shepherdii. 
Woodfordii. 



Blumenbachia insignis. 
Bonatea speciosa. 
Brachystelma crispum. 
Brassavola elegans. 



nodosa. 

tuberculata. 

Brassia caudata. 
Brodisea grandiflora. 
Brougbtonia coccinea. 

sanguinea. 

Browallia grandiflora. 



Vol 
54 
55 
55 
56 
54 
.11 
61 
61 
61 
61 
(il 
62 
58 
56 
57 
56 
60 
60 

55 
56 
54 
56 
59 
63 

59 

54 
61 
54 

54 
61 



No. 
2713 
2853 
2824 
2820 
2741 
2742 
3318 
3314 
3345 
3357 
3369 
3379 
3094 
2874 
3036 
2876 
3255 
3214 

2805 
2897 
2775 
2915 
3204 
3511 

3187 
2763 
3323 
2745 

2784 
3347 



Buddlea Brasiliensis. 

connata. 

Madagascariensis. 

Cactus alatus. 

cochinellifer. 



54 2733 

54 2711 

62 34:17 

60 3274 

56 2898 



2899 
2727 
2728 
2749 
2750 
3435 
3388 
3329 
3262 
3265 
'^ 2851 
58 3115 
58 I 3114 
58 3118 
3119 
2782 
3141 
2758 
2968 
3381 



Ibid. 
Caelogyne flaccida. 
Caladium fragrantissimum. 
grandifolium. 



3458 
3125 
3015 
3300 



Calandrinia discolor. 

grandiflora. 

speciosa. 



Calceolaria angustiflora. 

arachnoidea. 

bicolor. 



connata. 
crenatiflora. 
integrifolia, var. y, 



viscosissima. 



■ plantaginea. 

polifolia. 

purpurea. 

tbyrsiflora. 

Calendula officinalis. 
Calliopsis tinctoria, var 

purpurea. 
Calocbilus campestris. 
Calypso borealis. 
Calythrix virgata. 
Camellia Japonica, fl. 

albo. 

reticulata 



atro- 



simpl. 



Campanula macrantha, £. poly- 
antba. 

Prismatocarpus. 



Candollea cuneiformis. 

Canna glauca, y, rubro-lutea. 

Cargillia Australis. 

Carica Papaya. 

Ibid. 

Caryocar nuciferum. 

Ibid. 

Caryophyllus aromaticus. 

Ibid. 

Cassia glandulosa. 

Catasetum purum. 

— tridentatum, var. 
trifidum. 



Cattleya Forbesii. 

intermedia. 



Centrocbnium appressum. 
reflexum. 



Cepbalotus follicularis. 

Ibid. 

Cerastium Biebersteinii. 

Cerasus spherocarpa. 

Ceratiola ericoides. 

Cerbera Tangbin. 

Cereus grandiflorus. 

Napoleonis. 

Royeni. 

Ceropegia elegans. 
Lushii. 



INDEX. 



Vol 
60 
56 
57 
63 
55 
62 
58 
61 
60 
56 
61 
59 
56 
62 
58 
59 
60 
59 
59 
57 
57 
58 
61 
63 
63 
56 
56 
56 
58 
61 
61 

56 

58 

55 

54 

57 

63 

63 

55 

63 

63 

63 

63 

58 

60 

60 

63 

59 

59 

62 

62 

57 

62 

56 



59 

57 
66 
54 
60 



No. 

3267 

2929 

2974 

3481 

2836 

3405 

3072 

3303 

3215 

2918 

3296 

3137 

2925 

3398 

3049 

3165 

3221 

3166 

3130 

2970 

2971 

3051 

3340 

3488 

3468 

2894 

2895 

2893 

3081 

332.5 

3326 

2944 

3047 

2850 

2724 

2989 

352!) 

3482 

2810 

3460 

3474 

3505 

3484 

3102 

3242 

3230 

3519 

3158 

3159 

3415 

3432 

29SS 

3430 

2908 



57 I 2986 
57 2991 

5-1 2714 
57 3006 
3200 
3034 
2794 
2743 
3208 



Ceropegia Wightii. 
Cestrum alaternoides. 

bracteatum. 

Chsetogastra gracilis. 

lanceolata. 



Chilodia scutellarioides. 
Chrysophyllum Cainito. 

— ; — monopyrenum. 

Cineraria Tussilaginis 
Clarkia pulchella. 
Cleome dendroides. 



— gigantea. 

Clerodendron emirnense. 

hastatum. 

nutans. 

Clitoria? arborescens. 
Coburgia fulva. 
Coccoloba pubescens. 

uvifera. 

Cocculus palmatus. 

Ibid. 

Codiaeum pictum. 

Coleonema pulchrum. 

Collinsia bicolor. 

Collomia Cavanillesii. 

grandiflora. 

heterophylla. 

linearis. 



Columnea hirsuta. 
Colvillea racemosa. 
Ibid. 

Combretum grandiflorum. 
Commelina gracilis. 
Conospermum ericifolium. 
taxifolium. 



Conostylis aculeata. 
Convallaria oppositifolia. 
Cooperia chlorosolen. 
Corcborus olitorius. 
Coreopsis coronata. 

diversifolia. 

— filifolia. 
senifolia. 



Coryanthes maculata. 
Corydalis bracteata. 

longiflora. 

Cotoneaster laxiflora. 
Couroupita Guianensis. 
Ibid. 

Craspedia macrocephala. 
Crataegus coccinea. 
Crepis macrorhiza. 
Crescentia Cujete. 
Crinum plicatura. 
Crocus aureus. 



minimus. 



Crotalaria dichotoma. 

oralis. 

striata. 



verrucosa. 



Croton castaneifobum. 
Cunninghamia lanceolata. 
Cryptophragmium venustum. 



Vol, 

55 

55 

57 

67 

61 

60 

55 

56 

62 

r>7 

63 

61 

59 



56 
58 

r>7 

55 
54 

51 
55 
57 

57 
r,5 

C<-2 
56 
59 
55 
56 
59 
54 
55 
I 56 
55 
60 
58 
63 
CO 
58 
63 
63 
57 
62 
62 
5S 
56 



60 
63 
61 

57 
60 



No. 
2826 
2827 
2963 
2964 
3322 
3241 
2862 
2938 
3412 
3024 
3507 
3352 
3196 



54 ! 2717 
58 J 3058 
62 3418 
2906 
3074 
2960 
2867 
2744 
2721 
2875 
3005 
3031 
2825 
3382 
2.916 
3156 
2860 
2905 
3143 
2760 
2804 
2934 
2835 
3264 
3082 
3540 
3236 
3063 
3.500 
3513 
2972 
3449 
3411 
3107 
2881 



57 J 3013 
55 2831 



3243 
3257 
3407 
3253 
5!) 3168 

61 3332 

62 3457 
55 I 2844 

3209 
3534 
3298 
2980 
3233 



Cycas circinalis. 
Ibid. 

Cycas revoluta. 
Ibid. 

Cyminosma oblongifolia. 
Cynara Cardunculus, var. 
Cardunculus, [3. 



Cypripedium macranthon. 
— insigne. 
parviflorum. 



Cyrtopodium punetatum. 
Datura ceratocaula. 
Daviesia virgata. 
Deeringia celosioides. 
Delima sarmentosa. 
Dendrobium densiflorum. 

semulum. 

speciosum. 



Desmodium dubium. 
nutans. 



Dianthus Caryophyllus, var. 
Dichorisandra oxypetala. 
Didiscus cacruleus. 
Didymoearpus Rexii. 
Dielytra Canadensis. 
Dioscorea Cinnamomifolia. 
Diplopappus incanus. 
Dischidia Benghalensis. 
Diuris maculata. 
Dodonaea attenuata, mas. 
Dombeya angulata. 
Doronicum Caucasicum. 
Dorstenia ceratosanthes. 
tubicina. 



Draba aurea. 
Dracaena Australis. 
Dracophyllum secundum. 
Drosera binata. 
filiformis. 



Dryandra armata. 

nervosa. 

pteridifolia. 

tenuifolia. 



Dryas Drummondii. 
Dyckia rariflora. 
Echinocactus Eyriesii. 
Ottonis. 



Elicbrysum incanum. 
Encyclia patens. 

viridiflora. 

Epacris ceraerlora. 

heteronema. 

impressa. 

nivalis. 

onosmapflora. 



Epidendrum bicornutum. 

conopseum. 

fuscatum. 

Harrisonia\ 

macrocbilum. 

nocturnum. 

pallidiflorum. 

pygmaeum. 



INDEX, 



No. 
3410 
3151 
3448 
3068 
3427 
2923 
3126 
3360 

3180 

2854 

3234 

3227 

290.9 

2890 

2887 

3495 

3260 

3323 

2931 

2767 

3321 

3527 

3476 

2992 

2902 

3399 

2985 

3003 

3087 

32S2 

3305 

2939 

2829 

3178 

3309 

2896 

3083 

3280 

3498 

3364 

3521 

2940 
3368 

3349 
3328 
2843 
3506 
3131 
3231 
3496 
3124 
2725 
3041 
2776 
3440 
2924 
2883 
2977 
3463 
2716 



Epidendrum ? stenopetalum. 

variegatum. 

Epimedium diphyllum. 
Eranthemum strictum. 
Erica recurvata. 
Erigeron glabellum. 
Eriocaulon decangidare. 
Eriodendron anfractuosum, j3. 

Caribseum. 
Eryostemon myoporoides. 
Eriostemon salicifolium. 
Erythrina poianthes. 

velutina. 



Erythrolsena conspicua. 
Eseallonia rubra. 
Eschscholtzia Californica. 



Eucalyptus amygdalina. 
Eugenia trinervia. 
Eulophia streptopetala. 
Euonymus echinata. 
Euphorbia atro-purpurea. 

Bojeri. 

bupleurifolia. 

— corollata. 
splendens. 



Eurycles Cunningbamii. 
Eutoca Franklinii. 



Farsetia lunarioides. 
Ficus acuminata. 

comosa. 

rubiginosa. 

Franciscea Hopeana. 
Francoa appendiculata. 

soncbifolia. 

Frankenia pauciflora. 
Fritillaria leucantha. 



minor. 

Fuchsia discolor. 

globosa. 

macrostema, var. recur- 
vata. 

Gaillardia aristata. 

■ bicolor, var. Drum- 

mondii. 
Gardenia florida, fl. simplici. 
Gastrolobium retusum. 
Gaultheria Shallon. 
Gaura parviflora. 
Geitonoplesium cymosum. 
Gelonium fasciculatum. 
Gentiana quinqueflora. 
Geranium albifiorum. 
Gesneria aggregata. 

bulbosa. 

verticillata. 



Gilia achilleaefolia. 

gracilis. 

inconspicua. 

pungens. 

— ; — tricolor. 
GiUiesia graminea. 



Vol 

57 

60 

54 

54 

62 

55 

60 

54 

57 

55 

59 

55 

60 

59 

59 

59 

59 

62 

62 

54 

57 

56 

61 

62 

57 

68 

55 

57 

63 

51 

61 

(11 

59 

60 

59 

69 

66 

5!) 

57 

66 

58 

55 

54 

68 

62 

58 

54 

60 

57 

5!) 

60 

5} 

51 

:,r, 
58 
57 
(il 
61 
61 
55 
61 
56 
63 



No. 
3032 
3206 
2710 
2761 
3404 
2815 
3220 
2755 
2978 
2799 
3134 
2807 
3285 
3133 
3185 
3184 
3164 
3374 
3397 
2726 
2957 
2947 
3373 
3424 
2969 
3039 
2840 
2994 
3510 
2778 
3295 
3372 
3170 
3237 
3183 
3144 
2891 
3152 
3025 
2880 
3099 
2822 
2731 
3053 
3425 
3061 
2772 
3232 
3019 
3163 
3277 
2788 
2783 
2856 
3065 
3(»M) 
3348 
3315 
3297 
2861 
3.343 
2886 
3539 



Gladiolus psittacinus. 
Gloxinia speciosa, var. albiflora. 
Gnaphalium modestum. 
Gnidia tomentosa. 
Goldfussia anisophylla. 
Gomphrena globosa. 
Gongora atro-purpurea. 

speciosa. 

viridi-purpurea. 

Gonolobus niger. 
Gratiola tetragona. 
Grevillea acanthifolia. 



arenana. 

Caleyi. 

canescens. 

robusta. 

Habenaria cordata. 

gigantea. 

goody eroides. 

leptoceras. 

longicauda. 

macroceras. 

Hsemanthus carneus. 
Hakea ferruginea. 
Hedychium acuminatum. 

flavum. 

Hedyotis campanuliflora. 
Helenium autumnale. 
Helianthus decapetalus. 

pubescens. 

— : speciosus. 

Heliopsis laevis. 
Helleborus purpurascens. 
Heteropteris chrysophylla. 
Ilibbertia Cunninghamia. 
Hibiscus Genevii. 

liliiHorus,?7«r.hybridus 

Manihot, 0. 

splendens. 

Horkelia congesta. 
Houstonia longifolia. 

serpyllifolia. 

Houttuynia eordata. 
Hovea pannoea. 
Hoya Pottsii. 

Hunnemannia fumarirefolia. 
Hutchinsia stylosa. 
Hydrastis Canadensis. 
Ibid. 

Hymenanthera dentata. 
Hypericum hyssopifolium. 
Iberis nana. 



Tenoreana. 



Imatopbyllmn Aitoni. 
Indigofera atropurpurea. 

sylvatica. 

violacea. 



Ipomsea Horsfallia 1 . 

rubro-cserulea. 



Iris lutescens. 

tenax. 

tripetala. 

Isopogon Baxter! . 



INDEX. 



Vol. 
62 
62 

63 
61 
58 
57 
55 
62 
56 
55 
54 
54 
61 
58 

57 

59 
60 
60 
63 
62 3419 



59 
60 
61 
56 

59 

60 

56 

63 

63 

54 

59 

58 

58 

60 

58 

57 

60 

61 

59 

54 

54 

54 

54 

54 

54 

61 

58 

57 

57 

55 

56 

56 

56 

58 

60 

56 

63 

63 

60 

55 



No. 
3421 
3450 

3489 
3356 
3071 

3018 
2816 
3383 
2914 
2845 
2/22 
2/66 
3302 
3110 
2981 
3123 
3226 
3245 
3491 



3162 
3251 
3294 
2921 

3140 
3248 
2941 
3473 
3480 
2709 
3147 
3057 
3048 
3218 
3075 
3012 
3207 
3292 
3138 
2715 
2734 
2735 
2736 
2737 

2738 
3316 
3103 
3037 
3038 
2808 
2913 
2950 
2951 
3056 
3283 
2952 
3467 
3492 
3269 
2814 



Isopogon Loudoni. 

■ spathulatus, var. line- 



aris. 
Jaborosa integrifolia. 
Jambosa vulgaris; 
Janipha Manihot 
Jonesia Asoca. 
Justicia calycotricha. 

carnea. 

nodosa. 

quadrangularis. 

speciosa. 

ventricosa. 

Kentropbyllum arborescens. 
Lantana nivea, var. mutabilis. 

Selloviana. 

Lathyrus decaphyllus. 
Ledebouria Hyacinthina. 
Leontice Altaica. 
Leptosiphon androsaceus. " 
Leptospermum scoparium, var. 

grandiflorum. 
Leucopogon lanceolatus. 
Richei. 



Libertia formosa. 

Ligustrum Nepalense, ft. gla- 

brum. 
Libum tenuifolium. 
Limnocbaris Humboldtii. 
Linaria spquitriloba. 
Canadensis. 



Linum Berendieri. 
Liparis foliosa. 
Lissanthe sapida. 
Loaaa hispida. 
— incana. 

Placei, var. ft. 



Lobelia bypocrateriformis. 

Kraussii. 

mucronata. 

puberula. ft. 

- — robusta. 



Loekhartia elegans. 
Lodoicea Sechellarum. 
Ibid. 
Ibid. 
Ibid. 
Ibid. 

Lonicera Cbinensis. 
hirsute. 



Lophospermum scandens. 

Ibid. 

Lotus microphyllus. 

pinnatus. 

Ludovia latifoba. 
Ibid. 

Lupinus Crucksbankii. 

incanus. 

littoralis. 

subcarnosus. 

Texensis. 



Lychnis Pyrenaica. 
Lycopersicum Peruvianum. 



Vol.\ No - 
60 J 3273 
3362 
2839 
2793 
3537 
2787 
3202 
32S9 
3395 
2.927 
2806 
2729 
3154 
3173 
2789 
2955 
3146 
3210 
3090 
2907 
3205 
3176 
3442 
3128 
3377 
3378 
3327 
3336 
3067 
3353 
3363. 
3157 

2771 
2933 

3526 
3310 
2958 
3122 
3059 
3007 
3351 
2705 
3514 



61 

55 

56 

63 

54 

59 

60 

62 

56 

55 

54 

59 

59 

54 

56 

59 

60 

58 

56 

59 

5!) 

62 

59 

62 

62 

61 

61 

58 

(il 

61 

59 

54 

56 

63 

(il 

57 

58 

58 

57 

(il 

54 

63 



Lysimachia Azorica. 
Malesberbia linearifolia. 
Malva angustifolia. 

Morenii. 

Munroana. 

obtusiloba. 



3153 
2756 
2757 
3222 
3485 
2797 
3403 
2730 
2956 

2798 

2919 
2837 

2785 
3371 
3370 
3108 
3055 
3287 



Manettia cordifolia. 
Marsdenia flavescens. 
Maxillaria Deppii. 

Harrisonia?. 

— pallidi flora. 

— Parkeri. 

picta. 

plaeanthera. 

• racemosa. 

squalens. 

tetragona. 

Melaleuca Fraseri. 
Meloeactus communis. 
Mentha verticillata. 
Mentzelia hispida. 
Menziesia empetrifolia. 
Mespilus lobata. 
Micbauxia laevigata. 
Microtis parviflora. 
media. 



Milla uniflora. 

Mimulus luteus, var. variegatus. 

perfoliatus. 

roseus. 

var. Younganus. 

Mimusops dissecta. 
Mirbelia grandiflora. 
Mitella pentandra. 
Monarda aristata. 

fistulosa, flore maculato 

mentbaefolia. 



Monnina obtusifolia. 
Monodora Myristica. 
Moricandia arvensis. 
Morinda jasminoides. 
Mutisia speciosa. 
Myanthus barbatus, var. labello 

albo. 
Myrcia acris. 
Myristica officinalis. 
Ibid. 

Myrsine capitellata. 
Nemopbila insignis. 
Neottia apbylla. 

calcarata. 

grandifloia. 



Neottia F (/randiflora, est Ulan- 

tha grandiflora. 
Nepenthes distillatoria, mas. 
Nicotiana acuminata. 

glauea. 

noctiflora. 



Nierembergia calycina. 

filicaulis. 

gracilis. 



Nothoclsena tenera. 
Nuttallia Papaver. 



INDEX. 



No. 
2764 

2823 

2996 
2889 

3361 
2832 
3392 
3189 

2873 
3089 

2780 
2990 
3109 
3486 
3499 
2795 
2773 
3393 
3299 
3293 
3301 
3426 

3306 
3538 
3179 

3077 

3117 
2796 
2937 
2838 
2781 
2866 
2830 
3249 
3100 
3036 
2888 
3175 

3431 
2868 
3503 
2967 
2809 
3465 
2945 
3172 
2903 
2964 
3391 
2943 
3478 
3116 
3479 
3469 
3462 
3441 
3199 
3010 
3201 
33S6 
3494 



Octomeria graminifolia. 

serratifolia. 

Ocymum montanum. 
CEnotbera decumbens. 
Drummondii. 

Lindleyii. 

sinuata. 



Vol. No. 



speciosa. 
viminea. 



Oleo undulata. 
Omalanthus populifolia. 
Oncidium altissimum. 

bicornutum. 

cornigerum. 

crispum. 

papilio. 

pulcbellum. 

— — triquetrum. 

Onopordum Arabicum. 
Opuntia Brasiliensis. 
cylindrica. 

Orcbis tephrosanthos, var. den- 

sifobus. 
Ornitbidium album. 
Ornithogalum conicum. 

corymbosum. 

fimbriatum. 



Orobus canescens. 

sessilifolius. 

stipulaceus. 

Oabeckia glomerata. 
Oxalis bipunctata. 
carnosa. 



rosea, a. 

Oxylobium ellipticum. 
Palavia rbombifolia. 
Papaver croceum. 
Pseonia albiflora, k. rosea. 

— officinalis, var. Anemo- 

niflora. 

Russi. 



Passiflora capsularis. 

kermesina. 

ligularis. 



Penaea imbricata. 
Pentstemon Cobsea. 

gracilis. 

Murray anus. 

ovatus. 

procerus. 

Richardsonii. 



Peperomia clusiaefolia. 
Pereskia Bleo. 
Peristeria elata. 

— - — pendula. 

Petrophila acicularis. 
Phacelia congesta. 
Phlox Drummondii. 
Phormium tenax. 
Phrynium coloratum. 
Physiantbus albens. 
Physoetegia imbricata. 
truncata. 



3270 
3288 
3459 
3330 
3281 
3276 
3132 
3139 
2813 
3161 
3066 
3271 
3396 
3259 
3258 
2746 
3261 
3030 
2917 
2904 
3238 
2884 
3493 
2979 
2800 
2852 
3145 
3219 
3212 
2932 
3064 
2885 



63 3470 



2984 
2982 

2987 
2801 
2953 
3216 
3252 
2973 
3414 
3020 
3167 
3445 



2842 
2720 
3228 
60 j 3247 
62 3401 

59 3172 
62 : 3400 
58 ; 3086 
58 3085 
62 3443 
55 2S59 

60 3254 
54 2706 
62 3409 
57 2999 



Pimelea arenaria. 

graciliflora. 

hispida. 

hypericina. 

longiflora. 

sylvestris. 

Piper Betle. 

nigrum. 

Pitcairnia bracteata. 
Pittosporum cornifobum. 
Pladera decussata. 
Plagianthus divaricatus. 

sidoides. 



Platylobium Murrayanum. 
obtusangulum. 



Pleurotballis foliosa. 

prolifera. 

saurocepbalus. 



Plumbago rhomboidea. 
Podolepis gracilis. 
Pogostemon plectrantboides. 
Poinciana regia. 
Poinsettia pulcberrima. 
Polemonium pulcherrimum. 
Richardsoni. 



Polygala paucifolia. 
Polygonum adpressum. 
Pomaderris Andromedaefolia. 

betulina. 

Pontederia azurea. 
Portulaca Gilbesii. 

grandiflora. 



Potentilla atro-sanguinea ; hy- 
brida, Russelliana. 

gracilis. 

nivea, var. macro- 



phylla. 
Potbos crassinervia. 

■ macropbylla. 

microphylla. 

Priestleya villosa. 
Primula amcena. 



mistassimca. 

Pabnuri. 

pusilla. 

Sibirica. 

Sibirica ; /3. integer- 

v r erticiUata. 



Protea longiflora. 
Psychotria daphnoides. 
Pteris ]>edata. 
Pterostylis acuminata. 
Banksii. 



concinna. 

curta. 

nutans. 



Pultenaea cordata. 

pedunculata. 

subumbellata. 

Pyretbrum uliginosum. 
Randia Bowieana. 
Ranunculus cardiophyllus. 



INDEX. 



Vol. 
57 

57 

57 
57 
63 
58 
58 
54 
58 



62 

62 

62 

58 
62 

57 
61 
63 
63 
63 
63 
63 

59 
63 
55 
62 
62 
59 
57 
55 
58 
60 
61 



55 
55 
59 
60 
55 
63 
57 
62 
57 
54 
54 
61 
58 



54 

57 
60 
57 
57 



No. 
3009 
3022 
2997 
2998 
3508 
3080 
3079 
2740 
3078 



63 3483 
61 3367 
61 3290 



3423 

3439 

3422 

3106 
3454 

3008 
3335 
3530 
3497 
3504 
3524 
3475 

3149 
3490 
2847 
3453 
33M 
3182 
3029 
2811 
3113 
3256 
3365 



2872 
2864 
3135 
3235 
2855 
3515 
2959 
3406 
3026 
2732 
2712 
3339 
3044 
58 3070 
58 3045 
2774 
3023 
3211 
3027 
3028 



Ranunculus, millefoliatus. 

montanus. 

Renanthera coccinea. 

Ibid. 

Rheum Emodi. 

Rhipsalis Cassytha. 

fasciculata. 

grandiflorus. 

mesembryanthemoi- 

des. 
Rhodanthe, Manglesii. 
Rhodochiton volubile. 
Rhododendron arboreum, var. 

album. 
arboreum, var. 

hybridum altaclerense. 

calendulaceum, 



var. fulgidum. 



Caucasicum, 
var. stramineum. 

— Lapponicum. 
maximum, hy- 



bridum. 
Ribes cereum. 



sanguineum. 
speciosum. 



Rodriguezia Barkeri. 

planifolia. 

secunda. 



Rosa centifolia; muscosa, cris- 
tata. 

Kamtchatica. 

microphylla. 

sinica. 

Rubus Nutkanus. 
Ruellia elegans. 
Rulingia corylifolia. 
Ruscus androgynus, a. 
Salpiglossis atro-purpurea. 

integrifolia. 

linearis. 

straminea, var. 



picta. 
Salvia involucrata. 

pseudo- coccinea. 



— strictiflora. 



Santalum album. 
Saponaria glutinosa. 
Sarracenia rubra. 
Saxifraga leucanthemifolia. 

ligulata. 

petraea. 



Scaevola Koenigii. 
Schelhammera undulata. 
Schinus Molle. 
Schizanthus Grahamii. 
Hookeri. 



retusus. 



Scilla esculenta, j3. fl. albo. 

pumila. 

villosa. 

Scorzonera mollis. 
Selago Gillii. 



Vol.! No. 
63 3487 
55 2821 



3436 
2759 
2753 
3150 
2857 
2863 
2858 
3342 
3354 
3525 
3355 
2786 
3509 
3197 



57 


2965 


55 


2828 


54 


2708 


54 


2739 


62 


3385 


63 


3523 


62 


3390 


57 


2993 


58 


3042 


61 


3359 


56 


2949 


56 


2948 


56 


2930 


63 


3516 


61 


3317 


63 


3517 


59 


3136 


59 


3194 


62 


3417 


59 


3188 


60 


3224 


60 


3278 


59 


3191 


63 


3466 


54 


2751 


54 


2752 


57 


3004 


59 


3148 


63 


3512 


55 


2841 


60 


3275 


58 


3104 


58 


3096 


61 


3334 


56 


2935 


61 


3291 


63 


3501 


54 


2779 


54 


2790 


63 


3471 


58 


3097 


60 


3250 


57 


3002 


54 


2765 



Senecio ampullaceus. 
Sida globiflora. 

inaequalis. 

mollis. 

pulchella. 

rosea. 

sessiliflora. 

Sieversia Peckii. 
triflora. 



Silene Virginica. 
Silphium perfoliatum. 

— terebinthaceum. 

trifoliatum. 



Sisyrinchium Chilense. 

grandiflorum. 

maculatum. 

pedunculatum. 

Solanum Balbisii, var. pur- 
purea. 

coriaceum. 

Quitense. 

Tweedianum. 



Sollya heterophylla. 
Sophora tomentosa, /3. 
Sphacele Lindleyi. 
Sphenogyne crithmifolia. 
Stanhopea eburnea. 
Ibid. 

Stanhopea insignis. 
Stenochilus viscosus. 
Streptanthus hyacinthoides. 
obtusifolius. 



Strobilanthes Sabiniana. 
Stylidium scandens. 
hirsutum. 



Stypandra propinqua. 

Symphytum Caucasicum. 

Symplocarpus fcetidus. 

Syringa Josikaea. 

Tecoma Stans. 

Telekia speciosa. 

Telfairia pedata. 

Ibid. 

Terminaha Catappa. 

Thea viridis. 

Thunbergia alata (albiflora). 

Tillandsia psittacina. 

setacea. 



flore 



Torenia scabra. 
Tournefortia heliotropioides. 
Trachymene lanceolata. 
Tradescantia erassula. 

pilosa. 

Virginica, 

albo. 
Trifolium alpestre. 

Olympicum. 

renexum. 

Trilhum discolor. 

erectum, var. viridiflo- 

rum. 

erythrocarpum. 



Trixis auriculata. 



INDEX. 



Vol. 


No. 


61 


3324 


62 


3375 


59 


3190 


59 


31(59 


63 


3462 


54 


2762 


58 


3054 


57 


2956 


58 


3043 


62 


3428 


62 


3429 


62 


3446 


62 


3433 


62 


3447 


62 


3434 


63 


3522 


62 


3416 


57 


3014 | 


62 


3456 j 



Trochocarpa lamina. 
Tropaeolum majus, var. atrosan- 

guineum. 

pentaphyllum. 

tricolorum. 

Troximon glaucum. 

Tulipa stellata. 

Tupistra nutans. 

Ulantha grandiflora, sub nom. 

Neottia t grandifl. 
Urena lobata. 
Vaccinium albiflorum. 

csespitosum. 

Canadense. 

corymbosum. 

■ myrtilloides. 

Pennsylvanicum. 

virgatum. 

Vanda Roxburghi, var. unicolor. 
Vangueria A'elutina. 
Veltbeimia glauca, (var. floribus 

rubescenti-purpureis). 



Vol. 


No. 


56 


2910 


61 


3333 


! 63 


3541 


! 59 


3127 


- 58 


3062 


57 


2975 


63 


3461 


56 


2882 


63 


3533 


63 


3464 


56 


2946 


62 


3384 


61 


3307 


61 


3308 


62 


3438 


54 


2768 


58 


3088 


54 


2748 


62 


3402 


55 


2819 



Verbena bracteosa. 

chamajdrifolia. 

Verbena Tweedieana. 



venosa. 



Vernonia acutifolia. 
Veronica Alpina, var. Worms- 
kioldii. 

labiata. 

Vesicaria arctica. 

gracilis. 

grandiflora. 

Vicia argentea. 
Wedelia? aurea. 
Westringia cinerea. 

Dampieri. 

eremicola. 

Witheringia montana. 
Xanthocnymus dulcis. 
Zygopetalon Mackaii. 

Mackaii, /3. crini- 



tura. 



rostratum. 



ENGLISH 

GENERAL INDEX, 

TO 

THE PLANTS CONTAINED IN THE FIRST TEN VOLUMES OF THE 

NEW SERIES, 

(Or from Vol. LIV. to LXIII. inclusive, of the whole Work,) 

OF THE 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

hi x> in 



Vol. No. 
56 28/9 
59 | 3195 
63 3502 



61 
61 

58 
58 
57 
58 

61 

61 



56 2928 
61 3366 
2/54 
3171 
3341 
3203 
3 120 
2747 
3346 
3244 
3408 
3338 
3358 
3337 
3279 
3266 
3394 
2922 
3171 
3046 
3186 
3477 
3192 



54 
59 
61 
59 
62 
54 
61 
60 
62 
61 
61 
61 
60 
60 
62 
56 
59 
58 
59 
63 
59 



55 2848 



33-44 
3360 
3105 
3040 

3033 
3050 

3312 
3313 



Abronia, Honey-smelling. 
Acacia, Butcher's-broom leaved 

conspicuous, or Ne- 

pean Wattle. 

downy stemmed. 

feathery. 

■ feather-nerved. 

grey, fragrant. 

little halberd-leaved. 

intermediate. 

■ mournful. 

mucronated. 

narrow line-leaved. 

paradoxical, var. 

prickly-feathered. 

shady. 

short-pedicelled. 

slender curve-leaved. 

strong-scented. 

varnished. 

wave-leaved, variable. 

woolly-podded. 

Acrotriche, oval-leaved. 
Adamia, blue-berried. 
jEchmaea, Mertens'. 
Alkanet, changeable-flowered. 
Alpinia, magnificent. 
Alstrtemeria, broad-leaved, 
downy. 

eye-marked. 

golden-dowered. 

Mr. NeilPs. 

pale-flowered. 

parrot-flowered. 

sharp-pointed* 

leaved. 
Alyxia. Butcher's-broom leaved 
— I>aphne-like. 



Vol 
55 
61 
57 
i 
63 

59 
56 
60 
62 
58 
59 
57 
58 
59 
61 
58 
58 
59 
55 
51 

57 

-.1 
67 

56 
60 

55 

59 
54 
58 
58 
56 
58 
63 



No. 
2815 
3311 

2983 

3528 

3181 
2936 
3286 
3376 
3084 
3129 
2961 
3091 
3177 
3320 
3093 
3092 
3142 
2812 
2769 

3017 

2718 
2972 

2901 

3239 

2802 
3160 
2770 
3052 
3120 
2803 
3060 
3535 



Amaranth, annual, globe. 
Amaryllis, courtly. 

glaucous-leaved, 



broad-petaled. 

Hybrid, var. of the 



Parrot. 
Andromeda, four-sided. 

Hypnum-like. 

Willow-leaved. 



Anemone, Vine-leaved. 
Anthericum, bearded-flowered, 
half-bearded. 



wild 



Anthocercis, glutinous. 

Aphanochilus, mild. 

Arbutus, hairy. 

Ibid. 

Arbutus, sharp-pointed. 

Arracacha, eatable. 

Arthrostemma, shining. 

Arum, campanulate. 

Asarabaca, Canadian, or 
Ginger. 

Asphodel, Lancashire, bulbous- 
rooted. 

Aster, small-shrubby Cape. 

Avens, mountain, yellow-flow- 
ered. 

Azalea, fragrant, Indian. 

purple-flowered, fra- 
grant, Indian. 

Ba-ckia, shrubby, Chinese, 
stone. 



Banksia, entire-leaved. 

handsome. 

intermediate. 

marcescent. 

shore. 

West-coast, 



10 



INDEX. 



Vol. 


1 No. 


58 


3121 


54 


2777 


57 


29.96 


60 


3272 


60 


3213 


63 


3520 


62 


3444 


63 


3532 


56 


2920 


62 


3387 


56 


2900 


60 


3225 


57 


3001 


55 


2846 


57 


2*962 


55 


2849 


57 


2966 


54 


2723 


61 


3347 


55 


2817 


57 


2!) 76 


56 


2892 


61 


3304 


58 


3117 


55 


2796 


60 


3240 


55 


2818 


61 


3319 


60 


3217 


63 


35 IS 


54 


2719 


55 


2865 


56 


2926 


56 


2939 


57 


3016 


60 


3247 


62 


3463 


58 


3098 


60 


3229 


66 


2878 


62 


3451 [ 


55 


286.9 


55 


2870 


55 


2871 


56 


2877 


5S 


3076 


63 


3536 


58 


306!) 


62 


3413 


54 


2713 


55 


2853 


55 


2824 


59 


3156 


57 


3029 


62 


3111 


55 


2820 


61 


3318 


58 


3059 


62 


3430 


61 


3345 


61 


3314 


61 


3369 



Baptisia, perfoliate. 
Barbacenia, purple-flowered. 
Basil, mountain. 
Beaufortia, Dampier's. 
Beaumontia, large-flowered. 
Begonia, blood-red. 

cow-parsnep-leaved. 

— Dr. Fischer's. 

free-flowering. 

■■ Geranium-leaved. 

handsome-flowered. 

kidney-leaved. 

long flower-stalked. 

■ — papillose. 

particolored. 

two-petaled. 

various-leaved. 

wave-leaved. 

Bell-flower, giant, large-flower- 
ed, many-blossomed, var. 
Bignonia, General Cole's. 
Mrs. Telfair's. 



Billbergia, blood-stained. 
Rose-purple. 



Bitter- Vetch, canescent. 

sessile-leaved. 



Blechnum, lance-shaped, 
long-leaved. 



Bletia, deep purple-flowered. 

sharp-petaled. 

spreading-flowered. 

Woodfordian. 



Blumenbachia, palmated. 
Bonatea, showy. 
Botany-Bay Fig, rusty-leaved. 
Brachystelma, waved-leaved. 
Brake, pedate-leaved. 
Bramble, Nutka. 
Brassavola, elegant. 

fragrant. 

■ tuberculated. 

Brassia, long-tailed. 

Bread- Fruit Tree (a and /3). 

Ibid. 

Ibid. 

Brodisea, large-flowered. 

Broughtonia, crimson-flowered. 

Ibid. 

Browallia, large-flowered. 

Bucku, or crenulated Diosma. 

Buddlea, Brazilian. 

connate-leaved. 

Madagascar. 

Bur-marigold, striated-flowered 
Butcher's-broom, climbing. 
Cactus, sweet-scented, spiny. 

wing-stetnmed. 

Ceelogyne, drooping. 
Calabash-Nutmeg, Jamaica. 

; — Tree. 

Caladium, or Indian Kale, large 
leaved. 

delicious-scented. 

Calandrinia, large-flowered. 



Vol. 


! No. 


62 


3379 


61 


3357 


60 


3214 


63 


3511 


59 


3187 


54 


2763 


61 


3323 


54 


2784 


54 


2745 


54 


2733 


54 


2711 


54 


2783 


54 


2788 


60 


3241 


55 


2862 


60 


3274 


62 


3435 


62 


3388 


61 


3329 


60 


3262 


60 


3269 


61 


3342 


55 


2851 


60 


3265 


58 


3115 


58 


3114 


58 


3118 


58 


3119 


54 


2758 


62 


3381 


63 


3458 


59 


3125 


57 


3015 


60 


3267 


61 


3300 


56 


2929 


57 


2974 


65 


2836 


63 


3481 


59 


3141 


54 


2782 


62 


3105 


60 


3215 


63 


3470 


57 


2982 


57 


2984 


56 


2918 


59 


3137 


61 


3296 


58 


3049 


62 


3398 


56 


2925 



Calandrinia, showy-flowered. 

two-coloured- 
leaved. 

Calceolaria, entire-leaved, very 
viscid var. 

Calliopsis, dyeing, dark-flower- 
ed var. 

Calochilus, field. 

Calypso, northern. 

Calythrix, twiggy. 

Camellia, Captain Rawes's. 

single white-flowered. 

Campanula, angular-fruited, 
Cape. 

Candollea, cuneate. 

Candy-tuft, serrate,fleshy-leaved 

spathulate, fleshy- 
leaved. 

Cardoon, common. 

unarmed variety. 

Cargillia, southern. 

Cassia, glandular-leaved. 

Catasetum, spotless. 

— three-toothed var. 
trifid-lipped. 



Catchfly, Pyrenean. 
Virginian. 



Cattleya, middle-size-flowered. 
Mr. Forbes'. 



Centroclinium, close-pressed- 
scaled. 

reflexed-scaled. 



Cephalotus, follicled. 
Ibid. 

Ceratiola, Heath-like. 
Cereus, large-flowered, or night- 
blowing. 

Napoleon's. 

Van Royen's. 

Ceropegia, beautiful. 

- Dr. Wight's. 
Mr. Lush's. 



Cestrum, Alaternus-leaved. 
bracteated. 



Chaetogastra, lance-leaved, 
slender. 



Cherry, Noyau. 

Chickweed, Taurian, mouse- 
eared. 

Chilodia, Scutellaria-like. 

Cineraria, Colt's-foot. 

Cinquefoil, Mr. Russell's var. 
of the deep blood-coloured. 

snowy, large-leaved 



Clarkia, beautiful. 
Cleome, gigantic. 
tree-like 



tall, upright. 



Clerodendron, drooping-flower- 

ed. 

halberd-leaved. 

small-flowered, 

Madagascar. 



INDEX. 



11 



Vol 
59 
54 
54 
59 

63 
54 
54 



No. 
3165 
2749 
2750 
3153 

3471 

2790 

2779 



60 3221 
54 2741 
54 2742 
58 i 3051 

61 i 3340 
54 2734 



54 
54 
54 
54 
63 
63 
56 
56 
56 
57 
57 
58 
61 
61 
56 
59 
58 
55 
54 
57 
63 
60 

55 

63 
63 
63 
63 
57 
58 
60 
60 
63 
61 
59 

59 
59 
62 
56 
57 
57 
54 
57 
59 



2/35 
2736 

2737 

2738 
3488 
3468 
2894 
2895 
2893 
2970 
2971 
3081 
3325 
3326 
2944 
3188 
3047 
2850 
2724 
2989 
3482 
3234 

2810 

3460 
3484 

3505 
3474 
3032 
3102 
3242 
3230 
3519 
3299 
3158 

3159 
3124 
3415 
2908 

2986 
2991 
2714 
3006 
3200 



Clitoria, woody. 

Clove Spice. 

Ibid. 

Clove-tree, wild, or Bay-berry 
Myrtle. 

Clover, Buffalo. 

long-flowered. 

narrow-leaved, round- 
beaded. 

Coburgia, tawny. 

Cochineal Fig, spineless. 

Ibid. 

Codiseum, painted-leaved. 

Coleonema, beautiful. 

Cocoa-nut, double, or Seychel- 
les-Island. 

Ibid. 

Ibid. 

Ibid. 

Ibid. 

Collinsia, two-coloured. 

Collomia, Cavanilles'. 

large-flowered. 

— narrow-leaved, 
small-flowered. 



Columbo Plant. 
Ibid. 

Columnea, hairy. 
Colvillea, splendid. 
Ibid. 

Combretum, large-flowered. 
Comfrey, Caucasian. 
Commelina, slender. 
Conospermum, Ileath-leaved. 
Yew-leaved. 



Conostylis, prickly. 

Cooperia, green-tubed. 

Coral-tree, or Erythrina, naked- 
flowering. 

Corchorus, bristly-leaved, or 
Jew's Mallow. 

Coreopsis, crowned. 

six-leaved. 

— thread-leaved, 
various-leaved. 



Cornflag, splendid. 
Coryanthes, spotted-lipped. 
Corydalis, bracteated. 

— long-flowered. 



57 3034 
55 2794 



Cotoneaster, loose-clustered. 
Cotton-Thistle, Arabian. 
Couroupita, Guiana, or Cannon- 
ball tree. 
Ibid. 

Crane's-bill, white-flowered. 
Craspedia, large-headed. 
Crinum, plaited-leaved. 
Crocus, golden. 

least, purple. 

Crotalaria, dichotomous. 

oval-leaved, hair)'. 

striated-flowered. 

. warted. 

Croton, Chesnut-leaved. 



Wol. 


| No. 1 


57 


1 2999 


57 


3009 


60 


3208 


54 


2743 


61 


3335 


57 


3008 


1 56 


2911 



56 2912 
58 3095 



2826 
2827 
2963 
2964 
3322 
3507 
3455 
3196 
2717 
3058 
3074 
3418 
2906 
2960 
■2S67 

54 2721 

55 2875 
57 3005 

57 3031 
62 j 3413 

62 3382 

56 2916 
69 3156 

55 2860 

56 2905 

54 2760 

55 j 2804 

58 ! 3116 

63 3479 
55 2835 

60 3264 
63 3500 



3063 
321U\ 
3513 
3449 
58 3107 
57 2994 
66 2ssi 
55 2831 
57 3013 
3407 
3168 
60 3263 
60 3267 

62 3410 

55 2844 

60 3233 

62 3457 

63 3534 
60 3209 



Crowfoot, American, heart- 
leaved. 

milfoil-leaved. 

Cryptophragmium, stately. 

Cunninghamia, lance-leaved. 

Currant, red-flowered. 

waxy. 

Custard-Apple, netted. 

Ibid. 

Custard-Apple, undulated, Su- 
gar-apple, or Sweet-sop. 

Cycas, broad-leaved. 

Ibid. 

Cycas, narrow-leaved. 

Ibid. 

Cyminosma, oblong-leaved. 

Cyrtopodium, spotted-flowered. 

Daisy, American. 

Daviesia, twiggy. 

Deeringia, Celosia-like. 

Delima, climbing. 

Dendrobium, great. 

— — — — many-flowered. 

small-clustered. 



Desmodium, doubtful. 

drooping-flowered 



Dichorisandra, sharp-petaled. 

Didiscus, blue-flowered. 

Didymocarpus, Cape. 

Di elytra, Canadian. 

Diosma, crenulated, or Bucku. 

Diplopappus, hoary. 

Dischidia, Bengal. 

Diuris, spotted. 

Dodonsea, attenuated-leaved. 

Dombeya, angle-leaved. 

Dorstenia, cleft. 

Peziza-flowered. 



Dove-flower, lofty. 

pendulous. 



Dracaena, New Zealand, white- 
flowered. 
Dracophyllum, secund-flowered 
Dryandra, Fern-leaved. 

nerved-leaved. 

shaqj-pointed. 

slender-leaved. 

Dyckia, few-flowered. 
Echinocactus, Mr. Otto's. 
Elecampane, autumnal. 
Elichrysum, hoary-leaved. 
Encyclia, green-flowered. 

spreading-flowered. 

Epacris, foveolated. 
Onosma-flowered. 



snowy. 

varying-stemmed. 

wax-flowered. 



Epidendrum, acute-petaled. 

dingy-flowered. 

dwarf. 

Florida. 

large-lipped. 

Mrs. Harrison's. 



12 



INDEX. 



Vol. 

61 

57 

61 

59 

62 

58 

56 

59 

55 

GO 

56 

56 

66 

63 

60 

60 

56 

62 



No. 

3298 
2980 
3332 
3151 
3448 
3068 
2923 
3180 
2854 
3227 
2909 
2890 
2887 
3495 
3260 
3223 
2931 
3399 

2985 
3003 

2889 

3189 

2873 

3361 

3392 

3123 
3087 
3305 
3282 
3258 

3480 

3199 
3514 



55 2829 
3178 
3309 

2896 
3280 
3083 
3364 
3521 

3498 
3368 

56 2940 
3328 
2843 
3506 
3131 
3231 
3496 
3041 
2725 

54 2776 



Epidendrum, night-smelling. 

pale-flowered. 

two-horned. 

variegated. 



Epimedium, twin-leaved 

Eranthemum, upright. 

Erigeron, smoothish-leaved. 

Eriostemon, cuspidate. 

! Willow-leaved. 

j Erythrina, or Coral-tree, velvety. 
| Erythrolama, conspicuous. 
! Escallonia, red-flowered. 

Eschscholtzia, Californian. 

— - Saffron-coloured. 

Eucalyptus, Almond-leaved. 

Eugenia, three-nerved. 

Eulophia, twisted-petaled. 

Eurycles, small-flowered, or 
Brisbane Lily. 

Eutoca, Capt. Franklin's. 

silky. 

Evening Primrose, decumbent, 
small-flowered. 

— large white- 
flowered. 



— large pur- 
ple-flowered, twiggy. 

— Mr. Drum- 



mond's. 



scollop- 



leaved. 

Everlasting Pea, ten-leafletted. 

Farsetia, Lunaria-like. 

Fig, tufted or comose. 

sharp-pointed. 

Flat-pea, or Platylobium, ob- 
tuse-leaved. 

Flax, Berendier's yellow-flower- 
ed. 

New Zealand. 

Flywort, bearded, white-lipped 
var. 

Franciscea, short-flowered. 

Francoa, appendiculated. 

Sow-thistle-leaved. 



Frankenia, few-flowered. 
Fritillary, lesser, Altaic, 
white-flowered 



Fuchsia, balloon-flowered. 

large-stamened recurv- 
ed var. 

— ■ Port-Famine. 

Gaillardia, two-coloured, 
Drummond's var. 

whole-coloured. 



Gastrolobium, blunt-leaved. 
Gaultheria, Shallon. 
Gaura, small-flowered. 
Geitonoplesium, cymose. 
Gelonium, clustered-flowered. 
Gentian, five-flowered. 
Gesneria, bulbous-rooted. 

— cluster-flowered. 

— verticillate. 



Vol. 


No. 


f 62 


3440 


i 57 


2977 


|56 


2924 


56 


2883 


63 


3463 


i 54 


2716 j 


60 


3206 ! 


54 


2710 



2761 
3404 
3220 
2978 
2755 
279.9 
3530 
2807 
3133 
3184 
3185 
3285 
3487 

3374 
3397 
3164 
2947 
2957 
2726 
3373 
3424 
2988 
3427 
3134 
2969 
3039 



55 2840 

61 3372 

59 3170 

60 3237 



59 


3183 


56 


2891 


59 


3144 


59 


3152 


57 


3025 


59 


3198 


61 


3316 


56 


2880 


58 


3099 


55 


2822 


54 


2731 


58 


3053 


62 


3425 I 


58 


3061 


54 


2772 


60 


3232 


59 1 


3163 ; 


55 


2856 ! 



Gilia, Milfoil-leaved. 
■ sharp-leaved. 

slender. 

small-flowered. 

three-coloured. 

GiUiesia, grassy-leaved. 
Gloxinia, showy, white-flower- 
ed, var. 

Gnaphalium, squamose-flower- 

ed, Cape. 
Gnidia, downy. 
Goldfussia, unequal-leaved. 
Gongora, dark-fiowered. 

greenish-purple. 

large yellow-flowered. 

Gonolobus, black-flowered. 
Gooseberry, showy. 
Grevillea, Acanthus-leaved. 

Blechnum-leaved. 

gigantic. 

hoary. 

Sand. 

Groundsel, flask-flowered 

American. 
Habenaria, gigantic. 

Goodyera-like. 

heart-leaved. 

long-horned. 

long-tailed. 

slender-spurred. 

Hsemanthus, hairy, pink. 
Hakea, rusty-stalked. 
Hawk's-beard, large-rooted. 
Heath, drooping round-headed 
Hedge-hyssop, four-sided. 
Hedychium, sharp-leaved. 

— large yellow-flow- 
ered. 

Hedyotis, bell-flowered. 

Heliopsis, smooth-leaved. 

Hellebore, purplish. 

Heteropteris, golden-leaved. 

Hibbertia, Mr. Cunningham's. 

Hibiscus, Lily-flowered, Hybrid 
var. 

— large purple-eyed. 

— palmated-leaved, var. 



(5. 



splendid. 



Holyhock, common. 
Honeysuckle, Chinese. 
Horkelia, tufted-flowered. 
Houstonia, lonjj-leaved. 

Thyme-leaved. 



Houttuynia, cordate. 

Hovea, rusty. 

Hoya, Mr. Pott's. 

Hunnemannia, Fumitory-leaved 

Hutchinsia, sweet-scented, 
long-styled. 

Hydrastis, American. 

H ymenanthera, tooth-leaved. 

Imatophyllum, handsome-flow- 
ered. 



INDEX. 



13 



Vol.\ 

59 

62 

59 
61 

62 

57 
61 
58 
61 
61 
55 
56 
61 
63 
62 
62 

63 
55 

55 
57 
61 
57 
62 
54 
54 

55 
56 
55 
61 

60 



56 
62 
57 

57 
58 

56 
60 
60 

59 
62 

63 

59 

60 

61 

60 

59 

60 

54 

59 

58 

58 

60 

61 

57 

58 



No. 
3190 
3375 

3169 
3345 

3437 

3000 

3348 

3065 

3315 

3297 

2861 

2886 

3343 

3539 i 

3421 | 

3450 

3489 
2833 

2834 
2979 
3349 
3018 
3383 
2766 
2722 

2845 
2914 
2816 
3302 
3284 



Indian-cress, five-fingered. 

or Nasturtium, 



greater, dark red var. 

three-coloured . 



Indian Kale, large-leaved, or 

Caladium. 
Reed, glaucous-leaved, 

reddish-yellow-flowered var. 
Indigo, angular-stemmed. 
Plant, purple. 



Indigofera, blood-flowered 
Ipomsea, Mrs. Horsfall's. 
— reddish-blue. 



Iris, pale-yellow. 

three-petaled. 

tough-threaded. 

Isopogon, Mr. Baxter's. 

Mr. Loudon's. 

; spathulate-leaved, 

linear-leaved var. 
Jaborosa, entire-leaved. 
Jack Tree, or entire-leaved 

Bread Fruit. 
Ibid. 

Jacob's Ladder, bright-flowered 
Jasmine, Cape, single-flowered. 
Jonesia, fragrant. 
Justicia, flesh-coloured. 
— Hop-flowered. 

purple-flowered, East 



Indian. 



square-stalked. 

swoln-jointed. 

yellow-flowered. 



2938 
3412 
3024 
2981 
3110 

2917 
3226 
3245 
3143 
3419 

3491 
3162 
3251 
3294 
3278 
3140 
3248 
2709 
3147 
3048 
3057 
3218 
3292 
3015 
3027 



Kentrophyllum, arborescent. 
Kidney- Vetch, Rose-coloured, 

or Lady's Finger. 
Lady's Shpper, large-flowered. 
Ibid. 

lesser-flowered. 



Lantana, Mr. Sellow's. 

white-flowered ; 



changeable var. 
Lead- Wort, rhomboid-leaved. 
Ledebouria, Hyacinth-like. 
Leontice, Altaic. 
Leopard's-Bane, Caucasian. 
Leptospermum, rigid-leaved, 

large-flowered var. 
Leptosiphon, Androsace-like. 
Leucopogon, lanceolate. 

Riche's. 

Libertia, beautiful. 

Lilac, German, deep-flowered. 
Lily-slender-leaved. 
Limnocharis, Humboldt's. 
Liparis, many-leaved. 
Lissanthe, esculent. 
Loasa, hoary. 

hispid. 

Mr. Place's, var. j9. 



Lobelia, blue, downy var. 

Dominica. 

salver-shaped. 



Vol.\ No. 
60 3207 
59 3138 
54 I 2715 
3273 
3037 
3038 
2913 
2808 
2950 
2951 
3467 
3283 
3056 



60 

57 
57 
56 
65 
56 
66 
63 
60 
68 



56 

63 

61 

54 

55 

63 

55 

59 

69 

60 

61 

62 

56 

58 

59 

54 

56 

5!* 

55 

54 

62 

60 

68 

59 
59 

58 



Lobelia, sharp-pointed. 

— thick-stemmed. 

Lockhartia, beautiful. 
Loose-strife, Azorian. 
Lophospermum, climbing. 
Ibid. 

Lotus, pinnate-leaved, 
small-leaved. 



2952 
3492 
3362 

2787 
2793 
3537 
2839 
3202 
3204 
3289 
3339 
3395 
2955 
3173 
3146 
2729 
2927 
3154 
2806 
27S9 
34 12 
3210 
3090 

3205 
3176 
3073 



Ludovia, broad-leaved. 

Ibid. 

Lupine, fleshy-leaved. 

hoary. 

Mr. Cruckshanks' 

ruvian. 

sea-shore. 

Texas. 



Pe- 



54 


2707 1 


56 


2942 


i 57 


2995 


59 


3128 


62 


3378 


62 


3377| 


60 


3268 


59 


3193 


60 


3263 


{55 


2852 : 


61 


3327 


59 


3167 


56 


2907 


54 


2771 ! 


56 


2933 


63 


3526 


61 


3310 | 


57 


2958 


58 


3067 

i 



Malesherbia, linear-leaved. 
Mallow, blunt-leaved, Chilian. 

broad-lobed, vervain. 

Mr. Munro's. 

narrow-leaved. 

I Manettia, heart-leaved. 

Marigold, common. 

Marsdenia, yellowish-flowered. 

Mastick-tree, Peruvian. 

Maxillaria, Deppe's. 

— dingy-flowered. 

flat-anthered. 

four-cornered. 

— Mr. Parker's. 

Mrs. Harrison's. 

■ — > painted. 

pale-flowered. 

raceme-flowered. 

Medlar, cut-leaved. 

Melaleuca, Mr. Fraser's. 

Melon-Thistle, greater Turk's- 
cap. 

Mentzelia, hispid. 

Menziesia, Crow-berry-leaved. 

Mexican-Poppy, large-flow- 
ered. 

Michaelmas Daisy, pointed- 
leaved. 

— Salt Plain. 

— smooth- 
leaved. 

Michauxia, smooth. 

Microtis, middle-sized. 

small-flowered. 

Milk-vetch, bladdered. 
Fox-tail. 

procumbent. 

Milk-wort, few-leaved. 
Milla, single-flowered. 
Mimusops, cut-flowered. 
Mint, whorled. 
Mirbelia, large-flowered. 
Mitella, five-stamened. 
Monarda, awned. 

fistulose, spotted- 



flowered. 



Mint-leaved. 



Monkey- flower, perfoliate. 



14 

Vol. No. 
61 j 3353 

61 3336 

61 3363 

58 3122 

57 3007 

61 3351 

54 2705 



3222 
3375 

3485 
2730 
2956 

2797 

3403 
3371 
3108 
3370 

2828 

3055 
2756 
2757 
3287 
2764 
2823 
2832 

3089 

2780 
2795 

3499 
2773 
3486 



INDEX. 



Monkey-flower, Rose-coloured. 

— yellow Chilian 

var. 

yellow Chilian, 



Mr. Young's var. 

Monnina, blunt-leaved. 

Moricandia, field. 

Morinda, Jasmine-like. 

Mutisia, handsome, pinnate- 
leaved. 

Myrsine, cluster-flowered. 

Nasturtium, or Indian Cress, 
dark-red var. 

Nemophila, showy. 

Neottia, large-flowered. 

Neottiu? large-flowered, is Ulan- 
tha, large-flowered. 

Neottia leafless. 

spurred. 

Nierembergia, large-flowered. 

slender. 

slender-stemmed 



57 


2990 


62 


3393 


58 


3109 


63 


3531 


61 


3306 


62 


3426 


56 


2937 


55 


2838 


55 


2830 


54 


2706 


60 


3249 


62 


3431 


59 


3175 


56 


2888 


68 


3100 


56 


2898 


56 


2899 


57 


2967 


55 


2868 


63 


3503 


66 


2809 


63 


3466 



Nightshade, Balbis', purple 

flowered variety. 
Nothoclaena, thin-leaved. 
Nutmeg Tree, aromatic. 
Ibid. 

Nuttallia, Poppy-like. 
Octomeria, Grass-leaved. 

serrated-leaved. 

Oenothera, large-flowered, four- 
spotted. 

Olive, wavy-leaved, fragrant 

Cape. 
Omalanthus, Poplar-leaved. 
Oncidium, Butterfly. 

crisped-flowered. 

elegant. 

horned. 

tall-stemmed. 

■ triquetrous-leaved. 

two-horned. 

Onion, Mr. Cowan's. 
Ornithidium, white. 

Orchis, narrow-lipped military, 

crowded-flowered var. 
Orobus, large-stipuled. 
Osbeckia, cluster-flowered. 
Oxalis, Rose-coloured. 
Ox-eye, large-flowered, Marsh. 
Oxylobium, elliptic-leaved. 



Paeony, crimson. 
common, 



var. of the 



Anemone-flowered. 
— Double- White Chinese, 

with Rose-coloured flowers. 
Palavia, rhomb-leaved. 
Papaw Tree. 
Ibid. 
Passion-flower, ample-leaved. 

— angular- fruited. 

■ crimson. 

Pena?a, imbricated. 
Pentstemon, Cobae-flowered. 



Vol. 
62 
63 

| 56 
56 
56 
56 
59 
59 
63 
63 
62 
62 
57 
59 
58 



64 
57 
60 
66 
63 
60 
56 
56 
59 



No. 
3391 
3472 

2903 
2945 
2954 
2943 
3132 
3139 
3478 
3469 
3452 
3441 
3010 
3201 
3071 



3494 
3386 
2744 
3459 
3330 
3281 
3270 
3288 
3276 
3380 



59 


3126 


55 


2813 


55 


2798 


59 


3161 


58 


3066 


62 


3396 


60 


3271 


60 


3259 



2746 
3030 
3261 
2904 
3493 
3238 
2884 
2800 
3145 



60 


3219 


! 60 


3212 


56 


2932 


57 


3035 


66 


2801 


66 


2953 


57 


2987 


61 


3293 


61 


3301 


60 


3216 


57 


2973 



3020 

3414 
3259 



Pentstemon, Dr. Richardson's. 

Mr. Murray's scar- 
let. 

ovate-leaved. 

slender. 

— tall. 

Peperomia, clusia-leaved. 
Pepper, Betel. 

black, or common. 



Pereskia, Rose-coloured. 

Petrophila, needle-leaved. 

Phacelia, cluster-flowered. 

Phlox, Mr. Drummond's. 

Phrynium, coloured-spiked. 

Physianthus, whitish-leaved. 

Physic-Nut, eatable-rooted, bit- 
ter Cassada, Manioc, or Ta- 
pioca. 

Physostegia, blunt-calyxed. 
imbricated. 



Will- 



Picotees, two varieties 
Pimelea, hispid-flowered. 

Hypericum-leaved 

long-flowered. 

Sand. 

slender-flowered. 

wood. 

Pimpernel, Italian, Mr. 

more's var. 
Pipe-wort, ten-angled. 
Pitcairnia, bracteated. 
Pitcher-plant, male. 
Pittosporum, cornel-leaved 
Pladera, decussate. 
Plagianthus, Sida-like. 

spreading. 

Platylobium, or Flat- Pea, Mr. 

Murray's. 
Pleurothallis, leafy, fragrant. 

Lizard-flowered. 

proliferous. 

Podolepis, slender-stalked. 
Poinsettia, showy. 
Pogostemon, Plectranthus-like. 
Poinciana, superb. 
Polemonium, Dr. Richardson's. 
Polygonum, berry-bearing, or 

Macquarie-harbour Grape. 
Pomaderris, Andromeda-leaved. 

Birch-leaved. 

Pontederia, large-flowered. 
Poppy, orange-flowered. 
Pothos, large-leaved. 

small-leaved. 

thick-ribbed. 

Prickly-Pear, Brazilian. 

round-stemmed. 

Priestleya, villous. 
Primrose, bird's-eye, lesser, 

American. 
— bird's-eye, pale-flow- 
ered, American. 

Palinurian. 

purple Caucasian. 



INDEX. 



15 



Vol.\ No. 
59 3167 
62 3445 

55 2842 

56 2921 



54 

60 
62 
59 
62 
58 
58 
55 
62 
60 
56 
58 
62 
57 
57 
57 
58 
58 
54 
58 
63 
61 
62 

62 

58 
62 

62 

61 

63 
57 
60 
63 
63 
63 
61 
55 
59 
63 
63 
62 
59 
59 
55 
55 
55 

58 
60 
61 

60 

58 
58 



2720 

3228 
3401 
3172 
3400 

3085 
3086 
2859 
3443 
3254 
2885 
3064 
3409 
3022 
2997 
2998 
3079 
3078 
2740 
3080 
3483 
3367 
3422 

3439 

3106 
3454 

3423 

3290 

3508 

3021 
3246 
3504 
3497 
3524 
3356 
2847 
3149 
3475 
3490 
3389 
3182 
3135 
2872 
2864 
2811 

3113 

3256 
3365 

3235 
3111 
3112 



Primrose Siberian. 

Siberian, entire-leav- 



ed var. 



whorled-flowered. 

Privet, Nepal, glabrous var. 

Protea, long-flowered, cream- 
coloured. 

Psychotria, Daphne-like. 

Pterostylis, acuminated. 

large-leaved. 

neat. 

nodding-flowered 

short-lipped. 

Pulteneea, pedunculated. 

sharp heart-leaved. 

subumbellate. 

Purslane, large-flowered. 

Dr. Gillies. 

Randia, Mr. Bowie's. 

Ranunculus, yellow, mountain. 

Renanthera, scarlet. 

Ibid. 

Rhipsalis, cluster-branched. 

Fig-marigold-like. 

large-flowered. 

— — naked. 

Rhodanthe, Capt. Mangles'. 

Rhodochiton, twining. 

Rhododendron, Caucasian, 
straw-coloured var. 

flame-coloured, 



orange-red var. 
Lapland. 



hybrid var. 



hybrid var. 



Laurel-leaved, 

Tree, Highclere, 

Tree, white- 
flowered car. 
Rhubarb, officinal. 
Rock Cress, hill. 
Rose-coloured. 



Rodriguezia, even-leaved. 

■ Mr. Barker's 

side-flowered. 



Rose Apple. 

Chinese, three-leaved. 

Kamtschatka. 

Moss, crested var. 

small-leaved Chinese. 

Ruellia,neat blue-flowered. 
Rulingia, nut-leaved. 
Sage, erect-flowered. 

large-bracted. 

scarlet, hairy-stalked. 

Salpiglossis, deep-purple -flow- 
ered. 

entire-leaved. 

linear-leaved. 

straw-coloured, 

painted var. 

Sandal-wood. 

Sapota, common or Bully-tree. 

Ibid. 



Vol. 


No. 


62 


3406 


57 


2959 


57 


3026 


54 


2732 


54 


2712 


58 


3070 


58 


3045 



5S 
59 

59 
57 
54 
55 
62 
59 
55 
54 
63 
55 
55 
61 

61 

63 
61 
54 
63 
57 
59 
55 
56 
60 
58 
55 
54 
56 
57 
56 
55 
54 

54 
62 
63 

63 
62 

54 
54 
55 

55 

57 



57 

58 
61 
63 

54 



3044 
3166 

3130 
3028 
2753 
2821 
3436 
3150 
2857 
2759 
3515 
2863 
2858 
3360 

3354 
3525 
3356 

2786 
3509 
2965 
3197 
2874 
2876 
3255 
3094 
2805 
2775 
2915 
3036 
2897 
2855 
2739 

2708 
3385 
3529 

3523 
3390 

2727 

2728 

2791 

2792 
2975 



63 3461 



2993 
3042 
3291 
3501 

2767 
3101 



Saxifrage, fringe-leaved. 

— ■ ox-eye-leaved. 

stone. 

Scaevola, shrubby, East Indian. 
Schelhammera, wave-leaved. 
Schizanthus, acute-petaled. 

- blunt-petaled. 

Dr. Graham's. 

Sea-side Grape, downy, or great- 
leaved, Leather-coat Tree. 

round-leaved. 

Selago, Dr. Gill's. 

Sida, delicate, white-flowered. 

globe-flowered. 

oblique-leaved. 

reddish globe-flowered. 

sessile-flowered. 

soft-leaved. 

Side-saddle-flower, red. 
Sieversia, Mr. Peck's. 

three-flowered. 



Silk-Cotton Tree, five-stamened, 

Caribean var. 
Silphium, perfoliatetl. 

— — terebinthine. 

whorl-leaved. 

Sisyrinchium, Chilian. 

large-flowered. 

— long-stalked. 

spotted-flowered. 

Slipper- wort, cobweb. 

connate-leaved. 

crenate-flowered. 

narrow-flowered. 

Plantain-leaved. 

purple-flowered. 

tufted. 

— two-coloured. 

white-leaved. 

Soap-wort, clammy-stalked. 
Solanum, angular-leaved, 

downy. 

coriaceous. 

Mr. Tweedie's. 



Solomon's Seal, opposite- 
leaved. 

Sollya, various-leaved. 

Sophora, downy var. 

Souari, or Butter-nut. 

Ibid. 

Sour-gourd, Ethiopian, or Mon- 
key Bread. 

Ibid. 

Speedwell, alpine, Wormskiold's 
variety. 

fragrant white-flow- 
ered. 

Sphacele, large-flowered. 

Sphenogyne, Sampire-leaved. 

Spider-wort, hairy. 

Virginian, white- 
flowered var. 

Spindle-wood, Spinous-fruited. 

Spleen-wort, bird's-nest. 



16 



INDEX. 



No. 
3321 
34/6' 
3527 
2902 
2992 
3023 
2774 

3211 
3359 
2948 
2949 
3072 
3303 

3077 
3179 
3538 

2930 
3277 
3352 
3317 
3516 

3517 
3194 
3136 
3417 

3082 
3540 
2778 
3295 
3510 
3224 

2968 
3148 
3191 
3466 
2751 
2752 
3004 

3512 

2841 
3275 
3473 
2941 
2919 
2837 
2785 
2814 
3104 
3096 
3334 
2935 
3002 
3097 



Spurge, blood-flowered. 

Hare's-ear-leaved. 

Mr. Bojer's. 

showy, red-flowered. 

white-flowered. 



Squill, dwarf, 
esculent, 



or Camass ; 



white-flowered var. 

hairy-leaved. 

Stanhopea, ivory-lipped. 

— splendid. 

Ibid. 

Star-Apple, broad-leaved. 

Date-shaped, or 

Damascene Plum. 
Star of Bethlehem, hairy-leaved. 

Peruvian. 

pure white- 



flowered. 
Stenochilus, clammy. 
St. John's Wort, Hyssop-leaved. 
Stramonium, horn-stemmed. 
Streptanthus, blunt-leaved. 

Hyacinth-flow- 



ered. 

Strobilanthes, Mr. Sabine's. 

Stylidium, hairy. 

climbing. 

Stypandra, slender, azure-flow- 
ered. 

Sun-dew, forked-leaved, 
narrow-leaved. 



Sun-flower, Illinois. 

showy Mexican. 

ten-rayed. 



Symplocarpus, stinking, Skunk 
Weed, or Skunk Cabbage. 

Tanghin, poison. 

Tea, green. 

Tecoma, Ash-leaved. 

Telekia, large-flowered. 

Telfairia, pedate. 

Ibid. 

Terminalia, broad, downy- 
leaved. 

Thunbergia, winged, white- 
flowered var. 

Tillandsia, gaudy-flowered, 
setaceous-leaved.' 



Toad-flax, American. 

small, fleshy-leaved. 



Tobacco, acuminated-leaved. 
— glaucous-leaved, 
night-flowering. 



Tomato, large-flowered. 
Torenia, rou^h. 
Tournefortia, Heliotrope-like. 
Trachymene, lance-leaved. 
Tradescantia, white-flowered. 
Trillium, blood-stained. 
green-flowered. 



Vol. No. 

60 3250 

54 2765 

61 3324 

63 3462 

57 3011 



2762 
3054 
2956 



3043 
3416 

3014 
3456 

2910 
3062 
3333 
3541 
3127 
2882 
3464 
3533 
2946 
3027 
3331 
3502 

3384 
3307 
3308 
3438 
3432 

2934 

3429 
3446 
3447 
3433 
3522 

3434 

3428 
2768 

3103 

2866 
2781 
3088 
2825 

3019 
2748 

3402 

2819 



Trillium, upright 7 stalked, pale 
green-flowered var. 

Trixis, auriculated. 

Trochocarpa, Cinnamon-leaved. 

Troximon, glaucous-leaved. 

Trumpet-flower, gigantic- 
leaved. 

Tulip, stellated, East Indian. 

Tupistra, drooping. 

Ulantha, large-flowered, under 
the name Neottia ? large-flow- 
ered. 

Urena, angular-leaved. 

Vanda, Dr. Roxburgh's whole- 
coloured var. 

Vangueria, velvetty. 

Veltheimia, glaucous-leaved, 
(red-purple-flowered var.) 

Verbena, bracteated. 

Vernonia, sharp-leaved. 

Vervain, scarlet-flowered. 

— scarlet, Mr. Tweedie's. 
strong-nerved. 



Vesicaria, Arctic. 

large-flowered. 

slender-stemmed. 



Vetch, silver-leaved. 
Viper's-Grass, soft. 
Wall-Cress, early-flowering. 
Wattle, Nepean, or conspicuous 

Acacia. 
Wedelia, golden. 
Westringia, ash-coloured. 

— Dampier's. 

Desert. 



Whitethorn, large-flowered 
American. 

Whitlow-Grass, golden-flow- 
ered. 

Whortleberry, dwarf, tufted. 

Canadian. 

flask-flowered. 

many-flowered. 

pale greenish- 



flowered. 



leaved. 



small, willow- 



white-flowered. 

Witheringia, Mountain, or St. 
Lorenzo Potatoe. 

Woodbine, hairy American. 

Wood-sorrel, fleshy. 

two-spotted. 

Xanthochymus, sweet-fruited. 

Yam, or Dioscorea, Cinnamon- 
leaved. 

Yellow-root, Canadian. 

Zygopetalon, Mr. Mackay's. 

Mr. Mackay's 

hairy-lipped var. 

rostrate. 



E. Couchman, Printer, 10, Throgmorton Street, London.