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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CURTIS'S 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPRISING THE 



plants of tf)t ftopal (gartens of &eto 

AND 

OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN; 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S., 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D. CANTAB., CORRESPONDENT OF THE INSTITUTE OF FRANCE. 



VOL. XXII. £3 

OF THE THIRD SERIES; 

(Or Vol.XCII. of the Whole Work.) 




•^-"■re* — = 



" In order, eastern flowers large, 

Some drooping low their crimson bells 
Half closed, and others studded wide 
With disks and tiars, fed the time 
With odour." 

Tenvyson. 



LONDON: 
L. REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1866. 

Mo. Bot. Garden, 




J. I. TAYLOR AND CO., PRINTERS, 
T.ITTLE QTTEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S INN TIELDS. 



WILLIAM WILSON SAUNDERS, F.R.S., 

TREASURER AND VICE-PRESIDENT OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, 
A GENTLEMAN NO LESS DISTINGUISHED FOE HIS SCIENTIFIC ACQUIREMENTS 

THAN FOB HIS 

LIBEBAL ENCOTJBAGEMENT OF MANY BBANCHES OF SCIENCE ; 

AND TO WHOM 

HOBTICDLTUBE AND THE BOYAL GABDENS OF KEW ABE UNDEB SPECIAL 

OBLIGATIONS, 

€\)i& Uolutne is ©etJtcateH, 

HIS SINCERE FRIEND, 

JOS. D. HOOKER. 



Royal Gardens, Kbw, 
December 1, 186fi. 



Cijtrft gtvith. 

No. 253. 

VOL. XXII. JANUARY. [Price 5s. Qd. col d - 2*. 6rf. plain. 

OR NO. 948 OF THE ENTIRE AYORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMPRISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GEE AT BRITAIN, 

WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 

BY 

JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S., 

Stmtor ai flje &0i?al Botanic ©arflcus. at Stein. 




Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers exotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

Mo. Bot. Garden, 



HYACINTHS, TULIPS, AND OTHEK DUTCH BULBS 

IMPORTED BY 

Wm. CUTBUSH and SON. 

The DESCEIPTIVE PEICED CATALOGUE, with numerous cultural remark 
0D Sy Orders earnestly solicited, as the supply cannot possibly meet the increasing dema 
HIGHGATE NURSERIES, LONDON, N. 



THE OLD CHESHUNT NURSERIES, CHESHUNT, N. 



PAUL AND SON 

Invite the attention of intending Planters to the Fine Stock of 

ROSES, 

FRUIT TREES, EVERGREENS, DECIDUOUS TREES, AND SHRUBS 
ALL IN FINE CONDITION. 

Upwards of 70 Prizes haye been awarded to them for Pot and Cut Roses, including the premier awards of th 

PEICED DESCEIPTIVE CATALOGUES ON APPLICATION. 
Just Published, 

FLOWEEING PLANTS, GEASSES, & FEE. 5 

OF 

GEEAT BEITAIN. 

NEW EDITION, IN FOUE VOLUMES, 8*vo. 
The work contains 319 large coloured plates, and is bound in cloth boards, gilt edges, price 



SOCIETY FOE PROMOTING CHEISTIAN KNOWLEDGE, 
77, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, W.C., London. 



NEW WORKS NOW READY. 

CURTIS'S BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. Coloured Illustrations and Descripti 
the new and rare Flowering Plants of the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, and of other Be 
Establishments. By Dr. Hookeb, F.E.S., Director of the Eoyal Gardens, Kew. Third 
Vol. XXL, being the New Volume for 1865. With 66 Coloured Plates by Fitch, 42s. 

THE FLORAL MAGAZINE; Containing Figures and Descriptions of the 
varieties of Popular Garden Flowers. By the Eev. H. Hojtetwood Dombrain. V» 
with 64 beautifully-coloured Plates by J. Autdbews, 42s. 

Published monthly, with 4 Plates, price 2s. 6d. Volumes and Parts from the commen 
may still be had ; also cloth Cases for binding Vol. IV. 

GENERA PL ANT ARUM, ad Exemplaria imprimis in Herbariis Kewensibus 
definita, Auctonbus G. Bejjthah et J. D. Hookeb. Voluminis primi Pars II, 
Dicotyledonum Polypetalarum Ordines XI : Legumiuosas— Myrtaceas. 14s. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STEEET, COVENT GAEDEN. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 

B. S. WILLIAMS 

Respectfully informs his Customers and the Puhlic generally, that on and after the 1st of 
January, i860, his Counting-house, Seed Shop, Orchid Houses, Stoves, Greenhouses, and 
other Plant houses, will be removed to the Victoria Nursery, Upper Holloway, near the 
Highgate Archway, and immediately at the foot of Highgate Hill ; in which Nursery, in 
addition to the houses removed, he has just completed the erection of a large Show Conser- 
vatory and several new Plant Houses, forming a most complete Establishment ; he will then 
make this his principal place of business, instead of Paradise Nursery as heretofore. The 
Victoria Nursery is easy of access from all parts of London ; the direct carriage-route from 
the West End is through Albany Street, Regent's Park, Park Street, Camden Town, Kentish 
Town Road, and the Junction Road. The ' Favorite' Omnibuses from the Bank and London 
Bridge Railways, Victoria Station, Charing Cross, and Westminster, Regent Street, Picca- 
dilly, and Brompton, arrive at and start from the entrance of the Nursery every seven 
minutes. 

In connection with the above announcement, B. S. W. invites inspection of his most 
extensive and valuable collection of rare Exotic and other Plants. Throughout the Winter, 
Spring, and early Summer months, a continuous show of flowering and ornamental plants will 
be maintained in the large Conservatory, sufficiently interesting to repay a visit at any time. 

Victoria and Paradise Nurseries, Holloway, London, N. 

SUTTON'S SPRING- CATALOGUE 

AND 

AMATEUR'S GUIDE FOR 1866, 

(ILLUSTRATED.) In 4 Parts. 

PRICE SIXPENCE. GRATIS TO CUSTOMERS. 

CONTENTS. 
['ART 1.— A comprehensive List of all the best kinds | PART 3.— A detailed List of Bulbous Flower Roots 





ables, with Instructions on Cultivation. 
PART 2. — A comprehensive List of the most popular 
nds of Flower Seeds, with Instructions on Cultivation, 
eluding an Illustrated List of Continental Novelties re- 
utly imported by Messrs. SUTTON. 



(for Spring planting), Stove, Greenhouse, and other 
Plants, Hardy Ferns, etc. etc. 

PART 1. — A descriptive List of the most desirablo 
kinds of Grass and other Agricultural Seeds, and Remarks 
on the New Forage Plant, BROMUS SCIIR.EDERL 



ALSO 

A Useful and Concise Calendar of Operations in the Kitchen Garden, 

For the whole Year, written expressly for this Work. 
ORIGINAL ARTICLES on the POTATO DISEASE, USE OF FROZEN MANGELS, etc. 

AND A VALUABLE COLOURED RAILWAY MAP OF ENGLAND, 
Containing important information. 

SUTTON'S SHORT SELECT SEED LIST 

Is also ready, and will be sent Gratis and Post Free on application. 



ADDRESS, 

SUTTON AND SONS, Seed Growers and Merchants, Royal Berkshire Seed 
Establishment, READING. 



BOTANICAL M I 



GENUINE SEEDS 




JAMES VEITCII 

BEGB TO ANNOUNCE THAT HIS 

CATALOGUE OF KITCHEN GARDEN AND FLOWER SEEDS FOR 1866, 
WITH LIST OF IMPLEMENTS AND OTHER GAEDBN BEQU1S11 

Is now published, and will be forwarded Free on application. 

J. V., devoting his personal attention to this department of his Business, can warrant Ins 
Seeds Tkue to Name, and of the most genuine description. 

The CATALOGUE will he found to contain all NEW VEGETABLE and FLOWBB 
SEEDS of merit, in addition to those kinds in general cultivation. 

THE HOYAL EXOTIC NURSERY, KINGS ROAD, CHELSEA, LONDON, S.W. 

PELARGONIUM ZONALE, WILTSHIRE LASS. 

(Figured in December number of Floral Magazine.) 

DOWNIE, LAIRD, and LA1NG regret they will not be Bble to Bend out (he 
above Magnificent Pelargonium until May next, particulars of which will be duly 
announced. Orders are now being booked ; a list of subscribers will shortly be published. 
Coloured drawing by Andrews, for 14 stamps. 

Stanstead Park, Forest-Hill, London, S.E. 



NEW AZALEA INDICA. 

J1VERY AND SON have much pleasure in offering the undermentioned two beautiful 
• Seedlings, as they feel assured the? wili prove thoroughly distinct, and most desirable kind*. 
FOEGET-ME-NOT, brilliant glossy reddish-purple, lOs.iJd. and 21*. each, figured in the ' Floral 
Magazine,' May, 1864; BEAUTi r OF DORKING, white, striped and spotted with I 
10*. (id. and 21s. each. For a full description see Catalogue, which will he forwarded, post-free, on 
application. 

Dorking, July. 



KING/, 

All Orders for Seeds amounting to 21s. sent Carriage Paid. 

FLOWER SEED ORDERS SENT POST PAID. 




No. 1 Collection of Vegetable Seeds 10/6 



No. 2 
No. 3 
No. 4 
No. 5 
No. 6 
No. 7 
No. 8 



15/. 
21/. 

30/. 

42/. 
63/. 
U\. 
105/. 



No. 1 Collection of Flower Seeds 3/6. 



No. 2 
No. 3 
No. 4 
No. 5 
No. 6 
No. 7 
No. 8 



NOW READY, FREE, AND POST PAID. 

A Descriptive Priced Catalogue of Vegetable, Flower Seeds, Gladioli, etc 



b/6. 

7/6. 
10/6. 

1- 
21. 

30/ . 

,"42/&105^. 



Xoic Ready, Part II. , with 25 Coloured Plates, Price 15*., 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

TO THE 

FLORA OF MENTOXE. 

BY 

J. TEAHEEXE MOGGEIDGE. 



IN PREPARATION. 
A SECOND CENTURY OF ORCHIDACEOUS PLANTS, 

selected from the subjects published in Curtis' ' Botanical Magazine ' since 
the issue of the 'First Century.' Edited by James Bateman, Esq., F.R.S. 



New Series of Natural History for Beginners, 
BRITISH BEETLES ; a Familiar Introduction to the study 

of our Native Coleopteba. By E. C. Eye. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Plates, 
and Wood-Engravings, 10*. Qd. 

BRITISH SPIDERS ; a Familiar Introduction to the study 

of our Native Abachnida. By E. F. Staveley. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured 
Plates, and Wood-Engravings, 10s. 6d. 

BRITISH BEES ; a Familiar Introduction to the study of 

our Native Bees. By W. E. Schuckabd. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Plates, 
and Wood-Engravings, 10*. 6d. 

BRITISH BUTTERFLIES AND MOTHS ; a Familiar 

Introduction to the study of our Native Lepidopteba. By H. T. Stainton. 
Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Plates, and Wood-Engravings, 10*. 6d. 

BRITISH SEAWEEDS ; a Familiar Introduction to the 

study of our Native Marine Alg.e. By S. O. Gbay. Crown 8vo, 16 Co- 
loured Plates, and Wood-Engravings, 10s. Qd. 



* # * A good introductory series of books on British Natural History for the 
use of students and amateurs is still a desideratum. Those at present in use 
nave been too much compiled from antiquated sources ; while the figures, copied 
in many instances from sources equally antiquated, are far from accurate, the 
colouring of them having become degenerated through the adoption, for the 
sake of cheapness, of mechanical processes. 

The present series will be entirely the result of original research carried to its 
most advanced point ; and the figures, which will be chiefly engraved on steel, 
by the artist most highly renowned in each department for his technical know- 
ledge of the subjects, will in all cases be drawn from actual specimens, and 
coloured separately by hand. 



LONDON : 
LOTELL EEEVE AND CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



WORKS ON BOTANY. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA; b Description 

of the Flowering Plants and Ferns indicenous to, or natural! •■ 

By G. Bextham, F.K.- B Crown 8vo. 

' , Illustrai 

Edition*, with a Wood-Engravine, including dissections, of each §p J 8vo, 

2 vols., 1293 Wood-Engravi !.'-. £3. 10*. 

THE FIELD BOTANIST'S COMPANION; a Familiar 

Account, in the Four Seasons, of the most common of the Wild Flowering Plants of 
the British Isles. By Thomas Moore, F.L.S. One volume. Demy 8vo, 24 Coloured 
Plates, 21*. 

OUTLINES OF ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introducl 

to Local Floras. By Geobge Bextham, F.R.S., Prudent of the Linnean A 
2s. Sd. 

OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY ; containing 

Characters of above a Thousand Species of Fungi, and a Complete List of all that 
have been described as Natives of the British Isles. By the Ber. ML J. Herkelett, 
M.A., F.L.S. Demv 8vo, 24 Coloured Plates, 30*. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND; containing 

an Account of their Classical History, Uses, Characters, Development, 
Nutritious Properties, Modes of Cooking and Preserving, etc. Bv 0. D. I!u>ham, 
M.D. Second Edition. Edited by F. Currey, F.K.S. Crown *8vo, 12 Coloured 
Plates, 12*. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF BRITISH MYCOLOGY, comprising 

Figures and Descriptions of the Funguses of interest and novelty indigenous to 
Britain. By Mrs. T. J. IICSSEY. Royal 4to; I i'latcs, 

£7. 12*. Gd.; Second Series, 50 Coloured Plates, £1. 10*. 

THE BRITISH FERNS: Coloured Figures and Descriptions, 

with Analyses of the Fructification and Venation, of the Ferns of Cheat Britain 
and Ireland, systematically arranged. Bv Sir W. J. Hook Kit, F.R.S. Royal 8vo, 
66 Plates, £2. 2*. 

GARDEN FERNS: Coloured Figures and Descriptions, with 

Analyses of the Fructification and Venation, of a Selection of Exotic Ferns, adapted 
for Cultivation in the Garden, Hothouse, and Conservatory. By Sir W. J. H< 
F.R.S. Royal 8vo, 64 Plates, £2. 2*. 

F1LICES EXOTICiE: Coloured Figures and Description of 

Exotic Ferns, chiefly of such as are cultivated in the Royal Gardens of Kew. By 
Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Roval 4to, 100 Plates, fc6. 11*. 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES ; containing all that 

are known to be Natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. .1.1: BBS BUT, M.A., 
F.L.S. Demy 8vo, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

PHYCOLOGIA BRITANNICA: History of British Seaweeds, 

containing Coloured Figures, Generic and Specific Characters, Synonyms and De- 
scriptions of all the Species of Algse inhabiting the Shores of the Brit ish Island*. By 
Dr. W. H. Hautet, F.R.S. Royal 8vo, 4 vols., 360 Coloured Plates, £6. 6*. 

SYNOPSIS OF BRITISH SEAWEEDS, compiled from 

Dr. Harvev's ' Phycologta Britanxica./ 12mo 5* 

THE TOURIST'S FLORA; a Descriptive Catalogue of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns of the British Islands, France, Germany, Switzerland, 
Italy, and the Italian Islands. By Joseph Woods, F.L.S. Demv 8vo, 18*. 

THE RHODODENDRONS OF SIKKIM-HLMALAYA; 

being an Account, Botamcal and Geographical, of the Rhododendrons recently dis- 
covered m the Mountains of Eastern Himalaya, from Drawings and Descriptions 

™ a . de Z ?? SVOt J ™ y Dr -„ J - D - HoOKEE > F -R-S. By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. 
Folio, 30 Coloured Plates, £3. 16*. 

PARKS AND PLEASURE GROUNDS; or, Practical Notes 

on Country Residences, Villas, Public Parks, and Gardens. By Ciiakles II. J. 
Smith, Landscape Gardner. Crown 8vo, 6*. 



LOVELL REEVE AND CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



5552. 




"Vincent Brocks.Imp. 



Tab. 5552. 

EHODODENDEON Hodgsoxi. 
Mr. Hodgson's Rhododendron. 



Nat. Ord. Erioejb. — Decandkia Monogtkia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 133G.) 



Rhododendron Hodgsoni; frutex robustus, ramis cortice papyraceo tectis, 
ramulis crassis tomentosis, foliis amplis obovato-oblongis oblongisve 
obtusis supra glabris subtus tomento argenteo v. aubrufo opertis, basi 
rotundatis subcordatisve, petiolis crassis, capitulia magnia multifloris 
denaia, calyce obsoleto, corolla late campanulata pallide purpurea 
8-10-loba, stamiuibus 16-18, ovario pubesceute 10-16-loculari. 

Rhododeudiion Hodgsoni. Hooh.f. SihJcim Rhod. t.lo, etinJourn. Sort. 
Soc. Lond. v. 7. p. 7(5. 

Rhododendron sp. Griff. Notula;, v. 11. p. 303. Ic. t. 521. 



One of the noblest of the grand series of Rhododendrons 
that adorn the Eastern Himalayan mountains, discovered by 
Griffith in Bhotan in 1838, and gathered by myself in the 
alpine valleys of Eastern jfoml and Sikhim, at elevations of 
10-12,000 feet. It hWerecfrn the temperate house of Ivew 
in April of last year. This is one of the finest of all the 
Rhododendrons in foliage; the trunk is remarkable for its 
pale brown papery bark, which flakes off in patches as broad 
as the hand ; and the leaves often attain eighteen inches in 
length. Of the wood the mountaineers make spoons, cups, 
saddles, etc., and the leaves are used as platters for butter, 
curds, etc. 

Descr, A large shrub or almost a tree, ten to twenty feet 
high; main branches horizontal, almost as thick as the 
thigh; bark smooth, papery, flaking off; wood white, close- 
grained. Leaves ample, spreading, eight to eighteen inches 
long, oblong or oblong-obovate, obtuse or subacute, very 
coriaceous, glabrous and glossy above, beneath clothed with 

januaki 1st, lboo. 



silvery or ferruginous tomentum. Heads four to eight 
inches in diameter, of very numerous, crowded, i»al<- purple 
flowers; peduncles short, viscid, and often downy. Calyx 
obscurely lobed or vUa broadl] campanulate, 

one and a half to two and a half inches broad Storm tu 
teen to eighteen. Ovary pubescent ; ten- to sixteen-celled ; 
style stout; stigma rather large. Capsule narrow-linear, cj 
lindric, curved. 



Fig. 1. Stamen. 2. Ovary, style, and stigma -.—natural size. 3. Trans- 
verse section of ovary : — magnified. 







W.litdi.dd.etlith 



Tfacent-Brooks,Imp . 



Tab. 5553. 

LiELIA GEANDIS. 

Large-flowered Lartia. 



Nat. Ord. Oechide.e.— Gtnandeia Monaxduia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4302.) 



Iuelia grandis ; caule clavato monophyllo, folio coriaceo, pedunculo bifloro 
basi spathaceo longiore, floribus subhorizontalibus, sepalis lauceolatis 
reflexis, petalis late lauceolatis crispis convexis, labello niembranaceo 
venoso nudo undulato trilobo, laciniis lateralibus circa columnam con- 
volutis et multo longioribus. Lindl. 

L^lia grandis. Lindl. et Past. Fl. Gard. v. 1. n. 91, cum xylog. 



This fine Lalia first made its appearance in the establish- 
ment of M. Morel, of Paris, where it flowered in the spring 
of 1850. In the year following it was exhibited at one of 
the great London shows, but from that time it would seem 
to have entirely disappeared from our collections, until its 
remtroduction last year (1864) by Messrs. Hugh Low and Co., 
of the Clapton Nursery, who received a few plants of it from 
their collector at Bahia. From the same locality and about 
the same time, specimens were sent by Mr. Williams to the 
Royal Gardens at Kew, where one of them flowered finely 
in the summer of 1865, when it was drawn by Mr. Fitch for 
this work, in which the first coloured representation of the 
plant is now presented. Some slight discrepancies may be 
observed between Mr. Fitch's drawing and the woodcut in 
Faxton's Magazine, but these are readily accounted for by the 
circumstance that the former was made from fresh flowers, 
while the latter was taken from specimens that had probably 
suffered in their transmission to this country. 

In its habit and the general aspect of its flowers L. grandis 

JANUARY 1st, 18G6. 



is ondistinguishable from the Cattlex which — but for 

sight pollen-masses it would at once be referred. And 

a the latter structural distinction cannot be implicitly re- 
lied upon, for 1 have examined specimens of so-called Leliaa 
in which all but two pair of pollen-mam bwi Lj rudi- 

mentary. The circumstance of species of the two supp 
genera breeding freely together — as haa been proved b\ Mr. 
Dominy's experim< another fact pointing in the same 

direction, and . r to justify Profess i Eteichenbach's 

opinion that they ought not any longer to be kept apart, ex- 
cept for the convenience of cultivators. La Ua grandis should 
be grown with the Cattleyas. It is easily managed, and 
flowers during the summer months. 

Descr, An epiphyte with stems under a foot high, narrow 
at the base, but swollen above, and bear iitarv rigid 

leaf, which is rather broader at the base than at the point 
Peduncle proceeding from an ample spathe, two-flowered. 
Sepals nankeen-coloured, lanceolate, about two inches long; 
petals rather wider in the middle than the sepals, anjJ of the 
same colour, a little curled and in some cases toothed at the 
«does. Lip three-lobed. whitish with purple veins. Column 
entirely concealed by the side lobes of the lip, which are 
folded round it. 



Fig. 1. Column. 2. Pollen-masses -.—maf/ni/tr,!. 




"Wlitah.deletMi 



"^ncent Brooks, Imp- 



Tab. 5551. 
BEGONIA BACCATA. 
Berried -fruited Began ia. 



Nat. Ord. Begoniace;e. — Mon<ecia Poltandria. 
Gen. Char. (Fide supra, Tab. 4172.) 



Begonia haccata ; herbacea, elata, monoica, robusta, eaule petiolis pedun- 
culisque breviter tomentosis, foliis late cordato-rotundatis abrupte 
acuminatis remote insequaliter sinuato-dentatis subtus et utrinque 
secus nervos pubescentibus, stipulis amplis late oblongis obtusis 
deciduis, cymis brevibus axillaribus 6-S-floris, floribus magnis albis, 
sepalis utroque sexu 2 oblongo-rotundatis, antberis linearibus sub- 
emarginatis filamento gracili longioribus, ovai-io subgloboso obscure 
5-6-suleato 5-6-loculari, septis ramosis piacentiferis, stylis 5-G bicor- 
nutis cornubus tortis, fructu (ex Mannio) baccato indehiscente subglo- 
boso, carnoso. 



One of the most remarkable of the discoveries of our in- 
defatigable collector, Gustav Mann, in the Bight of Benin, 
was a fine and robust Begonia, with a baccate fruit ; of this, 
the subject of our present Plate, he sent living specimens to 
the Royal Garden in 1861, from the island of St. Thomas, 
which flowered in May of last year. The same collector also 
gathered it in Fernando Po, growing on an epiphyte at an 
altitude of 1300 feet. Like the very different, but scarcely 
less remarkable B. prismatocarpa (Tab. 5307), and the even 
more remarkable fern-leaved B. asplenii folia, Hook. f. (A. DC. 
Prod. xv. 320), both also discovered by Mr. Mann, the B. 
Mannii stands alone as a section of the genus, differing from 
all described in A. De Candolle's elaborate monograph of 
the genus, in the baccate fruit and five- or six-celled ovary, 
in which the septa are deeply lobed, or almost branched and 
covered with ovules; for the details of this I am indebted 
to Mr. Fitch's careful drawing, not having had the oppor- 
tunity of examining the plant when in flower. 

Descr, Stems tall, robust, as thick as the thumb, covered 
with ferruginous tomentum, as are the petioles, peduncles 

JANUARY 1ST, 1866. 



and pedicels, tt inches long, very broadly or- 

bicular-cordate, suddenly tapering to a long point, remotely 
toothed, glabrous except the nerves aboi ay beneath. 

Stipules very large, broadly oblong, obtuse,deciduoua FUm rs 

monoecious, in short axillan cymes, two and a half in 
across, white in our specimen, white and pink in dried i 
from Fernando Po. Sepals in both sexes two, broadly oblong, 
obtuse, concave. Stamens in one short compressed bundle! 
apparently seated on a flat receptacle; anthers narrow linear, 
obtuse, emarginate. Ovary nearly spherical, but somewhat 
urceolate, downy, obscurely five- or six-lobed, five- or 
celled, with deeply lobed dissepiments. Styles five or six, 
rather slender, with two horns, which are divaricating at the 
base, and twisted at their apices. Fruit described by Mr 
Mann as a large, nearly spherical, fleshy, indehiscent ben 



tin! iS f LStara ?M^"^ 2. Ovary and styles. 3. Transverse 
turn of ovary. 4. Miniature fruit :—nat. size. 




"W" fitch, del.eUith 



"Vincent Brooks, Imp- 



Tab. 5555. 

SPAliAXIS PTJLCIIERKDIA. 

Most beautiful Sparaxis. 
Nat. Ord. Ibidem. — Triaxdria Mo> t ogt>~ia. 



Gen. Char. Perigonium corollinum superum, infundibuliforme, tubo 
brevi gracili, limbi arapli 6-partiti laciuiis subsequalibus stellatira patentibus 
rarius campanulatim conniventibus. Stamina 3, tubo perigonii inserta, 
adscendentia, inclusa, filamentis subulatis. Ovarium obtuse 3-gonum, 3- 
loeulare ; ovula plurima, in loculorum angulo centrali 2-seriata; stylus fili- 
formis, stigmatibus 3 luiearibus recurvis. Capsula inembranacea, obsolete 
3-gona, subtorulosa, 3-locularis, loculicide 3-valvis. Semina pluriuia, sub- 
globosa. — Herbse Capenses, rlrizomate tubcroso-reticulato tunicato. l\>lia 
ensata, nervosa. Scapus simplex v. racemosus. Flores spicati, intra spatham 
2-valvem membranaceam inclusi. Endl. 



Sparaxis pulcherrima ; scapo gracillimo elato raeemoso, foliis anguste ensi- 
formibus sensim atteuuato-acumiuatis, ramis capillaribus elougatis de- 
vis apice florif'eris, bracteis elongato-subulatis subiutegerrimis, brac- 
teolis spatbaceis louge acuminatis, floribus maguis purpureis, peri- 
antbio aaquali eampanulato. 



For the introduction of this most lovely Cape bulb, we 
are indebted to the well-known unrivalled cultivators of 
hardy and half-hardy plants, Messrs. Backhouse, of York, 
who flowered it in October of the present year. The spe- 
cimens were procured from the district between the Keis- 
kamma and Buffalo rivers, on the eastern side of South 
Africa, and grew in a rich black soil. The plant is alluded 
to in the elder Backhouse's Missionary Narrative, p. 199. I 
have native specimens from the Albany district, tJitenhage, 
Assagaybosch, and Transvaal, all named S. pendula, which in 
habit it a good deal resembles ; but the whole plant is much 
larger, the perianth campanulate, and the bracts very dif- 
ferent in shape. A more lovely and graceful plant, from its 
extremely tall and slender stems and tiers of drooping flowers, 
cannot well be imagined. 

Desck. Leaves narrow ensiform, rather thick, about one- 

JANUARY 1ST, 1866. 



third of an inch broad, graduallj narrowed from below the 
middle to a very Blender apex, rigid, erect 
iugly tall and slender, attaining six feet in its native habitat, 
racemosery branched above and drooping; branches remote, 
capillary, three to biz inches long, curved from the weight of 
the pendulous flowers, which are clustered at their extremi- 
ties. Bracts at the base of the branches one and a half inch 
long, very slender, subulate, entin fts at the base of 

the flowers oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, somewhat laciniate. 
but less so than is usual in the genus. / pendulous. 

Perianth equal, one and a half inch long, dark blood-purple, 
campanulate. Ovary turbinate. 



Fig. 1. Eeduced figure of whole plant. '2. Apex of scape : — nst. rise. 
3. Base. 4. Apex of leaf :—?uit. size. 5. Ovary and stamens. 0. Ovary 
and style : — both magnified. 







V 



• 



r 



7 




W. fitch, del. et Mi 



Vincent Brooks, Inu 



Tab. 5556. 

EPIDENDBUM MYRiANTHini. 

Many-flowered Epidendrum. 



Xat. Ord. Orchide.e.— Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. ( Vide supra, Tab. 4:107.) 



Epidendrum: (Amphiglottium, Lindl.) myriantlium ; foliia Kneari-lanceo- 
latis acutis vaginis nigro-punctatis, paniculae composite effusse rarais 
divaricatis, bracteis setaceis, pedicellis ovariisque longissiinis, sepalis 
membranaceis oblongis obtusis, petalis lineari-spathulatis, labello 
longiore 4-partito bicalloso laciniis truncatis linearibus aequilongis 
recurvis lateralibus subintegris, intermediis apice tantum laceris, cli- 
nandrio utrinque obtuso appendice dorsali membranacea cucullata 
bifida. Lindl. 

Eeidendrttm myriantbura. Lindl. Fol. Orch. 



This most charming Epidendrum was discovered many 
years ago by Mr. Skinner at a very high elevation on the 
mountains of Guatemala, and a few of the specimens that he 
transmitted to this country have lingered in our collections, 
but — owing no doubt to their having been kept too warm — 
could never be induced to flower. As one of these happened 
to be still alive at Knypersley, though its shoots were no 
thicker than a crowquill, I directed it to be put in a cool 
house, in which some of the old and feeble stems speedily 
blossomed, and new shoots, thrice the strength of the others, 
almost immediately presented themselves. When these are 
sufficiently advanced, I have no doubt that masses of flowers 
will be produced, equal to the dried specimens preserved in 
the Lindleyan Herbarium (now at Kew), and which have 
assisted Mr. Fitch in preparing the representation on the 
opposite page. 

The plant flowered in June last in one of the cool houses 
at Knypersley, and .continued long in beauty. Some idea of 
its habit may be gathered from the reduced sketch in lhe 
Plate. The stems are about a yard high. — <7. B. 

JANUARY 1ST, 1866. 



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"W Fitch, del 



""vSncent Brooks,Irap • 



Tab. 555 7. 
CHAMERANTHEMUM Beteicm!; var. variegata. 
Beyriclis Chameranthemum; variegated-leaved var. 



Nat. Ord. Acanthacejs. — Didyxamia Angiospermca. 

Gen. Char. Calyx profunde 5-fidus. aequalis. Corolla bypocrateritnorpba 
Vel elongato-infundibtdiformis, tubo longo gracili, limbo subaequali. Sta- 
mina 4 fertilia, iufra os tubi paulove prof undius inserta, inclusa, per paria 
basi contigua ; antberae staminum majorum 2-loculares, minorum 1-2-locu- 
iares. Capsula interne depressa, valvis contiguis asperma, superius 2-locu- 
lans 4-sperma; depressimentum adnatum. Semina discoidea, retinaculis 
suffulta. — Herbae v. suffrutices Brasilieuses, habitu Eranthemi sed nam, 
Jioribus eliam minoribus. Spicajloribus oppositis, parvibracteatis. Nees in 
De Cand. Prod. 



Chameranthemum Beyrichii ; caide petiolisque strigoso-tomentosis, foliis 
ovalibus oblongisve margine subscaberulis. 

Chameranthemum Beyrichii. Ntes in Lindl. Introd. ed. 2. p. 285, et in 
Mart. Fl. Bras. p. 155. t. 28. 

Var. variegata; foliis albo-variegatis. 



The pretty plant here figured was sent to the Royal 
Garden by Mr. Bull, of Chelsea, in 1864, and flowered in 
March of the following year. It is a native of South Brazil, 
having been discovered by the traveller Beyrich, and since 
gathered by various collectors. According both to the de- 
scription of Nees, and to our own specimens, it is a very 
variable plant in stature and in the form of the leaves. Nees 
describes a state with the leaves on long petioles, and their 
surface variegated with red ; so that other showy forms may 
be worth cultivation, and one day find a place in our stoves. 

Desck. A rather slender herb, one to three feet high, 
sparingly branched. Stem and branches, peduncles and pe- 
tioles, covered with strigose pubescence. Leaves shortly pe- 
tioled, two to five inches long, oblong ovate-oblong or almost 
lanceolate-oblong, scarcely acute, minutely scabrid on the 
upper surface and margins, green or variegated with white. 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1866. 



Panicles strict, erect, branched, many-flowered ; branches Blen- 
der, elongate. Brads small, shorter than the cal\ ce& ( "('/•*'- 
lobes narrow, oblong-lanceolate, acute, glandular-pubescent. 

Corolla white, one and a half inch in diameter; tube rather 
slender, slightly curved; lobes oi the limb longer than the 
tube, equal, spreading oblong, waved. Stamens united at 
the very base in pairs; anthers included, those of the longer 
stamens linear-oblong, with two unequal cells; those of the 
smaller, one-celled. — J. I). II. 



Fig. 1. Calyx and style. 2. Tube of corolla, laid open. 3. Pair of 
stamens. 4. Ovary. 5. Young capsule : — all but Fig. 5 magnified. 







W. Fitch, del. etith 



%icent Brooks, fcj 



Tab. 5558, 

LUISIA Psyche. 
Butterfly-flowered Luisia. 



Nat. Ord. Obchide^e.— Gtynandria Monandrta. 

Gen. Char. Sepala herbacea, linearia, lateralibus labello suppositis, dor- 
sali minore. Petala dissimilia, tenuiora, ssepius longiora, patentissima vel 
iornicata. Labellum indivisum, savpius auriculatum, cuin columua conti- 
nuum, dependens, inappendieulatum, nunc convexum, nunc concavum et 
medio constrictum. Columua nana, carnosa, apoda. Stigma anticum, cir- 
cular^, rostello obtuso obsolete Pollinia 2, cereacea, postice excavata ; 
caudicula lata brevi trianguiari, glandula membranacea replicata. Anthera 
subrotunda, 2-locularis, vahulis niacilentis. — Herba? epiphyta, caulescentes, 
erecta, juncece, Asia et America- tropica. Folia teretia, ngida. Flores 
parvi y obscure virides vel purpurascentes. Lindl. 



Luisia Psyche; foliis teretibus cruris, spicis brevissimis paucifloris, se- 
pilo dorsali ligulato-t'ornicato, lateralibus angustioribus per dorsum 
carina! is, petalis cuneato-oblongis subacutis, labello basi utrinque au- 
riculato, ante auriculas a basi utrinque minute semicordato trans- 
verse obovato subacuto, limbo minute lobulato. Bchb. Jit. in. Gard. 
Chron. 

Luisia Pysche. Bchb.fil. in Mold et Schlechf. Bot. Zeit. 1863, p. 98, et in 
Gard. Chron. 1866 (' iS'ew Plants,' n. 312). 



Ihe genus Luisia consists almost exclusively of inconspi- 
cuous, taper-leaved plants, with much the habit of Vanda 
teres. There are, however, a few exceptions to the above 
rule, the most remarkable of which are an unintroduced 
plant (the Luisia volucris of Lindley) the flowers of which 
resemble birds with narrow outspread wings, and the species 
now figured for the first time, whose singular blossoms have 
quite an insect-like character. 

It was discovered in Burmah by the Rev. C. S. Parish, 
by whom a few living specimens were sent to Messrs. Hugh 
Low and Co., of the Clapton Nursery. It is well described 
by Prof. Reichenbach, both in the ' Botanische Zeitung ' of 
1863, and in the 'Gardeners' Chronicle ' of 1865. It grows 

FEBRUARY 1st, 186b'. 



slowly, but is easilj managed, and flowers freely during the 

spring and summer. 

Descr. Plant about a foot high. Leans thick, round and 
tapering, six inches long. Flower* produced, two or three in 

succession, on a very short spike. Sepals and petals a pale 
yellowish-green, the dorsal sepal being more concave and 
broader than the side sepals, which are ligulate, keeled along 
the back, and blunt at their extremities, and not half the 
length of the petals; the latter, which hang down like the 
ears of a rabbit, are more than an inch long, cuneate-oblong, 
and rather sharp at the end. Lip not so long as the petals, 
fleshy, convex, with two auricles at its base, the portion above 
* hich is transversely obovate, and slightly cordate, its disk is 
beautifully marked — after the manner of some species of 
Ophnjs — with dark violet-purple spots on a green ground. 
Column very dwarf. — J. B. 



Tig. 1. Front view of flower. 2. Pollen-masses : — magnified. 



5Sf>9. 




Yf. Pitch, ael.et. ntn. 






Tab. 5559. 

THIBAUDIA cordifolia. 
Cordate-leaved Tliibaudia. 



Nat. Ord. Vaocinie^:. — Decandbia Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4303.) 



Thibaudia cordifolia; ramulis glabratis teretibus, foliis breviter petiolatis 
oblongis obtusis integerrimis basi cordatis 5-7-plinerviis, petiolo 
pubescente, floribus subcapitatis, capitulis terminalibus nutantibus 
bracteis amplis oblongis concavis subsericeis involucratis, floribua 
breviter pedicellatis, calvcis tubo depresso, limbo breviter 5-dentato, 
corolla tubuloso-ventricosa extus pubescente, ore contracto 4-6-den- 
tato, filamentia brevibus latis, antberis lineari- oblongis in tubum sul- 
catum elongatum apice 2-rimosum productis. 

Thibaudia cordifolia. H. B. and Kunth, Nov. Gen.etSp.v. 3. p. 271. t/255- 
Be Cand. Prodr. v. 7. p. 563. 

Pboclisia cordifolia. Klotzsch in Linnaea, v. 24. p. 32. 



The beautiful plant here figured was exhibited by Mr. 
Bateman at the Horticultural Society, in December last, 
under the name of Thibaudia Ocanensis; it is clearly however 
the T. cordifolia of Kunth, a native of the alpine regions 
of the Andes of Bogota, Merida, Caraccas, Loja, and other 
provinces of New Granada and Ecuador. According to an 
observation of Dr. Triana in our Herbarium, it is called 
"Uva de Anis" in the Bogota Andes. 

Descr. A branched shrub, nearly glabrous, except on the 
tips of the branches, petioles, and inflorescence ; branches te- 
rete, pubescent with spreading hairs towards the tips, leaves 
one and a half to three inches long, coriaceous, ovate-oblong, 
obtuse, quite entire, margins slightly recurved, glabrous above, 
also below, or there covered with minute scattered glandular 
dots, five- to seven-nerved at the base ; petioles very short, 
pubescent, as are the nerves slightly beneath. Racemes re- 
duced to a crowded head of flowers, which is clothed at the 

FEBBUABY 1ST, 1866. 



base with oblong, concave, imbricating, rather silky bracts. 
Flowers on short, pubescent peduncles and pedicels, nearly 
one inch long, bright-red, white at the mouth of the corolla. 
Calyx-tube sub-globose, but depressed, and almost truncate at 
the base ; teeth five, short. Corolla tubular, but ventricose, 
between cylindric and oblong, much contracted at the mouth, 
with five short, spreading lobes. Stamens with very short 
broad filaments, and long, oblong anthers, their cells termi- 
nating in a long, straight, double tube, which opens by two 
anticous, subterminal slits. The flowers are occasionally tetra- 
merous or hexamerous. J. I). II 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Calyx, ovary, and style. 3 and i. Anthers : — all 
magnified. 






\ 







"Vincent Br 



Tab. 5560. 

BATJHINIA tomentosa; var. glabra. 

Downy Bauhinia ; glabrous var. 



Nat. Ord. Leguminos^:. — Diadeiphia Decandkja. 



Gen. Char. Calycis tubus brevis v. elongatus, limb us ante anthesin apice 
clausus v. contractus, per anthesin varie fissus. PetuJa 5, parum inaequalia, 
imbricata, summo intirao. Stamina 10 v. pauciora, libera v. breviter con- 
nata ; antbene versatiles, longitudinaliter dehiscentes. Ovarium ssepissime 
stipitatum ; stylus brevis v. elongatus. Legumen oblongum v. lineare, 
rectum v. obliquum, indehiscens v. 2-valve, intus continuum v. septatum. 
Semina compressa, albuminosa; cotyledones plana?; radicula brevis. — 
Arbores v. frutices erectee v. scandentes, interdwm cirrhifera;. Folia sim- 
plicia, 2-loba v. 1-foliolata. Flores racemosi, corymbosi v. paniculati. 



Bauhinia tomentosa; fruticosa, inermis, pubescenti-tomentosa v. glabrata, 
foliis basi cordatis rotundatis v. truncatis ad medium 2-lobis, lobis 
obtusis 3-nerviis, pedunculis 1-2-floris, calyce spathaceo tubo brevi, 
petalis flavis obovatis v. obcordatis, staminibus 10, fertilibus fere li- 
beris, ovario stipitato, legumine tenui piano lineari basin versus sensim 
angustato venoso acuto. 

Bauhinia tomentosa. Linn. Sp. PI p. 536. Be Cand. Prod. v. 2. p. 514. 
Burm. Zeyl.p. 44. t. 18. Harv. et Sond. Fl. Cap. v. 2. p. 275. 

Var. glabrata ; tota tenuiter pubescens v. glabrata. 



This handsome shrub was introduced to the Eoyal Gar- 
dens, Kew, by M. Monteiro, who sent seeds in 1860 from 
Bembe, in Benguela, the plants from which flowered in our 
stoves in November of last year. The species itself (of which 
this is rather a glabrous form) is a native of Ceylon, Malabar, 
and other parts of India; it is also commonly cultivated 
in the tropics of both the old and new worlds. In Africa, it 
is also found in Natal; by Kirk at Senna, during Living- 
stone's late expedition ; and in the interior of Dammara 
Land, by Baines and Chapman. 

Descr. A slender shrub in our stoves, four to five feet high, 
with long, rather pendulous branches, the branchlets, pe- 
tioles, under surface of the leaves, and inflorescence glabrous 

FEEKUABT 1ST, 1866. 



or pubescent Leaves nearly orbicular in circumscription, cut- 
to two and a half inches in diameter, two-lobed to the middle, 

rounded cordate or truncate at the base; lobes obtuse, each' 
three- to four-nerved; petioles .slender; stipules subulate. Ra- 
cemes small, few-flowered, terminal. flowers pale golden- 
yellow, with a deep-purple blotch at the base of the upper 
petal. Calyx spathaceous, rather short. Petals obovate or 
obcordate, concave, comment. Stamens ten, all fertile, nearly 
free. Legume flat, linear, but gradually narrowed down- 
wards, acute, glabrous or puberulous.— J.' I). II. 



Fig. 1. Calyx and stamen. 2. Ovary and base of calyx with the stamens 
removed :— both magnified. 




.ael.ettth 



Vrncanl 



Tab. 5561. 

EULOPHIA EUGLOSSA. 

Pretty-lipped Eulophia. 



Nat. Ord. Obchibe^;. — Gvna:ndria Monaxdria. 



Gen. Char. Perianthium esplanatum, sepalis petalisque ascendentibus, 
subrequalibus, aut omnino liberie, aut cum ungue magis minuave produeto 
columnae connatis. Labellum cornutum, aut brevius calcaratum, sessile, 
venis cristatis, barbatis vel omnino brevibus, stepius trilobum, nunc indivi- 
sum. Columna semiteres, marginata. Anihera 1-2-locularis. Pollinia 2, 
postice biloba vel cava, caudicula lineari brevi, glandula transversa. — Herb* 
terrestres, pseudobulbosa. Folia longa, membranacea, plicata vel pluries cos- 
tata. Scapi radicates, multijlori. Lindl. Gen. et Sp. 



Eulophia euglossa; pseudobulbo elongato sursum attenuato, foliis cu- 
neato-oblongis acutis, pedunculo basi vaginato racemoso, bracteis 
lineari-lanceia setaceo-acuminatis flores excedentibus, raento modico, 
sepalis petalisque ligulatis acuminatis subsequalibus, labello trifido, 
laciniis lateralibus acutangulis, lacinia media semioblonga acuta hinc 
undulata, carinulis obscuns geminis in disco inter lacinias posticas, 
calcari subclavato, ovarii pedicellati dimidiam non attingente, anthera 
apice tumida obtusji. Rchb.fil. 

Galeandra euglossa. Bchb.Jil. in Pot. Zeitung (1852), v. 9. p. 35. Lindl. 
West Afr. Orchids, Proceed. Linn. Soc. (May, 1862.) 



This singular plant was sent to Kew by Mr. G. Mann, from 
the banks of the Old Calabar river, on which — as indeed on 
all the streams that form the great delta of the Niger — Or- 
chids seem to abound. Unfortunately they rarely possess 
sufficient beauty to recommend them to the notice of the 
cultivator, as is the case with our present Eulophia which, 
notwithstanding its prettily-marked lip, can by no means be 
considered an attractive object. Its long pseudobulbs, ta- 
pering from the base upwards, are in their shape and ap- 
pearance not unlike the fossil Calamites that are found so 
plentifully in the different beds of the New Red Sandstone, 
and with which we are all of us familiar. 

E. euglossa was so named by Prof. Reichenbach, who met 
with it originally among some undetermined species from the 

TEBRUABY 1st, 1S66. 



West (oast of Africa, in Dr. Lindley's Herbarium. It seeme 
to have been rirst introduced by the Messrs. Loddiges, then 

it was sent to Consul Schiller, and still more recently, as 
already noted, to the Royal Gardens at Kew, where it hap- 
pened the other day to be in bloom when the great German 
Orchidist visited that establishment and drew up the descrip- 
tion that I have had much pleasure in transcribing. 

This Eulophia, like its congeners, is a terrestrial plant, and 
must be treated accordingly. Coming as it does from one of 
the sultriest regions on the earth's surface, it will of course 
require a good deal of heat — J. B. 

Desck. Pseudobulbs a span or more high, cylindrical, ta- 
pering in a fusiform manner at the end. Leaves cuneate, oblong, 
acute, a foot long. Peduncle elongate, with scales beneath, 
racemose at the top. Raceme many-flowered, flowers dis- 
tant. Bracts linear-lanceolate, very acuminate, longer than 
the flowers. Sepal* and petals lanceolate, acuminate, nearly 
equal, spreading, green. Lip trifid, lateral segments semi- 
ovate, acute, greenish-yellow, middle segment semi-oblong, 
acute, somewhat crisp, white, with some radiating purple 
streaks on the base, and with two carina 1 between the poste- 
rior segments. Spur clavate, green, not half the length of 
the pedicellate ovary. Column clavate. Anther with a ter- 
minal umbo. — Rekb.Jil. 



Fig. 1. Side view of lip. 2. Front view of ditto. 3. Column. 4. Pol- 
len-masses : — magnified. 






* 




"W.Bteh rid - 



Vincent Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 5562. 

TILLAN] )SIA xiphioides. 
Buenos Ayres Air-plant. 



Nat. Ord. Bkomeliacej:. — Hexaxdria Moxogyxia. 



Gen. Char. Calyx 3-partitus, laciniis Bubeequalibua. Petala 3 unguibus 
m tubum conniventibus v. convolutis, limbo patente. Stamina 6, hrpogyna, 
nlamentis linearibus alternis saepius petalis adhrerentibus. Ovarium li- 
berum, 3-loculare ; stylus filiformia, stigmate 3-fido, ovulis in loeulorum 
angulo centrali 2-seriatim affixis. Capsula cartilaginea, linearis v. ovata, 
3-locularis, loculicide 3-valvis, valvis endocarpio mox soluto duplicatis, 
eiplanatis v. tort is. Setnima plurima, ex baai septorum erecta, stipitata, 
stipite pilia papulosis cincto; testa dura. — Herbae plerumgue epiphytes le- 
pidota. Caulea fuliosi. Florea xpicati v. paniculati, bracteati, rarius soli- 
tar it. Endl. 



Iim,amjsia xtpkioidet; tota argenteo-tomentosa, foliis dense rosulatis 
patenti-incurvie, e basi lata longe late subulatis marginibus incurvis 
v. involutia, scapo brevi v. elongato simplici, spica disticha lineari- 
oblonga multiflora, bracteia anguste oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis 
flense imbrieatis. floribus albis, sepalis anguste aubulato-lanceolatis 
attenuato-acuminatis, petalorum ungue elongato-lineari, lamina ob- 
longo-obovata acuminata recurva erispata, stigmatis lobis brevibus 
linearibu8 recurvia. 

Tillandsia xiphioides. Ker in Bot. Reg. t. 105. 



A remarkably pretty and deliciously-scented plant, for 
which the Royal Gardens are indebted to Dr. Rayner, of 
Uxbridge, who sent the flowering specimen figured here 
in May, 1865 ; it is called by Ker a native of Buenos Ayres, 
but the only native specimens I have were gathered by the 
late Dr. Gillies, near Mendoza, where it is abundant on trees 
<nitl stones along the bases of the Cordillera, and is much 
prized for its delicate fragrance. 

Descr. A small rigid herb, covered with grey silvery to- 

FEBRtTARl 1ST, 1S66. 



mentum. Leave* crowded, rosumte, four to six inches Inn- 
half an inch broad at the bate, broadlj subulate with 
curved margins that arc u the tip. Scape \om 

.{■(' three to four inches long, distichous, com- 
pressed, of many closely imbricating, linear-oblong bracts, 
two inches lorn?. Flowers numerous, snow-white. Sepals 
linear lanceolate, acuminate. Petah with a slender, linear 
claw, one inch long, and broadly obovate acuminate, reflexed 
white, crisped blade. — J. 1). II. 



Fig 1. Calyx, style, and stigma. 2. Petal and stamen. 3. Ovary:— 
all magnified. 



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The Island of Hongkong, though oecopying an are* of aareely *£Jryj 
miles, is characterized by an extraordinary varied Flora, partaking i «""*«.« 
that of South Continental China, of which comparatively Utie is known The 
number of Species enumerated in the present volume is 10o6, derive I » hiefly 
from materials collected by Mr. Hinds, Col. Champion, Dr. Hance, Dr. Hailand, 
Mr. Wright, and Mr. Wilford. 



FLORA OF THE BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS 

By Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. Demy 8vo, 806 pp 87*. 6* WW"** 
under the auspices of the Secretary of State for the Colon.es. 
Containing complete systematic descriptions * %££S£JgS& 
Ferns of the British West Indian Islands, accompanied by an elaborate 
reference, and a list of Colonial names. 



FLORA YITlENSIS j a Description of the Plants of the 

Viti or Fiji Islands, with an Account of their History, Uses, and Pro- 
perties. By Dr. Berthold Seemann, F.L.S. Royal 4to, Parts I. to 
III. each, 10 Coloured Plates, 15*. To be completed in 10 Parts. 
This work owes its origin to the Government Mission to Viti, to which the 
author was attached as naturalist. In addition to the specimens collected, the 
author has investigated all the Polynesian collections of Plants brought to this 
country by various botanical explorers since the voyage of Captain Cook. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE NUEVA QUINOLOGIA 

OP PAVON, with Observations on the Barks described. By J. E. Howard, 
F.L.S. With 27 Coloured Plates by W. Fitch. Imperial folio, half- 
morocco, gilt edges, £6. 6*. 
A superbly-coloured volume, illustrative of the most recent researches of Pa- 
von and his associates among the Cinchona Barks of Peru, founded mainly on a 
manuscript and collection of specimens which were sold shortly before Pavon's 
death to a botanist of Madrid, from whom they passed into the hands of the 
author. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF SIKKIM-HIMALAYAN PLANTS, 

chiefly selected from Drawings made in Sikkim, under the superintendence 
of the late J. F. Cathcart, Esq., Bengal Civil Service. The Botanical 
Descriptions and Analyses by Dr. J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Imperial folio, 
24 Coloured Plates and an Illuminated Title-page by W. Fitch, £5. 5s. 

As an example of botanical drawing, colouring, and design, this work has never 
been surpassed. Only a few copies remain. 



THE LONDON JOURNAL QF BOTANY. Original 

Papers by eminent Botanists, Letters from Botanical Travellers, etc. Vol. 
VII., completing the Series. Demy 8vo, 23 Plates, 30$. 



JOURNAL OF BOTANY AND KEW MISCELLANY. 

Original Papers by eminent Botanists, Letters from Botanical Travellers, 
etc. Editefl by Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Vols. IV. to IX., Demy 8vo, 
12 Plates, £1. 4*. A Complete Set of 9 vols., half-calf, scarce, £10. 16*. 



ICONES PLANTARUM. Figures, with brief Descriptive 

Characters and Remarks, of New and Rare Plants, selected from the 
Author's Herbarium. By Sir W. J. Hookeb, F.R.S. New Series. Vol. 
V., Royal 8vo, 100 plates, 31j. Gd. 



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FERNS AND MOSSES. 



THE BRITISH TERNS; or, Coloured Figures and De- 
scriptions, with the needful Analyses of the Fructification and Venation, of 
the Ferns of Great Britain and 'Ireland, systematically arranged. By Sir 
W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal 8vo, 66 Plates, &2. 2a. 
The British Ferns and their allies are illustrated in this work, from the 
pencil of Mr. Fitch. Each Species has a Plate to itself, so that there is ample 
room for the details, on a magnified scale, of Fructification and Venation. The 
whole are delicately coloured by hand. In the letterpress an interesting account 
is given with each species of its geographical distribution in other countries. 



GARDEN FERNS ; or, Coloured Figures and Descriptions, 

with the needful Analyses of the Fructification and Venation, of a Selection 
of Exotic Ferns, adapted for Cultivation in the Garden, Hothouse, and Con- 
servatory. By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal 8vo, 64, Plates, £2. 2a. 
A companion volume to the preceding, for the use of those who take an in- 
terest in the cultivation of some of the more beautiful and remarkable varieties 
of Exotic Ferns. Here also each Species has a Plate to itself, and the details of 
Fructification and Venation are given on a magnified scale, the Drawings being 
from the pencil of Mr. Fitch. 



FILICES EXOTICA ; or, Coloured Figures and Description 

of Exotic Ferns, chiefly of such as are cultivated in jM°y«) £f d ' ns of 
Kew. By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal 4to, 100 Plates, £6. 11*. 
One of the most superbly illustrated books of Foreign Ferns that has been 
hitherto produced. The Species are selected both on account of their beauty of 
form, singular structure, and their suitableness for cidtivation. 

FERNY COMBES; a Ramble after Ferns in the Glens and 

Valleys of Devonshire. By Chablottte Chants. Second Edition. 
Fcp 8vo 8 coloured plates by Fitch, and a Map of the County, ba. 



HWDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that 

.™ known Natives of .h«- Brit* Ua ** £.* J. Pkkkki.kv. 

M A., F.L.S. Demy 8vo, pp. 360, 24, Coloured 1 latcs, 21*. 
A very complete Manual, comprising characters of all the npmm, »ilh the 
cirf.u. stances of habitation of each, with special chapters on devilment and 
SS!£m!JE* fructification, geographical distention, up and modes 
of^Ueetnig .ndVscrvine, folded by an extensive seW kM .Unc- 
tions, in which the essential portions of the plant are related, ... «un case 
a magnified scale. 



10 LOVELL REEVE AND CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



SEAWEEDS. 



PHYCOLOGIA BRITANNICA; or, History of British 

Seaweeds, containing Coloured Figures, Generic and Specific Characters, 

Synonyms and Descriptions of all the Species of Algte inhabiting the 

Shores of the British Islands. By Dr. W. H. Harvey, F.R.S. Royal 

8vo, 4 vols., 765 pp., 360 Coloured Plates, £6. 6*. Reissue in Monthly 

Parts, each 2s. 6d. 

This work, originally published in 1851, at the price of £7. 10s., is still the 

standard work on the subject of which it treats. Each Species, excepting the 

minute ones, has a Plate to itself, with magnified portions of structure and fruc 

tificatiou, the whole being printed in their natural colours, finished by hand. 



SYNOPSIS OF BRITISH SEAWEEDS, compiled from 

Dr. Harvey's ' Phycologia Britannica.' Small 8vo, 220 pp., 5*. 
A. Descriptive Catalogue of all the British Seaweeds, condensed from the 
' Phycologia Britannica.' It comprises the characters, synonyms, habitats, and 
general observations, forming an extremely useful pocket volume of reference. 



PHYCOLOGIA AUSTRAL1CA; a History of Australian 

Seaweeds, comprising Coloured Figures and Descriptions of the more cha- 
racteristic Marine Algse of New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, South 
Australia and Western Australia, and a Synopsis of all known Australian 
Algge. By Dr. Harvey, F.R.S. Royal 8vo, 5 vols., 300 Coloured Plates, 
£7. 13*. 
This beautiful work, the result of an arduous personal exploration of the 
shores of the Australian continent, is got up in the style of the ' Phycologia 
Britannica' by the same author. Each Species has a Plate to itself, with ample 
magnified delineations of fructification and structure, embodying a variety of 
most curious and remarkable forms. 



NEREIS AUSTRALIS; or, AlgEe of the Southern Ocean, 

being Figures and Descriptions of Marine Plants collected on the Shores 
of the Cape of Good Hope, the extra-tropical Australian Colonies, Tas- 
mania, New Zealand, and the Antarctic Regions. By Dr. Harvey, F.R.S. 
Imperial 8vo, 50 Coloured Plates, £2. 2s. 
A selection of Fifty Species of remarkable forms of Seaweed, not included in 
the ' Phycologia Australica,' collected over a wider area. 



LOVELL REEVE AND CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 11 



FUNGI. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY, containing 

Characters of above a Thousand Species of Fungi, and a Complete Eist of 

all that have been described as Natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. 

M. J. Berkeley, M.A., F.L.S. Demy 8vo, 484 pp., 24 Coloured Plates, 

30*. 
Although entitled simply 'Outlines,' this is a good-sized volume, of nearly 500 
pages, illustrated with more than 200 Figures of British Fungi, «ll carefully 
coloured by hand. Of above a thousand Species the characters are given, ami 
a complete list of the names of all the rest. 



THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. Con- 
taining an Account of their Classical History, Uses, Characters, Develop- 
ment, Structure, Nutritions Properties, Modes of Cooking and Preferring, 
etc. By C. D. Badham, M.D. Second Edition. Edited by P. Cukkk.y, 
F.R.S. Demy 8vo, 152 pp., 12 Coloured Plates, 12*. 
A lively classical treatise, written with considerable epigrammatic humour, 
with the view of showing that we have upwards of 30 Species of Fungi abounding 
in our woods capable of affording nutritious and savoury food, but which, from 
ignorance or prejudice, are left to perish ungathercd. " I have indeed grieved," 
says the Author, "when reflecting on the straitened condition of the lower 
orders, to see pounds of extempore beefsteaks growing on our oaks, in the shape 
of Fistulina hepatica ; Puff-balls which some have not inaptly compered to 
sweetbread ; Hydna, as good as oysters ; and Agaricus deliciows, reminding U of 
tender lamb-kidney." Superior coloured Figures of the Species are given from 
the pencil of Mr. Fitch. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF BRITISH MYCOLOGY, com- 

prising Figures and Descriptions of the Funguses of interest and novelty 
indigenous to Britain. By Mrs. T. J. Hussey. Royal 4to ; *iret Series, 
90 Coloured Plates, £7- 12*. 6rf.; Second Series, 50 Coloured Plate., 
£4. 10*. 
This beautifully-illustrated work is the production of a lady who, being an 
accomplished artist, occupied the leisure of many years in accumulating a port- 
folio of exquisite drawings of the more attractive forms and variety ol Brrtufc 
Fungi. The publication was brought to an end with the 140th I late by her 
sudden decease. The Figures are mostly of the natural sue, carefully coloured 
by hand. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE FUNGI OF OIK IIIXDS 

AND WOODS. Drawn from Natural Specimen*, by SahaH I hk.I. 
Royal 4to, First and Second Series, 10 Coloured Plate., 21*. each. 
A selection from a portfolio of Drawings of Fungi made io the neighbourhood 
of Shropshire. 



12 LOVELL REEVE AND CO.'s PUBLICATIONS. 



SHELLS AND MOLLUSKS. 



ELEMENTS OE CONCHOLOGY; an Introduction to the 

Natural History of Shells, and of the Animals which form them. By 
Lovell Reeve, F.L.S. Royal 8vo, 2 vols., 478 pp., 62 Coloured Plates, 
£2. 16s. 
Intended as a guide to the collector of shells in arranging and naming his 
specimens, while at the same time inducing him to study them with reference 
to their once living existence, geographical distribution, and habits. Forty- 
six of the plates are devoted to the illustration of the genera of shells, and 
sixteen to shells with the living animal, all beautifully coloured by hand. 



THE LAND AND FRESHWATER MOLLUSKS indi- 
genous to, or naturalized in, the British Isles. By Loveil Reeve, F.L.S. 
Crown 8vo, 295 pp., Map, and 160 Wood-Engravings, 10*. &d. 
A complete history of the British Land and Freshwater Shells, and of the 
Animals which form them, illustrated by Wood-Engravings of all the Species. 
Other features of the work are an Analytical Key, showing at a glance the na- 
tural groups of families and genera, copious Tables and a Map illustrative of 
geographical distribution and habits, and a chapter on the Distribution and 
Origin of Species. 



CONCHOLOGIA ICONICA j or, Figures and Descriptions 

of the Shells of Mollusks, with remarks on their Affiuities, Synonymy, and 
Geographical Distribution. By Lovell Reeve, F.L.S. Demy 4to, pub- 
lished monthly in Parts, 8 Plates, carefully coloured by hand, 10*. 
Of this work, comprising illustrations of Shells of the natural size, nearly 
2000 Plates are published, but the plan of publication admits of the collector 
purchasing it at his option in portions, each of which is complete in itself. Each 
genus, as the work progresses, is issued separately, with Title and Index ; and an 
Alphabetical List of the published genera, with the prices annexed, may be pro- 
cured of the publishers on application. The system of nomenclature adopted 
is that of Lamarck, modified to meet the exigencies of later discoveries. With the 
name of each species is giveu a summary of its leading specific characters in 
Latin and English ; then the authority for the name is quoted, accompanied 
by a reference to its original description ; and next in order are its Synonyms. 
The habitat of the species is next given, accompanied, where possible, by par- 
ticulars of soil, depth, or vegetation. Finally, a few general remarks are offered, 
calling attention to the most obvious distinguishing peculiarities of the species, 
with criticisms, where necessary, on the views of other writers. At the com- 
mencement of the genus some notice is taken of the animal, and the habitats 
of the species are worked up into a general summary of the geographical distri- 
bution of the genus. 



LOVELL REEVE AND CO.'s PUBLICATIONS 



18 



CONCHOLOGIA ICONICA IN MONOGRAPHS. 



Genera. Plates. £. «. 

ACHATINA 23 1 9 

achatinella 6 8 

Adamsiklla 2 3 

Amphidesma 7 9 

Ampullaria 28 1 IB 

Anastoma 1 1 

Akatina 4 5 

Ancillabia 12 15 

Anculotus 6 

Anomia 8 10 

Aeca 17 1 1 

Argonauta 4 5 

Artemis 10 I' 18 

aspergillum 4 5 

avicttla 18 1 3 

Buccinum ...: 14 18 

Bulimus 89 6 12 

Bullia 4 5 

Caltptrsa 8 10 

Carcellaria 18 1 8 

Capsa 1 1 

Capsella 2 3 

Cardita 9 II 

Cardium 22 1 8 

Cassidaria 1 1 

Cassis 12 ° l r ' 

Chama 9 11 

Chamostrea 1 

Chiton 33 2 2 

Chitonellus 1 1 

Chonijbopoma 11 14 

Cikce 10 13 

colijmbblla 37 2 7 

Concholepas 2 3 

Conus 56 3 11 

CoRBULA 5 6 

Crabia 1 ° 

Crassatella 3 4 

Crekatula 2 

Crkpidula B 

Cbucibulttm 7 „ 

CyCLOPHORUS 20 1 

Ctclostoha 23 1 9 

Cyclotus 9 11 

Ctmbium 26 1 13 

Cyprjsa 2/ 1 14 

Ctpricahdia 2 ° J 

Cttherea 10 13 

Delphinula B -6 

Dione 12 16 

Dolitjm 8 10 

Dowai 9 11 

Eburna 1 •! 

Erato 8 4 

Fasciolabia 7 « V 

Ficcla 1 J 1 

FlSSURBLLA M ] 

Fusus 21 1 « 

Glaccohomb 1 JJ I 

llAMA 1 ° 

Haliotis 1" * J 

Harpa « ,2 j? 

Hblii 210 13 5 

Hbmipbcten 1 " ' 

Hemisinub fi " 

HlWSITBS « ' \ 

Hippoptjb •• ? i 

Iaxthijia 5 || 5 

t„ 3 4 

■° , fl 1 

Isocabdia ' V * 

LlPTOPOMA * " "' 



d. 






6 

a 

8 

6 
8 




6 





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f. 

9 
6 
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Genera. Platei. £■ «• &■ 

Lingula 2 8 

LlTHODOMTJS 5 6 6 

LlTTORINA 18 1 3 

LUCINA 11 II 

IvTjtrabia B o 1 8 

Mactra 21 16 6 

Malleus 8 4 

Mangelia 8 111 r, 

Mabgibbila 27 1 H 8 

Melania M 8 14 6 

Mklanopsis 3 4 

Melatoma 3 

3 4 

Mesalia & Eglisia... 1 16 

Mksodesma 4 6 6 

Mkta 1 5 ' fi 

ttriBJ 89 9 9 8 

MoBIOLA 11 ° I. 1 '! 

MommkrOS 4 6 6 

W 2 7 

MVAI.ORA 1 1 

>MA 1 [' J » 

Mytilus '• 11 5 \* ° 

Nassa 29 7 

Natica 80 1 18 9 

Naitu.us 8 

M iTici u.4 A Lama... 8 10 6 

Nerita 19 J 4 

Nbritina 37 2 7 

Omva 80 1 If 

Oniscia J 

ORBicur.A 1 > « 

or* " ' " 

PaLUDOMUS rt " * " 

PAKTl'LA 4 6 6 

Patella *j 2 13 

Pbctbk 36 2 4 6 

Pectunculus 9 11 b 

Pedum \ „ J « 

Pbbna 6 8 

Phas.ahblla 6 8 

Phobls 3 4 

Pikna 34 2 3 n 

PlRENA 2 J 

Placukanomia 3 « * u 

Pleurotoma 40 f o 

FSAMMOBIA » •• « 

Psammotella 1 « * 

Ptkeoceba 6 9 8 " 

Ptlrocyclos 6 n ,2 S 

rInella-:::::: * : 

Bionrvu « J J 

Rostbllabia n i * 

So-fivrvoiAHiA I ■ 

8CABABLS ■? f « « 

Sioar.: ... * % I 

Bmoiuu ' , ( 

SOLAB.UM 8 

SoLBTEI-LIIfA 4 ' • 

,0 J 4 

1 14 4 

Tb««bba ... * '* , 

Tbbbbbllun 

Tbbbbbatcla A Rtn- , 



CfDcn. n««». M. : *. 

Theicu () 4 

ToKNATELLA 4 6 6 

m 8 10 6 

Tbigosii 'i I 6 

Tbitojc 20 1 6 6 

Tbochita 3 4 

Tbochvs 16 10 6 

Tigonia 1 16 

TlRBlXBLLA 13 16 6 



Tt'kBo 16 6 

TlBBITBLLA H 14 

I'UBBMI. i 

Vbbus .. 

viTBisA ... ' a is 

VOLITA 18 

YVL3BLLA 2 S 

ZWTFHIBU1... 10 6 



COXCHOLOGIA SYSTKMATICA ; or, Complete System of 
Conchology. By Lovei.l Reeve, F.L.S. Demy 4to, 2 vols. pp. 537, 
300 Plates, £8. 8*. coloured. 

Of this work only a few copies remain. It is a useful companion to the 
collector of shells, on account of the very large number of specimen* figured, as 
many as six plates being devoted in some instances to the illustration of a -ingle 
genus. 



INSECTS. 



CURTIS' BB1TISH ENTOMOLOGY. Qlustratioiia and 

Descriptions of the Genera of Insects found in Great Britain and Ireland, 
containing Coloured Figures, from nature, of the most rare and beautiful 
species, and, in manv iustances, upon the plants on which thev arc found. 
Royal 8vo, 8 vols., 770 Plates, coloured, £16. 16*. 

Or in separate Monographs. 

Orders. Platl 

Aphaniptuba - 

CotEOPTEEA 2J6 

DeeMaftbba 

DlCTYOPIEBA 1 

DlPTBBA 103 

Hbmipteka 32 

homoptbba 21 

A Reissue of the Orders Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymcuoptcra, and Lepf- 
doptera, in Monthly' Parts, each containing 5 Plates, with text, price 
2*. 6rf., commenced January 1st, 1863. 

' Curtis' Entomology,' which Cuvier pronounced to have " reached the ulti- 
matum of perfection," is still the standard work on the Genera of British In- 
sects. The Figures executed by the author himself, with wonderful minuteness 
and accuracy, have never been surpassed, even if equalled. The price at which 
the work was originally published was £-13. 16«. 



£ ». 
1 


A. 

B 






a 




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M. 
. 3 
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. 

. 

. 
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INSECTA BRITANNICAj Vols. IT. and III., Diptera. By 

Francis ^\ alker, F.L.S. 8vo, each, with 10 plates, 25*. 



I.oVEi.i. i;i.mi. \\[) « o.'s PUBLICATIONS. 



TRAVELS. 



THREE CITIES IN RUSSIA. By Professor C. Piazzi 

Smyth, F.R.S. Post 8vo, 2 Vols., 1016 pp. Maps and "Wood-Engravings, 

The narrative of a tour made in the summer of 1859 by the Astronomer 
Royal of Scotland, to the cities of St. Petersburg, Moscow, and Novgorod. 



THE GATE OF THE PACIFIC. By Commander Bed- 

ford Par, R.N. Demy 8vo, 430 pp., with 7 Maps and 8 Tinted Chromo- 
lithographs, 18*. 

A spirited narrative of Commander Pirn's explorations in Central America, 
made with the view of establishing a new overland route from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific Oceans, through English enterprise, by way of Nicaragua. 



TRAVELS ON THE AMAZON AND BIO NEGRO; 

with an Account of the Native Tribes, and Observations on the Climate, 
Geology, and Natural History of the Amazon Valley. By Alfred R. 
Wallace. Demy 8vo, 541 pp., with Map and Tinted Frontispiece, 18*. 

A lively narrative of travels in one of the most interesting districts of the 
Southern Hemisphere, accompanied by Remarks on the Vocabularies of the 
Languages, by Dr. R. G. Lathaii. 



WESTERN HIMALAYA AND TIBET; a Narrative of a 

Journey through the Mountains of Northern India, during the Years 1847- 

1848. By Dr. Thomson, F.R.S. Demy 8vo, 500 pp., with Map and 

Tinted Frontispiece, 15*. 

A summary of the physical features, chiefly botanical and geological, of the 

country travelled over in a mission undertaken for the Indian Government, from 

Simla across the Himalayan Mountains into Tibet, and to the summit of the 

Karakoram Mountains ; including also an excellent description of Kashmir. 



TRAVELS IN THE INTERIOR OF BRAZIL, princi- 
pally through the Northern Provinces and the Gold and Diamond Dis- 
tricts, during the years 1836-1841. By Dr. George Gardner, F.L.S. 
Second Edition. Demy 8vo, 428 pp., with Map and Tinted Frontispiece, 
12*. 
The narrative of an arduous journey, undertaken by an enthusiastic naturalist, 
through Brazil Proper, Bahia, Maranham, and Pcrnambuco, written in a lively 
style, with glowing descriptions of the grandeur of the vegetation. 



1»-, PUBLICATIONS. 



ANTIQUARIAN. 



MAN'S \<.i: IN THE WOULD ACCORDING TO 

HOLY SCRIPT! RE A\. 

8vo, 264 pp., it 



THE ANTIQUITY v An Examination of Sir 

Charles LyeU's recent Work. By S. I; Ldi- 

tion. 8vo, 1j. 



HOR.E FERALES; or, Studios in the Archaeology of the 

Northern Natious. Bv the late John M. KjtMBLK, M A Edited by 
Dr. R. G. Latham, F.R.S., tod A. \Y. FkaVES, M. A. Royal tto, 268 pp., 
34 Plates, many coloured, £3. 3*. 

The principal material left by the late Mr. Kemble for this work irai u in- 
tensive and interesting series of drawings ; and the thirty-four Plal 
a selection from these, with sonic important additions, described and 
under the superintendence of the Director of tl. Antiquaries. I hi 

objects delineated comprise Stoue Implements and Wee miners, 

Bronze Implements, Arrow-Heads, S Ids, Helmets 

and Trumpets, Iron Da_ Hone-Trappings, Bronse 

Horse-Trappings, Fibulae, Armlets, Diadi-ms, Collars and Personal Ornaments, 
Teutonic Swords, Weapons and Brooches, and a v.i. u tj of I ma and other scpul- 
chral objects. 



A MANUAL OF BRITISH AKCIIJSOLOCiV. By 

Charles Boutell, M.A. Roval Itimo, 898 pp., 80 coloured plates, 
10*. 6rf. 

A treatise on general subjects of antiquity, written especially for the student 
of archseology, as a preparation for more elaborate works Architect! 
pulchral Monuments, Heraldry, Seals. Coins, Illuminated Manuscripts and In- 
scriptions, Arms and Armour, Costume and Persona] Ornaments, Pottei 
celain and Glass, Clocks, Locks, Carrings, Mosaics, Embroidery, et< 
of in succession, the whole being illustrated by 20 attractive I .loured 

Figures of the various objects. 



SHAKESPEARE'S SONNETS, Facsimile, by Photo-Zinco- 

graphy, of the First Printed edition of 1009. Prom the Copy in the 
Library of Bridgewater House, by permission of the Right Hon. 'the Karl 
of Ellesmere. 10*. Brf. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



MANUAL OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS, Qualitative and 

Quantitative ; for the Use of Students. By Dr. Henry M. Noad, F.R.S. 
i 8vo, pp. 663, 109 Wood Eugravinsrs, 16*. Or, separately, Part L, 
\l.lTAnVE,*6«. ; Part II, ' QUANTITATIVE,' 10*. 6d. 
A Copiously-illustrated, Useful, Practical Manual of Chemical Analysis, pre- 
pared for the Use of Studeuts by the Lecturer on Chemistry at St. George's 
Hospital. The illustrations consist of a series of highly-finished Wood-Engra- 
vings, chiefly of the most approved forms aud varieties of apparatus. 



DICTIONARY OF NATURAL HISTORY TERMS, with 

their Derivatives, including the various Orders, Genera, and Species. By 
David II. MNtcou., M.D. Crown 8vo, 584 pp., 12s. 6d. 

An attempt to furnish what has long been a desideratum in natural history, — 
a dictionary of technical terms, with their meanings and derivatives. 



PHOSPHORESCENCE; or, the Emission of Light by Mine- 
mis, Plants, toad Animals. By Dr. T. L. Phifson, F.C.S. Small 8vo, 
225 pp., 30 Wood Engravings and Coloured Frontispiece, 5s. 

An interesting summary of the various phosphoric phenomena that have been 
observed in nature, — in the mineral, in the vegetable, and in the animal world. 



SURVEY OF THE EARLY GEOGRAPHY OP 

\\ BSTERN EUROPE, as connected with the First Inhabitants of Britain, 
their Origin, Language, Religions Bites, and Edifices. By Henry Lawes 
Loire, Esq. 8vo, 6*. 



THE ZOOLOGY OF THE VOYAGE OF H.M.S. SA- 

M \ B \\G. under the command of Captain Sir Edward Belcher, C.B., during 
the Years 1843-46. By Professor Owen, Dr. J. E. Gray, Sir J. Richard- 
son, A. Adams, L. Reeve, and A. White. Edited by Arthur Adams, 
F.L.S. Hoyal 4to, 257 pp., 55 Plates, mostly coloured, £3. 10*. 
In this work illustrative of the new species of animals collected during the 
surveying expedition of H.M.S. Samarang in the Eastern Seas in the years 1843- 
1846 there are 7 Plates of Quadrupeds, 1 of Reptiles, 10 of Fishes, 24 of Mol- 
lusca and Shells and 13 of Crustacea. The Mollusca, which are particularly in- 
teresting include the anatomy of Spirula by Professor Owen, and a number of 
beautiful' Figures of the living animals by Mr. Arthur Adams. 



I !.LL U11 



THE GEOLOGIST. A Liaf 

aud Mineralogy. Illustrated with highl; 

Edited by S. J.' Ma.- h.«>tuuu- 

inerous \Yood-Eugraviut;s, IS*. \ ol. \ II., 9*. 



OUTLINES OF BLBMENTABI IK>t ANY, as Intro- 
ductory to Local Floras. By Geoege Bentham, F.K.S., Prudent of the 
Linneaa Society. Demy 8vo, pp. 45, 2t. Gd. 



ON THE FLORA OF AUSTRALIA, its Origin, Affini- 
ties, and Distribution ; being an Introductory Essay to the 'Flora of Tas- 
mania.' By Dr. J. D. Hookek, F.R.S. 128 pp., quarto, 10«. 



CRYPTOGAMIA AXTAK' IK Lj or, Crvptopramic Plants 

of the Antarctic Islands. irately. In One Volume, quarto, 

£4. 4*. coloured, £2. 17*. plain. 



GUIDE TO COOL-OUnilh GROWING. Bj Jamm 

Batkmax, Esq., F.R.S., Author of 'The Orchidaccrc of Mexico and Gua- 
temala.' Woodcuts, It. 



A TREATISE ON THE GROWTH AM) IT i 

TREATMENT OF TIMBER TREES. liv G. W. Newton, of Oiler- 
sett, J.P. Half-bound calf, \0s. M. 



PARKS AND PLEASUBB GROUNDS; or, Practical 

Notes on Country Residences, Villas, Public Turks and Gardens. By 
Charles H. J. Smith, Landscape Gardener. Crown Bto, 6*. 



LITERARY PAPERS ON SCIENTIFIC SI 1UT< CS. 

By the late Professor Edward Forbes, F.R.S. , selected from hi* Writing! 

in the ' Literary Gazette.' With a Portrait and Memoir. Small 8vo, 6j. 



THE PLANETARY AND STELLAR UNIVERSE. A 

Series of Lectures. With Illustrations. By R. J. Manx. 12mo, 5a. 



LOVELL REKVE AND CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 19 



THE STEREOSCOPIC MAGAZINE. A Gallery for the 

Stereoscope of Landscape Senary, Architecture, Antiquities, Natural His- 
tory, Rustic Character, etc. With Descriptions. 5 vols., each complete 
in itself and containing 50 Stereographs, £2. 2*. 



THE OONWAY. Narrative of a Walking Tour in North 

Wales ; accompanied by Descriptive and Historical Notes. By J. B. 
Davidson, Esq., M.A. "Extra gilt, 20 stereographs of Welsh Scenery, 21». 



THE ARTIFICIAL PRODUCTION OF FISH. By Pis- 

carius. Third Edition. Is. 



WORKS IN PREPARATION. 



A SECOND CENTURY OF ORCHIDACEOUS PLANTS, 

selected from the subjects published in Curtis' 'Botanical Magazine' since 
the issue of the ' First Century.' Edited by James Bateman, Esq., F.R.S. 

[Pari I. just ready. 

During the fifteen years that have elapsed since the publication of the ' Cen- 
tury of Orchidaceous Plants,' now out of print, the 'Botanical Magazine' has 
been the means of introducing to the public nearly two hundred of this favourite 
tribe of plants not hitherto described and figured, or very imperfectly so. It is 
intended from these to select "a Second Century," and the descriptions, written 
at the time of publication by Sir W. J. Hooker, will be edited, agreeably with 
the present more advanced state of our knowledge and experience in the cultiva- 
tion of Orchidaceous plants, by Mr. Bateman, the acknowledged successor of 
l>r. I.indley U the leading authority in this department of botany and horticul- 
ture- The' size of the work will be a handsome royal quarto, and it is proposed 
to issue the hundred plates in ten quarterly Parts, each containing ten plates, 
carefully coloured by hand, price 10a. 6rf. 



THE BEWICK COLLECTOR. A Descriptive Catalogue 

of an Unique Collection of the Works of Thomas and John Bewick, of 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne. By the Rev. Thomas Hugo, M.A., E.S.A., the 
Possessor of the Collection. Demy 8vo, with a limited number, not ex- 
ceeding 100, printed on large paper. [Nearly ready. 
This volume will comprise an elaborate Descriptive List of the most complete 
collection yet formed of the works of the renowned Wood-Engravers of New- 
castle-upon-Tyne. It will include their books and book-illustrations, proofs of 
such in various states, and the engravings, with similar proofs, by Thomas Bewick, 
executed for private gentlemen, public companies, newspapers, exhibitions, bill- 
heads broadsides, and other miscellaneous purposes, with much original matter 
connected with the artists and their productions. 



21) | 1.1. BUI I AND CO.'S TOBl 



Commencement of a New Series of Natural History 
for Beginners. 



BRITISH BEETLES; a Familiar Introduction to the study 
of our Native Coleofteba. By E. C. Rte, Crowu 8vo, 16 Coloured 
Plates, and Wood-Engravings, 10*. 6d. [Jutt ready. 



BRITISH SPIDERS ; a Familiar Introduction to the study 

of our Native Arachnida. By E. F. Statelet. Crown 8vo, 16 Co- 
loured Plates and Wood-Engravings, 16*. &d. [Nearly ready. 



BRITISH BEES ; a Familiar Introduction to the study of 

our Native Bees. By W. E. Schuckabd. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Plates, 
and Wood-Engravings, 10*. 6d. [Nearly ready. 



BRITISH BUTTERFLIES AND MOTHS; a Familiar 

Introduction to the study of our Native Lepidopter a. Hv 1 1 . T. Stainton. 
Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Plates, and Wood-Engravings, 10*. C>d. 

| reparation. 

BRITISH FERNS: a Familiar Introduction to the Study of 

our Native Ferns and their Allies. By Makgakkt PhVBM, Crown 8vo, 
lfi Coloured Plates, and Wood-En<rravinirs, 10«. fw/. [/a the Preu. 



BRITISH SEAWEEDS; a Familiar Introduction to the 

'study of our Native Marine Alg*. By 8. O. G«AT. Crown 8vo, 16 
Coloured Plates, and Wood-Engravings, 10*. f>d. [In preparation. 



* # * A good introductory series of books on British Natural HittOf) for the 

use of students and amateurs is still a desideratum. Those at present in use 
have been too much compiled from antiquated sources , while the figures, copied 
in many instances from sources equally antiquated, arc far from accurate, the 
colouring of them having become & tkroogh the adoption, for the 

sake of cheapness, of mechanical processes. 

The present series will be entirely the result of original research carried to its 
most advanced point; and the figures, which will be chiefly engraved on steel, by 
the artist most highly renowned in each department for his technical knowledge 
of the subjects, will in all cases be drawn from actual specimens, and coloured 
separately by hand. 



LONDON : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



No. 255. 

VOL. XXII. MARCH. [Price 3s. U. col*- 2*. U. plain. 

OR No. 950 OP THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMPRISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHEE BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GBEAT BRITAIN, 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S., 

jBtrrctnr of tfje Hoyal 33flfcmtc @arifen£ ai lulu. 




Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers exotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1866. 




THE HYDROPULT, 

AN INTENTION FOE THROWING WATER BY HAND-POWER. 

(Secttred by Royax Lettebs Patent.) 
Weighs but 8 lbs. 
Will throw 7 or 8 Gallons of Water per minute 50 feet, when worked by the 
power of one Man. 

PRICE LIST. 

Complete with Brass Cylinders and Japanned Stirrup, £1. 12*. 6i. 

Complete with Brass Cylinders and Copper Stirrup, £2. 2s. 

The price, " complete " as above, includes 2| feet Suction, and 3 feet Delivery 
Hose, Galvanized W T ire Strainer, Rose, and Small Jet. 

THE HYDROPULT 

Is invaluable for use in the Garden for 

WATEEING BEDS, 

SPRINKLING- PLANTS, 

DROWNING OUT INSECTS, 

CLEANSING TREES FROM SMUTS, 

DRESSING WITH LIQUID MANURE, ETC. ETC. 

THE HYDROPULT 

Is desirable in every Household for 

WASHING WINDOWS. 

WETTING SIDE WALKS, 
SPRINKLING STREETS, 

WASHING CARRIAGES, 
EMPTYING CISTERNS, 
PILLING BARRELS 

A SPRAY BATH, ETC. ETC. 

ORDERED BY THE WAR DEPARTMENT AS FIRE ENGINES. 

ROBERT HOGG, LL.D. & P.L.S., REV. H. DOMBRAIN, A.B., SHIRLEY HIBBERB. 

ESQ., E.R.H.S., THOMAS RIVERS, ESQ. (the eminent Florist), and other well-known 

gentlemen, recommend the Hydropult as an Invaluable Garden Implement. 

The Hydropult will draw water horizontally, if necessary, through Two Hundred Feet Suction Hose, an 

force it through Delivery Hose to an altitude of One Hundred Feet. 

THE GREENHOUSE AND CONSERVATORY HYDROPULT. 

A NEW AND BEAUTIFUL IMPLEMENT, 

Weighing scarcely 5 lbs. 

And specially adapted for use in the Greenhouse and Conservatory. 

Price 35s. 

Complete, with Brass Cylinders and Copper Stirrup, 2\ feet Suction and 3 feet Delivery Hose, Strainer, Kose 

and Fan. _ , ,, l: ,, 

This New Implement must necessarily supersede Syringes and other devices of the kind, for it will be foun 
more effective in its operation. 

A LADY CAN WOEK IT FOR HOURS WITHOUT FATIGUE. 

CAUTION.— Important to the Public.— The extensive sale of the Hydropult has excited the cupidity of s< ?"^ nS 
respectable, but in reality unprincipled Manufacturers, who are now palming on the Public worthless imi ^ 
of the Hydropult, and through their connections are enabled to place said devices on exhibition, and for sale, in _ ^ 
of the principal Ironmongery and Seed Establishments throughout the City and provinces. These devices res ^ 
in many respects the Hydropult in appearance, and are calculated to deceive the unsuspecting. The rro P . 
therefore, issues this Caution, and respectfully intimates that parties wishing to purchase the Hydropult ^^U^- 
mine the machine offered for sale, and see if it has attached thereto a label, with the following words : — "The * ^ r ^ 
pult, Vose's Patent, manufactured only by Gbieeiths & Bbowitt, Birmingham. Charles Pomeboy HV 
Proprietor, & and 143, Cheapside, London." Unless this label is attached, the machine is not the Hydropult. 
PROSPECTUSES, WITH TESTIMONIALS, ON APPLICATION. 

HYDROPULT SHOW-ROOM, 142 & 143, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON. 

CHARLES POMEROY BUTTON, Peopeietob. 




BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



SHANKS' PAT ENT LAWN MOW EBS FOE 1866. 

Patronized on Five separate occasions, during the Season <?/" 1864, by 
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING- OF SAXONY; 

AGAIN ON FOUR SEPAEATE OCCASIONS DURING THE SEASON OF 1865 BY HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN; 

ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF HOLLAND; 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF PRUSSIA. 




HORSE MACHINE. 



PONY MACHINE. 



HAND MACHINE. 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, in presenting their LAWN MOWERS for the approaching Season, are gratified 
to be able to state that the demand for their celebrated Machines is rapidly increasing. 

iS. & Son, in introducing Improvements into their Machines, hare been careful that no Improvement be intro- 
duced which has merely novelty to recommend it, but that the advantages in point of durability and simplicity of 
construction, which have always been a peculiarity of their Machines, should still remain. 
A. S. & Son can confidently assure their numerous Friends and Customers and the Public generally that their en- 
avour will always be to supply a Machine, first-class in every way, one which cannot be surpassed if even equalled, 
uther for simplicity of construction, ease in working, or durability. None but the best materials and skilled work- 
men are employed in the manufacture of their Machines. 

PRICES — Including Carriage to most of the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in the Kingdom. 

SHANKS' NEW PATENT HAND MACHINE FOR 1866. 

O-inch Machine £3 10 Q\ Easily worked 



19-inch Machine £7 12 

22-inch Machine 8 7 

2i-inch Machine 8 17 



fi C Do. by a Man 

\ and a Boy. 
6 J Do. by Two 
6 |_ Men. 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT HORSE MACHINE. 
Widtli of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. 



12-inch Machine 4 10 0) by a Lady. 

14-mch Machine 5 10 Do. by a Boy. 

lb-inch Machine 6 10 Do. by a Man. 

Silent Movement for the four smallest sizes, 4s. extra ; for the other sizes, 7s. 6d. extra, 

SHANKS' NEW PATENT P0NY;& DONKEY MACHINE. 
Width of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. 

^-mch Machine £12 10 25s. extra. 

^8-mch Machine 14 10 30s. extra. 

^-mch Machine 15 15 30s. extra- 

Silent Movement, 12s. 6d. extra; Boots for Pony, 21s. 
per 6>et ; ditto for Donkey, 16s. per Set. Silent Movement, 20s. extra ; Boots for Horse's Feet, 

24s. per Set. 
SHANKS' PATENT LAWN MOW r ERS cut the Grass on uneven as well as on level Lawns; and it is quite 

immaterial whether the Grass be wet or dry. 

Every Machine warranted to give ample satisfaction, and if not approved of, can be at once returned. 



80-inch Machine £19 

36-inch Machine 22 

42-inch Machine 26 

48-inch Machine 28 



30s.extra. 

30s. extra. 

40s. extra. 

40s. extra. 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, 
27, LEADENHALL STREET, LONDON. 

MANUFACTORY, DENS IRONWORKS, ARBROATH. 



\t ^P a Stock of ^a™ 1 Mowers at 27, Leadenhall Street, London, from which Orders can be 

« once executed. They also have at their London Warehouse a staff of experienced Workmen thoroughly 
acquainted with all the details of these Machines, so that they are enabled to repair Lawn Mowers in 
iK)ndon as well as at the Manufactory. 



GREEN'S PATENT SILENS MESSOE, 

OR 

NOISELESS LAWN MOWING, ROLLING AND COLLECTING MACHINES. 
FITTED WITH PATENT SELF-SHARPENING CYLINDER CUTTERS. 



In Special Appointment 
Sole Manufacturer. 



Every Machine is 
warranted to give en- 
tire satisfaction, and 
if not approved of can 
be returned uncondi- 
tionally. 





£o Per gjost (Gracious 

glajestn % Cjuccu. 

Green's Patent Lawn 
Mowers have proved to 
be the best, and have 
carried off every prize 
that has been given in 
all cases of competition. 



PRICES OF HAND MACHINES. 



To cut 10 inches ... £3 10 ... Suitable for a Lady 

„ 12 „ ... 4 10 ... „ 

„ 14 „ ... 5 10 ... Suitable for one person 

„ 16 „ ... 6 10 ... „ 



To cut 18 inches 

,, 20 „ 
» 22 „ 
. 24 „ 



£7 10 Suitable for one person 

8 Suitable for two persons 

8 10 

9 0,, 



Prices of Horse, Pony, and Donkey Machines, including patent self-delivery box ; cross stay complete ; suitable 
for attaching to ordinary chaise-traces or gig harness. 



To cut 26 inches 
,. 28 „ 
„ 30 „ 



£13 
15 
17 



I Leather Boots for 
| Donkey, 18*. 



To cut 30 inches 
„ 36 „ 
» 42 » 

„ 48 „ 



£21 
24 
27 
30 



Leather Boots for 

Pony, 22*. 
Leather Boots for 
Horse, 26*. 



The 26, 28, and 30 inches can easily be worked by a donkey, or by two men, on an even lawn, the 30 and 36 
inches by a pony, and 42 and 48 inches by a carriage horse ; and, as the Machines make no noise in working, the 
most spirited animal can be employed without fear of its running away, or in any way damaging the Machine. * 

Both the Horse, Pony, Donkey, and Hand Machines possess (over all other Makers) the advantages of self- 
sharpening : the cutters being steel on each side, when they become dull or blunt by running one way round the 
cylinder, can be reversed again and again, bringing the opposite edge of the cutter against the bottom blade, when the I 
Machine will cut equal to new. Arrangements are made that the cylinder can be reversed, by any unexperienced 
person, in two or three minutes. 

The above Machines are made from the best materials, and of superior workmanship ; are delivered Carriage 
Free to all the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in England. 



GREEN'S IMPROVED NEW PATENT ROLLER, 

FOR 

LAWNS, DRIVES, BOWLING GREENS, CRICKET FIELDS, AND GRAVEL PATHS. 
SUITABLE FOR HAND OR HORSE POWER. 






PRICES OF 

HAND ROLLERS. 

Delivered at the principal 
Railway Stations in England. 

Diam. 30 in., len. 32 in. £7 10 



^^^ 



24 


26 


4 10 


20 


22 


3 10 


16 


„ 17 „ 


2 15 






PRICES OF 




ROLLERS FITTED 


WITH 




SHAFTS 




Suitable 


for Pony on 
Power. 


Sorst ' 


Diam. 30 


n., len. 32 in. 


£10 0, 


„ 30 


„ 36 „ 


10 15 


„ 30 


„ 42 „ 


11 1» 


„ 30 


„ 48 „ 


13 10 


„ 30 


„ 60 „ 


15 10 


„ 30 


„ 72 „ 


17 10 


» 80 


„ 84 „ 


19 10 



Thomas Green & Son, Smithfield Iron Works, Leeds ; 44 & 45, Blackfriars Road, 
London, S. ; and 19, Eden Quay, Dublin. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 

B. S. "WILLIAMS 

Respectfully informs his Customers and the Public generally, that on and after the let of 
January, 1866, his Counting-house, Seed Shop, Orchid-houses, Stoves, Greenhouses, and 
other Plant-houses, will be removed to the Victoria Nursery, Upper Holloway, near the 
Highgate Archway, and immediately at the foot of Highgate Hill ; in which Nursery, in 
iddition to the houses removed, he has just completed the erection of a large Show Conser- 
vatory and several new Plant-houses, forming a most complete Establishment; he will then 
make this his principal place of business, instead of Paradise Nursery as heretofore. The 
V ictoria Nursery is easy of access from all parts of London ; the direct carriage-route from 
the West End is through Albany Street, Regent's Park, Park Street, Camden Town, Kentish 
lown Road, and the Junction Road. The < Favorite' Omnibuses from the Bank and London 
Jndge Railways, Victoria Station, Charing Cross, and Westminster, Regent Street, Picca- 
dilly, and Brompton, arrive at and start from the entrance of the Nursery every seven 
minutes. J 

In connection with the above announcement, B. S. W. invites inspection of his most 

xtensive and valuable collection of rare Exotic and other Plants. Throughout the Winter, 

Spring, and early Summer months, a continuous show of flowering and ornamental plants will 

>e maintained in the large Conservatory, sufficiently interesting to repay a visit at anytime. 

Victoria and Paradise Nurseries, Holloway, London, N. 




THE ONLY PRIZE MEDAL FOR 

SEEDS, 

INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION 

1862. 

JAMES CARTER & CO. 
GENUINE GARDEN SEEDS. 




CARTER'S HALF -GUINEA BOX OF SEEDS will produce choice Vegetables all 
the year round. 

CAR rou ^ S GIJINEA B0X 0F SEEDS will produce choice Vegetables all the year 

CARTER'S TWO -GUINEA BOX OF SEEDS will produce choice Vegetables all 
the year round. 

ABOVE are suitable for Small, Medium, or Large Kitchen Gardens, and 
will be forwarded on receipt of Post Office Order. 

CARTER'S GENUINE GARDEN SEEDS.— Price Lists gratis and post-free. 

CAR C ^ R ' S ILLUSTRATED GARDENERS' AND FARMERS' VADE MECUM, 
n aining a most extensive List of Flower, Vegetable, and Farm Seeds ; also a 
endar of Operations for Flower and Kitchen Gardens, together with copious remarks 
°n *arm Management. 

JAMES CARTER & CO., 237 & 238, HIGH HOLBORN, LONDON, W.C. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER 



NEW ROSES OF 1866. 

|AUL AND SON'S LIST IS NOW READY. Their Plants are already strong, but 
will not be fit to travel till early March. 

THE "OLD" CHESHUNT NURSERIES, N. 



E. G. HENDERSON AND SON'S 
CATALOGUE FOR JANUARY, 1866, 

Is published, containing descriptive notes and other information of all the best novelties of this 
season, a copy of which will be forwarded, post-free, on application. 

WELLINGTON NURSERY, ST. JOHN'S WOOD, LONDON, N.W. 



WILLIAM CUTBUSH & SON 

HAVE the gratification of announcing that their GRAND EXHIBITION of HYA- 
CINTHS aud other Spring Flowers will be held at their 

NURSERIES, HIGHGATE, 

from TUESDAY, the 20th, to. SATURDAY, the 31st MARCH, 1866, both days inclusive, 
Admission free, from 10 a.m. till dusk. 

The Nurseries are easy of access by Omnibus from London Bridge Station, the Bank, Holborn, 
Tottenham Court Road, Islington, and Charing Cross, to the foot of the Hill, from thence a dis- 
tance of about ten minutes' walk. The Kentish Town Station, on the North London Railway, is 
one mile from the Nurseries. 

SUTTON'S SPRINa CATALOGUE 

AND 

AMATEUR'S GUIDE FOR 1866, 

(ILLUSTRATED.) In 4 Parts. 

PKICE SIXPENCE. GBATIS TO CUSTOMERS. 




PART 1. — A comprehensive List of all the beat kinds 
of Vegetables, with Instructions on Cultivation. 

PART 2. — A comprehensive List of the most popular 
kinds of Flower Seeds, with Instructions on Cultivation, 
including an Illustrated List of Continental Novelties re- 
cently imported by Messrs. SUTTON. 




CONTENTS. 

PART 3.— A detailed List of Bulbous Flower 
(for Spring planting), Stove, Greenhouse, and otne 
Plants, Hardy Ferns, etc. etc. . .1. 

PART 4.— A descriptive List of the most desirao» 
kinds of Grass and other Agricultural ^ecds, and Ren> ar 
on the New Forage Plant, BROMUS SCHR^DEIU- 

ALSO 

A Useful and Concise Calendar of Operations in the Kitchen Garden, 

For the whole Year, written expressly for this "Work. 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES on the POTATO DISEASE, USE OF FROZEN MANGELS, etc 

AND A VALUABLE COLOURED RAILWAY MAP OF ENGLAND, 

Containing important information. 

SUTTON'S SHORT SELECT SEED LIST 

Is also ready, and will be sent Gratis and Post Free on application. 
ADDRESS, 

SUTTON AND SONS, Seed Growers and Merchants, Royal Berkshire Seed 
Establishment, READING. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



BENJAMIN EDGINGTON, 

MARQUEE, TENT, RICK CLOTH, AND FLAG MANUFACTURER, 

BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY. 

Marquees and Tents for Horticultural Shows, for Sale or Hire. 

Netting for Fruit Trees, New and Second-hand ; Scrims for Greenhouse Blinds, Frigi 
Domo, Garden Mats, etc. 

Be particular to address — 

BENJAMIN EDGINGTON (only), 

2, DUKE STREET, LONDON BRIDGE, S.E. 

No other Establishment. 

NEW CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

JOHN SALTER'S Descriptive Catalogue for 1S66 is now ready, and will be 
sent on receipt of two postage-stamps. 

VERSAILLES NURSERY, WILLIAM STREET, VALE PLACE, HAMMERSMITH, W. 

FE RNS AND MOS SES. 

THE BRITISH FERNS ; or, Coloured Figures and Descriptions, with the needful 

Analyses of the Fructification and Venation, of the Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland, 

systematically arranged. By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal 8vo, 66 Plates, £2. 2«. 

The British Ferns and their allies are illustrated in this work, from the pencil of Mr. Fitch. 

Each Species has a Plate to itself, so that there is ample room for the details, on a magnified scale, 

of Fructification and Venation. The whole are delicately coloured by hand. In the letterpress 

an interesting account is given with each species of its geographical distribution in other countries. 

GARDEN FERNS; or, Coloured Figures and Descriptions, with the needful 
Analyses of the Fructification and Venation, of a Selection of Exotic Ferns, adapted for 
Cultivation in the Garden, Hothouse, and Conservatory. By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. 
Royal 8vo, 64 Plates, £2. 2s. 
A companion volume to the preceding, for the use of those who take an interest in the cultiva- 
tion of some of the more beautiful and remarkable varieties of Exotic Ferns. Here also each 
Species has a plate to itself, and the details of Fructification and Venation are given on a magnified 
scale, the Drawings being from the pencil of Mr. Fitch. 

EERNY COMBES ; a Ramble after Ferns in the Glens and Valleys of Devonshire. 
By Charlotte Chanter. Second Edition. Fcp. 8vo,-8 coloured plates by Fitch, and a 
Map of the County, 5*. 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are known to be 

Natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., F.L.S. Demy 8vo, pp. 

360, 24. Coloured Plates, 21*. 

A very complete Manual, comprising characters of all the species, with the circumstances of 

habitation of each ; with special chapters on development and structure, propagation, fructification, 

geographical distribution, uses, and modes of collecting and preserving, followed by an extensive 

series of coloured illustrations, in which the essential portions of the plant are repeated, in every 

case on a magnified scale. 

LOVELL REEVE fc CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



STANDARD WORKS ON BRITISH FUNGI. 

Just published, New and Cheaper Edition, with 12 Coloured Plates, price 12*., 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. 

AN ACCOUNT OF THEIR CLASSICAL HISTORY, USES. CHARACTERS 

DEVELOPMENT, STRUCTURE, NUTRITIOUS PROPERTIES, MODES 

OF COOKING AND PRESERVING, etc. 

By C. D. BADHAM, M.D. 

New Edition, Edited by F. CLTREEY, M.A., F.E.S., F.L.S. 



Just published, in broad octavo, 480 pages, with 24 Coloured Plates, cloth 30a 

OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNG0L0GY; 

CONTAINING CHARACTERS OF ABOVE A THOUSAND SPECIES OF FUNGI, 

AND A COMPLETE LIST OF ALL THAT HAVE BEEN DESCRIBED 

AS NATIVES OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

BY THE KEV. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 

The object of this volume is to give a Popular Account of Fungi in general and to 
present such information as will enable students, without the aid of anything more than a 
pocket-lens to determine the larger species. For this purpose it contains full Specific Cha- 
racters of the greater part of those Fungi which do not require a microscopV for their 
investigation amounting to more than a Thousand Species, together with original Coloured 
Figures by Fitch of above a Hundred and Fifty Species, with Dissections, followed b V a 
Glossary explanatory of unusual terms; and to meet the wishes of scientific friends a 
complete list ol the more minute species is appended. 

•Jl^r kiDd rf PNl<™phy we wish to get out of funguses is more general, and more generally 

woS!^'', V T l 9Mr 'i Berk ^f y \ 8 M informin g a companion as any plain man who 
would use plain English in place of barbaric Latin and Greek. . . . Fungologists will find a 
to be a valuable text book."— Athenaeum. 

< W^*k'°n tIil,eS ° f British ^"f^gy/ by the Rev. Mr. Berkeley, now supplies the stn- 
tZ Zf* necesf f7 mea ™ ?f understanding the subject. It has an excellent Introduc 
tion of 88 pages; a Systematic Description of all the species of frequent occurrence, written 
ov.r Twi'f Jf % f 6 J?* °!u te ° 'n^ 1 }* n *?*8° a8 the object will admit of; and more- 

Br T Sw- 1? n fr ° m the *^ m hand ° f Fitch ' crowded with floured Figures." 
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5563. 







Tab. 5563. 
HABEANTHUS fulgens. 
Brilliant-flowered Habranthus. 



Nat. Ord. Ahaeyllide-E.— Hexandbia Monogynia. 



Gen. Char. Perianthium campanulatum, tubo brevi ad faucera incrassato, 
squamuluso, lirabi laciniis subrequalibus. Stamina fauci inserta, libera, f'asci- 
culata, valde inaequalia. Stylus declinatus, sursum curvatus, stigmate 3- 
lido. Capsula 3-sulca. Semina loculis 2-seriata, horizoutalia, compressa; 
testa Crustacea, alia. — Herbas AmericiE tropic® et extratropicse australis 
indigence; radice bullosa. Folia angusta,2-faria, linear ia, jlaccida. Scapus 
cavus, onultiflorus. Spatba apice 2-fida.— Herbert. 



Habeawthus fulgens ; elata, robusta, foliis glaucescentibus 10-12-polli- 
caribus linearibus obtusis recurvis dorso convexis, ecapo tereti glauco 
basi purpurascente, spatha lacera, floribus 6-8 pedicellatis amplis 4-5 
poll, diametro, periantbii tubo brevi extus flavo, lobis lineari-oblongis 
patentibus miniatis basi aureis, squamis 2-cruribus, tilamentis flavis, 
stigmate minute 3-iobo. 



A truly magnificent plant, sent by Messrs. Backhouse, of 
York, with whom it flowered in April of last year. 

As a species, it approaches nearest to H. phycelloides, Bot. 
Reg. 1. 1417, but the whole plant is more than twice as large, 
and as far as can be judged from the indifferent figure given 
of that plant, this further differs in the brighter colour, yel- 
low filaments, larger broader perianth-lobes which spread 
widely, and in the character of the corona at the base of the 
lobes, which in H. phycelloides forms an annular bearded 
membrane, but in this consists of bifid fleshy scales. 

Desck. Bulb not seen. Leaves glaucescent, ten to twelve 
inches long, half to three-quarters of an inch broad, linear, 
recurved, obtuse, convex, and scarcely keeled at the beak. 
Scape one to one and a half foot high, as thick as the little 
finger, glaucous green above, purple below. Flowers seven 
in this specimen, four to five inches across, bright scarlet ; 

mabch 1st, 1866. 



tube yellow externally ; lobes linear-oblong, acute, golden- 
yellow at the base, the yellow forming a defined triangular 
mark; scales at the base of the tube of corolla six, forked. 
Stamens with yellow filaments. Stigma minutely three- 
lobed.— /. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Flower, with the perianth-segments removed. 2. Base of peri- 
anth-tube and scales. 3. Transverse section of ovary : — all magnified. 







WFitch^del etlixh 



Vincent B:rodts>P- 



Tab. 5564. 

D^NDEOBIUM DIXANTHUM. 

Double-tinted yellow Dendrobium. 



Nat. Ord. Orchideje. — GtTNandria Monandria. 



Dendrobium dixanthum; caule erecto teretiusculo basi valde tenui stipi- 
tato sesquipedali, racemis brevibus lateralibus 2-5-floris ex caulibus 
vetustis, mento parvo obtusangulo, sepalis lanceolatis acutis, petalis 
oblongis acutis sublongioribus margine minute denticulatis, labello ab 
ungue lato hastato subquadrato obtusangulo antrorsum dilatato, medio 
antice minute emarginato, toto margine minute serrulato denticulato, 
cannula transversa per unguis basin, nervis fere omnibus lineis cris- 
tularum obtectis. 

Dendrobium dixanthum. Bchh. fil. in Gard. Ohron. (1865) * New Plants,' 
n. 301. 



Moulmein, that inexhaustible mine of new Dendrobia, is 
the native country of this pretty plant which was discovered 
in 1864 by the Rev. C. P. S. Parish and sent to Messrs. H. 
Low and Co. of Clapton. It grows rapidly and flowers freely 
(in the early summer) under ordinary treatment. Unfor- 
tunately the leaves fall off the stems — old and young alike — 
before "the flowers have had time to expand, a circumstance 
that detracts materially from their effect. 

In Professor Eeichenbach's otherwise accurate description 
of the plant in the ' Gardeners' Chronicle' he speaks of the 
flowers as appearing singly on the side of the old stems, a 
mistake which the examination of additional examples — pro- 
duced at Knypersley and elsewhere — has enabled me to 
correct. The name is in allusion to the two tints of yellow 
which are found in its blossoms. 

In the form of its leaves — which are grassy and very sharp- 
pointed — this species resembles B. aduneum, from which 
however it is otherwise entirely distinct. 

Descr. Stems upright or nearly so, smooth, somewhat club- 
shaped, about half a yard high. Leaves grassy, three or four 
inches long, very sharp-pointed, falling off before any flowers 

MARCH 1st, 1866. 



appear. Racemes short, two- to five-flowered. Sepals (which 
like the petals rue a pale yellow) lanceolate, sharp-pointed, 
forming at their base a short mentuin or chin. Petals oblong, 
acute, less than an inch long, a little wider than the sepals. 
faintly toothed at the margin ; lip spreading out in front 
from a broad hastate nearly square blunt-angled claw, a 
little serrated along the whole extent of its margin, tra- 
versed by a bar across its base, of the same colour as the 
petals, excepting a deep orange tint on its disk. — /. B. 



Fig. 1. Column and claw of labellum. 2. Lip: — magnified. 




WFitc^del.etlith. 



"Vincent Brooks, Imp - 



Tab. 5565. 
GLADIOLUS Papilio. 

Butterfly-flowered Gladiolus. 



Nat. Ord. Ibidem. — Hexandbia Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 5427.) 



Gladiolus Papilio ; elatus, glaberrimus, foliis 2-3-pedalibus lineari-ensi- 
formibus striatis, spica pedali laxiflora, floribua distantibus, spathis 
cymbiformibus tubum perianthii superantibus, perianthio campanulato 
ringente, lobis subsequalibus omnibus late obovatis 3 exterioribus et 
interiorum supremo pallide purpureis basi flavis, interiorum 2-laterali- 
bus medio sanguineo-purpureis et plaga semilunari aurea pictis, stig- 
mate breviter trifido. 



The Cape Colony abounds in species of Gladiolus, amongst 
which that now figured appears the most beautiful, though 
not the most gorgeous, that has hitherto been made known ; 
nothing can well exceed the delicacy of the pale purple of 
the upper petals, or the vividness of the deep purple and 
golden-yellow markings of the lower ones. It was received 
at Kew, in 1861, from D. Arnot, Esq., of Colesberg, to whom 
the Royal Gardens are indebted for many excellent plants; 
it was also found by Mr. W. Wilson Saunders's collector, 
Cooper, from whom roots, kindly communicated by Mr. 
Saunders, flowered here two years later. 

Descr. Plant three feet high and upwards, quite glabrous, 
rather stout. Leaves narrow ensiform, gradually attenuated 
to the long acuminate apex, two to three feet long, one inch 
broad or upwards, striated, bright green. Spike a foot long 
and more, slender, slightly inclined, many-flowered. Flowers 
one to two inches apart. Bracts one to one and a half inch 
long, cymbiform, acute, longer than the perianth-tube, green, 
purplish on the back. Flowers horizontal, one and a half 
inch expanse, subcampanulate, with incurved lobes. Perianth- 

MABCH 1st, 186G. 



tube purple, exserted beyond the bract ; lobe* nearly equal in 
size, all broadly obovate, obtuse ; two upper outer segments 
very pale purple with a faint dash of yellow down the mid- 
dle; lower outer lobe with a strong purple central mark from 
the base to the middle, and beyond that a yellow spot; upper 
inner lobe coloured like the outer lateral ; two lower inner 
lobes with a broad very deep purple central band extending 
from the base to the middle, beyond which is a broad 
semilunar golden areole, encircling the end of the purple. 
Anthers linear. Stigma shortly three-cleft. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Ovary, tube of perianth, stamens, style, and stigma: — magnified. 



5566. 




"WTitck.dsl.etlith. 



^\5n.cent Brooks , Imp • 



Tab. 5566. 

PEBISTROPHE lanceolaria. 
Lance-leaved Peristrophe. 



Nat. Ord. Acanthace^!. — Diandria Monogtnia. 



Gen. Char. Calyx asqualis, 5-fidus v. 5-partitus, 2-bracteolatus. Corolla 
resupinata, 2-labiata, labiis planiusculis v. inferiore concavo, superiore 
apice 3-fido, inferiore integro v. 2-dentato. Stamina 2. Antherce angustae, 
2-loculares, loculis recte v. oblique uno pone v. supra altero positis, muticis. 
Capsula 2-valvis, 2-locularis, basi elongata, compressa, sterilis, eommissura 
valvarum plana, sursum compressa, loculis 2-spermis ; dissepimentum ad- 
natum, persistens. Semina discoidea, retinaculis uncinatis. — Herbae In- 
dicae, Uoribus speciosis. Flores speciosi, scupissime in capitula 2-bracteata 
inclusi, capitulis paniculatis. 



Pbeistbophe lanceolaria; herbacea, erecta, 2-4-pedalis, caule teretiusculo, 
ramulis et inflorescentia minute glanduloso-pubescentibus, foliis petio- 
latis lanceolatis oblongo-lanceolatisve glaberrimis membranaceis, 3-5- 
poll. longis, paniculis terminalibus dichotome ramosis erectis, capitulis 
sub-3-floris angustis, bracteolis elongato-subulatis | poll, longis, caljcis 
lobis subulatis excedentibus, corolla pallide purpurea, tubo gracili ex- 
serto 1-2 poll, longo, limbi labio superiore oblongo pollicari, inferiore 
multo breviore cymbiformi acuto, antheris rectis loculis superpositis. 

Peristeophe lanceolaria. Nees in Wall. PL As. Ear. pp. 111-114, et in 
Be Cand. Prod. v. 11. p. 496. 

Justicia lanceolaria. Boxb. Fl. Ind. v. I. p. 121. 



• Though many species of Aeanthacece are in cultivation, there 
is perhaps no order of plants which promises so many future 
valuable additions to our stoves. A large proportion of the 
species are very beautiful plants, they are most easily propa- 
gated, they come into flower in the dead of winter, when our 
houses are often denuded of other ornaments but of the com- 
monest sorts, and continue in flower for many weeks in suc- 
cession. Such is the case with the present beautiful plant, of 
which the Rev. Mr. Parish sent us seeds from Moulmein, 
a year ago, and whose offspring have continued in flower 
for six weeks in the palm-house shelves. The species, which 

march 1st, 1866. 



was first described by Roxburgh in the Calcutta Gardens, is 

confined to the far-eastern districts of India; it was found in 
the Sylhet jungles by Dr. Thomson and myself in 1850, but 
our plants are from Mr. Parish's seeds. 

Descb. A herbaceous plant, shrubby at the base and much 
branched, branches and infloresence viscid-pubescent. Leaves 
three to five inches long, lanceolate or oblong-lanceolate, 
long-acuminate, attenuated into the petiole, glabrous on 
both surfaces. Panicles terminal, much branched, branches 
erect, patent, with long, rigid, subulate bracts at the axils, 
terminated by three-flowered, narrow heads. Calyx-lobes subu- 
late, shorter than the similar bracteoles. Corolla pale purple, 
with a long, slender tube, that is compressed, and slightly 
twisted at the apex ; upper lip one inch long, oblong, three- 
toothed, pale purple-white, and speckled at the throat, lower 
very concave, much shorter, entire at the apex. Anthers 
straight.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Bracteoles, calyx, and pistils. 2. Stamens. 3. Ovary : — all mag- 
nified. 




WFitch,ael.etXith 



Vincent Brookafc? 1 



Tab. 5567. 
BATEMANNIA geandiflora. 
Large-flowered Batemannia. 



Nat. Ord. Obchide-e.— Gtnandbia Monandeia. 

Gen. Char. Mores ringentes. Sepala patentia, lateralia unguiculata, basi 
aequalia. Petala sepalis latiora, basi obliqua, pedi producto columnar ad- 
nata. Labellum cum columna articulatum, trilobum, cucullatum. Columna 
semiteres, basi elongata, clinandrio marginato. Antliera parva, bilocularis, 
membranacea. Pollinia 2, postice biloba, glandula triangulari, caudicula 
nulla. Lindl. Bot. Beg. v. 20. (1833) p. 1714. 



Batemannia grandiflnra ; pseudobulbis ovatia lucidisdiphyllis, foliis valde 
coriaceis lanceolatis acutissimis racemis basilaribus 2-5-floris 3-plo 
longioribus, sepalis exterioribus liberis lanceolatis acutissimis patenti- 
bus apqualibus, internis paulo minoribus subcarnosis basi latis, labello 
brevissime unguiculato, basi gynostemii product® articulato subconcavo 
trilobo, lobo medio majori fimbriato, apice longe acuminata. Columna 
arcuata, margine membranaceo, alis truncatis denticulatis. Antliera 
operculiformis 2-locularis. Stigma concavum, rostello acuto, glandula 
ovali antice attenuate. Pollinia 4 per paria superposita compressa. 
Rckb.jil. Bonpl. 1856. v. 4>.p. 323, et in Walters' Annates. 

G-aleotia grandiflora ; Bich. et Gal. I. c. et tab. 27. 



The genus Batemannia was so named by Prof. Lindley, 
upwards of thirty years ago, after the writer of these remarks. 
The original species, B. Colleyi, came from Demerara, and a 
second, B. Beaumonti, from Bahia, and with these Prof. 
Reichenbach has now associated two species of the supposed 
genus Galeottia (G.flmbriata and G. grandiflora), which agree 
well with Batemannia, except that the number of pollen- 
masses is four instead of two. A fifth species has been added 
under the name of B. meleagris (the Huntleya meleagris of 
Lindley), which, though I quite think my friend is right in 
removing it from Huntleya, I am convinced he is wrong in 
placing under Batemannia, with which its habit — more like 
that of an Eastern Vanda — does not at all accord. 

The present species is a very handsome plant, introduced 

makch 1st, 1866. 



many years since by Linden from New ( rranada, but still ex- 
tremely rare. The figure was taken from specimens produced 
in the spring of 1865, in Mr. Kucker's far-tamed collection. 
Being found at a lower elevation (4000 ft.) than the majority 
of its tribe in New Granada, it requires rather more warmth 
than most of what are now denominated " cool" Orchids. 

Descr. Pseudobulbs ovate, deeply furrowed, shining, two 
or three inches long, bearing two large, broadly-lanceolate, 
very sharp-pointed, leathery leaves. Flower-scapes much shorter 
than the leaves, three- to five-flowered. Sepals free, lanceo- 
late, very sharp-pointed, fully expanded, all of the same size, 
olive striped with reddish-brown. Petals rather smaller, 
slightly fleshy, broad at the base. Lip with a short claw, 
jointed with the extended base of column, rather hollow, 
three-lobed, its middle lobe largest, fringed, and very acumi- 
nate, white with purple streaks, and orange-coloured calli at 
the base. Column arched, with membranous edges, and trun- 
cate, toothleted wings. Anther two-celled. Stigma hollow, 
with sharp beak and oval gland narrowing to a point in front. 
Pollen-masses four. — J. B. 



Fig. 1, Pollen-masses: — magnified. 



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returned unconditionally. 

J. B. BROWN & CO.: OFFICES, 18, CANNON STEET, CITY, LONDON, E.G. 

{Nearly opposite St. Svithins Lane and « London Stone," and near London .Bridge.) 
WAREHOUSE (where Stock is kept), 148, UPPER THA* ES STREE TEC. 

(Oppose the City of London Brewery, and close to the Londo* Bndge Steamboat Pttrs.) 



HEATING BY HOT WATEE 



warmeVirifTf ^ ,f mi ! ted that ^ Ml ^ S ° f "* kind can be ™ re effe * 
warmed by Hot Water than by any other means ; but as so much depends 01 

W^t.^ " fiXCd ' * " ° f ^ ^^ ^^^ tha ^ be 
J. Jones & Sons are prepared to estimate for Warming, to any extent— 
GREENHOUSES. CHURCHES. 

CHAPELS. 
SCHOOLS. 
READING ROOMS. 
LECTURE ROOMS. 
BILLIARD ROOMS. 
HALLS AND PASSAGES. 
BATHS. 



CONSERVATORIES. 
VINERIES. 
HOTHOUSES. 
FORCING PITS. 
PEACH HOUSES. 
PINE STOVES. 
ORCHARD HOUSES. 



FACTORIES. 
OFFICES. 
WORKSHOPS. 
WAREHOUSES. 
DRYING ROOMS. 
CELLARS. 
COACH-HOUSES. 
HARNESS ROOMS. 



P^nni JO i NES & ??**' A PP aratus is sim pk in construction, moderate in cost, a 
economical m working. 

Fnr,intw eqUally / V l able f< ?f the Amateur's Greenhouse, or the longest rang 
?S ftffi Corns' Chapd ° r ^ ^^ ChUrGh ' f ° r pLte 0l 

in J Lf f mUy adaptC u f ° r DwelliD ^ Houses > as coils °f FP^ can be pfe 
TrSU ' hr ™ mm % the va ™«* rooms. One or more Baths may be he, 

the house!^ 6 a C ° nStant SUpply ° f h0t Water 0btained in au y ^' 

not nZ ^ areh0uses and Workshops this system of heating is unsurpassed, as i 

worknplt "iT °l ^F^ g °° ds dr ^ bat * also adds to the comfort of 
workpeople, and thereby effects a saving in labour. 

no «TA. J kl? & . S ^' 8 . ^ommend boilers of all kinds being set in brickwork 
possible; but portable boilers can be supplied, if required. 

MATEBIALS.— All Materials supplied will be of the best quality. 

DELIVEEY— Boilers of various kinds, and pipes and connections, being alff 
in stock, can, at a very short notice, be sent to any part. 

FIX ?5 G# r The Fix i n § wil1 be don e by experienced men, fully capable of finish, 
properly any work they may undertake; and J. Jones & Sons are prepared 
guarantee the effectual working of any apparatus fixed by their own men. 

ESTIMATES.— Plans and Estimates will be sent on application. 

J. JONES & SONS, 

HON MEKCHANTS AND HORTICTJLTTJEAL ENGINEEB 
6, BANKSIDE, SOUTHWARK, LONDON, S.E. 



VOL. XXII. APRIL. 



No. 256. 

[Price 3s. 6d. col 4 ' 2a. 6d. plain. 

OR NO. 951 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPRISING 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 

WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



BY 



JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S., 

mittctar 0f ti)t »o»aI Botanic ©artreruf of Sein. 




Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers exotic gTace our northers clime, 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1866. 




THE HYDROPULT, 

AX INVENTION FOR THROWING WATER BY HAND-POWER. 

(SECrBED BT EOTAX LKTTBBS PATENT.) 

Weighs but 8 lbs. 
Will throw 7 or 8 Gallons of Water per minute 50 feet, when worked 1 
power of one Man. 

PRICE LIST. 
Complete with Brass Cylinders and Japanned Stirrup, £1. 12*. Gd 
Complete with Brass Cylinders and Copper Stirrup, £2. 2s. 

The price, " complete " as above, includes 2| feet Suction, and 3 feet Dt 
Hose, Galvanized Wire Strainer, Rose, and Small Jet. 

THE HYDROPULT 

Is invaluable for use in the Garden for 

WATERING BEDS, 

SPRINKLING PLANTS, 

DROWNING OUT INSECTS, 

CLEANSING TREES FROM SMUTS, 

DRESSING WITH LIQUID MANURE, ETC. ETC. 

THE HYDROPULT 

Is desirable in every Household for 

WASHING WINDOWS. 

WETTING SIDE WALKS, 
SPRINKLING STREETS, 

WASHING CARRIAGES, 
EMPTYING CISTERNS, 
FILLING BARRELS, 

A SPRAY BATH, ETC. ETC. 
ORDERED BY THE WAR DEPARTMENT AS FIRE ENGINES. 
ROBERT HOGG, LL.D. & F.L.S., REV. H. DOMBRAIN, A.B., SHIRLEY HIBJ 
ESQ., E.R.H.S, THOMAS RIVERS, ESQ. (the eminent Florist), and other weil-Kno 
' gentlemen, recommend the Hydropult as an Invaluable Garden Implement. 
The Hydropult will draw water horizontally, if necessary, through Two Hundred Feet Suction 
force it through Delivery Hose to an altitude of One Hundred Xeet. 

THE GREENHOUSE AND CONSERVATORY HYDROPIC 

A NEW AND BEAUTIFUL IMPLEMENT, 

Weighing scarcely 5 lbs. 

And specially adapted for use in the Greenhouse and Conservatory. 

Price 35s. . 

Complete, with Brass Cylinders and Copper Stirrup, 2* feet Suction and 3 feet Delivery Hose, Stra 

and Fan. ■ A r ■* -il be foil 

This New Implement must necessarily supersede Syringes and other devices of the kind, for it wi 
more effective in its operation. 

A LADY CAN WOEK IT FOE HOUES WITHOUT FATIGUE. ^ 

CAUTION.— Important to the Public.— The extensive sale of the Hydropult has excited the c^^ j 
respectable, but in reality unprincipled Manufacturers, who are now palming on the Public wo ^ 
of the Hydropult, and through their connections are enabled to place said devices on exhibition and "^ 
of the principal Ironmongery and Seed Establishments throughout the City and provinces. Inese ^ p 
in many respects the Hydropult in appearance, and are calculated to deceive the unsuspecting. ^ ^ 
therefore, issues this Caution, and respectfully intimates that parties wishing to purchase the B.yox P^ u ^ 
mine the machine offered for sale, and see if it has attached thereto a label, with the following wor ds : ^^ 
pult, Vose's Patent, manufactured only by Griffiths & Beowitt, Birmingham. Chabxes W> , 

Proprietor, & and 143, Cheapside, London." Unless this label is attached, the machine is not the tlj 

PROSPECTUSES, WITH TESTIMONIALS, ON APPLICATION. n «rn() 

HYDROPULT SHOW-ROOM, 142 & 143, CHEAPSIDE, LO» J/ 

CHAELES POMEROY BUTTON, Pboprietob. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



SHANKS' PAT ENT LAWN MOW EES FOE 1866. 

Patronized on Five separate occasions, during the Season 0^1864, by 
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF SAXONY ; 

AGAIN ON FOUR SEPARATE OCCASIONS DURING- THE SEASON OF 1865 BY HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN; 

ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING- OF HOLLAND; 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF PRUSSIA. 




HORSE MACHINE. 



PONT MACHINE. 



HAND MACHINE. 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, in presenting their LAWN MOWERS for the approaching Season, are gratified 
to be able to state that the demand for their celebrated Machines is rapidly increasing 

AS. & Son, in introducing Improvements into their Machines, have been careful that no Improvement be intro- 
duced which has merely novelty to recommend it, but that the advantages in point of durabdity and simplicity of 
construction, which have always been a peculiarity of their Machines, should still remain. 

A. S. & Son can confidently assure their numerous Friends and Customers and the Public generally that their en- 
deavour will always be to supply a Machine, first-class in every way, one which cannot be surpassed if even equalled 
whether for simplicity of construction, ease in working, or durability. None but the best materials and skilled work- 
men are employed in the manufacture of their Machines. 

PRICES — Including Carriage to most of the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in the Kingdom. 

SHANKS' NEW PATENT HAND MACHINE FOR 1866. 

10-inch Machine £3 10 ) Easily worked 



19-inch Machine £7 12 



22-inch Machiue 8 7 

24-inch Machine 8 17 



12- mch Machine 4 10 0) by a Lady, 

14- inch Machine 5 10 Do.byaBoy. 

16-inch Machine 6 10 Do. by a Man. 

Sdent Movement for the four smallest sizes, 4s. extra ; for the other sizes, 7s. 6d. extra, 

SHANKS' NEW PATENT PONY & DONKEY MACHINE. 
^ ldth of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus- 

£>-inch Machine £12 10 25s. extra. 

^»-mch Machine 14 10 30s. extra. 

<30-inch Machine 15 15 30s. extra- 

Silent Movement, 12s. 6d. extra ; Boots for Pony, 21s. 
Per Set ; ditto for Donkey, 16s. per Set. 



g ( Do. by a Man 

{ and a JBoy. 
6 [Do. by Two 
6 |_ Men. 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT HORSE MACHINE. 
Width of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. 

30-inch Machine £19 30a.extra. 

36-inch Machine 22 30s. extra! 

42-inch Machine 26 ...40s.extra. 

48-inch Machine 28 40s.extra! 



Silent Movement, 20s. extra ; Boots for Horse's Feet 
24s. per Set. 

SHANKS' PATENT LAWN MOWEES cut the Grass on uneven as well as on level Lawns ; and it is quite 

immaterial whether the Grass be tvet or dry. 

Every Machine warranted to give ample satisfaction, and if not approved of, can be at once returned. 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, 
27, LEADENHALL STREET, LONDON. 

MANUFACTORY, DENS IRONWORKS, ARBROATH. 



• S. and SON keep a Stock of Lawn Mowers at 27, Leadenhall Street, London, from which Orders can be 
at once executed. They also have at their London Warehouse a staff of experienced Workmen thoroughly 
acquainted with aH the details of these Machines, so that they are enabled to repair Lawn Mowers in 
London as wel! as 'at the Manufactory. 



GEEEN'S PATENT SILENS MESSOE, 



OB 



NOISELESS LAWN MOVING, ROILING AND COLLECTING MACHINES. 

FITTED WITH PATENT SELF-SHARPENING CYLINDER CUTTERS. 

(To ier ftlost 6racious 



|in Special Appointment 
Sole IrTanufaeturcr. 



Every Machine is 
warranted to give en- 
tire satisfaction, and 
if not approved of can 
be returned uncondi- 
tionally. 




To cut 10 inches 
„ 12 „ 
„ 14 „ 

- 16 „ 



£3 10 

4 10 

5 10 

6 10 



PRICES OF HAND MACHINES. 
To cut 18 inches 
20 „ 



. Suitable for a Lady 
Suitable for one person 



22 

24 



lUajestn tin (jjucen. 



Green's Patent Lawn 
Mowers have proved to 
be the best, and have 
carried off every prize 
that has been given in 
all cases of competition. 



£7 10 Suitable for one person 

8 Suitable for two persona 

8 10 

9 0,, 



Prices of Horse, Pony, and Donkey Machines, including patent self-delivery box ; cross stay complete ; suit: 
for attaching to ordinary chaise-traces or gig hani* 

To cut 26 inches ... £13 ... 1 T ., ^ , , I To cut HO inches 
QO i' r\ n [ Leather Hoots for 0£ . 

,. 28 „ ... lo 0... > t. , 10 ,, 3b 



30 



17 Donkey, 18*. 



£21 1 Leather Boots for 
1 1 J Pony, 22s. 

42 „ ... 27 1 Leather Boots fo 
„ 48 „ ... 300 OJ Horse, 26*. 

Tlie 26, 28, and 30 inches can easily be worked by a donkey, or by two men, on an even lawn, the 30 and 
inches by a pony, and 42 and 48 inches by a carriage horse ; and, as the Machines make no noise in working, 
most spirited animal can be employed without fear of its running away, or in any way damaging the Machine. 

Both the Horse, Pony, Donkey, and Hand Machines poasen (over all other Makers) the advantages of* 
sharpening : the cutters being steel on each side, when they become dull or blunt by running one way round 
cylinder, can be reversed again and again, bringing the opposite edge of the cutter against the bottom blade, wn« 
Machine will cut equal to new. Arrangements are made that the cylinder can be reversed, by any unesperie 
person, in two or three minutes. 

The above Machines are made from the best materials, and of superior workmanship ; are delivered taxr 
Free to all the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in England. 



GREEN'S IMPROVED NEW PATENT ROLLEK, 

FOR 

LAWNS, DRIVES, BOWLING GREENS, CRICKET FIELDS, AND GRAVEL PATH£ 
SUITABLE FOR HAND OR HORSE POWER. 

PRICES OF 

ROLLERS FITTED AVi 
SHAFTS 



PRICES OP 

HAND ROLLERS. 



Delivered at the principal 
Railway Stations in England. 

Diam. 30in.,len. 32 in. £7 10 



24 


„ 26 „ 


4 10 


20 


„ 22 „ 


3 10 


16 


.. 17 „ 


2 15 




Suitable for Pony or & 


Power. 


Diam. 30 in. 


len. 32 in.f 1 


» 30 


jj 


36 „ 1 


„ 30 


j' 


42 „ 1 


M 30 


» 


48 „ j 


„ 30 


>' 


60 „ j 


„ 30 


>! 


72 „ I 


„ 80 


>) 


84 „ j 



Thomas Green & Son, Smithfield Iron Works, Leeds ; 44 & 45, Blackfriars Eo; 
London, S. ; and 19, Eden Quay, Dublin. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



NEW ZONALE PELARGONIUM, WILTSHIRE LASS. 



DOWNIE, LAIRD, & LAING 

Hare much pleasure in introducing this splendid Novelty, which was pronounced by the Members of the Floral 
Committee of the Royal Horticultural Society, and also by the Judges of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Regent's 
Park, su the finest PINK PELARGONIUM ever exhibited, and was awarded a First-class Certificate on each 
occasion. 

The following description is from the Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society of London : — " One of the finest 
of the pink-flowered Bedding varieties yet seen, remarkable, not so much for size of flower as for size and completeness 
of truss ; the leaves were marked with a pale zone ; the flowers were rosy-pink ; the base of the upper petals white, 
and the trusses are remarkably large and dense, having the valuable property of retaining their blospoms for a long 
time in the truss." , 

The following NURSERYMEN have already ordered it, and will be able to supply it on and after the 17th of May 

next, at 5s. each : — 



Backhouse t fe Son, York 

Barr & Sugden, Co vent Garden, 

W.C. 
Carter & Co., Hijrh Holborn 
Cutbnsh <fc Son, Highgate, N. 
F. & A. Dickson <fc Son, Chester. 
J. Dickson & Son, Chester 
Dickson <fe Turnbull, Perth 
J. Dobson <fc Son, Isleworth, W. 
J. Garaway & Co., Bristol 
E. G. Henderson & Son, St. John's 

Wood, N.W. 



Messrs. Ivery <fe Son, Dorking 

J. & C. Lee, Hammersmith, W. 
Hugh Low & Co., Clapton, N.E. 
Osborn & Sons, Fulham, S.W. 
F <fc A. Smith, Dulwich, S. 
Youell & Co., Great Yarmouth 
Mr. W. Barnes, Catnberwell, S. 
„ W. Bull, King's Road, Chelsea 
„ Clark, Brixton, S. 

,, W. Dillistone, Sible Hedingham, Es- 
sex, N.E. 



Mr. J. Fraser, Leyton, Essex. N.E. 
„ W. Ivery, Rye Lane, Peckham, S. 
„ J. Keynes. Salisbury , 

,. J. IP Ronald, Chichester 
„ W. Masters, Canterbury 
,, Monroe, Potter's Bar, N. 
„ P. J. Perry, Banbury 
„ C. Ramsay, Ball's Bridge, Dublinr 
„ G. Smith, Hornsey Road, N. 
„ R. Smith, Worcester 
„ B. S. Williams, Holloway, N. 



As our stock is limited, early Orders are respectfully solicited, which will be executed in strict rotation as received. 

PRIMULA, CALCEOLARIA, etc. 

WM. CUTBUSH AND SON are now sending out Seed of their superb PRI- 

' * MULA SINENSIS FIMBRIATA, which has for many years given great satisfaction. 

The ' Gardeners' Chronicle ' of the 6th of January, in Notices to Correspondents, says : — > 
The blooms sent are remarkably fine, richly coloured, full, and densely fringed ; they are evi- 
dently the produce of a capital strain." 

The 'Journal of Horticulture' of the 23rd of January, says that "The finest and richest 
coloured Chinese Primulas we have yet seen are those raised by Messrs. Cutbush and Son." 

Sealed packets, 2*. Gd. and 3s. Gd. each. 

CALCEOLARIA (James's). — This is the finest herbaceous variety extant. Per packet, 
2*. Gd. and Zs. Gd. each. 

CINERARIA, from finest named varieties. Per packet 2s. Gd. and 3s. Gd. each. 



HIGHGATE NURSERIES, LONDON, N. 



Q.EORGE SMITH'S New Catalogue is now ready, with a splendid woodcut of 

^ Nosegav Geranium LE GRAND, which is the finest of all Geraniums for effect; together 
with descriptions of New Seedling Zonale Geraniums, CHIEFTIAN, CHKISTABEL, EXHI- 
BITOR, GLADIATEUR, GREAT EASTERN, SIR R, PEEL, and PINK PERFECTION, 
which for their general fine qualities have received First-class Certificates at the Royal Botanic 
wardens, and Royal Horticultural Gardens, South Kensington, and all of which G. S. can with 
the greatest of confidence recommend for description : see Catalogue, which also contains select 
r * of Show FRENCH FANCY ZONALE AND VARIEGATED GERANIUMS, 
IUCHSIAS, VERBENAS, PETUNIAS, DAHLIAS, CHRYSANTHEMUMS, BEDDING 
ILANTS, etc., and will be sent in exchange for one postage stamp. 



TOLLINGTON NURSERY, HORNSEY ROAD, LONDON, N. 



\H'AI. M USER. 



E. G. HENDERSON AND SOX'S 
CATALOGUE FOR JANUARY, 1866, 

Is published, containing descriptive notes and other information Of all the best novelties of this 
season, a copy of which will he forwarded, post-free, on application. 

WELLINGTON NURSERY. ST. JOHN'S WOOD, LONDON, N.W. 

BENJAMIN EDGINGTON, 

MARQUEE, TENT, RICK CLOTH, AND FLAG MANUFACTURER, 

BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY. 
Marquees and Tents for Horticultural Shotvs,for Sale or Hire. 

Netting for Fruit Trees, New and Second-hand : Scrims for Greenhouse Blinds, Frigi 
Domo, Garden Mats, etc. 

Be particular to address — 

BENJAMIN EDGINGTON (only), 

2, DUKE STREET, LONDON BRIDGE, S.E. 

No other Establishment. 

PLAGUES OP THE GARDEN. 

SIMPLE AND SAFE REMEDY. | 

By using the "APHIS WASH," these pests of the Garden, together with SCALE, 
Caterpillars, Slugs, Earwigs, etc., are immediately destroyed. Leaves no stain, 
but strengthens the Trees or Plants. 

See 'GARDENERS' CHRONICLE,' August 19th, 1865. 
'GARDENERS' MAGAZINE,' July 1st, 1865. 

Sold by Chemists and others, in Is. Bottles and 2s. 67/. a Gallon, with full 

Directions for Use. 

WHOLESALE AT THE 

"CITY SOAP WORKS," MILTON STREET, LONDON, E.C. 

JUST PUBLISHED 

(GRATIS). 

THE GREAT CRINOLINE QUESTION 

SOLVED BY HEK MAJESTY 

THE EMPEESS OF THE FEENCH. 

Ladies should at once obtain gratis of their Draper or Corset Maker, THOMSON'S new Illustrat»oft 

showing the veritable 

•MODE DE L'IMPERATRICE." 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



NEW CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

JOHN SALTER'S Descriptive Catalogue for 1866 is now ready, and will be 

■*J sent on receipt of two postage-stamps. 

VERSAILLES NURSERY, WILLIAM STREET, VALE PLACE, HAMMERSMITH, W. 



Tf DGINGTON'S GARDEN NETTING, the cheapest and most 
.Li durable, 1 \d. per square yard, or in quantities of 250, 500, or 
1000 yards, carriage free. 
EDGINGTON'S MARQUEES and GARDEN TENTS are the 

prettiest. 
EDGINGTON ; S MARQUEES, for hire, are the most handsome 
and capacious. 

EDGINGTON'S RICK CLOTHS for sixty-one years have main- 
tained their celebrity as the best. 

HAYTHORN and BRITTAIN'S NETTINGS. Sample of material free on application. 
Be particular— Frederick Edgington & Co., Thomas Street, Old Kent Road, London, S.E. 

A liberal Discount to the Trade ! ! ! 
International Exhibition, 1862, Class XIX.— Honourable Mention. 




A. VERSCHAFFELT, GHENT, BELGIUM, 

Begs to announce that his CATALOGUE No. 78 is ready, and can be had of his Agents, 
Messrs. R. SILBERRAAD and SON, 5, Harp Lane, Great Tower Street, LONDON. 

SUTTON'S SPJRIN& CATALOGUE 

AND 

AMATEUR'S GUIDE FOR 1866, t 

(ILLUSTRATED.) In 4 Parts. 

PRICE SIXPENCE. GRATIS TO CUSTOMERS. 




of V ,. com prehensive List of all the best kinds 

PAPT ' With Instructions on Cultivation. 

kind f m~ A comprehensive List of the most popular 
MB of Flower Seeds, with Instructions on Cultivation, 

""•aiding an Illustrated List of Continental Novelties re- 

wntlj imported by Messrs. SUTTON. 



CONTENTS. 




PART 3. — A detailed List of Bulbous Flower Roots- 
(for Spring planting), Stove, Greenhouse, and other 
Plants, Hardy Ferns, etc. etc. 

PART 4. — A descriptive List of the most desirable- 
kinds of Grass and other Agricultural Seeds, and Remark* 
on the New Forage Plant, BROMUS SCBLELEDERI. 



ALSO 

A Useful and Concise Calendar of Operations in the Kitchen Garden, 

For the whole Tear, written expressly for this Work. 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES on the POTATO DISEASE, USE OF FROZEN MANGELS, etc. 

AND A VALUABLE COLOURED RAILWAY MAP OF ENGLAND, 

Containing important information. 

SUTTOrT'S short select seed list 

Is also ready, and will be sent Gratis and Post Free on application. 
ADDRESS, 

SUTTON AND SONS, Seed Growers and Merchants, Royal Berkshire Seed 
Establishment, BEADING. 



NEW PLANTS FOR 1866. 

B. S. WILLIAM S. 

VICTORIA AND PABADISE M I BOLLOWAT, LONDON", N.. 

Has great pleasure in offering, for the first time, the undermentioned Splendid Plants. Every rare has 
been used in the selection of the several kinds, therefore he trusts they will give the highest satisfaction. 



• AZALEAS. 

The two following beautiful varieties will be found great 
acquisitions, and B. S. W. feels confident that thev must 
take first rank as exhibition plants, PRINCESS ALEX- 
ANDRA being raised from the same parent* as Elegantis- 
siina, which has proved to be one of the best. The present 
variety will be found superior in quality, with much larger 
flowers, of a substance never before met with — the most 
important feature for prolonging the flowering season. 
PRINCESS HELENA is recommended for its general use- 
fulness, being a free bloomer and quite distinct in habit. 
PRINCESS ALEXANDRA. A beautiful form of Ele- 
gantissima, with flowers 3^ inches across ; petals round 
and smooth, of great substance, slightly striped with 
deep crimson ; a profuse bloomer. 31s. 6d. 
PRINCESS HELENA. — Deep rosy pink, upper petals 
spotted with lake. The transparency of the flowers 
causes it to be distinct from all other kinds ; habit 
good and free. 21*. 

RHODODENDRONS. 
These two elegant varieties are the Seedling productions 
of Mr. Bousie, late of Stoke Park, and were exhibited by 
him a few seasons since at the Royal Horticultural Meet- 
ings, and received Certificates of Merit as valuable additions 
for greenhouse, decoration, being of free-flowering habit, 
a feature much wanted in a greenhouse Rhododendron. 
DENISONII. — A Seedling from Dalhousianum, crossed 
with Edgeworthii and Gibsonii ; a very fine variety, 
with splendid habit, well furnished with clean-looking 
flattish elliptic leaves and large campanulated flowers, 
pure white, with a lemon stain towards the base, very 
elegant (to be figured in the ' Floral Magazine ' for 
May). 21s. 
McNABBII. — From ciliatum, crossed with Edgeworthii ; 
a very handsome plant, dwarfish in habit, with smooth 
elliptic leaves, and beautiful large blush-white flowers. 
21s. 

ACHIMENES. 
Six beautiful varieties raised by Mr. Parsons, of Welwyn, 
and far in advance of any yet sent out. PINK PERFEC- 
TION the same size as Mauve Queen, and equal in sub- 
stance, while GRANDIS gives the deepest violet shade ; 
all the others will be found equally distinct in their sepa- 
rate colours. Received Certificates of Merit from the 
Floral Committee. 

ADVANCE. — Flowers deep reddish purple, with a light 
spotted eye, shaded towards the margin, quite dis- 
tinct. 7s. 6d. 

ARGUS. — Colour rich plum, large deep orange eye, 
spotted with carmine, upper lobes of the flowers 
beautifully rayed towards the margin. 7*. Qd. 

AL T RORA. — Flowers 2 inches across ; colour rich heavy 
scarlet, with light yellow eye, very effective. 7*. 6d. 

GHANDIS. — Flowers deep violet colour, with a deep 
orange eye, finely spotted and shaded with carmine. 
7*. Qd. 

PINK PERFECTION.— Flowers very large, colour ma- 
genta rose ; the upper part of the eye rich carmine, 
the under lobes beautifully rayed with violet, very 
fine. 7s. 6d. 

STELLA,- — Flowers 2^ inches across, clear magenta, 
orange eye, spotted with carmine, nicely serrated, 
distinct and beautiful. 7s. Gd. 

The above set for 40s. 



SWAINSONIA MAGNIFICA. 

Figured in the ' Floral Magazine.' 
A free-growing and free-flowering greenhouse climber; 
native of Australia : habit and character partakes of both 
the Clianthus and Swainsonia ; while it has the robust and 
graceful-growing habit of the former, it produces more pro- 
minently the long pendent racemes of delicate bright-co- 
loured pink flowers of the latter, with a pure white centre 
in the upper petal or lobe. It is well adapted for a cool 
greenhouse, treated as a pot plant or planted out in a 
border for pillars or trellis- work. 10s. 6d. 
THUNBERGIA FRAGRANS. 
B. S. TV. believes this to be the most useful plant he has 
ever had the pleasure of offering, the whole character being 
quite distinct to any other Thunbergia, and whether grown 
as a pot plant or planted in the border for covering pillars 
and trellis-work, it will be invaluable, being free in growth, 
with ample foliage of a dark green, with great substance. 
It continues flowering throughout the year, but its prin- 
cipal period is during the winter months, a time when 
white flowers are scarce. Although grown in a warm 
stove, it has never shown the least sign of red spider, a 
most important feature in this class of plants. 10*. 6d. 
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Contents of No. 256, April 1866. 



ERICINELLA MANNII. 
POLYCHILOS CORNU-CERVI. 
TACSONIA VAN-VOLXEMII. 



MILTONIA ANCEPS. 
MUSS^NDA LUTEOLA. 



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EPIPHYLLUM TRUNCATUM ELEGANS. 
PELARGONIUM PELTATUM ELEGANS. 
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W. Fitch, del. et lith 



"WncenLBrooks,Imp . 



Tab. 5568. 

PEPEBOMIA UARUORATA. 

Marble-leaved Peperom ia. 

Nat. Ord. Pipebacej;. — Diakdkia jIoxogyma. 



Gen. Char. Amentum floribus dense v. remote tectum. Bracteee peltata?. 
Stamina 2, lateralia, filamentis teretibus v. subulatis. Anther a 2-loculares, 
loculis oppositis nunc effoetis sursum eonfluentibus bine subunilocularibus. 
Ovarium sessile, rectum v. obliquum, stigmate sessili deciduo penicillato v. 
fimbriate Bacca sessilis, fere exsucca, pericarpio tenui. Semen conforme, 
testa membrauacea v. coriacea. — Herbse carnosce, ramosa. Folia opposita, 
aJterna v. verticillata, exstipulatis. Amenta axillaria tenninalia v. oppo- 
sitifblia. 



Pepeeomia marmorata ; herbacea, robusta, glaberrima, caule tereti ramose, 
foliis oppositis confertis carnoso-coriaeeis ovatis obtusis basi profunde 
cordato-2-lobis lobis incumbentibus iutegerrimis supra fuaco-viridibua 
albo-marmoratis, subtus pallidioribus, 5-nerviis, amentia subterminali- 
bus 4-6 poll, longis gracilibus pedunculitis teretibus, floribus spiraliter 
dispositis, bracteis peltatis, apice dilatato orbiculari, pedicello craaso 
obconico, ovario obovoideo obliquo glanduloso, stigmate subterminali 
sessili disciform! fimbriate 



The genus Peperomia, though generally consigned to the 
"Botanic Garden" by horticulturists, contains a conside- 
rable number of species extremely well worth cultivation, 
and, amongst others, the subject of the Plate. For, unlike 
most other variegated-leaved favourites, this retains more or 
less of its beauty throughout the year. It is a native of 
South Brazil, where it was discovered by Mr. Weir, collector 
for the Horticultural Society. It was received at Kew, first 
from Air. Veitch, and afterwards from Mr. Wilson Saunders, 
F.R.S., — in both cases with the name of P. arifolia (a very dif- 
ferent plant, with peltate leaves). I find it nowhere described. 

Descr. A robust, branching, short, suberect plant, glabrous 

throughout, surface papillose with minute, translucent cells. 

Stems terete, branched, almost as thick as the little finger. 

Leaves petioled, opposite, three to five inches long, ovate-cor- 

maech 1st, 1866. 



date, deeply two-lobed at the base, tin- lobes rounded and over- 
lapping, quite entire, succulent, five-nerved, upper surface 
opaque, dull green, marbled with white, under pale green. 
Spikes single or two to three together, erect, slender, four to 
six inches long, on stout, erect peduncles, about one-sixth of 
an inch diameter. Flomen in rather doee spirals, but not 
crowded. Bracts peltate, summit orbicular, pedicel clavate. 
Stamens short ; anther two-celled. Ovary papillose, broadly 
obovoid, oblique ; stigma nearly terminal, discoid, with fim- 
briate edges. — J. I). 11. 



Fig. 1. Portion 01 amentum, with flower. 2 and 3. Side and front view 
of scale, stamens, and ovary : — all magnified. 



Tap, 5569. 
ERICIXELLA Mannh. 

ns Mountain Heath. 



Nat. Ord. Erice.e.— Tetieandria Mokootwia. 



Gen. Char. Calyx 4-partitus. laeinia infima majore. Corolla campanu- 
lata, limbo 4-fido suberecto. Stamina 4, rarius 5, libera v. subconnata. 
Stigma peltatum. Ovarium 3-6-loculare, loculis pluri-ovulatis. Capsnla 
3-6-locularis, 3 -G-valvis. — Fruticuli tenues, ericoidei, Africa? tropicae et 
australis et Madagaacarias incolce. Folia B^-natim ver/icillata, anguste, 
linearia. Flores terminates, pedicellati, parvi. Bracteje 0. 



EaicnrELLA Mannii; frutox ramosissimus, 5-12-pedalis, ramis ramulisque 
pubeacenti-tomentoaia puberulisve, foliia 4-nis patulia v. appressis 

elabria nitidis, pedicellia folia auperantibua, sepalis minoribus corolla 
dimidio brevioribus, antberis muticis inclusis, stylo breviter exserto. 
Eiucinella Mannii. Hook./, in Joum. Linn. Soc. vi. 16 et vii. 205. 



Till the expedition of Gustav Mann, late collector for the 
Royal Gardens of Kew, to the West Coast of Africa, the flora 
of the tropical mountains of that continent was totally un- 
known ; now, thanks to his intrepidity and prudence, we 
have excellent dried collections and many living plants from 
the loftiest regions of that district hitherto visited by white 
men,— viz. Fernando Po and the Cameroons Mountains. 
From this curious country Hdiclmjsum Mannii has already 
been figured {ante, Tab. 5431), and other curious things will 
hereafter appear. Meanwhile we here figure a type of ve- 
getation equally familiar in Europe and South Africa, but 
which had not previously been known to inhabit the inter- 
mediate region. M. Mann found it at an elevation of 10,000 
feet on Fernando Po, and between 4000 and 11,000 feet on 
the Cameroons Mountains, where it forms a shrub, sometimes 
twelve feet high. The other species of the genus, which is 
very closely allied to Erica itself, are found, one in Madagas- 

apetl 1st, 1866. 



car and another in South Africa. Our specimens were raised 
from seed, and flowered in the Heath-house in July, 1868. 

1 te8CB. A Blender, bushy, civet shrub, tour to ten teet high, 

with close-set, fastigiate, pubescent or tomentose branchlets. 
s quaternate, close-Bet, whorled in fours, one-eighth of an 

inch long, linear, with revolute margins, glabrous. Floiccrs 
numerous, three or four together at the tips of all the branch- 
lets, on short, curved pedicels, nearly globose, one-tenth of 
an inch long, dull-red. Calyx-lobes unequal, three of them 
ovate-oblong, half as long as the corolla, fourth linear-oblong, 
as long as the corolla, all ciliate at the base. Corolla sub- 
globose, with four short, obtuse, ciliate lobes. Stamen* in- 
cluded. Anthers four or five, broad, obcordate-oblong. slightly 
cohering. Ovary pubescent, six-celled. Style exserted ; stigma 
broad, dilated, cup-shaped, dark-red. — /. D. II. 



Kg. 1. Branch and leaves. 2. Leaf. 3. Apex of branch with flowers 
4. Flower. 5 and 6. Stamens. 7. Germen and transverse section of 
ovarv : — all magnified. 







W.Bx 



Yinceat Brooks , Imp ■ 



Tab, 5570. 

POLYCniLOS CORNU-CERV1 

Stag's-horn Polychilos. 



Nat. Onl. OucniDE-E. — Gynaxduia Monaxdeia. 



Gen. Char. Sepala explanata, carnosa, angusta, libera ; lateralibus sub- 
falcatis, leviter incurvis. Petala conformia, minora. Labellum posticum, 
unguiculatum, in disco foveatum, cum columna continuum, carnosuin, 
complicatum, tripartitum, laciniis lateralibus runcinatis terminali lunato 
apiculato. Appendix circa foveam membranaceus, semicyatbiformis, 5- 
aristatus, dentibus duobus auctus: altero minore a latere columnar, altero 
antico cultrato. Columna erecta, elongata, semiteres, basi bituberculata, 
clinandrio proclivi, rostello elongato decurvo. Stigma oblongum, excava- 
tum. Pallida 2, cereacea, postice fissa, caudicula elongata, obovata, glan- 
dula ovali. Lhull. Fol. Orch. 



Polychilos cornu-cervi ; foliis distichia coriaceia cuneatis oblongis, pe- 
duneulis lateralibus erectia auraum clavatia multiflorici aubsequalibua, 
rachi alata. 

Polycuilos cornu-ccrvi. Kuhl van Hass. Orch. tab. 1. 

Phal.enopsis cornu-cervi. llchb. jil. Xvu. Orch. 



Although long since discovered in Moulmein by Lobb, 
this curious plant had never reached England in a living 
state before the year 1864, when, through the kindness of 
the Rev. C. S. P. Parish, a few specimens of it were safely 
transmitted to Messrs. Low, some of which have already 
flowered. 

Dr. Lindley had doubts as to whether Polychilos was, as 
a genus, really distinct from Phalcenopsis, while Professor 
Reichenbach is decidedly of opinion that the two genera 
ought to be combined. Certainly the two species lately 
figured in this work (Phalcenopsis Luddemanniana and P. Su- 
matrana) and which are nearly intermediate between the 
older kinds of Phalasnopm and the present Polychilos, go far 
to strengthen the views of the German Professor, but on 
the whole I have thought it better to retain for the present 
Dr.Lindley's name, as so much fresh light is now being thrown 

APEIL 1st, 18G0. 



upon the Bubject l>y the constant discovery of new species, 

and we shall therefore ere Long be in a far better position to 
deal with the question in all its bearing 

P.comu-cervi flowers freely in the summer months, and is 

readily grown among other Indian Orchids. Not more than 
four or rive flowers on the same scape are ever open at the 
same time. 

Descr An epiphyf e with the habit of Phaht nnpsis. Leaves 
nearly a span Long, distichous, leathery, cuneatc, oblong, 
about equal to the peduncles, which are nearly erect, clav 
and forming a broad rachis, on which from six to a dozen or 
more flowers open in succession. Sepals expanded, fleshy, 
narrow, acute, the lateral ones partially falcate. Petals simi- 
lar to the sepals but rather smaller, of a yellowish-green 
barred with reddish-brown. Up whitish, unguiculate, hol- 
lowed on the disk, continuous with the column, fleshy, 
folded inwards, tripartite, the lateral divisions being inclined 
from the apex and the centre one crescent-shaped and apicu- 
late. By the hollow of the disk is a somewhat cup-shaped 
membranaceous appendage, usually furnished with five arista- 
(awns) and two teeth, one in front the other in the rear. 
Column erect, elongated, half- rounded, with two tubercles at 
its base ; the clinandrium lying low and flat, with an extended 
decurved beak. — J. B. 



Pig. 1. Lip and column (magnified) seen in front. 2. Ditto, ditto, seen 
sideways. 



Tab. 5571. 
TACSONIA Vax-Yolxe;,!!!. 

Van Volxem's Passion-flower. 



Nat. Ord. Passifloreje. — Pentaxdria Teigynia. 



Gen. Char. Calycis tubus elongatus, Cylindrical) ; lobi 5, lineari-oblongi 
v. lanceolati, colorati. Petala 5 v. 0, calycis lobis concolora et uniformia. 
Corona faucia duplex v. simplex, brevis v. elongatus. Stamina 5, b'lamentis 
cum gynophoro longe connatia, apice liberis; autherae versatile*, lineari- 
oblongae. Ovarium longe atipitatum, 1-loculare; styli 3, Btigmatibua 
eapitatia ; ovula placentis 3 affix a. puplurima. Bacca intus pulposa, poly- 
Bperma. Semina compressa, arillata, testa scrobiculata. — Fruticea scan- 
dentes, cirrhif-ri. Polia altema,lobata. Pedunculi scepius solitarii,l-flori, 
3-bracteati. Plores sapissime speciosi. 



Tacsoxia Yan-Yolxemii ; ramis gracilibus foliisque subtus puberulis, 
folds breviter petiolatis cordatis profunde 3-lobis, lobis anguste lan- 
ceolatis, petiolis glandulosis, acuminatis serrulatis, cirrhis elongatis, 
pedunculis solitariis Iongissimia capillaribus infra florem 3-bracteatis, 
bracteis parvis oblongis serrulatis, floribus amplis speciosis pendulis, 
calycis tubo basi globoso, lobis anguste lineari-oblongis dorso infra 
apicem apiculatis intus kerniesinis, petalis consimilibus obtusis ima 
basi plaga pallida notatis, corona brevissima simplici denticulata vio- 
lacea. 

Tacsonta (§ ? Psilantiies) Van-Volxemii. Funk, in Journ. of Hort. v. 5. 
Feb. 1S01. Lemaire, Jard. Fleuriste. t. 381. 



One of the most striking and beautiful plants hitherto in- 
troduced into Europe, easy of cultivation, and continuing a 
considerable time in flower. It promises to rival the Lapa- 
(jeria, and even to eclipse it. The genus to which it belongs 
inhabits South America, principally the valleys of the Andes ; 
and it is stated in Lemaire's ' Jardin Fleuriste ' that this spe- 
cies is a native of the temperate region of the province of 
Antioquia, in New Granada, where it is cultivated by the 
natives. It was introduced into Belgium, in 1858, by a zea- 
lous amateur, M. Van Yolxem, who found it in a garden at 
Bogota ; and I have native specimens collected by Goudot in 
ai'eil 1st, 180(5. 



the Quindiu Andes, in the nntry. For the specimen 

here figured, as well as for a fine young plant presented to 
the Royal Gardens, I am Indebted to Messrs. Lucombe and 
Price, of Exeter, h succeeds well in a warm greenhouse, 
and according to its discoverer it resists a temperature of 
the freezing-point in its own country. 

Desgb. Stems slender, slightly pubescent, as are the under 
surface of the leaves, petals, and peduncles. Leaves three 
to five inches long, cordate at the base, deeply three-lobed ; 
lobes membranous, lanceolate, acuminate, serrulate. CirrH 
slender. Peduncles exceedingly long and slender, almost 
capillary, ten to twenty inches long, one-flowered, tri- 
bracteate. Bracts placed a little below the flower, small, 
oblong, serrulate. Flowers rive to seven inches in diameter, 
bright-red. Calyx-tube green, globose at the base, three- 
quarters of an inch long ; lobes oblong or oblong-lanceolate, 
keeled ; keel and base externally green. Petals similar to the 
calyx-lobes, yellowish at the very base. Corona inconspicu- 
ous, toothed, violet. hort two inches long.— ,/. I). II. 



Fig. 1. Portion of corona : — mu<j,ufud. 







W.TitcKdel.etlti,. 



'foicent Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 5572. 

MILTONIA anceps. 

Two-edged-stem med Miltonia . 



Nat. Ord. Oechide.e. — Gtxasdkia Mokasdiua. 
Gen. Char. (Vide svpra, Tab. 4109.) 



Miltonia anceps ; pseudobulbis compressis versus apicem attenuates, foliis 
binis oblongis, racemo ancipiti unifloro foliis longiore articulato, sepalis 
petalisque lanceolato-oblongis patenti-recurvis, labello rhomboideo- 
lyrato apice recurvo basi pubescente bilamellato dente intermedio 
breviore adjecto, cliuandrio circulari carnoso dentato. Lindl. Fol. Orch. 

Miltonta anceps. Rchb. Xen. Orch. tab. sxi. 

Odoittoglossum anceps. Klotzsch, in Allgem. Gart. Aug. 9, 1851. 



This singular Miltonia was originally introduced from 
Brazil, by the Messrs. Loddiges with whom it flowered, but no 
figure of it has appeared in any English work and the plant 
itself seems to have disappeared for many years from our 
gardens. Fortunately a few plants of it were met with by 
Mr. Blunt, and sent to his employers Messrs. H. Low & Co. of 
Clapton, and from one of these, which flowered at Knypers- 
ley in the spring of 1865, Mr. Fitch obtained his drawing. 

The species is cultivated as easily and requires the same 
treatment as the other Miltonias. 

Desck. Pseudo-bidbs two-leaved, two or three inches long, 
adjoining each other, of the pale-yellowish tint usual in the 
genus. Leaves two on each pseudo-bulb, narrow-oblong, ta- 
pering at their extremity, shorter than the jtoiver-scapes, 
which are two-edged and partially concealed by long sheath- 
ing pointed bracts. Flowers one on each scape, two inches 
in diameter. Sepals and petals oblong-lanceolate, spread- 
ing, recurved, olive-coloured. Lip white with a few purple 
streaks and dots, somewhat lyre-shaped, slightly recurved at 
the apex, same length as the petals, along its pubescent base 
are two lamella?, with a third (sometimes in the form of a 
tooth) raised between them. Clinandrium round, and toothed. 
— J.B. 

AFRTL 1ST, 1SG6. 








•- 



t 



ffi 



1 




7 s 



' 



% 



■ 






?' 





■ 

ioentBrooka,Irtip- 



Tab. 5573. 

MUSS.EXDA LTTTEOLA. 
Captain Qranfs Mussmtda. 



Nat. Ord. EuuiACEiE. — Pentandbia Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Calycis tubus oblongus v. turbinatus ; lobi 5, decidui, uno 
Bffipissime in folium amplum coloratum petiolatum producto. Corolla in- 
fundibuliformis, tubo elongato, fauce villosa, limbo 5-partito. Antlierce 
5, sessiles, inclusse, liueares. Ovarium 2-loculare ; stylus gracilis, stigma- 
tibus linearibus ; ovula co, plaeentis stipitatis revoluto-2-lobis affixa. Bacca 
apice cicatricata, polysperma. Semina parva. — Frutices, arbores et suffru- 
tices tropici. Folia petiolata, ovata ; stipulae 2, libera? v. connata). Flores 
in corymbos terminates dispositi, bracteolati, sapissime albi v.flavi. 



Muss/Enda luteola ; suffrutex gracilis, ramis striatis teretibus et foliis sub- 
tus infloresceutia pubescenti-tomentosis, foliis 1-2 'poll, longis breviter 
petiolatis ovato-oblongis lanceolatisve acuminatis membranaceis, sti- 
pulis parvis ovato-subulatis, corymbis paucifloris, calycis lobis setaceis 
uno foliaceo petiolato oblongo albo v. pallide flavo, corolla? tubo J-l 
poll, longo, lobis late ovatis longe abrupte acuminatis luteolis, bacca 
parva sicca. 

Mtjss^nda luteola. Delil. in Caill. PI. Afria. 65. t. l.f. 1. DC. Prodr. 
v. ±.p. 371. 



A very pretty plant and one of unusual interest, as being 
first introduced into Europe by Captain Grant, the companion 
of the lamented Speke in his daring exploration of the head- 
waters of the Nile. During that memorable voyage Captain 
Grant made a very valuable collection of plants, that have 
been published by Dr. Thomson in the appendix to Speke's 
Narrative, and he further brought to Kew the seeds from 
which the specimen here figured was produced, and which 
flowered in our stove in August, 1863. It was found by 
Cailliaud, during his voyage to Meroe, on the Nile, in about 
lat. 10° N. Captain Grant collected it in the rocky ravines 
of Gani and Madi, and it was again found in the White Nile 
country, during Consul Petherick's expedition. 

Delile refers the M. lanceolata, Spreng. (Ophiorhiza lanceo- 
lata, Forskahl, Manettia lanceolata, Vahl, Musscenda ^Egyp- 

APBIL 1st, 1866. 



turn, l.amk.). of Arabia, to this, but as it does not at all agree 
with Forskahls description, 1 refrain from quoting these 
<mi<>ii_\ ma, 

Dbscs. A small, erect, slender, twiggy shrub, pubescent on 
tho branchlcts. Leaves below, and inflorescence. Lain* one 
and a half to two inches long, shortly petioled, ovate- or 
oblong- lanceolate, acuminate, membranous. Stipules ovate- 
subulate. Corymbs few-flowered ; fiowen in threes, usually 
shortly pedicelled. Calyx-teeth filiform or subulate, except 
one, that forms a white or yellowish, oblong or ovate-cordate, 
membranous leaf, half to three-quarters of an inch long. 
Calyx-tube an inch long and under ; lobes broadly ovate, with 
long acuminate points, pale-yellow. — J. I). 11. 



Fig. 1. Flower with foliaceous calyx-lobe removed. 2. Germen. 3. In- 
terior of throat of corolla, with anthers : — all magnified. 



NEW COLONIAL FLORAS. 



HANDBOOK OF THE NEW ZEALAND FLORA; a 

Systematic Description of the Native Plants of Xew Zealand, and the Chat- 
ham. Ivemiadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Maequarrie's Islands. 
By Dr. J. D. Hookeb, F.R.S. Demy 8vo. Part I., 475 pp., 16*. Pub- 
lished under the auspices of the Government of that colony. 

A compendious account of the plants of New Zealand and outlying islands, 
published under the authority of the Government of that colony. The present 
Part contains the Flowering Plants, Ferns, and Lycopods ; the Second Part, 
containing the remaining Orders of Cryptogamia, or Flowerless Plants, with 
Index and Catalogues of Native Names and of Naturalized Plants, will appear 
shortly. 



FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS ; a Description of the Plants of 

the Australian Territory. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the 
Linnean Society, assisted by Ferdinand Mueller, F.R.S. , Government 
Botanist, Melbourne, Victoria. Demy 8vo. Vol. I. 566 pp., and Vol. II. 
530 pp., 20.?. each. Published under the auspices of the several Govern- 
ments of Australia. Vol. III. in the press. 

Of this great undertaking, the present volumes, of more than a thousand 
closely-printed pages, comprise about one-fourth. The materials are derived 
not only from the vast collections of Australian plants brought to this country 
by various botanical travellers, and preserved in the herbaria of Kew and of the 
British Museum, including those hitherto unpublished of Banks and Solander, 
of Captain Cook's first Voyage, and of Brown in Flinders', but from the very 
extensive and more recently collected specimens preserved in the Government 
Herbarium of Melbourne, under the superintendence of Dr. Ferdinand Mueller. 
The descriptions are written in plain English, and are masterpieces of accuracy 
and clearness. 



FLORA HONGKONGENSIS ; a Description of the Flow- 
ering Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By George Bentham, 
P.L.S. With a Map of the Island. Demy 8vo, 550 pp., 16*. Published 
under the authority of Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

The Island of Hongkong, though occupying an area of scarcely thirty square 
miles, is characterized by an extraordinarily varied Flora, partaking, however, of 
that of South Continental China, of which comparatively little is known. The 
number of Species enumerated in the present volume is 1056. derived chiefly 
from materials collected by Mr. Hinds, Col. Champion, Dr. Hance, Dr. Harland, 
Mr. Wright, and Mr. Wilford: 



FLORA OF THE BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. 

By Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. Demy 8vo, 806 pp., 37*. 6d. Published under 

the auspices of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 
Containing complete systematic descriptions of the Flowering Plants and 
Ferns of the British West Indian Islands, accompanied by an elaborate index ot 
reference, and a list of Colonial names. 



FERNS AND MOSSES. 



THE BRITISH PERNS; or, Coloured Figures and Descrip- 
tions, with the needful Analyses of the Fructification and Venation, of the 
Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland, systematically arranged. B\ 9 
W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal Sro, 66 

The British Ferns and their allies are illustrated in this work, from the pencil 

Mr. Fitch. Ea has a Plate to itself, so that there is ample room 

for the details, on a magnified scale, of Fructification and Venation. The whole 

are delicately coloured by hand. In the letterpress an interesting account is 

given with each species of its geographical distribution in other countries. 



GARDEN* FERNS; or, Coloured Figures and Descriptions, 

with the needful Analyses of the Fructification and Venation, of a 8el< 
of Exotic Ferns, adapted for Cultivation in the Garden, Hothouse, and Con- 
servatory. By Sir W. J. Hookeb. P. U.S. Royal 8vo, 6 1 Plates. £2. 2*. 
apanion volume to the preceding, for the use of those who take an inter- 
est in the cultivation of some of the more beautiful and remarkable varieties of 
Exotic Ferns. Here also each Species has a Plate to itself, and the details of 
Fructification and Venation are given on a magnified Male, the Drawings being 
from the pencil of Mr. Fitch. 



1ILICES EXOTKLE; or, Coloured Figures and Description 

of Exotic Ferns, chiefly of such as are cultivated in the Royal Gardens of 
Kew. By Sir W J. Boons, F.R.S. Royal 4to, 100 Plates, £6. 11*. 
One of the most superbly illustrated books of Foreign Ferns that has been 
hitherto produced. The Species arc selected both on account of their beauty of 
form, singular structure, and their suitableness on cultivation. 



FERNY COMBES ; a Ramble after Ferns in the Glens and 

Valleys of Devonshire. By Chablotte Chanter. Second Edition. 
Fcp. 8vo, 8 coloured plates by Fitch, and a Map of the County, 5*. 



HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be Natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Bebkeley, 
MJL, F.L.S. Demy 8vo, pp. 360, 24 Coloured Plates, 'lis. 
A very complete Manual, comprising characters of all the species, with the 
circumstances of habitation of each j with special chapters on development and 
structure, propagation, fructification, geographical distribution, uses, and modes 
oi collecting and preserving, followed by an extensive series of coloured illustra- 
tions, in which the essential portions of the plant are repeated, in every case on 
a magnified scale. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



J. B. BROWN & CO/S 

NEW PATENT B B LAWN MOWER. 



Manufactured 

by 

J. B. Brown & Co., 

148, 

Upper Thames 

Street, 

London. 




Guaranteed to 

give perfect 

satisfaction, and 

if not approved of 

may be at once 

returned. 



J. B. BEOWN and Co., haying so very successfully introduced, at the rec ent Meeting of the Bath and West of Eng- 
land Society at Hereford, in June 1865, the NEW PATENT B B LAWN MOWER, of their own manufacture 
beg to mention that haying supplied the large number of MACHINES ordered on that occasion and up to the 
present time, with most unqualiBed satisfaction to every one, so far as they are aware, they are now actively P^™ 
to execute further orders for the approaching season ; and, owing to the large number of such orders already ^eiveo. 
they would very respectfully solicit all intending orders to be sent with as little delay as possible,-say to be executed 
at any time during the opening of the spring, or in the course of the summer, as may be desired. 

PRICES -including Carriage to any Railway Station or Shipping Port in England 

10-inch Machine .£3 10 01 I 18-inch Machine .7100 Easdy Varied by a Man. 

\ Easilu Worked by a Boy. 20-mch Machine -800 

OJ y * 22-inch Machine. 8 10 I Ditto ly Two Men. 

Ditto by a Man. I 24-inch Machine . 9 Oj 

If with brass mounted Grass Box, gold lettered, 5*. extra. a ^ ar>rTa A 

%• Ereiy Machine sent out is warranted to give ample satisfaction, and if not approved of maj -he "changed 
for an* other size of Machine, or for the Machine of any other maker, or may be at once returned unconditionally. 



12-inch Machine 
14-inch Machine 
K5-inch Machine 



4 10 

5 10 

6 10 



NEW IMPROVED PREMIUM WIRE NETTING. 

REDUCED PRICES, FEBRUARY, 1866. 



GREAT 
IMPROVEMENT 

IN 
GALVANIZING. 




WITH REDUCED 

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GALVANIZED 

AFTER MADE 



PRICES per Lineal Yard 24 Inches High. 



SizeofMesh. 



2J-inch 

2-iach 

lf-inch 

li-inch 
1-inch 
I -inch 



Mostly used for 



Japanned 



Hares, Dogs, Poultry . 
Gameor Poultry Netting 
Small Rabbits, Hares.etc 

Smallest Rabbits . . 
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Galvanized 



d. 


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d. 

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— ; T~~a~v ^.^ fW>A ""^Tainhe orincipal Kailway Stations and Shipping Ports in 

Quantities of 100 yards or upwards delivered tree at all me principal j 

England ; and 200 y ids or upwards deUvered free to most parts of Scotland and Ireland 

V Every description of Netting warranted to give satisfaction, and if not approved will be exchanged, or may be 
r returned unconditionally. 

J. B. BROWN & CO.: OFFICES, 18, CANNON STEET, CITY, LONDON, E.C. 

(Nearly opposite St. Swithins Lane and " London Stone," and near LondonBrndge^ 
WAREHOUSE (where Stoek is kept), 148, TTPPEB .IlUffi MJT REEJ EC. 

(Opposite the City of London Brewery, and close to the London Bndge Steamboat Piers.) 



HEATING BY HOT WATKR 

uarn/cVirilf u ;n :" y ;: ila,i, , te<J ** i'" 111 '"'^ rf «»J kil '<> «» be more effectually 

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GREENHOUSES. , CHURCHES. FACTORIES 

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in any plfttLlTH f °'' ^"^ H ° USCS ' as coils of P ! P- "» ** P^ 
fro,uThe ime ho ler ln S l "T* r ° 0n f 0ne or mOTe Uaths may be heated 
the house ' ' C0 ' 15ta " t S "PP^ of hot water °»'-™«l i» W part of 

not onh Ir^T Tt Worllsho P^ this *!***> of bating is nnsurnassed, as it i, 
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MATEBIAIS.-All Materials supplied will be of the best quality 

^n^^^T^ TT" H"* and P^ 8 a,ld ^nneetions, being always 
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-«" effeetnaiWing ^^ift^ Sl^ * 
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J- JONES & SONS, 

IEON MEBCHANTS AMD HOKTICULTTJBAL EKGMEEHS, 
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€T)trtl Stria. 

> No. 257. 

VOL. XXII. MAY. [Price 3*. 6d. col*- 2«. U. plain. 

OR NO. 952 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

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AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 

WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 

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JBirrttar at tfje »0i»al Botanic Sartensi at &rfn. 




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Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
A«d flower* exotic grace our northera clime. 



LOVEIX KEEVE k CO., 5. HENRIETTA STEEET. COVENT GARDEN. 

1866. 




THE HYDROPTJLT, 

INVENTION FOR THROWING WATER BY HAND-POWER. 

(SeCCBED BT BOTAX LlTTBBS PATKIT/.) 

Weighs but 8 lbs. ' 

TVill throw 7 or 8 Galk iter per minute 50 feet, when worked by the 

power of one Man. 

PRICE LIST 

Complete with Brass Cylinders and Japanned Stirrup, £1. 12#. 6d. 

Complete with Brass Cylinders and Copper Stirrup, £2. 2«. 

The price, " complete " as above, includes 2\ feet Suction, and 3 feet Delivery 
Hose, Galvanized Wire Strainer, Rose, and Small Jet. 

THE HYDROPTJLT 

Is invaluable for use in the Garden for 
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CLEANSING TREES FROM SMI 

DRESSING WITH LIQUID MANURE, ETC. ETC 

THE HYDROPTJLT 

Is desirable in every Household for 
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A SPRAY BATH, ETC. ETC. 
ORDERED BY THE WAR DEPARTMENT AS FIRE ENGINES. 
ROBERT HOGG, LL.D. & F.L.S., REV. H. DOMBRAIN, A.B., SHIRLEY HIBBEBD, 
ESQ., F.R.H.S., THOMAS RIVERS, ESQ. (the eminent Florist), and other well-known 
gentlemen, recommend the Hydropult as an Invaluable Garden implement. 
Z7«? Hydropult will draw water horizontally, if necessary, through Two Hundred Feet Suction Hose, ad 
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THE GREENHOUSE AND CONSERVATORY HYDROPULT. 
A NEW AND BEAUTIFUL IMPLEMENT, 

Weighing scarcely 5 lbs. 
And specially adapted for use in the Greenhouse and Conservatory. 

Price 35s. 
Complete, with Brass Cylinder and Copper Stirrup, 2* feet Suction and 3 feet Delivery Hose, Strainer, Boeete 

This New Implement must necessarily supersede Syringes and other devices of the kind, for it will be found much 
more euective m its operation. 

A LADY CAN WORK IT FOR HOURS WITHOUT FATIGUE. 

C! A S£? •~ I ™P^ rtant *,"? the Public -T he extensive sale of the Hydropult has excited the cupidity of «msJW 
\U respectable, but m reality unprincipled Manufacturers, who are now pilming on the Public wortldess imitah*» 
of t£S Pl ] i gh th f* c r necti ° n9 are enabled to P lace «<* de ™« on exhibition, and for sale, in w*? 

£ mllJZT^u T m n f U ^ Seed E8tabli8h °^t« throughout the City and provinces. These devices res*-* 
hSTS h P I PUl m appearance, and are calculated to deceive the unsuspecting. The Proprietor, 
JS ™T tbj8 _ C » ut j° n » and respectfully intimates that parties wishing to purchase the Hydropult should £* 

3T wT5SS?^ f 8 f ' T d T l*i" attached thereto a kbe1 ' * ith * he foll °™s ™ d9 : -" The A T 

KSnrlS fil^l^l ufsct ^ ed T on y h 7 Gbiffiths & Browitt, Birmingham. ChaSim Pomeboy Bit***' 
Proprietor, & and 143, Cheap 91 de, London." Unless this label is attached, the machine is not the Hydropult. 

TT V tx T 3«t,tt T ^ RO « PECTUSES ' Wl ™ TESTIMONIALS, ON APPLICATION. 

HYDROPULT SHOW-ROOM, 142 & 143, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON. 

CHARLES POMEROY BUTTON, Peopeietob. 



BOTA NICAL MAGAZINE ADVER TISE R. 

SHANKS r PATENT LAWN MOWERS FOE 1866. 



Patronized on Fire separate occasions, dining the Season o/lSQ4, by 
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF SAXONY; 

AGAIN ON FOUR SEPARATE OCCASIONS DURING THE SEASON OF 1865 BY HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN; 

ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF HOLLAND; 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF PEUSSLA. 




BOBSE MACHi: 



PONY MACHINE. 



HAND MAC HI. Mi. 



Season, are gratified 



ALEXANDER SHANKS i SON, in presenting their LAWN MOWERS for the approael 
to be able to state that the demand for their celebrated Machines is rapidly increasing. 

A. S. & Son, in introducing Improvements into their Machines, hare been careful that no Improvement be intro- 
duced which has merely novelty to recommend it, but that the advantages in point of durability and simplicity of 
construction, which have always been a peculiarity of their Machines, should still remain. 

A. S. & Son can confidently assure their numerous Friends and Customers and the Public generally that their en- 
deavour will always be to supply a Machine, first-class in every way, one which cannot be surpassed if even equalled, 
whether for simplicity of construction, ease in working, or durability. None but the best materials and skilled work- 
men are employed in the manufacture of their Machines. 

PRICES — Including Carriage to most of the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in the Kingdom. 

SHANKS' NEW PATENT HAND MACHINE FOR 1866. 

10- inch Machine £3 10 } Easily worked 



12-inch Machine 4 10 

H-inch Machine 5 10 

16-inch Machine 6 10 



) by a Lady. 
Do. by a Boy. 
Do. by a Man. 



19-inch Machine £7 12 

22-inch Machine 8 7 

24-inch Machine 8 17 



p, ( Do. by a Man 

( and a Boy. 
6 / Do. by Two 
6 |_ Men. 



Silent Movement for the four smallest sizes, 4s. extra ; for the other sizes, 7s. 6d. extra. 



|HANKS' NEW PATENT PONY & DONKEY MACHINE. 
ft idth of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. 

25-inch Machine £12 ]0 25s. extra. 

28-inch Machine 14 10 30s. extra. 

30-inch Machine 15 15 30s. extra. 

Silent Movement, 12s. 6d. extra; Boots for Pony, 21s. 
per Set ; ditto for Donkey, 16s. per Set. 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT HORSE MACHINE. 
Widtli of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. 

30-inch Machine £19 30s.extra. 

36-inch Machine 22 30s.extra. 

42-inch Machine 26 ...40s. extra. 

48-inch Machine 28 40s.extra. 

Silent Movement, 20s. extra ; Boots for Horse's Feet, 
24s. per Set. 
PATENT LAWN MOWERS cut the Grass on uneven as well as on level Lawns; and it is quite 
immaterial whether the Grass be wet or dry. 

Every Machine warranted to give ample satisfaction, and if not approved of, can be at once returned. 



SHANKS 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, 

27, LEADENHALL STREET, LONDON. 

MANUFACTORY, DENS IRONWORKS, ARBROATH. 

■*•• S. and SON keep a Stock of Lawn Mowers at 27, Leadenhall Street, London, from which Orders can bo 
at once executed. They also have at their London Warehouse a staff of experienced Workmen thoroughly 
acquainted with aU the details of these Machines, so that they are enabled to repair Lawn Mowers in 
London as well a3 at the Manufactory. 



ADVER1 



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To cut 30 inches ... £21 1 Leather Boots for 
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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER 



NEW ZONALE PELARGONIUM, WILTSHIRE LASS. 



DOWNIE, LAIRD, & LAING 

Have much pleasure in introducing this splendid Novelty, which was pronounced by the Members of the Floral 
Committee of the Royal Horticultural Society, and also by the Judges of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Regent's 
Park, aa the finest PINK PELARGONIUM ever exhibited, and was awarded a First-class Certificate on each 
occasion. 

The following description is from the Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society of London : — " One of the finest 
of the pink-flowered Bedding varieties yet seen, remarkable, not so much for size of flower as for size and completeness 
of truss ; the leaves were marked with a pale zone ; the flowers were rosy-pink ; the base of the upper petals white, 
and the trusses are remarkably large and dense, having the valuable property of retaining their blossoms for a long 
time in the truss." 

PRIMULA, CALCEOLARIA, etc. 

WM. CUTBUSH AND SON are now sending out Seed of their superb PRI- 
MULA SINENSIS FIMBRIATA, which has for many years given great satisfaction. 
The 'Gardeners' Chronicle' of the 6th of January, in Notices to Correspondents, says:— 
"The blooms sent are remarkably fine, richly coloured, full, and densely fringed ; they are evi- 
dently the produce of a capital strain." 

the 'Journal of Horticulture' of the 23rd of January, says that "The finest and richest 
coloured Chinese Primulas we have yet seen are those raised by Messrs. Cutbush and Son." 

Sealed packets, 2s. 6d. and 3s. 6d. each. 
CALCEOLARIA (James's).— This is the finest herbaceous variety extant. Per packet,' 
2*. Gd. and 3s. 6 d. each. 

CINERARIA, from finest named varieties. Per packet 2s. Gd. and 3s. 6d. each. 

HIGHGATE NURSERIES, LONDON, N. 



GEORGE SMITH'S New Catalogue is now ready, with a splendid woodcut of 
Nosegay Geranium LE GRAND, which is the finest of all Geraniums for effect ; together 
with descriptions of New Seedling Zonale Geraniums, CHIEFTIAN, CHRISTABEL, EX HI- 
BITOR, GLADIATEUR, GREAT EASTERN, SIR R, PEEL, and PINK PERFECTION, 
which for their general fine qualities have received First-class Certificates at the Royal Botanic 
Gardens, and Royal Horticultural Gardens, South Kensington, and all of which G. S. can with 
the greatest of confidence recommend for description : see Catalogue, which also contains select 
lists of Show FRENCH FANCY ZONALE AND VARIEGATED GERANIUMS, 
FUCHSIAS, VERBENAS, PETUNIAS, DAHLIAS, CHRYSANTHEMUMS, BEDDING 
PLANTS, etc., and will be sent in exchange for one postage stamp. 

TOLLINGTON NURSERY, HORNSEY ROAD, LONDON, N. 

BENJAMIN EDGINGTOxN, 

MARQUEE, TENT, RICK CLOTH, AND FLAG MANUFACTURER, 

BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY. 
Marquees and Tents for Horticultural Shows, for Sale or Hre. 
Netting for Fruit Trees, New and Second-hand ; Scrims for Greenhouse Blinds, Frigi 
Domo, Garden Mats, etc. 

Be particular to address — 

BENJAMIN EDGINGrTON (only), 

2, DUKE STREET, LONDON BRIDGE, S.E. 

No other Establishment. 



BOTANICAL M LG \/.l\K Al»\ ERTISER. 



NEW CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

JOHN SALTER'S Descriptive Catalogue for 1866 is now ready, and will be 
sent on receipt of two postage-stamps. 

VERSAILLES NURSERY. WILLIAM STREET, VALE PLACE, HAMMERSMITH, W. 

1Mb Tf'DGINGTON'S GARDEN NETTING, the cheapest and most* 4 
h^^BagMBSgi -*-^ durable, 1 \d. per square yard, or in quantities of 250, 500, or 

if^^BJHS EDGINGTON'S MARQUEES and GARDEN TENTS are the 

§£ ZE^ML EDGIXGTOX'S MARQUEES, for hire, are the most handsome 

" ^^ ^ ^^^^ ^ EDGINGTON'S RICK CLOTHS for sixty-one years have main- 
tained their celebrity as the best. 

HAYTHORN and BRITTAIN'S NETTINGS. Sample of material free on application. 

Be particular— Frederick Edgington & Co., Thomas Street, Old Kent Road, London, S.E/ 

A liberal Discount to the Trade ! ! ! 

International Exhibition, 1862, Class XIX. — Honourable Mention. 

PLAGUES OP THE GARDEN. 

SIMPLE AND SAFE REMEDY. 

By using the "APHIS WASH," these pests of the Garden, together with SCALE,l 
Caterpillars, Slugs, Earwigs, etc., are immediately destroyed. Leaves no stain, 
but strengthens the Trees or Plants. 

See 'GARDENERS' CHRONICLE,' August 19th, 1865. 
'GARDENERS' MAGAZINE,' July 1st, 1865. 

Sold by Chemists and others, in Is. Bottles and 2s. (id. a Gallon, with full 

Directions for Use. 
WHOLESALE AT THE 

"CITY SOAP WOKKS," MILTON STREET, LONDON, E.C. 

JUST PUBLISHED 

(GRATIS). 

THE GREAT CRINOLINE QUESTION ! 

SOLVED BY HER MAJESTY 

THE EMPEESS OF THE FEENCH. 

Ladies should at once obtain gkatis of their Draper or Corset Maker, THOMSON'S new Illustration, 

showing the veritable 

"MODE DE L'IMPERATIUCE." 



NEW PLANTS FOR 1866. 

B. S. W I L L T A M S, 

VICTORIA AND IWIIAIMSK NURSERIES, HOLLOWAY, LONDON, N., 
Has greal pleasure In offering, for the first time, the undermentioned Splendid Plants. Every care has 
been used in the selection of the several kinds, therefore he trusts they will give the highest satisfaction. 



AZALEAS. 

The two following beautiful varieties will he found great 
acquisitions, and B. S. W. feels confident that they must 
take first rank as exhibition plants, PRINCESS ALEX- 
ANDRA being raised from the same parents as Elegantis- 
shna, which has proved to be one of the best. The present 
variety will be found superior in quality, with much larger 
flowers, of a substance never before met with — the most 
important feature for prolonging the flowering season. 
PRINCESS HELENA is recommended for its general use- 
fulness, being a free bloomer and quite distinct in habit. 
PRINCESS ALEXANDRA.— A beautiful form of Ele- 
gantissima, with flowers 3 1 inches across ; petals round 
and smooth, of great substance, slightly striped with 
deep crimson ; a profuse bloomer. 31*. 6d. 
PRINCESS HELENA. — Deep rosy pink, upper petals 
spotted with lake. The transparency of the flowers 
causes it to be distinct from all" other kinds ; habit 
good and free. 21s. 

RHODODENDRONS. 

These two elegant varieties are the Seedling productions 
of Mr. Bousie, late of Stoke Park, and were exhibited by 
nun a few seasons since at the Royal Horticultural Meet- 
ings, and received Certificates of Merit as valuable additions 
for greenhouse decoration, being of free-flowering habit, 
a feature much wanted in a greenhouse Rhododendron. 
DENISONII. — A Seedling from Dalhousianum, crossed 
with Edgeworthii and Gibsonii ; a very fine variety, 
"with splendid habit, well furnished with clean-looking 
flattish elliptic leaves and large campanulated flowers, 
pure white, with a lemon stain towards the base, very 
elegant (to be figured in the ' Floral Magazine ' for 
May). 21s. 
McNABBIL— From ciliatum, crossed with P'dgeworthii ; 
a very handsome plant, dwarfish in habit, with smooth 
elliptic leaves, and beautiful large blush-white flowers. 

e . ACHIMENES. 

feix beautiful varieties raised by Mr. Parsons, of Welwyn, 
TTnv£ n advance of an .V yet sent out. PINK PERFEC- 
TION the same size as Mauve Queen, and equal in sub- 
l? +£ e ' Wh0e GRANDIS ff ives tll e deepest violet shade ; 
ail the others will be found equally distinct in their sepa- 
rate colours. Received Certificates of Merit from the 
floral Committee. 

ADVANCE. — Flowers deep reddish purple, with a light 
spotted eye, shaded towards the margin, quite dis- 
tinct. 7s. U. 

AK(jTJS. — Colour rich plum, large deep orange eye, 
spotted with carmine, upper lobes of the flowers 

Arrf Ut ' fully raved towards the margin. 7s. Qd. 
ALKORA. — Flowers 2 inches across ; colour rich heavy 

scarlet, with light yellow eye, very effective. 7s. 6d. 
"KANDIS. — Flowers deep violet colour, with a deep 

orange eye, finely spotted and shaded with carmine. 

PINK PERFECTION.— Flowers very large, colour ma- 
genta rose ; the upper part of the eye rich carmine, 
the under lobes beautifully rayed with violet, very 
fi ne. 7 S . 6 d. J J 

1LLLA. — Flowers 2^ inches across, clear magenta, 
orange eye, spotted with carmine, nicely serrated, 
distinct and beautiful. 7s. 6d. 

The above set for 40s. 



SWAINSONIA MAGNIFICA. 

Figured in the ' Floral Magazine.' 
A free-growing and free-flowering greenhouse climber ; 
native of Australia ; habit and character partakes of both 
the Clianthus and Swainsonia ; while it has the robust and 
graceful-growing habit of the former, it produces more pro- 
minently the long pendent racemes of delicate bright-co- 
loured pink flowers of the latter, with a pure white centre 
in the upper petal or lobe. It is well adapted for a cool 
greenhouse, treated as a pot plant or planted out in a 
border for pillars or trellis-work. 10s. 6d. 
THUNBERGIA FRAGRANS. 
B. S. W. believes this to be the most useful plant he has 
ever had the pleasure of offering, the whole character being 
quite distinct to any other Thunbergia, and whether grown 
as a pot plant or planted in the border for covering pillars 
and trellis- work, it will be invaluable, being free in growth, 
with ample foliage of a dark green, with great substance. 
It continues flowering throughout the year, but its prin- 
cipal period is during the winter months, a time when 
white flowers are scarce. Although grown in a warm 
stove, it has never shown the least sign of red spider, a 
most important feature in this class of plants. 10s. 6d. 
PELARGONIUMS, BEDDING. 
The following six Zonale Geraniums were raised by 
Shirley Hibberd, Esq., the eminent Horticulturist. It is 
well known that this gentleman has for some years given 
his close attention to this class of Bedding Plants, planting 
in his own experimental garden every kind that has been 
raised, and carefully testing or proving their worth as re- 
gards habit and novelty by comparison, etc. He has al- 
ready raised several valuable kinds, but prior to this sea- 
son none have been sent out under his name. B. S. TV", 
has prevailed upon Mr. Hibberd to allow him to use his 
name. This will convince all that they are each varieties 
of more than ordinary merit, and real novelties. 

ANDREW MARVEL.— Leaves bright green, with 
broad browTiish zone flowers, large, and of remarkable 
substance and smoothness ; colour vermilion-red : a 
fine variety. 7s. 6d. 
EVANGELINE. — Leaves rich green, with dark zone ; 
smooth circular flowers, colour French white, shading 
to delicate rose blush, large globular trusses, very dis- 
tinct and beautiful. 7s. 6d. 
H. W. LONGFELLOW.— Flowers finely formed, colour 
deep salmon flesh with red centre, with trusses large 
and globular ; leaves dark green, with brown zone ; 
a very fine variety. 7s. 6d. 
KATE ANDERSON.— Flowers average size and form, 
trusses globular, colour the most brilliant shade of true 
scarlet ; blooming profusely, likely to prove the most 
effective scarlet known ; leaves deeply zoned. 7s. 6d. 
MAGNA CHARTA. — Flowers very large and smooth, 
top petals the same size as the bottom ones, colour 
deep red ; leaves pale green, with obscure zone. 7s. 6d. 
The above set for 40s. 
PELARGONIUM ROSALIE (HOLLAND). 
The peculiar good qualities of this variety consist of free 
and compact habit of growth, with a moderate supply of 
rich salmon-red flowers of great substance and excellent 
form ; large trusses, well furnished with flower-buds, 
mounted on stout stalks, well above the foliage. For 
Winter Decoration it will be found invaluable. Received 
Certificates during the past season for its general useful- 
ness. 7s. 6d. 



A NEW GENERAL PLANT CATALOGUE in preparation, and, when ready, will be forwarded to 

all previous Customers and Applicants. 

Victoria and Paradise Nurseries, Holloway, London, N. 



STRAHAN AND CO.'S MAGAZINES TOR MAY. 



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CONTENTS. 
Philosophy and Theology. By the Rev. Pro- Christian km 

fessor Mansel. 
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Ecce Homo. By the Rev. Edw. T. Vanghan, M.A. 



REVIEW, 

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John Tynvhitt. M.A. 
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CONTENTS. 



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Chapters' XVIII., XIX., XX., XXI. 

The Child's Flower Lesson. 

A Visit to the Andaman Islands (the Convict 
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Unchanging. By Dora Greemvell. 

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Rev. J. J. Stewart Perowne, B.D. 
Summer in the City. By AL J. James. 
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THE SUNDAY MAGAZINE. 

Edited by THOMAS GUTHRIE, D.D. 
Sevenpence Monthly, Illustrated. 



CONTENTS 
Annals of a Quiet Neighbourhood. By the 

Vicar. XVI.-XX. With Illustration. 
The Cry of the Weary. By an East-End 

Blacksmith. 
Our Father's Business ; or, Methods to do 

Good. By the Editor. VII. — Perseverance in 

Well-doing. 
Hymns of the Reformation. By Isabella Bird. 
The Old Testament Sabbath in Theory and 

in Practice. By J. H. Rigg, D.D. 
The Nobleman's Son. By the Rev. J. H. Clark. 
A Lecture from a Window. By Andrew 

Whitgift. With an Illustration. 



Divine Providence. By Rev. A.W.Thor 
Prejudice. By the Author of • Studies 

ries.' Part II. (to be continued.) 
On the Rock. With an Illustration. 
The Waldenses. By the Rev. D. K. Guthi 

Part III. 
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Seu-Will. 
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The Surprise of the Christian's End 

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Sixpence Monthly, Illustrated. 

^ CONTENTS 

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Vambery. 
A Designing Aristocrat. By John'Ruffini. 
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Mr. Carlyle at Edinburgh. By Alexs 

Smith. 
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Trollope. 
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STBAHAN AND CO., MAGAZINE - PUBLISHERS, 148, STRAND, LONDON. 

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B01 INICA1 MAGAZINE A l»\ i.KTISER. 



EUGENIE DE CUE RIN. 

i. 

Shortly tcill be published, 

THE LETTERS OF EUGEME DE GUERLV. 

Crown 8vo, Price 7s. 6d. 

, Matthew Arnold, in his recently published Essays, says, — " At least one good book has appeared in 

1365 — The Letters of Eugkmk de Grruix." 



II. 
Now ready, a Second Edition, 

THE JOURNAL OF EUGENIE DE GUERIN. 

Crown 8vo, Price 7s. Od. 

The Edinburgh Review. — " We have never read a more touching record of devoted piety, sisterly 
affection, and ' love strong as death.' Eugenie de Guerin is an Antigone of France sublimed and 
ennobled by the Christian faith. Her Journal is the outpouring of one of the purest and most 
saintly minds that ever existed upon earth." 

The British. Quarterly Review. — " Perhaps no Journal was ever written so perfectly spontaneous 
and natural, so unconsciously recording the temper and thought of a just and beautiful life. Rarely 
is literature enriched or human life elevated by a book so genuine, so pure, and so stimulating. 

The Princeton Review (in noticing the American edition). — "We know of nothing in modem 
literature more cheering in its simplicity and tender grace than this record of the daily life within 
and about this old chateau in Languedoc, and this unconscious picture of the noble and devout 
maiden which it enshrines." 



LONDON: SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, & CO., STATIONERS' HALL COURT. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 



pESCATOREA. Figures of Orchidaceous Plants, chiefly from the Collection of M. 
-J- Pescatoue. Edited by M. Linden, with the assistance of MM. G. Litddeman, J. E. 
iWciiox, and M. G. Reichenbach. Folio, 41 Coloured Plates, £5. 5s., cloth gilt, morocco 
b ack ; £Q. e S-) w hole morocco, elegant. 

P ITIDE TO COOL-ORCHID GROWING. By James Bateman, Esq., F.R.S., Author 
^ of ' The Orchidaeeas of Mexico and Guatemala.' Woodcuts, 1.?. 

"DOTANICAL MAGAZINE. Coloured Illustrations and Descriptions of the new and 
-p rare Flowering Plants of the Royal Gardens, Kew, and of other Botanical Establishments. 
% Dr. Hooker, F.R.S., Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. Monthly, with 6 Coloured Plates, 
os. (id. 

Contents of No. 256, April 1866. 



ERICINELLA MANXII. 
POLYCHILOS CORNU-CERVI. 
TACS )NIA VAN-VOLXEMII. 



MILTOXIA AXCEPS. 
MUSS.EXDA LUTEOLA. 



TfLORAL MAGAZINE ; containing Figures and Descriptions of the newest varieties 
x of Popular Garden Flowers. By the Rev. LL Honywood Dombrain. Monthly, with 4 
coloured Plates by Andrews, 2s. 6d. 

Contents of No. 72, April 1866. 



EPIPHYLLTJM TRUNCATUM ELEGANS. 
-PELARGONIUM PELTATUM ELEGANS. 
MARANTA ILLUSTRIS. 



PRIMULA, KERMESIXA PLEXA, AXD 
QUEEN OE ENGLAXD. 



ILLUSTRATED HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA; a Description (with a 
.■*• Wood-Engraving, including dissections, of each species) of the Flowering Plants and Ferns 
indigenous to, or naturalized in, the British Isles. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the 
Lmnean Society. Demy 8vo, 2 vols., 1295 Wood-Engravings, £3. 10*. 

NOVELL EEEYE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



Vegetable "K^ < B A R R& S T C! I) . ] N . 



»£& wv ^kV ~~— j_ > 






Flo:; 




Carriage \^> 

Paid H KllOaNG STREET.CW^ 

A FEW EXAMPLES OF BARB & SUGDEN'S 

NEW PLANT CASES, 21s. to 42s. 

An Illustrated Priced Sheet in Preparation for Ladies living in the Country. 




\ 










Tor Important Notices, see BARR $• SUGDEN'S Advertisements for January, Tthnumj, Mar 



JUST PUBLISHED. 

Part III., Imperial folio, with Five Coloured Plato, price 21s., 
li/TOXOGRAPH OF ODONTOGLOSSUM, a Genus of the Vandeous Section 
-LT-L Orchidaceous Plants. By James Bateman, Esq., F.R.S. Parts I. and II., each 4 
5 Coloured Plates, and occasional Wood Engravings, 21s. 

Contents of Part III. 



ODONTOGLOSSUM LTXDLEYANUM. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM GLORIOSUM. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM WARNERIANUM. 



ODONTOGLOSS r M ST ELLATTJM. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM Al.KXA.N DK2E. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM RE1CHENI1EIMIL 



Part II., Royal ito, Ten Coloured Plates, 10a. 6d., 
QECOND CENTURY OF ORCHIDACEOUS PLANTS, selected from the subject; 
KJ published m ' Curtis's Botanical Magazine ' since the issue of the ' First Century.' Edited 
by James Bateman, Esq, F.B.S. & L.S, Author of 'A Monograph of Odoutoglossum,' 'The 
Orchidacese of Mexico and Guatemala,' etc. To be completed in Ten Parts. 

Contents of Part II. 
CYPRIPEDIUM L^VIGATUM. i CALANTHE VFTTCHTT 

JiUlSlEPHiUM WILLIAMSII. CATTLEYA QUADRICOLOR 

CCELOGYNE FUSCESCENS, var. BRUNNEA. j EPIDENDRUM PRISM ATOCARPUM. 

DENDROBIUM XANTHOPHLEBIUM. I BURLINGTONIA DECORA 

TfLORA VITIENSIS ; a Description of the Plants of the Yiti or Fiji Islands, with a 
X Account of their History, Uses, and Properties. Bv Dr. Berthold Seemann, F.L.S. Boy» 
4to, Part IV., 10 Coloured Plates, 15s. To be completed in Ten Parts. 

T>RITISH BEETLES; a Familiar Introduction to the study of our Native Coleoptt 

7 * £ i S T ^?\°' 16 Coloure d Steel Plates, engraved from natural specimens 

expressly for the ^ork by E W Kobinson, comprising figures of nearly 100 species, and 11 Wood- 
Engravmgs of Dissections by the Author, 10s. 6d. • 



LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDfr 



5574, 







Tab. 5574 

OYMBrDIUM Hookerianum. 
Dr. Hookers Cymbidium. 



Nat. Ord. Oechide^;. — G-ynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 48S1.) 



Cymbidium HooTcerianum ; foliis Uneari-ligulatis acutis (bipedalibus), va- 
ginis energice striatis,pedunculo porrecto racemose* grandifloro, floribus 
illos Cymbidii eburnei aequantibus, sepalis petalisque stellatis, oblongis 
obtuse acutis, petalis paulo angustioribus, labello trifido, laciniis late- 
ralibus basi subsemicordatis, seu a?qualibus, antice angulatis, lacinia 
antica subcordata ovata transversa lobulosa, lineis gerainis velutinis a 
basi disci in basin laciniae anticse, labello ceterum hinc illinc subvelu- 
tino. — Sepala et petala viridia. Labellum et coluinna albo-flavida, 
guttis atropurpureis. Rchb.fil. in ' Gardeners' Chronicle,'' Jan. 6, 1866. 

Cymbidium Hookerianum. Gar d. Chron. I. c. 



I have copied from the ' Gardeners' Chronicle ' for January 
6 of the current year, Professor Keichenbach's account of 
this very remarkable plant, which was by him gracefully de- 
dicated to Dr. Hooker, " with his best wishes and as a gratu- 
lation for the first New Year's Day of his Kew directorship." 
Mr. Fitch's drawing was taken from a plant that flowered 
this spring in the establishment of Messrs. Veitch, to whom 
it was sent many years ago by Mr. Lobb. According to Dr. 
Hooker, it grows wild in the Sikkim Himalaya, having been 
gathered there by himself in a district where he happened to 
meet with Lobb, who no doubt obtained his specimens from 
the same quarter. These flowered at Exeter not long after 
their arrival, but — owing probably to their having been kept 
too warm — many years elapsed before they flowered a se- 
cond time. This, however, they have at length done, thanks 
no doubt to their having been placed by Mr. Dominy under 
cooler treatment. The species is epiphytical and should be 
grown in a large pot, in which, if properly managed, it pre- 
sents a very striking appearance. 

Dr. Hooker, who, it has been already mentioned, saw the 

may 1st, 1866. 



plant in its native habitat, La of opinion that it should be re- 
garded rather as a very tine and large variety of C.giganteum 

than as a distinct species. Some such notion had also sug- 
gested itself to my own mind, but the question had perhaps 
better be left in abeyance until we shall have had the oppor- 
tunity of examining additional specimens. Under any cir- 
cumstances — /. e. whether it be merely a striking variety or a 
truly distinct species — it will always be worthily associated 
with Dr. Hooker's name. 

Desck.* Leaves one and a half to two feet long;, acute, 
strap-shaped, tough and leathery, dilated at the base, where 
they are exceedingly striated or streaked with two shades of 
green, much more so than in the ordinary form of C. ijigan- 
feu hi. Scape about the length of the leaves, erect in its 
lower portion (where it is covered with loose imbricated 
scales), but nodding from the point where the flowers are 
placed. Flowers from six to twelve, very large (four to five 
inches across), of a uniform green, the lip only excepted. 
Ovaries an inch and a half long. Sepals and petals stellate, 
oblong, obtusely-acute, the petals slightly narrower than the 
sepals. Lip three-lobed, the lateral lobes long, entire, fiat, 
somewhat lalcate and very sharp-pointed in front, bordered 
with fine hairs, the middle lobe crisp and fringed at the 
margin ; on the disk are two upright ciliated lamellae, parallel 
or slightly converging, more than half an inch in length ; 
the whole of the lip is of yellowish-white, changed into 
deeper yellow at the edges, where it is velvety and decorated 
with rich reddish-purple spots. Column clavate. edged, 
smooth, green, with a few reddish dots.— J. //. 



• The following description is mainly drawn up from a flower furnished 
by Messrs. Veitch, and varies in some respects from that of Professor 
Keichenbaeb. 



Tab. 5575. 

TILIEAUDIA coronaria. 

Small-leaved Th ibaudia. 



Nat. Ord. Vacciniace.?:. — Decandria MoxoaYNiA. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4303.) 



Thibattdta coronaria ; pubescenti-pilosa, foliis parvis breviter petiolatis 
ovatis obtusis integerrimis crasse coriaceis enerviis utrinque sparse 
pilosis, floribus axillaribus solitariis v. binis, pedicellis gracilibus foliis 
eequilongis, calycis laxe lanuginosi tubo brevi acute 5-gono basi di- 
latato 5-lobo, lobis 5 triangulari-ovatis acutis, corolla urceolata ob- 
tusa 5-gona, lobis brevibus patenti-recurvis late triangularibus, fila- 
mentis brevibus dilatatis ciliatis sequilongis, antheris sequilongis lo- 
culis brevibus oblongis in tubum duplicem angustum erectum apice 
2-porosum attenuatis ecalcaratis. 

Ceratostemma coronaria. Hart. Lind. 



This is another importation of my friend Mr. J. Bateman, 
whose energy in introducing this beautiful class of plants 
into Britain has been rewarded by signal success in rearing 
and flowering them. For a warm greenhouse no plants can 
be more desirable, the bright green leaves — rarely, if ever, 
infested by insects — are always beautiful, and the flowers, 
which are produced in profusion, remain in beauty longer 
than those of any other ornamental plants of the same na- 
ture. How little known these Andean Vacciniaceous plants 
are may be gathered from the fact that this is the third 
figured in this magazine within five months, all new to culti- 
vation and two likewise to science. 

T. coronariahas been cultivated by Mr. Bateman under the 
name of Ceratostemma, by which it was sold by M. Linden, of 
Brussels, but I have no other information regarding it beyond 
that it flowered with Mr. Bateman in January of the present 
year. It is probably a native of New Granada or Venezuela. 
It differs generically from Ceratostemma in the filaments not 
being connate into a tube, and is perhaps referable to 
may 1st, 18G6. 



Klotzsch's genus Themistoclesia (Linnsea, xxiv. 11), which, 
however, has a half-globose calyx. As many of that author's 
genera will certainly fall into T/tibatu/ia on a revision of the 
Order, it appears to me safe to regard the present plant as a 
Thibaudia too. 

Descr. A small, much-branched, rigid shrub. Brandies 
stout, pale-green, and — as well as the leaves, peduncles, and 
calyces — covered with distant, lax, soft, spreading hairs. Leaves 
numerous, spreading and deflexed, half an inch long, ovate, 
obtuse, quite entire, often glabrescent above, which is deep 
shining-green, beneath pale ; midrib and nerves none on either 
surface ; petiole very short. Pedicels axillary, solitary or two 
together, as long as the leaves, woolly. Flowers nodding or 
drooping, nearly an inch long. Calyx short, almost square 
in outline, pale-green, the base dilated and five-lobed, sides 
acutely five-angled or rather with five deep depressions ; lobes 
broadly triangular, acute. Corolla narrow-urceolate or tubu- 
lar and inflated below, obscurely five-angled, with five short 
spreading and recurved lobes, dark-red and shining, quite 
glabrous^ Filaments very short, free, oblong, margins ciliated. 
Anthers oblong, incurved, a little longer than the filaments, 
with a very long, straight, slender, double tube, opening by 
two oblong pores. Style slender, exsertcd ; stigma minute. 
Ovary five-celled, many-ovuled. /. J). If. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Calyx. 3 and 1. Stamens : — all magnified. 







"W Pitch, deL.etliLh 



Vincent Brooks, Tr^P 



Tab. 5576. 
MICROCACHEYS tetragona. 

Strawberry-fruited Cypress. 



Nat. Ord. Conifers. — Dicecia Monakdbja. 

Gen. Char. Dioicum. Ament. masc. terminalia, solitaria, sessilia, ovoidea. 
Antherce imbricata?, 2-loculares, loculis globosis ; pollen 3-gonum. Ament. 
fcem. terminalia, solitaria, sessilia, subglobosa. Squama) patentes, arete 
imbricata*, carnosa?, rubrae, late ovato-rhomboidse, concavae, incurvae. Ovulum 
solitarium, deorsum spectans, integumento exteriore abbreviato. Strobilus 
decurvus, ovoideus. Semina immatura dorso compressa, integumento ex- 
teriore basi cincta. — Frutex proslratus, ramosus ; ramis 4-gouis. Folia 
triawc/irfari-ovata, arete imbricata, obiusa, ciliolata. Amenta parva. 



Microcachkys tetragona. 

Miceocachbys tetragona. llook.f. in Lond. Jovrn. Bot. v. 4. p. 150, et in 

Flor. Tasman. v. 1. p. 358. t. C. B, 
Aethrotaxis (?) tetragona. Hook. Ic. PI. t. 560. 



This is surely one of the most remarkable of Conifers, and 
is in other respects one of the most interesting, being ex- 
tremely rare in its native country, and presenting the unique 
character in the Order of bearing a fleshy brilliantly-coloured 
cone. It is true that we have in the Yew, and in various 
species of Podocarpus, etc., fleshy highly-coloured fruits, but 
a Conifer with the scales themselves of the young cones as- 
suming a pulpy texture, semitransparent consistence, and 
bright colour, is, as far as I know, unique in the Order ; 
whether these characters persist in the ripe fruit I am un- 
able to say. 

Microcachrys tetragona inhabits the tops of a very few moun- 
tains of Tasmania, viz. the Western range and Mount Lapey- 
rouse, where it forms low straggling bushes. The plant here 
figured was brought to Kew by my friend W. Archer, Esq., 
F.L.S., of Cheshunt, on whose property it grew, and was by 
him presented to the Royal Gardens, where it produced its 
female cones abundantly in 1862 ; but having no male plant 
wherewith to fertilize it, no seeds were obtained. 

may 1st, 1866. 



Descb. A low, rambling bosh, with tough, straggling, four- 
angled branches and branch lets, clothed with evergreen, ap- 
pressed imbricate leans. Leaves one-tenth to one-sixth of 
an inch long, ovato-rhomboid, obtuse, ciliolate, convex at the 
back, obscurely keeled when dry. Male cones terminal, 
small, oblong or ovoid, one-eighth of an inch long, of twenty 
to thirty anthers, each consisting of a triangular scarious 
scale, having at its base two cells, opening by transverse slits. 
Female cones also terminal, ovoid or globular, one-fourth to 
one-third of an inch long, bright red, translucent. Scales 
thick and fleshy, with one naked ovule at their base. J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Leaf. 2. Young female cone. 3. Scale and ovule of ditto. 
4. Eipe female cone. 5. Scale and ovule of ditto. 6. Branch of male 
cones. 7. Male cone. 8. Anther: — all but Jig. 6 magnified. 



5311 



WRtc^aeLetkth. 




Vlncent.8roaks,Irnp . 



Tab. 5577. 

iris reticulata. 

Netted Iris. 



Nat. Ord. Ibidem. — Tbiandbia Tbigynia. 
Gen. Char. (Fide supra, Tab. 5298.) 



Iris reticulata; foliis angiitis strictis erectis linearibus acutis obtuse 
4-gonis cavis glaucis, perianthii segmentis exterioribus angustis cunei- 
formi-oblongis patentibus imberbibus, interioribus longioribus aequi- 
longisve erectis elongatis lanceolatis anguste spathulatis, ovario obtuse 
3-gono, stigmatibus oblongis, labio superiore 2-lobo recurvo serrato, 
interiore brevissimo. 

Ibis reticulata. Bieberstein, Fl. Taur. Cauc. v. 1. p. 34. Cent. Plant. Ear. 
Boss. v. 1. t. 11. Sweet, British FL Garden, ser. 2. v. 2. t. 189. 
Journ. Sort. Soe. v. 3. p. 166. 



Though far from the largest or most gorgeous, this is really 
one of the most beautiful species of Ms in cultivation ; no- 
thing can exceed the deep rich violet of its perianth-lobes 
and stigmata, or the delicious fragrance of violet it exhales, 
whilst the leaves are of a less coarse appearance and texture 
than is usual in the genus. The Royal Gardens are indebted 
for the plants here figured to Colonel Scott, R.E., who pro- 
cured them through his friend Captain Smith, R.E., a gentle- 
man employed in the telegraph department in Persia ; they 
flowered in a cool greenhouse in March of the present year. 
The plant is a native of Georgia, Asia Minor, Kurdistan, Syria, 
and Persia, and is extremely well deserving of cultivation as 
a spring flower of easy culture. 

Descr. Boot a solitary tuber, coated with a firm network 
of fibres. Leaves one foot high, striate, erect, glaucous, ob- 
tuselv four-angled, slightly twisted, with a sharp apex; 
Sheaths with white scarious edges, closely appressed to the 
bases of the leaves and flower-stems. Flowers three to tour 
inches in diameter, solitary, erect, deep-violet m hue and 
fragrance. Perianth with the tube one inch long, slender; 

MAY 1st, 1866. 



outer segments spreading, oblong-cuneiform, with a stout green 
midrib, blade dark-purple, with deeper veins and brilliant 
orange blotches towards the base; inner suberect, narrow 
spathulate, as long as the (niter, obtuse, slightly waved, 
all purple. Ovary obtusely trigonous. Stigma pale-purple ; 
upper segment Telexed, serrate, two-lobed; lower almost ob- 
solete. J.B.H. 



Tab. 5578. 

CEKOPEGIA soeoria. 
Kajfr avian Ceropegia. 



Nat. Ord. Asclepiadeje. — Pextasdria Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 5306.) 



Cebopegia sororia; volubilis, glabra, caule teimi, foliis anguste linearibus 
utrinque acutis internodiis longioribus, pedunculis axillaribus unifloris 
elongatis, sepalis lineari-subulatis, corolla? tubo glabra elongate, parte 
inferiore inflata elongata oblonga, parte superiore inferiore sequilonga 
cvlindrica, lobis partem superiorem tubi asquantibus pendulia lineari- 
o'blongis acutis ciliatis, corona? staminese lobis exterioribus subulatia 
longe ciliatis, interiorib us elongatis glabris. 

Ceropegia sororia. Harvey, mss. 



In the eighty-ninth volume of this work a very remark- 
able South African species of this genus is figured,— C. Bow- 
ken, Tab. 5407,— partaking very much of the character of 
this in the singular pendulous lobes of the corolla, which 
move with the faintest breeze, and probably are intimately 
connected with the function of impregnation, though how 
does not appear. Like many South African plants, it has 
large tuberous roots, though I cannot say whether, like its 
above-named congener, it is erect in its native country and 
becomes a twiner in our damper climate, having no indigenous 
specimen at hand to judge from. The specimen here figured 
was flowered by Dr. Moore, of Glasnevin,m May, 1865, from 
seeds sent by Mrs. F. W. Barber, from Kaffraria, and named 
by Dr.Harvey, who is engaged in working up the Asclepiadea* 
for the Cape Flora. Its name, sororia (sisterly), alludes to its 
kinship with C. Bowkeri, Miss Bowker (now Mrs. Barber) 
having sent both species to Dr. Harvey. It has also been 
found by Zeyher in the Albany district. 

Desck. A slender, glabrous, rather glaucous, branching 
climber with almost filiform stems and branches and long 
internodes. Leaves four to seven inches long, very narrow, 



MAY 1st, I860. 



linear-lanceolate, not halt' an inch broad, dark-green above. 
glaucous beneath. Peduncles axillary, solitary, about as 
long as the internodes, one-flowered. Flowers an inch and a 
half to two inches Long, pale-green, the reflexed lobes of the 

corolla darker green, with a double row of transverse purple 
bars above, pink beneath. Otl>/d'-lobes linear-subulate, not 
half the length of the swollen base of the corolla; tube of 
the corolla consisting of a narrow inflated lower and cylindri- 
cal upper portion of equal length, glabrous; lobes as long as 
the upper portion, linear-oblong, acute, villous and ciliated, 
keeled down the middle with reflexed sides. J. D. II. 



Fig. 1. Calyx and crown of anthers, etc. 2. Pollen-masses: — both mag- 
nified. 



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J. B. Bbown and Co., having so very successfully introduced, at the recent Meeting of the Bath and West of Eng- 
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HEATING BY HOT WATER 



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No. 258. 

VOL. XXII. JUNE. [Price Zt.M.coP' 2«. 6d. plain. 

OR NO. 953 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMPEISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 

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Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
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LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, CO VENT GARDEN. 

1866. 




THE HYDROPULT, 

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SHANKS' PATENT LAWN MOWEKS FOE 1866. 



Patronized on Five separate occasions, during the Season gjf 1864, by 
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Per Set; ditto for Donkey, 16s. per Set. 



P f Do. by a Man 

\ and a Boy. 
6 | Do. by Two 
6 i Men. 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT HORSE MACHINE. 
Width of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. 



30-ineh Machine £19 3(kextra 

36-inch Machine 22 30s. extra. 

■12-inch Machine 26 ...lOs.extia. 

48-inch Machine 28 40s.extra. 

Silent Movement, 20s. extra ; Boots for Dorse's Feet, 



21s. per Set. 

SHANKS' PATENT LAWN MOWERS cut the Grass on uneven as well as on level Lawns ; and' it is quite 

immaterial whether the Grass be wet or dry. 

Every Machine warranted to give ample satisfaction, and if not approved of, can he at once returned. 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, 
27, LEADENHALL STREET, LONDON. 

MANUFACTORY, DENS IRONWORKS, ARBROATH. 



A S. and SON keep a Stock of Lawn Mowers at 27, Leadenhall Street, London, from which Orders can hi 
at once executed. They also have at their London Warehouse a staff of experienced Workmen thoroughly 
acquainted with all the details of these Machines, so that they are enabled to repair Lawn Mowers in 
London as well as at the Manufactory. 



BOTANH U. M \(i \/!Ni: VI 



GKEEN'S PATENT SILENS MESSOB 



NOISELESS LAWN MOWING, ROLLING AND COLLECTING MACHINES. 

FITTED WITH PATENT SELF-SHARPENING CYLINDER CUTTERS. 



Jig Special Appointment 
Sole Manufacturer 



Every Machine is 
warranted to give en- 
tire satisfaction, and 
if not approved of can 
be returned uncondi- 
tionally. 




To cut 10 inches . . 

» 12 „ .. 

„ 14 „ .. 
« 16 „ 



£3 10 

4 10 

5 10 

6 10 



S OF HAND MACHINES. 
To cut 18 inches 
„ 20 „ 



, Suitable for a Lady 

H >» 

Suitable for one person 



u 

24 



<To ,*jcr ftlost Cjnicious 
Majesty % djuetn. 



Green's Patent La' 
Mowers have proved 
be the best, and hi 
carried off every pr 
that has been given 
all cases of competiti 



£7 10 Suitable for one person 

8 Suitable for two persow 

8 10 

9 0,, » 



Prices of Horse, Tony, and Donkey Machines, including patent self-delivery box ; cross stay complete ; 
for attaching to ordinary chaise-traces or gig harness. 
To cut 26 inches ... £13 



28 
30 



15 
17 



(Leather Boots for 
Donkey, 18*. 



To cut 30 inches 

,. 42 „ 

48 



£21 
24 
27 
30 



1} 



Leather Boots for 

Pony, 22s. 
Leather Boots for 
Horse, 26f. 



The 26, 28, and 30 inches can easily be worked by n donkey, or by two men, on an even lawn, the 30 ana 
inches by a pony, and 42 and 48 inches by a carriage horse ; and, as the Machines make no noise in working, 
most spirited animal can be employed without fear of its running away, or in any way damaging the Machine. J 

Both the Horse, Pony, Donkey, and Hand Machines possess (over all other Makers) the advantages of 
sharpening : the cutters being steel on each Bide, when they become dull or blunt by running one way roun 
cylinder, can be reversed again and again, bringing the opposite edge of the cutter against the bottom blade, wne 
Machine will cut equal to new. Arrangements are made that the cylinder can be reversed, by any unexperw 
person, in two or three minutes. t_ t . 

The above Machines are made from the best materials, and of superior workmanship ; are delivered t 
Free to all the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in England. 



GREEN'S IMPROVED NEW PATENT ROLLEE 



LAWNS, DRIVES, BOWLING GREENS, CRICKET FIELDS, AND GRAVEL PATHS 
SUITABLE FOR HAND OR HORSE POWER. 

PBICE9 OF 
IBICES OP 
HAND ROLLERS 



Delivered at the principal 
Railway Stations in England. 

Diam. 30in.,len. 32 in. £7 10 
„ 24 „ 26 „ 4 10 
„ 20 „ 22 „ 3 10 
„ 16 „ 17 „ 2 15 




ROLLERS FITTED WI 
SHAFTS 

B0 



Suitable for Pony or 
Power. 

Diam.30in.,len.32in.£l< 

36 „ 



30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
80 



42 
48 
60 

72 
84 



Thomas Green & Son, Smithfield Iron Works, Leeds ; 44 & 45, Blackfriars 
London, S. ; and 19, Eden Qnay, Dublin. 



PRIMULA, CALCEOLARIA, etc. 

WM. CUTBUSH AND SON are now sending out Seed of their superb PRI- 
MULA SINENSIS FIMBKIATA, which has for many years given great satisfaction. 
The ' Gardeners' Chronicle ' of the 6th of January, in Notices to Correspondents, savs :— 
" The blooms sent are remarkably fine, richly coloured, full, and densely fringed ; they' are evi- 
dently the produce of a capital strain." 

the ' Journal of Horticulture ' of the 23rd of January, says that " The finest and richest 
coloured Chinese Primulas we have yet seen are those raised by Messrs. Cutbush and Son." 

Sealed packets, 2s. Qd. and 3*. Qd. each. 

CALCEOLAEIA (James's). — This is the finest herbaceous variety extant. Per Dacket 
2*. Qd. and 3*. Qd. each. !■*«** 

CINERARIA, from finest named varieties. Per packet 2s. Qd. and Zs. Qd. each. 
HIGHGATE NURSERIES, LONDON, N. 



BENJAMIN EDGINGTON, 

MARQUEE, TENT, RICK CLOTH, AND FLAG MANUFACTURER, 

By Special Appointment to Hee Majesty and H.RBL the Peince op Wales. 
Also to the Royal Horticultural and Botanic Societies. 

Rick Cloths, New and Second-hand, with Poles, etc., complete. 
Marquees and Tents for Horticultural Shows, for Sale or Mire. 

NETTING AND BUNTING FOB FEFIT TBEES, ETC. 

AN ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE FREE ON APPLICATION. 
Be particular to observe the Christian Name, and address — 

BENJAMIN EDGINGTON ionly), 

2, DUKE STREET, LONDON BRIDGE, S.E. 
No other Establishment. 





GENEKAL PLANT CATALOGUES FOE 1866. 




JAMES VEITCH & SONS 

BEG TO ANNOUNCE THAT THE UNDERMENTIONED 

CATALOGUES FOR THE PRESENT SEASON 

Are now Published, and will he forwarded Post Free on application. 

General Catalogue of Stove and Greenhouse Plants, including Orchids, Ferns, Ornamental Foliaged Plants, 

Azaleas, Camellias, etc. 
■descriptive Catalogue of Hardy Trees and Shrubs, including Coniferse, American Plants, and the most recent 

Japanese introductions. 
Catalogue of Select Soft- Wooded and Bedding Plants, including the most desirable Novelties of the Season. 

■ Y- of SONS' Catalogue of New and Bare Plants of their own introduction was published on 

the 15th of May. 

____T HE ROYAL EXOTIC NURSERY, KING'S ROAD, CHELSEA, LONDON, S.W. 

JUST PUBLISHED 
(GRATIS). 

THE GREAT CRINOLINE QUESTION 

SOLVED BY HEE MAJESTY 

THE EMPEESS OF THE FRENCH. 

Ladies should at once obtain gratis of their Draper or Corset Maker, THOMSON'S new Illustration,. 

showing the veritable 

"MODE DE L'IMPEKATRICE." 



BOTANICAL M LGAZINE Al>\ KKl 



EDGINGTON'S GARDEN NETTING, the cheapest and most 
durable, 1 \d. per square yard, or iu quantities of 250, 500, or 
1000 yards, carriage free. 
EDGINGTON'S MARQUEES and GARDEN TENTS are the 

prettiest. 
EDGINGTON'S MARQUEES, for hire, are the most handsome 

and capacious. 
EDGINGTON'S RICK CLOTHS for sixty-one years have main- 
tained their celebrity as the best. 

HAYTHORN and BRITTAIN'S NETTINGS. Sample of material free on application. 

Be particular— Frederick Edgington & Co., Thomas Street, Old Kent Road, London, S.E. 

A liberal Discount to the Trade ! ! ! 

International Exhibition, 1862, Class XIX. — Honourable Mention. 




PLAGUES OF THE GARDEN. 

SIMPLE AND SAFE REMEDY. 

By using the " APHIS WASH," these pests of the Garden, together with SCALE, 
Caterpillars, Slugs, Earwigs, etc., are immediately destroyed. Leaves no stain, 
but strengthens the Trees or Plants. 

See 'GARDENERS' CHRONICLE,' August 19th, 1865. 
'GARDENERS' MAGAZINE,' July 1st, 1865. 

Sold by Chemists and others, in Is. Bottles and 2s. (jd. a Gallon, with full 

Directions for Use. 
WHOLESALE AT THE 

"CITY SOAP WORKS," MILTON STEEET, LONDON, E.C. 



DESTRC^-YOUR-SNSECT'FESTS 



You may easilv destroy all Plant Pests, 

Red Spider, Mealy Bug, Thrip, Green and Black' Fly, American Blight, Ants, Scale, Mildew, 

Without injury to the most delicate Plant or Tree, by using 

FOWLER'S GARDENERS' INSECTICIDE, 

Pronounced by all who have used it to be far superior to any other remedy. 
One trial will prove its efficacy. Testimonials fortvarded on application. 

Price 1*. 6d., 3s., 5s. Qd., and 10*. per Tin. Orders amounting to 18*., Carriage Paid.— Agents ReqA* 111 ' 



Mr. George Parsons, of the Keiimer, HassocVs Gate, and Brighton Nurseries, says : — " It is certa inty 
most effectual remedy that has at any time come under my notice — destroys every insect for which t 
applied it, without the least injury to the most delicate plant." , ^» 

Mr. Span/, F.R.E.S., of the Queen's Graperies, Brighton, says :— " I have had an opportunity of p« » 
its efficacy, it having been applied to all plants affected with Green and Black Aphis, Scale, Red »P ^ 
Thrip, etc., under my personal superintendence; the result has been satisfactory, without injury 
plants, and proved destructive to the insects." r ..j, 

Messrs. Wm. Wood and Son, Woodlands Nursery and Seed Warehouse, Maresfield, near TJdcfieW, ^ 
tex,tsji— "We have tried it on Roses affected with Mildew, Calceolarias covered with Green *!?> 
Aucubas and Oleanders infested with Scale ; and we have much pleasure in stating the plants are nc» F 
fectly clean and healthy." j 

_ Mr. George Quelch, Florist, Lewes Road, Brighton, says :— " It will give perfect freedom from in- 
in many instances more healthy verdure of foliage. It will prove one of the most welcome and lasting 1"*: . 

Mr. J. Crultenden, of the Rose Hill Nurseries, Brighton, says he is " perfectly satisfied with the res 
it wdl not only kill the insects, but will do so without in any way injuring the plants." 

GEORGE ft THOMAS FOWLER, NORTH STEEET, BRIGHTON. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



MESSES. GROOMBRIDGE AND SONS' 

PUBLICATIONS. 



CJEA PISHING AS A SPORT. By Lambton J. H. Young. Crown 8vo, 
^ cloth, Illustrated, 5s. 

fEN YEARS IN SWEDEN. By The Old Bushman. 8vo, cloth, 16*. 

A SPRING AND SUMMER IN LAPLAND; With Notes on the Fauna and 
£*■ Landscape of Lulea Lapmarck. By The Old Bushman. 8vo, cloth, 10*. 6d. 

THE TEMPLE ANECDOTES. First Volume, " Invention and Discovery," with 
x fourteen full-page Illustrations. Cloth gilt, 5*. 

ENTERPRISE AND ADVENTURE. Being the Second Volume of THE 
TEMPLE ANECDOTES. With fourteen full-page Illustrations. Cloth gilt, 5*. 

JOME INFLUENCE. A Tale for Mothers and Daughters. By Grace 
xx • Aguilar. New Edition. Illustrated. Cloth gilt, 5s. 

THE MAGNET STORIES for Summer Days and Winter Nights. Complete 
in Eight Volumes. Cloth gilt, Illustrated, each Half-a-Crown. 

^ DICTIONARY OF BOTANICAL TERMS. By the Rev. J. S. Henslow, 

M.A., late Professor of Botany in the University of Cambridge. Fcp. 8vo, cloth, 
with Illustrative Woodcuts, 4s. 

"^yAYSIDE WEEDS AND THEIR TEACHINGS. Botanical Lessons from 
the Lanes and Hedgerows. By Spencer Thompson, M.D. Crown 8vo, cloth, with 
117 Illustrations, 5s. 

plE BEE-KEEPER'S MANUAL. By Henry Taylor. Sixth Edition, with 
100 Engravings. Cloth gilt, 4s. 

THE GARDENER'S RECEIPT BOOK. By William Jones. Fifth Edition. 
x Cloth gilt, 2s. Qd. 

A NATURAL HISTORY OF CAGE BIRDS. By J. M. Bechstein, M.D. 
12mo, cloth gilt, with 70 Engravings, 3s. 6d. 

THE ROSE BOOK. By Shirley Hibberd, F.R.H.S. With numerous Illus- 
trations. Crown 8vo, cloth gilt, 5s. 

PROFITABLE GARDENING. By Shirley Hibberd, F.R.H.S. With Illus- 
trations. Post 8vo, cloth, 3s. 6d. 

THE BOOK OF THE AQUARIUM. By Shirley Hibberd, F.R.H.S. 
With Illustrations. Fcp. 8vo, cloth, 3s. 6d. 

gNGLAND'S WORKSHOPS. Post 8vo, cloth, 5-5. 

TELESCOPE TEACHINGS. By the Hon. Mrs. Ward. Illustrated with 
Coloured Plates. Cloth gilt, 7s. Gd. 

MICROSCOPE TEACHINGS. By the Hon. Mrs. Ward. Illustrated with 
7 x Coloured Plates. Cloth gilt, 7s. 6d. 

OBJECTS FOR THE MICROSCOPE. By L. Lane Clarke. Small 8vo, 
cloth, 3s. Qd. 

MARVELS OF POND LIFE. By Henry J. Slack. Post 8vo, cloth, IIlus- 
trated, 5s. 

GROOMBRIDGE AND SONS, 5, PATERNOSTER ROW. 



BOTANICAL MAGA/ 



Now Ready, small ito, cloth, gilt top, Volt. I., II., 111., and U "., each complete in itself, 
price 21*., and containing 14 Portraits, icit/t Memoirs. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC POETRAITS 

or 

MEN OF EMINENCE 

IN LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND ART, 
WITH BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS. 



THE PHOTOGRAPHS FROM LIFE, BY ERNEST EDWARDS, B.A. 



EARL STANHOPE. 
SIR CHARLES LYELL. 
J. H. FOLEY. R.A. 
W. M. THACKERAY. 
SIR R. I. MUBCHIS 
DAVID ROBERTS, RA. 
DR. WHEWELL. 
PROFESSOR OWEN. 



SIR RANALD MARTIN. 
REV. If. J. BERKELEY. 
SIR GEORGE SMART. 
ANTONIO PAMZZI. 
PROFESSOR TYNDALL. 
THOMAS WOoLNER. 
SAMUEL WARREN. 
HUGH CUMING. 



PROF. THOMAS GBAHAM. 
THOMAS BELL. 
PROF. D. T. ANSTED. 
DR. E LANKESTER. 
JOHN HAWKSHAW. 
S.. HUNTER CHRISTIE. 
W. R. GROVE. 
WARREN DE LA RUE. 



CONTENTS OF VOL. I. 

G GILBERT SCOTT, R.A. 

SIR G. WILKINSON. 

Slit W.J. HOOKER. 

PROF. STKKNDALE BENNETT. 

DR. LATHAM. 

SIR W. FERGU8SON. 

SOLOMON HART. R.A. 

BOBERT BROWNING. 



CONTENTS OF VOL. II. 

Mr. I - BENEDICT. 
BISHOP OF ST. DAVID'S. 
JOHN GOULD. 
THOMAS FAED, A.RA. 
SIR H. C. BAWLLKS 
DR. W. B. CARPENTER. 
JOHN PYE. 
DR. J. D. HOOKER. 



contents of vol. iii. 

John hullah. 
bib george back. 
prof. c. c. babington. 
admiral fitzroy. 
dr. hugh falconer, 
dr. william earr. 
george godwin, 
capt. r. burton. 



DR. J. E. GRAY. 

E. H. BAILY. 
J. O. HALLIWELL. 
PROFESSt 1 1; HUXLEY. 
JAMES FERGUSSON. 
REV. F. D. MAURICE. 
PROF. FARADAY. 
GEORGE CRU1KSHANK. 



J. O. WESTWOOD. 
A.J. B. BEBE8FOBD-H0PK. 
COMMODOBE MAURY. 
BOBERT HUM'. 
DB. POBBEfl W1H8LOW. 
THOMAS TIIORNYCROFT. 
JAS. SCOTT BOWERHANK. 
PROF. WM. A. MILLER. 



GEN. SIR DE LACY EVANS. 
RICHARD PARTRIDGE. 
MARTIN F. TUPPER. 
BISHOP OF LICHFIELD. 
SIR wm. E. LOGAN. 
Loud LTTTELTON. 
GEN. SIR JOHN BURGOYNE. 
SIR JAMES CLARK. 



REV. J. G. WOOD. 
CAPTAIN BEDFORD PIM. 
PATRICK MACDOWELL, R.A. 
COVENTRY PATMORE. 
DR. LINDLEY. 
PORD MADOX BROWN. 
MISS METEYARD. 
DR. H. M. NOAD. 



CONTENTS OF VOL. IV. 

E. M WARD, R.A. 
MRS. E. M. WARD. 
PROFESSOR SEDGWICK. 
WILLIAM HO WITT. 
MARY HOWITT. 
PROFESSOR HOFMANN. 

F. R. P1CKERSGILL, R.A. 
MR. <fc MRS. S. C. HALL. 



LOVELL REEVE. 
V. BARTHOLOMEW. 
CHARLES DICKENS. 
PROFESSOR AIRY. 
THOMAS WRIGHT. 
LORD WROTTESLEY. 
F. W. FAIRHOLT. 
RICHARD ANSDELL, A.R.A. 



Continued in Monthly Numbers, each containing 3 Portraits, with Memoirs, 2s. 6d. 

The Number for June contains Portraits and Memoirs of CHARLES DARWIN, MA, 
and Dr. BERTHOLD SEEMANN, F.L.S. 



It seems the intention of the editor to introduce a representative of Literature, Science, and Art, respectively, in each 
number ; an excellent plan, if only for the sake of variety. The photographs as likenesses are all capital. The biographical 
notices are well written, sufficiently ample for the purpose, and penned in a kindly yet independent spirit; the public We 
or the individual is the principal point the author has desired to set before his readers in the narrative accompanying 
each picture. This work, if carried on to any extent, as we trust it may be, will form a valuable book of contemporary 
illustrated biography. — Art Journal. 

" The biographical memoirs, so far as we have seen them, are concise and correct."— Athmaum. 
-™ 3 h - 6 idea ° f comb i n , i PS the ? e Pictures in little of the Men of the Time with authentic biographies of them, is a very haPPX 
one, and is very successfully carried out in the work before us."— Notes and Queries. 



London: ALFRED W. BENNETT, 5 Bishopsgate Without, E.C. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISKK. 



"An Argosy doth ride oar roaring Strand, 
Spicing the wind, and freighted with the spoils 
Of all the Orient." Old Play 

The 

ARGOSY 

Sixpence Monthly, Illustrated. 

THE First Volume of this new Magazine, which 
bears somewhat the same relation to other 
Magazines that the pleasure yacht bears to other ships, 
will be ready in a few days, in neat cloth, price 4/. 6d. 

It will contain the First Half of 



CHAELES EEADE'S NEW STOEY 

GRIFFITH GAUNT 

OR, JEALOUSY 



And Numerous Contributions by 



ANTHONY TROLLOPE, 
MRS. OLTPHANT, 
ALEXANDER SMITH, 
MATTHEW BROWNE, 
ROBERT BUCHANAN, 
FRANCES POWER COBBE, 
JOHN RUFFINI, 
CHRISTINA G. ROSSETTI, 



JEAN INGELOW, 
HENRY KTNGSLEY, 
ARMINIUS VAMBERY, 
GEORGE MACDONALD, 
ISA CRAIG, 

WILLIAM ALLLNGHAM, 
AMELIA B. EDWARDS, 
SYDNEY DOBELL, 

ETC., ETC., ETC. 



LONDON: STRAHAN AND CO., 

AND SOLD JJY ALL BOOKSELLERS. 



^ u T W ^J 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



TM1 AtflllAlL, iMii 



> 




A wonderful application of the principle of oscillation. Entirely " self -acting" the operator 

requiring no assistance whatever. ' , fl 

CHARLES POMEROY BUTTON, Patentee, Nos. 142 and 143, Cheapside, VW* 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



WORKS ON BOTANY. 



BENTHAM'S ILLUSTRATED BRITISH 

FLOEA ; a Description (with a Wood-Engraving, in- 
cluding dissections, of each species) of the Flowering 
Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in, the 
British Isles. ' 2 vols. 8vo. 1295 Wood-Engravings, 
from Original Drawings by W. Fitch. £3. 10*. 

BENTHAM'S HANDBOOK of the BRITISH 

FLORA ; a Description of the Flowering Plants and 
Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in, the British 
Isles. For the Use of Beginners and Amateurs. 12*. 

MOORE'S FIELD BOTANIST'S COM- 
PANION ; a Familiar Account, in the Four Seasons, 
of the most common of the Wild Flowering Plants of 
the British Isles. 24 Coloured Plates, by W. Fitch. 
21*. J 

HENTHAM'S OUTLINES of ELEMEN- 
TARY BOTANY, as Introductory to Local Floras. 
2*. 6d. J 

HOOKER'S FLORA of NEW ZEALAND; 

a Systematic Description of the Native Plants of New 
Zealand, and the Chatham, Kermadec's, Lord Auck- 
land's, Campbell's, .and Macquarrie's Islands. Part I. 
16*. Published under the auspices of the G-overnment 
ol that colony. [Part II in the Press. 

BENTHAM'S ELORA AUSTRALIENSIS ; 

a Description of the Plants of the Australian Territory. 
Vols. I. and II., 20*. each. Published under the au- 
spices of the several Governments of Australia. 

[Vol. III. nearly ready. 

GRISEBACH'S ELORA of the BRITISH 

WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. 37*. 6d. Published 
under the auspices of the Secretary of State for the 
Colonies. 

BENTHAM'S FLORA HONGKONGEX- 

SIS ; a Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns 
ot the Island of Hongkong. With a Map of the Is- 
&nd. 16s. Published under the authoritv of Her 
Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonies." 

HOOKER'S FLORA of TASMANIA; Roval 

4to, 2 vols. 200 Coloured Plates. £17. 10*. Pub- 
lished under the authority of the Lords Commissioners 
of the Admiralty. 

HOOKER on the FLORA of AUSTRALIA, 

its Origin, Affinities, and Distribution. 10*. 

HOOKER'S RHODODENDRONS of SIK- 

MM -HIMALAYA; being an account, Botanical and 
Geographical, of t he Rhododendrons recently discovered 
'" 1 1( L Mountains of Eastern Himalaya, from Drawings 
and Descriptions made on the spot, by Dr. J. D. 
Arr£?^ £R ' FRS - Folio > 30 Coloured Plates. £3. 16*. 

MO&GRIDGE'S FLORA of MENTONE. 

«oyal 8vo. Parts I. and II., each, 25 Coloured Plates, 

WOOD'S TOURIST'S FLORA; a Descriptive 

Catalogue of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of the 
-British Islands, France, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, 
*""! the Italian Islands. 18*. 



HOOKER'S BRITISH FERNS; Figures and 

Descriptions, with Analyses of the Fructification and 
Venation, of the Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland, 
systematically arranged. Royal 8vo, 66 Coloured 
Plates, £2. 2s. 

HOOKER'S GARDEN FERNS ; Figures and 

Descriptions, with Analyses of the Fructification and 
Venation, of a Selection of Exotic Ferns, adapted for 
Cultivation in the Garden, Hothouse and Conservatory. 
Royal 8vo, 64 Coloured Plates, £2. 2s. 

HOOKER'S FILICES EXOTICA; Figures 

and Descriptions of Exotic Ferns, chiefly of such as are 
cultivated in the Royal Gardens of Kew. Royal 4to, 
100 Coloured Plates, £6. lis. 

CHANTER'S FERNY COMBES; a Ramble 

after Ferns in the Glens and Valleys of Devonshire. 
Second Edition. 8 Coloured Plates and a Map of the 
County, 5*. 

BERKELEY'S BRITISH MOSSES, contain- 

ing all that are known to be Natives of the British 
Isles. 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

BERKELEY'S BRITISH FUNGOLOGY, 

containing Characters of above a Thousand Species of 
Fungi, and a Complete List of all that have been de- 
scribed as Natives of the British Isles. 24 Coloured 
Plates, 30s. 

BAD HAM'S ESCULENT FUNGUSES of 

ENGLAND, containing an Account of their Classical 
History, Uses, Characters, Development, Structure, 
Nutritious Properties, Modes of Cooking and Preserv- 
ing, etc. New Edition. Edited by F. Cukrey, F.R.S. 
12 Coloured Plates, 12*. 

HUSSEY'S BRITISH MYCOLOGY, compri- 

sing Figures and Descriptions of the Funguses of in- 
terest and novelty indigenous to Britain. Royal 4to. 
First Series, 90 Coloured Plates, £7. 12.?. Gd. ; Second 
Series, 50 Coloured Plates, £4. 10». 

HARVEY'S PHYCOLOGIA BRITANNICA; 

or, History of British Seaweeds, containing Coloured 
Figures, Generic and Specific Characters, Synonyms 
and Descriptions of all the Species of Algae inhabiting 
the Shores of the British Islands. Royal 8vo, 4 vols., 
360 Coloured Plates, £6. 6*. 

HARVEY'S SYNOPSIS of BRITISH SEA- 

WEEDS. 5*. 

HARVEY'S PHYCOLOGIA AUSTRALICA ; 

a History of Australian Seaweeds, comprising Coloured 
Figures and Descriptions of the more characteristic 
Marine Alga> of the South Hemisphere. Royal 8to, 5 
vols., 300 Coloured Plates, £7. 13.v. 

HARVEY'S NEREIS AUSTRALIS; or, 

Alga? of the Southern Ocean. Imperial 8vo, 50 Co- 
loured Plates, £2. 2#. 



REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN', W.C. 



10 BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 



In Demy and Imperial Svo, to range with the Editions of the ' Birds,' 
•Quadrupeds,' '/Esop,' and ' Select Fables,' pp. xxiv., 562, 

THE BEWICK COLLECTOR. 

A DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE 

OF THE WORKS OF 

THOMAS AND JOHN BEWICK; 

INCLUDING CUTS, IN VARIOUS STATES, FOR 

BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS, 
PRIVATE GENTLEMEN, PUBLIC COMPANIES, 

EXHIBITIONS, RACES, NEWSPAPERS, 

SHOP CARDS, INVOICE HEADS, BAR BILLS, 

COAL CERTIFICATES, BROADSIDES, 

AND OTHER MISCELLANEOUS PURPOSES, 

AND 

WOOD BLOCKS. 

With an Appendix of Portraits, Autographs, Works of Pupils, &c. &c. 

2Cfje tofjole tiesctibrti from tije ©rtgmals 

CONTAINED IN THE LARGEST AND MOST PERFECT COLLECTION 
EVER FORMED, 

AND ILLUSTRATED WITH A HUNDRED AND TWELVE CUTS 

from Bewick's own blocks. 
BY 

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LOYELL REEYE & CO., 5 5 HENRIETTA STREET, COYENT GAEDl 







-eLetlith. 



Vir1ceraBT00l1s.fr 



Tab. 5579. 

EULOPHIA virens. 

Greenish Eulophia. 



Nat. Ord. Obchide^;. — Gynandbia Mokaxdbia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5561.) 



Eulophia virens ,- foliis gramineis lineari-lanceolatis scapis ramosis bre- 
vioribus, sepalis petalisque oblongis obtusis basi angustatis tessellatis, 
labelli trilobi barbati lotus lateralibus abbreviatis intermedio ovato ob- 
tuso, calcare erectiusculo couico. Lindl. Gen. et Sp. 

Sebapias epidendroides. Retz. Obs. 6. 65. 

Limodoeum virens. Roxb. Coram, v. 1. t. 38. 

Limodoeum epidendroides. Willd. Sp. PI. v. 4. p. 123-4. 



This is not by any means a showy plant, a circumstance 
that may have had something to do with its tardy introduc- 
tion to European collections. It is a native of the Nilgher- 
ries and also of Ceylon where Mr. Thwaites met with it, and 
it is to him that the Royal Gardens at Kew are indebted for 
living specimens, one of which flowered there not long ago. 
It may be treated like the E. eiiglossa, figured in the February 
number of this work. 

Desce. Pseudobidbs roundish-ovate, two or three inches 
long, bearing several narrow grassy leaves, which are shorter 
than the branched or sometimes simple scapes. Sepals and 
petals nearly equal, oblong, bluntly pointed, narrowed at the 
base, of a yellowish-green, tessellated with brown lines. Lip 
longer than the petals, white with purple streaks, three- 
lobed, the lateral lobes being shortened, and the central one 
crisp at the margin obtuse and recurved at the apex, and 
furnished with rows of dark hairs along its disk ; at its base 
is a short nearly upright conical spur. Column continuous 
with the lip, but not more than a third of its length. — J. B. 



Kg. 1. Lip and column, seen sideways. 2. Lip. 3. Column. 4. Pollen- 
masses : — magnified. 
June 1st, 1866. 



5580. 




nt Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 5580. 

SCILLA Cooperi. 

Cooper's Squill, 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Hexandeia Mono arm a. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5308.) 



Scilla Cooperi ; bulbo subgloboso, foliis 8-10 poll, longis elongato-lanceo- 
latis obtusiusculis striatis utrinque concoloribus subtus purpureo line- 
aris et basin versus maculatis, scapo viridi foliis breviore, racemo 2-3- 
pollicari subdenso cylindrico, pedicellis patentibus pallide purpureis 
\-\ poll, longis, bracteis minutis, floribus purpureis | poll, latis, petalis 
patentibus non reflexis oblongis obtusis dorso apice incrassatis, sta- 
minibus erectis, antheris peltatis, ovario breviter stipitato depresso- 
hemisphserico 6-sulcato basi dilatato 6-lobo, stylo brevi recto, loculis 
2-ovulatis, ovulis geminis. 



The Cape bulbs are sufficiently numerous and difficult of 
determination to form a study of themselves ; and as they 
are wanting neither in interest nor beauty, it is to be hoped 
that they may soon find a historian. At present all is con- 
fusion as regards the genera and species of this long-culti- 
vated tribe, and we know no more difficult plants than these 
to name. The pretty species here represented has the habit 
and appearance of many Drimias, but differs from the typi- 
cal species of that genus in the two-ovuled cells of the ovary, 
and in the spreading lobes of the perianth, which are neither 
reflexed nor do they form a tube at the base. From the 
technical characters of Scilla it differs in the definite ovules ; 
but as it agrees in other respects, and is evidently a very 
close ally of the Canary Island S. Berthelotii (Tab. nostr. 
5308), which has also only two ovules in each cell, I cannot 
(in the present state of our knowledge) refuse it a place in 
that genus, of which but few Cape species have hitherto 
been described. The stipitate ovary, with two geminate 
ovules in each cell, occurs in other plants hitherto referred 
ivvrs 1st, 1866. 



to Drimia, and may form a good sectional or generic cha- 
racter for various plants hitherto referred to this genus or 
Scilla, and possibly belonging truly to neither. Our only- 
knowledge of S. Cooperi is derived from Mr. Cooper's Cape 
bulbs, for which the Royal Gardens are indebted to Mr. 
Wilson Saunders, F.R.S. 

Descb. Bulb subglobose, purple, smooth. Leaves eight to 
ten inches long, three-quarters of an inch broad, narrow, li- 
near-lanceolate, rather obtuse, striated, green on both sides, 
streaked with purple at the back, and spotted there towards 
the base. Scape shorter than the leaves, green. Baceme 
cylindric, two to three inches long. Flowers rather close- 
set, dark-red purple ; pedicels a quarter to half an inch long ; 
bracts very small. Perianth lobes oblong, spreading, obtuse 
and thickened at the apex. Stamens inserted in the perianth 
lobes, shorter than they are ; anthers oblong. Ovary hemi- 
spherical, six-lobed, with a broad six-lobed dilatation, then 
suddenly contracted to a short pedicel ; style short, erect, 
subulate ; stigma minute ; ovules two, ascending in each cell, 
collateral. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Ovary. 3. Transverse section of ditto : — all mag- 
nified. 



K?/. 




Vincent Broaksimp . 



Tab. 5581. 
CUPEESSUS Lawsomana. 

The Lawson Cypress. 



Nat. Ord. COXIFEB.E. — Moncecia Monandria. 



Gen. Char. Flores in diversis ramis monoici. Masc. Amenta termina- 
lia, cylindrica. Stamina decussatim opposita, 4-fariam imbricata; connec- 
tivo peltato mutico, loculis 2-4 subglobosis. Fcem. Amenta terminalia, 
subglobosa ; squamis 6-12, basi superne incrassatis, iuferne solutis. Ovula 
ad basin squamarum pauca v. plurima, erecta, lagaeniformia. Strobilus e 
squamis lignosis suborbicularibus angulatis peltatis, vertice mucronatis v. 
umbonatis, primum conniventibus, demum biantibus. Semina ad basin sti- 
pitis squamarum 2-3-co, compressa v. angulata, marginata v. alata. Em- 
bryo in axi albuminis carnosi 2-cotyledonus. — Arbores et frutices semper- 
virentes. Folia minuta, decussatim imbricata, squamceforniia v. rarius acerosa, 
sape dorso glandula notata. Gemmae nuda. 



CuPitESSUs Lawsoniana ; arborea, ramis patulis 4-gonis, foliis appressis 
imbricatis late ovatis acutis ovato-triangularibusve dorso sa3pissime 
gland uliferis, strobilis parvis globosis glaucis, squamis ad 8, vertice 
rhombeo lamina horizontali v. decurva patente late triangulari acuta 
instructo, ovulis 3-4, seminibus alatis. 

Cupressus Lawsoniana. Murray ex Gordon, Pinet. p. 62. 

? Cham^ecypams Boursieri. Dene. Ann. Soc. Bot. France, 1854, p. 70. Car- 
riere, Traite Gen. Conif. p. 141. 



The beautiful tree here represented has for the last few 
years been a great favourite in our gardens and shrubberies. 
and though a good many years must elapse before it attains 
arboreous stature (it is said to rise to a hundred feet in its 
native country), it has reached a sufficient height (fourteen 
to twenty feet) to demonstrate that it increases in beauty 
with its years up to that and probably a much greater eleva- 
tion. It was discovered — by Mr. Jeffreys, I believe — in the 
mountain valleys of northern California, lat. 40°-42° N., and 
the first description I find of it is in Gordon's valuable ' Pine- 
tum.' According to this author, the C. Boursieri of I)e- 
caisne is a synonym of it. Not having seen that plant, we 
cannot confirm the identification ; but if correct, it is very 
j ike 1st, 1866. 



possible that the name C.Boursieri should replace that of Law- 
&>/u'ana, — a contingency that would be greatly to be regretted, 
as the name of one of the most active and intelligent intro- 
ducers of rare Conifers is now deservedly and indissolubly 
connected with this beautiful plant. 

Gordon compares C. Lawsoniana with C. Nootkaensis, and 
justly, the plants bearing a considerable resemblance in a 
living state, and being with difficulty distinguished in the 
herbarium : C. Lawsoniana is, however, a much more fea- 
thery species, with more fan-like branches and slenderer 
branchlets ; the leaves also are of a glossier green, and the 
cones quite different, being smaller, glaucous, with a trans- 
verse, flat, acute, horizontal or recurved plate across the boss, 
very different from the more conical horn of C. Nootkaensis. 
The genus Chamwcyparis, to which both these species have 
been referred, is utterly futile, its only character, that of the 
scales bearing two instead of many ovules as in most Cy- 
presses, breaks down in the present species, whose ovules 
vary in number from two to four or even five or six. 

Descr. A large tree, said to attain a hundred feet in height, 
w r ith a narrow pyramidal coma. Branches spreading, fan- 
like and feathery in aggregate. Branchlets tetragonous, 
slender. Leaves ovate or triangular-ovate, acute, appressed, 
convex on the back and there furnished with a rather obscure 
gland. Cones globular, one-fourth to one-third of an inch in 
diameter, of about eight decussating scales. Scales rhom- 
boidal, with a flattened and transverse lamina at the back of 
the boss. Ovules two to four at the base of each scale. Seeds 
with two wings. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Branchlets and leaves. 2. Branch and male cone. 3 and 4. 
Stamens. 5. Female cone. 6 and 7. Seeds: — all but fig. 6 magnified. 



Sffi. 







Tab. 5582. 

WAESCEWIZELLA velata. 

Veiled Warscewizella. 



Nat. Ord. Oechideje. — Gynandeia Monaxdeia. 

Gen. Char. Perigonium carnoso-membranaceum, oblique insertura. La- 
lellum brevissime unguiculatum, subquadratum, lobatum, basi cucullata 
columnam amplectens, caeterum planiusculum, basi lamelliferum. Mentutn 
modicum. Columna semiteres, fovea triangula angusta sub rostello trilobo 
abscondita, lobus rostelli medius prosiliens. Anthera depresso-mitrata, 
apiculata, valvis posticis persistentibus, bilocularis. Pollinia 2 depressa, 
oblonga, alte bipartita, in caudicula ligulata, apice hastata. Olandula 
rhombea. (Character ex Reichenbach.) 



Waescewizella velata; ebulbis, foliis (4-5) spithamseis pedunculis um- 
floris duplo longioribus, sepalis petalisque reflexis, sepalis laterahbus 
lanceolatis acutis dorsali majore, petalis lato-ovatis acutis, labello ex- 
panso subquinquelobo a basi brevissime unguiculato, callo semi-ovato 
varie dentato in laminam transcendeute, carinis transcendentibus m- 
tegerrimis ; columna utrinque angulata. 

Waescewizella velata. PcU.fil. in Schl. Bot. Zeit. 1865,;?. 99. 

Zygopetalttm velatum. Idem in Hit. 



The genera Huntleya, Bollea, Warrea, Warscewizella, Pes- 
catorea, and Zygopetalum— to any one of which our present 
subject might put forth a claim to belong— form a sort of 
tangled skein, which neither a Lindley nor a Reichenbach 
have yet been able to unravel. I frequently pressed my late 
lamented friend, the former of the two botanists referred 
to, to undertake the examination of this difficult subject, but 
death snatched him away before he could bring himself to 
deal with a problem on which his views were constantly fluc- 
tuating, and I doubt whether the matter is even now ripe 
for solution. I find that Reichenbach, who saw the present 
plant in flower, regards it as identical with his own W. velata, 
but there is also a considerable resemblance to W. marginata, 
figured in ' Pescatorea ' and in the Professor's own < Xenia 

For my own part, although I formerly had doubts as to 
june 1st, 1866. 



whether Hinitleya and Warscewizslla-^-ex&ctlj alike as they 

are in habit — were really distinct in the structure of their 
flowers, I confess that at present I decidedly incline to the 
latter view ; and if Warscewizella be maintained as a genus, 
there can, I think, be no doubt at all that the plant on the 
opposite page ought to belong to it. 

But whatever the name -it may ultimately bear, the plant 
itself is unquestionably well worthy of cultivation, than which 
nothing can be more simple ; a moderately warm house and 
protection from the direct rays of the sun being all that is 
required. It flowers at all seasons, and is agreeably fragrant. 
It was discovered in New Granada by Mr. Blunt, who sent 
plants of it, and of many other varieties of the same species, 
to his employers. Messrs. H. Low and Co., of Clapton. 

Dkscr. Whole plant scarcely a foot high, the leaves (there 
are no pseudobulbs) grow in tufts of (generally) five, the 
larger ones about a span long. Peduncles short, rising from 
among the leaves, one-flowered, each tuft of leaves usually 
producing about four, of which not more than one or (at 
most) two are in perfection at the same time. Petiole about 
three inches long. Sepals and petals an inch long, yellowish- 
white, curved backwards, acute, the lateral sepals being much 
narrower than the upper, which is itself about equal to the 
broadly-ovate petals. Lip very large, spread wide open, but 
resting on a very short mentum, generally of the same hue 
as the petals, but with a crimson margin and some deep-purple 
streaks on its disk ; it is slightly five-lobed and furnished at 
its base with a strong callosity, resembling a semicircular 
row of teeth, of which there are five or seven, all running 
forwards into as many furrows. Column angled on each 
side. — J. B. 



Fig. 1. Front view of lip. 2. Column. 3. Pollen-masses. 



m. 




"Vv7Fiiaylel.et.lith. 



Tab. 5583. 

begonia geeaniotdes. 
Geranium-leaved Begonia. 



Nat. Ord. Begosiacb^i. — Monxecia Polyandria. 
Gen. Char. (Fide supra, Tab. 4172.) 



Begonia (§ Atjgttstia) geranioides ; berbacea, subacaulis, laxe pilosa, foliis 
orbiculari-reniformibus obscure 7-9-lobis, lobis obtuse crenatis, stipulis 
parvis ovato-lanceolatis ciliatis, cymis panieulatis multifloris, bracteis 
ovatia oblongisve obtusis ciliatis, floribus albis 1 poll, diametro, masc. 
sepalis petalisque 2 fere orbicularibus, staminibus liberis, antheris 
filamento sequilongis ; faem. sepalis 2, petalis 3 masculinis consiraili- 
bus, ovario 3-ptero, alis angulatis, placentis integris, stylis apice auri- 
culato-2-lobis, extremitatibus stigmatum tortis. 



The genus Begonia, though abounding in both tropical Asia 
and America, is comparatively rare in Africa. In A. De Can- 
dolle's monograph of the genus (Prodr. voLxv.), out of upwards 
of three hundred described species, only about five are natives 
of continental Africa, and though a few have subsequently 
been added in this Magazine (B. baccata, Tab. 5554, B. Mannii, 
Tab. 5434), and others, still undescribed, are contained in 
the herbarium, the total number is as yet under a dozen. 
The present species, which was imported from Port Natal by 
Messrs. Backhouse, of York, and sent by them to the Ma- 
gazine, belongs to the same section with all the other South 
African species, viz. B. Bregei (Tab. nostr. 3720), B. Natalenszs 
(Tab. nostr. 4841), and the little-known B. suffruticosa: all 
inhabit the eastern coast and mountains. B. geranioides is 
a very elegant species, and forms a very pretty greenhouse 
ornament. 

Descr. A rather small species ; the plant sent by Messrs. 
Backhouse is ten to fourteen inches high, throwing up nume- 
rous flowering stems and a crown of radical leaves. Radical 
leaves three to five inches in diameter, orbicular-reniform, 
obscurely seven to nine-lobed, bilobed at the base ; lobes very 
jtjne 1st, 186G. 



obtusely crenate, deep-green above pale beneath, with a few 
scattered, weak, paleaceous hairs; nerves pah-reddish; pe- 
tioles stout, bright-red ; stipules ovate-lanceolate, ciliate, en- 
tire or serrate above. Scapes numerous, trichotomously 
branched, stout, many-flowered ; bracts broadly ovate, obtuse, 
toothed above, ciliate. Flowers nodding, an inch in diameter, 
pure white. Male ft. : Sepals two, nearly orbicular. Petals 
two, similar. Stamens short ; filaments free, as long as the 
oblong anthers. Female ft. : Sepals two and petals three, like 
those of the male. Ovary three-winged, three-celled ; wings 
two projecting in an obtuse angle, the other more obtuse. 
Placenta? entire, covered with ovules. Style cleft to the 
middle into three, reniform, papillose stigmas, whose extre- 
mities are twisted. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Stamen. 2. Ovary, style, and stigmas. 3. Transverse section 
of ovary : — all magnified. 




WFitch,del.etlith. 



irvcei ■'- flrcdts, jttip • 



Tab. 5584. 

MYRSIPHYLLUM asparagoides. 

Asparag us-lea ved Myrsiphyllu m. 



Nat. Ord. Lixiace^. — Hexastdkia Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Perianth ium corollinum, 6-partitum, aequale, campanulato- 
connivens, apice patens. Stamina 6, basi laciniarum affixa, filamentis subu- 
latis ; antherce peltatae, erectae. Ovarium breviter stipitatum, 3-loculare ; 
styli 3, stricti, contigui, stigmatibus simplicibus ; ovula in loculis 2, super- 
posita. Bacca globosa, 3-locularis, loculis 2-sperrais. Semina angulato- 
subglobosa, testa coriacea atra, umbilico ventrali punctiformi. — Suffrutex 
gracilis, Capensis, glaber. Folia breviter petiolata, ovato-lanceolata, nervosa. 
Mores ad basin folii ex axilla squamulce scariosce gemini v. terni, pedicellis 
nutantibus, medio articulatis. Endl. 



MYBSiPHTTiLUM: asparagoides ; gracillimum, ramis flexuosis, foliis ovato- 
oblongis ovato-cordatisve acutis nitidis, floribus parvis viridibus nu- 
tantibus. 

Myksiphyllttm angustifoliura. Mill. Diet, n 2. Willd. Sp. PL I.e. Ait. 
Hort.Kew.v.l.p. 490. 

Myrsiphyllttm: asparagoides. Willd. in Berl. Mag. v. 2. p. 25. 

Medeola asparagoides. Willd. Sp. PL v. 2. p. 270. Bedoute, Liliac. t. 
442. 

Dracaena Medeoloides. Linn.fiL Suppl. 203. 

Asparagus Medeoloides. Thunb. Prodr. FL Cap. 66. 



Myrsiphyllum asparagoides, though hitherto never figured 
in this country, was introduced into England so early as 
1702, by the Duchess of Beaufort. Although long since 
almost gone out of cultivation, we have no hesitation in call- 
ing attention to it, as one of the most elegant greenhouse 
climbers that can well be found ; nothing, indeed, can exceed 
the feathery lightness of the plant when well grown and 
flowered ; and whether on account of its graceful habit, its 
flowering in mid-winter, the uniformity of its bright-green 
foliage, and perfume of its pearly flowers, it is one of the 
plants best suited for table decoration and ornamentation 
generally hitherto introduced. It is a native of various parts 
of the Cape of Good Hope colony, whence the plants here 

June 1st, 1866. 



figured were sent by Mr. Cooper, and contributed by our 
friend W. Wilson Saunders, Esq., F.R.S. It flowered at Kew 
from January to March. The only other described species. 
M. angusHfoka, appears to me not even to rank as a variety, 
the Leaves being most variable on the same specimen. 

Desck. A slender bright-green greenhouse creeper. Stems 
much branched, flexuose. Leaves (flattened branches) alter- 
nate, and. like those of Ruscus, inserted in the axil of a 
minute scale, ovate ovate-cordate or ovate-lanceolate, acute, 
quite entire, glabrous on both surfaces. Flower* solitary or 
in pairs or threes in the axils of the leaves, pendulous on 
'slender, articulated, short pedicels, one-third of an inch long, 
pearlv-white or greenish. Segments of perianth linear, ob- 
tuse, reflexed. Stamens erect, with small orange-red anthers. 
Ovary shortly stipitate, three-celled, with two superposed 
ovules in each cell. Berry globose, fleshv. six-seeded. — 

J. /;. //. 



Fig. 1. Branch and leaf. 2. Ditto and flowers. 8. Petal and stamen. 
4. Germen. 5. Transverse section of ditto : — all magnified. 



J. B. BROWN & CO/S 

NEW PATENT B B LAWN MOWER. 



Manufactured 

by 

J. B. Brown & Co., 

148, 

Upper Thames 

Street, 

London. 




Guaranteed to 

give perfect 

satisfaction, and 

if not approved of 

may be at once 

returned. 



J. B. Bbown and Co., haying so very successfully introduced, at the recent Meeting of the Bath and West of Eng- 
land Society at Hereford, in June 1865, the NEW PATENT B B LAWN MOWER, of their own manufacture, 
beg to mention that having supplied the large number of MACHINES ordered on that occasion, and up to the 
present time, with most unqualified satisfaction to every one, so far as they are aware, they are now actively preparing 
to execute further orders for the approaching season ; and, owing to the large number of such orders already received, 
they would very respectfully solicit all intending orders to be sent with as little delay as possible,— say to be executed 
at any time during the opening of the spring, or in the course of the summer, as may be desired. 

PRICES -including Carriage to any Railway Station or Shipping Port in England 
10-inch Machine . £3 10 01 I 18-inch Machine . 7 10 Easily Worked by a Man. 

12-inch Machine . 4 10 I Easily Wor Iced by a Boy. \ 20-inch .Machine . 8 0] 
14-inch Machine . 5 10 o] 22-inch Machine . 8 10 \ Ditto by Two Men. 

16-inch Machine . 6 10 Ditto by a Man. | 24-inch Machine . 9 Oj 

If with brass mounted Grass Box, gold lettered, 5?. extra. 

V Every Machine sent out is warranted to give ample satisfaction, and if not approved of may be exchanged 
for any other size of Machine, or for the Machine of any other maker, or may be at once returned unconditionally. 

NEW IMPBOVED PKEMITJM WIRE NETTING. 

REDUCED PRICES, FEBRUARY, 1866. 



GREAT 
IMPROVEMENT 

• Iff 
GALVANIZING. 




PRICES per Lineal Yakd 24 Inches High. 



SkeofMesh. 

2J-inch 

2-inch 

l|-inch 

la -inch 

1-inch 

$-inch 



Mostly uaed for 



Hares, Dogs, Poultry . 
GameorPoultry Netting 
Small Rabbits, Hares,etc 
Smallest Rabbits . . 
Pheasantries, etc. . . 
Aviaries, etc 



Light. 



Japanned 

d. 
2| 
H 

H 
8 
11 



Galvanized- 



d. 
3* 
3$ 
4i 
5* 
10 
1* 



Medium. 



Strong. 



WITH REDUCED 

PRICE, AND 

GALVANIZED 

AFTER MADE 



Extra Strong. 



Japanned. 



d. 

3£ 
3J 
4* 
H 

n 

i 



Galvanized. i Japanned. Galvanized. Japanned. jGi 

*. d. s. d. 

4 5* 
A\ H 

5 6i 
6i 8 

1 0| 1 1* 14 
14 14 



d. 
4i 
*i 
H 
6i 
0* 
4 



*. d. 
5 

51 
6i 
8 

1 7 



*. d. 
6 

" 

8 

10 

1 10 



— jiiianes, eie. ... n » »■ - -» - 

_. Q^tuTe7^ri5o~yards or xmwa^d7dellveTedlrc7aT all the prinripaT Railway Stations and Shipping Ports iu 
fiI »gland ; and 200 yards or upwards delivered free to most parts of Scotland and Ireland. 

V Every description of Netting warranted to give satisfaction, and if not approved will be exchanged, or may be 

returned uuconditionallv. 

J. B. BROWN & CO.: OFFICES, 18, CANNON " STEET, CITY, LONDON, E.C. 

{Nearly opposite St. Swit kin's Lane and " London Stone," and near London Bridge.) 

WAREHOUSE (where Stock is kept), 148, UPPER THAMES STREET EC. 

{Opposite the City of London Brewery, and close to the London Bridge Steamboat 1 icrs.) 



HEATING BY HOT WATER 



It is now generally admitted that Buildings of any kind can be more effectua 
warmed by Hot Water than by any other means ; but as so much depends on t 
way in which the Apparatus is fixed, it is of the greatest importance that it be do 
by experienced men. 

J. Jones & Sons are prepared to estimate for Warming, to any extent — 



GBEENHOUSES. 
CONSERVATORIES. 
VINERIES. 
HOTHOUSES. 
FORCING PITS. 
PEACH HOUSES. 
PINE STOVES. 
ORCHARD HOUSES. 



CHURCHES. 

CHAPELS. 

SCHOOLS. 

READING ROOMS. 

LECTURE ROOMS. 

BILLIARD ROOMS. 

HALLS AND PASSAGES. 

BATHS. 



FACTORIES. 
OFFICES. 
WORKSHOPS. 
WAREHOUSES. 
DRYING ROOMS. 
CELLARS. 
COACH-HOUSES. 
HARNESS ROOMS. 



J. Jones & Sons' Apparatus is simple in construction, moderate in cost,! 



economical in working. 



It is equally available for the Amateur's Greenhouse, or the longest range 
Forcing Houses ; for the smallest Chapel or the largest Church ; for Private Offi 
or those of Public Companies. 

It is admirably adapted for Dwelling Houses, as coils of pipes can be pia 
in any part, for warming the various rooms. One or more Baths may be hea 
from the same boiler, and a constant supply of hot water obtained in any pan 
the house. 

For Warehouses and Workshops this system of heating is unsurpassed, as 11 
not only the means of keeping goods dry, but it also adds to the comfort ot 
workpeople, and thereby effects a saving in labour. 

J. Jones & Sons recommend boilers of all kinds being set in brickwors 
possible ; but portable boilers can be supplied, if required. 



MATERIALS. — All Materials supplied will be of the best quality. 

DELIVERY.— Boilers of various kinds, and pipes and connections, being al* 
in stock, can, at a very short notice, be sent to any part. 

FIXING.— The Fixing will be done by experienced men, fully capable of finish 
properly any work they may undertake ; and J. Jones & Sons are prepare 
guarantee the effectual working of any apparatus fixed by their own men. 

ESTIMATES.— Plans and Estimates will be sent on application. 



J. JONES & SONS, 

IRON MERCHANTS AND HORTICULTURAL ENGINE^ 

6, BANKSIDE, SOUTHW ARK, LONDON, S.E. 



No. 259. 

VOL. XXII. JULY. [Price ZSm 6rf# w ^. 2a . 6d , plain , 

OR No. 954 OP THE ENTIRE "WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMPEISING 

THE PLANTS OE THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OP OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 

WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 

BY 

JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S.& G.S., 

mixcctar at tfje aaoyal 3B0tamc Gaxoeiul of Strin. 




Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers exotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, CO VENT GARDEN. 

1866. 




THE HYDROPULT, 

AX INVENTION FOR THROWING WATER BY HAND-POWER. 
(Sectbed by Boyax Letters Patent.) 

_;hs but 8 lbs. 
Will throw 7 or 8 Gallons of Water per minute 50 feet, when worked by the 
power of one Man. 

PRICE LIST. 
Complete with Brass Cylinders and Japanned Stirrup, £1. 12*. 6d. 
Complete with Brass Cylinders and Copper Stirrup, £2. 2*. 

The price, "complete " as above, includes 2\ feet Suction, and 3 feet Delivery 
Hose, Galvanized Wire Strainer, Rose, and Small Jet. 

THE HYDROPTJLT 

Is invaluable for use in the Garden for 

WATERING BEDS, 

SPRINKLING PLANTS, 

DROWNING OUT INSECTS, 

CLEANSING TREES FROM SMUTS, 

DRESSING WITH LIQUID MANURE, ETC. ETC. 

THE HYDROPTJLT 

Is desirable in every Household for 

WASHING WINDOWS. 

WETTING SIDE WALES. 

SPRINKLING STREETS, W' 

WASHING CARRIAGES, 
EMPTYING CISTERNS, 
FILLING BARRELS, 

A SPRAY BATH, ETC. ETC 
ORDERED BY THE WAR DEPARTMENT AS FIRE ENGINES. 
ROBERT HOGG, LL.D. & F.L.S., REV. H. DOMBRA.IN, A.B., SHIRLEY HI.BBM 
ESQ., F.R.H.S., THOMAS RIVERS, ESQ. (the eminent Florist), and other well-known 
gentlemen, recommend the Hydropult as an Invaluable Garden Implement. . 

The Hydropult will draw water horizontal ly, if necessary, through Ttco Hundred Feet Suction M» 
force it through Delivery Hose to an altitude of One Hundred Feet. 

THE GREENHOUSE AND CONSERVATORY HYDROPUI^ 

A NEW AND ..BEAUTIFUL IMPLEMENT, 

Weighing scarcely 5 lbs. 

And specialty adapted for use in the Greenhouse and Conservatory- 

Price 35s. . 

Complete, with Brass Cylinders and Copper Stirrup, 24 feet Suction and 3 feet Delivery Hose, btrame , 

and Fan. . ... ^ found £'' 

This New Implement must necessarily supersede Syringes and other devices of the kind, for it win 
more effective in its operation. 

A LADY CAN WOEK IT FOR HOTJES WITHOUT FATIGUE. 

CAUTION.— Important to the Public.— The extensive sale of the Hydropult has excited the ^P^*^ 
respectable, but in reality unprincipled Manufacturers, who are now palming on the Public ^y* s ^le, in cS 
of the Hydropult, and through their connections are enabled to place said devices on exhibition, and tor » '^ 
of the principal Ironmongery and Seed Establishments throughout the City and provinces. These oei 
in many respects the Hydropult in appearance, and are calculated to deceive the unsuspecting. ■* ^.j , 
therefore, issues this Caution, and respectfully intimates that parties wishing to purchase the Hydropui^ * ^ 
mine the machine offered for sale, and see if it has attached thereto a label, with the following words : ^ 

pult, Vose'3 Patent, manufactured only by Gkctfiths & Bbowitt, Birmingham. Charles Pome b 

ehed. the machine is not the Hydrop 



Proprietor, & and 143, Cheapside, London." Unless this label is attached, the machine 
IOSPECTUSES, WITH TESTIMONIALS, ON APPLICA' 

SHOW-ROOM, 142 & 143, CHEAPS 

CHARLES POMEROY BUTTON. Proprietor 



PROSPECTUSES, WITH TESTIMONIALS, ON APPLICATION. -,-nntf 

HYDROPULT SHOW-ROOM, 142 & 143, CHEAPSIDE, LONl^ 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



SHANKS' PATENT LAWN MOWERS FOE 1866. 

Patronized on Five separate occasions, during the Season of 1 864, by 
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF SAXONY; 

AGAIN ON FOUR SEPARATE OCCASIONS DURING THE SEASON OF 1865 BY HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN; 

ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF HOLLAND; 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF PRUSSIA. 




HORSE MACHINE. ' PONT MACHINE. HAND MACHINE. 

ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, in presenting their LAWN MOWERS for the approaching Season, are gratified 
to be able to state that the demand for their celebrated Machines is rapidly increasing. 

rl A 'a S ' £ ^T ' in mtroclucm g Improvements into their Machines, hare been cartful that no Improvement be intro- 
fluced which has merely novelty to recommend it, but that the advantages in ^oint of durabdity and simplicity of 
construction, which have always been a peculiarity of their Machines, should still remain. 

A. S. & Son can confidently assure their numerous Friends and Customers and the Public generally that their en- 
aoavonr will always be to supply a Machine, first-class in every way, one which cannot be surpassed if even equalled 
* nether for simplicity of construction, ease in working, or durability. None but the best materials and skilled work- 
men are employed in the manufacture of their Machines. 

PRICES— Including Carriage to most of the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in the Kingdom. 

SHANKS' NEW PATENT HAND MACHINE FOR 1866. 

[0-inch Machine £3 10 } Easily worked 



12-inch Machine 4 10 

H-inch Machine ..'..'. 5 10 

16-inch Machine 6 10 



19-inch Machine £7 12 

22-inch Machine 8 7 

24-inch Machine 8 17 



q ( Bo. by a Man 

\ and a Boy. 
6 f Bo. by Two 
6 l Men. 



) by a Lady. 
Do. by a Boy. 
Bo. by a Man. 

SUent Movement for the four smallest sizes, 4s. extra ; for the other sizes, 7s. 6d. extra. 
SHANKS' NEW PATENT PONY & DONKEY MACHINE. 
Width of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. 

£-meh Machine £12 10 25s. extra. 

^8-jich Machine 14 10 30s. extra. 

iO-mch Machine 15 15 30s. extra. 

Silent Movement, 12s. 6d. extra ; Boots for Pony, 21s. 
M ket ; ditto for Donkey, 16s. per Set. ' Silent Movement, 20s. extra ; Boots for Horse's Feet, 

24s. per Set. 
SHANKS' PATENT LAWN MOWEES cut the Grass on uneven as well as on level Lawns; and it 

immaterial whether the Grass be wet or dry. 
Every Machine warranted to give ample satisfaction, and if not approved of can be at once ret, 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT HOUSE MACHINE. 
Width of Cutter. " If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. 

30-inch Machine £19 30s.extra." 

36-inch Machine 22 30s. extra. 

42-ineh Machine 26 ...40s.extra. 

48-inch Machine 28 40s. extra. 



is quite 
urned. 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, 
27, LEADENHALL STKEET, LONDON. 

MANUFACTORY, DENS IRONWORKS, ARBROATH. 



■ and SON keep a Stock of Lawn Mowers at 27, Leadenhall Street, London, from which Orders can be 
_ once executed. They also have at their London Warehouse a staff of experienced Workmen thoroughly 
qnainted with all the details of these Machines, so that thty are enabled to repair Lawn Mowers in 
London as well as at the Manufactory. 



BOTANICAL 1CAOAZIXK AIHT.KTIS1 R 



DESTROr YOUR HNSECT FESTSj 



You mav easilv destroy :lll Plant lYsts, 

Bed Spider, Mealy Bug, Thrip, Green and Black' Fly, American Blight, Ants, Scale, Mildew, 

'Without injury to the most delicate Plant or Tree, by using 

FOWLER'S GARDENERS' INSECTICIDE, 

Pronounced by all who have used it to be far superior to any other remedy. 
One trial trill prove its efficacy. Testimonials forwarded on application. 
Price Is. 6d., 3s., 5s. 6d., and 10*. per Tin. Orders amounting to 18*., Carriage Paid.— Agents Keoj-ibed. 

Mr. George Parsons, of the Keymer, Hassock's Gate, and Brighton Nurseries, says :— " It is certainly the 
most effectual remedy that has at any time come under my notice— destroys every insect for which I hare 
applied it, without the least injury to the most delicate plant." _ 

Mr Spary, F.B.H.S., of the Queen's Graperies, Brighton, say? :— " I have had an opportunity ot proving 
its efficacy, it having been applied to all plants affected with Green and Black Aphis, Scale, Bed Spider, 
Thrip, etc., under my personal superintendence ; the result has been satisfactory, without injury to the 
plants, and proved destructive to the insects." , „ 

Messrs. Wm. Wood and Son, Woodlands Nursery and Seed Warehouse, Maresfield, near Lckjield,bu»- 
sex, say:— "We have tried it on Koses affected with Mildew, Calceolarias covered with Green Fly, and 
Aucubas and Oleanders infested with Scale ; and we have much pleasure in stating the plants are now per- 
fectly clean and healthy." . . , 

Mr. George Quelch, Florist, Lewes Bond, Brighton, says :— « It will give perfect freedom from insects, and 
in many instances more healthy verdure of foliage. It will prove one of the most welcome and lasting tnends. 

Mr. J. Cruttenden, of the Rose Hill Nurseries, Brighton, says he is " perfectly satisfied with the result; 
it will not only kill the insects, but will do so without in any way injuring the plants." 

GEORGE AND THOMAS FOWLEE, NORTH STREET, BRIGHTON. 



BENJAMIN EDGINGTON, 

MARQUEE, TENT, RICK CLOTH, AND FLAG MANUFACTURER, 

By Special Appointment to Hee Majesty and H.B.H. the Pbince of Waies. 
Also to the Eoyal Horticultural and Botanic Societies. 

Rick Cloths, New and Second-hand, with Poles, etc., complete. 
Marquees and Tents for Horticultural Shows, for Sale or Hire. 

NETTING AJTD BUNTING FOR FRUIT TREES, ETC. 





AN ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE FREE ON APPLICATION. 
Be particular to observe the Christian Name, and address — 
BENJAMIN EDGINGTON (only), 2, DUKE STREET, LONDON BRIDGE, Si 

No other Establishment. 



NOTICE-NEW HARDY CLIMBERS. 

CLEMATIS, PRINCE OF WALES. 

Large flowers of a rich deep violet-purple, with red bars down the centre of each sepal. 

First-class Certificate. 21s. each. 



tf» 



CLEMATIS RUBELLA. 
Very fine rich velvety claret ; stamens pale green. First-class Certificate. 21s. each 
The usual allowance to the Trade, and a List jof Firms will be advertised at a later period, 
be figured iu the ' Floral Magazine' for September. 

See Proceedings of Eoyal Horticultural Society's Scientific Meetings, June 27, 1865, p. 124, where James B *^.„ . 
Esq., called attention to a few prominent objects, of which the following is an extract referring to the above ^ eva& J^ 

" In the room you will notice an exhibition of Clematises, all of which are of a most magnificent type. ^ ■ 
can be more beautiful than these Clematises. See what fine large blue and purple petals they have, shining 
cases with metallic tints like the flowers of certain Ipomceas. They are varieties raised by those most a 
hybridizers, Messrs. Jackman, of Woking, who will have the honour of introducing quite a new race oi W 
which I believe will be ' amongst the be3t, if not the very best ornaments' for all out-of-door walls, etc. . i 

Messrs. GEOBGE JACKMAN & SON have much pleasure in informing the Public that they shah be 
position to send out the above two New Clematises in the coming Autumn (1866). v 

Orders will be taken now, and the Plants will be forwarded strictly. WOKING NUESEEY, SUEEE I- 



NEW SERIES OE NATURAL HISTORY. 

*** A good introductory series of books on British Natural History for the use of students and 
amateurs is still a desideratum. Those at present in use have been too much compiled from anti- 
quated sources ; while the figures, copied in many instances from sources equally antiquated, are 
far from accurate, the colouring of them having become degenerated through the adoption, for the 
sake of cheapness, of mechanical processes. 

The present series will be entirely the result of original research carried to its most advanced 
point ; and the figures, which will be chiefly engraved on steel, by the artist most highly renowned 
in each department for his technical knowledge of the subjects, will in all cases be drawn from 
actual specimens, and coloured separately by hand. The following are now ready : — 

BRITISH FERNS ; an Introduction to the Study of the Ferns, Lycopods, and Equiseta indigenous 
to the British Isles. With chapters on the Structure, Propagation, Cultivation, Diseases, Uses, Preservation, 
and Distribution of Ferns. By Maeg-aeet Plues. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Plates, and 56 Wood-Engravings 
by W. Fitch, 10*. Qd. 

BRITISH BEES ; an Introduction to the Study of the Natural History and Economy of the Bees 
indigenous to the British Isles. By W. E. Shttckard. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Steel Plates, comprising nearly 
100 Figured Engraved from Natural Specimens expressly for the work, by E. W. Robixson, and numerous 
Wood-Engravings, 10*. Qd. 

BRITISH BEETLES ; an Introduction to the Study of our Indigenous Coleoptera. By E. C. Rye. 
Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Steel Plates, comprising Figures of nearly 100 Species Engraved from Natural Specimens 
expressly for the work, by E. W. Robikson, and 11 Wood-Engravings of Dissections by the Author, 10*. 6d. 

If early Ready. 

BRITISH SPIDERS ; an Introduction to the Study of our Native Arachnida. By E. F. Staveley. 
Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Plates and Wood-Engravings, 10*. 6d. 

Other Works are in Preparation. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. Coloured Illustrations and Descriptions of the new and 
rare Flowering Plants of the Royal Gardens, Kew, and of other Botanical Establish- 
ments. By Dr. Hooker, F.R.S., Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. Monthly, with 6 Coloured 
Plates by W. Fitch, 3*. ijd. 

Contents of No. 259, July 1866. 



MECONOPSIS NIPALENSIS. 
POLYSTACHYA PUBESCENS. 
LOBELIA NICOTIAjSLEFOLIA. 



ANCYLOOYNE LONGIFLORA. 
ANGBiECUM CHAILLUANUM. 



FLORAL MAGAZINE ; containing Figures and Descriptions of the newest varieties 
of Popular Garden Flowers. By the Rev. H. Honywood Dombrain. Monthly, with 4 
coloured Plates by Andrews, 2s. Gd. 

Contents of No. 75, July 1866. 
PITCAIRNIA TABUL.EFORMIS. | RAPHIOLEPIS OVATA. 

CYPRIPEDIUM L^EVIGrATUM. ALPINE AURICULA, VICTORIOUS. 

LOVELL EEEVE & CO., 5, HENEIETTA STEEET, CO VENT GAEDEN. 



SESTROY YOUR INSECT WESTS] 



You may easily destroy all Plant Pests, 

Red Spider, Green and Black Fly, S?.^ e > 

Mealy Bug, American Blight, Mildew, 

Thrip, Ants, 

Without injury to the most delicate Plant or Tree, by using 

FOWLEE'S GAEDENEES' INSECTICIDE, 

Pronounced by all who have used it to be far superior to any other remedy. 
ONE TRIAL WILL PROVE ITS EFFICACY. 

Testimonials forwarded on applicat on. 
Price Is. 6d., 3s., 5s. Qd., and 10s. per Tin. Orders amounting to 18s., Carriage Paid. 

Agents Required. 
GEORGE & THOMAS FOWLER, NORTH STREET, BRIGHTON. 



1. M 1QAZINS AI'\ ERTISEB. 



WOEKS ON BOTANY. 



BENTHAM'S ILLUSTRATED BRITISH 

FLORA: a Description (with a Wood-Engraving, in- 
clu t>ns, ot' each species) of the Flowering 

Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in, the 

British Isles. I - 1296 \\ .',>.!- Engraving*, 

from Original Drawings by W. Fitch. £3. I 

BENTHAM'S HANDBOOK of the BRITISH 

FLORA ; a Description of the Flowering Plants and 
Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in, the British 
Isles. For the Use of Beginners and Amateurs. 12s. 

MOORE'S FIELD BOTANIST'S COM- 

PA^IOX ; a Familiar Account, in the Four Seasons, 
of the most common of the Wild Flowering Plants of 
the British Isles. 21 Coloured Plates, by W. Frrcn. 
21s. 

BENTHAM'S OUTLINES of ELEMEN- 
TARY BOTANY, as Introductory to Local Floras. 
2*. 6d. 

HOOKER'S FLORA of NEW ZEALAND; 

a Systematic Description of the Native Plants of New- 
Zealand, and the Chatham, Kermadec's, Lord Auck- 
land's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. Part I. 
16*. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that colony. [Part II in the Press. 

BENTHAM'S FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS ; 

a Description of the Plants of the Australian Territory. 
Yols. I. and II., 20*. each. Published under the au- 
spices of the several Governments of Australia. 

[Vol. III. nearly ready. 

GRISEBACH'S FLORA of the BRITISH 

WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. 37s. 6d. Published 
under the auspices of the Secretary of State for the 
Colonies. 

BENTHAM'S FLORA HONGKONGEN- 

SIS ; a Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns 
of the Island of Hongkong. With a Map of the Is- 
land. 16s. Published under the authority of Her 
Majesty's Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

HOOKER'S FLORA of TASMANIA ; Royal 

4to, 2 vols. 200 Coloured Plates. £17. 10*. Pub- 
lished under the authority of the Lords Commissioners 
of the Admiralty. 

HOOKER on the FLORA of AUSTRALIA, 

its Origin, Affinities, and Distribution. 10s. 

HOOKER'S RHODODENDRONS of SIK- 

KIM-HIMALAYA ; being an account, Botanical and 
Geographical, of the Rhododendrons recently discovered 
in the Mountains of Eastern Himalaya, from Drawings 
and Descriptions made on the spot, by Dr. J. D. 
Hookeb, F.R.S. Folio, 30 Coloured Plates. £3. 16s. 

MOGGRIDGE'S FLORA of MENTONE. 

Royal 8vo. Parts I. and II., each, 25 Coloured Plates, 
15?. 

WOODS'S TOURIST'S FLORA; Descriptive 

Catalogue of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of the 
British Islands, France, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, 
and the Italian Islands. 18s. 



HOOKER'S BRITISH FERNS; Figures and 

Descriptions, with Analyses of the Fructification and 
Venation, of the Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland, 

uatieullv arranged. Royal Svo, 66 Coloured 
Plates BS. it. 

HOOKER'S GARDEN FERNS; Figures and ■ 

Descriptions, with Analyses of the Fructification and i 
Venation, of a Selection of Exotic Ferns, adapted for 
Cultivation in the Garden, Hothouse and Conservatory. 
Royal 8vo, 6-i Coloured Plates, £2. 2s. 

HOOKER'S FILICES EXOTIC.E ; Figures I 

and Descriptions of Exotic Ferns, chiefly of such as are ' 
cultivated in the Roval Gardens of Kew. Royal 4to, I 
100 Coloured Plates, £6. 11*. 

CHANTER'S FERNY COMBES ; a Ramble 

after Ferns in the Glens and Valleys of Devonshire. 
Second Edition. 8 Coloured Plates and a Map of the 
County, os. 

BERKELEY'S BRITISH MOSSES, contain- 
ing all that are known to be Natives of the British 
Isles. 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 

BERKELEY'S BRITISH FUNGOLOGY, 

containing Characters of above a Thousand Species ot 
Fungi, and a Complete List of all that have been in- 
scribed as Natives of the British Isles. 24 Colour 
Plates, 30*. 

BADIIAM'S ESCULENT FUNGUSES of 

ENGLAND, containing an Account of their Classical 
History, Uses, Characters, Development, Struct^, 
Nutritious Properties, Modes of Cooking and fre»en 
ing,etc. New Edition. Edited by F. CraHKi, 1 .**• | 
12 Coloured Plates, 12*. 

HUSSEY'S BRITISH MYCOLOGY, compri- 
sing Figures and Descriptions of the Funguses ot J 
terestand novelty indigenous to Britain. K oj a , 
First Series, 90 Coloured Plates, £7. 12*. 6rf.; & eco 
Series, 50 Coloured Plates, £4. 10*. 

HARVEY'S PHYCOLOGIABRITANNlCAj | 

or, History of British Seaweeds, containing tow 
Figures, Generic and Specific Characters, Syn°nj 
and Descriptions of all the Species of Algffi inh*» . 
the Shores of the British Islands. Royal 8ro, <* 
360 Coloured Plates, £6. 6*. 

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\85 







Tab. 5585. 
MECONOPSIS Nipalensis, DC. 

Nepalese Meconopsis. 



Nat. Ord. Papavebace^:. — Polyandeia Monootnia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5456.) 



Meconopsis Nipalensis ; berba elata, robusta, tota setis patentibus cri- 
nita pubeque stellata siccitate aurea obteeta, foliis cauliuis sessilibus 
linearibus lineari-oblanceolatisve sinuato-lobatis, radicalibus petiolatis 
lineari-spathulatis subpirmatifidis, floribus racemosis aureis, pedicellis 
elongatis patentibus, capsula 8-10-valvi setis appressis pubeque stel- 
lata dense obsita. 

Meconopsis Nipalensis. DC. Prod. v. 1. p. 121. Hook. f. et Thorns. Fl. 
Ind. v. l.p. 253. Hook, f I. III. PI. Himal. t. is. 

Papavee paniculatum. Don, Prod. Fl. Nep.p. 197. Wall. Cat. t. 8123 a. 



This noble plant was originally discovered by the celebrated 
Br. Wallich in the mountains of Nepal, and more recently col- 
lected by myself abundantly in the central dampest regions of 
the Sikkim Himalaya, where at elevations of 10-11,000 feet 
above the level of the sea it often ornaments the rank herb- 
age that skirts the pine forest. A more stately and beauti- 
ful plant can hardly be imagined, except the Hollyhock, 
which it somewhat resembles .in miniature. The genus Me- 
conopsis abounds in the Himalaya, where the M. aculeata, 
Tab. 5456, and M. WallicMi, Tab. 4668, were also procured, 
and from whence other beautiful species remain to be im- 
ported. 

For the specimen here figured I am indebted to those inde- 
fatigable and skilful cultivators, Messrs. Backhouse, of York, 
who flowered it in July, I860. 

Descr. A tall, robust, simple or sparingly branched herb, 
three to five feet high, biennial f?), full of orange-yellow sap. 
Stem often one to two inches in diameter at the base, covered 
with spreading stiff hairs and shorter stellate down in more 
or less abundance. Badical leaves petioled, half to one and a 
jult 1st, 1866. 



half foot long, linear-spathulate or oblong-lanceolate, sinuate- 
pinnatifid; cauline sessile. Raceme erect, lax-flowered, one 
to two feet high ; pedicels distant, the lower sometimes two- 
flowered. Flowers pale-golden or sulphur-yellow, two to three 
inches in diameter. Sepals an inch long. Petals broadly 
obovate. Stamens with orange anthers. Ovary oblong, co- 
vered with erect yellow bristles ; style columnar ; stigma six- 
to ten-lobed ; placentas six to ten. Capsule subclavate, on a 
stiff erect pedicel, densely strigose with yellow hairs. Seeds 
with a cancellated spongy testa. — J. I). II. 



Fig. 1. Ovary. 2. Transverse section of ditto:— both magnified. 



t 



I 



1 



5586, 




W.Pitd-L del- at litK. 



Tfinr-ent BroeJo 



Tab. 5586. 

POLYSTACHYA pubescens. 
Hairy-stemmed Polystachya. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^:. — Gynandeia Monandeia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4161.) 



Polystachya pubescens; pseudobulbis fusiformibus 2-3-phyllis, foliis 
oblongo-lanceolatis subacutis spieis simplicibus teretibus erectis pube- 
rulis multifloris duplo brevioribus, floribus resupinatis (in genere ma- 
joribus), sepalis liberis ovatis concavis, petalis paulo minoribus obovatis 
obtusissimis, labello carinato trilobo sepalis vix sequali laciniis laterali- 
bus rotundatis, lacinia media ovata ad apicem paululum deflexa callo 
triangulari piloso versus basin, columna basi paulo producta. 

Epiphoea pubescens. Lindl. Gomp. Bot. Mag. v. 2. p. 201. 

Polystachya pubescens. Beielienlachjtl. in Walpers Ann. v. 6. p. 643. 



This is the prettiest species of a very unattractive genus. 
Its flowers are larger than those of any Polystachya hitherto 
discovered, — P. grandiflora, otherwise very different, alone 
excepted,— and they are of a brighter colour than those of 
P.lracteosa,wh\\e the tall, upright, unbranched, many-flowered 
spikes are quite peculiar. 

I have little doubt that this is the Epiphora pubescens de- 
scribed by Lindley twenty-five years ago, although the form 
of the sepals varies from that of his diagnosis, for the term 
" acutissima " can scarcely be applied to those of the figure. 
But we are now accustomed to look for these little diver- 
gences, especially when a species— as in the present instance 
—occupies a long extent of country ; for it was found first 
in Caffraria by Burchell, then in Delagoa Bay by Drege , near 
Somerset by Mrs. Barber, and on the eastern frontier ot our 
South African possessions by Mr. Button. It flowered at 
Kew three years ago. , 

Dr Lindley long since separated this plant— though with 
much hesitation— from Polystachya and founded upon it his 
genus Epiphora. But more recent discoveries would seem 

july 1st, 1866. 



to show that the two genera are not really distinct, and I 
am glad to find that Professor Eteichenbach is quite of this 

opinion. 

Dbscr. Whole plant less than a foot high. Pseuddbulbs 

distaff-shaped, more than an inch long, clothed at the base 
with large sheathing bracts that speedily become brown, 
and bearing two or three oblong-lanceolate leaves, which are 
from three to five inches long, leathery, and bluntly acute at 
their extremities. Flower-spikes twice the length of the leaves, 
terete, hairy, perfectly erect and many-flowered. Bracts tri- 
angular, concave, exceedingly acute, not half the length of 
the ovary, and standing out at right angles to the stem. 
Mowers resupinate, closely massed together, of a bright golden- 
yellow. Sepals hollow, ovate, rather blunt, streaked with red 
lines up the centre (inside). Petals rather less than the 
sepals, obovate, very blunt. Up rather shorter than the 
sepals, deeply three-lobed, the lateral lobes stretched a little 
forwards and rounded, the middle lobe ovate, very acute, and 
with its apex slightly bent down, at base of lip there is a 
triangular callosity, covered with small dark hairs ; there are, 
moreover, a few red streaks on its under surface. Column 
very short, semiterete, and most exceedingly clavate. — J. B. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Lip, spread flat. 3. Pollen-masses : — magnified. 



J&&7. 



I 










Tab. 5587. 

LOBELIA XICOTIAN.EFOLIA. 

Tubacco-leaued Lobelia. 



Nat. Ord. Lobeliace^e. — Pentattdeia Monogxnia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-lobus, tubo obconico ovoideo v. hemispbaerico. Co- 
rolla superne longitudinaliter fissa, 2-labiata, tubo cylindrico v. infundibu- 
liformi recto; labio superiore saepius minore et erecto, inferiore saepius 
patente latiore 3-fido v. rarius 3-dentato. Antherce 2 iuferiores v. rarius 
omnes apice barbatae. Ovarium inferum v. f-superum, rarissime subli- 
berum. — Herbae v. rarius suffrutices. Folia alterna. Flores sapius race: 
moso-spicatce ; pedicellis axillaribus. Corolla ccerulea alba violacea rubra 
v. ex rubro aurea. DC. 



Lobelia nicotianafolia ; elata, robusta, saepe ramosa, pubescens v. glabrata, 
foliis lanceolatis breviter petiolatis basi angustatis acuminatis denticu- 
latis, racemo basi foliaceo composito, ramis pyramidatis, bracteis acu- 
minatis gland uloso-dentatis, lobis calycinis tubo multoties longioribus 
serratis, corolla? labiis deflexis acuminatis, labii superioris lobis anguste 
lineari-lanceolatis labium inferius 3-lobum requantibus. 

Lobelia nicotianafolia. Heyne ex Rcem. et Sch. Syst. v. 5. p. 47. Boxb. 
Fl. Ind. v. 1. p. 506. DC. Prod. v. 7. p. 381. Wall. Cat. p. 1304. 
Wight, III. PI. Ind. Or. t. 135. 

Lobelia excelsa. Lesch. ex Roxb. Fl. Ind. Ed. Wall. v. 2. p. 114. DC. 
Prodr. v. 7. p. 381. Wall, Cat. n. 1305. Thwaites, Enum, PI. 
Zeylan. p. 170. Wight, III. PI. Ind. Or. t. 1173, 4. 

Lobelia aromatica. Moon, Cat. Wight, Ic. t. 1172. 

Rapuntium Lescbenaultianum et nicotiana>folium. Presl, Prodr. Lobel. 
p. 24. 



A stately plant, native of the Neilgherry and other moun- 
tains of the Indian peninsula and of Ceylon, for seeds of which 
the Royal Gardens are indebted to the late Mr. A. Black, 
Superintendent of the Botanical Gardens of Bangalore. It 
flowered in the temperate house in January of the present 
year, and attracted much attention for its striking habit and 
great height, attaining six feet and bearing a profusion ot 
pale lilac blossoms. In its native country, it is said to grow 
ten and even twelve feet high. I follow Mr. Thwaites m re- 



July 1st, 1866. 



during the L. excelsa and nicotianwfbUa to one. but maintain 
the latter name as being the first published, viz. by Rcemer 
and Schultes in 1819, whilst that of excelsa did not appear 
till 1824, in Wallich's edition of Roxburgh's ■ Flora Indica.' 

Descr. A tall, stout, herbaceous plant, six to twelve feet 
high, glabrous, or more or less pubescent, or even tomentose 
on the leaves below. Stem at the base as thick as the arm, 
simple or branched. Leaves narrow lanceolate, one to two 
feet long, acuminate, denticulate, more or less narrowed into 
a petiole ; veins prominent beneath. Raceme simple or com- 
pound, the branches a foot and upwards long, densely co- 
vered with close-set flowers forming pyramidal summits of a 
pale lilac colour. Bracts acuminate, toothed, the lower folia- 
ceous. Pedicels slender. Calyx-tube broadly hemispherical, 
five-ribbed; lobes lanceolate, longer than the tube, serrate. 
Corolla an inch long, upper lip of two linear acuminate pen- 
dulous lobes, as long as the lower, which is three-cleft to the 
middle, the outer lobes linear, the middle ovate-lanceolate, 
and all acuminate. Anthers deeply blue, two of them bearded. 
Stigma two-lobed — J. I). II. 



Fig. 1. Calyx, style, and stigma, — magnified. 



5588. 










Tab. 5588. 

ANCYLOGYNE longiflora. 

Long-jloivered Ancylogyne. 



Nat. Ord. Acawthace^e. — Diandbia Mondgynia. 



Gen. Char. Calyx 5-partitus, coloratus, laciniis subaequalibus v. inaequa- 
libus. Corolla tubulosa, limbo brevi obliquo subregulariter 5-fido, laciniis 
patentibus v. recurvia. Stamina fertilia 2, exserta, cum 2 breviora anan- 
tbera; anther <s oblongae, loculis parallelis hirtis ciliatisve basi calcaratis, 
calcaribus divergentibus. Ovarium 2-loculare ; stylus filiformis, staminibus 
longior, apice uncinatus, stigmate bifido, lobo altero dentiformi v. deficiente ; 
ovula 8. Capsula 4-gona, cuspidata, 8-sperma, septo crasso. Semina sub- 
orbicularia compressa, nitida, retinaculis cochleariformibus suffulta. — 
Herbse Americee tropica, caule 4>-gono. Folia glabra, raphidibus farcta. 
Spicae v. racemi terminales, compositi. Flores seepe speciosi, 1-bracteati. 



'Ancylogyne longiflora; foliis petiolatis ovato-oblongis obovato-lanceola- 
tisve acuminatis subsinuato-dentatis, panicula nutante, calycis laciniis 
subulato-lanceolatis longe acuminatis corolla? tubo 2-pollicari tertiam 
partem aequantibus, corolla? tubo lento curvo supra medium modice 
inflato, laate purpureo, lobis brevibus rotundatis- recurvis, filamentis 
elongatis filiformibus longe pectinato-ciliatis, pilis recurvis. 



A most beautiful plant, with something of the inflorescence 
of Eussellia juncea, introduced by Messrs. Veitch and Sons 
from Guayaquil, where it was discovered by their intelligent 
and most active collector, Mr. Pierce. It is undoubtedly one 
of the finest tropical Acanthacem ever introduced into this 
country, and cannot fail to be a most important accession to 
our stoves. It flowered with Messrs. Veitch in April of the 
present year. 

The genus Ancylogyne of Nees, as previously known, con- 
sisted of a few Peruvian and Brazilian plants, none of which 
had hitherto been in cultivation. 

Descr. A glabrous, apparently suffruticose plant. Stems 
four-angled, and leaves glabrous or minutely pubescent. 
Leaves four to ten inches long, petioled, ovate-oblong or ob- 
ovate-lanceolate, with long acuminate points, obscurely sinu- 

juit 1st, 1866. 



ate or subserrate. Fhweta arranged in a drooping elongated 
branched panicle, with subulate bracts at all the axils, one- 
eighth to one-fourth of an inch long, shortly pedicelled. 
Calyx-lobes one-third to one and a half inch long, nearly equal, 
subulate-lanceolate, purple. Corolla two inches long, nearly 
straight, cylindrical, and tubular, rather inflated above the 
summit of the calyx-lobes, bright vinous-purple ; mouth ob- 
lique ; lobes short, rounded, recurved. Stamens four, two 
fertile ; Ji 'laments very slender, exserted, garnished through- 
out their length with two series of long recurved hairs ; ste- 
rile stameiis with shorter filaments. Anthers bright-yellow, 
the edge of the cells ciliated ; spurs short, projecting. Ovary 
with eight ovules. — .7. 1). H. 



Fig. 1. Base of corolla and stamens. 2. Summit of filaments and an- 
ther. 3. Ovary. 4. Longitudinal section of ditto : — all magnified. 



sm 




YineenL Brooks,!^ 



Tab. 5589. 

AXGILECUM Chailluaxoi. 

M. J)u Chaillus Angra?ein>>. 



JSTat. Ord. Oechide-e. — Gynakdeia Monakdeia. 



Gen. Char. Perianthium patens. Sepala et petala subaequalia, libera. 
Labellwm sessile, cum basi columnar continuum, carnosum, indivisum, pe- 
talis consimile v. iis latius ; calcare recto v. flexuoso coniuto, saepius subcy- 
lindraceo, perianthio sequilongo v. multo longiore, raro obconico. Columna 
nana, subteres, raro elongata et semiteres. Anthera 2-locularis, truncata. 
Pollinia 2, 2-partibilia ; caudicula brevi v. elongata angusta, glandula tri- 
angulari v. lanceolata. — Epiphyta? cauhscentes. Folia coriacea. ligulata, 
apice obliqua v. 2-Ioba. Flores solitarii v. racemosi, albi virescentes v. 
cifrini, saepe herbacei. 



Axge^cum Chailluanum ; foliis valde coriaceis ligulatis 4-6 poll, longis 
1| poll, latis apice 2-lobis, lobis valde insequalibus rotundatis, margi- 
nibus undulatis, racemis 6-12-floris, bracteis amplis late ovatis sub- 
acutis acuminatisve, floribus ex albo virescentibus, sepalis petalis 
et labello consimilibus 1^ poll, longis anguste subulato-lanceolatis 
recurvis, calcare tenui elongato 3-5-pollicari, rostello valde elongate 



This very distinct Angrcemim was sent from the Gaboon 
to the Royal Gardens, by M. Du Chaillu, on his return from 
his last adventurous journey in Western Africa, and flowered 
in May of the present year. The same plant was also sent 
by M. Gustav Mann (collector for the Royal Gardens) from 
the Nun river, on the same coast, but has not flowered. It 
was named A. arcu'atum by the late Dr. Lindley, in the 
Hookerian Herbarium, but differs much from that South Afri- 
can species in the greater size, large flowers, longer, more 
acuminate sepals and petals, the spur several times longer 
than the perianth, and in the longer leaves, with undulated 
margins. 1 have given this the name of its celebrated dis- 
coverer. 

Desce. A small, stout epiphyte. Stems four to ten inches 
long, as thick as the little finger. Leaves loosely imbricate, 
four to six inches long, an inch and a half broad, leathery, 
jult 1st, 1866. 



shrivelling much when dry, very unequallj two-lobed at the 
apex; the lobes rounded, margins undulated, dark-green. 
Racemes drooping, tour to eight inches long. Lax-flowered. 

'/>■ white, with a pale-greenish tinge. Bracts broadh 
ovate or boat-shaped, subacute or acuminate, brown. Pedicel 

with ovary an inch and a half long. Petals, sepals and Up all 
of equal length and similar, narrow lanceolate-subulate, with 
slender acuminate points, recurved, about an inch and a half 
long. Spur very long, slender, flexuous, twice or thrice as 
long as the perianth, pale yellow-green. Column short and 
stout. BosteUum much produced into a subulate beak. Anther- 
case with a projecting, obtuse beak, much shorter than the 
rostellum. PoUinia small. — J. 1). H. 



Fig. 1. Column aud lip. 2. Column, anther-case, and rostellum. 3. 
Transverse section of ovary. 4. Upper view of column, anther-case, and 
rostellum. 5. Pollinia : — all magnified. 



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NATUML HISTORY FOR BEGINNERS. 



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use of students and amateurs is still a desideratum. Those at present in 
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figures, copied in many instances from sources equally antiquated, are far 
from accurate, the colouring of them having become degenerated through 
the adoption, for the sake of cheapness, of mechanical processes. 

The present series will be entirely the result of original research carried 
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The following are now Ready. 
BRITISH BEETLES ; an Introduction to the Study of our 

Indigenous Coleopteba. By E. C. Eye. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured 
Steel Plates, comprising Figures of nearly 100 Species, engraved from 
Natural Specimens, expressly for the Work, by E. W. Robi> t so> t , and 
11 Wood-Engravings of Dissections by the Author. 10*. 6d. 

BRITISH BEES ; an Introduction to the Study of the Natural 

History and Economy of the Bees indigenous to the British Isles. 
By W. E. Shockabd. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Steel Plates, compris- 
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BRITISH EERNS ; an Introduction to the Study of the Ferns, 

Lycopods, and Equiseta indigenous to the British Isles, with Chapters 
on the Structure, Propagation, Cultivation, Diseases, Uses, Preserva- 
tion, and Distribution of Ferns. By Mabgaeet Peues. Crown 8vo, 
16 Coloured Plates, and 56 Wood-Eugravings by W. Fitch. lQs.fid. 

Nearly Ready. 

BRITISH SPIDERS; an Introduction to the Study of our 
Native Arachkida. By E. F. Staveley. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured . 
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OTHER WORKS IN PREPARATION. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



J. B. BROWN & CO.'S 

NEW PATENT B B LAWN MOWER. 



Manufactured 

by 

J. B. Brown & Co., 

148, 

Tipper Thames 

Street, 

London. 




Guaranteed to 

give perfect 

satisfaction, and 

if not approved of 

may be at once 

returned. 



J. B. Beown and Co., having so very successfully introduced, at the recent Meeting of the Bath and West of Eng- 
land Society at Hereford, in June 1865, the NEW PATENT B B LAWN MOWER, of their own manufacture, 
t>eg to mention that having supplied the large number of MACHINES ordered on that occasion, and up to the 
present tune, with most unqualified satisfaction to every one, so far as they are aware, thev are now actively preparing 
o execute turther orders for the approaching season ; and, owing to the large number of such orders already received", 
ney would very respectfully solicit all intending orders to be sent with as little delay as possible,— say to be executed 
« any time during the opening of the spring, or in the course of the summer, as may be desired. 



10-inch Machine 
12-inch Machine 
14-ineh Machine 
16-inch Machine 



PRICES— including Carriage to any Railway Station or Shipping Port in England. 



£3 10 

4 10 

5 10 

6 10 



81 



■Easily Worked by a Boy. 
Ditto by a Man. 



18-inch Machine 
20-inch Machine 
22-inch Machine , 
2 1-inch Machine . 



10 
8 

8 10 

9 



Easily W< a Man. 

°1 

} Ditto by Two Men. 

0} 
# ^ m If with brass mounted Grass Box, gold lettered, 5*. extra, 

for a * .f' ver 7 " ac hhie sent out is warranted to give ample satisfaction, and if not approved of may be exchanged 
ny other size of Machine, or for tiie Machine of any other maker, or may be at once returned unconditionally. 

NEW IMPKOVED PREMIUM WIRE NETTING. 

REDUCED PRICES, FEBRUARY, 1866. 



GREAT 
IMPROVEMENT 

in 
galvanizing. 




WITH REDUCED 

PRICE, AND 

GALVANIZED 

AFTER MADE 



PRICES per Lineal Yard 24 Inches High.^ 



8i *eofMesh 

2 i-inch 

2-inch 

lf-inch 

H-inch 

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i-inch 



Mostly used for 



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Gameor Poultry Netting 
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Smallest Rabbits . . 
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Lifjht. 



Japanned 



d. 

2J 
3* 

3f 

H 

8 
11 



Galvanized 



d. 
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10 

U 



Medium. 



Strong. 



Extra Strong. 



Japanned. Galvanized, 



d. 
H 

H 



d. 

H 

6± 

4 



Japanned. 



t. 



Galvanized. Japanned. Galvanized. 



d. 

N 
H 

H 

B 
4 

7 




E&slanV °^ '^ y ar( * s or upwards delivered free at all the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in 
* * v ' an< ^ "^ yards or upwards delivered free to most parts of Scotland and Ireland. 

er y description of Netting warranted to give satisfaction, and if not approved will be exchanged, or may be 
T returned unconditionally. 

J - B.BROWN & CO. : OFFICES, 18, CANNON STEET, CITY, LONDON, E.G. 

(Nearly opposite St. Swithins Lane and " London Stone," and near London Bridge.) 
WAREHOUSE (where Stock is kept), 148, UPPER THAMES STREET E.C. 

{Opposite the City of London Brewery, and close to the London Bridge Steamboat Piers.) 



HEATING BY HOT WATER 

b/expene^ced m^ PParatUS " ""* * iS ° f ^ ***** NP"**" «* » be don 

J. Jones & Sons are prepared to estimate for Warming, to any extent— 



GREENHOUSES. 
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P mn^/T ES & i S0NS ' A PP aratus is sim ple in construction, moderate in cost, anc 
economical m working. 

Fnr,iniw eqUaUy f aVa u able f ° r the Amateu r's Greenhouse, or the longest range 01 

orthos! S°Sc oSjSf" 1 Chapd ° r ^ laTgeSt ChUrCh > f ° r PriVatG ° ffiCeS 

m nJvZ fT* hl y ada P te ? for Dwelling Houses, as coils of pipes can be placet 
from ?J s ' hl ™ mm % the Various rooms - 0ne or m ore Baths may be heated 
the house! a C0DStailt SUpply ° f hot Water obtained in an ? P^ 0l 

not onlv ^ arehouses and Workshops this system of heating is unsurpassed, as it I 

TOk^n^T °l e a Pmg g °° dS dr >' but il also adds t0 the ™ mfort of th£ 
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uossihl/w 8 & + S ^f\ re 1 c ommend boilers of all kinds being set in brickwork, il 
possible ; but portable boilers can be supplied, if required. 



MATERIALS— All Materials supplied will be of the best quality. 

DEI i?Yw?' Y ~ B ° ilers of various kinds, and pipes and connections, being always 
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FIX omT^l7l he FiX l ng v ^ be done b y experienced men, fully capable of finishing 
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JlblliUklES.-Plans and Estimates will be sent on application. 

J'- JONES & SONS, 

iBON MEECHANTS AND HOBTICTJLTURAL ENGINEEES 
6, BANKSIDE, SOUTHWARK, LONDON, S.E. 



€T)trlr gcrieh. 

No. 260. 

VOL. XXII. AUGUST. [Price 3*. 6d. col*- Is. 6d. plain. 

OR No. 955 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMPRISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S., 

JBtrcrtar of tfjc »0ijal Satanic <5arant!> ai fitto. 




Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flower* exotic grace oor northern clime. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1866. 



THE HYDROPULT, 




AN INVENTION FOB THROW IN (i WATER BY HAND-POWER. 
(Secured bt Royal Lettbhb Patent.) 

_rhs but 8 lbs. 

"Will throw 7 or 8 Gallous of Water per minute 50 feet, when worked by t 
power of one Man. 

PKICE LIST. 

Complete with Brass Cylinders and Japanned Stirrup, £1. 12*. Gd. 

Complete with Brass Cylinders and Copper Stirrup, £2. 2s. 

The price, "complete " as above, includes 2$ feet Suction, and 3 feet Delive 
Hose, Galvanized "Wire Strainer, Rose, and Small Jet. 

THE HYDROPULT 

Is invaluable for use in the Garden for 
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DRESSING WITH LIQUID MANURE, ETC. ETC. 

THE HYDROPULT 

Is desirable in every Household for 
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WETTING SIDE WALKS, 
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ORDERED BY THE WAR DEPARTMENT AS FIRE ENGINES. 

E °SS T ?5S% ££' D - & FLS ' EEV - IL DOMBRAIN, A.B., SHIRLEY HIBBER: 
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THE GREENHOUSE AND CONSERVATORY HYDROPULT. 

A NEW AND BEAUTIFUL IMPLEMENT, 

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And specially adapted for use in the Greenhouse and Conservatory. 

Complete, with Brass Cylinders and Copper Stirrup, 2* feet Suction and 3 feet Delivery Hose, Strainer, Kotf. 

»?A^SS2 necessar% 8upersede s ^ s - d ° ther de ™<* ° f the ^ for * *® * f0UDd ffi 

^ATTTxrw t A LADY CAN W0EK IT F0R HOURS WITHOUT FATIGUE. 
C respectable ^E^V^ Public --J he "tenure sale of the Hydropult has excited the cupidity of «f 
ofthe Hy droptlt a^d tfL^r 1 ™" 1 ^ Manufacturers, who are now palming on the Public worthless unit* 
of the SS iCmon^ . ^ C ^ eCt i.?i are enabled t0 P kce *»rt devices on exhibition, and for sale, m * 
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pult, Yose's pTteufninuTacW^ T f" fi k attadled tWo a labeL with «» following words :-"The _B? 
^rietor,&aJS«^eaSd?T^!!} y £ ^ E ? riTHS & Beowitt, Birmingham. ChaSxis Pokkbot Bct 
' ntT'i' London ' l °i«8 this label is attached, the machine is not the Hydropult- 

HYTVRfVPTTTnn ctt£™ SES ' WITH test 'monials, on application. tvm 

HYDKOPULT SHOW-BOOM, 142 & 143, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON. 

CHAELES POMEEOY BUTTON, Pkopeietob. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



ORCHIS MAOULATA SUPERBA. 

QSBOEN AND SONS are now taking orders for this beautiful hardy TERRESTRIAL 

V- 7 ORCHID, for which a First-clasa Certificate was awarded on the 19th of June by the Floral Committee of the 
Koyal Horticultural Society. It is of vigorous habit, If to 2 feet high, has leaves transversely marked with very dark 
stripes, and a dense spike of spotted rose-coloured flowers 6 inches long. Price 5s. each, to be delivered in autumn. 

FULHAM NURSERY, LONDON, S.W. 



BENJAMIN EDGINGTON, 

MARQUEE, TENT, RICK CLOTH, AND FLAG MANUFACTURER, 

By Special Appointment to Heh Majesty and H.R.H. the Prince of Waxes. 
Also to the Royal Horticultural and Botanic Societies. 




Hick Cloths, New and Second-hand, with Poles, etc., complete. 
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NETTING AND BUNTING FOB FRUIT TREES, ETC. 




AN ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE FREE ON APPLICATION. 

Be particular to observe the Christian Name, and address — 

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No other Establishment. 



EDGINGTON'S GARDEN NETTING, the cheapest and most 
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EDGINGTON'S MARQUEES and GARDEN TENTS are the 

prettiest. 
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HAYTHORN and BRITTAIN'S NETTINGS. Sample of material free on application. 
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A liberal Discount to the Trade ! ! ! 
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DESTROTYOUR UN SECT 



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Without injury to the most delicate Plant or Tree, by using 

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Pronounced by all who have used it to be far superior to any other remedy. 
ONE TRIAL WILL PROVE ITS EFFICACY. 

Testimonials forwarded on application. 
Price 1*. 6d., 3s., 5s. Qd., and 10*. per Tin. 

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AND OP 

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# 



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LONDON: ALEXANDER STRAHAN. 



55QC, 




VTRtch,del.etliLb. 



Vincent Brooks 



Tab. 5590. 
kleixia fulgen8. 

Brill iant-floivered Kleinia. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Syugenesia JEqualis. 

Gen. Char. Cajntuhim multiflorum, eradiatum, fere semper homoga- 
mum, floribus omnibus tubulosia 5-dentatis. Receptaculum planum. In- 
volucrum 1-seriale, polvphvllum, bracteolis parvis sa3pe calyculatum. Styli 
rami cono brevi basi ciliato terminati. Ackeenia erostria. Pappus setosus, 
subscaber, pluriserialis. — Herbae et i'rutices Africans, carnosa, sape glauca, 
remit teretibus v. angulatis cicatricatis. Folia alterna, integerrima v. sinuato- 
dentata. Flores albiflavi aurantiaci v. subminiafi. 



Kleinia fulgens ; suffruticosa, glaberrima, glauca, ramis teretibus, foliis 
breviter' petiolatis obovato-oblongis acutiusculis distanter obtuse ser- 
ratis utrinque glaucis carnosis, nervis tenuibus, pedunculis sub-1-floris 
bracteatis, bracteis remotiusculis lineari-oblongis, capitulis ecalycula- 
tis homogamis, involucri squamis liuearibus acutis, floribus lsete mi- 
niato-aurautiacis. 



The genus Kleinia consists of some twenty species, all na- 
tives of South Africa, and many of them forming handsome 
plants, well worthy of cultivation in the succulent house. 
Amongst these is the subject of the accompanying Plate, 
which was sent from Port Natal, by Mr. Plant, to our inde- 
fatigable horticulturist W. W. Saunders, F.R.S., and in whose 
succulent-house it flowered in May of the present year. The 
species does not exist in our herbaria, nor is it described in 
Harvey and Sonder's ' Flora Capensis.' There is, however, a 
very similar plant in cultivation, brought from Angola by 
Dr." Wclwitsch, which however, not having flowered, cannot 
be identified with it. 

Descr. A small, succulent, sirffruticose plant, about two to 
three feet high in our houses, everywhere covered with a 
pale-green glaucous bloom. Stems branched, terete, brittle. 
Leaves succulent, four to six inches long, with short, broad, de- 
current petioles, obovate-oblong, subacute, remotely bluntly 
serrate, uniformly smooth, glaucous and green on both sur- 
faces, veins very indistinct. Flowering peduncles four to eight 

AUGtOT 1st, 1S6G. 



nches long, erect, terete, one-flowered, looselj clothed with 

erect, linear, acute succulent bracts, half an inch to one inch 
long. Heads erect or inclined, an inch and a half long. In- 
volucre terete, without any small scales at the base ; leaflets 
eisjht to ten, linear, acute*. Florets bright vermilion-orange. 
Corolla-tuhe slender; lobes linear-oblong. Pappus scabrid, 
unequal. — J. 1>- H- 



Fig. 1. Vertical section of involucre and receptacle. 2. Floret. 3. Pap- 
pus. 4. Stamen. 5. Style and stigmas : — all magnified. 







W. Fitch, del.etlith 



Tab. 5591. 

FREMONTIA Calipornica. 

Calif or n hi n Fremon tia. 



Xat. Ord. MaltacM. — Pe>~tandria Mokogykia. 

Gen. Char. Flores 3-bracteati. Calyx patenti-campanulatus, coloratus, 
profunda 5-fidus, laciniis petaloideis leviter imbricatis. Petala 0. Sta- 
mina 5, filamentis basi in tubum conflueutibus superne patentibus; an- 
thercs reniformes, retrorsum dehiscentes (v. cohtmna staminea 5-fida, ramis 
liuearibus superne dilatatis et extrorsurn antheras 2 1-loculares antheratn 
2-locularem simulantes ferantibus). Ovarium 5-loculare, loculis oo-ovu- 
latis; stylus filiform is, stigmate aeuto. Capsula loculicide 4-5-valvis. 
Semtna ovata, testa Crustacea uitida, alburaine carnoso ; cotjledones ovatae, 
vsubplanae. — Frutex Calilbrnicus, sfellato-pubescens. Folia cordata, lobata. 
Flores majusculi.flavi, pedunculis oppositifoliis. 



Fremohtia Californiea. Torrey in Smiths. Contrib. v. 6. p. 5. t. 2. IValp. 
Ann. v. 4. p. 19. HooJc.f. et Benth. Gen. Plant, v. I. p. 212. 



A very singular and beautiful hardy Californian shrub, im- 
ported by Messrs. Veitch, and which flowered at their nur- 
series in June of the present year. It is undoubtedly the 
choicest early-flowering shrub introduced of late years, and 
more than rivals the Forsythias in many respects. It was 
discovered during Colonel Fremont's adventurous United 
States Expedition to the Rocky Mountains in 1846, and 
bears the name of that gallant officer and highly-distinguished 
explorer. 

The botanical characters of Fremontia are very anomalous. 
It was referred to a new section of Bombacece (Frernontiece) 
by its founder, and correctly placed along with the famous 
Hand-plant, Cheirostemon (Tab. nostr. 5135), and the stamens 
were described as five, with two-celled anthers. On the 
other hand, certain considerations of affinity and structure 
induced Mr. Bentham and myself, following Dr. Torrey, to 
regard the apparently two-celled anthers of this plant and 

MJfUTST 1st, 1866. 



Cheirostemon as consisting of two confluent single-celled an- 
thers, — whence \\e referred both to the OrdeT Malvaceae 
instead of Stercuttaceat. I must confess, however, that after 
examining living specimens of Fremont ic I am inclined to 

refer the Fremont 'tea- back to Sterculieicea, placing it next 
to the tribe Sf< < rcxliece. 

Descr. A Woody shrub, attaining ten feet in its native 
country, and resembling a Fig-tree. Leaves produced at the 
extremity of the branehlets, petioled ; petiole slender, one to 
three inches broad, suborbicular, three- to seven-lobed ; lobes 
entire or crenate, sparsely stellate-pubescent above, glaucous 
below, and ferruginous when dry. Peduncles as long as the 
petioles or shorter, stout, one-fiowered. Flowers numerous, 
golden-yellow, two to two and a half inches in diameter, 
tribracteolate at the base ; bracts small, ovate-subulate. 
Calyx broadly and openly campanulate, five-lobed to below 
the middle, petaloid, stellate-pubescent externally, villous 
internally, with five pits at the base ; lobes orbicular, apicu- 
late. Staminal column short, divided into five spreading 
arms, each terminated by two reniform parallel anther-lobes 
that dehisce outwardly. Ovary conical, pubescent, five- 
celled, with numerous ovules in each cell; style filiform, 
pilose, with spreading hairs ; stigma acute. — ,/. 1). H. 



Fig. 1. Arm of staminal column. 2. Ovary. 3. Transverse section of 
ditto : — all magnified. 



5592. 




"Wfitch. : 



Vhcer*Brod»l«¥- 



Tab. 5592. 

FERNANDESIA robusta. 

Stout Fernandesia. 



Xat. Ord. Oechide^e.— Gyxajs-deia Moxandkia. 

Gen. Char. JPerianthium patens. Sepala libera. Petala conformia, sub 
sepalo supremo conniveutia. Labellum anticum v. posticum, ecalcaratum, 
liberum, trilobum, disco tuberculatum. Columna brevis, utriuque aurita! 
Anthera bilocularis. Pollinia 2, solida, obovata.— Epiphjtas caulescentes. 
loha disticha, equitantia, imbricata. Eacemi pauciflori, terminates v. late- 
rales. Fiores parvi, lutei. Lindl. Gen. et Spec. 



Feenaudesia robusta; foliis carinatis ensiformibus acutis pedunculis uni- 
floris subaequalibus, bracteis triangulis cucullatis acutis, sepalis ob- 
longis apiculatis reflexis, petalis ovatis obtusis, labelli trilobi lobis basi- 
lar! bus magnis erectis obtusis incurvis, lobo iutermedio dilatato qua- 
drifido cuneato lamellis crenulatis instructo, callo hexagono in ima 
basi, column® alis brevibus rotundatis. 

Febnandesia robusta. Bateman, mss., hand Klotzsch. 



This, which is the largest of all the Fernandesias, was ori- 
ginally found in Guatemala by Mr. Skinner. More recently 
it has been reintroduced from the same country by that well- 
known ornithologist O. Salvin, Esq., who sent some plants 
of it to Kew, where they flowered freely, and enabled Mr. 
Fitch to prepare the figure on the opposite page. 

F. robusta is nearly allied to the Brazilian plant F. lunifera, 
figured under the name of LocJchartia lunifera in Eeich en- 
bach's 'Xenia' (tab. 39. f. 3), but it comes from a totally dif- 
ferent country, is much larger in all its parts, has sharp-pointed 
instead of blunt leaves, and is moreover furnished with an 
hexagonal (instead of heart-shaped, as in F. lunifera) callus on 
the disc of its lip. It is easily grown in any house where Cat- 
leyas or Oncidiums succeed, and flowers at different seasons. 

Descr. Stems upright, closely imbricated, about a foot 
high. Leaves keeled, an inch and a half long, sharp at the 
extremities. Peduncles drooping, about the length of the 

AUGUST 1st I860. 



leaves, one-flowered, provided with two or three triangular, 
acute, inflated bracts. Flower* two-thirds of an inch long, 
of a bright yellow colour, barred and spotted on the lower 

portion of the lip with red. Sepals oblong, apiculatc, bent 
backwards. Petals ovate, obtose, stretching a little forwards. 
Lip longer and larger than the petals, three-lobed, its pos- 
terior lobes large, upright, and carved a little at top ; the 
middle lobe dilatate. it-elf divided into four unequal portions, 
of which the two lateral are shorter and smaller, while the 
middle are wider and larger, all being blunt or rounded; 
along its disc run several lamelke. which are beautifully cre- 
nnlated, and at its extreme base there is an hexagonal callo- 
sity about the size of a pin's head. Wings of column short 
and rounded. — J. B. 



Fig. 1. Front view of flower. 2. Side view of ditto. 3. Column. 
4. Pollen -masses : — magnified. 



.v93. 




V^Fitck,dfil.eti.tK. 



■VlnoentBrodo.- 1 ^- 



Tab. 5593. 
SOIPEEVrVUM Paiyjd. 

Baron Paivas House-leek. 



Nat. Ord. Crassulacej;. — Dodecaxdria Dodecagynia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 6-cc-fidus v. -partitus. Petala 6-oc, libera v. basi 
connata filamentisque adhaerentia, oblouga v. lanceolata, acuta v. acumi- 
nata. Stamina nuinero petalis duplo v. rarius aequalia, libera, filamentis 
filiforraibus ; antherat didymae T. ovate. Squamula variae. Ovarii carpella 
tot quot petala, libera v. basi v. ad medium in calycis tubum immersa, in 
stylos filiformes attenuata, stigmatibus capitellatis ; ovula in carpellis oo, 
placentis marginalibus v. intrusis affixa. Folliculi oo-spermi. — Herbae v. 
suffrutices, carnosce, acaules v. caulescentes. Folia alterna, seepe revolnta. 
Cyma? particulates. Flores albi rosei virides Jlavi v. purpurascentes. 



Sempertitum PaivtE ; " fruticosum, glaucum, ramis subelongatis debilibus 
declinatis v. decumbentibus subtortuosis nudis, sursum laxe rosulato- 
foliosis, foliis spathulatis abrupte acutis v. mucronulatis, ramorum 
sterilium distincte serrulatim cartilagineo-ciliolatis, floralium integer- 
rimis, novellis floralibusque minute velutinis, ceteris glaberrimis, pani- 
cula late breviterque thyrsoidea laxa omnino glanduloso-velutiua, 
floribus 7-8-meris, petalis (virentibus) ligulato-acuminatis, apicibus 
recurvis unilateraliter contortis filamentisque deorsum incrassatis 
glanduloso-velutinis, antheris cordato-globosis muticis, glandulis hy- 
pogynis glabris transverse quadrato-oblongis rectilineari-truncatis in- 
tegerrimis." Lowe. 

Sempbettttjm Paivaa. Lowe, mss. 



This hitherto iinde scribed species of House-leek was 
brought to the Royal Gardens by my friend the Eev. K. T. 
Lowe, M.A., F.L.S., who discovered it in the island of Go- 
mera, one of the Canary group, and whose excellent descrip- 
tion I herewith append : — 

" I met with several plants of this Sempervivum (JEonium, 
Webb) in April, 1861, on walls a mile or two above the 
church in the valley of Hermigua, on the north side of Go- 
mera, on my second few days' visit to that long-neglected 
island, so interesting in the grandeur of its scenery and rich- 
ness of botanical productions. They were not in flower ; but 
perceiving them to differ from other Canarian species, I 
august 1st, 1866. 



brought awaj Bereral plants, some of which have since 
flowered in Madeira, under the care of Sir J. M. Moniz, and 
other two are now flowering with me here in England. 

"The species belongs to the same group as S. urbicum, 
C. Schm., 8. <-lliatittii. Willd.. and 8. Haworthii, W. B., ap- 
proaching nearest the two latter and especially the last; but 
it is perfectly distinct from all in habit and from each in 
various other characters. Its name is a just tribute to the 
unwearied zeal of the Barao do Castello de Paiva in pro- 
moting, both personally and by kind offices towards others, 
the investigation of the botany, malacology, and entomology 
of the Canaries. 

" Descr. A straggling tortuously branched low shrub, with 
a short erect stem, and long weak, slender, curved or crooked, 
pendently ascending or declining branches, 1-2 feet long, 
which are naked, woody and ashy-greyish downwards, with 
brown leaf-scars, fleshy, glaucous and leafy upwards, emitting 
occasionally aerial, brown, fibrous, pendent roots. Leaves 
highly glaucous, 1—2^ inches long, |-1 inch broad, those of 
the flowering branches thick and fleshy, of the barren thinner 
and finely serrulato-ciliate, the cilia white, short, acute, irre- 
gular and obsolete or wholly evanescent on the older leaves 
and flowering branches. Panicle terminal, ascendently erect, 
6-8 inches long and broad, minutely but thickly glandular- 
pubescent and slightly viscid, leafy; branches subelongate, 
erecto-patent, leafy, ending in forked cymes. Inflorescence 
and flowers (except the squamulae and lower halves of ovaries) 
glandular-pubescent. Flowers rather large, green, scentless, 
pyramidally conoidal in bud, \ inch long, in flower f inch 
broad. Sepals bright-green, fleshy, ovate, £ inch long. Petals 
three times the length of the sepals, -fa inch broad, narrow- 
acuminate, erecto-patent, tips recurved and spirally curved or 
twisted to one side both in bud and flower, pale-green, white 
downwards. Stamens erect or subincurved and connivent, not 
above half the length of the petals ; filaments white, gra- 
dually thickened and obcompressed downwards ; anthers pale 
or whitish, refuse, not apiculate. Scales incisor-tooth-like, 
short, transversely oblong, nearly twice as broad as high, recti- 
lineally truncate, with a broad, flat edge, perfectly entire, 
smooth, and shining. Lower half of ovaries smooth, shining, 
upper glandular-pubescent ; styles erect, glandular-pubescent ; 
stigmas recurvedly patent ; the whole white, forming an urceo- 
late or inverted funnel-shaped column, f-f the length of 
the stamens." — JR. T. Lowe. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Ovaries. 3. Single carpel :— all magnified. 







W Pitch , del . et litK 



s.irap 



Tab. 5594. 
SANCHEZIA xobilis. 

Brilliant-flowered Sanchezia. 



Xat. Ord. Aca>"Thace.£. — Diaxdbia Mo>"ogynia. 

Gen. Char. Calycis foliola 5, spatbulata, insequalia. Corolla tubus longe 
exsertus, tubulosus, ore coarctato, lirabi lobis 5 parvis late ovatis revo- 
lutis. Stamina fertilia 2, exserta, filameutis retrorsum pilosis ; anther <e 
2-loculares, loculis parallelis hirsutis basi breviter ealcaratis ; stamina 2 ru- 
dimentaria subuliformia inter bases fertilium. Ovarium 2-loculare; stylus 
filiformis, exsertus, apice curvus, 2-fidus ; ovula in loculis 4, adscendentia. 
Fructus ignotus. — Herbae Peruviana? robustce, ramosa?, ramis k-gonis. Folia 
petiolata, petiolis basi connatis, integer rimis v. dentatis. Flores speciosi, in 
cymas paniculatas confertas late bracteatas terminales dispositi. 



Sanchezia nobilis ; foliis ramisque glaberrimis obovato-oblongis lanceo- 
latisve acuminatis obtuse dentatis in petiolum latum attenuatis, brac- 
teis magnis late ovatis concavis puberulis rubris, corolla 2-pollicari 
fere glabra crocea. 



A most beautiful and highly-interesting plant, discovered 
by Messrs. Veitch's indefatigable collector Mr. Pearce, in 
Ecuador, in 1863, and which flowered in the Koyal Exotic 
Nurseries, Chelsea, in June last. It cerlainly belongs to the 
little-known genus Sanchezia of Euiz and Pavon, with the 
original description of which it agrees in all respects except 
the structure of the ovary. This, according to Kuiz and Pa- 
von's description and figure, is that of a Scrophularineous plant, 
whilst our plant shows it to be truly Acanthaceous. This is 
not the only instance in which the usually accurate authors of 
the * Flora Peruviana ' have referred the fruit of one plant to 
the flower of another, a mistake which could hardly have oc- 
curred in this instance had the Natural System been invented 
when the genus was described, for the two species figured in 
the * Flora Peruviana ' are so obviously Acanthaceous in habit 
and floral characters, that it is almost inconceivable that they 
should belong to any other Natural Order. 

Sanchezia nobilis differs from both the species hitherto de- 

august 1st, I860. 



scribed in its verj much greater size, and from 8. oblonga, 
which it closely resembles in foliage, and in the almost gla- 
brous corolla; its affinity with Ancylbgyne (Tab.nostr. 5588) 
is obvious, and so dose, that there can be little doubt but that 
the name Ancj/logyne should be suppressed. 

Dbscb. A stout, erect, herbaceous plant, altogether gla- 
brous except the inflorescence, which is faintly downy. Stems 
obtusely tetragonoue. Leaves three to nine inches long, 
oblong-obovate or oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, obtusely 
toothed, narrowed into short, broad-winged petioles, that are 
connate at the base. Inflorescence erect, terminal, of nume- 
rous opposite bracteate fascicles of flowers, forming together 
a dense panicle, most brilliantly coloured, the branches deep- 
purple, the bracts bright red, and the corollas yellow. Bracts 
an inch to an inch and a half long, orbicular, ovate, obtuse, very 
concave, each pair enclosing eight or ten flowers and reach- 
ing halfway up the corolla tube. Calyx-lobes not half as 
long as the corolla, obtuse. Corolla two inches long by one- 
third in diameter, cylindrical, nearly glabrous, slightly curved, 
contracted at the mouth. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Base of corolla, cut open, and stamens. 3. Ovary. 
4. Longitudinal, and 5. Transverse section of ditto : — all but Fig. 1 mag- 
nified. 



5595. 




W. Fitch, del. etlith 



VmcentBrc 



Tab. 559-"). 
SACCOLABIUM ampullaceum. 

Bottle-lipped Saccolabium. 



Nat. Ord. Oechidej:. — Gyxaxdbia Monaxdbia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5326.) 



Saccolabium ampullaceum ; caule brevissimo, foliis crassissimis distiehis 
ligulatis canaliculatis apice truncatis dentatis, racemis oblongis erectis 
foliis multo brevioribus, sepalis petalisque ovatis patentibus subsequa- 
libus, labello angusto acuminato concavo calcare compresso pendulo 
duplo breviore. Lindl. 

Saccolabium ampullaceum. Lindl. Sert. Orch. t. 17. Paxt. Mag. v. 13. 
*. *iy. 

Brides ampullaceum. Boxb. Fl. Ind. v. 3. p. 476. 



This is a neat, compact, and beautiful plant, it is likewise 
perfectly distinct from any other species of the genus at pre- 
sent known. It was figured so long ago as 1838 by Dr. 
Lindley, in his ' Sertum,' but his plate was copied from a 
drawing in the possession of the East India Company. A 
few living specimens found their way shortly afterwards into 
collections, — one of which, that flowered at Chatsworth, was 
figured in ' Paxton's Magazine,' — but the plant continued ex- 
ceedingly rare until Messrs. H. Low and Co. received a sup- 
ply from one of their Indian collectors. The accompanying 
figure was taken from a plant that flowered at Kew in May. 

&. ampullaceum is a native of Sylhet, where it was found 
growing upon trees by some of Dr. ^Roxburgh's correspon- 
dents. Dr. Wallich met with it near Bemphedy, and it was 
also gathered in Sikkim by Drs. Hooker and Thomson. Its 
time of flowering, both in India and our gardens, is the spring. 
It grows slowly, rarely producing offsets, but is easily ma- 
naged. Nothing can be more charming than its bright rose- 
coloured racemes, which are freely produced and last long in 
beauty. 

Descr. A dwarf plant, not rising more than six inches 

AUGUST 1st, 1866. 



high, usually with a simple stem. J j avis Imivh a span long, 
distichous, very thick, ligulato. with the edges nearly parallel, 
carinate beneath, channelled above, truncated and irregularly 

toothed at the apex. Flmvers of a deep rose-colour, growing 
in erect, oblong, axillary raceme*, which arc much shorter 
than the leaves. Flower-stalk* and ovary together about an 
inch long. Sepals and petals nearly equal, ovate, spread out 
flat and beautifully veined. Lip linear, falcate, twice as short 
as the sepals, channelled, acute, rather turned upwards at the 
point, with a compressed, straight, slender spur, nearly as 
long as the flower-stalk ; at the base of the lip are two teeth 
pressed close to the base of the column, and parallel with it. 
Column short, with a small hollowed stigma in front. — J. B. 



Fig. 1. Side view of flower : — magnified. 



AEFHAL GUAM 




■wonderful application of the principle of oscillation. Entirely •'self-acting" the operator 
requiring no assistance whatever. 

^RLES POMEROY BUTTON, Patentee, Nos. 142 and 143, Cheapside, London. 



HEATING BY HOT WATER 



It is now generally admitted that Buildings of any kind can be more effectually 
warmed by Hot Water than by any other means ; but as so much depends on the 
way in which the Apparatus is fixed, it is of the greatest importance that it be done 
by experienced men. 

J. Jones & Sons are prepared to estimate for Warming, to any extent— 

GREENHOUSES. I CHURCHES. FACTORIES. 



OFFICES. 

WORKSHOPS. 

WAREHOUSES. 

DRYING BOOMS. 

CELLARS. 

PINE STOVES. HALLS AND PASSAGES. COACH-HOUSES. 

ORCHARD HOUSES. BATHS. HARNESS ROOMS. 



CONSERVATORIES. CHAPELS. 

VINERIES. SCHOOLS. 

HOTHOUSES. READING ROOMS. 

FORCING PITS. LECTURE ROOMS. 

PEACH HOUSES. BILLIARD ROOMS 



J. Jones & Sons' Apparatus is simple in construction, moderate in cost, and 
economical in working. 

It is equally available for the Amateur's Greenhouse, or the longest range 01 
Forcing Houses ; for the smallest Chapel or the largest Church ; for Private Offices, 
or those of Public Companies. 

It is admirably adapted for Dwelling Houses, as coils of pipes can be place 
in any part, for warming the various rooms. One or more Baths may be hea 
from the same boiler, and a constant supply of hot water obtained in any part 
the house. 

For Warehouses and Workshops this system of heating is unsurpassed, as 1 
not only the means of keeping goods dry, but it also adds to the comfort 01 
workpeople, and thereby effects a saving in labour. .. 

J. Jones & Sons recommend boilers of all kinds being set in brickwor , 
possible ; but portable boilers can be supplied, if required. 



MATERIALS— All Materials supplied will be of the best quality. 

DELIVEEY — Boilers of various kinds, and pipes and connections, being aiw»P 
in stock, can, at a very short notice, be sent to any part. 

FIXING.— The Fixing will be done by experienced men, fully capable of finis ^ 
properly any work they may undertake ; and J. Jones & Sons are preparer 
guarantee the effectual working of any apparatus fixed by their own men. 

ESTIMATES.— Plans and Estimates will be sent on application. 



J. JONES & SONS, 

IMX MEKCHANT3 AND HOETICULTUKAL ENGINE 11 * 5 
6, BANKSIDE, SOUTHWARK, LONDON, S.E. 



Cl)tr& gtviet. * 

No. 261. 

VOL. XXII. SEPTEMBER. [Price 3s. 6d. col*- 2s. 6d. plain. 

OR NO. 956 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPRISING 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OE KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 

WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 



BY 



JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S., 

Strrctar at tfjc Boga! Botanic <5aracn£ at Seta. 




Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers exotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1866. 



HYACINTHS AND OTHER FLOWER ROOTS. 

JOHN FRASER begs to intimate that Ins CATALOGUE of HYACINTHS, NAR- 
CISSI, TULIPS, etc.. is now published, and may be had on application. A DESCRIPTIVE 
LIST of the best kinds of 8TBA WHERRIES il kbo ready for distribution. 

THE NURSERIES. LEA BUIDGE ROAD, LONDON, N.E. 



HYACINTHS, TULIPS, AND OTHER DUTCH BULBS, 

IMPORTED BY 

Wit. CTTTBUSH and SOX. 

The DESCRIPTIVE PRICED CATALOGUE, with numerous cultural remarks, Post-free 
on application. 

Early Orders earnestly solicited, as the supply cannot possibly meet the increasing demand. 

HIGHGATE NURSERIES, LONDON, N. 

DUTCH FLOWER ROOTS, 




JAMES VEITCH & SONS, 
ROYAL EXOTIC NURSERY, CHELSEA, S.W., 

BEG TO A>'JJOr> _ CE THAT THEY HATE BECEIYED THEIR 

ANNUAL SUPPLY OF BULBOUS ROOTS FROM HOLLAND, 

and are pleased to say that they are in excellent condition. 
Catalogues are now ready, and will be forwarded post-free on application. 
J. V. and So>"S desire to impress upon those who patronize them the great advantage 01 ( 
giving them their orders early, as the successful Cultivation of Bulbs depends in a great measure 
upon their being planted early in the season. 



DESTROY YOUR INSECT PESTS 



Tou may easily destroy all Plant Pests, 

Red Spider, Green and Black Ply, Scale, 

Mealy Bug, American Blight, Mildew, 

Thnp, Ants, 

Without injury to the most delicate Plant or Tree, by using 

FOWLEE'S GAEDENEES' INSECTICIDE, 

Pronounced by all who have used it to be far superior to any other remedy. 
ONE TRIAL WILL PROVE ITS EFFICACY. 

Testimonials forwarded on application. 

Price Is. 6d., 3s., 5s. 6d., and 10». per Tin. 
GEORGE & THOMAS FLOWER, NOETH STREET, BRIGHTON, 

A1TD OF 

HOOPER & CO., COVENT GARDEN MARKET, LONDON. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



NEW OR RARE P LANTS. 

JAS. BACKHOUSE & SON 

Have now ready for Distribution the following interesting Plants:— 

SPARAXIS PULCHERRIMA. "This most lovely Cape bulb" was figured and de- 
scribed in Curtis's ' Botanical Magazine ' for January of the present year. The flowers are very 
large (If inch long), bell-shaped, of a deep magenta purple ! Dr. Hooker says, " A more lovely and 
graceful plant, from its extremely tall and slender stems, and tiers of drooping flowers, cannot well be 
imagined." Its value is much increased by its being easy of cultivation in a cool greenhouse, where it 
flowers in the winter months. Price 10s. 6c?. 

HABRANTHUS FULGENS. Figured in the above work, under this name, in March 
last, and formerly known as Phycella sp. nova. It was received from our collector in Chili, and is 
one of the most brilliant-coloured bulbous plants that we know. Dr. Hooker speaks of it as " a truly 
magnificent plant, sent by Messrs. Backhouse, of York, with whom it flowered in April of last year. The 
flowers are 4 to 5 inches across, bright scarlet, with a yellow tube, borne in clusters of five to seven on a 
stem." Price 10*. 6d. 

MONOCH^TUM DICRANANTIIERUM. Figured in Curtis's < Botanical Magazine/ 
tab. 5506, and there spoken of as " an excessively pretty plant, deserving a place m every warm 
greenhouse." The flowers are very abundant, and of a bright rose colour, and the habit being neat and 
compact, it is an invaluable acquisition for the later months of the year. Price 5s. 

DIPLADENIA AMABIL1S. We again call attention to this most beautiful stove shrub. 
During the present season it has been exhibited at the meetings of the Royal Horticultural and 
Eoyal Botanic Societies, and in both instances a First Class Certificate was received. It produces free y 
deep rosy-crimson flowers of large size and exquisite beauty, and being of good habit, it is an invaluable 
plant for home decoration or exhibition. Price 3s. 6d. and 5s. each. 

A SPLENIUM ALTERNANS. A new and possibly hardy Fern of great interesVfrom 
A the hiyh regions of Northern India and Chinese Tartary (P), inhabiting stony woods at 6000 feet 
elevation. Fronds ovate, sinuated, tufted, very opaque, about 9 inches long, bearing a general resem- 
blance to Ceterach Officinarum. 7s. Gd. 

A SPLENIUM IN^EQUALE VAR. Elegant highly -divided fronds, viviparous, and ex- 
A. tremely interesting. First Class Certificate R.H.S. 3s. Gd. to 42s. 

"DELL^EA WRIGHTIANA. This is a very distinct and striking species with glaucous 
1 pinnate fronds, often subdivided in the lower series. First Class Certificate. 3s. 6d. to 10s. Gd. 
INDIGOFERA FLORIBUNDA. Although this plant has been introduced for some 
1 years, its great merit seems to be but little known Not only is it one of the most beautiW of 
summer-flowerin- greenhouse plants, but equally beautiful as a hardy shrub. A plant has stood out m 
our NumSX^v^vSS.? Hving through the extreme frost of 1860. It is now a bush 3 feet high and 
4 feet through, and last Lmmer wa! covered with a sheet of .bright ^^^^^^^Si 
ceedingly charming As a greenhouse plant it is very effective, the neat Acacia-hke foliage ^responding 
admirfbfy with the g P rofusion of bright lively flowers ; but it is as a virtua ly new an I most effective hardy 
plant that we now call attention to it. Nice plants in pots, 3s. 6d. each ; larger, 5s. to 10s. Gd 
QCHIZOSTYLIS COCCINEA. Having prepared a large stock of this much -admired 
O plant Twc can offer them, oi dooming strenfthV^. per dozen. J£™^™$2?zZen*Zfe 
the autumn and winter months, its brilliant crimson flowers render it a chief ornament oi any greenUouse, 
and amongst cut flowers it is most attractive. 

tTEPATICA ANGULOSA. This magnificent new species is f^y t™ i^ ««rf &e 
-H. Common Blue Hepatica in all its parts. Flowers sky-blue, frequently as large as a crown piece. 
Ought to be in every garden. 3s. Gd. . 

OAXIFRAGA LONGIFOLIA VERA. It has been our good ^^^^^^conTined 
O plants of this Queen of Saxifrages, as it may be truly termed, ^«»™?£ from JosetTes 6 or 
Its fleers form massive white plumes, 1* to 2 ^^'f^^^^^^^^^^t from 
8 inches across, of very narrow, glaucous (almost sdvery) leaves, closely J™™"?"- | u to bs 
the plant ordinarily grown under this name, as received from Continental Nurseries, <Ss. w. to o 

PRIMULA PURPUREA. This fine Himalayan specie. ^esembks <?- tll^Llr 
X appearance, but has very different leaves, a more robust habit, and larger and finer heads 
2s. Gd. each ; 24s. per dozen. . . 

JAS. BACKHOUSE & SON regret to say that they will %^^^^S! > ^T 1 ^^ 
out Plants of Lobelia coronopifolia this season. Orders received will be e ^™ ted J* ' 30 ° P 

A Catalogue of Bulbs, including Lists of Strawberries and useful Winter Decorative Plants, is just 
Published, and will be forwarded upon application. 

York Nurseries. 



BOTANICAL ICAGAZTNE ADVERTISER. 



WORKS ON BOTANY. 



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5596. 




etlith 



Vincent Brooks , Imp 



Tab. 5596. 

RHODODENDRON Fortunei. 

Mr. Fortunes Rhododendron. 



Nat. Ord. Ebicej:. — Pentandbia Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4336.) 



Rhododendron Fortunei; glaberrima, nisi ramulis foliis junioribus pe- 
dunculis calycibusque glanduloso-pubescentibus, ramulis robustis, 
foliis sublonge crasse petiolatis oblongis lineari-oblongisve acutis 
supra viridibus subtus pallidioribus, capitulis laxifloris, floribus amplis 
pallide roseis, calycis limbo parvo disciformi, corolla breviter campa- 
nulata, limbo amplo patente sub-7-lobo, lobis subundulatis, staininibus 
ad 14, ovario glanduloso 10-loculari. 

Rhododendron Fortunei. Lindley in Oard. Chron. 1859, pi. 868. 



The centre of the Rhododendron area is certainly Eastern 
Asia, from both the tropical and temperate regions of which 
continent new species are constantly turning up; hitherto, 
however, we have very few from China or Japan. The pre- 
sent very beautiful one was discovered by Mr. Fortune in 
the Chinese province of Chekiang, on mountains 3000 feet 
high. Its discoverer sent seeds to Mr. Glendining at Chis- 
wick, who raised plants that proved perfectly hardy in the 
open air, and from which Dr. Lindley originally described 
the species. For the specimen here figured I am indebted 
to Mr. Luscombe, of King's Bridge, who flowered it in May 
of the present year. In the foliage and form of the flower 
and structure of the calyx and ovary, as also in its fragrant 
odour, it is closely allied to R. Griffithianum and its variety 
Aucklandii, but excels both these in the lovely rose-colour 
of the corolla. 

Descr. A stout shrub, glabrous everywhere except on the 
young leaves and leaf-scales, peduncles, calyx, and ovary. 
Branches very stout, terete, pale-green, leaves five to seven 
inches long, oblong or linear-oblong, acute, bright-green but 

SEPTEMBER IsT, 1866. 



opaque on the upper surfaa . \. acute, rounded 

01 cordate at the b half to one inch long v red- 

brown. Head of eight to ten Loosely-clustered, rather pen- 
dulous ra Peduncle* half to one inch long. Calyx 
small, discoid. Corolla shortly campanulate, three to three 
and a half inches in diameter, seven-cleft, the lobes rounded, 
fragrant, of a fine pale-rose colour. A/< urteen ; Jila- 
< slender; anihen small. Ovary glandular-pubescent, 
ten-celled.— J. I). II. 



Fig. 1. Stamen. 2. Calyx and pistil. 3. Transverse section of ovary: 
-all magnified. 



5697. 




WTitcti,deL.etlith 



Vincent Brooks, 



Tab. 5597. 
ilex latifolia. 

Broad-leaved Japanese Holly. 



Nat. Ord. Ilicixe^:. — Tetrandria Monogynia. 

Gen. Char. Flores ssepius hermapbroditi. Calyx parvus, persistens, 
4-5-fidus. Corolla rotata, 4- rarius 5-6-partita, laciniis obtusis. Stamina 
lobi3 corolla? isomera, tubo brevi ejus leviter adhaerentia; anihera oblongse. 
Ovarium sessile, 4-6- rarius 7-8-loculare ; stylus brevis v. 0, stigmatibus 
tot quot ovarii loculis ; ovula in loculis 1 v. 2, collateralia. Drupa glo- 
bosa, 4-8-pyrena, v. putamiue 4-8-loculari. — Arbores v. frutices. Folia 
alterna, s&pe nitida, integerrima v. rarius dentata v. spinosa. Pedunculi 
axillares. Flores albi. 



Ilex latifolia; fruticosa, glaberrima, ramulis robustis augulatis, foliis crasse 
petiolatis coriaceis oblongo-lanceolatis oblongisve obtusis acutis v. 
acuminatis planis serratis basi cuneatis rotundatis v. augulatis, superne 
laete viridibus nitidis, floribus in capitula axillaria dense eougestis 
pallide viridibus, calycis lobis rotundatis, corollas lobis late oblongis 
obtusis, filamentis filitbrmi-subulatis, baccis globosis 4-pyrenis. 

Ilex latifolia. Thunb. Fl. Jap. p. 79. Be Cand. Prodr. v. 2. p. 16. 



This noble Holly, though often supposed to be one of the 
later importations from Japan, has long been cultivated in 
the Royal Gardens, where it has stood without protection, 
trained against a wall, for many years, and quite uninjured. 
In the open air I have not observed it flowering, but it 
flowers abundantly in the Temperate House during June 
and July. In other places near London and elsewhere, it is 
cultivated as a standard ; and though I have never seen it 
luxuriant under such circumstances in the east of England, 
it no doubt succeeds perfectly in the west. It is a beautiful 
shrub, of a paler green than the common Holly, with similar 
berries, and the flowers are produced in round heads of a 
pale yellow-green colour. As a species it is extremely closely 
allied to an arborescent Himalayan species that I have found 
in the Sikkim province, which has however large berries 
containing a bony three to four-celled nut, which does not, as 
in this, break up into four nucules. I have native specimens 

SEPTEMBER 1ST, 1866. 



of /. hiti folia, collected near \ aki by the late Mr. Old- 
ham, collector for the Renal Garden*, from whose seeds the 
plant here figured was raised. 

Descb. A tall evergreen glossy bush. Brain-In* very stoat, 
angular, grooved when dry. heaves three to seven inches 
long, oblong linear-oblong or oblong-lanceolate, acute, obtuse 
or acuminate, serrate, bright glossy-green above, paler and 
opaque below ; nerve* numerous, obscure when fresh. Flowers 
probably dioecious, in axillary, dense, subglobose, green clus- 
ters an inch to an inch and a half in diameter. Calyx with 
four short rounded lobes. Corolla cleft nearly to the base 
into four broadly oblong, obtuse, concave, pale-green lobes. 
Stamens usually larger than the corolla ; Jilaments filiform- 
subulate. Berries half to two-thirds of an inch in diameter, 
bright-red, globose or a little depressed, with a large persis- 
tent four-lobed stigma, containing four bony nuts. — J. B. II. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. The same, open 3. Calyx : — all magnified. 



5598. 




W. Fitch, del. etlith 



Vincent Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 5598. 
HUNTLEYA gbmfa. 

Waxy Hunthya. 



Nat. Ord. Obchidej:.— Gynandbia Monandria. 



IIuxtleta cerina ; pseudobulbis nullis, foliis cuneato-oblongis acutis pe- 
dalibus, pedunculis validis unifloria 2- vel 3-plo longioribus, sepalis 
petalisque subaequalibus subrotundis concavis carnosis, labello ovato 
convexo retuso crista crassa semicirculari truncata plicata, columna 
apice nuda. 

Hunt leva cerina. Lindl. in Paxt. Floio. Gar. v. 3. p. 535, cum xylo. 

Pescatoutv cerina. Rchb.Jtl. Xenia, t. 65. 



The first notice of this beautiful plant appeared in the 
third volume of Paxton's ' Flower-Garden ' (1852-3), where 
a description bv Dr. Lindley and a woodcut of the flower 
arc given. Dr. lindley had no hesitation in referring it to 
the same genus as a plant he had previously described in 
his « Sertum ' under the name of JIunthnja violacea, although 
its column was clavate, while in the latter species that mem- 
ber is remarkably short and thick. But since in other parts 
of its structure, as well as in habit, it agrees perfectly with 
the original type of the genus,* I have no hesitation m re- 
taining Dr. Lindley's name, although another high authority, 
Professor Reichenbach, has figured it in his 'Xema' under 
the name of Pescatoria cerina. 

The plant was originally discovered by Warszewicz in 
Veragua, on the volcano of Chiriqui, at an elevation of 

* It is to be noted that Dr. Lindley never drew up any character of 
this genus. Professor Keichenbach founded his genus Bollea upon the 
plant which Lindley had already described as Huntleya molacea the 
latter name ought therefore, if possible, to be retained. Dr. -Lindley a 
second species— H. meleagri*-vrUch has the habit of a Vanda whatever it 
may be, is certainly no Huntleya, neither is it a Batemanma to which 
genus Keichenbach" has referred it. It may possibly be a Jt mlesia ot 
which it has all the habit ; but the whole subject is one ol extreme dilh- 
eulty, and awaits further examination so soon as more extensive materials 
shall have been accumulated. 

BEPTEMBKB 1ST, 1866. 



8000 feet. Mr. Uucker was the first to flower it, and in- 
deed was almost its sole possessor, until some recent impor- 
tations made the plant more plentiful. Mr. Fitch's figure 
obtained from a plant exhibited, in beautiful condition, 
by Messrs. Veitch at one of the Tuesday meetings of the 
Royal Horticultural Society at South Kensington in June 
last. It has also flowered at Knypersley, where, although 
the flowers themselves were larger, the flower-stems were 
much shorter than those of Messrs. V eitch's specimen; those 
in Reiehenbach's figure are twice the length of either. I 
have also observed considerable variations in the form of the 
lip and of the sepals and petals, especially as regards the re- 
lative size of the two last. 

H. cerina grows slowly, but is easily managed in any house 
that suits the Trichopilias, many species of w r hich are found 
in the same district with itself. Its flowers are of very long 
duration. 

Descr. A bulbless epiphyte, producing tufts of four or 
five cuneate-oblong sharp-pointed leaves, which are about a 
foot long. Peduncles one-flowered, from two to six inches 
long, coming up at the base of the leaves, very strong. 
Sepals and petals generally nearly equal, the latter more or 
less unguiculate, an inch and a half long, nearly round, 
concave, fleshy, of a pale straw-colour. Lip yellow, ungui- 
culate, puckered, ovate, convex, retused, bearing at the foot 
of its disk a very thick semicircular ruff, composed of nu- 
merous plaits and folds. Coin, mi sometimes with a violet 
or brown blotch near its base, clavate, but with no expansion 
or hood over the anther. — J. B. 



Fig. 1. Lip, spread out flat. 2. Pollen-masses : — magnified. 



,:,<>!>. 




W. fitch, del. et Mi. 



VincentBrodks.Imp- 



Tab. 5599. 

NIEREMBEKGIA Yeitciih. 

Mr. VeitcKs Nierembergia. 



Nat. Ord. Solaxe.e. — Pentandbia Digtnia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx tubulosus v. subcauipanulatus, persistens, arcuatus, 
5-fidus, laciniis subaxpialibus. Corolla tubus gracilis, elongatus ; limbits 
infundibuliformis v. campanulatus, saepe plicatus, 5-lobus. Stamina 5, 
fauce corolla inserta, inaequilonga, filamentis conniventibus v. conuatis ; 
antJierce sub stigmate dehisceutes. Ovarium 2-loculare ; stylus simplex, 
stigmate 2-lamellato ; ovula pluriiua. Capsula calyce persistente tecta, 
2-locularis, septicide 2-valvis. Semina plurima, minima. — Herbas v. suffru- 
tices Austro- Americana;. Folia opposita, altema v. subverticillata, inteyer- 
rima. Flores e.rtra-alares v. oppositifolia, solitaria; corolla alba v. sub- 
viol ace a. 



Xteuembebgia VfitcJiii '■; glaberrima v. tenuiter pubescens, caulibus gra- 
cilibus prostratis ramosis, foliis plerisque oppositis liueari- v. obovato- 1 
oblonglfl v. spatliulatis, breviter petiolatis subacutis, floribus breviter 
pedicellate, calycis campanulati lobis magnis patenti-recurvis lineari- 
oblongis acutis, corolla? tubo filifbrmi, limbo lato campanulato, lobis 
latis subacutis. 

NrEREMRET?aTA Veitcbii. Berkeley, hiss. 



A lovely little plant, imported by Messrs. Veitch from Tu- 
cuman, in South America. Though we find nothing exactly 
like it either described or in the Herbarium, the species of 
this genus are so variable, that I suspect it will prove to be 
a form of the Chilian N. repens, R et P., or Peruvian N. spa- 
thulata, H.B.K., if indeed these be not all varieties of one 
widely-diffused and multiform plant, which differs in the 
amount of pubescence, the form and length of the leaves and 
their petioles, their opposite or alternate insertion, the length 
of the peduncles calyx-lobes and corolla-tube, and in the 
size of the flower. In the present species the lower leaves 
are alternate, and all the rest opposite, the petioles and pe- 
dicels short, and the calyx-lobes rather broad. 

Descr. An elegant, prostrate, branched, slender, glabrous, 
or very sparingly pubescent herb. Stems eight inches to a 
foot long, branches almost filiform, terete. Leaves half to 

SEPTEMBEB 1ST, 1866. 



one inch long, lowest alternate, the real opposite, varying 
from linear above to broadly spathnlate below, petiole short, 
acute or obtuse. Pedicels Longer than the petioles, a quarter 
of an inch long. 0tdffx4ube Bcarcelj oblique, short, between 

funnel-shaped and campanulate ; lobes linear-oblong, acute, 
green, spreading and recurved. CorollO'tube half to three- 
quarters of an inch long, slender, white ; Umb broadly cam- 
panulate, pale-lilac, with four spreading shallow broad lobes; 
each lobe with three veins. Filaments united into a tube, 
free at the base and apex. Stigmas broadly oblong. — J.D.IL 



Fig. 1. Stamen and stigma. 2. Ovary and disk: — loth magnified. 



5600. 




W ,Btdh , dd at Mi 






Tab. 5600. 

K^MPFERIA ]{osc(faxa 

Mr. Boscoe's Kcempferia. 



Xat. Ord. Scitamixe-e. — Monandria Moxogynta. 

Gen. Char. Calyx tubulosus, hinc fissus. Corollas tubus elongatus, fili- 
formis ; limbi lacinia? exteriores angustae, aequales, laterales patentes, pos- 
tica fomicata, interiores multo majores; labellum planum. Filamentum 
breve carinatum ; anthera mutiea, connectivo producto. Ovarium 3-locu- 
lare ; ovula plurima. Stylus filiformis, a filamento receptus ; stigraate ur- 
ceolato ciliato. Capsula 3-locularis, loculicide 3-valvis. Semina oo, aril- 
lata. — Herba? Indiece, habitu Cucumae, bracteis stepius 2-fariam imbricatis, 
rarius saccatis. Endl. 



K-Smpfekia Boscceana ; acaulis, tuberibus fasciculatis subsessilibus ob- 
longis, foliis horizontaliter patentibus suborbiculatis obtusis v. sub- 
acutis, marginibus minute undulatia opacis subcarnosis, superne luride 
viridibus colore saturatiore zonatis v. variegatis, floribus paucis sessi- 
libua radicalibus fasciculatis erectis albis, petalis obovatis obtusis, 
antico profunde 2-lobo. 

K^mpfekia Eoscoeana. Wall, in Lindl. Bot. Beg. t. 1212. 



Now that the beautiful foliage of many new and little 
known ScitamincfV is bringing them into notice as objects of 
horticultural interest, it is important to give figures of the 
well-established species, of which the present is one of the 
oldest and most beautiful. Though belonging to the same 
genus as the aromatic Galanga and the Zedoary, both highly 
prized in Hindoo medicine, perfumery, and cookery, the pre- 
sent species has no sensible qualities in its root or leaves, 
and its only claim to notice resides in its beautifully-mottled 
foliage. It is a native of Burma, was discovered by the late 
Dr. Wallich in 1826, and sent to the Horticultural Gardens, 
where it first flowered in 1829. The Royal Gardens are in- 
debted to Messrs. Veitch for the beautiful specimen here 
figured, which has continued flowering in a tropical stove for 
several weeks. 

SEPTEMBER 1ST, 18GG. 



De8C& Boots of nomeroos elongate, epindle-ehaped, fleshy, 
insipid, inodorous tubers. Stem none. Leaves two, appear- 
log together, spreading horizontally on the ground, tour to 

inches long, rather narrower, orbicular or orbicular-ob- 
long, subacute, rattier leathery and undulate, the margins 
with a slender, pale cartilaginous, minutely-crisped border; 
upper surface dull, dark, opaque green, variegated, mottled, 
01 zoned with paler green; under surface dirty-greenish, in- 
clining to reddish. Flowers fascicled, sessile, one opening 
at a time, pure white, four about one inch in diameter, in- 
odorous. Bracts lanceolate, hyaline. Calyx short, subcylin- 
dric, oblique, slender, glabrous. Tube of corolla cylindric, 
one and a half inch long ; outer segments linear, acute ; inner 
spreading horizontally, obovate, obtuse, anterior deeply 2- 
lobed; lobes obtuse. Anther linear-oblong; connective un- 
guiculate. Stigma cuneate, 2-lobed. — J. I). II 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. The same, with anterior petal removed. 3. Anther 
and stigma : — all magnified. 



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1601. 




"W. PiteK del 



Vincent Brooks, Imp- 



Tab. 5601. 
CCELOGYNE corrugata. 

Ccelogyne with wrinkled pseudobidbs. 



Nat. Ord. Obciildej:. — Gynasdria Mohahdbia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 5462.) 



Ccelogyne corrugata ; pseudobulbis ovatis rugosissimis csespilo.-us diphvl- 
lis, foliis oblongis membranaceis racemo erecto 3-6-floro longioribus, 
bracteis cymbitbrmibus oblongis, petalis sepalisque suboequalibus ob- 
longis acutis, labelli medio tricristati lobis lateralibus aeutiusculis 
intermedia ovato acumiuato obtuso. Lindl. 

Ccelogyne corrugata. Wight, Icon. t. 1639. Lindl. Fol. Orch. 



Although a very accurate representation of this pretty 
Ccelogyne appeared fifteen years ago in Dr. Wight's ' Icones,' 
it never, so far as I am aware, took its place among our living 
collections before the year 1863, when some specimens were 
received from India by the Royal Gardens at Kew. It is 
found, according to Dr. Wight, near Courtallum, Tulney 
Mountains (Neilgherries), where it flowers in August and 
September. It also grows wild in Khasya, according to Lobb. 
The figure is taken from a specimen that flowered at Kny- 
persley in the summer of the present year. Like many other 
Ccelogynes, it will not thrive in the East Indian house, but is 
quite at home in the coolest part of the Cattleya house. It 
should be grown in a pot. 

The wrinkled pseudo bulbs, which unfortunately are not so 
well rendered on the opposite page as in Dr. Wight's plate, 
are almost peculiar to the species. 

Descr. Pseudobidbs in tufts, ovate, very much (reticulately) 
wrinkled, two-leaved. Leaves about a span long, oblong, sub- 
acuminate, rather longer than the racemes. Racemes three- 
to six-flowered. Bracts boat-shaped, oblong. Sepals and 
petals nearly equal, oblong, acute, pure white. Lip three- 
lobed, lateral lobes smaller and blunter than the central 

OCTOBER 1st, 1866. 



which Ls ovate-acuminate ; on the disk are three raised pa- 
rallel longitudinal lines; the limit of the lij> is yellow in the 
inside, marked with orange streaks.- ./. B, 



Fi_'. 1. Column. 2. Lip, seen sideways. 3. Ditto, front view: — mag- 
nified. 



5602 




"OitcKdeletMi. 



Yincent Brooks, ImP' 



Tab. 5602. 

COTYLEDON fascicular. 

Glaucous-blue Cotyledon. 



Nat. Ord. Cbassulacej:. — Decandbia Pextagyitia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-partitus, corollas tubo Eequalis v. brevior. Petala 
o, saepius ad medium connata, erecta v. patentia. Stamina 10, rarissime 5, 
petalis saepius breviora. Squamulge variae. Ovarii curpella 5, in stylos 
filitormes attenuata, stigmatibus parvis ; ovula oo. Folliculi 5, cc-spermi. — 
Herba? v. f'rutices, raro annua, rami's foliisque seepius crassis, sed liabitu 
valde carice. Folia opposita v. alterna, petiolata v. sessilia. 



Cotyledon fascicularis ; glaberrima, pallide albo-virens, glauca, foliis spar- 
sis sessnlibus cuneato-obovatis cuspidatis planiusculis crassis, pani- 
culae ramis elougatis scorpioideis, floribus magnis pedicellatis pendu- 
lis, calycis iobis brevibus late ovatis acutis, corollas tubo calyce multo 
longiore subcylindraceo, lobis reflexis lineari-oblougis acutis. 



So far as these plants can be determined by descriptions, 
this appears without doubt to be the Cotyledon fascicularis 
of Aiton, and it further agrees with an unnamed drawing 
made many years ago at Kew of a Cotyledon that existed in 
the Garden at the date of the publication of ' Hortus Kew- 
ensis.' It is a beautiful plant, a native of South Africa, from 
whence the specimen here figured was sent by Mr. Cooper, 
to our friend W. W. Saunders, Esq., F.R.S., of Reigate, in 
whose fine collection of succulent plants it flowered in May 
1865. The habitats assigned in Harvey and Sonder's 'Flora 
Capensis' are chiefly in the Karroo districts. 

Descr. A glaucous very pale green erect shrub, one to two 
feet high, quite glabrous. Leaves scattered, two to three 
inches long, sessile, broadly obovate-cuneate, cuspidate, fully 
one-third of an inch in thickness, slightly concave, very pale 
glaucous-green, with a yellowish margin. Flower-stalk ten 
to twenty inches high, stout, terete, erect, paniculately 
branched ; branches erecto-patent,with scorpioid inflorescence. 
Bracts on the stem few, small, half an inch long, oblong, 

OCTOBER 1st, 1866. 



acute. Flowers pedicellate, pendulous, one inch Long. Calyx- 

broadlj ovate, acute. Corolla puberulous, five to six 

times longer than the sepals, cylindrico campanulate, with five 

reflexed unear*oblong Lobes; tub\ yellow-green and dull red; 

dull red with green margins. Stamens ten. included; 
filaments pubescent at tin- rerj base. Sqvamula connate 
with the base of the ovary, short, concave. — /. 1). 11. 



Fig. 1. Base of corolla and stamens. 2. Carpels and squamulae. 
Transverse section of carpels : — all magnified. 



5603. 




¥.?itcK,del.el]ith. 



Vincent Brooks, tap 



Tab. 5G03. 

GLYPTOSTKOBUS ebndulus. 
Pendulous deciduous Cypress. 



Nat. Ord. Co^ifehje. — Mo:n(ecia Polyandbia. 

Gen. Char. Mores in iisdem ramis monoici. Masc. Amenta parva, ra- 
mulis elongatis spieata v. paniculata, oblonga, sessilia. Aniherce 6-8, glo- 
bosas, ad basin squama? late ovatae, sessiles. Fcem. Amenta parva, ad basin 
spicae masculae pauca ; squama 8-10, ovatae. patentes. Ovula 2, ad basin 
squamarum, erecta, lagaeniformia. Strobili ovoideo-subglobosi, lignosi ; 
squama e basi strobili orta?, lineari-obcuneatae, imbricatae, caduca?, dorso 
mucrone conico instructae. Semina 2, ad basin squamse, compressa ; testa 
membranacea, superne alata. — Arbores Chinenses, ramulis erectis v. pen- 
duhs. Folia alterna, sparsa v. disticha, lineari-subulata, subtrigona v. plana. 
Gemmae perulatee. 



GrLYPTOSTEOBtrs pendulus ; ramis patentibus bonzontalibus et decurvis, 
ramulis ultimis adsceudentibus (demum pendulis) simplieiusculis elon- 
gatis, foliis junioribus subulatis adultis lineari-acieularibus acuminata's. 

Glyptostrobis pendulus. Endl. St/nops. Conif. p. 71. Carriere, Traite 
Gen. Conif. p. 152. 

Taxodittm Sinense. Sort. Noisette ; Gord. Pinetum, 308. 

Taxodium Sinense pendulum. Forbes, Pinet. Woburnense, p. 180. Loudon, 
Ecycl. p. 1078. 

Cupkessus disticba, /S. nutans. Ait. Hori. Kew. ed. 2. p. 323. 



One plant of the beautiful tree here figured was long cul- 
tivated at Kew, side by side with a specimen (since dead) of 
Taxodium distichum, of which it was considered a variety by 
the elder Aiton. Of its native country or introducer, how- 
ever, nothing is known, and I am indebted to Professor Oliver 
(who this year observed male and female flowers on it) for 
clearing up its botanical history, and referring it, no doubt 
correctly, to the rare and little known Glyptostrohis pendulus 
of China. Its similarity to the Taxodium distich um is very 
striking: like that plant it has pendulous spikes of male 
cones, with one or few female cones at the base of the spike, 
and sheds its ultimate branches annually, but it differs in the 

OCTOBER lsr, I860. 



foliage not being distichous, in the of the cone not 

being peltate, but arising from one point at the base of the 
cone, and in the winged >■■• d& The habit too is very re- 
markable, owing to the great slenderness of the twisted stem, 
decurved branches, and pectinately disposed branchlets. 

[>ES B. A -lender tree, forty feet high; trunk straight, co- 
vered with ragged reddish-brown bark. Branches horizontal 
and decurved, slender, ultimate four to six inches long, at 
first ascending and nearly erect, giving the branches a pecti- 
nate appearance, pendulous and deciduous in autumn. Leaves 
inserted all round the branchlets. young one-sixth to one quar- 
ter of an inch long, subulate, trigonous ; adult half to three- 
quarters of an inch long, nearly flat, narrow linear acicular, 
acuminate. Male infloresct net- in pendulous spikes or nar- 
row racemes two to four inches long, from the tips of the 
branches. Male cones one-eighth of an inch long, as broad 

the short peduncles, which are covered with closely im- 
bricating triangular scales, and ovoid-obtuse. Scales eighteen 
to twenty, like those on the peduncles, each bearing six to 
eight globose anther-cells at its base. Female cones minute, 
solitary or few at the bases of the male spikes, on very short 
scaly peduncles. Scales twelve to twenty, ovate with subulate 
lips, spreading, each with two collateral erect flagon-shaped 
ovules at its base. Ripe cone unknown. — ./. /A 11. 



Fig. 1. Leaves. 2. Male peduncle and cone. 3. and 4. Male scales 
and anther-cells, o. Female cone. 6. Scale of ditto and ovules: — nil 
magnified. 









T 



I 



& 






r 




W. Etch, del et Mi. 



Vincent Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 5601. 
HMJPTERUM Cotula. 

Cotula-flowered Everlasting. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Stsgenesia SrPEitFLTJA. 

Gen. Char. Capitulum multiflorum, nanc homogamum, floribus omnibus 
herniaphroditis tubulosis 5-dentatis ; nunc heterogamum, fl. radii uniseri- 
atis saepe paucissimis foemineis gracilibus. Involucrum imbricatum. squa- 
mis scariosis, interioribus conniventibus v. radiantibus. Receptaculum pla- 
num, epaleaceum, nunc nudum v. areolatum, nunc fimbrilliferum.' Achenia 
erostria, sessilia, areola terminali. Pappus 1-serialis, plumosus. — Ilerbse 
aut suffrutices Austro-Africanae et Australasicae. 



Helipterum Cotula; herbaceum, laxe pilosum v. subvillosum, ramie elon- 
gatis gracilibus simpliciusculis 1-cepbalis, foliis filiformibus, iuvolucri 
squamis radiantibus albis v. aureis, interioribus oblongis subacutis, 
intimis sa-pe abbreviatis, pappi setis sursum dilatatis longe plumosis, 
achsenio glaberrimo. 

Helipteeum Cotula. Be Cand. Prodr. v. G.p. 215. 

Helipterum citrinum. Steetz in Plant. Preiss. v. 1. p. 474. 

Helipterum simplex. Steetz, I.e. p. 475. 

Helipterum precox. F. Muell. in Kerb. Hook. 

Helichrysum (Helipterum) Cotula. Benth. in Huegel Enum. p. G5. 



A very beautiful West Australian Everlasting, for the seeds 
of which we are indebted to Mr. Thompson, of Ipswich, in 
whose establishment, and that of Kew, it flowered in May 
of the present year. The seeds were sent from Swan River 
by the son of the late T. Drummond, the veteran explorer of 
the vegetable riches of that country, and the introducer of 
most of the beautiful plants we possess from it. Like some 
other species of this genus, H. Cotula bears heads of two 
colours, golden-yellow and white, but I have seen no inter- 
mediates, and the individual plants have one-coloured heads ; 
the white-headed variety is the H. Cotula, the yellow H. citri- 
mtm, whilst. II. simplex seems founded upon weak unbranched 
specimens. The plants appear to be common in South-West 
Australia. 

OCTOPER 1ST, lSGb\ 



3CB. A slender annual plant, six to twenty-four inches 

high, more or less covered with weak flaccid iroolrj hairs. 
generally much branched from the base, but 
sometimes simple; branches very slender. Leaves scattered 
(opposite in very yonng weak plants), one inch long, filiform, 
Heads half to one inch across, solitary at the ends 
of the branches; yellow, or white with a yellow eye, Invo- 
htcral scales radiating, scarions, oblong or oblong-lanceolate; 
outer shorter, intermediate quarter of an inch long, sub- 
acute ; innermost again shorter, and sometimes very short 
and truncate. Pappus hairs thickened upwards, very plu- 
mose. Achenes smooth. — /. I). If. 



Fig. 1. Leaf. 2. Involucral scale. 3. Floret. 4. Pappus: — all magnified. 



\60S 







Tab. 5605. 

BOLBOPHYLLTJM bettctjlatum. 

Reticulated-lea ved Bolbophyllum. 



Xat. Ord. Obchide^i. — CtXNandria Monan-dkia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5309.) 



Bolbophyllum reticulation ; rhizomate elongato, pseudobulbis pedunculis 
squamis arnplis imbricatis truncatis, pseudobulbis ovoideis 1-phyllis, 
folio amplo ovato-cordato acuminata pallide viridi, nervis saturate viri- 
dibus nervulisque pulcherrime reticulata, pedunculis brevibus sub- 
2-floris, floribus magnis, sepalo dorsali petalisque subsimilibus ovato- 
lanceolatis acuminatis intus purpureo striatis, sepalis lateralibus majo- 
ribus concoloribus subfalcatis, labello trulliformi recurvo. 

Bolbophtlltjm reticulatum. Bateman, mss. 



A most singular and beautiful plant, certainly the finest of 
the genus, whether we consider the size of the flower, its 
handsome striped sepals and petals, or the extraordinary 
beauty of the large reticulated leaves. It was discovered by 
Thomas Lobb in Borneo, and flowered with the employers of 
that successful collector, Messrs. Veitch, at the Eoyal Exotic 
Nurseries, King's Road, in August of the present year. 
There is nothing at all resembling it in either the Lindleyan 
or Hookerian Herbaria at Kew, and may no doubt be taken 
as an earnest of the Orchideous riches remaining to be disco- 
vered in the Bornean forests. 

Descr. Rhizome elongate, prostrate, simple or sparingly 
branched, covered with closely imbricating, broadly ovate, 
acute brown scarious sheathing scales. Pseudobulbs solitary, 
scattered, ovoid, about an inch long, bearing one leaf covered 
by two or three sheathing scales, like those of the rhizome, 
but larger. Leaf large, three to five inches long, ovate-cor- 
date, acuminate, much nerved, the longitudinal and transverse 
nerves deep green, producing a beautiful reticulation on the 
paler green of the substance of the leaf; petiole short, stout. 

OCTOBER 1st, 1866. 



from the base of the pseudobulb, short, stoat, 
curved, one to two in< bes loi <1 \\ it h sheathing <>\ att*- 

acnminate bracts, two-flowered. Flower* one and a quarter 

inch diameter, pale externally, internally white, with stripes 
of clear red-purple (sometimes broken ap into spots) in the 
sepals and petals internally. Sepals arched ; dorsal ovate-lan- 
ceolate, acuminate: lateral much broader at the base, some- 
what falcate and declined. Petal? like the dorsal sepal, but 
smaller and more acuminate. Ltp trowel-shaped, recurved, 
cordate, with recurved auricles at the base, rather fleshy, 
spotted with purple; dam slender. — ./. D. 11. 



Fig. 1. Ovary, column, and lip. 2. Under side of lip. 3 and 4. Pollen 
— all magnified. 







WTitchdsLetlith 



4 




r * 


J 


* j 


Os> 


r 


\&- I 








\ ^ 




m ' 


1 




*m 


j^l 


1 1 





5ncent Brooks, Imp- 



Tab. 500(5. 
MUSSCHIA AYollastox] 
Mr. WoUastons Musschia. 



>>at. Ord. CajmunrL&cu. — Pextaxdkia Mohooyhxa. 

Gen. Char. Calyx o-fidus. Corolla profunde 5-fida, aurea. Stamina 
5, libera, filameutia basi glabris leviter dilatatis ; antherce lineares. cuspi- 
date. Ovarium breve, 5-gonum ; stylus columnaris, stigmatibus 5 elongatis 
horizontalibus apice revolutis. Capsula 5-locularis, 10-nervis, lateraliter 
fissuris numerosis inter nervos dehiscens, loculis 5 cum lobis cahcinis alter- 
nantibus. Semina ovoidea. — Nuffrutices ylahri ; caule robusto e'recto. Folia 
alterna, magna, serrata. Pauicula pyramidata, terminalis. FloreB magni. 
fieri. 



Musschia Wollattoni; herbacea, birto-pubeseens, suffrutescens, folii^ b- 
longo-laaceolatis acutis bad longe attenuatu se^ilibus argute dupli- 

cato-serratis pubescentibus subtus liir^utis, pauicula pyramidata elata 
multiflora, raniis patentibus, caljcis ainubus vix appeudiculatis, laei- 
niis oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis tubo 2-1-plo longioribus, corolla? 
velutinae laciniis linearibus tubo longioribus. 

Mussciii.v Wollastoni. Lowe in llooh. Lond. Journ. Bot. v. 8. p. 298. 
Johnson, I.e. v. 9. p. 1(31. 



A beautiful plant, introduced from Madeira into Kew 
about ten or twelve years ago, where it has flowered annually 
since in a cool greenhouse. The genus to which it belongs is 
restricted to the Madeiran group, and might perhaps be best 
referred to Campanula as a section of that genus, equivalent 
to Eucodon and Medium; it is confined to the Madeiran 
islands. The only other known species of Musschia is the old 
M. aurea, a plant cultivated at Kew as early as 1777, and 
figured in the ' Botanical Register,' t. 57. 

The Rev. Mr. Lowe, who is the author of this species, de- 
scribes it as being found but rarely in shaded valleys of Ma- 
deira, above three to four thousand feet elevation, and adds, 
in a private letter, that its habit is so much like that of 
Sonchus fruficosus, that it is only distinguishable at a little 
distance, when out of flower, by the non-sinuate leaves. 

Descr. A large-leaved undershrub. Stem naked, usually 

octobeb 1st, 1866. 



simple, two to six feet high, terminated l>\ a crown of leaves 
and pyramidal panicle Leaves flaccid, one to two feet long, 
often purplish, oblong-lanceolate, tapering to i broad sessile 
base, donbly serrate, pubescent above, hirsute below, succu- 
lent towards the middle. Pamch erect, pyramidal, two feet 
high and upwards ; branches spreading. Flower* large, yellow- 
green, one and a half to two inches long. Calyx green ; lobes 
oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, much longer than the angled 
tube. CotoUa-tube cylindrical, shorter than the linear re- 
curved lobes. Stigmas radiating, very large, half an inch 
long, revolnte at the apex. — J. I). II. 



Fig. 1. Calyx, ovary, and stamen, — magnified. 



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del* Fil 



Vincent Brooks, U 



Tab. 5607. 

BEACHYSTELMA Babberle. 

Mrs. Barber's Brackystelma. 



Nat. Ord. Asclepiade^e. — Pentandria Digynia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-pbyllus. Corolla campanulata, sinubus angulatis. 
Corona staminea^ 5-pbylla, foliolis gynostegio medio adnatis, 3-lobi's, lobis 
antheris oppositis simplicibus longioribusque ad basin dentibus binis in- 
trorsum plus minus pilosis stipatis. Gynostegium iuclusum. Antheree sim- 
plices, membrana destitute. Massce pollinis erectae, supra basin affixse, 
cum margine pellucido quasi operculatse. Stigma muticum. Folliculi 
graciles, Iteves, erecti, pedunculo recto. Semina COmosa.— Herbse Austro- 
Africanae, perennes, radice iuberosa, eduli. 



BiiAciiYSTELMA Barberies ; caule brevissimo, foliis lineari-oblonms acutis, 
noribus numerosissimis in capitulum amplum globosum congestis, co- 
rollse limbo explanato, lobis caudatis elongatis apicibus arcuatia cobse- 
rentibus. 

Brachystelma Barberia?. Harv. mss. 



The ' Botanical Magazine ' claims the privilege of figuring, 
from time to time, plants which are not as yet in cultivation 
in England, but which are so remarkable for their interest 
or beauty as to be objects of great and special interest, and 
to which public attention should hence be drawn. Amongst 
such subjects few can rival the subject of the present Plate, 
of which an admirable coloured drawing, made by our ac- 
complished correspondent Mrs. Barber, of The Highlands, 
Graham's Town, was transmitted to me for our late mutual 
friend Dr. Harvey, of Dublin, who had already named the 
plant from dried specimens. On hearing of Dr. Harvey's 
decease, Mrs. Barber transferred the drawing to me; and 
though unable to offer any botanical description of the parts 
of the flower, I have not hesitated to publish it, both in jus- 
tice to Dr. Harvey's memory and to his wish that it should 
bear the name of the amiable person and zealous botanist to 
whose exertions we owe our knowledge of it. 

The genus Brackystelma is a rather large South-African 
VOykmbsb 1st, I860. 



one ; the species grow in dry places, and form tuberous roots 
that are eaten by the natives. Some of the species have 
erect and others twining stems, but none hitherto described 
approach this in habit, whilst the coherent Ceropegia-like 
tips of the corolla-lobes is an unusual character in the genus. 
It was discovered by Mr. Bowker (Mrs. Barber's brother) 
in the valleys of the Isomo river, in Kaffirland. 

Descr. Root a depressed tuber, as large as a turnip. Stem 
very short. Leaves spreading, three to four inches long, 
linear-oblong, acute. Flowers collected into a sessile, dense, 
globose capitulum, four to five inches in diameter, dingy- 
purple, speckled with yellow in the disk. Corolla-limb one 
inch broad, slightly concave, shortly five-lobed; lobes trian- 
gular, terminating in slender tails one inch long, which arch 
inwards and cohere over the centre of the flower. — J. 1). H. 



5608. 




etlith 



Vincent Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 5608. 
NIEREMBEEGIA rivulaeis. 

Water Nierembergia. 

Nat. Ord. Solane^:. — Pentandeia Digynia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5590.) 



Nieeembergia rivularis ; glaberrima, caule gracili repente, folds alternis 
longe petiolatis oblongis oblongo-spathulatisve obtusis, floribus bre- 
viter pedunculatis oppositifoliis, calycis tubo cylindraceo supra me- 
dium 5-lobo, lobis oblongo-lanceolatis subacutis, corolla albida v. dilute 
flavescente, tubo gracili elongato, limbo late campaiiuluto explanato, 
lobis obtusis. 

Nierembebgia rivularis. Miers in JIook.Lond. Journ. Bot. v. 5. p. 167. 
Walp. Rep. v. 6. p. 568. 



A beautiful little species, a native of La Plata, whence 
it was introduced by Messrs. Veitch, of the Royal Exotic 
Nurseries, Chelsea, with whom it flowered in July of the 
present year. I have dried specimens from various places 
near Buenos Ayres, where it was discovered by the late Mr. 
Tweedie upwards of thirty years ago. This collector de- 
scribes it as a most lovely and fragrant plant, abounding by 
the sides of the Plate river, and only within high-tide mark, 
its flowers rising above the dwarf grass which grows in simi- 
lar situations in such profusion, that the plant is discerned 
from a great distance. The flowers are sometimes tinged 
with rose-colour. 

Descr. Everywhere glabrous. Stems slender, creeping and 
rooting abundantly, branched and matted. Leaves very va- 
riable in size, with the petioles one to three inches long; 
petioles very long and slender ; blade oblong or oblong-spa- 
thulate, obtuse, membranous, nerveless or almost so. Flowers 
sessile or shortly peduncled. Calyx a quarter to three- 
quarters of an inch long, cylindric, with five slightly spread- 
ing oblong-lanceolate subacute lobes. Corolla tube one to 

NOVEMBER 1st, 1S66. 



two and a half inches long, very slender, yellowish-white ; 
limb broadly campanulate, spreading, white with a yellowish 
tinge ; lobes broad, obtuse. Staminal tube entire to the sum- 
mit. Stigmas transversely oblong. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Stamen and stigmas. 2. Stigma. 3. Ovary : — all magnified. 



5609. 



Ai]i £ 




"Knoent Brod 



Tab. 5609. 

NOTYLIA bicolor. 

Two-coloured Notylia. 



Nat. Ord. Oechide^i. — G-ynandbia Monandeia. 

Gen. Char. Perianthium explanatum, sequale ; sepalis 2 lateralibus con- 
natis labello suppositis. Labellum liberum, ecalcaratutn, patentissimum, 
integrum, medio callosum. Columna erecta. Stigma rima verticalis. An- 
thera dorsalis, uniloculars, cum stigmate parallela. Clinandrium planum, 
antiee callosum, postice marginatum. Pollinia duo Integra, caudicula 
elongato-cuneata, glandula minuta. — Herbse epiphytes Americanee. Folia 
equitantia v el plana. Spicas radicales. Lindl. Gen. et Sp. p. 192. 



Notylia bicolor; foliis equitantibus ensatis spicis nutantibus apice race- 
mosis multi- (10-20-) floris duplo brevioribus, sepalis lineari-setaceis 
(inferiora ima basi coalita) albis, petalis paulo latioribus brevioribus la- 
zulinis ; labello libero breviter unguiculato ligulato ante apicem sagit- 
tate, apice setaceo ecarinato ; columna medio angulata labello duplo 
breviore, anthera maxima. 

Notylia bicolor. Lindl. in Benth. Plant. Rartw. 1842. p. 93. Bchb. Xen. 
Orch. v. 1. p. 46. 



This little Orchid is a perfect gem. It was first discovered 
in Guatemala by Mr. Skinner, and afterwards by Hartweg 
in the mountains of Comalapan, where it grows upon oaks. 
In its colouring it is quite unlike the other dozen or more 
species of Notylia, which are generally of a greenish-white, 
and, except as botanical curiosities, not worth growing. 

Notylia bicolor has been established at Knypersley for 
more than twenty years on a small branch of the Cork-tree 
Oak, on which it never fails to flower profusely in the au- 
tumn. It should be grown near the light at the cooler and 
drier end of the Cattleya-house. The flowers continue a 
long time. 

Desce. Whole plant often not more than an inch and a 
half high. Leaves generally about five, equitant. stiff, acumi- 
nate, slightly scimitar-shaped, scarcely half the length of the 

stovbmbeb 1st, 1866. 



flower-spikes. Flower-spikes drooping, two or three inches 
long, very slender and graceful, bearing (on their upper por- 
tion) from ten to twenty elegant little flowers. Sepals seta- 
ceous (the two lower ones joined together), white. Petals 
rather wider than the sepals, lilac, with blue spots towards 
their base. Lip free, narrow, slightly unguiculate, arrow- 
shaped near its apex, ecarinate, resembling the petals m co- 
lour. Column about half the length of the lip, angular near 
the middle. Anther very large, overlying nearly one-half of 
the column. — J. B. 



Fig 1. Flower, seen in front. 2. Ditto, seen sideways. 3. Side-view 
of lip and column. 4. Lip. 5 and 6. Pollen-masses and gland -.—mag- 
nified. 



5610. 










Tab. 5610. 
GLYPHiEA Monteieoi. 

M. Monteiro's Glyphcea. 



Nat. Ord. Tiliace^e. — Polyandbia Mokogtnia. 

Gen. Char. Sepala 5, rarius 4, libera. Petala totidem, basi nuda. Sta- 
mina oo, toro baud elevato inserta, filamentis brevibus basi in annulum 
brevissime connatis v. liberis ; antherce filamentis longiores, lineares, erectae, 
connective* apice in membranam brevissime producto. Ovarium 4-10-locu- 
lare, loculis oo-ovulatis ; stylus brevis, stigmate obtuso. Fructus oblongo- 
fusiformis, inermis, mesocarpio tuberoso, subindehiscens, co-spermus, car- 
pellis inter semina transverse septatis. Semina in loculis 1-seriata, orbicu- 
lata v. subquadrata, compressa, verticalia, testa Crustacea ; albumen carno- 
sum ; cotyledones cordato-orbiculatse. — Frutices Africans. Folia subin- 
tegra v. dentata, 3-plinervia. Cyrasc pauciflorae, axillares laterales et termi- 
nales. Cloves flavi. 



Glyphjea Monteiroi; ramis foliisque glabris, ramulis et infloresccntia 
stellatim pilosis, foliis ovatis oblongisve acuminatis crebre irregulariter 
dentatis, antheris basi breviter 2-lobis. 



The genus Glyphaa was established in the Flora of the 
Niger Expedition, upon a remarkable shrub discovered near 
the Congo river by Christian Smith, and which has since 
been found in Senegambia, Sierra Leone, and Fernando Po. 
More recently, two other forms or species have been de- 
tected also in tropical Africa; one on the east coast, and the 
other, the subject of the present Plate, on the south-west, 
viz. at Benguela, by M. Joachim Monteiro, to whom we are 
indebted for specimens of many curious plants, and especially 
for the WelwUschia (Tabb. 5368-69). This differs from the 
original species in the larger, broader, more ovate and more 
serrate leaves, in the much larger flower, and m the an- 
thers not being so confluent with the filaments at the base, 
but terminating in two evident lobules or teeth; whether 
these are permanent characters, or whether all the three 
Glyphceas may not be best referred to one species, is a point 
that cannot be determined without fuller materials than we 
possess. The Ghjphrra Monteiroi flowered in September of 

BTOVBMBKR 1st. [866. 



the present year, in a tropical stove, from seeds sent us by 
its discoverer. 

Desce. A shrub, with slender glabrous branches. Leaves 
glabrous, four to six inches long, membranous, oblong or 
ovate, rounded or slightly unequally cordate at the base, 
acuminate, acutely irregularly toothed. Cymes three- to four- 
flowered, pubescent with stellate hairs. Floivers an inch to 
an inch and a quarter in diameter, bright yellow. Sepals 
broadly linear, subacute. Petals similar in form, obtuse. 
Anthers narrow-linear, slightly two-lobed at the base. Fruit 
two inches long, sharply ribbed, four- to seven-celled. — 
J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Stamen. 2. Germen. 8. Transverse section of ovary. 4. 
Fruit. 5. Transverse section of do. : — all but 4 and 5 magnified. 



&J1. 







Tab. 5611. 
YANDA Eensoni. 

Colonel Benson's Vanda. 



]S T at. Ord. Oechideje.— Gynandeta Monakdeia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4432.) 



vanda Bensoni; foliis canaliculatis oblique inaequali-dentatis racemis 
erectis rigidis multifloris duplo brevioribus, floribus distantibus pedi- 
cellis subaequalibus, sepalis petalisque minoribus unguiculatis obovatis 
obtusis intus guttulatis (nee tessellatis), labello convexo ovato disco 
trilamellato apice alte bifido subreniformi auriculis ad basin triangu- 
laribus oblusiusculis, calcare conico obtuso. 

\anda Bensoni. Bateman, mss. 



This elegant addition to our list of Vandas was discovered 
in Rangoon and sent to Messrs. Veitch by that zealous natu- 
ralist Colonel Benson, after whom I have great pleasure in 
naming it. It flowered at Chelsea shortly after its arrival in 
the summer of the present year (18G6), though the spikes 
were of course inferior to those produced in its own country, 
some of the latter — which are now in the Kew herbarium 
— having been upwards of half a yard long, and carried 
as many as fifteen flowers. The length of its spikes, the 
absence of all tessellation, the spotting and yellow colour 
of the inside of the flowers, are among the marks that dis- 
tinguish the species from V. Boccburghii and V. concolor, 
to which it is nearly allied. It appears to be a very free 
grower. 

Descr. Plant a foot or more high, bearing a compact 
mass of distichous channelled coriaceous leaves, which are 
obliquely and unequally toothed, a span or more long. 
Flower-spikes upright, many-flowered, much longer than the 
leaves. Pedicels about an inch long, white. Flowers not 
closely arranged, about two inches across: the sepals and 

NOVEMBEE 1ST, 1866. 



petals (which are smaller than the sepals) unguiculate, ob- 
ovate, obtuse, white on the outside, and of a yellowish-green 
on the inside, where they are marked with numerous reddish- 
brown dots. Lip about the same length as the sepals, with 
two small, triangular, rather blunt side-lobes or auricles at 
its base, from in front of which it is ovate, convex, traversed 
by three lamellae, and terminated by a kidney-shaped, broad, 
bifid apex, which is of a beautiful violet colour, while the 
auricles and conical spur at the base are white. — /. B. 



Fig. 1. Lip and column, seen sideways. 2. Ditto, seen in front: — 
magnified. 



r*-™^ ^° W rmdy ' Boyal 4t °> ™ th 10 cohured M^s, 10s. 6d 

A SECOND CENTUEY OP OECHIDACEOUS PLANTS 

Edited by JAMES BATEMAN, Esq., P.B.S. 

To be completed in Ten Parts. 

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The Records of 10,763 Cures of ABth^ConsumptionT and otterlMsord^f the 

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SWteMl, b an n rtp,l S SOOiety r Mch haS re8U i ted fr T the discora 7 of this Medicine is, however far 

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taste Ck ' 8 Wafer8 are mvaluabIe for clearin g ^d strengthening the voice, and have a pleasant 

DR. LOCOCK'S WAFERS 
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Be careful to see the Name in the Government Stamp. 




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Testimonials forwarded on application. 
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It is now generally admitted that Buildings of any kind can be more effectually 
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IRON MERCHANTS AND HORTICULTURAL ENGINEER 

6, BANKSIDE, SOUTHWARK, LONDON, S.E. 



'■ *. "UXLO* ASD CO-) PBUreB18> UTTXB QUKMr num> w ( 



No. 264. 



VOL. XXII. DECEMBER. 



[Price 'is. 6rf. col*- 2s, fW. plain. 



Oil No. 959 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 



CURTIS'S 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPRISING 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEVV, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS EN GREAT BRITAIN,. 

WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S., 

iBarctnr of tijc Hayal Entamc Sartrensi at Seta. 




Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers exotic erace out northern clime. 



LOVELL REEVE & CO., 5, HE 



Now ready, Boyal ±to, with 10 coloured Plates, 10s. 6d., Part V. of 

A SECOND CMTUKY OP OECHIMCEOUS PLANTS, 

Selected from the subjects published in Curtis's • Botanical Magazine ' since the issue 

of the 'First Century.' 
Edited by JAMES BATEMAN, Esq., F.R.S. 

To be completed in Ten Parts. 

L. REEVE & CO., 5, HEN RIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 
AMBROISE VERSCHAFFELT, NURSERYMAN, 

GHENT, BELGIUM, 
OFFERS THE FOLLOWING NEW PLANTS. 



GREENHOUSE. 



AZALEA INDICA CRYSTALLINA. -Bright rose-salmon colour. 

<• amSt 5 r rT t £&J ery fine form and free boomer, 12*. 

tth ^ M»S-pOMBRAIN (figured in the ' Illustration Hor- 
ticole ; will be figured in the « Floral Magazine').— Beautiful 

Virw ?*!' iT^r r - e 1 .Txr 1 ^r en £ er ' and one of the finest imbricated forms, 12*. 
^,^;7 1 ' h NAL , C » R YSANTHEMUMS (published in the ' Il- 
lustration Horticole ') .-Seven beautiful varieties, the set 16*. 

HARDY. 

fcLNUS AUREA (the Golden Alder-tree) .-This will be one of the 
nnest trees. It is the common Alnus, with splendid golden leaves, 

PEAR BEORRfi DE FROMENTEL (figured in the 'Illustration 
Horticole ) .-One of the best Pears sent out, 8*. This fine Pear 
obtained several Prizes 

RH( ?£? DENDRON ARCHIDUC ETIENNE (lately figured in the 
Illustration Horticole '(.—Beautiful white flowers, with nume- 
rous black spots. Good plants, 12*. ; strong plants, £1. 



HARDY. 

RHODODENDRON EXQUISITUM.— Light rose, with large red 
spots, very fine, 8*. 

RHODODENDRON GRATIOSUM.— Lilac rose - , very delicate, with 
large spots, very fine, 8*. 

RHODODENDRON MADAME RUDOLPH ABEL.— Gn 

provement on Rhododendron Prince Camille de Rohan ; spots 
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TEA ROSE ISABELLE SPRUNT (lately figured in the 'Illustra- 
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WEIGELA PURPURATA— Oue of the most distinct varieties ob- 
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GYNERIUM ARGENTEUM FOLII3 VARIEGATIS.— I beg to 
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true variegated Gynerium, which is the good variety tent out by 
Mr. Rendatler. Good plants, 7*. 6d, ; six plants, £2. 



The Is EW GENERAL CATALOGUE, No. 79, is ready, and may be obtained free by writing to Ambeoise Yeb- 
AwSi^a]^ Bel g mm - A Coloured Drawing of the New Tea Rose IsabeHe Sprunt may be also obtained free. 
AflLbKOlSE VERSCHAFFELT recommends his Monthly Publication, the ' ILLUSTRATION HORTICOLE.' 
Efccb fl umber contains Three Coloured Plates of the Best and Newest Plants. Price 14s. 6d. a year, free. A Speci- 
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BARR & SUGDEN'S 



AUTUMNAL FLORAL GUIDE 

TO 

WINTER AND SPRING GARDENING, 

Contains a Treatise on "SPRING GARDENING," with 
Directions for Planting a series of Beds and Borders, with Early 
Flowering BULBS and PLANTS, the beauty and general effect 
of which will bear comparison with the gayest groups of our 
Summer and Autumn Blooming Plants, and may be had free by 
intending purchasers. 

BULBS and PLANTS for SPRING BLOOMING. 

100,000 CLIVEDEN DAISIES, Pink, Red, and White, S*. per **• 

21*. per 100 
100,000 VARIEGATED ARABI9, a fine permanent 

per doz.. 21*. per I 
200,000 MYOSOTIS 8YLVATICA (Forget-me-not), 1*- 6*. P* 

doz., 10*. 6rf. per 
100,000 8TACHYS LAN AT A, a fine permanent ed<: 

per doz., 21*. per ,„.,-« HE- 

POLYANTHUS, WALLFLOWER, PHLOX, AL1 

PATICAS. 





to 3* 


per ( 






21*. per 100 


« (id. 


per d 






) 21*. per 100 


. per 








r 100 






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to 30* 


per 1000 






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NA, 


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per doz., 18*. 



HONES, RANUNCULUS, 
Purple, and Y'ellbw, 4*. per 



BULBS forBIoo 
SPRLNG BLOO 



or Decoration, 10*. 6d., 15*. 6d., 21*., 30*., 42*., 63*., and 
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LANT8, 12*. 6d., 25*., 50*., 100*. to 200*. 



METRO] 

12. Ki 



BARR and SUGDEX, 

i SEED, BULB, A5TD PLANT WAREHOUSE, 

tEET, COVENT GARDEN. LONDON. R 



5672. 







Vincent BrooK- 



Tab. 5612. 

CYPELLA CLERULEA. 

Blue-flowered Cypella. 



Nat. Ord. Ibidem. — Tbiandeia Tbigynia. 

Gen. Char. Perianthiwm corollinum, superum, 5-phyllum, laciniis basi 
concayis exterioribus majoribus patentibus, interioribus recurvis. Stamina 
3, perigonii laciniis exterioribus basi inserta, filainentis brevissirae coalitis 
subulatis. Antherce oblong®, basifixae, loculis connectivum marginantibus. 
Ovarium inferum, oblongo-prismaticum, 3-loculare ; stylus brevis, filiformis, 
stigmate dilatato 3-lobo, lobis erectis 3-fidis basi appendiculatis. Ovula 
plurima, in loeulorum angulo centrali 2-seriata. Capsula membranacea, 
oblongo-prismatica, 3-locularis, loculicide 3-valvis. Semina plurima, an- 
gustata. — Herbae perennes, America? tropica? ; rhizomate bulboso-tuberoso. 
Caulis erectus, foliatus, apice ramosus. Folia late linear i-lanceolata v. ensi- 
jormia. Flores magni, speciosi, laxe paniculati, spatha 2-pkylla 1-Jlora. 



Ctpella caerulea; elata, foliis 3-6-pedalibus 1-1| lin. latis ensiformibus 
obtusiusculis v. acuminatis, floribus caaruleis, 4 unc. diametro, peri- 
anthii laciniis exterioribus late oblongis, ungue aurantiaco brunneo 
fasciato, laciniis interioribus dimidio minoribus angustioribus, lamina 
cseruleo-venosa, ungue aurantiaco fasciato, stigmatis lobis acumiuatis, 
raro 2-appendiculatis. 

Ctpella cserulea. Seubert in Herb. Reg. Berol. 

Mabica cserulea. Souk. Exot. Flora,/. 222. BoL Beg. t. 713. 



A magnificent plant, native of the Brazils, long known in 
our gardens, though displaced of late by newer but far less 
attractive favourites. Whether for the boldness of its disti- 
chous sword-like foliage or the magnificence of its tine Ins- 
like flower, it is well worthy of a permanent place in our 
stoves. The plant from which the accompanying drawing 
was made was sent to the Koyal Gardens from Bahia, by- 
Mr. Williams, and flowered in September of the present 
year. 

Descr. Leaves three to six feet long, an inch to an inch 
and a half broad, striate, on a very stout caudex in our plant, 
equitant, bright green, acute or obtuse, sometimes acumi- 

NOVEMBEE 1ST, 1866. 



nate. Flowers panicled; lower scathes four to six inches 
long ; floral two inches. Flowers variable in size, the fully- 
sized fully four inches in diameter. Outer perianth-leaves 
broadly oblong, obtuse, acute or apiculate ; blade blue, some- 
times blotched ; claw yellowish, with transverse brown bands ; 
inner segments about half as long as the outer, and much 
narrower proportionally; claw dirty-yellowish, with orange 
radiating bands; limb with radiating blue bands. Stigma- 
lobes bifid, each with a horn-like appendage at the base 
below.— J.D.H. 



Fig. 1. Stamens, style, and stigmas. 2. Transverse section of ovary:— 
both magnified. 



5613. 




etlith 



Vincen 



Tab. 5613. 

HELICONIA humilis. 

Dwarf Heliconia. 



Xat. Ord. Musace^:. — Pentandria Monogtnia. 

Gen. Char. Perianthium corollinura ; foliola exteriora sequalia, basi con- 
nata ; interiora lateralia subconformia, approximata, genitalia amplec- 
tentia, posticum nanum. Stamina 5, sexto abortiente nano, basi perigonii 
adnata. Ovarium 3-loculare ; stylus filiformis, stigmate obsolete 6-lobo. 
Ovula in loculis solitaria, e basi axeos adscendentia, anatropa. Capsula 
subdrupacea, 3-cocca, coccis osseis indehiscentibus. Hemina subglobosa, 
basifixa; albumen farinaceo-carnosum ; embryo linearis, orthotropus. — 
Herbae scepius elatce, Americes tropica incolce. Folia longe petiolata, petiolo 
basi vaginante scapum radicalem scepe velante. Spath® nwnierosce, distiches ; 
axillis Jloriferis . 



Heliconia humilis ; humilis, acaulis, petiolis longissimis, gracilibus, foliis 
oblongis oblongo-lanceolatisve breviter acuminatis basi cuneatis, scapo 
brevi radicali erecto, spatbis 4-6 erecto-patentibus distichis subulato- 
lanceolatis rubris apice viridibus multifloris, perianthii foliolis lineari- 
bus angustis ex albo viridibus. 

Heliconia bumilis. Jacq. Sort. Schcenb. t. 48, 49. Willd. Sp. PI. v. 1. 
p. 1187. Poem, and Sch. Syst. Veg. v. 5. p. 590. 

Mttsa bumilis. AubL Ouian, v. 2. p. 931. 



Few plants are so well worthy of cultivation, for those 
who can afford space for' the purpose, than the species of the 
magnificent genus Heliconia; they are easily managed, their 
beautiful foliage is evergreen, their brilliant flowering-bracts 
keep their colour for many weeks, and they may be rapidly 
increased by division of the rhizome. The present species is 
a native of Guiana, where it abounds in marshy places, and is 
called " petit Bahisia" by the French settlers, according to 
Aublet. Jacquin published an excellent figure and description 
of it in his < Hortus Schcenbrunensis ' so long ago as 17',)*, 
which appears to be the only figure extant. The specimen 
here figured flowered in the Royal Gardens, Kew. m Sep- 
tember of the present year. 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1806. 



Descr. Rhizome tuberous and creeping, covered with cir- 
cular scars of fallen buds, giving off thick fleshy root-fibres. 
Stem none. Leaves all radical, on long slender petioles two 
to three feet long ; blade one to two feet long, oblong linear- 
oblong or oblong-lanceolate, rather pale green, shortly 
abruptly acuminate, cuneate at the base. Scape short, radi- 
cal, hidden amongst the leaves, erect, straight ; flowering 
portion bright red, about a span long, bearing about four 
distichous spathes. Spathes erec to-patent, subulate from a 
broad base, nearly a span long, scarlet, with green stiff, al- 
most pungent points, thick and hard, not striated. Floivers 
five to six in a spathe, two to three inches long, sessile, 
crowded ; partial spathe membranous. Perianth white, green 
towards the apices of the narrow linear segments ; tube short, 
cylindric ; limb two-lipped, upper leaflet concave, bifid, lower 
at length revolute at the apex ; upper inner leaflet triden- 
tate, lower very short.— J". D. H. 



Fig. 1. Entire plant, reduced; anthers whitisb. 2. Inflorescence. 3. 
Flowers. 4. Ovary, etc. :— all magnified. 



5614. 




yf Rich, del et lith 



Tab. 5614 

CYPEIPEDIUM Schlimii. 

ScJdim's Lady's-slipper. 



Nat. Ord. Obchide^!. — GtYnandhia Monandkia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5349.) 



Ctpeipedium (Selenipidiitm) Schlimii; foliis coriaceis ligulatis acutis 
subpedalibus pedunculo hirsuto nunc raraoso brevioribus; bracteia 
tnangulis ancipitibus, ovario velutino, sepalis ovatis obtusis, superiore 
ovato, extus sericeo, inferiore subaequali (vel paulo majore) apice con- 
tracto cucullato, petalis sepalo sunimo majoribus, inferiori subaequa- 
libus; labello elliptico-saccato ostio angusto ; staminodio ovato pan- 
durato apiculato, stigmatis labio superiori triangulo, inferiori retuso 
lobato. Ex Beichenbach. 

Selenipidiitm Schlimii. Bchb. in Pescatorea, t. 34. Xenia Orch. t. 14. 



This pretty New Granada Cypripedium bears the name of 
its discoverer, M. Schlim, one of M. Linden's most zealous 
collectors, who found it in " moist places," in the neighbour- 
hood of Ocafia, at an elevation of four thousand feet above 
the sea-level. It first flowered in M. Linden's establishment 
in 1854. It was afterwards met with near La Cruz by 
Purdie, and on "dry banks "(!) according to the memorandum 
in the Hookerian herbarium. Possibly, however, the diffe- 
rent season of the year at which the plant was gathered by 
the respective collectors may explain the seeming discre- 
pancy. In this country it is still a rare plant, though it is 
easily grown in a mild temperature, especially if screened 
from the direct rays of the sun. It blooms in the late sum- 
mer and autumn months, always — when in vigour — producing 
flower-stems with at least one lateral, a peculiarity that is not 
represented in the figure, and which does not exist in the 
dried specimens. The drawing is taken from a plant exhi- 
bited at South Kensington in August last by Mr. Hull. 

DECEMBER 1ST, I860. 



As all the species of Cypripedium that have hitherto been 
found in intra-tropical America have in common the remark- 
able peculiarity of a three-celled ovary, Professor Reichen- 
bach is anxious to raise them —under the name of Selenipi- 
dium— into a separate genus; but however loth I may feel 
to differ from my distinguished friend, I cannot as yet see 
my way to accepting Selenipidium, except as a subgenus, in 
which latter form it may very conveniently stand. The strong 
family resemblance between such plants as C. Icevigatum from 
the Old World, and C. caudatum from the New, make it ex- 
ceedingly difficult to believe they can be essentially different 
in structure. 

There are still at the very least half-a-dozen noble Cypri- 
pedia to introduce from America south of the equator. Two 
of these (from the Quitensian Andes) are well figured in 
Keichenbach's 'Xenia,' under the name of Selenipidium 
Hartwegii and S. Boissierianum. As nothing so fine has yet 
reached us from the eastern hemisphere, we cannot but hope 
that some enterprising nurseryman will, ere long, add them 
to the treasures already in our stoves. 

Descr. A stemless terrestrial plant. There are from four 
to six leathery ligulate sharp-pointed leaves, a span to a foot 
long, from the centre of which issues the hirsute flower-stem, 
which is longer than the leaves, often branched, and gene- 
rally bearing about half-a-dozen flowers, of which not more 
than two or three are usually in perfection at the same time. 
Bracts triangular, flattened, more than half the length of the 
ovary, which is itself covered with soft velvety hairs. Sepals 
less than an inch long, ovate-obtuse, nearly uniform, but the 
lower one is slightly larger, hooded, and contracted at top. 
Petals rather larger than in the upper, or about equal to 
the lower sepal, white (like the sepals), with streaks or 
spots of crimson on the inner side, and a faint dash of crim- 
son behind. Lip formed of a large swollen elliptic bag or 
slipper with a contracted opening, white behind, but with a 
large blotch of deep rich crimson in front. Sterile stamen 
yellowish in front, ovate, panduriform, acuminate, having the 
upper lip of the stigma triangular, and the lower lip of the 
same bent backwards, and lobed.— J. B. 



Fig. 1. Side-view of staminodium (sterile stamen). 2. Front view of 
ditto : — magnified. 



5615. 




!?' V 




"V/"Rtoh iel etlith. 



Vincent Brr - 



Tab. 5615. 

HELIOTROPIUM convolvulaceum. 

Convolvulus-flowered Heliotrope. 



Nat. Ord. Boragine.^. — Pentandria Monogynta. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-partitus v. 5-dentatus, persistens. Corolla hypo- 
craterimorpha, fauce pervia interdum barbata, laciniis plica simplici (raris- 
sime dente iaterjecto) donatis. Stamina 5, tubo corolla) inserta. Ovarium 
4-loculare; stylus brevis, stigmate incrassato. Nuculce 1-loculares, demum 
separabiles, receptaculo communi 0. Semina exalbuminosa, embryone in- 
verso, cotyledonibus planis. — Herbal v. snffrutices, glabra pilosis v. hispida. 
Folia sarpius alterna, Integra v. denticulata. Cymae unilaterales. Eiores 
albi v. purpurascentes. 



Heliotropium convolvulaceum ; annua, hispido-pilosa, caule ramoso ramis 
patentibus adscendentibus, foliis alternis ovato-oblongis v. oblongo- 
lanceolatis integerrimis acutis enerviis, floribus axillaribus subsolitarns 
v. in cymas breves paucifloras dispositis, corolla? tubo hispido, limbo 
amplo explanato, stigmate capitato apice setoso, nuculis dimidiato- 
reniformibus perforatis. 

Heliotropium convolvulaceum. A. Gray in Proc. Am. Acad. v. 5. p. 340, 
et Mem. Amer. Acad. v. G. p. 403. 

Euploca convolvulacea. Nutt. in Am. Phil. Trans. N. Ser. v. 5. p. 189. 
DC. Prodr. v. 9. p. 559. Hook. Ic. Pi. v. 7. t. 651. 



A curious and beautiful American annual, grown by Mr. 
Thompson, of Ipswich, with whom the specimen here figured 
flowered in September of the present year; it is a native of 
the Southern United States, New Mexico, and Arkansas, m 
which last State it was discovered by Nuttall. growing on 
sandy plains. The flowers, which are most abundantly pro- 
duced, are sweet-scented, and open towards sunset like those 

of nxirabilis. 

Descr. A much-branched, suberect annual, a span to two 
feet high, hoary all over with short rigid simple hairs. Stem 
and branches terete. Leaves half to one and a halt inches 
long, very variable in shape, linear-oblong ovate ovate-orbi- 
cular or lanceolate, acute, narrowed or rounded at the base. 

DECEMBER 1ST, 18G6. 



quite entire. Flowers axillary, solitary, very shortly pedi- 
celled. Calyx quinquepartite ; lobes linear, hispidly pilose, 
rather shorter than the tube. Corolla salver-shaped, plaited ; 
tube contracted in the middle, pilose ; limb one inch across, 
white, nearly flat, five-angled, angles subacute ; lobes hairy 
along the back to the calyx; throat narrow. Anthers in- 
cluded, sessile, linear, pubescent at the tips. Ovary oblong- 
conic, four-celled, with a narrow adnate four-lobed concave 
disk at its base ; style slender, stigma capitate, crowned with 
stiff erect bristles. Capsule small, enclosed in the persistent 
calyx-lobes. — J! D. H. 



Fig. 1. Calyx. 2. Tube of corolla laid open. 3. Anther. 4. Germen 
and disk. 5. Transverse section of ovary :— all magnified. 



5616. 




"W. "Fitch, del. eflith 



Vincent Brooics 



Tab. 5616. 

LYCASTE GIGANTEA. 

Gigantic Lycaste. 



Nat. Ord. Obchedeje.— Gynandeia Monandbia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4193.) 



Lycaste gigantea ; pseudobulbis maximis oblongo-ovatis glabris subcom- 
pressis 2-3-phyllis, foliis oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis plicatis scapo 
vaginato unifloro longioribus, sepalis ovato- vel lineari-lanceolafcis ob- 
tusiusculis, lateralibus falcatis petalis lanceolatis brevioribus, labelli 
oblongi lauceolati trilobi laciniis lateralibua elevatis acutis intermedia 
serrata panduriformi concava apice integra recurva multo brevioribus, 
callo unico eniarginato sellasformi per hypochilium decurrente. 

Lycaste gigantea. Lindl. in Benth. Bl. Hartweg. p. 153. Orch. Linden, 
p. 21. Bot. Beg. v. xxxix. (1843) p. 15 ; Id. v. xxx. Misc. 48. 

Maxillaeia Heynderycxii. Morr. Ann. 1845-9. 



This stately Lycaste is very extensively diffused, having 
been found in Central America by Hartweg,— near Santa 
Martha by Purdie,— and in the forests of Merida, at an ele- 
vation of 5-600 feet, by Linden. As might under such cir- 
cumstances be expected there are many varieties differing in 
the size and colour of the flowers, and also— though to a less 
extent— in the size and form of the sepals and petals ; the 
latter are usually of a yellowish-olive, while the velvety lip 
is of a dark rich maroon bordered with orange. The speci- 
men figured was exhibited by Messrs. Veitch at South Ken- 
sington in July last. 

All the Lycastes may be regarded as subterrestrial, and 
should therefore be accommodated with large pots. They are 
readily grown in a moderate temperature, but prefer the 
shadier parts of the orchid-house. With the exception of 
L. Skinneri — now such a universal favourite — L. gigantea is, 
perhaps, the best of its race. 

Descr. Pseadobulbs very large (sometimes six inches high), 
oblong-ovate, smooth, and slightly compressed, bearing two or 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1S0G. 



three large, deeply plicated oblong-lanceolate acuminated ves, 
which are from half a yard to two feet long. Scape upright, 
one-flowered, partially sheathed (the upper sheath unguicu- 
late and same length as the sepals), usually shorter than the 
leaves. Sepals ovate, or sometimes linear-lanceolate, rather 
blunted (those at the side being falcate) of a warm yellowish- 
olive. Petals lanceolate, rather shorter than the sepals and 
of the same olivaceous hue. Lip oblong-lanceolate, 3-lobed, 
the lateral lobes being elevated, acute, and much shorter 
than the central one, which is panduriform, serrated at the 
edges, depressed along the centre, but with its apex recurved; 
the lower portion of the lip is occupied by a transverse sad- 
dle-shaped emarginate callus; the colour of the lip is usually 
a rich maroon bordered with a narrow orange rim, the whole 
having quite the appearance of velvet. — /. B. 



Fig. 1. Lip, nat. size. 



5677. 




W Fitch, del etlith 



Tfincent Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 5617. 

COMEEETUM miceopetalum. 

Small-petaled Combretum. 

Nat. Ord. Combeetace^:. — Octandhia Mofogynia. 

Gen. Char. Flores polygamo-dioici. Oalycis tubus supra ovarium con- 
strictus ; limbus campanulatus, 4-5-fidus, deciduus. Petala 4-5, raris- 
sime 0, parva, inter lobos corolla; inserta. Stamina 8 v. 10, 2-seriata, fila- 
mentis elongatis ; antherce parva?. Ovarium 1-loculare ; stylus subulatus, 
stigmate simplici ; ovula 2-(5, ab apice loculi pendula. Pructus 4-6-gonus 
v. 4-6-pterus, 1-spermus. Semen elongatum. — Frutices, rarius arbores 
tropica, scepissime scandentes. Folia opposita, rarius 3-4-natim verticillata, 
rarissime alterna, integerrima. Flores spicati v. racemosi. 



Combbettjm micropetalum ; ramulis puberulis, foliis oppositis breviter pe- 
tiolatis oblongis subacutis et apiculatis v. acuminatis, superne glabris 
subtus impresso-punctulatis junioribus pubescentibua, racemis axillari- 
bus breviter pedunculatis multi-densifloris, floribus congestis secundis, 
pedicellis calycibusque dense lepidotis, petalis minutis. 

CoMBRETUir micropetalum. DC. Prodr. v. 3. p. 19. St. Ril. Fl. Bras. 
Merid. v. 2. p. 249. 



A truly magnificent climber, native of Brazil, from Rio 
de Janeiro southward to the province of St. Paul, and north- 
ward to those of Minas Geraes and Goyoz. The specimen 
here figured is from a plant long cultivated by Dr. Moon; in 
a greenhouse at Glasnevin, which annually bears a profusion 
of blossoms under his skilful management, and presents a 
very striking appearance. It flowers in September here, 
but in its native country in May and June. The genus Com- 
bretum is a very considerable one, embracing fully a hun- 
dred and twenty species, many of great beauty, and that 
would be great acquisitions to our stoves. '1 he present plant 
comes very near to Don's C. formosum, published m 182 m 
the fifteenth volume of the Linnean Transactions, but that 
is described as having a calyx pubescent with rusty down. 

Descr. A large tree, according to the description in St. 11 1 - 
lake's < Flora f a tall rambling climber at Glasnevin Uirden. 

DECEMBER 1ST, I860. 



Branches terete, young clothed with lepidote scales. Leaves 
opposite, membranous, three to five inches long, variable 
in form usually oblong, obtuse acute or acuminate, glabrous 
above, beneath covered with minute pale pits, and clothed 
with scales when young ; petiole very short. Racemes spread- 
ing or refracted, four to five inches long, on short stout pe- 
duncles, axillary, simple, solitary; rhachis, pedicels, and calyx 
densely covered with lepidote scales. Flowers densely 
crowded, secund. Calyx green, one-third to half an inch long • 
tube slender, tetragonous; limb campanulate, four-lobed • 
lobes short, acute. Petals very minute, obovate, spathulate^ 
acute, btamens eight, three-quarters of an inch long, yellow 
with orange anthers.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Flower : — magnified. 



INDEX, 

In which the Latin Name3 of the Plants contained in the 
Twenty-second Volume of the Third Series (or Ninety- 
second Volume of the Work) are alphabetically arranged. 



Hate. 


Plate. 


5588 Ancylogyne longiflora. 


5597 


5589 Angreecum Chailluanum. 


5577 


5567 Batemannia grandiflora. 


5600 


5560 Bauhinia tomentosa ; var. gla- 


5590 


bra. 


5553 


5554 Begonia baccata. 


5587 


5583 Begonia geranioides. 


5558 


5605 Bolbophyllum reticulatum. 


5616 


5607 Brachystelma Barberise. 


5585 


5578 Ceropegia sororia. 


5576 


5557 Cbameranthemum Beyrichii ; 


5572 


var. variegata. 


5573 


5601 Coelogyne eorrugata. 


5606 


5617 Combretum micropetalum. 


5584 


5602 Cotyledon fascicularis. 


5608 


5581 Cupressus Lawsoniana. 


5599 


5574 Cymbidium Hookerianum. 


5609 


5612 Cypella casmlea. 


5568 


5614 Cypripedium Schlimii. 


5566 


5564 Dendrobium dixanthum. 


5570 


5556 Epidendrum myrianthum. 


5586 


5569 Ericinella Mannii. 


5596 


5561 Eulophia euglossa. 


5552 


5579 Eulophia virens. 


5595 


5592 Eernandesia robusta. 


5594 


5591 Eremontia Californica. 


5580 


5565 Gladiolus Papilio. 


5593 


5610 Glyphsea Monteiroi. 


5555 


5603 Glyptostrobus pendulua. 


5571 


5563 HabranthuJ fulgens. 


5559 


5613 Heliconia humilis. 


55 7 5 


5615 Heliotropium convolvulaceum. 


5562 


5604 Helipterum Cotula. 


5611 


5598 Huntley a Genoa. 


5? 8 2 



Ilex latifolia. 
Iris reticulata. 
Kaempferia Roscceana. 
Kleinia fulgens. 
Lselia grandis. 
Lobelia nicotianaefolia. 
Luisia Psyche. 
Lycaste gigantea. 
Meconopsis Nipalensis, DC. 
Microcachrys tetragona. 
Miltonia anceps. 
Mussaenda luteola. 
Musschia Wollastoni. 
Myrsiphyllnm asparagoides. 
Nierembergia rivularis. 
Nierembergia Veitchii. 
Notylia bicolor. 
Peperomia rnarmorata. 
Peristrophe lanceolaria. 
Polychilos cornu-fmi. 
Polystachya pubescons. 
Rhododendron Fortunei. 
Rhododendron HodgSODl. 
Saccolabium ampullaceum. 
Sanchezia nobilis. 
Scilla Cooperi. 
Sempervivum Paivaj. 
Sparaxis pulcherrima. 
Tacsonia Van-Volxemii. 
Thibaudia cordifolia. 
Thibaudia corouaria. 
Tillandsia xiphioidr*. 
Vanda Bcnsoni. 

.wizella relata. 



INDEX, 

In which the English Names of the Plants contained in the 
Twenty-second Volume of the Third Series (or Ninety- 
second Volume of the Work) are alphabetically arranged. 



Plate. 

5562 Air-plant, Buenos Ayres. 

5588 Ancylogyne, long-flowered. 

5589 Angrzecum, M. Du Chaillu's. 
5567 Batemannia, large-flowered. 
5560 Bauhinia, downy ; glabrous var. 
5554 Begonia, berried-fruited. 

5583 Begonia, Geranium-leaved. 
5605 Bolbophyllum, reticulated- 
leaved. 
5607 Brachystelma, Mrs. Barber's. 

5578 Ceropegia, Kaffrarian. 

5557 Chameranthemum, Beyrich's; 
variegated-leaved variety. 

5601 Ccelogyne, with wrinkled pseu- 

dobulbs. 
5617 Combretum, small-petaled. 

5602 Cotyledon, glaucous-blue. 
5574 Cymbidium, Dr. Hooker's. 

5612 Cypella, blue-flowered. 
5581 Cypress, the Lawson. 

5603 Cypress, pendulous deciduous. 
5576 Cypress, Strawberry-fruited. 

5564 Dendrobium, double-tinted yel- 

low. 
5556 Epidendrum, many-flowered. 

5579 Eulophia, greenish. 
5561 Eulophia, pretty-lipped. 

5604 Everlasting, Cotula-flowered. 
5592 Fernandesia, stout. 

5591 Fremontia, Californian. 

5565 Gladiolus, butterfly-flowered. 
5610 Glyphsea, M. Monteiro's. 
5563 Habranthus, brilliant-flowered. 
5569 Heath, Cameroons Mountain. 

5613 Heliconia, dwarf. 

5615 Heliotrope, Convolvulus-flow- 
ered. 



Plate. 

5597 Holly, broad-leaved Japanese. 
5593 House-leek, Baron Paiva's. 

5598 Huntleya, waxy. 
5577 Iris, netted. 

5600 Kaempferia, Mr. Koscoe's. 
5590 Kleinia, brilliant-flowered. 
5614 Lady's-slipper, Schlim's. 
5553 Lselia, large-flowered. 
5587 Lobelia, Tobacco-leaved. 
5558 Luisia, butterfly-flowered. 
5616 Lycaste, gigantic. 
5585 Meconopsis, Nepalese. 

5572 Miltonia, two-edged -stemmed. 
5606 Musschia, Mr. Wollaston's. 

5573 Musssenda, Captain Grant's. 
5584 Myrsiphyllum, Asparagus- 
leaved. 

5599 Nierembergia, Mr. Veitch's. 

5608 Nierembergia, water. 

5609 Notylia, two-coloured. 

5571 Passion-flower, Van Volxem's. 
5568 Peperomia, marble-leaved. 
5566 Peristrophe, lance-leaved. 
5570 Polychilos, stag's-horn. 
5586 Polystachya, hairy-stemmed. 
5596 Khododendron, Mr. Fortune's. 
5552 Rhododendron, Mr. Hodgson's. 
5595 Saccolabium, bottle-lipped. 
5594 Sanchezia, brilliant-flowered. 
5555 Sparaxis, most beautiful. 
5580 Squill, Cooper's. 
5559 Thibaudia, cordate-leaved. 
5575 Thibaudia, small-leaved. 
5611 Vanda, Colonel Benson's. 
5582 Warscewizella, veiled. 






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