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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."









CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



■*>*>■-, i 



COMPRISING THE 



JSHant* of the i&ogal ^arfciens of ISeto 

AND 

OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN; 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS: 



JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.H., C.B., P.R.S., F.L.S., &c. 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D, CANTAB., CORRESPONDENT OP THE INSTITUTE OF FRANCE. 



VOL. XXX. E) 

OF THE THIRD SERIES; 
(Or Vol. C. of the Whole Work.) 




Moreover, in these fayre ofl'sprinjres of Nature there is a charm removed from their 
Deautie, the which appcaleth to the harte; many iind in them the emblems of some 
excellent qualitic or tender icelinpre."— Old Hbbbal. 



LONDON : 
L. KEEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1874. 

[All Mights reserved.] 

Mo. Bo . 



LONDON : 

SAVILL, EDWARDS AHD CO., PRINTERS, CHANDOS STREET, 

COVENT GARDES. 



TO 



GEORGE MAW, ESQ., F.L.S., F.G.S., &a 

OF BENTHALL HiLL, BBOSELEY. 

My dear Maw, 

Allow me to dedicate to you this volume of the " Botanical 
Magazine," as a tribute to the value of your exertions in intro- 
ducing hardy herbaceous plants into Euglish gardens. No one of late 
years, or perhaps ever, has collected with his own hands so many of 
these for transmission to England, cultivated them with more suc- 
cess, or distributed them with more liberality — as the pages of this 
work to some small extent testify. 

Allow me also in this dedication to refer to that delightful excur- 
sion to the coasts of Mavocco and the Greater Atlas, that we made 
in company with our friend Mr. Ball, and which resulted in the intro- 
duction of so many interesting plants not hitherto known to English 

gardens. 

Believe me, 

Most sincerely yoars, 



JOS. D. HOOKER. 



Royal Gardens, Kew, 
Dec. 1, 1874. 



EhUu Series. 

No. 349. 

VOL. XXX. JANUARY. [Price 3s. 6<7. col*- 2s. Qd. plain. 

OR No. 1043 OF ? HE ENTIRE WORE. 



CURTIS'S 



'N 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



C03IPKI5IXG 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 



JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., F.R.S., L.S., &fe 

Birrctor of tfjc sKopal botanic Gnr&tns of Ittto. 




>"atnre and Art to adorn the pag"e combine, 
And flowers exotic trrace our northern dime. 



LONDON: 

L. REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GAB 

•74. 

{All Right* reserved.] 



Just published, price 7s. 6d. 

A SYNOPSIS OF TEE BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing Descriptions of all the Genera and Species (with 
localities of the rarer ones) found in Great Britain and 
Ireland. Based upon Wilson's Bryologia Britannica, Schimper's 
Synopsis, &c. By Charles P. Hobkirk, President of the Hud- 
dersfield Naturalist's Society. 

" A. singularly handy book. ... To the ordinary student who has made some progress, it 
has some advantages even over Wilson's Bryologia." — Scottish NataralM. 



L. Reeve & Co., 5, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

BOTANICAL PLATES; 

OR, 

PLANT PORTRAITS. 

IN GREAT VARIETY, BEAUTIFULLY COLOURED, 6d. and Is. EACH. 
List of nearly 2000, one stamp. 



L. Rkeve & Co., 5, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



FLORAL PLATES, 

BEAUTIFULLY COLOURED BY HAND, 6d. EACH. 
A Xcw List &/500 Varieties, one stamp. 

L. Reeve & Co., 5, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



NOW READY. 
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GENERA PLANTARUM. 

Part IV. being the first part of Vol. II., comprising Caprifoliaceae to Composite. 

Price 24s. 

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A TC eckly Illustrated Journal devoted solely to Horticulture in all its 
branches. 



"THE GARDEN," 

(rated Journal devoted solely to Hortic 
branches. 

PHE GARDEN is conducted by William Robinson, 

„ F ; L - S > Author of "Hardy Flowers," "Alpine Flowers for English Gar- 
dens, ' "The Parks, Promenades, and Gardens of Paris," &c, and the best 
Writers in every department of Gardening are contributors to its pages. 
The following are some of the subjects regularly treated of in its pages :— 
The Flower Garden. Hardy Flowers. 

Landscape Gardening. Town" Gardens. 

S^ZTSii! itory. 

' ' -^. Public Garden. 

i Gardens. The Greenhouse and 

ons. The Household. 

'1 he Wild Garden. 
woo*. I Tha Kitchen Garden. 

Tin iaay be obtained through al! ' ...; and at the Railway 

Book t , lt y it ma y also be ha m the Office at 5s. for 

*/?*? ; ■ f ' r » Y *- ar . payable in advance : 

and in Monthly tarts. Specimen Copies (post free) 4^d. 

3T, Southampton Street. Caveat Garden, W.C. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



THIRD SERIES. 



NOTICE OF RE-ISSUE. 

Some portions of the above work being out of print, and 
complete sets very difficult to obtain, the Publishers have 
determined to reprint so much as will enable them to com- 
plete a few copies as they may be subscribed for; and to meet 
the convenience of Subscribers, to whom the outlay at oue 
time of so large a sum as a complete set now costs is an 
impediment to its purchase, they will commence a re-is.-ue iu 
Monthly Volumes, thus spreading the cost over a period of 
two years and a half. The price of the volumes will be 42*. 
each as heretofore, but to Subscribers fur the entire series, 36e. 
each. The first volume will be ready January lit, 1874. 

As the reprinting will be carried no further than is 
required to meet the actual demand, early application is 
necessary to prevent disappointment Persons preferring to 
take a set complete at once may do so at the subscription 
price of 36s. per volume. Of the Third Series, twenty-eight 
volumes are completed; the twenty-ninth will be ready in 
December. 



The Botanical Magazine, commenced in 1787 and 
continued with uninterrupted regularity to the present time, 
forms the most extensive and authentic repertory of Plant 



History and ronraiture extant. The iumu oiiRIES, by tar 
the most valuable, comprising all the important additions of 
the last thirty years, contains about 2000 Coloured Plates, all 
from the characteristic pencil of Mr. W. Fitch, of Kew, with 
Descriptions, structural and historical, by Sir William and 
Dr. Hooker. 

LONDON : 
L. REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDE! 



FORM FOR SUBSCRIBERS. 

To Messrs. L. Reeve & Co., Publishers, 
5, Henrietta Street, 

Covent Garden. 

Please send to the undersigned the Botanical 
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* Subscribers will be good enough to indicate in which form they 
desire to receive the work, by striking out the words indicating the 
other form. 



6074 










Tab. 6074. 
SAXIFRAGA pelt^ta. 

Native of California. 



Nat. Ord. Saxifragace^.-— Tribe Saxifrages. 
Genus Saxifraga, Linn.; {Benth. $■ Boot./. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 635). 



^"'ZpJn^' ^ornate crasso repente, foliis omnibus radicalibu 8 
onge petiolatis erectis amphs peltatis orbiculatis amb.tu 6-10-iobatis 

nm!tiZr;1 en fl 1S ' SCapi f nUdiS d0ngatiS ' C ^ mis CMymboso-capitatis 
mul tiflons glandulosis, calycis tubo brevissimo obconico-campanulato 
sepahs oblongis obtusis, petalis ellipticis obtusis, filamentis subulatis 
carpelhs hberis m stylo* breves attenuate, stigmatibus dilatatis. 
Saxipraga peltate, Torr. Mss. in Benth. Plant. Hartweg, p. 311 ; e in Bot. 

sJfr\ S J X C') T^ PJ i V -S uMovt **>i En 9ler Monog. Gatt. 
naxiji. 108 Watp. Ann., vol. vii. p. 891. 



One of the largest species of the genus, and a very curious 

one, though far from being as handsome as many others. 

Variable as the foliage of the Saxifrages is, the present is the 

only one known in which that organ is completely peltate 

and like many other peltate-leaved marsh and water-loving 

plants, this is stated to be found on the margins of streams and 

in the water itself. I have seen indigenous specimens 

gathered in the Sacramento Mountains by Hartweg, who dis- 

covered the species; in the Mendreino county, California, by 

i'rol. Bolander, of San Francisco ; and others collected by 

-U>bb without a locality. A very singular form, either a 

variety or different species, is in the Hookerian Herbarium 

irom Clear Creek in North California; it has the almost 

glabrous cyme broken up into a distantly branched panicle, 

the branches of which have short rounded bracts at the base, 

ana has inflated much rounded carpels abruptly terminated 

WiUi short styles; the fruit figured in the "Botany" in the 

united btates Exploring Expedition resembles this, and not 

uie : narrower attenuated fruit of Hartweg's, Lobb's,ond the 

cultivated plants. Engler in his Monograph of Saxifraga 

JANUARY 1ST, 1874. 



makes a section of it {Peltophyllum) founded on the shape of 
the leaf, and on the carpels opening above only, but the 
latter is an error, for the carpels open to the base both in 
this plant and in that figured by Torrey. 

I _ am indebted to Messrs. Downie, Laird, & Laing for a 
specimen of this fine plant, which flowered with them in April 
1873; it would probably attain a greater size if planted in or 
near water and become a very conspicuous and attractive 
object. 

Descr. llootsiock as thick as the thumb, creeping partly 
buried m the soil; green with large broad leaf- scars ; the 
tip clothed with the broad green stipular leaf-sheaths, which 
are rounded with membranous pink-margins. Leaves all 
subtermmal, erect; petiole one to two feet long, cylindric as 
thick as a goose-quill, glandular-pubescent; blade orbicular 
peltate, six inches in diameter, G-10-lobed, the lobes cut 
and sharply-toothed, upper surface dark green with a deep 
funnel-shaped depression at the centre where attached 
to the petiole, pale beneath. Scape equalling or exceeding 
he leaves, terete and glandular like 1 the petiole. cZ 
three to five inches in diameter; subcapitate, repeatedly 
branched ebracteolate, glandular-pubescent 1 ^w/ one half 
inch in diameter. Calyx-tube very short, between obconic 
and campanulate; lobes 5, reflexed, oblong, tip rounded 

ends vv nirT " *"* t* *T^> *&&* rounde " at both 
ends white or very pale pink. Stamens equalling r exceed- 

carpels two, nearly Iree, narrowed into short stout stvW 
Wn 1-^1' ff dS ' arge ' subcuneat e, angled, compressed, 



[%. 1, Flower, with petals removed \— magnified. 



6075 




V.FitcbdeLetliti 



Traced EreoleEay&ScTnTnip 



Tab. 6075. 
XA1STHORRHCEA quadrangulata. 

Native of South Australia. 



Nat. Ord. Junce^s. — Tribe Xerotjotji. 
Genus Xanthorrhcea, Smith; (Endl. Gen. Plant., p. 152). 



Xanthorrhcea quadrangulata ; trunco arboreo, foliis gracilibus e basi paulo 
dilatato glaberrimo filiformibus rectangule tetraquetris glaucis angulis 
scaberulis, scapo 2-G pedali, spica3-4pedali, bracteisnumerosis angustis 
apice rbombeo-dilatatis acurainatis, sepalis albis paulo longioribus a;qua- 
libua anguste spathulatis obtusis v. cuspidatis valvatis; petalis, lineari- 
oblongis obtusis cuspidatis, staminibus longe exsertis divaricatis, capsula 
perianthio longiore. 

Xanthorrhcea quadrangulata, F. Muell. Fragment. Plant. Austral., vol. iv. 
p. 111. 

The Grass-gum trees are amongst the most remarkable 
vegetable features of that country of wonderful vegetable forms, 
Australia; and it is with great satisfaction that we now 
figure in the Botanic Magazine a second species of a genus so 
rare in cultivation. It is a native of South Australia, where 
it inhabits rocky hill-ranges, and was sent to Kew by Dr. 
Schomburgk, the energetic Director of the Adelaide Botanic 
Garden. Shortly after its arrival, the trunk which is 
four feet high, slowly developed its fresh green leaves, 
which steadily increased in number and length till the plant 
had the appearance given in the plate ; the flower-stem and 
Typha-like spike commenced to emerge about July of last 
year, and attained its full development in September, when 
the flowers began to expand from below upwards, and a full 
month elapsed before all had opened. During flowering time a 
copious honey-like secretion was exuded, which hung in great 
tear-like drops to the brown spike. A iew of the ovaries 
have swollen, and indeed matured, but the seeds have not 
been fully formed. 

Dr. Engelheart, of Gawlor-town, South Australia, an ardent 
Horticulturist, informs me that the Xantkorrhmas^ of which 
there are two species in that district (A", semiptana and quad- 

JAXl'ARY 1st, l«74. 



rangulatd), like a rich fern-soil, mixed with a good deal 
of fine black sand, and drive their straggling roots into 
crevices of rocks 20-30 feet down amongst the accumulated 
vegetable soil. Young plants have a very pretty appearance, 
resembling a Gynerium, but growing older, and periodically 
subjected to bush fires, all the leaves but the central are con- 
sumed, and an ugly charred and blackened stump with a tuft 
of leaves remains. 

About fifteen species of Xanthorrhcea have been discovered, 
of which the X Hastile of New South Wales (Tab. nost. 
4722), is the best known, from the uses of its long peduncles, 
which attain twenty feet in height, as spear-shafts, and for 
the rich red-brown astringent resin which forms between the 
densely compacted bases of the leaves, and which has been used 
as a substitute for gum-kino. It is often called the Black- 
boy, and a native boy with a tuft of grass on his head placed 
amongst a group of them, is, from a little distance, with diffi- 
culty distinguished from the surrounding trunks. Another 
species, X pecoiis, F. Muell., of West Australia, forms a staple 
fodder for cattle during a good part of the year. Several 
species are cultivated at Kew — viz., X quadrangulata, semi- 
plana, F. Muell., Hastile, Br. and minor, Br., with others not 
yet in a sufficiently advanced condition for determination. — 
/. D. H. 



Kg. 1, Whole plant: — reduced in size; 2, leaf: — of the natural size; 3, 
transverse section of leaf : — magnified ; 4, upper part of spike :— of the 
natural size; 5, flower and bracts; 6, bracts; 7, ovary; 8, fruit : — all 
magnified. 



6076' 




Tab. 6076. 
STEUDNERA colocasl&folta. 

Native of South America. 



Nat. Ord. Aroide^e. — Tribe Asterostigmea 
Genus Steudnera ; {Koch in Hegel Gartenjlora, 1869, p. 323). 



Steudnera colocasuBfolia ; caudice brevi crasso vaginis brunneis teeto, foliis 
longe petiolatis, petiolo tereti, lamina peltata concava ovato-oblonga 
acuminata basimodice emarginato-2-loba, subtus glauo-viridi macuns 
brunneis Jatis mfra nervos irrorata, pedunculis petiolo brevioribus et 
tenuionbus viridibus, spatha ampla tota aperta late ovata acuta recurva 
ttava disco pallide et sordide rufo-purpurea, spadice spatha rnulto 
breviore obtuso parte foeminea dorso spatha? fere toto adnata, ovariis 
contertis staminodiis brevibus clavatis circundatis hemisphericis 
^-locularibTis, stigmate sessile discoideo 5-gono, antheris columnse- 
tormibus late truncatis loculis 7-8 parallels connectivo columnari 
carnoso longitudinaliter adnatis. 

Steudnera colocasiajfblia, Koch, 1. c . 



According to Kegel and Koch this singular Aroid is a 
native of South America, whence it was imported by Linden, 
it, as I venture to think, the plant here figured and for 
winch I an indebted to Mr. Bull, is the Steudnera colocasiafotia 
a ^ ^" S a com P ar i son w ^h Kegel's description 

H? + ^ ate woul(i Ieave no doubt in my mind, were it not 
that Mr. Bull's plant has many staminodes and a 2-celled 
ovary, whilst Koch's has but one or two staminodes, and a 
o-celled ovary; the number of staminodes is very likely to 
)e variable, as is frequently the case with arrested organs, 
and our plants having, like Koch's, 5 rays to the stigma 
would indicate the probability of there being sometimes as 
many cells to the ovary. 

I regret having no information as to the exact habitat of 

us plant. Mr. Bull believes that he received his specimen 

irom Calcutta, but it is certainly not an Indian form. It 

elongs to Schott's section or tribe of Asterostigmea>, and its 

lies are for the most part American ; it, however, closely 

resembles in the form and colouring of the foliage a very 



JANUARY 1ST, 1874. 



ornamental Arvid {Colocasia Jenningsii), which I found in 
the Khasia mountains. The specimen here figured flowered 
in Mr. Bull's nursery in May, 1873. 

Descr. Rootstock one to two inches high, and one and a 
half in diameter, clothed with brown sheaths. Leaves few, 
six to ten inches long, terminal, oblong-ovate, acuminate, 
peltate, concave, with a shallow notch at the base, midrib 
strong, as are two nerves that proceed backwards from the 
insertion of the petiole ; lateral nerves numerous, spreading ; 
upper surface dark green, under glaucous green, with dark 
brown blotches between the nerves ; petiole one foot long 
terete, green. Peduncle, shorter and more slender than the 
petiole, terete. Spat he four inches long, broadly-ovate, 
acuminate, quite open, slightly concave, recurved after opening, 
yellow, with a suffused pale red-purple disk. Spaduv one 
and a half inches long, upper one-third free, subclavate, 
obtuse, clothed densely with hexagonal anthers ; lower two- 
thirds dorsally adnate to the spathe, densely clothed with 
ovaries, and each surrounded by five to eight short clavate 
staminodes. Anthers shortly columnar, apex of connective 
flat dilated ; cells seven to eight, linear, parallel, surrounding 
the thick connective. Ovary hemispheric, 2 -celled ; stigma 
discoid, 5-angled ; cells several-ovuled, ovules attached to the 
axis. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Spadix audita attachment :—o/ the natural size- 2, anther: 3, 
ovary and staminodes ; 4, transverse section of ovary .—all magnified. 



m 










WEtchddetlitli 



Tab. 6077. 
MESEMBRYANTHEMUM truncatellum. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Ficoide^;. — Tribe Mesembrye.e. 

Genus Mesembryanthemum, Linn.; (Benth. <Sf Hook. f. Gen. Plant., vol. i. 

p. 853). 



Mesembryanthemum truncatellum; obconicum, 1-3 poll, diametro, acaule, 
glaberimum, glaucum, crassum, pallide viride,foliis ad 4 decussatim oppo- 
sitis latissime cuneatis basi connatis appressis apicibus dilatatis, latissime 
truncatis, vertice lunatis convexis pallide bruneis depresso-tuberculatis 
colore saturatiore irroratis, basi vestigiis membranaceis fugaceis foliorum 
vetustorum vaginatis, floribus majusculis 1^ poll, diametro solitariis 
sessilibus, ovario inter folia 2 summa compresso, caljce 5-6-fido seg- 
mentis obtusis, petalis 2-serialibus numerosissimis anguste linearibus 
stramineis, staminibus perplurimis segmentis calycinis asquilongis, stylis 
ad 5 gracilibus, apicibus incurvis. 

Mesembryanthkmum truncatellum, Haworth Miscell. Nat., p. 22; Ait. I fort. 
Kew, Ed. 2, vol. iii. p. 213; Haw. Synop*. Plant. Succ, 203; DC.Prodr., 
vol. iii. p. 417. ; Harv. $■ Sond. Fl. Cap., vol. ii. p. 392. 



Though differing in some respects from the published 
description of Met. truncatellum, I have little hesitation in 
referring the vegetable oddity here figured to that plant. 
Thus Harvey, on what authority is not stated, describes it as 
only half an inch in size, whereas Haworth (the author of 
the species) calls it the " great dotted Dumplin," which 
implies that it is the largest of its allies, of which the 
smallest, M. minutum, is fully half an inch in size. Again, 
Haworth, in his original description (Misc. Nat.), describes 
the ovary as never extruded beyond the surface of the plant, 
a s in our specimen ; but in his Synopsis he describes it as 
exserted, and in this he is followed by He Candolle and 
Harvey. Lastly, the calyx is said to be 5-fid in the original 
description, and in De Candolle's Prodromus, and Harvey's 
* lora ; but 4-fid in the Hortus Kewensis : in our plant it is 
o-fid. 

JANUARY 1st, 1874. 



M. truncatellum was introduced into Kew in 1795, by 
F. Masson, one of the travellers attached to the establish- 
ment, and is described as flowering in November ; our plant 
was sent by Principal MacOwan/of Gill College, Somerset 
East, and flowered in October 1S73; it is a very rare species, 
was unknown to the Prince Salm Dyck, and is hence not 
included in his magnificent work ; it has never before been 
figured. 

Descr. Plant forming tufts of pale glaucous green, 
obconic, truncate, translucent fleshy masses, one to three 
inches in diameter, with a flat or convex rather tubercled 
brown surface ; each branch on plant, consisting of four leaves 
m opposite pairs, placed cross-wisp. Leaves very fleshy, broadly 
cuneate, connate to above the middle; back convex- face 
convex; crown lunate, brown, mottled, convex; the first formed 
fleshy leaves, after developing another pair between them, 
shrink into a mere membranous pellicle that sheaths the base 
of the younger pair. Flower solitary, sessile, one and a 
halt inches m diameter. Calyx-tube sunk and tightly-wedged 
between the two uppermost leaves; limb 5-6-cleft, lobes 
obtuse, tinged purple. Petals in two series, very numerous 
straw-coloured. Stamens very numerous, anthers yellow' 
Style* 5, slender, tips uncurved. — /. B. H. 



bo^ magged 2 ' fl ° Wer with tw0 se P als > and P etals of same side removed:- 



607 ft 




Witch i 



"VbcanLBrooksDsy iSon^fap 



Tab. 6078. 
COLCHICUM speciosum. 

Native of the Caucasus. 



Nat. Ord. MelanthacejE. — Tribe Colchice^:. 
Genus Colchicum, Tourn. ; {Endl. Gen. Plant., p. 137). 



Colchicum speciosum ; robustum, hysteranthum, cormo magnit. judglandis, 
foliis 4-5 late elliptico-lanceolatis, perianthii late purpurei tubo crassitie 
pennaa anserinse 6-12-pollicari, limbo 5 poll. diam. segmentis ellipticis 
apice rotundatis concoloribus non tessellatis, antheris elongatis flavis, 
stigmatibus subunilateralibus integris apicibus incurvis perianthii seg- 
mentis multo brevioribus. 

Colchicum speciosum, Stev. in Mem. Soc Nat. Mosc, vol. vii. p. 2G5, t. 
15 ; Kunth Enmn., vol. iv. p. 139; Hohen. JEnum. PI. Talusch., p. 23; 
Koch in Linncea, vol. xxii. p. 258 ; Ledeb. Fl. Ross., vol. iv. p. 204. 



-The largest known species of the genus, and a very hand- 
some one, a native of the countries bordering the Caucasus 
range on the south, and extending thence into Persia, if, as 
appears to be the case, a Ghilan plant of Aucher Eloi 
(n. 5370) is the same species. Ledebour in his Flora Rossica, 
says that it inhabits the provinces of Mingrelia, Iberia, the 
Suwant, Lenkoran, and the south-west shores of the Cas- 
pian sea. It has been for some time known to amateurs in 
England, though not hitherto figured in any English work. 
One of its nearest allies is the very broad-leaved C. byzanthuim 
(Tab. nost. 1122), which has a broader leaf, a much smaller 
paler flower, and broad short anthers; and is a native of 
Constantinople. 

C. speciosum has been cultivated for many years in Kew, 
but the specimen here figured, which is much more deeply 
coloured than the Kew ones, was sent by Messrs. Barr and 
kugden, who have a fine collection of the species of this 
beautiful genus. 

i>RscR. Oorm the size of a walnut, clothed with rich 
chestnut-brown shining sheathes, of which one, as broad as 
the finger in diameter, extends four to five inches up the 

MNUARY 1ST, 1874. 



scapes. Leafing-stem one foot high, with three to five leaves 
Leaves appearing before the flowers, a foot long, by two to 
four inches broad, elliptic, suberect, narrowed to the obtuse 
apex, of a dark green colour, paler beneath. Flowers numerous. 
Perianth-tube six to twelve inches long, as thick as a goose- 
quill, pale purple ; limb four to five inches in diameter, of a 
clear red-purple colour with a white throat ; segments ellip- 
tic, rounded at the point, concave, without conspicuous 
venation or tesselation. Anthers linear, oblong, yellow, 
bursting outwards. Styles three, subunilateral, slender, 
quite entire, white, tips slightly incurved.- Capsule two- 
thirds inch long, turgid. — J. D. H. 



6079 




Ld etiilh,. 



'iWiiJLBroolsIky&SciiIniJ) 



Tab. 6079. 

BAMBUSA STRIATA. 

Native of China. 



Nat. Ord. Graminie*:. — Tribe Bambuse^e. 
Genus Bambusa, Linn. ; (Munro in Trans. Linn. Soc, vol. xxvi. p. 87). 



Bambusa striata; culmo gracili inermi, internodiis ^-f poll, diametro viridi 
aureoque striatis cavitate angusto, foliis 6-8-pollicaribus |-1 poll, 
latis, e basi obliqua obtusa elongato oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatia 
subtus subglaucescentibus glabris, ligula brevi truncata ciliata, vagina 
lasvissima, paniculas ramis gracillimis, spiculis angustis f poll, longis sub- 
ternatim fasciculatis, fasciculis remotis sessilibus, glumis oblongo- 
lanceolatis acuminatis compressis larvibus obscure 9-11-nerviis, in- 
feriore longiore, palea inferiore subulato-lanceolata sub-enervi glaber- 
rima, superiore paulo breviore angusta 2-nervi, nervis dorso ciliatis, 
squamulis 3 oblongis ciliatis, antheris 6 paleis sequilongis linearibus 
acuminatis rubris demum liliacinis, ovario styloque elongato piloso, 
stigmatibus 2 subulatis. 

Bambusa striata, Loddiges ex Lindl. in Penny Cyclopedia, vol. iii. p. 357; 
Munro Monog. Bambus, in Trans. Linn. Soc, vol. xxvi. p. 121. 



The plant here figured has been, I believe, long known in 
this country as a native of China, and was introduced by 
the Messrs. Loddiges, of Hackney, many years ago. It is 
further cultivated in various tropical countries, and has been 
received at Kew both from the Jamaica and the Calcutta 
Botanic Gardens. In adopting the name striata, therefore, 
the only cause for hesitation is, that Lindley describes 
loddiges' plant as having the leaves narrowed at the base, 
which hardly applies to this, in which they are oblique and 
almost rounded on the lower half of the base and acute in 
the upper. The specimen at Kew, sent from the Calcutta 
botanic Gardens, is about six feet high, but Lindley describes 
Jt as attaining twenty feet, which from its habit it may very 
w ell be supposed to do. It belongs to Munro's third section 
of the genus Bambusa, which has a long hairy style, and to 
which the B. vulgaris and two other species belong. 

JANUARY 1ST, 1874. 



This plant flowered in November last, with Mr. Bull, who 
kindly sent me the specimen here figured ; its anthers stain 
paper of a lilac colour ; it has been called B. Fortunei, which 
I take to be a very different plant. 

Descr. A graceful tufted very glabrous slender species, 
six to twenty feet high. Culms as thick as the thumb; 
internodes four to six inches long, shining, striped yellow 
and green ; walls thick, tube slender. Leaves six to eight 
inches by three-quarters to one inch long and broad, linear- 
oblong or oblong-lanceolate from an obtuse unequal base, 
glabrous, finely ciliolate on the margin, rather glaucous 
beneath ; sheath slender, smooth, glabrous ; ligula short, 
truncate, ciliate. Panicle slender, sparingly branched; 
branches long, with distant fascicles of about three sessile 
spikelets, which are three-quarters inch long, narrowly elliptic- 
lanceolate, 3-5-flowered. Glumes and lower p'alea similar, 
acuminate, with many obscure nerves, smooth ; upper palea 
slender, 2 -nerved, nerves ciliate. Scales 3, oblong, pilose. 
Stamens 6; anthers almost as long as the glumes, linear, 
apiculate, red purple, lilac when old. Ovary hairy, as is the 
very slender style ; stigmas two. — /. D. II. 



Fig ■ 1 Spikelet; 2, flower; 3, scales, base of filaments, and pistil :— all 
magnified. 



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6080 




W.Fu 



VaKaitBroofa Day&wn .Imp 



Tab. 6080. 

FAGR^A ZEYLANICA. 

Native of Ceylon. 



Nat. Ord. Loganiace^e. — Tribe Fagr^ee^e. 
Genus Fagrju, Thunb.; {DC. Prodr., vol. ix. p. 28). 



Fagr^ea zeylanica; robusta, fruticosa, glaberrima, foliis 5-12-pollicaribua 
obovatis obovato-spathulatisve apice rotundatis sessilibus v. in petio- 
lum robustum angustatis crasse coriaceis, nervis paucis inconspicuis, 
cymis terminalibus 3-multifloris, floribus breviter et crasse pedicellatis, 
calycis ovoidei lobis rotundatis scarioso-marginatis, bracteolis paucis 
brevibus, corolla; tubo 4-pollicari sursum infundibulari, lobis oblongis 
apice rotundatis, genitalibus exsertis, antheris magnis. 

Fragr^a zeylanica, Thunb. Nov. Gen., vol. ii. p. 34; Act. Holm., 1782, p. 125, 
t. 4; Lamk. Ill, t. 167, f. 2 ; Blume Rumphia, vol. ii. t. 78; Thwaites 
Enum., p. 200 et 425 ; DC. Prodr., vol. ix. p. 29 ; Benth. in J own. Linn. 
Soc. Bot., 1857, p. 98. 

Solandra oppositifolia, Moon Cat., p. 15. 



A native of the central province of Ceylon, where, according 
to Dr. Thwaites, it abounds on the banks of the river at 
Balangodde. It is one of the handsomest species of a fine 
tropical Asiatic and Polynesian genus, of which some twenty 
species are enumerated by Bentham in his notes on Loganiaccai, 
published in the Linncean Journal (cited above), in 1857, to 
which several more are now to be added from the Malayan 
Islands. One species, the F. obovata, is figured in this 
work (Tab. 4205). The individual here figured was sent from 
Ceylon by Dr. Thwaites, about ten years ago, and flowered 
in the Boyal Gardens in July, 1873. 

Descr. A very stout glabrous spreading deep green thick 
and coriaceous-leaved shrub. Branches as thick as the little 
finger, bright green, as are all the parts, except the flowers, 
scarcely shining. Leaves variable in length and breadth, 
nve to twelve inches long, usually obovate, and narrowed 
into a very short, stout, semiterete petiole, which is, how- 
ever, sometimes one to one and a half inches long; blade 

FEBRUARY IsT, 1874. 



sometimes much elongated, and between obovate and spathu- 
late ; tip always rounded and sometimes emarginate ; margins 
slightly recurved ; nerves few, spreading, almost invisible in 
the fresh state. Cymes in terminal clusters, or solitary, three or 
more flowered, corymbose ; peduncles and short pedicels 
as thick as a goosequill, smooth ; bracts and bracteoles very 
short, triangular. Calyx nearly one inch long, ovoid, cleft to 
above the middle into rounded, appressed, overlapping lobes, 
with scarious margins when dry. Corolla white, leathery; 
tube four inches long, funnel-shaped above ; limb three to four 
inches in diameter; lobes oblong, thick, spreading and recurved, 
nerveless. Stanmis with very slender unequal filaments longer 
than the tube. Anthers nearly one-half inch long, broadly 
oblong, obtuse, pale yellow. Ovary cylindric ; style slender, 
exserted ; stigma green, capitate. — /. B. II 



Fig. 1, Specimen of natvral size ; 2, ovary ; 3, transverse section of ovary ; 
4, top of filament and anther : — all magnified. 



Tab. 6081. 
GAILLARDIA Amblyodon. 

Native of Texas. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Helenioidej:. 
Genus Gaillardia, Foug.; (Benth. S[ Hook./. Gen. Plant., vol.ii. p. 414). 



Gaillardia A mblyodon; annua, ramosa, pilis patulis hirtella, foliis semi- 
amplexicaulibus oblongis v. inferioribus spathulatis apices versus grosse 
dentatia basi auriculato-bilobis, capitulis pedunculatis 2£ poll, latis, in- 
volucri squamis 3-4-seriatis lineari-lanceolatis setaceo-acuminatis his- 
pidis conformibus externis basi concretis, receptaculi setis rigidis se- 
taceo-acuminatis achasnia superantibus, ligulis 12-15 obcuneato-oblongis 
trifidis sanguineo-purpureis, corollae lobis extus pubescentibus, achseniis 
cylindraceo-oblongis, pappo radii e squamis brevibus latis exaristatis 
disci oblongo-oblanceolatis longe setaceo-acuminatis. 

Gaillardia Amblyodon, J. Gay in Ann. Sc. Nat., ser. 2, vol. ii. p. 57; Torr. 
4r Gray Fl. N. Am., vol. ii. p. 267 ; Gray Chlor. Bot. Am., 32, t. 4. 



A very handsome October-flowering' annual, a native of 
sandy plains in Texas and New Mexico, where it blossoms 
from the beginning of summer until the winter's frost cuts 
it off. The genus to which it belongs inhabits both tempe- 
rate North America and extra-tropical South America, and 
consists of about eight species, of which two have been 
already figured in this Magazine — namely, the old G. bicolor, 
Lam. (Tab. 1602), and its variety Brummondii (Tabs. 3368 and 
3551); and the large yellow-flowered G. aristata (Tab. 2940). 
The present species was discovered by Berlandier in 1827, 
and collected subsequently by Lindheimer in 1844, and by 
Drummond in 1845. The specimen here figured was raised 
from seed by Mr. Thompson of Ipswich, and flowered in 
October, 1873. 

Descr. An annual branching herb, two to three feet high, 
forming large clumps, clothed with spreading short hispid 
hairs. Leaves, radical subspathulate ; cauline one and a half 
to two and a half inches long, semi-amplexicaul, oblong, sub- 
acute, coarsely toothed beyond the middle, usually contracted 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1874. 



below it; pubescent and pale beneath, midrib beneath hispid, 
base* 2-lobed, auricled. Heads two and a half inches dia- 
meter, terminal, peduncled. Jnvolucral scales green, rigid, 
3-4-seriate, subulate-lanceolate, hispid, erecto-patent, the 
outer confluent at the base. Receptacle clothed with rigid 
bristles which exceed the achenes. Ray-flowers twelve to 
fourteen, spreading, deep blood-red ; limb cuneate- oblong, ob- 
tusely 3-lobed. Disk-flowers short ; lobes short, obtuse, erect, 
pubescent externally. Achenes cylindric-oblong, those of the 
ray with a pappus of few short broad scales ; those of the disk 
with as many long rigid scales that terminate in setaceous 
points ; style-arms long, slender, exserted. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Ray-flower; 2, disk-flower; 3, pappus scale of the latter: — all 
magnified. 



6082. 





Land:: 



■5 eve & 



Tab. 6082. 
STAPELIA Cordeeoyi. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Asclepiade^.— Tribe Stafelisjb. 

Genus Stapelia, Linn. ; (Decaisne in DC. Prodr., vol. viii. p. 652). 



Stapelia (Duvalia) Corderoyi ; humilis, glaberrima, glauca, ramulis brevibus 
obesis procumbentibus ovoideo-oblongis obtusis sub-4-costatis, costis 
rotundatis remote dentatis, sinubus acutis, dentibus brevibus triangulari- 
subulatis patentibus basi carnosis et utrinque unituberculatis, corolla 
l 2 -2 poll lata ad medium 5-loba, lobis triangularibus acuminatis 
SOTdide viridibus marginibus recurvis, apices versus fusco-purpurascen- 
tibus, sinubus setoso-glandulosis, fauce elevata pallide-lilacina filamentosa, 
corona staminea duplici breviter stipitata purpurea, exteriore e disco 
crasso obtuse 5-gono, interiore e cornubus 5 brevibus crassis ovoideis 
exteriore impositis. 



I am quite unable to identify this very curious little 
Stapelia with any described species, though it clearly belongs 
to Haworth's section Duvalia. In habit, size, and form of 
branches it agrees with S. cmpitosa, Mass., but the flowers 
are very much larger, and of a totally different form arid 
colour. To the same division belong S. radial a (Tab. nost. 
619) and 8. reclinata (Tab. nost. 1897) ; but these have, like 
# ccesjntosa, small dark-coloured flowers, with very narrow 
corolla-lobes. 

t\/t na med this very curious and distinct species after 

-M>. Justus Corderoy, of Blewberry, near Didcot, an old and 
an eminent cultivator of succulent plants, and for many years 
a valued correspondent of the Royal Gardens. It flowered at 
-Blewberry in September of last year. 

JJescr. Branches short, procumbent, very stout, glaucous, 
about two inches long by three-quarters of an inch in dia- 
meter, very pale green and fleshy, obtusely 4-5 -ribbed, the 
ribs semi-cylindric with an acute sinus between them, each 
bearing two to four short triangular teeth, which are fleshy 
at the base, and there furnished with a globose tubercle on 
each side. Peduncles solitary or in pairs, about an inch long, 

FEBBUABl 1ST, 1871. 



green, variegated with purple. Calyx of five triangular- 
subulate green teeth, with red-brown tips. Corolla about one 
and a half inches in diameter, 5-lobed to about the middle ; 
lobes triangular-acuminate, dirty green, with purple brown 
tips, and a few long slender glandular purple hairs in the 
sinus, margin recurved ; throat surrounded with an elevated 
lilac coronal disk, clothed with slender spreading purplish 
hairs. St aminal- column on a short stipes, expanded into a 
broad fleshy purple obscurely 5-lobed disk (the outer corona) 
which bears on its summit as many egg-shaped obtuse spread- 
ing horns (which form the inner corona). Pollen-masses 
bright orange, reniform. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Teeth on ribs of branches ; 2, flower, with the corolla removed; 
3, pollen-masses : — all magnified. 




Eta* ,-■ 



Tab. 6083. 
iris douglasiana. 

Native of California. 



Nat. Ord. Iridace^. — Tribe Ieide^!. 
Genus Iris, Linn.; (Endl. Gen. Plant., p. 1G6). 



Iris Douglasiana ; imberbis, rhizomate crassitie digitis, foliis l-l|-pedalibus 
2~f P ^- l at i s planis anguste lineari-ensiformibus longe acuminatis 
scapum solidum excedentibus, spathse valvis 2-3-pollicaribus angustis 
acuminatis pedunculos longe superantibus, ovario angnsto obtuse 3- 
gono faciebus concavis, perianthii tubo \-\ pollicari, limbi 3-4 poll, lati 
segmentis exterioribus obovato-spathulatis pallide lilacinis disco albido 
venis purpureis, interioribus erectis elliptico-lanceolatis acuminatis 
lilacinis, stigmatibus cuneato-oblongis 2-fidis, lobis acutis dentatis. 

Iris Douglasiana, Herbert in Hook, fy Am. Bot. Beech. Voy. 395 ; Torrey in 
Whipple Rep. Bot. 35th Parallel, p. 144. 



Discovered by Coulter in California, and subsequently 
collected by David Douglas, in 1833, in New California, but 
unknown to me from any other locality and collector, except 
from a mention of the plant in one of the Eeports of the 
United States' surveys, quoted above, where it is stated to be 
found on hill-sides in the Grass Valley, California, together 
with a large-flowered variety (how large it is not said), and 
longer pedicels (one inch) at the Corte Madera, also in Cali- 
fornia. It is a very little known plant, being omitted in Klatt's 
monograph of the genus, (published in the Linnae, vol. xxxiv.), 
and is closely allied to S.longipetala (Tab. nost. 5298), which 
is, however, a very much larger species, with a remarkably 
short perianth-tube. I am indebted to Messrs. Veitch for the 
specimen here figured, which flowered in his nursery last year. 

Descr. Rhizome as thick as the little finger, creeping. 
Leaves a foot to a foot and a half long, by half to three- 
quarters of an inch in diameter, of a dark green colour, except 
at the bases and on the sheaths, which are paler, variegated 
with red, narrow-linear, gradually contracted into the acumi- 
nate tip, nerves obscure. Spathes usually two, enclosing 

FEBRUARY 1st, 1874. 



together two flowers, three to four inches long, narrow and 
long acuminate, without scarious margins. Peduncles shorter 
than the ovary, which is one to one and a half inches long, 
narrow-oblong, with three rounded angles and channelled 
faces. Perianth-tubes one-half to three-quarters of an inch long, 
rather stout, green ; limb three to four inches in diameter • 
outer segments obovate-spathulate, spreading and recurved, 
beardless, obtusely toothed, pale lilac, with a white disk 
which is veined with purple ; inner segments rather shorter, 
lanceolate, acuminate, erect; obtusely toothed, pale lilac- 
purple, not veined. Stigmas one half as long as the inner 
segments, bifid, oblong cuneate, segments acute. — /. B. H. 



C('fi4 ~ 




v.Btocfa .: St 



Tab. 6084. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM roseum. 

Native of Peri' 

Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. — Tribe Yksdzm. 
Genus Odontoglossum, H. B. $ K.- {Lindlfol. Orchid. Odontoglossum). 



Odontoglossum roseum; pseudobulbis late-ovatis compressis ancipitibus 
apice 2-foliatis, foliis loriformibus acutis canaliculatis sessilibus dorso 
carmatis coriaceis enerviis, racemis breviuscule pedunculatis cernuis 
elongatis multifloria, rachi tenui, bracteis ovato-lanceolatis viridibus 
pedicellis gequilongis, ovario gracili perianthio rosee l-poll. diametro, 
sepalis petalisque consimilibus oblongo-ellipticis subacutis patenti- 
recurvis, labello anguste 3-lobo, lobis lateralibus brevibus rotundatis, 
intermedio longe producto lineari apice paulo dilatato obtuse, disco 
inter Iobos laterales callo 4-fido ornato, columna apice pallida raem- 
brancea 3-fida, 

Odontoglossum roseum, Lindl. in Benth. Plant. Hartweg, p. 151; FoL 
Orchid. Odontogloss. p. 23: Rekhb.f.in Walp. Ann., vol vi. t. 848 ; 

Gard. Chron., 1867, p. 404; Andre in Linden Illust. llortic, vol. 
xviii. t. G6 ; Batman Afonog. of Odontogloss. t. 22. 



In its rose-coloured flowers this forms a remarkable contrast 
to the prevalent colour of the genus to which it belongs. It 
was discovered by Hartweg near Loxa, in the Peruvian 
Andes, in a quite cool region, and was introduced by Mr. 
Linden from that region by his able collector, Mr. Wallis, in 
1865, A figure of a small and poor specimen is given in 
Mr. Bateman's beautiful work upon this genus, and a much 
finer one in the " Illustration Horticole," where, however, the 
flowers are represented as larger and of a much deeper hue 
than in our plant. The specimen here figured was exhibited 
by Mr. Linden at the Horticultural Society in April, IS 71. 

Descr. Pseudohdbs two inches long by one and a half in 
diameter, broadly ovate, much compressed, 2 -edged, pale- 
brown when mature. Leaves five to seven inches long, by 
three-quarters to one inch in diameter, strap-shaped, acute, 
narrowed at the base, channelled and dark-green above, paler 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1874. 



and keeled beneath, very coriaceous, nerveless. Racemes pro- 
ceeding from the base of the pseudobulb, six to eight inches 
long, on a peduncle of half that length, graceful, curved, 
many-flowered; peduncle closely clothed with appressed 
obtuse sheathing green bracts ; rachis rather flexuous ; flowers 
rather distant and distichous ; bracts about as long as the 
pedicels, acute, appressed, green. Ovary very slender, 
3-angled, hardly distinguishable from the pedicel. Periantk 
one to one and a quarter inches in diameter, rose-red through- 
out. Sepals and petals similar, oblong-elliptic, acute, spread- 
ing and recurved, paler at the back. Liji about as long as 
the petals ; claw appressed to the column ; limb cuneate at 
the base, 3-lobed; lateral lobes small, rounded, enclosing a 
small disk which bears a 4-lobed appressed callus ; midlobe 
much longer than the rest of the lip, linear, dilated or spa- 
thulate at the obtuse tip, obscurely channelled above. Column 
rather slender, rose-coloured, with a 3-toothed white mem- 
branous tip. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, View of column and lip from above ; 2, the same from the disk : — 
both magnified. 



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LONDON: 
L. REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1874. 



ROYAL BOTANIC SOCIETY OF LONDON, 

GARDENS— REGENT'S PARK. 



AERANGEMENTS FOE 1874. 

EXHIBITIONS OP SPRING FLOWERS, Wednesdays, March 25, April 22. 

SUMMER EXHIBITIONS, Wednesdays, May 20, June 10, and June 24. 
Gates open at 2 o'clock. 

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Evening Dress. 

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Coloured Orders. 

LECTURES in the Museum at 4 o'clotk precisely, Fridays May 15, 22, 29 ; 
June 5, 12, 19, 26 ; July 3. 

ROYAL HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



MEETINGS AND SHOWS IN 1874. 

(Fruit and Floral Meeting.) 

(Hyacinths.) 

(Fruit and Floral Meeting.) 

(Early Rhododendrons.) 

(Pot Roses.) 

(Fruit and Floral Meeting.) 

(Great Summer Show.) 

(Fruit and Floral Meeting.) 

(Cut Roses.) 

(Zonal Pelargoniums.) 

(Fruit and Floral Meeting.) 

Do. 
(Dahlias.) 

J (Fruit and Floral Meeting.) 

\ (Fungi.) 
(Fruit and Chrysanthemums.) 
(Fruit and Floral Meeting.) 



March 


4. 


» 


18. 


April 1. 

15. 

May 13. 

„ 27. 
June 4 and 5. 




17. 


July 


!. 
15. 


August 


5. 


7J 


19. 


September 2. 


October 


7. 


November 11. 


December 


2. 



u 



THE GARDEN," 



A Weekly Illustrated Journal devoted solely to Horticulture in all its 
branches. 



and Gardens of Pari 
lening are contributors to its pages, 
jects regularly treated of in it 
, liar Jv Pknren 



THE GARDEN is conducted bv Wn 

- 1 - F.L.S., Author of "Hardy Flowers," "Alpine Fl< 
den*," *' The Pfcrha, Promenad 
Writers in every department of ( 
The following are some of the 

The Flower Garden. 
Landscape • 
The Fruit Qa 
Garden Stn; 

■ 

Trees and Shi 
The Garden may be obtainc 
ftt 4<1. pet OOpj. It 
a Quarter, t's. 9d. f 
and in Monthly Farts. 

37, BmtiunqptH 



Robinson, 

English Gar- 
and the best 






■ rdeng. ' 
enhotue and 



• 



n. 



ats ai- I lailway 

rom the Office at 5s. for 
I ibk in a.- 



, "W.C. 



W&5 




Vin coil. Biwks Bay ft S. ia,imp 



Tab. 6085. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM Roezlii. 

Native of New Grenada, 



Nat. Ord. Oiichideje. — Tribe VANDEiE. 
Genua Odontoglossum, //. B. $ K. ; {Lindl. Fol. Orchid., Odontoglossum). 



Odontoglossum Roezlii; pseudobiilbis parvis anguste ovatis compressis raar- 
ginibus acutis, foliis pcdalibus elongato lineari-lanceolatis acuminatis 
carinatiset lineato-nervoris, scapis gracilibus foliis brevioribus 1-2 floris, 
floribus maximis, periantbio piano, sepalis obovato-oblongis acutis niveis, 
petalis sepalis consimilibus niveis fascia magna lata versus basin san- 
guineo-purpurea ornatis, labello maximo late obcordato in sinu apicu- 
lato, ima basi in unguem brevem contracto, ungue utrinque postice in 
spinam rectam producto, disco 5-carinato spinisque aureo rubroque 
irroratis, columna breviuscula exalata. 

Odontoglossum Roezlii, Reichb. f. in Gard. Chron., 1873, p. 1303, cum Ic. 
Xylog., et in Xen. Orchid., vol. ii. p. 191 (cum. tab. 182 ined.) 



r This is a very near ally and a rival of the 0. vexillarium 
(Tab. nost. 6037) ; so near anally indeed, that Prof. Reichen- 
bach suggests the possibility of its being a hybrid between 
that plant and 0. JPftalamopsis. Putting aside the different 
colour of the flower, the principal distinctions between this 
and 0. vexillarium are the more slender leaves, which are 
nerved beneath, less robust habit, fewer-flowered scapes, the 
obcordate lip and longer column of this ; Prof. Beichen- 
bach indicates the flat (not revolute) sepals and the different 
keels at the base of the lip (he, however, finds three keels in 
this, not five, as in our specimen) ; to these maybe added the 
more slender and much longer floral bracts, and shorter scapes, 
ft is stated to be a native of New Grenada, where it was dis- 
covered by M. Eoezl, whose name it bears ; and was flowered 
by Mr. Bull in October last; to whom I am indebted for the 
opportunity of figuring it. It is a superb plant, and in 
respect of the pearly whiteness of the flower more admired 
by some than even 0. vexillarium. 

Descr. Pseudobulbs one to two inches long, narrowly ovate, 
compressed. Leaves eight to twelve inches long, narrowly 
hnear-lanceolate, acuminate, pale clear green above, paler and 

■march 1st, 1874. 



keeled beneath ; nerves parallel. Scapes about half the 
length of the leaves, slender, terete, 1-2-fiowered ; bracts 
subulate-lanceolate, half an inch long, green ; pedicels exceed- 
ing the bracts, gradually passing into the slender grooved 
ovary. Flowers three to three and a half inches across, but 
probably variable in size, almost as large as and closely 
resembling in form those of 0. vexillarhim ; perianth quite flat. 
Sepals subequal, one and a half inches long, the dorsal rather 
the narrowest, obovate-oblong, acute, snow-white. Petals 
as large as, and altogether similar to, the lateral sepals, but 
with a broad red-purple band across their breadth towards 
the base. Lip very large, two to two and a quarter inches in 
breadth, broadly obcordate with a mucro in the notch, very 
shortly clawed, snow-white, with faintly yellow marblings, 
tinged with pale red on the disk above the base ; a small 
spur-like horn arises on each side of the base of the claw, 
and is directed upwards and backwards, one on each side of 
the column ; and there are live short slender ridges on the 
disk in front of the interval between the spurs. Column not 
winged. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Front; and 2, side view of portion of lip and column : — magnified. 



Tab. 6086. 

BAUHINIA NATALENSIS. 

Native of Natal. 



Nat. Ord. Leguminos^:. — Tribe Bauhinie.e. 
Genus Bauhinia, Linn.; (Benth. 4' Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 575). 



Bauhinia (Pauletia) natalensis ; frutex inermis, erectus, glaberrimus, r&nmlia 
gracilibus, foliis parvis gracile petiolatis, foliolis 2 liberis oblique 
oblongis v. obovato-oblongis apice rotundatis, basi obtusis, pedunculis 
1-2-floris oppositifoliis gracilibus, stipulis setiformibus, Jloribus 1^ poll. 
diam. erectis albis, calyce spathaceo late cymbiformi apiculato, petalis 
obovatis apice rotundatis, staminibus 5 longioribus filamentis 2 basin 
versus calcaratis, 5 duplo minoribus antberis pai-vis, ovarii stipite libero, 
stylo elongato, stigmate capitato, legumine piano acinaciformi acuminato 
glaberrimo tenuiter venoso, basin versus sensira angustato, margine 
inferiore piano. 

Bauhinia natalensis, Oliv. Mss. in Herb. Kew. 



My first knowledge of tins elegant little shrub was derived 
from specimens collected in Natal by Mr. Moodie, and com- 
municated by Mr. McKen, the late energetic Curator of the 
D'Urban Botanic Gardens, in 1869. These were followed 
by pods with ripe seeds in 1870, from which the plant here 
figured was raised, and which flowered for the first time in 
September last. It is closely allied to the African and Indian 
B. tomentosa, Linn. (Tab. nost. 5560) and especially to a 
nearly glabrous and small-leaved varietv of that plant from 
Port Natal, but the leaflets are perfectly free, the flowers much 
smaller and the stamens quite different. 

Descr. A small, glabrous, slender, leafy bush. Brancklets 
nearly straight, slender. Leaves alternate, somewhat dis- 
tichous ; petiole very slender, quarter to a half inch long, 
ending in a subulate point between the leaflets, swollen at 
the base ; leaflets one inch long, quite free, obliquely obovate, 
or subovate-oblong, rounded at the apex, as also at the base on 
the outer side, dark green, rather paler beneath ; midrib and 
few nerves very slender ; stipules subulate. Peduncles leaf- 
opposed, 1-2-flowered, with two minute setaceous bracts 

MARCH 1st, 1874. 



at the base. Flower one and a half inches in diameter, 
pure white with a faint crimson streak along the midrib of 
the three smaller petals. Calyx with a short turbinate tube, 
and a broad spathaceous green apiculate limb, one-third 
inch long, which is truncate at the base. Petals erecto- 
patent, obovate-oblong, rounded at the apex, obscurely 
veined ; three upper rather smaller. Stamens ten ; filaments 
almost free, and slightly hairy at the base; five longer 
equalling the style, of which two have each a lateral spur above 
the base ; five shorter stamens half as long as the others ; 
anthers all oblong, obtuse, yellow ; cells ciliate at the base. 
Ovary stipitate, free, slender; style stout, elongate, stigma 
large, capitate. Pod three inches long by nearly one half inch 
broad, scimitar-shaped, acuminate, contracted at the base, flat, 
glabrous, obscurely reticulately nerved, convex edge flat, 
about C-seeded, interior almost divided between the seeds by 
a thin down.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Leaf and portion of stem ; 2, flower, with the petals removed ; 
3, long and short stamens : — all magnified. 



^■ 



i 









m 




j 









\. 



* 








v." 



y 

Tab. 6087. 
arabis blepharophylla. 

Native of California. 






Nat. Ord, Crucifek2e.— Tribe Arabide*. 
Genus Arabis, Linn.; (Benth. $ Hook.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. CD). 



Arabis blepharophjlla ; perennis, erecta, caulibus foliosis, foliis ciliatis ct 
sparse pilosis radicalibus rosulatis obovato-spathulatis obtusis sinuato-v. 
serrato-dentatis, caulinis eliiptico-v. lineari-oblongis obtusis basi sim- 
plicibus v. subauriculatis, racemis brevibus latis obtusis, floribus gracilo 
pedicellatis amplis roseis, petalis obovato-cordatis, siliquis l|-pollicaribus 
erectis rectis v. lente curvis Knearibus, valvis utriuque obtusis costa 
nervisque lateralibus flexuosis validis, stylo brevissimo, seminibus 
1-senatis orbicularibus compressissimis exalatis brunneis. 

Arabis blepharophylla, Hook, et Am. Bot. Beech. Voy., p. 321. 



Of the large genus Arabis almost all have white flowers ; in 
a very few species they are yellow, and in this alone of those 
known to me, do the colour and size of flower together recom- 
mend it for cultivation. It is a native of San Francisco, in 
California^ where it was discovered by David Douglas in 1833, 
and has since been collected by Bridges, Brewer, Bolander, 
and others, and is described as a great ornament in March 
on the hills of that State. It seems remarkable that so con- 
spicuous a plant, growing in what is now a populous State, 
should be so little known, but I find no other description of 
it than that in the Botany of Beechey's Voyage, published 
thirty-five years ago ; nor do I find any mention of it in the 
multitudinous and cumbrous records of the United States' 
Purveying Expeditions. Professor Asa Gray, of Cambridge, 
was, I believe, the first to send ripe seeds to England— this 
was in 1865 — from which plants were raised at Kew, and by 
Mr. Thompson, of Ipswich, if I recollect aright ; but it was 
not till quite recently that the plants throve (from seeds sent 
by Commissioner Watt, of the Agricultural Department of 
Washington) and appeared in their full beauty. The speci- 
men here figured flowered at Kew in January, in a cool 
march 1st, 1874. 



frame, where it has hitherto thriven better than in the open 
border or rockwork ; it is, however, doubtless quite hardy, and 
would succeed equally well out of doors, where, from its beauty 
and early flowering, it is sure to become a great favourite. 

Descr. Whole plant six to ten inches high, erect. Root 
perennial, fusiform. Flower-stem leafy, robust. Leaves all 
ciliate, and sparsely hairy with long simple or forked hairs ; 
radical forming a lax rosette three to four inches in diameter, 
spreading, one to two and a half inches long, petioled, 
obovate-spathulate, obtuse, irregularly sinuate or toothed, 
dark green above, paler beneath ; cauline leaves shorter, sessile, 
linear-oblong, obtuse, serrate or toothed, base rounded or 
slightly auricled. Flowering-racemes about two inches long, 
and nearly as broad, rounded at the apex ; pedicels half an 
inch long, slender, spreading, erect in fruit. Flower three- 
quarters of an inch in diameter. Sepals erect, linear- oblong, 
obtuse. Petals with a short claw and broadly obovate retuse 
rose-coloured limb. Filaments slender ; anthers small. Pod 
one to one and a half inches long, nearly one-eighth of an inch, 
broad, erect, slightly curved, linear; valves obtuse at both 
ends, rather coriaceous, margined, convex over the seeds; 
midrib and waved lateral nerves very strong, giving the 
surface a grooved appearance ; style very short, conical ; 
stigma minute. Seeds, about eight to ten in each cell, 
1 -seriate, orbicular, much compressed, brown, not winged. — 



Fig. 1, Flower with calyx and anthers removed ; 2, ovary , 3, immature 
capsule : — all magnified. 



€088 




"WfttcMeletlitfi 






Tab. 6088. 
NDNNEZHABIA (Chamjedorea, Auct.) 

GEONOM^EFORMIS. 

Native of Guatemala. 



Nat. Ord. Palmes. — Tribe Arecine;e. 
Genus Nunneziiaria ; Ruiz Sf Pav. — (Chajledokea, Willd. et auct.). 



■Nunneziiaiua (Psilostachys) geonomceformis ; caudice gracili erecto dense 
annulato, foliia erecto-patentibus breviter petiolatis simplicibus obovatis 
apice bipartitis, vaginis brevibus apertis, spadicibus $ infra et inter coro- 
nam enatis longe pedunculatis, pedunculo erecto, masculi ramis gracilli- 
mis pendulis densifloris, 11. $ compresso-globosis, perianthio exteriore 
annulari brevissimo latissime 3-lobo, interiore e foliolis 3 obovato- 
triangularibus, antheris inclusis oblongis, 11. $ scrobiculis spadicis 
suberecti subimmersis deprcsso-globosis, perianthii foliolis 3 exterioribus 
mteriora rotundata ovarium ampleetentia subsequantibus, staminodiis 
minutissimis, stigmatibus minutissimis exsertis. 

&IAMJEDORKA geonomajformis, Wendland Ind. Palm., p. 12 (1854), et in Otto 
et Dietr. Garten*., 1852, ex Oersted in Palm. Centroamcr. in Nntur. 
Foren. Vidensk. Meddels., 1858, p. 24; Oersted, L'Ameriq. Centr. 
Fasc. i. p. 14, t. 5 (1853). 

Cii. fenestrata, Hort. Houtt., ex Wendl. Ind. Palm, 12. 

Ch. humilis, Hort. Berlin, ex Wendl. I.e. 



This little Palm was received at Kew from the Eoyal 
Gardens of Berlin in 1856, and flowered in the Palm-house 
in May, 1859, and repeatedly since. Prom its dwarf habit, 
abundant foliage, and graceful male inflorescence, it is one of 
the most elegant of the beautiful genus to which it belongs. 
It is a native of Guatemala, whence it was introduced by 
Warsiewicz, and named by Wendland. Its foliage pre- 
cisely accords with that of a Peruvian congener, the N. ? gco- 
nomoides, Spruce (Journ. Linn. Soc, vol. xi. p. 122) ; but the 
flowers are very much larger and widely different. There is 
no question but that, as Mr. Spruce points out, Willdenow's 
generic name of Chamcedorea must give place to the prior one 
march 1st, 1874. 



of Nunnezharia, given to the genus nine years earlier by Ruiz 
and Pavon. 

The Kew plant, which in 1858 (when the accompanying 
drawing was made), had a stem only a few inches high, with 
four naked joints, has now a stem three and a half feet high, 
which presents sixty-four joints between the rootlets and 
lowest leaf base. It is stated to have borne sometimes male 
and sometimes female spadices. 

Descr. Whole height about four feet. Stem erect, as thick as 
the thumb, deep bright green ; internodes one-half to one inch 
long, not much contracted at the middle. Leaves spreading, 
eight to twelve inches long by five or six broad, obovate, 
obscurely serrate, apex two-partite, with spreading triangular 
lobes, deep green, plaited ; nerves about twelve on each side, 
perfectly glabrous ; petiole short, green ; sheath oblong, the 
lower pale red-brown. Spadices (male) axillary, and from the 
joints immediately below the leaves, very slender, erect, 
terminated by long slender alternate drooping branches, eight 
to ten inches long; peduncle clothed with slender, erect, 
orange-brown, acuminate sheaths four inches long ; branches 
very graceful, green, clothed throughout with close-set but 
not crowded male flowers. Flowers (male) compressed- 
globose, a quarter of an inch in diameter, dark green like the 
branch of the spadix, in which their bases are hardly sunk. 
Outer perianth of three minute membranous segments, connate 
into a cup ; inner much larger, obovate, connate at the tips 
for some time. Stamens six, surrounding a rudimentary ovary. 
Female Jower (from Oersted's description) immersed in pits of 
the erect branches of the spadix. Outer perianth nearly as 
large as the inner. Staminodes very minute. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1 , Eeduced view of whole plant ; 2, male spadix : —of the natural size ; 
3, portion of ditto and flower ; 4 male flower : — magnified. 



6089 




TtfHuiddeth'i 



Tab. 6089. 
RHIPSALIS Houlletii. 

Native of Brazil ? 



Nat. Ord. CactejE. — Tribe Opuntie;e. 
Conus Khipsalis, Gcertn.; (Benth. $ Hook./. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. 850). 



Kiiipsalis Houlletii; epiphytica, pendula, ramosa, glaberrima, caulibus 
gracilibus, ramulis foliaceo-dilatatis planis, internodiis elliptico-lanceo- 
latis 1— 1^-poll. diam. grosse obtuse serratis coriaceo-carnosis nervis 
obscuris, fioribus fere 1-poll. diametro pallide flavis odoris, ovario 
exserto oblongo obtuse 4-5-costato, perianthii foliolis 8-12 erecto- 
patentibus Ianceolatis acutis, exterioribus paullo minoribus, staminibua 
numerosis perianthio brevioribus, stylo gracili, stigmatibus 4-5. 

Ehipsalis Houlletii, Lemaire, Les Cactecu, p. 80, nomen tantum. 



This Bhipsalis has been cultivated for some time in the 
Eoyal Gardens, where it flowered first in November, 1872, 
and it has been received also from Mr. Corderoy, who sent us 
flowering specimens to be named in the same month of 1873. 
Quite recently Mr. Green contributed a fine plant of it from 
Mr. Wilson Saunders' late collection, which came from 
Paris, with the name I have adopted. I have failed to find 
any description of this species in any horticultural or botani- 
cal work. I may here mention that the difficulty of running 
down names of Garden plants is, through obvious causes, be- 
coming immense, and will soon be insuperable. I can recom- 
mend no more useful object to a Horticultural Society than 
the organizing a committee for the collection and classifica- 
tion (with references) of the names of all plants introduced 
into cultivation, together with the countries the plants come 
from, and their date of introduction. 

Desck. Stem probably many feet long, and pendulous 
from the branches of trees in its native woods, quite glabrous, 
green, with a faint tinge of brown purple along the margins 
of the leaf-like articulations, slender and cylindric between 
the articulations. Articulations three to six inches long, by 

MARCH 1st, 1874, 



one to one and a half broad, elliptic-lanceolate, acute, nar- 
rowed into the petiole-like branches, regularly coarsely ob- 
tusely toothed, between coriaceous and fleshy ,• quite flat, 
without scales or hairs ; midrib and lateral nerves broad and 
faint, the latter directed to the sinus of the teeth, and un- 
branched. Flowers copiously produced in the axils of the 
teeth, three-quarters to one inch in diameter, pale straw- 
coloured, odorous, opening by day. Ovary quite naked from 
a very early stage, sessile, oblong, with four to five obtuse 
ribs. Perianth erecto-patent ; leaflets 8-1 2, narrow-lanceo- 
late, acute or acuminate, the outer rather smaller. Stamens 
numerous, much shorter than the perianth. Style slender, 
stigmas four or five, spreading. — /. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Ovary stylo and stigma : — magnified. 






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6090 




-detidi 



, &nc«iilBiooksD3?iSc«i lD1 ' 



Tab. 6090. 
COLCHICUM PARKmsom. 

Native of the Greek Archipelago. 



Nat. Ord. Melanthace^;. — Tribe Colchice^:. 
Genus Colchicum, Town.; (End!. Gen. Plant, p. 137). 



Colchicum ParJcinsoni; hysteranthum, cormo magnitudine avellanie, foliis 
patuJis prostratis et humi appressis, elongato-lanceolatis acuminsti8 
margine insigniter undulatis, perianthii 3-4 poll, diametro tubo albo 
segmentis paten ti-recurvisalbis pulcherrime purpureotessellatis elliptico- 
lanceolatis subacutis, antheris cceruleis, polline fusco-purpureo, stigma- 
tibus minutis incurvis perianthii segmentis multo brevioribus. 

? Colchicum chionense, Haw.; ex Kunth. Enum., vol. iv. p. 139, sub 
C. variegatum. 

C Fritillaricum Chiense, Parkins. Parad., p. 155, f. 5, et p. 156. 



This charming Meadow Saffron appears to have been actu- 
ally lost sight of by botanists for nearly two and a half cen- 
turies. It is originally very accurately described and rudely 
figured by Parkinson, in the " Paradisus Terrestris," pub- 
lished in ] 629, where it is distinguished from the other tessel- 
lated-flowered Colchicums by its smaller size, brighter, clearer 
colouring, and the undulated leaves lying flat on and ap- 
pressed to the ground. 

Ray, in his "Historia Plantarum," p. 1172, published in 
1088, keeps up Parkinson's plant under his name, but adds 
to it Comutis's C. variegatum as the same thing ; in this he 
was mistaken, for a reference to Cornutis's work, published 
in 1635, with a rude woodcut, proves that his is a very dif- 
ferent plant, a native of Messina, and is probably that now 
known as C. Bivonat, Guss. The plant now called variegatum, 
and which is supposed to be the Linnsean one, is also a native 
or (xreece, and is figured at Tab 1028 of this work (copied 
and reversed in Reichenbach's " Flora Exoticse," t. 57, without 
acknowledgment). This, Mr. Baker informs me, is a much 
larger species than the subject of the present plate, with less 
pronounced and coarser tessellation, and having suberect leaves 
AHtn, 1st, 1874 



a foot high and less undulated. It is known under the name 
of C. variegatum, tessellatum, and agrippinum in English gar- 
dens, and is liable to be killed in severe winters. 

With regard to Haworth's name of chioncnse, cited with- 
out a reference by Kunth, I can nowhere else find it ; and 
having no means of knowing to what plant he applied it, I 
hesitate to apply it to this, which should henceforth bear the 
name of the acute old botanist who first published it, and 
whose quaint and characteristic description I here give at 
length : — 

"This most beautiful Saffron flower riseth up with his 
flowers in the Autumn, as the others before specified do, 
although not of so large a size, yet far more pleasant 
and delightful in the thick, deep blew or purple-coloured 
beautiful spots therein, which make it excel all others what- 
soever : the leaves rise up in the Spring, being smaller then 
the former, for the most part three in number, and of a paler 
or fresher green colour, lying close upon the ground, broad 
at the bottom, a little pointed at the end, and twining or 
folding themselves in and out at the edges, as if they were 
indented. I have not seen any seed it hath born : the root is 
like unto the others of this kinde, but small and long, and 
not so great : it flowreth later for the most part then any of 
the other, even not until November, and is very hard to be 
preserved with us, in that for the most part the root waxeth 
lesse and lesse every year, our cold country being so contrary 
unto his natural, that it will scarce shew his flower ; yet 
when it flowreth any thing earlie, that it may have any com- 
fort of a warm Sun, it is the glory of all these kindes." — 
Paradisus Terrcstris, p. 1 56. — J. D. H. 



€091 







Tab. 6091. 
BESCHORNERIA Tonelii. 

Native of Mexico. 



Nat. Ord. AmaryllidW — Tribe Agaves. 
Genus Beschorneria, Kunth; {Kunth, Enum. Plant., vol. v. p. 844). 



Beschorneria Tonelii'; foliis recurvis pedalibus elliptico-lanceolatis acumi- 
natis asperulis subtillissime denticulatis, seapo 4-pedali sanguineo- 
purpureo, panicula 2-pedali inclinata, ramis paucis gracilibus paten- 
tibus sparsifloris, bracteis ovato-Ianceolatis acuminatis pallidis, floribus 
nutantibus et pendulis, pedicellis ovariis perianthiique segmentis basi 
et dorso late sanguineo-purpureis, perianthii segmentis acutis viridibus. 

Beschorneria Tonelii, Jacobi in Otto Hamburg. Garten- unci Blumenz., 
vol. xx. p. 503, sine descriptione. 



Had I not examined this plant in a living state in Mr. 
Wilson Saunders's garden, where it flowered in May of last 
year, I should certainly have identified it with the original 
B. hibifora, Kunth, as figured at Tab. 4642 of this work ; 
nor am I now sure, after a comparison of these real or sup- 
posed species, that they are more than varieties of one. The 
present is of a laxer habit, has much broader leaves, and 
brighter red purple scape and panicle, the latter with drooping 
branches ; it has also rather longer more pendulous flowers 
with more acute perianth-segments. In all other respects, 
and especially in the floral organs, the two supposed species 
appear to be identical. 

According to General Jacobi, who (in Otto's work, cited 
above), has given a sketch of the genera and species of 
slf/avcd?, the genus Beschorneria contains four species, of 
which two are now figured in this Magazine, and the others, 
B. yuccoides and B. Parmentieri {Yucca Parmentieri, Roezl), 
are unknown to me. Unfortunately General Jacobi gives no 
description of B. Tonelii, his conspectus of Aloinece, which was 
commenced in the work referred to, not having been con- 
tinued to Beschorneria, and I am therefore dependent on the 

APIML 1st, 1874. 



authority of Mr. Wilson Saunders's garden for the name this 
plant hears. 

Descr. Stem very short. Leaves few, spreading, fifteen to 
twenty inches long, by two and a half inches broad, acumi- 
nate and keeled beneath towards the tip, minutely serrulate, 
scaberulous above, very glaucous, thick and hard, contracted 
into a flat thick petiole an inch broad. Scape four feet high, 
as thick as the middle finger below, and as well as the inflo- 
rescence of a bright red-purple colour. Panicle two feet long, 
slender, inclined, with few lax spreading simple branches bear- 
ing distant fascicles of two to five flowers ; bracts several to each 
fascicle of flowers, three quarters to one and a quarter inches 
long, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, spreading, membranous, pale. 
Flowers two and a half inches long, drooping, on slender pedicels 
half to three-quarters inch long. Ovary one inch long, obtusely 
3-gonous, dark red-purple, 6-grooved. Perianth tubular ; seg- 
ments linear, slightly dilated at the rather spreading acute tip, 
dark blood-red below and on the midrib, the rest very bright 
verdigris green. Stamens nearly as long as the perianth, fila- 
ments dilated above the base ; anthers linear-oblong. Style 
rather longer than the stamens, base conical : stigma obscurelv 
3-lobed.— J. D.H. J 



Pig. 1, Top of ovary with stamens and style:— magnified. 



6092 




Tab. 6092. 

ACONITCJM HETEROPHYLLTJM. 

Native of the Western Himalaya. 



Nat. Ord. Ranunculace^e. — Tribe Hellebores. 
Genus Aconitum, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 9). 



ACONITDM heterophyllum; caule erecto robusto simplici v. ramoso glabra 
superne pubescente, foliis radicalibus petiolatis rotundato-reniformibus 
v. cordatis obscure 5-lobis grosse duplicatim inciso-dentatis v. lobulatis 
glabris, caulinis late cordatis sessilibus brevissime petiolatis v. amplexi- 
cauhbus, racemis lateralibus v. terminalibus multifloris deuse v. 
laxifloris, pedicellis erectis, bracteolis 2-3, floribus cceruleis v. ochro- 
leucis purpureo cceruleo ve venosis, sepalis puberulis, supremo valde 
convexo, lateralibus oblique ovatis, antico lanceolato sinuoso, petalis 
ungue late lineari subincurvo apice subgloboso inflato ecalcarato, 
carpellis 5 pubescentibus, folliculis erectis. 

Aconitum heterophyllum, Wall. Cat. 4722 ; Royle III. PL HimaL, p. 56, 
t. 13; Hook. f. & Thorns. Flor. Ind., vol. i. p. 58; Hook.f. Flor. 
Brit. Ind., vol. i. p. 29. 

A. cordatum, Royle III. p. 56. 

A. Atees, Royle in Journ. As. Sot: Beng., vol. i. p. 459. 



The subject of the present plate is a very interesting plant, 
as being, though a member of a most poisonous genus, in 
extensive use as a tonic medicine throughout N. India, under 
the name of Atees or Atis. It inhabits the whole Western 
Himalaya, from Kumaon to Kashmir, at elevations from 
8-13,000 ft., growing in moist places, at the edge of forests, 
®c. It is a near ally of the famous Bikh poison of the same 
mountains, which does not seem to differ from our deadly 
A. Napellus (Monkshood). For the specimen here figured I 
am indebted to Colonel G. Smyth of Wetten-le-Wold, Louth, 
who cultivated it in his garden from Himalayan seed, and 
communicated it to Kevv in August of last year. 

M + • E ° jle S ' dys of t]lis species:— "In the native works on 
Materia Medica, as well as in the common Persian and Hin- 
cloostanee and English Dictionaries, Atees is described as 



APRIL 1st, 1874. 



being the root of an Indian plant used in medicine. This, 
the author learnt, was the produce of the Himalayas ; he 
therefore sent to one of the commercial entrepots situated at 
the foot of the hills, and procured some of the root, making 
inquiries respecting the part of the mountains whence it was 
procured. The plant-collectors, in their next excursion, were 
directed to bring the plant, with the root attached to it, as 
the only evidence which would be admitted as satisfactory. 
The first specimens thus procured are represented in Plate 13, 
and the root A tees having been thus ascertained to be the 
produce of a new species of Aconite, was named Aconitum 
Atees {Journ. Asiat. Soc., i. p. 459); but which has since been 
ascertained to be the Aconitum heteropliyllum of Dr. Wallich. 
The roots obtained in different parts of the country resemble 
one another, as well as those attached to the plant. They 
are about an inch in length, of an oblong oval-pointed form, 
light-greyish colour externally, white in the inside, and of a 
pure bitter taste. That its substance is not so injurious as 
the Bisk, I conclude from its being attacked by insects, 
while the other remains sound and untouched. The na- 
tives describe it as being of two kinds, one black, the other 
white, and both as bitter, astringent, pungent, and heating, 
aiding digestion, useful as a tonic, and aphrodisiac." — Eoyle 
111. PL Himal., p. 48. 



Fig. 1, Pedicel with bract, stamen, and two lateral sepals -.—magnified. 



cm 




Tfacoa BrookD jj& 3«i,li* 



Tab. 6093. 
panax sambucifolius. 

Native of New South Wales and Victoria. 



Nat. Ord. Araliace*. — Series Panacea. 
Genus Panax, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. 938). 



Panax sambucifolius ; glaberrimus, foliis pinnatis 2-pinnatisque, folioli 
polymorphs sessilibus petiolulatisve ellipticis v. lanceolatis integerrimis 
dentatis lobulatis v. pinnatifidis subtus glaucis, rachi interdum dlatata 
ad riodos articulata, umbellis terminalibus et axillaribus corymbosis 
paniculatis v. racemosis, calycis limbo brevissimo sinuato 4-5-dentato, 
fructu baccato globoso aquoso translucido, pyrenis plano-convexis dorso 
obtuse costatis. 

Panax sambucifolius, Sieb. in DC. Prod., vol. iii. p. 255 ; Benth. Fl. Austral , 
vol. iii. p. 382. 

P. angustifolius et P. dendroides, F. Muell. in Trans. Phil. Inst. Vict., 
vol. i. p. 42 ; Plant. Vict., t. 28. 

Nothopanax sambucifolius, Seem. Flor. Viti., p. 115. 



_ The singular beauty of .the translucent berries which per- 
sist for a long time on the plant, recommend the latter for 
cultivation. These resemble white currants in form and 
transparency, but have a faint blue tinge, and each is 
capped by a minute black calyx-limb, and two thread-like 
diverging or recurved styles. It is a native of extra-tropical 
Eastern Australia, extending from north of the New South 
Colony to Victoria; and a very similar plant (of which I 
have seen the leaves only) has been sent from Tasmania. Like 
so many Araliacete, the Ivy notably, the leaf varies most 
extraordinarily, being simply or doubly pinnate, and the 
leaflets being quite entire, toothed, lobed, or pinnatifid, and 
the petiole flat or dilated between the leaflets. The flowers 
are small and insignificant ; they appear in spring, and the 
beautiful berries ripen in September. 

Panax sambucifolius was introduced into Kew from the 
Melbourne Botanic Garden by Baron Mueller, and flowered 
for the first time in 1873. 

APRIL 1st, 1874. 



Descr. A shrub or small tree, everywhere quite glabrous ; 
branches slender, green. Leaves three to ten inches longi 
pinnate or 2 -pinnate ; leaflets one to three inches long' 
sessile or petioled, elliptic or lanceolate, quite entire, toothed' 
lobed or pinnatifid, and cut into distant short or long, broad 
or narrow lobes, glaucous beneath ; rachis simple winged or 
dilated and leafy. Umbels small, half an inch in diameter, 
green, in corymbs, racemes, or panicles ; peduncles slender ; 
pedicels very short, jointed below the flower. Flowers one- 
sixth of an inch in diameter. Calyx-tube hemispheric, con- 
tracted into a short stipe ; limb 4-5 -toothed. Petals four 
to five, spreading with incurved tips; those of the female 
flowers larger and often cohering at the tips, smaller and 
more spreading in the males. Fruit a watery transparent 
berry, one-third of an inch in diameter, crowned with a minute 
black calyx limb, and two slender recurved styles ; pyrenes 
two, plano-convex, with two striate dorsal ribs. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1 and 2, Male flowers; 3, calyx, and styles of ditto; 4, ripe fruit; 
5, transverse section of ditto : — all magnified. 



€094 







THucentBioaksDjj 



Tab. 6094. 
EPIDENDRUM criniferum. 

Native of Costa Rica. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe Epidendreje. 
Genus Epidendrum, Linn. ; {Lindl. Fol. Orchid. Epidendrum). 



Epidendrum (Spathium) criniferum ; caulibus repentibus et fasciculatis 
simplicibus gracilibus ima basi tuberosis superne foliosis, foliis sub- 
distichis, vaginis teretibus, lamina sessili lineari-Ianceolata acuta 
patenti-recurva, spathis pluribus viridibus lineari-oblongis apice 
truncatis, racemo terminali subsessili, bracteis minutis appressis, floribus 
2 poll, diam., sepalis subulato-lanceolatis acuminatis aureis rubro-fusco 
maculatis, petalis squilongis fere filiformibus, labelli laciniis lateralibus 
semi-ovatis^ incurvis lateribus in processus subulatos undulatos fissis, 
lacinia media porrecta lineari angusta, disco callis 2 parvis supra stigma 
ornato. 

Epidendrum criniferum, Reichb. f. in Gard, Chron. 1871, p. 1291. 



This belongs to a large West-Indian and South-American 
section of Epidendrum, of which many species have been 
described by Lindley in his " Folia Orchidacea," by Eeichen- 
bach, and by others; of the latter the Cuban E. nvulare, 
Lindl., according to Eeichenbach, comes nearest to this, but 
differs in the longer and narrower leaves, shorter bristles on 
the lip, and different midlobe of the latter. Eeichenbach 
further observes that the lip of this is totally white, but in 
the specimen here figured it is blotched with pale red, and 
the midlobe is yellow. 

Epidendrum criniferum was sent for figuring by Messrs. 
V eitch, in whose splendid collection of Orchids it flowered in 
January of the present year. 

Descr. Stems a foot high, in tufts from a creeping root- 
stock, slender, green, leafy, as stout as a swan's-quill, the 
basal joints swollen and half an inch in diameter. Leaf- 
skeathes one inch long, green, cylindric, with a truncate 
mouth ; leaf-blade, three to four inches long by half inch 
broad, spreading and recurved, linear-lanceolate, acute, sessile, 

april 1st, 1874. 



dark-green above, pale beneath, margins subrecnrved, midrib 
keeled. Spathes about three, terminal, erect, an inch long, 
linear-oblong, truncate. Racemes terminal, subsessile, inclined, 
about 6-flowered ; rachis green, one to one and a half inches 
long ; bracts small, green, appressed to the slender pedicel. 
Ovary slender, with the pedicel one and a half inches long. 
Perianth nearly two inches across. Sepals equal, flat, spread- 
ing, subulate-lanceolate, acuminate, golden-yellow blotched 
with chestnnt-brown. Petals as long and similarly coloured, 
but extremely narrow. Lip adnate to the column, 
3-lobed, lateral lobes semi-ovate with crinite margins, the 
setae curved upwards and waved ; disk white with very pale 
pink blotches and two tubercular calli close under the 
stigma; midlobe straight, yellow, very narrow, acute, ex- 
tending as far as the petals. Column white. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Ovary, column, and lip: — magnified. 



60.% 




- 



"VmcratBrooteDayiScuIm? 



Tab. 6095. 
RHOPALA Pohlii. 

Native of Brazil. 



Nat. Ord. Proteace^e. — Tribe Greville^e. 
Genus Rhopala, Schreb.; {Meissner in DC. Prod., vol. xiv. p. 424). 



Rhopala Pohlii ; arborescens, ramulis petiolisque fusco-tomentosis demum 
glabratis, foliis imparipinnatis, foliolis petiolatis oblique ovatis ellip- 
ticis-ovatisve acuminatis grosse serratis supra glabris nitidis subtus 
costatis reticularis laxe tomentosis v. glabratis, racemis erectis simpli- 
cibus v. compositis solitariis se'ssilibus aureo-lanatis, pedicellis bracteis 
parvis duplo longioribus, perianthio clavato ad medium 4-fido, seg- 
mentis anguste spathulatis, ovario villoso, stylo gracili. 

Rhopala Pohlii, Meissn. in Mart. Fl. Bras., fasc. xiv. p. 89, t. 33 ; et in 
DC. Prod., vol. xiv. t. 433. 

R. corcovadensis, Hort. 



The genus Rhopala, is one of the few American repre- 
sentatives of the Old World Proteacece, and is confined to the 
tropical and south temperate regions of the New World, 
where nearly forty species have been found, many of them in 
Brazil. They are, for the most part, exceedingly handsome 
evergreen plants, with dark -green shining coriaceous leaves, 
and insignificant blossoms, usually dotted with a rusty or 
golden pubescence. The present species is a native of the 
province of Minas Greraes, in Brazil, and of the neighbour- 
hood of Eio de Janeiro, whence it was introduced into Kew 
many years ago, from a Belgian garden I believe, pro- 
bably Mr. Linden's, under the name of B. corcovadensis. 
It has flowered repeatedly in the palm-house early in the 
year. 

Descr. A tree. Branches clothed with dense, bright, rusty- 
coloured woolly tomentum. Leaves a foot long and upwards, 
arched, pinnate, with five to eight pairs of subopposite and 
alternate pinnules, rachis, petiole, and petiolules villous ; 
pinnules three to five inches long, on stout petiolules, which 
are sometimes an inch long, obliquely ovate or elliptic-ovate, 

APRIL 1st, 1874. 



acuminate, coarsely acutely serrate, bright-green above, paler 
and tomentose but at length glabrate beneath, and reticu- 
lated with prominent veins. Bacemes axillary, erect, three to 
five inches long, subsessile, narrow, simple or compound 
at the base, covered with orange-red velvety pubescence ; 
pedicels strict, erect, much larger than the small bracts. 
Flowers one-third of an inch long. Perianth clavate before 
opening, divided to below the middle into four narrowly 
spathulate segments. Ovary narrow-ovoid, villous ; style 
slender, stigma clavate. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, pedicel and pistil -. — magnified. 



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6036 




\facentBTo 



Tab. 6096. 
xiphion slsyrinchium. 

Native of the Mediterranean Region. 



Nat. Ord. iRiDACEiE. — Tribe Iride^e. 
Genus Xiphion, Tourn. ; {Tab. nost. 5890). 



Xiphion Sisyrinchium ; bulbo globoso fibroso-tunicato, caule gracili ssepius 
flexuoso 2-6-floro, foliis sub-binis elongato-subulatis falcatis dorso 
semiteretibus, spathis 1^-pollicaribus ventricosis, ovario subsessili, 
peranthii tubo gracili subunciali, limbo tenuissimo coeruleo-violaceo 
1— 1$ poll, diametro, segmentis exterioribus obovato-spathulatis, inte- 
rionbus angustis paulo brevioribus - erectis, filamentia deorsum stylo 
adnatis,stigmatibus segmentis perianthii interioribus aequilongis profunde 
2-fidis, lobis erectis parallelis subulato-lanceolatis. 

X. Sisyrinchium, Baker in Seemann Journ. Bot., vol. ix. p. 42. 

Iris Sisyrinchium, Linn. Sp. PL, vol. i. p. 59; Sibth. Fl. Grate, vol. i. 
p. 30, t. 42 ; Cav. 7c, t. 193 ; Redoute Lil, t. 29 et 458. 

I. ^Egyptia, Delile Fragm. Fl. Arab., p. 6. 

I. fugax, Ten. Fl. Neap., vol. i. p. 15, t. 4. 

Gynandriris Sisyrinchium, Pari. Nuov. Gen., p. 52, Flor. Ital., vol. iii. 
p- 309 ; Godr. et Gren. Fl. France, vol. iii. p. 246 ; Klatt in Linnaea, 
vol. xxxiv. p. 577. 

Morju Sisyrinchium, Gaivl. Bot. Mag., t. 1407. 

M. fugax, Ten. Syll., p. 26. 

M. Tenoreana, Sweet. Brit. Fl. Gard., t. 110. 



This lovely little plant is the most widely diffused of all 
the Iridea>, extending from Spain and Marocco to Turkey and 
-kgypt in Europe and Africa respectively, and thence east- 
ward through Syria and Arabia to Affghanistan and Beloo- 
cnistan. It further, probably, passes the confines of the 
British Indies, as my correspondent, Dr. Aitcheson, informs 
me by a letter just received, that he has found a bulbous 
Ins in the North-Western Punjab, which, from his descrip- 
tion, may well be this. 

It will be observed that this is the Morcea Sisyrinchium, 
figured in this work (Tab. 1407), but so indifferently as 



**» 1st, 1874. 



hardly to be recognisable. It was introduced into England 
before the days of Gerard (1597), but is still scarce, being 
often killed by frost. The plants here figured flowered at Kew 
in May of last year, from bulbs sent by D. Hanbury, Esq., 
E.B.S., from Calabria. The bulbs are said {Bot. Mag. I. c.) 
to be eaten in Spain and Portugal, whence Gerard and 
Parkinson called them Spanish nuts ; but I cannot confirm 
this statement. 

Descr. Bulb the size of a large hazel-nut, globose, clothed 
with matted fibres. Stem six to twelve inches high, stout or 
flexuous, 2-6-flowered. Leaves dark green, usually twin, 
distichous, spreading or recurved, elongate- subulate very 
concave, rounded at the backs, about as long as the stem. 
Spat lies ventricose, membranous acuminate. Flowers one and a 
half inches in diameter, blue-purple, with a yellow oblong spot 
on the disk of the outer perianth segments. Ovary slender, 
about one inch long. Perianth-tube as long and more slender ; 
outer segments of limb reflexed, oblong-spathulate, obtuse ; 
inner narrow-lanceolate, erect, much paler. Stigmas erect, as 
long as the inner segments, bifid to the middle, segments 
subulate, parallel, erect. — /. B. H. 



Fig. 1, Apex of stigma -.—magnified. 



6(01 





W t''ilcli del cU 



-a,coiLBnidksDayiSo* io P 



Tab. 6097. 
ECHINOCACTCJS Cummingii. 

Native of Bolivia. 



Nat. Ord. Cacte^e. — Tribe Echinocacteje. 
Genus Echinocactus, Link $ Otto ; (Benth. $ Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 848). 



Echinocactus Gumming it ; subglobosus, griseo-virescens, tuberculis i-£ 
poll. diarn. distinctis subhemisphericis spiraliter dispositis centro de- 
pressis, areolis parvis fere circularibus, demum nudis, spinis exterioribus 
15-20 patentibus gracilibus strictis ad \ poll, longis pallide flavescen- 
tibus superioribus longioribus centralibus fortioribus, floribus 1 poll, 
diametro aureis, perianthii tubo infundibuliformi, laciniis ad 40 aureis 
extimis tubum efFormantibus brevibus imbricatis apicibus sanguineis, 
intimis numerosis patentibus lineari-oblongis obtusis, staminibus con- 
fertis auries tubo fere immersis, antheris parvis, stylo columnari, 
stigrnatibus 7-8 erectis cylindraceis. 

EcniNOCACTus Cummingii, Salm-Dyck. Cad. Hort. Dijck. Cult. p. 174; 
Labouret Monog. Cact., p. 264. 



A very elegant little globose Cactus, with rather large 
bright golden flowers, communicated to Kew by Mr. Pferf's- 
dorff in June of last year: it is stated by Labouret and Sal m- 
Dyck to be a native of Bolivia, and to be very rare in Europe, 
but one specimen according to the former author existing in 
France (in 1847), which was in the collection of M. Andry, 
of Chaillot. I give it the name under which Mr. Pferfsdorff 
sends it, assuming it to be correct ; it agrees with Labourers 
character in everything but the size of the flowers, which are 
described as " petites," whereas these are of considerable size 
m proportion to the size of the plant. 

Descr. Stem in our specimen two and a half inches in 
diameter, nearly globose, of a grey-green colour, hardly 
shining, contracted slightly at the base. Tubercles about 
one third of an inch in diameter, arranged in spirals, sub- 
hemispherical, base obtusely quadrangular, with a depression 
at the top in which the areole is placed. Areole small, nearly 
circular, outer spines about fifteen to twenty, strict, slender, 
erecto-patent, pale yellowish, the upper rather the longest, 



may 1st, 1874. 



central two or three shorter and stouter. Flowers numerous, 
sessile. Perianth golden yellow, one inch in diameter, and 
about as long; tube funnel-shaped, clothed with lax imbri- 
cating oblong scales tipped with red (the outer segments); 
inner segments numerous, spreading, linear-oblong, obtuse, 
flat and overlapping. Stamens lining the whole perianth- 
tube, the innermost much the shortest, filaments strict 
slender, anthers minute, yellow. Style rather stout with 
seven to eight erect, thickly filiform stigmas.— J". D. H. 



Pig. 1, Areole and spines ; 2, apex of tubercle and spines ; o, vertical 
section of flower :— all magnified. 



6098 




Tab. 6098. 
EPIDENDRUM (Barkeria) Lindleyanum. 

Native of Costa Rica. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^:. — Tribe Epidendrej:. 
Genus Epidendrum, L. ; (Lindley Fol. Orchid. Epidendrum). 



Epidendrum (Barkeria) Lindleyanum ; caule tereti ramoso non bulboso, 
foliis elliptico-oblongis acutis patenti-recurvis planiusculis enerviis sub- 
tus carinatis, vaginis breviuscnlis, scapo gracili terminali laxi-plurifloro, 
bracteis viridibus subulato-lanceolatis, floribus patentibus purpureas, pedi- 
cello ovarioque gracillimis, sepaliselliptico-lanceolatisacuminatis, petalis 
consimilibus sed latioribus, labello oblongo-quadrato apiculato ungue 
brevi basi columnar adnato, disco albo 2-carinato, columna clavata anguste 
alata, apice 3-loba. 

E. Lindleyanum, Reichb. f. in Walp. Ann., vol. vi. p. 375. 

Barkeria Lindleyana, Batem. in Bot. Beg., vol. xxviii. Misc., p. 2, et in 
Orchid. Mex., tab. xxviii.; Paxt. Mag. Bot., vol. xiii. p. 193. 



According to Keichenbach the genus Barkeria falls into 
Epidendrum, and no doubt rightly ; and I cannot but wonder 
how it was that Lindley, when revising the latter genus in 
his " Folia Orchidacea," failed to perceive that Barkeria must 
be united with it, the character of the winged column being 
a very trivial and far from conspicuous one, and the amount 
of adnation between the column and lip in Epidendrum itself 
being, as in Barkeria, very variable. 

Reichenbaoh further places all the Barkerias in a natural 
section of Epidendrum, which he designates as Amdlostoma, 
characterized by a free or nearly free lip ; to which section 
the name of Barkeria, now so well known amongst horticul- 
turists, may be equally well applied. 

E. Lindleyanum is a native of Costa Rica, where it was dis- 
covered by the late Mr. Skinner. The specimen here figured 
flowered in Mr. Veitch's establishment in December last, and 
has larger flowers, of a paler colour than those of the plant 
figured by Bateman, and by Paxton in his Magazine. 

-Descr. Stems a foot or more high, terete, sparingly 
mat 1st, 1874. 



branched and rooting at the nodes, clothed below with short 
pale sheaths, and above with subdistichous leaves, as thick 
as a goosequill. Leaves four to five inches long, spreading 
and recurved, elliptic-lanceolate, acute, nerveless, keeled at 
the back. Scape terminal, very slender, inclined, many- 
flowered. Flowers lax, two inches in diameter, purple except 
the white disk of the lip. Bracts green, slender, longer or 
shorter than the slender pedicel, but never exceeding the 
ovary, which is also slender. Sepals spreading and recurved, 
elliptic-lanceolate, acuminate. Petals similar, but broader. 
Lip oblong-quadrate, apiculate, flat with subserrate edges ; 
claw adnate to the lower one-third of the column ; disk white 
with two keels. Column clavate, narrowly winded purple 
three-lobed at the top.— J. B. H. ' 



Fig. 1, Column : — magnified. 



6080 



^S«$ 



.f\ 



Ifl/p 




"WfividdetM. 



VmcestBl-oaisi'- 



Tab. 6099. 
SENECIO (Kleinia) Anteuphorbium. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Senecionidejs. 
Genus Senecio, L. ; (Benth. and Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. ii. p. 446). 



oenecio (Kleinia) Anteuphorbium,; glaberrimus, carnosus, erectus, ramosus, 
caule crasso cylindraceo ad nodos constricto, foliis pollicaribus sparsis 
erectis oblongis lineari-oblongisve obtusis acutisve integerrimis carnosis, 
petiolo brevissimo secus caulem linea triplici deducto, capitulis polli- 
caribus crasse pedunculitis solitariis erectis, bracteis sparsis anguste 
linearibus, involucri squamis anguste linearibus acutis numerosis, flori- 
bus omnibus tubulosis flavis, pappi setis tenuissimis, acheniis laevibus, 
styli ramis apice acutis. 

Kleinia Anteuphorbium, DC. Prodr., vol. vi. p. 338 ; Harv. et Sond. Fl. 
Cap., vol. iii. p. 319. 

Cacalia Anteuphorbium, Linn. Sp. PI, p. 1168; Willd. Sp. PL, vol. iii. 
p. 1725 ; Ait. Hort. Kew., vol. iv. p. 497. 

Anteuphorbium Bauh. Pinax, 387 ; Dod. Pempt., 3, lib. ii. p. 378 ; Lob. 
Ic, vol. ii. p. 26 ; Moris Hist., vol. iii. p. 345 ; Bill. Hort. Elth., p. 63, 
t. 55, f. 2, 8. 



The subject of the present plate is one of the oldest Cape 
plants in cultivation, having, according to Dodonseus, been 
brought to Europe in 1570, and cultivated in England in 
Gerard's garden in 159G. Nevertheless, its recent South 
African habitat is up to this date unknown, no accurate 
description of it has hitherto appeared, and it has been but 
once seen in flower in Europe, until I received the 
specimen from which the accompanying drawing was made 
in January last from Mr. Thomas Hanbury's garden at 
Palazzo Orengo, near Mentone. Dillenius indeed, so early as 
1732, points out the rarity of its flowering, adding that, 
as his work " TheHortus Elthamensis," was passing through 
the press, he received a flowering specimen from a Mr. 
Powers, gardener to Mr. Blaithwaits, at Dirham in 
Gloucestershire, and which specimen he figures, though very 
wretchedly, for it appears to have been quite withered. 

may 1st, 1874. 



This plant has been long cultivated at Kew, where it forms 
an erect shrub 3-4 feet high in the succulent house. The name 
Anteuphorbiiim was given because of its being a reputed anti- 
dote against the acrid poison of the Cape Euphorbium. 

Descr. An erect perfectly glabrous smooth pale green 
succulent shrub, with thick fleshy cylindric stem and 
branches, one half to one inch in diameter, which are con- 
stricted at the base. Leaves about an inch long, erect, oblong 
or linear-oblong, acute or obtuse, pale green and fleshy like 
the branches, with rounded quite entire margins; petiole 
excessively short, produced down the stem as three slender 
lines. Heads an inch long, cylindric, erect, solitary, axillary ; 
peduncle very stout, almost clavate, with a few slender, 
scattered linear bracts, which are shorter than the head. 
Involucral bracts numerous, linear or linear- lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, green, slightly red at the base. Floivers all tubular, 
scarcely exceeding the involucre, yellow with a rose tinge. 
Corolla with short lobes. Anthers exserted. Stigmatic arms 
with short, conical, acute papillose tips. Achene small, quite 
smooth, crowned with a rather rigid pappus. — /. D. II. 

Fig. 1, Vertical section of top of peduncle and head ; 2, flower ; 3, stamen : 
— all magnified. 



6100 




Tab. 6100. 
REGELIA ciliata. 

Native of South- Western Australia. 



Nat. Ord. Mtrtace^e. — Tribe LEi'TOsrERJiE^ 
Genus Regelia, Schauer ; {Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. 706). 



Regelia ciliata ; frutex hirsutus v. pubescens, foliis parvis erectis patentibus 
recurvisve late ovatis obovatis v. fere orbicularis obtusis plains con- 
cavisve 3-5-nerviis, floribus in capitula globosa congestis, rachi lanata, 
calycis tubo ovoideo, lobis erectis, petalis minutis calycem vix exceden- 
tibus integerrimia ciliolatis, staminum phalangiis ungue lineari petals 
longe superantibus filamentis ad 12 erecto-patentibus filiformibus 
flabellatim dispositis, antheris minutis adnatis poris subtermmalibus, 
calycibus fructiferis concretis ore lato truncate 

R. ciliata, Schauer in Nov. Act. Nat. Cur., vol. xxi. p. 11, tab. i., ^ figs. 1—3; 
et in Plant. Preiss., vol. i. p. 148 ; Benth. Flor. Austral., vol. m. p. 170. 



This genus, named after the distinguished and indefati- 
gable Botanist and Superintendent of Culture mthe Imperial 
Botanical Gardens of St. Petersburg, consists of three West 
Australian plants, which, with the habit of Metrosideros, are 
closely allied to Beaufortia, differing chiefly in the form ol 
the anthers and number of ovules; by far the finest ol them 
is the B. grandiflora, Benth., which has never yet been intro- 
duced into cultivation, and in which the apparently scarlet 
bundles of stamens are an inch long, and the leaves, which 
are many times larger than those of B. ciliata, and clothed 
with a white silky pubescence. All are greenhouse hard- 
wooded plants. 

The species here figured has been cultivated for some years 
at Kew, flowering in September ; and I have also received it in a 
flowering state from Messrs. Backhouse, of York. 1 he ovary 
appears imperfect, as if the flower were male only, ine 
fruiting specimen figured is from the Herbarium. 

Bescr. A straggling twiggy bush, three to five feet high, 
with more or less pubescent or hirsute twigs and leaves, 
branchlets slender, strict, clothed with leaves. Leaves a 
quarter to a third of an inch long, erect, spreading, ana 

MAT 1st, 1874. 



recurved, imbricated tetrastichously, sessile, rigid, ovate 
obovate or almost orbicular, obtuse, flat or concave quite 
entire, 3- rarely 5-nerved, hairy on both surfaces. Flower- 
heads globose, half to three-quarters of an inch in diameter 
terminal, though as the axis elongates and becomes leafy 
the head becomes situated some inches below the top of the 
branchlet, of a dull red-purple colour. Calyx-tube villous 
rounded at the base ; lobes acute, subulate. Petals minute' 
scarcely exceeding the calyx, oblong, concave, quite entire,' 
with ciliate margins. Phalanges of stamens much exceeding 
the calyx ; claw linear, glabrous, giving off about twelve 
slender spreading filaments, each terminated by an adnate 
short two-celled anther, whose cells open by terminal short 
slits. Ovary a villous tubercle at the base of the calyx- 
tube. — /. D. H. J 



,. ^ J and 2, Leaves; 3, flower; 4, longitudinal section of calyx ; 5, petal; 
t>, tip oJ filament and anther \—all magnified. . 



6101 




VhZxkM fltivt. 



Incest Bn< 



Tab. 6101. 
SENECIO Doronicum, var. hosmariensts. 

Native of Northern Marocco. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Senecionide^;. 
Genus Senecio, L. ; (Benth. $ Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. ii. p. 446). 



Senecio (Crocisendes) Doronicum; herbaceus perennis polymorphs, floccoso- 
tomentosus v. glabratus, 1-pauci-cephalus, foliis crassiusculis dentatis, 
radicahbus knceolatis ellipticis v. ovato-cordatis dentatis sinuato-den- 
tatisve breviter v. longius petiolatis subacutis v. obtusis, involucri 
bracteati campanulati squamis lanceolatis acuminatis, ligulis 12-25 planis, 
achamns glabris striatis. 

S. Doronicum, Linn. Sp. PL, p. 1222 ; DC. Prodr., vol. vi. p. 357. 

Vab. hommiensis; caule breviori, foliis caulinis paucis angustis, inferioribus 
2-3 limbo lato in petiolum attenuatis, radicalibus late ovatis basi trun- 
cata v. subcordata in petiolum non deccurrentibus. Ball in Journ. 
Bot. n.s., vol. ii. p. 36? (1873). 



Senecio Doronicum is a very handsome and not uncommon 
feouth European plant, extending from the Pyrenees to 
Iransylvania, inhabiting considerable elevations in those 
countries, attaining a foot or two in height, with heads two 
inches in diameter. On the southern shores of the Mediter- 
ranean it has hitherto been found only in the northern moun- 
tains of Marocco, where it was discovered on Beni-Hosmar, 
a rugged limestone mass close to Tetuan, by Messrs. Ball, 
™ v > aad myself, in April, 1871, at an elevation of about 
J000 feet, growing in dry rocky places. 

In this state it forms a very pretty rockwork plant, flower- 
\f g 1 tS May in En g land - The specimen here figured is from 
Mr. Maw's rich garden of herbaceous plants at Benthall Hall, 
near Broseley, in Shropshire. 

-Uescr. A. perennial scapigerous herb, leaves below, scape, 
bracts, and involucre more or less clothed with floccose 
tomentum. Root of thick fibres. Radical-leaves one to one 
and a half inches long, ovate, elliptic-ovate, or ovate-cordate, 
acute or obtuse irregularly toothed, more or less contracted 

*** 1st, 1874. 



into the short petiole or not, dark green, rugose, and 
glabrous above, greenish-white beneath. Scape three to five 
inches high, rather stout; bracts few, scattered, linear, 
foliaceous. Heads solitary, one and a half to two inches in 
diameter, yellow. Involucre campanulate, sub-biseriate ; 
scales linear-subulate, green, with red purple tips, the inner- 
most close-set, with tips slightly spreading, base woolly. 
Ray-flowers about twenty, tube glabrous, very broadly linear- 
oblong, tip three-toothed; disk-flowers shortly five-toothed, 
teeth obtuse erect. Style-arms truncate. Achene short, 
smooth, eveD, glabrous ; pappus white, rather rigid, exceeding 
the involucre. — /. D. II 



Fig. 1, Ray-flower ; 2, style-arms of ditto ; 3, disk-flower ; 4, style-arms : — 
all magnified. • 



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61C2 







Tab. 6102. 
SAXIFRAGA florulenta. 

Native of the Maritime Alps. 



Nat. Ord. Saxifkagace^e. — Tribe Saxifrageje. 
Genus Saxifkaga, L. ; (Benth. $ Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 635). 



Saxifraga (Euaizoonia) florulenta ; foliis omnibus basalibus numerosissimis 
rosulatis confertis spathulatis coriaceis mucronatis glabris margine car- 
tilagineo setacco-ciliato apicem versus integerrimo, caule florifero erecto 
thyrsoideo fistuloso hirsuto, bracteis linearibus, pedunculis unifloris 
rarius bifloris erectis apice cernuis inferioribus longioribus, bracteolis 
sub flores fere 2 lanceolato-linearibus, calycis glanduloso-hispidi tubo 
obconico ovario adnato, lobis lanceolatis mucronulatis erectis, petalis 
atque staminibus duplo longioribus spathulatis obtusis 5-nerviis, stylis 
tribus capitatis staminibus sequilongis. 

Saxifraga florulenta, Moretti Tent. Sax., p. 9 ; Seringe in DC. Prodr., 
vol. iv. p. 20; Bertolon. Misc. Bot., xxi. p. 14, t. 2 ; Engler Monog. der 
Gatt. Saxifr., p. 248 ; Eegel Gartenfi. 1874, p. 2, t. 782. 



This striking and extremely local species was first dis- 
covered about the year 1820 (in the Alps of Fenestra) by an 
English tourist, who forwarded specimens to Professor 
Moretti of Pavia. It was rediscovered in the same locality 
in the year 185G, since which time it has been found in 
numerous distinct habitats. It appears to be tolerably abun- 
dant at an altitude of from 7000 to 9000 feet within a limited 
area of about eight miles square, in the higher regions of the 
watershed of the Maritime Alps, between the Col du Tenda 
and the valley of the Tinea north of Nice, on cliff faces and 
precipitous ravines facing the north. Mr. G\ Maw, to whom 
we are indebted for the specimen figured, informs me that it 
mostly grows in single rosettes, some of which are six or 
seven inches across j they are generally found under an over- 
hanging ledge protected from the drip and direct rainfall, the 
rosette turning downwards, and never exposed to the sun. 
-The plant was first introduced alive to this country by Mr. 
Moggndge. Its cultivation is extremely difficult, from the 
all but impossibility of obtaining well-rooted plants. It is an 
June 1st, 1874. 



extremely shy bloomer ; it probably lives to a great age before 
flowering, after which it dies. It seems entirely to fail under 
pot culture, but Mr. Maw informs me that M. Boissier has 
succeeded in growing it by wedging the rosettes firmly 
into the crevices of a brick wall with a northern exposure. 
Mr. Ellacombe has found it intolerant of frost at Bitton, near 
Bristol. 

Descr. Rosettes five to seven inches in diameter, concave, 
becoming convex at the time of flowering, bright green. 
Leaves three-quarters of an inch to two inches long, inner- 
most shortest, very numerous, densely imbricated, spathulate, 
mucronate, margin cartilaginous, with setaceous cilia below, 
entire towards the apex. Inflorescence a narrow thyrsoid 
panicle with a fistulose rachis, five to twelve inches high, 
more or less densely hairy; bracts linear- spathulate ; 
peduncles 1-2-flowered, with one or two linear-lanceolate 
bracteoles. Flowers half an inch long, slightly nodding. 
Calyx obconical, densely clothed with gland-tipped hairs ; 
lobes lanceolate, mucronulate. Petals pale lilac, twice as long 
as the calyx-lobes and stamens, spathulate, obtuse, 5 -nerved. 
Ovary three- celled ; styles capitate. Capsule globular. — 
W.T.T.D. 



Fig. 1, Leaf of a rosette; 2, do. back; 3, transverse section; 4, flower; 
5, do. calyx, limb, and petals removed ; 6, transverse section of ovary : — 
all magnified. 



103 







Tab. 6103. 

CROCUS CAN CELL ATUS. 

Native of Greece and Asia Minor. 



Nat. Ord. Iride^:. — Tribe Ixie^:. 
Genus Crocus, Tourn.; (Klatt in Linncea, vol. xxxiv. p. 674). 



Crocus cancellatus ; cormis mediocriter globosis, tunicis reticulata fibrosis 
brunneis demum in fibras setiformes perianthii tubi basim circumdantes 
solutis, areolis elliptico-oblongis, foliis post anthesin evolutis 6-8-po lli- 
caribus, vaginis lata raembranaceis, spatha bivalvi vel monophylla, 
involucro, perianthii tubo albido vel pallide lilacino, segmentis albis, 
vel lilacinis purpureo striatis ellipticis acutiusculis, fauce lutea lew, 
antheris aureis filamentis levibus longioribus, stigmatibus croceis multi- 
fidis antheras superantibus. 

Crocus cancellatiis, Herbert in Bot. Mag. sub t. 3864; Journ. Sort. Soc., 
vol. ii. p. 276 ; Baker in Gard. Chron., 1873, p. 1553. 

C. Schimperi, Gay in Schimp. PI. Cephal. exsic. 

C. Spruneri, Boiss. fy Heldr. Diagn., vii. p. 103. 

C. mazziaricus, Herb. Bot. Reg. 1845, Misc., p. 3; Bot. Reg., 1847, t, 16,f. 5 &6. 

C. dianthus, K. Koch in Linnaza, vol. xxi. p. 634. 

C nudiflorus, Sibth. £ Smith, Prodr. Fl. Grcec, p. 23 (excl. syn.). 



A well-known and beautiful species not apparently figured, 
except very ineffectively by Herbert. It is frequent in the 
Ionian Islands, Greece, Asia Minor, and reaches, it is said 
eastward to Armenia. In Greece it ascends to 4000 leet 
and in Taurus to the Alpine region. The curious reticulated 
coats, with a texture which recalls cocoa-nut fibre, especially 
in the prolonged bristle-like fibres surrounding the neck 
(similar to those met with in Albuca setosa or CMorogalum 
pomeridianum) distinguish this species from all the autumn 
flowering Crocuses. Amongst the spring-flowering species, 
coats of this kind are only found in C. rehcidatm and U 
msianus. The specimens figured were received from Cj. Wood, 
Esq., of Rochford, Essex, early in November, 1873. 

Descr. Corm globose, about one inch in diameter, clothed 
with coarse reticulated fibrous coats (not well represented m 

June 1st, 1874. 



the plate) prolonged above into loose bristle-like fibres. Leaves 
about seven, produced after the flowers (half their length in the 
plate). Perianth without an involucre ; tube slender, pale ; 
throat pale yellow ; limb three and a half inches in diameter, 
segments elliptic rather acute white with, reddish-purple 
streaks. Anthers shorter than the filaments. Stigma saffron 
coloured, divided into numerous segments. — W. T. T. D. 



Fig. 1, Reticulated coat of the corm ; 2, stigmas : — both magnified. 



6104 







Tab. 6104. 
CALANTHE curctjligoides. 

Native of Malacca. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^. — Tribe Vande^. 
Genus Calanthe, Br. ; (Lindl. Fol. Orchid. Calanthe). 



Calanthe (Eucalanthe) curculigoides ; foliis anguste ellipticis glabris scapo 
duplo longioribus, racemo cylindraceo denso, bracteis membranaceis 
caducis, labello trilobo, lobis lateralibus rotundatis, medio subpanduriform i 
acuto nervis quinque parallels, calcare uncinate, rostello longo setiformi 
faucem occludente. 

Calanthe curculitroides, Lindl. Gen. $ Sp. Orch., p. 251 ; Bot. Beg. 1847, 
t. 8; Fol. Orchid. Calanthe, p. 4; Walp. Ann., vol. i. p. 792 et vol. vi. 
p. 913; Wall. Gat., 7340. 

Styloglossus nervosum, Kuhl $ Hasselt ex Herb. Lindl; Breda Orch. Jav., 

t, 7: 

? AmbltCxLOTtis pulchra, Blume Bijd. 371. 

? Calanthe pulchra, Lindl. Gen. 4" Sp. Orch., p. 250. 



A native of Malacca, Penang, and Singapore, according to 
Lindley, who described it originally from specimens collected 
in the two latter countries by Wallich, and who afterwards 
figured it in the Botanical Register from a plant flowered by 
the Messrs. Loddiges of Hackney. In the latter work Dr. 
Lindley describes it as an undisputed novelty by reason oi its 
colour, which is pale dirty ochreous yellow in his figure, with 
much larger flowers than our plant, in which they are ot a 
rather bright orange. The flowers too are much more 
ringent in Lindley s figure and dried specimen, and the lip 
is more acute, but I can hardly think the species are different 
I have taken the two doubtful synonyms from the Botanical 
llegister, having no means of verifying them. .Lindley also 
gives Java as a habitat. . . i . i • 

Descr. Terrestrial. Leaves subradieal, distichous, sheathing 
at the base, narrowly elliptic or elliptic-lanceolate acute, with 
about six strong parallel nerves, deep green above, paler 
beneath. Racemes three to four inches long (or more), cylin- 



June 1st, 1874. 



drical, terminating a lateral scape about half the length of 
the leaves, and furnished with several brown sheathing 
scales. Bracts linear, membranous, brown, very fugitive. 
Flowers orange yellow, three quarters of an inch long, 
crowded ; pedicel one to three quarters of an inch. Perianth 
scarcely patent. Sepals oblanceolate, acute. Petals similar. 
Lip 3-lobed, about equalling the perianth; lateral lobes 
rounded, intermediate lobe subpanduriform, acute. Rostellum 
a slender style-like process half as long as the lip, and 
partially closing the mouth of the hooked spur. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, the same with the sepals and petals removed ; 3, lip, 
column, and base of ovary ; 4, pollinia : — all magnified. 



6105 




Tab. 6105. 
GREVILLEA fasciculata. 

Native of West Australia. 



Nat. Ord. Proteace^e. — Tribe Greville*:. 
Genus Grevillea, P. Br.; (Benth. Fl. Austr., vol. v. p. 417). 



Grevillea (Plagiopoda) fasciculata; frutex, ramulis pubescentibus, foliis 
pollicaribus sesquipollicaribusve sessilibus vel brevissime petiolatis 
oblongo- vel oblanceolato-linearibus acutis margine revolutis supra 
scabro-punctatis, racemis terminalibus axillaribusve sessilibus pauci- 
floris, perianthii pilosiusculi tubo basi gibboso sub limbo globoso 
reflexo, fauce pilis reflexis transverse barbata, disci valde obliqui glan- 
dula latissima truncata, ovario stipitato piloso, stigmate obliquo crasso 
concavo glabro. 

Grevillea fasciculata, R. Br. Suppl., p. 20; Meissn. in PI. Preiss., vol. i. 
p. 536 ; DC. Prodr. vol. xiv. p. 3G9 ; Benth. Fl. Austral., vol. v. p. 449. 
G. Meissneriana, F. Muell in Linncea, vol. xxvi. p. 357 ; Meissn. I.e. p. 860. 
G. aspera var. linearis, Meissn. in PL Preiss., vol. i. p. 537. 



A native of Western Australia, from King George's Sound 
to the Swan River. It was discovered on the south-west 
shore of the former place in 1829, by D. Baxter. The 
specimen figured was from a Swan River plant, flowered by 
Mr. Wilson Saunders, at Reigate, in May, 1878. 

Descr. A low and prostrate or erect shrub, attaining three to 
four feet. Branches slender, erect, more or less fasciculate, leafy, 
terete, youngest pubescent. Leaves three-quarters to one and 
a-half inches long, sessile, or very nearly so, acute, some- 
what variable in form from oblanceolate to linear-oblanceolate 
and linear, rather rigid with revolute margins, upper surface 
minutely scabrous -punctate, lower silky and pale brown. 
Racemes ox fascicles few-flowered, sessile, axillary and terminal 
on the lateral shoots. Flowers bright red with yellow tips, 
pedicels about half their length. Perianth a quarter to a 
third of an inch long, sac-like and gibbous at the base, con- 
tracted and revolute below the yellow limb, the tube furnished 
internally on the superior side with a transverse beard of 
June 1st, 1874. 



reflexed hairs below the contraction. Torus oblique, gland 
broad, truncate. Ovary very shortly stipitate, hairy. Style 
dilated upwards, somewhat exceeding the perianth, stigma 
very oblique glabrous fleshy concave and slightly hippo- 
crepiform.— W.T. T. D. 



Fig. 1, Leaf, under surface; 2, ditto, upper surface ; 3, flower, lateral 
view; 4, ditto, longitudinal section \—all magnified. 



GiCl> 




l<i*.kh 



MoomtB] 



Tab. 6106. 
LESSERTIA pebenkass. 

Native of Natal. 



Nat. Ord. Leguminoseje. — Tribe Galeo&E. 
Genus Lessertia, DC; (Benth. & Hook. J. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 503). 



LzssmriA pcrennans ; suffrutex, caulibus erectis virgatis valde striatis tenuiter 
puberulis, foliolis 7-10-jugis ellipticis elliptico-lanceolatisve utrinsecus 
serieeo-pubescentibus, racemia laxiusculis folia superantibus, floribus 
lilacmis, calyeis lobis attenuatis, legumine stipitato compresso oblique 
elliptico mucronato glabra, seminibus 3-4. 

Lessertia perennans, DC. Prodi:, vol. ii. p. 271 ; Han: * Sond. Fl. Cap., 
vol. ii. p. 216. 

All the species of the genus are natives of Southern Africa. 
The present one occurs in grassy places on the eastern side, 
from Albany to the Transvaal. The specimen figured was 
from a plant which flowered in the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, in 
July, 1873. 

Descr. Suffruticose with erect virgate strongly striate 
slightly pubescent fistular stems. Leaves imparipinnate, 
about two inches long, more or less silkily pubescent on 
both surfaces, and greyish, or rarely glabrate ; leaflets seven 
to ten pairs, very shortly petioluled, elliptic or elliptic- 
lanceolate, acute or mucronulate ; petiole about a quarter of 
an inch long ; stipules linear-falcate, membranous. Racemes 
rather lax, exceeding the leaves; peduncle one to three 
inches long. Pedicels rather longer than the flowers. Flowers 
a quarter of an inch long, reddish-lilac or white. Cdyx 
pubescent ; teeth narrowly triangular, gradually attenuate. 
Legumes about three quarters of an inch long, obliquely 
elliptic or oblong-elliptic, very shortly stipitate, compressed, 
membranous, 3-1-seeded— -//: T. T. D. 



* «g. 1, Leaflet; 2, I lower; 3, do. petals removed; 4, standard; 5, wing; 
<>» keel ; 7, ovary :— all magnified. 
June 1st, 1874. 



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6101 




I Fitch, del etiith 



riScjilaiP 



Tab. 6107. 
CHRYSANTHEMUM Catananche. 

Native of the Greater Atlas. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Anthemideje. 
Genus Chrysanthemum, L. ; (Benth. §■ Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii.p. 424). 



Chrysanthemum Catananche; perenne, subcsespitosum, sericeo-pilosum 
v. tomentosum, foliis radicalibus fasciculatis inajqualiter 1-3-ternatim 
sectis segmentis patentibus linearibus acntia obtusisve, petiolo linean, 
scapis adscendentibus superne nudis 1-cephalis, capitulo 1-2 poll, diam., 
involucri bracteis laxe imbricatis oblongis medio herbaceis late scanoso- 
marginatis nitidis, ligulis ad 25 latmsculis stramineis basi sanguineis 
obtuse 3-dentatis, disci floribus flavis, achasniis lineari-oblongis 10- 
costatis costis anguste alatis. 

Chrysanthemum Catananche, Ball in Trimen. Journ. Bot., 1873, p. 366. 



This, which is one of the most beautiful plants of the 
Greater Atlas, was discovered in 1871, by Messrs. Ball 
Maw, and myself, in valleys of that range at elevations of 
7000 to 9000 feet, flowering in May, and has since been 
cultivated both in Mr. Maw's garden, and at Kew, where 
it flowered for the first time in April of the present year. 
In its native country it forms patches of a silvery green hue, 
and of considerable size, in rocky valleys, and on mountain 
slopes exposed to the sun. The broad white mvolucral 
bracts are conspicuous for their silvery whiteness, hyaline 
texture, and transparency, relieved by a narrow purplish 
herbaceous central band ; their resemblance to the bracts ot 
Catananche has suggested the specific name. 

Descr. Rootstock stout, woody, branched, with often many 
heads. Leaves tufted, one to two and a half inches long, as 
well as the scape clothed with silky tomentum of a silvery 
green colour, petioled, irregularly 3-chotomously cut 
once twice or thrice into linear acute or obtuse spreading 
lobes; petiole slender, narrow. Scapes stout, ascendmg, 
three to six inches high, green. Heads solitary, one and a 
half to two inches across, pale yellow, the rays of duty 

july 1st, 1874. 



purplish hue outside towards the tip, and blood-red within 
at the very base ; disk of a darker yellow. Involucre cam- 
panulate; bracts imbricate, linear-oblong, scarious, white 
and transparent, with a purplish herbaceous median band. 
Ray-flowers about twenty-five, with a broad linear- oblong 
obtusely 3-toothed ligula and short glabrous tube ; style- 
arms oblong, obtuse ; achene linear, deeply 10-ribbed, ribs 
with narrow membranous wings ; pappus short, mem- 
branous, obliquely truncate. Disk-flowers slender, 5-toothed, 
glabrous, style-arms with broad truncate tips ; achenes 
narrow, like those of the ray but shorter ; pappus a short 
auricle — /. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Ray ; and 2, disk-flowers : — both magnified. 



6108 




Id etiith 



^AicffitBrookBD-ij-ti 



Tab. 6108. 

ERICA Chamissonis. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Ericaceae. — Tribe Ericej3. 
Genus Erica, L. ; {Benth. in DC. Prodr., vol. vii. p. 613). 



Erica (Melastemon) Chamissonis; erecta, ramosa, hirto-pubescens, foliis in- 
curvi-patentibus 3-nis £ poll, longis anguste linearibus dorso sulcatis, 
floribus numerosis in ramulis abbreviates terminalibus, pedicellis hirtis, 
bracteis minutis, calycis parvi segmentis acuminatis, corolla globoso- 
campanulata, lobis latis brevibus, staminibus inclusis filamentis brevibus 
glabris, antheris brevibus, loculis apice aubacutis lateraliter anguste 
criatatia poris amplis apices versus lateralibus, ovario hirto, stylo gra- 
cili, stigmato truncate 

Erica Chamissonis, Klotzsch in Herb. Reg. Berol. ex Benth. in DC. Prodr., 
vol. vii. p. 685. 

Many years ago the Cape Heaths formed a conspicuous 
feature in the greenhouses of our grandfathers, and in the 
illustrated horticultural works of the day, including this 
Magazine, wherein about 50 are figured. These have given 
place to the culture of soft- wooded plants — Geraniums, Cal- 
ceolarias, Fuchsias, &c. ; and the best collections of the 
present day are mere ghosts of the once glorious Ericeta of 
Woburn, Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Kew. A vast number of 
the species have indeed fallen out of cultivation, and a few 
easily propagated hybrids for decorative purposes are all that 
are to be seen of this lovely tribe in most of the best esta- 
blishments of England. No less than 186 species of Erica 
were cultivated at Kew in the year 1811, now we have-not 
above 50, together with many hybrids and varieties. Besides 
the fact of their going out of fashion, there have been two 
main causes for their present rarity ; of these the first and 
most conspicuous is bad treatment. As with Australian 
and other Cape hard- wooded plants, their culture is special, 
unknown to most gardeners of the present day, and they will 
not survive the promiscuous use of the water-pot and syringe, 
to which they are exposed if mixed up with many other things. 

july 1st, 1874. 



The second is, that very few collectors have been of late years 
in the Heath district of the Cape, which is almost confined to 
the narrow strip of country between the Western coast and 
the coast ranges, and where were the botanizing grounds of 
the collectors sent out at the beginning of the century. 

Erica Chamissonis is one of the few Heaths that extend 
eastward in South Africa, being found near Graham's Town 
in the Albany district, about 500 miles east of Cape Town, 
where it grows on rocky hills at an elevation of 2000 feet, 
flowering in October. Seeds of it were sent to the Eoyal 
Gardens by Mr. M'Owan. The plant here figured, raised 
from these, flowered in April. 

Descr. A shrub with slender leafy erect branches, all 
parts, except the corolla, clothed with short soft spreading 
hairs. Leaves about a quarter to a third of an inch long, 
ternate, spreading and incurved, sessile, linear, obtuse, grooved 
underneath from the recurvation of the margin. Flowers at 
the tips of short side-branches, solitary or three or four 
together, pendulous, rose-coloured, about a third of an inch 
in diameter ; pedicel half an inch long, pink, with two small 
basal bracts and two bracteoles above them. Calyx jointed 
with the pedicel, small ; teeth ovate, acuminate, much shorter 
than the corolla. Corolla between globose and campanulate ; 
lobes very short and broad. Stamens short, filaments gla- 
brous ; anthers short, with narrowly crested pointed cells 
and lateral slits near the tip. Ovary tomentose, 4-celled ; 
style slender, stigma truncate ; ovules many in each cell- 
—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Leaves; 2, flowers; 3, the same with the corolla removed; 4 and 
5, stamens; G, ovary; 7, transverse section of do. : — all magnified. 



em 




idethti. 



WuUrootaD^S*i»* 



Tab. 6109. 
ROMANZOFFIA sitchensis. 

Native of North- West America. 



Nat. Ord. Hydroleace^:. — Tribe Name.*;. 
Genus Romanzoffia, Cham. ; (Choisy in DC. Prodr., vol. x. p. 185). 



Romanzoffia sitchensis ; tota pilis crispulis aspersa, foliis reniformi-cordatia 

suborbiculatisve crenato-lobatis, cymis laxifloris. 
Eomanzoffia sitchensis, Chamiss. in Linncea, vol. ii. p. 609 ; Bongard Bat 

Stick, p. 41, t. 4; Hook. Fl. Bor. Am., vol. ii. p. 103; Ledeb. Flor. 

Boss., vol. iii. p. 181 ; Kegel Gartenji., vol. xxii. (1873) p. 33, t. 748. 



This very rare and interesting little plant, with the habit 
of a Saxifrage of the granulata group, is closely allied to the 
majestic Wigandia of our subtropical gardens, though so 
dissimilar in stature, habit, and general characters, and in 
coming from so different a climate and country. It is a 
native of a few distant spots over a very wide range of 
country in North- Western America, and has been gathered 
by very few collectors. First, by the late venerable Menzies, 
the Naturalist to Vancouver's voyage (and introducer of 
Araucaia imbricata) in May, 1793, who discovered a small 
slender variety of it on hanging rocks at Trinidad, in California, 
lat. 41° 10' N. ; next by Chamisso at Sitka in the then 
Eussian, but now American territory of Alaschka, fully 
1000 miles north of Trinidad, and by whom it was first 
described ; more lately it was gathered abundantly by Dr. 
Lyall on the Cascade Mountains, in lat. 69° N. in the bed 
of the Sallse river, and a large flowered variety (Kegel s 
B. grandiflora) on the same mountains, at an elevation of 1 000 
feet. Lastly we have specimens collected in South California 
(probably in the mountains), in lat. 35°, by Dr. Bigelow, 
surgeon to Lieutenant Whipple's exploration for a railway 
route across America in 1853-4 ; this is fully 1400 miles south 
of Sitka. 

Romanzoffia sitchensis is a rock -plant, easy of cultivation, 
July 1st, 1874. 



and was, I believe, introduced into Europe by Messrs. 
Haage and Schmidt, of Erfurt. The specimen here 
figured flowered in the Royal Grardens in April last. 

Descr. A weak, green, perennial-rooted, straggling, or sub- 
erect herb, four to eight inches high or long, more or less 
covered with scattered curled short hairs. Stems many from the 
root, branched. Leaves subradical, petioled, one to one and a 
half inches in diameter, orbicular-reniform, crenate-lobed, 
bright green, paler beneath ; petiole a half to one inch long. 
Cymes at the ends of the branches, few-flowered, ebracteate. 
Flowers variable in size, one-third to one-half inch in diameter, 
white ; pedicels slender, spreading. Sepals oblong-ovate, sub- 
acute. Corolla-lobes orbicular. Stamens attached to the base 
of the corolla-tube. Bisk annular. Ovary glabrous, style 
slender, stigma minute. — /. B. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, corolla laid open; 3, disk and ovary; 4, transverse 
Bection of ovary ; — all magnified. 



GIIC 




Tab. 6110. 
iris olbiensis. 

Native of Northern Italy and Southern France. 



Nat. Ord. iRiDACEiE. — Tribe Iride^e. 
Genus Iris, Linn. ; (Endl. Gen. Plant., p. 266). 



Iris olbiensis ; rhizomate crasso, caule brevi, foliis brevibus (2-6 poll.) lati- 
usculis acutis sensim acuminatis scapo brevioribus, floribus breviter 
pedicellatis magnis, spatha valvis membranaceis laxis abrupte acuminatis 
ovarium velantibus, perianthii tubo pollicari, limbi 3 poll, lati segmentis 
obovato-spathulatis decurvis apice rotundatis ungue barbato, interiori- 
bus iis sub&qualibus erecto-incurvis conniventibus elliptico-oblongis 
stipitatis, stigmatibus segmentis perianthii dimidio brevioribus bifidis 
lobis triangularibus acutis margine exteriore dentatis. 

Ibis olbiensis, He'non in Ann. Soc. Agric. Lyons; Gren. et Godr. Fl. de 
France, vol. iii. pt. i. p. 240 ; Parlatore Flor. Ital, vol. iii. p. 283. 



This belongs to a small group of dwarf Iris, which inhabit 
for the most part Southern Europe, and of which the I. 
pumila, L. (Tab. nost. 9, 1209 and 1261) may be taken as the 
type. It is a native of the South of France and North Italy, 
from Nismes eastwards, but apparently not advancing beyond 
Tuscany. It varies much in the colour of the flowers, which 
are sometimes white. It is distinguished from Lpumila by the 
much larger flowers, which are pedicelled and less fugacious, 
as also by the shorter perianth-tube. The /. italica of Par- 
latore appears to be only a variety of it; and it is represented 
by I. pseudo-pumila in Sicily. It is very closely allied to, if 
not a mere variety of the I. Chamaciris, Bertoloni, which has a 
wider range in France and Italy. The specimen here figured 
flowered in the Royal Gardens in April of the present year. 

Descr. Rootstock prostrate, very thick and fleshy, as big 
as the thumb. Leaves three to six inches long by one-third 
to two-thirds inch in diameter, erecto-patent, straight or some- 
what falcate, usually narrowed almost from the base to the 
acuminate tip, glaucous green. Scape rather larger than the 

Jult 1st, 1874. 



leaves, stout, erect, closely sheathed. Spathes one to two 
inches long, large and rather tumid, lax, obliquely truncate 
and acuminate. Flowers very large for the size of the plant, 
usually dark purple, three and a half to four inches across the 
perianth were it spread out ; pedicel short, stout. Perianth- 
tube longer than the ovary ; outer segments recurved, spathu- 
late-obovate, tip rounded, claw deeply bearded; inner seg- 
ments as long as the outer, erect and connivent, broadly 
elliptic-oblong with a narrow claw and cordate base. Stigmas 
not half the length of the inner perianth segments, their lobes 
triangular, acute, toothed at the outer edge. — /. D. M. 



Gin 




teentBrooteDariS-mtop 



Tab. 6111, 
CAMPSIDIUM chilense. 

Native of Chili. 



Nat. Ord. Bignoniace^:. — Tribe Bignonie^. 
Genus Campsidium, (Seemann in Bonplandia, vol. x. (1862), p. 147). 



Campsidium chilense; frutex volubilia glaberrimus, foliis oppositis impari- 
pirmatis, foliolis oppositis ellipticis v. ovato- v. elliptico- v. lanceolato- 
oblongis obtusis v. apiculatis integerrimis serratisve rachi antice sulcato, 
racemis terminalibus pendulis 6-10-floris, floribus coccineis gracile 
pedicellatis. 

Campsidium chilense ; Beiss $ Seem. ; ex Seem, in Bonplandia, vol. x. 
p. 147, t. 11 ; Gard. Chron., 1870, p. 1182, cum ic xylog. 

Tecoma Guarume, Hook, in Bot. Mag., t. 4896 in adnot. (non DC) 

T. valdiviana, Philippi in Linncea, 1857, p. 14. 

T. mirabilis, Hort. 

This very beautiful climber is a native of Chili and the 
Archipelago of Chiloe, and was discovered on the island of 
Huaffo by Dr. Eights, an American voyager, who sent a small 
collection of Chilian and Fuegian plants to Sir William Hooker 
some fifty years ago, amongst which is this plant. It lias 
subsequently been collected by many botanists, most recently 
by Br. Cunningham, naturalist to the surveying expedition 
of H.M.S. Nassau, who gathered it as far south as Wellington 
Island in lat. 40° S., where it would seem to be common. Its 
northern limit is probably Arique, near Valdivia, lat. 50° S., 
where it was found by Lechler. It is not a little remarkable 
that so beautiful a plant, and one found through so many 
degrees of latitude in Chili, should have escaped the obser- 
vation of C. Gay, whose Flora Chilensis, published in 1845, 
does not include it. The equally' conspicuous Berberidopsis 
corallina (Tab. nost. 5343) which, like Campsidium, is a 
native of the neighbourhood of the maritime capital of 
Valdivia, was also unknown to that author, though he spent 
many years exploring that country for the Chilian govern- 
ment. I am indebted to Messrs. Veitch for the plant here 
July 1st, 1874. 



figured, which flowered with them in April of the present 
year. 

Descr. A woody perfectly glabrous slender climber, 
ascending trees to a height of forty to fifty feet ; branches 
woody, angular, with pale yellowish bark, wood very hard. 
Leaves four to six inches long; leaflets three-quarters to one 
and a half inches long, sessile, usually five pairs and an odd 
one, elliptic-oblong or lanceolate, acute obtuse apiculate or 
emarginate, quite entire or serrulate, base equal or oblique, 
coriaceous, nerves very inconspicuous ; petiole grooved on the 
upper surface, sometimes faintly winged between the leaflets. 
Racemes terminal, pendulous, 6-10-flowered, peduncle short 
or long; pedicels slender; bracts small, linear-subulate. 
Flowers one and a half to one and three-quarters inches long. 
Calyx green, campanulate, shortly 5-lobed ; lobes triangular, 
acute. Corolla scarlet ; tube rather ventricose ; lobes small, 
rounded, toothed, hairy inside towards the margins. Stamens 
four inserted towards the base of the corolla-tube, filaments 
slender, hairy at the base; anthers oblong-linear, acute, those 
i a a tW ° longer stamens exserted, and of the shorter in- 
cluded. Disk elevated, cupular. Ovary flagon-shaped, glabrous, 
narrowed into the stout style; stigma of two oblong lobes ; 
cells two, with two placentas inserted on the septum in each; 
ovules very numerous. Capsule 2-valved, three to four inches 
long, narrowly elliptic- oblong ; valves coriaceous with a 
removable papery endocarp. Seeds not seen.—/. D. H. 



ovfrvn!^ 1 T rWi , t , hCOr ° llaremoved 5 2, corolla laid open; 3, anther; 4, 
ovary and disk :— all magnified. 



Tab. 6112. 

PYRUS BACCATA. 

Native of Siberia, Japan, and the Himalaya Mountains. 



Nat. Ord. Eosace^:. — Tribe Pomeje. 
Genus Pykus, L. ; (Benth. §■ Hook.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 626). 



Pyeus (Malus) baccata ; foliis ellipticis elliptico-ovatisve acutis acuminatis v. 
caudato-acuminatis serrulatis glabris eglandulosis, petiolo gracili, floribu3 
umbellatis albis, pedicellia gracilibus, calycis tubo ovoideo lobis lanceo- 
latis intus villosis, petalis leviter concavis albis, stylis ad 5 glabris, 
porno globoso apice (cicatrice calycis deciduo) late areolato. 

Pyeus baccata, Linn. Mant., 75; Pall. Fl. Ross., vol. i. p. 23, t. 10; DC. 
Prodr., vol.ii. p. 635; Led. Fl. Ross., vol. ii. p. 97; Loud. Arboret.,\o\. 
ii. p. 892 ; Koch Dendrol, vol. i. p.. 210; Regel Gartenfl., vol. ii. (1862) 
p. 201, t. 364 ; Brandis For. Flor. of N.W. India, p. 205. 

Malus baccata, Desf. Arb., vol. ii. p. 141. 



This charming tree, though so long known in cultivation, 
has never before been well figured in this country. It has a 
very wide distribution ; in Siberia it occurs in the eastern 
districts of Lake Baikal and in Dahuria ; thence it passes by 
the Amur river north of China into Japan, whence we have 
numerous specimens. In the Himalaya it extends from the 
Indus to Kumaon, at elevations between 6000 and 11,000 
feet, entering the Tibetan region of Piti ; and it was gathered 
by Br. Thomson and myself in the Moflong woods of the 
Khasia mountains, at an elevation of 6000 feet. It varies 
very much as to the pubescence of its parts ; the Siberian 
and Japanese specimens being almost wholly glabrous ; the 
Western Himalayan having more or less pubescent calyces, 
pedicels and petioles, and sometimes young leaves beneath ; 
whilst those from the dry region of Piti, on the border of 
Tibet, are as glabrous as the Siberian ; and those from the 
very wet region of the Khasia are the most pubescent of any. 
This correlation of humidity with pubescence is not unusual 
m the vegetable kingdom. 

The figure of JP. baccata is taken from Kew specimens, 

July 1st, 1874. 



where the species was introduced in 1784; though whence 
the plant here figured came is uncertain ; it will be remarked 
that it has a pubescent calyx-tube like the Himalayan forms. 
Descr. A small tree, with grey cracked bark, and round 
crown. Leaves one and a half to three and a half inches 
long, usually elliptic, acute or acuminate, finely serrate, 
glabrous, rarely pubescent beneath; petiole as long, very 
slender, glabrous, and as well as the petioles, pedicels and 
calyx, sometimes pubescent. Flowers umbelled, one and a 
half inches in diameter ; pedicels slender. Calyx-tube ovoid ; 
lobes lanceolate, deciduous. Petals white, rather concave, 
spreading. Stamens numerous. Styles 5, nearly free, glabrous 
or woolly at the base. Fruit size of a large cherry in cultiva- 
tion, smaller in a native state, globose, deeply intruded at the 
base, with a broad apical areole, austere, scarlet and greenish 
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Fig. 1, Calyx and styles : — magnified. 



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are as follows : — 

Tab. 6113. Crinum Moorei, Hook. /—Native of South 
Africa. 

„ 6114. Brachysema undulatum, Ker. — Native of 
Western Australia. 

„ 6115. Decabelona elegrans, Deccaane. — Native of South 
West Africa. 

„ 6116. Kniphofia Eooperi, Lew. — Native of South 
Africa. 

„ 6117. Achillea ageretifolia, Hook. /. — Native of 
Greece. 



6m 




Tab. 6113. 
CRINUM Mookei. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Amaryllide^. — Tribe Amarylleje. 
Genus Crinum, Linn. ; (Herbert Amaryllid., p. 242). 



Crinum Moorei ; bulbo pedali anguste ovoideo collo elongato, foliis ampli8 
4-poll. latisensiforimbus obtuse acuminatis striato-nervosis, scaporobusto, 
spathis late oblongo-lanceolatis herbaceis recurvis, pedicellis brevibus, 
perianthii tubo 3-pollicari, limbi 6-poll. diam. rosei segmentis late 
ellipticis apicibus incrassatis herbaceis, antheris flavis. 



A hardy Crinum is a rarity in English gardens, and except 
the beautiful C. capense, I know no other but this now in 
open air cultivation ; and beautiful as C. capense is, it is far 
exceeded in size, foliage, and colour by the subject of the 
present plate. 

Crinum Moorei was introduced into the Glasnevin Gardens 
in 1863, by a friend of Dr. Moore's, Mr. Webb, who had 
served on the commissariat staff of our army in South Africa, 
and had brought the seeds from the interior— as Dr. Moore 
thinks— of Natal. During the last five years the specimen 
from which the drawing was made has been planted in a 
border fronting the conservatory range at Glasnevin, without 
getting the slightest protection, flowering sometimes in 
autumn and at other times in spring. The leaves are cut up 
in the winter, but the bulbs are not seriously hurt, and soon 
recover themselves, when they push out a fresh set of their 
broad, peculiarly-ribbed leaves, eighteen to twenty inches long. 
The bulb is remarkably long, sometimes reaching eighteen 
inches. 

A closely allied species to this is the C. Colensoi of Natal, 
which will shortly be figured, which has also broad leaves and 
a long bulb, but the perianth-tube is much longer, and the 
flower smaller, with a narrower pale limb : it has been flowered 
by Mr. Bull and others, and may, we hope, also prove hardy. 

AUGUST 1st, 1874. 



Descr. Bulb twelve to eighteen inches long, narrow ovoid 
contracted into a long neck. Leaves twelve to eighteen 
inches long by four broad, very numerous, erecto -patent, ensi- 
form, with obtuse herbaceous tips, closely striated with strong 
nerves, deep bright green. Scape taller than the leaves, as 
thick as the thumb, green. Spat/ies six inches long, oblong- 
lanceolate, subacute, concave, herbaceous, reflexed. Floioers 
six to eight in a head, sessile or very shortly pedicelled. 
Ovary one inch long. Perianth-tube three inches long ; limb 
four inches in diameter, very broadly campanulate, bright 
rose-red ; segments spreading nearly from the base, broadly 
elliptic, with a callous green obtuse tip. Stamen one and a 
half inch long ; anthers half an inch long, yellow. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Reduced figure of whole plant. 



6114 







Tab. 6114. 

BRACHYSEMA undulatum. 

Native of South- Western Australia, 



Nat. Ord. LEGUiiiNOSiK. — Tribe PoDALYRTEiE. 
Genus Brachysema, Br. ; (Benth. fy Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. i, p. 467). 



Brachysema undulatum ; frutex erectus, ramulis foliisque eubtus sericoe- 
pubescentibus v. glabratis, foliis aiternis subsessilibus polymorphis late 
oblongis ellipticis ovatia linearibusve obtusis coriaceis, floribus 1-3 
pedicellatis interdum racemosis, calyce late urceolato campanulato 
sericeo, lobis subacutis, vexillo cordato, alis carina? sequilongis breviore 
reflexo, ovulia 15-20, legumine basi disco interiore cincto, ovoideo 
crustaceo piloso. 

Brachysema undulatum, Ker in Bot. Beg. t. 642 ; DC. Prodr., vol. ii, p. 
105; Lodd. Bot. Cab., t. 778 ; Bentli. Fl. Austral, vol. ii. p. 11. 

B. melanopetalum, Muell. Fragm., vol. iv. p. 11. 

Chorozema sericeum, Smith in Trans. Linn. Soc, vol. ix. p. 253. 

Podolobium? sericeum, DC. Prodr., vol. ii. p. 103. 

Oxylobium ? sericeum, Benth. in Ann. Wien. Mus., vol. ii. p. 70. 



A long known, but rare and curious greenhouse plant, 
remarkable for the dark violet-blue hue of the flowers, which, 
however, in native specimens, vary to lilac and pink. It has 
a wide range in Western Australia, from King George's 
Sound to Champion Bay, and occurs under three principal 
forms : — 1. With broad leaves, very silky beneath, with waved 
margins, and usually solitary flowers ; 2. With elliptic-oblong 
leaves, only slightly hairy beneath, hardly waved margins, 
and solitary flowers ; this is the B. melanopetalum of Mueller, 
and that figured here; 3. With linear leaves glabrous 
beneath having involute margins and racemose flowers. Of 
these the first is the common Swan-river form, and is also 
found at Champion Bay; the second comes from the Tone 
and Don rivers, and the third from the Tone, Gordon, and 
Blackwood rivers. 

Brachysema undulatum is a hard-wooded greenhouse shrub, 
requiring the same treatment as Chorozemas, &c. It was 

august 1st, 1874. 



raised by Mr. Bull, with whom it flowered in April of the 
present year. 

Descr. A shrub, four to six feet high; young branches 
calyx, pedicels, and usually the leaves beneath clothed with 
appressed silky pubescence. Stems and branches very slender. 
Leaves one to two inches long, very shortly petioled, from 
linear with margins recurved to orbicular with waved margins, 
tip apiculate or not base, rounded, coriaceous, glabrous and 
dark green above, paler and usually silky beneath. Stipules 
subacute, recurved. Flowers three quarters of an inch long, 
axillary, solitary or two or three together, shortly pedicelled 
or racemose. Calyx broadly campanulate with an urceolate 
gibbous tube ; lobes short, broad, subacute. Petals about 
twice as long as the calyx, dark purple, yellowish-green, or 
red ; standard reflexed, cordate, shorter than the oblong obtuse 
wings, which equal the obtuse keel. Ovary hairy, many- 
ovuled. Pod short, ovoid, crustaceous. — /. D. II. 



Ficr. 1, Flowers; 2, standard ; 3, wing petal ; 4, keels ; 5, ovary '—all 
magnified. 







rootoW 



Tab. 6115. 
DECABELONE elegans. 

Native of Angola. 



Nat. Ord. Asclepiadace^e. — Tribe Stapeli^e. 



Gen. Char. — Calyx brevis, 5-partitus, foliolis acuminatis,glandulisherbaceis 
acutis interdum introrsum interpositis. Corolla anguste campanulata, 
lurida ; tubo externe striis fnaculisque brunneo-purpureis consperso, 
interne pilis papillaaformibus deflexis instructo ; Umbo 5-fido, lacinns 
acutis, deltoideis, paidlo revolutis. Gynostegium imo tubo conditum. 
Coronas staminece lacinise 5, submonadelphae, alte bifidse, in fila gracilhma 
apice capitato-incrassat£e attenuata?. Anthera? ovatae, obtusav dorso ap- 
pendice ligulata incumbente ; massas pollinis horizontals^ cornpressae, 
subreniformes, funiculo appendice membranacea lineari munito. Stigma 
muticum, disciforme.— Herbse stapeliceformes Africa; australis praicijmm 
tropica; incolas. 

Decabeloxe elegans ; caulibus ramisque stapeliaefbrmibus angulato-costatis, 
costis saapissime 6 spinosis, spinis setis lateralibus duabus erectis armatis, 
floribus vel e ramulorum axillis vel ad fundum inter costas ortia, corona! 
staminege laciniis basi connatis albis, sursum in fila bina capitata atro- 
violacea gracillima attenuatis. 

Decabeloxe elegans, Dene, in Ann. Sc. Nat. 5 e ser. t. xiii. p. 404, pi. 2. 



During the month of June of the present year this ex- 
tremely interesting plant flowered for the first time in 
England, in the collection of J. T. Peacock, Esq., of Sudbury 
House, Hammersmith. A few weeks later flowers were also 
produced by plants in the Royal Gardens, Kew. 1 he plate 
has been drawn from Mr. Peacock's specimen, a compliment 
which is no more than is due to the zeal and enterprise wlncli 
he has shown in the cultivation of succulent plants. His 
plant has been grafted on a Stapelia, probably S. Flantn. it 
was obtained from Herr Pfersdorf, under the name of Veca- 
belone Sieberi, but it appears to be identical with the plant 
described and figured by Decaisne, which was also obtained 
from the same cultivator, though the precise native origin 

was unknown. . .-, i 

The Kew plants were obtained direct from Angola, tnrougii 
the aid of Mr. Monteiro, to whom botanical science is under 
many obligations in elucidating the still little known Mora 
of that country, and was found by him at Ambnz, about 
three miles from the sea, in sand, near a salt marsh or Hat. 
august 1st, 1874. 



The Kew Herbarium contains a specimen collected twenty 
years ago, at Loanda, by Dr. Welwitsch, who appears to have 
been disposed to constitute it a new genus, but subsequently 
referred it to Huernia. He notes that in habit it is " late 
csespitosa." 

The Eoyal Gardens, Kew, is also the fortunate possessor of 
specimens, both living and in spirit, as well as of drawings 
and analyses from His Excellency Sir Henry Barkly, Dr. Shaw, 
and Mrs. Barber of a second species, from Little Namaqualand. 
It is closely allied to D. elegans, the flowers being extremely 
similar, but the branches appear to have more numerous 
angles, and the two lateral setae of the spines are more slender, 
and deflexed instead of erect. I am indebted to Professor 
Thiselton Dyer for the accompanying revised description of 
the genus and of this species. 

Descr. Stems succulent; leafless, caespitose, four to six 
inches high, strongly angled, the angles furnished with 
patent spinous processes, each bearing two lateral erect barb- 
like setae. Flowers produced according to Decaisne from the 
axils of the branchlets, but apparently also from the branches 
themselves between the spinous angles. Flowers sub-erect (the 
pendent habit given in the plate is due to the plant having 
been grafted) ; pedicels one-third of an inch, accompanied by 
one or two membranous acute bracteoles. Calyx 5-lobed, lobes 
one third to half an inch long, linear-deltoid, acuminate 
with a small linear herbaceous appendage arising between 
each pair of lobes on the inner side. Corolla narrowly cam- 
panulate, 5-lobed, tube externally marked with brownish- 
purple streaks and spots on a lurid yellow ground, internally 
furnished with numerous papilla-like deflexed processes and 
hairs ; lobes deltoid, acute, slightly revolute. S/am'nial-crown 
5-fid; segments connate at the base, oblong, white, deeply 
bifid, each tapering into two filiform capitate dark violet 
processes, becoming ultimately flaccid and entangled. Anthers 
broadly ovate, obtuse, with a dorsal incumbent ligulate 
appendage ; pollen-masses horizontal, compressed, obovato- 
ensiform with a short funiculus furnished with a linear 
membranous appendage at the base, where it is attached to 
the stigmatic gland. Stigma disk-like. 



Fig. 1, Spinous process from branch viewed from above (magnified) ; 2. 
longitudinal section through corolla (not size) ; 8, longitudinal section 
tnrough gynostegium— the posterior pair of pollen-masses is represented 
displaced {magnified); 1, andrcecium viewed from above '(magnified); 
0, pair oi pollen-masses (magntJUd). 



Tab. 6116. 
KNIPHOFIA Rooperi. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Tribe Aloine^e. 
Genus Kniphofia, Mcench. ; (Bndl. Gen. Plant., p. 143). 



Kniphofia Rooperi ; acaulis, foliis elongato-ensiformibus If poll, latis alte 
carinatis tenuiter cartilagineo-serrulatis, scapo valido, bracteis caulinis 
paucis brevibus e basi lata semiamplexicauli subulatis, racemo ovoideo- 
oblongo, perianthii recti 1-| pollicaris lobis brevibns obtusis, bracteolis 
latis, filamentis demum exsertis. 

Kniphofia Rooperi, Moore in Gard. Comp., vol. i. p. 113 (Tritoma) ; Lemaire 
Jard. Meur., t. 362 ; Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc, vol. xi. p. 363. 



This is very nearly allied to the well known K. abides, 
{K. Uvaria, Tab. 4816, Tritoma Uvaria, Tab. 753), and may 
perhaps prove to be a late flowering variety of it ; in which 
opinion I am strengthened by Mr. Baker, who has mono- 
graphed the genus in the Linnean Journal. The chief 
character by which this was distinguished, namely, the in- 
cluded stamens, does not hold good, as the plate shows ; 
better ones may be found in the paler, less curved flower, in 
the form of the bracteoles, and in broad rich glaucous leaves. 

Of the fourteen species enumerated by Mr. Baker, seven have 
been figured in this country from cultivated specimens; namely, 
1. K. aloides, mentioned above, which was introduced in 1707, 
according to the Hortus Kewensis, and probably much earlier 
into Europe, as it is mentioned in Stapel's Theophrastus as 
'' Iris Uvaria promontorii Bonse spei ;" 2. K. pracox, Baker, 
(Saund. Eefug. Bot. t. 168) ; 3. K. Burchellii, Kunth (Bot. 
Reg. t. 1745); 4. K. pumila (Tab. nost. 764); 5. K. 
sarmentosa (Tab. nost. 744, Iris media) ; 6. K. caulescent 
(Tab. nost. 5946), and the present plant. Ml are probably 
hardy, and require protection only during very severe winters ; 
indeed, it is to the latter cause alone that can be attributed 
the loss during half a century of so conspicuous and easily 
grown a plant as K. aloides, which reappeared in cultivation 

AUGUST 1st, 1874. 



not very many years ago. K. Booperi is a native of British 
KafFraria, whence it was sent to England by Capt. Rooper, 
whose name it bears. The specimen here figured flowered 
with Mr. Wilson Saunders in November of last year. 

Descr. Two feet high. Stem none. Leaves eighteen inches 
long by one and three-quarters broad, ensiform, gradually 
acuminate, deeply keeled, at the back dark green, not glaucous, 
margin serrulate. Scape very stout, a foot long ; bracts few, 
short, membranous, subulate from a broad semiamplexicaul 
base. Spike six to eight inches long, ovoid-oblong. Flowers 
densely crowded, about one and a half inches long, orange-reel, 
becoming yellow with age ; bracteoles broadly lanceolate, 
acute. Stamens at length exserted. — /. D. If. 



6i n. 




Tab. 6117. 

ACHILLEA AGERATIFOLIA. 

Native of Greece. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Anthemide^:. 
Genus Achillea, Linn. ; {Benth. $ Hook./. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. 419). 



Achillea (Ptarmica) agemtijhlia ; peronnis, cocspitosa, tota niveo-tomentosa, 
foliis radicalilms confertlS ]»atenti-rocurvis anguste lingnlato-lanceolatis 
npices versus dilatatis obtusis crenato-serratis crenis interdum bisenatis, 
caulinis ssepe basi dilatatis et pectinato-lobulatis, capituhs solitarns 
amplis, involucri hemispheric! squamis oblongis, paleis oblongo-lanceo- 
latis apice scariosis laceris, ligulis 2-seriatJs late oblongis 3-crenatis. 

Achillea ageratifolia, Benth. in Benth. et Hook./. Gen. PZ., vol. i. p. 420. 

Anthemis ageratifolia, Sibth. Prodr. Flor. Grcec, vol. ii. p. 191 ! FL Grcec, t 
t. 888 ; DC. Prodr., vol. vi. p. 12. 

? A. Aizoon, Griseb. Fl. Runel. et Byth., vol. ii. p. 210; Walp. Rep., vol. vi. 
p. 187. 

? A. Aizoides, Boiss. et Orphan. ?nss. 



This charming little plant is a native of the mountains of 
Greece, and was first detected (in Crete?) by Sibthorp, and it 
has since been gathered on the mainland, by Prot. Orphaniues, 
of Athens, in the middle region of Mount Olympus m 
Thessaly, at an elevation of 5-7000 feet. A very nearly allied 
plant, most probably a variety, is the ^ilicnm Aizoon ot 
Griesbach, a native of the mountains of Macedonia, which 
has also been gathered in the upper regions ot Mount 
Parnassus, at an elevation of 6-7000 feet, by Prot. 
Orphanides, and named by him and M. Boissier Mkmm 
Aizoides ; it differs in the smaller size, shorter more spathu- 
late leaves, which show no signs of double crenature. Both 
are obviously species of Achillea, having compressed achenes, 
quite different from those of Anthemis, of which they have 
more the habit. , „, n 

Lindley, in the ninth volume of Sibthorp s Flora Gneca, 
observes correctly, that this is not the lepidophorum repandum, 

august 1st, 1874. 



as suspected by De Candolle ; he describes it from very im- 
perfect specimens, which he found in Sibthorp's herbarium, 
along with Gnapkalium luteo-album, from Crete. It appears to 
me so unlikely that these plants should have grown together, 
that I suspect some confusion of habitat, and that Sibthorp 
did not collect his plant in Crete, where no one has found 
it, but on Mount Olympus, which he visited, and where he 
could not well have missed finding it. 

The Eoyal Gardens are indebted to Mr. Niven, of the 
Hull Botanic Gardens, for living plants which flowered at 
Kew in May. 

Descr. Covered with white soft tomentum. Boots woody. 
Stems many, short, tufted. Leaves spreading, recurved ; 
radical one to one and a half inches long, linear-lingulate, 
obtuse, pectinately crenate, crenatures often in two series; 
cauline linear, obtuse or subacute, base at times dilated and 
pectinate. Floioering -stems six to ten inches high. Heads 
solitary, one to one and a quarter inches diameter,' white with 
a pale yellow disk. Involucre hemispherical \ scales with broad 
very obtuse scarious margins ; palea? linear-lanceolate with 
scanous toothed tips. Bay-flowers in two series, broadly 
oblong, with three toothed tips and a winged tube. Bisk- 
flowers with a winged lower half of the tube. Achenes 
obovate, flattened, winged. — /. D. H. 



Fig. J, Leaf; 2, flower of ray; 3, do. of disk -.—all magnified. 



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Late Vice-President of the Agri-Sorticultural Society of India. 



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6118 




Tab. 6118. 
iris tectorum. 

Native of Japan. 



Nat. Ord. Iridace^:. — Tribe Iride^!. 
Genus Iris, Linn. ; (Endl. Gen. Plant, p. 2G6). 



Iris tectorum; rhizomate crasso, caule elato, foliia pedalibus f-l| poll, latis 
Isete viridibus, scapo subcompresso foliis subaequante, spathis oblongis 
acutis herbaceis 3-valvibus, floribus 3-4 poll, diam., pedicello ovario 
aquilongo, perianthii tubo crassiusculo ore 6-glanduloso, segmentis 
crigpato-undulatis subsequalibus exterioribus lilacinis maculatis obovato- 
rotundatis reflexis ungue albido venis violaceis, crista laciniata, interiori- 
bus unicoloribus, filamentis complanatis, stigmatibus ligulatis superne 
dilatatis, segmentis grosse dentatis. 

Iris tectorum, Maxim. Diagn. brev. PI. Nov. Jap. Dec, viii. p. 563 ; Regd 

Garten- FL, vol. xxi. p. 65, t. 716. 

I. tomiolopha, Hance in Trimen Jour. Pot. JSf.S., vol. i. p. 229. 

I. cristata, Miq. Pro. FL Jap., p. 305, non Ait. 



Although the plant here figured came from Whampoa in 
China, where it was cultivated by Dr. Hance, Her Britannic 
Majesty's Vice-Consul at that port, there can be no question 
but that it is the Japanese Iris tectorum of Maximovicz, which 
grows in fields about Yokohama in Japan, and is likewise 
cultivated by the Japanese. It differs from Maximovicz's 
description, but not from native specimens, in having three 
spathes, which are acute or acuminate — characters which 
(with some others of foliage that are very variable) induced 
Dr. Hance to publish it as a new species, under the name of 
tomiolopha, in allusion to its cut crest. On the other hand it 
differs from Dr. Hance's description in the spreading inner 
perianth-segments, a character probably due to cultivation, 
as it occurs in the splendid Iris Kampferi var. Hendersoni, 
lately exhibited in the Eoyal Horticultural Society by 
Messrs. Henderson, and which is unquestionably a form of 
I. l&vigata, with a spreading perianth. With the North 
American /. cristata, to which it was referred by the late 

SEPTEMBER, 1874. 



Professor Miquel, it has no near affinity, but it has with the 
Himalyan I. decora, Wall., of Nepal. 

I am indebted to Mr. Bull for the specimen here figured, 
which was raised from seeds sent by Dr. Hance from his 
garden in Whampoa, and which flowered in April, 1874. 

Descr. Bootstock creeping, tuberous, annulate. Leaves 
about a foot long, by three-quarters to one and a quarter 
inches broad, ensiform, scarcely glaucous. Scape nearly terete, 
about as long as the leaves. Mowers three to four inches in 
diameter. Spathes three, herbaceous, green, erect, longer than 
the perianth-tube, acute. Pedicel about as long as the ovary. 
Perianth-tube one inch long ; outer segments one and a half 
inches broad, obovate, margin crisped and waved, pale lilac 
streaked with violet ; claw half as long as the limb, white ; 
crest running up the claw and half the limb, half an inch deep, 
white and lilac, deeply laciniate ; inner segments rather 
narrower than the outer, spreading, pale lilac, claw short. 
Stigmas half as long as the perianth-segments recurved, lilac, 
segments coarsely toothed. — /. I). II. 



6113 




^ i 



Tab. 6119. 
BOLBOPHYLLUM Dayanum. 

Native of Tenasserim. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^;. — Tribe Dendrobie^:. 
Genus Bolbophyllum, Thouars ; (Lindl. Gen. 4" £>P- Orchid., p. 47). 



Bolbophyllum Dayarmm ; rhizomate crasso cylindrico repente, pseudobulbis 
globoso-ovoideis sulcatis, folio oblongo obtuso crasse coriaceo-carnoso 
enervi costa subtus prominente floribus 2-3, 1 poll. diam. ringentibus 
in racemulo abbreviato subsessilibus, sepalis ovatis obtusis saturate 
viridibus purpureo-maculatis longe ciliatis, petalis multo minoribus 
lineari-oblongis acutis purpureis ciliatis, labelli parvi pallide viridis vix 
unguiculati lobis lateralibus parvis auriculseformibus crenulatis.terminali 
late oblongo obtuso crenato-dentato, disco cristis 3-elevatis centraljbus 
crenatis ornato, et utrinque intra cristas et margines seriebus 3 spinu- 
larum aucto, columna apice dentata. 

Bolbophyllum Dayanum, Reichb. f. in Gard. Chron., 1865, 434; Xenia 
Orchidacea, p. 128, t. 144. 



This singularly coloured species of Bolbophyllum was 
introduced by Mr. Day from Moulmein, and published in the 
Gardeners Chronicle for 1865, by Professor Keichenbach; and 
it has now again been sent to England by our old friend 
Mr. Parish, who has returned to the scene of his clerical and 
botanical labours, which he has resumed with his wonted 
energy and former success. It is very much to be wished that 
these might culminate in a general work from his pen on the 
Orchids of the Tenasserim provinces, that have proved such a 
mine of wealth in these plants, and for which Mr. Parish's 
special acquirements admirably suit him. As it is, Orchidology 
is falling into a hopeless condition, and but for the generous 
assistance of Professor Keichenbach, both cultivators and 
botanists would be very badly off indeed. A synopsis of the 
genera and species, or even a classified catalogue of these, with 
synonyms and habitats and references to publications, would 
be a boon to Botany and Horticulture. Of Bolbophyllum 
alone no less than eighty-four species were brought together 
by Prof. Keichenbach in the sixth volume of Walper's 

SEPTEMBER, 1874. 



" Annales," which professes to bring the subject down to 
1855 ; and who but Dr. Eeichenbach knows how many have 
been published since — and where ? 

Descr. Rhizome creeping, stout, as thick as a goosequill, 
smooth, woody, annulate. Pseudobidbs globose-ovoid, deeply 
channelled, with rounded ridges. Leaf shortly petioled, 
three to four inches long, by one quarter to two inches broad, 
thickly coriaceous, almost fleshy, oblong, tip obtuse, recurved ; 
midrib stout and convex below, deep green above, purplish 
beneath, nerveless. Flowers about three in a very shortly 
peduncled raceme or umbel from the base of the pseudobulb, 
one inch in diameter. Ovary curved, pedicel short, stout. 
Sepals spreading, ovate, obtuse, ciliate, with long spreading 
hairs, yellow-green, with six rows of dark purple spots. Petals 
about one quarter the size of the sepals, spreading, linear- 
oblong, obtuse, ciliate, purple with green edges. Lip very 
small, shortly clawed, pale purple edged with green, lateral 
lobes small oblong crenulate ; midlobe broadly oblong obtuse 
crenate, with three longitudinal crests in the disk, of which 
the lateral are raised towards the base into flat erect crenate 
plates ; there are also three rows of spinous processes on each 
side of the lip. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, sepal; 3, column and lip; 4, lip : — all magnified. 



6120 




Vn Fitct del et 



Sob, imj- 



Tab. 6120. 
CINNAMODENDRON corticosum. 

Native of the West Indies. 



Nat. Ord. Canellaceje. 
Genus Cinnamodendron, Endl. ; (Benth. §• Hook.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 121). 



Cinxamodexdron corticosum; glabcrrimum, foliis anguste elliptico-v. obovato- 
oblongis -lanceolatisve ssepe gibbis v. insequilateris obtusis v. subacute 
marginibus recurvis basi rotundatis acutisve, cymis panda axillaribus, 
sepalis 5 ovato-oblongis apice recurvis rotundatis, petalis 4-5 erectis 
oblongis, antheris 16-20. 

Cinnamodendron corticosum, Miers Contrib. to BoL, vol. i. p. 121, t. 24; 
Griseb. FL Brit. W.-Ind., 109. 



A well known West Indian tree, as the Mountain Cin- 
namon of Jamaica, or Canella bark of that island and St. 
Thomas, but not the true Brazilian plant of that name, which 
is its solitary congener, the 0. axillare of Endlicher. These 
two very distinct trees were indeed long confounded together, 
and their bark is still imported under the same name of 
Canella, and employed largely as an aromatic stimulant to 
purgatives and tonics, being reputed to be well adapted for 
debilitated stomachs. The Caribs (ancient natives of the 
Antilles) and the negroes of the present day employ it is a 
condiment. As an aromatic, Pereira says that it ranks 
between cinnamon and cloves. Mr. Hanbury informs me 
that the bark was exported during the last century as 
" Winter's bark" and is still found in the market ; as also that 
it is probably the " Wild Cinnamon tree of Sloane, commonly 
but falsely called Cortex Winteranus," though the tree that he 
figures Phil. Trans, xvii. 465, (1693) is certainly Canella alba. 
It is a local plant growing in Jamaica only in mountain 
woods of the parishes of St. Thomas in the Vale and St. 
John. 

In the following description I have followed the view of 
the nature of the outer floral whorls adopted in the Genera 
Plantarum, though more disposed to regard the outermost 

SSPTKMBER, 1X74. 



three organs as sepals, and the innermost four or five as 
staminal appendages. 

Descr. A small or large tree, fifty feet high, branched from 
the base, glabrous throughout; branches terete; bark aromatic. 
Leaves alternate, shortly petioled, four to five inches long T 
oblong-lanceolate, narrowed at both ends, subacute or obtuse, 
base rounded or acute, often very unequal- sided, one side 
bulging out above the middle, coriaceous, covered with pellucid 
dots, margins recurved, nerves 10-12 pairs, very slender, 
reticulations delicate ; petioles one quarter inch to one- third 
inch. Cymes axillary, very shortly peduncled, 6-8- flowered, 
quite glabrous. Flowers shortly pedicelled, one-third inch in 
diameter, orange-red, pedicels short, bracts at their bases 
deciduous. Bracteoles (or sepals) three, orbicular, green, 
ciliolate. Sepals (or petals) five, erect with recurved rounded 
tips, oblong- ovate, red. Petals (or staminal scales), four or five, 
erect, linear-oblong, unequal. Staminal column cylindric, 
5-lobed at the apex ; anthers sixteen to twenty, linear. Ovary 
seated in a cupular disk, obtusely 3-gonous, ovoid-oblong, 
obscurely contracted into a columnar style whose rounded 
apex is divided into three to five minute stigmatic lobes. 
Berry ovoid, half an inch long, many-seeded. Seeds ovoid, 
testa brown shining, albumen fleshy and oily; embryo 
linear. — /. D. II. 



Fig 1 Flower ; 2, the same with bracts and three sepals removed ,* 3 sta- 
minal column; 4, portion of do.; 5, disk and ovary; 6, transverse section of 
ovary : — all mini »; fid J ' ' 



ovary : — all magnified. 



6121 




«■ . 



Wfiui - 



TfacentBrO 



Tab. 6121. 
DROSERA Whittakerii. 

Native of South Australia. 



Nat. Ord. Droserace^:. 
Genus Drosera, Linn. ; {Benth. $■ Hook.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 662). 



Drosera Whittakerii; tubere globoso corticato cortice chartaceo fragih 
nitido, rhizomate erecto valido subterraneo, foliis rosulatis spathulato- 
obovatis viridibus crassiusculis, pilis glandulosis rubris elongatis, scapis 
brevibus 1-floria sepalisque elongatis viridibus eglandulosis, petahs 
obcordato-cuneatis albis, ovario globoso, stylis in lacinhs capillanbus 
capitellatis ad basim fissis. 

Droseba Whittakerii, Hook. Ic. PL, t. 375 ; Planch, in Ann. Sc. Nat, 
ser. 3, vol. ix. p. 202 ; Benth. Flor. Austral, vol. i. p. 462. 



This charming little plant was sent to the Eoyal Botanic 
Gardens of Edinburgh by Mr. W. A. Mitchell, formerly an 
employe in that establishment, where it was flowered by Mr. 
McNab in July last, and sent up to Kew for figuring, with a 
description by my friend Dr. Balfour, who observed that the 
sepals were reflexed, and the flowers an inch in diameter 
when well grown and expanded, a statement fully borne out 
by the dried specimens. The glandular hairs on the leaf are 
in all respects like those of D. longifolia, and act precisely in 
the same manner on being brought into contact with insects ; 
the leaf itself, however, does not become concave, but retains 
the remarkable convexity of surface of each half. 

Drosera Whittakerii \s a common Victorian and South Aus- 
tralian plant, and belongs to a group of very closely allied 
species, including D. bullosa, zonata and rosulata, all having 
tuberous roots, attaining a considerable size in the first named 
of these. Such sorts indicate a totally different kind of treat- 
ment to what answers in cultivation for D. rotundifoha and its 
allies; itindicates a resting season, preceded byone lor the ripen- 
ing of the bulb, and followed by a growing one in due course. 
The same remark applies to almost all terrestrial Australian 
Orchids, objects of inconceivable beauty and interest, but 
which have never been successfully kept in this country, 

DasCR. Leaves rosulate, very numerous., densely crowded, one 

SEPTEMBER, 1874. 



to one and a quarter inches long, one-half to three-quarters inch 
wide at the broadest part, obovate-spathulate, the petiolar 
part broad green, the blade tumid on the face on either side 
the mesial line, and studded with long red-brown glandular 
hairs, rather fleshy. Scapes several, about equalling the 
leaves, slender, erect and one-flowered, quite glabrous and 
not glandular. Flower one-half inch to one inch in diameter. 
Sepals oblong, obtuse, green, glabrous, eglandular. Petals 
obcordate-cuneate, white. Stamens quite hypogynous; anther- 
cells separated by the connective. Ovary globose ; styles 
split at the base into filiform capitate white filaments. — 
/. D. H. 



Fig. 1 and 2, Leaves ; 3, glandular hair of do. ; 4, flower ; 5, petal ; 6, 
top of pedicel, stamen, and pistil; 7 and 8, stamens; 9, ovary :— all 
magnified. 



em 




WRt/iddethih 



Tab. 6122. 
PENTSTEMON humilis. 

Native of the Rocky Mountains. 



Nat. Ord. Scrophularine^e.— Tribe Chelone^:. 
Genus Pentstemon, L'Her. ; (Benth. in DC. Prodr., vol. x. p. 320). 



Pentstemon humilis; glaberrimus, foliis radicalibus anguste lineari-lanceolatis 
ellipticis v. elliptico-spathulatis petiolatis integerriinis v. obscure crenatia 
acuminatis caulinis oblongis linearibusve, floribus racemosis breviter 
gracile pedicellatis, calycis lobis recurvis lanceolatis ciliatis, corolla 
semi-pollicari, tubo lente curvo modice inflate, limbo caeruleo 2-labiato, 
labii superioris lobis breviter oblongis inferioris late obovatis obtusia, 
filamentis glabris, antheranum loculis divaricatis, stylo piloso. 

Pentstemon humilis, Nutt. in Herb. Acad. Philad. ex A. Gray in Proc. 
Amer. Acad. Arts and Sc, October, 1862, p. 69; S. Watson Bot. 40th 
Parallel, pp. 220 and 454. 



The charming little plant here figured differs very much m 
stature and foliage from the indigenous specimens preserved 
in the Kew Herbarium, which are eight inches to a loot high, 
more robust, and have elliptic-ovate radical leaves, oblong- 
spathulate cauline ones, and flowers two-thirds of an inch long. 
All these, however, are differences of degree only, and I quite 
expect that older specimens of the cultivated plant will 
assume the stature and probably the foliage of the native 
ones. Add to these points the known variability of the 
species of Pentstemon, and that there is no other species to 
which the present bears any resemblance (except the foliage 
to the otherwise very different P. Mallii), and no doubt is 
left in my mind as to the identification of tins with PJtumihs. 

Pentstemon humilis was one of the indefatigable ft uttall s 
discoveries in the Eocky mountains, and it has since been 
gathered by the naturalists attached to various American and 
English Government-exploring expeditions, amongst others, 
by Dr. Lyall, of the Oregon Boundary Commission, who 
collected it at 7000 feet above the sea, between Fort Colville 
and the Eocky mountains, in 16C7. The plant here repre- 

3EPTEMBER, 1874. 



sented was sent for figuring by Messrs. Backhouse, of York, 
who flowered it in June last. 

Descr. Boot perennial, bearing many short branches. 
Leaves chiefly radical, from linear-lanceolate to elliptic-oval, 
obtuse acute or acuminate, coriaceous, quite entire, nerveless, 
glabrous. Flowering-stems six to twelve inches high, erect, 
with two or more pairs of linear-lanceolate or oblong leaves. 
Panicle of three or more whorls of shortly pedicelled flowers ; 
bracts herbaceous, ovate- lanceolate, acute. Flower half to 
two-thirds of an inch long, horizontal or drooping. Calyx 
small, glandular, pubescent or ciliate ; segments subulate- 
lanceolate, recurved. Corolla-tube moderately inflated, pale 
red dish -purple ; throat open, not folded \ limb 2-lipped, bright 
blue purple ; upper lip of two shortly oblong rounded lobes ; 
under of three shortly broadly obovate lobes. Filaments 
glabrous ; anther-cells divergent. Style hairy. — J. I). 11. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, base of corolla-tube, stamens and style : — all magnified. 



em 




Winch, deietitb 



Tab. 6123. 
BR0DIJ3A volubilis. 

Native of California. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^:. — Tribe Milled. 
Genus Brodi^a, Smith ; (Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc, vol. xi. p. 375). 



Brodi^a (Stropholirion) volubilis ; cormo globoso, foliis synanthiis carnoso- 
herbaceis 1-llpedalibus \-^ poll, latis, scapo volubili praslongo, spathis 
4-5 oblongo-lanceolatis, umbellis 15-30 floris, perianthio campanulato- 
infundibuliformi tubo subventricoso, segmentis suberectis obtusis, 
antheris sessilibus alatis, staminodiis ligulatis, ovario breviter stipitato. 

Brodijsa volubilis, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc, vol. xi. p. 377. 

Stropholirion californicum, Torrey in Bot. Whipple Exped., p. 149, t. 23 ; 
Benth. Plant. Hartweg, 339. 

Rupalleya volubilis, Moriere in Bull, Soc. Linn. Norm., viii. cum ic 
ex Bull. Soc. Bot. France, vol. xi. Bibl. 25. 

Dichelostehma californica, Wood in JProc. Philad. Acad., 1867, 173. 



It is not surprising that so remarkable a plant as this 
should have been erected into a genus j or that, considering 
the chaotic state of North American descriptive botany, it 
should have had two made on purpose for it ; or that it 
should in fact have been referred by name to three other 
genera before Mr. Baker, in his revision of the Liliacea, 
reduced it to its proper position as Brodieea, reserving for it, 
however, as a sectional name, Torrey's generic one of Stropho- 
lirion. For the justice of this view I would refer to our -plate 
of the floral structure of Brodiaa multifiora (Tab. 5JSJ), 
where it will be seen, that except by the twining scape, 
Stropholirion differs from that genus in no important par- 
ticular. . ., 

Brodiaa volubilis was discovered by Hartweg m tne 
Sacramento mountains, California, in 1846, and has since 
been found by various collectors in Sonora and other places. 
The scape sometimes attains twelve feet in length. 

The plant figured was raised and sent for figuring by 
Mr. Thompson, of Ipswich, in July of the present year. 

SEPTEMBER, 1874. 



Descr. Corm the size of a walnut. Leaves a foot long, 
narrowly linear-lanceolate, acuminate, trigonous, acutely keeled 
at the back, channelled in front, very pale green. Scape four 
to twelve feet long, twining amongst the branches of bushes, 
one quarter inch in diameter, green varied with pink. 
Umbel large, three to four inches in diameter, of very many 
(twelve to twenty) pedicelled rosy flowers ; pedicels a quarter 
to one inch long; spathes four or five, oblong-lanceolate, 
concave, shorter than the rosy pedicels, tipped with green. 
Flower three-quarters of an inch long. Perianth between 
campanulate and funnel-shaped ; tube 5-lobed, tumid ; seg- 
ments erect, ovate, obtuse. Anthers three, opposite the inner 
perianth lobes ; adnate to and winged by the broad filament 
behind it. Staminodes ligulate, notched, pubescent. Ovary 
shortly stipitate, ellipsoid 3-gonous.— /. D. R. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, vertical section of do. ; 3, staminode : — all magnified. 



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Tab. 6124 
tacca artocarpifolia. 

Native of Madagascar and Johanna. 



Nat. Ord. Taccace-e:. 
Genus Tacca, Forst. ; (Endl. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 159). 



Tacca artocarpifolia; data, foliis arnplig trisectis, segmentis petiolulatis 
1^-2 pedafibua pinnatifidis, laciniia pcdalibus 1-1£ poll, latis sensim acu- 
inin.it is, Bcapo elongato, iuvolucro (J-7-pliyllo, foliolis 4-8-pollicaribus 
caudato-acnminatis exterioribus deflexia angustioribus, interioribus 
laterioribus conniventibus erectis elliptico-lanceolatis, omnibus inte- 
gernmis v. exteriore 3-fido, pedicellis sterilibus pedalibus filiformibus, 
ovario turbinato alte 6-carinato, perianthio globoso. 

Tacca artocarpifolia, Seemann Flor. Vit., p. 101, in note. 



This very remarkable plant is a congener of the Ataccia 
cristafa of this work (Tab. 45S9), the genus Ataccia being 
now regarded as a synonym of Tacca, and of T. integrifolia 
(Tab. 14SS). It is a native of Madagascar and Johanna 
Islands, whence there are excellent specimens in the Hookerian 
Herbarium, from Mr. Justice Blackburn, Dr. Lyall, and 
W.T. Garrard. Its nearest ally is the well known T. pin- 
natifida, which, though one of the most widely cultivated and 
most useful plants in the Pacific Islands, has never yet been 
figured in any English botanical work ; nor, as far as we know, 
ever been introduced into this country. The tubers of T.pin- 
natifida afford the South- Sea arrowroot, said to be the best of 
all in cases of dysentery, and its starch is a favourite article 
of diet in the shape of puddings and cakes. 

The T. artocarpifolia has a tuberous root, and is, no doubt, 
as full of starch and as wholesome as T. pinnatifida. It 
flowered in the Eoyal Gardens in May of the present year, 
from roots received from Mr. Wilson Saunders in 1872. 

Bescr. Hoot tuberous. Leaves about three ; petiole two 

ieet long, stout, erect, cylindric, nearly as thick as a goose- 

<|uill, brown; base carved with thick sheathing wings; 

blade two to three feet in diameter, trisect ; segments stalked, 

OCTOBER 1st, 1^74. 



pinnatifid but not to the base ; pinnules three to four pairs, 
one and a half feet long, by one to one and a half inches broad, 
spreading, gradually narrowed into long acuminate points ; 
midrib stout, lateral nerves very slender, elongate, and run- 
ning parallel to the margins. Scape five to six feet high, as 
thick as the little finger, brown. Involucre of six to seven 
leaves ; outer narrow-lanceolate, five to six inches long, de- 
flexed ; inner erect, incurved, conniving, elliptic-lanceolate, all 
strongly nerved, green, caudate-acuminate. Flowers very nu- 
merous, pedicels one to three inches long ; sterile pendulous 
ones filiform, ten to twelve inches long, brown, grooved on one 
face. Ovary turbinate, with six strong keeled ribs, brown. 
Perianth glabrous, brown at the base, the rest green ; seg- 
ments broadly ovate, conniving, coriaceous. Stamens sessile. 
Stigma 3-lobed, lobes convex. Fruit six inches long, ellipsoid- 
oblong, 6-ribbed.— /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Reduced figures of leafing and flowering states ; 2, portion of leaf 
and 3, inflorescence : — of the natural size ; 4, flowers ; 5, the same with the 
perianth-segments removed ; 6, the same with 3 stamens removed showing 
the stigma : — all magnified. 



6)25 
















WYuAdeieUUv 



Vuic'eilLtlriiok';;'.;, 



Tab. 6125. 
POGONIA DISCOLOR. 

Native of Java. 



Nat. Ord. Okchide^. — Tribe Arethuse,e. 
Genus Pogonia, Juss. ; (Lindl. Gen. et Sp. Orchid., 413). 



Pogonia discolor; folio breviter petiolato rotundato-cordiito-multinervio 

discolori supra et subtus adnervos rufo-setoso, scapo subbifloro bracteis 

spathaceis occulto, sepalis petalisque consimilibus linearibus acuminata 

pallide fusco-viridibus, labello obcordato-2-lobo albido. 

P. discolor, Blume Mus. Bot. Lugd.-Bat, vol. i. p. 32; Coll. Orchid. 

Archip. Ind. et Jap., 152, t. 57, f. 1 ; Miquel Fl. Ind.-BaL, vol. m. 

p. 716. 

Kiphostemon discolor, Blume Flor. Jav. Pros/., vol. vi. ; Lindl. Gen. et 

Sp. Orchid., p. 453. 
Cordyla discolor, Blume Bijd., p. 417. 



The species of Pogonia have usually little to recommend 
them for horticultural purposes ; but to this there are excep- 
tions, especially amongst the Indian species, some of which 
that have been cultivated at Kew present, like that here 
figured, beautifully coloured and marked leaves that per- 
sist for many weeks, and attract the attention of the most 
ordinary observer. All have tuberous roots, often formed at 
the end of subterranean cylindric fibres. It is not easy so 
to manage their culture as that the leaves, flowers, and new 
tubers should be successfully formed, and upon this their con- 
tinuance under cultivation depends. The present is closely 
allied to the common P. plicata of Bengal, which has a 
rose-coloured lip. Blume describes the lip of P. discolor as 
entire, but it is retuse in his drawing, and distinctly 2- 
lobed in our specimen. 

Pogonia discolor is a native of damp forests in the moun- 
tain region of Western Java, where it flowers in November. 
The specimen here figured was flowered by Mr. Bull, 10 
February last, and the leaf was fully formed in the following 
June. 

OCTOBER lbT, 1874. 



Descr. Boot of small spherical tubers. Leaf solitary, three 
to five inches in diameter, nearly horizontal, orbicular-cor- 
date, cuspidate, convex, membranous ; upper surface dark 
rufous green, often with paler blue-green blotches between the 
nerves, clothed with long rufous bristles which are disposed 
in lines along the principal and secondary nerves ; under 
surface pale dull purple, with bristles on the principal nerves 
only ; nerves radiating from the top of the petiole, eleven to 
sixteen, rufous above ; petiole half to one inch high. Scape 
solitary, two to three inches long, clothed with the loose pale 
dirty-green or purplish bracteal sheaths. Flowers in pairs, one 
and a half inches in diameter. Ovary turbinate, sharply angled, 
short, glabrous. Sepals and petals equal and similar, spread- 
ing, three-quarters of an inch long, linear, acuminate, dirty 
grey-green. Lip as long as the petals, white, with a green 
disk, convolute for nearly its whole length ; limb obcordate, 
2-lobed, erose; disk crested. Column erect, clavate, white. 
Pollen-masses oblong. — ,/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Side, and 2, front view of ovary and lip: 3 column: 4 and 5, 
pollen masses :— all magnified. 



Tab. 6126. 
lilium maculatum. 

Native of Japan and N.E. Asia. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Tribe Tumped. 

Genus Lilium, Linn. ; (Baker in Gard. Chron. 1871 ; Journ. ITort. Soc. 
N.S. vol. iv. p. 39). 



Lilium (Martagon) maculatum; glaberrimum, bulbo solitario squamis fusi- 
formibus apice articulatis, foliorum verticillis 1-3, foliis in verticillo 
4-20 lineari-lanceolatis ellipticisve obtusis v. obtuse acuminatis, racemo 
1-12 flore, floribus 2-3 poll, diametr. cernuis, perianthio aurantiaco 
basi late campanulato, foliolis patenti-recurvis oblongis obtusis basim 
versus rima nuda nectarifera instructis medium versus punctis majus- 
culis atro-purpureis notatis, capsula pyriformi vertice depresso abrupte 
in pedicellum brevem attenuata. 
L. maculatum, Thunb. in Mem. Acad. Petersk, vol. iii. t. 5 ; Baker in Journ. 

Hort. Soc. Lond., N.S. vol. iv. p. 45. 
L. avenaceum, Fischer— F. Schmidt Flor. Sachalin ined. ex Maximovicz in 

Kegel GartenJL, vol. xiv. (1865) 290, t. 485. 
L. Martagon, LedA. Fl. Ross., vol. iv. p. 149, quoad plantam Kamtscha- 
ticam. 

A native of Kamtschafcka, the Kurile and Sachalin Islands, 
Japan, and South Eastern Manchuria, whence it was intro- 
duced into the Eussian Imperial Botanical Gardens, and we 
have dried specimens from Sitcha on the American coast. 

According to Maximovicz (in Gartenflora), there are two 
varieties of it : one, with a scented orange-yellow flower, 
which is that figured here, and which came from Victoria 
Sound; the other, with red inodorous flowers, is found in 
Japan and Kamtschatka, is figured by Kegel in the Gartenflora. 
The leaves of both varieties vary extremely, both as to the 
number of whorls, the number in each whorl, and in length 
and breadth. 

I am indebted to G. P. Wilson, F.H.S.. of Weybndge 
Heath, for the specimen figured, the bulb of which he pur- 
chased at a sale of Japan Lilies, in London, and which 
flowered in June of the present year. I have also seen a 
specimen flowered by Mr. William Saunders, F.H.S., m 1871. 

OCTOBER 1st, 1874. 



Descr. Bidb from the size of a large nut to that of a wal- 
nut ; scales fleshy, fusiform. Stem two to three feet high, 
slender, bearing one to three whorls of four to twenty leaves 
at various heights above the ground, but always far above it. 
Leaves narrow when many, broad when few, sessile, three to six 
inches long by one half to one and a half inches broad, linear- 
or elliptic-lanceolate or elliptic, obtuse or obtusely acuminate, 
with three to five principal nerves, dark green above, paler 
beneath; upper leaves alternate scattered, much smaller. 
Flowers usually four to six (one to twenty), irregularly race- 
mose; peduncles two three inches long ; bracts broad, green, 
leafy. Perianth two three inches in diameter, campanulate 
at the base, orange-yellow or red, with black rounded or ob- 
long spots about the middle of the segments which are spread- 
ing and recurved with obtuse thickened points. Filaments 
much shorter than the perianth ; anthers linear, yellow. Ovary 
oblong ; style short, clavate, stigma hemispherical. 'Capsule 
(according to Eegel) pyriform.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Ovary and style : — magnified. 



6127 







Tab. 6127. 
SCORZONERA undulata. 

Native of Algeria and Marocco. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Cinchonace^e. 
Genus Scorzonera, Linn. ; (Benth. $• Hook. f. Gen. PL, vol. ii. p. 531). 



Scorzonera undulata ; caule erecto gracili elongato ramoso glabro, foliis 
glabris radicalibus pedalibus anguste elongato-Ianceolatis attenuato- 
acuminatis vix undulatis, caulinis e basi lata sessile subulato-attenuatis, 
capitulis 2—2-^ poll, diam., involucri bracteis cano-tomentellis exte- 
rioribus late ovatis acutis apicibus recurvis, interioribus ter longioribus 
ovato-oblongis anguste marginatis, ligulis roseo-purpureis, corolla? 
tubo gracili apicem versus barbellato, acliEenio obconico costato costis 
crenulatis, pappi setis insequalibus infra medium phimosis, 5-6 ceteris 
longioribus robustioribus supra medium scabridis. 

S. undulata, Vahl. Symb., vol. ii. p. 85 ; Desfont. Flor. Atlant., vol. ii. 
p. 219 ; DC. Prodr., vol. vii. p. 117 {in part). 



That this is the true Scorzonera undulata of Vahl and of 
Desfontaine I have little doubt, though it differs somewhat 
from the description of the former in its flat leaves and more 
branched habit, and altogether from specimens in the Her- 
barium of the Greek plant with which Desfontaine and De 
Candolle confound the Barbary one. Vahl describes it as 
common throughout the region of Tunis, and Desfont;iino 
has found it in sandy places. In many respects, and especially 
in habit, it approaches S. purpurea, Linn., which has smaller 
bracts and very narrow leaves ; and also S. hispanica, which 
differs chiefly, if not only, in its yellow flowers. 

The specimen here figured was brought by Mr. Maw from 
Algeria, where he recognised it as apparently the same 
with a plant we found between Tangiers and Tetuan in 
Marocco. It flowered in July, and had a very handsome 
appearance. 

Descr. Root thick, fusiform. Stem one to two feet, slender, 
branched, glabrous or with scanty white tomentum towards the 
ends of the branches. Radical leaves nearly a foot long, narrowly 

OCTOBER 1st, 1874. 



linear-lanceolate, quite entire glabrous, three-quarters of an 
inch in diameter at the broadest part, gradually narrowed 
into a rather long petiole and to the acuminate apex, bright 
green, with a yellow midrib ; margins scarcely waved ; cavline- 
leaves three to six inches long, gradually narrowed from a 
broad sessile base to a very fine point, erect, keeled to the 
midrib, margins even. Peduncles slender, green or purplish. 
Heads two to two and a half inches in diameter, rose- 
purplish ; involucre cylindric, tumid at its base, hoary with 
a white down ; outer scales broadly ovate, with a recurved 
acuminate apex, green with pale margins ; inner twice or 
thrice as long, linear- oblong, with broad scarious margins. 
Flowers numerous. Corolla-tube slender, bearded below the 
mouth ; limb as long, linear, 5-toothed. Achenes (unripe) 
fimbriate, grooved, the ridges crenulate ; pappus-hairs about 
twenty, all plumose halfway up, five or six stronger than the 
rest and scab rid from above the middle to the apex. — 
/. B. IL 

Fig. 1, Flowers; 2, unripe achene and pappus : — both magnified. 




■i-tch. ielet JitL 



Tab. 6128. 
CITRUS Aurantitjm var. japonica. 

Cultivated in China and Japan. The Kumquat. 



Nat. Ord. Rutace^e. — Tribe Aurantie^. 
Genus Citrus, Linn. ; (Benth. $■ Hook.f. Gen. PL, v. i. p. 305). 



Citrus Aurantium var. japonica ; fruticosa, spinosa v. inermis, rami's angu- 
latis, petiolis cuneato-alatis v. lineari-cuneatis, foliis'elliptico- v. oblongo- 
lanceolatis obtuse acuminatis apices versus crenulatis, floribus axillanbus 
solitariis fascieulatisve albis, fructibus globosis v. ellipsoideo-oblongis 
4-6-locularibus, cortice granulate 
Citrus japonica, Thunb. Flor. Japan., 292 ; Ic. 1. 15 ; DC. Prodi:, vol. i. 540 ; 
Sieb. & Zucc. FL Jap., vol. i. p. 35, t. 15; Fortune in Hart. Soc. Joum., 
N.S. vol. ii. p. 4fi ; Gard. Chron. 1874, 336, cum ic. xylog.; Miq. Prohis. 
Fl. Jap. p. 15. 
C. Margarita, Lour. Fl. Coch., p. 570; DC. I.e. 
Kinkan, Kmmpf. Amain. Exot., vol. v. p. 801. 

Subvar. inermis.— C. inermis, Poxb. FL iW./vol. iii. p. 393. C. madurensis, 
Lour. FL Coch., 570 ; DC. Prodr., I.e. ; Pumph. Herb. Amb., vol. n. 
p. 110, t. xxxi. 

This well-known ingredient in Chinese sweetmeats has 
never previously been figured from cultivated specimens m 
Europe, though long known from Kiempfer's description and 
plate. According to Siebold, it is nowhere found wild in 
Japan ; this author says that, in common with all other spe- 
cies and varieties of Citrus, it has been introduced into the 
Island from China or India; also that it is extensively culti- 
vated under two varieties, one with globose, the other with 
oval fruit, which latter is rare. He adds, that the agreeable 
acid of the juice, flavoured by the aroma of the rind, renders 
the fruit very pleasant, but that it yields only a transient re- 
freshment, for it leaves a burning after-taste in the mouth. 

A magnificent fruiting specimen of this interesting shrub 
was exhibited by Mr. Bateman at the Horticultural Society 
in 1867, from which the accompanying drawing was taken. 
It belonged to the unarmed variety, and is far more luxuriant, 
both as to foliage and fruit, than the dried specimen, or those 

OCTOBER 1st, 1874. 



figured by Siebold and Zuccarini. As regards the cultivation 
of the Kumquat, Mr. Fortune, who introduced it, says in his 
paper published in the Journal of the Horticultural Society, 
quoted above, that it requires in summer plenty of water 
at a temperature of 80° to 100°, and a high atmospheric heat 
continued into autumn ; whilst in winter it should be kept cool 
and rather dry, for it will then bear 10° and even 15° of frost. 
It succeeds well grafted on Limonia trifoliata. 

Descr. A shrub or small tree, four to six feet high. Branch- 
lets green, glabrous, compressed, trigonous. Leaves biennial ; 
petiole one-third to one-half inch long, narrowly cuneate or 
almost linear ; blade three to five inches long, elliptic or ob- 
long-lanceolate, narrowed at both ends, obtuse, crenate above 
the middle. Floivers one to three, axillary, fascicled, three- 
fourths of an inch to one inch in diameter, white ; peduncles 
glabrous. Calyx short, five-lobed, glabrous, green, segments 
broad. Petals oblong, subacute. Stamens twenty or fewer, 
irregularly connate into bundles. Disk thick. Ovary 4-6- 
celled. Fruit two-thirds to one inch in diameter, globose 
or shortly ellipsoid, bright orange-yellow, 4-6-celled; rind 
thick, minutely tuberculate ; pulp watery, sweet and aci- 
dulous. Seeds few, like those of the common orange, but 
much smaller. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and Stamens — magnified ; 2, transverse section of the fruit 
the natural size. 



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6129 



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Tab. 6129. 

PASSIFLORA (Tacsonia) manicata. 

Native of New Grenada and Peru. 



Nat. Ord. Passiflorace^. — Tribe Passiflore^e. 
Genus Passiflora, Linn. ; (Benth. $ Hook. f. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. 810). 



Passiflora (Tacsonia) manicata; caule flexuoso subangulato, foliis 4-polIi- 
caribus coriaceis 3-lobis serratis supra glabris subtus pubescentibus, 
lobis ovatis acutis intermedio producto, petiolo pollicari 3-4-glanduloso, 
stipulis dimidiato-ovatis falcatis grosse dentatis, pedunculo petiolo 
duplo longiore, bracteis pollicaribus ellipticis acutis serrulatis liberis v. 
connatis, floribus coccineis, perianthii tubo ^-1-pollicari basi dilatato 
Hmbo 4-pollicari. 

Tacsonia manicata, Juss. in Ann. Muss., vol. vi. p. 393, t. 59, f. 2 ; Lindl. Sf 
Past. Fl. Gard., vol. i. t. 26 ; DC. Prodr., vol. iii. p. 334 ; Humb. 
Bonpl. Sf Kunth Nov. Gen., vol. ii. p. 139; Masters in Mart. Flor. 
Bras., vol. xiii. pars i. p. 541. 



This lovely plant lias been for many years cultivated in 
England, though not so extensively as it deserves, having 
had the reputation of not flowering freely. It was intro- 
duced previous to 1850 by the Horticultural Society, through 
its collector Hartweg, who found it in hedges near Loxa in 
Peru, where, indeed, it was discovered by Humboldt and 
Bonpland half a century previously. It is also a native of 
the Andes of Equador and New Grenada, where it was found 
by Purdie on the arid plains of Suta Marchan, and is there 
called Ruruba de Seneno. A similar undescribed species, or 
perhaps a variety of this, with white flowers, was gathered by 
Pearce at Puquina (in Pern ?), at an elevation of 10,000 feet. 

I am indebted for the accompanying drawing to Mr. E. J. 
Smith, of Coalport, in whose conservatory the plant flowered 
in July last. 

I regret not being able to follow Dr. Masters in retaining 
the genus Tacsonia, as is done in his very admirable Mono- 
graph of South American Passiflorse, in Martius's " Flora 
Brasiliensis ;" the only character hitherto adopted being the 

NOVEMBER 1ST, 1874. 



comparative length of the perianth-tube of Tacsonia, which is 
shorter m this species than in various Brazilian plants uni- 
versally referred to Passiflora. Could genera be limited by 
geographical distribution, Tacsonia would (as Dr. Masters 
indicates) be defined as being confined, as far as is hitherto 
known, to the Andes of South America, whilst the P asm ft or a* 
are spread over the warm regions of the whole American 
continent, and are found also in Asia and Australia. 

Descr Stem climbing, nearly terete, and as well as the 
petioles leaves beneath stipules bracts and perianth externally 
finely pubescent. Leaves about four inches long, coriaceous, 
d-lobed to about the middle, finely serrate; lobes broadly 
oblong, obtuse or subacute, dark green above, pale beneath, 
base rounded truncate or subacute; petiole about one inch 
long, with three to four glands. Stipules one inch in diameter, 
dimidiate-ovate, deeply toothed, convex. Peduncle longer than 
tne petiole. Bracts at some distance from the calyx, elliptic- 
ovate, acute, serrate, pubescent, free or united from the base 
U l w f d ^J om&tim ^ for half their length. Perianth-tube 
about nail an inch long, base inflated and 10-lobed; limb 
lour inches m diameter, vivid scarlet; corona double ; outer, 
at the mouth of the tube, of many series of short blue hairs, 
tne inner row of which connives around the column ; inner, at 
tbe top of the inflated base of the perianth, formed of a 
sigmoidly-mflexed membrane. Styles free.—/. D. IL 

Fig. 1, Vertical section of perianth tube :— somewhat magnified. 







Broote&y* 



Tab. 6130. 

CERINTHE GYMNANDKA. 

Native of Italy, Algeria, and Marocco. 



Nat. Ord. BoreaginEjE.— Tribe Cekinthejl. 
Genus Ceeinthe, Linn.; {A. DC. Prodr., vol. 10, p. 2). 



Ceeinthe gymnandra ; annua, glabra, caule subflexuoso simplici v. ramoso, 
foliis oblongis ovato-oblongisve apice sphacelatis obtuse arcuatia v. 
rotundatis basi auricula to 2-lobis, supra remote verruculosis subtus 
glabris, calycis foliolis lineari-oblongis erectis ciliatis, corolla curva 
infra medium clavato-inflato, lobis 5 triangulari-subulatis reflexis, an- 
therarum caudis setaceis apicibus exsertis. 

Ceeinthe gymnandra, Gaspar., Bendei dell Acad. Soc. BealBorbon diKap., 
vol. i. p. 72, ex Rekhb. Ic. Fl. Germ., vol. xviii. p. 36, t. 1297; 
Willkom. Sf Lange Fl. Hisp., vol. ii. p. 512. 



A very rare European plant, hitherto found, as far as I am 
aware, only near Naples, whence I have seen specimens col- 
lected by Heldreich ; it is however common in some parts of 
Western Algeria, as at Oran and Blidah, growing in sandy 
places, and in Marocco. Though hardly different from 
C. major (Tab. nost, 333), as pointed out by Willkomm and 
Lange, it is a very beautiful form of the genus, well worthy 
of cultivation, but unfortunately annual. One of its most 
striking characters is the discoloration of the tips of the 
leaves ; these in all our specimens are of a fine pale glaucous 
blue, except at the very end, which is pale greenish-yellow, 
bounded towards the midrib by a dull dark purple band ; 
thus the colouring of the leaf-tip is a repetition of that of the 
flower, and gives a bright appearance to the whole plant. 
Prom the above-quoted figure of Cerinthe major mi\\\s Maga- 
zine, the present differs in the yellow tubular terminal portion 
of the corolla, the narrower sepals not cordate at the base, 
and foliage ; but little dependence can be placed on these 
characteristics in so variable a genus. 

Our specimens were raised from seed sent by Messrs. 
Haage and Schmidt, and flowered in July. 

NOVEMBER 1ST, 1874.' 



Desor. Annual, very variable in size and stature, glabrous, 
except the calyx. Stem six to twelve inches high, usually 
ascending from a short base, simple or branched above, rather 
stout, quite smooth, pale yellow-green. Leaves one to four 
inches long, glaucous, usually ovate-oblong and somewhat 
contracted in the middle, rounded or obtusely pointed ; base 
2-lobed, with two deep rounded auricles ; upper surface with 
scattered small warts, only visible in the dry state, under 
surface quite smooth ; tips always discoloured, yellow-green 
with a purple band beneath it, strongly contrasting with the 
glaucous blue of the rest of the leaf; nerves faint. Floral 
leaves large, distichous, imbricate, enclosing and almost con- 
cealing the flowers. Flowers shortly pedicelled, nearly one 
inch long. Calyx half the length of the corolla ; leaflets 
linear-oblong, acute, ciliate, with a purple band below the 
tip. Corolla curved, lower parts rather inflated, subclavate, 
deep red-purple except at the base; upper part cylindric, 
yellow ; lobes short, triangular, subulate, yellow, sharply 
reflexed. Filaments short ; anthers slender, with exserted 
subulate purple tips, the cells caudate at the base. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, corolla laid open ; 3, stamen ; 4, disk, ovary and style : — 
all magnified. 



6$to 




"'faceat.'Bwoks 



Tab. 6131. 
MELALEUCA Wilsonl 

Native of South Australia. 



Nat. Ord. Myrtace^e. — Tribe Leptosperme^e. 
Genus Melaleuca, Linn. ; (Benth. Fl. Austral., vol. iii. p. 123). 



Melaleuca Wihoni ; ramulis junioribus exceptis glaberrima, foliis oppositis 
confertis patulis v. in ramulia junioribus imbricatia subulato-lanceolatis 
acutis v. acnminatis subtus convexis obscure 1-3-nerviis, noribus soli- 
tariis v. fasciculatis sparsis v. spicatis, calycis tubo ovoideo glabro basi 
rotundato lobis ovato-lanceolatis subacutis tubum aequantibus, petalis 
calycia lobis duplo longioribus ellipticis concavis, staminum phalangiis 
erecto-patentibus J-pollicaribus spathulatis, filamentis 15-20. 

Melaleuca \Vilsoni, F. Muell. Fragm., vol. ii. p. 124, t. 15 ; Benth. Fl. 
Austral., v. iii. p. 134. 



This is one of that larere class of hard-wooded Australian 
plants which, if properly cultivated, would ornament our con- 
servatories and greenhouses at seasons when little else worth 
looking at meets the eye, but which have almost throughout 
the country succumbed to the treatment they have received — 
namely, of watering in season and out of season. The genus 
to which it belongs contains just one hundred species, scat- 
tered over all parts of Australia, amongst which are some of 
the most brilliant-coloured plants of that gay Flora. The 
present is essentially a dry country species, inhabiting the 
desert of the Tattiave country, Port Lincoln, &c., in South 
Australia, as also the country around Lake Hindmarsh in 
the colony of Victoria. It was raised at Kew from seeds 
sent by Baron Muller from the Melbourne Botanic Garden, 
when he was director of that rich botanical establishment ; 
and was named by him after Mr. Charles Wilson, through 
whose aid, he states, this very beautiful species was 
discovered. 

Descr. A slender shrub, glabrous, except the puberulous 
young branches. Leaves close set, spreading, those on the 
young branches imbricate, one-third to three-quarters of an 

NOVEMBER 1ST, 1874. 



inch long, subulate-lanceolate, rigid, quite entire, concave 
below, obscurely 3-nerved, obtuse or pungent. Flowers 
crowded, rarely solitary, sometimes forming cylindric spikes, 
rarely solitary, sessile. Bracts imbricate, membranous, 
equalling the calyx-tube. Calyx green, tube one-twelfth of an 
inch long, ovoid, rounded at the base ; lobes rather shorter, 
erect, ovate, subacute. Petals about twice as long as the calyx- 
lobes, elliptic, subacute, concave, erect. Bundles of stamens 
erect, then spreading, half an inch long, bright rose-red ; 
claw linear-spathulate ; filaments fifteen to twenty. Fruit 
3-valved— J.D. H. 



Fig. 1, Front and 2, back view of leaf; 3, flower and bract; 4, flower 
with two calyx-lobes and petals removed, showing the base of two staminal 
bundles, and the style ; 5, staminal bundle :— all magnified. 



Tab. 6132. 
iris laevigata. 

Native of Japan and N. Eastern Asia* 



Nat. Ord. IbidacejE. — Tribe IridEjE. 
Genus Iris, Linn. ; (Endl. Gen. Plant., p. 266). 



Iris laevigata ; caule elato obtuse angulato foliato, foliis ^- § poll, latis anguste 
lineari ensiformibus acuminatis utrinque viridibus costa prominula, 
scapo 1-2 flore, spathis 2-3-valvibus, valvis insequalibus herbaceis 
elongato-lanceolatis acuminatis, floribus breviter pedicellatis maximis, 
pedicello ovario longiore, perianthii tubo crassiusculo segmentis exte- 
rioribus recurvis magnis late elliptico-ovatis obtusis ecristatis purpureis 
plaga basi aurea, interioribus parvis erectis conniventibus oblongis 
acutis, stigmatibus recurvis lineari-oblongis apice 2-lobis et dentatis. 

Iris laevigata, Fisch., ex Turcz. Cat. Baikal, No. 1119; Fisch. et Mey Ind. 
Sem. Hort. Petrop. ; Ledeb. Fl. Ross., vol. iv. p. 97 ; Klatt in Linncea, 
vol. xxxiv. p. 616; Maxim. Prim. Fl. Amurr., p. 271; A. Gray Bot. 
Jap., p. 412 ; Miquel Prol. Fl. Jap., 306. 

I. Gemelini, Ledeb. comment in Gmel. Fl. Sib. in Deuttscher, Bot. Ges. Eegensb., 
vol. iii. p. 48. 

I. Kxempferi, Sieb. ex Lemaire III. Hort. t. 157. 

I. versicolor, Thunb. Fl. Jap., 34 (ex Miguel, I.e.) non Linn. 



Whether under the indigenous form here figured, or the 
curious garden form called I. Kampferi var. B. G. Henderson 
(Gard. C'/iron., 1874, p. 45), this beautiful hardy ^plant is 
likely to become as great a favourite in England as it is said 
to be in Japan. It was originally introduced by Von Siebold 
from Japan, and flowered in Verschaflelt's establishment at 
Ghent in 1857, when a very pale variety of it was figured 
by Lemaire in the " Illustration Horticole." As it there 
appeared under the name of /. Kampferi of Siebold, I suppose 
that this latter author identified it with the Sziti or Itz falz 
of Kajmpfer {Jman. Exot. p. 873), a plant which Kaempfer 
describes as an Iris with large double flowers, and which 
flowers during many days. Hasskarl {Miquel Protus. p. 306) 
says that it is the Itsi Katsi of the Japanese. Whatever 
may be its Japanese name or the history of that of Kamipferi, 

NOVEMBER 1ST, 1874. 



it was no doubt first long previously described from Eastern 
Asiatic specimens by Fischer as I laevigata. It is a native 
of East Siberia from the Baikal and Dahuria to Kamtschatka, 
the Amur district, and Korea, and it thence extends to the 
northern parts of Japan. 

Mr. E. G. Henderson's variety, which I hope to figure 
soon, is a most remarkable and beautiful plant ; it is a 
monstrous state, with six or more equal or unequal spreading 
perianth segments ; for a description of which I must refer 
to Dr. Masters's article in the Gardeners Chronicle, referred 
to above. 

The specimen here figured was flowered in May last by 
G-. Maw, E.L.S., in his rich garden at Benthall Hall, 
Shropshire, from roots received from Max Leichtlin of 
Baden Baden ; it has also flowered at Kew for several years 
past. 

Descr. Stem two to three feet high, slender, obscurely 
angled. Leaves as long, one-half to two-thirds of an inch 
broad, narrow and slender, acuminate. Scape 1-3-flowered. 
Spatkes two to four inches long, narrowly lanceolate, her- 
baceous, the outer shorter. Flowers three to five inches in 
diameter, varying from pale to deep red-purple ; shortly pe- 
dicelled ; pedicel shorter than the subterete ovary. Perianth- 
tube about three-quarters of an inch long ; outer segments 
shortly clawed, broadly ovate-oblong, obtuse, reflexed, not 
crested, with a bright 3-cuspidate orange spot at the base 
of the limb; inner segments one to one and a half inches 
long, of the same purple colour, erect, conniving, sub-acute, 
oblong-lanceolate. Stir/mas spreading, linear-oblong, with 
bifid incurved lobes. — / D. II 




Which 



f 



Tab. 6133. 
POLYGONATUM vulgare var. macranthum. 

Native of Japan. 



Nat. Ord. Smilace^e.— Tribe Convallarie^e. 
Genus Polygonatum, Toumef. ; (Endl. Gen. PL, p. 154). 



Polygonatum vu laare ; caule arcuato acuto angulato, foliis alternis breviter 
petiolatis late ellipticis obtusis v. obtuse acuminatis subtus glauceseentibus 
6-nerviis, floribus 1-4, perianthii supra medium subinflati tobis brevi- 
bus late orbiculato-ovatis viridibus apice obtuse apiculatiset mcrassatis, 
filamentis glabris. 

Polygonatum vulgare, Desf. ; A. Gray Bot. Jap., p. 413. 

P. officinale, AIL; Maxim. Prim. Fl.Amur., 274; MiquelProl. Fl.Jap., 148. 

Convallaria Polygonatum, Linn. ; Thunb. Fl. Jap., p. 148. 

Var. macranthum, floribus l\ pollicaribus. 



I have retained this plant as a variety of P. vulgare with 
much hesitation, doubting its proving even as a variety dis- 
tinct from some already described forms of that variable plant. 
It is certainly not the same as Morren and Decaisne s 
i>. iaponicum, which they describe as having short solitary 
flowers with a campanulate perianth, and which is "J^*^ 
another form of P. mlgaium, a plant that extends from 
Western Europe (Norway and Spain) tofcJ«toto 
Lava, North East Asia and Japan, and winch I suspect exists 
in Eastern N. America under one or more forms. 

The size of the flower is perhaps the most nobceab Je feat ure 
of the plant here figured, though in that it is rivalled by both 
European and North Asiatic specimens; the inflation of the 
corolla above its middle and its slight contraction at the 
throat are other characters, which however disappea, : as he 
corolla withers and its lobes conmve. Decaisne »dM™ 
observe that the style exceeds the stamens in their ^". 
which is no doubt a sexual difference. In the form of its 
foliage it agrees best with the N. America P. «£«?**£ 
Dietr. and Otto, which has a terete stem. Lastly, having 



NOVEMBER 1ST, 1874. 



regard to the variability of the alternate-leaved Polygonatums, 
it would not surprise me to find that all were referable to 
two, the P. vulgare with a grooved stem, and P. multifiorum 
with terete stem. 

The subject of the present plate has long been cultivated 
at Kew under the name of P. japonicum, and it flowers in 
April. 

Descr. Rhizomes stout, creeping. Stems one to one and 
a half feet high ; stout, flexuous, green, angled and chan- 
nelled. Leaves two to three inches long, alternate, subsessile, 
broadly elliptic, obtuse or obtusely acuminate, light green 
above, glaucous beneath, 7-nerved, quite glabrous. Flowers 
one to four ; peduncles and pedicels longer or shorter than 
the perianth, very slender. Perianth one and a quarter 
inches long, terete, tubular, white, inflated slightly beyond 
the middle, contracted obscurely at the throat; lobes almost 
orbicular, with obtuse callous points, spreading, green. 
Filaments almost as long as the linear anthers, glabrous. 
Ovary globose ; style filiform.— J". D. H. 



Fig, 1, Flower laid open : — somewhat magnified. 



Tab. 6134. 
BLUMENBACHIA (Oaiophora) contorta. 

Native of Peru. 



Nat. Ord. Loase/e. 
Genus Blumenbachia, Schrad. ; (Berth. $ Hooh.f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 805). 



Blumenbachia (Caiophora) contorta ; caule volubili pilis urentibus patuhs 
reflexisque hispido, foliis breviter petiolatis triangulari-v.-oblongo-ovatis 
pinnatifidis laciniis acutis acute inciso-dentatis lobatisve utrinque his- 
pidis, pedunculis elongatis axillaribus, calycis lobis pinnatifido-lobatis, 
petalis patentibus, squamis cucullatis, staminodiis falcatis umdentatis, 
capsula ellipsoideo-oblonga 1-J pollicari. 

Loasa contorta, Lamk. Bid., vol. iii. p. 579 ; III. t. 426, f. 2 ; DC. Prodr., 
vol. iii. p. 340 ; Juss. in Ann. Mus., vol. v. p. 25, t 3, f. 1 ; Tratt. Archiv, 
vol. i. p. 17, t. 33. 

Caiophora contorta, Presl Reliq. Haenk,, vol. u. p. 42 ; Walp. Rep., vol. ii. 
p. 227, and vol. v. p. 781. 



Although described by Jussieu and (copying him) by 
Trattinick as having a capsule a foot and a half long, /' sesqui- 
pedalis," I have no doubt but that this is Lamarck s Loasa 
contorta, which that author describes as having a capsule 
about two inches long, as indeed it is figured by Jussieu. 
Lamarck's figure, again, a very indifferent one, represents the 
calyx-lobes as entire, though that author describes them as 
toothed. Presl, who founded the genus Caiophora on De 
Candolle's first section of Loasa, proposes besides the C. con- 
torta, two other species from the Andes of Peru a cirsitfoha 
and carduifolia; but judging from his description and the 
figures he gives of C. cirsiifolia, I suspect that they are 
varieties of C. contorta, which, according to numerous speci- 
mens preserved in the Kew Herbarium, varies extremely in 
the breadth and amount of division of the leaves. 

B. contorta is a native of Peru and Equador where it 
ascends to an elevation of 12,000 feet; should it prove as 
hardy as the charming B. Merit ia (Loasa latenha, lab nost. 
3632), it will be a very ornamental wall-plant m most parts 



NOVEMBER ] ST, 1874. 



of England. It is probably, like that plant, a biennial. It 
was raised from Peruvian seeds by Messrs. Veitch, and 
flowered in their grounds in July of the present year. 

Descr. A climber, several feet high, hispid with spreading 
and recurved stinging bristles and shorter spreading hairs. 
Leaves shortly petioled, four to six inches long, triangular- 
oblong or -ovate, pinnatifid to the middle or to near the base, 
hispid, dark green ; lobes few or many, broad or narrow, 
pinnatifidly lobed or toothed ; pale blue-green beneath. 
Peduncles axillary, as long as or longer than the leaves, stout, 
hispid. Flowers one and a half to two inches in diameter. 
Calyx-tube short, obscure; lobes one-third to half an inch 
long, linear-oblong, pinnatifidly toothed or lobed. Petals 
bright brick-red, three-quarters of an inch long, spreading, 
obtuse, with a few bristles on the back. Scales a quarter of 
an inch long, cup-shaped, green, 3-toothed at the rounded 
tip, pubescent. 8tami?iodes falcate, with one tooth on the 
margin, beyond which they are much narrowed and subulate. 
Staminal-bundles slender. Capsule (from Jussieu's figure) 
narrowly ellipsoid, an inch and a half long. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Scale and staminodes : — magnified. 



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Tab. 6135. 

RHEUM OFFICINALE. 

Native of Eastern Tibet and Western China. 



Nat. Ord. Polygonacea— Tribe Pteryqocarpjb. 

Genus Kheum, Linn.; (Meusn., in DC. Prodr., v. xiv. p. 32). 



Rheum officinale ; caulebrevi robusto diviso apice folioao, foliia ampbs or- 

biculari-ovatis cordatisvc villosulis subpalmathn breviter 8-7-lobatw, 
lobis incisis lobulisque acutis, ochrca obovoidea denHum fissa, petiolo 
robuatO pubescente intus hand sulcato, ramis florifcris foliosis panien- 
latim ranmlosis, paniculffi erectffl ramulis patenti-recurvis, ultimis flori- 
feria spiciformibus iratantibua densifloris, floribus breviter graale 
pedioellatis, pedicello basin versus articulate, perianthu fohobs late 
oblongis apice rotundatis interioribus paulo majoribus, stamimbus 9 
inclusis, disco annulari crenulato, stigmatibus orbicularis, acnanio late 
oblongo alis membranaceis obscure crenulatis nucleo duplo longionbus 
et laterioribus. 
Rheum officinale, Baillon in Mem. de /'Association Francaisc pour FArcincc- 
ment del Sciences, Sept, 1, Bordeaux, 1872, p. 514, t. x. (Translated m 
Trinun Jovm. Bot, 1872, p. 379): Adaneonia, vol. x. p. 24b; Oor- 
riere, Rev. Hortic, 1874, p. 93 ; F/ucl: £ Ihvdnm,, Pharmacy., p. 442 ; 
Gard. Chrori., 1874, v. i. p. 846. 



According to the evidence hitherto obtained, this grand 
plant (which is certainly the handsomest of all the Bkemi, 
except the Himalayan B. nobOe)'* that which produces much, 

if not all the Turkey Rhubarb of the pharmacopoeia It is a 
native of and also cultivated in Eastern and South-eastern 
Tibet, and was sent thence by the French missionaries to M. 
Dabry, the French Consul at Hankow. M. Dabry sent plants 
to M. Soubeiran, Secretary of the Jardin d Acclimatisation of 
Paris, where they flowered at Montmorency in lb 11. 
~ An excellent history of this plant is given in Fluckiger and 
Ilanbury's " Pharmacographia," quoted above from which it 
appears not to be certain that the true Turkey rhubarb of 
commerce is derived exclusively from this plant though the 
evidence of the missionaries who discovered it tha t . it is the 
main source of that drug, is supported by theiact tha t the re 
is no important discrepancy between this B, officinale and the 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1874. 



imperfect and scanty accounts and figures of the Chinese 
authors and early French missionaries. From the same work 
we learn that the drug was known to the Chinese long anterior 
to the Christian era, and was described in a work dedicated to 
the Emperor Shen-nung, the father of Chinese agriculture and 
medicine, who lived about 2700 B.C. Also that Marco Polo 
is the onty traveller who has visited the districts yielding 
rhubarb, in the mountains of one of which (Tangut) he de- 
scribes it as growing in great abundance ; this, however, is^ an 
error, for an account of it will be found in the Travels of Bell 
of Antermony (vol. i. p. 384—387), who found it in Mongolia, 
growing abundantly near marmot burrows. One of its most 
remarkable characteristics is its stout very distinct stem, 
which, and not the root, is considered to be the source of the 
rhubarb in the view of M. Baillon, and no doubt correctly. 

The rhubarb plant inhabits a vast area of Eastern Tibet 
and Western China, abounding in high plateaus, especially in 
spots enriched by old encampments. The plant here figured 
was sent to the Royal Gardens by M. Soubeiran, and flowered 
in June last, both at Kew and at Mr. Hanbury's garden at 
Clapham. 

1)esck. Stem as thick as the arm, four to ten inches high, 
divided into several leafing and flowering crowns. Leaves 
one to three feet in diameter, orbicular-ovate or cordate, shal- 
lowly 3- to 7-lobed, pubescent or subvillous, lobes acute and 
acutely irregularly toothed ; nerves stout beneath, flabellate ; 
petiole nearly terete ; ochrea split. Flowering -stems two to five 
feet high, erect, stout, leafy, pubescent, bright-green, pani- 
culately branched ; branches spreading; flowering branchlets 
spreading and drooping , three to five inches long, spiciform, 
very densely clothed with flowers. Flowers one-quarter inch 
in diameter, green ; pedicels slender, fascicled, jointed near 
the base. Perianth-segments broadly oblong, rounded at the 
tips, the inner larger, erect at the edges. Stamens nine, as 
long as the perianth, hypogynous. Disk thick, annular, ob- 
scurely 3-lobed, crenulate. Sthpnas orbicular, peltate. Fruit 
half an inch long, broadly oblong, emarginate, bright rod ; 
wings longer and broader than the nucleus.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Reduced view of whole plant ; 2, portion of leaf, and 8, of flower- 
ing branch, both of the natural size ; 4, (lower ; 5, stamen and pistil ; 6, pistil 
and disk : — all magnified ; 7, fruiting branchlet, not seen ; 8, fruit : — 
magnified. 




%J 



Tab. 6136. 
EPISCIA FULGIDA. 

Native of New Grenada. 



Nat. Ord. Gesneriace^e. — Tribe Beslerie^:. 
Genus Episcia, Mart. ; {DC. Pmlr., vol. vii. p. 546). 



Episcia fulfjida ; repens, stolonifera, tota pilis flaccidis villose, foliis cllipticis 
dliptieo-ovatisve subacutis basi rotundatis v. cordatis crenulato- 
scrratis convexis superne bullatim reticularis, petiolo brevi crassiusculo, 
floribus solitariis, pedunculo petiolo longiore, sepalis *— f-pobicaribus 
spathulato-oblongis subserratis, corolla; tate later itite tubo l-|-pollicari 
hirsuto, limbo lobis rotundatis erosis, staminibus inclusis, ovario 
hirsuto. 

Cyrtodeira fulgida, Lind. Cat. No. 90, p. 5; et in IJIllustr. Hortic, t. 131. 



I have little doubt as to this being the plant described by 
Linden as Cyrtodeira f'dyida, of which the figure in the 
" Illustration Horticole" is excellent, though in the description 
the blade of the leaf is described as scarcely longer than the 
petiole, and although the leaves want the pale band along 
the midrib and principal nerves, which render Linden's form 
of it so valuable for decorative purposes. It is a very close 
ally of the Brazilian E. reptans (Mart. Nov. Gen., f. 217) ; 
but F.fulpdais a much larger plant, and has shorter petioles, 
and differently shaped sepals, which are not entire ; it also 
comes from a very different country. Another congener is 
the Achimenes cupreata Hook. (Tab. nost. 4312), upon which 
Hanstein (L. v. xxvi. p. 206) founded his genus Cyrtodeira, 
distinguishing it from Episcia by the form and lesser curva- 
ture of the corolla-tube, a character that does not hold in 
the various species. Episcia fid yida is a native of New Gre- 
nada, whence it was first introduced by M. Linden. I am 
indebted to Mr. Williams for the specimen here figured, 
which flowered in his establishment in July last. 

Descr. Stem creeping, branched, stoloniferous, as thick as 
a goose-quill, and, as well as the whole plant, clothed with a 
soft villous pubescence. Leaves three to five inches long, 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1874. 



elliptic or elliptic-ovate, acute, crenulate-serrate, convex and 
bullately reticulated on the upper surface, dark emerald- green, 
paler along the midrib, inclined to coppery, especially the 
young ones ; petiole stout, about one-eighth the length of the 
blade. Peduncles axillary, solitary, stout, one to two inches 
long. Calyx gibbous at the base, one-half to three-quarters 
inch long, campanulate ; sepals spathulate-oblong, rounded 
and crenate towards the recurved tips. Corolla bright and 
almost vermilion-red ; tube hirsute, one and a-half inch 
long, cylindric, nearly straight ; limb one inch in diameter, 
nearly "equal; lobes rounded, irregularly toothed, pubescent 
towards the throat. Stamens included, filaments very slender ; 
anthers small, atlnate to the large connective. Ovary broadly 
ovoid, hirsute ; gland emargimite. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Cape; 2, corolla laid open; 3, top of stamen; 4 and 5, front and 
side view .of ovary : — all magnified. 



ff/37 




Tab. 6137. 
BOUCEROSIA MAROCCANA. 

Native of Marocco. 



Nat. Ord. AsCLEriADEiE. — Tribe StapeliEjE. 

Genus Bouceeosia, Wight $ Am. ; (Benth. fy Hook./. Gen. Plant, 
vol. ii. ined.). 



Bouceeosia maroccana ; ramis tetragonis marginibus angulato sinuafcis, loins 
trulliformibus acutis, corolla? iobis nudis tubo intus hirsuto, corona) 
Btaminese processubus 5 incurvis gynostegio incumbentibus cum 10 
erectis geminatim collateralibus capitatis alternautibus. 



A near ally of B. Gussoniana {Apteranthes Gussoniana, Tab. 
nost. 5087), of Algeria, and so like it that I Jong hesitated 
before deciding upon figuring and describing it as new ; be- 
sides, however, the differences of habit, which are more easily 
seen than described, there are so many other differential 
characters that, taken altogether, it is impossible to unite this 
with the Algerian plant. " The angles of the stem, instead I ot 
being faintly undulate, are longitudinally divided into broadly 
triangular lobes, each tipped with a minute leaf, which 
instead of being sessile adnate and npcurved, is trowel-shaped, 
contracted at the base, and usually dellexed. The Bowers are 
fewer, on longer pedicels ; the corolla-lobes want the long 
cilia, being quite naked, and are shorter, not so reflexed, and 
of a clearer purple, with fewer yellow bars, and the base ot 
the tube inside is densely velvety. But the greatest dif- 
ference is in the staminal crown, which m B. Gussoniana 
presents live capitate incurved processes, each with a knob on 
each side at the base ; but in this the live incurved processes 
are inflexed and incumbent upon the stigma, whilst the lateral 
knobs are elevated on erect stalks. How far any or all these 
characters are variable can only be known by a long and 
careful study. The probability of their proving constant is 
rendered more probable by the wide difference pf habit of 
the two plants, the A. Gussoniana being a native ot saline 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1874. 



situations in Sicily, Spain, and the Algerine coast; whilst 
J. maroccana inhabits the much lower latitudes of Mogado 
in Marocco. Here it was found on the rocky islet of 
Mogador by Messrs. Maw, Ball, and myself, and also else- 
where along the coast near the town, and introduced into 
Kew, where it flowered in July. 

The genus Apterantlies is merged in Boucerosia (itself pos- 
sibly referrible to Piaranthus) by Bentham in the forth- 
coming volume of the Genera Plantarum. 

Descr. Branches prostrate, six to ten inches long, by about 
one broad, 4-sided, the sides deeply sunk, the angles cut into 
broad subtriangular lobes, with an acute sinus, one-half to 
three-quarter inch long. Leaves on the angular summits 
of the lobes of the stem-angles, one-tenth inch long, trowel- 
shaped, contracted at the base, ciliolate. Flowers two to six 
in an umbel, pedicel one-quarter inch long, and subulate 
calyx-teeth green. Corolla one-half to two-thirds inch diameter, 
spreading, 5-lobed to about the middle ; lobes triangular, 
subacute, quite glabrous, pale green outside, dark red-purple 
within streaked transversely towards the base and around the 
cup with yellow ; tube densely villous. Crown of 5 inflexed 
processes that cover the staminal crown, and 10 erect 
capitate processes in pairs between the inflexed ones. — 
/. J). IL 



Fig. 1, Leaf; 2, outside, and 3, inside view of corolla ; 4, gynostegium 
&, pollen-masses : — all magnified. 



6138 




W.fiidi. da 






Tab. 6138. 
ONCIDIUM ZEBRINUM. 

Native of Venezuela. 



Nat. Ord. OBGBIDB*. — Tribe VAKDKA 
Genus Oncidium, Swartz ; (Lindl. Fol. Orchid., Oncidium). 



ONCIDIUM (Cyrtochilum) zebrinum; rliizomate robusto repentc, pseudobulbis 
compressis 4-5-pollicaribus ovato-lanceolatia hevibus, foliis G-9-polb- 
caribus ensiformi-lanceolatis acuminatis carinatis ncrvosis^ panicula 
longissiraa robusta fiexuosa, bracteis spathaceis ovato-oblongis obtusis, 
perlantlm foliolis albis rubro-fasciatis, petalis sepalisque conforuubus 
ligulato-oblanceolatis crispato-uudulatis, labello parvo e basi dilatato 
carunculato in laminam recurvam ovatam angustato, columns brevi 
recurva antice tumida sulcata utrinque apicem versus unidentata. 

O. zebrinum, Rchb. f. in Seem. Bomplmid, 1854 ; Lindl Fol. Orchid. Oncid. 
No. 1G ; Rchh.f. in Gard. Chron., 1372, p. 1355. 

Odontoglossum zebrinum, Rchb. f. in Linncea, vol. xxii. p. 849; Lindl. Fol. 
Orchid. Odontoglossum, No. 40. 



A very attractive plant from the pure white of the perianth, 
with its red-purple bars, and the fine gamboge-yellow of the 
bars of the lip ; at least such are the attractions of the variety 
iio-ured here. But Keichenbach describes a form in which 
the whole disk of the sepals is violet, and with only one 
violet spot at the base of each petal. In the length ot the 
panicle it exceeds all other species I have seen growing ; in 
the specimen here figured it was twelve feet long. Mr. 
Burbridse, who communicated the plant to me from the 
o-arden of Sir William Marriott, of Dover House, Blandford, 
observes, that the pseudo-bulbs are quite like those of 0. ma- 
crantkum (Tab. nost. 5743). . * 

Oncidium zebrinum has been sent home, living or dried, by 
various collectors, and was first flowered, according to Pro- 
fessor Reichenbach, bv Mr. Bull, in 1872 

Descr Rhizome stout, creeping, as thick as a goose-quill, 
with lanceolate brown scarious sheaths about one inch long 
Pseudo-bulbs three and a-half to four inches long, by one and 

DECEMBER 1ST, 1874. 



a-half to one and three-quarter inch broad, narrow ovoid, com- 
pressed, green, grooved when old or dry. Leaves six to nine 
inches long, between ensiform and lanceolate, acuminate, 
striated, keeled, deep green, paler beneath. Panicle sometimes 
twelve feet long, peduncle and rachis green, terete, as thick 
as a crow-quill and upwards, very flexuous but rigid, branches 
six inches long. Bracts one-half to three-quarter inch long, 
oblong-lanceolate, brown, dry. Pedicel together with the 
slender ovary one inch long. Perianth one and a-half to one 
and three-quarter inch in diameter. Sepals and Petals very 
similar, narrowly obovate or oblanceolate, or somewhat spa- 
tlmlate, waved and crisped, white with violet-red bars from 
the base to the middle. Lip much smaller than the petals, 
base broad subquadrate, irregularly thickened and warted, 
the centre yellow, the edges barred ; from this base the lip 
suddenly contracts into a triangular thick reflexed somewhat 
concave limb, which is white speckled with dull-red. Column 
short, tumid, and grooved in part, with a horizontal process 
on each side at the tip. — /. D. IL 



Fig. 1, View of ovary, column, and lip: — magnified. 



613$ 




Tab. 6139. 

FUCHSIA PROCUMBENS. 

Native of Neio Zealand. 



Nat. Ord. Osaorarikjs. 

Genus Fuchsia, Linn.; (Benth. $ ItooJc.f. Gen. Pk,nt.,vo\. 1, p. 790). 



rottmdato non inflato, lobis oblongis obtuse, petal* 0. 

W ? ^ 57 ; &ii. 5- ta£ F,c,, in -0 728; KM. k 
Gani. Chron., Sept. 1874. (Plant. 9). 
F. Kirkii, fl»M f» Ic. Plant, t. 1083 (Phot. t ). 

This curious little plant, so unlike a f^"« "^^ 

,„g on the «ar™»- ™° found on the Great Bamcr 

itT hv Mr Kirk in wo localities, both near the sea. 
Islands by JVlr. ivirK ui t relvino- on tlie 

This latter I distinguished ■^**2fcJ?SSfc I now 
length of the style and ^^P 1 ^ a o^toibuted to the 
find evidently a sexual °haiictei. lajjo cliaract er 

of J- Mmm (Handbook ^j^^ffi, 1 plants, the 
those of F. procmiau. Like » " *" w d the ' tw0 small 
*to are •£TfflMS A bisexual. Of 

r^ri^^^-t^rX^ 



DECEMBKB 1ST, 1874. 



again into a funnel-shaped limb, with lanceolate spreading 
lobes, and have minute petals ; whereas F. procumbent lias 
leaves without reticulation, has a cylindric corolla- tube with 
linear-oblong lobes which are sharply reflexed on the tube ; 
it has also often shorter petioles than F. Colensoi, and is 
apetalous. F. Colensoi may be divisible into two species ; one 
more robust with the calyx three-quarters of an inch long, the 
other as slender and trailing as F. procumbens, with the calyx 
one-third to one-half inch long ; but this .can only be deter- 
mined by studying the plant in all its states : the larger form 
is possibly only a small state of F. excorticata. 

F. procumbens was introduced into England by the late Mr. 
Williams, of Hendon, many years ago ; and again by Mr. J. 
Blackett, of Egham, from whose plant Mr. Burbridge sent me 
an excellent drawing in August last, in which, however, the 
flowers are represented as pendulous. About the same time 
Mr. Kinghorn, of Richmond, brought me a beautiful plant of 
it, from which the accompanying drawing was made by my 
very accomplished friend, J. F. Moggridge, F.L.S., and which 
is here reproduced by Mr. Pitch. 

Descr. Stems filiform, trailing, often many feet long, leaves 
one-half to three-quarters of an inch long, ovate or cordate, 
rarely orbicular, obscurely sinuate-toothed, membranous, 
pale green above, almost white beneath, not reticulated be- 
tween the principal nerves ; petiole filiform, longer than the 
blade. Floioers solitary, axillary, erect, pedicels one-fourth 
to one-half inch long. Calyx-limb longer than the pedicel, 
cylindric, rounded but not inflated at the base, pale orange- 
yellow ; lobes spreading, then reflexed on the tube, linear- 
oblong, obtuse, dark purple, green at the base. Stamens in 
the male plant on slender filaments ; anthers blue; those of 
the female with short filaments. Ovary ovoid ; style in the 
male plant included with a small stigma, in the female 
exserted with a large capitate stigma,— J. B. H. 



Fig, 1, Flower, with corolla laid open : — magnified. 



INDEX 

To Vol. XXX. of the Third Series, or Vol. C. of the 

Work. 



PL 


| PL 


Gl 17 Achillea ageratifolia. 


6132 


G092 Aconitum heterophyllum. 


6110 


G087 Arabis blepharophylla. 


6118 


6079 Bambusa striata. 


6116 


608 6 Bauhinia natalensis. 


610G 


G091 Besohorneria Tonelii. 


G12G 


G134 Blumenbachia contorta. 


G131 


6119 Eolbophyllum Dayanum. 


6077 


G137 Boucerosia maroccana. 




6114 Brachyscma undulatum. 


6088 


6123 Brodiaea volubilis. 


' 6085 


6104 Calanthe curculigoides. 


6084 


6111 Campsidium chilense. 


6138 


6130 Cerinthe gymnandra. 


6093 


6107 Chrysanthemum Catananche. 


6129 


6120 Cinnaniodendron corticosum. 


6122 


6128 Citrus Aurantium, var. japo- 


G125 


nica. 


G133 


6090 Colchicum Parkinsoni. 


6112 


G078 Colchicum speciosum. 


6100 


6113 Crinum Moorei. 


6135 


6103 Crocus cancellatus. 


6089 


6115 Decabelone elegans. 


6095 


6121 Drosera Whittakerii. 


6109 


6097 Echinocactus Cummingii. 


6102 


6094 Epidendrum criniferum. 


6074 


6098 Epidendrum Lindleyanum. 


G127 


6136 Episcia fulgida. 


6099 


6108 Erica Chamissonis. 


6101 


6080 Fagraca zeylanica. 


6082 


6139 Fuchsia procumbcns. 


G07G 


6081 Gaillardia Amblyodon. 


6 1 24 


6105 Grevillca fasciculata. 


6075 


6083 Iris Douglasiana. 


6096 



Iris laevigata. 
Iris olbiensis. 
Iris tcctorum. 
Kniphofia Booperi. 
Lessertia perennans. 
Liliam maculatum. 
Melaleuca Wilsoni. 
Mesembryanthemum trunca- 

tellum. 
Nunnezharia geonomaaforni is. 
Odontoglossum Eoezlii. 
Odontoglossum roseum. 
Oncidium zebrinum. 
Panax sambucifolius. 
Passi flora manicata. 
Pentstemon humilis. 
Pogonia discolor. 
Polygonatum vulgare. 
Pyrus baccata. 
Regelia ciliata. 
Rheum officinale. 
Rhipsalis Houlletii. 
Rhopala Pohlii. 
Romanzoffia sitchensis. 
Saxifraga florulenta. 
Saxifraga peltata. 
Scorzonera undulata. 
Senecio Anteuphorbium. 
Senecio Doronicum. 
Stapelia Corderoyi. 
Steudnera colocasiasfolia. 
Tacca artocarpifolia. 
Xanthorrlnca quadrangulata. 
Xiphion Sisyrinchium. 



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THE NATURAL HISTORY OF PLANTS. 

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