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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine"

a 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



,-. 



COMPRISING THE 



plants of ti)t ftopal barton* of &eto, 



OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN; 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 

BY 

[R WILLIAM JACKSON HOOKER, K.H., D.G.L. Oxon., 

LL.D., F.R.S.,and L.S., Vice-President of the Linncan Society, and Director of the Royal Gardens of Kev. 

AM) 

OBSERVATIONS ON THE CULTURE OE EACH SPECIES; 
By Mr. JOHN SMITH, A.L.S., 

Curator of the Royal Gardens. 

VOL. V 

<)K THE THIRD SERIES; 

{Or Vol LXXV. oft/,,' lllwlr Work) 




" The man 
Whom nature's works can charm, with God himsolt 
Holils convene." 



LONDON: 
REEVE, BENHAM, .\M> 

KINS WILLIAM STREET, STfAM) 



1849. 





I'UtNTF.T) BY REEVE, HFNIIAM, AND RKF.VF, 
BXATHCOCK COURT, STRAND. 



TO 

SIR LAURENCE PEEL, K.B., 

fa., 8fc, tf~c, 
Cfjtrf Busltitz of tlje &u$xemz Court at Calcutta, 

WHOSE BEAUTIFUL GARDENS ON THE BANKS OF THE HOOGLY 

STAND UNRIVALLED 

AMONG THE PRIVATE ONES OF INDIA ; 

AND WHOSE HOSPITALITY THERE IS PROVERBIAL ; 

THE PRESENT VOLUME 

IS DEDICATED, 

WITH SENTIMENTS OF THE SINCEREST REGARD AND ESTEEM, 

Bt HIS FAITHFUL AND OBEDIENT SERVANT, 

W. J. HOOKER. 



Royal Gardens, Kow, 
Dec. 1, 1849. 



INDEX, 

In which the Latin Names of the Plants contained in the Fifth 
Volume of the Third Series (or Seventy-fifth Volume of 
. the Work) are alphabetically arranged. 



Plate. 

4427 Aerides crispum. 

4452 Alloplectus capitatus. 

4453 Amlierstia nobilis. 
4467 Aristolochia macradenia. 
4449 Asystasia scandens. 
4483 Begonia cinnabarina. 
4433 Bejaria coarctata. 
4481 Brachysema aphyllum. 
4474 Brassavola Digbyana. 
4417 Cereus Leeanus. 

4443 reductus. 

4422 Cirrhopetaluni Macraei. 

4418 — nutans. 

4485 Clerodcndron Bethuneanum. 
4440 Ccelogyne fuliginosa. 
4470 Cnpania Cunniaghami. 
4435 Curcuma cordata. 

4479 Cychnoches barbatum. 
4468 Cyrtantbera aurantiaca. 

1444 catalpsefolia. 

(454 Cyrtochilum citrinum. 

4450 Dendrobium Cambridgeanum. 

4429 Devonianum. 

4477 tortile. 

4458 Dielytra spectabilis. 
4456 Epimedium pinnatum. 
4437 Eriopsis rutidobulbon. 
4439 Eriostemon intermedium. 
4-473 Escallonia macrantba. 

4480 Espeletia argentea. 
4423 Exacum Zeylanicum. 
4461 Gaultheria bracteata. 
4431 Gesneria picta. 
4430 Gloxinia fimbriata. 
4472 Gonolobus Martiauus. 
4475 Heliconia anorustifolia. 



4421 Heterotrichum macrodon. 
4482 Ixora laxiflora. 
4459 Lacepedea insignis. 
4447 Lapageria rosea. 

4424 Lisianthus pulcber. 
4428 Loasa picta. 
4445 Lycaste Skinneri. 
4426 Macleania punctata. 
4434 Maxillaria leptosepala. 
4471 Metrosideros florida. 

4425 Miltonia spectabilis; var. pur- 
pureo-violacea. 

4419 Mirbelia Meisneri. 
4462 Mitraria coccinea. 
4455 Mormodes lentiginosa. 
4460 Nematanthus ionema. 
4469 Nymphaea ampla. 
4436 Pachystigma pteleoides. 

4464 Pentstemon cyananthus. 
4442 Pesomeria tetragona. 
4478 Khododendron Clivianum. 

1457 formosum. 

4466 Boupellia grata. 

4465 Sauromatium gnttatum. 

4476 Schomburgkia tibicinus ; var. 
grancbtlora. 

4420 Scutellaria macrantha. 
4463 Sida (Abutilon) venosa. 
4416 Sobralia macrantha. 

4448 Stemonacanthus macrophyllus. 

4438 Stifftia chrysantha. 

4484 Tabernsemontana longinora. 

4441 Tliyrsacanthus bracteolatus. 

4432 Vanda tricolor. 

4451 Zieria macrophylla. 



INDEX, 

In which the English Names of the Plants contained in the Fifth 
Volume of the Third Series (or Seventy-fifth Volume of 
the Work) are alphabetically arranged. 



4427 Air-Plant, Sir Kichard Brooke's. 

4452 Alloplectus, capitate. 

4453 Amherstia, splendid. 

4449 Asystasia, climbing. 

4483 Begonia, Cinnabar-flowered. 
4433 Bejaria, close-flowered. 
4467 Birthwort, large glanduled. 
4481 Brachysema, leafless. 
4474 Brassavola, Mr. Digby's. 

4443 Cereus, dingy. 

4417 Mr. Lee's. 

4418 Cirrhopetalum, drooping-flow- 
ered. 

4422 Mr. M'Rae's. 

4485 Clerodendron, Capt. Betliune's. 
4440 Coelogyne, dark-flowered. 
4466 Cream-fruit. 
4470 Cupania, Mr. Cunningham's. 
4435 Curcuma, heart-leaved. 
1479 Cychnoches, bearded. 

4444 Cyrtanthera, Catalpa-leaved. 
4468 orange-flowered. 

4454 Cyrtochilum, lemon-coloured. 

4450 Dendrobium, Duke of Cam- 
bridge's. 

4429 Duke of Devon- 



shire's. 



4477 



twisted-petaled. 



4458 Dielytra, Moutan. 

4456 Epimedium, pinnate-leaved. 

4437 Eriopsis, rough-stalked. 

4439 Eriostemon, intermediate. 

4473 Escallonia, large red-flowered. 

4480 Espeletia, silvery. 

4423 Exacum, Ceylon. 

4461 Gaultheria, bracteated. 

4431 Gesneria, painted. 

4430 Gloxinia, fimbriated. 



Plate. 

4473 Gonolobus, Dr. von Martius'. 
4475 Heliconia, narrow-leaved. 
4421 Heterotrichum, long-toothed. 
4460 Ionema, dark blood-coloured. 
4482 Ixora, lax-flowered. 
4459 Lacepedea, fragrant. 
4447 Lapageria, rose-coloured. 

4424 Lisianthus, beautiful. • 
4428 Loasa, painted-flowered. 

4445 Lycaste, Mr. Skinner's. 
4426 Macleania, dotted-leaved. 
4434 Maxillaria, narrow-sepaled. 
4471 Metrosideros, copious-flowering. 

4425 Miltonia, showy; purple-violet 
var. 

4419 Mirbelia, Meisner's. 

4462 Mitraria, scarlet. 
4455 Mormodes, freckled. 

4436 Pachystigma, Ptelea-leavcd. 

4464 Pentstemon, azure-flowered. 
4442 Pesomeria, square-stalked. 
4457 Ehododendron, beautiful. 
4478 Duchess of Nor- 
thumberland's. 

4465 Sauromatium, spotted. 

4476 Schomburgkia, trumpet; large - 
flowered var. 

4463 Sida, veiny-petaled. 

4420 Skull-cap, large-flowered. 

4446 Sobraba, large-flowered. 

4448 Stemonacanthus, large-flowered. 
4438 Stifftia, golden-flowered. 
4484 Tabernaemontana, long-flowered. 
4441 Thyrsacanthus, bracteolated. 
4432 Vanda, three-coloured. 
4469 Watcr-Lily, broad-leaved. 
4451 Zieria, large-leaved. 




iL B ft a , 



Tab. 4417. 
CEREUS Leeanus. 

Mr. Lees Cerem. 

Nat. Ord. CactEjE — Icosandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Sepala numerosissima imbricata, basi ovario adnata, in tubum 
elongatum concreta, exteriora breviora calycinalia, media longiora colorata, 
intima petabformia. Stamina numerosissima cum tubo concreta. Stylus fiJi- 
formis, apice multifidus. Bacca areolata, sepalorum reliquiis squamata aut tuber- 
culosa. Gotyledones acuminatae. — Frutices carnosi, subglobosi, v. elongati, stricti, 
arhculati v. repentes, axi ligneo interne medullifero donati, angulis verticalibus, 
spinarum fasciculos gerentibus vel inermibm, regulariter sulcati. Anguli seu 
alse nunc plurima, nunc paucissimce, rarius duce tantum, et tunc rami compresso- 
alatt, vnermes. Flores ampli, e spinarum fasciculis later alibus trunci aut ramorm* 
vetushorum, aut crenis angulorum orti. Fructus oviformes, plerumque anno 
sequente maturescentes, edules. Tfeiff. 



Cereus Leeanus ; erectus subpedalis conico-cylindraceus, subacute 12-14-cos- 
tatus, areolis approximates pulvinato-tomentosis sub-12-spinosis, spinis v. 
aculeis acicularibus valde inaxjualibus strictis fuscis, exterioribus 2-3 bneas 
longis,centrali unciali, floribus subterminabbus speciosis lateritio-sanguineis, 
squamis calycinis apice viridibus setosis, petalis obovato-oblongis acutis. 



Presented to the Royal Gardens by Mr. Lee of the Hammer- 
smith Nursery, who received it from France, as an unknown 
species, native of Mexico. If published, it would be no easy 
matter to recognise it from description alone. It is only by 
good figures, taken from perfect flowering specimens of the living 
plants that we can hope to make known the distinguishing 
feature of the individuals of this singular family. The present 
species is among the most beautiful, a free bloomer, and its 
blossoms are large and showy. 

Descr. 0\xy plant is nearly a foot in height, about four inches 
broad tapering upwards, from a nearly cylindrical base, hence 
somewhat conical, the summit being the narrowest part : it is 
Jurrowed throughout its length rather deeply and acutely, 
tormmg elevated, rather sharp ridges or angles, which are studded 
at short intervals by small, dense, cushion-like tufts of wool, 
bearing the cluster (about twelve in a cluster) of sharp needle- 

*A»WAEI 1st, 184!), B 



shaped aculei, straight, very irregular in length, the outer 
series being the shortest, and gradually lengthening, till the 
central, longer and shorter than the rest, is about an inch long. 
At and near the summit, four or five large, handsome, brick-red 
(inclining to blood-coloured) flowers are produced. The tube 
(constituting the calyx) is green at the base, then yellowish 
orange, clothed with oblong fleshy scales {sepals), acute, tipped 
with green, and bearing at the point a tuft of aciculi or bristles. 
These scales pass rather suddenly into petals of an oblong- 
obovate-acute form, spreading and imbricated. Stamens nume- 
rous, rather longer than the tube. Style columnar. Stigma 
green, of many erect or connivent rays. W. J. H. 

Cult. The general practice with cultivators of Cactece is to 
grow them in poor soil, composed of light loam, mixed with 
siftings of lime-rubbish, and some sharp sand, giving them but 
little water, and keeping them in a moderately warm and dry 
atmosphere; during the winter, this treatment being in imitation of 
the natural climates of the plants, may be considered in a general 
view to be correct ; but other elements peculiar to climate are 
wanting, before we can be said to place the Cactece, or any other 
exotics, under the same influences by which they are supported 
in their native localities. It is quite true that we are able to 
produce an artificial climate, so far as temperature and the 
hygrometric state of the atmosphere are concerned ; but there are 
influences derived from the proximity of the sea, of certain 
geological formations, and of the greater or less elevation of 
extensive plains in connection with particular latitudes, which, 
with all our contrivance and appliances, we are unable to obtain 
to any extent. As Cactece inhabit many climates, growing in the 
hottest and most exposed arid places within the tropics, and 
ranging within 40 to 50 degrees of latitude on either side of the 
equator, it is impossible to lay down any other rule for their 
cultivation in our gardens than an approximate one. 

The modifications of this rule relate principally to temperature. 
The Cerem Leeanus, being a native of the north of Mexico, needs 
only to be protected during the winter from severe frosts : it has 
been known to bear several degrees of frost without injury. As 
spring advances it should receive some artificial heat and moisture, 
in order to get it into early growth, by which to ensure its 
flowering. Towards autumn it will be benefited by full exposure to 
the sun with plenty of free air, gradually decreasing the supply 
of water as the winter approaches. 

In respect to the soil, we have found, other circumstances being 
favourable, that Cactece are not very particular, provided it is a 
soil not retentive of moisture. J. S. 



Tab 4418 
CIRRHOPETALUM nutans. 

Drooping-jlowered Cirrhopetalum . 



Nat. Ord. Orchibe^e. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. (Fide supra, Tab. 4237.) 



Cirrhopetalum nutans; pseudo-bulbis ovato-subrotundis rugosis, folds ovato- 
obJongis obtusis erassis, scapo erecto elongato, umbclla multiflora nutantc, 
sepalis latcralibus longissimis linearibus ligulatis acutis supremo abbreviate 
acuminata, petalis ovatis acutissimis inferne ciliatis, labello linguiformi 
recurvo (bicristato, Lindl.), columns angulis obsolete bidentatis. 

Cirrhopetalum nutans. Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1839, MticelL n. 18. 



We have already given figures of two species of this remark- 
able genus, C.Thouarsii (Tab. 4237) and C.flmbriatum, (Tab. 
4391), and we have here the pleasure of exhibiting a third, 
possessing, however, more singularity than beauty. The la- 
bellum being loosely articulated moves when the plant is shaken 
in the slightest degree, or with the action of the wind or the 
breath. The Royal Gardens of Kew owe the possession of it to 
Messrs. Loddiges, by whom, it was imported from Manilla, 
through the instrumentality of Mr. Cuming. It flowered in 
the stove with us in July, 1848. Dr. Lindley compares it to 
C.Wallichii from Nepal, a species with which we are not 
acquainted. 

Descr. Caudew creeping, jointed, striated, rooting, about as 
thick as a raven's quill. Pseudo-bulbs subglobose, sheathed with 
large, brown, striated scales. Leaf solitary, articulated on the 
pseudo-bulb, subpetiolate, broadly or ovato-lanceolate, obtuse, 
very thick and fleshy, subcoriaceous, dark green, paler beneath. 
Scapes generally- two, springing from the caudcx at the base of 
each pseudo-bulb, long, slender, curved, articulated and partially 
sheathed with brown scales or bracteas. Umbel of several spread- 
ing, pale yellowish flowers. Sepals porrected, almost closed, upper 
one small, lanceolate, acuminate, lateral ones very long, linear 
or strap-shaped, acute, or mucronate, striated. Pelals broadly 

JANUARY 1ST, 184.'.). B " 



ovate, mucronate, shorter than the upper sepal, ciliated m the 
Lower half. Lip jointed unto the decurrent base ot the short 
column, lingulate, with thickened edges, recurved, bicristatc 
according to Dr. Lindley, a character which escaped my notice, 
as did also the obsoletely bidentate angles of the column. Anther 
hemispherical, small. W.J.H. _ 

Cult. Being a native of a tropical climate and epiphytal on 
trees, this orchidaceous plant requires to be kept in a hothouse in 
which a warm and moist atmosphere can be easily maintained ; 
a medium temperature of 75° in summer, and 65° in winter, will 
suit it. During the latter season the temperature may be allowed 
to fall during the night to 60°, or even a few degrees lower, 
especially in severely cold weather. It is common with plants of 
this nature, to imitate their natural mode of growth by attaching 
them to blocks of wood suspended from the roof of the house ; 
but there are many reasons against the use of wood for this 
purpose; neatly cut sods of compressed sphagnum moss are 
preferable, and fixing the plant to the sod with small pegs, which 
are soon superseded by the roots of the plants attaching them- 
selves to the moss : the sod should be suspended near the glass, 
but great care must be taken not to allow the direct rays of the 
sun to fall upon it during the summer months ; some kind of 
shade is therefore necessary. The sod should be kept moderately 
moist by syringing, but during the winter months water requires 
to be sparingly used, for then the minimum degree of vapour 
necessary to maintain a healthy atmosphere, will keep the sod 
sufficiently moist. J. 8. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Column, lip, and one petal : — magnified. 




i ,!.'). 




ieUtia 






Tab. 4419. 

MIRBELIA Meisneri. 

Meisners Mir delta. 



Nat. Ord. Leguminosa;. — Decandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-fidus bilabiatus. Legumen dispermum, longitudinaliter 
biloculare, sutura utraque superiore prsesertim introttexa. — Suffrutices Austra- 
lasici, fructu ad Astragalum, staminibus et habitu ad Sopkoreas accedentes. Folia 
ternatim verticillata. Mores purpurei. Be Card. 



Mirbelia Meisneri ; foliis (parvis) flabelliformibus in petiolum brevem angus- 
tatis apice inciso-multifidis segmentis spinosis. 

Mirbelia dilatata. Meisn. in Plant. Preiss.p. 76. (not Br.) 



From the collection of Messrs. Lucombe, Pince, and Co., who 
raised it from Swan River seeds sent by Mr. Drummond, and in 
whose collection it blossomed profusely in May, 1848. It is a 
very different species from M. dilatata, Br., being smaller in all 
its parts, more compact, bushy, with denser flowers and denser 
foliage, and the leaves are , broadly flabellate, multifid, with 
spinous segments. It is a most lovely greenhouse plant, and 
ought to be in every ornamental collection. 

Descr. The plant, as hitherto seen with us, constitutes a low 
bushy shrub, much branched and copiously leafy. Branches many- 
angled. Leaves generally ternately whorled, scarcely an inch 
long, cuneately flabellate, harsh, rigid, dark green, much waved 
and, as it were, crisped, tapering below into a short petiole, the apex 
m reality three-cleft, and pretty regularly so, but from the undu- 
lation this is not at first apparent ; the middle lobe is small and 
simple, the lateral ones multifid, every segment tipped with a 
spine, directed forwards or backwards according to the undulation. 
Floivers copious, in leafy racemes. Pedicels with two opposite, 
small bracteoles. Calyx campanulate, downy, two-lipped, upper 
lip trifid, lower bifid. Corolla red-purple, deeper in the lower 
half of each petal. Carina obcordate, with a yellow eye near 
the base. Keel obtuse, about as long as the blunt wings which 

JANUARY 1ST, 1849. 



conceal it. Stamens ten, free. Anthers oblong, yellow. Ovary 
stipitate, oblong, tapering gradually into the subulate style. 
Stigma minute, capitate. W. J. II. 

Cult. This belongs to a tribe of Australian plants, many of 
which are favourites with the amateur and cultivator on account 
of the lively appearance which they give to our greenhouses 
during the spring months. In their native country they present a 
rather harsh and scrubby appearance, but gay and enlivening the 
landscape when in flower, the colours being generally blue or 
yellow. These plants are found chiefly growing on poor soils, 
but our cultivation would not be very successful if we imitated 
their native soils too closely ; at the same time it must be allowed 
that the earth which suits them best for pot cultivation, is but 
poor, though in its use many points of management have to be 
attended to. Rough peat or heath mould, containing a sharp 
gritty sand, is suitable for this plant, draining the pot well with 
sherds, so that no superabundant water remains for any length of 
time after the necessary waterings, which should be done in the 
evenings, or mornings in summer, before the sun gains power. 
Care must be taken to see that at no time the mould becomes 
quite dry ; and during hot weather the pot should be so placed 
that the sun's rays do not fall upon it. The roots being fibrous 
and of a dry nature, are very susceptible of any sudden or great 
changes of temperature. While young, this species should be 
kept in a cool pit or frame, and as it is naturally inclined togrow 
up slender and naked, it is requisite to shortern the forward or 
leading shoots, so as to induce it to throw out side-shoots, in order 
to form a bushy plant. After a time, however, this must be 
done sparingly, as the flowers are produced on and towards the 
extremities of the branches. 

The plant is propagated by cuttings placed under a bell-glass 
and kept in a cool place for a short time, and afterwards the pot 
should be plunged in a gentle bottom-heat. /. S. 



a^c^T'S^^'""" 1 2 ' ""^""^ <"-»""• 



/ / zd 




Tab. 4420. 

SCUTELLARIA macrantha. 

Large-flowered Skull-cap. 



Nat. Ord. Labiate.— Didynamia Gtmnospekmia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4268.) 



Scutellaria macraniha; caule basi procumbente adscendente glabriusculo, 
foliis sessilibus lanceolatis obtusis integerrimis basi rotundatis subglabris 
ciliatis, floralibus calyce longioribus, racemis simplicibus, floribus oppositis 
secundis, calycibus pilosis, corollis ampbs extus pubescentibus, tubo supernc 
dilatato. Benth. 

Scutellaria macrantha. lisch. in Reichenb. Plant. Critic, v. 5. p. 52. rf.488. 
Benth. Lab. p. 436. Walp. Jiepert. Bot. v. B.p. 756. 

Scutellaria grandiflora. Adams, sec. Bunge (non Sims). 

Scutellaria fyc. Gmel. M. Sibir. v. 3. p. 228. n. 50. 



Native of Eastern Asia ; extending from Dahuna (Dr. Fischer, 
Bunge) probably all the way to the great wall of China, where 
it was detected by Sir George Staunton. Seeds were sent to us 
from the Petersburg Imperial Garden by Dr. von Fischer; and 
our plants, raised from them, blossomed in the open border 
during the summer of 1 848, in the Royal Gardens of Kew. It is a 
truly handsome and perfectly hardy plant, and we would strong y 
recommend its cultivation en masse, on account of its highly 
ornamental character, and because it continues long in blossom. 

Descr. Annual? Stems decumbent at the base, then erect, 
branched upwards; branches four-angled, glabrous. Leaves 
spreading/opposite, lanceolate, a little inclining to ovate at the 
base, obtuse, glabrous, the margins a little downy or ciliated, 
the upper ones narrower and smaller, the upper floral ones 
shorter than the flowers, but much longer than the calyx. 
Flowers in large terminal spikes or racemes. Calyx downy, as 
in the genus. Corolla large, rich purple, gemculated in the 
lower part of the tube, downy, limb two-lipped ; upper hp con- 
vex, threc-lobed, lower Up broader, nearly plane. Slamens m- 



ianuarv 1st, 184 ( J. 



eluded. Ovary four-lobed, glabrous, substipitate and arising 
from a large gland. Style included, filiform, a little thickened 
upwards ; stigma acuminate. W. J. H. 

Cult. A neat growing, hardy, herbaceous plant, which* will 
grow in any good garden soil It is well adapted for cultivation 
amongst pot-collections of alpine plants, and is propagated by 
division of the root and by seeds. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Gland and pistil -.—magnified. 



Tab. 4421. 
HETEROTRICHUM macrodon. 

Long-toothed Heterotrichum. 



Nat. Ord. Melastomace^e. — Decandria Monogtnia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx tubus ovato-globosus, limbus 5-8-fidus lobis persistentibus 
basi late dilatatis apice subulatis elongatis. Petala 5-8 ovalia. Stamina 10-16 
requalia, Jilamentis glabris, antheris oblongis basi vix gibbis apice 1 -porosis. 
Ovarium glabrum apice umbilicatum. Stylus cylindraceus. Stigma punctum 
pruinosum. Capsula baccata 5-8-locularis globosa calyce coronata. — Frutices 
America? tropica. Kami teretes petioli paniculae et calyces setis velpilis hispidi 
et pube stellaio-tomentosa inter setas intermixta velutini. Folia petiolata superne 
setosa subtus in nervis hispida, inter nerws velutina. Cyma termimlis trichotoma 
umbellata. Flores albi aut purpurei. Be Cand. 



Heterotrichum macrodon ; octomerum, ramulis petiolis cymisque pilis longis 
fulvis copiose vestitis, foliis oppositis inaequabbus cordato-ovatis acuminatis 
serratis 7-nerviis, cymis plurifloris, staminibus 16, petalis obovato-cuneatis. 

Heterotrichum macrodon. Planch, in Hook. Herb. 

Octomeris macrodon. Naudin in Ann. des Sc. Nat. Ser. 8. p. 53. 



A remarkable and very handsome Melastomaceous plant, the 
leaves beautiful from their velvety clothing, and the large white 
flowers in terminal corymbs, which are produced in succession 
for many weeks together. M. Funck's original specimen from 
Caraccas is in my Herbarium, and Mr. William Lobb sent seeds 
of the same species from New Grenada to Messrs. Veitch and 
Sons of Exeter, to whom we are indebted for the possession of 
it at Kew. The genus Octomeris, established by Naudin, seems 
in no way different from Heterotrichum, DC. The species 
flowers in the autumn in the stove. 

Descr. A shrub, seven to nine feet high, but flowering 
readily when scarcely one-fourth of that size. Branches terete ; 
younger ones herbaceous, everywhere, as well as the long petioles, 
peduncles, pedicels, and calyx, clothed with spreading, long, 
tawny, or rufous hairs. Leaves opposite, ample, but very un- 
equal (one large and one small in each pair), cordato-ovate, 
acuminate, regularly dentato-serrated, seven-nerved, the veins 
united by transverse ones, and these again by transverse veinlets ; 

1ANUARY 1ST, 1849. 



above rich velvety green, below paler, with stellate down, and 
the veins prominent, villous. Cymes terminal, of ten to twelve 
flowers of the size and colouring of those of the Horse-Chestnut. 
Calyx-tube campanulate, pale green, tinged with deep red above, 
the limb expanding, membranaceous, eight-toothed ; teeth long, 
linear, hispid. Petals eight, obovate, imbricated, pure white, 
red at the base. Stamens sixteen. Ovary conical, ovate, the 
base adherent with the base of the calyx, eight-celled. Style 
thick, columnar, inclined, shorter than the stamens. Stigma 
orbicular, obscurely lobed. W. J. H. 

Cult. Within our recollection it was customary to grow all 
Melastomacea in light peat soil, the same as was then used for 
Heaths ; but as it is now ascertained that the family is very 
numerous and widely spread, the great mass of species inhabiting 
tropical America, having very various habits and places of growth, 
it could not be expected that cultivators would in all cases be 
successful by using only one kind of soil. As it is known that 
some species grow naturally in very hard clayey soil, this want of 
attention to the nature of the plants may in a measure account for 
the paucity of species at this time in our gardens. The present 
one thrives well in good light loam ; it should receive plenty of 
pot-room ; the shoots require to be occasionally stopped in order 
to keep the plant from becoming naked below, but in houses 
where there is little space, it will be best not to encourage it too 
much; and as it is readily propagated by cuttings, it is advisable 
to have a succession of young plants ready to replace the old ones 
as they become naked, which they will do after a time /. S 



ova F rl S ' \ C SH T X and piStJL ■* I' Secti ° n ° f **■ 3 - Transverse section of 
ovary. 4. btamens : — magnified. 




Titak.lftl.etlitL. 



H3&*-.' 



Tab. 4422. 
CIRRHOPETALUM Macraei. 

Mr. M'Raes Cirrhopetalum. 



"Nat. Ord. OrchidejE. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char, (fide supra, Tab. 4237.) 



Cirrhopetalum Macraei j pseudo-bulbis ovatis Iambus, foliis solitarns oblongis 
acutis in petiolum attenuatis, scapis folio longioribus, racemis vix umbellate 
laxifloris, sepalis lanceolate acuminatis laterahbus longissimis supremo 
apice acuminatissimis incurvo, petalis ovatis acuminatis, columna utnnque 
alata apice longe bidentato, labello ovato-acuminato carnoso recurvo. 

Cirrhopetalum Macraei. Lindl. Gen. et Sp. Orchid.p. 59. 



Detected in Ceylon by Mr. M'Rae, growing upon trees in 
woods, and since sent from the same country by our worthy 
friend Mr. Gardner, the able Director of the Botanic Garden ot 
Peradenia, to the Royal Gardens of Kew. It flourishes on lumps 
of turf suspended from the roof of the Orchideous House, and 
blossoms in July. This is a much prettier species of the genus 
than the C. nutans, figured at Tab. 4418, the flowers being of a 
deeper yellow, mixed with purplish-brown. 

Descr. Pseudo-bulbs ovate, smooth, scarcely so large as nut- 
megs, the younger ones sheathed with brown fibrous scales : 
each is terminated by a solitary and rather large, oblong, fleshy, 
acute leaf, tapering into a rather long footstalk, which is articu- 
lated upon the bulb. Scape, a span long, slender, longer than 
the leaf, bracteated. Raceme (scarcely at all umbellate) ol about 
six pedicellated flowers, whose ground-colour is yellow. Upper 
sepal small, broad-lanceolate, with a long, very narrow, almost 
setaceous, incurved point, externally brown except at the margin ; 
lateral sepals very long, linear-lanceolate, gradually acuminated, 
streaked or dashed with red brown. Petals ovate, entire, acu- 
minate, purple brown. Column short, with two wings, mid 
terminating upwards in two subfalcatc segments or long teeth, 



JANUARY 1ST, 1849. 



slightly dentate at the margin ; the base of the column is de- 
current, and bears, articulated upon it, a recurved, ovate, acumi- 
nate, thick, fleshy lip. Anther-case small, hemispherical. W.J.H. 
Cult. The habit and nature of this plant being in every 
respect analogous to the species of the same genus figured at 
Tab. 4418, the remarks there given in regard to its cultivation 
ere equally applicable to this species. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Column and lip : — magnified. 



4 4 23. 




Tab. 4423 
EXACUM Zeylanicum. 

Ceylon Exacum. 



Nat. Ord. Gentianeje. — Pentandria Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4340.) 



Exacum Zeylanicum; caule tetragono subsimplici, foliis ses9ilibus elliptico- 
oblongis 3-nerviis inargine laevibus, calycis 5-partiti alis semicordato-ovatis, 
corollse cseruleae lobis obovatis obtusis, filamentis exsertis. Griseb. 

Exacum Zeylanicum. Roxb. Fl. Ind. I. p. 398. ed. Wall. I. p. 414. Griseb. in 
De Cand. Prod. 9. p. 45. 

Chironia trinervis. Linn. Sp. PI. p. 272. 

Lisianthus Zeylanicus. Spreng. Syst. Veget. l.p. 586. 

Lysimachia folio sinuato acuminato trinervio, flore caeruleo, calyce cariuato 
alato. Burnt. Zeyl. p. 145. 



A beautiful annual, raised from Ceylon seeds by Mr. Moore 
of the Glasnevin Botanic Garden, Dublin, where it flowered in 
September, 1848. It is really a striking plant, and by no 
means ill-figured in Burmann above quoted ; especially when we 
consider the period at which that plate was published (1737). 
The species is now, for the first time, introduced into Europe, 
and we trust so desirable a plant will continue to be propagated 
by seeds. 

Descr. Annual. Stem erect, four-sided, glabrous, as is every 
part of the plant, corymbosely branched above and there only. 
Leaves opposite, sessile, (for they can scarcely be said to taper 
into a foot-stalk,) elliptical-oblong or lanceolate, acuminate, 
distinctly three-nerved, paler and with the nerves prominent 
beneath, the edge or margin smooth to the touch. Corymbs 
terminal, leafy. Branches (or in other words peduncles and 
pedicels) four-sided, rather slender; ultimate pedicels three 
together. Calyx deeply five-cleft, membranaceous, green, the 
lobes tapering into subulate points, their back, down to the 
base of the calyx, having a broad membranaceous wing. Corolla 
rotate, large, handsome, rich purplish-blue; the tube short, 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1849. C 



slightly fringed at the mouth, where the stamens are inserted ; 
the limb large, spreading, five-lobed ; lobes oval or obovato- 
obtuse, pale on the underside. Stamen* five, erect, much 
protruded. Filaments short, white; anthers erect, oblong, 
orange-coloured, two-celled, two-lobe d at the base, tapering above 
and opening at the point by two pores. Ovary oval, glabrous. 
Style long, decurved, the apex curved upwards. Stigma trans- 
versely furrowed. W. J. H. 

Cult. This pretty Indian annual, like its British representa- 
tives (C/ilora perfoliata, and Chiro/iia Cm/arii/nt, \<\. ifl not very 
subservient to garden cultivation. The seeds should be sown 
early in the spring in pots filled with sandy peat soil, and afl they 
are very small, they require no covering of earth, but merely that 
the mould should be gently pressed down. The pot should be 
placed near the glass in a damp corner of the stove, or a pan of 
water should be set under them, as it is very a c c e s sa ry that t he- 
mould in the pot should be kept in a moist state without having 
occasion to sprinkle water over the surface, for if that is 
done the small germinating seeds are disturbed. When the 
young plants are sufficiently strong, they should be pricked out 
singly into the smallest sized pots; as they advance in growth, 
they require to be shifted into five-inch pots, or four Of five 
plants may be put into a wide shallow pot or pan, which will 
give the plants a fuller appearance. Loose turfy soil should be 
used, the pot being well drained, so that water may be freely given 
without the risk of the mould becoming stagnant; for as the 
stem is soft and herbaceous, the plant is apt to drop off suddenly, 
if kept too long wet about the root. This species of E*acvm 
is allied to Exacum tetragonum figured at Tab. 1840; and. as 
we have observed the latter to flower readily, when allowed 
to grow as a weed on the damp mossy surfaces of pots in the 
Orchidaceous house, the same method may be adopted with the 
present species, by sowing the seeds on suitable surfaces near 
the glass. Unless seeds are obtained, it is very apt to be lost 
In its natural habitat it appears to be truly annual, but m culti- 
vation this species, as also E. tetragonum, may sometime*, after 
flowering throw out short side branches close to the -round, 
winch with care may be preserved through the winter J 



2. pEti!;J^Jw 10 mr0 ^^"P-'^owin.thefnnge and the stanuu, 



-magnijii'd. 



4-4- Z4-. 







Tab. 4424 
LISIANTHUS pulcher. 

Beautiful Lisianthus. 

Nat. Ord. Gentians. — Pentandria Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. {Fide supra, Tab. 4324.) 



Lisianthus pulcher ; elatus erectus caule ramisque obtuse tetragonis, foliis 
petiolatis elliptico-lanceolatis acuminatis, nervis lateralibus paribus duobus, 
panicula terminali trichotoma, floribus pendulis, calyce brevi ovato brevi- 
5-lobo lobis obtusis, corollae (cocciueae) infundibuliformis tubo basi angus- 
tato, limbo parum obliquo 5-lobo lobis ovatis obtusis patentibus, staminibus 
styloque exsertis, anther is apiculatis. 



Beautiful as are all the species of the genus Lisianthus, as 
that genus is now restricted by the learned Grisebach, the present, 
together with another scarlet-flowered one, L. splendens, Hook. 
(Lond. Journ. Bot. vol. iv. p. 2G4. tab. 8) are, perhaps, the most 
beautiful ; and both these new species are among the discoveries 
of Mr. Purdie, during his botanical expedition to New Grenada. 
L. pulcher was found in the Monte del Moro in October, 1845. 
It has flowered in the stove at the Royal Gardens of Kevv, and 
more perfectly in the collection of Messrs. Lucombe andPince, 
Exeter Nursery, from whose fine plant our drawing was made 
in September, 1848. 

Descr. A tall shrub, according to Mr. Purdie, five to seven 
feet high in its native country, with opposite, obtusely fou - 
angular branches and leaves, which are also opposite, petiolate, 
ovato-lanceolate, four to five inches long, acuminate, obtuse at 
the base, penninerved ; nerves in two pairs from the costa, and 
running almost parallel with the margin, the lowest pair 
springing from near the base of the costa, the other pair from 
below the middle ; these nerves and costa are prominent and 
downy beneath, the rest glabrous. Panicle terminal, trichotomous, 
scarcely leafy, but bracteated with small scales at the setting on 
of the pedicels, and there is also a small pair of bracts near the 
middle of the pedicels. Flowers gracefully drooping. Cah/v 
small, ovate, shortly 5-lobed, lobes small obtuse, erect. Corolla 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1849. C 2 



one inch and a half and more long, rich scarlet, funnel-shaped ; 
the tube a little curved upwards, narrow at the base, inflated 
above the middle; the limb rather oblique, of five spreading, ovate, 
obtuse lobes, the mouth streaked with dark yellow. Stamens 
and style exserted. Anthers short, apiculate. Ovary seated on 
a large fleshy disk. Stigma bifid. W. J. R. 

Cult. Ever since Mr. Purdie sent us the seeds and description 
of this beautiful plant, we have been very desirous to see it 
brought into cultivation ; and in order to give it the chance of 
different modes of treatment, seeds were distributed ; but the 
raising of them has not been attended with the success we 
could have wished, only a few plants having been obtained. In 
its young state it appears to be rather delicate ; but from our 
little experience we have yet to learn what kind of treatment 
it should receive. A knowledge of the nature of its primitive 
habitat may in some degree assist us : we learn from Mr. Purdie 
that it is a suffruticose shrub, forming a bush five to seven feet 
high and two to three feet in diameter, growing at an elevation 
of between 7000 to 8000 feet on shelly limestone rocks, 
which are covered with a thin stratum of peaty soil of a dry 
nature. The climate he states to be moist and temperate, 
the heat never being excessive, sometimes the thermometer 
tailing to 40°, when ice is formed, the sensation of cold 
is very great, and the vapour in suspension in the atmosphere 
gives to the light of the sun a peculiar and rather unpleasant 
glare buch being the circumstances under which it grows, we 
therefore infer that it should be kept in a close greenhouse, 
potting it in loose peat soil, well drained, and it may possibly 
derive benefit by mixing with the mould thin pieces of 
limestone winch may also be employed for drainage. The 
beauty of this plant, as described by Mr. Purdie, renders any 
experiment for its cultivation worthy of trial, but it must be 
borne m mind that one drawback will always attend our experi- 
ments :-we cannot place it in an atmosphere of the tenuity and 
lightness which it enjoys at an elevation of 7000 to 8000 feet, 

rll w T ° P r° n ^ dlfferenCe ° f wei S ht of the atmosphere at 
different heights is the cause of the ill success attending the 
cultivation of many mountain plants. /. S. 



Pig. 1. Pistil :- 



-maynijiftl. 



4-4-25. 




E.B.& 



Tab. 4425. 

MILTONIA SPECTABILIS; Var. PURPUREO-VIOLACEA. 

Showy Miltonia ; purple-violet variety. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^:. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4204.) 



Miltonia spedabilis ; pseudo-bulbis ovalibus ancipitibus laevibus, fobis ligu- 
latis^ patentissimis, pedunculis unifloris squarais magnis ftiscis striatis 
imbricatis carinatis dense imbricatis, sepalis ovalibus planis, petalis con- 
formibus revolutis, labello maximo cuneato-rotundato basi trilamellato, 
columnar alis angustis acutissimis. Lindl. 

Miltonia spectabilis. Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1. 1992. Hook. Bot. Mag. t. 4204. 

£. floribus unicoloribus purpureo-violaceis. (Tab. nostr. 4425.) 



ror the full description of this species, we must refer our 
readers to the plate above quoted ; for, striking as this plant is 
from the intense purple-violet colour of the entire flower, yet in 
shape and every essential particular, it is identical with Mil- 
tonia spectabilis. Those parts which are palest in the original 
M. spectabilis (the petals and sepals for example, there, almost 
pure white) are here of the deepest purple ; and the lip, which in 
our Tab. 4204, is the most coloured, is here the least so, being 
of a paler purple than the sepals and petals. 

Dr. Lindley having since the publication of his original species 
added others, some at the expence of the genus CyrtocMlmn, it 
becomes necessary to give a specific character to this, which we 
are glad to do from Dr. Lindley 's 31st volume of the Botanical 
Register. W. J. H. 

Cult. The several species of Miltonia being natives of the 
warm parts of Brazil, this plant requires to be kept in the 
warmest division of the orchideous house. It is sometimes 
grown on a block of suspended wood, but we prefer shallow pots, 
well drained, and fixing it in rough peat soil, mixed with chopped 
sphagnum, moss, and broken potsherds. During summer it must 
be shaded from the sun's mid-day rays. It is observed that the 
S *b C1 u S °^ ^ s & enus nave generally a yellow unhealthy appearance, 
which to a certain degree seems natural to them. /. S. 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1849. 



Tab. 4426 

MACLEANIA punctata. 

Dotted-leaved Macleania. 



Nat. Ord. Vaccinie^e. — Decandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx truncatus obsolete 5-dentatus inferne ovario adherens. Corolla 
cylindracea, limbo 5-fido. Stamina 10, basi corollse inserta, filamentis per 
totam longitudinem in urceolura connatis. Anthera basi affixse dorso 
muticae, apice in tubura simplicera attenuatse et rimula singula introrsum 
dehiscentes. Ovarium 5-loculare, multiovulatum. Fructus ; Bacca ? — 
Frutex habitu Thibaudise vel Ceratostemmatis. Flores numerosi, axillarea, 
secundi. Folia subsecunda, nunc punctata. Rami cortice deciduo. Be Cand. 



Macleania punctata ; foliis sessibbus cordatis obtusis punctatis coriaceis pen- 
ninerviis, peduncubs glomeratis axillaribus terminalibus, corollis conico- 
urceolatis 5-gonis, ore dilatato, lobis patentibus. 



This is very distinct from the three species of this beautiful 
Vacciniaceous genus already described, from my original 
M.floribmda, (Hook. Ic. PI. 2. tab. 109,) which has very acute 
or acuminated leaves and a differently shaped corolla, from 
M. angulata, (Hook. Bot. Mag. t. 3779,) which has petiolated 
leaves &c, calyx narrower than the corolla, with its mouth con- 
tracted, and from M. longiflora, (Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1844, Tab. 25,) 
which has oval-oblong leaves, and a much longer, whole-coloured 
corolla, also contracted at the mouth ; and it differs from all in 
its distinctly dotted foliage. It is sent from the Andes of El 
Equador by Mr. William Lobb, and it flowered in the greenhouse 
of Messrs. Veitch and Son of Exeter in Nov. 1848. It exists 
in Professor Jameson's collection from the same country. 

Descr. A low shrub, with slightly angular branches. Leaves 
alternate, but inclined to be secund, sessile or with a most indis- 
tinct petiole, cordate, the upper ones approaching to oval, obtuse, 
entire, coriaceous, convex, the margin secund, glossy, dotted, 
delicately penninerved. Flowers pedunculate, crowded in the 
axils of the superior leaves, and in a terminal cluster, secund. 
Peduncles clavate, red. Calyx articulated upon the peduncle, 
turbinate, shortly 5- toothed, with 5 wing-like angles, fleshy, deep 

FEBRUARY I ST, 1849. 



red. Corolla full an inch long, between cylindrical and urceolate 
swollen in the lower half, contracted below the spreading mouth' 
6-angled, rose-red, except the upper part which is white tinged 
with yellow, lobes 5, acute, spreading. Stamens and style included 
W.J.H. J 

Cult. When required to give instructions for the cultivation 
of any particular plant, it is to be presumed that the rules laid 
down are the results of experience; but if it be recollected that 
most of the plants figured in this work are only of recent intro- 
duction to this country, and that it is the wish of the first pos- 
sessor to get his new plants into flower as early as possible, a 
result often obtained under circumstances not natural to the true 
habit of the plant,our directions, in most cases, as to its cultivation 
must be somewhat vague and uncertain. More time and expe- 

cli m rte ar of r T re 1' T d gUi l ed by our Pledge of the natural 
climate of the plant, we become acquainted with its habit 

ft should t" G ab n t0 ^ ^ is thG b6St mode of ^tmen 

known i Z Z ° n i ° r tW ° \ P CCieS ° f Madeania have ^en 
known to us for several years ; they have thick fleshy roots, and 

itJ^l ff n hablt ° f % r0Wth do not »PPe" to be well 
tto^int Wtl0nilI T tj butwe -e of opinion that 
Plan! ^ ThVsoLrTi greenh0U ^ the y w ^form handsome 
mus not be del i V^J^f ° f ^ ™ d ^ Wel1 mixed > but 
w th surfacT Tt 1, 3S n r °^T ed that the fibres kee P 
abundance o Zjt l" ^ dramed ' S0 as to P erm * 
wSuUhe risk of ll %T ^ ** Season of &™&> 
Wo "d frtlv 1 /r 11 b6C r nng Satumted - This "»y be 

KKt\lS I r ngS> PkCed UndGr a bell - glaSS ' W * h ■ 

J^^S^ ^ ' ***» 0f *"** tube. 2. Cal yx , pistil 



4 4- Z 7. 




I 




^ 






Tab. 4427. 

AERIDES crispum. 

Sir Richard Brooke s Air -Plant 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Cliar. {Vide supra, Tab. 4139.) 



Aerides crispum ; foliis planis apice obtusis obliquis bilobis racemis multifloris 
nutantibus duplo brevioribus, sepalis petalisque subaequalibus obtusis, 
labelli maximi lacinia intermedia multo majore ovata retusa serrulata basi 
bidentata lateralibus erectis acutis nanis, caleare cornuto incurvo. Lindl. 

Aerides crispum. Lindl. in Wall. Cat. n. 7319. Gen. et Sp. Orchid, p. 239. Bot. 
Reg. 1842. t. 55. 

Aerides Brookei. Batem. in Bot. Reg. 1841. 



A native of Courtallara, East Indies, whence I possess native 
specimens from its discoverer, Dr. Wallich. Living plants were 
received at the Royal Gardens of Kew in 1845, but the 
plant had previously (in 1842) flowered in the collection of 
Sir Richard Brooke, Bart., of Norton Priory. It is one of the 
most lovely of the very favourite genus Aerides, and still I 
believe one of the most rare. Our plant differs slightly from 
that represented by Dr. Lindley in the more diffused purple 
tinge on the lip, and its more deeply cut edge, rather fimbriated 
than serrated. It flowered with us in July. 

Descr. Stem flexuose, sending out large fleshy roots from 
below, leafy above. Leaves articulated upon the sheath, ligulate, 
retuse or bifid and oblique at the apex, distichous, a span long, 
coriaceous, keeled at the back below. Racemes drooping on a 
hngpeduncle springing from the side of the stem below the leaves, 
many-flowered, large, very handsome. Sepals larger than the 
petals, otherwise like them in shape and colour, oval or obovate, 
white, tinged with rose. Lip very large, 3-lobed, lateral lobes 
small, erect, ovato-obtuse ; middle one broadly ovate, fringed at 
the edge, 2-toothed at the base, there white, the rest deep rose- 
purple. Spur horn-like, slightly curved. Column short, white. 
iV/ew-masses two, on a long caudicle. W. J. H. 

Cult. This plant being a native of the hot and moist climate 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1849. 



of Southern India, requires to be kept in the warmest division 
of the orchideous house. Its natural habitat is on trees, to which 
it firmly attaches itself by its long naked roots. To imitate 
this, it is the general practice to fix the plant on blocks of wood 
which should be 8 to 4 feet long, set upright to allow space 
for the roots to descend ; but as wood of any kind soon decays 
in the orchideous house and then becomes a nidus for fungi 
and insects, it is desirable that some other mode should be 
adopted. In some portions of the house the several species of 
Aerides may be freely suspended without any support ; if near 
any upright surface (such as the walls of the house) it will be 
observed that the free aerial roots will in time direct their 
points of growth towards the wall, &c, and on reaching it will 
become attached, evidently showing that some kind of a basis 
of attachment is natural to these plants. Many years ago we 
remember seeing Aerides odoratum in fine flower, its roots being 
attached to a moist brick wall, and as they adhere in like manner 
to the side of garden pots, we have procured several tall cylindrical 
pots (something like chimney pots) round the margin of which we 
temporarily fix the plants ; but they soon fasten themselves by 
their roots gradually creeping over the surfaces of the pot both 
within and without, and by occasionally syringing the outside and 
a little water inside, the porous earthenware is kept sufficiently 
moist to be congenial to the roots. During the dry season 
this plant experiences very great heat, and therefore under our 
artificial cultivation it is advisable to lessen the supply of 
moisture after it has done flowering in summer. We have 
observed that the species of Aerides will bear with impunity a 
pretty free exposure to the sun ; though much depends upon the 
position of the house and the nature of the roof /. S. 



Fig. 1. Column and lip -.—magnified. 



4-4- Z8 




H. B. Jt R.inxp 



Tab. 4428. 

LOASA picta. 

Painted-flowered Loasa. 



Nat. Ord. Loase^e. — Polyadelphia Polyandria. 

Gen. CJiar. Calycis tubus ovario adherens, limbus persistens, 5-partitus,»qualis. 
Fetala 5, lobis cal. alterna, breviter miguiculata, concava. Squama 5, petaloideje, 
petalis alterna?, bi- aut triloba;, in conura conniventes et basi intus filamentis 2 
stenlibus instructae. Stamina numerosa, exteriora 10 sterilia, cetera in phalangis 
1 5-1 7-andras petalis oppositas disposita; antheris erectis bilocularibus. Stylus 
apice tnfidus. Capsula turbinato-oblonga, 1-locularis, apice 3-valvis calyce 
coronata, valvis margine placentiferis, placentis ideo cum vicina continuis. 
Stmina ovalia creberrima reticulata. B.C. 



•Loasa picta ; erecta debilis dichotoma parce pubescenti-pilosa, caule ramis 
petiolis pedunculisque pungenti-setosis, foliis rhombeo-ovatis lanceolatisve 
acnminatis acutis lobatis serratis, inferioribns petiolatis superioribus (brac- 
teisve) sessilibus, racemis terminalibus foliosis, pedicellis elongatis, ovario 
hispidissimo, petalis sterilibus ovatis acuminatis basi cucullatis apice bifidis, 
lobis calycinis petalisque reflexis. 



An extremely pretty species of Loasa, native of Chacapoyas 
in the Andes, and which, from the varied colour of the petals 
and nectaries (or petaloid scales), we have named picta. It 
was detected by Mr. William Lobb, and seeds were raised by 
Messrs. Veitch and Sons at their Nursery, Exeter, from whose 
plants the accompanying figure was taken in December, 1848; 
during which season, in a cool frame, the plants are covered 
with blossom from top to bottom. There is every reason to 
believe that it will prove a hardy annual, well suited for bedding 
out in the summer, when its graceful and lively flowers, yellow 
and white, with a red eye, cannot fail to prove attractive. We 
possess specimens in the Herbarium of the same species, gathered 
precisely in the same locality by the late Mr. Mathews. Its 
nearest affinity is with L. xantUifolia, Juss., but that has more 
cordate leaves, very hairy on both sides, the flowers smaller, 
wholly yellow, and the nectaries, as far as can be judged from 
the figure and from the dried specimens, are of a different form. 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1849. 



Descr. Annual. Stems about a foot high, dichotomouslv 
branched, weak, but nearly erect, clothed as arc the leaves, but ehielh 
on the nerves, with thin inconspicuous pubescence, mixed with 
many pungent setae. Leaves alternate, pale green, membranaceous, 
the lower ones two to three inches long, petiolatc (petioles setose), 
rhombeo-ovate, acuminate, acutely lobed and serrated : upper or 
floral leaves sessile, lanceolate, coarsely serrated, the uppermost 
(decidedly bracteas) almost linear, subulate, entire. Bat 
leafy. Pedicels elongated, drooping, setose. Flower* large (for 
the size of the plant), drooping. Ovar// cylindrical, very hispid. 
Calyx-segments ovate, acuminate, resexed Petals reflexed, 
obovate, acute, cucullate, hispid at the back, their colour brighl 
yellow in the lower half, the rest white. Nectaries or petalokl 
scales ovato-acuminate, bifid at the point, the base cueullate, 
white, beautifully mottled with red. W. J. II. 

Cult. Little requires to be said respecting the cultivation of 
this plant, as it is, like the rest of the genus, a tender annual. 
It should be sown in April in a frame or pit, and bv the end of 
May it will be safe to turn it out in the flower-borders. We 
know too little of it yet, to enable us to speak of its merits : but 
it will probably make a pretty bed in the flower garden. /. 8. 



Fig. 1 and 2. Outer and inner view of a petaloid scale ;~mag*,Jied. 



4-4 ZS. 







Tab. 4429. 
DENDROBIUM Devonianum. 

The Duke of Devotishire's Dendrobium. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^:. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4352.) 



Dendrobium Devonianum ; caulibus elongato-cylindraceis articulatis stnatis pro- 
liferis junioribus foliiferis, foliis lineari-lauceolatis distichis submembrana- 
ceis acuminatis, floribus (5-6) aggregatis, sepalis lanceolate integemmis, 
petalis ovatis acutis ciliatis apice purpureo-maculatis, labello cucullato amplo 
latissime cordato pulcherrime plumoso-fimbriato intus macubs 2 aurantiacis 
apice emarginato purpureo, calcare brevissimo. 

Dendrobium Devonianum. " Paxton, Mag. Bot. v.l.p. 169. 



Assuredly one of the most delicate and most lovely of all 
Orchideous plants, and worthy to bear the name of that distin- 
guished nobleman, the Duke of Devonshire, who has done so 
much to encourage Horticulture and Botany. It is a native ot tne 
Khoseea hiUs, East Indies, and bears this name in Mr laxton s 
Magazine of Botany, vol.vii. I do not find it anywhere hilly 
described. Our plant, from which the accompanying ngure 
was made, is from the collection of the late Mr. Uowes. l 
flowered with us in September, 1847. The charm of this plan 
is confined wholly to its flowers: the stems and foliage possess 
no attractions. Except in the colour and markings and punes- 
cence, the flowers have a considerable resemblance to tftose oi 
B.fimbr iatum. The leaves are widely different. , 

Desch. Stems elongated, nearly cylindrical, jointed pa e 
whitish-brown, and, as it were, proliferous; the young shoots 
leafy; leaves few, distichous, wide apart, linear-lanceolate, suo- 
membranaceous, acuminate. Flowers forming a ra thei dense 
raceme at the end of leafless shoots, large, handsome ; tiie giouna 
colour is white. Sepals broad-lanceolate, rather obtuse, entire 
faintly tinged with purple, the two anterior ones uniting at tne 
base and decurrent into a short obtuse or emargmate spur. 
Petals larger than the sepals, very spreading, ovate, ncuti, 
march 1st, 1849. D 



beautifully ciliated, the apex with a purple spot. Lip remarkably 
large, cucullate, very broadly cordate, deeply aud most elegantly 
fringed, bearing two large orange spots on the pure white 
ground, and tipped with purple at the emarginate apex. Column 
concealed within the base of the labellum. // r . J. II. 

Cult. This belongs to the caulescent section of Dendrobwm, 
and, being of a weak and slender habit, its appearance does not 
offer much inducement to the cultivator ; but what it wants in 
look as a plant, is amply compensated by its lovely flowers, 
which render it worthy of a place in every Orchideous collection. 
It requires to be kept in the warm Orchideous house ; and as the 
stems are weak and naturally pendulous, it should be suspended 
from the roof of the house, either attached to a block of mossy 
wood, or in an open wire basket containing loose turfy pent 
mixed with chopped sphagnum moss ; or the block of wood or 
wire basket may be dispensed with, by fixing the plant on a 
sod of solid sphagnum, which remains firm and sound a long 
time, and keeps entirely free from insects and fungi. During its 
season of growth it must receive the usual stimulus of heat and 
moisture, and shading from the mid-day sun in summer. After 
the stems have attained their growth, they will begin to lose 
their leaves : water must then be gradually withheld, and the 
plant may be more freely exposed to the sun. The flowers are 
produced on the leafless stems during the dry season, a character 
common to many of the species in the section of Dendrobtuni to 
which the present one belongs. It memoes by lateral shoots, 
which emit roots and continue to grow while attached to the 
old stems. J. S. 



Note on Exacum Zeylanutm. 

, f 1 f l7^!il NUm 5 er ' UndeT Em ? m Ze V lan ™™> Tab. 4423, it should have brer, 
TW it W V C t t0 the Glasnevin Gard ™ b * Ok"^ Taylor. Esq. 

the L S r n T' •°° n i after K amVal m C<! > l0n ' *" *«* "** the'l„a„ tv It 



judged the plant to be in seed. 



4-4-3 0. 







Tab. 4430. 

gloxinia fimbriata. 

Fimbriated Gloxinia. 



Nat. Ord. GesneriacejE. — Didynamia Angiospermia. 
Gen. Char. (Fide supra, Tab. 4213.) 



Gloxinia fimbriate', erecta simplex subtetragona, foliis brevi-petiolati8 ovatis 
acutis serratis glabris, pedunculis axillaribus solitariis unifloris, calycis 
segmentis ovatis patentibus foliaceis, corollse tubo elongato infundibuliibrmi- 
cylindraceo, ore obliquo, limbo amplo profunde 5-lobo lobis subaequalibus 
rotundatis margine undulatis tenuissime fimbriatis intus pilosulis. 

Gloxinia fimbriata. Hortul. Paris. 



A very pretty and delicate looking stove-plant, of which we 
regret to say that all we know of it is that we received it at the 
Kew Gardens from M. Ketelew of Paris, under the name here 
given, and that it flowered with us in September, 1848, and 
continued some time in great beauty. It appears extremely 
different from any Gloxinia with which we are acquainted, and 
is a valuable addition to the hot-house department. 

Descr. Boots elongated and scaly, as in the genus. Stems 
erect, herbaceous, simple, a foot or a foot and a half high, rather 
obscurely tetragonal, green, tinged with red : the angles often 
sending out short white filaments as if rooting. Leaves opposite, 
shortly petioled, ovate, acute, serrated, penninerved, glabrous, 
full green, paler, and with prominent nerves beneath. Peduncles 
axillary, solitary, single-flowered, longer than the petioles, much 
shorter than the leaves. Calyx-tube turbinate, angled : segments 
spreading, ovate, large, leafy, three-nerved, wavy. Corolla 
declined, large, pale purplish- white. Tube between infundibuli- 
form and cylindrical, deep yellow inside and beautifully sprinkled 
with red dots : the limb quite white, spreading, and large ; the 
lobes rounded, nearly equal, lapping over each other, pilose 
on the inner or upper surface, the margin waved and most deli- 
cately fimbriated. Stamens and style quite included within 
the tube. W. J. H. 

MARCH 1st, 1849. D 2 



Cult. This, like the rest of the genus, is an herbaceous plant, 
the stem dying to the ground after having flowered and perfected 
its singular roots, or rather underground stems. These are 
composed of numerous closely-packed scales, surrounding an 
elongated axis, each scale when separated being capable of pro- 
ducing a distinct plant. In a natural state the roots lie dormant 
during the dry season, and start into vigorous growth on the 
return of the rains. To imitate this, the roots (having been 
kept dry all the winter) require in the spring to be taken out of 
the last year's mould and repotted in soil composed of light 
loam and a portion of leaf-mould or sandy peat, so as to form a 
light open compost, not retentive of water. The roots may be 
either planted whole, or divided according to the number of 
plants required, planting them in wide shallow pots or pans j and 
in order to start them, the pans should be placed in bottom-heat 
in a warm pit or frame. Little water must be given at first, 
but as they advance in growth they will require it pretty freely. 
Care must be taken not to allow them to remain too long in the 
bottom-heat, as they are apt to grow weak. As soon as they 
have attained sufficient strength, they should be removed to a 
more airy part of the stove, shading them from the sun in the 
middle part of the day. If many roots have been put in a pan 
they will require to be thinned, and those that are to remain 
should be carefully supported and trained to the best advantage 
for displaying the flower. When the flower-stems begin to 
decay, heat and moisture must be gradually withdrawn, but 
even after the stems are quite withered, it is advisable to keep 
the mould moderately moist for several weeks longer ; as, if it is 
too quickly dried up, the roots are apt to shrivel and decay 
during their long season of repose. They may be kept under 
the shelves in the stove, or in a shed, or other dry moderately 
warm place. J. S. 



/ V.3V. 




B..B>3.:im£ 



Tab. 4431. 
GESNERIA picta. 

Painted Gesneria. 



Nat. Ord. GESNERIACEiE. — Didynamia Angiospermia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4217.) 



Gesneria picta ; tota velutino-hirsutissima, caule erecto elongato, foliis ovatis 
acuminatis crenato-serratis oppositis ternisque discoloribus inferioribus 
longe petiolatis lamina basi hinc decurrente, racemis elongatis foliosis, 
pedicellis aggregato-verticillatis foliis floralibus brevioribus unifloris, calycis 
tubo rotundato-hemisphserico dentibus 5 parvis erectis, corolla cylindracea 
subtus parum ventricosa ore contracto limbo parvo 5-lobo sequali maculato, 
staminibus styloque inclusis, glandulis hypogynis 5 quorum 3 basi con- 
junctis. 

P. minus hirsuta, foliis floralibus majoribus, corollis minoribus, foliis subtus 
pallidioribus. 



Two Gesnerias have been brought to my notice lately from 
Columbia ; the one here represented, sent home to the Royal 
Gardens by Mr. Seemann, the other introduced by Messrs. 
Veitch and Son, through their collector, Mr. William Lobb. I 
cannot find that either of them will accord with any described 
species. I have little hesitation then in considering them 
new ; but although there are some discrepancies, as above in- 
dicated, I think the two may, without much violence to nature, 
be considered the same species. Both are exceedingly beau- 
tiful, not only in the rich colour of the copious flowers, but in 
that of the underside of the leaves, and in the fine velvety texture 
of the upperside of the foliage. The blossoming continues 
through the summer and autumn, and till late in November. 
They require the heat of the stove. 

Descr. Stem herbaceous, two to three and more feet m 
height, densely clothed with purple-red down, mingled with long 
fine spreading hairs. Leaves opposite or ternate, ovate, very 
hairy, acuminate, crenately serrate, the lower ones on long 
petioles which are very hirsute, and which have one side of the 
blade decurrent on the petiole. Floral leaves on short petioles 

march 1st, 1849. 



and small, all rich red-purple beneath. Raceme terminal, 
elongated, leafy. Pedicels axillary, in whorls, angle-flowered, 
shorter than the floral leaves, very hairy. Calyx hemispherical, 
with five small erect teeth. Corolla inclined, but not drooping, 
scarlet, yellow beneath and at the mouth, very hairy and velvety, 
subcylindrical, rather ventricose below : the mouth small : the 
limb of five small, rounded, spotted lobes, and hairy, almost 
hispid. Stamens and style included. Ovary and ttyk hairy. 
Glands five, large : three combined at the base. W. J II. 

Cult. This plant belongs to that section of G&neria charac- 
terized by roots similar to those of Gloxinia, as described 
under Tab. 4430 ; and therefore the treatment recommended for 
the cultivation of Gloxinia fimbriate is applicable to this. It is 
of a robust free-growing habit, and continues | long time in 
flower; a succession of flowering plants may be kept up till 
late in the season by starting a few roots at intervals of about a 
month, beginning with the first early in February, and selecting 
the early-flowered roots of the previous vear for the first 
pottmg. / 8. 



Fig. 1. Pistil and hypogynous glands :—ma(;nifml. 



4-4-3Z 







Tab. 4432. 
vanda tricolor. 

Three-coloured Vanda. 



Nat. Ord. Orchideje. — Gynandria Monandeia. 
Gen. CJiar. (Fide supra, Tab. 4304.) 



Vanda tricolor ; foliis distichis canaliciilatis racemo pauci-(multi-)floro longiori- 
bus, sepalis coriaceis vmguiculatis obovatis obtusis, labello sequilongo trilobo 
per axin 3-lineato, calcare brevi obtuso, laciniis lateralibus rotundatis inter - 
medio convexo cuiieato emarginato latioribus. Lindl. 

Vanda tricolor. Lindl. in Bot. Reg. 1847. p. 59, ad calcem. 



One of the many very fine plants recently introduced by 
Messrs. Veitch and Son from Java, through Mr. Thomas Lobb. 
Dr. Lindley compares it with V. Hindsii, a New Guinea plant, 
with which we are unacquainted, and he distinguishes it from 
Vanda insignis of Dr. Blume (Rumphia, 1. 192. f. 3), most justly. 
It is besides a far handsomer species, and indeed one of the 
most beautiful of this eminently beautiful genus. Our specimen 
was kindly communicated by Messrs. Veitch in December, 1848. 

Descr. The stem is of moderate length, sending out large 
fleshy roots from the base, by which it is supported on trees, 
clothed with distichous linear-lorate, canaliculate, bright green 
leaves, a foot and more long. The raceme is drooping, of many 
large, handsome flowers, upon long clavate ovaries, striated and 
resembling thickened flower-stalks, deflowers are among the 
largest of the genus. Sepals obovate, attenuated at the base, 
spreading, waved, rich full yellow, with numerous spots and 
streaks of a dark blood colour : petals similar in general shape 
and colour, but rather narrower. Lip as long as, or rather 
longer than, the perianth, thick and fleshy, oblong-cordiform, 
or it may almost be called lyrate, being three-lobed, the tvvo 
lateral lobes rounded, the middle oblong, a little dilated at the 
apex, and there imperfectly two-lobed : the colour of the lip is 
generally purple, with elevated lines and streaks, the base and 



march 1st, 1849. 



the margin of the lateral lobes colourless. Column short, thick, 
white. W.J.H. 

Cult. This fine tropical epiphyte requires to be grown in 
the warm Orchideous house, fixed to a block of wood or some 
such surface, as mentioned at t. 4427, on which its aerial roots 
may attach themselves. During its season of growth the 
atmosphere of the house must be kept warm and moist, and 
gradually lessened when the plant indicates a cessation of 
growth, which may be known by the points of the roots 
ceasing to elongate. In our Orchideous houses it becomes 
difficult to regulate the temperature and moisture so as to 
give the numerous species, of various habits, which we have 
under cultivation, their proper season of growth and repose, 
some having by nature a tendency to grow at one particular 
season, and some at another. It is the understood rule to 
consider our summer months as analogous to the "rainy" 
and growing season of the tropics, and this, by the aid of the 
artificial means at our command, we can readily imitate ; but 
the " dry " season of the tropics presents a great difficulty, for 
as it coincides with our winter months, when the atmosphere 
is charged with moisture accompanied with a low tempera- 
ture, but which in the tropics is characterized more by a want of 
rain than any diminution of heat, and as to maintain a dry 
tropical climate in our hot-houses in winter would require a 
greater quantity of artificial heat than would be conducive to 
the health of the plants, it is the practice to lower the tempera- 
ture and reduce the amount of moisture to the minimum degree 
necessary for counteracting the bad effects of the necessary arti- 
ficial heat. But even under such treatment, we have observed 
that the several species of Vanda, Aerides, Saccolabium, &c, are 
always inclined to grow during the winter and spring months ; 
we have also observed that in summer, immediately after 
flowering, they cease to grow, and will then bear a considerable 
degree of exposure to dry heat without being injured (the heat 
and dryness at this season being natural). In the autumn 
months, when the sun begins to lose power, the atmosphere of 
the house will naturally become moist, which again stimulates 
the plant into growth. From these observations we consider 
that the period of rest for these plants, in our climate, under 
artificial cultivation, is the latter part of our summer, when they 
have done flowering ; and in order to give them their natural 
requirements in that respect, it is necessary to have separate 
compartments of the Orchideous house. /. 8. 



4 4-33. 







4433. 

BEJARIA COARCTATA. 

Close-Jlowered Bejaria. 



Nat. Ord. Ericaceae. — Polyandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx profunde et acute 7-fidus aut 7-dentatus. Petala 7 patula 
oblonga. Stamina petalorum duplo, a petalis libera, filamcntis subulatis basi 
hirsutis, tmth. muticis oscillatoriis apice biporosis. Ovarium subrotundum 
7-sulcatum. Stylus elongatus. Stigma depresso-capitatum 7-sulcatum. Cap- 
sula depresso-globosa calyce persistente cincta stylo terminata 7-locul. 7 : valvis, 
loculis polyspermis.— Frutices Americani. Folia sparsa sapius conferta mteger- 
rima coriacea. Flores racemosi aut corymbosi, bracteati, sapissime purpurei. DL. 



Bejaria coardata ; ramis junioribus pedicellis calycibus petiolis oostaqne subtus 
f U scescenti-lanosis,foliis elliptico-oblongis acutiuscubs plains subtus glaucis, 
racemis densis, pedicelUs florera styli stamina aequantibus. 



At length we have the pleasure of exhibiting what has been 
so long a desideratum in European Horticulture, a species ot 
Bejaria, which has, for the first time, blossomed in this country 
With the exception of the North American B raccmosa, all the 
other species are natives of South America ; and the genus seems 
to hold the same place in the Andes of Peru, Columbia, and 
Mexico, that its affinity, Rhododendron, does in the Hjrn a |a^ 
of the Old World, and to be scarcely less ornamental, lhe 
species now represented is from the collection of Messrs Lucombe, 
Pince, and Co, in whose Exeter Nursery it flowered 11 ia cool 
green-house in January, 1849, with no more care than is aevotea 
to Indian Azaleas. Indeed, seeing that it is a native of very 
cold situations in Peru ("in regni Peruviani frigidissimis prope 
urbem Cascamarcan "), according to Humboldt at an elevation 
of from 9,000 to 10,000 feet, it seems more than FooaDie i 
will bear the open border with us. A plant one toot high is 
covered with blossoms. Other species we know are in cultivation, 
though they have not yet blossomed. 

The genus was named by Mutis in compliment to one Bijar, 
a Spanish Botanist, and erroneously written Be/ana ty £™kus. 

Descr. Alow shrub with more graceful ramification than most 
of the species of the genus, flowering copiously when less than a 



MARCH 1st, 1849. 



foot high, leafy. Leaves evergreen, alternate, patent, elliptical- 
oblong, subacute, entire, of a compact and brittle texture, plane, 
obscurely penninerved, glaucous beneath. Petioles very short, 
and, as well as the costa beneath, woolly. Racemes terminal on 
the branches, short, many-flowered, compact. Pedicels with 
small, deciduous bracts, and about equal in length to the flower, 
woolly. Calyx woolly, hemispherical, seven-lobed. Petals 
seven, spreading, oblong-lanceolate or subspathulate, pale rose 
colour, with darker streaks. Stamens seven, erect, approximate, 
as long as the petals. Filaments subulate, dilated and downy 
at the base. Anther ' obovato-oblong, two-celled, opening by a 
terminal pore in each cell. Ovary free, subrotund, seven-lobed, 
seven-celled. Style as long as the stamens. Stigma seven- 
lobed. W.J.H. 

Cult. As very few examples of this beautiful plant are in this 
country, we know too little of its nature to speak with any 
degree of certainty as to the best method of cultivation. We 
learn from Mr. Pince that with him it has thriven and flowered 
well, placed close to the glass in a cool airy green-house, along 
with Chinese Azaleas, potted in a mixture of sandy peat, soil, 
and a small portion of half-decayed leaf-mould. It is increased 
by cuttings, and, as Mr. Pince's plant is expected to ripen seeds, 
we may expect ere long to see it in general cultivation. On 
account of its exceedingly neat habit and flowering in a dwarf 
state, it cannot fail to become a favourite with cultivators. 
Being a native of the elevated regions of tropical America, in a 
climate where the cold is (to our feelings) severe, it is expected 
that it will prove tolerably hardy in our climate, and Mr. Pince 
intends planting it in the open ground. It may possibly en- 
dure the mild winters of Devonshire, but we have our doubts 
on that point ; for although it may sustain in its native elevated 
region a certain number of degrees of cold below the freezing 
point, yet we must bear in mind that, on account of elevation, 
the air is lighter and water freezes at a higher temperature 
than it does at our level above the sea. Any specific number 
of degrees of frost at a high elevation are not, therefore, equi- 
valent in intensity to the same number of degrees with us. 
This circumstance, and our humid atmosphere in winter, are 
much against our success in the cultivation of plants from ele- 
vated regions. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Stamen. 2. Pistil -.—magnified. 



4^J^. 




. I '•'; i a 



Tab. 4434. 
MAXILLARIA leptosepala. 

Narrow-sepaled Maxillaria. 



Nat. Ord. OrchidevE. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. {Fide supra, Tab. 4228.) 



Maxillaria leptosepala ; pseudo-bulbis ovato-rotundatis ancipiti-corapressis 
unifoliatis, folio lato-lanceolato coriaceo obtuso inferne angustato, scapis 
radicalibus folio triplo brevioribus vaginatis, sepalis petalisque (brevioribus) 
patentissimis angustc lanceolatis acuminatis margine revolutis, labello 
obovato-oblongo 3-lobo, lobis lateralibus obtusis intermedio maximo revoluto 
obtuso marginibus deutato-fimbriatis disco pulvinato hirsuto. 



From New Grenada, whence it was sent by Mr. Purdie in 
1846. It bore its large and really handsome flowers in the 
stove of the Royal Gardens in July, 1849. 

Descr. Pseudo-bulbs clustered, about two inches long, ovato- 
rotundate, compressed, with acute edges, partially surrounded 
by membranous scales, and bearing, articulated upon the summit, 
a solitary leaf, nearly a foot long, oblong-lanceolate, obtuse, 
coriaceous, nerveless, tapering at the base into a kind of foot- 
stalk. Scapes two or three from the base of the bulb, much 
shorter than the leaf, clothed, almost completely, with pale 
yellowish membranaceous sheathing bracteas, the upper one the 
largest and sheathing the ovary. Flowers solitary, large. Sepals 
very spreading, two inches and a half long, yellowish-white, 
narrow-lanceolate, acuminate, the margins revolute; petals 
resembling these both in form and colour, but rather smaller. 
Lip moderately sized, oblong-obovate, three-lobed, with a 
cushion-like swelling at the base of the disk : side lobes involute, 
white, beautifully veined with purple : middle lobe long, obtuse, 
waved, toothed and fringed and crisped at the margin, white ; 
the disk yellow, villous. Column rather short. Anther-case large, 
crested. W. J. U. 

Cult. This epiphyte, being a native of the temperate region 
°f New Grenada, should be kept in the cool division ot the 

APRIL 1st, 1849. E 



Orchideous house. With us it is attached to a block of wood 
suspended from the roof of the house, and shaded from the 
mid-day sun in summer. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Ovary and column. 2. Pollen-masses. 3. Lip: — magnified. 



4-4-35. 




■ a,im£- 



Tab. 4435. 

CURCUMA CORDATA 

Heart-leaved Curcuma. 



Nat. Ord. Scitamine^. — Monandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Cat. tubulosus, tridentatus. Corolla tubus sursum dilatatus, limbi 
lacinice exteriores interioribus laterabbus conformes ; lahdhm majus, patens. 
Filamentum petaloideo-dilatatum, carinatum, apice trilobum, lobo interraedio 
anthera bicalcarata terminato. Ovarium inferum triloculare. Ovula loculorum 
angulo centrali plurima, horizontalia, anatropa. Stylus fibformis ; stigma capi- 
tatum. Capsula trilocularis, locubcido-trivalvis. Semina plurima, arillata. — 
Herbse in India orientab tropica indigents, acaules ; radicibus palmato-taberosis 
perennantes ; foliis herbaceis, petiolis vaginantibus, bifariis ; scapo simplki laierali 
v. centrali, spica simplici, erecta, comosa, inferne bracteis saccatis subimbricata, 
floribus Jlavescentibus intra quamvis bracteam ternis quinisve approximatis, brac- 
teolatis. Endl. 



Curcuma cordata ; radice digitato-palmata, tuberibus plurimis globosis ex apice 
filorum subfusiformium pendulis, foliis ovato-cordatis acummatis concolo- 
ribus ntrinque sericeo-villosis petiolis lougitudine aequantibus, spica centrali 
supra vaginas sessili oblongo-cylindrica, bracteis ovatis obtusissmiis villosis 
ore ampbssimo patentibus, coma? lucidis violaceis apice purpureo-maculatis. 
Wall. 

Curcuma cordata. Wall. PI. Asiat. liar. v. I. p. 8. 1. 10. 



One of the most beautiful of a singularly handsome group of 
plants, too much neglected in our stoves, where, whether in 
flower or only in leaf, they add greatly to the ornament of the 
house. The present is among many discoveries of Dr. W allien, 
who found it in thick Bamboo forests on the hills opposite 
Prome, and whose admirable figure and description above 
quoted have left nothing for future botanists to add. Plants 
were sent to Kew and to Syon House by Dr. Walhch, and 
from a flowering specimen at the latter place our figure was 
made in July, 1847. 

Descr. A handsome herbaceous plant, with little that can be 
called a stem, and that little consisting of the sheathing bases ot 
the leaf-stalks. Leaves a foot long (and petiole rather more 
than that) bifarious, ovate, acuminate, retuse or cordate at the 
base, obliquely penninerved, of a uniform full green colour. 

-vi'iul 1st, 1840. E ^ 



The richly coloured spike arises from the centre of the base of 
the upper petioles, it is cylindrico-oblong, erect. Bracteas ovate, 
5-fariously arranged, very obtuse, green, the apex reflexed, 
much darker, the upper ones forming a coma (sterile), rich 
violet, with a deep purple or blood- coloured spot. The struc- 
ture of the flowers will be better understood by a reference to 
the figure. W.J.H. 

Cult. A herbaceous tropical plant, having tuberous roots 
which lie dormant during the dry season, and start into growth 
on receiving the stimulus of moisture. It requires to be grown 
in a tropical house. In spring, the tubers, having been first 
deprived of the last year's mould, should be repotted in a fresh 
mixture composed of light loam and leaf-mould or turfy peat, 
the pots being well drained, and placed in a warm pit or frame 
in bottom-heat. Water should be given very sparingly till after 
the plant has made some growth ; and as the young roots are of 
a soft and succulent nature, we must not allow the mould to con- 
tinue long wet during the whole period of growth, for fear the 
roots should rot off. After flowering, the leaves soon show symp- 
toms of decay ; water must then be gradually withdrawn, and 
ultimately the pots require to be placed beyond the reach of 
moisture, while care must be taken that the mould does not 
become dust-dry ; for if long kept in such a state, the tubers 
will gradually part with their moisture, and become shrivelled 
and decayed. The plant is increased by separating the tubers 
when repotted in the spring. J. S. 



Fig. 1. Flower and bracteole. 2. Stamens and pistil. 3. Stigma -.—magnified. 



4-4-3 6 




13.&: 



4436. 
PACHYSTIGMA pteleoides. 

Ptelea-leaved Pachystigma. 

Nat. Orel. Rutace,e. — Polyandeia Monogynia. 



Gen. Char. Calyx subtripbyllus, sepalis concavis inaequalibus, aestivatione 
imbricatis, interiore majore, petalis conformi. Petala 4, libera, subrotunda, con- 
cava, alba, impunctata; aestivatione imbricativa. Stamina plurima, sub-30, 
libera, gynopJwro magno carnoso biseriatim inserta. Filamenta subulata. Jnthera 
ovales, triloculare*, antice longitudinabter dehiscentes. Ovarium globe-sum, gyno- 
phoro iinpositum, 7-8-sulcatum, velutinum, 7-8-loculare, loculis biovulatis, 
stigmate magno carnoso 7-8-lobato deciduo coronatum. Capsula demum e coccubs 
8 (quibusdam abortientibus), stellatim dispositis, basi coalitis, abortu plerumque 
inonospermis : epicarpio sicco subrugoso, dorso carina lata instructo ; endocarpw 
cartilagineo, demum soluto. Semen oblique ovatum. Podospermum majusculum, 
camosum, album. — Frutex seu Arbor humilis Jamaicensis, valde ramosus; 
ramulis cortice larni viridi-fusco iectis. Folia alterna, exstipnlata ; huge petiolata, 
trifoliolata ; foliolis ovatis, acutis, integerrimis seu obsolete serratis, copiose pelhi- 
cido-punctatis, petiolulatis, in petiolum articulatis, penninerviis; pedunculis axil- 
la rili/s, folio sublongioribus, parce subtrichotome ramosk, pedicellis basi bracteolatis, 
bracteolis deciduis. Mores majmculi,frag> -antes, albi. 



Pachystigma pteleoides. 

Pachystigma pteleoides. Hook. Ic. Plant. 1. Tab. 698-9. 



A native of the mountains of Santa Cruz, Jamaica, where it 
was discovered by Mr. Purdie, in 1844, from whose dried 
specimens the figure was made for the Icones Plantarum above 
quoted. Seeds having been received at the same time, living 
plants were raised, which have attained a height of eight or nine 
feet in the Royal Gardens, and bore their cream-white very fra- 
grant blossoms in the stove, for the first time, in February, 1849. 

Descr. The plant, in its native country, becomes a small tree, 
of slender and rather graceful habit, with ternate, petiolate, 
evergreen leaves of a full dark-green colour, full of pellucid dots. 
Peduncles or panicles from the axil of the upper leaves. Bowers 
cream-colour. The five-leaved calyx gradually passes into the 
concave petals. Stamens shorter than the petals, springing in 

AI'KIL 1st, 1849. 



two series from a large fleshy orange-coloured torus or gynolase. 
Stigma particularly large and deeply lobed. W. J. H. 

Cult. A tropical shrub or small tree, requiring the tempera- 
ture of the stove. It will grow in any kind of good garden-soil, 
if care be taken in watering, that the mould does not become 
stagnant. As it is of slender growth and apt to run up, it is 
advisable to shorten the branches so as to keep it bushy, and 
induce a greater number of flowering branches. It is readily 
propagated by cuttings, placed under a bell-glass and plunged in 
bottom heat. /. 8. 



Fig. 1. Pistil and gynobase. 2. Section of the ovary. 3. Stamen : — magnified. 



4 437. 




Tab. 4437. 
eriopsis rutidobulbon. 

Rough-stalked Eriopsis. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide,e. — Gynandria Monandria. 

Gen. Char. Caules succulenti (pseudo-bulbosi), apice tantura foliati. Racemus 
radicalis multiflorus. Bradea minimee. Mores explanati, laciuiis subsequalibus 
oblongis obtusis, mento brevi obtuso. Labellum anticum, concavum, trilobura, 
disco lamellatum e basi producta columnse articulatum. Columna semiteres, 
clavata, aptera. Anthem oblonga, subunilocularis : pollinia 4 insequalia, per 
paria filis 2 elasticis affixa ; glandula submembranacea, quadrata. Lindl. 



Eriopsis rutidobulbon ; caule (pseudo-bulbo) oblongo-ovato tereti nigoso, folns 
2 striatis, scapo radicali, racemo multifloro nutante, sepalis petalisque 
oblongis, labelli hirsutuli striati lobis lateralibus maximis intermedio 
minimo subintegro. 



From New Grenada, whence it was introduced by Mr. Purdie 
to the Royal Gardens of Kew, where it produced its fine raceme 
of flowers in August, 1848. It evidently belongs to the genus 
Eriopsis, established by Dr. Lindley on a plant which flowered 
in the collection of J. J. Brady, Esq., the origin of .which is un- 
known. It cannot, however, be the same species, as will be seen 
at once on comparing the two figures. 

Descr. Pseudo-bulbs (rather than "stem ) ovato-oblong, 
terete, of a dark purplish-black colour, singularly rough or 
wrinkled upon the surface, bearing two (rarely three) large, 
broadly lanceolate, striated, somewhat coriaceous leaves at the 
extremity; one, however, a little below the other so that a 
part of the pseudo-bulb is seen between. Scape a foot and a 
half long, radical, terete, dark purple, bearing a drooping raceme 
of many flowers. Sepah and petals alike, spreading, almost 
horizontally, oblong, obtuse, dull orange-yellow red-purple at 
the margin Lip about as long as the sepals, obtusely spurred 
at the blse behind, broadly ovate, three-lobed, the ^striated, 
lamellated, with a dull crest ; the lateral lobes broad, involute, 
the terminal one small, orbicular, obscurely two-lobecl, white, 
with dark purple spots ; the rest of the lip is dull orange-red, 

APRIL 1st, 1849. 



dotted with dark purple. Column shorter than the lip, greenish, 
semiterete, a little enlarged upwards. Anther hemispherical. 
W.J. H. 

Cult. Found by Mr. Purdie growing on the smooth stem of 
a Palm tree, fully exposed to the sun, in the temperate region of 
Antioquia in New Grenada, at an elevation of between 4,000 
and 5,000 feet, the thermometer falling in the morning to 65°, 
and rising during the day to 75°, which, on account of the less 
weight and consequent rarity of the atmosphere at that elevation, 
may be considered as equivalent to a temperature of 55° and 65° 
with us. We have, therefore, kept this plant in the cooler 
division of the Orchideous house, where it appears to thrive, 
potted in turfy peat, well drained, watering very sparingly in 
winter, and shading it from the mid-day sun in summer. This 
treatment, it must be confessed, is very different from what we 
may presume it to have received when "growing on the smooth 
stem of a Palm tree y fully exposed to the sun " but we fear that 
on account of our very different climate and present adaptations 
for cultivation, and the rarity of plants like this, it will be some 
time before we venture to try the experiment of placing such 
plants where they will be fully exposed to our summer sun. 
This appears to be a very rare plant, for although Mr. Purdie 
was very diligent in searching, yet he never met with a second 
specimen. J. S. 



Fig. 1. Lip. 2. Column and anther. 3. Pollen-masses : — magnified. 



4-4-38 




E.3 



Tab. 4438. 

STIFFTIA CHRYSANTHA. 

Golden-flowered Stifftia. 



Nat. Ovd. Composite — Mutisiace^e. — Syngenesia PerdiciejE. 

Gen. Char. Capituhim homogamum discoideum multi- et aequaliflorum. Iu- 
volucrum arete imbricatum, squamis coriaceis siccis multinerviis ovato-rotundis, 
int. liHearibus. Receptaculum nudum alveolatum. Cor. subcoriacea, glabra, 
regularis, 5-fida, 10-nervia, lobis extus circinnato-revolutis. Filam. Uevift. 
Antherce exsertaj longe caudate. Stylus cylindricus glaber bifidus, ramis brevi- 
bus sequalibus acutis. Achamium glabrum elongatum brevissime rostratum. 
Pappus multiseriabs paleaceus longus insequalis, paleis linearibus serratis. — 
Ai-bores Brasilienses glabra. Rami teretes. Folia alterne petiolata oblonga acu- 
minata penninervia. Capitula terminalia, pedunculis squamigeris. Be Cand. 



Stifftia chrysantha ; foliis late lanceolatis acuminatis, capitulis solitariis, flori- 

bus capituli indefinitis. 
Stifftia chrysantha. Mikan, Del. Fl. Bras. Fasc. 1. cum Ic. Be Cand. Prodr. 

v.l.p.2&. 
Augusta grandiflora. Leand. Akad. Mink. Phil. v. 7. p. 235. t.li. non Pohl. 
Plazia Brasiliensis. Spreng.Syst. Veget. v. 3. p. 503. 



Few cultivators have seen native specimens or the fine figure 
given by Mikan of this beautiful shrub, without feeling desirous 
to possess it in our stoves. It has been longer in our collections 
than we were aware of. Many years ago, plants of it were pre- 
sented to Kew by Mr. Henderson of the Pine- Apple Nursery; 
and plants have been also communicated to the Edinburgh 
Botanic Garden ; yet no one suspected that it was the celebrated 
Stifftia till its flowers appeared, nearly at the same time, both in 
Edinburgh and Kew. Our drawing was made from the Edin- 
burgh specimen, kindly sent in February, 1849, by Professor 
Balfour, with the following notes. IF. J. H. 

" This plant has been flowering for some time m the Edin- 
burgh Botanic Garden. It is a native of Brazil, and was derived, 
1 believe, originally from Kew. It is cultivated in a warm stove. 

" Descr. The plant is at present almost six feet high (ac- 
cording to Mikan it attains a height of eight to ten feet) and has six 
heads of very showy flowers. The woody stem is four inches and 
a half in circumference at the base, and the bark is rough. 
The primary branches come off in a somewhat dichotomous 
manner. Leaves lanceolate, acuminate, alternate, shortly petio- 



april 1st, 1849. 



late, entire, smooth and shining, having a single mid-rib, which 
. is slightly penninerved both on the under and on the upper 
surface ; venation reticulated, primary veins ending in curved 
veins within the margin. Petiole slightly grooved on its upper 
surface, articulated with the stem. Capitula solitary, terminal 
on the young branches, homogamous, containing about twenty- 
five discoid flowers. Peduncles short, thickened upwards, having 
small scales. Involucre somewhat turbinate, coriaceous, having 
thirty to forty imbricated scales arranged in several series, 
closely appressed in the young state, spreading after the corolla 
falls; scales green in the centre, paler towards the margins 
which are fringed with short hairs ; outer scales short, ovate, 
obtuse, often tipped with black, intermediate scales longer and 
less ovate, innermost oblong-linear, pale greenish, and about one 
inch in length. Receptacle having milky juice, nearly flat, 
marked with hexagonal spaces, in the centre of each of which 
there is a depression or pit for the flower. Corolla smooth, 
regular, tubular, about one inch and three-quarters long, of a 
pale orange colour below and becoming darker above, its'limb 
divided into five narrow, revolute circinnate segments which 
when unrolled are about half an inch long. Filaments smooth, 
coloured, inserted into the upper part of the corolline tube, alter- 
nating with the segments of the limb, arching over the orifice of 
the tube to join the anther below the middle; anthers two- 
lobed, much exserted, bifid at the apex, ending below in a bi- 
partite prolongation ; pollen elliptical, furrowed, ^cylindrical, 
exserted nearly one inch beyond the corolla and about a quarter 
ol an inch beyond the antheric tube, undulated at its lower part, 
straight above. Stigma bifid, its segments equal, acute, hairy 
on the inner side of its lobes, which close on the application of 
the pollen. Ovary green, triangular, three-quarters of an inch 
long, with a short yellowish beak at the summit whence the 
pappus proceeds Pappus reaching to near the upper part of 
the corolline tube in several rows, its hairs unequal and beau- 
tifully serrated with projecting cellular processes, of a pale orange 
colour, spreading much after the corolla falls." /. H Balfour 

Aow Al! S 1S a Sh i Ub ° f a robust and bush y habit > requiring 
the heat of the tropical stove, and growing in any kind of garden 
bam not retentive of moisture. Although we have had it in 
cultivation for about eight years, it was only recently that it 
showed flower ; bu we are of opinion that if young plants were 
vigorously grown, they would not be so dilatory in producing 
their curious inflorescence. It is propagated readily b} cuttings 
placed under a bell-glass in bottom-heat S.8. 

Fig. 1. Single flower : — % 



4-4-33, 







lGl. 



l-.B.fcB. 



Tab. 4439 
ERIOSTEMON intermedium. 

Intermediate Eriostemon. 



Nat. Ord. EuTACEiE. — Decandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Cat. 5-partitus. Petala 5. Stamina 10 ; filamentis hispidis 
ciliatis aut nudis, antheris terminalibus. Stylus 1, brevissimus. Carpella 5 
basi coalita. Semina in loculis 2 aut abortu solitaria. Embryo subcurvatus, 
radicula longa. — Erutices Arboresve nunc Diosmis, nunc Croweis, nunc Phe- 
baliis affinis, foliis alternis simplicibus, floribus axillaris. Be Cand. 



Eriostemon intermedium ; ramulis pubescentibus, foliis oblongo-obovatis glauces- 
centibus mucronatis subtus praecipue glanduloso-punctatis, floribus pcdun- 
culis axillaribus solitariis unifloris folio duplo brevioribus, calycibus pctalis- 
que glabris, filamentis ciliatis. 

Eriostemon intermedium. Hortul. 



My first knowledge of this handsome plant was from Robert 
Barclay, Esq., of Knott's Green, Leyton, who obligingly brought 
me specimens from the plant he had exhibited at, and for which 
a prize was awarded by, the Horticultural Society of London, in 
April, 1848; and from it our drawing was made. It bore 
the name of " E. neriifolium " but that is merely a name ot 
Sieber's specimens, which have compound flower-stalks, and are 
probably not different from E. myoporoides, DC. (Bot. Mag. 
t. 3180). Since then, we find the plant is in cultivation under 
the garden-name of E. intermedium, intending probably to imply 
that it holds a place between E. myoporoides and E. bwifohum, 
which is really the case ; or it may possibly be a hybrid ot the 
two. Whichever is the case, it is eminently worthy ot culti- 
vation in every greenhouse, loaded as the shrub is with its lively 
blossoms (white tinged with pink in bud) during the latter 
winter and early spring months, when such plants are peculiarly 



welcome. 



Descr. Our plant in the Kew Gardens is between two and 
three feet high, much branched. Leaves copious, scattered 
spreading, three-quarters of an inch to an inch or an inch and 
a half long, oblong-obovate, entire, one-nerved, the margins a 



APRIL 1st, 1849. 



little recurved, cuspidate, somewhat glaucous, especially beneath, 
and there having copious glandular reservoirs of oil, above 
sprinkled with very minute, pale dots, not visible to the naked 
eye. Peduncles on all the young branches, axillary, solitary, 
single-flowered, not half so long as the leaves, having a pair of 
minute bracteas near the base. Flowers rather large, starry. 
Calyx small, glabrous, five-lobed. Petals lanceolate, white; 
externally, especially in bud, tinged with rose-colour. Stamens 
ten, erect, alternately smaller, subulate, ciliated. Anthers ovate, 
mucronate. Ovary of five, ovate, acuminated lobes, seated on 
a large, flat, fleshy disk. Styles five, combined. Stigma five- 
lobed. W.J. H. 

Cult. This handsome flowering shrub, being a native of 
New South Wales, must be kept in the green-house. It 
appears to thrive best in turfy peat-soil, in which is mixed a 
portion of sharp white sand. It is necessary to have the pots 
well drained with potsherds, and the drainage will be much 
assisted by mixing pieces of charcoal with the soil. In order to 
obtain a handsome specimen, the plant must be carefully tended, 
shifting it at the proper time into a larger pot, and carefully 
training it into a neat form. To make it become bushy, the 
principal leading shoots should occasionally be shortened. During 
summer, it will require attention in watering, and the pot should 
be so placed that the sun's rays do not fall on the sides. It is 
propagated by cuttings placed under a bell-glass in bottom-heat, 
or by grafting it on stocks of Correa alba. J. S. 



Fig. 1. Portion of leaf, back view. 2. Flower from which the petals are 
removed. 3. Stamens. 4. Pistil and fleshy disk :—7>iagnified. 



4-i-4-0. 







Tab. 4440. 
CCELOGYNE fuliginosa. 

Dark-Lowered Codogyne. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^;. — Gynandria Monandria. 

Gen. Char. Sepala conniventia v. patentia, libera, sequaba, petaloidea. Petala 
nunc scpalis conformia, nunc linearia. Labellum cucullatum, saepius trilobura, 
lineis disci elevatis v. cristatis, nunc integerrimum ecristatum. Columna erecta 
libera margine alata, apice dilatata, nunc cucullata, stigmate bilabiato. Anthera 
bilocularis, septo medio non partibili, infra apicem columna? inserta. Pollluia 
4, libera, incumbentia ; nunc basi materie granulosa cohaerentia. — Herbac supra 
arbores et saxa vigentes, foliorum basibus in pseudo-bulbis dilatatis, rhizoraate 
nunc crasso squamoso nunc obsolete-. Folia coriacea srepius veins distinct is aqua- 
libus, nunc quibusdam crassioribns costata v. pllcata. Racemi terminales v. radi- 
cates v. squamis (bracteis steribbus) cornels erumpentes. Flores speciosi sape 
odoratl. Lindl. 



Ccelogyne fuliginosa ; caudice repente squamoso, pseudo-bulbis parvis oblongis 
compressis lsevibus, fobis birds lato-lanceolatis, racemo tcrminali bracteato 
4-5-floro, sepalis ovato-oblongis, petalis ovalibus duplo minoribus, iabelli 
spathulati disco bilamellato lamellis crispatis, lobis lateralibus brevibus 
convolutis, terminali orbiculato cibato fimbriato. 

Ccelogyne fuliginosa. Lodd. Cat. 



From the stove of the Royal Gardens, derived from the collec- 
tion of the Rev. Mr. Clowes. A native of India, and imported 
in the year 1838 : we have since received it direct from Calcutta. 

Descr. From an elongated, creeping, scaly caudex, about as 
thick as a swan's quill, arise, at rather distant intervals, the 
oblong, somewhat compressed, smooth, green pseiah-hn lbs, scaly 
at the base, bearing above two broadly lanceolate, waved, very 
acute, between membranaceous and coriaceous, faintly striated 
leaves. Raceme of from three to five rather large, handsome, 
secund Jlozvers, each when young and in bud enclosed in a 
sheathing, narrow, acuminated bractea. Perianth ochre-yellow ; 
sepals oval-oblong, rather acute, concave ; petals shorter than 
the sepals (and with the upper sepal almost connivent over the 
column). Lip large, oblong-spathulatc, thrce-lobcd, ochraeeous, 
the disk dark purple-brown, and furnished with two elevated 
crisped lines or lamella, three-lobed ; side lobes convolute, 

may 1st, 1849. F 



middle lobe orbicular. Column long, winged on each side above. 
W.J.H. 

Cult. This, being a tropical epiphyte, requires to be kept in the 
warm division of the orchideous house. With us it is attached 
to a block of wood suspended from the roof, receiving the same 
treatment with regard to heat and moisture as Indian epiphytal 
Orchidaceae. The chief point to be observed is to keep it more 
or less moist according to its season of growth, shading it 
from the mid-day sun in summer. /. 8. 



"Fig. 1. Column. 2. Anther-case. 3 and 4. Front and back view of tUe 
pollen-masses. 5. Front view of the lip -.-^magnified. 



4-4- bi 




Fitch, ieletlf 



U.S. & l-^ 



Tab. 4441. 
THYRSACANTHUS bracteolatus. 

Bracteolated Thyrsacanthns. 



Nat. Ord. AcanthacejE. — Diandeia Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4378.) 



Thyrsacanthus bracteolatus ; suffruticosus glaber, caule tetragono, foliis lan- 
ceolatis acuminatis sessilibus, panicula terminali brevi tbyrsoidea, ramis 
pseudo-verticillatis bracteatis, corolla elongato-subinfundibuliforaii limbi 
ol)li(|ue subregularis profimde divisi, laciniis elongatis liueari-oblongis, 
staminibus exsertis sterilibus subulatis brevissimis. 

Thyksacanthus bracteolatus. Nees, in Be Cand. Prodr. v. 11. p. 325. 

Justicia bracteolata. Jaca. Coll. v. 3. p. 253. Ic. Ear. v. 2. t. 205. Vahl, 
Enum. v. 1. p. 128. 

Odontonema lucidura. Nees, in Linncea, v. 16. p. 300. (excl. syn. Jndr.J 



A plant originally referred by Jacquin to Justicia, but 
evidently of the same genus of Acanthacea as that figured 
at Tab. 4378, resembling it in many respects. It differs in the 
much narrower and truly lanceolate leaves, and still more in 
the very different inflorescence, and in the deep and narrow 
divisions of the limb of the corolla. It inhabits New Grenada 
and the West Indian Islands, and is here figured from plants 
reared in the stove of the Royal Gardens from seeds sent by 
Mr. Purdie from Jamaica. 

Descr. Stem two to three feet high, four-angled, dark purple- 
brown. Leaves opposite, five or six inches long, nearly sessile, 
lanceolate, entire, slightly undulate, peuninerved, acuminatul. 
Panicle thyrsoid, terminal, obtuse. Branches pseudo-vcrticillate, 
slender, again divided and bearing several small, opposite, linear- 
oval bracteoles. Calyx small, naked, the five subulate segments 
equal Corolla scarlet, in our specimens an inch and a half long; 
t"hv slender, narrow below, bent down as it were at an angle m 
the middle, and from that point funnel-shaped; the limb 
unequal, two-lipped, deeply divided into five long, narrow, 
spreading segments, sprinkled with glandular dots. Stamens 
slightly exserted, except the two sterile ones, which are quite 
may 1st, 1849. F ^ 



included. Style also included. Ovary on a large fleshy disk. 
Stigma bifid. W.J.H. 

Cult. An upright suffruticose shrub, requiring tropical heat, 
and growing freely in any kind of light soil not retentive of 
water. Its flowers are produced at the apex of the branches ; 
and on account of its upright habit of growth, it does not 
readily form a bushy plant, even although the leading shoots 
are stopped. It is propagated freely by cuttings placed under a 
bell-glass. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Corolla laid open. 2. Pistil. 3. Anther -.—magnified. 



4-&. 




Tab. 4442. 

PESOMERIA TETRAGONA. 

Square-stalked Pesomeria. 



Nat. Ord. OrchidacEjE.— Gynandria Monandria. 

Gen. Cliar. Sepala subrequaba libera, sponte decidua. Petala conformia, basi 
columnre adnata, persistentia. Labellum posticum, cum columna connatura, 
basi gibbosum, limbo indiviso convolute Columna clavata semiteres, clinandrio 
dentato. Pollinia 4 cuneata. — Herba terrestris ; caulc tetragono, foliis mart* 
branaceis plicatis, racemo later ali simplici, bracteis sponte secedentibus ; rndicibus 
crassis simplicibm fibrosis. Lindl. 



Pesomeria tetragona. 

Pesomeria tetragona. Lindl. in Bot. Reg. Misc. 1838, n. 6. 

Epidendrum tetragonum. Tkouars, Orchid. Afr. t. 33, 34. 

A very remarkable Orchideous plant, native of the Isle of 
Bourbon, introduced to our stoves by the Messrs. Loddiges, but 
first detected and described, as an Epidendrum, by M. Aubert 
du Petit Thouars. Dr. Lindley has rightly determined it to be a 
very distinct genus, to which he has given the name of Pesomeria, 
from 7r t 7rT», to fall off, and pepos, a part ; in allusion to the 
sudden falling off of the convolute bracteas, of the sepals and 
petals also, leaving the labellum (which is decurrent with the 
base of the column), as shown in the two lower flowers m the 
spike of our figure. Dr. Lindley observes that the genus differs 
from Bletia in its four, not eight, pollen-masses ; but in our 
plant each pollen-mass is two-lobed, as if of two combined. 

Descr. Stem a foot or more high, erect, jointed, about as 
thick as the human finger, sharply four-angled and almost 
winged at the angles. Leaves inserted at the articulations, 
ovato-lanceolate, striated and somewhat plaited, membranous, 
much acuminated. Peduncle arising from the inner base of a 
lateral leaf, a foot high, bracteated. Flowers rather large eight 
to ten in a lax spike. Floral bracteas sheathing, deciduous. 
Sepals and petals uniform, spreading, oblong, acute, greenish 
externally, within red-brown, tinged with green. Lip applied 
close to the column, the base decurrent with it, the side lobes 

MAY 1st, 1849. 



convolute around it, the middle lobe crisped and terminated by 
a large mucro, downy within : the colour yellow, with streaks 
of orange-red, and there are three lamellae in the centre. Column 
winged above and dentate at the apex. Anlher-case hairy, 
bifid. Pollen-masses four, unequal, all of them bifid. W. J. H. 
Cult. Before we can cultivate certain plants with success, 
we require some knowledge of the climates in which they 
grow, so as to adapt the means we have in our power as 
far as possible to meet their several peculiarities. This 
plant is said to be a native of the Island of Bourbon, 
situated within the southern tropic, and distinguished by a moist 
climate, caused by the periodical rains, which fall twice a 
year ; also by the daily land and sea breezes, the former 
wafting cold vapours from the high mountains of the interior, 
which are said to be covered with snow during several months 
of the year ; and the latter bringing fogs from the ocean. 
Now, although we know this to be the general character of the 
climate, we are still unacquainted with the nature of the locality 
of this plant, which may be subjected to many local influences ; 
and our want of this precise knowledge may to a'certain extent be 
the cause of its slow growth with us. It has been kept in the 
warm division of the Orchideous house, potted in turfy peat — 
the usual precautions being taken to prevent the soil from be- 
coming stagnant. /. 8. 



Fig. 1. Column and decurrent and gibbous base of the lip. 2. Anther-case. 
3. Pollen-masses. 4. Lip : — magnified. 



4-4-4-3. 



yf 






L 



( x 



>X 



*7^v^' 



-s^ ' jviim 






*£/, 



*V^ • 



Wh 



V 






^ 



/ 



LelrtHtK. 






I HP 

% -. • 



ro&w* t*^ 






f\ v\\ 





lave Bentim & B.W 



Tab. 4443. 
CEREUS REDUCTUS. 

Dingy Cerem. 



Nat. Ord. Cacte^e. — Icosandria Monogynia. 
Gen.' Char. (Vide mpra, Tab. 4417.) 



Cekeus reductus; erectus elongatus cylindraceus lurido-virens Iongitudinabter 
plurisulcatus, sulcis profundis sub 14, costis tuberculatis, tubercubs seu 
mamillis ovalibus obscure hexahsedris convexis compressis conspicue areolatis, 
areob's lanatis, spinis sub 11 rectis acicularibus insequalibus rectis fuscis 
apice rigidissimis basi interioribus junioribus fulvis sub-8 elongatis vab- 
dioribus rebquis quintuplo minoribus, floribus subaggregatis terminabbus, 
calycibusinermibus basi squamosis, petabs (albis roseo-tinctis) oblongo-spa- 
tbulatis subserratis mucronatis. 

Cekeus reductus. Link, Enum. v. 2. p. 21. Pfeiff. Cact. p. 75. 

Cactus nobilis. Eaw.Syn.p. 174 (not Aiton, Hort. KewJ. 



An old inhabitant of the Cactus house of the Royal Gardens, 
originally received from Mexico. A very dingy looking species 
except when in flower, when the pure white corollas, with a 
slightly pink tinge, have a very pretty effect. 

Descr. Stem sometimes attaining a height of three leet, 
erect, terete or cylindrical, four to five inches broad, dingy glau- 
cous-green, deeply furrowed longitudinally with about fourteen 
or fifteen furrows, the ridges tuberculate or mamillate; ma- 
ntilla large, in a regular series, very convex, oval or obscure y 
six-sided, compressed, the centre having a conspicuous woolly 
areola from whence diverge about eleven sharp aciculated spines, 
of which the greater number are large, tawny m the young state, 
brown when old, always deeper at the base, three or tour are 
much the smaller of the cluster. Flowers two or three or more 
together, from the summit of the plant, Calyx-tube ^dark green, 
glabrous, scaly with remote scales, which upwards gradually 
pass into oblong sepals with white margins, and those again 
into the spreading petals, white, partially tinged with rose, 
the apex slightly serrated and mucronate. Stamens numerous, 

MAY 1st, 1849. 



very compact. Stigma of many erecto-patent, subulate, downy 
rays. W. J. H. 

Cult. An old inhabitant of this garden, said to be a native 
of Mexico ; but we have no knowledge of the particular locality, 
never having received it amongst the numerous collections im- 
ported of late years from different parts of South America. We 
have grown it in a mixture of loam and lime rubbish sittings, 
and kept it in a house the temperature of which averages 50° in 
winter. During that season we give it little or no water, but 
in summer allow it to receive the full power of the sun, and in 
hot dry weather frequently sprinkle it with water over-head, 
which should be always done in the morning, before the sun is 
powerful, or in the evening. Care must be taken not to allow 
the mould in the pot to become excessively wet ; for if it 
continue in a wet state, the soft roots are apt to be destroyed. 
As this species rarely produces off-sets, it is still a rare plant in 
this country. J. 8. 



4-4-4-4-. 




i rtlift.. 






Tab. 4444. 
CYRTANTHERA catalp^folia. 

Catalpa-leaved Cyrtanthera. 



Nat. Ord. AcANTHACEiE. — Diandkia Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Cat. 5-partitus quinquefidusve, aequalis, laciniis coloratis tenuibus 
ianceolatis. Corolla ringens, tubo longo, lobis profunde divisis scquabbus, supe- 
riore complicato lineari-falcato, inferiore elongato-obconico apice trifido, laciniis 
brevibus conniventibus, media plerisque angustiora apice complicato-recnrva. 
Stamina duo, basi tubi inserta eidemque ultra medium adnata, longitudine labii 
superioris, apice recurva. Anthera cernua, brevis, bilocularis, loculis antrorsum 
debiscentibus margine membranaceis in connectivo plerisque semdunari apice 
recurvo carinato subsecundis, lateribus plerumque arete contiguis muticis, altera 
paullo demissiore, subinde connectivo protracto omnino distantibus. Stigma 

obtuse unilabiatum. Fructus — Frutices caule valido, foliis amplis Mis 

petiolatis, floribus Aphelandra magnis et angustis. Plerisque thyrsus termimlis 
decomposite, densissimus, multiflorus, speciosus, ramis secimdifloris, bracteis brac- 
teolisque calyce longioribus plerumque coloratis teneris, Mis latioribus. Nees. 



Cybtantheea catalpafolia ; caule fruticoso erecto tetragono, folus sublonge 
petiolatis late cordatis acuminatis integerrimis basi truncatis, florahbus 
ovatis basi in petiolum brevem attenuatis, thyrso amplo ovato compacto, 
bracteis sepalisque lineari-subulatis, floribus flavis. 

Cyclantheka catalpsefoba. Nees, in Herb. Hook. 



This is a truly handsome and new plant, equally striking for 
its ample foliage and its fine thyrsi of full yellow flowers - u 
was obligingly sent to the Royal Gardens of Kew by Mrs. 
M'Donnel (the Lady of the Governor) from Honduras, and it 
flowers in the stove in the summer months. It constitutes one 
of the same genus of Acanthacea with Jmticia (Bot. Mag. 
tab. 3383). , . , 

Descr. Our plant is five to six feet high, erect, branched ; 
the branches opposite, as well as the leaves, which are petiolate, 
large, cordate, acuminate, entire, penninerved, truncated at the 
base, beneath the inflorescence is a pair of what may be called 
floral-leaves, much smaller than the others and tapering below 
into a short footstalk. Panicle or thyrsus dense, compact. 
Peduncles short, compound. Bractcas small, linear-subulate. 

MAY 1st, 1849. 



Calyx-segments almost equally narrow, but shorter. Corolla 
large, yellow, tubular, cut almost half-way down into two gaping 
lips ; the upper erect, complicate, entire (in which the stamens 
are lodged) ; lower lip reflexed, spathulate, channelled, three- 
toothed at the apex. Ovary oblong, smooth, sunk into a cup- 
shaped 47 W. Style very long, slender, filiform: stigma capi- 
Late, yy . «/. si. 

Cult. This is a soft-wooded, shrubby, tropical plant, of a 
rather weedy, naked habit, producing its handsome head of 
flowers on the apex of upright shoots. It will grow freely in 
any light kind of soil; but in order to obtain a large head of 
flowers a young healthy plant must be selected and potted in a 
mixture of good loam and leaf-mould or turfy peat. It should 
then be placed in a warm part of the stove, and shifted into a 
larger pot as it becomes necessary. During the summer, when 
it is m rapid growth, it should be watered freely, observing that 
the mould does not become stagnant, which will sometimes 
happen with soils composed of a portion of leaf-mould. Care 
should therefore be taken to have the pots properly drained. 
It is readily propagated by cuttings, placed under a bell-glass, 
or in a frame. J. 8. 



at Sf base — ^iS/ raCtCaS "^ pistil " 2 " ° Vary with the S landular CU P 



4-4-4.5. 




JbR.in?- 



Tab, 4445 
LYCASTE Skinneri. 

Mr. Skinner s Lycaste. 



Nat. Orel. Ouchide^e. — Gynandria Monandbia. 
Gen. Char. (Fide supra, Tab. 4193.) 



Lycaste Skinneri; bractea herbacea acuta cucullata ovario multo longiore, 
sepalis patentibus oblongo-lanceolatis acutis, petalis duplo brevioribus 
ovalibus erectis supra columnam convolutis apicibus reflexis, labelli 3-lobi 
lobis lateralibus erectis truncatis intermedio longiore ovato-rotuudato de- 
flexo, appendice carnosa linguseformi inter lacinias laterales locata, columna 
subtus pubescente. IAndl. 

Lycaste Skinneri. Lindl. Bot. Beg. 1843. Misc. p. 15. 

Maxillaria Skinneri. Bateman in Bot. Beg. 1843, Misc. n. 13. Orchid. Mex. 
et Gnat. tab. 35 (not Lindl. Bot. Beg. 1840, Misc. n. 101). 



Mr. Bateman, who has done great justice to this plant by his 
splendid figure above quoted, says with truth : " This is the 
facile princeps of all known Maxillarias ;" and with equal justice 
does he dedicate this fine species to its discoverer, J. Ure 
Skinner, Esq., to whom the Orchideous stoves of Europe are 
indebted for their most brilliant ornaments. "It is a native 
of Guatemala, and remarkable no less for the large size of the 
blossoms, than for their chaste colouring, white spotted and 
suffused with rich rose and crimson. It is a ready flowerer, 
and the flowers remain a long time in great beauty. 

Descr. Pseudo-bulbs oblong-ovate, compressed, bearing at the 
top a pair of large, oblong-lanceolate, membranaceous, plaited 
leaves. Scape radical, single-flowered, shorter than the leaves, fur- 
nished with five or six sheathing bracteas, the upper one sheathing 
the ovary. Mower very large, of a thickish and almost waxy 
texture. Sepals (five or six inches across from tip to tip) patent, 
oval, acute, faintly striated, white tinged with blush. Petals 
smaller than the sepals, broadly ovate, very acute, concave, also 
faintly striated, white, more tinged with blush than the sepals, 
almost conniving so as to form a hood over the column, the 

may 1st, 1849. 



apices recurved. Lip white, variously tinged and spotted with 
deep rose red, almost crimson blotches, three-lobed, the side 
lobes rounded, erect, the middle lobe broadly ovate, reflexed, 
the margin waved, the disk furnished with a large fleshy tongue- 
shaped callosity. Column semiterete, in front clothed with 
rather copious woolly hair. W. J. H. 

Cult. This beautiful plant is of easy cultivation, and thrives 
in the cool division of the Orchideous house. We grow it in 
turfy peat or sphagnum, and instead of using common garden- 
pots, we prefer shallow pans full of holes ; for it is observed that 
plants with the habit of Lycaste require only a few inches of 
soil ; consequently, if common garden-pots be employed, they 
will have to be filled nearly to the margin with potsherds or 
other open material, which becomes a harbour for insects. 
With the shallow pans this is avoided. In fixing the plants 
on the pans we keep them raised above the margin, and 
by so doing a greater surface is given to the roots which are 
often superficial. This also prevents any evils arising from over 
watering, which must be carefully avoided. It is propagated 
by divisions of the pseudo-bulbs. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Column : — magnified. 



4 4. i 6. 




Tab. 4446. 

SOBRALIA MACRANTHA. 

Large-Lowered Sobralia. 



Nat.Ord. Orchide^;. — Gynandria Monandria. 

Gen Char. Perianthium maximum, petaloideum, subsequale ; sepalis patentibus 
(petalis erectis, Lindl.). Labellum cucullatum columnam amplexans, basi angus- 
tatum, disco plicato-barbatum, apice bilobum. Colnmna elongata, margmata, 
clavata, apicis trifidi, lobo medio cucullato antherifero. Stigma marginatum, 
basi gibbero gemino nectarifero. Anihera terrainalis, stipitata, seimquadnlocu- 
laris. Pollinia farinacea 4, compressa, postice cohfereutia et contortuphcata, ecau- 
diculata — Herbre America cequinoctialis, terrestres, smphces, sape triorggales, 
foliosissima ; foliis plicatis ; floribus racemom terminalibus vel aidlariLus gemnm 
niveis roseis, sanguineis, violaceisve. Lindl. 



Sobralia macrantka; elata, foliis patenti-recurvis lato-lanceo a is ngidis tenu- 
acuminatis floralibus triple minoribus, racemo termmali iolioso pauciflo o 
perianthio amplo pateutissimo, sepalis oblongis, petalis latmribus margu 
superue uudulato-crispato, labelli apice latissimo rotundato-bdobo margtt 
tindulato. 

Sobralia macrantha. Lindl. in Sertum Orchid, sub. t.%9. Gm.et 8p. Orchui 
p. 431. Bot. Reg. 1842, Misc. n. 65. 



This belongs to a very fine genus of Ore hideous plants, as 
Dr.Lindley observes, having reed-like stems and handsome flowers, 
natives of tropical America ; and the finest of all the species is 
the one here figured for the first time, from plants growing in 
the Royal Gardens, collected by Mr. Skinner in Guatemala. 
Our fijmre is no exaggerated representation of the plant: m 
point of colour it falls far short of reality, for it is of that deep 
purplish-rose colour, which every botanical artist knows is so 
difficult to imitate upon paper. 

Descr. Terrestrial. Stems erect, aggregate, erect, terete, 
glabrous, jointed. Leaves from every joint, patent-reflexed, 
broad, lanceolate, rigid, much and very narrowly acuminate 
almost caudate, plaited, the base forming a brown sheath around 
the stem. Flowers very large, few on each stem, terminal ; one 
flower (on each stem) is open at a time, having at its base a large, 
leafy bract, resembling the stem-leaf, but much smaller, rert- 

june 1st, 1849. 



anih patent-reflexed, of a rich, deep, purple-rose colour. Sepals 
oblong, the edges even ; petals much broader, otherwise similar, 
but the edge in the upper half waved and crisped. Lip very 
large, the lower half forming a laterally compressed tube around 
the column : the apex expanding into a broad rotundate, two- 
lobed, crisped lamella, with a pale, somewhat heart-shaped 
yellow spot at the base. Column elongate, clavate, with a lateral 
tooth on each side, the anther at the top. W. J. H. 

Cult. The plant producing this splendid flower, belongs to a 
genus of terrestrial Orchids of a peculiar habit, having slender 
reed-like, leafy stems, varying from two to ten or more feet in 
height, which spring from a fascicle of thick fleshy roots. The 
species now figured is a native of Mexico, and is found to thrive 
best when kept in the cool division of the Orchideous house, 
the average winter temperature ranging between 55° and 60°. 
A light free soil suits it, which should be composed of a mixture 
of sandy peat and light loam, with the addition of a little leaf- 
mould. On account of its thick fleshy roots it is necessary to 
give it more pot-room than its slender habit would seem to 
require ; and as the roots are not inclined to go deep, wide 
shallow pots or pans are to be preferred, taking care to have the 
pot properly drained so as to allow free watering and syringing 
during summer, without the chance of the mould becoming 
saturated. Too much water should not be given in winter, 
during which season it is apt to be attacked by thrips. If these 
are not checked in time, the plant will soon assume a sickly 
appearance, owing to the cuticle of the under-side of the leaves 
having been destroyed by this minute but troublesome insect. 
Repeated fumigation with tobacco does much to keep them 
under, but it is advisable to remove the plant to a convenient 
place and apply the syringe to the under-side of the leaves, 
taking care that the water is at a proper temperature. It is 
increased by separating the roots, which requires to be done 
very carefully, so as not to break them; like many other 
monocotyledonous plants with thick fleshy roots, when broken 
they seldom or never make side-roots, the broken ones continuing 
to decay back to their origin. /. 8. 



Fig. 1 . Column : — natural rise. 



4-447; 




EitchlitL. 



H.B.&l 



Tab. 4447. 
LAPAGERIA rosea. 

Rose-coloured Lapageria. 



Nat. Ord. SmilacejE. — Hexandria MoMOfttNli. 

Gen. Char. Perianthium corollinum liexaphyllum campaiiulato-connivciis 
foliola exteriora basi concavo-carinata, interiora latiora rabangmculata. Stamina 
6, imis perianthii foliolis inserta, alterna paulo majora ; fihmenta subuhtn, 
libera, antherre basi fix;e. Ovarium uniloculare, placentis parietalibus tribus, 
ad suturas longitudinalibus. Ovula plurima, muco involuta, ortbotropa. Styhx 
cylindricus: stigma clavatum. Bacca ovato-oblonga, uiiilocularis, polysperma. 
Semina obovata, truncata, cornea, luteo-fulvescentia, in pulpe nidulantia.— 
Suffrutex Chilensis, volubilis ; radice fasciculata, caule teretiuscnh, foliis alterm, 
ovato-lanceolatis, cuspidalis, nervosis, reticulato-venosis, pedunculis axdlaribv* 
solitariis, unijbris, squamoso-bracteatis. Endl. 



Lapageria rosea. 

Lapageria rosea. Ruiz, et Pav. PI. Peruv. v. 3. p. ». t W- *f**9 %* 

Veget. v. 2. p. 99. 



No European cultivator of plants could see the figure of-ftp* 
geria in Ruiz and Pavon, and read their description ot the Bowers 
'"penduli, formosissimi: corolla rosea, ahquando roseo-punHva, 
intus punctis albis raaculata/' without an earnest desire to 
possess living specimens ; but it was not till the year 1847 tn« 
the Royal Gardens of Kew were first favoured with one from 
Conception (Chili) through the kindness of Rd. Wheelwright, 
Esq., an American gentleman, who has been instrumental m 
establishing steam-navigation in the Pacific, and who thus en 
joyed superior means for the transport to hnglanrl. ine 
following year, Messrs. Veitch and Sons were no less format, 
in importing it, through their collector, Mr. Ihomas Lobb ; 
but though extremely flourishing and now six feet high am I. 
Messrs. Veitch, it is to be regretted it has not _ye blossomn I : 
and our flowers are taken from dried specimens, aided by coloured 
figures made in the native locality. This colour is said, » 
Ruiz and Pavon, to vary from rose to rose-crimson, as >enM - 
-sented in our figure. Dr. Lindley constituted of this and oftte 
nearlv allied, and scarcely less beautiful, / huer" 



June 1st, 1849. 



aw, the Order 

2 



PhilesiecB; but Dr. Hooker, in his Flora Antarctica, vol. ii. 
p. 355, considers that, along with Calliocene, it naturally ranks 
with Smilacea : an opinion which is strengthened by the fact 
that, as related by Ruiz and Pavon, the roots are used by the 
Chilenos as a substitute for Sarsaparilla {Smilax Sarsaparilla). 
The large oblong, pulpy berry, which we have not seen, is 
prized as an esculent fruit, having a sweet and most agreeable 
flavour. The genus was named in compliment to Josephine 
Lapagerie, wife of Napoleon Bonaparte, who rendered great 
services to Botany by the cultivation of exotic plants in the 
beautiful gardens of Malmaison, and by the encouragement she 
gave to works on Botany. 

Descr. Stem many feet in length, climbing, terete, branched, 
naked below, here and there scaly. Leaves petiolate, ovato- 
lanceolate, coriaceous, glossy, acuminate, five-nerved and reti- 
culated. Peduncles axillary and solitary, longer than the pe- 
tioles, bearing a single, handsome, lily-like pendulous flower, 
of a deep red-rose-colour, internally especially spotted with 
white. * Outer sepals spathulate, with a gibbosity at the base, 
inner ones resembling them, but broader and more spotted. 
Stamen and style shorter than the perianth. W. J. H. 

Cult. Our knowledge as regards the culture of this plant is 
very limited. It is now rather more than two years since we 
received it from Chili, but owing to the circumstance of the 
roots having been injured in removing the plant from its native 
locality, and also to their monocotyledonous nature, they have 
continued to die back, and the plant has not yet shown 
symptoms of making a new growth. But judging from analogy 
there can be no doubt that this singular and beautiful plant, 
when once established, will prove to be of easy cultivation. Its 
habit is that of some species of Smilax, or rather more like 
hustreplms and Geitonoplesium, the species of which are well 
known to be robust climbing plants in the greenhouse. Lapa- 
geria being a native of Chili, it may be expected to prove 
to erably hardy ; but it is safest to keep it in the greenhouse 
till its nature is better known, which can only be learned by 
experience. J. S. 



4-4-4-8. 




Tab. 4448. 
STEMONACANTHUS macrophyllus. 

Large-jlowered Stemonacanthus. 



Nat. Ord. Acanthace^e. — Didynamia Angiospermia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx supra basin 5-partitus, fequalis. Corolla ex infundibuli- 
formi-hypocrateriformis, id est, faucibus elongatis obconicis, limbo patentissimo 
reflexove. Stamina 4 longe prominentia, tubi mediocris apici inserta, basi per- 
paria connata faucibusque longiore tractu adnata : anthera biloculares connectivo 
latiusculo demum ssepe complicato et turn loculis arctissime contiguis secundis, 
dorso anthera; carinato, antheram unilocularem fingentibus, loculis margine mem- 
branaceis. Stigma bilabiatum labiis planis acutis crassiuscuhs, sunenore bre- 
viore. Capsula ad basin brevi spatio contracta et asperma, hinc magu inttato- 
ovata vel oblonga et ad basin cavi tetra-octosperma. Semwa retinaculis sub- 
tensa, plana. Retinacula apice tridentata.— Frutices America* speciosi, tolus 
medii caulk sape ternis. Inflorescentia plus minus glandulosa-pilosa, raro (jlan- 
dulosa ; vel panicula terminalis, trichotomy bifida, floribus scepe altcrms brm- 
pedicellatis vel abbreviate ramis inflorescentia thyrsoidea ; vel denique Jlores in 
axillis foliorum superioribus solitarii sessiles. Bracteae par**, linear^ impute 
obtusa, patentee vel reflexa persistentes rariorive exeuiph dmOue. »»cteo» 
nulla. Flores coccinei. DC. 



Stemonacanthus macrophyllus; caule fruticoso erecto, ramis folnsque oratoa 
ovatove oblougis apicem versus attenuatis basi acuta ^^^f™ 
petiolatis utrinque subtilissime puberulis, peduiicuhs v. folia nqua t a u 
tifloris v. umbellatim quadrifidia multifloris folio o^ 10 "^' ' ™ 
lanceolatis pedicellos stantibus, calycibus ad \ 5-hdis bas. bibracteolatis 
glabriusculis, corolla tubulosa. Nees. 

Stemonacanthus macrophyllus. Nees in Be Cand.Prodr. v. 11. p. 205. 

Ruellia macrophvlla. Fahl, Symb. v. 2. p. 72. t. 39. Undl. Bot. Reg. 1846, 
t. 7. 



A handsome-flowered plant, easily increased by cuttings but 
more desirable in a young state (when it readily blooms) than 
when it has attained a large size, for then the foliage predominate, 
too much. It is an old species of Vahl, but only recently, so fer 
as we know, introduced to our stoves, by one of the collectors 
for the Royal Gardens of Kew, Mr. Purdie, in 1844, from .t. 
Martha, and apparently other places in New Grenada as well a. 

JUNE 1st, 1849. 



in Mexico and in Jamaica. It flowers throughout the summer 
months. 

t Dbscr. Plant three to four feet high, shrubby below, the 
rest herbaceous ; branches terete. Leaves opposite, petiolate, 
ovate acuminate, penninerved, reticulated, the margin sinuated 
or indistinctly toothed, puberulous. Panicles long as or longer 
than the leaves spreading, di-trichotomous : peduncles mdpediceh 
slender, bracteated,/ owm large, handsome, subsecund. Calyx 
oblong, tubular, with two bracteas at the base, half to three- 
quarters of an inch long, green, cut as far as the middle into 
hve nearly equal, linear-lanceolate, obtuse, ciliated, erect seg- 
ments Corolla between two and three inches long, bright 
scarlet : the tube curved, broader upwards, but laterally com- 
pressed somewhat plaited, yellow within: limb large, cut into 
hve nearly equal, oblong, obtuse lobes, which soon become re- 
hexed, tour above and one below. Stamens exserted : anther 

t 7%r? gltta ! es two " celled - Ovary on a large fleshy gland. 
Style filiform onger than the stamens: stigma of two linear, 
very unequal lobes. Capsule clavate, many-seeded W J H 
U7LT. An erect soft-wooded plant, requiring the heat of the 

n W "If T*?, freely - iR dry g00d g^en-soil. Like many 
other allied Acanthacea?, its habit is to grow up thin and naked 

tJl t lateral flowering branches, it is necessary to stop the 
leading shoots. It is readily increased by cuttings. /. & 

Eg. 1. Pistil : -natural size. 2. Capsule -.—magnified. 



4-tlS. 




Tab. 4449 

ASYSTASIA scandens. 

Climbing Asystasia. 



Nat. Ord. AcanthacEjE. — Didynamia Angiospermia. 



Gen. Char. Calyx 5-partitus, aequalis. Corolla subinfundibuliformis, limbo 
5-fi.do, subaequali, lacinia supera concaviuscula. Stamina 4 didynama, inclusa, 
per paria basi conuata. Anthem biloculares loculis parallelis basi callosis vel 
appendicular. Stigma capitatum, bilobum vel bidentatum.^ Capsulu basi 
compresso-attenuata, asperma, superius depresso-tetragona, bilocularis, tetra- 
sperma. Semina retinaculis sustensa, discoidea, basi angulo prominente.— Planta? 
Indue orientalis, Asia et Africa calidioris et temper ata, herbacea vel fruticulosa, 
laxce, diffusa, subsarmentosa. Racemus spiciformis, secundus, axillaris vel termi- 
nalis. Bractea communis et propria exigua aquales. Flores carulei vel luteo- 
caruleoque varii, sat speciosi. D. C. 



Asystasia scandens; scandens, foliis obovatis (ovatisve) acutis brevi-petiolatis 
glabris, racemis terminabbus compactis thyrsiformibus, pedicellis basi brjic- 
teatis, calycis segmentis lineari-lanceolatis ciliatis, corollae tubo superne 
ampliato curvato, limbi lobis ovato-rotundatis marginibus crenato-cnspatis, 
staminibus glandulosis. 

Asystasia scandens, Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1847. t. 31. {under Henfreya). 

Asystasia quaterna, Nees, in Be Cand. Prodr. v. W.p. 166. et p. 724. 

Henfreya scandens, Lindl. I. c. 

Uuellia quaterna, Thonn. Schum. in Plant. Guin. Seek. v. 2. p. 58. 



A remarkable African climbing Jeanihaceous plant. Dr. 
Lindlev had judged it to be nearly related to Thonning's Rucllia 
quaterna, to which indeed Dr. Nees von Esenbeck has without 
doubt referred it, and this again to his genus Asystasia.^ In this 
we follow him, preferring, however, Dr. Lindley's specific name, 
which is expressive, while that of Thonning can only tend to 
mislead, the number of the flowers being, in cultivation at 
least, anything but constant. This is one of the many hue 
plants introduced to our stove by Lord Derby, through the 
instrumentality of Mr. Whitfield. It flowers readily and remains 
a long time in blossom, in the Royal Gardens. 

Dmcr. A climbing -shrub, with terete stems and bramOes, 

June 1st, 1849. 



glabrous. Leaves opposite, on short thick petioles, generallv 
obovate, sometimes ovate, acute, penninerved, entire, of a dark 
rather glossy green, thickish and somewhat fleshy. Eacemes 
terminal, thyrsoid, of many large yellowish-white or cream- 
coloured flowers, having often a tinge of blush. Pedicels op- 
posite, subtended by a pair of subulate connate bracteas and a 
pair of smaller ones on the pedicel itself. Calyx naked, cut to 
the base in five-linear lanceolate ciliated equal segments. Corolla 
large, slightly hairy, the tube curved, the narrow cylindrical 
portion as long as the calyx, when it becomes suddenly enlarged 
and campanulate, spreading into a five-lobed nearly equal limb, 
the throat somewhat hairy, the lobes broadly ovate, obtuse, 
veined, the margin crenato-crisped. Stamens shorter than the 
tube, glandular. Anther dark-purple; cells aristate below. 
Ovary on a large gland. Style included. Stigma two-lobed. WJ.H. 
Cult. Most of the Acanthacece cultivated in our hot houses 
consist of soft-wooded plants, soon becoming unsightly, and re- 
quiring to be frequently renewed by bringing forward young 
healthy plants. The present species is rather an exception ; for 
although it is of a straggling somewhat scandent habit, yet it is 
worthy of notice not only on account of its pretty flowers but 
also for its full and fine dark-green foliage, not subject to insects. 
Being a native of Sierra-Leone it requires to be grown in a hot 
and moist atmosphere. A mixture of loam and peat with the 
addition of a little leaf-mould will suit it, the pot being 
placed in a position to receive bottom heat. On account of its 
scandent habit it requires to be supported, either by stakes or 
trained to a neat wire trellis fixed to the pot. Cuttings take 
root readily, when placed in pans under a bell-glass and plunged 
in bottom heat. 



Fig. 1. Pistil. 2. Stamen: — magnified. 



4-4-50. 







Tab. 4450. 
DENDROBIUM Cambridgeanum. 

Duke of Cambridge's Dendrobium. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4352.) 



Dendrobium Cambridgeanum ; caulibus penduUs articulatis foliosis, foliis ovato- 
lanceolatis acutissimis carnosis striatis basi oblique sessilibus, pedunculis 
bifloris, sepalis (basi in cornu elongatis decurrentibus) petalisque conformi- 
bus oblongis acutis patentibus, labello cucullato unguiculato latissime sub- 
rotundato sinuato margine reflexo supra densissime villoso, anthera punctis 
elevatis rugosa. 

Dendrobium Cambridgeanum, Paxton, Mag. of Bot. t. 265. Lindl. Bot. Reg. 
1841. Misc. n. 171. 



Drawn from a plant which flowered in the Orchideous house 
of the Royal Gardens, April 1849, derived from the collection of 
the late Rev. J. Clowes. It is a plant of great beauty, brought 
from India to Chatsworth by Mr. Gibson, collector for His Grace 
the Duke of Devonshire, in 1837, and honoured by a specific 
name after that of His Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge. 
Dr. Lindley alludes to its affinity with D. Paxtoni, but that is 
characterized by "petalis serrulatis," and "labello ovato . - • • • • 
margine inultifido-fimbriato ; " and to D. chrysanthum, which is 
described " labello denticulato retuso obsolete trilobo," and no 
notice is taken of any villosity. The prolonged spur is remark- 
able. I cannot therefore but record it as a distinct species. 

Descr. An Epiphyte, with jointed, pendulous stems, nearly as 
thick as the finger, the joints striated and clothed with sheaths 
of the leaves, streaked and spotted with red. Leaves broad, 
ovate-lanceolate, sharply acuminate, thick, fleshy, striated, the 
base very oblique and semicordate. From below the upper leaves 
the peduncle appears, very short, forked into two pedicels about 
two inches long and bearing two pendent, large, handsome 
flowers of a rich golden-colour. Sepals mA petals uniform, much 
spreading, oblong, acute, faintly striated. Lip pendent, cueul- 
late, from a convolute claw suddenly expanding into a broad, 



June 1st, 1849. 



rounded obscurely two-lobed lamina, whose upper surface is 
densely villous or tomentose, and the margin recurved, sinuated, 
or obscurely and irregularly lobed, but by no means multifid : 
the throat is distinguished by a large blood-coloured stain ; and 
the claw has an oblong callosity for nearly its whole length. 
Column exceedingly short. Anther rough, with small raised 
points. W. J. H. 

Cult. This beautiful epiphytal Orchid, being a native of India, 
requires to be grown in the tropical division of the Orchideous 
house. With us it is suspended from the roof growing on a 
sod of solid sphagnum peat, and receiving the same kind of 
treatment as mentioned at Tab. 4418 and 4432. In order to 
prolong the duration of this beautiful flower it should be re- 
moved to a cooler and dryer house, care being taken not to wet 
the flowers when syringeing or watering the plants. J". 8. 



Fig. 1. Lip. 2. Pollen-masses. 3. Column and decurrent base forming the 
spur : — magnified. 



4-4-54. 




Fitch. .M. et Ml. 



IL.B.*B..inf. 



Tab. 4451. 
zieria macrophyua. 

Large-leaved Zieria. 



Nat. Ord. DlOSME£. — Tetrandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 4-fidus. Petala 4 disco hypogyno inserta. Stamina 4, 
cal. lobis opposita j filamentis glabris basi intus uniglandulosis. Stylm 1 . 
Stigma 4-lobum. Carpella 4, intus connexa in capitulum 4-lobum, 4-locul.. lobis 
divaricatis. Semina in loculis solitariis compresso-ovata. — Frutices aut arbores. 
Folia opposita, petiolata, trifoliata, summa simplicia. Pedunculi axil/ares s/ppius 
trichotomi. Flores parvi, albi. Be Cand. 



Zieria mucrophylla ; frutescens, ramulis pubescentibus lsevibus, foliolis lanceo- 

latis, paniculis trichotomis folia subaequantibus, petalis obovatis punctata 

puberulis. 
Zieria macrophylla. " Bonpl. Nav. p. 64." Be Cand. Prodr. vA.p. 723. He 

Less.Ic. v. 3. p. 28. t. 48. 
Zieria arborescens. All. Cunn. MSS. in Herb. Hook. Sims, in Bot. Mag. sub 

Tab. 1395. Be Cand. Prodr. v. 1. p. 723. Hook. Journ. Bot. v.\. />. 25fi. 



This is a much handsomer species than the old Z. lanceolaia, 
Br. {Z. Smithii, Andr. and Sims, Bot. Mag. t. 1395). Mr. 
Allan Cunningham says it attains in its native country a height 
of from fourteen to sixteen feet : and the leaves and the flowers 
are the largest of the genus. The panicles are very compound, 
and they are generally equal to, or longer than, the leaves, but 
sometimes almost as short as the petioles. A still more impor- 
tant specific character is to be found in the smooth stems and 
branches never warted, which they strikingly are in the Z. lanceo- 
lata. Bonpland seems to consider Eastern Australia as the native 
country ; but in my own very rich herbarium I find no speci- 
mens but from Van Diemen's Land, to which country I believe 
it to be whollv confined. Mr. Gunn says it is common in shady 
ravines and mountain creeks, and that it is known in the colony 
by the name of Stink-wood. It flowers in a cool greenhouse m 
the spring months. 

Descr. An erect graceful growing shrub, with striated, 
smooth branches, slightly pubescent. Leaves opposite, trifoliate ; 

JULY 1ST, 18 4!). U 



leaflets lanceolate, more or less acuminate, entire, pellucido- 
punctate, paler and often slightly pubescent beneath. Panicles 
axillary, copious, generally about as long as the leaves, tricho- 
tomous, many-flowered. Pedicels and calyx stellato-pubescent. 
Sepals four, ovate. Stamens four. Filaments broad, crested at 
the top, with a large fleshy gland at its base within. Ovaries 
4, combined. Style, short, single. Stigma four-lobed. Petals 
twice as long as the calyx, punctate, puberulous. W. J. H. 

Cult. An early and neat-flowering greenhouse plant, growing 
freely in a mixture of light loam and peat in a well drained pot. 
In summer, care must be taken that it at no time suffers for 
want of water, which should be given early in the morning, or 
in the evening, and it is desirable to have it placed so that the 
direct rays of the sun do not strike the sides of the pot, for the 
roots, being fibrous, will suffer if long in contact with the heated 
material of the pot. The habit of this species is to grow up 
long and slender, and the branches being opposite, it is not 
much inclined to form a bushy plant, but which in a degree 
may be obtained by stopping the leading shoot. It is readily 
increased by cuttings in the usual way, or by seeds, which ripen 
with us. /. 8. 



Fig. 1. Pistil. 2. Stamen and gland. 3. Flower with the petals removed. 
4. Flower. 5. Petal : — magnified. 




B..B &B.,fflf- 



Tab. 4452. 
ALLOPLECTUS capita-pus. 

Capitate Allopfoctvz. 

Nat. Ord. Gesneriace^e. — Didynamia Angiospekmia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab, 4816.) 



Alloplectus capitatus ; elatus robustus, caule simplici obtuse tetragono, foliis 
amphs ovatis serratis dense velutino-sericeis subtus petiolisque magis mi- 
nusve sanguineis, pedunculis axillaribus foliorum supremorum brevibus, 
floribus dense umbellato-capitatis, pedicellis simplicibus umbellatisque, 
calycis sanguinei sepalis amplis foliaceis cueullatis marginibus reflexis 
dentatis, corollas calycem vix duplo suprrantis Bericee fiavve tubo supra 
medium ventricoso. 

Alloplectus speeiosus. Hortul. not of Poeppir/. 



■ Presented to the Royal Gardens of Kew by Messrs. Knight 
and Perry, of the King's Road Nursery, Chelsea, who received 
it from the continent under the name of JBoplectm specioms ;— 
but it has assuredly nothing to do with the only species de- 
scribed under that name, that of Dr. Poeppig. It is in all 
probability a native of tropical America, but of what part we 
have not learned. It is a veiy beautiful plant, both m the 
foliage and the flowers :— the former is of a large size, each leal 
from ten inches to a foot in length, of the richest possible velvety, 
or between velvety and silky, hue, the upper side- deep green 
verging to yellow, the under side purplish, while the stem and 
petioles, peduncles and calyx are of a rich crimson blood-colour :—■ 
the latter remarkable for its great size and the cucullate sepals 
or segments ; and in the centre of this deep red calyx with the 
very convex segments is an eye of yellow, formed by the com- 
paratively small corolla. It flowers in the stove in March 
and April, and is really a very striking plant. 

Descr. Stemm our specimen nearly three feet high, erect, simple 
stout, rather succulent than woody, bluntly four-angled, marked 
with the scars of the fallen leaves, above leafy, and there clothed 
with short dense blood-coloured velvety down. Leaoeti opposite, 
large, patent or drooping, ovate, serrated, acute, strongly veined. 

July 1st, 1849. " ~ 



especially beneath, everywhere clothed with a beautiful velvety 
nap or short soft down, glossy and of a rich green above, less 
glossy and often tinged with purple beneath. Peduncles stout, 
blood-coloured with velvety .down. Peduncles about two inches 
long, from the axils of the uppermost leaves, about as long as the 
petioles, erect, velvety, bearing a dense, globose, bracteated 
umbel of flowers ; pedicels simple or again umbellate, thickened 
upwards. Calyx very large, rich blood-colour, of five broad 
closely downy segments or sepals, cucullate, the very recurved 
margins denticulate. Corolla small compared with the calyx, 
yellow, silky with copious erect hairs : the tube ventricose above 
the middle, the mouth small, of five minute nearly equal seg- 
ments, margined with red. Stamens included. Ovary silky, 
with a large gland on one side. Style included. Stigma bifid. 
W. J.H. 

Cult. The species of this genus inhabit the primeval forests 
of tropical America, and may be considered as epiphytes, growing 
on trees or decaying vegetable matter in humid places. They 
have soft fleshy stems, and are of a trailing subscandent habit, 
becoming loosely attached by their soft roots, which, in a moist 
atmosphere, are emitted from below the axils of the leaves. The 
present species differs in some respects from the others, being of 
an upright stiff habit, and as yet our plant has shown no symp- 
toms of producing roots from the stem. It has flowered with us 
in the warm, moist stove, potted in loose peat soil, taking care, 
during the winter, that it is not over-watered. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Mower. 2. Corolla. 3. Pistil and gland -.—magnified. 



4-4-53. 




Tab. 4453 
AMHERSTIA nobilis. 

Splendid Amherstia. 

Nat.Ord. Legtjminos;e. Amherstie,e, Benth.— Diadelphia Decandria. 

Gen, Char. Sepala 4 basi connata in tubum persistenteni apice stamiuiferuin, 
suffultum bracteis duabus opposite maximis, aativatione valvatis. fetaia 5 
imequalia : duo inferiora minuta, subulato-hamosa ; lateraha cuneifonma diva- 
ricate ; supremum maximum patens, obcordatum, unguicula urn. Stamina 
lOdiadelpba; filamentis 9 in tubum ionium connatis, superne libens, alterms 
nanis; decimum liberum, basi pedicello ovarii accretum. Jf*r* T^"' 
omnes polliniferaj, altera* breviores. Ovarium stipitatum, falcatum, 4-6-0 u- 
latum, stipitetubocalycinoadnato; ,frfr, fiuformis ; ^^™2£d?V 
LeouAen pedicellatum planum, oblongum, polyspermum.-Arbor (Martaban cm , 
foli amplis,pari.pinmUs, 6-S-jugis, floribus speaosu, digest* m racemes maxi- 
mos, axillares, pedunculatos,flaccide pendulos. Wall. 



Amherstia nobilis. 

Amherstia nobilis. Wall. PL MaL Rar. v. 1. J».l. 1. 1 * 2. *aLp. Hepert. 
Bot. v. I. p. 844. 



Ever since the publication of this plant in Dr. Walhch s noble 
work, the Plant* Asiatic* Rariores, the greate st de sire has been 
felt by cultivators in Europe to possess it Dr Walhch u as not 
backward in procuring plants for the Calcutta Garden or in 
forwarding others to England, for a long time unsuccessfi, y. 
His Grace the Duke of Devonshire had he hmioi. -of in - 
porting the first living plant through the medium of bis elector, 
Mr. Gibson, who was%ent to the Pirman Empire for it ; and 
this is become a noble and vigorously growing speenwm n U* 
princely stoves of Chntsworth :-bnt » J*y^jJ5££ 
in horticulture, and the great care and jf^ «*£*■* 
a much younger plant in her rich collection has he stil g .eater 
honour of bringing it to flower in April, 184* lhis n t «a 
presented by ilnf Harfinge, then Governor Genera u theLa 
Indies in 1847, and when only eleven ***fa*™ZZ** 
blossoms in the stove of Ealing Park The tot ' «*?«/"" 
fitly sent to Her Most Gracious Majesty, Q^^om, the 
second was liberally placed at our disposal, and an atlas-folio 



july 1st, 1849. 



drawing has been made from it, a size which can alone do 
justice to such a subject. The pages of this magazine are of 
course quite inadequate to receive such a figure : and a flower- 
bud, and two expanded flowers, together with a small portion 
of a leaf, which was nearly three feet long, are all we shall 
attempt to portray. These flowers, of the natural size, do so 
well represent their nature and structure (the minute inferior 
petals, resembling two small curved scales, being the only 
part concealed from view), that we shall, rather than enter into 
a full description (faithfully given in the work above quoted), 
introduce an extract from Dr. Wallich's history of the discovery 
of this Prince of Mowering-Trees : — " The first notice I had of 
the existence of this magnificent tree," says that enthusiastic 
botanist, "was at Rangoon, in August, 1826, when Mr. Craw- 
ford favoured me with some dried unopened flowers, and a 
leaf of it, with the information that he had gathered it in a 
garden, belonging to a monastery, around the hill at Kogun, 
on the Saluen river, in the province of Martaban, where they 
appeared too beautiful an object to be passed unobserved even 
by the uninitiated in botany. Handfulls of the flowers were 
round as offerings in the caves before the images of Buddha " 

In March, 1827, Dr. Wallich accompanied the British Envoy 
to Ava, and m his Official Report of a Journey on the River 
fealuen, in order to examine the site and capabilities of the Teak 
torests m that direction, he thus writes i " In about an hour I 
came to a decayed Kioum (a sort of monastery), close to the 
large lull ot Kogun, distant about two miles from the right bank 
oi the river, and twenty-seven from the town of MartSban. I 
had been prepared to find a tree growing here, of which an 
account had before been communicated to me by Mr. Crawfurd, 
and winch I had been fortunate enough to meet with for the 
tost time a week ago at Martaban; nor was I disappointed, 
lhcre were two individuals of this tree here : the largest, about 
forty feet high, with a girth, at three feet above the base, of six 
leet, stood close to the cave : the other was smaller, and over- 
hung an old square reservoir of water, lined with bricks and 
stones, lhey were profusely ornamented with pendulous racemes 
of large vermillion-coloured blossoms, forming superb objects, 
' lualled m the Mora of the East Indies, and, I presume, not 
m passed m magnificence and elegance in any part of the world. 
i 1 " 1111 ^ lS T0ka - Neitller the P*V here nor at 
T^Zl "T^JF" ?W distinct ^eount of its native place 
• growth ; but there is little doubt that it belongs to the forests 

■t L P1 n mCe - The Sy° Ullcl Was strewed > cv en at a distance, 
ZL , tf S T- Whlch are carried da % ™ Offerings to the 
images m the adjoining caves. Round the spot were numerous 



individuals of Jonesia Asoca in full blossom, inferior in beauty 
only to those trees ; and it is not a little remarkable, that the 
priests in these parts should have manifested so good a taste as 
to select two sorts of trees as ornaments to their objects of 
worship, belonging to a small but well-marked and extremely 
beautiful group in the extensive family of Leguminous plants." 

This tree, which " when in full blossom is the most strikingly 
superb object that can possibly be imagined," Dr. Wallich had 
the gratification of naming in compliment to the Right Honour- 
able Countess Amherst and her daughter, Lady Sarah Amherst, 
the zealous friends and constant promoters of Natural History, 
especially botany, in India. W. J. H. 

Cult. It is now about ten years since the first and then only 
living plant of this splendid flowering tree was brought from 
India to the garden at Chatsworth. It was believed it would 
have to attain a considerable size and age before its flowers 
would be produced ; and although every care and attention have 
been paid to it, yet up to this time it has not flowered, thus 
confirming the opinion that age was needed. It was therefore 
with no little surprise that a few months ago we heard it an- 
nounced that a plant, not more than two years imported, was 
in flower at Ealing Park. This has been accomplished by 
growing the plant in a very moist atmosphere, with the tempera- 
ture ranging between 70° and 80°, and at the same time having 
the box in which it is planted surrounded by a bed of hot tan, 
with a temperature of 90°, and the whole plant enclosed by 
a canvass curtain, which serves as a shade, and assists in keeping 
the enclosed air in a state of greater moisture. From what we 
observed of the Ealing Park plant, and our knowledge of the 
rate of growth of a plant received at this Garden in March of 
last year, we consider it to be a fast-growing plant, when 
placed under treatment similar to the above; but care is 
required to keep it in a healthy and vigorous state. A mixture 
of good loam and peat soil suits it, and whether the plant 
is grown in a pot or box, or in a bed of earth, it is necessary to 
have the means of warming the earth, which is to be obtained by 
a hot-water tank, or tan, or by the two combined, as at Ealing 
Park. During the season of growth the highest degree of 
temperature and moisture must be maintained; but in the 
winter the thermometer need not be allowed to rise higher 
than 70°, with a corresponding diminution of moisture. Shading, 
in bright sunshine, must be carefully attended to, for the foliage 
being of a thin and dry texture, is very impatient of drought, 
whether arising from a dry atmosphere, or from a want of supply 
of sap from the roots ; and even with due care the margin and 
apex of the leaves are very apt to lose vitality, becoming brown, 



which gives the plant an unhealthy appearance ; but this is a 
circumstance common to several allied plants that have similar 
thin dry leaves, and we are informed that this also happens to 
plants growing in the Calcutta Garden. It is very necessary 
that the soil should be well drained and not of a retentive nature, 
for owing to the constant heat and moisture it is apt to 
become saturated and sodden, and this is more especially to be 
guarded against as regards soil in a large pot or box plunged 
in tan. In many respects Amherstia is like Jonesia, Brownea, 
&c, and like them can be increased by cuttings planted under 
a bell-glass, and placed in bottom-heat. Dr. Wallich informs 
us that all the plants sent to Europe have been obtained in the 
Calcutta Garden by layering. /. S. 



4-4-54.. 




LB.W 



Tab. 4454. 
CYRTOCHILUM citrinum. 

Lemon-coloured Cyrtochilum. 



Nat. Ord. OrchidejE. — Gynandria Monandria. 

Gen. Char. P'erianthium explanatum. Sepala libera, lateralia unguiculata. 
Petala paulo minora. Labellum ecalcaratum mdivisum, ungue tuberculato cum 
basi columnse continuo. Columna brevis, alata. Anthera bilocularis. Pollinia 
2, caudicula filiformi, glandula minuta.— Herbae epiphyte, v. terrestres, pseudo- 
bulbosce. Folia coriacea. Scapi radicales, pankulati. Flores speciosi. Lindl. 



Cyrtochilum citrinum ; pseudo-bulbis brevibus ovatis sulcatis apice diphyws, 
foliis lineari-oblongis acutiusculis, scapo radicali foliis multo longionbus, 
racemo simplici 8-10-floro, bracteis parvis, sepalis ovato-lanceolatis acumi- 
natis labello subduplo brevioribus, petalis ovatis subundulatis sepala sub- 
jequantibus, labellum maximum rubrotundo-pandurseformi basi attenuato 
bilamellato, columna utrinque unidentata. 



This has a good deal the habit of the Cyrtochilum filipes, 
Lindl. Bot. Reg., 1841, t. 59 {Oncidium Wraya, Hook, m Bot. 
Mag. t. 3854), but the scape is less slender, the flowers larger, 
of a uniform pale yellow or lemon-colour, with a different shaped 
lip, and a prominent and very conspicuous tooth on each side the 
short column. It is from Mrs. Lawrence's rich collection, where 
it flowered in April 1849, and was imported from Central 
America. 

Descr. Pseudo-bulbs clustered, short, ovate, somewhat com- 
pressed, furrowed, terminated by a pair of leaves four or five 
inches in length, linear-oblong, rather acute, subconaceous, 
nerveless. Scape a foot or more long, from the base of the 
pseudo-bulbs, erect, rather stout, thrice as long as the eaves 
jointed and bracteated, bearing a lax raceme of citron-coloured 
flowers at the apex. Bracteas at the base of the pedunculitorm 
ovary, small. Sepals spreading, uniform, much shorter than the 
lip, ovato-lanceolate, slightly tinged with green. Petals rather 
shorter than the sepals, ovate, acute, slightly waved. Lip very 
large, subrotund-panduriform, somewhat ungmculate at the base 
and there bilamellate. Column short, with a projecting, linear 

July 1st, 1849. 



tooth on each side. Anther-case hemispherical, with a central 
ridge. W.J.H. 

Cult. This pretty epiphyte will thrive in the cool division of 
the Orchideous house, placed in a basket suspended from the 
roof, or in a shallow pan filled with loose turfy peat mixed with 
sphagnum moss, shading it from bright sun in summer, and 
seeing that it does not receive too much water in winter. J. 8. 



Fig. 1. Pollen-masses. 2. Column and lip : — magnified. 



44-SS 




B..B.&] 



Tab. 4455. 
MORMODES LENTIGINOSA. 

Freckled Mormodes. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4214.) 



Mormodes lentiginosa ; pseudo-bulbis oblongis, foliis lanceolatis striatis, scapo 
radicali racemoso, floribus remotis pendulis punctis rufo-fuscis irroratis, 
sepalis arete reflexis oblongis acutis marginibus revolutis, petalis conformi- 
bus, labelli obovati lateribus revolutis, coluinna oblique torta apice acu- 
minato. 



A new and very remarkable species of Mormodes, quite un- 
like any hitherto figured or described, and equally with the 
subject of our last plate {CyrtocMlum citrinum) from the collec- 
tion of Mrs. Lawrence, and obtained from the same country. 
It flowers in April. 

Descr. The young pseudo-bulbs are almost globose, leafy : 
the old ones are oblong, terete, and partially sheathed with the 
withered membranous bases of the old leaves. Leaves, in the 
plant before us, a span long, lanceolate, membranaceous, striated. 
Scape from the base of a pseudo-bulb, a foot or a foot and a 
half high, racemose, flexuose where the remote drooping flowers 
are inserted. Bracteas small, membranaceous, acuminated. 
The general colour of the flower is pale reddish-brown every- 
where sprinkled with dark-coloured dots. Sepals and petals 
oblong, acute, with margins singularly recurved the tormer 
(sepals) refracted, the petals having an opposite direction, tne 
same as that of the column and lip. Lip rather large, rie^iiy, 
obovate, entire, the sides entirely curved back, revolute, almost 
like the flaps of a saddle. Column shorter than the lip, semi- 
terete, curved, and having a singularly oblique twist, acuminated^ 
Anthers taking the same shape as the apex of the column, ana 
hence much acuminated too : the colour is a deeper red than tne 
rest of the flower. W.J.H. . . nn - 

Cult. This Orchid may be potted in loose turfy peat. LMHing 

•'LEY 1st ,1849. 



winter it remains in a state of rest, and must then be kept in 
a moderately warm and rather dry stove, giving it little or no 
water. In the spring, when it begins to show symptoms of 
growth, it should receive the usual temperature and moisture of 
the Orchideous house, placing it near the glass on the front 
shelves, watering it carefully and shading it from the mid-day 
sun. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Column and lip : — magnified. 



4-lSS. 




. ^> 



4456. 
EPIMEDIUM PINNATUM. 

Pinnate-leaved Epimedium. 



Nat. Ord. BerberidejE. — Tetrandria Monogynia. 



Gen. Char. Sepala extus basi bibracteolata. Petala 4 intus appendice dis- 
colore aucta. Capsula siliculiformis, polysperma. Semina oblique transversim 
sita, utiilateraba. — Herbae perennes, fobis radicalibus petlulatis, fobobs serrato- 
aristatis. Be Cand. 



Epimedium pinnatum; birsutum, fobis ternatis vel biternatis, fobobs longe 
petiolulatis adultis glabris cordato-ovatis cibato-serratis, racemis radicalibus 
multifloris, petalis rotundatis, nectariis cucullatis calcaratis, margine erosis. 

Epimedium pinnatum. Fisch. in Be Cand. Syst. Veget. v. 2. p. 29. Prodr. v. 1. 
p. 110. Repert. Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. 1. p. 441. Ledeb. II. Boss. v. 1. p. 81. 



A most lovely little hardy plant, with flowers in form and size 
and colour resembling some Helianthemum, but, when they are 
inspected, the curious structure of an Epimedium may be detected. 
We owe our plants in the Royal Gardens, where they flowered 
in March, to Mr. Shepherd of the Liverpool Botanic Garden. 
It is a native of shady mountain woods in Gilan, a province of 
Persia, where it was first detected by Hablitz. It has since 
been found in the Caucasian region, on Mount Talusch, between 
Lenkoran and Suwant, at an elevation of 2,400 feet above the 
level of the sea. 

Descr. From a short rhizoma, partially underground, and 
more or less clothed with the large stipular scales of the base of 
the leaf-stalk, arise several leaves and flower-scapes, both one 
and the other clothed with patent hairs in the young state. 
Leaves a span or more long when fully formed, sometimes 
ternate, more generally twice ternate, or in other words pinnate 
with five leaflets, the two pairs very remote : the leaflets are ovato- 
cordate, with a deep narrow sinus, acute, ciliato-serrate, glabrous, 
except on the nerves beneath. Scapes about as long as the 
fully developed leaves, but bearing the raceme of flowers while 
the leaves are still young. Pedicels short, with minute bracteas. 
Calyx with two, small, deciduous bracts. Sepals four, ovate, 

JULY 1st, 1849. 



pale green. Petals four, subrotund, yellow, veined. Nectaries 
cucullate, yellow, the edge toothed ; terminating behind in an 
orange-coloured blunt spur. Stamens erect. Anthers as long 
as the filaments : valves as long as the anthers. Ovary oblong. 
Style shorter than the ovary : stigma depressed. W. J. H. 

Cult. Like the other well-known species of Epimedium, this 
is a hardy herbaceous plant, and may be cultivated in the flower- 
border, or kept in a pot along with the collection of the smaller 
kinds of herbaceous plants, generally termed Alpines. It is 
increased by division of the root. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Nectary. 2. Stamen. 3. Pistil -.—magnified. 



4-4- J 7. 




B..B. 



Tab. 4457. 
RHODODENDRON formosum. 

Beautiful Rhododendron. 



Nat. Ord. Ericaceae. — Decandria Moxogynia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4336.) 



Rhododendron formosum ; fruticosa gracilis, foliis oblongo-obovatis in petio- 
lum brevein attenuatis vix coriaceis junioribus prsecipue villosis subtus 
pallidis, pedicellis unifloris brevibus basi bracteatis, calyce brevissimo obscure 
5-lobo, corolla? (albse roseo-tinctae) tubo infundibulrformi-campanulato 5- 
angulato, limbo amplissimo B-lobo lobis rotundatis undulatis obtusissimis, 
filamentis (10) glanduloso-pilosis, ovario minute squamuloso. 

Rhododendron formosum. Wall. Plant. Asiat. Rar. v. 3. p. 3. t. 207. P>e 
Cand. Prodr. v. l.p. 721. 

Rhododendron Gibsoni. Hort. 



Our drawing of this truly beautiful and rare Rhododendron 
was made from a plant which flowered in a greenhouse at Syon 
Garden, Her Grace the Duchess of Northumberland's, April 
1849 : at the same time a plant which had been presented to 
the Royal Gardens by Mr. Low of Clapton, blossomed there also. 
In both cases the plants were sent as the Rhododendron Gibsoni 
of Mr. Paxton. Nor is there any reason to doubt the correct- 
ness of this appellation. Be that as it may, the species has 
been made known to the botanical world by an excellent figure in 
the Plantse Asiatics? Rariores of Dr. Wallich, ever since the year 
1832. It was discovered by the late Mr. Smith so early as 1815, 
on the mountains bordering on Silhet in Eastern Himalaya. The 
flowers are very large and highly fragrant, and the habit ot 
the plant is that of Rhododendron (or Azalea of most authors) 
ledifolium : but the leaves and the calyx are totally different. 
When brought by cultivation to the same degree of perfection 
as the plant just mentioned, it will be one of the most valuable 
shrubs for early forcing that can be conceived. Mr. Gibson, 
collector for His Grace the Duke of Devonshire, brought it from 
India some years ago, and it is probably one of the several species 

august 1st, 1849. X 



named but not described by Mr. Griffiths and detected by him 
in Eastern Himalaya. The flowers are a delicate white, tinged 
with yellow and rose, and have five external stripes of red. 

Descr. Our plant forms a small slender shrub, with deep- 
reddish-brown branches, the younger ones downy. Leaves ob- 
longo-obovate, obtuse, often with a small mucro, pale and glaucous 
beneath, tapering into a short foot-stalk, the younger ones hairy 
and of a very pale green. Peduncles short, in pairs, from the 
apex of the branches, soon over-topped with young shoots and 
then appearing lateral, bracteated at the base, bracteas ovate or 
obovate, brown. Calyx very small, obscurely five-lobed, often 
with long cilise. Stamens ten ■ filaments pilose. Anthers small, 
purple. Chary ovate, five-lobed, five-celled, dotted with copious 
minute scales. Style scaly or hairy. Stigma capitate, obscurely 
five-lobed. W. J. H. 

Cult. This pretty species of Rhododendron is not sufficiently 
hardy to bear our winters without protection. It will be best 
treated as a greenhouse plant, placing it along with Chinese 
Azaleas, &c, potting it in light peat mixed with a small portion 
of turfy loam, care being taken to have the pot well drained. 
The plant is increased by seed, which should be sown in pans 
filled with turfy peat to within an inch of the top, the re- 
mainder being made up of finely sifted peat mixed with a fourth 
part of sharp white sand. As the seeds are very small, they 
require no covering, a gentle pressure on the surface of the 
mould being quite sufficient. The pans should be placed in a 
warm or moist frame in a shady comer of the stove, and germi- 
nation will be hastened by placing a bell-glass over the pan, 
having a less diameter than the pan. To avoid the risk of 
disturbing the seeds in watering, it is advisable not to take off 
the bell-glass ; but by allowing the water to fall between the 
margin of the pan and glass, the mould will gradually absorb 
the water which will become diffused throughout the mass, and 
secure a uniform degree of moisture for the seeds. Shading 
during the day must be attended to both previous to and after 
germination, gradually admitting air and light as the young 
plants obtain strength. No doubt this species will readily 
hybridize with its allies and produce varieties, which can be 
maintained and increased by graftings on some of the more 
common species of the genus. J S 



Fig. 1 and 3. Varieties of the calyx, ovary, and style. 2. Stamen :- magnified. 



4-4-56. 




ntch.deletTifh.. 






Tab. 4458. 
DIELYTRA spectabilis. 

Moutan Dielytra. 



Nat. Ord. Fumariace^e. — Diadelphia Hexandria. 

Gen. Char. Petala 4, 2 exteriora basi aequaliter calcarata aut gibbosa. Siliqw 
bivalvis polysperma. — Herbae perennes. Flores racemosi, albi aut purpnrascentes. 
DC. 



Dielytra spectabilis ; caulescens, foliis subbipinnatis, pinnis petiolatis plerumque 
ternatis segmentis late ovato-cuneatis incisis, racemis elougatis bractcis 
subulatis deciduis, petalis ext. basi gibboso-rotundatis, int. oblongis can- 
natis supra medium valde constrictis, filamentis diadelphis, ultra medium 
geniculars liberis. 

Dielytra spectabibs. Be Cand. Syst. Veget. v. 2.^p. 110. Prodr. v. 1. p. i*6. 
Fortune, in Journ. Hurt. Soc. Land. v. 2. p. 178. t. 3. 

Eucapnos spectabilis. Sieb. et Zucc. Abhandl. der Munchen. Akid. (Physick. 
Math. ClasseJ v. 3. p. 721. 1. 1./. 2. ex Walp. Repert. v. 5. p. 23. 

Corydalis spectabibs. Pers.Syn. v. 2. p. 260. 

Fumaria spectabibs. Linn. Amcen. Acad. v. 7. p- 437. t. 7. 

Of tbis truly fine and hardy herbaceous plant, there seems no 
reason whatever for constituting a new genus, as Professors 
Martius and Zuccarini have done. Both in habit and structural 
character it is entirely a Dielytra, DC. The flowers are the 
largest of the genus, and the leaves and leaflets the broadest, 
and so much resemble those of the Paonia Moutan that, as 
Mr. Fortune assures us, the Chinese give the plant the name ot 
the "Red-and-whiteMoutan-flowerr We learn from the same in- 
telligent traveller, that it is one of the plants of which the Chinese 
Mandarins are so fond, and that they cultivate with so much 
pride in all their gardens. He first saw it in the artificial rocks 
in the Grotto-garden, Island of Chusan, growmg along with the 
equally beautiful Weiqelia rosea. It appears to have been known 
only in northern China or the borders of Tartary and China, and 
not to be a denizen of anv part of the Russian Empire ; tor it is 
not included in Ledebour's Flora Rossica. Nor, indeed, have 
we any clear account of its being seen otherwise than in culti- 
vation. Linnceus, who first published it, does, it is true give 
in the Species Plantarum, " Siberia (Demidoff) as the habitat : 
but the late possessor of the Linna3an Herbarium does not seem 
satisfied on that point, for he says in Rees' Cyclop^ that it is a 

august 1st, 1849. l 



native of Siberia or Tartary as far as we can discover."* It is 
cultivated by the Chinese and sometimes seen among their 
drawings of ornamental plants, being extremely handsome. The 
original specimen is in the Linnscan Herbarium, the only one 
we have ever met with in any collection." Gmelin includes it 
in his ' Flora Sibirica/ but expressly says, " stupendae pulchri- 
tudinis planta, qua3 e Sinis a chirurgo Henke adportata fuit." 
Descr. Habit of Diehjtra formosa (Bot. Mag. t. 1335) except 
that it is caulescent : a foot or a foot and a half high. Leaves 
pinnate, with three to five petiolate, pinnated pinnules, which 
are ternate or ternately and deeply cut, the segments broad, 
ovato-cuneate, incised. Stem, petioles, and peduncles red, Ba- 
ceme long. Pedicels slender, with a subulato-deciduous bractea. 
Flowers large, drooping, deep rose-red, inner petals nearly white. 
Calyx of two small, narrow-ovate, concave, coloured scales. 
Outer petals very large, cucullate, gibbous rather than spurred 
at the base : the apex attenuated, reflexed, spathulate. Inner 
petals oblong, carinate at the back, remarkably constricted above 
the middle ; the upper portion with a broad wing at the back, 
the apices cohering. Stamens united in two bundles of three 
each, geniculated above the middle, and the filaments are thence 
free. Ovary narrow, cylindrical : style short : stigma two-lipped. 

Cult. This handsome flowering herbaceous plant, has a 
fascicle of thick fleshy roots that lie dormant during winter, 
and push into growth early in the spring. We have not had it 
long enough under cultivation to enable us to say whether it 
will prove hardy in our climate ; but as it is from the north of 
China we anticipate it will, especially if covered over with a 
layer of old tan, or some such loose material during our severe 
frosts. Its early habit may probably render it liable to be hurt 
by late spring frosts, but as it makes a pretty appearance in a 
pot, it will prove a desirable plant for the greenhouse. It thrives 
in any good garden-soil, and when it has done flowering it 
should be placed out of doors. After the decay of the flowering 
stems it may be kept in a frame during winter, giving it only 
water sufficient to keep the mould moderately moist. It is pro- 
pagated by division of the root or by cuttings. /. S. 

* Alexander de Karamyschew, who appears to be the original authority for 
our knowledge of this fine plant in his « Dissertatio ' entitled ' Necessitas Historic 
JNaturaus Rossiae,' (Arncen. Acad, v. 7. p. 438) says, after alluding to Botanic 
gardens, ' Memim de cretero, me vidisse domi varias plautas omnium pulcher- 
ninas utpote Hypecoum erectum, Fumariam spectabilem aliasque pe digni^ima 
essent, ^quaa msererentur hortis magnatum summorum, ob illarum pulehritu- 

Fig. 1, 2, and 3. The different parts of the flower separated ■.— magnified ■ 



+ 4-53. 




nx i-JX- a 



Bl. B. t B- 10 ?- 



Tab. 4459. 

LACEPEDEA insignis. 

Fragrant Lacepedea. 



Nat. Ord. Hippocratace.e. — Pentandria Trigynia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-partitus (potius 5-sepalus) insequalis. Petala 5 brevis- 
sime unguiculata (sessilia). Stamina 5, filamentia libcris, anthcris bilocularibus 
longitudinaliter debiscentibus. Ovarium 3-locidare, loculis 8-ovulatis. Stylus 
3-sulcatus, deraum tripartibilis. Bacca stylis tricuspidata 6-9-sperma.— Arbor 
foliis serrulatis, paniculis terminalihis, floribua albis odoris. DC. 



Lacepedea insignis. 

Lacepedea insignis. H.B.K. Nov. Gen. Am. v. 5. p. 142. t. 444. Be Omd. 

Prodr. v. I. p. 512. 
Triceraia tinifolia. Willd. Herb.—Boem. etSch. Syst. Veget. v. 4. p. 803. 
Triceros Xalapensis. Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. l.p. 947. 



A really handsome shrub, attaining a height of fourteen to 
eighteen feet, with ample ever-green foliage and panicles ot 
white, deliciously scented flowers; each blossom the size ot, and 
in shape not much unlike that of the Barberry. It is a native 
of Mexico, requires the heat of a stove when the flowers come to 
perfection in May. Introduced to our gardens through the 
medium of Mr. Henderson of Pine Apple Place who kindly 
presented it to the Royal Gardens. Messrs. Humboldt and 
Bonpland named this in honour of the distinguished naturalist 
Count de Lacepede. The species is a solitary one of the genus 

Descr. A small tree, which, with us, has attained the height 
of ten feet, much branched. Leaves opposite, on long petioles, 
ovate or oblongo-ovate, subcoriaceous, pennmerved and reticu- 
lated, obscurely serrated, dark green above and glossy paler 
beneath, and with the nerves prominent. Petioles terete on, 
two, or three inches long. Preterminal, ^hwen ^i^, 
white, powerfully fragrant, ovato-globose Pete* sluidei 
without bracte*. CcL of five, imbricated, oval, ctotod^ rinte 
sepals. Petals not much longer than the sepals, white, obouito- 
oblong, erect, concave, obscurely crenate at the margin. fitauM 
erect, longer than the sepals. Filaments rather thick, subulate, 



august 1st, 1849. 



white. Anthers large, yellow, exserted just beyond the corolla. 
There is a large fleshy deeply -lobed and crenate disk surrounding 
the base of the ovary. Ovary ovate, three-lobed, hairy, or rather 
setose, tapering upwards into three eventually separated styles. 
Stigmas dilated. W. J. H. 

Cult. This is a shrub or small tree of free growth, requiring the 
temperature of the stove, not particular as to soil, but demanding 
the usual precautions as to watering and drainage. It is readily 
increased by cuttings, placed in bottom-heat under a bell-glass. 
J.S. 



Fig. 1. Petal. 2. Flower. 3. Pistil and hypogynous disk. 4. Section of 
ovary. 5. Flower from which the calyx and petals are removed :■ — magnified. 



4-A-60. 




Pitch del etlith. 



R3. h^rss^- 



Tab. 4460. 
NEMATANTHUS ionema. 

Dark blood-coloured Ionema. 



Nat. Ord. GesneriacejE. — Didynamia Gymnospermia. 

Gen. Cliar. Calyx liber obliquus ultra medium 5-fidus seu 5-partitus, lobis 
lanceolato-linearibus subsequalibus, summo paululum minore. Corolla infundi- 
buliformi-campanulato-obliqua basi postice gibba, fauce patula, bmbo sequabter 
5-lobo. Stamina 4 didynama cum quinto rudimentario aut nullo. Anther <b 
coheerentes. Annulus hypogynus et glandula postica. Capmla pyramidalis 
coriacea 1-locularis 2-valvis, placentis 2 parietabbus bilamellatis. Semina in- 
numerosa oblonga. — Frutices Brasilienses simplices aut pauce ramosi supra arbores 
scandentes saepe radicantes, epidermide nitida cinereo-testacea. Foba opposita (altero 
seepe minore) petiolata crassiuscula oblonga aut ovali-lanceolata utrinque acuminata 
subintegerrima, juniora ciliata. Gemmata nuda foliis complicates. Pedicelli 
axillares \-fiores solitarii ebracteati filiformes penduli. Corollse puniceee ampla. 
DC. 



Nematanthus ionema ; foliis lato-lanceolatis utrinque acuminatis, calycibus 
violascentibus incano-hirsutis, peduncubs 6- ad 12-uncialibus violaceo- 
alboque villosis. Mart. 

Nematanthus ionema. Mart. Nov. Gen. Bras. v. 3. p. 47. 

Nematanthus corticola. Schrad. in Gbtt. Gel. Am. v. 1. p. 719. Max. Prin:. 
von New. Reise nach Bras. v. 2. p. 208. et p. 343. 

Nematanthus Morrelbana. Hortul. 



This is the most striking of all the species of Nematanthus, 
known in cultivation, remarkable for the great length of the 
flower-stalks, the deep blood-colour of the corollas, the rich 
purple of the calyx-tube, and the pubescence on these latter. 
De Candolle, as observed under our Tab. 4018, N. longipes, 
seems inclined to refer it to that species : but we agree with Dr. 
von Martius that it is " distinctissima." According to this last- 
mentioned author, it grows in primeval woods of Brazil, between 
Ilheos and the town of San Pedro de Alcantara :— there flowering 
in September, with us in the spring months, requiring a moist 
stove for its successful cultivation. We owe the possession of it 
at Kew, to Mr. Henderson of Pine Apple Place, who sent it 
under the unpublished name of N. Morrelliana. 

Descr. A succulent scandent shrub, with terete branches 



AUGUST 1st, 1849 



sending out roots from near the insertion of the leaves. Leaves 
opposite, thick, fleshy, broadly lanceolate or slightly obovate, 
obscurely serrated, very dark green, acuminated, at the base at- 
tenuated into a thick footstalk about an inch long. Peduncles 
solitary or two together, from the axils of the leaves, slender, 
very long (six to twelve inches) and pendent, dark purple-red, 
villous, bearing a single large obliquely pendent flower. Calyx 
large, woolly rather than villous : tube turbinate, very dark 
purple : limb of five lanceolate, serrated, almost leafy, spreading 
segments. Corolla in shape resembling that of N. longipes 
(Tab. 4018) or of N. chloronema (Tab. 4080), but of a rich deep 
blood-colour and clothed with hoary purplish pubescence. Sta- 
mens and style as long as the tube. Chary hairy with a large 
gland on one side. W. J. H. 

Cult. A native of the forests of Brazil, and agreeing in every 
respect as regards habit with what is said of Alloplectm at 
Tab. 4452. It may be either grown in a pot in turfy peat soil, 
or in a basket suspended from the roof of the house, in the way 
that many Orchids are grown. /. JS. 



Fig. 1. Pistil and hypogynous gland. 



4-4-M. 




id etlith 



H.B..V 



Tab. 4461. 
GAULTHERIA bracteata. 

Bradeated Gaultheria. 



Nat. Ord. Ericace*. — Decandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-lobus demum amplians plus minus baccatus et capsulam 
ambiens aut fovens. Corolla ovata ore saepe contracta 5-dentata. ^ Stamina 10 
iuclusa, filamentis ssepe villosis, autheris 4-aristatis nempe apice bifidis, loculis 
biaristatis rarissirae muticis. Stylus filiformis. Stigma obtusum. Squama 
bypogyiice 10 distinctse aut concretEe. Capsula depresso-globosa, 5-locularis, 
5 -sulcata, 5-valvis, valvis septiferis loculicido-dehiscentibus. Placenta axi ad- 
nata. Senium innumerosa parva, testa subreticulata.— Frutices aut rarius arbus- 
culce ex America rarius ex India orti. Folia alter na sempervirentia, dent at a 
aut integerrima. Pedicelb nunc axillares \-flori nunc in racemum termimlem 
dispositi, bibracteolati. Corolla? alba rosea aut coccinea. DC. 



Gaulthekia bracteata j prostrata, ramis teretibus bispidis, foliis breviter pctio- 
latis cordato-ovatis acutis ciliato-serratis acutis supra Iwvitras subtus reti- 
cularis sparse piloso-hispidis, racemis terminalibus et axillaribus glanduloso- 
pilosis, bracteis ovatis coloratis flores aequantibus, calyce laxo lobis tri- 
angulari-acuminatis pilosis, corollis conico-ovatis, Hmbi lobis pateutibus. 

Gaultheria bracteata. Don, Gard. Diet. v. Z.p. 840. De Cand. Prodr. v. 7. 
p. 595. 

Andromeda bracteata. Cav. Ic. v. &.p. 42. t. 562./. 1. 

Gaultheria odorata. H.B.K.Nov. Gen.v.3.p.2S5. DeCand.Prodr.v.l.p.595. 

Gaultheria erecta. Vent. Sort. Cels. t. 5. De Cand. Prodr. v. l.p. 596. 

Gaultheria cordifolia. H.B.K.Nov. Gen. Am. v. 3. p. 285. t. 261. 

Gaultheria rigida. II.B.K. Nov. Gen. Am. v. 3. p. 287. t. 262. 



Among the most interesting of mountain plants m the tropics 
and in the southern hemisphere, especially of the New World, 
are the various species of the present genus Gaultheria. forty- 
three are enumerated by De Candolle; but many of these 
are assuredly varieties ; and it would require much time and a 
rich herbarium to elucidate the history of the genus. Ine 
present one, from the Andes of Columbia, sent to the Royal 
Gardens and to Syon by Mr. Purdie, is the Andromeda brae 
teata figured and described by Cavanilles ; and we are glad 
to give a representation from the living plant of what we believe to 

AUGUST 1st, 1849. 



be identical with the original plant. In addition to the syno- 
nymes above quoted we were almost disposed to add the G. 
Pichinchensis, Bentham, and G. rufescens, De Cand. ; but the 
clothing of the young stems is different, though variable. The 
greater or lesser breadth of the leaves, and the permanent or 
fugacious hairs of the different parts of the plant, are exceedingly 
uncertain characters. 

Descr. A low bushy, rigid, handsome, greenhouse shrub with 
prostrate branches as seen in the plants at Kew and at Syon 
Gardens (where our drawing was made), these branches more or 
less hispid, the setae generally mixed with glandular hairs in the 
younger portions of the plant. Leaves alternate, ovate or oblong 
or cordate, with a glandular mucro at the point, minutely serrated, 
penniveined and reticulated (more conspicuously beneath), gene- 
rally glabrous above, the serratures ciliated or tipped with hairs 
which are often deciduous : beneath glabrous or hairy, with setse 
about the base and mid-rib. Racemes axillary and terminal, 
simple, solitary : the flowers secund, rose-colour, as are the 
calyx and large bracteas : all these, as well as the short bi- 
bracteolated pedicels, are more or less hairy and more or less 
glandular. Calyx lax, cut deeply into five rather patent, acu- 
minated, triangular lobes. Corolla thrice as long as the calyx : 
conical-ovate, with five rather small ovate spreading segments of 
the limb. Stamens : filaments subulate, hairy. Anther-cells 
with two short horns. Ovary depressed, downy, five-lobed. 
Style columnar : stigma obtuse. W. J. H. 

Cult. From the elevated regions of New Grenada, and as it 
grows under the same influences as regards climate, and partakes 
of the nature of Bejaria coarctata (Tab. 4433), the remarks 
there given are applicable to this species. It should be grown 
m light peat soil, and kept in a cool airy pit or frame during 
winter, and in summer should not be exposed too freely to the 
sun in hot weather. As it is also found in the more elevated 
region of Quito, it may probably prove more hardy than we at 
present anticipate. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Flower, bractea, and bracteoles. 2. Variety of the same. 3. Stamen. 
4. Pistil: — magnified. 



4-^62. 




Tab. 4462 
MITRARIA coccinea. 

Scarlet Mitraria. 



Nat. Ord.GESNERiACE.fc — Didynamia Angiospermia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx inferus bractea biloba mitrgeformi calyculatus, 5-partitus 
(inaequalis), lobis pallidis lanceolatis fere pergamaceis. Corolla tubulosa sub- 
ventricosa, limbo bilabiato, lobo superiore bifido, infero 3-fido. Stamina 4, 
didynama exserta, antheris liberis ; quinti postice rudimentum elongato-filiforme. 
Ovarium disco hypogyno impositum. Stylus subulatus. Stigma crassiusculum. 
Bacca 1-locularis. Semina numerosa oblonga.— Frutex Chiloemis. Folia oppo- 
site. Pedicelli solitarii v. 2-3 axillares nutantes l-fori. Cor. coccinea. 



Mitraria coccinea. 

Mitraria coccinea. Cav. Ic. v. 6. p. 67. t. 579. Be Card. Prodr. v. 7. p. 537- 
Spreng. Syst. Veget. v. 2. p. 845. 



Among the most attractive features at the June Exhibition 
(1849) of the Chiswick Horticultural Society, was this rare and 
lovely plant, communicated by Messrs. Veitch of Exeter : being 
one of the many choice plants sent by Mr. William Lobb from 
Chiloe, the only known station for it. It is a plant that has 
long been among the desiderata of the Horticulturist. It is a 
greenhouse plant, and may be found capable of bearing the open 
air, were it not for the droughts of our country, so different 
from the perennial fogs of Chiloe. 

Descr. A low and somewhat succulent shrub, with obscurely 
tetragonous branches. Leaves rather small, but approximate, 
of a singularly delicate green colour, opposite, rarely ternate, on 
short petioles, ovate, acute, coarsely crenato-serrate, nearly gla- 
brous, paler and somewhat glaucous beneath. Peduncles much 
longer than the leaves, generally solitary from the axils, drooping, 
tubercled and slightly thickened towards the calyx, single 
flowered. Bractea large, two-lobed, nerved, broadly ovate, 
downy, closely embracing one side of the calyx. Calyx ol Ine, 
unequal, lanceolate sepals or lobes, pale-coloured, downy towards 
the point and edges, one large and four smaller. Corolla briglit 
scarlet: tube ventricose, curved, constricted at the base, tne 



august 1st, 1349. 



mouth a little contracted : the limb obscurely two-lipped, with 
five, subequal, spreading, obtuse segments. Stamen and style 
slightly exserted. Barren filament subulate. Ovary ovate, 
placed on a large hypogynous fleshy disk. Cells with two 
parietal receptacles. Stigma obtuse. W. J. H. 

Cult. This pretty and interesting plant belongs to the same 
group of GesneriacecB as Nematanthus (Tab. 4460) and Allo- 
plectus (Tab. 4452), partaking of the trailing subscandent habit 
of these and other allied tropical genera ; but Mitraria, being 
a native of the group of islands of which Chiloe is the chief, it 
may therefore be viewed as a tolerably hardy plant, especially in 
situations near the sea on our south and west coasts, the climate 
of Chiloe being characterized as very cold, with great humidity, 
for a great part of the year, but with little or no frost. We 
learn from Mr. Veitch (who is at present the sole possessor of 
this species) that four plants stood the open air of last winter in 
his Nursery at Exeter ; but in situations not so favoured as the 
mild climate of Devonshire, it will be safest to protect it during 
winter, either in the greenhouse or in a cold pit or frame. As 
it is of a neat habit and a free flowerer, and strikes readily from 
cuttings treated in the usual way, we anticipate that it will 
become a favourite plant for the greenhouse. /. 8. 



Fig. 1. Stamens. 2. Bractea, calyx, and pistil. 3. Calyx. 4. Ovary and 
hypogynous disk. 5. Transverse section of the ovary : — magnified. 



4-4-63. 







Tab. 4463 
SIDA (Abutilon) venosa. 

Veiny-petaled Sida. 



iNat. Ord. Malvaceae. — Monadelphia Polyandbia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4227.) 



Sida (Abutilon) venosa ; subarborea, ramis herbaceis glabris, foliis longe pe- 
tiolatis cordatis 7-palraatis profunde 7-lobatis, lobis lanceolatis acnminatis 
grosse inciso-serratis, stipulis subulato-lanceolati3, pedunculis axillaribus 
solitariis unifloris longitudine foliorum sub apiceui articulatis, calycis ampli 
campanulati tubo globoso 15-lamellato limbo 5-partito laciuiis ovato-lan- 
ceolatis acuminatis, petalis latissirae spathulatis concavis conaiventibus 
venosis. 

Abutilon venosura, Hortal. 



A large green-house shrub, or it may almost be called a small 
tree, the name of which we have only seen in print in a Catalogue of 
the Plants of the Botanic Garden of Zurich, marked "Abutilon 
venosum, Hort, Zuric." It appears to have come to England by 
way of Belgium, and we have no information of its native 
country; but if we judge from its affinity with Sida Bed- 
fordiana (Bot. Mag. t. 3892) and S.picta (t. 3840), we should in- 
fer that south Brazil is its native country. Of the two species just 
mentioned, it is most nearly allied to S.picta, on account of its 
palmated leaves ; but the segments of the leaves, and the flowers, 
especially the structure of the calyx, are very different. It 
blooms in the spring and summer, and our earliest knowledge ol 
it was from a fine specimen brought to us by Robert Barclay, Esq., 
who had flowered it at Nott's Green, Leytonstone. The blossoms 
are large and exceedingly handsome, from the rich colour and 
fine purple vcining of their petals. 

Descr. A small tree, with rather straggling branches the 
young ones herbaceous, quite glabrous. Leaves frequently a 
span long, broadly cordate, palmately and deeply scven-lobed, 
the lobes lanceolate, much acuminated, and coarsely and mcisely 
serrated : the young ones only with a few stellated hairs, ciuen\ 

SEPTEMBKR I ST, 1849. K 



on the nerves on the underside. Stipules subulato-lanceolate, 
entire. Peduncle axillary, solitary, about as long as the leaf, 
single-flowered, articulated and generally geniculated an inch or 
more below the calyx. Flower very large, drooping. Calyx 
large, bell-shaped, slightly downy, with rufous, stellated hairs ; 
the tube inflated, subglobose, very obtuse at the base, marked 
longitudinally with fifteen elevated striae or lamellae, which 
become obsolete in the five large ovato-lanceolate segments of 
the limb : these segments are clothed with whitish down within. 
Corolla twice as long as the calyx. Petals erecto-connivent, 
obovato-spathulate, very concave, golden orange colour, richly 
veined and reticulated with brown. Stamens numerous. Style 
as long as the column of stamens, with nine branches at the 
summit. W. J. H. 

Cult. A slender, upright, soft-wooded, shrubby plant of 
rapid growth, soon becoming tall and naked below, and there- 
fore better adapted for planting out in a greenhouse conserva- 
tory, than for cultivating in a pot. In either case it is desirable 
to shorten the leading shoots, so as to induce it to branch. It 
will thrive well in any good garden-loam, mixed with a little 
leaf-mould or sandy peat-soil. During summer it requires to be 
freely supplied with water, and may at that season be fully ex- 
posed to the open air. It is readily increased by cuttings, 
treated in the usual way. J. S. 



Fig. 1. V\$ti\;— magnified, 



4-4-64-. 




leL et'Etk 



Tab. 4464. 

PENTSTEMON cyananthus. 

Azure-flowered Penstemon. 



Nat. Ord. Scrophularine^e — Didynamia Angiospermia. 
Gen. C/iar. {Vide supra, Tab. 4319.) 



Pentstemon cyananthus; elatus glaucescenti-viridis,foliis integerrimis inferioribus 
oblongo-spatbulatis petiolatis acuminatis, caulinis sessilibus cordato-ovatis 
tenui-acuminatis rloralibus inferioribus late cordatis acuminatissimis, pedun- 
cidis axillaribus pseudo-verticillatis multifloris spicam foliosam interruptam 
spectabilem formantibus, sepalis angustis lanceolato-subulatis, corolla- pul- 
cherrima? azures (tubo purpureo) superne ampliato, limbi bilabiati lobis 
subaequalibus, antheris filamentoque sterili hirsutis. 



A more beautiful Pentstemon even than that we have figured 
at Tab. 4319, having equally handsome flowers, and these much 
more numerous and more compact, forming a spike (as in a 
specimen now before us) more than a foot long, and with much 
finer foliage. It is, too, an inhabitant of the same country, 
the upper valleys of the Platte River in the Rocky Mountains, 
where seeds were collected by Mr. Burke. These seeds were 
reared by Messrs. Lucombe, Pince, and Co., in whose Exeter 
Nursery the plants flowered beautifully, in the open air, in May 
1849. The species is doubtless quite hardy, and a great acqui- 
sition to our flower-borders. A bed filled with this species 
would have a splendid effect. It may rank near P. acuminatum, 
Dougl. (in Bot. Reg. t. 1285), but is quite different, and in- 
finitely more beautiful. 

Descr. Perennial. Stems herbaceous, erect, terete, simple m 
our specimen. Leaves all entire, inclining to glaucous- green. 
Root-leaves petiolate, spathulate, acuminate. Stem-leaves thz 
broadest and largest of the genus, cordato-ovate, or cordate, 
sessile, acuminate: those of the inferior pseudo-whorls broad y 
cordate and very acuminate : uppermost ones of all reduced to 
subulate bracteas. Peduncles opposite, axillary in all the upper 
floral and bracteal leaves, bearing cymes of many flowers, which 
form pseudo-whorls around the stem. Calyx of five BUDUlate 

SEPTEMBER 1ST, 1849. K 



sepals. Corolla rather large, the tube ventricose upwards, 
purple : the limb two-lipped, bright azure blue ; the segments 
obtuse, nearly equal, those of the upper lip being rather the 
smallest. Stamens and pistil included. Filaments much curved. 
Anthers and sterile stamen hairy. W. J. II. 

Cult. This fine species of Pentstemon is, like the rest of the 
genus, a hardy perennial plant, and will, we think, prove an 
ornamental plant for the flower-border. Although the several 
species of this genus are considered herbaceous perennials, 
some even assuming an evergreen suffruticose habit, yet the 
present species belongs to a section of which, after flowering, the 
plants often become weakly, and do not flower so fine the fol- 
lowing year. It is, therefore, desirable to have a succession of 
young plants, which, in those species which do not readily 
produce seeds, may be obtained by cuttings, placed under a 
hand-glass : this operation should be done as early in the 
summer as cuttings can be got, so as to have the young plants 
sufficiently strong by the autumn. On account of their ever- 
green suffruticose habit, it is desirable to shelter them in a 
frame during winter ; but taking due care that they do not 
suffer through damp. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Root-leaf: — natural size. 2. Stamens: — magnified. 



/ //■). 




Tab. 4465. 
SAUROMATIUM guttatum 

Spotted Sauromatium. 



Nat. Onl. Aroide.e. — Mon(ecia Polyandria. 

Gen. Char. Spatha basi tubulosa, limbo piano patente. Spadix inferne inter- 
rupte androgynus, genitalibus rudimentariis infra stamina sparsis apice sub- 
clavato nudus. Antherce distinctse, loculis oppositis, rimula brevi. subobliqua 
dehiscentibus. Ovaria plurima, libera, unilocularia. Omla 2, basilaria, e funi- 
culis brevibus erecta, orthotropa. Stigma terminale, sessile, depresso-hemi- 
splnericum. Baccee monospermy. Semen . . . . — Herbag Indicts ; tnbere radi- 
cali globom, carnoso, maximo, scapo radicali brevissimo, sub&olitario, basi squamoxo, 
spatha metadata, folio serotino, pedati-partito, mtdtilobo. Endl. 



Sauromatium guttatum ; foliis pedati-multipartitis lobis oblongis acuminata 
spatha ad os tubi irregnlariter subulato-repanda. 

Sauromatium guttatum. Sckott., Meletem. v. 1. p. 17. Blume, Rumphia, v. 1. 

p. 126. Kth. Enum.. Plant, v. 3. p. 28. 
Arum guttatum. fFall. PI. Asiat. Par. v. 2. pi. 10. p. 115. 



A very remarkable Aroideous plant, native of the East Indies, 
where it is probably not uncommon. Dr. Wallich detected it in 
Nepal, Blume in Java. Roots of our plant were sent to us by our 
friend Mr. Law, Tanna, Bombay, in 1848, and they flowered in 
the stove in the spring of the following year. The flower was 
succeeded by the leaf. The said flower has no very agreeable 
smell, but Dr. Wallich observes it is far less offensive than niany 
of the other species. Before expansion, Dr. Wallich found the 
heat at the bottom of the spatha to be very considerable. 

Descr. From the top of a large almost globose tuber, and 
surrounded by three or four membranaceous spotted scales or 
bracteas, arises the singularly shaped, and no less singularly 
marked, sessile spatha, from a foot and a half to two feet long, 
almost cylindrical below, but somewhat swollen at the very base ; 
at the height of three or four inches from the base the sheath 
opens, as it were, and is dilated into a large, [anceolato-subulate, 
channelled, fleshy spatha, which is reflexed and waved below at 
the margin : the colour, without livid or purplish-green, is within 

SEPTEMBER 1st, 1S49. 



greenish-yellow, palest below, and there marked with copious, 
small, red-purple spots, the rest with larger blotches, except at 
the apex, where it is rather streaked than spotted. Spadix 
erect below, and nearly cylindrical ; at the base densely clothed 
with copious, obovate ovaries, above which are several spatlm- 
t late, abortive ovaries, then naked to the apex of the erect 
portion, which is equally encased in the numerous sessile, two- 
celled anthers ; above this commences the almost cylindrical 
but slightly attenuated apex, nearly a foot long, and of a livid 
purple colour. On the decay of the flower the leaf developes 
itself on a spotted stalk, and is pedato-partite, with the segments 
oblong, attenuated, entire. W. J. H. 

Cult. A tuberous-rooted herbaceous plant, native of Bombay 
and other parts of India. The tubers lie dormant during the 
dry season, coming quickly into flower and leaf on receiving 
the stimulus of moisture. With us the roots are dormant in 
winter. They should be placed in a dry part of the stove, 
beyond the reach of receiving much moisture. Early in the 
spring the tubers should be examined, and (if necessary) re- 
potted; using a mixture composed of light loam and peat 
in about equal proportion, placing the pot in heat, and watering 
it sparingly, till the tubers begin to grow. The flower-stem 
conies first, and after a time is succeeded by the leaves, 
which remain green during summer. It produces offsets freely 
from the sides of the tuber, which* show themselves above 
ground. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Lower fertile portion of the spadix : — natural size. 2. Pistil. 3. An- 
ther : — magnified. 



a^r-fk 



4 16, 




a. B.J 



Tab. 4466. 
ROUPELLIA GRATA. 

Cream-fruit. 

Nat. Ord. Apocyne^e. — Pentandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-partitusglandulis baseos (circa 12) in annulum dispositis. 
Corolla tubus infundibuliformis ; faux coronata ligulis 10 sequidistantibus basi in 
annulum connatis; limbi lacinise 5, latse, aestivatione sinistrorsum convolutse. 
Stamina tubo inserta, inclusa, filamenta brevia, anthera sagittatse longe acumi- 
natse. Stylus filiformis, apice in massam 5-sulcatam antheris cobaarenteni dila- 
tatus, ultra dilatationem vix productus et obscure emarginatus. Nectarium 0. 
Ovaria ? Fructus (fide R. Br.) Voacanga v. Urceolce. — Gen. nov. e tribu Plu- 
mieriearum et subtribu Tabernamontanearum. — Frutex glaberrimus, habitu Taber- 
namiontanas Africaifas referens. Folia opposita, breviter petiolata, semipedalia, 
oblongo-elliptica, breviter acuminata, basi aculeata, crassiuscula, venis primariis a 
costa media divergentibus haud crebris subtus prominulis, rete venularum parum 
conspicua ; petioli basi parum dilatati, linea transversali conjundi et intus glan- 
dulis parvis acutis stipulceformibus aucti. Cympe terminates, sessiles, dense 6-8- 
flor(B,fere umbella>formes. Bractese ovato-lanceolata acute acuminata dorso cari- 
nata, \\- 2 tin. longa. Pedicelli bracteis lotigiores, calyce breviores. Calycis lobi 
obovati, 6-8 tin. longi, membranacei, apice colorati. Corolla alba palUde roseo- 
tincta, tubus sesquipollicaris, superne ampliatus, intus extusque glaber ; lacinias 
late obovata, margine crispa, pollice paullo lotigiores. Corona? ligulce lanceolato- 
lineares, erecta, pulcJire rosea, 4-5 tin. longa. Stamina ad originem partis am- 
pliata ubi inserta. Filamenta brevia, crassa, leviter papulosa. Antherarum 
acumen tubum corolla fere superans, auricula baseos breves recta, pars media tantmn 
pollinifera. Ovarium disco crassiusculo haud vero in nectarium producto insidens. — 
Bentham. 



Roupellia grata. 

Roupellia grata. Wallich et Hook. MSS. 

Cream-fruit. Afzelius in " Sierra leone Report, 1794. p. 113. n. 1." Broirn, 
App. to Tnckeys Narr.p. 449. 



It is with no small degree of pleasure that we are enabled to 
give a representation of a very handsome and very fragrant plant 
of tropical Africa, noticed by Afzelius as the Cream-fruit, so called, 
we presume, from the use occasionally made of the cream-like 
juice of the fruit, but of which little seems to be known beyond 
the bare mention of it under that name by Afzelius and Mr. 
Brown. It is a native of Sierra Leone; (introduced to our 
stoves, we believe, by Mr. Whitfield,) and, in May 1849, we were 
favoured with beautiful flowering specimens by Mr. Pince of the 

SEPTEMBER 1 ST, 1849. 



Exeter Nursery, from the collection of Mrs. Halford of Newcourt, 
near Exeter ; a lady ardently devoted to the cultivation of rare 
exotics. It was exhibited under the name of Strophanthus 
Stanleyanus, at the Devon and Exeter Horticultural Society's 
Spring Exhibition, and gained a prize. The plant possesses 
additional interest, in our estimation, as being the one selected 
by Dr. Wallich and myself to bear the name of the family of 
Roupell, of whom not a few have served the cause of Botany : 
viz., Charles Roupell, Esq., of Charlestown, South Carolina, 
commemorated in many of the pages of Sir James E. Smith's 
' Correspondence of Linnaeus;' Dr. Roupell of Welbeck Street, 
London, his grandson ; together with another grandson, Thomas 
Boone Roupell, Esq., a gentleman now high in the Civil Service 
of the E. I. Company, on the Madras Establishment ; while the 
talented lady of the latter is the authoress of a beautiful work 
about to issue from the press, illustrated by her own pencil, on 
Plants of South Africa. Hence the name is appropriately com- 
memorated in an African genus of no small beauty and fragrance. 
We are indebted to Mr. Bentham, who is now engaged in the 
preparation of the plants of the Niger Expedition, for the above 
generic character and description, which render any further 
botanical remarks on our part needless. If, as we trust, the 
plant comes into general cultivation, it cannot fail to be much 
prized ; if not for the application of the fruit (which may be 
better suited to an African than to an English palate), yet as- 
suredly for the size and beauty of colour of its flowers, no less 
than for their agreeable odour. W. J. H. 

Cult. This handsome, climbing, shrubby plant, being a native 
of Sierra Leone, consequently requires to be grown in a warm 
and moist hot-house. It is of free growth, and, being a 
smooth clean-leaved plant, not subject to insects, is well adapted 
for a trellis, or to train up a pillar or rafter ; and it will also 
form a bushy plant grown in a pot, if supported with a wire 
trellis, or by neat stakes. Good fresh loam, with a little leaf- 
mould, will suit it. As it is a fast grower, it requires water 
freely during summer; but care must be taken that the soil 
does not become stagnant. It is propagated by cuttings, which 
strike root readily when placed under a bell-glass, and the pot 
plunged m bottom heat. It appears to be a shy flowerer; for, 
although we have known it in cultivation for several years, we 
have not heard of its producing flowers, except in the collection 
above-mentioned. /. 8. 



Kg.l. Calyx and pistil. 2. Stamens. 3. Pistil and perigyncms scales. 
4. Stamen. 5. Section of the ovary -.—magnified. 



^6-67. 




Tab. 4467. 
ARISTOLOCHIA macradenia. 

Large glanduled Birthioort. 



Nat. Ord. Aristolochie^:.— Gynandria Hexandria. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4361.) 



Aristolochia macradenia; scandens glaberrima, foliis sublonge petiolatis cor- 
dato-hastatis, sinu profundo Into lobis rotundatis, pedunculo axillari soli- 
tario unifloro petiolo sublongiore, perianthii unilabiati tubo basi inflato 
striato, limbo ovato lateribus reflexis supra reticularis glandulosis, glandulis 
magnis globosis stipitatis. 



This curious plant flowered, in a warm greenhouse of the 
Royal Gardens of Kew, in the spring of 1849, and there our 
drawing was made. It had bloomed the year before with John 
Taylor, Esq., of Sheffield House, Kensington, to whom we 
are indebted for the possession of the plant. That gentleman 
imported it from Real del Monte. It is one of the most re- 
markable and distinct of the many species of the genus. 

Descr. Cultivated in a pot, with a balloon trellis, this forms 
a suffruticose, climbing plant, with long, slender, terete stems. 
Leaves alternate, four to five inches long, petiolate, between 
cordate and hastate, tapering to an acute point, glabrous, with 
about seven principal nerves and several connecting nervelets, 
the sinus deep and broad, the lobes large, rotundate, spreading. 
Petiole about an inch and a half long. Peduncle longer than 
the petiole, axillary, solitary, single-flowered. Flower rather 
large, somewhat drooping, including the germen, almost as long 
as the leaves. Ovary slightly downy, inferior, club-shaped, 
furrowed. Tube greenish, striated, the lower half much inflated, 
then contracted, at the summit again dilated and extending into 
a single declined, large, ovate lip, the sides always revolute, the 
upper surface rich brown, with yellow reticulated veins, and 
beset with large stipitate, globose glands, looking almost like the 
fructification of some Calicium. The tube inside is slightly hairy 
and there is a scale at the summit of the inflation. Column oval, 



SEPTEMBER 1ST, 1849. 



with six linear anthers on the sides, and a six-cleft stigma at 
the top. W.J.H. 

Cult. In all cases of strong-growing creeping plants, where 
there are means for planting them out, we always do so, 
as few can be cultivated to advantage in pots. This being a 
weak and slender-growing species of Aristolochia, it may be 
grown in a moderate-sized pot. With us it has flowered freely, 
trained to wire trellis fixed to the pot, and kept in a stove, the 
temperature of which in winter may average about 50°. A 
mixture of light loam and sandy peat-soil suits it. Propagated 
by cuttings, treated in the usual way. J. S. 



Fig. 1. Section of the base of the perianth : — magnified. 



14 6 S. 




Tab. 4468. 
CYRTANTHERA aurantiaca. 

Orange-jlowered Cyrtanthera. 



Nat. Ord. Acanthace^e. — Diandria Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, T.ab.4444.) 



Cyrtanthera aurantiaca ; fruticosa erecta, caule acuto tetragono, foliis lato- 
seu elliptico-lanceolatis rigidiusculis in petiolum breviusculum crassum 
attenuatis, tkyrso compacto ovato, floribus erectis flavo-aurantiacis, bracteis 
ellipticis, bracteolis sepalisque lanceolatis pubescentibus, corolla? labio 
superiore recto. 

Calcostylis aurantiaca. Ma/coy's Cat. 



The Acanthaceous plants contain many beautiful species 
known at present to us only in our Herbaria, but which are 
eminently worth cultivating, witness the many species of Strobi- 
lanthes, Barleria, &c. of the East Indies, especially of Ceylon ; 
while the New World, in Dipteracanthm and the genus here 
represented of tropical South America, presents individuals of 
equal merit in regard to beauty. Already two species of Cyr- 
tanthera have appeared in our Magazine, the Justicia carnea 
(Tab. 3383), now called Cyrtanthera maynifica by Nees, and our 
C catalpcefolia (Tab. 4444). There can be no doubt of the 
present being a congener of those. We received our plant, at 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, from our often-mentioned friend 
Mr. Henderson, of Pine- Apple Place ; and it appears to have 
been sent to him from Belgium under a name we can nowhere 
find in print, save in Makoy's Catalogue, but without any 
history of its introduction to Europe, or any mention of native 
locality. 

Descr. A shrub with erect stem: branches rather stout, 
herbaceous, acutely tetragonal. Leaves opposite, broadly ellip- 
tical, lanceolate, slightly acuminate, rather rigid, penmnerved, 
tapering below into a rather short thick petiole. Flower* large, 
handsome, bright-coloured, copious, erect, forming a dense ter- 
minal, bracteated thyrsus. Bracteas (at least the lower ones) 

SEPTEMBER 1st, 1849. 



almost half as long as the flower, elliptical, approaching to ovate, 
appressed, leafy. Bracteoles lanceolate, downy, scarcely longer 
than the sepals of the calyx, which resemble them, but are 
smaller. Corolla full golden-yellow on first expansion ; after- 
wards the tube and lower lip become orange-red. Limb nearly 
as long as the tube, upper lip erect, acuminate, the point bifid : 
lower lip oblong, much reflexed, three-fid, the segments linear, 
approximate, straight. Filaments nearly as long as the corolla, 
lodged in the channelled upper lip. Anther-cells separated by a 
connectivum, one higher up than the other, both with a short 
spur at the base, glandular at the margin. Ovary immersed in 
a large cup-shaped, irregular gland : style pubescent at the base, 
as long as the corolla : stigma a little thickened, bifid. W. J. H. 
Cult. This species of Cyrtanthera has a much stiffer habit, 
and of less luxuriant growth than the species figured at Tab. 
4444. The treatment there mentioned will suit it j but, on 
account of its weaker habit, care must be taken not to 
over-pot it. A succession of young plants should be kept, as it 
is apt to become naked and unsightly after flowering ; — a cir- 
cumstance common to most of the soft-wooded, sufrruticose 
Acanthacece. J. S. 



Fig. 1. Anther. 2. Bracteoles, calyx, and pistil. "3. Ovary and cup-shaped 
nectary : — magnified. 



i-i-63. 




\ v 



\ - 






Tab. 4469. 
NYMPH^EA ampla. 
Broad-leaved Water-Lily. 



Nat. Ord. NYMPH.EACE.& — POLYANDRIA MoNOGYNIA. 

Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4257.) 



Nymph.ea ampla ; foliis cordato-rotundatis peltatis grosse dentatis glaberrimis 
reticulatis maculatis superne minute tuberculatis subtus coloratis nervis 
prominentibus sinu profunde angustissimo, sepalis lineato-maculatis, pe- 
talis albis, antheris exappendiculatis exterioribus longissimis, stigmate con- 
cavo sub- 26-radiato. 

Nymph.ea ampla. Be Cand. Syst. v. 2. p. 54. Prodr. v. 1. p. 115. M l lad. Fl. 
Jam. p. 19. 

Castalia ampla. Salisb. Ann. Bot. v. 2. p. 73. 

Nymph/EA Rudgeana. Meyer, Fl. Prim. Esseq. p. 198. 

NympHvEa Lotus. Lunan, Jam. p. 271. 

NYMPHiEA Indica flore candido, &c. Sloane, Jam. v. I. p. 252. 

Nymph^a fobis amplioribus, &c. Browne, Jam. p. 243. 



At p. 3. of the Companion to the Bot. Mag. vol. 74. is given 
an account of the re-discovery of the long lost Nelumbwm 
Jamaicense. Together with tubers of that noble plant, those 
of the present little known but very handsome species of 
Water-Lily were sent to us by our valued friend Dr. M'Fadyen. 
We shared them with Mr. Silvester, of North Hall, Chorley, Lan- 
cashire, a most successful cultivator of Nymphaacea, and he had 
the good fortune to flower the plant in May 1849. From the 
specimen sent by that gentleman our figure is taken. Its nearest 
ally is the N. versicolor (Bot. Mag. t. 1189), whose flowers vary 
to white ; but the leaves in this are more deeply toothed, almost 
lobed, the colour on the underside is much deeper, the young 
leaves are wholly and deep red, there are copious linear dark 
spots on the foliage and sepals, and the tubers are very ditterent. 
Descr. Tubers about the size of a chestnut, rounded, but 
* We are rejoiced to know that Dr. M'Fadyen is engaged in continuing his 
'Flora of Jamaica.' 

OCTOBER 1st, 1849. L 



flattened at the top, from which the leaves issue. Leaves large, 
ample, floating, nearly orbicular, peltate, glabrous, with a deep 
very narrow sinus, reaching nearly to the insertion of the petiole, 
deeply and irregularly toothed, or almost sinuato-lobate at the 
margin, lobes or teeth very irregular, those at the sinus the 
longest and sharpest; the colour is purplish-green above, dark 
purplish-red below, on both sides reticulated with nerves, the 
nerves prominent and pale beneath, and on both sides marked 
with numerous, linear, black dots or short lines, radiating from 
the centre, more copious and larger towards the apex of the 
lobes. The fotvers rise above the water, and are white, larger 
than those of our own N. alba. Sepals four, ovato-lanceolate, 
pale yellow-green, sprinkled with brown linear dots, outer petals 
subsepaloid, all of them lanceolate, obtuse, the interior a little 
smaller. Stamens numerous, yellow. Fikwients short, awl- 
shaped ; outer anthers very long, spreading ; inner ones forming 
a cone over the many-rayed stigma. W. J. H. 

Cult. A tropical perennial aquatic, furnished with tuberous 
roots, that lie dormant in the muddy soil, during the dry season, 
and start into growth on being overflowed with water. In cul- 
tivating this plant the tubers should, early in the spring, be taken 
out of the last year's soil, and repotted in fresh pure loam, 
immersing the pots in water to the depth of about an inch be- 
low the surface of the pot. Where there is not the advantage 
of a proper tropical aquarium to grow them in, large pans 
or shallow tubs may be used, placed in a temperature of C5° 
to 75 , fully exposed to the sun. As the leaves increase in 
size sufficient room must be given to allow them to float freely 
on the surface of the water; for if they become overcrowded the 
under ones soon decay, which affect the others. Care is also 
requisite to keep the leaves free from Conferva ; and to assist in 
doing so a portion of the water should be drawn off every day, 
and fresh water added. Towards the end of autumn the leaves 
begin to decay : the water should then be gradually withdrawn, 
allowing only sufficient to keep the soil in a state of mud during 
winter ; at the same time lowering the temperature of the house, 
which, on an average, may be kept about 60°. /. 8. 



Fig. 1. Section of the ovary .—natural size. 



A-JLIO. 




I'itch Sel efiifch . 



-rLB.fcB-J" 1 }' 



Tab. 4470. 



CUPANIA CUNNINGHAMI. 

Mr. Cunninghams Cupania. 



Nat. Ord. SapindacevE. — Octandria Monogynia, 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-partitus asqualis. Corolla petala 5, receptaculo inserta, 
calycis laciniis alterna, aequalia, supra unguam squamula aucta, interdum nulla. 
Discus calycis fundum occupans regularis, integerrimus v. crenulatus. Stamina 
8, v. 10, disco intus inserta; filamenta filiforraia, libera, autlieree introrsae, bi- 
loculares, dorso insert®, mobiles, longitudinaliter dehiscentes. Ovarium centrale, 
sessile, triloculare. Ovula in loculis solitaria, angulo centrali paullo supra basim 
inserta, adscendentia. Stylus simplex, apice trifidus, lobis intus stiginatosis. 
Capsula coriacea v. sublignosa, pyriformis, 2-3-gona, 2-3-locularis, loculicide 
2-3-valvis, valvis medio septiferis. Semiua in loeulis solitaria, subglobosa, 
erecta, arillo cupulaeformi carnoso inclusa, testa crustacea. E,nbryonis cxalbuminosi, 
plus minus curvati, cotyledones crassissimse, incumbentes, radicula brevis, umbilico 
proxima, infera. — Arbores v. Frutioes erecti, inter tropicos totius orbis crescentes ; 
foliis alternis petiolatis, exstipulatis, abrupte pinnatis, foliolis oppositis v. alternis 
integerrimis v. serratis, interdum. pellucido-punctatis, floribus polygamis in racemos 
axillares dispositis. Endl. 



Cupania Canningkami ; ramis petiolis foliisque subtus paniculis calycibus fruc- 
tusque pubescenti-fei-rugineis, foliis pari-pinnatis foliolis 8-10 oblongis bre- 
vissime petiolulatis, petalis 4 rotundatis unguiculatis pilosulis intus bi- 
squamosis, squamis hirtis spathulatis dorso glanduloso-cristatis. 

Stadtmanxia australis. All. Cunn. MSS. 



The attention of most visitors to the great stove of the Royal 
Gardens is attracted to a lofty growing shrub or tree among the 
Palms, exceeding many of them in height, with large pinnated 
leaves, with the young branches especially clothed with fer- 
ruginous down, and labelled Stadtmanma australis of Allan 
Cunningham: it flowers in the spring, and is succeeded by 
large clusters of orange-coloured downy fruit, which split opes 
while yet attached to the plant, and exhibit the bright orange 
pulpy arillus containing the seed. This is the plant of which we 
here represent as much as our ordinary-sized plate will allow. 
Tt is a native of New Holland, on the north-east coast near the 
tropics, and was discovered by Allan Cunningham, who speaks 
of it in his notes before me as " a tree 30-40 feet high, found 
in dark Avoods at Five Islands district, and on the banks of 
Hastings River, at Port Macquarrie and Brisbane in Moreton 
Bay." I have specimens likewise, gathered at West Macquarrie 
by Mr. James Backhouse. Stadtmannia of Lamarck has now 
merged into Cupania ; and other species being found in Australia 
I have named the species after its lamented discoverer. It is a 
noble plant with handsome foliage and fruit, but rather insigni- 
ficant flowers, and of too lofty growth for ordinary cultivation. 

Descr. A small tree, chiefly branched at the top, brancMots 

OCTOBEB 1st, 1849. L * 



and all the younger parts, the petioles, leaves beneath, panicles, 
calyx, and fruit clothed with rusty down. Leaves one to two 
feet long, pinnated with four or five pairs of opposite, elliptical 
leaflets, smooth and glossy above, penninerved, the nerves very pro- 
minent and conspicuous beneath. Panicles terminal, often very 
compound, furnished with small deciduous red bracteas. Calyx 
obtuse or truncated at the base, cup-shaped, cut into five equal, 
hairy, ferruginous, ovato-triangular, erect segments. Petals four, 
white, suborbiculate, erose, slightly hairy, erect or a little in- 
curved, shorter than the calyx, clawed : within are two, large, spa- 
thulate, inflexed, hairy scales or appendages, the back near the apex 
of each bearing a glandular yellow stipitate crest. Stamens eight, 
erect, longer than the calyx and corolla, equal. Filaments 
subulate. Anthers oblong, two-celled, erect, pale yellow. Ovary 
subrotund, three-lobed, seated on one side of and upon a large 
bright orange-coloured fleshy gland or disk, densely clothed with 
ferruginous down and hairs : style longer than the stamens, with 
spreading seta? : stigma minute, three-fid. Fruit a three-lobed, 
depressed capsule, each lobe opening in the centre by a vertical 
fissure, and containing a solitary brown seed, enveloped by a pulpy 
arillus. Embryo green. W. J. H. 

Cult. A large tree of robust growth, in its native forests 
conspicuous above the other trees, the bark having an iron-like 
appearance. It is a native of the east coast of New Holland, 
about 31° south latitude, and therefore not adapted for out-door 
cultivation in this country. The plant from which the drawing 
was made was introduced in 1825, and for a number of years 
was kept in the green-house, and shifted as it increased in 
size into a larger pot, and ultimately into a plant-tub, in 
which it out-grew our green -house accommodation ; this caused 
it to be removed into the tropical Palm- house, where the 
stimulus of a warmer atmosphere induced it to flower for the 
first time during the present summer, and having perfected 
its seeds it has enabled us to obtain a stock of young plants ; for 
on account of its little tendency to throw out lateral branches 
we have not had the opportunity of increasing it by cuttings. 
It has therefore been considered a rare plant in this country, 
and being best adapted for growing in lofty houses, it can 
only be valued by a few ; but as it is of remarkable and 
striking habit, and on that account worthy of being admired, it 
may be kept in a small state for a number of years ; like a 
second plant in this garden of the same age, which is not half 
the size of the first. /. S. 

Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Petal with its appendages. 3. Stamen. 4. Pistil and 
hypogynous gland : — magnified. 5. Capsule. 6. Pulpy arillus, containing the 
seed. 7. Arillus laid open, showing the seed. 8.* Seed. 9. Embryo: — 
natural -she. 



4-4-7/ 




1'itch.ieLetliEK, 



TL.B.fcR-imp- 



Tab. 4471. 
METROSIDEROS Florida. 

Copious-flowering Metrosideros. 



Nat. Ord. Myrtace^e. — Icosandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Calycis tubus ovario adherens non angulatus, Umbus 5-fidus. 
Stam. 20-30 longissima exserta. Stylus filiformis. Stigma simplex. Capsula 
2- saepius 3-locularis, loculis polyspermis. Semina aptera. — Arbores aut frutices. 
Folia opposita aut alterna. Mores pedicellati nee ullo modo ut in Melaleuca 
et Callistemone ramo adnati. 



METRosiDEROs/onYfa ; foliis oppositis oblongo-ovatis glabris parallclim dis- 
tincte venosis subcoriaceis glabris, corymbo composito termiuali, calycibus 
turbinates, petalis staminibusque coccineis, fructibus urceolatis 5-costatis. 

Metrosideros florida. Sm. in Linn. Trans, v. 3. p. 268. Be Cand. Prodr. v. 3. 
p. 224. Ach. Rich. It. Nov. Zeal. p. 333. All. Cum. Bot. N. Zeal, in Ann. 
Nat. Hist. v.S.p. 113. 

Melaleuca florida. Font. Prodr. n. 114. 

Leptospermum scandens. Forst. Gen. t. 36. n. 1. 



A native of dense forests in New Zealand, introduced to our 
green-houses by Mr. Allen Cunningham, but although long 
admired for the beauty of its foliage, it blossomed for the first 
time in May 1849, when the bright red corymbs of flowers 
added in no small degree to the charm of the shrub. 

Descr. A shrub with us, about five feet high, everywhere 
glabrous, forming indeed a compact mass, but every now and 
then sending out spreading branches, which indicate that under 
favourable circumstances the plant would be scandent. Brunches 
rounded, or but indistinctly angular, reddish-brown. Leaves 
opposite, an inch or an inch and a half long, subcoriaceous, on 
short petioles, elliptical-ovate, even, slightly glossy, distinctly and 
closely nerved on both sides, the nerves uniting with an extra 
marginal nerve; dark green above, pale beneath, where also 
the dotting is more distinct than on the upper side, but not 
visible to the naked eye. Corymbs terminal, almost sessile. 
Peduncle red, compound. Calyx turbinate, attenuated below; 

OCTOBER 1st, 1849. 



the limb five-lobed ; lobes rounded, green. Petals orbicular, 
concave, red, deciduous, longer than the calycine lobes. Stamens 
numerous, at first involute, then spreading, four times as long as 
the petals ; filaments and anthers red. Style about as long as 
the filaments. Stigma a little dilated. W. J. H. 

Cult. This is a fine glossy-leaved evergreen shrub, forming 
under our cultivation a handsome bush, having much resemblance 
to the Myrtle. Although a native of New Zealand, the climate 
of which is said to be similar to that of Great Britain, yet we 
find it not sufficiently hardy to bear the open air in this country, 
during the low temperature of some of our winters, especially 
such as are sometimes experienced in the eastern and midland 
districts ; but we have every reason to believe that the climate 
of the coasts of Devon and Cornwall, and the south and west of 
Ireland, would be suitable for growing the plant in the open air, 
and that it would there flourish unprotected, and prove a highly 
ornamental shrub. Its habit shows it to love moisture, and 
although with us it grows freely, treated as a green-house plant 
in a pot or tub in loam, yet in its own country it assumes a very 
different habit, being epiphytal, climbing up and extending itself 
on trees to a great height, becoming fixed by its its aerial roots 
and branches, which interlace with the trees on which it grows, 
forming dense leafy masses similar to Ivy in this country, but of 
a much gayer appearance when in flower. We find it disposed 
to throw out roots on the main branches : it therefore readily 
increases by cuttings treated in the usual way. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Flower: — magnified. 



4-4-7 Z. 




Fitch ,iei «t Hth 



Tab. 4472. 
GONOLOBUS Martianus. 

Dr. von Martins Gonolobus. 



Nat. Ord. AsCLEPIADEiE. — Pentandkia Digynia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-partitus, sepalis patulis. Corolla subrotata, 5-partita, 
sestivatione contorta, laciniis saepissime patulis sed interdum patenti-reflexis v. 
erectiuscuKs. Corona stamina carnosula, parva, ad faucem corolla3 apposita, 
annuliformis, undulato-lobata, lobis integris prominentibus. Gynostegium breve. 
Antheree trausversim debiscentes, membrana terminatse. Massce pollinis extre- 
mitate exteriori, locxdi respectu, affixa?, apice bine pellucidse, stigmate tectae. 
Stigma planiusculo-depressum, pentagonum, sa3pe margine angusto cinctura. 
Follicidi ventricosi, subcostati, spinis innocuis plus minusve echinati. Semina 
comosa. — Frutices Americani volubiUs. Folia opposita cordata, ad limbi ortum 
glandulifera, scepissime hirta, pedunculi interpetiolares, racemi v. corymbiformes ; 
flores virentes,fusci v. atropurpurei, hand raro reticulato-venosi v. submarmorati. DC. 



Gonolobus Martianus: ramis petiolis pedunculisque pilis longis (siccitate 
ferrugineis) patentibus hirsutis, foliis pubescenti liirtis oblongo-ovatis cuspi- 
dato-acuminatis basi cordatis siuu clauso, peduncubs demum folio longiori- 
bus, umbellis plurifloris, sepabs (rubris) lanceolato-acuminatis patenti-re- 
flexis liirtis corollam (albam basi viridem) eequantibus, corolbe lobis ovato- 
rotundatis medio sulcato-plicatis, corona3 staminese lobis rotundatis carnosis. 

Fischeria martiana. Dcsne., in Be Cand. Pxodr. v. 8. p. 601. 



An Asclepiadeous plant, very closely indeed allied to Gonolobus 
velutinus, Schltdl. from Mexico (differing chiefly in the longer leaves 
and longer peduncles and approximate lobes to the base of the 
leaves),— and of which Decaisne says, " Habitu necnon inflores- 
centia Fischerice : " and on referring to Fischeria it will be seen to 
accord admirably with F. Martiana, described as a native of the 
island of St. Sebastian, Brazil : the spot where our fine dried speci- 
mens were gathered by the late Mr. Fox, when he was our Minister 
at the Court of Brazil. If, as I believe, I am correct in this re- 
ference, the plant is surely not distinct from Gonolobus, of which 
another nearly allied but not distinct species is the Gonolobus 
sc/osvs, Benth. (PL Hartweg, n. 1198.) In the stove of the 
Botanic Garden of Kew the plant proves to be a large climber, 

October 1st, 1849. 



loaded with pretty clusters of flowers in May and June, and 
covering to a great extent the gallery of the Palm House. 

Descr. Scandent, much branched ; branches densely clothed 
with patent hairs, which become reddish in drying. Leaves on 
shortish hairy foot-stalks, oblong-ovate, hairy on both sides, 
almost velutinous, mucronato-acuminate at the point, cordate at 
the base, with a deep but closed sinus. Peduncles axillary, 
solitary, at first flowering shorter than the leaves, afterwards 
elongated, hairy, bearing a many-flowered umbel with hairy 
pedicels. Calyx red, hairy : sepals narrow, lanceolate-acuminate, 
as long as the corolla. Corolla white, with a deep green radiating 
ring at the base : lobes spreading, ovato-rotundate, obtuse, 
longitudinally plaited in the middle. Lobes of the staminal 
crown rounded, fleshy. W. J. H. 

Cult. A tropical soft-wooded twining plant, of rapid and 
extensive growth, well adapted to cover trellis-work, pillars, &c, 
and recommending itself by its numerous bunches of flowers, 
and in not being subject to insects. Where it is required to 
cover a great space it should be planted in a mixture of loam 
and peat, about eighteen inches in depth, and well drained. 
It may also be grown in a pot, and trained up the rafters of the 
house, or on a wire trellis fixed to the pot ; and by occasionally 
stopping the leading shoots it may be made to flower abundantly. 
It is readily increased by cuttings, placed in bottom heat under 
a bell glass. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Staminal crown : — magnified. 



4-4-73. 




TitclLi. 



H.B. k !..ing>- 



Tab. 4473. 
ESCALLONIA macrantha. 
Large red-flowered Escallonia. 



Nat. Ord. Saxifrages. — Pentandria Moxogynia. 
Gen. Char. (Fide supra, Tab. 4274.) 



Escallonia (Sect. Stereoxylon, Presl) macrantha; ramulis glanduloso-pubes- 
centibus, foliis obovato-ellipticis obtusiusculis reticulatis serratis basi cunea- 
tis glabris subtus resinoso-punctatis, panicula terminali, bracteolis deciduis, 
calycis glanduloso-pilosi laciniis subulatis. 

Escallonia macrantha. Hook, et Am. in Bot. Misc. v. 3. p. 341. 



Our first knowledge of this fine Escallonia was from Mr. 
Cuming, who collected specimens in Chiloe (n. 20 of his Her- 
barium) ; but it was Messrs. Veitch who imported living plants 
to Exeter, from the same country, through their collector Mr. 
W. Lobb. As might be expected from its native locality, it 
proves hardy, and is assuredly the handsomest of all the 
species of Escallonia known to us. It flowers in June, and 
continues in blossom for a long period. 

Descr. A handsome shrub, two to three feet or more high, 
branched. Branches terete, the younger ones clothed with 
glandular pubescence. Leaves alternate, obovato-elliptical, rather 
obtuse, cimeate at the base, strongly and doubly serrated at the 
margin, reticulated on the surface, glabrous, dark and shining 
above, beneath paler and dotted with resinous points. Panicle 
terminal : pedicels bracteolated, the bracteoles deciduous. Flowers 
large, red. Calyx turbinate, clothed with stipitate viscid glands; 
the lower portion of the tube adherent with the ovary, the upper 
half free, campanulate, cut half-way down into five, erect or 
slightly spreading, subulate leeth. Corolla of five, spathulatc 
petals, the daws erect and forming a tube, the lamina spreading 
horizontally. Stamens as long as the tube. Ovarg two-celled^ 
Style columnar, surrounded at the base by a large, furrowed 
gland. Stigma thick, dilated, obscurely two-lobed. Fruit tur- 
binato-cylindrical, surmounted by the spreading persistent limb 
of the calyx and the style. W. J. II. 

OCTOBER 1st, 1849. 



Cult. We have not had sufficient experience in culti- 
vating this new species of Escallonia to know what degree of 
cold it will bear ; coming from South Chili we expect it 
will prove as hardy as the several species of the genus already 
known in this country. Although none of them will bear the 
very low temperature to which this climate is occasionally sub- 
ject, yet, if placed against a wall, in a warm sheltered place, 
with the precaution to protect them with a mat, and a layer of 
dry leaves or fern over the roots during frost, they may be 
preserved through our ordinary winters ; but to be safe against 
loss, it is recommended to keep a duplicate plant in the green- 
house. The present species is a free-growing shrub, and pro- 
pagates readily from cuttings, placed under a hand-glass in a 
frame. /. S. 



Fig. 1. Calyx and pistil. 2. Pistil. 3. Section of the ovary : — magnified. 
4. Fruit : — natural size. 



4-4.74-. 




fitch fol et lifh 



*,.£.* 



Tab. 4474. 
BRASSAVOLA Digbyana. 

Mr. Bigbys Brassavola. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^.— Gynandria Monandria. 

Gen. Char. Sepala et petala subsequalia, libera, acuminata. Labellum cuculla- 
tum, integrum, columnam involvens. Columna marginata , clavata, stigma* 
infundibuliformi, clinandrio postice tridentato. Pollinia 8, subaequaha qmbus- 
dam aliis parvis interiectis. Antliera 4-locularis, septis margmatis locuns sam- 
bipartitU.— Herb* caulescentes, epiphyte, apice folium ™«™\ff mm \*™ 1 - 
cylindraceum, (raro planum) carnosum, supra sulcatum apice subulatum gerentes. 
Flores terminates, magni, speciosi. Lindl. 



Brassavola Digbyana-, foliis ellipticis carnosis plank .^^J^^ 
solitario, labello sessili cucullato-cordato margmdous longe nmbriato-crimtu, 
clinandrio dente postico subulato mcumbente. 

Brassavola Digbyana. Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1846, t. 53. 



The most remarkable of all the Br as savolas (of <Miga» 
Dr. Lindley enumerates fifteen described specie^, ^««™ 
most singular of Orchideous plants, a native of Hondura s w hen e 
it was introduced by Mrs. M'DonneU, the '^ ° he 'f 
Governor. It flowered in the Orchideous house of the Kojal 
Gardens in June, and is deliriously fragrant. 

Descr. Pseudo-Mas elongated stem-hke, comp ssed omted, 
the joint sheathed, terminated by ^^,f , »^S 
thick, fleshy, but flattened though cannated fe f Frof'he base 
of the leaf arises the peAnck, compressed and sheathed term 
nated by a solitary, very large, fragrant /awer. *?*•' 
petals nearly similar, oblong, spreading, pale -\ urph »b g re m 
feintly striated, the petah paler and ^ther broader^ 
lurge.cucullate, cordate, white or "ream-co cured snr re un tag 
entirely the column, famtly ^^£S3 
aU round cut into a broad ba.r-hke ***•****?*££ 
with a hrremen tubercle. Column semiterete, winged, btyma 
w!!h throws'" Irom the back of the clinandnuu rises a 



with three furrows 

OCTOBER 1st, 1849. 



tooth which curves over part of the hemispherical anther. Pollen- 
masses eight, wedge-shaped. W. J. H. 

Cult. This is a rather slow growing epiphytal Orchid. With 
us it flowers attached to a block of wood, suspended from 
the roof of the tropical Orchideous house. ,/. 8. 



Fig. i. Column. 2. Pollen-masses .- — magnified. 



6-4-75. 




Fitch, del etlith. 



R.B.JkTt" 11 !- 



Tab. 4475. 

HELICONIA ANGUSTIFOLIA. 

Narrow-leaved Heliconia. 



Nat. Ord. Musace^e. — Pentandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Perigonii epigyni foliola exteriora sequalia, basi inter se concres- 
centia, interiora lateralia subconformia, approximata, genitalia amplectentia, 
posticum nanum. Stamina 5, sexto postico abortiente, basi perigonii adnata. 
Ovarium inferum, triloculare. Ovula in loculis solitaria, e basi axeos adscendentia, 
anatropa. Stylus filiformis ; stigma depressiusculum, obsolete sexlobum. _ Cap- 
sula subdrupacea, tricocca ; coccis osseis, indehiscentibus. Semina in coccis soli- 
taria, obovato-subglobosa, basifixa, testa ab endocarpio vix solubili. Embryo^ 
orthotropus, linearis, in axi albuminis farinaceo-carnosi, extremitate radiculari 
umbilicum attingente, infera. — Herba? Americana tropica ; foliis longe petiolatis, 
petiolis basi vaginantibus, scapum radicalem sape velantibus, spathis pluribus dis- 
iichis, in axilla fioriferis. Midi. 



Heliconia angustifolia ■ foliis lingulato-oblongis angustis utrinque acuminata, 
costa subtus vaginis petiolisque valde elongatis pulverulento-pubeseentibus, 
rachi flexuosa, spathis (6-7) multifloris 'lanceolatis acuminatis complicate, 
spathellis lanceolatis, sepalis (albis) Uneari-oblongis acutis erectis, sepalo 
nano trulliformi. 



A very handsome and rather dwarf species of Heliconia, in- 
troduced by Mr. Henry Shepherd, to the Liverpool Botanical 
Gardens, from Brazil. It flowered in January lb46, when its 
beautiful bright red spathas, deep orange-coloured ovaries and 
white sepals tipped with green had a very handsome effect. 
No described species corresponds with it, and, thanks to vr. 
Walpers, all the recently published ones are included m Ins 
" Annates Botanices Systematica^." 

Descr. I have not seen the entire growing p ant. L hejtov. < > - 
stem sent to me was sheathed by the bases of the long petioles ami 
the principal leaf was a foot and a half long and about thive 
inches wide, hgulato-oblong, with a stout costa and paialle 
oblique nerves, acuminated at both ends, glabrous, except that 
the costa beneath, as well as the very long, ^pet^ati 
cylindrical sheaths (at least in their upper part), were cot id 
with a scattered pulverulent or scurfy down. Ine upper leai 



NOVEMBER 1ST, 1849. 



rather small, above a span long, the petiole reduced to a spatha- 
ceous sheath, red at the base : from within this sheath the 
flexuose rachis appears, a span and more long, deep red, bearing, 
at distances of an inch or more, each arising from a nodus, six 
or seven lanceolate, acuminate, bright red, conduplicate spathas, 
the lowest one six inches long, the rest gradually shorter and 
less acuminated. Flowers eight to ten in the axil of the sheath, 
mixed with a few yellow-white, small, lanceolate spathella. Pe- 
dicels about an inch long, orange-colour. Ovary inferior, tur- 
binate, subtriangular, a little wrinkled, deep orange. Sepals 
white, tipped with yellow-green, three inches long, linear-oblong, 
acute, erect: three outer the longest, the sixth (upper one) 
very dwarf, a trowel-shaped scale. Stamens five, unequal. 
Anthers linear. Style a little shorter than the stamens. W. J. H. 
Cult. This belongs to a genus of tropical plants inhabiting 
moist places, conspicuous by their fine broad leaves and showy 
flowers, which are borne on a kind of stem formed by the 
sheathing petioles, in some species attaining the height of eight to 
ten feet, and slowly dying after having flowered ; forming, with 
Thalia and other allied genera, dense thickets in their native 
localities. The present may be considered a dwarf species of the 
genus, as it does not attain more than between three and four 
feet in height. It requires to be kept in the stove, and grown 
in a large pot, planting it in light loam and supplying it freely 
with water during summer. Its creeping rlnzoma-like roots soon 
fill the pot and produce a crowd of leafy stems ; but in order to 
obtain a vigorous growth, it is necessary occasionally to divide 
the roots, repotting them in fresh soil, which operation should be 
done in the autumn or early in the spring. J. S. 



Fig. 1 . Flowers with five larger sepals removed. 



4-47 S. 







H.."B-fc B-iny- 



Tab. 4476. 
SCHOMBURGKIA tibicinis; var. grandiflora. 

Trumpet Schomburgkia ; large-flowered var. 



Nat. Ord. Orchid-e^e. — Gynandria Monandria. 



Gen. Char. Sepala et petala conformia, patentia, omnino libera, basi tequalia. 
Labellum difformc, membranaceum, trilobum, semicucullatum, basi cum margine 
columiiEB connatum, supra basin tumidum (intrusum) : venis lamellatis. Columna 
alata. Pollhda octo. — Ehizoma repens, nudum, anmdatum, pseudo-btdbigentnt. 
Pseudo-bulbi magni, elongati, 2-S-pkglli. Folia coriacea. Scapi terminates mgi- 
nati. Bractae magna, sicca, spathacea. Flores speciosi, racemosi, congesti. LindL 



Schomburgkia tibicinis ; pseudo-bulbis conicis corniformibus annularis sulcatis 
3-pliyllis, foliis oblongis coriaceis patentibus, scapo longissimo tereti dis- 
tanter squamato apice pauiculato, panicula pyraraidali laxiflora, sepalis 
petalisque undulatis crispis, labello oblongo cucullato veuis per medium 5 
elevatis approximates, laciniis lateralibus apice rotuudatis intermedia sub- 
rliombea euiarginata, authera emarginata. Lii/dl. 

Schomburgkia tibicinis. Batem. Orchid. Mex. et Gnat. t. 30. 

Var. p. grandiflora ; floribus duplo majoribus labello extus paliido intus lobo medio 
luteo albo v. violaceo-limbato. Lindl. Bot. Beg. 1845. t. 30. (Taj;. Nostr.) 



Dr. Lindley considers this a variety of the S. tibicinis of 
Mr. Bateman'a splendid work on the " Orchideae of Mexico and 
Guatemala : " but it would perhaps be more correct to consider 
it the perfect state of the plant, such as it assumes in its 
native woods (Honduras) and such as good cultivated specimens 
exhibit in our stoves. The natives use the hollow stems or 
pseudo-bulbs as a horn or trumpet. These stems harbour 
insects, too, in great numbers. Mr. Bateman tells us that 
" Mr. Skinner, its original discoverer, was not permitted to ob- 
tain quiet possession of the first flowering specimens he saw ; 
for swarms of fiery ants issued forth in thousands from their 
snug retreat, to repel the spoiler, and inflicted pangs which none 
but the most ardent naturalist would have braved." It blossoms 
with us at Kew in June. 

Dbscr. Our flowering plant is a noble specimen, which we 

NOVEMBER 1st, 1S4-9. M L 



received from Mrs. Macdonnell, in 1843. The pseudo-bulbs 
grow in dense clusters a foot and a half long, swollen and annu- 
lated, terete, tapering upwards, terminated by two, rarely three, 
oblong, spreading, coriaceous leaves. Peduncle terminal, very 
long, bearing a panicle (of which our figure represents but a 
branch) of large showy bright-coloured flowers. Sepals and 
petals equal, spreading, oblong, waved, obtuse ; palish purple 
without, deeper and redder purple within, streaked with darker 
lines, tipped with green. Lip large : two side-lobes much the 
largest, pale without, streaked towards the edge with purple ; 
within orange (except a pale line down the centre), streaked and 
reticulated with dark purple: middle lobe white stained with 
yellow, having a broad purple border. Column thick, about 
half the length of the lip. Anther-case notched. W. J. H. 

Cult. This is a rather slow-growing epiphyte, requiring the 
temperature of the warm Orchideous house. It may be either 
grown on a block of wood suspended from the roof, or in a 
shallow pot or basket, filled with a thin layer of turfy peat mixed 
with potsherds in sufficient quantity to keep the peat open and 
from becoming retentive of moisture. Shading during summer 
requires to be attended to ; and in winter, care must be taken 
that the plant does not suffer from any excess of atmospheric 
moisture. /. 8. 



Fig. 1. Column. 2. Pollen-masses : — magnified. 



4-4-77. 




Pitch., deletlith. 



R.B.&R- 111 ?' 



Tab. 4477. 
DENDROBIUM tortile. 

Twisted-Metaled Dendrobium. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 43 B 2.) 



Dendrobium tortile j caulibus clavatis articulatis sulcatis vaginatis, foliis lmeari- 
bus retusis subcoriaceis, pedunculo bifloro, sepalis oblongis acutiuscubs un- 
dulatis tortilibus (petalis conformibus) 2 lateralibus in calcar retusum ctecur- 
rentibus, labello magno pubescenti-villoso obovato-coclileariformi basi intus 
pulvinato. 

Dendrobium tortile. Lindl. in Gardener's Citron* 1847. i>. 797. cum. Ic. not 
All. Cunn. 



A native of Moulmain, imported by Messrs. Veitch through 
their collector Mr. Thomas Lobb, exhibited at the Horticultural 
Society's rooms in May 1847, and presented to the Royal 
Gardens of Kew in April 1849. It produced its handsome and 
long-lived flowers in May. We adopt the name by which we 
have received it, for it is an expressive one, and the D. tortile 
of Allan Cunningham mentioned by Dr. Lindley m Bot. Beg. 
1839, Suppl. n. 31, is considered by the latter to be probably a 
Polystachya, and is, as far as I know, nowhere described. 

Descr. Our present plant exhibits no beauty m its stems or 
foliage. The former (on pseudo-bulbs) are about a span long, and 
club-shaped, jointed, sulcated, and for the greater part sheathed 
with pale brown, striated scales. The leaves are whol y confined 
to the yet unformed pseudo-bulbs, two or three in number, linear, 
channelled, retuse, subcoriaceous, obscurely striated. *rom near 
the apex of the old leafless pseudo-bulbs the peduncle appears, 
short, two-flowered. Ovary long, pedicelliform purple. Homers 
large, handsome. Sepals and petals uniform, oblong, spreading, 

* It is only since this page was in type that Mr. Veitch has referred roe to the 
' Gardener's Chronicle ' for the name and figure ; from winch it will be set. 
our representation is a very unfavourable one, for that six flowers are pioduced 
at one time on the pseudo-bulb. 

NOVEMBER 1st, 1849. 



white, delicately tinged with purplish rose, waved and spirally 
twisted (whence the name) : the two lateral ones decurrent into 
a distinct emarginate blunt spur. The lip is large, projecting 
forward, 'conchiform, or rhomboido-obovate, concave, membra- 
nous, slightly unguiculate, pubescent, faintly veined above and 
below, the margin entire, the sides near the base obscurely 
lobed : the colour lemon-yellow, with a slight tinge of purple : 
the base streaked with dark purple. The claw is occupied by 
a downy tubercle or callus. Column very short, green, decurrent 
to the base of the lip and forming the spur. Anther-case 
purple. W. J. H. 

Cult. This fine species of Bendrobium belongs to a group 
of the genus characterized by short, somewhat tumid pseudo- 
bulbs. Judging from our plant it appears to be of a rather weakly 
habit; but its beautiful flowers render it interesting in every 
collection of Orchids. Like the greater number of the genus 
it is epiphytal on trees, and, being a native of the hot and moist 
climate of Java, it requires to be grown in the warm Orchideous 
house. An average temperature of 75° in summer and 65° in 
winter will be congenial to it ; taking care, during the winter 
months, that it does not suffer from moisture, and shading, or 
placing it in such a position that it does not receive the direct 
rays of the mid-day sun, in summer. To imitate its epiphytal 
manner of growth, it should be attached to a block of wood sus- 
pended in a nearly horizontal position, or on a sod of compressed 
sphagnum moss. The latter we prefer, on account of its being 
tree from the evils arising from the use of wood : the hot and 
moist atmosphere of the Orchideous house soon brings the wood 
into a state of decay, forming a harbour for insects and con- 
genial to the development of Fungi; the mycelium of some 
species of the latter overrunning the surface of the block, 
bringing it into a state ungenial to the roots of the Orchid. Pro- 
bably the best preventative to the growth of fungi is to pre- 
viously char the blocks of wood; but in time the charring loses 
its virtue ; and another objection to the use of charred blocks is 
their unpleasant appearance to the eye. /. 8. 



Fig. 1. Column. 2. Lip. 3. Pollen-masses:— magnified. 



4-4-78, 




■ 



Tab. 4478. 
RHODODENDRON Clivianum. 

Duchess of Northumberland's Rhododendron. 



This is one of a very remarkable set of hybrid Rhododendrons 
produced by the rare and skill of Mr. Iveson, head gardener at 
Syon, and it was named by Dr. Lindley at the exhibition-rooms 
of the Horticultural Society, in compliment to Her Grace the 
Dowager Duchess «of Northumberland, who feels equal pride 
with her late noble and lamented husband in the floral treasures 
of Syon Gardens, and especially in the rare exotic fruits which 
have there been reared with such eminent success. 

We figure this as an example of what we are disposed to 
consider the most delicate and beautiful kind of Rhododendron 
yet in cultivation. , n j 

Cult. This fine plant is a hybrid, believed to be produced 
between Rhododendron Catawbiense and the white variety o 
Rhododendron arboreum. It is a strong growing variety, well 
adapted for forming standards. It is perfectly hardy but unfor- 
tunately, like the other known hybrids horn Rhododendron 
arboreum, it flowers too early for this climate, being apt to have 
its flowers destroyed by late spring frosts; but, as it makes a fane 
appearance, it is well worthy of protection while in flower. So long 
as the plants are of a moderate size, they may be taken np before 
coming into flower and planted in suitable sized pots, placing them 
in the green-house, where they will make a fine appearance; 
again planting them out after having done flowering. J. a 



NOVEMBER 1ST, 1849. 



4-4-73. 




tch. dtl et litti 



fL.B.&E.- m P- 



Tab. 4479. 
CYCHNOCHES barbatum. 

Bearded Cychnoches. 



Nat. Ortl. ORCHIDEiE. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4215.) 



Cychnoches barbatum; pseudo-bulbo ovato compresso demuin undo apice fo- 
lioso, folio solitario elliptico-oblongo utrinque attenuato plicsto, raoemo 
radicali longc pedunculato, pedunculo ovariisque pilosis, sepalis petalisque 
conformibus lanceolatis patentissimis, labelli facie superiore barbato, hypo- 
chilio alte alato, epicbibo cordato-ovato obscure trilobo subreflexo. 

Cychnoches barbatum. Lindl. MSS. 



From Mrs. Lawrence's rich collection at Ealing Park, recently 
imported from Costa Rica.— A singular and handsome plant, 
referred to Cychnoches by Dr. Lindley, but which appears to me 
almost to connect Gongora with that very sportive genus :— 
indeed, but for the free column (not bearing the upper sepal), I 
should have had little hesitation in referring it to the latter genus. 

Descr. A young plant scarcely exhibits a pseudo-bulb at all, 
only several, imbricating, leafy scales, terminated by an oblong- 
oval, acuminated, plaited leaf. When the leaf is fully developed 
the almost naked pseudo-bulb appears, ovate, compressed, green, 
smooth, with the withered scales at the base. Scape from the 
Jase of the pseudo-bulb, a foot long, dark purple, pubescent or 
«iairy, jointed, sheathed with scales at the joints: this is termi- 
nated by a drooping many-flowered raceme, a foot long, oi which 
the rachis and pedicel-like ovaries are dark-purple and hain. 
Flowers moderately large, at first sight a good deal resembling 
those of Gongora maculala, but larger. Sepals and petals alike, 
very spreading, almost reflexed in the opposite direction from 
the column, narrow-lanceolate, acute, dull yellow spotted with 
purple. Lip pendent (almost at right angles with the °varyj, 
formed into two portions as it were, and very hairy or bearded 
on the upper surface, white, tinged with yellow, and elegantly 
spotted with deep blood-colour': the lower or hypochhum is 

NOVEMBER 1ST, 1849. 



unguiculate, with two large wings at the upper extremity, and, 
if seen beneath, a small tooth between the wings is observed ; 
and here on the upper surface the epichilium is jointed upon 
the hmochUium : the former is cordato-ovate, obscurely three- 
lobed, a little reflexed. Column very long, slender, arched, semi- 
terete, enlarged upwards and cucullate just below the helmet- 
shaped anther-case. Pollen-masses two, club-shaped, with a 
long spathulate caudicle. W. J. H. 

Cult. Our knowledge of this singular plant is yet too limited 
to enable us to state the best mode of cultivating it, but judging 
of it by its affinity with Gongora, Mormodes, &c, it may be 
grown in turfy peat in pots well drained and kept in the cool 
division of the Orchideous house, especially during winter when 
the plant is in a state of rest ; at which time it should receive 
little or no water, but when it begins to show symptoms of com- 
mencing to grow it should then receive the stimulus of heat and 
moisture, placing it near the glass and shading it from the mid- 
day sun in summer. /. 8. 



o ^ g ,", 1, Fl0Wer de P rived of the se pals and petals. 2. Column, front view. 
3. Pollen-masses : — magnified. 




^ffefgs 



4-6-80. 



a etiek 



H.B.fc: 



Tab. 4480. 

ESPELETIA ARGENTEA. 

Silvery Espeletia. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Syngenesia Superflua. 

Gen. Char. Capitulum multiflorum monoicum, fi. radii numerosissirais, disci 
tubulosis 5-dentatis bisexualibus, abortu masculis. Invol. campanulatum im- 
bricatum polvplryllum. Recept. planiusculum paleaceum, paleis membranaceis 
obtusis. Antherce exsertse. Stylus radii bifidus gracilis, disci simplex. Achee- 
nia obovata subangulata calva, disci verosim. abortiva. — Herbse aquinoct. 
Americana dense lanato-tomentoscE resinosce perennes. Folia opposita Integra. 
Capitula ramos terminantia cori/mbosa hitea. De Cand. 



Espeletia argentea; dense pulcherrime sericeo-tomentosa, caule brevi crasso 
foliaceo demura florifero elongato nudiusculo paniculato corymbose- bracteato, 
foliis elongato-lanceolatis ncrvis obliquis, capituli radiis vix involucruni su- 
perantibus. 

ESFBLBm argentea, Ilumb. et Bonpl. PI. JEquinoct. v. 2. p. 15. t. 71. Be Cand. 
Brodr. v. 5. p. 516. 



Cultivated in the greenhouses both of the Royal Gardens of 
Kew, and at Syon, at which latter place it flowered m the 
summer of 1848. The seeds were sent in 1845 from the Para- 
mo of Siejo, New Granada, by Mr. Purdie, who says it is there 
called " Frailejon." The whole plant has a peculiar and cer- 
tainly somewhat terebinthine odour, and yields, like the genus 
Silphium (to which Uspeletia is allied in essential characters) a 
copious gum-resin, used in the preparation of ink and for other 
purposes. M. Bonpland seems to have omitted the rays ot the 
capitula in his figure, though he expressly says m the description 
" Hours radiees.'* In other respects the figure and description 
sufficiently accord with our plant 

Dbscr, This is really a beautiful and remarkable plant and 
a stately one when in flower, attaining then the height ol five 
or six feet Before flowering, however, the appearance is very 
different. A plant of three or four years old has a trunk six or 
eight inches high and as thick as one's wrist, rather bare below, 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1849. 



but the rest forming a crown of dense spreading leaves a foot 
and more long, spreading all round like those of an Aloe. Leaves 
narrow-lanceolate, densely silky and strigose on both sides. At 
the flowering season the apex of the trunk lengthens out into an 
upright densely silky, nearly leafless, corymboso-paniculate stem. 
There are a few leaves at the base, but these gradually pass into 
linear bracteas, and those again seem insensibly to merge into 
the involucral leaves. Capitula moderately large, yellow, the 
dish inclining to brown. Florets all subtended by a ligulate 
membranaceous scale : those of the ray ligulate, very numerous, 
compact, three-toothed, rather short in proportion to the disk. 
Ovary oblong, triangular, naked (no pappus). Style thrice as 
long as the tubular portion of the corolla, branches linear-subu- 
late. Florets of the disk male (in all as far as I could see) five- 
toothed. Stamens a little protruded beyond the mouth of the 
corolla. W.J.H. 

Cult. This singular-looking plant is a native of the mountains 
of New Granada, and was observed by Mr. Purdie to ascend 
nearly to the limit of perpetual snow, at an altitude where, on 
account of the diminished weight of the atmosphere, he found 
the cold very piercing, much more intense to the feelings than was 
indicated by the thermometer. He describes the old specimens 
as bearing a resemblance to posts about three feet high, covered 
with wool, and having a tuft of leaves on the top. Growing under 
such circumstances, the plant may be expected to prove tolerably 
hardy in this climate, but on account of its soft woolly nature it 
is liable to suffer from wet and damp. We therefore consider it 
best to keep it in a dry and airy part of the greenhouse, and, 
during damp weather in winter, to give it just sufficient water 
to keep the soil in a moderately moist state, wetting the woolly 
leaves as little as possible. A light sandy peat soil suits it; 
the pot being well-drained in the usual way, and in summer 
being placed in a position so that the sun's rays do not fall on 
the side of the pot. It will continue to be a scarce plant, as the 
only specimen that has flowered in this country has not ripened 
seeds, and the plant does not readily produce side-shoots. J.S. 



I' ig. I • Floret of the ray with its scale. 2. Floret of the disk and scale :•— 
magnified, 



4-4-84. 




.(LeLetlith- 



ILB.4 



Tab. 4481. 
BRACHYSEMA aphyllum. 

Leafless Brachysema. 



Nat. Ord. Leguminos.e. — Decandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-fidus insequalis tubo ventricoso. Cor. vexillo petalis 
cseteris breviore, alls carinse compressse asqualibus. Ovarium pedicello basi 
vaginulo fisso. Stylus filiformis elongatus. Legumen ventricosum polysper- 
mum. De Cand. 



Brachysema aphyllum ; ramis ancipiti-compressis alte alatis aphyllis, loco 
foliorum bracteis ovato-subulatis coloratis, floribus solitariis brevi-peduneu- 
latis, calyce profunde subEequaliter 5-lobo, lobis linearibus carinam § sequan- 
tibus. 



We depart here from our ordinary course, in representing a 
plant not yet actually in cultivation, and figured from dried 
specimens aided by a coloured drawing made from the recent 
plant at the Swan River settlement, in the interior of which 
colony it is a native;" and whence seeds as well as dried speci- 
mens have been sent by Mr. Drummond. We do not under- 
stand that any have yet germinated: but we are desnous to 
make known so interesting a plant, which we cannot doubt will 
ere long adorn our greenhouses with its beautiful winter or early 
spring flowers. We were, at first, disposed to consider it a 
new genus, but we adopt Mr. Bentham's views of its forming 
a group of Brachysema of which another species, B. pramor- 
sum, Meisn., from the same country, has an exactly similar calyx 
and corolla. Cryptosema of Meisner (Jamoma, Kippist) is a 
nearly allied plant, but with the two superior lobes of the calyx 
extremely short. . c , 

Descr. Apparently a small skrui, quite destitute of leaves 
with the branches singularly compressed and winged with broad 
wings margined with red on the two opposite sides, dark green, 
the wing* here and there with alternate teeth, upon which is a 
stipule, but no leaf: or this stipule becomes a bractea,whm 
from the same point within a short single-flowered peduncle 
i»i:cember 1st, 1849. N 



appears. Flower (always) reversed. Calyx large, obscurely 
two-lipped, with five nearly equal, linear, erect segments. Corolla 
at first orange sprinkled with red, afterwards deep red or blood- 
coloured. Vexillum very small, ovate, reflexed : wings shorter 
than the carina ; the latter being very large and (as seen in- 
verted) covering nearly the whole length of the stamens. Sta- 
mens ten : filaments long, free, equal : anthers oblong. Ovary 
linear-oblong, downy, gradually tapering into a long style. Fruit 
oblong, acuminate, downy, two-valved : in our specimens the 
seeds have fallen out. W. J. H. 

Cult. As this plant is not yet known to us in a living state in 
this country, we can only infer from its relationship the kind of 
treatment that may be suitable for its successful cultivation. 
Being a native of the Swan River Colony in Western Australia, 
it will require the protection of the greenhouse in winter. It 
belongs to a tribe of Leguminosce, which in that country gene- 
rally inhabit poor dry soils ; and on account of their appearance 
in the aggregate they compose a great part of what is termed 
bush or scrub, but which, nevertheless, comprehends many of our 
most beautiful greenhouse plants. This species may be expected 
to thrive if grown in rough peat soil, mixed with a portion of 
sharp sand, the pot being well drained so as to prevent the 
chance of the soil becoming stagnant ; care being taken during 
hot weather in summer that it is placed in a shady place, espe- 
cially id such a manner as not to allow the sun to heat the sides 
of the pot, since direct heat from the sun transmitted through 
the substance of the pot proves injurious to the fine fibrous 
roots in immediate contact with it. It is. to be observed that 
these precautions are only necessary to plants cultivated in pots ; 
for New Holland plants, when planted in the open ground, 
thrive during our summer without shade; and if the season is so 
far favourable as not to have early frosts, they will continue to 
flourish till Christmas, or later, provided (as in some seasons) 
the thermometer does not fall any night more than two or three 
degrees below the freezing point ; for we have observed that 
many New Holland plants (extra -tropical) do not suffer from 
cold so long as there is no actual frost. They appear to luxuriate 
during the cool and most autumnal months of this climate, 
many becoming handsome bushes, much to be regretted when 
at last destroyed by frost, /. S. 



■ ! M , g '' '; ^ t .' X! . 1 , lum - 2 - One of the wings. 3. Carina, 4. Stamens and 

pi&tll. 0. PlStll:— ,U((JHJjir<l. 



'6-4-8Z. 




Tab. 4482. 
ixora laxiflora. 

Lax-flowered Ixora. 



Nat. Ord. Rubiace/E. — Tetrandria Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4325.) 



Ixora laxifiora ; foliis oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis basi in petiolura perbrevem 
attenuatis, stipulis ovatis acuminatis ramo angustioribus, pauicula corym- 
bosa ampla laxissima foliis longiore, ovario globoso (rubro), calycis limbo 4- 
dentato erecto appresso, corollas tubo gracillimo lobis convexis obovatis 
patentibus in disco barbatis triplo brevioribus, antheris linearibus patentis- 
simis corollas lobos aequantibus, stylo exserto, stigmate bifido. 

Ixora longiflora. Sm. in Bees Cycl. v. 19. n. 8. Be Cand. Prodr. v. 4. p. 489. 
Benth. in Niger Flora, p. 414. 

Ixora brachyloba. Be Cand. Prodr. v. 4. p. 488. ? Benth. I.e. p. 413 ? 



A native of Sierra Leone, first described by Sir Jas. E. Smith, 
recently introduced by Mr. Whitfield to our stoves. Our speci- 
men of this delicate and very sweet-scented plant was commu- 
nicated by Messrs. Lucombe, Pince, and Co., of the Exeter 
Nursery, and it is well worthy of general cultivation, for it has 
handsome foliage and flowers, while small,' which are great 
recommendations as well as the fragrance. 

Descr. Shrub three to four feet high. Leaves, the largest, a 
span in length, oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, pennmerved, at- 
tenuated at the base into a very short petiole. Stipules ovate, 
acuminate, appressed, narrower than the branch which bears 
them. Panicle terminal, large, and singularly trichotomous, 
subcorymbose. Flowers very fragrant. Calyx deep red; the 
tobe (or ovary) globose, red : the free portion or limb is very 
small, and cleft into four erect, appressed teeth. Corolla white 
tinged with pink : the tube an inch and a half long, slender : 
the limb cut to the base into four spreading obovate segments, 
hairv in the disk. Filaments very short : Anthers quite exserted, 
Knear, as long as the lobes of the corolla and equally spreading 
with them. Style exserted. Stigma clavate, bifid. W. J. H. 

Cult. A native of the hot and moist climate of Java, there- 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1849. 



fore requiring to be grown in a warm hothouse. A mixture of 
light loam and leaf-mould will suit it, and in order to induce it 
to grow freely it should be placed in bottom heat, and in a 
moist atmosphere. As it is a slender upright-growing species, 
it is advisable to stop the leading shoot, in order to encourage 
the plant to produce a greater number of lateral flowering 
branches. It strikes readily from cuttings planted under a bell- 
glass, and placed so as to receive bottom heat. J. S. 



Fig. 1. Flower : — magnified. 



4-4-83. 




el et lith. . 



H..B. &&.»■?• 



Tab. 4483. 
begonia cinnabarina. 

Cinnabar-flowered Elephant's Ear 



Nat. Ord. Begoniace^. — Moncecia Polyandria. 
Gen. Char. (Fide supra, Tab. 4172.) 



Begonia cinnabarina ■ puberula, caule elongate- tereti folioso, foliis breviusculo- 
et crasso-petiolatis amplis oblique ovatis sinuato-lobatis duplicato-serratis, 
pedunculis elongatis rubris, floribus inter majores totis pedicellisque cinna- 
barinis, masc. 4- foem. 5-sepalis obovatis, capsulis subgloboso-triquetris, alis 
2 subobsoletis tertia longiuscule producta. 



For this extremely handsome species of Begonia we are in- 
debted to Messrs. Henderson of Pine Apple Place, who raised 
it from seeds sent by Mr. Bridges from Bolivia. The contrast 
between the green stem and darker green leaves, with the 
deep bright red of the long and stout peduncles and stipules, 
together with the red or rather deep large cinnabar-coloured 
flowers, is very striking, and renders this, I think I may say, the 
most desirable of all the species for cultivation : add to which, 
it blooms very freely in an ordinary stove (I suspect it would do 
so in a greenhouse) and continues long in flower. 

Descr. Stem erect, but zigzag, stout, terete, succulent, pale 
green, slightly downy, as are the leaves and petioles. Leaves 
on rather short, stout, terete, green petioles, from four to six 
or seven inches long, obliquely ovate, subplicate (the young ones 
very plicate and edged with red) sinuate or lobed at the margin 
and doubly serrated, the minute teeth red. Stipules ovate, 
membranaceous, acuminate, red. Peduncles a span and more 
long, rather stout, terete, deep and bright red, bearing a panicle 
(in our specimen) of six large handsome flowers, which, as well 
as the ovaries and pedicels and ovate bracts, are rather pale-red 
or deep cinnamon colour. The ultimate pedicels are ternate, 
drooping, of which the central flower is male, the lateral ones 
female. Malefl. Petals four, broadly obovate, spreading. Sta- 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1849. 



mens very numerous, dense, orange-coloured. Female fl. Petals 
five, rather smaller than those of the male. Ovary and capsule 
subglobose, with three longitudinal angles, two of the angles 
with small wings, the third with a somewhat triangular pro- 
jecting wing : wings red. W. J. H. 

Cult. The genus Begonia contains upwards of 140 described 
species, natives chiefly of the tropical regions of Asia and 
America, none, it is said, being found in Africa. They are 
characterized by a succulent texture, and many of them are of 
an epiphytal nature. Some have upright or climbing suffru- 
ticose stems ; others have creeping stems analogous to a rhizoma ; 
a few have tuberous roots, and a few are annuals. Many of 
them bear handsome flowers, which, with their peculiar and 
various-shaped foliage, and the ease with which the plants are 
cultivated, have caused them to become favourites in our hot- 
houses. The present very beautiful species belongs to the divi- 
sion with tuberous roots ; and as these lie in a dormant state 
during winter, they require to be placed so as not to receive 
more moisture than will keep the mould from becoming abso- 
lutely dry. For spring they should be repotted, using a mixture 
of light loam and sandy peat soil, and set in a warm pit or 
hothouse, placing the pot near the glass, and care being taken 
not to give much water till the plant has made some progress in 
growth. /. 8. 



Fig. 1. Ovary or young fruit : — magnified. 



4-4-84-. 




5t lltlL. 






Tab. 4484. 
TABERN^MONTANA longiflora. 

Long-flowered Taberncemoritana. 



Nat. Ord. Apocyne^e. — Pentandkia Monogynia. 

(ini. Char. Calyx 5-partitus (in T.coronaria 5-fidus) ; lobis aestivatione quiu- 
cunciali, 2 exterioribus, glandulis linearibus, 4-7, basi cujusque lobi vel paulo 
supra basim adtixis, vcrticillatis. Corolla hypocraterimorpha, tubo inferne, 
medio vel superne inflato saepius medio angustiore, exappendiculato, fauce nuda, 
raro glandulosa; lobis obtusis, aestivatione margiuibus dextrorsum convolutis 
apiceque replicatis. Stamina parte inflata tubi corollae inserta ; filamentis bre- 
vissimis aut nullis, antheris saepius sagittatis longe acuminatis, rarius linearibus, 
plerumque inclusis. Nectarium nullum. Ovaria 2, adpressa, glabra. Stylus 
unicus, basi interduin prope ovaria duplex, glaber. Stigma antheris proximum, 
basi plerumque annulatum, medio cylindraceum vel tuberculis auctum, apice 
bilobum (an raro simplex ?) Fructus 2, vel abortu solitarii, lineari-oblongi, ob- 
longi vel subglobosi, plus minus carnosi, pulposi, divaricati, nervis longitudinali- 
bus paucis. Ovula oo , amphitropa. Semina pauca vel plurima, intra pulpam 
cellulosam nidulantia, quasi arillo colorato tecta ?, obovoidea, pressione mutua 
angulata ; kilo depresso sulcato longitudinali ; testa longitudinaliter striata ; 
albumins carnoso ; cotyledonihm foliaceis apice curvatis, radiculam rectam aequan- 
tibus, liilo pnrallelis, radicula supera, cylindrica. — Arbores vel frutices intertro- 
picales: ramis septus dichotomia\ foliis oppositis, altero s<rpe minore, bifegris, 
plerumque glabris, petiolis brevibus in sfipnbs falsas intrnpetiolares basi exptauu 
rrl cotwatit, glandulis praierea axillaribus et nunc laieraltbut; cymis uxillaribus, 
plerumque geminis apice ramulorum ; floribus albis vel luteis. Alph. DC. 



Tabkkn.emontava longiflora ; glabra, foliis oblongo-elliptieis abrupte acuminatis 
basi acutis, petiolis basi dilatatis, pedunculis laxe subtritloris, calyeis lobis 
ovali-oblongis, corolla tubo longissimo paullo infra medium ventricoso con- 
torto et staminifero. Bent It. 

TabeRNjBXONTANA longiflora. Be/ttk. in Niger Flora, p. Hi. 



A new and valuable acquisition to our stoves, recently im- 
ported by Messrs. Lucombe, Pince, and Co., Exeter Nursery, 
from Sierra Leone, through Mr. Whitfield. The shrub has 
close-placed, ample, dark green foliage, and remarkably large 
white or pale cream-coloured flowers, diffusing a dehcious'aromatic 
fragrance, resembling that of cloves. Dr. Vogcl, who also found 
the plant at Sierra' Leone (as did Heudelot at Senegambia), 
speaks of this shrub as very handsome, with the aspect of a 

DECEMBEB 1ST, 1849. 



Citrus, and yielding a milky juice. Mr. Bentham observes that 
it will, along with his T. crassa (Niger Fl.), T. Africana, Hook., 
and T. ventricosa, Hochst., constitute a natural group of the 
genus, nearly allied to Voacanga, P. Th. 

Descr. An erect branching shrub -. the young branches green, 
terete. Leaves elliptical, large, with a short acumen, and a 
short but dilated petiole ; the nerves diverging almost horizon- 
tally from the midrib. Peduncles erect, stout, each bearing 
about three large white Jlowers. Calyx-lobes broadly oval, 
obtuse : at their base is a circle of minute glandular scales. 
Corolla with the tube twisted, four inches in length, swollen 
below the middle : limb of five waved or reflexed ligulate lobes. 
Stamens and style as in the genus and included. W. J. H. 

Cult. A tropical shrub, requiring a warm stove. It will 
thrive in a mixture of loam and peat soil, if placed so as to 
have the benefit of bottom heat, and watered and syringed freely 
during the summer ; but care should be taken that at no time 
(especially during its season of rest) the mould becomes satu- 
rated ; for the soft and slightly succulent roots are apt to 
suffer if kept in too wet a state while the plant indicates a 
cessation of growth ; and during that period it should be re- 
moved to a drier atmosphere. It will strike from cuttings placed 
under a bell-glass, and treated in the usual way for the propa- 
gation of tropical woody plants. /. 8. 



Fig. 1. Pistil. 2. Calyx-lobe with scales at the base. 3. Stamen. 4. Por- 
tion of the tube of the corolla, laid open to show the stamens, style, and stigma : 
— magnified. 



4-4-85. 




Reeve.inf 



Tab. 4485. 

CLERODENDRON Bethuneanum. 

Captain Betlmnes Clerodendron. 



Nat. Ord. Verbenace^e. — Didynamia Angiospermia. 
Gen. Char. {Fide supra, Tab. 4255.) 



Clerodendron lietlmneanum ; elatum fruticosura, ramis 4-sulcatis, foliis am- 
plissimis cordatis acuminulatis obscure serratis glabris basi profunda bilobis 
subtus sparse lepidotis, paniculis terminalibus maximis thyrsoideo-pyrami- 
datis bracteatis, bracteis lineari-spathulatis coloratis, calycibus maguis 
conicis acute 5-angulatis, limbo erecto 5-lobo, corolla? (coccinece) tubo 
calycem vix superante, limbo 5-lobo imequali obliquo lobis oblongis obtusis 
rerlexis superiore longiore basi albo, staminibus longissimis. 

Clerodendron Bethuneanum. Lowe in Hist, of Borneo, and in Hook Bot Mag 
Comp. (1848) v. 74. j?. 30. 



Whoever had the gratification of seeing the superb panicle of 
flowers of this Clerodendron in the stove of Messrs. Lucombe, 
Pince, and Co., of Exeter Nursery, in the month of September 
of this year, with the equally large and striking foliage, could 
form some idea of the treasures yet to be expected from the 
researches of Mr. Lowe, jun., in Borneo. Nor is the charm of 
this plant confined to the general aspect alone. Each flower is 
exceedingly beautiful in itself: peduncles, pedicels, bracts, calyx, 
corolla, the very long and graceful stamens, all are of the deepest 
crimson, while the two side-lobes of the corolla have a purple 
spot near the base (not easily represented in the figure) and the 
upper lobe has a much larger white spot. " Four species of 
Clerodendron" Mr. Lowe, jun., says, in the work above quoted, 
" adorn the banks of the Sarawak river : two of them, which are 
fragrant, bear white flowers, another is scarlet, and another 
crimson. The latter is the handsomest : it forms a shrub ten 
feet high, each branch terminated by a large lax panicle three 
feet long, of rich crimson blossoms, forming, with the equally 
crimson bracts and branches, a magnificent pyramid of bloom, 
every flower relieved by its white centre and protruding stamens ; 
the foliage is likewise ornamental, being large, dense, and heart- 
shaped." "This Clerodendron" Mr. Lowe continues, "which 
now grows well in England, has been named after Capt. Bethune, 
R.N., who brought it and several other fine plants from Borneo.* 
When its flowering season is past, the C. Bethuneanum does not 
lose all its charms j for the crimson bracts and calyces persist, 

-! them the noble Nepenthes ltajflmana , figured in our Bot. Mag. 



and the latter contain, each, a four-seeded berry of the richest 
blue colour." 

We are indebted to Messrs. Lucombe, Pince, and Co., for the 
splendid specimen, of which but a very small portion can be 
introduced into our plate. 

Descr. Although in its native country attaining a height of 
ten feet, it is one of those plants that flower readily when but of 
small size and confined in a pot. The whole is glabrous. The 
branches green, streaked with purple, marked with four furrows, 
hence four-angular, with the angles very obtuse. Leaves, the 
lower ones, on long petioles, very large, twelve to fourteen inches 
each way (in length and breadth), exactly cordate, acuminulate, 
with a deep sinus at the base, the margin obscurely toothed or 
serrated, the texture rather soft, the underside studded with 
minute scattered scale-like dots (lepidota). The upper leaves 
become gradually smaller and pass into bracts. Panicles large, 
lax, terminal, forming a pyramidal thyrsis two to three feet long ; 
peduncles and pedicels, as well as the entire ground-work of the 
flowers, crimson ; bracts lanceolato-spathulate, crimson (the lower 
ones broader). Calyx large, inflated, conical, with sharp angles, 
almost winged at the angles ; the limb of five, sharp, erect teeth. 
Tube of the corolla but little longer than the calyx : limb oblique, 
of five spreading, soon recurved, oblong lobes, of which the 
lateral ones have an intense purple spot at the base, and the 
upper and rather longer and larger lobe a pure white spot occu- 
pying the lower half of the lobe, and partially divided by a red 
line. O^four-lobed: style long, filiform : stigma bifid. Fila- 
ments of the stamens nearly four inches long, inclined down, but 
slightly curving upwards : anthers small, dark greenish-grey. 

Cult. Clerodendron is an extensive genus of soft-wooded 
tropical plants of various habits, a few of the species recom- 
mending themselves to our notice on account of their hand- 
some flowers ; the species figured is one of these. In order 
to produce a handsome head of flowers it is advisable to select a 
young healthy plant early in the season, and encourage it to 
rapid growth by giving it the usual stimulants of heat and mois- 
ture, and growing it in a tolerably rich soil. This may consist 
of light loam, mixed with a portion of leaf-mould or other vege- 
table manure ; the pot being well drained, so as to allow of 
watering freely without the risk of the soil becoming saturated, 
which a rich soil is apt to do if carelessly watered, especially after 
shifting the plant into a larger pot, before the roots penetrate 
into the fresh soil. Shading in summer for a few hours in the 
middle of the day will be necessary, especially if the roof of the 
house has a south aspect and is of a light construction. It 
may be propagated by cuttings planted under a bell-glass, and 
placed in any warm part of the stove. /. S. 



LATIN 



GENERAL INDEX, 



THE PLANTS CONTAINED IN THE LAST SEVEN VOLUMES OF THE 

NEW SERIES, 

(Or from Vol. LXIV. to LXX. inclusive, of the whole Work,) 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



Vol 
69 
68 
68 
69 
69 
69 
69 
70 
70 
67 
69 
64 
70 
70 
67 
65 

68 



69 



69 
67 
66 
67 
70 
64 
64 
68 
68 
68 



No. 
4032 
3939 
3933 
4041 
4012 
3980 
3993 
4077 
4126 
3852 
3994 
3563 
4050 
4049 
3843 
3654 

3958 
3944 

4008 
3858 
4005 
3848 
3754 
3875 
4123 
3610 
3608 
3919 
3904 
3927 



Acacia dentifera. 

diptera ; (3. erioptera. 

— platyptera. 
rotundifolia. 



Achimenes grandiflora. 

longiflora. 

multiflora. 

pedunculata. 

picta. 



Aconitum Chinense. 
Acronychia Cunninghami. 
Acropera Loddigesii. 
Acrophyllura verticillatum. 
Aerides affine. 
Aeschynanthus grandiflorus. 
Agave Americana, var. foliis 

variegatis. 
Alstrcemeria nemorosa. 

psittacina; v. Erembouldti 



(hybrid). 
Amicia Zygomeris. 
Anchusa petiolata. 
Androsace lanuginosa. 
Angelonia cornigera. 
Gardneri 



Anigozanthus Manglesii. 
Anoectochilus setaceus. 
Anthericum glaucum. 
Aporum anceps. 
Aquilegia Skinneri. 
Arctostaphylos nitida. 
pungens. 



Vol 
66 
66 
70 
65 
70 
65 

7" 

68 

65 

70 

70 

66 

67 

66 

67 

66 

69 

69 

69 

69 

70 

64 

64 

66 

64 

70 

66 

68 

64 

68 

mi 

64 



No. 
3769 
3756 
4120 
3640 
4128 
3678 
4106 
3962 
3679 
4094 
4113 
3788 
3831 
3649 
3818 
3741 
4025 
3990 
3968 
4046 
4100 
3564 
3559 
3720 
3591 
4131 
3731 
3949 
3597 
3888 
3736 
3599 



Aristolochia caudata. 

ciliata. 

ornithocephala. 

saccata. 

Armeria cephalotes. 
Arthrostemma versicolor. 
Asclepias vestita. 
Aspasia epidendroides. 
variegata. 



Barkeria spectabilis. 
Barleria flava. 
Barnardia scilloides. 
Barringtonia racemosa. 
Bartonia aurea. 
Batemannia Colleyi. 
Bauhinia forficata. 
Begonia acuminata, 
cocciiiea. 



hydrocotybfoba. 

nitida. 

Meyeri. 

monoptera. 

octopetala. 

parvifolia. 

platanifoba. 

rubricaubs. 

— — sinuata. 
Berberis nervosa. 
Bifrcnaria aurantiaca. 
Bignonia speciosa. 
Bletia Parkinsoni. 
Blumenbachia multifida. 



INDEX. 



No. 
4088 
3871 

3863 
4052 
3986 
3781 
3620 
3876 
3915 
3895 
3782 
3722 
4033 
3761 
4021 
3577 
3794 
4003 
4001 
3964 
3758 
3728 
3834 
3719 
3588 
3866 

3882 
3989 
4056 
4027 
3633 
3742 
3910 
3693 
3711 

4085 
3998 
3669 
3656 
4083 
3929 
3942 
3823 
3590 
3777 
4017 
3937 
3662 
4063 
3598 
3922 



Bolbophyllum Calamaria. 
Bomarea acutifolia; var. punc 
tata. 

simplex 



Boronia Fraseri. 
Bossiaea virgata. 
Bouvardia splendens. 
Boussingaultia baselloides. 
Brachycome iberidifolia. 
Boronia crenulata. 
Bossisea tenuicaubs. 
Brassavola cordata. 

cuspidata. 

• glauca. 

■ Perrinii. 



venosa. 



Brassia Lanceana. 

Lanceana ; var. viridiflora 

Wrayse. 

Bromheadia palustris. 
Brovvnea coccinea. 
Burrielia gracilis. 
Caladium petiolatum. 
Calectasia cyanea. 
Callichroa platyglossa. 
Calliprora lutea. 
Callithauma viridiflorum, et an 

gustifolium. 
Callistachys linearis. 
Callistemon pinifolium. 
Caltha sagittata. 
Canavalia ensifonnis. 
Carica citriformis. 
Cattleya citrina. 

■ crispa. 

guttata, /3. Itusselliana. 

intermedia, var. angusti 



folia. 



intermedia : 

labiata. 

Mossise. 

pumila. 

superba. 



variegata. 



Catasetum abruptum. 

globiflorum. 

integerriraum. 

luridum. 

Russellianum. 

viridi-flavum. 

Wailesii. 

Centanrea depressa. 
Cephaelis Ipecacuanlia 
Cereus Ackermanni. 
caerulescens. 



Vol. 


No. 


70 


4066 


- 67 


3813 


66 


3768 


66 


3789 


65 


3651 


70 


4084 


67 


3822 


70 


4093 


64 


3566 


64 


3567 


66 


3740 


69 


4022 


70 


4116 


65 


3641 


64 


3607 


68 


3903 


. 64 


3625 


64 


3583 


64 


3617 


66 


3726 


64 


3592 


69 


3983 


70 


4061 


66 


3743 


■ 64 


3584 


66 


3780 


67 


3865 


■ 67 


3867 


66 


3767 


65 


3644 


65 


3695 


68 


3935 


69 


4045 


70 


4065 


• 66 


3727 


64 


3586 


69 


4029 


66 


3747 


67 


3868 


67 


3869 


67 


3861 


67 


3864 


70 


4054 


67 


3855 


65 


3648 


68 


3880 


67 


3836 


67 


3826 



Cereus extensus. 

latifrons. 

Martianus. 

multiplex. 

■ pentalophus, /3. subarticu- 

latus. 

Pitajaya. 

speciosissimus, hybridus. 

Ceropegia oculata. 

■ serpentinus. 

stapeUiformis. 

■ vincsefolia. 

Cestum viridiflorum. 
Chabrsea runcinata. 
Chenopodium Quinoa. 
Chorizema Henclimanni. 

spectabile. 

Chrysocoma squamata. 

Chrysostemma tripteris. 

Chysis aurea. 

Cirrhsea fusco-lutea. 

Clarkia elegans. 

Clematis caerulea ; 0. grandi- 

flora. 

montana ; var. grandiflora. 

Clethra tomentosa. 
Clianthus puniceus. 
Cobsea macrostema. 
Coburgia coccinea. 

trichroma. 

Ccelogyne ocellata. 
Colletia horrida. 
Collinsia heterophylla. 
Coloeasia odorata. 
Columnea Schiedeana. 
Convolvulus ocellatus. 
Cooperia pedunculata. 
Coreopsis longipcs. 
Corrsea pulchella. 
Coryanthes maculata, var. Par- 

keri. 
Crocus annulatus, Adamicus. 
lagenaeflorus ; var. lacteus 

lutescens. 



speciosus. 
suaveolens. 



var. 



Cycnoches ventricoaum ; 

Egertonianum. 
Loddigesii ; var. leucochi- 

lum. 
Cymbidium triste. 
Cyrtochilum maculatum. 

maculatum; t?«r.ecornutum. 

Cystanthe sprengelioides. 



INDEX. 



No. 

3878 

3593 

3643 

4013 

3970 

3837 

3553 

3838 

3925 

4067 

3988 

3655 

4059 

4091 

4073 

3622 

3619 

3624 

3716 

4035 

4102 

4089 

3570 

3974 

4115 

3906 

3561 

3558 

4124 

3569 

3963 

3627 

3997 

3976 

3735 

3835 

3873 

3658 

3775 

3898 

3765 

3557 

3595 

3543 

3791 

3565 

3637 

3885 

3631 

3778 

3800 

3951 

3638 

3751 



Dahlia glabrata. 
Delphinum vimineum. 
Dendrobium aggregatum. 

crumenatum. 

macranthum. 

moschatum. 



Desmodium Canadense. 
Deutzia scabra. 
Digitalis lutea, 8. fucata. 
Diuema polybulbon. 
Diospyros, Sapota. 
Diplacus puniceus. 
Diplolama Dampieri. 
Disa cornuta. 

grandirlora. 

Dodecatheon integrifoLium. 
Dombeya cannabina. 
Dracophyllum capitatum. 
Dracopis amplexicaulis. 
Dryandra arctotidis. 
formosa. 



Drymonia punctata. 
Echeveria racemosa. 
Echinocactus centeterius. 

concinnus. 

corynodes. 

Maekireanus. 

maimnillaroides. 

Pentlandi. 



sessiliflorus. 

■ tenuispinus. 

tubiflorus. 



Echites hirsutn. 
splendens. 



Edwardsia Macnabiana. 
Elseodendron Capeiise. 
Elisena longipetala. 
Epacris microphylla. 
obtusifolia. 



Epidendrum calocheilum. 

cepiforme. 

chloroleucum. 



conaceum. 
crassifolium. 
densiflorum. 
diffusum. 



floribundum. 

Grahami. 

papillosum. 

Parkinsonianum. 

patens. 

Skinner i. 

tessellatum. 

violaceum. 



Vol. 

65 

?n 

66 

66 

70 

(it 

65 

69 

70 

70 

70 

66 

69 

64 

66 

66 

67 

66 

64 

69 

69 

67 

68 

65 

68 

67 

65 

70 

64 

66 
66 
69 
67 
66 
69 
68 
69 
66 
66 
68 
66 
64 
66 
65 
70 
64 
66 
67 
69 
64 
66 
65 
68 



No. 
3666 
4107 
3745 
3717 
4031 
3605 
3639 
4016 
4074 
4069 
4101 
3757 
4036 
3589 
3673 
3706 
3874 
3762 
3572 
3999 
4000 
3801 
3948 
3663 
3907 
3824 
3657 
4082 
3551 

3723 
3724 
4044 
3860 
3772 
4010 
3930 
4040 
3779 
3732 
3886 
3787 
3612 
3725 
3659 
4121 
3602 
3744 
3815 
3995 
3576 
3738 
3664 
3940 



viridi-purpureum. 

vitellinum. 

Epimedium Musschianum. 
Epiphyllum Bussellianum. 
Eranthemum montanum. 
Eria stellata. 
Erica florida, var. campanulata. 

Irbyana. 

jasminiflora. 

Sbannoniana. 



Eriostemon buxifolium. 
Erysimum Perofskianum. 
Eucalyptus splaclmicarpon. 
Eucharidium coucinnum. 
Euphorbia Jaccpiiniflora. 
Eutoca divaricata. 
Euterpe montana. 
Menziesii. 



Eutoca viscosa. 
Fuchsia alpestris. 

corymbiflora. 

fulgens. 

integrifolia. 

Sieboldiana. 

Franciscea latifolia. 
Francoa ramosa. 
Funckia albo-marginata. 

splendens. 

Gaillardia bicolor, var. Drum- 

mondu integerrima. 
Galactodendron utile. 
Ibid. 

Gardenia Sherbourniaa. 
Gardoquia betonicoides. 
multiflora. 



Gastrochilus longiflora. 
pulcherrima. 



Gastrolobium acutum. 
Gelasine azurea. 
Geranium cristatum. 
Gesneria bulbosa. 

cochlcaris. 

Douglasii, 0. vcrticillata. 

■ elongata, var. 

foscialis. 

Gardneri. 

Lindleyi. 

IMarchii. 

mollis. 

polyantha. 



Sceptrum, y. iguca. 
stricta. 
tuberosa. 
zebrina. 



INDEX. 



No. 
3680 
3934 

3943 
3971 
3881 
4064 
3687 
3786 
3660 
3841 
4087 
3798 
3737 
3596 

3961 
3870 

3760 
3689 
3857 
3862 
3746 
3821 
3936 
3542 

3549 
3771 
3730 
4072 
3828 
3894 
4047 
3696 
4079 
3992 
3965 
4020 
3587 
4051 
3665 
4068 
3685 
3978 
3675 
3842 
4037 
4118 
3652 
3905 
3552 
3957 



Gladiolus Mortonius. 

Gloxinia speciosa; var. macro- 

phylla, variegata. 

speciosa ; var. Menziesii. 

tubiflora. 

Goldfussia glomerata. 
Gomphrena pulchella. 
Gongora maculata. 
Gonolobus hispidus. 
Govenia Gardneri. 
Grabowskia duplicata. 
Greenovia aurea. 
Grevillea dubia. 
Grindelia inuloides. 
Habranthus Andersoni ; var. c 

Texanus. 

pratensis ; var. quadriflora 

Hsemanthus tenuiflorus ; var 

Mozambicensis. 
Hakea dactyloides. 
Helianthus mollis. 
Helichrysum niveum. 
Herbertia pulchella, et caarulea. 
Heterotropa asaroides. 
Hoteia barbata. 
Hibiscus Cameroni. 
Hippeastrum ambiguum, var. 1 

longiflora. 
breviflorum. 



solandriflorum. 

Hologymne glabrata. 
Houlletia Brocklehurstiana. 
Hymenoxys Californica. 
Hypocalyptus obcordatus. 
Hypocyrta strigillosa. 
Hypoxys stellipilis. 
Ilex platyphylla. 

Paraguayensis. 



IUicium religiosum. 
Impatiens glandidigera. 

scapigora. 

tricornis. 

Ipomsea Bonariensis. 

crassipes. 

■ Platensis. 

TVeediei. 



Ismene Maclcana. 
Isoraeris arborea. 
Isopogon scaber. 
Juanulloa parasitica. 
Kennedya nigricans. 
Kreysigia multiflora. 
Lacheualia glaucina. 
Lselia albida. 



Vol. 


No. 


67 


3804 


67 


3817 


67 


3810 


70 


4099 


70 


4090 


68 


3941 


70 


4129 


66 


3766 


68 


3908 


69 


3987 


69 


3996 


69 


4043 


65 


3700 


. 70 


4112 


66 


3763 


. 66 


3755 


. 64 


3578 


66 


3734 


65 


3699 


67 


3829 


66 


3785 


64 


3554 


64 


3574 


. 69 


4034 


66 


3770 


65 


3626 


65 


3632 


70 


4095 


65 


3671 


64 


3600 


64 


3609 


66 


3784 


64 


3550 


69 


4002 


64 


3604 


69 


4023 


70 


4110 


65 


3650 


68 


3946 


70 


4048 


64 


3594 


69 


3979 


67 


3805 


64 


3548 


65 


3698 


67 


3846 


67 


3814 


66 


3642 


65 


3647 


65 


3634 



Lselia anceps. 

autumnalis. 

furfuracea. 

peduncularis. 

superbiens. 

Lantana Selloviana ; /3. lanceo- 

lata. 
Laplacea semiserrata. 
Lasiandra petiolata. 
Lasiopetalum macrophyllum. 
Lathyrus nervosus. 

pubescens. 

Leianthus nigrescens. 
Leonotis nepetaefolia. 
Lepanthes sanguinea. 
Lepismium commune. 

Myosurus. 

Leptosiphon densiflorus. 
Leptotes bicolor, var. glauco- 

phylla. 
Leycesteria formosa. 
Liatris propinqua. 
Lilium speciosum, var. albiflo- 

rum. 
Limnanthes Douglasii. 
Linum monogynum. 
Liparia parva. 
Liparis Walkerise. 
Lisianthus Ttussellianus. 
Loasa lateritia. 

Pentlandii. 

Lobelia Bridgesii. 

Cavanillesii. 

erinoides. 

heterophylla. 

polyphylla. 

splendens, . var. /3. atio- 

sanguinea. 

syphilitica, hybrida. 

Lomatia ilicifolia. 

tinctoria. 

Lophospermum scandens. 
Luculia gratissima. 
Luxemburgia ciliosa. 
Lychnis Bungeana. 
Mneleania angidata. 
Macropodium nivale. 
Madia elegans. 
Malva Creeana. 

lateritia. 

purpurata. 

Mammillaria atrata. 

floribunda. 

Lehmanni. 



INDEX. 



r l 


No. 


69 


3972 


65 


3646 


70 


4060 


69 


3984 


67 


3797 


68 


3893 


66 


3713 


67 


3809 


65 


3704 


69 


3966 


65 


3629 


70 


4081 


68 


3945 


69 


3981 


64 


3614 


64 


3613 


67 


3877 


64 


3573 


69 


4028 


65 


3691 


65 


3690 


70 


4103 


66 


3793 


70 


4109 


64 


3560 


68 


3924 


64 


3601 


67 


3832 


65 


3708 


67 


3819 


67 


3796 


67 


3839 


70 


4092 


68 


3900 


68 


3879 


67 


3849 


67 


3850 


68 


3923 


67 


3802 


70 


4122 


66 


3753 


68 


3916 


68 


3917 


70 


4080 


69 


4018 


66 


3774 


70 


4096 


68 


3955 


70 


4104 


or, 


8764 



Mammillaria pycnacantha. 

tenuis. 

tetracantha. 

turbinata. 

Mandevilla suaveolens. 
Marianthus cseruleo-punctatus. 
Marica gracilis. 

humilis ; var. 2, lutea. 

Marshallia csespitosa. 
Maxillaria acutipetala. 

aureo-fulva. 

ciliata. 

cucullata. 

decolor. 

Hencbmanni. 

pumila. 

stapelioides. 

Steelii. 

Megaclinium maximum. 
Melocactus depressus. 
Merendera Caucasica. 
Microstylis bistionantba. 
Miltonia Candida; var. naves- 

cens. 

Clowesii. 

Mimulus Cardinalis. 

roseus ; (hybridus) var. 

Maclainianus. 
Monacanthus discolor, j3. viridi- 

floras. 
Monacbantbus Bushnani. 

fimbriatus. 

longifolius. 

roseo-albus. 

Monolopia major. 
Morina longifolia. 
Mormodes pardina. 
Mormodes pardina; var. uni- 

color. 
Muss superba. 
Ibid. 
Myantbus deltoideus. 

. spinosus. 

Myosotis Azorica. 
Nelumbium luteum. 
speciosum. 

Ibid. 

Nematantbus chloroncma. 

longipes. 

Nemophila atomaria. 
Nephelium Longan. 
Odontoglossum grande. 

. pulchellum. 

(Enotbera bifrons. 



Vol 
64 

6 1- 
66 
66 
67 
64 
(17 
68 
68 
61 
66 
68 
64 
66 
70 
67 
68 



No. 
3545 

3568 

3752 

3705 

3806 

3603 

3845 

3890 

3912 

3807 

3733 

3926 

3581 

3712 

4130 

3854 

3914 

3911 

3931 

3847 

3790 

4026 

3967 

4038 

3921 

3748 

3896 

3932 

3938 

3623 

4009 

3697 

3773 

3635 

3820 

3636 

3580 

3692 

4086 

3884 

3645 

3688 

3661 

3853 

3889 

4053 

3556 

3703 

3991 

4078 

3960 

3710 

3928 



(Enothera fruticosa, var. am- 

bigua. 
Oncidium Cebolleta. 

? concolor. 

Porbesii. 

Huntianum. 

luridum. 

■ — — macrantherum. 



monoceras. 

omithorhynchum. 

pachyphyllum. 

Papibo, var. limbatum. 

pubes ; var. flavescens. 

pumilum. 

raniferum, var. major. 

tricolor. 

Wrayse. 



Opuntia decumbens. 
monacantba. 



Oreodapbne bullata. 
Ortbosiphon incurvus. 
Osbeckia canescens. 
Chinensis. 



Othonna frutescens. 
tuberosa. 



Otochilus fusca. 
Oxabs Barreberi. 
lasiandra. 



lasiopetala. 

Martiana. 



Papaver Gariepinum. 
Passiflora Actinia. 

incarnata. 

Mooreana. 

nigelbflora. 

onycbina. 

— — Tucamanensis. 
Pavetta Caffra. 
Pavonia Schrankii. 
Pentas carnea. 
Pentstemon campanulatus. 

diffusus. 

glandulosus. 

gentianoides. 

heterophyllus. 

Pcrnettia angustifolia. 
Petabdium barlerioides. 
Petunia violacea, hybrida. 
Pbaceba tenacetifoba. 
Phajus albus. 

bicolor. 

maculatus. 

Phalocallis plumbea. 
Pharbitis Learii. 







INDEX. 



Vol 
69 
70 
64 
64 
66 
68 
66 
67 
68 
64 
66 
64 
69 
68 
68 
68 
68 
66 
64 

65 

69 
65 
68 
68 
70 
65 
65 
69 
65 
68 
67 



No. 
4024 
4076 
3618 
3621 
3783 
3891 
3721 
3833 
3950 
3579 
3750 
3575 
4007 
3682 
3897 
3952 
3920 
4006 
3616 



3707 
4019 
3676 
3909 
3959 
4117 
3668 
3653 
4039 
3670 
3947 
3825 



66 3759 

67 3811 



66 

69 
68 
69 
66 
64 
70 
68 
67 
64 
69 
70 
66 

69 
67 



3667 

3977 
3953 
4030 
3718 
3562 
4108 
3899 
3808 
3571 
3982 
4071 
3729 

4011 

3827 



Pharbitis Tyrianthina. 
Phaseolus lobatus. 
Philibertia grandiflora. 
Philodendron erassinervium. 
Phlogacanthus curviflorus. 
Physianthus auricomus. 
Pimelea Hendersoni. 

nana. 

spectabilis. 

Platystemon Californicum. 

■ leiocarpum. 

Platysaigma linearis. 
Pleroma Benthamianum. 
Pleurothallis Grobyi. 
picta 



68 I 3892 



Plumieria acuminata. 

Podotheca gnaphalioides. 

Poinciana G-illiesii. 

Polygala myrtifolia, var. grandi 
flora. 

Polystachia grandiflora. 

Polyspora axillaris. 

Potentilla glabra. 

Prepusa Hookeriana. 

Primula denticulata. 

Pterodiscns speciosus. 

Pyrus arbutifolia. 

Piehmannia Chinensis. 

Rhipsalis brachiata. 

Rhododendron albiflorum. 

anthopogon. 

arboreum ; Cinnamomeum, 

floribus roseis. 

■ campanulatum. 

■ Caucasicum j hybridum. 

nudiflorum; var. scintil 

lans (hybridum). 
Ptondeletia longiflora. 

odorata. 

Rosa Brunonii. 
Buellia ciliatiflora. 
Podophyllum auriculatum. 
Saccolabium guttatum. 
Salvia confertiflora ; var. £. 

— patens. 

Sarcanthus teretifolius. 
Saurauja spectabilis. 
Scaphyglottis violacea. 
Schomburgkia marginata; var. 

petalis sepalisqueimmarginatis. 
Senecio calamifolius. 

Heritieri; var. cyanoph- 

thalmus. 
Sida (Abutilon) Bedfordiana. 



Vol 

67 

69 

69 

70 

64 

68 

05 

67 

66 

65 

66 

66 

07 

70 

66 

65 

70 

70 

69 

64 

64 

67 

70 

66 

07 

69 

68 

OS 

68 

67 

68 

68 

67 

69 

70 

64 

70 

70 

68 

67 

64 

69 

66 

68 

67 

70 

7 

69 

84 

64 

68 

65 

70 

10 



No. 
3840 
3973 
4015 
4105 
3544 
3954 
3672 
3795 
3684 
3677 
3709 
3681 
3872 
4127 
3776 
3701 
4125 
4055 
3975 
3606 
3615 
3803 
4058 
3792 
3856 
4014 
3902 
3918 
3883 
3816 
3913 

4062 

3830 

4004 

4070 

3611 

4111 

4119 

3901 

3859 

3546 

3969 

3702 

3985 

3851 

4097 

3844 

4042 

3547 

3555 

3887 

3630 

4098 

4114 



Sida picta. 

Siphocampylos betulaefolius. 

longepedunculatus. 

lantanifolius. 



Sisyrinchium speciosum. 
Solarium Balbisii; var. bipinnata. 

— campanulatum. 

— crispum. 
fraerans. 



Sophronitis cernua. 
grandiflora. 



Spathodea pentandra. 
Sprekelia Cybister. 
Stapelia cactiformis. 
Statice arborea. 

puberula. 

macrophylla. 

rhytidophylla. 

Stelis atropurpurea. 
Stenactis speciosa. 
Stenomesson croceum. 
latifolium. 



Stephanotis floribunda. 
Stevia breviaristata. 
trachelioides. 



Stigmaphyllum heterophyllum. 
Strobilanthes sessilis. 
Stuartia pentagyna. 
Stilidium ciliatum. 
fasciculatum. 



recurvum. 



Tacsonia pinnatistipula. 
Tagetes corymbosa. 
Tecoma jasminoides. 
Tetranema Mexicanimi. 
Thermopsis fabrana. 
Thomasia stipulacea. 
Thunbergia chrysops. 
Tithonia ovata. 
Tofieldia pubens. 
Tradescantia caricifolia. 
Trichocentrum fuscum. 
Trifolium hybridum. 
Tropssolum azureum. 

- brachyceras. 

Lobbianum. 

■ Morit/.iamiiii. 

polyphyllum. 

Tulbaghia Ludwigiana. 

violacea. 

Tulipa tricolor. 
Tweedia versicolor. 
Umbilicus malacophyllus. 
Vanda teres. 



INDEX. 



Vol. 


No. 


67 


3799 


65 


3628 


65 


3694 


65 


3683 


70 


4075 


70 


4075 



Verbascum Tauricum. 
Verbena incisa. 

teucrioides. 

Veronica prostrata ; y. satureiae- 
folia. 

speciosa. 

Viscaria oculata. 



Vol. 


No. 


64 


3582 


68 


3956 


67 


3812 


64 


3585 


65 


3686 


65 


3674 



Xanthozia rotundifolia. 
Zichya glabrata. 
Zygopetalum Africanum. 

cochleare. 

Zygopetalon maxillare. 
Murrayanum. 



ENGLISH 



GENERAL INDEX, 



TO 



THE PLANTS CONTAINED IN THE LAST SEVEN VOLUMES OF THE 

•NEW SERIES, 

{Or from Vol. LXIV. to LXX. inclusive, of the whole Work, J 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



Vol. 


No. 


68 


3933 


69 


4041 


68 


3939 


69 


4032 


69 


4012 


70 


4077 


69 


3980 


69 


3993 


70 


4126 


69 


3994 



64 
70 
70 

67 
69 

67 

65 

68 

68 
65 
69 
69 
66 
67 
67 



3563 
4050 
4049 

3843 
4038 

3858 
3654 

3944 

3958 
3675 
4008 
4005 
3754 
3848 
3875 
3965 



Acacia, broad-winged, 
round-leaved. 



• two- winged ; downy var. 

tooth-bearing. 



Achimenes, large-flowered 

long-stalked. 

long-flowered. 

many-flowered. 

pointed 



Acronychia, Mr. Allen Cunning- 
ham's. 

Acropera, Mr. Loddiges'. 

Acrophyllum, whorl-leaved. 

Aerides, rose-coloured; or Air- 
plant. 

Aeschinanthus, large-flowered. 

African Ragwort; or tuberous 
Othonna. 

Alkanet, petiolated-leaved. 

Aloe, great American, with varie- 
gated leaves. 

Alstroemeria, Mr. Erembouldt's 
hybrid, var. 
woodland 



Amancaes, Mr. M'Lean's. 
Amicia, yoke-leaved. 
Androsace, shaggy-leaved. 
Augelonia, Mr. Gardner's. 

horn-bearing. 

Anigozanthus, Mr. Mangle's. 
Aniseed, Tree, sacred. 



Vol. 


No. 


70 


4123 


64 


3610 


64 


3608 


68 


3927 


68 


3904 


66 


3756 


65 


3668 


65 


3678 


70 


4106 


68 


3962 


65 


3679 


67 


3859 


69 


4020 


64 


3587 


70 


4051 


68 


3949 


70 


4094 


7n 


4113 


66 


3788 


66 


3751 


66 


3745 


67 


3831 


65 


• 3649 


67 


3818 


66 


3741 


68 


3916 



Anoectochilus, fringed. 

Antheridum, glaucous-leaved. 

Aporum, two-edged. 

Arctostaphylos, sharp-pointed ; 
or Bear Berry. 

shining. 

Aristolochia, fringe-flowered. 

Aroma, Arbutus-leaved. 

Arthrostemma, changeable-flow- 
ered. 

Asclepias, hairy-stemmed. 

Aspasia, Epidendrum-like. 

variegated. 

Asphodel, American downy- 
stalked. 

Balsam, glandular; or Touch- 
me-not. 
— stemless. 

three-horned. 



Barberry, strong-nerved. 
Barkeria, showy. 
Barleria, yellow. 
Barnardia, Chinese. 
Barren-wort, purple, 
white-flowered. 



Barringtonia, raceme-flowered. 
Bartonia, golden. 
Batemannia, Mr. Colley's. 
Bauhinia, forcipated. 
Bean of India, sacred; deep 
rose-coloured, var. 



INDEX. 



Vol. 


No. 1 


68 


3917 


64 


3559 


70 


4100 


69 


3968 


64 


3591 


69 


4025 


70 


4131 



Bean of India. 

Begonia, eight-petaled. 

Mr. Meyer's ; or Elephant': 



ear. 



69 

69 

66 

64 
66 

64 
68 
70 
70 
66 
65 
64 
66 
70 
70 
67 
67 



70 
68 
69 
64 
66 
67 
69 
66 
66 
66 
69 
66 

64 

69 
69 
69 
66 
66 
67 
66 



3990 

4046 

3720 

3564 
3731 

3597 
3888 
4065 
4120 
3769 
3640 
3599 
3736 
4071 
4088 
3863 
3871 

3915 
4052 
3895 
3986 
3620 
3781 
3876 
4033 
3782 
3761 
3722 
4021 
3794 

3577 
4003 
4001 
3964 
3758 
3728 
3834 
3719 



Penny-wort leaved. 

plane-leaved. 

— point-leaved; or Elephant's 
ear. 

— red-scaped ; or Elephant's 
ear. 

— scarlet-flowered ; or Ele- 
phant's ear. 

shining-flowered; or Ele 



phant's ear 
— small-leaved; or Elephant's 



single-leaved. 

sinnated ; or Elephant's 



Bifrenaria, orange-coloured. 
Bignonia, showy-flowered. 
Bind-weed, purple-eyed. 
Birth-wort, Bird's head. 
— livid-flowered, 
pouch-flowered. 



Blumenbachia, niultifid-leaved 
Bletia, Mr. Parkinson's. 
Boat-lip, violet. 
Bolbophyllum, quill-stemmed. 
Bomarea, simple. 
sharp -leaved ; speckled, 



var. 
Boronia, crenulatcd. 
Mr. Fraser's. 



Bossirca, slender-stemmed. 

twiggy. 

Boussingaultia, Basella-like. 
Bouvardia, splendid. 
Brachycome, Candytuft-leaved. 
Brassavola, glaucous. 

heart-lipped. 

Perrin's. 

— - spear-lipped. 
vein-lipped. 



Vol. 

64 

68 

69 

67 

64 
68 
67 
68 
64 
68 
66 
69 
69 
68 
66 
70 



Brassia, Mr. Lance's green-flow- 
ered, var. 

Mr. Lance's. 

Mrs. Wray's. 

Bromheadia, Marsh. 
Brownea, scarlet-flowered. 
Burrielia, slender. 
Caladium, long-stalked. 
Calectasia, bright blue. 
CaUichroa, golden. 



65 
66 

65 

70 
66 
65 
64 

68 
67 
65 

70 

66 
64 
<w 
70 
66 
70 
66 
64 
69 
70 
64 
68 
M 
6 1 
66 
64 
66 
65 

66 
67 



No. 

3588 
3882 
3989 
3866 

3594 
3929 
3823 
3942 
3590 
3937 
3777 
4017 
3998 
3910 
3656 
4085 

3669 
3711 

3693 

4083 
3742 
3662 
3598 
3922 
3813 
3651 

4066 

3789 
3566 
3822 
4084 
3768 
4093 
3740 
3567 
4022 
4116 
3607 
3903 
3583 
3617 
3726 
3592 
3743 
3702 

3780 
3865 



Calliprora, yellow. 
Callistachys, red-flowered. 
Callistemon, fine-leaved. 
Callithauma, green-flowered, and 

narrow-leaved. 
Campion, Dr. Bunge's scarlet. 
Catasetum, blunt-lipped. 

entire-lipped. 

globe-flowered. 

lurid. 

Mr. Wailes'. 

the Duke of Bedford's. 

yellow-green. 

Cattleya, crimson-lipped. 

crisp-flowered. 

dwarf. 

intermediate, variegated- 
lipped. 

Mrs. Moss's superb. 

narrow-leaved, intermedi- 



ate. 



spotted, Lord Edward Rus- 



sell's, var. 
— superb. 

yellow-flowered. 



Centaury, prostrate. 

Cereus, Ackermanu's Mexican. 

blue-stemmed. 

— broad-stemmed, 
five-winged, somewhat- 



jointed, var. 

long-stemmed, 



or Torch 



Thistle. 

probferous. 

serpent-kke. 

splendid ; hybrid, var. 

variable ; or Pitajaya. 

Von Martius. 

Ceropegia, ocellated. 

periwinkle-leaved. 

Stapelia-like. 



Cestrum, green-flowered. 
Chabraea, changeable-flow ercd . 
Chorizema, Mr. llenchmann's. 
showy. 



Chrysostemma, three-leaved. 
Chysis, golden-flowered. 
Cirrluea, yellow-brown. 
Clarkia, Californian. 
Clethra, downy, 
Clover, Mule white Trefoil, or 

tall Dutch. 
Cobsea, long-stemmed. 
Coburgia, scarlet. 



10 



INDEX. 



No. 
3867 
3767 
3644 
3695 
3919 
4045 
3727 
3586 
4029 
3747 

3622 
3959 
3723 
3732 

3868 

3869 
3861 
3864 
4054 



3648 
3880 
3836 
3826 
3878 
3988 
8648 
3970 
3837 
4013 

3553 
3838 
4067 
3655 
4059 
4091 
4073 
3619 
3624 
3716 
4035 
4102 
4089 
35 70 
3906 
3561 
3558 
4115 
4124 
3569 



Coburgia, three-coloured. 
Cselogyne, eyeletted. 
Colletia, bristling. 
Collinsia, variable-leaved. 
Columbine, Mr. Skinner's. 
Columnea, Mr. Schiede's. 
Cooperia, pedunculated. 
Coreopsis, long-stalked. 
Corraea, pretty. 
Coryanthes, spotted-lipped, Mr 

Parker's, var. 
Cowslip, American entire-leaved 
purple Nepal 



Cow Tree, or Palo de Vaca. 
Crane's bill, crested-seeded. 
Crocus annulatus, Mons. Adam's 



pale yellow, gourd-shaped 

showy. 

sweet-scented 



Cycnoches, ventricose-lipped ; or 
Swan-neck, Sir Francis Eger- 
ton's, var. 

Cymbidium, lurid-flowered. 

Cyrtochilum, spotted. 

spotted ; hornless, var 

Cystanthe, Sprengelia-like. 

Daldia, smooth, dwarf. 

Date-plum, Sapota. 

Dendrobium, close-flowered. 

large-flowered. 

— musk-smelling, 
sweet-smelling, 



stemmed. 
Desmodium, Canadian. 
Deutzia, rough-leaved. 
Dinema, many-bulbed. 
Diplacus, scarlet-flowered. 
Diplolaena, Dampier's. 
Disa, horned-flowered, 
large-flowered. 



clubbed 



D 

Dombeya, Hemp. 
Dracophyllum, round-headed. 
Dracopis, stem-clasping leaved 
Dryandra, Arctotis-like. 
splendid 



Drymonia, spotted-flowered. 
Echeveria, racemed. 
Echinocactus, many-flowered 

Mr. Mackie's. 

Mammillaria-like. 

neat. 

red-flowered. 

sessile-flowered. 



Vol 
68 
69 
69 
69 
66 
67 
67 
66 
65 
68 
65 
66 
64 
68 
64 
65 
66 
68 
66 
65 
64 
67 
64 
64 
70 
66 

69 
64 
70 
69 

64 
65 

67 
65 
66 
64 
66 
64 
70 
64 
67 
68 



No. 
3963 
3974 
3997 
3976 
3735 
3835 
3873 
3775 
3658 
3898 
3638 
3791 
3595 
3885 
3557- 
363* 
3778 
3951 
3765 
3666 
3565 
3800 
3543 
3631 
4107 
3717 

4031 
3605 
4101 
4036 

3589 
3673 

3874 
3706 
3762 
3572 
3764 
3545 
4056 
3574 
3802 
3923 
3925 

3907 
3824 
4000 
3948 
3999 
4082 
3801 



Echinocactus, slender-spined. 
variegated-flowered. 



Echites, hairy-flowered. 

splendid-flowered. 

Edwardsia, Mr. Macnab's. 
Elaeodendron, Cape. 
Elisena, long-limbed. 
Epacris, blunt-leaved. 
small-leaved. 



Epidendrum, beautiful-lipped. 

chequer-flowered. 

cluster-flowered. 

coriaceous-leaved. 

Dr. Graham's. 

green and white-flowered. 

many -flowered. 

■ Mr. Parkinson's. 

Skinner's. 

onion-rooted. 

purplish-green. 

spreading. 

spreading-flowered. 

thick-leaved. 

warty-fruited. 

yolk-of-egg. 

Epiphyllum, the Duke of Bed- 
ford's. 

Eranthemum, Mountain. 

Eria, star-flowered. 

Eriostemon, box-leaved. 

Eucalyptus, or Gum Tree, Splaeh- 
num-fruited. 

Eucharidium, pretty. 

Euphorbia, or Spurge, Jacquiuia- 
flowered. 

Euterpe, mountain. 

Eutoca, clammy. 
— straggling. 
Mr. Menzies. 



Evening Primrose, heart-leaved. 

■ shrubby, var. 

Pig Marigold, arrow-leaved. 
Flax, monogynous. 
Fly-wort, spine-bearing, 
triangular-lipped . 



Fox-glove, small, yellow; 

pie-flowered, var. 
Franciscea, broad-leaved. 
Francoa, white-flowered. 
Fuchsia, cluster-flowered. 

entire-leaved. 

— Mountain, 
splendid. 



pur- 



the glowing. 









INDEX 




1] 


Vol 


. No. 




Vol 


. No. 




65 


3663 


Funckia, Dr. Siebold's. 


66 


3760 


Hakea, finger-leaved. 


65 


3657 


variegated. 


65 


3639 


Heath, drooping, round-headed, 




64 


3551 


Gaillardia two-coloured, Drum- 






bell-flowered var. 








mond's entire-leaved var. 


70 


4074 


flask-flowered. 




4044 


Gardenia, Mrs. Sherbourne's. 


70 


4069 


Lady Shannon's. 




67 


3860 


Gardoquia, Betony-like. 


69 


4016 


Mr. Irby's. 




66 


3772 


— many-flowered. 


67 


3857 


Hebchrysum, snowy-flowered. 




68 


3930 


Gastrochilus,handsome-flowered 


67 


3862 


Herbertia, pretty and blue. 




69 


4010 


long-flowered. 


66 


3746 


Heterotropa, Asarabacea-like. 




69 


4040 


Gastrolobium, shajjp-leaved. 


68 


3936 


Hibiscus, Mr. Cameron's. 




68 


3928 


Gaybine, Mr. Lear's. 


66 


3771 


Hippeastrum, Solandra-flow- 




69 


4024 


Tynan purple. 






ered. 




66 


3779 


Gelasine, azure. 


70 


4079 


Holly, Canarian broad-leaved. 




68 


3886 


Gesneria, bulbous-rooted. 


66 


3730 


Hologymne, glabrous. 




66 


3725 


elongated var. 


69 


4027 


Horsebean, Jamaica ; or Over- 




65 


3659 


gaping-flowered. 






look. 




64 


3602 


Dr. Lindley's. 


67 


3821 


Hoteia, bearded. 




69 


3995 


many-flowered. 


70 


4072 


Houlletia, Mr. Brocklehurst's. 


68 


3940 


mottled-leaved 


67 


3828 


Hymenoxys, Californian. 


64 


3612 


Mr. Douglas's whorled var. 


68 


3894 


Hypocalyptus, obcordate. 


70 


4121 


Mr. Gardner's 


69 


4047 


Hypocyrta, rough-leaved. 


66 


3744 


Mr. March's. 


65 


3696 


Hypoxis, starry-haired. 


64 


3576 


sceptre-flowered, pale-flow- 


69 


3985 


Indian Cress, blue-flowered. 






ered var. 


66 


3714 


large-rooted. 


67 


3815 


soft-leaved. 


67 


3844 


Mr. Moritz's. 


66 


3787 


spoon-leaved. 


69 


4042 


many-leaved. 


65 


3664 


tuberous-rooted. 


67 


3851 


short-spurred. 


66 


3738 


upright. 


70 


4063 


Ipecacuanha. 


65 


3680 


Gladiolus, Mr. Morton's. 


65 


3665 


Ipomsea, Buenos Ayres. 


70 


4064 


Globe Amaranth, large-flowered. 


69 


3978 


Mr. Tweedie's. 


64 


3584 


Glory Pea, crimson 


65 


3685 


the Plata. 


68 


3934 


Gloxinia, rough; large varie- 
gated-leaved var. 


70 


4068 


thick flower-stalked or 

Bindweed. 


68 


3943 


rough-leaved; Mr.Menzie's 


69 


4037 


Isopogon, rough-leaved. 






var. 


67 


3842 


Isomeris, tree-like. 


69 


3971 


tube-flowered. 


70 


4118 


Juannulloa, parasitic. 


68 


3881 


Goldfussia, clustered. 


68 


3935 


Kale, Indian, fragrant. 


64 


3625 


Goldy locks, scaly-stalked. 


65 


3652 


Kennedya, dingy-flowered. 


65 


3687 


Gougora, spotted. 


70 


4076 


Kidney Bean, lobe-leaved. 


66 


3786 


Gonolobus, hispid. 


64 


3542 


Knight's Star Lily, ambiguous, 


65 


3660 


Govenia, Mr. Gardner's Brazil- 






var. 1 long-flowered. 






ian. 


64 


3549 


short-flowered. 


67 


3841 


Grabowskia, toothed. 


68 


3905 


Kreysigia, many-flowered. 


70 


4087 


Greenovia, golden. 


64 


3552 


Lachenalia, glaucous-flowered. 


67 


3798 


Grevillea, dubious. 


67 


3817 


Ladia, autumnal. 


66 


3737 


Grindelia, flea-bane-like. 


67 


3804 


two-edged. 


67 


3827 


Groundsel, Heritier's ; blue-eyed 


68 


3957 


white-flowered. 






eyed var. 


70 


4090 


gorgeous. 


69 


4011 


quill-leaved, Cape. 


70 


4099 


pedunculated. 


ill 


3596 


Habranthus, Anderson's Texas 


67 


3810 


scurfy-stalked. 






var. 


68 


3941 


Lantana, Mr. Sellow's ; long- 


68 


3961 


meadow ; four-flowered var. 






leaved var. 


67 


3870 


Hsemanthus, narrow-flowered, 


66 


4129 


Laplacea, semiserrated-leaved. 








Mozambic var. 


64 


3593 


Larkspur, slender, upright. 



12 



INDEX. 



No. 
3766 
3908 
3987 

3996 

4043 
3700 
4112 
3763 
3755 
3734 

3578 
3699 
3829 
3785 

3554 
4034 
3770 
3622 
4095 
3632 
3604 

3600 
3609 
3550 
3671 
4002 

3784 

4110 

4023 

4096 

3650 

3946 

4048 

3979 

3805 

3548 

3846 

3814 

3698 

3647 

3642 

3972 

4060 

3634 

3646 

3984 

3797 

3893 



Lasiandra, petiolated. 

Lasiopetalum, large-leaved. 

Lathyrus, nerve-leaved ; or 
Everlasting Pea. 

South American downy ; 

or Everlasting Pea. 

Leianthus, black-flowered. 

Leonotis, Cat-mint leaved. 

Lepanthes, blood-coloured. 

Lepismium, common. 

mouse-tail. 

Leptotes, two-coloured ; glau- 
cous-leaved var. 

Leptosiphon, thickly-flowering. 

Leycesteria, handsome. 

Liatris, sharp-seale spiked. 

Lily, crimson Japan ; white- 
flowered var. 

Limnanthes, Mr. Douglas'. 

Liparia, small. 

Mr. Col. Malker's 



Lisianthus, Duke of Bedford's. 
Loasa, Mr. Pentland's. 
red-flowered. 



Lobelia, hybrid var. of the blue 

American. 

Cavanille's. 

— — Erinus-like. 
■ many-leaved. 

— Mr. Bridges', 
shining ; dark 



leaved var. 

various-leaved. 



purple- 



Lomatia, dyeing 
Holly-leaved. 



Longan. 
Lophospermum, climbing. 
Luculia, fragrant. 
Luxembergia, fringe-leaved. 
Macleania, angle-flowered. 
Macropodium, Siberian. 
Madia, elegant. 
Mallow, pale red-flowered. 

purple. 

showy red-flowered. 

Maramillaria, copious-flowering, 

dark green. 

densely-spined. 



four-spined 

Lehmann's. 

taper. 

top-shaped. 

Mandevilla, sweet-scented. 
Marianthus, bine-spotted. 



Vol 
67 
66 
65 
67 
69 
64 
70 
65 
68 
64 
64 
69 
69 
67 
69 
65 
65 
65 
70 
64 

70 
66 
64 

65 
67 
67 
67 

64 
68 

67 

■'./ 
70 
67 

68 

lis 

70 

6) 
70 

66 
69 

7<) 
66 
66 

66 
70 

68 



No. 
3809 
3713 
3704 
3830 
3992 
3613 
4081 
3629 
3945 
3614 
3573 
3981 
3966 
3877 
4028 
3628 
3691 
3690 
4103 
3616 

4109 
3793 
3601 

3708 
3832 
3819 
3796 
3560 
3924 

3852 
3839 
4092 
3879 

3900 
3931 
4122 

3799 
4097 

3753 
4018 

4080 
3774 
3954 

3684 
4104 

3955 



Marica, humble ; yellow var. 

slender-stemmed. 

Marshallia, tufted. 

Marygold, corymb-flowered. 

Mate, or Paraguay Tea. 

Maxillaria, dwarf. 

— — fringe-lipped. 

golden-tufted. 

hooded. 

-• — Mr. Henchmann's. 

Mr. Steele's. 

■ pale yellow. 

■ sharp-petaled. 

Stapelia-like. 

Megaclinium, largest. 

Melindres, cut-leaved. 

Melocactus, depressed. 

Merendera, Caucasian. 

Microstylis, sail-flowered. 

Milk -wort, Myrtle-leaved, large- 
flowered var. 

Miltonia, Mr. Clowes'. 

white-lipped yellow var. 

Monk-flower, dingy, green- 
flowered var. 

fimbriated. 

Mr. Bushman's. 

— long-leaved. 

white and rose-coloured. 



Monkey-flower, Cardinal. 

Mr. Maclain's hybrid var. 



of the rose-coloured. 

Monk's hood, Chinese. 

Monolopia, larger. 

Morina, long-leaved. 

Mormodes, Leopard-spotted ; 
white-coloured var. 

Leopard-spotted. 

Mountain Laurel, blistered. 

Mouse-ear Azorean ; or Forget- 
me-not. 

Mullein, Taurican. 

Nasturtium; or Mr. Lobb's 
Indian Cress. 

Nelumbium, yellow. 

Nematanthus, long flower- 
stalked. 

shorter flower-stalked. 



Nemophila, spotted-flowered. 
Nightshade, Balbi's ; bipinnate- 
leaved var. 

fragrant South American. 

Odontoglossum, elegant. 
— — - great. 



INDEX. 



13 



ISO. 

3 12 
3 33 

3603 
3926 

3712 
3845 
3705 
3681 
3806 
3854 
3752 
3890 
3568 
3807 
4130 
3914 

3911 

3847 
4026 
3790 
3967 
4038 

3921 
4027 
3723 

3724 
3633 
3636 
3820 
3773 
3635 
4009 
3697 
3580 
3692 
4086 
3884 
36S8 
3661 
3645 
3853 
3889 
4053 
3556 
3703 
3960 
4078 
3991 
3710 



Oiicidium, bird's beak. 

■ butterfly ; broad-bordered 

ar. 

dingy-flowered. 

downy columned ; yellow- 
flowered var. 

frog ; larger var. 

large-anthered. 

Mr. Forbes'. 

Mr. Herbert's dwarf. 

Mr. Hunt's. 

Mrs. Wray's. 

one-coloured. 

one-liorned. 

— - — rounded-leaved. 

— - — tliick-leaved. 

three-coloured. 

Opuntia, decumbent ; or Prickly 
Fig. 

one-spined; or Prickly Fig. 

Orthosiphon, incurved. 

Osbeckia, Chinese. 

hoary-leaved. 

Othonna, shrubby. 

tuberous-rooted ; or Afri- 



can Ragwort. 
Otochilus, brownish-flowered. 
Overlook; or Jamaica Horse bean. 
Palo de Vaca ; or Cow Tree of 

the Caraccas. 
Palo de Vaca. 

Papaw, small citron-fruited. 
Passion-flower, large-stipuled. 

Lieut. Sulivan's. 

Mr. Moore's. 

Nigella-flowered. 

Sea Anemone. 

yellow-fruited Virginian. 

Pavetta, South African. 
Pavonia, Schrank's. 
Pentas, flesh-coloured. 
Penstemon, bell-flowered. 

Gentian-like. 

glandular. 

spreading. 

various-leaved. 

Pernettia, narrow-leaved. 
Petalidium, Barieria-Kke. 
Petunia, purple, hybrid, var. 
Phacelia, Tansy-leaved. 
Phajus, spotted-leaved. 

two-coloured. 

white. 

Phalocallis, lead-coloured. 



Vol 
64 
65 
66 
68 
67 
66 
68 
67 
67 
64 
66 
64 
69 
68 
65 
68 
68 
69 
69 
65 
64 
65 
68 

70 
65 
65 
69 
68 
66 
67 
65 
67 

65 
69 
68 
69 
66 
64 
70 
67 
68 
69 
64 
69 
66 
70 
63 
67 
69 
70 
79 
61 



No. 
3618 
3621 
3783 
3891 
3833 
3721 
3950 
3849 
3850 
3579 
3750 
3575 
4007 
3S97 
3682 
3952 
3920 
4006 
4019 
3707 
3623 
3676 
3909 

4117 
3641 
3653 
4039 
3947 
3759 
3811 
3667 
3825 

3670 
3977 
3953 
4030 
3718 
3562 
4108 
3808 
3899 
3988 
3571 
3982 
3729 
4055 
3892 
3810 
3973 
4105 
4015 
3544 



Philibertia, large-flowered. 
Philodendron, thick-ribbed. 
Phlogacanthus, curved-flowered. 
Physianthus, golden-haired. 
Pimelia, dwarf. 

— Mr. Henderson's, 
showy. 



Plantain tree, superb. 
Ibid. 

Platystemon, Californian. 
— — smooth-vfruited. 
Platystigma, linear-leaved. 
Pleroma, Mr. Bentham's. 
Pleurothallis, painted, 
the Groby. 



Plumieria, sharp-leaved. 
Podotheca, cudweed. 
Poinciana, Dr. Gillies'. 
Polyspora, axillary. 
Polystachia, large-flowered. 
Poppy, South African. 
Potentilla, glabrous. 
Prepusa, scarlet and white-flow- 
ered. 
Pterodiscus, showy. 
Quinoa, useful. 
Eehmannia, Chinese. 
Rhipsalis, opposite-branched. 
Rhododendron, bearded. 

bell-flowered. 

Caucasian hybrid, var. 

sparkling. 

tree, Cinnamon-leaved var. 



with rose-coloured flowers. 
— white-flowered. 



Rondeletia, blue-flowered. 
sweet-scented. 



Rose, Mr. Brown's. 
Ruellia, fringe-flowered. 
Rytidophyllum, auricula ted. 
Saccolabium, spotted. 
Sage, spreading. 
thick-flowered. 



Sapota, or Date-plum. 
Sarcanthus, round-leaved. 
Saurauja, showy. 
Schomburgkia, margined, var. 
Sea Lavender, rasp-leaved. 
Sida, Duke of Bedford's, 
painted-flowered. 



Siphocampylos, Birch-leaved. 
- Lantana-leaved. 
Ions: flower-stalked. 



Sisyrinchium, showy. 



14 



INDEX. 



Vol. 


No. 


65 


3672 


67 


3795 


65 


3677 


65 


3709 


65 


3681 


65 


3683 


70 


4057 


64 


3536 


65 


3627 


67 


3872 


70 


4127 


70 


4125 


69 


3975 


64 


3606 


64 


3615 


67 


3803 


70 


4058 


66 


3792 


67 


3856 


69 


4014 


68 


3902 


68 


3918 


68 


3883 


67 


3816 


68 


3913 


65 


3689 


67 


3855 


70 


4062 


69 


4004 


70 


4070 


64 


3611 


70 


4111 



Solanum, bell-flowered. 
■ wavy. 

Sophronitis, drooping-flowered. 

large-flowered. 

Spathodea, five-stemmed. 

Speedwell, prostrate, Savory- 
leaved, var. 

• showy-flowered. 

Spider-wort, sedge-leaved. 

Spine Cactus, tube-flowered. 

Sprekelia, the Tumbler. 

Stapelia, Cactus-like. 

Statice, large-leaved ; or Thrift. 

Stelis, dark-flowered. 

Stenactis, showy. 

Stenomesson, orange-flowered. 

wide-leaved. 

Stephanotis, copious- wering. 

Stevia, short-awned. 

trachelium-leaved. 

Stigmaphyllum, various-leaved. 

Strobilanthes, sessile-flowered. 

Stuartia, five-styled. 

Stylidium, ciliated-leaved. 

fascicled-leaved. 

recurved. 

Sun-flower, soft-leaved. 

Swanwort, Mr. Loddiges'; white- 
lipped var. 

Tacsonia, Mrs. Marryatt's ; or 
Passion flower. 

Tecoma, Jasmine-leaved. 

Tetranema, Mexican. 

Thermopsis, bean-leaved. 

Thomasia, large-stipuled. 



Vol. 


No. 


65 


3701 


66 


3776 


70 


4128 


70 


4119 


68 


3901 


■ 66 


3715 


66 


3749 


69 


3983 


66 


3757 


65 


3702 


69 


3969 


66 


3739 


64 


3547 


64 


3555 


68 


3887 


65 


3630 


70 


4114 


65 


3694 


70 


4061 


70 


4075 


66 


3748 


67 


3896 


68 


3938 


68 


3932 


70 


4098 


64 


3582 


68 


3956 


65 


3674 


65 


3686 


67 


3812 


64 


3585 



Thrift, downy-leaved Canary. 

gigantic Canary. 

large-headed 

Thunbergia, purple, golden-eyed . 

Tithonia, ovate-leaved. 

Torenia, heart-leaved. 

Tourretia, burr-fruited. 

Traveller's Joy, Violet-blue ; 
large-flowered var. 

Treacle Mustard, deep orange- 
flowered. 

Trefoil, Mule white ; or tall 
Dutch Clover. 

Trichocentram, brown-flowered . 

Trichopilia, twisted-petaled. 

Tulbaghia, Lud wig's. 

Violet-flowered. 

Tulip, three-coloured. 

Tweedia, changeable-flowered. 

Vanda, quill-leaved. 

Verbain, Germander-leaved. 

Virgin's Bower ; mountain 
large-flowered var. 

Viscaria, dark-eyed. 

Wood-Sorrel, Barrelier's shrubb. 

downy-stamened. 

Dr. Martius'. 

hairy-petaled. 

Umbilicus, soft-leaved. 

Xanthozia, round-leaved. 

Zichya, smooth-leaved. 

Zygopetalon, Mr. Murray's. 
Tree Fern. 



Zygopetalum, African. 
shell-lipped. 



LATIN 



GENERAL INDEX, 



TO 



THE PLANTS CONTAINED IN THE FOUR VOLUMES OF THE 
THIRD SERIES, 

(Or from Vol. LXXI. to LXXIV. inclusive, oft/ie whole Work,) 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



Vol. 


No. 


73 


4316 


74 


4384 


73 


4306 


74 


4350 


71 


4353 


71 


4175 


74 


4312 


71 


4144 


73 


4359 


72 


4210 


71 


4189 


73 


4293 


72 


4230 


72 


4260 


72 


4264 


72 


4236 


73 


4328 


73 


4320 


74 


4411 


74 


4351 


71 


4371 


72 


1816 


74 


1350 


74 


4400 


73 


1843 


71 


4159 


74 


4370 


71 


4145 


73 


4295 


73 


4313 


73 


1291 


71 


4180 



Abelia floiibunda. 
Acacia argyropliylla. 

celastrifolia. 

leptoneura. 

oncinophylla. 

Aehimenes argyrostigma. 
— . — cupreata. 

liirsuta. 

occllata. 

Adcnocalyrana comosum. 
Aeridea odoratum. 
/Echmea discolor. 
iKgiphila grandiflora. 
yEschinanthus Lobbianus. 

. pulcher. 

purpurascens. 

iEschynanthus longiflorus. 

speciosus. 

Allamanda Aubletii. 

Schottii. 

Alloplectus concolor. 

dichrous. 

repens. 

Anastatica hicvochuntica. 
Anemone Japonica. 
Angrsecum apiculatum. 

candatura. 

■ distichum. 

funale. 

Angnloa Clowesii, var. 
Anigozanthos fuliginosa. 
pulcherrmius. 



Vol. 


No. 


72 


4226 


74 


4377 


71 


4200 


71 


4146 


72 


4224 


75 


4407 


72 


4222 


74 


4388 


74 


4361 


72 


4221 


74 


4368 


74 


4409 


74 


4413 


72 


4248 


71 


4133 


71 


4136 


72 


4232 


71 


4172 


73 


4281 


73 


4308 


71 


4166 


72 


4267 


72 


4223 


73 


4339 


73 


4287 


74 


4392 


74 


4410 


73 


4300 


71 


4157 


71 


4154 


72 


4238 



Anona palustris. 
Anopterus glandnlosus. 
Anthocercis ilicifolia. 
Aotus gracillima. 
Aphelandra aurantiaca. 
Aquilegia leptoceras. 
Ariopsis peltata. 
Arissema Murrayi. 
Aristolocliia anguicida. 



grandiflora. 

Arnebia echioidcs. 
Asclepias Douglasii. 
Asystasia Cororaandeliana. 
Backhousia myrtifolia. 
Barbacenia squamata. 
Barnadesia rosea. 
Begonia albo-coccinca. 

fuchsoides. 

Berberis ilicifolia. 
Bolbophyllum Careyanum. 

umbellatum. 

Bouvardia longiflora. 

Browallia speciosa. 

Brunfclsia nitida ; /3? Jamai- 

censis. 
Burtonia pulchella. 

villosa. 

Calceolaria amplexicaulis. 

alba. 

floribnnda. 

Calliandra Harrisii. 



INDEX. 



No. 

4188 
4386 
4219 

4270 
4349 
4338 
4405 
4284 
4327 
4182 
4391 
4237 
4398 
4259 
4269 
4355 
4354 
4255 
4247 
4294 
4330 
4279 
4379 
4143 
4208 
4362 
4215 
4141 
4234 
4252 
4244 
4160 

4153 
4352 
4254 
4414 
4140 
4317 

4373 
4326 
4311 
4184 
4181 
4177 
4162 
4290 
4165 
4225 
4390 
4225 
4163 



Calliandra Tweediei. 

Cantua pyrifolia. 

Castasetum callosum ; var. gran- 

diflorum. 
Cattleya Skinneri. 
Ceropegia Cumingiana. 
Chasnestes lanceolata. 
Chirita Moonii. 

Sinensis. 

Walkeriae. 

Zeylanica. 



Cn-rhopetalum fimbriatum. 

Thouarsii. 

Clematis indivisa ; var. lobata. 
— smilacifolia. 
tubulosa 



Clerodendron capitatum. 

scandens. 

sinuatum. 



Collania Anrlinamarcana. 
Columnea aureo-nitens. 

crassifolia. 

Cordyline Eumphii. 
Corynocarpus laevigata. 
Cryptadenia uniflora. 
Cuphea cordata. 
silenoides. 



Cycnoehes Loddigesii. 
Cymbidium ochroleucum. 
Cypripedium barbatum. 
Datura comigera. 
Daviesia physodes. 
Deudrobium fimbriatum; var 

oculatum. 

moniliforme. 

■ secundum. 

Diastema ochroleuca. 
Dipladenia urophylla. 
Disemma aurantia. 
Dryandra carduacea ; var. an 

gustifolia. 
Echinocactus chlorophthalnius. 

cinnabarinus. 

hexaedrophorus. 

Leeanus. 

multiflorus. 

myriostigma. 

■ oxygonus. 

— — pectiniferus. 

Wilbamsii. 

Epidendrum longicolle. 
Episcia bicolor. 
Eranthemum albiflorum. 
Eria Dillwynii. 



Vol. 


) No. 


72 


4274 


72 


4266 


73 


4333 


71 


4202 


73 


4340 


73 


4280 


71 


4186 


72 


4205 


71 


4189 


72 


4209 


72 


4246 


72 


4233 


71 


4174 


74 


4375 


72 


4261 


72 


4218 


73 


4322 


73 


4307 


73 


4343 


71 


4185 


71 


4195 


72 


4240 


72 


4242 


72 


4217 


74 


4380 


74 


4348 


71 


4152 


73 


4342 


71 


4213 


74 


4395 


74 


4363 


71 


4171 


72 


4258 


71 


4179 


71 


4151 


71 


4201 


71 


4183 


71 


4192 


72 


4207 


74 


4401 


73 


4329 


71 


4135 


74 


4402 


74 


4347 


74 


4397 


72 


4253 



4346 
4310 
4408 
4404 
4301 
4305 



Escallonia Organensis. 
Eucalyptus Preissiana. 
macrocarpa. 



E volvulus purpuro-cceruleus. 
Exacum tetragonum ; /3. bicolor. 
Exogonium Purga. 
Exostemma longiflorum. 
Fagrsea obovata. 
Franciscea acuminata, 
hydrangeaeformis. 



Eriesia peduncularis. 
Fuchsia macrantha. 

serratifolia. 

spectabilis. 

Fugosia hakeaefolia. 

heterophylla. 

Gardenia longistyla. 

malleifera. 

nitida. 

Stanleyana. 




Genista (Teline) Spachiana. 
Gesneria bulbosa ; var. lateritia. 

elliptica; var. lutea. 

Hondensis. 

Libanensis. 

pardina. 

Scliiedeana. 

■ triflora. 

Gloxinia pallidiflora. 
Gmelina Eheedii. 
Goldfussia isophylla. 
Gompholobium barbigcrum. 

venustum. 

versicolor ; var. caulibus 



purpurcis. 
Govenia utriculata. 
Habrothamnus corymbosus. 
fasciculatus. 



Hebecladus biflorus. 
Heinsia jasminiflora. 
Hibiscus ferox. 

grossulariaefoHus. 



Hindsia violacea. 
Hoya bella. 

cinnamomifolia. 

imperialis. 



Hydrangea Japonica ; var. caeru- 

lea. 
Hypocyrta glabra. 
leucostonia. 



Iambosa Malaccensis. 
Impatiens repens. 
Ipomaea murioata. 
pulchella. 



INDEX. 



>l 
72 
74 
73 
73 
74 

I 

I 

2 



No. 

4206 

4372 

4332 

4325 

4399 

4191 

4376 

4220 

4302 

4169 

4243 

4265 

4256 

4393 

4314 

4315 

4324 

4389 

4150 

4365 

4132 

4193 

4149 

4273 

4334 

4358 

4299 

4292 

1164 

4374 

4228 

4235 

4321 

4204 

1214 

4387 

4285 

4282 

4257 

4272 

4148 

4357 

4367 

4406 

4319 

4203 

4156 

4297 

1289 

4173 

4231 

4241 

4262 

4412 



Ipomaea simplex. 
Isopogon attenuatus. 
sphaerocephalus 



Ixora Griffithii. 

lanccolavia. 

odorata. 



Jatropha podagrica. 
Kopsia fruticosa. 
Lselia cinnabariiia. 
Leianthus longilblius. 
— — umbellatus. 
Lescheuaultia arcuata. 

splendens. 

Lcuchtenbergia Principis 
Leucothoe pulchra. 
Liebigia speciosa. 
Lisianthus acutangulus. 
Lithospermum canescens. 
Lobelia thapsoidea. 
Lopimia malacophylla. 
Luculia Pinciaua. 
Ly caste fulvescens. 
Lycium fuchsioides. 
Lyonia Jamaicensis. 
Malachadenia clavata. 
Mamillaria clava. 
Marsdenia maculata. 
Martynia fragrans. 
Masdevallia fenestrata. 
Maxillaria acicularis. 

maerobidbon. 

Warreaua. 



Medinilla speciosa. 
Miltonia spectabilis. 
Mormodes Cartoni. 
Napoleona imperialis. 
Nepenthes Kafflesiana. 
Niphaea albo-lineata. 
Nymphaea dentata. 
Odontoglossum hastilabium. 
Oncidiura bicallosum. 
Orothamnus Zeyheri. 
Oxypetalum solanoides. 
Passiflora amabilis. 
Pentstemon Gordoni. 
Peristeria Earkeri. 

- Humboldtii ; nor. fulva. 



Phabenopsis amabilis. 
Pharbitis cathartica. 
Phyllarthron Bojcriaimm 
Pinguicula orcliidioidcs. 
Pitcairnia undulatifolia. 
Pleroma elegans. 
l'leroma Kunthianum. 



\Vol. 
| 71 
71 
71 
74 
73 
71 
73 
M 
71 
71 
73 
71 
7:5 
71 
78 
72 
72 
74 
71 
7:2 
71 
7:2 
71 
7:! 
U 
73 
71 
74 
73 
74 
71 
74 
7:2 
71 
7:2 
71 
71 
71 
74 
71 
72 
71 
7 2 
78 

73 

71 
73 
7 --2 
7:2 
73 
7:2 
71 

7:; 



No. 
4142 
4161 
4176 
4356 
4309 
4199 
4336 
4381 
4198 
4147 
4298 
4158 
4318 
4196 
4290 
4268 
4271 
4360 
4170 
4227 
4134 
4212 
4178 
4331 
4403 
4286 
4194 
4364 
4283 
4345 
4138 
4394 
4211 
4197 
4263 
4167 
416S 
4366 
4416 
4187 
1251 
4383 
1239 
4344 

1303 
4378 
4288 
4249 
4229 
4335 
1:215 
4385 
4323 



Pleurothallis bicarinata. 

Polystaehya bracteosa. 
Porphyroeoma lanceoluta. 
Primula Stuartii. 
Puya Altensteinii ; var. gigantea, 
Rcevesia thyrsoidea. 
lvhododendron Javanicum. 

Nilagiricum. 

Pdiy nchoglossum Zeylameum . 
llucllia lilacina. 
Purdieana. 



Salpixantha coccinea. 
Salvia leucantha. 
Scaavola attenuata. 
Scutellaria cordifolia. 

incamata. 

Ventenatii. 



Sida (Abutilon) iutegerrima. 

pajoniaeflora. 

— vitifolia. 
graveolens. 



Sinningia velutina. 
Siphocampylos cocciueus. 
— — glandulosa. 

manattiaeflorus. 

microstoma. 



Smeatkmanuia laevigata. 

pubescens. 

Smithia purpurea. 
Solandra lams. 
Solanum macranthum 
Sonerila stricta. 
Stachytarpheta aristata. 
Stanhopea tigrina. 
Stenocarpus Cunninghami. 

vStrebtzia augusta. 

Strobilanthes lactatus. 
Swaiiisona Greyana. 
Tacsonia mollissima. 
Talauma Candollii. 
Tetrazygia ehvagnoides . 
Theoplirastus Jussiaei. 
Thibaudia Pincliincheusis, #. 
glabra. 

pulcherrima. 



Tliyrsacantlius strictus. 
Tillandsia bulbosa ; par. picta 
Torenia Asiatica. 
cdcntula. 



Tritonia a urea. 
Tropaeohmi crcnatiflorum. 
Smithii. 



speciosuiu. 



INDEX. 



Vol. 


No. 


73 


4337 


71 


4137 


73 


4304 


73 


4275 


73 


4278 



Tropasolum uinbellatum. 
Turncra ulraiflora. 
Vanda cristata. 

I Victoria regia. 



Vol. 


No. 


74 


4415 


74 


4382 


71 


4155 


74 


4396 



Vricsia glaucophylla. 

speciosa. 

Whitfieldia lateritia. 
Weigela rosea. 



ENGLISH 



GENERAL INDEX, 



TO 



THE PLANTS CONTAINED IN THE FIRST FOUR VOLUMES 
OF THE THIRD SERIES, 

(Or from Vol. LXX1. to LXXIV. inclusive, of the whole JVorkJ 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



Vol. 


No. 


73 


4310 


73 


4306 


74 


4340 


74 


4384 


74 


4350 


73 


4312 


71 


4144 


71 


4175 


74 


4359 


73 


4293 


72 


4210 


72 


4230 


72 


4264 


73 


4328 


72 


4260 


72 


4236 


73 


4320 


71 


4139 


74 


4411 


74 


4351 


72 


4226 


72 


4250 


72 


4216 


74 


4371 


73 


4341 


71 


4159 


73 


4295 


71 


4145 


74 


4370 


73 


4313 



Abelia, copious-flowering. 
Acacia, Celastrus-leavetl. 

hook-leaved. 

silver-leaved. 

slender-leaved. 

Achimenes, copper-leaved. 

hairy. 

silvery-spotted. 

Achimenia, eyeletted. 
jEchmea, two-coloured, or 

Crab's Eye. 
Adenocalymna, Hop-flowered. 
iEgiphila, large yellow-flowered 
iEschinanthus, beautiful. 

long-flowered. 

Mr. Lobb's. 

purplish-green. 

showy. 

Air-plant, fragrant. 
AUamanda Aublet's. 

large-flowered, erect. 

Alligator Apple-tree, or Water. 
Alloplectus, creeping. 

two coloured. 

whole-coloured. 

Anemone, Japan. 
Angraecum, apiculated, 

cord-like. 

two rowed. 

long-tailed. 

Anguloa, Mr. Clowes' var. 



Vol. 


No. 


71 


4180 


73 


4291 


74 


4377 


71 


4200 


71 


4146 


72 


4224 


72 


4222 


74 


4388 


74 


4361 


74 


4409 


74 


4413 


72 


4248 


71 


4133 


74 


4404 


71 


4136 


72 


4232 


71 


4172 


73 


4281 


73 


4308 


74 


4361 


71 


4166 


72 


4221 


72 


4267 


72 


4223 


73 


4339 


73 


4287 


74 


4392 


74 


4410 



Anigozanthus, beautiful yellow. 

sooty. 

Anopterus, glandular-leaved. 
Anthocercis, holly-leaved. 
Aotus, slender. 
Aphelandra, orange. 
Ariopsis, peltate 
Arissema, Dr. Murray's. 
Aristolochia, snake. 
Arnebia, Echium-like. 
Asclepias, Douglas's. 
Asyotasia, Cororaandel. 
Backhousia, Myrtle-leaved. 
Balsam, creeping. 
Barbacenia, scaly-stalked. 
Barnadesia, rose-coloured. 
Begonia, or Elephant's Ear, 

scarlet and white-flowered. 
Fuchsia-like, or Elephant's 

Ear. 
Berberry, holly-leaved. 
Birth wort. 

gigantic-flowered. 

Bolbophyllum, Dr. Careif s. 

umbelled. 

Bouvardia, long-flowered. 
Browallia, showy-flowered. 
Brunfelsia, shining leaved j 

Jamaica var. 
Burtonia, beautiful. 
villous. 



TNDEX. 



No. 
4297 
4231 
4300 

4157 
4238 

4188 
4386 
4219 

4270 
18 k9 

4182 
4284 
4405 
4327 
4338 
4391 
4237 
4269 
4259 

4398 

4355 
4354 
4255 
4247 
4407 
4294 
4330 
4279 
4379 
4362 
4208 
4143 

fc] n 

4252 
4244 
4160 

4153 
4352 
1254 

4414 

II ID 

4203 

4156 
4317 

1326 

4373 
4311 



Butterfly-plant, Indian. 
Butterwort, Orchis-like. 
Calceolaria, or Slipper-wort, 
clasping-leaved. 
white-flowered. 



Calliandria, Mr. Harris's. 
Mr. Tweedie's. 



Cantua, pear-leaved. 
Catasetmn, tumour-lipped, large 

flowered var. 
Cattleya, Mr. Skinner's. 
Ceropegia, Mr. Cuming's 
Chirita, Ceylon. 

Chinese. 

- Mr. Moon's. 
Mrs. Walker's 



Chcenestes, lanceolate-leaved. 
Cirrhopetalum, fimbriated. 
Thouars'. 



Clematis, tubular-flowered. 

or Virgin's Bower, smilax 



leaved. 

undivided-leaved 



variety. 
Clerodendron, capitate. 

climbing. 

sinuate-leaved. 



lobed 



Collania, Andinamarcana. 
Columbine, slender- spurred. 
Columnea, golden, 
thick-leaved. 



Cordyline, Rumphius. 

Corynocarpus, smooth-leaved. 

Cuphea, catch41y. 

large red-flowered. 

Cryptadenia, solitary-flowered. 

Cymbidium, pale yellow. 

Datura, horn-bearing. 

Daviesia, hatchet-leaved. 

Dendrobium, fringe-lipped, var. 
with sanguineous eye. 

necklace-stemmed. 

one-sided. 

Diastema, pale yellow. 

Hipladenia, taper-pointed. 

Disemma, New Caledonia. 

Dove-flower, or Peristeria ; Mr. 
Barker's. 

Humboldt's; tawny-fl. var. 

Dryandra, Thistle-like ; narrow- 
leaved var. 

K< hinocactus, cinnabar-flowered. 

green-eyed. 

hexsedron. 



Vol 
71 
71 
71 
73 
71 
71 
71 

73 
71 
74 
72 
71 
72 
72 
73 
71 
73 

71 

72 
71 
72 

72 

72 

71 
74 
72 
72 
73 
73 
73 
71 
71 
72 

72 
74 
74 

71 
78 

7:2 



No. 
4181 
4177 
4184 
4296 
4190 
4162 
4172 

4281 
4165 

4390 
4225 
4163 
4274 
4266 
4333 
4202 
4340 

4186 
4205 
4189 
4209 
4246 
4233 

4174 
4375 
4261 
4218 
4307 
4343 
4322 
4185 
4195 
4242 

4217 
4348 
4380 
4152 
4342 
4240 



72 


4213 


74 


4395 


74 


4363 


71 


4179 


71 


4171 


72 


4258 


71 


1151 


74 


4389 


73 


4333 



Echinocactus, many-flowered. 

many-spotted. 

Mr. Lee's. ^ 

Mr. William's. 

pectinated. 

sharp-angled. 

Elephant's Ear, or Begonia ; 
scarlet and white flowered. 
Euehsia-like. 



Epidendrum, long-necked. 
Episcia, two-coloured. 
Eranthemum, white-flowered. 
Eria, Dilwyn Llewelyn's. 
Escallonia, Organ-Mountain's. 
Eucalyptus, Dr. Preiss's. 

large-fruited, or Gum tree. 



Evolvulus, purple-blue flowered. 
Exacum, square-stalked ; two- 
coloured var. 
Exostemma, long-flowered. 
Fagraea, obovate-leaved. 
Franciscea, acuminated. 
Hydrangea-like. 



Eriesia, jointed-pedicelled. 
Fuchsia, large-flowered, apeta- 
lous. 

— serrated-leaved. 

showy. 



Fugosia, Hakea-leaved. 

various-leaved. 

Gardenia, clapper-bearing. 

glossy-leaved. 

long-styled. 

Lord Derby's. 

Genista, Mr. Spach's. 

Gesneria, elliptic-leaved ; yellow 
var. 

Honda. 

leopard-spotted. 

many-flowered. 

Schiede's. 

three-flowered. 

tuberous rooted ; brick- 
coloured var. 

Gloxinia, pale-flowered. 

Gmelina, Rheede's 

Goldfussia, equal-leaved. 

Gompholobium, changeable 
purple stemmed var. 
— fringe-keeled. 
graceful. 



Govenia, bladdery. 
Gromwell, hoary. 
Gum-Tree, large-fruited. 



INDEX. 



Vol. 
71 
71 
71 

72 
73 
74 
71 
74 
74 
74 
74 
72 

74 

73 

72 

73 

73 

73 

73 

72 

74 

73 

71 

74 

73 

74 

74 

72 

72 

73 

71 

72 

74 

73 

73 

72 

73 

73 

71 

72 

71 

71 

71 

72 

73 

74 

74 

74 

73 

73 

71 

72 

72 



No. 
4183 
4201 
4192 
4207 
4329 
4401 
4135 
4368 
4402 
4347 
4397 
4253 

4346 
4310 
4245 
4323 
4337 
4301 
4305 
4206 
4372 
4332 
4191 
4399 
4325 
4376 
4400 
4220 
4234 
4302 
4169 
1248 
4393 
4314 
4265 
4256 
4315 
4324 
4150 
4257 
4132 
4193 
4149 
4273 
4334 
4365 
4358 
4408 
4299 
4292 
4164 
4228 
4235 



Habrothamnus, cluster-flowered 
corymb-flowered. 



Hebecladius, twin-flowered. 
Heinsia, Jessamine-flowered. 
Hibiscus, Gooseberry-leaved, 
stinging. 



Hindsia, large-flowered. 
Hogmeat, poison. 
Hoya, beautiful. 

cinnamon-leaved. 

imperial. 

Hydrangea. Japan ; blue 

ered var. 
Hypocyrta, shining-leaved. 
white-mouthed. 



flow 



Indian Cress, notch-petaled. 

showy. 

umbellate. 



Ipomaea, fine-leaved. 
— handsome, 
simple-stalked. 



Isopogon, attenuated-leaved. 
■ round-headed. 



Ixora, fragrant. 

lance-leaved. 

Mrs. Griffiths'. 



Jatropha, gouty-stalked. 
Jericho, rose of. 
Kopsia, shrubby. 
Lady's Slipper, bearded. 
Laelia, cinnabar-coloured. 
Leianthus, long-leaved, 
umbellate. 



Leuchtenbergia, noble. 
Leucothoe, elegant. 
Leschenaultia, drooping. 

splendid scarlet flowered. 



Liebigia, showy. 
Lisianthus, sharp-angled. 
Lobelia, Mulleiu-like. 
Lotus, tooth-leaved. 
Luculia, Mr. Pince's. 
Lyeaste, tawny-flowered. 
Lycium, Fuchsia-flowered. 
Lyonia, Jamaica. 
Malachadcnia, club-stalked. 
Malacophylla, soft-leaved. 
Mamillaria, club-shaped. 
Maple- Apple. 
Marsdenia, spotted-leaved. 
Martynia, fragrant. 
Masdevallia, windowed. 
Maxillaria, large splendid. 
Mr. Warre's. 



Vol. 


No. 


. 74 


4374 


73 


4321 


72 


4204 


72 


4214 


74 


4387 


74 


4384 


71 


4138 


73 


4282 


71 


4148 


72 


4272 


74 


4357 


- 74 


4367 


74 


4406 


74 


4368 


73 


4319 


71 


4156 


73 


4289 


71 


4173 


72 


4262 


74 


4412 


71 


4142 


72 


4241 


73 


4285 


71 


4161 


71 


4176 


74 


4356 


73 


4280 


73 


4309 


71 


4199 


73 


4336 


74 


4381 


71 


4198 


74 


4400 


71 


4147 


73 


4298 


73 


4318 


71 


4196 


74 


4360 


71 


4134 


71 


4170 


72 


4227 


72 


4212 


74 


4403 


72 


4331 


71 


4178 


73 


4286 


7:2 


4268 


73 


4299 


72 


4271 


71 


4154 


74 1 


4364 



Maxillaria, needle-leaved. 
Medinilla, showy. 
Miltonia, showy. 
Mormodes, Carton's. 
Napoleona, imperial. 
Nasturtium, Sir James Smith's. 
Nightshade, large-flowered. 
Niphsea, white-fined. 
Oncidium, two-warted. 
Odontoglossum, halberd-leaved. 
Orothamnus, Mr. Zeyher's. 
Oxypetalum, Solanum-like. 
Passion-flower, white-crowned. 
Pelican-flower. 
Peristemon, Mr. Gordon's. 
Peristeria, or Dove-flower ; Hum- 
boldt's ; tawny-flowered var. 
Pharbitis, purging. 
Phyllarthron, Mr. Bojer's. 
Pleroma, elegant. 
Prof. Kunth's. 



Pleurothallis, double-keeled. 
Pitcairnia, broad-waved-leaved. 
Pitcher Plant, Sir Stamford 

Eaffles'. 
Polystachya, bracteated. 
Porphyrocoma, lance-leaved. 
Primrose, Stuart's. 
Purga, or True Jalap. 
Puya, Attenstein's gigantic rur 
Reevesia,' thyrse-flowered. 
Rhododendron, Javanese. 
Neelgherry. 



Rhynchoglossum, Ceylon. 
Rose of Jericho. 
Ruellia, lilac-flowered. 
Mr. Purdie's. 



Sage, white-flowered. 
Scaevola, attenuated-leaved. 
Sida, entire-leaved. 

heavy-scented. 

Paeony-flowcred. 

• vine-leaved. 

Sinningia, velvety. 
Siphocampylos, manettia- 
flowered. 

— glandular. 

— showy scarlet -flowered. 

— small-mouthed. 
Skull-Cap, flesh-coloured. 

heart-leaved. 

Ventenat's. 

Slipper-wort, copious-flowering. 
Smeathmannia, downy. 



INDEX. 



Vol. 


No. 


71 


4194 


73 


4283 


74 


4345 


74 


4394 


71 


4197 


72 


4263 


71 


4167 


71 


4168 


74 


4366 


74 


4416 


72 


4215 


71 


4187 


72 


4251 


74 


4383 


72 


4239 


73 


4303 


73 


4344 



Smeathmannia, smooth-stalked. 
Smithia, purple-flowered. 
Solandra, smooth-leaved. 
Sonerila, upright. 
Stanhopea> tiger-spotted. 
Stenocarpus, Mr. Cunningham's 

VStrelitzia, great white. 

Strobilanthes, milky-leaved. 
Swainsona, Grey's. 
Swanwort, Mr. Loddige's. 
Tacsonia, downy-leaved. 
Talauma, De Candolle's. 
Tetrazygia, Eheagnus-like. 
Theophrasta, Jussieu's. 
Thibaudia, beautiful. 
Pichincha ; glabrous mr. 



\Vol. 


No. 1 


74 


4378 


73 


4288 


72 


4249 


72 


4229 


73 


4335 


71 


4158 


71 


4137 


73 


4334 


72 


4211 


72 


4269 


74 


4415 


74 


4382 


73 


4275 


73 


4278 


74 


4396 


71 


4155 



Thyrse-flower, upright. 
Tillandsia, bulbous; coloured var. 
Torenia, large-flowered. 

purple-blotched. 

Tritonia, golden. 
Trumpet-Flower, scarlet. 
Turnera, Elm-leaved. 
Vanda, crested. 
Vervain, Bastard, aristate. 
Virgin's Bower, or Clematis, 

tubular-flowered. 
Vriesia, glaucous-leaved. 
showy. 

V Water-Lily, great Victoria. 

Weigela, rose-coloured. 
Whitfieldia, brick-coloured.