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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

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t/L- C* 



CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 






ILLUSTRATING AND DESCRIBING 

plants of ti)c ifcogal botanic Savorns of l&rto, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; 

EDITED BY 

D. PKAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S. 

DIRECTOR, ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW. 

vol. vii. m 

of the fourth series. 

(Or Vol. CXXXVII. of the Whole Work.) 




"From many lands 
They form one social shade, as if convened 
By magic summons." 

COWPER. 



LOXDOX : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., LTD., 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments, 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, CO VENT GARDEN 
1911. 

[All rights reserved,] 



LONDON : 
PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED, 
DUKE STREET, STAMFORD STREET, S.E., AND GREAT WINDMILL STREET, 



To 
CHAELES SPEAGUE SAEGENT, LL.D., F.M.L.S. 

director op the arnold arboretum, 

whose generous gifts 

of rare and striking plants 

have supplied the 

Botanical Magazine 

with many interesting subjects, 

this volume 

is cordially dedicated. 



Keiv, December 1, 1911. 



INDEX 

To Vol. VII. of the Fourth Series, or Vol. CXXXVII. 
of the whole Work. 



8392 Acineta Moorei. 


8364 


8407 Aciphylla latifolia. 


8357 


8398 Aphelandra fascinator. 


8390 


8354 Aquilegia flabellata, var. 


8391 


nivea. 


8374 


8355 Aster Falconeri. 


8356 


8401 Buddleia officinalis. 


8405 


8402 Caladium pubescens. 


8410 


8377 Cattleya Eex. 


8363 


8366 Cirrhopetalum longissimum. 


8379 


8353 Cladothamnus pyrolaeflorus. 


8360 


8367 Clematis aristata, var. Den- 


8411 


nisae. 


8368 


8395 Clematis chrysocoma. 




8365 „ montana, var. Wil- 


8380 


sonii. 


8400 


8387 Clusia grandiflora. 


8403 


8378 Columnea gloriosa. 




8385 Cucumis metuliferus. 


8372 


8386 Cypripedium speciosum. 


8408 


8373 Deinanthe caerulea. 


8362 


8352 Dendrobium Dartoisianum. 




8371 „ muricatum, var. 


8406 


munificum. 


8381 


8384 Dracocepbalum argunense. 


8394 


8369 Elaeagnus argentea. 


8383 


8370 Felicia petiolata. 


8399 


8396 Impatiens Herzogii. 


8409 


8358 Kennedya Beckxiana. 


8388 


8389 Landolphia Petersiana. 


8359 


8404 Leonotis dysophylla. 


8393 


8397 Lissochilus stylites. 


8382 


8375 Lonicera Henryi. 


8376 


8361 Masdevallia pachyura. 





Meconopsis simplicifolia. 
Meliosma cuneifolia. 
Mormodes revolutum. 
Mutisia Clematis. 
Oncidium Sanderae. 
Phaedranassa Carmioli. 
Phyllodoce amabilis. 
Pitcairnia tabulaeformis. 
Primula Maximowiczii. 
Prostanthera pulehella. 
Prunus microcarpa. 

,, Sargentii. 
Pseuderanthemum malac- 

cense. 
Pteronia incana. 
Rhododendron arnbiguum. 
„ japonieum, 

var. pentamerum. 
Rhododendron lacteum. 

„ spinuliferum. 

,, sutchuen- 

ense. 
Ruellia Devosiana. 
Saussurea Veitchiana. 
Senecio saxifragoides. 
Spiraea Veitchii. 

„ Wilsoni. 
Symbegonia fulvo-villosa. 
Torenia atropurpurea. 
Urceocharis edentata. 
Viburnum Henryi. 

,, rhytidophyllum. 

Villaresia mucronata. 



dFourtf) &mts. 

No. 73. vj 



VOL. VII.— JANUARY. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. Gd. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s. 



ob No. X4ST OF THE ehtike wobk « 
C U R T I S ' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY . L 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Dtrecior, iRojiai Botanic (^.-uiiens, Iteto. 




"From many lands 
They form one social shade, as if convened 
By magic summons." 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVERNMENTS. 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVE NT GARDEN. 
1911. 

[All rights reserved.'] 
(Entered at the New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



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By F. WOOD-JONES, B.Sc, F.Z.S. 

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THE HEPATICL23 OF THE BRITISH ISLES, 

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THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations 
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With 288 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. Qd. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.B.S., F.L.S. 

With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles, 

By GEORGE BE NT HAM, F.R.S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THeIrFHSH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 

Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook" and other British Floras 

7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, y*. 



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rap 



Tar. 8352. 

DENDROBIUM Dartoisianum. 

Indo- China. 

Oechidaceae. Tribe Epidendbkae. 
Dendrobium, Swartz; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498. 



Dendrobium Dartoisianum, De Wildem. in Oard. Chron. 1906, vol. sxxix. 
p. 380; a D. tortile, Lindl. caule elongato cylindrico, sepalis petalisque 
magis tortilibus et undulatis, labello angustiore et valde convoluto differt. 

Herba epiphytica. Fseudolmlbi aggregati, eloneati, cylindrici, 35-75 en. longi, 
foliacei. Folia disticha, oblongo-lance )lata, subobrusa, pitentia vel 
recurva, 9-10 cm. longa, 2 5-3 '5 cm. lata. Racemi axillares, breves, 
2-4 cm. longi, 2-4-flori. Bracteae oblongae, obtusae, convoiutae, 6-8 mm. 
longae. JPedicelli graciles, 3 • 5-4 cm. longi. Flores speciosi, pallide lmei, 
sepalis petalisque apice purpureis, labello basi purpureo-lineato. Sepa/u 
pateutia, lineari-ob longa, obtusa, irregulariter torta, 3-3 - .~) cm. longa. 
LabeHum integrum late ellipticum, obtusum, basi convolutum, 4 cm. 
longum ; discus velutinus. Mentum obtusuni, 3 mm. longum. L'uluruua 
lata, 6 mm. longa.— R. A. Rolfe. 



The fine Dendrobium -which forms the subject of our 
illustration was discovered in 1905 in Indo-China. The 
precise locality has not so far been indicated, but it is said 
to occur at about 1,750 feet above sea-level. It was 
introduced to cultivation by Mr. Gr. Bronckart along with 
another Indo-Chinese species, D. Bronekartii, De Wildem., 
figured at t. 8252 of this work, which is a native of Annam. 
The nearest ally of D. Dartoisianum is D. tortile, Lindl., a 
native of Chittagong and Burma ; figured at t. 4477 of this 
work ; the stems of D, Dartoisianum are, however, longer 
and more cylindric than those of D. tortile, the undulate 
sepals and petals are more markedly twisted, the base of 
the lip is narrower and more convolute and the coloration 
of the flowers is different. The plant from which our 
figure has been prepared was purchased for the Kew collection 
in 1906 from Mr. M. Verdonck, Ghent. It has been grown 
and flowered in a tropical house at Kew under the con- 
ditions suitable for the species of the group to which 
D. nobile, Lindl., belongs; during winter it is rested in an 
airy greenhouse. 
Januaby., 1911. 



Description. — Herb ; epiphytic ; pseudobulbs clustered, 
cylindric, l<|-2^ ft. long, leafy. Leaves distichous, oblong- 
lanceolate, almost blunt, spreading or recurved, 3^-4 in. 
long, 1-1| in. wide. Racemes short, |-1| in. long, 2-4- 
flowered ; bracts oblong, blunt, convolute, ^-^ in. long ; 
pedicels slender, 1^-lf in. long. Flowers showy, pale 
yellow with purple-tipped sepals and petals and a purple- 
streaked lip-base. Sepals spreading, linear-oblong, blunt, 
irregularly twisted, I5-I5 in. long. Petals oblong, blunt, 
with undulate margins, irregularly twisted, 1^—1 1 in. long. 
Lip entire, wide elliptic, blunt, convolute at the base, 11 in. 
long ; disk velvety. Mentum blunt, -|- in. long. Column 
wide, \ in. long. 



Pig. 1, portion of Iabellum ; 2, column ; 3, pollinia ; 4, sketch of an entire 
plaut : — all enlarged except i, which is much reduced. 



n't - O 




Tab. 8353. 
CLADOTHAMNUS pyrolaeflorus. 

North-west America. 



Ericaceae. Tribe Rhodobeae. 
ClaoThamnus, Bongard; Benth. et Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 598. 



Cladothamnus pyrolaeflorus, Bongard in Mem. Acad. Petersb. ser. vi. vol. ii. : 
V&j. Sitcha, p. 37, t. 1 ; .Sargent in, Garden <fc Forest, vol. X. 1897, p. 216, 
fig. 27; a specie altera, C. campanulata, Greene, l'oliis pedicellisque glabris 
et corolla rotata choiipetala distinctissinia. 

Frutex, 1-3-metraIis ; rami graciles, juniores rubescentes, praeter lineas 
2 minute rufo-puberulas glabri, vetusti cortice griseo vel gri.seo-fuseo tecti. 
Folia subsessilia, lanceolata vel obovato-lanceolata, basi seusim attenuata, 
apice glanduloso-apiculata, 2-2' 5 cm. longa, 7-10 ram. lata, tennia, glabra, 
pallide viridia. Flores terminates in ramis i'oliatis saepe abbreviatis, 
solitarii vel perpaucis ex axillis summis ortis additis, nutantes ; pedicelli 
breves vel demum ad 1'5 cm. longi. Culycis Fegmenta foliacea, lanceolata 
vel oblongo-linearia, apice gland nloso-incrassata, saepe inatqualia, circiler 
1 cm. longa, supra basin constricta et utrinque ciliolata. Petalu oblonga, 
obtusa, 1*5 cm. longa, tenuia, mox evanescentia, flavido-rubescentia \el 
flavido-rosea. Antherae superne rinds latis dehiscentes. Stylus incurvus, 
demum apice involutus, persist ens. Capsula subglobosa, 5 mm. diametro, 
septicide 3-5-valvis. Semina minuta, compre^sa, ovoidea vel ellipsoidea, vix 
5 mm. longa. — Tolmiea occidentalism Hook. Fl. Bor, Am. vol. ii. p. 44. — 
O. Staff. 



The plant here figured is a native of Alaska, where, 
according to Professor Sargent, it grows along the borders 
of upland meadows, opening its flowers in succession during 
several weeks in summer. In addition to C. pyrolaeflorus 
there is, according to Professor Greene, another species of 
Cladothamnus, C. campanulatus, which inhabits the high 
mountains of British Columbia and Washington, and lias 
been confounded with the Alaskan plant. C. campanulatus, 
Greene, is readily distinguished from C. pyrolaeflorus by 
having the petals united in a short tube ; the anthers too 
are said to open differently. There is no example of this 
species, the characters assigned to which would appear to 
exclude it from the genus, in the herbarium at Kew ; the 
only specimen in the collection to which the name 
C. campanulatus is attached is undoubtedly C. pyrolae- 
florus, as indeed are all the specimens at Kew collected in 
British Columbia and Washington. C. pyrolaeflorus \\;i* 

January, 1911. 



discovered by Dr. C. H. Martens in the Island of Sitka in 
182S, but is rarely met with in gardens. The material on 
which our illustration is based was obtained from a plant 
which flowered with Mr. T. Smith, Daisy Hill Nursery, 
Newry, in June, 1910. In localities otherwise suitable, the 
cultivation of C. pyrolaeflorus, if grown under the conditions 
necessary for Rhododendron hirsutum, is, Mr. Smith informs 
us, not attended by any difficulty. 

Description. — Shrub; 4-10 ft. high; branches slender, 
when young reddish and glabrous except for two lines of 
very short reddish hairs, when mature covered with grey 
or tawny bark. Leaves almost sessile, lanceolate or obovate- 
lanceolate, gradually narrowed to the base, gland-tipped, 
J-l in. long, J-f in. wide, thin, glabrous, pale green. 
Flowers terminal on leafy often contracted branches, 
solitary or with a few additional blooms in the axils of the 
uppermost leaves, nodding; pedicels short or at length § in. 
long. Calyx-lobes leafy, lanceolate or linear-oblong, gland- 
tipped, often unequal, about | in. long, narrowed above tin- 
base and ciliolate on both surfaces. Petals oblong, blunt, 
f in. long, thin, soon disappearing, yellowish-red or 
yellowish-rose. Anthers opening at the apex by wide 
chinks. Style incurved, ultimately almost circinate, per- 
sistent. Capsule subglobose, under £ in. wide, septici dally 
3-5-valved. Seeds minute, compressed, ovoid or ellipsoid. 



Fig. 1, calyx with pistil ; 2 and 3, stamens; 4, ovary; 5, cross-section of 
ovary : — all enlarged. 



> 



8354 







ttBroo 






Tab. 8354. 

AQUILEGrIA FLABELLATA, var. NIVEA. 

Japan and Sakhalin. 



Ranunculaceae. Tribe Helleboreae. 
Aquilegia, Linn.) Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 8. 



Aquilegia flabellata, Sieb. & Zucc. Fl. Jap. Fern. Nat. i., 1843, p. 75, var. 
nivea, Hort. ; floribus albis tantuni a typo recedit. 

Uerba, rbizomate ascendente lignoso simplice vel panciramoso superne basibus 
persistentibus foliorura obtecto. Gaules floriferi solitarii, erecti, 15-25 cm. 
longi, sparse pilosi, saepius triflori. Folia radicalia p!ura, longipetiolata, 
basi vaginantia, ternatim decomposiia ; foliola circumscriptione orbiculari- 
flabellata, trisecta, 2-5 cm. diametro, subtns glauceseentia ; segmenta 
trilobata, lobis subrhomboideis iternm lobatis lobulis ro'undatis. Folia 
catdina 2-3, petio'o usque ad apicem vaginante; segmenta circiter ad 
medium lobata. Flores cernui, albi ; ilos terminalis primum evolutus 
pedunculo circiter 5 cm. longo ebracteato; flores laterales podunculati, 
pedunculis apice bracteatis, pedicellis 1-2 cm. longis. Sepal t breviter 
iinguiculata,nnguedeseendente2-3 mm. longo; lamina basi abrupte sursum 
curvata, ovato-elliptica, levifer emarginata, 1*7 cm. longa, 1*2 cm. lata. 
Fetala erecta, calcarata ; lamina oblonga, saepius leviter emarginata, 1*3 cm. 
longa, 7-8 mm. lata, cab-are circiter 1 cm. longo interne valde curvato. 
Stamina circiter 40, in torn convexo radiatim 10-seriata, exteriora s-ensini 
minoia; filamenta sumilata; antherae ellipticae vel elliptico-oblongae. 
Staminodia in 1ubum 10-dentatum connata. Carpella 5-7, stricte erecta, 
arete sibi adpressa, in angnlo ventral] ciliata. — A. flabellata, var. fl. niv., 
Duren in Eev. Hort, Eelge, 1889, p. 157.— T. A. Sfbague. 



The Aquilegia which forms the subject of our plate is a 
white-flowered form of the Japanese A. flabellata, Sieb. & 
Zucc, which Franchet & Savatier in their Enumeratio 
Plantarum Japoniae, p. 11, have treated as identical with 
A. (jlandulosa, Fisch. This view is not, however, generally 
accepted ; indeed the most recent view, advanced by Finet 
and Gagnepain (Contrib. Fl. As. Or. fasc. i. p. 155), is that 
A. flabellata may be no more than a variety of A. sibirica, 
Lamk, characterised by shorter stems and larger cauline 
leaves, and by having the limb of the petals not much 
shorter than the sepals. From the gardening point of 
view, however, A. flabellata must be regarded as sufficiently 
distinct from A. sibirica to deserve separate treatment. The 
stems of A. flabellata are generally three-fiowered, having a 
terminal and two axillary flowers; of these the terminal 

January, 1911. 



opens first and then the lower of the axillary ones. The 
abrupt curve at the junction of the claw and blade imparts 
a cordate appearance to the base of the sepals. The plant 
from which the material for our figure was obtained 
flowered in the garden of Canon Ellacombe at Bitton, near 
Bristol, in May, 1909. The species thrives in a mixture of 
loam and peat. 

Description - . — Herb; rootstock ascending, woody, simple 
or sparingly branched, clothed upwards with persistent 
leaf bases. Stem solitary, erect, 6-10 in. high, sparingly 
hairy, generally 3-nowered. Leaves at the base several, 
long-petioled, the lower portion of the petioles sheathing, 
ternately decompound •, leaflets orbicular-flabellate, 3-sect, 
|-2 in. wide, glaucescent beneath ; segments 3-lobed, the 
lobes somewhat rhomboid and again divided into rounded 
lobes; stem-leaves 2-3, the petioles sheathing throughout); 
segments lobed almost to the middle. Flowers nodding, 
white, the terminal opening first, its peduncle bractless and 
about 2 in. long; the lateral on peduncles bracteate at their 
tips, with pedicels «|-§ in. long. Sepals shortly clawed, the 
claw descending, about 1 lin. long, the blade abruptly 
upcurved at the base, ovate-elliptic, slightly emarginate, 
| in. long, \ in. wide. Petals erect, spurred, blade oblong, 
often slightly emarginate, \ in. long, about -\- in. wide, spur 
about 5 lin. long, strongly curved at the tip. Stamens 
about 40, radiately 10-seriate on the convex receptacle, 
gradually decreasing in size outwards ; filaments subulate ; 
anlhers elliptic-oblong. Staminodes united in a 10-toothed 
tube. Carpels 5-7, quite erect, closely adpressed, ciliate 
along the ventral angle. 

Figs. 1 and 2, stamens; 3, stanunodes and pistil ; 4, pistil :— all enlarged. 




oner 
OODO 






M 



mMwmm 




Wicer' 



Tab. 8355. 

ASTER Falconeri. 

North-western Himalaya. 

Compositae. Tribe Asteboideae. 
AbtEH, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 271. 



Aster Falconeri, Hutchinson in Gard. Chron. 1910, vol. xlvii. p. 39S ; affinfs 
A. diplostephioidi, Benth., sed foliis radfcalibus breviter petiolatis denti- 
culatis, caulibus ad apicem dense imbricatim foliatis, involucri bracteis 
2-3-seriatis valde imbricatis niarginibus dense et longe pilosis et floribus 
disci flavis differt. 

Ilerba; rhizoma perennans. Folia radicalia numerosa, oblongo-oblanceolata vel 
oblanceolata, inferne sensim attenuata, apice subacuta vel mucronulata, 
15-20 cm. longa, 4-5 cm. lata, tenuiter chartacea, remote denticulata, 
dentibus circiter 12 mm. distantibus, nervis lateralibus utrinque 6, supra 
paulo immersis subtus leviter elevatis, nervis transVersis paucis cum costa 
subparallelis. Caulis monocephalus, ad apicem dense foliatus, circiter 
40 cm. altus. Folia caulina lanceolata ad apicem acutum sensim acuminata, 
basi rotundata et semiamplexicaulia, majora 8 cm. longa, 3 cm. lata, minora 
4 cm. longa, 1 cm. lata, integra, utrinque parce pubescentia. nervis latera- 
lilius utrinque circiter 5 e costa crassa ascendentibus. Capitulum bracteis 
foliaceis exterioribus 4 cinctum, 9 cm. diametro. Involucri bracteae sub- 
3-seriatae, exteriores virides, lineari-lanceolatae, acutae, circiter 2 cm. longae 
et 3 mm. latae, extra dense pilosae, intus glabrae, interiores leviter pube- 
scentes, margine paullo scariosae, apice filiformes. Flares radii numerosi ; 
tubus 2' 5 mm. longus, viridis, adpresse pilosus; lamina linearis, apice 
trifida, 4 cm. longa, 2 - 5 mm. lata, basin versus albida, ceterum subcoerulea ; 
stylus exsertus; achaenia subcylindrica, 3 mm. longa, 1 mm. diametro, 
parce pilosa ; pappus biseriatus, externus tenuis et paleaceus, lincari- 
lanceolatus, acutus, 2*5 mm. longus, minute serrulatus, internus filiformis, 
6 mm. longus, minute barbellatus. Flores disci aurantiaci; tuhus 5 mm. 
longus, in medio dilatatus et pilosus, ceterum glaber, inferne albo-viridis ; 
antherae 2-5 mm. longae; pappus ut in floribus radii; achaenia 3 mm. 
longa, subquadrangularia, parce pilosa; stylus exsertus, lobis 1 mm. 
longis. — A. diplostephioides, var. Falconeri, C. B. Clarke, Comp. Ind. p. 45. — 
J. Hutchinson. 



The handsome Aster here figured is a native of the 
mountains which surround the Valley of Kashmir, reaching 
its western limit, so far as available specimens go, in the 
Kamri Pass leading from the Kishn Ganga Y'alley south- 
east of Gilgit ; it has not yet been found to the east of the 
Sutlej. Originally considered identical with Aster diplo- 
stephioides, Benth. a native of Sikkim and Eastern Nepal, 
figured at t. 6718 of this work, our plant was first 
recognised as distinct by the late Mr. C. B. Clarke who, 

Janpaky, 1911. 



me 




Tab. 8356. 
PHAEDRANASSxl Carmioli. 

Costa Rica. 

Amaryllidaceae. Tribe Amarylleae. 

Phaedranassa, Herb. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 732; Engl. & 
Prantl, Nut. Pfianzenf. vol. ii. pars v. p. 115. 



P. Carmioli, Baker in Saunders, Befwj. Bot. t. 46; Handb. A mo ryll. p. 108; 
P. chlorwrae, Herb., affinis, perianthii sejrmentis angustioribus tuboque 
tenuiore supra ovarium haud constricto differt. 

Jlerba; bulbus subglobosus, 5-7"5cin.diametro, subito in collobrevi contractus, 
tunicis membranaceis brunneis vestitus. Folia 1-3, sjnanthia, oblanc<o- 
lata, obtusa, 35 cm. longa, 5'5 cm. lata, costata, glabra, glauca, membra- 
nacea; nervi utrinque circiter 20, tenues; petiolus 20 cm. longus, supra 
canal iculatus. Scajms erectus, 60 cm. altus, teres; spathae 6, anguste 
lanceolatae, membranaceae ; umbella 5-10-flora ; pedicelli graciles ad 
20 cm. longi. Periaitthium anguste infundibuliforme, 4 cm. longum, 
coccineum, supra virMe luteo-marginatum; tubus 1 cm. longus; lobi 
oblanceolati, apice subobtusa iner-issati, parte inferiore membranaceo- 
marginati. Stamina prope apicem tubi affixa; filamenta paullo exserta; 
antherae ellipticae, 3 mm. longae, dorsifixae. Ovarium ellipticum, 1 cm. 
longum, a iride; stylus filiformis, stamina superans; stigma punctiforme. 
— C. H. Wright. 



According to the arrangement adopted by Mr. Baker in 
the Handbook of the Amaryllideae the genus Phaedranassa 
includes lour species from the Andes of Ecuador or 
Colombia, with a fifth, the subject of our plate, which is 
a native of Costa Rica. One of the Andean species, 
P. cldoracra, Herb, (sometimes written " chloracea "), is not 
uncommon in collections in a variety of forms which differ 
mainly as to the number, size and colour of their flowers. 
To some of these forms distinctive names have been given, 
and one of them has been figured at t. 5361 of this work 
as P. obtusa, Herb. To this rather variable species 
P. Carmioli, here figured, is closely allied. The mem- 
branous margins of the perianth-lobes in our species overlap 
and, while not organically united, mutually adhere. On 
tbis account an appearance of having a long corolla tube 
with short perianth-lobes, in place of the short tube charac- 
teristic of all the Andean forms, is imparted to the Costa 
Rica plant, which was introduced to cultivation by Mr. 
Jasiary, 1U11. 



Jules Carmiol and was first flowered, in 1867, by the late 
Mr. Wilson Saunders. It has flowered since then with 
Mr. J. O'Brien, Harrow-on-the-Hill, with Mr. A. Worsley, 
Isleworth, with Mr. W. E. Ledger, Wimbledon, and possibly 
elsewhere. The plant from which our figure has been pre- 
pared flowered in March, 19L0, with Mr. AY. E. Gumbleton, 
to whose garden at Belgrove, Queenstown, the bulb had 
been sent two years previously from that of Mr. Ledger, 
who, while failing with the other species, has, he informs 
us, once flowered the Ecuadorean P. viridijlora, Baker, and 
has found it comparatively easy to flower P. Carmioli. 
The plant thrives well in a cool stove, and with care may 
succeed in an ordinary heated greenhouse ; it is not fasti- 
dious as to soil, and grows satisfactorily in a mixture of 
peat or leaf mould and yellow loam, to which sand should be 
added. It is deciduous and requires complete rest after the 
leaves die down. The tall flower stalk precedes the leaves, 
which, however, develop while the plant is in flower. 

Description. — Herb\ bulb nearly globose, 2-3 in. wide, 
abruptly narrowed to a short neck and clothed with brown 
membranous sheaths. Leaves 1-3, appearing during flower- 
ing time, oblanceolate, obtuse, 14 in. long, about 2 in. wide, 
glabrous, glaucous, membranous, with a pronounced midrib 
and about 20 slender veins on each side ; petiole 8 in. 
long, channelled above. Scape erect, 2 ft. high, cylindric ; 
spathes 6, narrow lanceolate, membranous ; umbel 5-10- 
flowered ; pedicels slender, |-| in. long. Perianth narrowly 
funnel-shaped, 1^ in. long, the lower two-thirds scarlet, the 
upper third green with yellow margins ; tube 5 lin. long ; 
lobes oblanceolate, with rather blunt thickened tips, with 
membranous margins lower down. Stamens attached near 
the top of the tube ; filaments shortly protruded ; anthers 
elliptic, dorsifixed, 1£ lin. long. Ovary elliptic, green, 5 lin. 
long ; style filiform, longer than the stamens ; stigma 
minute. 



Fig. 1, corolla in vertical section, showing ovary, style, and stamens ; 2 and 
3, anthers ; 4, apex of style and stigma .—all enlargtd. 



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8352 -DENDROBICTM DABTOISIANTTM, Lvlo-CMna. 
Jule? 8353.— CLADOTHAMXUS PYROLAEFLORUS, Nortlt-iced 
-»r America. 

\r '„ 8304.— AQUILEGIA FLABELLATA, var. NIVEA, Japan and 
^\ l Sakhalin. 

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e „ 8356.— PHAEDRANASSA CABBOOLI, Costa Rica. 

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8357 




dfllJ.N.Fitchlith. 



Tmceat Brooks, Day 8c Son Li^isnp 



1. Reeve 6V C°. L on dor 



Tab. 8357. 

MELIOSMA CUNEIFOLIA. 

Western China. 



Sabiaceae. 
MELIOSMA, Plume; Benth. et Hvuk.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 414. 



Meliosma cuneifolia, Franch. in Nouv. Archiv, Mus. Paris, set", ii. vol. viii. 
p. 211 ; affinia M. myrianthae, Sieb. et Zucc. et M. dilleniaefoliue, Wall. ; ab 
ilia foliis basi angustatis cuneatis, ab hac foliis minoribus angustioribus 
costa nervisque exceptis utrinque glabris facile distinguitur. 

Arbor velfrutcx, cortice glabro. Folia anguste obovato-cuneata, e basi longe 
attenuata, apice acuta interdum abrupte et breviter acuminata, 6-18 cm. 
longa, 1*5-7 cm. lata, repando-denticulata vel fere dentata, charracea, 
utnnque glabra costa nervisque puberulis exceptis et praeterea ad axillas 
nervorum lateralium barbata, nervis lateralibus numerosis utrinque 20-25 
parallelis in foliis maturatis circiter 5 mm. distantibus supra paullo 
immersis subtus prominentibus, venis ineonspicnis; petioli ad 2 cm. longi, 
supra canaliculati, parce puberuli. Pani'-nla pyramidalis, ampla, multi- 
flora, circiter 20 cm. longa et lata; rhacliis leviter angulata, puberula, 
ramis primariis patentibus vel subpcndulis ad 10 cm. longis, ramis 
t-ecundariis floreutibus ad 1*5 cm. longis; pedicelli circiter 2mm. longi, 
dense puberuli; bractcolae minimae, ovato-deltoideue, ciliolatae, p<.r- 
sistentes. Flores viridi-flavi, 6 mm. diamctro. Sepala 5, ovata vel ovato- 
rotundata, coriacea, ciliolata, extus concav.i, glabra, petal is triple* minora. 
Pttala 5, valde inaequalia; 3 exteriora orbicularia, subcoriacea, 8 mm. 
lata, glabra, striata; 2 interiora parva, membranacea, profunde biloba. 
Stamina 5, petalis opposita, inaequalia, basi cum petalis cohaerentia, 
2 majora perfecta, 3 ananthera ante petala majora, filamentis plains 
glabris; antherae magnae, globosae. Discus cupularis, inaeqnaliter lobatus 
vel dentatus, carnosus. Ovarium ellipsoideum, glabrum vel papillosum 
vel pubeseens; stylus eonicus, glaber. Fructus subglobosus integer vel 
bilobus, 3-5 mm. diametro. — J. Hutchinson. 



The handsome species here figured was first discovered 
by tl;e Abbe David in June, 1800, in the mountains of 
Moupine. Since then it lias been met with on Mount Omi 
in Szechuan by the Rev. E. Faber, in the Patung district 
of Hupeh by Mr. A. Henry, and in valleys on the eastern 
flank of the Li-Kiang range in North -western Yunnan by 
Mr. (t. Forrest. It was also found again on Mount Omi 
by Mr. E. H. Wilson when collecting on behalf of Messrs. 
J. Veiteh & Sons, in whose nursery at Coombe Wood 
Februabv, 101 1. 



plants raised from seed obtained by Wilson have proved 
quite hardy. From one of these plants, which flowered 
in July, 1909, was obtained the material on which our 
figure is based. The genus Meliosma has a special interest 
for growers of ornamental shrubs owing to its being the 
only genus of the family Sabiaceae members of which can 
be grown in the open air in the average climate of Great 
Britain. Indeed, prior to the introduction of M. cuneifolia, 
the only one that had flowered in England was M. myriantha, 
Sieb. & Zucc, which is, however, much more tender, and 
is only suitable for the mildest parts of this country. 
Botanically the two species nre very closely allied, and our 
plant differs chiefly from M. myriantlia, which is a native 
of Japan and Corea, in having the leaves narrowly cuneate 
at the b;ise. Another very nearly allied species is M. 
dilleniaefolia, Wall., from Northern India ; from this latter, 
which is not hardy, our plant is readily distinguished by 
its smaller leaves, which are glabrous except on the mid- 
rib and lateral nerves. A third species, M. Veitchiorum, 
Hemsl. (Kew Bulletin for 1906, p. 155, and for 1910, 
p. 173, with plate), from the highlands of Central China, 
also nearly allied but with much larger and entire leaflets, 
shares with our plant the advantage of being hardy out of 
doors in Southern England. There is a considerable degree 
of variation in the amount of tomentum on the ovary in 
M. cuneifolia ; the original specimens on which the species 
was ba^ed have distinctly pubescent ovaries, while those 
raised from Wilson's seed* have the ovaries quite glabrous. 
Intermediate conditions, however, occur, and in other 
respects the specimens are identical. In a wild state 
M. cuneifolia attains the dimensions of a tree; in cultiva- 
tion the plants, which now flower annually in July, form 
healthy bushes 4-5 feet high. They have not yet ripened 
fruits, so that for their propagation recourse will probably 
have to be had to layering. 

Description'.— Tree or shrub; bark glabrous. Leaves 
narrowly obovate-cuneate, acute or at times shortly and 
abruptly acuminate, gradually narrowed to the base, 
margin repandly toothed, 2£-7 in. long, J-3 in. wide, firm, 
puberulous along the midrib and nerves and with tufts of 
hairs m the nerve angles beneath, elsewhere glabrous ; 



lateral nerves 20-25 on each side, parallel and nearly 
straight, in older leaves about 2 lin. apart, somewhat sunk 
above, prominent beneatli ,- cross-veins inconspicuous ; 
petiole reaching § in. in length, channelled above, sparingly 
puberulous. Panicle pyramidal, many-flowered, about 8 in. 
across; rachis faintly angular, puberulous; main brandies 
spreading or somewhat pendulous, reaching 4 in. in length ; 
secondary floriferous twigs 7-8 lin. long ; pedicels about 
1 lin. long, closely puberulous ; bracteoles minute, ovate 
deltoid, ciliolate, persisting. Flowers greenish-yellow, 
3 lin. wide. Sepals 5, ovate or rounded ovate, very firm, 
ciliolate, concave outwards, glabrous, one-third shorter 
than the petals. Petals 5, very unequal ; 3 outer orbicular, 
firm, 1| lin. wide, glabrous, striate ; 2 inner small, mem- 
branous, deeply 2-lobed. Stamens 5, opposite and united 
at the base to the petals, unequal ; 2 larger perfect, 
3 without anthers opposite the larger petals ; filaments 
flat, glabrous; anthers large, globose. Disk fleshy, cup- 
like, unequally lobed or toothed. Ovary ellipsoid, glabrous 
or papillose or pubescent ; style conical, glabrous. Fruit 
subglobose, entire or 2-lobed, 2-3 lin. in diameter. 



Fig. 1, flower ; 2, calyx and pistil ; 3, larger petal with, barren stamen ; 
4 and 5, fertile stamens with smaller petals ; 6 and 7, heads of barren stamens ; 
8, pistil and disk ; 9, ovary in longitudinal section : — all enlarged. 



8358. 




Tab. 8358. 
KENNEDY A Becrxiana. 

Australia. 

Legumixosae. Tribe Phaseoleae. 
Kennedya, Vent.; Benth. et Book./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 531. 



Kennedya Beekxiana, F. v. MuelL Fragm. xi. p. 98 ; afflnis K. macrophylhie, 
Benth., sed indumento parciore foliolis minoribus pedunculis brevioribus 
2-floris ovario stipitato differt. 

TIerba volnbilis, perennis ; ramuli graciles, rubescentes, fere glabri. Folia 
pinnatim trifoliolata ; stipulae lanceolatae, acutae, G mm. longae, rigidius- 
culae, mox deflexae; petioli ad 5 cm. longi, supra canaliculati ; foliola 
breviter petiolulata apice rotundata vel fere truncata, mucronata, basi 
obtusa vel fere truncata, ad B cm. longa, 5 cm. lata, cbartacea, utrinque 
fere glabra, terminale obovatirm vel obovato-ellipticum, a lateralibus 
cllipticis parum inaequalibus circiter 2 cm. distans, nervis lateralibus 
utrinque 5-6 intra marginem arcuatis cum nervulis supra prominulis 
subtus conspicuis; stipellae lateralium ad 5 mm. longae terminalis paulo 
breviores. Fedunculi axillares, flores duos gerentes, 1 cm. longi, prope 
basin bracteato-involucrati, involucro e bracteis duabus apice acuminatis 
coalitis infundibulari-orbiculari transverse 1-3 cm. lato rigidiusculo 
ciliolato ; pedicelli pedunculo paulo breviores, parce pilosuli. Calyx 
bilabiatus, pedunculo aequilongus, viridis nisi inter lacinias basi rubro- 
maculatus, extus parce appres^e pilosulus, intus fere sericeo-pubescens ; 
tubus labiis fere duplo longior, 5 mm. diametro; labium superum ovatum, 
breviter bidentatum, inferum supero aequilongum in lacinias 3 late lanceo- 
latas acutiusculas partitum. Corolla longe exserta, vix 4 cm. longa, petalis 
omnibus subaequilongis glabris vtxilli basi exccpto coccineis ; vexillum 
reflexum, ovatum, obtusum, 2 '7 cm. latum, basi breviter auriculatum, 
2-callosum, macula viridi-sulphurea nigro-marginata oblonga 1 cm. longa 

6 mm. lata ornatum, stipite fere 3 mm. longo ; alae oblongae, obtusae, 
appendiculatae, circiter 5 mm. latae, stipite 5 mm. longo, medio carinae 
leviter adhaerentes ; carina oblongo-falcata, acutiuscula, appendiculata, 

7 mm. lata, more alarum stipitata. Stamen vexillare omnino liberum. 
Pistillum 4-5 cm. altum, glabrum ; ovarium 1*5 cm. altum, stipite 7 mm. 
longo, stylo filiformi stigmate parvo capitate— W. G. Ceaib. 



The striking Kennedya which forms the subject of our 
figure was raised at Kew from seed purchased in 1008 
from Mr. J. Staer, Wahroonga, New South Wales. The 
plant from which the material for our plate was obtained lias 
grown vigorously in a greenhouse, twining along a rafter 
after the manner of K. rubicunda, Vent. It flowered for 
the first time in April, 1910, and has been identified by 
Mr. Craib, from the original description, with K. Beekxiana, 
F. v. MuelL, a species based on material collected by Mr. 
W. Webb in South-western Australia inland from King 
George's Sound, of which there is no authentic specimen 
in the herbarium at Kew. It appears to be the largest 
February, 1911. 



flowered of the Kennedy as so far introduced to cultivation, 
and is most nearly allied to K. macrophylla, Benth., but is 
readily distinguished by its smaller leaflets, its shorter 
2-flowered peduncles, its stalked ovary and its more 
sparing pubescence. From K. rubicunda, above mentioned, 
it differs in having constantly 2-flowered peduncles and a 
glabrous pistil ; the same characters separate it from K. 
nigricans, LindL, a species figured at t. 3652 of this work. 

Description. — Herb, climbing, perennial ; branches 
slender, reddish, almost glabrous. Leaves pinnately 3- 
foliolate ; stipules lanceolate, acute, 3 lin. long, rather 
rigid, becoming deflexed ; petioles up to 2 in. long, chan- 
nelled above ; leaflets shortly stalked, tips rounded or 
almost truncate, bases obtuse or almost truncate, up to 3 in. 
long, 2 in. wide, firm, glabrous on both sides; terminal 
leaflet obovate or obovate-elliptic, about 10 lin. remote from 
the elliptic, slightly unequal lateral ones ; lateral nerves 
5-6 on each side, curved along the margin and like the 
secondary veins prominent above and distinct beneath ; 
stipels of lateral leaflets 2^ lin. long, those of terminal 
leaflet shorter. Peduncles axillary, 2-flowered, 5 lin. long, 
with a rather flattened rigid involucre about ^ in. wide 
composed of 2 connate acute ciliate bracts ; pedicels 
sparingly hairy, shorter than the peduncles. Calyx 2- 
lipped, as long as the pedicel, green with reddish markings 
at the base between the lobes, sparingly pubescent outside, 
silky hairy within ; upper lip ovate, shortly 2-toothed, 
lower as long, with 3 rather pointed wide lanceolate lobes. 
Corolla much exserted, about 1| in. long, petals of about 
the same length, red except for a greenish-yellow, dark- 
margined patch at base of standard ; standard reflexed, 
ovate, obtuse, over 1 in. wide, slightly auriculate and 
2-callose at the base, its claw 11 lin. long ; wings oblong, 
obtuse, appendiculate, about 1\ lin. wide, slightly adherent 
to keel in the middle, their claw 2J lin. long ; keel oblong- 
falcate, rather acute, appendiculate, Z\ lin. wide, clawed 
like the wings. Vexillary stamen quite free. Pistil nearly 
2 in. long, glabrous ; ovary § in. long, stipe 3± lin. long ; 
style filiform ; stigma small capitate. 

Fig. 1, calyx laid open, showing stamens and pistil; 2, base of standard; 
3, wing-petal; I, keel-i>etal ; 5, ovary -.—all enlarged. 



8359 




M S dd.J.N.PiteHtth 



rirooks.Dav A ^cr. Lt*imp 



L.R 



eeve &-O.L01 



Tab. 8359. 
URCEOCHARIS Edentata. 

Peru. 

Amabyllidaceae. Tribe Amabylleae. 
Urceochaeis, Mast, in Gard. Ghrtn. 1892, vol. xii. p. 214. 



Urceocharis edentata, C. H. Wright in Kew Bulletin, 1910, p. 24 ; 
ab U. Vlibrani, Mast., corona inter filamenta inappendiculata differt. 

Heron; bulbus tunicis brnnneis membranaceis ve>titns; collum breve, 1 "3 cm. 
diametro. Folium solitare, elliptico oblongum, breviter acuminatum, basi 
cuneatum angulis exterioribus rotundatis, glaberrimum, 15 cm. longum, 
8 cm. latum; costa supra canaliculata, subtus lata prominensque. Scupus 
termiaalis, 20 cm. altus, 5 mm. diametro, dilute viridis. circa 4-florus ; 
bracteae brunneae, 2-5 cm. longae, 5 mm. latae, scariosae ; pedicelli 
1*5 cm. longi. Pervmthium album, prope apicem extus cremeum; tubus 
cylindricup, 2 cm. longus, 2 mm. diametro; limbus late campanulatus, 
4 "5 cm. diametro ; lobi elliptici, acuti, 4 cm lon<;i, l'5cm. lati. Stamina 
exserta; filamenta basi dilatata connataque. Uvurium 8 mm. longum, 
trilobum ; ovula pauca. — C. H. Wright. 



In 1892 the late Dr. M. T. Masters gave a description in 
the Gardeners' Chronicle of an interesting- hybrid which 
had been raised by Messrs. Olibran. The parents of this 
hybrid were Urceolina pendula, Herb., figured at t. 5464, 
and Eucharis grandifiora, Planch., figured at t. 4971 of 
this work ; the name given to the plant was Urceocharis 
Clibrani. Two years ago the plant now figured was 
acquired for the Kew Collection by purchase from Messrs. 
Sander & Sons, St. Albans. This plant had been for- 
warded from Peru by the firm's collector, Mr. Forget, who, 
it is understood, had met with it in a wild state and in a 
remote p;irt of that country. It flowered in a moist 
tropical house at Kew in July, 1909 ; another specimen, 
identical in every respect, flowered at St. Albans in 
January, 19 L0. So nearly allied to Urceocharis Clibrani, 
Mast,, 'is this Peruvian form, which Mr. Wriglit has 
described as Urceocharis edentata, that there is hardly 
room for doubt as to its being another hybrid, perhaps 
identical as to parentage with Messrs. Cli bran's plant, but 
Febbuaby, 1911. 



iii this case probably a natural 01 The two plants 

referred to Urceocharis have a perianth with a narrowly 
cylindric tube and a campanulate limb, the lobes of which 

curve outwards at the apex only as in Urceolina, and not, 
as in Eueharis, almost at right angles to the tube. They 
further agree with Urceolina in being deciduous. The 
flowers of Urceolina are either devoid of a stamina! corona 
or possess one that is quite rudimentary ; those of Eueharis 
have a distinct corona with free teeth between the bases 
of the filaments. In the hybrid raised by Messrs. Clibran 
there are two such teeth about one-third the length of the 
filaments between each pair of stamens. But in the pre- 
sumably wild plant sent by Forget from Peru, which in 
every other respect is indistinguishable from Urceocharis 
Clibrani, there is no trace of these appendages. 

Description. — Herb; bulb clothed with brown mem- 
branous sheaths; neck short, ^ in. thick. Ltaf solitary, 
deciduous, elliptic-oblong, shortly acuminate, base cuneate 
with rounded outer angles, quite glabrous, 6 in. long, '.\ in. 
wide; midrib channelled above, broad and pronounced 
beneath. Scape terminal, 8 in. long, 2}, I'm. thick, pale- 
green, 4— 5-flowered ; bracts brown, scarious, 1 in. long, 
2^ lin. wide; pedicels ^ in. long. Perianth white, pale- 
yellow towards the tips of the segments, especially ex- 
ternally; tube cylindric, f in. long, 1 lin. wide; limb 
wide campanulate, 1| in. across; lobes elliptic, acute, 1^ in. 
long, § in. wide. Stamens exserted ; filaments dilated and 
united at the base. Ovary 4 lin. long, 3-Iobed ; ovules 
few. 



Fig. I, androecium ; 2 and 3, anthers; 4, apex of style:— all enlarged except 1, 

which is of natural size. 



8360 







Tab. 8360. 
peunus microcarpa. 

Orient. 

Eosaceae. Tribe Prcneae. 
Pkuxus, Linn.; Benfh. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 603. 



Prunus microearpa, C. A. Mey. Enum. Cusp. p. 167; C. K. Schneid. Handb. d, 
LaubhiJzk. vol. i. p. 604, fig. 337 s-t et fig. 338 f, cum varietate tortuosa, 
p. 605, fig. 337 w-x et fig. 338 g-h ; inter species sectionis Microcerasi 
florihus t'ructibusque distincte vel longiuscule pedicellatis distincta. 

frutex humilis vel ad '2 m. altus, valde variabilis; rami virgati vel divaricati, 
rigidi vel tortuosi, juniores saepe pubescentes demum glabresceutes rarius 
glabri, cottice cas f aneo vel fusco tecti. Folia late ovata vel ovato-elliptica 
vel lanoeolato-oblonga, subacuta, serrato-dentata, 1-3 cm. longa, 0"7-2 cm. 
lata, glabra vel plus minusve pubescentia; petioli tenuiter pubescentes, 
1*5-5 mm. longi; stipulae e basi fimbriata subulatae, ad 6 mm. longae. 
Flares perpauci, plerumque bini, in bracbycladiis foliatis brevissimis cum 
foliis vel paulo antea evoluti; pedicalli tenuiter pubescentes vel glabri, 
3-12 mm. longi. Receptaculum rubescens, late cylindricum, post fecunda- 
tionem medio constrictum, 3-4 mm. longum, glabrum vel ima basi 
pubescens. Sepnla ovata, ciliata, 1-1 '5 mm. longa. Petala albo -rosea 
vel alba, obovata, circiter 5 mm. longa. Fructus ovoideus, acutiusculus, 
0*7-1 cm. lougus, in planta spontanea ruber vel luteus. — P. diffusa, 
C. K. Schneid. Handb. d. Laubholzk. p. 606, fig. 337 u-w et fig. 338 i. 
Cerasus microearpa Boiss. Fl. Or. vol. ii. p. 646. C. tortuosa et C. diffusa, 
Boiss. et Hausskn. Fl. Or. vol. ii. p. 617. — O. Staff. 



The little Cherry here figured was acquired for Kew 
from Zoeschen in 1900 and has been grown in the Prunus 
collection ever since. It is a form of P. microearpa, 
C. A. Mey., originally described from specimens collected on 
Mount Bashbarmak, north of Baku, which represent a state 
with glabrous leaves and finely pubescent young twigs. A 
state with rigid divaricate or tortuous branches, distinctly 
pubescent all over, was later treated by Boissier and Hauss- 
knecht as a distinct species, Cerasus tortuosa. The same 
authors based on specimens from South Persia, more diffuse 
in habit and with smaller leaves and flowers, another species, 
Cerasus diffusa. But Bornmueller, who collected P. micro- 
earpa on the hills around Erbil in Xorth-eastern Mesopotamia, 
found the plant to vary, in the same locality, as to pubes- 
cence, length of fruit-stalk and colour of fruit. Dr. Stapf, 
who knows P. microearpa on the hills and mountains near 

Febeuabt, 1911. 



to and southwards from Shiraz, where it usually forms a 

small shrub with stiff spreading or tortuous branches, found 

it as variable there as in Mesopotamia as regards pubescence 

and fruit. Herbarium material shows that from Syria and 

Western Kurdistan to Chorassan and Southern Persia it is 

everywhere as variable. Dr. Stapf therefore concludes that 

P. microcarpa should be treated as a species very variable 

not only in habit and stature, which depend greatly on 

the physical conditions under which it grows, but as to 

pubescence, length of fruit-stalk, size of leaf and size and 

colour of fruit which vary independently. The form depicted 

represents a state which most resembles Cerasus tortuosa, 

Boiss. & Hausskn., but differs therefrom in having, even 

in the unfolding buds, practically glabrous leaf-blades, 

though the petioles, like the twigs, are pubescent. This 

form comes from Asia Minor. Under cultivation it loves 

sunshine and should be given a southern exposure. It 

appears perfectly hardy and flowers prettily in May. 

Under our dull skies it fails to fruit freely, and such fruits 

as do form are liable to fall while still green. 

Description". — Shrub, often dwarf, at most 7 ft. high, 
very variable in habit, branches virgate or spreading, rigid 
or tortuous, usually at first pubescent, occasionally glabrous, 
hark dark brown or tawny. Leaves wide ovate or ovate- 
elliptic or lanceolate-oblong, subacute, serrate, -g-l^ in. long, 
|-| in. wide, glabrous or more or less pubescent ; petioles 
thinly pubescent, 1-3 lin. long- ; stipules £ in. long, subu- 
late from a fimbriate base. Flowers very few, often only 2, 
on short leafy twigs appearing with or shortly before the 
foliage ; pedicels thinly pubescent or glabrous, l~^ in. long. 
-Receptacle reddish, wide cylindric, narrowed in the middle 
after the fruit has set, 1-2 lin. long, glabrous or pubescent 
at the base. Sepals ovate, ciliate, under 1 lin. long. Petals 
pale rose or white, obovate, about 2| lin. long. Fruit 
ovoid, rather pointed, 3-5 lin. long, coloured as in our 
figure when about to fall ; in wild plants sometimes red, 
sometimes yellow. 



Fig. 1, base of a leaf with stipules; 2, flower; 3, longitudinal section of 
receptacle, showing 2 ovaries-anonia'.ous; 4 and 5, stamens: — all enlarged. 



8361. 




Tab. 83G1. 

MASDEVALLIA pachyura. 

Ecuador. 

Orchidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 
Masdevallia, Ruiz et Pav.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 492. 



Masdevallia pachyura, Reichb. f. in Gard. Chiron. 1>74, vol. ii. p. 322, ut 
Limnim, vol. xli. p. 12; Woolw. Monogr. Musdev. [p. 19, t. 4]; Gard. Vhron. 
1897, vol. xxii. p. 255, fig. 77; inter species sectionis Amandae florilms 
inajusculis rubro-punctatis distincta. 

Rerba epiphytica, cacspitosa, nana, epseudobulbosa. Folia conferta, petiolata, 
spathvdato-oblonga, coriacea, apice subacuta et recurva ; limous' basi 
attenuatus, 7-10 cm. longus, l"5-2'5 cm. latus; petioli 5-7 cm. longi, 
bad vaginis membranaceis obtecti. ticapi erecti graciles, 15-22 cm. longi ; 
racemi laxi, 5-7-flori; bracteae ovatae, subobtusae, membranaceae, 5-7 nun. 
longae. Pedicelli circiter 4 mm. loniri. Floret majuacnli, straminei, rubro t 
punctati, sepalorum lateralium caudae et nervae tnedianae flavae. 6 
basi in tubum brevem connata; posticum late elliptico-ovatum, cnculla- 
tum, breviter caudatum, circiter 2 cm. longum ; lateralia patentia ango^to 
ovata, breviter caudata, caudis recurvis. Pela'a olJonga, apice tridentuta, 
circiter 7 mm. longa. Labellum pandnrato-oblongnm, obtusuni, fere ad 
apicem tricarinatnm. Columna clavata, 5 mm. longa. — M. tridens, Reichb. i- 
in Otia Bob Hamb. p. 13.— It. A. Rolke. 



The plant of Masdevallia pachyura here figured was 
purchased for Kew at an auction sale in 1!>08. The 
species is a member of the small group .\iii<nul<i>>, with 
racemose flowers and with the tube formed by the -■ 
distinctly constricted below. It is a native of Ecuador, 
where it was discovered by Roezl. It was first described by 
Keichenbach in 1874. Its introduction to cultivation we 
owe to the late Mr. Consul Lehmann, who sent plan' 
Mr. J. O'Brien, with whom it flowered for the first tin* in 
1897. Lehmann has noted that the range of tin's species is 
somewhat restricted, it being confined to the western dopes 
of Chimborazo, about one degree south of the Equator, at 
elevations of from 5,600 to 8,300 feet above sea level. It 
is abundant around Cayandelet and above Pallatanga. 
Usually found growing on trees in very damp thick woods, 
it also occurs occasionally on walls of rock. As a rule it 
Febhcaby, l'Jll. 



flowers in the wild state in March and April ; sometimes it 
flowers again in November ; the mean temperature of its 
habitat ranges from 59° to 64° Fahrenheit. The plant 
grows well and flowers freely under the treatment suitable 
ior most Masdevallias ; a cool moist greenhouse, shade from 
direct sunshine and a compost of sphagnum and peat. The 
specimen from which our illustration has been derived 
flowered in January. 

Description. — Herb, epiphytic, dwarf and tufted, without 
pseudobulbs. Leaves clustered, spathulate-oblong, coriaceous, 
recurved and rather acute at the tip, narrowed to the base, 
3-4 in. long, f-1 in. wide ; petiole 2-3 in. long, with mem- 
branous sheaths at the base. Scapes slender, erect, 6-9 in. 
long ; racemes lax, 5-7-flowered ; bracts ovate, somewhat 
blunt, membranous, ^-i in. long ; pedicels about -| in. long. 
Flowers ratber large, straw-coloured with reddish dots, the 
tails and midribs of the lateral sepals yellow. Sepals united 
at the base in a short tube, the upper wide elliptic-ovate, 
hooded, shortly tailed, about | in. long; lateral pair spread- 
ing, narrow ovate, shortly tailed, the tails recurved. Petals 
oblong, 3-toothed at the tip, about |- in. long. Lip pandu- 
rate-oblong, obtuse, 3-keeled almost to the tip. Column 
olavate, under £ in. long. 



Figr. 1, flower; 2, petals and column; 3, column and lip; 4, anther-cap; 
5, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 74, FEBRUARY, 1911. 



Tab. 8357.— MELIOSMA CUNEIFOLIA, Western China. 
„ 8358.— KENNEDYA BECKXIANA, Australia. 
„ 8359.—TJRCEOCHARIS EDENTATA, Peru. 
„ 8360.— PRUNUS MICROCARPA, Orient. 
„ 8361.— MASDEVALLIA PACHYURA, Ecuador. 

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8362 




M.Sdftl.J.N.F]±ch]iiJ: 



k5,Day-&San I 



L.Beevi 



Tab. 83G2. 
I1H0D0DENDR0N sutchuenense. 

Central China. 



Ebicaceae. Tribe Rhodokeae. 
Rhododendron, Linn. ; Benih. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron (Eurhododendron) sutchuenense, Franch. in Journ. de Bot. 
vol. ix. p. 392 ; Hemsl. et E. H. Wils. in Kew Bull. 1910, p. 112 ; inter 
species bujus sectionis foliis floribusque haud lepidotis B. Fortumi affinis, 
a qua fere omnino glabra et foliis oblanceolato-oblongis differt. 

Fritter 2 5-3 m. altus, haud lepidotus et fere omnino glaber, ramis floriferis 
rectis crassis interdum primum plus minusve tomentosis. Folia numerosa, 
ad apices ramorum conferta, longe petiolata, bene evoluta, crassa, coriacea, 
glabra vel interdum subtus secus costam diu tomentosa ; lamina oblancto- 
lato-oblonga, 8-25 cm. longa, sed saepius circiter 15 cm. longa, deorsum 
attenuata, apice saepius rotundata, obtusa, superiora minora interdum 
acuta, supra saturate viridia, infra pallida ; cost a crassissima, subtus 
elevata ; venae primariae latemlea numerosae, sat conspicuae; venae 
ultimae subtiliter reticulatae ; petiolus validus, interdum fere suberosus, 
2-4 cm. longus. Flares dense corymboso-racemosi, 7-8 cm. diametro. 
gemmarum squamis variis intns sericeis ; corymbi subsessiles, usque ad 
20 cm. diametro ; pedicelli 1*5-2 cm. longi. Calyx parvus, fere obsolctus, 
obscure lobatus, glal>er. Corolla late campanukta, 5-lobata, lobis latis 
rotunda tie emarginatis, rosea, intus postice maculis sanguineis ornata, 
basin versus puberula. Stamitm 13-15, declinata, quam corolla brevioia; 
tilamenta filil'oruiia, infra medium pubescentia ; antherae fere nigrae. 
Ovarium 12-loculare, glabrum, nudum ; stylus glaber, declinatus, stamina 
vix superans, stigmate sanguineo. Capsula lignosa, oblonga, circiter 
2 - 5 cm. longa, stylo lignescente coronata. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



This handsome Rhododendron is one of the fruits of the 
first journey in China made by Mr. E. H. Wilson on behalf 
of Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, and is the first of the large- 
leaved, large-flowered, new Chinese species to blossom in 
cultivation. Several of the smaller species of Rhododen- 
dron, which cover considerable patches of open country 
on the higher mountain slopes, as Calluna does in this 
country, have already been figured in this work. The 
large and broad-leaved species, of which R. sutchuenense is 
an example, occur as a rule, Mr. Wilson informs us, in 
partial shade and in association with other trees. Among 
these larged-leaved species the one here figured has the 
unusual interest of flowering while it is of small size, and 
Mauch, 1911. 



the fine truss shown in our plate was borne by a plant, in 
the Coombe "Wood Nursery, which was less than 2 feet in 
height. The flowers open early in March, so that they run 
considerable risk of damage by frost. It will therefore be 
advisable to select for this species, which otherwise is 
hardy, a position shaded from the early morning sun. In 
other respects its treatment should be that given to most 
Rhododendrons. This species was originally described 
from specimens collected in Szechuan. All those in the 
herbarium at Kew come, however, from Western Hupeh. 

Description. — Shrub, 8-10 ft. high, free from scales and 
nearly glabrous, flowering twigs straight, thick, occasionally 
more or less tomentose at first. Leaves numerous, clustered 
at the ends of the twigs, long-petioled, thick and leathery 
when full grown, glabrous or sometimes tomentose on the 
midrib beneath ; oblanceolate-oblong, from 3-10, but usually 
about 6 in. long, narrowed to the base, usually rounded at 
the tip, the uppermost smaller and occasionally acute, deep 
green above, pale beneath ; midrib very stout, prominent 
beneath ; lateral main veins numerous and rather pro- 
minent ; reticulation fine ; petiole stout, occasionally almost 
corky, f-1^ in. long. Flowers densely corymbose, about 
3 in. across, bud scales variable, silky ; corymbs almost 
sessile, up to 8 in. wide; pedicels |-| in. long. Calyx 
small or almost obsolete, faintly lobed, glabrous. Corolla 
wide campanulate, with 5 broad rounded emarginate lobes, 
rose-coloured and marked behind on the inside with darker 
spots, puberulous towards the base. Stamens 13-15, decli- 
nato, shorter than the corolla; filaments filiform, hairy 
below the middle; anthers almost black. Ovary 12-locular, 
glabrous, naked ; style glabrous, declinate, hardly longer 
than the stamens ; stigma bright red. Capsule woody, 
oblong, about 1 in. long, tipped by the hardened style. 



Fig. 1, portion of under-surface of a leaf; 2-5, bracts of the inflorescence; 
6 calyx and pistil; 7 and 8, stamens; 9, transverse section of ovary:— 

all enlaryvd. 



Tab. 8363. 
PRIMULA Maximowiczii. 

Northern China. 

Pkimulaoeae. Tribe Primuleae. 
Primula, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 681. 



Primula Maximowiczii, Eegel in Act. Hort. Petrop. vol. iii. (1874), p. 139 ; 
Oard. Chron. 1910, vol. xlvii. p. 221, fig. 96; species ab affini P. tangutica, 
Duthie, calycis lobis brevioribus, corollae coccineae lobis brevioribus facilo 
distinguenda. 

Ikrba perennis, efarinosa, calycis lobis exceptis glabra. Folia omnia radicalia, 
anguste elliptica vel oblongo-elliptica, apice obtusa vel subacuta, basi in 
petiolum membranaceo-alatum attenuata, 4-16 cm. longa, 2-4 '7 cm. lata, 
supra viridia subtus pallidiora, nervis lateralibus utrinque numerosis 
supra conspicuis subtus prominulis, margine crenulato-denticulata. Scapus 
robustus, teres, erectus, folia multoties superans, 20-3Q cm. altus, umbellam 
solitariam multiflorara vel umbellas plures superpositas gerens. Pedicelli 
graciles, l - 5-4 cm. longi, primo recti, demum curvati. Calycis viridis 
tubus ad 6 mm. longus, 8-3*5 mm. diametro, lobi acuti vel subacuti ad 
3 mm. longi, margine ciliolati. Corollae coccineae tubus cylindricus 
superne leviter ampliatus, 1'3-1'6 cm. longus, 2-3 mm. diametro, ore 
annulo subpentagono instructus, limbus 1*5 cm. diametro, lobi reflexi 
oblongi, exsiccati atro-purpurei, 7-7 - 5 mm. longi, 2*5-3 mm. lati. Antheruc 
parvae; filamenta brevia basem versus dilatata. Ovarium globosum; stylus 
calycis tubum paulo superans, apice depressus. — P. oreocharin, Hance in 
Journ. Bot. vol. xiii. (1875) p. 133. P. Maximowiczii, var. (3 Dielsiana, 
Pax in Engl. Pflanzenr. vol. iv. Primulaceae, p. 107. — W. G. Craib. 



The Primula here figured has been, since its independent 
and almost simultaneous description by Hegel and Hance 
in 1874 and 1875 respectively, an object of desire and ;i 
subject for debate. The original specimens showed that 
P. Maximowiczii must prove a welcome addition to horti- 
culture. The wish of more than five and thirty years' .stand- 
ing has at last been fulfilled. The original specimens, 
collected by Moellendorf, Bretschneider, Hancock and 
Potanin, all came from the province of Chihli in Northern 
China, from the mountains in the neighbourhood of Peking. 
The plants now, thanks to the efforts of Messrs. J. Veitch 
& Sons, established in this country come from the same 
province, but from a locality considerably further to the 
Mabch, 1911. 



north; they were obtained by Mr. W. Purdom in the 
mountains of Northern Wei-chang, at about 9000 feet above 
the sea. The species has also been recorded from Shansi by 
Giraldi. The doubt connected with P. Maximowiczii has 
had regard to the colour of the corolla. This, in all dried 
specimens, is purple, and ' purple ' is the colour attributed 
to the plant both by Regel and by Pax. Yet Hancock 
found that his specimens, when fresh, had the corolla 
■ intense crimson,' and Potanin, an equally reliable 
observer, found one plant with ' red,' another with 
' yellow ' corollas. Nor are our doubts even now at an 
end. Our figure was prepared on 23rd March, 1910, from 
a plant sent to Kew from the Coombe Wood Nursery for 
identification ; the colour, somewhat remarkable and unusual 
in a Primula, accords with the experience of Hancock. 
Yet, on the previous day, the Gardeners' Chronicle states 
(Lc. p. 221), a Certificate was awarded by the Royal Horti- 
cultural Society to a plant of the same species shown by 
Messrs. Yeitch which had a i dark, clear purple ' corolla. 

The nearest ally of P. Maximowiczii is a Primula from 
Western Kansu, which Maximowicz considered to be no 
more than a variety of our plant. Five years ago, however, 
Duthie and Pax independently and simultaneously accorded 
specific rank to this variety, as P. tangutica. Their species, 
which appears always to have a * dark purple' corolla, has 
been figured at t. 8043 of this work. It differs mainly 
from the plant now described in having longer calyx-teeth, 
narrower corolla-lobes, and in the upper portion of the 
scape being distinctly puberulous. P. Maximowiczii proves 
to be perfectly hardy, and Messrs. Yeitch find that it thrives 
best in a mixture of peat, loam and sand, in equal propor- 
tions, and grows most satisfactorily when given a shady 
position. 

Description. — Herb, perennial, green, all parts except 
the ciliate calyx-lobes glabrous. Leaves all radical, narrow 
elliptic or oblong-elliptic, obtuse or subacute, narrowed 
below into a membranous winged petiole, crenulate-toothed, 
l|-6 in. long, f-2 in. wide, bright green above, paler 
beneath, lateral nerves many on either side, conspicuous 
above and evident beneath. Scape stout, cylindric, erect, 
much longer than the leaves, 8-12 in. high, with a terminal, 



single or several-tiered umbel ; pedicels slender, |-1| in. 
long, at first straight, ultimately recurved. Calyx green ; 
tube 3 lin. long, about 1^ lin. wide ; teeth acute or sub- 
acute, about half as long as tube, with ciliate margins. 
Corolla red ; tube cylindric, slightly widened upwards, 
-g— § in. long, 1 ^ lin. wide, with a faintly 5-angled ring at 
the throat, limb -f in. across ; lobes oblong, reflexed, \-\- in. 
long, 1^ lin. wide, always dark purple in dried specimens. 
Stamens with short filaments, dilated towards the base ; 
anthers small. Ovary globose ; style slightly longer than 
the calyx-tube ; stigma depressed capitate. 



Fig. 1, section of calyx, showing pistil; 2, section of corolla, showing 
stamens: — both enlarged. 




83C1. 



"Vincent Brc 



Tab. 8364. 

MECONOPSIS SIMPLICIFOLIA. 

Himalaya. 

Papaveraceae. Tribe Ecpapaveheae. 

MECONOPSIS, Vig. ; Benth. et llook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 52; Prantl & Kiindig 
in Engl. & Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenf. vol. iii. pars 2, p. 141. 



Meconopsis (§ Polycliaetia) simplicifolia, Walp. Pep. vol. i. p. 110 ; Hook. f. 
III. Him. PI. t. 8; Ff. des Serves, vol. xiii. t. 1324; llook.f. et Thorns. Ft. 
Jnd. p. 252 et PI. Brit. Lid. vol. i. p. 118; Prain, Ann. Bot. vol. xx. p. 354; 
species P. quintuplinerviae, Kegel, proxima, petalis coeruleis baud pur- 
pureis semper ultra 4 statim distiucta. 

Ilerba monocarpica, acaulis. Folia radicalia, caespitosa, pilis barbellatis laxe 
hirsuta, ovato-lanceolata, apice acuta vel subobtusa, margine integra vel 
remote dentata, basi sensim in petiolum distinctum attenuate, 1U-20 cm. 
longa, 2-2*5 cm. lata, supra viiidia, subtus pallidiora. Flore* speciosi, 
magni, in scapis simplicibus pilosis 1-floris 30-40 cm. altis singuli, sul>- 
erecti; alabastra nutantia. Sepala 2, oblongo-ovata, 3 cm. longa, extra 
hirsuta. Petala 6-8, spiraliter disposita, ovata, coerulea, 5 cm. longa, 
3 cm. lata. Stamina cc, pluri-seriata, filamentis angustis glabris discretis. 
Ovarium e carpellis 6-8 compositum, parce setosum, cy lindricum, 2 ' 5-3 cm. 
longum ; stylus distinctus, glaber, crassus, 6-7 mm. longus ; stigma 
dei^resso-dilatatum lobis radiautibus divaricatis ; placentae iutrusae; ovula 
plurima. Capsula lineari-clavata, 2 * 5-5 cm. longa, parce setosa ; semina 
reticulata. — Papaver simplici/olium, D. Don, Prodr. Fl. Ncp. p. 196. 
Stylophorum simplici/olium, Spreng. Syst. vol. iv. cur. post. p. 203. — ■ 
D. Peain. ^_^_ 

The handsome Poppywort here figured has long been a 
familiar plant in European alpine gardens. It is a native 
of the high Himalayan Alps at from 12-16,000 feet above 
sea-level and extends along the southern aspect of the 
range from Central Nepal eastward to Bhutan ; it also 
crosses some, at least, of the passes leading northward to 
the Tibetan table-land, and has been found at similar eleva- 
tions in the provinces of Khamba and Phari in South Tibet. 
In the section Polycliaetia, characterised by the barbellate, 
in place of smooth, hairs which constitute the indumentum, 
M. simplicifolia is a member of the group Grandes, all the 
species of which have divaricately radiating stigmatic lobes. 
In two of these, M. integrifolia, Franch., figured at t. 8027, 
and M.punicea, Maxim., figured at t. 8119 of this work, the 
stigma is sessile ; in the remaining species of the group 
there is, as in our plant, a distinct style. Among these 
M. simplicifolia most resembles M. quintuplinerviae Kegel, a 
native of North-western China, which, however, differs in 

March, 1911. 



having but 4 petals, which are purple in colour. In habit 
and general appearance our plant also agrees with M.pseudo- 
integrifolia, Prain, a yellow-flowered Tibetan species ; as 
regards its fruit it agrees with the Himalayan M. grandis, 
Prain. First met with by Wallich in Nepal in 1819, it was 
originally introduced to horticulture by Sir J. D. Hooker, 
from Sikkim, in 1848. It has been repeatedly reintroduced 
since, and the plant used in preparing our illustration 
was raised from seed received in 1908 from the Royal 
Botanic Grarden, Calcutta. The seedlings were kept in a 
cold frame until the spring of 1910, when they were planted 
in a shaded moist position in the Rock Garden, where they 
flowered in May, but failed to produce seeds. Less vigorous 
in habit than some of the other species, M. simplicifolia 
requires greater attention than most, especially when the 
young seedlings, after they have produced two or three 
true leaves, are pricked out into boxes or small pots. So 
far as is known, M. simplicifolia is strictly monocarpic and 
usually flowers in the second year. Occasionally, however, 
at Edinburgh, where the climatic conditions enable this 
species to thrive more satisfactorily than it does further 
south, a few plants, Professor Bayley Balfour informs us, 
defer flowering till their third season. 

Description. — Herb, monocarpic, usually biennial ; stem- 
less. Leaves all radical, tufted, sparingly hirsute, ovate- 
lanceolate, acute or somewhat obtuse, entire or distinctly 
toothed, gradually narrowed downwards into a distinct 
petiole, 4-8 in. long, |-1 in. wide, green above, paler 
beneath. Flowers showy, large ; scapes 1-flowered, hirsute, 
1-1^ ft., in fruit sometimes 2 ft, in height; buds nodding; 
open flowers almost erect. Sepals 2, oblong-ovate, about 

1 in. long, hirsute externally. Petals 6-8, ovate, clear blue, 

2 in. long, about 1 in. wide. Stamens many, several-seriate ; 
filaments narrow, glabrous, free. Ovary composed . of 
6-8 carpels, cylindric, about 1 in. long, sparingly setose ; 
style distinct, glabrous, thick, about \ in. long; stigma 
depressed, enlarged laterally, with radiating divaricate 
lobes ; placentas intruded ; ovules numerous. Capsule 
linear-clavate, 1-2 in. long, sparingly setose ; seeds 
reticulate. 

Fig. 1, stamen; 2, pistil: — ?>o//i enlarged. 



8365 




Tab. 8365. 
CLEMATIS Montana, var. Wilsonii. 

China. 



Eanunculaceae. Tribe Clematideae. 
Clematib, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 3. 



Clematis montana, Buch. ex DC Syst. vol. i. 1818, p. 164, var. Wilsonii, 
Sprague ; affinis var. rubenti, Hort., a qua sepalis angustioribus albis recedit. 

Frutex scandens caule striato puberulo. Folia opposita, trifoliolata ; petioli 
4-10 cm. longi, minute sparse puberuli ; petioluli foliolorum terminalium 
1*5-2 "5 cm. longi, ei foliolorum lateralium duplo vel triplo breviores ; 
foliola ovata, acutissime acuminata, basi subtruncata vel subcordata (ea 
ramulorum floriferorum elliptica utrinque angustata) 4-8 cm. longa, 
2 "5-4 cm. lata, grosse serraia dentibus apiculatis, tenuiter herbacea, supra 
glabra, subtus in nervis puberula; nervi supra impressi, subtus promi- 
nentes. Flores in ramulis abbreviatis foliatis basi perulatis fasciculati. 
PeduncuU uniflori, graciles, 15-20 cm. longi, puberuli. Sepala 4, petaloidea, 
alba, induplicato-valvata, obovato-oblonga, ex apice retuso mucronata, 
2-2 • 5 cm. longa, 1-1 • 2 cm. lata, intus glabra, extra medio glabriuscula, 
utroque latere dense pubescentia. Petala nulla. Stamina numerosa, 
exteriora 1*5 cm. longa, interiora 1 cm. longa; filamenta linearia, glabra; 
antherae lineares -vel oblongo-lineares, 2 - 5-3 mm. longae, lateraliter 
dehiscentes. Pistilla numerosa ; ovarium compressum, glabrum ; stylus 
superne glaber, ceterum sericeo-villosus. — T. A. Sprague. 



Clematis montana, Buch., is a somewhat polymorphic 
species widely spread in the Himalaya and in the mountains 
of Western and Central China. Ten distinct varieties have 
been recognised by Briihl as occurring" in Sikkim, Tibet 
and Yunnan, though some of these depart so markedly 
from typical C. montana that they might perhaps be just 
as well treated as distinct species. The variety which 
forms the subject of our plate is a native of China ; our 
figure has been made from a plant which flowered in July, 
1909, in the Coombe Wood Nursery of Messrs. J. Yeitch 
& Sons, where it is known as the " autumn flowering 
C. montana " ; it was obtained for them in Central China 
by their collector, Mr. E. H. Wilson, whose name it bears. 
It appears to be most nearly allied to a variety of 
C. montana from Hupeh with pink flowers. But in addition 
to having white in place of pink sepals, var. Wilsonii differs 
from the variety rubens of our gardens in having the 
sepals more oblong, with a more sharply marked glabrescent 
March, 1911. 



median band outside, and in having less deeply cut leaflets. 
It is not, however, at all certain that the Chinese var. 
rubens, Hort., is the same as the original var. rubens, 
Kuntze, which is based on a statement by Hooker and 
Thomson that in the Himalaya the flowers of C. montana 
are sometimes pinkish. Like other members of the genus, 
C. montana, var. Wilsonii thrives in a rich loamy soil which 
is all the better if of a calcareous nature. At Kew, where 
no lime is actually present in the soil it is found very 
advantageous to many species of Clematis if slaked lime 
be added. Like the other varieties of C. montana, our 
plant produces its flowers from the nodes of the previous 
season's growth ; it should therefore only be pruned after 
the flowers are past, and the shortening back of the shoots 
during winter, so useful in the case of most species of 
Clematis, must here be avoided. Propagation can be 
readily effected by means of cuttings. The garden value 
of this variety is enhanced by the fact that it flowers at 
least two months later than the typical C. montana and 
about six weeks later than var. rubens. 

Description. — Shrub, climbing; stems striate puberulous. 
Leaves opposite, 3-foliolate ; petioles 1 1-4 in. long, finely 
sparingly puberulous ; stalks of the end leaflet -§— 1 in. long, 
twice or thrice as long as those of the lateral leaflets ; 
leaflets ovate narrowly acuminate, truncate or subcordate, 
those of the flowering shoots elliptic and narrowed to the 
base, l 1 — 3 in. long, 1-1 5 in. wide, wide serrate with 
apiculate teeth ; thin, glabrous above, puberulous on the 
nerves beneath ; nerves sunk above, raised beneath. 
Flowers fascicled on short leafy branchlets clothed with 
bud-scales at the base. Peduncles 1 -flowered, slender, 
0-8 in. long, puberulous. Sepals 4, petaloid, white, 
induplicate-valvate, obovate-oblong, retuse but mucronulate 
at the tip, f-1 in. long, about £ in. wide, glabrous within, 
almost so along a central band outside, but densely pubes- 
cent elsewhere. Petals 0. Stamens many, the outer % in. 
long, the inner under \ in. long; filaments linear, glabrous ; 
anthers linear or narrow oblong, 1-1^ lin. long; dehiscence 
lateral. Carpels many ; ovary compressed, glabrous ; style 
glabrous above, silky hairy elsewhere. 



Fig. 1, stamen ; 2, carpel :—loth enlarged. 



8366 




Tab. 8366. 
CIRRHOPETALUM loxgissimum. 

Slam. 



Obchidackae. Tribe Epidenbreab. 
CmRHOPETALUM, Thou. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant. vol. iii. p. 504. 



Cirrhopetalum longissimum, Ridl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxxii. p. 280 ; 
Oard. Chron. 1909, vol. xlvi. p. 364 ; Bolfe in Orch. Rev. 1909, p. 373; Journ. 
Roy. llort. Soc. n. s. vol. xxxv. Proc. pp. 271, 273, fig. 160 ; a speciebus 
omnibus adhuc notis sepalis lateralibus Jongissjmus facile distinguendum. 

Ilerba epiphytica, repens. L'hizoma crassiusculum; internodi 3-7 cm. longi. 
Pseudobulbi ovoidei, 2*5^1 cm. longi, basi vaginis ovatis membranaceis 
obtecti, monophylli. Folia subse.^silia, oblonga, coriacea, apice recurva et 
subacuta, basi attenuata, 9-15 cm. longa, 2 • 5-4 -5 cm. lata. Scapi arcuati 
vel penduli, circiter 20 cm. longi, vaginis 2-3 acuminatis obtecti. Floret: 
umbellati, 4-7, breviter pedicellati, albiduli, roseo-striati. Bracteue 
oblongo-lanceolatae, acuminatae, 1-1*6 cm. longae. Pedicelli circiter 
1*5 cm. longi. Sepal urn posticum lanceolatum vel oblongo-lanceolatum, 
ciliatum, 1 - 5-l - 8 cm. Iongum, incurvum, concavum, venis rubris 5 per- 
cursum ; sepala lateralia alte connata, linearis, longissime caudata, 20-30 cm. 
longa, rubro-striata ; caudis filiformibus. Petala falcata, oblonga vel 
oblongo-lanceolata, subacuta, ciliata, 8-10 mm. longa. Label lum. recurvum, 
ovato-oblongum, subacutum, caruosum, medio canalicnlatum, circiter 
8 mm. Iongum. Columna oblonga, circiter 8 mm. longa; stelidia falcato- 
incurva, filiformia, acuta; anthera hispidula. — E. A. Bolfe. 



The remarkable Cirrhopetalum which forms the subject 
of our plate is a native of Siam, where it was found, 
near Panga, by Mr. Curtis, with whom it flowered in the 
Botanic Garden at Penang in October, 1893. It was first 
described, some three years later, by Mr. H. N. Hid ley, 
Director of the Singapore Botanic Garden. A plant of the 
species was received at Kew from the Malay Peninsula in 
1894. It would appear to be shy of flowering, for it has not 
yet done so at Kew, though a plant in the collection at the 
Royal Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, did so in July, 1903, 
and another in that of Sir Trevor Lawrence, at Burford, 
flowered in November, 1909. The figure of the inflores- 
cence here depicted was prepared from Sir Trevor 
Lawrence's specimen sent for identification to Kew; that 
of the leaves, pseudobulbs and rhizome has been taken from 

March, 1911. 



the plant in the collection at Kew which agrees in every 
detail with the Burford plant. The species thrives well 
under the conditions suitable for other tropical species of 
the genus ; the circumstances which determine the forma- 
tion of flowering spikes, however, remain obscure. When 
these spikes do form, the plant becomes a striking object, 
owing to the remarkable length of the lateral sepals, which 
in the wild state and in flowers developed in the open air in 
the Malay Peninsula are stated by Mr. Ridley to be upwards 
of a foot in length, and readily distinguish it from every 
hitherto described species. 

Description. — Herb, epiphytic ; rhizome creeping, rather 
stout; internodes 1J-2J in. long; pseudobulbs ovoid, 
1-1^ in. long, clothed at the base with ovate membranous 
sheaths, each bearing a single leaf. Leaves subsessile, 
oblong, leathery, recurved and subacute at the tip, narrowed 
to the base, 3J-6 in. long, 1-1 J in. wide. Scapes curved or 
pendulous, about 8 in. long, beset with 2-3 acuminate 
sheaths. Flowers in umbels of 4-7, shortly pedicelled, 
whitish with rose-coloured streaks, bracts oblong-lanceolate, 
acuminate, 5-7 lin. long, about as long as the pedicels. 
Sepals : posterior lanceolate or oblong. lanceolate, ciliate, 
f-f in. long, incurved, concave, marked with 5 red longi- 
tudinal veins; lateral pair long connate, linear, 8-12 in. 
long, with distinct pink longitudinal streaks, and ending in 
very long slender tails. Petals falcate, oblong or oblong- 
lanceolate, somewhat acute, ciliate, 4-5 lin. long. Lip re- 
curved, ovate-oblong, subacute, fleshy, channelled along the 
centre, about 4 lin. long. Column oblong, about 4 lin. 
long ; stelidia falcately incurved, filiform, acute ; anther 
shortly hispid. 

Fig. 1, a dorsal sepal ; 2, a flower with sepals removed ; 3, column and lip ; 
4, lip : 5, anther-cap ; 6, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



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8367 




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^VincenbBroolra.Day&Son Lt^imp. 



Tab. 8367. 
CLEMATIS aristata, var. Dennisae. 

Australia. 



Kanunculaceae. Tribe Clematideae. 
Clematis, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 3. 



Clematis aristata, B. Br., var. Dermisae, W. B. Guilf. in 7c. ; varietas 
pulchra filamentis salmoneo-rubris distincta. 

Frutex dioicus, scandens, semper virens, caule striato parcissime puberulo. 
Folia opposita, trifoliolata ; petioli 4*5-7 - 5 cm. longi; petioluli 1-3 "5 cm. 
longi; foliola ovato-lanceolata vel lanceolata, acute caudato-acuminata 
acumine recurvo, basi cordata vel truncata, 5-10 em. longa, l - 8-4"5 cm. 
lata, grosse dentato-serrata, glabra, opaca, basi quinquenervia, nervis 
exterioribus patulis, intermediis versus apicem curreutibus juxta medium 
folii cum nervis superioribus lateralibus patulis connexis. Paniculae 
axillares, pluriflorae ; rhachis usque ad 2 cm. longa, breviter dense pilosa ; 
bracteae late subulatae marginibus incurvis, 3 - 5-5 mm. longae ; pedunculi 
decussati, uniflori, densiuscule pilosi, apice bibracteati, 3-10 mm. longi ; 
pedicelli 3 " 5-5 cm. longi, pilosi. Flores masculi : Sepala 4, aestivatione 
valvata, alba, lanceolato-ligularia, apice obtusa, in basin leviter angustata, 
2-2 • 5 cm. longa, 4 "5-7 mm. lata, extra pubescentia, intus glabra. Stamina, 
numerosa ; filamenta salmoneo-rubra, linearia, extima circiter 7 mm. longa, 
intima circiter 2 mm. longa ; antherae oblongae usque lineares, extimae 
2 "5 mm. longae appendice exclusa, intimae 4 mm. longae, connectivo apico 
ultra thecas in appendicem subulatam circiter 1*7 mm. longam producto. 
Budimenta pixtillorum nulla. Flores feminei et achaenia ignoti. — C. Sanderi, 
W. Wats, in Gard. Chron. 1907, vol. xli. p. 310.— T. A. Spbague. 



Clematis aristata, R. Br., to which the form here figured 
is referred, is a native of Australia. The species was 
originally based on specimens from New South Wales, 
but in the Flora Australiensis a somewhat comprehensive 
view was adopted by the late Mr. Bentham, who attributes 
to C. aristata a wide distribution, and assigns to it several 
varieties. It is now, however, generally believed that the 
variety coriacea of that work includes at least the typical 
C. aristata and C. coriacea, DC, that the variety blanda is 
the distinct Tasmanian C. blanda, Hook., and that the 
variety occidentalis is the equally distinct Western Aus- 
tralian C. pubescens, Hueg. Some authorities, on the other 
hand, have treated as distinct certain forms that are usually 
referred to typical C. aristata, and in the case of the subject 

Al'KIL, 1911. 



of our illustration, the plea for separate treatment is un- 
usually strong. The plant here depicted differs markedly 
from true C. aristata in the longer coarsely dentate-serrate 
leaflets, and in this respect agrees more closely with certain 
specimens from New South Wales in the Kew herbarium 
which may be referable to C. coriacea, DC. These New 
South Wales specimens, however, which do not agree with 
typical C. aristata, differ also from our plant, which is a 
native of Victoria, in having considerably longer append- 
ages to the anthers. Specimens of what we believe to be 
the female state of our plant were first collected by the late 
Baron von Mueller on Mount Disappointment and in the 
Delatite valley nearly sixty years ago ; the notes attached 
to these specimens show that von Mueller originally con- 
sidered the plant entitled to specific rank. More than 
half a century was to elapse before the plant attracted in 
Australia the notice that it deserves, for it was not till 
about 1904 that it was introduced to cultivation by Mrs. J. 
Dennis, of Murngal, who had met with it on the Healesville 
ranges in Evelyn. Mr. W. E. Guilfoyle, Director of the 
Melbourne Botanic Gardens, on receiving examples, marked 
his sense of the position of the form and of the merit of its 
discoverer by naming it in her honour. Under this name, 
already familiar in Australian gardens, Mr. Guilfoyle, early 
in 1907, forwarded living examples to Messrs. F. Sander 
& Sons, in whose nursery at St. Albans our plant flowered 
in May, 1907, for the first time in Europe. This introduc- 
tion was noted at the time in the Gardeners' Chronicle ; 
the writer of that note, while unaware of the history of 
the plant, independently formed the opinion at which Baron 
von Mueller had arrived in 1852. Later in the same year 
Messrs. Sander presented a living plant to the Kew col- 
lection. This plant, from which the material for our figure 
has been derived, has thriven well in a sunny greenhouse 
under the conditions suitable for C. indivisa, Willd., figured 
at t. 4398 of this work, which it resembles in habit and in 
being evergreen. It blossoms in May, and the flowers, 
which are fragrant, are striking on account of the salmon- 
red colour of their filaments. This character has not been 
ascribed to any of the forms hitherto referred to C. aristata, 
nor do the specimens of those at our disposal indicate its 
existence. Having regard, however, to the incertitude 



attending negative evidence it appears desirable, until 
further field observation has been made, to follow Mr. 
Gruilfbyle in treating- this striking plant as a well-marked 
variety of C. aristata. 

Description - . — Shrub, dioecious, evergreen, climbing; 
stem striate, sparingly puberulous. Leaves opposite, 3- 
foliolate ; petioles lf-3 in. long; petiolules |-1£ in. long; 
leaflets ovate-lanceolate or lanceolate, sharply caudate- 
acuminate with recurved tips, base cordate or truncate, 
2-4 in. long, f-lf in. wide, coarsely serrately toothed, 
glabrous, dull, 5-nerved from the base, outer nerves 
spreading, intermediate extending towards the leaf tip, 
united from the middle onwards with the upper spreading 
lateral branches of the midrib. Panicles axillary, many- 
flowered ; rachis under 1 in. long, shortly closely hairy ; 
bracts wide subulate with incurved edges, about 2 lin. long ; 
peduncles decussate 1-flowered, densely pilose, 2-bracteolate 
at the tip, 2-5 lin. long ; pedicels 1 £-2 in. long, pilose. 
Male /lowers : Sepals 4, valvate, white, lanceolate-ligulate, 
obtuse, base slightly narrowed, f-1 in. long, 2-4 lin. wide, 
pubescent externally, glabrous within. Stamens many ; 
filaments salmon-red, the outer about \ in. long, three times 
as long as the inner ; anthers oblong to linear, the outer, 
without the appendage, about 1 lin. long, half as long as 
the inner; connective produced beyond the anther cells in 
a subulate tip nearly 1 lin. long. Rudimentary pistil 0. 
Female flowers and fruit unknown. 



Fig. 1, flower-bud ; 2, an outer stamen ; 3, an inner stamen : — all enlarged. 



83b 




itBroateDayA 



Tab 8368. 

PSEUDERANTHEMUM malaccense. 

Malay Peninsula. 



ACANTHACEAE. Tribe JUSTICIEAE. 



Pseuderanthemum, Radlk. ; Lindau in Engl. & Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 
vol. iv. pars iii. B, p. 330. 



Pseuderanthenmm malaccense, Lindau, I.e. : species a P. crenulato, Eadlk. 
(k'ranthemum crenulatum , Wall, ex Lindl.), quacum olim confusa, corollis 
multo longioribus statim distinguenda, caeterum ramis pilis minutis rigidis 
e basi incrassata sursum curvatis subadpressis, floribus sub anthesi sub- 
aequal iter secundum racemi axem distributis, calycibus brevibus pedicellis 
aequilongis vei inferioribus sublongioribus cognoscenda. 

Frutex 1-1-5 m. altus; rami teretes pilis minutis rigidis e basi incrassata 
sursum curvatis subadpressis scabriduli. Folia lanceolata vel elliptico- 
lanceolata, utrinque attenuata vel apice saepius acuminata, 8-12 cm. longa, 
2-5 cm. lata, tenuia, tenuiter scabridula, in costa utrinque minute pilosula, 
nervis lateralibus utrinque circiter 7 obliquis prorsus curvatis ; petiolus 
gracilis, 1-2 cm. longus. Inflorescentia simpliciter ramosa, 1-5 cm. longa, 
interdum basi ramulo (raro pluribus) aucta, omnibus partibus indumento 
ramulorum simili induta, floribus nurnerosis, multis eodem tempore apertis 
primo in verticillos paucifloros approximatos dispo-itis vel oppositia vel 
hincinde sparsis (inferioribus saepe rudimentarius), dispositione sub 
anthesi magis minusve obliterata ita ut ad summam racemum sub- 
aequalem continuum referat; bracteae lanceolatae vol lauceolato-subulatae, 
1-2 mm. longae, patentes; bracteolae bracteis similes nisi pro ratione 
latiores, breviores; pedicelli 1-2 mm. longi, oblique erecti vel e l>asi 
patente adscendentes. Calyx peralte divisus, vix 2 mm. longus, segmentis 
subulatis. Corolla hypocrateriformis; tubus angustus, subrectus, 2*5-3'5 
cm. longus, pallide violaceus, extra parce minute glandulosus; limbus 
pallide violaceus vel albido-violaceus, lobo antico intermedio ruliro- 
punctato, 2 cm. vel paulo ultra diametiens, lobis anticis 3 a posticus 
2 altius connatis divergentibus lafe oblongis, intermedio antico ad (J mm. 
lato, medio pilis consperso. Antherae breviter ellipticae, filament is aequi- 
longae, 1 mm. longae, connectivo minute glanduloso. Ovarium glabrum, 
disco annulari cinctum ; stylus inferne sparse pilosiusculus. Qapsvia 
ignota. — Eranthemum crenulatum, var. an (j u at i folium, Nees in DC. Piodr. 
vol. xi. p. 454. E. malaccense, C. B. Clarke in Hook. f. Fl. Brit, Ind. vol iv. 
p. 498 et in King & Gamble, Mat. Fl Mai. Ben. p. 888 (Jouxn. As. Soo. 
Beng. vol. Ixxiv. pars ii. p. 078) partim. /•>'. graciliflornm, Bedd. in .Journ. 
Boy. llort. Soc. xxxiv. p. 71 quoad syn. E. malaccense; an Noes.— O. Staik. 



The handsome Acanthad which forms the subject of our 

plate baa been figured from a plant wliieli flowered in the 

collection at Kew in May, 1910. This plant, which was 

sent by Mr. H. N. Ridley from the Singapore Botanie 

Apeil, ion. 



Garden in 1908, was accompanied by the remark tihat it is 
the true Eranthemum malaccense, Clarke, a species which 
appears to be confined to the Malayan Peninsula, where it 
extends from Langkawi in Kedah southwards to Johor. 
The plant is, as Mr. Ridley indicates, E. malaccense ; the 
identification is important because, in a valuable annotated 
list of cultivated Acantkaceae by Col. R. H. Beddome, 
published in the Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society 
in 1908, E. malaccense, Clarke, has been treated as identical 
with E. graciliflorum, Nees. Some doubt has arisen as to 
the precise limitation of E. malaccense, and more than one 
species has been included under that name, but, for reasons 
which have been discussed in a recent number of the Kew 
Bulletin (1911, p. 79), and need not be detailed here, 
Dr. Stapf has found himself unable to adopt the view that 
the true E. malaccense, here figured, is undoubtedly refer- 
able to E. graciliflorum. Our plant, however, is not a 
member of the tribe Ruellieae, and therefore is not an 
Eranthemum ; it belongs to the tribe Justicieae, and is a 
member of the genus Pseuderanthemum, the species of 
which, owing to a misapprehension explained at t. 8239 of 
this work, are still at times supposed to be Eranthemums. 
On this account the name given to this species by Dr. 
Lindau must be adopted; another species, P. seticalyx, 
Stapf, from Tropical Africa, has already been figured at 
t. 8244 of this Magazine. P. malaccense grows freely in 
a stove and forms a bush about 3 feet in height. Like 
many tropical Acanthads it is most satisfactorily cultivated 
when raised annually from cuttings, and requires to be 
liberally treated as regards soil and moisture. 

Description.— Shrub ; 3-5 ft. high, branches terete, 
somewhat seabrid with small rigid upcurved somewhat 
adpressed hairs. Leaves lanceolate or elliptic-lanceolate, 
narrowed to base and tip or often acuminate, 3-5 in. long, 
f-2 in. wide, thin, slightly seabrid, finely hairy along the 
midrib above and below, lateral veins about 7 on each side, 
oblique, curving throughout ; petiole slender, -|-f in. long. 
Inflorescence simply branched, ^-2 in. long, sometimes with 
one or more basal branches, scaberulous everywhere like 
the twigs, flowers numerous, many opening together, at 
first in few-flowered whorls or opposite or occasionally 



scattered, the very lowest often rudimentary, at length 
more or less drawn out above in a raceme ; bracts lanceo- 
late or lanceolate-subulate, about 1 lin. long, spreading ; 
bracteoles like the bracts, but rather wider and shorter ; 
pedicels about 1 lin. long, oblique and erect or ascending 
from a spreading base. Calyx deeply divided, barely 1 lin. 
long, lobes subulate. Corolla hypocrateriform ; tube narrow, 
nearly straight, 1-1 £ in. long, pale violet, finely sparingly 
glandular outside ; limb pale violet or violet-white, with 
red specks on mid-lobe of lower lip, about § in. across, lips 
spreading, their lobes wide oblong, the 2 upper more 
distinctly connate than the 3 lower, of which the median is 
| in. wide, sparingly hairy in the centre. Anthers short 
elliptic, as long as their filaments, the connective somewhat 
glandular. Ovary glabrous, surrounded by the annular 
disk ; style faintly hairy below. Capsule unknown. 



Fig. 1, calyx and style ; 2, corolla, laid open; 3 and 4, stamens; 5, ovary 
and disk : — all enlarged. 



8369 




» 






^ !£ 
















t 



Tab. 8360. 
ELAEAGNUS argentea. 

North America. 

* 

Elaeagnaceae. 

ELAEAGNUS, L inn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 204. 



Elaeagnus argentea, Pursh, Fl. Amer. Sept. vol. i. p. 114; Watson, Dcndrol. 
Brit. vol. ii. t. 161 ; Britt. <fc Brown, III. Fl. Northern United St. vol. ii. 
p. 467; affinis E. angustifoliae, Linn., sed foliis petiolis brevioribus, 
pedicellis brevioribus, calycis tubo multo angustiore et baccis minoribus 
argenteis facile distinguenda. 

Frutex ad 4 m. altus, ramosissimus, cortice brunnoo lepidoto. Folia alterna, 
petiolata, lanceolata vel elliptico-lanceolata, acuta vel obtusa, basi cuneata 
vel obtusa, utrinque nitide argenteo-lepidota, lamina 2-6 '5 cm. longa, 
0"7-3 cm. lata, petiolo 3-6 mm. longo. Flores axillares, fasciculati, herma- 
phroditi vel masculi, pedicellis 2-4 mm. longis. Calyx extra argenteo- 
lepidota, intus glabra; tubus 1 cm. longus parte infra constrictionem 
3-3*5 mm. longa elliptica; limbus 4-lobus, luteus, lobis 3-4 mm. lonyis 
2-5-3 mm. latis ovatis acutis. Stamina 4, ad faucem calycis inserta, erecta, 
filamentis vix 1 mm. longis glabris. Ovarium glabrum; stylus in flow 
hermaphrodito elongatus, ad faucem attingens, basi pubescens, in flore 
masculo rudimentarius, brevissimus. Bacca 1/5 cm. longa, 1 cm. crassa, 
ellipsoidea, argenteo-lepidota. — N. E. Bbown. 



The genus Elaeagnus, which includes about twenty-five 
species, mostly natives of South-Eastern Asia, is represented 
in North America by the solitary species here figured, 
which extends from Utah to the Upper Missouri and 
thence eastward to Minnesota and Canada. Two other 
species, both natives of Japan, have already been figured 
in this work; E. multijlora, Thunb., at t. 7341, and E. 
macrophylla, Thunb., at t. 7638. Like the other species of 
the genus, E. argentea is characterised by the close lepidote 
indumentum to which it owes the popular name Silver 
Berry by which it is known in the United States and 
Canada, and among hardy shrubs wljo.se leaves have this 
grey metallic lustre the present plant is perhaps the most 
striking. There are others of the same shade, but they 
mostly are of dull surface, and lack the peculiar metallic 
sheen characteristic of this species. It also flowers freely, 
and its clear yellow blossoms contrast admirably with the 

AraiL, ML 



foliage. E. argentea is occasionally grown and sold in 
nurseries as Skepherdia argentea, but the true S. argentea, 
Nutt., known popularly in the United States as the Buffalo 
Berry, though similarly silvery lepidote, is at once dis- 
tinguished from our plant by its opposite leaves. The 
plantfrom which our figure has been prepared has long 
been in cultivation at Kew, where it forms a desirable shrub 
and is quite hardy. It is readily propagated by means of 
suckers which are freely produced. 

Description— Shrub; reaching a height of 14 ft., freely 
branched ; bark brown, lepidote. Leaves alternate, petioled, 
lanceolate or elliptic-lanceolate, acute or obtuse, base cuneate 
or rounded, lepidote and with a faint metallic sheen above, 
silvery lepidote beneath, f-21 in. long, J-U in. wide; 
petiole 2-3 hn. long. Flowers axillary, fascicled, 2-sexual 
or male only; pedicels 1-2 lin. long. Calyx silvery 
lepidote outside, glabrous within; tube 5 lin. W, 
narrowed below the middle, the lower widened portion 
elliptic, 1J-2 lin. long; limb 4-lobed, yellow, the lobes 
ovate acute about 2 lin. long, 11 li n . wide . Stamens 4, 
inserted in the calyx throat, filaments very short, glabrous. 
Ovary glabrous ; style pubescent at the base, elongated 
and reaching the calyx throat in the 2-sexual flowers; 
ovary in male flowers rudimentary with a minute style. 
Betry 8 lin. long, o lm. across, ellipsoid, silvery lepidote. 

3, a^fma5h^te°L^ i 8 * 10 ^ 1 !?- f ¥ SCaleS 0n both s " rfoces ! 2 > scales ' 



8370 







Tab. 8370. 

FELICIA PETIOLATA. 

South Africa. 

Comfositae. Tribe Asteboldeae. 
Felicia, Cass.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 274. 



Felicia petiolata, N. E. Br. in Kew Bull. 1906, p. 20, in obs. ; Gard. Chron. 
1907, vol. xlii. p. 81, fig. 34 ; affinis F. Cymbalariae, Schlechter (Aster 
Cymbalariae, Ait.) sed foliis alternis et floribus radii multo majoribua 
differt. 

Suffrutex subprocumbens ; rami sabteretes, parce puberuli; ramuli juniores 
stricti, erecti, pilosi. Folia alterna, obovata vel lanceolata, apice obtusa 
vel subacuta, basi cuneata, 1-2-5 cm. longa, 0*5-1 "5 cm. lata, grosse 
strrata, subchartacea, utrinque pilosa, obscure pellucido-punctata, nervis 
lateralibus irconspicuis ; petioli usque ad 5 mm. longi, pilosi. Pedunculi 
soiitavii, terminates, parce foliati, usque ad 7 cm. longi. Jnvolucri bracteae 
oblongo-lanceolatae, acutissimae, 4-5 mm. Iongae, 1* 5-2 mm. latae, extra 
parce pilosae, margine paulo membranaceo. Flores radii rosei, circiter 12 ; 
corollae tubus cylindricus, 3 '5 mm. longus, parce puberulus; limbus 
oblong o-ellipticus, apice bifidus, 1 cm. longus, 3 mm. latus, 5-nervis. 
Achaenia compressa, ambitu oblongo-obovata, 3 mm. longa, 1"5 mm. lata, 
breviter pubiscentia. Pappus uniseriatus, barbellatus, 3 mm. longus. 
Flores disci flavi ; corollae tubus 5 mm. longus, glaber, lobis ovatis obtusis. 
Achaenia subteretia, 2 mm. longa, puberula. Pappus ufc in floribus radii. 
— Aster petiolatus, Harv. Thes. t. 154, et in Harv. et Sond. Fl. Cap. vol. iii. 
p. 80. — J. Hutchinson. 



The pleasing Composite here figured was originally met 
with by Mr. T. Cooper in 1861, in Basutoland and in the 
Albert Division of Cape Colony, where it was found 
hanging over precipitous rocks. It appears never to have 
been collected again until 1003, when Mr. Dieterlin sent 
from Basutoland to the Botanic Garden, Montpeliier, a 
herbarium specimen and some ripe achenes, thus effecting 
its introduction to European gardens. Several species of 
the genus Felicia have already been figured in this work : 
F. tenella, DC, as an Aster, at t. 33 ; F. reflexa, DC, also 
as an Aster, at t. 884 ; and F. echinata, DC., at t. 8049. 
Like the last-mentioned species, F. petiolata is a shrub of 
loose straggling habit, and therefore under cultivation it 
requires to be cut back frequently dining the season of 
April, 1011. 



growth. Its nearest ally in the genus appears to he 
F. Cymbalariae, Schlechter (Aster Cymbalariae, Ait.), but 
it is readily distinguished, among other characters, by the 
alternate leaves and the much larger ray-florets. The 
plant has to be grown under greenhouse conditions and its 
cultivation is unattended by difficulty. In the Kew col- 
lection it flowers about midsummer ; the plant from which 
our figure has been prepared flowered early in June, 1910, 
in the collection of Mr. W. E. Ledger, Wimbledon, by 
whom it was sent for identification. 

Description. — Undershrub ; branches more or less 
prostrate, rounded, sparingly puberulous ; young twigs 
strict, erect, hairy. Leaves alternate, obovate or lanceolate, 
obtuse or somewhat pointed, cuneate at the base, £— 1 in. 
long, J-| in. wide, coarsely toothed, rather papery, hairy 
and faintly gland-dotted on both sides, lateral nerves 
indistinct ; petiole \ in. long or less. Peduncles solitary, 
terminal, sparingly leafy, sometimes 3 in. long. Bracts of 
the involucre oblong-lanceolate, very acute, 2 lin. long, 
1 lin. wide, sparingly hairy externally, margin somewhat 
membranous. Hay-florets about 12, rose-coloured ; corolla- 
tube cylindric, under 2 lin. long, sparingly puberulous ; limb 
oblong-elliptic, with bifid tip, 5 lin. long, lj lin. wide, 
5-nerved. Fruit compound, oblong-obovate, 1^ lin. long, 
| lin. wide, shortly pubescent; pappus-hairs 1-seriate, bar- 
bellate, 1 \ lin. long. Disk-florets yellow ; corolla-tube 
2 J lin. long, glabrous ; lobes ovate, obtuse. Fruit subterete, 
1 lin. long, puberulous ; pappus-hairs as in fruits of the ray. 



Fig. 1, bract of the involucre; 2, ray-floret; 3, disk-floret; 4, pappus-Lair; 
5, anthers; 0, style-arms: — all enlarged. 



6311 




M.S.deLJ.N.ritchhth. 



,/&SurvLi5-iitT 



LReeve&C; 



Tab. 8371. 
DENDROBIUM muricatum, var. muxjficum. 

New Caledonia. 



Orchid aceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 
Dkndrobium, Swartz; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498. 



Dendrobium muricatum, Finet, var. muniflcum, Finet in Bull. Soc. Bo f . 
France, vol. 1. (1903), p. 378, t. 14, fig. 7-18; Rolfe, in Orch. Rev. 1909, 
p. 347; a typo labello spathulato, lobis lateralibus quadratis, isthmo 
cnneato-oblongo, lobo medio ovato-orbiculari crenulato-undalato concavo 
differt. 

Ilerba epiphytica. Rhizoma validum, radices murieatas emittens. Pseudobulbi 
ovoideo-oblongi, 4-7 cm. longi, 2-3 cm. lati, vaginis membranaceis striatis 
imbricatis demum deciduis vel ad filamenta hispida reductis obtecti, cica- 
tricibus 5-7-annulati, apice mono- vel diphylli. Folia elliptico-oblonga, 
coriacea, apice recurva et subacuta, basi in petiolum brevem attenuata, 
8-22 cm. longa, 3-7 cm. lata. Scapi subterminales, arcuati, 20-40 cm. longi ; 
basi vaginis pancis brevibus obteeti ; racemi nxultiflori ; bracteae triangu- 
lares, acutae, 2 mm. longae; pedicelli 1*5 cm. longi. Sepala patentia, 
oblonga, apiculata, circiter 2 cm. longa, viridia, brunneo-maculata. Petala 
patentia, oblonga, subobtusa, circiter 2 cm. longa, viridia, minute brunneo- 
punctata. Labellum articulatum, submobile, trilobum, fere 2 cm. longum; 
lobi laterales erecti, quadrati, truncati, subconcavi, 3 mm. longi, virides, 
margine purpureo-striati ; isthmus cuneato-oblongus, 8 mm. longus, 
rubro-purpureus; lobus medius ovato-orbicularis, concavus, 8-10 mm. 
latus, margine crenulato-undulatus, aureus ; discus props basin biauricu- 
latus. Columna lata, 4 mm. longa. Mentum subobsoletum. — R. A. Rolfe. 



The very remarkable Dendrobium which forms the subject 
of this plate is a native of New Caledonia first described by 
Mr. Finet in 1903. In reviewing its position in the genus 
Mr. Finet has suggested that it may belong to the section 
Dendrocoryne and be an ally of D. speciosum, Smith, figured 
at t. 3074 of this work. The difficulties in the way of 
accepting this suggestion are considerable, and Mr. Rolfe, 
who points out that the vegetative organs, as shown in the 
plant here figured, have probably not yet reached their full 
development, is inclined to treat it rather as an aberrant 
member of the section Sarcopodium. The form regarded as 
typical D. muricatum differs markedly from the variety here 
depicted in the shape of the lip, especially in the widely 
hastate-cordate anterior lobe. The muricate roots character- 
istic of the species are remarkable and recall those of 
D. mutabile, Lindl. The plant from which our figure has 
been prepared flowered in the Royal Botanic Garden, 

April, 1911. 



Glasnevin, in August, 1909. Mr. Moore, to whom we are 
indebted for the material, informs us that this plant, con- 
sisting then of two fair-sized pseudobulbs, was presented by 
Dr. R. Schlechter to the Irish national collection in 
September, 1906, and was stated to have come direct from 
New Caledonia. In 1907 it made but weak growth, in 
1908 a slightly stronger growth, and in 1909 a vigorous 
fresh growth, about two-thirds the size of the imported 
pseudobulb, was perfected and produced the inflorescence 
shown in our figure. The hard, firm nature of the pseudo- 
bulbs and the thick coriaceous leaves indicate that it is a 
light-loving species. At Glasnevin, Mr. Moore has grown 
it in a pan suspended near the glass in the intermediate 
orchid-house where it gets abundant light and a fair supply 
of air. In this position, potted in a mixture of Osmunda 
fibre and fibrous peat, with some broken crocks and a little 
fresh sphagnum worked through, the plant thrives well. 

Description. — Herb ; epiphytic ; rootstock stout, giving 
out muricate roots. Pseudobulbs ovoid-oblong, 1§-2J in. 
long, about 1 in. thick, clothed with membranous striate 
imbricate sheaths which ultimately are reduced to hispid 
shreds or disappear, leaving the pseudobulb marked by 
5-7 annular scars. Leaves 1-2, terminal, elliptic-oblong, 
leathery, recurved and somewhat pointed at the tip, 
narrowed downwards into a short petiole, 3-9 in. long, 
1^-2^ in. wide. Scapes almost terminal, curved, 8-16 in. 
long, clothed below with a few short sheaths ; racemes 
many -flowered ; bracts triangular, acute, 1 lin. long ; 
pedicels § in. long. Sepals spreading, oblong*, apiculate, 
about | in. long, greenish and with brown blotches. Petals 
spreading, oblong, rather blunt, as long as the sepals, 
greenish with smaller brown spots. Lip jointed, slightly 
mobile, 3-lobed, nearly as long as the petals ; lateral lobes 
erect, quadrate, truncate, somewhat concave, 1J lin. long, 
greenish with a purple streaked margin ; isthmus cuneate- 
oblong, \ in. long, reddish-purple ; central lobe ovate-orbi- 
cular, concave, 4-5 lin. long, margin crenulate-undulate, 
yellow ; the disk 2-auricled near the base. Column broad, 
2 lin. long, with hardly any mentum. 



Fig. 1, lip; 2 and 3, column ; 4, anther cap; 5, pollinia: — all enlarged. 



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„ 8368.— PSEUDERANTHEMLM MALACCENSE, Malay Peninsula. 
„ 8369.— ELAEAGNUS ARGEXTEA, North America. 
„ 8370.— FELICIA PETIOLATA, South Africa. 

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Tab. 8372. 

RHODODENDRON lacteum. 

Western China. 



Ericaceae. Tribe Khodoreae. 
IvHododendhon, Linn.; Be nth. et Jlook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 59'J. 



Rhododendron (Eurhododendron) lacteum, Franch. in Bull. Soc. Bot. France, 
vol. xxxiii. (1886), p. 231 ; llemsl. in Journ. Linn. 8oc. vol. xxvi. p. 26 ; 
species ex affinitate B. Falconeri, Hook, f., a quo differt foliis minoribus 
basi baud cordatis haud subtus conspicue grosse reticulatis, tloribns 
majoribus et staminibus longioribus subexsertis ; etiam fobs iis 
B. Wiyhtii, Hook, f., simillimis sed floribus omnino diversis. 

Arbor gregaria (Delavay), ramis floriferis crassis rigidis primum tomentosis. 
Folia in apicibus rainorura conl'erta, petiolata, coriaeea, rigida ; lamina 
oblongo-lanceolata. 15-20 cm. longa, 6-8 cm. lata, apice rotundnta cum 
mucronulo, basi rotundata vel subcuneata, supra glabra, subtus den>issime 
ferrugineo-tomentosa, costa crassa subtus e'evata, venis primariis utrinque 
circiter 15 subtus sat conspicuis; petiolus crassissimus 2-3 cm. longus. 
Corymbi densi, subsesssiles, multiflori, 14-18 cm. diametro; bracteae 
(exteriores non visae) obovato-oblongae, 2-3 cm. longae, rotundatae, 
pubesceutes ; pedicelli tomentosi, 2 ■ 5-3 "5 cm. longi. Flare* albi, iutus 
in parte superiore tubi sanguinei, 6-7 cm. diametro, ad peclicellum oblique 
afflxum. (Jalyx brevifsimus, obscure lobatus. Corolla late campanulata, 
saepius 8-lobata, lobis brevibus rotundatis emar^inatis la+e imbiicatia 
recurvis. Stamina plerumque 16, decliuata, inaequalia, longiora corollara 
aequantia, filamenta filiformia, infra medium puberala; antlierae brunneo- 
purpureae. Ovarium oblongum, fere 1 cm. longurn, densissime furfuraceo- 
tomentosum, 8-loculare, luculis multiovulatis ; stylus glabcr, stamina 
paullo superans. Capsula non visa. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



Tlie handsome Rhododendron here figured is one of a 
number of species raised in the Jardin des Plantes from 
seeds sent to Paris by tlie late Abbe Delavay. A set of 
these plants was presented to Kew in 1888, and the first 
to flower was JR. scabrifulium, Franch., figured at t. 7159 
of this work in 1891, followed by R. racernosum, Franch., 
figured at t. 7301 in 1893, and by R. irroratum, Franch., 
given at t. 7361 in 1894. These three are comparatively 
small shrubs which mature early, and it was not till 1904 
that another member of the set, R. Delavayi, Franch., 
similar in habit to the well-known R. arboreum, Sm., 

Mat, 1911. 



flowered for the first time in the garden of tlie late 
Mr. Acton, at Kilmacurragh, Wicklow ; it was figured in 
1907 at t. 8137 of this work. The species here described 
has postponed flowering for even a longer period, for it was 
not till 1908 that it first blossomed in the garden of 
Mr. P. L. de Vilmorin, at Verrieres-le-Buisson. It has now to 
be recorded as having flowered in this country in the garden 
of Mr. F. D. Grodman, at South Lodge, Horsham, where a 
collection of Rhododendrons has been, for many years, 
cultivated with exceptional skill and success. From this 
plant, a large and hardy bush, which blossomed for the 
first time in April, 1910, was obtained the material from 
which our illustration has been prepared. It may be men- 
tioned that there is an equally fine example of R. lacteum at 
Kilmacurragh, of the same age as the South Lodge plant, 
but that there is as yet no record of its having flowered. 
In this feature of not flowering until it is about 20 years 
old R. lacteum resembles its nearest ally, R. Fakoneri, 
Hook, f., figured at t, 4924 of this Magazine, and there is 
every indication that it may grow to as large a size as 
R. Falconeri and R. grande, Wight, attain in the warmer 
parts of Britain, and that it may prove fully as hardy as 
these species. It should be noted that another species of 
Rhododendron, from Borneo, first described in 1894, has 
been given the same name. For this latter plant, R. lacteum, 
Stapf, in Trans. Linn. Soc. Bot. ser. 2, vol. iv. p. 197, t. 15, 
Mr. Hemsley proposes to substitute the name R. Stapjianum, 
Hemsl. 

Description'. — Tree, gregarious, flowering shoots stout, 
firm, at first hairy. Leaves clustered at the ends of the 
shoots, petioled, coriaceous, firm ; blade oblong-lanceolate, 
6-8 in. long, 2£-3 in. wide, rounded and mucronulate at 
the apex, base rounded or somewhat cuneate, glabrous 
above, densely rusty-tomentose beneath, midrib stout, raised 
beneath, main veins about 15 on each side, fairly conspicuous; 
petiole very stout, about 1 in. long. Corymbs dense, sub- 
sessile, many-flowered, 6-7 in. across ; bracts (the outer not 
seen) obovate-oblong, about 1 in. long, rounded, pubescent; 
pedicels tomentose, 1-1J in. long. Flowers white, with a 
blood-red patch in the upper portion of the tube within, 
2-2| in. wide, obliquely attached to the pedicel. Calyx very 



short, obscurely lobed. Corolla wide campanulate, usually 
8-lobed ; lobes short, rounded, emarginate, distinctly imbri- 
cate, recurved. Stamens generally 16, declinate, unequal, 
the longest as long as the corolla tube; filaments filiform, 
pnberulous below the middle ; anthers purplish-brown. 
Ovary oblong, about § in. long, densely scurfy-tomentose, 
8-celled ; cells many-ovuled ; style glabrous, rather longer 
than the stamens. Capsule unknown. 



Fig. 1, bracts; 2, upper portion of pedicel, calyx and pistil ; 3, hairs; 4 and •>, 
uncus; C>, cross-section of ovary : — all enlarged. 



stamens 



8373 




L.Reeve & CLoiuLcm. 



Tab. 8373. 

DEINANTHE caerulea. 

China. 

Saxifp.agaceae. Tribe Hydrangeae. 
Deinanthe, Maxim. ; Engl. & Prantl, Natiirl. Pflanzenf. vol. iii. pars ii. A, p. 74. 



Deinanthe caerulea, Stapf: species ab altera generis hujus, D. bifida, 
Maxim., foliis supra pilis simplicibus uniformibus adpres^e strigosis, infra 
praeter costani hinc in le pilis perpaucis eonspersam glabris, inflorescentia 
nee umbellatim congesta nee involucrata, floribus amoeue caeruleis, 
capsulae parte supera alte conica distiucta. 

Ilerba perennis, circiter 30-50 cm. alta. Phizoma crassum, horizontal, 
nodosum, copiose fimbrilligerum. Caulis solitariu*, e rhizotnate terrni- 
nalis ima basi et intervallis 5-10 cm. remotis squamis oppositis vel sub- 
opp >sitis seariosis late oblongis obtuss 5-10 mm. longis emarcescentibus 
instructus, glaber vel raro superne parce pilosulus. tvlia plerunique 4 in 
apiee caulis congesta, raro paulo dissita, opposita, magnitudine valde 
variabilia, petiolata; lamina ovata vel late elliptica apice saltern foliis 
majoribus saepe 2-fida lobis latis acutis vel acuminatis, basi rotundata 
vel cuneata, circumcirca grosse acute serrata, 10-25 cm. longa lobis si 
obviis circiter 5 cm. longis, 6-16 cm. lata, tenuia, supra laxe adpresse 
strigosa, pilis simplicibus, infra glabra nisi hinc inde pi lis perpaucis costae 
insidcntibus, nervis obliquis utrinque 7-9, venis transversis laxis; petiolus 
J - 5-10 cm. longus, glaber. Panicula terminalis, pt.dunculo 5-15 cm. longo 
suffulta, glabra, raiuis plerumque 3-1 nisi imis duobus approxi'natis 
dssitis, bractea foliacea lanceolata serrata ad 2' 5 cm. longa suffultis, 
2*5-6 cm. longis glahris c.vmas 3-1-floras gerentibus. Flares stertles per- 
pauci, pedit-ello gracili ad 3 cm. longo suffulti, 3-4-sepala, sepalis caerule- 
seentibus rotundatis demum ad 14 mm. diametro persistentibus. Flores 
fertiles nutantes, speciosi, pedictllo validiore ad 1*5 cm. longo suffidti. 
JReceptaculum late breviter turbinatum, glabium. tiepa/a 5, ovato-rotun- 
data, obtusa, 4-5 mm. alta, matuia persistentia et paulo aucta, glabra, 
cum receptaculo caerulescentia vel rubescentia. Petala 6-8, rotundata, 
conciva, 10 14 mm. diametro, amoene caerulea. Stamina numerosissima 
tilameutis caeruleis antheris caerulescentibus. Slyli in culummtm 5-6 aim. 
longam connata; stigmata brevia, conniventia. Capsula nutans, parte 
infera subglobosa ad 5 mm. alta et columna stylari coronata. — D. bifida, 
Oliver in Hook. Ic. PL t. Ifc84; nee Maxim.— O. Stapf. 



The genus Deinanthe was based by Maximowicz in 1867 
on a plant which grows in shady woods in Southern Japan. 
It has been figured in the Somoku Zusetz under the name 
Chiin bai so, and according to Franchet and Savatier may 
occasionally be met with in Japanese gardens. The Japanese 
species D. bifida, Maxim, does not extend beyond Japan, 
but the genus is represented in China by another winch us 

May, Ian. 



here figured. This Chinese species, when first sent to 
Europe by Mr. A. Henry, who discovered it at Hingshan in 
Hupeh, was identified from his specimens with the Japanese 
plant. They are indeed closely allied, but now that Hying 
plants are known it is evident that they are very distinct. 
The introduction of D. caerulea to cultivation we owe to 
Mr. E. H. Wilson, who rediscovered the plant at Nant'o in 
Hupeh, where it grows in wet places on cliffs, when collect- 
ing on behalf of Professor Sargent of the Arnold Arboretum. 
From some of the seeds then obtained plants were raised by 
Mr. H. J. Elvves in his garden at Colesborne, Cheltenham, 
where the species flowered for the first time in this country 
in August, 1009. One of the Colesborne plants, presented 
by Mr. Elwes to Mr. Dimsdale, of Ravenshill, Lechlade, 
flowered there in May, 1910, and provided the material 
from which our figure has been made. Material from 
another and much more robust plant, which flowered at 
Colesborne in August, 19 L0, was subsequently communicated 
by Mr. Elwes, who informs us the plant evidently prefers a 
very shady and moist situation, specimens put out under a 
north wall growing much more vigorously than those kept 
in pots. At Colesborne it has all the appearance of being 
a hardy plant. Mr. Elwes has directed our attention to the 
fashion in which the corolla separates from the receptacle 
when the flower is only two or three days old. In a note 
on the specimens obtained by him at Nant'o Mr. Wilson 
states that the flowers are white to purple ; apparently only 
blue flowers have as yet been produced in cultivated plants. 
In the Japanese D. bifida, the petals appear always to be 
creamy-white or pure white with yellow stamens. 

Description.— Herb, perennial, 1-1 1 ft. high. Rootstock 
stout, horizontal, nodose, with many fibrous roots. Stem 
solitary, rising from the tip of the rootstock, with opposite 
or nearly opposite pairs of scarious, oblong, blunt bracts, 
I in. long, at the base and at the nodes. Leaves generally 4, 
clustered at the top of the stem ; blade ovate or wide 
elliptic, 2-fid at the tip, at least in the larger leaves, 
rounded or cuneate at the base, coarsely, sharply toothed, 
4-10 in. long, 2|-G in. wide, the lobes when present about 
'1 in. long, membranous, sparingly adpressed strigose above 
with simple hairs, beneath glabrous except for a few hairs 



on the midrib ; nerves 7-!) on each side, oblique; petiole 
f-4 in. long, glabrous. Panicle terminal, with a glabrous 
peduncle 2— b' in. long, nnd usually 3-4 glabrous branches, 
the two lower approximate, the others scattered, l-2j in. 
long, each in the axil of a leafy bract 1 in. long, and each 
supporting a 3-1-flowered cyme. Sterile flowers very few, 
on slender pedicels over 1 in. long, with 3-4 bluish rounded 
persistent sepals, ultimately over *■ in. wide. Fertile flowers 
showy, nodding, on stouter pedicels f- in. long. Receptacle 
shortly wide turbinate, glabrous. Sepals 5, ovate-rotund, 
obtuse, 2-3 lin. long, persistent and slightly enlarged when 
mature, glabrous and bluish or reddish like the receptacle. 
I\tals 6—8, bright blue, rounded, concave, 5-7 lin. wide. 
Stamens very many, with blue filaments and bluish anthers. 
Styles- united in a column 2^-3 lin. long ; stigmas short, 
connivent. Capsule nodding, subglobose below, 2^ lin. 
long, tipped by the columnar style. 

Figs. 1 ;;, stamens ; 1, stigmas ; ~>, section of ovary : — all enlarged. 



8374 










Tab. 8374. 
ONCIDIUM Sanderae. 

Peru. 

Okchidaceae. Tribe Vandeae. 
Oncidium, Sivartz; Benth. et F/ook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 562. 



Oncidium Sanderae, Bolfe in Gard. Chron. 1910, vol. xlviii. p. 67; Orch. Rev. 
1910, pp. 248, 351; affinis 0. Papilioni, Lindl., >ed petalis labelloque 
magnopere crispo-undulatis et columnae alis glandnloso-pectinatis differt. 

Herha; epiplvytica. Pseudobulbi ovato-oblongi, subcomprcssi, 4-6 cm. longi, 
3-4 cm. lati, monophylli. Folia subsessilia, coriacea, oblonga, subobtusa, 
brunneo-reticulata, 30-45 cm. longa, 5-8 cm. lata. Scapi suberecti vet 
arcuati, circiter 80 cm. longi, prope apicem subeompress-i, pauciflori ; 
bracteae oblongo-lanceolatae, acuminatae, 2 cm. longa" ; pedicel li 4-5 cm. 
longi. Flores specio'i, heteroclironici. Sepalum posticum lineari-lanceo- 
latnm vel subspatlvulatum, acutum, circiter 8 cm. longum, rufo-brunneum ; 
serala la^eralia oblonga, acuta, criepo-undnlata, flava, brunneo-maculata, 
6-7 cm. longa, 2 cm. lata. Peta'a lineari-lanceola'a vel subspathulata, 
acuta, rnfo-brunuea, circiter 7 cm. loiga. Labef/um tril'>bmn; lobi laterales 
rotundati, cr.spo undulati, flavi, brunneo-maculati, 1 cm. lati ; lobus inter- 
medins unguiculatus, orbicularis, crispo-undulatns, circiter 3*5 cm. longus 
et latus; crista 5-loba, laevv?. Cohimna 1 cm. longa, clava'a, alis latis 
longe glanduloso-pectinatis. — E. A. Eol*e. 



The remarkble Oncidium which forms the subject of our 
plate is a very interesting addition to the small group of 
species known as Butterfly Orchids hitherto believed to 
consist of but two species, viz. : — 0. Papilio, Lindl., figured 
at t. 2705 of this work, which is a native of Trinidad and the 
adjacent coast of Venezuela, and 0. Kramerianum, Reich, f., 
which occurs in Colombia and Ecuador. This new member 
of the section is a native of Peru, where it was obtained m 
the Moyobamba district by Mr. Forget, when collecting 
on behalf of Messrs. F. Sander & Sons, by whom it was 
imported in 1909. It flowered in the firm's nursery at 
St. Albans in August, 1910, and from their plant was 
received the material on which our figure is based. The 
three species of which this group is composed bear a close 
resemblance to each other in habit and in the handsome 
marbling of their leaves. It is interesting to note that, 
although geographically more remote from 0. Papilio than 
from O. Kramerianum, it is to 0. Papilio that 0. Sanderae 
is most closely allied, the upper portion of the inflorescence 

May, 1911. 



being somewhat flattened; U. Kramerianum is readily 
distinguished from Loth by its nodose inflorescence. 
0. Sanderae is, however, "readily distinguished _ from 
0. Papilio by the much crisped lateral petals and lip, by 
the lighter coloration of the flowers, and by the numerous 
glandular appendages on the wings of the column. There 
is every indication that under cultivation 0. Sanderae will 
thrive under the conditions as to heat, light and moisture 
that are suitable for its two near allies. 

Description. — Herb ; epiphytic. Pseudobulbs ovate- 
oblong, slightly compressed, 1 J — 2J in. long, l^-lj in. wide, 
monophyllous. Leaves subsessile, coriaceous, oblong, some- 
what obtuse, marbled with brown, 1—1^ ft. long, 2-3 in. 
wide. Scapes suberect or arcuate, about 2^ ft. long, some- 
what flattened towards the apex, few-flowered ; bracts 
oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, | it), long; pedicels lf-2 in. 
long. Mowers showy, opening one at a time. Sepah : 
upper linear-lanceolate or somewhat spathul&te, acute, 
reddish-brown, about 3 in. long ; lateral oblong, acute, 
crisped and wavy, yellow, spotted with brown, 2|-2f in. 
long, 1| in. wide. Petals linear-lanceolate or somewhat 
spathulate, acute, reddish-brown, about 2| in. long. Lip 
.">-lobed ; lateral lobes rounded, crisped and wavy, yellow, 
spotted with brown, 5 lin. wide ; mid-lobe clawed, orbicular, 
crisped and wavy, about 1-J in. long and broad; crest 
5-lobed, smooth. Column, 5~lin. long, wings broad, dis- 
tinctly glandular pectinate. 



Fig. 1, column and base of lip; 2, anther-cap; 3, pollinarium ; 4, sketch of 
an entire plant :— 1-3 enlaryed, 4 much reduced. ' 



8376 







Tab. 8375. 
LONICERA Henryi. 

China 

Cai'Rifoliaceae. Tribe Lonicereae. 
Loniceba, Linn.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant vol. ii. p. 5. 



Lonicera Henryi, Hemsl. in Joum. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. (1888). p. 359; Rehder 
in Rep. Missouri B«t. Gard. vol. xiv. (1903) p. 148; affinis L. Giraldii, 
Rebder, e qua foliis haud pilosis facile distinguenda. 

Frutex scandens; ramuli floriferi graciles, primo densius fnlvo-pubescentes, 
dcmum fere glabri, cortice rubro-brunneo obte^ti. Folia oblongo-Ianceo- 
lata, apice acute acuminata, basi rotundata, truncata vel leviter eordata, 

4 5-7 cm. longa, 1-3-2 cm. lata, cbartacea, utrinque nisi secus costam 
glabra, margine ciliata, nervis lateralibus utrinque 8-10 intra roarginem 
arcuatis pagina superiore leviter impressis inferiore prominulis, nervis 
trangversis utrinque conspicuis. Flores sessiles, peiiunculis bifloris 
6-1-5 cm. longis ad apices ramulorum dispositi ; brack ae subulatae, 
7 mm. longae, setulosae; bracteolae parvae, ovato-ob'ongae, setuloso- 
ciliatae. Recentacula inter se libera, circiter 4 mm. alta, glabra. Calycis 
lobi lanceolati, obtusiusculi, fere 2 mm. longi, parce setuIoFO-ciliati. 
Corollae bilabiatae tubus circiter 1-3 cm. longus, extra glaber, intus 
pilosus; labium inferius e lobo singulo oblongo obtuso 15 cm. lonpo 

05 cm. Into, supcn'us e lobis 4 oblongis obtusis lateralibus basi margine 
interiore auriculatis constatum. Stamina brevissime exserta ; tilamenta 
parce pilosa; antherae oblonpae, versatiles, 4 mm. longae. Stylus stami- 
nibus subaequialtus, parce pilosus, stigmate p'lrvo capitate. — Caprifolium 
Ihnryi, O. Kuntze in Rev. Gen. PL vol. i. p. 274. — W. O. Craib. 



The handsome Honeysuckle which forms tlie subject of 
our plate was introduced to cultivation by Mr. B. II. Wilson. 
who obtained it, when collecting on behalf of the Arnold 
Arboretum, in the province of Hupeb, where it had pre- 
viously been met with bv Mr. A. Henry, whose specimens 
formed the basis of its original description. It is. however, 
now known to occur also in the provinces of Szechnan and 
Yunnan. The species belongs to the section Nintooa, 
another species of which, L. Giraldii, Render, lias already 
been figured at t. S23b' of this work. But though nearly 
allied and members of the same natural group, these Two 
are readily distinguished, because the leaves of />. Henryi 
are glabrous except on the midrib, whereas those of 
L. Giraldii are pilose on both surfaces. />. Henryi has 
been in cultivation in this country at Kew, and in some 
May, 1911. 



other collections, for rather less than three years, and the 
first plant to flower in England is one at Nuneham in the 
garden of the Right Hon. L. Harcourt, to whom we are 
indebted for the material on which our illustration is based. 
A free-growing climber which promises to be hardy, 
L. Henryi is very easily propagated by means of cuttings 
made of half-ripened shoots taken about the end of July 
and placed in gentle bottom heat. The fact that the species 
is evergreen gives it a particular value in gardens, for in 
spite of the quite extraordinary number of hardy woody 
plants that have been introduced during the last decade, 
true evergreen climbers, as distinguished from the bushy 
shrubs made to do duty as such on garden walls, form still 
but a small group. This is largely due to the fact that 
evergreen climbers represent a type of vegetation more 
characteristic of tropical and subtropical than of the cool 
temperate zones ; any accession to their numbers which is 
likely to thrive in our climate is therefore welcome. 

Description. — Shrub ; climbing ; twigs slender, at first 
densely tawny-pubescent, at length almost glabrous ; bark 
reddish-brown. Leaves oblong-lanceolate, acutely acu mi- 
mate, base rounded, truncate or slightly cordate, 1|-2| in. 
long, ^-| in. wide, papery, glabrous on both surfaces except 
on the midrib, margin ciliate, lateral nerves 8-10 on each 
side, curved within the margin, impressed above, raised 
beneath, transverse veins visible on both surfaces. Flowers 
sessile, on 2-flowered peduncles £-^ in. long towards the ends 
of the branches ; bracts subulate, over £ in. long, se.tulose ; 
bracteoles small, ovate-oblong, setulose ciliate. Receptacles 
free, glabrous, about 2 lin. long. Calyx lobes lanceolate, 
somewhat obtuse, about 1 lin. long, sparingly setulose 
ciliate. Corolla 2-labiate, tube about ^ in. long, glabrous 
without, pilose within ; lower lip of one oblong obtuse 
lobe § in. long, under | in. wide, upper lip of 4 oblong- 
obtuse lobes auriculate at the base on their inner margins. 
Stamens slightly exserted ; filaments sparsely pilose; anthers 
oblong, versatile, 2 lin. long. Style about as long as the 
stamens, sparingly pilose; stigma small, capitate. 



Fig. 1, a pair of flowers; 2 and 3, anthers; i, upper portion of style, and 
stigma : — w.l enlarged. 



8376 




JCS.dfl 



T Da«n> t. HOT. J. . 



Tab. 8376. 

VILLARESIA m ucronata. 

Chile. 

ICACINACEAE. 
Villaresia, Ruiz et Pav. ; Benth. et J/ook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 353. 



Villaresia nmcronata, Ruiz et Pav. Fl. Per. vol. iii. p. 9, t. 231; Gay, Fl. 
(Ml. vol. ii. p. 13: Miers, Contrib. But. vol. ii. p. 115, t. 67; Engl, in Mart. 
Fl. Bras. vol. xii. pars 2, p. 58; Beiche, FL Chi!, vol. ii. p. 4 ; arbor habitu 
Ilicis Aquifohi, Linn., a qua foliis exstipulatis, subtus m axillis nervorum 
lateraliurn fovtolatis necnon floribus distinguitur. 

Arbor ; ad 12 in. usque alta. Ramuli angulati, pubescentes, demum glabre- 
scoutes. Folia alterna, breviter petiolata, ovato-oblonga vel elliptico- 
oblonga, spinuloso-apiculata, basi obtusa vel rotundata, 5-8 cm. longa, 
2 • 5^-4 • 5 cm. lata, integra ; ea arborum juvenium et surculorum majora, 
basi rotundata vel subcordata, margine undulata, valde spinuloso-dentata ; 
coriacea, leviter convexa, supra nitida, subtus pallidiora, opaca, nervis 
prominentibus, foveolis pluribus singulis in axillis nervorum; petioli 
4-7 mm. longi. _ Thyrsi terminates et in axillis foliorum superiorum singuli, 
2 -o-o cm. long i, breviter pilosi, ramis patulis apice flores plures sessiles 
gerentibus. Flores pentameri. Sepaia suberccta, imbricata, late elliptica 
vel suborbicularia, rotundata, 15-2 mm. longa, sub-equilata, sparse 
ciliata, extra inferne pilosa. Petala cum filamentis interne leviter connata, 
flavido-alba, elliptico-oblonga, apice rotundata, 6 mm. longa, 3 mm. lata, 
nervo medio intus valde incrassato prominente. Filamenta crasse subulata, 
2-3 mm. longa ; antherae late ellipticae, circiter 1 ■ 3 mm. longae, lateraliter 
deliiscentes. Ovarium abortu 1-loculare, ovoideum, circiter l - 5 mm. 
jongum; stylus rectus, circiter 1 mm. longus; stigma obliquum, irregu- 
lariter lobatum ; ovula 2, collateral, pendula. Brupa ovoidea, 10-16 mm. 
longa, 8-19 mm. diametro (ex Reiche).— V. pungent, Miers, Contrib. Bot. 
vol. ii. p. 116, t. 68. Citronella mucronatu, D. Don in Edinb. New Phil. 
Journ. vol. xiii. Oct. 1832, p. 213.— T. A. Sirague. 



The commemorative name Villaresia was originally 
bestowed by Ruiz and Pavon on a Peruvian plant collected 
at rillao ; a description of this genus was given by them in 
1794 (Fl. Per. et Chil. Prodr. p. 35), and an account of 
V. emarginata, the species on which it was based, was 
supplied in 1798 (Syst. Veg. Fl. Per. et Chil. p. G4). The 
specimens of this Peruvian plant would appear to have been 
lost ; possibly, as D. Don has suggested, in the shipwreck of 
the San Pedro de Alcantara. But from the descriptions 
which exist we learn that V. emarginata had a sessile 
stigma, an oblong acuminate 2-valved, 1 -seeded capsule, and 

May, 1911. 



an oblong tetragonal seed surrounded by a fleshy 2-lobed 
arillus. It has hitherto proved impossible to identify V. 
emarginata with any Peruvian plant collected since it was 
described, but it is obvious that it is a member of a genus 
very different from that to which the plant with a distinct 
style and a drupaceous fruit here figured belongs. 

Specimens of our plant, V. mucronata, collected at Con- 
cepcion in Chile, were made the basis of a second and different 
Villaresia by the same authors in 1802 (Fl. Per. et Chit. 
vol. iii. p. 8), and although D. Don in 1832, realizing the 
situation, proposed to substitute for the Chilian Villaresia 
the name Citronella, his suggestion has not been adopted, 
subsequent authors preferring to apply the name proposed 
by Ruiz and Pavon to the Chilian V. mucronata and its 
allies. The material on which the figure of V. mucronata 
here given has been based was derived from a fine example 
in the garden of the Right Hon. the Earl of Ilchester at 
Abbotsbury, where it forms a tree between 50 and 60 ft. 
high, of pyramidal habit, but somewhat drawn up by other 
trees. It may be remarked that Miers stated that this 
species, which is the 'Naranjillo' of Aconcagua, had been 
described in the Viceroy's report to His Majesty the King 
of Spain as from 50 to 60 ft. high, but that lie (Miers) had 
never seen or heard of its attaining any approach to that 
size. The species is only hardy in the south-west of England 
and in other parts of the United Kingdom with a similar 
climate. The upper portion of the tree has leaves which 
are devoid of spines, but on young trees and on suckers 
from old trees the leaves are' spinescent- toothed, and the 
plant described as V. pungens by Miers is only this state of 
V. mucronata. The only mode of increase in this country 
is by means of cuttings, but these, unfortunately, do not root 
readily. The tree at Abbotsbury was introduced to the 
collection there about 1840 by the Hon. W. Fox-Strangways 
— whose name is commemorated in the genus Stranvaesia, 
one of the most ardent horticulturists of his day. 

Description.-- Tree ; usually 40 ft. or less, rarely 50-60 ft. 
in height; twigs angular, at first pubescent, ultimately 
nearly glabrous. Leaves alternate, short petioled, ovate- or 
elliptic-oblong, in old trees with a spinulous tip and an 
obtuse or rounded base, 2~o in. long, 1-1 1 in. wide, entire ; 



in young specimens and on suckers from the base larger, 
with a rounded or subcordate base and an undulate promi- 
nently spinulous-toothed margin ; leathery, slightly convex, 
dark green, shining above, paler and dull beneath, nerves 
raised beneath, often with solitary pits at their angles ; 
petiole 1^-2| in. long. Flowers 5-merous, in solitary 
shortly pubescent thyrses, terminal or in the upper axils, 
1-2 in. long ; their branches spreading, with several sessile 
flowers at their tips. Sepals suberect, imbricate, wide 
elliptic or nearly orbicular, 1 lin. long or less, sparingly 
ciliate and pilose outside near the base. Petals yellowish- 
white, elliptic-oblong, rounded at the tip, 3 lin. long, 
ij lin. wide, the midrib thickened and prominent on the 
inner face. Filaments rather stout subulate, shortly adnate 
below to the petals, 1-1± lin. long; anthers wide elliptic, 
opening laterally. Ovary by abortion 1-celled, ovoid, 
under i lin. long; style, straight, ^ lin. long; stigma 
oblique, irregularly lobed ; ovules 2, collateral, pendulous. 
Drupe ovoid, 5-8 lin. long, 4-9 lin. wide. 



Fit*. I, portion of a leaf, nn lersmfaee, showing pits; 2, flower; 3, calyx and 
pistil, l and 5, stamens; 6, vertical section of ovary; 7, transverse section of 
ovary :— all enlarged. 



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7th r 







8377 



L Reeve &.C London. 



Tab. 8377. 
CATTLEYA Rkx. 

Peru. 



Ouchidaceae. Tribe Epidendueab. 
Cattleya, Liudl. ; Benth. tt Ilook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 531. 



Cattleya Rex, O'Brien in Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. viii. p. 634; 1891, vol. is. 
pp. 272, 273, fig. 61; Lindenia, t. 2ii5; Rev. Hort. 1891, p. 228, cum ic; 
Jivirhenbachia, ser. 2, vol. ii. p. 55, t. 72; Cogn. Diet. Ic. Orch., Cat. t. 22; 
affinis C. ma-imae, Liudl., sed tepalis petaiisque eburneis et labello colore 
valide differt. 

Herba epiphytica. Pseadobufbi fusiformi-clavati, subeompressi, 15-30 era. longi, 
monophylli. Folia oblonga, subobtusa, coriacea, 20-25 cm. longa, 5-6 cm. 
lata. Spatha lineari-oblonga, obtusa, 8-12 cm. longa. Bacemi 12-20 cm. 
longi, 3-6- H ori ; bracteae triangulari-ovatae, acutae, 6-8 mm. longae. 
Pedirelli 6-7 cm. longi. Flores magni, ppeciosi. Sepala patentia, oblongo- 
lanceolata, suhacuta, 7-8 cm. longa, apice recurva, eburnoa. Betala sub- 
patentia, elliptica vel rhomboideo-elliptica, obtusa, undulata, 7-8 cm. 
longa, eburnea, sepa'a triplo latiora. Labellum integrum, late oblongiun, 
7-8 cm. longum ; lobi laterales columnam involventes, flavi ; lohus inter- 
medins expan-us, orbicularis, valde crispo-undulatns, roseus, basi sanguineo- 
venosus, marline pallido ; discus flavus purpnreo-striatus. Colnmna 
clavata, arcuata, 3-3 -5 cm. longa. Pulliuiu 4, compressa, appendicibus 
linearibus reflexis. — R. A. Bolee. 



This handsome Cattleya was originally discovered by 
Mr. Bungeroth on the western slopes of the Peruvian Andes, 
and was introduced to cultivation by Mr. L. Linden, 
L'Horticulture Internationale, Brussels, in which estab- 
lishment it flowered for the first time in 1890; in the Kevv 
collection it flowered for the first time in 1893. The plants 
of this earliest importation did not as a rule survive many 
years, and the species had become very rare in cultivation 
when Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, a year ago 
succeeded in obtaining a fresh consignment of plants from 
Mayobambo, in the Upper Amazon region. One of these 
plants, purchased for the Kew collection, flowered in a 
tropical house in July, 1910, and afforded the material from 
which our plate has been prepared. The species may be 
regarded as most nearly allied to C. maxima, Lindl. ; it 
June, 1911. 



differs, however, in having ivory-white in place of light 
purple sepals and petals, and in the different shape and 
markings of the lip, which has also yellow side-lobes. It is 
said that sometimes as many as nine or ten flowers may be 
counted on the old racemes of newly imported plants. 
Experience indicates that tropical conditions are most 
suitable for this Catthya, the healthiest examples being 
those grown along with C. aurea and C. Laivrenciana in a 
warm moist house where they receive a fair amount of 
sunshine in summer. 

Description. — Herb ; epiphytic ; pseudobulbs fusiform- 
clavate, somewhat compressed, 6-12 in. long, monophyllous. 
Leaves oblong, rather blunt, coriaceous, 8-10 in. long, 2-2^ 
in. wide. Spathe linear-oblong, obtuse, 3-5 in. long. 
Bacemes 6-8 in. long, usually 3-6-flowered ; bracts tri- 
angular-ovate, acute, J— ^ in. long; pedicels 2-3 in. long. 
Flowers large, showy. Sepals spreading, oblong-lanceolate, 
subacute, about 3 in. long, recurved at the tip, ivory-white. 
Petals somewhat spreading, elliptic or rhomboid-elliptic, 
obtuse, margin wavy, about 3 in. long, thrice as wide as 
the sepals, ivory-white. Lip entire, wide oblong, about 
3 in. long ; lateral lobes yellow, enveloping the column ; 
mid-lobe flattened, orbicular, markedly wavy and crispate, 
rose-coloured with dark-red veining at the base and a paler 
margin ; disk yellow streaked with purple. Column cla- 
vate, curved, 1|-1J in. long. Pollinia 4, compressed, with 
linear reflexed appendages. 



Fig. 1, column ; 2, anther-cap and pollinia; 3, pollinia; 4, a single pollen- 
mass; 5, sketch of an entire plant :— 1-4 enlarged, 5 much reduced. 



837,1 




:>oks,Day&.Sc 



Tab. 8378. 
COLUMNEA gloriosa. 

Costa Rica. 

Gesneeiaceae. Tribe Cyetandbbae. 
Columnea, Linn.; Btnth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 100 ( J. 



Columnea gloriosa, Spragw ; affinis C. microcalyci, Hanst., a qua caule patule 
birsuto, corolla superne latissima recedit. 

Jferba epipbytica, perennis. CauUs in planta culta penduli, plus minusvo 
anisophylli, pilis pluricellularibus patule densiuscule hirsuti. folia opjx)sita, 
breviter petiolata, ovata vel ovato-oblonga, apice obtusa, basi rotund tta, 
plus minusve inaequilateralia, 2-3 5 cm. louga, 1-1 '7 cm. lata, valdo 
convexa marginibus reflexis, supra dense hirsuta nervis impressis, subtus 
in nervis valde prominentibus hirsuta ceterum inconspicue puberula; 
nervi laterales obliqui, utrinque 3-4; petioli 2-3 mm. longi. Fiona 
axillares, solitarii, erecti. Pedunculus 2-2*5 cm. longus. Sepala 5, 
inferne leviter connata, in statu explanato 1*5 cm. longa, 07 cm. latu, 
ungue latissimo ascendente, lamina patente late ovata marginibus valde 
reflexis, supra pilis articulatis rubef-centibus dense villosa subtus sparsim 
bievius villosa. Corolla coccinea lutea, in toto 6'5-8 cm. longa, extra 
breviter sparsiuscule villosa; tubus basi postice vakle gibbosus gibbere 
supra applatiaio, supra gibberem leviter constrictus, abhinc usque ad os 
leviter ampliatus, antice luteus in toto circiter 2 '8 cm. longus; limbus 
valde bilabiatus, postice leviter aicuatus sursum valde ampliatus ; lobus 
anticus porrectus, oblongo-lanceolatus, circiter 35 cm. longus, 1 cm. latus; 
lobi laterales in toto circitcr 3 5 cm. lonci, circiter 3 cm. cum galea 
connata ; galea conspicue emarginata lobis rodundatis. Stamina 4 ; fila- 
menta glabra, antice in vaginam medio 7 "5 mm. longam lateribus 
5-5 5 mm. lonpam corollae tubo in medio 25 mm. adnatam connata; 
antherae in quadram connatae. Disci gland u la unica, postica, leviter 
emarginata, cum annulo angusto basia ovarii atnplectcnte connata. 
Ovarium appresse villosum ; placentae bilamellatae, introrsura ovulifcrac; 
stylus superne pilis longiusculis articulatis aliis brevioribus glanduloso- 
capitatis interudxtis villoso-pubescens, inferne sparse pulwrulus. — 
T. A. Speague. 



The Columnea which forms the subject of our illustration 
is perhaps the most handsome of the species yet introduced to 
cultivation. The plant from which the material for our figure 
has been obtained was purchased for the Kew collection in 
1909 from Messrs. Haage & Schmidt, of Erfurt, who are 
well known on account of the large number of uncommon 
and interesting plants which they cultivate. A native of 
Costa Rica, C. gloriosa belongs to the section Eucolumnea, 
June, VJ1L 



marked by the strongly 2-lipped corolla with the lateral 
lobes more or less adnate to the hood and by the solitary 
posticous disk-gland. Our plant may be readily distinguished 
from the other species in cultivation by its spreading calyx 
and its convex, hairy, reddish leaves with much reflexed 
margins ; the sepals resemble miniature leaves. It also 
differs in its prostrate habit and in the exceptional size and 
brightness of its flowers. Seven other Coluinneas of the 
same section have already found a place in this work. 
The finest of these is C. magnifies, Kl. & Hanst., a native 
of Central America, figured in t. 8225. Allied to C. mag- 
nified are three West Indian species: C. rotundifolia, Salisb., 
figured as " C. scandens" in t. 1(514; the true C. scandens, 
Linn., t, 5118; and C. hirsuta, Sw., t. 3081. A pretty 
little plant with small ovate or ovate-oblong glabrous 
leaves is C. Oerstediana, KL, from Costa Rica, figured in 
t. 8344 ; and C. Schiedeana, Schlecht, from Mexico, given 
in t. 4045, is remarkable for the colour of its flowers, the 
calyx being brick-red. and the corolla yellow with red spots. 
Lastly C. crassifolia, Hook., also Mexican, figured in t. 4330, 
is striking on account of its long, suberect, linear-lanceolate 
leaves. A comparison of the figures to which reference 
has been made will show that some of the best diagnostic 
characters are afforded by the shape and indumentum of 
the leaves and by the nature of the calyx. At Kew C. 
gloriosa is cultivated in a basket suspended from the roof; 
the long pendent shoots, which retain their leaves through- 
out the year, produce flowers freely during the summer. 
The plant requires tropical conditions with abundant 
moisture and shade from bright sunshine. 

Description. — Herb ; epiphytic, perennial. Stems 
prostrate or, under cultivation, pendent; rather densely 
clothed_ somewhat spreading hairs. Leaves opposite, those 
ot a pair somewhat unequal, shortly stalked, ovate or ovate- 
oblong, obtuse, base rounded and slightly unequal, f-li i»- 
lon g, h~i in. wide, very convex with reflexed margins, 
densely hairy above with the nerves sunk, beneath the 
nerves raised and hairy, elsewhere faintly puberulous ; 
lateral nerves 3-4 on each side, oblique; petiole about 
1 hn. long. Flowers axillary, solitary, erect, on peduncles 
$-1 m long. Sepals 5, faintly connate at the base, spreading, 



wide ovate, with reflexed edges, densely clothed nhove, more 
sparingly beneath with reddish hairs, about | in. long, 
| in. wide, with a broad ascending claw. Corolla scarlet 
and yellow, 2|-3 in. long, sparingly villous outside with 
si tort hairs ; tube a little over 1 in. long, very gibbous at 
the base behind, somewhat constricted above the swelling, 
thereafter widening slightly to the mouth, yellow in front; 
limb markedly 2-lipped, slightly curved forward and much 
widened upward, anterior lobe straight, oblong-lanceolate, 
about 1^ in. long, over } f in. wide, lateral lobes about 1^ in. 
long, over 1 in. wide, connate with the hood ; hood distinctly 
ernarginate with rounded lobes. Stamens 4 ; filaments 
glabrous, united in front in a sheath 3-4 lin. long, which is 
partially adnate to the corolla tube ; anthers united at their 
tips. Disk composed of a solitary, posticous slightly 
ernarginate gland continuous with a narrow ring surround- 
ing the base of the ovary. Ovary adpressed hairy ; 
placentas 2-lamellate, introrsely ovuliferous ; style villous 
above with long, jointed hairs mixed with shorter glandular 
tipped ones, below sparingly puberulous. 



Fig:. 1, a single sepal; 2, base of corolla, seen in section and showing 
stann'nal attachment ; 3 and 4, anthers ; 5, ovary and posticous disk-gland ; 
6, stigma : — all enlarged. 



8379 




M-S.daL.J.rcFrtdiljth. 



2 1 

^entBrooks,Da.y&.SariI#rnp 



Tab. 8379. 
PR08TANTHERA pclohella. 

Australia. 

Labiatak. Tribe Pbostantbkbeae. 
ProsTANTBERa, LabiU.; Benth. et Ilook.f. Gen, Plant, vol. ii. p. 1217. 



Prostanthera pulchella, Slam ; species distincta, foliis linearibus Yel lineari- 
lanceolatis obtusis vel rotundatis, floribus in racemos laxos dispositis, 
calyce post anthesin aperto, corolla sudrotata inconspicue bilabiata, lobis 
superis lobos inferos fere aequantibus, antheris inappendiculatis. 

Suffrutex gracilis, floribundus, circiter 4 dm. altus, ramuHs patentibus parce 
minuteque adpres^e puberulis. Folia subse^silia, linearia vel Iineari- 
lanceolata, 1-2 cm. longa, 1-5-2 mm. lata, obtusa vel rotundata, integra, 
fere glaberrima, parce glanduloso-punctata, siccitate plus minusve revoluta. 
Flares in racemos laxos erectos paulum strictos 5-8 cm. longos 10-18-noio* 
dispositi ; bracteae foliis similes vel minores, pedicellos aequantes vel leviter 
superantes; pedicelli 2-5 mm. longi, adpresse griseo-puberuli, apicem 
versus bibracteolati. Calyx circiter 5 mm. longus, extra parce minuteque 
puberulus et glandulis sessilibus paucis instructus, intra superne sat dense 
puberulus, post anthesin apertus; labia integra vel emarginata, labio 
supero 2 - 5 mm. longo 3 mm. lato quam labium inferum paulum breviore. 
Corolla subrotata, inconspicue bilabiata, lilacina, basi tubi alba, fauce 
punctis numerosis atropurpureis no'ata; tubus 3-5 mm. longus, basi 
angustus, fauce fere aequaliter ampliatus; limbns 1*5 cm. latus; labium 
superum 2-lobatum, paulum arcuatum, 5-d nun. longum, 9 mm. latum, 
lolds obovatis 4 mm. longis 4-5 mm. latis leviter imbricatis crenulatis; 
labium inferum patens, 6 mm. longum, lobis oblongis vel ellipticis 5 mm. 
longis 3-4 mm. latis crenulatis. Stamina longiora corollae medium vix 
superantia; antberae puberulae inappendiculatae. Nuculae obovoidcac, 
glabrae, foveolatae.— S. A. Skan. 



The interesting plant here figured was presented to Kew 
by Mr. T. A. Dorrien Smith of Tresco Abbey, Isles of Scilly, 
in 1908, under the name Prostanthera phylicifolia. Its 
introduction to English gardens we owe to Captain A. A. 
Dorrien Smith, who informs us that, so far as he can recollect, 
he obtained it from Messrs. Naian, nurserymen of Christ- 
church, New Zealand. That the plant is a Prostanthera 
will be very evident if our illustration be compared with 
the figure of P. dentkulata, R. Br., given in t. 7934 of this 
work. Yet in spite of the general similarity of these two 
plants it will be noticed that they differ very markedly, for 
P. dentkulata has setose leaves and is quite unlike our 
plant as regards calyx, corolla and anthers. Two other 

J INK, 1{)11. 



species which agree with our plant in habit and in having 
narrow leaves are P. linearis, R. Br., and P. empetrifolia, 
Sieb., the latter figured in t. 3405 of this work under the 
name Chilodia scutellarioides ; both of these, however, have 
a distinctly two-lipped corolla, the upper lip being much 
the shorter, and are therefore very different from the 
species here figured. With the true P. phylicifolia, F. 
Muell., for which our plant is apparently mistaken in New 
Zealand, it has little in common, for P. phylicifolia is much 
more woody, its leaves are broader, shorter and conspicu- 
ously re volute, its corolla is altogether different, and its 
anthers are appendaged. The genus Prostanthera, which 
includes over fifty species, is restricted to Australia, the 
eastern portion of the continent being the home of the 
majority. Many of these species were formerly cultivated 
in this country as greenhouse plants together with other 
showy Australian species. Now they are hardly known 
outside the limits of botanical collections. But the one 
here figured, now introduced by way of New Zealand, is 
not one of these, nor indeed is it one that has ever been 
previously described. In Baron von Mueller's Second 
Census of Australian Plants, where forty-four species are 
enumerated, twenty-eight are recorded from New South 
Wales, eighteen from Victoria, thirteen each from Queens- 
land and South Australia, seven from Western Australia 
and three from Tasmania; several of the species are 
common to two or more of these states. We have so far 
failed to ascertain from which of these subordinate areas 
P. pulchella may have found its way to New Zealand, 
while it is almost as difficult to suggest where it should be 
placed within the genus to which it belongs. In the Flora 
Australiensis the species are disposed in two sections. In 
one of these, Euprosfanthera, the corolla tube is short and 
wide, the upper lip is short, very broad and erect, the lower 
lip is much longer and spreading, while the lips of the 
calyx are usually closed over the fruit. In the other, 
Klanderia, the corolla tube is incurved and dilated upwards, 
the upper lip is erect and concave and is as long as or 
longer than the spreading lower lip, while in fruit the lips of 
the calyx usually remain open. A third section, Depresme- 
nilia, has been added in the Natiirlichen Pflanzenfamilien ; 
the most salient feature of this is that the calvx is shortly 



5-toothed. P. pulchella, in which the calyx has two 
entire or emarginate lips, cannot be referred to the last 
section. If it must be placed in one or other of the 
remaining- sections it is to Euprostanthera rather than to 
Klanderia that it should be referred, but it does not by any 
means satisfactorily accord with the characters exhibited 
by the other species of the section. In the gardens of 
Tresco Abbey P. pulchella forms a shrub which thrives 
well in the open and flowers freely in April. At Kew it 
is cultivated in the Temperate House, where it grows 
satisfactorily when planted in sandy peat and given the 
treatment suitable for species of Boronia and other Austra- 
lian genera. 

Description. — Uhdershrub; about l£ ft. high, of graceful 
habit and freely flowering ,• twigs spreading, sparingly 
finely adpressed puberulous. Leaves subsessile, linear or 
linear-lanceolate, £— ^ in. long, 1 lin. wide, obtuse or rounded, 
entire, almost glabrous, sparingly gland-dotted. Flowers in 
lax erect rather strict 10-18-flowered racemes, 2-3 in. long; 
bracts like the leaves but smaller, as long as or rather 
longer than the 1-2 lin. long pedicels which are adpressed 
grey-puberulous and 2-bracteolate at the tip. Calyx about 
2\ lin. long, sparingly finely puberulous and glandular out- 
side, densely puberulous near the top within, lips entire or 
emarginate, the upper rather shorter than the lower, remain- 
ing open after flowering. Corolla subrotate, faintly 2-lipped, 
lilac, the tube white at the base, the throat with dark purple 
dots ; tube about 2 lin. long, narrow at the base ; limb 
8 lin. wide ; upper lip 2-lobed, slightly arched, 2|-3 lin. 
long, 4| lin. wide, lobes obovate, 2 lin. long and about as 
wide, faintly imbricate and crenulate ; lower lip spreading, 
3 lin. long, lobes oblong or elliptic, 2^ lin. long, about 2 lin. 
wide, crenulate. Stamens didynamous, the larger pair 
barely reaching the middle of the corolla ; anthers puberu- 
lous and without appendages. Outlets obovoid, glabrous, 
fo veolate. 



Fig. 1, a pair of leaves; 2, bracts, bracteoles, calyx and pistil; 3, corolla, 
laid open ; 4 and 5, anthers ; 6, ovary : — all enlarged. 



8380 




■ rtchiei 



.Reeve &C^, OJl d c 



Tab. 8380. 
PTERONIA incana. 

South Africa. 

Compositab. Tribe Asteroideae. 
Pteronia, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 259. 



Pteronia incana, DC. Prod. vol. V. p. 358; Flarv. in TJarv. et Sond. Fl. Cap. 
vol. iii. p. 100; affinis P. glaucae, Thunb., sed foliis planis, involucri 
bractcis anguste lanceolatis subacutis marginibus hyalinis differt. 

Frutex ramosissimus, 1-1 • 3 m. altus ; rami graciles, elongati, leviter angulati 
vel subteretes, glabrescentes ; ramuli cinereo-lanati. Folia opposita, 
lincaria vel oblanceolato-linearia, basin versus angustata, obtusa vel sub- 
acuta, # 5-2 cm. longa, 1-3 mm. lata, plana, cinereo-lanata. Capituhi 
numerosa, circiter 8-flora, obconioa, circiter 2 cm. longa et lata, flava. 
Involucri bracteae 4-5 seriatae, atiguste lanceolatae vel lineari-lanceolatae, 
subacutae, 2*5-8 longae, 1-1 ■ 75 mm. latae, margine hyalinae, glabrae. 
Corollae tubus 7-8 mm. longus, apice 1'75 mm. diametro, ad basin leviter 
angustatus, glaber; lobi 6, lanceolati, subacuti, 3 - 5 mm. longi, 1 mm. lati, 
glabri. Autherae 4 mm. longae. Stylus teres, 1 cm. longus, glaber, 
profunde bilobus, lobis 3 mm. longis apice triangulare stigmatosis, 
Achaenia inferne longe villosa, anguste oblongo-ellipsoidea, 3 mm. longa, 
l"5mm. diametro. Jleceptaculum brevitersetosum. Pappi setae numerosae, 
8 mm. longae, barbellatae. — P. xantholepis, DC. I.e. Eupatorium cinereum, 
Linn. f. Suppl. p. 354.— J. Hutchinson. 



The genus Pteronia, to which the subject of our illustra- 
tion belongs, includes upwards of sixty species of small dry 
or glutinous South African shrubs. The species here figured, 
P. incana, has a wide range within the area occupied by 
the genus, and extends from Lesser Namaqualand in the 
north-west to the Albany district in the south-east. Its 
nearest ally is P. glauca, Thunb., from which our plant is 
readily distinguished by its flat and usually longer leaves 
and by its narrower glabrous involucral bracts which have 
hyaline margins. This, the first species of the genus to be 
figured in this work, for the plant figured at t. 1697 as 
P. pauciftora is a Helipterwn, is a favourite in Riviera 
gardens, where it flowers freely from March till May and 
forms a bush some three feet high, which is attractive alike 
for its wealth of blossom and its remarkably sweet peach- 
•Ju.ne, 1911. 



like odour. The material from which our figure has been 
prepared came from the garden of Lady Han bury at 
La Mortola, Ventimiglia, to which the species was first, 
introduced by the late Mr. D. Hanbury in June, 1872. At 
Kew the plant thrives well under the conditions suitable for 
South African heaths, but it does not flower at all freely, 
probably owing to the absence of sufficient sunshine during 
the winter months. 

Description. — Shrub, 3-4 ft. high, much branched ; 
branches long and slender, slightly angular or nearly 
cylindric, almost glabrous ; twigs grey pubescent. Leaves 
opposite, linear or oblanceolate-linear, narrowed towards 
the base, obtuse or subacute, £-§ in. long, about 1 lin. wide, 
flat, grey pubescent. Heads numerous, about 8-flowered, 
obconic, about f in. long and broad, yellow. Bracts of the 
involucre 4-5-seriate, narrow lanceolate or linear-lanceolate, 
somewhat acute, 1J-4 lin. long, under 1 lin. wide, glabrous 
and with hyaline margins. Corolla tube about 4 lin. long, 
mouth under 1 lin wide, slightly narrowed at the base, 
glabrous ; lobes 6, lanceolate, subacute, about 2 lin. long, 
^ lin. wide, glabrous. Anthers 2 lin. long. Style terete, 
5 lin. long, glabrous, deeply 2-lobed ; lobes 1 \ lin. long, 
with triangular stigmatic tips. Fruit narrowly oblong- 
ellipsoid, 1^ lin. long ? under 1 lin. wide, villous with long 
hairs below. Receptacle shortly setose. Pappus of numerous 
barbellate setae, * in. long. 



Fig. 1, leaf; 2, involucral bracts; 3, flower-head; 4, flower; 5, setae of the 
pappus; 6, anthers; 7, style-arms —all enlarged. 



8381 




IS.del J.NPn 



;,Day 



&Son 






Tab. 8381. 

SAUSSUREA Veitchiana. 

Central China. 

Compositak. Tribe Cynaboideae. 
SAUSSUBEA, DC. ; Benth. et hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 471. 



Saussurea Veitchiana, Drummond et Hutchinson in Kew Bull. 1911, p. 190; 
!-p<.c;es e £>rege S. bracteae, Decne, a S. ob-allata, Wall., et a specielms ;ili s 
atnplius bracteatis capitulis latins cnrymbosis demnm longe pedunculatis, 
a S. um'Jlora, Wall., j>appo conspicue 2-seriato, a S. Sch%iltzi>, Hook, f., 
margine foliorum argute denticulato ncccras-so crenato-. c erratodif*noscitur; 
a 8. iodoxteyia, Hance, cujus maxime affinis, propter folia superiora basi 
dilatata necnon phyllaria acutiora satis distincta. 

Verba erecta, 40^i5 cm. alta, plnricaulis caulibus sulcatis superne fl >ccosis. 
Folia radicalia mimcrosa, breve jxitiolabi, anguste oblongo-lanceolata, 
caulina sj)arsa, sessilia, basi subinflata; semiamplexicaulia ima va^inantia, 
omnia acuta, margine undulata leniter denticulata, nitide virescentia, 
costa crassa pallidiore vel in supi*emis purpurascente, supra fere glabrata, 
subtus laxe pilosa, majora circiter 20 cm. longa, fere 4 cm. lata, summum 
caulem versus sensim diminuentia deniqne in biacteas membranaceas 
ovato-lanceolatas apice argute ac^minatas plus minusve cymbi formes pur- 
purascentes abeuntia. Uapitula 2-10, plus minusve araneosa fere ovoidea, 
2'5 cm. longa, parte ventricosa circiter 1'2 cm. lata, flosculos 20-30 atro- 
purpnreos includentia, peduncidis superne incrassatis fistulosis corymbosira 
depositis suffulta. Becerdaculuni circiter 5 mm. latum, finibrillis snb- 
pellucidis mumtum. Phylluria imbricata, exteriora ovato-lanceolata 10mm. 
louga, 4 mm. lata, laxe pilosa, extra nigrescentia, interiora longiora magin 
acuminata. Corvllae tubus 8 mm. longns, tenuis t-ed su| erne subito campa- 
nulatus, limbus 5-partitus segmentis linearibus basi snbsaceati*. Antheruc 
basi caudato-lanatae, nit>r< scentes. Cyj&elae obtuse quadrangnlares, 
subglabrae ; pappus 2-i-eriatus, setis exterioribus paucis scabris, in- 
teriorihus duplo longioribus plurimis plumosis demum fuscetcentibus. — 

J. It. DltUMMOND. 



The Composite genus Saussurea, including some seventy 
species, is characteristic of the mountainous and temperate 
regions of the northern hemisphere. The striking plant 
here figured belongs to a well-defined group of species 
characterised by the flower-heads being more or less 
enclosed in the inflated, bladderlike, membranous, veined 
bracts or uppermost leaves, which differ in coloration as 
well as in texture from the leaves proper. This group 
has its headquarters in the Alpine regions of India and 
China, and the species now figured is one of the many 
interesting plants from the Chinese portion of this area for 
whose introduction horticulture is indebted to Mr. E. II. 
Wilson when collecting on behalf of Messrs. J. Yeitch & 
Sons. The seeds of this species were obtained at Fang in 
June, 1911. 



Central China and readied Messrs. Veitcli towards the end 
of 1901. Plants were raised in 1902, and from one of these, 
presented by Messrs. Veitch to the Royal Botanic Garden, 
Glasnevin, in December, 1904, came the material from which 
our plate has been prepared. Planted in a good border 
and protected by a wall facing south-east, S. Veitchiana, 
Mr. Moore informs us, has proved perfectly hardy at Glas- 
nevin. The soil which has been found suitable is a light 
loam, fairly deep and well-manured. The plant, to which the 
dark flowers impart a very remarkable appearance, flowered 
for the first time in 1909 and again more strongly in 1910. 
As Mr. Drummond points out, the species though nearly 
related to the others which constitute the ' bracteate 
group is nevertheless readily distinguishable from most of 
them. Its closest ally is the as yet little-known S. iodostegia, 
so named on account of its violet-tinted floral leaves, 
described by the late Dr. Hance from specimens collected 
on Siao Wu-tai-shan by Mr. Hancock so long ago as 1876. 

Description.— Herb, 2-3 ft. high, witb about 2-5 leafy 
scapes from a tufted crown ; flowering stems erect, rigid, 
floccose upward, grooved, leafy. Leaves green above with 
a pale stout midrib, loosely hairy beneath, those lowest 
down about 10 in. long, 2 in. wide just below the middle, 
oblong-linear, acute, sheathing ; upper ovate-lanceolate, 
semiamplexicaul, gradually smaller upwards, with expanded, 
subinflated, rounded subauriculate bases and finely denticu- 
late undulate margins, passing just below the inflorescence 
into thin, acuminate, blush-coloured to purplish bracts. 
Jime^nearly ovoid, over 1 in. long and about § in. wide at 
the thickest part ; peduncles hollow and enlarged below the 
heads, receptacle beset with fine semi-transparent hair-like 
processes. Florets about * in. long; tube narrow, slender 
below, suddenly wide campanuiate above, limb 4-lobed, 
segments linear, somewhat saccate at the bnse. AiPhers 
alternately black, with woolly tails. Cypselae obtusely 
4-angled. Pappus double, bristles of the outer series few, 
scabrous, of the inner copious, twice as long, feathery. 

Fig. 1, section of flower-head ; 2, a single floret ; 3, a process of the receptacle ; 
4, outf-r pappus hairs ; 5, inner pappus hairs: 6, anlher: 7, upper portion of 
style with style-arms:— all enlarged. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 78, JUNE, 1911. 

Tab. 8377.— CATTLEYA REX, Pen,. 
„ 8378.-COLTJMNEA GLORIOSA, Costa Biea, 
„ 8379.— PROSTANTHERA PULCHELLA, Australia. 
„ 8380.— PTERONIA IXCANA, South Africa. 
„ 8381.— SATJSST7REA VEITCHIANA, Central China, 
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838Z 










Tab. 8382. 

VIBURNUM RHYTIDOPHYLLUM. 

Western China. 

CAl'Ill koliaceae. 
Vibubnum, Linn. ; Benth. et Ilouk.f. O'eu. Plant, vol. ii. p. 3. 



Viburnum rhytidophylhm, llemri. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Hot. vol. xxiii. 
p. 355 ; J. 11. Vcitch in Journ. lloy. Hort. tioc. vol. xxviii. l'J03, p. 63, f. 23 ; 
Gard. Chron. vol. xxxix. 1906, p. 418, ct vol. xlii. 11)07, p. 2:20; species ex 
affinitate V. Lantanae, Linn., a quo differt imprimis foliis semper virenti bus 
oblongo-lanceolatis subacuminatis floribusque sessilibus. 

Frutex vel arbor parva novellis tomentosis; rami florigeri crassi, rigidi, recti, 
internodiis quam foliis multoties brevio'ibus. Folia opposita, petiolata, 
crassa, subcoriacea, rigida, oblongodanceolata, cum petiolo 10-25 cm. longa, 
2-6 cm. lata, sursum sensim atteuuata, obtusa vel subacuta, basi rotundata 
vel brevissime auriculata, margine apicem versus ob>cure denticulata, supra 
glabra, subnitida, grosse rugosa, subtus dense albo- vel brunneo-tomeutosa, 
pilis bulbo-stellatis multo-radiatis ; venae conspicuae, supra impressae, 
subtus elevatae. Infloreacentia terminals, cornpo>ita, umbellato-cymosa, 
quaternatim ramosa, subhemisphaerica, quam folia brevior, usque ad 
15 cm. diametro, undique stellato-tomentosa. Jlracteae squamiformes, 
inconspicuae ; bracteolae geminatae, liuearts vel ovatae, calycem aequantes 
vel paulo excedeutes. Flores albi, subsessiles, 5-7 mm. diametro. Calyx 
tomentosus, lobis parvis ovatis obtusiusculis. Corolla fere rotata, lobis 
oblongo-ovatis obtusis. Stamina 5, exserta, tilameutis filiformibus antheris 
oblongis luteis. Ovarium inferuiu, uuiloculare, uniovulatum; stvli 3, 
brevissimi, connati, stigmatibus subcapitatis. Fructus obloDgus, com- 
]>ressus, circiter 8 mm. longus, primum ruber, demum niper, nitidus. 
Semen unicum, pendulum, albuminosum ; embryo minutissimus, in apice 
albumiuis positus. — W. Dotting Hemsley. 



Viburnum rhytidopltyllum is one of the most remarkable 
shrubs which the recent exploration of Western China has 
given to gardens. It is perfectly evergreen, but of a type 
very distinct from any evergreen species In the genus, 
resembling more, in its excessively wrinkled leaves, the 
species of the " Lantana " group. It is, however, absolutely 
different from those or any other Viburnum, and is, indeed, 
one of the best-marked of all shrubs in cultivation. 

Introduced by Mr. E. II. Wilson for Messrs. Veitch in 1900, 
it has withstood, without any injury, all the frosts of the 
last decade. The plant from which our figure was prepared 
was purchased in 190G, and is growing against a south 
wall, [t does not need such protection as that position 
gives, but, so far at any rate, has flowered and borne fruit 

July, 1911. 



more freely there than in the open. It forms its inflorescence 
and partially develops it in autumn, but the flowers do not 
expand until the following May. They are of a dull 
yellowish white and not particularly ornamental. The 
fruits turn red in September, and the plant then acquires 
its greatest beauty ; finally the fruits turn black. 

V. rhytidophyllum requires a rich loamy soil and appears 
to thrive anywhere except on a bleak, wind-swept spot. 
It can be increased easily by means of cuttings made of the 
summer growths about the end of July, and placed in pots 
of sandy soil in a slightly heated, close frame. 

Description. — Shrub or small tree ; young shoots tomen- 
tose ; flowering twigs stout, rigid, straight, their internodes 
much shorter than the leaves. Leaves opposite, petioled, 
thick, firm and subcoriaceous, oblong-lanceolate, 4-10 in. 
long, including the petiole, f-2^ in. wide, gradually 
narrowed to an obtuse or subacute tip, base rounded or 
slightly auriculate, obscurely toothed towards the tip, 
glabrous, somewhat polished and coarsely rugose above, 
densely white or brown tomentose with many-rayed 
stellate hairs beneath ; nerves conspicuously impressed 
above and raised beneath. Inflorescence terminal, com- 
pound, umbellately cymose, four times branched, almost 
globose in outline, snorter than the leaves, about 6 in. 
across, everywhere stellate-tomentose. Bracts scale-like 
and inconspicuous ; bracteoles geminate, linear or ovate, as 
long as the calyx or even rather longer. Flowers white, 
almost sessile, 2J-3J lin. across. Calyx tomentose, with 
small ovate rather blunt lobes. Corolla almost rotate, 
lobes oblong-ovate, blunt. Stamens 5, exserted ; filaments 
filiform; anthers oblong, yellow. Ovary inferior, 1-celled 
and 1-ovuled ; styles 3, very short, united, their stigmas 
subcapitate. Fruit oblong, compressed, about £ in. long, 
at first bright red, ultimately quite black, polished. Seed 
solitary, pendulous, albuminous; embryo very minute, 
lodged at the apex of the albumen. 



Fig. 1, a flower and bracteole; 2, a separate bracteole; 3, an expanded 
flower; 4, pistil and part of calyx, the ovary in section and showing the 
pendulous ovule ; 5, a hair from the calyx ; 6 and 7, anthers, seen from in front 
and from behind ; 8, fruit ; 9, the same in longitudinal section ; 10, embryo : 
— all enlarged. 



more freely there than in the open. It forms its inflorescence 
and partially develops it in autumn, but the flowers do not 
expand until the following May. They are of a dull 
yellowish white and not particularly ornamental. The 
fruits turn red in September, and the plant then acquires 
its greatest beauty ; finally the fruits turn black. 

V. rhytidophyllum requires a rich loamy soil and appears 
to thrive anywhere except on a bleak, wind-swept spot. 
It can be increased easily by means of cuttings made of the 
summer growths about the end of July, and placed in pots 
of sandy soil in a slightly heated, close frame. 

Description. — Shrub or small tree ; young shoots tomen- 
tose ; flowering twigs stout, rigid, straight, their internodes 
much shorter than the leaves. Leaves opposite, petioled, 
thick, firm and subcoriaceous, oblong-lanceolate, 4-10 m. 
long, including the petiole, J-2J in. wide, gradually 
narrowed to an obtuse or subacute tip, base rounded or 
slightly auriculate, obscurely toothed towards the tip, 
glabrous, somewhat polished and coarsely rugose above, 
densely white or brown tomentose with many-rayed 
stellate hairs beneath ; nerves conspicuously impressed 
above and raised beneath. Inflorescence terminal, com- 
pound, umbellately cymose, four times branched, almost 
globose in outline, snorter than the leaves, about 6 in. 
across, everywhere stellate-tomentose. Bracts scale-like 
and inconspicuous ; bracteoles geminate, linear or ovate, as 
long as the calyx or even rather longer. Flowers white, 
almost sessile, 2J-3J lin. across. Calyx tomentose, with 
small ovate rather blunt lobes. Corolla almost rotate, 
lobes oblong-ovate, blunt. Stamens 5, exserted ; filaments 
filiform; anthers oblong, yellow. Ovary inferior, 1-celled 
and 1-ovuled; styles 3, very short, united, their stigmas 
subcapitate. Fruit oblong, compressed, about \ in. long, 
at first bright red, ultimately quite black, polished. _ Seed 
solitary, pendulous, albuminous ; embryo very minute, 
lodged at the apex of the albumen. 



fl / lg * }' a wer and bracteole ; 2, a separate bracteole ; 3, an expanded 
nower; 4, pistil and part of calyx, the ovary in section and showing the 
penauious ovule ; 5, a hair from the calyx ; 6 and 7, anthers, seen from in front 
and from behind; 8, fruit; 'J, the same in longitudinal section; 10, embryo: 



8383 







L Reeve & C?London. 



Tab. 8383. 
SPIRAEA Yeitchii. 

Central China. 

Eosaceae. Tribe Spireae. 
SriKAEA, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 611. 



Spiraea (Chamaedryon) Veitchii, Hem&l. in Gard. Chrtm. vol. xxxiii. 1903, 
p. 258; J. II. Veitch in Journ. Roy. Hurt. Soc. vol. xxu'ii. ly< 3, p. til; 
species S. canescenti, D. Don, et S. Henryi, Hems]., proxime accedens, ab 
ambabus tamen fuliis margine integris supra glabris fac-illime distin- 
guenda. 

Frutex 3-4-metralis, arcuatim ramoea; ramuli juveniles densius pubescentes; 
rami graciles, dense foliati ; cortex primum rubescens. Folia breve 
petiolata, membranacea, ova'a, oblonga vel interdmn obovata, obtnsa vel 
Rubacnta et minut'ssime mucromilata, bftsi cnneata, margine inteacrrima, 
2-4 cm. longa, 0"6-2 cm. lata, supra glabra, subtns minulissime pnbernla; 
petiolug pnbescens, 2-3 mm. Jongus. Floras sat nnmerosi in corymbos 
4-7 cm. latos ramulos ]a*erales dense fobaros 8-13 cm. lotions terminantes 
dens:s<ime augregati; flores singnli 4 mm. la'i. Galijr. latissime intundi- 
bularis, extra puberulus, lobis triangrdaribus aontis tuho I'roviorilms 
snbpatentibus. Petal t alba, Riilwbn-ulaua. (M/a glabrescentia, meui- 
branacea, 3 mm. longa, introisim dehiscentia.— W. J. Bean. 

The handsome Chinese Spiraea here figured is, as Mr. 
Bean points out, most nearly allied to the Himalayan 

5. canescens, D. Don, and the Chinese S. Henryi, Hems!. 
From the former it is readily distinguished by its glabrous 
leaves, which are never toothed towards the tip as they 
usually are in S. canescens; from the latter it is distinguished 
hy the same characters and in addition by the fact that m 

6, Henryi the leaves are very considerably larger. In the 
original description some stress has also been laid on the 
distichous arrangement of the branches in S. Veitchii; this, 
bowever, is a character which is more apparent than real, 
•'Tid cannot therefore be said to be altogether distinctive. 
The short flowering twigs, from whatever aspect of the 
stem they may originate,^ wavs assume an erect position, 
with the result that every eoVymb faces upwards and is 
situated in the same plane as its neighbours. This arrange- 
ment, which imparts to the branch lets the spuriously 
distichous disposition alluded to, transforms the arching 

Jclt, 1911. 



branches on winch the corymbs are borne into long flower 
sprays of striking and singular beauty. Mr. E. H. Wilson, 
who discovered this species in Western Hupeh in 1900 
(Herbarium No. 2276) when collecting for Messrs. J. Veitch 
& Sons, and introduced it that year to European gardens, 
informs us that he considers it the finest of the Chinese 
Spiraeas. This opinion has not been belied by experience 
since it was expressed, and as there appears to be no doubt 
as to the perfect hardiness of the species, it should make a 
valuable addition to cultivated shrubs. The original plants 
in Messrs. Veitch's nursery at Coombe Wood, from one of 
which, in flower in July, 1909, the material for our figure 
was obtained, make growths six to eight feet long in a 
season. Such shoots are barren the first year, but in the 
following season develop short flowering branches from the 
nodes. Like nearly all the Spiraeas, S. Veitchii requires a 
rich loamy soil and can be propagated by late summer 
cuttings. Such pruning as it requires consists of the 
removal of old and crowded stems as soon as the plant is 
out of flower. 

Description.— Shrub up to 10 or 12 ft, high, of spreading 
habit ; branches very leafy, arching, graceful, reddish when 
young and covered the tirst year with a close pubescence. 
Leaves deciduous, entire, oval, oblong or occasionally 
obovate, cuneate at the base, rounded and with a smail 
mucro at the apex, f-1 J in. long, \-% in. wide, glabrous 
above, beneath very minutely puberulous ; petiole pubes- 
cent^ -J^-J i n> ] on g # Corymbs 1^-2^ in. in diameter, 
terminal on short, lateral, leafy branchlets. Flowers very 
numerous and densely arranged, A in. in diameter. Calyx 
broadly funnel-shaped with acute triangular lobes, puberu- 
lous. Petals white, almost orbicular. Carpels glabrescent, 
l in. long, membranaceous, dehiscing ventrally. 



Fig. 1 an expanded flower ; 2, calyx and pistil ; 3, calyx, laid open, showing 
me carpels; 4,branchlet of a corymb, showing fruit: 5, ripe fruit -.— all enlarged 
*l't i, whtch is of natural »iz*. 



except 4, which is of natural size. 



8384 



£5& 




^Xm ^r. 







London 



Tab. 8384. 
DRACOCEPHALUM argunexse. 

North-eastern Asia. 



Labiatak. Tribe Nepeteae. 
Dbacooephalum, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1199. 



Dracocephalum argunense, Finch, ex Link, Enum. PI. Ilort. Berol. vol. ii. 
p. 118; Beichb. Ic. et Descr. PI. t, 1 ; Lodd. But. Cub. t. 797; Sweet, Brit. 
Fl. Gard. vol. i. t. 47; Benth. Lab. Gen. et Sp. p. 499, et in DC. Prodr, 
vol. xii. p. 402; Komaroo in Acta Borti Petrop. vol. xxv. p. 356; species 
J). Ruyschianae, Linn., valde affiuis, sed floribus multo majoribus praesertim 
di fieri 

Ilerba pereimis. Caules graciles, saepe numerosi et simplfces, 3-6 dm. alti, 
praesertim in nodos plus minnsve pubtscentes, interdum inferne glabre- 
scentes. Folia lineari-lanceolata, linearia vel lanceolata, 3-7 cm. longa, 
2-4 mm. raro ad 10 mm. lata, apice obtusa, interdum leviter etnarginata, 
basi in petiolum brevissimum attenuata, Integra, margine saltern siccitate 
plus minusve revoluta, supra scaberula, infra minute glauduloso-punctata, 
in costam pilis paucis hispidis praedita, saepe hispidulo-ciliata ; axillae 
foliorum saepe ramulis abbreviatis folia minora gerentibus. Verticillastri 
2-6-flori, approximati vel inferiores distantes, racemum spicifonnem 
terminalem 4-7 cm. raro ad 12 cm. longum formantes. Bracteae ellipticac 
vel ovato-lanceolatae, acuminatae, subspinescentes, basi cuneatae, albo- 
ciliatae, ca'ycem saepis<iiite paulum breviores. Bracteolae lanceolatae, 
circiter 1 cm. longae. PedirelU 3-6 mm. longi, pubescentes. Calyx circiter 
2 cm. longus, tubuloso-campanulatus, basi sinuum inter dentos breviter 
protrusus, puberulus vel interdum pilosus; labium superum 3-tiduin, 
dentibus 5-7 mm. longis lateralibus triangulari-lanceolatis quam dens 
melius elliptico-ovatus iuinoribus; labium inferum 2-fidum, dentibus 
triangulari-lanceolatis vix 1 cm. longis ut ceteribus subspinescentibus et 
breviter ciliatis. Corolla 3-1 cm. longa, violaceo-coerulea, extra allto- 
punctata, plus minusve villosa, intra in labium inferum albo-maculata, 
praesertim in labium superum villoma ; tubus incurvatus, inferne vix 2 mm. 
latus, superne abrupte ampliatus et valde veutricosus, 10-12 mm. latus; 
labium superum suborbiculare, gakatum, 8 mm. longum, emarginatum ; 
labium inferum patens, circiter 12 mm. longum, lol>o medio obovato- 
obreniforme 10-12 mm. latum, lobis lateralibus subrotundis multo majore. 
Stamina e tubo exserta, labio supero paulum breviora; antherae den.so 
albo-villosae. Nuculae trigouae, 3-5 mm. longae, inferue albo-vilIo>ae. — 
D. Buyschiana, var. speciosum, Leileb. Fl. Ross. vol. iii. p. 390; Garhnfl. 
1880, p. 375, cum tig. D. Euyschiana, var. japonicum, A. Gray in Mem. 
Amer. Acad. N.S. vol. vi. p. 403 ; Masters in Gard. Cliron. 1879, vol. iii. 
p. 166, fig. 29. D. Evysrhi'ina, Franch. et Savat. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. i. 
p. 376; Franch. PI. David, p. 240, non Linn. 1). Buyscftianum, Forbes & 
Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 292. I), altaicense, Hort. Vilm. ex 
"Vilm. Fl. PI. Terre, ed. 1, p. 250, non Laxm. - S. A. Skan. 

The handsome Dracocephalum which is the subject of our 
plate belongs to the small section Ruyschiana, looked upon 
by authors earlier than Linnaeus as a separable genus, 

Jci.Y, 1911. 



which is characterized by having villous anthers. This 
section includes the two 'species D. Ruyschimm, Linn., and 
J), austriacum, Linn. To these two plants D. argunewe 
is very closely allied, especially to the former, from which 
it is only to be satisfactorily distinguished by its much 
larger flowers ; the latter, which agrees with our plant as 
regards the size of its flowers, is readily distinguished by 
being much more hairy and by usually having divided 
leaves whose segments are spinescent at the tip. In his 
recent Flora Mandshuriae, however, Mr. Komarov has 
retained D. argunense as a distinct species, a decision with 
which we fully concur. Komarov also unites with our 
plant the Japanese one described by the late Professor Gray 
as D. Ruyschianum, var. japonicum, though it has to be 
remarked that the specimens of this Japanese plant in the 
Kew herbarium have the calyx much more hairy. The 
typical form, now figured, is a native of Dahuria, 
Mandshuria, the Amur region and the province of Chili 
in North China. It is an old denizen of European gardens, 
having been first introduced in 1822. The Japanese form 
was apparently first introduced by Messrs. J. A r eitch & Sons, 
who had it in cultivation at Coombe Wood in 1879, when 
it was figured in the Gardeners' Chronicle under the name 
suggested by Gray. This introduction was effected through 
the agency of the late Mr. C. Maries, who had obtained the 
plant on the central mountains of Japan. The reintro- 
duction of the typical form has again been due to Messrs. 
Veitch, who received seeds in October, 1909, from their 
collector, Mr. W. Purdom. These seeds were obtained at 
AVeichang in Northern Chili ; the plants raised therefrom 
reached a flowering size in August, 1910, when the material 
on which the accompanying figure has been based was sent 
from Coombe Wood, where, Messrs. Veitch inform us, the 
plant grows well in good sandy loam and in a sunny 
situation. 

Description. — Herb, perennial ; stems slender, usually 
several, simple, 1-2 ft. high, more or less hairy, especially 
at the nodes, sometimes nearly glabrous lower down. 
Leaves linear, linear-lanceolate or lanceolate, 1 J-2| in. long, 
1-2 rarely as much as 5 lin. wide, obtuse, or occasionally 
slightly emarginate, narrowed at the base to a very short 



petiole, margin entire, slightly re vol ate, scaberulous above, 
finely glandular-punctate beneath, often hispidly ciliate, 
often with short axillary branches bearing smaller leaves. 
Whorls 2-6-flowered, close set or the lower somewhat 
remote, making a terminal raceme lj-2§ in., rarely over 
4 in. long; bracts elliptic or ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, 
slightlj' spinescent, cuneate, white-ciliate, rather shorter 
than the calyx ; bracteoles lanceolate, about 5 lin. long ; 
pedicels 1-3 lin. long, pubescent. Calyx about f in. long, 
tubular campanulate, the bases of the sinuses slightly 
produced outwards, puberulous or sometimes pilose ; upper 
lip 3-fid, lobes 2£-3| lin. long, the lateral triangular-lanceo- 
late, smaller than the elliptic-ovate central ; lower lip 2-fid, 
teeth triangular lanceolate, about 4 lin. long, all slightly 
spinescent and shortly ciliate. Corolla 1^-lJ in. long, 
violet, white dotted externally, villous especially on the 
upper lip ; tube incurved, hardly 1 lin. wide below, abruptly 
enlarged and ventricose above, 5-6 lin. wide; upper lip 
suborbicular, hooded, 4 lin. long, emarginate ; lower lip 
spreading, about 6 lin. long, midlobe obovate-obreniform, 
5-6 lin. wide, much larger than the subrotund side-lobes. 
Stamens exserted from the tube but rather shorter than the 
upper lip ; anthers densely white-villous. Nutlets trigonous, 
about 2 lin. long, white-villous below. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil ; 2, corolla, laid open ; 3 and 4, anthers ; 5, oyary 
and disk : — all enlarged. 



8381 







T -r-> 



Tab. 8385. 
cucumis metuliperus. 

Tropical and South-east Africa. 

Cucurbitaceae. Tribe Cucumerineae. 
Cucumis, Linn. ; Bentk. et Eooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 826. 



Cucumis metuliferus, E. Meyer ex Schrad. lieliq. in Linnaea, vol. xii. p. 406, 
and in Drege Zwei Pflanz. Docum. pp. 176 and 150; Naud. in Ann. S c . Nat. 
ser. 4, vol. xi. p. 10; Rev. Hort. I860, p. 187, fig. 42 ; Harv. & 8ond.Fl Gap. 
vol. n. p. 495; Oliver, Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. ii. p. 543; Cogniaux in DC. 
Monogr. Phanerog. vol. iii. p. 499; affinis C. mtivo, Linn., sed fructn 
spmis conicis elongatis armato nee sparse tubercnlato differt. 

//erZw Pcandens, cirrhosa. Caulis gracilis, hispidus vel setoso-hirsutns. Folia 
alterim; petiolus 2-11 cm. longus, hispidus; lamina 5-12 cm. longa et lata. 
d-o-iobata, utrinque hirsuta vel subhispida, lobis brevibus acutis vel 
breviter cuspidato-acuminatis irregulariter dentatis. Oirrhi simplices, 
gracnes, parce hispidi. Florea unisexuales, masculis fasciculatis femineis 
so itariis extra (ovario spinoso-tuberculato excepto) cum pedunculis sub- 
mspido-villosis. Peduncuii masculorum 0*5-2 cm. longi, femineorum 
i i • °t) C 'o'~ on "*" @ a ty c i s tubus 4-5 mm. longus, obconico-campanulatus. 
lobis 2-2-y mm. longus subulatis. Corolla 3-4 cm. diametro, 5-loba, ltttea, 
Jobis ovatis obtusis. Stamina H; filamenta brevissima, vix 1 mm. longa; 
antherae oblongae, 2 ' 5-3 mm. longae, minutissime ciliatae, apice crenulato- 
orjstatae. Stylus 4 mm. longus ; stigma magnum, 3-lobum. Frttettu 
b-li. cm. longus, 4-7 cm. crassus, oblongus vel ellipsoideus, obtuse 
tngonus, spinis crassis anguste conicis 5-13 mm. longis echinatus, pulchre 
ruber. Semina 6 mm. longa, ovata, obscure marginata, levia. — C. Ti„- 
neanus, Kotschy & Peyr. PI. Tinn. p. 17, t. 8.— N. E. Brown. 



The Horned Cucumber which is the subject of our illus- 
tration was originally discovered by Drege in Pondoland 
in the vicinity of St. John's River. But although it was first 
reported from South-east Africa, the plant would appear to be 
rare there, for it lias not been met with by any subsequent 
collector. In Tropical Africa, however, it is very widely 
distributed ; it has been reported from Nubia, Abyssinia 
and Jur, as well as from Mozambique on the eastern side 
of the continent; from Nigeria, Cameroons and Angola on 
the western side. The specimens in the collection at Kew 
were raised from seeds presented to the establishment in 
1899 by Mr. C. H. Staiiton, Field Place, Stroud ; these 
seeds had been collected by Major A. E. Stanton, of the 
Hth Soudanese, while serving at Khartum. The plant 
when given the treatment suitable for the common Cuctim- 



July, 1911. 



ber grows vigorously and fruits freely. The fruits are 
of an olive green colour until they are quite ripe, when 
they become rich scarlet ; they remain on the stems long 
after the latter are dead, and at this stage, as they hang in 
the late autumn from the rafters of the Tropical Aquatic 
house at Kew, along with the fruits of the other gourds 
grown there, are highly ornamental. C. metuliferus is 
easily propagated from its seeds, which are produced in 
quantity. 

Description". — Herb ; climbing by means of tendrils. 
Stem slender, hispid or setose. Leaves alternate ; petiole 
1-4 in. long, hispid ; blade 3-5-lobed, the lobes acute or 
cuspidate-acuminate, their margin irregularly toothed, 
hispid on both sides, 2-5 in. long, and as much across. 
Tendrils simple, slender, sparingly hispid. Flowers 1-sexual, 
the males in clusters, the females solitary, almost liispidly 
villous outside like the peduncles; the ovary with spinulous 
tubercles; male peduncles 2-10 lin. long, females f-l^ in. 
long. Calyx with an obconic-campanulate tube, 2-2^ lin. 
long ; teeth subulate, half as long as the tube. Corolla 
5-lobed, 1 £-1 1 in. wide, yellow ; lobes ovate, obtuse. 
Stamens 3 ; filaments very short; anthers oblong, 1-1 ^ lin. 
long, very finely ciliate, with crenulate apical crests. Style 
2 lin. long ; stigma large, 3-lobed. Fruit 2J-5 in. long, 
1J-21 in. thick, oblong or ellipsoid, bluntly 3-gonous, beset 
with thick narrowly conical spines J-J in. long, rich scarlet 
when ripe. Seeds i in. long, ovate, smooth, faintly 
margined. 

Fig. 1, section of a lower portion of a male flower, showing the insertion of 
tne stamens ; 2, a stamen ; 3, style and stigma of a female flower ; 4, tubercles 
lrom an ovary; 5, a seed -.—all enlarged. 



8386 




VmeeniBt 



Tab. 8386. 
CYPEIPEDIUM speciosum. 

Japan. 



Orchidaceae. Tribe Ctpripedieae. 

Cypripedium, Linn. ; Benth. et Book./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 634. Cypripedilum, 
Pfitzer in Engl. Pflanzenreich, Orch. Pleon. p. 28. 



Cypripedium speeiosum, Polfe in, Kew Bulletin, 1911, p. 207; species a 
C. macrantho, Swartz, floribus pallidis roseo-striatis et staminodio acutiore 
differt. 

Herba 20-40 cm. alta. Caules erecti, crassiusculi, pubeseentes, foliosi. Folia 
sessilia, ovato-oblonga vel elliptico-oblonga, acuta vel breviter acuminata, 
ciliolata, breviter pubescentia, 7-10 cm. longa, 2-5 cm. lata, plicata. 
Bracteae foliosae, magnae, ovatae, acutae. Flores speciosi, albiduli Tel 
pallide carnei, roseo-venosi. Sepalum posticum ovatum, acutum vel 
breviter acuminatum, 3-4 • 5 cm. longum; sepalum inferum ovatum, apice 
breviter bifidum, 2 5-3 ■ 5 cm. longum. Petala falcato-oblonga, acuta, 
4-4 '5 cm. longa, l'5-l -8 cm. lata. Labellum sulglobosum vel ovoideo- 
globosum, 3-4 cm. longum; ore semicirculari marginato; lobi laterales 
obtueanguli. Staminodium ovato-hastatum, acutum, 1 cm. longum. — 
C. macranthum, So mokou Zusetsu, vol. xviii. t. 83 ; nee Swartz. ft ma- 
cranthum, var. /3. veniricosum, Franch. et Sav. Ennm. PL Jap. vol. i. (1879), 
p. 40, excl. syn. ; Matsumura, Nomencl. Jap. PL p. 63; nee Eeicbb. f. 
C. Thuribergii, Matsumura, Index PL Jap. vol. ii. (1905), p. 242, pro parte ; 
Eolfe in Orch. Eev. vol. xvi. p. 186 ; nee Blunie— Honzo Zufu, vol. xxxix. 
t. 18 (recto). — E. A. Eolfe. 



The figure of the striking Cypripedium given in our 
plate has been prepared from a plant sent to Kew for 
identification by the establishment of Bees, Limited, with 
whom it flowered in June, 1910. The species is one with 
a somewhat interesting history. It has been in cultivation 
in this country for a number of years and, at all events at 
the time of its introduction as well as for some time there- 
after, was accepted as being C. macranthum, no doubt owing 
to the fact that the figure of the plant in the Japanese work 
So mokou Zusetsu bears this name. It is, however, quite 
distinct from the original C. macranthum, Swartz, figured 
at t. 2938 of this magazine, which has flowers of a uniform 
deep rose-purple shade. Franchet and Savatier, fully 
realising this, have thought it to be the same as C. macran- 
thum, var. veniricosum. But it is equally distinct from the 
plant so named by the younger Eeichenbach, and Professor 
Matsumura on discovering this fact has concluded that it 
July, 1911. 



must be the Japanese plant described by Blume as 
C. Thunbergii, with the result that of late years this Cypri- 
pedium has, in all carefully determined collections, been 
grown under that name. But an examination of the 
original type of C. Thunbergii, BL, for an opportunity of 
studying which we are indebted to the kindness of Dr. 
G-oethart of the Leyden herbarium, shows that, of the three 
suggestions from time to time adopted, that of Matsumura 
happens to be the least satisfactory. Our plant is un- 
doubtedly a near ally of C. macranthum, though it differs 
too greatly to admit of its being included therein ; with 
C. Thunbergii its affinity is much more remote. So far as 
we know at present C. macranthum does not occur in Japan, 
and C. speciosum, which seems to be widespread in that 
country, may be looked upon as its representative. Besides 
the coloured figure given in the So mokou there is another 
in the older Honzo Zufu. In this latter figure, however, 
rose-coloured blotches are depicted on the lip ; these have 
not been met with so far in any living specimen and would 
appear at least to be unusual. The cultivation of C. 
speciosum presents no great difficulty, the conditions suitable 
for C. macranthum being also suitable for our plant. 

Description.—//^ ; stems erect, rather stout, pubescent, 
leafy, 8-16 in. high. Leaves sessile, ovate- or elliptic- 
oblong, acute or shortly acuminate, ciliolate, shortly pube- 
scent, 3-4 in. long, |-2 in. wide, plicate. Bracts leafy, 
large, ovate, acute. Flowers showy, whitish or pale flesh- 
coloured, veined with rose. Sepals : upper ovate, acute or 
shortly acuminate, 1|-1§ in. long, lower ovate, with a 
shortly 2-fid tip, 1-Jl in. long. Petals falcate-oblong, 
acute 1^-lf in. long, |—| in. wide. Lip subglobose, or 
ovoid-globose, 1^-11 in. long, with a semicircular mouth ; 
lateral lobes rather bluntly angled. Staminode ovate-hastate, 
acute, 5 lin. long;. 

Fig. 1, section of lip; 2, column :— loth enlarged. 



LOVELL REEVE & CO., Ltd., 

6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, 
London, W.C. 



Descriptive List 

of 

Illustrated Works on British Natural History 

for 
Young Observers, Collectors, and Nature Students. 



The works described in this List form a series of hand- 
books of interest to all who have exercised any degree of 
observation on the common species of insects and plants that 
have come before them ; their object is to guide the reader 
in the first steps of Natural History, and to lead him on to 
the investigation of the structure, classification, distribution, 
and economic uses of the forms of life enumerated. 

Each volume is complete in itself, and forms an intro- 
duction to more advanced work. The series is uniform in 
size, Crown 8vo. (j\ x 4%), and comprises : — 

9. British Grasses. 

10. „ Ferns. 

11. „ Fungi. 

12. „ Flora. 

13. „ „ Illustrations. 

14. Uses of British Plants. 

15. Collections and Recol- 
lections of Natural 

8. Edible British Mollusca. History and Sport. 



I. 

2. 


British 


Insects. 
Beetles. 


3. 


j> 


Butterflies 

Moths. 


4- 


»> 


Bees. 


5- 


>> 


Spiders. 


6. 

7- 




Zoophytes. 

Seaweeds. 



Specimen Page of Staveley's Insects. 




WINGS OF INSECTS, AND THEIR CLASSIFICATION. 43 

very broad, the outline being rather more than the quarter 

of a circle. The veins radiate Fig. 17. 

from a point in the thickened 

part of the membrane, and the 

wing is packed first by being 

closed together like a fan and 

then transversely folded in two 

places (fig. 17). From this 

complicated double folding is a .Wing of Earwig magnified. 

derived the name of the order *>. do.° do. m*™ 1 ™ 6 " 

c. do. do. closed. 
to which the earwigs belong, 

viz., Euplexoptera (cS, well, TrAeKxos, folded ; irrepbv, wing. 
For figures of Order II, Euplexoptera, see Plate IV., 

fig- 1. 

To the earwig, the grasshopper, cricket , locust, and cock- 
roach (or blackbeetle of our kitchen) succeed. Resembling 
the earwig in the fan-like folding of the bind wing, they 
differ from it in having no transverse folding (fig. 18), and 
from this character of the Fig. 1?. 

wing is derived the name 
of the order under which 
these insects are ranged ; 
namely, Orthoptera, or 
straight - winged (dpdos, 
straight ; -n-Tcpov, a wing.") 
The fore wings, although 
much thickened, are less thick and horny than those of 
either the beetles or the earwig, and are useful in flight. 

And here we come upon a most curious little appara- 
tus. The merry chirp of the house cricket and of the 
grasshopper are amongst our most familiar sounds, yet 
few inquire the nature of the instrument by which the 
little creature produces its pleasant music. This, the pri- 




Wing of Grasshopper (Acrida 
viridissiina). 



1. 

British Insects. 

A familiar description of the form, structure, habits and 
transformation of Insects. By E. F. Staveley. 

Contents : — Introduction. — I. Distinguishing characters of Insects. — II. External struc- 
ture. — III. Wings and classification. — IV. Changes of Insects. — V.-XXVI. Description of 
families, Genera and Species including Coleoptera (Beetles), Euplexoptera (Earwigs, etc.), 
Orthoptera (Cockroach), Thysanoptera (Thrips), Neuroptera (Mayfly, etc.), Trichoplera 
(Caddis-fly', Hymenoptera (Ants and Wasps), Aculeata (Bees), Lepidoptera (Butterflies and 
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British Beetles. 

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By E. C. Rye. Second edition, revised and in part re- 
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Contents : — I. On the relations and divisions of the class Insecta. — II. Structure, Meta- 
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V. Hooks useful to the student. — VI.-VII. On Collecting. — VIII. Sections and Families. — 
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16 coloured Plates, illustrating 32 ferns, and 55 woodcuts, 
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Phycomycetes and Ustilagineae. By George Massee 
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Contents :— General Introduction, Morphology.— Geographical Distribution.— Fossil 
Fungi.— Lichen-forming Fungi.— Myxogastres —Bacteria, or Schizomycetes.— Collection and 
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12. 

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revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, K.C.S.I., C.B., F.R.S. 

"A descriptive enumeration of all the plants wild in the British Islands, distinguished by 
such characters as may be readily perceived by the unlearned eye, and expressed, as far as 
lay in his power, in ordinary language, vsing such technical terms only as appeared indis- 
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14. 
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Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the 
derivations of their names. By the Rev. Prof. G. Henslow, 
M.A., F.L.S. With 288 illustrations. Price 4s. 6d. net. 

15. 

Natural History and Sport. 

Collections and recollections of natural history and sport 
in the life of a country Vicar. By the Rev. G. C. Green, 
Vicar of Modbury, S. Devon. 

^ Contains the Author's observations and reminiscences in many counties and places 
Cambridge, Northamptonshire, Hampshire, North Wales, Ireland, Scotland, Devon, etc , 
etc. 10 woodcuts. 

Price 6s. 6J. net. 



Specimen page of Plues' Ferns. 
POLYPODIUM. 



Ill 



POLYPODIUM. 

Gen. Char. " Sori dorsal, subglobose or oval, destitute of 
involucre. Veins free (as in all the British species) or anasto- 
mosing." — Sir W. Hooker. 

2. Polypodium vulgare, L. Common Polypody. 

Caudex stout, widely creeping, scaly. Fronds ovate-oblong. 
Sori round, placed in a row on either side the mid-vein. 

The name of this well-known fern is formed, from two 
Greek words, polys, many, and pous, podos, a foot ; and 
is applicable because of the many rootlets thrown ont 
from the caudex. 

The form of the frond is very variable, — we sometimes 
find it eighteen inches long, <; ^ 
while the plants that grow on 
old walls have often fronds 
not more than three inches u 
in length. The caudex creeps 
horizontally, becoming inter- ", 
laced and matted when left 
long undisturbed, and densely 
clothed with narrow, glossy 
brown scales. The frond is 
pinnate, the pinnae nearly 
equal, opposite, and slightly 
waved or jagged at the mar- 
gin. Each pinna has a mid- 
vein, from which branches 
issue, and the fructification is 
situated at the point of the side veins. 

Common as this fern is, and familiar to every one 
who has eyes to see with, it never fails to be noticed 
with favour. Lending to the decaying trunk a new 




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Tab. 8382.— VIBURNUM RHYTIDOPHYLLUM, Western China. 
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„ 8384.— DRACOCEPHALUM ARGUNENSE, North-eastern Asia. 
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Tab. 8387. 

clusia grandiflora. 

Guiana. 

Guttiferae. Tribe Clusieae. 
Clusia, Linn. ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 170. 



Clusia grandiflora, Splitg. in Tijd. Nat. Gesch. vol. ix. p. 101 ; Miq. Stirp. 
Surinam. Select, p. 90, tt. 25, 26; Planch, et Trianain Ann. Set. Nat. ser. 4, 
vol. xm. p. 325; Engl, in Mart. Fl. Bras. vol. xii. pars 1, p. 423; Vesaue in 
nt. Monogr. vol. viii. p. 106; affinis C. insigni, Mart., a qua floribus 
majonbus, connectivo longius producto recedit. 

Arbuscula dioica, 3-6 m. alta, maximis arboribus innata, truncos radicibns 
implicitans et eas sensim strangulando necans, succo flavescente viscoso 
scatens. Rami patuli, crassi, subangulati ; ramuli circiter 1-5 cm. 
diametro, crassi, virides, laeves. Folia versus apices ramulorum conferta, 
opposita, petiolata, obovato vel elliptico-obovata, apice rotundata, basi 
obtusa vel plus minus cuneata, interdum inaequalia, 15-30 cm. longa, 
i 0-15 cm. lata, coriacea, glabra, supra intense viridia nervis lateralibus 
mconspicuis, nervo medio utrinque valde prominente, subtus pallidiora 
nervis lateralibus vix visibilibus, lineis numerosissimis nigrescentibus 
asceudentibus notata ; petioli 7-11 cm. longi, basi caulem semiamplectentes, 
mfeme per 2-3 cm. supra applanati. hamuli florentes in axillis paria 
supremi foliorum ramuli orti, circiter 3 cm. longi, par unicum cataphyllo- 
rum, et paria 1-3 foliorum gerentes. Cymue terminates, 3-2-florae; 
pedunculus circiter 3 cm. longus, leviter decurvatus; pedicelli 2*5-3 cm. 
longi; bracteae deltoideo-ovatae, circiter I -2 cm. longae; bracteolae iis 
similes, obtuse carinatae, vix 1 cm. longae. Flares masculi: Sepala 6, alba 
marginibus roseo-tincta, in paria 3 disposita, exteriora et interiora antico- 
postica, media lateralia ; sepala extima ceteris minora, late ovato-clliptica, 
media transverse elliptica, 1-6 cm. longa, 3 -2 cm. lata, intima elliprica, 
3 cm. longa, 2*5 cm. lata. Petala 8, alba, basin versus rosea, ambitu 
pynformia, circiter 6-5 cm. longa, 5 cm. lata, medio late umbonata.umbone 
piano leviter elevato tantum. Stamina circiter 500, eburnea, irregulariter 
8-seriata, exteriora majora : filamenta in cupulam circiter 4 cm. diametro 
1'3 cm. altam alte connata, parte libera 1*5-2 mm. longa; antherae 
lateraliter dehiscentes; extimae lineares, apicem versus leviter aognstatae, 
connectivo excluso 5 mm. longae, connectivo lato ultra loculos in appen- 
dicem subulatam 5 mm. longam producto; intimae 2*5 mm. low. 
appendice 1 mm. longa. Staminodia numerosissima, in corpus ceritralcin 
discoideum gummosum fere 2 cm. diametro 7 mm. altum conglutinata. 
Mores feminei: Ovarium subglobosum; stigmata 14-15, sessilia, radiata. 
Capsula late ovoidea, albida, post dehiscentiain depresso-glolwsa 14- 1->- 
valvis. Semina numerosa, arillo aurantiaco inclusa.— C. maxima, L. C. Iticb. 
ex Planch, et Triana, 1. c. C. rosea, Ch. Lein. in Hortic. Univ. vol. m. p. 33, 
f"im ic, non Linn. C. in sign is, Benth. in Hook. Lond. Journ. Bot. vol. n. 
1843, p. 368, non Mart. C. petiolata, Klotzsch ex Engl. L c— T. A. SrKAGiK. 



The genus Clusia includes nearly a hundred species, 
natives of Tropical America and the West Indies. All 
August, 1911, 



appear to be dioecious; many, including the subject of our 
plate, are epiphytic. Though they are not parasites these 
epiphytic species nevertheless in time usually destroy the 
trees on which they grow by strangling them. C. grandi- 
flora, here figured, is a native of Guiana and belongs to the 
group Chlamydodusia, Engl., the species included in which 
are characterised by the peculiar structure of their male 
flowers, which have, within a shallow cup composed of the 
united filaments, a central deep yellow discoid gummy mass 
composed of a very large number of staminodes agglutinated 
together and overlaid by a layer of soft resin. The material 
on which our illustration has been based was derived from 
a plant in the Cambridge Botanic Garden which flowered 
in July, 1910, when specimens were forwarded for study 
by Mr. R. Irwin Lynch. This plant, Mr. Lynch informs 
us, was received at Cambridge from the gardens of the 
Royal Botanic Society at Regent's Park twenty-two years 
before. At Cambridge it has flourished in a stove in which 
the temperature in severe winters has been as low as 55° F. ; 
for some seasons past it has flowered annually. The plant 
is now 9 feet high, and has six branches fully furnished 
with fine leaves, some of which are as much as 18 inches 
long and 7^ inches across ; testimony as to its epiphytic 
habit is afforded by the production of numerous roots 
varying in thickness from that of a lead pencil to that of 
one's little finger. Its cultivation among other tropical 
plants has not given rise to any great difficulty ; the best 
soil appears to be a mixture of fibrous peat and loam with 
good drainage. The pot need not be large ; that used for 
the Cambridge plant has been a ten-inch one. The plant 
loves moisture both in the air and at the root ; it may be 
propagated by cuttings, though some time is required and 
six months may be necessary to establish a specimen. The 
species is not susceptible to insect-pests. 

Description.— Shrub, dioecious, 10-20 ft. in height, 
epiphytic on large trees which it embraces and ultimately 
strangles by means of its roots; juice yellowish, viscid; 
branches thick, spreading, somewhat angular ; twigs about 
| in. thick, green and smooth. Leaves clustered towards 
the end of the twigs, opposite, distinctly petioled, obovate 
or elliptic-obovate, apex rounded, base obtuse or somewhat 



cuneate, sometimes unequal, margin entire, 6—12 in. long, 
3-6 in. wide, coriaceous, glabrous, dark green above with 
the lateral nerves obscure, paler beneath with the lateral 
nerves faintly visible, but marked with numerous blackish 
ascending lines, midrib prominent on both sides ; petiole 
3-4^ in. long, partially stem-clasping at the base, flattened 
on the upper aspect in the lower third. Flowering twigs 
appearing in the axils of the upper pair of leaves on a shoot, 
each over 1 in. long and each with one p'tir of cataphyllaries 
and 1-3 pairs of leaves. Cymes terminal, 3-2- flowered ; 
peduncles over 1 in. long, slightly decurved ; pedicels 1 in. 
long or rather longer ; bracts deltoid-ovate, about ^ in. 
long ; bracteoles like the bracts, obtusely keeled and rather 
shorter. Male: Sepals 6, white with rosy margins, in three 
pairs, the outer and inner in front and behind, the central 
pair lateral ; outer sepals smaller than the rest, wide ovate- 
elliptic, central transversely elliptic, | in. long, 1^ in. wide, 
inner elliptic, nearly 1| in. long, 1 in. wide. Petals 8, 
white, rosy towards the base, with pyriform outline, about 
2^ in. long, 2 in. wide, with a wide slightly umbonate 
smooth centre. Stamens about 500, ivory white, irregularly 
3-seriate, the outer larger than the others ; filaments 
connate below in a cup about 1| in. across and ^ in. deep, 
their free portions 1 lin. long or less ; anthers opening 
laterally, those of the outer series linear, slightly narrowed 
upwards, about 2^ lin. long, with a broad connective which 
is produced as a subulate appendage as long as the anther, 
those of the inner series about half as long, with a very 
short appendage. Staminodes very many, agglutinate in 
a central discoid gummy mass about § in. wide and over 
i in. high. Female: Ovary subglobose ; stigmas 14-15, 
sessile, radiate. Capsule broadly ovoid, white, depressed 
globose and 14-15-valved when it dehisces. Seeds many, 
enveloped in an orange-coloured arillus. 



Fig. 1, longitudinal section through a portion of the stammal cup; 2 and 3, 
stamens; 4, central resinous mass enclosing the agglutinated staminodes, in 
vertical section and surrounded behind by the stamens of the innermost series; 
5, group of staminodes from the centre of the flower: -4 slvjhtly, the others 
much enlarged. 



S388 




M.S. del. J.N.Fitdhlith. 



VhicentBrotSUsTDay &SojlL^u^P- 



T, Reeve &cC .~Lcnic 



Tab. 8388. 
torenia atropurpurea. 

Malay Peninsula. 

Scbophulariaceae. Tribe Grattoleae. 
Touenia, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 954. 



Torenia atropurpurea, Rid?, in Journ. H. As. Soc. Straits, 1907, no. 49, p. 21 ; 

Gamble in Journ. As. Soc. Bengal, vol. lxxiv. pars 2, p. 874; species calyce 
anguste tubuloso omnino exalato, corollae atropurpureae tubo elongato 
inferne angustissimo facile distinguenda. 

Herba perennis caulibus gracilibus ramosis repentibus interdum radicantibus 
ad 6 dm. longis parcissime hirtellis. Folia petiolata, ovata vel deltoideo- 
ovata, l'5-3'5 cm. longa, 1-2 cm. lata, acuta, basi cuneata vel interdum 
subtruncata, serrata, supra saepe scaberula, infra fere glaberrima ; petioli 
circiter 5 mm. longi. Flores saespissime solitarii, pedunculati, caules et 
ramos terminantes. Pedunculi l - 8-2 - 5 cm. longi, saepe geniculati, infra 
medium bracteis 2 parvis linearibus instructi. Calyx anguste tubulosus, 
1*3 cm. longus, parcissime hirtellus, omnino exalatus, obscure angulatus, 
alte 5-lobatus, lobi subaequales, erecti, lineari-lanceolati, circiter 1 cm. 
longi, basin versus 2 mm. lati, sensim acuminati. Corolla atropurpurea, 
4 cm. longa ; tubus angu;>te infundibularis, incurvatus, calyce multo 
longior, dimidio inferiore anguste cylindrico vix 2 mm. lato, dimidio 
superiore sensim ampliato fauce circiter 1 cm. lato ; limbus patens, 
2 3-2 - 5 cm. diametro, subaequaliter 4-lobatus, lobis passim crenuklis 
supero interdum emarginato. Stamina longiora leviter exserta, filanientis 
basin versus dentem brevissimum instructis, breviora vix exserta : antherae 
per paria cohaerentcs. Stylus breviter exsertns. Capsula subellipsoidea, 
glabra, calyce paulum brevior. — T. asiatica, Prain in As. 8oc. Bengal, 
vol. lxxii. pars 2, p. 18 et vol. lxxiv. pars 2, p. 354, vix Linn. — S. A. Skan. 



The pleasing Torenia here figured, which is striking on 
account of the colour of its corolla and is remarkable for 
the unusual length of its corolla-tube, is a native of the 
island of Sumatra and of the central portion of the Malay 
Peninsula. In Perak and Selangor, according to Mr. 
llidley, it occurs, often in considerable clumps, on clay 
banks. A member of the section Nortenia, Benth., which 
Du Petit Thouars looked upon as a distinct genus, the 
plant here figured deviates considerably from the more 
typical members of that group in having a calyx which is 
faintly angled only and not winged. In this respect it 
approaches most closely to the well-known T. asiatica, Linn., 

August, 1911. 



figured at t. 4249 of this work, and when the plant was 
originally dealt with in the light of herbarium material, the 
somewhat comprehensive view of the limits of T. asiatica 
adopted by Bentham in 1846 (DC. Prodr. x. 410), and 
further extended by Hooker in 1884 (Fl. Brit. Ind.iv. 277), 
appeared to justify the inclusion of this Malayan plant in 
that familiar species. This view has not, however, been 
generally adopted. The material from which our tigure 
and description have been prepared was obtained from a 
plant presented to Kew in 1909 by the late Col. Beddome, 
from his interesting collection of uncommon stove and 
greenhouse plants at Sispara, West Hill, Putney. Col. 
Beddome had originally obtained this plant from Sir F. 
Crisp, to whose collection at Friar Park, Henley, it had 
come, as T. rubens, from an Erfurt nursery. This alterna- 
tive suggestion has some justification, for T. rubens, Benth., 
like T. asiatica and like the plant here figured, has a 
calyx which is keeled only and not winged. But the colour 
of the corolla is very different in T. rubens, and there 
appears little room for doubt that Mr. Eidley, to whom the 
plant now figured is familiar in a wild state, is fully 
justified in treating it as a distinct species. Like the other 
species of Torenia in cultivation, T. atropurpurea thrives 
well in a warm, moist house, and may be used as a basket 
plant or grown, where there are borders of soil, as under- 
growth, since the plants readily spread over the surface and 
flower freely. In its coloration and in the form of its 
corolla T. atropurpurea provides a marked contrast to 
T. Fournieri., Linden, figured at t. 6747 of this work, the 
species that is now perhaps most frequently employed in 
this way; another characteristic difference will be * found 
in the fact that the stigmatic lobes of T. atropurpurea are 
not sensitive as is the case with those of T. Fournieri. 

Description. — Herb, perennial ; stems slender, branched 
and prostrate, sometimes rooting at the nodes, sparingly 
puberulous, sometimes reaching 2 ft. in length. Leaves 
petioled, ovate or deltoid-ovate, f-ljr in. long, -J-J in. wide, 
acute, base cuneate or subtruncate, serrate, often scaberulous 
above, almost glabrous beneath; petiole 2-3 lin. long. 
Flowers usually solitary, peduncled at the ends of the stem 
and branches. Peduncles f-1 m. long, often geniculate, 



2-bracteate below the middle ; bracts small, linear. Calyx 
narrow tubular, ^ in. long, sparingly puberulous, obscurely 
angled but not winged, deeply 5-lobed ; lobes subequal, 
erect, linear-lanceolate, about 5 lin. long. Corolla dark- 
purple, 1^ in. long ; tube narrowly funnel-shaped, incurved, 
much exceeding the calyx, the lower half narrow cylindric, 
1 lin. wide, the upper half gradually expanding, the throat 
5 lin. across; limb spreading, about 1 in. wide, subequal ly 
4-lobed, the lobes faintly crenulate with the uppermost 
sometimes emarginate. Stamens didynamous, the longer 
pair slightly exserted, their filaments shortly denticulate 
some distance above the base, the shorter pair hardly 
exserted ; anthers cohering in pairs. Style shortly exserted. 
Capsule subellipsoid, glabrous, rather shorter than the 
calyx. 

Fig. 1, calyx and pistil ; 2, corolla-tube, laid open, showing the stamens ; 3 and 
4, anthers; 5, ovary and disk; 6, fruit; 7, seeds : — all enlarged except 6, which 
is of natural size. 



8389 




MS.del JH.HtcKlith 



Vincent Brooks^ay & San 



It&i&f! 



L. Reeve &.C?Lon4om 



Tab. 8389. 
LANDOLPHIA Petersiana. 

East Africa. 

Aiocynaceae. Tribe Plumekioideae. 
Landolphia, Beauv.; Benth. et Hook./. Oen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 692. 



Landolphia Petersiana, Dyer in Kew Report, 1880, p. 42; inter species 
sectionis Aneyclobotrys foliorum nervis lateralibus tan turn 6-8 in utroque 
latere atque corollae lobis tubum excedentibus insignis. 

Frutex scandens o])c inflorescentiarum sensitivarum ; rami novelli rufo- 
pubescentes vel tomentosi. Folia elliptica vel oblongo-elliptica, subacuta 
vel saepius obtusa, 8-11 cm. longa, 3-5 cm. lata, coriacea, prinio utrinquc 
laxe pubescentia, mox glabrata, nervis lateralibus utrinque 6-8 (raro 10), 
venarum reticulatione tenui ; p-tiolus circa 6 mm. longus. Panicula 
longitudine varia, pedunculate, floribus numerosis se. c silibus in apicibus 
ramorum aggregatis ; rami patuli vel recurvi, tenuiter rufo-pubescentes 
vel glabrcscentes; pedunculi 2-5-10 cm. longi, graciles ; bracteae ovato- 
lanceolatae vel ovato-oblongae, acutae, rufo-pubescentes. Calyx 2 mm. 
longus ; sepala ovato-oblonga, obtnsa, rufo-pubescentes. Corolla alba, 
fragrans, 16-26 mm. longa in alabastro ; tubus gracilis cyliudricus, 
6-9 mm. longus; lobi oblique oblongi vel lineari-nblongi, acuti vel obtusi, 
12- 16 mm. longi, crispo-ciliati. Antherae ovato-oblongae, acutae, vix 2 mm. 
longae. Ovarium globosum, minutissime rufo-tomentosum. .Stylus cum 
stigmate 2 mm. longus. Fructus globosus, ad 6 cm. diametro. tenuiter 
velutinus, pericarpio coriaceo ; semina 8-18 mm. longa. — Planch. Prodr. 
Apocyn. p. 319; Dewcvre, Caoutch. Afr. Monogr. Landolph. p. 27, partim; 
Jumelle, PI. a Caoutch. et a Gutta, p. 57, partim ; Warburg, Kautshukpfl. 
p. 118, partim; Thiselton-Dyer in Hook. Ic. Plant, t. 2756; Stapf iu 
Thiselton-Dyer, Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. iv. p. 47. L. scandens,\ars. Petersiana, 
rotundifolia et Stuhlmanniana, Ilallier f. Kautschuklianen in Jahrb. Hamb. 
"Wissensch. Anstalt, vol. xvii. (1890), 3 Beih. pp. 82, 83; liussc in Engl. Bot. 
Jahrb. vol. xxxii. (1902), pp. 169-172. Ancyclobotrys PeUrvuma, Pierre in 
Bull. Soc. Linn. Paris, 1898, p. 91. A. rotundifolia, Pierre, 1. c. \>. 92. 
Willughbeia Petersiana et W. senemis, Klotzsch in Peters, Beise Itfossamb-. 
Bot. vol. i. pp. 281, ^82.-0. Stapf. 



The Landolphia here figured is widely spread throughout 
East Africa, where it extends from the Bahr-el-Grhazal and 
Mombasa through German East Africa to. Nyasaland and 
Mozambique. As the number of names that have been 
applied to it indicates, the species is evidently a very variable 
one, and what have been taken for distinguishable forms 
or varieties may represent little more than individual or 
local states. The species, generally known in East Africa 
as the " Mpira," was first added to the Kew collection in 

Arousr, 1911. 



1879, when seeds were sent by Dr. (now Sir J.) Kirk from 
Zanzibar. In 1892 another plant was received at Kew 
from the Jardin des Plantes, Paris. This latter plant, 
which has been grown since then in the Tropical Economic 
House at Kew, flowered there for the first time in July, 
1910, and provided the material on which our illustration 
has been based. The flowers are pure white and sweetly 
scented ; the fruit, which varies in shape from globose on 
the Lower Zambesi to pear-shaped in German East Africa, 
is edible ; the latex yields a rubber, but only of inferior 
quality. The plant thrives well under tropical conditions, 
and is easily propagated by means of stem-cuttings. 

Description. — Shrub, climbing by means of the inflo- 
rescence ; young twigs rusty-pubescent or tomentose. 
Leaves elliptic or oblong-elliptic, subacute or often obtuse, 
3-4J in. long, 1^-2 in. wide, coriaceous, at first loosely 
pubescent on both sides, at length becoming glabrous ,* 
lateral nerves 6-8, rarely 10 on each side, reticulation fine ; 
petiole about \ in. long. Panicle pedunculate, of varying 
length, bearing numerous sessile flowers clustered at the 
tips of its spreading or recurved, thinly rust} T -pubescent or 
almost glabrous branchlets ; peduncle 2-4 in. long, slender ; 
bracts ovate-lanceolate or ovate-oblong, acute, rusty-pubes- 
cent. Calyx 1 lin. long; sepals ovate-oblong, obtuse, 
rusty-pubescent. Corolla white, fragrant, f-1 in. long in 
bud; tube slender, cylindric, \~\ in. long; lobes oblique, 
oblong or linear-oblong, acute or obtuse, ^-f in. long, 
crisply ciliate. Anthers ovate-oblong, acute, under 1 lin. 
long. Ovary globose, very finely rusty-tomentose. Style 
with stigma 1 lin. long. Fruit globose, up to 2| in. in 
diameter, sparingly velvety; pericarp coriaceous. Seeds 
i~?i in. loner. 



Fig. 1, flower bud; 2, calyx in section, showing ovary; 3, corolla laid open, 
showing stamens; 4 and 5, stamens \~all enlarged. 



8390 







. S on^ 



X. Reeve & C° London. 



Tab. 8390. 

MORMODES revolutum. 

Peru. 

Obchidaceae. Tribe Vandeae. 
MomiODEs, Lindl. ; Benth. et Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 552. 



Mormodes revolution, llolfe in Ken) Bulletin, 1909, p. 367; a M. specioso, 
Linden, floribus immactilatis, labelli lobis lateralibus amplis obtusis et lobo 
intcrmedio fere aequalibus differt. 

Ihrba epiphytica. Pseudobulbi fusiformi-oblongi, 11-13 cm. longi, vaginis 
membranaeeis striatis imbricatis vestiti. Folia recurva, elougato-Ianceolata, 
acuta vel acuminata, 3-5-nervia, plicata, snbcoriacea, 15-30 cm. longa, 
3-3*5 cm. lata. Scapi axillares, 10-17 cm. longi, basi vaginis tubulosia 
vestiti, multifiori. Bracteae ovato-oblongae, ol)tusae, 5-8 mm. longae. 
Pedicelli 4-5 cm. longi. Flores speciosi, miniati, labello flavo. Sepula 
oblongo-lanceolata, acuta vel acuminata, apice et mavgines subrecurva, 
2 ■ 5-3 "5 cm. longa; lateralia subrefiexa. Petala erecta, oblongo-lanceolata, 
acuminata, apice et margine recurva, 2 "5-3 "5 cm. longa. Labellum ungui- 
cnlatum, trilobum, 2-2' 5 cm. longum; lobi laterales late oblongi, 5 mm. 
longi ; lobus intermedins ovatus, acuminatus, reflexus, circiter 8 mm. 
lougus. L'ulumna oblique incurva, acuta, 1*5 cm. longa. — R. A. Rolfe. 



The striking Mormodes here figured was introduced by 
Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, from Peru, where it had 
been obtained in the Moyobamba region by their collector, 
Mr. Forget. The species flowered for the first time in 
cultivation in July, 1909, at St. Albans, and was described 
from material supplied by Messrs. Sander, from whom a 
plant was thereafter acquired by purchase for the Kew 
collection. This plant, which has thriven well in an inter- 
mediate temperature, under the treatment most suitable 
for the allied genus Catasetum, flowered at Kew in 
January, 1910, and developed a much longer spike with a 
more strongly three-lobed lip than the plant on which the 
original description was based. The figure here published 
has been drawn from the plant at Kew, which flowered 
again in January, 1911. M. revolutum is allied to the 
Colombian 31. speciosum, Lindl., but differs in the characters 
enumerated by Mr. Rolfe. Another species of similar habit 
August, 1911. 



is the recently described M. Wolterlana, Kraenzl., which 
however differs, according to the published account, in 
having the inside of the lip and parts of the column hirsute. 

Description". — Herb, epiphytic ; pseudobulbs fusiform- 
oblong, 4^-5 in. long, clothed with membranous, striate, 
imbricate sheaths. Leaves recurved, elongate-lanceolate, 
acute or acuminate, 3-5-nerved, plicate, firm, 6-12 in. long, 
1£-1J in. wide. Scapes axillary, 4-7 in. long, clothed 
below with tubular sheaths, many-flowered; bracts ovate- 
oblong, obtuse, 2|-4 lin. long ; pedicels 1^-2 in. long. 
Flowers showy, cinnabar-red with a yellow lip. Sepals 
oblong-lanceolate, acute or acuminate, somewhat recurved 
at the tip and edges, I-l 1 - in. long; the later sepals some- 
what reflexed. Petals erect, oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, 
the tip and edges recurved, 1-1^ in. long. Lip clawed, 
3-lobed, f-1 in. long; lateral lobes wide oblong, 2 \ lin. 
long; mid-lobe ovate, acuminate, reflexed, about 4 lin. long. 
Column obliquely incurved, acute, § in. long. 



Fig. 1, anther cap ; 2, pollinarium ; 3, whole plant :— 1 and 2 enlarged, 3 reduced. 



xtei 




WncantBrociloDflr*-* 1 



L.TW-./, 



Tab. 8891. 

MUTISIA Clematis. 

Tropical Andes. 

Compositae. Tribe Mutisiaceae. 
Mutisia, Linn./. ; Benfh. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 485. 



Mutisia Clematis, Linn./. Suppl. 373; Cav. Ic. vol. v. t. 492; Lamb. 111. 
t. G90, fie:. 1 ; //. B. et K. Nov. Gen. et Sp. vol. iv. p. 15 ; Lens, in Linnaea, 
vol. v. p. 266 ; DC. Prodr. vol. vii. p. 5; Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. v. p. 501, 
fig'. 88 ; species M. grandiflorae, Humb. et Bonpl. affinis, sed ab ea foliolis 
4-5-jugis cum capitulis antherisque minoribus, et bracteis involucri in- 
terioribus plernmque obtusis differt. 

Ihrba scandens ; caulis fruticosus, sulcatus, lanato-tomentosus. Folia alterna, 
pinnata, rhachi in cirrhum producta ; foliola subchartacea ; 4-5-juga, 
breviter petiolulata, oblongo-lanceolata, apice obtusa vel subacuta, 
mucronata, margine integra, l'5-4 cm. longa, 0'8-l"3 cm. lata, supra 
prinmm parce lanata, mox glabrescentia, subtus lanato-tomentosa. Capitula 
pendula, anguste oblongo-cylindrica, 6-7 cm. longa, apice circiter 6 cm. 
diametro. Involucri bracteae 4-5-seriatae, exteriores plus minusve ovato- 
lanceolatae, interiores lineari-oblongae, obtusae, usque ad 3 "5 cm. lorgae, 
1 cm. latae, extra tomentosae. Flores radii 9-10, recurvi, coccinei ; corollae 
tubus cylindricus, 4 cm. longns, 1-25 mm. diametro, glaber ; lamina ovato- 
elliptica, trifida, 2 cm. longa, 1 cm. lata, glabra. Stylus breviter exsertus. 
Flores disci numerosi; corollae tubus cylindricus, 4 cm. longus, sub 
anthesin paullo infra medium longitudinaliter apertus ; Iobi linearcs, 
subacuti. Antherae circiter 1"7 cm. longae, exsertae, ad apicem extra 
minute puberulae. Stylus circiter 5 mm. exsertus, 2-lobus, lobis dorso 
minute puberulis. Achaenia oblonga, 3 mm. longa, laevia, glabra. Pappi 
setae 1-seriatae, 1*7 cm. longae, plumosae. — J. Hutchinson. 



The genus Mutisia includes upwards of sixty species, all 
confined to the higher ranges of the Andes of tropical 
South America. Many of these are of considerahle heauty 
and interest and well worthy of cultivation. As yet, 
however, only five or six species appear to have found 
their way into European gardens, and only three plates 
in this work, t. 2705, t, 5273 and t. GOOO, have so far been 
given to the illustration of the genus. The species now 
figured, M. Clematis, is a native of Peru and Colombia and 
is the second of the group characterised by having pinnate 
leaves to appear in this Magazine ; the pinnate-leaved form 
already depicted, M. speciosa, Ait., described under t. 2705, 
differs very markedly from our plant in having strongly 
reflexed outer involucral bracts. The nearest ally of 
M. Clematis is, however, M. grandiflora, Humb. et Bonpl., 
which has larger and fewer leaflets, larger flower heads, 

August, 1911. 



longer anthers and acutely tipped involueral bracts. ^ Of 
the various species that have been brought under cultiva- 
tion M. Clematis has proved much the easiest to manage. 
Thirty years ago it clothed a considerable portion of the 
South Octagon in the Temperate House at Kew, its shoots 
growing as vigorously as a Cobaea and providing an 
abundant crop of flowers every spring. The plant from 
which the material used for our illustration was derived 
grows against a pillar in the Himalayan section of the 
same house, where it flowers freely in May. Evergreen in 
habit, it has the disadvantage of presenting a somewhat 
unprepossessing appearance in winter, owing to its foliage 
and young shoots suffering to some extent, but by the 
removal of all weak growth early in the year the plant 
very soon comes into condition again. It can be propagated 
from cuttings formed of half-ripened shoots, as well as from 
seeds. 

Description-. — Herb, climbing; stem rather woody, 
grooved, woolly pubescent. Leaves alternate, pinnate, 
their rachises produced into tendrils ; leaflets firm, 4-5- 
paired, shortly stalked, oblong-lanceolate, obtuse or sub- 
acute, mucronate, entire, f-1^ in. long, J— £ in. wide, at 
first sparingly woolly above, soon almost glabrous, under- 
neath woolly-pubescent. Heads pendulous, narrowly 
oblong-cylindric, 2^-2§ in. long, about 2^ in. across at 
the top. Bracts of the involucre 4-5-serlate, the outer 
more or less ovate-lanceolate, the inner linear-oblong, 
obtuse, the largest 1J in. long, 5 lin. wide, tomentose out- 
side. Bay-florets 9-10, recurved, bright red ; corolla-tube 
cylindric, 1J in. long, under 1 lin. wide, glabrous; ray 
ovate-elliptic, 3-fid, § in. long, 5 lin. wide, glabrous. Style 
slightly exserted. Disk-florets numerous; corolla-tube 
cylindric, 1J in. long, when open longitudinally split 
rather below the middle; lobes linear, subacute. Anthers 
about I in. long, exserted, finely puberulous at the tip on 
the outer side. Style distinctly exserted, 2-lobed, lobes 
finely puberulous on the back. Achenes oblong, lj lin. 
long, smooth, glabrous. Papjnis 1 -seriate, the setae 
plumose, | in. long. 

Fig. 1, part of a leaf showing the mucronate tip ; 2 flower of the ray ; 3, a 
pappus-stta ; 4, flower of the disk ; 5, anther; 6, style-arms :— all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
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Tab. 8392. 
ACINETA Moorei. 

South America, 

Okchidaceae. Tribe Vandeae. 
Aoineta, Lindl. ; Benth. et Hook.fi Gen. riant, vol. iii. p. 551. 



Aeineta Moorei, Ilolfe; species A. Ilrulyamie, Re'chb. f., affinis sei floribus 
crebre maculutis labellique lobis lateralibus distiucte latioribus differt. 

Ihrha epiphytica ; pseudobulbi conferti, ovoidco-oblongi, sulcati, crassi, 
7-10 cm. longi, apice tripbylli. Folia petiolata, lanceolato-oblonga, 
breviter acuminata, plicata, subcoriacea, 30-40 cm. longa, 5-6 cm. lata. 
Scapi penduli, multiflori, oirciter 80 cm. longi, vaginis tubulosis amplis 
vestiti; bracteae patt-ntes, elliptico-ob'ongae, obtusae, valde concavae, 
l"5-l - 8cm. longae; pedicelli 4-5 cm. longi, scabridi vel papillis nigris 
crebre aspersi. Flores speciosi, subglobosi, straminei, crebre brunneo- 
pimctulati. Sepalum posticum suborbiculave, obtusuna, valde concavum, 
3-3'5 cm. longum ; t-epala lateralia late et oblique ovato-orbicularia, 
obtusa, concava, 3 - 5-4 cm. longa. Pttala late elliptica, obtusa, sub- 
concava, 3 cm. longa. Labdlum rigide earnosum, cum basi columnae con- 
tinuum, 3-lobum, 4 cm. longum ; unguis latus, concavus, 2 cm. longus ; 
lobi Iaterales oblique renitbrmes, truncati, 1*5 cm. lati; lobus intermedins 
oblcngus, apice contractus et subobtusus, concavus, l - 5 cm. longus; 
discus crasse calloso-appendiculatus; callus late oblongus, ba^i ct apico 
breviter bilobus. Columna clavata, 2 cm. longa, basi parco pubcscens, 
apice late alata; pollinia 2, cerea, pyriformi-oblonga, in glandulam dila- 
latam affixa.— E. A. Rolfe. 



Three species of Aeineta have already been figured in this 
work, viz. : — A. Barkeri, Lindl., as a Peristeria, t. 4203 ; 
A. superba, Reichb. f. (A. Humboldtii, Lindl.), also as r 
Peristeria, t. 4156 ; and A. densa, Lindl., t. 7143. Most of 
the species have flowers of a yellow ground colour, hut 
Reichenbach has described as A. Ilrubyana, Reichb. f., one 
with flowers of a whitish ground colour and very few spots. 
To A. Hrubyana, which is rare in collections, our plant is 
closely allied; it is readily distinguished by the flowers 
being more copiously marked with reddish brown spots, and 
differs considerably in the structuie of the Jip. Our plant 
was purchased at Bruges, from Messrs. Sander & Sons, for 
the Royal Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, in 1903, as a distinct 
but unnamed species. It grew well, Sir F. W. Moore 
informs us, in a mixture of Osmunda fibre, good peat, 
and charcoal in a basket' suspended from the roof of 

September, l'Jll. 



an intermediate orchid house with a minimum night 
temperature of 55° F., and flowered for the first time in 
July 1905. Flowers and photographs submitted to Kew 
indicated that the plant was new to science, but fuller 
material was desirable. With some of the Acinetas the act 
of flowering, at, least when under cultivation, has an 
exhausting effect. This species has been no exception to 
this rule, and it was not until July 1909 that it flowered 
again. From the material then supplied our figure and a 
diagnosis of the species have been prepared. Though 
smaller than most of the known species, and though some- 
what less vigorous than these in growth, A. Moorei does 
not deserve to be spoken of as delicate. It thrives well 
under the conditions already mentioned, but requires rest 
when a season's growth is finished. 

Description.— Herb ; epiphytic ; pseudobulbs clustered, 
ovoid-oblong, stout, sulcate, 3-4 in. long, 3-phyllous. 
Leaves petioled, lanceolate - oblong, shortly acuminate, 
plicate, almost leathery, 12-lb" in. long, 2-2 J in. wide. 
Scapes pendulous, many-flowered, about a foot in length, 
clothed with wide tubular sheaths; bracts spreading, 
elliptic-oblong, obtuse, very concave, f — f in. long ; pedicels 
lf-2 in. long, scabrid or closely beset with black papillae. 
Flowers showy, subglobose, straw-coloured, closely punctu- 
late witli brown spots. Sepals : posterior suborbicular, 
obtuse, very concave, l{-li| in. long; lateral widely and 
obliquely ovate-orbicular, obtuse, concave, ll-H in. long. 
Petals wide elliptic, obtuse, slightly concave" if in. long. 
Lip firmly fleshy, continuous with the base of the column, 
3-lobed, 1£ in. long; claw wide, concave, | in. long; lateral 
lobes obliquely reniform, truncate, f in. long, mid-lobe 
oblong, narrowed and somewhat blunt at the tip, concave, 
5 in. long; disk thickly callose-appendiculate, the swelling 
wide oblong, slightly 2-lobed at apex and base. Colon* 
clavate, § in. long, slightly pubescent at the base, widely 
winged at the apex ; pollinia 2, waxy, oblong-pyrilbrm, 
adiiate to a dilated jrland. 



Fip. 1, lip with one side-lobe removed ; 2, column ; 3 and 4, pollinating 
cenhoin behind and in front; 5, whole plant, from a photograph, the tcape 
upported: -1-4 enlarged. 6 reduced.. F 



8333 




klith 



VinoentBrooJis,Day &Son Lt. on? 



L-FUeve &.C°Lan<lor 



Tab 8303. 
VIBURNUM Henryi. 

China. 



CAritiKOLiACEAE. Tribe Sambucbab. 
Vibuuncm, Linn./. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 3. 



Viburnum (Microfilms) Henryi, TTemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. XXlii. p. 353 ; 
Gard. Chron. 1'JlO, vol. xlviii. p. 265 cum fig.; inter species sinenses 
affines foliis lanceolate glabris subtns in axillis venaruni primariarum 
gfandul&ia et inflore.scentia pyramidali distincta. 

Frutex ornatus usque ad 3-4 m. altns vel interdnm supra rupos vagans (testo 
Henrv), sempervirens, praeter perulas fereundique glaber, raraulis floriferis 
teretilms graeiliusculis, internndiis quam foliis brevioribus. Folia oppo- 
pita, petiolata, coriacea, oblonga, ovato-oblonga vel hmceolata, interdnm 
angnste lanceolata, absque petiolo usque 15 em. longa sed saepins 
5-10 cm. longa, utrinque attennata vel basi plus miuusve rotundata, 
calloso-denticulata, margine interdum rubescentia, glabra vel rarius 
subtus praecipue secus venas primarias pilis stellatis parcissiine insfructa, 
subtus in axillis venarum primariarnm glandulosa, glandulis immersis; 
venae primariae utrinque 5-7, sat conspicnae ; petiolus 1-3 cm. longus, 
sursum leviter dilatatus, subalatns. Fhres inter minores, pallide lntei 
vel flavo-vi rentes, cymoso-paniculati, brevissimc pedicel lati ; paniculae 
terminates, pyramidales, 5-10 cm. longae. ramulis rubris, bracteatae brncteis 
linearibns cito deciduis inferioribus 2-3 mm. longis. Cah/x brevissimns, 
inaequaliter 5-dentatus, dentibus rotundatis. Corolla breviter campanu- 
lata, 6-7 mm. diametro, lobis rotundatis obscure dcnticulatis. Stamina 
quam corollae lobi breviora. Ovarium 1-loculare, 1-ovidatum. I)rupa 
rubra, fere sanguinea, dcraum nigrescens, ovoidea, ciiciter 1 cm. longa. — 

W. 130TTING llEMSLEY. 



The Viburnum which is the subject of our illustration is 
a Chinese species which was originally described from 
specimens collected in the Patung district of Ifupeli in 
Central China by Mr. A. Henrv, by whom the plant was 
subsequently met with in Szechuan. The plant from 
which our plate has been prepared was introduced to 
cultivation in 11)01 by Mr. E. II. Wilson for Messrs. J. 
Veitch & Son, in whose nursery at Coombe Wood it has 
since been grown without any protection. It, is, from the 
horticultural standpoint, distinct and striking on account 
of its paniculate inflorescence as contrasted with the flat 
corymbs of most of the species of Viburnum in our gardens. 
Its value as a shrub in collections is further enhanced by 
its evergreen habit, a character which is not common among 

SK1TK.M15KR, 1D11. 



hardy species. The beauty of V. Henryi is, however, 
greatest in September, when the fruits are of a beautiful 
coral-red and are only beginning to turn black. In habit 
it is somewhat stiff and rather sparingly furnished with 
leaves. It is easily propagated by means of cuttings made 
of fairly ripened wood and placed in gentle heat. Like 
most of the species of the genus it prefers a cool, moist, 
loamy soil. 

Description. — S/iruh, showy when in fruit, sometimes 
erect and stiff, 10-14 ft. high, sometimes, according to 
Henry, in a wild state clambering on rocks, evergreen, 
nearly glabrous everywhere except on the bud scales; 
flowering twigs terete, rather slender ; internodes shorter 
than the leaves. Leaves opposite, petioled, coriaceous, 
oblong or ovate-oblong or lanceolate, sometimes narrowly 
lanceolate, up to 6 in. long, but usually 2-4 in. long, 
narrowed to both extremities or more or less rounded at 
the base, callous-toothed and sometimes reddish along the 
margin, glabrous or very sparingly stellate-pubescent on 
the main-nerves beneath, and there with sunken glands at 
the junction of the nerves and midrib ; main nerves 5-7 on 
each side, rather prominent; petiole J-l| in. long, slightly 
widened upwards and faintly winged'. Flowers small, pale 
yellow or greenish yellow, cymosely paniculate, very shortly 
pedicelled; panicles terminal, pyramidal, 2-4 in. long, their 
twigs red, bracteate ; bracts linear, very soon deciduous, the 
lowest 1-1 J lin. long. Calyx very short, unequally 
5-toothed; teeth rounded. Corolla shortly campanulate, 
3-3 £ lin. across ; lobes rounded, faintly denticulate. Stamens 
shorter than the corolla lobes. Ovary 1-locular, 1-ovuled. 
Drupe coral red, deepening as it ripens, at length almost 
black, 4-5 lin. Ion jr. 



g 'i b portion of under side of leaf, showing glands ; 2, a flower-bud; 3, an 
expanded flower; 4, calyx and pistil; 5, stamen in bud: 6, stamen from an 
expanded flower; 1, a drupe:— «M enlarged. 



8391 




S-delJ-N-Fitchlith. 



\£ncer. 



L Reevs &. C° London. 



Tab. 8394. 

SENECIO SAXIFRAGOIDES. 

New Zealand. 

Compositab. Tribe Senecionideae. 
Seneoio, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 446. 



Senecio saxifragoides, Hook. f. Fl. N. Zel. i. 144 ; Cheeseman Man. N. Zel. 
Ft. 372 ; affinis 8. lagopo, Baoul, sed robustior ; foliis majoribus crassioribus 
magis villosis differt. 

Herba perennis; rhizoma robustum, apice dense et longe lanatum. Folia radi- 
calia, potiolata, late oblongo-elliptica vel suboibicularia, apice rotunda ta, bad 
paullo cordate, 8-12 cm. longa, 4 5-10 cm. la'a, coriacea, margine uudulata, 
denticulata, supra laxe et appresse villosa, deinura fere glabra, prope 
marginem longe setosa, subtus incano lanati, nervis lateralibns utrinquo 
7-9 basi patulis apicem versus sutarcuatis distinctis; petioli robusti, 
usque ad 7 cm. longi, cum costa incano-lauati et purpureo-setosi. Scapi 
ad 30 cm. longi, ramosi, villis albis et setis purpureis inBtructi; bracteae 
spathulatae vel Iineares, ad 3 cm. longae; pedunculi 1* 5-3 "5 cm. longi. 
Capitu/a subcorymbosa, 4 cm. diametro, flava. Involucri bracteae anguste 
lanceolatae, subacutae, vix 1 cm. longae, extra villosae. Flores radii 
18-20; corollae tubus cylindricus, 25 mm. longus, glaber: limbos 
oblanceolatns, apice tridentatus, l - 2 cm. longus, 4 mm. latus, 4-ntrvis, 
glaber; achaema cylindrica, glaber, pappi setae barbellatae, 3*5 mm. 
longae. Flores disci numerosi ; corollae tubus 4 mm. longus, infra medium, 
constrictus, supra medium ampliatus, glaber; lobi ovato-lanceolati, sub- 
acute, 1 mm. longi, 05 mm. lati, glabri; antherae obtusae, 2 - 5 mm. 
longae ; pappus et acbaenia ut in floribus radii ; styli rami 1 mm. longi. — 
J. Hutchinson. 



The genua Senecio is represented in New Zealand by 
about thirty species, all of them endemic except one, 
S. lautus, Forst., which is widely spread in Australia and 
Tasmania. The New Zealand species constitute two natural 
groups, one composed of herbaceous perennials, the other 
of shrubs or small trees. The species of the shrubby group 
are very distinct and easily separated ; those of the herba- 
ceous section, to which the subject of our plate belongs, are 
somewhat variable and difficult to discriminate. Our plant, 
S. saxifragoides, is most closely allied to S. lagopus, Raoul, 
but is of stouter habit, with larger and thicker leaves, more 
densely villous on the upper surface. The specimen from 
which the material of our figure was obtained is one of a 
collection of New Zealand plants brought together by 

8EITEMHEK, 1'Jll. 



Mr. H. H. Travers and disposed of by auction at the rooms 
of Messrs Protheroe and Morris in 1908. It was planted, 
along with various species of Olearia, in an unheated frame, 
where it grew well and flowered freely in the summer of 1910. 
It may prove to be hardy in England, and if so, should be a 
most useful plant for the rock garden, being a perennial and 
evergreen with handsome foliage, and forming, when in 
flower, a strikingly beautiful object. 

Description. — Herb, perennial ; rootstock stout, with a 
densely woolly crown. Leaves radical, petioled, wide 
oblong-elliptic or nearly orbicular, rounded at the apex, 
slightly cordate at the base, 3-5 in. long, l|-4 in. wide, 
coriaceous, margin waxy, denticulate, laxly and adpressed 
villous, but soon almost glabrous above, distinctly setose 
near the magin, hoary-woolly beneath ; lateral nerves 7-9 
on each side, spreading at the base, somewhat incurved 
towards the apex ; petiole stout, up to 2| in. long, hoary- 
woolly and purplish setose like the* midrib. Scapes up to 
1 ft. high, branched, clothed with white hairs and purple 
setae; bracts spathulate or linear, over 1 in. long; 
peduncles §~1£ in. long. Heads almost corymbose, li in. 
across, yellow. Involucral bracts narrow lanceolate, sub- 
acute, about I in. long, villous outside. Ray-florets 18-20 ; 
corolla-tube cylindric, over 1 lin. long, glabrous ; limb ob- 
lanceolate, 3-dentate at the tip, J in. long, 2 lin. wide, 
4-neryed, glabrous; achenes cylindric, glabrous; pappus 
setae barbellate, nearly 2 lin. long. Disk-florets numerous ; 
corolla-tube 2 lin. long, narrowed below the middle, 
widened above the middle, glabrous ; lobes ovate-lanceolate, 
subacute, very small, glabrous ; anthers obtuse, over 1 lin. 
long ; pappus setae and achenes as in the rav-florets ; style- 
arms J lin. long. 



lJV a rortl „ on °/ a Ie af showing the setae near the edge; 2, an involucral 
t>nvct; d ray-floret; 4, disk-floret; 5, pappus seta; 6, anthers; 7, style-arms; 
o, an entire plant, showing habit :— all enlarged except 8, which is much reduced. 



S395 







Vm.centBrool<s,Dw & Son Lt*imp 



IReeve &.C° London. 



Tab. 8395. 

CLEMATIS CHRYSOCOMA. 

China. 



Eanunculaceae. Tribe Clematideae. 
Clematis, Linn.; Denth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 3. 



Clematis chrysocoma, Franch. in Bull. Soc. BoK France, to 1 , xxxiii. p. 3G2 ; 
Finet & Gugnep. Contrih. Fl. As. Or. i. 10; aflmis C. tnontanae, Ham., a qua 
indurnento grossiore densiore receiit. 

Fruticulus humilis rami's erectis vel decumbentibus pallide brunneis sparse 
pilosis. Folia trifoliolata ; petiolus 2-5-7 cm. longus, dense pilosus ; 
foliola petiolulata, ambitu elliptico-obovata, grosse 3-5-dentata, subtus 
dense subsericeo-pilosa, pilis ex^iccando aurtds, supra sparsius pilosa, 
terminalia conspicue petiolulata, 2-4, cm. lonpa, I- 5-3*5 cm. lata, lateralia 
breviter petiolulata, minora. Floret solitarii bini Tel terni.e ramulis Talde 
abbreTiatis foliatis orti. Ptdunculi 4-7 cm. longi, crassiusculi, dense 
pilosi, sursum incrassati. Sepala 4, patentia, obovato-elliptica, apiculata, 
1*8 cm. longa, 1*2 cm. lata, alba margine roseo, supra glabra, subtus 
sericeo-pubescentia. Petala nulla. Stamina numerosa; filamenta appla- 
nata, linearia Tel oblongo-linearia ; antberae oblon^ae vel oblongo-lineares, 
deorsum leviter angustatae, 3-3 5 mm. longae. Pistilla numerosa, con- 
gesta, dense villosa, apicibus stylorum purpureo-bruuneorum exceptis. 
Achaenia compressa, pilosa, stylis longis plumosis. — T. A. Sprague. 



The Clematis here figured is a Chinese plant which 
approaches very closely to the Eastern Himalayan form 
treated by Mr. Briihl as a variety, var. chumbica, of 
C. montana, Ham.; it differs chiefly from the Chunibi 
Valley plant in its coarser indumentum, and it is possible 
that the two may not be specifically distinct. But until a 
revision of the numerous varieties of C. montana recognised 
by Briihl has been effected it is desirable to maintain 
C. chrysocoma as a separate species. The plant which has 
supplied the material for our figure was presented to the 
Kew collection by Mr. M. L. de Vilmorin in the spring of 
lH 10. It grew very well during the summer and flowered 
abundantly from the old wood. Unfortunately, it does not 
promise to be very hardy, and at the first frost died down to 
the woody base, so that it was necessary to take up the plant 
and house it during the winter. The plant is easily pro- 
pagated by cuttings made of nearly ripened wood. 
Skptxmbeb, 1911. 



Description. — Shrub, of low stature, with erect or 
decumbent, pale brown, sparingly hairy brandies. Leaves 
3-foliolate; petiole 1-2J in. long, densely pilose; leaflets 
stalked, elliptic-obovate, coarsely 3-5-toothed, densely 
almost silky hairy beneath, sparingly hairy above, the 
terminal leaflet more distinctly stalked, f-lj in. long, 
§— 1J in. wide, the lateral leaflets smaller and more shortly 
stalked. Flowers solitary or 2-3, on very short leafy twigs. 
Peduncles l^-2f in. long, rather stout, densely hairy, 
thickened upwards. Sepals 4, spreading, obovate-elliptic, 
apiculate, J in. long, | in. wide, white with a rosy margin, 
glabrous within, silky-pubescent outside. Petals 0. Stamens 
numerous ; filaments flattened, linear or linear-oblong ; 
anthers oblong or oblong-linear, slightly narrowed down- 
wards, ]i-2 lin. long. Pistils numerous, crowded, densely 
villous except at the tips of the brownish-purple styles. 
Achenes compressed, hairy ; styles long, plumose. 



Figs. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3, pistil ; 4, head of achenes ; 5, a single achenc :— 
ail enlarged except 4, which is of natural size. 



8396 




I 



VoncenlBrookspay &Scn Lt B"P 



J- Reeve & C° Lonrlr 



Tab. 8396. 

IMPATIENS Herzogii. 
\ 

German New Guinea. 

Balsaminaceae. 
IairATlENS, Linn. ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 277. 



Impatiens Herzogii, K. Schum. in Engl. Bot. Jahrh. vol. ix. p. 204 ; species 
J. Hawheri, Bull, affinis ; differt glabritia, ramulis tetragonis glandulis 
interpetiolaribus minutis, colore florum, vexillo apice truncato intruso, 
alarumque lobis breviter 2-lobis. 

Ilerba robusta, ramosa, glaberrima, grandiflora, ramis patulis ramulisque tetra- 
gonis viridibus. Folia 6-14 cm. longa, inferiora opposita, superiora 
5-7-natim verticillata, petiolata, firma, ovata ovato-oblonga vel ovato- 
lanceolata, utrinque acuminata, serrulata, basin versus saepe longe ciliata, 
subtus pallida, nervis utrinque 8-10 ; petiolus 2-5 cm. longus ; glandulae 
basi petiolorum subulatae, herbaceae, virides. Jvflorescentia simpliciter 
pedicellata ; pedicelli solitarii vel fasciculati, 4-6 cm. longi, graciles, erecti. 
Flores 4-6 cm. expansi, colore miniacei. Sepala 2, ovato-lanceolata, acumi- 
nata, l'5-2 cm. longa, pallide viridia. Vexillum 2-3 cm. latum, ovato- 
rotundatum vel cuneatum, margine superiore truncato medio paullo 
intruso in sinu apiculato ; costa dorso ala prominente carinave angusta 
viride instructa. Alae sessiles vexillo triente longiores; lobi basi liberi, 
basales 2-2 '5 cm. longus, obovato-oblongus, 2-lobus, basi acutus; distalis 
2'5-3"5 cm. longus, obcordatus, basi longe attenuatim stipitatus; auricula 
dorsalis 0. Labelli limbus cymbiformis, acuminatus, ad 1 cm. longus ; calcar 
5-7 cm. longuni, gracillimum, incurvum, rubrum. Filamenta brevia, late 
subulata ; antherae orbiculares, rubro-purpureae. — J. D. Hookeu. 



The Impatiens which forms the subject of our illustration 
is a native of New G-uinea. The plant from which the 
material for this figure has been derived was raised at Kew 
from a cutting sent from the Royal Botanic Garden, G-las- 
nevin, and raised there, so Sir F. W. Moore informs us, from 
seeds sent by Dr. R. Schlechter from German New Guinea. 
It has proved a freely growing, freely flowering species, 
amenable to very varied cultural conditions. It has survived 
the winter and flowered well in the cool moisture of an 
Odontoglossum house, with a night temperature of 50° F. ; 
in the dry atmosphere of a Cactus house ; and in a bright 
stove pit with a night temperature of 65° F. But of these 
three conditions that most suitable is clearly the last men- 
tioned ; the plant grows more freely, flowers more profusely 
and is of a decidedly brighter colour when grown in a 
stove pit. It requires a rich soil and can be readily pro- 
pagated by cuttings. The nearest ally of /. Herzogii is 
September, 1911. 



7. Hawkeri, Bull, figured at t. 8247 of this work, which is 
also a native of New Guinea. They may in most cases be 
readily distinguished by the fact that I. Hawkeri is partially 
hairy and has dark red flowers, whereas I. Ilerzogii is per- 
fectly glabrous and has vermilion-coloured flowers. But 
while it is thus easy and, from the horticultural standpoint, 
convenient to keep them apart, Sir Joseph Hooker points 
out that, having regard to the conformity of the two in all 
essential respects and to the circumstance that they are 
natives of the same country, there is little room for doubt 
that they are forms of the same species. This conclusion is 
supported by the fact that in the Kew Herbarium there are 
two authentically named specimens of I. Ilerzogii received 
from the Berlin Herbarium, one collected in Kaiser 
Wilhelmsland by Mr. Hollrung, the other obtained in New 
Guinea by Mr. Lauterbach, in both of which the branches 
are glandular pubescent. 

Description-. — Herb; stout, branching, branches and 
twigs 4-angled, quite glabrous, spreading. Leaves 2J-5J 
in. long, opposite low down, in whorls of 5-7 higher up, 
petioled, firm, ovate or ovate-oblong or ovate-lanceolate, 
acuminate, narrowed to the base, serrulate and often long 
ciliate towards the base, bright green above, pale beneath, 
with 8-10 nerves on each side ; petiole f-2 in. long ; 
glands at the base of the petiole subulate, herbaceous, 
green. Inflorescence simply pedicelled ; pedicels solitary or 
clustered, lJ-2£ in. long, slender, erect. Flowers showy, 
Ja -2 ? m - across. Sepals 2, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, 
f-f in. long, pale green. Vexillum §-lJ m - wi( *e, ovate- 
rotund or cuneate, upper edge truncate, somewhat inturned 
in the middle, apiculate in the sinus, the midrib with a 
prominent, green dorsal wing or ridge. Wings sessile, one- 
third longer than the vexillum ; lobes free at the base, the 
basal §-1 in. long, obovate-oblong, 2-lobed, acute at the 
base; the distal 1-1 * in. long, obcordate, the base long and 
narrowly stipitate, without any dorsal auricle. Labellum 
with a cymbiform acuminate limb, about £ in. long ; spur 
2-2| in. long, very slender, incurved, red. Filaments short, 
wide subulate ; anthers orbicular, reddish purple. 

Fig. 1, stamens; 2, pistil:— both enlarged. 



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„ 8393.— VIBURNUM HENRYI, China. 
„ 8394.— SENECIO SAXIFRAGOIDES, New Zealand. 
„ 8395.— CLEMATIS CHRYSOCOMA, 'China. 
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Tab. 8397. 
LISSOCHILUS BTYL1TES. 

Tropical Africa. 

Obchidaceae. Tribe Vandeae. 
LiesocniLUS, R. Br.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 536. 



LissochiluB stylites, Reichb, f. Otiu Bot. Hamb. pp. 61, 75 ; Flora, 1885, 
p. 379; Rolfe in Dyer Fl. 1'rop. A/r. vol. vii. p. 83; iiffinis L. arenario, Lilidl., 
sed planta otunino aiajorc et labello callis stylitbrinibus capitatis vel 
obovatis differt. 

Herb terrestris, erecta, 1-1 • 5 m. alta. Folia suberecta vel arcuata, lineari- 
lanceolata, acuta vel acuminata, basi attenuata, plicata, 0" 75-1 m. longa, 
3-5 cm. lata. Scapi erecti, 1-1 • 5 m. alta; racemi laxi, circiter 30 cm. 
longi, 6-9-flori ; bracreae lineari-lanceolatae, acuminatae, 2-4 cm. longae, 
patentes ; pedicelli 2 "5-3 cm. longi. Flores speciosi. Sepal a reflexa, 
ovato-lanceolata, acuminatissima vel fere aristata, 2 "5-3' 5 cm. longa, 
pallide viridia, basi lilacino-sulfusa. Petala suberecta, latissime elliptica 
vel sul>orbicularia, apice obtusa et subreflexa, 2 5-3 cm. longa, pallide 
purpurea. Lahellum late panduratum vel pandurato-trilobum, 3-3*5 cm. 
longum, basi late saecatum, pallide purpureum ; lobi laterales latissimi, 
rotnndati; lobus intermedins transverse oblongus, obtusus vel emargi- 
natus; saccus ampins, apice obtusus vel paullo dilatatus, extra albus, 
apice flavus, intus pallide viridis, fusco-punctatus, apice bicallosus ; calli 
compressi, 3-4 mm. longi, apice obscure 2-3-lobi. Columna clavata, 2 cm. 
longa; antbera apiculata; pollinia 4, per paria connexa, anthera dehiscente 
glandula rostelli utrinque longe acuminata in stipitam breveni affixa. — 
B. A. Rolfe. 



Lissochilus stylites is a species which was originally 
described by the late Professor Reichenbach in 1878 from 
material collected by Dr. Schweinfurth near Munsa in the 
Monbuttu Countiy, and was then stated to be allied to 
L. arenarius, Lindl., but to be distinguished by the 
presence of a pair of styliform capitate calli in the throat 
of the lip. A plant collected by Mr. Mechow in Angola 
was subsequently referred to the same species, as a form that 
differs only in having a shorter crest. Another plant, 
which had been received by the Hon. Mrs. Foley from a 
friend at Ikom, on the Cross River, Southern Nigeria, with 
the information that it grows in hot and moist localities, 
flowered in her collection at Packham, Fordingbridge, 
Hants, in June, 1909. This plant was exhibited at a meet- 
ing of the Royal Horticultural Society and supplied the 
material from which our plate has been prepared. This 
Nigerian Lissochilus is considerably larger in all its parts 

OcTOBKR, 1911. 



than the widely distributed L. arenarius, but agrees 
extremely well with the original description of L. stylites, 
and is believed to represent that species. The genus Lisso- 
chilus is rich in ornamental forms ; unfortunately, however, 
though suitable for cultivation as garden plants, they are 
not easy to manage. Some, which grow naturally in 
swampy ground, require subaquatic treatment, and at Kew 
species such as L. Horsfallii, L. giganteus and L. Mahoni 
have been brought into flower by planting in large pans ol 
peat and sphagnum half submerged during the growing 
period in a tank suitable for Victoria regia, with the water 
at a temperature of about 75° F. Others again, like 
L. Krebsii and L. ugandae, grow well for a time when 
planted in a border of peat in a fairly dry house suitable 
for succulent plants. All the species appear to improve it 
allowed to rest in a fairly dry condition for two or three 
months after the leaves have withered. 

Description. — Herb, terrestrial, erect, 3-5 ft. high. 
Leaves suberect or arcuate, linear-lanceolate, acute or 
acuminate, narrowed to the base, plicate, 2^-3 ft. long, 
1^-2 in. wide. Scapes erect, 3-5 ft, high; racemes lax, 
about 1 ft. long, 6-9-flowered ; bracts linear-lanceolate, 
acuminate, f-lj in. long, spreading ; pedicels 1-lj in. 
long. Flowers purple, showy. Sepals reflexed, ovate- 
lanceolate, very acutely acuminate or almost aristate, l-l^r 
in. long, pale green tinged with lilac at the base. Petals 
suberect, wide elliptic or almost suborbicular, obtuse and 
somewhat reflexed at the tip, 1-1 J in. long, pale purple. 
Lip widely pandurate or pandurately 3-lobed, lj-l^ in« 
long ; base widely pouched, pale purple ; lateral lobes 
broad, rounded; mid-lobe transversely oblong, obtuse or 
emarginate ; pouch wide, obtuse or slightly dilated at the 
tip, outside white, pale green within, yellow at the tip and 
2-callose, dotted with pale brown; callosities compressed, 
l|-2 lin. long, faintly 2-3-lobed at the tip. Column clavate, 
I in. long; anther apiculate; pollinia 4, united in pairs, 
attached when the anther opens by a short stalk to a 
long acuminate rostellar gland. 

Fig. 1, part of lip; 2, column; 3, anther cap; 4, pollinarium ; 5, sketch of 
an entire plant:— a?? enlarged except 5, which is much reduced. 



8338 




ent Bro olrs JD ay <3c Son 



L Reeve ScC 9 L evador 



Tah. 8398. 
APHELANDRA fascinator. 

Tropical South America. 



ACANTHACEAE. Tlibo APHELANDKEAE. 

Aphelandra, B. Br. ; Benth. et Uook.f. Oen. Blunt, vol. ii. p. 1102. 



Aphelandra fascinator, Linden & Andre in Hlustr. Ilort. vol. xxi. p. 42, 
tab. 164 ; ab A. acuti. folia, Nees, affini bracteis integris undique rnol liter 
glanduloso-pilosis, sepalis longiuscule setaceo-acuminatis gland uloso- 
pilosis, labii inferioris segmento intermedio laterahbus duplo longiore 
latioreque diversa. 

iSujfrutex caulibus teretibus glabris; gemmae nxillares albo-tomentosae. Folia 
integra, elliptica vel late lanceoiata, utrincjue acuminata, basi in petiolum 
brevem attenuata, ad 20 cm. longa, ad 1 cm. lata, molliter lierbacea, 
glabra nisi novella subtus fugaciter pubescentia, supra saturate viridia 
vittis argenteis secundum costam nervosque dispositis percursa, subtus 
purpureo-olivacea costa et nervis purpureis prominentibus. tipiote ad 
apices ramorum ortae, densae ; bracteae ovato-ullipticae, subacutae, 
integrae, 2-2 ■ 2 cm. longa«, ad 1 cm. latae, extra undique glanduloso-albo- 
pilosae; bracteolae subulatae, ad 1"5 cm. lougae, eodem indumento ac 
bracteae. Sepala herbacei, aequilonga, 18-2U mm. longa, posticum 
oblongum, 3-dentatum, dentibus subulatis interiore quam laterahbus 
multo breviore, caetera e basi anguste-lanceolata longe subul ita, omnia 
glanduloso-pubescentia, superne lon^e albo-ciliata. Corolla fulgenter 
coccinea, sparse molliterque glanduloso-pilosa ; tubus cylindricus, 3 '5-4 
cm. longus, 4-5 mm. latus ; labium superum valde coucavum, a fronto 
visum late lanceolatum, acutum vel acute acuminatum, 2 cm. longuni; 
labium infcrumj inaequaliter 3-partitum, lobo intermedio late rotundato- 
ovato, 2'5-3 cm. longo, 2 (vel ultra) cm. lato, lateralibus late elliptico- 
ovatis acutis 1*7-2 "9 cm. longis 1 • 1-1*2 cm. latis. Stamina paullo supra 
basin inserta ; filamenta ima ba^i glanduloso-villosula, supra medium 
patule eglatiduloso-pilosa, ultra 4 cm. longa ; antherae acutae, 5 mm. 
longae, glabrae vel magis minusve villosulae. Ovarium praetor apicem 
glanduloso-villosulum glabrum; stylus interne et ad stigma pubescens. 
Cupsula ignota. — 0. Stapf. 



According to Mr. Andre the handsome Acanthad which 
forms the subject of our illustration was discovered in semi- 
umbrageous forests in Colombia in 1872, and was intro- 
duced to cultivation by Mr. J. Linden in the following year ; 
it was first described from a piant in Mr. Linden's nursery 
at Brussels in 1874. There is, however, in the herbarium 
at Kew a specimen collected in the neighbourhood of 
Bogota by Mr. D. Bowman, when travelling on behalf of 
the Royal Horticultural Society, which agrees so closely with 
the form of Aphelandra fascinator known in cultivation 
that it may safely be treated as belonging to the same 

OcToBEB, lull. 



species. This specimen, which was communicated to Kew by 
the late Mr. W. W. Sanders, was obtained by Bowman some 
time between 1866 and 1868, the year in which he died. 
A . fascinator is one of the most useful as it is one of the 
most striking of garden Acanthads, being easy to grow in 
a warm moist greenhouse and giving abundant flower during 
the winter months. At Kew it is raised annually from 
cuttings set in spring and grown in a rich loamy soil. 
When in flower the plants do well if subjected to the 
conditions suitable for tropical Begonias. 

DESCRIPTION. — Undershrub ; stems terete, glabrous ; 
axillary buds white-tomentose. Leaves entire, elliptic or 
wide-lanceolate, acuminate, narrowed at the base into a 
short petiole, up to 8 in. long and 3 in. wide, softly 
herbaceous, when young softly fugaciously puberulous, 
soon glabrous, dark green above with silvery bands along- 
side the midrib and main-nerves, beneath with prominent 
purple nerves and veins, and between these paler purplish. 
Spikes dense, terminating the branches ; bracts ovate- 
elliptic, somewhat acute, entire, |-1 in. long, -^ in. wide or 
rather wider, glandular white pilose externally ; bracteoles 
subulate, J-~ in. long, pilose like the bracts. Sepals herba- 
ceous, 0-10 lin. long, the posterior oblong, 3-toothed, the 
teeth subulate and the inner much shorter than the lateral ; 
the remaining sepals subulate from a narrowly lanceolate 
"base, all glandular pubescent and with long white ciliae m 
the upper portion. Corolla brilliant scarlet, sparingly 
softly glandular pilose; tube cyliudric, l\-li in. 1° 1J £> 
2-2£ lin. wide; upper lip very concave, wide lanceolate as 
seen from in front, acute or sharply acuminate, 10 lin. long; 
lower lip unequally 3-partite, the mid-lobe widely rounded 
ovate, 1-1£ in. long, | in. wide, lateral lobes elliptic-ovate, 
acute, about f in. long, | in. wide. Stamens attached a 
short distance above the base ; filaments glandular-puberu- 
lous at their insertion, above the middle clothed with short 
spreading non-glandular hairs, nearly 2 in. long ; anthers 
acute, 2| Jin. long, glabrous or somewhat puberulous. 
Ovanj glabrous except at the tip which is glandular 
puberulous; style hairy below and again near the stigma. 
Capsule not seen. 

Fiji. 1, calyx and style; 2, base of corolla-tube, and stamens; 3 and 4, 
anthers ; 5, ovary :—all enlarged. 



ssm 








I. Reeve & C "London. 



Tab. 8399. 
SPIRAEA Wilsoxi. 

Central China. 

liosACKAE. Tribe SpiBAEEae. 
SriRAKA, Linn. ; Benth. tt Hook./. Otn. Flant. vol. i. p. 611. 



Spiraea (Chamaedryon) Wilsoni, Ihtlhie in Ilort. Veitch. (190G), p. 379 ; 
sp cies e grege S. cunescentin, D. Don, sinensibus S. Henryi, Hems], ct 
H. Vvitrhii, Hemsl. quam maxime nccedens, ab hac foliis pubescentibtis 
ranmlisque floriteris abbreviatis facillhne sejungenda, ab ilia foliis integiis 
vel paucidentatis pedunculis pedicellisque fiere glabris apte distinguenda. 

Fruttx ornatus 2-2"5-metralis, arcuatim ramosus ramis elongatis ; rarauli 
pnipurascentes, pubescentes. Folia alterna, decidua, firmula, ovata vel 
olK)vata vel oblonga, subacuta vel obtnsa, basi cuneata, margine praesertim 
in rarnulis floriteris integra vel apicem versus pauci-dentata, 2-3 cm. 
longa, l-2"5 cm. lata; supra opaca, cinereo-puberula, subtus pallidiora, 
pubesceutia, ciliata; petiolus 3^1 mm. longus. Corymbi compacti, sub- 
globosi. in rarnulis floriteris lateralibus terminales, pluriflon s, 4-5 cm. 
diametro; pedunculi pedicellisque parce pilosi vel omnino glabri. F/ores 
albi, (I'd cm. lati. Ca'yx 5-lobns ; 1 obi triangulares, margine ciliati, 
ccterum glabri, tubo campanulato glabro breviores. Petafa 5, sub- 
orb cularia. Carpellu 5, 2*5 mm. longa, membranacea, minute pilosa, e 
latere ventrali dehiscent es. — W. J. Bean. 



The subject of our piate is oue of a well-defined group of 
three closely allied Chinese Spiraeas added to European 
collections during recent years. The group as a whole is 
nearly related to the Himalayan S. canescens, D. Don, which 
has long been familiar in our gardens. But while readily 
distinguishable from that Himalayan shrub, the members 
of this Chinese group, which includes S. Jhnryi, Hemsl., 
figured at t. 8270 of this work, S. Veitclrii, Hemsl., figured 
at t. 8383, and S. Wihoni, the species now depicted, 
approach each other more closely, and while all three are 
fully entitled to separate recognition, at least, from the 
horticultural standpoint, some care will be called for in 
their discrimination in cases where the types are not grown 
side by side. The three plants appropriately commemorate 
the names of individuals who have played leading parts in 
the discovery and introduction to Europe of plants from 
Central and Western China. S. Veitchii will always be 
easily distinguished from S. Wilsoni by its glabrous entire 
leaves, its much longer flowering branches and its finely 

OCTOBEB, 1911. 



pubescent pedicels and calyx-tube. S. Henryi on the otlier 
hand is not s<> readily distinguishable from our plant by 
any striking difference in structure, though the two are 
unmistakable when seen growing side by side. But apart 
from their difference in habit, S. Henryi will be easily 
recognised by its much more frequently and more coarsely 
toothed leaves, which are slightly lustrous and are less 
pubescent, as well as by its laxer corymbs, with pilose 
pedicels and a hairv calyx-tube. S. Henryi, moreover, 
flowers about a fortnight later than S. Wilsoni does. ^ -Like 
nearly all the Spiraeas, S. Wilsoni is easily cultivated 
where a good loamy soil is available. It is advisable to 
remove old flowering branches that have become worn out, 
but any shortening back of the shoots must be avoided. 
The plant flowers on short branchlets produced on the shoots 
of the previous summer; the aim should therefore be to 
have the latter as long as possible and to prevent them from 
becoming unduly crowded. Propagation is readily effected 
by making cuttings of side twigs with a " heel " in the 
month of July ; the flowers open in June. The material 
from which our plate has been prepared was supplied from 
one of the original plants of this species growing in the 
nursery of Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons at Coombe Wood. 

DESCRIPTION. — Shrub, of graceful habit, ultimately 6-8 ft. 
high, with long arching branches and purplish pubescent 
young shoots. Leaves deciduous, rather firm, oval or 
obovate or oblong, somewhat acute or quite blunt at ihe 
tip, cuneate at the base, either entire — especially on the 
flowering branchlets, or with a few teeth near the apex 
on b T ; I-2J in. long, f-1 in. wide ; dull greyish green and 
pubescent above, paler and more closely pubescent beneath, 
ciliate; petiole | in. long or shorter. Corymbs terminal 
on short lateral branchlets, compact, rounded, many-flowered, 
l|-2 in. across ; peduncles and pedicels sparsely pilose or 
glabrous. Flowers pure white, J in. wide. Calyx with 
5 triangular lobes rather shorter than tube, margins of 
lobes ciliate, otherwise quite glabrous. Petals 5, suborbi- 
cular. Carpels 5, T V in. long, minutely pilose, dehiscing 
ventral Iy. 

Fig. 1, a flower seen from the side ; 2, the same seen from above ; 3, gynoe- 
ciuux; -i, u single carpel -.— all enlarged. 



8400 




- 

6 



Tab. 8400. 
RHODODENDRON ambiguum. 

Western China. 

Ericaceae. Tribe Ehodobeae. 
Rijoi ODENDRON, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron (Eurhododendron) ambiguum, IlemsJ.; infer species foliis 
lepidoto-glandulosis B. trifloro, Hook, f., valde afnnis, diffurt tamen foliis 
maturis minus coriaceis, magis acuminati% lcpidibus majoribus minus 
crebris, cymis plus quam trifioris et corolla extra pauci-Iepidota intus 
postice viridi-maculata. 

Frutex dense ramosus, ramis floriferis graeiliuseulis primum praeter glandulis 
paucis nudis. Folia persistentia, sparsa, petiolata, lanceolata, cum putiolo 
4-8 cm. longa, acuminata, apice glandula subglobosa instructa, basi 
rotundata, utrinque primum crebre lt-pidoto-glandulo^a, supra cito nuda, 
subtus inter lepides primum luteas demum feres nigras pallida, venis 
immersis obscuris. Corymbi umbel liformes, terminates, saepius 5-7-flori; 
pedicelli graciliusculi I - 5-2 cm. longi, curvati, crebre lepidoti. Calyx 
brevissimus, dentibus obtusis. Corolla late campanulata, circiter 5 cm. 
diametro, viridi-flava, intus pubernla postice viridi-maculata, extra pauci- 
lepidota, tubo brevi, lobis Litis rotundatis. Stamina 10, alterna breviora, 
longiora corollam paubo excedentia ; filamenta filiformia, medio pilis latis 
tubuloso-vesiculatis l-locu ! aribus dense vestita. Ovarium dense lepidotum, 
5-loculare, stylo glabro stamina paullo excedente. Capsula adhuc ignota. — 

W. BOTTING HeMSLKY. 



Tlie Rhododendron here figured is a member of the group 
of Eurhododendra, the species of which are characterised by 
being more or less lepidote both as regards leaves and 
flowers, and by having both leaves and flowers of medium 
size, the latter often yellow and in few flowered corymbs. 
This group is represented in China by a considerable 
number of closely related forms, including R. lutescens, 
Franch., and R. continuum, Hemsl., which is also in culti- 
vation in this country. The nearest ally of the form here 
described is perhaps the Himalayan R. triflorum, Hook. f. 
R. ambiguum, which was introduced from Western China by 
Mr. E. H. Wilson on behalf of Messrs. J. Yeitch & Sons, to 
whom we are indebted for the material from which our 
figure has been prepared, will be welcomed in gardens as 
an addition to the scanty number of species with yellow 

October, 1911. 



flowers. Like most of the forms included in the same group, 
it promises to be quite hardy. It thrives in a moist but not 
too heavy soil free from calcareous matter. It seems likely 
to produce good seed under cultivation, but failing its pro- 
pagation in this manner may be increased by cuttings. 

Description. — Shrub, closely branched ; flowering twigs 
rather slender and naked except for a few glands. Leaves 
persistent, scattered, petioled, lanceolate, including the 
petiole 1^-3 in. long, acuminate, with a subglobose apical 
gland, rounded at the base, at first closely glandular- scaly 
on both sides but soon becoming naked above, pale beneath 
between the close-set scales which at first are yellow but 
soon become almost black ; nerves rather faint. Corymbs 
umbellate, terminal, usually 5-7-flowered ; pedicels rather 
slender, £-§ in. long, curved, closely scaly. Calyx very 
short, the teeth blunt. Corolla wide campanulate, about 
2 in. across, greenish yellow, puberulous within and dotted 
with green behind, sparingly scaly outside ; the tube short, 
the lobes broad and rounded. Stamens 10, alternately 
longer and shorter, the longer somewhat exserted ; fila- 
ments filiform, densely clothed except above and at the 
very base with short broad hollow 1-celled hairs. Ovary 
closely scaly, 5-celled ; style glabrous, rather longer than 
the stamens. Capsule not seen ripe. 



Fig. 1 terminal portion of a leaf, showing the scaly under surface and the 
apical gland ; 2, scales from under surface of leaf; 3, ca'yx and pistil; 4 and 5, 
Mamens; o, portion of the p;lose section of a filament :— all enlarged. 



8401 




M-S.deLj.N.RioKjiih 



l BL-ooJts.Day&.SonU^jnp 



L.Reeve & CPlondon.. 



Tab. 8401. 

BUDDLEIA OFFICINALIS. 

China. 

Loganiaceae. Tribe Euloganieae. 
Buddleia, Linn. ; Benth. et Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 793. 



Buddleia officinalis, Maxim, in Bull. Acad. Petersb. vol. xxvi. (1880), p. 41)6, 
et MHang. Biol. vol. x. p. 675; Olio, in Hook. Icon. Plant, t. 1972; Hemsl 
in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 675; Gard. Ghron. 1911, vol. xlix. p. 201, 
cum fig. ; ex affinitate B. macrostachyae, Benth., a qua foliis petiolatis, 
glomerulis pedunculatis, rami's fere teretibus, floribusque minoribus differt 

Frutex ramosissimus, 1-2*5 m. altus. Rami fere teretes, dense cinereo- 
tomentosi. Folia oblongo-vel lineari-lanceolata, acuminata, circiter 10 cm. 
lorjga, 1-2 "5 cm. lata, integra vel argute serrulata, supra sparse appresse 
pilosa, subtus dense cinereo-tomentosa ; petioli 5 mm. longi, supra canali- 
cular. Thyrsi ad ramos terminales, 8-30 cm. longi; glomeruli breviter 
pedunculati, 3-10-flori ; pedicelli quam calycis tubus breviores ; bracteolae 
lineares, pedicellis aequilongae. Calyx 3 mm. longus, extra dense tomen- 
tosus ; tubus quam lobi obtusi duplo longior. Corolla- pallide vel obscure 
lilacina, fauce aurantiaca ; tubus circiter 10 mm. longus, leviter curvatui-', 
utrinque pilosus ; limbus 6 mm. diametro ; lobi 4, late elliptici, obtusi. 
Antherae 1*5 mm. infra corollae faucem afflxae, oblongae. Ovarium 2 mm. 
longum, apicem versus tomentosum ; stylus brevis, basi pubescens ; 
stigma longum, clavatum, 2-fidxim. Capsula ovoidea, obtusa, calyce duplet 
longi or. — B. madagascariensis, Hance in Journ. Bot. 1882, p. 37, non Lam.— 
C. H. Weight. 



The Buddleia which forms the subject of our illustration 
was originally discovered by Dr. Piasezki in the provinces 
of Shensi and Kansu in Northern China, and was first 
described from his specimens by the Jate Mr. Maximowicz 
thirty years ago. The name B. officinalis, then applied to 
it, has reference to the circumstance that, according to 
Piasezki, the flower buds are collected and carried to 
Hankow, where they are sold as a medicine. The plant 
has since been found by Mr. A. Henry in the province of 
Hupeh in Central China, and has more recently been met 
with in the Yang-tze valley by Mr. E. H. "Wilson when 
collecting on behalf of the Arnold Arboretum. To Wilson 
horticulture is indebted for the introduction of the species 
to cultivation, and the material for our figure has been 
obtained from a plant raised from seed presented by 
Professor Sargent in 1008, which flowered at Kew in 

October, 1911. 



November, 1910. B. officinalis promises to be a useful 
winter flowering plant for greenhouse decoration, a class to 
which additions are always welcome. It may prove hardy 
in the extreme south-west of England, but elsewhere will 
call for treatment such as is given to B. asiatica and to pot 
chrysanthemums. The cuttings should be rooted in bottom 
heat in spring and grown in pots of rich loamy soil. 
During summer the plants should be grown in the open 
air and fed liberally, the pots being plunged in ashes. 
About the beginning of October, before frosts occur, the 
plants should be taken indoors to flower. When thus 
treated they remain in flower for about three months. 
Like its ally B. variabilis, Hemsl., figured at t. 7609 ol 
this work, our plant varies somewhat as regards its foliage, 
but is readily distinguished by the corolla, which is pubes- 
cent outside, and by the different tomentum on the under 
surface of the leaves. 

Description. — Shrub, 3-8 ft. high, with numerous 
densely grey pubescent nearly terete branches. Leaves 
oblong-lanceolate to linear-lanceolate, acuminate, about 
4 in. long, i-1 in. wide, entire or sharply serrulate, 
sparingly adpressed hairy above, densely grey pubescent 
beneath; petiole 2J lin. long, grooved above. Flowers in 
thyrses at the ends of the branches; thyrses. 3-12 in. long, 
composed of short peduncled, 3-10-flowered glomerules ; 
pedicels shorter than the calyx-tube; bracteoles linear, as 
long as the pedicels. Calyx 1^ lin. long, densely pubescent 
outside ; tube twice as long as the blunt lobes. Corolla pale 
or very pale lilac with orange throat; tube about 5 lin. 
long, slightly curved, hairy without and within; limb 3 lin. 
wide ; lobes 4, wide elliptic, obtuse. Anthers oblong, 
ad n ate to corolla-tube some distance below the throat. 
Ovary 1 lin. long, tomentose in the upper third ; style short, 
pubescent below; stigma long, clavate, 2-fid. Capsule 
ovoid, obtuse, twice as long as the calyx. 



Fig. 1, a flower; 2, calyx in section, and pistil ; 3, corolla, laid open ; 4 and 5, 
anthers : — all enlarged. 



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Tab. 8397.— LTSSOCHILUS STYLITES, Tropical Africa. 
„ 8398.— APHELANDRA FASCINATOR, Tropical South 

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„ 8399.— SPIRAEA WILSONI, Central China. 
„ 8400.— RHODODENDRON AMBIGUUM, Western China. 
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to or Naturalized in the British Is'es. 

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ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH JLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of Briiisn Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 
ng an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Flora. 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Kngruvings, 9*. 

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8 




Tab. 8402. 

CALADIUM pubescens. 

Peru. 

Auoideae. Tribe Colocasieae. 
Caladium, Vent. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 97G. 



Caladium pubeseens, A T . E. Br. ; affinis C. puherulo, Engl., sed foliis cordatis 
(nee sagittatis) lobis posticis quam anticus fere decies brevioribus, veuis 
primariis numerosioribus et spadice multo longiore differt. 

Ilerba. Tuber jrlobosnm vel depresso-globosum, profuse bulbilliferum. FoUorum 
petiolus 10-32 cm. Ionjrus, basi vau;inatus, dense pubescens, pailide virens ; 
lamina deflexa, 20-30 cm. longa, 9 "5-23 cm. lata, cordato-ovata vel elongato- 
cordato-ovata, subabrupte acuminata vel acuta, utrinque pubescens, laete 
viridis, lobis basalibus 1*5-3 cm. longis late rotundatis, venis primariis e 
costa utrinque 10-18 patentibus levissime curvatis, basalibus in sinu 
breviter denudatis, supra iuipressis subtus prominentibus. Pedunculus 
20-21 cm. longus, pubescens, pailide virens. Spatha 13 cm. longa, extra 
subvelutino-pubescens, intus glabra; tubus 2 - 5-3 cm. diametro, sub- 
globosus, basi obliquus, dorso canaliculars, pailide virens; lamina 
suberecto-reflexa, 10*5 cm. longa, 6 cm. lata, ovata, caudato-acuminata, 
intus alba, extra albo-virens. Spadix 9-10 cm. longus, parte feminea 
1 cm. longa, 1 cm. crassa, luteo-alba, parte mascula 7-9 cm. longa, 1*2- 
1 • 5 cm. crassa, leviter compressa, obtnsa, lactea, basi stammodiis pauci- 
seriatis instructa. Ovarium oblongum, truncatum, pilis paucis imnutis 
conspersum, 4-loculare, Ioculis pluriovulatis. — N. E. Brown. 



The very distinct Caladium which forms the subject of 
our illustration was sent to Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. 
Albans, from Peru, where it was obtained by Mr. Forget. 
As it reached this country along- with a consignment of 
Cattleya Rex the probability is that it is a native of the 
Moyobambo region. The plant which supplied the material 
for our figure was presented to Kew by Messrs. Sander, and 
flowered for the first time in September, 1009. Another 
individual flowered simultaneously in the Royal Botanic 
Garden at Glasnevin. Among Caladiums the species is 
remarkable for its pubescence, a character rarely met with 
in the Aroid family at all, and in this respect it is very 
unlike any other Caladium in cultivation ; indeed there is 
but one other species in the genus which has been described 
as pubescent. This is C. puberulum, Engl., which is 
undoubtedly nearly allied to our plant, but which differs 
in the characters noted by Mr. Brown. There are, how- 
ever, two other Aroids, which have hitherto been regarded 
as species of Xant/to&oma ; X. pilosum, C. Koch, and X. Ilot- 

NoVEMBEK, 11)11. 



tonianum, Schott ; so closely allied to C. puhescens that Mr. 
Brown has found it necessary to transfer both to Caladium, 
as C. pilosum, N. E. Br., and C. Hottonianum, N. E. Br., 

respectively. So close is the affinity between C. p'dosum, 
N. E. Br., and C. pubendum, Engl., that it is barely possible 
to distinguish the two by the characters assigned to the 
latter. All three differ conspicuously from C. puhescens in 
having only five or six primary veins on each side the 
midrib; in C. puhescens the number varies from ten to 
eighteen. C. puhescens is rather exceptional in the genus 
in having an attractive inflorescence; the white limb of 
the spathe renders this quite ornamental. The plant 
flowers freely when grown in a tropical moist house under 
the treatment suitable for other species of the genus. It is 
easily propagated by division of the fleshy, potato-like 
tuber. 

Description. — ILrb ; tuber globose or depressed-globose, 
bearing numerous bulbils. Leaves 8-12 in. long, 3|-9 in. 
wide, ovate-cordate or elongate cordate-ovate, somewhat 
abruptly acuminate or acute, pubescent on both sides, 
bright green, basal lobes |— lj in. long, wide rounded, 
principal nerves about 10-18 on each side of the midrib, 
slightly curved, the basal pair marginal for a short distance 
at the sinus, all somewhat impressed above and raised 
beneath; petiole 4-13 in. long, sheathing at the base, 
densely pubescent, pale green. Peduncle about 8 in. long, 
pubescent, pale green. Spathe 5-6 in. long, almost velvety- 
pubescent externally, glabrous within ; tube l-l£ in. wide, 
subglobose, oblique at the base, channelled on the back, 
pale green; blade suberect, then reflexed, 4 in. long, 2 4 in. 
wide, ovate, caudate acuminate, white within, greenish- 
white on the back. Spadix 3|-4 in. long; female portion 
5 lin. long and about as thick, yellowish white; male 
portion about 3 in. long, 6-8 lin. wide, slightly compressed, 
obtuse, milk white, with a few rows of staminodes at the 
base. Ovary oblong, truncate, beset with a few minute 
hairs ; cells of ovary 4, each with several ovules. 



Rg.1, spadix; 2, male flower; 3, female flower; 4 and 5, female flower, to 
vertical und m transverse section; 6, ovule; 7, sketch of an entire plant:— «» 
cnlary,,! except 7, which i, much reduced. 



8403 




AWjniBrooks,Day &Son LtSrtp- 



L. Reeve & C?Lor^on. 






Tab. 8403. 
RHODODENDRON japoxicuh, var. pentamerum. 

Japan. 



Ericaceae. Tribe Rhodoreae. 
Rhododendron, Linn. ; Benth. et Eook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. G99. 



Rhododendron (Eurhododendron) japonicum, Schneider III. JIandb. 
Laubholzk. vol. ii. p. 490; var. pentamerum, Hutchinson; a typo corollis 
pentameris staminibus 10-11 et ovario 5-loculare differt. 

Frutex ; rami glabri. Folia oblanceolata, apice obtuse mucronata, basi subacuta, 
7-8 cm. longa, 2-3 cm, lata, rigide coriacea, supra viridia, glabra, arete 
reticulata, subtus ferrugineo-tonientosa; petioli circiter P5 cm. longi, 
robusti, transverse rngosi, minute pubescentes, demum glabri. 1'erulirum 
folia obovato-spathulata, apice rotundata, ad 2"5 cm. longa, membranacea, 
utrinque pubescentia. Bractce Jineari-filiformes, 1 cm. longae, pilosae. 
Pedicelli 2'5-3 cm. longi, parce crispo-puberuli. Florts 6-7 cm. expansi. 
Calyx brevis, 5-dentatus, dentibus trianguFaribus subobtusis parce 
pubescentibus. Corolla subcampanulata, rosea, 5-mera; tubus 2 cm. 
lungus, utrinque glaber; lobi subrotundati, emarginati, ad 3 cm. lati- 
btamitw, 10-11, vix exserta; filamenta inaequalia, ad 3 cm. longa, inferne 
puberula, superne glabra; antherae fla\ae, 3'5 mm. longae. Ovarium 
5-loculare, dense rubiginoso-pilosum ; stylus filamenta vix superans, 
glaber; stigma. minute 5-tidum. — R. Metternichii, var. pentamerum, Maxim, 
in Mem. Acad. Petersb. ser. 7, vol. xvi. no. 9, p. 22. R. IJymer/unthe.s, 
var. pentamerum, Mabino in Tokyo Pot. Mag. vol. xvi. p. 33. R. 
Metttrnichii, Shirasawa, Ic. Ess. For. Jap. vol. ii. t. 60, fig. 1-13. — 
J. Hutchinson. 



The handsome Rhododendron which forms the subject of 
our figure has been known for some time in collections 
under the name R. Metternichii ', Sieb. & Zucc. It is not, 
however, the same as the plant so named by Siebold and 
Zuccarini, which differs from that here depicted in having 
a corolla with seven lobes, in having fourteen stamens and 
in having a seven-celled ovary. The form in question is, 
however, the one that was originally described by ]>lume 
under the name Hymenanthes japonica ; to the use of this 
earlier specific name Schneider has recently reverted, though 
it is remarkable that in doing so he has not alluded to the 
existence of the variety now figured. Like the typical 
plant our variety is wild in the mountains of Central 
Japan, and both are frequently met with in gardens in 

KoVKMRER, 1911. 



that country. In spite, therefore, of their rather striking 
differences the two appear to be races rather than varieties 
of the same species. The cultivation of this Rhododendron 
does not differ from that which is suitable for Rhododendrons 
generally. It likes a soil preferably but not necessarily of 
a peaty nature and free from lime ; it requires abundant 
moisture. When peat is not readily available a plentiful 
admixture of decayed leaves forms a good substitute. The 
plant from which the material for our plate was obtained 
is one imported from Tokyo in 1894; at Kew it grows as 
a low spreading bush. 

Description. — Shrub; branches glabrous. Leaves ob- 
lanceolate, apex bluntly mucronate, base somewhat cuneate, 
about 3 in. long, f-1 1 - in. wide, firmly coriaceous, green, 
glabrous and closely reticulate above, rusty tomentose 
beneath ; petiole about f in. long, stout, transversely 
rugose, at first finely pubescent, at length glabrous. Bud- 
scales obovate spathulate, rounded at the tip, reaching 1 in. 
in length, membranous, pubescent on both surfaces. Bracts 
linear-filiform, 5 lin. long, pilose. Pedicels 1-1^ in. long, 
sparingly clothed with crisped hairs. Flowers about 3| in. 
across. Calyx short, 5-toothed ; teeth triangular, rather 
blunt, sparingly pubescent. Corolla almost campanulate, 
rose-coloured, 5-lobed ; tube f in. long;, glabrous without 
within ; lobes somewhat rounded, emargmate, over 
1 in. wide. Stamens 10-11, hardly exserted ; filaments 
unequal, over 1 in. long, puberulous below, glabrous 
above ; anthers yellow, nearly 2 lin. long. Ovary 5-celled, 
densely rusty pilose; style hardly longer than the filaments, 
glabrous ; stigma minutely 5-lobed. 



Pig 

4 and 



iff. ■ 1, part of leaf, showing midorsurface ; 2, bract; 3, calyx and pistil; 
td 5, .stamens; 6, suction of ovary; 7, hair from ovary:— all enlarged. 



8WJ 




M.S.dei.JN.Fitchlitk 



T5n«ni Brooks.Day &Sor 



L.Re.GVe &.C.<>l.rmAr 






Tat?. 8404. 

LEONOTIS DYSOPHYLLA. 

South Africa. 

Labiatae. Tribe Stachydeae. 
Leon otis, Pers. ; Benth. et Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1214. 



Leonotia dysophylla, Benth. in E. Meyer, Coram, p. 242, et in DC. Prmlr. 
vol. xii. p. 536 ; Skan in Dyer, Fl. Cap. vol. v. sect. 1, p. 380; affinis 
L. Mel/eri, Baker, sed foliis subtus pubescentibus vel plus minusve villosis 
nee albido-tomentosis, calycis dentibus brcvioribus, floribus aurantiacis 
nee albis differt. 

llerba; caules robusti, 6-10 dm. alti vel ultra, basi lignosi, dense puberuli. 
Folia ovato-lauceolata vel interdum ovata, usque ad 8 cm. longa et 3 cm. 
lata, apice obtusa vel subacuta, basi longe cuneaf o-attenuata, sat regulariter 
crenata vel crenato-serrata, breyiter et mol liter pubescentes vel saepe 
subtus praesertim dense villosa, saepe crassiuscula ; pctiolus 1*5-4 cm. 
longus. Verticillastri solitarii vul duo, magni, multiflori. Bracteo/ue 
lineares, 1-1*5 cm. longae, apice spinescentes. Pedicetli circiter 3 mm. 
longi. Calyx subtubulosus, incurvatus, 1*8-2*4 cm. longus, adpresse 
puberulus; dentes 8, spinescentes, dente supremo deltoideo-ovato 4-6 mm. 
longo quam ceteri triangulares multo longiore. Corolla, aurantiaca, 2*5- 
3*5 cm. longa, inemvata, superne extra dense villosa; tubus subtubulosus, 
tubo calycis aequilongns ; labium super run oblongum, concavum, 1*5-2 cm. 
longum, integrum; labium int'erum 3-lobatum, 8-10 mm. longum, lobo 
intermedio obovato retuso 6-8 mm. longo, lobis lateralibus ellipticis leviter 
brevioribus. Stamina sub galea ascendentia ; filameuta villosa. Stylus 
demum staminibus paulo longior, bifidus, lobo postico minuto. Nucvlaa 
subtrigonae, apice truneato-rotundatae, minute papiliosae, disco cupuJi- 
forme antice paulo altiore cinctae. — L. dasyphylla, Drege, Zwei I'll. 
Doeum. p. 198. L. malacophylla, Guerke in Engl. Jahrb. vol. xxii. p. 142. 
— S. A. Skan. 



The genus Leonotis comprises about twenty species, all 
but one of which are limited to Tropical or South Africa. 
The exception, L. nepetaefolia, R. Br., is widely distributed 
in tropical regions, being found in tin- Mascarene Islands, 
Tropical Asia and America, apparently often as a weed. 
L. Leunurus, R. Br., a deservedly popular winter-flowering 
greenhouse plant and the most attractive of the genus, is a 
native of the Cape, and like many Cape plants has become 
naturalised in West Australia (Benin. Fl. Austral, vol. v. 
p. 74). This species has been in cultivation since 1712, 
and was figured in this work under the name of Phlomis 
Leonurus, Linn., at t. 478, more than a century ago. A 
few other species have been introduced into gardens, such 
as L. intermedia, Lindl., L. ovata, Spreng., L. dufria, E. 

NOYEMBKKj r,)ll. 



Meyer, and L. nepetaefolia alluded to above. The subject 
of our plate, L. dysophylla, is recorded from the Orange 
River Colony, the Transvaal, Transkei, G-riqualand East 
and Natal. The plant which supplied the material for the 
illustration flowered in January last in the Cambridge 
Botanic Garden, having been raised there from seed 
received from Mr. Gr. Thorncroft, Barberton, Transvaal. The 
seed was sown in an Intermediate House in February ; the 
plants were grown on and planted out of doors for the 
summer, and given very much the treatment of bedding 
plants. The more vigorous individuals were taken up in 
autumn and flowered in pots during the winter. The 
species may, Mr. Lynch informs us, be grown as an 
ordinary greenhouse plant under the treatment suitable for 
L. Leonurus, and, as in the case of that species, stopping 
must be done with discretion, so as to secure the strongest 
possible flowering shoots. 

Description. — Herb; stems stout, 2-3 ft. high or taller, 
woody at the base, densely puberulous. Leaves ovate- 
lanceolate, occasionally ovate, 3-3 1 in. long, over 1 in. 
wide, obtuse or subacute, nan-owed to the base, rather 
regularly crenate or crenate-serrate, shortly softly pubes- 
cent or often densely villous, especially beneath, often 
rather thick ; petiole -f-1^ in. long. Verticillasters solitary 
or two superposed, large and many -flowered ; bracteoles 
linear, -J—J in. long, spinescent at the tip; pedicels over 
1 lin. long. Calyx almost tubular, incurved, f-1 in. long, 
adpressed puberulous; teeth 8, spinescent, the uppermost 
deltoid-ovate, 2-3 lin. long, much larger than the rest. 
Corolla orange, l-l* in. long, incurved, densely villous 
outside above; tube almost cylindric, as long as the calyx- 
tube ; upper lip oblong, concave, g-f in. long, entire ; lower 
lip 3-lobed, 4-5 lin. long, mid-lobe obovate, retuse, 3-4 lin. 
long, lateral lobes elliptic, rather shorter. Stamens ascend- 
ing under the upper lip ; filaments villous. Style ultimately 
rather longer than the stamens, 2-fid, the posterior lobe 
very small. Nutlets somewhat trigonous, with truncately 
rounded tips, finely papillose; disk cupular, rather deeper 
in front. 

Fig. 1, flower; 2, corolla-tube laid open, showing the stamens; 3 and 4, 
anthtrs ; 5, ovary aud disk ; 6, npj er portion of htyle :—all enlaryed. 



S405 




Vincent I 



■ 



Tab. 8405. 

PHYLLODOCE AMABILIS. 

North America. 

Ericaceae. Tribe Phyllodoceae. 

Piivllouoce, SaJisb. Par. Lon. t. 36 ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. 
p. 595 ; Maxim, in Mem. Acad. Petersb. ser. 7, vol. xvi. no. 9, p. 5 ; Ihude 
in Engl. <f; Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenf. vol. iv. pars 1, p. 40. 



Phyllodoce amabilis, Stop/; species P. empetriformi, A. Gr., et P. intermedia*, 
A. Gr., alnuis, ab utraque corolla campann lata late aperta fere tota alba ct 
filanientis quam antherae parvae plus quam duplo longioribus distincta. 

Fmticulut circiter 15 cm. altus, rami* ercctis rigidis dense foliatis, raraulis 
praeter setulas nigricantes gland liligeras eparsas lineis minute pubernlis 
notatis. Folia croborrima, subsessilia, linearia, obtusa, marginibng arete 
revolutis, 6-8 mm. longa, 1 2-1 • 5 mm. lata, supra lattvia, glabcrrima, 
subtus ob costam validam et margines revolt itas bisulcata, in costa 
densissime albo-papillo.-a, ad flexura^ minute spinuloso-serrata vel in 
sunuuis glanduloso-cih'ata. J 1 lores ad apices ramoruin 5-7, congest!, 
axil lares; pedicelli filiformes, 2-2-5 cm. longi, rubescentes, glanduloso- 
pubescentes, basi prophyllis binis ovatis obtusis valde coneavis viridibus 
circumdati. Sepala ovata, subacuta, 2 - 5 mm. longa, praeter margines 
superiores ciliolatas glabra, rubra. Corolla campanulata, late aperta, 
5-7 mm. longa, lobis late rotundato-ovatis 1*5 mm. longis, lactea cum 
loborum apicibus roseis et ima basi lineis roseis notata. Filamenta glabra, 
tenuia, 2-2 • 5 mm. longa; antherae 1 mm. longae. Ovarium glanduloso- 
papiiloeum; stylus 3 mm. longus, inclusus. Capsula depresso-globosa, 
2' 5 mm. alta, 3 mm. dianietro, superne pilis brevibus glanduligeris 
induratis submuriculata. Semina oblique oblonga vel semiellipsoidea, 
subacuta, 0'6-O"7 mm. longa, pallide brunnta, testa longitudinaliter 
striata. — 0. Stapf. 



The Phyllodoce here figured is one of the daintiest of the 
Ericaceae, forming neat dense tufts of erect stems a few 
inches high. It is cultivated at Kew in a mixture of peat, 
leaf soil and sand, and flowers profusely in May, the plant 
being then almost hidden by the pinky white hells. It is 
admirably adapted for a moist nook in the Rock Garden 
where there is peaty soil. If a spot can be selected where 
a boulder throws a shadow over the plant for a few hours 
about midday but otherwise leaves it fully exposed it would 
be an advantage. The origin of our plant is obscure. It 
may be said to come nearer to P. intermedia than it does to 
P. empetriformis on account of its small short anthers, but 

Novi MBKB, l'Jll. 



it differs from both these well-known species in the white, 
widely campanulate and not urceolate corollas. The anthers 
indeed at first sight suggest that they may be imperfect 
and that the plant is a hybrid, but they contain pollen 
which appears to be quite normal, and the plant besides 
produces abundant seed. There is little doubt that it is a 
native of the Eocky Mountains or of the Cascade Range, 
the habitat of P. empetriformis and its immediate allies, but 
as to the exact borne of the charming plant now described 
we are at present without a clue. It is easily propagated 
by cuttings in sandy peaty soil made in July and placed in 
a close slightly heated frame. 

Description. — Shrublet, about 6 in. high; branches erect, 
rigid, closely leafy; twigs sparsely beset with blackisli 
glandular setae and lines of minute hairs. Leaves close- 
set, subsessile, linear, obtuse, with distinctly recurved edges, 
3-4 lin. long, under 1 lin. wide, smooth and glabrous above, 
beneath 2-sulcate owing to the stout midrib and the reflexed 
edges, denselj* white papillose along the midrib, finely 
ppinulose serrate or, in the upper leaves, glandular ciliate 
in the folds. Flowers in clusters of 5-7 at the tips 
of the twigs, axillary ; pedicels filiform, |-1 in. long, 
reddish, glandular pubescent, surrounded at the base by 
a pair of ovate, obtuse, very concave green bracts. Sepals 
ovate, subacute, over 1 lin. long, glabrous except on the 
ciliolate edges, red. Corolla campanulate, opening widely, 
2|-3£ lin. long, lobes wide rounded, ovate, under 1 lin. 
long, white with the tips of the lobes pink and with rose- 
coloured lines at the base. Filaments glabrous, slender, 
about 1 lin. long; anthers \ lin. long. Ovary glandular 
papillose; style l\ lin. long, not exserted. Capsule de- 
pressed-globose, 1| lin. long, 1-J lin. wide, submuriculate 
towards the apex with short hardened glandular hairs. 
Seeds obliquely oblong or almost ellipsoid, rather pointed, 
very small, pale brown ; testa striate longitudinally. 



Fig. 1, leaves; 2, a young leaf; 3, bract; 4, flower; 5, corolla, laid open; 
6 and 7, stamens; 8, pistil; 9, fruits; lo, a single capsule; 11, seed:— all 
9 



8406 




'Htchlith 



R 



^Vincent Broota^Daj'* - 



Tab. 8406. 

RUELLIA Devosiaxa. 

Brazil. 

Acanthaoeae. Tribe Rtjellieae. 

Rcellia, Linn.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1077; Lindau it, Engl. 
& Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenf. vol. iv. pars 8b, p. 308. 



Huellia Devosiana, Morren in Belg. Hort. vol. xxvii. p. 344, t. 19 ; species ex 
affinitate A*. Schauerimae, Lindau, et R. calvescentis, Lind. ; ab utraque 
indnmento tactu molliter velutino et ovario undique densissime tomentello, 
ab ilia praeterea foliorum substantia tenuiore nee subcoriacea dicenda, et 
bracteolis floribusque minoribuB distat. 

Suffrutcx, 30-50 cm. altus, erectus, ramis gracilibus superne tetragonis inferne 
tandem teretibus cinereo-tomentello-velutinis. Folia elliptica vel oblonga, 
utrinque acuta, subintegra, ad 7 cm. longa, fere ad 3 cm. lata, molliter 
herbacea, novella albo-hirsuta, adnlta utrinque tactu mollia, minute 
papillo.so-velutina et insuper pilis mjijoribus ad margines copiosis ceterum 
spirsis obsita, supra saturate viridia et secundum costam albo-vittata, 
infra purpurea; petioli graciles, pilosi, 8-10 mm. longi. Flore* axillares, 
solitarii, sessiles, versus ramorum apices siti. Bracteo/ae late oblanceolatae 
in basin linearem attenuatae, 12-14 mm. longae, indumento folionim. 
Calyx fere ad basin 5-partitus, 8 mm. longus, segmentis aequalibus, 
tenuiter subulatis, minute pubescentibus superne longe allto-ciljatis. 
Corolla in fauce et ad loborum nervos medianos lilacino-tincta, cireiter 
4-5 cm. longa, extra tenuiter glanduloso-pubescens ; tubus ad 1*5 cm. 
longus, anguste cylindricus, rectus, deinde in fauce ampliatn.s et 
subobliquus; lobi subaequales, late emarginati, 1 cm. longi, 7-10 mm. Iati. 
Antherae oblongae, aequales, 2"5 mm. longae; filaments glabra, antica 
9 mm. longa, postica 5 mm. longa. Ovarium ellipsoideum, dense albo- 
cinereo-tomentellum ; stylus pubescens. Capsula (ex autore) obovoidea. 
Una 5-6. — O. Stapf. 



According 1 to Morren the Ruellia here figured was intro- 
duced from Brazil in 1875 by Messrs. Jacob-Makov of Liege 
and was named R. Devosiana in their catalogue of l s 7n' in 
compliment to Mr. A. Devos, then in charge of the botanical 
collections of the University of Liege. Morren, with some 
reason, compares it with R. picta, a plant of rather doubtful 
status figured by Loddige in 1828, without analysis or 
description, at 1. 1448 of the Botanical Cabinet. Lindau has 
treated R. Devosiana as identical with R. Schauerinna, a 
view which it is not convenient from the horticultural stand- 

NoVEMBEB, 1911. 



point to accept, and one that could only be adopted if 
R. Schaueriana be treated as a very variable species which 
includes R. calvescens as well. A figure of R. Schaueriana 
has been given at t. 4147 of this work under the name 
R. lilacincL It differs from R. Devosiana in having firm, 
somewhat shining leaves that are almost or quite glabrous, 
in having larger lilac to purple flowers, and in having a 
different ovary. In this work, however, two other plants 
that approach even more closely to R. Devosiana than 
R. Schaueriana does have also been figured ; one at t. 4366 
as Strobilanthes lactatus, the other at t. 5106 as Dipterac- 
anthus calvescens. Of these the former is readily distin- 
guishable from R. Devosiana, because its leaves are very 
like those of R. Schaueriana ; it differs from R. Schaueriana 
in having a more slender ovary. The latter, which is 
believed to be the same as R. calvescens, differs con- 
siderably from R. Devosiana as regards the indumentum on 
the stem and leaves and lias an ovary like that of the plant 
figured as Strobilanthes lactatus. It is, however, necessary 
to remark that, in his review of the Acanthaceae under culti- 
vation in collections, the late Col. Beddome has placed two 
of these four plants under R. solitaria, a species only 
known from Velloso's figure and his rather meagre descrip- 
tion^ while Nees has referred R. solitaria to R. Schaueriana. 
In view of this dubiety all that can with safety be said is that 
R. Devosiana, here figured, belongs to a group of species 
of which R. Schaueriana is the best-known member ; that it 
is readily distinguishable from the other members of this 
group already in cultivation ; and that, from the garden 
standpoint, it is desirable to accord it separate recognition. 
The plant from which the material for our figure has been 
obtained was received at Kew in 1903 from the Jardin des 
Plantes, Paris. It forms a compact little shrub and is 
useful to grow as a trailer or basket-plant in a warm house. 
Its flowers are produced in autumn. 

Description.— Undershrub, 1-1 J ft. high, erect; branches 
slender, angular above, ultimately cylindric below, grey- 
velvety tomentose. Leaves elliptic or oblong, acute, with 
cuneate base, nearly entire, 2J-3 in. long, 1 J in. wide, softly 
herbaceous, when young white hirsute, when full-grown 
soft to the touch on both surfaces, finely velvety-papillose 



and beset above with long hairs, rather densely along the 
margins, more sparingly elsewhere ; upper surface dark- 
green with a white streak along the midrib, imdersurface 
purple; petiole slender, 4-5 lin. long. Flowers axillary, 
solitary, sessile, towards the end of the branches. Bracteoles 
wide oblanceolate, narrowed to a linear base, 6-7 lin. long, 
with the same pubescence as the leaves. Calyx 5 -partite 
nearly to the base, 4 lin. long ; lobes equal, narrow subulate, 
finely pubescent and with long white hairs in the upper 
portion. Corolla white with lilac throat and lilac lines 
along the middle of the lobes, about If in. long, glandular 
pubescent outside ; tube about -§ in. long, narrow cylindric, 
straight below, widening into a slightly oblique throat ; 
lobes nearly equal, emarginate, 5 lin. long, 3-5 lin. wide. 
Anthers oblong, equal, over 1 lin. long ; filaments glabrous, 
the anterior about 5 lin. long, the lower 1\ lin. long. Ovary 
ellipsoid, densely pale-grey tomentose ; style pubescent. 
Capsule obovoid. 

Fig. 1, part of leaf; 2, calyx and pistil; 3, corolla-tube, laid open ; 4 and 5, 
anthers; 6, ovary ; 7, longitudinal section of ovary :— all enlarged. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 83, NOVEMBER, 1911. 



Tab. 8402.— CALADTTJM PTJBESCENS, Peru. 
„ 8403.— RHODODENDRON JAPONICUM, vah. PENTA- 

MERUM, Japan. 
„ 8404.— LEONOTIS DYSOPHYLLA, South Africa. 
„ 8405.— PHYLLODOCE AMABILIS, North America. 
„ 8406.— RUELLIA DEVOSIANA, Brazil, 

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Tab. 8407. 

ACIPHYLLA LATIFOLIA. 

Auckland and Campbell Islands. 

TJmbelliferak. Tribe Seselineae. 
Acipiiylla, Forst. ; Benth. et Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 912. 



Aciphylla latifolia, Cockayne, Subantarct. In. pp. 188 et 197, fig. 0; species 
ex affinitate A. antipodue, a qua differt foliorum scgmentis ultimis ovato- 
lanceolatis. 

Ilerba robusta, 1-2 m. alta, fere undique glabra, polygamo-dioica vel dioica. 
Caulis basi usque 10-12 cm. diametro, sulcatus, sursum dense ramosus, 
floribundus. Folia crassa, coriacei, radicalia Ionge petiolata ; 30-60 cm. 
longa, ovata, bipinnatisecta ; segmenta ovato-lanceolata, decurrentia, apice 
spinosa, margine incrassata; venae, saltern in siccis, conspicuae ; foliorum 
inflorescentiae petioli latissimi, vaginati, cymbiformes, apice paucilobati 
vel dentati. Umbellae compositae, axillares et terminates, stipitatae, 
folia paullo excedentes, multiradiatae, 6-10 cm. diametro. Braiteae 
lineares, acutae, radios validos subaequantes. Bracteolae bracteis similes, 
flores superantes. Umbellulae multiflorae. Floret purpurei, masculi in 
vivis tantum visi. Calycis dentes conspicui deltoidei, inaequales. Fetala 
ovata, medio incras^ata, longitudinaliter costata, apice recurva. CarpeUa 
(in siccis ab ill. Hook. f. leetis) sa^pius subaequaliter 5-alata, interdum 
3- vel 4-alata; valleculae univittatae, vittis latis; commisura 2-vittata 
vittis angustis. — Anisotome latifolia, Hook. f. Fl. Antarct. i. p. 16, t. 8. 
Ligusticum latifolium, Hook. f. Handb. Fl. Nov. Zeal. p. 94; Cheesem. 
Manual, N.Z. Fl. p. 215, et Subantarct. Is. p. 408. Calosciadium lati- 
folium, End I. Gen. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



The handsome Umbellifer which forms the subject of our 
illustration is a native of the Subantarctic Islands of New- 
Zealand. This species, Aciphylla latifolia, and two other 
members of the same genus, A. antipoda and A. acutifolia, 
in association more or less with three species of the Umbelli- 
ferous genus PleurophyUum, constitute jointly the most 
conspicuous feature in the vegetation of the Auckland 
and Chatham Islands. For the introduction of this species 
to England horticulture is indebted to Oapt. A. A. Dorrien 
Smith, and the material for our plate, which was sent from 
the garden of Mr. T. A. Dorrien Smith, Tre.-co Abbey, 
Isles of Scillv, has come from the first plant of this species 
to flower in this country. The plant in question is a male 
specimen, and unfortunately so far female flowers are not 

Dbokhbrb, l'.'ll, 



available; to complete the plate a drawing by Miss J. J. 
Clark of ripe fruits, collected by Sir J. D. Hooker, and one 
of a transverse section of the same, have been added. The 
genus Acipkylla is in some regards the southern representa- 
tive of the northern Ligusticum, and Mr. Hemsley has 
followed the " Genera Plantarum " of Bentham and Hooker 
in referring this plant to the former rather than the latter 
genus. This course has also been adopted by Dr. Cockayne, 
whose personal knowledge of the islands in which it occurs 
is so extensive. But the Umbelli ferae of New Zealand 
stand in need of generic revision, and Mr. Cheeseman has 
suggested, with some reason, that the genus Anisotome, 
proposed many years ago by Sir J. D. Hooker, should be 
revived for the accommodation of A. latifolia and its 
undoubted congeners. 

Description. — Herb, almost everywhere glabrous, poly- 
gamo-dicecious or dioecious. Stem stout, 3-7 ft. high, 4-5 
in. thick at the base, furrowed, densely branched upwards, 
many-flowered. Leaces thick, leathery, the radical long- 
stalked, 1-2 ft. long, ovate, twice pinnatisect ; segments 
ovate-lanceolate, decurrent, with spinulous tips, their 
margins thickened ; veins rather conspicuous ; petioles of 
the leaves of the inflorescence very broad, sheathing, 
cymbiform, with few apical segments or teeth. Umbels 
compound, axillary and terminal, stipitate, rather longer 
than the leaves, many-branched, 2^-4 in. across. Bracts 
linear, acute, about as long as the" stout umbel-branches. 
Bracteoles like the bracts but smaller, rather longer than 
the flowers. Secondary umbels many-flowered. Flowers 
purple. Calyx-teeth conspicuous, deltoid, unequal. Petals 
ovate, thickened in the centre, longitudinally ribbed, 
recurved at the tip. Carpels usually subequally 5-winged, 
sometimes only 3-4-winged; valleculae 1-vittate, vittae 
wide ; commissure 2-vittate, narrow. 



Fig. 1, a cluster of male flowers ; 2, calyx and rudimentary pistil ; 3, a petal ; 
4, lnut ; t>, the game magnified ; fi, section of a ripe fruit ; 7, sketch of an entire 
plant:— aft enlarged except 4 which is of natural size and 7 which is ruttc'i 
rtduced. 



8408 







lag-ASonLtf 



Tab. 8408. 

RHODODENDRON spinuliferum. 

China. 



Ericaceae. Tribe Khodobkae. 
Ehododendbon, Linn.f. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron spinuliferum, Francli. Journ. de Bot. vol. ix. (1895), p. 399 ; 
Yihuorin in Rev. Hort. vol. x. (1910), p. 401, cum tab.; Hemsl. et 
E. Hi Wih. in New Bull. 1910, p. 120; floribaa Ii. Keytii, Nut*, simile 
Bed ramulorum foliorum pediceliorum caljcisque indumenta valde diver- 
sum. 

Suffrutex, circiter 1-2 5 m. altus (ex Forrest); ramnli juventuto grisco-pilosuli 
et praeterea setosi, mox subglabvi cortice rubro-brunneo obtecti. Folia 
lance )lata vel obla ceolata, apice calloso-acuminata, basi acuta, 2'5-4*5 
cm. longa, circiter 1 em. lata, coriacea, supra rnguloaa, subglabra, 
marginem versus spinalis aspera, subtus parce pilosa et squamulosa, 
nervis lateralibus utrinque 5-7 supra impres-is subtus prominulis nervis 
transversis supra impressis subtus conspicuis, petiolis circiter 4 mm. lougis 
suffulta. Infloretcentia terminalia circiter 4-flora ; pe licelli 5-8 mm. longi. 
Calyx fere 1 mm. altus, cum pedicellis laimginosus. Corolla rubra, 
tulmlosa, apicfm basemque versus leviter peduientim contracta, glabra ; 
tubus 14 mm. lougus ; lobi 5, imbricati, ovati, 9 mm. longi. Stamina 10, 
ex>erta, inaequalia; filamenta 2'2 2'J mm. longa, glabra; antherae ad 
2 mm. longae, atrae. Ovarium 4 mm. altttm, lanatum et parce glandu- 
losum ; stylus stamina longiora Bubaequan*, interne parce puberulus. — 
W. G. Cbaib. 

Tlie Rhododendron which we here figure is a Chinese 
species originally described by Franchet from specimens 
collected in Yunnan by Delavay, where it lias also been met 
with by Henry and by Forrest. For its introduction to 
European collections horticulturists are indebted to Mr. 

M. Ii. de Vilmorin, who has raised plants from seed sent 
to him by Ducloux in L907. The material from which 
our illustration has been prepared was Bupplied by Mr. 
de Vilmorin from one of these plants, which flowered at 
Lea Barres for the Bust time in the spring of L910. The 
only species of Rhododendron which resembles Ii. spinuli- 
ferum in the peculiarly shaped corolla is R, Keysii, Xutt.. 
figured at t. 4875 of this work. 6o striking is the deviation 
from the normal type of corolla in the genus, that R. Keysii 
has been treated as the representative of a distinct section. 
In other respects, however, our plant approaches more 
closely to /■'. spictferwn, Franch., an 1 R. scdbrifolium, Frauch., 

DlXEMBElt, 1911. 



both of which have a calyx and a corolla of altogether 

different type. Mr. de Yilmorin remarks that in general 

habit B. spinuliferum bears a greater resemblance to 

R. Augustinii, Hemsl., than to any other species with 

which he is acquainted. B. spinuliferum is a shrub of tall 

thin habit, making slender shoots one foot or more in 

length during the growing season. The leaves are disposed 

evenly and regularly along the twigs, and are not clustered 

near the apex of a shoot as is so commonly the case in this 

genus. A plant presented to Kew by Mr. M. L. de Vil- 

morin is grown in peaty soil in a nursery, and during the 

coldest winter weather has required to be covered by a 

glass light. It has also been necessary to protect the plant 

from injury by spring frosts. While, therefore, we have 

as yet had but a brief acquaintance with this remarkable 

species, we fear, and in this both Mr. E. H. Wilson and 

Mr. G. Forrest, with their extensive Chinese experience, 

concur, that it will thrive in the open only in our mildest 

counties. 

Description. — Small shrub, according to Forrest 3-8 ft. 
high in the wild state; twigs when young finely grey- 
pilose and also setose, soon however becoming glabrous ; 
bark reddish brown. Leaves lanceolate or oblanceolate, 
thickened-acuminate at the tip, base cuneate, 1-lf in. long, 
about 5 lin. wide, firm, rugulose above and almost glabrous, 
hut with scattered bristles near the margin, beneath 
sparingly pilose and lepidote ; lateral nerves 5-7 on each 
side, impressed above, somewhat raised beneath, transverse 
veins sunk above, barely visible beneath ; petiole about 
2 lin. long. Inflorescence terminal, usually about 4-flowered; 
pedicels 3-4 lin. long. Calyx very short, woolly like the 
pedicels. Corolla red, tubular, gradually and slightly 
narrowed towards the apex as well as the base, glabrous ; 
tube 7 lin. long; lobes 5, imbricate, ovate, 4 lin. long. 
Stamens 10, exserted, unequal ; filaments f-i^ in. long, 
glabrous ; anthers about 1 lin. long, almost black. Ovary 
2 lin. long, woolly and sparingly glandular ; style about as 
long us the longer stamens, sparingly puberulous below. 



Fig. 1, apex of leaf, upper surface; 2, the same, lower surface; 3, ecales; 
■i- 0» JX and pistil ; 5 and G, stamens; 7, cross-section of ovary:— all enlarged- 



mod 




"Vincent Broc , 



Tab. 8401). 

SYMBEGONIA fulvo-villosa. 

New Guinea. 

BEGONrACEAE. 
Symbkgonia, Warb. in Eng. & Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenf. vol. ill- pars 6 A. p. 14J. 



Symbegonia fulvo-villosa, Warb. I.e. fig. 52 ; K. Schum. & Lauterb. Fl. 
Deutsch. Schutzgeb. Siidsee, p. 459; foliis conspicue duplo-serratis distincta. 

Jlerba erecta, 13-21 cm. alta. Caulis rubro-tinctus, crispule villosus, superne 
vix ultra 2 mm. diametro. Folia lanceolato-oblonga, acuta, basi vaklo 
inaequilatera, latere altero valde auricnlata, 6 "5-7 cm. longa, 3 cm. lata, 
marline conspicue duplo-serrata, supra viridia ; nitidula, minute punctato- 
foveolata, nervis valde impressis sparse inconspicue pilosulis, ceterum 
glabra, subtus plus minusve rubro-tiiict i, nervis valde prominentibus 
hispidulis, venulis inconspicuis, mesophyllo dense albido-punctato ; petioli 
circiter 4 mm. longi, uti caules induti. S'ipulae lanceolatae, costa producta 
caudatae, in toto l'5cm. longae, 3*5-4 mm. latae, pallide virides, mem- 
branaccae, cauda 4-5 mm. longa. Flares monoici, breviter pedicel I ati. 
d : Perianthii segmenta 2, libera, ovata, valvata. Stamina 12-20; fila- 
menta pro parte majore in columnam connata; antherae basifixae, oblongo- 
ovatae, lateraliter dehiscentea. $ : Perianthi'im gamophyllum, campunu- 
latum, pallide flavura extra breviter fulvo-villosum, lobis 5 patulis ovatis 
denticulatis. Ovarium omnino inferum, trialatum, breviter inconspicue 
villosum, alis subtriangularibns acute acuminata* ; styli :;, ban oonnati, 
profunde bifidi, superficie stigmatica spirali ; placentae bilamellatao 
lame] lis parallelis utrinque ovuliferis. — Begonia j'ulcu-villosa, Warb. ex 
K. Schum. & Lauterb. I.e.— T. A. Spbague. 



The interesting plant here figured is ;i member of the 
JBegoniaceae, which family is now known to include five 
distinct genera. In two of these, Begonia itaelfand Hille- 
brandia, the segments of the perianth are distinct in botb 
the sexes; in one of them, Begoniella, the segments of the 
perianth are united in both sexes. The remaining two 
genera have the perianth-segments distinct in one sex, 
united in the other. In Semibegoniella it is the male flower 
which has the segments of the perianth united, while those 
of the female flower are free. But in Symbegonia, the 
genus to which the subject of our illustration belongs, it is 
the female flower in which the perianth-segments are united, 
the male in which they are free. This genus is endemic 
in New Guinea, and includes four species, all of which have 
been discovered in Kaiser- Wilhelrasland. The plan! which 

Dxohbxb r.'ii. 



supplied the material for our figure was raised at GMasnevin 
from seed sent by Dr. R. Schlechter from New G-uinea in 
1908. Only one seed germinated and the resulting plant 
has been grown in an intermediate house with a minimum 
night temperature of 55° F. in a compost of fibrous loam, 
peat and leaf mould. It is of branching habit, under a foot 
in height. In winter most of the shoots die down to the 
crown. Propagation is readily effected by cuttings. 

Description. — Herb, erect, 5-8 in. high ; stems tinged 
with red, crisply hairy, about as thick as a crow-quill 
above. Leaves lanceolate-oblong, acute, very unequal at 
the base and strongly auriculate on one side, 2^-2§ in. 
long, 1£ in. wide, deeply double serrate, green, shining 
and finely punctulate above, finely and sparingly pubescent 
on the sunken nerves, but elsewhere glabrous, more or less 
tinged with red beneath and with prominent hispidulous 
nerves, the fine reticulations hardly visible and the 
mesophyll closely white punctate ; petiole about 2 lin. 
long, pubescent like the stem ; stipules Lanceolate, their 
midrib produced in a slender tip about 2 lin. long, mem- 
branous, pale green, including the tip about f in. long and 
about 2 lin. wide. Flowers 1-sexual, shortly pedicelled. 
Perianth-segments in the male flower 2, free, valvate, ovate. 
Stamens 12-20; filaments united in a column for most of 
their length ; anthers basifixed, oblong-ovate ; dehiscence 
lateral. Perianth-segments of female flower connate in a 
pale yellow campanulate tube, hairy on the outside; 
lobea f>, ovate, serrulate, spreading. Ovary quite inferior, 
3-winged, wings almost triangular, sharply acuminate ; 
styles 3, connate below, deeply 2-fid, with a spiral stig- 
matic surface; placentas 2-lamellate, lamellae parallel, 
bearing ovules on both surfaces. 



Fig. 1, style arms: — enlarged. 



8410 




Tab. 8410. 

PITCAIRNIA TABULAEFORMIS. 

Mexico. 

Bbomeliaceae. Tribe Pitcaiknieae. 

Pitcaienia, Viler it. ; Benth. et Jlook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. G65 ; Mez in DC 
Monogr. Phan. vol. ix. p. 341. 



Pitcairnia tabulaeformis, Linden, Catal. 1862, p. 5 ; E. Morren in Brig. 
Hortic. 1862, p 257, cum ic. ; Lemaire in Ulnstr. Hortic. vol. ix. (1862), t. 344 ; 
Flor. Mag. vol. v. t. 297 ; Baker, Ilandb. Bromel. p. 10!) ; Mez in DC. Monogr. 
Phan. vol. ix. p. 447 ; species P. heterophyllae, Beer, affinis, quae foliis hetero- 
morpliis, exterioribus a basi late ovato subulatis 5 em. longis marginibus 
spinosis, interioribus linearibus inermibus recedit. 

Eerba subacaulis. Folia rosulata, patentia, sublanceolata, acuta, 12 cm. longa, 
3 cm. lata, superiora sensim minora, glabra, supra pseudovelutina, in- 
tegerrima, undulata, anguste albomarginata, translucentia, nervis pluribus 
tenuibus praedita. Tnfloreteentia ante anthesin strobiliformis, demum 
breviter racemosa, multiflora; bracteae ovatae, virides; bracteolae oblongae, 
2*5 cm. longae, lacteae, apice rubro-tinctae. Sepala 1*7 cm. longa, 
oblonga, acuminata, obscure lactea. Petala 5 cm. longa, lineari-ligulata, 
basi squamulata, aurantiaca. Stamina inclusa, antheris sub-agitiatis. 
Ovarium conicnm, trigonum; stylus breviter exsertus; stigma trilobum, 
spiraliter contortum. — C. H. "Wkight. 



The Pitcairnia here figured is one of the most distinct 
and decorative members of the genus. It is now an old 
garden plant; it was first exhibited by Mr. Linden in 18GL 
or 1862 ; his plants had been sent from Chiapas in Mexico 
by Mr. Ghiesbreght. P. tabulaeformis differs from every 
other known species except P. heterophylla , Beer, figured 
at t. 4501 of this work under the name P. exscapa, Hook, f., 
in having a congested somewhat capitate inflorescence. 
But our species is readily distinguished from P. heterophylla, 
which has dimorphic leaves, the inner being linear and 
grass-like, the outer much shorter and densely spiny along 
the margins, by having leaves that are uniform and devoid 
of marginal spines. The petals in our plant are spirally 
twisted, but in such a manner as to reach different levels and 
so to impart to the flower a zygomorphic appearance. In 
cultivation P. tabulaeformis is easy of management; it does 
well when grown under tropical conditions in a peaty soil 
with an abundant supply of moisture. It ripens seed freely, 

PSCKMBEB, l'.Ul. 



and plants raised in this way reach a flowering condition 
in ahont two years ; it may also be propagated by offsets 
which develop round the base of the plant after it has 
flowered. Our figure lias been prepared from a plant which 
blossomed at Kew in June 1910. 

Description. — Herb, almost stemless. Leaves rosulate, 
spreading, oblanceolate, acute, 4-5 in, long, 1-1$ in. wide, 
gradually smaller upwards, glabrous, margin undulate 
but quite entire, with a narrow white border ; nerves 
numerous, very slender. Inflorescence at first cone-like, 
at length shortly racemose, many-flowered ; bracts green, 
ovate ; bracteoles oblong, milky white or pale yellow, their 
tips tinged with red, about 1 in. long. Sepals § in. long, 
oblong, acuminate, yellowish-white. Petals 2 in. long, 
linear ligulate, bright orange, with basal scales. Stamens 
shortly included ; anthers somewhat sagittate. Ovary 
conical, trigonous ; style shortly exserted ; stigma 3-lobed, 
spirally twisted. 

Fig. 1, petal and stamen: 2, anther; 3, pistil: — a?? enlarged. 



8411 




LR, 






Tab. 8411. 

PRUNUS Sargentii. 

Japan. 

Eosaceae. Tribe Pbuneae. 
PbunUS, Lindl. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 609. 



Prunus Sargentii, Rehder in Mitteil. Deutsch. Pendrol. Gesell. 1S08, p. 159 ; 
affinis P. serrulatae, Lindl., sed umbellis 2-4-floris sessilibus vel sub- 
sessilibus, foliis latioribus grossius serratis dentibus vix aristatis differt. 

Arbor glaberrima, ad 25 m. nsque alta, trunco ad 1 m. diametro, cortice fusco 
lenticellis magnis instructo ; rami nigrescentes. Gemmae anguste ovoideae, 
acutae, ad 10 mm. longae. Folia obovato-elliptica vel oblongo obovata, 
longe caudato-acuminata, basi rotundata vel inferiora subcordata, 6-9 cm. 
longa, 3-5 cm. lata, argute serrata, supra viridia, snbtus glaucescentia, 
utrinque glabra, nervis lateralibus utrinque 7-10; petioli l - 5-2'5 cm. 
longi, graciles, apice glandulis 2 instructi. Flores rosei, 3-4 cm. diametro, 
in umbellis sessdibns 2^-floris dispositi; pedicelli graciles, ad 3 5 cm. 
longi, basi bracteis foliaceis glanduloso-serratis snffulti. Culyx tubulosus, 
circiter 5 mm. longus ; lobi ovato-lanceolati, acuti, 4-5 mm. longi, integri. 
Petala obovata, emarginata, ad 1-8 cm. longa, 1-1 "4 cm. lata. Stamina 
20-25, petalis breviora. Ovarium glabrum ; stylus glaber, starrinibus 
leviter superans. Drupae (teste Eehder) ovoideo-glohosae, 10 mm. longae, 
9 mm. diametro, nigro-purpnreae : putamen ovoidto-globusum, leviter 
compressum, 9 mm. longum, 7 mm. latum, flavescenti-albmn, laeve, acute 
carinatum. — P. Pseudo-cerasus, Sargent, Gard. & For. vol. x. p. 462, non 
Lindl.— J. Hutchinson. 



The Japanese Cherry here figured is most nearly related 
to P. serrulata, Lindl., from which it may be readily 
distinguished by its few-flowered, sessile or subsessile 
umbels and its broader and more coarsely seriated leaves, 
the teeth of which are hardly pointed. P. strrulata has 
long been in cultivation in European collections under the 
name P. Pseudo-cerasus, and has been figured at t. 8012 
of this work under that name. This error we have been 
enabled to detect and remedy through the kindness of 
Professor Seward, who has permitted us to study the types of 
Lindley's two species which are preserved in the University 
herbarium at Cambridge. P. Sargentii, the subject of our 
plate, was first raised in the Arnold Arboretum from seeds 
collected in Japan in 1890 by Dr. Bigelow, and was again 
introduced to the same collection in 1802 by Professor 
Sargent who, in 1893, presented seeds to Kew. Sargent 
Lecembeb, 1911. 



who, in figuring and describing the species, made the 
error regarding its identity, which has so long prevailed in 
this country with regard to the identity of P. serrulata, 
states that the timber of this tree is highly esteemed in 
Japan for wood-carving and for the preparation of the 
blocks used in printing cloth and wall-paper. In its native 
habitat the tree is stated to attain a height of eighty feet 
with a trunk three feet in diameter. Since its introduction 
to cultivation P. Sargentii has proved one of the most 
beautiful of single-flowered cherries. Hitherto fruits have 
not been freely borne in this country, but in the Arnold 
Arboretum trees of the same generation as those at Kew 
present a striking appearance in the latter part of June 
because of the extraordinary abundance of their small black 
cherries. The seeds these afford provide the best means of 
propagation ; failing seeds the species can no doubt be 
budded on Mahaleb or Gean stocks. The leaves in autumn 
assume a beautiful dark red hue. The tree should be 
planted in good loamy soil in a sunny spot. 

Description. — Tree, sometimes reaching 80 ft. in height; 
trunk reaching 3 ft. in diameter ; bark tawny, beset with 
large lenticels ; twigs blackish, glabrous. Buds narrowly 
ovoid, acute, about 5 lin. long. Leaves obovate-elliptic or 
oblong-obovate, long caudate acuminate, rounded at the 
base, those lowest on the twigs subcordate, 2J-3J in. long, 
1^-2 in. wide, sharply serrate, green above, glaucescent 
beneath, glabrous on both sides, main nerves 7-10 on each 
side; petiole slender, f-1 in. long, with a pair of apical 
glands. Flowers rose-coloured, 1|-1J in. across, in 2-4- 
flowered sessile umbels ; pedicels slender, up to 1 J in. long, 
with glandular serrate basal bracts. Calyx tubular, about 
2 J \\w. long, lobes ovate-lanceolate, acute, 2-2 J lin. long, 
entire. Petals obovate, emarginate, § in. long, about J in- 
wide. Stamens 20-25, shorter than the petals. Ovary 
glabrous; style glabrous, rather longer than the stamens. 
Drupe ovoid-globose, 5 lin. long, 4j lin. wide, purplish- 
black ; stone ovoid-globose, slightly compressed, 4J lin. 
long, 3^ lin. wide, yellowish-white, smooth, sharply keeled. 



sJ?™ 1 '/?? tion ° f flowev with ^als removed ; 2 ani 3, anthers ; 4, longitudinal 
sect.oa of the ovary:— all enlarged. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 84, DECEMBER, 1911. 
Tab. S407.--ACIPHYLLA LATIFOLIA, Auckland and Campbell 

„ 8408.— RHODODENDRON SPINULIFERUM, CI 
-SYMBEGONIA FULVO-YILLOSA, New Gh 
-PITCAIRNIA TABULAEFORMIS 

„ 8411.— PRUNUS SARGENTII, J< 

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