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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CURTIS'S 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



'•fryMfcfcnrtirtTi 



COMPRISING THE 



JMantg of tfjc ftopal <*Bartien£ of Ueto, 



OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



FOSEPH DALTON HOOKEK, M.D., C.B., P.K.S., F.L.S., &c. 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D. CANTAB., CORRESPONDENT OF THE INSTITUTE Of FltANCE. 

VOL. XXXI. 

OF THE THIRD SERIES; 
(Or Vol. CI. of the whole Work.) 




" A lily of a day 
Is fairer far in May, 
Although it fall and die that night— 
It was the flower and plant of Light. 
In small proportions we just beauties see 
And in short measures life may perfect be." 



— Ben Jonson. 



LONDON : 
L. REEVE fc CO.. 5, HENRIETTA STREET. COVENT GARDEN. 

187- r >. 
[All Riuh<!> rtten 



Mo. Bot. i 



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ST. MA.RY-LE-STRAND, W.C. 



TO 



MAXWELL T. MASTERS, M.D. F.R.S., F.L.S. 



Dear L>r. Masters, 

Pray accept the dedication of a volume of the 
" Botanical Magazine," a work which endeavours to promote 
views which you so prominently advocate — namely, the 
necessity of treating scientifically the results of Horticultural 
skill and enterprise. 

Believe me ever, 

Very sincerely yours, 

JOS. I). HOOKER. 



Royal Garden, Kew, 

December 1, 1875. 



STljirtJ Scries. 

No. 361. 

VOL. XXXI. JANUARY. [.Price 3s. M. coP- 2s. M. plain. 

OR No. 1055 OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMPRISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 

BY 

JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., P.R.S., F.L.S., && 

Btrtctor of tf)e IJogal botanic ©artcns of IScfo. 




Nature and Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers exotic grace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 
L. REEVE & CO., 5, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1875. 

[All right$ reterced. 



ROYAL BOTANIC SOCIETY OF LONDON, 

GARDENS— REGENT'S PARK. 



ARRANGEMENTS FOR 1875. 

EXHIBITIONS OF SPRING FLOWERS, Wednesdays, March 31, April 28. 

EXHIBITION OF CLEMATIS, May 1 to May 24. 

EXHIBITION OF ROSES, May 3 to May 10. 

SUMMER EXHIBITIONS OF PLANTS, Wednesdays, May 26, Jane 16. 

EXHIBITION OF FRUIT AND CUT FLOWERS, Wednesday, June 30. 

SPECIAL EVENING FETE, Wednesday, July 14. 

PROMENADES, every Wednesday in May, June, and July, excepting the 
Exhibition days, commencing May 5. 

LECTURES in the Museum at 4 o'clock precisely, Fridays, May 14, 21, 28 ; 
June 4, 11,18, 25; July 2. 

RE-ISSUE of the THIRD SERIES of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Now ready, Vols. I. to XIII., price 42s. each (to Subscribers for the entire 
Series 36s. each). 

HPHE BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, Third Series. By Sir 
-*- William and Dr. Hooker. To be continued monthly. 

Subscribers' names received by the Publishers, either for the Monthly Volume 
or for Sets to be delivered complete at 36s. per Volume, as soon as ready. 



L. Reeve & Co., 5, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

Now Ready, completing the Work, Double Part XI. and XII., with 
8 Coloured Plates, Royal ito, price 10s. 

ORCHIDS, 

AND 

How to Grow them in India & other Tropical Climates. 

BY 

SAMUEL JENNINGS, F.L.S., F.R.H.S. 

Late Vice-President of the Agri-Horticultural Society of India. 

The Work complete in 1 Vol., cloth, gilt edges, 63s. Cloth Cases for 
Binding, 2s, 6d. 



L. Reeve & Co., 5, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



DEDICATED BY SPECIAL PERMISSION TO H.R.H. THE 
PRINCESS OF WALES. 

NOW READY, Complete in Six Parts, 21s. each, or in One Vol., imperial folio 

with 30 elaborately Coloured Plates, forming one of the most beautiful 

Floral Works ever published, half morocco, gilt edges, £J 7a. 

A MONOGRAPH OF 0D0NT0GL0SSUM. 

A Genus of the Vandeous section of Orchidaceous Plants. By James Bateman 
F.R.S., F.L.S., Author of " The Orchidacea? of Mexico and Guatemala." * ' 

L. Rekye & Co., 5, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



EOYAL BOTANIC SOCIETY OF LONDON, 

GARDENS— REGENT'S PARK. 



ARRANGEMENTS FOR 1875. 

EXHIBITIONS OF SPRING FLOWERS, Wednesdays, March 31, April 38. 

EXHIBITION OF CLEMATIS, May 1 to May 24. 

EXHIBITION OF ROSES, May 3 to May 10. 

SUMMER EXHIBITIONS OF PLANTS, Wednesdays, May 26, Jane 1(5. 

EXHIBITION OF FRUIT AND CUT FLOWERS, Wednesday, June CO. 

SPECIAL EVENING FETE, Wednesday, July 14. 

PROMENADES, every Wednesday in May, June, and July, excepting the 
Exhibition days, commencing May 5. 

LECTURES in the Museum at 4 o'clock precisely, Fridays, May 14, 21, 23 ; 
June 4, 11,18, 25; July 2. 

RE-ISSUE of the THIRD SERIES of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Now ready, Vols. I. to XIII. , price 42s. each {to Subscribers for the entire 
Series 36s. each). 

rpHE BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, Third Series. By Sir 
-*- William and Dr. Hooker. To be continued monthly. 

Subscribers' names received by the Publishers, either for the Monthly Volume 
■or for Sets to be delivered complete at 36s. per Volume, as soon as ready. 



L. Reeve & Co., 5, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



Now Ready, completing the Work, Double Part XI. and XII., vnth 
8 Coloured Plates, Royal ito, price 10s. 

ORCHIDS, 

AND 

How to Grow them in India & other Tropical Climates. 

BY 

SAMUEL JENNINGS, F.L.S., F.R.H.S. 

Late Vice-President of the Agri-Horticultural Society of India. 

The Work complete xa 1 Vol., cloth, gilt edges, 63s. Cloth Cases for 
Binding, 2s, 6d. 



L. Reeve & Co., 5, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



DEDICATED BY SPECIAL PERMISSION TO H.R.H. THE 

PRINCESS OF WALES. 

NOW READY, Complete in Six Parts, 21s. each, or in One Vol., imperial folio, 

with 30 elaborately Coloured Plates, forming one of the most beautiful 

Floral Works ever published, half morocco, gilt edges, £7 7s. 

A MONOGRAPH OF 0D0NT0GL0SSUM. 

A Genus of the Vandeous section of Orchidaceous Plants. By James Batemas 
F.R.S., F.L.S., Author of " The Orchidaces of Mexico and Guatemala." 

L. Reeve & Co., 5, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 




GUV 







Mncent/Bi'ooltsDa-y £; Son, Imp 



Tab. 6140. 
EUCALYPTUS cornuta. 

Native of South- Western Australia. 



Nat. Ord. Myrtace^e. — Tribe Leptosperme^e. 
Genus Eucalyptus, IS her. ; {Benth. Sf Hook. f. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. 707). 



Eucalyptus cornuta; arbor, ramulis gracilibus pallide rubris, foliis 3-4- 
pollicaribus elliptico-lanceolatis acuminatis glauco-viridibus, nervia 
obliquis intramarginali a margine remoto, pedunculis axillaribus 
robustis curvis modice a vertice compressis, floribus 6-40 in capitulum 
subglobosum cohterentibus sessilibus receptaculo non immersis, calyce 
conico-turbinato angulato operculo rubro in rostrum 2— 3-pollicare 
obtusum robustum sensim attenuato, ovarii apico calyce non immerso 
conico in stylum gracilem attenuato, staminibus alabastro non inflexis 
extimis 3-pollicaribus, fructu turbinato truncato ore non contracto. 

Eucalyptus cornuta, Labill. Voy., vol. i. p. 403, t. 26 ; DC. Prodr., vol. iii. 
p. 216; Schauer in Plant. Preiss., vol. i. p 127; F. Muell. Fragment., 
vol. ii. p. 39, excl. syn.; Benth. Fl. Austral, vol. iii. p. 234. 



Amongst the wonderful forms of Australian vegetation 
this is not the least striking, whether from its singular 
structure or the colouring of its inflorescence. It is a native 
of South- Western Australia, where it was discovered by 
Labillardiere in the beginning of the century; and from whence 
numerous dried specimens are in the Kew Herbarium, from 
Cunningham, Drummond, Oldfield, Harvey, and others, col- 
lected from King George's Sound eastward to Cape Eiche. 
It is the " Yeit" of the colonists, and, according to Oldfield's 
notes, it must be a very variable tree, as he describes some 
specimens as from trees 10 feet high, others from trees 30 
to 40 feet high, and others still from trees of 80 to 100 feet 
high. The bark he describes as rough, hard, persistent, 
and light brown in the larger trees ; as black, and half fibrous 
in others ; and as smooth in the smaller trees. At Kew, 
where two specimens are cultivated in tubs in the south 
octagon of the temperate house, it forms a slender tree, 

JANUARY 1ST, 1875. 



about nine feet high, with smooth bark and spreading 
branches, as represented in the figure. 

Eucalyptus comuta was raised at Kew, from seed sent by 
Drummond many years ago, and flowers annually in about 
June from the old wood. The flower-heads and flowers of 
the cultivated plant are more than twice as large as those of 
any wild specimen in the Herbarium. 

Descr. A small or large slender tree, with a bushy crown ; 
branchlets slender, hardly drooping, red. Leaves three to 
four inches long, alternate, coriaceous, elliptic-lanceolate, 
acuminate, narrowed into a short red petiole ; nerves obscure, 
oblique, the intra-marginal remote from the margin.. Flowers 
six to forty, in a globose head four to six inches in diameter 
(including the operculum), closely cohering by their calyces, 
but not connate or sunk in the" receptacle ; peduncle very 
stout, curved, two inches long, compressed horizontally. 
Calyx half an inch long, green, turbinate, angled ; operculum 
one to one and a half inches long, conical at the base, narrowed 
into a stout obtuse curved beak, bright red. Stamens forming 
a dense corona, three inches long, the inner shorter, filaments 
flaccid, yellow; anthers linear-oblong, cells parallel. Tip 
of ovary conical, not sunk below the margin of the calyx- 
tube, narrowed into a slender curved style. Head of fruit 
often three inches in diameter. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1 Reduced view of tree ; 2, branch, leaves, and inflorescence : 3 
calyx and ovary : — of the natural size. * 



Tab. 6141. 
crocus byzantinus. 

Native of Transylvania and the Banal. 



Nat. Ord. Iride^E. — Tribe Ixie^E. 
Genus Crocus, Tourn.; (Klatt in Linnoza, vol. xxxiv. p. 674), 



Crocus byzantinus; cormo parvo depresso-globoso, rete e nbris longitudi- 
nalibus gracilibus dense intertextis in vaginam foliorum basim cingentem 
producto, folds 3-4 vernalibus g-poll. latis, floribus autumnalibus soli- 
tariis, perianthii tubo 4— 6-pollicari ad medium vaginis albis tecto, 
limbo 3-3-J poll. diam. pallide purpureo v. lilacino, foliolis ellipticis 
acutis, interioribus pallidioribus v. albis dimidio minoribus, antheris 
davis filamentis longioribus, stigmatibus purpureis apice capillaceo- 
7-10-fidis. 

Crocus byzantinus, Ker in Bot. Mag., sub tab. 1111; Herbert in Bot. Reg. 
1847, t. 4, f. 5 ; et in Journ. Hort. Soa, vol. ii. p. 269 ; Baker in Gard. 
Chron. 1873, p. 1633. 

C. banaticus, Gay in Bull. Feruss., vol. xv. p. 220, non Heuffel. 
C. speciosus, Reichb. PI. Crit., t. 1267-8, non M. Bieb. 
C. iridiflorus, Hevff. Ulster. Bot. Wochenb. 1857, p. 222 ; Reich. Ic. Fl. Germ., 
vol. ix. t. 361, f. 802-3. 

C. Hubertianus, Kozrnike in Walp. Ann., vol. vi. p. 37. 

Crociris iridiflora, Schur. Sert. 1853, p. 73. 

Crocum montanum, Clus. Hist., vol. i. p. 209. 

Crocus byzantinus argenteus, Parkins. Par. p. 1 68, t. 1 69, f. 3. 



A late autumnal species of Crocus, remarkable for its acute 
perianth segments, and the small size of the three interior of 
these. Its synonymy is numerous and intricate, and for this 
I am indebted to Mr. Baker's valuable paper on Croci in the 
Gardeners' Chronicle. It is one of the eailiest introduced of 
the exotic species, being figured by Clusius in the very com- 
mencement of the seventeenth century (1601), from whom 
the specific name byzantinus is adopted, he having received it 
from Constantinople, where however it is unknown to 

JANUARY 1ST, 1875. 



Griesbach, who enumerates it amongst the "Croci inqui- 
rendi " in his " Spicilegium Morse Rumelicse et Bithynica?." 

Crocus byzantinus has long been in cultivation at Kew 
and elsewhere, and the drawing was made partly from 
specimens communicated by Major Trevor Clarke, and partly 
from others that flowered in Kew in November last. 

Descr. Corm three quarters to one and a quarter inches in 
diameter, depressed-globose, clothed with a light brown net- 
work of longitudinally interlaced fibres, that extends in a 
sheath for a short way round the base of the leaves, and some- 
times also up the flowering-scape. Leaves three to four, pro- 
duced in spring, dark green, one-third of an inch in diameter, 
with a central yellow rib towards the base only. Sheaths 
on the scape closed, white, reaching to about halfway 
between the flower and corm. Perianth-tube slender, white ; 
limb three to three and a half inches in diameter, lilac- 
purple ; segments elliptic-ovate, acuminate, very concave, 
the inner not half as large as the outer, sometimes white! 
Stamens included; anthers yellow, longer than the filaments. 
Stigmas purple, split at the top into from seven to ten 
slender segments. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Portion of sheath of corm ; 2, stigmas:— loth magnified. 



cm 



■ 

I 







WRtch ddetluii 






Tab. 6142. 

JAMESIA AMERICANA. 

Native of The Rocky Mountains. 



Nat. Ord. SaxifkagejE. — Tribe Hydrangea. 

Genus Jamesia, Torr. and Gray ;—(Benth. # Iloolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 

643). 



Jamesia americana ; ramulis junioribus petiolis foliis subtus et inflorescentia 
laxe villosis, foliis ovatis obtusis crenato-dentatis supra glabris, pani- 
culis brevibus terminalibus basi foliosis, calycis lobis rotundatis, petalis 
oblongis. 

Jamesia americana, Torr. Sf Gray Flor. N. Am., vol. ii. p. 593 ; Walp. Ann., 
vol. ii. p. 614; A. Gray Plant. FendL, p. 55 in nota ; Carriere in Rev. 
Hortic, October, 1874, p. 389 cum ic xylog. 



First described from imperfect specimens by Torrey and 
Gray, in 1840, and named by them " in commemoration of the 
scientific services of Dr. Edwin James, its worthy discoverer, 
the botanist and historian of Major Long's expedition to the 
Eocky Mountains in 1820, and who during the journey made 
an excellent collection of plants under the most unfavourable 
circumstances." Those were the days when every traveller 
in the Eocky Mountains carried his life in his hand, and 
when to hold it fast required the subtlety of the savage, plus 
the pluck of the white man. Little was known of this plant 
for many subsequent years, not until it was gathered by 
Fendler in 1847, and after another long interval by C. C. 
Parry, in 1801, in the very spot where James had discovered 
it — namely, the head-waters of Clear Creek, and on Alpine 
ridges east of Middle Park, in the Colorado territory, 
lat. 40° N. Considering the numerous collections that have 
been made in other parts of the Eocky Mountains, and that 
do not contain the Jamesia, it is evident that it is a very 
rare and local plant. 

Though so much more like a Eosaceous plant in habit and 
inflorescence, Jamesia is truly saxifragaceous, and closely 

JANUARY 1st, 1875. 



allied to Hydrangea ; it is quite hardy, and was raised at Kew 
about twelve years ago, from seed received, I believe, from 
Dr. Asa Gray, where, however, it has not flowered. For the 
plant here figured I am indebted to the Eev. Mr. Ellacombe, of 
Bitton, near Bristol, who flowered it in October last. 

Descr. A branching shrub; branches opposite, covered 
with a loose, papery bark ; branchlets, petioles, leaves beneath, 
and inflorescence clothed with soft villous pubescence. Leaves 
opposite, petioled, one to two inches long, ovate, obtuse, 
crenate-toothed, glabrous, but not shining above, with im- 
pressed veins; petiole one-quarter to one-third inch long. 
Cymes terminal, erect, shortly pyramidal, many-flowered, the 
lower branches leafy at the base. Flowers half an inch diameter ; 
white, pedicels one-sixth inch long. Calyx villous, tur- 
binate, 5-lobed, lobes rounded or broadly ovate, acute, white. 
Petals 5, spreading, oblong, obtuse. Stamens 10, the alter- 
nate shorter; filaments linear, flattened; anthers broadly 
oblong. Ovary conical; styles 3-5, stout, erect, stigmas 
subcapitate. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, the same, with the petals removed ; 3, long and ahort 
stamens ; 4, ovary j — all magnified. 



Tab. 6143. 
BLUMENBACHIA chuquitensis. 

Native of Peru. 



Nat. Ord. Loase^e. 
Genus Blumenbachia, Schrad.; {Benth. § Hook. f. Gen. PL, vo\ i. p. 805). 



Blujienbachia chuquitensis ; setis urentibus elongatis laxe conspersa, caule 
erecto v. subvolubile robusto folioso ramoso, foliis longe petiolatis 
oblongis v. oblongo-lanceolatis pinnatitidis basi pinnatis, foliolis segmen- 
tisve ovatis pinnatifido-lobatis subtus dense pubescentibus, pedunculis 
erectis foliis brevioribus 1-floris, floribus 1J-3 poll. diam. 5-10"-meris, 
sepalis crenato-lobulatis, capsula globoso-turbinata. 

Loasa chuquitensis, Meyen, reise um den Erde, vol. i. p. 483 in note. Walp. 
in Nov. Act. Acad., vol. xix. Suppl. 1, p. 339; Rep. vol. v. p. 780. 



A handsome Peruvian herbaceous plant, allied to the Chilian 
B. coronata {Caiophora coronata, Hook. & Arn. ; see Haage 
& Schmidt in Eevue Hortic. 1874, p. 58), but differing 
wholly in habit, this having a stout erect, or suberect and 
leafy stem, with the petioles and axillary peduncles shorter 
than the leaf-blade, and B. coronata being a tufted plant, 
with a short procumbent stem, very slender petioles much 
longer than the blade, and long scape-like peduncles rising 
from the ground. These two species are indeed so closely 
allied, that I was at first disposed to regard i?. chuquitensis as 
an overgrown, erect, robust-branched specimen of the Chilian 
plant, with hypertrophied flowers; but besides the differences 
alluded to, this has much more entire sepals, and comes from 
much further north in the Andes. It was imported from 
Peru by Messrs. Veitch in 1863, through their collector, 
Mr. Pearce, and there are indigenous specimens in the Kew 
Herbarium, collected by Lechler in Peru, at San Antonio 
a place I do not find in the maps. The capsule is slightly 
twisted when quite ripe, thus showing a passage from Blu- 
menbachia to Caiophora, genera that are united in the 

JANUARY 1ST, 1875. 



Genera Plantarum. The number of petals varies in the 
cultivated state from 5 to 10, hut all are quite symmetrical. 

B. chuquitensis flowered in Messrs. Veitch's establishment in 
September, and is quite hardy. (When first sent to view to 
be named, in 1865, it was supposed to be the C. coronata, 
under which name Mr. Veitch tells me that he has conse- 
quently distributed it.) 

Descr. Whole plant laxly clothed with spreading shining 
stinging hairs, one-fifth of an inch long, also more or less 
stellately pubescent, especially upon the leaves beneath. 
Stem stout, erect, straight or nexuous, perhaps twining when 
full- grown, leafy. Leaves, including the petiole, eight to ten 
inches long ; blade oblong-lanceolate, longer than the petiole, 
pinnatifid, the lower segments free, all ovate, irregularly 
pinnatifidly lobed, recurved, concave beneath. Peduncles 
axillary, two to four inches long. Flowers one and a half to two 
inches in diameter, brick-red, with five to ten petals. Calyx 
turbinate ; lobes ovate-lanceolate, recurved, lobulate. Petals 
boat-shaped, rounded at the tip, setose at the back, bright 
brick-red, with yellow inside and on the outer margin on 
either side the tip. Scales cup-shaped, with three dorsal and 
two interior appendages. Capsule one and a half inches 
long, globosely turbinate, many-ribbed, slightly twisted when 
mature. — /. D. II 



Fig. 1, Scale and appendage: — magnified. 




6144- 







- T mp 



Tab. 6144. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM maxillare. 

Native of Mexico. 



Nat. Ord. Ouchide.2B. — Tribe Vandejj. 
Gemig Odontoglossum, H. B. Sf K. ; (Lindl. Fol. Orchid. Odontoglossum). 



Odontoglossum maxillare ; pseudobulbis anguste oblongis 3-pollicaribus, 
foliis lineari-lanceolatis subacutis carinatis, pedunculo brevi cum racemo 
4-6-flore folio breviore nutante, bracteis membranaceis pedicello 
asquilongis, floribus l|-2-poll. diam., sepalis lanceolatis aristato-acumi- 
natis albis basi macula fusco-rubra notatis, petalis asquilongis latioribus 
oblongis apiculatis albis basi purpureo-maculatis, labello parvo breviter 
unguiculato 3-lobo inter lobos laterales parvos retrorsum auctatos 2- 
calloso, lobo intermedio multo majore trulliformi recurvo marginc 
undulato albo, disco basim versus macula 2-loba aurantiaca notato, 
columna brevi aptera. 

Odontoglossum maxillare, Lindl. in Bot. Reg. sub tab. 62 ; Fol. Orchid. 
Odontoglossum, no. 23 ; Reichb. f. in Walp. Ann., vol. vi. p. 834 ; 
Lemaire III. Hortic. t. 200. 



Dr. Lindley first described this beautiful plant under the 
name it bears, from a single flower procured from Mr. C. B. 
Warner in 1847. Its native county was then unknown; 
but from its resemblance to 0. Cervantesii and other species 
of Mexico, it was supposed, correctly as it has proved, to 
come from that country. A reference to Lindley's figure of 
0. Cervantesii [Hot. Reg., 1845, t. 36) shows that 0. Maxillare 
is indeed closely allied to that plant, but differs essentially in 
the much longer oblong pseudobulbs, less petioled leaves, nar- 
rower sepals, much shorter wingless column, obtuse anther- 
case, different shaped lip, and in the colouring of the whole 
flower. 

I am indebted to Messrs. Veitch for the use of a beautiful oil- 
painting of this plant by Mrs. E. G. Wrigley, from which the 
engraving here given has been made; the specimen which 
accompanied it was flowered by Mr. Wrigley at Broadoaks, 

JANUART 1ST, 1875. 



Bury, Lancashire, in November last, and was procured from 
Messrs. Veitch, who obtained it from Roezl. 

Descr. Pseudobulbs about three inches long, narrowly ob- 
long, mnch compressed, pale green. Leaves five to seven 
inches long, narrowly lanceolate, acute, keeled, hardly petioled. 
Racemes 4-6-nowered, inclined, together with the rather stout 
peduncle shorter than the leaves. Bracts slender, membra- 
nous, brown; pedicel together with the ovary one and a half 
inches long, slender. Perianth nearly two inches in diameter. 
Sepals lanceolate, aristately acuminate, white, with a red- 
brown lobed spot at the base. Petals broader than the sepals, 
oblong, apiculate, with a livid purple-brown blotch at the 
base. Lip much smaller than the petals, recurved, claw 
short, hollowed ; lateral lobes small, forming two recurved 
acute appendages to the claw; mid-lobe trowel-shaped, acu- 
minate, with waved or crisped margins, white, with a broad 
2-lobed orange blotch on the disk towards the base, behind 
which are two obtuse yellowish calli. Column very short, 
not winged ; anther-case obtuse. — J. D, H. 



Fig. 1, Flower, with sepals and petals removed ; 2, front view of column 
and lip : — magnified. 



NOW READY, Part II., 10s. 6d. 

FLORA OF INDIA. 

BY 

DE. HOOKER, C.B., F.R.S. 

Assisted by various Botanists. 
PART III. JTTST READY. 



L. Reeve & Co., 5, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
NOW READY, Vol. 3, with 551 Wood Engravings, 25s. 

THE NATURAL HISTORY OF PLANTS. 

By Prof. H. Baillon, P.L.S., Paris. Translated by Marcus M. IIartog, B.Sc., 
Lond., B.A., Scholar of Trinity College, Cambridge. Contents : — Meni- 
spermacese, Berberidaceas, Nymphaeacea?, Papaveraceas, Capparidaceoe, Cruci- 
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Tab. 6140.— EUCALYPTUS CORNUTA (Double Plate). 
M 6141.— CROCUS BYZANTINUS. 
„ 6142.— JAMESIA AMERICANA. 
n 6143.— BLUMENBACHIA CHUQUITENSIS. 
,. 6144.— ODONTOGLOSSUM MAXILLARE. 



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ORCHIDS, 

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Tab. 6145. 
EPIDENDRUM syringothyrsls. 

Native of Bolivia. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^:. — Tribe Epidendrejs. 
Genus Epidendrum, Linn. ; {Lindl. Fol. Orchid., part 2, p. 1). 



Epidendrum (amphiglottium) syringothyrsis ; caulibus 4-pedalibus suberecti3 
gracilibus fasciculatis Miosis, foliis alternis distichis e basi vaginante 
viridi elliptico-lanceolatis acuminatis recurvis coriaceis dorso carinatis 
lffite viridibus, pedunculo spatha oblonga acuta brunnea vaginata ra- 
chique valido purpureis, racemo magno ovoideo densifioro nutante, flori- 
bus horizontalibus fusco-purpureis, bracteis parvis subulatis, pedicellis 
cum ovario l-l|-pollicaribus gracilibus, perianthio 1 poll, diam., sepalis 
elliptico-lanceolatis subacutis, petalis a;quilongis linearibus, labello ad 
apicem columnar sessili parvo ad medium trilobo, lobis lateralibus 
subquadrato-rotundatis integris, intermedio minore subquadrato trun- 
cato apiculato, disco albo callis 3 lamelliformibus, columna clavata exa- 
lata utrinque juxta foveam biloba purpurea. 

Epidendrum syringothyrsis, Reichb. f. mss. 



A very tall and handsome species, which flowered in Mr. 
Veitch's fine Orchid collection in May, 1868, and again with 
a larger raceme than that here figured in the same month of 
the following year. It is a native of Bolivia, where it was 
collected, in 1866, by Messrs. Veitch's collector, the late Mr. 
Pearce, and is evidently a member of the immense section to 
which E. evectum (Tab. nost. 5902) belongs, and of which the 
type is the long known E. elongatum, Jacq. (Tab. nost. 611), 
which latter is one of the earliest cultivated tropical Orchids. 
Prom all its congeners that are known to me, it differs in the 
great size of the dense-flowered raceme, which, from its general 
resemblance to that of the Lilac in form and colour, has sug- 
gested to Professor Reichenbach, the specific name of syrinyo- 
thyrsis. Its nearest ally is E. porphyreum, Lindl., a native of 
Peru, which has a panicled inflorescence. Though long 
known under the name given above, no description of it lias 
hitherto appeared. I have, however, confirmed the name by 
application to my friend Dr. Eeichenbach, who at once for- 
februauy 1st, 1875. 



warded me a description. Dr. Eeichenbach further informs 
me, that he has native specimens gathered in 1845 by 
Mandon in the Province of Laruaja, near Sorata, at eleva- 
tions of 7-8000 feet. 

Descr. Stem tufted, about four feet high, slender, erect, 
or inclined, leafy, terete ; internodes one to two inches long. 
Leaves numerous, distichous, alternate ; sheath green, cylin- 
dric, three to four inches long; blade six to seven inches 
long, recurved, elliptic-lanceolate, acuminate, keeled beneath, 
faintly nerved, deep green above, paler beneath. Peduncle 
shorter than the raceme, stout, terete, clothed with brown 
lax sheathing bracts, and as well as the rachis dark red- 
brown ; rachis stout, grooved. Panicle five to seven inches 
long by four broad, inclined, broadly ovoid, obtuse, dense- 
flowered. Flotvers very numerous, horizontal ; bracts small, 
subulate. Pedicel and ovary together one to one and a half 
inches long, slender and as well as the perianth dull red- 
purple. Perianth one inch in diameter. Sepals spreading 
horizontally, elliptic-lanceolate or rather broader upwards, 
acute. Petals as long, but narrower. Lip sessile at the end of 
the column, small, 3-lobed, lateral lobes quadrate with 
rounded angles, quite entire; midlobe smaller, quadrate, 
with an apiculus at the truncate apex; disk white with 
three tumid yellow calli. Column clavate, not winded — 
/. B.H. & 



Fig 1, Reduced view of plant ; 2, portion of stem, and a panicle :— of the 
natural size ; 3, column and lip : — magnified. 



GM 










Tab. 6146. 
lil1um canadense, vak. parvtjm. 

Native of California. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^e. — Tribe TcjlipEjE. 
Genus Lilium, Linn. ; (Baker in Gard. Chron., 1871). 



Lilium canadense, var. parvum ; caule gracili stricto glabro 1-1^ pedali, 
foliis sparsis et verticillatis 1^-2 pollicaribus oblongo- v. obovato-lan- 
ceolatis obtusis v. subacutis 1-3-nerviis subundulatis marginibus 
scaberulis glabris, floribus parvis laxe subcorymbosis nutantibus longe 
gracile pedicellatis, pedicellis erectis ebracteatis, perianthio tubuloso- 
campanulato flavo-aurantiaco, foliolis supra medium patenti-recurvis 
oblanceolatis subacutis medium versus purpureo-maculatis, exterioribua 
paulo angustioribus, staminibus perianthio brevioribus, antheris majus- 
culis flavis, stigmate capitato integro. 

L. canadense var. parvum, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc, vol. xiv. p. 241. 

L. parvum, Kellog. in Proc. Calif. Acad. Nat. Sc, vol. ii. p. 179, t. 12 ; 
Hegel Gartenfi., vol. xxi. p. 163, t. 725; Duchart. Obs. 98. 



I follow Mr. Baker's comprehensive account of the genus 
Lilium, published in the " Journal of the Linnsean Society/' in 
referring this pretty Western American plant to a form of the 
Eastern American L. canadense, though before being con- 
vinced of their identity, I should like to have more knowledge 
of the fruit of the two plants than I have the materials to ob- 
tain. The fruit of L. canadense is linear-oblong, nearly an inch 
long in its largest state; that of a small specimen of L. parvum 
from Scott's Mountains, near the 42nd parallel, collected by 
Lyall, is subspherical in outline, truncate at the top, and 
about half an inch in diameter. Lastly, Kegel in the Garten- 
flora describes the margins of the outer perianth segments 
of L. parvum as densely puberulous, which is not the case in 
the specimens before me. 

The variety parvum inhabits a wide range of the mountains 
of AVestern America from British Columbia southwards, and 
appears to vary extraordinarily in stature and in the size of 
all its parts. The form here represented, was sent for 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1875. 



figuring from the fine collection of Messrs. Barr and Sugden, 
with whom it flowered in June of last year. 

Desch. Bulb globose, of many fleshy narrow acute scales. 
Stem a foot to a foot and a half high, slender, erect, terete, 
quite glabrous. Leaves scattered or whorled or both on the 
same stem, one and a half to two inches long, sessile, ob- 
lanceolate or oblong-lanceolate, obtuse or subacute, glabrous 
with minutely roughened margins, undulate, obscurely 
3-nerved, pale green, upper gradually smaller. Flowers laxly 
corymbose, drooping ; pedicels three to four inches long, very 
slender, suberect, ebracteate. Perianth one to one and a quarter 
inches long, narrowly campanulate, bright orange-red with 
the tube greenish externally. Perianth-segments oblanceolate, 
spreading and recurved for the upper third, spotted with 
dark red-purple about the throat, subacute, the outer rather 
narrower, quite glabrous. Stamens shorter than the perianth, 
filaments slender ; anthers rather large, yellow. Ovary ob- 
long ; style stout clavate, stigma capitate entire. — J. 2). H. 



Fig. 1 , Inner, and 2, outer, perianth segments : — magnified. 



6141 






r Q oks Day 1S<k. T onj. 



Tab. 6147. 
VERONICA PINGUIFOLIA. 

Native of New Zealand. 



Nat. Ord. ScROPHUXARiNEiE. — Tribe Vero-nice^e. 
Genua Veronica, Linn. ; (Benth. in DC. Prodr., vol. x. p. 458). 



Veronica (Decussatse) pinguifolia ; fruticulus glaberrimus robustus ramosus 
glaucus, ramis oppositis v, suboppositis crebre cicatricatis erectis v. 
decumbentibus, ramulis puberulis, foliis imbricatis sessilibu8 erecto- 
patentibus obovatis v. obovato-oblongis obtusis integerrimis crasse 
coriaceis concavis enerviis, costa obscura subtus ecarinata, spicis con- 
fertis axillaribus et subterminalibus brevibus subglobosis densifloris 
pubescenti-pilosis, floribus sessilibus, bracteis coriaceis ciliatis, sepalis 
oblongis obtusis puberulis ciliatis, floribus albis, capsula obovato- 
oblonga obtusa compressa emargiuata. 

V. pinguifolia, Ilooh.f. Handbook of New Zeal. Flora, p. 210. 



The shrubby Veronicas of New Zealand are a prevailing 
feature throughout the islands, at all elevations, and in almost 
all situations. Upwards of thirty species have been discovered, 
including some of remarkable beauty, of which V. speciosa (Tab. 
nost. 4057) and V. salicifolia, with their numerous varieties 
and hybrids, are the only ones well known in cultivation, 
except the less attractive V. ellipiica {V. decussata, Ait., Tab. 
nost. 242), one of the earliest cultivated greenhouse shrubs 
of the Southern Hemisphere, and which inhabits New Zealand, 
Terra del Fuego, and the Falkland Islands. Amongst the 
least conspicuous of this group is the present plant, which is 
a native of considerable elevations (3000-5000 ft.) in the 
Nelson and Canterbury provinces of middle Island of New 
Zealand. 

V. pinguifolia has been cultivated for several years both at 
Kew, and in Mr. Isaac Anderson Henry's garden near Edin- 
burgh, where it was first raised from seed. It has stood in the 
open air throughout the winter without protection at Kew, 
and flowers in midsummer. It is very closely allied to 

FEBRUARY 1st, 1875. 



V. carnosula, another New Zealand species, distinguished by 
its acute glabrous capsule. 

Descr. A stout erect or subprostrate woody shrub, 
four inches to four feet high ; branches closely covered with 
leaf scars, the branchlets pubescent. Leaves one-sixth to 
one-half of an inch long, closely imbricate, erecto-patent, 
sessile, very thick and coriaceous, glaucous, obovate-oblong, 
obtuse, quite entire, nerveless, not keeled, midrib very obscure. 
Flowers one-third of an inch in diameter, in almost globose 
crowded axillary and subterminal dense-flowered spikes, quite 
sessile, white. Bracts as long as the calyx, convex, oblong, 
obtuse, cihate, deciduous. Sepals oblong, obtuse, ciliate and 
pubescent. Corolla-tube equalling the calyx, lobes broadly 
ovate with rounded tips, veinless, the lower lobe half the size 
of the others, and more contracted at the base. Filaments not 
exceeding the corolla; anthers blue. Ovary pubescent; 
capsule obvate-oblong, emarginate, compressed, pubescent, as 
long as, or twice as long as the calyx. — J. D. If. 



^fiS/ eWOfflOWer; 2 ' corollaand ^men; 3, calyx and capsule 



(1118 







Tab. 6148. 
FOURCROYA Selloa. 

Native of Guatemala. 



Nat. Ord. Amaryllide^e. — Tribe Agaves. 
Genus FouRcroya, Vent. ; {Endl. Gen. Plant, p. 181). 



Fourcroya Selloa ; caudice brevi robusto, foliis perplurimis dense confertis 
vindique patentibus strictis 3-pedalibus carnoso-tibrosis^ anguste ensi- 
formi-lanceolatis supra basim angustatis attenuato-acuminatis margine 
remote spinosis, spinis incurvis mucroneque terminali tenui deciduo 
castaneis, utrinque supra basim subcarinatis, subtus asperis secus 
costam basim versus remote spinosis, scapo 15-20 pedali stricto remote 
bracteato, paniculge amplge laxse ramis erecto-patentibus, bracteis parvis 
ovato-lanceolatis viridibus, floribus pendulis 2-2^ poll. diam. breviter 
pedicellatis, ovario parvo anguste oblongo, perianthii foliolis oblongis 
obtusis dorso fere albis intus viridibus late albo-marginatis, filamentis 
triangulari-subulatis perianthio multoties brevioribus, antheris parvis 
flavis. 

F. Selloa, K. Koch in Wochenschrift, 8 jahrg., p. 22 ; Jacobi in Hamburg 
Garten Zeit., vol. xxii. p. 408. 



The plant here figured was named as above by General 
Jacobi on his visit to Kew some years ago (in 1865, I think). 
It is described in his monograph of the genus published in 
Otto's Gartenflora in 1866 ; as also previously by Karl Koch, 
but from foliage only. I am not aware that it has flowered 
anywhere but at Kew, where two individuals in the spring 
of last year sent up flowering scapes, which pushing rapidly 
upwards, were allowed to protrude through the roof of the Suc- 
culent House, and expanded in magnificent panicles in Sep- 
tember. They continued flowering till November, and formed 
bulbils in the branches of the panicle as well as flowers. At 
the same time, three other fine plants of the same class 
flowered in the same house, and required exit through the 
roof— namely, Agave americana and two specimens of Dasy- 
lirium acrotrichum. 

F. Selloa is a native of Guatemala, and has long been 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1875. 



cultivated at Kew, where it was received from the Con- 
tinental gardens. 

Descr. Trunk one foot high, clothed with "brown remains 
of old leaves. Leaves forming a nearly-rounded coma six 
feet in diameter, spreading on all sides, straight, rigid, bright 
green, narrowly lanceolate -ensiform, contracted above the 
base, gradually narrowed into a long, pungent, deciduous, 
chestnut-brown spine ; margin with remote, incurved, horny, 
chestnut spines, a quarter of an inch long ; upper surface con- 
cave and granular, convex and almost keeled at the con- 
tracted part ; lower surface rough, with close set points, 
convex, raised along the middle line towards the base and 
there armed with a few spines. Scape fifteen to twenty feet 
high, slender, strict, green, with a few small sub-erect lan- 
ceolate-subulate bracts. Panicle four to six feet high, spread- 
ing, laxly branched; branches slender, erecto-patent, lax- 
flowered. Bracts at the bases of branches small, green. 
Flowers two inches in diameter, rather crowded on short 
branchlets, drooping, very shortly pedicelled ; bracteoles 
small, green, subulate. Ovary oblong, half an inch long. 
Perianth-segments equal, elliptic- oblong, rounded at the apex, 
spreading and incurved, almost white externally ; internally 
green, with a broad white margin. Stamens about one-third 
the length of the perianth. Filaments fleshy, triangular- 
subulate, greenish white ; anthers small, yellow. Style 
subulate. 



Fig. 1, Whole plant, reduced; 2, leaf, reduced ; 3, portion of leaf; and 
4, of panicle : — of the natural size. 




I iletlith 



\5ncei;tBr&QBEllBy4.S(m ) ln{ 



Tab. 6149. 

SENECIO MACftOGLOSSUS. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe SenecionidEjE. 
Genus Senecio, Linn. ; (Benth. $ Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 446). 



Senecio ^ macro glossus ; alte scandens, glaberrimus, lucidus, caule volubili 
cylindraceo tereti, foliis petiolatis triangular i-hastatis acutis, lobis late- 
ralibus simplicibus dentatis v. pauci-lobulatis acuminatis, pedunculis 
axillaribus et terminalibus 1-flores gracilibus elongatis pauci-bracteatis, 
involucri squamis lineari-oblongis acuminatis, exterioribus patentibus 
apicibus non sphacelatis, quam interioribu8 erectis conniventibus 
aquilongis angustioribus, floribus radii 8-12, ligulis pollicaribus late 
elhptico-oblongis apice minute 3-dentatis, disci ad 40, pappi setis gra- 
cilibus albis, achamio cylindrico glabro multistriato. 

S. macroglossus, DC. Prodr., vol. vii. p. 404; Haw. Sf Sond. Fl. Cap., 
vol. iii. p. 403. 



A remarkably handsome plant, and one fitted for dwelling- 
room culture, its Ivy-like glossy leaves being evergreen, its 
large flowers produced in mid-winter, and its habit well 
adapted for a trelliswork. I have indeed heard of either this 
or an allied species being cultivated in drawing-rooms abroad, 
and trained round the walls beneath the ceiling. Like most 
Cape plants, it wants very careful watering and plenty of 
iresli air. It is the largest flowered species of the enormous 
genus to which it belongs, and which contains nearly one 
thousand species, and the flowers remain for a considerable 
period in perfection. According to the Flora Capensis, 
8. macror/lossus extends from the Keiskamma river (west of 
Algoa Bay) to Natal, but the only specimen we have that 
precisely agrees with the cultivated plant was collected by 
Mr. Sanderson on the Palmiet river, immediately to the 
east of Table Bay in the Western Cape district. 

The specimen figured is from a plant cultivated in the 
Succulent House at Kew, where it is trained upon one of the 
rafters, and forms a very ornamental feature, blossoming at 

FXBBUABT 1st, 1875. 



Christmas ; it was raised from seed sent by Mr. Sanderson 
in 1868. 

Descr. Quite glabrous, lucid, shining. Stems slender, 
twining, climbing trees for many feet, cylindric, terete, red- 
brown below ; branches green. Leaves alternate, petioled, 
one and a half to two and a half inches in diameter, 
triangular, acute or acuminate with acuminate simple 
lobed or toothed lateral lobes, base deeply cordate with a 
narrow sinus, dark glossy-green above, pale beneath, rather 
fleshy, nerves palmate as in the Ivy. Peduncles terminal and 
axillary, three to five inches long, slender, green, naked or 
with a few scattered subulate green bracts. Heads two and 
a half inches across. Involucre one inch long ; outer scales 
or bracteoles spreading and incurved, narrow linear, acumi- 
nate, as long as the inner, which are broader, acute, erect, 
and connivent into a cylinder, tips of all green. Hay-flowers 
eight to twelve, very large ; limb one and a half inches long, 
elliptic, pale yellow, with three minute blunt teeth at the 
much contracted tip ; disk-flowers about forty, small. Pappus 
of fine soft hairs. Achene slender, terete, striate. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Ray- ; and 2, disk-flowers : — both, magnified. 



6150 




Tab. 6150. 
ERYTHROTIS Beddomei. 

Native of Malabar. 



Nat. Ord. Commelyne^. 
Genus Novum, Erythrotis, Hook. f. 



Char. Gen. Sepala 3, sequalia, libera. Petala 3, eequalia, libera, orbiculata, 
membranacea, obscure unguiculata. Stamina 6, omnia fertilia et 
aqualia, filamentis filiformibus supra medium longe barbatis ; anthe- 
rarum loculis connectivum marginantibus, superne divergentibus. 
Ovarium 3-loculare ; stylus filiformis, glaberrimus, apice non incras- 
satus, stigmate punctiformi ; ovula in loculis 2, superposita, superiore 
adscendente, inferiore pendulo. Capsula . . . .— Herba Malabarica, 
prostrata, villosa. Folia carnosula, disticha, subimbricata, ovato- cor data, 
acuta. Flores parvi, rubri, ad apices ramulorum breviter racemosi, 
pedicellis brevibus geminis unibracteatis. 



A singularly beautiful little plant, and one easy of cultiva- 
tion, discovered by Col. Beddome, F.L.S.. on dry bare rocks, 
at an elevation of 3-4000 feet, in the Myhendra mountains 
of South Travancor, from whence he sent seeds to Kew, 
where plants raised from which flowered in December last. 
It appears to me to be a new genus, closely allied to Cyanotis, 
but differing in its prostrate habit, inflorescence, the arrange- 
ment of the bracts, perfectly free sepals, and filiform style, 
without an inflation below the stigma. The filaments are 
quite those of Cyanotis; and it is remarkable that whilst 
the calyx and corolla are red, the beards of the filaments are 
bright blue (as in Cyanotis). The brilliant colouring of the 
under surface of the leaves is a very unusual character in 
the group of Commelynece, to which it is most allied. 

Erythrotis Beddomei is a stove plant, but well adapted for a 
warm conservatory during summer, when it may be trained 
over the pots and made very ornamental ; the colouring of 
the under surface of the leaves is however very variable, 
and pales much in winter. 

Descr. Whole plant villous, with spreading hairs that turn 
brown in drying. Branches starting from a primary stout erect 
shoot with lanceolate large spreading leaves, three to six inches 

J-'KBRUARY 1ST, 1875. 



long, spreading from the root, appressed (except at their up- 
turned tips) to the ground, stout, densely leafy. Leaves one 
to one and one-half inches long, rather fleshy, translucent, 
close-set, imbricating, distichous, spreading horizontally, 
ovate-cordate, acute, sessile on their sheaths, green and convex 
above with recurved purple tips, margins recurved, bright red 
beneath ; nerves seven to nine, obscure ; sheaths one quarter 
of an inch long, cylindric, fringed with long cilia. Flowers 
four to eight racemed in pairs on short peduncles at the ends 
of the branches and branchlets, one-third of an inch in diameter, 
shortly pedicelled, each with one elliptic- oblong bract on the 
pedicel. Sepals three, perfectly free, ovate-oblong, acute, 
hispid on the back. Petals orbicular, quite free, membranous, 
red, nerveless, very shortly clawed. Stamens rather longer 
than the petals, filaments filiform, beards blue ; anthers yellow. 
Cells slightly diverging upwards. Ovary hispid, 3-celled; style 
slender, filiform, quite glabrous, stigma punctiform ; ovules 
two in each cell, superposed, upper ascending, lower pendu- 
lous.—/. D. II 

Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, calyx and ovary ; 3, stamens : — all magnified. 



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0151 







Tab. 6151. 

GUSTAVIA GRAC1LLIMA. 

Native of New Grenada. 



Nat. Ord. Myrtacejs. — Tribe LecythidejE. 
Genns Gustavia, Linn. ; (Benth. $• Hook.f. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. 721). 



Gustavia gracillima ; glaberrima, foliis elongato-lineari-lanceolatis (juniori- 
bus brevioribus et latioribus) acuminatis in petiolum pollicarem angus- 
tatis serratis marginibus undulatis creberrime nervosis, floribus 4-poll. 
diam. axillaribus solitariis v. binis roseis, pedicellis 1-1 1 pollicaribus 
medio 2-bracteolatis glabris, calyce brevissimo 4-lobo, lobis latioribus 
quam longis obtusis, petalis ad 8 obovato-oblongis apice rotundatis 
glaberrimis, filamentis purpuras, ovario pubescente ecostato. 

G. gracillima, Miers in Trans. Linn. Soc, vol. xxx. p. 181. 



The genus Gustavia contains, according to Mr. Miers' new 
revision of it in the Linnean Transactions, upwards of twenty 
species, natives of various tropical parts of the South American 
Continent. Of these the only one hitherto figured from living 
specimens in Europe is the beautiful G. imignis (Tab. nost. 
5069), which flowered in Kew in 185S, and yet all the other 
species are as beautiful, and some, like that now figured, 
far more highly coloured than that superb plant. The pre- 
sent is a young plant which differs from the full grown state 
of the same in the shorter and broader leaves, which have 
since the drawing was made, attained on the plant a length 
of thirteen by one and one-half inches, and in indigenous 
specimens they are fifteen to eighteen inches by three-quarters 
to one inch. It is a native of Kew Grenada, where it was 
discovered by Purdie in the woods of Carmin, in 1845, form- 
ing a singular small tree flowering on its slender, lofty trunk, 
in July. 

The specimen here figured was sent by Mr. Bull from his 
establishment at Chelsea, where it flowered in September of 
last year ; it was collected by Eoezl in New Grenada. 

Descr. A tree with a slender trunk, quite glabrous every- 
march 1st, 1875. 



where ; branches with pale bark, densely leafy at the tips. 
Leaves close-set, spreading and recurved, fifteen to eighteen 
inches long by one to one and a-half inches broad, oblanceo- 
late in the young plants, much longer and more narrow in 
the old ones, acuminate, serrate, narrowed into a slender 
petiole about one to two inches long, margin somewhat 
waved, midrib prominent beneath ; veins numerous, close-set, 
arched, very slender. Flowers four inches in diameter, rose- 
red, produced from the leaf-axils in the young plant, from the 
wood in old ones, solitary or in pairs. Peduncle one to two 
inches long, stout, clavate, with small orbicular appressed 
bracts at the base, and two opposite ovate, small, appressed 
bracteoles about the middle. Calyx very short, with four 
broad obtuse lobes. Petals about eight, obovate-oblong, 
rounded at the tip, glabrous on the back. Staminal-tube 
yellow ; filaments dark purple ; anthers numerous, most 
densely packed, linear. Ovary pubescent at the top, style very 
small, pointed. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Peduncle, calyx, and ovary; 2, portion of staminal tube, filaments, 
and anthers ; 3, filament and anther : — all magnified. 



6M 







'fin cent BrodksDay £. Sou. iop 



Tab. 6152. 
MASDEVALLIA Chimera. 

Native of New Grenada. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe PLEUEOTHALLinE^. 
Genus Masdevallia, Ruiz. $■ Pav. ; (Lindl. Gen. Sf Sp. Orchid., p. 192). 



MasdevaLLTA Chimcera ; caulibus fasciculatis, foliia 6-8-pollicaribus lineari- 
oblanceolatis acutis basi angustatis sed vix petiolatis carinatis, scapis 
curvis foliis brevoribus robustis 5-6-bracteatis, floribus horizontalibua, 
sepalis basi in tubum brevem late campanulatum profunde sulcatum 
connatis dein late ovatis in caudas tripollicares filiformi-subulatas 
abrupte anguatatis citrinis sanguineo maculatis, intus pilia longis 
vestitis, marginibus reflexis, petalis brevibus cuneato-oblongis, labello 
breviter stipitato oblongo saccato, marginibus inflexis dentatis, nervis 
intus carinatis, columna acuta. 

M. Chimaera, Reichb. f. in Gard. Chron., 1872, p. 463 ; and 1875, p. 41, 
cum ic. xylog. Xen. Orchid., vol. ii p. 195, t. 185; Andre Rev. Hortic, 
t. 117, 118. 

A very singular plant, of which M. Andre says in the 
Illustration Horticole, that no name more applicable could 
be found for it than that given by Professor Eeichenbach — 
namely, that of the offspring of Typhon and Echidna, which 
had the body of a goat, the head of a lion, and tail of a 
dragon, and which vomited flames of fire. Without pushing 
the simile to an extreme, there is enough in the grotesque 
and almost threatening appearance of this plant, due to the 
arched flower-stalk and protruded flower, like the head and 
body of a viper about to strike, to justify Prof. Eeichen- 
bach's happy fancy in giving it the trivial name alluded to. 
Nor is it at all destitute of beauty ; and though not so gor- 
geously coloured as M. ignea (Tab. nost. 5962), or M. Lindeni 
(Tab. 5990), it is well worthy of cultivation, and a plant likely 
to lend popularity to a genus of which new species are being 
yearly imported, and which for number and variety of 
species, facility of growth and neatness of habit, would alone 
satisfy the wants of a moderate collector of Orchids. Indeed, 

MARCH 1st, 1875. 



it is much to be wished that Orchid fanciers, who take an 
intelligent interest in the Order, would, according to their 
means, make their collections famous for completeness in one 
or a few of the larger and less pretentious genera, as well as 
for the production of gigantic specimens of the showy kinds. 
As it is, England is the grave of Orchids ; of the millions im- 
ported but a few hundreds survive the first few years, and 
this very much because every collector forms a miscellaneous 
collection, wherein it is impossible to meet the requirements 
of any but the most indifferent to the treatment the gene- 
rality may experience. 

M. Chimmra is a native of deep valleys in New Grenada, 
where it was discovered by Eoezl, and imported by M. Linden 
in 1872. For the splendid specimen here figured I am in- 
debted to Mr. Bull, who flowered it in December last. 

Descr. Stem tufted. Leaves six to nine inches long, nar- 
rowly oblanceolate, acute, narrowed at the base, which is clothed 
with four to six sheaths, keeled. Scape shorter than the 
leaves, arched, stout, with five or six green appressed sheaths. 
Flowers eight inches long from tip to tip of the dorsal and 
lateral sepals, yellow, spotted with blood-red. Ovary small, 
curved, red-brown. Periantli-tuhe shortly campanulate, 
deeply 6-grooved. Sepals three-quarters of an inch broad, 
broadly obovate, hispid with soft spreading hairs on the inner 
surface, suddenly contracted into slender, red purple tails, 
three inches long, margins reflexed. Petals very short, one- 
sixth of an inch long, spathulate, expanded at the tip into 
four spreading lobes, with a thick red caruncle between the 
lobes. Lip one-third of an inch long, slipper-shaped, with 
inflexed toothed margins, and keeled ribs within, white. 
Column as long as the petals, acute. — J. B. H. 



Fig. 1, Ovary, lip, petals and column : — magnified. 













^ccnt Brooks Davi f 



Tab. 6153. 
COLCHICUM luteum. 

Native of Kashmir and Affghanistan. 



Nat. Ord. Melanthace^:. 



Colchicum luteum; cormo pollicari dimidiato-globoso, tunicis laavibus 
castaneis membranaceis, vaginatis foliis 3-i Knearibus obtusis 
deraum elongatis 6 pollicaribus ^-g poll, latis, floribus 1—3 cum 
foliis coaetaniis luteis, periantbii tubo 2-3 pollicari, limbi segroentis 
pollicaribus lineari-oblongis obtusis, antheris luteis linearibus fila- 
menta basifixa longe superantibus, stigmatibus luteis filiformibus 
elongatis exsertis, carpellis pollicaribus superne liberis in stylos 
attenuatis. 

C. luteum, Baker in Gard. Chron., 1874, p. 33. 

Melanthaceaj, Griff. Posth. Papers, vol. ii. p. 328. 



Mr. Baker, who described this pretty little plant from 
dried specimens preserved in the Hookerian Herbarium, re- 
marks that it would be a great acquisition to our stock of 
cultivated Colchicums, and would no doubt be hardy in our 
English gardens ; also, that it is the only yellow-flowered 
kind hitherto known, all the others being of a purple colour 
running off into white. As a species it belongs to the 
Mediterranean group, with leaves and flowers produced at 
the same time, and both in spring. It is a native of the 
mountains in the extreme West of India beyond the Indus, 
in Hazara, at an elevation of 7000 feet, where it flowers in 
December and January. An apparently identical plant has 
been gathered by Dr. Thomson, F.R.S., in the valley of 
Kashmir, at an elevation of 5-7000 feet, flowering in 
June; by Stocks in Beluchistan ; and by Griffith, who is 
the discoverer of the species, in Kafferisthan, near Otipore,^ 
about the year 1840, flowerino- in April at an elevation of 
6-7000 feet. It has also been gathered by Stocks in 
upper Beluchistan, and by Henderson in the Zoji pass in 
Kashmir. For the specimens here I am indebted to Dr. 
Atchison, F.L.S., of the Indian Medical Service, an ex- 

makch 1st, 1875. 



cellent botanist, who communicated the bulbs by post, in 
1874, to Kew, where they flowered in January of the present 
year, and from whom we have dried specimens from Abbot- 
tabad, in Hazara, with much narrower leaves than his own, 
the cultivated ones, or those from Kashmir and Afghanistan.' 
Descr. Corm one to two inches long, by three-quarters to 
one inch thick, almost halfmoon-shaped, slightly laterally 
compressed, pointed bluntly at the base ; sheaths smooth, 
membranous, dark brown, the inner often produced upwards 
into a tube round the leaves. leaves three to four, produced 
with the flower, sheathed at the base, narrow linear-ligulate, 
obtuse, concave, three to four, at length six to seven inches 
long, bright green. Flowers two to three, bright and almost 
golden yellow. Perianth-tube two to three inches long, slender, 
white, sometimes purple in wild specimens ; limb one inch long, 
about two and a half inches broad when expanded ; segments 
linear-oblong, rather broader upwards, obtuse. Stamens ex- 
tending two-thirds up the perianth limb; anthers linear, 
basifixed, much longer than the filaments. Styles filiform, 
exserted. Capsule two-thirds to one inch long, ovoid, of three 
brown leathery carpels, free at the top and narrowed into the 
style-bases. — J. B. H. 



615&- 







Tab. 6154. 
THEROPOGON pallidus. 

Native of the Himalaya Mountains. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^ — Tribe Smilace^e. 
Genus Theropogon, {Maxim, in Bull. Acad. St. Petersb., vol. xv. p. 89). 



Theropogon pallidus ; glaberrimus, csespitosus, foliis distichis erecto-recurvi3 
gramineis acutis planis 1-3-nerviis basi membranaceo-vaginatis, scapis 
erectis foliis brevioribus strictis angulatis ancipitibus v. 2-3-alatis, 
racemis erectis vix nutantibus 6-16-floris, bracteis linearibus acutis 
viridibus pedicellis nudis curvis brevioribus, floribus nutantibus cam- 
panulatis pallide roseis cum pedicello articulatis, peranthii segmeatis 
ovatis,^ filamentis brevibus dilatatis antheris acutis latioribus, ovarii 
globosi loculis G-10-ovulatis, stylo stricto, stigmate punctiforme, bacca 
pisiformi oligosperma, seminibus compressis, testa tenuissima albumini 
corneo adhsrente. 

T. pallidus, Maxim. I. c. 

Ophiopogon? pallidus, Wall. Cat., 2138; Kunth. Enum., vol. v. p. 300. 

? O. mollis, Royle III, 382 (nomen tantum). 

O. brevifolius, Royle Herb. 



A very common Himalayan plant, from Kumaon, alt. 6000 
feet, to Nepal and Sikkim, in which latter county it ascends 
to 10,000 feet ; also common in the Khasia mountains, where 
it is found at 5-GOOO feet towards the tops of the hills. It 
prefers mossy rocks, and the bases of old trees, when the roots 
run rather superficially in the loose soil. 

This plant was long regarded as a doubtful Ophiopogon, 
from which its soft habit at once distinguishes it, a character 
that makes me suspect that it is Boyle's O. mollis, a plant of 
which no authentic specimens are known to exist, except the 
plant called brevifolius in Mss. Herb, (at Kew), and which 
is not alluded to in his Himalayan Botany, be the same. 
From Ophiopogon it further differs in its annual foliage, ber- 
ried fruit, broad filaments, free base of the ovary, many ovules, 
the seed not being exposed by the rupture of the pericarp, as 
in that genus, and the excessively thin adherent testa. 



MARCH 1st, 1875. 



Our specimens were received from the rich collection of 
W. W. Saunders, Esq., late of Beigate, raised from seed. 

Descr. Densely tufted, perfectly glabrous throughout. 
Boots of stout fleshy tortuous fibres. Leaves distichous at the 
base, and then clothed with long membranous sheaths, grassy, 
each six to eighteen inches long, a quarter to half an inch 
broad, erect and recurved, acuminate, soft, with a distinct 
midrib and many slender nerves, margin quite entire, rather 
glaucous beneath. Scape shorter than the leaves, very slender, 
erect, with two or three sharp angles or narrow wings. 
Maceme two to four inches long, 6-1 6 -flowered, erect or 
slightly nodding, rachis compressed, bracts linear-subulate, 
green, shorter than the curved pedicels. Flowers campanulate, 
pale rose-red, one-third inch in diameter. Perianth-segments 
ovate, subacute, rather fleshy, nerveless. Stamens very short ; 
filaments broadly orbicular-obovate, fleshy ; anther sessile 
on the filament, narrower than it is, ovate, acute, cells diverg- 
ing. Ovary globose, 3 -celled ; style strict, stigma minute ; 
ovules six to ten in each cell. Berry size of a pea, with few 
compressed brown very hard seeds ; testa extremely thin, ad- 
herent to the horny albumen. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, the same cut vertically; 3, stamens; 4, tranverse 
section of ovary; 5, ditto entire; 6, fruit: — all but 6 magnified. 



6156. 




"ifirxent -Broois Ear !c San fcttf- 



T^b. 6155. 
WAHLENBERGIA tuberosa. 

Native of Juan Fernandez. 



Nat. Ord. Campanulace^:.— Tribe Wahlenbergiejs. 
Genus Wahlenbergia, Schrad. ; (Endl. Gen. PL, p. 516). 



Wahlenbergia tuberosa ; glaberrima, rhizomate e tuberibus epigseis confertis 
subglobosis diametro juglandis, caulibus gracillimis erectis 6-24-polli- 
caribus laxe ramosis et foliosis, foliis pollicaribus patulis linearibus acutis 
obtusisve dentatis 1-nerviis, floribus erectis apicem versus caulis 
paniculatis, ovario obconico, calycis segmentis linearibus patenti- 
recurvis utrinque, 1-2-dentatis, corolla canipanulata \ poll, longa 
alba rubro-vittata, lobis brevibus recurvis, filamentis glabris tubo 
corolla ter brevioribus. 



I find no description answering to this very curious and 
beautiful plant, nor any specimens in the Herbarium, which 
is the more remarkable as the Island from which it comes has 
been visited by several botanists, who have detected there 
two other species of Wahlenbergia. These are both much 
taller and stouter plants, with 'broader serrated leaves and 
much larger flowers. In the whole genus, which is a tole- 
rably uniform one in habit, I know of no feature so remark- 
able as the tuberous rootstock of this, which resembles a 
cluster of small potatoes placed on the top of the pot ; the 
contrast of these grotesque objects, with the exquisitely grace- 
ful thread-like stems and profusion of pearl white rose- 
streaked blossoms, is exceedingly striking, and recommends 
the plant as a most desirable one for greenhouse and probably 
out-of-door culture. Of course care must be taken not to over- 
water the plant when past flower, or the tubers will soon rot. 

Messrs. Veitch sent the plant here figured, m lull flower in 
September of last year, together with another specimen, 
nearly two feet high. They received it from Juan 1 ernandez, 
where it was discovered by their collector, Mr. Downton, in 
1873. 

MARCH 1st, 1875. 



Descr. Quite glabrous. RootstocJc of clustered subglobose 
woody tubers, one to one and a half inches in diameter, irre- 
gularly constricted on the surface concentrically. Branches 
many, six to twelve inches high, branched from the very 
base, suberect, very slender, leafy, paniculately branched 
above; branchlets suberect, almost capillary, 1-flowered 
at the tips. Leaves scattered, numerous, one-half to three- 
quarters of an inch long, spreading and rather deflexed, 
narrow linear, uniform, obtuse or acute, slightly toothed at 
the margin, bright green, 1 -nerved. Flowers very copiously 
produced at the tips of the panicled branches, erect, half an 
inch long; the branches that bear them forming filiform pe- 
duncles with one or two small recurved leaves. Ovary 
obconic, very short. Calyx -segments half as long as the 
corolla, narrowly linear, spreading and recurved, green, with 
one or two teeth on each side. Corolla bell-shaped, white 
with five bright rose-red bands down the segments and tube 
externally ; segments short, ovate, recurved. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Leaf; 2, flower ; 3, the same laid open : — all magnified. 



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„ 6152.— MASDEVALLIA CHOLERA. 
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6156. 







AncentBrooksDayl Son,lnp 



Tab. 6156. 
PHYLLOCACTUS biformis. 

Native of Honduras. 



Nat. Ord. Cacte^e. — Tribe Epiphylle^e. 
Genus Phyllocactus, Link. ; (Benth. $■ Book. f. Gen. PL, vol. i. p. 849). 



Phyllocactus biformis; caule tereti flexuoso, ramis complanatis oblongis 
lanceolatis v. elongato-lanceolatis in petiolura crassum angustatis' 
crenato-serratis obtusis v. subobtusis, costa crassa, ovario cylindraceo 
squamulis minutis sparsis, perianthii infundibuliformis segmentis 8-12 
sub-biscriatis anguste lanceolatis acuminatis roseo-purpureis exteriori- 
bus angustioribus staminibus 6-12, stigmatis radiis 4-5, bacca parva 
lagaeniformi. 

Phyllocactus biformis, Labouret, Monog. Cact, p. 418. 

Disocactus biformis, Lindl. in Bot. JReg., 1845, t. 9 ; p. 77. 

Disisocactus biformis, Salm Dyck, Cact., p. 57 ; Lemaire, Les Cactees. 

Cep.eus biformis, Lindl. in Bot. Reg., 1843 ; Misc., p. 33. 



A very pretty and distinct species of Phyllocactus, differing 
from all others in the few perianth segments and stamens, on 
which account Lindley made a new genus of it, under the 
name of Disocactus — from 8i C> two, kjoq, equal, and kuktoq, 
in allusion to the equal number of petals and sepals in the 
specimen he figured, which presented four of each. r I he 
iaog he appears to have dropped, no doubt for the sake of 
euphony, but it has been taken up by Salm Dyck, and the 
amplified name retained by such subsequent authors as have 
held to the genus being a good one. 

For my own part, I entirely agree with Labouret in mer^ 
fog the genus' into Phyllocactus, from which it differs in 
nothing but the fewer perianth segments, the distinction of 
which into an inner and outer series is not so evident in the 
specimen here figured. Dr. Lindley's plant further differs 
from that here figured in its outer segments beine more 
slender, almost filiform, and the inner comparatively broader 
and closer placed. 

Phyllocactus biformis is a native of Honduras, whence it 
was introduced by G. Ure Skinner, Esq., in 18:30. He sent it 

APRIL 1st, 1875. 



to the late Sir Charles Lemon, who had a famous collection 
at Carcleugh, in Cornwall ; and it has been long cultivated at 
Kew, where it flowered in January, 1874 ; and I am indebted 
to Mr. Corderoy for another specimen which flowered with 
him in June ; it had six narrower outer segments, four inner, 
and only six stamens. 

Descr. Stems epiphytic, two to four feet long, cylindric, as 
thick as a swan's quill below, flexuous, branched. Branches 
leaf-like, lower broadly ovate or oblong, obtuse, two inches 
long, petioled, obscurely crenate ; upper three to five inches 
long, narrow lanceolate, narrowed at both ends, subacute, 
obtusely serrate ; all of them bright green, thick, and fleshy, 
with a stout costa, and no evident nerves. Floivers situated 
in the crenatures, two to two and a half inches long. Ovary 
'half an inch long, cylindric, green, with a few minute scat- 
tered, triangular scales. Perianth bright red-purple, funnel- 
shaped, two inches in diameter ; segments eight, ten, or 
twelve, lanceolate, long acuminate, the four or six outer 
narrower and shorter than the inner. Stamens six to eight, 
filaments of unequal length, anthers linear. Stigma with four 
slender papillose rays. Berry red-purple, ovoid or flagon- 
shaped. Seeds very minute. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower -with the perianth cut vertically ; 2, berry ; 3, transverse 
section of ditto i — all magnified. 



6757. 




olnDari Sanlngi 



Tab. 6157. 
PENTSTEMON antirrhinoides. 

Native of California. 



Nat. Ord. Scrophularine,e. — Tribe Chelone^e. 
Genus Pentstemon, Uher. ; (Benth. in DC Prodr., vol. x. p. 320). 



Pentstemon (Breviflori) antirrhinoides ; fruticosus, subcinereus, fere glaber, 
ramosissimus, ramulis tenuibus virgatis, foliis parvis vix petiolatis 
spathulato- v. obovato-oblongis linearibus v. oblanceolatis obtusis y. 
subacutis integerrimis subenerviis, pedunculis gracilibus breviusculis 
v. subelongatis axillaribus unifloris v. terminalibus diphyllis 1-2 floris, 
sepali3 ovatis acutis, corolla lutea nuda, labiia amplis, superiore orbicu- 
lato concavo emarginato marginibus recurvis, inferiore 3-lobo, lobis 
oblongis obtusis, filamento ananthero villoso, antheris glabris loculis 
divergentibus. 

Pentstemon antirrhinoides, Benth. in DC. Prodr., vol. x. p. 594 ; A. Gray 
in Proc. Amer. Acad., Oct. 1862, p. 56. 



A very charming shrubby half-hardy plant, discovered in 
California by Dr. Coulter nearly half a century ago, and, as 
far as I am aware, found by no one since till Bolander 
gathered it in the Santa Maria Valley, San Diego. It is re- 
markable for the lemon-yellow colour of its flowers in a genus 
of which most of the species are red, violet, purplish, or blue, 
colours which rarely occur along with yellow in one group of 
closely allied vegetable forms, though instances do occur (as 
Gentian). 

Pentstemon antirrhinoides flowered at the Eoyal Gardens, 
Kew, in September, 1874, from specimens sent by Mr. Niven, 
of the Hull Botanic Gardens. It is the twenty-fourth species 
figured in this work, out of upwards of fifty that have flowered 
in European gardens. The total number of species known 
in 1862 was sixty-four, of which an enumeration is given by 
Asa Gray in the Proceedings of the American Academy ol 
Sciences, quoted above. 

Descr. A small, much -branched, glabrous, subcmereous 
shrub ; branches and branchlets slender, erect, leafy. Leaves 
three-fourths to one and a quarter inches long, obovate-spa- 
thulate, or oblong, or lanceolate, rarely linear-obovate ; obtuse 



APRIL 1st, 1875. 



or acute, quite entire, narrowed at the base into a very short 
petiole, nerves very indistinct. Flowers one inch in diameter, 
lemon-yellow, solitary and axillary in the ultimate branchlets, 
or more frequently terminal, with two leafy bracts, or three 
together— two with two leafy bracts, and the intermediate 
one bractless ; peduncle one-half to an inch long, very slender. 
Calyx-segments ovate-oblong, acute, outer larger. Corolla 
glabrous, tube short, broad; limb two-lipped; upper lip 
orbicular, concave, arched, notched at the tip, margins re- 
curved ; lower 3-lobed, lobes oblong, rounded at the tip. 
Stamens quite glabrous ; anther-cells divaricating, antherless 
filament bearded. Ovary ovoid. Style slender, stigmatic- 
lobes minute. — /. B. H. 



Fig. 1, Corolla laid open ; 2, top of filament and anther ; 3, calyx and 
style ; 4, ovary, ovule and base of style :— all magnified. 



&I5S. 




tcr., aei «. \i\ 



Yiaceni 



Tab. 6158. 

PYRUS PRUNIFOLIA. 

Native of Siberia and North China. 



Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Pome^e. 
Genus Pyrus, Linn. • (Benth. $■ Hook. f. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. 626). 



Pyrus (Malus) prunifolia ; foliis gracile petiolatis late elliptic o- v. obovato- 
orbiculatis subacutis creberrime serrulatis, junioribus subtus araneosis, 
umbellis simplicibus, calycis tube- lanato segmentis lanceolatis reflexis, 
petalis obovatis unguiculatis, stylis basi connatis, bacca calyce peristente 
coronata subglobosa v. ovoidea kevi v. costata. 

PTBU8 prunifolia, Willd. Phi/tog., vol. i. p. 8; Sp. PI, vol. ii. p. 1018; Ait. 
Hort. Kew., ed. ii. vol. iii. p. 208 ; DC. Prodr., vol. ii. p. 635 ; Led. 
Fl. Ross., vol ii. p. 97 ; Hegel. Gartenjl., 1862, p. 203, t. 364, f. 7-11 ; 
Loud. Arboret., vol. ii. p. 892 ; K. Koch. Dendrol., vol. i. p. 207. 

Malus prunifolia, Spach, Suites d Bitffon, vol. ii. p. 151, t. 9 et 10. 

M. hybrida, Desf. Arb., vol. ii. p. Hi • Lois, in Duha?n., Ed. Nov., p. 140, 
vol. vi. t. 42, f. 1. 

Cratjegusa cerasi folio, Mill. Gard. Diet, p. 180, t. 269. 



It is singular that no good figure should exist of so beau- 
tiful and well known a tree as this, and one introduced before 
1758, which can only be accounted for by its being usually 
confounded with the P. baccata (Tab. nost. 6112), which was 
not introduced till 1784, and from which its connate styles and 
totally different fruit, crowned by the persistent calyx, at 
once distinguish it. I have seen no native specimens, and 
though stated by the earlier authors, including De Candolle, 
to be a native of Siberia, Ledebour does not seem to have 
known it, for he quotes De Candolle and Willdenow's de- 
scription, giving Siberia with a query as its habitat; and, 
though described by Miller in 1760, is a native of Dahuria, 
whence it was introduced into the St. Petersbur^-h Gardens, it 
is not included in Turczaninov's Flora Ijaical-Dahurica. 
Kegel, however, gives Dahuria and the Baikal as its native 
countries ; and Karl Koch says North China, Tartary, and 
Southern Siberia. De Candolle, Ledebour, and Lowdon all 
describe the calyx as glabrous, but it is decidedly woolly, 



aphil 1st, 1875 



even after the petals have fallen; these latter are white and 
vary much in breadth. Kegel enumerates four varieties of 
the fruit, distinguished by form (ovoid or globose), colour 
(greenish and red), the top being depressed or not, and the 
surface obtusely ribbed or smooth. Loudon quotes Knight 
for the statement that some of the finest cultivated apples 
raised by the latter were due to fertilization by the pollen of 
this, and that their progeny proved more hardy and their 
fruit matured earlier, and was higher flavoured. Loudon 
further regards the P. baccata as doubtless a sub variety of 
this, differing only in not having a persistent calyx ; but the 
whole character of its fruit is so different, and that of the 
connate style of this so constant, that however like in foliage 
and flower, I cannot think them the same. 

Spach divides the species into two, one, Mains Fontaine- 
siana with triangular-lanceolate calyx segments; the other, 
M. prunifolia, with oblong-lanceolate calyx segments, and 
which flowers a fortnight earlier. 

Pyrus prunifolia has been an inhabitant of Kew for 
upwards of a century, and flowers in April and May, fruiting 
in October. 

Descr. A small tree ; young shoots, petioles, leaves beneath 
and inflorescence cottony. Leaves two to three inches long, 
ovate or obovate, or nearly orbicular, subacute, rarely acu- 
minate, margin with small, close-set, rather unequal serra- 
tures ; petiole often as long as the blade. Umbels sessile, 
6-10-flowered ; peduncles, one to one and a half inches long. 
Flowers white, one and a half inches in diameter. Calyx-tube 
obconical, lobes lanceolate, villous. Petals orbicular or 
oblong. Styles connate below the middle. Berry about an 
inch in diameter, globose or ovoid, base intruded, smooth or 
obscurely channelled, crowned by the persistent calyx, green 
or amber yellow and bright red in varying proportions. — 



Fig. 1 , Flower with petals reversed : — viagnifled. 



6153. 




::■•■& San. fc?- 



Tab. 6159. 
MASDEYALLIA Peeibteria. 

Native of New Grenada. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide;e. — Tribe Pleukothallide^e. 
Genus Masdevallia, Ruiz, fy Pav. ; — (Lindl. Gen. Sf Sp. Orchid., p. 192). 



Masdevallia Peristeria; caulibus fasciculatis, foliis 4-6-pollicaribus 
lineari-oblongis obtusis basi angustatis sed vix petiolatis carinatis, 
scapis strictis vaginato-bracteatis robustis, floribus adscendentibus, 
sepalis basi in tubum latum subcylindricum basi gibbum alte 6-costatum 
connatis dein a basi lata triangulari-ovata in caudas flavas rectas sesqui- 
pollicares abrupte angustatis fulvis creberrime sanguineo maculatis 
intus glaberrimis, marginibus lente recurvis, petalis parvis oblique 
lineari-oblongis truncato-ernarginatus, labello unguiculato, lamina 
oblonga medio subdilatata subacuta papillosa apice recurva, column* 
subacute. 

Masdevallia Peristeria, Reichb. f. in Gard. Chron., 1873, p. 500. 



A much less striking plant than M. Chimara* figured in 
last month's number (Tab. 6152), and yet sufficiently re- 
markable if judged by the standard of its congeners. 
Eeichenbach says that it comes very near Lindley's M. 
coriacea, and his own M. civilis (Tab. nost. 5476), from which 
latter it differs in the much larger broader leaves, longer 
scapes, and tails to the perianth, but agrees well in the form 
of the petals and lip, and in the markings of the perianth. 
The lip is, as Eeichenbach remarks, very singularly coloured, 
being covered with innumerable close-set amethystine papilla; 
on a white ground. The name is given in allusion to the 
likeness of the top of the column and petals to those of the 
Dove-plant {Peristeria elata, Tab. nost. 3116), where the 
anther case represents a dove's head, and the outstretched tips 
of the petals its wings, as in the Church's symbol of the 
Holy Spirit, whence the name of El Spirito Santo was 
given to the Peristeria bv its discoverers the Spaniards. 



* Prof. Keichenbach kindly informs me that the M. Chmara of the Bevut 

Horticole is not the true plant, but M. Mctcriiiia, Reichb. f. 
APRIL I St. IS?;"). 



Masdevallia Peristeria is a native of New Grenada, whence 
it was imported by Messrs. Veitch, to whom I am indebted 
for the plant here figured, which flowered in April. 

Descr. Stems tufted. Leaves erect, four to six inches 
long, by one to one and a quarter inches broad, linear- 
oblong, or oblanceolate-oblong, obtuse, deep green, keeled at 
the back, very coriaceous, hardly contracted into a petiole 
above the sheaths. Scapes two to three inches long, stout, 
strict, erect, clothed with rather ventricose bracts. ' Ovary 
one-third of an inch long. Perianth four to five inches from 
tip to tip of the sepals, which are connate into a tube two- 
thirds of an inch long, and as much in diameter, nearly 
cylindric, but gibbous at the base, with six stout ribs, dirty 
yellowish white externally; free portion of the sepals spread- 
ing, broadly triangular ovate, glabrous, suddenly contracted 
into stout, subulate yellow tails one and a half inches Ion* 
honey-yellow, spotted closely with red, margins slightly re- 
curved. Petals white, linear-oblong, clawed, oblique at the 
base, tip truncate and notched. Lip with a linear claw and 
oblong subacute limb, which is dilated in the middle and 
suddenly contracted beyond it, upper surface studded with 
amethystine papillae, tip recurved. Column white apiculate. 
— -J- JJ. H. 



«JI?" I' r [d t V i-T ° f OVai7 ', Hp ' Petals and col ^n; 2, front view of the 
same ; 3, hmb of lip seen m front ; 4, pollen :— all magnified. 



6160. 




W Fuch. del 



Tab. 6160. 
FOURCROYA undulata. 

Native of Mexico. 



Nat. Ord. Amaryllide^.— Tribe Agaves. 
Germs Fourcrota, Vent. ;—{Endl. Gen. Plant, p. 181). 



Fourcroya undulata ; caule brevissimo, foliis paucis sesquipedahbus dia- 
metro bipollicaribus ensiformibus patentibus ngidis longe acuminata, 
apicibus spinulisque rnarginalibus subremotis castaneis supra basim 
dilatatam contracts, superne plano-concavis, subtus scabns obscure 
carinatis, marginibus subundulatis, utrinque opacis olivaceo-viriaibus 
non glaueis, spinulis e basi deltoidea incurvis, scapo gracili stricto una 
cum panicula 10-pedali, bracteis paucis subulatis, pamcula elougata 
stricta pubescente, ramis brevibus strictis erecto-patentibus, Hon bus 
2-nis pendulis viridibus, bracteolis minutis, pedicelbs brevibus, ovano 
pubescente elongato-subcylindraceo, perianthii foliolia anguste obiongis 
obtusis, stylo brevi subulate 

Fourcroya undulata, Jacobi Nachtrage Versuch. Systemat. Ordnung Agave*, 
p. 55. 

Though in many respects so similar to F. Selloa, figured ^in 
last month's number of this work, this is a remarkably diffe- 
rent species, much smaller in all its parts, apparently never 
forming a stem, and with the leaves broader for their length, 
and more or less undulated at the margin ; its spines also are 
more hooked. It is a native of the provinces of Chiapas ami 
Tabasco in Mexico, where it was found by the traveller 
Giesbrecht, who sent it to Yerschaffelt's splendid establish- 
ment in Ghent (now incorporated with the no less celebrated 
Brussels' one of Linden). The Kew specimen, which is here 
figured, flowered in the Royal Gardens in November, Ib74 
rather later than the other species, than which it may want 
a warmer climate, as that of Chiapas and Tabasco is described 
as hot, damp, and its hills as clothed with a tropical lorest. 
It was received from the rich collection of W. W. bander., 
Esq., F.E.S. f ■ 

Descr. Stem none, or very short indeed. Leave* tormin^ 
a fiat crown three feet in diameter, not very numerous, 
strict, spreading, one and a half feet long by two incnes m 
diameter at the broadest part, and one-eighth ol an inc. 

ait.il 1st, 1s7.">. 



thick, eusiform, long acuminate, terminated by a pungent 
chestnut-brown spine, obscurely keeled at the back, which is 
scabrid ; margin subundulate with incurved chestnut-coloured 
stout spines, olive-green on both surfaces, but not glaucous. 
Scape with the panicle ten feet high, green, with few 
subulate bracts. Panicle elongate, slender, narrow, erect, 
pubescent ; branches a foot long, more erect than spreading, 
simple, strict. Flowers all drooping, usually in pairs ; pedicels 
very short, and bracts minute. Ovary cylindric, pubescent, 
nearly an inch long, green. Perianth two to two and a half 
inches in diameter, pale green ; segments narrow-oblong, 
obtuse, obtusely keeled down the centre. Filaments subu- 
late, with broadly deltoid bases; anthers short, yellow. 
Style subulate.—/. D. IL 



Fig. 1, Entire plant, reduced ; 2, leaf; 3, branch of panicle and flowers 
both of the natural size. 



6161 




. 



Vmcenl Broote D av & Sob !b? 



Tab. 6161. 
CYRTOPERA sanguinea. 

Native of the Sikkim Himalaya. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe Vande^e. 
Genus Cyrtopera, {Lindl. Gen. if Sp. Orchid., p. 189). 



Cy rtopera sanguined ; tubere crasso oblongo annulato, scapo infra medium 
vaginato superne bracteato bracteis elongato-subulatis floralibus ovario 
brevioribus v. longioribus, sepalis ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis, petalis 
brevioribus oblongis apice obtuse 3-crenulatis brunneis v. fusco- 
sanguineis, labello 3-lobo pallide roseo, lobis lateralibus brevibus 
obtusis incurvis, intermedio orbiculato recurvo basi 3-carinato, carinis 
in nervos papillosos ramosos desinentibus, calcare brevi conico vires- 
cente, anthera apice producta truncata. 

Cyrtopera sanguinea, Lindl. in Journ. Linn. Soc, vol. iii. p. 32. 



The materials at my command for describing tins plant are 
my own specimens collected in 1848 in Sikkim, a coloured 
sketch of a flower made from the same by myself, a 
coloured drawing of the whole plant made by Judge Cath- 
cart's artists in Sikkim, and the flowering specimen here 
figured. These show that the plant is very variable in colour 
and robustness, though but little in other respects. The 
colour of the flower as shown in my own sketch is a dull 
reddish purple, extending over the short spur, with a rose- 
red limb to the lip ; colours which induced Dr. Lindley to 
name the species sanguinea, a name hardly justified by those 
hues. Cathcart's drawing, made by native artists (and these 
are often very faithless to nature), represents the scape as 
very stout, brownish purple, with broad sheaths and no sub- 
ulate bracts ; the bracts, pedicel, ovary, and flower are of a 
uniform purple-brown colour, suffused with pink, except the 
whole lip, which is rose-coloured. This, which passed under Dr. 
Lindley's eye when he described the species, is also marked 
by him 0. sanguinea. Mr. Fitch's drawing speaks for the cul- 
tivated plant as flowered at Kew, which agrees well with my 
dried specimen in all except the absence of the sheathes at 
the base of the scape; differs much from both the drawings 

APRIL 1st, 1875. 



in the singular clayey-brown colour of the flower and its 
green spur. I have seen no leaves, and Lindley has described 
the plant as aphyllous, a character which I greatly doubt. 
It is, of course, possible that several species are here con- 
founded, but the uniform shape of the perianth and lip in all 
renders this unlikely. 

C. sanguinea inhabits the tropical region of Sikkim, and is 
found in dense forests, at 3-5000ft. elevation ; the Kew 
plants flowered from tubers which have been received both 
from the late Dr. Anderson, of the Calcutta Botanical 
Gardens, and Mr. Grammie, of Darjeeling. 

Descr. Tuber two to three inches long, oblong-cylindric, 
annulate, pale. Scape one to one and a half feet high, stout 
or slender, with three sheathing bracts below the middle, 
which pass into subulate bracts above ; the floral longer or 
shorter than the ovary. Pedicels and ovary slender, green. 
Flower one and a half to two inches in diameter, varying 
from pale red-purple to brown, with the lip pale and rosy. 
Sepals ovate or ovate-lanceolate, very acuminate. Petals 
shorter, more elliptic, obtuse, with three small teeth at the 
tip. Lip shorter than the petals, produced behind into a short, 
broad, obtuse projecting spur; limb 3-lobed ; lateral lobes 
incurved, obtuse, with a purple spot within at the base of 
each ; mid-lobe expanded, recurved, rounded, very obtuse ; 
disk with three close-set keels, which give off radiating raised 
papillose branched nerves that almost reach the margin. 
Column produced at the top into a truncate or minutely- 
notched tip. — /. D. II 



Fig. 1, Petal; 2, ovary, column and lip; 3, lip; 4, column; 5, pollen : — 
nil magnified. 



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Tab. 6162. 

CROCUS CHRYSANTHUS. 

Native of Asia Minor. 



Nat. Ord. Iridejg. — Tribe Ixieje. 
Genus Crocus, Tourn. ; (Baker in Gard. Chron., 1873, p. 291). 



Crocus chrysanthus; cormo globoso tunicis laavibus castaneis nitidis in 
segmenta ovata concava apice fissa solutis basi truncatis non v. obscure 
fibrosis, spat.ha basali nulla, foliia 3-5 flores vix superantibus angustis 
T V poll, latis, spatha propria 1-2-phylla, floribus 2 aureis, perianthii 
tubo aureo limbo bis terve longiore non fasciato, segmentis aureis 
anguste elliptico-oblongis obtusis, antheris elongatis vitellinis exsertis 
filaments puberula excedentibus, stigmatibus vitellinis integris apice 
truncatis erosis. 

C. chrysanthus, Herbert in Journ. Tlort. Soc, vol. ii. p. 285 (non Bot. Reg., 
1847, t. 4, fig. 1); Baker in Gard. Chron., 1873, p. 291. 

C. annulatus, var. chrysanthus, Herbert in Bot. Mag., sub t. 38 Gl et 3862 ; et 
in Bot. Beg., 1843, Misc., p. 27. 

C. croceus, K. Koch in Linnoza, vol. xix. p. 7. 

C. sulphureus, Griseb. Fl. Rum. et Bith., vol. ii. p. 373 (non Ker). 

C. mEesiacus, J. Gay in Plant. Exsicc. Balans. Orient, n. 33 (non Gawler). 



This lovely little species was first described by Herbert, in 
1841, in tins Magazine, as a variety of C. annulatus, with the 
caution, however, that it might prove a distinct species. 
Such it has since been justly regarded by Mr. Baker, from 
whose valuable enumeration of the Crod, published in the 
Gardeners Chronicle, I have taken the synonymy quoted 
above. It is here figured, for the first time, from specimens 
sent me by my friend Mr. Elwes, F.L.S., who gathered it in 
Asia Minor, probably (he tells me) near Smyrna, in March 
1874. Here it was originally discovered by Fmvaldsky, and 
collected later by Balansa, who observes that it is abundant 
on hills about 3000 feet high, flowering in March. It has 
also been found in Macedonia and Thrace by Gnsebach. 

Besides its colour, C. chrvsanthis has its sweet odour to 
recommend it; and it appears to be a very free bloomer 
The abrupt bases of the coats of the corm, which are smooth 

MAY 1st, 1875. 



and shining, and break off into ovate acute concave frag- 
ments, are very peculiar. 

Descr. Corm one-half to three-quarters of an inch in 
diameter, globose, with a broad fibrous base ; coats smooth, 
shining, not at all fibrous, truncate at the base, breaking up 
into ovate concave segments that are split at the top into 
acute bristly teeth. Buds solitary, 1-2-flowered. Basal 
spat/ie none. Leaves three to five, about as tall as the flower, 
very narrow, about one-sixteenth of an inch broad, margins 
smooth recurved, costa white. Sheaths pale; floral one or 
two. Flowers one and three-quarters to two inches in 
diameter, bright golden yellow, odorous ; tube two to three 
times as long as the limb, yellow, not striped; segments 
narrowly elliptic-oblong, obtuse. Anthers exserted, slender, 
longer than the somewhat pubescent filaments, bright orange- 
yellow. Stigmas of the same colour, quite entire, truncate, 
obscurely erose. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of coat of corm ; 2, stigmas -.—both magnified. 



6163. 




■ 



Tab. 6163. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM Warscewiczii. 

Native of Costa Bica. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. — Tribe Vande^e. 
Genus Odontoglossum, H. B. et K. ; {Lindl. Fol. Orchid., Odontoglossum). 



Odontoglossum (Pbahenopsoidea) Warscewiczii; pseudobulbis parvis an- 
guste oblongis compressis, foliis pedalibus anguste elliptico-lanceolatis 
acuminatis, scapo gracili, 6— 8-flore, floribus amplis albis, perianthii 
plani segmentis basi roseis, sepalis ovatis acutis, petalis paulo majoribus 
elliptico-oblongis obtusis v. subacutis, labello amplo late panduriforrai 
apice bilobo basi in unguem brevissimum constricto, ungue simplici 
concavo marginibus elevatis puberulis disco basi carinis 3 brevibus 
obtusis puberulis, columna brevi exalata. 

O. Warscewiczii, Reichb. f. in Mohl et Schlecht, Bot. Zeit., 1852, p. 692 ; 
Xen. Orchid., vol. i. t. 208, t. 81; in Gardeners' Chronicle, 1875, 
p. 270 ; Lindl. FoL Orchid. Odontogl, n. 21* 



No oiis can compare this lovely plant with its gorgeous 
congeners, 0. vemllarium (Tab. nost. 6037) and 0. Plialanopms, 
without recognising with Professor Beichenbach their close 
affinity in foliage and habit, whilst in floral structure they 
differ materially, especially in the lip, which in 0. vexillarium 
has the claw produced backwards into an acute horn on 
either side, whereas in this it is quite simple. The ridges of 
the claw and disk of the lip further differ remarkably, as a 
comparison of the plates will show. 0. Warscewiczii was dis- 
covered by Joseph von Warscewicz, the Polish nobleman who 
has added so many fine plants to our stoves, in Costa Eica ; 
it was first flowered by Messrs. Veitch, in February of this 
year, and by them sent for figuring in this Magazine. It is 
a very free bloomer, and may, as Dr. Beichenbach suggests, 
rival 0. vexillarium itself in the estimation of florists. Its 
discoverer describes it as growing at a considerable elevation, 
and being very scarce. 

Descr. Pseudobulbs tufted, small, one and a half to two 
inches long, oblong-ovate, compressed, margins acute. Leaves 
distichous, nearly a foot long, elliptic-lanceolate, acute, bright- 
green above, paler beneath and keeled. Scape about as long 

MAY 1st, 1875. 



as the leaves, slender, inclined or drooping, C-8-flowered. 
Pedicels and ovary together one and a half inches long, 
slender, pale; bracts small, acute, appressed. Perianth two 
to two and a half inches in diameter, fiat, white, with a rose- 
coloured blotch at the base of each segment, and two at the 
base of the lip. Sepals broadly ovate, acute. Petals about 
as large, elliptical, rounded or apiculate at the tip. Lip very 
broadly fiddle-shaped, with rather sharply angled sides, the 
broad apex 2-lobed, with a mucro in the notch ; lobes some- 
what reflected, obtusely quadrate; claw very short, small, 
concave, with a raised pubescent golden-yellow annulus or 
border, from which three contiguous obtuse short yellow 
keels project upon the disk. Column very short. — /• D. H. 



Fig. 1, Front, and 2, side view of lip and column : — both magnified. 



61&4 




Vincent E 



Tab. 6164. 
HEMICH^NA fruticosa. 

Native of Guatemala and Costa Rica. 



Nat. Ord. Scrophularine^:. — Tribe Gratiolej;. 
Genus Hemicieena, Benth. ; (in Plant. Hartweg., p. 78). 



Hemich^ena fruticosa ; ramulis herbaceis, subteretibus, foliis 3-5-pollicaribus 
oblongo-lanceolatis sub-duplicato-dentatis acuminatis basi amplexicauli- 
connatis pubescentibus, cymis axillaribus 3-5-floris foliis brevioribus, 
bracteis oblongis acutis, calycis lobis subaequalibus tubo brevioribus 
lanceolate -subulatis, corolla aurea facie Mimuli, lobis obovato-rotundatis 
tubo intus puberulo brevioribus. 

H. fruticosa, Benth. Plant Hartw., p. 78 ; Walp. Rep., vol. iii. p. 452. 

Leucocarpus fruticosus, Benth., 1. c. 350, et in DC. Prod., vol. x. p. 336. 



A very handsome rock plant, but not likely to be hardy ; 
found originally by Hartw eg in Guatemala, and described by 
Bentham in 1839 as a new genus, which however he im- 
mediately after, but on insufficient grounds, merged into 
Leucocarpus. 

Nothing further was known of Hemichama till it was sent 
from Costa Rica by Endress, plants from whom flowered at 
Messrs. Veitchs' establishment, July, 1873. Osbert Salvin, 
F.R.S., an able ornithologist and assiduous collector of plants, 
next found it growing on the Volcan de Alitan in Guate- 
mala, at an elevation of 10,000 feet above the sea. Mr. Salvin 
sent seeds of it to England, which germinated and flowered 
at Kew, but the specimen here figured was from Mr. Veitch. 
Hemichama differs from Leucocarpus (one species of which, 
L. alatus, is figured in this work, Tab. 30C7, as Mimuius 
perfoliatvs), in the capsular fruits and anthers with parallel 
cells, as well as in the more deeply cleft calyx ; in habit and 
foliage, the genera are remarkably alike. From Mimuius, with 
which Leucocarpus was formerly confounded, both it and 
Hemichama differ in their inflorescence. 

Descr. A glandular pubescent shrub, three to five feet 
high ; branches terete, herbaceous, green. Leaves opposite, 
four to eight inches long, two to two and a half broad, oblong- 



MAY 1st, 1875. 



lanceolate, acuminate, irregularly or doubly toothed, contracted 
somewhat above the amplexicaul base, which unites with that 
of the opposite leaf, dark green, pubescent on both surfaces, 
nerves very oblique. Cymes usually 3-flowered, much shorter 
than the leaves ; peduncle three-quarters to one inch long ; 
pedicels very short ; bracts oblong, herbaceous, caducous. 
Calyx half-inch long, tubular, somewhat oblique, 5-angled ; 
mouth 5-lobed; lobes straight, subulate-lanceolate, green. 
Corolla golden-yellow ; tube twice as long as the calyx, broad, 
smooth, terete, gradually expanded into the obscurely 
2-lipped spreading limb, which is one to one and a half inches 
broad ; lobes nearly equal, rounded ; tube puberulous within, 
speckled with red at the throat. Stamens inserted towards 
the base of the tube, filaments nearly straight, two rather 
longer than the rest ; anthers shortly oblong, cells parallel. 
Ovary ovoid; style slender, stigmatic lobes flat elliptic. 
Capsule rather longer than the calyx, oblong; valves flat, 
grooved down the middle of the back, glabrous ; placentas 
thick. Seeds very minute. — /. D. II 



Fig. 1, Corolla laid open; 2, calyx and style; 3, ovary; 4, tranverse 
section of ditto : — all magnified. 



616,5 




leletkU 



VmcentBrccks Day&_SonTmp 



Tab. 6165. 
DICHORISANDRA Saundersii. 

Native of Brazil. 



Nat. Ord. Commeltne^b. 
Genus Dichorisandra, Mikan; (Mart, et Seubert, Flor. Bras., fasc. iv.p. 235). 



Dichorisandra Saundersii ; caule gracili terete piloso, foliis subdistichia 
elongato-lanceolatis longe acuminatis ciliatis basi in raginam brevem 
ciliatam vix tumidam abrupte attenuatis, inflorescentia terminali, flori- 
bus in racemum densum subcapitatum confertis brevissime pedicellatis, 
f poll, diametro, pedicellis sepalisque oblongis obtusis glabris, petalis 
obovatis apice rotundatis sepalis ter majoribus violaceis, staminibus 6 
subsequalibus, filamentis crassis antheris linearibus brevioribus, ovario 
glabro. 

I have searched in vain amongst the published species of 
Dichorisandra for this pretty species. About thirty species of 
the genus are known, most of them, like D. Saundersii, are 
Brazilian, and amongst them D. gracilis, Nees et Mart, 
approaches nearest to this in character, but differs in its small 
flowers and pubescent inflorescence, as well as in having three 
stamens with long anthers and short filaments, and the other 
three with short anthers and long filaments. The other 
species of the genus figured in this work are D. oxypetala, 
Hook. (Tab. 2721), D. leucophthalmos, Hook. (Tab. 4733) 
which has radical inflorescence, and D. picta, Lodd. (Tab. 
4760), all very different from this. 

Dichorisandra Saundersii was introduced from Brazil by 
W. Wilson Saunders, Esq., F.E.S., and given by him to Kew, 
where it flowered in July, 1873; it forms a pretty stove 
plant about three feet high. 

Descr. Stem two to three feet high, slender, very sparingly 
branched ; branches slender, cylindrical, terete, pilose, as are 
the sheaths, with slender ascending hairs. Leaves five to six 
inches long, numerous, sub-bifarious, lanceolate, long-acumi- 
nate, recurved for the most part, 5 -nerved, dark green, 
suddenly contracted at the base into the sheath, margins 
recurved in the lower part, pale beneath ; sheaths a quarter to 
one-third of an inch long, hardly tumid, green, mouth rounded. 

may 1st, 1875. 



Inflorescence terminal, nearly glabrous ; peduncle very short, 
stout. Flowers three-quarters of an inch diameter, crowded 
in a dense ovoid almost capitate panicle two inches long ; 
pedicels very short, glabrous. Sepals oblong, obtuse, concave, 
glabrous, white, tipped with violet. Petals more than twice 
as large as the sepals, obovate, concave, rounded at the tip, 
violet except at the base, which is white. Stamens 6, sub- 
equal ; filaments very short, stout, obovoid ; anther longer 
than the filament, rather slender. Ovary subglobose ; style 
straight, or nearly so, stigma obtuse. — /. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, petal and stamen; 3, apex of pedicel and stamens; 4, 
pistil : — all magnified. 



6166 







Tab. 6166. 
GALANTHUS Elwesii. 

Native of Asia Minor. 



Nat. Ord. Amaryllideje. — Tribe AjiaryllejE. 
Genus Galanthus, Linn.; (Endl. Gen. Plant., p. 174). 



Galanthus Elwesii ; vaginae ore lateraliter fisso, foliis binis 6-8-pollicaribus 
f poll, latis planis basi carinatis semitortis valde glaucis, spatha 1} 
pollicari, floribus amplis 1-1 \ poll, diam., segmentis exterioribus late 
obovatis concavis albis, interioribus cuneato-oblongis medio constrictis 
apice 2-lobis, lobis obtusis divergentibus intus plicato-carinatis viridi- 
bus fascia media alba. 



This fine Snowdrop is very distinct from any previously 
described, though whether all these, namely, G. nivalis, L., of 
N. Europe, G. plicatus, M.B. (Tab. nost. 2162, a poor plate 
of a small specimen), of the Caucasian regions, and G. Im- 
perati, Bert., of Italy (G.plicatus, Tenore not of M. Bieb.), 
should not, together with this, be regarded as geographical 
forms of one may be a matter of opinion. G. Elwesii is 
nearest to plicatus, but differs in its basal sheath being more 
or less deeply notched or even divided on one side ; in the 
leaves not being folded within the sheath, but twisted ; in 
the larger flower and fruit ; and in the form and colour of the 
inner perianth-segments, which in G. plicatus are not as in 
this constricted in the middle, and are merely notched, not 
2-lobed at the tip, and are white with two confluent green 
spots confined to the top. Lastly, the anther-cells are 
shorter and broader in G. Elwesii than in the Kew speci- 
men of G. plicatus. 

Galanthus Elwesii is a native of the summits of Yamanlar- 
dagh mountains, north of the Gulf of Smyrna, where it was 
discovered by M. Balansa in 1854, and whence dried speci- 
mens were distributed under the name of G.plicatus, being 
so named by M. J. Gay of Paris. I am indebted to Mr. 
Elwes, of Miserdine House, Cirencester, a gentleman who 
to an ardent love of scientific horticulture unites the powers 
of a traveller, collector, and observing naturalist, for pointing 
may 1st, 1875. 



out its distinctive character from G. plicatus, and which Mr. 
Baker has confirmed. Mr. Elwes collected the specimens 
here figured on the mountains near Smyrna in 1874 and 
cultivated them in his garden at Miserdine, which bids fair 
soon to contain perhaps the largest and best private collection 
of well-named bulbous plants in the kingdom ; it flowered in 
February and is quite hardy. 

Descr. Bulb globose, three-quarters of an inch in diameter ; 
tunics thick, fleshy. Sheath membranous, mouth oblique 
and cleft on one side. Leaves two, six or eight inches long 
by three-quarters of an inch broad, obtuse, flat except towards 
the base, where they are keeled, "not-plaited, but always 
twisted" {Elwes), very glaucous, sheathing the base of 
the flowering scape. Scape six inches high, oblong on a 
transverse section. Spathe one to two inches long, con- 
volute, border membranous. Ovary obovoid, one-half inch 
long. Perianth one and a half inches in diameter, or more 
when spread out, outer segments white, broadly obovate 
obtuse concave ; inner oblong- cuneate, constricted somewhat 
above the middle, 2-lobed at the tip, the lobes obliquely 
truncate and spreading ; green, with a white wrinkled border 
and a broad white horizontal band above the middle ; outer 
surface smooth, inner deeply ribbed. Filaments very short ; 
anther-cells short, broad, with long prolongations and subu- 
late recurved tips. — /. I). IT. 



Fig. 1, Tip of ovary, style, and stamen; 2, back, and 3, front views of 
inner perianth segment : — all magnified. 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 

CONTENTS OF No- 365, MAY, 1875. 

Tab. 6162.— CROCUS CHRYSANTHUS. 
jf 6163.— ODONTOGLOSSUM WARSCEWICZII. 
j? 6164.— HEMICHJENA FRUTICOSA. 
„ 6165.— DICHORISANDRA SAUNDERSU. 
„ 6166.— GALANTHUS ELWESII. 



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6167 









Ymcentfiroote I 



Tab. 6167. 
KNIPHOFIA Macowani. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. LiLiACEiE. — Tribe Aloineje. 
Genus Kniphofia, Mcench. ; (Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc, vol. xi. p. 360). 



Kniphofia Macowani; foliis 1-H-pedalibus rigidissimis anguste elou- 
gato-subulatis carinatis basi ^"poll. latis sulcatis, marginibus crenato- 
denticulatis, scapo foliis sequilongo, racemo 3-4-pollicari, bracteis 
ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis, floribus deflexis brevissime pedicellatis, 
perianthio pollicari subcylindraceo basi hemispherico supra ovarium 
non constricto e flavo aurantiaco-coccineo, segmentis rotundatis patenti- 
bus, genitalibus inclusis. 

K. Macowani, Baker in Trim. Jour. Bot., 1874, p. 3. 



We have several dried specimens of this pretty little 
Kniphofia, collected by its discoverer, whose name it bears, 
in grassy places of the Boschberg mountains in Somerset 
district, where it inhabits elevations of 4000 to 5000 feet. 
It was described from these by Mr. Baker, and flowered 
shortly afterwards in the Eoyal Gardens from roots sent by 
Professor Macowan. It is remarkably distinct from any of 
the fourteen species described by Mr. Baker in the eleventh 
volume of the " Linntean Journal," and which are alluded to 
under K. Rooperi (Tab. nost. 6116), and forms one of six ad- 
ditional species subsequently described by Mr. Baker in Dr. 
Triraen s " Journal of Botany," quoted above. 

It is best treated as a greenhouse plant, though probably 
as hardy as the other species of the genus. 

Descr. Root of stout fibres. Stem as thick as the thumb 
at the base, clothed with the rigid fibrous nerves of the old 
leaves. Leaves one to one and a half feet long, suberect, 
one-third of an inch broad at the base, narrow subulate, 
strongly keeled, triangular at the back, deeply grooved, 
margins strongly toothed, tips flattish. Scape as long as the 
leaves or longer, slender, cylindric, with one subulate bract 
or none. Raceme three to five inches long, cylindric-ovoid. 
Bracts one-quarter of an inch long, ovate-lanceolate, acumi- 

june 1st, 1875, 



nate, white, membranous. Flo teas very shortly pedicelled, 
deflexed, yellowish passing into bright orange-red; tube 
nearly cylindric, rounded at the base, not contracted above 
the ovary, slightly narrowed from the lower third to the 
throat ; segments one-twelfth of an inch long, rounded, 
spreading. Stamens included. — /. D. H. 



Fig 1, Flower, magnified. 



6168 










Tab. 6168. 
CROCUS Crewel 

Native of the Greek Archipelago. 



Nat. Ord. Iride;e. — Tribe Ixie^:. 
Genus Crocus, Toum. ; (Klatt in Linncea, vol. xxxiv. p. 674). 



Crocus Creioei ; cormo ovoideo-globoso, tunicis basi truncatis lavigatis, ex- 
terioribus brevioribus in vaginam fissam basim foliorum cirgentern 
productis, rete e fibris tenuissimis dense intertextis, foliis binis ver- 
nalibus flores vix superantibus -^ poll, latis canaliculatis, costa alba, 
spatha 2-phylla 1-flore, interiore anguste lineari, exteriore tubum 
perianthii vaginante, perianthii tubo 2-pollicari albo lineis 6 purpureis 
striate, limbo albo pollicari, segmentis oblongo-lanceolatis acutis ex- 
terioribns lineis 3 purpureis notato, interioribus estriatis, fauce luteo 
glabro, antheris purpureis filamentis luteis tequilongis stigmatibus 
linearibus integerrimis. 



Allied to C. hijtonis (Tab. nost. 845), but very distinct^ in 
many characters, and with the corm of C. Icevigatus, Bory, whilst 
differing from these and all other known species in the purple 
anthers. It is remarkable that so distinct an undescribed 
plant should inhabit Syra, the best known of all the Greek 
islands, and one which has long been the coaling station for 
the Mediterranean steamers, whence the traffic diverges in 
one direction to Smyrna, and in the other to Constantinople 
and the Black Sea. This fact shows how much remains still 
to be done towards the investigation of the bulbous plants of 
the Levant, and especially in respect of such genera as 
Crocus, whose flowers are very fugacious. 

Crocus Crewei is a discovery of the gentleman, H. G. 
Elwes, Esq., F.L.S., to whom horticulture is indebted for 
the introduction of many new Oriental bulbs, including 
the Galanthus figured in the last number of this Magazine 
(Tab. 6166). Mr. Elwes collected seeds and corms of it on 
hills about 1000 feet high, growing with C Bon/i, and 
flowering very early, and transmitted corms to the Eev. H. 
Harper Crewe, who flowered them at the Rectory, Drayton 
Beauchamp, in March of the present year. At Mr. Elwes's 
June 1st, 1875. 



desire I have named it after our common friend, Mr. Crewe, 
whose collection of Croci is the richest in Europe. 

Descr. Corm the size of a hazel-nut, ovoid-globose ; tunics 
very smooth, truncate and split at the base, the outer suc- 
cessively shorter, so that they seem to imbricate downwards ; 
the outermost constricted at the top into a short toothed 
sheath; texture very close, with no appearance of reticula- 
tions. Leaves two only, two to three inches long, slender, 
equalling or slightly exceeding the flower ; midrib broad and 
prominent ; upper surface with a distinct white line. Proper 
spai/tes two, outer enfolding the leaves ; inner narrow, linear. 
Flower solitary. Perianth-tube one to two inches long, very 
slender, white, with six purple stripes ; limb one and a half 
inches broad, white ; segments oblong-lanceolate, acute, the 
outer with three fimbriate purple stripes on the back, the 
inner not streaked ; throat bright-yellow, glabrous. Filaments 
short, yellow, equalling the slender purple anthers, which are 
a quarter of an inch long, and reach half-way up the limb. 
Stigmas slender, orange-yellow, undivided.-—/. D. H. 



Pig. 1, Section of tunics of corm ; 2, ditto of leaf seen from the back; 3, 
styles : — all magnified. 







Vincent ■Son 1 " 



Tab. 6169. 
DRACAENA Smithii. 

Native of Tropical Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Liliac^;. — Suborder Aspai;age."f. 
Genus Dracaena, Vand. ; (Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc, vol. xiv. p. 52). 



Drac.ena Smithii ; caule elato simplici gracili, foliis confertis patenti-recur- 
vis 3—4 pedalibus supra medium 2-£-3£ poll, latis inferne angustatis 
apice acuminatis striato-nervosis lsete viridibus tenuiter coriaceis, costa 
superne evanida subtus valida prominula, marginibus integerrimis 
tenuiter cartilagineis, inflorescentia paniculatim ramosa suberecta, rami* 
patentibus, floribus in axillis panicula? et ramulorum apicibus fascicu- 
latis flavis, bracteis 2-5-pollicaribus lanceolatis, bracteolis minutis 
deltoideo-ovatis acutis, pedicellis brevissimis, perianthio ,^-pollicari. 
tubo cylindraceo, segmentis tubum gequantibus lineari-oblongis apicibus 
incurvis, filamentis crassis perianthii segmentis aequantibus, antheris 
deltoideis Ioculis basi divergentibus, stylo gracili longe exserto, stigrnato 
peltato 3-lobo. 

P. Smithii, Baker MSS. 



The precise origin of the handsome Dracama here figured 
is unknown; it has been in cultivation for many years, Both 
at Kew and Sion House, and it appears to be so closely allied 
to D. fragrans that I cannot doubt its being an African 
species, and one probably introduced by Whitfield from the 
West Coast, a quarter of a century ago. As it is, all trace 
of its history is lost in both establishments. A reference to 
the plate of D. fragrans, published in this Magazine 
(Tab. 1081), will show how near to one another these plants 
are, this differing chiefly in its narrower, more straight, and 
much less undulated leaves, in the yellower flower, with a 
shorter perianth-tube, and in the divaricating base of the 
anther- cells. 

Mr. Baker, who I follow in keeping it distinct from 
D. fragrans, has proposed that the name of the late and 
present able Curators of the Royal Gardens (both named 
John Smith, and unrelated) should be attached to this plant, 
which is the more applicable, inasmuch as the present Curator 
had charge of the gardens of his Grace the Duke of Northum- 

june 1st, 1875. 



berland at Sion House, where as well as at Kew, D. Smithii 
has been long in cultivation; it flowers in winter or early 
spring in both establishments. 

Descr. Stem fifteen feet high, slender, hitherto quite 
unbranched, cylindric, almost smooth. Leaves three to four 
feet long, forming a spreading rosette on the very crown of 
the stem, slightly recurved, not waved, narrowly ensiform, 
broadest beyond the middle, acuminate, narrowed towards 
the base before dilating at the insertion, broadest part two 
and a half to three and a half inches in diameter, narrowest 
about one inch, bright green, striated; midrib indistinct 
above, very strong and prominent beneath; lateral nerves 
reduced to innumerable striations; margin thinly cartilagi- 
nous. Inflorescence of several subsessile suberect branched 
panicles two feet long, glabrous ; rachis and branches stout, 
terete, green; bracts two to five inches long; bracteoles 
small, crowded, ovate, acute. Flowers in crowded fascicles in 
the axils of the panicle, and terminating short branchlets, 
subsessile. Perianth pale yellow, half-inch long; tube 
cylindric, base conical ; segments as long as the tube, linear- 
oblong, with acute incurved tips. Filaments as long as the 
perianth-segments, rather stout ; anthers broadly ovate, cells 
diverging at the base. Style slender, equalling the stamens ; 
stigma peltate, 3-lobed. — /. D. H. 



Pig. 1, Reduced figure of whole plant; 2, portion of panicle, and 3 of 
lent:— both of the natural size; 4, flower -.—magnified. 



6170 










Tab. 6170. 
balbisia verticillata. 

Native of Chili and Peru. 

Nat. Ord. G-eraniaceje. — Tribe WendtieJ3. 
Genus Balbisia, Cat:; (JBenth. fy Hook.f. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. 276). 



Balbisia verticillata ; frutex glaucus, ramis gracilibus strictis, foliis op- 

positis alternisque tripartitis, segmentis lineari-oblongis obtusis acutisvo 

integerrimis sericeo-pilosis marginibus revolutis, floribus terminalibus 

solitariis pedunculatis amplis aureis. 
B. verticillata, Cav. in Ann. Cienc. Nat., vol. vii. p. G2, t. 46 ; Don in Ed. 

New Phil. Joum , 1833, p. 277 ; Klotzsch in Linncea, vol. x. p. 431. 
B. peduncularis, Don in Ed. New Phil. Joum., 1833, p. 277. 
Ledocaepon chilense, Desf. in Mem. Mus., vol. iv. p. 250 ; DC. Prod., vol. i. 

p. 702; C. Gay, Flor. Hist. Pis. et Polit. Chile Bot, vol. i. p. 394. 
L. argentum, Presl. St/mb., vol. i. 66, t. 44 ; C. Gay, l.c. p. 394. 
L. pedunculare, Lindl. Bot. Reg., t. 139 ; C. Gay, l.c. p. 393. 
L. Meyenianum, Walp. Rep., vol. v. p. 380. 
L. cistiflorum, Meyen Reise, vol. i. p. 470; Nov. Act. Nat. Cur., vol. xix. 

Suppl. i. p. 316. 
Cbuckshanksia cistiflora, Hook. Bot. Misc., vol. ii. p. 211, t. 90; Klotzsch, 

l.c. p. 432. 

This beautiful half-hardy shrub was introduced into the 
Horticultural Gardens in 1825; but like so many other 
plants requiring occasional protection to insure its con- 
tinuance in the open air, it soon was lost from out of doors, 
and coming from a dry cool climate, it damped off when 
transferred to a pit ; such plants indeed can be secured only 
through a constant repetition by cuttings, and by more care 
than is usually bestowed on plants with unfamiliar names. 
When properly grown it is an exceedingly handsome thing, 
flowering in August and September, and resembles a gigantic 
Hypericum more than an (Enothera, with which latter it has 
more usually been compared. The Chilian name is Flor de 
San Jose, and it has a wide range, both in Chili and Peru, 
growing on dry hills and ascending to 10,000 feet. 

Balbisia verticillata has been introduced for the second 

June 1st, 1875. 



time by Messrs. Veitch, who sent the specimen here figured 
in September last. 

Descr. An erect shrub, three to six feet high; branches 
alternate, and as well as the twigs and leaves, clothed with 
dense more or less silky hairs. Leaves alternate and oppo- 
site, sessile, one-quarter to one inch long, divided to the 
base into narrowly linear-oblong obtuse or acute slightly 
curved segments, margins quite entire and recurved; midrib 
very strong. Floicers two to three inches in diameter, on 
slender terminal peduncles one to three inches long. Bracts 
of about ten linear leaf-like segments, placed close under the 
calyx. Sepals five, half an inch long, ovate-lanceolate, 
acuminate. Petals five, broadly ovate-cuneate, tip rounded or 
retuse, golden yellow, contorted in a3stivation. Stamens ten, 
much shorter than the petals ; filaments slender, yellow ; 
anthers about as long, linear, orange-yellow. Ovary ovoid, 
silky, 5-celled ; stigmas five, sessile, linear, red-purple, spread- 
ing. Ovules many, 2-seriate in each cell. Capsule loculicidally 
5-valved ; valves cohering by the septa with the axis. Seeds 
numerous, angled ; albumen thin, fleshy : cotyledons folded. 
-/ D. II. J> J 



Fig. 1, Branch and leaves; 2, flower with petals removed ; 3, ovary :— 
all magnified. J 



617} 







Tab. 6171. 
MASDEVALLIA Estradjk. 

Native of New Grenada. 

Nat. Ord. Orchideje. — Tribe Pleurothallide.e. 
Genus Masdevallia, Ruiz §• Pav. ; (Lindl. Gen. $• Sp. Orchid., p. 192). 



Masdevallia Estrada ; caulibus fasciculatis, foliis 3-pollicaribus elliptico- 
oblongis v. spathulatis obtusis v. apice 2-clentatis in petiolum angus- 
tatis coriaceis vix carinatis, scapis gracilibus lente curvis foliis paulo 
longioribus supra medium et basin versus bracteatis, floribus adscen- 
dentibus, ov'ario brevi angulato et sulcato, sepalis in tubum brevem 
latum campanulatum connatis in caudas filiformes flavas florem exce- 
dentibus abrupte angustatis, supremo scaphiformi oblongo concavo 
basi luteo supra medium purpureo, lateralibus oblongis planiusculis 
marginibus recurvis, petalis parvis dimidiato-oblongis apice obtuso 
dentato basi antice in auriculam productis, labello oblongo truncato 
callo purpureo recurvo apiculato, columna exalata apice 3-loba. 

M, Estrada?, Reich, f. in Gard. Chron., 1874, p. 435. 



Though neither so rich in colour nor grotesque in form as 
the species of Masdevallia lately figured in this work, the 
present species promises to be a favourite with cultivators 
from its dense habit of growth, abundant flowering, and the 
delicate tints of the flowers. It is a native of New Grenada, 
and was, according to Dr. Eeichenbach's statement in the 
Gardeners Chronicle, first observed in the garden of a New 
Grenada lady, Dona Estrada, a skilful grower of Orchids. 
It was subsequently found by Mr. Patin, collector for Mr. 
Williams, of the Victoria and Paradise Nurseries, through 
whom it was thus first introduced into this country. 

For the specimen here figured I am indebted to H. E. 
Cauty, Esq., of Liverpool, who sent in April last a plant 
with fifty-five leaves and fourteen flowers. 

Descr. Stems densely tufted, forming a cushion-like mass 
of leaves. Leaves with the petioles three inches long, elliptic 
or cuneate-spathulate, obtuse or bifid at the tip, coriaceous, 
gradually narrowed into the petiole, obscurely keeled, deep 
green above, pale beneath. Scapes rather longer than the 
leaves, erect, slender, slightly curved, with one sheathing 

June 1st, 1875. 



bract below the flower, and another towards the base. Flowers 
inclined, three inches in diameter from the tip of the upper 
to those of the lateral sepals. Sepals combined at the base 
into a short campanulate tube, then spreading, subequal, all 
of them abruptly contracted into slender spreading almost 
filiform yellow tails longer than themselves; upper sepal 
boat-shaped, very concave or galeate, lower half yellow, upper 
half violet-purple ; lateral sepals more flattened, with strongly 
recurved margins, violet-purple towards the lower half, the 
upper half white or straw-coloured. Petals very small, white, 
membranous, dimidiate-oblong, tip truncate and toothed, 
base dilated in front into an obtuse auricle, Lip linear- 
oblong, shortly clawed, nearly white, tip provided with a 
terminal recurved purple callus ; surface nearly smooth. 
Ovary angled and grooved. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower with sepals removed ; 2, column and claw of lip ; 3, lip : — 
all magnified. 



Tab. 6172. 
VIBURNUM Sandankwa. 

Native of Japan. 



Nat. Orel. Caprifoliace^e. — Tribe Sambuce/e. 
Genus Viburnum, Linn.; (Bentli. fy Ilook.f. Gen. PL, vol. ii. p. 3). 



Viburnum Sandankwa ; ramis teretibus verruculosis, foliis petiolatis ellip- 
ticis elliptico-ovatisve obtusis v. subacutis basi rotundatis v. acutis 
grosse crenato-serratis v. fere integerrimis coriaceis glaberrimis, petiolo 
crasso J-i-pollicari aspero, nervis paucis validis arcuatis, corymbis 
axillaribus v. terminalibus parvis erectis paucifloris breviter peduncu- 
latis glabris v. puberulis basi ebracteatis, bracteolis parvis herbaceis 
ovato-lanceolatis, ovario subgloboso, calycis dentibus parvis ovato- 
rotundatis, corollae alba? tubo i-pollicari, limbi lobis suberectis concavis 
rotundatis. 

V. Sandankwa, Hassle." Retzia, pug. i. p. 38; Miq. Prol. Fl. Jap., p. 156; 
Walp. Ann., vol. v. p. 96. 



A hardy evergreen shrub, cultivated in Japan, whence we 
have cultivated specimens gathered by Maximovicz at 
Nagaski, and native ones from the Loochoo Islands, gathered 
by C. Wright during the American North Pacific Exploring 
Expedition in IS 5 3-6, and subsequently in the same island 
by Dr. Weyrich, communicated from the St. Petersburg 
Botanic Gardens. Hasskarl, who describes it from cultivated 
specimens, says that it very rarely flowers ; Miquel, in his 
Prolusio, gives a description of it, but no habitat ; he how- 
ever indicates its affinity with the Himalayan V. cylindricum, 
Don, and V. embescens, Wall., to the former of which it is 
most nearly allied in the concave corolla limb, but differs in 
the short peduncle of the corymb, which is not glandular, 
and in the toothed leaves. 

V. Sandankwa has been long cultivated at the Scilly Islands, 
where the late proprietor, Aug. Smith, Esq., M.P., formed 
at Tresco Abbey a magnificent collection of half-hardy herbs, 
shrubs, and trees, principally procured (and this amongst 
them) from the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, and from Messrs. Veitch 
of the then Exeter Nurseries. This collection is now 
sedulously cared for by his heir, J. Dorrien Smith, Esq., 

june 1st, 1875. 



who sent to Kew to be named flowering specimens of V. 
Sandankwa in March last ; it is not a little remarkable that 
a shrub, native of the Loochoo Islands, which are but little 
north of the tropics and within the zone of the typhoons 
of the Chinese Seas, should flourish in 52° N. and in the cool 
Atlantic Ocean. At Kew it has proved hardy, planted 
against a wall in a very sheltered place, but has never 
flowered. 

Descr. A shrub four to six feet high, or small tree , 
branches terete, bark dark brown, warted. Leaves two to 
four and a half inches long, elliptic or oblong-ovate, or sub- 
obovate, obtuse or subacute ; base rounded or cuneate ; mar- 
gin loosely crenate-toothed, especially above the middle, some- 
times quite entire ; tips of the teeth glandular j nerves three 
or four on each side the midrib, strong, arched j upper surface 
bright green, under paler with a few obscure glands or none ; 
petiole quarter to half an inch long, stout, rough. Cymes 
terminal and in the upper axils, short, few-flowered, shortly 
peduncled, suberect, pubescent, nearly globose in the cul- 
tivated specimens ; bracts at the base none, those at the forks 
small, ovate-lanceolate, herbaceous. Flowers very shortly 
pedicelled. Calyx-teeth small, rounded, ovate. Corolla white, 
with a faint rose tinge, tube one-third to half an inch long, 
cylindric ; lobes erecto-patent, rounded, concave. Anthers 
small, exserted. Stigma on a short stout style, 3-lobed. — 
J. B. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2, calyx, ovary, style and stigma: — magnified. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 366, JTJNE, 1875. 

Tab. 6167.— KNIPHOFIA MACOWANI. 
6168.— CROCUS CREWEL 
6169.— DRAC^NA SMITHII. 
6170.— BALBISIA VERTICILLATA. 
6171.— MASDEVALLIA ESTRADA. 
6172.— VIBURNUM SANDANKWA. 



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Tab. 6173. 
vanda limbata. 

Native of Java. 



Nat. Ord. Obchide-e. — Tribe Vande^:. 
Genus Vanda, Lindl. ; (Lindl. Fol. Orchid. Vanda), 



Vanda limbata; caule suberecto elato robusto, foliis distichis 6-10-pollicari- 
bus patenti-recurvis linearibus apice obtuse 2-lobis carinatis crasse et 
dure coriaceis, pedunculo elongato, racemo multifloro, floribus 2-poll. 
diametr., petalis sepalisque consimilibus spathulatis intus cinnamomeis 
disco tesselato aureo-limbatis extus albis v. pallide lilacinis, labello dorso 
in calcar breve conicum obtusum producto, lobis lateralibus parvis 
rotundatis intermedio sepalis sequilongo quadrato infra apicem obscure 
apiculatam paulo constricto lateribus deflexis pallide lilacino disco 
obscure 5-7-sulcato, ungue brevi callo instrueto, columna brevi 
cucullata. 

V. limbata, Blume, Bumphia, vol. iv. p. 49 sub V. furva ; Lindl. Fol. Orchid. 
Vanda, p. 6; Beichb.f. in Walp. Ann., vol. vi. p. 867. 



A near ally of V. insignia, as an inspection of our Plate 
5759 will show, but abundantly distinct in the leaves, form 
of the lip and coloration of the margins of the sepals and 
petals. It is almost identical with the Javanese V. furva of 
Blume, which is poorly figured in that author's fine work, the 
" Bumphia," and which he distinguishes from V. limbata by 
a very slight character in the lip which I do not perceive ; 
his figure of V. furva represents a smaller plant, with a nar- 
rower lip, and no golden edges to the sepals and petals. All 
are closely related to the old V. Boxburghii of Bengal, 
indifferently figured in this work (Tab. 2245), and which 
stands in much the same relation to its above-mentioned 
allies that Cypripedium Argus and the other Indian species 
alluded to under the Plate of that plant in this number 
(Tab. 6175) do to C. venustum. In both these cases the type 
of the group, in so far as this is represented by the first de- 
scribed of its species, is continental Indian, and inhabits the 
extreme western verge of the area occupied by the group ; 
and is inferior in size, in luxuriance of foliage, and especially 
in the brilliant colouring of the flowers to its eastern allies. 

July 1st, 1875. 



Many other instances of this relation between the botanical 
characters of Asiatic plants and their geographical distribution 
may be cited ; and the same remark applies to the animal 
kingdom and especially to the insects, which are so closely 
correlated in form, colouring, and habits of life, with the 
flowers they affect. 

Vanda limbata was introduced by Messrs. "Williams of Hol- 
loway, with whom it flowered in July of last year. 

Descr. Stem in the cultivated species three feet high, as 
thick as the little finger, green, with long straggling roots as 
thick as a goosequill. Leaves six to eight inches long, dis- 
tichous, linear, three-quarters to one and a half inches broad, 
recurved, keeled, obtusely unequally bifid at the top ; dark 
green. Raceme six to eight inches long ; peduncle about as 
long, laxly 10-1 2 -flowered, green; bracts minute, triangular. 
Pedicel and ovary nearly two inches long, white. Perianth two 
inches in diameter. Sepals ondpetak nearly equal and similar, 
spathulate bright cinnamon-coloured within and tesselated, 
with a golden border, pale and suffused with lilac externally. 
Lip 3-lobed, pale lilac, produced behind into a short conic 
obtuse spur ; lateral lobes small, rounded ; midlobe as long 
as the sepals, quadrate, slightly fiddle-shaped, obscurely 
mucronate at the truncate tip, angles rounded, disk tumid, 
with five to seven parallel grooves, margins reflexed, claw 
with a prominent callus. Column short, hooded. — /. D. II. 



Fig. I, Ovary, lip, and column; 2, front view of lip and column: — loth 
magnified. 



Tab. 6174 
DIETES Huttoni. 

Native of the Cape of Good Hope. 



Nat. Ord. Iridace^e. — Tribe Iride^e. 
Genus Dietes, Salisb. ; (Klatt in Linncea, vol. xxxiv. p. 583). 



Dietes Huttoni ; rhizomatosa, vaginis basalibus brunneis scariosis, foliis ad 
caulem solitariis ensiformibus firmis glabris viridibus facie canaliculars 
acuminatis sesquipedalibus vel bipedalibus, caule pedali ssepissime bifloro 
bracteis pluribus navicularibus acutis cincto, spathas valvis lance olatis 
acutis, pedicello bracteas superante, ovario cylindraceo, tubo supra 
ovarium nullo, perianthii limbo luteo, segmentis 3 exterioribus 
obovato-oblongis obtusis supra medium reflexis supra unguem purpureo 
lineatis, segmentis interioribus angustioribus brevioribus oblanceolatis 
erectis, stigmatibus late petaloideis, lamina perianthio duplo breviorc, 
appendicibus apicalibus deltoideis denticulatis. 



Sent by Mr. Hutton from the eastern province of the Cape 
Colony to the Kew collection, where it flowered in the 
month of March of the present year. This genus Dietes is 
scarcely distinct from Iris by any botanical character. One 
belongs to the Cape, and the other to the north temperate 
zone. Dietes catemdata, Klatt. (Moraa catenulata, Ker., 
Bot. Reg., tab. 1074), a plant of our cool stoves, has white 
perianth-segments which spread from the very base when 
they expand. Our present plant is nearer D. bicolor, Sweet. 
{Iris bicolor, Lindl., Bot, Beg., tab. 1404), but is still more 
like an Iris than either of them, and completely connects 
together the two genera ; and the only appreciable character 
in which Dietes differs from Moraa, which is abundantly 
represented in the Cape flora, both as regards individuals 
and species, is that the former is rhizomatose and the latter 
bulbiferous. 

Descr. Shortly rhizomatose, with copious wiry root-fibres. 
Undeveloped leaves numerous, scarious, dark brown, sheathing 
the outside of the tufts of the stem and proper leaves. Deve- 
loped leaves not more than one to a stein, firm b texture, 
green, ensiform, one and a half or two feet long, three- 
quarters of an inch broad, deeply channelled down the face, 

iolt 1st. 1875. 



tapering to a long point. Stem terete, about a foot High, 
2-3-flowered, covered with a close succession of lanceolate, 
acute, clasping bract-leaves. Pedicels two or three inches 
long, protruded from the bracts when developed. Ovary 
cylindrical, half to three-quarters of an inch long. Perianth- 
limb bright yellow, the outer segments obovate-oblong, obtuse, 
an inch and a half long, reflexing from below the middle, 
marked at the top of the claw with a circle of purple lines ; 
inner segments bright yellow, oblanceolate, rather shorter 
than the outer. Stigmas an inch long, broadly petaloid, 
with broad deltoid reflexing toothed apical appendages. 
Flower sweet-scented. — «/". G. Baker, 



Tab. 6175. 
CYPRIPEDIUM Argus. 

Native of the Philippine Islands. 



Nat. Ord. Orciiide^e. — Tribe Cypripedie/E. 
Genus Cypripedium, Lindl. ,■ (Endl. Gen. Plant., p. 220). 



Cypripedium Argus ; foliis omnibus radicalibus subdistichis oblongo-Ianceo- 
latis acutis pallide viridibus maculis saturatioribus tesselatis, scapo 
valido elongato glanduloso-pubescente rubro-fusco 1 flore, spatha ovario 
valde elongato multo breviore, sepalo supremo late ovato-cordato 
acuminato albo-purpureo striato, lateralibus connatis angustis labello 
suppositis, petalis lineari-oblongis obtusis undulatis margine ciliatis 
pallide viridibus maculis purpureis ocellatis, labelli sacco ostio retuso 
utrinque angulato, staminodio hippocrepiformi. 

Cypripedium Argus, Reichb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 608, and 1874, 
p. 710. 



A very near ally indeed of the old C. barbatum of Java 
(Tab. nost. 4234), but differing in the very acuminate upper 
sepal, and the brilliant ocellated markings on the petals, as 
also in the much larger size, stouter habit, and longer ovary. 
Also allied to C. purpuratum (Tab. nost. 4901), C. Hookcrte 
(Tab. nost. 5362), and others, of which the type is the old 
C. venustum of Wallich (Tab. 2129). All* these have a 
similar habit, tesselated leaves, a broad upper sepal, vari- 
ously-marked petals, similar sacs to the lip, and a horseshoe- 
shaped extremity to the column. All are further natives of the 
hotter parts of India and its Archipelago, and suggest the idea 
that they are races of one variable species. C. Argus is no 
doubt much the handsomest of all these j it was discovered 
by Mr. Wallis, Messrs. Veitch's collector, in the Island of 
Luzon, one of the Philippines, and was flowered in Messrs. 
Veitch's establishment in March of the present year. 

Descr. Root of stout fibres. Leaves five to eight inches 
long, by one to one and a half inches broad, subdistichous, 
oblong-lanceolate, acute, rather fleshy, nearly flat, pale green, 
tesselated with square dark green spots. Scape a foot high, 
stout, red purple, clothed with spreading glandular hairs, 
1 -flowered. Spat he two inches long, compressed, green, with 

JULY 1st, 1875. 



a very oblique mouth, much shorter than the stout erect 
glandular ovary, which is sometimes four inches long. 
Flowers four to five inches broad across the petals. Upper 
sepal broadly ovate-cordate, much acuminate, white with 
many dark green and purple stripes ; lateral sepals combined 
into one ovate lanceolate blade, with a notched tip, which is 
placed under the lip, and is rather broader and larger than 
this is, pale with green stripes. Petals longer than the 
upper sepal, deflexed at an angle of forty-five degrees, three 
inches long, linear-oblong, obtuse, whitish, faintly tinged 
with green, rose-coloured towards the tip, studded with dark 
purple spots, some of which are ocellated ; margins fringed 
with purple hairs, many of which are disposed in tufts in the 
marginal purple spots. Lip two inches long; sac inflated, 
smooth, dirty purple above ; mouth with acute raised angular 
margins. Staminode horseshoe-shaped with incurved points. 
Stigma suborbicular. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Front; and 2, lateral view of column : — both magnified. 



Tab. 6176. 

CROCUS MINIMUS. 

Native of Corsica. 

CROCUS Fleischeri. 

Native of Asia Minor. 



Nat. Ord. Iridace^e. — Tribe Ixie^e. 
Genus Crocus, Linn.; (Baker in Gard. Chron., 1873). 



Crocus minimus ; vernalis, bulbo parvo ovoideo tunicis fibroso-membranaceis, 
scapo brevissimo spatha basali prsedito, foliis 3-5 angustissimis synanthiis 
albido-vittatis marginibus revolutis, spatha propria univalvi, tubo pur- 
pureo 2— 3-pollicari, limbi segmentis oblongo-oblanceolatis obtusis 
purpureis sa3pe albo-variegatis, fauce glabra albida, antheris flavis, 
filamentis glabris, stigmatibus integris fulvis. 

C. minimus, DC.Fl. Franc, v. iii. p. 243; Red. LiL, t. 81; Reich. Ic. Crit., 
t. 1267; Ic. Fl. Germ., t. 795 ; et aliorum, (non Bot. Mag., tab. 2994). 

C. insularis, Gay in Bull. Feruss., 1831, p. 221; Bot. Reg., 1843, t. 21 ; 
Herbert in Journ. Hort. Soc, vol. ii. p. 261. 



Crocus Fleischeri ; vernalis, bulbo ovoideo tunicis fibrosis, scapo brevissimo, 
spatha basali nullo, foliis pluribus angustissimis glabris albo-vittatis 
marginibus valde revolutis, tubo albido bipollicari, spatha propria 
univalvi, limbi segmentis albis oblongis subacutis dorso longitudinaliter 
purpureo-lineatis, fauce glabra lutea, antheris citrinis, filamentis glabris, 
stigmatibus fulvis multifidis. 

C. Fleischeri, Gay in Bull. Feruss., 1831, p. 219. 

C Fleischerianus, Herbert in Journ. Hort. Soc, vol. ii. p. 278. 

C. candidus, " Clarke" ex Boiss. Diag., No. 13, p. 16. 



These are two welcome additions to our stock of spring 
Crocuses grown in this country. C. minimus was in the country 
before, but has been lost for many years, indeed till now, when 
Mr. George Maw has brought it again from Corsica. It is 
frequent in that island, flowering in low situations in 
January, and upon the mountains up to March, and occurs 
also in Sardinia. It is the smallest of all the spring- 
flowering Crocuses, and is most like some of the varieties of 
versicolor, but it has been confounded in this country with 
ju ly 1st, 1875. 



biflorus, a form of which was figured under the name of 
minimus in Plate 2994 of this Magazine. 

Crocus Fleischeri is another interesting addition to our 
stock of garden bulbs, made by Mr. Elwes, in his tour in 
Asia Minor last spring. It is a very distinct plant, and has 
never been in cultivation before. The points which best 
mark it from other spring-flowering species are the 
divided stigmas and very complicated bulb-coats, the fine 
fibres of which are plaited in regular vertical strands. It 
was discovered on limestone hills near Smyrna, by the 
botanist whose name it bears, and we have it also from 
Cilicia, gathered by Aucher Eloy, and from Lycia, gathered 
by the late Professor Edward Forbes. The specimen drawn 
came from the rich collection of the Eev. H. Harpur Crewe. 
Descr. of C. minimus. Conn ovoid, very small, the tunics 
slightly fibrous. Basal spatke present. Leaves three to five to 
a fascicle, reaching as high as the flower, not more than a line 
broad, with a distinct white central band and very revolute 
edges. Proper spathe one-valved, but the valve occasionally 
bifid at the apex. Perianth-tube purple, about a couple of 
inches long. Limb an inch or less long in wild specimens, the 
divisions blunt oblanceolate-oblong, mixed purple and white, 
the outer usually tinged with yellow on the outside, the 
throat white and glabrous. Anthers yellow, a quarter or 
half an inch long, equalling or exceeding the glabrous fila- 
ments. Stigmas deep orange-red, entire, gradually widening 
from the base to the tip. 

Descr. of C. Fleischeri. Conn ovoid middle-sized, the coats 
made up of fine fibres plaited in regular strands. Basal spathe 
absent. Leaves overtopping the flower, six to twelve to a 
corm, very narrow, with a distinct white band and revolute 
edges. Proper spathe monophyllous, sometimes cleft at the 
tip. Tube about a couple of inches long, white with purple 
stripes. Perianth-limb an inch or more deep, the segments 
oblong subacute, pure white with lilac stripes down the back, 
the throat yellow, glabrous. Anthers lemon-yellow, exceeding 
the glabrous filaments. Stigmas saffron-yellow, more or less 
cut at the tip, but much less so than in nudiflorus and 
specwsus.—J. G. Baker. 



4 fon'n \\^ roc " 8 . mnt ^-'— natural site; 2, an outer corm coat ; 3, an anther ; 

/, W , ? ' Wlth . StigmaS '— aU unified. Fig. 5, Crocus Fleischeri : 
'x"'"«/ «« ; 6, an anther ; 7, top of sty l e 4 h sti °, AS _ all magn ified. 




TfincABrootoD.3 



Tab. 6177. 
TULIPA Greigi. 

Native of Turhistan. 



Nat. Ord. Liliaceje. — Tribe TulipejE. 
Genus Tulipa, Linn. ; (Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc, vol. xiv. p. 27;")). 



Tulipa Greigi; bulbo magno, tunicis fuscis apicibua intus strigosis, caule brevi 
puberulo robusto unifloro, foliis 3-4 glauco-viridibus copiose pulchre 
castaneo maculatis subtiliter puberulis prope marginem valde undulatis, 
inferioribus oblongis, superioribus lanceolatis, perianthio aperte cam- 
panulas 3-3^-pollicari, segmentis omnibus subconformibus obovatis 
cuspidatis vel emarginatis splendide coccineis, ad unguem macula magna 
nigra flavo-marginata przeditis, staminibus perianthio quadruplo brevi- 
oribus, antlieris flavis oblongis filamento nigro lanceolato asquilongis, 
ovario cylindraceo stamina superante, stigmate profunde sulcato auriculia 
reflexis. 

T. Greigi, Regel Enum. Tulip., p. 49; Gartenflora, vol. xxii. (1873) p. 200, 
tab. 773 ; Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc, vol. xiv. p. 289. 



During the last two years no less than three striking new 
Tulips have been added to the list of species cultivated in 
this country. Although they come from different localities, 
they all three resemble one another closely, both from a 
botanical and horticultural point of view. They are 
T. bwtica, of Boissier, a native of Greece ; T. Eichleri, of 
Regel, a native of Georgia; and T. Greuji, the subjectof the 
present Plate. The two former have not yet been figured, 
but we hope soon to be able to find room for them. To 
compare them with familiar types, all the three species 
come between T. suaveolens, the common early Due Van Thol 
tulip of the gardens, on the one hand ; and on the other, 
T. OculLs-solis and T. proteose. They show the dwarf habit, 
downy stems and nearly uniform obtuse perianth-segments ot 
the first, but have tne large, nearly black basal blotch, with 
a distinct yellow border, which fills up the whole claw of the 
perianth-segments of the latter, and gives to the flower its 
most characteristic mark as compared with T. Gesneriana and 
other common kinds. We received at Kew T. Greiyi direct 

July 1st, 1875. 



from Dr. Kegel, but it has not yet flowered with us. The 
Plate was made, partly from a plant sent through Mr. 
Burbidge from the New Plant and Bulb Company of Colches- 
ter, and partly from a very fine specimen forwarded by our 
indefatigable correspondent, Max Leichtlin, Esq., of Baden- 
Baden, who has grown it in Germany with great success. 
The species was gathered in Turkistan by Sewerzow and 
Fedschenko, and was named by Dr. Begel in compliment to 
General Greig, President of the Imperial Eussian Horti- 
cultural Union. 

Desch. Bulb as large as a small hen's egg, the membranous 
brown tunics slightly hairy on the inner side towards the 
top. Stem two to eight inches high, 1-flowered, stout, 
terete, distinctly downy. Leaves usually four, glaucous-green 
and obscurely downy on the face, spotted with copious oblong 
and linear blotches of a bright chestnut-brown colour, much 
undulated towards the cartilaginous border, the lower ones 
oblong acute, five or six inches long by two or two and a half 
inches broad, the two upper ones lanceolate. Perianth erect, 
three or three and a half inches deep, campanulate with the 
divisions spreading abruptly from about the middle when 
fully expanded, all nearly uniform in shape, obovoid, nar- 
rowed gradually from three-quarters of the way up to a 
deltoid claw, the apex cuspidate or emarginate, the 
upper three-quarters of the segment bright crimson, the 
claw filled up with a large obovate-rhomboid blotch with a 
bright yellow aureole. Stamens three-quarters of an inch 
long, the oblong yellow anther equalling in length the 
lanceolate, flattened, black filament. Ovary cylindrical, an 
inch long, narrowed to the neck; stigma yellow, twice as 
broad as the neck of the ovary, deeply channelled, the 
auricles conspicuously reflex ed. — /. G. Baker. 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 367, JULY, 1875. 

Tab. 6173.— VANDA LIMBATA. 
n 6174.— DIETES HUTTONL 
n 6175.— CYPKIPEDIUM ARGUS. 
„ 6176.— CROCUS MINIMUS and CROCUS 

FLEISCHERI. 
n 6177.— TULIPA GREIGI. 



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6178. 













Tab. 6178. 
MERTENSIA alpina. 

Native of the Rocky Mountains. 



Nat, Ord. Boragine^:. — Tribe Lithosperme*:. 
Genus Mertensia, Roth. ; {DC. Prodr., vol. x. p. 87). 



Martensia alpina; gracilis, erecta, sericeo-pilosa v. glabra, caule simplici, 
foliis auguste spathulato- v. lanceolato-oblongis obtusis subacutisve 
superne scaberulis v. lawibua magnibus ciliatis, nervis obscuris, 
calyce alte 5-fido corollse tubo breviore, lobis oblongis lanceolatisve 
acutis obtusiave, corolla limbo breviter 5-fido, filamentis brevibus 
antheria asquilatis. 

M. alpina, Don, Gen. Syst. Gard., vol. iv. p. 372 ; DC. Prodr.,vol. x. p. 91; 
A. Gray in Amer. Jour. Arts $ Sc, vol. xxxiv. (1862) p. 340, et in 
S. Watson, Sot. AOth Parallel, p. 461. 

M. Drummondii, Don ex A. Gray, I.e. 

Lithospermum Drummondii, Lehm. Pugitt., 2, p. 26, et in Hook. Fl. Bor. 
Amer., vol. ii. p. 86. 

Pulmonaria alpina, Torr. in Ann. Lye. New York, vol. ii. p. 224. 



A lovely little rock-plant, a native of the higher parts 
of the Rocky Mountains, and like many such, inhabiting an 
immense stretch of latitude, namely from 39° N., to the 
Arctic Sea coast. It is an extremely variable plant, as Dr. 
Gray remarks; who concludes that the Arctic coast speci- 
mens, which I have referred to M. virginica, are indeed 
specifically referable to the Rocky Mountain one from Colorado. 
The latter, though resembling M. virginica in habit, is cer- 
tainly, as Gray rightly points out, well distinguished by the 
stout broad filaments, which are those of the species here 
figured. Other variations occur in the hairyness of its parts, 
including the tube of the corolla within ; which is, according 
to Gray, glabrous or pilose. In the Arctic coast specimens 
and Dr. Parry's from the Colorado district, the stamens are 
inserted on the throat of the corolla, as they are m the plant 
here figured ; but in Dr. James', which resemble the Arctic 
coast ones in habit, they are inserted far down the tube, as 
they are in all the specimens from the west side of the Kocky 

august 1st, 1875. 



Mountains, which are moreover all hirsute. Dr. Gray further 
remarks, that those specimens with the stamens inserted low 
down have all short styles, which is contrary to the dimor- 
phism of the Boraginese. It will be observed that in our 
figure the stamens are inserted on the throat of the corolla, 
and the style is long. 

M. alpina was imported by Messrs. Backhouse of York, 
who flowered it in May last. 

Descr. Perennial, glabrous, or clothed more or less with 
soft hirsute pubescence. Stems simple, erect, sparingly 
leafy, slender. Leaves sessile, chiefly cauline, one to one 
and a half inches long, linear-oblong or spathulate, radical 
often broader, acute or obtuse, upper surface smooth or 
muricate, margin ciliate. Cymes lax-flowered. Flowers 
drooping, one-third to two-thirds of an inch long ; bracts 
leafy ; pedicels short, slender. Calyx shorter than the corolla- 
tube, 5-cleft to the middle or lower, segments oblong and 
obtuse, or lanceolate and acute. Corolla light or dark blue, 
tube cylindric; limb campanulate, very shortly 5-lobed, lobes 
rounded; throat naked or pilose. Stamens inserted at the 
base of the throat or lower down ; filaments as broad as the 
oblong anthers. Style short or long. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, corolla laid open; 3, pistil and disk : — all magnified. 



6179 







Tab. 6179. 
MICHELIA LANUGINOSA. 

Native of the Himalaya. 



Nat. Ord. Magnoliace^:. — Tribe Magnolie.*. 
Genus Michelia, Linn. ; (Benth. fy Hook.f. Gen. Plant., vol. i. p. 19). 



Michelia lanuginosa; ramulis foliis subtus alabastrisque sericeo v. velutino- 
tomentosis foliis elliptico-lanceolatis acuminatis supra glaberrimis, 
floribus sessilibus pallide stramineis, sepalis petalisque ad 18 anguste 
lineari-oblongis obtusis acutisve, ovariis et gynophoro dense tomentosis, 
carpellis maturis paucis discretis obovoideis pedicellatis verrucosis pedi- 
cellatis. 

M. lanuginosa, Wall. Tent. Fl. Nap., p. 8, t. 5; Cat. n. 6493; Hook.f. 

$ Thorns. Fl. Ind., vol. i. p. 80 ; Hook.f. Fl. Brit. Ind., vol. i. p. 43. 
M. velutina, DC. Prodr., vol. i. p. 79. 



Described as a lofty tree in Nipal, according to Wallich, 
by whom it was discovered in 1821 ; though I never saw it 
forming anything but a small tree in Sikkim, where I found 
it at an elevation of 6-7000 feet in 1848. It has also been 
collected in Bhotan by Griffith, and in the Khasia Moun- 
tains by Lobb. The flowers, which are very sweet-scented, 
vary much in size, from three to four and a half inches in 
diameter, in the number of sepals and petals, and in the 
depth of their straw colour. 

Michelia lanuginosa was sent to Kew from Sikkim by Dr. 
Thomson, when superintendent of the Botanic Gardens of 
Calcutta, about twenty years ago, and was planted out in the 
Temperate House about ten years ago. It now forms a small 
sparingly-branched tree, twelve feet high, It never flowered 
till the present year, when many buds formed in March, and 
which, owing to the cold and cloudy spring, never opened 
till May, by which time most had fallen off" unopened. 
Wallich observes that the scent of the flowers is less power- 
ful, and therefore more agreeable, than in the other common 
Indian species of the genus, of which the Champaca is the 
best known. 

Descr. A tree; branchlets, leaves beneath, and buds 
august 1st, 1875. 



clothed with a thick soft white tomentum that is silky in 
the young parts. Leaves drooping, five to eight inches long, 
elliptic-lanceolate, acuminate; rounded or acute at the base, 
thinly coriaceous, bright green above ; petiole one half to three 
quarters of an inch long, tomentose. Stipules very deciduous, 
densely tomentose. Flowers subsessile, axillary towards the 
ends of the branchlets, very variable in size, three to four 
and a half inches in diameter. Sepals and petals very 
numerous, about eighteen, the outer densely silky and 
concave, the inner spreading flat, rather flexuous, linear- 
oblong, acute or obtuse, pale straw-coloured. Anthers very 
narrow, apiculate, on short filaments. Gynophore and ovaries 
densely tomentose, except the styles, which are glabrous. 
Ripe carpels four to five inches ; spike an inch or more long, 
broadly obovoid, pedicelled, warted, slightly compressed, 
1-3 -seeded. Seeds large, with a scarlet aril. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Stamen; 2, gynophore and ovaries: — both magnified. 



6180. 







T^b. 6180. 
TYPHONIUM Brownii. 

Native of Sab-tropical Australia. 



Nat. Ord. Aroide^e. — Tribe Dracuncule^e. 
Genus Typhonium, Schott. ; {Schott. Prodr. Syst. Aroid., p. 105). 



Typhonium Brownii; folio hastato-tripartito v. profunde trilobo, segments 
lobisve elliptico- v. lineari-lanceolatis acuminatis lateralibus horizontah- 
bus, sinubus rotundatis acutisve, spatha breviter pedunculata, tubo 
globoso v. ovoideo viridi, lamina 5-pollican late ovata acuminata 
concava marginibus recurvis extus viridi intus luride purpurea, 
spadicis parte feminea brevi conica, parte mascula cylindracea stipitata, 
stipite basi organibus neutris filiformibus circinnato-decurvis onusto, 
appendice fusiformi-conoideo v. elongato obtuso v. subacute bruraeo- 
purpureo nitido spatha multo breviore. 

T. Brownii, Schott, Avoid., vol. i. p. 77, 1855 ; Prodr. Syst. Aroid., p. 107; 
F. Muell. Fragm. Phyt. Austral, vol. viii. p. 187. 

Arum Orixense, Brown, Prodr., p. 336, non Roxb. 



A very curious Aroid, belonging to a genus that extends 
from Western India to Australia and the Malayan Islands 
and of which probably many species are still to be discovered 
in New Guinea and the eastern islands of the China sea. It 
is a native of Eastern Australia, extending from Port Jackson 
northward to Eockingham bay in latitude 19° S., and, accord- 
ing to Mueller, varying in the length of the club-shaped apex 
of the spadix from one to five inches, as also in the breadth 
of the spathe. Under these circumstances it is not surprising 
that Robert Brown referred this to the T. orixense {Arum 
orixense of Roxburgh), a plant very widely spread in tropical 
and subtropical India, and which yet may prove to be a geo- 
graphically-separated variety of this. . 

Typhonium Brownii was flowered by Mr. Bull in April last, 
from bulbs imported by him from Rockhampton in Queens- 
land, and sent for figuring in the Botanical Magazine It is 
another of the many rare and remarkable plants ol nttie 
commercial worth perhaps, but of great scientific interest or 
the accurate knowledge of which botanists are so mucn in- 

mjguot 1st, 1875. 



debted to Mr. Bull's horticultural skill and love of curious 
plants. 

Descr. Corm of irregular shape, about the size of a walnut, 
sending up several leaves and spathes at the same time, and 
then going to rest for a season. Leaves very variable in size 
and shape, 3-partite or 3-lobed, the segments or lobes five 
to seven inches long, lanceolate or elliptic-lanceolate or linear, 
acuminate, the lateral spreading, all rather membranous, deep 
green; petiole five to ten inches long, stout, cylindrical. 
Scape one to three inches long, stout. Spalhe four to seven 
inches long; tube globose or ovoid, green; limb broadly 
ovate, acuminate-concave, open, coriaceous, lurid purple 
within, and obscurely fasciated with darker transverse lines, 
margins recurved ; back green, suffused with purple towards 
the margins. Spadix shorter than the spathe ; male portion 
shortly conic, covered with densely-crowded ovaries; above 
this is a cylindric column, one to two inches long, covered 
for three-quarters of an inch at the base with deflexed circm- 
nate filaments (deformed ovaries) that descend over the 
ovaries, and no doubt entangle insects there ; male portion 
half an inch long or more, cylindric, dull purple ; appendix 
ovoid or subulate, one to five inches long, glossy dark-brown, 
obtuse acute or truncate. Anthers shortly cuneate, 4-celled, 
with four terminal pores. Ovaries 1 -celled, with a subsessile 
peltate stigma ; ovule one, ascending. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Spadix ; 2, anther ; 3, deformed ovary ; 4, ovary ; 5, vertical, and 
6, transverse section of ditto : — all magnified. 



6181- 




Tab. 6181. 
ERANTHEMUM hypocrateriforme. 

Native of Tropical Western Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Acanthacea— Tribe Erantheme* 
Genus Eranthemum, Linn. ; {Nees in A. DC. Prodr., vol. xi. p. 445). 



Eranthemum hypocrateriforme; fruticosum, fere glaberrimum, caule 4-gono, 
foliis ovatis subacutis petiolatis subtus pallidis, spicis terminalibus pube- 
rulis solitariis v. fasciculatis, bracteis parvis ovatis setaceo-acuminatis, 
sepalis subulato-lanceolatis, corolla; tubo gracili pollicari, limbi patentis 
extus straminei intus coccinei lobis subfequalibus elliptico-obovatis ob- 
tusis basi saturate rubris et nigro punctulatis, antheris parvis exsertis 
brunneis. 

E. hypocrateriforme, Br. ex Poem. Sf Sch. Syst. Veg., vol. i. p. 175; 
Willd. Sp. PL ed. Dietr., vol. i. p. 445; Nees in DC. Prodr., voL xi. 
p. 454; Benth. in Hook. Niger Flora, p. 484; T. Anders, in Journ. 
Linn. Soc, vol. vii. p. 52. 

E. affine, Spreng, Syst. Veg., vol. i. p. 69. 

Justicia hypocraterif ormis, Vahl, Enum., vol. i. p. 165. 



The genus Eranthemum, of which there are so many Indian, 
Pacific Islands, and Brazilian species, is comparatively scarce 
in Africa, where only six species have been hitherto detected, 
though no doubt many more await discovery. Of these, the 
present is much the handsomest, and is indeed one ol the 
most attractive of the genus. It is apparently confined to 
the West Coast, extending from Accra to Sierra Leone, irom 
which latter place seeds were received in 1870 from the Key. 
Mr. Bockstadt, a very intelligent gentleman attached to the 
mission there, to whom the Eoyal Gardens are indebted lor 
many interesting plants, and who has since fallen a victim to 
disease contracted in that pestilent climate. B. hypocrateri- 
forme flowered in the Eoyal Gardens in May of the present 

^Descr. A small shrub, glabrous throughout, except the 

rachis and peduncle of the spikes. Stem and branches acutely 

quadrangular, rather stout. Leaves two to three inches long, 

ovate, with an obtuse contracted point, contracted at the oase 

august 1st, 1875. 



into a petiole half an inch long, firmly coriaceous, dark green 
above, pale beneath. Spikes solitary at the end of the 
branches, or crowded on short subterminal branches, one to 
three inches long, sessile or shortly stalked; rachis and 
peduncle finely downy. Brads shorter than the calyx, 
appressed, ovate with subulate points, keeled. Calyx about one- 
third of an inch long ; sepals subulate, lanceolate, quite gla- 
brous. Corolla-tube one inch long and upwards, very slender, 
slightly curved ; limb one inch in diameter, straw-coloured on 
the back, bright red above ; segments flat, horizontal, elliptic- 
obovate obtuse, the lower rather the larger, and the two 
upper rather the smaller, each with a very dark red base, 
which is speckled with almost black dots. Anthers shortly 
protruded, dark blue-purple. Ovary narrowly ovoid, on an 
obscure annular disk. — /. D. H, 



Fig. 1, Stamens; 2, calyx and style: — all magnified. 



Tab. 6182. 
allium narcissiflorum. 

Native of Dauphine and Piedmont. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^;. — Tribe Allied. 
Genus Allium, Linn.; (Kuntli. Euum., iv. 379). 



Allium narcissi/forum; rhizomate brevi obliquo fibril setosis copiosis 
vestito, foliis 5-6 ascendentibus glabris glaucis anguste linearibus 
planis, scapo subcylindraceo folios snperante, umbellis 2-10-floris ante 
antliesin cernuis, spatba monopliylla ovata brevi, pedicellis flore brevi- 
oribus, perianthio campanulato purpureo pro genere magno, segmentis 
obovato-oblongis cuspidatis late imbricatis ad finem ascendentibus, 
genitalibus perianthio duplo brevioribus, filamentis conformibus lineari- 
bus, stj'lo apice breviter cuspidato, ovulis in loculo geminis, seminibus 
triquetis nigris. 

A. narcissi florum, Vill. Delph., vol. i. p. 267, et vol. ii. p. 258, tab. 6 ; 
Kuntk Enum., vol. iv. p. 434; Gren. et Godr. Flor. France, vol. iii. 
p. 211 ; Reg el Mon. AIL, p. 181. 

A. grandiflorum, Chaix in Vill. Delph., vol. i. p. 320; Lam. Encyc, vol. i. 
p. 68. 

A. pedemontanum, Willd. Sp. Plant., vol. ii. p. 77 ; Reich. Ic. Fl. Germ., tab. 
504, fig. 1104. 

A. nigrum, All. Pedem., p. 158, tab. 25, non Linn. 

A. roseum, Linn, Herb. 



This is by tar the most showy in its flowers of all the 
Alliums. It is a native of the limestone mountains of the 
south-east of France and north-west of Italy, and belongs to 
the large group of species in which the annual bulbs arise 
from a creeping perennial root-stock, which is covered by a 
dense coat of matted fibres. Although an extremely well- 
marked plant, it has been much misunderstood by botanical 
authors. Linnseus confused it with Allium roseum, and Alhoni 
with Allium nip-urn, both of which belong to the section 
which has no root-stock, and as will be seen from the synonyms 
cited, it was named twice over in the " Flora de Dauphine' oi 
Villars. The specimens from which the plate was drawn, 
were procured by Mr. G. Maw from Monte Campione, m the 
north-west of Italy. 

AUGUST 1st, 1875. 



Descr. Bulbs, arising from an oblique perennial root-stock 
thicker than a quill, which gives out downwards abundant 
radicular fibres, and is sheathed by a dense coating of dry 
matted wiry fibres. Leaves five or six, sheathing the base of 
the stem for about a couple of inches, all leaving it at the 
same point, suberect, fleshy, narrow-linear, six or nine inches 
long, two or three lines broad, flat, fleshy, glaucous. Scape 
over-topping the leaves, nearly terete. Flowers two to ten 
in a close umbel which droops before they expand. Spatlie 
large membranous ovate-lanceolate, usually simple, tinged 
with purple. Pedicels shorter than the flowers. Perianth 
permanently campanulate, deep purple, half or even three- 
quarters of an inch deep, the segments obovate or oblong 
with a distinct cusp. Stamens not more than half as long as 
the perianth, the filaments uniform slightly flattened. Style 
twice as long as the depressed globose ovary, tricuspidate at 
the very tip. Ovules two in a cell. Seeds black triquetrous. 
— /. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Flower, with the corolla laid open ; 2, apex of pedicel and ovary 
•both magnified. 



6183 







Tab. 6183. 
COLUMELLIA oblonga. 

Native of Ecuador. 



Nat. Ord. Columelliace^:. 
Genus Columellia, Ruiz fy Pav. ; (End!. Gen. Plant., p. 745). 



Columellia oblonga ; ramulis sericeo-pubescentibus, foliis planis petiolatis 
obovato- v. elliptico-lanceolatis obtusis integerrimis v. apices versus 
dentatis subtus glabris v. sericeo-pubescentibus, nervo percurrente 
calloso-apiculatis cymis, terminalibus pedunculatis sericei3. 

C. oblonga, Ruiz et Pav. Fl. Per. et Chil, vol. i. p. 28, t. 8, f. i. VaJd, 
Enum., vol. i. p. 300 (Columella); DC. Prodr., vol. vii. p. 549; Endl. 
Iconog., t. 84. 

C. sericea, Humh. Bonpl. §■ Kunth, Nov. Gen. Am., vol. ii. p. 388; 
DC. I.e. 



The very remarkable plant here figured belongs to one of 
the comparatively few genera of flowering plants whose 
affinities are quite unsettled, although their structure is per- 
fectly well understood. It was referred to the neighbourhood 
of Jasmines by Don, who raised the genus to the rank of a 
natural order, but differs in the adherent calyx, seeds, and 
other characters. Lindley places it between Facciniea and 
Mubiacece, confessing, however, that " it is impossible to say 
where it really ought to stand." De Candolle suggests its 
affinity with Gesneriacece, and no better has been hitherto 
found, though Saxifrages have been preferred upon plausible 
grounds. Decaisne considers it to be very near llubiacece, 
and I have suggested Loganiacea. 

There are but two species known of the genus, and both 
are natives of the Andes, where, however, they have no wide 
range, being apparently confined to the Andes of Peru and 
Equador. 

C. oblonga inhabits an elevation of 9000 to 13,000 feet, 
and is very common in the heights above Quito. It was 
raised from seeds sent by Dr. Jameson to J. Anderson Henry, 
Esq., who forwarded a young plant to Kew in 1870, which 

.\rr.usT 1st, 1875. 



flowered in the Temperate House for the first time in January 
of the present year. 

Desc. A small tree, with opposite silky branchlets; 
branches covered with brown bark. Leaves opposite, one to 
two inches long, obovate or elliptic-lanceolate, obtuse, with 
an apiculus formed by the swollen tip of the decurrent mid- 
rib, quite entire or toothed towards the tip, coriaceous, con- 
tracted at the base into a short petiole, upper surface bright 
green and shining, under surface glabrous or clothed with silky 
pubescence. Cymes terminal and terminating short lateral 
branches; laxly 6-10-flowered, shortly peduncled, very silky; 
bracteoles small. Flowers shortly pedicelled, one-half to 
three-quarters inch in diameter. Calyx-tube adherent, silky ; 
lobes five, unequal, oblong, subacute. Corolla coriaceous, 
golden yellow, tube short, broad ; lobes five, spreading, orbi- 
cular, rather concave, imbricate. Stamens two, inserted near 
the base of the corolla ; filaments short, broad, ending in a 
dilated connective bearing two sinuous anther-cells; pollen 
simple, globose. Ovary almost wholly sunk in the calyx- 
tube, its crown hemispheric; style short, stigma broad, 
obscurely 2-4-lobed ; ovules very many, on two parietal bifid 
placentae that project into the axis of the cell, and subse- 
quently coalesce, forming a 4-celled ovary. Capsule 4-celled, 
crown septicidally 2-valved, the valves bifid and splitting 
the style into four. Seeds very numerous, oblong, testa 
smooth, embryo clavate, minute near the base of the fleshy 
albumen.— J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and ovary; 2, corolla laid open; 3 and 4, stamens: — all 
magnified. 



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Tab. 6184. 

D 10 IN" EDULE. 
Native of Mexico. 



Nat. Ord. Cycadk^:. — Tribe Encephalarte,e. 
Genus Dion, Lindl. (Alph. DC. Prod., v. xvi., pt. 2, p. 537). 



Dion edule ; trunco 3-5 pedali, foliis junioribus pilosis demum glaberrimis 3-5 
pedalibus pinnatifidis anguste lanceolatis rigidis, segmentis utroque latere 
ad 100 erecto-patentibus lineari-lanceolatis subulato-acuminatis pungentibus 
multinerviis, rachi supra plana subtus f^nnvPT-o oti-"^''''" * --•»-'" 



Plate 6184 is unavoidably postponed till 
the next number. 



****~*u . ■. luoara, j ui'juci -ov lAivnsMXy x viii. {1844), p. 97. 

Platyzamia, Zicccarini in Abhandl. Math. Phys. Kl. Bayer Akad., v. iv., p. 23, 
t. 4. 



Por greenhouse decoration the remarkable Cycad here 
figured is at once the most easily cultivated, effective, and 
on account of the flatness of its rigid frond, the most easily 
of its class kept free of that pest of Cycads, the scale insect. 
It is a native of Mexico, where it is said to be found in 
various provinces, and has been in cultivation since 1843, 
when it was brought from that country by a Mrs. Lavater, 
who presented a plant to the Horticultural Society. Dr. 
Lindley remarked that about the same time Messrs. Loddiges 
bought a stock of the plant. The earliest Kew plant was 
received from Siebold. With less apparent justice Lemaire 
attributes to Lindley " un inconcevable lapsus calami '' in 
stating that the seeds were destitute of embryo ; a statement 
that we have no reason to doubt the correctness of, seeing 
how often such is the case in Cycadew. 



Tab. 6184. 

DION EDULE. 

Native of Mexico. 



Nat. Ord. Cycade^e. — Tribe Encephalartej:. 
Genus Dion, Lindl. (Alph. DC. Prod., v. xvi., pt. 2, p. 537). 



Dion edule ; trunco 3-5 pedali, foliis junioribus pilosis demum glaberrimis 3-5 
pedalibus pinnatifidis anguate lanceolati8 rigidis, segmentis utroque latere 
ad 100 erecto-patentibus lineari-lanceolatis subulato-acuminatis pungentibus 
multinerviis, rachi supra plana subtus convexa, strobilis $ pedalibus cylin- 
draceis breviter crasse pedunculatis albolanatis basi bracteis ovato-lanceo- 
latis longe acuminatis densissime villoris stipatis, squamis $ pollicaribus 
cuneatis pallide cseruleis apicibus lanuginosis trapezoideis apice inferiore 
densissime antheriferis, strobilis J ovoideis densissime lanuginosis squamis 
apicibus longe productis ovato-lanceolatis. 

Dion edule, Lindl. Bot. Beg. Misc., 1843, No. 82, Miquel in Linnssa, 
v. xix. (1846), p. 415, et xxi. (1848), p. 567 ; Walp. Ann., v. i., p. 747, et v. 
iii., p. 453 ; Lemaire, 111. Hortic.v. ii., Misc. p. 91 cum Ic. ; A. DC. Prod., 
v. xvi., pt. 2, p. 537. 

D. imbricatum, Miq. ; D. aculeatum, Lem., et D. angustifolium, Miq., omnia > 
i.e., Lemaire, I.e. 

Zamia ? Maelen, Miquel in Linnma, xviii. (1844), p. 97. 

Platyzamia, Zuccarini in Abhandl. Math. Phys. Kl. Bayer Akad., v. iv., p. 23, 
t. 4. 



For greenhouse decoration the remarkable Cycad here 
figured is at once the most easily cultivated, effective, and 
on account of the flatness of its rigid frond, the most easily 
of its class kept free of that pest of Cycads, the scale insect. 
It is a native of Mexico, where it is said to he found in 
various provinces, and has been in cultivation since 1843, 
when it was brought from that country by a Mrs. Lavater, 
who presented a plant to the Horticultural Society. Dr. 
Lindley remarked that about the same time Messrs. Loddiges 
bought a stock of the plant. The earliest Kew plant was 
received from Siebold. With less apparent justice Lemaire 
attributes to Lindley " un inconcevable lapsus calami '' in 
stating that the seeds were destitute of embryo ; a statement 
that we have no reason to doubt the correctness of, seeing 
tow often such is the case in Cycadem. 



Dion edule has been cultivated at Kew, almost ever 
since its introduction into Europe, and thrives both in the 
cool end of the Palm House and in the octagon of the Tem- 
perate House, forming a trunk 3 to 4 feet high and 8 to 10 
inches in diameter. The spread of the crown is 8 to 10 feet, 
and contains as many as 50 fronds, each 4 to 5 feet in length, 
and 6 to 9 inches in breadth. Both sexes cone frequently, 
the male cone varying from 9 to 12 inches in length, the 
female from 7 to 12 inches. It is a variable plant, and the 
three species cited under the synonyms were founded upon 
variations in the form of the fronds, in the number of their 
nerves, and their slight toothing in a young state. A fourth 
species has lately been proposed by Lemaire, under the name 
of D. strobilaceum, of which I know nothing. 

The seeds of Dion are eaten by the Mexicans, both the 
fleshy testa and the albumen, which latter in other Cycadese 
is full of a starch that affords an excellent arrow-root. 
Miquel observes that the genus Dion is more nearly allied to 
certain fossil genera of Cycadece than is any other living 
representative of the order, and that in the form of the in- 
florescence and insertion of the ovules it closely resembles 
the genus Zamoistrobus — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1. — Reduced figure of the whole plant ; 2, portion of frond ; and 3, top of 
stem, petiole and male cone, both of the natural size ; 4, scale of male cone seen 
from above ; 5, the same seen from below, slightly magnified ; 6, anther ; 7, 
pollen grains, both highly magnified; 8, lateral and, 9, central view of scale of 
female cone, of the natural size. 



6185 






BrodtaU*fcS 



Tab. 6185. 
PEIMULA Parryi. 

Native of the Rocky Mountains. 



Nat. Ord. — PrimulacejE. — Tribe PRiMULEiE. 
Genus Primula, Linn.—Benth. and Hook. Gen. f.,' Plant., v. ii., p. 631 (ined.). 



Primula (Auricula) Parryi, elata, minute puberula, rhizomate crasso, foliis car- 
nosis 6-9-pollicaribus anguste obovato-oblongis obtusis v. subacutis supra 
glaberrimis subtus glanduloso-puberulis obscure denticulatis petiolo crasso, 
scapo elato robusto, involucri bracteis valde insequalibus parvis oblongo- 
lanceolatis erectis subacutis integerrimis, urabella unilaterali multiflora, 
pedicellis elongatis inaequilongis, calycis glandulosi tubo tereti ovoideo, 
lobis subsequilongis ovato-subulatis erectis, corollse tubo calycern Tix supe- 
rante, limbi lobis obovato- v. rotundato-obcordatis rubro-purpureis, fauce 
aureo inappendiculato. 

P. Parryi, A. Gray in Amer. Journ. Arts and Sc, ser. ii., v. xxxiv. (1862), p. 
257 ; Watson, Bot., 40th parall., p. 213 ; Porter and Coulter, Synops. Fl. 
Colorado, p. 88. 

Except perhaps the P.japonica (tab. nostr. 5916), this is 
the handsomest Primrose ever introduced into this country. 
It was discovered about 1860, in the Eocky Mountains of 
the Colorado district, always on the borders of alpine streams 
near the snow-line, flowering in July, where it gives the name 
of " Primrose Creek " to one of the affluents of the Colorado 
Eiver, in about lat. 37° "N. Since that period it has been 
discovered commonly in alpine and subalpine spots in Nevada, 
in the E. Humboldt range, Clover Mountains, Gray's Peak, 
and Mount Lincoln, ascending to 13.000 feet altitude ; thus 
having a considerable range, both in latitude and longitude. 
Dr. Gray compares the species with the Caucasian P. pycno- 
rhiza, and with P. algida and P. nivalis, and suggests the pos- 
sibility of all being forms of one — a question which cannot be 
decided without more copious specimens than I possess. 
Primula Parryi was raised and flowered by Messrs. Backhouse, 
of York, who sent the specimen here figured to Hew in May 
of the present year. 

Descr. Densely tufted; rootstock very stout, thicker 
than the thumb? Leaves crowded, suberect, 5-9 inches long, 
narrowly obovate-oblong, obtuse or subacute, sessile ornarrowed 
into the very broad petiole, obscurely toothed or quite entire, 



shining above, paler and minutely puberulous and glandular 
beneath, as are the scape and inflorescence. Scape 6-18 inches 
high, robust, pale green. Umbel of many flowers, one-sided, 
bracts 6-8, erect ; very unequal, J to \ inch long, oblong-lanceo- 
late, acute ; pedicels 1 to 3 inches long, slender ; flowers inclined 
or horizontal. Calyx-tube ovoid, glandular, terete, contracted 
at the base ; lobes as long as the tube, ovato-subulate. Corolla 
1 inch in diameter, tube rather longer than the calyx, 
yellow, without folds ; limb flat or slightly cupped, bright 
red purple ; lobes variable in breadth, obovate- or orbicular- 
obcordate. Stamens included, filaments very short. Capsule 
globose, included in the calyx-tube. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. — Corolla laid open with stamens and ovary exposed ; magnified. 



618S 







, ..DayiSoBi 



Tab 6186. 
DRAB A Mawii. 

Native of Spain. 



Nat. Ord. Cruciferjj. — Tribe Alyssine.e. 
Genus Draba, Linn. [Benih. and Hook, f., Gen. Plant, vol. L, p. 74.) 



Drara (Aizopsis) Mawii, parvula, dense csespitosa, caulibus brevissimis coin- 
pactis, foliis densissime rosulatis breviter lineari-oblongis obtusia setoso- 
ciliatis nervo subtus valido, scapis per-brevibus aphyllis paucifloris, floribus 
amplis brevissime pedicellatis, sepalis oblongis concavis dorso setosis, 
petalis cuneato-obovatis albis, siliquis corymbosis breviter ellipsoideis com- 
planatis hispidis ad 8-spermis stylo brevissimo. 



It is not without hesitation that I propose as new a Euro- 
pean species of the large and very variable genus Draba, but 
after a very careful examination and comparison I am unable 
to match the plant here figured with any known to me by 
specimen or description. It belongs to the section Aizopsis, 
and its nearest affinity is with the Spanish D. cantabrica, 
Willkomm (? D. Dedeana, Boiss. and Eeut.), which differ in the 
yellow petals and elongate fruiting raceme. It also resembles 
very closely, in habit especially, the Draba hispayiica, Boiss., 
a native of Spain and Algeria, but differs conspicuously in 
the white flowers, broad petals, flat pod, and very short style. 
It has also the habit, form of pod and style, and many of the 
characters of the D. Zahlbruc/cneri, Host, of the Eastern 
Alps ; but that has small flowers and glabrous pods. 

Draba Mawii is a native of Pancorbo in Old Castile, 
between Burgos and Miranda, where it was discovered 
by Mr. Maw in 1870, and introduced into his garden at 
Brosely and into the Eoyal Gardens of Kew. It 
flowered in the spring of 1873, and the fruit ripened 
for the first time in May, 1874. It is an excellent rock 
plant, of compact habits, bright green foliage, and red-brown 
buds, that are succeeded by crowded pearly flowers. 

Desce. Forming low densely tufted bright green patches. 
Stems much branched, densely clothed with spreading rosulate 
leaves. Leaves J to \ of an inch long, linear-oblong, obtuse, 
shining, margin pectinate, with rigid incurved or spreading 



bristles, under-surface with a prominent mid-rib. Scape very 
short, woolly, 2 to 4 flowered, pedicels very short. Flowers 
\ of an inch in diameter. Sepals very concave, bristly at the 
back, green, tipped with red brown. Petals three times as 
large as the sepals, obovate-cuneate, retuse, spreading, qnite 
white. Stamens about equalling the sepals. Pods on corymbs, 
\ of an inch long, ellipsoid, very compressed, about 8 seeded ; 
valves flat, hispid ; style very short indeed, stigma minute. 
Seeds oblong, with short funicles. 

J. D. H. 



Fig. l, leaf ; 2, flower ; 3, the same with the petals removed ; 4, ovary ; 
5, fruiting branches ; 6, pods; 7, the same with one valve removed, showing the 
seeds ■ all but fig. 5 magnified. 



6187 







Tab. 6187. 
CEOCUS Bo by i. 

Native of Greece. 

Nat. Ord. IridacejE. — Tribe Ixie^e. 
Genus Crocus, Linn. ; (Baker in Gard. Chron., 1873). 



Crocus Boryi; autumnalis, cormo ovoideo tunicis brunneis membranaceis 
deorsum laceris, spatha basali nullo, foliis 4-6 synanthiis angustissimis 
vittatis margine revolutis, spathfe proprise valvis duobus lanceolatis, peri- 
anthii tubo luteo 1^-3-poll. longa limbi segmentis oblongo-spathulatis, 
obtusis 1-2 poll, longis lacteis saepissime estriatis basi puberulis aurantiacis, 
antheris lacteis, filamentis luteis puberulis, styli ramis fulvis multifidis 
divaricatis. 

C. Boryi, J. Gay in Ferus. Bull, xv. (1832;, p. 220 ; Baker, Gard. Chron., 1873, 
p. 1533. 

C. Boryanus, Herbert in Bot. Reg., 1847, tab. 16, 6g, 10; Journ. Hort. Soc, vol. 
ii., p. 291 ; Klatt Linnxa, vol. xxxiv., p. 685. 

C. ionicus, Herbert Bot. Reg., 1843 ; Misc., p. S. 



This pretty autumn-flowering Crocus is common in many 
of the islands, and on the mainland of Greece. We have 
specimens at Xew from Corfu and Cephalonia, and from 
Mount Parnes and Mount Corydalus, in Attica. It was first 
brought into notice by the celebrated traveller and naturalist, 
Colonel Bory de Saint Vincent, after whom it was named by 
his friend Gay in 1832. He speaks of it as covering the 
mountains after the rainy season, from November to January, 
flowering with the Mandragora. There are several closely 
allied Grecian forms, as C. Iwvigatus, Tournefortii, and Orpha- 
nidis, of which we can scarcely judge whether they are species 
or varieties till they are watched side by side under cultiva- 
tion. This one is characterised by it pure white unstriped 
flower with a yellow throat, and it is one of the few Cro- 
cuses that have white anthers. It has never yet been satis- 
factorily figured, and we are indebted for the opportunity of 
doing so now to Mr. Elwes, who brought it last spring from 
Syra, where it grows in company with C. Crewei (tab. 
6168). 



Descr. Autumnal, the leaves contemporary with the flower. 
Corm ovoid, middle-sized, the brown membranous tunics 
breaking up into small slices in the lower half. Leaves four 
to six, very narrow, with a distinct white midrib, and very 
revolute edges. Basal spathe absent. Proper spathe of two 
white lanceolate membranous valves. Perianth-tube yellow, 
much exserted from the spathe-valves. Perianth-limb 
usually about an inch deep, milk-white with a finely downy 
yellow throat, the segments blunt oblong, spathulate. 
Stamens about half as long as the limb, the milk-white 
anthers much longer than the short yellow filaments. Stig- 
mas orange-red, overtopping the anthers with numerous 
divaricating capillary branches. — J. G. Baker. 

Fig. 1. — Part of membranous tunic of corm ; 2, stigmas; both magniped. 



6188. 







Tab. 6188. 
WAHLENBERGIA Kitaibelii. 

Native of Hungary. 



Nat. Ord. CampanulacejE.— Tribe Campan'C'le.e. 
Genus Wahlenbergia, Schrad. (Benth. Sp Hook./., Gen. Plant., v. ii. p. 555, ined.). 



Waiilenbergia Kitaibelii, caulibus decumbeutibus foliisque anguste lincari- 
elongatis obtusiusculis pilosis, bracteis e basi ovato eubulato-lanceolatis 
exterioribus recurvis floribus brevioribus, calycis tubo piloso, lobis ovato- 
lanceolatis acuminatis pubescentibus sinubus denticulo interjecto, corolla 
pollicari. 

\V. Kitaibelii, Alph. DC, Monog. Camp., p. 131." 

Campanula (jraminifolia, Waldst. Sf Kitaib., PI. rar. Hung., r. ii. p. 166, t. 154. 

Edraianthus Kitaibelii, Alph. DC, Prod, v , vii. p. 449. Reichb., Ic. Fl. Germ, v., 
xix. t. 1588. 



The plant here figured for the first time in England (for 
indeed it has not been introduced before) is best known under 
the generic name of Edraianthus, a genus now merged in 
Wahlenbergia, from which it is not distinguished by any 
available character. From Campanula, which it so much re- 
sembles, it differs in the cells of the capsule dehiscing at the 
tip between the calyx-lobes, instead of on the outside at the 
base of the lobes. Several species of Edraianthus arc 
described, all similar in habit, and all natives of South- 
eastern Europe. Erom all others this differs in the small tooth 
placed between the calyx-lobes, a character unfortunately not 
observed by our artist. W. Kitaibelii is a native of the 
Alps of Croatia, Transylvania, and the Banat, whence it 
was introduced by Messrs. Backhouse, who sent flowering 
specimens from York in May of the present year. 

Descr. Boot stout, spindle-shaped, perennial. Stems 4-6 
inches long, spreading from the root, decumbent, and then 
ascending, slender, red brown, softly hairy, sparingly leafy. 
Leaves 2-3 inches long, chiefly radical, narrowly linear, about 
| of an inch broad, subacute, sparingly softly hairy, the 
marginal hairs recurved ; cauline similar, but rather shorter . 
Heads 4-6-, rarely 1-2 -flowered ; bracts shorter than the 



flowers, green and subulate-lanceolate from a broad red- 
brown ovate base, quite entire, or slightly toothed, the outer 
recurved, all shorter than the flowers. Flowers sessile, about 
one inch long, erect. Calyx-tube hairy, conical, red brown ; 
lobes green, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, spreading^ pu- 
bescent, and ciliate, with a small tooth in each sinus. 
Corolla violet blue, rather narrowly campanulate; tube 
5-angled; lobes spreading and recurved, ovate, acute. 
Filaments very broad, ciliate; anthers twisted after the 
pollen has escaped. Stigma (or pollen- collecting portion of 
the style) elongate, cylindric ; lobes 2, short, spreading.— 
,/. D. H. 

Fig. 1, leaf ; 2, flower with the corolla removed, magnified. 



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„ 6185.— PRIMULA PARRYI. 
„ 6186.— DRABA MAWII. 
„ 6187.— CROCUS BORTI. 
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Tab. 6189. 
DELPHINIUM Cashmirianum. 

Native of the Himalaya Mountains. 



Nat. Ord. Ranunci t lace.e.— Tribe Hellebores. 
Genus Delphinium, Linn. (Benth. and Hook., f. Gen. Plant., vol i., p. 9.) 



Dklphinium Cashmirianum; glabrum plus minus pilosum v. Bericeo-piloaum, 
caule subsimplici erecto parce folioso, foliis radicalibua orbiculatia palma- 
tim 5-7-lobia, lobis cuneato-ovatis acutia inciso-dentatis, caulinis 3-5-par- 
titis, floribus laxe corymbosis, bracteis lanceolatis, bracteolia linearibua, 
floribus magnia azureis, aepalis oblongis obtusis, calcare paulo breviore 
conico robusto lente decurvo obtuso, petalis dorsalibua 2-lobia calcaribus 
elongatis, lateralibua oblique 2-lobia barbatia lobia obtusia. 

D. Cashmirianum. Royle, III. Bot. Himal, p. 55, 1. 12. Hook./.et Thorns. Fl. I*d., 
p. 52, excl. synon. D. Jacqemontiaaum. Hook.,f. Ft. Brit. Ind., V. i. p. 26. 



About a dozen species of Delphinium inhabit the Himalaya 
Mountains, of which the present is one of the handsomest. 
All are found at considerable elevations, and some of them 
that come from the loftiest spots, as D. Brunonianum, Koyle 
(Tab. nost. 5461), exhale so strong a musky odour that the 
ignorant mountaineers attribute the odorous secretion of the 
musk-deer to the animals' feeding on that plant, and of 
the D. glaciale, which is equally strongly scented. No 
such odour has been attributable to D. Cashmirianum, 
though it too occurs at great heights, ascending from 12,000 
to 15,000 feet in the Western Himalaya, where it ranges from 
the longitude of Kumaon to that of Kashmir, abounding in 
grassy valleys, &e. 

The subject of this plate was raised by J. Anderson 
Henry, Esq., from seed sent from the north part of Kashmir 
by Dr. Bellow, during his journey to Kashgar with Mr. 
Forsyth, and it flowered well at Hay Lodge, Trinity, in July 
of the present year. 

Descr. Whole plant except the inflorescence glabrous, 
but native specimens are glabrous, hairy, silky, or even almost 
hispid. Stem very simple, flexuous, one foot to one and a 
half foot high, slender, sparingly leafy. Radical leaves 
orbicular, two to three inches in diameter, palmately five- to 
seven-lobed, the lobes coarsely acutely toothed and cut; petiole 



five to eight inches long ; cauline leaves shortly petioled, three- 
to five-lobed, cut like the radical ones, all rather thick and 
bright green. Inflorescence corymbose, silkily hairy, the 
branches rather spreading, inclined, one or more flowered ; 
bracts lanceolate, sub-erect, bracteoles linear. Flowers two 
inches long from the tip of the sepals to that of the spur, 
broad, deep azure blue, silkily pubescent; lateral sepals 
broadly oblong, obtuse ; dorsal produced into a broad, inflated, 
conical, decurved, obtuse spur about two-thirds as long as the 
sepal. Dorsal petals almost black, the limb erect, two lobed, 
the spurs funnel-shaped with decurved tips ; lateral petals 
greenish, their limb deflexed, unequally two-lobed, with 
prominent hairs on the face. Ripe carpels hairy. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. — Petals magnified. 



6)30 




-^ 



VmcentBrocteBayiSoii.iBF 



Tab. 6190. 

MASDEVALLIA Davisii. 

Native of Peru. 



Nat. Ord. Obchide^;. — Tribe Pleurothallide.e. 
Genua Masdevallia, Ruiz and Pav. (LindL, Gen. and Sp. Orchid., p. 192). 



Masdevallia Davisii; foliis 8-pollicaribus anguste lineari-oblanceolatis sub- 
acutis carinatis crasae coriaceis, scapis gracilibus foliis longioribus, floribus 
horizontabbua aureis, ovario brevi, sepalis in tubum subcylindraceum baai 
gibbum connatis breviter caudatia, supremo minore ovato in caudem sequi- 
longam attenuato marginibus recurvis, lateralibus maximis 2£ poll, longia, 
fere parallelia in caudas J poll, longas abrupte angustatis sinu anguBto, 
petalis dimidiato-oblongis apice obtusis emarginatis basi antice auriculatis, 
labello lineari-oblongo obtuso 3-carinato, columna apice erosa: 

M. Davisii, Reichb. f. Xen. Orchid., v. 3, t. 3, ined.,et in Gard. Chron., 1874, pp. 
710, 711. 



This fine Masdevallia is remarkable for its size and colour. 
It was discovered by Mr. "W. Davis near Cuzco in Peru, and 
was flowered by Messrs. Veitch in August of the present year ; 
the plant here figured bearing twenty flowers. Singular as the 
colour is, it is probably very variable. Reichenbach describes 
the perianth-tube as " whitish yellow, with a blackish- violet 
great eye-spot on each side ; '' and the other parts of the 
flower as " yellowish white outside and of the deepest 
splendid orange inside ; " colours not at all repeated in our 
specimen. 

Descr. Leaves six to eight inches long exclusive of the 
short part below the joint, two-thirds of an inch broad, 
narrowly oblanceolate, obtuse, keeled, concave above, dark 
green, thick, and coriaceous ; sheaths one inch long, pale, 
loose. Scapes slender, longer than the leaves. Flower nearly 
horizontal, four inches long from the tip of the upper to that 
of the lateral sepals, one and a half inch broad across the 
lateral sepals, pale golden yellow, with obscure small orange 
markings at the base of the perianth externally. Ovary very 
short, curved, grooved, green. Sepals combined at the base 
into a subcylindrical tube two-thirds of an inch long, which 
is gibbous at the base ; upper two inches long, ascending, 
broadly ovate, margins recurved, gradually contracted into a 



slender tail as long as itself ; lateral two and a half inches 
long, nearly parallel, connate to beyond the middle, with an 
acute sinus, oblong, rather convex, suddenly contracted into 
a tail about a quarter of an inch long. Petals very small, 
dimidiate-oblong, with broad claws, auricled at the base on 
one side ; tip almost truncate, notched. Lip shorter than 
the petals; claw slender; limb linear-oblong, obtuse, with 
three longitudinal stout ridges running through its length. 
Column not winged, apex toothed. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1.— Flower with perianth removed; 2, column and claw of lip; 3, 
column and lip ; 4, limb of lip : — all magnified. 



6191 




Tab. 6191. 

TULIPA Eichlebi. 

Native of Geonjix. 

Nat. Ord. LlLIACEJi. — Tribe Tli.ipk 1.. 
Genus TtJLJDPA, Linn. (Baker in Joum. Linn. S6c.\ vol. xiv. p. 275). 



Tulipa Eichleri ; bulbo ovoideo glabro tunicis fuscis brevibus apice intus strigoso- 
pilosis, caule elongato unifloro sub leute dense puberulo foliis 3-5 lanceolatis 
glauco-viridibus superne minutissime puberulis marginibus planis levibus, 
scapo gracili, perianthio aperte campanulato 3-4 poll, diara., segmentis omni- 
bus conformibus obovatis cuspidatis sanguiueo-coccineis basi macula magna 
violacea flavo-maculata, staminibus perianthio dimidio brevioribus, antheris 
purpureo-brunneis filamenta nigra aequantibus, ovario obtuse 3-gono sta- 
minibus paulo breviore, stigmatis sessilis ramis crassis horizontalibus undu- 
latis. 

T. Eichleri, Regel. Garlenjl., v. 23 (1874), n. 193, t. 799. Baker, in Gard. Chron., 
1875, p. 620. 



When figuring the no less gorgeous Tulipa Greigi for this 
volume (Tab. 6177), allusion was made to three striking new- 
Tulips, which, " though coming from different localities, re- 
sembled one another very closely in both a botanical and 
horticultural point of view." We have here the second of 
these, which is the latest discovered of them, not being in- 
cluded in Mr. Baker's careful monograph of the genus pub- 
lished only a year ago. It belongs to the group Scabriscapce 
of Baker, all the species of which are natives of th<; Medi- 
terranean region, from Italy eastward to the Levant, and of 
the Caspian region extending to Turkestan. This indeed is 
the principal area inhabited by Tulipa, for very few of 
its species (nearly fifty are described) reach the extreme 
east of Asia; only one is found in India (T. stellata, Hook.), 
and that is confined to the North-eastern Himalayas, and 
one ( T. cdulis, Baker) in Japan. The T. Eichleri was dis- 
covered by the traveller, whose name it bears, in the Baker 
district of Georgia. 

I am indebted to Mr. Elwes for the fine flowering speci- 
men of T. Eichleri, which flowered in his rich collection last 
spring, and also for a bulb which he has presented to the 
Royal Gardens. 

Desck. Bulb in our specimen small, ovoid, hardly two 



inches long, covered with a brown, smooth tissue, which is 
bristly on the inner surface towards the tip. Stem six inches 
high, leafy, stout, one-flowered, pubescent. Leaves alternate, 
lower twelve to fifteen inches long by two broad, upper 
smaller, sessile, lanceolate, acuminate, glaucous green, mi- 
nutely pubescent above, margins plane and smooth. Scape 
slender. Flower three inches in diameter, broadly coropanu- 
late ; perianth-segments obovate, rounded at the top with a 
mucro, deep scarlet, with a broad, wedge-shaped, dark violet- 
blue spot at the base, which is margined with yellow. Sta- 
mens less than half the length of the perianth-segments; 
anthers violet-brown, as long as the black filaments. Ovary 
trigonous ; stigmas horizontal, with recurved tips, very thick, 
undulated, pale yellow. — J. D. H. 



6WZ 







Tab. 6192. 

HETERANTHEKA limosa. 

Native of America. 



Nat. Ord. Pontederiace^e. 

Genus Heteranthera, Ruiz and Pav. {Seubert in Mart. Flor. Bras. Pouted., 

p. 87.) 



Heteranthera limosa, csespitosa, subacaulis, glaberrima, foliis longe petiolatis 
ovatis v. oblongo- v. rotundato-ovatia obtusis atriato-venosis, petiolo 
crasso articulato fiatuloao, pedunculis sessilibus petiolia multo brevioribua 
unifloria, apatha angusta subulato-acuminata, perianthii tubo angusto- 
pollicari, limbi fere jequalis \\ poll. diam. cserulei lobia lineari-oblongia 
obtusia, staminibus subsequalibus, filamentis antheras lineari-oblongas sub- 
sequilongis, stigniate clavato oblique truncato apice crenato. 

H. limosa, Vahl, Enum. v. 2, p. 44. Pursh. Fl. N. Am., v. 1, p. 32. Benth. PI. 
Hartweg, p. 25. Griseb. Fl. Brit. Ind., p. 590. A. Gray, Bot. N. U. States, 
ed. 2, p. 485. Seubert in Mart. Flor. Bras., vol. 3, part 1, p. 89. 

H. alismoidea, Humb. et Bonpl. ex Link, Jahrb., v. 3, p. 73. 

Leptanthua ovalis, Mich. Fl. Bor. Am., t. 1, p. 25, t. 5. 

Pontederia limosa, Swartz, Prod. p. 37, Fl. Ind. Occ, v. 1, p. Gil. Sloane, Hist. 
Jam., 1, t. 149, f. 1. 



A very pretty water-plant of wide distribution, inhabiting 
very wet marshes from Virginia to Venezuela and Brazil, and 
likely to become a favourite for cultivation in tropical aquaria, 
where it may be grown in pots standing in the water. As 
far as I am aware, but one species of the genus Heteranthera 
had hitherto been cultivated in Europe, namely the //. 
graminea of Vahl, a very insignificant submerged species, a 
native of North America, which was introduced into the 
Glasgow Botanical Garden half a century ago, along with 
Vallisnerea spiralis, and is well figured in Hooker's " Exotic 
Flora," tab. 94, under the generic name of Leptanthus. About 
a dozen species of the genus are described, some of which, 
having spikes of bine flowers, are no doubt worthy of cultiva- 
tion. 

Seeds of H. limosa were sent from Santa Martha, in New 
Grenada, to the Eoyal Gardens by M. Endres, which ger- 
minated and flowered in the short space of a few weeks. M. 
Endres states that it grew in brackish pools. It flowers at 
Kew from May onwards. It is a plant of very wide range, 



from the warm temperate region of the United States (Illinois 
and Virginia) to Bahia in Brazil. 

Descr. Quite glabrous, tufted, stemless. Leaves erect, 
long-petioled, one to two inches long, from orbicular-ovate to 
almost lanceolate, obtuse, pale bright green on both surfaces, 
striated with numerous veins ; petiole six to ten inches long, 
stout, cylindric, transparent, transversely jointed, fistular. 
Peduncle one-half to one inch long, 1-flowered, apparently 
springing from the side of a petiole towards its base, but in 
reality from a short branch that gives off a leaf and a peduncle, 
which latter is embraced at the base by the sheath of the petiole 
of the leaf. Spathe green, embracing the tube of the flower, 
subulate -acuminate. Perianth-tube slender, one to one and a 
half inch long; limb as much in diameter, bright vio.et blue; 
segments linear-oblong, obtuse. Filaments nearly equal, 
subulate, about equalling the linear-oblong anthers. Ovary 
narrow; stigma clavate, obliquely truncate, crenate at the 
top.—/. D. H. 

Fig. 1. — Perianth-tube and stamens; 2, upper part of perianth-tube laid 
open, with stamens and stigma; 3, ovary ; 4, transverse section of ditto : — all 

magnified. 



6/33 




LdetUh 






Tab. 6193. 
oxalis arenakia. 

Native of Chili. 

Nat. Ord. Oxalide^e. 
Genus Oxalis, Linn. ; Benth and Hook., f. Gen. PL, v. i., p. 276. 



Oxalis arenaria ; acaulis, glaberrima, rhizomate tuberoso, foliis 3-4-foliolatis 
foliolis sessibbus bilobo-obcordatis subtus glaucis, scapo gracilliiuo petiolis 
multoties longiore, umbellis 3-10-floris, bracteis minutis ovato-subulatis 
recurvis, pedicellis gracilibus, sepalis oblongo-lanceolatis obtusisdorso apices 
versus 2-glandulosis, petalis sepalis triplo longioribus cuneato-obcordatis 
purpureis, filamentis puberulis in cupulam turbinatam basi connatis, ovario 
oblongo-ovoideo, stylis brevibus. 

O. arenaria, Bertero et Colla, Plant, rar Chil, p. 10, t. 3 ; Walp. Rep., i., 485 ; 
C. Gay, Flor. Cliil.. v. i., p. 454. 



The genus Oxalis, once a favourite amongst amateur 
horticulturists, has of late years experienced the neglect that 
has overtaken so many interesting classes of herbaceous 
plants. Upwards of one hundred and thirty species, chiefly 
natives of South Africa, have been figured as under cultiva- 
tion in Europe. By far the larger number of these are con- 
tained in the beautiful Monograph of the genus published by 
the elder Jacquin in 1794, from specimens cultivated in the 
Imperial Gardens at Vienna. In 1808 fifty-eight species 
were in the Kew collection, where there are now only thirty ; 
and no species has been figured in this Magazine for a quarter 
of a century, when (1850) the lovely 0. elegans of the Andes, 
Tab. 4490, appeared. Happily a love of the genus lingers 
amongst scientific horticulturists, to one of whom, G. Munby, 
Esq., I owe the opportunity of figuring the present species. 

Oxalis arenaria is a native of Chili, where it is widely 
distributed, being found in sandy pastures near Valparaiso, 
Santiago, and other localities. It has also been gathered on 
the Andes of Bolivia, by Mandon, in the neighbourhood of 
Sorata, at an elevation of between eight and nine thousand 
feet above the sea-level. The specimen here figured flowered 
with Mr. Munby in March. 

Descu. Quite glabrous. Rhizome of fleshy scales forming 



together an ovoid tuber as large as a hazel-nut. Leaves all 
radical, three- to four-foliolate ; petiole very slender ; leaf- 
lets sessile, one-third to nearly an ineh long, obcordate, with 
broad rounded lobes, and an open sinus, pale bright-green 
above, glaucous beneath. Scapes twice as long as the 
petioles or mora, very slender. Umbel three- to ten-flowered ; 
involucral bracts very small, green, ovate-subulate or lanceo- 
late, recurved; pedicels one to two inches long. Flowers 
one to one and a quarter inch in diameter, bright violet- 
purple. Sepals oblong-lanceolate, obtuse, green, with a 
double gland near the tip on the back. Petals much longer 
than the sepals, cuneate-obcordate, with a shallow sinus. 
Stamens united into a turbinate cup at the base. Ovary 
ovoid-oblong; styles short.— J". D. H. 



Fig, 1. Flower with the perianth removed ; 2, ovary :— both magnified. 



6m. 





WFa'cb, (Ret tak 



\5ccent 



BmitoD«y*Sffl*P 



Tab. 6194. 
CRASSULA Bolusii. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Crassulace^ 
Genus CraSSUIA, Linn. (Benth. and Hook.,/. Gen. PL, v. i., p. 657). 



Crassula (Squamulosse) Bolusii ; parvula, diffuse ramoaa, rami3 gracilibus 
laxe foliosia adscendentibus teretibus sparse patentibus pilosisjapice floriferis, 
foliis i poll, longis patulis elliptico-lanceolatis acutis marginibus 
ciliatis ceterum glaberrimis radicalibus pollicaribU3 liaeari-spathalatis 
omuibua carnosis dorso seoiiteretibus facie convexis viridibus nigro maculatis 
v. fasicatis, floribus corymbosis§ uac. diameter, breviter pedicillatis, calycis 
segtnentis ovatis acutis ciliatis, petalis oblongis subacutis dorso infra apicem 
mucronulatis carneis, glaadulis hypogyais brevibu3 emirgiuatis, cirp^llis 
ovoideo-lanceolatis in stylos breves attenuatia, stigmatibu3 puuctiformibus. 



A very pretty little Cape succulent, apparently not in- 
cluded in Harvey and Sonder's Cape Flora. It was dis- 
covered by Mr. H. Bolus, near Graafreinet, who sent both 
living and dried specimens to Kew, As a species it is closely 
allied to C. Cooperi (Kegel Gartenfl., 1874, p. 36, t. 786), a 
widely distributed Cape species, but differs in the less 
straggling habit, much longer and narrower radical leaves, 
and in the dark blotches on the foliage. 

The specimen here figured is from plants sent to Kew by 
Mr. Bolus in 1874, which flowered in the Succulent House in 
July of the present year. 

Descr. A small, bright green, tufted, perennial herb. 
Stems ascending, three to five inches high, slender, leafy at 
the base, sparingly so higher up, very sparsely clothed 
with spreading short white hairs. Leaves fleshy, pale green, 
with dark, almost black blotches, one-third to one-half inch 
long, elliptic-lanceolate, acute, the lowest often one 
inch long, and more or less spathulately oblanceolate, upper 
surface convex, the lower almost semiterete, margin with a 
row of white rather recurved cilia, otherwise perfectly 
glabrous. Flowers very small, one-sixth inch diameter, in 
terminal corymbose cymes, very shortly pedicelled. Calyx- 
segments ovate, acute, red, ciliate. Petals twice as long, oblong- 
lanceolate, acute, with a dorsal mucro near the top, pale 



flesh-colour. Anthers red. Hypogynous glands small, yellow, 
notched. Ovaries ovoid-lanceolate, narrowed into very short 
straight styles with minute stigmatic tips. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. Portion of branch and part of leaves; 2, flowers; 3, petal; 4, sta- 
mens, glands, and carpels ; 5, carpels and glands : — all magnified. 



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Tab. 6195. 

PROTEINOPHALLUS Rivieri. 

Native of Cochin-China. 



Nat. Ord. Aroide^e.— Tribe Pythonie.e. 

Nov. gen. Proteinopiiallus. — Spatha basi convoluta; lamina ampla cordato- 
orbiculari acuta explanata ad 20-costata, marginibus recurvis. Spadix spa- 
tbam longe superans, inferne continuo-androgynus organibus neutns 0; 
appendice elongato fusiformi subulato, sensim acuminato. Antherse 
confertse, filaniento crasso sequilatae, 2-loculares, 2-porosse. Ovaria nuine- 
rosa, dense conferta, globosa, 2-3-locuIaria ; stylus brevis, colunmaris, 
stigmate capitato 3-lobo ; ovula in loculia solitaria, angulo interion prope 
bari adnata, anatropa. 

Herba elata, CocMnchinensis, radice magno tuberoso. Folium serotinum, 
longe crasse petiolatum, lamina amplissema, trisecta, segmentis bipinnatifidis. 
Scapus elongatus, strictns, gracilis. Spathse tubus ovoideus ; lamina 1 £ ped. 
diametro, saturate luride purpurea, nervis impressis, nervulis Iransvcrsis junctis. 
Organa ma&cula cum femineis continua. Spadicis appendix pedalis et ultra, 
basi lobulatus, luride purpureus, lente curvus. 

Proteinophallus Rivieri, Hook / 

Amorphophallus Rivieri, Durieu in Rev. Hortic, 1870, p. 573 ; 1872, p. 19 ; 
1873, pp. 305 et 344. Gard Chron., 1873, p. 610, cum Ic. xylog. 

A. palmseformis, Riv. MSS. 

To Mr. Bull belongs the credit of importing and first 
flowering in England the two most gigantic and singular 
herbaceous Aroids known to us of late years, namely, the 
Godwinia gigas (Tab. nost. 6048) and the subject of the present 
plate. The latter plant, though hitherto figured only by an 
uncoloured but excellent woodcut in the Gardeners Chronicle, 
is already well known to horticulturists as a hardy plant, suited 
to open-air cultivation even in England — a fact strangely 
inconsistent (if Nature can be inconsistent) with that of its 
native climate being the eminently hot and humid one of 
Cochin-China, whence it was introduced into Europe by M. 
Riviere, jardinier-en-chef of the Luxemburg Palace Garden 
in Paris. 

I have been led, after careful consideration of the structure 
of this plant, to reject it from Amorphophallas, a genus with 
which I was well acquainted in India, and from which, except 
in the form of the leaf, it differs greatly in habit, as it does m 
certain floral characters. In Amotyhophallus proper the spathe 
is almost sessile, expanded almost from the base into an 
irregularly-plaited, funnel-shaped limb, with a lobed lip all 
round ; the spadix is very short, with a deformed appendix 
(whence the generic name) ; the style is very long and 
slender, and the ovules have longer funicles. Schott, indeed, in 
his "Synopsis Aroidearum," would have excluded the present 
plant from the subtribe Amorplwpatlidew, which he charac- 

November 1st. 1875. 



terises by the spathe not being convolute below, and by the 
ovules having long funicles, and would have included it 
under that of Hydro sminece (an African group), with the 
spathe convolute and tubular below, and the ovules attached 
by a broad base. My impression is, however, that these sub- 
tribes are not distinguishable as such. I have only further 
to advert to the remarkable uniformity of leaf-structure in 
these gigantic Aroids, that of Proteinophallus being not only 
characteristic of the tribe Pythoniece, but occurring amongst 
the Dracontiece in Godwinia, a genus as far removed as 
possible from the Amorphophalli. 

Descr. Root three to twelve inches in diameter, often weigh- 
ing several pounds. Petiole eighteen inches high, as thick as the 
finger, cylindric, mottled with brown; blade of leaf dark green, 
two feet in diameter ; 3-partite, the three principal divisions 
shortly stalked, deltoid, deeply pinnatifid ; segments spread- 
ing, oblong, again pinnatifid ; ultimate lobes ovate, acuminate, 
convex, with a single costa and spreading lateral veins. 
Flowering-stem produced before the leaf, nearly three feet 
high and upwards of one inch in diameter, cylindric, strict, 
very dark brownish-green, clothed at the very base with loose 
erect spathes that are pale and mottled with greenish-brown. 
Spathe with a convolute tube six inches long and three in 
diameter, limb nearly horizontal, orbicular, acuminate, four 
feet in circumference, about 15-nerved, the nerves deeply 
sunk and united by transverse venules; convolute portion 
contracted at the top, pale green with very dark green 
spots and purple edges ; limb of spathe dark vinous 
purple, with a green lustre ; margins recurved, involute, 
and as it were auricled at their meeting above the tube. 
Spadix almost twice as long as the spathe ; female portion 
two inches long and one and a quarter in diameter, cylindric, 
densely clothed with greenish-purple ovaries ; male portion 
contiguous, three inches long, densely clothed with vertically 
elongate anthers ; appendix fifteen inches long ; cylindric, 
gradually tapering from the lobulate base to the acute tip, 
irregularly marked with longitudinal depressions of the same 
colour as the spathe. Anthers sessile, 2-celled, with two pores 
vertically placed. Ovary globose, 2 -3 -celled ; style short but 
distinct, stigma capitate 2-3-lobed ; ovules one in each cell, 
anatropous, attached to the placenta towards its base by a 
broad face.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Root and leaf; 2, flowering stem, both one quarter the natural size; 3, 
inflorescence one half the natural size ; 4, female part of spadix of the natural 
size ; o stamens ; 6, ovary ; 7, verticoe : 8 and 9, transverse sections of ditto, 

magnified. ' 



6196 



... 









*sn 







Tab. G196. 
FERULA (EURYANGIUM) Sumbul, 

Native of Turkestan. 



Nat. Ord. UmbelliferjE.-— Tribe Peucedane.e. 
Genus Ferula, Linn. (Benth et Hook, f., Gen. Plant, vol. i., p. 917). 



Ferula (Ettryangium) Sumlul ; elata, glauca, glabriuscnla, caule stricto solido, 
foliia radicalibus patulis rigidis pro planta parvis minute sparse pubcrulis 
ambitu triangulari-deltoideis 3-pinnatim sectis, petiolo robusto lamina 
breviore, vagina brevi, racbibus pinnarum basi incrassatis, pinnnlis polli- 
caribus cuneato-obovatis margine inferiore decurrente apices versus crenato- 
lobulatis subpinnatitidisve pallide viridibus glaucisque, inflorescentise elon- 
gate angustse ramis sparsis gracilibus alternis erecto-patentibus, umbellis 
secus ramos alternis superioribusve oppositis crassiuscule pedunculatis, 
bracteis ad basin ramoruin et umbellarum ovato-v.-oblongo-lanceolatis flavis 
membranaceis, umbellis 1-2 poll, diametro, exinvolu cratis, radiis 7-10, 
umbellulis ad 20 floris radiis brevissimis, floribus parvis confertis flavis, calyce 
obsoleto, petalis incurvis ovato-acuminatis, vittis 4 dorsalibus (in carpellis 
immaturis) in valleculis solitariis maximis, 2 commissuralibus parvis. 

Euryangium Sumbul, Kaufmann in Nov. Mem. Soc. Hist. Nat. Mosc, v. xii. 
(1871), p. 253, t. 24, 25 ; Fluckiger et Hanbury, Pharmacop., p. 278. 



Two roots of this fetid drug were received at Kew from 
the Director of the Imperial Garden at Moscow in 1872, of 
which one rotted, and the other, planted in the Herbaceons 
ground amongst stones, and sheltered in winter, threw up 
leaves in the first year, and in the second leaves and a 
flowering stem nine feet high, from which materials the 
accompanying plate was made in July last, after which the 
whole plant died. 

Unfortunately, owing to the wetness of the season, the 
flowers, which were copiously impregnated by bees, yielded 
no ripe fruit, though the carpels continued to swell for several 
days amid cloud and rain. The plant is a native of Turkestan, 
where it inhabits mountains east of Samarkand, at an elevation 
of 3000-4000 feet. It was there discovered by the celebrated 
traveller Fedschenko in 1869, who sent roots to Moscow in 
1871. 

According to Fluckiger and Hanbury's admirable work 
quoted above, the Sumbul plant here described— which is 
remarkable for the fetid, musky, and milky juice of its root— - 
was introduced into Russia in 1835 as a substitute for musk 
and a remedy for cholera ; thence it reached Germany in 
1840 and England in 1850, where it was admitted into the 
Pharmacopoeia in 1867. In commerce the root is imported in 
transverse slices one to five inches in diameter, with a dry 

November 1st, 1875. 



papery bark, resinous inner surface, and spongy farinaceous 
central portion, which has a musky odour and bitter aromatic 
taste. To us the odour of the root, whether fresh or dry, is 
detestable, resembling putrid musk, and it is very penetrating 
and durable. Another kind of Sumbul is alluded to by the 
same authors as Indian Sumbul, it is described in Percira's 
" Elements of Materia Medica " ; and a third has been im- 
ported into England from China. Both these are of unknown 
origin. 

As a genus I cannot regard Euryangium as separable from 
Ferula, with which it agrees in habit, inflorescence, foliage, 
flowers, and form of fruit ; it differs in the great size of the 
solitary vittse. The vittae are, however, a most inconstant 
character in Ferula, varying even in the same species ; and if 
Narthex is included in it, so must also be Euryangium, as a 
section at the most. 

Descr. Root fusiform, a foot long, crowned with a tuft 
of the bristly remains of old leaves, spongy within, and full 
of fetid milk. Leaves puberulous, all radical, petioled ; petiole 
a foot long ; blade three feet in diameter, deltoid in outline, 
3-pinnatifid, pale green, rachis of primary and secondary 
segments terete, swollen at the base; ultimate pinnae laxly pin- 
natifid, segments rhomboid-cuneate, obtusely crenate and cut 
at the apex, pale green, glaucous beneath, nerves flabellate. 
Stems trict, erect, solid above, nine feet high, terete, obscurely 
striate, one inch in diameter at the base, bearing a few 
scattered subsessile imperfect leaves. Inflorescence sparse, 
elongate, oblong in outline; branches erecto-patent, alter- 
nate, bearing alternate or rarely opposite compound umbels 
one and a half to two and a half inches in diameter; 
rachis and branches green ; bracts at the axils linear- 
oblong, membranous, subacute, yellow. Umbels of six to 
eight rays. Involucre none. Partial umbels one-quarter 
to one-half inch in diameter, peduncles one-half to three- 
quarters of an inch long. Flowers one-sixth of an inch 
in diameter, crowded, very shortly pedicelled, outer herma- 
phrodite, inner smaller. Calyx-teeth very obscure. Petals tri- 
angular-lanceolate, yellow, incurved. Stamens seated around 
a disk, filaments short, incurved Anthers yellow. Disk cup- 
shaped, fleshy, with waved, almost sinuate margins. Stylo- 
pods small, sunk in the disk ; styles very short, recurved, 
obtuse. Ovary with five very large vittse between the 
dorsal ridges, and two small commissural ones.— J. D. II 

Fig 1 Whole plant, much reduced • 2, portion of leaf; 3, inflorescence of 
the natural size ; 4, r ' ' 



6197 




Tab. 6197. 

crocus veluchensis. 

Native of Greece and Transylvania. 

Nat. Ord. Iride.e. — Tribe Ixie^e. 
Genus Crocus, Tourn, (Baker in Gard. Chrou., 1873). 



Crocus veluchensis ; vernalis, cormo globoso tunicis fibrosis subtiliter reticulatis, 
spatha basali nulla, foliis 3-6 synanthiis augnste linearibus albo-vittatis, 
spatha propria bivalvi, perianthii tubo limbuni duplo superaute, fauce con- 
colore pilosulo, segmentis 1-1J poll, longis obtusis violaceis ssepe apice albo 
maculatis, antheris luteis filamentos albos superantibus vel sequilougia, 
stigmate aurantiaco rauiis tribus clavato-petaloideis subintegris. 

Cfiocus veluchensis, Herbert in Bot. Beg., v. 31, Mise., p. 72; Bot. Reg., v. 33, 
tab. 4, fig. 4. 5 Joum. Ilort. Soc., New Series, v. 2., p. 274 ; Schur Fl. 
Transyl., p. 652. 

C thessalus, Bom. et Sprun., Ding. PL Orient., No. 13, p. 17. 

C. exiguus, Schur Fl. Transyl, p. 652. 



Very near Crocus Sieberi (Tab. nost. G03G), from which 
it mainly differs by the throat of the perianth being con- 
colorous instead of bright yellow. It was discovered by 
Signor Vrioni whilst collecting for the late Dean Herbert on 
Mount Veluchi (Tymphrestus), near the northern border of 
Greece (not the Morea, as inadvertently stated by Herbert 
in his final monograph of the genus in the Journal of the 
Horticultural Society), and has since been found on the 
Parnassus range, and in the mountains of Thessaly, Thrace, 
and Transylvania. The abrupt white tip to the otherwise 
purple perianth-segments, shown in the plant drawn in the 
Botanical Eegister, is not a specific character. We have 
lately received from Colonel Trevor Clarke a flower of C. 
vernus with perfectly similar coloration. 

C. veluchensis is still a very rare plant in cultivation. The 
plate was drawn from specimens sent by the Rev. H. Harpur 
Crewe, who received it from Herr Leichtlin. It flowers in 
spring at the same time as vernus and Sieberi. 

Desce. Corms very small, globose, the outer tunics 
made up of finely-reticulated fibres, like those of 0. vernus 
and Sieberi. Basal spathe absent. Leaves three to six, 
produced at the same time as the flowers, narrow linear, with 

NOVEMBEK 1ST, 1875. 



a distinct white costal band. Proper spathe of two linear 
valves, which reach to the top of the tube. Perianth-tube 
two to three inches long, violet on the outside ; throat con- 
colorous, finely pilose; limb one to one and a half inch deep, 
the divisions oblong-spathulate, obtuse, deep violet pale 
violet or white, without any distinct striping. Stamens 
reaching more than halfway up the limb. Anthers lemon- 
yellow, equalling or exceeding the pilose white filaments. 
Stigma orange-yellow, overtopping the anthers, the three 
clavate-petaloid forks only fringed at the tips.— J". G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Fibres of tunic ; 2, stigmas :— both magnified. 



6Ti)S 




Tab. 6198. 
caeica candamaecensis. 

Native of the Andes of Ecuador. 



Nat. Ord. Passiflore^e. — Tribe Papaya cem. 
Genus Carica, Linn. (Benth. et Hook, f., Gen. Plant., v. i., p. 815). 



Carica castdamarcencis ; caule gracile stricto, foliia longe petiolatia aubtus 
petioloque molliter pubescenti-tomentellis ambitu orbiculatis profunde cor- 
datis sinu basi rotundato ad medium fere 5-lobis, lobis latis 3-lobulatis, 
]obuli8 ovatis oblongisve acuminatis, lobis basalibus extus auriculato- 
lobulatis, superne glabris saturate viridibu3 nervis tomentellis venulis 
impressis, subtus pallidis nervis validis prominentibus, corymbis axillaribua 
breviter pedunculatis floribus monoicis terminali ssepius fceminea ceteris 
masculis, omnibus brevissime pedicellatis, calycis lobis triangulari-subulatis, 
corolla? viridia tubo £ pollicari, lobis linearibus revolutis, staminibus fauce 
tubi insertis biseriatia, filamentis crassis brevibus, antherarum loculis con- 
nective incrassato apice abrupte subulato adnatis, fructibua oblongo- 
obovoideis 5-locularibus apiculatis basi constrictis obscure et obtuse 5-gonia 
inter anguloa depressis. 

C. candamarcensis, Hort. Belg. 



The graceful little tree here described was raised from 
seeds sent from the Ecuadorian Andes by the late Professor 
Jameson, of Quito, to the late Mr. Hanbury, with whom it 
flowered in an open border at Clapham in 1874. A speci- 
men received from him again both flowered and fruited abun- 
dantly at Kew during the past summer and autumn, in the 
open air, where it was stood out after being brought into bud 
in a greenhouse. According to Mr. Hanbury this is the 
species mentioned by Mr. Spruce in his and M. de Mello's 
very learned and interesting paper on the Papayaceae, 
published in the Journal of the Linnean Society quoted 
above, as the Chambura. or common Carica, of the Ecuado- 
rian Andes, where it is cultivated up to an elevation of 9000 
feet for the sake of its edible fruit. Mr. Spruce adds that 
when he visited the mountain of Tunguragua in February, 
1858, the ground was strewed with its ripe and rotting fruits, 
which were smaller and sweeter than that of the common 
Papaw, and were the favourite food of the bears that infest 
the forests of that mountain. The trunk he describes as 
being as stout as that of the common Papaw, and the leaves 
even larger ; the fruits as being 8-9 inches long, and some- 
times nearly as broad ; the flesh white (not yellow, as the 
common Papaw), soft, and with a pleasant flavour, being 
sometimes very acid in cool sites. 

It will be seen from our drawing and description that, as 
might be expected, the trunk is smaller with us than in Ecuador, 

NuVEMHEK 1st, 1875. 



as also that the flesh is not white within, but yellow. I can vouch 
for the delicious scent and grateful taste of the fruit, in both 
which qualities it widely differs from the common Papaw, 
which is not, in my opinion, worth cultivating for the dessert- 
table, while this is so decidedly ; it, moreover, makes a much 
handsomer greenhouse plant than the Papaw. 

According to De Mello and Spruce, thirty-three or thirty- 
five species of Carica (including Vasconcellw) are known to 
them, of which upwards of twenty are A ndean, and the rest 
natives of other parts of tropical America. 

The name Chamburu is, according to Mr. Spruce, applied 
to ail the larger-fruited Andean species. I have found no 
authority for that of eandamarcensis, under which specimens 
have been received from Belgian nurseries. 

Descr. Stem in our plants eight feet high, as thick at the 
base as the fore-arm, strict, erect, tapering upwards, tomen- 
tose at the top. Leaves numerous, subterminal, spreading, 
dark green above, pale beneath ; petiole one to one and a half 
feet long, strict, terete, horizontal, and as well as the blade 
beneath and its nerves above densely clothed with fine, soft, 
pale pubescence ; blade one and a half foot in diameter, nearly 
circular in outline, 5-lobed to the middle, with the terminal 
lobe slightly produced, deeply cordate at the base, where the 
sinus is rounded at the petiole, but usually closed at a 
distance from it by the overlapping lobules of the two basal 
lobes; lobes palmately spreading, pinnatifid, 3-5-lobulate, the 
ultimate divisions spreading, broadly oblong, suddenly acumi- 
nate, entire or with an acute lobule or tooth on one or both 
sides ; upper surface glabrous, shining, with yellowish ribs 
and nerves, and sunk venules ; lower surface with very stout 
prominent ribs, nerves, and venules. Flowers green, pube- 
scent, in very shortly peduncled axillary corymbs, almost 
sessile on the peduncle. Calyx-lobes minute, subulate. Corolla- 
tube one-third of an inch long, terete ; lobes linear, revolute. 
Stamens in two series at the mouth of the tube ; anther-cells 
linear, adnate to the face of the short thickened filaments ; 
connective with an incurved subulate point. Fruit three 
inches long and upwards, oblong-obovoid, apiculate, some- 
what contracted at the base, obscure ; 5 -angled, with hollowed 
sides between the angles, bright golden yellow, very fragrant 
and sweet, 5 -celled. Seeds a quarter of an inch long, aril 
transparent. 

Fig. 1, Reduced plant ; 2, inflorescence ; 3, flower laid open ; 4, two stamens; 
9n,Ja rudl f mentary ovary ; 6, fruit ; 7 and 8, seeds with aril :— all butfrjs- 

£ and 6 viagnijied. ' 



6199 




WFiwhdcletLith 



"Vincent Brooks .Day * San ] 



Tab. 6199. 

DENDEOBIUM amcenum. 

Native of Nipal and Sikkim. 



Nat. Ord. Okchide^:. — Tribe Dendrobuls. 
Genus Dej;drobh:m, Swartz {Lindl, Gen. et Sp. Orchid., p. 74). 



Dikdiobium atnamm; caulibus gracilibus elcrgatis peudulis teretibus folufens 
viridibus, foliis laxis 3-4-pollicaiibus lineari-lanceolatis acuminata 
vaginisque teretibus viridibus, caulibus floriferis multo longioribus apbylhs 
teretibus ad nodos vix inciaseatis, vaginis pallidis, intemodiisl^- ad2-polli- 
caribus, floribus ad nodos solitariis v. in pendunculo communi perbievi 2-3, 
pedicellis gracilibus pollicaribus, ovario brevi, peiiantbio 2 polb diametr. ex- 
planato albo apicibus foliolorum purpureo-roseis, sepalis petalisque patenti- 
recurvis convexis obtuse acuminatis, labello basi breviter convoluto, limbo 
cucullato obscure 3-lobo, marginibus undulatis, tubo intus flavo, limbo 
subacuto intus pubescente marginibus erosis, calcare semi-pollicari recto 
truncate 

D. ancenum, Wall, in Lindl. Gen. et Sp. Orchid., p. 79, et in Bot. Reg., 1874, 
Misc., p. 79 ; Reich./, in Walp. Ann., v. vi., p. 286. 

? Limodoium apbyllum, Roxi. Cor. PL, v. i. p. 34, t. 41. 

? Cymbidium apbyllum, Swartz in Nov. Act. Up*., v. vi., p. 73, &c. ; Wttta. 
Sp. Pl. y v. iv., p. 100 ; Roxb. Fl. Ind., v. iii., p. 462. 



One of the earliest discovered, but latest imported species 
of the magnificent and now enormous genus to which it 
belongs; remarkable not only for its great beauty and 
the delicacy of the colours and texture of its flowers, but for 
its fragrance, which Wallich well described as exquisite, and 
not unlike that of Oka fragrans. Whilst referring this to 
D. amcenum of Wallich, I must enter a caution as to its being 
considered the Limodorum aphyllum of Roxburgh, which has 
been referred to it by Lindley and others. In the first place, 
Roxburgh's plant comes from a very different locality, 
namely, the Coromandel coast ; in the second, it has no pink 
colouring towards the tips of the perianth-segments; m the 
third place, the flowers are solitary; and in the fourth, 
Roxburgh makes no mention of the sweet odour so character- 
istic of this plant. There is a sketch of D. amcenum, 
but of a form with a much narrower (perhaps unexpanded) 
lip amongst Cathcart's drawings of Sikkim plants preserved 
in the Kew Library, and I find a flower of it m Lindley s 
Herbarium from Chatsworth, but no good specimens any- 

November 1st, 1875. 



where. I cannot but suspect its being a variety of 
D. primulinum, together with the Coromandel plant and 
other allied forms. 

The specimen from which the accompanying drawing 
was made was flowered by Mr. Bull, who received it from 
the Himalaya (probably Sikkini), where it was found at an 
elevation of 5000 feet. It flowered in June, 1874, in his 
nursery. 

Descr. Stems pendulous, fascicled, one to two feet long, 
slender, clothed with pale appressed sheaths ; internodes 
one and a half to two and a half inches long. Leaves three 
to four inches long, linear-lanceolate, acuminate, wavy ; 
sheaths green. Flowers solitary, or two to three on a very 
short common peduncle at each node of the flowering-stem, 
two to two and a quarter inches in diameter ; pedicels very 
slender, together with the very small ovary one inch long ; 
bracts minute, ovate, acute. Sepals ovate-lanceolate, sub- 
acute, white, with a violet-purple blotch from the tip to one- 
third way down ; spreading and recurved. Petals similar in 
shape and colour, but broader. Lip with a convolute tube, 
expanding into a trumpet-shaped mouth and broadly ovate 
limb that is minutely fimbriate round the edge; lateral 
lobes hardly distinguishable from the broad subacute 
terminal one, which is violet-purple, with three broad deeper- 
coloured veins, and white margins ; concavity of the lip 
velvety and yellow, with a few purple streaks on each side ; 
spur half an inch long, truncate. Column very short, — 
J. D.H. 



Fig. 1, Pedical, ovary, lip, and spore : — magnified. 



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Tab. 6195.— PROTEINOPHALLUS RIVIERI. 

„ 6196.— FERULA (EURYANGIUM) SUtiBUL. 

„ 6197.— CROCUS VELUC HEN/SIS. 

„ 6198.— CARICA CANDAMARCENSIS. 

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6200. 




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Tab. 6200. 

CALOCHORTUS citrinus. 

Native of California. 



Nat. Ord. Li l AC e.e.— Tribe Tulipe.k. 
Genus CALOCHORTUS, Pursh. (Baler in Linn. Joan*., vol. 14, p. 302), 



CAJLOCHORTUS {Mariposa) citrinus ; bulbo ovoideo, caule coryniboso 3-4-cephalo 
basin versus furcato, foliis linearibus semipedalibus glauco-viridibus, floribus 
suberectis, sepalis 1|- poll longis lanceolatis dorso viridulis facie flavidis 
prope basin maculatis, petalis bipollicaribus rotundato-cuneatis cuspidatis 
citrinis, facie haud zonatis prorsus pilis purpureis decoratis, supra unguem 
nudam foveola flavida dense barbata prseditis, genitalibus perianthio duplo 
brevioribus, antberis cylindricis apiculatis filamento lanceolato sequilongis, 
ovario clavato, stylis brevibus falcatis. 



This is a fine new species of that section of the genus 
Calochortus specially favoured by cultivators, which I have 
followed Professor Wood in calling Mariposa. The species 
known previously are C. venustus, Leichtlinii, Gunnisoni, 
splendens, macrocarpus, and luteus. They all come from 
either British Columbia, the Rocky Mountains, or California, 
and, with care, are hardy in our London gardens. The 
present plate was drawn from a plant which flowered last 
summer with Mr. G. F. Wilson in a cool greenhouse at 
Weybridge, the bulb of which was given to him by Mr. 
Elwes. All the species of this section agree with one 
another closely in their bulbs, leaves, and general habit. 
This one has the large flowers and acute anthers of 
C. splendens, but otherwise the flower is more like that of 
a large specimen of C. luteus, with which it agrees in ground- 
colour, but from which it differs considerably in decoration. 

Descr. Bulb ovoid, under an inch thick, with a mem- 
branous tunic. Stem a foot or a foot and a half high, firm, 
terete, glaucous, 3-4-flowered, forked low down. Leaves 
tolerably firm in texture, linear, glaucous, those from the 
bulb half a foot long, those that subtend the branches similar 
but smaller. Flowers permanently erect. Sepals an inch and 

Db< bxbke 1st, 1875. 



a half long, lanceolate, acuminate, greenish and naked on the 
back, yellow on the face, with a small hairy brown spot near 
the base. Petals ronnd-cuneate, a couple of inches broad 
and deep, rounded with a cusp on the outer border, bright 
lemon-yellow, the claw naked, above the claw is a round, 
conical, hairy yellow spot with a purple border, the rest of 
the face is without any zone or blotch, but covered with 
spreading purple, gland- tipped, bristly hairs. Stamens half 
as long as the petals ; filament erect, lanceolate ; anthers 
cylindrical, pale purplish-brown, apiculate, diverging, one- 
half to five-eighths inch long; pollen pale brown. Ovary 
clavate, under an inch long; stigmas short, falcate. — 
J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Stamen ; 2, pistil; 3, gland-tipped hair from the face of the petal:— 
all magnified. 



6Z0J 




Tab. 6201. 

DIURIS ALBA. 

Native of New South Wales. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe Neottie-e. 
Genus Diuris, Smith; (Benth., Fl. Austral., vol. vi., p. 324). 



Ditjris alba ; tuberibus lobatis, caule gracillimo, foliis paucis anguste linearibus 
gramineis acuminatis concavis, floribus 2-3, sepalo dorsali late ovato obtuso 
concavo albo, lateralibus deflexis dorsali 2-3-plo longioribu8 anguste 
liuearibus obtusis viridibus linea media fuscopurpurea, petalis sepalo dor- 
sali longioribus unguiculatis ovatis obtusis albis ungue fusco-purpureo, 
labelli lobis lateralibus subquadratis unidentatis interruedio multo majore 
trulliforini pallide roseo, carinis 2 a basi ad medium elevatis crassiusculis 
purpureo-punctulatia, stamiuodiis falcatis dentatis columnam brevem vix 
superantibus. 

D. alba, Br., Prodr., p. 316; Lindl, Gen. Sf Sp. Orchid., p. 509; Benth., Fl. 
Austral., vol. vi., p. 325. 



The beauty of the terrestrial Orchids in the Australian 
Colonies is proverbial. In spring and summer the meadows 
are in many places enamelled with them, and it is no unusual 
thing to find thirty or forty species in a comparatively limited 
area, comprised under the genera Diuris, Thelemytra, Praso- 
phyllum, Glossodia, and Pterostylis, and in such quantities 
that bouquets may be made of them in any number, and I feel 
assured that in no other part of the world may so many different 
forms of Orchids be found in a given small area as in the 
Australian Colonies. Unfortunately, though easily procured 
and transported to Europe, they are cultivated there with great 
difficulty, flowering once only, if at all, and disappearing for 
ever after, a result probably due to our uncongenial seasons. 

Of Diuris (of which the species figured is one of the least 
attractive kinds) but one species has been figured from speci- 
mens flowered in England, namely, the D. maculata (Tab. 
nost. 3156), though nearly a dozen other widely distributed 
species, some of great beauty, remain to be introduced. 

D. alba is most closely allied to, if not a slender variety 
of D. punctata, Sin., differing in the flower not being lilac and 
spotted all over. It has also a more northern range, from New 

December 1st, 1875. 



South Wales to Eockingham Bay, whereas D. punctata ranges 
from the former district southward to Victoria ; the flowers 
are usually much smaller than those here figured, but Clarence 
Bay specimens have them quite as large. The plant figured 
here flowered in August last in the open border from tubers 
sent by Thos. Moore, F.L.S., Director of the Sydney Botanic 
Garden. 

Descr. Tubers as large as nuts, lobed. Stem eight to 
sixteen inches high, slender. Leaves shorter than the stem, 
usually two only, sometimes one or none, very narrow, linear, 
concave; sheaths about two, loose or appressed. Bracts 
two inches long, erect, acuminate, loosely sheathing. Flowers 
about two, very variable in size, two-thirds to three and a half 
inches in diameter from the tips of the petals to those of the 
lateral sepals. Dorsal sepals ovate, obtuse, concave, white ; 
lateral deflexed, sometimes two and a half inches long, green 
with a brown-purple central stripe. Petals clawed, ovate, 
white, the claw brown-purple with white edges. Lip with 
two small subquadrate toothed lateral, and a large trapezoid 
mid-lobe, pale rosy-coloured or nearly white ; disk with two 
raised lobed keels that are speckled with red. Sta?ninodes 
falcate. Column very short.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower with sepals and petals removed : — magnified. 



6m. 




Ddy 8c San ■ 



Tab. 6202. 
GLADIOLUS Cooperi. 

Native of Natal and the Cape. 



Nat. Ord. Ibidace^. — Tribe Gladiole.e. 
Genus Gladiolus, Linn. (Klatt in Linncea, vol. 32, p. 689). 



Gladiolus Cooperi; bulbo globoso membranaceo-tunicato, foliia ensiformibus 
glabris acunrinatis subcoriaceis valide nervatis, radicalibus sesquipedali- 
bus, scapo robusto bipedali crebre bracteato, spica pedali laxe 8-12-flora 
bracteis lanceolatis acuminatis, exterioribus 3-4 poll, longis, floribus arcuatol 
ascendentibus, tubo flavido anguste infundibulari 2J-3 poll, longo, limbi 
rubro-lutei segmentis tribus superioribus sub conformibus obovato-spathu- 
latis acutislJ-2 poll longis, tribus inferioribus multo miuoribus lanceolatis 
acutis, genitalibus arcuatis perianthio triente brevioribus. 



When Mr. Thomas Cooper was travelling in South Africa 
on behalf of Mr. Wilson Saunders, he paid special attention 
to these ensiform-leaved Gladioli, of the group of which G. 
cardinalis and G. ysittacirms are the familiar garden repre- 
sentatives.^ He discovered, or at any rate brought into 
notice in Europe, no less than three very striking new species, 
of all of which bulbs were sent home and duly and success- 
fully cultivated at Eeigate, so that they all are now esta- 
blished as inhabitants of our gardens, enlarging materially 
the groundwork upon which hybrid isers can carry forward 
their experiments. Of these we have already figured G. 
Saundersii, Tab. 5873, and G. dracocephalus, Tab. 5884, and 
this is the third. It has now been spread about in gardens 
for several years, but has never been botanically named or 
described. The plate was drawn from a specimen that 
flowered at Kew in September 1872. We have dried 
specimens in the Kew Herbarium from Natal, from Krauss 
and Gueinzius, and from Somerset, from Mrs. Barber. In 
the very decided inequality of the three upper as compared 
with the three lower perianth- lobes, it is most like G. 
psittacinus, Bot. Mag., Tab. 3032, from which it differs by its 
longer tube and spathe-valves, and decidedly acute perianth- 
lobes. 

Df.cemheh 1st, 1875. 



Desce. Bulb globose, with membranous tunics. Radi- 
cal leaves about half-a-dozen, developed in a distichous rosette, 
erect, ensiform, glabrous, acuminate, a foot or a foot and a 
half long by an inch, broad, glaucous-green, with very strong 
raised ribs. Scape stout, terete, two feet high, closely 
bracteated by reduced leaves. Expanded spike a foot long, 
of eight to twelve arcuate-ascending flowers. Spathe-valves 
firm, green, lanceolate, acuminate, the outer three to four 
inches long, the inner one rather shorter and narrower. 
Perianth-tube a narrow, yellowish-green funnel, two and a 
half to three inches long. Limb with close, purple-red, 
anastomosing, vertical lines on a yellowish groundwork, the 
three upper segments similar in size and shape, obovate- 
spathulate, decidedly acute, one and a half to two inches 
long by an inch broad, the two outer reflexed at the tip 
when the flower is fully expanded, the inner one permanently, 
falcate ; three lower segments plain yellow or little striped 
with red, an inch long, lanceolate, acute, reflexing. Geni- 
talia arching, two-thirds as long as the limb ; anthers cylin- 
drical, purplish-yellow, half an inch long; stigmatic lobes 
oblanceolate, spreading. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Anther and top of filaments ; 2, stigmas and upper part of style : — 
both magnified. 



6Z0.1 







o 

1 



Tab. 6203. 
DECABELONE Barklyi. 

Native of Little Namaqualand, S. Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Asclepiadacejj.— Tribe Stapelie.e. 

Genua Decabelone, Dene. (Benth. et Hook. f., Gen. Plant, vol. ii., p. 784 ined • 

Hot. Mag., 6115). 



DBCABELONE Barklyi ; caulibus ramisque crasso-carnosis cactiformibus angulato- 
costatis costis saepissime ad 12 spinosis, spinis teouibus erectis setia late- 
ralibus duabus deflexis armatis, corona staminea duplici. exteriore tubo 
stamineo affixa m lobos 10 filiforines apice globuliferos sub«equales divisa, 
lnteriore squamis apicem versus attenuatis antheris adfixis squaroulis brevibus 
bindis interpositis. 

Decabelone Barklyi, Dyer, MSS. 



Under Tab. 6115 it was mentioned that the Royal Gar- 
dens, Kew, possessed specimens both living and in spirit, as 
well as drawings and analyses, from H. E. Sir Henry Barkly, 
Dr. Shaw, and Mrs. Barber, of a second species of Decabelone 
from Little Namaqualand. As was stated there it is closely 
allied to D. elegans, the flowers being extremely similar, but 
the branches have nearly twice the number of angles ; and 
the two lateral setae of the spines are more slender and de- 
iiexed instead of erect. 

The first discovery of this interesting plant is due to H. E. 
Sir H. Barkly, who sent a sketch of the plant in January, 1874, 
having found it three years previously growing in the Karoo, 
near the Orange River. Shortly after Dr. Shaw, who, as well 
as M'Lea, had found it in the same locality, sent to Kew 
specimens in spirit, and a careful analysis. Not having seen 
the description of Decabelone, Dr. Shaw rightly recognised 
the generic distinctness of the plant from other Stapeliece, and 
proposed that it should constitute a new genus, to be named 
m honour of the Governor of the Cape. I have endeavoured, 
as far as the specific name will allow, to give effect to Dr. 
Shaw's wishes. 

The present plate is partly founded upon a fine drawing 
for which Kew is indebted to Mrs. Barber, partly upon speci- 

December 1st, 1875. 



mens which flowered at Kew during the past year, and which 
were sent by Sir H. Barkly. 

Descr. Stems succulent, leafless, ceespitose, three to six 
inches high, with ten to twelve strongly marked angles fur- 
nished with processes each bearing one erect and two lateral 
deflexed slender white spines. Flowers borne as in D. elegans, 
occasionally two on a common peduncle, suberect ; pedicels 
one-third to one-half inch. Calyx 5-lobed, lobes quarter of 
an inch long, linear-deltoid. Corolla two to three inches 
long, narrowly carnpanulate, tube slightly curved, marked 
much as in D. elegans ; lobes deltoid, very acute, with occa- 
sionally an intermediate tooth. Stamina 'I- crown double; 
exterior of ten similar segments connate at the base and 
slightly united in pairs, tapering into filiform, capitate, dark 
violet processes; interior of ten dissimilar processes, five 
slender and adnate to the anthers, upon which they are 
incumbent as in D. elegans, five alternating with these and 
one-third as long, broadly deltoid, and bifid. Anthers as in 
D. elegans. — W. 7. T. D. 



Fig 1, Section through exterior staminal-crown, showing andrcecium viewed 
from above (magnified) ; 2, portion of staminal-crown viewed from within, on the 
right of the figure the place of attachment is shown of two anthers which have 
been removed on the left an anther the form of »hich has been accidentally dis- 
torted by the lithographer ; 3, pair of pollen-masses viewed from above (maq- 
nijieu). *> J 



62m 




*.*Ju&4o«tLiA 






Tab. 6204. 

PERNETTYA Pbntlandii. 

Native of the Andes of South America. 



Nat. Ord. Ericaceae. — Tribe Arbote,e. 
Genus Pernettya, Gaud. {Benth. et Hook. f., Gen. Plant., vol. ii., p. 582 ined.). 



Pernettya Peft£ZartfZu; fructiculus ramosissimus, ramulis sparse setulosis glabrisve, 
foliis confertis breviter petiolatis ovatis acutis iioq mucrcmatis serrulatis 
rigide coriaceis supra Iambus, siccis subtus rugulosis, pedicellis axillaribus 
1-fioris foliis brevioribus v. longioribus glabris puberulis v. setulosis, 
bracteolis parvis situ variis, calycis lobis ovatis acutis fructiferis dorso 
tumidis carnosis ciliolatis, corolla globoso-ovoidea glabra, bacca pisiformi. 

P. Pentlandii, DC, Prodr., vol. vii., p. 587 ; Wedd., Chlor. Andin., vol. ii., p. 170, 
t. 72, f. c. 

P.'angustata et P. parvifolia, Benth., Pi. Hartweg, p. 219. 

? P. purpurea, D. Don, ex. G. Don. Gen. Syst., vol. iii., p. 837 ; DC., I.e. 



A little evergreen shrub, a native of the temperate and 
colder regions of the higher Cordilleras from Venezuela to 
Chili, ascending to near the limit of perpetual snow, and 
varying greatly in stature, habit, and size of leaf. The form 
figured here approaches to the var. parvifolia of Weddel 
(P. parvifolia, Benth.), which inhabits the Andes of Ecuador, 
as Pichincha and Cotopaxi, and has smaller leaves and short 
pedicels. 

The curious intumescence of the back of the fruiting sepals 
of this species is a remarkable character, not noticed by any 
author, and perhaps not constant; it is worthy of remark, 
however, as showing a tendency to Gaultheria, in which the 
enlarged baccate fruiting calyx embraces the capsule, and in 
which genus the capsule becomes baccate in a few species, 
and thus shows a tendency towards the structure of 
Pernettya. In fact, except by the characters of the fruiting 
calyx and fruit, these two genera are not distinguishable. 
They have^ however, very different geographical ranges, 
Pernettya being, with the exception of an anomalous Tas- 
manian species, confined to and abounding in the South Ameri- 
can Alps, whereas Gualtheria, though equally or even more 
abundant on the Andean Pernettya region, extends to New 
Zealand, Australia, the Malayan Archipelago, and Indian Alps. 

December 1st, 1875. 



Pernettya Pentlandii was raised by J. Anderson Henry, 
F.L.S., from seeds sent from an elevation of 14,000 feet on 
the Quitonian Andes by his and our late correspondent, 
Dr. Jameson ; it flowered in June, fruited in November, and 
proved quite hardy at Trinity Lodge, Edinburgh. 

Desce. A rigid, branched, small shrub. Branches and 
branchlets angled, setulose or glabrous, leafy. Leaves 
crowded or sparse, two-thirds of an inch long and under, 
ovate or ovate-lanceolate, acute, serrulate, not mucronate or 
pungent, glabrous, very coriaceous, shining, rugose beneath 
when dry ; petiole very short ; young ciliate-toothed. Flowers 
solitary, axillary, drooping; pedicels puberulous, longer or 
shorter than the leaves, red ; bracteoles minute, few, scattered. 
Calyx-lobes ovate, acute, tumid and fleshy, but not other- 
wise much enlarged in fruit. Corolla one-third of an inch 
long, white, ovoid-globose ; teeth minute, recurved. Sta- 
mens ten, filaments puberulous, dilated at the base ; anthers 
with four short bristles. Berry the size of a large pea, 
dark blue-purple. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, portion of branch, leaf, pedicel, and flower • 2, stamens ; 3, ovary 
and disk ; 5, fruit ; 6, the same cut across transversely : — all magnified. 



6203 




Tab. 6205. 

CALATHEA leucostachys. 

Native of Costa Rica. 



Nat. Ord. Cannace^e. 
Genus Calathea, Meyer; (Endl., Gen. Plant., p. 227). 



Calathea leucostachys ; tenuiter inolliter villosa, caule robusto, foliis elliptico- 
oblongis utrinque rotundatis apice apiculatis sessilibus v. breviter et crasse 
petiolatis supra viridibus subtus costa excepta glabris sanguineo-pur- 
pureis, pedunculo brevi robusto, spica 3-5-pollicari, bracteis longe villosis 
subacute imbricatis tubo campanulato stramineo, lamina dilatata ampla 
recurva latiore quam longa, floribus inclusis albis brevissime pedicellatis, 
sepalis lineari-oblongis acutis pilosis tubum corollae sequantibus, corollse 
limbi segmentis subsequalibus oblongis subacutis valde concavis, labello 
petalis consimili, staminodiis petaloideis marginibus crispatis inflexis, anthera 
parva mucronata. 



This is another fine Central American species of Calathea 
introduced by Messrs. Veitch, to whom also is due the credit 
of introducing the C. tubispatha (Tab. nost. 5542) and C. 
Veitchiana (Tab. 5535). As a species the present comes 
nearest the C. Warzewiczii, Klotzsch, (Eegel Grartenflora, 
1866, t. 575), especially in the form and colour of the spike, 
bracts, and flowers, but differs wholly in habit, in being much 
more villous, and in the sessile or subsessile broader leaves. 

The cultivated species of Calathea are now very nu- 
merous, and from their perenenial and highly-coloured 
foliage are deservedly most desirable plants for moist stove 
cultivation. As many as thirty-four species, exclusive of 
varieties, are enumerated in the " Supplementum ad indicem 
Seminum Ann. 1868, Hort. Bot. Imp. Petrop," as being 
under cultivation in European gardens, and judging from the 
extent of the genus in our herbarium, many more are yet 
to be introduced. 

Calathea leucostachys flowered in Mr. Veitch's establish- 
ment at Chelsea in October, 1874, from plants sent from 
Costa Eica by Mr. Endres. 

Descr. Whole plant more or less villous, except the 
under-surface of the leaf, of which the midrib only is so ; 

Decbmher 1st, 1875. 



hairs long, soft, spreading, but not matted. Stem short, twelve 
to eighteen inches high. Leaves six to ten inches long, 
sessile or with short stout petioles, elliptic-oblong, rather 
variable in breadth, tip rounded and apiculate, base also 
rounded, rarely subcordate, upper surface deep green, under 
dark red-purple ; principal nerves ten to twenty pair ; sheaths 
appressed, green. Spike three inches long and upwards, 
cylindric-ovoid ; peduncle very robust, short. Bracts 
softly villous, rather closely imbricate ; tube three-quarters 
of an inch long, campanulate, pale yellow ; blade spreading, 
recurved or almost revolute, white, much broader than long. 
Flotvers hardly exceeding the bracts, sessile, white. Sepals 
pilose, upwards of an inch long, linear- oblong, acute, con- 
cave. Corolla-tube equalling the sepals, slender ; limb one 
half an inch long; segments oblong, acute, very concave, 
nearly equal. Staminodes petaloid, with incurved crisped 
margins. Anther small, acute. Stigma broad on a stout, 
curved, torulose style. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower; 2 and 3, top of corolla-tube with its segments removed, 
showing the staminodes in position ; 4, the same laid open, showing the style 
and anther : — all magnified. 



INDEX 

To Vol. XXXI. of the Third Series, or Vol. CI. of 

the Work. 



PI. 

6182 Allium narcissi florum. 
6170 Balbisia verticillata. 

6143 Blumenbacbia Chuquitensis. 

6205 Calathea leucostachys. 

6200 Calochortus citrinus. 

6198 Carica candamarcensis. 
6153 Colchicum luteum. 

6183 Columellia oblouga. 
6194 Crassula Bolusii. 
6141 Crocus byzantinus. 
6162 Crocus chrysanthus. 
6168 Crocus Crewei. 
6176 Crocus minimus. 
6187 Crocus Boryi. 
6197 Crocus veluchensis. 
6175 Cypripedium Arcus. 
6161 Cyrtopera sanguinea. 
6203 Decabelone Barklyi. 

6189 Delphinium Cashmirianum. 

6199 Dendrobium amoenum. 
6165 Dicborisandra Saundersii. 
6174 Dietes Huttoni. 

6184 Dion Edule. 
6186 Draba Mawii. 
6169 Dracaena Smitbii. 

6201 Diuris alba. 

6145 Epidendrum syringothyrsis. 

6181 Eranthemum hypocrateri- 

forme. 

6150 Erythrotis Beddomei. 

6140 Eucalyptus cornuta. 

6196 Ferula (Euryangium) Sumbul. 

6148 Fourcroya Selloa. 

6 1 60 Fourcroya undulata. 



par- 



Pl. 

6166 Galanthus Elwesii. 
6202 Gladiolus Cooperi. 

6151 Gustavia gracillima. 
6164 Hemichaena fruticosa 

6192 Heteranthera limosa. 
6142 Jamesia Americana. 

6167 Kniphofia Macowani. 

6146 Lilium Canadense, v; 

vura. 

6152 Masdevallia chimoera. 
6159 Masdevallia peristeria. 

6171 Masdevallia Estradas. 

6190 Masdevallia Davisii. 

6178 Mertensia alpina. 

6179 Michelia lanuginosa. 
6144 Odontoglossum maxillare. 
6163 Odontoglossum Warscewiczii 

6193 Oxalis arenaria. 

6157 Pentstemon antirrhinoides. 
6204 Pernettya Pentlandii. 
6156 Phyllocactus biformis. 
6185 Primula Parryi. 

6195 Proteinophallus Rivieri. 

6158 Pyrus prunifolia. 
6149 Senecio macroglossus. 

6154 Theropogon pallidus. 
6177 TuHpa Greigi. 

6191 Tulipa Eichleri. 

6180 Typhonium Brownii. 
6173 Vanda limbata. 

6147 Veronica pinguifolia. 

6172 Viburnum sandankwa. 

6155 Wablenbergia tuberosa. 
6188 Wahlenbergia Kitaibelii. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 372, DECEMBER, 1875. 

Tab. 6200.— CALOCHORTLS CITRINTJS. 
6201.— DIURIS ALBA. 
6202.— GLADIOLUS COOPERI. 
6203.— DECABELONE BARKLTI. 
6204.— PERNETTYA PENTLANDIL 
6205.— CALATHEA LEUCOSTACHYS. 



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