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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."



CURTIS'S 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMl'Iil.SlNG THE 



pants oi tfte ftopal Gartens! of Jttto 

AND 

OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IX GREAT BRITAIN; 

WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 

BY 

JOSEPH DALTON J[OOKER,M.D., F.R.S. L.S.&G.S., 

D.C.L. OXON., 1J,.D. CANTXB., CORRESPONDENT OF THE INSTITUTE OF FKANCi;. 

VOL. XXIII. 

OF THE THlIiD SERIES; 

(Or Vol.XCIU. of the Whole Work.) I , 





"The earth's embroidery then have ye eyed, 

And smile of blossoms, purple, red, and white ; 

Their vernal-tinctured leaves, luxurious, dyed 
In Flora's livery, painted by the lieht." 

W. Thomson. 



' 



L O N PON: 
L. REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1867. 

Mo. Bot. Garden, 

1827. 




J. E. IAVLOU A.M) CO., I'lil.Vl I.i.:-, 
1 ! I J 1.1. Ql"i:i.- l.vi I, UKCOlH'fl INN rUXIM 



DANIEL OLIVER, F.R.S., P.L.8., 

KEEPER OF THE QSBBARIUM AND LIBRARY IK THE KOYAL GARDENS, KEW, 
AND PROFESSOR OF BOTANY IN UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, LONDON. 

My dear Oliver, — 

In dedicating this Volume to you, I am desirous of 
recording the services you have rendered me, not only in its 
preparation and in that of the previous volumes published 
under my authorship; but as the efficient Keeper of that 
Herbarium and Library, upon the perfect order and scientific 
arrangement of which the 'Botanical Magazine' is depen- 
dent for whatever scientific merit it possesses. 

Ever affectionately yours, 

JOS. D. HOOKER. 

Eoyal Gardens, Kew, 
December 1, 1867. 



No. 265. 

VOL. XXIII. JANUARY. [Frke3s. 6d. col d > 2*. M. plain. 

OR No. 960 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPRISING 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OE KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



BY 



JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S., 

Strcctar of fl)c Itaijal Batttitc Sai-Sms a£ Hcto. 













^^!T*%& 



,>:.v ; 



">;■; -v ! 



- -_-■■ --■ ;T ■-.' 



Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers exotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 
REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, CO VENT GARDEN. 

u 18fi.7. 

mo. dOi : en. 



NOTICE TO FRUIT GROWER! 



J. HOUSE, 

EASTGATE NURSERY, PETERBOROUGH, 

IS NOW PREPARED TO SEND OUT 

THE SEEDLING APPLE, "LORD BURGIILEY," 

FOE WHICH JTE WAS AWARDED 

A FIRST-CLASS CERTIFICATE 



AT THE 



ROYAL HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, MARCH 21st, 18G5. 



la the 'Journal of Horticulture and Cottage Gardener' of March 28th, 1865, the folk 
lotice appears in connection with the Fruit Committee of the Royal Horticultural Society (Geo. 
•\ Wilson, Esq., F.Pi.S., in the chair) : — "A seedling Apple, of unusual excellence at this seaso" 
if the year, was exhibited by Mr. House, of Peterborough, and which has been named ' Lor 
Burghley.' It is of medium size, roundish, and slightly flattened ; is somewhat bluntly angula 
>n the side, and ridged on the apex, this being caused by the prominent termination of the sic 
angles. The skin, on the shaded side, is of a deep golden-yellow, and on that next the sun of 
deep clear shining crimson. The whole surface is dotted over with large russet specks, like tl 
Golden Eeinette. The eye is somewhat closed, and set in a pretty deep basin, which is uneven, 
in consequence of the angles which terminate there. Stalk half an inch to three-quarters long, 
frequently a mere knob. Plesh yellowish, very tender, leaving but little mark in the mouth, very 
juicy, sweet, and with a fine pine flavour and "rich aroma. Tins delicious Apple is now in perfec- 
tion, and has the appearance as if it would keep Tor two months hence. Apart from its excellent 
quality, it is highly ornamental, and has a tenderness of flesh, and a flavour similar and equal to 
;e Pippin. It was awarded a first-class certificate." 
•Gardeners' Chronicle' of the 25th of March, 1SG5 :— " A valuable hardy-looking 
needling Apple, named Lord Burghley, from Mr. House, of Peterborough, to which a certificate 
is awarded." 

THE FOLLOWING TESTIMONIALS HAVE ALSO BEEU RECEIVED BY MR. HOUSE :- 
Meaan, Hirers and Co., SawbridgewortJt, March 15/7*, 1865. 
3ir,— Your Apple is remarkably handsome and sound, and one of the finest dessert apples 
known. 

Messrs. Lee and Co., Hammersmith, March '22nd, 18G5. 
Sir, —The Apple you exhibited yesterday was very sound and good flavoured. 

Mr. ■!. R. Pearson, CM well, March Ylth, 1865. 
3ir, — Your Apple is the best I know of. 

Mr. Mathemm, Gardener at B ' . mford V rel 2Vh, 1865. 

Sir,— Your dessert Apple is the best I have ever seen. 

Mr. Davie, Gardener ai I H I, A i Vh. 1865. 

Sir. —Your Apple is remarkably sound, handsome, and excellent in flavour. 



After the Testimonials from such eminent Fruit Growers as those enumerated, nothing more 
?_dbe added by J. II. to assure those who plant this Apple that they may anticipate tin 
tisfactory results 

'rice of fine Maiden Trees, 5s. The usual allowance to the Trade. 

Ike Stock being limited, the price cannot be reduced be/on th L868. 

Eastgate ^rRSERT, Peterporoegii, December, 1SGG. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



VARIEGATED PELARGONIUM "METEOR," SALTMARSH AND SON'S. 

This beautiful variety, to which a First-Class Certificate was awarded at a meeting of the Royal 
Horticultural Society, will be sent out on the 1st of May, 1867, with a few others by the same 
raisers, at 21*. each. The usual discount to the Trade. Orders will be executed in strict rotation. 
Further particulars will appear in future advertisements. 



SALTMARSH AND SON, MOULSHAM NURSERIES, CHELMSFORD. 



GENUINE fSBJHS) SEEDS. 




JAMES VEITCH AND SONS 

BEG TO ANNOUNCE THAT THEIR 

CATALOGUE OF KITCHEN GARDEN AND FLOWER SEEDS FOR 1867, 
WITH LIST OF IMPLEMENTS AND OTHER GARDEN REQUISITES, 

Is now Published, and will be forwarded free on application. 



THE ROYAL EXOTIC NURSERY, KING'S ROAD, CHELSEA, LONDON, S.W. 
FINEST NAMED ®M$&j& HYBRID GLADIOLI. 

JAMES VEITCH AND SONS 

HAVE MUCH PLEASURE IN OFFERING 

FINE BULBS OF ALL THE BEST NAMED VARIETIES IN CULTIVATION. 

Choice Selections at 5s., 10s., 15s., 24s., and 36s. per dozen. 

TWELVE SPLENDID NOVELTIES OP THIS YEAR'S INTRODUCTION FOR 63*. 



GLADIOLUS BRENCHLEYENSIS, per doz. 3s. ; per 
100, 21s. 
ELORIBUNDUS, per doz., 2*. 6d. ■ per 

100, 15s. 
GANDAVENSIS, per doz., Is. 6d. ; per 

100, 10s. 6d. 
NB PLUS ULTRA, per doz., Is. 9d. ; 
per 100, 12s. 6d. 

FINEST DOUBLE ITALIAN TUBEROSES, per doz., 3s. 



GLADIOLUS INSIGNIS, per doz., 4s. ; per 100, 30s. 

„ CARDINALIS, per doz., Is. 9d. ; per \ 

100, 12s. 6d. 
PSITTACINUS, per doz., Is. ; per 100, 

6s. 
SEEDLINGS, per doz. 6s. ; per 100, 
42s. 



DETAILED DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUES POST-FREE ON APPLICATION. 



ROYAL EXOTIC NURSERY, KING'S ROAD, CHELSEA, S.W. 

Now ready, Royal 4ito, with 10 coloured Plates, 10s. Gd., Part V. of 

A SECOND CENTURY OP ORCHIDACEOUS PLANTS, 

Selected from the subjects published in Curtis's ' Botanical Magazine ' since the issue 

of the ' First Century.' 

Edited by JAMES BATEMAN, Esq., F.R.S. 

To be completed in Ten Parts. Part VL will be published February 1st. 



' 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



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The Records of 10,763 Cures of Asthma, Consumption, and other Disorders of the 

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The benefit to society which lias resulted from the discovery of this medicine is, however, far greater than these 
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4 BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



1867. 

FIRST WEEK IN JANUARY 

WILL BE PUBLISHED 

FIRST EDITION (25,000) 

OF 

BARK, AND SUGDEFS 

GUIDE 

TO THE KITCHEN AND FLOWER GAEDEN. 



A COPY 

WILL BE PRESENTED TO EACH CUSTOMER 

INTENDING PURCHASERS 

WILL ALSO BE PRESENTED WITH COPIES ON SENDING THEIR ADDRESSES 



THE GUIDE 

WILL EMBKACE EVERY NOVELTY AND SPECIALITY "WORTHY OF NOTICE IN 

FLOWER AND VEGETABLE SEEDS. 



Vegetable Seeds Carriage Paid. 



COLLECTIONS OF VEGETABLE SEEDS COLLECTIONS OF FLOWER SEEDS 

3/6, 5/6, 7/6, 10/6, 15/., 21/., 42/., 63/., 84/ 
10/6, 21/., 30/., 42/., 63/., 84/., 105/., to 210/. 105/., to 210/. 

For full particulars of these Collections see the Guide. 



Flower Seeds Post Paid. 



BARR AND SUGDEN, 12, KING STREET, COVENT GARDEN, W.C 



5618. 




n.delet htli 



Vincent Broaks,Imp 



Tab. 5618. 
CATTLEYA Dowiana. 

Captain Bow's Cattleya. 



Nat. Ord. Obcjiideje. — Gynandbia Monandbta. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4700). 



Cattleya Dowiana; pseudobulbis validis clavatis sulcatis monophyllis, 
foliis lato-oblongis obtusis, spatba obtusa pedunculo 2-6-floro sub- 
aequali, floribus speciosissimis, sepalis lanceolatis acutis seasilibus 
planis, petalis plus quam duplo latioribus raargine contortis obtusius- 
culis labello subaequalibus, labello maximo obscure trilobo oblongo 
emarginato crispo disco laevi araplissimo velutino atro-purpureo venis 
aureis pulcberrime ornato, columna subarcuata labello fere obtecta 
et labello 3-plo breviore. 

Cattleya Dowiana. Bateman in Gard. Chron., Oct. 1866. 



This superb Cattleya was originally discovered by Warsze- 
wicz in Costa Rica, and by him plants were forwarded to 
this country ; but arriving in bad condition they eventually 
died. The dried specimens moreover that accompanied the 
living plants seem to have been mislaid or destroyed, so that 
during the last ten years doubts had come to be entertained 
as to the existence of a really distinct species of such unex- 
ampled beauty as that which the letters of the veteran tra- 
veller described. And in the mean time his name was given 
to another supposed species respecting which the greatest 
confusion now prevails, and which, whether or not it be a 

^mere variety of C. Mossia? (labiata), is at all events perfectly 
different from the glorious thing to which even the double 
plate on the opposite page fails to do adequate justice. 

Fortunately for the lovers of fine Orchids the plant, such 
as Warszewicz originally described it, was rediscovered in 
1864 by M. Arce, a zealous naturalist who was and is still 
busily engaged in collecting birds, insects, and plants, for 

•Mr. Salvin and Mr. Skinner, throughout some of the richest 
portions of Costa Rica. The plants which Arce sent home 

JANUABY 1ST. 1867. 



were purchased by Messrs. Veitch and Son, in whose esta- 
blishment at Chelsea one of them flowered for the first time 
in the autumn of 1865. To their liberality I am myself in- 
debted for a specimen that subsequently flowered at Kny- 
persley and which was (in the autumn of 1866) exhibited 
at one of the Tuesday meetings of the Royal Horticultural 
Society at South Kensington. From this Mr. Fitch's draw- 
ing was made. Beautiful as the latter is, it probably gives 
but a poor idea of what the plant will ultimately become, 
for the native specimens in Messrs. Veitch's possession have 
some of them borne as many as five or six flowers on a scape. 

Utterly unlike as are the nankeen and purple colours of 
our plant to those of every other Cattleya, still as colour 
alone is scarcely considered a sufficient botanical distinction, 
and as in the mere form of its flowers C. Dowiana comes 
very near to some of the many varieties of C. Mossice, there 
was for a while some doubt on my mind as to whether it might 
not eventually have itself to be ranked among the number, 
especially as C. pallida, which has been shown (see Tab. 5504) 
to be undistinguishable from other forms of C. labiata, has 
been found by Hartweg as far north as Oaxaca. I have 
lately however seen a letter from Messrs. Low's Costa Rica 
collector, who, after announcing his discovery of what he 
then supposed to be a new Cattleya, goes on to describe the 
colours, which are precisely those of C. Dowiana, thus 
proving at all events that the latter is not given to sport or 
change, and I am therefore now fully disposed to believe 
that it is essentially distinct from all other members of the 
genus. Be this as it may, it is a worthy plant to bear the 
name of a gallant officer in the American Packet service, 
the well-known Captain J. M. Dow, to whom I have great 
pleasure in dedicating it, as some slight acknowledgment 
of the many kindnesses shown and the frequent assistance 
rendered to English naturalists and men of science who have 
been so fortunate as to come in his way in their passage 
along the coasts of the Pacific. 

C. Dowiana is very easily grown, but the warmest end of 
the Cattleya house seems to suit it best. 

Descr Psevdobulhs eight inches to a foot high, slender at* 
the base but very much swollen in their upper portion, 
furrowed. Leaves one on each pseudobulb, oblong, thick, 
and rather broad for the genus, from a span to a foot long. 
Peduncle two- to six-fl©wered, exceedingly stout, about six 
inches long, proceeding from a ftpqthe Somewhat shorter than 
itself. Flowers very large and beautiful, nankeen-coloured, 
with the exception of the lip, their total expansion nearly 



seven inches. Sepals lanceolate, acute, sessile, smooth at 
the edges. Petals more than twice as broad as the sepals, 
about the same length as the lip, somewhat obtuse, very 
much waved at the margin. Lip oblong, crisp, very large 
and prominent, of a substance resembling dark purple velvet 
beautifully and uniformly streaked with golden threads 
radiating from its centre, where they meet three other 
golden lines passing longitudinally. It is obscurely three- 
lobed, the lateral lobes being gathered round so as almost 
to conceal the column; the central lobe emarginate, very 
large, with its edges exceedingly curled. Column not more 
than one third the length of the lip. — J. H. 



5679. 




V. Etch, del etlith. 



joks , Imp 



Tab. 5619. 

BOWIEA VOLUBILIS. 

Twining Bowiea. 



Nat. Orel. Liliacejs. — Hexandhia Monouyma. 



Gen. Char. Flores abortu monoici. Perianth i urn 6-partituin, herbaceum, 
laciniis patenti-reflexis lineari-subulatis apicibus incurvis glandulosis. Sta- 
mina hypogyna, in fl. $ imperfecta, minuta, in fl. <$ filamentis lineari- 
subulatis; antherce oblonga?, 2-loculares. Ovarium couico-heinisphaericum, 
lata basi sessile, 3-loculare ; stylus breviuscul us, rectus, stigmate capitato 
3-lobo; ovula in loculis ad 6. Capsula oblongo-eoniea, obtusa, 3-gona, 
inembranacea, loculicide 3-valvis, polyspermia. Semina irregulariter ob- 
longa, compressa; testa laxa inembranacea, atra, splendila. — Herbs aphjlla. 
Tuber globosum, carnosum, apice nudum v. squamis paucis parvis trianyu* 
lari-subulatis circa basin pedunculi imbricatis coronatum. Pedunculus 
floriferus volubilis, viridis, carnosulus, ramosissimus, ramis inferioribus 
ramulosis, ramulis dichotomis divaricatis teretibus corniculatis non florid 
feris, superioribus in pedicellis elongatis curvis de.iinentibus. Flores inter 
minores, virides. 



Bowiea volubilis. Han. mss. 



Though possessing little beauty, this is certainly one of 
the most curious plants ever introduced into Europe, and 
is further perfectly new to science ; for though in botanical 
characters allied to Ih'imia and SciUu. in habit and general 
appearance it is like no other plant whatever. It consists of 
little more than a globose, fleshy, almost tuberous, green 
bulb, from the apex of which ascends yearly a very slender, 
twining, green flower-stem, six to eight feet high, that throws 
off an abundance of compound, curving, flowerless branches 
below, and above bears numerous small, green flowers. For se- 
veral years a specimen of this plant, sent to the Royal Gardens 
by Henry Hutton, Esq., of Grahamstown, was an object of 
great curiosity at Kew ; the twining, branched flower-stem 
ascended, like a Cape Asparagus, the rafters of the succulent- 
house for four or five feet, and as this bore no flowers, was 
presumed to be a branched, leafless stem proper. This died 

J ANITA TJX 1ST, 1807. 



down the same year, and no one guessed the family of plants 
to which it belonged. In the following year a similar twi- 
ning stem produced a few minute flower-buds, which were 
sent to my friend the late Dr. Harvey, who identified them 
with a plant of which he had dried specimens, collected on 
the eastern frontier of the Cape district by Mrs. Barber, and 
to which he had attached the manuscript name of Boiviea, 
in honour of the late Mr. Bowie, formerly collector for the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, and latterly superintendent of the late 
Baron Ludwig's Garden at Cape Town, the old genus Boiviea 
having been reduced to Aloe. Other living specimens have 
since been received from Mrs. Barber and from Mr. Wilson 
Saunders, F.R.S., collected by Cooper, and it is from one of 
the latter that the accompanying drawing has been made. 

Descb. Wholly green, rather fleshy. Bulb as large as an 
orange, green, the coats few, very thick, fleshy, with yellow 
margins. Leaves 0, except a few scales at the apex of the 
bulb. Flowering-stem or scape solitary, very slender, two to 
four feet long, twining, excessively branched, the branches 
intertwisted, repeatedly dichotomously divided, the branch- 
lets curved, divaricating, terete, without flowers, Ilowerinq 
peduncles at the upper part of the scape, on its axis or 
branches, one to two inches long, slender, divaricating. 
Flowers half to two-thirds of an inch in diameter. Perianth 
six-cleft to the base ; segments linear or lanceolate-subulate, 
with incurved tips. Stamens inserted at the base of the 
ovary ; filaments slender, subulate ; anthers oblong. Ovary 
three- celled, with several ovules in each cell ; style short ; 
stigma capitate, three-lobed. Capsule membranous, oblong^ 
three-valved. Seeds several, flattened, with a loose, black, 
brilliant testa. — ./. I). II 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Stamen. 3. Ovary. 4.. Transverse section of ditto :— 
all magnified. 



5620. 




i- 



/ 



>A 



K 



W Fitch, del et lith. 



Vincent Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 5620. 
CURCUMA Austkalasica. 
Australian Wild Turmeric. « 



Xat. Ol'd. ZlNGIBERACSiE. — MoNASDRIA MONOOTXIV. 

Gen. Char. Calyx tubulosus, 3-dentatus. Corolla; tubus sursum dilafa- 
tua, limbi laciqise exteriorea iuterioribus lateralibui eont'orines ; labelhnn 
majtts, patens. Fdamenfum petaloideo-dilatatum, earinatum, apice '2- 
Iobum, lobo intermedio anthera 2-calcarata terminate Ovarium info- 
rum, 3-loculare ; stylus filiformia, stigmata capitato; ovula in loculornm 
angulo centrali plurima, horizoutalia, anatropa. Oapsula 3-locularis, locu- 
bcide 3-valvis. Semiua plurima, arillata. — Herbs WJ India oriental] tro- 
pica indigent, acaales, raJicibus palmato-tubcrosis. Folia petiolata, hrr- 
bacea, pedohs ragiuantihus. Scapus simpler, lateralis v. centralis. Npiea 
erecta, carnosa, inferne bracteis saccatis subimbricata. Flores jlavesceates, 
intra quamvis bracteara 3-5-7?/, approximati, bractcolati. 



Curco.ia Australasica ; foliia petiolatis oblongo v. ovato-lanceolatis acu- 
minata glaberrimis, scapo terminal], spica multiflora, bracteis inferi- 
onbus obtusis recurvia flore brevioribua viridibua, anpremia oblongs 
oblongo-lanceolatiaye acutis acuminatiave roseis, ealycia tubo corollas 
dimidio breviore, lobis brevibus rotundatis, corolla laciniia oblongis 
obtusis, labello orbiculato recurvo retuso v. emarginato marginibus 
undulatis, anthera oblonga calcaribus couniventibus, filamento lato 
cueullato. 



Qf the extensive and beautiful Indian genus Curcuma, no 
species had been known to inhabit Australia previous to the 
visit of Mr. John Vcitch to that continent, who was the dis- 
coverer and means of introducing the present species from 
its north-eastern corner (Cape York) into England. The 
plant here figured flowered in Messrs. Yeitch's establishment 
in August of the last year, and the same specimen, presented 
by them to the Royal Gardens, continued in flower through- 
out the following month and beginning of October, forming 
a very striking ornament in one of the tropical stoves, where 
it lifted its beautiful crown of transparent, rose-coloured 
bracts above the surrounding green foliage. As a species, 
it approaches extremely near to two Indian ones, described 
by Dr. Roxburgh, viz. the common C. longa (Turmeric), and 
C. montana, differing from both in the cucullate bracts, with 

JANUARY 1ST, 1867. 



recurved tips, and in the broader base of the leaf. The root 
is white, and has but a slight aroma. 

Descr. Root of bundles of cylindric, white tubers, con- 
stricted here and there. Leaves a foot to a foot and a half 
long, narrow-lanceolate or lanceolate, with a rounded base, 
acuminate. Sdape terminal, at first short, then lengthening 
considerably. Spike five to seven inches long, cylindric, 
many-flowered. Bracts, lower cucullate, close set, and con- 
nate by their bases, obtuse, recurved, green ; upper spread- 
ing, oblong, acute, rose-red, one inch long. Flowers pale- 
yellow. Ovary globose. Calyx-tube half as long as the co- 
rolla-tube ; lobes three, obtuse. Corolla-lobes oblong, obtuse. 
Up orbicular. Anther oblong, with conniving spurs. Sta- 
minodes terete — /. D. II. 



Fig. 1. Front, and 2. Side view of flower. 3. Stamen and stigma. 4. 
Side view of do. 5. Side view of ovary and staminodia. 6. Front view of 
staminodes : — nil magnified. 



5621. 




■VOitch.del.etlith. 



Vincent Brooks Jmp 



Tab. 5621. 

HELIANTHEMUM ocymoides. 

Basil-like Rock-rose. 

Nat. Ord. Cistink^:. — Polyandria Monogtma. 



Gen. Char. Petala, in floribus perfectis, 5. Stamina numerosa. Ovarii 
placentae v. semisepta 3 ; ovula in quavia placenta oo ; stylus cum ovario 
articulatus, filiformis v. subclavatus, nunc abbreviatus ; stigma capitatum 
v. eristato-3-lobum. Embryo uncinatus, 2-plicatus v. circumflexus. — Herbrc 
suffrutieesce, basi seepius decumbenti-ramosa. Flores scepius in racemos 
terminates, simplices v. 2-Jldos dispositi v. inferiores axillares. Petala lata. 



Helianthemum ocymoides; caule suffruticoso erecto ramoso gracili, ramis 
incanis hie illic pilosis, foliis oppositis lineari- v. spathulato-oblongis 
aeutis obtusisve apice recurvis utrinque incanis, pedunculis elongatis 
superne subcorymbosim ramosis gracilibus laxe patentim pilosis, sepalis 
3 ovatis longe acuminatis pubescentibus v. tomentosis, petalis late 
obcordatis basi purpureis, stylo brevi, stigmate magno capitate 

Heliaxthbmum ocymoides. Persoon, Rack. v. 11. 76. DC. Prodr. v. 1. 
p. 267. Sweet Cistin. t. 13. 

Cistus ocymoides. Lam. Diet. v. 11. p. 18. 

Cistus sampsucifolius. Cavan. p. 65.2?. 96, non Milleri. 



A most beautiful hardy Rock- or Sun-rose, native of Spain 
and Portugal, where, like its congeners, it inhabits dry. 
rocky hills. It was for some years cultivated in the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, and flowered in July in an open border, 
though apt to be cut by the frost. The beautiful genus to 
which this belongs was once a favourite in cultivation, but 
has of late given way before the rage for t; bedding-out 
plants," which now monopolize the once varied borders of 
English gardens. No less than seventy species of Helianthe- 
mum, besides varieties, are figured in Sweet's valuable work 
on the cultivated plants of the Order, published in 1830. and 
of these a great number are now no longer to be found in 
England. It is to be hoped that the time will yet come 
when the taste for really beautiful and interesting plants will 

JANUARY 1st, 1867. 



reign again, and replace the present passion for a blaze of 
gaudy colours along our garden walks. 

Descr. A shrub two to three feet high, slender, twiggy, 
with erect, rather flexuous branches, everywhere covered on 
the leaves and branches with a hoary pubescence. Leaves 
opposite, half to one and a half inch long, those on the 
main stems and branches linear-oblong acute, those on the 
branchlets more spathulate, with recurved tips, all equally 
hoary on both surfaces. Peduncles very slender, six to nine 
inches long, many-flowered. Pedicels corymbose, branched 
towards the tip of the peduncle, opposite below, half to one 
inch long, erect, as well as the peduncles covered with loose 
soft, very spreading hairs. Flowers an inch and a quarter to 
an inch and a half broad, bright yellow with a purple eye. 
Sepals ovate, long acuminate, subtended by two linear nar- 
row bracts, tomentose on the back. Petals broadly and 
shallowly obcordate, with an apiculus between the lobes. 
Stamens unequal, very numerous ; filaments short ; anthers 
purple, with yellow pollen. Ovary globose, villous ; style 
very short ; stigma large, capitate, three-lobed. — J. 1). H. 



Fig. 1. Calyx and ovary. 



5622. 




VTRteh,del.etkh. 



Vincent Brooksjtnp 



Tab. 5622. 
gejas cauliflora. 

Anchovy Pear. 

Nat. Ord. MYETACEiE. — Monadelphia Polyandbia. 

Gen. Char. Cahjcis tubus turbinatus, supra ovarium baud productus, 
limbus cupulatus, demum in lobos 2-1 irregulariter ruptus. Pctahi I. 
rarius 5, pateutia. Stamina oo, disco crasso subcupulato oc-seriatim in- 
serta, interiora minora, filamentis crassis in globum conniventibus invo- 
lutis; antherae parvae, loculis distinctis longitudinaliter dehiscentibus. 
Ovarium inferum, 4-loculare ; stylus v. breviter conicus, stigmatibus 4 
cruciatim radiantibus • ovula in loculis 2-4, pendnla. Fructus carnosus, 
ovoideus, calycis limbo coronatus. Semen saepius 1, pendulum, testa crassa. 
— Arbores excelsce Americana?. Folia alterna, ad apices ramulorum con- 
ferta, sape longissima, penninervia, interferrima v. obscure sinuato-dentata, 
epunctata. Flores in trunco ramisaue breviter pedicellati et subsessiles, 
r asciculati. 



Geias caulijlora ,• foliis lanceolatis acuminatis recurvis glaberrimis, pedun- 
culis brevibus crassismultinoris,noribus pallide flavis, petalis oblongis 
obtusis. 

Geias cauliflora. Linn. Sp. PL 732. DC. Prodr. v. 3. p. 296. Griseb. Fl. 
Brit. W. Ind. p. 243. 

Anchovy Pear. Shane Hist. Jam. v. 2, p. 122. t. 217. / 1, 2. Browr.e, Jam. 
p. 245. Lunan, Sort. Jam. v. 1. p. 19. 



This is a plant of considerable interest, in a horticultural 
and perhaps also in an economic point of new. In the first 
place, it is one of the most striking and easily managed of all 
those stately, palm-like tropical dicotyledonous trees that are 
so greatly admired, and are essential for the decoration of 
every stove ; and in the next place, as the " Anchovy Pear,'" 
it has long been, according to some authorities, in esteem as 
a West Indian fruit. The latter is a large, brown, fleshy 
drupe, like that of the Mammee-apple, which was, according 
to Sloane, pickled and eaten by the Spaniards in lieu of 
mangoes, and was sent as a great rarity to Spain. Browne, 
in his ' Natural History of Jamaica,' says nothing of the value 
of the fruit, but M'Fadyen, who represents the English taste 
ja^uaet 1st, 1867. 



in such matters, says in his second volume (unpublished), " 1 
cannot learn that the fruit is ever collected for use, or 
brought to the market." 

The Grias cauliflora is found throughout the Spanish 
Main, growing in clumps or thickets, and its flowers are 
deliriously sweet-scented. It has flowered several times at 
Kew, and lately in September of last year. 

Desce. A tree twenty to fifty feet high, trunk undivided 
or with a few simple branches. Leaves crowded at the ends 
of the branches, spreading and drooping, three to four feet 
long, ten inches broad, obovate-lanceolate, acuminate, cuneate 
at the base and continuous with the short petiole, quite 
entire or obscurely waved and crenulate, dark green, quite 
glabrous, shining. Flowers on short stout branching pedun- 
cles, produced on the trunk far below the leaves, two inches 
broad, pale yellow, very fragrant. Calyx limb irregularly 
four-cleft, Petals four, fleshy, oblong, obtuse, nerveless. 
Stamens crowded, incurved. Jpex of ovary square and red. 
Fruit ovate, eight-grooved, containing an oblong, one-seeded 
nut— J. D. II. 



Fig. 1. Whole plant, reduced. 2. Branch and flower, nat. size. 3. 
Ovary and calyx. 4. Transverse section of ditto. 5. Vertical section of 
stamen. 6. Stamen : — all magnified. 



GROOM'S 
SUPERB NEW ZONATE GERANIUMS. 

(See Descriptive Circular.) 

A faithful Illustration by Andrews of the Set may be had for Thirteen Postage Stamps. 

Robert Ward, The Rosery, Ipswich. 



NEW ENGLISH HYBRID PERPETUAL ROSES, 
MRS. WAED, MRS. JOHN BERNERS, AND IPSWICH GEM. 

ROBERT WARD has the pleasure to announce that he is now taking Orders for the above 
splendid Seedlings, which will be let out next spring, and that these truly beautiful varieties will 
prove equally satisfactory with his celebrated '.John Hopper.' 

A Descriptive Circular man he had on application. 

Coloured Plates by Andrews of 'Mrs. Ward' and ' Mrs. Berners,' post-free for 21 Stamps. 

ROBERT WARD, THE ROSERY, IPSWICH. 

HYACINTHS, TULIPS, AND OTHER DUTCH BULBS, 

IMPORTED BY 

¥m. CUTBUSH and SOX. 

The DESCRIPTIVE PRICED CATALOGUE, with numerous cultural remarks, Post-free 
on application. 

Early Orders earnestly solicited, as the supply cannot possibly meet the increasing demand. 

HIGHGATE NURSERIES, LONDON, N. 
SUTTON'S UNRIVALLED COLLECTIONS OF SEEDS. 



SUTTON AND SONS 

ARE NOW PREPARED TO RECEIVE ORDERS FOR THE ABOVE, 
THE IT. - I V WHICH a UB F* . < ; •' -: — 

'HE KITCHEN GARDEN. FOR THE FLOWER GARDEN. 

£. s. d. ! £. g. 

No. 1. A complete Collection fur one j No. 1. A of the mv 

supply 3 3 

No. 2. A complete Collection of ditto, i: : tish varieties 

ties proportionately reduced . . 2 2 No. 2. A complete Colled to . . 1 11 

. Ill 6 No. 3. A cor ■ ... 1 1 

.110 1 of ditto . . 15 

. 15 No. 5. . ditto . 10 

. 10 6 Fret ! 1 Rail. 





No. 3. A complete Collection of ditto 
No. 4. A complete Collection of ditto 
No. 5. A complete Collection of ditto 
No. 6. A complete Collection of ditto 



Not. 1, 2, 3, i, 5, j 



SUTTOf^'S RINGLEADER PEA, 

The very best and earliest in cultivation, Price 2s. per Quart. 

SUTTON'S SPRING CATALOGUE AND AMATEUR'S GUIDE FOR 1SG7 

"Will sbortlv be ready., and forwarded on receipt of 12 stamps : gratis to customers. 
All Goods sent Carriage Free (except small parcels). 5 per cent, discount allowed for cash pay \ent. 
SUTTON & SONS. ROYAL BERKSHIRE SEED ESTABLISHMENT. READING 



HEATING BY HOT WATER 



It is now generally admitted that Buildings of any kind can be more effectui 
warmed by Hot Water than by any other means ; but as so much depends on 
way in which the Apparatus is fixed, it is of the greatest importance that it be j 
by experienced men. 

J. Jokes & Sons are prepared to estimate for Warming, to any extent — 



GREENHOUSES. 
CONSERVATORIES. 
VINERIES. 
HOTHOUSES. 
FORCING PITS. 
PEACH HOUSES. 
PINE STOVES. 
ORCHARD HOUSES. 



CHURCHES. 

CHAPELS. 

SCHOOLS. 

READING ROOMS. 

LECTURE ROOMS. 

BILLIARD ROOMS. 

HALLS AND PASSAGES. 

BATHS. 



FACTORIES. 
OFFICES. 
WORKSHOPS. 
WAREHOUSES. 
DRYING ROOMS. 
CELLARS. 
COACH-HOUSES. 
HARNESS ROOMS. 






J. Jones & Sons' Apparatus is simple in construction, moderate in cost, a 
economical in working. 

It is equally available for the Amateur's Greenhouse, or the longest range 
Forcing Houses; for the smallest Chapel or the largest Church; for Private Off 
or those of Public Companies. 

It is admirably adapted for Dwelling Houses, as coils of pipes can be 
in anv part, for warmins the various rooms. One or more Baths may be 
..in the same boiler, and a constant supply of hot water obtained in any pa" 
• house. 

For Warehouses and Workshops this system of heating is unsurpassed, a? « 
only the means of keeping goods dry, but it also adds to the comfort of 
rkpeople, and thereby effects a saving in labour. 
J. Jones & Sons recommend boilers of all kinds being set in brickwork, 
possible ; but portable boiltrs can be supplied, if required. 



MATEBIALS.— All Materials supplied will be of the best quality. 

DELIVEEY.— Boilers of various kinds, and pipes and ci i -■ " ■- 

in stock, can, at a very short notice, be sent to any | 

EIXIKG.— The fixing will be done by experienced men, fully capable t f I 

; 3 & Sons are pre] 



properly any work they may undertake; and J 
guarantee the effectual working of any apparatus fixed bj 

ESTIMATES.— Plans and Estimates will be sent on application. 



own men- 



J. JONES & SONS, 

IEON MEECHANTS AND EOBTICTJLTTJKAL ENGINE* 3 

6, BAXKSIDE. SOUTHWARK. LONDON. S.E. 



Cljirlf Series,. 

No. 266. 

VOL. XXIII. FEBRUARY. [PriceZs. 6d. col*- 2s. M. plain. 

OR NO. 961 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPRISING 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GEE AT BRITAIN , 

WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 



BY 



JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S. 

director of tfjc Rami JSotaruc ©artictiS at Bdn. 




Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers exotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 
REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1867. 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT LAWN MOWEES FOR 18i 



Patronized on Five occasions, during the Season of 1SQ4>, by 
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF SAXONY; 

DUEING THE SEASON OF 1865 THEY WERE PATRONIZED ON FOUR OCCASIONS BY HER MAJES 

THE QUEEN; 

ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF HOLLAND; 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF PRUSSIA; 

AGAIN, DURING THE SEASON OF 1866, THEY WERE PATRONIZED ON FOUR OCCASIONS BI 

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 




ALF 
be abb 

A. S. 

- 
men are 

PR1 



HORSE MAOHiNjf. PONT MACHINE. HAND MACHINE. 

ZANDER SHANKS & SON, in presenting their LAWN MOW E 1 ! 3 Season of 1867, ar< 

to state that the demand for their celebrated Machines rapidly increases every year. The BUCceB' 
Shanks Machines during last Season is quite unparalleled in the hi-tory of the Lawn Mower. 
& Son can confidently assure their numerous Friends and Customers and the Public zenerallj • ' 
will always-be to supply a Machine, first-class in every wvj, one which cannot be surpassed if i 
tor simplicity ot construction, ease in working, or durability. None but the besl materials and skilled 1 
employed in the manufacture of their Machines. 

C ES— Including Carriage to most of the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in the King** 

SHARKS' NEW PATENT HAND MACHINE FOR 1867. 



Machine £3 10 } Sonify worked 

Machine 410 0) hy a Lady. 

Machine 5 10 Do.byaBoy. 

llaclnne 6 10 Do.byaMan. 



Silent Movement for the four smallest sizes, 4s. extra 



C Do Jv 3 
19-mch Machine £7 12 6£ x 

22-inch Machine 8 7 6 J 1> ■ 

2 1-inch Machine 8 17 6[ &*" 



7 , M. extra. 



28-inch 
30-inch 



W NEW PATENT PONY & EONKEY MACHINE. 
>f Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus 

^ il <*™ t12 ,0 ° 25*.extr». 

Jf**? 6 11 10 80*. extra. 

M**™ 15 15 :;o.v. extra. 

Silent Movement, Yls. Gd. extra. 



SHANKS' IEW PATENT EOESE MACBfl* 



36-inch Ma 

2 



b Patent Delivering ApP^ 
£19 3Lb ' : 

'.40i.fi 



22 



28 

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SHANKS' PATENT LAWN MOV. 



and it 



Every Mc 



warranted to five ample 



■fl qf t ran be at once r> 






ALEXANDEll SHANKS & SON, 
27, LEADENHALL STEEET, LONDOH. 

MANUFACTORY, DENS IRONWORKS. ARBROATH- 



at once executed. -;'- 1 f f aWn ^^ at 27 ' ^adenhall Bt, . London, from which OrffM 
^^^t^-it^T^ 1 ^^ London Warehouse a .US of experienced Workmen thoj 
Sdon S ^1 \ ■ - ^^Lf these Mach ^es. so that they are enabled to repair Lawn ** 
wmaon as wed a, at tne iianufactory. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



GENUI NE GA RDEN SEEDS. 

NUNEHAM PAKK ONION. 

KV^nl^ C ? TBJJm AND S ° N ha ^ great gratification in announcing that this SUPERB 
N a W U.N 1U^ has in every instance where shown obtained the first prizes. It is the largest and 
heaviest cropper of all Onions, mild and long keeping. 

In Sealed Packets, 2s. 6d. Each. 
Wm. C. & SON'S Catalogue of Vegetable, Flower, and Farm Seeds, post free on application. 

VARIEGATED PELARGONIUM "METEOR," SALTMARSH AND^SON'sT 
5 is 4 boil 1 ' ltifll l yaHety, to which a First-Class Certificate was awarded at * meeting of the Koval 
horticultural Society, will be sent out on the 1st of May, 1867, with a few others by the same 
raisers, at 21s. each. The usual discount to the Trade. Orders will be executed in strict rotation 
further particulars will appear in future advertisements. 

SALTMARSH AND SON, MOULSHAM NURSERIES, CHELMSFORD. 




GENUINE MP SEEDS. 



JAMES VEITCH AND SONS 

BEG TO ANNOUNCE THAT THEIR 

CATALOGUE OF KITCHEN GARDEN AND FLOWER SEEDS FOR 1867, 

WITH LIST OF -IMPLEMENTS AND OTHER GARDEN REQUISITES, 

Is now Published, and will be forwarded free on application. 

THE ROYAL EXOTIC NURSERY, KING'S ROAD, CHELSEA, LONDON, S.W. 

For Conservatories, Greenhouses, Orchard-Houses, and Pits, 

Where Bedding Plants are kept during the Winter, the Best and Cheapest Means to repel the Frost is 

HAYS'S PATENT CONSTANT STOVE 

Which requires no Flue, is Cleanly, Portable, and Economical, requires attention only once in 
twelve hours, ensures a regular and constant heat at a trifling cost, and fully supplies a want Ian* 
lelt by every class of gardener. ° 

Price 30* GO* and 80s each. The Patent Fuel supplied in Bags containing two bushels 
price 1*. 10d. per bushel. Bags charged 9d. each, and allowed for if returned. 

these btoves are also eminently adapted for Churches, Halls, Hospitals, Offices, Shops, Wine 
, eliars, Coach Houses, Harness Rooms, etc., etc., and can be made on the same principle to anv 
size or design. r r J 

Particulars, Testimonials, and Reports from Professor Pepper. Mr. Thomas Rivers, and other 
reliable authorities, free, from 

HENRY BAKER, 17, HARP LANE, GT. TOWER STREET, LONDON, 

Sole Agent for Stoves and Fuel. 



Now ready, Royal Uo, with 10 coloured Plates, 10*. ft*., Part YL of 

A SECOND CENTUEY OP OECHIDACEOUS PLANTS, 

Selected from the subjects published in Curtis's • Botanical Magazine ' since the issue 

of the 'First Century.' 

Edited by JAMES BATEMAN, Esq.,F.R.S. 

To be completed in Ten Parts. Part VII. will be published April 1st. 

REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



BARE AND SUCH) UN'S GUIDE 

TO THE KITCHEN AND FLOWER GARDEN FOR 1867. 

IT EMBRACES EVERY NoVKLTY AM) SI'i:< 1 \ 1,1 I V WORTHY OF NOTICE Df 

FLOWEE AND VEGETABLE SEEDS. 

INTENDING PURCHASERS 
WILL BE PRESENTED WITH COPIES ON MINDING THEIR ADDRESSES. 



COLLECTIONS OF VEGETABLE SEEDS 

Sent Carriage Paid. 

21/., 30., 42, 63, 84, 105, to 210. 

Smaller Collections made up if required. 



COLLECTIONS OF FLOWER SEEDS 
S.-nt Post Paid. 
3 6, 5 6. 7 6, 10 6, 15.. 21 ., 42.. 63.. 84., 
105 , to 210. 



For full particulars of these Collections see the Guide 
BARR & SUGDEN S WINDOW CONSERVATORIES & WINDOW FERNERIES 

OP VARIOUS STY I 

The present Illustrations are part of a series which B. & S. have fitted up. The introduction of 
these elegant structures is a great boon, especially in large towns. Window Conservatories (« 
Illustrated) being constructed generally in the front of the BOOM, gift increased elegance to tte 

facade, and contribute to the retirement of the interior. Plants in bloom may be conserved « 
these for a longer period than if they wen • exposed to the drier atmosphere of the room, orferj 
may be successfully grown m them; indeed they may be made an interesting source of recreate 

'throughout the year. 

Window Ferneries, which can be constructed with or withoul an Aquarium and Fountain.^ 
are u , e d principally on defectively lighted staircases, or to replace wind] ave stained gb£ 

lhey are also used in rooms where the proapeet ia objectionable ; and as the> abul some little dis- 
tance outwardly, in addition to the refreshing nature [e and abating no white! 
; the light, they give an enlarged appearance to the apartment 

WINDOW CONSEBVATOBY. WZXSO* FEBKBBT. 





■■'■ \ 






1 


— 















BARR AND SUGDEN, 12, KING STREET, C0VENT GARDEN. W.C 



5623. 




W Etch, del et lith . 



Vincent Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 5623. 
TAFEINOTES CabolOta 

Empress Charlottes Tapeinotes. 



Nat. Ord. GeSNERTACE-E.— DlDYNAMIA AnGIOSPERMIA. 

Gen. Char. Calyx libera inequalta, 5-partitus. Corolla itifundibulirormi- 
subnngens, ban postice gibba, tubo antice interdum grosse ventricoso, 
fence contracto, limhi erecti, labio superiore 2- inferiore 3-lobo. Stamina 
4, didynaina, et quinti rudimentum ; antherce cohacrentes. DwciM in glan- 
dulam poaticam tumens. Capsula ovata, coriacea, 1-locularis, 2-Taifia 
placentis 2 ! parietalibua 2-lamellatis. Smimmqo, oblonga.— Herba? Braai- 
heiises, subcarnosat, cattle ba*i tnberoso. Folia opposita v. subopposita pe- 
tiolata, subdentata. Pedicelli l-1-axillares, 1-2-jtori. 



Tapeinotes Carolina; suffruticosa, foliis confertia oblon s is oblongo- 
laneeolatisve acuminatis basi acutis crenato-serratis supra nitidis Tu- 
ride yirescentibus subtus hirtis rubro-purpureis, pedicellis angulatia 
1-noris infra calycem 5-alatis, sepalis t'oliaceis deltoideo-cordatis acutia 
margjuibaa recurvis undulatis, corolla alba calyce duplo longiore, tubo 
inflato hiraoto, lobis parvis suborbiculatis glabris, ovario birsuto. 

Tapeinotes Carolina?. Wawra, CEstr. Bot. Zeitschrift, 1862, p. 273, cum 
to. ; Bot. Ergebn. Reise Maximil. p. 72. t. 9. 



A beautiful stove plant, introduced into this country by 
Mr. Bull, of Chelsea, from whose plant the accompanying 
drawing was made, in November, 1866. It was discovered 
during the Brazilian travels of his present Majesty the Em- 
peror of Mexico (Maximilian I.) in 1859-60, and was intro- 
duced into the Imperial Garden of Schonbrunn (Vienna) and 
published by Dr. Henrich Wawra, who accompanied the ex- 
pedition as surgeon and naturalist. It bears the name of the 
Empress of Mexico (Charlotte). 

The other species of Tapeinotes, of which there are several, 
are all natives of Brazil and well worthy of cultivation, as 
indeed are most of the plants of the beautiful Order to 
which it belongs. 

Descr. A small undershrub. Stem and branches terete, 
red-brown, rather succulent. Leaves crowded towards the 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1867. 



ends of the branches, opposite, four to six inches long, shortly 
petioled, oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, obtusely serrate, dark 
bluish-green and shining- above, with sunk veins and scat- 
tered short hairs, bright red-purple and hairy below. Pe- 
duncles axillary, solitary, one-third as long as the leaves, an- 
gular, one-flowered^ with two subulate bracts at the base. 
Calyx of five, large, leafy, triangular, cordate, acute, green 
sepals, with undulate, recurved margins. Corolla an inch 
and a half long, white ; tube curved upwards, inflated and 
gibbous below, villous with long hairs ; mouth contracted ; 
lobes short, broad, rounded, glabrous. Stamens included ; an- 
thers cohering. Ovary villous. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1. Base of calyx and ovary : — magnified. 



,' '■-• t 



sm. 




Lot Mi 



Vincent Broods 






Tab. 5624 

AXniU'OTTM CTTRATUM. 

Citron-yellow Angrcecum. 

N;it. Ord, <)l!(HII)I..V,. — (iVSAM)UlA MONANDIIU 

Gen. Char. (Vide tupra, Tab. 5589.) 



Akoilbcuh citratum; aubaaculia, foliis conferm oblongo-lanceolatia icu* 
minatia convexiuacalia, Bcapo gracili pendulo, bracteia appressia ob* 
tuaia nigria, floribua inter minorea racemoaia breviter pedicellatia 
pallida atramtneo-albia, pedicellia teretioaculia, Bepalia lateralibua obo- 
rato-apathulatia obtusia, doraali multo tuiuore arcuato porrecto, petalia 
aepalia majoribaa breviter unguiculatia obovato-rotundatia, labello 
anguiculato, lamina orbiculari emarginato-2-lobo, calcare labello daplo 
longiore flexuoao. 

A n<;r y.cvv. citr.ituni. Pet. T I Hit. Purtic. Plant. Orchid, rrcueillies 

xur It's trots ile$ </' AJrique, t. 61. 



A very curious and pretty little species, of which I find 
no record subsequent to the publication of Uu Petit Thouars' 
work, cited above, and which was published in ! 822, for, 
strange to say. it is omitted in Lindley's celebrated ' Genera 
and Species of Orchidaceous Plants.' 'Hie structure of the 
flower seems peculiar, owing to the small size of the dorsal 
sepal, as shown both in Thouars' and Mi-. Fitch's drawings. 
1 regret not having seen the living specimen, to confirm this 
character. The name is given in reference to the pale yellow 
(citron-coloured) flowers, which are scentless. The plant is 
a native of Madagascar, and was flowered by Messrs. Veitch, 
of the Royal Exotic Nurseries. Chelsea, in March, 1865. 

Descr. Stem very short, half an inch long, sending out 
abundance of slender flattened aerial roots. Leaves few, 
close-set, three to four inches long, oblong-lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, contracted at the base, smooth, convex, and bright 
green above, paler below; midrib deeply sunk. Scapr- 
radical, with the flowering portion twice as long as the leaves, 
pendulous, very slender, with numerous short, sheathing, 

Fl.BRrART 1st. 1867. 



appressed, obtuse, black bracts. Raceme three to five inches 
long, slender, many-flowered. Flowers rather close-set, shortly 
pedicelled, three-quarters of an inch diameter, flat, pale straw- 
colour. Lateral sepals obovate-spathulate, obtuse, rather re- 
flexed ; dorsal very much smaller, arched over the column. 
Petals a little larger and much broader than the lateral sepals, 
orbicular, obovate, with short claws. Lip with an orbicular, 
emarginate, or two-lobed flat blade, and short broad claw. 
Spur about twice as long as the lip, flexuous, rather slender. 
—J. J). H. 



Fig. 1. Portion of raceme and flower. 2. Column, lip and spur. 
Pollen-masses, spur and gland : — all magnified. 






5626. 




WFitcKdeletlith 



Ymcent Brooks ,hif 



Tab. 5625. 

IMPATEENS LAiiroLiA. 

Broad-leaved Cingalese Balsam. 



Is at. Ord. Balsaminej:. — Pentandima I\Io> t ogtnia. 

Gem. Char. Floret irregulares, Sepala 3, rarinime 5, imbricata, 2 late- 
re lia p.irva, uepius riridia; posticum maximum, in calcar productum. Pe- 
tala 3, anticum eiteriua concavuro, lateralia 2-lida (e 2 coal it ii composite) ; 

lobo supenore exteriore. Stamina 5, filamentia brevibus complanat is \ 
antherce circa stylum conniventes r. coha?rentes, loculis introrsum debia- 
centibtis. Ovarium oblongum, 5-loculare; stigma aeasile, 5-dentetmn, v. 
stigmata 5, parra; ovula in loculia oo, Buperpoaita, 1-aeriata. Captula 
2-6-loculana, loculicide dehiscens ; vaivis 5, elastic© desilientibus. Srmina 
exalbumniosa.— Ilerbae nunc frutescentes, m»mm glabra. Folia opposita 
alterna v. verticillata, exstipulata. PcduucuU axil/ares, rarius radicates, 
1-oc-Jiori. Flores sape speciosi. 



IMPATttStlatifoUa; erecta, glaberrima, tbliia alternia rarius oppositis 
verticil iatisve ovato-laneeolatis attenuato-acuminatia basi acutis argute 
aerratia dentibus inferioribus setiferis, petiolo longC setoso, setia glan- 
dularis, pedicellis axillaribus aolitariia 1-floris ebracteolatis, floribua 
majuscuha pdlide purpureis, sepalis lateralibua oblique oblongo-lan- 
leolatis vindibus, labelli limbo concavo viridi, calcare gracili curvo, 
vexdlo obcordato-2-lobo dorso cornuto, alia 2-partitia horizontaliter 
patentibus. 

Impatiexs latifolia. Linn. Sp. PI. 123S. ITook.f. and Thorns, in Journ. 
Linn. Soc. i\\ p. 124. 

Impatiexs cuapidata. Wiqht and Am. in HooJc. Comp. Bot. Mag. v 1 p 

321. Wight, Ic. t. 741. T/ucaifes, Enum. PL Ceylon, p. 65. 
Impatien-s bipartita. Am. in Hook. Comp. Bot. Mag. I.e. p. 322. 
Impatiens floribunda. Wight in Madr. Journ. Sc. v. 5. p. 7. 



Of the vast horde of Indian perennial Balsams, only two 
or three are actually in cultivation, whilst nearly a hundred, 
most of them highly ornamental, are yet to be introduced, 
and especially from the subtropical jungles of Ceylon, the 
western Ghauts, and the Himalaya. Amongst those of the 
first-named locality the present is a conspicuous instance, 
which we owe to our indefatigable correspondent G. H. K. 
Thwaites, F.R.S., who sent seeds from the Royal Gardens, 

FEBEUABY 1ST, 18G7. 



Peradenia, in the winter of 1865, plants from which flowered, 
in moderate heat, at Kew, in September, 1866. It belongs 
to a most puzzling group of this genus, in which the leaves 
are sometimes opposite or whorled, but more often alternate, 
and is most closely allied to, if not identical with, the L 
flaccida of this work, Tab. 5276, differing chiefly in the 
broader leaves. Thwaites, indeed, refers I. flaccida to the 
Iinneean I. latifolia, but describes it as a decumbent plant, 
which does not accord with the habit of the original specimen 
in the Linnamn herbarium. Unfortunately the locality of 
the Linna?an specimen is unknown ; it is marked as from 
the Cape of Good Hope, obviously erroneously, and has the 
spur bifid at the apex (an abnormal feature). Lastly, L flac- 
cida, according to Thwaites, is a lowland plant, ascending to 
an elevation of 3000 feet ; whereas the present is a mountain 
species, occurring between 4000 and 7000 feet. It is also a 
native of the ghauts of Western India. 

Descr. A shrub, two to four feet high, much branched, 
quite glabrous. Stems terete, rather swollen at the joints. 
Leaves usually alternate, sometimes, especially in peninsular 
Indian specimens, opposite or whorled, petioled, very variable 
in size and shape, two to four inches. long, ovate or ovate- 
lanceolate, acuminate, sharply serrate, lower serratures seti- 
gerous, as is the petiole. Flowers in solitary, one-flowered, 
axillary peduncles, one to two inches long, flat, an inch to 
an inch and three-quarters in diameter, pale purple. Lateral 
sepals small, green, oblong-lanceolate. Lip concave, green, 
with a long, slender spur. Upper petal deeply two-lobed, 
with a green horned keel at the back. Wings spreading, 
upper lobe largest, emarginate, all obtuse. — J. L). H. 



Fig. 1. Upper limb of ovary : — magnified. 



5626. 




W. Rich, del. et Mi. 



Vincent Brooks, M" 



Tab. 5G26. 

CL AVI J A ¥V LG E N S. 

Brill ian t-Jlo wend Cla rija. 

Nat. Ord. Myrsixk.e. — Pkktanbeia Monocynia. 



(let). Char. Cah/.v profunda 5-fidus, laciniis obtusis imbricatis. Corolla 
tubus brevis; /o'w" 5, fauce in appendicea 5 camosaa cum lobis alternantea 
tuniente. Stamina 5, filamentis brevissimis liberis v. connatin ; anther* 
extrorsum debiacentea, aepe in capitulum conniventea. Ovarium 1-localare; 
stflut breviaaimua, stigraate breri 2-lobo ; ovula paaea placenta; parvte baai- 
lari inserta. Bacca globosa, oligoaperma. Semina placenta) globom affixa, 
umbilico ventrali, testa mucilaginoaa, albumins corneo; embryo excentri- 
cus, cotyledonibua ovatia plains, radiculainfera. — Fruticea America) tropica) i 
caule rimplici, apice folioso. Folia altema, coriacea. Racemi axiliares. 
Flores inter minore*, abortu unisexuales, albi jlavi v. aurantiad. 



Clavija fulgent; foliia breriter peliolatis, elongato-obovato-lanoeolatia 
obtusis v. subacutis supra medium remote denratis, costa valida, nervis 
inconspicuia, racernia erectis robnatia multi-densifloris, floribus majua- 
culis erecto-patentibus rubro-aurantiacis, pedicellia brevibus craaaia, 
calycis lobis ciliolatis, corolla? lobis orbiculatis, giandulis subrotundis, 
tilameutis liberie, antheris aubquadratia flavis, couuectivo crass^. 



The beautiful plant here figured, and which flowered in 
the Royal Gardens in September of last year, is stated to 
have been received about eighteen years ago, but I can find 
no record of either its native country or donor, except that 
it may possibly have been raised from seeds sent from Lima, 
in Peru, by the late Mr. M'Lean, an old correspondent of the 
Gardens. Its congeners, of which a dozen or so are well 
described, are all South American, extending from Brazil to 
Panama, and down the Andes on the west coast to Peru, but 
amongst them all I find none, either in our herbarium or 
books, that equals this for the size and colour of its flowers. 
As a stove plant it is easily managed, flowers freely, and 
having the habit of the genus in foliage, etc.. it forms a very 
strikingly ornamental plant. 

Desck. Trunk erect, in our plant about four feet high, very 

TKBRUARr 1st. 18(37. 



stout, three-quarters of an inch in diameter, with scattered 
subulate scales towards the top. Leaves ten to fourteen inches 
long, three to five inches broad, very narrowly obcuneate- 
spathulate, obtuse or subacute, narrowed into the very short 
stout petiole, remotely toothed towards the apex, dark-green, 
very coriaceous ; nerves obscure ; midrib very stout. Racemes 
erect, four to five inches long, an inch and a half in diameter, 
rachis entirely hidden by the densely crowded flowers. Pedi- 
cels very short, stout, glabrous. Base of calyx turbinate ; lobes 
orbicular, minutely ciliated. Corolla half an inch to two- 
thirds of an inch in diameter, deep orange-red, yellow in the 
disk ; lobes rounded, with very tumid subhemispherical glands. 
Stamens small, sunk between the glands of the petals ; fila- 
ments short, stout, free ; anthers subquadrate ; cells recurved 
at the base on the very thick, subquadrate, SAvollen connec- 
tive. Ovarii with a short conic style and capitate stigma. — 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Calyx and ovary. 3 and 4. Stamens -.—nil magnified. 



5627. 




W Fitch, deLet lit* 



"Vincent ^Brooks, Imp- 



Tab. 5627. 

MESOSPINIDIUM sanguineus 

Rosy Mesospinidium. 



Nat. Ord. Obchides:. — Gynandeia Monandeia. 

Gen. Char. Perigonium subcarnosum, clauaum. Scpalum summum lanceo- 
laturu ; sepala lateralia connata, apice bifida, lacinia utraque lanccii, basi 
subsaccato labello supposita ; petala triangulo-lanceoiata, acuta, sepalis basi 
vix imbricantibus. Labellum cuneatum, obcordatum, limbo revoluto, carina 1 
duse, unguem marginantes, eboracese, nunc antice lobatae caualetn veluti- 
num inter se linquentes, lamella biloba depressa anteposita, subimmobile. 
Columna semiteres, antice profunde excavatum. Androclinii limbus utrinque 
dependens ; rostellum ascendens, acuto-triangulum, bicuspidatum. Anthcra 
unilocularis, antice retusa, medio cuspidata. Pollinia globosa, postice 
minute perforata. Caudicula linearis, basi latior; glandula lancea. Cha- 
racter ex Bchb. Walp. Annates, v. p. 6. 



Mesospinidium sanguineum ; pseudobulbis ovalibus compressis nebulosis 
diphyllis, foliis cuneato-ligulatis acutis, racemis secundis, ramosis foliis 
longioribus, bracteis squamEeformibus minutis, sepalis oblongis acutis, 
lateralibus medium versus bifidis, sepalis cuneato-ovato-acutis, labello 
lingulato acuto, lateribus erectis, carina lineari per disci basin superi- 
orem apice sc. medio labello divergenti bieruri, androclinio minute 
lobulato. 

Mesospinidittm sanguineum. Bchl.fil. Walp. Annates, I.e. 



A very pretty plant, with nodding racemes in the way of 
those of Bodriguesia secunda, but larger and handsomer. 
Unlike the latter species, which is found abundantly at the 
embouchure of the Amazon river, and which therefore luxu- 
riates in a great degree of heat and moisture — this Meso- 
spinidium is met with at a great elevation, and consequently 
in a cool climate, among the Peruvian and Quitensian Andes, 
whence descend some of the largest tributaries of that most 
magnificent of all streams. Although discovered by Jameson 
more than twenty years ago, and subsequently met with by 
Warscewicz, it does not appear to have ever reached this 
country alive before the year 1866, when plants of it were 
received in excellent condition from Ecuador, by the Messrs. 

FEBBUAEY 1ST, 1867. 



Backhouse, of York, who exhibited a flowering specimen 
of it — from which the Plate was derived — at one of the 
Tuesday meetings at South Kensington in November last. 
It appears quite at home in what may conveniently be termed 
the " Peruvian house," as meant to include the coolest and 
dampest section of temperate Orchids, while the " Mexican 
house " would indicate a climate somewhat warmer and drier 
than the last, but still cool. 

As a genus, Mesospinidium comes near to Odontoglossum, 
from Avhich a superficial observer might fail to distinguish it- 
Professor Keichenbach — the founder of the genus — would 
also make it embrace the genera 'Ada' and 'Abola' of 
Lindley, a view in which I find myself at present unable to 
concur. 

Descr. An epiphyte, with compressed, prettily-mottled oval 
two-leaved pseudobulbs. Leaves ligulate, sharp-pointed, 
shorter than the many-flowered drooping slightly-branched 
flower-stem. Bracts minute, scale-like. Sepals oblong, acute, 
the side ones joined at the base — for more than half their 
length. Petals cuneate, ovate, acute, of a firm waxy sub- 
stance, and (like the sepals) of a uniform warm rosy tint. 
Lip Ungulate, sharp-pointed, its sides erect, its middle lobe 
recurved, with a two-limbed diverging process at the base. 
The lip at its point is of the same rosy tint as the sepals and 
petals, but fades into white in its lower portion. Column 
white, slightly lobed. — J. Bateman. 



Fig. 1. Side view of lip and column. 2. Front view of lip. 3. Ditto 
of column. 4. Pollen-masses -. — magnified. 



5628. 




W. Fitch, dsLet Iitti 



Vincent Broois,Imp 



Tab. 5628. 

BARLEEIA Gibsoni. 
Dr. Gibsons Barleria. 

Nat. Ord. Acantuaceje. — Diaxdria Monogyma. 



Gen. Char. Calyx 4-partitus, laciniis cruciatim oppositis, super* et in- 
fera plerumque majoribus. Corolla regulariter infuiidibulit'orinis v. hvpo- 
craterimorpha, 5-loba, ore dilatato, laciniis imbricatis, Buperiore plerumque 
breviore. Stamina 2, cum stamiuodiis 2 3 v. 4, didvnama, circa basin tubi 
inserta. Antherer oblongse v. lineares, 2-loculares, loculis parallelis uraturia. 
Stigma v. infundibuliforme, compressum, truncatum, limbo integro, v. an- 
gustum, oblique 2-fidum. Capsula circa basin fere 2-loeukris, septo integro 
adnato, basi 2-4-aperma. Semina retinaculo suffulta. — llcrba; v. frutices, 
ramosa. Inflorescentia spicata axillaris v. solitaria. Calyx 2-bracteolatus. 



Barleria Gibsoni ; fruticosa, glaberrima, foliis ovato- v. oblongo-lanceolatis 
acuminatis in petiolum brevem angustatis, margine minute ciliolatis, 
floribus mbterminalibus paucia vix spicatis, bracteis parvis anguste 
ovatis, caiycis foliolis exterioribus anguste subulatis imerioribus 
elliptico-oblongis obtusis subacutisve viridibus, exterioribua duplo 
longioribua multotiesque majoribus, corollae pallide purpureas tubo 
infundibuliformi calycem sequante, limbi lobis subaequaliter rotundatia 
2 inferioribus medio macula saturatiore notatis, ore pallido, staminibus 
2 cum staminodiis 3 parvis subulatis. 

Barleria Gibsoni. Dalzel in Hook. Kew Journ. Bot. v. 2. p. 339. 



It has already been remarked in this work, that the hitherto 
much neglected Order AcanthacecB abounds in beautiful 
garden plant.-, which, from their habit of flowering in winter, 
are especially desirable for stove cultivation in this climate. 
Such is the subject of the present Plate, a native of the 
Ghauts of Central India, for seeds of which the Royal Gar- 
dens are indebted to Dr. Anderson, of the Royal Gardens, 
Calcutta, which flowered at Kew in December, 1866. Hand- 
some as it is, it falls very far short indeed of some of its 
congeners, also natives of the Western Indian Ghauts, and of 
which one, B. grandiflora, Dalzel, has leaves a span long, 
and spikes of flowers, whose corollas are four to four and a 

FEHRUARr 1st, 18G7. 



half inches long by two inches diameter. The genus is a 
large one, and contains very many beautiful species. 

Descr. A small, quite glabrous shrub ; our first year's plants 
are twelve to eighteen inches high, but will probably attain 
three or four feet. Stems branched, shrubby, terete. Leaves 
two to four inches long, shortly petioled, lanceolate or oblong 
or ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, rather rough at the margin, 
coriaceous, glaucous below ; nerves distinct, running very 
obliquely. Flowers in very short terminal spikes, or axillary 
in the uppermost leaves. Calyx one and a half inch long ; 
outer sepals very narrow subulate, not half the length of the 
inner, which are oblong, obtuse, convex, nerved. Corolla 
large, pale purple ; tube as long as the calyx, funnel-shaped, 
paler ; lobes spreading, orbicular, each one-third of an inch 
in diameter, inner rather smaller, two upper with a dark pur- 
ple blotch in the centre. Stamens two, with three stami- 
nodes ; filaments glabrous ; anthers oblong, purple. Stigma 
narrow, very obliquely bifid. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1. Calyx, — nat. size. 2. Base of corolla and stamens. 3. Germen s — 
magnified. 



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ESTIMATES.— Plans and Estimates will be sent on application. 



J. JONES & SONS, 

IRON MERCHANTS AND HORTICULTURAL ENGINEERS, 

6, BANKSIDE, SOTJTHWAEK, LONDON, S.E. 



*. B. IATLOB AJTO CO., PBISTBBS, 



UTTLS 4J5TBHr STBSEX. ft. B. 



UTljtrJf £*rfn* 

No. 267. 

VOL. XXIII. MARCH. [Price'is. 6cl. col' 1 - U. C><1. plain. 

OR NO. 962 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S ' 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMPRISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN . 

WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 

BY 

JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S.. 

Bixcttat at ifyc ftoyal Entente ©artrcni at StriD. 




Nature and Art to adorn the page combine. 
And flowers exotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON. 

REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

L867. 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT LAWN MOWERS FOE 1867. 



Patronized on Five occasions, during the Season 0^1864, by 
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF SAXONY; 

DUBTNG THE SEASON OF 1865 THEY WERE PATRONIZED ON FOUE OCCASIONS BY HEE MAXES. 

THE QUEEN; 
ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF HOLLAND; 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF PRUSSIA; 

AGAIN, DUBING THE SEASON OF 1866, THEY WEEE PATRONIZED ON FOUR OCCASIONS BY 

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 




HA3D MACHINE. 



HORSE MACHINE. PO^T MACHINE. 

ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, in presenting their LAWN MOWERS for the Season of 1867, are F 8 ^/ 
be able to atate that the demand for their celebrated Machines rapidly increases every year. The sucee: 
attended Sharks' Machines during last Season is quite unparalleled in the history of the Lawn Mower. 

A. S. & Son can confidently assure their numerous Friends and Customers and the Public generally tna . „^ 

l every way, one which cannot, he surpassed il 
ov durability. None but 
men are employed in the manufacture of their Machines. 



i 



deavour will always be to supply a Machine, first-class in every way, one which cannot be surpasseu u « 
whether for simplicity of construction, ease in working, or durability. None but the best materials and ski 
m are employed in the manufacture of their Machines. 

PRICES— Including Carriage to most of the principal Radway Stations and Shipping Ports in the Kingdom- 

SHANKS' NEW PATENT HAND MACHINE FOR 

O-inch Machine £3 10 \ Easily worked 



-inch Machine 4 10 0) by a Lady, 

4-inch Machine 5 10 Do. by a Boy. 

6-inch Machine 6 10 Do.byaMan. 



( Do. i>/ « Man 
19-inch Machine £7 12 6|^ an d a Boy- 

22-inch Machine 8 7 6/D*-* 1 * 



6l 



Me* 



24-inch Machine 8 17 

Silent Movement for the four smallest sizes, 4*. extra ; for the other sizes, 7s- 6d. extra. 

SHANKS' NEW PATENT HORSE MACHDff^ 
Width of Cutter. H with Patent Delivering App"^ 

30-inch Machine £19 0.... 

36-inch Machine 22 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT PONT & DONKEY MACHINE. 
Width of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. 

25-inch Machine £12 10 25*. extra. 

28-inch Machine 14 10 30*. extra. 

30-inch Machine 15 15 30$. extra. 

Sdent Movement, 12*. 6d. extra. 

Silent Movement, 20*. extra. 

SHANKS' PATENT LAWN MOWERS cut the Grass on uneven as well as on level Lawns ; and B ■ 9 

immaterial whether the Grass be wet or dru. 

A 
Every Machine warranted to give ample satisfaction, and if not approved of, can be at once retur 



42-inch Machine 26 

48-inch Machine 28 mm 




ALEXANDEK SHANKS & SON, 
27, LEADENHALL STREET, LONDON. 

ANUFACTORY, DENS IRONWORKS, ARBROATH. 



A. S. and SON keep a Stock of Lawn Mowers at 27, Leadenhall Street. London, from which Orde ™ toag lil: 
at once executed. They also have at their London Warehouse a staff of experienced Wort --,.;. 



1 



acquainted with all the details of these Machines, so that they axe enabled to repair 
London as well as at the Manufactory 



|E Lawn Mowers 




GOOD SEEDS, 




CARRIAGE FREE. 



SUTTON'S UNRIVALLED COLLECTIONS OP SEEDS 
FOR ONE YEAR'S SUPPLY. 

SUTTON AND SONS 

ARE NOW PREPARED TO RECEIVE ORDERS FOR THE ABOVE, 
THE PRICES OF WHICH ARE AS FOLLOWS:— 



FOE THE KITCHEN GARDEN. 

No. 1. Complete Collection for 1 year's supply- 
No. 2. A complete Collection of ditto, quanti- 
ties proportionately reduced 
No. 3. A complete Collection of ditto 
No. 4. A complete Collection of ditto 
No. 5. A complete Collection of ditto 
No. 6. A complete Collection of ditto 

Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, free by Sail. 




£. s. 


d. 


3 3 





2 2 





1 11 


6 


1 1 





15 





10 


6 



FOR THE FLOWER GARDEN. 



No. 1. A complete Collection of the newest 
and most approved German and Eng- 
lish varieties 
No. 2. A complete Collection of ditto 
No. 3. A complete Collection of ditto 
No. 4. A complete Collection of ditto 
No. 5. A complete Collection of ditto 
Free by Post or Rail. 



£. s. d. 



2 2 
1 11 
1 1 
15 
10 



SUTTON'S RINGLEADER PEA, 

The very best and earliest in cultivation, Price 2*. per Quart. 

SUTTON'S SPRING CATALOGUE AND AMATEUR'S GUIDE FOR 1867 

Is now ready, aud will be sent post-free on receipt of Twelve Stamps. Gratis to Customers. 

SUTTON'S FINE LAWN GRASS SEEDS, 

As used in the principal Lawns and Pleasure- Grounds in the Country. Is. 3d. per pound, 24*. 

per bushel, carriage free. 

■all Goods Carriage Free (except very small parcels) . 5 per cent, discount allowed for cash payment. 

SUTTON & SONS, ROYAL BERKSHIRE SEED ESTABLISHMENT, READING. 

GENUINE SEEDS, CARRIAGE FREE. 

B. S. WILLIAMS' 

NEW GENERAL PRICED AND DESCRIPTIVE SEED CATALOGUE 

FOR 1867 

CAN BE HAD FREE ON APPLICATION. 
THE VEGETABLE SEED PART 

Contains LISTS of the best varieties of each kind of VEGETABLE. Only those sorts are recommended that can be 
r ehed upon for producing sure and good crops. Especial attention is directed to the following NEW and CHOICE 
KINDS, full descriptions' of which will be found in the Catalogue. 

WILLIAMS S ALEXANDER BROCCOLI, 2*. 6rf. per packet. I ST*™* J A^wmv' u m V Z P ' C w 
WILLIAMS'S MATCHLESS RED CELERY, 1$. per packet. MALVERX HAL L MM. V 1«. orf. per packet. 

ORANGEEIELD DWARF TOMATO, 2*. per packet. I DIGStt ELL PRIZE ENDH E, 1». per packet. 

RAPHANCS CAUDATUS (The Wonderful Radish), Is., is., and as. per packet. 
COMPLETE COLLECTIONS of KITCHEN GARDEN SEEDS, to suit Gardens of various sizes, for Contents of 

which see page 44 in Catalogue : — 

10s. 6d., 21s., 42s., 63s., 84s. each. 

THE FLOWER SEED PART 

Contains Imported and English-gwmn FLOWER SEEDS I in ■Colons. p __ ___ 

The Best of the New Introductions, 1866, in ASNH ALs, BlL>>IALS,, and PLRE^sNIALS. 

Choice Strains of FLORISTS' FLOWERS. 

The following are unequalled : — 
PRIMULA (VniUI^I superb strain, the finest in cultivation).— Red, 
n , White, or Mired Seed, b 6d„ 3s. M., and 5*. per packet 

CALCEOLARIA (Join's strain, the best variety for exhibition).- "S^,^^SLgS2?- .- extra choice , tra ; , 

Colours are exceedingly rich, profusely spotted and vexned, fc. <,/., COTBABULjW , = ££* yjg- *gj 

■A&S'(W,^Silfel strain).-A stand of flower., thejro^o.. per packet. 

LIL1XM AURATU1I (a large importation of this beautiful Lily just received) .—Strong Bulbs, 3*. 6d., 5s., 

Is. 6d., and 10*. id. each. 

YICTOKIA AND PAKADISE NUBSEKIES, EPPEK HOLLOWAY, LONDON. N. 



duction of this strain, was exhibited at the July Show of the 
Royal Botanic Society, and was the admiration of all. \h. 



-This is the 
is. dd. and 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISES. 



NEW ROSES FOR 1867. 

JOHN FRASER, 

OF THE LEA BRIDGE ROAD NURSERIES, N.E, 

HA3 ITtrCH PLEASTTRE IN ANNOUNCING THAT HIS 

DESCRIPTIVE LIST OF CAREFULLY SELECTED NEW ROSES FOR 186^ 

IS NOW READY, AND WILL BE FORWARDED ON APPLICATION. 
$W The Plants are this Season unusually strong and healthy. 



NOTICE.-NEW ROSES FOR 1867. 

t^pJ ^ 7 "^- VAEII L TIES ' being the cream on] y of the best new ki "ds known on the Coi 

DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUES GRATIS on application to the SUBSCRIBEKS. 
WILLIAM WOOD & SON, 

WOODLANDS NURS ERY, MARESFIELD, NEAR UCKFIELD, SUSSEX.-Feb. 9. 

ttavp. « WILLIAM CUTBUSH & SON 

1 and o herwlnt^ ° f ann Tr! ft* their GRAND EXHIBITION of HYACINTH 
MOMxS "S^SJ^EZS™ rlASS CRYST AL PALACE, SYDENHAM, fro 
inclusive MARCH, to SATURDAY, the 6th of APRIL, 1867, both da 



NEW CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

J ^^'!^^^ «™OMl fo r 1867 is now ready, and will be sent, 

Versailles Nursery, William Street, Vale Place, Hammersmith, W. 

(^ ear Kensington Railway Station.) 

E D o?«?0™S G ^^ NB ?IS r S' tlle chea P est and ™ st Arable, Id. per square yar. 

rmmiSSSS^S ££?-' 500, or 100 ° Tards > carria £ e free. F 

thebeS CK CL0THS for Sixty-two Years have maintained their celebrity * 

ISLINGTON'S SS ^GARDEN TENTS are the prettiest. 

H VYTHmfvs nAw^vhJZ}?™' are the most h »d8ome and capacious. 

MAXIHOBJS 8 and WALLER'S NETTINGS. Samples and material free on application. 

Lo!LrS C E lar ~ FREI)EKICK EDGINGT0N ^d CO., Thomas Street, Old Kent B« 

A Liberal Discount to the Trade ! 
International Exhibition, 1862, Class XIX. Honourable Mention. 



m*« -r *r For D , Conservator ies, Greenhouses, Orchard Houses, and Pits, 

Bedding Plants are kept during the Winter, the best and cheapest means to repel 

the Frost is 

JlSSo^SL^^P ST ;° VE ' Which ref l uires ™ ***> * Cleanly, Portable, and 
heat l*n^2?S R * enU ° n r ]y ° nCe in twelve bours > ensures a regular and constat 

Price?30 60, a tl So ^ ? Up P, J 68 l™* lon S felt * ever V class of gardener. 
Price 2 1M ner'bH l.l °»- 11 eacn - ^e Patent Fuel supplied in Bags containing two bushe 

TW S?L P I 61 BagS Char - ed 9 * each ' and a »oVed for if returned 

C^C^ra^HZ^^^^^ 011 ^^ Hall *> H^pit™. Offices, Shops, *£ 
size or design ' UeSS KoOIn8 ' ete " etc "> and can ^ ^ade on the same principle to -3 

"K»M Mr. Thomas Rivers, and otic, 

sole Agent for StoVes and Fuel ' ' *"?**+ Ore** Tower Street, Londc 



EVERY GARDEN REQUISITE KEPT IN STOCK 



AT 



CARTER'S GREAT LONDON SEED WAREHOUSE, 

237 AND 238, HIGH HOLBORN, LONDON, W.C. 

GROOM'S CHOICE NEW ZONAL GERANIUMS. 

' Miss Mautin",' beautiful soft rosy peach ; ' Sir Fitzrot Kelly,' striking scarlet-cerise ; 
' Floribunda Alba Nana,' dwarf white. Pronounced to be the finest varieties ever raised, 
as bedders or for pot culture. To be sent out in the Spring (1867) 

BY ROBERT WARD, THE ROSERY, IPSWICH. 

The set of three Strong Autumn-struck Plants, 10s. Gd. 
Usual Discount to the Trade when not less than three Sets are taken. 

F. AND A. SMITH'S 

CHOICE SEEDS SAVED FEOM THEIR OWN COLLECTION. 



LEADING VARIETIES ONLY. 



Coxcomb, Gd. and 1*. per packet. 
Gloxinia (very fine), 1*. „ 

Petunia, 1*., 2s. Gd., and 5s. „ 
Miinulus, 6d. and 1*. „ 



Geranium Tricolor, 2*. Gd. and 5*. per packet. 

„ Bicolor, 2s. Gd. and 5s. „ 

„ Zonale, Is., 2s., 2s. Gd. and 5s. „ 

Intermediate Stock (purple), Is. „ 

Cineraria, Is., 2*. Gd., and 5*. „ 

NEW CATALOGUE for 1867, of Tricolor, Bicolor, and Zonale Geraniums, 
NEW ROSES o/1867, with other NEW PLANTS, is now ready, and may be had on application. 

THE NURSERIES, DULWICH, S. 

BENJAMIN EDGINGTON, 

MAEQUEE, TENT, RICK-CLOTH, AND FLAG MANUFACTURER, 

BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY 
AND H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES. 





§§ MARQUEES & TENTS FOE HORTICULTURAL SHOWS 
FOR SALE OR HIRE. 
ill^ Sick Cloths, New and Second-hand, with Poles, etc., complete. 
Tanned Netting for Fruit Trees, New and Repaired Scrims for Greenhouse Blinds, Frigi domo, 

Garden Mats, etc. 
An Illustrated Catalogue Free by Post. 

Be particular to observe the Christian Name, BENJAMIN EDGINGTON (only), 
2, DUKE STREET, LONDON BRIDGE, 8.R No other Establishment. 



Perfect Freedom from Coughs in 10 Minutes after use, 

And Instant Belief and a Rapid Cure of 

Asthma, Consumption, Influenza, Coughs, Colds, 

And all Disorders of the Breath, Throat, and Lungs, 

are ensured by 




a most agreeable taste. 

CUBES OF ASTHMA AND COUGHS. 

" Lymm, Cheshire. 

" In allaying any irritation of the chest or lungs, check- 
ing all disposition to coughing, and promoting that ines- 
timable boon, a comfortable night's refreshing sleep, ; they 
certainly stand unrivalled.— J. H. Evans, Druggist. 

In every newspaper and periodical in the kingdom may 
be seen testimonials of their wonderful efficacy. 

To Singebs and Public Speakers Db. Locock's 
Wafebs are invaluable for clearing and strengthening the 
voice. Price 1*. l^d., 2s. 9d., and 4s. 6d. per box. Sold 
by all Chemists. 



INDIGESTION AND BILE. 



The only effectual and pleasant-tasting 

Stomachic Aperient and Antibilious Medicine 

IS 

DR. LOCOCK'S 

EXCELSIOR WAFERS. 

It acts promptly, tastes delightfully, and 
requires no restraint in diet or habits. 

Sold at 1*. \\d., 2s. Od., and 4*. Gd., by all 
Druggists, and by the Proprietors' Agents, Da 
Silva and Co., 26, Bride Lane, Fleet Street, 
London, E.C. 



BAEE AND SUGDEN'S GUIDE 

TO THE KITCHEN AND FLOWER GARDEN FOR 1867. 

IT EMBRACES EVERY NOVELTY AND SPECIALITY WORTHY OF NOTICE US 

PLOWEE AND VEGETABLE SEEDS. 

INTENDING PURCHASERS 

WILL BE PRESENTED WITH COPIES ON SENDING THEIR ADDRESSES. 



COLLECTIONS OF VEGETABLE SEEDS 

Sent Carriage Paid. 
21'., 30;., 42/., 63/., 84/., 105/., to 210/. 

Smaller Collections made up if required. 



COLLECTIONS OF FLOWER SEEDS 
Sent Post Paid. 
3/6, 5/6, 7/6, 10/6, 15/., 21/., 42/., 63/., 84 
105/., to 210/. 



For full particulars of these Collections see the Guide. 
BARE & SUGDEN'S WINDOW CONSERVATORIES & WINDOW FERNEKLT" 

OF YABIOUS STYLES. 

The present Illustrations are part of a series which B. & S. have fitted up. The introduction | 
these elegant structures is a great boon, especially in large towns. Window Conservatories (as 
Illustrated) being constructed generally in the front of the house, give increased elegance to m 
iacade and contribute to the retirement of the interior. Plants in bloom may be cou served | 
these for a longer period than if they were exposed to the drier atmosohere of the room, or fer. 
may be successfully grown in them; indeed they may be made an interesting source of recreatiu 
throughout the year. 

Window Ferneries, which can be constructed with or without an Aquarium and Fountain, ai 
are used principally on defectively lighted staircases, or to replace windows that l.ave stained glas= 
Ihey are also used in rooms where the prospect is objectionable ; and as thev abut some little dis- 
tance outwardly, m addition to the refreshing nature of the green foliage, and abating no whit rf 
the light, they give an enlarged appearance to the apartment. 

WINDOW CONSEEVATOBY. WINDOW JEHNEBY. 









BARE AND SUGDEN, 12, KING STREET, C0VENT GARDEN, W.C. 



5629. 




W. Pitch, del et Mi. 



Vmcent Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 5629. 

pleeoma sarmentosa. 

Sarmentose Pleroma. 



Nat. Ord. Melastomace^:. — Decandeia Monootnia. 

Gen. Char. Cahjcis tubus paleaceus hirsutus v. strigoaus, ovoidotis cam- 
panulatus v. elongatus ; lobi 5, subulati lanceolati v. oblongi, decidui. 
Petala 5, obovata, ssepe insequilatera et retusa. Stamina 10, o?qualia v. 
subsequalia, filamentis glabris pilosis v. glandulpsis; antherae consimiles, 
lineari-subulatas, arcuatae, connectivo basi breviter v. longius producto an- 
tice 2-tuberculato iuappendiculato. Ovarium liberum v. basi cost is 5 
calyci adhserens, vertice liispidum v. setosura, 5-loculare ; stylus filiformis, 
curvus, glaber v. pilosus, stigmate punctiformi. Capsida 5-valvis, calvce 
inclusa. Semina cochleata. — Frutices^ suffrutices. rarius herba% America 
australis tropica et subtropicce incolce, interdum scandentes, scepius kispidfg v. 
strigoso-hirsutce. Folia petiolata, ovata v. oblonga, integerrima. Flores 
smpissime paniculati, purpurei v. violacei. 



Lasiandea sarmentosa ; fruticulus patentim villosus, ramis ramulisque sar- 
mentosis, foliis breviter petiolatis ovatis ovato-oblongisve aeutis basi 
rotundatis cordatisve 7-nerviis utrinque pilosis, paniculis 3-chotomis 
terminalibus paucifloris, pedicellis brevibus, calycis tubo obovoideo v. 
subgloboso dense tomentoso, lobis subulato-lauceolatis recurvis tuho 
longioribus, petalis late cuneato-obovatis violaceis, filamentis glabris, 
antheris majoribus connectivo basi producto basi 2-tuberculato, mino- 
ribus connectivo breviore 2-tuberculato, ovarium ad medium calyci 
costis 5 adhaerente. 

Lasiandea sarmentosa. Naud. in Ann. 8c. Nat. ser. 3. v. 13. p. 130. 

Ch^togastra sarmentosa. DC. Prodr. v. 3. p. 134. 

Rhexia sarmentosa. Bonpl. Rhex. t. 10. 



A very beautiful plant, discovered by Humboldt and Bon- 
pland in the cool valleys of Peru, near Cuenca, and since 
collected by Dr. Jameson at the same spot, alt. 8000 feet, 
and elsewhere; by Spruce, at the base of Chimborazo ; and 
by Dr. Seemann, at Loxa and Cuenca, etc., who observes 
that it is very common and called " Flore de Gallinaso." 
The specimen here figured was flowered in December, 1866, 
by our zealous correspondent Isaac Anderson Henry, F.L.S., 
of Edinburgh, from seeds sent by Dr. Jameson. As this 
marcu 1st, 18G7. 



plant is as well adapted for greenhouse cultivation as Mono- 
chcetum, and is far more beautiful, it is one of the most 
■valuable acquisitions to our houses of late years. 

Descr. A small, rather slender, straggling subscandent 
undershrub, covered with spreading, villous hairs. Leaves 
on petioles half an inch long; blade an inch and a half to 
two inches long, ovate, acute, quite entire, rounded or cor- 
date at the base, five- to seven-nerved, hairy on both surfaces, 
bright green above, paler below. Flowers two to two and a 
half inches in diameter, deep violet and very handsome, in 
small, few-flowered panicles at the ends of the branchlets ; 
peduncles and pedicels short, villous. Calyx-tube broadly 
ovoid ; lobes longer than the tube, spreading, subulate-lan- 
ceolate. Petals broadly obovate-cuneate, retuse. Anthers 
dark purple, with green connectives filaments and tubercles ; 
the longer with the connective produced at the base, where 
it bears two tubercles ; smaller anthers with the connective 
tubercled, but not produced. — /. I). II. 



Fig. 1. Large, and 2, small stamens. 3. Calyx, ovary, and style. 4. 
Transverse section of ovary. 5. Capsule :— all magnified. 



5630. 




W.Fitah ; djaLetlith 



Tab. 5030. 

SARCANTHUS erinaceus. 

Hairy-stem med Sarcan th us. 



Nat. Ord. Obchide^e. — Uy.sammua Moxakdhta. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab, 1039.) 



Sarcanthus erinaceus ; pedunculo muriculato echinato racemoso, bract pis 
triangulis abbreviatis echinulatis, ovariis pediccllatis nque eehinnlatis, 
sepalis oblongis acutis seque echinatis, petalis Hgulatis obtusis, labello 
excavato tridentato, utrinque sub columna plieato, dentibus lateralibus 
bidentatis, dente medio producto triangulo, calcare rctrorso conico- 
cylindraceo vacuo, gibbere pandurato sub columna, columna gracili 
elongata, rostello deflexo subulato elongato apice bidentato, caudicula. 
ab ovato basi lineari, polliniis in stipite bifido centrice caudicula; in- 
sert© reflexis. liclib. in Oard. Chron. 1866. 

Aebides dasypogon. Sort., non Lindl. 

Saecanthus Stowellianus. Batem., mss. 



The first plant that I ever saw of this pretty Sarcanfhus 
was bought, under the name of Aerides rubrvm, about ten 
years ago, at one of Stevens's sales. After several years' culti- 
vation, it flowered at Knypersley, and as I first noticed the 
open blossoms as I was passing through the Orchid houses 
in company with my lamented friend Hugh Stowell, I called 
it provisionally after him. I did not, however, describe or 
collate it at that time, and as I shortly afterwards met with it 
in Messrs. Low's collection under the name of Aerides dasypo- 
gon, I too hastily concluded that such was probably its 
real name, and made no further inquiries into the matter. 
In the autumn of last year, however, I met with the plant 
again — a nd this time under the name of Sarcanthm erinaceus 
— in the Royal Gardens at Kew, where it had been seen by 
Professor Reichenbach, and named as above by him. This 
name, which well describes the peculiarly shaggy or hedge- 
hog-like appearance of the flower-stems, must therefore 
march 1st, 1867. 



stand. It is a rare plant and, always excepting Saccolabimn 
giganteum, the slowest grower of its tribe. My plant, which 
is about four inches high, has at length begun to branch, 
and, as the branches all flower freely, my specimen has 
already become an attractive object; — in our grandchildren's 
days it will be quite charming ! It flowers freely during the 
summer months in the East India house. Its introducer, 
both to Kew and to Clapton, was the Rev. Mr. Parish, who 
no doubt met with it in Moulmeyne. — J. Bateman. 



Fig. 1. Front view of flower. .2. Side view of ditto -.—magnified. 



5631. 




.kth. 



"Vincent, Brooks, faf- 



Tab. 5631. 

SIPHOCAMPYLUS Humboldtianus. 

Humboldt- s Siphocampylus. 

Nat. Ord. Lobeliace^;. — Pentandria Monogynia. 



Gen. Char. Calycis tubus turbinatus v. hemisphaoricus ; lobi 5. Corolla! 
tubus ssepissime elongatus, incurvus et supernc veutricosus, integer, 
rarissirae et basi tantum fissus ; limbi 2-labiati lobi 5, tubo brqviores, 
superiores reflexi. Stamina connata ; antberae hirsuta: v. 2 inieriores bar- 
batse. — Frutices suffrutiees v. herb* Americanae, erecta v. scandt,itr.s. 
Folia alterna v. verticillata. Pedicelli axillares. Flores albi v. rubri. 
Corolla scepius pubescens. 



Siphocampylus Humboldtianus; suffruticosus, ramulis patentim subvil- 
losis, foliis alternis petiolatis subcoriaceis ovato-lanceolatis ovatisve 
acuminatis calloso-denticulatis superne glaberrimis subtus sparse pi- 
losis, venis inconspicuis, pedicellis petiolo aequilongis, calycis glabri 
tubo turbinato, deutibus brevibus triangularibus, corolla fere 2-pollicari 
longe tubuloso integro, tubo e basi subinflato breviter subcylindraceo, 
deinde pro maxima parte latiore compresso leDte incurvo, lobis brevibus 
triangulari-lanceolatis patentibus. 

Siphocamphyltts Humboldtianus. DC. Prod. v. 7. p. 398. 

Siphocampylus fulgens. Floral Magazine, t. 313. 

Lobelia Humboldtiana. Presl, Prod. Lob. 35. 



This elegant plant was sent for figuring by Mr. Bull, of 
Chelsea, with whom it flowered in November, 1866, and to 
whom the Royal Gardens are further indebted for a living 
plant that has also flowered. The plant is no doubt a native 
of Peru, whence most of its congeners have been brought, 
and it is evidently (if any dependence is to be placed on 
descriptions) the 8 Humboldtianus, DC, of which, however, 
I have seen no authentic specimens; it also approaches S. 
Peruvianus, but is larger in all its parts, has broader leaves 
and pubescent stems, and different calyx-lobes. The genus 
/Siphocampylus is very nearly allied to Lobelia, and like it, 
abounds in showy flowered plants. Upwards of fifty species 
have been described, of which scarce a dozen have been in- 
troduced into our gardens. Some are climbers, and. coming 

march 1st, 1867. 



from the cooler regions of the Andes, may be expected to 
grow in a temperate house. The present is a very choice 
plant, and succeeds well in a warm greenhouse, when it is 
very attractive. 

Descr. A small bush, three feet high, branching from the 
base. Stem and branches pubescent with spreading leaves, 
purplish-brown, slender, flexuous, but apparently not scan- 
dent. Leaves alternate, on slender petioles three-quarters of 
an inch long, ovate or ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, acute or 
rounded at the base, irregularly minutely toothed or serrate, 
dark green and glabrous above, paler and pilose beneath, ra- 
ther coriaceous ; nerves very faint. Pedicels axillary, solitary, 
slender, as long as the petioles. Flotvers drooping, decurved, 
bright scarlet. Calyx glabrous, small ; tube turbinate or 
subcampanulate, angled; teeth very small. Corolla almost 
two inches long, scarce half an inch broad at the broadest 
part, laterally compressed, ribbed, lower quarter narrower, 
subcylindric, with an inflated base, remaining three-quarters 
gently swelling, arched ; lobes one-third of an inch long, 
triangular-lanceolate, recurved. Anthers exserted, violet- 
purple, nearly glabrous. Style very slender, stigma small. 
— /. D. H. 



Pig. 1. Calyx, ovary, and style : — magnified. 



5632. 




rooKS 



Tab. 5632. 

ONCIDIUM SERRATUM. 

Serrated On cidiu m . 



Nat. Ord. Oechide^;. — Gynandeia Monandeia. 
Qen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4148.) 



Oncididm serratum ; pseudobulbis ovalibus elatis dipbyllis, foliis erectis 
rigidis acutis basi angustatis canaliculars, panicula pauciflora brevio- 
ribus, sepalis serrato-crispatis, dorsali reniformi, lateralibus multo 
longioribus obovatis patentissimis, petalis ovatis acutis serrato-crispatis 
conniventibus, labello multo minore bastato, laciniis acutis intermedia 
lineari obtusa medio constricta lateralibus acuminatis triplo minoribus 
(crista depress^, crenulata), columnar alis subulatis ascendentibus. 

Oncidittm serratum. Lindl. Sert., Rchb. in Walpers Ann. vi. 

Oncidium diadema. Hort. 



1 was much struck with this very remarkable Oncidium, 
which I had the good fortune to see in flower in the Bishop 
of Winchester's collection at Farnham Castle, in December 
last. It has the colour and somewhat the appearance of 0. 
crispum, but the flowers are tossed about after a strange and 
fantastic fashion, which will no doubt become still more pro- 
noncee as the plant gathers its full strength and sends forth 
twining scapes nine or ten feet long. It belongs to a pecu- 
liar group, that was at one time regarded as a distinct genus, 
i. e. Cyrtochilum, but which is now more properly considered 
a subgenus of Oncidium. Some of them — the Cyrtochilum 
vohbile of Poeppig, for example — have stems twenty feet 
high. Mr. Linden was the introducer of the present plant, 
which he sold under the unwarranted name of 0. diadema 
in Stevens's rooms. It is a native of Peru, and must be re- 
garded as a moderately " cool " orchid. 

Descr. Pseudohdbs tall and oval, bearing one or two 
long, rigid, erect, acute leaves, which are narrowed at the 
base and canaliculate. Panicle lax. many-flowered, much 

MAECH 1st. 1867. 



longer than the leaves (in wild' specimens nine or ten feet 
long). Sepals with crisp and serrate margins, the upper one 
kidney-shaped, the lateral ones very much longer, obovate 
and spread open, of a brown chocolate colour, tipped and 
margined with yellow. Petals same colour as the sepals, 
than which they are much shorter, ovate, acute, connivent. 
Lip very small, hastate, the side portions being acuminate 
and three times less than the central, which is linear, obtuse, 
and narrowed in the centre, with a depressed, serrate, or 
crenulate crest ; the colour is similar to that of the sepals 
and petals, with more yellow about the crest. Column with 
awl-shaped, ascending wings. — J. Bateman. 



Fig. 1. Front view of lip and column: — magnified. 



5633. 




-. delet 



Vincent Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 5G33. 

SYNADENIUM Grantii. 

Captains Grant's MUkbush. 



]S"at. Ord. Euphorbiacej:. — Moncecia Monandbta. 

Gen. Char. Involucrum campanulato-bemispbaericum, rcgulare, 5-lobum, 
5-glandulosum, glandulis in cupulam horizontalem plano-concavam margine 
lobulatam integram v. lobos involucri includentem coalitis. Flores tnasculi 
25-30, in fasciculos'5 lobia involucri oppositos dispositi, ecalyculati. Brac- 
teolce alia? inter fasciculos lineares distinctae apice fimbriatac, alia? circa 
florem femineum ultra medium in tubum membrauaceum apice fimbriatutn 
coalita;. Flos femineus centralis, obsolete calyculatus. Styli ad medium 
eonnati. Semen carunculatum. — Frutices v. arbuscula? Africani, remit tr- 
retibus carnosis. Folia sparsa, Integra. Cymse terminates, corymbose, laxa, 
2-B-ckotom(e. Involucra alia in dichotomiis sessilia, alia terminaha, basi 
foliis floralibus 2-nis oppositis suffulta. Boiss. 



Sysadenittm Grantii ; frutex erectus, ramosus, glaberrimus, raima crassis 
teretibus, foliis obovato-spatbulatis obtusis in petiolum brevem attenu- 
atis, floralibus parvis appressis tomentosis involucro sequilongis apice 
rotundatis, involucri pulvinati annularis integerrimi tomentosi lobis 
margine interiori pulvini insertis erectis late oblongis gibbis apice den- 
tatis, calyculis masculis sub-5-lobis, lobis angustis ciliatis. 



During Captains Speke and Grant's adventurous journey 
to the lake-feeders of the Nile, the latter of the distinguished 
explorers made an excellent collection of dried plants, which 
has thrown great light on the botany of Central Africa ; 
together with some seeds, which vegetated in the Royal 
Gardens, including the beautiful Muss&nda luteola (Plate 
5573). The dried plants were examined by Dr. Thomson, 
and are enumerated in the Appendix to Captain Speke's 
work ; amongst them was a fragment of a succulent Euphor- 
biaceous plant, which, having retained its vitality, was taken 
by Dr. Thomson to the propagating pits, and being planted, 
has now developed into a striking green Euphorbiaceous 
bush, seven feet high, — the subject of this Plate. It be- 
longs to a very curious genus, Synadenium, closely allied to 
Euphorbia itself, established by M. Boissier in his excellent 

MABCH 1st, 1867. 



monograph of Euphorbia and its allies, published in the 
fifteenth volume of De Candolle's ' Prodromus.' The genus 
as there constituted consists of two species, a Natal and Mada- 
gascar one ; these being described from dried specimens are 
necessarily difficult of recognition, and S. Grantii is evidently 
closely allied to the Natal S. arborescens, but according to 
Boissier's careful description that must be a much smaller 
plant in all its parts, with longer petioles ; and the involucre 
in our species differs from it, and indeed from the generic 
character, in being entire. 

8. Grantii was found by Captain Grant near villages in 
lat. 3° 15' N., in February, 1862, and there only. The Kew 
plant flowered in November, 18G6. 

Descr. An erect bush, six to ten feet high, with a stout, 
terete, green stem, few very thick, erect branches, and co- 
lumnar branchlets thicker than the thumb. Leaves scattered, 
three to four inches long, obovate-spathulate, obtuse, not 
very succulent, quite entire, dark green above, paler below. 
Cymes axillary, corymbosely branched, six to eight inches 
long, sparingly dichotomously, green. Pedicels purplish. 
Floral leaves or bracts appressed, obtuse, tomentose, green. 
Involucre a quarter of an inch in diameter, consisting of an an- 
nular, tomentose, red-purple cushion, on the inner margin of 
which are five broadly-oblong, pubescent, toothed, erect scales. 
Stamens on separate cymes from the pistils, twenty to thirty, 
with purple anthers and fimbriate calycules at the base of 
their pedicels. Styles green, with bifid recurved stigmas. 
JT).H. 



Fig. 1. Female and, 2, male involucres. 3. Scale of ditto. 4. Male 
flower and calyculus. 5. Pistil : — all magnified. 



5634. 




W Fitch, del etTith. 



Vincent Brooks, Imp 



Tab. 563i. 

PEPEROMIA AEirOLiA; var. argyreia. 

Arum-leaved Peperomia; silver-striped var. 



Nat. Ord. Pipeeace^;. — Diandbia Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 55(38.) 



Pepeeoxiia arifolia; acaulis,glaberrinia, foliis alternis longe petiolatis ovato- 
v. cordato-rotundatis acutis integerrimis supra basin peltatis 7-9-ner- 
viis subsucculentis junioribus concavis, superne laete viridibus opacis, 
subtus pallidis, petiolis rubris, atnento longe pedunculato terminali v. 
laterali gracili elongato, pedunculo petiolia sequilougo, floribus con- 
fertis, bracteis peltatis breviter stipitatis, filamentifl brevibud crassis, 
ovario obovoideo, stigraate sessili globoso pubescente. 

Pepebomia arifolia. Miquel, Syst. Piperac p. 72. Martius, Fl. Bras. Pi- 
per ac. p. 9. t. 2.f. 9. 

Pipee arifolia. Sort. Petrop. 

Var. argyreia ; foliis inter nervos albo-fasciatis. 



Under Plate 5668 there was figured a beautiful Peperomia 
from the collection of our friend Mr. Wilson Sanders, F.R.S., 
that had been cultivated in his and several other establish- 
ments under the name of P. arifolia, but which was there 
shown to be quite a distinct species ; the present Plate con- 
firms this opinion, and at the same time affords the opportu- 
nity of figuring an equally beautiful species. The true P. 
arifolia, as here shown, has no stem, alternate leaves that 
are peltate, very broad, less concave, and not two-lobed at 
the base ; whereas the P. marmorafa had erect stems, oppo- 
site, narrow and very thick leaves, two-lobed at the base where 
the petiole is inserted. Both are natives of South Brazil, and 
were collected by Mr. Weir, Collector for the Horticultural 
Society. The specimen here figured flowered in the esta- 
blishment of Mr. Bull, of Chelsea, in November, 1866 ; it is 
a very beautiful plant, and like so many of its congeners, is 
well adapted for placing along the edge of a shelf in a 

MARCH 1st, 1867. 



tropical house, both because of its beautifully-marbled leaves, 
and the length of time which these keep in good condition. 
In fact few plants are better adapted for permanent border- 
ing in tropical houses than Peperomias, their leaves varying 
so much in depth of colour, in marbling, in the different 
hues of their upper and under surfaces, and in the colour of 
their stalks; then too they are not attractive to insects, make 
no litter, and give very little trouble in propagating and culti- 



vating. 



Desck. Rhizome very short, rooting, as thick as the little 
finger. Leaves tufted at the apex of the rhizome, alternate ; 
petioles dark red, four to eight inches long, terete ; blade 
three to five inches long, orbicular-ovate or -cordate, acute, 
rounded retuse or two-lobed at the base, quite entire, rather 
succulent, concave, bright green but not shining above with 
broad white belts between the nerves, pale below. Peduncles 
as long as and of the same colour as the petioles. Catkin three 
to four inches long, slender, pale green. Flowers close set, 
but not densely packed, very minute. Bract peltate, orbi- 
cular, with a short, stout stalk. Filaments very short; anthers 
oblong. Ovary t obovoid, with a globular, sessile stigma.— 
.7. R H. 5 



Fig. 1. Portion of catkin. 2. and 3. Side and front views of bract, 
stamen, and pistil : — all magnified. 



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AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 
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And flowers exotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 
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1807. 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT LAWN MOWERS FOE 1867. 



Patronized on Five occasions, during the Season of 1864, ly 
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HORSE MACHINE. 



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ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, in presenting their LAWN MOWERS for the Season of 1867, are gratified to 
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NEW TRICOLORED GERANIUMS. 

un> A. SMITH'S CATALOGUE FOR 18(37, containing Descriptions of their Splendid 
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NEW CHRYSANTHEMUMS. 

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Tab. 5635. 

SACOOLABIUM giganteum. 
Gigantic Saccolabiu m. 



Nat. Ord. Okchidejs. — Gynaudkia Monandia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 5433.) 



Saccolabivm giganteum ; foiiis latissimis coriaceis crassis apice inaequali 
obtuse bilobis racemo densifloro subsecundo subsequalibus, sepalis 
cuneato-ovatis obtuse acutis, petalis angustioribtis, labelli lamina eura 
columna subparallela ob ealcaris limbos laterales praeruptos liberos 
cuneato-Habellata apice trifida, laciniis lateralibus semirhombeis, la- 
cinia media ligulata crassa retusa baud producta, lineis barbellatia 
geminis in basi utrinque in latus ealcaris compressi cylindracei conici 
transceudentibus ibi spbincterem efficientibus, columna brevi recli- 
nata, anthera breve rostrata, polliniis spbeericis breve stipitatis. Hchb. 

Saccolabium giganteum. TVall. ; Lindl. Gen. et Sp. Orch. 221. 

Vanda densiflora. Lindl. Paxt. Fl. G. t. 42. Folia Orch. Vanda, n. 22. 
Gard. Chron. 1866, 1194. 



The honour of introducing this beautiful plant, as well as 
of having been the first to flower it, belongs to the Bishop 
of Winchester, in whose collection at. Farnham Castle it 
made its appearance several years ago. Unfortunately the 
Bishop's plants were small, and the spikes produced — though 
sufficient to enable Dr. Lindley to recognize the species — 
gave but an imperfect idea of the noble aspect that it would 
eventually assume. The plant moreover is so exceedingly 
slow in its movements, that notwithstanding the generous 
anxiety of the Bishop to distribute it, a century might have 
elapsed before all the orchidians amongst her Majesty's sub- 
jects could have been supplied, had no further addition been 
made to the number of imported specimens. Happily how- 
ever about a year ago a fresh supply of fine plants were re- 
ceived by Messrs. Veitch from Rangoon, having been sent to 
them by the gallant Colonel whose name will be worthily 
perpetuated in the Vanda (V. Bensoni), lately figured in this 

APRIL 1st, 1867. 



work. One of these flowered in the highest perfection in 
November last, when it was exhibited at one of the Tuesday 
Meetings of the Horticultural Society, exciting — as well it 
might — universal admiration. The flowers, which were more 
agreeably perfumed than those of 8. violaceum, continued in 
beauty for nearly a quarter of a year. As to cultivation, 
patience rather than skill is required, — the main object 
being to obtain as large specimens as possible, for the ra- 
cemes of flowers will be large in proportion. 

No doubt S. giganteum is very nearly related to S. viola- 
ceum ; still it is unquestionably distinct from, and vastly su- 
perior to that species. " The chief difference," as Professor 
Eeichenbach observes in an able notice of the plant in the 
Gard. Chron., "is to be found in the shape, and, in conse- 
quence, in the nervation of the lip. The lip of Saccolabium 
violaceum is panduriform, retuse at the apex, with a tooth in 
the end. All the nerves run nearly parallel. Here the lip 
is tapering to the base, much dilated at the apex, where it 
is trifid, but not truncate, with a projecting tooth. Both 
species have a projecting callosity beneath the lip. Let us 
add, that the colours of Saccolabium violaceum have a more 
bluish hue, and that that species, bearing more blotches both 
on the sepals and petals, has a totally different appearance. 
S. Harrisonianum we regard as a splendid white variety of 
the last." 

Desck. Leaves very broad and fleshy, streaked and chan- 
nelled, irregularly bidentate or eroded at their extremity, 
from six inches to a foot long, about equal to the dense, 
many-flowered, nodding, subsecund racemes, that issue from 
the point of their junction with the stem. Sepals whitish, 
cuneate-ovate, obtusely acute, not so wide as the petals, 
which are of the same colour, with the addition of a few 
lilac spots. The lamella (or plate) of the lip is nearly pa- 
rallel with the column, wedge-shaped, divided at its apex 
into three portions, of which those at the sides are semi- 
rhomboidal, while that in the middle is short and slightly 
retused, all these three portions being of the most lovely 
violet hue, while the remainder of the lip is the same tint as 
the sepals and petals ; there are two hairy lines at the base 
of the lip, which, descending into the short spur, form a sort 
of sphincter for the round pedicellate pollen-masses. Column 
slightly bent backwards, with a short beak on the anther.— 
J. Bateman. 



Fig. 1. Column and lip, seen sideways. 2. Front of lip : — magnified. 



,C 



5636. 




Vincent, Brcc 



Tab. 563(1. 
COEDYLINE australis. 

New Zealand Ti-tree. 



Nat. Ord. Liliaceje. — IIexandeia Monogtnia. 



Gen. Char. Flores hermaphroditi. Ferianthium campanulatum ; foliola 
6, persistentia, aequalia, patentia, basi breviter v. lougius connata. Sta* 
viina 6, basi fbliolorum perigonii inserta, filamentis subulato-nliformibus 
glabris ; antlierae versatiles, oblonga?. Ovarium ovoideum v. obovoidcum, 
obtuse 3-gonum, 3-loculare ; stylus rectus, columnaris, stigmate 3-lobo ; 
orula in loculis pauca v. numerosa. JRacca subglobosa, 3-loeulari.s. oligo- 
v. polysperma. Semina angulata, testa atra nitida. Arbores, rarius 
berbae, stepe elata?. Folia apices versus trunci v. ramorum congesta, pa- 
tentia. rnsiformia, coriacea, nervis parallclis, costa obscnra v. dislincta. 
Paniculae ampla, exertee v. nutantes, ramosissinue, multijlora. Flores albi 
v. ccerulei, S-bracteati, bractea intermedia 2-nervi, ceteris 1-nerriis. 



Cordyline australis ; caudice elato arboreo, demum ramoso, foliis ensifor- 
mibus, 3-3 ped. longis, l|-2 poll, latis, supra basin paulo augustatis, 
nervis uniformibus numerosissiniis striolatis, costa obscura, panicula 
erecta ramosissiraa, floribus albis confertis. 

Cordylike australis. Hook.f. Fl. Nov. Zeal. v. 1. 1. 257. Oard. Chron. I860. 

p. 792. Handbook of New Zeal. Flora, 281 {non. Endl.). 
Dracena australis. Forst. Prodr. 151. 



The history of the New Zealand and Australian Cordyliw* 
was long in a. state of great confusion, which I attempted to 
clear up in the 'Gardeners' Chronicle' in 18G0. I then 
showed that the Dracwna australis of Forster, which was 
undeterminable from that author's description, was, accord 
ing to the figure in the Banksian Herbarium, not the plant so 
cited in this Magazine (Tab. 2835). I also showed that the 
Magazine plant, which was sent from the Sydney Botanical 
Garden, was most probably procured from Norfolk Island, 
whence I have dried specimens collected by A. Cunningham, 
so long the Superintendent of the Sydney Gardens. 

I have now the pleasure of figuring what I believe to be 
the true Dracaena australis of New Zealand, the commonest 

april 1st, 18G7. 



of four or six species that inhabit that group of islands, and 
a plant which could not well have escaped Forster's notice. 
It is a very handsome small tree, almost hardy in the west 
of England, quite so in the Scilly Islands, where Mr. Augus- 
tus Smith has flowered fine specimens in the open air. It 
often passed for C. indivisa in the nurseries, but that, as is 
now well known, is a totally different plant, with a much 
broader, yellow-green, strongly-veined leaf, and a drooping 
panicle of much larger flowers. The plant from which the 
accompanying drawing was made, flowered in the temperate 
house at Kew, in June, 1866. 

Descr. Trunk slender, twelve to twenty feet high, branch- 
ing at the top when old. Leaves two to three feet long, en- 
siform, an inch and a quarter to two inches broad, slightly 
contracted above the base, with numerous fine, parallel, 
striated veins, and no obvious midrib, dark green. Panicle 
very large, erect, copiously branched. Flowers most abun- 
dant, crowded, white. Perianth-tube very short, limb spread- 
ing, one-third of an inch in diameter, inner segments 
toothed irregularly in the margin. Berry as large as a small 
pea, white, with black shining seeds. — J. ]). H. 



Fig. 1. Eeduced figure of whole plant. 2 and 3. Base and apex of leaf. 
4. Branch of panicle. 5. Bud. 6. Flowers. 7. Ovary. 8. Transverse 
section of do. Fig. 5-8, magnified. 



5631 




'WRtelv.deI.et'lith. 



Vincent Brooks, Imp 






Tab. 5637. 
TINNEA ^thiopica. 

Violet-scented Tinnea. 

Nat. Ord. Labiate. — Didynamia Gtmnospeumia. 



Gen. Char. Calycis 2-labiati tubus subenervis, ventricosus, verticaliter 
depressus, hbiis planis subeequalibus integerrimia semi-orbicularibus. 
Corolla tubus brevis, rectus, latiusculus, cylindricus, limbi verticaliter 
depressi 2-labiati labio superiore abbreviate) 2-lobo, inferiore porrecto 3- 
lobo, lobis lateralibus parvis rotundatis intermedio multo majore subor- 
biculari emarginato. Sfat?u'na 4, filatnentis baai barbellatis ; anthers in- 
clusas, parvse, reiniformes, filamento oblique adnata?. Stylus gracilis, stig- 
mate ina?qualiter 2-fido. Fructus . . . — Frutex erect us, ramosus, ramis tere- 
tibus cano-pubescnifibns. Folia parva, petiolata, ovato- v. ovoideo-lanceolafa, 
acuta v. subobtusa, integerrima. Verticillastra axillaria, pauciflora, peduncn- 
lata. Flores odori, majusculi, pedicellate calyce viridi, corolla fusco-pur. 
purea. 



Tixjtea asthiopica, Kotschy in ' Plantce Tinneance' ined. cum tabula. 



Amongst the more important scientific results of the late 
gallant explorations of Central Africa, has been a great 
accession to our knowledge of its previously little known 
flora; and for this we are indebted almost exclusively to 
three individuals — Dr. Kirk, during Livingstone's explora- 
tion of the Zambesi and Shirr rivers and Lakes Shirwa and 
Nyassa; Captain Grant, during Captain Speke's and his own 
adventurous journey to the upper waters of the Nile ; and 
Mdlle. Tinne and Herr Heuglin. during their disastrous 
Nile voyage. Singularly enough, the beautiful plant here 
figured was found by all three expeditions, and I do not know 
to whom the merit of being its first discoverer belongs, though 
we owe to Mdlle. Tinne the introduction of the plant, and 
the specimen here figured. Dr. Kirk gathered it on the 
Manganga hills, in October, 1862; and Captain Grant, in the 
Umyoso forest, in August of the same year; but where Mdlle. 
Tinne's party, who collected it in 1863, found it, I do not 
know, their collections being at Vienna ; and my late friend 

apbil 1st, 1867. 



Dr. Kotschy, the author of the hitherto unpublished work 
in which this plant is figured, is recently deceased. 

Thinea is a stove plant, of which seeds were sent home by 
Mdlle. Tinne's party, and were raised at Liverpool, by Mr. 
Sandbach, in 1865 ; and it is no less remarkable for the 
maroon-purple colour of its flowers, than for their delicious 
perfume of violets. It flowered copiously at Mr. Williams's 
Nursery at Holloway, and at Kew, last winter. The genus 
belongs to the division Stachydeoe, of the Order Labiatce. 

Desce. A hoary bush, four to six feet high. Steins and 
branches erect, terete, ribbed, twiggy. Leaves on short slen- 
der pedicels, ovate, subacute or acute, quite entire, narrowed 
at the base; nerves faint. Floivers copiously produced in 
all the upper axils ; in native specimens, arranged in terminal 
elongate spikes. Peduncles two- to three-flowered, bracteate. 
Calyx bright green, ventricose, depressed, two-lipped; the 
lips broad, transversely flattened, quite entire. Corolla dark 
maroon-purple, tube broad, little longer than the calyx ; 
limb compressed horizontally, two-lipped, upper lip short, 
almost truncate, two-lobed, lower advanced, nattish, three- 
lobed, lateral lobes small rounded, middle large, orbicular, 
emarginate. Stamens four, with parallel filaments, bearded 
at the very base ; anthers small, concealed under the upper 
lip, attached laterally to the filament, reniform, two-celled. 
Style slender. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Corolla laid open. 2. Ovary, style and stigma and disk:— hoik 
magnified. 



5638. 




Wfi.tch.iel.et Mi. 



Vincent Brooks . Irrrp 



Tab. 5638. 

DICTYOPSIS Thtobeegii. 

Tkunbergs Dictyopsis. 



Nat. Ord. Smilace^:. — Hexandbia Monogtnia. 

Gen. Char. Flores hermaphroditi. Perianthium deciduum, tubuloso- 
campanulatum, limbo brevi 6-lobo, lobis recurvis 3-nerviis. Stamina 6 basi 
penantlm tubi inserta, filamentis inferne tubo adnatis, inclusis ; anther® 
oblongae. Ovarium ovoideum, basi attenuatum, apice cum stylo columnari 
continuum 3-loculare, stigmate capitato 3-lobo ; ovula in loculis 2-4 2- 
seriata. Bacca globosa, 3-locularis, oligosperma. Semina plano-convexa 
testa coriacea, albumine copioso.— Herba ylaberrima, scandens, foliosa 
ramis gracilhmis teretibm. Folia sessilia, ovata, acuminata, inteaerrimd 
basi rotunda/a v. cordata, casta tenui distincta, nervis lateralibus numerosis 
tenmbus, nervuhs transversis pulcherrime reticulatis. Pedunculi simplices 
v. 3-ckotome ramosp, aocillares et terminates, pedicellis gracilibus sub calyce 
articulatis. i lores parvi, nutantes, albo-virescentes. 



Dictyopsis Tkunberaii. Harv. Gen. Cap. PL Ed. 2, ined. 

Kuscus reticulatus. Thunb. Prodr. Fl. Cap. 13. Willd. Sp. PL v. 4. «. 876. 
Kunth, Enum. PL v. 5. p. 276. 



At Plate- 5584 of the last volume of the Magazine, was 
figured a Cape climbing Liliaceous plant, of singular grace 
and beaut}, so much resembling this in habit and general 
appearance, that it must strike every one as surprising 
that these plants have nothing whatever to do with one 
another ; that they do not belong to the same natural family- 
even ; and that the apparently precisely similar leaves of the 
two are in the one case (that of the Myrsiphyllmn) not leaves 
at all (as noticed under its description). The Myrsiphyllum 
is a Liliaceous plant, with six leaflets to the perianth, seeds 
with a black covering, and the apparent leaves are flattened 
leaf-like branches, growing from the axils of small scale-like 
true leaves. The Dictyopsis is a Smilaceous plant, with 
an entire tube to the perianth, seeds with a coriaceous 
pale testa, and true leaves without scales at their bases. 

APRIL 1st, 1867. 



Dictyopsis reticulata is a most beautiful tender greenhouse 
climber, as graceful and as fitted for all decorative and orna- 
mental purposes as MyrsiphyUum. It is a native of the 
eastern districts of South Africa, from Albany and Somerset 
(Mrs. Barber and Mr. Hutton) to British Kaffraria (Cooper) 
and the coast land of Natal (Dr. Sutherland). 

Descr. A slender, graceful, glabrous leafy climber. Stems 
and branches cylindric. Leaves sessile, ovate, acuminate, 
rounded or cordate at the base, with many parallel nerves, the 
central forming a distinct midrib, all finely reticulated with 
cross-nerves. Peduncles axillary and terminal, three- or more- 
flowered, sometimes paniculately branched. Flowers drooping, 
pedicelled; pedicels articulate. Perianth tubular-campanu- 
late, green below, white above, limb of six reflexed lobes. 
Stamens six, filaments adherent to the sides of the base of 
the perianth-tube ; anthers oblong. Ovary narrowed above 
and below; style columnar; stigma capitate, three-lobed ; 
ovules two to four in each cell. Berry subglobose, half 
an inch in diameter. Seeds with a coriaceous coloured testa 
and copious albumen. — J. 1). IL 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. The same laid open :— both magnified. 



5639. 







Ymceni. Brooksjmp, 



Tab. 5G39. 

DOMBEYA Mastersii. 

Dr. Masters's Dombeya. 



Nat. Ord. Sterculiace^e. — Monadelphia Pentandria. 
Oen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5487.) 



Dombeya JUatterni; rarnulis gracilibus foliis utrinque et inflorescentia 
pilis laxis molliter villosis, foliis gracile petiolatis late ovato-cor- 
datis acuminatis angulatim sub-3-lobis serrato-dentatis 7-9-nerviis, 
pilis subtus ad nervos stellatis, stipulis lanceolatis ?, corymbis gracile 
pedicellatis subsimplicibus multifloris ebracteatis. pedicellis filiformibus 
calycibusque patentim pilosis, bracteis lanceolatis sepalis reflexis cou- 
similibus, petalis obovato-cuneatis valde obliquis uno latere producto 
acuto albis, staminibua 15, stylo gracili, stigmatibus filiformibus re- 
curvis. 

Dombeya angulata. Masters in Gard. Chron. January, 1867, p. 14, non Cav. 



The beautiful plant here figured flowered in the Palm 
house at Kew in January of the present year, and was the 
subject of an interesting communication to the c Gardeners' 
Chronicle ' by Dr. Masters, who, besides deservedly eulogizing 
it for the elegance of its perfumed trusses of pure white 
flowers, adds some valuable observations on the morphology 
of the flowers, and a curious account of the action of the sta- 
minodes in the process of fertilization. The staminodes, he 
observes in the opening flower to curve downwards and out- 
wards, so as to come into contact with the stamens, whose 
anthers open outwardly, and allow their pollen to adhere to 
them. Being thus provided with a freight of pollen, the 
staminodes uncoil, and bring their points to a level with the 
stigmata, which curl round them, and thus receive the pollen. 
Should this interesting observation be verified, it will prove 
a remarkable discovery, and proof of an arrangement for self- 
fertilization, as curious as any that Mr. Darwin has dis- 
covered for the contrary effect 

With regard to the correct nomenclature of this species 

APRIL 1st. 1867. 



(of the introducer of which I find no record in the Gardens), 
it is certainly not D. angulata, which is well figured at Tab. 
2905 of this work, and which has very broad bracts, pink 
flowers, and much less oblique petals; nor do I think it 
agrees with any Mauritian species ; but it is identical with a 
tropical African one, of which there are specimens in the 
Hookerian Herbarium, collected in Abyssinia by Dr. Eoth, and 
by Captain Grant on the banks of the Nile north of Chopeh, 
in November, 1862.. It is further very nearly allied to, if 
not identical with D. Schimperiana, A. Rich., of Abyssinia, 
but that is a larger plant, with broader, more obtuse petals, 
and a longer staminal tube. 

Descr. Our plant is a small bush, from four to five feet 
high, sparingly branched, the branches slender, nearly gla- 
brous; branchlets tomentose, with soft, spreading hairs. 
Leaves four to seven inches long, deeply cordate-ovate, acu- 
minate, obscurely angularly lobed, rather sharply toothed, 
five- to nine-nerved, bright-pale-green, villous, with long 
hairs, on both surfaces, those on the nerves beneath stellate. 
Peduncles axillary, slender, about as long as the petioles, 
bearing a simple or rarely subcompound corymb. Bracts 
none at the base of the pedicels. Pedicels numerous, slender, 
one inch long, pilose, with soft, spreading hairs. Flowers 
pearly-white, one inch in diameter; bracts beneath the 
flowers lanceolate, as long as and similar to the sepals. 
Sepals narrow-lanceolate, one-third of an inch long. Petals 
very obliquely obovate-cuneate, produced at one side into an 
obtuse or acute point, white. Stamens fifteen, with pinkish 
filaments and a short tube ; staminodes strap-shaped. Style 
slender, pilose at the base; stigmas filiform. Ovary very 
woolly.— J. RE. 



Fig. 1. Stamen and ovary. 2. Ovary: — both magnified. 



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Suitable for Pong or Horse 
Powe r. 

Diam.30in.,len. 32in.£10 

« 30 „ 36 „ 10 15 

■ 30 » 42 „ 11 15 

» 30 „ 48 „ 13 10 

» 30 „ 60 „ 15 io 

» 30 „ 72 i; id 



BO 



84 



19 10 



Thomas Green & Son, Smitnfield Iron Works, Leeds ; 44 & 45, Blackfriars Eoad, 
London, S. ; and 19, Eden Quay, Dublin, 



HEATING BY HOT WATEE. 



It is now generally admitted that Buildings of any kind can be more effectua 
warmed by Hot Water than by any other means ; but as so much depends on I 
way in which the Apparatus is fixed, it is of the greatest importance that it be d< 
by experienced men. 

J. Jones & Sons are prepared to estimate for Warming, to any extent — 



GREENHOUSES. 
CONSERVATORIES. 
VINERIES. 
HOTHOUSES. 
FORCING PITS. 
PEACH HOUSES. 
PINE STOVES. 
ORCHARD HOUSES. 



CHURCHES. 

CHAPELS. 

SCHOOLS. 

READING ROOMS. 

LECTURE ROOMS. 

BILLIARD ROOMS. 

HALLS AND PASSAGES. 

BATHS. 



FACTORIES. 
OFFICES. 
WORKSHOPS. 
WAREHOUSES. 
DRYING ROOMS. 
CELLARS. 
COACH-HOUSES. 
HARNESS ROOMS. 



J. Jones & Sons' Apparatus is simple in construction, moderate in cost, 1 



economical in working. 






It is equally available for the Amateur's Greenhouse, or the longest range 
Forcing Houses ; for the smallest Chapel or the largest Church ; for Private Oifli 
or those of Public Companies. 

It is admirably adapted for Dwelling Houses, as coils of pipes can be pla 
in any part, for warming the various rooms. One or more Baths may be hea 
from the same boiler, and a constant supply of hot water obtained in any part 
the house. 

For Warehouses and Workshops this system of heating is unsurpassed, as i 
not only the means of keeping goods dry, but it also adds to the comfort oi J 
workpeople, and thereby effects a saving in labour. 

J. Jones & Sons recommend boilers of all kinds being set in brickwork 
possible ; but portable boilers can be supplied, if required. 



MATERIALS— All Materials supplied will be of the best quality. 

DELIVERY— Boilers of various kinds, and pipes and connections, being abv • 
in stock, can, at a very short notice, be sent to any part. 

FIXING. — The Fixing will be done by experienced men, fully capable of finish 
properly any work they may undertake; and J. Jones & Sons are preparec 
guarantee the effectual working of any apparatus fixed by their own men. 

ESTIMATES.— Plans and Estimates will be sent on application. 




J. JONES & SONS, 

IRON MERCHANTS AND HORTICULTURAL ENGINEER 

6, BANKSIDE, SOUTHWARK, LONDON, S.E. 

J. %. TATLOR AHD CO., PEI5TBBS, LITTLE %fB*MM SIBEET, W. C. 



No. 269. 

VOL. XXIII. MAY. [Price's*. oV. cul ;1 - is. dd. plain. 

OR NO. 9G1 M THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMPRISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KBW, 

AND OF OTHEB BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS INGBEAT BRITAIN, 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS j 



JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S., 
Birntfli of tlyi lloyal Jtiatamc fror&tiU af Bcid. 




.^;w- * 






- 



"■*. : 



""<««*; 



Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flower* exotic crace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 
HENRIETTA STREET, COVEN! GARDEN, 

15(37. 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT LAWN MOWERS FOE 1867 



Patronized on Five occasions, during the Season o/"1864, by 
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, 

AND ONCE EY HIS MAJESTY THE KING- OF SAXONY; 

DUEING THE SEASON OF 1865 THEY WESE PATRONIZED ON FOUR OCCASIONS BY HER MAJESTY 

THE QUEEN; 
ONCE EY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OE HOLLAND; 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF PRUSSIA; 

AGAIN, DURING THE SEASON OF 1868, THEY WERE PATRONIZED ON FOUR OCCASIONS BY 

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 




^-- 



HOKSE MACHINE. 



PONT MACHINE. 



HAND MACHINE. 

gratified 

■ . •- 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, in presenting their LAWN MOWERS for the Season of 1867, are 
be able to stale that the demand for their celebrated Machines rapidly increases every year. The sui 
attended Shabxs? Machines during last Season is quite unparalleled in the history of the Lawn Mower. 

A. S. & Son can confidently assure their numerous Friends and Customers and the Public generally that their' 
deavour will always be to supply a Machine, first-class in every way, one which cannot be surpassed it even equa 
whether for simplicity of construction, ease in working, or durability. None but the best materials and skilled Wo 
men are employed in the manufacture of their Machines. 

PRIC ES— Including Carriage to most of the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in the Kingdom. 

SHAKES' NEW PATENT HAND MACHINE FOE IS. 

4 10 0) byaZady. 19-mch Maclime £7 12 6 { aml a Bo : 

ne 5 10 Do. by a Boy. 22-inch Machine 8 7 6 / Do. by 1M 

He 6 10 D». by a Man. \ 24-inch Machine 8 17 6i Men. 

Silent Movement for the four smallest sizes, 4s. extra ; for the other sizes, Is. Qd. extra. 




hine 
ine 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT HORSE MACHO* 
Width of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering App^ 

30-inch Machine £19 30s.e*i 

36-inch Machine 22 ; 

42-inch Machine 26 

48-inch Machine 28 40 *- eSl 

Silent Movement, 20*. extra. 

SHANKS' PATENT LAWN MOWERS cut the Grass on uneven as well as on level Lawns; and it is <P 

immaterial whether the Grass be wet or dry. 

1- '■':; MacOne warranted to give ample satisfaction, and if not approved of, can be at once returned- 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT PONY & DONKEY MACHINE. 
Width of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. 

25-inch Machine 812 10 25s. extra. 

88-inch Machine 14 10 30s. extra. 

80-inch Machine 15 15 0... 30s. extra. 

Silent Movement, 12s. Qd. extra. 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, 

27, LEADENHALL STREET, LONDON. 

MANUFACTORY. DENS IEONWOKKS, AEBROATH. 



A S. and SON keep a Stock of Lawn Mowers at 27, Leadenhall Street, London from which Orders can 
at once executed. They also have at their London Warehouse a staff of experienced Workmen thoror.g 
acquainted with aH the details of these Machines, so that they are enabled to repair La-am Holers 



Lcndon as ^ell ao at the Manufactory. 



NEW ZONAL PELARGONIUMS. 

DOWNTE, LA1ED, and LAING most respectfully announce that they will send out the 
following splendid varieties, which have been so much admired, and have received the highest 
yards wherever shown, including First-class Certificates at the Boyal Horticultural Society. 
The following extract is from the ' Journal of Horticulture,' July 17, 1866 : — " There are so many 
good Nosegays, and so much alike, that it requires something quite new in colour to surpass them, 
or, in many cases, to equal them. The large bold truss of Stella and Le Grand, or the KING OF 
THE NOSEGAYS, must be the models of perfection in this class of flowers." 

ING OF THE NOSEGAYS.— Bright orange-scarlet. Very large truss, dwarf habit. Very 
free and most effective variety. 7s. 6d. each. 
MBS. LA1NG (Nosegay). — Glowing carmine-scarlet. Very dwarf, free, and most effective as a 

bedder. A beautiful and distinct variety. 5s. each. 
MRS. MENZIES. — Bright rosy-salmon. Flowers perfect, good habit, free, and very fine. 5s. each. 
SAMBO. — Very dark glussy scarlet, of great substance. Flowers of the finest form. Very large, 
compact, globular truss ; quite distinct from all others. 7s. <$d. each. 

Ready second week in May. 
STANSTEAD PARK NURSERY, FOREST HILL, S.E. 

THE NEW ENGLISH HYBRID PERPETUAL ROSES AND ZONAL GERANIUMS 



ROBERT WARD, 

Eaiser of the Celebrated Rose John Hopper, begs to announce that his 

BEDDING ROSES, 

MES. WAED, MRS. JOHN BEEXEES, and IPSWICH GEM, 

Will be sent out in the Spring ; also, 

GROOM'S ZONAL GERANIUMS, 

MISS MAETIN, SIE FITZEOY KELLY, and FLOBIBUNDA ALBA NANA. 
The Set of Boses, 21s. The Set of Geraniums, 10*. 6i. Package included. 
See 'Journal of Horticulture,' Juue 26th, and July 31st; also ' Floral Magazine ' for Sep- 
tember, October, and last month, in which they are figured. 

A Descriptive Circular will be sent on application. Beautiful Illustrations, each 13 Stamps. 

NEW ZONAL PELARGONIUMS. 

SALTMAESH and SON, Nurserymen, Seedsmen, and Florists, Chelmsford, have great pleasure 
in introducing the following SEEDLINGS of their own raising, feeling confident they will give 
equal satisfaction with the two now well-known varieties, Luna and Little Treasure, sent out by 
them in 1865. They will be ready for distribution in May next. Early orders are solicited, as the 
stock is limited. 

ZONAL PELAEGONITJMS. 

REINE D'lTALIE (Saltmarsh and Son). — A seedling from the highly esteemed variety Roi d'ltalie, possessing all 
the good properties of its parent in compactness of habit, profusion, form, and size of flowers, each blossom 
measuring 1£ of an inch in diameter ; colour, pale salmon-flesh, shading off to flesh-white at the edges, with pure 
white eye, altogether forming a most attractive specimen for pot culture. Price 7*. 6d. each. 

CRITERION (Saltmarsh and Son). — Also a seedling from Roi d'ltalie, with darker zone, producing an abundance of 
flowers, of the large size of its parent, of the most perfect form, and borne on stout footstalks ; habit compact 
and vigorous ; colour bright orange-vermilion, with small white eye. Price It. 6d. each. 

VAEIEOATED ZONAL PELAEGONIUMS. 

METEOR (Saltmarsh and Son).— Foliage large and flat, almost circular, having a green disc about 1± inch in 
diameter, surrounded by a very broad and well-defined zone of deep sienna maroon and bright red in about equal 
proportions, leaving a clear margin of about a quarter of an inch of bright chrome-yellow ; flowers bright scarlet 
with white eye ; habit compact and vigorous. Figured in ' Floral Magazine ' for January, 1867. 

The above splendid variety will prove a valuable addition to the Golden Tricolor section of variegated Pelargo- 
niums. It is quite distinct from any variety hitherto introduced, and was awarded a First-class Certificate at 
the Royal Horticultural Society's meeting in September, 1864. Price 21*. each. 

ELECTRIC (Saltmarsh and Son) .—Foliage greenish-yellow, changing with exposure to sun and air to a rich golden 
yellow, with a very broad zone of dark chocolate, in the way of Luna, but more heavily zoned, and of more 
robust habit, producing fine trusses of scarlet flowers, with white eye. Price 10*. 6d. each. 

VENUS (Saltmarsh and Son).— Foliage greenish-yellow, changing to golden-yellow, with slight bronze zone; habit 
compact and spreading, producing neat trusses of well-formed flowers on short footstalks of a soft and pleasing 
shade of rosy-cerise, altogether forming a most attractive variety by the harmonious blending of its colours and 
its remarkably close habit of growth. Price 10*. 6d. each. 

SNOWSTORM (Saltmarsh and Son). —Foliage green, with a very deep edge of pure white. This variety will be 
found to display a greater proportion of white variegation than any other yet produced. The leaves are less 
disposed to curl than most varieties of this class ; in addition to which, the habit is exceedingly close, yet robust 
and bushy ; flowers rosy-scarlet, with white eye. Price 10*. 6d. each. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



NEW ZONALE GERANIUMS. 

DUCHESS OF SUTHERLAND, INTERNATIONAL, LADY CONSTANCE GROSVENOR. 
The above Nosegay Varieties were selected from many thousand seedlings, and have gained 
the highest awards wherever shown. The ■ Gardener's Magazine' says, "And this brings me to 
DUCHESS or SUTHERLAND and LADY CONSTANCE GROSVENOR, which have been 
several times shown by Mr. Turner this season, and ought to be sent out next spring at nothing 
less than a guinea a plant, to recoup their raisers for the hundreds they have need to grow for the 
muck-heap." Strong Plants now ready, 5s. each. 

CHARLES TURNER, THE ROYAL NURSERIES, SLOUGH. 

CHOICE SEEDS~ 

WILLIAM CUTBUSH AND SON strongly recommend the following :— 
PRIMULA SINENSIS FIMBRIATA, of the finest possible strain, Red, White, or mixed, 2*.6i, 

3s. Gd., and 5s. per packet. . , 

CALCEOLARIA, saved from James's choice strain, very fine, 2s. Qd., 3s. Gd., and 5s. per packet. 
CINERARIA from named flowers, 2s. Qd., 3s. Gd., and 5s. per packet. 

SNOW'S WINTER WHITE BROCCOLI, true, W. C. & Son's own saving, 2s. 6d. per packet. 
NUNEHAM PARK ONION, 2s. Gd. per packet. 

For other Choice Seeds see Catalogue, Post-free. 
HIGHGATE NURSERIES, LONDON, N. Jj 

NEW TBICOLOE.ED GERANIUMS. 

F. and A. SMITH'S CATALOGUE FOR 1867, containing Descriptions of their Splendid 
Varieties of the above, which have obtained the following awards : — 

Two £5 Prizes for the Collection Crystal Palace. 

A Prize for the Collection Liverpool. I Five Certificates Peterborough. 

A. Prize for the Collection Manchester. Five Certificates Nottingham. 

A Prize for the Collection Leicester. Six Certificates Brighton- 

A Prize for the Collection Birmingham. | One Certificate International. 

May now be had on application. 
_________ DULWICH, SURREY. ^^_____ 

NEW BICOLORED AND ZONALE GERANIUMS. 

F. and A. SMITH'S CATALOGUE FOR 1867 is now ready, containing Descriptions 

of the above, which have obtained Thirteen Certificates. 

DULWICH, SURREY. 



NEW ROSES, 1867. 

F. and A. SMITH'S DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE of the above may be had on application- 

Strong seasoned Plants now ready. 
DULWICH, SURREY. 



BENJAMIN EDCINCTON 



MARQUEE, TENT, RICK-CLOTH, AND FLAG MANUFACTURER, 

BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY 
AND H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES. 

•MARQUEES & TENTS FOR HORTICULTURAL SHOWS 

FOR SALE OR HIRE. 

Rich Cloths, New and Second-hand, with Poles, etc. complete. 

TANNED NETTING FOR FRUIT TREES, NEW AND REPAIRED. 

SCRIMS FOR GREENHOUSE BLINDS, FRIGT DOMO, ETC. 

An Illustrated Catalogue Free by Post. 

Be particular to observe the Christian Name, BENJAMIN EDGINGTON (only)> 
2, DUKE STREET, LONDON BRIDGE, S.E. No other E S tabli S bment. 





BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



WORKS ON NATURAL HISTORY. 



MONOGRAPH OF ODONTOGLOSSUM. By James Bateman, Esq. Part IV., Imp. folio. 
5 coloured plates, £1. 1*. Contents : Odontoglossum Loeve, Odontoglossum Luteo-purpureum, Odontoglossum 
Bictoniense, Odontoglossum Alexandras, Odontoglossum Maculatum. 

SECOND CENTURY OF ORCHIDACEOUS PLANTS. By James Batsman, Esq. Part 
VII., royal Ito, 10 coloured plates, 10*. 6d. Contents : Renanthera Lowii, Trichopilia Turialvse, Epidendrum 
Myriaiithnm, Pilumna Fragrans, Oncidium Longipes, Dendrobium Eburneum, Odontoglossum Cordatum, 
Phahrnopsis Lowii, Dendrobium Bigibbum, Orchis Foliosa. 

i HE BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. Edited by Dr. Hooker, Third Series, No. 269, May, 

coloured plates, 3s. Gd. Contents : Dalechampia Roezliana, Agave Schidigera, Gomphia Tlieophrasta, Epiden- 
drum Eburneum, Myrtus Chekon. 

THE FLORAL MAGAZINE. Edited by the Rev. H. Hontwood Dombrain. No. 85, May, 
4 coloured plates, 2*. 6d. Contents : Varieties of Persian Cyclamen, Lalia Pilcheri, Coleus Gibsonii, Verbena, 
Lady of Langlebury. 

HANDBOOK OF THE NEW ZEALAND FLORA. By Dr. Hookeb, F.R.S. Part I., 16*. 

Part II., 14*. Or complete in one volume, £1. 10.?. 

I'LORA AUSTRALIENSIS. By G. Bentham, F.R.S. Vol. III., £1. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns 
indigenous to, or naturalized in, the British Isles. For the Use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George 
Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnean Society. New Edition. Crown 8vo, 12*. 

THE ILLUSTRATED BRITISH FLORA; a Description (with a Wood Engraving, including 

Dissections, of each Species) of the Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in, the British Isles. 
By G. Bentham, F.R.S. Demy 8vo, 2 vols., 1295 Wood-Engravings, from Original Drawings by W Fitch 
£3. 10*. 

THE FIELD BOTANIST'S COMPANION; a Familiar Account, in the Four Seasons, of the 
Wild Flowering Plants of the British Isles. By Thomas Moobe, F.L.S. Demy 8to, 24 Coloured Plates by 
W. Fitch, 21*. 

THE BRITISH FERNS. Figures and Descriptions, with Analyses of the Fructification and 
Venation, of the Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland, systematically arranged. By Sir W. J. Hooker F R S 
Royal Svo, 66 Coloured Plates, £2. 2*. 

GARDEN FERNS. Figures and Descriptions, with Analyses of the Fructification and Vena- 
tion, of a Selection of Exotic Ferns, adapted for Cultivation in the Garden, Hothouse, and Conservatory By 
Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal 8vo, 64 Coloured Plates, £2. 2*. 

FILICES EXOTICA Figures and Description of Exotic Ferns, chiefly of such as are culti- 
vated in the Royal Gardens at Kew. By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal 4to, 100 Coloured Plates, £6. 11*. 

FERNY COMBES; a Ramble after Ferns in the Glens and Valleys of Devonshire. By 
Charlotte Chanter. Third Edition. 8 coloured plates and a Map of the County, 5s. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGX". Containing Characters of above a Thousand Species of Funo-i, and 
a complete List of all that have been described aa Natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Beekeley 
M.A., F.L.S. 8vo, 24 Coloured Plates, 30s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. Containing an Account of th*>ir Classical 
Historv, L T ses, Characters, Development, Structure, Nutritious Properties, Modes of Cooking and Preserving, etc 
By C. D. Badham, M.D. Second Edition. Edited by F. CrBREr, F.R.S. 8vo, 12 Coloured Plates, 12s. 

BRITISH MOSSES. Containing all that are known to be Natives of the British Isles. By the 
Rev. M. J. Beekeley, M.A., F.L.S. 8vo, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

GUIDE TO COOL-ORCHID GROWING. By James Batemak, Esq., F.R.S., Author of 

'The Orchidacese of Mexico and Guatemala.' Woodcuts, 1*. 

SYNOPSIS OF BRITISH SEA W r EEDS. From Dr. Harvey'a * Phycologia Britannica.' 5*. 

BRITISH SPIDERS ; an Introduction to the Study of the Ara^eid.e of Great Britain and 
Ireland. By E. F. Statelet. Crown 8vo, 16 Plates, drawn expressly for the work, by Tcffen West, con- 
taining Coloured Figures of nearly 100 Species, 10s. 6d. 

BRITISH BEES; an Introduction to the Study of the Natural History and Economy of the Bees 
indigenous to the British Isles. By W. E. SHrcKARD. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Steel Plates, containing nearly 
100 Figures, engraved from Natural Specimens expressly for the work, by E. W. Robinson, 10s. 6d. 

BRITISH BEETLES ; an Introduction to the Study of our Indigenous Coleopteba. By E. C. 
Rye. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Steel Plates, comprising Figures of nearly 100 Species, engraved from' Natural 
' Specimens expressly for the work, by E. W. Robinson, 10s. 6d. 

BRITISH FERNS*; an Introduction to the Study of the Ferns, Lycopods, and Equiseta indigenous 
to the British Isles. With Chapters on the Structure .Propagation, Cultivation, Diseases, Uses, Preservation, 
and Distribution of Ferns. By Margaret Plfes. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Plates, drawn expressly for the 
work, by W. Fitch, and 56 Wood-Engravings, 10s. 6d. 



REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



New Edition, in Foolscap 8vo, with Four Woodcuts, price 4s., 

THE ROSE AMATEUR'S GUIDE; 

Containing ample Descriptions of all the fine leading Varieties of Roses, regularly classed in their 
respective Families ; their History and Mode of Culture. By Thomas Rivebs. Ninth Edition, including 
a Rose-Garden Calendar. 

London i LONGMANS, GREEN, and CO., Paternoster Row. 

NEW PLANTS FOR 1867. 

HENRY CANNELL has great pleasure in introducing to the public the following Plants, 
of unusual advance on all other kinds in their respective classes. They have been chosen 
from upwards of Three Hundred Seedlings, sent from almost every county in the United 
Kingdom, and are sure to give the greatest satisfaction by their superior qualities. 

FUCHSIAS. 

KING OF THE DOUBLES.— This is the finest exhibition Double Fuchsia ever sent out. Habit 
perfect ; the corolla beautifully striped. 7*. Qd. each. 

MRS. GLADSTONE.— Great advance on all the white corolla kinds, and reflex equal to the well-known 
Guiding Star. 7s. &d. each. ,. 

BLAND'S FLO RIBUNDA.— This Fuchsia will introduce a new race, being perfectly distinct from all 
others ever sent out, and H. C. believes it will become equal to the well-known Tom Thumb gera- 
nium, and will shortly be planted in every garden and on every window. It has a scarlet tube an 
sepals, pure white corolla ; very short, stiff growth, requiring no stakes. A bed of this looks at a dis- 
tance to have the appearance of being covered with thousands of stars. For bedding and small po | 
this reallv has no equal, and is a decided acquisition. 5s. each. . , 

THE PERFECT CURE.— Scarlet tube, and sepals perfectly reflexed ; good habit and grower, with* 
most extraordinary-shaped corolla, which make it one of the most pleasing and curious novelties 
the Fuchsia ever seen. The corolla is formed on the ends of each stamen, and measures from tip 
tip three to four inches over, and is a very attractive and amuBing variety. 5s. each, the set ot to 
for £1. Is. Ready to send out on the 1st of May. , , 

MONSTER.—This is the largest ever sent out, the corolla measuring from two to two and a halt incne> 
over, and is as large as a Rose ; scarlet tube and sepals, very rich violet-purple corolla, very stio > • 
stiff habit. On account of its immense blooms and good growth, and being an abundant bloomer, 
is the most saleable Fuchsia ever sent out. 7s. 6d. each. , , u 

The demand being so great for this, H. C. finds it impossible to get sufficient stock of it to send 
out before the 1st of July. 

NEW TROP.S10LUMS COMPACTUM. 

FOB BEDDING AND BIBBON BOBDEBING. 

LUTEUM IMPROVED.— Immense improvement upon the one sent out last season. Beautiful bngh f 

yellow, for bedding, etc. No Calceolaria is near an equal to this for its continual and abundance 

bloom. Is. 6d. each. , _ 

THE MOOR. — In every way equal to the above ; colour, deep-dark maroon-crimson, a grand new co o 

for bedding ; has long been required for geometric gardens. Is. 6d. each. , - nS 

SCARLET GEM.— For its beautiful colour and dwarf compact habit, and continual massive blooming' 

no Scarlet Geranium is equal to this. 2s. 6d each. -n.-^. 

These were examined when growing in the garden by the Committee, and all were awarded a i?i 

Class Certificate. 
XO VELTY .— In every way equal to the above ; with a beautiful peculiar mixed bronze and yellow colour, 

fine for fancy beds, being quite a novel attractive colour. 2s. each. , , r^a 

These were raised by Mr. J. George, who is well known for introducing this new race of bedcu z 

plants ; and they are equally valuable for pots, having been in bloom ever since Christmas. All tn 

are acknowledged to be decided acquisitions. The following is an 

Official Description from tne ' UNITED HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY,' Dec. 8, 1866. 

"All these were considered as great additions as bedding plants, and cannot be too extensively gro^' 
lney far surpass any other plants in profusion of bloom, and the weather does not affect them to *"J 
apparent extent ; no one should be without them. In Scarlet Gem you have a most brilliant and attra^ 
tire variety, far surpassing the T. Lobbii section for effect in the parterre or ribbon-gardening- 
VV. Meale, Secretary. r , 

1st of Ma 36 ' f ° r 65 ' Gd ' '' US ' Per d ° Zen 5 £2 ' 2s ' f ° r 5 ° ' U f ° r 10 ° ; P acka S e deluded. Eeady ° D 

FLORAL GUIDE, with fuller description, for Four Stamps. 

FUCHSIA NURSERY, WOOLWICH. 



Tab. 5640. 
DALECHAMPIA Roezliana. 

RoezVs Dalechampia. 



Nat. Ord. Euphorbiace^;. — Moncecia Polyandrta. 



Gen. Char. Flores monoici, £ et $ , involucro compresso 2-pbyllo 2- 
sexuali inclusi. Calycis J lacinise 4-5, valvatse; ? 5-12, imbricatse. JPetala 
utriusquc sexus 0. Discus fl. £ 0; fl. $ ssepius obsoletus. Stamina cen- 
tralia, in receptaculo convexo sita ; antherse 2-rimosae, loculi longitrorsum 
adnati. Ovarii loculi 1-ovulati. Capsula 3-4-cocca. Semina ecaruncu- 
lata ; cotyledones complanatse. — Frutices tropiei, scepissime volubiles. Folia 
alterna, petiolata, penninervia v. palminervia, indivisa lobata v. ao-foliolata. 
Stipule 2. Flores axillares, pedunculati, bracteis foliaceis albis pallidis v. 
coloratis 2-stipulatis inclusi. Involucella $ B-Jlora, $ oz-flora, latere supe- 
riore Jloribus sterilibus carnoso-ceraceis pallidis multicristatis aucta. 



Dalechampia Roezliana ; caule erecto, foliis sessilibus v. brevissime pe- 
tiolatis obovato-oblongis lanceolatis spathulatisve longe acumiuatis 
integerrimis v. supra medium grosse obtuse serratis basi angustatis 
cordato-2-lobis, stipulis ovato-triaugularibus, ovario sericeo-pubesceute, 
stylo gracillimo, stigmate obtuso. 

Vae. a. rosea ; involueri foliolis grosse dentatis serratisve pulchre roseis. 

Dalechampia Eoezliana, var. a. rosea. Mueller Aryan, in DC. Prod v 15 
p. 1233. 



A truly superb plant, one of the noblest introduced for 
many years, comparable only with the Bougainvillwce amongst 
those of its habit, and exceeding these in the size and clear 
rose-colour of its broad membranous veined involucral leaves. 
The specimen here figured was flowered in March of the pre- 
sent year by Mr. Bull, of Chelsea, who procured it from 
Messrs. Van Houtte, of Ghent. It is a native of Vera Cruz, 
and, according to its first describer, Dr. Mueller Argan (in 
De Candolle's ' Prodromus '), living plants were sent from 
Mexico to the Botanic Garden of Zurich by its discoverer, 
M. Eoezl. Mueller further has another variety, p viridis, 
distinguished by its subentire leaves, and greenish or green- 
ish-red involucral leaves, which he states to be cultivated by 

MAT 1st, 1867. 



M. Van Houtte, and to have been received by that eminent 
nurseryman from M. Ortgies, of Zurich ; but I can hardly 
fancy this variety being anything more than an imperfectly 
developed state of the original plant {a rosea). 

The genus Balechampia contains some fifty tropical plants, 
chiefly American ; very few of them having any claims to 
horticultural notice, though the white bracts and scandent 
habit of some may recommendthem. 

Descr. An erect shrub, three to four feet high, much 
branched and leafy, glabrous, bright-green. Leaves six inches 
long, subsessile, narrow obovate-oblong or -lanceolate, long 
acuminate, entire or coarsely obtusely toothed above the mid- 
dle, narrowed and produced towards the base, which is cordate, 
dark shining green above, paler below. Stipules large, green, 
ovate or triangular-ovate. Peduncles solitary, axillary, strict, 
shorter than the leaves. Involucral bracts two to two and a 
half inches long, broadly cordate, sessile, toothed, membra- 
nous, nerved, of a brilliant rose-red colour, alternating with 
two small ovate, acute, green stipule-like outer bracts. 
Flowers clustered, male and female together, with many 
braeteoles at the base of the clusters. Male flowers on a jointed 
pedicel. Sepals five, oblong, spreading and incurved, pube- 
rulous. Staminal column cylindric, pubescent; anthers nu- 
merous, capitate ; pedicelled waxy capitate bodies (imperfect 
male flowers) are clustered together at one side of the male 
flowers. Female flowers subsessile. Calyx-lobes six, erect, lan- 
ceolate, irregularly toothed or entire. Ovary pubescent, 
three-celled. Style very slender ; stigma obtuse. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1. Cluster of flowers. 2. Ditto of imperfect males. 3. Male flower 
and pedicel. 4. Stamen. 5. Cluster of female flowers. 6. Female flower. 
7. Ovary. 8. Transverse section of ditto -.—all magnified. 




Vincent Brooks Imj 




Tab. 5641. 

agaye scmdigera. 

Splintered-Leaved American Aloe. 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllide.e. — Hexandria Moxogynia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 5333.) 



AoAVJI tchidigera; acaulis, foliis horizontaliter pateutibus pedalibus an- 
guste ensiformibus spinuloso-acuminatis supra basin dilatatam paulo 
angustatis viridibus albo-lineatis marginibus late albo-lanatis in fills 
planis elongatis retortis desinentibus, scapo stricto gracili 6-pedali 
bracteis elongatis strictiusculis acicularibus dense obsito, spica elon- 
gata stricta sublaxiflora, floribus viridibus 2-3-nis, fasciculis subsessili- 
bus bractea filiformi subtensis, ovario cylindrico pollicari glaber- 
riuio, periantbii tubo subinfundibuliformi ovario a»quilongo, lobis 
lineari-oblongis revolutis acutis tubo a?quilongis, filamentis subulatis 
perianthio aequilongis strictis, antheris lineari-elongatis. 

Agave scbidigera. Lemaire in Verschqffelt Cat. 1861 ; Compte Rendu Soc. 
Roy. d'Aqric. et Bot. Gand, 1861 ; lllust. Rortic. v. 8. sub t. 287, et 
v. 9. t. 330. 

Agave filifera, var. pannosa et var. adornata. Scheidw. in Compte Rendu 
Soe. Roy. Agric. et Bot., et in C. Koeli, Wochenschr. n. 36. 1861. 



The remarkable plant here figured was introduced into 
Europe in 1861, from Mexico, by Mr. Verschaffelt, of Ghent, 
and its foliage was figured in the • Illustration Horticole ' of 
the following year, where it is also described by M. Lemaire. 
on whose authority our synonyms and quotations rest. Our 
specimen flowered in January in Mr. Williams's establish- 
ment, Paradise Nursery, Ilolloway, where the drawing was 
executed by Mr. Fitch. As a species, M. Lemaire states 
that it is so very closely allied to A. filifera, that he was 
at first disposed to regard it as a variety of that plant, 
but that it differs in the more linear (less oblong) leaves, 
more dilated at the base, their less pungent tips, and the 
very much thicker, broader, woolly, torn edges of the leaf, 

MAY 1ST, 18G7. 



while, according to the figure of the A. filifera in the ' Revue 
Horticole,' the corolla-lobes of that plant are shorter. 

Descr. Stem none. Leaves forming a low subhemisphe- 
rical mass ; lower spreading and recurved ; upper suherect, 
about one foot long, narrow linear-ensiform, with red sub- 
pungent apices, dilated at the base and slightly contracted 
above it ; with irregular longitudinal broad white bands on 
both surfaces, and white edges, from which are given off 
woolly recurved flattened broad filaments, one to three 
inches long. Scape strict, erect, about six feet high, lower 
third covered with numerous erect or recurved subulate red- 
brown bracts, two inches long and upwards. Spike rather 
slender, very many-flowered, cylindric. Flowers, including 
the stamens, three and a half inches long, green, with yellow 
anthers, rather dense, in fascicles of two or three, each fas- 
cicle subtended by a filiform red flexuous bract. Pedicels 
very short, with very small broad bracteoles. Ovary cylin- 
dric, glabrous. Perianth tube as long and broad as the 
ovary, lobes as long as the tube, linear, acute, re volute. 
Filaments strict, subulate, one inch long ; anthers nearly as 
long, linear-elongate. Stigma obtusely three-lobed. /. B. H. 



Fig. 1. Eeduced figure of entire plant. 2. Leaf, nat. size. 3. Flowers, 
nat. size. 




564-2. 




"W. Fitch, deLetlith 



Tab. 5642. 

GOMPHIA Theophrasta. 

Thcophrasta-like Gomphia. 



Nat. Ord. Ochnace2e. — Decandbia Mono&ynia. 

Gen. Char. Sepala 5, docidua. Fetala 5, calyce paulo longiora, obovata, 
uuguiculata, itubricata. Torus crassus, lobatus, in gynophorum elevatus. 
Stamina 10, basi tori inserta, erecta, conniventia ; antherte sessiles, poris 
dehiscentes. Ovarium profimde 5-G-partitum ; styli arete connati, stigmate 
simplici ; ovula in loculis solitaria, a basi adsceudentia. Drupes 5 v. 
abortu pauciores, toro ampliato sessiles. Semen erectum; testa membra- 
nacea; cotyledones carnosse, plano-convexae ; radicula brevissima, ad bilum 
deseendens. — Arbores v. frutices (/laberrimce. Folia alterna, persistentia, 
simplicia, coriacea, nitida, argute serrata, nervis creberrimis. Stipula? libera 
v. connatte. Panicula? v. racemi terminates v. terminates et axillares, brae- 
teatce. Flores lutei, pedieellis basi articulatis. 



Gomphia Theophrasta ; foliis pedalibua brevissime petiolatis elongato- 
ovato-lanceolatis accuminatis serrulatis supra basin obtusum integerri- 
mis, paniculis ramosis ramis suberectis basi bracteis 2 subulatis sti- 
puhrlbrmibus auctis, fasciculis 2-5-floris, floribus ^un. diam., pedieellis 
gracilibus curvis ebracteolatia, sepalis oblongo-lanceolatis subacutia 
pallide viridibus, petalis oblongo-ovatis obtusis. 

Gomphia Theophrasta. Lind. Hort. Cat. 1859. 

Wolkensteinia Theophrasta. Beqel in GartenpZ. v. 14 (1865). p. 131. t. 
171. 



Of the large and handsome genus Gomphia, containing 
upwards of eighty species, almost all of them American, and 
distinguished for their glossy foliage, and many for their 
beautiful flowers, not half-a-dozen have been introduced into 
Europe, and only one, G. olivceformis (Tab. 52G2), has 
hitherto been figured from living specimens in this country ; 
yet no plants can be more suited for stove decoration, 
whether for the persistence of their bright, shining, ever- 
green foliage, or the golden colour of their inflorescence. 

67. Theophrasta was introduced by Mr. Linden's collectors 

from South America, but of its exact native country I have 

no information. It is allied to the Brazilian 67. casfaneafolia, 

DC, but differs conspicuously in the very much longer leaves. 

may 1st, 1S67. 



attenuated to an obtuse base, with the margins quite entire 
for an inch above the petiole, and in other points. 

Desck. A small stove shrub, probably becoming a bush or 
small tree in its native country. Leaves crowded at the apex 
of the stem, a foot long, three inches broad, spreading and 
recurved, on very short thick petioles a quarter of an inch 
long, acuminate, acutely serrulate from an inch above the 
base to the tip, oblong-lanceolate, almost linear below, 
rounded at the very base, not very coriaceous ; veins nume- 
rous, arching. Panicle a foot long, copiously branched; 
branches stout, ascending, with two subulate stipuliform 
bracts at the base. Flowers one-third of an inch in dia- 
meter, in clusters of two to five on the branches of the 
panicle ; pedicels spreading, slender, curved, without bracts. 
Sepals linear- oblong, obtuse, pale yellow-green. Petals 
golden-yellow, rather longer than the sepals, ovate-oblong, 
obtuse. J. I). H. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Stamen. 3. Pistil. 4. Transverse section of 
ovary : — all magnified. 




sm. 




WfitdvaeLetTith 



"Vincent Brooks, Imp . 



Tab. 5643. 
EPIDEKDKUM ebtjknbtjm. 

Ivory-flowered Epidendrum. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Gynandria Diandria. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 5336.) 



Epidendrtjm (Euepidendrum) eburneum ; caulibus erectia fasciculatis 
teretibus foliosis, foliis oblongia lineari-oblongisve planiusculis obtusis 
coriaceia enerviis, racemo termin:ili 4-6-floro brevi inclinato, bracteia 
parvis viridibus late ovato-triansularibus, aepalia lineari-lanceolatis 
acuminatia integerrimia pallide citrinia, petalis angustioribus, labeJlo 
ungue columnae adnato lamina ampla cordato-rotundata acuta inte- 
gerrima planiuscula eburnea baai 2-tuberculata, columna crasaiuscula 
apice truncata sub-5-dentata. 

Epidejtdruh eburneum. Reichenb. fil. in Gard. Chron. 18G7, p. 404. 



A handsome stove Orchid, discovered by Mr. P. Hender- 
son, of the Royal Mail Packet Company's service, by whom 
it was sent to T. R. Tuffnell, Esq., of Spring Grove, Isleworth. 
It was found within a few miles of Colon, in Panama, grow- 
ing in swamps, close by the railway, and flowered with Mr. 
Tuffnell in December, 1866. It belongs to the subsection 
" plain [folia racemosa" of the section Euepidendrum in Lind- 
ley's arrangement of this vast and difficult genus, as given in 
his ' Folia Orchidacea,' but is wholly different from all de- 
scribed species, and from any preserved in the Lindleyan or 
Hookerian Herbaria at Kew. Though wanting the gorgeous 
colours of so many stove Orchids, its good foliage and ivory- 
white lip recommend it for cultivation. 

Descr. Stems tufted, one to two feet high, terete, leafy, as 
thick above as a swan's quill, more slender below, deep green. 
Leaves alternate, spreading, plane, three and a half to four 
and a half inches long, and an inch and a quarter broad, 
linear-oblong, obtuse, amplexicaul, very coriaceous, with an 
impressed costa but no nerves, dark green on both surfaces. 
Raceme terminal, without spathes or membranous bracts, 

siat 1st, 1S67. 



four- to six-flowered; rachis inclined, stout, green, terete. 
Bracts minute, green, broadly triangular-ovate. Ovary gibbous, 
pedicelled. Sepals an inch and three-quarters long, spreading, 
linear-lanceolate, acuminate, quite entire, and. as well as the 
equally long but narrower petals, of a pale citron-green colour. 
Lip sessile on the apex of the column, orbicular-cordate, an 
inch and a quarterto an inch and a half in diameter, ivory- 
white, slightly concave, subacute, quite entire, smooth, with 
two small yellow calli at its base. Column stout, truncate 
and five-toothed in fruit, white like the lip. — J. I). II 



Fig. 1. Ovary and column. 2 and 3. Pollinia : — magnified. 






5644. 




Wfitch,ael.et"tLth. 



Yfrteert. Brooks, imp . 



Tab. 5644 

MYETUS Cheken. 
Chequen of Chili. 



Nat. Ord. Myetace.e. — Poltandkia Monogtnia. 



Gen. Char. Calycis tubus turbinatus, adnatus, ultra ovarium vix aut 
breviter productus ; lobi 4-5, imbricati v. aperti. Petala 4-5, patentia. 
Stamina oc, cc-seriata, libera ; authera? basifixae, rimisdehiscentes. Ovarium 
perfecte v. imperfecte liberum, 2-3- rarius 4-loculare ; stylus filiformis, 
stimulate parvo v. rarius eapitato ; ovula in loculis oo, angulo centrali inor- 
dinate oo-seriatim affixa. Bacca calycis tubo inclusa, limbo coronata v. 
rarius limbo deciduo nuda. Semina perfecta l-2-oo, subreniformia, testa 
ossea Crustacea v. membranacea ; embryo hippocrepicus v. parum involutus, 
radiculalongissimatereti, cotyledonibus multo brevioribus nunc minimis. — 
Erutices, rarius arbores. Folia opposita. Pedunculi axillares, scepius 
graciles, 1-3-7- rarius ao-flori. 



Myrttjs (Luma) Cheken ; fruticosa, dense foliosa, ramulis glabris pube- 
rulis tomentosisve obscure 4-gonis ibliisque glanduloso-punctatis, foliis 
patulis breviter petiolatis elliptico- v. oblongo-ovatis apiculatis basi 
obtusis acutisve utrinque glaberrimis nervis paucis indistinctis, pedun- 
culis 1-floris foliis longioribus brevioribusve, bracteolis infra calycem 
subulatis, floribus \ unc. diam. albis 4-meris, calycis lobis petalisque 
orbicularis, petalis glabris ciliolatisve. 

Myktus Cheken. Spreng. Syst. Veg. v. 2. p. 85, excl. syn. 

Eugenia Cheken. DC. JProdr. v.3. p.276. Hook, et Am. Bot. Beech. Voy. 
56. C. Gay, Fl. Chil. v. 2. p. 390. 

Luma Cheken. A. Gray, Bot. IF. S. Expl. Exped. v. 1. p. 536. t. 66. 



This is one of those pretty evergreen Chilian plants, so 
suitable for walls in all the milder parts of England, and for 
greenhouse decoration everywhere, but which is apt to be 
cut by a winter's cold below the average, and burnt by a 
long summer's drought, on the eastern side of the kingdom. 
Its nearest affinity is with the Myrtus Luma {Eugenia Luma. 
supra, Tab. 5040), which, indeed, is united (perhaps rightly) 
with it as a variety by A. Gray, but that plant has more 
distinctly apiculate leaves and usually three-flowered pedun- 
cles. 

mat 1st. 1S67. 



Myrtus Cheken has been for some years in cultivation, and 
was introduced from Chili, I believe, by Messrs. Veitch. 
The plant from which the accompanying drawing was made 
flowered in Kew in July, 1866. In Chili it is in great re- 
pute as a medicine in cases of inflammation of the eyes, in 
diarrhoea, and in other disorders. 

Desck. A small, densely-leafy, much branched shrub. 
Branchlets obscurely tetragonous, glabrous pubescent or 
tomentose, covered with glandular dots. Leaves close-set, 
shortly petioled, one-third of an inch long, oblong-ovate or 
oblong, obtuse, apiculate or subacute, nearly flat, quite 
glabrous, nerves obscure. Peduncles solitarv, usually one- 
flowered, shorter or longer than the leaves, slender. Flower 
two-thirds of an inch in diameter, white. Calyx tube turbi- 
nate, with two subulate bracts at the base ; limb of four orbi- 
cular lobes. Petals orbicular, glabrous or ciliated. Stamens 
Very numerous. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. The same, with the petals and stamens removed :— 
'Hitf/ni/iea. 



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LAWNS. DRIVES. BOWLING GREENS, CRICKET FIELDS. AND GRAVEL PATHS. 

SUITABLE FOR HAND OR HORSE POWER. 

PKICES OF 

ROLLERS FITTED WITH 
SHAFTS 



PKICES OF 

II VND ROLLI 

principal 
i Stations i . 

^m. 30 in., len. 32 in. £7 10 
„ 24 „ 26 „ 4 10 

„ 20 „ 22 „ 3 10 

16 „ 17 ., 2 15 




Suitable for Pony or Horse 

P i'<'er. 

Diam. 30 in., Ien. 32 in. £10 

* 30 „ 36 „ 10 15 

„ 30 „ 42 „ 11 15 

m SO „ 48 „ 13 10 

• *> ,. 60 „ 15 10 

- W .. 72 „ 17 10 

» SO „ 84 „ 19 10 



Thomas Green & Son, Smithfield Iron Works, Leeds ; 44 & 45, Blackfriars Road, 
London, S. ; and 19, Eden Quay, Dublin. 



HEATING BY HOT WATER 



It is now general! v admitted that Buildings of any kind can be more effectual? 
warmed by Hot Water than by any other means ; hue as so much depends on the 
way in winch the Apparatus is fixed, it is of the greatest importance that it be done 
by experienced men. 

J. Jones & Sons are prepared to estimate for Warming, to any extent— 

CHUKCSES. FACTOEXES. 

CHAPELS. 

SCHOOLS. 

READING ROOMS. 

LECTURE ROOMS. 

BILLIARD ROOMS. 

HALLS AND PASSAGES. 

BATHS. 



GREENHOUSES. 
CONSERVATORIES. 
VINERIES. 
HOTHOUSES. 
FORCING PITS. 
PEACH HOUSES. 
PINE STOVES. 
ORCHARD HOUSES. 



OFFICES. 

WORKSHOPS. 

WAREHOUSES. 

DRYING ROOMS. 

CELLARS. 

COACH-HOUSES. 

HARNESS ROOMS. 



J. Jones & Sons' Apparatus is simple in construction, moderate in cost, 
economical in working. 

It is equally available for the Amateur's Greenhouse, or the longest ra »| e J* 
Forcing Houses ; for the smallest Chapel or the largest Church ; for Private Umces, 
or those of Public Companies. , 

It is admirably adapted for Dwelling Houses, as coils of pipes can be pla^ 
in any part, for warming the various rooms. One or more Batbs may be i 
from the same boiler, and a constant supply of hot water obtained in an) p 
the house. 

For Warehouses and Workshops this system of heating is unsurpassed, as 
not only the means of keeping goods dry, but it also adds to the comfort o 
workpeople, and thereby effects a saving in labour. 

J. Jones & Sons recommend boilers of all kinds being set in brickwork, 
possible ; but portable boilers can be supplied, if required. 



MATERIALS.— All Materials supplied will be of the best quality. 
DELIVEEY.— Boilers of various kind*, and pipes and connections, being aI*«F 
in stock, can, at a very short notice, be sent to any part. 

EIXIITG— The Fixing will be done by experienced men, fully capable of finis*^ 
properly any work they may undertake; and J. Jones & Sons are prepare 
guarantee the effectual working of any apparatus fixed by their own men. 

ESTIMATES. — Plans and Estimates will be sent on application. 



J. JONES & SONS, 

IEQN MEECHANTS AND EOETICTJLTTJEAL ENGINEEBS 

6, BANKSIDE, SOUTHWARD:, LONDON, S.E. 

J. E. IAILOB j3j CO., PBISIEBa, LilXLE vjCElEi' ilRtET, Vf. C. 



Cijtrn Series. 

No. 270. 

VOL. XXIII. JUNE. [Price 3s. U. col d - 2s. U. plain. 

OR No. 965 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPRISING 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 



BY 



JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S., 

iBtrcctar at tf)t Royal Botanic ©ar&cnS ai I&cto. 




'■Gtcra* 



"-_-■*'' ^^"^i^r' 5 ^ J »»"' r ' T ,:i ,:~j ■■■."ST.* -" ' > 



Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers eiotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 
REEVE St CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

L867. 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT LAWN MOWERS FOE 1867, 



Patronized on Five occasio?is, during the Season of 1864, hy 
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OE SAXONY; 

DUBING THE SEASON OF 1865 THEY WEBE PATRONIZED ON FOUR OCCASIONS BY HER MAJES- 

THE QUEEN; 
ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF HOLLAND; 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF PRUSSIA; 

AGAIN, DURING THE SEASON OF 1866, THEY WERE PATRONIZED ON FOUR OCCASIONS BY 

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 




HOBSE MACHINE 



PO>'Y MAC HIV 



HAND MACHINE. 



atlfied to 



(Do. 



Jflju 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, in presenting their LAWN MOWERS for the Season of 1867, are g^ 
be able to state that the demand for their celebrated Machines rapidly increases every year. The success 
attended Sharks' Machines during last Season is quite unparalleled in the history of the Lawn Mower. 

A. S. & Son can confidently assure tiieir numerous Friends and Customers and the Public generally that • ^ 
deavour will always be to supply a Macliine, first-class in every way, one which cannot be surpassed ii ev ^",' 
whether for simplicity of construction, ease in working, or durability. None but the best materials and skillet 
men are employed in the manufacture of their Machines. 

PRICES — Including Carriage to most of the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in the 

SHANKS' NEW PATENT HAND MACHINE FOE 18. 

10-inch Machine £3 10 0") Easily worked 

12-inch Machine 4 10 0) hy a Lady. 

11-inch Macliine 5 10 Do.byaBoi/. I 22-inch Machine 8 7 

16-inch Macliine , 6 10 Do. by a Man. \ 21-inch Machine 8 17 

Silent Movement for the four smallest sizes, 4s. extra ; for the other sizes, 7s. 6d. extra. 

SHANKS' NEW PATENT PONY & DONKEY MACHINE, j SHANKS' NEW PATENT HORSE MACHTSB- 

Width of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. I Width of Cutter, 

25-inch Machine £12 10 25s. extra. 

28-inch Machine 14 10 30.?. extra. 

30-inch Machine 15 15 30s. extra. 

Silent Movement, 12s. Gd. extra. 



19-inch Machine £7 12 6 aw ? a #»• 

GfDo.byl** 

6l *<* 



If with Patent Delivering A 



30.*. « tra " 
40s.e* tra - 



30-inch Machine £19 0.... 

36-inch Macliine 22 0.... 

42 -inch Machine 26 0.... 

■48-inch Machine 28 0.... 

Silent Movement, 20s. extra. 

-' PATENT LAWN MOWERS cut the Grass on uneven as -well as on level Lawns; and it is Q 1 "' 
immaterial whether the Grass be icet or dry. 

Every Machine icarranted to give ample satisfaction^ and if not approved of can be at once return* • 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, 

27, LEADENHALL STREET, LONDON. 

MANUFACTORY, DENS IRONWORKS. ARBROATH. 



S. and SON keep a Stock of Lawn Mowers at 27, Leadenhall Street, London, from which Orders c& n 
at once executed. They also have at their London Warehouse a staff of experienced Workmen thorough 
acquainted with all the details of these Machines, so that thev are enahled to repair Lawn Mo^exs 
London as well as at the Manufactory. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 

CHOICE SEEDS. 

WILLIAM CUTBUSH AND SON strongly recommend the following :— 

PEIMULA SINENSIS FIMBKIATA, of the finest possible strain, Bed, White, or mixed, 2s. (ML, 

Ss. Gd., and 5s. per packet. 
CALCEOLARIA, saved from James's choice strain, very fine, 2s. Gd., 2s. 6d., and 5*. per packet. 
CINERARIA from named flowers, 2s. Qd., Ss. Gd., and 5s. per packet. 

SNOWS WINTER WHITE BROCCOLI, true, W. C. & Son's own saving, 2s. 6d. per packet. 
NUNEHAM PARK ONION, 2s. Gd. per packet. 

For other Choice Seeds see Catalogue, Post-free. 

HIGHGATE NURSERIES, LONDON, N. 

NEW ZONAL PELARGONIUMS. 

DOWNIE, LAIRD, and LAJNG most respectfully announce that they will send out the 
following splendid varieties, which have been so much admired, and have received the highest 
awards wherever shown, including First-class Certificates at the Royal Horticultural Society. 
The following extract is from the ' Journal of Horticulture,' July 17, 1866 : — " There are so many 
good Nosegays, and so much alike, that it requires something quite new in colour to surpass them, 
or, in many cases, to equal them. The large bold truss of Stella and Le Grand, or the KING OE 
THE NOSEGAYS, must be the models of perfection in this class of flowers." 
KING OF THE NOSEGAYS.— Bright orange-scarlet. Very large truss, dwarf habit. Very 

free and most effective variety. Is. Gd. each. 
MRS. LAING (Nosegay). — Glowing carmine-scarlet. Very dwarf, free, and most effective as a 

bedder. A beautiful and distinct variety. 5s. each. 
MRS. MENZIES. — Bright rosy-salmon. Flowers perfect, good habit, free, and very fine. 5s. each. 
SAMBO. — Very dark glossy scarlet, of great substance. Flowers of the finest form. Very large, 

compact, globular truss ; quite distinct from all others. 7*. Gd. each. 

Ready second week in May. 
STANSTEAD PARK NURSERY, FOREST HILL, S.E. 

IjlDGINGTON'S GARDEN NETTING, the cheapest and most durable, Id. per square 
J yard, or in Quantities of 250, 500, or 1000 Yards, carriage free. 

EDGINGTON'S RICK CLOTHS for Sixty -two Years have maintained their celebrity 
as the best. 

EDGINGTON'S MARQUEES and GARDEN TENTS are the prettiest. 
EDGINGTON'S MARQUEES, for hire, are the most handsome and capacious. 
HAYTHORN'S and WALLER'S NETTINGS. Samples and material free on 
application. 

Be particular— FREDERICK EDGINGTON and Co., Thomas Street, Old Kent Road, 
London, S.E. 

A Liberal Discount to the Trade ! 

International Exhibition, 1862, Class XIX. Honourable Mention. 
CATALOGUES FOR 1867. 



JAMES VEITCH AND SONS 

BEO TO ANUOtTIfCE THAT THE FOLLOWING 

NEWLY-PRINTED CATALOGUES ARE NOW READY, 

and will be forwarded Post Free on application : — 

CATALOGUE of NEW PLANTS for the PEESENT YEAR. 

CATALOGUE of GENERAL COLLECTION of STOVE and GREENHOUSE PLANTS, ORCHIDS, 

FERNS, etc. 

CATALOGUE of SOFT-WOODED and BEDDING PLANTS. 

Each Catalogue contains Lists of the most distinct and popular Plants in their respective classes. 

ROYAL EXOTIC NURSERY, KING'S ROAD, CHELSEA, S.W. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



NEW TRICOLORED GERANIUMS. 

F. and A. SMITH'S CATALOGUE FOR 1867, containing Descriptions of their Splendid 
Varieties of the above, which have obtained the following awards :— 

Two £5 Prizes for the Collection • Crystal Palace 

A Prize for the Collection Liverpool. 

A Prize for the Collection Manchester. 

A Prize for the Collection Leicester. 

A Prize for the Collection Birmingham. 



Five Certificates Peterborough. 

Five Certificates Nottingham. 

Six Certificates Brighton. 

One Certificate International. 



May now be had on application. 
DUUWICH, SURREY. 



NEW BICOLORED AND ZONALE GERANIUMS. 

F. and A. SMITH'S CATALOGUE FOR 1867 is now ready, containing Descriptions 

of the above, which have obtained Thirteen Certificates. 

DULWICH, SURREY. 

NEW ROSES, 1867. 

F. and A. SMITH'S DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE of the above may be had on application- 
Strong seasoned Plants now ready. 
DULWICH, SURREY. 



BENJAMIN EDGINCTON 



MAKQUEE, TENT, EICK-CLOTH, AND FLAG MANUFACTURER, 



BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY 
AND H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES. 





MARQUEES & TENTS FOR HORTICULTURAL SHOWS 

FOR SALE OR HIRE. 

Rick Cloths, New and Second-hand, with Poles, etc., complete. 

TANNED NETTING FOR FRUIT TREES, NEW AND REPAIRED. 

SCRIMS FOR GREENHOUSE BLINDS, FRIGI DOMO, ETC. 

An Illustrated Catalogue Free by Post. 

Be particular to observe the Christian Name, BENJAMIN EDGINGTON (only)' 
2, DUKE STREET, LONDON BRIDGE, S.E. No other Establishment^^, 

NEW WORKS NOW READY. 

THE EDIBLE MOLLUSKS OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND. With Recipes for 

Cooking them. By M. S. Lotell. Crown 8to, 12 coloured plates, 8s. 6d. , 

SECOND CENTURY OF ORCHIDACEOUS PLANTS. By James Bateman, Esq. part 

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THE BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. Edited by Dr. Hookeb, Third Series, No. 270, June, b 

coloured plates, 3s. 6d. 

THE FLORAL MAGAZINE. Edited by the Rev. H. How* wood Dombbain. No. 86, Ju* e ' 

4 coloured plates, 2s. Qd. 

MONOGRAPH OF ODONTOGLOSSUM. By James Bateman, Esq. Part IV., Imp- f° U °' 

5 coloured plates, £1. Is. 

GUIDE TO COOL-ORCHID GROWING. By James Bateman, Esq., F.R.S., Author of 

'The Orchidacese of Mexico and Guatemala.' Woodcuts, Is. 
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land. By M. Pixes. Crown 8vo, 16 coloured plates and 100 wood-engravings, 10*. 6d. 

REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



~>6U 




W Fit/ii,deletlith 



,^*- ; 



Vincent Brooks, Imp . 



Tab. 5645. 
AMABYLLIS pardina. 

Spotted-floivered Amaryllis. 



Nat. Ord. Amaeyleide.3:. — Hexajtdeia Monogy>ia. 

Gen. Char. Perianthii tubus brevis v. 0, limbi subringentis lobis sub- 
sequalibus recurvis, fauce saspius squamulosa. Stamina 6, fauce periauthii 
inserta, filamentis liberis erectis v. declinatis ; antheraa versatiles. Ovarium 
3-loculare; stylus elongatus, staminum directione, stigmate simplici v. 3-fido; 
ovula plurima. Capsula membranacea, oblongo-3-gona v. depressa, 3-locu- 
laris, 3-valvis. Semina plurima, globosa, compressa, marginata v. alata, v. 
interdura abortu solitaria, carnoso-baccata, loculum v. capsulara implens. — 
Herbae tropica? et subtropicse, bulbo tunicato. Folia scapo cocetanea v. sero- 
tina. Spatha 2-valvis, \-co-flora. 



Amaeyeeis (§ Hippeastrum) pardina ; elata, foliis bifariis flore cosetaneis 
late linearibus obtusis scapo robusto glauco basi rubro maculato bre- 
vioribus, spathis 2-floris, periautbii 5-7 poll. diam. subinfuudibulifor- 
mis tubo brevissimo intus fimbriato, lobis subsequalibus ovato-oblongis 
acutis pallide stramineis creberrime miniato-puiictatis. staminibus de- 
clinatis subaequalibus, stigmate obscure 3-lobo. 



A truly magnificent plant, discovered in Peru by Mr. 
Pearce, collector to Messrs. Veitch, of the Royal Exotic 
Nurseries, Chelsea, by whom it was flowered in March of the 
present year. It is certainly the most striking species of the 
genus known to me, and even Mr. Fitch's skill has failed to 
give full effect to the dazzling contrast of the bright vermi- 
lion spots on the translucent substance of the perianth. It 
is a stove plant of easy cultivation, and a worthy rival of the 
more temperate Lilium auratum. 

The genus Hippeastrum, of Herbert, which includes many 
American species of Amaryllis, differs from this latter by such 
very slight and variable characters, that it cannot be regarded 
as of any practical value, and I therefore follow Endlicher in 
regarding it, together with its allies Zephyranthes, Nerina, 
Vallota, etc., as sections of the great and widely diffused and 
very natural genus Amaryllis. 

Descr. Bulb clothed with pale brown, membranous scales. 
juxe 1st, 18G7. 






Leaves bifarious, recurved, appearing with the flowers, and 
then eight to ten inches long, by an inch and a half broad, 
pale green, linear or narrow-linear, oblong, obtuse, not 
striated. Scape as thick as the little ringer, twelve to eighteen 
inches high, contracted at the apex, glaucous-green, speckled 
with red at the base. SpatJie two-flowered ; leaflets about as 
long as the pedicels, one to two inches, linear, membranous. 
Ovary short, green. Perianth five to seven inches in diame- 
ter ; tubes very short, fimbriate inside ; lobes broadly ovate- 
oblong, acute, spreading and recurved, nearly equal, pale 
straw-coloured, profusely covered with vermilion spots, verdi- 
gris-green at the base, with a dark purple band at their in- 
sertion. Stamens nearly equal, decimate ; anthers green. 
Stigma very obscurely three-lobed.' — J. B. H. 



"Fig. 1. Ovary, base of perianth, and stamen. 2. Transverse section of 
ovary : — magnified. 






5646. 




W Fitch, del c 



Vincent Brooks, Imp- 



Tab. 5640. 
BLETIA Sherrattiana. 

Sherratfs Bletia. 



Nat. Orel. Orchide^:. — Gynandria Monandhia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 3319.) 



Bletia Slierrattiana ; pseudobulbis depressia, foliis 3-4-plicatis utrinque 
acuminatis, scapis simplicibus apice racemosis subbrevioribus, floribus 
intense roseis, bracteis acuminatis ovario brevioribus, sepalis oblongo- 
lanceolatis obtuse acutis, petalis duplo latioribus, labelli trifidi lobis 
lateralibus apertis rotundatis maximis planis, intermedio multo niinore 
reniformi medio apiculato, lamellis 3 aureis parallelis totum axim 
labelli percurrentibus. Columna clavata, arcuata, baud conspicue alata. 



-Bateman. 



This, which is perhaps the prettiest of the true Bletias, is 
a native of New Granada, whence the Messrs. Low imported 
it about the year 1864. In its habit it is so similar to the 
old and well-known B. verecunda that it Avas quite a surprise 
to me when the spikes of bright-rosy flowers showed them- 
selves in all their distinctness and beauty. As the plant is 
quite new, I have named it after my gardener, Mr. Sherratt, 
who almost from a child has been specially devoted to 
Orchids. 

As regards culture that, of course, is of the simplest 
character. Being terrestrial, it requires a large pot, and 
being found at a lower level than most of the New Granada 
species, it can scarcely be classed among " cool " Orchids. 
The Cattleya or intermediate house seems to suit it well. 

Desce. Pseudobulbs flattened, about two inches across. 
Leaves three or four, plicated, acuminate at either end, 
raised upon an upright, greenish stalk, including which they 
are nearly a yard long. Bracts acuminate, shorter than the 
ovaries. Flowers of a very delicate texture, a dozen or more 
in a somewhat dense terminal mass, bright rose-colour. 
Sepals about an inch long, oblong-lanceolate, bluntish. Petals 
june 1st, 18G7. 



twice as broad, rounded. Lip longer than the petals, deeply 
three-cleft, the lateral lobes being thrown wide open and 
rounded, very much larger than the intermediate one, which 
is kidney-shaped, emarginate, and apiculate. Three parallel 
golden lamellse traverse the entire length of the axis of the 
lip, from whence a network of veins radiates. Column 
arched, clavate, much shorter than the lip. — J. B. 



Fig. 1. Lip spread flat. 2. Column. 3. Side view of pollen-masses. 
4. Front view of ditto : — magnified. 



5647. 




WJitxii.del.et lith 



I J 

Vincent Brooks. Imp 



Tab. 5647. 

BILLBEEGIA sphacelata. 

Ckupon of Chili 



Xat. Ord. Bkomeliace^;. — Hexanbeia Moxogtnia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5502.) 



Btlebergia sphacelata ; caule brevi robusto, foliis nutnerosis carnoso-cou- 
gestis 4-5-pedaIibus anguste ensiformi-lanceolatis concavis viridibus 
remotiuscule spinulosis, floribus in capitulum axillare sessile dense 
congestis, braeteis subulatis spinuloso-serratis medio sphacelatis, sepal is 
dimidiato-laneeolatis acuminatis integris v. uno latere 1-dentatis, petalis 
erectis obtusis basi intus 2-tuberculatis, filamentis breviusculis cotn- 
pressis, antheris apiculatis, stigmatibus lineari-subulatis vix tortis. 

Brojielia sphacelata. Ruiz et Pav. Prodr. v. 3. p. 32. Gay, Fl. Chili, 
v. 6. p. 8. 

Greigia sphacelata. Kegel, Gartenflora, v. 14. p. 137. /. 474. 



This very handsome Bromeliaceous plant, conspicuous for 
its magnificent crown of leaves, each from four to five feet 
long, flowered in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in October, 1866, 
from specimens sent by Dr. Kegel from the Imperial Botanic 
Gardens of St. Petersburg. Though not altogether corre- 
sponding with the Greigia sphacelata described and figured 
by Dr. Kegel in the ' Gartenflora,' I can hardly doubt its 
being that plant, both from its origin and habitat. The diffe- 
rences are that Regel's plant is represented as having obtuse 
anthers, whereas in the Kew plant the anthers are strongly 
mucronate. In Ruiz and Pavon's description the flowers are 
said to be purple, which is not the case with our plant. 

Billbergia sphacelata is a native of temperate Chili, near 
Concepcion, in lat. 37° S., where it is called Chupon, and the 
sweet pulpy fruits, which are greedily eaten by children, are 
called Chu pones. 

Desck. Stem very short. Leaves numerous, densely 
crowded, bright green and shining, erecto-patent and recurved, 
june 1st, 1867. 



four to five feet long, dark-green, narrow-lanceolate en si- 
form, one inch broad, concave, not keeled nor striate, with 
rather distant spines on the margins, which are recurved, 
gradually tapering to the acuminate apex. Head of flowers 
axillary, short,' very many-flowered, sunk amongst the leaves 
near the crown or at the side of the stem, much depressed. 
Bracts longer than the flowers, erect subulate-lanceolate, 
spinous-ciliate, whitish, with greenish tips, and brown across 
the middle. Flowers pale rose-red, an inch and a half long. 
Ovary smooth. Sepals dimidiate-lanceolate, with often a deep 
tooth on one side. Corolla tube rather shorter than the linear- 
oblong, obtuse lobes, which have a thickened two-lobed scale 
or two tubercles at the base. Filaments subulate, compressed. 
Anthers linear, with a terminal mucro. Stigmas three, linear- 
subulate, hardly twisted. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Corolla tube, lobe, and stamens. 3. G-ermen :— all 
slightly magnified. 



5648. 




W. Fitch 



del at rata 



Vincent Erooka Imp 



Tab. 5648. 

STEMON ACANTHUS Peaecei. 

Mr. Pearces Stemonacanthus. 



Nat. Ord. Acanthacej:. — Didyuamia Angiospermia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx profunde 5-fidua, aequalis. Corollas tubus elongatus, 
curvus, sensim ampliatus ; limbus ringens, 2-labiatus, 6-lobus, lobis pa- 
tentibus v. reflexis. Stamina 4, exserta, infra os tubi inserta, filamentis 
per paria connatis ; antherae oblongae, 2-loculares, loculis contiguis. Stigma 
2-ndum, lobis angustis. Capsula basi contracta, asj)erma, superne 4-8- 
sperma. Semina planiuscula, retinaeulis suffulta. — Suffrutices Americani. 
Folia opposita v. infer iora 3-na. Inflorescentia axillaris v. terminal**, laxa 
v. densa. Bracteae parvce v. angusta. Flores coccinei, ebracteolati v. 2- 
bracteolati. 



Stemonacanthus Pearcei ; caule acute 4-gono, foliis breviter petiolatis 
lane olatis louge acuniinatis obtuse serratis glaberrimis subtus fuseo- 
purpureis, paDiculis axillaribus paucifloris, pedunculis petiolis paulo 
lougioribus, calycis pilosuli lobis subulatis, corolla? 2-2|-pollicaris 
tubo gracile lobis revolutis, ovario glacduloso. 



Of the beautiful American Acanthaceous genus Stemon- 
acanthus, very few species have hitherto been introduced into 
this country, though our herbaria contain several that are 
eminently worthy of cultivation. But one, S. macrophyllus, 
(Tab. nostr. 4448,) has been figured previously in this Maga- 
zine ; it resembles the present in habit and general charac- 
ters, but has a much more lax inflorescence. 

8. Pearcei is a stove plant, native of Bolivia, where it was 
discovered by Messrs. Veitch's able collector, whose name it 
bears, and flowered in the Royal Exotic Nurseries in March 
of the present year. I find no described species near it in 
characters, but think it possible that it may be identical with 
Arrhostoxylum Roenkeanwm, Nees (in DC. Prod. v. 11, t. 211), 
which, though placed by its author in a genus which differs 
from Stemonacanthus chiefly in the obtuse calyx-lobes, is 
nevertheless itself described as having subulate calyx-lobes. 

Bescr. An erect, glabrous undershrub. Branches acutely 
quadrangular, stout. Leaves shortly petioled, five to six inches 



rovjL 1st, 1867. 



long, lanceolate, long-acuminate, obtusely serrate, green 
above, brown-purple below, with very prominent veins. Pe- 
duncles axillary, patent, few-flowered, rather longer than the 
petioles. Bracts linear ; bracteoles none, or one or two subu- 
late. Calyx half to three-fourths of an inch long, divided 
below the middle into subulate, erect lobes. Corolla scarlet, 
two to two and half inches long, erect ; tube slender, slightly 
curved, gradually dilated upwards, compressed ; lobes recurved 
or revolute. Anthers shortly oblong, two-celled ; cells con- 
tiguous, red-purple. Ovary glandular. — J. D. II 



Fig. 1. Calyx and bracteole. 2. Stamens. 3. Anther. 4. Ovary:— all 
magnified. 



5649. 




"W Fitch , del et lith 



VmcentBr oaks .Imp- 



Tab. 5649. 
DENDROBIUM macrophylltdi ; var. Feitchianum. 
Large-leaved Dendrobe ; VeitcKs var. 



Nat. Ord. Oechidb^. — GtYkandbia Monandbia. 
Oen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4755.) 



Dendbobidm macrophyllum ; caulibus basi teretibus superne clavatis pro- 
funde sulcatis 2-3-phyllis, foliis sessilibus oblongis apice oblique 
2-fidis v. emarginatis, racemo terminali erecto elongato apice nutante 
multifloro, bracteis membranaceis acutiusculis, pedicellis sepalisque 
ovato-oblongis extus birsutis, petalis spathulatis acutis flavidis, labello 
maguo 3-lobo, lobis lateralibus adscendentibus reniformibus purpureo- 
flabellatim striolatis, interraedio transverse dilatato convexo flabella- 
tim maculato obscure 3-dentato. 

Denbbobitjm macropbyllum. A. Hick. Serf. Astrolab.p. 22. t. 6. 

Var. VeitcManum ; foliis minoribus. D. Veitchianum. Lindl. Bot. Req. 
1847, sub. t. 25. 



The true D. macrophyllum of A. Kichard, a native of New 
Guinea, is one of the finest of Orchids, having leaves up- 
wards of a foot long and a spike twice as long : the plant here 
introduced differs only in the smaller leaf from Richard's 
figure and description, and is clearly a variety of that species. 
It was named after its introducers, Messrs. Veitch, by Dr. 
Lindley, who seems to have overlooked Richard's plant, or 
he would surely otherwise have alluded to it as a close ally 
at any rate. Our specimen of var. VeitcManum was flowered 
by Messrs. Backhouse, of York, in February of the present 
year, and I am indebted to my friend Dr. Reichenbach for 
its identification, as also for the information that I), ferox, of 
Hasskarl, is another of its many varieties, which inhabit 
the Javan and Sumatran hills. 

The var. VeitcManum is a native of Java, whence it was 
sent to England by the late Mr. Thomas Lobb, one of the 
most indefatigable and successful of Messrs. Veitch's collec- 
tors. It inhabits the hottest jungles of the hottest climate in 
JUjfE 1st, 1867. 



the globe, and must be treated accordingly, and even then, as 
Mr. Bateman informs me, it is difficult to flower. 

Descr. Stems tufted, eight to twelve inches high, terete 
and as thick as a goose-quill below, expanding upwards into 
a club-shaped, deeply grooved pseudobulb, that bears two or 
three terminal or subterminal leaves. Leaves four to six 
inches long in this variety, sessile, oblong, pale green, nearly 
plane, unequally two-lobed at the very tip. Maceme a foot 
and upwards high, erect, nodding at the apex, many-flowered. 
Bracts linear-oblong, membranous. Pedicels short, nearly 
glabrous. Ovary and back of sepals hirsute. Flowers two 
inches in diameter. Sepals ovate-oblong, acute, greenish- 
yellow, paler inside. Petals smaller, spathulate, dirty-white. 
Lip large, three-lobed ; lateral lobes subreniform, ascending, 
yellow-green with radiating purple streaks ; middle lobe 
transversely oblong, convex, obscurely three-lobed, green, 
with a few radiating dotted lines. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Lip. 2. Column. 3, 4. Pollen : — all magnified. 



Just published, Crown Svo, 12 Coloured Plates, 8s. 6d. 
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EDIBLE MOLLUSKS OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND, 

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HARYEY'S PHYCOLOGIA BRITANNICAj 

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HARYEY'S NEREIS AUSTRALIS; <J 

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■^ 



REEN'S PATENT SILENS MESSOR, 



NOISELESS LAWN MOWING, ROLLING AND COLLECTING MACHINES. 
FITTED WITH PATENT SELF-SHARPENING CYLINDER CUTTERS. 



||d Suetial §tj)p ointment £l|^ff| 
Manufacturer 



mt 



Every Machine is 
arranted to give en- 
re satisfaction, and 
not approved of can 
3 returned uncondi- 
onally. 




To cut 10 inches 
» 12 „ 
» M „ 
ii 16 „ 



£3 10 

4 10 

5 10 

6 10 



PRICES OF HAND MACHINES. 
Suitable for a Lady | To cut 18 inches 



. . . Suitable for one person 
... 



20 



21 



(To p£T |Host o3racious 
jllajcstir tbt ojuccn. 



Green's Patent Lawn 
Mowers have proved to 
be the best, and have 
carried off every prize 
that has been given in 
all cases of competition. 



£7 10 Suitable for one person 

8 Suitable for two p. 

8 10 „ 

9 0,, 



Prices of Horse, Pony, and Donkey Machines, including patent self-delivery box ; cross stay complete ; suitable 
attaching to ordinary chaise-traces or gig harness. 



cut 26 inches 

.. 28 „ 
» 30 „ 



.. £13 
.. 15 
.. 17 




0.. 



[Leather Boots for 
"" J Donkey, 18*. 



To cut 30 inches 
» 36 „ 
,, 42 „ 

. 48 „ 



£21 
84 

27 
30 



SI 

°o} 



Leather B<>. ■•- 
Pony, 22*. 
Leather Boots for 
Horse. 26*. 



The 26, 28, and 30 inches can easily be worked by a donkey, or by two men, on an even lawn, the 30 and 36 
he* by a pony, and 42 and 48 inches by a carriage horse ; and, as the Machines make no noise in working, the 
'St spirited animal can be employed without fear of its running away, or in any way damaging the Machine. 

Both the Horse, Pony, Donkey, and Hand Machines possess (over all other Makers] the ■drantagw of self- 

• irpening; the cutters being steel on each side, when they become dull or blunt by running one way round the 

r, can be reversed again and again, bringing the opposite edge of the cutter Male, when the 

ichine will cut equal to new. Arrangements are made that the cylinder can be reversed, by any unexperienced 

'•sou, in two or three minutes. . 

The above Machines are made from the best materials, and of superior workmanship; ■ 
M to all the principal Railway Stations and Shipping Ports in England. 



iREEN'S IMPROVED NEW PATENT ROLLER, 

FOR 

LAWNS, DRIVES, BOWLING GREENS. CRICKET FIELDS, AND GRAVEL PATHS. 
SUITABLE FOR HAND OR HORSE POWER. 



PRICES OF 

HAND ROLLERS. 

'elirered at the principal 

t Stations M England. 

£7 10 
4 10 
3 10 
2 13 



30 in., len. 32 in. 



24 
20 
16 



26 



17 




PRICf- 

ROLLERS FITTED WITH 
SHAFTS 

V for Pony or ,. 

" l\,irer. 

Diam. 30 in., len. 32 in. £10 



30 
30 

30 
30 



36 
42 

js 
SO 
72 



10 15 

11 15 
13 10 
15 10 
17 10 
19 10 



Thomas Green & Son. Smithfield Iron Works. Leeds ; 44 & 45, Blackfriars Koad, 
London, S. ; and 19, Eden Quay, Dublin. 



HEATING BY HOT WATEE. 



It is now generally admitted that Buildings of any kind can be more effectually 
warmed by Hot Water than by any other means ; but as so much depends on the 
way in which the Apparatus is fixed, it is of the greatest importance that it be done 
by experienced men. 

J. Jones & Sons are prepared to estimate for Warming, to any extent — 

FACTOEIES. 



GREENHOUSES. 
CONSERVATORIES. 
VINERIES. 
HOTHOUSES. 
FORCING PITS. 
PEACH HOUSES. 
PINE STOVES. 
ORCHARD HOUSES. 



CHURCHES. 
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SCHOOLS. 
READING ROOMS. 
LECTURE ROOMS. 
BILLIARD ROOMS. 
HALLS AND PASSAGES. 
BATHS. 



OFFICES. 

WORKSHOPS. 

WAREHOUSES. 

DRYING ROOMS. 

CELLARS. 

COACH-HOUSES. 

HARNESS ROOMS. 



J. Jones & Sons' Apparatus is simple in construction, moderate in cost, 
economical in working. 

It is equally available for the Amateur's Greenhouse, or the longest range 
Forcing Houses ; for the smallest Chapel or the largest Church j for Private Office 
or those of Public Companies. 

It is admirably adapted for Dwelling Houses, as coils of pipes can he placea 
in any part, for warming the various rooms. One or more Baths may be &ea 
from the same boiler, and a constant supply of hot water obtained in any part 
the house. 

For Warehouses and Workshops this system of heating is unsurpassed, as it 
not only the means of keeping goods dry, but it also adds to the comfort oi 
workpeople, and thereby effects a saving in labour. 

J. Jones & Sons recommend boilers of all kinds being set in brickwork 
possible ; but portable boilers can be supplied, if required. 



MATERIALS.— All Materials supplied will be of the best quality. 
DELIVERY.— Boilers of various kinds, and pipes and connections, being always 
in stock, can, at a very short notice, be sent to any part. 

FIXING.— The Fixing will be done by experienced men, fully capable of fin *Jj; 
properly any work they may undertake ; and J. Jones & Sons are prepared 
guarantee the effectual working of any apparatus fixed by their own men. 

ESTIMATES. — Plans and Estimates will be sent on application. 

IRON MERCHANTS AND HORTICULTURAL ENGINEERS, 

L6, BANKSIDE, SOUTHWARK, LONDOX, 8.E. 
J. B. TATLOB A3TD CO., FHXSTEBS, tilXLK (JCEES SIBEBX, W. C. 



No. 271. 

IPrice 3*. 6d. col d - 2s. 6d, plain. 

OR NO. 966 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMPRISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., F.R.S. L.S. & G.S., 

sBimtflr of tljc Boyal Botanic <3aracn£ at Scto. 




Nature and Art to adorn the paee combine, 
And flowers exotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 
REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, CO VENT GARDEN. 

1867. 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT LAWN MOWERS FOE 1867. 



Patronized on Five occasions, during the Season 0/1864, by 
HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OE SAXONY; 

DURING THE SEASON OF 1865 THEY WERE PATRONIZED ON FOUS OCCASIONS BY HEB MAJESI 

THE QUEEN; 

ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF HOLLAND; 

AND ONCE BY HIS MAJESTY THE KING OF PRUSSIA; 

AGAIN, DURING THE SEASON OF 1866, THEY WERE PATRONIZED ON FOUR OCCASIONS BY 

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 





HOESE MACHINE. PONY MACHINE. HA3D MACHINE. 

ALEXANDER SHANES & SON, in presenting their LAWN MOWERS for the Season of 1867, are gratifie 
be able to state that the demand for their celebrated Machines rapidly increases every year. The success wii< 
attended Shanks' Machines during last Season is quite unparalleled in the history of the Lawn Mower. 

A. S. & Sox can confidently assure their numerous Friends and Customers and the Public generally that - l,ar 
deavour will always be to supply a Machine, first-class in every way, one which cannot be surpassed if even <*| 
whether for simplicity of construction, ease in working, or durability. None but the best materials and skuleu * 
men are employed in the manufacture of their Machines. 

PRICES— Including Carriage to most of the principal RaUway Stations and Shipping Ports in the Kingdom. 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT HAND MACHINE FOE 18. 

19-inch Machine £7 12 



10-ineh Machine £3 10 "> Easily worked 

12-inch Machine 4 10 0) by a Lady. 

14-inch Machine 5 10 Do.byaSoy. 

16-inch Machine 6 10 Do. by a Man. 



C Do. 



Mart 



6 { and a Boy. 

22-inch Machine 8 7 6 f Do. by Two 

2-1-inch Machine 8 17 6 i Men. 

Silent Movement for the four smallest sizes, 4s. extra ; for the other sizes, 7*. 6c/. extra. 



SHAKES' NEW PATENT HORSE MACHINE. 
Width of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering A. 

30-inch Machine £19 J^S 

36-inch Machine 22 30*. es r 

42-inch Machine 26 40*. e * "' 

48-inch Machine 28 40*.« ir ' 

Silent Movement, 20s. extra. 

NKS' PATENT LAWN MOWERS cut the Grass on uneven as well as on level Lawns ; and it is 1 mte 
immaterial whether the Grass be wet or dry. 

Every Machine warranted to y ice ample satis/action, and if not approved of, can be at once returned' 



SHANKS' NEW PATENT PONY & DONKEY MACHINE. 
Width of Cutter. If with Patent Delivering Apparatus. 

25-inch Machine £12 10 25*. extra. 

28-inch Machine 14 10 30*. extra. 

30-inch Machine 15 15 30*. extra. 

Silent Movement, 12*. 6d. extra. 



ALEXANDER SHANKS & SON, 

27, LEADENHALL STREET, LONDON. 
MANUFACTORY, DENS IRONWORKS, ARBROATH. 



A. 8. and SON keep a Stock of Lawn Mowers at 2f, Leadenhall Street, London, from which Orders can 
at once executed. They also have at their London Warehouse a staff of experienced Workmen thorough; 
acquainted with all the details of these Machines, so that they are enabled to repair Lawn Mowers ib 
London as well as at the Manufactory. 






BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



I^DGINGTON'S GARDEN NETTING, the cheapest aud most durable, Id. per square 
J yard, or in Quantities of 250, 500, or 1000 Yards, carriage free. 

EDGINGTON' S RICK CLOTHS for Sixty-two Years have maintained their celebrity 
as the best. 
EDGINGTON'S MARQUEES and GARDEN TENTS are the prettiest. 
EDGINGTON'S MARQUEES, for hire, are the most handsome and capacious. 
HAYTHORN'S and WALLER'S NETTINGS. Samples and material free on 
application. 

Be particular— FREDERICK EDGINGTON and Co., Thomas Street, Old Kent Road, 
London, S.E. 

A Liberal Discount to the Trade ! 
International Exhibition, 1862, Class XIX. Honourable Mention. 



BENJAMIN EDGINCTON 



MARQUEE, TENT, RICK-CLOTH, AND FLAG MANUFACTURER, 

BY SPECIAL APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY 
AND H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES. 





MARQUEES & TENTS FOR HORTICULTURAL SHOWS 

FOR SALE OR HIRE. 

Rich Cloths, New and Second-hand, with Poles, etc., complete. 

TANNED NETTING FOR FRUIT TREES, NEW AND REPAIRED. 

SCRIMS FOR GREENHOUSE BLINDS, FRIGI DOMO, ETC. 

An Illustrated Catalogue Free by Post. 

Be particular to observe the Christian Name, BENJAMIN EDGINGTON (only), 
2, DUKE STREET, LONDON BRIDGE, S.E. No other Establishment. 

SPLENDID NEW BLACK GRAPE, THE MUSCAT CHAMPION. 

JAMES VEITCH AND SONS 

WILL SEND OUT, ON AND AFTEK THE FIRST OF JULY NEXT, THIS 
MAGNIFICENT SEEDLING VARIETY, 

UNDOUBTEDLY THE FINEST YET OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC. 

It was raised by Mr. Melville, of Dalmeney Park, from the Champion Hamburgh, crossed with the Cannon Hall 
Muscat. It is a very free setting varietv, and succeeds perfectly under the same treatment as the Black Hamburgh. 
The bunches are large, well shouldered, and the berries of great size, resembling in every respect the Champion 
Hamburgh, but with a most exquisite and powerful Muscat flavour. 

In the ' Gardeners' Year Book ' for 1862, Dr. Hogg says :— " This is perhaps one of the greatest advances in 
new grap es we have yet had It is, in fact, a Mill Hill Hamburgh with a Muscat flavour. The bunches are very 
^rge and well shouldered, the berries roundish and oblate, and the flesh firm and melting, juicy, richly flavoured, and 
w ith a fine Muscat aroma " 

In the Report of the Fruit Committee of the Royal Horticultural Society for September 10, 1861, it is thus 
mentioned :— « The bunch in size and shape had all the appearance of one of the Mill Hill Hamburgh. It was large 
and well set. The berries were large, round, and oblate, shaped like small oranges, and very much ' hammered.' The 
fle »h is firm, juicy, sweet, and richly flavoured with a marked Muscat flavour." The Committee were of opmion that 
't was a decided cross, a very excellent Grape, and well worthy of notice. . , . . „ ,, 

The Editor of the ' Gardeners' Chronicle ' remarks :— " Large both in bunch and berry, possessing a fine Muscat 
flavour, and, in the opinion of many, one of the best grapes in the world.'; 

The ' Scottish Horticulturist,' in quoting the above, says :— « An opmion we can cheerfully endorse. To those 
w ho think from the term Muscat that it requires an equal amount of heat to ripen it to perfection, we can assure 
them that it ripens as early, under exactly the same treatment, as the Black Hamburgh." 

Good established Plants, on 1st July next, 21s. each. 
Extra strong Plants, for fruiting in pots, 31s. 6d. and 42s. each. 

ROYAL EXOTIC NURSERY, KING'S ROAD, CHELSEA, S.W. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



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POPULAR SCIENCE REVIEW. No. 24, July, 2s. 6d., contains:— Venus's I 

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Insurance, by Dr. Hardwicke — The New Electro-Magnetic Machines, by S. J. Mackie, F.G.S., illus 
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HARDWICKE'S SCIENCE GOSSIP, No. 31, July, price 4rf. An Illustrated 51 

of Interchange and Correspondence for Students and Lovers of Nature. A never-failing source of re 
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AT HOME IN THE WILDERNESS, being Adventures and Experiences in Unci 

Regions ; in which it is shown where and when to encamp ; how to equip and manage a tram of pact 
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his powder dry, or he'll hav' his har ris'd, sure' as beaver medicine." By J. Keast Lord, late 01 the 
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Tab. 5652 is unavoidably postponed till 
next month. 



565C. 




^fttch,dfil.etlttK 



Vincent. Brookslmp ■ 



Tab. 5050. 
draba violacea. 
Violet-flowered Draba. 



Nat. Ord. Ckucifeb^:. — Tetradidtnamia, Siliculosa. 

Gen. Char. SepaJa brevia, a?qualia. Stamina simplicia. Siliqua elliptica 
oblonga v. raro linearis, compressa, poly sperm a, rarius oligospermia, valvis 
planiusculis rarissime costatis, septo membranaceo ; stylus brevis v. elonga- 
tus, stigmate simplici. Semina 2-seriata, immarginata, fuuiculis setaceis; 
cotyledones accumbentes. — Herbse scepissime parva, ccespitosrr, pitbe ttcllata 
incanre. Folia Integra, radicalia scepe rosulata. Scapi caulesue nudi V. 
fohosi, foliis sessilibus. Flores ebracteati v. inferiores foliaceo-bracteati, 
scepe parvi, albi v. aurei, rarius rosei v. purpurei. 



Draba violacea ; frutfculus suberectus, raraosus, ubique incano-tomentosus, 
eaulibus basi nudis cicatricatis superne longe foliatis, foliis brevibns 
laxe imbricatis obovato-oblongis obtusis subspathulatisve integerrimis 
v. obtuse dentatis, floribus subcorymbosis violaceis, pedicellis iuferiori- 
bus foliaceo-bracteatis elongatis, siliqua oblonga recta v. curva in sty- 
lum elongatum acicularem angustata. 

Dkaba violacea. DC. Prod. v. 1. p. 171. Hook. Ic. PI. t. 35. 

Draba Bonplandiana. H. B. et K. JVov. Gen. et Sp. v. 5. p. 78. 



It is seldom that a species of so obscure a genus as Draba 
possesses such horticultural attractions as to claim a place in 
the * Botanical Magazine ;' but such is the case with the pre- 
sent plant, which is further very interesting on account of 
its locality, for it attains almost as great an elevation on the 
lofty Andes as any Phamogamic plant. It was discovered 
by Humboldt and Bonpland near Quito, and has since then 
been gathered repeatedly by Professor Jameson, of that city, 
who sent seeds to his friend I. Anderson Henry. Esq., F.L.S., 
of Hay Lodge, Edinburgh, and from whom living plants in 
flower were received at Kew in March of the present year. 
Professor Jameson describes it as of rare occurrence, and 
growing in loose rocks and walls at elevations of 13-15,000 
feet. It was figured by my father as long ago as 1837, in 
the ' Icones Plantarum,' with the remark, u This would in- 
deed be a lovely plant to introduce into our gardens." 
JUI.T 1st, 1867. 



The genus Draba, so abundant in the mountains of North- 
ern Europe, is even more characteristic of the Andes of tro- 
pical America, where many species, including most of the 
finest of the genus, are to be found. 

Descr. A densely hoary-tomentose shrubby-stemmed herb, 
a foot or so high. Brandies naked and scarred below, clothed 
above with imbricating obovate or obovate-spathulate leaves. 
Leaves about half an inch long, obtuse, equally tomentose on 
both surfaces, obtuse, entire or obtusely toothed. Scapes 
leafy. Mowers subcorymbose ; lower pedicels slender, aris- 
ing from the axils of the uppermost leaves. Flowers nearly 
half an inch diameter. Sepals suberect, oblong. Petals 
obovate-spathulate. Pod about a third of an inch long, ob- 
long, acute at both ends, very flat, straight or curved, nar- 
rowed into an acicular long style. — J. 1). H. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Stamens. 3. Ovary, style, and stigma: — all magnified. 




5651 




T v 



' 











"fciceiU iJrocfe,Imp ■ 



Tab. 5651. 

IPOMCEA Geerabdi. 
Gerrard's Ipomcea. 






Nat. Ord. Convolvtjlace^:. — Pentatjdbia Mcwogynia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide tupra, Tab. 5330.) 



Ipomcea Gerrardi ; caule laevi volubili, petiolis pedunculis sepalis foliisque 
subtus adnervos laxe albo-lanatis v. araneosis, foliis rotundato-cordatis 
obtusis acuminatisve obscure sinuatis integerrimis supra glabris, pe- 
dunculis axillaribus solitariis 1-floris 2-bracteolatis, bracteolis brevibus 
obtusis persistentibus, sepalis mediocribus oblongis obtusis concavis, 
floribus amplis albis suaveolentibus, seminibus dense et copiose fusco- 



lanatis. 



Of this very fine plant the seeds have several times been 
sent to Kew from Natal, where it seems to be known as 
"wild cotton;" the first were received in 1857, from our ex- 
cellent correspondent Dr. Sutherland, Surveyor-General of 
the colony ; and from a plant reared from these the drawing 
here published was made. It forms a tuberous stock above 
the earth as large as the fist, from which annual stems shoot, 
attain a length of ten to fifteen feet, and flower copiously. 
It succeeds well in the moderate heat of the Palm stove, 
flowering about August. The seeds wore exhibited as " wild 
cotton " in the Great Exhibition of 1862, and attracted some 
attention as a possible substitute for cotton, the cotton famine 
at that time raging. 

As a species, I. Oerrardi is closely allied to /. albivenia, 
Don, of Zanzibar (Convolvulus albivenius, Lindl. IJnt. Keg. t. 
1116), but that plant is more woolly, the stems are tubercled, 
the bracts are long and linear, and the inside of the (much 
smaller) corolla tube is purple. I have named it after a 
most indefatigable collector. Mr. Gerrard, of Natal, who 
sent dried specimens to Sir W. Hooker, and who, after ex- 
ploring the countries to the nortrnvard of Natal, proceeded 
with impaired health as a naturalist to Madagascar, where 
he soon succumbed to that pestilential climate. 
jui.y 1st, 1867. 



Desc. Stems numerous, from a stout woody root-stock, ten 
to fifteen feet long, twining, not tubercled, cobwebby or 
covered with thin white wool, as are the petioles, nerves of 
the leaves below, peduncles, and sepals. Leaves on terete 
petioles two to four inches long, rounded-cordate, four to five 
inches long, obtusely or acutely acuminate, obscurely sinuate. 
Peduncles axillary, solitary, one-flowered, shorter than the 
petioles, stout, terete. Bracts very small, short, ovate, obtuse, 
persistent. Sepals two-thirds of an inch long, concave, obtuse. 
Seeds densely four inches in diameter, very sweet-scented. 
Corolla white, clothed with brown wool. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Disk and pistil. 2. Seed with its woolly covering. 3. The same 
removed :— all hut Fig. 1 of the nat. size. 




W. Fitch., del etlith.. 



Vincent Brooks , Io?' 



Tab. 5652. 
DENDEOBIUM Bullerianum. 
Mr. Wentworth Bailer's Dendrobium. 



Xat. Ord. Orciiide.e. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4755.) 



Dendrobium Bullerianum ; caulibus suberectk striatis foliosis (floriferis 
aphyllis), foliia ovato-lanceolatis acutis, floribus geminatis vel ternatis, 
bracteis ovatis acutis pedicellis 5-plo brevioribus, sepalis petalisque 
(paulo latioribus) lanceolatis acutis, labello integro late ovato acuto 
macula magna circulari aurea supra discum. Bateman. 

Dendrobium gratiosissimum. Hort. 



A few plants of this pretty Dendrobium were imported 
two or three years ago from Moulmeine by the Messrs. Hugh 
Low and Co. of Clapton, to whom they had been sent — like 
so many other additions to this beautiful genus — by their 
indefatigable correspondent, Mr. Parish. In structure it is 
perhaps most nearly allied to T). crepidatum, from whence 
the form of the lip abundantly distinguishes it : while in the 
size and colouring, and general effect of its flowers, it some- 
what resembles the otherwise very different D. Dewnianum. 

Mr. Wentworth Buller, one of our most zealous Orchidolo- 
gists, having been the first to flower this plant in his very 
rich collection at Strete Raleigh, Devon, I have great plea- 
sure in naming the plant in his honor. He describes it as 
of very easy cultivation in the Dendrobium house, where it 
flowers in the spring. 

Desck. Stems nearly erect, slender at the base, and rising 
to upwards of a foot in height, striated, leafless when flower- 
ing. Leaves ovate-lanceolate, two or three inches long, sharp- 
pointed, falling off before the flowers appear. Bracts ovate, 
acute, five times longer than the pedicels. Flowers in twos 
and threes, of a creamy white, faintly tipped with rose. Sepals 
august 1st, 1867. 



oblong-lanceolate ; petals wider than the sepals, ovate-lanceo- 
late, acute. Lip broadly ovate, acute, its edges entire, and 
its disc decorated with a large, rich, circular yellow spot, 
which is streaked with reddish-orange lines. — J. B. 



Fig. 1. Column and base of lip. 2. Lip spread out: — slightly magnified. 



.5653. 




WfttcMeUtlitlY 



OmdsJl^P- 



Tab. 5653. 
mjdgea mackophylla. 

Large-leaved Rudgea. 



Nat. Ord. Rubiace^:. — Pentakdbia Monogtnia. 

• Gen. CJiar. Calycis tubus subglobosus; lobi 5, acuti. Corolla subinfun- 
clibuliformis ; tubus gracilis, fauce nuda ; lobi 5, erecto-patentes v. reflexi, 
subconcavi, apice 3-quetro iucurvo v. deflexo. Stamina 5, corolla? fauce in- 
serts, inclusa, filamentis brevibus v. elougatis ; antherae oblon^a 1 , erectae. 
Ovarium 2-loculare; stylus simplex, stigmate 2-cruri; ovula in loculis soli- 
taria. Bacca 2-locularis, 2-spertna. — Arbores et frutices America? tropica?, 
glabri v. cinereo-pubescentes. Polia breviter v. longe petiolata. Stipulae 
magna, libera v. connate, scepe fimbriates v. setosa. Plores in paniculas v. 
capitula terminates v. pseudo-terminales dispositi, albi. 



Rudgea. macrophylla ; frutex glaberrimus, ramulis robustis, foliis 1-2- 
pedalibus brevissime petiolatia elongato-obovato-oblongis v. lanceo- 
latis subacutis inferne angustatis basi acutis obtusis v. cordato-2-lobis, 
floribus maguis in capitulum magnum densiflorum globosum crasse pe- 
dunculatum dispositis, stipulis in tubum connatia dorso intra margines 



setosis 



Rudgea macrophylla. Benth. in Linn. v. 23. p. 456. Walp. Ann. v. 2. p. 

7.1 7 



747. 



A magnificent plant, and belonging to a genus which, 
though containing many species, had never previously, so far 
as I am aware, been introduced into European gardens. All 
of the species are South American, and the present, which 
flowered in Mr. Henderson's Nursery, of Pine-apple Place, 
in March of the present year, is a native of the neighbour- 
hood of Rio de Janeiro, where it has been found by various 
collectors, and is described (by Gardner) as a shrub six feet 
high. 

Desck. A glabrous, shining, deep-green shrub, about six 
feet high. Branches terete, very stout. Leaves very large, 
one to two feet and upwards long, very shortly petioled, 
narrow obovate-oblong or obovate-lanceolate, acuminate, 
spreading and recurved, narrowed to the base, which is 
acute obtuse or auriculate-two-lobed, very coriaceous, shin- 
ing, with a stout broad midrib and numerous veins. Stipules 
july 1st, 1867. 



connate into a cylindric short sheath, with two rows of 
thick, erect setiform processes on their sides. Flowers cream - 
white, collected into a globose dense head as large as a 
small fist. Peduncle very stout, cylindric ; each flower one 
to one and a half inches long. Ovary globose, pubescent. 
Calyx teeth small, acute. Corolla thick in texture, funnel- 
shaped ; lobes very thick, tips scarcely inflexed. Filaments 
long; anthers included. Style slender; stigmas linear. — J.D.II. 



Fig. 1. Stipules, stem and base of leaf. 2. Flowers, both qfnat. size. 
3. Stamen. 4. Pistil and calyx. 5. Transverse section of ovary. 6. Ovule : 
— all magnified. 



5654. 







UL -fir 






V It *f 



Ij kM Ny 



W..Etch.deL.etJith. 




Tab. 5654 

EPIDENDEUM Coopeeianum. 

Mr. Cooper's Epidendrum. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide,e. — Gynandria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5336.) 



Epidendkum (§ Spathium) Cooperianum ; caulibus rigidis erectis versus 
apicem foliosis, foliis disticbis lanceolatis acutis pedunculo denso 
nutaube multifloro e spatba herbacea carinata subduplici orto vix 
a?quantibus, bracteis minutis setaceis, flonbus carnosis, sepalis ovali- 
lanceolatis acutis, petalis minoribus lineari-lanceolatis acutis, labello 
amplo basi bicalloso trilobo, laciniis lateralibus, maximis subrotundo- 
cuiieatis, intermedia transversa reniibrmi alte eniarginata, liuea elevata 
per discum currente ; clinandrio obtuse dentato. — Bateman. 

Epidendrum Cooperianum. Batem., mss. 



Cultivators scarcely need to be told that the vast genus 
Epidendrum is divided, as respects habit, into two grand 
divisions, i.e. the species that have and the species that have 
not pseudobulbs. They are also well aware that it is among 
the latter that the most describable kinds ai^ generally to 
be found. There are, however, a few exceptions, amongst 
which must be numbered the plant now represented, which 
has a neat, compact, caulescent habit, and will well repay 
cultivation. It is named in compliment to Mr. Cooper, of 
Alpha House, Old Kent Eoad, a very zealous collector and 
successful grower of Orchids, who had the merit of exhibit- 
ing it for the first time at one of the Tuesday meetings of 
the Horticultural Society in the spring of last year. A 
month or two later, it was exhibited at another of these 
meetings by Mr. Dawson, of Meadow Bank, near Glasgow. 

It is a Brazilian plant — probably from the neighbourhood 
of llio — and grows readily in the Cattleya house, but it 
should also be tried in the Mexican house, in which very 
many Brazilian Orchids — especially divers Oneidia — would, 
I conceive, succeed perfectly. The Cattleya house itself 
jult 1st, 1SG7. 



frequently proves too warm and too moist for many of the 
Orchids from the higher portions of the Organ Mountains, 
whence not a few of the most popular species have come 
to us. 

Descr. A caulescent plant with erect rigid stems, two feet 
or more high, thickly clothed in their upper portion with 
stiff distichous lanceolate sharp-pointed leaves, which are not 
quite so long as the dense nodding peduncle, which issues 
from what is usually a twofold keeled herbaceous spathe, 
the latter not quite so long as the leaves. Baceme many- 
flowered. Flowers coriaceous, of a dull yellowish-brown, 
with the exception of the lip, which is bright rose. Sepals 
oval-lanceolate, acute. Petals narrower than the sepals, 
linear-lanceolate, acute. Lip large, fully as broad as the 
column is long, divided into three unequal portions, of which 
those at the side are plane, subrotund, and rather wedge- 
shaped, while the central one is much smaller, kidney- 
shaped, and deeply emarginate ; the disk of the lip is tra- 
versed by a raised line, and has at its base two oblong calli. 
Column somewhat bluntly toothed. — /, B. 



Fig. 1. Column and lip, seen in front. 2. Pollen-masses : — magnified. 



5655. 




WBbcli;dfil.etlith 



Vincent Broelis , Imp . 



Tab. 5655. 
gloxinia htpocyrtiflora. 

Hypocyrta-flowered Gloxinia. 



Nat. Ord. Gesneeiace^:. — Didynamia Ajs'Giospebmia. 

Gen. Char. Calycis tubus basi ovario connatus, 5-fidus v. 5-partitus. Co- 
rolla polymorpha, tubo cylindrico v. inflato, limbi lobis patentibus v. conni- 
ventibus. Stamina basi corolla? inserta, didynama. Discus e glandulis 
5 liberis v. aimulus crenatus. Ovarium basi v. altius calycis tubo adhaarens. 
Stylus crassiusculus, stigmate 2-lobo. Fructus capsulars. — Herbse radici- 
bus fibrosis, propagulis repentibus. Flores axillares. 



Gloxixia hypocyrtijlora ; herbacea, erecta, tota patentim subhirsuta, radice 
fibrosa, propagulis aucta, foliis oppositis breviter petiolatis ovato-rotun- 
datis obtusis basi cordatis, sinu angusto, convexis obtuse serratis 
reticulatim venosis, areolis bullato-regulosis, costa nervisque pallidis, 
pedunculis axillaribus solitariis 2-nisve adscendentibus validis 1-floris, 
calycis parvi tubo ovario connato, limbo ultra ovarium producto sub- 
campanulato breviter 5-fido, corolla ventricosa gibba fere globosa 
patentim hirsuta, lobis 5 parvis conniventibus faucem claudentibus, 
filamentis styloque villosis, antherarum loculis pubescentibus disci 
glandulis 5 erectis, ovarii apice libero. 



The Gesneriacece are confessedly a very difficult tribe to 
classify, and the subject of the present Plate tends to in- 
crease the difficulty. In its habit, fibrous roots, and the 
presence of propagula (shoots bearing leafy buds), it is a 
Gloxinia; in the corolla, a Hypocyrta ; in the glands, a 
Gesnera ; whilst in the small calyx it differs from the ordi- 
nary forms of all these genera. Many botanists would no 
doubt found a new genus on it ; but this I am unwilling to 
do for a member of an Order whose genera are already so 
badly defined. It must also be observed, that though it 
differs in the form of the corolla so much from any known 
Gloxinia, this organ presents extremely different forms in 
the various species both of that genus and of Gesnera. 

Gloxinia hypocyrtijlora is a native of the forests of the 
Quitenian Andes, whence there are dried specimens (with 
propagula) in the Hookerian Herbarium, collected by Pro- 
jult 1st, 1S67. 



fessor Jameson. For the specimen here figured I am in- 
debted to Messrs. Veitch, who introduced it by means of 
their excellent collector, Mr. Pearce. It is a very beautiful 
plant, especially in the rich green of its velvety leaves tra- 
versed by pale veins. 

Descr. A very hirsute and subglandular herb, a foot or so 
high. Moots fibrous. Stem erect, terete, soft. Leaves oppo- 
site, three to four inches long, on petioles half to three- 
quarters of an inch long, broadly ovate-cordate, with a very 
narrow sinus at the base, convex, obtuse, obtusely serrate, 
costa and nerves yellow, contrasting strongly with the dark 
emerald-green closely-reticulated surface of the leaf; the 
areolae between the nerves present elevated conical papillae. 
Peduncles one to two, in the axils of the leaves, ascending, 
and when numerous on the plant, forming a sort of corymb, 
stout, curved, three to four inches long. Calyx very short, 
broadly campanulate ; limb produced beyond the ovary, 
shortly and obtusely five-lobed. Corolla two-thirds of an 
inch long, bright orange-red, nearly globose, but gibbous 
below, with five very obscure lobes which close over the 
mouth, bright orange-red, yellower on the gibbous portion. 
Glands epigynous, five, thick. Stamens four, filaments hir- 
sute ; anthers cohering, pubescent ; fifth stamen rudimentary. 
Ovary sunk in the calyx tube, apex free, hairy. Style stout, 
pubescent. Stigma two-lobed. — J. 1). H. 



Fig. 1. Corolla laid open. 2. Calyx and ovary. 3. Glands, and base of 
calyx. 4. Glands removed: — all magnified. 



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OR No. 967 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMPRISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 

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1867. 



JVoio ready, Imperial Uo, with Six Beautifully-coloured Plates, price 16s., Part I. of 

WILD FLOWEES OF BRITISH NORTH AMERICA, 

BY MRS. MILLER, Authoress of « The Wild Flowers of Nova Scotia.' 
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HYACINTHS AND OTHER DUTCH BULBS. 

WILLIAM CETBESH abb SON beg to announce that their Catalogue of lie 
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The Bulbs are unusually fine this Season. 

HIGHGATE NURSERIES, LONDON, N. 

BALSAMS. 

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THE NURSERIES, DELWICH, S. 




TRICOLORED GERANIUMS. 

F. and A. SMITH will forward by post a Collection of Leaves, from their beautiful 
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THE NURSERIES, DELWICH S. 



SUPERB NEW LATE GRAPE, 

"MRS. PINCE'S BLACK MUSCAT. 



" 



TO BE SENT OUT THIS MONTH. 
AS A HIGH-FLAVOURED LATE GRAPE ITS EaUAL DOSS NOT EXIST ^ 
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LUCOMBE, PINCE, AJtD CO., to prevent disappointment, beg to inform the 

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The Public is earnestly invited to see the Vines now fruiting, or send for Testimonials 

EXETEE NTJESEEY, EXETEE. 

N.B.— -Their beautiful New Seedling Gloxinias and Achimenes will be sent out at 
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'DGINGTON'S GARDEN NETTING, the cheapest and most durable, Id. per s 4 u3 
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A Liberal Discount to the Trade ! 
International Exhibition. L862, Class XIX. Honourable Mention. 



5656. 




NNV'iU-AvAftAefLWVh. 



VincenL rh'ookrjimp 



Tab. 5656. 

EPIDEND11UM CNEMIDOPHORUM. 
Sheathed Epidendrum. 



Xat. Ord. Okcride^;. — GtTnanuria Monandkia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 5336.) 



-CiPiBEKDETJM (Spathinm) cnemidophorum ; spathis p]urimis foliaceis equi- 
tantibus obtusis, racemo niultifloro sessili cernuo simplici vel (rarius) 
paniculato, bracteis linearibus, sepalis oblongis obtusis, petalis lineari- 
bus, columna sigmoidea, labelli lobis carnosis integerrimis lobis Iate- 
ralibna rotundatis, intermedio cuneato bilobo rotundato, callis 2 maxi- 
niis lineisque tribus elevatis quarum intermedia major. Lindl. Fol. 
Orch. 

Ei'iDENimuM cnemidophorum. Lind, Fol. Orch. 



This most remarkable plant was long since discovered by 
the late Mr. Skinner, who laboured ineffectually for many 
years to introduce it alive into our gardens. At length how- 
ever his perseverance was rewarded, and he had the satis- 
faction of receiving, early in 1864, a cargo of some twenty 
or thirty specimens, all in the most perfect condition, and of 
which some were sold at Stevens's .Rooms, while others, with 
his wonted generosity, were distributed amongst his friends. 
Among the latter Sir Philip Egerton was not forgotten, and 
from a particularly fine specimen that flowered at Oulton, 
and which was exhibited at South Kensington in April last, 
Mr. Fitch's very characteristic representation was obtained. 
Even this however by no means conveys an adequate idea 
of the stately appearance presented by the plant, the stems 
of which were when exhibited already some five feet high, 
while a dozen still more vigorous growths were preparing to 
follow. 

In its native country (Guatemala) it is found at an eleva- 
tion of at least 7000 feet, and it must consequently be kept 
cool, if we would expect it to thrive in our collections. 
At Oulton it receives little more than ordinary greenhouse 

august 1st. 1867. 



treatment, and with me it succeeds perfectly in the Mexican 
house. Patience however will have to be exercised, for — 
even in Guatemala — it takes nearly seven years to grow a 
really fine plant ; but this when once obtained will remain 
a sort of heirloom for generations. The roots being very 
large and fleshy, it requires abundant pot-room, the pots 
being filled with a mixture of broken potsherds, sphagnum, 
and fibrous peat. 

Mr. Skinner once showed me a clever model of this plant 
executed in coloured paper, and which he obtained from the 
nuns of some Guatemala convent, in whose garden it was 
cultivated for the sake of its flowers. The white background 
of these, contrasted with the rich spotting on the inner side, 
does, indeed, produce a very striking effect, and no doubt 
attracted the attention of the sisterhood. This model showed 
a compound raceme a foot or more long, which I expect will 
be at least equalled by those of the plant at Oulton when it 
flowers again. 

Desck. A robust terrestrial plant, throwing out numerous 
fleshy roots, and forming tufts of stout leafy stems, which are 
from half an inch to an inch thick, and from four to six feet 
high. Leaves from six to ten inches long, glossy, dark green 
and sharp- pointed. From the extremity of the stem there 
issues forth a nodding, many-flowered (sometimes, though 
rarely, compound) raceme, protected by numerous blunt, 
sheathing, equitant, pale green spathes. Flowers fleshy, on 
white pedicels three times as long as themselves. Sepals 
oblong, obtuse, broader than the linear petals, both being 
white at the back, and of a pale yellow, mottled with rich 
reddish brown inside. Lip divided into three fleshy lobes, 
of which those at the sides are rounded and entire, while 
that in the centre is wedge-shaped and deeply cleft into two 
portions, which are divergent and rounded ; its colour lfl 
a creamy white, with rosy tints. Column somewhat curved 
and club-shaped, about the same length as the lip. — J- -#• 



Fig. 1. Front view of lip and column, slightly magnified. 2. Dimi- 
nished outline of the plant. 



5657. 







Vincent Brooks.i 



Tab. 5657. 

BEGONIA JBoliviensis. 
Bolivian Begonia. 



Nat. Ord'. Begoniace^;.— Moncecia Poetandbia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4131.) 



Uegonia (§ Barya) Boliviensis ; herbacea, glabra, ramosa, foliis breviter 
petiolatis oblongo-laueeolatis acuminatis valde inaaquilateralibus basi 
obliquis subcordatis penninerviis irregulariter incisoserratis, denti- 
bus setaceis, stipulis oblongo-lanceolatis serratis, peduneulis axillari- 
bus pollicaribua 2-floris fl. J 1 et $ , bracteis amplis cucullatis serratis, 
floribus magnis coccineo-cinnabarinis, perianthii foliolis lanceolatis 
c? 4, $ 5, filaruentis in conum elongatum alte counatis, antheris ob- 
tusis, stigmatibus 3 ramis fascia papi]Josa basi continua cinctis, ovario 
3-ptero, placeutis alte 2-fidis, aegmentis utrinque ovuliferis. 

Begonia Boliviensis. BO. Prodr. v. 15. pars I. p. 287. 



The very beautiful plant here figured was procured by 
Messrs. Veitch from Bolivia, through their collector, Mr. 
Pearee, and was exhibited for the hrst time at the Inter- 
national Horticultural Show in Paris in May last, when it 
attracted more of the attention both of botanists and horti- 
culturists than any other plant then brought to that magnifi- 
cent floral exhibition. 

Begonia Boliviensis was discovered by Weddell in the Cor- 
dillera of Bolivia, and belongs to a very small section of the 
genus, to which the (generic) name of Barya was given by 
Klotzsch ; the only other species being the B. monadelpha, 
Ruiz and Pav., a native of Peru. In habit the Baryas sin- 
gularly resemble the species belonging to the subgenus Cas- 
par y a, KL, but differ wholly in the structure of their stigmas. 
Descr. Glabrous. Boot a small tube. Stem herbaceous, 
two to three feet high, sparingly branched. Branches cylin- 
drical, green, translucent. Leaves on very short petioles, four 
to five inches long by one to one and a half inches broad, 
august 1st, 18(57. 



lanceolate or ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, very unequal at 
the base, the larger lobe rounded, acutely doubly serrate and 
obscurely lobulate, feather-veined, bright-green above, with 
red margins, pale below. Stipules oblong-lanceolate, toothed, 
recurved, green. Peduncles axillary, one inch long, two- 
flowered, male and female. Bracts green, broadly ovate, 
cucullate, toothed. Pedicels one inch long, red. Floivers 
drooping, bright cinnabar-scarlet ; S two inches long, with 
four lanceolate perianth-leaflets two inches long, ? with five 
half as long. Stamens united into a long conical column ; 
anthers small, oblong, yellow. Ovary three-winged ; styles 
three ; stigmas two-lobed, lobes with a spiral band that is 
continuous at their bases. Placentas bifid, with ovules on 
both surfaces of the segments. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Staminal column. 2 and 3. Stamen. 4. Pistil. 5. Transverse 
section of ovary : — all magnified. 




5658 



^r 



^."Pitah,del.,- 



^5nceri Brook - 



Tab. 5658. 

PEOSTANTHEEA nivba. 

Sno w-whife Prostanthera. 



Nat. Ord. Labiate. — Dibtnajiia GtI'mnospermia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx campanulatus ; tubus brevis, 13-striatus; labia indivisa 
tructus clausa. Corolla tubo brevi amplo, fauce campanulata, labio supe- 
riore erecto subplano, inferiore patente. Stamina 4 ; antherae 2-loculares, 
iociijjs parallelis, connectivo subtus calcarato. Stylus apice 2-fidus, lobia 
8uba?qualibus. — Frutices glandulosi. FJores axillares v. racemosi sub cahjce 
bract eis parvis instructi. 



1 ROstaisTheba nivea ; glaberrima, foliis linearibus v. lineari-lanceolatis 
niargine (sicco) revolutis, racemis laxis, calycibus glabris, ]abio supe- 
rjore maximo, inferiore dimidio breviore ciliato, cormectivi calcare 
altero brevi, altero elongato loculum bis superante. 

Prostantheea nivea. Can)}, in Benth. Lab. p. 452. Benth. in DC. Prodr. 
v. 12. p. 561. 



The Prostantheras belong to a class of hard-wooded plants, 
the cultivation of which has of late years given place to that 
of innumerable varieties of Fuchsias and other more gaudy 
but in many respects less interesting things, that now form 
the staple of "our greenhouse furniture. There are some 
twenty-six species described by Bentham, all Australian. 
Many of them are pretty and graceful, and they further 
flower at a season when little else that is not forced for the 
purpose is to be had in the conservatory. P. nivea is a 
native of rocky hills in New South Wales and Victoria, 
where it was discovered by the late Allan Cunningham (for- 
merly of Kew). The specimen here figured was raised from 
seeds sent to Kew by Dr. Mueller, and flowered in May of the 
present year. 

Desck. A glabrous bush, three to four feet high. Stems 
and branches slender, twiggy, upper four-angled ; branchlets 
erecto-patent. Leaves one to one and a half inches long, 
spreading, linear or linear-lanceolate, acute, quite entire, 
pale-green, nearly flat, margins re volute when dry. Flowers 
attttst 1st, 1S07. 



forming loose racemes, being solitary in the axils of the 
uppermost leaves, shortly pedicelled, bracteoles linear. Calyx 
green; tube hemispherical, grooved; lobes ciliolate, upper 
obscurely three-lobed, lower much smaller, obtuse. Corolla 
two-thirds of an inch in diameter, white with pale lilac lobes, 
and a few yellow-brown spots on the throat at the base of 
the lower lip ; upper lip short, two-lobed. Leaves spreading, 
deeply three-lobed, lateral obtuse, middle truncate and emar- 
ginate, all pilose and crisped at the margin. Anther with 
one flat spur that is erose at the tip, and as long as the cell, 
the other adnate with the connective, and much smaller. 
Ovary subglandular ; stigma 2-fid. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2 and 3. Stamens. 4. Calyx. 5. Pistil : — all magnified. 



5659. 




sUitk. 



"Vinent Brods 



Tab. 5659. 

OESTRUM ELEGANS. 

Purple Habrothamnus. 



Nat. Ord. SoLANACE-aS. — P-ENTAN.DBIA MotfOGYIflA. 

Gen. Char. Calyx 5-fidus 5-dentatus v. 5-partitus. Corolla inftmdibuli- 
iormi-tubulosa, tubo ventrieoso, fauce constricta, limbo parvo 5-lobo. Sta- 
mina 5, tubo adnata, rarhis libera ; antbera? 2-lobse, longitudinaliter dehia- 
centes. Ovarium breviter stipitaturo, stipite disco circumdato, 2-loculare, 
septo medio placentifero ; stylus simplex, stigmate vario ; ovula pauca. 
Bacca ovoidea v. globosa, 1-2-locularis, oligosperma. Semina compressa, 
albuminosa ; cotyledonea parvae, foliaceae. — Frutices v. arbusculae. Folia 
solitaria v. gemina, petiolata, penninervia. Flores racemosi. 



Cestrum (Habrothamnus) elegans; fruticosa, ramis herbaceis teretibus 
pubescenti-tomeutosis, foliis petiolatis ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis 
basi rotundatia, cymis terminalibus, calyce obconico glabro, corolla? 
laciniis acutis. 

Oestrum elegans. ScMecht. in Linn. v. 19. p. 261. Dunal in DC. Prodr. 
v. 13. pars I. p. 000. 

Habrothamnus elegans. A. Brong. Kerb. Gen. de VAmat. ser. 2. v. 4. et 

Hort. Univ. v. 5. p. 293. 
Habrothamnus purpureus. Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1844, t. 43, et Misc. p. 12. 



The figures hitherto published by Van Houtte and Lind- 
ley give no idea of the size and beauty of the flower of this 
fine plant, and these are succeeded by magnificent grape- 
like clusters of deep purple globular berries one-third of an 
inch in diameter. 

The Habrothamnus section of Cestrum are all natives of 
Mexico. Several species are described, evidently very closely, 
if not too closely related. The present grows at elevations 
of 3-4000 feet, and succeeds well in a temperate house. The 
plant fruited was sent by Mr. Henderson, of Wellington 
Nursery. 

The genus Habrothamnus of Endlicher, established as a sec- 
tion by Schlechtendal, has been reduced again to Cestrum by 
Dunal in the ' Prodromus ' of A. De Candolle, in conformity 
with which work we have described the above species. 

AUGUST 1st, 1867. 



Descr. A large bush or small tree, with graceful pendu- 
lous leafy branches ; branchlets cylindrical, pubescent. Leaves 
alternate, shortly petioled, lanceolate or oblong-lanceolate, 
quite entire, acuminate, three to four inches long, pubescent, 
pilose on the nerves beneath, deep-green, membranous, 
rounded acute or obscurely cordate at the base. Flower in 
dense pendulous, thyreoid, compound racemes, one inch long, 
purplish-red, shortly petioled. Calyx short, tube turbinate, 
green ; lobes broadly triangular-ovate, acuminate, erect. 
Corolla tubular, gradually inflated, then contracted below 
the mouth, glabrous ; limb short, with five spreading trian- 
gular acute lobes ; mouth and inner surface glabrous. Sta- 
mens inserted two-thirds of the way down the tube ; filaments 
filiform ; anthers included, small, yellow. Ovary globose ; 
style slender; stigma capitate, truncate, included. Berry 
globose, half to three-quarters of an inch in diameter, fleshy, 
deep red-purple, two-celled, many-seeded. — J. 1). H. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Vertical section of corolla. 3. Pistil. 4. Transverse 
section of fruit : — all hut Fir/. 4, magnified. 



5660. 




TfncentBrocks>p- 



Tab. 5660. 
agave xylonacantha. 

Woody-tlwrned Agave. 



Nat. Ord. Amaktllide^:. — Hexa^dbia Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5333.) 



Agave ocylonacantha ; acaulis, foliis subsquarroso-patentibus ensiformibua 
aeummatis apice subtrigono pungente glaueis granulatis supra plnnius- 
cuha subtus coiivexis ecarinatis estriatis, margine cartilagineo albo acu- 
leis dilatatis siraplicibus v. fureatia instructo, scapo elato bracteis longe 
setaceis numerosis instructo, racerao densifloro, pedunculis pedicellis- 
que brevibu?, bracteolis subulatis, periauthii tubo brevissimo lobis 
oblongis obtusis erectis viridibus ovario cylindrico aequilongis. C. 
Koch, Wochenschr. 1861, p. 39. 

Agate xylonacantba. Salm-Dyck, in Bonplandia, v. 7. p. 92. Jacobi in 
Otto, Hamburg. Garten- und Bhtvten-Zeitung, v. 20. p. 547. 



The ' Botanical Magazine ' seems especially adapted for 
the publication of that noble class of plants that few can 
afford to cultivate, and which seldom flower in cultivation, 
but which are of equal interest to the scientific botanist and 
to the horticulturist. Amongst these the Aloes and Agaves 
hold, after the Palms, the place of honour, and their value 
for decorative purposes is becoming yearly more apparent. 

The subject of the present Plate is a native of Real del 
Monte, Mexico, whence it was sent to the Royal Gardens in 
1846, by Mr. Repper, to whom the Gardens are indebted for 
many fine plants. 

Descr. Stemless. Leaves spreading all round, two to three 
feet long, three to five inches broad, thick, rigid, and succu- 
lent, rough with minute granulations, but neither keeled, 
striated, nor ribbed, plane above, convex beneath, glaucous- 
green, ensiform-Ianceolate, gradually acuminate to the pun- 
gent trigonous apex ; margin broad white, cartilaginous, beset 
with flat-lobed, white, vertically compressed, simple or lobed 
spinous processes, the lobes irregular, often uncinate. Scope 

AUGUST 1st. 18G7. 



nine to ten feet high, strict, rather stout, green, beset with 
long, strict, subulate bracts, two to eight inches long. Flowers 
in a very dense, elongate, strict, erect raceme, three to four 
feet long, clustered in twos and threes on short, stout pedun- 
cles, that are subtended by a reflexed subulate bract one and 
a half to two inches long; each flower, with the stamens, 
three inches long; pedicels very short; bracteoles minute, 
subulate. Ovary cylindric, one inch long, glabrous, green. 
Perianth tube very short ; lobes linear-oblong, obtuse, erect, 
about as long as the ovary, green. Stamens as long as the 
ovary and perianth, erect. Filaments yellow with a red 
tinge, strict. Anthers yellow, linear, two-thirds of an inch 
long. Style slender, shorter than the stamens ; stigma small, 
capitate. — J. J). H. 



Fig. 1. Reduced figure of the whole plaut. 2 and 3. Portions of the 
leaf. 4. Ditto of the raceme: — both ofnat. size. 



7? 



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HYACINTHS AND OTHER DUTCH BULBS. 

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HIGHGATE NURSERIES, LONDON, N. 

^eautTful^oxgiToves. 

J- IVERT and SON can now supply New Seed of their fine strain of the above, in 1*., U. int.. 
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\ DORKING AND REIGATE NURSERIES. 

NEW EOSES FOB 1868. 



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HATE PURCHASED TIIE STOCKS OF 

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^ '.ieh have been exhibited on the Continent this season, and hope to exhibit them in London m 
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.1 frr.i 



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5661. 




XRrdyiel.etlith. 



Vincent lipooks Jmp 



Tab. 5661. 

COLAX jugosus. 

Furrowed-Upped Colax. 

Nat. Ord. Orchidia. — GtTNandkia Monandria. 

Gen. Char. Perianthiwm vix ringens, in mentum breve production, sub- 
gtobosum. ^ Sepala et petala subaequalia, oblonga. LabcHum unguiculatuai, 
immobile, inappendiculatum, ungue brevi sublineari in laminam dilatatam 
3-lobam dilatato. Columna semiteres, subelongata. Anthem earnosa, 
subimmersa. Pollinia 4, obovoidea, caudiculae mem bran a cere elongatsa 
angustatse adnata ; glandula obscura. Bostellum 5-lobum. — Herbffl fteth 
dobulbosa, Brasilienses. Folia terminalia et radicalia, plicata. Pedunculi 
radicales, erecti, 1-3-JZori, vaginati. Flores majuscnli. 



Colax jugosus ; pedunculo 2-3-floro, sepalis ovato-rotundatis albis>, petalis 
late obovatis albis fasciis purpureis creberrime notatis, labelli viliosi 
jugosi purpureo-fasciati lobis lateralibua parvia, intermedio semiorbi- 
culari, columna villosa. 

Colax jugosus. Lintll. in Hot. Betj. 1843; Misc. p. 51. Beivhenb.Jil. Xen. 
Orch. p. 107. t. 41. 

Maxillaria jugosa. Lindl. Bot. Beg. 1840; Misc. p. 51. 



The genus Colax was established by Lindley upon certain 
Mamillaries with less ringent flowers than the majority of 
the species of that genus and a peculiar caudicle, though 
how far such differences will hold good as generic cannot be 
determined, until a revision of this great and most important 
Order shall settle the value of the characters now so arbitra- 
rily used for the limitation of its genera. Colax is, however, 
upheld by Keichenbach, whose authority on Orchidese is 
unquestionably the highest, and who gives a very fair figure 
of this species in the valuable work referred to. 

Colaxjiigosus is a native of Brazil, and, according to Lindley, 
was introduced by Messrs. Loddiges. The specimen here 
figured flowered in Mr. Ruckers magnificent collection at 
Wandsworth in May of the present year. I have followed 
Keichenbach in referring it to Lindley 's C. jugosus, from 
whose description in the ' Botanical Register ' it differs in 

SEPTEMBER 1ST, 1SG7. 



the petals being banded with dark purple, not speckled with 
crimson. 

Desck. Pseudobulbs elongate-ovoid, compressed, smooth 
and even, two to three inches long. Leaves from the apex 
and base of the pseudobulbs, lanceolate, acuminate, six to 
nine inches long, an inch and a half to two inches broad. 
Scape radical, clothed with imbricating, rather ] turgid, acute 
sheaths, an inch to an inch and a half long, two- to three- 
flowered. Flowers subglobose, when fully expanded two 
inches in diameter. Sepals broadly oblong, almost rounded, 
obtuse, pale cream-colour. Petals obovate-oblong, shortly 
unguiculate, obtuse, white, thickly studded with short, trans- 
verse, black-purple bands. Lip smaller than the petals, 
shortly unguiculate, velvety and covered with fleshy ridges, 
three-lobed ; lateral lobes small, banded longitudinally with 
dark purple spots ; middle lobe semicircular, streaked and 
splashed with dark purple. Column villous in front. — J. L). 11. 



Fig. 1. Lip. 2. Column. 3. Polliuia and caudicle : — all magnified. 






5661. 







V?. Htch.dfi] etlith 



Tab. 5662. 
DEAC iENA surculosa ; var. maculata. 
Long-shooting Draccena ; spotted-leaved var. 



A T at. Ord. Asparagine^:. — Hexandria Monogtpia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5218.) 



Deacena surculosa ; fruticosa, surculos strictoa erectos squamosos e ra- 
dice eniittens, caulibus gracilibus dichotome ramosis paucifbliatis 
squamosis, cicatricibus squamarum delapsarum annulatis, f'oliis bre- 
viter petiolatis oblongo-laiiceolatis acuminatis striato-nervosis, nervia 
omnibus parallel's, squamis lanceolato-subulatis membranaceis erectis, 
pedunculo terminali gracili erecto, bracteis minutis, floribus in co- 
rymbum laxum globosum dispositis gracile pedicellatis, pedicello basin 
versus articulato, periantbii tubo gracili lobis linearibus reflexis aequi- 
longo, filamentis filil'ormibus. 

Dracjena surculosa. Lindl. in Bot. Reg. t. 1169. 

Var. maculata ; foliis fulvo-maculatis. 



This is another of the spotted-leaved Draccmas that 
inhabit, and indeed are almost peculiar to the shores of 
western tropical Africa, and, with the I), phryaoides (Tab. 
nostr. 5852) and D. bicolor (Tab. 5248), dried specimens were 
sent home by Mr. Gustav Mann, whilst collector for Kew on 
that dangerous but prolific coast. 

D. surcxlosa was discovered by the late George Don, when 
collector for the Horticultural Society of London in 1821, 
at Sierra Leone, and from the plants he sent to England the 
figure published in the ' Botanical Register ' was made ; 
these however wanted the yellow spots so conspicuous in 
var. maculata, and the pedicels of its flowers are rather 
shorter; in other respects the plants are identical. It is 
very near the D. elliptica, var. maculata (Tab. nostr. 4787), 
but has very different flowers and inflorescence. 

I), surculosa, var. maculata, was collected by G. Mann in 
1863 on the banks of the Old Calabar River, but the speci- 

SEPTEMBER 1ST, 18G7. 



mens here figured were communicated by Mr. Clarke, of the 
Glasgow Botanic Garden, to whom the Royal Gardens are 
indebted for a fine living plant. 

Desck. A shrub, six to eight feet high, sparingly dichoto- 
mously branched, throwing up copious, stout, erect, rod-like, 
scaly surculi from the root. Stems and branches very slender, 
annulate where the scales have fallen away, terete, with de- 
ciduous subulate membranous scales here and there on the 
shoots and at the base of the peduncle. Leaves in scattered, 
subopposite pairs, and whorled in threes, spreading, flat, tour 
to six inches long, one and a half to two inches broad, 
shortly petioled, oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, finely striated 
with parallel nerves, rather membranous in texture. Peduncle 
terminal, strict, erect or inclined, three to five inches long, 
slender, with scattered sheathing scales, bearing at the top a 
globose, lax corymb of greenish-white flowers. Peduncles one 
inch long, very slender, with subulate bracts at the insertion, 
jointed near the base. Ovary oblong. Perianth-tube above 
the ovary nearly half an inch long, slender ; lobes linear, 
reflexed, obtuse, about as long as the tube, pale-yellowish. 
Filament slender, filiform, as long as the perianth lobes ; 
anthers oblong, yellow. Ovary bluntly trigonous ; style very 
slender ; stigma capitate, three-lobed. Berry as large as a 
pea, one-seeded. Seed subglobose. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Upper part of stamen. 3. Pistil. 4. Transverse 
section of ovary. 5. Fruit : — all hut Fig. 5 magnified. 



5662. 




\A .«. lith 



Vincent r: 



Tab. 5663. 

BEGONIA Yeitchii. 

Veitclis Begonia. 



]S T at. Ord. Besoniace^;. — Moncecia Poltandria. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4131.) 



Begonia (§ Huszia) Veitchii ; acaulis, laxe pilosa, foliia crasse petiolatis 
oblique ovato- v. rotundato-cordatis lobulatis et crenulatis, nervis fla- 
bellatissubtusprominulis, scapo robusto 2-floro (fl. <$ et ? ), bracteis 
2 oblongis obtusis roseis, floribus amplis miniato-ciunabarinis, peri- 
anthii foliolis obovato-rotundatis in $ 4, in ? 5, filamentis liberis, an- 
theris obtusis, ovario 3-loculari, placentis 2-fidis, lobis lobulatis uudi- 
que ovuliferis, sty lis 3-2-furcatis, cruribus fascia papillosatorta cinctis. 

Begonta Veitchii. Hook. f. in Gard. Chron. 1867,^). 734, cum ic. xylofj. 



Of all the species of Begonia known, this is, I think, the 
finest. With the habit of Saxifraga ciliata, immense flowers 
of a vivid vermilion-cinnabar red, that no colourist can re- 
produce, it adds the novel feature of being hardy, in certain 
parts of England at any rate, if not in all. It was discovered 
by Messrs. Veitch's collector, Mr. Pearce, near Cuzco, in 
Peru, at an elevation of 12,000-12,500 feet, and the plants 
grown in Mr. Voitch's establishments have already given 
proof sufficient of their hardihood, by withstanding a tem- 
perature of 25° Fahr. with absolute impunity. Unwilling as 
I am to pronounce on the probable or possible adaptation of 
exotic plants to an English climate, I cannot but believe 
that in the south-western counties and in the south of Ire- 
land, the Begonia Veitchii will certainly prove one of the 
most ornamental of border plants. 

A very nearly allied species to this exists in the Hookerian 
Herbarium, collected by Man don in the Andes of Bolivia, 
near Sorata, altitude 9,000-10,000 feet ; it is, however, more 
caulescent, and has a glabrous scape, with larger stipules and 
bracts. I have mentioned this as the same species as Yeitchii. 

SEPTEMBER IsT, 18G7. 



in the ' Gardeners' Chronicle,' but from live specimens since 
received from Major Trevor Clarke, I believe it to be dis- 
tinct, having a caulescent habit, many-flowered scapes, and 
less brilliantly coloured flowers. It will shortly be figured 
in this work as B. Clarkii. 

Descr. Root tuberous. Stem almost none. Leaves nearly 
radical, on short, stout, pilose petioles, orbicular- or broadly 
ovate-cordate, concave, obscurely lobed and crenate, four to 
six inches in diameter, thick in texture ; nerves radiating 
from the centre, very prominent below ; upper surface dark- 
green, under very pale ; margins red and ciliate. Stipules 
membranous, triangular, ovate, red. Scape erect, stout, 
terete, eight to ten inches high, pilose, two-flowered, male 
and female. Bracts concave, membranous, oblong, obtuse, 
ciliate, rose-red. Peduncles about one inch long. Flowers 
one and three-quarters to two and a half inches in diameter, 
bright cinnabar-red ; male flower largest ; perianth segments 
four, broadly ovate ; stamens very numerous, crowded on a 
slightly elevated torus; filaments filiform; anther broadly 
obovate, obtuse ; female flower, perianth segments five, as in 
the male flower. Ovary green, obcuneate, unequally three- 
winged ; style trifid, lobes bifid, with spiral stigmatic bands ; 
placenta bifid and lobed, the lobes ovuliferous all over. — 
J. I). H. 



Fig. 1. Ovary and style and stigmas. 2. Transverse section of ovary. 
3. Stamen : — all magnified. 



566k, 




"WFitch,del.etlnl 



Tab. 5664 

EPIDEKDBTJM Bbassayoms. 

Brassawla-like Epidendrum. 



A r at. Ord. OscniBEiE. — G-yna^dkia Moxanbkia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4107 .) 



Epibetwrum Brassavolce ; pseudobulbis semifusiformibus compressis di- 
phyllis, foliis oblongis acutis racemo multifloro 2-8-plo brevioribus, 
sepalis petalisque subsequalibus lineari-lanceoiatis acuminatis, labello 
longe cuneato oblongo acuminato lineis tribus per discum carinato, 
androclinii dentibus lateralibus triangulo-semilunatis extus medio 
unidentatis, denti medio spathulato sursum serrulato. Rchb. 

Epibenbbuh Brassavolae. Bclib. in Bot. Zeitung, 1852, p. 738; et in Beitr. 
Orchid. Flora Cent. Amer. p. 36. Lindl. Folia. Bateman in Card. 
Chron. (1867), p. 682. 



This very distinct Epidendrum was discovered by the late 
Mr. Skinner on the mountains of Guatemala, and he it was 
who gave me (in 1865) the plant from which the accom- 
panying figure was obtained. Professor Eeichenbach had pre- 
viously examined wild specimens of the same thing, gathered 
on the volcano of Chiriqui, and these suggested to him the 
very appropriate name of Brassavolw, under which he de- 
scribed it several years ago in a German periodical. But, 
although long known to botanists, I am not aware of the 
species having ever flowered in England before the present 
summer, when a spike made its appearance in the Mexican 
house at Biddulph Grange, in which the quaint form and 
singular colour of its blossoms attracted much attention. It 
grows freely, and will, no doubt, prove to be a popular 
favourite, especially when it has become strong enough to 
produce such copious heads of bloom as those that are pre- 
served in the herbaria. The flowers continue a long time in 
beauty, and, though scentless by day, are agreeably fragrant 
by night. It is most nearly allied to E. jrrismafocarpum, but 
is a far handsomer plant ; nor does it require so much heat 
as that species. 

SEPTEMBER 1ST, 1867. 



Descr. Pseudobidbs compressed, somewhat fusiform, a span 
long, bearing two leaves. Leaves oblong, acute, much 
shorter than the raceme, which is many-flowered, and some- 
times attains the height of from two to three feet. Flowers 
nearly four inches across, arranged in a raceme proceeding 
from a short pointed spathe. Bracts triangular, much 
shorter than the ovaries. Sepals and 'petals nearly equal, 
spread wide open, about two inches long, linear-lanceolate, 
acuminate, of a rich yellowish-brown. Lip not quite so long 
as the petals, oblong, wedge-shaped at the base, acuminate 
at the apex, where it is tipped with a patch of lovely mauve, 
the other portions being straw-colour ; along its disk run two 
or three carinate lines. Column three-toothed, the side 
teeth being triangular and semilunate, while that in front is 
spathulate and serrulate. — J. B. 



Fig. 1. Column. 2 and 3. Pollen-masses: — magnified. 



5665. 




"WfttcKdeLetlith.. 



Ymcent tivoo'ss, 






Tab. 5665. 
erodium macradenium. 

Spotted-Jlowered StorJesbill 



Nat. Ord. Geeaniace^;. — Monadelphia Pestandeia. 

Gen. Char. Flores regulares v. vix irregulares. Sepala 5, imbricate. 
Petala 5, imbricata. Glandulce 5, petalis alternae. Stamina 5, cum stami- 
nodiis totidem anantberis alternata et basi cum iis in tubum connate. 
Ovarium 5-lobum, 5-]oculare, rostratum, rostro in stylum abeunte, ramis 
5 longitudinaliter stigmatosis ; ovula in loculis 2, superposita. Gapsitla 
5-loba ; lobi 1-spermi, ab axi placentifero septifrage dehiscentea, caudis a 
basi ad apicem elastice revolutis. Semina exalbuminosa, cotyledonibus 
plicatis v. flexuosis. — Herbas, rarius suffrutices, ramis sape articulato-no- 
dosis. Folia opposita, altero sape minor e^ v. alterna, den fa fa lobata v. dis- 
sccta. Stipulae membranacece. Pedunculi axillares. Flores sapius umbel- 
lati, rarius solitarii v. 2-ni. 



Erodittm macradenium ; acaule, foliis petiolatis ambitu oblongis pinnati- 
sectis pubescenti-glandulotiis, segmentis pinnatifidis, raehi dentafca, 
peduueulis umbelliferis, involucri foliolis lanceolatis v. ovatis acumi- 
natis, sepalis anguste oblongis longe mucronatis, petalis obovatis, 2 
superioribus paulo minoribus plaga lata purpurea notatis, seminibus 
estriatis. 

Ekodioi niacradeniutn. Llitrit. Goran, f. 1. Gren. et Godr. Fl. France, 
v. I. p. 313. 

Eeodiu.m graveolens. Lapeyr. Hist. PI. Pyren. abregee, p. 390. 

Eeodium glandulosum. Willcl. Sp. PI. v. Z.p. 628. DC. Prodr. v. I. p. 615. 

Geranium glandulosum. Cav. Diss. v. 5. t. 125./. 2. 

Geeats'IUM radicatum. Lapeyr. FL Pyren. v. 1. t. 1. 



There can be little doubt but this charming hardy peren- 
nial plant is the very rare Erodium macradenium, L'herit., 
though it does not agree with the author's character in hav- 
ing acute petals, nor with the descriptions of Willdenow and 
Lapeyrouse, who describe the two spotted petals as larger 
than the others; nor with Willdenow's observation that 
the involucral leaves are linear-lanceolate. Still, the habit 
and all other characters, including the colour of the flower. 
agree so precisely with those of E. macradenium, that it is im- 

SEPTEMBEE 1ST, 1867. 



possible to separate it specifically by the slight and probably 
variable differences above noted. 

E. macradenium is a native of the Pyrenees, where it was 
discovered by Lapeyrouse in 1782, who describes it as being 
remarkable for the extraordinary length and peculiar form 
of the roots, and strong, acrid, penetrating odour of the fo- 
liage. The specimens figured were received from Messrs. 
Backhouse, to whom we are also indebted for living plants 
now flowering in the Royal Gardens. 

Descr. Boot very large, stout, long, tortuous amongst 
rocks, crowned with the ragged bases of the old leaves. Stem 
scarcely any. Leaves crowded near the top of the root, 
spreading, on long petioles, hairy and glandular, one and a 
half to two inches long, oblong in outline, pinnate, the seg- 
ments linear-oblong, pinnatifid ; rachis with a toothed wing. 
Peduncles longer than the leaves, ascending. Flowers um- 
bellate, three-quarters of an inch in diameter. Involueral 
leaves ovate or lanceolate, acuminate. Sepals oblong-linear, 
with a long, subterminal mucro. Petals longer than the 
sepals, obovate ; two upper purple, with a deep black-purple 
horse-shoe spot, and purple veins ; three lower pale purple. — 
J. I). H. 



Fig. 1. Calyx and pistil: — magnified. 



5666. 




W.Fjtd- 



"VmcentBroote '-tx. 



Tab. 5666. 

GEIFEINIA Blumenavia. 

Dr. Blumenaus Griffinia. 



Nat. Ord. Amabyllide^i. — Hexandeia Mokogynia. 

Gen. Char. Perianthium corollinum, superum, tubo brevi cylindrico, 
limbo insequali sub-2-labiato 6-partito, lobo inferiore porrecto. Stamina 6, 
summo tubo inserta, filameutis filiforrnibus, declinatis v. uno assurgente, re- 
bquis declinatis ; antJierce versatiles. Ovarium inferum, 3-loculare ; stylus 
3-sulcus, stipnate indiviso 3-fido v. 3-lobo ; ovula in loculis 2, collateralia. 
Capsula membranacea, 3-sulca, 3-locuIaris. Semina in loculis subsolitaria, 
obovata, erecta, testa ocbroleuca nitida ; embryo axilis. — Herbse Brasilienses, 
oulbo radicali tunicato. Polia pauca, petiolata, ollonga, costato-nervosa. 
Seapus subci/lindrictfs, solidus. JFlores umbellati, spatJia 2-valvi arida. 



(jBIffinia Blumenavia ; foliis subgraciliter petiolatis oblongo-lanceolatis, 
floribus 3 unc. diam., periantliii foliolis oblongo-laneeolatis obtusi,s 
albis, 5 superioribus roseo-venosis, superiore latiore, inferiore angus- 
tiore, stigmate 3-fido, lobis acutiusculis recurvis. 

&MFF1NIA Blumenavia. Koch et Bouehd ex Carriere, in Rev. Horticole, 
1867,^?. 32, cum icone pessima. 



A very charming tropical bulbous plant, discovered by Dr. 
Blumenau at St. Catherine's, Brazil, and sent by him to the 
Berlin Botanic Gardens. It is advertised by Messrs. Haage 
and Schmidt in their catalogue for 1867, and the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, are indebted to Messrs. E. G. Henderson and 
Son for specimens which flowered in April of the present year. 
The figure in the ' Revue Horticole ' is so bad, that it Mould 
have been impossible to have recognized the species by it, and 
as it is, I am indebted to Messrs. Haage and Schmidt for the 
verification of the plant. 

The genus Griffinia seems to be very closely allied to 
Amaryllis, differing conspicuously in the persistent leaves. 
Endlicher describes it as having a stamen ascending, which 
we do not observe in this plant. Herbert, again (on 'Bul- 
bous Plants, 1 p. 228), implies that all are decimate. End- 
licher says the stigma is undivided or obsoletely three-lobed, 
whereas in G. Blumenavia it is three-cleft. 

SEPTEMBER 1.3T. 1S67. 



Descr. Bulb as large as a wild hyacinth, covered with 
brown scales. Leaves numerous, four to five inches long, on 
rather slender petioles, oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, ob- 
scurely nerved in a young state, as figured, ribbed and 
marked with transverse veins when old. Scape erect, six to 
eight inches long, terete, solid. Umbel six- to eight-flowered ; 
spathes membranous. Peduncles one inch long. Perianth 
white, three inches in diameter ; segments oblong-lanceolate, 
obtuse, all but the lowest traversed with fine, broad, pale 
rose-coloured veins; uppermost broadest, lowermost narrow- 
est and pointed. Filaments slender, all declinate ; anthers 
yellow. Stigma trifid, lobes acute. — J, 1). H. 



Fig. 1. Pistil. 2. Transverse section of ovary: — both magnified. 






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5667. 




"Vincent Brooksjmp 



Tab. 5667. 

LiELIA MAJALIS. 

May-flowering Laelia. 



Nat. Ord. OECiiiDEiE. — Gvsatsdeia Monandeia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 158.) 



L.HLIA majalis ; pseudobulbis ovatis vel subrotundis, foliis solitariis coria- 
ceis oblongis, spicis 1- vel rarissime 2-floris subaequalibus, bracteis raem- 
branaceis ovatis, sepalis lanceolatis petalis oblongo-lanoeolatis duplo 
latioribua, labelli lobo medio rofcimdato emargiiiato piano, lateralibus 
parvis obtusis. Lindl. 

L^lia majalis. Batemm, Orchid. Hex. et Guat. t. 23. Sot. Beg. v. 30. t. 
30. Paxton, Mag. v. 12. p. 1. 

Bletta speciosa. Hb. Bonpl. et Kunth, Nov. Gen. et Spec. v. 1. p. 342. 

Hchb. in Walpers' Ann. v. 6. 
Bleth grandiflora. La Llave. 



This magnificent Mexican Orchid has long been known to 
botanists. Hernandez was the first to notice it, and he gives 
it a place by the side of the glorious Tigridia pavonia and a 
Stanhopea (probably S. Martiana) in the singular frontis- 
piece that he prefixed to his work on the natural history of 
New Spain, published about two hundred years ago. Early 
in the present century it caught the eye of Humboldt him- 
self, by whom, or rather by his collaborateur Kunth, it was 
described under the name of Bletia speciosa. Lexaiza, the 
companion of La Llave, subsequently found it growing over 
the whole province of Mechoacan, but failing to identify it 
with Humboldt's plant, published it under the designation 
of B. grandiflora. Later still, when it flowered in Mr. 
Llewelyn's collection at Penllargare, Dr. Lindley, supposing 
it to be a new La?lia, gave it the name of L. majalis, which 
is merely a Latin rendering of the vernacular name, " Flor 
de Mayo," by which the species is known over nearly the 
whole of Mexico, and which of course indicates the usual 
period of its blossoming ; and although the latter name has. 
as regards priority, no right to stand, still, as it has been ac- 
cepted over all Europe, it would scarcely be desirable, even if 
it were possible to disturb it. 
octobee 1st, 1867. 



This Lgelia is no stranger, having been introduced for thirty 
years at least, and I well remember being present at the un- 
packing of a quantity of it that had been brought over on spe- 
culation in 1837 by a M. Deschamps, who was much surprised 
to discover that because a few plants of the species had been 
sold for several guineas a-piece, a cargo of many hundreds 
could not find purchasers at the same rate. But however 
numerous the specimens, none of them survived for more 
than a few years, as was the case with a subsequent importa- 
tion of the same thing by the Horticultural Society. In 
two or three instances, indeed, flowers were produced, but 
they gave a very inadequate notion of the beauty of the 
plant which was not likely to succeed permanently under 
other than cool treatment. It was reserved for Mr. Ander- 
son, gardener to Mr. Dawson of Meadow Bank near Glas- 
gow, to produce flowering specimens fully equal to those 
that the plant sends forth in such rich profusion in its native 
haunts, and which, exhibited at South Kensington in the be- 
ginning of June last, excited much astonishment and admi- 
ration. One of these is represented on the opposite side, 
and its beauty is not in the slightest degree exaggerated in 
Mr. Fitch's drawing, excepting that two flowers are shown 
on a spike as sometimes, though rarely, occurs in the wild 
specimens ; in cultivation it has hitherto produced only so- 
litary flowers, but these were more than a span across. 

Mr. Anderson's plants are accustomed to a rather close 
and warm temperature during the day in summer, but at 
night are kept as cool as possible, while in winter they are 
allowed a decided rest. I apprehend, however, that a cool 
airy and rather dry temperature, — an imitation, in short, of 
the Mexican climate, — will be found at least equally effica- 
cious ; at all events, in such a climate my own plants are 
thriving beautifully, being suspended near the glass on 
branch orchid-pots. 

Descr. Psendobulbs ovate or subrotund, two inches high, 
and bearing solitary, leathery, oblong leaves, which are 
about the length of the Jloivers, i. e. fully a span across. Bracts 
membranaceous, ovate. Spikes short, issuing from apex of 
the bulb, one- or (very rarely) two-flowered. Sepals lanceo- 
late. Petals oblong-lanceolate, twice the width of the 
sepals, and like them of a beautiful rosy -lilac. Lip three- 
lobed, the middle lobe emarginate, rounded, its edges lilac, 
and its centre white with lilac streaks, the side lobes small, 
white inside, with lilac streaks. — J". Bateman. 



Fig 1. Column. 2. Lip: — natural size. 



5668. 




id.etlitli 



= tfssA. 



■t'71£G S~ 



/*//#/* JcA~/A 



Tab. 5668. 

iECHMEA GLOMERATA. 
Crowded-flowered JEchmea. 



Nat. Ord. Bromeliace2e. — Hexakdeia Moxooynia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra. Tab.' 5117.) 



Noumea glomerate; foliis e basi amplexantibus sensim dilatatis late li- 
neari- v. oblongo-ligulatis cuspidatis 8-4 poll, latis viridibus, margine 
spinalis remotiusculis brovibus nigris inferioribus crebrioribus re- 
eurvis ornato, scapo erecto folio longiore ramoso viridi-roseo picto, 
ramis brevibua undique florif'eris, floribus bracteatis dense glomeratis, 
bracteis basi ovatis dein subulatis sepalisque erectis imbricatis san- 
guiueis pungentibus, petalia violaceis acuminatis, ungue apice 2-squa- 
itiato, filamentia flliformibuB. 

Pivonneata glomerata. Gaud. Voy. Bonite, t. 63. 

-llopioPHYTuir augustum, partim. Beer, Die Familie der Bromeliaceen, p. 
136. 



m A native of the province of Bahia, in Brazil, from whence 
living specimens were sent in 1863 by C. Williams, Esq., of 
that city, which flowered in the Palm House of the Royal 
Gardens in March of the present year. It is a most beau- 
tiful plant, easy of cultivation, and is very effective at a 
season when the tropical houses are rather deficient in con- 
spicuous plants. 

This species is exceedingly well figured in the ' Botany of 
the Voyage of the French Frigate Bonite,' a work which is 
unfortunately unaccompanied by descriptive matter ; it there 
bears the generic name of Pivonneava, which is probably 
synonymous with Beer's Hoplophytum, founded on a group of 
Achmeas with rigid spinescent foliage, branched inflores- 
cence, an ovoid ovary crowned with the subulate calyx-teeth, 
^n almost closed perianth, and erect petals. 

Beer, in the above-quoted work, confounds this with the 
#• augustam {Tillandsia augusta, Arrab. Fl. Flum. t. 135), a 
Pfant with woollv inflorescence, and much smaller flowers, 
according to the figure. 

OCTOBER 1st. 1867." \ 



Dbscr. Quite glabrous. Stem simple, or branched at the 
base only. Leaves spreading on all sides, one to two and 
a half feet long, four to six inches broad, linear oblong, 
rounded at the apex, with a cuspidate point; beset along the 
margin with short, rather distant, black spines, those on the 
lower part recurved and closer-set, dull green, not glaucous 
nor shining, nerveless, concave below 7 , not thick in texture. 
Scape stout, erect, six to eight inches high, bearing a bril- 
liantly coloured blood-red branched panicle, of large bracts 
studded with small violet flow r ers ; rachis green, tinged witli 
red ; floriferous branches short, thick, forming with the 
dense bracts broadly ovoid masses. Bracts rather longer 
than the flowers, subsquarrose, ovate, with long subulate 
pungent apices. Calyx-lobes ovate, acuminate, pungent. 
Petals twice as long, violet ; blade linear-oblong, with re- 
curved acuminate apex, the claw with two scales at the 
junction with the blade. Filaments filiform ; anthers linear. 
Stigma subclavate, with a twisted apex. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Flower. 2. Petal and stamens. 3. Ovary, style, and stigma : — 
all magnified. 



>B69. 




Tab. 5669. 

BOKDELETIA Purdiei. 

Mr. Purdie s Rondel eti a. 



Nat. Ord. Rubiace^.— Pen-tatn'dria Monooyxia. 

Gen. Char. Calycis tubus subglobosus ; limbus 4-5-partitus, lobis ob- 
longis linearibusve acutis persistentibus. Corolla tubus cylindricus, limbo 
patenti 4-5-fido, lobis subrotundatis. Stamina 4-5 ; anthers fauce calyeia 
msertae, sessiles. inclusie. Discus tumidus. Ovarium 2-loculnre ; stylus 
filiformis, stigraate 2-fido ; ovula numerosa, placentis septo aduatis affiza. 
Capsida globosa, calycis limbo coronata, 2-locularis, ab apice ad basin loculi- 
cide v. septicide in valvas 2 apice fissis dehiscens, polysperma. Semina 
minima, angulata, 2 v. plura perfecta. — Frutices v. arbuscula> America? tro- 
picae incol/z. Folia sessilia v. pctiolata. Stipube inirrpctiolarrs, deltoidea 
v. Uneari-lanceolatfS. Flores inter minores, in pedttnculos axillares 3-cho- 
tomos paniculasve tape multifloras terminates disposili. 



Eondeletia Purdiei ; ramulis et iuflorescentia subsericeo-puberulis, foliis 
ovato-oblongis obtusiusculis in petiolum brevem angustatis v. basi 
contracta cordata utrinque glaberrimis v. subtus ad nervos puberulis, 
nervis plurhnis, stipulis deltoideis, floribus iu corymbos terminales 
densifloros 3-cbotome ramosos dispositis 4-5-meris Juris, calycis lobis 
subulato-lanceolatis tubo subaequi longis, corolla? flava? lobis glabris, 
fauce aunulo tumido 5-lobo aucto. 



A very charming and fragrant hothouse shrub, a native of 
various parts of Venezuela and New Granada, and intro- 
duced into the Royal Gardens, upwards of twenty ypars ago, 
by Mr. Purdie, an eminent collector for the establishment. 
who was afterwards Curator of the Botanic Garden at Tri- 
nidad. Mr. Purdie sent it from the province of St. Martha, 
where it has been also collected by Goudot and by Schlim 
(n. 17 and 926), and the same plant has been found in 
Venezuela by Fendler (n. 586). 

As a species it is well marked by the obtuse leaves, which 
are suddenly contracted to a narrow base, their numerous 
oblique veins, and the large corymbs of yellow flowers ; the 
mouth of whose corolla is surrounded by a thickened ring. 
It is a free flowerer, and very fragrant. 
OCTOBER 1st, 1867. 



Descr. A slender shrub, with almost silky pubescent 
branchlets and inflorescence. Leaves three to eight inches 
long, ovate-oblong or almost oblong-lanceolate but obtuse, 
narrowed at the base into the very short petiole, or suddenly 
(in the larger lower leaves) terminating in a small cordate 
base, glabrous and deep green above, with a red midrib ; pale 
and usually glabrous below, with many (sometimes ten to 
fourteen) oblique nerves on each side the costa. Stipules 
triangular, silky-pubescent. Mowers small, half an inch 
long, crowded in terminal and axillary rounded corymbs, pale 
yellow, fragrant. Calyx-lobes as long as the tube, subulate- 
lanceolate. Corolla with a thickened ring at the throat. — ■ 
J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Flower: — magnified. 



5670. 




^^ 



id.etlek 






Tab. 5670. 

THAPSIA decipiens. 

Madeiran Tliapsia. 



Nat. Ord. Umbelliferje. — Pextandkia Dic.ynia. 

Gen, Char. Calycis dentes inconspicui. Petala cuneato-obovata, apicc in- 
nexa, Integra v. ob costam impressam 2-fida. Discus depressus v. explanatus, 
stylopodiis variis. Fructus oblongus, a dorso compressus, carpellis dorso 
leviter convexis 2-alatis ; juga primaria filiformia, asqualia, obtusa, latoralia 
inter alas juxta commissuram sita, secundaria dorsalia primariis coafbrmia, 
Jateralia in alas latas cum plaga commissurali continuas expansa ; vitta sub 
jugis secundariis v. omnibus solitaria?. Carpopkorum 2-partitum. Semen 
com plan atum. — Herba3 Mediterranean et Madeirenae«,jwett«tf* v. bietmee, 
sapius elatce, caudice nunc valde elongato frutescentes. Folia pinnatim de- 
composita, segmentis inciso-pinnatijidis. Umbella; comjyositce, muUiradiatce. 
Jnvolucrum saepius 0; involucellorum bract cae paucm parv<e 9, 0. Florea 
flavicantes, sordide albi x. purpHrascentes. 



Thapsia dccipiens ; caule nudo erecto gracili simplici annulato apice f'o- 
lioso, foliis 2-3-pinnatisectis, segmentis ovatis ovato-lauceolatusve in- 
eiso-serratis nunc lobulatis, petiolis rachi costaque subtus tomentosia, 
umbcllis in panicalas elatas ramosaa dispositis pubesceutibu^, involu- 
cri foliolis 10-12 oblongis inciso-serratis v. pinnatiseetis, carpellorum 
alia serratis. 

Selinuk decipieus. Schrad. et Wendl. Sert. Ham. v. 3. p. 23. t. 18. 

Melanoselinum decipiens. Hoffm. TJmb. ed. 2. v. I. p. l5G,exI)C. Frodr. 
v. 4*. p. 208. Lowe, Manual of Flora of Madeira, p. 862. 



This is one of the most remarkable Umbelliferous plants 
in cultivation, and though of little beauty as regards inflo- 
rescence, is in habit and foliage an extremely elegant and 
graceful plant. Unlike its congener, it has a slender, erect, 
annulate, palm-like stem, two to four or even six feet high, 
and half to one inch in diameter, bearing at the top a splen- 
did waving crown, three to four feet across, of two to three 
pinnatisect leaves. It is a native of rocky gorges in the 
island of Madeira, where it was first brought to light, in 
1829, by the Rev. R. T. Lowe, M.A.. the distinguished in- 
vestigator of the natural history of the Madeira, Canarian, 



'6 l 
octobee 1st, 18G7. 



and Cape cle Verde Islands. Curiously enough, however, it 
had been for many years previously in cultivation under the 
name of Bubon Galbannm (a totally different and Persian 
plant), owing to which mistake De Candolle gave it the spe- 
cific name of decipiens. 

The Rev. Mr. Lowe describes the T. decipiens as a magni- 
ficent, palm-like Umbellifer, exuding, when cut or bruised, 
a copious, fragrant gum or resin, smelling of spirits of tur- 
pentine and carrots, and having fragrant flowers also. He 
adds that it is usually biennial, dying altogether after flower- 
ing ; but sometimes the paniculate inflorescence alone dies, 
and the plant becomes branched. 

The specimen here figured flowered in the succulent house 
of the lloyal Gardens in April of the present year. It has 
perfected seeds since the drawing was made. — J. J). H. 



Fig. 1. Reduced figure of the entire plant. 2. Portion of flowering 
panicle. 3. Ditto of leaf. 4. Flower. 5. Imperfect ditto at base of 
umbel. 6. Fruit. 7. Ditto. S. Transverse section of unripe ditto : — ell 
magnified, except 2, 3, and 6, which are ofnat. size. 



5671 




- 



Tab. 5671. 

EPIMEDITJM alpinum; var. rubrum. 

Hell-flowered Barren-wort. 



-Nat. Ord. Bekberide^e. — Tetrandria Moxogyxia. 

Oen.^ CJmr. Sepala 8, petaloidea, plana, exterioribus minoribus minusque 
coloratis, et petala 4 nectariformia cucmllata v. calcarata 4-fariam super- 
posita. Stamina 4, libera ; antherse valvulis 2 sursum dehiscentes. Car- 
pellum 1, stigmate parum dilatato ; ovula co, juxta suturam ventralem 2- 
seriiilia. Capsula siliqureformis, 2-valvis, valva e'orsali minore decidun. m:i- 
jorem placentiferam nudaute. Semina pauca, raphe ariilrcformi ; embryo 
leviter ineurvus. — Herbae Europse et Asia? temperatae incohe, rUzomate re- 
pente. Folia pinnatim semel lisve 3-secta,folio7is denticulatis, caul ina 1-2. 
-Kaeemi simplices v. subramosi, terminales v. oppositifolii. Flores varie 
color at i. 



-CiPiMEDirM alpinum ; sparse gland uloso-pilosum, foliis radicalibus v. cau- 
linis 2-ternatis, foliolis ovato-cordatis acuminatis ciliolato-serratis, se- 
palis concavis obtusis, petalis interioribus cucullatis in calcar horizon- 
tale petalum exterius subscquans productis, antheris linearibus apicu- 
latis filamentis brevibus. 

var. rubrum; foliis rubro-marginatis, petalis exterioribus rubris. 

Epimedium rubrum. Morren in Journ. d'Hort. 1844. Begel in Ind. Sem. 
Rort. Petrop. 185G, p. 33. Gartenflom, 1857, p. 21. 



A very elegant, hardy, herbaceous plant, equally suited 
for the shady border or rockwork, and for early greenhouse 
decoration. Originally introduced into the St. Petersburg 
Gardens, from Japan, in 1844, and since cultivated in various 
establishments. The specimen here figured has flowered in 
the Royal Gardens in April and May for several years past. 
I find no character whatever, except the rather larger size and 
the red colour of the flowers, by which it may be distin- 
guished from the well-known reddish-yellow-flowered Epi- 
medium alpinum, a plant of which no detailed description is 
required. 

It is very much to be desired that plants of the habit of 
growth of that here figured should be more extensively culti- 
vated. Their forms are peculiarly graceful, and suited for 
pot-culture and table-decoration; their bright foliage i> 

OCTOBER 1.8T, lSb'7. 



rigid, and retains its appearance uninjured for weeks, whe- 
ther in-doors or out-of-doors, and nothing can exceed the de- 
licate grace of the panicle of nodding flowers. There are 
several other species of Epimedhim equally deserving of cul- 
ture, as E. macranthum, E. Musschianum (Tab. nostr. 3745), 
E. pinnatum (Tab. 4456), E. violaceum (Tab. 3791), and E. 
difhyllum (Tab. 3448). All are hardy, all suited for deco- 
ration, and a collection of half-a-dozen of the spring-flower- 
ing species, brought forward into flower at the same time by 
a skilful gardener, would deservedly command a high award 
at any horticultural exhibition. — J. J). H. 



Fig. 1. Inner petal. 2. Ovary. 3. Stamen: — all magnified. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE ADVERTISER. 



HYACINTHS AND OTHEE DUTCH BULBS. 

WILLIAM CUTBUSH and SON beg to announce that their Catalogue of the above 

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SUTTON'S COMPLETE COLLECTIONS OF FLOWER-ROOTS, 

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FOR POTS AND GLASSES . FOR O pEN GROUND 



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'" cl ude all the Varieties so much admired at the Spring Shows. Price 12*. per dozen, or £4. 4s. per hundred. 

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5672 




Flower i Nat. Size 



W i i' h li i el teh 



Vincent Brooks. Imp 



Tab. 5672. 

ARISTOLOCHIA Goldieana. 
The Rev. H. Goldie's Aristoloehia. 



Nat. Orel. Aristolochie.*;.— Gynandbia Hexandiua. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5295.) 



Aristolochia Goldieana; glaberriina, foliia ovato- v. triangulari-cordatis 
acuminatis, basi prof'unde exsculptis, floribus maximis, periantkii re- 
f'racti utriculo elongato subclavato, limbo infundibuliformi-campanu- 
Iato, ore ampliato truncato obtuse 3-lobo, lobis caudato-acumiuatis, 
staminibus ad 24, colmnuae lobis ad 12 2-cruribus. 

Aristolochia Goldieana. Nob. in Trans. Linn. Soc. v. 25. p. 185. t. xir. 



South America has hitherto been considered the head- 
quarters of the gigantic flowers Aristolochias, so well known 
in the stoves of the gardens of the curious for the fine 
colouring of their perianth and their atrocious odour. Of 
these, Humboldt, upwards of half a century ago, published 
an account of one (A. grandiflora, Tab. nostr. 4368-9) whose 
flowers were worn on the head by the Indian children, and 
which has often been quoted as (excepting perhaps the Eafflesia 
Arnoldii) the largest flowered plant hitherto known. How- 
ever this may be, the American Aristolochias are eclipsed by 
the discovery of the present plant, of which specimens, pre- 
served in alcohol, were communicated to me, in 1864, by the 
Rev. W. C. Thomson, from the mouth of the Old Calabar 
river, and which I described and figured in the ' Linnean 
Transactions ' above quoted, and named, in accordance with 
Mr. Thomson's wish, after his fellow-labourer, the Rev. Hugh 
Gfoldie, of the United Presbyterian Missionary Society. 

The merit of flowering A. Goldieana is due to Mr. Clarke, 
the zealous and intelligent Curator of the Glasgow Botanic 
Gardens, who received living specimens from his active cor- 
respondent Mr. Thomson, and flowered a plant of it in July 
of the present year, and the blossom of which he kindly 
transmitted to the Magazine for figuring. 

NOTJSMBEB l.ST, 1^(17, 



Aristolochia Goldieana differs from all its numerous con- 
geners, except two others, also West African species, in the 
number of stamens, which are about twenty-four, six being 
the normal number in the genus ; also, in the three-lobed 
perianth, and in the twelve bifid stigmatic lobes of the 
column. It has also been gathered in forests near Elugu, by 
the Bishop of Sierra Leone, who, in 1859, gave specimens to 
the late Mr. Barter, the Botanist to Baikie's Niger Expedi- 
tion, and which are preserved in the Hookerian Herbarium. 
It was also found at Sierra Leone by G. Mann. Its odour of 
putrid meat is as offensive as that of the Brazilian species. — 



I greatly regret having to reduce the figure to one-half its natural size 
to make it available for the Magazine, — the flower drawn having measured 
26 by 11 inches. 

Fig. 1. Portion of stem and leaf : — natural size. 2. Vertical section of 
side of perianth, showing the colour of stamens and stigmas : — magnified. 






56ft 







•*V>> 








"Vincent Brooks, in - -?- 



Tab. 5673. 
LILIUM Leichtlinii. 
Max LeichtUn's Lily. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^;.— Hexandeia Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5838.) 



Luium Leichtlinii ; caule 2-3-pedali gracili glaberrimo 1-floro, foliis alternis 
sparsis lineari-lanceolatis 3-4 poll, longis \ poll, latis acufcis sessilibus 
subenerviis ima basi ad insertionem utrinque pilosulis v. villosulis, 
nore nutante 4 poll, diametro, perianthii foliolis e basi oblonga lanceo- 
Jatis obtusis revolutis, exterioribus angustioribus, interioribus basin ver- 
sus 2-cristatis 2-carinatisve eristis carinisve pubescentibus, omnibus 
aureis purpureo-maculatis, filamentis stramineis, antheris brunneis. 



Bulbs of this charming Lily were received by Messrs. Veitch 
and Sons from Japan, along with those of L. auratuni, and com- 
municated to me for determination in July of the present 
year. Though resembling in some respects L. tigriniim in 
the form of the flower, it differs from that plant, not only in 
colour, but in the graceful habit, scattered leaves, and crested 
inner segments of the perianth. From the prince of the 
genus, L. auratum, which in some respects it approaches, it 
differs both in the colour and form of the perianth-leaves, 
and in wanting the long processes on these which L. auratum 
bears. 

I have named this plant after a zealous cultivator of the 
genus, to whom the Royal Gardens are indebted for various 
rare species, M. Max Leichtlin, o£ Carlsruhe, a gentleman 
who is especially devoting himself to the elucidation, by 
culture, of the numerous species and races of this noble 
genus of bulbous plants. 

Desck. Stem tall, slender, two to three feet high, te- 
rete, glabrous, except where the leaf joins the stem at each 
side, where a few long hairs appear. Leaves alternate, ses- 
sile, rather remote, linear-lanceolate, acute, spreading and 
recurved, three to four inches long by a quarter of an inch 

NOVEMBER 1 ST, 1SG7. 



broad, pale bright green ; nerves obscure. Flowers solitary 
in our specimens, nodding, four inches in diameter, pale 
golden-yellow, spotted with small oblong blotches of clear 
red-purple, or maroon-brown. Perianth segments revolute, 
outer narrower, with two keeled pubescent ridges from below 
the middle to the base ; inner segments broader, one inch 
across, the ridges dilating into irregularly-toothed crests on 
the disk below the middle. Filaments straw-coloured, long, 
curved ; anthers yellow brown or purplish, half an inch long. 
Style and stigma yellow. — J. J). H. 



5674. 







"VOitck.deletMi 



"Vincent Brooks Imp 



Tab. 5074 

CCELOGYNE humilis. 

Dwarf Pleione. 

Nat. Ord. Okchidejk. — Gtnandria MokasdbU. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 5462.) 



CffiLoar^E (Pleione) humilis; pseudobulbis lagenseformibus, bracfcea ob- 
longo-lanceolata petaloidea ovavio longiore demum retraeta, pedunculo 
denudato, sepalis petalisque lineari-lanceobtis patentibus planis, la- 
bello ciliato emarginato, lineis 6 fimbriates disrautibus venis totidem 
coloratis interjectis. Lindl. 

Pleione humilis. Don, Fl. UTep. p. X7. Paxt. Fl. Qard. t. 51. Zemerire, 
Jard. Fl p. 158, 



This pretty Pleione, although long since introduced and 
figured, had been lost to the country for many years; no 
doubt through inattention to its habits and constitution. 
Fortunately a fresh supply of plants was recently obtained 
(through Dr. Anderson, of the Calcutta Botanic Gardens) 
from Sikkim by the Royal Gardens at Kew, and it was here 
that the one represented in the Plate flowered last winter. 
Tt is quite a mountain plant, having been found on the Indian 
Alps, in Nepal, Sikkim, and Bhotan, at an elevation of seven 
to eight thousand feet, growing among moss in shady places, 
and even on the trunks of trees. Dr. Hooker met with se- 
veral varieties during his travels in the Himalaya, where this 
and other species take the place of our autumn Crocuses, 
throwing up masses of gay flowers after the leaves have dis- 
appeared. Excepting Ccelogyne metadata, which is found two 
thousand feet lower, all the Pleione section of Ccelogyne arc 
easily cultivated in the shadiest part of the coolest house ; 
and they form a most interesting group, to which other fine 
species, not yet introduced, will, I trust, ere long be added. 
They require to be grown in a pot. 

Descb. Pseudohulbs in the form of bottle-flasks, from one to 

XOVEMBEK 1st. 1867. 



two inches long, of a dark purplish-green, crowned with soli- 
tary, narrow, and rather long acuminate dark green leaves. 
Peduncle one-flowered, at first enclosed in a pale violet bract, 
which afterwards shrivels up and leaves the peduncle naked. 
Sepals and petals open, linear-lanceolate, smooth and even at 
edges, white faintly tinted with rose. Lip fringed in its 
upper portion, emarginate, of the same colour as the petals, 
except where it is traversed by six parallel veins (that are 
also fringed), and between each of which rich crimson streaks 
are interposed. Column clavate, distinctly adnate to the 
base of the lip, of which it is not much more than half the 
length. — /. B. 



Fig. 1. Lip spread out. 2. Side view of column and ovary. 3. Front 
view of ditto. 4, 5. Pollen masses : — all more or less magnified. 



5675 




Pitch del. et lith 



Vincent Brooks. Inip 



Tab. 5675. 

BEGONIA Clarkei. 

Major Trevor Clarke's Begonia. 



Nat. Ord. Beciontaceje. — Mojkecia Poeyandbia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4131.) 



Begonia (§ Huszia) Clarkei; caulescens, caule erecto robusto puberulo 
colorato parce ramoso, foliis oblique rotundato-eordatis obtusis lobu- 
lars et crenatis nervis radiantibus ciliolatis, superne pallide viridibus, 
nervis subtus prominulis, stipulia late triangularibus, pedunculis ro- 
bustis axillaribus 2-bracteatis 2-floris, pedicellis 2-bracteolatis, bracteis 
bracteolisque late oblongis obtusis, floribus amplis la3te roseis, ? 5- 
petalis. 

Begonia Clarkei. Nob. supra, sub Tab. 5663. 



I have already stated with regard to this lovely Begonia, 
under the description of B. Veitchii, that I had, from imper- 
fect specimens, regarded it as a form of the latter plant. A 
fine-flowering specimen, sent by Major Clarke to the Royal 
Gardens, shows a considerable difference between them, and 
enables me to give a figure of it here. From a comparison of 
this with Tab. 5663 (B. Veitchii), it will be seen that the pre- 
sent differs in being a caulescent, branched, pubescent but 
not pilose plant, with purple stem and branches, large opaque 
foliage, axillary peduncles, and larger, deep rose-coloured 
flowers. 

B. Clarkei is probably a native of a wanner region than 
B. Veitchii, and, as Major Clarke assures me, requires the 
temperature of a warm greenhouse. This gentleman had 
possessed the specimens here figured for several years before 
flowering it, and received it from Messrs. Henderson as a 
native of Peru. This is apparently the same as a plant gath- 
ered by Mandon, near Sorata, in the Bolivian Andes, at an 
elevation of eight to nine thousand feet, of which specimens, 
without name, are preserved in the Hookerian Herbarium. 
Whether this and B. Veitchii, together with another allied to 



NOVEMBER 1ST, 1S6J. 



it from the same country, and hitherto unpublished, will 
eventually prove wholly distinct, is, 1 think, doubtful ; they 
will probably be extensively hybridized, and thus blended for 
all but horticultural purposes. 

Descr. A tall succulent herb, two feet high. Rhizome 
stout. Stem pubescent, as thick as the little finger, purplish. 
Leaves six to eight inches in diameter, obliquely orbicular- 
cordate, obtuse, lobulate and crenate, pubescent, dull green 
above, nerves radiating ; petioles stout, three to five inches 
long. Peduncles axillary, stout, longer than the petioles, 
bibracteate at the middle, two-flowered ; pedicels slender ; 
bracts and bracteoles one-third to two-thirds of an inch long, 
pale, oblong, obtuse, ciliate. Flowers two to two and a hall 
inches in diameter. Female perianth five-peltated, blight 
rose-red ; petals obovate retuse or emarginate. Styles three, 
bifid, the arms twisted and surrounded with a spiral, papillose 
band. Ovary three-lobed, with two short wings, and the third 
produced into a wedge-shaped form. Placenta bifid, the seg- 
ments lobed and covered evervwhere with ovules. — /, D. II. 



Fig. 1. Transverse section of ovary, — magnified. 



S676. 




*W Fitch, del etkth 



Vincent Brooks. Imp 



Tab. 5676. 

CYMBIDIUM Huttoni. 

Mr. Muttons Cymbidium. 



Nat. Ord. Oechide^;. — Gtnandbia Monandbia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 5457.) 



Ctmblditjm Huttoni; pseudobulbis aggregatis ampullaceo-ovoideis cora- 
pressis suleatia basi vaginatis, foliis 2-nis anguste oblongia obtusis 
crasse coriaceis enerviis lsete viridibus, scapo radicali brevi, squamis 
paucis brevibus late triangularibus, racemo ad 10-flore, sepalis late 
oboyato-oblongis recurvis acuminatis intus labellique lobo intermedio 
fasciis brevibus brunneis creberrime transverse notatis, petalis minori- 
bus recurvis intus brunneis, labelli lobis lateralibus erectis obtusis 
longitudinaliter faseiatis intermedio breviter oblongo, columna elon- 
gata semiterete. 



At first sight this remarkable plant does not much resemble 
a Cymbidium, but after a careful consideration and comparison 
with the hitherto published species of this genus I see no 
reason to separate it : the structure and form of the pollinia 
and their gland is the same, as are the essential characters of 
the column and perianth ; the very coriaceous nerveless leaves 
are to be found in C. tigrinum (Tab. nostr. 5457), but the 
very broad perianth-segments and their colour are unique in 
the genus in so far as I know it. 

C Huttoni is a native of Java, and is named after its dis- 
coverer, Mr. Henry Hutton (at the request of Messrs. Veitch). 
in commemoration of his zealous services and early death. 
Mr. Hutton, a most ardent student and promising collector 
(son of the Mr. H. Hutton, head gardener to the Eight Ho- 
nourable Lord Houghton), was sent to the East by the Messrs. 
Ve itch, and after twelve months' residence in Java, when, as 
was hoped, he had become inured to the climate, he fell a 
victim to his enthusiasm. The plant which commemorates 
nis services flowered with Messrs. Veitch in June of the pre- 
sent year. 

NOVEMBEE 1ST, 1867. 



Descr. Pseudobulbs three to five inches long, elongate 
ovoid, with straight sides, compressed, grooved, green, 
sheathed to above the middle. Leaves in pairs, six to eight 
inches long, two to two and a half inches broad, narrow ob- 
long, obtnse, very coriaceous, nerveless, dark green. Scape 
from the base of the pseudobulbs, stout, curved with a few 
distant, short, triangular, appressed scales. Baceme about 
ten-flowered, pendulous, six to eight inches long. Flowers 
shortly pedicelled, an inch and a half in diameter. Bracts 
small. Perianth ringent. Sepals recurved, obovate, acumi- 
nate, pale brown externally, internally studded with trans- 
verse, small, short, chocolate streaks or blotches. Petals 
smaller, but similar in form and direction, dark chocolate in- 
side. Lip subsessile, lateral lobes erect, obtuse, greenish, 
striped with chocolate ; middle lobe oblong, acute, banded on 
each side of the median line, like the sepals, but darker. 
Column long, semiterete. Pollen-gland bicuspidate. — J. P. H. 



Fig. 1. Lip. 2. Column. 3, 4. Pollen : — all magnified. 



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;,(>. 










Tab. 5677. 

CALCEOLARIA pisacomensis. 

Orange-red Calceolaria. 



Nat. Ord. Scrophulahine^:.— Diandria Monogynia. 
Gen. Char. (Vide supra, Tab. 4929.) 



^alceolarta pisacomensis ; caule robusto stricto erecto superne ramis 
et inflorescentia pubescentibus v. furfuraceo-tomentellis, foliis breviter 
petiolatis ovatis obtusis, marginibus recurvis grosse irregulariter 
crenatis supra rugosis minute scabcrulis, subtus glanduloso-pubescen- 
tibus, cymis in axillis superioribus suberectis umbellatim multifloris, 
noribus erectis gracile pedicellatis, calycis lobis late ovatis subacutis, 
corolla? rubro-aurantiaca; labio superiore parvo margine refleio, 
mferiore magno adscendente calceiformi, antice sublobulato. 

Calceolaria pisacomensis. Meyen, Reise um die JErde, v. 1. p. 469. Walp. 
in Nov. Act. Acad. Nat. Cur. xix. Suppl. v. l.p. 396. Hep. v. 111. p. 162. 



This is certainly the handsomest Calceolaria that has been 
introduced for many years ; and though, owing to its siy.e. 
Probably unsuited for bedding-out in masses, its robust habit, 
copious flowers, and beautiful colouring cannot fail to recom- 
mend it as one of the choicest recent contributions to the 
flower-garden. It was imported from Peru by Messrs. Veitch 
and Sons, through their indefatigable and successful collector, 
Mi'. Pearce, and was originally discovered by the distin- 
guished traveller Meyen, near Arequipa, in Peru. The 
specimen here figured flowered in Messrs. Veitch 's Nursery in 
August of the present year. 

It is very much to be desired that the accession of such 
fine plants as this would induce cultivators to turn their 
attention to the extensive genera to which they belong, witli 
the view not only of procuring new species, but of recover- 
ing some of their many beautiful once-cultivated con- 
geners. No less than twenty-three handsome species of Cal- 
ceolaria are figured in this Magazine, all from specimens once 
living in England ; probably not half-a-dozen of these now 
exist in any one collection. * Kew ought to possess all, and 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1S67. 



will, I hope, recover some ; but it is obviously impossible for 
any single establishment to afford time, space, and labour to 
cultivate everything worth keeping, greatly as it is to be 
desired ; it is to local institutions and private establishments 
that we must look for special collections ; and if more ot the 
latter would, instead of aiming at all the novelties of the 
day, strive to form complete collections of certain classes of 
ornamental plants, the number of these would be greatly 
increased, and science as well as horticulture be benefited 
accordingly. 

Descr. A tall, stout, erect perennial. Stems glabrous 
below, pubescent or subtomentose above, obtusely quadran- 
gular. Leaves one to two inches long, subsessile, ovate-cor- 
date, obtuse ; margins recurved, coarsely irregularly crenate, 
minutely scabrous above, glandular-pilose below. Cymes very 
numerous in all the upper axils, suberect, umbellate, many- 
flowered. Flowers on slender pedicels, of a rich orange- 
yellow, passing into bright orange-red. Calyx lobes broadly 
ovate. Upper lip of corolla small, reflexed; lower large, 
ascending, slipper-shaped, obscurely iobed in front. — /. D> -"• 



Fig. 1. Stem and branch. 2. Flower: — magnified. 



56) 8 




Tab. 5678. 
NYCTOCALOS Thomsoxi. 

Assamese Nyctocalos. 



Nat. Ord. Bignoniace^e. — Didynamia Angiospermia. 

Gen. Char. Calyx parvulus, subcampanulatus, extus infra os sequaliter 
o-dentatus. Corolla elongato-infundibuliformis, tubo tereti leviter 
arcuato; lobi 5, subsequales v. inferiore majore, lati, imbricati. Stamina 
4, cam rudimento subulato quiuti, fauce tubi corollse inserta, didynama, 
inclusa, filamentis filiform i-subulatis ; antherce loculis divaricatis ab apice 
connectivi apiculati pendulis. Discus annularis. Ovarium breviter 
stipitatum, 2-loculare ; stylus elongatus, filiformis, stigmate 2-lamellato ; 
ovula numerosa, placentis secus marginea septi affixis sub-2-seriatim inserta. 
Capsula lanceolata, plana, septifraga, valvis medio carinatis crasse coriaceis. 
uemina . . . . — Frutiees alte scandentes, glabri. Folia opposifa, 3-jfbliolafa, 
joliolis integerrimis. Flores speciosi, in cymas longe pedunculatas dispositi. 



Ni'Ctocalos Thomson* j foliolis ovato- v. oblongo-lanceolatis longe acumi- 
natis, pedunculis terminalibus, floribus 7-pollicaribus albis. 



We have long had in the Herbarium specimens of this 
very handsome Bignoniaceous plant, which differs wholly in 
habit from any Asiatic genus hitherto described, and were 
gathered on the Miku hills, near Gowahatty, in Assam, by 
Mr. Simons. It was not, however, till about six years ago 
that living plants were received from Dr. Thomson, F.RS., 
then Superintendent of the Calcutta Botanic Garden, and these 
have flowered during the present year in the Victoria House, 
at Kew. Though differing in having four stamens instead of 
five, and these didynamous, it is no doubt a species of the 
Javanese genus Nyctocalos, of Teijsman and Binnendyk, first 
published in Miquels ' Journal de Botanique ' (vol. i. p. 366), 
and figured in 1863 by the same author in his great folio 
work, ' Choix des Plantes Rares ou Nouvelles Cultivees et 
Dessinees dans le Jardin Botanique de Buitcnzorg.' The 
Assam species resembles the Javanese entirely in foliage, 
but has much larger and terminal white flowers, those of 
N. brunsfekin-florns being only three inches long, of a 
pale pinkish-purple, and disposed in axillary cymes. The 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1SG7. 



regular corolla and five equal stamens attributed to the 
Javanese plant are characters which we should like to see 
confirmed. 

Descr. A tall, glabrous climber ; branches slender, terete 
Leaflets four to six inches long, petiolulate, ovate- or oblong- 
lanceolate, long-acuminate, membranous, flowers erect, in 
short, four- to five-flowered cymes, which are borne on 
slender, terminal, pendulous peduncles as long as the flowers 
themselves. Pedicels short, thick, with minute acute 
bracteoles. Calyx green, with five red-brown teeth on the 
outside below the margin. Corolla seven inches long, pure 
white, expanding at night and dropping next morning ; lobes 
five, very broad and obtuse or retuse, two upper smaller, 
approximate, lower largest and two-lobed. Anthers yellow. 
Pod six inches long and two inches broad, quite flat.— =-*7i D. II 



Fig. 1. Portion of corolla and stamens. 2. Calyx, cut open and showing 
the ovary. 3. Transverse section of ovary. 4. Pod : — all but Fi'j. 4 
magnified. 



i679. 




"Vincent Brook 



Tab. 5679. 
DENDEOBIUM Benson. 

Mrs. Benson 's Bendrobe. 



Nat. Oi-d. Okchidej;. — Gtnanbria Monanbeia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4755.) 



-Uendkobium Bensonice ; oaulibus suberectis striatia (floriferis aphyllis) 
teretiusculis, nodis non tumidis, folds linearibus acutia emarginatisve, 
floribus ad nodos solitariis v. in pedunculis 2-3-iIoris dispositis, 
bracteis minutis acutis, sepalis oblongo-lanceolatis obtusis albis, 
petalis late oblongo-rotundatis albis, labello orbiculato concavo inte^ro 
albo, disco tomentoso lsete aureo maculis 2 purpureis basin versus 
notato, marginibus denticulatis. 



This beautiful plant belongs to a puzzling set of Den- 
drobcs. natives of the Malayan peninsula, Burma, and Assam, 
of which I). Bierardi (Tab. 2584) is the oldest known 
member, and I), crcpidatum (Tab. 4993 et 5011), B. nodatum 
(Tab. 5470), and I). Bullerianum (Tab. 5652), more recently 
discovered members. To the B. nodatum the present is, indeed, 
most closely allied, but differs in the much larger flowers, 
broader petals, and orbicular labellum, which is rounded at 
the apex. That intermediate forms, connecting some of these 
together and with others, will be found, cannot be doubted ; 
meanwhile, as objects of cultivation they differ materially, 
and it is most important that they should be well figured 
for ulterior botanical purposes. 

B. Bensonice is a native of Moulmein, and was sent to 
Messrs. Veitch by an indefatigable collector and horti- 
culturist, Colonel Benson, after whose lady it is named at 
his own request. Along with it Colonel Benson has sent, as 
a smaller form, a plant with more acute petals and sepals, 
and a tendency to have a pointed lip ; this is probably refer- 
able to B. nodatum. 

Descr. Stems tufted, one to three feet long, suberect and 
pendulous, terete, nodes not tumid, internodes one inch long, 

BECEUBEK 1st, 1S07. 



concealed by the membranous sheath. Leaves few, on sepa- 
rate stems from the flower, linear, acute or emarginate, two 
to three inches long, one-third of an inch broad, keeled. 
Flower produced at the joints, usually two or three on a 
common peduncle, rarely solitary ; bracts and bracteoles very 
small, acute, pale green, as are the peduncles and pedicels. 
Flowers two inches in diameter, snow-white, except the lip, 
which has a broad, deep golden-yellow disk, and two purple 
spots near the base. Sepals oblong, obtuse. Petals much 
broader, almost orbicular. Lip orbicular, contracted to a 
short, convolute neck; edges denticulate, surface concave, 
finely tomentose. Column very short. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1. Column and mentum. 2. Lip: — magnified. 






5680 




"W. Fitch, del. etHth. 



cs.Imp. 



Tab. 5680. 

BEGONIA hosjsploea. 
Hose-flowered Begonia. 



Nat. Ord. BEGcmiACE;E. — Motstceoia. Poltawdbia. 
Gen. Char. {Vide supra, Tab. 4131.) 



Begonia (§ Huszia) rosaflora; acaulis, foliis omnibus radicalibus crasse 
petiolatis orbiculari-reuiformibus basi profunde 2-Iobis conoavis, niar- 
ginibus recurvis lobulatis dentatis ciliolatis rubro-marginatis, supra 
nervis radiantibus impressis bullatis, subtus pallidis, nervis robustis 
pilosis, stipulis membranaceis, scapis erectis robustis laxe villosis 
rubris sub-3-floris, bracteis bracteolisque late oblongia obtusis, floribus 
amplis breviuscule pedicellatis 5-petalis, petalis late roseis orbicu- 
laris emarginatis, filamentis liberis, antheris brevibus latis obtusis, 
ovario 3-loculari piloso, placentis 2-fidis etlobulatis undique ovuliferis, 
stylis 3 2-furcatis, cruribus fascia papillosa torta cinctis. 



This lovely plant is the second species of Begonia allied 
to B. Veitchii (Tab. 5663), which I alluded to under B. 
Clarkei (Tab. 5675), and about the specific distinctness of 
which I expressed my doubts. In all respects it is much 
more closely allied to B. Feitchii than to B. Clarkei, being 
stemless, with similarly concave leaves and few-flowered 
scapes ; it differs, however very conspicuously, in the stouter 
red petioles and scapes, in the broader rounder leaves, with 
very deeply impressed veins (and hence bullate upper surface), 
in the broad obtuse stipules and bracts, in the villous scape, 
in the blunt bracteoles close under each flower, in the more 
numerous flowers, which are of a pale red, like those of the 
Briar Rose (not the vivid cinnabar-red of B. Veitchii), and in 
the acute wing of the hairy ovary. So many and such con- 
spicuous characters would amongst less variable plants than 
Begonias abundantly establish these species as distinct, and 
whether they prove permanent or no, it appears particularly- 
desirable to publish good figures of all these forms on their 
arrival, and before they fall into the hands of the hybridizers, 

DECEMBER IsT, 1SG7. 



by whom the specific characters, of such beautiful and popu- 
lar plants, will doubtless soon be blended. 

B. roswflora was imported by Messrs. Veitch and Sons 
from Peru, where it inhabits elevations on the Andes of 
twelve thousand feet. It flowered in July of the present 
year. 

Desck. A stout stemless herb. Petioles, scapes, bracts, and 
stipules pale or bright red. Leaves pale green, two to four 
inches across, on stout, hairy petioles two to six inches long, 
orbicular-reniform, very concave, with deeply sunk radiating 
nerves ; margins recurved, lobulate, edged with red, toothed 
and ciliolate, veins below prominent, hairy, Stipules broad, 
blunt. Scapes stout, villous, three-flowered. Bracts and 
hracteoles broadly ovate, obtuse, Flowers two inches in dia- 
meter, bright rose-red. Petals five, orbicular, emarginate. 
Stamens very numerous ; filaments short, free ; anthers orbi- 
cular. Ovary hairy, with one short acute wing. Styles and 
placenta as in B. Veitchii. — J. P. H. 



Fi<r. 1. Ovary. 2. Transverse section of ditto. 3 and 4. Stamens : — all 
magnified. 



5681 




s 
WFitah.delet Mi 



Vincent Brooks, Imp . 



Tab. 5681. 
SACCpLABIUM Huttoni. 

Mr. Mutton's Saccolabium. 



Xat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Gtynaxdria Monandria. 
Gen. Char. {Fide supra, Tab. 5326.) 



oaccolabium Huttoni; caule breviusculo, foliis crasse coriaceis inibri- 
catis breviter loratis carinatis apice 2-lobis, racemis elongatis multi- 
subdensifloris pendulis, floribus secundis erectis, pedunculis floribus- 
que lsete roseo-purpureis, sepalis petalisque patentibus subaequalibus 
late oblongis apice rotuudatis, labelli 3-lobi lobis parvis erectis calcar 
obtuse infundibuliforme incurvum rubro-purpureum coronantibus, late- 
ralibus subquadratis, interraedio angusto. 

Aerides Huttoni. Sort. 



It is difficult to suppose that this lovely plant should have 
escaped the many zealous Dutch botanical explorers of its 
native country, Java, or the collectors attached to the mag- 
nificent gardens of Buitenzorg, where more tropical plants 
are cultivated than in any other garden in the world, and 
named with scientific accuracy. But neither in books nor 
catalogues do we find any notice of this plant, which was 
discovered by Mr. Hutton, whose early, lamented death was 
alluded to under another of his discoveries (Cymbidimn Hut- 
toni, Tab. 5676) only last month. It flowered in the collec- 
tion of its importers, Messrs. Veitch and Sons, in September 
last, and from its vivid colours ranks as the most beautiful 
species of the genus hitherto in cultivation. 

I have referred this plant to Saccolabiurn rather than to 
Aerides, not doubting but that it is congeneric with *S T . ampul- 
laceum, Lindl. (Tab. nostr. 5595), and S. miniatum, Lindl. 
(Tab. 5326); but I must add, that I know of no valid cha- 
racters by which these genera are to be distinguished, if T 
am to follow Lindley's collocation of species under each. 

Desck. Stem stout, rigid, suberect, closely beset with dis- 
tichous imbricating foliage. Leaves six inches long, loriform. 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1867. 



rigidly coriaceous, keeled, three-quarters of an inch broad, 
unequally two-lobed at the apex, deep green. Raceme from 
the axils of the lower leaves, a foot long, pendulous, rather 
slender, very many-flowered. Bracts minute. Flowers erect, 
an inch long from base of spur to tip of upper sepal, bright 
rose-purple, the lip much deeper-coloured ; pedicels paler. 
Sepals and petals nearly equal, broadly oblong, rounded at 
the apex, spreading. Lip formed chiefly of the stout funnel- 
shaped, somewhat incurved, obtuse spur, the mouth of which 
is formed by the three small erect lobes of the lip ; of these 
the lateral are quadrate ; the middle is broadly linear and 
obtuse.—-/. IX II 



Fig. 1. Flower, — magnified. 






5682 



■ , 

■ ■ . 




V. Fitch, del ei liti 



cent Brooks, Imp- 



Tab. 5682. 

VITIS HETEROPHYLLA, Thwib. / var. HUMULIFOLIA. 
Hop-leaved Vine. 

Nat. Ord. AmpelidEjE. — Pextandbia Movooybix. 

Gen. Char. Calyx brevis, integer v. 4-5-dentatus v. lobatus. Prtala 
4-5, libera v. apice ealyptratim cohaerentia. Discus varius v. obsoletus. 
Stamina 4-5, infra marginem disci inserta, filamentis subulatis ; anthers 
libera?. Ovarium ovoideum v. subquadratum, 2- rarissirae 3-4-loeulare ; 
stylus brevis v. ; ovula in loculis 2. Bacca ovoidea v. globosa, 1-2-loeu- 
laris, 1-2-sperma. — TYutices cirrhi, sarmentosi, scepe alte scandenfes. Folia 
simplicia v. composita. Fdores parvi, in cynias thyrsosve racemosos panicu- 
latos spicatos v. umbellatos dispositi, non raro polyyamo-monoici. 



Vitis heterophylla, Thunb.; var. humulifolia; caule tereti gracili glabro 
v. piloso, foliis profunde 3-5-lobis late cordatis sinu aperto, lobis 
basi constrictis ovato-rhombeis acutis v. acuminatis serratis, cirrhis 
2-fidis, petiolo nervisque pubescentibus, cymis longe pedunculitis di- 
chotome ramosis rarius gracilibus divaricatis, floribus minutis, calyce 
breviter 5-lobo, petalis liberis, disco membranaceo truncato, baccis 
spbgericis pallide cyaneis. 

Vitis heterophylla. Thunb. var. f3, Siebold et Zuccarini, Abhandl. Baier. 
AJcad. Wissenschaft, iv. v. 2. p. 197. 

Ampelopsis humulifolia. Bunye, Mem. Sav. Etr. St. Petersl. v. 2. p. 86. 
ex Walp. Hep. v. l.p. 441. 



Japan contains many species of Vine, of which several are 
now growing freely in the open-air at Kew against the 
walls of plant-houses. Amongst these that figured here 
was conspicuous this autumn for the peculiar colour of its 
lovely pale blue berries, its bright red stems, and hop-like 
foliage, which latter character suggested to Dr. Bunge. its 
discoverer in North China, the very appropriate name of 
humulifolia. It has since been found in Corea. whence dried 
specimens and seeds have been received from Mr. C. Wilfoid, 
collector for the Royal Gardens, and in Japan, where it was 
found by the celebrated Japanese traveller Siebold. 

The V. humulifolia was reduced, by Siebold and Zuccarini, 
to a variety of the old V. heterophylla of Thunberg. a plant 

DECEMBEB 1ST, 1867. 



that we have growing close by this variety at Kew, and which 
differs both in appearance and in the scarcely-lobed leaves. 
By these authors V. heterophylla comprises an entire-leaved 
variety (a) and a cut-leaved variety (/3), to the former of which 
Bunge's humulifolia is referred by them ; our own specimens, 
however, of Bunge's plant, received from himself, have 
deeply lobed leaves, exactly as in our figure. Bunge, indeed, 
describes his humulifolia as having the lower leaves lobed 
and the upper entire, but in our live plant the lobed foliage 
is pretty constant throughout, whilst the leaves of our living- 
Japanese specimens of V. heterophylla are uniformly entire, 
or only obscurely lobed throughout. 

J)esck. A nearly glabrous, climbing, slender vine. Stems 
two to five feet long ; branches glabrous or pilose, red, nearly 
terete. Leaves on slender red petioles, three- to five-lobed, 
with a broad open sinus at the base ; lobes acutely serrate, 
middle lobe contracted at the base, dark green and rather 
rugose above, pale beneath, with pubescent veins. Tendril* 
bifid. Cymes on slender peduncles, sparingly divided ; branch- 
lets divaricate. Flowers subumbellate, minute, green. Petals 
five, free. Stamens on the margin of a rather membranous 
annular disk surrounding the ovary. Berries globular, of a 
fine pale china-blue colour, dotted with black. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Bud. 2. Expanded flower : — magnified. 



INDEX, 

In which the Latin Names of the Plants contained in the 
Twenty-third Volume of the Third Series (or Ninety- 
third Volume of the Work) are alphabetically arranged. 



Plate. 

5668 vEchmea glomerate. 
5641 Agave schidigera. 

5660 xylonacantlia. 

5645 Amaryllis pardina. 
5624 Angrsecttm citratum. 

5672 Aristolochia Goldieana. 
5628 Barleria Gibsoni. 
5657 Begonia Boliviensis. 

5675 Clarkei. 

5680 rosaeflora. 

5663 Veitchii. 

5647 Billbergia sphacelata. 

5646 Bletia Sherrattiana. 

5619 Bowiea volubilis. 

5677 Calceolaria pisacomensis. 
5618 Cattleya Dowiana. 
5659 Oestrum elegans. 
5626 Clavija i'ulgens. 
5674 Coelogyne humilis. 

5661 Colax jugosus. 
5636 Cordyline australis. 

5620 Curcuma Australasica. 
5676. Cymbidium Huttoui. 
5640 Dalechampia Boezliana. 
5679 Dendrobium Bensonise. 
5'652 Bullerianum. 

5649 macropliyllutn; var. 

Feitchiann in . 

5638 Dictyopsis Thunbergii. 

5639 Dombeya Mastersii. 

5650 Draba violacea. 

5662 Dracasna surculosa; var. mactdata. 
56G4 Epidendrura Brassavola-. 
5654 Cooperianum. 



Plate. 

5656 Epidendrum cnemidopborum, 

5643 i eburneum. 

5671 Epimedium alpinum ; var. m- 
brtttn. 

5665 Erodium maoradeniiim. 
5655 Gloxinia hypocyrtiilora. 
5642 Gomphia Theophrasta. 
5622 Grias cauli/lora. 

5666 Griffinia Bhmieuavia. 
5621 Helianthemum ocymoides. 
5625 Impatiens latifolia. 

5651 Ipomcea Gerrardi. 

5667 Lselia majalis. 
5673 Lilium Leiclitlinii. 

5627 Mesospinidium sanguineum. 
5644 Myites Cheken. 
5678 Nyctocalos Thomsoni. 

5632 Oncidium serraturo. 

5634 Peperomiaarifolia; var. argyreia. 

5629 Pleroina sarmentosa. 
5658 Prostanthera aires. 

5669 Eondeletia Purdiei. 
5653 Budges macropbylla. 

5635 Saccoluhiimi gigauteum. 
5681 Huttoni. 

5630 Sarcantluis erinaceus. 

5631 Sipliocampylus llumboldtiainis. 
5648 Stemonaeanthus Pearcei. 

5633 Synadenium Grantii. 
5623 Tapeinotes Carolina?. 

5670 Thapsia decipiens. 
5637 Tinnea .Ethiopica. 

5682 Vitis heterophylla, Thunbery ; 
var. luunid'tfoUa. 



INDEX, 

In which the English Names of the Plants contained in the 
Twenty-third Volume of the Third Series (or Ninety- 
third Volume of the Work) are alphabetically arranged. 



Plate. 

5668 xEchmea, crowded-flowered. 
5660 Agave, woody-thorned. 
5641 Aloe, splintered-leaved American. 
5645 Amaryllis, spotted-flowered. 

5624 Angrsecum, citron-yellow. 
5672 Aristolocliia, The Rev. H. Gol- 

die's. 

5625 Balsam, broad -leaved Cingalese. 
5628 Barleria, Dr. Gibson's. 

5671 Barren-wort, red-flowered. 
5657 Begonia, Bolivian. 

5675 Major Trevor Clarke's. 

5680 rose-flowered. 

5663 Veiteh's. 

5646 Bletia, Sherratt's. 
5619 Bowiea, twining. 
5677 Calceolaria, orange-red. 
5618 Cattleya, Captain Bow's. 
5644 Chequen of Chili. 

5647 Chnpon of Chili. 

5 626 Clavija, brilliant-flowered. 

56G1 Colax, furrowed-lipped. 

5676 Cymbidium, Mr. Hutton's. 

5640 Dalechampia, Iloezl's. 

5679 Benrobe, Mrs. Benson's. 

5649 Large-leaved; VeiteVs 

var. 
5652 Bendrobium, Mr. Wentworth 

Buller's. 

5638 Bictyopsis, Thnnberg's. 

5639 Dombeya, Br. Masters's. 
5650 Braba, violet-flowered. 

5662 Bracmna, long-shooting; spot" 

terf-leaved var. 
5664 Epidendrnm, Brassavola-lifce. 



Plate. 

5654 Epidendrum, Mr. Cooper's. 

5643 ivory-flowered. 

5656 sheathed. 

5655 Gloxinia, Hypocyrta-flowered. 
5642 Gomphia, Theophrasta-like. 

5666 Griffinia, Br. Blumenau's. 
5659 Habrothamnns, pnrple. 
5651 Ipomoea, Gerrard's. 

5667 Laelia, May-flowering. 

5673 Lily, Max Leichtlin's. 
5627 Mesospinidium, Rosy. 

5633 Milkbush, Captain Grant's. 
5678 Nyctocalos, Assamese. 
5632 Oncidinm, serrated. 

5622 Pear, Anchovy. 

5634 Peperoraia, Arum-leaved; silver- 

striped var. 

5674 Pleione, dwarf. 

5629 Pleroma, sarmeutose. 
5G58 Prostanthera, snow-while. 
5621 llockrose, Basil -like. 
5669 Rondeletia, Mr. Purdie's. 
5653 Rudsrea, large-leaved. 
5635 Saccolabium, gigantic. 
5681 Mr. Hutton's. 

5630 Sarcanthus, hairy-stem med. 
5G31 Siphocampylus, Humboldt's. 
5648 Stemonacantlms, Mr. Pearce's. 
5665 Storksbill, spotted-flowered. 
5623 Tapeinotes, Empress Charlotte's. 
5670 Thapsia, Madeiran. 

5637 Tinnea, violet-scented. 
5636 Ti-tree, New Zealand. 
5620 Turmeric, Australian Wild. 
56S2 Vine, hop-leaved. 




WORKS ON FEENS AND MOSSES. 



BRITISH FERNS; an Introduction to the Study of the 

Ferns, Ltcopods, and Equiseta indigenous to the British Isles. With 
Chapters on the Structure, Propagation, Cultivation, Diseases, Fses, Pre- 
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loured Plates, drawn expressly for the work by W. Fitch, and 55 Wood- 
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One of L. Keeve and Co.'s 'New Series of Natural History for Beginners,' accurately 
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Species, and Coloured Figures of 32 of the most interesting, including magnified direc- 
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THE BRITISH FERNS ; or, Coloured Figures and Descrip- 

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Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland, systematically arranged. By Sir W. 
J. Hooker, F.B.S. Boyal 8vo, 66 Coloured Plates. £2. 2s. 
The British Ferns and their allies are illustrated in this work, from the pencil of Mr. 
Fitch. Each Species has a Plate to itself, so that there is ample room for the details, on 
a magnified scale, of Fructification and Venation. The whole are delicately coloured by 
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GARDEN FERNS; or, Coloured Figures and Descriptions, 

with the needful Analyses of the Fructification and Venation, of a Selection 
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cultivation of some of the more beautiful and remarkable varieties of Exotic Ferns. 
Here also each Species has a Plate to itself, and the details of Fructification and Venation 
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FILICES EXOTICiE ; or, Coloured Figures and Descriptions 

of Exotic Ferns, ehieflv of such as are cultivated in the Eoyal Gardens of 
Kew. By Sir W. J. "Hooees, F.B.S. Eoyal 4to, 100 Coloured Plates. 
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FERNY COMBES; a Ramble after Ferns in the Glens and 

Valleys of Devonshire. By CfiAKtorrE Chantek. Third Edition. Fcp. 
8vo, 8 Coloured Plates by Fitch, and a Map of the County, 6*. 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, comprising all that 

are known to be Natives of the British Isles. By the Kev. Bf. J. Berkeley. 
M.A., F.L.S. Deavy 8vo, 2i Coloured Plates, 21#. 




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