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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CURTIS'S 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPRISING! THE 



pants of tf)t &ogal OBrarben-s of i^cto 

AND , 

OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN; 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., F.R.S., L.S.,&c. 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D. CANTAB., CORRESPONDENT OF THE INSTITUTE OF FRANCE. 



VOL. XXIX. £ 

OF THE THIRD SERIES; 
(Or Vol. XCIX. of the Wiole Work.) 




" J'ay seulement faict icy un amas dp flours, n'y ayant fourny du mien que 
le filet a les tier," — Montaignk. 



LONDON : 
L. REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1873. 

[All Eight* reserved.] 



Mo. Be 

1897. 



LONDON : 
SAVILL, EDWARDS AND CO., PRINTERS, CHAN DOS STREET, 
COVEST GARDEN. 



TO 



DAVID MOOEE, Ph.D., F.L.S., M.E.I.A., 

SUPERINTENDENT OF THE ROYAL DUBLIN SOCIETY'S BOTANIC GARDEN, GLA8NEVIN. 

Dear Dr. Moore, 

I have great pleasure in dedicating a volume of the 
"Botanical Magazine" to one who, whilst maintaining a very rich 
and beautiful Botanical Garden at a high standard of excellence, has 
advanced Botanical Science by many original observations and expe- 
riments. 

I further gladly embrace this opportunity of testifying to the 
value of your contributions to the British and especially the Irish 
Flora, which you have enriched by the discovery of many new and 
interesting indigenous plants ; by the publication, with Mr. A. Moore, 
of the " Cybele Hibernica/' and by your " Synopsis of Irish Mosses." 

Believe me, 

Dear Dr. Moore, 

Very faithfully yours, 

JOS. D. HOOKER. 

Royal Gardens, Kew, 
Dec. Ut, 1873. 



VOL. XXIX. JANUARY. [Price 3s. 6c?. col*- 2s. M. 

OR No. } J^31 OF THE ENTIRE WORK 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 

COMPKISISG 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OP OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 



JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., F.R.S., L.S., & 

• Director of tijc Uoruil botanic Gardens of Hex. 




> 



L O N D N ; 
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1573. 



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THE 

NATURAL HISTORY OF PLANTS. 

By Professor BAILLON, 

President of the Linnean Society of P 

Translated, with Additional Notes and References, 

By MARCUS M. HARTOG-, B.Sc. 

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Countne, traversed by the Expedition of 1870, under T. D. Fousytu, 
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6009 




W7itch.de! etiith 



VmcentBr ooks Day & Son jmp 



Tab. 6009. 
MUTISIA ILICIFOLIA. 

Native of Chili. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Mutisiejs. 
Genus Mutisia, Linn.f.; (DC. Prodr., vol. vii. p. 4). 



Mutisia ilicifolia; glabra v. ramulis foliisque subtus araneoso-tomentosis, 
caule scandente angulato v. alato alis spinulosis, folia sessilibus 
oblongo-cordatis truncatis v. 2-lobis spinoso-dentatis rigide coriaceis 
cirrhiferis, pedunculis axillaribus l-floris, involucri cylindracei bracteis 
ovato-oblongis apice rotundatis muticis v. appendiculatis, v. infimis 
ovato-lanceolatis spinescentibus interdum refractis, floribus radii 8-12 
pallide roseis, ligula anguste lanceolata acuminata. 

Mutisia ilicifolia, Cav. Ic. t vol. v. p. 63, t. 493 ; DC. Prodr., vol. vii. p. 7 ; 
Hook. Bot. Misc., vol. i. p. 7, t. 4 ; Paxtoris Magazine of Botany, vol. xv. 
t. 101, cum ic. ; Gay Flor. Chilen., vol. iii. p. 266. 

M. spinosa, Ruiz et Pav. Svst., p. 193; Less, in Linnxa, 1830, p. 271 ; 
DC, I.e. 

M. auriculata, Less, ex Hook, et Am. Comp. Bot. Mag., vol. i. p. 107. 

M. latifolia, Don in Trans. Linn. Soc, vol, xvi. p. 270 ; Sweet Brit. FL 
Gard., Ser. 2, t. 288. 

M. Gayana, liemy in Gay Flor. Ghilen., vol. iii. p- 268; Walp. Ann., 
vol. i. p. 990. 

M. Lechleri, Schultes Bipont. in Herb. Lechler. 



A charming green-house plant, introduced into England 
in 1832, from Chili, where it appears to be common around 
Valparaiso and elsewhere, climbing amongst bushes. Sweet 
informs us it was then not uncommon in English collec- 
tions, but rarely flowered, whence he recommended its cul- 
tivation in the open border against a trellis. It next appeared 
in Paxions Magazine, since which I find no notice of it till 
October of last year, when my friend Mr. Wilson Saunders 
sent me the specimen from which the accompanying draw- 
ing was made. M. Uicifolia is a very variable plant indeed, 



JANUARY l.ST, 187:'.. 



as the numerous synonyms cited above show; it varies 
especially in the stem being winged and spinous-toothed, or 
wingless ; in the depth of the sinus at the base and apex of 
the leaf, and in its under-surface being glabrous or clothed 
with a white or brown cobwebby tomentum ; in the bracts of 
the involucre being all rounded at the point, or some or all 
terminated by a claw or foliaceous appendage, or the lower 
of them being much produced, lanceolate pungent and 
spreading or reflexed; and finally in the number and 
breadth of the ray-flowers. A series of twenty-five native 
specimens m the Herbarium displays all these variations 
graduating into one another. 

Desce. A climbing slender shrub, glabrous or with the 
branches, peduncles, and leaves beneath clothed with cob 
webby tomentum. Leaves one to two inches long, spreading 
sessile oblong, deeply cordate or auricled at the base, tip trun- 
cate or bifid or 2-lobed, margins spinous-toothed, rirndlv 
coriaceous bright green above, pale beneath, nerves reti- 
culate ; cirrhus stout. Heads axillary, solitary, peduncled 
three inches m diameter. Invohcral bracts many-seriate' 
very variable (as described above). May-flowers eight to twelve* 
pale pink or purplkh; ray narrowly lanceolate, acuminate - 
inner lip very small, 2-toothed. Bisk-flowers with a short 
revolute outer lip and smaller 2 -partite re volute inner one 
Pappus hairs pilose.— J. B. H. 



60 tO 










| 



- ... 













Tab. 6010. 
ANDRYALA mogadorensis. 

Native of Marocco. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Cichorace^. 
Genua Andryala, Linn.; {DC. Prodr., vol. vii. p. 245). 



Andryala mogadorensis ; fruticosa, robusta, tota dense albo-lanuginosa et 
superne glanduloso-pilosa, foliis confertis sessilibus ^-amplexicaulibus 
basi obtus%g cordatisve oblongis oblongo-spathulatis ovatis v. cordiformi- 
bus obtusis v. apiculatis integerrimis v. sinuato-dentatis, infimis petio- 
latis spathulatis, corymbis foliosis, involucri hemispherici bracteis basi 
connatis subulato-lanceolatis acuminatis longe glanduloso-pilosis, ligulis 
5-dentatis, receptaculo dense setoso. 

Andryala mogadorensis, Cosson in Herb. Balama. 



This beautiful undershrub forms snow-white masses on a 
little rocky islet in the bay of Mogadore, on the Western 
Marocco Coast, in lat. 31£° N., and has hitherto been found 
nowhere else. It was discovered by Balansa in 1868, and 
gathered by Messrs. Maw, Ball, and myself there in May, 
1871. Mr. Maw was so fortunate as to transmit a living plant 
to his garden at Ben thai Hall, Broseley, which flowered in the 
following April, and is here figured. 

The genus Andryala is chiefly a Mediterranean one, and 
finds its south-western limit in Marocco and the Canary 
Islands. Most of the species are herbs, with little to re- 
commend them to the horticulturist, the present one being 
considerably the most handsome of those known to me. 

-Uescr. A small undershrub, one to two feet high, with 
straggling habit, densely clothed with a thick snow-white 
appressed tomentum, and the upper parts and inflorescence 
especially covered with spreading black glandular hair. 
Leaves crowded, very variable in size and shape, the radical 

JANUARY 1ST, 1873. 



obovate-spathulate and contracted into a long petiole, together 
four inches long ; the cauline one to two inches long, sessile, 
cordate or auricled at the base, ovate and concave, or oblong 
and flat, or spathulate -oblong, quite entire or sinuate-toothed, 
tip rounded, sometimes mucronate. Corymbs leafy, terminating 
the branches, with six to ten heads, of which one or two open 
at a time. Heads shortly and stoutly pedicelled, one and a 
half inches in diameter, golden-yellow. Involucre hemisphe- 
rical, densely glandular; bracts connate below, free portions 
uniseriate or sub-biseriate, subulate-lanceolate, acuminate, 
spreading, fringed with long glandular hairs. Legumes strap- 
shaped, truncate, with five long acute teeth. Achenes small ; 
pappus hairs silvery white, slender, scabrid. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Radical leaf of the natural size; 2, outer floret ; 3, style arms; 4, 
pappus hair : — all magnified. 



6011 




ViuceiitBrooVsDiy&SoiiInip 



Tab. 6011. 
RHYNCHANTHERA grandiflora. 

Native of North Brazil and Guiana. 



Nat. Ord. Melastomacejb.— Tribe Microlicieje. 
Genus Khynchanthera, DC; {Benth. and Hook.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 738). 



Khynchanthera grandiflora; patentim pilosa, caule ramoso, ramis ramu- 
lisque teretibus, foliis petiolatis ovato-cordatis acuminata serrulatis 
7-nerviis, paniculia terminalibus multifloris, bracteis foliaceis supremis 
sessilibus, calycis tubo ovoideo, lobis subulatis, petalis elhptico-obovatis 
acutis roseis, staminibus 10, uno maximo, quatuor mediocribus et 
quinque minutis imperfectis. 

Khynchanthera grandiflora, DC. Prodr., vol. iii. p. 107 ; Trina in Trans. 
Linn. Soc, vol. xxviii. p. 31. 

R. monodynama, DC. I.e. 

Khexia grandiflora, Bonpl. Ehex., p. 26, t. 11. 

Melastoma grandiflora, Aubl. PI. Oman., vol. i. p. 414, t. 160. 

Osbeckiia Aubletiana, Spreng. Syst. Veg., vol. ii. p. 311. 



Apparently common in Eastern South America, north of 
the tropic, being found from the Amazons to Demarara, 
growing in moist savanahs, and attaining six feet in height 
It is a beautiful plant, easily grown, and well worthy ot 
cultivation, throwing out a profusion of its rose-coloured 
flowers in the autumn months in England, and in November 
and December in its native habitat. The single large stamen, 
arching down over the four smaller ones, is a very singular 
feature of the flower; it probably contains pollen of a de- 
ferent potency from what the anthers of the others contain. 
As in most Melastomaceai, the style, though curved m the 
same direction as the stamen, is also thrown back, so as to 
remove the stigma far from the anthers. It would be very 
interesting to know the significance of this arrangement, 

I.YM'AKY 1ST, 1873. 






which, no doubt, serves so to direct the visits of insects as 
to insure cross fertilization. 

R. grandijlora was sent to the Royal Gardens by Mr. Bull, 
F.L.S., of Chelsea, who introduced it from Demarara. 

Descr. An undershrub, five to six feet high, erect, much 
branched, clothed more or less densely with, rather stiff 
spreading hairs. Stem and branches cylindric. Leaves two 
to three inches long, broadly ovate-cordate, acuminate, 
serrulate, 7 -nerved, hairy on both surfaces, especially on 
the nerves beneath, bright-green above, paler beneath, trans- 
verse nerves slender ; petiole variable in length, half to one 
inch. Panicles six to ten inches long, lax, leafy, slender, 
erect, branched ; bracts leafy, uppermost sessile and lanceo- 
late. Flowers two inches in diameter ; pedicels short, slender. 
Calyx one-third inch long, ovoid or urceolate, hispid ; lobes 
subulate or filiform. Petals elliptic- obovate, acute or apicu- 
late, bright rose-coloured. Stamens sharply arched forward, 
the dorsal much the largest, with a red filament, clavate con- 
nective and yellow recurved beaked anther; four smaller 
stamens not half the size ; five smallest rudimentary. Style 
slender, red. — /. B. H. 



Fig. 1. Flower with petals removed; 2, petal and rudimentary stamen : 

both viagnified. 



eon 







Vmc 



Tab. 6012. 

MERENDERA Aitchisont. 

Native of the Panjab. 



Nat. Ord. Melanthace.e. — Tribe Colchtcejj. 

Genus Merendera, Raymond. — Bulbocodium § Merendera ; 
(Endl. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 137). 



Merendera Aitchisont ; cormo ampullaeformi uno latere obtuse carinato basi 
contracto oblique in discuni producto, disco truncato facie inferiore 
radices emittente, tunicis pallide flavo-brunneis, collo elongate, vagina 
membranacea, foliis anguste linearibu8 acutis ^-poll. latis concavis, 
nore lij-poll. diam., perianthii pallide lilacini lamina ungue gracdi bre- 
viore lanceolata dorso basin versus carinata, antheris virescentibus. 

Bulbocodium, Sp., Aitchison, Cat. Plants Punjab $ Sindk. p. 151. 



lhe genus Merendera, regarded by some, and perhaps 
rightly, as a division of Bulbocodium, has been hitherto sup- 
posed to find its Eastern limits in Persia, where 31. caucasica, 
a species very clearly allied to the present, has been collected 
by Kotschy. The genus was first detected east of the con- 
necting ranges of our Indian possessions by Major Vicary, 
who, about twenty years ago, sent to Sir W. Hooker frag- 
ments of a species which I suppose to be identical with this, 
irom the Mar-gulla p ass of t]ie Sa j t range ± n ^ p an j aD . 

ore recently it has been found near Jhelum, in the same 
district, by U r . Aitchison, F.L.S., an ardent botanist, and 
author ot a very valuable catalogue of the plants of the Panjab, 

h- i« g last suramer Dr - Aitchison sent bulbs to Kew, 
which flowered in November of the present year, and are here 
figured. r J 

U A j a fP ecies there is little at first sight to distinguish the 
-'/• Aitclumni from 3f. caucasica, which extends from Persia 
eastward to Asia Minor, and from the tropical African 31. 

JANUARY 1ST, 1873. 



abyssynica, A. Eich. {M. longispatha, Hochst, and M. Schim- 
periana, Hochst), except the very pale colour of the tunic of 
the corm, a character not likely to vary ; to which others 
would probably be added could living specimens be compared. 
The flowers are fragrant. 

Descr. Corm one and a half inches long, flaggon-shaped, 
with a long neck, compressed and obtusely keeled on one side; 
base contracted and produced into an oblique sublateral disk, 
that roots from its under-surface ; tunic a very pale chestnut 
brown colour. Sheath short, scarious, mouth obliquely trun- 
cate. Leaves one to two inches long whilst the plant is 
flowering, about one-sixth inch broad, acute, concave, dark- 
green, rather fleshy, lengthening to six and eight inches when 
the plant is in fruit. Flower one and a half to two inches in 
diameter, pale lilac, funnel-shaped ; perianth segments with a 
very slender claw and lanceolate obtuse blade, which is keeled 
at the back towards the base, keel pale reddish. Filaments 
inserted at the base of the blade, subulate, equalling the 
linear obtuse greenish anther. Ovary narrow ; styles quite 
free, filiform. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Scape and ovary ; 2, perianth-segment and stamen:— hot h magnified. 



son 




deletJith 



-oksIiay&SoTiLiir 



Tab. G013. 
DENDROBIUM Hookemanum. 

Native of Assam and Sikkim. 



Nat. Ord. Obchideje. — Tribe Malaxide^ § Dendrobie.e. 
Genus Dendrobium, Swartz ; {LindL Gen. $ Sp. of Orchid., p. 24). 



Dendrobium (Holochrysa) Ilooherianum ; caulibus fasciculatis foliosis, foliis 
oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis nervosis, racemis axillaribus paucifloris, 
bracteis imnutis, fioribus amplis aureis, sepalis petalisque conformibus 
oblongis acutis integerrimis, labello late orbiculato-cordato velutino 
profunde fimbriato, fimbriis barbellatis, intus basin versus maculis 
* purpureis ornato. ungue convoluto intus calloso, mento conico apice 
rotundato. 

Dendrobium Hookerianum, LindL in Journ. Linn. Soc. Land.. 1859, vol. Hi. 
p. 8. 

D. chrysotis, Heichb.fi. in Gard. Chron., 1870, p. 1311. 



I am indebted to Mr. P. W. Burbridge, formerly of Kew, 
and now of the Fairfield Nurseries, for the opportunity of 
figuring this, which is the largest flowered and freest 
flowering species of the section to which it belongs. Mr. 
Burbridge describes it as growing vigorously in a Cattleya- 
house, flowering in September and October, and being 
especially valuable as a decorative plant, because of the habit 
(previously noticed by Dr. Masters, in The Gardeners Chronicle) 
of flowering synchronously with the foliage, which is abundant 
and of a lively green. A specimen grown by Mr. Petch, the 
gardener at Manley Hall, near Manchester, produced at one 
time twenty-five racemes, with as many as nine flowers on a 
raceme, and this on a single plant. 

Dendrobium Hookerianum is stated to come from Assam, 
which is very possible, as I discovered it in the neighbouring 
province of Sikkim in 1848, growing on trees in hot valleys, 
at an elevation of 1-5000 feet above the sea. In an excellent 

JANUARY 1st, 1873. 



drawing of it which I possess, made by a native artist, the stems 
are figured as thick as the little finger, and the numerous 
racemes are only 3-4-flowered, but each flower is upwards of 
four inches in diameter. It is very closely allied to D. 
fimbriatum, Wall, a native of the adjoining province of Nipal, 
but differs in the much larger size, in flowering on the leafy 
stems, in the quite entire (not toothed) margins of the sepals 
and petals, and in the double blotch on the lip. 

Descr. Stems tufted, two to three feet long, grooved, green 
or purplish. Leaves distichous, three to five inches long, 
oblong-1 aiceolate, acuminate, recurved. Racemes borne on 
the leafing stems, shortly peduncled, 3-9-flowered, spreading ; 
peduncle and pedicels slender, green ; bracts small, appressed. 
Ovary slender. Perianth three to four inches in diameter, 
golden-yellow, with two red-purple blotches on the disk of 
the lip. Sepals and petals equal and similar, spreading, 
oblong, acute, margins quite entire. Lip with a con volute 
claw and almost circular or more or less ovate or cordate 
repanded limb, which is velvetty on the surface and deeply 
cut along the edge into equal and equidistant bearded fringes 
nearly half an inch long ; callus oblong, adnate to the cla^ 
and concealed by its convolute margins ; mentum conical, 
rounded at the apex. — /. B. H. 



6014 








>L./ 


1 



uaceDlBiodki 



Tab. 6014, 

VBIESIA BRACHYSTACHYS. 

Native of Brazil. 



Nat. Ord. Bromeliace^e. — Tribe Tillandsie^e. 
Genus Vriesia {Lindl. in Bot. Mag., t. 4382). 

Vriesia brachystachys ; glabra, foliis e basi lata late loriformibus acutis re- 
curvis concavis integerritnis viridibus, scapo rubro foliis longiore, 
vaginis acutis appressis, spica ovato-oblonga lata valde compressa dis- 
ticba, bracteis 1-iloris basi imbricatis fere horizontalibus falcato- 
lanceolatis acuminatis compressis infra medium rubris dein viridibus, 
floribus bracteis excedentibus flavis elongatis 3-gonis, perianthii lacings 
exterioribus coriaceis carinatis lineari-oblongis obtusis, interioribus in 
tubum apice 6-fidum apicibus viridibus coherentibus, squamis ad basin 
tubi perianthii oblongis obtusis. 

Vriesia brachystachys, Kegel in Gartenflora, 1866, p. 258, t. 518. 



A very brilliant stove plant, first made known by Dr. 
Kegel, from a specimen received at the Imperial Gardens of 
St. Petersburg!!, from Messrs Booth and Sons, of Hamburgh, 
about ten years ago, when, however, its native country was 
unknown. This, however, we have ascertained to be Brazil, 
through specimens collected in that country by Dr. Burchell, 
who gathered them in the province of S. Paolo. 

The spike in both Kegel's figure and Burchell's specimens 
is very small indeed (not two inches long), compared with 
that represented in our plate, which is a faithful^ representa- 
tion of a specimen which flowered in Mr. Pucker's establish- 
ment at Wandsworth in November of last year. The sta- 
mens are much longer too than those represented in the 
Gartenflora ; but this is probably due to imperfect develop- 
ment of the latter. The genus Vriesia has been reduced to 
Tillandsia, from the typical species of which the present plant 
differs in the form of the inner perianth segments, which are 
not spirally convolute in age. 

Descr. Stem at the base, as clothed with the leaves, one 



JANUARY 1st, 1873. 



and a half inches in diameter. Leaves four to six inches long 
by one to one and a half inches broad, spreading and re- 
curved, pale rather glaucous green on both surfaces, mem- 
branous, broadly strap-shaped from a dilated sheathing base, 
tip rounded with a mucro, or acute, faintly striate. Scape six 
inches long, stout, cylindric, scarlet, clothed with small ap- 
pressed erect sheaths, with green tips, the lower of which are 
acute and the upper elongate and acuminate. Spike five 
inches long by four inches broad, broadly ovate, distichous, 
very much compressed, rachis scarlet. Bracts closely imbri- 
cating at the base, nearly horizontal, two inches long, lanceo- 
late with acuminate incurved points, laterally much com- 
pressed, 1 -flowered, green beyond the middle, scarlet below 
it. Flowers projecting half an inch beyond the bracts, elon- 
gate, bluntly trigonous ; ovary oblong. Perianth pale yellow, 
outer segments linear-oblong, coriaceous, keeled, rounded at 
the tips ; inner, twice as long as the outer, cohering nearly 
to the tips, which are dark green. Scales within the 
base of the perianth oblong, obtuse. Filaments filiform; 
anthers linear, yellow, their tips exserted. Style thickened 
at the base, flexuous ; stigmas 3, short. Capsule (in dried 
specimen) trigonous, valves rigid pungent, back deeplv 
wrinkled.—/. D. II F J 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, style and stigmas ; 3, segment of inner perianth, stamen 
and scales : — all magnified. 



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HARVESTING ANTS 

AND 

TRAP-DOOR SPIDERS. 

NOTES AND OBSERVATIONS ON THEIR 



BY 



J. TRAHERNE MOGGRIDGE, F.L.S. 




LONDON: 
L. REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GAKDBN. 

1873. 



In the first part of this work the Author shows that certain 
South-European Ants do employ grain and seeds as food, and are 
possessed of the provident habits attributed to them by the Ancients 
but denied by some of the most able naturalists of modern times. 
The manner in which these ants cut, carry, and store their 
harvest, and treat sprouted seeds, as also the structure of their 
granaries and passages, sometimes excavated in the solid sand- 
stone rock, with many other details, will be found illustrated and 
described here. 

The second part contains an account of what is known of the 
habits and economy of the Trap-door Spiders, the explanations 
being accompanied by plates and woodcuts. 

Those who have, up to the present time, described the dwel- 
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lined with silk and closed at the mouth by a hinged door which 
lies level with, and is made to resemble, the surface of the earth. 

Two new types of nest, found in the Riviera, are now added, 
and in these, besides the surface door, a second subterranean 
door is present, placed a short way down the tube, and this the 
spider closes in the face of any intruder who may have entered 
the nest. One of these double-door nests is branched, the other 
unbranched. 

It is hoped that the present publication may serve to show 
that the field of observation afforded by the habits of living 
creatures is one which lies invitingly open to all true lovers of 
nature, and may still be explored with good hopes of making new 
and interesting discoveries. 



LONDON : 
L, REEVE & CO, 5, HENRIETTA ST, COVENT GARDEN, W.C. 



eon 







Tab. 6015. 

bellis rotundifolia, var. ccerulescens. 

Native of Marocco. 



Nat. Orel. Composite. — Tribe Asteroide^e. 
Genus Bellis, Linn.; (Benth. and Hooh.f. Gen. PL, vol. ii. p. 265.) 



Bellis robundifolia • perennis, foliis gracile petiolatis late ovatis orbiculatisve 
apice rotundatis sinuato-dentatis 3-nerviis appresse pilosis, scapo gracili 
pubescente, capitulo \-\\ poll, diam., involucri bracteis pubescentibus 
v. hirsutis suba?qualibus, corollis radii albis v. azureis discique basin 
versus pilosulis, achgeniis epapposis marginibus ciliatis. 

Bellis rotundifolia, Boiss. et Reut. Pugill. PL Nov. Alger, et Hisp., p. 55, 
excl. syn. ; Wilkomm et Lange Prodr. Fl. Hisp., vol. ii. p. 32, 
excl. syn. 

Var. ccendescens, corollis radii azureis. Bellis ccertdescens, Coss. Mss. in 
Herb. Balansa. 



The Blue Daisy is one of the commonest spring flowers in 
various parts of Marocco, abounding in fields with a rich soil 
on the hills near Tangier, and occurring in great profusion by 
the water-courses of the valleys of the Greater Atlas in lat. 31°, 
at elevations of 4000 to 11,000 feet. In the low country 
between Tangier and the Atlas, as at Mazagan, Casa Blanca, 
Mogador, and the base of the Atlas, it was not found. 
Specimens brought by Mr. Maw and myself flowered both at 
Brosely and Kew, in May and September respectively ; of 
these Mr. Maw's (here figured) were by far the most luxu- 
riant, the specimen being twice as large as any gathered by 
myself in Marocco, and more glabrous. A pot-full of this 
species in flower presents a most beautiful appearance, from 
the delicate azure hue of the ray-flowers. 

Bellis rotundifolta was first described from specimens col- 
lected by its discoverers, Messrs. Boissier and Beuter, in 
Oran, the westernmost province of Algeria (that adjoining 

nSBKUABY 1st, 1878. 



Marocco), in 1849, where it has since again been gathered by 
Balansa in 1852, and by Bourgeau in 1856. It was supposed 
by its discoverer to be the same as Bellium rotundifolium, 
Desfontaine (Flor. Atlant., vol. ii. p. 279, t. 235, f. 1), which 
is, however, a very different plant, with an obvious pappus, 
described in De Candolle's Prodromus as consisting of five 
palea3 alternating with as many bristles. The original form 
of Bellis rotmidrfolia has white flowers, and is common in 
Marocco ; the blue variety of it was first found by M. 
Balansa, during his adventurous journey in Marocco in 
1867. 

Descr. Root perennial. Leaves more or less pubescent, 
sometimes covered with scattered appressed hairs, at others 
more tomentose ; petiole slender, one to three inches long ; 
blade three-quarters to one and a quarter inches long, ovate 
orbicular or subcordate, sinuate-toothed, 3-nerved. Scape 
slender, much exceeding the leaves. Heads three-quarters to 
one and a quarter inches in diameter, quite resembling those 
of the common daisy, but with fewer often broader ray-flowers, 
which vary from white to pale blue.—/. B. II 



.Jig- ^Flowerofray; 2 » flower °fdisk; 3, style-arms of ray flower; 4, 
ditto of disk flower -.—all magnified. 



6016 



V 




mcentBroaksi), 



Tab. 6016, 
ELLEANTHUS xanthocomus. 

Native of Peru. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe PleurothallejE. 
Genus Elleanthus, ■Presl.; (Reichb. f. in Walp. Ann., vol. vi. 472.) 



Elleanthus xanthocomus ; caulibus simplicibus, vaginis asperulis, foliis 
lanceolatis acuminatis summi vagina ampliata, racemo suberecto v. in- 
clinato, bracteis scariosis e basi ovata subulato-acuminatis nervosis 
navis inferioribus flores citrinos superantibus, ovario sepalisque ovato- 
oblongis obtuse carinatis papillosis, petalis obtusiusculis, labello obovato 
medio constricto marginibus involutis ultra medium dilatato laminaque 
parva apicali transverse oblonga 2-loba ciliato-dentatis, callis geminis 
elongatis ovatis a basi in medium labelli productis, carinis semi-lunatis 
transversis versus apicem ante-positis, columna utrinque angulata alis 
superne vix dilatatis. 

Elleanthus xanthocomus, Reichb. f. in litt. ad Wilson Saunders. 



Professor H. Eeichenbach lias identified the well-known 
genus Evelyna with the previously published Elleanthus of 
„£,:' wll ° originally established it under this name in the 
Kehquiaa Hamkeana)," published in 183G, or five years 
before Evelyna was founded by Pceppig and Endlicher, in 
honour of the accomplished English dendrologist and author, 
John Evelyn; to whom the dedication of another genus 

m °£// emblematic of his P ursuits is most justly due. 

-ttleantkis xanthocomus was described by Dr. Eeichenbach 
from specimens reared by W. Wilson Saunders, F.H.S., 
which were exhibited in May 1872, at the Koyal Horticul- 
tural Society, and were received from Peru by Major Trevor 
Uarke, F.H.S. 

The description given above is drawn up by the aid of one 

nelly communicated by Dr. Eeichenbach, who made careful 

notes and observations on the figure of the calli, &c, in the 

Pi Which are not represented in the accompanying drawing. 

«bbuabi 1st, is?:;. 



Descr. Stems ten to twelve inches high, simple, ereet, 
slender. Sheaths rough, the lower cylindric, the upper 
slightly inflated. Leaves suberect, five to seven inches long, 
lanceolate, acuminate, about 10-nerved besides the midrib, 
margins recurved, much contracted at the base, deep green 
above, paler beneath. Spike suberect or inclined, dense, two 
to three inches long, ovoid, shortly peduncled, many-flowered. 
Bracts yellow, tinged with green ; lower one inch long, 
exceeding the flower, subulate-lanceolate from an ovate base ; 
upper shorter, ovate, acuminate. Flowers crowded, bright 
yellow, sessile, half an inch long. Ovary short, papillose. 
Perianth closed. Sepals papillose, ovate-oblong, subacute, 
obtusely keeled. Petals as long, oblong, obtusely apiculate. 
Lip with the tip exserted, obovate or oblong, and panduriform 
from being contracted in the middle, margins strongly in- 
curved ; terminal lobe small, tranversely oblong, 2-lobed, 
margins and those of the outer end of the basal part of the 
lip erose and ciliate. Colli on the sides of the lip semi- 
lunar. Column scarcely dilated above. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Flower ; 2, side, and 3, front view of lip ; 4, column : — all magnified. 



6011 




' 



Vincent I 



Tab. 6017. 

ALSOMITRA sarcophylla. 

Native of Burma and Siam. 



Nat. Ord. Cucurbitaceje. — Tribe Zanonie^e. 
Genus Alsomitra, Poem.; (Benth. and Hook.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 840.) 



Alsomitra sarcophylla ; frutex scan dens, ramosissimus, glaberrimus, foliis 
crasse carnosis breviter petiolatis 3-foliolatis, foliolis breviter petiolulatis 
ovatis v. elliptico- v. oblongo-ovatis obtusis integerrimis 3-nerviis 
medio sulcatis, cirrhis simplicibus, paniculis terminalibus et axillaribus 
multifloris, floribus parvis, sepalis oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis corollae 
lobis elliptico-ovatis acutis dimidio minoribus, staminibus parvis re- 
curyis ; '< fl. £ perianthio ut in $ , ovario clavato, stylia 3-4 brevibus 
conicis carnosis stigmatibus semilunaribus" (Wall), fructu cylindraceo 
truncato, seminibus compressis testa muricata, ala oblonga byaiina. 

Alsomitra sarcophylla, Hook. f. in Benth, and Hook.f. Gen. PL, I c. 

Zaxosu sarcophylla, Wall. Plant. As. Ear., vol. ii. p. 28, t. 133. 



A singular climbing Evergreen plant, one of a small ano- 
malous tribe of Citcurbitacea, which is distinguished by its 
five stamens, 1- celled anthers and ovary, and very curious 
fruit, which is almost cylindric, and opens by a tricrural slit 
at the truncate top. It is a stove-plant, and has remarkably 
fleshy bright green foliage, which is admirably adapted for 
decorative purposes, keeping fresh for a very long time, even 
without water. The flowers, which are individually insig- 
nificant, are produced in immense abundance. This plant is 
moreover recommendable from being very free from the 
attacks of scale and the other insect-pests of the hothouse. 
It m a native of forests in Burma and Siam, abounding in 
arid, sterile, and exposed situations aloug the banks of the 
lrrawaddy river, where it was discovered by Dr. Wallich in 
1826, flowering in the month of November. Our plants 
were sent from the Calcutta Botanic Garden by the 

FEBRUARY 1st, 1873. 



late Dr. Anderson about eight years ago, and flowered for 
the first time in November 1872. 

Descr. A lofty climber, perfectly glabrous everywhere. 
Stem very slender, copiously branched ; branches cylindric, 
pendulous. Leaves alternate, 3-foliolate, petiole very short, 
thick; leaflets two to three inches long, elliptic-ovate or 
oblong, or ovate-lanceolate, obtuse or apiculate, quite entire, 
very fleshy, one-tenth of an inch in thickness, bright green, 
and obscurely 3-nerved above, channelled down the middle, 
paler and reticulated beneath ; petiolules about as long as 
the petiole. Tendrils quite simple. Panicles slender, axillary 
and terminal, pendulous, many-flowered, greenish-yellow. 
Flowers dioecious, shortly pedicelled, ebracteolate, one-third of 
an inch m diameter, very pale straw-coloured. Sepals ovate- 
oblong, acuminate, half as large as the rotate corolla, whose 
segments are elliptic-ovate and apiculate. Stamens small, 
recurved; anthers small, adnate, 1 -celled. " Ovary club- 
shaped, 1 -celled, many-ovuled ; ovules parietal ; styles three 
to tour, short, conic, stigmas semilunar. "—Wall. Fruit two 
inches long, subcylindric, obtusely 3-gonous, smooth, nar- 
rowed at the base into the pedicel. Seeds compressed ; nucleus 
obovate ^testa black, muricate ; wing oblong, obtuse, hyaline. 



4 ril g eW al ' fl r e , r / J ^ Same ' Ia i d ° pen; 3 ' *amen :-«« magnified; 

*, npeiruit. — natural size ; 5, ripe seed- natt/ml •.'« o j -j: i 

Figs. 4-7 are taken from HwSS £*^ ^^'-^Jmfied. 



6018 




"Vrn.ee; ' 



Tab. 6018. 
BRACHYOTUM confertum. 

Native of the Andes of Peru and Ecuador 



Nat. Ord. Melastomaceje. — Tribe Osbeckie^e. 
Genus, Brachyotum, Triana ; (Benth. and Ilooh. f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 743.) 



Brachyotum confertum ; frutex erectus, ramossissimus, setoso-hirtulus, foliis 
parvis petiolatis oblongis ovatisve acutis v. obtusis marginibus revolutis 
utrinque subappresse setulosis 3-nerviis, floribus poliicaribus terrai- 
nalibus solitariis breviter pedicellatis pendulis basi 6-bracteatis, bracteis 
2 foliaceis patentibus ceteris surborbiculatis cucullatis appressis, calycia 
segmentis late ovatis obtusis ovarioque sericeo-pilosis, corolla tubuloso- 
campanulata, petalis saturate purpureis oblique late obcordatis ciliofatis, 
antheris recurvis basi breviter appendiculatis, ovario libero, capsula apice 
obtuse 5-dentata. 

Brachyotum confertum, Naud. in Trans. Linn. Soc, vol. xxviii. p. 49. 

Ch^togastra confefta, DC. Prodr., vol. iii. p. 135 ; Naud. in Ann. Sc. Nat. 
Ser. 3, vol. xiv. p. 136 ; Jameson Synops. Plant. Equit., vol. i. p. 228. 

Ehexia conferta; Bonpl. Rhex., t. 20. 



A very singular and beautiful Melastomaceous shrub, 
abundant on the Andes of Ecuador and Peru, where it must 
form a very conspicuous and attractive feature in the land- 
scape. It was introduced by our friend Professor Jameson, 
late of Quito, who transmitted seeds from hills near Cuenca 
to Isaac Anderson Henry, Esq., of Trinity, Edinburgh, 
who raised the plant and flowered it profusely in a green- 
house, when eighteen inches high, in November last. We 
have herbarium specimens gathered in the Chachapoyas 
province of Peru by Matthews, and at Loja and Cuenca, 
both in Ecuador, by Seemann and Jameson. It was dis- 
covered by Humboldt and Bonpland in the beginning of the 
century. The figure in Bonpland's " Melastomaceae" is most 
unsatisfactory, and evidently coloured from a dried specimen 
or description. 

FKllRUAIiV 1st, 1873. 



Descr. An erect bush, very much branched ; branches 
suberect, cylindric, upper clothed with spreading rigid 
flexuous bristles, which are variable in quantity and length, 
being much softest and sparsest in the cultivated specimens. 
Leaves crowded, shortly petioled, a quarter to one-third of an 
inch long, coriaceous, ovate or oblong, obtuse or acute, 
margins revolute, clothed above and beneath with sub- 
appressed bristles, nerves one on each side the very stout 
midrib. Flowers solitary, terminal, shortly pedicelled, pen- 
dulous, together with the bracts upwards of an inch long, 
each with two opposite spreading leaf-like bracts, and four 
decussating orbicular concave coriaceous appressed ones, the 
inner of which reach the base of the calyx-lobes, all as well 
as the calyx clothed with appressed rather silky bristles ; the 
four inner bracts are pale yellow-green, the outer pair suf- 
fused with red. Calyx-tube broadly ovoid, lobes live, large, 
broadly ovate, concave. Corolla tubular, deep violet-purple. 
Petals broadly obliquely obcordate, ciliate, convolute. 
Stamens included, filaments short ; anthers linear, with 
short basal appendages. Ovary free, appressed, strigose, 
5-celled, 5-angled, with five obtuse terminal auricles. — 



Fig. 1. Leaf; 2, petal; 3, calyx and stamen; 4, vertical section of ditto; 
5, stamen \—hxII magnified. 



6019 







Tab. 6019. 
ZINGIBER Pabishii. 

Native of Moulmein. 



Nat. Ord. Scitamine.e. — Tribe Zingibers. 
Genus Zingiber, Gasrtn. ; (Endlicher Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 222.; 



Zingiber Parishii ; fere glaberrima, caule foliato gracili 3-pedali, foliorum 
lamina 4-7-pollicari elliptico-Ianceolata acuta in petiolum breveni 
angustata, subtus sparse appresse pilosa, scapo robusto vaginato, vaginis 
vindibus obtusis, spica 4-G-pollicari cylindraceo-subclavata, bracteis 
ad 20 erecto-patentibus imbricatis late obovatis cucullatis obtusis v. 
retusis v. truncatis viridibus marginibus rubris incurvis, ovario brevi, 
penantlno externo tubuloso obtuse 3-lobo interiore dimidio brevioiv, 
interions tubo lf-pollicari gracili, segmentis albis dorsali oblongu 
obtuso fornicato, 2 lateralibus exterioribus longioribus dependentibus 
lineari-oblongis subacutis, 2 interioribus brevibus late oblongis obtusis. 
labello segmentis exterioribus breviore obovato obtuso. venis pallide 
iusco-purpureis tessellatim reticulato, staminodiis linearibus, anthera 
ianceolata in rostrum acuminatum loculis sequilongum products. 



A very handsome species of a large and little known Indian 
genus, which can be satisfactorily illustrated by drawings 
only. It was discovered by our indefatigable correspondent, 
the Rev. C. Parish, in Moulmein, and roots were transmitted 
by him to Kew, which flowered for the first time upwards of 
~L n 3^ ar s ago. The specimen here figured, also received from 
Mr. Parish, flowered in July, 1872, in the same month as 
the previous specimen had. 

-L'Escr. Hoots fascicled on creeping rhizomes. Leafing 
stems three feet high, as thick as a swan's quill, almost 
cyhndric. Leaves with a glabrous terete sheath, short green 
? b ™ se auricles, and an elliptic-oblong or lanceolate-acute 
blade four to six inches long, which is dark green above, 
paler beneath, and there sparingly clothed with appressed 



FEBRUARY 1ST, 1873. 



hairs ; at the base they are contracted into a short petiole. 
Scape stout, three to four inches high, clothed with obtuse 
green obtusely keeled striated sheaths, the upper of which 
are acute and margined with red. Spikes four to six inches 
long, cylindric, rather broader upwards. Bracts closely im- 
bricated, erecto-patent, three-quarters of an inch in diameter, 
cucullate, green with broad scarlet margins, refuse or trun- 
cate, or obtusely apiculate. Flowers one inch long, pale straw- 
coloured, the lip reticulated in squares with brown-purple 
veins. Ovary short. Outer perianth tubular, with three short 
rounded lobes half as long as the tube of the inner perianth, 
which is one and a half inches long. Dorsal segment hooded, 
arched, linear-oblong, subacute ; outer lateral recurved, linear- 
oblong acute ; inner lateral much shorter, truncate or rounded 
at the tip. Lip obovate, much shorter than the outer lateral 
segments. Staminodes linear, obtuse. Anther linear-oblong 
produced into an erect subulate beak as long as itself. Stigma 
of two small ciliate lobes.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Flowers; 2, anther; 3, stigma; 4, ovary and staminodes:— all 
magnified. 



w 

Tab. 6020. 

COTYLEDON mamillaris. 

Native of Namaqualand. 



Nat. Ord. CrassulaceuE. 
Genus Cotyledon, Linn. ; {Benth. and Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. ii. p. 659.) 



Cotyledon mamillaris; glaberrima, caule crasso elongato parce rainoso 
ramis paucis pallide rufis apicibua decurvis laxe foliosis, foliis crassis 
laxis horizontalibus fusiformibus teretibus acutis glaucis basi in 
petiolum crassum brevem cylindraceuni contractis lsevibus, spica termi- 
nal! elongate pendula simplici rachi cylindracea fusco-rubra, fioribus 
TT-pollicaribus in fasciculos 3-floros sparsos dispositis horizontaliter 
divaricatis, bracteolis minutis, calyce parvo viridi heraispherico 
o-dentato, corolla rubro-purpurea tubo elongato 5-gono angulis cos- 
tatis, limbo parvo patenti-recurvo breviter 5-lobo, lobia saturate 
rubris undulatis caudato-acuminatis, squanmlis minutis orbiculatis 
emarginatis, ovariis angustis. 

Cotyledon- mamillaris, Linn. f. StippL, p. 242 ; Thunb. Flor. Cap., p. 397 ; 
DC. Prodr., voUii. p. 398; Harv. and Sond. Flor. Cap., vol iii.p. 377. 

C Zlicautis, Eckl. and Zeyh.fid. Hare, I.e. 



A native of the arid western districts of the Cape region, 
which contains so many of the most peculiar forms of South 
African vegetation, and whence the dry stoves of our grand- 
fathers were supplied with the majority of those curious, in- 
teresting, and often singularly beautiful succulents that are 
now all but banished from cultivation. Of the genus Cotyle- 
don there are three-and-twenty South African species alone 
described in Harvey's and Sonder's Flora, of which twelve 
were in 1811 cultivated at Kevv, where there are now 
eighteen. 

Descr. Quite glabrous. Stem one to two feet high 
(branched, creeping and rooting, according to Thunberg), 
ascending in our specimen, and sparingly branched, pale red- 
brown, as thick as the middle finger, fleshy, covered with the 

FEBRUARY 1st, 1873. 



prominent scars of fallen leaves, tips decurved. Leaves scat 
tered, two to two and a half inches long, horizontal or ascend- 
ing, spindle-shaped, pointed, contracted at the base into a 
short, stout, swollen petiole, quite cylindric on a transverse 
section, succulent, terete, quite smooth, pale, very glaucous 
green, nerveless. Spike a foot long, terminal, slender, pen- 
dulous ; peduncle and rachis dark chestnut-brown, cylindric. 
Flowers two-thirds of an inch long, in scattered fascicles of 
three, spreading horizontally from the rachis and divaricating 
from one another, quite sessile. Calyx green, hemispheric, 
with two minute bracts at the base, shortly 5-toothed. 
Corolla-tube dull red-brown, half an inch long, tubular, with 
5-ribbecl angles, contracted at the mouth; limb dull red- 
brown, a quarter of an inch in diameter, spreading and 
reflexed, 5-lobed ; lobes shallow, undulate, with a long subu- 
late point. Scales minute, orbicular, notched. Ovaries long, 
slender.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1 Whole plant :— diminished ; 2, flower and bracts on portion of 
rachis; d, flower removed; 4, ovaries and scales :— all magnified. 



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1873. 



€021 







Vmce!!' I ,'i(iv,(bij 



Tab. 6021. 
PHILODENDRON rubens. 
Native of Venezuela and Trinidad. 



Nat. Ord. Aroide,e. — Tribe Philodendrej:. 
Genus Philodendron, Schott ; {Prodr. Syst. Aroid., p. 219.) 



Philodsndron rubens; caudice robusto subereeto, vaginis stipuheformibus 
ampbs ovato-lanceolatis pallide roseis membranaceis persistentibus, 
Joins ovato-cordatis hastatiave acuminatis coriaceis basi profimde 2-Iobia 
lobis obtusis sinu lato v. angusto, venis in lobis ad 6, posticis breviter 
denudatis,petiolo gracili cylindraceo elongato superne undulato-asperatis, 
pedunculo brevi, spatha 6-8-polIicari extus albo-virescente intus 
amoene rubro-purpurascente, lamina tubo oblongo-ovoideo paulo ven- 
tricoso sesquilongiore erecta navicidari sensim in cusj)idem conicum 
erectam angustata, spadice spatha breviore v. subaequante, parte foeminea 
constricta tertiam v. quartam partem occupante, ovariis 3-4-locularibus 
multi-ovulatis, stigmatibus majusculis. 

Philodendron rubens, Schott, Synops. Avoid., p. 84; Prodr. Aroid., p. 245. 



I refer this magnificent Aroid to Schott 's P. rubens with 
little doubt, though it diners from his description in the 
length of the spadix, which he describes as being much 
shorter than the spathe, whilst in the Kew plant it equals 
the spathe in length. In all other respects the plants 
accord so well that it is not likely they should specifically 
differ ; and they further come from almost the same country ; 
ochott s plant, which he describes from cultivated specimens, 
from Venezuela, and the Kew one from the neighbouring 
island of Trinidad, whence it was sent by Dr. Cruger, then 
(in 1866) Superintendent of the Botanic Gardens. As 
Dr. Cruger was in the habit of receiving plants from the 
adjacent coast of Venezuela, and P. rubens is nowhere 
described as a Trinidad plant, it is not impossible that the 
specimen sent to Kew may have come after all from the 

makch 1st, 1873. 



former country. Dr. Schott mentions that the spathe is 
sometimes double, which implies a tendency to an abnormal 
condition of the inflorescence in his specimens, which were 
cultivated in the Imperial Gardens of Schonbrunn. 

Descu. Stem in the Kew plant two feet high, as thick as 
the wrist, inclined, cylindric, green, sending numerous roots 
into the water of the tank in which the pot stands (possibly 
the species is a climber). Stipular sheaths semi-amplexicaul, 
spreading, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, rose-coloured, mem- 
branous, surrounding the leaf-bases. Petiole one and a 
half to two feet long, slender, swollen at the base, cylindric, 
dark green, with rough raised lines towards the top. Leaf 
fifteen to sixteen inches long by thirteen to fifteen broad, ovate- 
cordate, or hastate, shortly acuminate, deep green above, 
paler beneath, lobes rounded with about six nerves in each, the 
posterior marginal for a short distance from the petiole, 
basal sinus deep, open or contracted. Peduncle short, green, 
cylindric. Spathe six to eight inches long, erect, white ex- 
ternally, suffused with green down the back and with pale 
rose colour on the sides ; inside vivid red-purple ; tube ovoid- 
oblong, rather contracted; open part longer, boat-shaped, 
narrowed into a conical erect cusp nearly one inch long. 
Spadix nearly as long as the spathe, cylindric ; pistilliferous 
part short, contracted ; staminiferous and barren parts elon- 
gated, cylindric, obtuse, white. Ovaries densely crowded, 
oboyoid, 3-4-celled ; cells many-ovuled ; stigma sessile, 
orbicular. Anthers few, fertile, broader upwards, truncate — 
J. D. H. 



Fig 1, Whole plant reduced; 2, portion of leaf of natural size; 3, upper 
part of stem sheath and inflorescence; i, spadix -.—both of natural size ; 5, 
ovary; 6, transverse, and 7, vertical section of ditto: 8, staminode ; 9, 
stamen: — all magnified. 



eon 




ncentJirooks 



Tab. 6022. 
ARPOPHYLLUM spicatum. 

Native of Mexico. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^;. — Tribe Epidendre.<e. 
Genus Arpophyllum, Llav. and Lex. ; (Lindl. Gen. and Sp. Orchid., p. 151.) 



Arpophyllum spicatum; caudice repente crassitie perms olorinse, vaginia 
inferioribus graimlatis, folio pedali complicato arcuato ligulato subacuto 
carinato, pedunculo brevi suberecto, spica cylindracea densiflora 
3-5-pollicari, floribus purpureo-roseis J poll, diam., petalis sepalis 
subasqualibus margine postico eroso, labello 3-lobo concavo margine 
eroso, lobo medio parvo orbiculari. 

Arpophyllum spicatum, Llav. and Lex. Nov. Veg. Descript., vol. ii. p. 19; 
Lindl. Gen. and Sp. Orchid., 151; Bot. Reg., vol. xxv. Misc. p. 16; 
Ann. Nat. Hist. 1840, vol. iv. p. 384; Benth. PI. Hartweg., p. 72; 
Walp. Ann. vol. vi. p. 448. 



Apparently a very rare plant, since, though described up- 
wards of forty years ago by Llave and Lexarca, and introduced 
into this country in 1839 by Hartweg, it has hitherto never 
been figured or accurately described. Indeed, so imperfect is 
the original character given by the author just mentioned, that 
I depend less upon it for the identification of the plant here 
figured, than upon Lindley's having referred the plant collected 
by Hartweg (with the dried specimens of which this accords) 
to Llave and Lexarca's Arpophyllum spicatum. It is a native 
of Mexico, and was first found by its describers at Sultepec, 
and near Aricubaro (localities which I do not find in any map 
or gazetteer), and later by Hartweg, at the Hacienda del 
Carmen, wherever that may be. There are other specimens 
of apparently the same plant in the Hookerian Herbarium, 
collected by Galeotti, in the Oak and Pine region of Oaxaia, 
at 7000 to 8500 feet elevation ; and by Jurgensen on the 
Sierra San Pedro Nolasco, Talea, &c. These differ greatly in 



march 1st, 1873. 



the length and breadth of the sheath of the peduncle, being in 
all very much larger than in the Kew plant, as also in the 
amount of glandular pubescence on the ovaries and rachis ; 
all agree in stature, habit, and the complicate arcuate leaf, 
flowers, &c. The lower sheaths of the stem are remarkably 
granulate when dry in most specimens, but not in all. The 
specimen here figured flowered in Kew, in the Catleya House, 
in April, 1872. The spike resembles in colour and form that 
of Gymnadenia conopsea. 

Descr. Rhizome cylindric, creeping, as thick as a swan's 
quill, hard, green, sending out stout roots, and ascending 
strong sheathed flowering branches, two to six inches long, 
bearing each a leaf and raceme of flowers ; sheaths somewhat 
compressed, appressed, or slightly ventricose, brown, rigidly 
coriaceous, obtuse, older ones granulate on the surface. Leaj 
about one foot long, falcate, complicate, keeled, subacute, very 
coriaceous, smooth, bright green. Peduncle three to four inches 
long, stout, green, erect, with a basal sheath, which is very 
variable in size. Spike three to five inches long, dense. Flowers 
rose-purple, one-third of an inch in diameter. Ovary slender, 
sharply angled, more or less glandular-pubescent. Sepals 
equal, broadly oblong-ovate, obtuse. Petals similar or larger, 
the upper or posterior margin erose. Lip rather longer than 
the petals, very shortly clawed ; concave ; base gibbous ; lateral 
lobes short, terminal, orbicular, cup-shaped, margins of lobes 
erose. Column obscurely toothed at the tip. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, column and lip; 3, column; 4, lip:— all magnified. 



6m 




"W.fricL I 



Tab. 6023. 
ARISARUM VULGARE. 

Native of the Mediterranean Region. 



Nat. Ord. Aroide^:. — Tribe Akisare£. 
Genus Arisarum, Targ. Tozzi ; (Schott, Prodr. Si/st. Avoid., p. 20.) 



Arisarum vulgare; foliis solitariis oblongo-hastatis obtusis apiculatis, 
pedunculo petiolo breviore v. longiore concolore v. purpureo-maculato, 
spatha fornicata brevi curva basi tumida oblique truncata lamina brevi 
cucullata obtusa v. apiculata purpurea, spadicis appendice curva apice 
globosa-clavata exserta. 

Arisarum vulgare, Targ. Tozzi, Ann. Mus. Florent., vol. ii. p. 67; Kunth. 
Enum. Plant., vol. iii. p. 15 ; Parlatore Flor. Italian., vol. ii. p. 235; 
Reichb. Ic. Flor. Germ., vol. vii. t. 7; Durieu Bot. Explor. Alger., 
t. lxiv. f. 10—12. 

Arum Arisarum, Linn. Sp. PL 1370; Gren. and Godr. Flor. France, vol. 
iii. p. 331; Moggridge Contrib. Flor. Mentone, t. 47; J acq. Hort. 
Schamb., vol. ii. t. 192; Sibthorp Flor. Grcec, t. 948. 



A very common Mediterranean plant, inhabiting earthy 
banks etc., from Palestine and Egypt to Portugal and 
Marocco, and reappearing in the Canary Islands (A. subex- 
sertum, Webb), and in the Azores {A. azoricum, Schott). 
Schott has indeed made species out of no less than twelve forms 
from so many countries within the above-named limits, but the 
characters he gives are utterly unsubstantial, and the dried 
specimens upon which he has founded them are often abso- 
lutely undistinguishable. The genus in tact consists of but 
two species, the present, which has a very wide range, and 
A. proboscidcum, Savi, of the Apennines, which is t distin- 
guished by the spathe being produced into a long twisted 
tail. 

The specimens here figured are from Marocco, where the 
plant abounds, and where my attention was directed to its 
root by Mr. Hunot of Saffi, as affording a food to the natives 
march 1st, 1873. 



during their frequent seasons of famine ; when they are duo- 
up, washed, and cooked, notwithstanding their poisonous 
properties. The Arab name is Ironne. A similar use is 
made of the roots of the great Arisamas in the Himalaya (see 
A. curvatum, Tab. nost. 5931). During my visit to Marocco 
this plant was long past flower, and I am indebted to my 
friend Dr. Leared for the specimen here figured, which he 
brought in a flowering state in November last. The spathes 
are small and much paler than in the Mediterranean forms • 
but this probably is to be accounted for by the confinement 
ol the plant on board the steamer during its homeward 
voyage; for m dried specimens from Tangier, they are as 
large and highly coloured as in European ones. 

Descr. Boot a tuber of various shapes, sometimes as large 
as a walnut but usually smaller, producing a solitary leaf 
and scape which are surrounded at the base by a membranous, 
acute sheath one to three inches long. Petiole three to eight 
inches long pale green, sometimes speckled or blotched with 
purple, terete, succulent; blade usually three inches long, but 

hr^r e \l W1Ce f h ge ° r mUGh s '™ller,. very variable in 
breadth, oblong-hastate or almost deltoid, obtuse, apiculate, 

bnght green above, paler beneath; lobes spreading or pointing 

downwards, obtuse. Scape shorter or logger than the petiole 

and LlV ? l i" n0t > S r tke ° ne and a half to tL and 
kVl U 1 ^ tU > inflated ' obli ^ el J truncate; 

d£k nurn ,' '11 1 T^ about aS lon & ™ the tube 

round the conical base of the snirliv . «r,+i ' 

Oimnp* f^„r *„ i- a a., spadix; anthers remform. 

tate-1/: Tff Y ^^ ^ V6r y Sh0rt > °%»»V 



di«o*_V°!;™^ 2 a " d 3 ' stame " s ' 4 > "vary; 5, verti cal seclion of 



60U 




Tab. 6024. 
NIDULARIUM spectabile. = ^£oze6&'# 

Native of Brazil. fit S—S&&JL 



Nat. Ord. Bromeliace*:.— Tribe Ananasse^:. 
Genus Nidularium, Lemaire Jardin Fleuriste, vol. iv., Misc., p. 60, t. 441. 



Nidularium spectabile; acaule, cjcspitosum, foliis rosulatis recurvis e basi late 
dilatata late loriformibus (ad 2-poll. latis) planiusculis minute distanter 
spinuloso-dentatis apice late sanguinea rotundatis ungue rigido ter- 
minals supra yiridibus subtus glaucescentibus albo transverse fasciatis, 
iioribus in fasciculum multifiorum terminalem sessilem dense congestis, 
bracteis lanceolatis acuminatis purpureis calycem aequantibus calycis 
Jobis oblongis longe cuspidatis sanguineis, petalis infra medium in 
tubum connatis dein ellipticis acuminatis recurvis violaceis, antheris 
sessilibus. 

Nidularium spectabile, T. Moore in Gard. Chron., 1873, p. 8. 



lhe genus Nidularium was established by Lemaire in 
18o4, and includes various species of the old genera 
Bromelia, Billbergia, &c, together with others, of which a 
dozen are enumerated by Morren, in his valuable " Catalogue 
des Bromeliacees cultivees au Jardin Botanique de l'Universite 
de Liege" (IS 7 3.) Amongst them N. Meyendorffii, Kegel, 
{Billbergia olens, Tab. nost. 5502), is the only one quoted as 
being hitherto figured in the "Botanical Magazine." The 
genus is probably a large one, and we have dried 
specimens of the foliage of several Brazilian species, 
besides the considerable number that are in cultivation. 
N. spectabile was imported by Mr. Bull from the interior 
of Brazil, and flowered in his establishment in December, 
1872. It is a very striking plant, allied to N. Meyen- 
dorffii, Lemaire (111. Hort. t. 245), but very distinct; 
and may at once be recognised from any species hitherto 
cultivated in England, by the singular bright blood-red ends 
M.uiCH 1st, 1873. 



of the leaves, whieh form a clearly defined and singular con- 
trast both to the bright green of the upper surface and the 
glaucous dull green of the lower surface of the leaf. 

Descr. Tufted, stemless. Leaves twelve to fourteen inches 
long by one and a half to two inches broad, inner shorter, 
broadly strap-shaped from a very broad sheathing base' 
slightly concave, points rounded with a beak-like cusp, 
margin with small remote spiny teeth, upper surface dark 
green except the tip, which presents a bright blood-red 
patch half an inch deep on both surfaces ; under surface 
covered with alternate dull green and dirty white lepidote 
transverse bands ; towards the base of the leaf the green 
bands are purplish. Mowers numerous in a crowded terminal 
flat-topped fascicle, one and three quarters to two inches in 
diameter, sunk amongst the uppermost leaves, spinulose 
Irom the prominent bracts, which are lanceolate concave, rose- 
purple above the middle, and terminate in acicular points. 
Ovary ovoid, white. Calyx-limb of three elliptic blood-red seg- 
ments, terminating in erect acicular points, which equal the 
corolla-tube. Corolla-tube pale, obtusely 3-angled ; limb 
three quarters of an inch diameter, of three spreading and 
recurved ovate acuminate violet-blue segments. Anthers 
linear-oblong, sessile in the mouth of the tube — /. D H. 



•J^LZS VU u red r d \ 2 ' fl0wer and br » cts ; *> Portion of tube 
and a segment of corolla with anthers; 4, ovary -.-all magnified. 



6025 




"VJncentBrooisDay SSoEjaP- 



Tab. 6025, 
ARECA pumila. 

Native of the Malayan Archipelago. 



Nat. Ord. Palmes. — Tribe Arecine^i. 
Genus Areca, Linn.; {Endl. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 247.) 



Areca pumila ; cattle humili arundinaceo basi dilatato, cicatricibus pro- 
minentibus ad 2 poll, remotis, foliisad 1-2-pedalibus, vagina cylindracea 
paulo turgida viridi, rachi glabra, petiolo brevi pinnis ad 5-jugis e basi 
lata remotis late falcato-oblongis acuminatis sub 5-nerviis subtus 
minutissime asperulis, summis confluentibus prsemorso-dentatis, spadice 
brevi arrecto breviter pedunculato glabro pinnatim ramoso, bracteis 
angustis subulato-lanceolatis, floribus masculis ultra medium ramulorum 
flexuosorum 2-seriatim imbricatis secundis, fcemineis ad basin ramu- 
lorum solitariis cum masculis 2 imperfectis stipatis, sepalis in fl. <J 
minutis petalis subacutis multoties minoribus, fl. ? sepalis amplis petalis 
paulo brevioribus, staminibus 3, fructu elongato ellipsoideo umbonato. 

Arcea pumila, Blume, Rumphia, vol. ii. p. 71, t. 99 et 102, nan Martins. 

Areca triandra, Roxb. var. pumila Miguel Fl. Ned. Ind., vol. iii. p. 11 ; 
Flore des Jardins, vol. ii. t. 10 (1859) excl. synon. Martii, Miqitelii et 
Griffithii. 

Areca triandra, Roxb. var. /3. pumila, Mart. Hist. Palm., vol. iii. p. 311. 



The present elegant Palm lias been the subject of much 
confusion. It was originally discovered by Blume, who 
appears to have communicated its discovery to Von Martius 
under the name of A. pumila. Martius, however, through 
some mistake, described and figured Blume's A. Nenga, a totally 
distinct plant, belonging to another section of the genus, for 
Blume's A. pumila. Griffith ("Calcutta Journal of Nat. Hist.," 
vol. v. 456) retains Martius' name of A. pumila for A. Nenga, 
in which he is followed by Miquel (" Fl. Ind. Bat., vol. iii. 
P- 14) ; and, lastly, the anonymous author of the " Flor e 
des Jardins " (1859), quotes all the above names as belonging 
to one plant, and accompanies them by a wretched reduced 
copy of the true A. pumila taken from Blume's work. For . 
march 1st, 1873. 



tunately Blume's excellent plates and descriptions leave no 
doubt as to the name of the plant here figured. 

With regard to Roxburgh's Areca triandra, to which Miquel 
has referred this as a variety, I was very familiar with it in 
Bengal ; it is a much larger plant, attaining 30 feet in 
height, is always stoloniferous, and has usually many more 
and narrower pinnules. 

A. pumila is a native of Java, and was received at the Royal 
Gardens from Holland many years ago j it flowered fre- 
quently, usually in the spring months, up till some six years 
ago, when it died after transplantation. 

Descb .Stem three feet high, erect, slender, without 
stolons, solitary, swollen at the very base, green ; rings very 
prominent, two inches apart. Leaves few, about two feet long ; 
sheath cylmdnc, slightly inflated, green, petiole short and 
rather smooth ; blade ovate-oblong, cut into about five pairs of 
leaflets^ which are rather distant, oblong from a very broad 
base, falcate, acuminate, about 5-nerved, minutely asperulous 
beneath. Spathe suberect, much shorter than the leaf-sheath, 
nabellately sparingly branched, stout, shortly peduncled, 
green, quite gabrous. Flowers unilateral ; $ minute, 2 -seriate, 
imbricate on slender white flexuous branchlets, secund. Sepals 
mmute triangular. Petals elliptic-ovate, subacute. Stamens 
three : fl. 9 sessile at the base of the small branches, with a 
mmute imperfect male flower on each side. Sepals green, 
broad, subacute, keeled, rather shorter than the petals. Drupe 
two inches long, ellipsoid-oblong, red-brown; umbonate.- 

«/. JJ. XI. 



Fig 1. Reduced viw of whole plant ; 2, top of stem and spadix, of the 

matb anch- ' l" S3 \ ^ flower ™ th "^ -le" and Wse of 
male branch .—all magnified; 5, friut, of natural size, from Blume. 



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6026 




incmtBroak: 



Tab. 6026. 
ZAMIOCULCAS Boivinii. 

Native of Eastern Tropical Africa. 



Nat. Ord. ABOIDEJC. — Tribe Okoxtie.i:. 
Cxenus Zamioculcas, Schott ; ( Dene, in Bull. Soc.Bot. France, vol. xvii. p. 321). 



Zamioculcas Boivinii; foliis 3-ternatim sectis, foliolis ovato-lanceolatis 
acuminatis seasilibus v. breviter petiolatis, petiolo tereti medio nodoso- 
mcrassato, pedunculo gracili, spathje lamina lanceolata acuminata intus 
pallide strammea, extus luride viridi lineolis fuscis creberrime striolata. 

Zamioculcas Boivinii, Dene. I, c. p. 322. 



When last year I figured in this Magazine the curious 
Z. Loddic/edi (Tab. 5985), and called attention to the fact of 
a species with bipinnate leaves having been described by my 
friend M. Decaisne, I little expected that living specimens of 
this wore then actually on their way to Kew from its inde- 
fatigable correspondent Dr. Kirk, II. B. M. Vice-Consul at 
Zanzibar, who procured them from the coast opposite to that 
island. Further, on referring to the Herbarium, I find 
under the genus Antkomdmes dried specimens of this same 
Zamioctdcas, collected by Dr. Kirk himself, when accom- 
panying Dr. Livingstone on his second expedition, in 1861, 
on the banks of the Shire river, opposite to the rapids of 
Zedzani. As a species this differs widely in habit from Z. 
Loddifjexu, bearing apparently only a single leaf, whose 
petiole is not so remarkably clavate at the base, though 
similarly swollen into a node at the middle ; the peduncle 
is very much longer and more slender, the spathe much larger, 
longer, and more lanceolate, and the spadix of a very diffe- 
rent form ; the filaments also are different, the anthers open 
by pores, the ovary has a distinct style, and lastly, instead 
Oi being all over pure bright greea, the peduncles", petioles, 
und spathe externally of Z. Boivinii are of a lurid green, 

APRIL 1st, 1873. 



fasciated with pencilled streaks of greenish or purplish brown, 
giving* a singularly lurid and snake-like look to the plant. 
Considering all these points, it is perhaps doubtful whether 
Z. Boivinii should not be regarded as the type of a distinct 
genus or sub-genus, to which the name of Gonatopus, in 
allusion to the knee-like swelling on the petiole, might be 
applied. 

Descr. Rhizome short, dilated. Leaf in our specimen soli- 
tary, radical, enclosed at the base along with the peduncle in a 
few short membranous acute sheaths, two to three feet long, 
erect ; blade triangular-ovate, triternately pinnate ; petiole as 
thick as the little finger, with one swollen oblong node in 
the middle, and as well as the slender rachis, partial petioles, 
and peduncles of the spathes, of a dull green, crossed by 
irregular bands of brownish stria? ; pinna) opposite, sessile or 
shortly petioled, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, membranous, 
faintly nerved. Peduncles two in our specimen, one on each 
side of the petiole, shorter and much more slender than it is, 
cylindric, terete. Spathe six inches long, ovate-lanceolate 
from a short sheathing base that embraces the female flowers, 
long-acuminate; blade revolute, dirty yellow-green inside, 
lurid yellow-green outside, with six to eight obscure dark 
nerves and innumerable dark striae. Spadix equalling the 
spathe; female portion one inch long, subglobose ; male 
portion cylindric, four inches long by one-third of an inch 
broad, yellow, terete, densely clothed with yellow hexagonal 
ilowers, whose truncate perianth-segments give it an even 
surface. Perianth-segments four, prismatic, thick, truncate, 
closely embracing the organs of fructification. Male flower :— 
stamens four, surrounding a rudimentary pistil, filaments very 
short, broad ; anthers included, incumbent, didymous, cells 
opening by large terminal pores. Female flower":— ovary ob- 
o void, 2 -celled, contracted into a columnar style with a capitate 
stigma; ovules ascending from the septum, solitary in each 
cell, micropyle inferior. — J. I). II. 



Fig. 1, Reduced figure of plant ; 2, pinnules of the natomi size :—3, mule 
flower; 4, atainens and rudimentary ovary; 5, Btamen; 0, female flower ; 
., pistil; 8, vertical section of ditto : — all magnified 



€027. 







1 ' 




SncentBTooksDay ic Sonjmp 



Tab. 6027. 

sedum dasyphyllum, var. glanduliferum. 

Native of Spain and Marocco. 



Nat. Ord. Crassulaceve. 
Genus Sedum, L. ; {Benth. and Hook f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 609). 



Sedum dasyphyllum var. glanduliferum; humile, cjespitosum, glaucum, 
glanduloso-pubescens, caulibus brevibus basi ramosis tortuosis, foliis 
surculorum dense congestis ovoideis v. ellipsoideis teretibus obtusis, 
caulinis sparsis consinulibus v. longioribus et subspathulatis, cymis 
paucifloris, sepalis oblongis obtusis petalisque albis roseo-tinctis extus 
glanduloso-pubescentibus, ovariis turgidis hispidulis in stylos breves 
suberectos repente angustatis, glandulis hypogynis parvis. 

Sedum dasyphyllum, var. £ glanduliferum, Moris Flor. Sardoa, vol. ii. 
p. 125. 

Sedum glanduliferum, Gussone Flor. Sic. Prodr., vol. i. p. 519 ; Tenorc 
Flor. Neap. Syll, p. 226, et Flor. Nap., vol. iv. p. 251, t. 232, f. 2; 
Boiss. Voy. Espagn., p. 226. 

Sedum Corsicum, Buby Bot. Gall., vol. i. p. 292 ; DC. Prodr., vol. iii. p. 406 ; 
Tenor* Flor. Nap., vol. iv. p. 252. 



A very free -growing variety of Sedum dcmjphjUmn, well 
adapted on this account and from its glaucous habit for rock- 
work cultivation. It is a native of dry rocks and banks in 
Spain, extending thence to Sicily, Corsica, and Calabria, 
ascending in the former country to 7000 feet elevation on 
the Sierra Nevada, and also occurring in North Africa from 
the Atlas to the Blidah province of Algeria and throughout 
the mountainous regions of Marocco. It is most nearly 
allied to S. dasyph/Uum, as a variety of which it is no doubt 
correctly regarded by Moris in his Flora Sardoa, who ob- 
serves that the amount of glandular pubescence varies 
greatly, and that the petals are obtuse, acute, or shortly 
acuminate in both the original S. dasyphyllum and its variety. 



■ut.ii. 1st, IS7:j. 



It flowered both in the Eoyal Gardens and at Benthall Hall 
from plants brought from the greater Atlas by Mr. Maw and 
myself in 1871. 

Descr. Tufted, perennial, glaucous, glandular-pubescent. 
Stems prostrate and ascending, one to three inches long, the 
flowerless shoots short, densely clothed with imbricating 
leaves, and forming club-shaped masses. Leaves a quarter to 
one-third of an inch long, succulent, sessile, ovoid or ellipsoid 
obtuse, terete, hardly flattened on the upper surface ; those on 
the flower-bearing stems remote, often larger and more 
obovate or spathulate. Cymes 5-8-flowered ; flowers very 
shortly pedicelled, one-third of an inch in diameter, white 
with rose-coloured tips and dorsal keel of the petals. Sepals 
green, oblong, obtuse, glandular, half as long as the corolla 
fetal* elkpfac-ovate, acute obtuse or shortly acuminate, 
glandular-pubescent at the back. Anthers brown. Glands 
short small, clavate. Ovaries turgid, hispid, abruptly con- 
tracted into short somewhat recurved styles. J. J) j/ 



«£? gi?L L r,^4 b j: d ; *> "«« "^ . 5, ovaries and hypo- 



6078 




W.atch.deietJiti 



,-S?tmJinp 



Tab. 6028, 
FREYCINETIA Banksii. 

Native of New Zealand. 



Nat. Ord. Pandane^e. 
Genua Fijeycinetia, Gaudichaud ; (Endl. Gen, PI., p. 212). 



* rf/tcinetia Banksii ; alte scandens, caule gracili ramoso, ramis foliosis, 
folns confe-rtis 2-3-pedalibus e basi vaginante anguste lineari-subulatis 
1-poJl. latis marginibus carinaque minute spinuloso-serrulatis, bracteis 
e basi lata ovata concava carnosa alba v. pallide lilacina subulato- 
lanceolatis erectis, spadicibus simplicibus erectis breviter crasse pedun- 
culitis, masculis 3-5 poll, longis ^ poll, diametro elongato conk-is 
obtusis, staminibus 8-12 circa ovarium rudimentarium oblongum 
cretudatum dispositis, filamentis elongatis, spadice femineo oblongo- 
cylmdraceo obtuso, ovariis longitudinaliter elongatis, stylo crasso disco 
angusto crenulato (crenulis stiginatibus respondentibus) coronato, ovulis 
numerosissimis supra totam superticiem internam cavitatis ovarii con- 
iertis oblique pendulis, staminodiis parvis remotis spatliulatis stylo 
adnatis. 

Fretcinetia Banksii, Cunningham in Hook. Comp. Bot. Mag., vol. ii. p. ;!77 ; 
Hook.f. Flor. Nov. ZeL, vol. i. p. 237, t. 54, 55 ; Handbook of the New 
Zealand Flora, p. 275. 



A well-known New Zealand plant, the Kie Kie of the 
natives (according to Mr. Mantell), whose fleshy bracts, called 
Tawhara, are greedily eaten by them, and also made by the 
colonists into a very luscious jelly tasting like strawberries. 
In reference to this, the late Dr. Sinclair informed me that 
this food was so highly prized by the natives, that in some 
parts of the island, the forests where the plant abounds is 
tabooed till the bracts are ready for eating, when the members 
of the tribe to whom the forest belongs, at a given signal rush 
into the woods and satiate themselves with the luscious food. 
It is common in the forests of the Northern Island, as far south 
as the East Gape, and it is said to occur in the Middle Island 
also, but J have seen no specimens from thence. It festoons 



A1M1IL 1ST, l.Sy.'i. 



the trees, winch it climbs by means of its clasping roots, pre- 
senting a very beautiful appearance. The leaves are used for 
basket-making. Two plants of it are grown in the Palm- 
house at Kew, and have attained one, the female, the height 
of five feet, the other of about three ; both flowered for the first 
time this year, the male first, and so long before the female 
showed any sign of flowering, that the pollen of the former 
was all shed before the opportunity offered of fertilizing the 
latter. The bracts of the male were pure white, those of 
the female a pale lilac. The plants were sent to the Eoyal 
Gardens in a Ward's case by Dr. Hector, F.E.S., the Director 
of the Geological Survey of New Zealand. 

Descr. A lofty climber, ascending the trees for one 
hundred feet and more. Stem rooting, slender, about one 
inch in diameter. Leaves two to three feet long by one inch 
broad, elongate linear- subulate, spreading and recurved, 
minutely spinulose-serrulate, keeled, concave, tip trigonous, 
green with a paler line halfway between the midrib and 
margin. Inflorescence dioecious, in the centre of the extremity 
of the branches, surrounded by bracts three to six inches 
long, that have an ovate very fleshy, white or pale lilac base 
and subulate tip. Spadices crowded, erect, shortly peduncled ; 
males three to five inches long, by one-third of an inch in 
diameter, gradually narrowed to the obtuse tip, bright yellow. 
Flowers crowded, each consisting of eight to twelve stamens 
surrounding a vertically elongated crenulate green disk ; fila- 
ments slender, anthers small. Female spadix shorter than the 
male, elongate oblong, cylindric, tip rounded. Ovaries densely 
crowded, consisting of a vertically elongated laterally com- 
pressed hard green style bearing eight to ten spathulate 
staminodes on its sides, and crowned by a crenulate stigmati- 
ferous disk, placed on a wedge-shaped cell, the inner surface 
of which is densely crowded with anatropous ovules. 
Fruiting spadix green, five inches long. J. D. II 



Fig 1, Reduced view of branch, leaves, and inflorescence, about one-eighth 
natural s lze ; 2, male spadix and bract; 3, portion of spadix and male 
Umver ; 4, ripe female spadix ; 5, its style and staminodes, of the natural 
«Wj (>, vertical section of ovary, with ovules: — magnified. 



601$ 




Xfitdi dd eUith 



lucent Brooks Day* Son™* 



Tab. 6029. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM tripudians. 

Native of Peru. 



Nat. Ord. Okchideje. — Tribe Vande^e. 
Genus Odontoglossum, It. B. and K. ; (Lindl. Fol. Orchid., Odontoglossum). 



Odontoglossum tripudians ; pseudobulbis ovoideo-oblongis compressis, foliis 
7-10-pollicaribus lineari-lanceolatis acuminatis, racemo simplici pluri- 
floro, bracteis subulato-lanceolatis pedicello dimidio brevioribus, floribus 
2-poll. diametro, sepalis elliptico-oblongis acuminatis intus castam-is 
basi et apice aureis, petalis sepalis subsimilibus aureis plagis latis lobatis 
castaneis transversis notatis, labello albo roseo maculato brevissime 
unguiculato ambitu oblongo-quadrato, medio constricto, lobo basilar? 
margine obscure crenato, terminali paullo latiore rotundato apicu- 
lato marginibus erosis, disco basi carinis ad 10 flabellatim dispQsitis, 
carinis 4 interioribus longius productis spinescentibus, columns supenu: 
alatas alia laceria incurvis. 

Odontoglossum tripudians, Reichb.f. in Bonplandia, 11 Jahrgang (1854) p. 
100; Walp. Ann., vol. vi. p. 830. 



The genus Odontoglossum is now so largely increased in 
number of species and in the beauty of these, that it may 
fairly be said to rival Dendrobium in the estimation of Horti- 
culturists and especially of Orchid growers. The present 
beautiful species was discovered by Warsewicz in about 
1849, and described by H. Keichenbach in the work quoted 
above, where it is compared with O. rigidum, Lindl., a species 
differing in the long claw of the lip and in other respects. 
It was flowered by Messrs. Veitch in January of the present 
year, and for brilliancy of colour and size of flower is cer- 
tainly a magnificent species. It had been placed in the 
section Xanthoglossum, from which, however, the white colour 
of the lip removes it. The contrast between the muddy 
yellow-green of the back of the flower, and the clear, bright 

april 1st, l-s?:;. 



hues of the front is very remarkable, and rendered all the 
more so by the habit of the plant, which (in the specimen 
here figured) turns all the flowers on one side of the raceme 
to the observer and the other away ; considering that the 
raceme is erect, this suggests either a possible rotation of 
the rachis so as to expose the flowers by turns to the light, 
or an arrangement by which one side secures the forenoon 
and the other the afternoon exposure to the light. 

Descr. Pseudobulbs ovoid-oblong, about three inches 
long, compressed, green. Leaves seven to ten inches long, 
linear-lanceolate, acuminate, keeled, deep green above, paler 
beneath. Eaceme erect, longer than the leaves, 8-10-flowered, 
nearly naked, peduncle and rachis stiff, green j bracts small, 
triangular-lanceolate, shorter than the pedicels. Flowers two 
inches in diameter ; perianth spreading, dull yellow-green on 
the back, except at the tip. Sepals elliptic-oblong, acuminate, 
rich maroon brown, with golden tips and bases. Petals 
equalling the sepals, golden yellow, with very broad trans- 
verse maroon brown lobed blotches. Lip oblong in outline, 
shortly clawed, white with rose-coloured blotches; lateral 
lobes rounded, obscurely crenate ; terminal suborbicular, api- 
culate, erose; disk with about ten keels radiating from the 
claw, of which the four inner are produced on to the surface 
of the basal lobe, and end each in a spinous process. Column 
winged at the tip, wings incurved, deeply 3-6-toothed.— 



Fig. 1, Column and lip '.—magnified. 



mo 




l&ncent Brooks Day & ScmJmp 



Tab. 6030. 
CHAM^DOREA Tepejilote. 

Native of Eastern Mexico, 



Nat. Ord. Palmes. — Tribe Arecine.e. 
Genus Cham^dorea, Willd. ; (End!. Gen. Plant, p. 245). 



Chaxledekea Tepejilote : caule solitario gracili erecto non radicante, inter- 
nodiis 1— 2-pollicaribus, foliis 3— 4-pedalibus pinnatis, pinnis multijugis 
ad 1J pedalibus anguste lanceolatis acuminatis leviter falcatis sub 
7-nerviis, spathis numerosis 6— 10-pollicaribus laxis viridibus rostrato- 
acuminatis ad medium clausia, spadice $ pedunculato curvo nutante, 
pedunculo subcylindraceo, ramis perplurimis pendulis 5-7-polliearil>us 
teretibus, floribus 6-seriatim dispositis, perianthii segmentia exterioribus 
obsoletis interioribus transverse oblongis, filamentis basi liberis, 
antheris obliquis, spadice $> suberecto ramis 6-10 divaricatis cylin- 
draceis quam $ brevioribus et strictioribus, floribus semi-immersis, 
perianthio maris. 

Chajledorea Tepejilote, Liebm. in Mart Hist. Palm., vol. iii. p. 308. 

Stephanostachys Tepejilote, Oersted Palmes Centroamerkance, p. 28, ex 

Natur. Hist. Foren. Vidensh. MeddeUls. 1858, an S. Wendlandiana, 

Oersted, I. c. ? 



A very graceful palm, introduced from Mexico by Wendland 
of Herrenhausen, Hanover, to whom the Eoyal Gardens are 
indebted for the specimen here figured, which flowered for 
the first time in 1860, and has done so repeatedly since. It is 
probably the plant described by Oersted as C. (Stephanostachys) 
Wendlandiana, and which was cultivated in the Herrenhausen 
stoves under the name of C. Tepejilote, Liebm., and which 
Oersted distinguishes from that species by the more numerous 
branches of the spadix, longer outer perianth-segments and 
more obtuse inner ones ; but as I am quite unable to discover 
any developed outer perianth, and the plant otherwise agrees 
perfectly with Liebman's original Herbarium specimen of 
C Tepejilote, I am obliged to adopt his name, doubting 
greatly the specific distinctness of the two. 

APRIL 1st, 1873. 



Descr. Stem erect, ten feet high, as thick as a stout cane ; 
joints numerous, green, swollen upwards, the very lowest 
only rooting. Leaves three to four feet long, spreading, 
pinnate, pinnules in many (twelve to twenty) pairs, one to 
one and a half feet long by one and a half to two inches 
broad, slightly curved, narrow lanceolate, acuminate, 7-nerved, 
green. Male spadix with a long erect sheathed peduncle, 
which curves and branches beyond the sheaths; sheaths 
about seven, rather lax, very rigid and coriaceous* green, six 
to ten inches long, the last longest ending in a long beak, 
all acuminate, and closed for about halfway up ; branches of 
spadix twenty to thirty, pendulous, six to ten inches long, 
a quarter of an inch in diameter, quite cylindric and terete, 
densely clothed to the base with golden yellow flowers, 
apiculate. Outer perianth obsolete ; inner of three trans- 
versely oblong segments. Stamens sessile in the base of the 
perianth, filaments clavate, free at the base ; anthers short, 
oblique. Female spadix erect, with six to ten shorter strict 
spreading branches.— J! D. If. 



Fig. 1, Seduced view of the whole plant ; 2, portion of male spadix of the 
natural size; 3, male flowers on the axis; 4, male flower removed; 5, 
stamen : — all magnified^ 



60ol 




ethth 






Tab. 6031. 
CROCUS Olivier:. 

Native of Greece. 

Nat. Ord. Iride^.— Tribe Ixie^;. 
Genus Crocus, Town. ; (Klatt in Linncea, vol. xxxiv. p. 647). 



Crocus Ohvieri; cormis mediocribus globosis, tunicis membranaceis brunneis 
basin versus fibrosis fibris parallels, foliis 4-5 flores superautibus 
s poll, diam., margimbus Isevibus non recurvis, costa subtus prominula 
ciliolata, subtus glaucis, vaginis Iatis ex albo virescentibus, spatha 
^-valvi corolla fete aurantiaca, tubo 3-4 pollicari, limbi lobis obtusis 
extus basi 3-fasciatis, fauce glabra concolore, antheris pallide citrinis 
mamentis concoloribus longioribus, stigmatibus aurantiacis 2-3-fidis 
lobis elongatis. 

Crocus Olivieri, J. Gay in Ferussac Bull. Se. Nat, vol. xv. p. 219 (Jan. 
"H»J; Koernicke in Flora 1856, p. 470. 

C Aucheri, Boiss. Diagn. Pi. Q r ., vol. xiii. p. 13 (1867); W alp. Ann., 
vol. vj. p. 52. 



hv^! g1 ^ J ? etected in the Island of Scio in the Levant, 
»ytne French oriental traveller and botanist Olivier, from 
in wh 6Ctl0ns [t was described by M. Gay of Paris, 

thP K° SQ tj°^ S t0 tlle ori g inaI specimen (now preserved in 
ue ivew Herbarium), he states that he does not see how it 

ners irom a plant collected by the same traveller between 
in A ° Tr L Sub »equently it was collected at Guenive 

* Asia Minor by Aucher Eloi, and described from thence as 
it rf\ S P ecies h y Boissier (C. Aucheri). More recently still 

nas been gathered in the Abies region of Attica in Greece, 
at elections of l-3500ft. by Professor Orphanides ; and by 
flowp • l ■ a T ngst the m elting snows of Mount Parmes, 

nearl Sr m j m ° nth ° f March " As a s P ecies {t is raost 

luteus T T i i0 ,i ?' m(esiac M, Gawler, Tab. nost. 1111,(6'. 

*, uamk., 6. lageneBjiorus, Salisb., C. aurem, Smith, Tab. 

april 1st, 1873. 



nost. 2986, C vernus, Curt., Tab. nost. 45, non Smith ; all 
according to J. Gay's notes), which differs conspicuously in 
the entire stigmata, much larger size, paler colour and coarser 
habit. I have not quoted Klatt's monograph (Linnsea, v. 
34), because, as Mr. Baker informs me, he is in error with 
regard to all the synonymy of C. sulfureus, Ker, under which 
he includes C. Olivieri. 

Crocus Olivieri flowered in January in the Eoyal Gardens, 
and I received it at the same time from my friend Giles 
Munby, Esq., under the better known name of C. Auckeri. 

Descr. Corms about the size of a hazel-nut, globose, 
covered with a thin membranous shining coat that becomes 
torn into parallel (not reticulate) fibres at the base. Sheaths 
several, broad, greenish-white, membranous. Leaves over- 
topping the flowers, about one-eighth of an inch broad, acute, 
green, margins not recurved, quite smooth, glaucous beneath 
with a very prominent ciliolate keel. Spathes 2-valved, nearly 
equaling or exceeding the corolla-tube. Corolla bright golden 
orange, faintly smelling, tube three to four inches long ; limb 
nearly two inches in diameter ; throat glabrous, concolorous ; 
segments obtuse, rather broad, each with three dark streaks 
outside near the base which extend a little way down the 
tube. Anthers pale lemon coloured. Stigmas orange-yellow, 
each deeply 2-3-fid.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of the tunic of the corm; 2, transverse section of leaf; 3, 
stigmas : — all magnified. 









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6032 




Vincent Brooks Diy & Soul 



T^b. 6032. 

PHAJUS BLUMEI var. Bernaysii 

Native of Queensland. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide,e. — Tribe, EpTOENDR&fi. 

Genus Piiajus, Lour. ; (Lindl. Gen. et Sp. Orchid., p. 120). 



Phajus Blumei ; foliis non maculatis, sepalis petalisque subroqualibus lancco- 
latis acuminatis intus coloratis, labello requilongo convoluto apice 
trilobo, lobis lateralibus brevibus obtusis, intermedio crispato orbicu- 
lari apiculato, disco obscure 3-lamellato parce piloso, calcare brevi 
obtuso v. 2-fido conico ovario quater breviore, columna clavata antice 
et dorso ima cum anthera puberula. 

Phajus Blumei, Lindl. Gen. et Sp. Orchid., 127; Vriese Illast. Orchid. 
Ind. Or. Ned. cum Ic. ; Blame Coll. Orchid. Archip. Ind. et Jap. p. 2, 
t. 1, et 5 D. 

Limodorum Incarvillei, Blume Bijd., p. 374. 

Var. Bernaysii, Reichb.f. OU8. sepalis petalisque extus albis intus sulphureis. 
columna subtriandra. P. Bernaysii, llowl. mss. ; Reichb. f. in Gard. 
Chron., March, 1873, p. 301. 



This appears to differ from P. Blumei in colour only, and 
I hence follow the opinion kindly given me by Prof. 
Reichenbach, in considering it to be a form of that plant 
Whether or no both are not further mere varieties of 
P. grandifolius, Lour., is questionable ;* the latter plant is 
stated to be found in Australia, from which country Mueller 
has described four species— viz., P. australis, Fragm. 1 hyt. 
Aust. vol. i. p. 42, from Lady Elliot's Islands ; P. kucopluem, 
I.e. vol. iv. p. 163, from Rockingham Bay ; P- grandifohus, 

* Dr. Reichenbach obligingly informs me that he has thus distinguished 
three of the species here below mentioned. 1. P- graiuhjohus ; sepals and 
petals acute, tip of lip notched, spur short thick. 2. P. Blame,, sepals and 
petals acuminate, tip of lip acute, spur short thick. 3. P. WaUtChtt; spui 
longer, riender. He adds that they might be regarded as subspecies. 

may 1st, 1873. 



from various warm parts of the East Coast ; and a P. Carroni. 
Of these he says, P. misiralis and leucopham have to be further 
compared with P. grandifolim, Lour. ; implying that the two 
former are not satisfactorily established. Judging from the 
published figures of P. grandifolius (Tab. nost. 1924, Bletia 
Tan/cervillia), and of P. Mcolor, Lindl. (Tab. nost. 4078), I 
should not be surprised if these, together with the Australian 
species and P. Blumei, proved to be all varieties of one plant, 
differing in the length of the spur ; and of which P. Wattichii, 
Wall. (PI. As. Ear. t. 158) is a form, with a narrower mid-lobe 
to the lip. In this case the species would have a wide dis- 
tribution, from Ceylon and China through the Malay to the 
Pacific Islands. 

P. Blumei, var. Bernaysii, whether a species or variety, 
differs from all the above in the sulphur-coloured inner sur- 
face of the petals, sepals, and lip ; its tending to a triandrous 
column, which it shares with P. JBlumei, is rather an abnormal 
condition of that organ than a specific character. The spur 
is shorter than in the figure of grandifolius quoted above. 
P. veratrifolius, Lindl., of Silhet, is stated to be yellow 
flowered, and Blume describes a P.Jiavus from Java, so the 
colour is not peculiar to P. Bernaysii. 

This beautiful plant was communicated from the stoves of 
Messrs. Veitch, with whom it flowered early in the present 
year. It was named Bernaysii by Dr. Rowland, in compli- 
ment to A. Eernays, Esq., one of the most active promoters 
of the Acclimatization Society of its native country, Queens- 
land, and a valued correspondent of Kew. 

Dkscr. Pseudo-bulb as large as a potato. Leaves one and 
a half to two feet long, similar to those of P. grandifolius. 
Flowering-stem and spike nearly three feet high, the latter 
many-flowered; flowers crowded, four inches in diameter, 
nearly white externally, sulphur-yellow within. Sepals and 
petals lanceolate, acuminate. Lip about as long as the petals ; 
convolute portion sulphur yellow; lateral lobes rounded, 
very short-waved, terminal white, nearly orbicular, apiculate, 
margin slightly recurved, waved, yellow on the disk, white 
towards the margin ; spur one quarter the length of the lip, 
conical, curved. Column pubescent on the front and back, as 
is the anther. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Column; 2, lip -.—both magnified. 



€033 




lei etiiti 



Tab. 6033. 
XIPHION HISTRIO. 

Native of Mount Lebanon. 



Nat. Ord. Iridace.e. — Tribe Iride.e. 
Genus Xiphion, Town. ; (Tah. rwst. , r >8!)0). 



Xiphion Histrio ; vaginis membranaceis iraa basi demum reticulatis, foliis 
pedalibus basi vaginis 8-5-pollicaribus elongatis albis tectis anguste 
subulatis tetraquetris flores longe saperantibus, spathis membranaceis 
angnstis elongatis apice obtusis, perianthii tubo gracillimo 3-poIlieari, 
segmentis exterioribus obovato-spathulatis ultra medium horizontaliter 
patentibus ceruleis, margines versus plagis saturate violaceis macalatia 
disco aureo purpureo-venoso, interioribus erectis exterioribus paulo 
brevioribus longe unguiculatis anguste oblongo-lanceolatis apice obtusis 
mtegris azureis, stigmatis segmentis apice remotis erectis dimidiato- 
oblongis subacutis margine exteriore obtuse crenato. 

Iris Histrio, Eeichenb.f. in. Bot. Zeit. 1872, p. 488. 

Iris Libani, Reuter mss. 



I received plants of this beautiful species in a fresh state 
and in full flower, from Mr. Berberey of La Ferriere, near 
Geneva, early in March last, with his own and M. Boissier's 
request that it should be figured in the Botanical Magazine. 
Mr. Berberey further has had the goodness to inform me that 
it is the Iris Libani of his late lamented friend, M. Eeuter's 
Mss., and was sent about ten years ago to M. Boissier by M. 
Gaillardot, who found it on Mount Lebanon and on Mount 
Grerizim, in Palestine ; as also that its nearest ally is X reli- 
culatum, M. Bieb. (Tab. nost. 5577, sub. Iris), from which it 
differs not only in structural characters, but in its paler colour, 
in flowering fully six weeks earlier, and in being inodorous. 
A comparison with X. reticulatum shows that this is further 
abundantly different, in its much smaller size, copious finely- 
reticulated sheaths of the corm, much fewer shorter broader 
stout leaves often not exceeding the scape, broader spathes 
mat 1st, 187:;. 



and differently shaped inner perianth-segments, which are 
notched at the tip. It is a very beautiful plant, but whether 
hardy in this country remains to be proved ; as a pot plant 
it cannot fail to be highly prized. 

Descr. Tufted, slender, rather flaccid. Conn ovoid, the 
size of a wren's egg, clothed with pale membranous sheaths, 
which are slightly reticulated in age. Sheaths of the scape 
and leaves (inner), three to five inches long, white, very mem- 
branous, obtuse or subacute, margins entire. Leaves a foot 
long, one-sixth of an inch in diameter, linear-subulate, acute, 
acutely 4-angled, with a deep angular groove upon each face, 
dark green. Scape very slender, not half the length of the 
leaves, clothed with sheaths, of which the upper are acute. 
Spathes very membranous, narrow, acuminate, white, nearly 
equalling the perianth-tube. Flower three inches in diameter. 
Perianth-tube three to four inches long, very slender, blue 
above ; outer segments obovate-spathulate, spreading but not 
reflexed above the middle, claw narrow, blue with dark purple 
rib and veins externally ; blade deep blue round the margins, 
fading to pale purple towards the faintly golden disk, which 
is streaked with purple veins, blotched with dark blue on the 
uppermost third ; inner segments shorter, paler, and more 
grey blue, erect, lanceolate-spathulate, margins quite entire. 
Stigmatic lobes half an inch long, spreading, rather distant 
above, dimidiate-ovate, acute, outer margins crenate, of the 
same colour as the inner perianth- segments. Ovary very 
narrow, ellipsoid. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Section of leaf; 2, upper part of style and stigma : — loth magnified. 



6054 




W fitch 



^cer>tBroolls:Da5r& Scm-fc* 



Tab. 6034. 
ACRANTHUS arachnitis. 

Native of Madagascar. 



Nat. Ord. OKCHiDEiE. — Tribe Vanmls. 
Genus Acranthus, Lindl. ; (Gen. et tip. Orchid., p. 243). 



Acranthus arachnitis: foliis loratis non undulatis, pedunculo capillari, vaginis 
internodiis brevioribus appressis, flore 2 -poll. diam. toto viresceiite, 
perianthii segmentis e basi lata abrupte caudato-attenuutis subacutis, 
sepalo dorsali basi late ovata, laterafibus basi latioribus quam longis 
margine inferiore gibboso-producto apicibus deflexis, petalis sepalo 
dorsali consimilibus, labello recurvo e basi oblongo subquadrata in 
apicem triaugularem caudato-acuminatuin contracto, lateribus obscure 
unidentatis, calcare brevi sacciformi obtuso. 

Ackanthes arachnitis, Lindl. Bot. Reg. sub. t. 817. 

DfiNDROBIUM arachnitis, Petit- Thouars, Hist. Orchid. lies austral. d'Afrique, 
t. 88. 



The curious genus Acranthus was founded by Lindley upon 
Dendrobium arachnitis of Petit-Tliouars, and another species, 
brought by Forbes from Madagascar, and which he rightly 
distinguished as A. grandijlora (see Bot Beg. I.e.), together 
with the magnificent Angracum sesquipedale, which 1 need 
hardly add is not a congener. In his " Genera et Species 
Orchidearum," however, he modifies this opinion, and refers 
Thouars' plant with a doubt to his A. grandijlora, saying, 
" I formerly thought Du Petit-Thouars' J), arachnitis distinct 
from this, but a better acquaintance with the habits of tro- 
pical Orchidese has now induced me to cancel that supposed 
species." — There is, however, no question but that Lindley fl 
first opinion was correct, A. grandifiora differing not only in its 
greater size, but in the shorter, broader, undulate, more mem- 
branous leaves, the more numerous lax sheaths of the scape, 
that exceed the internodes, and the paler yellower green colour 
of the flower. A. arachnitis has been long cultivated at Kew 

may 1st, 1873. 



from specimens sent from the Botanic Garden of the Mauritius, 
procured no doubt from Madagascar. I find flowers of it in 
Lindley's herbarium, obtained from Kew in 1852, and well 
described in Mss. I should add that he changed the name 
(possibly through inadvertence) from Acranthes in the 
Botanical Register to Acranthus in the " Genera et Species 
Orchidearum," which latter spelling is retained in his Vege- 
table Kingdom, and hence adopted here. The plant here 
figured was sent to Kew by Mr. Home of the Mauritius 
Garden. 

Descr. Leaves equitant, five to eight inches long by three- 
quarters to one inch broad, ovate, recurved, keeled, not un- 
dulate, deeply very unequally obtusely 2-lobed at the tip, 
sheathing portion short, deep green above, paler beneath. 
Peduncle six inches long, very slender, 1-2-flowered at the 
apex, with four to six slender brown appressed sheaths which 
are shorter than the internodes. Flowers nearly two inches in 
diameter across the tips of the sepals, wholly yellow green, 
the tips of the perianth -segments, which are all caudate acu- 
minate, of a deeper yellow green. Dorsal sepal with a 
broadly ovate base ; lateral much larger, deflexed, the very 
broad base produced into a gibbous lobe on the lower side. 
Petals similar to the dorsal sepal. Lip equalling the lateral 
sepals, recurved, base quadrate-oblong, abruptly terminating 
in a triangular caudate acuminate lobe, with a notch at its 
base on each side, disk slightly pubescent, basal angles some- 
what recurved ; spur a very short inflated oblong obtuse sac— 



Fig. 1, Side view of base of column, spur, and lip ; 2, front view of column 
and spur ; 3, lip :— all magnified. 




60Z5 






Tab. 6035. 

HYPOXIS LONGIFOLIA. 
Native of Algoa Bay. 



Nat. Ord. Hypoxide^e. 
Genus Hypoxis, Linn. ; (Endl. Gen. Plant., p. 174). 



Hypoxis longifolia ; perennis, foliis basi membranaceis sublonge vaginantibus 
longissimis gramineis 2-pedalibus vix ^-poll. latis flaccidis acuminatis, 
supra concavis, subtus semicylindrieis ecarinatis, marginibus et dorso 
parcissime pilosis obscure 7-9-nerviis, scapo radicali foliis multoties 
breviore ancipiti inferne glaberrimo superne una cum ovario et 
perianthio pilis elongatis appressis molliter villoma, umbella 2-4-flore, 
bracteis setaceis pedicellis brevioribus, ovario turbinate, perianthii 
aurei l$-poll. diam. segmentis subvalvatis, exterioribus lanceolatis 
acutis extus viridibus, interioribus paulo Jatioribus carina tantum 
pubescente, staminibus epigynis, filamentis antheris ovato-cordatis 
ajquilongis, stylo brevi, stigmate conico obtuso, capsula apice tantum 
dehiscente, seminibus globosis atris. 

Hypoxis longifolia, Baker ?nss. 



A very distinct species of Hypoxis, brought by Mr. Cooper 
from Algoa Bay when collecting for W. Wilson Saunders, 
Esq., remarkable for the great length of its narrow, flaccid, 
grass-like leaves. A .very similar and probably identical 
plant is contained in the Hookerian Herbarium, gathered by 
Burke at the Tat river— a stream I do not find in the maps ; 
it differs a little in the longer and broader membranous leaf- 
sheaths and longer filiform bracts, but seems to be otherwise 
identical. Mr. Baker, who carefully examined and named 
H. longifolia, regards it as being most nearly allied to the 
N. American H. erecta (Tab. nost. 701), which is a much 
smaller plant, with shprter, broader leaves, differently shaped 
anther, and a subcapitate 3-lobed stigma. Our plant flowered 
in the Royal Gardens, August, 1871. 

Descr. Sterna tufted, covered up the neck with a few 
withered remains of old leaves, leaves numerous, the outer 

may 1st, 1873. 



two feet long, spreading on the ground ; the inner sheath 
suberect ; sheath broad, membranous, two to four inches long; 
blade grass-like, very slender, scarcely a quarter of an inch in 
diameter, flaccid, bright green, with a few scattered hairs on 
the margins and keel, back semicylindric, face concave, 
nerves five to seven, obscure. Scapes several, much shorter 
than the leaves, glabrous below the upper part as well as 
the flowers densely villous with long silky hairs. Umbel 
4 — 5-flowered, bracts very slender, filiform, subulate, shorter 
than the flowering pedicels, which are one half to three 
quarters of an inch long. Ovary turbinate. Perianth one 
and a half inches in diameter, golden yellow within, outer 
segments lanceolate, subacute, green and villous at the back ; 
inner rather broader, with a dorsal green villous midrib. 
Stamens epigynous, very small, filaments short, subulate, as 
long as the ovate-cordate small short anthers. Style shortly 
columnar from a conical base, stigma conic obtuse undivided. 
Capsule opening at the top only. Seeds several in each cell, 
globose, testa black, punctulate. — J. D. It. 



Fig. 1, Ovary, style and stigma; 2, transverse section of ditto; 3, seed : — 
all magnified. 



6036 




WEucWeLeilith 



i e D OT &So<J.IiflP 



Tab. 6036. 
CROCUS Sieberi. 

Native of Greece. 



Nat. Ord. Irideje.— Tribe Ixieje. 
Genus Crocus, Tourn. ; {Klatt in Linncea, vol. xxxiv. p. 647). 



Crocus Sieberi; cormi tunicis validis fortiter reticulatis, vagmis suWis, 
foliis 4-7-latiusculis costa nervate canaliculus enervibus involucre . 0, 
perianthii tubo pallido, fauce aureo, segments violacen, ^^ J-f*£ 
pnrpnreo striatis elliptico-oblongis obtusis, filaments brevibus flavis 
infra faucem insertis, antheris aureis filamento duplo longioribus, st.g- 
matibus croceis integris. 

Crocus Sieberi, Gay in Bull. Feruss., vol. xxxv. p. 220 (1831). 

C. nivalis, Borj, et Chaub. Voyage de la Moree (1832); Serb** inBrt. 
Beg. 1847% 4, f. 1, et Hist. Sp. Crocus in Journ Sort. Soc, vol. n. 
p. 274 (1847); Klatt in Linncea, vol. xxxiv. p. 682. 

C. sublimis, Herbert in Bot. Reg. 1845, Miscell, p. 73. 

C. vermis, Sibth. $ Sm. Prodr. Flor. Grate, vol. L p. 24 excl. synon. 



A common Greek plant, and, in fact the ^mmonest 
Crocus of that country, found at an elevation between 
1000 and 7000 feet, according to Professor Orphanide; also 
occurring in Bosnia, Crete, and Herzegovina, flower n re 
quently near the melting snow. It is a very early bloom ng 
species, and I received flowering specimens from biles 
Mumby, Esq., Messrs. Ware of Tottenham, and the Ko } ai 
Gardens, all about the middle of January and _ bcgimmgot 
April. The very closely allied C. ^ iude? T ff M^t 
which inhabits the Morea and Transylvania, differs chiefly in 
wanting: the orange colour on the throat. . 

Klatt is no doubt in error in describing the «cape as m 
volnerate. It is not so easy to understand Herberts reason 
for considering Gay's julim different from Bo s m*k 
if we suppose, what seems improbable, that tnesc a 



.MAT 1st, 1873. 



made use of the same terms to designate the various series 
of sheaths of the lower leaves and scape, which terms, as 
used by Herbert, are anything but intelligible. Herbert 
further^ alters Sieberi of Gay into Sieberiamts, in accordance 
with his own views of specific nomenclature. Bory figures 
the three stigmas as of unequal length and slightly lobed, 
which is not the case in our specimens. 

Descr. Corm the size of a hazel-nut, clothed with a stout 
longitudinally reticulate brown tunic (not well represented in 
the plate). Leaves four to seven, rather broad, produced with 
the flowers, shorter than the flowering scape, nerves very faint, 
midrib stout. Perianth without an involucre (involucrate 
according to Klatt) ; tube slender, pale ; throat golden yel- 
low ; limb two to two and a half inches in diameter, segments 
elliptic-oblong, obtuse, pale or dark violet-blue, or white with 
pale violet-blue streaks. Filaments shorter than the linear 
golden anthers. Stigmas deep orange yellow, quite entire, 
exceeding the stamens. « Capsule naked, purple towards the 
top. Seeds small, subangled, glabrous, pale brown." Her- 
bert. — /. B. II. 



Tig. 1, Reticulated fibres of the tunic; 2 and 3, stigmas :-hcth magnified. 



ZZ, March 1st, 1873. No. 951. 



"AUTOMATON LAWN MOWER" 




DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED BY 



RANSOMES. SIMS & HEAD, IPSWICH 



^ANSOMES, SIMS & HEAD are the oldest manufacturers of Lawn 

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Machine-made Gearing is adopted for communicating motion to the knives, being the 
best and simplest plan far superior to chains or other methods ; as whilst almost noiseless, it is 
not liable to get out of order. . ,. , 

The Cutting Barrels are fitted with the best knives, of rolled steel and iron combined. 
The steel forms the cutting edge and the iron at the back wears away faster than the steel edge, 
thus maintaining a sharp cutting edge much longer than when the knives are entirely ot steel, or 
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Price* including Free Delivery to the Principai E*U«*V Stations in -»* ta "* 

H-inch^obeusedbyaMan ... £5 10 O 



8-inch, suitable for very small Lawns £2 15 

io-inch, suitable for a Lady 3 10 

12-inch, „ Lad 4 10 O 



i6-inch tQ be use( ] j n , a Man *nd '. 7 io O 
lS-inch j u y \ S 

***** Cases, 5s. extra. These Ca.es are most convene/or keeping the Machines in durhuj the Winter. 1 

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BANSOMES, SIMS & HEAD^g^arantee^thesTMachines to ^°™ ****,£££. 

Perfectly, and if not approved of, they may be returned, carnage-paid, withm mom 



REPORTS FROM THIRTY-FIVE COUNTIES 



"AUTOMATON LAWN MOWER." 



l.-BEDFORDSHIRE.-From Mr. W. R. 
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4-CAMBRIDGESHIRE — Prom the Rev. 
Edwd J. Routh, M.A., Newnham —I have 
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CAMBRIDGESHIRE.-From G. P. Jos- 
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KENT.-From G B. Airy, Esq., Astron- 
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in experience that the grassought to be mown ma 
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RANSOMES, SIMS & HEAD, ORWELL WORKS, IPSWICH. 



Eeports on the Automaton Lawn Mower, continued. 



17— LANCASHIRE.-From Mr. C Rylance, 
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Gardener to R. Bagge, Esq., Gaywood Hall, 
King s Lynn.— The Automaton Lawn Mower that 
we had of you gives me great satisfaction, and I have no 
hesitation in saying that it is the best machine I have 
ever used for easiness of draught and uniform surface. 
NORFOLK.-From W. M. Hazard, Esq., 
Harleston— The 20-in. Ransomes' AutomatonLawn 
Mower I purchased of you gives me perfect satisfaction, 
and I think it is in every respect a first-class machine, 
very simple and easy to work. 

22.-NORTHAMPTONSHIRE.-Rev. A. W. 
Annand, Roade Vicarage, Northampton.— 
The Rev. A. W. Annand, has much pleasure in stating 
that he has one of Messrs. Ransomes' 14-in. Autom- 
aton Lawn Mowers in use for the last two years, and 
that during that time it has never been out of order, 
but has done its work entirely to his satisfaction. 

23.-NORTHUMBERLAND.-From J. Gib- 
? on ' Esq., Roseworth Tower, Gosforth — 
My gardener has used Ransomes' Automation Lawn 
Mower for nearly three years, and it has given entire 
satisfaction 

24;-NOTTINGHAMSHIRE.— From Rev. 
C H. Prance, Sutton Ashfleld, Mansfield. 
— I am entirely satisfied with the Automaton Lawn 
Mower yon sent me. 

25 -OXFORDSHIRE.-From Mrs. Brick- 
?n ' OverthoT-pe Lodge, Ban bury. -Mrs. 
Bnckwell has had two of Messrs. Ransomes' Automaton 
.Lawn Mowers in use for four years ; thev have done the 
work well, without requiring any repairs 

OXFORD SHIRE. -From R. Noddings, 
Esq, Elm Tree Villa, Cowley, Oxford.-The 
IU-iiieh Automaton Lawn Mower I bought of you at the 
Oxford Show last year is everything that lean wish 
for. My young stable-boy can work it with the greatest 
ease. 

2 %rSHROPSHIRE.-From Vice-Admiral 
F. Vere Cotton, Allport House, Whit- 
cnurcn.— I am much pleased with Messrs. Ransomes' 
Automaton Lawn Mower, it is doing its work perfectly. 

27,- SOMERSETSHIRE -From Mr. Henry 
.Barker, Mountlands, Taunton.— The Autom- 
aton Lawn Mower I bought of you last year works 
very well, and its construction is good. 

28-STAFFORDSHIRE-FromH. M. Mor- 
£ an « Esq.. M.D., Lichfield.— After having used 
the Ransomes' Automaton Lawn Mower the whole of 
last summer, I am able to say it duos its work efficiently, 
and has given me entire satisfaction. 

2 ^7 S ? FF 9 LK - F ' on> L- P- Jeffs, Esq., 
weybreid.— lhe two Ransomes' Automaton Lawn 

Mowers are the best machine* I ever saw. They do 
iheir work beautifully, quite beyond my expectations. 



SUFFOLK.-From J. R. Ansell, Esq., 
Kirton.— I have great pleasure in informing you that 
the Automaton Lawn Mower with which you supplied 
me in 1869 meets with my approval. I have new r had 
any thing done to it, and it is now in first-class order. 

SUFFOLK—R. Porter, Esq., Rushmere, 

Ipswich.— I have much pleasure in stating that the 
Automaton Lawn Mower (fives great satisfaction, work- 
ing very efficiently and being easily kept in order. 

30. -SURREY.— From J. Powell, Esq., Field 
House, Lark Hall Rise, Clapham— lammuch 
pleased with the Automaton Lawn Mower you supplied 
to me in 1869. It does its work very well, and has 
required no adjusting or sharpening during the whole 
period. 

SURREY.— FromR. C Bell, Esq., Kew- 
My Automaton Lawn Mower has worked very well, but 
I find it goes easier without the box, and as the cuttings 
improve the grass, and have no slovenly appearance, 1 
have left off using that appendage for some time. 

SURREY.-From A. Neame, Esq., Court 
Lodge, Sutton. — The Automaton Lawn Mower you 
supplied to me in 1869 is apparently as good as when 1 
first had it, alter having been constantly used, and has 
not cost me one shilling to keep in order. I see no 
prospect of requiring anothi r ; should I do so, I should 
certainly purchase an Automaton. 

31. -SUSSEX -From B.H.Combe,Esq.,J.P., 
Oaklands, Westfield.near Battle.— I am very 
much pleased with the Automaton Lawn Mower; it 
works very well and easily. 

32— WARWICKSHIRE.— From E. Scriver, 
Esq., Wormleighton Hill, Leamington.— 
The 12-inch Automaton Lawn Mower I had from you 
in 1867 continues to do its work efficiently, and I con- 
sider it a most excellent and durable machine. 

33. -WILTSHIRE.— From J. Ferris, Esq., 
Little Wishford, near Salisbury.— I a 

the Automaton Lawn Mower i purchased last year, a 
very useful machine. As it cuts the grass level and 
makes clean work behind, and by so doing, saves 
manual labour. 

WILTSHIRE- From Mr. Geo. Wilkin, 
GardencrtoH- F. Talbot, Esq., Lacock Abbey. 
—After using the Automaton Lawn Mower lor nearly 
three vears, it has given me entire satisfaction ; it 
performs its work quicklv and well, and I like the peai 
much better than chains. I feel much pleasure in 
recommending it to my friends, which I can do with 
confidence. 

WILTSHIRE-Fr >m Mr. John Curnick, 
Netherstreet Farm, Bromham, Devizes — 
The Automaton Lawn Mower I bought in 18S8, gives 
me great satisfaction ; it works easily, does its work 
well! "and has greatly improved my lawn, 

34 -WORCESTER.-From Messrs. Clunes 
and Davis-— We have tried one of your Automaton 
Lawn Mowers, and are pleased to say that it works 
very satisfactorily. 

35 —YORKSHIRE— From J. Blythe Robin- 
son Esq.,Westwood, Beverley.-I am happy 
to inform you that the Automaton Lawn Mower 
which I purchased of you in 1869 answers exec- 
well • I like it very much. It has never given way in 
imv part, and does it work just as well as when it was 
new although it has been constantly used. Some other 
lawn mowers are frequently getting out of order, and 
are the subject of continual complaint. 

TERSE Y.— From James Levesque, Esq., 
rrnaqrlale— The 18-inch Automaton Lawn Mower 
vou sent here gives the 1,:. ti-n ; and al- 

though in full work for two ^^ nothing 

for repairs, and is now as good as when first bought. 

IRELAND— From W. P. Urquhart. Esq., 
M P Castle Pollard, Co. Westmenth-I am 
hanpy'to add mv testimony, if it can be of any service 
to vo'u in favour of the efficiency of your Automaton 
Lawn Mower, one of which you supplied I 
It has been in constant use, has never pot out of 
order and has accomplished the ta-k of keeping a lawn 
smooth which was not in a very promising condition. 



RANSOMES, SIMS & HEAD, ORWELL WORKS, IPSWICH. 



ENLARGED DRAWING OP THE 

FRONT PART OF THE "AUTOMATON" LAWN MOWER. 




Showing mode of Adjusting the Cutters to the Ledger Blade, and regulating 
the cutting height from the ground. 

B the adjustable arm which carries the revolving knives or cutters D D- C is the fixed " ledger " or cutting 
blade, against the front edge of which the knives D D act. E and F arc adjusting screws for accurately regulating 
the revolving knives D D to the fixed ledger blade C- G are wooden rollers which support the front ot tee 
Machine and keep the knives and ledger blade just clear ot the ground. These rollers are easily adjusted Dy 
screws O. so as to regulate the cutting height from the ground. The revolving knives D D s " "!^ J ust pres f 
lightly against the fixed ledger blade (j, and this degree of nicety can be easily and exactly adjusted by means or 
the screws E and F- If, for instance, the knives do not quite touch the ledger blade C, slacken the nut E .a trine, 
and tighten the screw F- If. on the contrary, the cutters press too hard upon the blade C. then slacken the screw 
F and tighten up the nut E- A leaf of a plant or shrub, or a slip ot writing paper applied between the edges ot 
the revofving knives D D and the edge of the ledger blade C. will show when they cut properly by producing a 
clean cut, on the knives being made to revolve, and no more pressure or closeness ought to be grven ^ na ? 'J 
sufficient to produce this effect. Care should be taken never to overstrain the set screws, but they should betignt 
enough to ensure their not becoming loose of themselves. _ , 

When the knives require sharpening, take off the side wheel cover, then screw the small iron handles [sent 
with the Machine) into the arm of the outside toothed wheel, and turn this wheel rapidly backwards, first taking 
care that the frame is supported on each side by a brick or block of wood placed below the bearings of the mam 
rollers. This rapid turning of the knives m a contrary direction to that which they revolve when in use, will 
very soon sharpen both the knives and ledger blade, it at the same time oil is freely dropped upon them, and also 
some fine emery (nearly the finest made) carefully shaken upon the revolving knives. Adjust the knives upon 
the ledger blade delicately, as the process of grinding goes on. 

Full Instructions for using, keeping in order, and adjusting the Automaton Lawn Mower sent with every 
Machine, 

NEWLY DESIGNED GARDEN ROLLERS. 

Ransomes, Sims & Head can 
recommend these Rollers with the 
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rather for use than ornament. The 
bearing of the Roller is in the 
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excluded. 

These Rollers do not leave ribs 
in the grass or gravel, like the 
double rollers, and are much lower 
in price. As the axles do not 
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^ danger of injuring shrubs and 
barking trees is avoided. 




PRICES.-16 in., 60/- 18 in., 70'- 20 in., 80/- 22 in., 90- 24 in., 100/- 

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6057 







Tab. 6037. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM vexillarium. 

Native of New Grenada. 



Nat. Orel. ORCiiiDEiE. — Tribe Vande^e. 
Genus Odontoglossum, H. B. and K. ; (Lindl. Fol. Orchid., Odontoglossum) . 



Odontoglossum (Phalasnopsoidea) vexillarium; pseudobulbis parvis anguste 
oblongis compressis, foliis pedalibus anguste elliptico-lanceolatis acumi- 
natis, scapo gracili 2-4-flore, floribus maximis roseo-suffusis, perianthio 
piano, marginibus foliolorum basique labelli albis, sepalis petalisque late 
obovato-oblongis obtusis acutis v. subacutis, labello maximo orbiculari 
2-lobo, ima basi in unguem brevem contracto, ungue hastato angulis in 
cornua acuta adscendentia productis, disco pauci-calloso, colunma 
brevissima exalata. 

Odontoglossum vexillarium, Rcichb. f. in. Gardeners' Chronicle, 1867, 
p. 901 ; 1872, p. 667 cum in Xylog. ; 1873, p. 580, and 644, fig. 123. 



The first notice of this plant, which is now deservedly the 
envy of every Orchid grower who does not possess it, ap- 
peared in the " Gardeners' Chronicle" of 1 867, where, as we 
gather from our friend Professor Eeichenbach, the interests 
of science are unfortunately sacrificed to the desire of the sole 
possessor of any useful information regarding its origin and 
country that these should be withheld from the public. In 
the volume for 1872, however, a fall account of its intro- 
duction, obtained from various growers, is given by Professor 
Eeichenbach, and from which I learn that the plant was 
overlooked by Warscewicz, discovered by the late lamented 
Bowman on the western slope of the Andes of New Grenada, 
and sent home alive, but in a dying state, first by Mr. Walhs, 
when collecting for Mr. Linden, and secondly by Mr. Eoezl, 
also dead, and lastly, by Mr. Henry Chesterton, whose plants 
flowered with Messrs. Veitch, to whom I am indebted for 
the opportunity of now figuring it. Considering the worship 
now being paid to this Queen "amongst Orchids, it would be 



June 1st, 1878. 



superfluous to discuss its beauty, to which Mr. Fitch has 
done no more than justice in the plate. Its resemblance to 
a Miltonia in flower is very striking, and it adds another 
instance to the many existing of the difficulty there is in 
fixing the generic limits of epiphytic Orchids. The form of 
the sepals and labellum and their relative sizes vary exceed- 
ingly, and are very dissimilar from those figured in the 
Gardeners' Chronicle (1873, fig. 123), also from Messrs. 
Veitch's Orchid houses. 

Descr. Pseudohdbs one and a half to two and a half inches 
long, narrow-oblong, compressed. Leaves six to twelve inches 
long, by one to one and a half inches broad, narrowly elliptic- 
lanceolate from a narrower sheathing base, acute, keeled, 
deep green above, paler beneath. Scapes several, some- 
times six from one pseudobulb, very slender, longer 
than the leaves, sheaths small, distant, appressed. Racemes 
3-4-flowered ; flowers on slender pedicels, bracts a quarter of 
an inch long. Flowers much the largest of the genus, very 
variable in size, the largest four inches long ; perianth quite 
flat. Sepals subequal, obovate-oblong or obovate-cuneate, 
subacute or truncate, flat, rather recurved, very pale rose- 
coloured. Petals larger or smaller than the sepals, and of 
the same shape, but usually more acute, of a deep rose-colour, 
with a broad white margin. Lip quite flat, of one large, 
almost rounded 2-lobed limb, contracted into a claw at the 
base, and produced there into two ovate acute ascending 
bracts; there is a small 2-lobed callus at the very base of the 
claw, close to the column, and three small ones at its distal 
end j the lip is white, suffused with deep rose-colour on the 
disk of each half, and pale yellow streaked with red on the 
claw. Column very short indeed. — /. I). If. 



Fig. 1, Rase of lip and column -.—magnified. 



6038 




WBtdiddetkL 



^centBvoobDay&S^ 



Tab. 6038. 
l^elia jonghiana. 

Native of Brazil. 



Nat. Ord. Op.ciiide.e. — Tribe EpidendrEjE. 
Genus L^clia, Lindl. ; {Gen. et Sp. Orchid., p. 116)* 



Ljelia Jonghiana ; rhizomate robusto radicibus crassis, pseudobulbis 
approximatis erectis compressis elliptico-oblongis tunica alba apice 
oblique truncata acuta latere fissa arete indutis, folio solitario brevi 
lato elliptico-oblongo apice rotundato emarginato crapissime coriaceo 
saturate viridi, scapis 1-2-floris, floribus 4-4^ poll, diametr., labelli 
apice albo excepto amethystinis, sepalis lineari-lanceolatis acutis, 
petalis late elliptico-oblongis obtusis, labelli lobis undulatis crispatis 
et erosis albis, disco carinis 7 aureis parallelis undulatis ante lobum 
medium abrupte terminatis ornato, columna elongata exalata, pollinia 8. 

L^lia Jonghiana, Reichb. f. and Libon in Gardeners' Chronicle, 1872, 
p. 425 f. 128. 



According to Professor Keichenbach this very distinct and 
beautiful plant was discovered by M. Libon, an ill-fated young 
traveller, who fell a victim to his zeal in the Brazils, and after 
whom the pretty genus Libonia was named ; and the intro- 
duction is due to Mr. de Jonghe of Brussels, an eminent cul- 
tivator, after whom it was named in accordance with M. 
Libon's wishes. The specimen here figured was communi- 
cated by Messrs. Veitch, with whom it flowered in March of 
the present year. 

In the sixth volume of Walper's " Annales," the genera 
Cattleya, Lalia, and Bletia are united by Dr. Keichenbach 
under the latter name: I prefer to follow his practice 
in separating at any rate the membranous plaited leaved 
species of Bletia proper, from the coriaceous-leaved Cattleya* 
and Lcelias — though, as between Pleione and ('wlogyne, the 
difference is not always easy to support. 

Descr. Rhizome very stout, creeping, with remarkably 
thick root-fibres. Pseudobulbs one and a half to two and a 
jcxe 1st, 1873. 



half inches long, approximate, narrow ovate-oblong, com- 
pressed, green, clothed with a white membranous appressed 
sheath, that ends in a short point, and is usually split on one 
side ; a short outer boat-shaped sheath also envelops the base 
of the pseudobulb. Leaf sessile, short, three to five inches 
long by one and a half to one and three-quarters of an inch 
broad, broadly oblong, tip rounded (rarely acuminate, accord- 
ing to Mr. Luddemann), or emarginate, very coriaceous, 
indeed, deep bright green and shining. Scape stout, much 
shorter than the leaf, 1-2-flowered. Mower four inches in 
diameter across the petals, which, as well as the sepals and 
convolute body of the lip, are of a bright amethyst colour. 
Sepals linear-lanceolate, acute. Petals larger and broader 
than the petals, broadly elKptic-oblong, obtuse. Lip convo- 
lute ; lateral lobes very shallow, and, as well as the short 
emarginate midlobe, white with crisped and waved minutely 
toothed margins j disk of the body of the lip white, with 
seven parallel, slender undulate, golden-yellow ridges, which 
are not prolonged on to the midlobe. Column slender, not 
winged. Pollen masses eight. — /. D. If. 



Fig. 1, Column ; 2, lip spread open ; 3 and 4, front and back view of pollen- 
masses : — all magnified. 



6059 




IfincenLBrookeDaytSonfaP 



Tab. 6039, 

BEGONIA HERBACEA. 

Native of Brazil. 



Nat. Ord. Beuoniace^e. 
Genus Begonia, Linn. ; (A. DC. Prodr., vol. xv. pt. 1, p. 278). 



Begonia (Trachelocarpus) herbacea; rliizomate crasso repente apice folioso, 
foliis subsessilibus v. petiolatis confertis elongato-oblanceolatis acumi- 
natis irregulariter denticulate- serratis viridibHS basi contracts obtusis 
v. in petiolum angustatis, stipulis ovatis pectinato-ciliatis, floribus 
masculis ad apicem scapi elongati umbellatis, bracteis 2 oppositis con- 
cavis ciliatis, sepalis 2, petalis 0, fcemineis axillaribus sessilibus 
3-sepalis, petalis 0, ovario lagenajformi, stigmatibus reniformibus 
apicibus brevibus tortis. 

Begonia herbacea; Vellozo Flor. Flum., vol. x. t. 53; A. DC. Prodi:, 
vol. xv. p. 388. 

B. attenuate, Masters in Gard. Chron., 1873, p. 679, tig. 129 [not of A. DC.) 



This singular species of Begonia belongs to a small and 
very little known Brazilian section of the genus, of which 
there are three supposed species, all very imperfectly de- 
scribed. They differ from their congeners in the monoecious 
inflorescence, on which the male flowers are raised on long 
scapes, and the females are sessile in the axils of the leaves. 
The species here figured is a native of Rio de Janeiro, and 
is published in the " Flora Fluminensis," a work equally 
remarkable for its pretentious character and the badness of 
its execution. The figure it gives of our plant forms no 
exception to this, omitting as it does the stipules, bracts, 
female flowers and all analysis, but being in other respects 
identical and very characteristic as to habit, I have no hesita- 
tion in assuming it to be the plant before me, and hence in 
adopting Vellozo's name. It is very probable that the other 
species of the section, B. r/rizocarpa, Fischer, and B. attenuate, 
A. DC, may prove varieties of it, the former differing in the 

JUNE 1st, 1»73. 



white- spotted leaves with fewer nerves and shorter male 
peduncles, and the latter in the fewer nerves, 2-flowered 
short male peduncles, and long petioles. 

Begonia attenuata has long been cultivated at Kew, where 
it was received from the Botanical Gardens of Berlin ; it has 
also been sent to me for determination by Mr. Burbidge 
from the Manchester Botanic Gardens. It flowers freely in 
the month of March. 

Descr. Bhizome as thick as the little finger, creeping, cylin- 
dric, clothed with root fibres and persistent stipules. Leaves 
tufted at the end of the rhizome, four to six inches long, 
sessile or petioled, oblanceolate, acuminate, margin serrulate 
and obscurely lobed, quite glabrous, concolorous, pale green, 
nerves oblique, seven to eight on each side, base obtuse or 
acute ; petiole naked or winged, the wings undulate. Sti- 
pules broadly ovate, pectinate- ciliate. Scape of male flowers 
rather shorter than the leaves, slender, terete, erect, 
4-6-flowered ; bracts orbicular, concave, pectinate-ciliate. 
Male flowers half to three quarters inch in diameter, urn- 
belled, pedicels a quarter of an inch long. Sepals two, 
orbicular-ovate, obtuse, white Anthers in a globose stipitate 
head, cuneate, obtuse. Female flowers sessile in the axils of 
the leaves. Ovary turbinate from an obtuse base, contracted 
above into a beak one-third of an inch long, trigonous, angles 
wmged, wings obscurely toothed or lobed. Sepals three, 
nearly orbicular, white. Style short, arms three, with reni- 
form- broad stigmas, the corners of which have twisted 
appendages. Placentas entire.—,/. D. H. 



Figl, Leaf: natural size; 2, stamens; 3 and 4, anthers; 5, ovary; 
t, transverse section of ovary : - all magnified. 



6040 




'rtncentSrooksDayiSoolnlp. 



Tab. 6040. 

GREYIA SUTHERLANDI. 

Native of Natal. 



Nat. Ord. Sapindaceje. — Sub-order Melianthej:. 
Genus Grevia, Hook, and Harv. ; {Benth. fy Hook.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 100). 



Greyia Sutherland*; Hook, and Harv. in Harvey Thesaurus Capensis, t. 1. 
Harvey and Sonder Flor. Cap., vol. ii. p. 308 ; Harvey Gen. S. African 
Plants., ed. 2, p. 62. 



This singular and beautiful plant, which was raised by 
Dr. Moore from seed introduced into the Glassnevin Gardens 
about the year 1859, has been so extensively distributed both 
by himself and from Kew, that it is now one of the commonest 
plants in European Botanic Gardens. Singularly enough, 
though growing very freely and even luxuriantly in our green- 
houses, it had never flowered in Europe, except (I believe) in 
the south of France, till March of the present year, when a 
small plant in a 6-inch pot, in the Chelsea Botanic Gardens, 
having been starved for the purpose, threw off all its leaves, 
and put forth instead a raceme of coral-like buds, which the 
curator, Mr. Thomas Moore, was good enough to communi- 
cate to me for figuring in the Botanical Magazine. This, 
though much inferior as to its inflorescence to the wild 
specimens (which bear upwards of 100 flowers in racemes 
two to three inches in diameter) is so characteristic, that I 
gladly take the opportunity of figuring it. 

Greyia Sutherlandi forms a small tree at Port Natal, 
described by its discoverer, Dr. Sutherland, the Surveyor- 
General of the colony and an ardent naturalist, as growing in 
clefts of much exposed headlands, at elevations of 2000 to 
6000 feet, in the Drakenburg mountains, and flowering in 
August and September (early spring). It was named after 
Sir George Grey, K.C.B., Governor-General of the Cape 
Colony at the time of its discovery. 

-n-NE 1st, 1873. 



The affinities of Greyia are not at first obvious, and are 
still disputed. Dr. Harvey referred it doubtfully to Saxi- 
frages, and I unhesitatingly to the suborder Melianthea of 
Sapindacea, a position which my friend did not accept, on the 
ground that it differs from Sapindacea " in its 1-celled ovary, 
parietal placentas, indefinite and very numerous ovules, 
copiously albuminous seeds, and minute straight embryo." 
(See Gen. S. Afric. PL ed. 2, p. 62). But the ovary is 
5-celled, and the placentas axile, whilst all the other cha- 
racters noted above as discrepant, actually accord precisely 
with those of Meliantheee, to which the curious thick branches, 
unequal stamens, and membranous almost follicular capsule 
further ally it, and leave no doubt in my mind of its true 
relationship with that order. The figure here given is taken 
from dried specimens in part. Professor Oliver has remarked 
upon native specimens recently received from Mr. Cooper, that 
the petiole, in falling away, carries with it the old cuticle of 
the bark from a considerable portion of the branch. 

Descr. A small tree, with thick naked branches, covered 
with a yellowish brown bark. Leaves clustered at the ends of 
the branches, spreading, petioled, two to three inches long, orbi- 
cular ovate or oblong, deeply cordate at the base, margins lobu- 
late and toothed, glabrous, minutely glandular, veins spreading, 
deep green above, paler beneath ; petiole three-quarters to 
one inch long, dilated at the base. Racemes terminal, four 
to six inches long, subcylindric, two to three inches in 
diameter, very many-flowered ; bracts lanceolate ; pedicels 
glabrous, one-half to three-quarters of an inch long. Flowers 
drooping, densely imbricating downwards, subglobose, about 
half an inch in diameter. Calyx hemispheric, green, with five 
broad rounded erect lobes. Petals five, subequal, much 
longer than the calyx, orbicular, concave, glossy, scarlet, 
fleshy and shining. Bisk cupular, with ten marginal teeth, 
each crowned with a peltate gland. Stamens ten, subregular, 
hypogynous, filaments curved, slender, red, exserted; anthers 
short, dark red-purple. Ovary elongate- ovoid, laterally 
5-lobed, 5-celled, narrowed into a subulate style with a punc- 
tiform stigma; ovules numerous, biseriate in the inner angle 
of the cells. Fruit capsular, septicidally 5-vaived, mem- 
branous, many-seeded. Seeds albuminous, embryo minute. 
—J. D. II '___ 

Fig, 1, Flower; 2, the same with the calyx and petals removed; 3, por- 
tion of disk and glands; 4, ovary; 5, transverse section of ditto; 
6, capsule:— all but Jig. 6 magnified. 



604) 




W filch, 3d ellitii. 



TSncentBrooks^rt^-^f 



Tab. 6041. 

linama heterophylla. 

Native of Marocco. 



Nat. Ord. Scrophularine^. — Tribe Antirrhine^e. 
Genus Linaria, Linn. ; {Benth. in DC. Prodr., vol. x. p. 265). 



Linaria (Linariastrum) heterophylla; annua, caule erecto gracili parce 
ramoso superne et inflorescentia glanduloso-puberulis, foliis alternia 
linearibus obtusis laxis, floribus breviter pedicellatis dense confertis 
pallide stramineis, bracteis parvis oblongis pedicellis brevioribus, calyce 
parvo segmentis linearibus erectis, corolla pollicari caliare recto subu- 
lato tubo asquilongo, labio superiore recto elongato alte bifido, labii 
inferioris lobo medio perbrevi lateralibus deflexis breviore, palato 
valde prominente, capsula brevi compressa calycem vix excedente, stylo 
2-fido, seminibus minutis, curvis obtuse trigonis transverse sulcatis. 

Linaria heterophylla, Desfont. Fl. Atlant., vol. ii. p. 48, t. 140. 

L. reticulata, fieichb. Iconogr., t. 431 ; non Desj. 

L. stricta, Guss, PI. Rar. Sic, p. 250. 

L. aparinoides, Ckav. Monoq., p. 138: Benth. in DC. Prodr., vol. vii. 
p. 275. 

Antirrhinum aparinoides, Willd. Sp. PL, vol. iii. p. 247. 

A. strictum, Sm. et Sibth., Flor. Grcec, vol. vi. p. 75, t. 594. 

A. multicaule, Ten. Fl. Nap. Prodr., p. 36 non Linn. 



A tall branching annual, not uncommon in fields at the 
foot of the Greater Atlas, and at Casa-blanca on the west 
(Atlantic) coast of Marocco, a country which, as remarked 
under the beautiful L. maroccana (Tab. nost. 5983), abounds 
in species of this genus. Though resembling a good deal at 
first sight the English L. vulgaris, it differs conspicuously in 
the pale flowers, small bracts, very prominent palate, remark- 
ably long straight deeply 2-lobed upper lip of the corolla, 
in the very short midlobe of the lower lip, and the small 
capsule not exceeding the calyx; it is further an annual, 
and of a more branching habit ; the seeds, also, are 
wholly different, not, as erroneously figured by the artist in 

june 1st, 1873. 



our plate, discoid with an orbicular wing, but minute 
trigonous and deeply transversely grooved. 

L . pallidiflora was raised from seed brought by Mr. Maw 
and myself from Marocco in 1871, and flowered in July of the 
following year. It is a native of Sicily and Cyprus, but was 
discovered by Desfontaines in North Africa, and described and 
figured by him as L. heterophylla in 1798. Willdenow, in 
1800, referring all Linarias to Antirrhinum, in which there was 
already an A. heterophyttum, altered the trivial name to apari- 
noides ; lastly, Chavin, in 1833, restored the plant to Linaria, 
but carelessly adopted Willdenow's trivial name, in which he 
has been followed by subsequent authors. The L. tingitana 
of Bossier and Heldreich is a more robust variety, with broader 
leaves, which has been gathered by Mr. Ball and myself at 
Cape Spartel. The Mount Atlas specimens are much more 
slender than those found nearer the coast. The L. viscosa, 
Dum., of Spain, is probably another form. 

Descr. A tall annual erect herb, two to three feet high, 
dark green, not glaucous, branching from the base, glabrous 
below, glandular-pubescent towards the tips of the branches 
and throughout the inflorescence. Leaves scattered, spreading, 
one to two inches long, narrow linear or acicular, obtuse, 
rarely narrowly elliptic, lanceolate, rather fleshy, 1 -nerved. 
Racemes usually branched at the base, branches slender, not 
leafy, elongating much after flowering, conical in bud. 
Flowers densely packed, shortly pedicelled ; bracts oblong- 
linear or subspathulate, obtuse, shorter than the pedicels, or 
equalling them, suberect, green. Calyx rather longer than 
the pedicel, one quarter to one third of an inch long ; seg- 
ments linear-oblong or spathulate, obtuse, green, erect, not 
spreading, nearly equal. Corolla, including the spur, an inch 
long, very pale straw-coloured, with a pale golden yellow 
patch; upper lip very long, erect, 2-lobed to the middle, 
keeled in front, the lobes obtuse reflected ; lower lip veined, 
side lobes deflected, midlobe very short, semicircular ; palate 
obtusely conical, 2-lobed; spur slender, very acute, quite 
straight, in a line with and as long as the neck of the corolla. 
Style 2-fid. Capsule very small, equalling the calyx, obtuse, 
compressed. Seeds minute, curved, black, deeply transversely 
grooved. — /. D. II 



Fig. 1, Flower: magnified— N.B. The figure of the fruit and seeds 
(fig. 3) should be cancelled. I suspect that they were taken from 
L. maroccana (Tab. nost. 5983), which was collected along with L. hetero- 
phylla. 



ZZ March 1st, 1873. 



No. 051. 



"AUTOMATON LAWN MOWER" 




DESIGNED AND MANUFACTUEED BY 

RANSOMES, SIMS & HEAD, IPSWICH. 

O ANSOMES, SIMS & HEAD are the oldest manufacturers of Lawn 

{/j^ Mowers, their experience in these Machines extending over more than thirty years. 

The Automaton Lawn Mowers were brought out" in 1867 from entirely new designs 

and patterns, embodying the latest improvements suggested by long and varied experience. 

From the universal approbation they have met with, R. S. & H. can recommend them with 

the greatest confidence. 

Machine-made Gearing is adopted for communicating motion to the knives, being the 
best and simplest plan far superior to chains or other methods ; as whilst almost noiseless, it is 
not liable to get out of order. 

The Cutting Barrels are fitted with the best knives, of rolled steel and iron combined. 
The steel forms the cutting edge and the iron at the back wears away faster than the steel edge, 
thus maintaining a sharp cutting edge much longer than when the knives are entirely of steel, ot 
steel both front and back. The pivots and bearings are of hardened steel, so that these 
important parts will last several seasons without requiring repair. 

No Bibs in the Grass are left by these Machines, but a beautiful flat uniform surface 
is obtained, giving the lawn a carpet-like appearance, very far superior to any work which can 
be done with a scythe and at a much less cost. 

All the Grass is Collected by these Machines thus obviating the necessity of 
sweeping the lawn after it is cut. 

If desired the Cut Grass can be Left on the Lawn by simply removmg 

the box in front of the Machine, thus combining the advantages of both the systems ot lawn 
mowing before the public. 

THEY ARE EXTREMELY SIMPLE, VERY DURABLE, LIGHT IN DRAUGHT, 
AND NOT LIABLE TO CET OUT OF ORDER. 

MORE THAN 7,000 AUTOMATON LAWN MOWERS 

Have been sold since their introduction in 1867, and 

ARE GIVING THE GREATEST SATISFACTION. 

Testimonials from 35 English Counties given on the inside pages. 

Prices, including Tree Delivery to the Principal Railway Station/ in England. 
8-inch, suitable for very small Lawns £2 15 14-inch to be used by a Man ...£5 10 O 

1 o-inch, suitable for a Lad v 3 IO O tfi inrh 1 , 1, „ A ) & 1° ° 

y ? *V X v to be used by a Man and I „ 10 

... 4 10 O iS-.nch Boy 80 

20-inch ( . ? Tt / 

These Cases are most convenient for keeping the Machines in during the If inlet. 
Full prices allowed for Cases if returned. 
A New Horse-Power Machine, with draft-bar complete, 36-inch, suitable for 
a Horse or Pony £24. 

RANSOMES, SIMS & HEAD ~guaranteT these Machines to perform their work 
Perfectly, and if not approved of, they may be returned, carriage-paid, within a montn. 

fOVKR. 



1 2-inch, „ Lad 

Packing Cases, Ss. extra 



REPORTS FROM THIRTY-FIVE COUNTIES 

ON THE 

"AUTOMATON LAWN MOWER." 



1— BEDFOBDSHIBE— From Mr. W. B. 
Southam, Dunstable.— Your Automaton Lawn 
Mower gives great satisfaction, and does its work 
remarkably well. 

2— BEBKSHIBE-From Mr. J. Holden, 
Crown Nursery, Beading.— The Automaton 
Lawn Mower gives satisfaction to myself and the 
gentleman who has bought it. I will thank you to 
send me another 10-inch Machine immediately. 

3— BUCKS— From Mr. W. Grimsdell, High ! 
Wycombe. — Mr. Grimsdell is very much pleased 
with the 16-in. Automaton Lawn Mower. 

4— CAMBBIDGESHIBE— From the Bev. 
Edwd. J. Bouth, M.A., Newnham — I have 
great pleasure in stating that the Automaton Lawn 
Mower I purchased from you a year ago gives me com- 
plete satisfaction in every way. It works well and 
smoothly, and does not get out of order. 

CAMBBIDGESHIBE— John Symonds, 
Esq., Dotterel Hall, Balsham, has used one 
of Kansomes, Sims & Head's Automaton Lawn Mowers 
for 4 years, and has much pleasure in saying that he 
can recommend it with confidence. 

CAMBBIDGESHIBE— From G. F. Jos- 
lmg, Esq., Great Thurlow Hall, nr. New- 
market.— Having used Messrs. Itansomes' Automaton 
Lawn Mower two seasons, I have pleasure in stating 
that I am perfectly satisfied with it in every way, and 
consider it a very useful machine, being both strong 
and light in draught. 

CAMBBIDGESHIBE— From Edwd. P. 
Frost, Esq., West Wratting Hall.— I have 
pleasure m statin* that the Automaton Lawn Mower 
with which you supplied me, works very satisfactorily. 

5 TO?£- HNA] i VOlNI SHIBE— From Lt -Col. 

Williams, Bangor— Lieut. -Col. Williams begs to 
inform Messrs. R. S. & II. that the Automaton Lawn 
Mower arrived safely, and has been in daily use this 
week, working to his entire satisfaction. 
6 ^ C f E £HIBE -From Mr. John Down- 
ward, Hampton Hall, Malpas.-I have had 
an Automaton Lawn Mower in constant work for 
implement ^ COnsider il a S ood and efficient 

7 ri^ R ,? YSHI £?-From Mr. C Benns, 
f-,wnArP resS ' Chesterfield—The Automaton 
£ +k- i y° T u «« nt me answers very well ; indeed it 

™w£^ y °f 6 - J }u re had wnich does n °t r e<iuire more 
power to work it than is advertised 

8 iS^^ IBE i rom Mr. W - James, 
Kingmore House, Teignmouth— My gar- 

wUh wh,>T Sme tha V he A ^omaton Lawn Mower 
JrtmirnT^* y ou . i suppU,d me Iast summer, works 
admirably and quite to his satisfaction in all respects. 

W D a?ehfm TS B?i B rl E - Fr 1 oln Mr " C ' Beale, 

a 14 hfii 4 m ; _ . g00 T d enou - h t0 send off immediately 
Sri." £ t A " t ? mat c on La ™ Mower. The one you sent 
does its work m a first-rate style. 

10 fiel§ U Hmi AM ^ ,r °K m Mr - Tho3 ' Hal1 - Tat- 
Lawn \ H w^^' Wa sfungton— The Automaton 
tSS!r P ? r fr d last <**">* ha * given me good 
satisfaction, I shall have no hesitation in recommend- 

U cUffe SS H n ^"; F ^ m . % C Javal « Es< l- Kan- 

oune ±LOUSe, East Ham— I have ereat nlea. 
rutomatoria ,n8 ; he Satisfa «-» given to^e^ 
i869 ^ Ir^vZtlT, r8Upp,iedb ^ OU in ,he W 
received i?f?om you ? h n ° W aS emdent aS when l 

E?q Sa F*' F F s°A m T W£ ton A - Gwynne, 
court Tk,™ 1 '!. 40 ; 1 Cllff House, Dover- 
court. -I have much pleasure in stating that the 
men°t m wn^ La ™ M °™rfobtained from vour e ^blish- 
miperkTand 3 'S^** ** U ^ lts ™ k in a 

3CESXSS&St ,, » gardcners expreS3 

ESSEX.-From the Bev. Percy Smith 
Pattiswick Beetory, Braintree -I hav?,,, w 
KX r ™ Ut °r" n *~2 ^SttWof f all a'v '" 
ntver been Zt „ "or f*™**! 1 5* ^P«t-tions. ft has 
S„™ ou ' °f order ; and it performs its work ex- 
peditiously and efficiently. My gardener, an intelligent 



man, who knows well its make and performance, is 
much pleased with the machine, and has never resetted 
abandoning the scythe for it. 

* ! S 4f 1 ?i:~ Fr0ln Mr - J ' Douglas, Gardener 
to F Witbourn, Esq., Loxford Hall, Ilford. 
—1 have much pleasure in bearing testimony to the 
excellence of your Automaton Lawn Mower. It is 
remarkably easy to work, the arrangement for setting 
the knives is most simple, and the machine itself is not 
liable to get out of order. It is the most efficient Lawn 
Mower I have ever used. 

ESSEX— From E. Mead, Esq., South 
House, Great Waltham, Chelmsford.-The 
Automaton Lawn Mower is a first-class Machine. I 
am very pleased with its work. I have used it when 
the grass is wet, as well as when hard and dry, and 
see no difference in its work, which cannot be said of any 
others. 

ESSEX.- Prom Mr. H. Harrison, Gardener 
toW. H. Dunnett, Esq., Dedham.-Now the 
mowing season is past, I beg to testify to you my satisfac- 
tion with the 36-inch and 20-inch Automaton Lawn 
Mowers I got from you last May; I have used the 36-inch 
Machine with a small pony, on a very sloping piece of 
grass, with perfect ease and ithas done its workinamost 
perfect and satisfactory manner. Of the 20-inch hand 
Machine, enough cannot be said in its praise ; the easi- 
ness of draught, and the clean and perfect cut, are most 
satisfactory. Our lawn was sown with grass seed, so it 
was rather in a rough state when we commenced with 
your Machines, now it is all one can wish for I have 
great pleasure in recommending your 20-inch Lawn 
Mower for small places, as the best I have used. 
12— GLOUCESTEBSHTEE— From Mr. E. 
Bridges, Collonade, Cheltenham. The Auto- 
maton Lawn Mower you sent me is one of the best I 
have ever seen, and does its work admirably. I shall 
recommend these Machines wherever I can. 
13 — HANTS— From B. H. Cooper, Esq., 
Stud Farm, Lymington.— The Automaton Lawn 
Mower has given great satisfaction. It cuts the grass 
well, works easily, and has never got out of order. 

HANTS— ISLE OF WIGHT— From 
John Le Mesurin, Esq.. Bimbridge— I am 
glad to be able to report that your Automaton Lawn 
Mower works most satisfactorilv. 
14— HEBTFOBD— Mr. J. Cooper, Maiden- 
head Street.— I have great pleasure in saying, trora 
what I have seen of your Automaton Lawn Mowers, 
through my customers, that they really are very satis- 
factory. 1 think I am right in saying I have heard 
no compla nt whatever. This fact will speak for their 
value, &c. 
15— HUNTS— From A. Sperling, Esq, JB. 
Lattenbury Hall, St. Ives— I have used a 
Kansomes' small-size Automaton Lawn Mower tor 
several years, and I prefer it to other machines. It 
- work well and easily, and the wear and tear w 
slight. 

HUNTS— From Mr. Jas. Bartram, Gar- 
dener to J. Bust, Esq., Alconbury House— 
I have much pleasure in recommending your Autom- 
aton Lawn Mower, having had one for two sesons, 
which for durability, freeness of cutting anu conve- 
nience, has given me great satisfaction. 
16 -KENT—From A. Jackson, Esq., May- 
field Place, Orpington— J he Automaton La»n 
Mower is a first-rate one, and cannot be better, i" 
Archimedian, just come out, will not go down, ior 
it leaves the cut grass on the lawn, which has to oe 
swept off afterwards. 

KENT—From G. B. Airy, Esq., Astron- 
omer Boyal, Boyal Observatory, G, re , e ? T 
Wich— The Automaton Lawn Mower funUMeaoj 
you in I860, works quite to our satisfaction. . v,e ,^t. 
m experience that the grass ought to be mown in a one 

state than wh<n cut with the scythe; also that .?L 
ought to be taken that there be no special meqiM iiu 
of ground, and no loose pebbles. These «"™~?*^ 
presume, must be necessary In the use of cve, 7' t j, e 
mower. With a trifling attention to these r°'" ts ' l „ 
implement works extremely well. There has cee" 
Breakage of any importance. 



RANSOMES, SIMS & HEA^ORWELiTwOIlKS, IPSWICH 



Eeports on the Automaton Lawn Mower, continued. 



17— LANCASHIRE— From Mr. C. Rylance, 
Town Green, Aughton, Ormskirk— The 
Automaton Lawn Mower came to hand safely, and gives 
satisfaction. I will take every opportunity of recom- 
mending your machines. 

18— LEICESTERSHIRE—FromE. Fisher, 
Esq., Market Harboro'.— The Kansomes' 10-in. 
Lawn Mower works very well indeed. 

19.-LlNCOLNSHIRE.-From J. L. Bell, 

Esq., Bourn. — I beg to bear testimony to the general 
good qualities, in addition to the material and manu- 
facture of your Automaton Lawn Mower. I have other 
machines, but in preference, always use yours, as none 
approach it for steady, uniform, clean cutting. 

20.— MIDDLESEX— From J.J. Arrow.Esq., 
Dalston. — I have much pleasure in informing you 
how excessively well your Automaton Lawn Mower 
works. I have had it constantly in use for the last two 
summers, and therefore can testify as to its good quali- 
ties, both as regards its use and durability, and have 
no hesitation in saying that it surpasses all others I 
have seen in working and simplicity. 

MIDDLESEX— From C Ballance, Esq., 
Stanley House, Lower Clapton.— I have much 
pleasure in bearing testimony to the excellence- of your 
Automaton Lawn Mower. I have had it in constant 
use for two years, and as yet it has needed no repairs, 
1 am just commencing to use it for the third season. 

21— NORFOLK— From Mr T. Williams, 
Gardener to R. Bagge, Esq., G-aywood Hail 
Jiing s Lynn.— The Automaton Lawn Mower that 
we had of you gives me great satisfaction, and I have no 
hesitation m saying that it is the best machine I have 
ever used tor easiness of draught and uniform surface 
NORFOLK— From W. M. Hazard, Esq., 
Harleston— The 20-in. Kansomes' Automaton Lawn 
Mower I purchased of you gives me peifect satisfaction, 
and 1 think it is m every respect a first-class machine 
very simple and easy to work. 

22— NORTHAMPTONSHIRE— Rev. A. "W 
Annand, Roade Vicarage, Northampton— 
Ihe Rev A. W. Annand, has much pleasure in stating 
that he has one of Messrs. Ransomcs' 14-in. Autom- 
aton Lawn Mowers in use for the last two years, and 
that during that time it has never been out of order, 
but has done its work entirely to his satisfaction 

2 L~ N S RT % UMBERLAT ™>.-From J- Gib- 
son, Esq., Roseworth Tower, Gosforth — 

My gardener has used Eansomes' Automation Lawn 

safefection y thtCe yCarS ' andit haS given entire 

2 tw^ TTIWG -J 1AMS HIRE.--From Rev. 
O. H. France, Sutton Ashfield, Mansfield. 
-I am entirely satisfied with the Automaton Lawn 
Mower you sent me. 

2 w7i? XFOR ^ SHIRE -- From M ". Brick- 
f£f,iT iV7 e ^ orpe , L odge, Banbury.-Mrs. 

Bnckweli has had two of Messrs. Ransomcs' Automaton 
t^ M ,°. we " l n us <> f°r four years ; they have done the 
work well, without requiring any repairs 

TT?„ X £? R £ SH *£ E - Fr °m R- Noddings, 
uftM 11 ? Tr . ee 7 illa ' Co ^ley, Oxford.-The 
10-mch Automaton Lawn Mower I bought of you at the 
Uxlord Show last year is everything that I can wish 
eas y ° Ung stdble " b °y can work ^ with the greatest 

2 %rSHROPSHIRE.-From Viee-Admiral 
^ u re T Cotton ' Allport House, Whit- 
cnurcn— I am much pleased with Messrs. Ransomes' 
Automaton Lawn Mower, it i* doins its work perfectly. 

27.-SOMERSETSHIRE -From Mr. Henry 
a irker, Mountlands, Taunton.-The Autom- 
aton Lawn Mower T bought of vou last year works 
very well, and its construction is good. 

2 ^r r , S ^ AFF £ RDSH:TRF -FromH. M. Mor- 
gan, Esq., MD., Lichfield— After having used 
ine Kansomes' Automaton Lawn Mower the whole of 
last summer, I am able to say it does its work efficiently, 
ana has given me entire satisfaction 

2 ^SUFFOLK.- From ^ P. Jeffs, Esq., 
Weybread— The two Ransomes' Automaton Lawn 
Mowers are the best machines I ever siw. They do 
their work beautifully, quite beyond my expectations. 



SUFFOLK.-From J. R. Ansell, Esq., 
Jiirton.— I have great pleasure in informing vou that 
the Automaton Lawn Mower with which vou supplied 
me in 1869 meets with my approval. I I. . 
any thing done to it, and it is now in fir.-t-class order. 

SUFFOLK— R. Porter, Esq., Rushmere, 
Ipswich— I have much pleasure in stating that the 
Automaton Lawn Mower give- great satisfaction, work- 
ing very efficiently and being easily kept in order. 

30—SURREY— From J. Powell, Esq., Field 
House, Lark Hall Rise, C lapham —I am much 

pleased with the Automaton Lawn Mower you supplied 
to me in 1869. It does its work v. ry well, and has 
required no adjusting or sharpening curing the whole 
period. 

STJREEY.-FromR. C Bell, Esq., Kew- 
My Automaton Lawn Mower has worked very well, but 
I find it goes easier without the box, sad as the cuttings 
improve the grass, and have no slovenly appearance, I 
have left off using that appendage for some time. 

STJRREY.-From A. Neame, Esq., Court 
Lodge, Sutton.— The Automaton Lawn Mower you 
supplied to me in 1869 is apparently a? good as when I 
first had it, after having been constantly used, and has 
not cost me one shilling to keep in order. I see no 
prospect of requiring another ; should I do so, I should 
certainly purchase an Automaton. 

31— SUSSEX— From BHCombe,Esq.,J.P., 
Oaklands, Westfield, near Battle— I am very 
much pleased with the Automaton Lawn Mower; it 
works very well and easily. 

32— "WARWICKSHIRE— From E. Scriver, 
Esq., Wormleighton Hill, Leamington— 

The 12-inch Automaton Lawn Mower I had from you 
in 18f7 continues to do its work efficiently, and I con- 
sider it a most excellent and durable machine. 

33.— WILTSHIRE.-From J. Ferris, Esq., 
Little Wishford, near Salisbury— I consider 
the Automaton Lawn Mower I purchased last year, a 
very useful machine. As it cuts the grass level and 
makes clean work behind, and by so doing, saves 
manual labour. 

"WILTSHIRE-From Mr. Geo. Wilkin, 
Gardener to HF. Talbot, Esq., Lacock Abbey. 
— After using the Automaton Lawn Mower tor nearly 
three years, it has given me entire satisfaction ; it 
performs its work quickly and well, and I like the gear 
much better than chains. I feel much pleasure in 
recommending it to my friends, which I can do with 
confidence. 

"WILTSHIRE-Fr-'m Mr. John Curnick, 
Netherstreet Farm, Bromham, Devizes — 
The Automaton Lawn Mower I bought in lf-fis*, gives 
me great satisfaction ; it works easily, does its work 
well, and has greatly improved my lawn. 

34 —WORCESTER— From Messrs. dunes 
and Davis.— We have tried one of your Automaton 
Lawn Mowers, and are pleased to say that it works 
very satisfactorily. 

35 —YORKSHIRE— From J. Blythe Robin- 
son, Esq.,Westwood, Beverley— I am happy 
to inform you that the Automaton Lawn Mower 
which I purchased of you in 1869 answers exceedingly 
well • I like it very much. It has never given way in 
any part ami does it work just as well as when it was 
new although it has been constantly used. Someother 
lawn mowers are frequently getting out of order, and 
are the subject of continual complaint. 

JERSEY.-From James Levesque, Esq., 
Grassdale —The 18-mrh Automaton Lawn Mower 
vou sent here gives the highest - nd al- 

though in full work for two seasons, has cost nothing 
for repairs, and is now as good as when 1, 

IRELAND— From W P. Urquhart, Esq , 
M P Castle Pollard, Co. Westmeath-I am 
hatw'to add my testimony, if it i 
to you in favour of the efficiency of your Ant- 
Lawn Mower.one of which you supplied to me in 
It has been in constant use, has never got out of 
order u * of keeping a lawn 

smooth which was not in a very promising condition. 



RANSOMES, SIMS & HEAD, ORWELL WORKS, IPSWICH. 



ENLARGED DRAWING OP THE 

FRONT PART OF THE "AUTOMATON" LAWN MOWER 




Showing mode of Adjusting the Cutters to the Ledger Blade, and regulating 
the cutting height from the ground. 

B the adjustable arm which carries the revolving knives or cutters D D- C is the fixed "ledger "or cutting 
blade, against the front edge of which the knives D D act. E and F are ad] usting screws for accurately regulating 
the revolving knives D D to the fixed ledgei blade C- G are wooden rollers which support the tront 01 ine 
Machine and keep the knives and ledger blade just clear of the ground. These rollers arc easily -adjusted oy 
screws O, so as to regulate the cutting height from the ground. The revolving knives D D sno "'^ ]u pTCh f 
lightly against the fixed ledger blade C> and this degree of nicety can be easily and exactly adjusted by means or 
the screws E and F- If. for instance, the knives do notquite touch the ledger blade C, slacken the nut E a trine, 
and tighten the screw F- If, on the contrary, the cutters press too hard upon the blade C- then slacken the screw 
F and tighten up the nut E- A leaf of a plant or shrub, or a slip of writing paper applied between the edges 01 
the revolving knives D D and the edge of the ledger blade C, will show when they cut properly by producing a 
clean cut, on the knives being made to revolve, and no more pressure or closeness ought to be g"' en ' l! ^? }. 
sufficient to produce this effect. Care should be taken never to overstrain the set screws, but they should be tignt 
enough to ensure their not becoming loose of themselves. _ . . 

When the knives require sharpening, take off the side wheel cover, then screw the small iron handles (sent 
with the Machine) into the arm of the outside toothed wheel, and turn this wheel rapidly backwards, first taking 
care that the frame is supported on each side by a brick or block of wood placed below the bearings of the main 
rollers. This rapid turning of the knives in a contrary direction to that which they revolve when in use, will 
very soon sharpen both the knives and ledger blade, if at tne same time oil is freely dropped upon them, ana aiso 
some fine emery (nearly the finest made) carefully shaken upon the revolving knives. Adjust the knives upon 
the ledger blade delicately, as the process of grinding goes on. 

Full Instructions for using, keeping in order, and adjusting the Automaton Lawn Mower sent with every 
Machine. 



NEWLY DESIGNED GARDEN ROLLERS. 

Ransomes, Sims & Head can 
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greatest confidence. They are or 
solid construction, and the best 
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rather for use than ornament. The 
bearing of the Roller is in the 
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excluded. 

These Rollers do not leave ribs 
in the grass or gravel, like the 
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in price. As the axles do not 
project beyond the handles, the 
danger of injuring shrubs and 
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^RICES.-IS in., 60 ... 18 in., 70/- 20 in., 80- 22 in., 90/- 24 in., 100/- 
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em 




- 



TfacwtBre 



Tab. 6042. 



PRIMULA VERTICILLATA VAR. SINENSIS. 



Native of Abyssinia. 



Nat. Ord. Primulace^e. — Tribe Primulej:. 
Genus Primula, Linn. ; {Duly in DC. Prodr., vol. viii. p. 34). 



Primula (Sphondylia) verticillata ; stramineo-farinosa, foliis irregulariter 
argute serratis, radicalibus rosulatis obovato-spathulatis -lanceolatisve 
acutis in petiolum late alatum angustatis, floralibus verticillatis sessilibus 
lanceolatis ovato-lanceolatis obovatisve acuminatis pedicellis longiori- 
bus, floribus numerosissimis erecto-patentibus, calycis campanu^ati 
lobis ovato-lanceolatis integerrimis v. irregulariter serratis, corolla tubo 
angusto elongato calyce ter longiore, lobis obovatis suborbicularibus 
oblongisve emarginatis v. erosis. 

Primula verticillata, Forsk. Flor. jEgypt.-Arab., p. 42; Vahl. Symb., vol. i- 
p. 15, t. 5 ; Dubyin DC. Prodr., vol. viii. p. 35 ; Jaub. and Spach, III. 
PL Orient., vol. v. t. 438 ; Link, and Otto Abild., t. 51. 

Var. sinensis ; bracteis inferioribus latioribus 3-neviis, calyce ad medium 
5-fido, corollas limbo fere pollicem lato lobis rotundatis emarginatis ; 
Mast, in Gard. Chron., 1870, p. 597 ; P. sinensis, Hochst. in Schimp. 
PI. Abyss., sect. ii. n. 0G2 ; Field and Gard. Serf. Plant., vol. i. t. is ; 
Jaub. and Spach, III. PI. Orient, vol. v. t. 440; P. Boveana, A. 
Beich. Tent. Flor. Abyss., vol. ii. p. 15, non. Dcsne. ; P. Courti. Hort. 
Veitch. 



P. verticillata was originally discovered in the Arabian 
province of Yemen, on the margins 'of rivulets on Kierma, a 
calcareous mountain in north latitude 14J° — that is, towards 
the southern extremity of Arabia Felix. In his "Flora 
uEgyptiaco-Arabica," posthumously edited by Niebuhr, this 
mountain is described (p. xc), as being higher than its neigh- 
bours, almost destitute of trees, but covered with crops of 
herbs and cereals, the Holcns excepted, which the peasants 
say is unable to withstand the cold of that elevation. This 
Primula was subsequently gathered under three forms m 
various parts of Arabia, and in Abyssinia, amongst which 
forms no constant differences can be detected. Of these the 

july 1st, 1873. 



true plant of Forskahl has narrow involucral leaves, a calyx 
divided to below the middle into narrow lanceolate segments, 
and a corolla not one-third of an inch in diameter, with ovate 
truncate divisions. The second form is the P. Boveana of 
Decaisne (P. verticillata, Botanical Magazine, t. 2842), which 
differs from the type chiefly in the more obovate corolla- 
lobes, which are quite entire or obscurely crenate, and the 
irregularly toothed calyx divisions. It varies greatly in the 
size of the corolla and breadth and form of the involucral 
leaves, and is found near Muscat in Arabia, on Mount Saint 
Catherine m the Sinaitic Peninsula, and in the Tigre province 
of Abyssinia. The third is the present plant, which has uni- 
formly a much broader corolla, with nearly orbicular emargi- 
nate lobes, and entire or sparingly toothed calyx-lobes. 

Primula verticillata has been long cultivated in Europe, 
having been raised from seed brought, I believe, from the 
bmaitic Peninsula ; but the Abyssinian variety is of recent 
introduction into England by Messrs. Veitch. The specimen 
here figured flowered in the Eoyal Gardens in March of the 
present year ; it grows freely on rockwork. 
m Descr. Rootstock as thick as the thumb, and several 
inches long. Radical leaves six to twelve inches long, 
obovate-spathulate, contracted into a more or less long and 
broad petiole, acute, irregularly acutely toothed, clothed 
with a lemon-coloured or almost white meal beneath. 
acape a span high and upwards, mealy, with two whorls of 
flowers subtended each by four to six leafy bracts, or with 
the upper whorl reduced to an umbel. Involucral leaves, 
sessile ovate-lanceolate, 3-nerved, one to two inches long, 
toothed like the other leaves. Flowers very numerous, pale 
yellow; pedicels slender, striate, erecto-patent, shorter than 
the involucre, furnished at the base with linear bracts. 
£X ,ff J ' ^P^^ate, cut to the middle into entire or 
toothed triangular-ovate lobes. Corolla-tube one inch long, 
limb nearly as much in diameter, lobes rounded, notched.- 



Pi 



g. I, Calyx, style, and stigma '.—magnified. 



am 







Tab. 6043. 
MENINIA TURGIDA. 

Native of Cochin-China. 



Nat. Ord. Acanthace^. — Tribe Asystasie*:. 
New Genus, Meninia, Fua. 



Gen. Char. — Calyx 5-fidus, laciniis acutis purpuras, asstivatione valvatis. 
Corolla ringeus, tubo in anconem flexo, ad faucem dilatato reticulato- 
venoso introrsum villoso, lobis asstivatione imbricatis uno vexillari. Sta- 
mina 2 fertilia (absque rudimentis sterilium), inclusa, ad tubi basin, in- 
serta, antherae oblongae inferne subsagittatas, loculis parallels purpurascen- 
tibus, connectivo crasso papilloso subapiculato. Discus hypogynus 0. 
Ovarium 2-loculare, stylus stamina subasquans, stigmate obsolete 2-lobo ; 
ovula in loculis 4. Fimctus .... Dene. mss. — Herba glaberrima, 
sublignosa, febrifuga, amara, ramis obtuse tetragonis, ad nodos incrassatis 
et articulatis. Folia opposita, elliptico-lanceolata, obtuse acuminata, 
integerrima, breviter petiolata. Flores mediocres, in paniculam sessilem 
thyroideam terminalem densifloram dispositi, bracteate et bracteolate, albi 
roseo reticulato. 



Meninia turgida, Fua mss. 



For the 
which is 



the opportunity of figuring this very interesting plant. 
— is a celebrated febrifuge in its native country, I am 
indebted to my friend Professor Decaisne, who sent a living 
specimen of it from the Jardin des Plantes to Kew (where it 
flowered in April of the present year), and who has more 
recently supplied me with the generic character given above, 
and the following particulars : — 

Meninia turgida was established by M. Fua, who has 
studied carefully the organogeny of Jcanthacecs, but who has 
hitherto published nothing on the subject. The flowers were 
analysed by M. Decaisne in 18G9, and found to be absolutely 
diandrous, without a trace of arrested stamens, so that it 
cannot be referred either to Asystasia or to Thyrsacantlmx. 
The plant itself is remarkable for its febrifuge properties, 
which have been investigated by Mr. Weber; it is called 
Thuong-son by the natives. 



joly 1st, 1878. 



Descr. An erect herb, woody below, quite glabrous. 
Branches strict, green, articulate ; internodes obtusely 
4-angled, swollen at the nodes. Leaves opposite, four to 
seven inches long, shortly petioled, elliptic-lanceolate, ob- 
tusely acuminate, quite entire, bright green above, pale 
beneath. Inflorescence a terminal contracted sessile erect 
obtuse dense-flowered thyrsoid panicle j lower bracts leafy, 
upper small, hidden amongst the flowers; bracteoles two, 
ovate-lanceolate, acute, exceeding the calyx, much shorter 
than the corolla ; pedicels very short, angled. Calyx of five 
subequal subulate teeth, brownish-purple, much shorter than 
the corolla-tube. Corolla-tube stout, geniculately inflexed 
below the middle, rather turgid at the very base, white, the 
throat yellow within the lower lip ; throat inflated, villous 
within j limb of five spreading and recurved ovate subacute 
lobes, the lower broadest, all white and reticulated with pink 
nerves. Stamens two, with no traces of rudimentary ones, 
inserted in the throat opposite the lower lip ; filaments in- 
curved ; anthers, linear-oblong, apiculate, papillose on the 
back, cells connate throughout their length. Ovary 2-celled, 
cells 4-ovuled ; style slender, stigma minutely 2-fid.— /. B. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, corolla laid open; 3, anther; 4, flower with corolla 
removed; ,,, vertical and transverse sections of ovary -.—all magnified. 



6044 




"\iacait 



Tab. 6044 
CRASS ULA profusa. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Orel. Cuassulaceje. 
Genus Ckassula, Linn, ; (Benth. and Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 657). 



Ckassula (Perfilata) profusa ; glaberrima, vix glauca, profuse ramosa, raniis 
dependentibus et repentibus teretibus, foliis ima basi connatis ovbicu- 
Lari-ovatis acutis carnosis dorso convexis, margine integflrrimo badio- 
lirabato superne serie intramarginali punctorum ornato, cymia breviter 
pedunculatis capitatis, calycis segmentis linearibus, petalis ovatis 
acutis albis, stylis divergentibus, glandulis hypogynis brevissimis. 



A free-flowering and remarkably ramous species of Crassula, 
sent from the Grraaf Eeinett district of the Cape Colony by 
Harry Bolus, Esq., who has contributed many new and curious 
plants to both the Gardens and Herbarium at Kew. It 
approaches the C. perfossa, Lam., and C. perforata, Linn., but 
differs from both in habit, in the only slightly connate leaves, 
and longer narrow calyx lobes ; it is still nearer C. marginata, 
Ait., with which it further agrees in habit, but the leaves are 
not broadly connate, and are green (not purple) beneath. The 
structure of the leaf is very curious. The margin, which is quite 
entire, is edged with a narrow band of chestnut- brown, within 
which is a series of orbicular slightly convex puuetiform 
disks. These disks, when highly magnified, are found to 
consist of a very dense cellular tissue, that terminates down- 
wards in a conical form, and communicates with the peripheral 
ends of the nerves, in the loose parenchymatous substance oi 
the leaf. The surface of the disk is studded with excessively 
minute stomata, of a different form from the other stomata 
on either surface of the leaf, the guard-cells of these stomata 
further contain on their outer edge a row of minute diloro- 
phyle granules, giving them a most beau til ul appearance. 
The same disposition of these disks occur in C. lactea and 
('. marfuiala, but not in C. perforata ; their terminating the 

JUL! L»T, li-wil. 



ultimate branches of the nerves indicates their performing an 
important function in the nutrition of the plant. 

C. prolifera was raised from seed received in 1871 from 
Mr. Bolus, and now forms a profusely flowering mass of 
branches and leaves, two feet in diameter ; it flowered from 
March to June of the present year. 

Descr. Quite glabrous, excessively branched; branches 
pendulous and creeping, one to two feet long, cylindric. 
Leaves sessile, half to three quarters of an inch long, orbi- 
cular-cordate, slightly connate at the base, acute or cuspidate, 
very thick and fleshy, slightly convex above, more so beneath, 
pale green on both surfaces, hardly glaucous, margins quite 
entire and glabrous, with a narrow chestnut-coloured border 
on the upper surface, within which is a series of minute 
points. Flowers white, in capitate peduncled cymes, which 
are about one inch in diameter, and subtended by two small 
orbicular fleshy bracts; pedicels a quarter to half inch 
long, turbinate at the apex. Calyx of five linear acute 
segments half as long as the petals. Corolla one-third of an 
inch m diameter, of five ovate acuminate free petals, 
tmged with pink at the back. Stamens hardly exceeding 
tne styles; anthers yellow. Hypogynous glands very short 
and broad. Carpels five, ovoid, abruptly terminated by di- 
verging styles with capitate stigmas —JDH. 



hvS'vnn, Bud , ; V 6 ^/ 3 ' flower expanded; 4, stamen; 5, ovaries and 
nypogynous glands :— all magnified. 



6045 







Tab. 6045, 
RHODODENDRON malayanum. 

Native of the Malayan Archipelago. 



Nat. Ord. Erice^e. — Tribe RnoDOREiE. 

Genus Rhododendron, Linn. ; (Maximovicz in Mem. Acad. Imp. Sc. 
Petersb., vol. xvi. No. 9, p. 13). 



Rhododendron malayanum; foliis breviter petiolatis ellipticis utrinque 
acutis supra luride viridibus subtus badiis una-cum petiolis pedunculis 
calycibus ovariisque lepidotis, umbellis terminalibus 3-8-floris, pedi- 
cellis brevibus, calyce minute 5-dentato, corolla hypocraterimorpha 
sanguineo- rubra, tubo elongato sulcato lente curvo basi gibbo, limbi 
subeequalis lobis parvis rotundatis, staminibus 10, antheria vix exsertis, 
ovario elongato 5-loculari, stiginate obtuso minute 5-lobo incluso. 

Rhododendron malayanum, Jack. Mai. Misc., No. 7, p. 17, ex Hook. 
Journ. Bot., vol. i. p. 369 ; DC. Prodr., vol. vii. p. 725 ; Miquel Fl. 
Ind. Bat., vol. ii. p. 1059. 

R. tubiflorum, DC. I.e.; Miquel, I.e. et in Ann. Mus. Lugd. Bat, vol. i. 
p. 45, t. ii. A ; Vireya tubiflora, Blum. Bijd., p. 855. 



Dr. William Jack, of the late East India Company's service, 
a very able botanist and author of the " Malayan Miscellanies," 
was the first to make known this fine plant (in about 1823), 
which he discovered on the summit of Gunong Bunko, a 
remarkably insulated mountain, commonly called by Euro- 
peans the Sugar-loaf, in the interior of Bencoolen, Sumatra. 
Dr. Jack observes of this mountain that, though estimated 
at only 3000 feet in height, the character of its vegetation is 
decidedly alpine, a fact which he attributes to the form and 
consequent exposure of its sharp conical peak. Rhododendron 
malayanum has since been gathered repeatedly on Mount 
Ophir, Malacca, at an altitude of 4000 feet. It is clearly 
the same as the Javanese It. tubiflorum; and the Celebes 
Island R. celebicum differs only in the paler under-surface of 
the leaves. The specimen here figured was obligingly com- 
municated by Messrs. Bollisson, of Tooting, who received 

july 1st, 1873. 



it, through their collectors, from Java. It was originally 
introduced by Lobb when travelling for the elder Veitch in 
1854, and was said to come from Borneo, where Lobb was 
collecting; but as that indefatigable collector had already 
visited Mount Ophir, from whence he had sent excellent 
dried specimens, now in the Hookerian Herbarium, I suspect 
that the Bornean habitat is a mistake. 

This species is evidently most closely allied in flowers to 
B. jasminiforum, Hook. (Tab. nost. 4524), also a native of 
Mount Ophir ; and in foliage to the Himalayan B. bland- 
fordiaflorum, Hook. (Tab. nost, 4930). 

Desck. A large shrub or small tree; branchlets red- 
brown, and, as well as the leaves beneath, petioles, pedicels, 
calyx, ovary (and corolla sparingly), clothed with red-brown 
lepidote scales. Leaves three to four inches long, elliptic or 
elliptic-lanceolate, acute at both ends, coriaceous, narrowed 
into a petiole one-third to two-thirds of an inch long, dark 
green above, red-brown beneath. Floicers in terminal few- 
flowered umbels, nodding, three-quarters of an inch long; 
peduncles short, curved. Calyx minute, 5-toothed. Corolla 
dull scarlet ; tube three-quarters of an inch long, slightly 
curved, grooved, gibbous at the base; limb flat, horizontal, 
one-third to half an inch across ; lobes orbicular. Stamens 
ten; anthers short, small, hardly exserted. Ovary slender, 
o-celled, clothed with scales; style slender; stigma minute, 
D-lobed. — J. B. H. 



n^wtiUd. StameD; 2 ' CalyX aild ova] T; 3 > transverse section of ditto :-all 




6046 



3oks iay&Sa 



Tab. 6046. 

BORONIA MEGASTIGMA. 

Native of 8. W. Australia. 



Nat. Ord. Rutace^e. — Tribe Boroxie/E. 
Genus Boronia, Sm. ; (Benth. and Ilook.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 291). 



Boronia mefjastigma ; fere glabra, ramulis gracillimis virgatis, foliolis 3-5 
anguste linearibus obtusis rigidis, pedunculis axillaribus 1-floris, pedi- 
cellis sub flore incrassatis, sepalis parvis obtusis, petalis fere orbiculatis 
concavis late imbricatis fusco-purpureis intus flavidis, staminibus alter- 
natim valde inasqualibus antheris majorum purpureis cassis stignm 
attingentibus, antheris minorum minimis flavis polleniferis substigma 
reconditis, stigmate sessili magno umbonato 4-lobo. 

Boronia megastigma, Neesin Plant. Preiss., vol. ii. p. 227 ; F. Muell. Fragm.. 
vol. ii. p. 97 ; Benth. Flor. Austral, vol. i. p. 315. 

B. triads, Turcz. in Bull Mosc. 1852, pars 2, p. 162. 



A native of the districts around King George's Sound, 
where this curious plant is well known to the settlers for the 
delicious fragrance of its flowers, which renders it a most 
desirable object for cultivation. ' It was introduced into 
Kew by seed originally received from Baron von Mueller, 
and susequently living plants were presented by M. 
Thozet. It is also remarkable for its slender habit, spare 
foliage, the singular colour and structure of its flowers, which 
are produced in great abundance ; for the very short stamens, 
of which the four opposite the sepals are larger, with purple 
anthers destitute of pollen, and the four alternate ones -are 
minute, hidden under the very large 4-lobed stigma, yellow 
and polleniferous. The somewhat aromatic fragrance of the 
- flowers resembles nothing known to me ; it is most delicious ; 
and though not overpowering, soon fills a large room ; and 
should it be capable of being obtained as a perfume, 1 may 
safely predict its being in great request. In these respects, 



jult 1st, 1873.1 



of delicacy of odour accompanying a singular brown-purple 
colour, it resembles the Tinnaa Mhiopica of Tropical Africa 
(Tab. nost. 5637) ; and like the Tinnsea, the Boronia is very 
easy of cultivation, if treated like a Heath in an ordinary 
greenhouse. 

Descr. A very slender shrub, two feet high, with twiggy 
erect branches, and spreading opposite branchlets. Leaves 
very sparse, one-third to two-thirds of an inch long, sessile, 
the upper with one pair of pinnules besides the terminal, the 
lower with two pairs ; pinnules narrow-linear, obtuse, glabrous, 
or with a few scattered hairs. Flowers very copiously pro- 
duced, solitary in the axils of the upper leaves of the branch- 
lets, subglobose-campanulate, one-half inch in diameter, 
shortly peduncled, drooping ; peduncle one-half inch long, 
with two connate bracteoles above the middle. Sepals very 
small, subacute, gibbous at the back towards the apex. 
retab nearly orbicular, concave, broadly imbricate, maroon- 
purple outside, greenish-yellow within. Stamens eight, very 
small iour sepahne with purple empty anthers on a level 
with the stigma, four petaline very minute, with four polleni- 
terous yellow anthers concealed under the stigma. Stigma 
very large, sessile, umbonate, 4-lobed.— J D it 



yIS\}o^^ 2 ^°^ 1[ \f ,iheSa - mQVf{i ' h the P etals removed; 4, trans- 
verse section of ovary :— all magnified. 



6041 




W Bt lltil 



lAncentBrooksDaj-iSanJoV 



Tab. 6047. 
OMPHALODES Lucillb. 

Native of Asia Minor. 



Nat. Ord. Boragine.e. — Tribe Cynoglosse.e. 
Genus Omphalodes, Town.; {DC Prodr., vol. x.p. 158). 



Omphalodes Lucilice ; perennis, glaberrima, caulibus e rhizomate pluriniia 
decumbentibus, foliia radicalibus longe petiolatis ellipticis oblongis 
ovatisve obtusis acutis v. mucronulatis, superne remote et minute pus- 
tulatis caulinis sessilibus, pedicellis gracilibus folia floralia longe super- 
antibus demum arcuato-recurvis, sepalis ovato-oblongis pedicello multo 
brevionbus, corolla rotata calyce quadruplo ampliore, nuculis margine 
membranaceo integro lam. 

Omphalodes Luciliae ; Botss. Diagn., No. iv. p. 41 ; Alph. DC. in DC. Prodr., 
vol. x. p. 162; Jaubert and Spach, III. Plant. Orient., vol. iv. t. 865. 

This beautiful plant has hitherto been found only in two 
localities, which are very distant from one another, in Asia 
Minor—namely, Mount Sypilus, near Manesis (the ancient 
Magnesia, north-east of Smyrna), where it was discovered by 
Aucher Eloi; and in the Eastern Taurus Mountains of 
Bulgar dagh, in the province of Cilicia (now Itschili), adjoin- 
ing the Gulf of Scanderoon. In both places it inhabits con- 
siderable altitudes, attaining 8000 feet. It is decidedly the 
most beautiful species of the genus, and is well adapted for 
rockwork cultivation, remaining in flower for a considerable 
time in cool weather, and presenting all shades of colour in 
the corolla, from a pale pink-purple to azure. The specimen 
here figured was presented to the Eoyal Gardens by James 
Atkins, Esq., of Painswick, and which flowered profusely 
for a second time after arrival. The flowers are very much 
larger than either in the native specimen or in the figure 
cited in the fine work of Jaubert and Spach ; and I do not 
find any trace of the serratures of the sepals which are there 
represented, and which are described as cilia on the margins 
of the sepals. 

JULY 1st, 187o. 



Descr. Glabrous. Rootstock long, perpendicular, its summit 
clothed with the withered bases of the petioles. Radical leaves 
long-petioled ; blade one to two inches long, elliptic-ovate 
or oblong, acute obtuse or mucronate, narrowed into a 
petiole one to three inches long, above marked with faint 
distant pustules, beneath quite smooth ; nerves very obscure ; 
cauline smaller, sessile. Flowering-branches four to eight 
inches long, trailing, remotely leafy ; cymes 6-8-flowered, 
flowers distant; pedicels half to one and a half inches 
long, the lower subtended by leafy bracts, spreading, re- 
curved in fruit. Calyx campanulate, with five oblong- 
ovate acute spreading lobes. Corolla one half to one inch in 
diameter, quite rotate, pale pink-purple at first, then azure ; 
tube very short, inflated ; limb flat, five-lobed to the middle ; 
lobes rounded; mouth nearly closed by five protuberances 
opposite the segments. Stamens included, filaments very 
short, subulate ; anthers ovoid. Nucules trigonous, with 
narrow margins. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Corolla laid open; 2, flower with the corolla removed -.—magnified. 



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• Day&SonJmp 



Tab. 6048. 
GODWINIA Gigas. 

Native of Nicaragua. 



Nat. Ord. Aroidejs. — Tribe Dracontieje. 
Genus Godwinia, Seemann ; (Journ, Bot., vol. vii. p. 278 and 315). 



Gopwinia Gigas; Seem. I.e. t. 96 et 97. Gard. Ckron. 1872, p. 1720, 
et 1873, p. 73. 



Nothing smaller than the elephant folio size can do justice 
to an illustration of the wonderful plant of which a reduced 
figure and analysis is here given from the specimen which 
flowered m Mr. Bull's nursery in December hist, and which 
was repeatedly exhibited at Horticultural Shows in 

London, where, as well as in Mr. Bull's stove, its curious 
structure attracted the attention of botanists, and its stature, 
almost grotesque form, habit and colour, that of horticul- 
turists and amateurs. 

< The genus to which Godwinia belongs is, as correctly 
indicated m the Journal of Botany, the essentially tropical 
American tribe of Dracontica, and has nothing to do with 
the gigantic Indian JmorpkopAalii, which it represents in the 
JNew World, and which it resembles so much in stature and 
habit • nor with the even more stately ConopkaUus of Sierra 
JLeone. It is a native of the Chontales mountains of 
-Nicaragua, where it was discovered by Dr. Seemann in 
1 80 J, growing amongst brushwood near rivulets. 

> In its native state the tuberous root of Godwinia attains a 
circumference of two feet two inches, and a weight of 90 92 oz. 
±ne petiole reaches ten feet in height, and has a metallic lustre 
and mottled surface resembling a snake standing erect, and 
bears a blade three feet eight inches long. The peduncle 
is shorter than the petiole, about five feet and a half, and the 
spathe alone is two feet long. The plant grows with great 
rapidity, and emits a peculiar odour. Dr. Seemann named 
tins prodigy a fte r Mr. George Godwin, F.B.8., the eminent 

IUGU8T 1st, ],S73. 



architect, a gentleman of varied attainments, in especial recog- 
nition of his philanthropic efforts to spread a love of window- 
gardening and other pursuits amongst the humbler classes 
of London. 

Mr. Fitches' drawing was made in Mr. Bull's nurserv in 
December, 1872. J 

Descr. Boot as large as a man's head, giving off stout 
spreading fibres. Leaf solitary ; blade nine to ten feet in cir- 
cumference, nearly circular in outline, trichotomously divided, 
the ultimate divisions pinnatifid and dichotomous; seg- 
ments confluent, subacute, deep green; petiole attaining ten 
feet high, as thick as the arm, remotely muricate, yellow, 
mottled and striped with purple in transverse bars. Spatlic 
two feet long, narrow, erect, boat-shaped, hooded at the top, 
thick and leathery, maroon-brown within and without, opaque ; 
base dirty yellow and orange red, convolute, embracing the 
spadix, upper part open, but hardly gaping. Spadix much 
shorter than the spathe, cylindric, obtuse, shortly peduncled, 
quite free from the spathe, covered throughout with flowers. 
Perianth dull yellow, of six elongate cuneate truncate segments. 
stamens S1 x to eight in flowers here drawn, (12-biseriate, 
lnmen,inSeem.Journ.) filaments flattened, subulate; anthers 
exserted, small, 2-celled, cells each opening by a terminal pore. 
Ovary flagon-shaped, 3-celled, gradually contracted into a long 
stout purple style which much exceeds the perianth, and is 
truncate and stigmatiferous at the tip ; cells 1-ovuled, ovule 
attached by a broad surface to the septum.—./ D H. 



nf ™' ' f a J*™?* ^ ; 2 and 3 ' ° f SCa P e and s r"the; 4, portion 
st,rn% ' 0f > athe; °' s P adi *:-^ ofnat. size; 7, flower ; 8, 

Tf^tfJT* 7 ' ' traQSverse > aQ d 11, longitudinal, section of do. :- 



CV4-3 




Tab. 6049. 
SONERILA Bensoni. 

Native of the Madras Peninsula. 



Nat. Ord. Melastomace^— Tribe Sonerile^. 
Genus Sonerila, Roxb. ; (Smth. and Ilook.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 753). 



oonerila Bensoni; herbacea, fere glaberrima, ramosa, caule erecto ramisque 
crassis obscure 4-gonis, foliis petiolatis ovatis acutis serratis sub 
7-nerviis, cymis multifloris, pedunculo valido, calycis tubo ovoideo 
6-costato Bcaberulo, limbi lobis 3-parvis rotundatis subfequalibus, 
petalis late ovato-orbiculatis acutis dorso carinatis, carina ciliolata, sta- 
minibus 6, antheris acuminato-rostratis. 



Colone ^ Benson procured seeds of this plant from the 
Western Ghauts of Malabar, I believe, which he transmitted 
to Messrs. Yeitch, who forwarded the specimen here figured 
to Kew. It so closely resembles the S. elegans, Wight (Tab. 
nost. 4978), that I am in much doubt as to the propriety of 
keeping it distinct, notwithstanding its remarkable character 
of hexandrous flowers, a condition which obtains in only 
two other species of this large genus, which numbers upwards 
of fifty species, all of them Indian or Malayan. From 8. 
elegans it further differs in the smaller and more shortly- 
petioled leaves, which are glabrous, in the 6-ribbed calyx- 
tube, and much smaller flowers. From S. speciosa, Zenk. 
(Tab. nost. 502G), a very similar plant, and from the same 
region, it also differs in the hexandrous flower, small petals, 
their paler colour, and the ribbed calyx-tube. 

The Sonerilas are beautiful plants, inhabitants of humid, 
cool, shady mountain regions of India and the Malayan 
Islands, often growing on mossy rocks and tree trunks. 
Though easily raised and flowered, they have hitherto proved 
to be very difficult of continued cultivation, partly no doubt 
from being kept in too hot and damp a condition, but no less 
to their soft and succulent stems, which rapidly decay in 



august 1st. is;:;. 



the winter months, when their vitality is checked by cold or 
other causes. 

Descr. A succulent branching herb, nearly glabrous, 
except the scape and calyx. Stem and branches as stout as 
a goosequill, obscurely 4-angled. Leaves rather succulent, 
two to two and a half inches long, ovate, acute, serrate, 
5 -nerved, shining green shot with brown-purple above, 
rose-purple beneath ; petiole about half as long as the blade. 
Peduncles two to three inches long, bright red, solitary, ter- 
minal, erect, slightly strigose above. Cymes about 6-flowered. 
Mowers one inch in diameter, shortly pedicelled. Calyx- 
tube ovoid, 6-ribbed, scaberulous ; limb cupular, 3-lobed, lobes 
subequal, rounded. Petals almost orbicular, acute, bright 
purple. Stamens six ; anthers ovate, gradually produced into 
an obtuse beak. Ovary 3-celled, its ' apex produced within 
the calyx-tube, conical and 6-toothed. Style decimate.— 



Fig.l, Flower with the petals removed; 2, petal; 3, stamens; 4, ovary 
with part of calyx-tube removed : — all magnified. 



6050 




^nctntBTooksTJay fcS(ai tap 



Tab. G050. 

DENDROBIUM lituiflorum. 

Native of Tenasserim ? 



Nat. Ord. Okciiide^:. — Tribe Dendrobieje. 
Genus Dendrobium, Swartz; {Lindl. Gen. et Sp. Orchid., p. 74). 



Dendrobium lituijhrum ; eaulibus fasciculatis gracilibus elongatis dependent- 
ibua arundinaceis basi tuberosis, floribus ad nodos 1-5, sepalis patent- 
lbus oblongo-lanceolatis obtusis v.'acutis petalisque latioribus ovato- 
oblongis laite purpureis, labelli lituiformis ungue convoluto incurvo, 
Jamina orbiculari concava disco intense purpurea, limbo lato stramineo 
velutino margine anguste lilaeino integerrimo. 

Dendrobium lituiflorum, Lindl. in Gard. Chron, (1856, May), p. 185. 

D. Hanburyanum, Reichb. f. in Bonplaxdia, vol. iv. p. 329 (Oct. 1856). 



Dr. Lindley, the author of this species, ohserves that it 
belongs to the I), nobile group, but that besides its different 
habit, it is a much handsomer plant, with a longer lip and 
very acute petals and sepals. Its native country was un- 
known at the date of its publication, and is not now certain ; 
but judging from the number of forms allied toD. noMleihxA 
have lately been received from Rangoon, Moulmaine, and 
the Tenasserim provinces, it is most probable that it was 
imported from thence. Very shortly after Dr. Lindley had 
published it, it was described as D. Hanburyanum by Prof. 
Reichenbach, and from the same source — Mr. Hanbury's 
garden. Our specimen flowered in the Royal Gardens in 
April of the present year. 

1 he specific name is derived from lituus, a kind of curved 
trumpet or clarion, in allusion to the form of the lip. 




'5 



a 
loi 

pressed, truncate, striate. Leaves not seen. Flowers solitary, i >r 
August 1st, 1873. 



2-5-fascicIed on a short peduncle at the nodes, two inches in 
diameter; bracts short; pedicels and ovary very slender, 
together one inch long. Sepals spreading and recurved' 
oblong-lanceolate, acute or apiculate, bright purple, reticu- 
lated. Petals spreading, ovate-oblong, much broader than 
the sepals, of the same colour, except towards the base, where 
they are nearly white. Zip one and a half inch long; 
curved like a trumpet, with the mouth upwards. Claw con- 
volute, white with deep purple transverse stripes. Limb 
expanded, orbicular, concave, with recurved margins. Disk 
of a very deep violet-purple colour, this is surrounded by a 
broad faint yellow velvety band, which is edged with purple 
that extends to the quite entire margin of the limb.— 
/ D. If. 



Fig. 1, Lip: — magnified. 



' >>«??-- 



6051 




yr&x&.&A<sMi. 



TiaceaitBroolkg Dty JLSoiirlnip. 



Tab. 6051. 
SILENE Hookeri. 

Native of California. 



Nat. Ord. Caryophylle^e. — Tribe Silene^e. 
Genus Silene, Linn.; (Benth. and Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 147). 



Silene Hookeri ; perennis, tota tomentoso-pubescens, caulibus e radici peren- 
nate plurimis decumbentibus foliosis, foliis anguste elliptico-lanceolatis 
v. oblanceolatis acutis enerviis in petiolum latum angustatis, radicalibus 
in plantis junioribus spathulatis, floribus solitariis v. in axillis sub- 
cymosis amplis pediceLlatis rarius in pedunculos 2-floros dispositis, 
calyce pollicari anguste oblongo demum turgido non viscoso 
10-nervio, limbi brevis lobis triangulari-ovatis, petalis pallide roseis 
ungue basi ciliato superne in laminam cuneatam 4-G-fidam sensim 
dilatato facie 2-carinato, carinis in dentes productis, limbi lobis linearibus 
asqualibus v. variis acutis v. obtusis, staminibus petalinis ungue multo 
brevioribus sepalinis filamentis filiformibus elongatis, ovarii stipite 
glaberrimo. 

Silene Hookeri, Nuttall in Torr, and Gray Fl. N. Am., vol. i. p. 193. 

S. Bolanderi, A. Gray in Proc. Amer. Acad., vol. vii. p. 330 (March, 1868). 



This curious species of Silene was discovered some forty 
years ago in woods of the Wahlaniet, in Oregon, and has been 
gathered repeatedly since by various collectors in different 
parts of Oregon and California; most recently by Prof. 
Bolander, in wooded hillsides in the Plumas country. It is 
quite unlike any other cultivated in Europe, and especially 
remarkable from the great size of the flowers in comparison 
with the rest of the plant. Nuttall, the founder of the 
species, describes the petals as white, but they are of 
a pale rose colour in our specimens. In Gray's description 
and our specimens of S. Bolanderi these petaline lobes vary 
exceedingly in number, length, and breadth, the outer on 
either side being sometimes reduced to mere teeth. 

Silene Hookeri is well adapted for rock work cultivation ; 
it was introduced by Professor Bolander, who sent seeds to 
Mr. Thompson of Ipswich, who forwarded living specimens 

august 1st, 1873. 



to Kew, which flowered in May of the present year. The 
flowers are very fugacious. 

Descr. Whole plant softly pubescent, subtomentose or 
almost woolly. Stems many from a perpendicular root, which in 
old plants is stout and woody, decumbent, six to ten inches long, 
slender. Leaves two to three inches long, the lower elliptic- 
spathulate, narrowed into long petioles, the remainder elliptic- 
lanceolate acute or acuminate, all uniformly pubescent on 
both surfaces, midrib and nerves very obscure. Flowers two to 
two and a half inches in diameter, solitary in the leaf-axils, 
or sometimes obscurely arranged in terminal or axillary few- 
flowered cymes ; pedicels very short. Calyx about one inch 
long, at first narrow, soon turgid, 10-nerved, veins obscure, 
teeth short, erect, green, with narrow membranous edges' 
Petals twice as long as the calyx, pale pink ; claw ciliate, 
gradually dilating into the broad limb, which is 4-cleft; lobes 
very variable, narrow or broad, equal, or the outer smaller 
or reduced to teeth, acute or obtuse; there arc two parallel 
white ridges on the claw which terminate in white teeth at the 
blade. Gynophore columnar, nearly glabrous. Stamens very 
unequal five petaline very short; five sepaline with slender 
filaments. Ovary glabrous, ovoid ; styles slender.—/. D. H. 



\JHft li Petal and petaIine St:lmen ^ 2 > gynophore, very young ovary, and 
ftCSf 3 ' VCTy ^ 0V ^ and upbore; t*Ub Jy, : 




LdetM 



"VSucent Br o oks Day&S&al 



Tab. 6052. 
CINCHONA Calisaya, var. Josephiana. 

Native of Bolivia and Peru. 



Nat. Ord. Kubiace^:. — Tribe Cinciione>e. 
Genus Cinchona, Linn.; (Benth. and Hook.f. Gen. PL, vol. ii. p. 32). 



Cinchona Calisaya ; foliis oblongis v. lanceolato-obovatis obtusis basi at- 
tenuatis rarius utrinque acutis glabratis nitidis v. subtus pubescentibus 
in axillis venarum scrobiculatis, filamentis quam dimidia anthera 
plerumque brevioribus,capsnla ovata florem longitudine sequante, semini- 
bus margine crebre fimbriato-denticulatis {Weddell, Hist. Nat. Quinq., 
30). 

Var. /3. Josephiana; frutex pratensis foliis oblongo-v. ovato-lanceolatis 
acutiusculis obtusisve utrinque glaberrirnis rigidulis scrobiculatis v. 
escrobiculatis capsula vulgo maore. 

C. Calisaya var. Josephiana, Weddell, Hist. Nat. Quinq., p. 31. Note* sur 
les Quinquinia, 18 et 54. Gust. Planch, des Quinq., p. 74. Triana, 
Nouv. Etudes sur les Quinq., p. 64. 



This very distinct looking form of Cinchona Calisaya 
flowered in October, 1872, with Mr. Howard, who informs 
me that he received the plant from Kew some five or six 
years previously, but that he has kept no record of the locality 
whence it was originally obtained. It is obviously one of 
the plants brought by Mr. Pearce in 1866, and of which 
there are specimens from himself in the Kew herbarium, 
marked as an evergreen shrub, six to ten feet high, gathered in 
flower at Moro, altitude 5-6000 feet, January, 1866, several 
Ward's cases of which were forwarded from Kew to India in the 
same and following years. Mr. Howard at first supposed it 
to be the C. micrantha, var. Calisayoides (which is inseparable 
by botanical characters from C. micrantha var. oblongifolia, of 
Weddell), and it is indeed to all appearance intermediate 
between C. Calisaya and C. micrantha. Subsequently, after a 
correspondence with Dr. Weddell, he agreed with that 
learned author in considering it referable to C. Calisaya var. 
Josephiana. The " Itzhu cascarilla" of the Peruvians, a plant 
which grows very abundantly in the same regions as C. 

august 1st, 1873. 



Calisaya (namely, Bolivia and Southern Peru), but in open 
meadows, not in woods, to which no doubt the comparatively 
coriaceous foliage is attributable, and to which it owes its 
native name. Weddell indeed regards it as a subspecies, 
and places under it three varieties, a. glabra, b. pubescens, and 
c. discolor {C. Boliviana, Wedd. in part), to the first of 
which our figure belongs, though the leaves are longer and 
narrower than the description would imply. 

Owing to its growing out of the forest, the seeds of this 
form appear to be much easier procured than those of the 
true Calisaya, which is unfortunate, as Mr. Howard pro- 
nounces the bark to be of inferior quality, a fact which he 
is disposed to connect with the colour of the flowers, which 
are greenish white below, and brilliant white above. C. 
micrantha var. virdiflora, affording another case in point. The 
colour of the flowers should, however, according to Dr. 
Weddell, be pink, and Pearce remarks that the flowers were 
pink in his native specimens * They are very fragrant ; the 
odour is described by Mr. Howard as between cloves and 
jessamine. The name Josephiana was given in honour of 
Joseph de Jussieu, who described it in his MSS. 

Descr. A bush or a small shrubby tree. Leaves five to 
ten inches long, by one and a half to three broad, elliptic- 
oblong or narrowly oblong or obovate-lanceolate, obtuse or 
subacute, coriaceous, lucid, dark green, quite glabrous on both 
surfaces, except the nerve-axils beneath. Petiole a half to 
three-quarters of an inch long. Flowers two-thirds of an inch 
long, in terminal erect panicles. Calyx small, green, pubes- 
cent. Corolla-tube tomentose, not split laterally, dull green 
below, clear white above (in cultivated specimens), as are 
the lobes. Stamens of male flowers with the filaments 
about half the length of the anthers; of the female very 
short indeed. Capsule equalling the flower in length, turgid. 
Seeds with a closely fimbriate wing. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, the same with the corolla laid open :— both magnified. 



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Tab. 6053. 
HIBBERTIA Baudouinti. 

Native of New Caledonia. 



Nat. Ord. Dilleniaceje. — Tribe HibbertiEjE. 
Genus Hibbertia, And. ; (Benth. and Jlooh.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 14). 



Hibbertia (§ Cyclandra)2fatMfoutmt; suffrutex humilia glaberrimus robustus, 
foliis Bubpedalibua sessilibua anguste lanceolatis acuminatia integer- 
rimis v. aubaerratia subtua pallidia coata valida, racemis elongatia 
robuatia multdfloria, floribua secundia 2 poll. diam. subaesailibus, bracteis 

oblongo-v.-lanceolato- subulatis, aepalis oblongia apiculatis, petalia 
obovato-cuneatis emarginatis, staniinibus ad 100 extimis sterilibus, 
carpellis 2-4 glabria. 
Hibbertia Baudouinii, Brong. et Gn's, Plantes peu connucs de la Nouvelle- 
Caledonie, in Ann. Sc. Nat., ser. 5, vol. ii. p. 149. 



This noble plant differs considerably in habit from its 
Australian congeners, and approaches in the curious inflores- 
cence to its New Caledonian ally Trisema, from which it is 
distinguished by being pentapetalous. It was discovered by 
the traveller whose name it bears near Port-de-France 
in New Caledonia; and was introduced into Europe by 
Dr. Moore of the Glassnevin Gardens, Dublin, who received 
seeds of it from his brother, the Superintendent of the Bo- 
tanical Gardens of Sydney. There is an indigenous fruiting 
specimen in the Kew Herbarium sent under this name by 
Yieillard, gathered on the top of Mount Mou, which has 
shorter leaves and very much enlarged sepals. 

The distribution of the genus Hibbertia is very remarkable 
it abounds in Australia, three or four species are natives of 
New Caledonia, and two of Madagascar ; the latter, however, 
forming a very distinct section or subgenus; whilst the JNew 
Caledonian species belong to a section that abounds in the 
adjoining continent. The genus is absent from New 
Zealand. 

SEPTEMBER 1ST, 187.". 



Descr. A small shrub, glabrous in all its parts, except 
an obscure silky pubescence on the edges of the sepals. 
Stem as thick as the little finger, grooved. Leaves crowded 
towards the ends of the branches, spreading, a foot long, 
sessile, narrow lanceolate, acuminate, quite entire or minutely 
distantly serrulate; midrib broad, pale; nerves very faint, 
coriaceous, paler and subglaucous beneath. Racemes axillary, 
equalling the leaves, stout, subrecurved. Flowers secuna, 
subsessile, two inches in diameter. Bracts and bracteoles 
three, shorter than the sepals, the lower narrow- oblong, acu- 
minate, the upper subulate, green, deciduous. Sepals oblong, 
concave, apiculate, coriaceous, green. Petals bright yellow, 
obovate-cuneate, retuse. Stamens very numerous and densely 
crowded; filaments slender; anthers linear-oblong, the outer 
imperfect. Carpels 2—4, ovoid, turgid, glabrous, with slender 
diverging styles.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Stamen; 2, carpels; 3, transverse section of do. :— all magnified. 




6054- 



WRtck del etM 






Tab. 6054. 
K^MPFERIA ROTUNDA. 

Native of the East Indies. 



Nat. Ord. Soitamwe^e. — Tribe Zinzibeka. 
Genus Kjempeeria, Linn. ; (Endl. Gen., p. 223). 



K^mpferia rotunda, radicibus tuberiferis, scapis precocibus, vaginis Litis 
acutis viridibus v. luride purpureis, foliis elliptico-lanceolatis acutis disco 
saturate viridi ceterum colore pallidiore irrovatis subt us fusco- purpureis, 
ovario glabro, perianthio exteriore spathaceo, petalis 3 exterioribus 
anguste loriformibus albis interiores excedentibus, interiorum 2 supe- 
riorum late oblongis apiculatis fere albis, inferiore 2-lobo lobis 
orbiculato-oblongis apiculatis purpureis, antheraa connectivo superne in 
laminam 2-fidam polymorpham fisso. 

KiEMPFERiA rotunda, Linn. Flor. Zeylan., p. 9 ; Tab. nost., 920. lioscoe 
Scitam. PL, t. 97. Wight Ic. PL Ind. Or., t. 2029. Flore des Serres, 
vol. x. t. 1041. 

K. longa, Jacq. Hort. Schoenbr., t. 317. Ann. Sc. Nat., ser. 2, vol. xr. 317, 
t. 20, f. 5-8. Eedoute Lit., vol. j. t. 49. 

Malan Kua, Rheede Hort. Mai., pt. xi. p. 17, t. 9. 



At first sight, on comparing this with the early figure of 
K. rotunda (Tab. 920), it would appear to be a very different 
plant, and its close accordance with Jacquin's fine figure of 
C. longa, led at once to its reference to that species. After, 
however, a careful comparison with the excellent dissected 
specimen of K. rotunda in the Kew Herbarium, and the 
numerous published plates of that plant, including the above 
cited very indifferent one published nearly seventy years 
ago in this Magazine, I cannot but regard K. longa as a 
well cultivated form of rotunda, which, as in the case of the 
specimen here figured, produced its flowers in April, and its 
leaves at about midsummer. This opinion is, indeed, ex- 
pressed by Sims (see Tab. 920), who, notwithstanding that 
his figure bears no great resemblance to Jacquin's, perti- 
nently says, " Upon what ground Jacquin considers his A . 
longa as a different species I cannot conjecture." 

SEPTEMBER 1ST, 1873. 



Kampferia rotunda was known to Bauliin and Bay, and 
has been cultivated in England for nearly a century ; it is a 
reputed native of the East Indies, but as far as I can make 
out is only known in continental India in a cultivated state ; 
Roxburgh says that it is " no doubt a native of various parts 
of India/' but adds, "yet I cannot say where it is indigenous." 
Wight figures it from Malabar, but does not state whether 
it is indigenous or no. Thwaites includes it in his enumera- 
tion of Ceylon plants, as an inhabitant of the warmer parts 
of that island. The specimen here figured flowered in Mr. 
Bull's establishment in April of the present year. 

Col. Heber Drury, the best authority on the economic plants 
of India, says of this the Bhu champa, or Bhue champa of 
Bengal (Useful Plants of Inda, ed. 2, p. 271), that its native 
place is unknown, and that it is much cultivated in gardens, 
because of the beauty and fragrance of the flowers ; he adds, 
that according to Rheede, the whole plant is reduced to 
powder, and used as an ointment, in which state it is 
reckoned as very useful in healing wounds, &c. The root, 
which has a hot ginger-like taste, is useful in anasarcous 
swellings. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Apex of ovary with stamen and style : — magnified. 



6055 




deietlitt. 



iotoI>a.ylSoji,fap- 



Tab. 6055. 
SEMPERVIVUM tectorum, var. atlanticum. 

Native of the Greater Adas. 



Nat. Ord. Crassulace.e. 
Genus Sempervivum, Linn. ,- (Benth. and Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 660). 



Sempervivum tectorum, var. atlanticum • foliis rosularum obovato-oblongis 
apice breviter acuminatis utrinque breviter glanduloso- pubescentibus 
margine ciliatis caulinis oblongo-lanceolatis, superioribus cymisque 
glanduloso-pubescentibus, calyce infra medium fisso, staminibus omni- 
bus perfectis virgineis obscure viridibus, squamis hypogynis minutis- 
simis glandulosis, carpellis divergentibus toro elevato sufFultis et a 
verticillis exterioribus squamis exceptis omnino discretis staminibus 
asqui-Iongis. 

Sempervivum tectorum, Linn. var. atlanticum, Ball, in Trimen. Lond. Journ. 
Bot., 1873, ined. 



The Common Houseleek is so polymorphous a plant that 
many species have been made of its various forms, which 
differ remarkably in beauty, brightness of colour, and value 
in a horticultural point of view. Of these the present 
is one of the handsomest and most distinct, so much so that 
Mr. Ball has doubtfully proposed it as a sub-species. It 
was discovered by Messrs. Balli Maw, and myself, on rocks 
in the valley of Ait-Mesan in the Greater Atlas, at an eleva- 
tion of about 5000 feet, and flowered on the rockwork in 
Kew in June of the present year. Its bright star-like 
flowers, with white petals, having a broad ruby-coloured central 
stripe, gave it a very sparkling appearance. Like the 
Common Houseleek it is easily propagated, and should 
replace its duller coloured prototype in general estimation. 

Descr. Rosettes three to four inches across. Leaves two 
inches long, bright green, obovate-oblong oblanceolate or 
obovate-spathulate, very shortly mucronate, more or less 
glandular-pubescent on both surfaces, margin ciliate, tips 
reddish; cauline leaves oblong-lanceolate, upper glandular- 
pubescent, all turning a brilliant vinous red-purple as the 
flowers begin to expand. Ci/me dichotonious, densely 

SEPTEMBER lsT, 1873. 



glandular-hairy, many-flowered, spreading. Flowers one and 
a quarter to one and a half inches in diameter. Calyx sub- 
spherical, densely hairy, divided three-fourths of the way 
down into twelve oblong acuminate green segments. Petals 
spreading, narrow linear, acuminate, white, with a broad, 
bright red-purple median band. Stamens all perfect; 
anthers dull green before bursting. Hypogynous glands 
very small, glandular. Carpels erect, equalling the stamens, 
raised on a lobed disk considerably within the staminal whorli 
green; styles subulate, slightly recurved. — J. D. H. 



aUma ^JSf* ^ cal y x and car P els 5 3 > car Pels and hypogynous glands :— 




me 



Vmccnt.BroaksDayfc 



Tab. 6056. 

PHILYDRUM GLABERETMUM. 

Native of the Pacific Islands ? 



Nat. Ord. Philydre^e. 
Genus Philydrum, Banks; (Endl. Gen. PL, p. 133). 



Philydrum glaberrimum; foliis ensiformibus, inflorescentia paniculata alba, 
bracteis lanceolatis acuminatis, perianthii foliolis recurvis 2 exterioribus 
subaequalibus ovato-oblongis obtusis, lateralibus multo minoribus 
staminis filamento brevi crasso, anthera oblonga loculis rectis v. paulo 
mcurvis connectivo dorso rubro, stylo gracili, ovario glaberrimo. 



The natural order to which this plant belongs has hitherto 
been supposed to consist of but two species, belonging to as 
many genera, of which one, Metceria, is Australian, and the 
other, Philydrum lanuginosum (Tab. nost. 783), extends from 
eastern temperate Australia to China and the Malayan 
Peninsula. It was therefore with no small surprise that I 
received from Mr. Bull in May last living specimens of a 
plant which, on examination, proved to belong to this order, 
and to be so closely allied to the Philydrum lanuginosum in 
floral structure, as well as in habits and foliage, that I cannot 
consider its one divergent character, that of almost straight 
(not spirally -twisted) anther-cells, to have more than a sectional 
or subgeneric value, to which the name of Orthothylax may 
be attached. Unfortunately the native country of this very 
interesting discovery is not certainly known; Mr. Bull 
having received it from Sydney in a box that contained both 
Australian and Pacific Island plants. Considering how well 
known the former Flora now is (thanks especially to Baron 
Mueller's researches), and how little known are the Pacific 
Islands botanically, it is probable that this Philydrum comes 
from the latter. 

The genus Philydrum is a very remarkable one, on account 
of the dimerous perianth and monandrous flowers. The 

SEPTEMBKK 1ST, 1873. 



latter, Griffith (Notula? PL iii. p. 230) has correctly shown 
to be due to the coalition at a very early period of the 
two posticous sepals; and he attributes the monandrous 
andrcecium to the suppression of the two posticous stamens, 
not considering the two lateral perianth segments to be 
staminodes, on account of their appearing to belong to a 
different series from the stamens. In our species, however, 
there is a very obscure connexion between the bases of these 
two segments and the filament, which favours the view of 
their staminal origin, though they may belong to an outer 
series of stamens, whilst the solitary developed one belongs 
to an inner series. 

The affinity of Philydrece has been disputed. Brown 
regarded them as having affinities with Orchidea and Bur- 
manniaceae ; Endlicher places them between Melanthacea and 
Juncece ; and Lindley refers them to his alliance Xyridales, 
which also includes Commelynacea, Meyaceee, and Xyridacete, 
a position which appears to be the most natural. 

Descr. A tufted herb, three feet high, quite glabrous 
throughout. Leaves equitant, ensiform, acuminate, two 
feet long, one inch broad, dull green, coriaceous, margin 
perfectly entire, midrib prominent; nerves very oblique, 
few, with transverse venules; sheaths with scarious edges. 
Flowering -stem exceeding the leaves, terete, leafy. Panicle 
erect, with erect branches, a foot long, its branches, flowers, 
and upper bracts white ; lower bracts ensiform, two inches 
long, green ; upper ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, one quarter 
to half an inch long. Flowers sessile, three-quarters of an 
inch broad in their longest (vertical) diameter. Outer Pcrant/i- 
■scy merits oblong, ovate, obtuse, or apiculate, recurved, white ; 
inner much smaller, also recurved and obtuse. Stamens 
slightly curved, filaments very short and stout. Anthers 
oblong, obtuse, with parallel contiguous cells, connective 
orange-red at the back. Ovary curved, unequally 3-lobed 
and 3-celled, quite glabrous; style slender, and stigma 
minute. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower and bract ; 2, front view of flower; 3, stamens; 4, ovary ; 
5, vertical section of do. : — all magnified. 



6051 




idetlith 



-cent Brooks Day 1 



Tab. 6057. 
MESEMBRYANTHEMUM introrsum. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. FicoidejE.— Tribe Mesembrye^e. 

Genus Mesembbyanthemum, Linn.; (Benth. and Hook. f. Gen. Pi, 
vol. i. p. 853). 



MESEMBRYAOTHEMDMtn&wttm; ramulis effusis erecto-decumbentibus, juni- 
oribus hispidulis foliisque minute celluloso-tessellatis, foliis remotis 
i-cylindraceis patenti-recurvis apice sepalisque penicillatim barbatulis, 
setia ad 10 badiis, floribus terminalibus solitariis gracile pedunculitis, 
calycis tube- turbinate, lobis subcylindraceis duobus majoribus, petalis 
sub-2-seriatis radiantibug anguste linearibus ochraceis vitellinis roseis v. 
rubris, filainentis albis externis anantheris, stigmatibus 5 minutis 
conico-recurvis. 

Mesembryanthemum introrsum, Haivorth in Phil. Mag., 1824, p. 428. ex DC. 
Prod., vol. iii. p. 440. Salm Dycle, Monog. Mesemb., fasc. 52, f. 2. 
Harv. and Sond. Fl. Cap., vol. iii. p. 446. 



There are many good reasons for encouraging the culti- 
vation of the once favourite genus Mesembryanthemum, amongst 
which not the least is their duration, for when once estab- 
lished they need never be lost; they are further evergreen, 
cost little in soil and cleaning, and many of them are 
amongst the most brilliantly coloured greenhouse plants. 
The subject of the present plate has been established at Kew 
for at least half a century. The first notice I find of it is in the 
work of Haworth, quoted above, who states that it was culti- 
vated in Kew in 1824. I do not, however, find it described 
in the second edition of "Hortus Kewensis," published in 1 SI 1, 
where 175 species are enumerated as then in cultivation in 
the Royal Gardens; a number reduced in 1855 to 157, and 
now increased to 225, including some varieties and species 
that have not yet flowered. Upwards of 300 species are 
described from the Cape alone, in Harvey and Bonders' 
-b lora. 

-Descr. Stem branched from the base; branches a foot 
and more long, at first erect, then prostrate or pendulous, as 

SEPTEMBER 1ST, 1873. 



thick as a sparrow quill, and like the surface of the leaves 
tessellated and papillose with bladdery cells ; young parts 
minutely hispid, each papilla bearing a bristle. Leaves in 
distant pairs, about one inch long, somewhat recurved, semi- 
terete, with very rounded sides, tipped with a pencil of about 
ten spreading brown bristles, connate at the base, light green, 
fleshy. Flowers three-fourths of an inch in diameter, on long 
slender terminal peduncles. Calyx-tube turbinately hemi- 
spheric, obscurely obtusely angled, green; limb of five 
spreading and recurved segments like the leaves, of which 
two exceed the petals, and are tipped like the leaves with 
bristles. Petals biseriate, the inner shorter, narrow linear, 
obtuse, very various in colour, white fading to rose-colour, 
or ochreous, or red. Stamens short, filaments white; the 
outer with imperfect anthers. Stigmas five, small, short, 
conic, recurved. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of stem and leaves; 2, vertical section of flower; 
3, stigmas : — all magnified. 



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6068. 







Tab. 6058. 
LILIUM (hybridtjm) Kramert. 

Raised from Japanese Parents. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Tribe Tdlipe^e. 
Genus Lilium, Linn.; {Baker in Gard. Chron., 1871). 



Liumr (bybridum) Kramcri ; caule gracili erecto simplici 4-pedali tereti 
viridi fusco leviter striato, foliis sparsis horizontalibus breviter petio- 
latis anguste lanceolatis acuminatis glabris supra saturate viridibus 
subtus pallidis, flore solitario terminali inclinato v. borizontali 8-10 poll, 
dinmetro, albo pallide rnseo v. carneo, perianthio infundibuliformi- 
campanulato, segmentis oblanceolatis subacutis epapillosis supra me- 
dium revolutis, staminibus declinatis, antheris liueari-oblongis polline 
ferrugineo, stigmate viridi. 



As a rule hybrid plants do not find a place in the Botanical 
Magazine, from nowant of admiration for these always interest- 
ing, and often beautiful, productions of the gardener's skill, 
but from the simple fact that nature supplies superabundant 
materials for this work, and that it is the more legitimate func- 
tion of a Botanical work to illustrate the possible or probable 
parents of future hybrids, and thus afford toothers the means 
of elucidating the history of hybrids when these are formed. 
In the present case it was under the erroneous impression that 
L. Kramert was a species that it was prepared for publication 
in the Magazine, and not with the view of illustrating itself or 
its origin, which are, however, both sufficiently deserving of a 
place in the pages of a Botanical work. 

Lilium Kramert has been forwarded for figuring both by 
G. Wilson, Esq., F.L.S., and by Messrs. Barr and Sugden, to 
the former of which gentlemen a first-class certificate was 
awarded for it by the Eoyal Horticultural Society. Accord- 
ing to Mr. Baker it is a hybrid between L. speciosum and 
L. japonicum, an opinion which Mr. Wilson thinks confirmed 

OCTOBER 1st, 1873. 



by its foliage and odour. It would be interesting to know 
precisely, respecting this relationship, which of the parents 
took the father's part and which the mother's duties. Mr. 
Wilson informs me that he believes it was sent by Mr. 
Kramer of Japan to Messrs. Teutschel of Colchester two years 
ago under three varieties, accompanied by coloured drawings. 
Of these No. 1 had rather expanded flowers like L. longiflorum 
with mauve tint on the back of the petals. No. 2 was wholly 
mauve. No. 3 was wholly white. Of these Mr. Wilson has 
flowered Nos. 1 and 2, of which No. 1 had not smooth edges 
to the petals, and No. 2 was of a deeper mauve than in the 
drawing. Mr. Barr has been good enough to give me pre- 
cisely similar information as the result of his experience, with 
the addition that these Lilies vary much in size according to 
cultivation. 

Referring to figures of the supposed parents ofZ. Krameri, 
this plant agrees with L. speciosum var. album (Tab. nost. 
3785) in the form of the flower, fragrance, decimate stamens, 
and long anthers ; in all of which points it differs from L. 
japonicum. On the other hand, it agrees with L. japonicum 
in the narrow leaves, absence of papillae on the perianth 
segments, and colour of the pollen. 

Unfortunately little is known of these Japanese Lilies in 
their wild state. Most are imported as cultivated in the 
gardens of the natives, though L. auratum, the noblest of all, 
is said to abound in the fields of Japan. All vary much in 
colour, L. speciosum especially, from deep rose colour to pure 
white.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Eeduced figure of plant; 2, young capsule : — loth of the natural 
size. 



6053 




Tab. 6059. 
CARAGUATA Zahnii. - Gvz/t/rs///? 

Native of C/iiriqui. ^ t /.&&. 



Nat. Ord. Bromeliace^:. — Tribe Tillandsie^e. 
Genus Caraguata, Plumier • (Endl. Gen. PI., p. 183). 



Caraguata Zahnii • caespitosa, subcaulescens, glaberrima, nitida, foliis 
pedalibus e basi lata lineari-lanceolatis integerrimis recurvis acutis et 
apiculatis infra medium concavis flavis rubro-striatis, ultra medium 
planis coccineis apicem versus viridibus, scapo erecto dense foliaceo- 
vaginatis, vaginis spithamaus imbricatis suberectis subulato-lanceolatis, 
panicula densa aurea, pedicellis brevibus, bracteis ovato-subulatis 
apicibus elongatis rubris, bracteolis ovato-oblongis, sepalis lineari- 
oblongis subacutis, corolla? tubo calycem paulo superante lobis ovatis 
obtusis concavis, filamentis tubo corolla? adnatis, antheris vix exsertis 
lineari-oblongis, stigmate 3-fido. 

Tillandsia Zahnii, Hort. Veitch. 



I have adopted the specific name proposed for this splendid 
plant by its importers, Messrs. Veitch, in commemoration of 
the services of their excellent collector Mr. Zahn, who dis- 
covered it in 1870, in Chiriqui, Central America, shortly be- 
fore he perished by drowning, a victim to his enterprise, on 
his way to Costa Rica. 

The genus Caraguata comprises the Tillandsias with united 
petals and filaments adnate to the tube of the corolla. A good 
illustration of one species, C. splendent, is given by Professor 
Morren, of Liege, who is justly celebrated for his knowledge 
of Bromcliaceai, and the fine collection he has formed of them 
in the Botanic Garden of Liege, in the Flore des Serres 
(t. 1091) ; the C. Zahnii is nearly allied both to this and to 
Grisebach's Tillandsia com pact a, but differs in the much 
longer leaves, long sheaths on the scape, and form of the 
bracts. Messrs. Veitch's specimen, which is here figured, 
flowered in May of the present year. 

OCTOBER 1st, 1873. 



Descr. Stems tuftea, branched from the base, very short, 
densely leafy, whole plant perfectly glabrous and shining! 
Leaves a foot long, by one to one and a quarter inches 
broad at the middle, linear-ligulate, acute, apiculate ; lower 
half concave, rounded at the back, yellow with crimson 
stripes ; upper half nearly flat, of a bright crimson pass- 
ing into yellow, and then into green at the tip, margin 
quite entire and smooth. Scape erect, densely clothed 
with erect scarlet sheaths a span long, the long acute 
tips of which reach the inflorescence; the sheaths are 
lanceolate-subulate, obtusely keeled, quite entire, and very 
indistinctly nerved. Inflorescence an oblong compressed dense 
panicle of a pale golden colour, except the scarlet tips of the 
lowest bracts, which project from the base, and are ovate 
with long subulate points; bracteoles boat-shaped, obtuse, 
hard and coriaceous, rather exceeding the sepals. Sepals 
Jinear-oblong, very concave, subacute, coriaceous, imbricate. 
Corolla-tube shortly exceeding the calyx, terete; limb one- 
third of an mch m diameter, of three ovate very obtuse concave 
lobes Stamens with the filaments wholly adnate to the 
corolla-tube, at the mouth of which the linear-oblong yellow 
anthers appear to be sessile. Ovary trigonous ; stigmatic lobes 
three, linear, erect, twisted.—/. D. II. 



^St ?' f dUCed VieW ° f whole P lant 5 2 > flower i S > Potion of corolla and 
stamens; 4, ovary style and stigmas :— figs. 2,3 audi, magnified. 



6060 




Vffitch,ddetkh 



Wceat Brooks Diyi SanTmp 



Tab. 60G0. 

LINAKIA SAGITTATE. 

Native of Morocco. 



Nat. Ord. SceophulaeinEvE. — Tribe Antirrhtne^e. 
Genus Linaria, Linn. ; (Benth. in DC. Prodr., vol. x. p. 266). 



Linaria (Elatinoides) sagittata ; glabra, caudice brevi lignosa, caulibus 
filiformibus subscandentibus elongatis intricatim ramosis, foliis alternis 
petiolatis oblongo-hastatis lauceolatis linearibus basi sagittatis integer- 
rimis, floribus flavis axillaribus solitariis, pedicellia capillaribus, calycis 
segmentis lanceolatis acutis, corollae amphe flavas calcare tubo longiore. 

Linaria heterophylla, Spreng. Syst. Veg., vol. ii. p. 790; Chavan. Monog. 
Linar., p. 112; Benth. in DC. Prod., vol. vii. p. 270; Webb. 4' Berth. 
Phytogr. Canar., vol. iii. 141, t. 181 (non Derfontaines). 

L. Webbiana, Visiani L'Orto Bot. di Torino, p. 142; ex Walp. Pep., vol. iii. 
p. 195. 

L. circinnata, Sweet, Brit. Fl. Gard., ser. 2, vol. iii. t. 235. 

L. Lancerottse, Delile, Sem. Hort. Monsp., 1836, p. 26 (ex Webb.). 

Antirrhinum heterophyllum, Schousb. Beobacht. Gewcichs. Marokh, 181, 
t. 3 ; Wiild, Sp. PL, vol. iii. p. 234. 

A. sagittatum, Poir. Diet. Suppl., vol. iv. p. 19. 



In the June number of this Magazine (Tab. 6041)* it was 
pointed out that the name Linaria heterophylla, which had 
long been applied to the species now figured, must be retained 
for that to which it was first applied by Desfontaines, whose 
excellent published drawing and description left nothing 
wanting for the recognition of the plant to which he had ap- 
plied that name. I have now the opportunity of figuring 
the species which had usurped the name of heterophylla, and 
which is a very interesting one on account of its subscandent 
habit, that enables it to climb amongst the hedges of 
Marocco to a height of five feet and more, forming tangled 
masses that spread for yards over the bushes, which are some- 



* On the second page of the description, and third line from the top, for 
pallidiftora read heterophylla. 
OCTOBER 1st, 1873. 



times speckled with its golden blossoms. It was described 
first from Schousboe's Maroccan specimen as Antirrhinum 
heterophjllum by Schousboe the Danish Consul and naturalist ; 
then by Poiret, from specimens in Desfontaines' Herbarium 
(no doubt Algerian) as A. sagittatum ; then by Sweet as L. 
circinnata, a name derived from the recurved leaves of the 
specimens he figured, which are not characteristic of the 
species: his specimens were supposed to be raised from S. 
American seed. Later still in Visiani (according to Walpers) 
as L. JFebbiana, from Canarian specimens ; and lastly by 
Delile as L. Lancerotta. 

Linaria sagittata is a common plant about Magador, and ex- 
tends as far south as Agadir. It is also found in the Island 
of Lancerotte, one of the Canaries, and that one considerably 
the nearest to the Maroccan coast, but in no other island of that 
group, which looks as if it were a comparatively recent im- 
portation that had not as yet spread further to the westward. 
The specimen here figured was raised from seeds brought by 
us from Marocco in 1871, and which flowered in June of the 
present year in Mr. Maw's garden and in the Eoyal Gardens, 
Kew. 

Descr. Stems very slender, six to ten feet long, branched, 
subscandent from a woody perennial stock. Leaves scattered, 
distant, petioled, one to one and a half inches long, lanceolate- 
oblong or linear with a hastate base, quite entire, primordial 
forming a rosette at the crown of the stock, sessile, elliptic- 
lanceolate, acute. Flowers yellow, axillary, solitary on capillary 
pedicels often exceeding the leaves. Sepals lanceolate, acute. 
Corolla one and a half inches long, lips very broad, upper with 
three short lobes, lower very short with a prominent palate ; 
spur pubescent, exceeding the tube. Capsule globose, bursting 
by two pores. Seeds reniform. — /. D. //. 



Fig. 1, Flower: — magnified. 



606! 




id stiti 



"VmcentBrooksH ' 



Tab. 6061. 
PELECYPHORA aselliformis var. concolor. 

Native of Mexico. 



Nat. Ord. Cacte^e. — Tribe Echinocacte^e. 
Genus Pelecyphora, Ehrb. ; (Benth. and H.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 8-48). 



Pelectphora aselliformis; Ehrenberg in Bot. Zeit., vol. i. (1843)p. 737 ; W alp. 

Rep., vol. v. p. 822; Salm-Dyck Cact. in Hort. DycL cult. 5, et adn. 78 ; 

Forst. Handb. der Cact. p. 257 ; Labouret. Monog. Cact. p. 148. Must. 

Hortic.i vol. vi. t. 186. 
Var. concolor, petalis concoloribus. 



This remarkable and still very rare plant, has been long 
known amongst Cactus growers, and has in fact been in the 
trade for many years, having been imported by the brothers 
Tonel from Mexico, where it was said to have been found 
with the equally anomalous Cactaceous genus Aniahnium 
(111. Hort., vol. xvi. t. 605 a). It was first published by Ehren- 
berg, from specimens grown in Berlin in 1S43, but nothing was 
known of its floral character till Lemaire, in 1858, published 
in the " Illustration Horticole" quoted above, an excellent 
figure of it with a very full and interesting description. 

The specimen here figured was forwarded by Mr. Justus 
Corderoy of Blewbury, early in June last, with the observa- 
tion that the flower differs markedly in colour from that ol 
Lemaire's plant, which has an outer series of pale petals, 
whereas those of this are uniformly of a rose-purple, like tie 
inner series of Lemaire's. Though so unlike other Cacti in the 
sculpturing of the stem and its mammilla, PeUcyphofa^ not 
essentially different in these respects from MammUUma ; 
the mammilke (which Lemaire regards as abnormal petioles 
and calls podaria) are vertically oblong, and crowned verti- 
cally with two contiguous rows of flat short horny cuspidate 
processes that overlap horizontally, and resemble the teeth 
of a comb ; these are analogous to the spines of a Mammdlana, 

OCTOBER 1st, 1873. 



but instead of being free and projecting, they lie flat, and are 
adnate to the ridge of the mammilla. This double series 
resembles curiously a wood-louse, with which insects the plant 
seems covered, and which fact has given it the trivial name 
of aselUformis. 

Descr. Stem tufted, dark green, shortly cylindric, three to 
four inches high, one and a half to two inches in diameter 
often constricted about the middle, apex rounded. Mammilla 
spirally arranged, vertical, one third of an inch long, 
rhomboidal in a tranverse section at the middle, com- 
pressed laterally at the crown into a ridge, and contracted 
to a narrow base, woolly in the axils; spines minute, short, 
Hat cartilaginous, linear, oblique, subfalcate, pungent, bifari- 
ously arranged on the crest of the mammilla, adnate to its surface 
with free tips. Flowers clustered towards the top of the stem, 
one and a half inch in diameter, sessile. Ovary small, naked, 
oblong, sunk m the axils of the mammillae. PeriantA-tu&eshorb, 
free, naked, funnel-shaped; segments in about four series, 
ODovate-oblong ; acute, rose-purple. Stamens very numerous, 
inserted m the mouth of the tube, filaments slender, multi- 
senate ; anthers minute. Style columnar ; stigmas with four 
erect lobes.—./; D. H. 



Fig. 1, front and 2, side view of a mammilla ; 3, flower laid open :— 
all magnified. 



6062 




WBtdi.delel Kit 



■^cortBroafaDar^^toe 



Tab. 6062. 
rubus deliciosus. 
Native of the Rochy Mountains. 



Nat. Ord. Kosaceje. — Tribe Rube^e. 
Genus Rubus, Linn. ; (Benth. and Hook.f. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. G16). 



Rubus deliciosus ; inermis, pubescenti-tomentosus, eglandulosus, e setosus ; 
caule erecto fruticoso ramoso, foliis simplicibus reniformi-rotundatia 
3-5-lobis argute dentato-serratis rugosis, stipulis persistentibus lanceo- 
latis, pedunculia 1-7-floris, floribus amplia, sepalis ovato -lance olatis 
apice dilatatis foliaceis serratia petalis orbiculatis crenato-lobulatis 
brevioribus. 

Rubus deliciosus, Torrey in Ann. Lyceum, New York, vol. ii. p. 196; Torr. 
<$f Gr. Flor. North America, vol. i. p. 450; G. -Don, Gard. Diet, 
vol. ii. p. 539. 

A very interesting and little-known plant, described by its 
discoverer, the late Dr. James, as bearing a fruit of delicious 
sweetness and considerable size ; the latter of which characters 
is not borne out by the specimens communicated by Mr. Henry 
and figured herewith. Whatever may be the qualities of its 
fruit, there is no question about the handsomeness of the 
flowerino- plant, whose flowers somewhat resemble those 
of a white rose in size and abundance. It is a native of the 
Rocky Mountains, between the latitudes 39° and 4o JN., 
on alpine ridges, where it was discovered by Dr. James in 
1822, and there are specimens in the Kew Herbarium col- 
lected bv James in the Colorado territory m 1861, and by 
E Hall and J. P. Harbour in 1862. Between the dates of 1822 
and 1861, it does not seem to have been seen by any natu- 
ralist. Torrey and Gray (I.e.) and G. Don, in his Gardeners 
Dictionary, describe the flowers as purple, which is not the 

case 

' Mubus deliciosus was introduced into cultivation in England 
by my friend Isaac Anderson Henry, F.L.b, ol Hay Lodge, 
Edinburgh, who received the seeds from N.W. America in N. 

OCTOBER 1st, 1873. 



lat. 44°, and flowered the plants he raised from them in May, 
1870. He describes it as " a bush a yard high, covered with 
large lovely blossoms, and quite an ornamental plant, irre- 
spective of the coming fruit." The fruit, however, did not 
come either in that or the following year, but in the end of 
last July Mr. Anderson Henry sent a fruit, which is here 
figured, and which was of a maroon brown colour and agree- 
able taste. 

Descr. A shrub a yard high, pubescent and tomentose, 
but without glands, bristles, or prickles; stems much branched, 
erect, covered withbrown bark. leaves \ong--petiohd, two inches 
in diameter, orbicular-reniform, 3-5-lobed, acutely toothed, 
rugose, bright green; stipules lanceolate, acuminate. Pedun- 
cles solitary, axillary, 1-3-flowered ; pedicels slender, often 
exceeding the leaves. Flowers many, two inches in diameter. 
Sepals ovate-lanceolate, with dilated cut tips. Petals pure 
white, orbicular, crenate, longer than the sepals, Fruit globose 
soft, sweet.—/. B. II. 



Fig. 1, Calyx ; 2, ovary ; 3, ripe fruit:— all but 3 magnified. 



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606& 




WPrtdi,ael etink 



3*b. « 



fesa Brooks Daft S<m,ii¥ 



Tab. 6063. 
SENECIO (Kleinta) Haworthii. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Senecionideje. 

Genus Kleinia, Haw. ; (Benth. $ Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. ii. p. 449, 
sub Senecio). 



Senecio (Kleinia) Haworthii; fruticosa, erecta, tota Iana alba mduta, caule 
ramisque teretibus carnosis, foliis 1-2-pollicaribus erecto-patentibus, 
cylindraceis utrinque attenuatis v. ellipsoideis acutis capituhs termi- 
nalibus pollicavibus solitariis pedunculatis, pedunculo robusto pauci- 
bracteato, involucri squamis lineari-oblongis acutis exterioribus paucis 
parvis subulato-lanceolatis appressia, floribus omnibus tubulosis mvo- 
lucrum excedentibus flavis, pappi setis tenuissimis, achems papulosis, 
styli ramis apice truncatis. 

Kleinia Haworthii, DC Prodr., vol. vii. pt. i. 338; Han: and Sond. Fl. 
Cap., vol. iii. p. 318. 

K. tomentosa, Haw. Succ. PL. p. 314. 

Cacalia tomentosa, Haw. Misc., p. 189, non Linn., &c. 

C. Haworthii, Sioeet in Loud. Hort. Brit., p. 336. ? 

C. canescens, Willd. Enum. SuppL, 427 ; Spreng. Sj/st. Vcg., vol. iii. p. 472. 



This singular Cape succulent has long been en ltivated in 
Europe, having been introduced into England in 1 795 accord- 
ing to Haworth, though its name does not + appear ^,r l either 
edition of the « Hortus Kewensis." ^^^^^"vWes 
Africa is not known, and Harvey in the "Flora Capensis ^ qnotes 
the description of De Candolle, and this seems all he knew 
about it. « Hab. Cape, cultivated in Europe (at east 
formerly), flower undescribed." As De Candolle also states 
that the flower is unknown in Europe, it was with great 
interest that I received a flowering specimen from m) friend 
D. Hanbury, F.E.S., who obtained it in the £fn« »™ 
brother Thomas Hanbury, Esq., at Palazzo Orengo near 
Mentone, in July of the present year, and which is he 
figured. Mr. Hanbury informs me that it forms a little 



NOVEMBER 1ST, 1873. 



woody plant, a foot high, and flowered for the first time this 
year, producing but one flower-head. Though not, as above 
stated, enumerated in the " Hortus Kewensis," this plant has 
been cultivated for many years at Kew, where there is no 
record of its origin. It forms a small suffrutescent herb a few 
inches high, in the Succulent House, growing freely enough. 
Haworth again (PL Succ, 314) says, "This extraordinary 
. plant has not yet produced any flowers with me. It is 
completely enveloped in a short dense skin-like cover of 
cottony wool, which is even capable of being stripped off the 
leaves like a skin, leaving the leaves themselves green after 
being divested of it. This cotton, if lighted in the flame of 
a candle, &c, slowly consumes in the manner of touch-paper, 
owing to the resinous quality this genus abounds in. 
C. tomentosa is capable of living very long without water, as 
are ^ also other woolly succulents, &c." The absence of the 
conical points to the stigma of this species would remove it 
from Kleinia as characterized by most authors ; its habit and 
capitulum are, however, those of the peculiar group of chiefly 
South African plants to which that name was originally 
applied. 

Descr. A small undershrub, with spreading roots and 
erect much branched stems, wholly clothed with a soft silvery 
appressed snow-white wool, exposing when removed a very 
pale green cuticle. Stem and branches cylindric, as thick as a 
goose-quill. Leaves one to two inches long, cylindric or ellip- 
soid, acute, narrowed into a very short petiole. Peduncle 
terminal, two inches long, stout, erect, with a few scattered 
linear acute bracts. Head erect, one and a quarter inches long, 
cylindric, discoid, many-flowered ; involucral-scales appressed, 
inner series about eight, linear-oblong, acute, with a few outer 
rather shorter lanceolate ones, and some still smaller subulate 
ones at the base. Flowers longer than the involucre ; achene 
small, papillose; pappus hairs very slender and soft, 
silvery, equalling the slender tubular 5-'lobed corolla ; anthers 
with obtuse tips and bases ; style arms spreading, truncate, 
pubescent. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, style arms ; 3, pappus hairs : — all magnified. 



6064 







-tfncant Brooks Day h. W^ 



Tab. 6064 
PENTSTEMON Palmeri. 

Native of California. 



Nat. Ord. Scrophulauine^;. — Tribe Chelone,£. 
Genus Pentstemon, L'Her. ; (Benth. in DC. Prodi:, vol. x. p. 320). 



Pentstemon (Eupentstemon) Palmeri ; erectus, elatus, robustus, glaberrimus, 
glaucus, snperne glanduloso-puberulus, foliis late ovato- v. oblongo- 
lanceolatis argute inequaliter sinuato-dentatis inferioribus petiolatia 
spathulatis superioribus late connatis perfoliatis, panicula elongata ra- 
cemosa nuda, pedunculis 2-4-floris, pedicellis gracilibus, bracteolis 
parvis, sepalis ovatis subacutis, corolla roseo-purpurea, tubo turgido- 
campanulato, limbo 2-labiato ringente, labio superiore brevi recurvo 
2-lobo, inferiore 3-lobo, filamentis glaberrimis, staminodio villoso. 

Pentstemon Palmeri, A.Gray in Proc. Amer. Acad. #c, vol. vii. p. 378, and 
vol. viii. p. 291. Watson in U.S. Geol. Etoplor. 4<M Parallel, Bot., p. 
220. 



The first notice of this noble species was drawn up by 
Professor Asa Gray, from a cultivated plant supposed to have 
been raised from seeds collected in Utah ; and it has since 
been fully described from dried specimens collected by Sereno 
Watson during the Geological Exploration of the 40th Parallel, 
who gives as its habitat in the work quoted above " Arizona ; 
foot-hills of the Trinity, West and East Humboldt Mountains 
in Nevada, alt. 5-6000 ft., June, July. Also from Southern 
Utah (Palmer)." The figure we give is from a specimen of a 
secondary branch or shoot, forwarded by Mr. W. Thompson, 
of Ipswich, who flowered it in August of the present year from 
American seeds ; he informs me that it attains a height of three 
to four feet, from which, and Watson's attributing to it a 
stature of two to five feet, I judge that it must be altogether 
the grandest and most beautiful known species of the genus. 
Though coming from so southern a latitude, 3.2 -42 £%., 
appears to be quite hardy. 

Descr. Quite glabrous and glaucous, except the inflores- 
cence, which is described as minutely glandular pubescent in 

NOVEMBER 1ST, 1873. 



native specimens. Stem tall, erect, robust, cylindric, often 
branched above. Leaves, the lower ovate-oblong or lanceolate 
subacute,four to five inches long,long petioled, coarsely toothed'; 
the upper more deltoid-ovate, connate by their very broad 
bases. Panicle much branched, thyrsoid, a foot long, strict, 
erect, very many-flowered, leafless ; bracts and bracteoles 
small, subulate -lanceolate, green. Flowers erecto-patent, one 
and a half inches long. Sepals ovate-lanceolate, acuminate. 
Corolla-tube constricted at the base, then dilated campanulate 
and ventricose, especially below ; upper surface rose-purple, 
lower almost white ; limb 2-lipped, upper lip broad, recurved, 
2-lobed, dark purple, lower of 3 equal rounded lobes also re- 
curved, pale rose with purple streaks at the base of each 
lobe. Stamens included, quite glabrous, filaments slender, 
curved ; anthers short, reniform ; staminode with a slender 
stipes and spathulate densely villous blade that lies on the 
lower lip, and is exserted. Ovary glabrous; style very 
slender. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of side shoot and leaf; 2, portion of upper part of stem 
and upper leaves : — both of the natural size ; 3, calyx and ovary ; 4, base of 
corolla, stamens and staminode : — magnified. 



6065 




Tab. 6065. 

SAXIFRAGA Kotschyi. 

Native of Asia Minor. 



Nat. Ord. Saxifragace^e.— Tribe Saxifrages. 
Genus Saxifraga, Linn. ; (Benth. Sf Hooh.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 635). 



Saxifraga (Aizoonia) Kotschyi; caespitoso-pulvinaris, foliis parvis in cau- 
diculos duros oblongos floriferos dense imbricatis oblongo-obovatis apice 
rotundatis crasse coriaceis glabris membranaceo-margmatis mtegernmis 
v. basin versus denticulatis ambitu remote foveolatis, cauhbus fioriteris 
erectis glanduloso-pilosis foliosis, foliis spatliulato-obovatis apiculatis, 
cymia paucifloris, floribus breviter pedicellatis inconspicuis, calycis tubo 
obconico ovario adnato, lobis triangularibus erectis, petalis parvis spatnu- 
latis, staminibus (imperfecta ?) brevibus discum margmantibus, stigma- 
tibus reniformi-capitatis. 

S. Kotschyi, Boiss. Diagn., ser. ii. part 2, p. 65 ; Fl. Orient, vol. ii. p. 804. 



This is one of the group of Saxifrages that forms dense hard 
cushion-shaped masses on the mountains of the foouUi oi 
Europe and Western Asia, where they are exposed to great 
summer heat and winter cold, without the humidity ot a more 
northern or western climate. They are consequently very 
difficult to cultivate in England; and where they have suc- 
ceeded they never form the luxuriant masses that they do m 
the Mediterranean region. S. Kotekpis a native of precipitous 
rocks in the Cilician Taurus, at an elevation of 6-9000 eet 
as also of the mountains of Armenia and Cataoma^ all m 
Asia Minor, where it was discovered by ^ncher EloiJ he 
French explorer on the Thessalian Olympus. The ^specimen 
here floured flowered in the Royal Gardens (whore it lias 
been in cultivation for a good many years) in May, 1878. 
and bears evidently imperfect flowers the p al e 
smaller than in the native specimens, and the stamens and 
the styles quite arrested in growth. , 

DiicE. Densely tufted rosettes, which are b m h and 
glaucous green, oblong or cylindnc, and one-halt to two 

NOVEMBER 1ST, 1873. 



inches long by one-half to three-quarters inch in diameter, 
forming hard, almost incompressible masses from the rigidity 
of the close-set spreading leaves. Leaves one quarter to 
one-third inch long, closely imbricate, spreading, obovate, 
obtuse, apiculate, shining, concave above, obscurely keeled 
beneath, margin white and membranous, sometimes erose 
towards the base, with a few distant impressed points 
that are very obscure in a living state, shining on both 
surfaces. Flowering-stems one inch to three inches high, 
strict, erect, stout, with many reniform spathulate erecto-patent 
cauline leaves, which are tinged red, and clothed at the 
margin and back with glandular hairs, as on the stem and 
inflorescence. Flowers cymose, few, erect, shortly pedicelled, 
one-quarter to one-third inch in diameter. ' Calyx-tube 
turbinate or obconic, adnate to the ovary ; lobes erect, tri- 
angular, acute. Petals yellow, a little longer than the calyx 
m theKew specimens, twice as long in wild ones, spathulate. 
Stamens imperfect in the Kew specimen, exserted in the 
native ones. Stigmas capitate in the cultivated specimens, 
sessile on the two conical tops of the ovary, terminating 
slender styles in the wild ones. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Leaf of a rosette; 2, do. of a flowering stem ; 3, flower : 4, ovary 
and stamen :— all magnified. 



6066 




Tab. 60G6. 

CELSIA BETONICLE FOLIA. 
Native of N. W. Africa. 



Nat. Ord. ScrophularinEjE. — Tribe Verbasceje. 
Genus Celsia, Linn. ; (Benth. in DC. Prod., vol. x. p. 244). 



Celsia betonicafolia ; pubescenti-pilosa v. glabra, superne viscoso-puberula, 
caule subsimplici, foliis longe petiolatis oblongis elliptico-oblongisve 
obtusis integris v. inferioribus basi lyrato-pinnatifidis crenatis venis 
impressis, superioribus minoribus sessilibus, summis cordato-amplexi- 
caulibus, floribus longiuscule v. longe pedicellatis, sepalis latiusculis in- 
tegerrimis serrulatisve, corolla aurese extus brunneas lobis rotundatia 
supremo 2-partito, staminibu3 inferioribus glaberrimis, antheris linea- 
ribus adnatis, superiorum filamentis brevibus clavatis lanatis. 

Celsia betonica?folia, Desfont. Fl. Atlant., vol. ii. p. 58. Benth.inA. DC. 
Prod., vol. x. p. 245. Jacq. Fragment, p. 65, t. 96. 



A little-known plant, discovered by Desfontaines in fields 
in Algeria, subsequently in Tangiers by Salzmann, and 
lastly by myself (in 1839), on the top of a peak in the Island 
of St. Jago, one of the Cape de Verd group, a station very 
far removed from the above. It is remarkable that it has not 
been detected in the Canary Islands. It is closely allied to 
the widely distributed C. cretica, L. (Tab. nost. 964), which 
ranges from the Canary Islands to the East Indies, differing 
in usually less divided leaves and long pedicels of the flowers. 

In Marocco two varieties occur, one nearly glabrous, the 
other woolly ; both are found in the valleys of the Greater 
Atlas, ascending to 5000 feet, as also in fields on the plains; 
the lower leaves are sometimes pinnatifid throughout. The 
specimen here figured was flowered by Mr. Niven of the 
Hull Botanic Gardens, in August last, I believe from seeds 
procured by Mr. Maw in Marocco, in 1871. 

Descr. Biennial, two to three feet high, glabrous or 
sparingly pubescent, glandular above. Stem erect, simple, or 
paniculately branched above, terete, rigid. Leaves three to 

NOVEMBER 1ST, 1873. 



six inches long, long-petioled, oblong or elliptic or lanceolate- 
oblong, obtuse or subacute, crenate or toothed or doubly 
toothed, the lower sometimes lyrate-pinnatifid at the base, 
rugose with impressed nerves above ; the upper smaller, ses- 
sile; uppermost ovate-cordate and semiamplexicaul ; petiole 
one to three inches long. Raceme sometimes eighteen inches 
long, many-flowered ; pedicels half to one inch long, longer 
than the sessile toothed acute bracts. Flowers one inch in 
diameter. Sepals broadly ovate, toothed or entire, margins 
and apex recurved. Corolla golden yellow, suffused with red- 
brown externally, orange-red on the throat ; lobes rounded, 
concave, margins crenulate. Stamen exserted, two lower 
decimate, quite glabrous, with narrow adnate anthers; two 
upper much shorter, filament clavate densely bearded, anther 
like that of the lower stamens, but smaller. Ovary pubescent. 
Capsule globose. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower with corolla removed ; 2, corolla laid open and stamens ; 
3, anther of lower stamen ; 4, one of the upper stamens : — all magnified. 



mi 




WJitiailellitii 



Tab. 6067. 

ARISTOLOCHIA tricaudata. 

Native of Eastern Mexico. 



Nat. Ord. Aristolocuie^;. 
Genus Aristolociiia, Linn. ; {Duchartre in A. DC. Prod., vol. xv. p. 420). 



Aristolochia (Siphisia) tricaudata; arborescens, ramis sarmentosis nodoso- 
flexuosis articulatis, foliis breviter petiolatis ovato-lanceolatis acutis 
supra glabris subtus nervis pilosis, pedunculis axillaribus basi bracteo- 
latis rubris, ovario angusto, perianthii tubo basi subsaccato mox re- 
fracto dilatato abrupte recurvo, ore late expanso unilabiato margine 
superiore tenuiter recurvo emarginato, inferiore in ligulas 3 longissime 
subulatas flexuosas 4-pollicares desinente, gynostemio breviter stipi- 
tato 5-lobo, lobis ovatis erectis, antheris 6 angustis per paria gyno- 
stemii segmentis adnatis. 

Aristolochia tricaudata, Duchartre in Lem. Must. Hortic, vol. xu. ; Misc., 
p. 97, et vol. xiv. t. 522. 

A native of the forests of Chiapas, in the extreme east of 
Mexico, where it was discovered by Ghiesbreght an inde- 
fatigable explorer, and transmitted by him to M . Verschaffelt 
of Ghent, by whom it was published, in 1866,^ with an 
excellent plate in the "Illustration Horticole When 
describing it, M. Verschaffelt pays a just tribute to the ments 
of M. Ghiesbreght, of whom he say, " No botanist or hort - 
cnlturist is ignorant of the indefatigable zeal of this 
collecting botanist, who during the last thirty J»*a" 
explored the hot regions of the American continent, whence 
his numerous discoveries have enriched our Garden and 
Herbarium with many handsome and interesting plans. 
H. tricaudata flowered in the stove at the^Royal^Ga.dens 



ii. zncauaara nowereu m mo »i~ , ;. ^ T ,-> u • «.» 

in August last, on a plant received from Mr Bull me 
previous year. It is 'aid to recommend itscl to the ca n 
vator from the negative quality of wantog the *£*"• 
odour so prevalent amongst its congeners. It betong* 
to the tribe Sipkmo, which includes but few species, suae 
of which are North American, as the well-known A. topic of 

NOVE.MHKi: 1st, 1873. 



our gardens, and the others Indian, as A. saccat (Tab. nost. 
3640) and A. T/iwaitesii (Tab. nost. 4918). 

Descr. ^ Arborescent ; bark grey, cracked ; branches sar- 
mentose, jointed, zigzag, remarkably swollen at the nodes ; 
young parts petioles and nerves of the leaf beneath covered 
with a short red tomentum. Leaves five to eight inches, ob- 
long, acute or acuminate, rounded and often unequal at the 
base, deep green, rugose and glabrous above, with impressed 
nerves, pale beneath with much raised pubescent nerves; 
petiole one-fourth to one-third of an inch, stout, pubescent. 
Mowers solitary, inserted at the nodes; pedicels red, one- 
half to three-fourths of an inch, on a very short 2-bracteolate 
peduncle. Ovary narrow, purple. Perianth-tube short, pale 
and subinnated at the rounded base, suddenly refracted, the 
ascending part at once dilating into a concave wide limb, 
one and quarter inches in diameter, with an obliquely 
truncated much dilated mouth that is contracted to a 
triangular throat, forming a fold with a deeply intruded 
border ; limb maroon-red outside and very dark purple-brown 
inside, upper margin slightly recurved, notched in the middle, 
lower split into three diverging long subulate tails four 
inches long, of a very dark red-brown colour, half inch broad 
at the base. Column short, capitate, 3-lobed, shortly stipi- 
tate ; lobes (stigmas) triangular, erect. Anthers six, linear, in 
three pairs ; adnate to the face of the lobes.-—/. D. II 



Fig. 1, Longitudinal section of perianth -tube, showing the intruded fold:— 
oj the natural size ; 2, top of column -.—magnified. 



GOGS 




TfoceuLBn 



Tab. 6068. 
CRASSULA Saxifraga. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Crassulace^. 
Genus Crassula, Linn.; {Benth. $ Hook./. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 657). 



Crassula (Tuberosa) Saxifraga; glaberrima, radice tuberoso, caule brevi- 
usculo simplici v. ramoso, foliis paucis amplis oppositis breviter petio- 
latis orbiculatis subreniformibusve coriaceo-carnosis lobulatis, lobulia 
crenulatis subtus sanguineis v. viridibus, pedunculis terminalibus 
elongatis gracilibus, cymis parvis multifloris corymbosis, sepalis 5 ovatis 
dorso infra apicem glandulosis petalis ovato-oblongis acutis ter brevio- 
ribus, squamis hypogynis minutis, carpellis oblongis in stylos recto 
breviuscnlos attenuatis. 

Crassula Saxifraga, Harv. in Harv. $■ Sond. Flor. Cap., vol. ii. p. 357. 



For this very singular and brilliantly coloured S. African 
plant the Royal Gardens are indebted to Principal MacOwan, 
of Gill College, Somerset East, who transmitted tubers of it 
from that district, which flowered in June of the present year. 
It would seem to have a wide South African distribution, being 
found on mountain sides from the extreme south-west, as on 
theMuysenberg mountain, near Simon's bay, to Port Elizabeth 
and Albany. It is nearly allied to C. Septas, Thunb., which 
is a small plant, with fewer very much larger umbellate long- 
pedicelled flowers that have six to nine narrow petals. The 
Septas globifera of this Magazine (Tab. nost. 1472), which 
Harvey has considered to be a luxuriant garden state of 
C. Septas, is much nearer and may be a variety of this, but 
has, according to the plate, usually 6-merous flowers and 
smaller leaves, more cuneate at the base. Judging from 
dried specimens, Drege's Septas capensis L. a. is C. Sa,rijra</a. 
The brilliant red colouring of the under-surface of the leaf is 
not a constant character. 

Descr. Whole plant quite glabrous. iZoo/ tuberous, as large 
as a hazel nut, or even walnut. Stem two to four inches high, 

NOVEMBER 1ST, 1873. 



inclined or erect, as thick as a goose-quill, cylindric, red. Leaves 
two to four pairs, two to three inches diameter, opposite, con- 
nate by their short broad petioles, very fleshy, flat, horizontal, 
slightly concave above, orbicular or subreniform, margin lobu- 
late, the lobules crenulate, upper surface bright green with 
broad flabellate whitish nerves that are not impressed, under- 
surface blood-red, with very faint nerves. Scape terminal, four 
to six inches high, slender, strict, erect, with a few subulate 
scales, pale-pink. Cyme one to two inches in diameter, many- 
flowered, sub-3-chotomously divided; bracts and bracteoles 
minute, subulate, pedicels one-eighth to one-third of an inch 
long. Flowers one-fourth of an inch in diameter, very pale flesh- 
coloured. Sepals ovate-oblong, green, with a gland at the back 
below the tip of each. Petals of the same shape, but three 
times larger, subacute, spreading. Anthers globose, red-brown. 
Bypogynous-scales minute. Carpels ellipsoid, narrowed into 
straight short styles. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Margin of leaf; 2, flower 
4, carpels and hypogynous scales :— 



; 3, the same, with the corolla removed ; 
all magnified. 



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I u-ooksDay A. Sai^iim 



Tab. 6069. 
PASSIFLOBA (Tacsonia) insignis. 

Native of Peru ? 



Nat. Ord. Passiflorace*:.— Tribe Passiflore^:. 
Genus Passiflora, Linn. ; (Bentk $ Jtook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 810.) 



Passi flora (Tacsonia) insignis; ramulis petiolis pedunculis foliisque subtus 
lanatis, foliis ovato-oblongis lanceolatisve acuminatis dentatis basi 
subcordatis supra rugosia nitidis, petiolo brevi glanduloso, stipulis 
fiinhriatis, flore maximo longe pedunculato, braoteis ovato-oblongis 
lacmiato-serratis concavis, sepalis tubo ter longioribus lineari-oblongis 
obtnsis dorso carinatis et infra apicem longe calcaratis, petalis paulo bre- 
vioribus ecalcaratis, corona externa e filis brevibus 1-seriatis, interna 
bulbo basi tubi inclusa membranacea dellexa margine lacera, gynandrio 
gracili exannulato, ovario villoso. 

Tacsonia insignis, Masters in Gard. Chron., 1873, p. 1112, fig. 239. 



I cannot do better than introduce this plant in the words 
of Dr. Masters, who when first describing it says, " In so 
beautiful a genus as Tacsonia, and mindful especially of the 
very beautiful T. Van-volxemii, it is difficult to find adjectives 
at once distinctive and expressive wherewith to describe the 
several forms." Of its history unfortunately too little is 
satisfactorily known. A specimen was sent to Dr. Masters by 
Mr. Anderson, gardener at Sowerby House, Hull, with the 
information that it was raised by him from seed sent, some 
years previously, from South America, probably Peru, by 
Mr. Yarborough Greame. The specimen figured here was 
sent by Mr. Anderson, at the request of Mr. Backhouse 
of York, in September last. 

T. iaxiynh is without question the finest species of the genus, 
whether in foliage or flower, owing to the bright glossy deep 
green of the rugose upper surface of the leaf, and the gigantic 
size of the flower, the sepals of which are violet crimson, 
and the petals of a deeper and redder hue. Dr. Masters 
observes that it belongs to the section Pnggendorffia of 

DECEMBER 1st, 1878. 



Passiflora, characterized by the filamentous corona ; its affinity 
with T. Van-volxemii (Tab. 5571), T. quitensis (Tab. 5876), 
T. eriantha (Tab. 5750), and T. mollissima (Tab. 4187), is 
evident ; but in all these the corona is reduced to glands, and 
the leaves are lobed. 

Descr. A tall woody climber. Young parts, petioles, pe- 
duncles and leaves beneath clothed with pale or dark rusty- 
brown matted wool. Leaves five to seven inches long, ovate 
or oblong or lanceolate- ovate from a cordate base, obscurely 
lobed, toothed, upper surface glossy wrinkled ; petiole short, 
stout, glandular. ^ Stipules small, pinnatisect. Flowers solitary, 
axillary, six fo eight inches diameter; peduncle very long, 
four to six inches ; bracts opposite, below the flower, oblong- 
ovate, fimbriate- toothed, concave, green, tomentose. Perianth 
tomentose externally ; tube two inches long, with a depressed- 
globose bulb half to three-quarters inch diameter at the base. 
Sepals linear-oblong, obtuse, concave, keeled, violet-crimson, 
the keel green and terminating below the rounded apex in a 
green spur one inch long. Petals rather shorter than the 
sepals and darker crimson, rounded at the tip, nearly flat. 
Corona half inch long, of one series of white threads, mottled 
with blue ; inner corona an inflexed lacerate membrane at 
the base of the tube above the bulb. Gynandrium very long, 
slender, glabrous. Ovary subglobose, densely lanate. Anther 
and stigmas as in its congeners. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Vertical section of tube of perianth ; 2, leaf :— both natural size. 



6070 




Tab. 6070. 
GAULTHERIA insipida. 

Native of Ecuador and New Grenada. 



Nat. Ord. Ericeje. — Tribe Andromede^e. 
Genus Gaultheria, Linn. ; {DC. Prod., vol. vii. p. 592) 



Gaultheria insipida; ramuli8 petiolis foliisque subtus ad nervos sparse 
strigoso-pilosis, foliia breviter petiolatis ovatis acuminatis integerrimis 
v. serrulatis ciliatis supra glabriusculis subtus nervosis, racemis hispi- 
dulis folio brevioribus, bracteis ovatis lanceolatisve pedicello brevioribus, 
corolla parva conica glabra, calycis tubo basi 5-lobo lobis triangularibus, 
antheris ecalcaratis, fructu albo insipido 5-lobo. 

Gaultheria insipida, Benth. Plant. Hartweg., 225; Walp. Pep., vol. vi. 
p. 415. 

G. petraea, Weddell Chlor. Andin., vol. ii. p. 172. 



A pretty little half-hardy shrub, of which the old leaves in 
autumn assume a most beautiful rich red-brown or claret colour 
on the upper surface, and which bears, at the same time, a 
profusion of pearl-like white fruits, each with five crimson 
spots on the crown, answering to the lobes of the baccate 
calyx, which are scarlet in flower. It is apparently a common 
plant in the Andes of Ecuador and New Grenada. It was 
discovered by Colonel Hall at 7000 feet elevation, near 
Camino Eeal in the valley of Loa. Professor Jameson next 
sent it from woods on Pilzhum and Pichincha, at elevations of 
9-10,000 feet. Goudot gathered it on the peak of Tolima, to 
the westward of Sta. Fe de Bogota, in New Grenada; 
Hartweg, near Quito ; and Weddell, in the province of Pasto. 
The above localities embrace a range of nearly 800 miles of 
the Andes. The fruit is described as eatable, but tasteless. 

I am indebted for the specimens here figured to Mr. Isaac 
Anderson Henry, F.L.S., who raised it from seeds sent by 
Professor Jameson upwards of ten years ago, and who has 
both flowered and fruited it. 

UECEMBER 1ST, 1873. 



Descr. A shrub six to eight feet high, with long slender 
sarin entose branches, which, as well as the petioles and leaves 
beneath, especially on the nerves and racemes, are sparsely 
strigose with rigid bristles. Leaves two to three inches long, 
shortly petioled, ovate or oblong-ovate, acuminate, serrulate 
or almost entire, coriaceous, bright green and shining above, 
with impressed nerves, paler beneath with very prominent 
reticulated nerves ; old leaves highly coloured, claret-brown, 
rarely deep blood-red; petioles one-quarter inch long. 
Racemes axillary, two by eight inches, 8-10-flowered ; rachis 
and peduncle hispid ; bracts small shorter than the pedicels, 
which are one-quarter inch long, lanceolate, acute, green. 
Mowers about one-third inch long, inclined. Calyx-tube 
broad, green, with the base intruded and 5-lobed ; teeth 
broadly triangular, acute, scarlet. Corolla conical, white ; 
teeth small, suberect. Filaments curved, puberulous; 
anthers oblong, not spurred behind, pores oblong, anticous. 
Ovary pilose at the top. Fruit one-third inch in diameter, 
subglobose, 5-lobed, white, waxy, fleshy, with 5 crimson 
spots on the crown. — «/". D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, stamen; 3, ovary: — all magnified. 



6071 




'Fitch dd « Uti 



- muni Brooks D^Saaw 1 ? 



Tab. 6071. 

ALOE (Apicra) deltoidea. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. LiLUCEiE. — Tribe AgapanthEjE. 
Genus Aloe, Linn.; {Endl. Gen. Plant., p. 143). 



Aloe (Apicra) deltoidea; robusta, caulescens, foliis |— 1-poll. longis quinque- 
fariis confertissimis horizontalibus crassis deltoideo-ovatis acuminatis 
pungentibus supra planis subtus convexis carinatis marginibus plani- 
usculis carinaque superne eroso-serrulatis luride viridibus Isevissimis, 
racemo spicEeformi elongato flexuoso rnultifloro, pedicellis brevissimis, 
bracteolis deltoideo-lanceolatis pedicellum superantibus, perianthii erecti 
tubo i-pollicari oblongo-cylindraceo virescente lobis brevibus late obo- 
vatis sub-2-lobis erosis albis ter longiore, staminibus ineequilongis in- 
clusis, antheris brevibus, ovario lineari-oblongo, stylo brevicurvo. 



This singular succulent belongs to the same section of 
Aloe with A.foliolosa (Tab. nost. 1352), pentagon** (Tab. nost. 
1838), spirella, imbricate (Tab. nost. 1445), spiralis, etc., of 
Haworth, which are all closely allied, having 5-fariously 
densely imbricating leaves, that clothe the stem throughout, 
and terminal racemes of erect flowers, with an oblong tube 
and short segments. It differs from the first-named of these 
chiefly in size, and in the leaves not being spirally disposed 
except on the young shoots, though I should much doubt 
this character being of any value. It has long been cul- 
tivated in the Eoyal Gardens, where there is no record of 
its introduction. The perfect regularity with which the 
leaves are superposed in five series, and the columnar stem, 
render it a very striking object in the greenhouse. It flowers 
in May, and is easily propagated by offshoots from the base 

of the stem. „ 

Dkscr. Stem strict, erect, wholly clothed with leaves from 

the very base upwards, emitting stout cylmdric roots, and 

surculi from the base ; diameter across the leaves two inches. 

Leaves three-quarters to one inch long, most densely o- 

decembeu 1st, 1873. 



fariously imbricate, quite horizontal, deltoid-ovate, acumi- 
nate, pungent, deep shining green, quite smooth and glabrous, 
upper surface nearly flat, under convex with a slight keel, 
margins thick and flattened, the edges of the margin as well 
as the keel beyond the middle are minutely serrulate. Baceme 
spiciform, a foot )long ; peduncle and rachis stout, cylindric, 
slightly compressed towards the base, light-brown, glaucous, 
with two or three scattered ovate-lanceolate bracts. Flowers 
lax, very numerous, erect, one-third inch long, greenish- 
white ; bracteole deltoid, much exceeding the very short pedi- 
cel, appressed to the perianth, greenish-white. Perianth-tube 
cylindric-oblong, light green, almost terete ; limb of six short 
broad obovate obscurely two-lobed and erose segments. 
Stamens included, unequal j anthers shortly oblong. Ovary 
subcylindric, style curved. — / D. H. 



Fig. 1, Back, and 2, front, of a leaf; 3, transverse section of do.; 4, flower 
pedicel and bracteole ; 5, vertical section of perianth : — all ■magnified. 



an- 1 




■W.Rtii, - - 



*octo.M j 



Tab. 6072. 
SYKINGODEA pulchella. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Iride^e. — Tribe Ixie^. 
Genus novum, Syeingodea. 



Gen. Char. — Perianthium membranaceum, hypocraterim orphum; tubus 
gracillimus, elongatus ; limbi lobi 6, aequales, patentes, cuneato-spathu- 
lati, 2-lobi, incurvi, glaberrimi. Stamina 8, fauci perianthii inserta, 
jequalia, erecta, filamentis subulatis brevibus; antherae basifixae, 
lineari-subulatae, obtusae, basi sagittatse, flavee. Ovarium lineari-obovoi- 
deum, subc'ylindraceum, 3-loculare ; stylus gracillimus, elongatus, apice 
in stigmata 3 papillosa linearia emarginata fissus; ovula in loculis go, 
2-seriata. Fructus .... — Herbae montium Africaa? australis ditione 
Graifreinet incola, pusilla, bullosa ; bulbis ovoideis, squamis brunneis lawi- 
bus non reticularis ; Jibris radicalibus capillaribus. Folia patentia, fere 
capillaria, squamis membranaceis albis basi inclusa, teretia, antice obscure 
canaliculata. Spathas 2, hyalina, basi conduplicatce, dein lanceolato- 
subulate acuminate, perianthii tubo ter breviores. Flores solitarii, breviter 
pedicellati, perianthii tubo fere bipollicari pallide rubro, basi spathis oc- 
cluso ; limbo 1 poll, diametro, lobis extus purpureis intm pallide- 
lilacinis. 



After much consideration of the ill-defined genera of the 
allies of Ixia and Trichonema, I find myself compelled to create 
a new genus of this lovely little plant, which belongs to 
Klatt's tribe of Ixiea, characterized by the two spathes, sepa- 
rate equal filaments, and linear stigmas. From all the genera of 
this tribe it differs in the solitary flower and 2-lobed perianth 
segments. Trichonema is its nearest ally in most points, but 
has usually a short perianth-tube, or if a long one it is 
funnel-shaped, its stamens are inserted within the perianth- 
tube, and the stigmas are divided. Galaxia has a long 
slender tube, but in it the filaments are connate, and the 
stigmas are lamellar and multifid. 

Syringodea pulchella is one of Mr. Harry Bolus' interesting 
discoveries, and was found in plains amongst the Sneeuwberg 
mountains at an elevation of 4600 feet above the sea, 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1873. 



flowering in April. He sent bulbs to Kew, which flowered 
in September of the present year. The name is derived from 
avpiyyuSriQ, fistular, in allusion to the slender perianth -tube. 

Descr. Bulbs ovoid, the size of a hazel-nut ; scales 
appressed, brown, smooth, not reticulated. Leaves capillary, 
spreading, green, two to three inches long, terete, with a 
slight groove in front, enclosed at the base in white mem- 
branous sheaths one inch long, with a few ragged brown 
ones outside. Spathes 2, hyaline, oblong and conduplicate 
below, subulate-lanceolate above, about one-third the length 
of the perianth-tube. Flowers solitary, the base of the 
perianth-tube and ovary immersed in the sheaths, very 
shortly pedicelled. Perianth salver-shaped; tube two inches 
long, very slender, terete, not swollen upwards, pale purple ; 
limb one inch in diameter, lobes connate-spathulate, 2-lobed, 
incurved, dark purple outside, with white edges, lilac within. 
Stamens 3, inserted at the mouth of the perianth ; filaments 
five, very short, subulate ; anthers yellow linear-subulate from 
a sagittate base obtuse at the tip. Ovary one quarter inch 
long, narrowly obovoid, 3-celled ; style very long, capillary, 
exserted, divided at the summit into three revolute linear 
entire stigmas; ovules numerous, 2-seriate in each cell. 
Fruit unknown. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1 Section of apex of leaf ; 2, flower, with the perianth segments re- 
moved; 3, ovary, style, and stigma ; 4, transverse, section of ovary :— all 



magnified. 



6013. 




Tab. 6073. 
aquilegia leptoceras vak. chrysantha. 

Native of New Mexico and Arizona. 



Nat. Ord. Ranunculace^e. — Tribe Hellebores. 
Genus Aquilegia, Linn. ; (Benth. Sf HooJc.f. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. 8). 



Aquilegia leptoceras, Nutt. in Journ. Acad. Philadelph., vol. vii. p. 8 ; Tab. 
nost. 4407. 

Var. flava, A. Gray Plant. Wright, pt. ii. p. 9; elata, 2-4-pedalis, race- 
mosa, floribus saturate flavis, sepalis oblongo-lanceolatis, calcaribus 2|- 
pollicaribus. — A. chrysantha, A. Gray in Proc. Atner. Acad., ined., and 
in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 1335 and 1501, cum Ic. Xylog., f. 304. 



It is with great diffidence that I dissent from my friend 
Prof. Gray's opinion of the specific rank of this Columbine, 
which he first regarded as a variety [flava) of the American 
A. leptoceras, but more recently distinguishes as a species under 
the name of A. chrysantha. In his remarks uponthed. chrysantha, 
which he has communicated to the Gardeners Chronicle, Dr. 
Gray relies principally for its distinction upon, 1. The stature ; 
2. different geographical range and altitude ; 3. its later and 
longer period of flowering; 4. its colour; 5. its smaller flowers. 
Now as regards the first of these, it appears that A. leptoceras 
is stated to be one to one and a half feet high, and A. chrysantha 
four feet ; but we have dried specimens of the former that must 
' have been at least three feet high (perhaps much more), and 
I have found the European A. vulgaris, which in England is 
one to two feet high, attaining nearer four feet in the Atlas 
Mountains. As regards distribution, A. leptoceras ranges 
from the head waters of the Columbia to those of the 
Colorado, i.e., from 40° to 35° N., and A. chrysantha ranges 
from New Mexico to Arizona, i.e., from 35° to 31° N. As the 
altitude of the habitat of Chrysantha is not given, I cannot 
compare it with that of Leptoceras, but would instance as a far 
greater extension of distribution in longitude and altitude, the 

DECEMBER 1 ST, 1873. 



above mentioned A. vulgaris, which has a range of upwards of 
2000 miles in latitude, namely, from Mid-Norway in lati- 
tude 64°, to the Atlas Mountains in latitude 32°, descend- 
ing to 4000 feet in the valleys of the latter. Of the period 
of flowering I can say nothing ; but a comparison of the 
figure now given with the Magazine plate of A. leptoceras 
(Tab. 4407) or with that in the Botany of Beechey's Voyage 
(Tab. 72), under the name of macrantha, shows no appreciable 
difference in the size of the flowers, and the spurs are even 
longer in dried specimens of A. leptoceras. With regard to 
colour, though A. leptoceras is usually described as only blue 
and white, Nuttall, its discoverer, calls it ochroleucous, and 
Burke, who collected it in the Snake country, sent specimens 
thus coloured. These facts, taken in conjunction with the 
known variability of the genus, lead me to adopt Mr. Back- 
house's opinion (appended to Dr. Gray's description in the 
Gardener's Chronicle), that this is but a form, and not a very 
decided one, of the American A. leptoceras. 

There is still a doubt as to the propriety of adopting for 
this plant the name of leptoceras, which was given originally 
by Fischer, to what is now known to be a very different one 
from Siberia (see Bot. Reg., vol. xxxiii. t. 64), and of which I 
have examined indifferent specimens from the St. Petersburg 
Garden. In the Flora Indica, published in 1855, Dr. Thom- 
son and I have referred this, which has quite short spurs, 
to a form of A. vulgaris, identical with A. pyrenaica, DC, an 
opinion which, if accepted, will admit of leptoceras being re- 
tained for the American plant. 

I am indebted to Mr. Backhouse for the specimen here 
figured, which flowered with him in June last, and was very 
fragrant.—/. D. II. 



INDEX 

To Vol. XXIX. of the Third Series, or Vol. XCIX. of 

the Work. 



PI 

6034 Acranthus arachnitis. 
6071 Aloe (Apicra) deltoidea. 

6017 Alsomitra sarcophylla. 
6010 Andryala mogadorensis. 
6073 Aquilegia leptoceras var. 

chrysantha. 
6025 Areca pumila. 
6023 Arisarum vulgare. 

6067 Aristolochia tricaudata. 
6022 Arpophyllum spicatum. 

6039 Begonia Herbacea. 

6015 Bellis rotundiflora, var. casru- 

lescens. 
6046 Boronia megastigma. 

6018 Brachyotum confertum. 
6059 Caraguata Zahnii. 
6066 Celsia betonicsefolia. 

6030 Chamaedorea Trepejilote. 

6052 Cinchona Calisaya, var. Jo- 

sephiana. 
6020 Cotyledon mamillaris. 
6044 Crassula profusa. 

6068 Crassula Saxifraga. 

6031 Crocus Olivieri. 
6036 Crocus Sieberi. 

6013 Dendrobium Hookerianum. 

6050 Dendrobium lituiflorum. 

6016 Elleanthus xanthocomus. 
6028 Freycinetia Banksii. 
6070 Gaultheria insipida. 
6048 Godwinia gigas. 

6040 Greyia Sutherlandi. 

6053 Hibbertia Baudouinii. 
6035 Hypoxia longi folia. 

6054 Ka;mpferia rotunda. 
6038 Laelia Jonghiana. 

6058 Lilium (hybridum) Krameri. 



PL 

6041 Linaria heterophylla. 

6060 Linaria sagittata. 
6043 Meninia turgida. 
6012 Merendera Aitchisoni. 

6057 Mesembrjanthemum intror- 

sum. 
6009 Mutisia ilicifolia. 
6024 Nidularium spectabile. 
6029 Odontoglossum tripudians. 
6037 Odontoglossum vexillarium. 
6047 Omphalodes Lucilse. 
6069 Passiflora (Tacsonia) insignis. 

6061 Pelecyphora aselliformis, var. 

concolor. 

6064 Pentstemon Palmeri. 

6032 Phajus Blumei, var. Bernaysii. 
6021 Philodendron rubens. 

6056 Philydrum glaberrimum. 

6042 Primula verticillata, var. 

sinensis. 
6045 Rhododendron malayanum. 
6011 Rhynchanthera grandiflora. 

6062 Rubus deliciosus. 

6065 Saxifraga Kotschyi. 

6027 Sedum dasyphyllum, var. 

glanduliferum. 
6055 Sempervivum tectorum, var. 

atlanticum. 

6063 Senecio (Kleinia) Haworthii. 
6051 Silene Hookeri. 

6049 Sonerila Bensoni. 
6072 Syringodea pulchella. 
6014 Vriesia brachystachys. 

6033 Xiphion Histrio. 
6026 Zamioculcas Boivinii. 
6019 Zingiber Parishii. 



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