(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."



--U. <" t 



CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



ILLUSTRATING AND DESCRIBING 



plant* irf tyt lftm?al mtanic ffiartmus of l£eto, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; 



EDITED BY 



SIE DAVID PKALN, C.M.GL, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

DIRECTOR, ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW. 

VOL. VIII. / 
OF THE FOUETH SERIES. 

(Or Vol. CXXXVIII. of the Whole Work.) 




"A treasure-house of flowers 
With wage of outland travel and all wit 
Of garden craft and wary tilth indued." 

Anon. 



LONDON": 
LOVELL EEEVE & CO., LTD., 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments, 

6, HENEIETTA STKEET, COVEXT GAEDEX. 
1912. 

[All rights reserved.] 



•*>- bou (jar 
7912 



LONDON : 

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED 

DUKE STREET, STAMFORD STRSET, S.E., AND GREAT WINDM,LL STREET, W. 



To 

JOHN MEDLEY WOOD, A.L.S., 

whose devotion to their interests, 

during the many years 

that he has held charge 

of the durban botanic garden, 

has been op signal benefit 

alike to horticulture and to botany, 

this volume of the 

Botanical Magazine 

is warmly dedicated. 



Kew, December 1, 19J2, 



No. 85. 



VOL. VIII. -JANUARY. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6i. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s. 



OK No. 1499 °* THK 8NTI 



US WOEK. 



CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

-xa™ HAND . cot oua SD 9wm WITH DESCRIPT10NS> stbuct0ra1j and HisT0B[cAr 

OF NEW AND BARK 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTAOTC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHBR BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 



EDITED BY 



D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Btrmor, laopai Botanic ©arftrns, ISfto, 






L 

LOVEL1 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



CORAL AND ATOLLS, 

Their history, description, theories of their origin both before and sincv> 
that of Darwin, the influence of winds, tides, and ocean current 
their formation and transformations, their present condition, products, 
fauna, and flora. 

By F. WOOD-JONES, B.Sc, F.Z.S. 
Numerous illustrations, plates and map. 24s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATIC-3E OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W, H. PEARSON. 
2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 "s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 

a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthihgton G. Smith, F.L.S. 
Two Vols., 24 Coloured Plates, 36s. The Supplement separately, 12s. 



BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES AND USTILAGINEJE. 

By GEORGE MASSEE 

to the London Society for the Extension of University Teacu 
. Crown 8vo., with 8 Plates, 6s. 6d. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles, 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F.R.S. 

Bevised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9a. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THL^BMTISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

rl Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Flora. 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Kugraving*, 9*. 

& CO., Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET. 



84 n 




"Vincent Brooks J)ay &i Hon Ztrimg 



.artdan. 



Tab. 8412. 
BEGONIA DICHU9A. 
Bra2il. "* 

Begoniaceae. 
Begonia, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Oen. Plant, vol. i. p. 811. 



Begonia (Knesebeckia) dichroa, Sprague in Oestr. Gart. Zeit. 1907, p. 418, et 
in Kew Bull. 1908, p. 251 ; floribus masculis coccineis, femineis albo- 
coccineis distincta. 

Planta elata, glabra, pilis minutis moniliformibus glandulosis in innovationes 
et inflorescentiam adspersis exceptis. Folia plantae juvenilis rhomboideo- 
elliptica, semicordata, acuminata, 10-12 cm. longa, 5-5 "5 cm. lata, albo- 
maculata; folia plantae adultae ovato-oblonga, acute acuminata, basi valdo 
obliqua, semicordata, 8-nervia nervis infimis parvis inconspicuis superne 
nervis utrinque 3-5 penninervia, 22-30 cm. longa, 9-13 '5 cm. lata, margine 
leviter undulata, supra saturate viridia, nitidula, subtus pallida ; petioli 
2-5 cm. longi; stipulae ovatae, acute acuminatae, 2-5 cm. longae, 1*5 cm. 
latae. Pedunculus 3-6 - 5 cm. longus. Bichasium multiflorum, floribus 
masculis terminalibus, femineis axillaribus. Bracteae cymbiformes, in 
statu explanata ovatae, obtusae, 1-1*5 cm. longae, - 8-l cm. latae, ut 
rbachis coccineae. Flares masculi pedicellis circiter 2 cm. longis. 
Perianthii segmenta 4, coccinea, 2 exteriora late obovata, obtusa, 2*3 cm. 
longa, 1*9 cm. lata, 2 interiora oblanceolata, rotundata, 1*2 cm. longs, 
4-5 mm. lata. Stamina in toro convexo 1*6 mm. alto insidentia; filamenta 
2-3 mm. longa; antherae obovoideo-oblongae, vix 1*5 mm. longae, loculis 
versus basin convergentibus. F/ores feminei sessiles vel breviter pedicel- 
lati. Perianthii segmenta coccinea, 5, quorum 2 exteriora late obovata, 
obtusa, 1*4 cm. longa, 1*1 cm. lata, intimum oblongum, rotundatnm, 
7-8 mm. longum, vix 4 mm. latum, cetera 2 intermedia. Ovarium 3- 
loculare, 1-5 cm. longnm, primum album, tandem purpureo-tinctum, 
alis 6-7 mm. latis, placentis bipartitis undique ovuliferis. Styli basi 
brevissime connati, 3-3 '5 mm. longi, bifurcati, ramis vix ultra 1 mm. 
longis in helicem sesquicyclicam tortis, papillis stigmaticis externe infra 
furcam continuis. — T. A. SritAGUE. 



The interesting Begonia which forms the subject of our 
illustration was obtained for the Kew collection in 1907 
from Messrs. Haage & Schmidt, Erfurt. It occupies a some- 
what isolated place within the section Knesebeckia, yet while 
this is its most satisfactory systematic position as the species 
of this extensive genus are at present classified, it bears a 
striking resemblance to B. metadata, Raddi, a species 
which belongs, however, to the section Gaerdtia, in which 
the two segments of the placenta bear ovules on their outer 
surfaces only. The most natural explanation of this 
January, 11)12. 



peculiar combination of characters that can be suggested 
is that B. diehroa may be a hybrid between twoTpecies 
belonging to different sections. Yet in the present instance 
this explanation is perhaps not the true one, because 
JJ diehroa has matured seeds at Kew, and the resulting 
plants have proved to be exactly like the parent one. It 
is, however, just possible that too great stress has been laid 
on the character afforded by the circumstance that the 
segments of the placenta bear ovules on one side only, or 

tront° a i r r iv eS - B r t ich T is a S P ecies that squires 

whaHL TvT5 U I™ laT ^ e leaves and is of a some- 
what lax habit; for a Begonia its growth is slow The 

febi WllCh ^ Pr ° duc , ed in W, are remarkable for 

,nv of th g ^° rang f" SCarlet C0l0ur ' a tint ™ }ike that of 
know. t. } eT Cultl 1 vat f d s P^ies included in the group 
known in gardens as shrubby Begonias. 

zhiT^T N '~ IIer \ ta "' With minute ottered beaded 
ottrw L ItT ° n th r e yomi S sll00ts and ^florescence, 
el n ^ 1/ ,°? LmV - eS in y°™S P lants rhomboid' 

o^e-obW' ^ 'l ^ Wlth White ; in fu ""grown plants 
ouW ft g ' i rp 7 - acuminate > ba ^ semicordate but very 
spicnouB Z7 td Wlth ■* ie l0West P air sma11 aiid ™°"- 
<* o-neived on each side, 9-12 in. W 4I-.51 f n wiMa 

SSSSr ,™l; ei ? > ; pet,o , le f - 2 in - lon ^ ; st, 'p u|es OTat e> 

3'in W te '^j n -. Ion e. 7 Jin. wide/ A^ 
flowers ermCf M f¥ a "" m many-flowered, the male 
ovS when n?'' *!, fe,, ^ e axlI,ar y- ^»wto cymbiform, 

long. Perianal f TT', P edlc elled, about 10 lin. 
pair oblateol ? 7 / ,*■ ^ * in - wide > the innor 

abort; anthers obovn,, n V6X ™ Sed rece P ta * ; filaments 

verged Wds ,re' d Lt 0n8 2^ yeh0rt ' ^T Ce ", C ° n " 
pedicelled /',-,.;,„,/ * lowers sessde or shortly 

wide nutate f o htTl,^, 5, PiD > k> fte tW ° ° nterm ^ 
innermost ob ong^^Jd ofev ?* * £" 7** ,bo 



wide, the remaining two intermediate in size and form. 
Ovary 3-celled, about 8 lin. long, at first white, ultimately 
with a purplish tinge; wings 3-3J lin. wide; placentas 
2-partite, their lamellae bearing ovules on both faces. 
Styles shortly united at the base, under 3 lin. long, 
bifurcate, their arms very short and helicoidly twisted, 
the stigmatic papillae extending downwards beyond the 
point of bifurcation. 



Figs. 1 and 2, anthers ; 3, a female flower, the perianth segments removed ; 
4, stigmas; 5, ovary in section:— all enlarged. 



£473 




S.delJ.l\ r .Fitchl]th. 



\1nce-nt. Bro dias.Day iSoaTat^iinj:) 



Tab. 8413. 
ELLIOTTIA racemosa. 
Southern United States. 

Ericaceae. Tribe IIhodoeeae. 

Elliottfa, Muhl ex Ell. Sketch Bot. 8. Car. & Georg. vol. i. p. 448; Benth. et 
Book. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 598, partim ; Drude in Engl. & Prantl, Nat. 
Pflanzenf. vol. iv. pars 1, p. 32. 



Elliottia racemosa, Muhl. Cat. PI. Am. Sept. 1813 (nomen) et ex Ell. Sketch 
Bot. S. Car. tfc Georg. 1817, vol. i. p. 448 et in Nutt. Gen. N. Am. add. 1821 ; 
Gray, Syn. Ft. N. Am. vol. ii. pars 1, p. 44; Sargent in Gard. & Forest, 
vol. vii. p. 207, t. 37 et in Sylva N. Am. vol. xiv. p. 31, t. 712; Kew Bull. 
1906, p. 226, et 1911, p. 322 ; species unica. 

Arbor ad 6 m. alta vel saepius fruticosa, ramis virgatis novellis gracilibus 
pubescentibus castaneis, deinde aurantiaco-fuecis demum fusco-cinereis 
glabris. Folia alterna, oblonga vel elliptico-oblonga, utrinque acuta, 
7-10 cm. longa, 2 -5-3 "75 cm. lata, membranacea, supra saturate viridia, 
glabra, infra pallida, laxe pilosa; petioli basi dilatati, pubescentes, 8-10 
mm. longi. Inflorescentiae terminales, racemosae vel subpaniculatae, 
15-25 cm. lonprae, laxae ; bracteae bracteolaeque lanceolatae vel subulatae, 
scariosae, mox deciduae; pedicelli 10-15 mm. longi, graciles. Calyx 
patellari-cupularis, diametro 3-4 mm., rubescens, 4-lobus, lobis perlatis 
cuspidatis ciliolatis, praeter cilia glaber. I'ebda 4, ima basi leviter 
cohaerentia, anguste spathulato-oblonga, i0-12 mm. longa, 3 mm. lata, 
alba. Stamina 8 ; filamenta 5 mm. longa, linearia ; antberae basi bilobae, 
oblongo-lanceolatae, 2 ■ 5 mm. longae. Ovarium disco crasso 4-lobo insidens, 
depressum, 4-loculare ; stylus filiformis, supeme incurvus incrassatusque, 
8-9 mm. longus; stigma oblique capitatum. Fructus ignotus. — 0. Stapf. 



The beautiful shrub or small tree which forms the subject 
of our illustration is confined naturally to a small area in 
northern Georgia which extends across the Savannah River 
into South Carolina. Within this limited tract it is rare or 
at least local in woods, especially along rivers. The species 
was first received at Kew in 1894 from the late Mr. P. J. 
Berckmans, of Augusta, Georgia, who sent some pieces 
with a little root attached, accompanied by a note recording 
his having first noted it when botanising with the late 
Professor A. Gray some thirty years previously. Unfor- 
tunately none of the pieces grew, and it was not until 
1902, when two well-rooted plants were again sent by 
Mr. Berckmans, that Elliottia racemosa became established 
in the Kew Collection. One of the plants has been injured 
Januaky, 1912. 



as the result of attempts to propagate the species by root- 
cuttings; the other has grown well, and is now a shrub 
about seven feet high, which flowered i'or the first time in 
July, 1911. The two plants are situated in a bed of heaths 
where, to the ordinary sandy soil of Kew, have been added 
a little peat and some leaf soil. Conditions suitable for 
Rhododendrons and the Heath family generally appear to 
suit the Elliottia exactly. The great difficulty with this 
species is to propagate it; although the stigmas were 
carefully dusted with pollen and the flowers attracted 
many bees, not a single fruit was developed. Ordinary 
cuttings of the twigs have been tried several times without 
success. Layering is now being tried, but grafting, which 
suggests itself, seems excluded owing to the difficulty in 
finding a suitable stock, 

< Description.— Shrub, or small tree, 20-24 ft. high, twigs 
virgate, when young slender, pubescent, chestnut-brown, 
later orange-tawny, ultimately grey-tawny and glabrous. 
Leaves alternate, oblong or * elliptic-oblong, acute, base 
cuneate, 2§-4 in. long, 1-1^ in. wide, membranous, dark 
green above, glabrous, pale and loosely pilose beneath ; 
petiole dilated below, pubescent, 4-5 lin. long. Inflorescence 
terminal, racemose or almost paniculate, 6-10 in. long, lax ; 
bracts and bracteoles lanceolate or subulate, scarious, semi- 
deciduous ; pedicels slender, 5-7 lin. long. Calyx flatly 
cupular, about 2 hn. across, reddish, 4-lobed, the lobes 
rather broad, cuspidate and ciliolate, but otherwise glabrous 
Petals 4, white, slightly cuneate at the very base, narrow 
spathulate oblong, 5-6 lin. long, under 2 lin. wide 
btamens 8; filaments 2£ lin. long, linear; anther 2-lobed 
below oblong-lanceolate, over 1 lin. long. Ovary resting on 
a thick 4-lobed disk, depressed, 4-celled ; style filiform, 
thickened and incurved above, 4 lin. long; stigma obliquely 
capitate. Fruit unknown. ^ J 



4 J&£X2i£££3!l£*} 3 ' Ycrtical scction of c;Uyx < ** «* ™*; 



8114. 




StS-del.J.N. 



Vmcartt 






Tab. 8414. 

BERBERIS Wilsonae. 

China. 

Berbekidaceae. Tribe Bekbereae. 
Berberis, Linn.; Benth. et Ilooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 43. 



Berberis Wilsonae, Bemsl. in Kew Bull. 1908, p. 151 ; H. Spooner in Gard. 
Chron 1907, vol. xlii. p. 372; Veitch in Cat. Nov. 1907; species adspectu 
h. lhunbergd similis, differt spim's infra foliorum fasciculos 3, foliis 
crassissimis eximie reticulatis flores excedentibus et floribus numerosis 
mmonbus in racemos congestos dispositis. 

Frutcr, tarde decidnus vel fere sempervirens, ad 1 m. alius, patulus ; ramuli 
graciles. angulati, minute brunneo-pubeseentes. Folia fascicnlata oblancco- 
lata vel anguste obovata, sessilia, apice rotundata mucronata vel subacute, 
casu d-partita, basi sensim attenuata. 0-6-2-5 cm. Ionga, 2-6 mm. lata, 
pallide vindia, supra opaca subtns glauca, conspicuo reticulata; fasciculi 
in axilhs spmarum 3-furcatarum dispositi ; spinarum rami aciculati 1-2 cm. 
Jodri. Mores aureo-lutei, 1 cm. diametro, in fasciculos vel umbellas breve 
peclunculatas dispositi. Sepala 6, obovato-orbicularia, 2-3 mm. Ionga 
ieJala b obovata, sepalis paulo breviora. Stamina petalis breviora. 
fructus globosus, 6 mm. diametro, pallide puniceus— W. J. Bean. 



Among the many new forms belonging to the genus 
Berberis which recent exploration in China has disclosed, 
the subject of our plate is one of the most distinct and 
attractive. It is a native of Central and Western China, 
and was first met with bv Mr. E. H. Wilson when collecting 
on behalf of Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons in the neighbour- 
hood of Tatien-lu in 1903. The material for our figuro 
lias been derived from a plant presented to the Kew 
collection by Messrs. Veitch in 1907. But while very 
different from any of the species formerly known in 
gardens, B. Wilsonae appears to be one of a series of variable 
forms from the same general region rather than an isolated 
and well differentiated species. This conclusion is the 
result of an examination of a number of Chinese 
Barberies, palpably of the same type of B. Wilsonae, 
though noticeably different in their details, recently intro- 
duced to cultivation at Kew, Coombe Wood and elsewhere. 
I erhaps the most nearly allied of these forms is one which 
has been described as B. parvifolia, Sprague. Another 
form almost if not quite identical with B> Wilsonae was 

Januaij v, 1912. 



collected in Yunnan by Pere Ducloux ; his specimens are 
not definitely dated, but it is known that they were obtained 
some time prior to 1901. If B. paroifvlia can be regarded 
as no more than a variety of the species to which B. Wil- 
sonae belongs, then this species has been in cultivation at 
Aew since 1896, when seeds were received from St. Peters- 
burg. As a garden plant B. Wilsonae has attractions in 
its flowers, which appear during July and August ; in its 
trait, which ripens in October ; and, according to Wilson, 
in the brilliant autumnal tints of its foliage. It is how- 
ever, necessary to remark that, at Kew, the last-mentioned 
characteristic has not been strikingly manifested; indeed, 
the young plants grown here have shown a marked 
tendency to retain much of their foliage throughout the 
winter The dwarf, spreading habit of the plant renders 
it suitable for the rock-garden in a sunny position where 
its branches can overhang some miniature cliff. It prefers 
a loamy soil and is very easily increased by means of seeds. 

Description. —A deciduous or sub-evergreen shrub of low, 
spreading habit, 2 to 4 it. high; branchlete slender, zig-zag 
angled, clothed with a minute, dark-brown pubescence. 
Leaves m fascicles produced in the axils of triple-forked 
spmes, each fork acicular, f to £ in. long; oblanceolate or 
narrowly obovate, sessile, the apex rounded, mucronate or 
somewhat acute, or occasionally tripartite, ± to 1 in. long, 
TW to ¥ m. wide; dull greyish-green above, more or less 
E fc UQ * th u aiid conspicuously net-veined. Flowers 

staH i 1?? 1 G 1 " ye L l0W ; i m \ hl diameter ' in fascicle8 or Portly 
^a Led umbels. Semis 6, obovate-orbicular, JL to i in. long. 

than ho 'n°M V /] 8h0rt f r , than the se P ak ® a ™^ ^rter 
than he petals. Berry globose, { in. in diameter, pale salmon- 

led on the sunny side, yellowish or whitish in the shade. 
T.fe^-IR*^* 3 ' fl ° WCr M]y 0pcn ' 4 > *»tol 5 and G, stamens; 



8-115 




J.N. Fitch. HtM 



VLneenlBrooks.Day 8t3c 



ewp&C? London. 



Tab. 8415. 
pisa luqe ns. _ 
South Africa. 

Obchidaceae, Tribe Opbbydeae. 
Disa, Berg. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. G'SO. 



Disa (Herschelia) lugens, Bolus in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. XX. p. 483, in Tram. 
S. Afr. Phil. Soc. vol. v. p. 171 et in Jc. Orch. Austr.-Afr. vol. ii. t. 76; 
N. K Br. in Gard. Chron. 1885, vol. xxiv. p. 232; Schlecht. in Ehigl. Jahrh. 
vol. xxxi. p. 288; affinis D. barbatae, Sw., sed labello amplo et viride, sepalo 
postico viridi-striato et sepalis lateralibus purpureas differt. 

Ilerba terrestris, gracilis, 40-80 cm. alta. Folia radicalia, pauca, suberecta, 
elongato-h'nearia, graminifolia, subacuta, rigida, supra eanaliculata, subtus 
carinata, 20-55 cm. longa. Scapus erectus, strictus vel flexuosus, 40-80 cm. 
altus, vaginis membranaceis arete amplectentibns acuminatis distantibus 
vestitus. Bacemus 10-20 cm. longus, laxe 5-15-florus. Bractene ovato- 
lanceolatae, acuminatissimae, membranaceae, pedicellis multo breviores. 
Pedicetti 2-2*5 cm. longi. Flores patentes, mediocres. Sepalum posticum 
galeatum, late ovatnm, apice acutum et recurvum, 1-1-4 cm. longum, 
pallide coeruleum, viridi-striatum ; dorso in calcar conicum apice acumi- 
natum et recurvum 6-8 mm. longum producto. Sepafalateralia patentia, 
oblongo-lanceolata, acuta, 1-1-4 cm. longa, purpurea. Petala resupinata, 
triloba, ineurva, 6 mm. longa; lobo postico oblongo-lanoeolato utrinquo 
denticulate, lobo antico falcato-oblongo obtuso et integro. Labellum 
deflexum vel recurvum, oblongo-lingui forme, profunde lacerato-multifidnm, 
l - 8-2-3 cm. longum, laciniis apicem versus saepe 2^4-lobis. Columva 
brevis; anthem valde resupinata; rostellum erectum, trifidum; stigma 
pulvinatum. — D. barbata, Lindl. Gen. et Sp. Orch. p. 354, partim ; non Sw. 
Herschelia lugens, Kraenzl. Orch. Gen. et Sp. vol. i. p. 806. — E. A. Eolfe. 



The interesting- South African Orchid which forms the 
subject of our illustration is one of the " blue" Disas, which 
are sometimes looked upon as belonging to a distinct genus 
Herschelia, Lindl. According to the late Mr. Bolus, who 
first described the species in 1884, our subject is by far the 
tallest and strongest member of the Herschelia group which is 
here treated as a distinct section. This species was, prior to its 
differentiation by Dr. Bolus, confused with the nearly allied 
D. barbata, Sw., but is readily distinguished by the metallic 
greenish-purple hue of its flowers ; those of D. barbata are 
white, lined with blue on the dorsal sepal. I). lugens grows 
on the Cape Flats, in moist sandy soil among Restiaceae, at 
an elevation of about 100 feet above sea level, and flowers 
there in the months of October and November. From this 
January, 11)12. 



locality it extends eastward as far as Coldstream, near 
Grahamstown. Though the species has been repeatedly 
introduced to cultivation in this country, it is by no means 
easy to maintain in good condition, owing to its tendency 
to dwindle away after flowering. It thrives most satisfac- 
torily when grown as a greenhouse-plant in a cool, airy, 
sunny position in a mixture of equal parts of sand, peat, 
loam and charcoal. The growth of the tubers commences 
in autumn, and when the plants have become well established 
and are in full growth they require an abundance of water 
at the root. After the flowers have appeared the plant 
commences to die down. The supply of water should then 
be gradually reduced until growth ceases. Then the tubers 
should be kept quite dry for a period of from two to three 
months. 

Description.—//^, terrestrial, slender, 1J-2 ft. high. 
Leaves few, radical, suberect, linear-elongate, grassy, ri^id 
subacute channelled above and keeled on the under surface' 
8-20 in. long. Scape erect, strict or flexuose, U-2 ft. lon°- 
clothed with membranous, closely clasping, distant, acumi- 
nate sheaths; racemes laxly 5-1 5 -flowered, 4-8 in. long; 
bracts ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, membranous, much 
shorter than the pedicels ; pedicels f-1 lin. long. Flowers 
spreading, of moderate size. Sepals : posterior pale blue 
with greenish stripes, galeate, wide ovate, with an acute 
recurved tip, and prolonged behind in a conical acute and 
recurved spur 3-4 lin. long; lateral purple, spreading 
oblong-lanceolate acute, 5-7 lin. long. Petals resupinate 
2-lobed incurved 3 lin. long ; posterior lobe oblon- 
lanceolate, denticulate on each side, anterior falcate-oblon- 
obtuse, entire. Lip deflexed or recurved, narrowly oblong 
and deeply multifid-lacerate, f-1 in. long; segments often 
2-4-lobed towards the tip. Column short; anther very 
lesupmate ; rostellum erect, 3-fid ; stigma pulvinate. 

Fig. 1, petal ; % part of lip , 3, column ; 4, pollinia -.-all enlarged. 



8416 




.N.Fitchlith 



'.w&Sc 



I..Refiv> 



Tab. 8416. 
CALCEOLAEIA cana. 

Chile. 

Scbopiiulabiaoeae. Tribo Calceolaeieae. 

Calceolaria, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 920; Kracnzl. in 
Engl. PJlanzenr. Scroph.-Antirrh.-Calc. p. 21. 



Calceolaria cana, Cav. 7c. vol. v. p. 27, t. 443, fig. 2; Benth. in DC. Pr<«1r. 
vol. x. p. 209; Clou, in Gay, Fl. GUI. vol. v. p. 182; Kraenzl. I.e. p. 48; 
affinis C. arachnoideae, Grab.., sed planta tenuiore minuscule dense lanata, 
foliis caulinis multo minoribus et corollae colore differt. 

Jlerba perennis, caespitosa, parvula, scaposa. Folia radicalia arete conferta, 
oblongo-lanceolata, spathulata vel obovata, 3-6 cm. longa, 1-5-2 "2 cm. 
lata, apice subacuta vel obtusa, basi in petiolum latum saepc brevem 
sensim angustata, integra vel denticulata, plus minusve dense albo-lanata. 
Scapus gracilis, erectus, inflorescentia inclusa 3-5 dm. altus, teres, parce 
pilosus vel glabrescens, apice saepe bifurcatus, foliis paucis lineari-oblocgis 
6-8 mm. longis instructs. Inflorescentia laxa, primo subenrymbiformis, 
more dichasii ramosa, demum ramulis racemiformibus 5-15 cm. longis 
praedita, plus minusve glanduloso-pubescens. Pedicelli gracillimi, 8-10 
mm. longi. Flores odorati. Calyx circiter 4 mm. longus, glanduloso- 
pubescens, lobis subaequalibus ovatis circiter 2 mm. latis. Corolla albida 
cum maculis et lineis parvis rubris vel purpureis ornata, saepe plus 
minusve colore rubro vel purpureo suffusa, fauce lutea et maculis majori- 
bus purpureo-brunneis notata; labium superum cucullntum, calyco 
mbaequilongum ; labium inferum ellipsoideo-globosum, 9-10 mm. longum, 
6-8 mm. latum, orificio obovato, 4-5 mm. diametro. Stamina brevissiiua 
filamentis parce glanduloso-pubescentibus. Ovarium dense glanduloso- 
puberulum, calyce paulum brevius. Capsula late ovoidea, breviter rostrata, 
4-5 mm. longa. — S. A. Sean. 



In the most recent monograph of the genus Calceolaria 
Dr. Kraenzlin has recognised about two hundred species, all 
of them confined to the American continent, where they 
extend from Mexico through Central America to South 
America, and occur also in the Falkland Islands. In the 
case of the solitary Peruvian form with triandrous flowers, 
C. triandra, Vahl, the treatment proposed by Gr. Don has 
been followed and the plant is recognised as the type of a 
distinct genus Porodittia, G. Don; while the four New 
Zealand species, to which have to be added two from Chile 
and Peru, with ringent but not calceolate lips, have been 
placed by Kraenzlin in a distinct genus, Jovellana. Vt ith 
very few" exceptions the species referable to the restricted 
Januauy, 1912. 



genus Calceolaria are found only on the western side of the 
American continent. They are concentrated more especially 
in Peru and Chile, the number of species in Peru being 
about ninety-four, in Chile about seventy-five. Each country 
has fifty-eight species peculiar to itself; only nine species 
are common to both. The species which forms the subject 
of our plate is one of those peculiar to Chile, where it has 
been collected by Mr. H. J. Elwes as far south as the Bafios 
de Chilian in Nuble at 5-6,000 feet above sea level, and 
by Professor Philippi as far north as the province of 
Coquimbo. The plant from which our figure has been 
prepared is one of several raised from seed purchased in 
October, 1910, from Mr. J. D. Husbands, Limavida, Chile. 
Grown in a pot in a cool frame, it has formed suberect 
stems about four inches long, some of which have developed 
terminal erect slender scapes about a foot and a half in 
length that continued to bear flowers from June till October. 
The flowers, which are distinctly violet-scented, have hitherto 
been stated to be yellow, doubtless the result of descrip- 
tions based on dried specimens in which they soon become 
yellowish or brownish-white; they are. however, usually 
purple, less often rose coloured. The plant, which appears 
to be a perennial, might easily be mistaken, when not in 
flower, for a Stachys or a Gnaphalium. The nearest ally of 
C. cana is C. arachnoidea, G-rah., figured at t. 2874 of this 
work ; that species, however, differs from C. cana in being 
usually more robust and more woolly and in having much 
larger cauline leaves, with purple self-coloured flowers 
devoid of the markings which characterise those of C. cana. 

Description.—//^, perennial, tufted, rather small, 
scapose. Leaves radical, close set, oblong-lanceolate, spa- 
thulate or obovate, 1J-2J in. long, *-* in. wide, subacute 
or obtuse, gradually narrowed to a broad often short 
petiole, entire or finely toothed, more or less densely white 
woo ly Scape slender, erect, including the inflorescence 
I-i 2 it long, cylindnc, sparingly pilose or nearly glab- 
rous, often bifurcate upwards, with a few small linear 
oblong leafy bracts, 3-4 lin. long. Inflorescence open, at 
first almost corymbose, cyrnosely branched, the branches 
ultimately elongated, raceme-like, 2-6 in. long, more or 
less glandular pubescent. Pedicels very slender, 4-5 lin 



Jong. Flowers violet-scented. Calyx about 2 lin. Ion"-, 
glandular-pubescent, lobes ovate, subequal, about 1 lin! 
wide. Corolla white, distinctly marked with small purple 
or rose-coloured blotches and lines, often more or less 
suffused throughout with rose or purple; throat yellow, 
with larger purplish-brown blotches; upper lip hooded, 
about as long as the calyx ; lower lip ellipsoid-globose,' 
about 5 lin. long, 3-4 lin. wide; mouth obovate, 2-2| lin! 
across. Stamens very short ; filaments sparingly glandular- 
pubescent. Ovary densely glandular puberulous, slightly 
shorter than the calyx. Capsule densely glandular- 
puberulous, shortly beaked, 2-2| lin. long. 



Pig. 1, flower ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, pistil ; 5, portion of inflorescence from 
another plant: — all enlanjcd except 5, ivhich is of natural size. 



Complete in GO vols., royal 8w, with nearly 4000 hand-coloured 
Plates, many Mo or double plates, 42s. each net. 

CURTIS & HOOKER'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

THIRD SERIES. 



jFtgttres attti ©escrtpttons of Itfeto ano Eare plants, 

SUITABLE FOR THE GARDEN, STOVE, OR CONSERVATORY, 

BY 

Sir J. D. HOOKER, M.D., C.B., G.C.S.L, F.R.S., 

ASSISTED BY 

WILLIAM BOTTING HEMSLEY, F.R.S., F.L.S. 



NOTICE OF RE-ISSUE. 



Some portions of the above work being out of print, and complete sets 
very difficult to obtain, the Publishers have determined to reprint so 
much as will enable them to complete a few copies as they may be 
subscribed for ; and to meet the convenience of Subscribers, to whom 
the outlay at one time of so large a sum as a complete set now costs 
is an impediment to its purchase, they will commence a re-issue of 
two Volumes Monthly, thus spreading the cost over a period of 
two and a half years. The price of the volumes will be 42s. each as 
heretofore, but to Subscribers for the entire series 36s. each, or a 
complete set of the 60 vols, will be supplied for £100 cash. Subscribers 
may commence at any time. 

The Botanical Magazine, commenced in 1787, and continued 
with uninterrupted regularity to the present time, forms the most 
extensive and authentic repertory of Plant History and Portraiture 
extant. The Third Series, by far the most valuable, comprising ftU 
the important additions of the last sixty years, contains nearly 4000 
Coloured Plates, with Descriptions, structural and historical, by Sir 
William and Sir Joseph Hooker. 

A set complete from the commencement in 1787, including the First, 
Second, and Third Series, to the end of 1904, 130 vols., may be had, 
price £136. 

N.B. — A Fourth Series commenced in January, 1905, and is edited 
by D. Prain, CLE., LL.IX, F.R.S., Director of the Royal Botanic 
Gardens, Kew. ____ 

Monthly, ivith Six Coloured Plates, 3s. 6d. Annual Subscription, 42s. 
Payable, in Advance. 



LONDON : 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., Limited, 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments 
6. HENRIETTA STREET, OOVENT GARDEN. 



FORM FOR SUBSCRIBERS TO THE RE-ISSUE. 



To Messrs. Lovell Reeve dt Co., Limited, Publishers, 
6, Henrietta Street, Covcnt Garden. 
Please send to the undersigned the Botanical Magazine, Third Series, 
two Volumes Monthly, at 36s. per Volume, or the 60 vols, for £100.* 



Name 



Address 



Date 



Conveyance 



* Subscribers will be good enough to indicate in which mode they desire 
to receive the work, by striking out the words indicating the other mode. 



FORM FOR SUBSCRIBERS TO THE NEW (FOURTH) 

SERIES. 

To Messrs. LOVELL REEVE & Co., Limited, 

6, Henrietta Street, Covent Gakden. 

Please send the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE monthly, as published, for 
which I enclose 42s. subscription for the year. 

Name 

Address 



Date. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By Geouge Bentham, 
F.R.S. Revised bv Sir J. L>. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS "of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Pitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," .and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 
Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 
HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Bev. M. J.Behkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) -found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Chakles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New 
Edition, entirelv revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worth ington G. Smith, 
F L S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12*. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Curuey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE.E. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and otherB. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 
FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS: a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Muelt.ek, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W. H. Hauvky and 
0. W. Sondee, and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.B.S. Vols. 
I.— 111., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., 
Parts I. & II., 9s. each. Part III., 8s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Danikl Oliver, F.K.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. M. 
Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— III., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d. 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 
Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermad-c's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and JIacquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Gkiskbach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the tecre- 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 85, JANUARY, 1912. 

Tab. 8412.— BEGONIA DICHROA. 
„ 8413.— ELLIOTTIA RACEMOSA. 
„ 8414.— BERBERIS WILSONAE. 
„ 8415.— DISA LUGENS. 
„ 8416.— CALCEOLARIA CANA. 

LonL t B«T,^L, D „ 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21, 



A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Series To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemsley. 

BOTANIOAL RLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is each n«*. n i 
over 3000. Three Stamps. ' LlSts of 

i _ 

NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.-IIL, 8.. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 
The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. TIIISELTON-DYER FES 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30, ; Sect. II., 27, Vol. V., 25, «. Vol . VII . § 27 ' s . 6d , Vol ym 

25,6(2. 
PubliM un d ,r «, .MoHiyj^ke Secretary „ f SMe ^ ^ ^ .^ 

NOW BBADT. Vol. v., Sect . ~ Part ~ ^ . ^ m 3j 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

SyStema " C DeSCI " PtU,n "LWfM the C - 6 C01 °°'. *«** 

Vols. 1. to III., 20s . eacn. 
By HARVEY and SONDEE. 
The Continuation edited by Sir W. T THISFTTnv nv,„ 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52, V ol . 1V „ S J C , ^ * ™ ^-DYER, E.R.S. 

Vol. VII., 33, - ?art L ' 9t ' Vol. VL, S*»- 

Published under the authoritv of *•>,» o 

L6TOL Bek* 4 Co . Z^T71fa^rt7stt«i Core ot r „ 
— - onu.ei,, covent uarden. 



WJTBWl : PJUSTKD BV WILLIAM GLO* 



RA1GVOKB STREET, S.K. 



No. 86. V 

VOL. VIII.— FEBRUARY. 

OK NO. 1500 0F 1HE EH TIKK WORK. 



Monthly, price 3s. Qd. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s. 



C U R T I S ' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 



EDITED BY 



D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Birettor, TRonal Botanic ffTarfiens, Ueto. 




" 'Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and white 
Nature's own sweet and cunning hand laid on." 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AN"D INDIAN GOVERNMENTS 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVE NT GARDEN. 

1912. 

[All rights reserved.'] 
{Entered at the New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 
CORAL AND ATOLLS, 

Their history, description, theories of their origin both before and since 
that of Darwin, the influence of winds, tides, and ocean currents on 
their formation and transformations, their present condition, products, 
fauna, and flora. 

By F. WOOD-JONES, B.Sc, F.Z.S. 

Numerous illustrations, plates and map. 24s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATIC^ OF THE BRITISH ISLES, 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., E.L.S. 

With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Wobthington G. Smith, F.L.S. 
Two Vols., 24 Coloured Plates, 36s. The Supplement separately, 12s. 



BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES AND USTILAGINE^l. 

By GEORGE MASSEE 

(Lecturer on Botany to the London Society for the Extension of University Teaching). 
Crown 8vo., with 8 Plates, 6s. 6d. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BURBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific 'Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BE XT HAM, F.R.S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 

Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Flora. 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9*. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN, 



6411 







°Lcn.dc 



Tar. 8417. 
STANHOPEA peruviana. 

Peru. 

Orchidaceak. Tribe Vandeae. 
Stanhopea, Frost; Bentli. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 549. 



Staixhopea peruviana, Rd/e; species e grege S. Wardii, Lodd., floribus 
minoribtis, petalis angustis, et labelli hypochilio valde abbreviate) Tel late 
oblongo lateribus obscure angulatis distincta. 

Herba; pseudobulbi ovoideo-oblongi, obscure angulati, 4-6 cm. longi, mono- 
phylli. Folia petiolata, late elliptica, subobtusa, margine subundulata; 
limbus 25-35 cm. longus, 12-14 cm. latus ; petiolus 0-7 cm. longus. Scapi 
penduli, circiter 25 cm. longi, vaginis ovato-oblongis subimbricatis vestiti, 
multiflori. Bracteae oblongae vel ovato-oblongae, subobtusae, valde con- 
cavae, 4-5 cm. longae. Pedicelli 5-6 cm. longi. Flores speciosi, aurei, 
labelli hypochilio lateribus atropurpureo-suffusis, epichilio punctulato, 
columna punctulata. Sepalum posticum oblongum, subobtusum, con- 
cavum, 4-5 cm. longum; sepala lateralia oblique et late ovata. obtusa, 
4 cm. longa. Petali lineari-oblonga, subacuta, revoluta, 3'5 cm. longa. 
Labellum circiter 4 cm. longum ; hypochiliiim subglobosum vel late 
oblongum, 2-5 cm. longum, 1-7 cm. latum, curvatum, lateribus carinatis, 
canali postice apcrta; mesochilii cornu falcato-lanceolato, acuto, 2 cm. 
longo ; epichilium orbiculari-ovatum, apice reflexum et apiculatum, circiter 
1*5 cm. longum. Columna incurva, late alata, 35 cm. longa, 1*5 cm. 
lata. — B. A. Eolfe. 



The handsome Stanhopea here figured was discovered in 
Peru by Mr. Forget when collecting on behalf of Messrs. 
Sander & Sons, St. Albans, to whom Kew is indebted for 
the plant which forms the basis of our plate. _ This plant 
was presented by them to the Kew collection in 1909, the 
year of its first importation. It has thriven well in the 
Cattleya House and flowered for the first time in January, 
1910. It is allied to the Mexican S. Wardii, Lodd., but has 
smaller flowers with narrower petals, while the hvpochile of 
the lip differs materially in shape and is not distinctly 
angled at the base. It may also be compared with 
S. Shuttleivorthii, Reichb. f„, but that species again has 
larger flowers, while the hvpochile of the lip is broadly 
expanded at the base. S. peruviana is remarkable for the 
unusual width and almost board-like firmness of its dark- 
green, plicate leaves. As in most other species of the 
genus the flowers, which in S. peruviana are very fragrant, 
last for only a few days. 

FxBBUARTj 1912. 



Descbiption.— Herb; pseudobulbs ovoid-oblong, obscurely 
angled, 1A-2J in. long. Leaves solitary to a pseudobulb, 
petioled, broadly elliptic, somewhat obtuse, margin slightly 
undulate ; blade 10-14 in. long, 5-6± in. across ; petiole 
about 2J m. long. Scapes pendulous, many-flowered, about 
2 i? lr t ] ° ng ' clothed with ov ate-oblong slightly imbricate 
sheaths. Bracts oblong or ovate-oblong, somewhat obtuse 
very concave, up to 2 in. long. Pedicels about 2 in long' 
Floivers showy, golden-yellow, the hypochile of the lip 
sutfused at the sides with dark purple, the epichile of the 
lip and the column spotted with dark rrarple. Sepals: 
posterior oblong, rather obtuse, concave," up to 2 in. in 
length; lateral obliquely and broadly ovate, obtuse, If in. 
Jong. Petals linear-oblong, subacute, revolute, 1| in. long 
Lip about If in. long; hypochile sub-globose or wide 
oblong, 1 m. long, § in. across, curved, the sides keeled, 
the channel open behind ; horn of the mesochile falcate- 
lanceolate, acute f in. long; epichile orbicular-ovate, 
renexed and apiculate at the tip, about £ in. long. Column 
incurved, broadly winged, \\ in. long, £ in. across. 



Fig. 1, lip; 2 horns of the mesochile and the epichile; 3, column • 4 and 5 
polhnanum seen from in front and from behind ; 6 sketch of an entire plant _ 
all enlaraed cmn/ (\ -,nU,.L .*. -»-.^i — j.—j ll puim. 



all enlarged except 6, which is much reduced. 



8418 




VincentBroo]'.: 



LReev.- 



Tab. 8418. 
STRANVAESIA undulata. 

China. 

Kosaceae. Tribe Pomeae. 
Stbanvaesia, Lindl. ; Bentli. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 605. 



Stranvaesia undulata, Decne in Nouv. Arch. Mu*. Paris, vol. x. p. 178 ; 
Schneid. Handb. d. Laubhohk. vol. i. p. 713 ; affinis S. Nussia, Schneid. 
(Pyrus Nussia, Ham. ex Hon; S. glaucescens, Lindl.), sed foliis semper 
integerrimis, corymbis minoribus minus floribundis, receptaculis sub 
anthesi nunquam albo-lanato-toinentosis distincta. 

Frutex vel arbor in patria ad 9 m. alta, ramulis adprcsse hirtis vetustis cortice 
plumbeo vel cinereo tectis. Folia lanceolata vel oblanceolata, in eadem 
planta valde variabilia, basi acuta vel subacuta, rarius obtnsiiiscula, 
apice acuta, breviter acute acuminata vel interdum obtusiuscula, inte- 
gerrima, 3 ■ 5-10 cm. longa, 1* 5-8*5 cm. lata, coriacea, viridia, infra 
pillidiora et plerumque ab initio glaberrima, supra in costa et ad margines 
primo pubescentia, saepe quasi lineis arpenteis notata, deinde magis 
minusve glabrescentia, nervis utrinque 7-12; petioli 10-15 mm. longi, 
supra canaliculati et magis minusve— interdum dense — hirto-pubescentes ; 
stipulae subulatae, 6-11 mm. longae, sub anthesi persistentes. Corymbi 
interne saepe foliati, majores ad 5 cm. alti et 5-6 cm. diametro, densi vel 
laxiusculi, ramis pedicellisque mstgis minusve adpresse liirtis, rarissimo 
fere glabris, lu'sce demum elongatis, ad 6 mm. longis. heceptacvlum ?emi- 
globoso-turbinatum, sub anthesi 2 mm. altnm, laxe vel parce pubescens et 
superne plerumqne plabrum. Sepala triangularia, paulo ultra 1 mm. 
longa, minute ciliolata. Petala alba, orbicularis 3-4 mm. diametro, 
cito decidua. Stamina circiter 20, antberis rubris. Ovarium vertico 
tomentosum ; stylus ad 4 mm. longus ; stigmata eapitata. Fructus 
aurantiaci, subdepresso-globosi, 6-7 mm. diametro. — 0. Stavf. 



Tlie Stranvaesia which is here depicted, owing to the 
fleeting nature of its blossoms, for the petals fall as a rule 
in one or two days, does not possess much value as a 
flowering shrub. But as an ornamental-fruited evergreen 
it is exceedingly attractive, and as it is particularly hardy it 
is expected that in places with a cold winter climate, such as 
New England or Eastern Canada, it may make an efficient 
substitute on walls for the Pyracanth so much employed in 
this manner in Europe. The form here figured was intro- 
duced about 1000 by Mr. E. H. Wilson for Messrs. Veitch 
& Sons, from whom the plant was purchased. In England 
Febbuakv, 1912. 



it can be grown as a shrub, and thrives well in loamy soil in 
a sunny situation. It can be increased either by cuttings 
or by seeds. S. undulata, to which our form is here referred 
by Dr. Stapf, is taken in the sense proposed by Schneider, 
and includes S. Davidiana, Decne, which in turn appears 
identical with S. Ilenryi, Diels. The characters which dis- 
tinguish these Stranvaesias are somewhat slight. Though 
our numerous Chinese specimens can be assorted into two 
groups which approximately correspond to the *S. undulata 
and S. Davidiana of Decaisne, these groups pass into each 
other. The plant figured is one of these intermediate forms, 
because its leaves are those of S. undulata as originally under- 
stood, while the inflorescences point to its being S. Davidiana. 
iS. mtegrifolia, Stapf, from Kinabalu in Borneo, mainly differs 
from this Chinese species in having leaves with a smaller 
number of rather more prominent nerves. 

Description-. — Shrub or tree, reaching 30 ft. in height in 
Central China ; twigs adpressed hairy ; bark ultimately 
dark bluish-grey. Leaves lanceolate or oblanceolate, most 
variable on the same individual, acute or shortly sharply 
acuminate or even almost blunt, base wide or narrow 
acute, margin quite entire, 1^-4 in. long, f-l£ in. across, 
coriaceous, green, paler and usually quite glabrous beneath, 
at first pubescent on the midrib and margins above, often 
marked as with silvery lines; nerves 7-12 on each side; 
petioles 5-8 lin. long, usually more or less hairy ; stipules 
subulate, 3-5 lin. long, more or less persistent till flowering 
is past. Corymb* often leafy below, the larger 2 in. long 
and rather more across, dense or rather open, "their rachises 
and pedicels more or less adpressed hairy, or occasionally 
almost glabrous ; pedicels ultimately elongating, 3 lin. long. 
Juceptaele hemispherical-turbinate, in flower 1 lin. deep, 
laxly and sparingly pubescent below, usually glabrous 
upwards. Sepals triangular, very short, minutely ciliolate. 
Petals white, orbicular, about 2 lin. across, soon falling. 
Stamens about 20, anthers red. Ovary tomentose above ; 
style about 2 lin. long; stigmas capitate. Fruit orange, 
somewhat depressed-globose, 3-4 lin. in diameter. 

Pier. 1, hud; 2, a flower in vertical section, the petals removed: 3 and 4, 
gtamtrns; 5, pyrene: — all mlargtd. 



84 W 




i 



Tab. 8419. 

LEPTOSPERMUM sooparium, var. Njchollit. 

New Zealand. 



Myrtaceae. Tribe Leptospermeae. 
Leptospermum, Forst.; Benth. et Hook./. Oen. Plant, vol. i. p. 703. 



Leptospermum scoparium, Forst. Char. Gen. p. 48, var. TSlchollii ; a forma 
typica floribus carmineis solum differt. 

Frutex ad 3-5 m. altus. ramosissimus, rami's divaricates primum sericeis cito 
glabreeceritibus. Folia alterna, lanceolata, 8 mm. longa, 2 mm. lata, 
mucrona*a, breviter petiolata, rigida, obscure trinervia, punctata, viridia 
vel cuprea, juniores sparse pubescpntia. Floret ad apices ramoruai 
breviornm lateraliom solitarii, circiter 1*8 cm. diametro. Bereptaemlum 
cimpanulatum, glabrum, minute punctatum. SepcUa 5, ovata, obtusa, 
glabra, colorata. Fetala 5, patentia, carmine*. Stamina circiter SO, 
uniseriata, filamentis 2 mm. longis snbnlatis carmineis, antberis 0"5 mm. 
longis versatilibus longitudinaliter dehiscentibus. Ovarium inferum, 
snperne convexum, 5-lobatum, 5-loculare; stylus 2 mm. longus stigmate 
terminali capitato. Ovula in quoqne loculo nnmeroea, linearia, horizon- 
talia.— L. NirlolUi, Dorrien-Smith in Gard.Chron. 11)08, vol. xliii. p. 3U8 — ■ 

W. B. TCRRILL. 

For the introduction of the interesting Leptospermum 
now figured European gardens are indebted to Captain 
A. A. Dorrien-Smith, by whom it was brought to England 
from New Zealand in 1908. In the Gardeners' Chronicle 
for that year Captain Dorrien-Smith informs us that in 
New Zealand this plant is termed L. Nichollti, a name 
previously unknown in this country. It is stated that the 
plant was first found growing on sandhills to the north 
of Christchurch, and is believed in New Zealand to have 
originated as a seedling from a white-flowered plant 
discovered some years earlier in South Island, known there 
as L. Chapmann, another name previously unknown in 
English collections. It is further said that the flowers 
of plants raised from seeds of this L. Chapmanii vary 
from bright rose to white, while their foliage varies from 
green to the colour of the leaves of the Copper Beech, 
L. Nichollu being one of the forms in which the leaves are 
of this latter colour. So far as this character is concerned 
it is found at Kew that the foliage is copper-coloured only in 
plants grown in the open ; those grown under glass have the 

February, 1912. 



leaves green as shown in our illustration. The information 
available suggests that both L. Chapmanii and L. Nichollii 
may be no more than seedling forms of L. scoparium, a some- 
what variable species widely distributed in Australia and 
New Zealand. In New Zealand botanical literature alone 
we find abundant testimony as to this variability; four 
distinguishable forms are recognised in Mr. Cheeseman's 
" Manual," three of which were first described in Sir J. D. 
Hooker's " Handbook," the fourth in Dr. Kirk's " Students' 
Flora." In this Magazine yet another variety, with pink 
flowers, has been described at t. 3419 as var. grandiflora ; 
in the absence of more definite testimony it seems best 
for the moment to accord our plant similar treatment, as 
yar. Nichollii, differing from the white-flowered type only 
in the brilliant carmine colour of the sepals, petals and 
filaments. Whatever its origin and status may be, L. 
scoparium, var. Nichollii, is a valuable addition to our 
gardens. It should command general favour since it is as 
hardy as L. scoparium itself, which is a common shrub in the 
open in the warmer parts of the United Kingdom and is 
hardy against a south wall at Kew. This variety is readily 
propagated from cuttings, and plants so raised flower when 
about a year old. The flowers open, in plants grown under 
glass, in April and last about six weeks. 

Description— Shrub reaching 10-18 ft in height, much 
branched ; branches divaricate, at first silky, soon almost 
glabrous. Leaves alternate, lanceolate, 4 lin. long, 1 lin. 
across, mucronate, short petioled, rigid, faintly 3-nerved,' 
punctate, green or copper-coloured, sparingly pubescent 
when young. Flowers solitary at the tips of rather short 
lateral twigs, about | in. across. Receptacle campanulate, 
glabrous, finely punctate. Sepals 5, ovate, obtuse, glabrous, 
coloured. Petals 5, spreading, carmine. Stamens about 30, 
1-senate; filaments 1 lin. long, subulate, carmine; anthers 
very short, versatile, opening longitudinally. Ovary in- 
ferior, convex above, 5-lobed and 5-celled ; style 1 lin 
long; stigma terminal capitate. Ovules many in each cell 
linear, horizontal. 

JfS&Sr" 1 % bUdi ^ aflowcr ^ llp P ct ^^noved; 4 and 5, stamens :- 



Afl 



8420 




M..S 






"VnicenLB 






Tab. 8420. 
olearia chathamica. 

Chatham Islands. 

Compositae. Tribe A bteroideae. 
Oleabia, Moench. ; Benth. et Book.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 276. 



Olearia chathamiea, T. Kirk in Trans. New Zeal. Inst. vol. xxiii. p. 444 ; Kirk, 
Students' Flora, p. 264; Cheeseman, M<i». New Zeal. Flora, p. 280; Dorrien- 
Smith in Journ. Hoy. Hort. Soc. vol. xxxvii. p. 61 ; affinis 0. operinae, Honk, f., 
sed foliis latioribus pedunculis longioribus bracteisque paucis foliaceis 
ditfert. 

Frutex robustus, 1-2 m. altus ; rami robusti, longitudinaliter sulcati, molliter 
albido-tomentosi. Folia alterna, oblanceolata vel oblongo-lanceolata, 
subacuta vel breviter acuminata, basi in petiolum brevem latum attenuata, 
6-12 cm. longa, l - 5-3'5 cm. lata, cras«a, rigide coriacea, serrata, dentibus 
obtusis callosis, supra glabra, reticulata, viridia, subtus dense-albido- 
latiata, nervis laterabbus utrinque 2-3 supra imprests subtus leviter 
elevatis. VapiMa pedunculata, 5-6 cm. diametro, pedunculo lanato 
bracteis foliaceis instructo Invducri bracteae lineares vel ohlaneeolato- 
lineares, acutae vel subacutae, ad 1 cm. longae, scariosae, extra superne 
lanatae, intus glabrae. Flores radii numerosi, pallido-violacei. Corollae 
tubus 4 mm. longus, parce puberalus ; limbus oblongo-linearis, subacutus, 
circiter 1*5 cm. longus, 3-4 mm. latus, integer, glaber. Flores disci 
purpurei. Corollae tubus cylindricus, superne dilatatus, 4 mm. longus; 
lobi lanceolati, subacuti. Avtherae 2 mm. longae. Stylus glaber; rami 
subacuti, 1*5 mm. longi. Achaenia basi attenuata, sulcata, 0"5 cm. longa, 
puberula. Fajipus unistriatus, setosus ; setae inaequales, ad 4 mm. longae. — 
0. operina, Hook. f. Handb. New Zeal. Flora, p. 731, partim. 0. angusti- 
folia, var., Buchanan in Trans. New Zeal. lust. vol. \ii. p. 336, t. 15. — 
J. Hutchinson. 



The handsome Olearia which forms the subject of our 
illustration is confined to the Chatham Islands, east of New- 
Zealand, where, according to Captain Dorrien-Smith, who 
has given an account of the plant in the passage quoted 
above, it grows in compact masses on the cliff edges or 
scattered about among the upland bogs in association with 
O. semidentata, Decne, a species which, according to 
Dorrien-Smith, is even finer than 0. chathamiea. In its 
native habitat the plant is in flower during the months 
from November till February, each plant blooming for a 
prolonged period. Both Mr. Cheeseman and Captain 
Dorrien-Smith state that the ray-florets may at times be 
white ; the disk-florets are violet-purple. _ The nearest 
ally of the species in the genus Olearia is 0. operina, 
Febuuary, 1912. 



Hook, f., a native of New Zealand, from which our plant 
may be most readily distinguished by its broader leaves, 
and by its longer peduncles with fewer and more leafy 
bracts. For the material on which our figure is ba^ed we 
are indebted to the kindness of the Rev. A. T. Roscawen, in 
whose garden at Ludgvan Rectory, near Marazion, a plant 
imported by Captain Dorrien-Smith in 1008 flowered in 
June, 1911. The species, Mr. Boscawen informs us, has so 
far proved quite hardy at Ludgvan. It prefers a position 
sheltered from the mid-day sun, and seems to thrive best in 
a mixture of bog-earth, leaf-mould and grit. It is easily 
propagated by means of cuttings, which readily strike in the 
open without any protection. 

Descriptiox.— Shrub, 3-7 ft. high ; stems stout, branches 
stout, sulcate, softly white-tomentose. Leaves alternate, 
oblanceolate or oblong-lanceolate, subacute or shortly. 
acuminate, narrowed below to a short broad petiole, 
2J-5 in. long, |-1J in. wide, thick, firmly leathery, serrate 
with blunt thickened teeth, glabrous, reticulate and green 
above, densely white-woolly beneath, main nerves 2-3 on 
each side of the midrib and like it impressed above, 
slightly raised beneath. Heads peduncled, 2-2£ in. wide ; 
peduncle woolly with a few leafy bracts. Bracts of the 
involucre linear or oblanceolate-linear, acute or sub- 
acute, 4-5 lin. long, scarious, woolly towards the apex 
outside, glabrous within. Ray-florets many, usually pale 
violet-purple, occasionally in wild plants white ; corolla- 
tube 2 lin. long, sparingly puberulous, limb oblong-linear, 
subacute, 7-8 lin. long, about 2 lin. wide, entire, glabrous. 
Disk-florets violet-purple ; corolla-tube cylindric, dilated 
upwards, 2 lin. long ; lobes lanceolate, subacute. Anthers 
1 lin. long. Style glabrous ; its arms subacute, under 1 Jin. 
long. Fruit narrowed to the base, sulcate, 2}> lin. long, 
puberulous. Pappus 1-seriate, setose; setae unequal, the 
longest 2 lin. long. 



Fte 1, bract of the involucre ; 2, part of a ray-floret ; 3, setae of the pappus : 
4, du>k-iioret ; o, anther; 6 style-bi audits :— all enlarged. 



842J 










Vincent Brooks, Day SoSofiLfJinij 



Tab. 8421. 

CRASSULA Barklyl 

South Africa. 



Crassulackak. 
Crassula, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. G57. 



Crassula Barklyi, N. E. Brown in Ken: Bulletin, 1906, p. 19; affinis C. 
columnar*, Linn. f.,sed minor et foliis tennioribus ciliatis suberectis differt. 

Ilerla succulcnta. Caulis 2 -5-5 cm. altus, simplex vel basi raraosus, cum foliis 
basi 1-2-1-8 cm. crassns, snperue leviter attenuatus, obtuse tetragonus. 
Foha opposita, decussata, arete imbricata. suberecta, basi connata, trans- 
verse elliptico-oblonga vel late lunata, obtusissima, dorso convexa, c'arnosa, 
margimbus acutis ciliolata, brunnea, punctata, inferior* Oo-O-G cm. 
tonga, 1-2-1-3 cm. lata, superiora gradatim minora. Flores terminales, 
dense capitati, subsessiles. Sepala lineciri-spathulata, obtusa, glabra, 
mmute ciliata, 3 mm. longa. Corolla gamopetala, profnnde 5-loba, glabra, 
alba (rubro-tincta ?) ; tubus 2-2-5 mm. longus; lobi 6-7 mm. longi, 
lineares, obtusi, apice recurvo-patuli. Stamina 5, inclusa, ore tubi 
inserta; filamenta 1 mm. longa; antlierae 1 mm. Longae, oblongae. 
Squamae hypogyna* 1 mm. longae, erectae, lineari-oaneatae, trnhcatae vel 
emarginatae, canalieulatae. (Jarpdla 5, basi connata, erecta, stricta, 
subteretia, superne vix angustata.— N. E. Brown. 



The somewhat peculiar Crassula here figured was origin- 
ally discovered in Little Namaqualand by the late Sir 
Henry Barkly, who communicated it to Kew in 1875. The 
plants here figured were received at Kew from Professor 
H. H. W. Pearson, of Cape Town, in January, 1911 ; they 
formed part of* a collection made during the Percy Sladen 
Expedition, and were found by Mr. Pillans, a member of 
the party, on a ridge four miles to the south-east of 
Bakhuis. Grown in a house devoted to succulent plants, 
these specimens flowered in March, 1911. While under 
these conditions the flowers produced have been white, there 
is reason to think that when fully exposed to sun and air 
in their native habitat the petals assume a reddish tinge. 
The sterns too, as compared with those of the specimens 
collected by Barkly, are unusually long ; the original ones 
are only 1-1| inches high. Like oilier species of Crassula 
with a compact pyramidal habit, (J. Barklyi is of slow 
growth and is prone, after flowering, to lose its vigour. 
The requirements of this and its nearer allies are best met 
February, 1912. 



by supplying dry tropical conditions and a sandy soil. Of 
these allies the most nearly related appears to be C. colum- 
naris, Linn, f., from which, however, C. Barklyi is readily 
distinguished by the characters mentioned by Mr. Brown. 

^ Description. — Herb, succulent ; stem 1-2 in. in height, 
simple or branching at the base, including the leaves 
4~| in. thick at the base, slightly narrowing upwards and 
bluntly 4-angled throughout. Leaves opposite, decussate, 
closely imbricate, almost erect, connate at the base, the 
lower 2-3 lin. long, 6-7 lin. wide, gradually diminishing 
upwards. Flowers terminal, densely capitate, nearly sessile. 
Sepals linear-spathulate, obtuse, with finely ciliate margins 
but elsewhere glabrous. Corolla gamopetalous, deeply 
5-lobed, glabrous, in cultivated specimens white ; tube 
about 1 lin. long; lobes 3 lin. long or longer, linear, 
obtuse, with recurved spreading tips. Stamens 5, included', 
attached to the mouth of the tube ; filaments and oblong 
anthers both very short. Hypogynous scales very short, 
erect, linear-cuneate, truncate or emarginate, channelled. 
Carpels 5, connate below, erect, strict, almost terete, hardly 
narrowed upwards. 

Fig. 1, a pair of leaves ; % a flower; 3 and 4, stamens; 5, carpels and hypo- 
gynous scales ; b, a single hjpogynous scale :— all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of BeginnerB and AmateurB. By George Bkntham, 
F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo,9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnrean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L. S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New 
Edition, entirelv revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley", M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 1 2s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Currey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^E. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookkk, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bkntham, F.R.S. , F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.lt.S. Complete in 7 Yols., £7 4s. Published under th" 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 
FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Katal. By W. H. Harvky and 
O. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thisei/ton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. 
I.— III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., 
Parts I. & II., 9s. each. Part III., 8s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 

20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. Bd. 

Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— III., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIIL, 25s. 6d. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Maequarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker, C.B., before th© British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

L0VELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Coveut Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 86, FEBRUARY, 1912. 



Tab. 8417.— STANHOPEA PERUVIANA. 
„ 8418.— STRANVAESIA UNDULATA. 
„ 8419.-LEPTOSPERMUM SCOPARIUM, var. NICHOLLII. 
„ 8420.— OLEARIA CHATHAMICA. 
„ 8421.— CRASSULA BARKLYI. 
Lotell Bekvk & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemsley. 



BOTANICAL RLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. Qd. and Is. each Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 



NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— Ill 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 
The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER F R S 
Vol. IV., Sect. 1., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6d. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol VIII 

25s. 6d. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., Part IL, 9s. each ; Part III 8s 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of ttePta* of the Cape Colony, Catfraria, 

Vols. I. to in., 20s. each. 

By HARVEY and SONDER. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER F R S 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 88.. Vol. IV., Sect. U., 2 4, Vol . y., Part L> ^ ^ ^ ^ 

PUbll8hed Und " the M Z£^~* « *« — «ood Hope, 
Lovell Reeve & Co. LtDm g, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



: PRIKTSD BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND - . ,„ ^T STAM^ST^"^ 



dfourtf) J?m'e£. 

No. 87/ 



VOL. VIII.— MABCH. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s. 



OB No, 2501 OF THK EI,TIK E WOEK. 

C D R T I S ' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE ' 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Sirmor, Boijal Botanic ffiarncns, "Kcto. 




Ek^VV*** VCr 



" Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and white 
Nature's own sweet and cunning hand laid on.' 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN* GOVERNMENTS. 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVE NT GARDEN. 

1912. 

[All rights reserved.] 
{Entered at the New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



CORAL AND ATOLLS, 

Their history, description, theories of their origin both before and since 
that of Darwin, the influence of winds, tides, and ocean currents on 
their formation and transformations, their present condition, products, 
fauna, and flora. 

By F. WOOD-JONES, B.Sc, .F.Z.S. 
Numerous illustrations, plates and map. 2is. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 

THE HEPATICiE OP THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 
2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 

With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Wohthington G. Smith, F.L.S. 

Two Vols., 24 Coloured Plates, 36s. The Supplement separately, 12s. 

BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES AND USTILAGINE JE. 

By GEORGE MASSEE 

(Lecturer on Botany to the London Society for the Extension of University Teaching). 
Crown 8vo., with 8 Plates, 6s. 6d. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BURBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.E.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

Br GEORGE BE NTH AM, F. R. S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9*. 

ILLUSTBATIONS OF THE BEITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 

Drawn by W.H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Flora. 

7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, b*. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



84ZZ 







VuicentBro oj \ 



Tab. 8422. 
BRUNFELSIA undulata. 

West Indies. 

Solanaceae. Tribe Salpiglossidae. 
Brunfelsia, Sw. ; Benth. et Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 911. 



Brunfelsia undulata, Sw. Prodr. Veg. Ind. Occ. p. 90 et Fl Ind. Occ. vol. ii. 
p. 1035; Hot. Peg. t. 228; Benth. in DC. Prodr. vol. x. p. 200, partim; 
Urban, Sijmb. Antill. vol. iii. p. 374; species B. americanae, Linn., affinis, 
corollae lobis undulatis fructuque subclrupaceo differt. 

FruUx vel arbor parva, usque ad 6 m. alta : oralis debilis. Folia ovato- 
lanceolate, utrmque attenuate, subacute, integerrima, 6-18 cm. longa, 
2-4"5 cm. lata, glabra; venae tenues, dense reticulatae; petiolus 6 mm. 
longus. Flores solitares, terminales vel in axillis foliorum summorum 
dispositi, breviter pedunculati. Calyx 2 cm. longus, breviter irregulari- 
terque lobatus, extra glanduloso-pubescens ; lobi obtusi. Corolla alba (an 
semper?); tubus cylindricus, leviter curvatus, 8-9 cm. longus, 5 mm. 
diametro, extra pubescens; limbus patens, 6-7 cm. diametro; lobi 5, 
rotundati, 2-5 cm. lati, marginibus undulatis. Stamina corollae fcntw 
aequilonga. Ovarium oblongum, calyce dimidio brevius ; stylus cylindri- 
cus, e corollae tubo paullo exsertus; stigma bilobum. Fructm subdru- 
paceus— B. nitida, var. jamaicensis, Benth. in DC. Prodr. vol. x. p. 201. 
B. Jamaicensis, Grisob. Fl. Brit. W. Ind. p. 432, partim. 



The Brunfelsia which forms the subject of our illustration 
was first introduced to this country from Jamaica about a 
century ago, but the plant which supplied the material for 
the present figure is one obtained in 1904 for the Kew 
collection from Messrs. J. Yeitch & Sons. This plant 
flowered at Kew in October, 1909. It is a vigorous shrub 
of upright habit and, as the plate shows, bore numerous 
flowers in the axils of the uppermost leaves so as to form 
large clusters at the ends of the branches. In wild speci- 
mens, however, it is usual to find but one terminal flower. 
This species belongs to that section of the genus wherein 
the corolla tube is many times longer than the calyx. 
>\ ithin this section the various species are difficult to 
discriminate. In one of them, B. nitida, Benth., the calyx 
is divided nearly to the base ; this character is also exhibited 
by the plant which was figured in the Botanical Register, 
at t. 167, under the erroneous name B. undulata. In 
B. americana, Sw., however, and in the true B. undulata, 
Mabch, 1912. 



bw., which is here depicted, the calyx is cup-shaped and 
has very short obtuse lobes. While, however, the two are 
c osely allied, B. americana can be readily recognised by its 
obtuse leaves, whereas tbose of our plant taper to both ends 
Jt is a matter for observation as to whether the colour of 
the corolla varies in this species, because in LoddiW 
Botanical Cabinet, at t. 388, and in Keichenbach's Flora 
Exotica , at t 294 are given figures, under the name 
IS. undulata, of a plant with a yellowish corolla. Under 
cultivation B undulata thrives in a warm house when planted 
m loamy soil and liberally watered. It ought to prove a 
useful shrub in tropical gardens, for it appears to thrive in 
the open even m the south of Europe, and plants have been 
raised atKew from seeds which ripened in 1888 in the 
Botanic Garden at Palermo. There is reason to believe 
that it is represented in various private collections in this 
country, sometimes under the erroneous name of Portland™ 
gmndiflora Linn., also a West Indian plant which is how- 
ever, readily distinguished, without taking into account 
other characters, by the fact that its leaves are opposite. 

Description-^™/,, or, in a wild state, a small tree 
reaching 20 ft in height, with a comparatively slender stem 
Leaves ovate-lanceolate, narrowed to both ends, subacute,' 
quite entire, 2£-7 m. long, f-lf in. wide, glabrous; nerves 
slender, close y reticulate; petiole J in. long. Flower, 
usua ly m wild plants solitary, terminal ; often in cultivated 
plants several in the upper axils forming terminal clusters ; 
peduncles very short. Calyx % in. W^hortty irregularly' 
obed, glandular pubescent externally ; lobes obtuse. Corolla 
I\\Zu\ T5 Te fli ?' ^ y* U ™'^ ! tube cylindric, 
Snallv I^h H ? hn X •* in * in diameter ' P*« besc ^ 
1^ J / '1 b S P rea . dm 8> 2 i ln - across; lobes 5,rounded, 
coroll^l' n marg if undu]ate - Stamens as long as the 
corolla tube Ovary oblong, half as long as the calyx ; style 

fi£2J*^ exserted; sti * ma 2 lobed - *& K 

Fig. 1, calyx, in vertical section, and pistil; 2 and 3, stamens -.-all enlarged. 



84-23 




J.N."P] 



''.ntBraoks^ 



L.Reeve AC°r, rt -n^, 



, Tab. 8423. 
SYRINGA Julianae. 
China. 

Oleaceae. Tribe Sveingeae. 
Syuinga, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant vol. ii. p. 675. 



Syringa Julianae, C. Schneider in 111. TTandh. Laubholzk. vol ii p 777 ficy 
tfimZiM' ^ ? BU1 » 1912 ' P - 37; affinis & P^scentis,' Turcz.,' sed 

fit' f° -S U ? minonbu8 * atlthe ™ paulo sub faucem corollae insertis, 
Iructibus ut videtur non verrucosis. ' 

^tatif™lt r rlf Ve fenseque ramose, ramulis annotinis hornotinisque 
utr Z ZZ lhU ? deUlde g,abr 1 ]S ^scentibus. Folia ovato-elliptica, 
kfXn; n^ gG T ma ' VU ' ld,a ' breve P^escentia, subtus pallidiora 
!if! ? • r P o ae - C ' pUe ad Dervos P ub escentia, 2-5-1-3 cm. longa, 1-2-3 cm 
mrvae P ad fi ;° m m r- l0ngb VUl ^ UlL *&»*»" terming, cymo^ 
Km albo vioH^i fi n f e ' ra r hS t* P 6 ^ 61118 brevissimis subhirsutis 
caducis suff, ?tf h i 7 m ™\ l0Ug1 ' betels linearibus calyce brevioribus 

The interesting Lilac here figured is a Chinese species 
nearly allied to the well-known Syringa pubescent, Turcz , a 
native of northern China and south-eastern Mongolia. The 
two together form the group recognised by Dr! Schneider 
as i the Pubescentes, which belongs to the section Vulgares 
wherein are included such familiarly known garden shrubs 
as S. vulgaris W 5. oMata, Lindl, 5. persica^hum., and 8. 
«*«■»■« , Willd. The species now described by Dr. Schneider 
as 6. Julianae is one that was raised by Messrs. J. Veitch 
frnmW 11 ! e ™ rsei T at Coombe Wood from seeds sent 

Plant wlXr ° r ,n f fc Mr ' R R Wilson in 1901 « The 
from M SU P )he * the material for 0llr V^e was obtained 
Ornot?T' + yeitch !? 190n utlder the n ame & ? „ 7 ^ 
nrov rW K e £ L ? ,, 2 Mled descri P ti « n of S. villosa originally 

J^A V SL?^ llas bee v orae , d , ubiet ^ as to th ° 

has h™J» P , V. . examination of his type specimen 
t MMrfX> estal J lls, > ed f'e fact that the plant figured at 
5 *« i,™' "f & BnMmUM, Lemoine/is really 
»Vf?? , J ,M ' and that tl» Lilac figured at t 7064 under 



March, 1012. 



S. villosa is really S. pubescens, Turcz., the nearest ally of 
our plant. S. Julianae is, however, very distinct from 

5. pubescens in its villous leaves, brancblets and inflo- 
rescence ; S. velutina, Komarov, which also resembles our 
plant, is readily distinguished by its different calyx. 

6. Julianae as grown at Kew is at present a small shrub 
3 to 4 feet in height, bushy and virgately branched ; it 
promises to attain a considerably larger size. It flowers in 
late May and in June, and although it is not likely to 
become a rival in gardens of the fine Lilacs now in cultiva- 
tion, it is worth a place as a pretty and unusual type of 
the genus Syringa. The blossoms have the characteristic 
fragrance of the Common Lilac, but are strikingly distinct 
from those of other cultivated species in the deep purplish 
lilac colour of the corolla-tube outside as contrasted with 
the nearly white corolla-segments inside, and in the purple 
peduncle and pedicels. The glabrous calyx is purplish- 
violet. The species should be grown in rich, moist, loamy 
soil, and can be propagated by cuttings of moderately firm 
young wood placed in gentle heat in July. 

Description.— Shrub, 3-4 ft. high or higher, shortly 
and densely branched, twigs of the present and of last 
season's growth rather pubescent, at length becoming 
glabrous and blackish. Leaves ovate-elliptic, acute and 
cuneate, quite entire, green, shortly pubescent, beneath 
rather pale and rather markedly pubescent especially on 
the nerves, 1— If in. long,J-l in. wide; petioles under \ in. 
long, puberulous. Inflorescences terminal, cymose, small, 
rather more than 2 in. in length, branches and pedicels 
very short, slightly hairy. Flowers white and lilac-purple, 
3-4 hn. long ; bracts linear, shorter than the calyx, 
caducous. Calyx violet, glabrous; teeth rather distinct, 
wide-tnangular, acute. Anthers violet, inserted a little 
below the corolla-throat. Fruit not known ripe, when 
young not verrucosa 



Fig. 1, portion of the ed<:e of a leaf; 2, flower; 3, corolla, laid open; 4 and 5, 
anthers; 0, instil:— all enlarged. 



84-Z4 




.cULJ.N.Fit ■ 



^/mcentB-rook: 



L.R^evc &C° London.. 



Tab. 8424. 
DOMBEYA calaxtha. 
British Central Africa. 



Sterculiaceae. Tribe Dombeyeae. 
Dombeya, Cav.; Berth, et Book./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 221. 



Dombeya calantha, K. Schum. in Engl Monogr. Afr Pfl vol v 1100 n 98 • 
species eymis longipedoncnktfe instar corymborum, flaribus i'is j£fr£ 
mosclmtae^mn eimilibus, ovarii loculis intus dense stellato-pilosis 6-8- 

ovulatis distmcta. " ' 

Planta erecta, fruticosa, 5-5 m. alta. Caulis subsimplex, 2 em diametro 
branneo-velutanus, interne cicatricibus foliorum couspicuis notatus Sa m i 
laterales pauci breves,_ folia minuscula indivisa et tricuapidata eerentea 
Folta triloba vel subquinqueloba lol-is acute acuminatis, lobo medio quam 
ceteris majore, obis extenoribus minimis circiter 30 cm. diametro, marine 
dentibus apiculatis grossius* ulc serrata, basi profunda cordata V-nervia 
supra asperule steHato-pubascentia nervis prominulis venis 'impressis' 
subtus dense pubescentia vel tomentosa nervis et venis promineSibus • 
petioli orator 22 cm. longi, breviter dense hirsuti. Stipulae liS 
Ilinceotatoe, 1-8 cm. longae. Cymae instar corymborum, circiter 15-florae 
ex dicbasio simplice ramis cincinnalibus constantes. Pedunculm 15-ly cm' 
longus, ut pedicelli molliter pilosus; pedicelli 2-5-3 cm. longi. Brncteolae 
flores singu os mvolucrantes deciduae, ovato-laneeolatae, eaudato-acumi- 
natae, 1 o-2 cm. longae 3 ■ 5-5 ■ 5 mm. latae, stellato-pubescentes. Calvcu 
segmenta primum patula, demum reflexa, laneiolata, acuta 1- (3-1 -7 cm 
longa, o-5-5 mm. lata, extra molliter Btellato-pilosa, basi le'viter eonnata. 
t orolla rosea, circiter 3-5 cm. diametro; petala late oblique obovata, leviter 
letusa vel subtruncata, 1;8-H cm. longa, 1-5-1-7 cm. lata, tenuia. 
Statmna 15, cum stammodus interne monadelplia, in triades staininodiis 
singulis alternates disposita; tubus staminalis albus, circiter 4 mm 
longus; stamina lateralia triadum medio tongiora; filamenta 6-8 mm' 
longa, sursum leviler angustata; anthe.ae oblongae, 4-4-5 mm longae'- 
stamina media tilamentis 4 mm. longis, antheris 3-5-4 mm. Wis' 
Siamtnodta 5, snbspathulata, 1-6-1-7 cm. longa, apicem versus roseo- 
tincta ; pars superior lmeari-lanceolata, subacuta. 1-3 mm. lata. Ovarium 
subglobosnm, vix 6 mm. diametro, breviter albido-velutinum, 5-locuIare; 
Joculi b-8-ovulati, intus pariete externo dense stellato-pilosi septis glabris; 
ovuia elhpsoidea, vix 1 mm. longa; columna stylaris circiter 1 cm. longa, 
interne stellato-pubescens, superne parce puberu'a, ramis 4-5 mm. longis 
revolutis.— T. A. Spbague. 



Hie interesting Dombeya here figured was raised at Kew 
from seed received in 1907 from Mr. J. M. Wood, the 
veteran Director of the Botanic Gardens at Durban, where 
it had been in cultivation under the name of D. epectabilis, 
Boj. When it flowered for the first time in Februarv, 1911, 
it was found on examination that it is not Bojer's plant so 
March, 1912. 



named, but that it is the species described for the first time 
in 1900 by the late Dr. K. Schumann as D. Calantha and 
based by its author on herbarium specimens received at 
Kew in 1897 from Zomba in British Central Africa, where 
the plant had been collected by the late Mr. A. Whyte and 
by Mr. J. M. McClounie. The examination of flowers of 
this cultivated specimen, and a re-examination of those of the 
original type, have shown that the number of ovules in a cell 
is usually 6-8, not 4-6 as Dr. Schumann was led to believe. 
This point, though apparently not important, deserves to 
be noted, owing to the fact that in this genus some stress 
has been laid by Dr. Schumann on the number of ovules 
present in each cell. Another character which Dr. Schu- 
mann has treated as of consequence is the presence or 
absence of stellate hairs within the ovary; it is to be 
noted that in the species now figured these stellate hairs 
occur, but that while present on the inner wall they are 
absent from the septa. The material from which our figure 
has been prepared was derived from a plant which has grown 
vigorously in a border in the Mexican house in Kew, and 
which, but for severe annual pruning, would have attained 
tree-like dimensions. It is an evergreen, and when loaded 
with flowers, which are of the same tint as, and bear a 
strong superficial resemblance to those of the Musk Mallow, 
is a singularly attractive object. Unfortunately at Kew it 
has failed to ripen seeds. 

Description.— Shrub, erect, 11-12 ft. high. Stem f in. 
thick, brownish-velvety, marked below with leaf-scars ; 
lateral twigs few and short, bearing small undivided or 
lobed leaves. Leaves 3-lobed or somewhat 5-lobed, lobes 
acutely acuminate, the mid-lobe largest, the lateral lobes 
very small, about 12 in. across, margin coarsely acutely 
toothed, base deep cordate, 7-nerved, above harshly stellate 
pubescent with sunk nerves, beneath densely pubescent or 
tomentose with raised nerves and veins ; petioles 8-9 in. 
long, shortly densely hairy ; stipules linear-lanceolate, § in. 
long. Cymes corymbiform, about 15-flowered, each branch 
of the simple dichasium being a scorpioid cyme. Peduncles 
6-8 in. long and pedicels 1-1 J in. long, softly pilose; 
bracteolea each enclosing a solitary flower, deciduous, ovate- 
lanceolate, caudate-acuminate, |-| in. long, 2-3 lin. wide, 



stellate pubescent. Calyx lobes at first spreading then 
reflexed anceoate, acute, f in. long, under 3 lin. wide, 
sottly stellate pilose outside, shortly connate below. Corolla 
rose-coloured about 1| in. across; petals widely obliquely 
obovate, slightly retuse or subtruncate, f in. long, 7-8 liii 
wide delicate. Stamens 15 and staminodes 5, conjointly 
united in a short white tube about 2 lin. deep, each stami- 
node alternating with three stamens; lateral stamens of 
each triad with filaments 3-4 lin. Jong and anthers over 
2 Im long, central with filament 2 lin. long and anthers 
I Jin. long or shorter ; staminodes subspathulate, } in. lono- 
tinged with rose towards the tip, the upper portion linea?- 
Janceolate, subacute, under 1 lin. wide. Ovary subglobose 
under 3 lin wide, shortly white-velvety, 5-celled ; cells' 
b-8 ovuled, densely stellate hairy within on the walls but 
not on the septa ; ovules ellipsoid, very small ; style-column 
about 5 lin. long, stellate pubescent below, sparingly puberu- 
lous above; style-arms revolute, about 2 lin. lon<r. 

Fig. 1, petal ; 2, staminal column, laid open ; 3, pistil ; 4, hairs :-«?? enlarged. 



84-25 




'tt.FitchJitk 



VmcentBrooks,Da/ &SonLL d imp 



L. Reeve &C°L 



Tab. 8425. 

COROKIA COTONEASTER. 

New Zealand. 

Cornaceae. Tribe Coeneae. 
Corokia, A. Cunn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 949. 



Corokia Cotoneaster, Baoul in Ann. Sci. Nat. 1844, vol. ii. p. 120 H in Choiaa 

PI. N.Zel. p. 22; Hook.f. Flor. N. Zeal. vol. i. p. 98 et in Handb. N. Zeal. 

?'-f- ?'rP 6 Wild - Ic - Hort Then - voL "• P* 140 > *■ 83 ' s P ecies C - bud d~ 
leoidi, A. Cunn., affinis, sed ramis paucifloris abbreviatis, foliisque facile 
distinguenda. 

Frutex 1-2 m. altus, ramosissimus ; rami abbreviate plerumque 2-3 cm. longi 
rigidi, atro-rubri, divaricato-tortuosi, iuniores flores et folia gerentes' 
semores plus minusve attenuati, nudi. Folia alterna, secus ramos 
abbreviatos in fasciculos 3-folios disposita, brevissime petiolata, spathulata 
apice emargmata vel interdurn apiculata, 10-12 mm. longa, 5-7 mm. lata, 
supra nitida, iufra albo-tomentosa, juniores supra pubescentia, nervis 
obscuris. Flores axillares solitarii, pedunculis 3 mm. longis albo-tomen- 
tosis Sepala 5, triangularia, 1 mm. longa, albo-tomentosa, persistentia. 
Petala 5, oblonga, G mm. longa, apice acutiuscula, basi squamula ciliato- 
fimbnata mstructa, persistentia. Stamina 5, petalis alterna; filamenta 
3 mm. longa, glabra; antherae 2 mm. longae. Discus carnosus, glal.tr, 
integer, apice planus, aurantiacus. fieceptaculum turbinatum, albo- 
tomentosum. Ovarium 1-loculare, 1-ovulatum; stylus 2"5 mm. lonpus, 
glaber; stigma capitatum, obscure 2-lobum. Fructus drupaceus, ruber' 
10 mm. longus, 7 mm. diametro, sepalis petalisque persistentibus coronatus.' 
— J. Hutchinson. 



The Corokia here figured, C. Cotoneaster, is a native of 
New Zealand, where it is found both in the North and in 
the South Islands. A familiar plant in gardens, especially 
in the south and west of England and in Ireland, it is 
scarcely hardy in the open ground at Kew ; it will survive 
a mild winter, but is injured or killed by a few severe frosts. 
On a south wall, however, it thrives excellently and flowers 
freely every May. The material from which our figure has 
been prepared was obtained from a plant grown by Canon 
Ellacombe at Bitton, near Bristol, which forms a bush in a 
sheltered corner of his remarkable garden, but otherwise is 
not protected. This specimen is now a shapely plant five 
or six feet high and shows the remarkably interlaced 
branches with their tiny leaves and bright yellow, starry 
flowers to excellent advantage. C. Cotoneaster will grow 
March, 1912. 



either in loamy or in peaty soil provided it be open and 
well drained, acd can be increased by cuttings of firm twigs 
taken off in July and placed in gentle heat. Raoul and 
others describe the ovary as 2-celled with one ovule in each 
cell ; De Wildeman has figured the ovary as 1-celled and 
directed attention to the fact that this is the usual arrange- 
ment. In all the flowers examined by Mr. Hutchinson 
only one loculus containing a single pendulous ovule has 
been found, his experience thus coinciding with that of 
De Wildeman, not with that of Raoul. 

Description.— Shrub, 4-7 ft. high, much-branched; 
branches, very short, usually about 1 in. long, rigid, very 
dark red, divaricate and interlaced, the younger with leaves 
and flowers, the older slender, naked. Leaves alternate, in 
groups of threes along the shorter branches, shortly 
petioled, spathulate, emarginate or occasionally apiculate 
at the tip, 5-6 lin. long, 2-4 lin. wide, shining above, white 
tomentose beneath, when young pubescent above; veins 
indistinct. Flowers axillary, solitary ; peduncles 1J lin. 
long, white tomentose. Sepals 5, triangular, very short, 
white tomentose, persistent. Petals 5, oblong, 3 lin. long, 
tip rather acute, base with a ciliate-fimbriate scale within, 
persistent. Stamens 5, alternating with the petals ; filaments 
1 J lin. long, glabrous ; anthers 1 lin. long. Bisk fleshy, 
glabrous, entire, margin uniform, orange-yellow. Receptacle 
turbinate, white tomentose. Ovary 1-celled, 1-ovuled ; 
style about 1 lin. long, glabrous ; stigma capitate, obscurely 
2-lobed. Fruit drupe-like, red, 5 lin. long, 3J lin. wide, 
tipped by the persistent sepals and petals. 



~ 7 1 ' Z° nn ", ? f ' 2 ' flower ' 3 ' ovarv aild ca1vs > in vertical section: 4, hair : 
5 petal ; b, scale from petal ; 7, anther ; 8, pistil ; 9, fruit; 10, fruit in vertical 
section; 11, embryo :-all enlarged except 9, which is <>f natural size 



8426 




w 



A^IAfl^jH 




■hlitk 



L. Reeve &. O . London. 



"Vincent Brooks Day ASonLf^vitrip 



Tab. 8426. 

CEREUS SiLVEgTRii. 

Argentine Republic. 

Cactaceae. Tribe Echinocacteae. 
Cereus, Linn. ; Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 849. 



Cereus Silvestrii, Spcg. in Annies del Museo 'National de Buenos Aires, vol. xi. 
p. 483; affinis C. procumbenti, Engelm., sed caulibus gracilioribus, pulvillis 
confertioribus, spinis numerosioribus et gracilioribus, floribus minoribus et 
miniatis differt. 

Herba ; caules prostrati vel centrales adscendentes, 3-10 cm. longi, 9-14 mm. 
crasai, 8-angulati, pallide virides; pulvilli 1-5-2 -5 mm. sejuncti; aculei 
16-20, setacei, 1-5-2 mm. longi, albi. Flores laterales, erecti, infundibuli- 
formes ; tubus 2 ' 5-3 cm. longus, rectus, apice 9-10 mm. diametro, rufescens, 
squamis ovatis acutis perparvis longe pilosis laxe obtectus; segmeuta 
3-4-seriata, patula, 1-3-2 cm. longa, 4 mm. lata, lanceolata, acuta, pulchre 
miniata. /Staromainclusa; filamenta rubra ; antherae ochroleucae. Stylus 
ocbroleucus, stigmatibus 8-9. — N. E. Beown. 



The very beautiful Cereus which forms the subject of our 
plate is a native of Argentina, where it was originallv 
discovered in the provinces of Tucuman and Salta by Dr. 
Philipp Silvester, in whose honour it was named. A 
member of the group of forms to which belongs C. procum- 
bens 9 Engelm., figured at t. 7205 of this work, it is readily 
distinguished from that species by its more slender stems, 
its more closely approximate cushions of spines, the spines 
themselves being smaller ; it differs also in having smaller 
flowers which are very unlike those of C. pubescens in colour. 
The plant which supplied the material for our illustration 
was purchased in the spring of 1911 for the Kew collection 
from Messrs. Haage & Schmidt, of Erfurt. In the catalogue 
ot this firm a figure of the plant is given ; that figure 
represents it as a compact many-stemmed herb of semi- 
dependent habit growing in a hanging pot. At Kew it 
flowered freely in May, 1911, in the house devoted to 
succulent plants. The elegance and the bright orange- 
scarlet colour of its flowers, exceptional in the genus, fully 

March, 1912. 



entitle it to horticultural favour. The cultural require- 
ments of C. Silvestrii are a loamy soil and abundant sun- 
shine ; a fair allowance of water should be supplied in 
summer, with little or none at all in winter. 

Description'. — Herb; stems succulent, prostrate or the 
central ascending, 1J-4 in. long, 4-7 lin. thick, 8-angled, 
pale-green; spine-cushions very closely set; spines 16-20 
to a cushion, setaceous, 1 lin. long or shorter, white. 
Flowers showy, lateral, erect, infundibuliform ; tube 1-1J 
in. long, straight, 4-5 lin. wide at the top, reddish, loosely 
clothed with very small, ovate acute, pilose scales ; segments 
3-4-seriate, spreading, i-f in. long, 2 lin. wide, lanceolate, 
acute, brilliant orange scarlet. Stamens included ; filaments 
red ; anthers pale yellow. Style pale yellow, stigmas 8-9. 



Fig. la cushion of spines, from the stem; 2, scale with hairs, from the 
nower-tube ; 3, stamen ; 4, stigmas :— all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Terns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
i £ B o F ° r the aBe 0f Be £ iimers an d Amateurs. By George Bentham 
F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W H 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham s " Handbook," and other British FloraB. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo 9s 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle^ Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, II. A. F L S 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J Berkeley 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, 4c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FTJNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Wobthington G. Smith 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement onlv, 12s 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Ct/erey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 

BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^l. By 

George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F 
Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Bakee, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the* Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W. H. Harvey and 

0. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols 

1. — III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V 
Parts I. & II., 9s. each. Part III., 8s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII 33s 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. Bv Daniki. Oliver, F.R.S. 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III. each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s 6<i 
Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— III., 8s. Vol. VII., 27«. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s 6c?' 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec'B, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Griskbach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. I). 

Hookee, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, AuguBt 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 87, MARCH, 1912. 



Tab. 8422.— BRUNEELSIA UNDTJLATA. 
„ 8423.— SYRINGA JTJLIANAE. 
„ 8424.— DOMBEYA CALANTHA. 
„ 8425.— COROKIA COTONE ASTER. 
„ 8426.— CEREUS SILYESTRII. 

Lovell Urf^E & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemsley. 



BOTANICAL RLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6cZ. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 



NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— III., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III.. 20s. each. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Yol. IV., Sect. 1., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Yol. V., 25s. 6 J. Vol. VII., 27a. Qd. Vol. VIII., 

25s. Qd. 

Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 



NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., Part IL, 9s. each ; Part III., 8s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony Caffraria 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By HARVEY and SOLDER. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER F.R S 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. Yol. IV., Sect. II., 2U. Vol. V., Part I. 9, Vol VI "4* 

Vol. ViL, 33s. '' " ' 

Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 

Natal and Transvaal. 



Loveix Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



LONDON : PRINTKD VY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LTD.. DUKE STREET, STAMFORD STREET, S.E. 



dFourtf) §cvits. 

No. 88.' 



VOL. VIII.— APRIL. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s. 



OR NO. 150S 0F THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGUBES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Qirmor, mojjal HJotanit Gartens, lEUto. 




" Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and white 
Nature's own sweet and cunning hand laid on." 



LONDON : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVERNMENTS. 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVE NT GARDEN. 

1912. 

[All rights reserved.'] 
(Entered at the New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



ICHARD 
EME01E 



XL A 

FJ^fGICIDES. 
WSED KILLER Ac. 



MANUFACTURER : riju 

G. H. RICHARDS, 

234, Borough High Street, London, S.E, 



MAZGAY, *■*£■£«" 

Holder of Diploma of Honour from the 
Gardeners' Scientific Society, Holsatia. 

GARDEN ARCHITECT AND 
GARDEN BUILDER, 

Streatham Avenue, Sefton Park, 
LIVERPOOL. 

Design and construction of pleasure grounds, 
rock, water gardens, and cascades ; perennial 
borders, pergolas, parterres, terraces, ornamental 
bridges, garden sculpture and furniture, &c ; 
gardens inspected and advice given on horticul- 
ture, forestry, and pomology ; work undertaken 
at home and abroad. 

Correspondence in all European Languages. 

Himalayan (hardy) Rhododendrons, 

and other species. 

Rare Shrubs, Alpines, 

the most Complete Collection. 

Dwarf Alpine Shrubs. All the best Herbaceous 

Plants and Aquatics. Daffodils and Lilies, and 

all the choicest Hardy Bulbous Plants. 

Construction of Rockeries and Planting. , 

Catalogue ox application. 

G. REUTHE, 

The Fox Hill Nursery, Kestoa, Kent. 



Gardening for Profit or as a Hobby. 

Ladies received for Practical Gardening Training 

(with Board- Residence). 

A large collection of beautiful and rare hardy herbaceous and Alpine 

Plants grown ; special attention given to silver-leaved varieties. 

For Terms and Catalogue apply to Lady Proprietor, 

Whin's Nursery Garden, Chalfont St. Peter, Bucks. 

Station: GERRARD'S CROSS. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLOEA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, P.B.S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hookee, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9«. 

iLLngmnomTormlSnBH flora. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 

Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentfom's "Handbook," and other British Flora. 
Ith Edition, with 1315 Wood Kngraviu^s, &t. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 




84Z3 



Wr 






Tab. 8427. 
SCHOMBURGKIA Lueddkmaxi. 

Venezuela. 



Obchidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 
Schombdbgkia, Lindl. ; Benth. et Eoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. in. p. 534. 



Schornburgkia Lueddemani, Prill, in Journ. Soc. Imp. Hort. Paris, vol. viii. 
(1862) p. 275 ; affinis S. undulatae, Lindl., sed pseudobulbis gracilioribus' 
bracteis longioribus et colore riorum differt. 

Herba epiphytica, rhizomate valido, vaginis late ovatis subimbricatis obtecto 
Pseudobulbi erecti, fusiformi-clavati, suleati, basi attenuati, vaginis 
distichis imbricatis obtecti, 15-25 cm. longi, medio 2 "5-3 cm. lati apice 
saepissime diphylli. Folia arcuata, elongato-oblonga, suhohtusa, coriacea, 
20-35 em. longa, 4-5 cm. lata. Scapi erecti, elongati, 45— d0 cm. alti) 
vaginis lanceolatis numerosis obtecti, apice multiflori. Bracteae lineari- 
lanceolatae, acutae, convolutae, 4 cm. longae. Pedicelli 35 cm. longi. 
Flores mediocres, brunnei, labellum columnaque purpnreura, crista et anthem 
flavae. Sepala patentia, lineari-oblonga, obtusa, \alde undulata, 3-4 cm. 
longa. Petalt sepalis similia. Labellum trilobum, facie columnae adpres- 
sum, 1-5 cm. longum; lobi laterales angnste oblongi, obtusi, suberecti ; 
lobus intermedins recurvus, ovato-orbicularis, apiculatus, circiter 7 mm. 
longus, marginibus prope apicem incnrvis ; discus tricarinatus. Column* 
clavnta, arcuata, 1-5 cm. longa; anthera breviter bicornuta; pollinia 8, 
per paria superposita, a latere parallele compressa, appendicula granulosa 
laminiformi connexa.— E. A. Rolfe. 



The Schomburgkia which forms the subject of our 
illustration is an Orchid which is interesting as having 
reappeared after having been lost sight of for half a 
century. The species was first described by Mr. E. 
Prillieux in 1862 from a specimen in the collection of 
Mr. Luddeman in Paris, but nothing was then known of 
its native country or of its history, though its affinity 
with S. undulata, Lindl., was pointed out and especial 
attention was drawn to the bright yellow patch on the 
lip which is a conspicuous feature of the plant. In 
January, 1908, an auction sale of surplus orchids from the 
collection of the Hon. W. Rothschild, Tring Park, was 
held in London. At this Kile the plant from which our 
hgure has been prepared was purchased for the Kew 
Apbil, 1912. 



collection. Its identity was unknown, but the plant was 
reported to have been received originally from Venezuela. 
This plant has been grown in a teak basket in a mixture 
of peat and sphagnum in a warm house along with S. 
undulata and other species of the genus, and has thriven 
well under this treatment. It was not, however, until 
January, 1911, that the plant flowered for the first time at 
Kew. When it did flower it was found to possess all the 
features characteristic of the species which Prillieux had 
named S. Lueddemani Like other Schomburgkias the 
plant requires a liberal allowance of direct sunshine, and 
after a season's growth is completed should be kept, for a 
few weeks, dry at the roots. 

Description.— Herb, epiphytic; rhizome stout, clothed 
with broad, ovate, somewhat imbricate sheaths ; pseudobulbs 
erect, fusiformly clavate, sulcate, narrowed to the base, 
clothed with distichous imbricate sheaths, 6-10 in. long, 
1-li in. thick about the middle, often 2-leaved at the 
tip. Leaves arcuate, elongated oblong, somewhat obtuse, 
coriaceous, 8-14 in. long, 1J-2 in. wide. Scapes erect, 
elongated, lj-2 ft. long, clothed with many lanceolate 
sheaths, many-flowered; bracts linear-lanceolate, acute, 
convolute, If in. long; pedicels l 1 - in. long. Flowers of 
medium size, brown with purple lip and column, the crest 
and anther yellow. Sepals spreading, linear-oblong, obtuse 
markedly undulate, 1±-1§ in. long. Petals like the sepals'. 
Lip 3-lobed, adpressed to the lace of the column, § in. lono-; 
lateral lobes narrow oblong, obtuse, suberect; mid lobe 
recurved, ovate-orbicular, apiculate, about { in. lono- the 
edges incurved near the tip; disk 3-keeled. Column 
clavate, arcuate, § in. long; anther with 2 short processes; 
pollinia 8, superposed m pairs, laterally compressed, united 
by a granular laminar appendage. 



-IlF'J/JJFJ? 2 ' COl ,T n [ 5 ant her-cap; 4, pollinia; 5, sket.-h of entire plant: 
— all enlarged except 5, which is much reduced. l 



8428 
















J I 




I 


[ 


> ■ 





imp 



Tab. 8428. 
MAGNOLIA Kobcjs. 

Japan. 



Magnoliaceak. Tribe Magnolieak. 
Magnolia, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 18. 



Magnolia Kobus DC. Syst. vol. i. p. 456 et Prodr. vol. i. p. 81; Miq. Prolus. 
*L. Jap. p. 146; Sargent, For. Fl. Jap. p. 9, t. 3; Card. Chron. 1905, 
vol. xxxvii. p. 265, cum ic. ; Shirasawa, lc. Jap. vol. i. t. 39. fig. 1-12 ; 
0. K. Schneider, 111. Handb. Laubhohk. vol. i. p. 329; species M. stellatae, 
maxim, et M. salici/oliae, Maxim., affinis; ab ilia statura altiore et petalis 
paucioribus latioribusque, ab hac gemmis pedunculisque pubescentibus 
et tolns majonbus subtus haud glaucis facillime distinguenda. 

Arbor, culta 4r-5-metralis jam florifera, sylvatica 20-25-metraIis ; coma juventute 
anguste pyramidali, demum subsphaerica ; ramuli attriti aromatici, 
nornotini intense brunnei nodis pubescentibus, annotini fere atri, gla- 
brescentes; gemmae pubescentes. Folia decidua, obovata, basi cuneata, 
apice obtuse cuspidata, margine integra, 10-18 cm. longa, 5-10 cm. lata, 
glabra vel glabrescentia, subtus conspicue reticulata; petioli 1-25-2-5 cm. 
Jongi Flores speciosi, 10 cm. lati, ad apices ramulorum lateralium solitarii. 
lT j subuIata > caduca, 15 cm. longa, viridescentia, glabra. Petala 6, 
a +1,1 GStra me ^ io purpureo-lineata, 2-seriata, exteriora 3 oblongo- 
spathulata, 5 cm. longa, 2 cm. lata, interiora 3 angustiora paulo breviora. 
Stamina numerosissima ; filamenta purpurea, 2 mm. longa; antherae 
lutescentes, applanatae, 6 mm. longae. Carpella secus axin centralem in 
coJumnam subcylindricam 1*5-2 cm. longam aggregata. Fr actus 10 cm. 
jongus, brunneus, saepe contortus curvatnsve. Stmina miniata, 8 mm. 
lata.— W. J. Bean. 



Although the Magnolia here figured is less effective than 
some other members of the genus so far as its flowers are 
concerned, it is at least in one of its forms one of the most 
striking. If, for the genus, the flowers be small, the tree 
which bears them is, according to Professor Sargent, in 
the neighbourhood of Sapporo in Japan, one that attains a 
height of over 70 feet with a straight clean trunk 6 feet in 
girth. In stature therefore it rivals M. hypoleuca, Sieb. 
and Zucc, another native of Japan figured at t. 8077 of 
ty . W0I ^> an( l M. acuminata, Linn., f., from the eastern 
United States. The nearest allies of M. Kobus are, how- 
over, M. stellata, Maxim., figured at t. 6370 of this work, 
which is always a small shrub and which has from twelve 
Ai'itiL, 1912. 



to twenty petals to a flower, and M. salicifolia, Maxim., 
which has glabrous peduncles and winter-buds with narrower 
leaves that are glaucous beneath. But besides the lofty 
form alluded to, which Sargent has treated as a distinct 
variety, var. borealis, there is another form of M. Kobus, 
also represented in European collections, which while it 
never attains the dimensions of the Sapporo tree, differs 
from its companion in flowering more freely while still 
young and in having smaller leaves and more slender twigs. 
This second form, the one on which the original description 
of the species was based, is that to which the plant whence 
our material was derived belongs. That form was first 
introduced to England about 1879 by Mr. C. Maries when 
collecting for Messrs. J. Veitch and Sons ; the original tree 
is still in their nursery at Coombe Wood. The trees at 
Kew, which are now about 15 feet high, usually come into 
leaf early in April. The spray figured, which came from 
one of these, did not flower until May, 1911, the flowers of 
this Magnolia, like those of most early flowering trees and 
shrubs, having been retarded for three or four weeks by a 
long-continued cold spell. This circumstance also explains 
the forwardness of the foliage as depicted in our plate ; as 
a rule the flowers appear on quite naked shoots. In gardens 
M. Kobus will be valued for its great hardiness, its shapely 
pyramidal form and its copious leafage. As a flowering 
tree it is also highly attractive, and in this respect it suffers 
from comparison only with other members of the same 
genus, which includes some of the finest flowering trees of 
the northern temperate zone. It likes a moist, deep, open 
soil and should be raised from imported seeds. 

Description. — Tree, deciduous, of narrow pyramidal form 
when young, ultimately rounded, in one form 15-20 ft., in 
another 70-80 ft. in height ; twigs aromatic when bruised, 
dark brown and silky about the nodes when young ; almost 
black when a year old ; winter-buds pubescent. Leaves 
obovate, cuneate at the base, bluntly cuspidate at the tip, 
entire, 4-7 in. long, 2-4 in. wide, glabrous or glabrescent, 
conspicuously reticulately veined beneath ; petioles J-l in. 
long. Flowers 4 in. across, solitary at the tips of short 
lateral twigs. Sepals 3, subulate, caducous, f in. long, 
greenish, glabrous. Petals 6, pure white with a purple 



median line outside; the outer 3 about 2 in. long, | in. 
wide, oblong-spatliulate ; the inner 3 rather narrower and 
shorter. Stamens very numerous; filaments purple, 1 lin. 
long; anthers yellowish, flattened, \ in. long. Carpels 
adnate throughout an erect cylindric column 7-9 lin. long. 
Fruit 4 in. long, brown, often curved and contorted owing 
to irregular development of the seeds. Seeds scarlet, 4 lin. 
in diameter. 

Fig. 1, stamens and pistil; 2 and 3, anthers; 4, section of carpels:— all 
enlarged. 



$429 







Tab. 8429. 
agave protuberaxs. 

Mexico. 

Amaryllidaoeae. Tribe Agaveae. 
Agave, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 738. 



Agave protuberans, Engelm. ex Baker, Uandb. Amaryll. p. 197; species ex 
affinitate A. virginiate, Linn., a qua floribus congestis tuboque perianthii 
multo breviore differt. 

Herba, acaulescens. Tuber globosum, 5 cm. diametro, perenne. Folia radiealia, 
rosulata, subcarnosa, fragilia, lineari-lanceolata, 15-20 cm. longa, 3-4 cm. 
lata, supra canaliculata vel fere conduplicata, viridia, brunneo-pnrpureo- 
maculata, marginibus planis vel nndulatis, angnstissime albo-cartilagineis, 
minutissime denticnlatis instructa. Scapa erecta, 60 cm. alta, 6 mm. 
diametro, rigida, subglauca. Bradeae lanceolatae, acuminatae, 4' 5 cm. 
longae, sursum gradatim minores, crassae. Spica 10 cm. longa, densiflora; 
flores in papillas rhacbidis tumidas singulatim insidentes; bracteolae 2, 
altera abaxialis, e basi deltoidea 6 mm. lata acuminata, 12 mm. longa, 
purpurascens, albo-marginata, altera lateralis, 4 mm. longa, 1'5 mm. lata, 
membranacea, albescens. Pervmthii tubus 3 mm. longns; segmenta 1*5 
cm. longa, 5 mm. lata, oblonga, obtusa, apice leviter cucullata, viridescentia, 
minute purpureo-maculat i. Filamenta longe exserta, 4 cm. longa, subulata, 
alba, purpureo niaculata; antherae oblon^ae, 13 mm. longae, brunneo- 
purpureae. Ovarium 10 mm. longum, 6 mm. latum, 6-costatum, obliquum ; 
stylus cylindricus, staminibus aequilongus ; stigma incrassatum, trilobum. 
— A. guttata, Hemsl. Biol. Amer.-Centr. vol. iii. p. 343, tab. 87, non Jacobi 
et Bouche. Leichtlinia frotuberans, Herm. Ross in Tcon. Plant. Hort. 
Panorm. p. 8, tab. 3 (1896) ; Engl. & Prantl, Natiirl. Pflanzenf. Nachtr. n. 
p. 11, and iii. p. 49.— C. H. Wright. 



Tlie subject of our illustration is one of those Agaveae 
which differ both from the true Agaves and from the 
Littaeas in having the flowers solitary on simple racemes 
or spikes and in having herbaceous leaves without a terminal 
pungent spine. Considerable diversity of opinion has 
existed with regard to the status of the group which 
about a century ago appeared to Salisbury entitled to 




later H. Ross treated the group as a distinct genus Leiciit- 
linia, a name bestowed upon the species now figured because 
of its introduction by the late Mr. Max Leichtlin. But the 
structure of the flowers in all species of Uaujrcda, which 
April, 1912. 



name takes precedence of Leichtlinia, agrees so well with 
that of the Agaves and the Littaeas that it seems desirable 
to consider the group a subgenus of Agave. All the Man- 
fredas are Mexican with the exception of A. virginica 
which is confined to the Southern United States. One of 
the best known is A. maculata, Jlzgd, figured at t. 5122 
of this work as " A. maculosa." The Kew plant of A. 
protuberans was received from Mr. Leichtlin in 1882 
shortly after its introduction from Mexico, where it in- 
habits the mountains near San Luis Potosi at altitudes of 
6,000-8,000 feet above sea level. The species flowered in 
1908 with Mr. R. H. Beamish at Grlounthaune near Cork, 
and in June, 1910, at Oolesborne, with Mr. H. J. Elwes, 
to whom we are indebted for the material for our figure. 
Like the other Manfredas, A. protuberans requires green- 
house conditions. 

Descriptiox. — Herb ; stemless ; tuber globose, 2 in. wide, 
perennial. Leaves radical, rosulate, somewhat fleshy, 
fragile, linear-lanceolate, 6-8 in. long, lj-lf in. wide, 
above channelled or almost conduplicate, green blotched 
with brownish purple, margins even or waved, narrowly 
white-cartilaginous and very finely denticulate. Scape 
erect, 2 ft. high, \ in. thick, rigid and slightly glaucous ; 
bracts lanceolate, acuminate, the largest l 1 - in. long or 
longer, gradually diminishing upward, thick. Spike 4 in. 
long, dense-flowered ; flowers solitary on the swollen nodes 
of the rachis; bracteoles 2, an abaxial with a deltoid base 
J in. wide, acuminate at the tip, reaching A in. in length, 
purplish with white margins, and a lateral which is much 
smaller, membranous and whitish. Perianth with a short 
tube, only £ in. long, and with oblong, obtuse segments 
slightly hooded at the tip, greenish and finely blotched 
with purple, \ in. long, | in. wide. Filaments far exserted, 
If in. long, subulate, white blotched with purple; anthers 
oblong, ^ in. long, brownish purple. Ovary ^ in. long, 
I in. wide, 6-ribbed ; oblique; style cylindric, as long as the 
stamens; stigma thickened, 3-lobed. 



F'S- 1, portion of perianth, showing staniinal insertion and stamens; 2 pistil 
showing ovary in vertical section; 3, transverse section of ovary; 4, 'ovule;' 
5, sketch ot an entire plant:— all enlarged except 5, which is much reduced. 



8430. 




KS.del J.N. Pitch ]ith. 



\5ncent Brooks : Day <£. Son 



L "Reeve 8c G° London. 



Tab. 8430. 
DAPHNE RETUSA. 

Western China. 

Thymelaeaceae. Tribe Thtmelaeae. 
Daphne, Linn, ; Benth. et HooJe.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 190. 



Daphne retusa, Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxix. p. 318 ; Render in 
Engl. Bot. Jahrb. vol. xxv. p. 96; Pritzel in Engl. Bot. Jahrb. vol. xxix. 
p. 481 ; species D. odorae, Thunb. affinis sed statura humili, foliis multo 
minoribus plerumque retusis perulisque dense ciliaiis diflfert. 

Fruticulus densissime ramosus, 6-10 dm. altus, subglobosus, vere cum foliis 
novellis florens. Rami novelli magis minusve pubescentes, demum 
glabrati, annotini cortice pallide brunneo tecti. Folia in annum secundum 
persistentia, oblonga vel oblanceolato-oblonga, obtusa, plerumque retusa, 
basi in petiolum perbrevem latiusculum attenuata, exsiccando interdum 
ob margines valde revolutas specie oblongo-linearia, 3-7 cm. longa, 
8-17 mm. lata, coriacea, glaberrima, supra saturate viridia, subtus 
pallida, nervis obsoletis. Flores e gemmis terminalibus perulatis orti, 
umbellatim dispositi, ramulis foliisque novellis stipati et foliis nonnullis 
vetustis suffulti. Gemmae 1 cm. longae, peralis oblongis vel ellipticis 
obtusis vel acutis ad margines dense ciliatis caeterum glabris. Ferianthium 
album, magis minusve roseo- vel violaceo-suffusum vel extra totum violaceo- 
roseum, glabrum ; tubus cylindricus 10-12 mm. longus ; lobi ovati, obtusi- 
usculi, ad 10 mm. longi, 5 mm. lati. Stamina 2-seriata, series circiter 
4 mm. distantes, inferior medio tubo inserta antheris haud exsertis. 
Ovarium glabrum, stigmate capitato, stylo brevissimo. Bacca subglobosa, 
carnosa, rubra, 10 mm. longa, 8 mm. diametro. — 0. Stapf. 



The interesting Daphne here figured was first discovered 
by Mr. A. E. Pratt in 1889 at altitudes of between 9,000 
and 13,000 feet in the neighbourhood of Tatien-lu in 
Western Szechuan. In 1903 it was again collected in the 
same district by Mr. E. H. Wilson, and was sent by him to 
Messrs. J. Veitch and Sons who have raised it in their 
nursery at Coombe Wood. The material on which our 
illustration has been based came from a plant in the 
Coombe Wood nursery, where it is an evergreen shrub 
of compact and shapely form, about eighteen inches high and 
as much wide, well furnished with shining dark green 
foliage. The flowers, which are freely produced in early 
May along with the new leaves, have all the pleasing 
fragrance that is characteristic of the genus, which, taken 
as a whole, is not very easy to cultivate. Judging, how- 
Apkil, 1912. 



ever, by the appearance of the plants at Coombe Wood, 
I), retusa promises to be more amenable to treatment 
than most. It will probably have to be propagated by 
grafting, and an evergreen species like the familiar 
D. Laureola should be tried as a stock, although it may be 
possible to work it on the deciduous D. Mezereon as well. 
D. retusa approaches very closely to D. tangutica, Maxim,, 
a species described from specimens collected in Western 
Kansu, and differs from the Kansn plant, if the only 
specimen of the latter at Kew can be relied upon, mainly 
in having more hairy young branches, broader and less 
re volute leaves, more densely ciliate perulae and more 
obtuse perianth segments. 

Description. — Shrub, of small size, densely branched, 
2-3^ ft. high, crown subglobose, flowering in spring 
contemporaneously with the new leaves. Twigs more or 
less pubescent but soon becoming glabrous; when a year 
old with greyish brown bark. Leaves lasting till a second 
year, oblong or oblanceolate-oblong, obtuse, often retuse, 
narrowed at the base to a short rather broad petiole, as 
they dry up often assuming owing to their margins becoming 
inturned a linear or oblong-linear appearance, 1J-3 in. 
l° n g> i— I i n - wide, coriaceous, quite glabrous dark green 
above, pale beneath, the veins obscure. Flowers umbellately 
arranged, produced from the terminal scaly buds, accom- 
panied by young twigs and new leaves and surrounded 
below by a few leaves of the previous season. Buds 5 lin. 
long, scales oblong or elliptic, obtuse or acute, with densely 
ciliate edges, but elsewhere glabrous. Perianth white, more 
or less tinged with rose or violet, or outside quite violet- 
rose, glabrous; tube cylindric 5-6 lin. long; lobes ovate, 
rather obtuse, 5 lin. long, half as wide. Stamens in 2 
series, about 2 lin. apart ; the lower series about the middle 
of the tube, the anthers included. Ovary glabrous, style 
very short, stigma capitate. Berry subglobose, fleshy, red, 
5 lin. long, 4 lin. in diameter. 



Fig 1, apex of leaf; 2, bud scales ; 3, perianth, laid open ; 4 and 5, stamens ; 
6, pistil :— all enlarged. 



8431. 




M.G.&el.JiN Jr'itchlitk 



"^Srujent BrooksDa.y&.Soiii.t rl inxp 



u Re-eve &.C.?Lcrruion.. 



Tab. 8431. 
CAMPANULA arvatica. 

Spain. 

Campanulaceae. Tribe Campanui-eae. 
Campanula, Linn. ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 561. 



Campanula arvatica, Lag. in Varied, de Ciencias, 1805, p. 40, et in Gen. et Spec. 
Nov. (1816) p. 12; Feer in Journ. de Bot. vol. iv. (1890) p. 339; Willkomm, 
Fl. Hisp. Suppl. p. 130 ; species C. Morettianae, Eeichb., affinis sed foliis 
minoribus glabris corollisque latius campanulatis distinguenda. 

Herba perennis, rhizomate centrali caules plures quoquoversus emittente. 
Caules graciles, subangulati, glabri, foliati, uni- vel pauci-flori, 10-20 cm. 
longi. Folia basilaria 8-9 mm. longa, 8-10 mm. lata, cordato-rotundata, 
petiolis ad 2 cm. longis suffulta, caulina alterna, 6-8 mm. loDga, 4-6 mm. 
lata, rhomboldea, breviter petiolata, summa sessilia, omnia apice apiculata, 
acute dentata, glabra, nervis obscuris primariis 5. Flores et terminates et 
axillares, ad caulium vel ramorum apices solitarii. Sepala 5, lineari- 
subulata, 5 mm. longa, accrescent ia, marginibus quibusque dente solitario 
circiter medium instructis. Corolla late campannlata, 2*5-3 cm. diametro, 
coerulea, lobis 5 patulis 8 mm. Ion»is 6-8 mm.latis. Stamina 5, tilamentis 
3 mm. longis 1 mm. a basi expansis, parte expansa 0"75 mm. lata ciliata, 
antheris 3 mm. longis. Beceptuculum glabrum, 3 mm. altum. Stylus 1 cm. 
longus, exsertus; stigma trilobum, lobis 1-5 mm. longis. Capsula fere 
cylmdrica, glabra, 6 mm. longa. Semina cylindrica 1*25 mm. longa, - 5 
mm. diametro. — C. acatangula, Ler. et Lev. in Journ. Bot. vol. xvii. (1879) 
p. 198, et Deux Excurs. bot. dans le nord de l'Espagne, p. 51, t. vii. ; Gard. 
Ohron. 1911, vol. 1. p. 220, fig. 104.— W. B. Tokbill. 



The very interesting Campanula here figured is a species 
which is endemic in Northern Spain, where it is confined 
to that portion of the Cantabrian mountains known as the 
Picos di Europa which lies between the provinces of Leon 
and Asturias. It was first recognised as a distinct species 
under the name C. arvatica more than a century ago, but 
appears to have been lost sight of until some thirty years 
ago when it was rediscovered and again described by 
Leresche and Levier as C. acutangula. Its nearest ally in 
the genus is C. Morettiana, Reich b., a native of the Tirol, 
and occasionally in gardens it is treated as a variety of that 
species. The Spanish is, however, very readily distinguished 
from the Tirolese plant in being glabrous in all its parts, 
in having smaller leaves, more slender stems, and especially 
in having a more open and less distinctly funnel-shaped 
Apeil, 1912. 



corolla. Though the names C. acutangula or C. Morettiana 
var. acutangula appear to have become generally adopted 
in collections, Feer has made it perfectly clear that they are 
only recent substitutes for the original name and must 
therefore be set aside. The plant from which the material 
for our figure was obtained is one purchased for the Kew 
collection in 1909 from Mr. H. Correvon, of Geneva, under 
the name proposed by Leresche and Levier. It forms a 
close prostrate tuft about 2 inches high and should be 
planted in a sheltered position in well-drained shingly soil. 
The flowers are produced in July ; unfortunately the species 
has not proved hardy at Kew. 

Description. — Herb, perennial ; rootstock central, giving 
out numerous stems in all directions. Stems slender, slightly 
angular, glabrous, leafy, one- or more-flowered, 4-8 in. 
long. Leaves dimorphic; basal about i in. long, slightly 
broader than long, cordate-rounded, with petioles j-f in. 
long ; cauline alternate, 3-4 lin. long, 2-3 lin. wide, 
rhomboid, shortly petioled or the uppermost sessile ; all 
apiculate, sharply toothed, glabrous, with 5 obscure main- 
nerves. Flowers solitary, or both terminal and axillary at 
the ends of the stems and branches. Sepals 5, linear-subulate, 
2| lin. long, accrescent, each with a solitary tooth on either 
margin near the middle. Corolla wide campanulate, 1—11 
in. across, blue ; lobes 5, spreading, 4 lin. long, 3-4 lin. 
wide. Stamens 5, filaments 1J lin. Jong, each widening a 
little above the base into a suborbicular ciliate plate ; anthers 
as long as the filaments. Receptacle glabrous, 1£ lin. high. 
Style 5 lin. long, exserted ; stigma 3-lobed, lobes under 
1 lin. long. Capsule nearly cylindric, glabrous, 3 lin. long. 
Seeds cylindric, small. 



Fig. 1, bud, the corolla removed; 2 and 3, stamens; 4, stigma; 5, an unripe 
capsule ; 6, a seed :—all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FO REIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the nee of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.B.S. ReviEed oy Sir J. D. Hooker; Crown 8vo, 9*. _ _• 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawing by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Benthanrs " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En. 
eravingB. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Liunaean 
Society. New Edition, Is. ., 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 2_ls. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, 
MA F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. . . 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 
all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found m Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles. P. Hobkikk, F.L.S., Ac, 4c. ^ew 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6<L 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., 
F L S With a Supplement of nearly 400 page* by Worthington G. Smith, 
p!L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Cdrrey, F.B.S. 12 Coloured 

BRITISH S FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTlLAGLNEiE. By 
George Masses. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. . ' 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, I.R.8., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 
FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 
Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
taS Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspicesofthe several Governments of Austmlia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES By J. G. 

BAKER, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. ■ . , D , ,. 

FT OR A CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description ot the FJants oi 
thVcape CoLy Caffraria, and Port Haul. By W H. Hahvkt and 
O W Sonues, and continued by Sir W T. Th.seiton jD«. j, F.B S Vols. 
I.-I1L, 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; beet. IL 2iB Vol V., 
Parts I & IL, 9s. each. Part III Ss. Vol VI., 24s. Vol. VII , 33s. 

piORAof TROPICAL AFRICA. Bv Daniel Oliver, * .R.S., 

Jjl.UHAOI irivxri^-" -^ Thisflton-Dyer F.B.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
Ta dC °xTjX l!t T'ms YollT SeS-'lL, 27s. Vol. V., 25s. «. 
Vn," VI Secl'l Parts > I J-IV. £. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIIL, 25s. 6U 

HANDBOOK of'the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Dewtiorion of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermad c's Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquame's Islands. By 
lir J D Hookfk F.B.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 

FT ORW °3S' BRmSH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr Grisksach |S 42s. Published under the auspices of the Seere- 

tv^fTaR 8 1xORAS ° l,mi A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

INSX £o«, C.B before- the British Association Jor the Advancement oi 
Science, at Nottingham.^AuguBt^, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE $ C0.7Lri>7^ eMietta Street ' Oovent Gardeu - 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 88, APRIL, 1912. 



Tab. 8427.— SCHOMBTJRGKIA LUEDDEMANI. 
„ 8428.— MAGNOLIA KOBUS. 
» 8429.— AGAVE PROTUBERANS. 
„ 8430.— DAPHNE RETUSA. 
„ 8431.— CAMPANULA ARVATICA. 
Lqtbm, Rektk & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Oovent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. 1,-CXXX, 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemsley. 



BOTANICAL RLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 

NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.-IV., 8s. each. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER PES 

Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30*. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6i. Vol. VII., 27*. 6* Vol Viri 

25s. 6i. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., P art II., 9s. each ; Part HI 8s 

FLORA CAPENSIS: 

A Systematic Description ofJ^H»teof the Cape Coiony, Ca ff ,aria, 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By HARVEY and SONDEE. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYEP P P q 
Vo, , V., 9eo , ,, 62! . Vo , „., ^ „., ^ ^ ? _ papt l _ ;_• UL ^ ^ 



Lovei 



Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covenfc Garden. 



No. 80. ' 



VOL. VIII.— MAY. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s, 



oe No. 1503 0F THE entire work - 
CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BT 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LLJX, F.R.S., 

JBirmor, IXopal I3oiamc ffiarnens, ^tto. 




- —"^ -i *^% 



inty tnily bie 
Nature's own sweet 



LONDON : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE H03IE, COtONIAL AN'D INDUS GOVERNMENTS. 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1912. 

[All rights reserved.] 
(Entered at the New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



SMITH'S WEED KILLER 



is absolutely PERFEC T.- 

4- Tins of Powder orj 
*4- Gallons of Liquid' | 
to ma ke LOO Gallons. 

G/<6 Carriage Paid. 
MARK %m\ft\A.Zoe///tl//?co//?sfi/re. 



Himalayan (hardy) Rhododendrons, 

and other species. 

Rare Shrubs, Alpines, 

the most Complete Collection. 

warf Alpine Shrubs. All the best Herbaceous- 
'hints and Aquatics. Daffodils and Lilies, and 
1 the choicest Hardy Bulbous Plants. 

Construction of Rockeries and Planting. 

Catalogue ox Application. 

G. REUTHE, 

The Fox Hill Nursery, Keston, Kent. 



Gardening for Profit or as a Hobby. 

Ladies received for Practical Gardening Training 
(with Board-Residence). 

A large collection of beautiful and rare hardy herbaceous and Alpine 
hints grown; special attention given to silver-leaved varieties. 



For Terms and Catalogue apply to Lady Proprietor, 

Whin's Nursery Garden, Chalfont St. Peter, Bucks. 



Station: GERHARD'S CROSS. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATICJ5 OP THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 
2 Vols., 228 Platea. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 
a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Wobthington G. Smith, F.L.S. 
Two Vols., 24 Coloured Plates, 36s. The Supplement separately, 12s. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British isles. 

By GEORGE BEKTHAM, F.R.S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hookek, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIOHS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, 

1 >ka\vn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., akd W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bmtham's "Handbook," and other British Flora. 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood, Engravings, i>«. 

LL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN, 



843Z 



















A 























// 



• » I t\ /...,■ 












,/ 














/ 



/V 




cmD^- 'A 











M S. del. J.N. Fitch lith 



"AncentBro oks,Day & SonLti^mp 



1 , "Reeve & C ° LoTvian. 



Tab. 8432. 
DAVIDIA involucrata, var. Vjlmorixiana. 

Central and Western China. 



Coknaceae. Tribe Nysseae. 



Davidia, Baill. Adans. vol. x. (1871), p. 115, et in Nouv. Arch. Mas. Hist. Nat. 
Far. ser. 2, vol. viii. (1885), p. 242, t. 10. 



Davidia involucrata, var. Vilmoriniana, Hems/.; a D. involucrata typica 
foliis subtus haud albo-tomentosis differt. 

Arbor elegans mediocris. foliis lis Tiliae specierum nonnullarum similibus, 
inflorescentia capitata, bracteis 2 amplis alliis ornata. Folia alterna, 
exstipulata, longe petiolata ; lamina p ipyracea, ovato- vel orbiculari-cordata. 
absque petiolo 6-12 cm. longa, abrupte caudato-acuminata. margine grosse 
glanduloso- vel calloso-serrata, primum pilis longis apprcssis praecipue 
secus costam nervosque vestita, cito glabrcpcentia; vei ae primariae utrinque- 
5-7, sat prominentes, furcatae ; petiolus fere teres, supra anguste canalicu- 
latns, gracilis, flexilis, 4-10 cm. lnngus. Inflorescentia pseudoterminalis, 
capitata, longe pedunculata, pendula, monogama vel heterogamy ; podun- 
culus floriger 5-8 cm. longus, prope apicem bibracteatus, fructiger 8-10 
cm. longus; bracteae suboppositae, sessiles, saepissime inaequales, 
foliaceae, foliis similes sed albae, membramceae, oblongo-lanceolatae vel 
oblanceolatae, basi rotundatae vel subcordatae, acuminatae, longiores 
usque ad 15 cm. longae, per anthesin capitalum nutantem superim- 
pendentes, cito deciduae. Capitu/um saepius heterogamum, circiter 3 cm. 
diametro, multiflornm, florem unicum hermaphroditumet flares numerosos 
masculinos gerens, nunc omnino masculinum, nunc flore femineo solitario ; 
receptaculum subglobosum, ebracteolatum. Flores nuwcttWnt eeasiles, 
achlamydei (vel perianthium pulviniforme). Stamina 1-7 (interdum 
usque ad 12, fide Hornet) annulatim posita ; filamenta bene evoluta, 
filiformia ; antherae purpureae, cordiformes biloculares, apiculatae. Flos 
hermaphroditus (au vere hermaphroditus ?) brevissime (.edicellatus, in 
receptaculo g'oboso oblique insertus. Perianthium nullum vel ad s pianm- 
las minutas inter stamina epigynas redactum. Stamma 5-10 v. 1 numcM- 
siora (inter I um usque ad 26, tide Hornet), epigyna, parva, imperfecta 
(an semper ?). Ovarium inferum, saepissime 7-loculare, loculis uniovulatis ; 
styli lobi loculis isomeri, arete recurvi ; ovula pendula. Frwtut drupaceus, 
ellipsoideus, circiter 4 cm. diametro maximo, flavo-viridis, brnnneo-putic- 
tatus; epicarpium et mesooarpium tenuia; endocarpium osscum, durissi- 
mum ; dehis -entia per valvulas dorsales ab apice usque a i medium tructus 
deciduas; embryo m endospermio tenui rectus, radicnla Buperiore quam 
cotyledonibus oblongis paullo breviore.— Davidia Vilinoriuiaua, I)ode in 
Eev. Hort. 1908, p. 4u6. D. involucrata, Oliv. in Hook. Ic. Plant, t. Ubl, 
et Gard. Chron. vol. xxxix. (1906), p. 346 cum figura— W. B. Hemslky. 



Davidia was one of the earliest and is certainly one of 
the most striking of the novelties discovered in Western 
China when the botanical exploration of that region was 
begun over forty years ago. The first specimens were 
transmitted to the late Professor Baillon by the Abbe 
May, 1912. 



David in 1869 ; the first to reach Kew were collected by 
Mr. A. Henry in 1889. Horticulture owes the introduction 
of the genus into cultivation to Pere Farges, who sent seeds, 
from which a solitary plant was raised, to Messrs. Yilmorin 
in 1897. Faroes sent a second supply of seeds in 1898, and 
in 1899 Mr. E. H. Wilson sent to Messrs. J. Yeitch & 
Sons a third consignment, from which a large stock of 
plants was obtained. The original tree raised in 1897 
flowered for the first time in the collection of Mr. M. L. de 
Yilmorin at Les Barres in 1906 and was figured in the 
Gardeners' Chronicle that year on 2nd June at p. 346. The 
trees in the nursery of Messrs. Veitch at Coombe Wood 
flowered for the first time in 1911, and a figure was given 
in the Gardeners' Chronicle that year on 27th May at p. 329. 
Both of these figures represent conditions with relatively 
small flowers. Meanwhile, however, the original tree at 
Les Barres has at last developed its full beauty, and from 
this tree has been obtained the material on which our 
illustration has been based, the fruiting specimens having 
been supplied by Mr. M. L. de Yilmorin in October, 1908, 
the flowering sprays in May, 1911. Mr. Hemsley has 
discussed the history of the introduction of Davidia in the 
Kew Bulletin for 1907 at p. 301, and described the 
germination of the seeds in the Linnean Society's Journal, 
vol. xxxv. at p. 556, while Mr. A. S. Home has dealt 
exhaustively with the structure and affinities of this 
remarkable plant in the Linnean Society's Transactions, 
series 2, vol. vii. at p. 303. The various forms which it 
assumes are considered by Mr. Hemsley, Mr. M. L. de 
Yilmorin, and Mr. E. H. Wilson to be no more than 
varieties of one species. Mr. L. II. Dode, however, is 
inclined to distinguish three species, recognisable by the 
colour and the degree of pubescence of their leaves. As a 
tree for the climate of the British Isles Davidia possesses 
two very valuable characteristics : it starts into growth 
late and finishes early. Thus it escapes damage alike 
from late i-pring or from early autumn frosts. So far as 
the experience of the last ten years enables us to judge it 
is quite ^ hardy. A vigorous feeder, it needs a deep, moist, 
well-drained loam. It can be increased by cuttings, but 
plants so raised do not grow with the clean vigour of 
seedlings. 



Description.— -Tree of medium height, with Linden-like 
foliage, and capitate inflorescences with two large white 
bracts. Leaves alternate, ovate- or orbicular-cordate, 
abruptly caudate-acuminate, coarsely serrate with glandu- 
lar or thickened teeth, 2£-4| in. long, 2-3 in. wide, 
at first adpressed hirsute, especially on the midrib and 
nerves, soon glabrous ; main-nerves 5-7 on each side, 
rather prominent, forked; petiole slender, l§-4 in. long, 
almost cylindric, with a faint channel above ; stipules 0. 
Inflorescence apparently terminal, capitate, pendulous, 
monogamous or heterogamous ; peduncle 2-bracteate near 
the top, in flower 2-3 in., in fruit 3-4 in. long; bracts 
almost opposite, sessile, usually unequal, leafy, white, 
membranous, oblong-lanceolate or oblanceolate, acuminate, 
base rounded or subcordate, the longer up to 6 in. in 
length, overhanging the pendulous capitulum, soon de- 
ciduous. Capitulum generally heterogamous, about l£ in. 
across, many-flowered, with a solitary 2 -sexual and many 
male florets, or with only male flowers, or only a solitary 
female flower; receptacle subglobose, without bracteoles. 
Male flowers sessile, naked or with perianth reduced to a 
swollen ring. Stamens 1-7, or sometimes (Home) 12, 
attached annularly ; filaments well developed, filiform ; 
anthers purple, cordate, 2-locular, apiculate. Hermaphro- 
dite (or apparently hermaphrodite) flower shortly pedicelled, 
obliquely set on the globose receptacle. Perianth 0, or 
reduced to minute epigynous scales mixed with the stamens. 
Stamens 5-10 or more — sometimes up to 26 (Home)', small, 
epigynous and usually apparently imperfect. Ovary 
inferior, generally 7-celled ; cells 1-ovuled ; style-lobes as 
many as cells, much recurved ; ovules pendulous. Fruit 
drupe-like, ellipsoid, about 1| in. long, greenish -yellow 
with brown dots ; epicarp and mesocarp thin ; endocarp 
bony, very hard, opening by dorsal chinks extending to 
the middle of the fruit ; embryo straight, enclosed in a thin 
endosperm ; radicle superior, rather snorter than the oblong 
cotyledons. 

Fig. 1, an inflorescence from which most of the stamens have fallen ; 2, a 
cluster of male flowers from which most of the stamens have fallen ; 3, a stamen ; 
4, ovary in transverse section:— all enlarged. 



8433 




M.S.del.J.N.FitchHth. 



"Vincent Broolcs.D ay ScSonl I 



"L Reeve &CrLandon. 



Tab. 8433. 
iris chrysographes. 

China. 

Ibidaceae. Tribe Irideae. 
Ibis, Linn. ; Benih. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 686. 



Iris chrysographes, Dykes in Gard. Chron. 1911, vol. xMx. p. 362; affinis 
J. Forrestn, Dykes, sed habitu, foliis minus arete dispositis, florum colore 
et SPguientornm exteriorum lamina magis deflexa oblongo- vel subobovato- 
elliptica distiacta. 

Herba rhizomatosa, circiter 4 dm. alta, pluricaulis. Carries simplicos, folia 
1-2 redacta gerentes, angustissime fistnlosi, 1-2-flori. Folia liu'earia, 
superne longe attenuata, acuta, arcuatim extra curvata, 35-45 cm. longa' 
7-8 mm. lata, viridia. Spathae angustae, virides, acutae, 5-7 cm. longae! 
Pedicelli 25-37 cm. Lmgi. Perigonii tubus circiter 1 cm. longus; 
tegmenta exteriora valde deflexa, lamina oblongo- vel subobovato-elliptica^ 
5 cm. longa, 2'5 cm. lata, pulcherrime atro-purpureo-violacea, velutino- 
papillosa, medio striis striolisque aureis notata, ungue lineari-oblongo, 
2-5-3 cm. lorigo, rubro-purpureo, tenuiter aureo-maculato ; segment* 
interiora erecta, oblonga, obtusa, in unguem attenuate, eo incluso 6-6-5 
cm. longa, 8-10 cm. lata, atro-purpureo-violacea. Styli rami saturate 
purpurei, cristae lobis ovatis obtusis. Staminum filamenta circiter 1 • 7 cm. 
longa, antlitrae 13 cm. longae. Ovarium 1*5 cm. longum.— 0. Staff. 



The handsome Iris here figured was discovered in 
Western Szechuan in 1908, where it was found by Mr. 
E. H. Wilson growing in thickets near Kuan Hsi'en at 
elevations of from 7,000 to 11,000 feet above sea-level. 
The plant from which the material for our plate was 
obtained was grown by Mr. W. E. Dykes in his garden at 
Charterhouse, Godalming, from a seedling raised by Miss 
Willmott in her garden at Warley Place, Essex. It came 
into flower towards the end of May, 1911. A freely 
floriferous species and at the same time one of the most 
richly coloured of those now in cultivation, /. chrysographes 
promises to prove a favourite garden plant. As Mr. Dykes 
has pointed out in the Gardeners' Chronicle, the species is 
a member of the " Sibirica " group, and is closely allied to 
/. Forrestii, Dykes, but differs in colour of flower and in 
habit; it also flowers somewhat earlier than I. Forrestii. 
May, 1912. 



Among the more familiar species in collections it also 
approaches rather closely to /. laevigata, Fisch., but may 
be^ at once distinguished by its narrower, more sharply 
pointed spathes. The rich dark purple flowers with their 
velvety texture render the plant a very conspicuous object ; 
the colour is well set off by the central line and the 
broken flanking streaks of golden yellow. These flanking 
streaks vary somewhat in number and extent, sometimes 
they are almost absent and only the central golden yellow 
line appears. Another species closely allied to I. chryso- 
graphes is /. Delavayi, Micheli, from Yunnan, which has, 
however, a different capsule and seeds, and as a garden 
plant is readily distinguished by its taller stature and by 
its blue purple flowers with white markings. Mr. Dykes 
nnds that /. chrysographes is not difficult to grow in any 
soil that is fairly rich in humus and is not heavily charged 
with lime. It appears not to demand either the excessive 
moisture or the very retentive soil in which /. Delavayi 
best succeeds. a 

Description.— Herb ; rhizome rather slender, giving off 
several rather slender unbranched stems, hollow with a 
narrow lumen about 1J-1J ft. high, bearing 1-2 reduced 
leaves and 1-2 flowers. Leaves linear, much narrowed 
upwards, acute, curving outwards, 1{-U ft l on o- x_L i n 
wide, green Spathes narrow, green, acute, 2-2l & int long.' 
Pedicels 1-lJ m> lon „ Perianth with tube a] ^ mit 5 j.fe 

long; outer segments much deflexed ; blade oblong-- or 
almost obovate-e liptic, 2 in. long, 1 i n . wide, brilliant dark 
purple-violet, velvety papillose, marked in the centre with 
golden yellow lines and streaks; claw lin ear-oblong: 1-1* 
in. long, reddish purple, finely dotted with golden yellow • 
inner segments erect oblong, obtuse, narrowed below into 

purple- violet Style with deep purple arms, their crests 
with ovate blun lobes. Siemens with filaments about 8 lin. 
long, anthers 6 lin. long. Ovary 8 lin. long. 



^S^JSLfST 1 2 and 3 ' «°™*'> 4, sti gm a: all enlar^l 



843*. 












- 












-«s=n s- w ~^m 




m 




VL 



ch]lth. 



Bve&.C?Londnn 



Tab. 8434. 
SAXIFRAGA lingulata. 

Maritime Alps. 

Saxifragaceae. Tribe Saxifrageae. 
Saxtfeaga, Linn.; Benth. tt Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 635. 



Saxifraga lingulata, Bellardi, App. Fl. Pedem. p. 20; Engl Monoqr. Saxifraqa, 
p. '235; Burnett, FI. Alpes Marit. vol. iii. p. 25i); Sprayne in Kew Bull. 
1911, p. 129 ; rosulis foliorum polyphyllis, foliis longis' linearibus acutis 
supra canaliculars distincta. 

Herha caudiculis rosulas polyphyllas gerentibus. Folia linearia (interdum 
subspathulato-linearia), acuta, 3-12 cm. longa, 3-5 mm. lata, rioda, 
recurva, supra canaliv-ulata, inferne rubra, foveis mtramarginalibus 
num,rosis conspicue caloareo-incrustatis. Panicula suboblonga, raultiflora ; 
pedunculus 6-13 cm. longus, foliatus ; bracteae oblongae, acuta'e, in r eriores 
circiter 1 • 5 cm. longae, ceterae sursum gradatim minores. Calyx inferne 
minute glandulosus; lobi suberecti, ohlongi, apice rotundati, 2"5 mm 
longi, 1-5 mm. lati, glanduloso-ciliolati. Petala anguste obovata vel 
oblongo-obovata, 8 mm. longa, 35 mm. lata, alba, inferne ciliolata 
purpureo-gnttata, trinervia nervis lateralibus \ supra basin ortis. FHa- 
menta subulata, oppositisepala 2-5 mm. longa, oppositipetala 2 mm longa. 
Styh breves, liben, apice demum rtcurvi.— $. caliosa, Smith in J. Dickson 
Coll. Dried PI. fasc. 3, no. 63, nomen prius.— T. A. Sprague. 



The subject of our plate is an old garden plant which 
has been grown for many years in the collection at Kew, 
where it is quite hardy. Perhaps the finest of the Silver 
Saxifrages, S. lingulata was discovered by Bellardi in the 
mountains of Piedmont towards the close of the eighteenth 
century, and was at first confused by most botanists with 
the Pyrenaean S. longifolia. Typical S. lingulata would 
appear to be all but confined to the Italian Maritime Alps. 
On the French side of the frontier its place is taken by a 
distinct variety, var. lantoscana, Engl, which has short, 
spathulate, very obtuse leaves and a unilateral panicle. In 
Central and Southern Italy it is again replaced by another 
distinct variety, var. australis, Engl., which has broader, 
more or less linear-spathulate leaves. These two varieties 
have sometimes been treated as specifically distinct from 
S. lingulata proper, but the identity of the three as regards 
May, 1912. 



floral characters and the existence of numerous intermediate 
forms—apart altogether from possible hybrids — render it 
inadvisable to separate them specifically. It is interesting 
to note that the high-level forms of var. australis from 
Naples and Sicily approach more closely to var. lantoscana, 
at the other extreme of the general specific area, than they 
do to the typical plant. Though hardy at Kew, the atmo- 
spheric conditions are adverse to the formation of good 
inflorescences in the open, and the plant shows to most 
advantage when given frame treatment and planted in a 
pot or pan of loam and powdered limestone. Away from 
the smoke of London, as for example in the garden of Miss 
Willmott, at Warley Place, Essex, this species is a success, 
planted on a rockery in a sunny position, where it thrives 
vigorously and forms a large clump. & Iwqulata flowers 
in May. J 

Description.—^^, with a rosulate many-leaved crown 
and a central flowering stem. Leaves linear or sometimes 
subspatnulate-lmear, acute, 1-5 in. long, U- 2± lin wide 
rigid, recurved, channelled above, red near the base, with 
numerous marginal pits loaded with chalk. Panicle many- 
flowered, rather oblong; the flowering stem below the 
panicle 2-5 in. long, leafy ; bracts oblong, acute, the lower 
about J in long, the rest gradually smaller upwards. 
Lalyx finely glandular near the base; lobes suberect 
oblong with rounded tips, over 1 lin. long, under 1 lin' 
wide, glandular-ciholate. Petals narrow-obovate or oblou"-- 
obovate, 4 Im. long, under 2 lin. wide, white, ciliolate near 
the base and dotted with reddish-purple within, 3-nerved 
in the upper two-thirds. Filaments subulate, those opposite 
the sepals over 1 lin. long, rather longer than those opposite 
the petals, btyles short, free, ultimately recurved at the 
tip. 

6 S&1 1 ; 7 TV I' ^ 9Ct ; ?■' fl °T er with P etaIs removcd ! 4 > V^l : 5, stamen ; 




8435 



l.ReevefLC?L ■ 



Tab. 8435. 

HYPOCALYMMA robustum. 

West Australia. 

Myetaceae. Tribe Leptospebmeae. 

Hypocalymma, Schauer; Benth. et Eook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 702 
(Hypocalymna). 



Hypoealymma robustum, Lindl. in Bot. Beg. vol. xxis. t. 8 ; Schauer in 
Linnaea, vol. xvii. p. 241, et in Lehm. PI. Preiss. vol. i. p. 110; Benth. Fl. 
Austral, vol. iii. p. 92 ; Be Wild. Ic. Bort. Then. vol. vi. t. 235; ab H. stricto, 
Scbauer, cui affinis, floribus minoribus distinguendum. 

Suffrutex circiter unimefcralis, glaber; ramuli strlcti, virgati, cortice rubro- 
brunneo obtecti. Folia patentia, sessilia, crassa, linearia vel lineari- 
lanceolata, apice acuta, 1-2 cm. longa, sectione transversa ambitu ])lus 
minusve triangularia, ut in receptaculo sepalis petalisque pauci-glandulosu. 
Flores axillares, plerumque gemini, sessiles, sed nonnunquam 3-4-nati et 
pedunculo communi perbrevi validiusculo suffulti; bracteae bracteolaeque 
scariosae, circiter 2 "5 mm. longae, 1-1-75 mm. latae, concavae. Rteepta- 
culnm obconico-patelliforme, circiter 3*5 mm. diametro. Sepala oblt>ngo- 
rotundata, ad 2-5 mm. longa et 2-25 mm. lata, scariosa. Pefala punicea, 
obovato-elliptica, 3*5 mm. longa, 3 mm. lata. Stamina 30-40, petala 
subaequantia, filamentis basi breviter connatis. Stylus 4l mm. Iongus; 
ovarium apice planum, 2-loculatum, 6-ovulatum. — Leptospermum robus/n/n, 
Endl. Hueg. Enum. p. 50.— W. G. Ceaib. 



The Swan Eiver Peach Myrtle, which we here figure, is 
a West. Australian plant that half a century ago was a 
favourite decorative pot-shrub in English conservatories, 
where it was grown along with species of Boronia, Chart- 
zema, Epacris, and Erica. Now that the cultivation of 
hard-wooded greenhouse plants has fallen out of favour it 
is rarely seen in private collections. Out of doors it has 
always been somewhat difficult to grow, even in the most 
favoured parts of the United Kingdom, and the plant from 
which the material on which our plate is based was derived 
has the two-fold interest of being one which was grown in 
the open, though in a very sheltered position under a wall, 
in the garden of the late Mr. Gumbleton at Belgrove, 
Queenstown, and of being the last of the many contribu- 
tions sent by that distinguished and successful gardener to 
May, 1912. 



embellish the pages of this Magazine. In the garden at 
Belgrove it flowers in the month of February. The plants, 
which are now included in the genus Hypocalymma, were 
at first considered to belong to the genus Leptospermum, 
though they were treated by Endlicher as constituting a 
distinct section of the latter genus. To this section Lindley 
and Schauer simultaneously and independently accorded 
the rank of a distinct genus, and their decision has never 
been questioned since, though, owing to a typographical 
error which has found currency, the name in English 
garden lists has of late years usually been given as 
Hypocalymna. 

Description. — Uhdershrub, 3-4 ft. high; twigs strict, 
virgate, glabrous ; bark reddish-brown. Leaves spreading, 
sessile, thick, linear or linear-lanceolate, acute, J-§ in. long, 
more or less triangular in section, sparingly glandular. 
Flowers axillary, usually in pairs, sessile ; sometimes 3-4- 
nate and then borne on a very short rather stout peduncle ; 
bracts and bracteoles scarious, about 1 Hn. long, nearly as 
wide, concave. Receptacle obconic patelliform, about 2 lin. 
wide. Sepals rounded oblong, scarious, about 1 lin. long 
and broad. Petals pink, elliptic obovate, nearly 2 lin. long, 
H lin. wide. Stamens 30-40, about as long as the petals ; 
filaments shortly connate below. Style 2 lin. long ; ovary 
flattened at the top, 2-celled, 6-ovuled. 



Fig. 1 leaf; % flower-buds; 3, flower in longitudinal section: 4 and 5 
stamens; b, ovary in transverse section :— all enlarged. ' 



8436 




S.deLJ.NJitch.hth. 



WncentBrooks.Day &SorLl;t d imp 



Tab. 8436. 

CALCEOLARIA Forgetii. 

Peru. 

Sceophulabiaceae. Tribe Calceolabieae. 

Calceolabia, Linn.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 029; Kranzl. in 
&nyl. Pflanzenr. Scroph.-Antirrh.-Calc. p. 21. 



Calceolaria Forgetii, Shan ; species C. virgatae, Ruiz et Pav. affinis, Red 
loins longms petiolatis oppositis (nunquam ternatis), corollae labio infero 
erecto ad labium superum adpresso orificio rninore et ungue breviore 

Suffrutex ad 4 "5 dm. altus. Caules graciles, teretes, griseo-puberuli, cortice 
purpurascente ; mternodia 2-5-6-5 cm. longa. Folia ovata, 15-6 cm. 
(saepms 3-4 cm.) longa, 1-4 cm. (saepius 2-2-5 cm.) lata, obtusa vel 
subacuta, irregulariter crenato-serrata, basi rotundata vel paulum cuneata, 
supra saturate vindia, breviter pubescentia, infra pallidiora, venis primariis 
pubescentibus exceptis fere glaberrima, glandulis sessilibus instructa; 
petioms U-o-1-5 cm. longus, sat dense pilosus. Cymae subdichasiales 
cauies et ramulos summos terminantes, paniculam laxam multifloram 
ob ongam vel pyramidalem 1 ■ 5-2 dm. longam formantes. PedietUi graciles, 
£> LA mm. longi, sat dense breviter pubescentes. Ualyx circiter 4 mm. 
longus 4-lobus ; Iobi late ovati vel suborbiculares, subaequales,3-3-5 mm. 
longi, l -5-3 mm. lati, obtusi vel rotundati, integerrimi, extra et ad margi aea 
dense pilosi vel villosi, glandulis sessilibus instructi. Corolla 7-10 mm. 
longa, 5-8 mm. lata, pallide lutea, labio infero basi intra macula magna 
rubro-brunnea ornato, labiis basi ciliatis; labium superum cahri sub- 
aequilongum cueullatum, basi 5 mm. latum ; labium inferum ol>ovoideo- 
globosum, 6-9 mm. longum, erectum, ad labium superum adpressum, vix 
usque ad medium apertum, ungui brevi latoque. Stamina corollae labio 
supero paulum longiora; filamenta parce pilosa. Ovarium ovoideum, 
densissime glanduloso-papillosum ; stylus vix 2 mm. longus.— S. A. Ska*. 



The pleasing Calceolaria here figured was presented to 
Kew in 1909 by Messrs. F. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, to 
whom seeds had been sent by Mr. Forget when collecting 
on their behalf in Peru. It forms a compact little shrub, 
and when out of flower has the aspect of a Heliotrope or 
of a bedding Verbena. When it flowered for the first time 
it was believed to be C. vinjaia, Ruiz & Pav., to which it, 
is certainly closely allied, and under this name was referred 
to in the Gardeners' Chronicle, 1912, vol. Ii. p. 50, where 
a figure, reproduced from a photograph, is given. But, as 
Mr. Skan points out, the figure originally supplied by Ruiz 
and Pavon of their C. virgata (Fl. Peruv. vol. i. t. 31, 
Mat, 1912. 



fig. a) represents a plant with opposite or ternate subsessile 
leaves, and with a considerably diverse lip. No doubt the 
species now figured has been, in various collections, referred 
to C. virgata. The flowers of C. Forgetii are smaller than 
is usual in the genus and are not very conspicuous in 
colour; they are, however, very freely produced, and on 
this account impart a distinct horticultural value to the 
plant. They are remarkable from the fact that the pouched 
lower lip points upwards. At Kew plants placed in an 
open sunny border have grown well and flowered freely 
in summer, but have not withstood the winter in the open. 
Plants grown in pots in a greenhouse have, however, 
flowered almost as freely and proved equally attractive. 

Description.— Under shruh, 1-1 \ ft. high; stems slender, 
terete, grey pubescent with purplish bark ; internodes l-2£ 
in. long. Leaves ovate, £-2j in., usually lj-lf in. long, 
i-if in., usually |-1 in. wide, obtuse or subacute, irregu- 
larly crenate serrate, base rounded or somewhat cuneate, 
dark green and shortly pubescent above, paler beneath 
and nearly glabrous, but beset with sessile glands except 
along the pubescent nerves and veins ; petiole \-\ in. long, 
rather closely hairy. Cymes at the ends of the stem and 
branches, forming an oblong or pyramidal lax many- 
flowered panicle 6-8 in. long. Pedicels slender, 4-4 in 
long, shortly but rather closely pubescent. Calyx about 
2 lin. long, 4-lobed ; lobes wide-ovate or suborbicular 
subequal, 11-2 lin. long, 1-1 1 lin. wide, obtuse or rounded^ 
quite entire, densely hairy or villous outside and on the 
margins, beset with sessile glands. Corolla 4-5 lin long 
2^-4 lin. wide, pale yellow except for a large reddish 
brown blotch inside the lower lip ; lips ciliate at the base, 
the upper cucullate about as long as the calyx, U lin. wide 
at the base, the lower lip obovoid globose, 3-4± lin long 
erect and adpressed to the upper lip, barely open as far as 
the middle, with a short broad claw. Stamens rather longer 
than the upper lip of the corolla ; filaments sparingly hairy 
Ovary ovoid, densely glandular papillose; style hardly 
1 Jin. long. J 

Fig 1, flower; 2 calyx in section, showing pistil; 3, corolla; 4, basal portion 
of corolla showing the blotch within ; 5, a stamen :-ull enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA j a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By Geoege BenthaM 
F.E.S. Eevised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W H 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Benthams "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.E.S., President of the Linntean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A.,'f L S 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition. 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Eev. M. J.Berkeley 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21#. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Chakles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, Ac. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 
BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkelef, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worth ington G. Smith 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Currey, F.E.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^J. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 
FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.E.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mukllek, F.E.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 
FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants of 
the Cape Colony, CafFraria, and Port Natal. By W. H. Harvrt and 
O. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thisemon-Dyer, F.E.S. Vols 
I.— III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V 
Parts I. & II., 9s. each. Part III., 8s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.E.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 305. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6d 
Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— IV., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d" 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.E.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Seore- 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2*. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 89, MAY, 1912. 



Tab. 8432.— D AVIDIA INVOLUCRATA, var. VILMORINIANA. 
„ 8433.— IRIS CHRYSOGRAPHES. 
„ 8434.— SAXIFRAGA LINGULATA. 
„ 8435.— HYPOCALYMMA ROBUSTUM. 
„ 8436.— CALCEOLARIA FORGETII. 

Lovell Reevk <fc Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemslky. 



BOTANIOAL PLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is. each. Lista of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 



NOW BEADY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— IV., 8s. each. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6<i. Vol. VII., 27s. Gd. Vol. VIII. 

25s. 6d. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., Part II., 9s. each ; Part in., 8s 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description rt^Banbof the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

Vols. 1. to in., 20s. each. 
By HARVEY and SOJSTDEE. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F R S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 24s. *ol. V., Part I., k Vol. VI, 24s. 

Vol. VII., 33s. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 

Natal and Transvaal. 



Lovell Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



LONUOH : PRIHTBD BY WHJJA* CLOWES ASdIo^tZVuKB STREKT, STAMFORD STKKZT, S.S. 



is 



No. 90/ 



VOL. VIII.— JUNE. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 425. 



or No. 1504 0F THE ENTIRE w obk. 

CUKTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGCBES WITH DESCKIPTIONS, 8TRUCTDRAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OP NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW. 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Dirmor, Royal Botanic Gardens, Scto. 



X3l 




" Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and white 
Nature's own sweet and cunning hand laid on." 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME. COLONIAL AND INDIAN" GOVERNMENT*. 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, OOV8NT GARDEN. 

1*312. 

[All rights reserved.'] 
{Entered at Vie New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



ICHAJRD 
EMEOIE 



XL ALL. 

FJ^WGICIDES. 
KILLER Ac. 

mm 



FROM 



HORTICULTURAL-TRADE EVFRVWHFfiF 



MANUFACTURER: 



G. H. RICHARDS, 

234, Borough High Street, London, S.E. 



Himalayan (hardy) Rhododendrons, 

and other species. 

Rare Shrubs, Alpines, 

the most Complete Collection. 

Dwarf Alpine Shrubs. All the best Herbaceous 
Plants and Aquatics. Daffodils and Lilies, and 
all the choicest Hardy Bulbous Plants. 

Construction of Rockeries and Planting. 

Catalogue on application. 

G. REUTHE, 

The Fox Hill Nursery, Keston, Kent. 

GLYNDE 

SCHOOL OF GARDENING 

SUSSEX. 



Principal: Hon. FRANCES WOLSELEY. 



SEVERAL VACANCIES. 

Moderate Terms. 
Past Students prosper well. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



XfiE HEPATIC^ OF THE BRITISH ISLES, 

By W. H. PEARSON. 
2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

Bi thk Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 

a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Wobthington G. Smith, F.L.S. 
Two Vols., 24 Coloured Plates, 36s. The Supplement separately, 12s. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F. R. S. 

Bevised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.B.S., &c. 9s. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 

Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Benthavi's " Handbook," and otiier British Flora. 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Kngraviugs, Ds. 



LOVELL REEVE & CO., Lid., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 




8437 



M-SdelJ 



Vincent Brooks.Day &• Son Lt4iTOp. 



L Reeve &.C° London.. 



Tab. 8437. 

BRACHYCHITON acerifolils. 

Australia. 

Sterouliaceae. 

Biuciiychiton, Schott et Endl. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 218, pro 
sechoxe Sterculiae ; K. Schum. in Engl, et Frantl. Nat. Pflanzcnf. vol. iii. 0, 
p. 90. * j j 



.Brachychiton acerifolius, F. Muell. Frwjm. vol. i p 1- vol ii p 177' 
vol. v. p. 209 ; vol. vi. p. 173; Second Census Austral. PI. p. 26; affinis 
li. pojmlneo, E.Br., a quo foliis palmatim 5-lobisvel 7-lobis, necnon floribus 
glabris differt. 

Arbor 18-30 m. alta semidccidua, glabra. Folia longipetiolati. ftmbitu semi- 
elliptica vel suborbicnlaria, 20-21 cm. diameteo, ultra medium palmatim 
o-Moba, basi p.us minusve cordata, tenuiter coriacea, nitidula, creberrime 
reticulata, Iobis ovato-oblongis interdum subtrilobis obtuse cuspidatis 
interne angustatis; petioli 15-25 cm. Iongi. Faniculae axillares multi- 
florae, versus apices ramulorum aggrcgatae. Flora polygami, penduli, 
vjvide coccinei rf Calyx infundibulari-campanulatus, sub anthesi 12 15 
mm. longus; lobi deltoidei, reflexi Fetala 0. Stamina perfecta circiter 15, 
ex apice gonophon medio iucrassati et hcunosi orta; iilamenta interne in 
tnhum plus minusve connata, 5 interiora longiora, ananthera, carpella 5 
rudimentaria circumdantia. $ Calyx maris. Fetala 0. GonoUorum- 
breve, incrassatum. Stamina maris. Carpella 5 ; ovaria libera, oblonga, 
papiilata ; sty u in feme hberi, superne connati ; stigmata in unum quinque- 
lobatum connate. Folliculi magni, longo stipitati, tfzbvi.- Sterculia aceri- 
/<*•«, A. Cunn.in Loudon, Hort. Brit. p. 392, partim; Benth. Fl. Austr. 
vol. i. p 229; Moore & Betcbe, Handb. Fl. N. S. Wales, p. 62; Bailey, 
Queensl. Fl., pars 1, p. 138; Quilfoyle, Australian Plants, pp. 341, 103.- 

1. A. bPKAGUE. x r 

The Flame Tree, for such is the name given in Queens- 
land and New South Wales to the species which forms the 
subject of our plate, is a tree which attains, in its native 
forests, a height of from sixty to a hundred and twenty feet 
with a trunk three feet through; it vields a soft 'light- 
coloured wood. According to London the species was first 
introduced into England in 1824, and there is a drawing in 
the collection at Kew made from a plant growing in the 
Itoyal Gardens in 182G. This drawing bears a note to the 
ettect that the plant was introduced from New South Wales 
m 1825. In the garden of Lady Hanbury at La Mortola, 
V entimigha, B. acerifolius thrives in the open air but at 
hew it can only be grown under glass, and the material for 
our illustration has been obtained from a plant which is 
June, 1912. L 



grown in one of the beds in the central portion of the 
Temperate House, and is now a tree about forty feet high. 
This plant has been in cultivation at Kew since 1862, when 
it was presented to the national collection by Messrs. J. 
Veitch & Sons, Chelsea. Under cultivation in a greenhouse 
the species is easily kept in health, but it evidently requires 
abundant sunshine to induce it to flower, which the Kew 
plant did for the first time in June 1910. Already two 
other species of this genus have been figured in this work; 
B. Bidwillii, Hook., at t. 5133, and B. discolor, F. Muell. at 
t. 6608. 

Description.— Tree, 60-120 ft. in height, semideciduous, 
glabrous. Leaves long-petioled, semi-elliptic or suborbicular, 
b-10 in. across, palmately 5-7-partite, the base more or less 
cordate, thinly coriaceous, shining, closely reticulated ; lobes 
ovate-oblong, sometimes slightly 3-lobed, bluntly cuspidate, 
narrowed downwards; petiole 6-10 in. long. Panicles 
axillary, many-flowered, clustered towards the ends of the 
twigs Flowers polygamous, pendulous, bright pink. 
2 Calyx narrow campanula^, 6-7 lin. long when in flower ; 
lobes deltoid, reflexed. Petals absent. Stamens about 15 
perfect, attached at the tip of a gonophore thickened and 
spongy at the middle ; filaments more or less connate below 
in a tube, the 5 inmost longer than the rest and without 
anthers, surrounding 5 rudimentary carpels. % Calyx as 
in the male. Petals absent. Gonophore short and stout 
btamens as in the male. Carpels 5 ; ovaries free, oblong 
papillate; styles free below, connate above; stigmas united 

m iabrou8 10b0late head * Fdlicles lar 2 e ' lon S stipitate, 

J&]'S a^n£^:^ tl0n Sb ° Wing StameDS ^ rUdimeDtary 



8438 




M.S. del. J.N. Fitch Mi 



"Vincent Brooks,Day*.Son 



LReeve&C? London.. 



Tab. 8438. 

RUPICOLA SPRENGELIOIDKS. 

Australia. 

Epackidaceae. Tribe Epacrideae. 
RDPICOLA, Maid, in Proc. Linn. Soc. N.S. Wales, vol. xxiii. (1898), p. 774. 



Rupicola sprengelioides, Maid., I.e. p. 775; species unica. 

Frutex ad 75 m. altus, ramia virgatis tenuiter pubescentibus dense foliatis. 
Folia lineari-lanceolata, obtusiuscule acuminata, basi in petiolum brevissi- 
mum contracta, 1-5-2, ex autore ad 3 cm. longa, 2-3 mm. lata, rigid*, 
subovenia. Flares in foliorum axillis solitarii, plerumque all ramorum 
apicibus remoti, quasi in racemum multiflorum foliatum superne sterilcm 
congesti ; pedicelli graciles, bracteati, ad 1 cm. Ionpi, tenuiter puberuli ; 
bracteae 12-16 secundum pcdicellum dispositi, sursum accrescentes, 
inferiores ovato-oblongae, superiores lanceolatae, summae acuminatae et 
sepalis similes nisi breviores. Sepala persistentia, anguste lanceolata, 
acuminata, 5-5 mm. longa, pallide viridia, anguste albo-marginat a. 
Corolla subrotata, fere 1*5 cm. diametro, lactea: tubus vix 1 mm. longus; 
segmenta ovata, subacuta, 6 mm. longa, 2-5-3 mm. lata. Filameida 
1-5 mm. longa, papillosula; antherae aequilongae, 1-loculares, ab ^apice 
rima una dehiscentes. Discus obscurus. Ovarium glabrum ; stylus 3"5 mm. 
longus, filiformis ; stigma stylo vix latius. Capsula, e specimiue spontaneo, 
globosa, 2 mm. diametro, loculicide dehiscens. Semina oblique ovoidea, 
6-0 7 mm. longa.— 0. teTArr. 



The interesting Epacrid which forms the subject of our 
plate was discovered by Messrs. J. H. Maiden and W. Forsyth 
near the southern edge of the King's Tableland in the Blue 
Mountains of New South Wales in 1898, and was first 
described by Mr. Maiden in the same year. To Mr. Maiden 
horticulture is further indebted for its introduction to this 
country, and the plant from which the material for our 
figure was obtained is one raised from seed sent by him to 
Kew in 1906. The structure of the anthers appeared to 
Mr. Maiden, when first describing the plant, to render its 
position among the Epacrideae somewhat obscure, but on 
account of the general agreement of the species with the 
genus Epacris itself as regards foliage, Mr. Maiden placed 
Rupicola next to Epacris. In this, as it now appears, the 
author was fully justified, since Rupicola is found to agree 
with Epacris as regards its anthers. With the species of 
Epacris, Rupicola further agrees in the matter of cultural 
requirements, and when treated as they are treated it forms 

June, 1912. 



shapely little shrubs, some of which flowered freely for the 
first time in April 1911. 

Description.— Shrub, 2{ ft. high ; branches virgate, 
thinly pubescent, densely leafy. Leaves linear-lanceolate, 
somewhat bluntly acuminate, narrowed at the base into a 
very short petiole, |-f in. or, in wild plants, sometimes over 
1 in. long, 1-1 1 lin. wide, rigid, inconspicuously veined. 
Flowers solitary in the leaf-axils, usually some distance 
below the tips of the twigs, and thus simulating a leafy 
many-flowered raceme with a barren apex ; pedicels slender, 
braeteate, 4-5 lin. long, thinly puberulous ; bracts 12-16 
to a pedicel uniformly disposed throughout its extent but 
increasing in size upwards ; the lowest ovate-oblong, those 
above lanceolate, the uppermost acuminate and resembling 
the sepals but rather smaller. Sepals persistent, narrow 
lanceolate, acuminate, 2^-3 lin. long, pale green with 
narrow white margins. Corolla subrotate, almost J in. 
across, milky-white; tube barely J lin. long; segments 
ovate, subacute, 3 lin. long, 1-1J lin. wide. Filaments 
under 1 lin. long, finely papillose, anthers snbequal, 1-locular, 
dehiscing from the tip by a single chink. Disk obsolete. 
Ovary glabrous ; style under 2 lin. long, filiform ; stigma 
hardly wider than the style. Capsule, in wild specimens, 
globose, 1 lin. across, opening loculicidally. Seeds obliquely 
ovoid, very small. 

Fig. 1, leaves; 2, bracts and flower; 3, corolla, laid open; 4 and 5, anthers- 
6, transverse section of an anther; 7, pistil; 8, transverse section of an ovary - 
«J vertical section of an ovary; 10, fruit; 11, fruit, two sepals removed; 
12, seed:— all enlarged except 10, which is of natural size. 



8439 







L. Reeve 



Tab. 8439. 

IXORA LUTEA. 

Garden Origin. 

Eueiaceae. Tribe Ixobeae. 
Ixoba, Linn. ; Benin, et Hook.f. Qen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 113. 



Ixora lutea, Hutchinson ; affinis 1. coccineae, Linn., Fed inflorescentia Iaxiore, 
floribus ochroleucis, corollae lobis oyato-rhomboideis abrupte mucronulatis 
differt. 

Frutex erectus, vix 1 m. altus ; rami jnniores minute puberuli, demum glabri. 
Folia oblongo-elliptica, apice conspicue mucronata, basi paullo inaequaliter 
cordata, 7-9 cm. longa, 4-5 cm. lata, tenuiter cbartacea, margine leviter 
recurvata, utrinque glabra, pallida, nervis lateralibus utrinque circiter 10 
patulis intra marginem anastomosantibus subtus prominulis, venis laxis 
utrinque distinctis; petioli crassi, 1*5 mm. longi, minute puberuli; 
stipulae e basi lato longe subulatae, 7-10 mm. longae, basi circiter 5 mm. 
latae, glabrae. Uorymbi laxiflori, circiter 12 cm. expansi ; rami primarii ad 
2 cm. longi, minute puberuli ; bracteae triangulari-subulatae, acutae, 
1*5-2 mm. longae. Ftores ochroleuci, sessiles. Beceptaculum 1*5 mm. 
longum, puberulum. Calycis lobi 4, late ovati, subacuti, L75 mm. longi, 
1*5 mm. lati, coriacei, margine leviter membranacei et interdum pauci- 
dentati, extra minute puberuli, intra basi pectinatim multiglandulosi. 
Corollae tubus cylindricus, 3"5 cm. longus, vix 1 mm. diametro, extra 
glaber; limbus 3 cm. expansus; lobi 4, ovato-rhomboidei, mucronulati, 
i'3-1'7 cm. longi, 0'5-0 - 8 cm. lati, glabri. Antherae subsessiles, exsertae, 
4 mm. longae, acute acuminatae. Ovarium 2-loculare ; stylus gracilis, glaber, 
paullo exsertus, ramis leviter recurvatis intra complanatis 2 mm. longis. — 
Ixora coccinea var. lutea, Hort. ex Veitch Cat. Indoor PI. 1910, p. 47. — 
J. Hutchinson. 



The beautiful Ixora here figured is one that has been in 
cultivation at Kew for at least a couple of decades. It was 
originally received from the Royal Botanic Garden, Pera- 
deuiya, Ceylon, under the garden name / coccinea, var. 
lutea, and under this name it is now to be met with in 
many private collections and in various nursery catalogues. 
It is certainly, as this garden name implies, most nearly 
allied to /. coccinea, figured long ago at t. 169 of this work. 
But it is readily distinguished from /. coccinea, not only by 
the colour of its flowers, but by its more lax inflorescence 
and by the larger ovate-rhomboid corolla lobes, though in 
habit and foliage it bears a close general resemblance to the 
various named forms of /. coccinea in cultivation. Like these 
June, 1912. 



other garden Ixoras, I. lutea is easily cultivated under moist 
tropical conditions, and like them, when in flower, is an 
exceedingly attractive plant. 

Description. — Shrub, 2-3 ft. high, erect ; young twigs 
at first finely puberulous, at length glabrous. Leaves 
oblong-elliptic, distinctly mucronate, base somewhat un- 
equally cordate, 3-3^ in. long, If- 2 in. wide, thinly papery, 
margin slightly recurved, pale green, glabrous on both sur- 
faces, lateral nerves about 10 on each side of the midrib, 
spreading, looping within the margin, raised beneath, 
secondary venation lax, distinct both above and below ; 
petiole stout, 7-8 lin. long, finely puberulous; stipules long 
subulate from a wide base, 4-5 lin. long, about 2^ lin. wide 
at the base, glabrous. Corymbs lax-flowered, about 2| in. 
across; main branches up to § in. long, finely puberulous; 
bracts triangular-subulate, acute, about 1 lin. long. Flowers 
pale yellow, sessile. Receptacle under 1 lin. long, puberulous. 
Calyx 4-lobed ; lobes wide ovate, subacute, under 1 lin. long, 
nearly as wide, coriaceous, their margins membranous and 
at times sparingly toothed, finely puberulous outside, pecti- 
nately glandular at the base within. Corolla 4-lobed ; tube 
cylindric, 1^ in. long, very slender, glabrous outside; limb 
about 1 in. across ; lobes ovate-rhomboid, mucronulate, 
6-8 lin. long, 2J-4 lin. wide, glabrous. Anthers almost 
sessile, exserted, 2 lin. long, acutely acuminate. Ovary 
2-celled ; style slender, glabrous, shortly exserted, its arms 
1 lin. long, slightly recurved and flattened on the inner face. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil ; 2, section of calyx and ovary; 3 and 4, stamens :— 
all enlarged. 



8440 




BrooJffi : 



Tab. 8440. 
lycium pallidum. 

Southern United States and Northern Mexico. 



Solanaceae. Tribe Ateopeae. 
Ltcium, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 9C0. 



Lyeium pallidum, Miers in Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 2, vol. xiv. p. 131 
(1854) ; species L. carolinianum, Walt., simulans, corollie tuho loiigiori 
filiimentisque glabris recedit. — Miers, 111. S. Amtr. Fl. vol. ii. p. 108, t. 67, 
fig. C ; Torrey, Bot. Mex. Bound. Surv. p. 154 ; A. Gray in Proc. Amer. Acad. 
vol. vi. p. 45, et in Syn. Fl. N. Amer. vol. ii. pars i. p. 238 ; Gard. & For. 
1888, p. 341, fig. 54 ; Mitt. Beutsch. Dendr. Gts. 1906, p. 38 ; Gard. Chron. 
1909, vol. xlvi. p. 232, cum ic. 

Frutex ramosus ; ramuli tortuosi, brunnei, dense foliosi, spinis recti's instruct:". 
Folia ad nodos incrassatos fasciculata, oblanceolata, obtusa, in petiolum 
brevem contracta, usque ad 3 cm. longa, 8 mm. lata, glauca, subcarnosa, 
venis obscuris. Flores solitares vel geminati ; pedicelli 4 mm. longi, glabri. 
Calyx pedicello paullo brevior, poculiformis, carnosus, glaber ; lobi 5, tnbo 
aequilongi, obtusi vel subacuti. Corolla pallidissime lutea vel fere alba, 
basi carneo-tincta, 2 cm. longa ; tubus infra cylindricus, superne infundi- 
buliformis; lobi 5, rhomboideo-ovati, obtusi, 5 mm. longi. Stamina 5, 
subaequilonga, exserta ; filamenta paullo supra medium tubi corollae ineerta, 
pars libera glaberrima, pars adnata pilosa ; antherae ovatae, cordatae. 
Stylus filiformis, longe oxsertus; stigma clavatnm, leviter bilobum. Bacca 
globosa, 7 mm. diametro, coccinea. — L. Schafneri, A. Gray ex Hemsl. in 
Biol. Centr. Amer. Bot. vol. ii. p. 426.— C. H. Wright. 



The Lyeium which forms the subject of our illustration 
is the most distinct and, as a flowering shrub, the most 
effective species of the genus in cultivation. It was first 
discovered by Fremont in 1844 on the Rio Virgen, one of 
the tributaries of the Colorado River, where it forms a small 
bush 2-3 feet in height. There are, as Dr. Asa Gray has 
pointed out, two distinguishable forms of L. pallidum; one 
of these, which is the form figured by Miers, was collected 
by Fendler in New Mexico, and has the corolla-tube quite 
glabrous inside; the other, from Colorado, which is that 
now figured, while agreeing with the New Mexican form in 
all other respects, has the corolla-tube hairy inside below 
the insertion of the stamens. This form, which has been m 
cultivation in the open at Kew since 1880, blossoms freely 
every year from the end cf May until mid-June, its slender 
spreading branches being gracefully wreathed from base ^to 
tip with pendent, pale-greenish ; purple-tinged flowers. But 
•k'N'i:, 191a 



until 1911 not one of the examples in the Kew collection 
ever developed a fruit ; in that summer, doubtless owing to 
the prolonged and excessive heat, an abundant crop of 
berries was produced. These, being of a bright red colour, 
rendered the plants most attractive during July and August. 
Hitherto the species has been propagated by layering, cuttings 
having proved difficult to strike. Doubtless this method of 
increase will still, as a rule, require to be adopted; it may 
be long ere another crop of fruits is borne. A loamy, weli- 
drained soil, of a light rather than heavy vet by no means 
too light character, suits it best, and it must be given the 
sunniest position available. 

Description— Shrub, 3-4 ft. high, much branched; 
branches spreading, brownish, densely leafy, armed with 
straight spines. Leaves clustered on the thickened nodes, 
oblanceolate, obtuse, narrowed to a short petiole, l-l^ in. 
long i in wide, glaucous, somewhat fleshy, ' obscurely 
veined, flowers solitary or in pairs; pedicels 2 lin. long, 
glabrous Calyx rather shorter than the pedicel, cup- 
shaped, fleshy, glabrous ; lobes 5, as long as the tube, 
obtuse or somewhat acute. Corolla pale greenish-yellow or 
almost wkte, purplish-pink at the base? | in. long ; tube 
ovn? J" \ U I-" 61 , ha P ed aW ' lob * s 5, rhomboid- 
eT.rlJ ^ H lm ' ° ng - Stamens 5 > n <*rly equal, 

tWnrnn- T^ *?*"* d * W J abov <> the ™<*dle of 

ir^' thGlr *T P ° ni0ri Z hh ™«> that below the 
hi eZr r V anthe 1 rS ovate - c °rdate. Style filiform, 

5, ^fiZttS^ • ana i, anthers; 



844 J 








\ 



3 27 




) U 






^~^7^J 










T3roa"ks,Day &.Son Lt a jjrr> 



& C? Londc 



Tab. 8441. 

PEROVSKIA ATRIPLIC1FOL1A. 

Afghanistan to Western Tibet. 

Labiatae. Tribe Monardeae. 
Perovskia, Earel. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1193 (PerowsJcia). 



Perovskia atriplicifolia, Benth. in DC. Prodr. vol. xii. p. 261; Boiss. Ft. 
Orient, vol. iv. p. 589; Aitchison in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. p. 86; 
Hook.f. Fl. Brit. Lid. vol. iv. p. 652; Andre in Bev.Hort. 1905, p. 344, cum 
tab. col. (omnes sub nomine Perowskia); species P. scrophulariaefoliae, 
Bunge, arete affinis, sed caulibus brevissime stellato-tomentosis incanis, 
foliis basi multo angustioribus differt. 

Frutex, 1-1*6 m. altus. Caules erecti, stricti, teretes, brevissime stellato- 
tomentosi, incani, superne ramosi. Folia ovato-lanceolata vel lanceolata, 
majora 4-6 cm. longa et 1-2-2-5 cm. lata, subacuta, irregulanter serrata 
vel inciso-serrata, basi gradatim angustata, primo plus minusve pi I is 
simplicis vel stellatis vestita, demum fere glabrescentia, utrinque resinoso- 
glandulosa, subtus venis primariis prominentibus ; petiolus 0-5-1-5 cia. 
longus. Inflorescentia paniculiforniis, 3-5 dm. longa, ramulis nuraerosis 
strictis gracilibus spiciformibus. Verticillastri numerosissimi, 2-b-tiori, 
plus minusve dissiti. Bracteolae anguste ovatae vel lauceolatae, calyce 
breviores. Flores sessiles vel brevissime pedicellati. Calyx tubulosus, 
3-4 mm. longus, leviter 2-labiatus, dense albo-liir.sutus, resinoso-glandu- 
losus; labium superum inaequaliter 3-dentatum; labium infer nm J-deuta- 
tum ; dentes deltoidei, acuti, 0-5-1 mm. longi. Corolla coerulea circiter 
1 cm. longa, parce pilosa; tubus tubuloso-infundibuhforims O-o mm. 
longus, intus oblique annulato-pilosns ; limbus patens planus 2-labiatus; 
labium superum 4-lobum, 4-5 mm. longum, 8 mm. latum, lobw ovatis 
vel sul>orbicularibus, 1*5-2 mm. longis 1-25-2* 5 mm. latis; labium 
inferum indivisum, elliptico-ovatum, 3-4 mm. longum d mm latum 
Stamina 4, 2 postica minima, sterilia, inclusa, 2 antica ertilia subinclusa 
vel longe exserta. A uculae obovoideae, basi disco leviter denticulato ciuctae. 
Stylus inclusus vel exsertus. — S. A. Sean. 



The Labiate genus Perovskia, to which the plant here 
figured belongs, is a somewhat anomalous one, comprising 
four species, two of which are natives of Turkestan with a 
third confined to Beluchistan, and a fourth, the one now 
depicted, which extends from the mountains ot Afghanistan 
through the Western Himalaya to Western Tibet. In the 
Karakoram Range it is met with at elevations up to 
10,000 feet above sea level. Dr. Aitchison has reported it 
as plentiful in certain parts of the Kuram Valley, and 
described it as being singularly striking when in flower. 
The flowers in Afghanistan are usually lavender-coloured, 



June, 1912. 



but are occasionally pure white ; the plant has an odour 
closely resembling that of Salvia officinalis. The plant from 
which the material for our plate has been obtained is one 
that was procured for the Kew collection in 1906 from 
Messrs. Bees, Limited. Under cultivation it retains the 
features attributed to it in the wild state by Aitchison ,• its 
chief value as a garden plant lies in the abundant and very 
pleasing display of blossom which it provides in August 
and September when few shrubby species are to be had in 
flower. The silvery grey of the stems and flower-stalks 
affords an admirable contrast with the rich violet-blue of 
the corollas. The flowers are produced in a large panicle, 
1-1A ft. high, terminating the current season's growth. 
Much of the upper part of this growth is soft and dies off in 
winter ; the plant should therefore be pruned back to the 
woody portion of the stem and branches every spring. Like 
most of the Labiate family, it is easily increased by cuttings 
of young wood, made about July and placed in gentle heat. 
P. atriplicifolia thrives well in a deep but not heavy loam. 
There has been some dubiety as to the exact natural 
position of the genus, mainly perhaps owing to the fact that 
both Karelin and Bentham have described as the upper lips 
ot the calyx and corolla what in reality are the lower. Bunge, 
who pointed out this misapprehension in 1851, has shown 
that the corolla is almost identical in structure with that of 
some ot the Ocimoideae. The flowers are dimorphic ; some- 
times, as m our figure, with short stamens and an exserted 
style sometimes with an included style and with exserted 
tertile stamens. 

Description.-^^, 3-5 ft. high. Stem erect, strict, terete, 
shortly stellate-tomentose hoary, branching upwards. Leaves 
ovate-laneeo ate or lanceolate, the largest l£-2± in long, 
4-1 m wide, subacute, irregularly serrate or incised, 
gradually narrowed to the base, at first more or less 
covered with simple or stellate hairs, at length nearly 
glabrous, resmously glandular on both surfaces with rather 
raised main-nerves beneath ; petiole H fo. l ong . Infiores . 
cence paniculate 1-1£ ft. long, with numerous strict, slender, 
spiciform branches ; whorls verv numerous, 2-6-flowered 
more or less segregated ; bracteoles narrow-ovate or lanceo- 
late, shorter than the calyx. Flowers sessile or very shortly 



pedicelled. _ Calyx tubular, l|-2 lin, long, slightly 2-lipped, 
densely white tomentose, resinously glandular ; upper lip 
unequally 3-toothed, lower 2-toothed ; teeth deltoid, acute, 
very short. Corolla blue, about 5 lin. long, sparingly 
hairy ; tube somewhat funnel-shaped, 2 1 — 3 lin. long, with 
an oblique ring of hairs within ; limb spreading, flat, 
2-lipped; upper lip 4-lobed, 2-2 1 - lin. long, 4 lin. wide, 
the lobes ovate or suborbicular ; lower lip entire, elliptic- 
ovate. Stamens 4 ; the two upper very small, sterile, 
included ; the two lower fertile, sometimes almost included, 
sometimes far exserted. Style exserted or included. Nutlets 
obovoid, surrounded at the base by a somewhat lobed disk. 



Fig. 1, flower; % calyx and pistil ; 3, corolla, laid open; 4 and 5, anthers; 
6, ovary and disk :— all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLO NIAL, A ND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
l S l*'o F £ r the um of Beyers and Amateurs. By George Bent-ham, 
r-r T -J'5. b - Revised °y Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9«. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W H 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Benthams '•Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
^^ m F aving8 ' 7th Edison, revised and enlarged, orown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By Geobse Bkntham, F.R.S., President of the Lim'iffian 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in G 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkibk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Woeth ington G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Cuerey, F.E.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^J. By 
Geoege Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookek, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of 

Australian Territory. By G. Bkntham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted 1 
Mueller, F.R.8. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. 

Bakee, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Co. 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plai,' 

the Cape Colony, Cafl'raria", and Port "Natal. By W. H. Hahvk.t 

0. W. Sondbr, and oontinued by Sir W. T. Thisef-.ton-Dyer, F.R.S. ' 

1. — III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol 
Parts I. & II., 95. each. Part III., 8s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33.?. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyeb, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6d. 
Vol. VI.. Sect. I., Parts I.— IV., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d. 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA: a Systematic 
Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.E.S. Published under the anepiees of the Govern: 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. 

Hookek, C.B.. before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, Aug; tfd. 

LOYELL REEVE & C Street, €o 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 90, JUNE, 1912. 



Tab. 8437.— BRACHYCHITON" ACERIFOLIUS. 
„ 8438.— RTJPICOLA SPRENGELIOIDES. 
„ 8439.— IXORA LUTEA. 
„ 8440.— LYCITJM PALLIDUM. 
„ 8441.— PEROVSKIA ATRIPLICIFOLIA. 

Lotell Rekve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21s. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

rising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemsley, 



BOTANICAL PLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 8000. Three Stamps. 

NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— IV., 8s. each. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER F.R.S. 

L, 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6i. Vol. VII., S7«. 9d. Vol. VIII.. 



I r tne authcmty of tne Beet etary of State for th* 
NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., Part II., 9 S . oao h ; Part III. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of tte Hang^f the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

Vols. |. to in., 20s. each. 

By HARVEY and SONDEE. 

The Continual by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER F R S 

Vol. IV., Sect. I. : 52* Vol. IV., Sect. II., ^ Vol. V., P art I., 9 ," V oi. VI., **. 

Published under tne authority -of the Government,, of the Cape of Good Hope, 

■Natal and Transvaal. 



!VE & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covers 



jfourtlj sprits. 

No. 91. ; 



VOL. VIII.— JULY. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s, 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s. 



OR No. 1505 0F THE E!fTIRE WORK. 

CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLO BED FIGURES WITS DESCErPTIONS, 8TBUCT0BAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OB NEW AND BABE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHEK BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Strertor, l^oyai botanic ffiamtns, fteto. 







e red and white 
ling hand laid on." 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

ITBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN' QOVER v 1TEN~ 

6. HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEa. 

1912. 

Office as second-class n> liter.) 



THE HEPATIC^ OF THE 
BRITISH ISLES. 

W. H. PEAKSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. 
45 5s. Plain, £1 10s. Coloured. 

i.L Reeve & Co.. Ltd., 6, Henrietta 
Street, Covent Garden. 



Himalayan (hardy) Rhododendrons, 

and other species. 

Rare Shrubs, Alpines, 

the most Complete Collection. 

Dwarf Alpine Shrubs. All the best Herbaceous 
Plants and Aquatics. Daffodils id Lilies, and 
all the choicest Hardy Br;lbous Plants. 

Construction of Rockeries and Planting. 

Catalogue ox application. 

G. REUTHE, 

The Fox Htll Nursery, Keston, Kent. 



BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES AND USTILAGINEjE. 

By GEOEGE MASSEE 

{Lecturer on Botany to the London Society for the Extension of University Teaching), 

Crown 8vo., with 8 Plates, 6s. 6i. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BURBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.B.S., F.L.S. 
With 43 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, Jl.A., F.L.S. 

a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Woethington G. Smith, F.L.S. 
Two Vols., 24 Coloured Plates, 36s. The Supplement separately, 12s, 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F.R.S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., P.B.S., &c, 9s. 



ILLHSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants 

Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., AirD W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an IB* 'rated Ccmpanum to Bentham's «• Handbook," and other British Flora. 

7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Eogravings, 9*. 



ELL REEVE & CO., Ltd, 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



8M2. 







. 



Tab. 8442. 
agave marmorata. 

Mexico. 

Amaryllidaceae. Tribe Agaveae. 
Agave, Linn. ; Benth. et Book./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 733. 



Agave (Euagave) marmorata, Boezl in Belg. Hort. 1883, p. 238 ; Baker Ilundb. 
Amaryll. p. 179; a speciebus ceteris snbsectionis Americanae nuncupatae 
differt foliis glaucissimis aspcrrimis floribusque parvis jucunde hzteis. 

Frutex aoaulis. rosula simplex usque 2 m. diaraetro et 1 m. fere alta, foliis 
circiter 30 eleganter patenti-recurvis coraposita. Folia lanceolata, 1*05- 
l'l m. longa et 25-27 cm. supra medium lata, basin versus ad 14 cm. 
angustata, basi biconvexa 6-8 cm. crassa praesertim subtus earinato- 
convexa, a medio marginibus incurvis subundulatis late et profunde 
caualiculata, glanca vel caesia, dtfloratione tantum viridescentia, utrique 
— pracsertim subtus — asperrima, a basi usque apicem repando-dentata, 
aculei validi, irrcgulares, deltoideo-cuspidati, cornei, brunnei, asperi, 
basi carnosae deltoideae vel ovatae insidientes, sinubus protundis ro- 
tundatis vel acutis separate majores 20-50 mm. distantes et 15-20 mm. 
longi saepissime minoribus interjectis, inferiores et summi sensim 
minores ex margine recto vix repando; spina terminalis 20 mm. longa, 
griseo-brunnea, subulata, haud decurrens, asperrima. Inflorescentiae 
3-75 m. sitae; pedunculus pro rata plantae paullum robustus, 1"95 m. 
altus, viridis, basi bracteis foliaceis paucis munitus, superne bracteis 
taenia deltoideis acuminatis scariosis circiter 15-16 cm. longis remotis 
onustus; panicula oblongo-cylindracea, circiter 1-8 m. longa et 55 cm. 
lata, ramis circiter 2C erecto-patentibns apice tripartitis majoribus 25 cm. 
longis ; flores dense aggregati, parvi, jucunde lutei. Pedicelli brevissimi ; 
bracteae minutae, deltoideae, mox siccantes. Ferianthii segmenta cam- 
panulato-conniventia, erecta, basi tantum in tnbum brevem connata, 
apice mox siccantia, carnosula, laete lutea, exteriora ovato-lanceolata, 
acutiuscula, dorso convexa, intus late canaliculata, 16-18 mm. longa et 
6 mm. lata, interiora breviora, obtusiora et latiora, dorso carinata, intus 
profunde canaliculata; stamina imo basi tubi affixa, filamenta lutea 
inaequalia, 3-3 5 cm. longa, antherae 16 mm. longae, luteae. Ovarium 
20-22 mm. longum, 6 mm. latum, laete et nitide viride, subtngono- 
cylindracenm ufrinqne attenuatum, sub tubo 6-sulcatum ; stylus demum 
35 mm. longus, lutcus, stigma subtrilobum capitatum.— A. Berger. 



Agave marmorata was collected by Roezl in the Province 
of Tehuacan, Mexico, and has since then been rather rare 
in collections. Of two plants in the garden of the late 
Sir T. Hanbury at La Mortola, Ventimiglia, under this 
name, in 1901, one poled in autumn 1904. The scape was 
damaged by frost during the following winter, and it 
produced from the stump a large number of bulbils, by 



July, 1912. 



means of which it has been propagated and distributed 
Other plants identical with these have been received 
since at La Mortola from the Botanic Gardens in Palermo 
and Paris under the name of A. aspernma. One ot the 
plants derived from the original specimen flowered at .La 
Mortola in June, 1911, and provided the material on which 
our figure is based. Our plant agrees well with the 
description of A. marmorata given by Baker in his Hand- 
book of the Amaryllideae, p. 179; his remark, "between 
A. Scolymus and A. americana" well expresses its characters. 
The leaves are glaucous, almost white, and only become 
greener in dying off on the flowering plant, They are 
extremely rough, especially on the underside and near the 
point ; the marginal and end spines are also tubercular and 
rouffh. The Indians are said to make use of the leaves in 
veterinary medicine. 

The position of A. marmorata is not altogether clear. 
From the leaves it might be considered a member of the 
Americanae of Baker, but the small bright yellow flowers 
preclude this and suggest a closer affinity to the species 
allied to A. Willdingii, Tod., though here again A. marmorata 
differs as regards the arrangement of its flowers on the 
branches. 

Description. — Shrub; stem 0; rosette simple, without 
suckers or offshoots, 2 yards in diameter and 1 yard high, 
with about thirty leaves. Leaves spreading from the base, 
recurved from the middle and with a slightly inflexed tip, 
lanceolate or oblanceolate-spathulate, 40-44 in. long, above 
the middle 10-11 in. broad, hence gradually narrowed to 
a channelled point ending in a conical, greyish brown, very 
rough spine, § in. long, not decurrent ; constricted towards 
the base and about 5J in. broad at the neck, about 3 in. 
thick at the base, convex on both sides, but very markedly 
and almost broadly keeled on the underside, gradually 
thinner above, broadly channelled and with the margins 
erect and somewhat undulate, much repand between the 
large irregular spines, very glaucous or almost white or 
with a bluish tint, becoming paler and greener only before 
decaying, very rough everywhere, especially on the under- 
side and near the top ; marginal spines from a broad horny 
base, cuspidate-uncinate, brown, rough, rising from a broad 



ovate or deltoid fleshy cushion of the leaf margin, §-2 in. 
distant and 7-8 lin. long, separated by a roundish or acute 
sinus; the lower and higher marginal spines gradually 
smaller and the edge not repand between them. Inflores- 
cence about 12 ft. high ; scape relatively slender, about 6 ft. 
long green, smooth, with several deltoid acuminate scanous 
empty bracts, 2 J-6 in. long, and a few leaf-like bracts at its 
base; panicle oblong-cylindric, about 6 ft. long and 22 in 
broad, with about twenty-six spreading branches, the longest 
10 in. long; flowers in dense clusters, bright yellow, with a 
somewhat unpleasant smell, rather small, l£ in. (including 
the style 2| in.) long. Pedicels short, bracts minute, soon 
drying. Perianth-seqments united at their base into a snort 
tube, erect, campanulate, fleshy, bright yellow, soon wither- 
ing at the top; the outer ones ovate-lanceolate, acute 
8-9 lin. long and 3 lin. broad, convex on the back and 
broadly channelled inside, the interior shorter, more obtuse 
and broader, with a fleshy keel at the back and a deep 
furrow inside. Stamens yellow, filaments inserted at the 
base of the tube, erect, unequal, 15-17 im long; anthers 
yellow, 8 lin. long. Ovary bright and glossy green 
subtrigonous or subcylindric, tapering at both end, and 
below the tube shortly 6-furrowed, 10-11 lin. long ami 
21-3 lin. broad; style ultimately over U m. long, } ellow, 
somewhat thickened at the obscurely 3-lobed stigma. 

Fig. 1, spine from loaf-margin; 2, anther; 3, stigma ^ s^ch of entire 
plant, from photographs :-uIl enlarged except 4, which u much reduce 



8443 




'Aries 



nn-P 



Tab. 8443. 
erica ciliaris. 

South-western Europe. 

Ericaceae. Tribe Ebiceae. 
Ebica, Linn.; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 590. 



Erica ciliaris, Linn. Sp. PL ed. 1, p. 354 ; Bot. Mag. t. 484 ; Benth. in DC. 
Prodr. vol. vii. p. 665 ; Syme, English Botany, ed. 3, vol. vi. p. 36, t. 887 ; 
affinis E. Tetralici, Linn., sed floribus racemosis, corolla obliqua et antheris 
muticis facile distinguitur. 

Frutex nanus, ramosissimus ; rami glanduloso-pubescentes. Folia 4-na, patula 
vel subreflexa, brevi^siine petiolata, 1-5-5 mm. lon»;a, 0*75-2 mm. lata, 
ovata, ovato-oblonga vel lineari-lanceolata, acuta, basi rotundata, mar- 
ginibus revolutis et pilis longis glanduliferis ciliatis, glabra. F/ores ad 
apices ramorum racemosi, foliis redactis bracteati. Sepala 3-3*5 mm. 
longa, folia simulantia. Corolla nutans, 1 cm. longa, oblique ovato-urceo- 
lata, glabra, pulchre purpurea. Stamina inclusa; antherae oblongae, 
muticae. Ovarium glabrum. — E. Maweana, Backhouse in Elorist and 
Pomologist, 1882, p. 75.— N. E. Bkown. 



The beautiful hardy Heath, Erica ciliaris, is a member 
of the interesting contingent of British species which 
elsewhere find a home in south-western Europe. This 
species in the United Kingdom is, in a wild state, to be 
met with only in the counties of Dorset, Cornwall and 
Galway. It extends thence to France, and is most plentiful 
in Portugal and Spain. An old garden plant, Erica ciliaris 
was figured in this work at t. 484 more than a century ago 
and that figure affords a satisfactory idea of the species as 
met with in the British Islands, in France, and in Spam. 
But in Portugal, besides the ordinary form, there is another 
which, while it cannot be discriminated by any salient mor- 
phological character even as a variety, is from the cultural 
standpoint so distinct and striking as to deserve a place in 
our pages. For the earliest record of this form and for its 
introduction to horticulture we are indebted to^ the late 
■Mr. 0. Maw, who met with it in Portugal in 1872 It at 
once attracted the attention of the late Mr. J. McNab, who 
in a note written in 1875 calls attention to the fact that 
Mr. Maw's plant has a more compact habit of growth and 
Jl-ly, 1912. 



that its flowers are not secund as in E. ciliaris proper. 
Ten years later this striking form was reintroduced, and in 
1882 it was described by Mr. Backhouse as E. Maweana. 
The plants of the earlier introduction had by this time been 
almost lost to cultivation. Fortunately, however, some 
were preserved by Messrs. Cunningham and Fraser in their 
nursery at Edinburgh, and plants were purchased from them 
for Kew a number of years ago. Since then it has been 
largely propagated by cuttings and planted in masses in 
various parts of the grounds ; these from July till October 
give bright displays of rich colour. For soils that are free 
from lime Mr. Maw's Heath may be recommended as per- 
haps the showiest of the late-flowering sorts, and while even 
its most ardent admirer will agree that it is not desirable to 
follow Mr. Backhouse in considering it a species apart from 
E. ciliaris, there is no doubt that the ordinary lover of 
flowers must feel that formal system is subject to some 
degree of limitation since it is found impossible to accord 
separate botanical recognition of any kind to this pleasing 
and striking plant. 

Description. — Slwub, dwarf, much branched ; branches 
glandular, pubescent. Leaves 4-nate, spreading or sub- 
reflexed, shortly petioled, 2^ lin. long or shorter, 1 lin. 
wide or less, ovate, ovate-oblong, or linear-lanceolate, acute, 
base rounded, margin re volute and ciliate with long 
glandular hairs, otherwise glabrous. Flowers densely 
racemose at the ends of the branches, bracts like reduced 
leaves. Sepals 1^-1 1 lin. long, resembling the leaves. 
Corolla nodding, 5 lin. long, obliquely ovate-urceolate, 
glabrous, rich purple. Stamens included; anthers oblong, 
muticous. Ovary glabrous. 



Fig. 1, leaves; 2, flower; 3, calyx and androccium ; 4 and 5, anthers; 
6, ovary ; 7, cross-section of ovary : — all enlarged. 



<*m. 




L. Reeve &3?Lon.da 



A5jLcentBrook3,Dajr&3on Lt^Utg). 



Tab. 8444. 
STYRAX WiLgoNii. 

China. 

Styeaceae. 
Styrax, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 669. 



Styrax Wilsonii, Bolfe ; affinis S. japonici, Sieb. et Zucc, foliis duplo minoribus 
et irrcgulariter deatatis floribusque duplo minoribus differt. 

Fruticulus compactus, ramosissimns ; rami novelli subterotes, pubescentes. 
Folia alterna, petiolata, elliptico-ovata, irregulariter et pauce dcntatu, 
parce pubescentia pilis saepe stellatis, 1-1 '5 cm. longa, venis lateralibns 
paucis subtus prominentibus ; petiolus 2 mm. longus. Flores in racemos 
axillares terminalesque breves laxos simplices paucifloros dispositi. 
Ftdunculi circiter 3 mm. lougi. Calyx campanulatus, stellato-pubescens, 
2-5-3 mm. longus; lobi triangulari-rhomboidei, subacuti, 0'5-l mm. 
longi. Corolla alba, 8-10 mm. longa, 5-partita; tubus 2-3 mm. longus; 
lobi subpatentes, elliptico-oblongi, pilis minutissimis stellatis dense 
obsitis, aestivatione imbricati. Stamina 10, subaequalia ; filamenta 5 mm. 
longa; antherae lineares, flavae, 2"5 mm. longae. Ovarium ovoideum, 
pubescens; stylus 1 cm. longus. Fructus globoso-ovoideus, 7-8 mm. 
longus, minutissime cinereo-velutinus ; semen globoso-ovoideum, 6-7 mm. 
longum, brunneum. — 11. A. Kolfe. 



The genus Styrax is represented in gardens hj some 
half-dozen species of great beauty and distinction. Of 
these the best and hardiest is S. japonicum, Sieb. and Zucc, 
figured at t. 5950 of this work as S. serrulatum, from which, 
however, it is quite distinct. The others include S. Obassia, 
Sieb. and Zucc, which is given at t. 7030, and S.IIemdeyanum, 
Diels, which occupies t. 8339. Neither S. amencanum, 
Lam., nor S. officinale, Linn., which may be grown success- 
fully in somewhat warmer localities, are very hardy atKew. 
The species which forms the subject of our illustration is 
quite distinct from any of the foregoing; it comes nearest 
to S. japonicum, but is" about half the size of that plant in 
all its parts. It is a compact shrub of shapelv form, and 
flowers at a remarkably early age ; the plant which yielded 
the material for our plate in June, 1911, is one which was 
raised from seed in 1909, but it had actually flowered, 
though less freely, in 1910, when only seventeen months 
old. The seed from which the plant was raised was 
presented to Kew by the Arnold Arboretum and had been 
July, 1912. 



collected by Mr. E. H. Wilson in China in 1908. As 
regards the hardiness of S. Wilsonii we are not yet in a 
position to pronounce definitely ; Mr. Wilson thinks it may 
he tender while young but hardy after a firm woody stem 
has been established. In any case, for the present, it will 
be desirable to afford protection for young plants during 
severe frost, though it may be remarked that when, during 
the winter of 1911-12, on one occasion 18°-20° of frost 
were registered, only the tips of the twigs were injured in 
the nursery at Kew. Propagation can be secured by layers, 
but it will probably be preferable to rely on seeds, more 
especially since the plants flower when so young. 

Description. — Shrub, small and compact; young twigs 
subterete, pubescent. Leaves alternate, petioled, elliptic- 
ovate, irregularly and sparingly toothed, sparingly pubescent 
with usually stellate hairs, \-% in. long, \-\ in. wide, 
secondary nerves 2-3 on each side somewhat raised beneath ; 
petiole about j\ in. long. Flowers in axillary and terminal 
short, open, few-flowered racemes, their stalks about J in. 
ong. Calyx campanulate, stellate-hairy, 1A-U lin long, 
lobes triangular-rhomboid, subacute, very short. Corolla 
white, i in. long or rather longer, 5-partite; tube JL-4 in. 
Jong; lobes imbricate, somewhat spreading, elliptic-oblong, 
fanely closely stellate-puberulous. Stamens 10, subequal ■ 
fa amenta \ in. long; anthers linear, yellow, \ in. Tone 
Ovary ovoid, pubescent; style f in. long. Fruit globes?! 
ovoid, about | in. long, finely grey-velvety; seed globose- 
ovoid, about £ in. long, brown. 



andrL}um a !rv^i. PiSti |- ; % P isti k ca1 ^ P"tiJ "mowd; 3, corolla av,l 
anaioeciumm vertical section ; 4 and 5, anthers; 6, fruits : 7, a solitary fruit- 
H, seed :-all enlarged except 0, which U of natural Uzi ' J ' 



8H6 




J3i FitcKlith 



vhiaeniSxo 



L.Reeve &.C?London 



Tab. 8445. 
COTYLEDON subrigida. 

Mexico. 

Ceassulaceae. 
Cotyledon, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. C59. 



Cotyledon subrigida, Robins, and Seaton in Proc. Amer. Acad. vol. xxviii. 
p. 105 ; afflnis C. gibbiflorae, Moc. and Sesse, sed foliis oblanceolatis acutis, 
rami's panicuke brevioribus et magis erectis floribusque aurantiacis per- 
glaucis differt. 

Jlerba succnlenta, breviter caulescens, omnino glabra. CauJis 2 cm. crassus. 
Folia circiter 18, rosulata, adscendentia vel patula, sessilia, crasso-carnosa, 
10-15 cm. longa, 5-6 • 5 cm. lata, oblanceolata vel sublanceolata, acuta, 
viridia. glauca, marginibus rubris Ieviter crispatis. Pedunculi axillares, 
circiter 50 cm. alti, superne in racemis 3-5 secundis adscendentibus 
ramosi, pallide virides vel rubescentes, glauci. Bracteae inferiores 2-3*5 
cm. longiie, 9-17 mm. latae, superiores gradatim minores, sessiles, ovato 
lanceolatae, acutae, basi breviter calcaratae, glanco-virides, rubro-mar- 
ginatae. Pedicelli 4-18 mm. longi, glauco-vindes. Sepa'a valde patula, 
1-3-1-7 cm. longa, basi 5-6 mm. lata, superne attenuata, acuta, glauca, 
rubro-marginata. Corolla 2 cm. longa, 1*6 cm. diametro, 5-angularis, 
urceolata, fere ad basin 5-loba, pulchre aurantiaca, interne lutescens, 
perglauca ; lobi arete imbricati, apice patuli, oblongi, acuti. Stamina 10, 
inclusa; antherae atrorubrae ; pollen luteum. Glandalae hypogynae 1 mm. 
lottgae, 3 mm. latae, transversim oblongae, intcgrae, rubrae. Carpcl/a 
1*6 cm. longa, in styluni gradatim attenuata, inferne pallide viridia, 
superne fusco-pnrpurea. — luheveria subrigida, Eose in Bull. New York 
Bot. Gard. vol. iii. p. 10.— N. E. Bbown. 



The handsome Cotyledon which forms the subject of our 
illustration is very distinct from any of the other species of 
this genus now in cultivation, though among these it is, 
perhaps, more nearly allied to the familiar C. gibbiflora, 
Moc. and Sesse, than to any other. But from C. gibbiflora 
it differs widely in the form and colour of its leaves, and in 
the rich orange tint of its corolla, which is very glaucous on 
the outside. The branches of the inflorescence are shorter, 
more erect and stiffer. C. subrigida was first discovered in 
Mexico, in October, 1892, by Mr. C. G. Pringle, growing 
on ledges of cliffs in the Tultenango Canon. The plant 
from which the material for our figure has been obtained 
was presented to Kew in 1905 by the authorities of the 
Natural History Museum, Washington, U.S.A., under the 

July, 1912. 



name proposed by Dr. Rose. It has grown vigorously in 
the cooler end of the Succulent House at Kew and flowered 
profusely in October, 1911. Like the other species of the 
genus in cultivation it is easily grown if placed in a sunny 
position out of doors during the summer and protected from 
frost in winter by being transferred to a greenhouse or a 
heated frame. 

Description.—/^, succulent and shortly stemmed, 
everywhere glabrous. Leaves about 18, rosulate, ascending 
or the lower spreading, sessile, thickly fleshy, 4-6 in. long, 
2-2J in. wide, oblanceolate or almost lanceolate, acute, 
green and glaucous, with red somewhat crispate margin. 
Peduncles axillary, about l 1 - ft. high, branching up- 
wards into 3-5 ascending, secund racemes, pale green or 
tinged with red, and glaucous. Bracts sessile, ovate- 
lanceolate, acute, shortly spurred at the base, glaucous-green 
with red margin, gradually diminishing upwards, the lowest 
%-li m. long, -1-1 in< across> p t dicels l-f in. long, 
glaucous-green. Sepals markedly spreading, J-| in. long, 
about | in wide at the base, narrowed upwards, acute' 
glaucous with red margin. Corolla f in. lon«-, * in wide 
urceolate, 5-angled, 5-lobed almost to the base brilliant 
orange above, yellowish lower down, very glaucous- lobes 
closely imbricate, spreading at the tip, oblong, acute 
Stamens 10, included ; anthers dark-red ; pollen yellow 
Ilypogynous glands transversely oblong, entire red T in' 
wide, very short. Carpels over * in. long' gradually 
narrowed into the style, pale green below, dull purple 
upwards. * i 

Fig 1, petal with three stamens; % carpels and hypogynous Males- 
3, sketch of an entire plant :-l and 2 enlarged, 3 much reduced ** ' 




8446 



v 



U 




Tab. 8446. 
PSEUDER ANTHEMUM jjlacinum. 

Malay Peninsula. 



ACANTHACEAE. Tribe JUSTICIEAE. 



PSEUDERANTHEMUM, Badlh. ; Lindau in Engl. & Prantl, Nat. Pflanzcnfam. 
vol. iv. pars iii. B, p. 330. 



Pseuderanthemum lilacinum, Stapf; ppecies nova P. Teljsmannii, Stapf 
(Eranthemo Teijsmannii, King), proxima, sed foliis angustis repando- 
undulatis magis pubescentibus, panicula latiore, corolla lilacina, staminodhs 
distincte evolutis, stylo pilosulo distincta. 

Suffrutex cultus erectus, ad 1-2 m. altus, ramis teretibus adpresse tenuiter 
pubescentibus demum subglabratis. Folia lanceolata, longe acuminata, 
late repando-undulata, basi acuta vel rotundata, 12-25 cm. longa, 3 '5-5 -5 
cm. lata, viridia, tactu mollia, in nervis minute pubescentia, praeterea 
parce pilis rigidulis minutis aspersa, nervis laterahbus utrmsecus 8- J 
obliquis intra margines saltern superne eximie arcuatim connexis ; petiolus 
1-4 cm. longus, tenuiter pubescens. Inflorescentia pamculata, ramis 
inferioribus ad 1-5 cm. longis obliquis intermedns miilto brevionbus 
summis brevissimis omnibus apice cymas congestas 5-3-floras gerentibus 
adpresse tenuiter pubescentibus ; pedicelli demum 2-3 mm. longi; bracteao 
lanceolatae vel e basi latiuscula subulatae, ad 3 mm. longae tenuiter 
pubescentes : bracteolae bracteis simillimae nisi mmores. Calyx 4-5 mm. 
longus, laxe tenuiter pubescens, profunde 5-fidus, segmentis Imeari- yel 
subulato-linearibus. Corollae tubus angustus, rectus albums circiter 
4 cm. longus, extra parce minutissime glandulosus intra inter filamenta 
decurrentia albo-pilosus ; limbus coeruleo-lilacinus, m labn mferions 
segmento intermedio mactilo albo vel mtescente et punctis rubris mmut s 
notatus, 3 cm. latus, extra glaber, intus in macuo pi losul us, segment s 
subaequalibus, 13-15 mm. longis, 6-8 mm. latis, lam ««P™ W™^ 
matis oblongis labiiinferiorisdivergcntdnisovato-oblongis omnibus obt UKS. 
Anthtrae exscrtac, nigro-coeruleae, 1 mm. longae; filamenta Ion 
longa, filiformia. btaminod* filifornna, apice capitatim incra J ita, 
brevissiuia vel ad 0"8 mm. longa. Ovarium glabrum. Capsula ignota.- 
0. Stapf. 

The Pseuderanthemum of which a figure is here given 
is a native of Selangor, and perhaps also of other parts ot 
the Malay Peninsula. The plant which has provided the 
material for our illustration was presented to Kew in I»U» 
by Mr H. N. Ridley, then Director of the Singapore 
Botanic Garden ; it was sent under the name Eranthemum 
Teijsmannii, and it is certainly very nearly allied to the 
species described as E. Teijsmannii by the late .Mr. b. 13. 

July, 1U12. 



Clarke in the materials for a Flora of the Malayan Peninsula 
edited by the late Sir G. King and Mr. J. S. Gamble, which 
is, in turn, no doubt also the species referred to as E. 
Teijsmamiii by Mr. Ridley in his account of an expedition 
to Temengoh in the Journal of the Straits Branch of the 
Royal Asiatic Society in 1909. But while the two are so 
closely related, they differ very materially in the points 
to which Dr. Stapf directs attention, and more particularly 
in respect of their habit, for E. Teijsmannii, as limited bv 
Mr. Clarke, is a " shrubby creeper," and is spoken of by 
Mr. Ridley as "easily recognised by its climbing habit, 
scrambling to some height up bushes and often forming a 
bulky mass." Whether Mr. Clarke's species be identical 
with the original E. Teijsmannii, T. And., a plant cultivated 
in the Royal Botanic Garden, Calcutta, originally sent there 
trom Java, is not clear. All that is definitely known of 
that plant is that it too is one "with a straggling habit," 
and therefore unlike the subject of our plate, which forms 
an erect shrub some 3 feet in height. Grown in a 
.Lropical House under the conditions suitable for Begonias 
it thrives well and flowers in April. As a garden pfant it 
is comparable m value with the other species of the genus 
of wlr^ P >m ?- al ; read 2 in culti ™tion,an African mlmber 

■A E T7-T~? krUb ^ h0Ut 3 ft ] %^ branches terete, 
at first thinly adpressed pubescent, ultimately glabrous 
Leaves lanceolate, long-acuminate, widely repandly undu- 
late, base cuneate or rounded, 4J-10 in. long U-21 in 
wide green, soft minutely pubescent on the nerVes and 

8 tn re e-X n sif J "V^ hai ^^eral nerves 
8-y on each side, oblique, looping within the maro-in 
especially towards the apex ; petiole^ -l£ in. W th m k 
piibescent Irtforescence panicnlate, £ fower tl 

to J in. long, oblique, those higher up much shorter i)l 
uppermost very short, all with terminal coasted 3^ 
flowered cymes; pedicels ultimately 1-U lin lot think 
adpressed pubescent ; bracts lanceolate or suKe from 

ike the brads but smaller. Calyx 1-U \ m l on „ tbinlv 
loosely pubescent, deeply 5-fid ; iobes Cjffi 



lanceolate. Corolla-tube narrow, straight, about \\ in. long-, 
almost white, finely sparsely glandular outside, within 
white-pilose between the decurrent filaments; limb lilac- 
blue, with a white or yellowish blotch and a number of 
minute red specks on the mid-lobe of the lower lip, 1£ in. 
across, glabrous outside, pilose within on the blotch, lobes 
subequal, \- -| in. long, \-\ in. wide, those of the upper lip 
close together, those of the lower lip divergent, all ovate- 
oblong, obtuse. Anthers exserted, very dark blue ; filaments 
very short, filiform. Staminodes filiform, with swollen tips, 
short or very short. Ovary glabrous. Fruit not seen. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil ; 2, corolla-throat, laid open, showing stamens and 
staminodes ; 3 and 4, anthers : — all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F. R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L. S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F. U.S., President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Kev. M. J. Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkibk, F.L.S., Ac, Ac. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 
BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Wobthington G. Smith, 
F L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Cuerey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates 12s 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^I. By 
Geobge Massee. 8 PlateB. 6s. 6d. __ B 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. , 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. . ,>, c .,. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S , assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Bakeb, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. , 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants ol 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W H. Harvkt and 
O. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyee F.R S. Vols. 
I.-III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II 24s Vol V., 
Parts I. & II., 9s. each. Part III., 8s. Vol .VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S, 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyee, F.R.S Vols. I. to III., each 

*Os Vol IV Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6d. 

Vol'. vlrSecI-LTParts i'.-IV., «.. Vol VII., 27s . W. Vol. VIII. 25s. 6d. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND *LORA: a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zeaknd, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie ' ■ W^ By 
8ir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. T wnTiv tct AVn« P~ 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS By 

Dr. Geisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D 

Hookeb, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, Angust 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 

CONTENTS OF No. 91, JULY, 1912. 



Tab. 8442.— AGAVE MARMORATA. 
„ 8443.— ERICA CILIARIS. 
n 8444.— STYRAX WILSONII. 
w 8445.— COTYLEDON STJBRIGIDA. 
(| 8446.— PSEUDERANTHEMUM LILACINUM. 
Lotell Eeevk & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21s. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Rotting Hemsley. 



BOTANICAL RLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. Qd. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 



NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— IV., 8s. each. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 
The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
V., Sect. 1., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6<J. Vol. VII., 27s. 6i Vol. VIII., 

25s. 6d. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., Part II., 9s. each ; Part III., 8s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By HARVEY and SONDER. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., Part I., 9». Vol. VI., 24*. 

Vol. VI 1., 33s. 

Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 

Natal and Transvaal. 



Lovell Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



FK1STKH BY WILLIAM CLOWES AKD SONS, LTD., ICKE STBEKT, STAMFURB STBKBT, d.U. 



jfourtf) Irenes. 

No. 92. 



VOL. VIII.— AUGUST. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s, 



OR NO. 1500 0F THE ENTIRE W0RK - 

CUHTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D, F.R.S., 

Simtor, ttotial botanic ffiarntns, TScto. 





" ^ : . >•- 



• ■ " - ' 






« Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and white , 
Natures own sweet and cunning hand laid on. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVERNMENTS- 

6. HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1912. 

[All rights reserved.] 

(Entered at the New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



ICHARD 
-DIE 



XL ALL. 

lNSEJ^TODES, 
FJ^NGICIDES, 
EED KILLBRAc. 

msSmM 



FROtvl 



1H0RT1CULTURALTRADE EVERYWHERE! 

MANUFACTURER : »W 

G. H. RICHARDS, 

234, Borough High Street, London, S.E. 



Himalayan (hardy) Rhododendrons, 

and other species. 

Rare Shrubs, Alpines, 

the most Complete Collection. 

D\rarf Alpine Shrubs. All the best Herbaceous 

Plants and Aquatics. Daffodils and Lilies, and 

all the choicest Hardy Bulbous Plants. 

Construction of Rockeries and Planting. 

Catalogue on Application. 

G. REUTHE, 

The Fox Hill Nursery, Keston, Kent. 

THE HEPATIC^ OF THE 
BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEAKSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. 
£5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



Lovell Reeve & Co., Ltd., 6, Henrietta 
Street, Covent Garden. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. "W. BURBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Bakeb, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 

With a Supplement of nearly 4.00 pages by Woethington G. Smith, F.L.S. 
Two Vols., 24 Coloured Plates, 36s. The Supplement separately, 12s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F.R.S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hookeb, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9*. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 

Dbawn btW.H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentliam's " Handbook," and other British Flora. 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, if*. 



LOVELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



8W 




Vi ncertitBrooiksiDav ft S an. L L a irap 



L Reeve & C?Lona 



Tab. 8447. 
HYDRANGEA Sargentiana. 

China. 

Saxifragaceae. Tribe Hydrangeae. 
Hydrangea, Linn.; Benth. et Haok.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 610. 



Hydrangea Sargentiana, Iiehder in Sargent, PI. Wihon. pars i. p. 39; 
species II. Rosthornii, Diels, proxima, sed caulis indumento rudi, floribus 
paullo minoribus, sepalis florum sterilium integris distinguendum. 

Fmtex ad 2 m. altus, ramis superne villis rudibus et setulis intermixes 
obtectis. Folia ovata, breviter acuminata, basi cordata vel rotundabi, 
inacqualiter crenata creius latiusculis apiculatis, 15-30 cm. Ionga, 6 5-16 
cm. lata, supra obscure viridia, adprcsse strigosa, subtus laxe strigoso- 
tomentosa ; petioli pubescentes villis rudibus hinc inde admixtis. Corymbm 
dermis, 12-16 cm. diametro, axibus omnibus pubesccnti-tomentosis 
primariis praeterea pilis longioribus et hinc inde villis rudibus obsitis; 
radii primarii suboppositi ad 12 vel 13, ad 7 cm. longi ; bracteae mox 
deciduae, Ianeeolatae, acuminatae, dense strigillosae ; pedicelh florum 
fertilium ad 2 mm. longi, graciles, sterilium ad 15 mm. longi. Horn 
fertiles ante ipsa anthesi 2 -5-3 mm. diametro, violascentes, depresso- 
globosi. lieceptaculuhi turbinatum, 1 mm. longum, subglabrum. bepala 
bde triangularis 0-5 mm. Ionga. P-ta(a mox decidua, oblongo-ovata, 
vix 2 mm. Ionga. Staminum filamenta breviora petala aequantia, majora 
ta subdnplo superantia. Ovarium subinferum; styli 2 vel 3. Capvrta 
(ex autore) hemisphaerica, leviter 10-12-costata, 3 mm. diametro. 
Semina elliptica, utrinque in alam brevem contracta, striata, circa 0-7 nom. 
Ionga. Flares steriles radiantes, 2 -5-3 '5 cm. diametro, all>i, tepalis late 
obovato-orbicularibus integris in dorso laxe strigilloso-pilosis— O. STArF. 



The Hydrangea which forms the subject of our plate was 
discovered in China by Mr. E. H. Wilson, at Hsing-Shan- 
Hsien, Western Hupeh, at about 5000 to 6000 feet above 
sea-level, in 1007. A share of Wilson's seeds was pre- 
sented to Kew by Professor Sargent, Arnold Arboretum, 
early in 1908 ; from these seeds was raised the plant which 
has supplied the material for our figure. //. Sargentiana is 
readily recognisable, and from a cultural standpoint is very 
distinct owing to the conspicuously bristly covering of its 
stems and petioles, though apart from this rather striking 
feature there does not appear to be much to distinguish it 
from its nearest ally, //. Rosthornii, Diels, another Chinese 
form, which appears to serve as a connecting link between 
our plant and the Himalayan II. robusta, Hook. f. & Thorns. 
77. Sargentiana does not give promise of being one of the 
August, 1912. 



hardiest of its genus; several young plants succumbed at 
Kew to the winter conditions of 1909-10, and since then 
the remaining plants have been afforded protection in 
severe weather. It is to be hoped that as its age increases, 
and it becomes more woody, this striking and beautiful 
shrub may prove more robust, especially as it flowers in late 
July, when flowering shrubs are particularly in request. A 
strong grower, it needs good loamy soil, and it is probable 
that, as in the case of the other Hydrangeas, the most 
satisfactory method of propagation will be by cuttings. 

Description". — Shrub, 6-7 ft high ; branches clothed 
upwards with harsh hairs and stiff bristles. Leaves ovate, 
shortly acuminate, base cordate or rounded, margin crenate, 
the teeth unequal, rather broad, apiculate, 6-12 in. long, 
2|-CJ in. wide, dull green above, with adpressed hairs, 
beneath paler and loosely strigosely hairy ; petiole pubescent, 
with an admixture of harsher hairs. Corymb dense-flowered, 
5-6| in. across, the axes and especially the main ones 
tomentose with a mixture of longer hairs, some of them 
harsh, the main rays up to 12 or 13, almost opposite, 2| in. 
long ; bracts soon deciduous, lanceolate, acuminate, densely 
stri^ose ; pedicels of the fertile flowers 1 lin. long, slender, 
of the sterile flowers J-f in. long. Fertile fioioers before 
opening 1 J lin. long, pale violet, depressed-globose. Sepals 
wide-triangular, very short. Petals soon deciduous, oblong- 
ovate, under 1 lin. long. Stamens 2-seriate, filaments of the 
shorter series as long as the petals, those of the longer series 
nearly twice as long as petals. Ovary almost inferior; 
styles 2-3. Capsule hemispherical, slightly 10-12-ribbed. 
1^ lin. wide. Seeds elliptic, narrowed at both ends into a 
short wing, striate, very small. Sterile flowers ray-like, 
1-1} in. across, white ; sepals broadly obovate-orbicular, 
entire, loosely strigosely hairy on the back. 



Fig. 1, portion of a flowering-axis; % hairs from the axis; 3, fertile flowers; 
4, calyx and pistil; 5 and G, anthers; 7, a young outer flower*— <dl enlarged. 



8M8. 




M.S.ad.J.N.HtchKth. 



VincentBrooks F Day&SonLt4iiT5 



L. Reeva &. C° London . 



Tab. 8448. 

ALOE Steudneri. 

Eritrea and Abyssinia. 

Liliaoeak. Tribe Aloineae. 
Aloe, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 470. 



Aloe Steudneri, Schweinf. in Bull. Herb. Boiss. vol. ii. App. ii. p. 73 ; Baker 
in Dyer Fl. Trop. A/r. vol. vii. p. 458; Berger in Bugler, Pjlanzenr. 
Liliaceae-Aloineae, p. 287; affinis A. Scholleri, Schweinf., scd foliis magis 
attenuatis marginibus cartilagineis angustioribus pedicellis multo 
longioribus et perianthii segmeutis basi tantum connatis differt. 

i/erfo^succulenta, acaulis vel subcaulescens, diehotome divisa. Folia circiter 
25, dense rosulata, erecto-patentia vel subincurva, carnosa, 5 - 5-6 dm. 
longa, basi 12-15 cm. lata, gradatim attenuata, apice acuta, margine 
anguste cartilaginea, dentata, pallidissime roseo-tincta dentibus parvis, 
deltoideis, 1-2 mm. longis, 1-4 cm. inter se sejimctis, supra plana vel leviter 
convexa sed prope apicem concavo-canaliculata, subtus versus marginem 
singulum crassiora ideoque oblique convexa, vix carinata. Inflorescentiae 
saepe 2 ex eadem rosula, pedunculis simplicibus vel superne ramosis 
erectis glaucis sursum purpureo tinctis 8-9 dm. altis, ramis racemosis 
15-25 cm. longis ; bracteae erectae, imae pedunculo ramove adpressae, eae 
flores subtendentes convolutae, pedicellos aniplectentes, U5-2 cm. longae, 
ovatc-lanceolatae, acuminatae, carinatae, nervis striatae, rubrae; pedicelli 
l'8-2 cm. longi, rubri, apice recurvi. Pcrianthum 4 - 7-5*3 cm. longum, 
1*4 cm. latum, trigono-cylindricum, deflexum et prope apicem minopere 
recurvum, ad basin fere 6-partitum; segmenta lineari-oblonga, obtusa, 
exteriora 3 recta, intense rubra, interiora 3 apice recurva, inferne r 
apice fusco-Jutea, rubro-costata. Stamina inclusa vel subiuclusa, filameiitis 
pallide luteis, antheris brunneis, polliue salmoneo-carneo. Stylus demum 
exsertus, pallide luteus. 



The handsome Aloe here figured, which was first 
described by Dr. Schweinfurth in 1894, is a^ species for 
whose introduction European horticulture is indebted to 
Professor Penzig of Genoa. Schweinfurth 's account of the 
plant was based on Abyssinian specimens gathered by 
Dr. Steudner in the Ghaba Valley at about 1 1500 feet above 
sea-level in 18G2, and on some inflorescences collected by 
Penzig on Mt. Sabr in Eritrea at an altitude of 8500 feet in 
1891, along with the living plants whereof that whence 
our material has been obtained forms one. That A. Steudneri 
is a species as distinct as it is striking has never been in 
doubt; its precise position and its exact relationship^ to 
other species have, however, been somewhat obscure. This 

Attoust, 1912. 



obscurity lias bad its origin in the somewhat fragmentary 
character of the original material, and has been increased 
by the capricious disposition of the species in the matter of 
flowering. There is a healthy plant in the succulent col- 
lection at Kew, kindly presented by Professor Penzig in 
1890. But this plant, though it thrives well under the 
conditions suitable for other Aloes, has not so far flowered. 
On the other hand a plant sent by Professor Penzig to the 
Cambridge Botanic Garden flowered there as early as March 
1901. The material for our figure has, however, been 
derived from yet another plant which flowered for the first 
time in the garden of Lady Hanbury at La Mortola in April 
1011. During the journey in the course of which Penzig 
rediscovered Steudner's Aloe, he collected young plants of an 
Aloe which, he believed might be A. Schimperi, Schweinf. ; 
one of these plants was given by him to the late Sir 
Thomas Hanbury in 1901. When this plant did at length 
flower it proved to be in reality A. Steudneri ; the figure here 
given has been prepared from its flowers and from a photo- 
graph communicated, along with a full description, by 
Mr. A. Berger. In the account here given full use has 
been made of that description, and of one by Mr. Brown, 
who, ten years earlier, had occasion to deal with the 
Cambridge plant. It may be noted, however, that while 
these two very competent authorities are satisfied that the 
plant is A. Steudneri there is still some obscurity as to its 
position in , the genus. Dealing with this point in the 
'Pflanzenreich,' Mr. Berger places the species provisionally 
at the end of the section Purpurascentes with A. purpura' 
scens, Haw., and A. succotrina, Lamk. The study of the 
living plant has led Mr. Berger to suggest that its affinities 
are rather with A. percrama, Tod., and A. rubro-lutea, 
Schinz, and has induced Mr. Brown to suggest a close 
relationship with A. Scholleri, Schweinf. However this 
may be, the plant, in spite of the shyness with which it 
flowers, is a striking one and well worthy of a place in 
succulent collections. 

Description. — Herb; succulent, nearly stemless, branching 
at the base. Leaves about 25, in a dense rosette a yard 
across, erect and somewhat spreading or incurved near the 
point, about 2 ft, long, 5-0 in. wide at the base, gradually 



narrowed to the acute point, with a narrow hyaline some- 
what rose-coloured toothed margin, the teeth 1 lin. long or less 
and separated by intervals of from |-1| in., upper surface 
flat or slightly convex, but towards the point concave and 
channelled, under surface obliquely convex owing to one 
side of the leaf being rather thicker than the other, hardly 
keeled. Inflorescences usually 2 from the same crown ; 
peduncles erect, simple or sparingly branched, nearly 3 ft. 
high, glaucous with a purple tinge upwards; the branches 
racemose, 6-10 in. long ; bracts erect, those below empty, 
ad pressed to their stem or branch, the flowering ones con- 
volute, embracing the pedicels, £-f in. long, ovate-lanceo- 
late, acuminate, keeled, striate, red; pedicels |-f in. long, 
red, recurved at the tip. Perianth about 2 in. long, over 
h in. wide, slightly trigonous, deflexed and then slightly 
upturned near the top, 6-partite nearly to the base ; segments 
linear-oblong, obtuse, the 3 outer straight, deep red, the 3 
inner recurved at the tip, rose-pink below, dark yellow at the 
tip, with red veins. Stamens included or nearly so ; filaments 
pale yellow ; anthers brown ; pollen salmon-coloured. Style 
at length exserted, p;de yellow. 



Figs. 1 and 2, anthers; 3, ovary and style; 4, an entiic plant, from 
a photograph: — all enlarged except 4, ivln'ck is much reduced. 



844d. 




VmcentBroolra,Day &Son.Lt- a imp- 



£ Reeve &.C?LoTuion. 



Tab. 8449. 
MUEHLENBECKIA oqmplexa. 

New Zealand. 



POLYGONACKAE. Tribe COCCOLOBEAE. 

Mdehlexbeckia, Meisn. ; Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 101. 



™ n 5 eC ? la ? om P lex a, ^isn. PI. Vase. Gen. pars alt. p. 227, and in 
D Q Prodr. vol. xiv p. 147; Hook. f. Handb. Fl. N. Zeal, p 236; Dammer 
*« Engl. & Prantl Naturl. Pflanzenfam. vol. iii. p. 32; Cheeseman, Manual 
^v. zeal */ora,p. 592 ; species a M. adpressa, Labill., stigmate papilloso nee 
differt reCedlt ' facie M - axiUa ™> H ook. f., quae floribus subsolitariis 

Herbae gregariae aut moles magnas formantes aut super frutiees vel rupes 
repentes. Cauhs hgnosus, tenuis, rubro-biunnens, scaber vel vemxeosus. 
Soha orbiculana vel breviter oblonga, intcgra vel ad medium pandnri- 
fomiiter contracta, obtusa vel emarginata, raring subacuta, basi cordata 
yel rotundata, 5-25 mm. longa, 4-20 mm. lata, ntrinque glabra, marginibus 
Jeyiter mcrassatis; petiolus tenuis, quam lamina paullo brevior, pubescens; 
«npulae_deciduae. Fiores dioici vel po ygamo-dioici. Spicue axillaris, 
circiter Id mm. longae, sessiles vel breviter peduncnlatae; bracteolae Into 
ovatae, 2 mm. longae, brunneae, scariosae, dorso infra apieem mucronatae, 
cihatae. Perianthium album vel virescens, profunde 5-paititum, 4 mm. 
iongum ; _ segmenta oblonga, obtusa. Stamina 8. Flora feminei: 
1 ervmthium ei riorum maseulorum similis. Discus brcvis, irrcgulariter 
lobatus. Ovarium trilobum; stigma trdobatum, magnum, papillosum. 
Achenium nigrum, nitetis, in periauthio accrescente carnoso nitido albo 
Jnclusum. — Polygonum mmnltxum, A. Ounn. in Ann. Nai Hist. wet. 1, 
vol. i. p. 455 (1838); Hook, in But. Mag. vol. lxxii. App. p. 5 (1846); 
■Hook. t. Fl. N. Zeal. vol. i. p. 210. MueMenbeckia microphyllu, Colenso in 
Irans. N. Zeal. Inst. vol. xx. p. 204. M. paucifolia, M. trilobate ct 
M. truncuta, Colenso, I.e., vol. xxi. pp. 99-101.— C. IL WmcuT. 



I lie Polygonaceous genus MueMenbeckia includes some 
nfteen species, widely spread in the Southern Hemisphere 
from Australia and New Zealand through Polynesia to 
extra-tropical and Andine South America. They vary 
much in habit, some of them being climbers which much 
resemble species of Convolvulus, while one has flattened 
branches and has much the appearance of certain species of 
Acacia. Four of these Muehlenbeckias have been introduced 
to gardens in this country and two of them have already 
been figured in this work ; M. adpressa, Meisn., as Polygonum 
adpressum, Labill., at t. 3145, and 31. platyclados, .Meisn., as 
Coccoloba plafr/clada, F. Muell., at t. 5832. The species now 
figured, which is a well-known plant in gardens in the 
August, 1912. 



warmer parts of the United Kingdom, was introduced into 
the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in 1842 by the Rev. W. 
Colenso. Somewhat variable in the character of its foliage, 
Mr. Colenso has recognised as distinct four different and 
fairly recognisable forms naturally encountered. Mr. Cheese- 
man has described it as forming dense thick elastic masses 
many feet in diameter or climbing over bushes or rocks. 
At Kew it exhibits the same features, but it is here unfortu- 
nately liable to partial injury from frost, so that large masses 
are apt to become disfigured. The material for our illus- 
tration was obtained from a specimen sent from Herm Island, 
Guernsey, by Mr. D. Hill, Herga, Watford. The perianth 
in fruit is accrescent, and becomes glistening white. 

Description - . — Herbs with thin, woody, reddish-brown, 
scabrid or finely warted stems, growing gregariously and 
forming dense tufted masses or climbing over shrubs or 
rocks. Leaves orbicular or shortly oblong, entire or pandur- 
ately contracted about the middle, obtuse or emarginate at 
the apex, cordate or rounded at the base, -^-1 in. long, i-f 
in. wide, glabrous on both sides, with slightly thickened 
edge ; petiole slender, rather shorter than the leaf-blade ; 
stipules deciduous. Flowers dioecious or polygamo-dioecious. 
Spikes axillary, about f in. long, sessile or shortly peduncled ; 
bracteoles wide-ovate, 1 lin. long, brown, scarious, mucronate 
on the back a little below the tip, ciliate. Perianth white 
or greenish, deeply 5-lobed, 2 lin. long; the lobes oblong, 
blunt. Stamens 8. Female perianth as in the male flower. 
Disk short, irregularly lobed. Ovary 3-lobed ; stigma 
3-lobed, large, papillose. Nutlets black, shining, enclosed 
in the fleshy glistening enlarged perianth, which becomes 
white as the fruit ripens. 



Fig. 1, section of a female flower, showing the pistil; 2, the same, pistil 
removed, showing the disk ; 3, a pistil; 4, ripe fruit, enclosed in the accrescent 
perianth ; 5, the same in section, showing the nutltt l— all enlarged. 



8450 




i-Reevo &C°Xandan. 



Tab. 8450. 
PYCNOSTACHYS Dawei. 

Uganda. 

Labiatae. Tribe Ocimoideae. 
PYCNOSTACHYS, Hook. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1177. 



Pycnostachys Dawei, N. E. Br. in Oard. Chrm. 1907, vol. xli. p. 18; species 
P. affini, Griirke, verisimiliter proxima, sed foliis distincte petiolatis, calycis 
tnbo glandulis sessilibus instructo haud villoso dentibus basi ciliatis 
differt. 

Herb* robusta, l - 2-l # 8 m. alta, Iaxe ramosa, ramis tetraeonis puberulis. 
Folia anguste lanceolata vel Hneari-lanceolata, 1* 2-3 dm. lwga, 1*3-4 cm. 
lata, apice longe attentiata vel fere caudata, basi in petiolura gradatim 
angustata, regulariter serrata, utrinque breviter puhe<centia, infra glandulis 
ferrugineis sessilibus praedita. Spicae terminals, ellipsoideo-ovoidcae, 
3-13 cm. longae, 3-4 cm. latae, densissime multifl >rae. Bracteae spathulato- 
lanceolatae, 9-12 mm. longae, incurvae, longe albo-ciliatae. UuJycis paulum 
accrescentis tubus brevis, glandulis sessilihus dense vestitus, inter denbs 
in lobulos submembranaceos ciliatos prodnctus ; denies aciculares, 6 (post 
antlesin usque ad 15) mm. longi, basi longe albo-ciliati. Corolla vivide 
caerulea, 1 ■ 8-2 ■ 2 cm. lonpa, extra spans breviter pubescens ; tubus dimiilio 
inferiore gracilis, circa medium subito deflexus et compres-so ventricosus; 
labium superum planum, subcuneatum, 5 mm. longum et latum, breviter 
aequaliter 4-lobum ; labium inferum compresso-naviculare, circiter 1 cm. 
lorgam, apice acuminatum et abrupte inflexum. Stamina in lahio infero 
inclusa; filamenta edentata vel 1-3 cum dente plus minusve prominente 
instructa. Xumiloe globoso-lenticulares, disco autice va'de producto 
circumdatae.— S. A. Skan. 



The handsome winter-flowering Labiate here figured was 
first discovered in Uganda in 1898 by the late Mr. A. 
Whyte, but for its first appearance in cultivation horticulture 
is indebted to Mr. M. T. Dawe, formerly Director of the 
Scientific and Forestry Department, Uganda, who sent seeds 
to Kew in 1905, as well as herbarium specimens collected 
at an elevation of 4000 feet in the districts of Mabira and 
South Buddu. Plants raised from these seeds flowered m 
January 1906. The specimen now figured was sent to 
Kew for identification by Dr. A. R. Wallace, in December 
1911, and originated from seeds received by him from 
Uganda. , . . 

The genus Pi/enostachys comprises about thirty-six Tropi- 
cal African species, two of which are also met with in South 
Africa, with one, P. coerulea, Hook., which is confined to 
Madagascar, and one, P. purparascens, Bnq., known only 
August, 1912. 



from South Africa. Two besides P. Dawei have appeared 

in cultivation, namely P. coerulea and P. wticifolia, Hook., 
the latter of which is figured at t. 5365 of this work. The 
genua is distinguished from Plectranthus and Coleus by the 
much denser inflorescences and the spinescent calyx-teeth. 
P. Dawei is probably most nearly allied to P. affinis, Giirke, 
but that species is known at Kew from description alone ; 
Dr. Giirke's species is understood to have sessile leaves — in 
P. Dawei they are usually distinctly petiolate. 

In cultivation P. Dawei forms a somewhat straof^lino" shrub 
and calls for the same treatment as Coleus thyrsoideus, Baker, 
another Labiate from Uganda, which is more familiar in green- 
houses than the suhject of our plate. But, while not difficult 
to grow, its flowers are apt to be injured at Kew by fogs. 

Description. — Herb; stems stout, 4-6 ft. high, laxly 
branched ; branches 4-angled, puberulous. Leaves narrow- 
lanceolate or linear-lanceolate, 5-12 in. long, ^-1| in. wide, 
considerably narrowed to the tip, sometimes almost caudate, 
gradually narrowed to the base, margin uniformly serrate, 
shortly pubescent on both surfaces, beset with rusty sessile 
glands beneath. Spikes terminal, elliptic-ovoid, 1^-5 in. 
l° n o> l? -1 ! in- across, dense, many-flowered. Bracts 
spathulate-lanceolate, £-$ in. long, incurved, ciliate with 
long white hairs. Calyx slightly accrescent; tube short, 
densely beset with_ sessile glands, its limb produced between 
the teeth into ciliate almost membranous lobules ; teeth 
acicular, in flower { in., in fruit over ^ in. long, sparingly 
shortly pubescent outside, ciliate at the base with long white 
hairs. Corolla deep blue, £-£ in. long, sparingly shortly 
pubescent outside ; lower half of the tube slender, near the 
middle suddenly deflexed and compressed-ventricose ; upper 
lip flat, somewhat cuneate, under { in. long and' broad, 
shortly equally 4-lobed ; lower lip compressed-navicular, 
twice as long as the upper lip, with an acuminate abruptly 
inflexed tip. Stamens nestling within the lower lip ; fila- 
ments sometimes all toothless or with 1-13 provided with a 
more or less pronounced tooth. Nutlets globose-lenticular ; 
surrounded below by the disk, which is very markedly 
swollen in front. 

Fig. 1, portion of a leaf, showing the under surface; 2, flower; 3 hair; 
4, section of calyx, showing nutlets and disk ; 5, corolla laid open ; 6, a stamen 
With toothed filament; 7, upper portion of style with stigma -.-all enlarged. 



8451. 




:Ltfi"¥- 



Tab. 8451. 
agave disceptata. 

Central America ? 

Amaryllidaceae. Tribe Agaveae. 
Agave, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 738. 



Agave (Littaea) disceptata, J. E. Drumm.; species e grege A. geminijttrrae, 
Scaimag., et A. angvstvmmae, Engelm., maxime affinis, ab eis nutetn ol> 
perigonii tubum conspicue breviorem et ob ovarium baud angnstatum 
facile distinguenda. 

Suffrutex, trunco perbrevi foliis sat congestis rosulatim dispositis celato. 
Folia fibroso-coriacea, exteriora patentia nee recurva, intermedia recta 
ascendentia, interiora plus minusve incurva, pedetentim in *bracteas 
abeuntia, lineari-lorif irniia, parte superiore leniter angustata, basi primum 
tenui, tunc in pulvinum modicum excre^cente, infra quadraeformi, supra 
ovato-lanceolata, ad 4-5 cm. ultra basin in collum sensim contracta, versus 
apiceiu sat obtusum gradatim attenuata ibique spina vix 5 mm. longs 
armata, pulvino incluso circiter 17 cm. longa, ima basi vix 2" 5 cm. lata, 
apud collum fere 7 mm., ultra collum circiter 10 mm. lata, pulvini medio 
fere 12 mm. crassa, utraque facie parum convexa, laevigata, laHe viridia, 
in parte superiore praese>tim subtus lineis lacteis iiregulariter notata, 
margine subpapyracea, tandem filamentoso-dilacerat*. Scapvs 1*66 m. 
altus, pedunculo circiter 8 dm. longo braeteis subscariosis elongatis 
instracto; bracteae basi deltoideae, superne aciculares, subadpressae, ad 
medium scapum circiter 2"5 cm. loujiae. Flores geminati, in spicam 
laxiuseulam digesti ; pedicelli doliiformes brevissinri ; bracteolae iab- 
membranaceae, obscurae. Perigonii lobi margine purpureo-rosei, cuterum 
viridescentes, ultra 12 mm. longi, fere 5 mm. Jati; tubus circiter 12 mm. 
longus, inferne constrictus ibique circiter 25 mm. latus. Stamina parum 
arcuata, circiter 5 cm. longa, filamentis rubescentibus, antberis luteis basi 
retusis. Ovarium circ'ter 1-2 cm. longum. 5 mm. latum, obscure rubro- 
notatum; stylus vix 3 cm. longus. Oapnda, vix matura, b-loba Iotas 
alternis maiusculis minimisque, circiter 1-5 cm. longa, 8 mm. lata. 
Semina circiter 4 mm. longa, atra, polita vix tamen mtentia— A. J.eoj>oldi, 
Hort. ex Kew Hand-list Tend. Monocut. p. 115— J. R. Drummond. 



The Agave which forms the subject of our plate is one 
which was presented to Kew in 1893 by the late Mr. A\ . 
B. Kellock from the valuable collection of succulent plants 
formed by him in his garden at Stamford Hill. Its history 
beyond this point is unfortunately obscure in the extreme. 
It was received at Kew as A. Leopoldi, Hort., and at the 
time of its presentation Mr. Kellock believed it to have 
originated as the result of crossing A. filifera, Salmdvck, 
with A. prineeps, Hort.; it has found a place in the Kew 
Hand-list of Tender Monocots under the name attributed 
August, 1912. 



to it by Mr. Kellock. It may, however, be pointed out 
here that this is not the only Littaea presented to Kew under 
the name A. Leopold} ; as a matter of fact this plant, the 
A. Leopoldl of the ' Hand-list,' was known in Mr. Kellock's 
collection as A. Leopoldl No. II., and the name has been 
provisionally restricted to the Littaea now figured because 
A. Leopoldl No. I. was found to agree with a plant already 
under cultivation under an older name. What the identity 
of ' A. princeps,* suggested as one of the parents of our plant, 
may be it has been impossible to ascertain, but the matter is 
not now of material consequence, since it is found, now that 
the plant has flowered, that its characters negative the sug- 
gestion that it is a hybrid between any two of the Littaeas 
known to have been in cultivation in any part of Europe. 
On the contrary these characters clearly point to its being a 
perfectly valid species and, although as to this there is not the 
same certainty, its characters suggest that it is probably a 
native of Central America. Like A. jilifera, A. disceptata 
produces suckers from the base of the stem, and like A. fillfera 
has thriven well in the Succulent House at Kew under the 
conditions suitable for Agaves generally. Here it flowered, 
eighteen years after its presentation, in October 1911, and 
provided the material from which our figure has been 
drawn, and on which it has at last been possible to base a 
definite description. 

Description. — Succulent undershrub, stem very short, 
clothed with a dense rosette of leaves. Leaves fibrous- 
coriaceous, the outermost spreading but not recurved, the 
central straight ascending, the innermost somewhat incurved, 
passing gradually into the bracts, linear-loriform, the upper 
portion very gradually narrowed, the base thin, then 
suddenly swollen into a pulvinus, which is square below, 
ovate-lanceolate above, contracted into a neck about 2 in. 
above the base, at the apex, which is rather blunt, armed 
with a spine which is under | in. long, nearly 1 in. across 
at the base, about ^ in. wide at the neck and f in. wide 
higher up, the pulvinus about £ in. thick in the middle, 
slightly convex, smooth and bright green on both surfaces, 
but in the upper portion and especially beneath irregularly 
marked with whitish streaks, the margin almost papery 
ultimately shredding into thin curled threads. Scape about 



5 \ ft. high, its peduncle about 2 J ft. long, clothed with long 
subscarious bracts ; bracts deltoid at the base, acicular above, 
somewhat adpressed to the scape, those in the middle about 
1 in. long. Flowers scattered in a rather loose spike, 
geminate ; pedicels rather thicker in the middle than at 
either extremity, very short ; bracteoles almost membranous, 
obscure. Perianth-lobes greenish with rosy-purple edges, 
over J in. long, about £ in. wide ; tube about J in. long, 
narrowed below and there T \j- in. wide. Stamens slightly 
curved, about 2 in. long ; filaments reddish ; anthers yellow, 
retuse at the base. Ovary about £ in. long, | in. wide, 
obscurely streaked witb red ; style about 1| in. long. Cap- 
sule, barely ripe, 6-lobed, the lobes alternately large and quite 
small, about § in. long, J in. wide. Seeds about I in. long, 
black and polished but hardly shining. 



Fig. 1, section of a leaf; 2 and 3, anthers; 4, stigma; 5, sketch of an entire 
plant: — all enlarged except 5, which is much reduced. 



'. BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Perns indigenous to, or naturalized in the Brit ieh 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised aDd enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By Geobge Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnrean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J.Bkkk 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Chakles P. Hobkibk, F.L.S., &c, 4c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vq, 6s. 6d. _''•„ -, r . 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley M.A., 
F L.S With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Wobihikotok G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12ft 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND By C. D 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Cukrey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 

BRITISri'FUNGI, PHYCQMYCETES and USTILAGINEJ3. By 

Geoege Massee. 8 PlateB. 6s. 6<J. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols. ; £12. - ■ _ 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : ^^if^l^^t*- 

Government of Mauritius. . f . pi a ,,f tt ,,f 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Sv.tematic Descnption of the Plan 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria and Port *.ul. By J^- « 

<wt T '34s Vol.' VI., 24*. Vol. VII., 33s. . rD(! 

n .NMOOK f"Yh?HKW y zKALAHl> Fl.OKA : a **•«* 

HANDBOOK Ot tner*r»» ^ Zealand, and the Chatham, 

Description °L*? A ^*^«J?J^«*r* 1.^.. By 
IJTd "oome tSS. P^liehed P under the ausp.ees of the Government 
oAhatColouy. Complete, 42s lN DIAN ISLANDS. By 

FL0 5 A G °Lt G Ca ^L.™ 2 Wished "under the auspices of the Sec*' 

Tv«nTi?7TOBAS 0l0,, A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D 

INS ^ L n^ R C B betre* the British Association for the Advancement of 
HoOKEB, L.c., Deioro f« iqor 2» Gd 

Science, at Nottingham^August 27, W^JE. **. 

LOYELL REEVE & CO., Lr^THenrictta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 

CONTENTS OF No. 92, AUGUST, 1912. 



Tab. 8447.— HYDRANGEA SARGENTIANA. 
„ 8448.— ALOE STEUDNERI. 
„ 8449.— MUEHLENBECKIA COMPLEXA. 
„ 8450.— PYCNOSTACHYS DAWEL 

„ 8451.— AGAVE DISCEPTATA. 
Loveli. Rekvk & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

ANEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemslet. 



BOTANICAL PLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 



NOW EEADY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— IV., 8s. each. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Vol. IV., Sect. 1., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. Qd. Vol. VII., 27*. 64. Vol. VIII. 

25s. 6d. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 



NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., 34s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffrapia, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to HI., 20s. each. 
By HARVEY and SOKDER. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 24s. Vol. VI., 24*. Vol. VII , 33s. 

Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 

Natal and Transvaal. 



Lovell Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



> : PKianu* by wouam ctowaa amb sous, ltd., dgo stbket, btamtorb anuEm, s.k. 



No. 93." 

VOL. VIII.— SEPTEMBER. 

or No. 1507 0P THE ESTIUE W0BK 



Monthly, price 3s. Qd. coloured, 2s. 
Annual Subscrtption, Us. 



CUKTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGUBBS WITH DESCRIPTIONS, 8TRPCTCRAI. AND HlsTORI 

OF NKW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KJ 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PR A IN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

©trmor, fional Botanic Gartens, "Beto. 




« Tls beauty truly Went, 
Nature's own sweet and 



- 



LONDON : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

■ THK HOME. COLONIAL AND INDIAN GO' 

HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GAR- 
1912. 
[All rights reserved.] 
[Entered at the New York Post Off* as second-^ 



THE HEPATIC.® OF THE 
BRITISH ISLES. 

W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. 
i. Plain, Si 10s. Coloured. 



5, Henrietta 



Street, Covent Garden. 



Himalayan (hardy) Rhododendrons, 

and other species. 

. Rare Shrubs, Alpines, 

the most Complete Collection. 

Dwarf Alpine Shrubs, All the best Herb. 
Plants and Aquatics. Daffodils and Lili, 
all the choicest Hardy Bulbous Plants. 

Construction of Rockeries and Planting. 

Catalogue on Application. 

G. REUTHE, 

The Fox Hill Nursery, Keston, Kent. 



BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES AND USTILAGINEiE. 



By GEORGE MASSEE 

'he London Society for the Extension of University Teaching). 
Crown 8vo., with 8 Plates, 6s. 6d. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

Br F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 
a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Bakeb, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 
implement of nearly 400 pages by Wobthington G. Smith, F.L.S. 

Two Vols., 24 Coloured Plates 36s Th P ^ T -™ ri ,„„ 

^cu ^ intes, oos. Xae ^supplement separately, !2s. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F.R.S. 

&"*> J. D. Hookbb, C.B., G.G.S.I., F.B.S., &«. 9i. 

ILLUSTEiTIOHS OF THE BRITISH FLOBA. 

A Series of Wood Engraving,. „it„ Dissections, of BrWsh Plants 
"AW.V sr W - H - "Mi *** W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

ated Ccmpu iham\ "Hn*,!,,^ » 

*~ handbook," ana oilier British. Flor 

7th Edition, with 1818 Weod Kagravingg, $»,, 



IIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



msz 




H.S.de 



IfiiicentBroaks , .Day&San/Lt\*-rJTip. 



X.Reeve 8c C 9 Larv-dom. 



Tab. 6452. 

DENDROBIUM Imtiiikmi. 

New Hebrides. 

Dendbobium, Swurtz; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498. 



Dendrobium (Ceratobium) Imthurnii, Bolfe in Kew Bulletin, 1912, .pp. 131, 
206; a D. untennato, Lindl., caule multo altiore et crassiore, loins multo 
latioribus, labello longiore et petalis brevioribus differt. 

Ilerba epiphytica. Caules aggregati, 1-1-25 m. alti, ban 2'5-8 cm. Mi, supra 
attenuati, pluriarticulati, foliosi. Folia disticlia, elhptico-obloiiga, obtOM 
vel apiculata, valde coriacea, 7-10 cm. longa, 3-5 5 cm. lata. i:,tr,,,,i 
axillares, prope apicem ramorum producti, circiter 35 cm. long], suberecti, 
multiflori. Bravba* late triangulari-ovatae, acutae, 2-1 cm. longae. 
Pedicetti 4-5 cm. longi. Flores mediocres, albi, labelli lobis laterabhus 
lilacino-lineatis. Sepalum posticum oblongo-lanceolatum, acutum, spirahter 
semitortum, 2 cm. longum; sepala lateralis similia, basi obliqua, et in 
mentum triangulare acutum 1 cm. longum extensa. Prfofa Bubpatentia, 
lincaria, acuta, basi attemiata, supra paululo dilatata et torta, 6-6 '0 cm. 
longa. LabeUum trilobum, 2'5 cm. longum ; lobi laterales oblongi, obtusi, 
minute crenulati ; lobus intermedin obovato-lanc.olatus, acutus, minute 
crenulatus, 1-3 cm. longus, circiter 6 mm. latus; lamellae per discum 
parallelae 3, prope apicem dilatatae, truncatae et minute crenulatae. 
Columna oblonga, 6 mm. longa.— R. A. Eolfe. 



The striking Dendrobium— perhaps the most rohust of 
all the species in cultivation, for its pseudobulbs are over 
three feet and sometimes over four feet in height— which 
forms the subject of our illustration is one ot the novelties 
for whose introduction horticulture is indebted to Mr 
Everard im Tburn. It was met with by Sir Kveran , when 
Governor of Fiji and High Commissioner ot the Western 
Pacific, in the island of Elate, one of the New Hebrides, 
and was presented by him to the national collection at Kew 
on his return to Europe. It is, as Mr. Ro He points out, 
most nearly allied to D. aniennatum, Lmdl., but is a much 
taller plant, with broader, thick and rigid leaves with 
stouter pseudobulbs as thick as the human thumb, and with 
relatively shorter petals. I). Imthurnii is thus a very readily 
distinguishable species and one worthy to commemorate the 
services to science of its distinguished discoverer. At Kew 
the plant from which the material for our figure has been 
derived has thriven well in a tropical house; it flowered tor 
the first time in September, 1911. 

Septxmbbb, 1912. 



Description. — Herb, epiphytic. Pseudohulbs clustered, 
stem-like, 3-4 J ft. high, about 1 in. thick at the base, some- 
what narrowed upwards, leafy and with many nodes. 
Leaves distichous, elliptic-oblong, obtuse or apiculate, very 
coriaceous, 3-4 in. long, 1|-2| in. wide. Racemes axillary, 
produced near the tops of the pseudobulbs, about 14 in. 
long, many-flowered, nearly erect. Bracts wide, triangular- 
ovate, acute, f-lj in. long. Pedicels up to 2 in. long. 
Flowers of medium size, white, the lateral lobes of the 
labellum marked with lilac streaks. Sepals: the dorsal 
oblong-lanceolate, acute, somewhat spirally twisted, § in. 
long; lateral sepals like the dorsal but with an oblique 
base prolonged as a triangular, acute mentum 5 lin. long. 
Petals somewhat spreading, linear, acute, narrowed to the 
base, slightly expanded and somewhat twisted upwards, 
H~H in. long. Labellum 3-lobed, 1 in. long; lateral lobes 
oblong, obtuse, minutely crenulate ; mid-lobe obovate- 
lanceolate, acute, minutely crenulate, | in. long, about \ in. 
wide ; disk traversed longitudinally by 3 parallel lamellae 
which are dilated, truncate and finely crenulate near their 
anterior extremity. Column oblong, \ in. long. 



r5^J' P° rti0T i-° f {he labellum; % column; 3, anther-cnp; 4, pollinia; 
5, sketch of an entire plant :~all enlarged except 5, which is much reduced. 



8453 







M.6 .deL J.K.r isck htn. . 



• Bro aits Da.Y & Son-Irt^imp. 



L.Heeve fltCS London. 



Tab. 8453. 

COLUMNEA GLABRA. 

Costa Rica. 

Gesxeriaceae. Tribe Cvetanlbeae. 
COLUMNEA, Linn. ; Btnth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1009. 



Columnea (Eucolnmnea) glabra, Oerst. Centralamericas Geaneraeeer, p. 62 ! 

Hanst. in Liimuea, vol. xxxiv. p. 4(M; species foliis ellipticooliJongis 
carnosis glabris, calycis segmentis erectis ligularibus distincta. 

Fruticulus 0*5 m. altus, ramosus, caule cra^so inferne circiter 1 cm. diam<'tro, 
ramulis satis nodosis 3-4 mm. diamero inferne nudis superno fdiatis, 
internodiis 0"4-2 cm. longis. Folia opposita, versus apices ramulorum 
aggregata, breviter petiolata, elliptico-oblonga, obtusa, 2 - 5-3 cm. longs, 
1-1-4 cm. lata, carnosa, supra convexa nervo medio impresso, ncrvis 
lateralibus occultis, subtus pallidiora perinconspicue punctata, margine 
parce inconspicue ciliolata cetermn glabra. Floret singuli in axillis 
superioribus. Fedicelli basi bibracteati, 5-7 mm. longi. Bracteat ligulares, 
obtusae, circiter 8 mm. longae. Valyds segment* erecta, ligularia, obtusa, 
1*2-1*8 cm. long*, 4-5 mm. lata, parce pilosula. Corolla in alabastro 
apice acute cuspidata, in toto 7-7 '5 cm. longa, extra pilis capitatis breviter 
iuconspicue hirsuta; tubus 4-4-5 cm. longus, sursum sensim ampliatus; 
lobus anticus deflexus, lanceolatus, circiter l - 3 cm. longus, marginibus 
revolutis; lobi laterales e basi delioidea angustati, retror.-i, marginibus 
revolutis; galea supra lobos laterales 1*5-2 cm. producta marginibus 
leviter reflexis. FUamenta ini'ei-ne in vaginam brevcm antice ooniiata, 
minute pilosa; antherae oblongae, in quadram cohaerentes. 
glandula unica, postica, 2 mm. longa, retusa. Ovarium Bericeo-tomeoto- 
sum; stylus glanduloso-pilosus. Bacca calyce persistenle suffulta, alba, 
depresso-globosa, 1*8 cm. diametro, pubescens. — T. A. SrnAGiE. 



The Columnea which we here figure is a native of Costa 
Rica, where it appears to be one of the commonest species 
of the genus, and is certainly one of the most beautiful. It, 
is a native of the cooler mountain tracts, and has been 
recorded as occurring at altitudes of 5000-6000 feet above 
sea-level. In his work 4 La subregiou fitographica coafci- 
ricense' Dr. Werckle informs us that the Costa Rica Colum- 
neas may be segregated into pseudo-epiphytic species, with 
large leaves and insignificant flowers, and true epiphytes 
with small leaves and large flowers. The latter group 
includes a few species whose stems creep along the Btems 
and branches of trees, emitting at the nodes adventitious 
roots by which they are attached to the bark, and a larger 
group with free stems, sometimes, as in the case ot C. micro- 



September, 191' 



calyx, Hanst., pendulous from the branches which support 
them at other times, as in the case of C. glabra here 
described, quite erect. The plant from which the material 
ior our plate has been derived was acquired for the Kew 
collection from Mr. Lemoine in 1907. It has thriven well 
in an open compost, rich in humus, in a moist atmosphere 
kept at a temperature of 50°-60° F., and has formed a 
handsome shrublet about two feet high which is covered 
in spring with bright scarlet flowers. Propagation may 
be effected either by seeds or by cuttings. The seeds, 
However, are very minute and the young plants, which 
grow slowly, are difficult to raise. Cuttings, on the other 
Hand root readily in sandy peat and soon develop into 
shapely plants which flower freely while still quite small. 

Description.-^/^, up to 2 ft. high, branching above; 
stem about ) m thick at the base, twigs nodose, J in. thick, 
naked below, leafy upwards, internodes |4 in. long! 
Leaves opposite clustered towards the ends of the twigs, 
Bhort. p e tl oled, ellipt.c-oblong, obtuse, 1-1± in. long, J-J £ 

rTprv' 1 J ' C0Z1Ye ? ab ° Ve Witb the midrib Bunk, lateral 
ot 'rurplv SC T "I + H T and ^ ^intly punctate beneath, 

^:r sha 7 ™ the upper axils; pedicels 2-bracteate at 
hLr^Jl g; b r aCtS li - ulate ' obtuse > ab o«t \ in. 
Ifn wldf ,n er t Ct ' h -f Ulate ' ° btuse > about i **• long, 
Lnidat? 15?*, ^ llose - Coro ^ to b «d acotefy 

ex na i; t t l 1 "l* ^ " hen fl % ex P a » d ^, hinato 
externally with short capitate hairs; tube U-l| in Ion- 

t f y i r ri o r"t UPWardS; antGT i i0r ] o b edcL7ed lanceo^; 
from a delto if ' ""S" 11 WV ? ,, S te ' lateral "obi narrowed 
produced 1 SnS; re i tr0r8e i' I heir mar - ins solute; galea 
SSff JSS? ^ 7 lateral lobe * fori-} in., its margins 
a short Bh£th ed i f /a T fe United oel"and in front in 
the tini ffc z nelj ! F ' 0Se; anthers ohh ^ Bering by 
Sand l P li'n if ^ dUCed £ a * olit: ^ "tu 8e posticous 
h- i v /? g> °T^ Sllk y-P« b escent ; style glandular- 

tSSL w2 S ?r rted ^ the f )ersisterit cal ^> depressed- 
globose, white, pubescent, about £ in. across. 



open, and stamens; 
wfo'c/j is t,f nutnral size. 



-84-m 




M.S.deLJ.KFiichiifk. 



■Vincent BrooloP^rlSonLAit? 



L.Rteve iC° LarxioTL. 



Tab. 8454. 
BERBERIS VERRUOCJLOSA. 

China. 

Beuberidaceae. Tribe Berbebideae. 
Berbebis, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 43. 



Berberis verruculosa, Benul. et E. H. Wile, in Ken- Bulletin, 100G, p. 151 ; 
affiiiis B. pruinosae, Franch., a qua ramis verruculosis differt. 

Frutex sempervirens, circiter 1 m. altus. Rami fulvi, dense verruculosi. 
JlainuU valda abbreviate folia et flores pscudofasciculatim gercntes. Folia 
primaria spiniformia, trifurcata, 1-2 cm. longa, spinula multo minore 
utriuque saepe adjecta. Folia ramuhrum abbreviatorum 3-5, breviter 
petiolata, elliptico-oblonpa, utriuque angustata, l'5-2"5 cm. longa, circiter 
1 cm. lata, spinuloso-dentata dentibus utrinque 2-4, coriacea, glabra, 
supra nitida nervo medio et lateralihus leviter imprests, subtus pruinosa 
nervo medio prominulo. Fedice/li 4-5 mm. longi, basi bracteis pluribus 
imbricatis deltoideo-ovatis vel ovato-oblongis apiculatis usque ad 2 mm. 
lon<ds carmineis circumdati. Sepala G, petaloidea, lutea ; exteriora ovato- 
orbicularia, 4 mm. longa ; interiora suborbicularia circiter 6 mm. diametro. 
Petala G, lutea, nectaria 2 gerentia, obovata, G mm. longa, 5 mm. lata, 
exteriora trilo^ata lobo medio parvo, interiora integra vel leviter emur- 
ginata; nectaria discreta, 0"75 mm. supra basin petalorum sita, oblonga, 
1 mm. longa. Stamina 6, 4 mm. lonua; filamenta crassa. Ovarium 1 mm. 
longum, vix 2 mm. diametro; stigma sessile, peltatum, ultra 2 mm. 
diametro. Bacca oblongo-ellipsoidea, circiter 1'3 cm. longa, cyaneo- 
purpurea, pruinosa. — T. A. Sprague. 



Berberis verruculosa, here figured, one of the most distinct 
and attractive of the newer Chinese species of the genus, 
was discovered in 1904 on the mountains around Tatien-lu, 
in Western Szechuan, by Mr. E. II. Wilson during his 
second expedition to China undertaken on behalf of Messrs. 
J. Veitch and Sons. It is most closely allied to B. pruinosa, 
Franch., a native of the province of Yunnan, but differs 
from that species in its verruculose branches and in having 
fewer and larger flowers. The material from which our 
plate has been prepared was obtained from a plant pre- 
sented to the Kew collection by the Messrs. Yeitch in 1909. 
B. verruculosa forms a sturdy low bush of dense habit with 
stiffly arched branches and dark lustrous foliage. It is 
apparently very hardy, and its neat habit and slow growth 
make it especially well adapted for the Rock Garden. It 
has not yet borne seeds freely, but it can be propagated by 

SsPTBXBXBj 1912. 



cuttings made of firm wood in August and placed in sandy 
soil under a cloche in some sheltered shady spot. 

Description. — Shrub, evergreen, 3-4 ft. high ; branches 
tawny, densely verruculose ; twigs very short, bearing the 
clustered leaves and flowers. Leaves : primaries reduced to 
3-furcate spines, J-J in. long with frequently a much 
smaller additional spinule on each side ; those of the 
abbreviated twigs 3-5, shortly petioled, elliptic-oblong, 
narrowed to both extremities, |—1 in. long, about ^ in. 
wide, with 2-4 spinulous teeth on each side, coriaceous, 
glabrous, shining above with sunk midrib and lateral 
nerves, pruinose beneath with the midrib slightly raised. 
Pedicels ^-^ in. long, surrounded at the base by numerous 
deltoid-ovate or ovate-oblong, apiculate, imbricate red bracts 
each about 1 lin. long. Sepals 6, petaloid, yellow; outer 
ovate-orbicular, 2 lin. long ; inner suborbicular about 3 lin. 
wide. Petals 6, yellow, each with 2 nectaries, obovate, 
3 lin. long, 2^ lin. wide; outer 3-lobed with a minute 
mid-lobe, inner entire or slightly emarginate ; nectaries 
distinct, oblong, small, adnate a little above the base of the 
petals. Stamens 6, 2 lin. long; filaments stout. Ovary 
2 lm. long, under 1 lin. wide ; stigma sessile, peltate, over 
1 lm. across. Berry oblong-ellipsoid, about A in. long, 
purplish- blue, pruinose. 



Fi<_'. 1, part of stem, showing verruoae ; 2, leaf-spine and axillary short shoot ; 
two leaves of the latter removed; 3, petal; 4 and 5, stamens; 6, pistil -.-all 
enlun.ed. 



8455 




M.S.de 



VJncent Broak Sr Dajr&Sani .^""P 



& C ? L axuLan.. 



Tab. 8455. 
CHIRONIA laxa. 

South Africa. 



Gextianaceae. Tribe Chironieae. 
Chibonia, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 805. 



Chironia laxa Gdg tn Engl. Bot Jahrh. vol. xxvi. p. 105; Brain in Dyer 
Fl. Cap. voL it pars 1, p. 1112; species C. serpyllifoliac, Lehm., quam 

SinTuen^a! 8 " maJ ° nbUS Pr ° Iatitudine dupI ° &*3SmqR 

IJerua unique glabra, caulibns minopere angulatis, foliatis, laxe ramosis 3-5 dm 
long.s, raims patu is Tel adscendentibus. Folia sessilia, opposite, mem-' 
branacea lanceolate, apice acuminata, basi rotundata, margine nK 
obscure 3-nervia, 2-2; 5 cm. longa, 2-3 mm. late, Tiridia. Flore, saepissfme 
2-3 nonnunquam singub, ramulos terminantes et in axillis summis 
umlaterabter dispositi ; peduncnli rigidiusculi, 1-2-3 cm lonjri ?E 
anguste campannlatua, 5-partitus, 6 mm. longus; lobi linearVsubuiat? 
tubo pan lo longiores. Corolla purpureo-punicea, tubo angnrfe cXdrico 

S'mteat 1 /? 1 ^!^ 101 !' ^ r ai * ust ? to > ™&* ovato-lWeolX b- 
acummatis 10-12 mm. longis 4-5 mm. latis. Stamina exserta- anthene 
rectae, luteae Ovarium anguste oblongum, acutum, 6 mm Sngum stylo 
gracili ovario ongiore minopere declinato, stigmate 2-lobo.-C. Llampli- 
foha, E. Mey. Comm. p 177, non Lamk. V. Schlechteri, Schoch in Bull Herb 
Boiss. ser. 2, toI. li p. 1110, et in Bot. Centralbl. Beih. xiv 214 -D PbIin 



The genus Chironia includes about thirty-four species, of 
which twenty-five are natives of South Africa. Though 
nearly one-half of these have been from time to time intro- 
duced to European greenhouses, only two are generally 
met with in cultivation; these are C. linoides, Linn", 
figured at t. 511 of this work, which has been continuously 
m cultivation since the later years of the seventeenth 
century, and C. floribunda, Paxt., which has been generally 
grown since the middle of the nineteenth century. The 
disappearance of those which have not persisted has not 
been due to any serious difficulty connected with their 
cultivation, but has been owing to the fact that many 
appear to be monocarpic and that none of them readily 
ripen their seeds in this country. The species which 
flower more than once and can be propagated vegeta- 
tively are, therefore, the only ones that can be relied 
upon to continue in collections. The species now figured is 
a native of the Eastern region of the Cape Colony ; its seeds 

HtHTEMBEIi, 1912. 



were transmitted from Tenibuland by Canon Mason to his 
brother Canon Mason, Master of Pembroke College, and made 
over to Mr. E. I. Lynch, Curator of the Cambridge Botanic 
Garden, where a plant flowered in June, 1911. Mr. Lynch 
finds that C. laxa is not difficult to grow if care be exercised ; 
the chief danger to be avoided is injury by the Begonia mite, 
from which it may be guarded by the use of suitable insec- 
ticides. The best soil is a sandy loam, and good drainage 
must be provided, though watering need not be specially 
restricted. If the seed be sown early the plants may flower 
during the first year, but if sowing be delayed till "summer 
good plants can be obtained which flower in the following 
year. Owing to its weak habit, three or four plants should 
be grown together in a 4£-inch pot. The nearest ally of 
C. laxa is C. serpylli folia, Lehm., which we know from the 
seed-list of the Hamburg Botanic Garden to have been 
in cultivation there in 1828, but of which no subsequent 
cultural trace can be found. Whether it may be possible 
to establish C. laxa, permanently it is as yet impossible to 
say. But even if it should disappear, there ought to be no 
insuperable difficulty in securing fresh importations of seeds 
m -!\ 0nly a 0f this bllt of other species of Chironia which are 
wild in South Africa, most of which are well worthy of a 
place, even if only temporarily, in our greenhouses. 

Descriptiox.—//^, everywhere glabrous; stems slightly 
angular, leafy, laxly branched, 1-1$ ft. long; branches 
ascending or spreading. Leaves opposite, sessile, membranous, 
lanceolate, acuminate, base rounded, margin entire, faintly 
o-nerved rom the base, f-1 in. long, 1-U li n . wide, green. 
* lowers showy, usually 2-3, sometimes solitary, terminal; 
peduncles J-1J in. long, rather stiff. Calyx narrowly cam- 
panula^, 5-partite, 3 lin. long; lobes linear-subulate, rather 
longer than the tube. Corolla pale magenta, tube narrowly 
cylindric, halt as long again as the calyx ; limb contracted ; 
9° of 1 ? vate ; lauceolate J somewhat acuminate, 5-6 lin. Jong, 
l-l^ lm. wide. Stamens exserted ; anthers straight, yellow. 
Ovary narrow-oblong, acute, 3 lin. long ; style slender, longer 
than the ovary, slightly declinate; stigma* 2-lobed. 

6 Shi'' ca ' yx , aml i )istil ; % ovary in vertical section ; 3 and 1, authers; 
<jj X>ibtJi : — ail enlarged, ' 



8456 




\ 



r 




Vi 






~2 



> 











Lchlith 



X Re eve &. C°Loniorv 



Vin.c<srxBrooles£>a.y&-SonI>t*-imp 



J 



Tab. 8456. 
PRIMULA Wattii. 

Himalaya. 

Primulaceae. Tribe Priiiuleae. 
Pbimula, Linn.; Benih. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 631. 



Primula Wattii, King ex Watt in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xx. p. 10 cum tab. ; 
Hook.f. in FT. Brit. Ind. vol. iii. p. 672 ; Pax et Knuth in Engl. Pflanzenr. 
—Primulaceae, p. 66 ; Gard. Chron. 1912, vol. Ii. p. 286, t. 138 ; ab affini 
P. soldanelloide, Watt, calycis lobis forniae diversae haud integris 
distinguenda. 

Herba nana. Folia oblonga vel oblongo-oblanceolata, apice obtusa, basi in 
petiolum angustata, 2'5 cm. looga, 1*5 cm. lata, grosse crenata, mem- 
branacea, efarinosa, pagina superiore pilis longis albidis plus minusve 
instructa, inferiore costa nervisque lateralibus pilis similibus instructa, 
nervis lateralibus utrinque circiter 6 cum nervis transversis supra 
impressis subtus prominentibus ; petioli subalati, circiter 7 mm. longi, 
sparse longe albo-ciliati. Scapus circiter 10 cm. altus, capitulum e floribus 
numerosis pendulis constitutum gerens; bracteae parvae, lanceolatae vel 
fere rotundatae, membranaceae. Calyx majnsculus, cupularis, corollae 
tubo subaequialtus, membranaceus, laxus, irregulariter lobatus, lobis 
irregulariter serratis, viridis et longitudinaliter brunneo-pictus. GorolUu 
violaceae nisi fauce albo-farinosae tubus 5 mm. longus, limbus late 
campanulatus, 5-lobus, lobis fere cordatis irregulariter lobatis. Antherae 
oblongae, apiculatae, 1 mm. altae, filamentis vix 1 mm. longis. Pittillum 
1 mm. altum, glabrum, ovario subgloboso stylo aequialto, stigmate late 
truncato-capitato. — W. G. Cuaib. 



The Primula here figured was originally met with on 
the Cho-la range in Eastern Sikkim, where in certain 
localities it is abundant on banks and ridges, though, taken 
generally, it is rather rare. The plant from which our 
illustration has been prepared is one lent for the purpose by 
Messrs. R. Gill and Son, Falmouth. But it has also 
flowered in the Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh, and at 
Kew, from seed presented by the Calcutta Botanic Garden 
in 1911 which had been collected by Mr. W. W. Smith in 
Sikkim during the autumn of the previous year. In this 
country it comes into flower in April or a little later ; in 
the wild state, however, it does so from mid-July onwards 
into August under daily rain or heavy mist and in conditions 
hardly to be met with in Britain. Primula Wattii, with 
P. Reidii, Duthie, P. soldanelloides, Watt, and P. unijlora, 
September, 1912. 



Klatt, is a member of a very natural and well-marked 
coterie of the Soldanelloid group of Primulas. It is readily 
distinguished from its allies by the bronze tint of its buds, 
the very wide calyx with irregularly toothed lobes, the 
rather large white mealy eye, and the minute pistil. Like 
many other Primulas, P. Wattii is practically monocarpic ; 
after flowering when about a year old the plants die or 
are too weak to flower a second time. For horticultural 
purposes such species have to be treated as annuals ; 
unfortunately they do not always ripen seeds under 
cultivation. 

Descriptiox. — Herb. Leaves membranous, green, oblong 
or oblong-lanceolate, obtuse, base narrowed to the petiole, 
margin coarsely crenate, 1 in. long, | in. wide, with 
scattered long white hairs above and similar hairs on the 
midrib and nerves below; lateral nerves about 6 on each 
side, these like the midrib and the transverse veins sunk 
above, raised beneath; petiole almost winged, about J in. long, 
sparingly ciliate with long white hairs. Scape about 4 in. 
high, bearing a many-flowered head of flowers ; bracts small, 
lanceolate or almost rounded, membranous. Calyx rather 
large, cupular, about as long as the corolla-tube, membranous, 
loose, irregularly lobed, the lobes irregularly toothed, green 
with longitudinal brown streaks. Corolla violet with a 
white mealy eye ; tube ^ in. long ; limb wide-campanulate, 
">-lobed, the lobes subcordate and irregularly lobulate. 
Anthers oblong, apiculate, very small ; filaments very short. 
Pistil very small, glabrous, subglobose ; style about as long 
as the ovary ; stigma widely truncate-capitate. 



Fig. 1, calyx; 2, calyx in section, showing the minute pistil ; 3, corolla laid 
open, showing the stamens and the white mealy eye; 4, pistil:— all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLO NIAL, AND FO REIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
i 8 « e, F ° r the USe of Be g inuei- 8 and Amateurs. By George Bentham 
F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W H 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravinge. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s, 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnaean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L. S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., &c, «tc. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith', 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement onlv, 12s 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D, 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Ctjrrey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
• Plates. 12s. 

BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^}. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S. , assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W. H. Harvky and 

0. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols 

1. — III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol V 
Sect. I., 34s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6d 
Vol. VI., Sect. L, Parts I— IV., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham 
Kennadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 
Hooker, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOYELL REEYE & CO., Ltd., G, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 93, SEPTEMBER, 1912. 



Tab. 8452.— DEKDROBIUM IMTHURNTI. 
„ 8453.— COLTJMNEA GLABRA. 
tt 8454.— BERBERIS VERRUCULOSA. 
„ 8455.— CHIRONIA LAXA. 
„ 8456.— PRIMULA WATTII. 
Lotell Rebvk & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemslet. 



BOTANICAL PLATES 

Prom the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 



NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— IV., 8s. each. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Vol. IV., Sect. I.; 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6<i. Vol. VII., 27s. Sd. Vol. VIII., 

25s. 6d. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 



NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., 34s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By HARYEY and SONDEK. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. Vol. IV., S*ect. II., 24s. Vol. VI., 24*. Vol. VII., 33s. 

Published tinder the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 

Natal and Transvaal. 



Lovell Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



:lohdon : prihted BY WILLIAM CLOWES ahp sous, LTP., BUKE STKEBT, STAMFORD STREET, S.E. 



dfomti) Merits. 

No. 94. 



VJL. VIII.— OCTOBER. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s. 



OR NO. 1508 0F THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CUttTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

oomunm hand-coloured FIGD r E s with descriptors, stbttctubai and histor.cal, 

OH NEW AND BARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, K£\V } 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Burner, ftonai Boiantc tfiarOens, Ueto. 




" Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and white 
Nature's own sweet and cunning hand laid on." 



LONDON : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVERNMENTS. 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVE NT GARDEN. 

1912. 

[All rights reserved."] 
(Entered at t)ie New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



wmm 

EMED1E 



XL AUL 

INSEGj^TODES, 

FJ^WGICIDES. 

MffiED KILLERAc. 



a 



I] 



il 



FROM 

IHORTICULTURALTRADE EVERYWHERE! 

MANUFACTURER: ",7i4 

G. H. RICHARDS, 

234, Borough High Street, London, S.E. 



Himalayan (hardy) Rhodo 

and other species. 

Rare Shrubs, Alpine 

the most Complete Collect 

Dwarf Alpine Shrubs. All the best 
Plants and Aquatics. Daffodils and 
all the choicest Hardy Bulbous Pk 
Construction of Rockeries and Planting. 

CATALOGUE ON APPLICATIC... 

G. REUTHE, 

The Fox Hill Nursery, Keston, Kent. 

THE HEPATIOE OF THE 
BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEAKSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. 
£5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



Lovell Reeve & Co., Ltd., 6, Henriett 
Street, Covent Garden. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W..BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Bakee, F.R.S., F.L.S. 

With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 

With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Wokthihgton G. Smith, F.L.S. 
Two Vols., 24 Coloured Plates, 36s. The Supplement separately, 12s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLOKA 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BEXTHAM, F. R. S. 

Revised fcy Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants 

Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH. F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's " Handbook" and other British Flora. 

7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Kti£rntvtli«rs, ! J *. 



LOVELL REEVE k CO., Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GAB 








Wr.S.del..J.N.Pibsh.lith. 



&C?I 



Tab. 8457. 
CHAMAEDOREA glaucifolia. 

Colombia ? 

Palmae. Tribe Areceae. 
Chamaedoeea, Willd.; Smth. et Book./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 910. 



Chamaedorea glaucifolia, H. Wendl, Lid. Paha. p. 64; Gard. and Forest 
vox. yin. p. oU4, fig. 70 ; species sectionis Euchamacdoreac distinctissima 
ioliolis longe Imean-laneeolatis distinguitur. 

Caulis erectus, ad 4-5 m. altus, remote annulatus. Folia erecto-patentia 
glaucescentia, breviter vagina n tia ; foliola utritique usque ad 40 irre-u- 
lanter disposita, lmeari-lancoolata, longissime acuminata, circiter 35 cm 
longa, I J mm. lata, basi inorassata, costa oonapicua; rhachis supra acutm- 
gula, subtns convexa; petiolus supra canaliculatus, subtus convexus. 
Pan tenia ; dioica, mascula 4 dm. longa, ramis 2 dm. longis ; spathae oblono-ae 
acummatae, 2-5 dm. longae, 2-5 cm. latae, glabrae. 'Flores masculi; Calyx 
J mm. longus, cupularis, breviter obtuseque dentatus, brunneo-marginatus 
Corolla sessihs, 5 mm. longa, fere ad basin tripartita ; lobi carnosi, acuti 
concavi valvati. Stamina 6, quam corolla paullo breviora; filamenta 
crassa, triangulaiia, antheris fere aequiionga. Ovarii rudimentum columnare 
apice tnhdum, stamimbus superans. Flores feminei : Calyx corollaque iis 
florum masculorum similes. Staminodia nulla. Ovarium 3 mm. longum 
et latum, tnangulare ; stigmata 3, brevia, recurvata. Paniculae fructiqerae 
rami et calyces corallini. Fructus globosus, 7 mm. diametro, atro-nitidus. 
bemma globosa; raphe conspicua; testa reticulata.— C. H. Wright 



The elegant Chamaedorea which is here figured is one 
that has been in cultivation in the Aroid House at Kew for 
some forty years. In this house it has thriven well, but has 
formed a very slender stem too thin to support unaided the 
fine crown of elegant foliage which it bears. It flowers and 
fruits frequently, and the opportunity which presented itself 
in 1912 of obtaining flowers of both sexes was taken to 
provide this illustration. The genus Chamaedorea includes 
a considerable number of species mainly met with in 
the mountains of Central America, though a few extend as 
far to the south as the Andes of Peru and Bolivia. But 
as to the precise locality of C. glaucifolia, which is perhaps 
the most graceful of them all, there is an element of doubt. 
It was first described in 1854 by EL Wendland from a 
solitary male plant cultivated in the Brussels Botanic 
Garden and believed to have been introduced from pine 
woods near Chiapas in New Grenada. More recently 
however, it has been stated to be a native of Guatemala* 
October, 1912. 



and it is to be noted that the most familiar Chiapas is the 
Mexican state which lies immediately to the north-east of 
Guatemala. When it was first introduced to cultivation 
small plants of C. glaucifolia were much in request as table 
plants and for other decorative purposes. The leaflets of 
C. glaucifolia bear some resemblance to those of C. elegans, 
Mart, a species which, however, belongs to the section 
Collinia, in which the petals are more extensively united 
than in Euchamaedorea, to which section Wendland has 
referred our plant, and with which, as regards its floral 
characters, it better agrees. It has, however, to be 
remarked that in Euchamaedorea most of the species have 
broad leaflets tapering to both ends and have the leaflets 
approximated in groups, a feature which is not very con- 
spicuous in C. glaucifolia. 

Description-.— Shrub ; stem erect, slender, reaching 15 ft. 
in height, distantly annulate. Leaves ascending below, 
spreading towards the apex, glaucescent, shortly sheathing ; 
leaflets about 40 on each side, rather irregularly set, linear- 
lanceolate, very long acuminate, about 14 in. long, J in. 
wide, thickened at the insertion, midrib prominent; rhachis 
sharply angled above, convex beneath ; petiole channelled 
above, convex beneath. Panicles 1-sexual, dioecious, the 
males 16 in. long, their branches 8 in. long; spathes 
oblong acuminate, 10 in. long, 1 in. wide, glabrous. 
Male: Calyx 1 hn. long, cupular, shortly bluntly toothed, 
with brown edges. Corolla sessile, 2£ lin. long, 3-lobed 
almost to the base ; lobes fleshy, acute, concave, valvate. 
Mamens 6, rather shorter than the corolla ; filaments stout, 
triangular, about as long as the anthers. Rudimentary 
ovary columnar, 3-lobed, larger than the stamens. Female : 
Uityx and corolla as in the male flower. Staminodes 0. 
Ovary triangular, lj lin. long and about as much across; 
stigmas 3, short, recurved. Fruiting panicles with coral- 
red branches and calyces. Fruit globose, over J in. in 
ammeter back, polished. Seeds globose, raphe conspicuous ; 
testa reticulate. ^ r 

a7i??,\i,w al + e flowers ; \ a m »!e flower, one petal removed, showing anthers 
f ti,P «m * °?7 ; 3 ' anther ; 4, rudimentary ovary; 5 a femafe flower; 

'.J.?;,? ***** amoved, showing the ovary; 7, transverse section of 
ovary, « and 9, seeds :-«// enlarged except 8, which U of natural size. 



845S 




teS.it 



tilth 



Vincent 3rooks,D.iy&SonLt. i*$. 



L. Reeve &C" 



Tab. 8458. 
CEROPEGIA Thorncroftii. 

Transvaal. 



Asclepiadaceae. Tribe Ceropegieae. 
Ceuopegia, Linn. ; Benth et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 770. 



Ceropegia Thorncroftii, AT. E. Brown ; species nova affinis C. crispatae, 
N. E. Br., sed floribus multo ininoribus lobis brevioribus et intra giblK>30- 
carinatis diffort. 

Eerba perennis, volubilis. Radices fasciculatae, carnosae, 10-14 mm. orassae, albae. 
('an lis 3-4 mm. crassus, glaber. Folia opposite, subearnosa, glabra, viridia ; 
petioli 6-10 mm. longi, 2-3 mm. crassi ; laminae 2'5-5'5 cm. longae, 
1-2-4 cm. latae, ovatae vel elliptico-ovatae, acutae, basi rotundatae vel late 
cuneatae, marginibus undulatis et pins minusve crisputis. CumaetaUhxee, 
pedunculatae, mnltiflorae; pednnculi 1*5-1*7 cm. longi, 2 mm. crassi, 
glabri. Bracttae minutae, 1-3 mm. longae, deltoideo-subulatae. Sepala 
3-4 mm. longa, subulata, b;isi dilatata, glabra, purpureo-pnnctata. Corolla 
alba, purpureo-maculata, extra glabra; tubus 2 - 5 cm. longus, curvatus, 
intus pilosus, basi ellipsoideo-inflatns et 8 mm. diametro, superne 3 mm. 
iliametro, cylindrical fauce infundibuliformis et 8 mm. diametro; lobi 
9-10 mm. longi, erecto-iticurvati, apice connati, lineari-oblougi marginibus 
reflexis, intus ad medium gibboso-carinati et glabri, interne parce pilosi. 
Coronae exterior is lobi adscendentes, 1 mm. longi, oblongi, subtruncati vel 
obtusi, fiisco-purpureo-marginati, minute ciliati. Qoronae interiori* lobi 
2 mm. longi, lineares, conniventes, subcohaerentes, fusco-purpurei, glabri. 
— N. E. Bmown. 

The Ceropegia which forms the subject of our illustration 
is a native of the Transvaal, where it was discovered in the 
neighbourhood of Barberton by Mr. G. Thorncroft, to 
whom also horticulture is indebted for its introduction to 
European collections. Plants were sent by Mr. Thorncroft 
to the Botanic Garden, Cambridge, where it was flowered 
for the first time in August, 1011, by Mr. Lynch, to whom 
we are indebted for the material on which our figure has 
been based. When it flowered it was found to be an 
nndescribed species and has been named in honour of its 
discoverer. C. Thorncroftii closely resembles C. crispata, 
N. E. Br., not only in its habit and as regards its foliage, 
but also in having a cluster of thick fleshy roots instead of 
a tuber. But while it is nearly allied to C. crispata, 
C. Thorncroftii differs markedly from that species in 
having much smaller flowers characterised by the gibbous 
projection at the middle of the keel on tbe inner side of the 
October, 1912. 



lobes, of which there is no trace in C. crispata. Mr. Lynch 
informs us that C. Thorncroftii requires the usual treatment 
under ordinary tropical conditions of the other species of the 
genus except that in winter it appears to demand a rather 
higher temperature than the majority, and to prefer a 
greater degree of dryness. It has done well in the Stove, 
but has not succeeded in the Cactus House. The masses of 
fleshy roots appear to be sensitive to any excess of moisture, 
especially if associated with too low a temperature. 

Description. — Herb, twining, perennial ; roots white, 
clustered, fleshy, J in. thick; stem about f4 in. thick, 
glabrous. Leaves opposite, somewhat fleshy, glabrous, 
green, ovate or elliptic-ovate, acute, base rounded or wide- 
cuneate, margin undulate and more or less crispate, l-2£ 
in. long, i_l| i n . w jd e ; petiole 3-5 lin. long, stout. 
Cymes axillary, peduncled, many-flowered; peduncles 
about in long, 1 lin. thick, glabrous; bracts minute, 
deltoid-subulate. Sepals about i in. long, subulate, wide- 
based, glabrous, dotted with purple. Corolla white with 
purple blotches, glabrous outside ; tube 1 in. long, curved, 
pilose within, with an inflated ellipsoid base I in. across, 
aoove cyhndric and only 11 Hn. w i de , the throat funnel- 
snaped 4 in. across; lobes over -\ in. long, erect then 
incurved their tips connate, linear-oblong with reflexed 
edges, within gibbously keeled and glabrous at the middle, 
sparingly pilose below the middle. Outer corona with 
ascending oblong subtruncate or obtuse lobes £ lin. long, 
which are finely cihate and have dark-purpll margins. 

dlTJ 0r ? a , W u th h ? e ar ' wnwYiDg, somewhat cohering 
dark-purple glabrous lobes 1 lin. long. 

corona/^corom • R^SS SeCti ° D of coroI]a ; 3 > hairs **** ^er surface of 
», % corona, 5, pollen-masses : -all enlarged. 



8459 




hfli 



•LReave&C I 



Tab. 8459. 
OSMANTHUS Delavayi. 

China. 



Olkaceae. Tribe Oleineae. 
Osmanthus, Lour. ; Smth. et Hook. f. Oen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 677. 

Osmanthus Delavayi, Franch in Bull. Soc. Linn. Paris, vol. i. p. 613- affinis 
%Jg*<Knm ex C. B.C arke, a quo foliis parvisplerumque argute scrrati 
flonbus longionbus omnibus, ut videtur, terminalibus distat. ^ rdUS ' 

Frutex sempervirens, 2 mm. altus (ex Franchet), ramosus cortice cinerm 
xarouhs hornotims puberulis. Folia elbptica, utrinque acuta S 
obtusiuscna, marg.ne argute serrata vc] obsolete dentata (e X Franchet) 
curator 1-5 cm. longa, 0"8-0-9 cm. lata, coriacea, glabra, .upra^SS 
viridia, subtus pallidiora glar,dulis oleiferis m^^nctnta;pMon2^ 
long, superne mmu te puberuli. Fbrum fasciculi i termina es perulis h£ 
obovatis vel rotundat s 2-4 mm. longis scariosis Solatia suffulti ; wOceS 
pnberuh 2-5 mm longi. Calyx tubuloso-campanulatus, pauE Sra 
medium 4-lobus, lobis rot.mdatis obtusis vel obtusissimis cil iatk . CW/a 
alba, glabra odorata, tubo superne leviter ampliato 9-10 mm longo lobis 
obovatc : elbpti C1 8 obtusis 4-5 mm. longis. Stamina medio uSTn'serta 
filamentis breves, antheris ovato-oblongis connective brevi er ap S & 
OvarUm elhpsoideum, stylo eo vix aequilongo, stigmate bilobo Druna 
(ex Franchet) ovato-sub. otuuda, nigro-caerulea.-O. Staff P 

The Osmanthus which is here figured is one of the most 
pleasing of new evergreen shrubs. It is named in honour 
of the late Abbe Delavay, by whom it was originally 
discovered in the mountains near Lankong, in Yunnan 
at about 9500 feet above sea-level, and by whom it was 
introduced to cultivation through seeds sent to Mr M L 
de Vilmorin. The species is now offered for sale ' by' 
Messrs. Lemoine of Nancy and by Mr. Chanault of Orleans 
lhe plant from which the material for our illustration has 
been derived is one purchased for the Kew Collection from 
Messrs. Lemoine which flowered in March, 1912 At Kew 
it thrives in a well-drained loamy soil and appears to be 
quite hardy. Besides being evergreen it has the advantage 
o being one of the earliest flowering of shrubs while its 
blossoms have a most delightful fragrance. In this respect 
it resembles its nearest ally, 0. suavis, King, a native of 
bikkim and Mampur, at elevations of 0000 feet or rather 
lower, winch is, however, readily distinguished by its larger 
more acute leaves and it. somewhat smaller lateral as well 

0(T()J5KR, 1912. 



as terminal flowers. 0. suavis, which is not hardy at Kew, 
and 0. Ddavayi together constitute a distinct section of the 
genus, to which Mr. Franchet has given the name Siphos- 
manthus. 0. Delavayi may be increased by late summer 
cuttings. 

t Description.— Shrub, 8 ft. high, evergreen, freely branch- 
ing; bark grey; young shoots puberulous. Leaves ellip- 
tic, acute or somewhat obtuse, base cuneate or somewhat 
rounded, margin sharply serrate or sometimes obscurely 
toothed, about § in. long, * in. wide, coriaceous, glabrous, 
deep green above, rather paler beneath, dotted with dark 
oil-glands; petiole 1 lin. long, finely puberulous above. 
flowers m terminal clusters, at first enclosed in wide ovate 
or rounded, scanous, ciliolate bud-scales 1-2 lin. long- 
pedicels puberulous, short. Calyx tubular-campanulate, 
4-obed rather beyond the middle; lobes rounded, blunt, 
filiate. Corolla white, glabrous, fragrant; tube slightly 
widened upwards over | in. long; lobes obovate-elliptic, 
obtuse, about 2 lin. long. Stamens inserted about the 
middle ot the corolla tube; filaments very short; anthers 
ovate-oblong with a shortly apiculate connective. Ovary 
ellipsoid about as long as the style; stigma 2-lobed. 
fnut ovate-rotund, very dark blue. 



^W-^T^t^tSiL^'*-* 



8460 









M.S.del.JXF ltc hlith. 



"^nceni Bro o ks,Day &£ 



L.Reeve«,C?Iondon. 



Tab. 84G0. 
ELSIIOLTZIA Stauxtoxi. 

China. 



Labiatae. Tribe Satubeineae. 
Elsholtzia, Willd. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Qm. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1181. 

Elsholtzia Stauntoni, Benth. Lab. p. 161, et in DC. Prodr. vol. xii y 160- 
H<™**n Journ. Linn Soc vol. xiii. p. 85; Franchet, PI. David, pars l' 
P - oi ( r™, P. ube ™ la ); &»*»* * "ems!, in J num. Linn. Soc. vol xxvi 
?» \n^ k *? ^ Ut Beutsch - D( ndr. Ges. 1909, p. 288; Hyde in (Yard 

Chron 1912, vol h. p. 21, fig. 16; ab E. polystach»a%nth., floribus m3to 
majonbus pamculas laxiores et latiores formantibus facile distinguenda. 

Suffrutex graveolens. Caules erecti, 1-1 -.5 m. alti, subteretes, canescenti- 
tomentelli apice valde ramosi. Folia petiolata, late lanceolata 9-12 cm 
longa 2-5-d cm. lata superiora gradatim minora, longe acuminata, inciso- 
serrata, basi in peholum gensim angustata, margine et venis prmiariis 
mmute puberulis exceptis glalxrrima, infra pallida et crebre glanduloso- 
pucctata ; petiolus ■ 0-1 ■ 5 cm. longus. Verticillastri 5-10-flori paniculas 
numerosas spidformes laxas saepissime terminates subsecundas 7-15 cm 
Farms ad 20 cm. longas formantes. Bracteae et bracteolae lanceolate vol 
Jinean-Ianceolatae, saepe 2-4 mm. longae. Pedicelli 2-3 mm lonci breviter 
pubescentes. Calyx tubulosus, 2-5-3 mm. longus, extra breviter albo- 
tomentosus, glanduloso-punctatus, 5-dentatus; dentes ovato-lanceolati 
1-1-70 mm. loiigi subaequalcs, acuti. Corolla roseo-purpurea, circiter 
I mm. ouga, extra breviter pubescens, glandulis sessilibus paucis instructa ■ 
tubus leviter incurvus, mfundibuliformis, iutus oblique annulato-pilosus \ 
limbos leviter bilabiatus ; labium superum erectum, profunde emaigmatmn 
1-omm. longum; labium inferum 3-lobatum, 2-5 mm. longum lobis sub- 
orbicularibus intermedio concavo glabro 2 mm. longo quam ceteri majors 
Stamina 4, glabra, longe exserta, duo antica Iongiora. Stylus glaber k.nce 
exsei-tus, apice profunde 2-fidus. Nuculae laeves, ell.psoideae/disco denti- 
culato antice valde producto circumdatae— S. A. Skan. 



The Elsholtzia here figured is probably, from the horti- 
culturist's point of view, the best of the genus, which is 
now known to include about 36 species, mostly natives of 
India and China. Three species, distinct from the Asiatic 
are known from Tropical Africa. Two of the Asiatic 
species have already been figured in this work, namely 
A cnstata, Willd., at t. 2560, and F. blanda, Benth., under 
the name of Aphanochilus blandus, Benth., at t. 3091. The 
former is widely distributed, occurring in Northern Asia, 
China and Japan, and in the Temperate and Tropical 
Himalayas, and has even appeared in cultivated places in 
several parts of Northern Europe. 

E. Stauntoni, the subject of our illustration, is apparently 
limited to the Province of Chihli in North China. Its 

OCTOLEU, 1912. 



introduction to cultivation was brought about by Mr. J. GT. 
Jack of the Arnold Arboretum, who, during his visit to 
tlte Far East in 1905, obtained cuttings from some plants 
which he found growing on hills near the Great Wall, 
northwards of Nankow. The material from which our 
figure has been prepared has been derived from a plant 
presented to Kew by Professor Sargent of the Arnold 
Arboretum in 1910. The species has proved quite hardy 
at Kew, where it forms a shrub some five feet high in a 
border in the Arboretum where it flowers freely in 
September and October. The leaves are aromatic. Pro- 
pagation may be effected by cuttings of the young shoots 
which root readily in a close frame in autumn. 

Description.— Under shrub, aromatic. Stems erect, 4-5 ft. 
high, almost cylindric, faintly hoary -.tomentose, much 
branched upwards. _ Leaves petioled, wide-lanceolate, 3^- 
4^ in. long, 1-11 in. wide, gradually diminishing in size 
upwards, long acuminate, margin " incised-serrate, base 
gradually narrowed into the petiole, glabrous except on 
the margin and the main-nerves which are finely puberu- 
lous, rather pale and closely gland-dotted beneath ; petiole 
i-s in. long. Verticillasters 5-10-flowered, arranged in 
numerous loosely spicate panicles which are usually sub- 
secund and terminal and are from 3-6 in. or occasionally 
up to 8 in. long; bracts and bracteoles lanceolate or linear- 
lanceolate, 1-2 hn. long; pedicels about 1 lin. long, shortly 
pubescent. Calyx tubular, over 1 lin. long, shortly wliite- 
omentose outside, gland-dotted, 5-toothed ; teeth ovate- 
lanceolate, under 1 lin. long, acute, subequal. Corolla 
rose-purple, about J in. long, shortly pubescent outside and 
with a tew sessile glands; tube slightly incurved, funnel- 
shaped with an oblique ring of hairs within; limb faintly 
dipped, upper lip erect, deeply notched, under 1 lin. Ion-, 
lower lip 3-lobed, over 1 lin. long, lobes suborbicular, the 
central glabrous outside, 1 lin. long, rather larger than 
the two lateral lobes. Stamens 4, glabrous, far exserted, 
the lower pair longer than the upper. Style glabrous, far 
exserted, deeply 2-fid. Nutlets smooth, ellipsoid, surrounded 
by a denticulate disk which is distinctly produced in front. 

illk^uU^l], % fl ° WCr ' 3 ' col ' olla > lai(1 °P cn i 4 and 5, anthers ; G, ovary and 



8461. 




KS.del.J.N.FiXAlitX 



Uafiey&.Sof&S' 



L "Reeve &.C 1 ? London. 



Tab. 8401. 

FURCRAEA eleoans. 

Mexico. 



Amaryllidaceae. Tribe Agaveae. 
Fubcbaea, Vent; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 739. 



Furcraea elegans Tod. Hart Bot Panorm. p. 13, t. 4 ; Baker, Handb. AmaryU 

P* * ' J -. Ji ' Brur nmo?id in Rep. Missouri Bot. Gard. 1907 rm 45 fifi 1* 
t. 2; species ex affinitate F. flavoviridis, Hook., a qua foliiSVrasrioribM 
spmis vahdionbus staminorumque filamentis brevius subulatis differt 
Strife* acaulis Fo&i 40-50 rosulatim disposita, primum erecto-mtuk 
demum patent* ve recurva, 2-2-35 tn. longa, 10 cm. lata, Jonge ]anc P eo]a 'a 
basi pagina supenore tumida marginibus compressis, supra S?£ 
contract*, con yexa delude gradatini plana, tertia suprema canalicular 
apice spina recta 15 cm. longa instructa, marginibus spinis an^ curat* 
subtnangulanbus acummatis armata, supra obscure viridia purmlreo 
margmata, sub us scabra lnflore*centia 7 "75 m. alta, gemmiferrKS- 
culus basi circiter 15 cm. diametro, fere ad basin ramigtr ; rami ad ?7 m 
longi, multiflon; bracteae lanceolatae; pedicelli 1 cm. lougi, nntantS' 
Pertant/num glabrum; tubus 2'2 cm. longus, extra demum bruniieus 7e- 
menta 3 cm. longa, ovata,intus pallide viridia, exteriora interioribus paullo 
angustiora, extra purpurea demum brunnescentia. Momenta 1 cm E 
fusifonma apice breviter subulata; antherae oblongae, basi breviSr' 
cordatae. Stylus s aminibus paullo longior, parte inferior* alte Sal cu ata 
parte supenore cyhudnca; stigma breviter trilobum.-K GhietireaMiiet 
F.jnigwmformie,KoTt. Vershaffelt. ex Tod. Hort. Bot. Panorm n 13 
C H. Weight. v ' 

The fine Furcraea which forms the subject of our illus- 
tration is a native of Mexico, which has been known in 
European collections for many years. It was first described 
by the late Professor Tod a ro from a plant which flowered 
in the Botanic Garden at Palermo in 1875, and is distin- 
guished from all the other species which have a very short 
stem or are quite stemless, by the size of its leave/which 
at times attain a length of nearly eight feet. Its nearest 
ally in the genus is F flavoviridis, Hook., figured at t 5163 
ot this work, which however has thinner leaves with more 
slender marginal spines and has the upper subulate portion 
oi the filaments as long as the lower swollen part. Another 
ally is F. undulata, Jacobi, figured at t. 6160 of the 
Botanical Magazine; this latter, however, is a much 
smaller plant, with the leaves conspicuously contracted just 
above the base, while the inflorescence is unbranched in its 

Ocxobeb, 1912. 



lower portion. At Kew F. elegans has long been in culti- 
vation and has thriven well in the Succulent House under 
the treatment suitable for Agaves and other species of 
Furcraea. Here, however, it lias not yet flowered, and the 
material for our figure has been obtained from a plant 
which flowered in the garden of Lady Hanbury at La 
Mortola Ventimiglia, in March, 1912. When communi- 
cating this material Mr. A. Berger also kindly supplied 
excellent photographs which show the habit of the plant 
In this La Mortola plant the exterior of the flower was 
more highly coloured than in the Palermo specimen de- 
picted m Todaros original figure, where the brownish tint 
is but slightly indicated. 

BESCRiPTiox.-^^r^^, stemless. Leaves 40-50, rosu- 
Rl a ft i a f c ? ndin & ultimately spreading or recurved, 
o 2 8 "-Jong, 4 in. wide, narrow lanceolate, swollen at the 
base on the upper side with the margins there compressed, 
tZ\ a baSe h n dl y at a11 contracted, convex at first 
IrZX tf g T* ^ and P the u PP er third channelled, 
alont tL P Wlth a f tra, ^ ht s P ine nearI J * ™- ] ™£ and 
sninf, wl-r rglnS ^ somewha * triangular acuminate 

Iris on th CUrVe f ° r r rds ' dul1 ^en with purplish 
n ar gms on the upper 8urf ^ lower surface 

zt7TZV\ 25 V'W bulbiferous; peZcle 
bra°nhe up tV ft* l^*' ^^ W ° Ut ' 
lanceolate; pedicels* » in ?' ^J^ered ; bnicte 
fflabrous • tX I • , ] ° ng ' nod dmg. Pma»M 

within the r,ntT ' *? * • lon S> ovate > v ery pale green 
Tt e n^t , 12 • h rath f- " arro » er than the others, purple 
wi h shorts h \°^' de - «*"■■* 1 in- long, fusiform, 

at the hit ^ / 6 PS L a " therS 0bl0n ^' sl « cordat « 
ehaanriUhJ % 'r f ther lon g er th ™ *e stamens, 
channelled below, cyhndr.c above ; stigma shortly 3-lobed. 

Tigs. 1 and 2, stamens; 3, stylo -.-all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLO NIAL, AND F OREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
v <l B 'c F £ r the J use of beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
S.K.b. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W B 
Jitch, F.L.S., and W. G.Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Benthams "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
„^r^? T f ymgB ' 7th EdiE i° D . revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnwan 
Society. >iew Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Towhsem), M,A. 'f L S 
With Colottred Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition 21s 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J Etcm 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

ail the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer oi.es) fotti 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. ITohkirk, F.L.S., 
Edition, entirelv revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. fid 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Behkeli 

F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worth ikgtox G. B 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12« 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. Bv'c D 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Cubkbt, F.B.S. 12" Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 

BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGIJULE. By 

Geoege Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 
FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS: a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by 
JluELLEit, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments oi* Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of th. 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENS1S: a Systematic Desoription of the Plan 

the Cape Colony, Cafl'raria", and Port Natal. By W. H. If 
Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thiskmton-Dyi 
>wjh. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II. 
Sect. I., 34s. Vol. VI., 24*. Vol. VII., 33s. " " 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Dakiel Omver, F.R.S 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dver, F . I to III . 

20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV v V 25$ Gd 

Vol. VI.. Sect. I., Parts I.— IV., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII 25 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : . at [ c 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, ai 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macqunrri* 
Sir J. D. Hooker. F.R.S. Published under the anepioea oi 
ot' that Colony. Comniete, 42s. 

FLO: he BRITISH WEST INDIAN IS1 Bv 

bach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspic :ecre- 

of State for the Colonies.' 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J D 
Hooker, C.B., before .he British .'• f or the Advancemr 

Science, at No g^ 

LOYELL BEEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, Hour, ,t, Covent Gai 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 94, OCTOBER, 1912. 



Tab. 8457.— CHAMAEDOREA GLAUCIFOLIA. 
» 8458.— CEROPEGIA THORNCROFTII. 
„ 8459.— OSMANTHUS DELAY AYI. 
„ 8460.— ELSHOLTZIA STAUNTON! 
„ 8461.— FURCRAEA ELEGANS. 
Lotell R EKVE & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Series To which is prefixed a History of the 

Magazine by W. Botting Hbmslkt. 

BOTANICAL RLATES 

Prom the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6 *. and 1, each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 

NOW BEADY. Vol. VI., si^IW.-IV., 8.. each. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s/each. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Ooatin»ti« edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F RS. 
Vol. I\„ Sect. 1., 30s. s Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V o 5s M ' , rTr ' OJ 

> »u>. v.,„03. bd. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 

25s. 6d. 

Published under the authority of the Secret*™ »f <w-* / ji 

j j oeaetary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. . ,^ 

FLORA CAPENSIS- 

A Sys^a.c Oeseription ^ p I1 R&ff the Cape Colony, „*. 
Vols. I. to SI., 20s . each. 
By HARVEY and SONDES 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F R S 

Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. Vol IV s„„, tt .„ »»,*.*.». 

Public „ L L ' 24S - Vo1 - VI - 24 '- Vol. VII., 33s. 

Published under the autaoritv of tv,* n.~ 

7^f; d %r:z m ^ u of the cape - °°°* *•■»• 

., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



dFourtf) ^m'ts. 

No. 95. i 

VOL. VIII.— NOVEMBER 

OR No. 1509 0P THE ENTIRE WORK. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s, 



C U R T I S ' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 



EDITED tT 



D. PR A IN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Qtrmor, IRojjal botanic iSarBcns, Scto. 




" Tis beauty truly blent, whose red ant! white 
Nature's own sweet and cunning hand laid on." 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

tLIBHBB COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVERN! 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, GOVE NT GARDEN. 

1912. 

[All rights reserved.] 
(Entered at tht New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



THE HEPATIC^ OF THE 
BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. IT. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. 
£5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured, 

Loyell Eebvjg & Co., Ltd., 6, Henrietta 
Street, Covent Garden. 



Himalayan (hardy) Rhododendrons, 

and other species. 

Rare Shrubs, Alpines, 

the most Complete Collection. 

Dwarf Alpine Shrubs. All the best Herb 
Plants and Aquatics. Daffodils and Lilies, and 
aft the choicest Hardy Bulbous Plants. 

Construction of Rockeries and Planting. 

Catalogue on application. 

G. REUTHE, 

Tfce Fox Hill Nursery, Keston, Keat. 



BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES AND USTILAGINE.E. 

By GEORGE MASSEE 
on Botany to Vie London Society for the Extension of University Teaching), 
Crown 8yo., with 8 Plates, 6*. 6d, 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BURBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Germs by J. G. Bakes, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

By the Hey. M. J. BERKELEY, M. A., F.L.S. 

a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Wobthington G. Smi^h, F.L.S. 
Two Vols., 24 Coloured Plates, 36s. The Supplement separably, 12a. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized In the British Isles, 

By GEORGE BE NTH AM, F. R. S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hookeb, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants 
tr \V. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 
Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and otJier British Flon 
7tb Edition, with 1315 Wood Eugravin^g, 9*. 



/OVELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



Tab. 8462. 
ERIOPSIS Helenas. 

Peru, 

Obchidaceae. Tribe Vandeae. 
Ekiopsis, Lindl. ; Beidh. et Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 545. 



Eriopsis Helenae, Krdnzl. in Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. xxii. p. 98; affinis 
E. sceptri, Eeichb. f. et Warscew., sod labelli lobo intermedio breviter 
unguiculato et lamellis duplo latioribus differt. 

Eerba epipliytica, 50-60 cm. alta. Pseudobulbi subteretes, elongati, erecti, 
15-25 cm. longi, apice 3-4-pbylli. Folia elongato-oblonga, subacuta, 
arcuata, coriacea, 40-55 cm. longa, 2 -5-3 '5 cm. lata. Scapi erecti, arcuati, 
circiter CO cm. longi ; racemi laxi, multiflori. Braeteae laneeolato-oblongae, 
breves. Pedicelli graciles, 3-4 cm. longi. Flores mediocres. Sepala et 
petala patentia, oblonga, obtusa, circiter 2 cm. longa, ochracea, brunneo- 
marginata, LaMlum trilobum, circiter 1*6 cm. longum; lobi laterales 
transverse oblongi, obtusi, incurvi, ochracei ; lobus intermedins oboyato- 
spathulatus, obtusus, suberectus, albus, purpnreo - maculatus ; discus 
pnberulus, lamellis triangulari-oblongis supra inter lobos laterales diver- 
gentibus. Columna clavata, circiter 1 cm. longa, viridia; pollinia 4, 
inacqualia, anthera glandulae dehiscenti Bqnamiformi affixa. — E. A. Eolfe. 



The orchidaceous genus Eriopsis, Lindl., includes about 
six species, all South American, and extends from Griiiana 
and Colombia to Northern Brazil and Peru. One of these 
species, E. rutidobulbm, Hook., has already been figured at 
t, 4437 of this work. The species now figured, E, Helenae, 
Kranzl., is a native of Peru, whence it was introduced by 
Messrs. Sander and Sons, in whose establishment at St. 
Albans it flowered for the first time in 1897 and provided 
the material on which Dr. Kranzlin's original description 
was based. In 1894 Messrs. Sander presented one of their 
plants to the Eoyal Botanic Gardens, Kew, where it throve 
well in a tropical house under the conditions suitable for 
species of Dendrohium, but did not flower until June, 1909, 
when it afforded the material from which our illustration 
has been prepared. Unfortunately the exhaustion resulting 
from the production of its striking inflorescence was so 
severe that the plant has since succumbed. 

NOVEMBEK, 1912. 



DESCRIPTION. — Herb, epiphytic, 1^-2 ft. high ; pseudo- 
bulbs subterete, elongated, erect, 6-10 in. long, with 3-4 
subterminal leaves. Leaves elongate-oblong, subacute, 
curved, very firm, 16-22 in. long, 1-lJ in. wide. Scapes 
erect, curved upwards, about 2 ft. long ; racemes lax, many- 
flowered ; bracts lanceolate-oblong, short ; pedicels slender, 
H-li in. long. Flowers of medium size. Sepals and petals 
similar, spreading, oblong, obtuse, about § in. long, dull 
yellow with brown margins. Labellum 3-lobed, about § in. 
long; lateral lobes transversely oblong, obtuse, incurved, 
dulj yellow ; mid-lobe obovate-spathulate, obtuse, suberect, 
white with bright purple spots ; disk puberulous, its lamellae 
triangular-oblong, diverging above between the lateral 
lobes. Column clavate, about 5 lin. long, green ; pollinia 
4, unequal, anther attached to a separable scale-like 
gland. 

Fig. 1, lip; 2, column, showing attachment; 3, anther-case; 4 and 5, 
pollmarium seen from in front and from behind; 6, sketch of an entire plant: 
all enlarged except 6, which is much reduced. 



8463 









- J.TT.Ktehifth. 



L Reeve &C r ' ' 



Tab. 8463. 
MESEMBRYANTHEMUM Pearsonii. 

South Africa. 



Ficoideae. Tribe Mesembryeae. 
Mesembryanthemum, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 853. 



Mesembryanthemum Pearsonii, A". E. Brown in Kew Bulb tin, 1 ( J12, p. 277; 
affinis M. testiculari, Ait., sed foliis multo majoribus, cal yee supra folia 
exserto et floribus bicoloribus differ!. 

Herba perennis succuienta, 4-5 cm. alta. Folia 2, basi connata, patulo-adscen- 
dentia, 8*5-4 cm. longa, 4 - 5 cm. lata, 2 - 5 cm. crassa, facie interiors sub- 
plana, marginibus subacutis, subtusvel dorso subgibboso-convexa et leviter 
carinata, vertice leviter convexa, obtusissima, laevissima, glabra, alba, baud 
glauca. Flos solitarius, inter folia terminalis. Beduneulus exsertus, 
2 - 5 cm. longus, validus, compressus, erectus, quadri-bracteatus, glaber. 
Bracteae inferiores 1"5 cm. longae, - 8 cm. latae, 0*8 cm. erassae, subacute 
trigonae, obtusae, superiores minores, laeves, glabrae, albidae. Calyx 
1*8 cm. diametro, 6-lobns, glaber; lobi 3-4 mm. longi, 5 mm. lati, latissime 
ovati, obtusi. Corolla 3-3 2 cm. diametro, bicolor; petala 3-4-seiiata ; 
cxteriora circiter 1*3 cm. longa, linearia, obtusa, jmlebre purpurea; 
interiora gradatim minora, subochraceo-lutea, rubro - striata. Stamina 
numerosissima, patula, in annulum congesta; filaments alba; antherae 
pallide luteae. Styli nulli; stigmata sessilia, magna, 5 mm. diametro, 
diaciformia, obscure crenata. — N. E. Brown. 



The very distinct and striking Mesembiyanthemum of 
wliicli a figure is given here, was collected in 1910 by Mr. 
Pillans on the eastern slope of a ridge about twelve miles 
south of Nieuwerust, during the expedition to the Orange 
River led on behalf of the Percy Sladen Trustees by 
Professor Pearson. The plant was received at Kew from 
Professor Pearson, in whose honour it is named, in the 
spring of 1911, and flowered in a sunny frame during the 
summer of the same year, thereby allowing the preparation 
of our illustration. As a species it is most closely allied to 
M. testiculare, Ait., but the leaves are nearly twice as large 
and the calyx is exserted to about the level of the leaf-tips. 
In habit, size and form it also approaches M. Bolusii, 
Hook, f., but it differs very markedly in having smooth 

NOVEMBEB, 1912. 



and very white, though not glaucous, leaves as well as in 
having more exserted flowers and in being without any 
style. In the absence of a style and in having a large 
sessile discoid stigma, M. Pearsonii differs from all other 
species known to Mr. Brown by their flowers, though it is 
not impossible that in M. testicular, of which flowers have 
not been seen, the same arrangement may exist. _ The 
flowers of M. Pearsonii appear to expand at night or in the 
very early morning, becoming more or less closed during 
the day. In colour they are somewhat peculiar, two or 
three of the inner series" of petals being of a dull yellow 
colour, more or less streaked with purple, the petals of the 
outermost series being entirely mauve-purple. In cultivation 
M. Pearsonii requires the conditions suited to M. Bolusn, 
M. testiculare and the other species which have very thick 
succulent leaves. 

Description. — Herb, perennial, succulent, l|-2 in. high. 
Leaves 2, connate at the base, between ascending and 
spreading, lj-lj in. long, If in. wide, 1 in. thick, almost 
flat on the inner face, somewhat gibbously convex and 
slightly keeled on the outer, the margin subacute, the apex 
slightly convex, quite blunt, everywhere quite smooth, 
glabrous, whitish but not glaucous. Flower solitary, 
terminal between the leaves ; peduncle exserted, 1 in. long, 
stout, compressed, erect, 4-bracteate, glabrous ; lower bracts 
? in. long, \ in. wide and \ in. thick, somewhat sharply 
trigonous, obtuse ; the upper bracts smaller, smooth, glabrous, 
whitish. Calyx \ in. wide, ti-lobed, glabrous ; lobes \-\ in. 
^ on g> i in. wide, very broadly ovate, obtuse. Corolla about 
!£ in. across ; petals 3-4-seriate, the outer about | in. long, 
linear, obtuse, mauve-purple; the inner progressively 
smaller, somewhat dull yellow streaked with purple. 
Stamens very many, spreading, clustered in a ring ; fila- 
ments white ; anthers pale yellow. Style ; stigma 
large, discoid, obscurely crenate, -} in. across. 



Fig. 1, petals; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, stigma; 5, ovary in vertical section 

all i uliiiijul. 



8464 




KS.delJKPitchEth. 



Vinceni Brooks Day<f 



L Reeve & C <? London. 



Tab. 8464. 

corn us con t tro££rsa. 

Himalaya and Eastern Asia. 

COENACEAE. Tribe CORNEAE. 

Cornus, Linn.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant. VoL i. p. 950; Winn/, in Engl 
Pflanzenr. vol. iv. no. 229, p. 43. 



Cornus controversa, //ems?, ex Prain in Pot. Mag. t. 8261 et in Kew JiuJJ. 
1909, p. 331; Wang, in Engl. Pflanzenr. vol. iv.no. 229, p. 49; Koehne, 
Milt. Deutsch. Bendrol. Gesellsch. 1909, p. 185; ab altera specie sectionis 
Bothrocaryi, Koehne, foliis majoritnis, inflorescentia ampliore post anthesim 
magis distracta, putaminia fovea apicali pro rata ininore distincta. 

Arbor 9-12 m. alta, ramis novellis glabris vel raro parce pilosulis rubescentibus 
vel nigricantibus. Folia alterna, lamina elliptica vel ovato-elliptica, aaepe 
lata, basi acuta vel rotundata, apice acute acuminata, 8-16 cm. longa, 5-8 
cm. lata, supra saturate viridia, infra magia minusve glauca, primo 
utrinque adpresse pilosa, superne cito glabrata, pilis medio-fixis arete 
adpressis, nervis lateralibus utrinque 6-7 valde obliquis conspicuis ; 
petiolus 2-7 cm. longus. Injlorescentia corymbosa, pedunculo 2-3 cm. 
longo suffulta, percomposita, ad 18 cm. diametro, fructifera divaricato- 
distracta, laxa, ramis ramulisque hirtcllis, pedicel lis 3-5 mm. longia. 
Flores albi, 8-12 mm. diametro. Receptacvlum dense argenteo-incano- 
pilosum. Sepala minuta, triaugidaria, discum vix aeqoantia. Petala 
oblonga vel lanceolato-oblonga, acuta, dorso parce pilosula. Filamenia 
petalis paulo longiora; antlierae 1-5-2 mm. longae. Stylus glaber, 
1-75-2-5 mm. longus. Drupa globosa, 6-8 mm. diametro, nigrescens; 
putamen leviter costulatum, apice foveola vix tricntem diametri aeqaante 
exeavatum. — C. macrophyUa. Wall. Cat. n. 4(59 partim ; C. B. Clarke in 
Hook f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. ii. p. 744 partim; Forbes et Hemsl. in Journ. 
Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 846 partim ; Koehne in Gartenfl. vol. xlv. p. 286, flg. 1 
a-c et vol. xlvi. p. 9(5 et in Mitt. Deutsch. Dendr. GcsellFch. 1903, p. 36 : 
Shiraaawa in Ess. Forest. Ic. t. 77, fig. 13-23; Harms in Engl. Bot. Jahrb. 
vol. xxix. ]>. 506; non Wall, in Boxb. V. brachypoda, K. Koch, Dendr. vol. 
i. p. 685 partim; Koehne, Dendrol. p. 435; non C. A. Mey. 0. glaum, 
Blame ex K. Koch I.e. partim; Koehne in Gartenfl. vol. xlv. p. 286 et 
vol. xlvi. p. 96. Corn* species 2 alteruifoliue, S. Moore in Journ. Bot. vol. v. 
p. 292.— O. Stapf. 

The Comas here figured is one of the most elegant of 
small deciduous trees in cultivation ; it has a slender erect 
stum with horizontal branches in tiers a foot or more apart. 
Its alternate leaves distinguish C. controversa, Hemsl., from 
all other Cornels except the American C. alterni folia, Linn, 
f., a species easily recognised by its fewer pairs of nerves. 
The plant from which our figure was prepared was obtained 
from Messrs. J. Yeitch and Sons. The confusion between 
November, 1912. 



this species and C. brachypoda has been dealt with by Mr. 
Hemsley under C. macrophylla, Wall., at t. 82G1 of this 
work ; of the two forms to which tiie name C. brachypoda 
has been applied Mr. Hemsley has treated the one with 
alternate leaves, now figured, as distinct, and has referred 
that with opposite leaves to C. macrophylla. Dr. Koehne 
who, twelve years earlier, had studied the question, accepts 
for our plant the name C. coniroversa proposed by Mr. 
Hemsley, in preference to the name C. macrophylla which 
he had then applied to it, but now treats the Himalayan 
opposite-leaved Cornel as distinct from the one of China 
and Japan ; for this last he employs the name C. brachypoda^ 
0. A. Mey. In this he has been followed by Dr. Wangerin. 
However this may be, the fact has been definitely established 
that the alternate-leaved C. controversa here figured is distinct 
alike from C. macrophylla and C. brachypoda. In cultivation 
in this country C. controversa is quite hardy. It needs a 
good loamy soil and abundant moisture to bring out its 
characteristic beauty. It may be increased both by cuttings 
and by layers, but it is preferable to propagate from seeds 
if these can be obtained. 

Description.— Tire, 30-40 feet high, twigs glabrous or 
rarely sparingly pilose, reddish or blackish. Leaves alternate, 
elliptic or ovate-elliptic usually rather broad, base acute or 
rounded, apex sharply acuminate, 3-6 in. long, 2-3 in. wide, 
dark green above, more or less glaucous beneath, at first 
adpressed hairy on both sides but soon glabrous above, hairs 
attached mesially, lateral nerves 6-7 on each side, oblique, 
distinct; petiole §-2£ in. long. Inflorescence corymbose, 
much branched, up to 7 in. wide, peduncle |-1| in. long; 
in fruit divaricately explanate, lax, the ramifications finely 
hairy, the pedicels l|-2± lin. long. Flowers white, £-£ in. 
across. Receptacle densely white-pilose. Septals minute, 
triangular, hardly as long as the disk. Petals oblong or 
lanceolate-oblong, acute, sparingly puberulous on the back. 
Filaments rather longer than the petals; anthers about 1 lin. 
long. Style glabrous, about 1 lin. long. Drupe globose, 
3-4 lin. wide, blackish, stone slightly ribbed, with an apical 
foveola hardly one-third the width of the stone. 

Fig. 1, bud; 2, flower; 3 and 4, anthers; o, portion of a corymb in fruit :— 
all enlarged except 5, which is of natural size. 



8465 




M.S.del.J.UFitchlith. 



,<s,La.y 



&.Sc 



L.Reeve &. C° London. 



Tab. 8465. 

iris caroliniana. 

Virginia and Carolina. 

Ikidaceae. Tribe Ikideae. 
Iris, Linn.; Benth. etffook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686. 



Ins caroliniana, 8. Wats, in A. Gray, Man. ed. vi. p. 518, et in Proe \», 
Acad. vol. xiv. p. 134; Sargent in Gard. & For. vol. vi. p. 334 fig 51- 
Britt. & Brown, 111. Fl. N. Unit. Slat. vol. i. p. 449 cum ia; species 

/. versicolor^ Linn., affinis sed foliis viridibus nee glaucis, florum majorum 
colore lavandulaceo vel Iavandulaceo-purpureo et seminibus macnis in 
unoquoque loculo 1-seriatis differt. 

Herba rhizomate crasso. Folia basalia ensata, acuta, ad DO cm. longa, 1 ■ 5-3 cm 
lata, laete viridia, laevia, subtenuia, ncrvis tenuibus mediis 2-3 quani 
caetens magis conspicuis. Cauli* subgracilis, 40-60 cm. altus, simplex vel 
ranus parce ramosus, 1-foliatus folio flores attingente basalibus simili nisi 
angustiore, 2-3-florus. Spathae lanceolatae, acutae, 3 5-4 cm. longae 
tenuitcr seanoso-herbaceae, interdum fusco-suffusae. PedicelU inaequales' 
sub anthesi spathis breviorcs vel eas aequantes, longiores demum exserti! 
Perianthii tubus vindis, fusco-suffusus, 6-8 mm. (ex auctoribus ad 12 mm.) 
longus ; segmenta exteriora 5-5 cm. longa, limbo descendente obovato3 cm. 
longo 2*2 2*3 cm. lato lavandulaceo vel lavandulaceo-purpureo distincte 
purpureo-venoso basin versus ad Iatera albido medio lutescente, ungue 
2-5 cm. longo explanato 7-8 mm. lato viride-luteo purpurco-veuoso ; 
segmenta interiora erecta, oblougo-lanceolata in unguem gracilem Ben-am 
attenuata, 3*5-3*7 cm. longa, 11 mm. lata, lavandulacea vel lavandulan <.- 
purpurea. Filamenta 6 mm. longa; antherae albidae, 13 mm. longae. 
Ovarium 11-12 mm. longum, subteres; styli rami oblanceolatodineares, 
cristae lobis dentatis oblique ovatis exclusis 3 mm. longis. Copsula ambitu 
oblonga, obtusissime triquetra, 3 5-4* 5 cm. longa, ad 2 cm. diametro. 
Semina applanata, crassiuscula, 8-10 mm. diametro, in unoquoque loculo 
1-seriata, fusca. — 0. STArr. 



The interesting Iris which forms the subject of our 
illustration was first discovered by Mr, W. A. Manda near 
Wilmington, in North Carolina, and flowered for the 
first time in cultivation in the Harvard Botanic Garden, 
when it was described by the late Mr. S. Watson. While' 
botanically very closely allied to J. versicolor, Linn., the 
plant now described, /. caroliniana, S. Wats., is horticul- 
tural^ very distinct, and the two are readily discriminated 
by the characters to which Dr. Stapf has called attention. 
November, 1912. 



At Kew I. caroliniana has been in continuous cultivation 
for some ten years past, growing well and flowering freely 
every year in the' Bock Garden. A native of swampy 
places it shows, even under cultivation, a predilection for 
swampy conditions, and if these be provided it sets seeds 
freely. In 1908 a fresh supply of seeds was presented to 
Kew by the Missouri Botanic Gardens, and from one of the 
plants so obtained has been derived the material for our 
plate. 

Description. — Herb, rootstock stout. Leaves at the base 
ensate, acute, up to 3 ft. long, f-l^ in. wide, bright green, 
smooth, rather thin, with 2-3 mesial nerves rather stronger 
than the others. Stem rather slender, 1 J— 2 ft, high, simple 
or rarely sparingly branched, 1 -foliate, the stem-lea? reaching 
the flowers, like the basal leaves but narrower ; flowers 
2-3. Spatkes lanceolate, acute, l±-l£ in. long, thinly 
scarious-herbaceous, sometimes tinged with brown. Pedicels 
unequal, shorter than or equalling or exceeding the spathes. 
Perianth-tube green, tinged with brown, £-.1 in. or, accord- 
ing to S. Watson, sometimes ^ in. long; outer segments 
over 2 in. long, the limb dependent, obovate, over L in. 
long, under 1 in. wide, lavender or lavender-purple, with 
darker purple veins, the base white towards the sides and 
yellowish in the centre, claw 1 in. long, when spread flat 
about -3- in. wide, greenish-yellow with purple veins ; inner 
segments erect, oblong-lanceolate, gradually narrowed into 
a slender claw, 1^-1^ in. long, under ^ in. wide, lavender 
or lavender-purple. Filaments £ in. long; anthers whitish, 
over | inch long. Ovary about | in. long, subterete ; style- 
arms oblanceolate-linear, excluding the toothed obliquely 
ovate lobes of the crest about 1 \ in. long. Capsule oblong, 
very bluntly 3-quetrous, 1|- 1| in. long, | in. across. 
Seeds flattened, rather thick, about -l in. across, 1 -seriate in 
each loculus, brown. 

Figs. 1 and 2, anthers; 3, a stigmatic lobe : — all enlarged, 



8466 




MS.det.JN.FiteMnh. 



7. «. 

VincentBrooks Day&SonLfW 



L. Reeve &_C?London 



Tab. 84G6. 
COROKIA yiro^a. 

New Zealand 

Coknaceae. Tribe Cobxeae. 
Cokokia, A. Cunn. ; Benin, et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 949. 



Corokia virgata, Turrill; species C. Cotoneaster, Raoul, valde affiuis sed 
foliis majoribus ramis haud divaricato-tortuosis petalorumque squamulis 
diversis differt. 

Frutex 2 - 5 m. altus, ramosns; ramuli teretes haud divaricato-tortuosi, 
juniores albo-tomentosi mox glabrati fusco-brtmnei. Folia alterna, 
oblongo-spatbulata, apice acuta, minute apiculata, ad 45 cm. longa et 
15 cm. lata, brevissime petiolata, supra riitida, infra dense adpresse albo- 
tomentosa, juniora supra pubescentia, nervis obscuris. Floret in racemes 
terminales vel axillares trifloros dispositi, bibracteolati, peduDculis 
1-2 mm. longis, adpresse albo-tomentosis suffulti. Sepala 5, triangular u, 
1-5 mm. longa, dorso adpresse albo-tomentosa. Petala 5, patentia, 
oblonga, 5 mm. longa, apice breve acuminata incurvata, flava, ima baai 
intra squamula in segmenta 3-5 divisa instructa. Stamina 5 ; filamenta 
glabra 2 mm. longa; antherae 1'5 mm. longae. Discus carnosus, glaber, 
integer, aurantiacus. Beceptaculuin turbinatum, albo - tomentosum. 
Ovarium uniloculare, ovulis solitariis; stylus 3 mm. lonpus, stigmate 
capitato obscure trilobate Fructus adhuc ignotus. — W. B. Tuebill. 



The genus Corokia, of which the species most familiarly 
known in English gardens, C. Cotoneaster, Raoul, has been 
already figured in this volume at t. 8425, is endemic in 
New Zealand. The other previously described species are 
C. buddleoides, A. Cunn., and C. macroearpa, T. Kirk. 
But in his Manual of the New Zealand Flora, Mr. Cheese- 
man notes that what may prove to be a fourth species of 
Corokia has been collected by himself at Spirit's Bay in the 
North Cape district. This plant Mr. Cheeseman describes 
as a twiggy bush, six to twelve feet high, with slender 
branches which are not tortuous, and with alternate leaves 
one half to one and a half inch long, which are narrowly 
linear-obovate or oblanceolate contracted at the base into 
very short petioles. It is, therefore, just possible that the 
species encountered by Mr. Cheeseman, of which he failed 
to obtain flowers, is that now for the first time described. 
The material for our plate has been supplied from a plant 
which has been in cultivation at Kew since 1907, when it 
November, 1912. 



was raised from a cutting received from the editor of the 
Gardeners' Chronicle, to whom it had been submitted by 
a correspondent for identification. The precise history of 
its introduction to horticulture is therefore unknown. 
C. virgata is undoubtedly very nearly allied to C. Cotone- 
aster, but is distinguishable at a glance by its slender 
straight branches and its larger leaves. Another differential 
character which appears to be constant is to be found in 
the scales at the base of the petals ; these organs in our 
plant are divided almost to the base into a few narrow 
segments, in C. Cotoneaster they are delicately fimbriate on 
the margin but have a broad undivided base. As grown 
at Kew C. virgata is now a shrub about eight feet high, 
which thrives well and flowers freely in the Himalayan 
section of the Temperate House. But although this situation 
is necessary at Kew, it is probable that in the warmer parts 
of the British Isles, where the other species of Corokia are 
known to thrive, this species also may be found hardy out 
of* doors. 

Description.— Shrub, about 8 ft. high, virgately branched; 
twigs terete not divaricately twisted, when young white- 
tomentose, but soon glabrous and dark brown. Leaves 
very shortly petioled, alternate, oblong-spathulate, acute, 
U P t0 l i m - Jong, | in. wide, shining above, closely 
adpressed white - tomentose beneath, pubescent above 
when young; veins indistinct. Flowers in terminal and 
axillary 3-flowered racemes, 2-bracteolate ; peduncles 1 lin. 
long or less, adpressed white-tomentose. Sepals 5, trian- 
gular under 1 hn. long, adpressed white-tomentose outside. 
Petals 5, spreading, oblong, 2£ lin. long, with shortly 
acuminate incurved tips, yellow, each with a basal scale 
completely divided into 3-5 segments. Stamens 5; fila- 
ments glabrous, 1 Jm. long ; anthers rather shorter than the 
hJaments. Disk fleshy, glabrous, entire, orange-yellow. 
Receptacle turbinate, white-tomentose. Ovary 1 -celled ; 
ovule solitary; style 1J lin. long; stigma capitate, faintly 
•Mobed. Fruit not seen. 



.fcStl'w fl< ? Wer i : V hair; 3 > vertica t section of calyx and pistil; 4, petal, 
•howiag basal scale; 5, a scale; G and 7, anthers :-all enlaced 




BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By Gkokge Bentham, 
F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnaean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J.Bekkki.ey, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by WortbingtonG. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D, 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Curret, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^I. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6<J. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookkk, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bkntham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Bakes, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W. H. Harvkt and 
O. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. THiSEr.TON-DYER, F.R.S. Vols. 
I.— III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., 
Sect. I., 34s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 64. 
Vol. VI.. Sect. I., Parts I.— V., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d. 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary- of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 
Hooker, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 95, NOVEMBER, 1912. 



Tab. 8462.— ERIOPSIS HELEKAJE. 
„ 8463.— MESEMBRYANTHEMUM PEARSONII. 
„ 8464.— CORPUS CONTROVERSA. 
„ 8465.— IRIS CAROLENTAKA . 
„ 8466.— COROKIA VIRGATA. 

LOVELL Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemsley. 



BOTANICAL PLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 



NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I.— V., 8s. each. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Vol. IV., Sect. 1., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 64. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII. 

25s. 6d. 
Published wider the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. III., Part I., 8s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. 1. to III., 20s. each. 
By HARVEY and SONDER. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., Sect. I., 34s. Vol. VI., 24*. 

Vol. VII., 33s. 

Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 

Natal and Transvaal. 



LovELt. Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 






LONDON : PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LTD., ©USE STREET, STAMFORD STREET, S.K. 



dfourtlj i?trie£. 

No. 96. 

VOL. Vni.— DECEMBEB. 

OR jSTo. X510 0P THE ENTIRI WORK, 



Monthly, p-ice 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plai 
..nnual Subscription, 42a, 



OURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOUBED FIGDBE5 WITH DESCRIPTIONS, TRUCTUBAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NSW AND BARB 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITKD BY 

SIR DAVID PRAIN, C.M.G., C.LI, LL.D., F.R.S., 

Burner, IRotial Botanic GarBnis, ::ei». 




LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 



. 



1912. 

[All rights reserved.'] 
(Entered at the New York P< 



ICHAJRDC 
EMEDIE 



XL ALL 

P0WGICIDES. 
KILLERAc 

. -J" 

[HORTICULTURAL TRADE B/ERYWKEPF 

MANUFACTURE!: n.m 

G. H. RICHARDS, 

234, Borough High Street, Lndon, S.E. 



Himalayan (hardy) Rhododendrons 

and other species. 

Rare Shrubs, Alpines, 

the most Complete Collection. 

D-warf Alpine Shmbs. All the best Herbaceous 
ties. Daffodils and Lilies, and 
all the choicest Hardy Bulbous PI. 

Construction of Rockeries and Planting, i 

Catalogue on application. 

G. REUTHE, 

The Fox Hill Nursery, Keston, Kent. 



THE HEPATIC^ OF THE 
BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARS OX. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. 
£5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 

Lovely Reeve & Co., Ltd., 6, Henrietta 
Street, Coven t Garden. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

. W. BURBIDGE, F.L.S. 
*V ientific Bevie of the entire Genua by J. G. Baker, F.R.S., F.L.S. 

WitkiS beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 






-iNES )F BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

By the Rev M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 

ly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith, F.L.S. 
Jolouid Plates, 36s. The Supplement separately, 12s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Description of he Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GE)RGE BE NTH AM, P. R. S. 

Re** i D. Hooker, C.B*. G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 



ILLUSTRATONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants 
n W.H.FITCH. F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 
i Illustrakd Conoanion to Bentham's "Handbook;' and other British Flora. 
7th Eition, with 1315 Wood Eugravjngs, &*. 



>Vh,LL R] 



CO. Ltd., 6, U 



:NT GARDEN. 



8467 




M.S 



i! BroolcsDciy 






Tab. 8467. 

PINUS FLEXILIS. 

Western North America. 

Conifeeae. Tribe Abietineak. 
Fjncs, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 438. 



Pinus flexilis, James in Long's Expedition, vol. ii. p. 34; Sargent in Sil»a 
North Amer. vol. xi. p. 35, tt. 546, 547 ; Henry in Elves & Henry, The Trees 
of Great Britain and Ireland, p. 1046; species P. albicauli, Enpelm., 
proxime affinis sed innovationum ramulis cinfreia nee rubescentibus 
strobis apertis et seminibus argute marginatis diffcrt. 

Arbor, saepius 12-15-metralis, nonrinnquam 25-metralis ; in aridis montiura 
eacuminibus interdum fruticosus, 3-6 dm. altus ; ramuli juniores 
laevissimi, glabri vel minutissime pubescentes. Folia glomerulis 5-foliatis 
aggregata, diu persistentia, vetustiora quinquennalia vel septuennalia, 
juniora saepe ad ramulos plus minusve appressa, triangularia, curvata, 
apice acicularia, margine integerrhna, 5-9 cm. longa, 1*25 mm. lata, 
cmenscentes, utrinque lineis stomatum 3-4 notata. Strobi ovoidei, 
7*5-10 cm. longi, 4-5 cm. lati, singuli vel bini vel terni, sessiles; squamae 
late ovatae, l - 2-2 "5 cm. Iongae, 1-2 cm. latae, intus cinereae, margine libera 
pallide brunneae, deflexae, ciasse mucronatae. Semina ovoidea, complanata, 
margine unilateraliter vel utrinsecus acutata, 1 cm. longa, ala subobsoleta. 
— W. J. Bean. 



The Pine here figured, Pinus flexilis, is extremely rare in 
British pineta, and the only good specimens we know of are 
two trees in Lord Rayleigh's grounds at Terling Place, 
Essex, and a group of four trees in the Kew pinetura from 
the largest of which the material for the preparation of our 
plate was obtained. So far as is generally known, this is 
the finest example in the British Isles ; it measures at the 
present time 33 feet in height and 3 feet in girth of trunk. 
The group of trees at Kew is situated just within the 
Isleworth Ferry Entrance, and was planted there by Sir 
Joseph Hooker at the time of the formation of the pinetum, 
1871-1872 ; the plants had been obtained from the firm of 
Dickson & Turn bull, Edinburgh. The species was dis- 
covered in Colorado near the base of Pike's Peak in 1820, 
and was introduced to cultivation in 1861, by Dr. Parrv. 

There are three characters which, in conjunction, distin- 
guish P. flexilis from all other pines in cultivation whose 
leaves are five in a bundle : the entire margins of the 

&9CB3tBIBj 1012. 



leaves, the deciduous leaf-sheaths and the glabrous young 
shoots. It is most closely allied to P. albicaulis, which has 
also entire leaf-margins and deciduous leaf'-sheaths, but has 
reddish pubescent young shoots and indehiscent cones with 
much thickened, triangular, pointed scales. 

As a tree for garden and park, P. jiexilis is worth grow- 
ing for its distinct appearance. Its branches are upturned 
at the ends, rather candelabra-like ; the leaves are 
often pointed forwards more than is shown in the plate ; 
this, in conjunction with the sparse branching, produces a 
slender form. The species is widely spread and forms 
extensive forests in Western N. America, reaching its 
largest size on the mountains of Northern New Mexico and 
Arizona. It thrives very well in the indifferent soil and 
atmosphere of Kew, and whilst its growth is not rapid — - 
under a foot a year — the trees are very healthy. It has 
hitherto been propagated by imported seeds. 

Descriptiox. — Tree, ordinarily 40-50 ft., sometimes 
80 ft. high, but sometimes also reduced to mere scrub a 
foot or two high on bleak mountain-tops ; young branchlets 
perfectly smooth and glabrous in the tree figured, but some- 
times in a wild state covered with minute pubescence. 
Leaves in bundles of fives, persisting for 5-7 years, the 
younger ones often somewhat appressed to the branch, 
triangular in section, sharply pointed, curved, margins 
entire, 2-3 J in. long, ^ in. wide, grey-green with 3-4 lines 
of stoinata on each face. Cones ovoid, 3-4 in. long, If in. 
wide, solitary or in pairs or threes, sessile ; scales broadly 
obovate, |-i in. long, f-J in. wide, grey within, the 
exposed margin pale brown, deflexed, tipped by a stout 
niucro. Seeds ovoid, flattened to a sharp edge on one or 
both sides, about \ in. long, with only a rudimentary wing. 



Fig. 1, transverse section of a leaf; 2 and 3, stamens; 4, female cone in 
flower; o and 6, bract and scale; 7, fruit scales ; 8, seed :— all enlarged. 



8468 











LReew 



Tab. 84G8. 
PRIMULA Julias. 

Transcaucasia. 

Primulaceae. Tribe Primuleae. 
Primula, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 631. 



Primula Juliae, Kusnezow in AcK Hort. Jurjev. vol. i. p. G7 et Ft. Caur. crif. 
vol. iv. p. 75; Pax et Knuth in Engler Pflaneenr. Prim. p. 56; Irving in 

Card, Chron. 1912, vol. Ii. p. 293, cum ic; a J', acaute, Linn., foliis 
reniformi-orbieularibus basi cordatis longe petiolatis, corollae colore 
diverso tubo calycein lere dtiplo superante recedit. 

Eerba pennni*. Folia reniformi-orbicularia, basi cordata, margine gros^e 
crenata, plerumque circiter 3 cm. diametro, ntrvis lateralibus ntrinque 5 
supra immersis subtus prominentibus, pagina utraque glabra, petiolo ad 
7 cm. longo subalato inferne gradatim incrassato rubro-lineolato glabro 
adjecto. Scapus defieiens; pedicelli numerosi, folia subaequantes, ut 
petioli rubro-lineolati, glabri. Calyx anguste tubulosus, angulatus, 1 cm. 
Jongns, vix ad medium lobatus ; lobi atigusti, lanceolati, acutiuscule 
acuminata, ciliolati. Corollae tubus ad 1*7 cm. longus, limbos ad 3 cm. 
diametro fauce sulfur, o, lobis obcordatis ad 1 cm. latis eaepiwime 
irregulariter pauci-dentatis. Antherae apiculatae, 1*5 mm. longae. 
Ovarium 2 mm. altum; stylus ante anthesin exsertus, stigmate capitato. — 
W. G. Craib. 

The pleasing Primula winch forms the subject of our 
illustration is a Transcaucasian species for the introduction 
of which horticulture is indebted to Professor Kusnezow, 
Director of the Botanic Garden at Dorpat, by whom it was 
sent from Dorpat to various institutions in this country, 
including the Botanic Garden at Oxford and the Royal 
Botanic Gardens at Kew. The plants at Oxford proved 
hardy, planted out in a sheltered border, during the winter 
of 1911-12, and flowered freely in April, 1912. The plants 
at Kew, which were received from Dorpat early in the 
spring of 1912, flowered at the same time as those at 
Oxford. From one of these Kew specimens was obtained 
the material from which our figure was drawn. This figure 
shows a deviation in one respect from the plant on which 
Professor Kusnezow based his original description, for he 
lias described the flower-stalks as being twice to thrice as 
long as the leaves, whereas in the plants grown in this 
country the flower-stalks have been hardly, if at all, longer 
than the leaves. In describing the species Mr. Craib has 

DiXEMBER, 1912. 



compared P. Juliae with P. acaulis owing to the fact that 
in neither of the two is a scape developed. But while they 
agree in this regard, and while in habit they have much in 
common, Mr. Craib remarks that they differ very greatly in 
leaf; they may be compared because they are similar, but 
it is doubtful if they can be spoken of as really closely 
allied. P. Juliae is a species which it is easy to propagate 
by means of seeds and still easier to multiply by division of 
the stolon-like growths which are produced" from the main- 
stem. 

Description-.— Herb, perennial. Leaves reniform-orbi- 
cular, base cordate, margin coarsely toothed, usually rather 
over 1 in. across, lateral nerves about 5 on each side, sunk 
above, raised beneath, glabrous on both surfaces; petiole 
up to 3 in. long, slightly winged, gradually thickened down- 
wards, glabrous, streaked with red. Scape ; pedicels many, 
as long as the leaves, streaked with red and glabrous like 
the leaf-stalks. Calyx narrowly tubular, angled, 5 lin. long, 
iobed less than half-way down ; lobes narrow-lanceolate, 
rather acutely acuminate, ciliolate. Corolla tube over f in. 
long limb up to 1± in. across, throat sulphur-yellow, lobes 
oDcordate, up to 5 Hn. wide, often irregularly sparingly 
toothed. Anthers apiculate, under 1 lin. long. Ovary 1 Fin. 
long; style exserted before the flower opens; stigma 
capitate. L & 

auSSs--^ Lir^' in 8CCtiOD ' Sh ° WiDg PlStil ' 3l COr ° lla ' laid ° pCn ' sh0Wing 



8463 




.deLjJ 






LReevc & Z',° London - 



Tab. 8469. 

AKANIA Hillii. 

A ustralia. 

AKANIA, Hook./.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. pp. 409, 1C00: Stapf in 
Kew Bulletin, 1912, p. 379. 



Akania Hillii, Hook. f. in Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant. I.e.; Benth. Flor. 
Austral, vol. i. p. 471 ; species unica. 

Arbor 9-12-metralis inflorescentiis exceptis glabra, rami's junioribns pallide 
brunneis lenticellis verrucosis. Folia imparipinnata, 30-60 (rarius ad 90) 
cm. longa; rhachis robusta, teres, pallida; foliola opposita vel rarius 
alterna, utrinque 6-15, petiolulo basi apiceque incrassato 4-10 mm. longo 
suffulta, lanceolata, acuminata, spiuuloso-serrata, 12-3U cm. longa, 
1*75-3 "5 cm. lata, coriacea, utrinque lucida, exsiccando saltern glau- 
cescentia, nervis utrinsecus 15-20, prope marginem arcuato-connectis 
prominentibus, venis imprimis subtus prominulis eleganter anastomos- 
antibus, areolis ob papillas foveolas stomata recipientes densissime 
vestientes subtus albo-maculatis. Paniculae axillares vel supra-axillares 
vel interdum e ligno vetusto ortae, amplae, 30-45 cm. lonpae, floribimdae, 
praete rrhachin basi tandem ^labratam dense pubescentes ; ped celli 6-8 mm. 
lougi, graciles; bracteae minutae, ovatae vel lanceolatae. Flores odorati. 
Calyx deciduus, 5-sepalus, cum receptaculo haud alto obovoideus, 3-4 mm. 
longus ; receptaculum extra pubescens intus basi dtnse sericeum ; 
sepala inaequalia, iml>ricata, rotundato-ovata, obtusa, praeter cilia uiinuta 
marginalia magis minusve glabrescentia. Petala 5, dtxtrorsum vel 
sinistrorsum contorta, obovato-oblonga, basi subunguiculata, alba vel 
(spontanea) pallide rosei, 8-10 mm. longa. Stamina plerumque 8, rarius 9, 
epipetala 3-4 imo calycis fundo. episepala (exteriora) 5 paulo altius imerta ; 
filamenta glabra, iiliformia, ad 4 mm. longa; antherae oblongae, basifixae, 
lateraliter dehiscentes; pollen tetiaedrico-globosum, poris 4. exine minutis- 
sime ^r.mulata. Ovarium olilongo-obovoideum, tonientellum, in stylum 
columnarem 4-5 mm. loiignm basi pubescentem abiens; stigma minute 
3-lolmm ; loculi 3, 2-ovulati ; ovula superposita, anatropa, micropyle 
supera, rhaphe ventrali. Frudus capsularis, loculicide dehiscens, ovoideus 
vel pyriformis, 2-2 25 cm. longus, valvis coriaceo-lignosis, fuscis. 
Semina in quoque loculo 2 vel 1, ellipsoideo-globosa vel, si duo, contactu 
applanato-truncata, 10 mm. longa, 8 mm. lata; testa Crustacea, pallida, 
interdum maculata ; hilum oblongum, impressum ; teamen tenue, solutum; 
albumen secundum cotyledonum margines tenue, caeterum crassum, carno- 
sum, amygdalos amaros redolens; embryo amplus; cotyledones crassae, 
subplanae; ladicula brevis, plumula minuta. — Cupania lucens, F. Muell. 
Fragm. vol. iii. p. 44. Lomatia Bidwillii, Kew Hand-list Tend. Dicot. p. 415. 
— 0. Stapk. 

The interesting and striking plant which forms the 
subject of our illustration is a native of Australia and is 
the representative of a monotypic genus of singularly- 
isolated character. The plant in question was received at 
Kew in 1872 from Mr. Linden, from whose nursery at 
Ghent it was issued under the name Lomatia Bidwillii. At 
Kew it has been grown in an open border in the Mexican 

DECEMBER, 1912. 



House, where it has thriven well and has developed into a 
graceful tree twenty feet or so in height. During the forty 
years which have elapsed since its arrival, the tree had made 
no attempt to flower until February, 1912, when its striking 
inflorescences were developed from the hard, woody stem, 
and proved that the plant was not a Lomatia but was 
Akania Hillii. The difficulties that attend the reference of 
the genus Akania to its proper natural family have been 
fully discussed by Dr. Stapf in an interesting note in the 
Kew Bulletin for 1912, pp. 378-9, where the extraordinary 
diversity of view to which its characters have given rise is 
clearly displayed. But, whatever its most natural position 
may be, A. Hillii, whether as grown for its foliage only or 
when it rewards the patience of a generation by developing 
its blossoms, is from the cultural standpoint a species well 
worthy of a place in a roomy greenhouse. 

m Description.— Tree, 30-40 ft. high, glabrous except the 
inflorescence. Leaves unequally pinnate, 1-2 ft., rarely 
3 ft. long; rachis stout; leaflets opposite or occasionally 
alternate, 6-15 on each side, lanceolate, acuminate, spinu- 
lose-serrate, 5-12 in. long, j-J. in. wide, coriaceous, shining 
on both sides, nerves 15-20 on each side, anastomosing 
near the margin, finely reticulated beneath, with white 
ioveolate papillae within each areola; petiolules 2-5 lin. 
Jong Panicles axillary, or supra-axillary, or from the old 
wood, 1-1 1 it. long, lax but little branched, pubescent 
except the base of the rachis ; pedicels slender,^- 1 , in. long. 
Sepals 5, deciduous, 2 lin. long, somewhat unequal, rounded, 
obtuse ; margins dilate, elsewhere nearly glabrous. Petals 5, 
contorted, obovate-oblong, clawed, white or (in wild plants) 
pale rose, 4-5 lin. long. Stamens usually 8, rarely 9, 
o-4 epipetalous inserted at the base of the calyx, 5 (outer) 
episepalous inserted higher up; filaments glabrous ; anthers 
oblong. Ovary ovoid-oblong, 3-celled, contracted into a 
thickened style ; stigma minutely 3-lobed ; ovules 2 in each 
cell superposed. Fruit a capsule, § in. long, dehiscing 
Jocuhcidally ; valves finely coriaceous. Seeds 1-2 in each 
cell, ellipsoid globose or truncately flattened, 5 lin. long, 
4 lin. wide ; testa crustaceous. 

Fig. 1, floral diagram ; 2, bxid ; 3, flower in vertical section; 1 and 5. anthers; 
b, ovary m vertical section :- all en'ar^d. 



8410. 




K.s.aea.j.N.Pitchhth 



"\foicen.tBroo:te,Diy&Soi 



.L^ir"? 



L Reeve & C° London. 



Tab. 8470. 
LISSOCHILUS Andersoxi. 

Tropical West Africa. 

Orchidaceae. Tribe Vandeae. 
Lissochilds, B. Br.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Blant. vol. iii. p. 536. 



Lissochilus Andersoni, Bolfe in Kew Bulletin, 1910, p. 159; a L. Milsoni, 
Bolfe, sepalis lateralibus et labello brevioribus differt. 

Ilerba terrestris. Bhizoma moniliforme articulis ovoideo-incrn ssatis 2-3 cm. latis. 
Folia 2, elongato-lanceolata, acuminata, recurva, plicata, 25-30 cm. longa, 
2-3 cm. lata, basi erecta, angusta et conduplicata. Scapi erecti, circiter 
50 cm. alti, basi vaginis paucis lanceolatis obtecti ; raceini laxi, 4-5-flori. 
Bracteae deltoideo-lanceolatae, acumiuatae, 1-1-4 cm. longae. Ftdicelli 
1-5-2 cm. longi. Flores 2-2-3 cm. longi, pallide suli'urei. Sepala sub- 
patentia, lineari-lanceolata, acuta, 2-2- 5 cm. longa; lateralia apice sub- 
falcata. Petala erecta, parallela, elliptico-oblonga, subobtusa, 2 cm. longa, 
1 cm. lata. Labellum 3-lobum, 2 "5 cm. longnm ; lobi laterales late oblongi, 
obtusi vel truncati, erecti, 1-2 cm. longi; lobus intermedius suborbicularis, 
obtusus, margine undulato et lateribus recurvis ; discus carinis 5-7 verru- 
cosis pallide purpureis instructus; saccus conicus, obtusus, 4-5 mm. 
longus. Columna clavata, subcompressa, 1*2 cm. longa; anthera apicu- 
lata ; pollinia 4, per paria plus minusve concreta, cerea, anthera dehiscente 
stipiti brevi glandulae latiusculae affixa. — 11. A. Eot-fe. 



The African orchidaceous genus Lissochilus is a large 
one; about one hundred species have been described. 
Many of these have been introduced into cultivation, but 
few of them thrive after the first year or two, owing to 
exhaustion following the act of flowering. This in turn is 
largely owing to the difficulty attending the imitation 
of the conditions under which most of the species naturally 
grow. The majority are found in open sunny positions 
which are converted into swamps during the rainy season, 
when the plants are in growth and produce flowers. These 
swamps during the hot season are completely dried up, and 
at this time the species of Lissochilus die down to a fleshy 
subterranean tuberous rootstock. L. Andersoni, the species 
which forms the subject of our plate, is a native of such 
localities on the Gold Coast, which has been collected at 
Aburi by Mr. J. Anderson and on the Afram plain by 
Mr. W. H. Johnson. A plant received at Kew from 
Mr. Anderson in 1908 flowered in the Orchid collection 
December, 1912. 



in April, 1!)10, when our figure was prepared. In the 
genus our species is most nearly allied to L. Millsoni, 
Rolfe, one which has not yet been introduced to cultivation, 
and to L. purpuratus, Lindl., figured at t. 7921 of this 
work. Though the natural conditions cannot be reproduced, 
it is found that a Lissochilus thrives best when grown under 
stove conditions, fully exposed to strong sun, in a compost 
consisting of good turfy loam, leaf mould and sand in equal 
proportions. Abundant water and liberal treatment with 
cow manure is needed during the growing period ; after 
flowering is over the plant should be gradually dried off, 
and the tubers stored at a temperature of 50°-60° F. until 
the following spring. 

Description-.— Herb, terrestrial ; rootstock moniliform, 
the segments ovoid, §-l£ in. thick. Leaves 2, narrow- 
lanceolate, _ acuminate, recurved, plicate, 10-12 in. long, 
f-li in. wide, narrow, erect and conduplicate below. Scapes 
erect, about I J ft. high, with a few lanceolate basal sheaths; 
racemes laxly 4-8-flowered ; bracts deltoid-lanceolate, acu- 
minate, 5-7 lin. long; pedicels |-f in. long. Flowers 
1-1 in. long, pale sulphur-yellow or greenish-yellow. 
Sepals somewhat spreading, linear-lanceolate, acute, f-1 in. 
long; the lateral pair subfalcate at the tip. Petals erect, 
parallel, elliptic-oblong, somewhat obtuse, | in. long, over 
I- in. wide. Lip 3-lobed, 1 in. long; lateral lobes wide- 
ohlong, obtuse or truncate, erect, \ in. long; mid-lobe 
suborbicular, obtuse, the margin undulate and' the sides 
recurved ; disk with 5-7 pale-purple waited ridges ; spur 
sac-like, conical, blunt, 2-3 lin. long. Column clavate, 
somewhat compressed, i in. long; anther apiculate ; pollen- 
masses 4, more or less joined in pairs, when the anther 
opens attached by a short stipe to a rather broad gland. 

f,F n \ S ' }' col " mn ! 2 and 3 > pollinia with stipes and gland, seen from back and 
iront ; i, subterranean tuber :~aU enlarged except 4, which is of natural size. 



847/. 




' ^fipW 



■ del.J.N.FiLchlilh. 



VLncerrt.Brooks,Degr&.Son U a imp 



L Reeve & C? London. 



Tab. 8471 

rosa omeiens1s. 

Western China. 

Eosaceae. Tribe Eojeae. 
Eosa, Linn. ; Benth. et Eooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 625. 



Rosa omeienBis, Bolfe; affinis R. sericeae, Lindl., sed foliolis plurimis et 
angustioribus, floribus saepissime minoribus et fiuctus pedicelha ni- 
crassatis et flavis differt. 

Frvtex robustus, ramosns, 1-3 m. altus. Hamuli juniores saepius dense 
setulosi, vetusti glabri, aculeis validis stipulanbus e basi di lajate Onm- 
presse subulatis subrectis armati. Folia 3-6 cm. longa, viiidia, 9-lS-fobo- 
lata; foliola oblonpa vel elliptico-oblonga, aigute serrulata, 1-2 cm. longa, 
3-7 mm. lata, rhachis parce acnleolata. glabra, subtus pallidiora. Sttjmiae 
petiole- adnatae, 6-8 mm. longae, basi anpustae, apice dilatatae, acutae, 
argute dentatae. Ftores in ramulis brevibus laterahbus sohtarn, all i, 
circiter 3 cm. diametro. Pedunculi graciles, 1-2 cm. longi. livtyiacuhun. 
ellipsoideum, glabrum. Caiych lobi deltoidei, acuti vel acummali, mtegri, 
8-10 mm. longi, basi 3-4 mm. lati, villosuli. Fetala saepissime 4, 
obeordato-orbicularia, circiter 1'5 cm. lata. Stamina 3-4 mm. longa; 
h'lamenta glabra; antherae late oblougae. Carpella oblonpa, pilosa ,; styli 
Jiberi, brevissime exserti, pilosi. Fructus ellipsoideus, 1-13 cm. longus, 
saturate ruber, pedicelli 1-1 3 cm. longi, incrassati, flavi.— E. A. Eolfe. 



The Rose here figured may be regarded as the Eastern 
representative of the Himalayan Eosa sericea, Lindl., winch 
has been figured at t. 5200 of this work. But E. omeuruns 
differs markedly from E. sericea by its more numerous, 
relatively narrower leaflets, its usually considerably smaller 
flowers and in the thickened yellow fruiting pedicels. It 
was first discovered a quarter of a century ago by the Rev. 
E. Faber on Mount Omei, Szechuan, at about 8,000 ft. 
above sea-level. Later it was met with in the same neigh- 
bourhood and also on the Fang Mountains, Hupeh, by 
Mr A. Henry, who has described it as a large spreading 
bush 6 to 10 ft. high, forming thickets on the mountains 
at elevations of from 8,000 to 9,500 ft. For the introduc- 
tion of E. omeiensis to this country, horticulture is indebted 
to Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, through their collector, Mr. 
E H Wilson, who met with the species both on Mount 
Omei* and on the Fang range, and records it as occurring at 
elevations of from 4,000 to 10,000 ft. elevation. With 
December, 1912. 



Messrs. Veitcli it flowered and fruited in 1908, and pro- 
vided the material from which our illustration has been 
prepared. Judging by the manner in which it grows in 
their nursery at Coombe Wood, R. omeiensis appears to be 
as hardy and vigorous as its ally, R. sericea. It has the 
same elegant, much divided foliage, which imparts to the 
whole plant a fern-like grace, while the yellow stalks of 
the fruits add a curious and striking feature to the plant in 
autumn. It thrives in good loamy soil, and the seeds it 
bears so freely will afford an easy means of propagation. 
According to Faber, the fruits are eaten in China, and have 
a pleasant acid taste. 

PfiSCRTPTlOir.— Shrub, 3-10 ft. high, freely branching, 
the young shoots usually densely setulose, the older shoots 
glabrous, armed with stout stipular subulate spines which 
are nearly straight and are somewhat flattened and wide- 
based. Leaves l£-2i in. long, green, 9-13-foliolate ; leaflets 
oblong or elliptic-oblong, sharply toothed, ^-f in. long, 
in. wide, rachis sparingly prickly, glabrous, rather 



8 4 



pale on the under surface ; stipules adnate, ±-l in. long, 
narrowed at the base, dilated at the apex, acute, sharplv 
toothed. ^ Flowers solitary on short lateral twigs, white, 
over 1 in. in diam. ; peduncles slender, ^-J in. long. 
Receptacle ellipsoid, glabrous. Calyx-lobes deltoid, acute 
or acuminate, entire, J in. long or longer, somewhat villous. 
letals usually 4, obcordate-orbicular, about f in. broad. 
stamens j-i m. long; filaments glabrous; anthers wide- 
oblong. Carpels oblong, pilose ; styles free, shortly exserted, 
pilose. Fruit ellipsoid, -^ in. long, bright red; pedicels 
-+ in. long, thickened, yellow. 



L_J 

3 " 



Figs. 1 and 2, stamens; 3, carpel:- a?? enlarged. 



INDEX 

To Vol. VIII. of the Fourth Series, or Vol. CXXXVIII. 
of the whole Work. 



8451 Agave disceptata. 
8442 ,, marmorata. 
8429 ,, protuberans. 
8469 Akania Hillii. 
8448 Aloe Steudneri. 
8412 Begonia dichroa. 

8454 Berberis verruculosa. 
8414 „ Wilsonae. 
8437 Brachychiton acerifolius. 
8422 Brunfelsia undulata. 
8416 Calceolaria cana. 

8436 „ Forgetii. 

8431 Campanula arvatica. 
8426 Cereus Silvestrii. 
8458 Ceropegia Thorncroftii. 
8457 Chamaedorea glaucifolia. 

8455 Chironia laxa. 
8453 Columnea glabra. 
8464 Cornus controversa. 
8425 Corokia Cotoneaster. 
8466 „ virgata. 
8445 Cotyledon subrigida. 
8421 Crassula Barklyi. 
8430 Daphne retusa. 

8432 Davidia involucrata, var. Vil- 

moriniana. 
8452 Dendrobium Imthurnii. 
8415 Disa lugens. 
8424 Dombeya calantha. 
8413 Elliofctia racemosa. 
8460 Elsboltzia Stauntoni. 
8143 Erica ciliaris. 



8462 Eriopsis Helenae. 
8461 Furcraea elegans. 
8447 Hydrangea Sargentiana. 
8435 Hypocalymma robustum. 
8465 Iris caroliniana. 

8433 „ chrysographes. 

8439 Ixora lutea. 

8419 Leptospermum scopariuin, 

var. Nichollii. 

8470 Lissochilus Andersoni. 

8440 Lycium pallidum. 
8428 Magnolia Kobus. 

8463 Mesembryanthenmm Pear- 

sonii. 

8449 Muehlenbeckia complexa. 

8420 Olearia chatbamica. 
8459 Osmanthus Delavayi. 

8441 Perovskia atriplicifolia. 

8467 Pinus flexilis. 

8468 Primula Juliae. 
8456 „ Wattii. 

8446 Pseuderantbemum lilaci- 
num. 

8450 Pycnostachys Dawei. 

8471 Eosa omeiensis. 

8438 Rupicola sprengelioides. 

8434 Saxifraga lingulata. 

8427 Schomburgkia Lueddemani. 

8417 Stanhopea peruviana. 

8418 Stranvaesia undulata. 
8444 Styrax Wilsonii. 
8423 Syringa Julianae. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. Revised oy Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L. S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravingB. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES. of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S. , President of the Linnsean 
Society. N JW Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

local" 68 °f tne l ess common species. By F. Townsend, II. A., F.L.S. 
Ypjii Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HAN-*£OOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21». 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, Sic. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Eev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worth ingtonG. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D, 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F, Cxjrrey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^]. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S. , assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published nnder the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 
the Cape Colony, Caffraria", and Port Natal. By W. H. Harvey and 
O. W. SoNnER, and continued by Sir W. T. Thisemon-Dver, F.R.S. Vols. 
I.— III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., 
Sect. I., 34s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25>. 
Vol. VI.. Sect. I., Parts I.— V., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6<L 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native PlantB of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macqnnnie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker. F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker C.B. before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science,' at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2a. 6d. 

L0VELL REEYE & CO., Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANIC MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS 0* EMBER, 1912. 

Tab. 8467.— Pl> TS, 

„ 8468.— PRIM % 

„ 8469.— AKANL 

„ 8470.— LISSOCHi -*P Oitt, 

„ 8471.— ROSA OML. ^s 
Lotet-l Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Stre 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDE. 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOL?. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a Histo. 
Magazine by W. Bottisg .' emsley. 



BOTANICAL PLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

uitifally-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. Gd. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000, Three Stamps. 



NOW EEADY. Vol. VI., Sect. L, Parts L— V., 8s. each. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 
Tne Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
I :iOs. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 0.?. Vol. VII., 27s. 6a. 

i the authority of the S 
NOW READY. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. |. to III., 20s. each. 



me oontmuat:. ,- Sir W. ') 

VoLIV v * cl - IV., V 1. V„ Sect. 3 

33s. 

Published under the authority -ovemmentg of the Cape of Good Hope, 

Natal and Transvaal.