(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."



CURTIS'S 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



ILLXSTRATING AND DESCRIBING 



plants of t\)t Monai Botamr O^arfiens of lUto, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; 

EDITED BT 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S. 

DIRECTOR, ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW. 



VOL. VI. 
OF THE FOUETH SEEIES. 

(Or Vol. CXXXVI. of the Whole Work.) 



13 




"There laviah Nature in her best attire 
Pours forth sweet odours ami alluring sights, 
And Art with her contending doth aspire 
To excel the natural with made dellghta." 

SP1H81R. 



LONDON : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., LTD., 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments, 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1910. 
[All rights reserved.] 



"^ BOT. GARDEN 
1910 



Complete in 60 vols., royal 8w, with nearly 4000 hand-coloured 
Plates, many Mo or double plates, 4:2s. each net. 

CURTIS & HOOKERS 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

THIRD SERIES. 



figures anti Descriptions of l$fa anti Eare plants, 

SUITABLE FOR THE GARDEN, STOVE, OR CONSERVATORY, 

BY 

Sir J. D. HOOKER, M.D., G.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., 

ASSISTED BY 

WILLIAM BOTTING HEMSLEY, F.R.S., F.L.S. 



NOTICE OF RE-ISSUE. 

Some portions of the above work being out of print, and complete sets 
very difficult to obtain, the Publishers have determined to reprint so 
much as will enable them to complete a few copies as they may be 
subscribed for ; and to meet the convenience of Subscribers, to whom 
the outlay at one time of so large a sum as a complete set now costs 
is an impediment to its purchase, they will commence a re-issue of 
two Volumes Monthly, thus spreading the cost over a period of 
two and a half years. The price of the volumes will be 42s. each as 
heretofore, but to Subscribers for the entire series 36s. each, or a 
complete set of the 60 vols, will be supplied for £100 cash. Subscribers 
may commence at any time. 

The Botanical Magazine, commenced in 1787, and continued 
with uninterrupted regularity to the present time, forms the most 
extensive and authentic repertory of Plant History and Portraiture 
extant. The Third Series, by far the most valuable, comprising all 
the important additions of the last sixty years, contains nearly 4000 
Coloured Plates, with Descriptions, structural and historical, by Sir 
William and Sir Joseph Hooker. 

A set complete from the commencement in 1787, including the First, 
Second, and Third Series, to the end of 1904, 130 vols., may be had, 
price £136. 

N.B. — A Fourth Series commenced in Januarv, 1905, and is edited 
by D. Prain, C.I.E., LL.D., F.R.S., Director of the Royal Botanic 
Gardens, Kew. 

Monthly, with Six Coloured Plates, 3s. 6d. Annual Subscription, 42s. 
Payable in Advance. 



LONDON : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., Limited, 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Goveknments. 
6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



FORM FOR SUBSCRIBERS TO THE RE-ISSUE. 

To Messrs. Lovell Beeve & Co., Limited, Publishers, 
6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
Please send to the undersigned the Botanical Magazine, Thikd Series, 
two Volumes Monthly, at 36s. per Volume, or the 60 vols, for .£100.* 



Name 



Address^ 



Bate 



Conveyance 



* Subscribers will be good enough to indicate in which mode they desire 
to receive the work, by striking out the words indicating the other mode. 



FORM FOR SUBSCRIBERS TO THE NEW (FOURTH) 

SERIES. 

To Messrs. LOVELL BEEVE & Co., Limited, 

6, Henrietta Street, Covext Garden. 

Please send the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE monthly, as published, for 
which I enclose 42s. subscription for the year. 

Name 

Address 



Date 



jfourti) sjm'rs. 

No. 61. 



VOL. VI.— JANUARY. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s, 



OB NO. X4T5 OF THE ENTIRE w OEK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGDRES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

iSirrctor, Utottai Botanic CTiarnens, Tteto. 




-"•etrja* 



There lavish Nature in her best attire 
Poors forth nreet odours and alluring sights 
And Art with her contending doth aspire 
To excel the natural with made delights." 



LONDON: 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVERNMENTS 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 
1910. 

[All rights reserved.] 
{Entered at the New York Post Office as second-class' matter.) 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



MATERIALS FOR A FLORA OF THE MALAYAN PENINSULA. 

By H. N. Ridley, M.A., F.R.S., Director of Botanic Gardens, Singapore. 
Complete in Three Parts, 30s. 

CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND OF THE ADJACENT PORTIONS OF GARHWAL AND TIBET. 
By Lt.-G-en. Sir Bichaed Strachey and J. F. Dcthie. 5s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATIC-ffi OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 
2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 vs. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations 
of their names. By the Rev. Prof. G. Henslow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Crown Svo, 4a. 6d. 

THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Bakeb, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles, 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, P.R.S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and YY. G. SMITH. F.L.S. 
Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's " Handbook; 1 and other British Floras. 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9*. 

LOVELL EEEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



8232 




VoicentBroo 



ififlevt 



Tab. 8292. 
SYRTNG-A Bretschneideri. 

North China. 

Oleaceae. Tribe Syrinqeae. 
SYRtNGA, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 675. 



Syringa Bretschneideri, Lemoine ex Wien. Illmtr. Oart. Zeit. 1890, p. 36!) ; 
W iff mack in Garlenfl. 1895, p. 499; Henry in Bev. Ifort. 1902, p. 40; 
species 8. Joaikaeae, jacq., affinis, sed foliis subtus pubescentibus, paniculis 
majoribua densioribus et floribus pallidioribtis differt, 

Frviex ad 3 m. alius, ramia glabris. Folia elliptica vel elliptico-lanceolata, 
acuta vel acuminata, basi cuneata vel cuneato-rotundata, supra glabra, 
subtus pallidiora, tenuiter piloso-pubescentia, putiolo 7-15 mm. longo, 
lamina 6-15 cm. longa, 2 5-6 - 5 cm. lata. Banicula 8-30 cm. longa, 
8-16 cm. lata, floribus ad nodos ramorum vel apice ramulorum ultimorum 
in fasciculos dense confertis. Pedicelli 0-2 mm. longi, glabri vel minute 
puberuli. Calyx 2-2*5 mm. longus, campanulatus, breviter et obtuse 
4-dentatus, pilis paucis conspersis instructus vel glaber. Corolla roseo- 
lilacina, glabra; tubus 1-1-2 cm. longus; lobi 3-4 mm. longi, ovati, 
obtusi, patentes. Capsula deflexa, 1-1 • 4 cm. longa, 4 mm. crassa, oblongo- 
lanceolata, obtusa, glabra. — S. Kmodi, var. rosea, Cornu in Rev. Hort. 1888, 
p. 492, c. icon.; Wittmack in Gartenfl., 1895, p. 499, fig. 100. S. villosa, 
Sargent in Gard. & For. 1888, p. 222, nee Vahl.— N. E. Brown. 



The Lilac here figured was introduced to European 
gardens from Northern China, whence seeds reached Paris 
somewhere between 1879 and 1883. The examples in the 
Kew collection have been received from various sources and 
under the diverse names S. Emodi, var. rosea, S. villosa, 
S. Josikaea, var. eximia, and S. Bretschneideri. In 1888 it 
was in France treated as a variety of S. Emodi, Wall. ; 
that species, however, differs from the subject of our plate 
in having quite glabrous leaves which are much paler 
beneath, with a different main-venation and a less distinct 
secondary reticulation ; the panicles too are smaller and the 
flowers are white. In the same year our plant was else- 
where referred to S. villosa, Vahl ; Yahl's plant is, however, 
a very distinct species with smaller and rounder leaves, less 
copious panicles and smaller flowers of a paler colour. The 
species now described is more nearly allied to S. Josikaea, 

January, 1910. 



Jacq., of which it has by some growers been considered a 
variety, than to either of the species just mentioned ; 
S. Josikaea, however, has glabrous leaves, much whiter 
beneath, and has more deeply coloured flowers than our 
plant, which appears amply entitled to the separate recog- 
nition first accorded to it by Mr. Lemoine in 1900. Like 
all Lilacs, S. Bretschneideri is fond of abundant moisture and 
generous treatment at the root; it thrives well in a rich 
loamy soil. The finest example in the collection at Kew is 
now a handsome bush 10 ft. high and as much through, but 
it promises to become considerably taller. Its fine panicles 
— 18 in. high and 12 in. across — are at their best in early 
June when those of the common Lilac and its varieties have 
faded. This feature adds greatly to the value of S. Bret- 
schneideri in the garden, and entitles it to a foremost place 
among hardy flowering shrubs. It can be increased by 
means of cuttings and also by seeds. 

Description. — Shrub, 10 ft. high or higher ; branches 
glabrous. Leaves elliptic or elliptic-lanceolate, acute or 
acuminate, base cuneate or almost rounded, glabrous above, 
beneath paler and thinly pubescent, 2^-6 in. long, 1-2^ in. 
wide, petiole 2|-6 in. long. Panicle 3-12 in. long, 3-(> in. 
wide, flowers densely clustered at the nodes or at the tips of 
terminal branchlets. Pedicels 0-1 lin. long, glabrous or 
finely puberulous. Calyx I-I5 lin. long, campanulate, 
shortly and bluntly 4-toothed, glabrous or beset with a few 
scattered hairs. Corolla lilac-rose, glabrous ; tubes 5-6 lin. 
long, lobes 1J-2 lin. long, ovate, obtuse, spreading. Capsule 
deflexed, 5-7 lin. long, 2 lin. wide, oblong-lanceolate, obtuse, 
glabrous. 

Fig. 1, flower with corolla removed ; 2, corolla laid open ; 3, ovary, the style 
removed : — all enlarged. 



8293 







Xm Reeve &.0?Xjar4.&o/\ 



Tab. 8293. 

ibis mi xt ta. 

Japan. 



Iridaceae. Tribe Irideae. 
Irts, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686. 



Iris minuta, Franch. et Sav. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. ii. pp. 42 (excl. syn.), 521 ; 
Maxim, in Mel. Biol, pars x. p. 715; BaJeer, Handb. Irid. p. 2; Makino in 
Tokyo Bot. Mag. vol. xvi. p. 149; 1. ntthmicae, var. nana", Maxim., affinis 
sed floribus minoribus luteis, tubo perigonii graeili multo longiore, 
laciniarum interiorum forma et magnitudine distincta. 

fferha humilis, dense caespitosa, rhizomate repente tenui radices copiosissimas 
tuberculiferaa edente, innovationibus aliis florigeris, aliis folia tantum 
proferentibus. Folia innovationum sterilium circiter 4, iufima hrevia, 
vaginantia, demum in fibras soluta, caetera anguste ensiformia, summum 
sub anthesi fiores vix duplo superans, demum ad 45 cm. longum et 2-8 mm. 
latum, acutum, 5-7-nerve; folia innovationum fertilium omnia brevia, 
vaginantia. Scapus gracilis, brevis. Spatha 2-valvis, unifiora ; valvae 
oblanceolatae, angustae, acutae, versus margines scariosae, viridescentes, 
3-3 • 5 cm. longae. Pedicellus gracillimus, ad 2 vel ultra 2 cm. longus. 
Pirigonium luteum, 2 '5-3 cm. diametro; tubus gracilis, circiter 2 cm. 
longus ; laciniae exteriores ebarbatae, ungue erecto-patente quam limbo 
longiore intus luteo extra luteo-viridi, limbo patulo vel paulo defiexo 
obovato ad 10 mm. longo et 8 mm. lato luteo secundum costam fusco- 
purpureo-maculato ; laciniae interiores erectile, quam exteriores breviores, 
styli crestas paulo excedentes, ungue purpurascente angusto, limbo obovato 
retuso flavo. Anther ae 4 mm. longae. btyli rami pallida flavi cum cristis 
10 mm. (vel paulo ultra) longi, cristae lobis anguste ovato-lanceolatis 
subacutis. Ovarium oblongo-cylindricum, obtuse trigonum, 8-10 mm. 
longum. Capsula subglobosa, 15 mm. longa, tricostata. Semina sub- 
globosa, flava, 4 mm. diametro, appendice majusculo albido. — 0. Staff. 



The plant from which the drawing now given has been 
prepared was obtained for the Kew collection by purchase 
from the Yokohama Nursery Company in February, 1908 ; 
a few days after its arrival a flowering example of the 
same species was presented to the herbarium at Kew by 
Mr. AY. E. Ledger, who had grown it in his garden at 
TVimbledon. The species, which is described in the Yoko- 
hama catalogue as " a lovely tiny Iris, 4 or 5 inches high, 
with yellow flowers," is only known in a cultivated state. It 
is generally assumed to be the plant described by Franchet 

January, 1910. 



and Savatier as I. minuta, though it has to be observed that 
these authors describe the flowers as pale blue with purple 
veins, and identify with their species an Iris figured in the 
Honzo Zufu (vol. xxiii. fol. recto, fig. 1 recto, fig. sinistr.), 
which is altogether a different plant. On the other hand, 
the late Mr. Maximowicz has given, under /. minuta, an 
account of a coloured drawing by Siebold of a Japanese Iris 
which agrees very well with the plant now figured, and 
there is no doubt that our plant is a species to which the 
exhaustive description of 1. minuta by Mr. Makino applies. 
At Kew, i". minuta has been cultivated in a pot in a cold 
frame, where it has formed grassy evergreen tufts, with 
thin, wiry, freely branching and interlacing rhizomes that 
emit numerous very thin roots. These roots, when ex- 
amined late in the season, are found to bear many very 
small potato-like tubers, in shape and size somewhat resem- 
bling the eggs of ants ; these tubers may serve the purpose 
of the large fleshy tubers met with on the roots of certain 
species of Asparagus and referred to at plate 8288 of this 
work. While not a showy species, /. minuta deserves to be 
included in cultivated Iris collections ; it is evidently easily 
kept in health, and promises to prove fairly hardy. It 
flowers freely in May. 

Description. — Herb, dwarf and densely tufted ; root- 
stock creeping and branching, with numerous slender roots 
at length beset with many small tubers ; shoots some 
flowering, others bearing only leaves. Leaves of the sterile 
shoots about 4, the lowest short and sheathing, at length 
splitting into fibrils, the others narrow ensiform, the upper- 
most barely twice as long as the flowering shoots, 18 in. 
long, 1-4 lin. wide, acute, 5-7-nerved ; those of the flower- 
ing shoots all short and sheathing. Scape slender, short ; 
spathe 2-valved, 1-flowered ; valves oblanceolate, narrow, 
acute, with scarious margins, greenish, lj-li in. long; 
pedicel slender, f-1 in. long. Perianth yellow, 1-1£ in. 
across ; tube slender, about | in. long ; outer lobes un- 
bearded, claw erecto-patent longer than the limb, yellow 
within, greenish yellow externally, limb spreading or some- 
what deflexed, obovate, about 5 lin. long, 4 lin. wide, yellow 
and flecked with purple along the mid-rib ; inner lobes 
erect, shorter than the outer, rather longer than the style- 



crests, claw narrow, purplish, limb obovate, retuse, yellow. 
Anthers 2 lin. long. Style-arms pale yellow with crests 
5-6 lin. long", lobes of the crests narrowly ovate-lanceolate, 
subacute. Ovary oblong-cylindric, bluntly trigonous, 4-5 lin. 
long. Capsule subglobose, about f in. long, 3-costate. Set ds 
subglobose, yellow, 2 lin. wide, with a rather large whitish 
appendage. 

Fig. 1, part of a root showing small tubers; 2, standard; 3 and 4, stamens ; 
5, stigma ; 6, fruit ; 7 and 8, seed: — all except 6 and 7 enlarged. 



82m 







'Landau, 



Tab. 8294. 

DIPELTA 7ENTRIC0SA. 

Western China. 

Caprifoliaceae. Tribe Lonicebeae. 

Dipelta, Maxim, in Bull. Acad. PJtersb. vol. xxiv. p. 50; Engl, (ft Prantl. 
Naturlich. Pflan-zenfam. vol. iv. 4, p. 165. 



Dipelta ventricosa, Hemsl. in Gard. Chron. 1908, vol. xliv. p. 101; a specibus 
adhao descriptis corolla usque ad basin late ventriccro-inflata differt. 

Frutex 2-5 m. altus, ramulis florigeris novcllis pubeacentibns moz glabris; 
internodii circiter 5 cm. longi. Folia opposita, lanoeolata rel ovato- 
lanceolata, longe caudato-actuuinata, basi rotnndata vol raro snbacuta, 
5-15 cm. longa, 2-4 5 cm. lata, membranacea vel demum snbcori 
mai^gine remote glandnloso-denticolata, ciliolata, supra parce strigillosa, 
subtus nervis parce pilosula, nervis lateralibus utriuque G-7 supra 
inconspicuis ; petioli gracilcs vix ad 1 cm. usque longi, glanduloso-pilosi. 
Pedunctdi axillares, gracillimi, breves, l-pluriflori ; pedicclli 1-1*0 cm. 
longi, parce glanduloso-pubescentes ; bracteae fill forme-:, 1-2 mm. longae, 
pilosae; l>racteolac 6; 2 minimae infra pedicelli medium positae; 4 amplae, 
perastentes, juxta ovarii basin enatae, - exteriores ovatae, minores, 
2 interiores auriculi formes, ad 1*5 cm. usque longae. Calycit segmenta 
lineari-lanceolata, acutissima, 5-8 mm. longa, ciliolata. Corolla tubulosa, 
bilabiata, circiter 3 cm. longa, extra rubro-purpurea, intne albo-aurantiaca; 
tubus latus ad basin usque ventricoso-inflatus, antice basi leviter gibbosus, 
lobis 5 rotundatis leviter rccurvis. Stamina 4, didynama, postica e fauce 
brevissime exserta, filamentis riliformibus glabris. Ovarium 4-loculare, 
glanduliferum ; stylus filiformis, integer, glaber. Fructut calycis segmentis 
coronatus, bracteolis accrescentibus appressis reticulatis absconditus, 
cum bracteolis circiter 2 cm. diametro. — J. Hutchinson. 



The germs Dipelta, founded by Maximowicz in 1877, 
differs from Diervilla ( \¥eigelia) t to which it is most closely 
allied, by the presence of the striking bracteoles at the base 
of the ovary which grow out to form dry membranous 
wings to the fruit. The species which forms the subject of 
our plate differs from every other in the genus in having 
the corolla widely inflated to the base ; it appears, however, 
to be most nearly allied to D. yunnanensis, Franch., which 
differs in having entire leaves as well as in having the tube 
of the corolla contracted at the base. Like D. yunnanensis, 
the species now figured is a native of Western China, where 
both species have been found by Mr. E. H. Wilson, growing 
January, 1910. 



at an altitude of 8,500 ft. above sea-level. The material 
on which the present figure and description have been based 
was supplied by Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, in whose 
nursery at Coombe Wood it forms a handsome shrub which 
thrives excellently in the good loam characteristic of the 
locality. Judging from its behaviour there, D. ventricosa 
promises to be a satisfactory garden plant ; it is quite 
hardy, its cultivation presents no difficulties, and it is 
easily propagated by cuttings. 

Description. — Shrub, 7-18 ft. in height, young flower- 
ing shoots at first pubescent, soon glabrous ; internodes 
about 2 in. long. Leaves opposite, lanceolate or ovate- 
lanceolate, caudate-acuminate, base rounded or rarely 
slightly cuneate, 2-6 in. long, 1|-2| in. wide, membranous 
or at length subcoriaceous, margin distantly gland-toothed, 
ciliolate, sparingly strigose above, sparsely pubescent on the 
nerves beneath ; lateral nerves 6-7 on each side hardly 
visible above ; petioles slender, 4-5 lin. long, glandular 
hairy. Peduncles axillarj^ slender, short, 1-more-flowered ; 
pedicels 5-8 lin. long, sparingly glandular pubescent ; 
bracts filiform, 1 lin. long or less, hairy ; bracteoles 6 ; 
2 very small below the middle of each pedicel, 4 large near 
the base of the ovary, of these the outer pair smaller ovate, 
the inner pair auriculate up to 8 lin. long. Calyx-lobes 
linear-lanceolate, very acute, 3-4 lin. long, ciliolate. Corolla 
tubular, 2-lipped, about 1\ in. long, outside red, within 
whitish orange ; tube wide ventricose to the base, slightly 
gibbous below in front ; lobes 5, rounded, slightly recurved. 
Stamens 4, didynamous, the upper pair somewhat exserted ; 
filaments filiform, glabrous. Ovary 4-celled, glandular ; 
style filiform, entire, glabrous. Fruit crowned by the per- 
sistent calyx-lobes, and hidden by the adpressed reticulate 
accrescent bracteoles, J in. wide, including the bracteoles. 



Fig. 1, upper pair of bracteoles, calyx and pistil, seen from behind; 
2, bracteoles and calyx, front view ; 3, base of corolla tube, laid open, showing 
the stamens ; 4 and 5, anthers : — all enlarged. 



8295 




"VilicanlBroQks.DayciLSai 



L Reeve 8c C° London 



Tab. 8205. 
ourisia macrophylla. 

New Zealand. 

SCROPHDLABIACEAE. Tribe DlGITALEVE. 

Ourisia, Gommers.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 962. 



Ourisia macrophylla, Hook. 7c. PL vol. vi. tt. 545-546 ; Hook. f. Flor. New 
Zeal, vol. i. p. 197, ot Handb. New Zeal. Fl. p. 218; Che ft man, Man. New Zeal. 
FL p. 549; species 0. maerooarpae, Hook, f., affinis, sed scapo pedicellisque 
pubescentilms facile distinguenda. 

Herba perennis. Folia radicalia; petiolus 2-5-10 cm. longus, supra leviter 
concavus, dorso rotundatus, pubescens, marginibus ciliatis purpureo- 
tinctus; lamina 8-8 '5 cm. longa, 2-7 ■ 5 cm. lata, ovata vel elliptico-ovata, 
obtusa, basi subcordata vel rotundata, crenato-denrata, utrinque glabra, 
laete virens, yenis valde impressis. Scapus 7 '5-30 cm. longus, interdum 
foHorum sessilium lanceolatorum vel ellipticorum pari instructus, pubescens. 
Mores verticillis 1^4 dispositi. Verttcitti 3-8-flori, 4-8-bracteati. Bracteae 
1-2 cm. longae, 4-12 mm. latae, seniles, lineari- ad ovato-Ianceolatae, 
acutae vel obtusae, plus minusve dentatae, glabrae, ciliatae. Pedicelli 
2-5 cm. longi, pubescentes. Calyx 7-10 mm. longus, fere ad basin 5-lobus 
et prope basin leviter constrictus; lobi oblongo-lanceolati, apice obtusi 
vel acuti et glandulo minuto instructi, tenuiter pubescentes, minute ciliati. 
Corolla 2-2 "2 cm. diam., alba; tubus calyce vix longior, fauce luteo- 
barbatus; limbus obliquus, planus, 5-lobus; lobi late obovati, apice 
emarginati, duobus superioribus minoribus. Stamina subexserta, glabra, 
alba ; staminodium brevissimum filiforme. Ovarium ovoideum, glabrum 
stylus exsertus, glaber. — N. E. Brown. 



There are at least nine species of Ourisia natives of New- 
Zealand, and all of them are worthy of a place in our 
gardens. But though some of them have been known to 
science for over half a century, the species here figured 
appears to be the first that has been introduced to cultiva- 

ion. It is certainly one of the finest in the genus, but it 
can hardly claim to excel, from the horticultural standpoint, 
0. macrocarpa, Hook, f., which differs in being more 
robust, with glabrous scapes and pedicels and larger sepals 
and fruit ; or 0. robusta, Col., also more robust, with 
pubescent scapes and pedicels, with more numerous whorls 
of flowers and more flowers in each whorl, but with rather 
smaller corollas. It would appear indeed that 0. robusta 

January, 1910. 



is at times mistaken for 0. macrophylla, since the plant 
figured as 0. macrophylla, both in Harris, New Zealand 
Flowers, t. 8, and in Illustrations of the New Zealand 
Flora, t. 11, appears to be really 0. robusta. The example 
from which the figure now given has been prepared was 
obtained in 1907 from Messrs. Bees, Limited. Grown in a 
pan of loamy soil and kept under glass all winter, it 
flowered in a cold frame in April ; it may prove hardy m 
the warmer parts of the United Kingdom. The flowers last 
for a month or more, and are succeeded by seeds which on 
being sown germinate in a fortnight and afford a ready 
means of increase. 

Description. — Herb, perennial. Leaves radical ; petiole 
tinged with purple, 1-4 in. long, somewhat concave above, 
rounded on the back, pubescent, the margins ciliate ; blade 
1|-3J in. long, |-3 in. wide, ovate or elliptic-ovate, obtuse, 
base subcordate or rounded, margin crenately toothed, 
glabrous on both sides, bright green, the veins sunk above. 
Scape 3-12 in. long, at times with a pair of sessile lanceo- 
late or elliptic leaves, pubescent. Flowers in 1-4 whorls, 
each whorl 3-8-flowered with 4-8 sessile, linear- to ovate- 
lanceolate, acute or obtuse, more or less toothed, glabrous, 
ciliate bracts 5-10 lin. long, 2-6 lin. wide ; pedicels |-2 in. 
long, pubescent. Calyx 3-5 lin. long, divided almost to 
the slightly constricted base into 5 oblong-lanceolate lobes, 
obtuse or acute with a minute apical gland, thinly pubescent 
and finely ciliate. Corolla 10-11 lin. across, white; tube 
hardly longer than the calyx ; throat beset with yellow 
hairs ; limb oblique, flat, 5-lobed, the lobes wide obovate, 
emarginate, the two upper smaller than the others. Stamens 
slightly exserted, glabrous, white,- staminode very short, 
filiform. Ovary ovoid, glabrous ; style glabrous, exserted. 



Fig. 1, culvx and pistil ; 2, corolla laid open, showing stamens and steuainode 

6 ami -1, stamens; a, ovary :— all enlarged. 



Tab. 8201). 
eria rhodoptera. 

Philippines. 

OuCHIDACEAE. Tribe El'lDESPREAE. 

Ebia, LindL; Benth, et Hv»k.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 509. 



Eria rhodoptera, Rcichb. f. in (lard. Chron. 1882, xviii. ]). 586; ltolfe in Orch. 
Rev. 1909, p. 220: ad E. DMwynii, Hook., accedit, Bed petalis et labelli 
lobis lateral i bus sanguineis differ! 

Pteudobuflri aggregati, ovoideo-oblongi, 3-10 em. toogi, 2-4-phylli. Folia 
coriacea, oblongo-lanceolata, subacuta, 12-25 cm. longa, 2-3 cm. lata. 
tScajn erecti, 14-17 cm. longi, parce pubescentes; racemi multiHori. 
BracU >e oblongae, subobtusae, membranaceae, 1-1 '8 cm. longae, Btra- 
niineae. Pedicelli graciles, 1*3-2 cm. longi. Floret mediocres, numerosi, 
etraminei, petalis et labelli lobis lateralibus sanguineis. Sepala oblonga, 
Babacuta, apice recur va, 1-1 "3 cm. longa. Petala oblonga, subacuta, 
apice oblique incurva, 1-1*8 cm. longa. LabeUum trilobum, 6-8 mm. 
longum; lobi laterales crecti rotandati, obtusi; lobna intermedins 
recurrus, obovatus, apiculatus ; discus triearinatns, carinis apice crenatis 
vol subfimbriatia (,'olumt»a clavata, 4 mm. longa. — /•'. Laucheana, Kriinzl. 
in Gard. Cliron. 1892, vol. xi. p. 809. — R. A. Kolke. 



Eria rhodoptera was described by the late Professor 
Reichenbach from a plant which flowered in the Pine- 
apple nursery of Messrs. Henderson & Son, at Maida 
Yale, in 1882. The plant, which was described as having 
flowers of a pallid whitish or ochre colour, with purple 
petals and purple side-lobes to the lip, appears to have been 
soon lost sight of, and its native country was unknown. Ten 
years later Professor Kranzlin described as E. Laucheana 
a plant, of which the native country was also unknown, 
from the collection of Prince Leichtenstein at Eisgrab. A 
plant of E. Laucheana was sent to Kew in 1904 from the 
Botanical G-arden at Heidelberg, where there is a good and 
well-grown collection of Orchids. This plant flowered at 
Kew in April in a tropical house under the treatment 
suitable for species of Eria, Dendrobium and Coelogyne, and 
on flowering it was found to be identical with herbarium 
material of a species of Eria from the Philippines and also 
January, 1910. 



to be the same as the earlier described E. rhodoptera. The 
species comes nearest to E. D'dliuynii, of the section 
Hymeneria, figured at t. 4163 of this work, but is one of 
the most distinct in this section on account of its crimson 
petals and lip. 

Description'. — Herb ; pseudobulbs clustered, ovoid- 
oblong, 2|-4 in. long, 2-4-leaved. Leaves coriaceous, 
oblong-lanceolate, subacute, 4|— 10 in. long, |— 1J in. wide. 
Scapes erect, 5J— 7 in. long, sparingly pubescent ; racemes 
many-flowered ; bracts oblong, subobtuse, membranous, 
5-9 lin. long, pale straw-coloured or whitish. Flowers 
medium, many, pale straw-coloured or whitish, with crim- 
son petals and side-lobes of lip ; pedicels slender, 6-10 in. 
long. Sepals oblong, subacute, recurved at the tip, 5-6 lin. 
long. Petals oblong, subacute, obliquely incurved at the 
tip, 5-6 Jin. long. Lip 3-lobed, 3-4 lin. long; lateral lobes 
erect, rounded, obtuse ; mid-lobe recurved, obovate, apicu- 
late ; disk 3-keeled, the keels crenate or somewhat fimbriate 
at the tip. Column clavate, 2 lin. long. 



Fitr. 1, lip and column; 2, column, front view; 3, pollinia :— all enlarged. 



The Books in this Catalogue have been reduced to net cash 

prices, and are sent Post-free on receipt of remittance. 

All previous Catalogues are withdrawn. 

LIST OF WORKS 

ox 

NATURAL HISTORY, TOPOGRAPHY, 
ANTIQUITY, AND SCIENCE. 



CON X E N T S. 



Page 

3 



Botany 

Ferns . . . 7 

Mosses and Hepatic.*; 8 

Fungi .... 8 

Alg.l ... 9 

Shells and Mollusks 9 

Entomology 10 



Zoology 
Antiquarian . 
Miscellaneous 

Serials 

Victoria Library. 
Plates . 
Forthcoming Works 



13 
14 
14 
15 

16 

16 
16 




PUBLISHED by 



LOVELL REEVE & CO., Limited, 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Govkrn.v 

. HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN, W.C. 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S 
Crown Series of Natural History. 

For descriptive details, see Catalogue. 

These handy and well -illustrated Volumes, while popular in 
style to suit beginners, are strictly scientific in method, and 
form excellent introductions to more advanced works. They are 
admirably adapted for school prizes and presents. 



Handbook of the British Flora. By G. Bentham, 

F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hookeb, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., 
Ac. 9*. 

Illustrations of the British Flora. Drawn by 

W. H. Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L-S. 1315 Wood 
Engravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, 9s. 

British Grasses. By M. Pi/ues. 16 Coloured 

Plates, and Woodcuts, 9*. 

British Ferns. By M. Plues. 16 Coloured Plates, 

and Woodcuts, 9s. 

British Seaweeds. By S. 0. Gray. 16 Coloured 

Plates, 9*. 

Synopsis of British Mosses. By C. P. Hop.kif/k, 

F.L.S. Revised Edition, 6s. 6d. 

British Insects. By E. F. Staveley. 16 Coloured 

Plates, and Woodcuts, 12s. 

British Beetles. By E. C. Rye. 2nd Edition, 

revised by Rev. Canon Fowlek, M.A., F.L.S. 16 Coloured 
Plates, and Woodcuts, 9s. 

British Butterflies and Moths. ByH. T. Stainton. 

2nd Edition, 16 Coloured Plates, and Woodcuts, 9s. 

British Bees. By W. E. Shuceard. 16 Coloured 

Plates, and Woodcuts, 9s. 

British Spiders. By E. F. Staveley. 16 Coloured 

Plates, and Woodcuts, 9s. 

British Zoophytes. By Arthur S. Pennington 

F.L.S. 24 Plates, 9*. * 

The Edible Mollusca of Great Britain and Ireland 

with Recipes for Cooking them. By M. S. Lovell. Second 
Edition. 12 Coloured Plates, 9s. 



Lovell Keeve and Co., Limited 3 

BOTANY. 
The Botanical Magazine ; Figures and Descriptions 

of New and Rave Plants suitable for the Garden, Stove, or Green- 
house. Fourth Series. Edited by D. Prain, C.I.E., LL.D., 

F.R.S., Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. Vols. I. V. 

Royal 8vo, 42s. each. Published Monthly, with 6 Plates, 3*. 6d', 
coloured. Annual Subscription, 42s. 
CoMttumoH of the Thibd Sebies in 60 Vols., with nearly 4000 
Coloured Plates, 42*. each ; to Subscribers for the entire Series, 
36*. each. 

Monographs from the Third Series of the Botanical 

Magazine, in which the plates and descriptions illustrating each 
< Jenus are brought together under one wrapper, A List may be 
had on application. The prices vary from Is, to 51s. 

A New and Complete Index to the Botanical 

.Magazine. Vols. I. to CXXX. Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 
3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the Magazine 
by W. Botting Hemseey. 21s. 

Catalogue of the Plants of Kumaon and of the 

adjacent portions of Garhwal and Tibet. By Lt.-Gen. Sir 
Richard Strachey and J. F. Duthie. 5s. 

The Uses of British Plants. Traced from 

antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations of 
their names. By the Rev. Prof. G. Henseow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. 6d. 

Handbook of the British Flora; a Description of 

the Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in, 
the Bnt.sh Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By 
Geohge Bentham, F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker C B 
G.C.S.I., F.R.S. Crown 8vo, 9s. "' 

Illustrations of the British Flora; a Series of 

Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from 
Drawings by W. H. Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, FLS 
forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's " Handbook " 

W* w ei ' , B / lt[sh Pl01 ' aS - 7th Edition ' »*■* *»* ^a^ed. 
Idl5 Wood Engravings, 9s, 

A 2 



4 Lovell Reeve and Co., Limited 

Outlines of Elementary Botany, as Introductory 

to Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S. New 

Edition, Is. 

The Narcissus, its History and Culture, with 

Coloured Figures of all known Species and Principal Varieties. 
By F. W. Buebidge. and a Review of the Classification 
by J. G. Baker, F.L.S. Super-royal 8vo. 48 Coloured 
Plates, SO*. 

The Natural History of Plants. By H. Baili.on, 

President of the Linnsean Society of Paris, Professor of Medical 
Natural History and Director of the Botanical Garden of the 
Faculty of Medicine of Paris. Super-royal 8vo. Vols. I. toVIIL, 
with 3545 Wood Engravings, 21s. each. 

The Floral Magazine; New Series, Enlarged to 

Royal 4to. Figures and Descriptions of the choicest New Flowers 
for the Garden, Stove, or Conservatory. Complete in Ten Vols. f 
in handsome cloth, gilt edges, 36*. each. 
Fiest Series complete in Ten Vols., with 560 beautifully-coloured 1 
Plates, £15 15*. 

The Young Collector's Handybook of Botany. 

By the Rev. H. P. Dunster, M.A. 66 Woodcuts, 3s. 

Materials for a Flora of the Malayan Peninsula. 
By H, N. Hidf.ey, M.A., F.P..S,, Director of Botanic Gardens, 

Singapore. Complete in Three Parts, 30s. 

British Wild Flowers, Familiarly Described in 

the Four Seasons. By Thomas Moore, F.L.S. 24 Coloured 
Plates. 14s. 

Mora Vitiensis ; a Description of the Plants of 

the Viti or Fiji Islands, with an Account of their History, Uses. 
and Properties. By Dr. Berthoid Seemann, F.L.S. Royal 
4to, Coloured Plates. Part X., 25s. 

Flora Hongkongensis ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By 
George Bentham, F.RS. With a Supplement by Dr. Hance. 
2ls. Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for 
the Colonies. The Supplement separately, 2*. inf. 



Lovell Reeve and Co., Limited 5 

Flora of Mauritius and the Seychelles ; a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By 
J. G. Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of 
the Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

Flora of British India. By Sir J. D. Hooker, 

G.C.S.I., C.B., F.R.S., &a. ; assisted by various Botanists. Com- 
plete in Seven Vols., cloth, £'12. Published under the authority 
of the Secretary of State for India in Council. 

Flora of Tropical Africa. By Daniel Oliver, 

F.R.S., F.L.S. Vols. I. to III., 20*. each. Continuation. 
Edited by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
Vol. IV., Section 1, 30s. Section 2, 27s. Vol. V, 25s. 6d. 
Vol. VI., Section 1, Part 1, 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 
25s. 6d. Published under the authority of the Secretary of State 
for the Colonies. 

Handbook of the New Zealand Flora; a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the 
Chatham, Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Mao 
quarrie's Islands. By Sir J. D. Hooker, G.C.S.I., F.R.S. 
42s. Published under the auspices of the Government of that 
Colony. 

Flora Australiensis ; a Description of the Plants 

of the Australian Territory. By George Bentham, F.R.S., 
assisted by Ferdinand Mueller, F.R.S. , Government Botanist, 
Melbourne, Victoria. Complete in Seven Vols., £7 4s. Published 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

Flora of the British West Indian Islands. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of 
the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

Flora Capensis ; a Systematic Description of the 

Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By 
W. H. Harvey, M.D., F.R.S., and O. W. Sonder, Ph.D. Vols. I. 
to III., 20s. each. Continuation. Edited by Sir W. T. Thiselton- 
Dyer, C.M.G., CLE., LL.D., F.R.S. Vol. IV., Section 1, 
52s. Section 2, 24*. Vol. V., Part I„ 9s. Vol. VI., 24*. 
Vol. VII., 33s. 



6 Lovell Reeve and Co., Limited 

Genera Plantarum, ad Exemplaria imprimis in 

Herbariis Kewensibus servata definita. By George Bentham, 
F.E.S., F.L.S., and Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S.. late Director of the 
Royal Gardens, Kew. Complete in 7 Parts, forming 3 Vols., £8 2*. 

Flora of West Yorkshire; with an Account of the 

Climatology and Lithology in connection therewith. By Frederic 
Arnold Lees, M.R.C.S. Eng., L.R.C.P. Loud., Recorder for the 
Botanical Record Club, and President of the Botanical Section of 
the Yorkshire Naturalists' Union. With Coloured Map, 21s. 

Flora of Hampshire, including the Isle of Wight, 

with localities of the less common species. By F. Towns end, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, greatly enlarged and improved. 
With large Coloured Map and two Plates, demy 8vo, 21s. 

British Grasses; an Introduction to the Study 

of the Graminere of Great Britain and Ireland. By M. 
Plues. Crown 8vo, with 16 Coloured Plates and 100 Wood 
Engravings, 9a-. 

Insular Floras. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hookeb, C.B., before the British Association for the advance- 
ment of Science, at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

Icones Plantarum. Figures, with Brief Descrip- 
tive Characters and Remarks, of New and Rare Plants, selected 
from the Author's Herbarium. By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. 
New Series, Vol. V. 100 Plates, 31s. Qd. 

Botanical Names for English Readers. By Randal 

H. Alcock. 8vo, 6s. 

A Second Century of Orchidaceous Plants, selected 

from the Subjects published in Curtis's "Botanical Magazine" 
since the issue of the " First Century." Edited by James B 
man, Esq., F.R.S. Complete in One Vol., Royal Uo, 100 Coloured 
Plates, £5 os. 



Lovell Keeve and Co., Limited 7 

Dedicated by Special Permission to H.R.H. tlie Princess of Wales, 
now H.M. Queen Alexandra. 

Monograph of Odontoglossum, a Genus of the 

Vandeous Section of Orchidaceous Plants. By James Bateman, 
Esq., F.R.S. Imperial folio, in One Vol., with 30 Coloured Plates, 
and Wood Engravings, cloth, £6 16s. 6d. 

The Rhododendrons of Sikkim-Himalaya ; being 

an Account, Botanical and Geographical, of the Rhododendrons 
recently discovered in the Mountains of Eastern Himalaya by 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. By Sir W. J. Hookee, F.R.S. Folio, 
30 Coloured Plates, £'4 14s. 6rf. 

The Potamogetons of the British Isles ; De- 
scriptions of all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. By 
Alfeed Fryer, A.L.S., Illustrated by Robert Morgan, F.L.S. 
Royal 4to. Sections 1, 2 and 3, containing parts 1-3, 4-6, 7-9, 
each with 12 Plates, 21s. coloured ; 15s. uncoloured. 



FERNS. 
British Ferns; an Introduction to the Study of 

the Ferns, Lycopods, and Equiseta indigenous to the British 
Isles. With Chapters on the Structure, Propagation, Cultivation, 
Diseases, Uses, Preservation, and Distribution of Ferns. By 
M. Pities. Crown 8vo, with 16 Coloured Plates, and 55 Wood 
Engravings, 9s. 

The British Ferns; Coloured Figures and Descrip- 
tions, with Analysis of the Fructification and Venation of the 
Ferns of Great Britain and Ireland. By Sir W. J. Hooker, 
F.R.S. Royal 8vo, 66 Coloured Plates, 36s. 

Garden Ferns ; Coloured Figures and Descriptions, 

with Analysis of the Fructification and Venation of a Selection o{ 
Exotic Ferns, adapted for Cultivation in the Garden, Hothouse, 
and Conservatory. By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal 8vo, 
64 Coloured Plates, 36s. 

Filices Exoticse ; Coloured Figures and Description 

of Exotic Ferns. By Sir W. J. Hooker, F.R.S. Royal Mo, 
100 Coloured Plates, £6 lis. 

Ferny Combes ; a Ramble after Ferns in the Gleus 

and Valleys of Devonshire. By Charlotte Chanter. Third 
Edition. Fcap. 8vo, 8 Coloured Plates and a Map of the 
County, 3s. 6d. 



8 Lovell Reeve and Co., Limited 

MOSSES AND HEPATIC/E. 

Synopsis of. British Mosses, containing Descrip- 
tions of all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer 
ones) found in Great Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. 
Hobkibk, F.L.S., Ac., &c. New Edition, entirely revised. 
Crown 8vo, Qs. 6d. 

Handbook of British Mosses, containing all that 

are known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. 
M. J. Bebkeley, M.A., F.L.S. Second Edition. 2-1 Coloured 
Plates, 21s. 

The HepaticEe of the British Isles ; being Figures 

and Descriptions of all known British Species. By William 
Henry Peabson. New and cheaper issue. Complete in 2 Vols., 
with 228 Plates, plain, £5 5s.; coloured, t'7 10*. 



FUNGI. 

British Fungi, Phycomycetes and Ustilagineae. 

By George Massee (Lecturer on Botany to the London Society 
for the Extension of University Teaching). Crown 8vo, with 
8 Plates, 6s. 8rf. 

Outlines of British Fungology. By the Bev. 

M. J. Berkeley, M.A., F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 
400 pages by W'orthington G. Smith, F.L.S., bringing the 
work down to the present state of Science. Two vols., 24 
Coloured Plates, 36s. The Supplement separately, 12*. 

The Esculent Funguses of England. Containing 

an Account of their Classical History, Uses, Characters, Develop- 
ment, Structure, Nutritious Properties, Modes of Cooking and 
Preserving, &c. By C. D. Badham, M.D. Second Edition. 
Edited by F. Curbey, F.E.S. 12 Coloured Plates, 12*. 



Lovell Reeve asd Co., Limited 

ALG>E. 

British Seaweeds ; an Introduction to the Study of 

the Marine Alg.e of Great Britain, Ireland, and the Channel Islands. 
By S. 0. Gray. Crown 8vo, with 16 Coloured Plates, 9s. 

Phycologia Britannica; or, History of British 

Seaweeds. Containing Coloured Figures, Generic and Specific 
Characters, Synonyms and Descriptions of all the Species of Algae 
inhabiting the Shores of the British Islands. By Dr. W. H. 
Harvey, F.R.S. New Edition. Royal 8vo, 4 vols. 360 
Coloured Plates, £6 6s. 

Phycologia Australica; a History of Australian 

Seaweeds, comprising Coloured Figures and Descriptions of the 
more characteristic Marine Alga? of New South Wales, Victoria, 
Tasmania, South Australia, and Western Australia, and a 
Synopsis of all known Australian Algae. By Dr. W. H. Harvey, 
F.R.S. Royal 8vo, Five Vols., 300 Coloured Plates, £6 10s. 



SHELLS AND MOLLUSKS. 

Elements of Conchology ; an Introduction to 

the Natural History of Shells, and of the Animals which form 
them. By Lovell Reeve, F.L.S. Royal 8vo, Two Vols., 62 
Coloured Plates, £2 16s. 

Conchologia Iconica ; or, Figures and Descriptions 

of the Shells of Mollusks, with remarks on their Affinities, Syno- 
nymy, and Geographical Distribution. By Lovell Reeve, 
F.L.S., and G. B. Sowerby, F.L.S. Complete in Twenty Vols., 
4to, witli 2727 Coloured Plates, half-calf, £178. 

A detailed list of Monographs and Volumes may be had. 

The Edible Mollusca of Great Britain and Ireland, 

with the Modes of Cooking them. By M. S. Lovell. With 
12 Coloured Plates. New Edition, rewritten and much en- 
larged, 9s. 

Testacea Atlantica ; or, the Land and Freshwater 

Shells of the Azores, Madeiras, Salvages, Canaries, Cape Verdes, 
and Saint Helena. By T. Vernon Wollaston, M.A., F.L.S. 
Demy 8vo, 21s. 



10 Lovell Reeve and Co., Limited 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

A Monograph of the Genus Teracolus. By 

E. M. Bowdlee Shaepe. Parts 1 to 11, 4to, each with 4 
Coloured Plates, 7* - . Qd. 

A Monograph of the Membraeidse. By George 

Bowdlee Buckton, F.E.S., F.L.S. To which is added a Paper 
entitled " Suggestions as to the Meaning of the Shapes and 
Colours of the Memhracidse in the Struggle for Existence," by 
Edwaed B. Poulton, D.Sc, M.A., Hon. LL.D. (Princeton), 
E.R.S., &c, Hope Professor of Zoology in the University of 
Oxford. Complete in One Vol. 4to, with 2 Structural and 60 
Coloured Plates, cloth, gilt tops, £6 15*. 

Monograph of the British Cicadae or Tettigidse. 

By Geoege Bowdlee Beck-ton, F.R.S., P.L.S., F.C.S., F.E.S., 
&c. Two Vols. 8vo, 82 Coloured Plates, 42*. 

The Natural History of Eristalis Tenax, or the 

Drone-Fly. By Geoege Bowdlee Buckton, F.R.S., F.L.S., 

&c. 9 Plates, some Coloured, 8*. 

The Hymenoptera Aculeata of the British Isles. 

By Edwaed Saundebs, F.L.S. Complete in One Vol., with 3 
Structural Plates, 16*. Large Paper Edition, with 51 Coloured 
Plates, 68.?. 

The Hemiptera Heteroptera of the British Islands. 

By Edwaed Saundebs, F.L.S. Complete in One Vol., with a 

Structural Plate, 14s. Large Paper Illustrated Edition, with 31 
Coloured Plates, 48*. 

The Hemiptera Homoptera of the British Islands. 

A Descriptive Account of the Families, Genera, and Species 
indigenous to Great Britain and Ireland, with Notes as to 
Localities, Habitats, <fcc. By James Edwabds, F.E.S. Complete 
in One Vol., with 2 Structural Plates, Us. Large Paper, with 
28 Coloured Plates, 43*. 



Lovell Reeve and Co., Limited 11 

Dedicated, by Special Permission, to Her late Majesty Queen 
Victoria, Empress of India. 

Lepidoptera Indica. By F. Moore. The Con- 
tinuation by Col. C. Swinhoe. 4fco. Vol. I., with 94, and 
Vols. II. to V., with 96, Coloured Plates ; Vol. VI., with 84 
Coloured Plates; each £9 5*., cloth. Parts 73 — 80, 15*. each. 

The Lepidoptera of Ceylon. By F. Moore, F.L.S. 

Three Vols., Medium 4to, 215 Coloured Plates, cloth, gilt tops, 
£21 12s. Published under the auspices of the Government of 
Ceylon. 

The Lepidoptera of the British Islands. By 

Charles G. Barrett, F.E.S. Complete in 11 vols. £G 12s. 
Large Paper Edition, with 501 Coloured Plates, £33 15s. 
Alphabetical List of Species contained in the work, Is. Gd. 
Large Paper Edition, 2s. 

Labelling' List of the British Macro-Lepidoptera, 

as arranged in "Lepidoptera of the British Islands." By 
Charles G. Barrett, F.E.S. Is. tjd. 

The Larvse of the British Lepidoptera, and their 

Food Plants. By Owen S. Wilson. With Life-sized Figures 
drawn and coloured from Nature, by Eleanora Wilson. Super- 
royal 8vo, with 40 Coloured Plates. 63s. 

TheColeoptera of the British Islands. ADescriptive 

Account of the Families, Genera, and Species indigenous to Great 
Britain and Ireland, with Notes as to Localities, Habitats, &c. 
By the Rev. Canon Fowler, M.A., F.L.S. With two 
Structural Plates and Wood Engravings, complete in 5 Vols., 
£4. Large Paper Illustrated Edition, with 180 Coloured Plate;., 
containing 2300 figures, £14. 

A Catalogue of the British Coleoptera. By 

D. Sharpe, M.A., F.R.S., and W. W. Fowler, M.A. Is. 6d. 

The Butterflies of Europe; Illustrated and De- 
scribed. By Henry Charles Lang, M.D., F.L.S. Complete 
in Two Vols., super-royal 8vo, with 82 Coloured Plates, con- 
taining upwards of 900 Figures, cloth, £3 18s. 

•»• The Systematic List of European Buttbkjties from the above work 
teparately, price Is. ; or printed on one tide of the paper only for Label*, 1*. t}d. 



12 Lovell Reeve and Co., Limited 

British Insects. A Familiar Description of the 

Form, Structure, Habits, and Transformations of Insects. By 
E. F. Statelet, Author of" British Spiders." Crown 8vo, witb 
16 Coloured Plates and numerous Wood Engravings, 12*. 

British Beetles ; an Introduction to the Study 

of our indigenous Coleopteka. By E. C. Bye. 2nd Edition, 
revised by Eev. Canon Fowlek. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured 
Steel Plates, and 11 Wood Engravings, 9s. 

British Bees ; an Introduction to the Study of the 

Natural History and Economy of the Bees indigenous to the 
British Isles. By W. E. Shuck ard. Crown Svo, 16 Coloured 
Plates, and Woodcuts of Dissections, 9s. 

British Butterflies and Moths ; an Introduction to 

the Study of our Native Lepidoptera. By H. T. Staintos. 
2nd Edition. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Plates, and Wood 
Engravings, 9.?. 

British Spiders ; an Introduction to the Study of 

the Araneim: found in Great Britain and Ireland. By E. F. 
Statelet. Crown 8vo, 16 Coloured Plates, and 44 Wood 
Engravings, 9«, 

Curtis' s British Entomology. Illustrations and 

Descriptions of the Genera of Insects found in Great Britain 
and Ireland, containing Coloured Figures, from Nature, of the 
most rare and beautiful Species, and in many instances, upon the 
plants on which they are found. Eight Vols., Royal Svo, 770 
Coloured Plates, £24. 

Or in Separate Monographs. 

Ordert. Flutes. £ ,. d. Orders. Ph\ttt, £ «• *• 

Afhanipteka . . 2 2 Htmehoptera . . 125 6 6 

'Joieopteba ... 256 12 16 Lepidopteba . 193 9 13 

Debmaptera ... 1 010 Neueoptera ... 13 13 

Oiciyopibea. . . 1 10 Omaloptbka 6 6« 

Diptbra .... 103 530 Orthopteba '. 5 060 

Hemipteba ... 32 1 12 Stkbpsiptkba . . 3 030 

Homopibba. ... 21 110. Trichopteea . . 9 090 

"Cuitis's Entomology," which Cuvier pronounced to have " reached 
the ultimatum of perfection," is still the standard work on the Genera 
of British Insects. The Figures executed by the author himself, with 
wonderful minuteness and accuracy, have never been surpassed, even 
if equalled. The price at which the work was orijrinallv published 
was £43 16\y. " 3 ' 



Lovell Reeve and Co., Limited 13 

Harvesting Ants and Trap-door Spiders ; Notes 

and Observations on their Habits and Dwellings. B}' J. T. 
Moggbidge, F.L.S. Illustrated. With Supplement, 17s. 
The Supplement separately, cloth, 7s. Gd. 

Insecta Britannica ; Diptera. Vol. III*. By 

Fbancis Walkee, F.L.S. 8vo, with 10 Plates, 25*. 

The Structure and Life History of the Cockroach 

(Periplaneta Orientalis). An Introduction to the Study of 
Insects. By L. C. Miale, Professor of Biology in the Yorkshire 
College, Leeds, and Alfred Denny, Lecturer on Biology in the 
Firth College, Sheffield. Demv 8vo, 125 Woodcuts, 7*. Gd. 



ZOOLOGY. 

Foreign Finches in Captivity. By Arthur G. 

Butleb, Ph.D., F.L.S., F.Z.S. Complete in One Vol. Royal 4to. 
with 60 Coloured Plates, cloth, gilt tops, £i 14?. Sd. 

The Physiology of the Invertebrata. By A. B. 

Griffiths, Ph.D., F.R.S.E. Demy 8ro, 81 cuts, 15*. 

British Zoophytes; an Introduction to the Hy- 

droida, Actinozoa, and Polyzoa found in Great Britain, Irelaud, 
and the Channel Islands. By Abthue S. Pennington, F.L.S. 
Crown 8vo, 24 Plates, 9a-. 

Handbook of the Vertebrate Fauna of Yorkshire ; 

being a Catalogue of British Mammals, Birds, Reptiles, Amphi- 
bians, and Fishes, found in the County. By William Eagle 
Clarke and William Denison Roebuck. 8vo, 8s. Gd. 

Handbook of the Freshwater Fishes of India; 

giving the Characteristic Peculiarities of all the Species known, 
and intended as a guide to Students and District Officers. By 
Capt. R. Beavan, F.R.G.S. Demy 8to, 12 Plates, 10,9. Gd. 

The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. Samarang, 

under the command of Captain Sir Edward Belcher, C.B., during 
the Years 1843-46. By Professor Owen. Dr. J. E. Gray. Sir J. 
Richabbson, A. Adam3, L. Reeve, and A. White. Edited by 
Astheb Adams, F.L.S. Royal 4to, 55 Plates, mostly coloured, 
£3 10*. 



14 Lovell Reeve and Co., Limited 

ANTIQUARIAN. 
A Manual of British Archaeology. By Charles 

Boutell, M.A. Second Edition. 20 Coloured Plates, 9s. 

Sacred Archaeology; a Popular Dictionary of 

Ecclesiastical Art and Institutions from Primitive to Modem 
Times. By Mackenzie E. C. Walcott, B.D. Oxon., F.S.A., 
Precentor and Prebendary of Chichester Cathedral. 8vo, 15*. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Respiratory Proteids. Researches in Biological 

Chemistry. By A. B. Griffiths, Ph.D., F.R.S.E. 6*. 

Collections and Recollections of Natural History 

and Sport in the Life of a Country Vicar. By the Bev. G. C. 
Green. With Woodcuts from Sketches by the Author. 6*. 

West Yorkshire; an Accountof its Geology, Physical 

Geography, Climatology, and Botany. By J. W. Davis, F.L.S., 
and F. Arnold Lees, F.L.S. Second Edition, 8vo, 21 Plates, 
many Coloured, and 2 large Maps, 21*. 

Natal ; a History and Description of the Colony, 

including its Natural Features, Productions, Industrial Condition 
and Prospects. Bv Henry Brooks, for many years a resident. 
Edited by Dr. R. J. Mann, F.R.A.S., F.R.G.S., late Superin- 
tendent of Education in the Colony. Demy 8vo, with Maps, 
Coloured Plates, and Photographic Views, 18*. 

St. Helena. A Physical, Historical, and Topo- 
graphical Description of the Island, including its Geology, Fauna, 
Flora, and Meteorology. By J. C. Melliss, A.I.C.E., F.G.S., 
F.L.S. In one large Vol., super-royal 8vo, with 56 Plates and 

Maps, many coloured, 21s. 

The Geologist. A Magazine of Geology, Palaeont- 
ology, and Mineralogy. Edited by S. J. Mackie, F.G.S., F.S.A. 
Vols. V. and VI., each with numerous Wood Engravings, 15*. 
Vol. VI 1., 7*.6<*. 

The Artificial Production of Fish. By PlsCARlUSS 

Third Edition. Is. 



Lovell Reeve and Co., Limited 15 

Everybody's Weather-Guide. The use of Meteoro- 
logical Instruments clearly explained, with directions for securing 
at any time a probable Prognostic of the Weather. By A. Stein- 
METZj Esq., Author of " Sunshine and Showers," &c. Is. 

Meteors, Aerolites, and Falling Stars. By Dr. T. 

L. Phipson, F.C.S. Crown 8vo, 25 Woodcuts and Lithographic 
Frontispiece, 6s. 

The Young Collector's Handy Book of Recreative 

Science. By the Rev. H. P. Dunsteb, M.A. Cuts, 3s. 

The Royal Academy Album; a Series of Photo- 
graphs from Works of Art in the Exhibition of the Eoyal Academy 
of Arts, 1875. Atlas 4to, with 32 fine Photographs, cloth, 
gilt edges, £6 6s. ; half-morocco, £7 Is. 

The same for 1876, with 48 beautiful Photo-prints, cloth, £6 6s. ; 
half-morocco, £7 7s. Small Edit. Royal 4to, cloth, gilt edges, 63s. 

Manual of Chemical Analysis, Qualitative and 

Quantitative; for the use of Students. By Dr. Henet M. Noad, 
F.R.S. New Edition. Crown 8vo, 109 Wood Engravings, 16s. 
Or, separately, Parti., "QUALITATIVE," New Edition, new 
Notation, 6s. ; Part II., "QUANTITATIVE," 10s. 6d. 



SERIALS. 

The Botanical Magazine. Figures and Descrip- 
tions of New and Rare Plants. By D. Prain, CLE., LL.D., 
F.R.S. Monthly, with 6 Coloured Plates, 3s. 6d. Annual sub- 
scription, post free, 42s. in advance. 
Re-issue of the Third Series, in Monthly Vols., 42s. each ; to Sub- 
scribers for the entire Series, 36s. each. 

The Potamogetons of the British Isles. By 

Alfred Fryek, A.L.S. Royal 4to. 4 Coloured Plates, 7s. 

Monograph of the Genus Teracolus. By E. M. 

Bowdleb Sharpe. Demy 4to. 4 Coloured Plates, 7s. 6d. 

Lepidoptera Tndica. By Col. C. Swinhobl In 

Parts, with Coloured Plates, 15s. each. 



16 Lovell Reeve and Co., Limited 

THE VICTORIA LIBRARY. 

A New Series of Standard and Popular Work?, 

in handy pocket volumes, cloth, yellow edges, Is. each. 

Vol. I., British Oratory, containing Six famous Speeches, 
viz.: Grattan on Irish Independence, Pitt on Union, Peel on 
Corn Laws, Bright on Reform, Jones on Democracy, Gladstone 
on Oaths. 

Vol. II. English Dramas : The Birth of Merlin, and Thomas 
Lord Cromwell. 

Vol. III. On the Study and Use of History : By Lord 
Bolingbroke. 

Vol. IV. English Dramas : By Congreve. " The Way of the 
World," and " The Mourning Bride." 

Vol. V. A Tale oe a Tub : By Dean Swift. With notes and 
translations. 

Vol. VI. Spenser's Fairy Queen: A selection of the most 
beautiful passages in modernized orthography, with analyses o' 
each book. Notes and explanations of archaic words. 

Vol. VII. Life of William Pitt: By T. Evan Jacob, M.A. 

Vol. VIII. Elizabethan Songs and Sonnets. 



PLATES. 

Floral Plates, from the Floral Magazine. Beauti- 
fully Coloured, for Screens, Scrap-books, Studies in Flower-painting, 
&c. 6c?. and Is. each. Lists of over 1000 varieties, One Stamp. 

Botanical Plates, from the Botanical Magazine. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. <></. and 1<- 
each. Lists of over 3000, Three Stamps. 



FORTHCOMING WORKS. 
Corals and Atolls. By T. Wood Jones, B.Sc, 

F.L.S. In the press. 

Flora of Tropical Africa. Vol. VI. In the press.- 
Flora Capensis. Vol. V. In the press. 

H-oiirjon : 

LOVELL REEVE & CO.. Limited. 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, \nd Indian Government?. 

r>, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

LONDON: PRINTED BY WTDUAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED, 
DUKE STREET, BTAHEOBD STREET, S.E. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA j a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in tne British 
Isles, For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Ben'Miam, 
F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Benihams " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the LinnasaD 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24.Coloured Plates, 21*. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Chakles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New- 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkelet, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Currey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGLNEjE. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLJ3RA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J.I). Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S. , F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Muellek, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 
FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 
the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W. H. Harvktt and 
O. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thise^ton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vole. 
I.— III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., 
Part I., 9s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T, Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. Gd. 
Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d. 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 61, JANUARY, 1910. 

Tab. 8292.— STRING A BRETSCHNEIDERI, North China. 
„ 8293.— IRIS MINUTA, Japan. 
„ 8294.— DIPELTA VENTRICOSA, Western China. 
„ 8295.— OURLSIA MACROPHTLLA, New Zealand. 
„ 8296.— ERIA RHODOPTERA, Philippine. 

LOVELL Rekvk & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Bottino Hemsley. 

MONOGRAPHS 

Prom the Third Series of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descrip- 
tions, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may bo had separately. Prices 
from Is. to 51s. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANICAL PLATES » 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully -coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6<l. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 

NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. L, Part I., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir VV. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Vol. IV., Sect. L, 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6L Vol. VII., 27s. 64. Vol. VIII, 

25s. 6d. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. IV., Sect. L, Part VI., 13s. 6d. Vol. IV., Sect. I., complete, 52s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By HARVEY and SONDER. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

V0 VT- , Tv eCt i L '. P TT fc I o, 88 - ''J &rt l lL and m '* 6 *- 6d - each ! P«t3 IV. & V., 8s. each. 
Vol. IV., Sect. IL, 24s. Vol. V., p art Li 9 ,, Vol V[ ^ Vo , VI[ ? 33s . 

Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope. 

Natal and Transvaal. 

Lovhll Reeve & Co. Ltd., n, Henrietta Street, CWnt Garden. 

LONDON : PRINTED BY WILLIAM OLOVn »si> anrc _„, 



.iTomti) Strits. 



No. 62/ 



VOL. VI.— FEBRUARY. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. fid. pi 
Annual Subscription, 4,2s. 



OB No. X476 OF THE ENTIRE w OEK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 






CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE R07AL BOTANIC GARDENS, KKW 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Director, ^onai Botanic tfiartttrts, IXeto. 




There lavish Nature in her best attire 

■ lours and alluring sights. 
And Art with her contending doth aspire 
To excel the natural with made del; 



L O X 1) O X : 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN' GOVERNMENTS. 

6. HENRIETTA STREET, COVBNT GARDEN. 
1910. 

[All rights reserved.} 
(Entered at tlie New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



MATERIALS FOR A FLORA OF THE MALAYAN PENINSULA. 

By H. N. Ridley, M.A., F.R.S., Director of Botanic Gardens, Singapore. 
Complete in Three Parts, 30s. 

CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND OF THE ADJACENT PORTIONS OF G-ARHWAL AND TIBET. 
By Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard Strachey and J. F. Duthie. 5s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATIC-SI OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations 
of their names. By the Rev. Prof. Gr. Henslow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. 6d. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Bakee, F.R.S., F.L.S. 

With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENT HAM, F.R.S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hookeh, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W.H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's " Handbook; 1 and other British Floras. 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9*. 

LOVILL REEVE A CO, Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GAI 

Hop* 



8297 








\ £ 







as 










"Vincent Brooks.Day-&5cm Lt^ixnp 



Tab. 8297. 
COELOGYNE Mooreana. 

1 1 a nam. 

Orchidaceae. Tribe Epidendbeae. 

COELOGYNE, Lindl.; Berdh. et Mook.f. Gen. riant, vol. iii. p. 518 ; Pfitzer in 
Engl. Fflunzenreich, Ooelogyninae, p. 20. 



Coelogyne Mooreana, Sander ex liol/e in Kew Bull. 1907, p. 129 ; Gard. Chron. 
1906, vol. xl. p. 414; Polfe in Orch. Rev. 1907, p. 23; 1908, p. 329, fig. 42; 
affinis C. cristatae, Lindl., pseudolmlbis aggregates, f'oliis longioribus, scapis 
altioribus, bracteis deciduis et floribus minoribus differt. 

Herba. Pseudobulbi aggregati, ovoideo-oblongi, obtuse tetragoni, canaliculati, 
circa 7 cm. longi, apice angusti, diphylli. Folia elongato-lanceolata, acuta, 
7-iiervia, basi in petiolum attenuate, 21-50 cm. longa, 3-5 cm. lata, arcuata. 
Scapi erecti, 30^10 cm. alti; racemi 4-8-flori. Bracteae deciduae. Pedicelli 
2 ■ 5-3 • 5 cm. longi. Fb*re* speciosi, albi, labelli disco aureo-maculato et pilis 
subclavatis flavis instructo. Sepala elliptico-oblonga, acuta, leviter 
carinata, 4*5-5 cm. longa. Petala elliptica, acuta 4-5 -5 cm. longa. 
Labelhtm trilobum,3-3 - 5 cm. longum, basi concavo-saccatum ; lobi Jaterales 
oblongi, ol>tusi, incurvi et columnam involventes; lobns intermedins 
ovatus, obtusus; discus crebre piloso-papillosus, pilis gracilibus 3-4 mm. 
longis et apice subclavatis. Columna gracilis, late alata, circa 2 "5 cm. 
longa. — R. A. Rolfe. 



This handsome Coelogyne was introduced from Annam 
by Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, through their 
collector, Mr. Micholitz, who found it growing at an eleva- 
tion of 4,500 ft. above sea level on the Laos aspect of the 
Lang Bian range. It flowered first, in December, DOG, at 
St. Albans and simultaneously at the Royal Botanic 
Garden, Glasnevin. Another plant presented to the Kew 
collection by Messrs. Sander has not yet flowered, though it 
has thriven well under the cultural conditions suitable for 
C. cristata, Lindl., to which it is more nearly allied than to 
any other known form. The material on which the original 
description was based, and that employed in preparing the 
plate now given, has been supplied from the Glasnevin 
plant by Mr. F. W. Moore, after whom the species has been 
named. The largest flower-spike so far produced in culti- 
vation has borne eight flowers. These in structure and as 
regards the appeudages of the lip are very like the flowers 
Febkuary, 1910. 



of C. cristata, but are firmer in texture and remain longer 
fresh. In habit, however, C. Mooreana differs a good deal 
from C. cristata, aud is much more like the Malayan 
C. Sanderiana, Reichb. f. The species is likely to become 
popular in Orchid collections. 

Description.' — Herb; pseud obulbs clustered, ovoid-oblong, 
obtusely 4-augled aud channelled, about 3 in. long, narrowed 
towards the tip, 2-leaved. Leaves long lanceolate, acute, 
7-nerved, narrowed below into a petiole ; 10-20 in. long, 
i£-2 in. wide, arcuate. Scapes erect, 12-16 in. long; 
racemes 4-8 -flowered ; bracts deciduous; pedicels 1-1 J in. 
long. Flowers handsome, white, the disk of the lip with a 
golden yellow blotch and beset with yellow subclavate 
processes. Sepals elliptic-oblong, acute, faintly keeled, 
lj-2 in. long. Petals elliptic, acute, lf-2 in. long. Lip 
3-lobed, U-l| in. long, base concave, pouched ; lateral 
lobes oblong, incurved and embracing the column ; mid- 
lobe ovate, obtuse ; disk closely beset with slender processes 
about 2 Jin. long, clavate at the tip. Column slender, 
widely winged, about 1 in. long. 



Kg.l, lip; 2, one of the lip papillae ; 3,0011111111; 4, author-cap ; 5 pollinia: 
b, Whole plant, showing habit:— 1-5 enlarged, much reduced. 



82$8 




X Reeve & 



Tab. 8298. 

POPULIS KIGRA, v;ir. BKTULI FOLIA. 

Origin uncertain. 



Salioagxah. 
Populus, Linn.', Bentk. el Hook./. Gem. !'l<u,t. vol. iii. p. L12. 



Populus nigra, Linn., var. betulifolia, Torrty, /■'/. New Vork, vol. ii. \>. 216; 
a forma typica ]>etiolis et ramnlu juniori i>us pnbescontibos differ! 

Arbor, 9-25 m. alta; trunons rugodssimus, 0*fi I no. fiarisaime ad 1*75 m.) 
diametro, eomam magnam oToideam ferens; ramuli junioree plus minngre 
pnbeseentes, fiavi, rettuti einerasxsentee, gemmis pallida brnnneia. Folia 
(leltoideo-rlioiniioidcu. 6-10 om. longa, 5-8 can. lata, apioe tonge attenaato- 
acnminata, baai late euneato-xotundata, rariua truncate v< l leriseime 
cordata, aarrnlata, saepe primo pnbescentia cito glabr supra 

saturate viridhi, infra paulum paUidiora; petioli ad 6 cm. longi, pnmo 
pnbeaoentes. Amenta matcula 2~> 5 cm. longa Squama* late obovatae, 
circiter 4 mm. longae, Laciniis L*75 mm. loogia instructae. Antkera* eaepe 
11-17. A iini gracilia, 7 10 em. longa. PedictUi 2 ?> mm. longi. 

Capsular ovoideae, 5-7 mm. longae. — /'. nigra, var. betulaqfolia, Wesmael 
in DC. Prodr. vol. xvi. pars 2, p. 328. /'. nigra, var. / C. K. 

Schneider. 111. Handb. Lanbholzk. toL L p.5, fig. 4m, a. P. Ifichx, 

Fl. Bor.-Am. vol. ii. ]>. 214. an Linn. /'. hudaonica, Ifichx t Hist. Ail'. 
Am. vol. iii. p. 298, tab. 10, fig. 1, et X. Am. Sylva, vol. ii. p. 114, tab. 96, 
fig. 1. P. bttvltfolia, Pnrab, FL Am. Sept. vol. ii. p. 619; London, Arb. el 
Frut. Brit. vol. iii. p. 1656, fig. 1516, et Encyol. Trees and Shrubs, | 
fig. 1501; Dodo, Kxtr. Bionogr. In&L Gen. Populna, p. 18.- S. A. Skan. 



The downy-twigged Black Poplar of English collections 
is readily distinguished from the smooth-twigged tree com- 
monly grown in gardens aa Populus nigra by its more 
compact, rounded, Elm-like head, and by a greater tendency 
to develop huge burrs on its old boles. But many forms 
intermediate in f'acies between these two trees are to be 
met with ; among these intermediates the pubescence, the 
presence or absence of which is so distinctive of the extreme 
types, varies remarkably in degree and duration without 
being uniformly correlated with differences in habit I 
examination of many specimens from different trees com- 
the impression that the pubescence can hardly be relied 
upon as affording a varietal character. If this conclusion 
be just, the status usually accorded to the downy Black 
Febbuaby, 1910. 



acuminate, base wide, cuneately rounded, rarely truncate or 
slightly cordate, margin serrulate ; often at first pubescent 
but soon becoming glabrous ; dark green above, somewhat 
paler beneath ; petiole reaching 2^- in. in length, at first 
downy. Male catkins 1-2 in. long ; scales wide obovate, 
about 2 lin. long with a marginal fringe of segments nearly 
as long; anthers usually 11-17. Female catkins slender, 
3-4 in. long; pedicels l-l 1 - lin. long. Capsules ovoid, 
2^-3| lin. long. 

Fig. 1, upper portion of petiole and base of leaf; 2 and 3, male flowers; 
4, female flower; 5, female perianth :—uU enlarged. 



8288 




Tab. 8299. 
CAMPANULA Beauverdiaxa. 

Transcaucasia and Northern Persia. 



Campanulaceae. Tribe Campanuleae. 
Campanula, Linn.; Benth. ti Book./. Qen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 561. 



Campanula Beauverdiana, Fomin in Monit. Jard. Bot. Ti/lis, vol. i. p. 12, 
t. i. fig. 1; species C. Steveni, M. Bieb., affinis Bed calycis tnbo indnmento 

papilloso vestito, corollaque ad tertiam partem lobata differt. 

fferba glabra vel minute birta, ad 6 dm. alia. Rhizoma tenuc, breve. Cavles 
graciles, ereeti vel ascendentes. Folia inferiora oblongo-ovata vel late 
ovata, G cm. longa, 1"5 cm. lata, obtusa, erenato-serrata, in petiolum panllo 
quam lamina longiorem attenuata ; folia superiora sessilia, qtiam inferiora 
minora, lineari-Ianceolata vel lanceolata, acuta, parce glanduloso-denticulata ; 
folia suprema linearia, acuminata, basi subtus tuberculospongiosoinstructa. 
Flores politares vel pauci ; pedicelli graciles, ad 7 cm. longi. Calycis tubus 
anguste obconicus, 7 mm. longus, 10-costatus, inter costaB papilbs alius 
infiatis praeditus; lobi quam tubus usque ad duplum longiores, anguste 
lanceolati, acuminati. Corolla azurea, glabra, late eampanulata, 3 cm. 
diametro, quam calycis lobi duplo vel ultra duplo longior ; lobi quam tubus 
duplo breviores. Filamenta e basi sulxmadrata, pilosa, subulata, glabra. 
Stylus ad mediam partem divisus; rami purpurei, extra dense hirsuti. 
— C. Steveni, var. vesiculosa, Bornm. in Bull. Herb. Boiss. 2 me ser. vol. vii. 
p. 774.— C. H. Wright. 



The plant of Campanula Beauverdiana which forms the 
subject of our illustration was raised at Kew in 1008 from 
seed received from the Botanic Garden, Tiflis. The species 
was described in 1!)05 from specimens collected on the 
mountains near Mzchet, some fifteen miles from Tiflis. It- 
has since then been described as a variety of C. Steveni, 
M. Bieb., by Dr. Bornmuller, from material gathered by 
himself on Mount Elburs in North Persia (not Mount 
Elburz in the Caucasus) at an altitude of 8,500 ft, above sea- 
level. In this locality it was found growing in company 
with typical C. Steveni, a widely distributed species to 
which, in the dried state, C. Beauverdiana bears a close 
resemblance. In the living state, however, they are readily 
distinguished, for the calyx of C. Steveni is without any 
indumentum, while the purple-violet corolla is lobed half- 

February, 1910. 



way down and the style-arms are longer than the undivided 
portion. Under his original description of C. Beauverdiana 
Dr. Fomin mentions a gathering by Sintenis from Kirkpauli 
in Turkish Armenia, the specimens of which were distri- 
buted as C. Steveni under the number 5647. At Kew, 
however, the specimens of Sintenis n. 5647 consist in part 
of C. Steveni, in part of C. Beauverdiana, so that in Armenia 
as in Persia the two species evidently grow together. 
0. Beauverdiana is a perennial, in character much resem- 
bling the native C. rotundifolia, Linn. ; it thrives well and 
flowers freely under the conditions suited to that species, 
and is at its best in May and June. 

Description. — Herb, glabrous or finely hairy, reaching 
2 ft. in height, with a slender short rootstock and slender 
erect or ascending stems. Leaves below oblong-ovate or 
wide ovate, 2£ in. long, -| in. wide, obtuse, crenate-serrate, 
narrowed into a petiole rather longer than the blade ; 
leaves higher up sessile, smaller than the lower, linear- 
lanceolate or lanceolate, acute, sparingly glandular toothed ; 
uppermost leaves linear, acuminate with a spongy tubercle 
at the base below. Flowers solitary or few ; pedicels 
slender, the longest nearly 3 in. long. Calyx with a narrow 
obconic 10-ribbed tube, about 4 lin. long, beset with white 
inflated papillae between the ribs ; lobes narrow lanceolate, 
acuminate, nearly or quite twice as long as the tube. 
Corolla blue, glabrous, wide campanulate, 1 J in. across, 
twice as long as the calyx-lobes or rather longer ; lobes half 
as long as tube. Filaments subulate, glabrous, springing 
from a subquadrate, pilose base. Style divided to the 
middle, the arms purple, densely hairy on the outer side. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil ; 2 and 3, stamens :— all enlarged. 




8Bi 






Tab. 8300. 

RHODODENDRON Keiskei. 

Japan. 



Kbicaokab. Tribe Rhodokeae. 
Tihododendbon, Linn.; Benth. ft Book./. Oen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron Keiskei, Miq. Proltu. Fl. Jap, p. 75 : Maxim, in Mim. Acad. 

Imp. tic. St. Felernb., 7"'" serie, vol. xvi. (1870), p. '23, t. 4, f. 11-17 ; species 
ex affinitate II. trijlorl. Hook, t, a quo differt pedicellis brevioribus, florilms 
minoribus, calycis lobis brevissimis, et corollae intus epunctatae tubo 
breviore. 

Frttfex 1-2-metralis, dense ramosus, ramis rigidis primnm parce lepidotis. 
Folia biennis, ooriacea, breviter petiolata petiolis ruhris, laneeolata \< 1 
oblongo-lanceolata, cum petiolo 3-7 em. louga, vix acuta, basi cnueafa, 
rotundata vel interdum Bubcordata, sujira parce obscureque lepidota, 
subtus pallidiora, crebre distincte que lepidota. Flora flavi, 4-5 cm. 
diametro, 3-5 aggregati, pedicellis lepidotis longiores. Calycia lobi lati, 
brevissimi, rotundati. Corolla late campanulata, extra parce lepidota, 
intus epunetata, tubo brevi, lobis aequalibus ovato-oblongis obtusis. 
Stamina 10, quam corolla breviora, declinata, rilanientis filiformibus infra 
medium parce puberulis, antheris aurantiacis. Ovarium 5-loeularc, 
densissime lepidotum, stylo glabro recurvo. Qaptula angnsta. 
evlindrica, circiter 1 cm. longa. — W. Botting Hemblkv. 



There are in the. herbarium collection at Kew only two 
wild specimens named R. Keiskei', one of these, in flower, 
was collected by the late Mr. Maximowicz on the volcanic 
mountain Wunzen, in 1863 ; the other, in fruit, is from 
Mt. Tchako, in the province of Tosa, and was communicated 
by the College of Science, Tokyo University, in 1893. The 
plant now figured was obtained for Kew from a nursery in 
Yokohama in 1908, and flowered in a pot in an unheated 
frame in April, 1909. From this plant the flowering speci- 
men originally collected by Maximowicz differs in the calyx- 
lobes being more distinctly developed and fringed on the 
margin, in the stamens and style being relatively longer, 
exceeding the corolla, and in the leaves being slightly hairy 
along the midrib on the upper side. The fruiting specimen 
received in 1893 differs in the petioles being furnished with 
two rows of long weak bristles which form a conspicuous 
Fkbuuaey, 1910. 



fringe. In other respects the three representatives of 
B. Keiskei at Kew agree very closely. The species is most 
nearly allied to R. triflorum, which is figured at t. 19 of the 
Rhododendrons of the Sikkim Himalaya. Though the plant 
has not yet wintered in the open air, it promises to be 
hardy ; if this be borne out by experience, the chief value of 
the species will be in adding a new yellow-flowered ever- 
green' 'Rhododendron to the out-door garden. It should 
thrive under the conditions suited to other species ; a soil 
preferably peaty, that is free from lime and abundantly 
supplied with moisture. 

Description. — Shrub, 3-7 ft. high, densely branched, 
the branches when young sparingly lepidote. Leaves 
biennial, coriaceous, short petioled, lanceolate or oblong- 
lanceolate, including the petiole 1^—3 in. long, somewhat 
acute, base .cuneate, rounded or occasionally subcordate, 
sparingly and obscurely lepidote above, paler beneath and 
closely distinctly lepidote. Flowers yellow, lf-2 in. across, 
in clusters of 3-5 ; pedicels rather long, lepidote. Calyx- 
lobes wide, rounded, very short. Corolla wide campanulate, 
sparingly lepidote outside, epunctate within ; tube short, 
lobes equal, ovate-oblong, obtuse. Stamens 10, shorter than 
the corolla, declinate ; filaments filiform, sparingly puberu- 
lous below the middle; anthers orange. Ovary 5-celled, 
very ' densely lepidote ; style glabrous, recurved. Capsule 
narrow, nearly cylindric, about 5 lin. long. 



Fig. 1, portion of a leaf ; 2, a covering leaf from a young inflorescence ; 3, a 
scale from the same; 4, calyx and pistil; 5 and 6, stamens; 7, cross-section of 
an ovary : — all enlarged. 







.*!•* 



Tab. 8301. 

agonis margin ata. 

Western Australia. 

Myhtackae. Tribe Leptospekmeae. 
Agonis, DC; Benth. et Book.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 703. 



Agonis marginata, Schau. in PI. Preiss. vol. i. p. 117; Benth. Fl. Austral. 
vol. iii. p. 98; affinis A, obtusissimae, F. Muell., sed foliis et floribus 
minoribus staininibusque paucioribus differt. 

Frutex 2-3 m. altus, ramis et ranmlis molliter pubescentibus. Folia obovato- 
oblonga, obtusa vel minute mucronulata, basi in petiolum brevern angus- 
tata, 1-3 cm. longa, 0*5-1 cm. lata, coriacea, e basi quinquenervia, margine 
pilis densis appressis pubescentia. Flores sessiles, fasciculati, fasciculis 
axillaribus subglobosis 10-20-floris. Bracteolae exteriores late orbiculaies, 
4 mm. diiimetro, dense ciliatae ; interiores obovatae, concavae, 3 mm. longae, 
dorso carinatae, albo-villosae. Calycis tubus 2 mm. longus, extra parce 
pubescens, lobis rotundatis molliter ciliatis et sericeo-pubescentibus intus 
rubro-purpureis. Petalorum limbus suborbicularis, circiter 3 mm. 
diatnetro, glaber, albus, ungue brevi rubro-purpureo. Stamina 10, petalis 
et calycis lobis opposita. Stylus glaber, stigmate capitato. Ovula 3-4. 
Fructus conglomerate apice loculicide deliiscentes. — Leptospermum mar- 
ginatum, Labill. PI. Nov. Holl. vol. ii. p. 10, t. 148. Billiottia marginata, 
G. Don, Gen. Syst. vol. ii. p. 827. Fabricia stricta, Lodd. Bot. Cab. 
t. 1219.— J. Hutchinson. 



For the material on which the figure of this beautiful 
shrub given at plate 8301 1ms been based, Kew is indebted 
to Mr. T. A. Dorrien Smith, in whose garden at Tresco 
Abbey, Isles of Scilly, it grows luxuriantly in the open, 
though in most parts of the British Inlands it is not hardy. 
The genus Agonis to which the plant belongs includes fifteen 
species, all of which are limited to Western Australia. In 
the Flora Australiensis the late Mr. Bentham has divided 
the genus, which as a whole was formerly deemed, owing to 
its [alternate leaves and to the relative lengths of the 
stamens and petals, a section of Leptospermum, into two 
sections. The first of these, the Taxandria, were charac- 
terised by having ten stamens, regularly opposite to the 
calyx-lobes and petals and by having two ovules in each 
cell. The second section, the Ataxandria, were characterised 
Februaet, 1910. 



by having, with the exception of -A, grandiflora, twenty to 
thirty stamens, none of which are opposite the centres of the 
petals, with at the same time four to six ovules in each cell. 
As Mr. Hutchinson points out, however, the character 
derived from the number of ovules is evidently liable to 
some variation, and must therefore be used with caution, 
for in A. marginata, the species now depicted, while there 
are ten stamens strictly opposite the calyx-lobes and petals, 
there are three or four ovules in e ich cell. 

Description.— Shrub, 6-10 ft. high, branches and small 
twigs softly pubescent. Leaves obovate-oblong, obtuse or 
finely mucronulate, narrowed at the base into a short petiole ; 
blade t|— 11 in. long, 3-5 iin. wide, coriaceous, 5-nerved 
from the base, margin densely pubescent with adpressed 
hairs. Flowers sessile, clustered, the clusters axillary, almost 
globose, 10-20-flowered ; outer bracteoles wide orbicular, 
densely ciliate, 2 lin. across; inner obovate, concave, keeled 
on the back, white villous, 1^ lin. across. Calyx-tube 1 lin. 
long, sparingly pubescent externally ; lobes rounded, softly 
ciliate and silky pubescent, reddish purple within. Petals 
with a white, glabrous, suborbicular limb, about 1^ lin. 
wide, and a short reddish purple claw. Stamen* 10, opposite 
the petals and calyx-lobes. Style glabrous, stigma capitate. 
Ovules 3-4 in each cell. Fruit conglomerate, the individual 
fruits opening loculicidally at the tips. 



Fig. 1, bud with bracteoles; 2, bracteole; 3, section of a flower; 4 and 5, 
stamens ; 6 and 7, vertical and transverse sections of ovary ; 8, placenta with 



ovules:— all enlarged 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description o! 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By k< 
F.tt.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo,y<*. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of v 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawing*? by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Com 
to Bentham's " Handbook," aud other British Flora*. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crov- 

outlines of Elementary botany, as introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bkntham, F.R.S., Piesident of the Lii 
Society. New Edition, Is, 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsknu, 11. A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Kev. M. J. Bkkkklxy, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Colon 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH M< g Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Speoies (with localities 

Britain and Ireland. By Oharlfs P. Hoiskirk, F.L.S., & 

Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Bi -.. 

F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by W -mith 

F.L S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 3f^ 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF EN D. 

Bajuiam, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. CtTttRBV, F.h 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH IETES and USTILAGINKiE. By 

GtaOBOE Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. 1). 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 
FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS: a Description of f the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bkntjiam, F.I' ttfed by F. 

Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. er the 

auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and th< By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the* Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port l^atal. By W. II. Harvkt and 
O. W. Sunder, and continued bv Sir W. T x-Dykb, F.R.S. Vols. 

I.— ITT., 20s. each. Vol. 
Part I., 9s. Vol. VI., 24.*. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA 

and continued by Sir W. T , Thi 

20a. Vol. IV.,' Sect. I., 30*. ^ -ect. II., 2 -">», Gd. 

Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part L, 8s. Vol. VII... 27*. 64, Vol. VIII. 86s. Qd. 
HANDBOOK of th* I) FLORA mutic 

Description of the .©aland, a. 

Kermadee's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquai b. By 

Sir J. D. Hook i Published auspices o 

of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIA* By 

Dr. Gkisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Col< i 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. 1). 

Hooker, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, Augnet 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE <fc CO. Ltd.. 6. Henr it Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 62, FEBRUARY, 1910. 



Tab. 8297.— COELOGYNE MOOREANA, Anmm. 
„ 8298.— POPTJLUS NIGRA, vab. BETULIFOLIA. 
„ 8299.— CAMPANULA BEAUVERDIANA, Transcaucasia. 
„ 8300.— RHODODENDRON KET8KEI, Japan. 
„ 8301.— AGONIS MARGINATA, Western Australia. 
Lovell Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21«. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.—CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hbmslet. 

MONOGRAPHS 

From the Third Series of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descrip- 
tions, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may be bad separately. Prices 
from Is, to 51s. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANICAL PLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 

NOW READY ."art I., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to 111.. 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 
The Continuation edited by Sir W. 1. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
., Sect. 1., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27a. Vol. V., 25s. Cxi. Vol. VII., 27*. M. Vol. VIIL 

25s. 6d. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colomea. 

NOW READY, Vol. IV., Sect. I., Part VI., 13s ■ f< , Sect. I., complete, 52s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal, 

Vols. |. to in., 20s. each. 
By HARVEY and SONDE K 

V«i ttt J 1 " 6 ^° n * 1I1Dati011 edited by Si* W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F. B 
■ VJ-'l V 6 Sect if I 24 88, 'fn* and I1L ' Gs - «• «"* ; Parts IV. ft V., 8s. eaeh. 
■p k, L , ' ° l " Part ! - 9 - ^ Vli 24*- VoL VII., 33s. 

FabU.hed under tne authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 

Natal and Transvaal. 

„ ... ^°- Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

DOS • PRIST! 



No. m. 



VOL. VI.— MARCH. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42*. 



OK No. X4:T7 0P THK KNTJKB WOEK. 

G U 11 T I S ' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURRD F1GORES WITH DESCRIPTIONS 

OF NKW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KK\\\ 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL . 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAM, GXE., LL.D.. F.R.&, 

«3u£unt. Rojtai fcotamt &arBcns, "Sfto. 






m» itm 




in— mum an mm 



L \" : 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Lti 



1910. 






LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



MATERIALS FOR A FLORA OF THE MALAYAN PENINSULA. 

By H. N. Ridley, M.A., F.R.S., Director of Botanic Gardens, Singapore. 
Complete in Three Parts, 30s. 

CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND OF THE ADJACENT PORTIONS OF GARHWAL AND TIBET. 
By Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard Strachet and J. F. Dtjthie. 5s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATICiE OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations 
of their names. By the Rer. Prof. G. Henslow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. 6d. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By P. W. BURBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.R.S., F.L.S. 

With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA : 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENT HAM, F.R.S. 

- J. D. Hookek, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn bv W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Jllustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook;' and other British Flora. 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9*. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd, 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



830Z 




1 Reeve SlC. 



Tab. 8302. 

REHMAXXIA Henrti. 

China, 

SCROPHTJLAIUACEAE. Tribe DlGITALEAE. 
EEHMANNIA, Libosch; Bcnth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 900. 



Rehmannia Henryi, N. E. Brown in Keto Bull. 1909, p. 262; species affinis 
B. aw/ulatae, Herasl., sed humilior, foliis obtuse lobatis et dentatis, bmoteiB 
vel foliis floralibus longe petiolatis, calycis lobis latioribus et corollae lobis 
albis differt. 

Uerba perennis, 15-40 cm. alta, simplex vel basi ramosa, ubique glanduloso- 
pilosa. Folia radicalia 7-18 cm. longa, 2*5-6 cm. lata, elliptico-oblonga, 
obtusissima, basi in petiolum 1-6 cm. longum attenuata, crenato-dentata 
vel plus minusve pinnatini Iobata et obtuse dentata ; folia caulina simillima, 
gradattzn minora, longe petiolata. Flora axillares, 3-6 cm. distantcs. 
Pedicelli adscendentes, 3-5 cm. longi, basi bracteolis 1-2 subulatis 2-4 mm. 
longis muniti. Calyx adscendens (haud nutans), campanulatus, lobis 
patentibus; tubus 1-1 3 cm. longus; lobi subaequalcs, 1-1*2 cm. longi, 
5-9 mm. lati, anguste vel late deltoidei vel deltoideo-ovati, obtusi, glandula 
brunneo-aurantiaca subapiculati, intcgri vel pauce dentati. Gorollae tubus 
4 - 5-5 cm. longus, dorsaliter compressus, apice 2 cm. latus, extra pubescens, 
sordide sulfureiTS, minnte rubro-punctatus, intus inferne glaber, superne 
pubescens, luteus, minute rubro-punctatus; limbus obliquus, bilabiatus, 
4 - 5 cm. diametro, albus, utrinque pubescens ; labium superius bilobum, lobis 
subquadratis apice obtusissime rotundatis emarginatis ; labium inferius 
fere ad basin trilobum, lobis 2' 5 cm. longis 1*5 cm. latis oblongis apice 
rotundatis, medio lateralibus imbricato, palato bicarinato dorso faucis 
adpresso. Stamina inclusa, glabra, antlierarum loculis 3 mm. longis 
deflexo-divergentibus. Ovarium ovoideum, glabrum ; stylus inclusns, 
glaber; stigmata late rotundata. — Rekmoattut 1'iasezkii, Hemsl. in Journ. 
Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 194, non Maxim. — N. E. Brown. 



The genus Rehmannia includes six known species, all 
natives of China, though one — R. glutinosa, Libosch — 
extends also to Japan. It has given no little trouble to 
systematic workers, and one suggested species — R. ? Old' 
Iiami, Hemsl., a native of Formosa — has recently had to 
be transferred to Gesneraceae and treated as the type 
of a distinct genus. Three of the species have already 
been dealt with in this work. At t. 3653, under the 
synonym R. chinen&is, is given a figure of R. glutinosa ; 
at t. 7191 R. rupestris, Hemsl., is depicted; at t, 8177, 
under the synonym R. angulata, a figure has been given 
of a species very nearly allied to R. angulata, which, 
March, 1910. 



however, is now found to deserve separate recognition. 
For the plant in question, Mr. Brown suggests the name 
R. data. It is characterised by being twice as large as 
R. angulata; by having leaves with 2-6 acute entire lobes 
on each side in place of having either very many marginal 
teeth, or, if there be a few lobes or large teeth, by these 
being again toothed ; by having bracts or flowering leaves 
with long cuneate bases not broader than the lamina nearer 
the apex, as against very broadly and rather abruptly 
cuneate bases which are wider than any other part of the 
lamina. The corolla in R. elata is slightly larger and is 
bright soft rosy purple on the lips, yellow dotted with red 
in the throat ; in R. angulata the rather smaller corolla is 
red with a band of scarlet at the margin of the upper lip 
and has orange dots inside the lower lip. The species now 
figured is in somewhat like case ; it has hitherto been 
treated as a form of R. Piasezhii, Maxim., a native of the 
northern parts of Shensi, which differs in being over 3 ft. 
high, and in having subsessile bracts or flowering leaves 
and purplish flowers. 

Originally discovered by Mr. A. Henry about 1885 in 
the neighbourhood of Ichang, and subsequently collected 
by him near Nanto, R. Ilenryi was again met with by 
Mr. E. H. Wilson somewhere in the same general region. 
A share of the seed obtained by Mr. Wilson was com- 
municated to Kew, in 1907, by the Director of the Arnold 
Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, Mass. Plants raised from this 
seed grew well under ordinary greenhouse treatment, and 
flowered in 1908 and again in 1909, when the figure 
now given was prepared. The species sets seeds freely, 
and it may prove hardy in the warmer parts of England. 

Description.—//^, perennial, 6-18 in. high, simple or 
branching at the base, glandular hairy throughout. Leaves 
at the base 3-7 in. long, l-2£ in. wide, elliptic-oblong, 
quite obtuse, their bases narrowed into a petiole J-2J in. 
long, crenately toothed, or more or less pinnately lobed and 
obtusely dentate; cauline leaves or bracts like the basal 
leaves, gradually decreasing upwards, long petioled . Flowers 
axillary, 1-J.-2J i n . apart ; pedicels ascending, 1J-2 in. long, 
with 1-2 subulate basal bracteoles 1-2 lin. long. Calyx 
ascending, never nodding, campanulate ; lobes nearly equal, 



spreading, 5-6 lin. long, 2^-4^ lin. wide, narrowly or 
widely deltoid or deltoid-ovate, obtuse, with entire or 
sparingly toothed margins, and with a brownish-orange 
snbapiculate gland; tube 5-6^- lin. long. Corolla tube 
lf-2 in. long, dorsally compressed, f in. wide at the mouth, 
pubescent without and dirty yellow with minute red specks, 
within glabrous below, pubescent above, yellow with minute 
red specks; limb oblique, 2-lipped, 1| in. wide, white and 
pubescent on both sides ; upper lip 2-lobed, lobes sub- 
quadrate, rounded and emarginate at the top ; lower lip 
3dobed nearly to the base, lobes 1 in. long, § in. wide, 
oblong, rounded at the tip, the lateral overlapping the 
central ; palate 2-keeled, partially occluding the mouth. 
Stamens included, glabrous ; anthers 1| lin. long, the cells 
deflexed, diverging. Ovary ovoid, glabrous; style included, 
glabrous; stigmatic lobes wide, rounded. 



Fig. I, stanuns and part of a corolla, laid open ; 2 and 3, anthers; 4, ovary, 
with style and stigma:— all <.nlnrrjed. 



8303 







Tab. 8303. 

AQUILEGrIA alpina. 

The Alps and Apennines, 



Eanunculaceae. Tribe Hellebokeak. 
Aquilegia, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 8. 



Aquilegia alpina, Linn. Sp. PI. 533; All. Fl. Vedem. vol. ii. p. 04, t. (>ti; Koek, 
Syn. Deutsch. u. Schweiz. FL ed. 3, p. 50; Eouy et Fouc. Fl. Fr. vol. i. 
p. 128 ; Fiori e Paoletti, Fl. Anal. Ital. vol. i. p. 520 ; floribus magnis 
caeruleo-purpureis, staminibus pctalis brevioribus distinguitur. 

Caules plures, erecti; 1-3-flori, puberuli. Folia radicalia plerumque bitcrnata; 
petiolus et petioluli pilis longiusculis sparse puberuli; foliola anibitu 
rhomboideo-orbicularia, 2 "5-4 cm. diametro, usque ad medium trifula, 
lobis inciso-crenatis, laciniis ultimis pleruraque longioribus quarn laiis, 
subtus subglauca ; folia caulira parva, trifoliolata vel simplicia, .segmentis 
angustis. Flores 6-8 cm. diametro, caeruleo-violacei. H<q<uUi patulft, 
ovata, circiter 4 cm. longa, in unguem brevem angustata. Petala 
3 '5-4 cm. longa; lamina truncata vel leviter emarginata, quam calcar 
vmcatum manifesto brevior. Stamina circiter 40, 10-seriata, exkriora 
brevia antberis magnis, interiora longiora antheris minoribus ; filamenta 
superne linearia, basin versus sensim dilatata ; antherae oblongae, 
2-2 "5 mm. longae, apiculatae, basi cordatae. Staminodia 10, anguste 
lanceolata, circiter 7 mm. longa. concava, bjalina. Carpella 5, dense 
pubescentia. Folliculi 2-2*5 cm. longi, pubescentes. — T. A. Speague. 



Aquilegia alpina, the species here figured, is a native of 
the Alps of Dauphine, Switzerland and Piedmont, and of 
the Tuscan and Emilian Apennines. The typical form 
of the species has almost straight spurs, hut the degree of 
curvature of the spur seems to be subject to considerable 
variation, and the plant here depicted — which, in respect of 
its spur, approaches A. Sternberg//, Heichb., but differs from 
that species in its more robust habit and in having petals 
that exceed the stamens — is perhaps rather an extreme 
form than a distinct variety of A. alpina. For the material 
from which our plate has been prepared we are indebted to 
Mr. D. Hill, in whose rock-garden at Herga, Watford, the 
plant here depicted flowered freely in the early summer of 
1909. The plant was obtained by Mr. A. W.Hill on the 
Pleine Madeleine, near Chandelon, in Yalais, where the 
species was found growing in quantity on a small level alp 
bordered with low trees and shrubs, at about 5,000 ft. above 

March, 1910. 



sea-level. At the time of its collection, in the second week 
in August, 1907, only a few flowers remained, and most of 
the plants bore nearly ripe seed. A few plants, carefully 
dug up so as to preserve the long tap-root, were, on 
reaching England, potted in a mixture of sandy loam and 
peat, and kept during winter in a cold frame. In the 
following spring they were transferred to the rock-garden 
in a mixture of loam and peat, and in a situation where 
they received partial shade at different times during the 
day. Seeds have been produced, and some of these have 
germinated. 

Description. — Herb, perennial ; stems several, erect, 1-3- 
flowered, puberulous. Leaves at the base mostly twice 
ternate ; petioles and petiolules sparingly puberulous ; leaf- 
lets rhomboid-orbicular, l-lf in. across, trifld to the middle, 
the lobes incised crenated, their ultimate segments usually 
longer than broad, somewhat glaucous beneath ; stem leaves 
small, trifoliolate or simple, their segments narrow. Flowers 
2|-3 in. across, blue-violet. Sepals spreading, ovate, about 
If in. long, narrowed into a short claw. Petals lj-lf in. 
long, blade truncate or slightly emarginate, distinctly shorter 
than the hooked spur. Stamens about 40, 10-seriate, the 
outer shorter with large anthers, the inner long with 
smaller anthers ; filaments linear above, gradually widening 
towards the base ; anthers oblong, 1-1^ Tin. long, apiculate, 
cordate at the base. Staminodes 10, narrow lanceolate, about 
3j lin. long, concave, hyaline. Carpels 5, densely pubescent. 
Follicles |-1 in. long, pubescent, 

enlafl'd 1 aM 2 ' 0Uter stamens ' 3 > st aminodes and pistil; 4, pistil -—all 



8304 







Tab. 8304. 
RHODODENDRON mucronulatum. 

Central and Eastern Asia. 

Ericaceae. Tribe Rhodoreae. 
Rhododendron, Linn. ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 591). 



Rhododendron (Rliodorastrum) mucronulatum, Turcz. in Bull. Soc. Nat. 
Mosc. 1837, n. 7, p. 155, et 1848, vol. i. p. 585 ; species vel forsan varietas 
R. daurici, Linn., a quo differt foliis majoribus tenuioribus acutis ante 
anthesin caducis et floribus majoribus numerosioribus. 

Frutex nanus, ramosus, ramulis ultimis gracilibus parce lepidotis. Folia 
sparsa, internodiis quam petiolis vix longioribus, decidua, breviter gracili- 
terque petiolata; lamina tenuia, lanceolata, 3-8 cm. longa, saepius utrinque 
attenuata, apiculata, margine leviter undulata, utrinque, sed praecipue 
subtus, obscure lepidota; petioli 3-5 mm. longi. Ciemmae florifirae 
uniflorae, sessiles, 2-5 ad apices ramulorutn aggregatae; squamae plus 
minusve lepidotae, latae, fere orbiculares, exteriores crassiores, ciliolatao, 
circiter 4 mm. lotigae, intermediae tenuiores, albae, fimbriatae, circiter 
8 mm. longae, 2 vel 3 interiores lineari-spathulatae, fimbriatae, 10-12 mm. 
longae. Flores pallide rubro-purpurei, 4 "5-5 cm. diametro, brevissime 
pedunculati. Calyx brevissimus, dentibus deltoideis lepidotis. Corolla late 
campanulata, extra puberula baud lepidota, intus epunctata, lobis latis 
imbricatis rotundatis undulatis. Stamina 10, declinata, alterna breviora, 
longiora corallam baud excedentia ; filamenta infra medium pilis planis 
linearibus crispulis unicellulatis instructa ; antherae atro-purpureae. 
Ovarium 5-loculare, lepidotum, stylo glabro curvato stamina longiora 
paullo excedente. Capsula non visa. — II. dauricum, var. mucronulatum, 
Maxim. Rhod. As. Or. p. 44. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



Examples of this pleasing Rhododendron had been a 
desideratum for the Kew collection for many years, but it 
was not until 1907 that a batch of plants, from one of 
which our figure has been prepared, was obtained by 
purchase from a firm of nurserymen in Yokohama ; these 
plants were actually sent as representing a variety of 
R. quinquefolium, Bisset and Moore. The section Rhodo- 
rastrum, to which R. mucronulatum belongs, is distinguished 
by the flowers being solitary in each involucre of bracts 
instead of being in trusses. The late Mr. Maximowicz, who 
looked upon our plant as a variet} 7 of R. dauricum, Linn., 
states that it is readily distinguishable from typical R. 
dauricum, as it occurs in the southern portion of its area, 
but that as we proceed northwards forms are found that 
March, 1910. 



exhibit a gradual transition to what may be considered the 
most reduced form of the same species. The form which 
may be regarded as typical R. dauricum was figured from 
the garden of Mr. Woodford, Vauxhall, at t. 636 of this 
work so long ago as 1803 ; the variety sempervirens is 
represented at t. 1888. The only other species belonging 
to this section is the pretty R. virgatum. Hook, f., por- 
trayed at t. 5060 of this Magazine. Judging, so far as it 
is safe to do so, from its short existence under cultivation m 
this country, R. mucronulatum would appear to be hardy 
and a good grower. With their roots in a sandy peaty 
soil, our plants have made shoots 6 to 12 in. long during 
the past summer. This Rhododendron is deciduous, its 
leaves turning yellow before they fall ; it can be increased 
by means of cuttings. 

Description". — Shrub, dwarf and branching; the twigs 
slender and sparingly lepidote. Leaves scattered, the inter- 
nodes rarely longer than the petioles, deciduous, shortly 
stalked ; blades thin, lanceolate, 1^-3 in. long, usually 
narrowed to both ends, apiculate, margins somewhat undu- 
late, sparingly lepidote on both faces, but most markedly 
beneath ; petioles 2-3 lin. long. Flower-buds sessile, 
1 -flowered, in groups of 2-5 near the tips of the twigs ; 
scales more or less lepidote, wide, nearly orbicular, the 
outer rather firm, ciliolate, about 2 lin. long, the inter- 
mediate thinner, white, fimbriated, about 4 lin. long, the 
innermost 2-3 linear-spathulate, fimbriated, 5-6 lin. long. 
Flowers pale reddish-purple, lf-2 in. across, shortly 
peduncled. Calyx very short, with deltoid lepidote teeth. 
Corolla wide campanulate, puberulous outside, but not 
lepidote, epunctate within; lobes wide imbricate, rounded 
and undulate. Stamens 10, declinate, alternately shorter 
and longer, the longest not exceeding the corolla ; filaments 
hirsute below the middle with flattish linear crisped 1-cellcd 
hairs; anthers very dark purple. Ovary 5-celled, lepidote, 
style glabrous, curved, rather longer than the longest 
stamens. Capsule not seen. 

+ i. Fi ^ h po / tion of undersurface of a leaf; % calyx and pistil; 3, a scale from 
the pistil ; 4 and 5, stamens; 6, hairs:— all enlarged. 



, 



8305 







Tab. 8305. 
PITTOSPORUM Colbnsol 

New Zealand. 

Pittospobaceak. Tribe Pittosporeae. 
Pittospokum, Dunks; Benlh. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. ]>. 131. 



Pittosporum Colensoi, Hook./. Ft. Nov.-Zel. vol. i. p. '2~, Oheeieman, Man. 
N. Zeal. Fl, p. 53; affinis P. tenutfolio, Banks ei Sol., • quo foliis 
coriaceis marginibua planis et bracteis snbperaistentibus distinguitur. 

Arbuscula cortice nigvo. Ramuli validiuscnli, fusci, pilia longs moliilms 
puberuli. Folia patentia, versus apicem ncurva, elliptioo-oblonga, 

oblongo-lanoeolata vol obovato-oblonga, apicc acuta, bisi obtusa vol rotim- 
data, 3-7 cm. longa, 2-3 cm. lata, coriacea, supra saturate viridia, sub- 
nitidula, costa pallidiore, subtus pallide viridia, crebre reticulata; pctioli 
usque, ad 1 cm. longi. InjUretcmHa terminalis et axillaris, floribtu 
sohtariis vel ternis. Braeteae pedicellos inferno imbricaatea, subpersistentes, 
obiongae, aeutae vel apiculatae, 3*5-5 - 5 mm. lotigae, 8-8*5 mm. latae, 
imrpureae, extra sparse l'runueo-villosae, praesertim versus margiue-. 
PcdieeUi 8-10 mm. longi. 8epala latissime ovata, apiculata, 45 mm. 
longa, 3 - 5-l *5 mm. lata, extra sparse villosa. Petala oblanctolata, obtnaa 
vel rotundata, J "5 cm longa, 5 mm. lata, raids reflexa, marginilms [enter 
retlexis. Filamenta 6*5 mm. longa, glabra; antherao 2'D mm. longae. 
Ovarium ovoideo-oblonguni, I mm. longmn, sparse villosum, "2-3-Ioculare ; 
stylus 2 mm. longus; stigma capitatum viridi-luteum. — I'. tenvtfoliuTn, 
var. Colensoi, Kirk, Stud. Fl. N: Zeal. p. 17.— T. A. Stjcague. 



The genus Pittosporum is confined to the eastern hemi- 
sphere throughout the more mildly temperate and subtropical 
regions of which its species, some fifty in number, are widely 
spread. It is most highly differentiated in New Zealand, 
which is the home of about twenty-five per cent, of the 
forms so far characterised. Already seven plates in this 
work have been devoted to the illustration of its species ; 
tt. 1396, 1684, 2075, 3161, 4799, 5978 and 74715. For the 
material from which the figure now given of vet another 
form, P. Colensoi, Hook f., has been prepared, we are 
indebted to Mr. T. A. Dorrieu Smith, in whose garden at 
Tresco Abbey, Isles of Seilly, this species, which in most 
other parts of the United Kingdom is decidedly tender, 
forms a handsome shrub which thrives vigorously and 
flowers freely in the open. P. Colensoi is very nearly 
allied to P. tenuifolium, Banks & Sol.; so many forms that 
appear to be intermediate between ' the two have been 

Marcii, Win. 



reported that the late Mr. T. Kirk, in his " Student's Flora 
of New Zealand," has treated the subject of our plate as a 
variety of P. tenuifolium. Mr. T. F. Cheeseman, however, 
in his " Manual " has recently vindicated the right of 
P. Colensoi to the specific status accorded to it by Sir J. D. 
Hooker. The chief distinguishing features of our plant, as 
compared with P. tenuifolium, are the larger, more coriaceous 
and flat leaves, and the more persistent bracts. Some of the 
intermediate forms which lend weight to Kirk's view are in 
cultivation in this country, and specimens of such have been 
communicated to the Kew herbarium from the Eoyal 
Botanic Gardens, G-lasnevin, and from the gardens of 
Trinity College, Dublin, and of the Royal Horticultural 
Society. The flowers of these intermediate forms are, 
however, mostly like those of P. tenuifolium, while the 
leaves, though approaching in texture those of P. Colensoi, 
have undulate margins. For its cultivation a sandy soil 
with an admixture of peat is most suitable, and the most 
satisfactory mode of propagation is by cuttings in heat. 

Description.— Shrub ; bark blackish ; twigs stout, tawny, 
pubernlous with long soft hairs. Leaves spreading, their 
tips recurved, elliptic-oblong, oblong-lanceolate or obovate- 
oblong, acute, the base usually obtuse or rounded, l£-3 in. 
long, f-l£ in. w ide, coriaceous, dark green with a paler 
midrib and somewhat glossy above, pale green and closely 
reticulated beneath; petiole 4-5 lin. long. Inflorescences 
terminal and axillary ; flowers solitary or in threes ; bracts 
more or less persistent, closely covering the pedicels, oblong, 
acute or apiculate, 2-3 lin. long, 1^-2 lin. wide, purple, 
sparing. y brown hairy outside especially towards the edges ; 
pedice s 4-5 lin. long. Sepals very wide ovate, apiculate, 
2-2 lin long, 11-2 lin. wide, sparingly villous outside. 
petals oblanceolate, obtuse or rounded, dark red, 8 lin. long, 
-a -1m .wide, markedly reflexecl, the margins also slightly 
renexed Filaments 3A lin. long, glabrous; anthers lj lin. 
<>°T 11 A mfy ^ vold -°blong, 2 lin. long, sparingly hairy, 

d " cellecl; st y Ie 1 lin. long; stigma capitate, yellowish 
green. a L 

3 a^f/ffl^ ST W /; th , pedicel and bracts ' * stamenS and PI ' Stil; 
, mcio, o, pibui: — all enlarged, 



8306 




r> 




















"^-^•—^ 





L. Reeve &„ ( 



Tab. 8306. 
NOTYLTA TRIBEPALA. 

Mexico. 

Orchidaceae. TlilH3 Vanpeae. 
Notylia, Linctt. ; Benth. et Book./, '•'<». Plant. toL iii. p. 586 



Notylia trisepala, Lindi. in Pax*. Fl. Gard. vol. iii. (1852 8) p. 46; Reiekb./. 
Xen. Orch. toL i p. 49 j inter species affinal aepalJa lateralibna lil*ris vel 
subliberifi distincta. 

Herba epiphytica, nana. P$e%tdobulbi oblongi, anboompreaai, vi\ ] em. longi, 
raginia Qonauplicatia oblongia acntia imbrioatia obtecti, monophylli. 
Folia oblonga, Bobobtuaa, coriacea, -1 8 cm. tonga, 1*5 8 cm. lata. Scapi 
penduli, 7-10 era. longi, raginia lanceoiatia obtecti; raoemi eyUndriei, 
multifield. Braeteae obkmgo-lanoaolataa, aent&e, 1 L*5 mm. longae. 
Pedieelli 8-6 mm. longi. Hide riridea. 8epalwm poatienm 

ereetum, ovato-oblongum, aeutum, 3-4 em. louguin ; aapaia lateralia libera 
■vel Boblibera, incur va, oblonga, aubacnta, 4-6 mm, longa. Potato sub- 
erecti, incurva, orato-oblonga, aubaenta, 8-4 nun. longa. LaioUum sub- 
ereetura, breriter iinguieuIaTiim, trnlliformi-oratnm, anbobtnaam, 8-4 mm. 
longom, basi obtuse carinatom. Calwnna clavata, _' 8 mm. longa ; anthem 
ovata; pollinia 2, eerea, oroidea, ad apioam stipit is longi tenuis affixa, 
glandula parva. — K. A. Uolfe. 



The genus Notylia includes about twenty species, all of 
which are natives of Tropical America. While none of 
them can be considered showy Orchids, most of them are 
characterised by a certain degree of grace and charm ; two 
other species of the genus have already, on this account, 
found a place in this work; N. tricolor, Klotzsch, at t. 5609, 
and N. albida, Klotzsch, at t. 6311. The species now 
figured, X. trisepala, Lindl., was first described over half a 
century ago from a plant of unrecorded habitat which had 
flowered in the collection of .Mr. Van Houtte at Ghent. In 
1895 a plant possessing similar characters was sent to Kew 
for determination by Mr. Kienast Zolly of Zurich; this 
example was stated to have been obtained from Mexico. 
The plant which forms the subject of our plate flowered in 
May, 1909, in the collection of Air. W. E. Ledger, AVimble- 
don, by whom it was presented to Kew. This plant 
reached Mr. Ledger from his friend Mr. Hermesseo, who 
had collected it at Samborne, Vera Cruz, Mexico. 

March, 1910. 



Description. — Herb, epiphytic, dwarf. Pseudobulhs ob- 
long, somewhat compressed, barely 5 lin. long, clothed 
with conduplicate, oblong, acute sheaths, 1-foliate. Leaves 
oblong, somewhat obtuse, coriaceous, lf-3 in. long, f-lj in. 
wide. Scapes pendulous, 3-7 in. long, clothed with lan- 
ceolate sheaths; racemes cylindric, many-flowered; bracts 
oblong-lanceolate, acute, 5-8 lin. long ; pedicels 1-^-3 lin. 
long. Flowers pale green. Sepals, the posterior erect, ovate- 
oblong, acute, 1^—2 lin. long; the lateral free or nearly so, 
incurved, oblong, subacute, 2-2£ lin. long. Petals suberect, 
incurved, ovate-oblong, subacute, 1^-2 lin. long. Lip sub- 
erect, shortly clawed, ovate-scoopshaped, almost obtuse, 
1^-2 lin. long, the base bluntly keeled. Column clavate-, 
1— 1-Jr lin. long; anther ovate; pollinia 2, waxy, ovoid, 
attached at the tip of a long slender stalk, gland small. 



__ Fig. 1, a flower; 2, column and lip; 3 and 4, column from a young flower; 
5, anther-cap; 6, pollinia:— all enlarged. 






BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
IsleB. For the use of Begiuners and Amateurs. By Gkohgk Be.ntham, 
F.B.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith. F.L.S.. forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.B.S. , President of the Linnaean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townseno, II. A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J.Brkkei.et, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hohkikk, F.L.S., Ac, Ac New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. BKKKEr.Fr. M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Cuhrey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINK^E. By 

George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookkk, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : u Description of the Plants of the 
Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Bakeb, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W. H. Hakvky and 
0. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. 
I.— III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. ; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., 
Part I., 9s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V.. 25s. 6d. 
Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d. 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA: a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. B> 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auepices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

HoOKEB, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d, 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden- 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 63, MARCH, 1910. 



Tab. 8302.— REHMANNIA HENRYI, China. 
„ 8303.— AQUILEGIA ALPINA, The Alps. 
; 8304.— RHODODENDRON MUCRONULATUM, Asia. 
„ 8305.— PITTOSPORUM COLENSOI, New Zealand. 
„ 830G.— NOTYLIA TRISEPALA, Mexico. 

Lovell Reevk & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICK 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.—CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemslicv. 

MONOGRAPHS 

From the Third Series of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descrip- 
tions, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may be had separately. Prices 
from Is. tools. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANICAL RLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. M. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 

NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to 111., 20s. each. 

By D. QL1VER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. TiUSELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. L, 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. M. Vol. VII., 27s. <nd. Vol. VIIL 

25s. 6d. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. IV., Sect. I., Part VI., IS*. 6d. Vol. TV., Sect. I., complete, 52s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By HARVEY and SONDE K. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTOX-DYER, F.R.S. 

VoI"l V*' w'/?? ^ 'J^l 11 - and m " 6s - 6d - «ch ■ Parts IV. & V., 8s. each. 
Vol. IV., Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., p art L> 9s . Vol VL 24sS Vol V IL, 33s. 

Publwhed under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 

Natal and Transvaal. 

. Lovelt. Rfu;vf A Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Coreut Garden. 



Jfourti) £?ertfs. 

No. 64^ 



VOL. VI.— APRIL. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. platn. 

Annual Subscription, 42s. 



OB No. J^TS OF 1HE ENTIKB w <>bk. 

CUKTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KKW, 

AND OTHEK BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 



EDITED BT 



D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Director. Hopal botanic ^arnerts, T&ttio. 




in ! ," -- _%*< ST- 



"There lavish Nature in her best attire 
Pours forth sweet odours ami atlmring sights 
Ami Art with her contending doth ..- 
To excel the natural with made del 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIC AND INDIAN (iOVEUNMENTS. 

6, HENRIETTA STREET. COVENT GARDEN. 

1910. 

'All rights reserved.] 
(Entered at the New York Fost Ojlice as secomi - '■.) 



.OVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



MATERIALS FOR A FLORA OF THE MALAYAN PENINSULA. 

By H. N. Ridley, M.A., F.R.S., Director of Botanic Gardens, Singapore. 
Complete in Three Parts, 3( 

CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AM) OF THE ADJACENT PORTIONS OF GARHWAL AND TIBET. 
By Lt.-Gen. Sir Richaed Straciiky aud J. F. DUTHIK. 5s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATIC^ OF THE BBITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 
2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 S*. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together smb. the derivation* 
of their names. By the Kev. Prof. Gr. Hensc v . M.A., F.L.S. 
SV iti) '288 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. 6d. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Germs by J. G. BaKBB, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 80s. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Is'es. 

By GEORGE BE NTH AM, F. R. S. 

(i by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., <fcc. 9*. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 

!***■ bv W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH. F.L.S. 

Forming an [Unrated Companion to Bentham's « Handbook her British Floras. 

7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, i»*. 



LOVELL REEVE 4 CO I td., $ HENRIETTA STREET, CO VENT GARDEN. 



8301 




M.S.&91.-J.N.F; 



\5nceni Bi-oofe flay &Son.H^uiy . 



I, Reeve &. C? Londc 



Tab. 8307. 
TYPHONODORUM Lindleyanum. 

Madagascar. 



Araceae. 
Typhonodorum, Schott; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 977. 



Typhonodorum Lindleyanum, Schott in Oest. Bot. Wochenbl. 1857, p. 70; 
Gen. Aroid. t. 43, et Prodr. p. 161; Engl in DC. Monogr. Phanerog. vol. ii. 
p. 332 ; species unica. 

Planta robusta, glabra, caule 1-3 m. alto et 10-30 cm.crasso, fibrosis vaginarurn 
vestigiis vestito. Foliorum petioli 0" 60-1 "30 m. longi, validi, teretes, supra 
leviter concavi vel carinati et in utroque latere carinaeleviterconcavo-cana- 
liculati, longe vaginati ; lamina 0" 35-1 "05 m. longa, 18-60 cm. lata, oyata, 
acuta vel subacuminata, basi profunde cordata vel sagittata, lobis basalibus 
rotundatis vel deltoideis obtusis sinu triangulari aperto sejunctis. Pedun- 
culus petiolo brevior, teres, 2*5-4 cm. crassus, viridis. Spatha suberecta, 
40-60 cm. longa ; tubus 8-13 cm. longus, oblongus, viridis ; lamina 
32-47 cm. longa, 8-13 cm. lata, lanceolata, acuminata, basi convoluta, 
superne explanata, undulata, utrinque flavida. Spadix 25-41 cm. longus ; 
inflorescentia feminea 5-9 cm. longa, neutra 3-5 cm. longa, mascula fertilis 
4-9 cm. longa, sterilis superior 13-18 cm. longa, flavo-aurantiaca. Flores 
feminei nudi, organis neutris paucis interdum commixti ; ovarium ovoideum, 
1-loculare, 1-ovulatum; stigma sessile 3-4-lobum; ovnlum erectum, ana- 
tropum. Flores masculi nudi, inferiores antheris 4-8 in synandrium trun- 
catum connatis, superiores steriles. Baccae magnae. Semina 2-2 ■ 5 cm. 
diametro, compresso-orbicularia. — T. madagascariense, Engl. Bot. Jabrb. 
vol. i. p. 188.— N. E. Brown. 

The gigantic evergreen Aroid which forms the subject 
of our illustration is a native of Madagascar, where it 
grows in water or in marshy places. It has, however, been 
introduced thence to the Island of Johanna in the Comoros, 
to Mauritius and it is also believed to Reunion, on account 
of its seeds which are eaten by the inhabitants. It develops 
an arboreous unbranched caudex crowned with a tuft of 
large sagittate leaves. The plant from which our drawing 
was made was presented to Kew in 1905 by the Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Dahlem, Berlin ; placed in a bed of mud 
along with the Egyptian paper reed, it has grown vigorously 
and attained its present dimensions. It flowered at Kew 
for the first time in May, 1909, and afterwards developed 
ripe seeds, from which seedlings have been raised. Some 
of the seeds germinated in the bottom of the spathe. 
April, 1910. 



Description. — Shrub, all parts glabrous. Stem stout, 
3-10 ft. high, 4-12 in. thick, clothed with the fibrous 
remains of old leaf-sheaths. Leaves long-petioled ; blade 
1|-3J ft. long, 7 in. to 2 ft. across, ovate acute or almost 
acuminate, deeply cordate or sagittate, the basal lobes 
rounded or deltoid, obtuse, with a wide triangular sinus 
between ; petiole stout, terete, long-sheathing, 2-4J ft. long, 
slightly concave or keeled above and somewhat concave! y 
channelled on either side of the keel. Peduncle shorter 
than the petiole, green, terete, 1-lf in. thick. Spathe 
suberect, 1^-2 ft. long ; tube 3-5 in. long, oblong, green ; 
blade 13-19 in. long, 3-5 in. across, lanceolate, acuminate, 
convolute below, somewhat flattened above, margins undu- 
late, yellow on both faces. Spadix 10-16 in. long; female 
portion 2-3J in. long, neuter 1J-2 in. long, male fertile 
portion lf-3^ in - l 011 g> sterile upper portion 5^-7 in. long, 
orange yellow. Female flowers naked, mixed at times with 
a few neuter flowers ; ovary ovoid, 1-celled, 1-ovuled. 
Male flowers naked, the lower with 4-8 anthers connate in 
a^ truncate synandrium, the upper sterile. Berry large. 
Seed l|-2 in. across, flattened-orbicular. 



Fig. 1, sketch of plant, showing habit ; 2, leaf and apex of petiole ; 3, in- 
florescence ; 4, part of spadix ; 5, three barren male flowers ; 6, a fertile male 
newer ; 7, two female flowers with a neuter organ between them ; 8, longitudinal 
section of a female flower and a neuter organ ; 9, transverse section of an 
ovary ;— 1-3 reduced, 4 of natural size, 5-9 enlarged. 



8308 




3 M , 



:<k. 



Tab. 8308. 

SAXIFRAGA Griskbaoiiii. 

South East Europe. 

Saxifragaceae. Tribe Saxifraoeae. 
Saxifraga, Linn. ; Benth. et Ilooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 035. 



Saxifraga (Kabschia) Grisebachii, Dcf/en d Dorfl. in Thnktchr. Acad. Wins. 
Wien. vol. lxiv. p. 721; Irving in (lard. Uhron. 1909, vol. xlvi. p. 196, 
fig. 81; affinis S. Freder><:i-Ai<<jiisti, Bias., sed foliis basalibus majoribus 
confertis et patentibus differt. 

ITerba caespitosa, caudiculis brevibus dense foliosis; catties floriferi erecti, 
foliosi, 10-15 cm. alti, dense et patule glanduloso-pilosi. Folia inferiora 
imbricata, patula, sessilia, spatlmlato-lingulata, apice rotundato-mucronata, 
0*5-2 cm. longa, 0*4-0 - 6 cm. lata, supra foveolis intramarginalibus nnme- 
rosis, subtus carinata, marline cartilagineo versus basin parce ciliato; folia 
caulina patentia, oblongo-spathulata, circiter 1 cm. longa et 3 mm. lata, 
rubella, apice in mucronem viridem contracta, utrinque mucronc excepto 
dense glanduloso-pilosa. Indorescentia racemosa Tel subspicata ; pedicelli 
bracteis multo breviores. Calyx rubro-purpureus, dense glanduloso-pilosus ; 
lobi inaequales, oblongo-elliptici, apice rotundati, usque ad 6 mm. 
longi. Petala erecta, elliptico-lanceolata, purpurea, circiter 2 mm. longa, 
vix 1 mm. lata, inferne ciliata. Stamina petalis vix longiora. — 
J. Hutohinsox. 

The Saxifrage which forms the subject of our illustration 
is a native of the mountains of Albania and Central 
Macedonia. It was introduced into cultivation in 1902, 
in which year it received a first class certificate from the 
Royal Horticultural Society. It is a member of the section 
Kabschia, Engl., which includes three other species with red 
flowers and with somewhat similar foliage and habit, 
S. Frederici-Augusti, S. media, and the recently introduced 
S. Stribrnyi. From the first of these S. Grisebachii is 
readily distinguished by having larger and more spreading 
basal leaves. The two others differ from our plant mainly 
in having a branched inflorescence with distinctly pedicelled 
flowers. At Kew S. Grisebachii is grown in pots in a cold 
frame, and is transferred in March, when it comes into 
flower, to the Alpine House, where it continues in blossom 
for a month or more. When grown out of doors the plant, 
though quite hardy in other respects, is apt to suffer in 
winter from excess of moisture. 
April, 1910. 



Description. — Herb, with short tufted densely leafy 
bases, the flowering stems erect, leafy, 4-6 in. high, rather 
densely beset with spreading glandular hairs. Leaves at 
the base imbricate, sessile, spathulate-ligulate, with rounded 
mucronate tips, 3-10 lin. long, 2-3 lin. wide, with numer- 
ous intramarginal pits on the upper side, keeled beneath, 
margin cartilaginous and sparingly ciliate near the base ; 
stem-leaves spreading, oblong-spathulate, about 5 lin. long, 
under 2 lin. wide, reddish with an abruptly narrowed green 
tip, rather densely glandular hairy except at the tip. 
Inflorescence racemose or subspicate, the pedicels much 
shorter than the bracts. Calyx reddish-purple, densely 
glandular hairy ; lobes unequal, oblong elliptic, rounded at 
the tip, the largest 3 lin. long. Petals erect, elliptic- 
lanceolate, purple, about 1 lin. long, barely half as wide, 
ciliate towards the middle and at the base. Stamens hardly 
exceeding the petals. 



Fig. 1, a basal leaf; 2, a stem leaf; 3, a bract and flower; 4, flower; 5, petal; 
6, stamen ; 7, pistil : — all enlarged. 



8309 




Vuicfflii RrooW 



Tab. 8309. 
RHODODENDRON Harrovian™. 

Western China. 



Ebicaceae. Tribe Rhodoreae. 
Rhododexdbon, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron Harrovianum, Bmul. in Oard. Chron. 1910, vol. xlvii. p. 4 ; 
species ex affinitate R. heliolepidis, Franch., a quo differt foliis angustiori- 
bus minus distincte apiculatis, corollae lobis acutis et staminibus exsertis. 

Frutex 60-90 cm. altus ; rami recti, rigidi, primum lepidoti, intcrnodiis qtuun 
petiolis vix brevioribus. Folia sparsa, persistentia, coriacea, superiora 
patentia; lamina anguste lanceolata, 3-7 cm. longa, obscure apiculata, basi 
cuneata, margine recurva, supra atroviridia, nitida, lacvia, costa impressa, 
subtus creberrime lepidota, lepidibus parvis, costa valida, elevata; petiolus 
crassiusculus 4-8 mm. longus. FUtrm 3-5 in ramorum apicibus aggregati, 
pedicellati, pedicellis crassiusculis, 1" 5-2 cm. longis saturate rubris albo- 
lepidotis. Calyx brevissimus, obscure lobatus vel fere truncatus. Corolla 
campanulata, 2-2 "5 cm. louga, lobis latis, extra parte inferiore saturate 
rubro-j)urpurea, albo-lepidota, lobis violaceo-purpureis, intus violaceo- 
purpurea, iobis superioribus flavo-maculatis. Stamina 10, exserta, alterna 
longiora, usque ad 3*5 cm. longa; filamenta supra basin et infra medium 
zona pilorum longorum patentium ornata. Ovarium 5-loculare, crelxjrrime 
Iepidotum; stylus glaber, cum ovario circiter 3-3" 5 cm. longus. Capsula 
non visa. — W. Botting Hems let. 



The Rhododendron that forms the subject of our figure, 
which has been drawn from material supplied by Messrs. J. 
Veitch & Sons from a plant that flowered in their nursery 
at Coombe Wood in April, 1000, is one of the hardiest of the 
species newly introduced from China, where it was dis- 
covered by Mr. E. H. Wilson. All the plants now in 
cultivation have been raised from imported seeds, but 
judging by its appearance and by the behaviour of allied 
species, it is probable that its propagation by means of 
cuttings may be successfully accomplished. R. Harrovianum, 
which flowered at Coombe Wood for the first time in 1007, 
has grown well there under conditions adapted to Rhodo- 
dendrons in genera] ; a peaty, sandy soil and abundant 
moisture. In addition to R. heliolepis, Franch., to which, 
as Mr. Hemsley points out, it is nearly allied, our plant may 
also be compared with R. coombense, Hemsl., figured at 
Apbil, 1910. 



t. 8280 of tliis work, from which it differs in its longer 
leaves, its larger, violet-purple flowers, and its exserted 
stamens. 

DESCRIPTION. — Shrub, 2-3 ft. high; branches straight, 
rigid, at first lepidote ; internodes nearly as long as the 
petioles. Leaves scattered, persisting, coriaceous, the upper 
spreading ; blade narrow lanceolate, 1 J-3 in. long, slightly 
apicnlate, cuneate at the base, the margin recurved, dark 
green shining smooth and with the midrib sunk above, 
beneath closely lepidote with fine scales and with a stout 
raised midrib; petiole rather stout, 2-4 lin. long. Flowers 
pedicel led, in clusters of 3-5 at the tips of the branches; 
pedicels rather stout, J-| in. long, reddish and dotted with 
white scales. Calyx very short, faintly lobed or almost 
truncate. Corolla campanulate, f-1 in. long, lobes broad, 
tube deep reddish-purple and dotted with white scales 
outside in the lower part, higher up like the lobes outside 
violet-purple, within corolla uniformly violet-purple save 
for yellowish blotches on the upper lobes. Stamens 10, 
exserted, alternately longer and shorter, the longest 1£ in. 
in length, filaments with a band of longish spreading hairs 
above the base but below the middle. Ovary 5-celled, 
closely lepidote ; including the quite glabrous style l^-li 
in. long. Capsule not seen. 



Pig. 1, portion of underside of a leaf; 2, a scale from the same ; 3, calyx and 
pistil : t. scales from the ovary ; 5 and 6, stamens of each series ; 7, section of 



ovary :~ull enlarged. 



8310 




Tab. 8310. 

DIPELTA FLORIBUNDA. 

China. 

Caprifoliaceae. Tribe Lonicereae. 

Dipelta, Maxim. Bull. Acad. l\'trrsb. vol. xxiv. (1878) p. 50, quoad plantam 
floriferam tantum; Hemsl. in Gard. Chron. 1908, vol. xliv. p. 101. 



Dipelta floribunda, Maxim. Bull. Acad. Petersb. vol. xxiv. p. 51, et in MA. Bid. 
vol. x. p. 80 ; Spooner in Oard. Chron. 1907, vol. xlii. p. 2 cum figura ; 
species typicn, a D. ventricosa, Hemsl., imprimis bracteolis pcltatis, corolla 
infra medium in tubum angustum constrieta et corollae lobis longioribus 
distinguenda. 

Frutex saepius 3-5 m. altus, habitu vultoque THarvUlae sjiecierum nonullarum. 
ramis elongatis graciliusculis primum pubcrulis, internodiis qnam folia 
saepius brevioribus. Folia opposita, exstipulata, breviter petiolata, tenuia, 
decidua, lanceolata, ovato-lanceolata, vel ovata, saepius 5-10 cm. longa, 
acuminata, acuta, basi subcuneata vel rotiindata, integra, primum pube- 
rula, demum glabrescentia, subtus pallidiora ; venae primariae latencies 
utrinque circiter 4, primum pilosulae nltimis reticulatis pellucidis ; petioli 
3-6 mm. longi. Flores ad foliorum axillas fasciculati; pedunculi breves, 
saepius 2-foliati et 3-6-flori ; pedicelli graciles, 1-1*6 cm. longi, puberuli. 
Bracieae lineares, pnberulae, 7-10 mm. longae, cito deciduae. Bracteolae 6, 
valde difformes, nempe 2 minimae infra pedicelli medium positae, oppo- 
sitae, cito deciduae; 4 persistentes, per anthesin accrescentes, demum 
scariosae, venosae, juxta ovarii basin enarae, confertae ; 2 exteriores vel 
inferiores minores, inaequales, 1 antica, 1 postica ; antica major, ovata, 
obtusa, basi lata, pedicellum amplexans, plene evoluta circiter 1*6 cm. 
longa; postica similis nisi minor, circiter 0"5cm. longa; 2 interiores vel 
superiores majores, rotundato-oblongae, leviter obliquae, auriculaeformes, 
peltatae, 2-2 5 cm. diamctro maximo, capsulam omnino occultantes. 
Calycis limbus ad basin 5-partitus ; lobi subaequales, lineares, circiter 
5 mm. longi, glandulosi, acutissimi, persistentes. Corolla albo-rosea, 
inflato-tubulosa, bilabiata, circiter 3 cm. longa ; tubus infra medium con- 
strictus, cylindricus ; limbi lobi subaequales, rotundato-oblongi, patentee, 
circiter 1 cm. longi, labio inferiore intus striis aurantiacis ornato. 
Stamina I. didynnma, inclusa. Ovarium inferos), birsutnm, 4-loculare; 
loculi 2 fertiles, 1-ovulati ; 2 steriles ovula plura imperfecta includentes j 
stylus flliformis, glaber, leviter exserta. FYucttu (immaturus tantnm visus) 
angulatus, lobis calycinis coronatus, circiter 1*5 cm. longus, intra bracteolas 
accrescentes occultatus. — W. Botting Hems ley. 



The genus Dipelta has, owing to the absence of complete 

material, never hitherto been fully described. The late Mr. 

Maximowicz, by whom it was founded on specimens of the 

species here illustrated, could only report of the fruit, which 

April, 1910. 



we now know to be a small dry capsule, concealed within 
the scarious accrescent bracteoles, as " said to be a red 
edible berry." Perfect seeds were sent to England in 
December, 1904, by Mr. E. H. Wilson to Messrs. J. Veitcli 
& Sons, but none exist in the herbarium at Kew. These 
seeds, gathered at altitudes of from 6,500 to 8,000 ft. above 
sea level in Western China, were sown by Messrs. Veitch 
early in 1905, and produced plants from one of which came 
the material from which our figure has been prepared. 
Three other species of Dipelta have been described ; 
D. yunnanensis, Franchet, D. elegans, Batalin, and D. ven- 
tricosa, Hemsl., all from Western China. In the herbarium 
at Kew there are specimens in fruit of yet another form 
discovered by Mr. A. Henry in Hupeh in Central China. 
This is noted by Henry as possibly a new species ; it is a 
tree 10-40 ft. high, and has larger and much broader leaves 
than D. floribunda, to which it is most nearly allied, and of 
which the late Professor Batalin considered it to be a state. 
This doubtful form, like D. yunnanensis and D. elegans, is 
not yet in cultivation, but the herbarium material available 
does not indicate that any one of the three is superior as an 
ornamental plant to the species now figured, or to D. ven- 
tricosa, figured at t. 8294 of this work" In the nursery of 
Messrs. Veitch at Coombe Wood, D. floribunda forms a free- 
growing bush of rounded habit about 4 ft. high, bearing in 
general appearance a resemblance to one of the Bush 
Honeysuckles, or to a Diervilla. It requires a good, loamy 
sod and can be increased by cuttings. It is quite hardy, 
and flowers during May. 

Description.— Shrub often 10-16 ft. high, in habit 
recalling some of the Diervillas ; branches long, rather 
slender, at first puberulous ; internodes mostly shorter than 
the leaves. Leaves opposite, without stipules, short-petioled, 
thm, deciduous, lanceolate, ovate-lanceolate, or ovate, often 
2-4 in. long, acute and acuminate, somewhat cuneate or 
rounded at the base, entire, at first puberulous but soon 
gla orescent, rather paler on the underside; main nerves 
about 4 on each side, somewhat hairy at first, the fine 
reticulate venation translucent; petioles 2-3 lin. long. 
* lowers (clustered in the leaf-axils; peduncles short, usually 
2-leaved and 3-6-flowered ; pedicels slender, 5-8 lin. long, 



puberulous. Bracts linear, puberulous, 3-5 lin. long, soon 
disappearing. Bracteoles 6, dissimilar; the lowest pair 
below the middle of the pedicel very small, opposite, soon 
disappearing ; the remaining four close-set near the base of 
the pistil, persistent, accrescent, ultimately scarious, strongly 
veined ; of these the two outer or lower anterior and posterior, 
both smaller than the two inner or upper, but themselves 
unequal ; the anterior lower ovate, obtuse, wide-based, 
embracing the pedicel and about 8 lin. long, the posterior 
similar but only about 3 lin. long ; the two upper or inner 
rounded-oblong, slightly oblique, auriculaeform, peltate, |-1 
in. across in the widest part when mature, and quite conceal- 
ing the capsule. Calyx limb 5-partite, lobes nearly equal, 
linear, about 2^ lin. long, glandular, very pointed, persistent. 
Corolla pale rose, inflated tubular, 2-lipped, about l\ in. 
long; tube narrowed below the middle, cylindric; lobes 
nearly equal, rounded-oblong, spreading, about 5 lin. long ; 
lower lip marked with orange lines. Stamens 4, didynamous, 
included. Ovary inferior, hirsute, 4-celled, with 2 fertile 
1-ovuled cells and 2 sterile cells with several imperfect 
ovules in each ; style filiform, glabrous, somewhat exserted. 
Fruit (only seen unripe) angled, tipped by the persistent 
calyx lobes, about 8 lin. long, hidden by the accrescent 
bracteoles. 



Fig. 1, peltate bracteoles, calyx and pistil ; 2, the same with one peltate 
bracteole removed ; 3, base of the corolla, laid open ; 4, anther : — all enlarged. 






837/ 



r 











Hoere AC? London 



Tab. 8311. 
OORNUS Nuttallil 

Western. North, America. 

CoKNAOEAE. 

Coknus, I. inn.; lioith. rt Hook./. (in>. Plant, vol. i. p. 947. 



Cornus Nuttallii, Audubon, Bird* <>f North Am. edL fol. el. (1837) 
t. 367 (nomen) et ed. norm. (1842), vol. iv. pp. 313, 815, t. 379; Turr. £ 
Gray, /■'!. N. Am. vol. i. ]). 652; Sarqent, Sitva N. Am. vol. v. p. 69, t. '214 ; 
Eaittoood, Tree* of California, p. 73, t. 51; ('. K. 86hneider, III. Hondo. 
Laubholzk. vol. ii. p. 454, flg. 31 li, m. ; afiinis C.fioridae, Linn.. Bed elatior, 
folds ad obovatum rorgentibus vix vel breviter aonmmatu gabtiu 
copiosius pilosis, involucro majore, bractcis abrupte apiculatis vel acumi- 
natis distincta. 

Frii/'., vel arbor, 15-24 m. alta, cortiec griseo lacvi, rami's nisi novcllis glabris 
fuscis. Folia plermnquc obovala Tel obovato-olliptica, breviter vol obscure 
acuminata, 5-12 cm. longa, 4-9 cm. lata, supra primo ad prowo pilosa, 
citissimc glabrata, Bubttw canescentia, molliter pilosa vel vjllosnla, nervis 
utrinque circiter 5; petioli (i-15 mm. longi. Braeteat involncrantes plerum- 
que 6, obovatae, breviter apiculatae, rarins acnminatae, albidae, luteo- vel 
interdum mbro-suffusae, 4-8 cm. longae, 2-5-7 cm. latae. Florum capital* 
1-4-2 cm. diametro ; flores fertiles com sterilibus mixti. Calyx extra 
adpresse griseo-pubescens. Petala viridi-albida. Drnpae paucae perfect ae 
inter abortivas minores numerosas, oblongae, rnbrae, 8-12 mm. Joi 
apice calyce persistente nigrwomte eoronatae. — Benthamia Xuftaiin, TsnUfii 
in Tokyo Bot. Mag. vol. xxiii. p. 41. — f). Stai-f. 



The subject of our plate is the noblest of the Cornels. It 
is met with on the Pacific coast of North America from 
British Columbia and Vancouver Island to Southern Cali- 
fornia, and is common on the Coast Mountains down to 
Monterey. In the most favourable conditions, and especially 
in the Redwood forests of Northern California, it attains a 
large size ; one tree is recorded as reaching 1 a height of 
100 ft. Professor Sargent and Miss Eastwood speak of it 
as one of the most beautiful of trees, gorgeous in autumn 
with its red fruits and brilliantly coloured foliage ; a recent 
writer in the Gardeners' Chronicle says that on this account 
the tree is spared even by the settler. The involucre, often 
loosely spoken of as the flower, is at times 6 in. across, with 
individual bracts 2| in. wide. The first botanist to discover 
April, 1910. 



the species was Mr. David Douglas, about 1826; at that 
time it was believed to be only a form of C.fiorida, and it 
was not recognised as distinct till it was rediscovered by 
Mr. Thomas Nuttali, some ten years later, during a journey 
to the Pacific coast. In the 1837 elephant folio edition of 
the Birds of North America, which consists of plates only, 
t. 367 is devoted to Columba fasciata, with which is asso- 
ciated a branch of this Cornel. In the 1842 edition of the 
same work, which is accompanied by letterpress, Audubon 
explains his indebtedness to his friend Nuttali for the infor- 
mation that the berries of this hitherto uncharacterised tree 
form a staple food of this particular pigeon. In publishing 
the technical description added by Nuttali to his notes, 
Audubon took the opportunity to dedicate the species to his 
friend. 

There is no indication that seeds of C. Nuttallii reached 
England at the time of its discovery by Douglas, but we 
learn from Audubon that on its rediscovery by Nuttali seeds 
were transmitted to Lord Ravensworth, and further, that 
information had reached America that these seeds had 
germinated. In spite, however, of its introduction seventy 
years ago, C. Nuttallii has never been common in this 
country, and it certainly is not so amenable to the artificial 
conditions of cultivation as most of the dwarfer Cornels are. 
During the spring of 1909, however, the species flowered at 
Kew, in the garden of Mr. B. E. C. Chambers at Haslemere, 
and with Messrs. Veitch & Sons at Coombe Wood. The 
Kew plant, from which our main figure has been made, was 
purchased from a French nurseryman in 1904, and is now 
5 ft. high and quite healthy ; during the past season it has 
made shoots 1 to 1^ ft. long. It is growing in a sandy loam 
to which some peat and decayed leaves have been added. 
Our experience with this Cornel has not been sufficiently pro- 
longed to justify a dogmatic statement as to its treatment, 
but we should recommend for it a well-drained loamy soil 
abundantly reinforced with decayed leaves— the ordinary 
" leaf-soil " of the gardener, a sunny, sheltered position, and 
attention to the matter of watering whilst the plants are young 
and the root system is not extensive. A heavy cold soil is 
probably as ill-suited for it as a very dry sandv one. Perhaps 
the finest plant of C. Nuttallii in this country is one in the 
garden of Mr. Chambers, who supplied from it the fruit 



depicted in our plate ; it is a small tree, about 15 ft. high, 
with a single stem. Mr. Chambers informs us that he finds 
the number of bracts in an involucre to vary from 4 to 8. 
Judging by our six years' experience, the species appears 
to be hardy enough, except that the succulent tips of the 
shoots are sometimes cut back. This seems to expose it to 
fungoid attacks, and in this way a number of young plants 
have been lost at Kew. 

Description. — Shrub or tree, reaching 50-85 (rarely 100) 
ft. in height ; bark grey and smooth ; twigs glabrous except 
when quite young, tawny. Leaves usually obovate or 
obovate-elliptic, shortly or faintly acuminate, 2-4£ in. long, 
If— 3^ in. wide, at first adpressed hairy above but soon 
glabrous, hoary beneath and softly pubescent ; nerves about 
5 on each side; petioles 3-8 lin. long. Bracts of the invo- 
lucre usually 6, obovate, shortly apiculate, rarely acuminate, 
whitish and tinged with yellow or occasionally with pink, 
If— 3^ in. long, 1-2| in. wide. Flowers in heads 7-10 lin. 
in diameter ; the fertile accompanied by sterile flowers. 
Calyx adpressed grey-pubescent externally. Petals greenish- 
white. Drupes few perfect mixed with many smaller abortive 
ones, oblong, red, 4-6 lin. long, tipped by the persistent 
blackish calyx. 

Fig. 1, part of underside of a leaf; 2, flower ; 3, vertical section of calyx and 
pistil : — all enlarged. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE 

OF 

DR. A. G. BUTLER'S FOREIGN FINCHES. 



Royal 4 to, in Handsome Cloth, Gilt Top, £4 14s. 6d., 
post free on receipt of remittance. 

FOREIGN FINCHES 

IN CAPTIVITY, 

By ARTHUR G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S., F.Z.S., F.E.S., 

Corresponding Member of the various Foreign Societies. 
With 60 plates, by F. W. FROHAWK, beautifully coloured by hand. 



" Dr. Butler treats his subject more exhaustively than Herr Wiener ; 
he has adopted a more Scientific classification, and his book is infinitely 
better illustrated. Indeed, the hand-coloured plates in Dr. Butler's book 
are in themselves fully worth the price which is charged for the whole 
book." — Feathered World. 




LONDON : 

LOVELL REEVE & CO:, Limited, 
Publishers to ihc home. Colonial and Indian Governments, 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVE NT GARDEN. 



This issue differs in no respect from the former issue. The 
reimbursement of a considerable portion of the large outlay incurred 
for the production of the work, enables the Publishers to make a 
concession from the high price at which it was unavoidably 
published, with a view to bring it within the means of a wider 
circle of readers. 



form for Subscribers, 

To Messrs. LOVELL EEEVE & CO., Ltd., 
6, Henrietta Street, 

Covent Garden, 

London, W.C. 

Please to forward cop of Dr. A. G. Butler's " Foreign 

Pinches in Captivity," in Cloth, at £4 14s. Bd., for which I enclose 
remittance. 



Name 
Address 



Date 




BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F. R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, froni Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En. 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnasan 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common specieB. By F. Townsend, it. A., F.L.8. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Benkelet, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates,"21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Chakles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S. , &c, &c. New 
Edition, entirelv revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. fid. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. Jtf. J. BKUKr-xEY, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worth jngton G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Cukrey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 

BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE2E. By 

George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. I). Hookkk, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 
Australian Territory. By' G. Bentham, F.R.S. , F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.K.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. • Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants of 
the Cape Colony, Caflraria, and Port Xaial. By W. 11. Hakvut and 

0. W. Sondes, and continued by Sir W. T. Thisem-on-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. 

1. — III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24*. Vol. V., 
Part I., 9s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Danibi. Oliver, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25*. 6d. 
Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. Vol. VII., 27*. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25*. 0d. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA: a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FxiORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Geisebach. F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hookee C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science,' at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 



LOVELL REEVE <fc CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden 



the species was Mr. David Douglas, about 1826 ; at that 
time it was believed to be only a form of C. florida, and it 
was not recognised as distinct till it was rediscovered by 
Mr. Thomas Nuttall, some ten years later, during a journey 
to the Pacific coast. Id the 1837 elephant folio edition of 
the Birds of North America, which consists of plates only, 
t, 367 is devoted to Columba fasciata, with which is asso- 
ciated a branch of this Cornel. In the 1842 edition of the 
same work, which is accompanied by letterpress, Audubon 
explains his indebtedness to his friend Nuttall for the infor- 
mation that the berries of this hitherto uncharacterised tree 
form a staple food of this particular pigeon. In publishing 
the technical description added by Nuttall to his notes, 
Audubon took the opportunity to dedicate the species to his 
friend. 

There is no indication that seeds of C. Nuttallii reached 
England at the time of its discovery by Douglas, but we 
learn from Audubon that on its rediscovery by Nuttall seeds 
were transmitted to Lord Ravensworth, and further, that 
information had reached America that these seeds had 
germinated. In spite, however, of its introduction seventy 
years ago, C. Nuttallii has never been common in this 
country, and it certainly is not so amenable to the artificial 
conditions of cultivation as most of the dwarfer Cornels are. 
During the spring of 1909, however, the species flowered at 
Kew, in the garden of Mr. B. E. C. Chambers at Haslemere, 
and with Messrs. Veitch & Sons at Coombe Wood. The 
Kew plant, from whieh our main figure has been made, was 
purchased from a French nurseryman in 1004, and is now 
5 ft. high and quite healthy ; during the past season it has 
made shoots 1 to 1 J ft. long. It is growing in a sandy loam 
to which some peat and decayed leaves have been added. 
Our experience with this Cornel has not been sufficiently pro- 
longed to justify a dogmatic statement as to its treatment, 
but we should recommend for it a well-drained loamy soil 
abundantly reinforced with decayed leaves— the ordinary 
" leaf-soil " of the gardener, a sunny, sheltered position, and 
attention to the matter of watering whilst the plants are young 
and the root system is not extensive. A heavy cold soil is 
probably as ill-suited for it as a very dry sandv one. Perhaps 
the finest plant of C. Nuttallii in' this country is one in the 
garden of Mr. Chambers, who supplied from it the fruit 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 64, APRIL, 1910. 



Tab. 8307.— TYPHONODORUM LINDLEYANUM, Madagascar. 
8308.— SAXIFRAGA GRISEBACHII, South East Europe. 
8309— RHODODENDRON HARROVIANUM, Western China. 
8310.— DIPELTA FLORIBUNDA, China. 
8311.— CORNUS NUTTALLII, Western North America. 

Lovell Rekvk; & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemslky. 

MONOGRAPHS 

From the Third Series of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descrip- 
tions, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may be had separately. Price* 
from Is. to 51s. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANICAL RLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 




52s. 



NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISF.LTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. 1., 30s. ; Sect. IL, 27s. Vol. V., 25*. 6J. Vol. VII., 27s. ««*• Vol. 

25s. 6d. 

Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. IV., Sect. I., Part VI., 13s. 6d. Vol. IV., Sect. I., complete, 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By HARVEY and BONDER. 

The Continuation edited by Sir \V T THISELTON'-DYER, F.R.S. 
VoL IV. , Sect I., Part I., B,. , I> arts IL and nj r>J 6(i> each . Parts IV. & V., 8s each- 

Vol. IV., Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., fart 1 9 71 Um. Vol. VIL, 33s. 

Publiahed under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good *oV, 

Natal and Transvaal. 



L0VBLL RsEVE * Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. ^^_ 

L05D05 : PF.IKTKD BY WILUA* CLOW* AND~ SONS. VBK, MJO STREET. STAMFORD STREBT, «•» 



dfourtf) Sttits. 

No. 05. 



VOL. VI.— MAY. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 4-s. 



OR No. X4T0 OF ,HK KNT1KK WOEE. 

C U B T I S ' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KK\\\ 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, G.I.E., LL.D., F.R.S., 

tBtrrrtor, Bona I Botanic fiarnrns, Hcto. 



-"-*«va* 




i#»— <sfci*L. 




IF \ i 




<•.;?■. 



■ 



Vat lire in her best attire 
Pours forth sweet odours anil alluring sights, 
And Art with her contending doth u 
To excel the natural with made delights. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN UOVKBNMB 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVKXT GARDEN'. 

1910. 

[A 11 rights reserved.] 
(Entered at the New York Post Office as secotrd-class viatter.) 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



MATERIALS FOR A FLORA OF THE MALAYAN PENINSULA. 

By H. N. Ridley, M.A., F.R.S., Director of Botanic Gardens, Singapore. 
Complete in Three Parts, 30s. 



CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND OF THE ADJACENT PORTIONS OF GARHWAL AND TIBET. 
By Lt.-Gey. Sir Richard Strachey and J. F. Dutiiie. 5s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATICiE OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations 
of their names. By the Rev. Prof. G. Henslow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. Qd. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
"With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BE NT HAM, F. R. S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 
Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9*. 

LOVELL REEVE k CO, Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



mn 







Heev,, 



Tab. 8312. 

CYMBIDIUM ixsigne. 

Annarn. 

Orchidaoeae. Tribe Vandeae. 
Cymbiditw, Swartz; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 530. 



Cymbidium insigne, Rolfe in Gai^d. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxv. p. 387; Oreh. Rev. 
1904, p. 230 ; 1906, p. 175 ; Rev. Hort. 1907, pp. 495, 496, fig. 166, et ic. OoL ; 
he Jardin, 1907, p. 309, fig. 170; Rev. Hort. Beige, 1907, p. 53, ic. col.; Diet. 
Ic. Orch, Cymb. t. 10; affine G. yrandifloro, Griff., sed floribus minoribuK 
dilute roseis et labello suborbiculari distinctum. 

Ilerba; pseudobulbi ovoidei, 6-7 cm. longi. Folia elongata, lineari-oblonga, 
acuta, subcoriacea, - 5-l m. longa, I '8-1*5 cm. lata, basi latiora, con- 
duplicata. Scapi suberecti, 0' 75-1" 25 m. longi, vaginis lanceolatis acutis 
obtecti; racemi multiflori. Bracteae ovatae, acutae, 5 mm. longae. I'>di- 
celli 5-6 cm. longi. Flares speciosi. Sepala et petala patentia, subaequalia, 
elliptico-oblonga, subacuta, dilute rosea, 4-5 cm. longa, apice subrecurva. 
Labellum suborbiculare, trilobum, 3-5-4 cm. longum, dilute roseum, pur- 
pureo-maculatum, lobis lateralibus erectis subincurvis apice rotundatis, 
lobo intermedio suborbiculari obtuso vel emarginato, disco villoso et oallis 
geminis velutinis luteis a basi fere ad apicem instructo. Oolumna clavata, 
incurva, 2*5 cm. longa. — Cymbidium Sanderi, Hort. Sander ex Gard. 
Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. pp. 108, 115, fig. 49; Garden, 1905, vol. Ixviii. 
p. 1, 1. 1277.— E. A. Eolfb. 



The handsome Cymbidium here depicted, which is 
perhaps the most beautiful member of* the genus, was 
first met with in Annam by Mr. Gr. Bronckart in February, 
1001, growing along ravines and in sandy soil at elevations 
of from 4,000 to 5,000 ft. above sea-level. Later in the 
year one of Bronckart's specimens, accompanied by an 
excellent painting of the plant, was presented to Kew by 
Mr. G. Schneider ; on these the original description of the 
species was based. According to Bronckart's field note 
the plant as met with by him is always terrestrial; the 
spikes in wild plants are from 3 to 4J ft. in length and 
bear each from ten to fifteen light-red flowers. Living 
plants were subsequently sent to this country. In 1904 
the species was again met with in Annam by Mr. W. 
Micholitz when exploring on behalf of Messrs. Sander & 
Sons, and again dried specimens, with spikes said by 
May, 1910. 



Mr. O'Brien to give evidence of having had seven or 
eight flowers, and living plants once more reached this 
country. The plants of this second consignment were 
distributed under the name C. Sanderi, which name, 
however, cannot now be taken up. In February, 1908, a 
fine flower spike was presented to Kew by Mr. J. Gurney 
Fowler, from a plant in his collection at Grlebelands, South 
Woodford, and a living specimen which flowered at Kew 
in March, 1909, and from which our illustration was 
prepared, was presented to the collection by Messrs. Sander. 
The colour of the sepals and petals varies in cultivated 
plants from white to rose, and there are forms in which 
the spots on the labellum are even darker than is shown 
in our plate. The species thrives well under the treatment 
that best suits C. grandiflorum and C. Tracy anum ; the 
temperature of a warm greenhouse, a compost consisting 
of two parts fibrous loam and one part leaf soil with a 
sprinkling of silver sand and small potsherds. Liberal 
supplies of water should be afforded whilst growth is being 
made; thereafter the soil should be kept dry for a few 
weeks. 

Description— Herb ; pseudobulbs ovoid, 2|-3 in. long. 
Leaves elongate, linear oblong, acute, lg-3J ft. long, 6-8 
lin. wide, rather wider at the base, conduplicate. Scapes 
suberect, 2J-4 ft. long, clothed with lanceolate acute 
sheaths ; racemes many-flowered ; bracts ovate, acute, 
2 1 lin. long; pedicels about 3 lin. long. Flowers hand- 
some ; sepals and petals spreading, subequal, elliptic-oblong, 
subacute and somewhat recurved at the tip, pale rose, lf-2 
in. long. Lip suborbicular, 3-lobed, l|-lj in. long, pale 
rose with purple blotches ; lateral lobes erect, rounded and 
somewhat recurved at the tip, mid-lobe suborbicular, obtuse 
or emarginate, the disk villous and bearing two yellow 
velvety thickened lines extending from the base almost to 
the tip. Column clavate, incurved, 1 in. long. 



Fig 1 crests of the labellnm ; 2, column ; 3, anther-cap ; 4, pollinia ; 5, sketch 
ot a plant, showing habit:— all enlarged except h, which u much reduced. 



sm 




K.S.daLJ.'N.Fitd\Hth. 



wtsw*****" 1 *** 



l.Reevs & Cf L onion. 



Tab, 8313. 

PRIMULA Forrkstii. 

Western China. 

PRIMULACEAE. Tribe PRIMULEAE. 

Primula, Linn. ; Smth. et Ihok.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. G31. 



Primula Forrestii, BaJf.f. apud Forrest in Not. Boy. Bat. Oard. Ed in. VMS, 
pars six. p. 228, cum icon.; affinis P. Imllatac, Franco., sed braoteis, 
pedicellis, calyce et corolla baud aureo-farinosis differt. 

Ilerba perennis, 15-90 cm. alta, corolla excepta undiquc dense glanduloso- 
pubescens. Bliizoma elongatum, crassum, lignosum, apice foliorum anno- 
tinorum vestigiis obtectum. Folia omnia radicalia, cbartacei, irregolariter 
duplo-crenata vel vix duplo-dentata, juvenilia, subtus snlpliurea mox viri- 
descentia; infima reflexa, ovato-elliptica, apice obtusa, basi rotnndata vel 
cuneata, 3 "5-5 cm. longa, 1 '5-8*8 cm. lata; petioli compressi 3-4 cm. 
longi ; superiora erecta, oblonga elliptico-oblonga vel ovato-oblonga, 
apice obtusa, basi cordata vel subtruncata, 5-11 cm. Ionga, 2 • 5-5 "5 em. 
lata; petioli supra plani, subtus convexi, 6-J cm. longi. Scapi erecti, 
robusti, 8-23 cm. longi, folia aequantcs vel superantes, umliclluin sim- 
plicem multifioram gerentes. Flores sulfurei; pelicelli 1-4 cm. longi; 
bracteae foliaceae, late lanceolatae. Calyx campanulatus, 10 mm. lonp;us, 
lobis ovatis apice rotundatis 3 mm. longis. Corollae tubus basi cylindricus, 
superne infundibuliformis, 14 mm. longus, fauce saturate aurantia co ; 
limbus 2 cm. diametro, lobis luteis late obcordatis. Capsula ovoidea, calyce 
inclusa. — W. G. Craib. 



The figure of the handsome Primula which forms the 
subject of our plate has been prepared from material 
supplied in May, 1909, by Bees, Limited, by whom the 
species was introduced to cultivation through their collector, 
Mr. Gr. Forrest, whose name has been associated with the 
plant by Professor Bayley Balfour. The species was met 
with by Mr. Forrest on the eastern flank of the Likiang 
range in North-western Yunnan at from 9,000 to 11,000 
it. above sea-level. According to him, it is usually found 
growing in the crevices of dry shady limestone cliffs, it 
has a long, very tough woody rootstock, with a much 
tapering base, reaching a total length of 2-3 ft., only 
2-3 in. being enclosed in the rock. The free portion is 
pendulous, except for a few inches at the tip, where it turns 
outwards and upwards, the upper two-thirds being clothed 
with the remains of the leaves of former years which, at 
the apex, form a dense matted mass. This extensive cover- 
ing, taken in conjunction with the fact that behind the 
larger specimens the rock has been scored and worn into 
Mat, 1910. 



grooves over an incli deep by the motion of the whole 
plant in the breeze, seems to indicate that some individuals 
must reach a considerable age. P. Forrestii in habit 
greatly resembles P. bracteata, Franch., and P. bullata, 
Franch., both of which also affect limestone rocks, and to 
both of which it is morphologically very nearly allied. 
From the former our species is readily distinguished by 
the corolla tube exceeding the calyx, by the longer scapes, 
and by the cordate bases of its larger upper leaves ; from 
the latter it is easily separated owing to the fact that the 
bracts, pedicels and calyx are not farinose. The leaves 
when young are sulphur-yellow on the underside, but 
become green beneath as they mature. The plants growing 
at Kew have proved healthy in a cold frame ; whether 
they may prove hardy in the open it is not yet possible 
to say. They have thriven well in a loamy soil, forming a 
many-crowned tuft. 

Description. — Herb, perennial, 6 in. to 3 ft. high, 
densely covered with glandular hairs except on the corolla. 
Rootstock long, stout and woody, clad, especially at the 
apex, with the remains of old leaves. Leaves all radical, 
chartaceous, irregularly twice crenate or almost toothed, 
when young yellow, soon becoming green, beneath ; the 
lowest reflexed, ovate-elliptic, ohtuse with base cuneate or 
rounded, l±-2 in. long, §-l£ in. wide, the petioles com- 
pressed, 1{~H in. long ; the upper erect, oblong, elliptic- 
oblong, or ovate-oblong, obtuse with base subtruncate or 
cordate, 2-4| in. long, 1-2| in. wide, the petioles flattened 
above, convex beneath, 2J-3^ in. long. Scapes erect, stout, 
3-0 in. long, as long as or longer than the leaves ; umbels 
simple, many-flowered. Flowers sulphur-yellow with a 
deep orange eye; pedicels J-l£ in. long; bracts wide 
lanceolate, leafy. Calyx campanulate, 5 lin. long; lobes 
ovate with rounded tips, under 2 lin. long. Corolla with 
a tube 7 lin. long, cylindric at the base, funnel-shaped 
upwards, throat deep orange ; limb f in. across, lobes 
widely obcordate, sulphur-yellow. Capsule ovoid, enclosed 
in the calyx. 

Fig 1, calyx and pistil ; 2, the same, calyx in section; 3, section of corolla ; 
4 and 5, anthers -.—all enlarged. 



sm 




M.S. del J.N.FitcJUitH. 



Ifincerut HroQksX'ay 



ScSonU^-P 



L.TReeire &. C? JLojidon... 



Tab. 8314. 
NOTHOFAGrUS Antarctica, var. uliginosa. 

Temperate South America. 



CUPULIFEBAE. Tribe QUERCINEAE. 

Xotiiofagus, Blume, Mus. Bot. Lugd.-Bat. vol. i. p. 307.— Fagus, Linn., sect. 
Nothofagus, Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. in. p. 410. 



Nothofagus antarctica, Oersted in Vidensk. Sehk. 8k. ser. 5, toL ix. p. 354 ; 
Be Wildeman, Voy. Belgica, p. 73; Duseti hi Svensk. Sxped. Maftil. vol. ii/. 
n. 5, p. 198 ; Elwes <fc Henry, Trees of Great Brit. & Ireland, vol iii. p. 553, 
t. 202, f. 1 ; var. uliginosa, Beiche, Beitr. Chil. Buchen, p. 11 ; Macloskie in 
Rep. Princeton Univ. Exped. Patag. vol. viii. p. 328; E lives & Henry, I.e. 
p. 554; a typo foliis utrinque pilis minutis erectis vestitis differt. 

Arbor interdum magnum vel in montibus arbuscula vel frutex; rami sparse 
albido-lenticellosi, juniores pilis erectis dense vestiti; gemmae ovoideae, 
leviter compressae, 3 mm. longae, glabrae, squamis paucis obtectae. Folia 
oblongo-ovata, elliptico-ovata vel ovata, l-2 - 5 em. ravius usque ad 4 cm. 
longa, 6 mm. -1*5 cm. rarius usque ad 2 - 5 cm. lata, apice rotundata, basi 
inaequalia, truncata vel leviter cordata, irregulariter crebreque crenuhito- 
denticulata, interdum obscure lobata, supra atro-viridia, infra pallidum, 
utrinque pilis minutis erectis vestita, primo plicata ; nervi paepius 
utrinque 4; petiolns 1-4 mm. longus, pubescens. Flora meuatii axillares, 
solitarii vel interdum geminati, breviter pedunculati. Periaidhium cam- 
panulatum, 4 mm. longum, saepe Sdobatum, lobis late ovatis circiter 
2 mm. longis uno saepius ceteris miuori parce ciliatis. Stamina 10-29, 
exserta; antberae lineari-oblongae, 2'5-3 - 5 mm. longae, conspicue apicu- 
latae. Floresfeminrt, axillares, sessiles. Fruclus involucrum 4-valvatum ; 
valvae oblongae, 5-6 mm. longae, parce ciliatac, quaque Bqnamia 3-5 trans- 
versis brevissimis scariosis rubidis praedita. Nucttlae 3, circiter 4 inm. 
longae, media 2-alata, laterales 3-alatae. — Fagus antarctica, Forstcr, var. 
uliginosa, A. DC. in DC. Prodr. vol. xvi. pars 2, p. 120; Bean in Kew Bull. 
1906, p. 381. F. idiginosa, Phil, ex A.DC. I.e.— S. A. Sean. 



The Southern Beeches, at one time considered congeners 
of the Northern ones, are now usually treated as belonging 
to a distinct genus, Nothofagus, which includes 17 species, 
whereof 8 are South American, 6 belong to the New Zealand 
flora, and 3 are Australian or Tasmanian. These southern 
species differ from the members of the northern genus 
Fagus in that the male flowers are solitary, geminate, or 
in threes, while the fruit, which is relatively small and 
contains 1-3 nutlets, usually has the 2-4 involucral valves 
with transverse entire toothed or lobed scales. They are 
evergreen or deciduous trees or shrubs with usually wry 
small leaves. 
May, 1910. 



Nothofagus antarctica is widely spread in temperate 
South America from lat. 38° S. to Tierra del Fuego, 
where, as in Patagonia, it and the evergreen N. betuloides 
are the dominant trees. But while JV. antarctica, in one 
or other of its forms, has several times been introduced to 
the gardens of Great Britain — its earliest introduction was 
effected by Sir Joseph Hooker, 70 years ago, when he was 
attached to the famous expedition under Sir James Boss 
in the " Erebus " and " Terror " — it never appears to have 
become permanently established in this country. A goodly 
number of fine examples of its natural companion, N. betu- 
loides, may be met with in the milder parts of the British 
Isles, but of N. antarctica itself there are few. Indeed, if 
we except the young trees raised from seed brought from 
Chili by Mr. H. J. Elwes in 1902, there is but one well- 
known specimen ; this grows at Hafodunos in Denbighshire, 
and is believed to be over 30 years old. From this it 
would seem as if the species is not altogether adapted to 
our climate. Yet the young trees in the collection at Kew 
are growing with remarkable vigour, and passed through 
the trying winter of 1908-9 without injury. 

According to Mr. Elwes, N. antarctica is the commonest 
species met with by him, during his South American 
journey, at high elevations on both sides of the Chili- 
Argentine frontier. He found it associated with Araucaria 
at 4,000 ft. above sea-level, and it occurs frequently in 
marshy situations on the plain of Valdivia. The variety 
here figured is known in Chili as " Mere." It forms a 
dense scrub on the Argentine side of the frontier; near the 
Baths of Chillian it goes up to 7,000 ft. or even higher, 
and covers the summits of the mountains round Lake 
Nahuel-huapi up to 6,000 ft. When seen here by Mr. 
Elwes in the month of February the leaves bad turned a 
brilliant red. This variety was again met with by the 
Princeton University Expedition growing in Patagonian 
swamps and in woods at Chubut in the Argentine Andes. 
The individual which supplied the material on which our 
figure is based was raised from seed collected by Mr. Elwes 
near Lake Meliquina. It is now a small tree, 16 ft. high ; 
it flowered very freely in a clump of heaths near the 
Pagoda at Kew in May, 1909. The plants at Kew are 
grown in various soils; those in the average sandy loam 



with which a little peat has been mixed thrive best. Our 
young trees are of rather thin, open habit, making, at present, 
annual shoots 1-3 ft. in length. Their distichous mode of 
branching adds to the peculiar elegance and distinctiveness 
of their appearance. Propagation is readily effected by 
means of layers, but it is doubtful whether trees so raised 
will make such well-grown specimens as those obtained 
from seed. 

Description. — Tree, often of considerable size; at high 
elevations a small tree or shrub ; branches sparingly wliite- 
lenticelled ; twigs densely covered with erect hairs ; buds 
ovoid, somewhat compressed, under 2 lin. long, glabrous, 
with few scales. Leaves oblong-ovate, elliptic-ovate, or 
ovate, ^-1 in., rarely 1^ in. long, 3-8 lin., rarely 1 in. wide, 
tip rounded, base unequal, truncate or slightly cordate, 
irregularly closely crenate denticulate, occasionally ob- 
scurely lobed, dark green above, paler beneath, with 
minute erect hairs on both sides, plicate when young ; 
nerves usually 4 on each side, petiole 2 lin. long or less, 
pubescent. Male flowers axillary, solitary or occasionally 
geminate, shortly peduncled. Perianth campanulate, 2 lin. 
long, often 5-lobed ; lobes wide ovate, sparingly ciliate, 
about 1 lin. long, one usually smaller than the others. 
Stamens 10-29, exserted ; anthers linear-oblong, 1-1| lin. 
long, distinctly apiculate. Female flowers axillary, sessile. 
Fruit with a 4-valved involucre ; valves oblong, about 
3 lin. long, sparingly ciliate, each with 3-5 very short 
transverse scarious reddish scales. Nutlets 3, about 2 lin. 
long, the central 2-winged, the two lateral 3-winged. 



Fig. 1, portion of a leaf; 2, male flowers ; 3, stamen ; 4, bract; 5, perianth 
of a female flower ; (5, the same, laid open ; 7, ovaries, the involucre removed ; 
8, fruit, showing involucre and nutlets; !), nutlet:— all enlarged. 



8315 




l.lS.del.J.N.HwWitk 



jtoJ^&Sanl**^ 



L.Heeve JcC .London. 



Tar. S3 15. 
CORNUS Florida, var. rubra. 
Eastern North America, 

COBNACEAE. 

Coiuvas, Linn. ; BentL et Ilooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 950. 



Cornus florida, Linn. Sp. PL 117; var. rubra, Eort, Parsons; Btv. If mi. 
1894, p. 600; spades O. NuttaUii, Audub., et C. Kousae, Baerg., proximo 

acceiens, ab hac tamen bracteis amplioribus baud acumiuatis t'oliisqiic 
majoribus facile distinguenda, ab ilia involuoris aimotinis statiin sejun- 
guenda. 

Arbor duruosa sylvestris interum 10-metraIis, culta potius arbuscula 4-5-metra- 
lis, ramis patentibus; raniuli teretes, rubescentes, mox glabrescentea 
Folia lata elliptica ovatave, apice breviter acuminata, utrinque sed prac- 
sertim subtus pubescentia, 7 '5-12 "5 cm. longa, 4-7 '5 cm. lata, Bupra 
saturate viridia, subtus pallidiora glaucescentia. Bracteae involucrautcs 
saepissime 4 per autnmnum genitae, ])er hicmem capitulum terminate 
foventes, primo vere inflorescentes deniquc aestate incuute plane cvolutac 
inflorescentiam speciosam 7*6-11*5 cm. latam praebentes; Bingulae pete- 
loideae, obcordatae, 3-5 cm. longae, roseae nerris parallelis saturatioribus 
notatae, apice emarginato plus minusve deflexac. Floret 6 mm. long] in 
capitulum densum l - 3 cm. latum aggrcgati. Calycis lobi 4, obtusi, 
pubescentes. Corollae lobi 4, liguiiformes, apice Iutescentc excepto virides, 
pubescentes. Stylus columuai'is ; siigma tniucatum. Fritctut ovoideos, 
1'3 cm. longus, maturitatc rubescens; caro tenuis, farinulcnta ; semina 
pro quaque pyrene 1 vel 2. — W. J. Bban. 



Cornus florida, according to Sargent, is one of the 
commonest and most generally distributed of deciduous 
trees and shrubs in the Middle and Southern United States. 
and occurs at all elevations from sea-level to nearly the 
summits of the higher Alleghany Mountains. The type, 
figured in 1801, at t. 526 of this work, has been in England 
nearly 200 years. It was in the nursery of Thos. Fairchild 
at Hoxton in 1730 ; nine years later it was in the Chelsea 
Botanic Garden. The variety figured, which is rare in a 
wild state, was first introduced by Messrs. Parsons, of 
Flushing, New York. The material for our figure was 
supplied by Mr. B. E. C. Chambers, from his garden at 
Grayswood Hill, Haslemere, which contains a remarkable 
assemblage of rare trees and shrubs, admirably cultivated. 
May, 1910. 



The only other cultivated Cornels with which C. florida is 
likely to he confused are C. Nuttallii, Audub., figured at 
plate 8311 of this work, and the Japanese C. Kousa, Buerg. 
The former is distinguished by the flower-heads not being 
enclosed by the involucre during winter, and by the usually 
more numerous bracts with acute, but not deflexed, apices. 
C. Kousa differs from both in its smaller ovate-lanceolate, 
acuminate bracts, and in its smaller leaves. 

The bark of C. florida, officinally known as " Dogwood 
Bark," yields cornine, a bitter principle which has astringent, 
tonic and stimulative properties. It was at one time valued, 
especially in America, in intermittent fevers. 

Cornus florida is unlikely to occupy an important place 
in English gardens, except, perhaps, in the more favoured 
ones of the south and west. In Ireland, South Wales and 
in the west of Scotland it ought to succeed in many places; 
and in those favoured regions few more beautiful shrubs pan 
be grown. At Kew it succeeds only under protection. 
Mr. Chambers informs us that his plant of var. rubra is now 
10 ft. high and 8J ft. through, and that it is much more 
floriferous and lasts a longer time than the ordinary white- 
" flowered " type. It is grown in open sandy loam fully 
exposed to the sun. 

Description.— Tree, of bushy habit, occasionally 40 ft. 
high in a wild state, usually a wide-spreading bush less than 
15 ft. high under cultivation. Young brandies terete, glab- 
rescent, tinged with red. Leaves broadly elliptic or ovate, 
pubescent on both surfaces, especially beneath, 3-5 in. long, 
l.J-3 in. yide, dark green above, pale and glaucescent 
beneath, with a short acuminate apex. Involucre terminal, 
forming in autumn and enclosing the flower-head during 
winter, expanding in spring, reaching its fullest beauty in 
May, when it has become 3-4 1 in. across. Bracts 4, petal- 
like, obcordate, 1^-2 in. long, 1 in. wide, parallel-veined, 
bright rosy red, apex notched and decurved. Flowers 
3 hn. long, produced in a crowded head \ in. across. Calyx- 
lobes 4, pubescent, obtuse. Corolla-lobes 4, ligulate, pubes- 
cent, green, tipped with yellow. Style columnar, with a 
truncate stigma. Fruit an ovoid drupe \ in. long, red when 
ripe ; flesh thin, mealy ; stone containing one or two seeds. 

! I. flowers: 2. BeetiaQ ofcatyi and pistil ; :; mid 4, anthers :—nll enlarged, 




MLS del. J.N. Faic^. W 



Vi^entBrook^ay&SarvLt^ 



Tab. 8316. 
ACANTHOPANAX Henrti. 

West China. 



Araliaceae. Tribe Sohxpflebeak. 

Acanthopanax, Miq.\ Benth. el Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 398; Ba 
Engl, & Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenf. vol, iii. pars K, p. 49. 



Acanthopanax Henryi, /farms in Engl. & Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenf. vol. iii. 
pars 8, p. 50; Hemsl. in Jour/t. Linn. 8oc. vol. xxxvi. p. 45] ; C. K. Schnt id* r, 
111. Handb. Laubholzk. vol. ii. p. 424; affinis A. leucorrhizo, Harms, Bed 

foliolis supra scaberulis infra (saltern ad nervos) subvillosulis acutis v< I 
breviter acivruinatis minute dentatis, pedunculis pedicellisque robustioribus 
brevioribus distincta. 

Fritter, 2 m. vel ultra altus; rami citissime glabrati, aculeis e basi longitudina- 
liter elongata subito conicis compressis saepe recurvis armati. Folia 
5-, raro 3-foliolata; petiolus 3-5*5 cm. longus, primo magis minusve 
villosulus, deinde praeter apicem glabratus ; foliola oblanceolata vel late 
lanceolato-ovata, acuta vel breviter acuminata, basi saepe cuneatim in 
petiololum 3-6 mm. longum attenuata, integra vel saepius a medio arete 
minuteque (rarius magis conspicue) dentata, intermedium G-12 cm. 
longum, 2-5-3 (rarius 4) cm. latum, supra saturate viridia, scaberula, 
infra pallidiora, magis minusve (imprimis ad nervos) villosula, nervis 
utrinque circiter 7. Vmbdlae ad apices ramorum subumbellatim cou- 
gestae; terminalis cactera longe praecedens, multiflora, densa, 1 • 5-3 cm. 
diametro, pedunculo robusto subglabro vel villosulo vel subtomentoso, 
2 - 5-3'5 cm. longo suffulta ; pedicelli sub anthesi 9-12 mm. longi, eodem 
indumentum ac pedunculi induti, inarticulati. Ovarium glabrum vel 
magis minusve villosulum, obovoideum, sub antbesi 1-2-5 mm. longum; 
discus 1-5-2-5 mm. diametro. Petala ovarium aequantia vel subaeqnantia. 
Styli florum fertilium 1-5-2-2 mm. longi, connati ; stigmata punctiformia. 
Baccae demum nigrae, globosae, 'J-10 mm. diametro. — Eleutherococcus 
Henryi, Oliv. in Hook. lc. PI. xviii. t. 1711; Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. 
vol. xxiii. p. 341.— 0. Stapf. 



The Acanthopanax here figured was first discovered in 
Hopeh, Central China, by Mr. A. Henry, and was intro- 
duced to cultivation by Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons through 
their collector, Mr. E. II. Wilson. From one of -the plants 
raised by Messrs. Veitch in their nursery at Ooombe Wood 
and obtained from them for the Kew collection in 1 !)();">, 
May, 1910. 



the material for our illustration has been taken. This 
plant is now 5 ft. high and as much through, with stout, 
straight thorny branches and of sturdy rather than graceful 
habit. As a shrub for gardens it is, on the whole, more 
curious than beautiful ; at the same time, the foliage is 
handsome and the globose heads of inky black fruits are 
striking. The leaflets are variable as regards shape and 
degree of pubescence. The flowers are not particularly 
attractive ; they do not appear, as a rule, until August and 
September. The fruits ripen in October and continue 
until Christmas. The plant succeeds well in ordinary 
loamy soil and may safely be deemed hardy. The bark 
of the root is employed in China as a drug. 

Description. — Shrub, 5 ft. or more in height, branches 
soon becoming glabrous, armed with flattened, abruptly 
conical often recurved thorns with longitudinally expanded 
bases. Leaves 5-, rarely 3-foliolate ; petiole l|-2 in. long, 
at first more or less puberulous, soon becoming glabrous 
except near the tip ; leaflets oblanceolate or wide lanceolate- 
ovate, acute or shortly acuminate, often narrowed at the 
base into a petiolule 2-3 lin. long, entire or often from the 
middle onwards closely finely serrate, occasionally more 
conspicuously toothed/ the central 1|— 5 in. long, 1-1J, 
rarely If in. wide, deep green and scaberulous above, paler 
and more or less pubescent especially in the nerves beneath ; 
lateral nerves about 7 on each side. Umbels clustered at 
the ends of the branches, the terminal much larger than the 
others, many-flowered, dense, J-2J in. across"; peduncles 
stout, almost glabrous or pubescent or somewhat tomentose, 
1-1J; in. long ; pedicels in flower 4-6 lin. long, with the 
same degree of pubescence as their peduncles, never articu- 
late. Ovary glabrous or more or less pubescent, obovoid, 
in flower £-l£ lin. long; disk %-l{ lin. across. Petals 
almost or quite as long as the ovary. Styles of the fertile 
flowers f-i lin. long or slightly longer,' connate ; stigmas 
minute. Berry black, globose, 4-5 lin. in diameter. 



1 Ig. 1, maie flower ; 2, calyx and pistil of a hermaphrodite ( 
with short styles; :-;, section of a female flower; I, calyx and pi 
pnrodite or female flower with long styles: 5, apyrene: 6, sceti 
7, embryo: — all enlarged. 



or female flower 
stil of a henna- 
section of the same; 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By Geokge Bentham, 
F. R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham s " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By Geokgk Bentham, F. R.S., President of the Linnaean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities bf the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., &c, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Eev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Ccrrey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINEiE. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. I). Hookek, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 
Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S. , F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published uuder the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W. H. Harvky and 
O. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. 
I.— III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., 
Part I., 9s. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 
and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6<i. 
Vol. VI., Sect. L, Part I., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 2os. 6<J. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auepicesof the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science,' at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 65. MAY, 1910. 

Tab. 8312.— CYMBIDirM TNsicXE, Annam. 
„ 8313.— PRTMULA FOBRESTII, Western Qkina, 
>t 8314.— 2TOTHOFAGTTS ANTARCTICA, vab. ULTGINOBi 

South America. 
t , 8315.— CORNUS FLORIDA, vab. RUBRA, Eastern Not 

America. 
„ 8316.— ACANTHOPANAX HENRYI, Weei China. 

Lovell Rekvk & Co. Ltd., R, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 




JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THI 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of ti 
Magazine by W. Bottino Hi.mnley. 

MONOGRAPHS 

From the Third Series of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

_ 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descri 
tiona, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may be had separately. r» 
from Is. to 51s. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANICAL PLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. Gd. and Is. each. L' st3 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 

NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I, to Ml.. 20s. each. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTOX-DYRK, F.R.S. 
Vol. IY., Sect. 1., 30s. , Sect. TI., 27.. Vol. V., 25s. M, Vol. VII., 27*. **• V " K V1 

25s. 6d. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. IV., Sect. I., P arfc VI., 13s. U. Vol. IV., Sect. L, complete, 52* 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to ML, 20s. each. 

By HARVEY and SONDER. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W T THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Vo VJ- 'iv ec V-' P TT t I :;/ s - ; Parts IL and m.. *• «<!• «*<*; Parts IV - & Jr 8s ^ Gh 

Vol. IV., Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., Part I 9- Vol VI 24*. Vol. VIL, 33*. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

Natal and Transvaal. 

Lovkli, Reevk & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street. Covent Garden. 

tOKDOK : PRIBTKD BY WIUU3I CL0WU6 «tB SOH8, LTU, M*J STREET. HAMfOW «**■* ** 



.jfourti) Series. 

No. 66. 



VOL. VI.— JUNE. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s. 



OR NO, 1480 OF THK KHT1KR WOHK. 

CUHTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

iSirmor, &oi»al Cotank diVarrirns, I^rto. 




-«*««k t*—J«i^. 







J,< \*. &*&#!' 



' There lavish Nature in her best attire 
Pours forth sweet odours and alluring sights, 
And Art with her contending doth aspire 
To excel the natural with made delights." 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

UBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVERNMENTS. 

6. HENRIETTA STREET, COVBNT GARDEN. 

1910. 

[All rights reserved.] 
(Entered at the New York Post Office as second-class matter.} 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 



CORAL AND ATOLLS, 

Their history, description, theories of their origin both before and since 
that of Darwin, the influence of winds, tides, and ocean currents on 
their formation and transformations, their present condition, products, 
fauna, and flora. 

By F. WOOD-JONES, B.Sc, F.Z.S. 

Numerous illustrations, plates and map. 24s. 

CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND OP THE ADJACENT PORTIONS OP GARHWAL AND TIBET. 
By Lt.-Gen. Sir Richaed Strachey and J. F. Duthie. 5s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATIC^ OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations 
of their names. By the Rev. Prof. G. Henslow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. Qd. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BURBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Bakeb, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F. R. S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 

BA0STEATI0I8 OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 

Drawn- by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bcntham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 

7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9*. 



LOVELL REEVE A CO, Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



8317 




V5ncanti3EOol*s,"Da.y& SanLifbmp 






Tab. 8317. 
AGAVE Fkanzosixi. 

Mexico or Central America. 

Amaryllidaoeae. Tribe Agaveae. 
Agave, Linn.', Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 733. 



Agave (Euagave) Franzosini, Nissen in Hort. ex Bicasoli, Delia Uiilita dei 
Giardini d'Acclimazione (1888), p. 7 (nomen); S^well in Gard. Chron. 
1889, vol. vi. p. 69 ; W. Wats, in Kew Bull. 1889, p 301 ; Bale, in Kern 
Bull. 1892, p. 3, et in Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. xii. p. 179, tig. 31 ; Berger in 
Gartenwelt, 1898, vol. ii. p. 603, c. icon.; species ex affinitate A. Ferae 
Cruris, Mill., sed differt foliis numerosioiibus niajoribus glaucissimis 
asperrimis, paniculaque magis elongata. 

Acaulis, rosnla maxima, stolonifera. Folia circiter 40, magna, erecta e'eganter 
recurvata, 2 25 m. longa, oblanceolata, superne canaliculata, rigida sed 
parum carnosa, saepe ad margines undulata vel varie flexa, basin versus 
sensirn attenuata et carnosiora, subtus valde convexa, supra medium 
35-41 cm. lata, sensim acuminata et in spinam validam conieam 6-7 cm. 
longam atro-brumieam breviter decurrentem abeuntia, glaucissima, sub sole 
aestivo albida vel caesia, utrinque asperrima et basin versus zonis vel arcis 
viridibus laevibus irregulariter maculata, ad margines parum sinuatos 
aculeis magnis atro-brunneis remotiusculis deltoideo-uncinatis vel patulis 
1-2 cm. longis armata. Ivflorescentia maxima, 11 "5 m. alta; scapus 
yalidus basi 27 cm. diametro, 2 "75 m. longus, glaucous, bracteis Taenia 
inferioribus foliaceis superioribus deltoideis subulato-acuminatis munitus; 
panicula 8 75 m. longa, 2 - 9 m. lata, oblonga, ramis numerous paten tibus 
viridibus superne repetite trichotnme divisis floras numerosos gerentibus ; 
bracteae parvae, deltoideae, reflexae ; pedicelli 1-2 cm. longi. Berianthii 
segmenta basi in tubuin ventrico^o-infundibuliformem 22 mm. longuin 
extra flavescentem continuata, superne libera, aurea, mox siccantia, 
32 mm. longa; exteriora superne liuearia, obtusa, planiuscula, interiora 
dorso carinata intus canaliculata. Stamina ad medium tubi affixa; 
nlamenta flavescentia, robusta, 8 cm. longa; antherae sulfureae, 4 cm. 
longae. Ovarium 5 cm. longnm, ;-!(-6)-ponum, laete et nitide viride, 
basin versus attenuatum, superne 13 mm. latum; stylus robustus trigonus, 
demum 12 cm. longus; stigma capitatuin, obscure trilobum. — A. Berger. 



The Agave which forms the subject of our illustration, 
which Mr. J. G.Baker terms " the prince of the Agaves," is 
ceriainly one of the noblest members of the genus, 
very distinctive whitish or bluish colour which shows to 
much advantage in strong sunlight, the vigour of its 
growth and the grace of its habit combine to render it a 
striking and delightful object. It is not certainly known 
whether its original home be Central America or Mexico, 
but it almost certainly came from one or other of these 
June, 1910. 



areas, and Mr. Yicenzo Rieasoli, in the place quoted above, 
gives Mexico as its home. It appears to have been intro- 
duced to Italy in the first instance by Mr. Francesco 
"Franzosini, in whose fine garden at Intra on Lago Maggiore 
there were plants prior to 1878, the year in which it was 
added by the late Sir T. Hanburv to his collection at La 
Mortola, where it flowered for the first time in 1889. Since 
then it has flowered repeatedly there, has always produced 
abundant seed, and has been widely distributed. It was 
first added to the collection of Agaves at Kew in 1890, when 
Sir T. Hanbury sent seeds to this establishment, which in 
1892 was further indebted to the same generous correspon- 
dent for a living plant. 

The plant from which the material employed in preparing 
our plate was obtained was a magnificent specimen in the 
garden at La Mortola, whose age was not much over 1 5 years. 
At the end of April it showed no sign of flowering, but in the 
middle of May the enormous peduncle began to appear, and, 
growing with great rapidity, reached its full size in about 
six weeks ; the first flowers began to open on the lowest 
branches on July 21st, and a fortnight later the material for 
our plate was available. 

A, Franzosini is easily propagated by suckers which soon 
grow into sturdy plants under the treatment suitable for 
A. Vera Cruz, and appears to be as hardy as that species. 
At La Mortola it seems to prefer the hottest situations ; it 
requires as much light as possible, and should not be kept at 
all damp, otherwise it is apt to become less glaucous and to 
lose much of its distinctive beauty. At Kew A. Franzosini 
thrives well under the treatment suitable to its nearest 
allies. 

Descriptions— Stem 0; rosette very large, in full-grown 
examples 15 ft. wide and 10-11 ft. high, with about 40 
somewhat recurved and gracefully bent, whitish or bluish- 
white leaves and many suckers. Leaves about 7£ ft. lpngi 
j> *> m thick at the base, convex on both sides, but especial y 
beneath, and there narrowed, 6£ in. wide, thence gradually 
becoming wider and thinner upwards, oblanceolate and 

J j m ' across wnen flattened out, but generally broadly 
and deeply channelled while still young and erect, the 
margins at tunes wavy, the apex ending in a strong conical 



subulate blackish -brown end-spine 2^-3 in. long, decurrent 
on the margins for 4-8 in.; the margins lower down 
bordered with spines and slightly or hardly repand between 
the spines ; those lowest down rather small and close set, 
3 lin. long and 8 lin. apart, deltoid uncinate, the next above 
larger, and f-1 in. apart; the upper spines about the middle 
of the leaf 2 in. apart, and sometimes with one or two 
smaller ones between them, deltoid-uncinate, recurved or 
spreading from a wide fleshy base, above the middle still 
larger, about § in. long, and from a more repand margin ; 
those near the tip standing as far apart, but again smaller; 
all blackish brown ; upper leaves in a flowering rosette 
shorter and narrower, the highest linear-lanceolate with a 
straight margin and sometimes with a continuous horny 
border ; both surfaces rough and whitish, but irregularly 
marked with small green patches or stripes, especially 
underneath. Inflorescence almost 40 ft. high ; scape stout, 
about 9 ft. long and 11 in. thick, with several empty bracts, 
the lowest leafy, the upper scaly, triangular with a subulate 
tip ; panicle oblong or cylindric-ovate, about 10 ft. across ; 
branches spreading, the lowest shortest, with small deltoid 
basal bracts, 2-3 times 3 -furcate upwards, many-flowered ; 
pedicels 5-10 lin. long; bracts very small, deltoid ; flowers 
over 4 in. (including the style over 7 in.) long. Perianth- 
segments united below in a globose or wide funnel-shaped 
tube; above free, linear, obtuse, sf/on withering, brightish 
yellow; the outer flat, 1£ in. long, the inner narrower, 
keeled without and channelled within. Stamens attached 
near the middle of the tube; filaments stout, yellowish, 
3 in. long ; anthers sulphur yellow, 1£ in. long. Ovary 
somewhat clavate, 3(-6)-anglel, smooth, bright green, 
2 in. long, narrovved at the apex; style very stout, 4^ in. 
long; stigma thickened, obscurely 3-lobed. 



Figs. 1 and 2, anthers ; 3, stigma ; 4, whole p!ant, showing habit : — 
1-3 enlarged, 4 much reduced. 



8918 




LReeve & 



Tab. 8318. 
FOUQUIERIA BPLENDENS. 

Northern Mexico and South- Western United States. 



FoUQUIERACEAE. 

Fouquieria, H. B.K.; Benth. et Hook. f. Oen. Plant, vol. i. p. 161; Engl. <fc 
Prantl, Nattirl. Pflanzenfam. vol. iii. p. 298 ; Kachtr. i. p. 251, ii. p. 228. 



Fouquieria splendens, Engelm. in Wis?. Mem. Tour Mex. p. 98 ; Kush in Bull. 
Torr. Bot. 01 «b, vol. xxx. p. 456 ; a speciebus caeteris filamentis supra basm 
squama munitis distiucta. 

Frutex spontaneus 2-6 m. altus, gJaber, a bad parce ramosus, rami's ad 
2 • 5 cm. crassis fere rectis spinosis sulcatis cortice laevi fusco vel aetate 
cinerascente obtectis. Folia ramorum longorum obovato- vel oblanceolato- 
oblonga, obtusa vel subacuta, basi in petiolum perbrevem attenuata, 
2-3 cm. longa, - 5-l cm. lata, ramorum abbreviatorum fasciculata, minora; 
petiolus costaeque ]mrs maxima demum induratue, persistens, spinam 
1-2-5 cm. longam patulam sistens. Jnflorexcentiae terminals— raro una 
altera ve axillaris, paniculatae, angusfae, 10-15 cm. Jongae, ncpe mulri- 
florae, ramis brevibus plerumque ad fascicules florum reductis, interdum 
fere omnibus unifioris; bracteae scariosae, cadncae; pediceIJi ad 5 mm. 
longi, saepe breves. Sepala late ovata vel suborbicularia, obtusissima, 
5-8 mm. Jonga, pallida, margine bya'ino. Corolla rubra; tubus rectus, 
superne sensim paulo ampliatus, 10-16 mm. longus; lobi late ovati vel 
suborbiculares, obtusi, recurvi vel revoluti, 4-5 mm. loogi Stamina 15, 
filamentis exsertis inaequilongis supra basin paulo diktats et intus 
squamula biloba extra pilosa instructis ; antherae 4 mm. lonpae, con- 
nectivo apiculato. Styli magis minusve alte coaliti. Oapnla 10-18 mm. 
longa, valvis crustaccis. Semina 7-8 mm. longa, alba, ala mox in pdod 
soluta basi ad 2 mm. lata circumdata. — 0. Staff. 

The genus Fouquieria, established in 1823 by Bon pin nd 
and Kunth, was five years later treated by the elder 
De Candolle as the type of a distinct natural family. In 
taking this step, De Candolle in reality only endorsed a view 
already suggested by the authors of the genus. Since then 
the affinities and the systematic status of Fouquieria have 
been carefully studied by several able taxonomists, whose 
conclusions have not always been in accord. One point 
which emerges from the discussion as indisputable is that the 
genus occupies a singularly isolated position. Having 
regard to this fact, and to the consideration that its relation- 
ships are by no means clear, it is more satisfactory to treat 
Fouquieria as the representative of an independent family. 

JtNE, 1910. 



The species here figured, F. splendent*, extends westwards 
from N.W. Texas through New Mexico and Arizona to 
Southern California, thence southwards to Lower California 
and the Mexican states of Coahuila, Chihuahua and Sonora. 
In the northern part of this area the plant is variously 
known as the Coach Whip, the Tine Cactus, Jacob's Staff; 
its Mexican name is the Ocotello. The bark contains a 
gum and a resin, and yields, in addition, the substance 
known as Ocotello Wax. " It makes an effective and almost 
impenetrable hedge, and, according to Dewey, it is some- 
times planted closely in line around a rectangle 10 ft. long 
and 5 across; an opening is left at one end, a covering 
of brush is laid on top, and the result is a hut such as 
Mexican families of the poorest class inhabit. 

The material from which our figure has been prepared 
was communicated by Mr. F. W. Moore from a specimen in 
the G-lasnevin collection. That plant is about 3 ft. m 
height, sparingly branched and strongly armed with stout 
thorns. The few roots are strong and woody ; the small, 
thin and delicate leaves are deciduous ; the indication there- 
fore is that the plant does not require much water or a 
moist atmosphere. It thrives well and is vigorous at 
Glasnevin in the Cactus house, in partial shade, with a 
minimum night temperature of 50°-52° F. ; it is grown in 
an 8-in. pot in loam, mixed with one-fifth finely broken pot- 
sherds and old mortar. In the growing season, March to 
October, it requires a fair amount of water, and has 
occasionally to be syringed ; during the dull winter months 
it needs very little water, and the atmosphere has to be 
kept dry so as to provide the marked period of rest which 
the plant demands. 

Description.— Shrub, in a wild state 6-20 ft. high, 
sparingly branched from the base, branches up to 1 in. thick, 
nearly straight, armed with spines, channelled and covered 
with smooth, at first tawny, at length ash-grey bark. 
Leaves of the long branches obovate- or oblanceolate-oblong, 
obtuse or subacute, narrowed at the base to a very short 
petiole, j-lj in. long, 3-5 lin. wide ; those of the short 
branchlets fascicled and smaller, their petioles and midribs 
ultimately hardening into long spreading persistent spines 
-5-1 in. long. Inflorescences usually terminal, casually one 



or more axillary, panicled, narrow, 4-6 in. long, generally 
many-flowered, on the short branches often reduced to 
fascicles of flowers, or sometimes almost all to single flowers ; 
bracts scarious, caducous ; longest pedicels 2-3 lin. long, 
often quite short. Sepals wide ovate or nearly orbicular, 
obtuse, 2^-4 lin. long, pule with hyaline margin. Corolla 
red ; tube straight, slightly widened upwards, 5-8 lin. long ; 
lobes wide ovate or nearly orbicular, obtuse, recurved or 
re volute, 2-2^ lin. long. Stamens 15, filaments exserted, 
unequal, slightly widened above the base and bearing there 
on the inner aspect a 2-lobed scale which is hirsute on the 
outer side ; anthers 2 lin. long ; connective apiculate. 
Styles more or less connate from below upwards. Capsule 
5-9 lin. long, valves crustaceous. Seeds 3£-4 lin. long, 
white, surrounded by a wing 1 lin. wide at the base, which 
soon breaks up into a fringe of hairs. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil ; 2, sepal ; 3 and 4, stamens ; 5, base of a filament ; 
6 and 7, anthers ; 8 and 9, transverse and vertical sections of an ovary : — 
all enlarged. 



8319 



I 







Tab. 8310. 
kalmia cuneata. 

Carolina. 

Ebicaceak. Tribe Ehodobeae. 
Kalmia, Linn.; Beuth. et Book./. Oen. Plant, vol. ii. ]). 59G. 



Kalmia cuneata, Mich.r, Ft. Bor. Amer. vol. i. p. 257 ; Nuttall, Gen. North Amer. 
PI. vol. i. p. 267; Saryent in Garden <fc Forest, vol. viii. p. 431, tip. (!0 ; 
affinis K. angutlifoliae, ) inn., sed foliis alternis (nee verticil latis) basi 
cuueato-atteuuatis vix petiolatis et subtus pilis glanduliferis obsitis facilo 
distinguitur. 

F'rutex ad 1 m. altus, ramis junioribns glfiiiduloso-pubernlis rubris demura 
glabris et atro-bninneis. Folia alterna, 2-5 cm. longa, 05-1 - 6 cm. lata, 
lauceolata vel oblanceolata, acuta vel olitusa, basi cuneato-attenuita, 
sessilia vel vix p. tiolata, supra glabra, atr )\iridia, subtus pilis minutjs 
glanduliferis couspersa, jallide viridia, decidua. Fiona fascicnlati. fasci- 
culis 2-6-floris infra foliis aggregates. Pedic-Jli 1*5-2 cm. lorifri, flliformee, 
pilis glanduliferis conspersi. Calyx profunde 5-lobus, glaber, viridis, 
rubro-marginatus ; lobi 2 "5 mm. lonj-'i, oblongi, obtusi, npiculati, mardni- 
l)iis reflexis. Corolla 1-1 "5 cm. diametro, late cupuliformis, bicviter 5-Ioba, 
basi 10-gibbo-a, glabra, extra bneis 5 g!anduloso-pubeso<utibus, alba, 
fimdo annulatim punctis rubris notata; lobi Jate deltoiileo-ovati, subacuti. 
Stamina 10, filatneutis basi pubescent i bus. Ovarium subglol>OMim, basi 
10-sulcatuni, p. lis minutis glauduliferis dense oLtertum: stylus • !-(;• "J mm. 
longus, glaber. OapttUu G mm. diametro, valvis 5 dirupta. — N. K. Brown. 



The beautiful shrub here figured was originally discovered 
in South Carolina by Michaux prior to 1803, and was again 
met with by Nuttall in the same region, in swamps between 
Camden and Statesville, some time before 1818. Nuttall 
found it also near Newborn in North Carolina, but this very- 
rare plant, which seems to be confined to Carolina, appears 
never to have been gathered, after Nuttall's time, until 
Mr. W. W. Ashe, of the State Geological Surve} r , met with 
it in a pine-barren swamp between the Cape Fear and Back 
rivers, some ten miles to the north-west of Whitehall in 
North Carolina, during the winter of 1893-04. In the 
summer of 1894 it was introduced, from this locality, into 
the collection of Mr. G. W. Vanderbilt at Baltimore, where 
it flowered in June, 1905. Since then this Kalmia has been 
collected in swamps in Bladen county, North Carolina. 
The plant from which the figure of K. cuneata now given 

June, 1910. 



lias been prepared is one of a large batch raised from seed 
presented to Kew, in January, 1904, by Professor Sargent of 
the Arnold Arboretum. The species, so far as can be judged 
from the experience of the past five winters, promises to be 
quite hardy. It has an erect habit, and flowers in July 
trom the upper portion of the preceding year's growth. At 
Kew it grows very well in the soil used for Ericaceous 
plants generally ; a sandy loam, devoid of calcareous matter, 
to which a proportion of peat has been added. Grown in a 
mass, K. cuneata produces a, very pleasing effect; it is, 
moreover, useful on account of its flowering so late in the 
season, when comparatively few shrubs remain in blossom. 

Description. — Shrub, 3-4 ft. high, young branches 
glandular-hairy and red, ultimately glabrous and dark 
brown. Leaves alternate, f-2 in. long, ]-£ in. wide, 
lanceolate or oblanceolate, acute or obtuse, cuneately 
narrowed at the base, sessile or very shortly petioled, 
glabrous and dark green above, beneath paler and with 
scattered minute glandular hairs, deciduous. Flowers 
clustered in fascicles of 2-6 below the leaves ; pedicels 
filiform with scattered glandular hairs. Calyx deeply 
5-Iobed, glabrous, green with red margins; lobes 1| lin. 
long, obtuse, apiculate, the margins refiexed. Corolla 
5-8 lin. across, widely cup - shaped, shortly 5-lobed, 
10-gibbous at the base, glabrous except for 5 lines of 
glandular hairs outside, white, with a ring of red dots at 
the base; lobes widely deltoid - ovate, somewhat acute. 
Stamens 10, filaments pubescent at the base. Ovary sub- 
globose, 10-grooved at the base, closely covered with minute 
glandular hairs ; style about 3 lin. long, glabrous. Capsule 
3 lin. wide, dehiscing by 5 valves. 

Fig. 1, a flower ; 2, the same, corolla and stamens removed ; 3 and 4, stamens ; 
5, ovary:— all tnlarytd. 



8320 




M.S.del.J.'N.Fitcklith 



Vin^ntB^D^S.nU'W 



■LT?eev» &^C°l,nr,Ar,T, 



Tab. 8320. 

SCUTELLARIA vjolacea. 

India and Ceylon. 

Labiatae. Tribe Stachydeae. 
ScDTELLARfA, Linn.; Batth. et Book./. Gen, Plant, vol. ii. p. 1201. 



Scutellaria violaeea, Heyne ex Wall. PI. As. Bar. *oi. i. p. 66j Benlh. Lab. 
Gen. et Sp. p. 429, et in DC. Prodi: vol. xii. p. 418 ; Wight, Lc. PL Jnd. Or. 
vol. iv. t. 1449; Thwaites, Enum. PI. Zeylan. p. 239; Book./. Fl. Brit. I ml. 
vol. iv. p. 668; Trim<>i<, Band-Book Fl. Ceylon, vol. iii. p. 382; Gard. Chron. 
19U4, vol. xxxv. p. 389; species S. discolori, Colebr., affinis, sed foliis 
saepissime ovatis et racemis brevioribus floribus oppositis facile dis- 
tinguenda. 

Ilerba perennis, e basi ramosa. Cables graciles, erecti, usque ad 6 dm. alti, 
pnberuli, ) arce ramosi, internodiis 3-4-5 cm. longis. Folia ovatn, 4-8 cm. 
longa, 3-5 cm. lata, subacuta vc4 breviter acuminata, basi c rda a vel 
rotundata, Fat grosse crenata vel interdum serrato-dentata, supra fere 
glaberrima, infra praesertim in venis piimariis puberula, tennia; petiolus 
gracilis, 3-6 cm. lonizus, breviter pubescens. Llacerni terminates, graciles, 
9-15 cm. longi, multiflori, saepe secundi, rbachido et pcdicellis breviter 
glanduloso-pubescentibus. Jiradeae ellipticae, obtusae, pedicelli dimfdio 
leviter longioies. Flora soliWii, oppositi, paribus circiter 1 cm. disjunctis. 
J'edicelli 2-3 mm. longi. Cahjr circiter 3 mm. longus, post aiitjiesm vafde 
accrescens, glandulo-o-pubescens, Jabiis brevissimis laiis supmoiis dono 
squama lata 1*6-2 mm. longa posiice alte concava pnedito. Corolla 
circi'er 1-8 cm. lon^a, violaeea, labi > inferiori macula alba notato ; tubus 
sat tenuis, basi valde curvatus, faucem versus gradatim dilatatus ; labium 
suierius circiter 5 mm. longum, trilobatum, lobo intermerlio maximo 
emaryinato; labium inferius rabJntegram vel ubuctue lobatum, sul>- 
orbiculare, 6-8 mm. longum lat unique. Stamina infra galeam iochiaa; 
anthorarum loculi lateraliter breviter ciliati. Ditcut antice \aldc gibbosns, 
superne parce glandulis sessilibus inslructus. A'ttcWaa oboroideae, minute 
tuberculatae. — 8. indica, Roxb. Hort. Beng. 45, et FL Ind. vol. iii. p. 24, 
lion Linn. & Jloribunda, Benth. in DC. Prodr. vol. xii. p. 4] 8.— 8. A.bKAM. 



Scutellaria violaeea, the species now figured, lias been in 
cultivation at Kevv since 1900, when plants were raised 
from seeds received from the Botanic Garden at Ilakgala, 
Ceylon. The nearest allies in the genus are S. discolor, Colebr., 
also an Indian species, and & indica, Linn., which, in spite 
of its name, is a Chinese plant. The former is, as a rule, 
readily distinguished from S. violaeea by the fact that its 
flowers are almost always scattered on the rachis, whereas 
in all the forms referred to S. violaeea they are opposite. 
The latter, which agrees with S. violaeea in having opposite 
flowers, appears to be always smaller in stature, in leaves 
and in flowers. In the wide sense in which S. violaeea is 
taken in the Flora of British India the species extends from 
June, 1910. 



the Nilgiri Hills in the Indian Peninsula, at elevations up to 
7000 ft,, southwards to Ceylon, and is represented in the 
Eastern Himalaya by a distinct variety. Even in its 
southern area, however, the variability in stature, in the 
hairiness and texture of the leaves, and in the size of the 
flowers is such that Sir Joseph Hooker recognises there 
three other varieties, all of which have at times been treated 
as distinct species. The form here depicted, which appears 
to be typical S. violacea, as cultivated at Kew, forms a fairly 
compact plant about a foot and a half in height, which 
flowers freely in a warm house about midsummer. As a 
pot plant it is most satisfactory when raised from cuttings 
every year, and when grown under the conditions suitable 
for the well-known S. javanensis, Jungh., and S. Ventenatn, 
Hook. 

Description. — Herb, perennial, branching from the base. 
Stems slender, erect, 1J-2 ft. high, puberulous, sparingly 
branching, the internodes lj-lf in. long. Leaves ovate, 
l|-3 in. long, 1^-2 in. wide, subacute or shortly acuminate, 
base cordate or rounded, rather coarsely crenate or at times 
serrately toothed, almost glabrous above, puberulous beneath, 
more especially along the main-nerves, thin ; petiole slender, 
l|-2^ in. long, shortly pubescent. Racemes terminal, 
slender, 3^-6 in. long, many-flowered, often secund, the 
mchia and pedicels shortly glandular-pubescent; bracts 
elliptic, obtuse, hardly as long as the pedicels. Flowers 
solitary, opposite, the pairs about 5 lin. apart; pedicels 
l-lj lin. long. Calyx about 1^ in. long, much enlarged 
after flowering, glandular-pubescent, lips very short and 
broad, the upper with a broad dorsal scale f-1 lin. long, 
deeply concave behind. Corolla about f in. long, violet 
with white blotches on the lower lip; tube rather slender, 
much curved below, gradually widening to the throat; 
upper lip about 1\ lin. long, 3-lobed, the central lobe 
largest, eroargmate ; lower lip suborbicular, nearly entire or 
obscurely lobed, 3-4 lin. across. Stamens hidden under the 
hooded^ upper lip; anther-cells shortly ciliate on the sides. 
Disk distinctly gibbous in front, sparingly beset above with 
sessile glands. Nutlets obovoid, minutely tubercled. 

Fig. 1, flower; 2, corolla-tube laid open, showing staminal insertion; 
3, antler ; -1, style ; 5, ovary and disk :— all enlarged. 



$321 




$321 




Tab. 8321. 

CIRRHOPETALUM biflorum. 

Java. 



Orchidackae. Tribe Epidendkeae. 

CIRRHOPETALUM, Lindl. ; Benth. et Ilook.f. Gen. riant, vol. ill. p. 504. 

Cirrhopetalum biflorum, J. J. Smith in Ic. Bogor. vol. ii. t. 120, fig. B ; Bperiei 
C. picturato, Lodd , proxima a quo scapis gracilibns mnlto brevioribus et 
bifloris, sepalis lateralibus longe attenuatis valde differt. 

Ihrba epiphytica. Jihizoma repcns, gracilius. Pscadobulbi aliquatenus dis- 
tantes, ovato-oblongi, tetragoni, circiter 3-4 cm. lonpi, monopbylli. Folia 
subsessilia, lance 'lata vel oblongo-lanceolata, subobtusa, coriacca, basi 
attenuata, 12-15 cm. longa, 2-2 ■ 5 cm. lata. Scapi gracilcs, sul>erocti, 
8-10 cm. longi, basi vaginis lanceolatis paucis obtecti, apice biflori. 
Bradeae ovato-lanceolatac, acuminatae, concavae, circiter 1 cm. longae. 
J'fdi'-elli patentes vel deenrvi, circiter 3 cm. longi. Florn magni, ppeciosi, 
piirpureo-punctati. Senium posticum elliptico- vel lanceolato-oblongnm, 
concavnm, longe setiferum ; limbus circiter 2 cm. longus, seta 1 cm. longa, 
saepe incurva; sepala lateralia lineari-Ianeoolata, longissime attenuata, 
8-9 cm. longa, dtcurva. Petala oblongo-lanceolata, brevissime tridentata, 
eciliata, circiter 6 mm. longa, dente medio interdum setifero. Labellnm 
recurvum, ovato-oblongum, subobtnsum, carnosum, eciliatum, circiter 
8 mm. longum. f'ohemna brevis, lata, edentata, basi in pedem atteimatnm 
inenrvum prodncta. — B>iUf,pl,yllum biflorum, Teij*m. et Binn. in NederL 
Kruidk. Arcbief. vol. iii. (1855) p. 397; Miq. Fl. Ind. Bit. vol. iii. p. (it7 j 
Feichb. f. in Walp. Ann. vol. vi. p. 262; J. J. Smith, Orch. Jav. p. 469.— 
R. A. Rolfe. 

A native of the mountains of Java, to which island it 
appears to be confined, tin's distinct species, which was dis- 
covered by Teijsmanu and Binnendijk, and described by 
them more titan half a century ago, long remained prac- 
tically unknown in Europe, and has but recently been intro- 
duced to cultivation. The plant from which the figure now 
given has been prepared was presented to Kew in 1008 by 
the Hon. W. Rothschild, Tring, and flowered in the tropical 
orchid collection in June, 1909. C. biflorum is, perhaps, 
most nearly allied to C. picfuratum, Lodd. (Bulbophyllum 
picturatum, Reichb. /.), a native of Tenasserim, figured at 
t. 6802 of this work, but is very easily distinguished by the 
characters noted by Mr. Rolfe. The most striking feature 
in our plant is the constantly 2-flowered scape, to which it 
owes its name, and on account of which it serves as a link 
between the group of forms with solitary flowers, referred to 
at t 8199, and those species that possess the umbellate 
inflorescence at one time thought characteristic of the 
genus. The difficult question as to whether the genus Cirrho* 

JCNE, 1910. 



petalum, proposed by Lindley, can be upheld, is one tlial has 
already been alluded to in these pages. The other leading 
feature in a normal Cirrhopetalum is the elongation of the 
lateral sepals, which, moreover, are perfectly united. This 
character, like that of an umbellate inflorescence, also 
breaks down, for species occur that serve to link forms like 
the present, in which the elongation is pronounced, with 
typical Bulbophylla, where the lateral sepals hardly exceed 
the upper. But the difficulty thus created is only a tech- 
nical one. It no doubt fully justifies the union of Cirrho- 
petalum and Bulbophyllum, if the question be considered from 
a purely formal standpoint. When, however, regard is had to 
the fact that such intermediate forms are few in number, and 
to the consideration that if these be left out of account it is 
impossible to mistake a Cirrhopetalum for a Bulbophyllum, 
it is more convenient to adopt, as Mr. Smith in this case has 
done, the usage that prevails among growers of orchids 
generally. C. bijlorum thrives well at Kew planted in a 
teak basket in sphagnum moss and osinunda fibre; it 
requires to be kept in a moist condition during the period 
of active growth. 

Description". — Herb, epiphytic. Rhizome creeping, rather 
slender. Pseudobulbs somewhat distant, ovate-oblong, tetra- 
gonous, about 1^—1^ in. long, monophyllous. Leaves sub- 
sessile, lanceolate or oblong-lanceolate, somewhat obtuse, 
coriaceous, narrowed to the base, 5-6 in. long, f-2 in. wide. 
Scapes slender, suberect, 3-4 in. long, clothed at the base 
with a few lanceolate sheaths, 2-flowered ; bracts ovate- 
lanceolate, acuminate, concave, about 5 lin. long. Flowers 

red, 




^uiuuw, uuneave, with a long seta, its limD aDOui iv »«« 
long, the seta 5 lin. long ; lateral linear-lanceolate, much 
attenuate, 3-3£ in. long, decurved. Petals oblong-lanceolate, 
very shortly 3-toothed, about 3 lin. long, without setae or 
with the mid-tooth occasionally ending in a seta. Lip 
recurved, o\ate-oblong, somewhat obtuse, fleshv, without 
cilia, about 4 lin. long. Column short, broad, without 
teeth, base prolonged as a narrow incurved foot. 

Fig. 1, flower with sepals removed; 2 lip: 3, column; 4, pollinia:— all 
eularyed. 



Complete in 60 vols., royal 8vo, with nearly 4000 hand-coloured 
Plates, many Mo or double plates, 42s. each net. 

CUKTIS & HOOKER'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

THIRD SERIES. 



JFitjuros antr JBrscripttorts of Neto aim Hare plants, 

SUITABLE FOR THE GARDES, STOVE, OR CONSERVATORY, 

BY 

Sir J. D. HOOKER, M.D., C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., 

ASSISTED BY 

WILLIAM BOTTING HEMSLEY, F.R.S., F.L.S. 



NOTICE OF RE-ISSUE. 

SOME portions of the above work being out of print, and complete sets 
very diffieulo to obtain, tbe Publishers have determined to reprint so 
much as will enable them to complete a few copies as they may be 
subscribed for ; and to meet the convenience of Subscribers, to whom 
the outlay at one time of so large a sum as a complete set now costs 
is an impediment to its purchase, they will commence a re-issue of 
two Volumes Monthly, thus spreading the cost over a period of 
two and a half years. The price of the volumes will be 42*. each as 
heretofore, but to Subscribers for the entire series 86*. each, or a 
complete set of the GO vols, will be supplied for £100 cash. Subscribers 
may commence at any time. 

The Botanical Magazine, commenced in 1787, and continued 
with uninterruptel regularity to the present time, forms the most, 
extensive and authentic repertory of Plant History and Portraiture 
extant. Tne Third Series, by far the most valuable, comprising all 
the important additions of the last sixty years, contains nearly 4000 
Coloured Plates, with Descriptions, structural and historical, by Sir 
"William and Sir Joseph Hooker. 

A set comp'ete from the commencement in 1787, including the First, 
Second, and Third Series, to the end of 1904, 130 vols., may be had, 
price £136. 

N.B. — A Fourth Series commenced in Januarv, 100"), and is edited 
by D. Prain, C.I.E., LL.D., F.R.S., Director of the Royal Botanic 
Gardens, Kew. 

Monthly, tvith Six Coloured Pla l es, 3s. 6d. Annual Siibscrij>'ion, 42*. 
Payable in Advance. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., Limited, 

Publishers to thk Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments, 
6, HENRIETTA STREET, COYENT GARDEN". 



FORM FOR SUBSCRIBERS TO THE RE-ISSUE. 

To Messrs. Lovell Reeve <& Co., Limited, Publishers, 
6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
Please send to the undersigned the Botanical Magazine, Third Series, 
two Volumes Monthly, at 36s. per Volume, or the 60 vols, for £100* 



Name 



Address 



Date 



Conveyance 



* Subscribers will be good enough to indicate in which mode they desire 
to receive the work, by striking out the words indicating the other mode. 



FORM FOR SUBSCRIBERS TO THE NEW (FOURTH) 

SERIES. 

To Messrs. LOVELL REEVE & Co., Limited, 

6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

Please send the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE monthly, as published, for 
which I enclose 42s. subscription for the year. 

Name _ _ . . 

Address _ . 



Date 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By Geokgk Bentham, 
F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham/8 "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the LinnaHn 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common Species. By F. Townbend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 
known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev.M. J. Bekkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., 4c, 4c. New 
Edition, entirelv revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., 

F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Cckrey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 

Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^. By 

George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 
FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookkk, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S. , F.L.S., assisted by F. 
M teller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices nf the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of tbe Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 
FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W. II. IlAuvrr and 

0. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thisemon-Dter, F.R.S. Vols. 

1. — III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 525.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., 
Parts I. & 11., 9s. each. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniki. Oliver, F.R.S., 
and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6d. 
Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6i. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6i. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. B\ 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Seore- 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. I). 
Hooker C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science,' at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE k CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Gardec. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 66, JUNE, 1910. 

Tab. 8317.— AGAVE FRANZOSINI, Mexico or Central America. 
„ 8318.— FOUQUIERIA SPLENDENS, Northern Mexico and 

South-Western United States. 
„ 8319.— KALMIA CUNEATA, Carolina. 
„ 8320.— SCUTELLARIA VIOLACEA, India and Ceylon. 
„ 8321.— CIRRHOPETALUM BIFLORUM, Java. 

Lotell Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. r 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemslet. 



MONOGRAPHS 

From the Third Series of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descrip- 
tions, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may be had separately. Prices 
from Is. to 51s. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANICAL RLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. Gd. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 



NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to II!., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6<J. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIIL, 

25s. 6dL 

Publislied under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., Part I., 9s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I, to in., 20s. each. 

By HARVEY and SONDER. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., Part I., 9*. Vol. VI., 24*. 

Vol. VII., 33s. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 

Natal and Transvaal. 

Lovell Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

LOJCDOH : PJUHIED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SOUS, L TB., IDU STREET, STAMFORD S«Mt, »■*• 



JFourtJ) 5?trifs. 

No. 67. 



VOL. VI.— JULY. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6<i. colovre<i, 2s. M. plain. 

■al Subscription. 



OR NO. } J^I or THE KNTIKK WOKS. 

C D H I I S ' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING H AND-COI.o r It M> HOURM Ui IONS. M'Kn H'lUI, AND IIMORKAI., 

OF NEW AM) i. 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KKW, 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL B3TABLI8HMBNTE 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN. CLE., LL.O.. F.li.s.. 




-JWUi. ■; 







re in h< 
■ 
And Art with h<-: 
To e\c(\ Lh< 






L o .\ D < 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. I/n».. 

PUBLTSFIERS TO TTTK TTOM LAL AND INDIA 

5, HENRIETTA 8TBEET, COVE NT CAI 
1910. 

[All rights reserved.] 
(Entered at the New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 



CORAL AND ATOLLS, 

Their history, description, theories of their origin both before and since 
that of Darwin, the influence of winds, tides, and ocean currents on 
their formation and transformations, their present condition, products, 
fauna, and flora. 

By F. WOOD-JONES, B.Sc, F.Z.S. 

Numerous illustrations, plates and map. 24s. 

CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND OF THE ADJACENT PORTIONS OF GAEHWAL AND TIBET. 
By Lt.-Geu. Sir Eichaed Stuachey and J. F. Dutiiie. 5s. 

NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. ' 



THE HEPATIC-2E OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5«. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations 
of their names. By the Rev. Prof. G-. Henslow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Grown 8vo, 4s. 6d. 

THE NARCISSIJsTusllistory and Culture. 

By F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by Z. G. Bakeb, F.R.S., F.L.S. 

With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA- 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BEKTHAM, F. R. S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plane 
Brawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 
Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Fl 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Bugmviogf, 5**. 

LOVELL reeve <t CO Jtd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GA'BDl 



8322 




Vtncsxu. BrooO<5,Day4 Sonl.t? m,p 



. J 



Tab. 8322. 
BEGONIA Martjana, var. grandiflora. 

Mexico. 



Begoniaceae. 
Begonia, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 811. 



Begonia (Knesel>eckia) Martiana, Link et Otto, Jc. Bar. p. 40, t. 25; var. 
grandiflora, Gamier in III, Hort. &(\r. vi. vol. ii. p. US, fig. 14 J a forma 
typica floribus inajoribus praesertim diffiert. 

Herba terrestris, tuberosa, tubere ellipsoideo-oblongo carnoso circitcr 5 < in. 
longo, caulc 30-45 cm. alto, raniis erectis carnosis glabris foliosis. Folia 
petiolata, oblique cordata, subacuta, duplicato-crenata, glabra vel Mice 
pilosa, 8-15 cm. longa, 5-8 cm. lata, petiolis 1-3 cm. Jongis; stipulae late 
ovatae, eubintegrae. Flores bracteati bracteolatique, axil lares, singuli vel 
fa^ciculati, magtii, roBei, masculi 4-meri, temiiiei saepius 5-meri ; bracteao 
foliaeeae, supra gradatim minores et subconcavae; braeteolae late ovatae, 
obtusae, submembranaceae. Sepala suborbicularia, 2*5-3 cm. lata, siiIh 
concava. Petala suborbicularia, 1-1 5 cm. lata. Stamina muneroea, 
filamentis l>asi in columnam brevem connatis. StyH 3, basi connati' 
superne 2-fidi. Capmla 8-a!ata, alis inaequalibus ereuulatis, apice stylis 
persistentibus coronata. — B. A. Rolfb. 



The handsome Begonia which forms the subject of our 
plate is perhaps best considered a garden race of B. 
Martiana, Link and Otto, a native of Mexico, which the late 
Mr. A. de Candolle considered to be itself no more than a 
variety of B. gracilis, Kunth. The examination of a large 
series of specimens, however, has led Mr. Jlolfe to take the 
view that the two are, on the whole, better treated as 
distinct species ; B. gracilis is always a smaller plant than 
normal B. Martiana, with more slender and never strictly 
erect stems, while it has much more divided leaves and a 
different inflorescence. As thus separated B. Martiana is 
represented in gardens by three more or less readily dis- 
tinguishable forms, known respectively as var. grandiflora, 
var. puleherrima and var. racemiflora. They differ but 
slightly from each other and have all been familiar plants 
in Begonia collections during the past twenty years. All 
three are good garden plants, with stems sometimes reach- 
ing 2 ft. in height when well grown, though when they 
July, 1910. 



are small in size and weak in growth owing to having 
received unsuitable treatment, they are alike in bearing a 
close resemblance to B. gracilis, with which, as already 
remarked, their identity has been suggested. Of the three 
forms, that now figured from a. plant which flowered in the 
Kew collection in July, 1909, is certainly the finest, and the 
extent to which selection has led, in this case, to the evolu- 
tion of an improved garden race may perhaps be best 
estimated by a comparison of our illustration with that given, 
at plate 2966 of this work, of B. diversifolia, Graham, which 
is now recognised as being only a state of B. Martiana. 
Our plant grows well when kept in a frame or greenhouse 
and shaded from bright sunshine. The whitish, irregularly 
shaped tubers lie dormant from about October until the 
following April, when they develop several stems which 
grow rapidly and flower freely in July. The plants ripen 
seeds and also produce clusters of small bulbil-like buds — 
which may be used for propagation in place of seeds, in the 
axils of the leaves. 

Description. — Herb; terrestrial; tuber ellipsoid-oblong, 
fleshy, about 2 in. long ; stem 1-1 £ ft. high; branches erect, 
fleshy, glabrous, leafy. Leaves petioled, obliquely cordate, 
somewhat acute, twice crenate, glabrous or sparingly hairy, 
3-6 in. long, 2-3 in. wide ; petioles ^-1^ in. long ; stipules 
wide ovate, almost entire. Flowers bracteate and bracteolate, 
axillary, solitary or clustered, large, rose-pink, the males 
4-merous, the females usually 5-merous ; bracts leafy, 
gradually diminishing upwards and subconcave ; bracteoles 
wide ovate, obtuse, almost membranous. Sepals suborbicular, 
1-1J in. wide, subconcave. Petals suborbicular, 5-8 lin. 
wide. Stamens many, their filaments connate below in a 
short column. Styles 3, connate below, 2-armed above. 
Capsule 3- winged, the wings unequal, crenulate ; the apex 
tipped by the persistent styles. 



Figs. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3 stigma ; 4, ovary, in cross-section : — all enlarged. 



8323 




M.S.iel.J.N.R ;! 



VinoentBrc^D*^^ 



LTReevrj &.C? Ionian. 



Tab. 8323. 

IRIS Clarkei. 

Sikkim. 

Iridaceae. Tribe Iuideae. 
Ibis, Linn, ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 68G. 



Iris Clarkei, Baker, Handb. Jrid. p. 25 et in Book. f. Ft. Brit. hid. vol. vi. 
p. 275; Dykes in QarcL Citron. 1909, vol. xlvi. p. 15; aitinis /. Dttavayi, 

Mich., sed caule solido, foliis adultis minus rigidis parte snperiore demtsea, 
spathis maps herbaceis, flore minus exserto/segznentis exterioribus aliter 

variegatis distincta. 

lie rha ad 70 cm. alta, rhizomate late repente praciliore spatharum residui* in 
fibras solutis vestito. Folia linearia, acuta, 25-60 cm. Ionga, 1-1 3 cm. 
lata, primo erecta, adulta parte superiore demissa, trnuitor prominenter 
nervosa, uno latere mapis minusve glauei. Scaptu in planta culta ad 
70 cm. altus, in spontanea humilior, subttres, solidu*. parce ramosus vel 
saepius simplex. Spatha 2-valvis, 2-flora; valvae lanceolalao, acutae vel 
acute subiicuminatae, herbaceae, virides, 7-8 cm. loiU'ae. FediceUut sub 
anthesi 2-5-5 cm., demum ad 7 - 5 cm. longus. Perigonium purpuno- 
violaceum, variegatum, circiter 7 cm. diametro; tubus vix 1 cm. longus; 
laciniae exterae cbarbatac, ecristatae, ungue erecto-patente limbo sub- 
aequilongo )atiuscu!o, limbo patulo vel subdemisso obovato (explanato 
obovato-rotundato), basi luteo-suffuso, ad medium albo-variegato, caeterum 
purpureo-violaceo, 3-3 • 5 cm. longo ; laciniae intcriores oblique erectae, 
oblanceolatae, in ungnem gradient attenuatae, 4-4-5 cm. longac, vjolaceae. 
Antherae 15 mm. longae. Styli rami coerulei, cristis inclusis 4-4-5 cm. 
longi, crista 1 cm. Ionga, ad 1*3 cm. lata, lobis sese obtegentibus rotundatis. 
Ovarium 3-gonum. OapnUa oblonga, 3-gona, 3 5-5 cm. Ionga, lateribus 
1'5-1*7 cm. latis. Semina compressa, suborbicularia, 4-4 5 mm. diametro, 
nigi-o-fuscescentia, marginibus pallidis. — J. hitttaituca, Dykes in Gard. Chron 
1909, vol. xlv. pp. 3, 36.— 0. Staff. 



This handsome Iris was met with for the first time in 
1848 by Sir J. D. Hooker, who found it on Tonglo as well 
as on the Yakla in Sikkim at about 10,000 ft. above sea- 
level, and made in the field a coloured sketch of the plant 
which is now in the Kew collection. It was again gathered 
on Tonglo in 1857 by the late Dr. T. Thomson, in 1808 by 
the late Dr. T. Anderson, and in 1875 by the late Mr. 0. B. 
Clarke, to whom the species was dedicated by Mr. Baker. 
It has since been met with in other localities in Sikkim 
and has been gathered in the Chumbi Valley, further to the 
east, by the collectors of the late Sir George King, to whom 
European Iris lovers owe its presence in their collections, 
where it has found a welcome since 187(1. Treated origin- 
ally, for reasons which have been explained by Mr. Dykes, 
July, 1910. 



from whose garden at Godahning came the material on 
which our illustration has been based, as a member of the 
Pseudevansia group, it now appears that its true position in 
the genus is near the Western Chinese I. Delavayi, Mich., 
in the Apogon group. Its cultivation offers no especial 
difficulty and its propagation is easy. Mr. Dykes has called 
attention to the peculiar liability of this species to consider- 
able variation in the form and coloration of the standard?, 
and to some variation in the foliage. In imported plants 
he finds that all the leaves have a curiously polished upper 
surface, whereas in some seedlings there may be found 
leaves that are distinctly glaucous on both surfaces, while 
other shoots on the same plants bear leaves which show the 
characteristic polished upper surface. 

Description. — Herb ; in cultivation sometimes nearly 3 ft. 
high, in a wild state rarely so tall ; rootstock wide-creeping, 
rather slender, clothed with the fibrous remains of the 
spathes. Leaves linear, acute, 10-24 in. long, J -^ in. wide, at 
first erect, the upper half ultimately drooping, finely but 
distinctly nerved, more or less glaucous on one side. Scape 
nearly cylindric, solid, sparingly branched or often un- 
branched. Spat he 2-valved and 2-flowered ; valves lanceo- 
late, acute or almost acuminate, herbaceous, green, about 
3 in. long. Pedicels in flower 1-2 in., at length 3 in. long. 
Perianth purple-violet, variegated, Dearly 3 in. across ; tube 
about I in. long; outer segments unbearded and without 
crests, the somewhat spreading claw rather broad and about 
as long as the limb, which is 1|-1^ in. long, obovate, or 
when flattened out obovate-rounded, and spreading or 
slightly drooping, flushed at the base with yellow, splashed 
with white in the middle and beyond this purple-violet; 
inner segments obliquely erect, oblanceolate, 1^-lf in. long, 
narrowed to a slender claw and of a violet tint. Anthers 
< hn. long. Style-arms blue, including the crests lj-lf in- 
long, the lobes rounded, overlapping, the crests 5 fin. long 
and 6 hn. wide. Ovary 3-gonous. Capsule oblong, 3- 
gonons, li-2 in. long, the sides 7-9 lin. wide. Seeds sub- 
orbicolwr, flattened, 2-2J lin. wide, dark brown with pale 
margins. 



*Jga. 1 Mid a anthers; 3, s i gma ; 4, capsule; 5 and 6, seeds :-aU enlarged 
' " ■! 'i 1 and .y, wh / eft art of nut « rul size. 



8324 




Wno-ntBrookB,^ 3 " 1 



te^unp 



L.Reeve 8tC° London 



Tab. 8324. 
PHILADELPHIA Delavayt. 

Western China. 

Saxifragaceae. Tribe Hydbanoeae. 

PHiLADEr.pnus, Linn. ; Tienth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. (>42; Koehne in 
Jief/el Gartenfloia, vol. xlv. (1890), p. 450. 



Philadelphus Delavayi, It, Henry in Rev. JTort. 1!)03, p. 12, fig. 3 ; affini's 
P. tomentoso,VJal\., sed foliis supra plerumque pilis densioiibus et fructilms 
multo minoribus differ! 

Frnfi.r 1-4 m. altus ; rami subteretes, cortice deciduo ; ramuli stx riles pa rce 
pilosi, floriferi glabri. Folia ovata vel oblongo-lanceolata, a|iice ar-nte 
acuminata, basi rotundata vel subcuneata, 2-8 cm. longa, 1-3 cm. lata, 
tenuiter chartacea, remote denticulata, utrinque, supra tamen parcius, 
pilosa, nervis lateral ihus utrinque 3-4 subtus paulo elevatis; petioli 3-5 
mm. longi, parce et longe pilosi. Hamuli laterales floriferi 4-5 cm. longi, 
circiter 5-flori, basin versus foliati ; pedicelli 5-7 mm. longi, glabri. Flora 
albi vel extra albo-rosei, 2 - 5-3 cm. diametro. Seceptarulum obovoideum, 
3 mm. longum, extra glabrum. Calycis tubus brevissimus ; segments 4, 
ovata, acuminata, 5 mm. longa, 3 mm. lata, extra glabra, intus apicem 
versus dense villosa. Petala elliptica vel obovato-elliptica, npiee rotundata, 
1-1*3 cm. longa, 0*8-1 cm. lata, utrinque glabra. Nomina numerusa, 
filamentis sty lis aequilongis. tityli connati, glabri, 4 mm. longi, etigrnati- 
bus liberis antlieris aequilongis. Capsuta obovoidea, circiter mm. longa, 
5 mm. diametro.— J. Hutchinson. 



Few shrubs are more satisfactory in the garden than the 
members of the genus Philadelphus. They are easily grown 
and they flower profusely at a time when the great majority 
of flowering trees and shrubs have gone out of blossom. 
The one now figured is attractive not only for its abundant 
clusters of white, well-formed flowers, but for its agreeable 
fragrance. P. Delavayi was first introduced into European 
gardens by the Abbe' Delavay, who sent seeds from Yunnan in 
1890. It was again met with in 1004 by Mr.E. H. Wilson, 
from whose seeds the plant here figured was raised by Messrs. 
J. Veitch & Sons. Though a distinct and easily recognis- 
able form, it seems somewhat doubtful whether it should be 
considered specifically separable from the Indian P. tonien- 
tosus. Wall., for the salient differences are only to be found 
in the greater degree of tomentum on the upper surface of 
July, 1910. 



the leaves and the considerably smaller fruit of this, the 
Chinese representative of Wallich's plant. Like the rest of 
the genus, P. Delavayi thrives in rich moist soil in full sun, 
and is easily increased by cuttings of soft wood placed in 
heat. The only pruning necessary is an occasional thinning 
out of worn out or ovd'crowding stems ; no shortening back 
can be effected except at the expense of the succeeding crop 
of blossom. 

Description. — Shrub; 3-15 ft. high; branches nearly 
cylindric, bark flaking ; sterile twigs sparingly hairy, 
flowering shoots glabrous. Leaves ovate or oblong-lanceo- 
late, sharply acuminate, base rounded or somewhat cuneate, 
12-3 in. long, |-1| in. wide, thinly papery, distantly toothed, 
hairy on both sides, but more sparingly so above, lateral 
nerves 3-4 on each side slightly raised beneath ; petioles 
2-3 lin. long, sparingly pubescent with long hairs. Fertile 
shoots lateral, lf-2 in. long, about 5-flovvered, leafy below; 
pedicels 3-4 lin. long, glabrous. Flowers white, or in bud 
flushed with rose externally, 1-1 1 in. across. Receptacle 
obovoid, under 2 lin. long, glabrous outside. CalyaAuhe 
very short; lobes 4, ovate, acuminate, 2^ lin. long, \\ lin. 
wide, outside glabrous, within densely villous towards the 
tip. Petals elliptic or obovate-elliptic, rounded at the tip, 
5-7 lin. long, 4-5 lin. wide, glabrous on both sides. Stamens 
many, their filaments as long as the styles. Styles connate, 
glabrous, 2 lin. long, the stigmas free and as long as the 
anthers. Capsule obovoid, about 3 lin. long, 2£ lin. across. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil; 2 and 3, anthers :— all enlarged. 



8325 




TySncentBroc. 



L Reeve kC? London 



Taij. 8325. 

AUI3T0L0CHIA moupinensis. 

Western China. 



Akistolochiackae. 
Auistoloc:iia, Li/m.; Heath, et Book,/, (leu, J'luitt. vol. iii. ]i. LS& 



Aristolochia moupinensis, Fraud, in Sour. Arch. Mm. Par. i 2"" s/r. vol. \. 
(1887-8), j). 79; species ex affiuitate A. Kmenmfori, Willd., a qua foitu 
hand lobatis pedunculisque braeteatis differt. 

Saffrutex scandens; rami graciles, primom donse sprieoi, drrnnm puberal! 
l-olia cordata, acuta vcl breviter acuminata, 10-12 cm. longa. 0-10 cm. 
lata, auriculis bisalibns rotundatis mm vel vix convergentibns, supra 
impresse punctata et pilis brevibus instructa, robttta cinarao-pnb o ao en tw ; 
l>etiolns 6 cm. longus, hirsutus. PedmnamH soli tares, axillircs, mtiflori, 
8 cm. Iongi; bracteae ovatae, 1 cm. longae. PeritmtkH tubus extra dilute 
▼iridifi, 4 era. longus, abrupte curvatus, medio inflatus, apice basi.|ne 
attenuatus, extra hirsutus, intus flavus; limbus oblique trilobus, 3 cm. 
diametro. inter lohos recurvus, intra flavescens rubro maculatus, iriargini- 
bus viridibus. CoJnuina 4 mm. longa; antherae 6. Ovarium lo cm. 
longum, oblongum; 6-costatum, hirtellum; stigmata 6, brevia, obtusa. 
Capsula 7 cm. longa, 3 cm. diametro, anguste 0-alata. — C. H. Whigbt. 



The Aristolochia here figured was first discovered bj 
Pere David in the Moupine region in Western China. Late. 
it was met with at Tsekou in Yunnan by Pere Monbeijj 
and was again collected, at an elevation of 6,500 ft. 
above sea level in Western China, by Mr. E. H. Wilson on 
behalf of Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, in whose nurseri- ~ b3 
Coornbe Wood it flowered in June 1908 and again in ,hme 
1909. A. moupinensis is very closely allied to A. Kaempferi, 
Willd., a species figured at t. 49 of Kaempfer's Icones 
Selectae, edited in 1791 by Sir Joseph Banks, under the 
name San Kakso. This figure shows the trilobed leaves 
and the naked peduncle described by Willdenow and 
evidenced by a Japanese specimen collected by the late Mr. 
Maximowicz. But another Japanese specimen at Kew 
collected by Mr. F. V. Dickins and identified by the late Mr. 
Franchet as A. Kaempferi, though, it has the naked peduncle 
of that species, has entire leaves as in A. moupinensis, and 
it may be that eventually the two plants will have to be 
July, 1910. 



considered conspecific. The peduncle of A. moupinensis is 
however distinctly longer than that of A. Kaempferi and 
the perianth, although hairy, is less densely so. The 
material from which our illustration has been prepared was 
communicated by Messrs. Veitch, who kindly supply the 
information that the plant has proved quite hardy at 
Coombe Wood. It flowers there very freely, prefers a 
rather retentive loamy soil and grows best in a sunny 
position ; no pruning is required beyond the removal of any 
weak or decayed wood. In its native habitat, according 
to Pere David, it is found growing among shrubs. 

Description. — Undershrub; scandent with slender branches 
which at first are densely silky, but when older are merely 
puberulous. Leaves cordate, acute or shortly acuminate, 
4-4| in. long, 2|-4 in. wide, with rounded but hardly 
meeting auriculate basal lobes, impressed punctate and beset 
with short hairs above, greyish pubescent beneath ; petiole 
2\ in. long, hirsute. Peduncles axillary, solitary, 1 -flowered, 
about 3 in. long ; bracts upraised, ovate, 5 lin. long. 
Perianth-tube pale green outside, 1J in. long, abruptly 
curved, swollen in the middle, narrowed both to the base 
and the apex, hirsute without, yellow within ; limb 
obliquely 3-lobed, l£ in. across, its margin recurved 
between the lobes, yellowish with red markings inside, 
greenish towards the margin. Column 2 lin. long ; anthers 
6. Ovary 8 lin. long, oblong, 6-ribbed, somewhat hirsute ; 
stigmas 6, short, obtuse. Capsule 2| in. long, l£ in. across, 
narrowly 6-winged. 



Fig. 1, vertical section of perianth-tube ; 2, column :— loth entaryed. 



8326 




.llS.Aelj.N.Ht.dh-Ufk. 



Vinr 



vLt^i"* 



L."R<5»ve &. C c London. 



Tab. 8326. 
RHODODENDRON flavidum. 

Western China. 

Eijicaceae. Tril>e IUiodobeae. 
Rhododendron Linn.; Bmtk. d Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron (Osmothamnus) flavidum, Franch. in Joum, •/, ]',»,!. vol. i\. 
(1895), p. 31*5 ; inter species in hortifl europaaifl enliis /.'. lepidoto, Wall., 
affinis; ab eo tamen differt imprimia floribtu brevissime pedicellai 

Frnfirulus_ 45-60 cm. altus, praeter corollara fere undiqne pnlchre lepidotus 
dense ramosus, ramis tenuibus. Folia conferta, imbricate, OOtiacea, 
poraistentia; lamina ovato-oblonga, 1-2 cm. longa, abrupte apicnlate, 
rotundata, conoavo-convexa, maigine recurva, ntrinqne cxeberrime U pidota, 
supra atroviridis, inter lepides nitida, canaliculate, subtus pallida ; petioloa 
2-3 mm. longm Floret 3-5, flavi, in ramorum apieibus pedicellati, 
pedicellis 4-7 mm. longis arete recurvis. Cnlyx subbilabiatns, herbacens; 
lobi leviter inaequales, ovati, 4-6 mm. longi, acute acuminati, demon 
recurri. Corolla fere regularis, subrotata, circiter 3 cm. diametro, hand 
lepidota, lobis rotundatis undulatis, fauce villosula. Stamina 10, quam 
corolla breviora, filamentis paulo supra basin et infra medium incras.-afis 
pilosulis. Ovarium 5-loculare, denfnsaime lepidotum; stylus- emu ovario 

16-17 mm. longus, infra medium puberulus. Capmla nondum note. 

H. prirnulinum, Hemsl. in Gard. Chron. 1910, vol. xlvii. p. 4.— W. Hotting 
Hemsley. 

The pretty little Rhododendron which is here figured 
is one of the many novelties for the introduction of which 
horticulture has to thank Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, who 
raised plants from seeds secured on their behalf in Western 
China by Mr. E. IT. Wilson. Some of these plants flowered 
with Messrs. Yeitch in their nursery at Coombe Wood in 
April 1000, when the material from which our illustration 
has been prepared was communicated. It happens that this 
is one of the few species obtained by Mr. Wilson, whereof 
there are no specimens in the herbarium collection at Kew 
that correspond with the field-number accompanying the 
.seeds, so that nothing is yet known as to the appearance of 
the fruit. The plants themselves grow well at Coombe 
Wood in the open ground and without artificial protection, 
under the conditions suitable to most other species of the 
genus. When the earliest flowering shoots produced in 
this country became available they appeared to justify the 
Jolt, 1910. * 



segregation of the plant from R. flavidum in consequence of 
various differences in floral characters. Well developed 
specimens, subsequently communicated, have, however, 
satisfied Mr. Hemsley that the characters in question are 
insufficient, and prove that the form of the calyx- lobes, the 
length of the corolla-tube and the relative length of the 
stamens and corolla are by no means constant. R. flavidum 
will be welcomed in gardens as an addition to the scanty 
group of species with yellow flowers. 

Description. — Shrublet ; 1J-2 ft. high, densely branched, 
the twigs slender, covered in almost every part save the 
corolla with fine scales. Leaves closely set, overlapping, 
coriaceous, persistent; blade ovate-oblong, 5-10 lin. long, 
suddenly apiculate, the base rounded, concavo-convex with 
recurved margins, closely scaly on both surfaces, dark 
green above, polished where not covered with scales and 
channelled along the midrib, beneath paler; petiole 1-1 £ lin. 
long. Flowers yellow, 3-5 together at the tips of the twigs, 
with abruptly recurved pedicels 2-3^ lin. long. Calyx 
almost 2 -labiate, herbaceous ; lobes somewhat unequal, 
ovate, 2-3 lin. long, sharply acuminate, at length reflexed. 
Corolla almost regular, nearly rotate, about 1J in. wide, 
without scales, lobes rounded with wavy margins, throat 
somewhat pubescent. Stamens 10, shorter than the corolla, 
filaments thickened a little above the base and below the 
middle, somewhat pubescent. Ovary 5-celled, very closely 
scaly; style and ovary together 8-9 lin. long, the style 
puberulous below the middle. Capsule not seem 



^ Fig. 1, scales from upper side of leaf; 2, calyx and pistil ; 3 and 4, stamens 
o, ovary and disk ; G, transverse section of ovary :— all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Perns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Begi»ners and Amateurs. By GbokgK Uknt;iam, 
F.B.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, Us. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of V 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings.' 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, i)s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Inttoductorj to 

Local Floras. By George Bkntham, F.R.S., President of the Linrimnn 
Society. New Edition. Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsrnd, 11. A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J.BlfttlXIT, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing DtMoriptioi 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Gieat 
Britain and Ireland. By Chakles P. Hobkiuk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New 
Edition, entirelv revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Bkhkelkt, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by WorthingtonG. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Ciihrey, F.B.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12*. 

BRITISH FUNGT, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^E. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12*. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bkntiiam, F.K.S., F.L.S., assiste-i 1>\ F. 
Mueller, F.B.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4*. Published under the 
auspices :ial Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. (i. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Governmr tius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Cafl'raria, and Port Natal. By W. H. Haktki 
0. W. So.vdeb, and continued bv Sir W. T. Thisef.ton-Dyeb, F.R.S. 
I.- III., 20s. each. Vol. IV.," Sect. I., K II., 24*. Vol. 

Parts I. A II., 9s. each. Vol. VI., 24s. ' 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.8., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-D . I. to III., each 

20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vo!. V., 25?. 6d 
Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6i. 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA: a Systematic 
Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham. 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Maequarrie's Islands. Bv 
, D. Hooker, F.B.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Compl *■«», 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Griskbach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker. C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6<2. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 67, JULY, 1910. 

Tab. 8322.— BEGONIA MARTIANFA, var. GRANDIFLORA. 
Mexico. 
8323.— IRIS CLARKEI, Sikh 
8324.— PHILADELPHIA DELAY AYI, Wester 
8325.— ARISTOLOCHJA MOI/PINENSIS, Western China, 
8326.— RHODODENDRON FLAVIDUM, Western China, 
Lovell Rekvk & Co. LTD., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 

Magazine by W. Botting Hemslky. 

MONOGRAPHS 

Prom the Third Series oi the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descrip- 
tions, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may be had separately. 
from Is. to 51s. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANICAL PLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. of 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6(3. and Is. each, 
over 3000. Three Starrr 

NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect, I., Part I., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir \Y T. TSUSELTON-DYEK, F.R.S. 

xt i uir 9t< dd. Vol. \ui. 
Vol. IV, Sect. 1., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Yo> v ol. ML, "*• 

35s. 6i. 

Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. L, Part I., 9s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS;- 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, canr 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By HARVEY and SONDER. 
The Contraction edited by Sir W. T. THISELTO> r -DYER, p - R - ft - ^ 

Vol. IT, Sect. I., 52s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., Part I., 9 ! - Vo '- 

7IL ' 335 - „ n0 f Good Hope, 

Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape 

Natal and Transvaal. 



Reevk & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street. Covent un 

. -- ™tt».t.„ nTYynnM *wn son- IIP , BOK* sTB&BX. *- T * M 



JFourtl) a?tn*a. 



No. 68. 



VOL. VI.— AUGUST. 



Monthly, price 3*. 6d. aoiottftd, 2- 



ob No. 1482 OF THK e " tikic wobk * 



CUHTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STKUCtCBAL AND HMTOKICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHEK BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BT 

D. PR A I*, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S, 

QirmoT, itopnl botanic tfVamms, licto. 




mCiMST* 



MBU1SB i^KB »^e«^* 







'-*«&« -- — ^PBW^S?»^5aBWpCs&g3Jllr* - ,; 



"There lavish Nature In her best attire 

■ ngbts, 
h her contending doth a 
e natural with ma<i 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 

PUBLI31 HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN UOVERNM 

PwIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1910. 

[All rights reserved.) 
(Entered at the New York Pest Office as second-class matter.) 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 

CORAL AND ATOLLS, 

Their history, description, theories of their origin both before and since 
of Darwin, the influence of -.winds, tides, and ocean currents on 
formation and transformations, their present condition, products, 
fauna, and flora. 

By F. WOOD-JONES, B.Sc, F.Z.S. 

Numerous illustrations, plates and map. 2-k. 

CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND OF THE ADJACENT PORTIONS OF GARHWAL AND TIBET. 
By Lt.-Gen. Sir Bichard Stkachky and J. F. Duthie. 5s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE 



THE HEPATI02E OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

Bj W. H. PEAB/ ~>N. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations 
of their names. By the Rer. Prof. G. Hknslow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. 6d. 

THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientifa Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.E.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BE NT HAM, F. R. S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., Ac. 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS oflffilBniBH FLORA. 

A Series, of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of Briiisn Plants. 
Drawn bv W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 
mg an Uluttrated 'Oompanum to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 
1th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engraving, if*. 

LOVELL REETE A CO, J TO ., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVLNT GABDKN. 



6321 




-nrfimp 



/ 



L Reeve & C ° Lo adjax. 



Tab. 8327. 

BULBOPHYLLUM vi ripens. 

Java. 

OitcHrnAOEAE. Tribe Epidendreae. 
Bulb >piiyllu.\t, T/muars; Benth. et Ilooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 501. 



Bulbophyllum virescens, J, J. Sm. in Bull. Inst. Buitenz. vol. vii. (1900), 
p. 3 ; lc Bogor. vol. ii. p. 99, t. 119, fig. A ; Iiol/e in Orch. Hev. 1904, 
p. 272 ; Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. xl. p. 261, suppl. tab. ; Orchis, 1<109, p. 123, 
figs. 16, 17 ; a B. Binnendijkii, Sm., sepalis petalisque viridibus immaculatis 
differt. 

Jlerba epiphytica Rhizoma repens, validnm, vaginis striata imbricatis ob- 
tectum. Pseudobulbi distantes, lineari-oblongi, striati, 10-13 cm. longi, 
monophylli, basi vaginis ovatis striatis obtecti. Folia petiolata, coriacea, 
ovato-oblonga, subacuta, 15-20 cm. longa, 7-8 cm. lata; petioli 2-5 cm. 
longi. Scapi suberecti, 16-20 cm. longi, apice decurvi, vaginis spatbaceis 
obtecti. Bracteae anguste lanceolatae, acuminati?simac, 2-2 • 5 cm. longae. 
PedirelH 2-2 -5 cm. longi. Flores umbellati, magni, sjwciosi, 8-10. Sepala 
patentia, ovato-lanceolata, caudato-acuminata, 10-12 cm. longa, pallidc 
viridia, brunneo-venosa et ret culata. Betalu anguste ovato-lanceolata, 
caudato-acuminata, 3 '5-4 cm. longa, pallide viridia, brunnco-venoFa! 
Labellum recurvum, cordato-ovatum, subobtusum, subcamosum, cireiter 
2 cm. longum, pallide viride, basi purpureum. Columna brevissima, basi 
in pedem latum producta ; dentes oblongi, obtusi. — R. A. Rolfe. 



The striking Bulbophyllum which forms the subject of 
our illustration is a member of a very distinct group of 
Malayan species which includes B. Pahudii, Reichb. f., 
B. Ericssoni, KraenzL, figured at t. 8,088 and B. Bin- 
nendijkii, J. J. Sm., figured at t. 8,187 of this work. 
From the last-mentioned species, which is its nearest ally, 
our plant differs in a few minor structural details and in 
having flowers without spots. B. virescens was first 
described ten years ago from specimens collected on Mount 
Tuna in the island of Amboina, at about 2,500 feet above 
sea level. Shortly thereafter plants which, on flowering, 
proved to belong to this species were obtained by Messrs. 
Hugh Low & Co. from an island off the coast of Now 
Guinea- The plant from which our figure has been 
made was acquired by purchase from Messrs. Low in 1B05 ; 
it flowered in the tropical Orchid house at Kew in Juno. 

August, 1910. 



1909, and was as remarkable in appearance as it was 
disagreeable in odour. It requires the same cultural treat- 
ment as its near allies, B. Erlcssoni and B. Binnendijkii ; 
a shallow teak basket, a compost of sphagnum, peat fibre 
and dead leaves, with a position close to the roof glass in a 
moist tropical house. When the plant is making new 
growth plenty of water should be supplied ; when growth 
has finished only enough water should be given to prevent 
the soil from becoming quite dry. 

Description. — Herb, epiphytic ; rhizome creeping, stout, 
clothed with striate imbricating sheaths ; pseudobulbs 
remote, linear-oblong, striate, 4-5 in. long, 1-leaved, clothed 
at the base with ovate striate sheaths. Leaves petioled, 
coriaceous, ovate-oblong, subacute, 6-8 in. long, 2^-3| in. 
wide ; petioles |-2 in. long. Scapes suberect, 6-8 in. long, 
their apices decurved, clothed with spathaceous sheaths; 
bracts narrow lanceolate, very long acuminate, f-1 in. long; 
pedicels as long as the bracts. Flowers large and showy, 
in 8-10-flowered umbels. Sepals spreading, ovate-lanceolate, 
caudate-acuminate, 4-5 in. long, pale green, with brownish 
veins and nerves. Petals narrowly ovate-lanceolate, 
caudate-acuminate, 1^-lf in. long, pale green with brownish 
nerves. Lip recurved, cordate-ovate, subobtuse, somewhat 
fleshy, about § in. long, pale green with a purple base. 
Column very short, produced below into a wide foot ; teeth 
oblong, obtuse. 

Fig. 1, column and foot; 2, pollinia :—hoth enlarged. 



8328 




* s -a*J.K.Rtbh.ii fl ^ 



■LReeve &.C?Landon. 



'inc^ntBroakB^aj&Sffi^^ 1 * 



Tab. 8328. 

PATRINIA TRILOBA. 

Japan. 

Yaleuiaxaceae. 
Patrinia, Juss. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1511 



Patrinia (Centrotrinia) triloba, Miq. in Verh. Kon. Akad, Wetcnsch. vol. ii. 
pars iv. p. 22; Maxim. MS. Biol. vol. viii. p. 420; affiuis P. gibbotae, 
Maxim., sei corolla paulo majore. caule basi hand nudo, foliis ambit u 
cordatis vel cordato-ovatis profunde lobatis distinct*. 

Jhrha perennis, crecta, inflorescentia excepta simplex 20-40 cm. alta. Caulis 
teres, rubescens, cum pedunoulis bifaeialiter pubescens, nodis pubescenti- 
bus. Folia petiolata, petiolis ad 9 cm. longis caulem amplectentibus, 
radicalia ambitu cordate, superiora cordato-ovata ad 7 cm. longa, 5 cm. 
lata, profunde palmatim tri- vel quinque-lobata, lobis basalibus minoribus, 
terrain ali majore rhombeo plus minusve trilobo, nervis e basi plerumque o, 
nervutisque subtus conspicuis, acumine excepto grosse serrata, supra parce 
subtus in nervis marginibusque puberula. Ct/mae ternae; bractcae infimao 
foliaceae ambitu ovato-lanceolatae, trilobae, circiter 1 "5 cm. longae, 8 mm. 
latae, grosse serratae, summae lineares, ciliatae, serratae integraeve ad 
1 cm. longae, 1 mm. latae. Oaiyeis lobi miDuti. Corolla lutea, tubulosa, 
7 mm. longa, calcarata, calcari 2 mm. longo et circiter 1 mm. diametro, 
tubo calcari nequilongo, extra glabro intus pilis longiusculis obrito. 
Stamina exserta ; filamenta fere S mm. longa, pilis divergentibus parcc 
instructa. Ovarium circiter 2 mm. altum, glabrum; stylus 5 mm. toogOB, 
glaber, stigmate capitato. Fructus paleae nervosae fere triplo majori 
adnatus. — r. palmata, Maxim. Mel. Biol. vol. vi. p. 267; Bull. Acad. Imp. 
Petersb. vol. xii. p. 67 ; Franch. et Savat. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. i. p. 216. 
B. jpalmatifida, Maxim, ex Miq. in Verh. Kon. Akad. Wetcnsch. vol. ii. 
pars iv. p. 22. Valeriana triloba, Miq. in Prol. FL Jap. p. 272.— 
\V. G. Craib. 



The plant here figured, which was raised at Kew from 
seed received from the Tokyo Botanic G-arden, quite merits 
the encomium " decus generis," bestowed upon it by the late 
Mr. Maximowicz when he for the first time published it 
under its proper genus. Its nearest ally is Patrinia gibbosa, 
Maxim., like the subject of our illustration a native of Japan ; 
both are members of the section Centrotrinia, founded by 
Maximowicz to include those species in which the corolla is 
gibbous or spurred and the fruit is adnate to an accrescent- 
bract. P. triloba is, however, readily distinguished from 
P. gibbosa by its larger flowers, its rather smaller, sharply 
lobed and cordate leaves and its leafy stem. Siebold was 
the first European botanist to meet with P. triloba, which is 
August, 1910. 



confined to the woodland tracts of Central and Northern 
Japan ; his specimens formed the basis of Valeriana triloba, 
Miq. It was again met with by Maximowicz, whose speci- 
mens were distributed as Patrinia palmati/ida, a name 
modified in 1867, when the species was formally published, 
to P. palmata. The study of the specimens issued by 
Maximowicz had meantime satisfied Miquel that the plants 
collected by Siebold and by Maximowicz are conspecitic 
and that the generic position accorded to the species by 
Maximowicz is correct, The adjustment of name thereby 
rendered necessary was made by Miquel in 1870 and 
endorsed by Maximowicz a year later. P. triloba is a 
hardy herbaceous perennial, easily cultivated under the 
conditions suitable for most of the species of Patrinia and 
Valeriana. It thrives well in the Eock Garden at Kew, 
where it is in flower in July and August, the months 
during which it also flowers in a wild state. 

Description. — Herb, perennial ; stems erect, terete, 
reddiah, 8-16 in. high, un branched below the inflorescence, 
with hues of pubescence on the peduncles and with pubescent 
nodes. Leaves petioled, the radical cordate, those of the stem 
ovate-cordate, deeply palmately 3- or 5-lobed, and usually 
5-nerved from the base, the largest 3 in. long, 2 in. wide ; 
basal lobes rather smaller than the rhomboid more or less 
3-lobed central ; main and secondary nerves beneath rather 
prominent; margin rather coarsely toothed except towards 
the tips ot the lobes ; sparingly hairy above, more markedly 
pubescent on the margins and along the nerves beneath; 
petioles slender 3 J in. long, stem-clasping at the base. 
Byrnes 3-nate ; lower bracts leafy, ovate-lanceolate, 3-lobed, 
coarsely toothed, about 8 lin. long, 4 lin. wide, upper linear, 
ciiiate toothed or entire, 5 lin. long. Calyx-teeth minute. 
Coro^ yellow, tubular, 34 lin. long, with a spur about 1 lin. 
w If '' YT 6 T , g as the s P ur ' g^rous without, hirsute 
npVrlo 1 r i g S Within " Stamens exserted ; filaments 
/W ? 1 ' g ? s P ari * n ^y hirsute with spreading hairs. 
Oomj glabrous, about 1 lin. long; style glabrous, 2J lin. 
long , stigma capitate. Fruit adnate to a large, veined pale. 

i . W . o ca]yx and p . st H . g ^ scd . on Qf coro]Ia _ tubo . 4 and ^ authers . 



83% 




.IN.-Fitoh.litk 



~VIn.aer±Bro. 



L. Reeve &.C' ?] 



Tab. 8329. 
PTEKOSTYRAX hispidtjm. 

Japan. 

Stteaceak. 

Pterostyeax, Sieb. et Zucc. Fl. Jap. vol. i. p. 94. 



Pterostyrax hispidum, Sieb. et Zucc. in Abh. Akad. Muench. vol. iv. pars iii. 
p. 132 ; Carriere in Tteo. Hort. 1875, p. 307, fig. 50, et 1876, p. 394, tig. 83, 
84; Frauch. et Savat. Enum. 1*1. Jap. vol. i. p. 310; Pct<rs in h'it>/f<r, 
Pflanzenr.—Styracaceac, p. 103 (hispidus); affinis P. corymboso, Sieb. et 
Zucc, sed fioribus in paniculo angusto elongato dispositis et fructu 
distinguenda. 

■Arbor ramis glabris et cortice cinereo-brunnco. Folia alterna, exstipulata, 
petiolis 1-2-5 cm. longis, Iaminis 6-21 cm. longis, 3-10 cm. Jatis elliptiris 
acutis vel breviter acuminatis basi acutis denticulatis supra viridibus 
subtus pallidioribus et glabris vel minutissime albido-tomentosis secus 
venis pubescentibus. Paniculi axillares, 10-16 cm. longi, 4-5 cm. lati, 
adscendentes vel penduli, bad 2-3-foliati, superne ebracfeati, pilis patulis 
pubescentes, ramis patentibus 1-5-2 cm. longis bifurcatis secundifloris, 
floribus subconfertis. Pedicelli 1-2 mm. lonui. Calyx obconicus, pluri- 
costatus, 5-denlatus, minute albo-tomentosus, dcntibus 1-1 - 3 mm. longis 
deltoideo-ovatis actitis. Corolla fere ad basin 5-partita, utrinque minute 
subtomentosa, alba, lobis 8 mm. longis 3-3 5 mm. latis patentibus vel 
recurvis elliptico-oblongis obtusissimis. Stamina 10, 1-1 1 cm. Ionga, 
filamentis pubescentibus basi in tubo connatis; antherae lineari-oblongae, 
dorsifixae. Ovarium inferum, 3-loculare, loculis 4-ovulatis ; stylus 
siaminibus longior, basi conico-inci'assatus, pubescens. Ovula imdio 
axi siffixa, 2 supcrioribns erectis 2 inferioribiis pendulis. Frvclus 1 cm. 
longus, 2*5 mm. crassus, subelavato-t'nsiformis, pluri-costatns, liaud 
alatus, dense hispiilns, stylo tcrmiuatus. — Halesia kutpida, Mast, in Gard. 
Cliron. 1S81, vol. xxii. p. 176, fig. 3i, et 1909, vol. xlvi. p. 89; Nhir.isawa, 
Ic. Jap. vol. ii. t. 65, fig. 1-3. — is T . E. Brown. 



The germs Pterostyra.r, to which the subject of our plate 
belongs, is so nearly allied to Halesia, Linn., and so similar 
to that genus in floral characters, that in the Genera Plan- 
tarum the two were united by Bentham and Hooker. But 
the position of the inflorescence, the absence of brond wings 
on the fruit, the shape of the corolla and the difference 
in number of corolla lobes so markedly distinguish Ptero- 
styrax and Halesia that the two are now, by almost universal 
consent, kept apart. The two groups inhabit different areas, 
for while Halesia is an American genus, Pterostyra.r is 
Arousx, 1910. 



confined to the old world, being represented by three 
species in Japan and by two in China. Specimens of one 
of the Chinese species have indeed at times been referred 
to the species here depicted ; this identification, it is now 
found, cannot be sustained. One of the most distinct and 
beautiful of hardy trees, P. hispidum grows well at Kew, 
and flowers freely almost every year. When its branches 
are furnished with their long pendent panicles, an example 
of P. hispidum is one of the most effective ornaments of the 
garden, the more so because, flowering as it does in late 
June, it escapes comparison with other trees, equally 
striking, which by then are out of flower. It thrives in a 
good loamy soil and in a sunny situation and, like most 
trees of its class, flowers most abundantly after a hot 
autumn. It hast never suffered in the least from frost at 
Kew, but it grows to a larger size and more quickly in the 
warmer counties, and the material from which our plate 
has been prepared was derived from a particularly hand- 
some specimen in the garden of Canon Ellacombe at Bitton, 
near Bristol. In the south-west of Ireland there are some 
splendid examples approaching 40 feet in height and more in 
diameter of crown. The species should be raised from seed 
which occasionally ripens in this country and has been 
offered several times in recent years for exchange in the 
Kew seed-list. Japanese nurserymen also offer it at 
moderate rates, but usually under 'the name of its nearest 
ally, P. corymbosum. The variable character of the under- 
side of the leaves is not due to age, for leaves that are 
finely white tomentose and leaves that are glabrous beneath 
may be found on the same branch. 

Description. — Tree, with glabrous branches and ashy- 
brown bark. Leaves alternate, denticulate 2J-8 in. long, 
l 5 -4 in. wide, elliptic, acute or shortly acuminate, base 
cuneate, green above, paler and smooth or in leaves of the 
same age finely white tomentose beneath, the veins pubes- 
cent ;< petiole 1-1 in. long; stipules 0. Panicles axillary, 

9 1 1 m " a & l *~ 2 ilh wide ' ascending or pendent, 
1 fHeaved at the base, bractless above, pubescent with 
spreading hairs, their branches spreading, |-1 in. long, 
2-tnrcate; flowers somewhat clustered and secund, their 
pedicels 1 lin. long or less. Calyx obconic, manv-nerved, 



5-toothed, finely white pubescent ; teeth about | lin. long 
deltoid-ovate, acute. Corolla 5-partite almost to the base, 
white, finely pubescent on both sides ; lobes 4 lin. long, 
l|-2 lin. wide, elliptic-oblong, quite obtuse, spreading or 
recurved. Stamens 10, 5-6 lin. long; filaments pubescent 
and connate below ; anthers linear-oblong, dorsifixed. 
Ovary inferior, 3-celled, the cells 4-ovuled ; style longer 
than the stamens, pubescent, thickened downwards ; ovules 
attached near the centre of the axis, the upper pair erect, 
the lower pair pendulous. Fruit 5 lin. long, 1 Jin. wide, 
subclavately fusitbrm, many-ribbed, wingless, densely 
hispid, tipped by the style. 



Fig. 1, flower, partly open ; 2, calyx and pistil in longitudinal section ; 3, put 
of the staminal lube and stamens; 4, ovary in transverse section; 5, joung 
fruit : — all enlarged. 



mo 




Tab, 8330. 
GAMOGYNE pulchea 



Aboideae. Tribe Philodendreae. 
Gamogyne, N. E. Br.; Benth. et Jlook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 985. 



Gamogyne pulchra, N. E. Br. in Kew Bull. 1910, p. 197 ; affinis G. Burbidyci, 
N. E. Br., sed pistillodiis basalibus, staminodiis deficientibus, stigmatibus 
rubris spatliaque kermesina diflfert. 

J/erba i erennis, acaulis, omnino glabra. Folia suberecta, petiolata ; lamina 
3-17 cm. longa, 2-3'7cm. lata, lanceolata, acuta, basi cuneato-acuta, supra 
vnidis subtus pallidior; petiolus 5-9 cm. longus, teres, canaliculars, basi 
Imviter sed late vaginans. J edvnculi erecti circiter 14 cm. longi, teretes, 
rufo-brnmu i. Sjiattia subrmtans, e'lipsoidea, acuta, convoluta, apice 
tautum aperta, 4-45 cm. longa, 2 en), diametio, laete kermesina. &padix 
quam Fpatha fere duplo brevior, inclusus, cylindrnceus, obtusus, parte 
i'emii.ex quam pars mascula subduplo breviure basi organis neutris (o\ariis 
abortis) truncatis flavo-virentibus instructa, parte mascula parti femiutae 
contigua staminodiis deficientibus. Antherue oblongae, compiessae, trun- 
catae, apice biporosae, flavescentes. Ovaria oblonga, truncata, connala 
stipmaribus punieeis sessilibus, 1-Iocularia placentis duabus parietalibus 
et basabbus brevibus. Ovula plurima, erecta, suborthotro] a, funiculis 
elongatis.— N. E. Brown. 



The plant now figured was received at Kew from the 
Singapore Botanic Gardens in 1905 with the suggestion 
that it might be a form of Piptospatha Ridleyi, N. E. Br., 
figured at t. 7410 of this work ; another species of the same 
genus, P. insignis, N. E. Br., is given at t. 6598. The two 
genera are indeed so closely allied as to be indistinguishable 
so far as any vegetative character is concerned. They are, 
however, readily discriminated when in flower because in 
Piptospatha the connective is produced and the ovaries are 
distinct, whereas in Gamogyne, the genus to which our 
plant belongs, the anthers are truncate and the ovaries are 
united. The plant figured has been grown on a small 
rockery in the Nepenthes house, where it has thriven well 
and has formed a sturdy tuft of leaves ; it flowered for the 
first time in March, 1909, and thus enabled its generic 
position to be ascertained. As a garden plant Gamogyne 
pulchra is superior to either of the species of Piptospatha 
mentioned above, and in this respect is even preferable to 
its nearest ally, Gamogyne Burbidgei, N. E. Br., a Bornean 
August, 1910. 



plant which is well known in tropical collections. The 
botanical characters that distinguish G. pulchra from 
G. Burbidgei, it will be observed, are not very striking ; 
the species now figured is provided with neuter organs at 
the base of the spadix where in G. Burbidgei there are 
none ; on the other hand, G. Burbidgei has neuter organs 
situated between the male and female portions of the 
spadix, a situation in which there are no neuter organs in 
G. pulchra. The stigmas of G. pulchra are red, whereas 
in G. Burbidgei they are greenish yellow, but the most 
marked distinction between the two plants, from the cultural 
standpoint, lies in the colour of the spathe which in 
G. pulchra is much deeper and brighter red than in G. Bur- 
bidgei. The localities from which the two species have 
been reported are somewhat remote ,• G. pulchra comes from 
the Malayan Peninsula, and has not, so far, been met with 
in Borneo. Mr. H. N. Ridley has kindly informed us that 
G. pulchra comes from the rocky stream on Gunong Pulai 
in Johor. Gunong Pulai is the most eastern peak in the 
range of which Gunong Panti, the original habitat of 
Piptospatha Ridleyi, is the most western hill. 

Description. — Herb, perennial, everywhere glabrous. 
Leaves suberect, petioled ; blade lj-lj in. long, |-1| i»- 
wide, lanceolate, acute, base cuneate, green above, paler 
beneath; petiole 2-3^ in. long, terete, channelled, base 
shortly but broadly sheathing. Peduncles erect, about 
5| in. Jong, terete, reddish brown. Spathe almost nodding, 
ellipsoid, acute, convolute, opening only at the top, 
1J-1| in. long, | in. wide, bright crimson. Spadix hardly 
more than half as long as the spathe, included, cylindric, 
obtuse, the female portion hardly more than half as long as 
the male, beset at the base with yellowish green pistillodes, 
passing abruptly to the male portion without intervening 
staminodes. Anthers obloner, compressed, truncate, witli 
2 apical^ pores, yellowish. "Ovaries oblong, 1 -celled, trun- 
cate, united; the stigmas sessile, pink; ovules numerous, 
erect, almost orthotropous, attached to 2 short basal and 
partly parietal placentas. 

. F^ 1, spadix with the spathe removed; 2, stamen ; 3, ovaries; 4, an ovary 
in longitudinal section; 5, ovule; 0, sketch of an entire plant :-l-5 ndarr 1 * 
l> iiiurli reduced. 




N - v 



Tab. 8331. 

PSORALEA affixis. 

South Africa. 

Leguminosae. Tribe Galegeae. 
Psokalea, Linn.', BentTi. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 491. 



Psoralea affinis, Eckl. et Zcyh. Enum. p. 224; afflnis P. pinnatae, Linn., scd 
pednncul s elongatis foliis aequilongis et calycis lobis obtusissiniisutrinque 
dense nigro-hirsutis differt. 

Fruter ; rami quadrangulares, glabri vel parcissime pilosi, conspicue resinoso- 
punctati ; ramuli floriferi procurnbentes, usque ad 25 cm. longi, plus 
minusve angulares, circiter 3 mm. diametro, glabri tcI novelli parce nigro- 
pilosi. Folia imparipinnata, 3^-juga, petiolo communi 3-4 cm. longo 
supra anguste canaliculate parce piloso; foliola opposita, breviter petiolu- 
lata, linearia, acuta, 4-5 cm. longa, 2-3 mm. lata, 1-nervia, coriacea, 
glabrescenn'a, nigro-punctata ; petioluli carnosi, pubescentes, 1 mm. longi; 
stipulae carnosae vel coriaceae, ovato-lanceolatae, acutae, majorcs 4 mm. 
longae. PedancuU axillares, 1-fiori, apices ramulorum versus conferti, foliis 
aequilongi, pubescentes, bracteis bilabiatis calycinis apicalibus instruct]'. 
Calycis tubus subcampanulatus, 6 mm. longus, 5 mm. diametro, conspicue 
resinoso-glandulosus, extra 10-costatus, co-tis dense nigro -pilosis; calycis 
lobi ob!ongo-ovati, apice rotundati, 4 mm. longi, 3 mm. lati, utrinque 
dense nigro-liirsuti. CoroH>t coerulea nisi carina api.-em versus atro- 
purpurea ; vexilli limbus latis-ijme obovatus, apice truncatus, eniarpinjitns, 
15 cm. latus, multistriatus, utrin<|ue glaber, ungue 4 mm. longo: nlau 
oblongo-ellipticae, apice rotundatae, 1-3 cm. lohgae, G nun. Jatae, unguibns 
7 mm. lmgis; carina obtusa, ali.s fere aequilongi. Tubtu ttamiwdi* 
1*2 cm. longus. Ovarium 3 mm. longum, glabrum ; stylus gracilis, 1 cm. 
longus, glaber, sti-rnia*e pirvo glob m. — P. pinnata, var. ntbglabra, JJarv. 
in Harv. & Sond. Fl. Cap. vol. ii. p. 145.— J. Hutchinson. 



The plant here figured has long been grown in gardens 
under the name of Psoralea pinnata, itself an old garden 
plant which is stated in the Hortus Kewensis to have been 
in cultivation at Hampton Court so long ago as 161)0. 
When Ericas and other South African shrubs were more in 
favour than they are at present, P. pinnata was a favourite 
greenhouse plant, and it is by no means improbable that 
then, as now, the two forms were in cultivation without 
being distinguished from each other. The right of the 
form here figured to separate recognition was pointed out 
by Ecklon and Zeyher more than seventy years ago, and 
al though the late Dr. Harvey was led to treat P. pinnata, 
August, 1'JIU. 



somewhat comprehensively, as a species with four distinct 
varieties of which our plant is one, Mr. Hutchinson points 
out that the characters which distinguish the two are such 
as to justify their segregation, not merely from the stand- 
point of the cultivator, but from that of the taxonomist. 
The peduncles of P. pinnata are exceedingly short, its 
calyx-lobes are ovate-lanceolate, acute and subglabrous, 
while the indumentum is much less dense than in P. ajfinis, 
which has peduncles as long as the leaves, a strongly 
10-ribbed calyx tube, and short, rounded, very densely 
hirsute calyx lobes. The true P. pinnata is widely spread 
in South Africa from the Cape Peninsula to Algoa Bay. 
The plant here figured has a more restricted range and has 
been met with only in the divisions of George, Knysna, 
Uniondale and Uitenhage. In most parts of England 
P. affinis can only be grown as a pot plant, when it may 
be made to form bushes 3 feet or so in height, or planted 
in the border of a sunny greenhouse, when it soon becomes 
a large Cassia-like shrub reaching 10 feet high ; at Kevv 
it flowers in early spring and forms a very attractive object 
in the Conservatory and the Temperate House. The specimen 
from which our plate has been prepared came, however, 
from the garden of Mr. T. A. Dorrien Smith, Tresco Abbey, 
Isles of Scilly, where the plant is quite hardy in the open 
and flowers in April. 

Description. — Shrub; branches 4-angled, glabrous or 
sparingly hairy, with resinous glands ; flowering twigs 
procumbent, up to 10 in. in length, more or less angled, 
about 1J lin. thick, glabrous or at first sparingly pilose 
with black hairs. Leaves odd-pinnate; leaflets opposite, 
3-4-paired, shortly stalked, linear, acute, If -2 in. long, 
1— H lin. wide, 1-nerved, coriaceous, soon becoming gla- 
brous, dotted with black glands ; leaf-rachis 1^-li in. long, 
narrowly channelled above, sparingly hairy ; petiolules 
fleshy, pubescent, | lin. long; stipules fleshy or coriaceous, 
ovate-lanceolate, acute, the largest 2 lin. long. Peduncles 
axillary, 1 -flowered, clustered at the ends of the branches, 
as long as the leaves, pubescent, with two terminal bila- 
biate calycine bracts. Calyx with a subcampanulate tube 
3 lin. long, 2\ lin. wide, with conspicuous resinous glands, 
10-ribbed externally, the ribs densely hirsute with black 



hairs ; lobes oblong-ovate with rounded tips, 2 lin. long, 
1A lin. wide, densely hirsute on both sides with black hairs. 
Corolla blue, with a dark purple keel-tip; standard-limb 
wide obovate, tip truncate emarginafe, 8 lin. wide, glabrous, 
claw 2 lin. long ; wings oblong-elliptic, rounded, 6 lin. long, 
3 lin. wide ; keel obtuse almost as long as the wings. 
Stammal tube 6 lin. long. Ovary \\ lin. long, glabrous ; 
style slender, 5 lin. long, glabrous ; stigma small, globose. 



Fig. 1, calyx laid open, with pistil ; 2, base of vexillum ; 3, wing and keel 
petals; 4, pistil; 5, section of ovary :— all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles- For the ubo of Beginners and Amateurs. By Geokge Bentham, 
F. R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s". 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Benihanrs "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 
Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnaean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L. S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J . Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21.*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Grestt 
Britain and Ireland. By Chakles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., &c, &c. New 
Edition, entirelv revised. Crown 8vo, 6.5. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkelet, M.A., 

F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Cuurey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 

BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S. , F.L. 8., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the autlurity of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W. U. Hakvkt and 
O. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. 
I.— III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., 
Parts I. & II., 9s. each. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Dan'ibi. Oliver, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6i. 
Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. Vol. VII., 27e. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d. 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA: a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. Bv 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the au^picesof the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Gkisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies- 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker, C.B., before the British Association tor the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOYELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 68, AUGUST, 1910. 



Tab. 8327.— BULBOPHYLLUM VIRESCENS, Java. 
„ 8328.— PATRINIA TRILOBA, Japan. 
„ 8329.— PTEROSTYRAX HISPIDUM, Japan. 
tt 8330.— GAMOGYNE PULCHRA, Malaya. 
„ 8331.— PSORALEA AFFINIS, South Africa. 

Lovell Reevk & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W.. Botting Hexislky. 



MONOGRARHS 

From the Third Series of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descrip- 
tions, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may be had separately. Prices 
from Is. to 51s. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANICAL RLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bsautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 



NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 
The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. 1., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. Qd. Vol. VII. , 27*. &*• VoL VIT1 

25s. 6d. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., Part IL, 9s.) 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to 111., 20s. each. 

By HARVEY and SONDER. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W T THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. Vol. IV., Sect. IL, 24s. Vol. V., Part I., 9*. Vol. VI-, W 

Vol. VII., 33s. 
PubUshed under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hop* 

Natal and Transvaal. 



Loykll Reevb A Co. Ltd., 6, Henri, tt.i Street, Covent Garden. 



LOSIKO i NU5TJJD BY RBtUI (UM UB MM, VtD., PCM STREET. STAMFOKD STRKJ" 



3.H. 



JFourtf) j&erirs. 

No. 69.' 



VOL. VI.— SEPTEMBER. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6<i. coloured, '2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 4:1s. 



ok No. X483 OF llIK entikk wokk » 
C U K T I S ' 8 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND R 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KKVV, 

AN!) OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BT 

D. PEAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Dirtttor, Gojial botanic tfVarfirns, HUto. 







L O N I) 

LOVELL REEV 



PUBLIS 

6. HENRIETTA 



', COV hN I 



■served.] 



\ 



Office, as second-class matter. 






LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



JUST PUBLISHED, 



CORAL AND ATOLLS, 

Their history, description, theories of their origin both before and since 
that of Darwin, the influence of winds, tides, and ocean current 
their formation and transformations, their present condition, pr< 
fauna, and flora. 

By F. WOOD-JONES, B.Sc, F.Z.S. 

Numerous illustrations, plates and map. 24s. 

CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND OF THE ADJACENT PORTIONS OF GARHWAL AND TIBET. 
By Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard Strachey and J. F. Duthie. 5s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATI02E OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 
2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations 
of their names. By the Rev. Prof. G. Henslow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. Qd. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 
to or Naturalized in the British Isles, 
By GEORGE BENT HAM, F. R, S. 
a by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLOBA 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plait* 
Drawn by \\\ H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH. F.I 

For mil rv— « 

am' s "Handbook," and other L 

' t; ' Edition, 'js. 

"^>**** ,.i ; ket,cov; 










^'■.'LoruHc 



Tab. 8332. 
RHODODENDRON Uxgerxii. 

Caucasus. 

Ericaceae. Tribe Khodoreae. 
Ehododendeon, Linn.; Benth. et Hook/. Oen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron (Eui'hododendron) Ungernii, Trautv. in. Acta Hart. Petrop. 
vol. ix. (1884), p. 514; Hegel, Gartenflora, vol. xxxiv. (1885), p. 335 et 
vol. xxxv. (1886), pp. 378, 1226 ; Lipsky, Consp. Ft. Catcc. in Acta Hort. 
Tifi'n, vol. iv. p. 382; inter species caucasicas foliis oblongo-oblanceolatis 
rigiHe apiculatis subtus densissime fulvo-toinentosis et floribus dilute 
roseis distinctum. 

Frutex vel arbor parva, 4-6 m. alta, ramis floriferis crassis rigidis rectis 
primum pubescentibus. Folia valide petiolata, sparsa, biennia vel 
triennia ; lamina crasse cor'acea, rigida, oblongo-oblanceolata, 10-15 cm. 
longa, maxima supra medium 5 cm. lata, apice rotundata simul apiculata, 
basi cuneata, supra glabra, saturate viridia, subtus densissime firmiterqne 
fulvo-tomentosa, costa supra imprcssa, subtus crassa, elevata, venis 
utrinque ineonspieuis ; petiotus crassus circiter 2 cm. longus, primum 
pubescens, leviter canaliculus. Fiona albo-rosei, circiter 5 cm. diametro, 
racemoso-corymbosi, corynibis 20-30- floris et 15-20 cm. diametro; pedicel li 
graciliusculi, 3-4 cm. longi, pilis albis crispulis parce vestiti ; bracteie 
angnstae, acutae, quam pedicelli breviores, fulvae, albo-pilosulae, cito 
deeidnae. Cah/cis lobi inaeqnales, 3-6 mm. longi, lanceolati, obtusi, 
glanduloso-ciliati. Corolla late campanulata, extra glabra, intus infra 
me bum puberula, usque ad medium 5-lobata; lobi fere aequales, lati, 
rotundati, obscure emarginati, recurvi, posterior major intus obscure 
punctatus, onirics longitudinaliter venoso-striati. Stamina 10, quam corolla 
triente breviora, inter se alterna paullo bi-eviora; antherae breves; fila- 
loenta filiformia, infra medium et paullo supra basin zona glandularum 
stipitatarum ornata. Ovarium 5-loculare, ]iilis crassis crispulis dense 
vestitum; stylus glabor, stamina paullo excedeus. Cfaptubt sul>c\liiidriea, 
circiter 1*5 cm. longa, glabresceus. Scmina circiter 1*5 mm. longa, 
utrinque cristata. — W. 13. Hemsley. 



The species here figured is a native of the district of 
Batoum to the south of the Caucasus, where the familiar 
Rhododendron ponticum, Linn., figured at t. 650 of this 
work, is also wild. It was discovered some twenty-five 
years ago, by Baron Ungern-Sternberg, growing under 
Picea orientalis at elevations of from 4000 to 6000 feet 
above sea -level, where it occupies a zone between that of 
R. ponticum, at lower levels, and that of R. caucasicum,Ys\\^ 
figured at t 1145 of this work, higher up. The subject of 
our illustration was raised from seed received from the 
Imperial Botanic Garden, St Petersburg, in 1866; at Kew 
it has been grown in a pot under the conditions most 
September, 1910. 



suitable for Himalayan species and is now a bush about 
6 feet high, with leathery dark green leaves, smooth above 
but densely woolly below. It has very rarely flowered ; the 
flowers now figured were produced in July, 1909. Although 
it has hitherto been afforded protection during winter there 
is reason to think, when its native habitat and the 
behaviour of other species from the same region are taken 
into account, that it may prove hardy in this country. 

Description. — Shrub, or small tree, 12-20 feet high ; 
flowering twigs straight and stout, at first pubescent. 
Leaves distinctly petioled, alternate, persisting for 2-3 sea- 
sons, thickly coriaceous, firm, oblong-oblanceolate, 4-6 in. 
long, the largest 2 in. wide above the middle, tip rounded 
and apiculate, base cuneate, glabrous and dark green above, 
beneath closely and firmly tawny-tomentose ; midrib im- 
pressed above, strong and raised beneath, lateral nerves 
inconspicuous on either surface ; petiole stout, about I in. 
long, pubescent at first, slightly channelled. Flowers pale- 
rose^about 2 in. across, corymbose, corymbs 20-30-flowered, 
6-8 in. through ; pedicels somewhat slender, 1$-1§ in. long, 
sparingly clothed with crisp white hairs; bracts narrow, 
acute, shorter than the pedicels, tawny, with a white 
pubescence which soon disappears. Calyx-lobes unequal, 
1J-3 Hn. long, lanceolate, obtuse, glandular-ciliate. Corolla 
widely campanulate, glabrous outside, within puberulous 
below the middle, 5-lobed halfway down, the lobes almost 
uniform, broad, rounded, faintly emarginate, recurved, the 
uppermost, which is slightly larger than the others, faintly 
dotted, all distinctly longitudinally veined. Stamens 10, 
one-third shorter than the corolla, alternately shorter and 
longer ; anthers short ; filaments filiform, with a band of 
glandular stipitate hairs below the middle and a little above 
the base. Ovary 5-celled, densely clad with stout crisp 
hairs ; style glabrous, somewhat longer than the stamens. 
< <ipsule subcylindric, about j in. long, almost glabrous. 
beeda under 1 Hn. long, crested at both ends. 



4 „v?f; l ' I*? ? f a lraf showi "S nnderaurface ; 2, calyx and pistil; 3, stamens; 



ration of ovary :~ a ll, except 1, enlanjed. 



8333 







Tab. 8333. 

CHIRITA RUPESTRIS. 

Malay Peninsula. 

GESNERACKAE. Tribe CyHTANDREAE. 

Chirita, Ham.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1022; Clarke in 
DO. Monogr. Phan. vol. y. pars 1, p. 109. 



Cliirita rupestris, Bidl. in Journ. Str. Br. Roy. As. Son. n. 43 (1905), p. 59 et 
in King & Gamble, Mat. Ft. Mai. leu. iv. 976 (Journ. A*. Soe, Bena. 
vol. Ixxiv. pars 2, p. 766); inter species in peninsula malayana adhtto 
obvias C. Glasgovii, Bidl., niaxime affinis, corolla dimidio brevioie 
facillime tamen distinguenda, 

llerla erecta, simplex Tel e basi ramosa, 30-60 cm. alta, caule glabrcseente. 
Folia opposita, ovata. apice subacuta, basi inaequalia, truncata rotundata vel 
subcuneata, 5-8 cm. longa, 2 - 5-6 cm. lata, margine serrata, membranaoea, 
subtus parce farinosa, utrinque pilosa, pilis supra longiusculis multi- 
oellularibus subtus brevioribus, nervis lateralibus utrinque circiter 10 
subtus prominulis; petioli ad 7 cm. usque longi, pilosi, supra canaliculate 
Fedunculi axillares, solitarii \el bini, 4-8-flori, 1-3 "5 cm. longi; bracteae 
connatae ctipulam pilosim margine crenato-serratam formantes. Pedicelli 
glabra, fere 8 mm. longi. Calyx fere ad basin usque partitas, segmenlis 
linenri-lanceolatis circiter 1 cm. longis pilis longiusculis ciliatis. Corolla 
infundilmliformis, intus antice lutea, ceternm azurca; tubus albas, 
calycem paulo excedens, bracteis aequilongus, intra calycmi curvatus, 
extra et apice intus glanduloso-pilo.ms; Iiubna pataloa 12 nun. lafus. 
Stamina 2; filaments 7 mm. supra basin tubi inaerta; antlnrae postico 
lmrbatae; staminodia 3, quorum 2 fihmentis fere aeqnilooga, alteram 
perbreve. Discus annularis. Ov-trium p'lis a-lpzessis obteotum, 9 mm. 
altum, 1 mm. diametro; stylus stamina superans; stigma 2-latnellatum. — 
W. G. Craib. 



A marked feature of the species of the Datura! family 
Gesneraceae to which the plant here figured belongs is 
their extremely limited distribution. This pleasing Chirita 
appears to be no exception to this rule, for it has s<> far 
only been met with on the limestone rocks of Lankawi 
which are, it appears, particularly rich in Gesneraceous 
plants ; it is one of the many novelties met with by 
Mr. C. Curtis, in the course of his botanical investigation 
of this island, which lies off the coast of Kedah in the 
Malay Peninsula. It was introduced to European horti- 
culture by Mr. H. N. Ridley, who communicated seeds to 
Kew from the Singapore Botanical Garden in 1905, the 
year in which he first published an account of the plant. 
As cultivated at Kew, in a moist tropical house, it is a 
SranuiBXR, 1910. 



bushy compact annual about 2 feet in height, which flowers 
freely and continuously during autumn. It is easily 
brought to perfection under the treatment suitable for 
Gloxinias and other tropical G-esneraceae. 

Description. — Hero, erect and simple or branching from 
the base, 1-2 feet high ; stems soon becoming glabrous. 
Leaves opposite, ovate, acute at the tip, often rather unequal 
and truncate, rounded or slightly cuneate at the base, 
serrate, 2-3 in. long, l-2£ in. wide, membranous, slightly 
mealy beneath, hairy on both surfaces with several-celled 
hairs which are longer above than below, lateral nerves about 
10 on each side, somewhat raised beneath ; petioles 2-2^ in. 
long, channelled above. Peduncles axillary, solitary or 
paired, each 4-8- flowered, J— 1^ in. long; bracts connate 
in a hairy cup with a crenately toothed margin. Pedicels 
glabrous, about § in. long. Calyx divided nearly to the 
base into 5 linear-lanceolate lobes about 5 lin. long which 
are ciliate with longish hairs. Corolla funnel-shaped ; limb 
bright blue with a yellow blotch in front within, spreading, 
| in. across ; tube white, somewhat curved below, as long 
as the bracts and rather longer than the calyx, glandular 
hairy outside and at the mouth within. Stamens 2 ; fila- 
ments inserted about £ in. above the base ; anthers bearded 
behind; staminodes 3, the lateral nearly as long as the 
filaments, the central very short. Disk annular. Ovary 
beset with adpressed hairs; over ^ in. long, only \ hn. 
wide; style longer than the stamens; stigma 2-lobed. 



Fig. 1, part of a leaf, under side; % calyx and pistil; 3, pistil, portion of 
calyx removed; 4, corolla, laid open; 5 and 6, anthers; 7. an antlier-hair :— 
all enlarged. 



8334 







Tab. 8334. 

TRISTELLATEIA afstralts. 

Malaya and Australasia. 

Malpighiaoeae. Tribe Hibeae. 
TRISTELLATEIA, Thouars; Benth. et Book./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 258. 

Tristellateia australis, A. Rich. Sert. Astrolab. p. 38, t. 15; foli is ovatis vel 
ovato-oblongis acutis basi saepius rotundatis glabris aspectu laurino, all's 
fructmim anguste oblongis distincta. 

Frutex scandens, altas. Hamuli conspicue Ienticellati, juniores pilis medifixis 
sparse puberuli, seniores glabri, floriferi penduli. Folia opposita, ovata vel 
ovato-oblonga, apice acuta, recurva, basi plerumque rotuudata, leviter 
complicata, 5-10 cm. longa, '2 • 5-5 '5 cm. lata, opaca, glabra, supra nervis 
lateralibus quam mesophyllo pallidioribus vcnulis inconspiouis, subtus 
crebre reticulata costa satis prominente ; nervi later des utrinque 4-5, 
arcuati; petioli 0*7-2 cm. longi, conspicue suleati, puberuli, inarginibus 
minute serrulatis; stipulae subulatae, acutae, vix 1 mm. longae, petiolo 
leviter adnatae. Bacemi 5-15 cm. longi, 12-16-flori, floribus oppositis 
pedunculatis: pedunculi 6-7 mm. longi ; apice bibracteati, bracteis minutis 
siibulatis ; pedicelli singuli, 1 •8-1*0 cm. longi, sursum incrassati. 
Alabastra breviter cymbiformia latere postico concavo, quinquecostata. 
Sepala erecta, oblonga, 2*5 mm. longa, 1*5 mm. lata, ejilandulosa. Fttala 
aestivatione ascendenti-imbricata, oblonga vel ovato-oblonga, 1* 1-1*2 cm. 
li;n<ra, apice obtusa, basi truncata vd subcordata, ungue 2 mm. longo. 
Stamina 10, quorum 5 antipetala longiora; filamenta basi breviter connafa, 
in alabastro fiava, mox rubescentia, post lapsura antlierarum intense 
rubra, antipetala 4 mm. longa, crassa, antisopala 2 mm. longa, pro rata 
gracilia; antberae oblongae, breviter rostratae, 2-2*5 mm. longae, poris 
duabus terminalibus dehiscentes. Ovarium hexagoDO-globo^mn, circifi r 
2 mm. diametro, 3-Ioculare, lateribus antilocularibus cristafis, latcribus 
interlocularibus sericeo-pilosis; styli 3, innequales, quorum unus 7 mm. 
longus, secundus duplo minor, ttrtius miniums; ovula solitaria, pendula. 
Fructus tricocci, cocci's circiter 8-alatis, abs anguste oblougis. — T. austra- 
lasica, A. Juss. Monopr. Malpigh. p. 241; Benth. PI Austr. vol. i. p. 286; 
Hook. f. PL Brit. Ind. vol. i. p. 418. tkttftuma laurifolium, Wight et Arn. 
in Edin. New Phil. Joum. vol. xv. 1833, p. 179.— T. A. Spbague. 

The plant here figured was raised at Kew from seeds 
received in 1902 from the Botanic Garden, Singapore. Its 
cultivation presents no difficulty and in the Palm House, 
where it is grown, it forms a strong climber with pendent 
shoots which in summer produce graceful terminal racemes 
of yellow flowers. The filaments, which in bud are 
yellowish, begin to assume a reddish tint when the petals 
expand and by the time the anthers have fallen become 
bright red and impart a characteristic appearance to the 
flowers. One of the most widely distributed members of 
the natural family Malpighiaoeae, Tristellateia australis 
appears to be characteristic of the littoral flora met with 
on sea coasts from the Mascareues to Melanesia. While, 

Sbftxmbkb, 1910. 



however, all save two of the nineteen species of Tristellateia 
hitherto described are natives of Madagascar or East Tropical 
Africa, T. australis appears to occur only in the eastern 
portion of this region ; its most western habitats, so far as 
is known, are the Malayan Peninsula and Siam, whence it 
extends eastward through the Malayan Archipelago to 
Queensland, New Guinea, New Ireland, the Solomon 
Islands, New Caledonia, the Philippines and Formosa. 

Description. — Shrub, climbing ; twigs with prominent 
lenticels, at first sparingly puberulous with centrally 
attached hairs, at length glabrous ; flowering shoots 
pendulous. Leaves opposite, ovate or ovate-oblong, acute 
and recurved at the apex, base usually rounded and some- 
what folded, 2-4 in. long, l-2\ in. wide, dull, glabrous, 
lateral nerves above rather pale, secondary nervation indis- 
tinct, beneath closely reticulate with a rather prominent 
midrib ; lateral nerves arching, 4-5 on each side ; petioles 
J-j in. long, markedly channelled, puberulous, with slightly 
serrulate edges ; stipules subulate, acute, slightly adnate. 
Racemes 2-6 in. long, 12-16-flowered, the flowers opposite, 
peduncled. Buds shortly cymbiform, concave behind, 
5-ribbed ; peduncles 3-4 lin. long, with 2 small apical 
subulate bracts ; pedicels 6-8 lin. long, thickened upwards. 
Sepals small, erect, oblong, eglandular. Petals imbricate, 
oblong or ovate-oblong, 5-6 lin. long, obtuse, base truncate 
or subcordate, the claw 1 lin. long. Stamens 10, 2-seriate, 
those opposite the petals the longer; filaments shortly 
connate at the base, in bud yellow, soon becoming reddish 
and ultimately, after the anthers fall, deep red; those 
opposite petals 2 lin. long, stout; those opposite sepals 
1 hn. long and more slender; anthers oblong, shortly 
beaked, about 1 lin. long, opening by terminal pores. 
Ovary globose, somewhat 6-angled, about 1 lin. wide, 
^-celled; crested opposite the cells, silky hairy on the 
intervening areas; styles 3, unequal, one 3 lin. long, the 
second half as long, the third minute ; ovules solitary, 
pendulous. Fruit 3-coccous ; cocci about 8-winged, the 
wings narrow oblong 



" 1, petioles; 2, flower, the petals partly removed; 3, a hair; 4 ami 5, 
ailodnr';,! ' ' Vcl11t * al B«Jtion of pistil, showing the .styles: — 



8335 







T vSn£eni.Brooks.Ew& 



Tab. 8335. 

MICROMELES caloxeura. 

Western China. 

ROSACEAE. Tllte POMEAK. 

MiceomeleSj Decne ; C. K. Schneider, Handb. d. LaubholzJc. vol. i. p. 700. 



Micromeles caloneura, St aj if in Kew Bull. 1910, p. 192 : species ex affinitate 
M. Schwerinii, C. K. Schneider, foliis infra viridibus subglabris serratnra 
minus inaequali et minus acuta, inflorescentia multo minus villosa, floribus 
majoribus, sepalis latis obtusis, stylis 5, fructibusque majoribus distincta. 

Arbor mediocris vel frutex ; rami glabri, cortice subnitido nigro-castaneo 
obtecti, parce lenticellati, tandem transverse ru#osi. Gemmae hibernantes 
ovoidei extra glabri ; perulae intus fulvo-pilosae et ex axillis pilis fulvis 
slipatae. Folia elliptico- vel obovato-oblonga, acuta vel rarius acuminata 
vel interdum obtusiuscula, basi subacute, duplicato-serrato-crenata, crenis 
nervos laterales primarios recipentes quam caeteris plerumque majoribus, 
6-9 cm. longa, 3-4 ■ 5 cm. lata, firme herbacea, decidua, supra glaberrima, 
demum saturate viridia, infra pallida, secundum nervos saltern ad eoruni 
axillas parce villosula, nervis lateralibus subrectis eximie parallels 
utiinque 10-12 supra eleganter impressis infra prominentibus, venis 
transversis areolisque tenuissimis ; petioli 12 mm. longi, primo laxe 
pilosi, mox glabri, anguste canaliculati ; stipulae subfiliform.es, 6-8 mm. 
longae, pi!osae, mox deciduae. Floret 6 mm. diametro j>lerumque in 
ramis abbreviatis in corymbos multifloros dispositi; ramuli et pedicelli 
bracteisque caducissimis filiformibus laxs villosuli. Jieceptaculum turbi- 
natum, pilosulum. Sepahi late ovata, obtusa, vix 2 mm. longa, villosula. 
Fetala alba, late obovata, 5 mm. longa. Stamina circiter 20; antlierae 
violaceo-purpureae. Styli 5, inferne conna*a. Frucfus globoso-pyriformis, 
brunueus, lenticellatus, 8-10 mm. longus. — O. Staff. 



The germs Micromeles is already represented in gardens 
by two beautiful species, M. abiifolia, Koehne, and J/. 
Fulgneri, C. K. Schneider ; the former of these has already 
been figured at t. 7773 of this work. To these the species 
now figured will prove a welcome addition. It was first 
met with by Mr. A. Henry in North Wushan, Szechuen, in 
1889, and was again collected by Mr. E. H. Wilson in the 
same general region, in woods at 8000 feet above sea-level, 
in 1904. From seeds sent by Wilson to Messrs. James 
Veitch and Sons plants have been raised in their nursery at 
Coombe Wood and from one of these, which flowered for 
the first time in 1909, the material for our plate has been 
derived. M. caloneura has proved perfectly hardy and has 
thriven well in cultivation, and, while it is as yet premature 
September, 1910. 



to pronounce definitely with regard to its propagation, the 
fact that it has fruited within five years of the sowing of 
the seed seems to indicate that this should prove easy. 

Description. — Tree or shrub; branches glabrous, bark 
almost, shining, dark chestnut, sparingly lenticelled, ulti- 
mately transversely wrinkled. Resting-buds ovoid, glabrous ; 
scales tawny hirsute within and with axillary tufts of tawny 
hairs. Leaves elliptic- or obovate-oblong, acute or rarely 
acuminate or at times bluntish, base subacute, margin twice 
serrate-crenate, the notches in which the primary nerves 
end rather larger than the rest, 2^-3 J in. long, l^-lf in. 
wide, firmly herbaceous, deciduous, quite glabrous and at 
length deep green above, pale beneath, and sparingly hairy 
on the nerves, at least at their points of origin ; lateral 
nerves 10-12 on each side, nearly straight and markedly 
parallel, finely impressed above, prominent beneath, trans- 
verse veinlets very slender; petioles | in. long, at first 
loosely hairy, soon glabrous, narrowly channelled ; stipules 
almost filiform, 3-4 lin. long, hairy, soon deciduous. Flowers 
$ in. across, in many-flowered corymbs on short twigs; the 
branchlets, pedicels "and the filiform caducous bracts loosely 
pubescent. Receptacle turbinate, somewhat hairy. Sepals 
wide ovate, obtuse, under 1 lin. long, rather hairy. Petals 
white, wide obovate, 2± lin. long. Stamens about 20; 
anthers violet-purple. Styles 5, connate below. Fruit 
globose-pyrit'orm, brown, lenticelled, 4-5 lin. long. 



Fig 1. margin of leaf; 2, vertical section of a flower, the petals removed ; 
*> MM 1, Stamens; 5, vertical section of a fruit ; G, seed :— all enlarged. 



S33S 







- 



Tab. 8330. 
ALECTORURUS tkdobnsis. 

Japan. 

Lixiaceae. Tribe Asphodeleae. 
Alectoruiuts, Mukino in Bot. Mag. Tokyo, vol. xxii. p. 14. 



Alectorurus yedoensis, Mukino in Bot. Mag. Tokyo, vol. xxii. p. 16 ; species 
unica. 

Ilerba perennis, glabra. Rhizorna breve, crassum. Folia 6-11, caespitosa, 
disticha, felcato-eusiformia, obtusa vel subacuta, Anna, laevia, 11-55 cm. 
longa, - 7-2 - 5 cm. lata, supra vaginam aiticulata; costa inconspicua. 
Scapus aphyllns, 25-70 cm. longus, compressus, saepe .anguste alatns; 
panicula pyramidalis ; flures ad ramos racemosim dispositi, dimorphi, 
alii staminibus longe exsertis, alii staminibus periantbio aequilongis; 
bracteae anguste Janceolatae, 2 mm. longae; bracteolae miuutae, e hasi 
lato cuspidatae; pedicelli supra medium articulati. Perianthium cam- 
panulatum, dilute roseum; segmenta G, 2-seriata, basi breviter coimata, 
riorum staminibus exsertis oblonga, concava, obtusa, leviter carinata, 
uninervia, 5 mm. longa ; florum staminibus inclasis late elliptica, 3 mm. 
longa. Stamina 6 ; tilamenta 3 vel 10 mm. longa ; antherao dorsifixae, 
ovatae, basi cordatae. Ovarium trilobum, giabrum; .stylus stamina 
Iongiora superans, staminibus brevibus aequilongus ; stigma minutam; 
ovula 2, collateialia, ascendentia. Capsu/a loculicida. Semina oblonga, 
trigona, basi pilis longis albis instructa. — Anthericum yedoense, Maxim, ex 
Franoh. et Sav. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. ii. pp. 83, 529. Bulhinella yedoctwi*, 
Matsum. in Bot. Mag. Tokyo, vol. xv. 39, et Ind. PI. Jap. vol. ii. pars i. p. 192. 
DiancUa sp., Sav. in Som. Zusetz. ed. 2, vol. vi. n. 46. — C. H. Wright. 



The graceful Asphodeline here figured, which is known 
in Japan, where it is a native, as the Keibi-ran, or Keibi 
" orchid," has given some little trouble to students of 
Japanese plants. The late Dr. Savatier, dealing with a 
good Japanese figure of the species, at first thought that 
it might be a Dianella but subsequently abandoned this 
opinion in favour of that of the late Mr. Maximowicz who 
treated it as an Anthericum ; it is under the name Anthe- 
ricum yedoense, bestowed on the plant by this eminent 
botanist, that the plant is generally known in gardens. 
Professor Matsumura, with ample reason, at a later date 
removed the plant from Anthericum, but, as Mr. Makino 
has more recently shown, Matsumura's belief that our plant 
September, 1910. 



is a Bulbinella is not really more tenable than the sugges- 
tion of Savatier or of Maximowicz, and there is hardly room 
for doubt that the most satisfactory course is to adopt 
Makino's view and to consider it the type of a genus 
apart. The flowers are dimorphic, each plant bearing one 
kind only ; in one group the stamens are twice as long as 
the perianth ; in the other the stamens are not exserted. 
It is not improbable that this divergence may be of sexual 
significance and it has been suggested that the long-staminate 
form, here figured, may be the male. The plant from which 
our plate has been prepared was presented to Kew in 1901 
by Mr. A. K. Bulley, Ness, Neston, Cheshire. At Kew it does 
not flower freely but is quite hardy, and forms, when in flower 
in July, an elegant tuft. The treatment most suitable for it 
is that which is also suitable for hardy species of Antkericum. 

Description. — Herb, perennial, with a short, thick root- 
stock ; all parts glabrous. Leaves 6-11, tufted, distichous, 
falcate-ensiform, obtuse or subacute, firm, smooth, 4-20 in. 
long, i- Hn. wide, articulate with the sheath, midrib hardly 
distinguishable from the remaining nerves. Scape naked, 
10-30 in. long, compressed and often narrowly winged, 
bearing a pyramidal panicle. Flowers racemosely set along 
the panicle-branches, dimorphic, some with far exserted 
stamens, others with the stamens only equalling the 
perianth-segments; bracts narrow lanceolate, 10 lin. long; 
bracteoles very small, cuspidate from a broad base ; pedicels 
jointed above the middle. Perianth campanulate, pale rose ; 
segments 6, 2-seriate, shortly united at their bases ; those 
of the long-staminate flowers oblong, concave, obtuse, faintly 
keeled and 1-nerved, 2£ lin. long; those of the short- 
staminate flowers wide elliptic, l 1 - lin. long. Stamens 6; 
filaments 1 J lin. long in one form, 5 lin. long on the other ; 
anthers dorsifixed, ovate, their bases cordate. Ovary 3-lobcd, 
glabrous ; style in the long-staminate form longer than the 
stamens; in the short-staminate form as long as the fila- 
ments; stigma minute; ovules 2, collateral, ascending. 
tapstde loculicidal. Seeds oblong, 3-gonous, with a basal 
tuft of long white hairs. 



BwiSA^" 8 ' 2 aT1<l 3 > rtMWOW; 4, pistil; 5, sketch of an entire plant, 
ftOWing habit:-,*// a.laojr.l, ,.,,,.,,, 6j „{& u ^ .,„,„,,,,. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnajan 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, II. A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., <fcc, &c. New 
Edition, entirelv revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FTJNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Currey, F.R.S. 12" Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGINE^. By 

George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. I). IIookkk, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 
FLORA AUSTRALIKNS1S: » Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bk.ntham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Muellek, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W. II. Hakvky and 
0. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. TiiisEr.TON-DvER, F.R.S. Vols. 
I.— III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., 
Parts I. & II., 9s. each. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Damki, Olivkr, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thishi. ton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27.-. Vol. V.. 25s. 6.L 
Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d. 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Hacquame's Islands. Bj 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISI.ANLS. bj 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 4&f. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, Augh t*. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE k CO. Ltd., G, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 69, SEPTEMBER, 1910. 



Tab. 8332.— RHODODENDRON UNGERNII, Caucasus. 
„ 8333.— CHIRITA RUPESTRIS, Malay Peninsula. 
m 8334.— TRISTELLATEIA AUSTRALIS, Malaya and 

Australasia. 
„ 8335.— MICROMELES CALONEURA, Wetter* China. 
„ 8336.— ALECTORURUS YEDOENSIS, Japan. 

LOVELL Bekvk &, Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 
JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 
i 
Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemslky. 



MONOGRAPHS 

From the Third Series of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descrip- 
tions, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may be had separately. Prices 
from Is. to 51s. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANICAL RLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. M. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 



NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Continuation edited by Sir VV. T. THI'BEliTON-DYBB, F.R.S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. U. Vol. VII. ,27s. 64 Vol. VIII., 

25s. 6d. 

Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., Part II., 9s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Vols. I. to HI., 20s. each. 
By HARVEY and SONDER. 
v . __ The Contin ™tion edited by Sir W. T. THISELTOX-DYER, F.R.S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. y l. IV., Sect. II., 24,. Vol. V., Part I., 9s. Vol. VI., 24*. 
_ Vol. VII., 33s. 

Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 
Natal and Transvaal. 

_ L ° tKt * m * 0*I*»* VWirttVaww, Covent tt«i*». 

fcOWO, : fhwtm BY WII , UAM (^^^^ Hma STAMK „ 1;l> STREKT , ,.k. 



dfouttl) Jr>ntfS. 

No. 70. 



VOL. VI.— OCTOBER. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42a. 



OB No. 24S4 OF 1HK KHTIBJB WORK. 

CURT IS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, . 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, HEW \ 

AND OTHER BOTANK7AL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Director, Bon a I Botanic (Tinrotns, IXcto. 




•lours and ai: 
Ami Art with he) - 



LOV 



E & CO. Ltd., 



6, HBNRIE1 EKT, COVE 



id.] 



(Entered a; 'ork Post Office as second-class Tnatter.) 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 

CORAL AND ATOLLS, 

Their history, description, theories of their origin both before and since 
that of Darwin, the influence of winds, tides, and ocean currents on 
formation and transformations, their present condition, products, 
fauna, and flora. 

By F. WOOD-JONES, B.Sc, F.Z.S. 

Numerous illustrations, plates and map. 24a. 

CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND OF THE ADJACENT PORTIONS OF GARHWAL AND TIBET. 
By Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard Strachey and J. F. Duthie. 5s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATIC2E OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By»W. EL PEARSON. 
2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations 
of their ngfresi By the Rev. Prof. G. Henslow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Crown 8yo, 4$. 6d. 

THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific iievim of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 49 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles, 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F.R.S. 

Revised by Sir J. D, Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF YhTbRITISH FLOBA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
I,R H. FITCH, F.L.S., akd W. G. SMITH. F.L.S. 

tied Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Flc-r 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engraving, 9s. 



!EVE & CO. Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



8331 




.Fuch.li.th. 



Vincent Brooks J)^ (Sc-Son. Lt.mp 



L Reeve & C° Lan.don. 



Tab. 8337. 
BETULA Maxtmowiczii. 

Japan, Saghalien and Manchuria. 

Cupulifebae. Tribe Betttlkak. 
Betula, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 401. 



Betula (Betulaster) Maximowiczii, Kegel in Bull. Soc. Nat. Mosc. vol. xxxviii. 
par* ii. p. 418, t. 6, ff. 1-S; Winkler in Engl. Pflanzenr., Bet.ulaceae, p. 89, 
f. 22, D-F; Bailey, Cyclop. Amer. Horf. vol i. p. 158; Elwcs (& Henry, Trees 
of Great Brit. <fe Ire'and, vol. iv. p. 976, t. 269, f. 6; species distincfissima, 
foliis ad 15 cm. longis basi profunde cordatis, amentis femineis 2-4 elongatis 
in racemos dispositis. 

Arhor interdum ad 30 m. alta; trnncus 0"5-l m. diametro, cortice papyraceo 
pallide aurantiaco vel griseo ; ramuli fere glabri, cortice nitente brunneo 
sparse Ienticellato. Folia late ovata, 8-15 cm. longa, 6-9 cm. lata, apice 
breviter et abrupte acuminata, basi profunde cordata, glanduloso-S( rrata 
vel biserrata, laete viridia, supra primo pilis erectis vestita, demum 
glabrescentia, infra ubique sparse pubescentia vel costa et venis primariis 
pnbescentibus exceptis glabra, glanduloso-punctata ; venae Jaterales 
utrinque 10-12 in dentes ceteris longiores exeuntes ; petioli 2-4 cm. 
longi, glabri vel pubescentes. Amenta masaita apice ramulorum fascicu- 
late, auguste cylindracea, 8-12 cm. longa, bracteae rotundatae, breviter 
ciliatae, glandulis sessilibus paucis iustructae. Amenta feminea 2-4 in 
racemes laxos d'sposita, anguste cylindracea, 3 cm. longa, fructifcra 4-8 cm. 
1 >nga, circa er 1 cm. lata; bracteae maturae glabrae, 4-5 mm. longae, 
fiiciter 2 - 5 mm. latae, 3-lobatae, lobis lateralibus levittr patentibus lolx> 
inter medio multo brevioribus ; nnculae vix 2 mm. longae, latissime alatae. 
— ft. MaximmuirzhoHi, Pcgel in DC. 1'rodr. vol xvi. sect. ii. p. 180; Shir.n in 
Bot. MHg. Tokyo, vol. Tin. p. 321, t. 6, ff. 36-38; Sargent, For. Fl. Japan, 
p. 62; Shirasawa, Ic. Ess. Forest. Japon, text. p. 45, t. 23, ff. 1-8; Mavr, 
Frenidland. Wald- u. Farkbiiume, p. 449 (//. Maximowicsiana). — S. A. Sk.\n. 



The handsome Birch which forms the subject of our plate 
is remarkable on account of its large and deeply cordate 
leaves which impart to the species a striking resemblance to 
some of the Lindens. It was originally met with by the 
lamented Mr. Maximowicz in the island of Yezo in Japan, in 
which country it was afterwards collected by Dr. Mayr on 
the Nikko mountains in Hondo. According to Professor 
Sargent it ranges northwards through Saghalien into 
Manchuria. In 1888 the late Mr. J. E. Yeitch sent a 
supply of seed of this tree from Yezo to England, thus for 
the first time introducing it into Europe, where examples 
are now to be met with in many establishments. En 1893 
Professor Sargent presented to Kew front the Arnold 
Arboretum a supply of seed received by him from the officers 
of the Imperial Forest Department of Yezo. Prom a plant 
October, 1910. 



raised at Kew from this seed the material on which our 
illustration is based was derived. B. Maximowiczii is a 
member of the small section Betulaster in which are in- 
cluded B. alnoides, Ham., B. luminifera, Winkler, and JJ. 
Baeumkeri, Winkler, all natives of the Himalaya or of 
Central and Southern China. The species included in this 
section are characterised by having the elongated fruiting 
catkins arranged in racemes, rarely solitary, and by their 
broad-winged nutlets. The only other Birch in which the 
leaves are distinctly cordate at the base is B. ulmifolia, Sieb. 
& Zucc. ; from this B. Maximowiczii is easily distinguished 
by its larger, broadly ovate leaves. Dr. Shirasawa describes 
the wood of our tree as hard, and as showing no difference 
in the colour of the heart and the sap woods. In Japan, 
where it is known as Udai-kamba or Saihada-kamba, the 
timber is used for house-building ; fishermen also make 
torches of the bark, which is said to take fire readily even 
when wet. 

Description. — Tree, sometimes attaining a height of 

100 feet; trunk lh~%k feet thick ; bark pale orange or grey, 

papery ; twigs nearly glabrous, with brown polished 

sparingly lenticelled bark. Leaves broadly ovate, 3-6 in. 

Jong, 2£-3± in. wide, shortly and abruptly acuminate, base 

deep cordate, margin glandular serrate or twice serrate, 

bright green, clothed above at first with erect hairs which 

11 disappear, beneath glandular punctate and uniformly 

sparingly pubescent or with pubescent midrib and nerves 

'"it glabrous elsewhere; lateral nerves 10-12 on each side 

ending j u marginal teeth rather longer than the rest; 

petiole f-l£ i n . l on g, glabrous or pubescent. Male catkins 

. cicled at the tips of short twigs, narrow cylindric, 3-4| 

m - lon g; bracts rounded, shortly ciliate, with a few sessile 

glands. Female catkins 2-4 arranged in loose racemes, 

narrow cylindric, 1^ in. long, in fruit l|-3 in. long and 

W»Ut 5 j ln< wide . bractg when mature gi 4l b r ous, 2-2£ hn. 

'ong, about 1{ Hi,, wide, 3-lobed ; lateral lobes somewhat 

fFeading, m fl C h shorter than the mid-lobe; nutlets under 

i im. long, wide winced. 



•Ukin I' P ! °f a V la1( ' ( ' ;ltkin i L> > male flowers ; 3, anther; 4, part of a fe 
nature W T\° Wrl ' ; fi - 1,mct ot ' fom:ll « Hower; 7, pistil; 8, vaaxffl 
"« , », bract of fruiting catkin; 10, winged nutlet:-«a« enforced. 



8338 



Y^fDl 







"Vincent Brooks. Day 



[.tf>n* 



L.Re« 



Tab. 8338. 
ROSA Moyesii. 

Western China. 

Eosaoeae. Tribe Roseau. 
Rosa, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. G25. 



Rosa Moyesii, Ilemsl. et E. II. Wilson in Kew Bull. 1905, p. 159 ; species ex 
affinitate B. macrophyllae, a qna differt foliis aculeatis, fob'olis crebem'me 
serrulatis, floribus subsolitariis sanguineis et fructu uiajore cum calycis 
lobis persiste2itibus crectis circiter 6 cm. longo. 

Frutex 2 5-3 '5 m. aJtus; rami glabri parce aculeati, aculcis brevibus recfis ba^i 
dilatatis. Folia 7-13 foliolata, cum petiolo brevi 8-18 cm. longi, 4-7 "5 cm. 
lati, rhachi gracillirna aculeolata pubcrula simul inconspicue glandulosa; 
foliola piaeter terminale sul>sessi]ia, tenuia, ovata, oblonga, rlliptica vel 
inirdum fere orbicularia. 5-3 cm. longa, deorsum gra latim minora, 
creberrime calloso-serrulata, praeter costam infra pilusulam tttrinque 
glabra, subtus pallidiora; stipulae rubenles, latae, mtegrae, 15-2 cm. 
longae, minute ciliolato-glandulosae, parte libera deltoidea vix acuta. 
Flora saturate rubro-sanguinei, petalis extra pallidioribus, 4'5-6'5 cm. 
diametro, solitarii vel bini, erecti ; pedunculi quam folia breviores glandu- 
bs longe stipitatis eonspicue ornati. Calyx languide fusco-purpureus; 
tubus nudus vel glandulis stipitatis plus minnsve vestitus; lobi 5, 
patentee, e basi ovata eaudati, apice di'ata'i, foliacei, petala fere acqnantes, 
intus tomt*nto»i, extra in partibus aids obtectis etiam primus tnmentosi, 
rarius pauciglandulosi. tetula s icpissime 5, fere orbicularia, emarginata, 
2-3 cm. lata, exp'auata, sese leviter obtegentia. Stamina numerosissima, 
filamentis brevissimis, anthcris fusco -flavis. Carpella 15-20, pilosa, libers, 
e tubo brevissime exseita. Fruetus saturate rubro-aurantiaeus, ampul li- 
formis, cum calycis lobis nunc erectis 6-7 cm. longus, nonrmnquam 
glandulis paucis stipitatis infra medium instructus; achaeuia pilosula.— 

W. lioTTJNG IIJOISLEY. 



The strikingly beautiful Rose here figured is a native of 
the mountains of Szeclman, between Mount Onii and 
Tatienlu at elevations of from 7000-9000 feet above a a- 
Jevel. It was first collected by Mr. A. E. Pratt and was 
subsequently met with by Mr. E. H. Wilson, who also 
secured ripe seeds on behalf of Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, 
in whose nursery at Ooombe Wood plants were raised which 
are now 6-8 feet high. From one of the original plants 
the flowers and fruits now depicted were supplied by Messrs. 
Veitch in June and in September, 1909. It may be 
remarked that in addition to the form here figured there is 
another with paler flowers which, though also beautiful, is 
less effective than that here shown. JR. Moyesii will no 
doubt require the conditions that have been found to suit 

OCTOBEK, 19.10. 



the great majority of roses ; a sunny position and a good 
loamy soil inclining to be of a heavy rather than a light 
character. Such pruning as may be called for will have to 
take the form of a thinning out of the older wood ; certainly 
not a general shortening back of the branches. It can he 
propagated by cuttings made in August and placed in gentle 
heat. Seeds will also be available, but having regard to the 
possibility of hybridisation it will be necessary that any 
seed collected be taken from plants isolated from other 
roses. 

Description.— Shrub, 8-10 feet high ; branches glabrous, 
sparingly prickly, prickles short straight with widened 
bases. Leaves with 7-13 leaflets, including the short petiole 
3-7 in. long, 1^-3 in. wide, rachis very slender, puberulous, 
with also small prickles and minute glands ; leaflets except 
the terminal almost sessile, thin, ovate, oblong, elliptic or at 
times almost orbicular, |-l£ in. long, gradually smaller 
towards the basal pair, closely serrulatewith thickened teeth, 
glabrous on both sides except on the slightly pilose midrib 
beneath, bright green above, paler beneath ; stipules wide, 
entire, J-| in. long, reddish, finely glandular-ciliate, the free 
tips deltoid, subacute. Flowers deep blood-red, the petals 
paler outside, lf-2J in. across, solitary or in pairs, erect ; 
peduncles shorter than the flowers, clothed with conspicu- 
ous long-stalked glands. Calyx faintly tinged with dull 
purple; tube naked or more or less clothed with stalked 
glands ; lobes 5, spreading, caudate from an ovate base, 
leafy, almost as long as the petals, within tomentose, at first 
also hairy outside on the portions overlapped in bud by 
adjacent sepals, rarely slightly glandular. Petals usually 5, 
almost orbicular, emarginate, %~l{ in. wide, explanate, 
slightly overlapping. Stamens very many, filaments very 
short, anthers tawny-yellow. Carpels 15-20, pilose, free, 
somewhat exserted from the tube. Fruit deep orange-red, 
ampulhform, crowned by the calyx lobes which become 
erect and including these 2£-2£ in. long, sometimes 
sparingly clothed with stalked glands below the middle ; 
achenes somewhat pilose. 

i»*2*lii. 1 ^ tadiMl s i ction of a fl0 ^er from *hich the calyx-lobes ami 

^£-Jn^T£h 2 ' t st T en ' 3 ' a C ^ d > 4 > ■ ripe fl ' uit; 5 

«-•, vxeej* 4 ana o, enlarged. 



8S39 




M.S.ae!J.NFit^ii.tk. 






Tab. 8339. 
STYUAX Hemsleyaxus. 

Central China. 

Styracaceae. 

SxiRAX, Linn.; Benth. et Ilooh.f, Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 669; Perkins in Engl. 
Pjianzenr., Styracaceae, p. If. 



Styrax Hemsleyanus, Diels in Engl, Bat. Jahrb.vol. xxix. p. 530; Pcrkint I.e. 
p. 70; affiuis 8. glubrcscenti, Benth., sed folds saepe denticulatis floribus 
minoribus plerumquo in pauiculis dispositis difl'ert. 

Arbor 6-10 m. alta, cortice albo insigne instrncta (fide A. Henry) ; rami snb- 
teretes, primum stellato-tomentelli, demum glabri et cinereo-fusci. Folia 
alterna vel sul>opposita, ambit u poumorpha, plerumque laJe obovato- 
elliptica vel oblique ovata, apice obtusa vel Bubacnta, iutir.lum breviter 
acuminata, ba;-i rotmidata vel subcuneata, 7-13 cm. longa, 4-10 cm. lata, 
tenuiter chartacea vel numbianacea, denticulata, supra glabra, subtus 
costa nervisque parce stellatim pilot a ceterum glabra, nervis Iateralibus 
5-8 piope marginem anastomo^antibus, nervis t . ansveisis subpaiallelis. 
Jnfioreacentia 8-15 cm. longa, racemosa vel pauiculaia, axillaris vel 
terminalis, 8-20-flora ; rhachis adpresse stellatim ru o-tomentella, demum 
subglabia ; bractoae minutae, tomentellae, caducae. Flares 1-5-2 cm. 
longi, 2-3 cm. diametro; pe-.licelli ad 5 mm. lonjd, stellato-tomentelli. 
Calycit tubus cupuliformis, 5-6 mm. altos, 4 mm. diametro, 5-G-dcu tat us, 
leviter costatus, extus rufo-stellao-tomentellus, dentibus acntis 1-2 mm. 
longis. Corolla alba, 5-partita; tubus 4-5 mm. longus, lobis imbriratis 
elliptico-lanceolatis 1-1*5 cm. longis 5-7 mm. iatia rabmembranaceia 
utrinque ailpresse albido-stellato-tomcntellis. Stamina 10, corollae lobia 
brevio.a, tilamentis complanatis cum antlxris parce sielkto-pilosis. 
Ovarium ovoideum, den e albo-tomeiitosuni, triloculaie. niulijovulatum : 
stylus glaber, corollae lobis patilo brevior. tructm obovoideus, 2 cm. 
longus, 1'3 cm. diametro, exocarpio tounntello, stylo basi persistente 
breviter niucrouatus, calyce persistent*. - J. Hutchinson. 



The Styrax here figured was discovered by Mr. A. Henry 
in Szechuan and Hupeh in 1888, and again met with in 
Szechuan by Mr. E. H. Wilson, who sent seeds to Messrs. J. 
Veitch & Sons. From a plant raised from these seeds, now a 
vigorous small tree of slender pyramidal form and about feet 
high, in the Coombe Wood Nursery, which flowered in June, 
1909, the material for our figure was derived. The leaves are 
of a pale bright green, and of striking size. Henry notes 
this species as being, in a wild state, 30 feet high, with 
white, fragrant flowers and remarkable white bark. It bears 
a general resemblance in habit and flower to S. Obassia, Sieb. 
& Zucc, a Japanese species sometimes met with in collections, 
figured at t. 7039 of this work, but differs from that species in 

OCTOBEE, 1910l 



that the bud is not enclosed by the base of the petiole, the 
leaves are nearly always contracted at the base, more finely 
toothed and glabrous or nearly so underneath, while the 
inflorescence is branched at the base and the fruits are 
abruptly contracted and mucronate at the tip. S. HemsUyanus 
is not closely related to any species from Eastern Asia ; its 
nearest ally appears to be the Mexican S. glabrescens, Bentli. 
It thrives well in open loamy soil and promises to be hardy ; 
for young plants, a proportion of one-third peat added to 
ordinary soil, about their roots, will probably be found 
advantageous. 

Description.— Tree, reaching a height of 20-30 feet, 
with remarkable white bark ; branches almost cylindric, at 
first slightly stellate-hairy, at length glabrous and tawny. 
Leaves alternate or almost opposite, usually wide obovate- 
elliptic or obliquely ovate, obtuse or subacute, occasionally 
shortly acuminate, base rounded or almost cuneate, f-5 in. 
long, l|-4 i n< w ide, rather thin, denticulate, glabrous above, 
beneath sparingly stellate-pubescent on midrib and nerves, 
elsewhere glabrous; main nerves 5-8 on each side anasto- 
mosing near margin, transverse veins nearly parallel. Inflo- 
rescence 3-6 in. long, racemose or almost paniculate, axillary 
or terminal, 8-20-flowered ; rachisat first with a close stellate 
pubescence, at length nearlv glabrous ; bracts minute, tomen- 
tose, caducous. Flowers 8-10 lin . long, %-\\ in. across ; pedicels 
- Im. long,stellate-pubescent. Calyx cup-shaped, 5-6-toothed; 
tube 2.1-3 lin. deep, 2 lin. wide, faintly ribbed, rusty stellate- 
tomentose outside ; teeth acute, 1 lin. long or less. Corolla 
« lute o-partite ; tube 2-3 lin. long ; lobes imbricate, elliptic- 
lanceolate, 5-8 lin. long, 2J-3| lin. wide, almost membra- 
nous, closely white stellate-tomentose without and within. 
xamens 10, shorter than corolla lobes; filaments flattened, 
sparingly clothed, like the anthers, with stellate hairs. 
viary ovoid densely white tomentose, 3-celled, many- 
1 1 uleci '' style glabrous, somewhat shorter than corolla 
lo> l * i obovoid > 10 lin. long, 6 lin. wide ; exocarp 
j "ewuat pubescent; apex tipped with the persistent style- 
Mae, calyx in fruit persistent 

« ttdlj autW ■ a! r l pis !- i ! ; 2 ' stcllatc k"'w ; 3, corolla, laid open, and stamens ; 
' "*"*» o»ptttu:— ■ nil enlarged. 



W) 




MS.dflLJJTJitchiyK 



V^enLBroo^Day* 3 ^- 



I. Re evB&C? London 



Tab. 8340. 

IBIS WlLSONH. 

China. 

Iridaceae. Tribe Ikideae. 
Ibis, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iiL p. 6S6. 



Iris Wilsonii, C. IT. Wright in Keto Bu 1 !. 1907, p. 321 ; affinis 1. sibiricar, 
Linn., sed pedicellis et spathis herbaceis longis, floribus plernmque luteis 
distincta. 

Jlerba rhizomate brevi, collo ob vaginas vetnstas solntns fibrosa Fo7iaba£al'a 
30-60 cm. longa, 5-6 (rarius ad 9) mm. lata, apice brevi oblique sub- 
incnrvo, laete viridia, Jaevia, saltern inferne inaequalitcr nervosa, nervia 
mediis 3-4 quam ceteris magis prominentibus et conspicuis. Caulis 
20-30 cm. altup, cylindricus, l-foliatns, folio circiter 15 cm. longo infra 
medium orto foliis basatibus fdrnili, 2-1-florus. Spathae mapis rmnusve 
berbaceae, una saepe in laminam perbrevem abiens, 6-10 cm. longoe, 
2-4 mm. latae. Pedi'-eUi inaequales, longiores, ad 13 cm. longi. Perianthii 
tubus viridis, 8-10 mm. longus, obtuse ttigorms ; segments exteriora 4-5 cm. 
longa limbo reflexo oblongo- vel obovato-elliptico l'5-2 cm. Jato luteo infra 
medium purpureo-venoso, ungue quam limbo piulo breviore 7-9 mm. lato 
margines versus copiose purpureo-venoso; segmenta interiora oblongo- 
lameolata in unguem gracilem attenuate, 2-3 • 5 cm. longa, 6-8 mm. lata, 
lutea. Filamenta 9-11 mm. longa ; antherae albidae, 11-12 mm. longae. 
Ovarium, obtuse triquetrum, sub anthesi 1*5-1 "8 cm. longum ; st.vli rami 
f-ubspathulato-linean s, superne 7-8 mm. latae, luttac, cristae lobis late 
ovatis eroso-denticulatis ; stigmate late trian^ulari. Cap*ula trijuctra, 
oblonga, utrinqne breviter attenuate, 8-3*5 cm. longa. Semina obli<ine 
triquetro-ovoidea, apice truncata, m'gro-fusea, 4-5 mm. longa. — O. Staff. 



The Iris here figured was discovered by Mr. E. II. Wilson 
in Western China on behalf of Messrs. J. Veitch $ Sons. 
and the material on which our figure is based was supplied 
from a plant which flowered with them in July, 1909. 
Another plant, presented by them to Kew, also flowered 
simultaneously in the Iris collection, where it has grown 
freely under the conditions suitable for the well-known 
/. sibirica, Linn., which it resembles in habit It appears 
to be quite hardy, and promises to prove a useful addi- 
tion to the list of garden Irises. In 1907 Mr. Wilson 
rediscovered this plant in Western Hupeb, growing in grass- 
lands near Fang Hsien, at about 7000 feet above sea-level. 
But in addition to the form here figured there is another 
and nearly related form, which flowered with Messrs. Veitch 
in 1007, collected by Mr. Wilson on their behalf at Fang in 
Central China, of more robust habit and with wider spat lies 
which extend ns far as or beyond the top of the perianth- 

OtTOBEtt, 1U10. 



tube. This stouter form lias been distinguished by Mr. 
Wright as a variety, var. major, of /. Wilsonii, but the 
venation of the leaves is somewhat different, and it may be 
necessary, when more ample material is available, to treat 
this robust plant as a distinct species. As gathered in a 
wild state and also under cultivation all the specimens of 
Mr. Wilson's two plants have pale yellow flowers. But it 
has to be remarked that in 1906 Mr. G. Forrest collected, 
on the eastern flank of the Tali range in Western Yunnan, 
an Iris with bright purplish-blue flowers as in /. sibirica, 
hut which only differs from /. Wilsonii in other respects in 
having more finely acute leaves and wider perhaps less 
herbaceous spathes. This blue form is met with in moun- 
tain pastures at 10,000 feet above sea-level. 

Description. — Herb, rhizome short, its apex crowned 
with the fibrous remains of the leaf-sheaths. Leaves at the 
base 1-2 feet long, 3-4 lin. wide, the tip short, slightly 
obliquely incurved, bright green, smooth, unequally veined 
at least in the lower portion, 3-4 of the nerves towards the 
centre more prominent than the others. Stem 8-12 in. high, 
2- or 1-hWered, cylindric, 1-foliate, the leaf about 6 in. 
long and arising below the middle, like the basal leaves 
except as regards its size. Spathes somewhat herbaceous, 
one usually produced in a short blade, 2£-4 in. long, 1-2 
lin. wide. Pedicels unequal, the longer reaching 5 in. in 
length. Perianth-tube green, 4-5 lin. long, bluntly 3- 
gonous ; outer segments nearly 2 in. long, with a reflexed, 
oblong- or obovate-elliptic limb 8-10 lin. long, veined with 
purple^below the middle, claw somewhat shorter than the 
limb, 3-5 lin. wide, copiously veined with purple towards 
the edge ; inner segments oblong-lanceolate, narrowed to a 
slender claw, %-\{ i n . long, 3-4 lin. wide, yellow. Fila- 
ments 5-6 lin. long ; anthers whitish, rather longer than the 
filaments. Ovary bluntly 3-cornered, in flower 8-9 lin. long ; 
stvle-arms subspathulate-linear, 3-4 lin. wide above, yellow, 
lobes of the crest wide ovate, erosely toothed ; stigma wide 
triangular. Capsule triquetrous, oblong, slightly narrowed 
to both ends, 1|-1| in> i Seeds obUqne? triquetrous- 

oxoid, truncate at the tip, dark-tawny, 2-2 i lin. long. 

^^ifc^ Mta; A* lobe of *"? **&**> 4 > fruit; 5> sced * : -" u> 



8341 






. - 
















U: 



M.S.dei.J.K.FitchJitK 






! m 







m \ m 










Vincent Bro 



te,D a y&SonL^ 



L. Reeve & C? London. 



Tab. 8341. 

PBIMULA LlTTONIAKA. 

Western China. 

Pkimttlaceae. Tribe Pkimcxeae. 
Primula, Linn.; Benth. et Hoole.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 631. 



Primula Littoniana, G. Forrest in Not. Hoy. Bot. Gard. Edin. 1908, pars xix. 
p. 225, cum icon.; ab affini P. Viali, Delavay ex Franch., partibus omni- 
bus nmlto majoribus, calycis lobis tubo aequalibus, satis distincta videtur. 

IJerba perennis, 30-60 cm. alta. Folia omnia radicalia, anguste oblonga, 
obtusa, inferne longissime attenuata, ad 20 cm. longa, 7 cm. lata, irregula- 
riter dentata, ciliata, utrinque pilosa, subtus praeterea in costa araneoso- 
pilosa, nervis secundariis utrinque numerosis, obliquis; petioli circiter 
9 cm. longi. Scapi erecti, robusti, 40-60 cm. alti, folia longe superantes, 
basi glabri, supra parcissime farinosi, spicas siinplices densas multifloras 
7-12 cm. longas, 2 ■ 5-3 "5 cm. diametro gerentes. Flores violaceo-coerulei, 
reflexi; bracteae lineares parce farinosae. Calyx late campanulatus vel 
globoso-campanulatus ; tubus 2 mm. longus; lobi coccinei, ovato-lancc olati, 
subacuti, 4 mm. longi, 2'5 mm. lati. Oorollae tubus circiter 1 cm. longus, 
2 mm. diametro, calycem multoties superans; limbos concaviis 6-8 mm. 
diametro, lobis late Ianceolatis integris apice obtusis 4 mtn. longis, 2 , 5mm. 
latis. Cannula globosa, parva, calyce inclusa. — W. G. Cbaib. 



The Primula here figured was collected in Yunnan by 
Mr*. Gr. Forrest on behalf of Messrs. Bees, of Neston ; the 
plant depicted was acquired from that firm in August, 1909. 
In Cheshire this species seems hardy, and plants grown in 
the open at Kew were uninjured by the frosts of the past 
winter. P. Littoniana belongs to a group of forms nearly 
allied to one sent to Paris by the late Pere Delavay under 
the name P. Viali. It is not clear what the relationship of 
the different forms in this group may be. Mr. Franchet, 
who formally described Delavay *s species, associated there- 
with a plant found in Szechuan by Pere Soulie, which 
has bilobulate corolla segments in place of the entire lobes 
that characterise the plant named by Delavay. Messrs. Pax 
and Knuth refer to P. Viali yet another Primula collected 
by Mr. Ford in China. As regards the last-mentioned plant 
it has to be remarked that, in the Kew collection, Ford has 
included under the same field number two forms; one refer- 

OdOBER, 1910. 



able to P. deflem, Duthie, but hardly distinguishable from 
the plant figured by Pax and Knuth as P. Viali, the other 
not distinguishable from the Eastern Himalayan P. bellidir 
folia, King. But Ford's two plants, though distinguishable, 
are so nearly related that his opinion, based on field obser- 
vation, as to their specific identity may be correct ; by 
parity of reasoning there is nothing improbable in the views 
of Pax and Knuth and of Franchet respectively, or in a 
suggestion that all these forms may be referable to one 
variable species first named P. bellidifolia by the late 
Sir Greorge King. This being so, it is not surprising that 
so experienced a field observer as Mr. E. H. Wilson should 
consider the plant here figured to be only a strong form of 
P. Viali, Delavay. On the other hand, photographs of 
P. Littoniana, taken in the field, indicate a degree of 
uniformity among the particular plants involved that does 
not admit of being lightly put aside, so that, in spite of 
the fact that the differential characters pointed out by 
Mr. Craib are far from convincing, it is convenient, from 
the gardening standpoint, to treat P. Littoniana and P. Viali, 
for the moment, as distinct. 

Description. — Herb, perennial, 1-2 feet high. Leaves 
all radical, narrow oblong, obtuse, much narrowed to the 
base, up to 8 in. long, 3 in. wide, irregularly toothed, 
ciliate, hairy on both surfaces and cobwebby beneath, 
especially along the midrib, secondary nerves many, 
oblique; petiole about 3| in. long. Scapes erect, stout, 
1^-2 feet high, rising far above the rosette, glabrous 
below, very sparingly mealy above, ending in dense, 
simple, many-flowered spikes which are 3-5 in. long and 
1-1J in. across. Flowers violet-blue, reflexed ; bracts 
linear, sparingly mealy. Calyx wide campanulate or 
globose-campanulate ; tube 1 lin. long; lobes pink, ovate- 
lanceolate, somewhat acute, 2 lin. long, l\ lin. wide. 
Corolla much larger than the calyx ; tube about 5 lin. 
Jong, 1 lin. across; limb concave, 3-4 lin. across; lobes 
broadly lanceolate, entire, obtuse, 2 lin. long, l'£ lin. wide. 
Capsule globose, small, enclosed in the calvx. 



Fig 1, Bower; 2, section of calyx, showing pistil; 3, section of corolla, 
showing anthers; l,uketch of an entire plantf-oW enlarged except I, «*«* w 

'-" uc/i f( 'I ui ed. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and VV. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 
FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, II. A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in I 
Britain and Ireland. By Chakles P. Hokkirk, F.L.S., Ac, Ac. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. fid. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Bekkelet, M.A., 

F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Ccrrey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGIXF-E. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. fid. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookkk, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 
FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 
Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. <r. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By W. II. Harvkt and 
O. W. Sonder, and continued by Sir W. T. TmsEr.TON-DvER, F.R.S. Vole, 
I.— III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V.. 
Parts T. & II., 9s. each. Vol. VI., 24s. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 
20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6d. 
Vol. VI.. Sect. I., Part I., 8s. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d. 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA: a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. Bv 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science, at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 70, OCTOBER, 1910. 



Tab. 8337— BETTJLA MAXIMOWICZII, Japan, Saghalien and 
Manchuria. 
„ 8338.— ROSA MOYESII, Western ChinaK 
„ 8339.— STYRAX HEMSLEYANUS, Central China. 
„ 8340.— IRIS WILSONII, China. 
„ 8341.— PRIMULA LITTONIANA, Western China. 

LOTELt Kekvk & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Coveut Garden. 
JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemsley. 



MONOGRAPHS 

S 

From the Third Series of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descrip- 
tions, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may be had separately. Prices 
from Is. to 51s. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANIOAL PLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is. each. LUt3 of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 



NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 
The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. TUISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. 1., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27a. Vol. V., 25s. 6i. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIIL 

25s. 6d. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., Part II., 9s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to 111., 20s. each. 
By HARVEY arid SONDER. 
v i r^ The Conthmation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.P..S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. Vol. IV., S,ct. II., 24s. Vol. V., Part I., 9, Vol. VI., SI* 

Vol. VII., 33s. 
flushed under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope. 
Natal and Transvaal. 



LovsLt Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, liermttti Street, Covent Garden. 

whdo,: nmn n wmjum w,ym An ton, im> n tva sTBKETrsTAawuDiir.KiiTT3.ii. 



No. 71. 



VOL. VI.— NOVEMBER. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plaii 
Annual Subscription, 42s. 



OB No. 1-4S5 OF THE ENTIKE WORK. 

C U B T I S ' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW, 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S,, 

D'rcctor, ~ilona" botanic CarCens, Hero. 





fc.. .fc4^.^V 



^ 



'There lavish Nature in her best attire 
Pours forth sweet odours and alluring sights, 
And Art with her contending doth aspire 
To excel the natural with made delights." 



L O N I) (3 N : 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd.. 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN* OOVERNM1 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN'. 

1910. 

{All rights reserved.] 
(Entered at the New York Post Office as second-class matter.) 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 



CORAL AND ATOLLS, 

Their history, description, theories of their origin both before and since 
that of Darwin, the influence of winds, tides, and ocean currents on 
their formation and transformations, their present condition, products, 
fauna, and flora. 

By F. WOOD-JONES, B.Sc, F.Z.S. 

Numerous illustrations, plates and map. 24a. 

CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND OF THE ADJACENT PORTIONS OF GARKWAL AND TIBET. 
By Lt.-Gen. Sir Richard Strachey and J. F. Duthie. 5s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATIC^ OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, together with the derivations 
of their uames. By the Rev. Prof. G. Henslow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. 6d. 



THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. \Y. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA : 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BE XT HAM, F. K. S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plant: 

Drawn by W. H. PITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Farming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 

7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engraving*, 9*. 



UTCELL BJEra & CO, Lid., 6, HEKBBBXTA STREET, COVENT GAKDEK. 



8$4Z 




KT.S.Ael.JITFitnhloti 



Vnrcent Hrooks^Day & San.L-L a imp 



LHesvB & C? Lanacm 



Tab. 8342. 

XERONEMA Moorii. 

New Caledonia. 

Liliaceae. Tribe Asphodeleae. 
Xeronema, Brongn. et Gris ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 781. 



Xeronema Moorii, Brongn. et Gris in Bull. Soc. Bat. France, vol. xi. (1864), 
p. 316, in Choix PI. Nouv. Gated, t. 1, et in Nouv. Arch. Mus. Par. vol. iv. 
p. 2, t. 1 (1868) ; species unica. 

Ilerba ; radice fibrosa, caule brevissimo. Folia disticha, vaginantia, ensi- 
forruia, lateraliter compressa, 40 cm. longa, 3 cm. lata, glabra, minute 
punctata, titiapus quaiu folia inferiors paullo longior; racemus 15 cm. 
longus, abrupte curvatus, rhachi horizontal; bructeae elongatae, vagi- 
nantes ; flores secnndi, erecti, rubro-purpurei ; bracteolae seariosac, 
oblongae, breviter mucronatae, 1 cm. longae, 4 mm. latae; pedicelli 6 mm. 
longi. Periauthii segmenta 6, oblongo-lanceolata, apice auguste cucullata, 
persistentia, 16 ram. longa, 3 mm. lata, minute maculata. Stamina quam 
perianthiuni dnplo longiora; filamenta rubro-purpurea, subulata; antherae 
oblongae, introrsae. Ovarium oblongum, trilobatum ; ovula in quoquo 
loculo 8-10; stylus subulatus, poi-t anthesin spiralit^r tortus; stigma 
parvum. obscure trilobum.— A". Moorei, Andre in 111. Hort. 1877,]). 184, 
pi. 297 ; Endc-r in Garteufl. 1878, p. 319 ; Keuthe in Gartenrl. 1889, p. 408, 
lip. 09. Scleronema Moorii, Brongn. et Gris in Ann. Sci. Nat. 5'" ser. 
vol. ii. p. 166. — C. H. "Weight. 



The rather striking plant here described is a native of 
the mountains of New Caledonia, where it grows on volcanic 
rocks at elevations of from 3-5,000 feet above sea-level. It 
was originally discovered by Mr. C. Moore, Director of the 
Sydney Botanic Garden, and was introduced to European 
horticulture by Mr. J. Linden in 1875. The specimen from 
which our figure has been prepared was purchased for the 
Kew Collection from Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons in 1896. 
The distichous compressed leaves, sheathing at the base, 
impart to the species a facies recalling that characteristic of 
many of the Iridaceae; the flowers, however, are of a 
distinctly liliaceous type, and the genus Xeronema, to which 
our plant belongs, together with the Australasian genus 
Ilerpolirion, Hook, f., which has a quite different habit, 
constitutes the sub-tribe Xeroneminae of the Asphodeleae in 
the Naturlichen Pflanzenfamilien of Engler & Prantl. 
In cultivation it calls for the treatment most suitable for 

November, 1910. 



many South African bulbous plants ; potted in a peaty soil 
and kept moderately moist all the year round. It enjoys 
bright sunshine and flowers annually in June. The perianth 
segments and filaments persist and retain their colour for 
a month or more. The subhorizontal direction assumed by 
the flower-bearing portion of the rachis and the curving of 
the pedicels so as to bring all the flowers into an approxi- 
mately erect position are constant features which impart 
a characteristic aspect to the plant. Xtronema Moorii does 
not ripen seeds in this country ; it may, however, be 
propagated by division. 

Description. — Herb ; stem very short, roots fibrous. 
Leaves distichous, sheathing at the base, ensiform, laterally 
compressed, 1^ feet long, 1| in. wide, glabrous, finely dotted. 
Scape rather longer than the lower leaves ; raceme 6 in. 
long, abruptly bent to a nearly horizontal position ; bracts 
elongated, sheathing ; flowers secund, erect, reddish-purple ; 
brapteoles scarious, Oblong, shortly mucronate, 5 lin. long, 
2 lin. wide ; pedicels 3 lin. long. Perianth 6-lobed ; lobes 
oblong-lanceolate, narrowly hooded at the tip, persisting, 
8 lin. long, 1| lin. wide. Stamens twice as long as perianth ; 
filaments reddish-purple, subulate; anthers oblong, dark 
purple, introrse. Ovary oblong, 3-lobed ; ovules 8-10 in 
each cell ; style subulate, spirally twisted after the opening 
of the flower ; stigma small, obscurely 3-lobed. 



Fig. 1 flower ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, pistil ; 5, sketch of an entire plant, 
snowing habit :— all enlarged except 5, which is much reduced. 



8343 







tohiitH 



Tab. 8343. 

PLEIOCARPA mutica. 

West Africa. 

Apocynaceak. Tribe Plumekioideae. 
Pleiocabi'A, Benth.; lienth. et Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. (i99. 



Pleiocarpa mutica, Benth. in M ook. Ie. PL 1. 1181 ; Stapf in. Thi*eltott-Dyer t 

Ft. 'In p. Afr. vol. iv. pars i. p. 98; affinis J', rostratac, Benth., sed 
corolla multo breviorc eius lobis bievibus et fructu liaud rostrato ovoideo- 
glolioso distincta. 

Frutex, l'fi in. altus, ramis fuscescentibus. Folia elliptiea vel oblonga, abrupte 
acuminata, basi acuta Tel subacuta, 8-16 cm longa, 3'5-C cm. lata, tenuitor 
coriacca, supra lucidu, nervis iitrin'pie 11-14; petiolus mm. longus. 
Flore* in fasciculus globoaos multifloros axillares dispositi, brevissimo 
pedicellati. Sepal" ovata, obtusa vel subacuta, ad 2 nun. longa. Corolla 
Jactca, tnbo cvlindrico 12-1G mm. lango, loMs oralis vel oblongis, obtusis, 
C-7 mm. longis. CarpcLa 5, uniovul ita. Fruct<m baccati, ovoideo-globosi, 
obtusi vel apiculati, rugosi, 8 mm. longi. — Hunttria pleiocarpa, Saltier f'., 
Kantschuklianen in Jahrb. Hamburg. Wissensch. Anstalt. vol.xvii. (1899)3. 
Beih. p. 193, partim. — 0. Ktalt. 



The genus Pleiocarpa, to which the subject of our plate 
belongs, is endemic in Tropical Africa, from which region 
twelve species have so far been reported. The one here 
figured, P. mutica, is a native of the Cameroons, where it 
was first met with by Mr. G. Mann. It has since been 
found in Old Calabar, whence it has been introduced to 
European horticulture. The material made use of in 
preparing our illustration has been derived from a plant 
which flowered at Kew in June, 1909 ; tin's plant was raised 
from a cutting received from the Glasgow Botanic Garden 
in 1902. It has thriven well in a stove under the tropical 
conditions suitable for species of Ixora, and is striking 
from the cultural standpoint owing to the profusion of its 
beautiful white flowers. From the morphological point of 
view it is interesting on account of the presence in the 
flower of five carpels. This peculiarity it shares with 
another species, P. rostrata, Benth., while in a third species, 
P. salici folia, Stapf, there are three or four carpels. The 
remaining species of Pleiocarpa have only two carpels, 
which is the number characteristic of the order Apocynaceae. 

NOVEMBEU, 1910. 



Description. — Shrub ; 5 feet high ; branches somewhat 
tawny. Leaves opposite, elliptic or oblong, abruptly 
acuminate, base cuneate, 3-6 in. long, 1^- 2| in. wide, 
thinly coriaceous, shining above, nerves 11-14 on each 
side; petiole 3 lin. long. Flowers shortly pedicelled, in 
axillary many-flowered globose clusters. Sepals ovate, 
obtuse or subacute, about 1 lin. long. Corolla pure white; 
tube cylindric, 6-8 lin. long ; lobes ovate or oblong, obtuse, 
3-3| lin. long. Carpels 5, each 1-ovuled. Fruit berry-like, 
ovoid-globose, obtuse or apiculate, rugose, 4 lin. long. 



Fig. 1, an unopened flower; 2, calyx and pistil; 3, vertical section of 
corolla ; 4 and 5, anthers ; 6, ovary ; 7, section of ovary : — all enlarged. 



8344 




Tab. 8344. 
COLUMNEA Oerstediana. 

Costa Rica. 

Gesneraceae. Tribe Cvrtandreae. 
COLUMNEA, Linn.; Benth. et Eook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1009. 



Columnea Oerstediana, Klotzsch ex. Oerst. Cenlralam. Qemer. p. 61, t. 8; 
Hanst. in Linnaea, vol. xxxiv. p. 407 ; affinis C. micropliyllae, Klotzsch & 
Hanst., a qua foliis supra glabris subtus minute puberulis recedit. 

Sufrutex vel herha epipbytica caule lignoso subtetragono fusceecente glabro 
nitidulo ramoso, ramis elongatis, teste Oersted strictis patenti-arrectis, 
indivisis supeme sparse appresse pubescentibus, internodiis 1-1 ■ 7 cm. 
longis. Folia opposita, breviter petiolata, late ovata vel ovato-oblonga, 
apice acuta vel subacuta, basi obtusa vel rotundata, 1-1 • 5 cm. longa, 
7-10 mm. lata, carnosa, supra convexa, saturate viridia, nitidula, glabra, 
subtus pallida, minute appresse puberula; nervi laterales utrinque 3-4, 
valde obliqui, subtus conspicui ; petioli 2-3 mm. longi. Flores axillares, 
solitarii, erecti. Fedunculus circiter 1 cm. loDgus. Hepala erecta, valde 
imbricata, ovata, caudato-acuminata, interne repando-dentata, ultra 
1*5 cm. longa, 7 mm- lata, extra appresse puberula. Corolla coccincu 
In Mo circiter 7 cm. longa, bilabiata, extra pilis articulatis sparse villosa ; 
tubus angnstus, faucem versus sensim ampliatus, 4-4 ■ 5 cm. longus, ixtferne 
postice gibbosus; labium posticum galeiforme, apice rotundatiun vel snb- 
cuspidatum ; lobi laterales patentes, triangulares, cum galea alte connati ; 
lobus anticus reflexus, lineari-lanceolatus, circiter 1*7 cm. longus. 
Stamina 4, exserta ; tilamenta glabra; antherae in quadram cob ae rentes. 
Disci glandula unica, postica, emarginata. Ovarium appresse pubescens; 
placentae bilamellatae. — T. A. Sprague. 



The Columnea here described, a native of Costa Kica, like 
its congener, C. magnijica, Klotzsch & Hanst., figured at 
t. 8225 of this work, does not appear to have been collected 
since its first discovery fifty years ago. This suggests that 
many of the Central American Gesnerads may have a 
limited distribution, and that further exploration of this 
region may lead to the introduction of forms that are as 
yet unknown. The plant on which our plate is based 
flowered in February, 1910, in the collection of Col. II. H. 
Beddome, Sispara, West Hill, Putney. This plant was a 
young cutting rooted in a propagating frame and grown in 
a small pot kept close to the roof-glass of a stove ; another 
plant flowered simultaneously in a stove at Kew. Old plants 
rarely flower freely, but from the pendent habit assumed by 
November, 1910. 



their branches, which give off small adventitious roots at 
the nodes, they form effective basket-plants, and bear a 
considerable resemblance to some of the tropical species of 
Aeschynanthus not only in this respect, but in the character 
of the foliage and in the aspect of the flowers. It would 
appear, however, from the account given by Oersted, that 
under natural conditions this species has a woody stem 
which gives off long straight spreading branches without 
adventitious roots. 

DESCRIPTION. — Undershrub or herb, epiphytic; stem 
woody, somewhat 4-angled, rather tawny, glabrous, 
freely branched ; branches simple, sparingly adpressed 
pubescent upwards, with internodes 5-9 lin. long, in a wild 
state, according to Oersted, strict and spreading or upraised, 
in cultivated plants flexuous and pendent. Leaves opposite, 
shortly petiolecl, wide ovate or ovate-oblong, acute or sub- 
acute, base obtuse or rounded, 5-8 lin. long, 3-5 lin. wide, 
fleshy, convex and deep green, shining and glabrous above, 
beneath pale green, and very finely adpressed puberulous; 
lateral nerves 3-4 on each side, very oblique, distinct 
beneath ; petiole 1-1 1| lin. long. Flowers axillary, solitary, 
erect, their peduncles about 5 lin. long. Sepals erect, much 
imbricate, ovate, caudate-acuminate, repandly toothed below, 
about 8 lin. long, 4 lin. wide, adpressed puberulous outside. 
Corolla^ pink, nearly 3 in. long, bilabiate, sparingly villous 
with jointed hairs externally ; tube narrow, slightly widened 
towards the throat, 1|-1| in. long, somewhat gibbous at the 
base behind ; upper lip galeate with a rounded or slightly 
cuspidate tip ; lateral lobes spreading, triangular, connate for 
pme distance with the upper lip ; lower lip reflexed, linear- 
lanceolate, about 9 lin. long. Stamens 4, exserted ; fila- 
ments glabrous; anthers cohering. Disk-gland solitary, 
posticous, emarginate. Ovary adpressed pubescent; pla- 
centas 2-lamellate. 



o >r in*" *' i U pair of leavcs ; 2 ' cal J'x, in vertical section, and pistil ; 3, base of a 
ujroua md stamens; 4, a jointed corolla-hair :— all enlarged. 



8<m 




M.S. del 






Tab. 8345. 

PYRACANTHA angustifolia. 

South-western China. 

Rosaceae. Tribe Pomeae. 
PYRACANTHA, Roem. ; C. K. Schneider in Handb. d. Laubhohh vol. i. p. 7G1. 



Pyracantha angustifolia, (J. K. Schneider in Handb. d. LavbhoJgk. vol. i. 
p. 7G1; a P. coccinca, Iioem. (Crataegus Pyracantha, Med.), rcceptaculo 
calyceque extus cincreo-tomentoso et foliis lineari-oblongis intcgris differt. 

Frutex divarieato-ramosus, ramulis primo maeis minusve ocliraceo-tomentnsis 
anno secundo glabratis, cortice fusco-purpnreo obfectis, rueoso-lrnti- 
cellatis, nonnullis in spinas validas 0"5-l - 5 cm. longas mutatis. Folia 
in bracbvcladiis et ad macrocladiornm bases fascicubitim congesta, per- 
sistentia, lineari-oblonga, obtusa, mucronulo imposito, basin versus imgis 
minusve attenuata, margine recurvo integra vel bine inde minntissimo 
glanduloso-serrata, 2-6 cm. longa, 7-9 mm. lata, subcoriar-ea, supra nisi 
novella glabra, nitidnla, infra griseo-torrentella indumento demum laxo 
vel fere evanido ; nervi laterales tenues, utrinque circiter 8, supra impressi; 
petioli 3-10 mm. longi. Corymbxdi pauciflori vel ad 15-fiori quam folia 
breviores ; pedunculi pedicellique cinereo-tomentosi. JReceptacuIum turbi- 
natum, cinereo-tomentosum. Sepala late ovata, persistenter tomentosa, 
1 '5 mm. longa. Petafa alba, suborbicularia. Stamina circiter 20. Oar- 
pella 5 ; styli 5. Fructus depresso-globosus, aurantiacus, glabratus, 
6-8 mm. diametro, calyce persistente coronatus; pyrenae dorso inferno 
receptaculo adnatae caeterum liberae, reoeptaculo circumvallatae. — 
Cotoneaster angustifolia, Franch. PI. Delav. p. 221. — 0. Stapf. 



The Chinese Thorn here figured is very closely allied to 
the European Everlasting Thorn and to its Himalayan 
representative the White Thorn of Nepal. A perplexing 
divergence of view has prevailed as to the taxonomic 
position and status of these three Thorns. The Everlasting 
Thorn or Jkiisson Ardent which, in 1753, Linnaeus named 
Mespilus Pyracantha, was, forty years later, treated by 
Medik as a Crataegus and, after a similar lapse of time, 
referred by Spach to Cotoneaster. The Nepalese White 
Thorn was in the first instance referred, in 1814, to Crataegus, 
by Roxburgh, as C.crenulata, hut was treated by D. Don in 
1825 as a Mespilus, and was only transferred, by Koch, to 
Cotoneaster as recently as 1869. The subject of our illus- 
tration, which was discovered by Delavay in Yunnan in 
1882, was in the first instance referred hy Franchet in 1880 
to Cotoneaster as C. angustifolia. The agnomen " Pyra- 

Novemuku, 1910. 



cantha " definitely associated by Linnaeus with the Buissoi 

Ardent is believed to have been misapplied ; it is generally 

held that the Pyracantha of Greek authors is our Hawthorn. 

Nevertheless the use of the name Pyracantha to connote 

the Everlasting- Thorn has become popular ; that plant is 

now, and bids fair to remain, the Pyracantha of gardens, 

which fails to appeal to the \ay mind either as a Crataegus 

or as a Cotoneaster. In this case the popular instinct 

appears to be sound, for the suggestions made by 

Medik and by Spacb, though more satisfactory than that 

of Linnaeus, are both more or less open to objection. 

Under the circumstances it seems desirable, and it certainly 

is more convenient, to adopt yet another suggestion, first 

made by Eoemer in 1847, and recently endorsed by 

Schneider, and to treat the group of species to which our 

plant belongs as a genus Pyracantha, closely allied indeed 

both to Crataegus and to Cotoneaster, but equally distinct 

from either. Pyracantha angustifolia was first introduced 

to cultivation by Mr. M. L. de Vitmorin from seeds sent to 

Les Barres from Eastern Tibet by Soulie in 1895. A 

second set of plants was raised at Kew from seeds sent from 

"Western China in 1899 by Lieut. Jones. The original 

plant at Les Barres bears plentiful crops of berries which in 

the late autumn develop a bright orange colour. At Kew, 

where P. angustifolia does well on a sunny wall, there is 

hardly sufficient sunshine to bring out its best qualities as a 

shrub, and in the open, although it survives the winter, it 

has not proved perfectly hardy. In the warmer conditions 

of South-western England it is more at home, and the 

material for an illustration has been obtained from a plant 

m fruit in the open in January, 1910, in the garden of Lieut.- 

Col. I). D. ^ Cunningham at Tormount, Torquay ; the 

flowering twig which completes our figure was supplied in 

July, 1910, from the same bush. The species is best 

propagated from cuttings of half ripened wood. 

Description.— Shrub; branches spreading; twigs at 
first more or less yellow tomentose, in their second season 
glabrous, their bark tawny purple, rough with lenticels ; 
occasionally some of the twigs modified into stout spines 
3-8 lin. long. Leaves clustered on abbreviated twigs or at 
the bases of longer ones, persistent, linear-oblong, obtuse 



fwith a slight mucro, more or less narrowed to the base, 
margin recurved, entire or here and there faintly glandular 
serrate, §-2j in. long, 4-5 lin. wide, subcoriaceous, glabrous 
above except when young and somewhat polished, beneath 
clothed with a grey tomentum which becomes lax and 
almost disappears with age ; lateral nerves slender, about 
8 on each side, impressed above ; petioles 2-5 lin. long. 
Corymbs rather few-flowered, shorter than the leaves; 
peduncles and pedicels grey pubescent. Receptacle turbinate, 
grey pubescent. Sepals wide ovate, persistently pubescent, 
8 lin. long. Petals white, suborbicular. Stamens about 20. 
Carpels and styles 5. Fruit depressed-globose, orange- 
yellow, glabra te, 3-4 lin. long, tipped by the persistent 
calyx lobes; pyrenes adnate dorsally in their lower portion 
to the receptacle, otherwise free from though surrounded by 
the receptacle. 

Fig. 1, part of a leaf; 2, a flower; 3, calyx, partly removed, showing stamens 
and pistil; 4, a carpol; 5, fruit in vertical section, showing pyrenes; 0, ■ 
pyrene; 7, the same in vertical section; 8, sead : — all enlarged. 



8346 










Tab. 8346. 
HOULLETIA Sakderl 

Peru. 

Orchidaceae. Tribe Tandeae. 

Houlletia, A. Bronyn.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 550; 
PJitzer in Engl. & Prantl Nat. Pflanzenf. vol. ii. pars 6, p. 168. 



Houlletia Sanderi, Bolfe in Gard. Chron. 1910, vol. xlvii. p. 203; Orel. Rev, 
1910, p. 118; species II. Lowianae, Reichb. f. proxima, sed labelli lobis 
lateralibus fulcato-oblongis et obtusis nee Ionge acuminati.s distincta. 

Eerbi epiphytiea. Pseudobulbi conferti, ovoideo-oblongi, sulcati, 5-7 cm. 
longi, circiter 2 cm. lati, monopbylli. Folia breviter petiolata, oblongo- 
lanceolata, acuta, subplicata, recurva, circiter 30 cm. longa, 4 cm. lata. 
Scapus erectus, 25-30 cm. alta, vaginis lanceolatis acutis ol>tcctus, 2-3- 
florus. Bracteae lanceolatae, breviter acuminatae, nigro-punctatae, circiter 
1*5 cm. longae. Pedicelli 3-4 cm. longi. Flures magni, straminei, inversi. 
Sepala snbpatentia, valde concava, posticum late eliiptienm, apiculatum, 
circiter 3 cm. longum ; lateralia late ovata, apicnlata, circiter 3 cm. Ionga. 
Petala suborbicularia, subconcava, circiter 3 cm. longa. Labellum profundi- 
trilobum ; lobi laterales late falcato-oblongi, apice obtusi vel rotundati et 
leviter recurvi, 1*5 cm. longi, medio transverse carinati, fronte in dente 
obtuso extensi; mesocMlium oblongum, truncatum, 1 cm. Ionguj], car- 
nosum ; epichilium obovato-oblongum, 1 ■ 5 cm. longum, apice denticulat urn, 
basi cuneatnm, submembranaceum. Colurnua clavata, ai-cuata, circiter 
1 • 8 cm. longum ; pollinia 2, cerea, ovoidea ; stipes lineari-oblongus ; glandula 
suborbicularis.— E. A. Rolfe. 



Three members of the South American genus Houlletia 
have already been figured in this work: //. BrocHehurstiana, 
Lindl., a native of Brazil, at t. 4072; //. picta, Linden and 
Reichb. f., a native of Colombia, at t. G305 ; and 77. Lands- 
bergi, Linden and Reichb. f., another Brazilian species, at 
t. 7362. The interesting species now depicted was imported 
from Peru by Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans; there is 
an example of the species in the orchid collection at Kew. 
II. Sanderi flowered for the first time in Europe in January, 
1910, in the nursery of Messrs. Sander & Sons at Bruges; 
our plate has been prepared from the specimen then sent to 
Kew for determination. It is most nearly allied to //. 
Lou'iana, Reichb. f., another Colombian species, but differs 
considerably in the details of the lip, more especially in the 
very dissimilar side lobes. The Kew plant, which has not 

November, 1910. 



vet flowered, thrives well under the treatment suitable for 
*Lycaste Skinneri, Lindl., an orchid which is figured at 
t. 4445 of this work. 

Description. — Herb ; pseudobulbs close set, ovoid-oblong, 
furrowed, 2-2^ in. long, about f in. thick, unifoliate. Learns 
shortly petioled, oblong-lanceolate, acute, slightly plicate, 
recurved, about 12 in. long, 1J in. wide. Scape erect, 
10-12 in. long, 2-3-flowered, clothed with lanceolate acute 
sheaths; bracts lanceolate, shortly acuminate, black dotted, 
about 8 lin. long; pedicels l^-lj in. long. Flowers large, 
pale yellow, inverted. Sepals somewhat spreading, very 
concave, apiculate, about 1\ in. long, the posterior wide 
elliptic, the lateral pair wide ovate. Petals nearly orbicular, 
somewhat concave, about 1^ in. long. Lip deeply 3-lobed ; 
lateral lobes widely falcate-oblong, obtuse or rounded and 
slightly recurved at the tip, 8 lin. long, transversely keeled 
in the middle and prolonged in front in an obtuse tooth ; 
mesochile oblong, truncate, 5 lin. long, fleshy ; epichile 
obovate-ohlong, 8 lin. long, with denticulate tip and cuneate 
base, nearly membranous. Column clavate, curved, about 
9 lin. long ; pollinia 2, ovoid, waxy ; stalk linear-oblong ; 
gland suborbicular. 



Fig. 1, Up and column ; 2, column seen from in front ; 3, pollinia :—aU 
entaryed. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F. U.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8to, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
tc Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 
Local Floras. By George Bentham. F. R.S., President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight v with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A - ., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J.Behkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates,*21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., &c, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 

BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Bktikelet, M.A., 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement onlv, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. 'By C. D. 

Babham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Currey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 
Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTILAGIXE.E. By 
George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. 6d. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookkk, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted 1 • I' 
Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published ooder the 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. Q. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA OAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants < 

the Cape Colony, CaftYnria. and Port Natal. By W. II. Harvkt and 
1). W. Soxper, and continued bv Sir W. T. Thiseltox-Dyer, F.R.S. Vole. 
I. — III.. 2G». each. Vol. IV. 'Sect. I.. 52s.; Sect. II., 24*. Vol. V., 
Parts I. ft EL, 9*. each. Vol. VI., 24*. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Damki, Oliver. F.R.8., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., mc 
20s Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25.*. M. 
Vol. VL. Sect. L, Part I., 8s. Vol. VII.. 27s. 6-1. Vol. VIII.. 25s. 6<*. 
HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. Bv 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspiceBof the Government 
of that Colonv. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science,' at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 2s. 6d. 

LOVELL REEVE k CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OP No. 71, NOVEMBER, 1910. 



Tab. 8342.— XERONEMA MOOR II, New Caledonia. 
„ 8343.— PLEIOCARPA MTJTICA, West Africa. 
„ 8344.— COLUMNEA OERSTEDIANA, Costa Biea. 
w 8345.— PYRACANTHA ANTGUSTIFOLIA, South-western 

China. 
» 8346.— HOULLETIA SANDERI, Peru. 

Lovell Rekve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Coveut Garden. 
JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21*. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting Hemsley. 

MONOGRAPHS 

From the Third Series of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descrip- 
tions, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may be had separately. Prices 
from Is. to 51s. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANIOAL RLATES 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. Gd. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stamps. 

NOW READY. Vol. VI., Sect. I., Part I., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III.. 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 
The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. ; Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6,1. Vol. VII. ,27s. <M. Vol. VIII., 

25s. U. 
Published wider the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., Part II., 9s. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each. 

By HARVEY and SONDER. 

The Continuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

^ol. IV., Sect. I., 52s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., Part I., 9». Vol. VI., 24*. 

Vol. VII., 33s. 
- a ousted under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 
Natal and Transvaal. 

__ L0 ^ LI ' REEVE * Co - L ™„ «, Henr.aU Street. Covent (xKruen. 

I»S : PRISTED BY William -LOWES AND K>«9, LTD., tCKE STREET, STAMFORD STREET, S.K. 



No. 72. 



VOL. VI.— DECEMBER. 



Monthly, price 3s. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6d. plain. 
Annual Subscription, 42s. 



OK NO. 1480 OF THE ENTIEB WORE. 

C D H T I S ' S ' 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTAINING HAND-COLO0BED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTCBAL AND HISTORICAL, 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW 3 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

EDITED BT 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Uirmur, Bogal i3otanic ©arflcns, Ittto. 




"^M. 



LONDON: 

LOVELL REET 0. Ltd., 



PUBLISHES 

6, hen: 



LSTD INDIAN GOVEk 

REET, COVENT GARDEN. 
1910. 



[All rights reserved.) 
(Entered a 'ork Post Office as second-class matter.) 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



JUST PUBLISHED. 



CORAL AND ATOLLS, 

Their history, description, theories of their origin both before and since 
that of Darwin, the influence of winds, tides, and ocean currents on 
their formation and transformations, their present condition, products, 
fauna, and flora. 

By F. WOOD-JONES, B.Sc, F.Z.S. 

Numerous illustrations, plates and map. 2 is. 

CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND 01 DJACBUT PORTIONS OP G-ARHWAL AND TIBET. 

By Lt.-Geu. Sir Bicharu Strachey and J. F. De.tiiie. 5s. 



NEW AND CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATIOffi OF THE BRITISH ISLES, 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

ols., 228 Plates. £5 5s. Plain, £7 10s. Coloured. 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

Traced from antiquity to the present day, tog-ether with the derivations 
of their names. By the Eev. Prof. GL Henslow, M.A., F.L.S. 
With 288 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. Qd. 

THE NARCISSUS: its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BTJRBIDGE, F.L.S. 

Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Bakee, F.P..S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BE NT HAM, F. R. S. 

'■■ D. Hoo: G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &e. 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
H. FITCH? F.L.S., aid W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

m to Bentham's ''Handbook," and other British Flora-; 
Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, Us. 



$34? 




oKlith 



TincentBi:oo'kB r 'Di5r&SorLLt a --L-iicf). 



LBoem &.. C° London . 



Tab. 8347. 

PINUS Armandii. 

South-western China. 

Coniferae. Tribe Abietineae. 
PlNTTS, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 483. 



Pinus Armandii, Franch. in PI. David, vol. i. p. 2:<5, t. 12, et in Journ. de 
Pot. vol. xiii. p. 254; Beissner in Nuov. Giorn. Bot. Hal. n. s. vol. iv. p. 184, 
t. 5, fig. 2; Mast, in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 549 et vol. xxxv. p. 582, 
in Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 66, figs. 30, 31, et in Journ. Bot. 
vol. xli. p. 269, ex parte ; Diets, Fl. Cenir. China, p. 216 ; Henry in Flwes & 
Henry, Trees of Gt. Brit. & Jrel. pars V. p. 1043 ; species P. koraiensi, Sieb. 
et Zucc, affinis sed raraulis cinereis glabris vel sub lente sparse pilosis, 
foliis tenuioribus, strobilorum squamis apice baud vel vix reflexis, semini- 
bus circumcirca argute marginatis distincta. 

Arbor ad 18 m. alta, cortice laevi viridescente tecta. Gemmae lanceolatae vel 
cylindricae, pallidae, vix resinosae, squamis mox deciduis. Eamuli novelli 
laeves, glabri vel pilis sparsis minutis parce conspersi, deinde cinerascentes. 
Folia quinatim fasciculata, tenuia, obtusiuscula, minute serrulata, 10-15 cm. 
longa, vix 1 mm. lata, sectione transversa triangularia, superne viridia, 
infra utrinque vitta albida notata. Amenta mascula aggregata, cylindrica, 
lutea, ad l - 5cm. longa, basi squami6 late obovatis tenuiter scariosis superne 
hyalino-marginatis suffulta. Strobili subterminales, penduli vel patuli, 
pedunculo 2-2 "5 cm. longo valido suffulti, elongato-ovoidei vel cylindrici, 
obtusi, 10-17 "5 cm. longi, 5-7*5 cm. diametro; squamae rigidae, lignosae, 
rhombicae, ad 3 - 5 cm. longae, 3 cm. latae, parte tecta rubescente, parte 
exposita viridi vel demum olivacea, apice iucrassato vix vel brevis^me 
recurvato. Semen ellip.-oideum, paululo a dorso compressum, 12-15 mm. 
longum, 10 mm. latum, circumcirca acute marginatum, margine saepe apice 
producto, pallide fuscescens. — P. Armandii var. Mastersiana, Hayata in 
Journ. Coll. Sc. Tokyo, vol. xxv. p. 216, fig. 8. P. quinquefolia, David, 
Voy. China, vol. i. p. 192, et Nouv. Arch. Mus. vol. vii. p. 95. P. ncipioni- 
formis, Mast, in Bull. Herb. Boiss. vol. vi. p. 270. P. koraiensis, Mast, in 
Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p. 34, fi?s. 18, 19 ; in Journ. Bot. vol. xli. 
p. 269, ex parte, et in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxxv. p. 582, ex parte ; 
Beiesner in Bull. Soc. Bot. Ital. 1899, p. 310; nee Sieb. et Zucc. 
P. Mastersiana, Hayata in Gard. Chron. 1908, vol. xliii. p. 194.— 0. Staff. 



The interesting Pine here figured has much the general 
aspect of the Himalayan P. excelsa, Wall., often known as 
the Bhutan Pine, or of the Mexican P. Ayacahuite, Ehrenb., 
the Hickory Pine ; the cones are, however, very unlike 
those of the two species mentioned. The species is most 
nearly allied to the Corean Pine, P. koraiensis, Sieb. & 
Dkcember, 1910. 



Zticc, with which it has to some extent been confounded. 
The material from which our illustration has mainly been 
prepared was derived from one of a group of young trees 
raised from seed transmitted to Kew in 1897 by Mr. A. 
Henry, who had collected it at Mengtze, in Yunnan. 
These trees, which are now from 10-15 feet high, and 
are growing very freely, are probably the finest in Europe. 
Whilst several of them have borne cones, no male inflores- 
cence has yet been produced, and the seeds are consequently 
infertile. The figures of the male flowers, male spikelets 
and seed here given have been prepared from an authentic 
specimen of the plant preserved in the herbarium at Kew. 
The cones of P. Armandii, which promises to be one of the 
most ornamental of the pines of the 5-leaved group, vary 
consideraby in size, the largest being 7 in. long and 3-3| in. 
wide. 

Description. — Tree, reaching 60 ft. in height, bark 
smooth, greenish. Buds lanceolate or cylindric, pale and 
hardly resinous, their scales quickly deciduous. Twigs 
smooth, glabrous or sparingly beset with small scattered 
hairs, at length ash grey. Leaves in tufts of five, slender, 
somewhat blunt, very finely serrulate, 4-6 in. long, under 
h bn. wide, triangular in section, green above, beneath 
with a whitish line along each side of the midrib. Male 
catkins clustered, cylindric, yellow, reaching 8 lin. in 
length, clothed at the base with wide obovate scales thinly 
scarious upwards and with hyaline edges. Cones sub- 
terminal, pendent or spreading, their peduncles |— 1 in. long, 
elongate-ovoid or cylindric, obtuse, 4-7 in. long, 2-3 in. 
wide; scales rigid, woody, rhomboid, 1^ in. long, lj m. 
wide, the hidden lower portion reddish, the exposed upper 
part green or at length olive-green, the tip thickened and 
hardly if at all recurved. Seed ellipsoid, somewhat dorsally 
compressed, 0-7 lin. long, 5 lin. wide, of a pale tawny 
colour and with a sharp circumferential edge which is 
often somewhat produced at the tip. 



. Fig. 1, leaves; 2, tip of a leaf: 3, leaf in transverse section ; 4 and 5, male 
inflorescence; 6 and 7, male fluwere: 8, seed:-l 4 and 8 of natural size, the 
rent enlarged. 



8348 




Vincent Brooks,!) ay * Sc 






8 3c G° London. 



Tab. 8348. 
NEOGLAZIOVIA concolor. 

Brazil. 

Bromeliaceae. Tribe Billbekgieae. 

Neoglaziovia, Mez in Mart. Flor. Bras. vol. iii. pars 3, pp. 180, 426 ; Engl. A 
Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenf. Nachtr. i. p. 66. 



Neoglaziovia concolor, C. H. Wright ; species N. variegatae, Mez, affinis sed 
foliis uniformiter albo-lepidotis distincta. 

Ilerba, caulis abbreviatus. Folia 5-8, linearia, acuminata, basi crassa vaginata, 
rigida, albo-lepidota, 40-60 cm. longa, 2- 5 cm. lata; spinae inter se 
1-1 "5 cm. distantes, 4 mm. longae, basi compressae, subulatae, incurvae 
v«l rarius rectae, aliquando parte foliorum supreraa obsoletae. Baaemtu 
terminal's, quam folia brevior; pedunculus albo-floccosus ; bracteae lanceo- 
latae, albo-floccosae, infima 10 cm. longa, superiores gradatim minores ; 
pedicelli 5 mm. longi, patentes. Calyx cinnabarinus, ovoideus, glaber, 
1 • 5 cm. longus ; lobi brevet, obtusi. fetala violacea, oblongo-spathulata, 
obtusa, 2 cm. longa ; squamae basilares 2 mm. longae, laceratae. 
Staminum filamenta 1 ■ 7 cm. longa, crassa ; antherae dorsifixae, ovales, 
albae, 2 mm. longae; pollinis granulae ellipticae, longitudinaliter 1-sul- 
catae, eporosae. Ovarium inferum, ovulis in loculis paucis; stylus 
staminibus aequilongus, ramis 3 brevibus spiraliter contortis instructus. — 
C. H. Wright. 



The Bromeliad here figured is a native of the northern 
portion of the State of Bahia in Brazil, where it is known 
as the Makimheira ,• here it grows in association with the 
Caroa, a very nearly allied plant referred by Baker to the 
genus Dyck'ia as D. Glaziovii, but treated by Mez, perhaps 
more satisfactorily, as the type of a distinct genus Neogla- 
ziovia. From the Caroa (N. variegata) the Makimbeira 
(N. concolor) differs in its shorter stature and in having its 
leaves uniformly white-lepidote, the younger parts are 
indeed almost woolly ; the leaves of N. variegata are 
glabrous or only very minutely lepidote, and when fresh 
are conspicuously marked with lighter transverse bars 
which in dried specimens become obscure or disappear 
entirely. The leaves of both species furnish fibre ; that of 
the Caroa is well known and comes chiefly from the 
Queimadas District ; it is made into ropes for binding 
December, 1910. 



packages of tobacco. These ropes have a breaking strain 
of 3 tons to the square inch ; they are, however, very 
sensitive to attack by alkalis. The fibre of the Makim- 
beira is less well known and is of a softer and poorer 
quality ; attention to this fibre and to the plant itself was 
first called in 1902 by His Majesty's Consul at Bahia in a 
letter to the Imperial Institute. In 1903 living plants of 
the Caroa and the Makimbeira were received at Kew from 
the Imperial Institute; the latter, which flowered for the 
first time in a tropical greenhouse in September, 1909, 
provided the material for the figure now given. jV. concolor 
has proved, as compared with Bromeliads generally, to be 
of very slow growth under the artificial conditions of a 
tropical collection; possibly under natural conditions it 
may thrive more luxuriantly. At Kew it is planted in a 
pot in peaty soil and kept in a warm moist house where it 
receives shade from bright sunshine. 

Description. — -Herb ; stem very short. Leaves 5-8, 
linear, acuminate, thick and sheathing at the base, firm, 
white-lepidote, U-2 ft. long, 1 in. wide; spines 5-8 lin. 
apart, 2 lin. long, flattened at the base, subulate, incurved 
or occasionally straight, at times absent towards the apex 
of the leaf. Raceme terminal, shorter than the leaves; 
peduncle white-woolly ; bracts lanceolate, white-woolly, 
the lowest 4 in. long, gradually decreasing in size upwards; 
pedicels under \ in. long, spreading. Calyx scarlet, ovoid, 
smooth, over l in. long ; lobes short, blunt. Petals violet, 
oblong-spathulate, blunt, § in. long; basal scales 1 lin. long, 
lacerate. Stamens nearly as long as petals ; filaments stout ; 
anthers dorsinxed, oval, white, 1 lin. long; pollen-grains 
elliptic, with a single longitudinal groove and without 
pores. Ovary inferior ; cells few-ovuled ; style as long as 
the stamens, with three short spirally twisted stigmatic 
arms. 



mJSL h o ertlcaI sectlou of flower with inner perianth segments and stamens 
; Ik' 7 a i" /? er ,P eriMth segment; 3 and 4, anthers; 5, style-arms; 
<o vines, (, sketch ot an entire plant:— all enlarged except 7, which w much 



8349 




Viivcen±Broote,DayA- 






L. Reeve &C? Landor. 



Tab. 8349. 
CORYL0P3IS Veitchiana. 

Central China. 



Hamamklidaceae. 
Corylopsis, Sieb. et Zucc; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. CG7. 



Corylopsis Veitehiana, Bean ; inter species hucusque doscriptas C. rinenri, 
Hemsl., et V. Henryi, Hemsl., proxima ab ilia tamen f'oliis maturis glaber- 
riruis staminibusque plane exsertis, ab liac calycis lobis tubo breviorilms, 
petalis latioribus, staminibus exsertis, nectariis calycis lobos exoedentibus 
apte distinguenda. 

Fruter 2-metralis comam fere spbaericam compactam efflciens; ramuli etiam 
junioies glabri, rnbescentes. Folia breve petiolata, elliptica, abrapte breve 
acuminata vel acuta, mucronulata, basi subeordata, 7-10 cm. lon^a, 
4-5 cm. lata, primum purpnrascentia et subtus secus nervos p. lis per* 
pancis simplicibus cito cadncis vestita, max glaberrimn supra saturate 
viridia subtus glaucescentia vel glanca, i-oriaeea; venae primariae utrinque 
6-7 parallelae, vena ima nervo-* 4-5 versus laminae marginem etnittente, 
omnes subtus elevatae in dentes setaceos excurrentes; periolns (! mm. 
longus, gla'^eriimus. Ramuli floriferi cernui, spicati, bracteati, 2*5-6 cm. 
longi, 1*7 cm. lati, ex axillis foliorum delapsornm orti, 10-15-flori ; rhachis 
pilosa, basi pernlis paucis vacnis obsita. Bractm- titipulare* 2-4, concavae, 
j)lus minusve translucentes, pallide viridi-flavi, orbiculares, extra glabrae, 
margine ciliatae, intus sericeae ; bracteae floriferae similes nisi mi n ores et 
extra intusque hirsutae. Calyx viridi-flavus, birsutus; lobi 5, rotundati, 
ciliati, tubo triplo breviore". Ptt<rfa 5, primulina, spatbulato-orbicularia, 
lamina 4 mm. lata in unguem 3 mm. longum attenuata Stamina 5; 
antherae brunnco-rubrae distincte exsertae. Aectariu 5, argute 2-dentata, 
calycis lobos parum excedentia. SiyK encti, apice recuivi. Vapsula ignota. 
— W. J. Bean. 



The Hamamelidaceous genus Corylopsis is rather widely 
distributed throughout Eastern Asia from the Eastern 
Himalaya to Japan. iSo far thirteen species have been 
reported ; of these four seem confined to Southern Japan 
and six occur in Eastern and Central China, only one of 
these, C. sinemis, Hemsl., extending from Kiang-si, through 
Hupeh, as far as Szechuan in Western China. In the 
western portion of the region occupied by the genus the 
species seem less numerous, one only having been collected 
in Bhutan, another in the Khasia Hills and a third in 
Manipur. The species here figured was collected at 
Dbckmbee, 1910. 



Chang-yang in Western Hupeh by Mr. E. H. Wilson in 
May, 1900, when seeds were sent to Messrs. J. Yeitch & 
Sons, growing in the same general region as C. sinensis, to 
which and to C. Ilenryi, Heinsl., another species from 
Hupeh, it is most nearly allied. From C. sinensis our 
plant is, however, readily distinguished by its leaves which - 
when mature are quite glabrous, by its distinctly exserted 
stamens and by its red-brown not yellow anthers; from 
C. Heuryi it differs by having more rounded petals and 
very much shorter calyx-lobes. The flowering spike of 
Corylopsis is the termination of a young ultimately leafy 
branch. The empty basal protective scales do not, as is 
the rule, fall away when the buds open ; above these 
scales are a few bracts of stipular nature in association 
with one or more of which leaves are produced ; above 
these again come the true floral bracts, each with a sessile 
axillary flower and lateral bracteoles. The true character 
of the inflorescence is evident by the time the seeds are 
ripe, for the leaf-bearing base of the axis has by then 
become woody. The plant from which our figure has been 
prepared was raised by Messrs. Yeitch in their nursery at 
Coombe Wood, where it has flowered regularly in April 
for some years past, and is then decidedly attractive owing 
to the soft primrose-yellow colour and the pleasing fragrance 
of its blossoms. It appears to be quite hardy ; it grows well 
in an open sandy loam and can be propagated by cuttings. 

Description. — Shrub ; 5-6 ft, high, of bushy rounded 
habit; branches reddish when young, glabrous. Leaves 
shortly petioled, elliptic, suddenly shortly acuminate or 
acute and mucronulate, somewhat cordate at the base, 
3-4 in. long, 1J-2 in. wide, reddish-purple and sparingly 
silky hairy on the nerves beneath when young, becoming 
dark green above, more or less glaucous and perfectly 
glabrous beneath when full grown, coriaceous; main veins 
6-7 on each side, straight and parallel, the lowest pair 
giving off 4-5 strong nerves outwards; veins all prominent 
beneath and extending beyond the margin in setaceous 
teeth ; petiole glabrous, about { in. long. Flowering 
branches spicate, nodding, bracteate, 1-2 in. long, § in. 
wide,^ lateral on the naked wood of the previous year, 
10-15-flowered; main-axis pilose and beset at the base 



with a few empty membranous scales; stipular bracts 2-4, 
concave, semi-translucent, pale yellowish-green, orbicular, 
f in. in diameter, glabrous outside, ciliate, silky within; 
floral bracts similar in colour and shape but smaller and 
hairy on both sides. Calyx greenish-yellow, hairy, with 
5 ciliate rounded lobes about one-third the depth of the 
tube. Petals 5, primrose-yellow, spathulate orbicular, ^ in. 
wide, narrowed to a claw about -} T in. long. Stamens 5, 
the red-brown anthers distinctly exserted. Nectaries 5, 
sharply 2-dentate, somewhat longer than the calyx-lobes. 
Capsule not seen. 



Fig. 1, flower and bracts; 2, petal ; 3, stamens and pistil; 4, staminode ; 
5, staiLen ; (i, vertical section of pistil : — all enlarged. 



8350 







^maent Brooks Pay &- DonLt^wp 



Tab. 8350. 

JACOBINIA SUBERECTA. 
Uruguay, 



ACANTHACEAE. Tribe JUSTICIEAE. 
.TacobjNia, Moric. ; Smth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1114. 

Jacobinia suberecta, Andre in Rev. Hortic. 1900, p. 210 cum ic. ; species 
J. stellatae, Robins. & Grreenm., affinis aed habitu prostrato foliis minnribus 
obtusioribus pilisque simplicibus nee stellatis vehitinis facillime distin- 
guenda. 

Herba, molliter velutino~tomentosa. Caul en elougati, pros t rati, ramis floriferis 
erectis. Folia petiolata, opposita, patula, crasse berbaoea, ovata, obtusa, 
basi rotundata vel cuneato-rotundata. 2-7 cm. longa, 1-3*5 cm. lata; 
petiolus 1-3 "5 cm. longus. Cymae peduaculatae, parvae, 5-10-florae vel 
abortu 1-florae; bracteae spathidato-objvatae, obtusae, 8-9 mm. longae, 
3-4 mm. Jatae; bracteolae lmeari-1 mceolatae, acuminatae, pube?centes et 
ciliatae, 4-6 mm. longae; flores sessiles. Oatycis tubus 1*5-2 mm. longus, 
subhemisphaericus ; lobi 3-4 mm. longi, lanceolato-attenuati, acutissimi, 
extra glabri, intus pilis minutissirais conspersi, subciliati. Corolla bila- 
biata, extra pubescens, intus glabra, laete coccinea; tubus 3*5 cm. longus, 
leviter curvatus, interne gracilis, supevne ampliatus, fauce 5-6 mm. 
diametro ; labium superius 1 cm. longum, ovatum, apice minute emargina- 
tum; labium inferius 1 cm. longtim, oblongum, apice subtrancatum, 
3-dentatum. Stamina 2, corollae subaequilonga, medio tubo inserta; 
filamenta pubescentia ; antherae loculis oblongis uno paullo altius affixo. 
Discus percrassus, cupularis, lutescens. Ovarium apice minute pubescens ; 
stylus tiliformis, glaber, stigmate minutissime 2-lobo. — N. E. Bbown. 



The attractive Jacobinia here figured is a native of 
Uruguay, whence it was introduced into cultivation in 
1899 by Mr. J. Sallier of Neuilly-sur-Seine. The habit of 
the plant is unusual in the genus, for most of the species 
of Jacobinia have erect stems ; in /. suberecta, however, the 
stems are prostrate and form a compact mass which gives 
off a number of erect flowering brandies. This character- 
istic renders it a very suitable plant for culture in a hang- 
ing basket. A pleasing grey-green effect is produced by 
the velvety pubescence which clothes the leaves and stems, 
to which the bright scarlet flowers afford a striking contrast. 
The material from which our figure has been prepared was 
presented by Col. R. H. Beddome, who successfully flowered 

J'KCEMBEK, 1910. 



it in his stove collection at West Hill, Putney, in July, 1909. 
Col. Beddome informs us that this Jacobinia does not flower 
with him when grown as a large plant under ordinary 
stove conditions. But young succulent cuttings, rooted in 
the spring in the propagating frame, planted in small pots 
in a mixture of leaf-mould, loam, sand and pea-shaped 
crocks, and slightly fed with fertilizer, have flowered freely 
in his collection when kept on shelves quite close to the 
glass. 

Description. — Herb ; uniformly softly velvety pubescent ; 
stems long and prostrate ; flowering branches erect. Leaves 
petioled, opposite, ovate, obtuse, base rounded or cuneately 
rounded, |-2J in. long, J-l^ in. wide ; petiole \-~l\ in. 
long. Cymes peduncled, small, 5-10-flowered or by sup- 
pression 1-flowered ; bracts spathulate-obovate, obtuse, 
about i in. long, ^ in. wide ; bracteoles linear-lanceolate, 
acuminate, pubescent and ciliate, 2-3 lin. long ; flowers 
sessile. Calyx tube about 1 lin. long, nearly hemispheric ; 
lobes about 2 lin. long, narrowly lanceolate, very acute, 
glabrous outside, subciliate, clothed within with minute 
hairs. Corolla 2-lipped, pubescent outside, glabrous within, 
bright scarlet; tube 1^ in. long, slightly curved, slender 
below, widened upwards and about \ in. across at the top ; 
upper lip 5 lin. long, ovate, slightly emarginate ; lower lip 
5 lin. long, oblong, subtruncately 3-toothed. Stamens 2, 
about as long as the corolla, adnate to the middle of the 
tube ; filaments pubescent ; anther cells oblong, one situated 
higher than the other. Disk very thick, cup-shaped, 
yellowish. Ovary slightly pubescent at the apex-, style 
filiform, glabrous ; stigma minutely 2-lobed. 



Fig. 1, flowering cyme, with corolla removed; 2, calyx and base of style; 
tf, ea , yx partly removed, to show disk and ovary; 4, stamens, with portion ot 
corolla-tube :— all enlarged. 



8351 




London. 



Tab. 8351. 
DENDROBIUM Sanderae. 

South-eastern Asia. 

Orchidaceae. Tribe Epidenijreae. 
Dentrobium, Swartz; Benth. et llook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498. 



Dendrobium Sanderae, Rolfe in Gard. Chron. ISO!),, vol. xlv. p. 374, fig. 163; 
Orch. Bet'. 1909, p. 209, fig. 17; aZ). Dearei, Eeichb. f., floribus majoribus et 
labelli basi lobisque lateralibus purpureo-strktis differt. 

Herla epiphytica, erecta. Caules elongati, infra medium paullo incrassati 
40-80 cm. alti, sfriati, dense foliati, internodi 2-2 5 cm. distantes. Folia 
oblonga vel elliptico-oblonga, acuta vel minute biloba, 4-5 cm. longa, 
circiter 1-1 "5 cm. lata. Bucemi laterales, pope wpicem ramorum product], 
1-5-2-5 cm. longi, 3-4-flori, basi vaginis ochreatis brevibus obtccti.' 
Bracteae late ovato-oblongi, subacuti, membran icei, 2^3 mm. longi. Pedi- 
reUi circiter 4 cm. lo lgi, teretes. More* magni, albi, labelli disco et lobis 
lateralibus purpureo-striatis. Sepalnm posticum lanceolatum, acutum vel 
acuminatum, carinatum circiter 3*5 cm. longum; sepala lateralia oblongo- 
lanceolata, acuta vel acuminata, carinata, circiter 4 cm. longa, basi obliqua 
in mentum conicum acuminatum 2 cm. longum producta. LdbeUum 
trilobum, 4 cm. longum; lobi laterales rotundati vel subtruncati, 1 cm. 
lati ; lobus intermedins obovatus, truncatus vel obtuse bilobus, crenulatus, 
2-2'5 cm. latus. Columna lata. — R. A. 1'olfe. 



The figure of the striking Dendrobium here given has 
been made from a plant presented to the Kew collection of 
orchids by Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans. It is most 
nearly allied to the Philippine D. Dearei, Reich b. f., but 
differs from that species in having larger flowers which, in 
addition to some minor structural points, are marked by the 
presence of purple stripes on the side lobes and base of the 
lip. Introduced to cultivation only in 1909, sufficient time 
has hardly yet elapsed to admit of a definite judgment as to 
its cultural requirements. So far it has thriven well at Kew 
under the treatment that answers for D. Dearei ; tropical 
conditions with plenty of water both at the root and over- 
head while new growths are being formed, and rest in a 
dry atmosphere afterwards. The imported plants have 
flowered in October, but it is possible that when the species 
has become established in this country they may flower in 
spring. 
Deokmbkr, 1910. 



DESCRIPTION. — Herb ; epiphytic, erect ; stems elongated, 
somewhat thickened below the middle, 1^—3 ft. long, 
striate, closely leafy ; internodes |— 1 in. apart. Leaves 
oblong or elliptic-oblong, acute or very shortly 2-lobed, 
nearly 2 in. long, 5-8 lin. wide. Racemes lateral, produced 
near the apex of the stems, f-1 in. long, 3-4-flowered, 
clothed at base with short sheaths; bracts wide ovate-oblong, 
somewhat acute, membranous, 1-1| lin. long ; pedicels 
about 1| in. long, terete. Flowers large, white with purple 
stripes on the disk and the lateral lobes of the lip. Sepals 
white, the upper lanceolate, acute or acuminate, keeled, 
about 1^ in. long; lateral oblong-lanceolate, acute or 
acuminate, keeled, about 1| in. long, oblique at the base 
and produced into a conical acuminate rnentum § in. long. 
Lip 3-lobed, 1| in. long, lateral lobes rounded or almost 
truncate, 5 lin. wide, central lobe obovate, truncate or 
obscurely 2-lobed, crenulate, f-1 in. wide. Column, broad. 



Fig. 1, column; 2, antlur-cap; 3, pollmia ; 4, sketch of an entire plant:— 
all enlaryed except 4, which is much reduced. 



INDEX 

To Vol. VI. of the Fourth Series, or Vol. ('.WW I. 
of tlie whole Work. 



8316 Acanthopanax Henryi. 

8317 Agave Franzosini. 
8301 Agonis marginata. 

8336 Alectorurus yedoensis. 
8303 Aquilegia alpina. 

8325 Aristolochia moupinensis. 
8322 Begonia Martiana, var, 
grandiflora. 

8337 Betula Maximowiczii. 
8327 Bulbophyllum virescens. 
8299 Campanula Beauverdiana. 
8333 Chirita rupestris. 

8321 Cm-hope talum biflorum. 
8297 Coelogyne Mooreana. 
8344 Columnea Oerstediana. 
8315 Cornus florida, var. rubra. 

8311 „ Nuttallii. 

8349 Corylopsis Veitchiana. 

8312 Cymbidium insigne. 
8351 Dendrobium Sanderae. 
8310 Dipelta floribunda. 
8294 „ ventricosa. 
8296 Eria rhodoptera. 

8318 Fouquieria splendens. 
8330 Gamogyne pulchra. 
8346 Houlletia Sanderi. 
8323 Iris Clarkei. 

8293 „ rainuta. 
8340 „ Wilsonii. 

8350 Jacobinia suberecta. 

8319 Kahnia cuneata. 
8335 Micromeles caloneura. 
8348 Neoglaziovia concolor. 



8314 Nothofagus antarotioa, var. 
uMginosa. 

8306 Notylia trisepala. 
8295 Ourisia macrophylla. 

8328 Patrinia triloba. 

8324 Philadelphus Delavayi. 

8347 Pinus Arraandii. 

8305 Pittosporum Colensoi. 

8343 Pleiocarpa mutica. 

8298 Populus nigra, par. betuli- 

folia. 
8313 Primula Forrestii. 
8341 „ Littoniana. 
8331 Psoralea afnnis. 

8329 Pterostyrax hispidum. 
8345 Pyracantha an^ustifolia. 
8302 Eebmannia Ilenrvi. 
8326 Rhododendron flavidum. 
8309 „ Harrovia- 

num. 
8300 Rhododendzon Keiskei. 
8304 ,, mucronnla- 

tum. 
8332 Rhododendron Ungernii. 

8338 Rosa Moyesii. 

8308 Saxifraga Grisebachii. 
8320 Scutellaria violacea. 

8339 Styrax Hemsleyanus. 
8292 Syringa Bretschneideri. 
8334 Tristellateia australis. 

8307 Typhonorlorum Lindleya- 

num. 
8342 Xeronema Mooiii. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA j a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and- Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9*. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravinge. 7th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S. , President of the Linneean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsf.Nd, M.A., F.L. S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates. 2nd Edition, 21s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

' known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J.Berkeley, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. 
BRITISH FfJNGOLOGY. By the Rev. M. J. Berkeley-, M.A.; 
F.L.S. With a Supplement of nearly 400 pages by Worthington G. Smith, 
F.L.S. 2 vols. 24 Coloured Plates. 36s. Supplement only, 12s. 

THE ESCULENT FUNGUSES OF ENGLAND. By C. D. 

Badham, M.D. 2nd Edition. Edited by F. Cukrey, F.R.S. 12 Coloured 

Plates. 12s. 
BRITISH FUNGI, PHYCOMYCETES and USTlLAGLNEJi:. By 

George Massee. 8 Plates. 6s. Qd. 
FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J- D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and othei-s. Complete in 7 Vols., £12. 
FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Complete in 7 Vols., £7 4s. Published under th« 
auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES. By J. G. 

Baker, F.L.S. 24s. Published under the authority of the Colonial 
Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants oi 

the Cape Colony, Caffraiia, and Port Natal. By W. H. Harvkt and 
0. W. Solder, and continued by Sir W. T. Thiseivfon-Dyer, F.R.S. Vole, 
I. —III., 20s. each. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 52s.; Sect. II., 24s. Vol. V., 
Parts I. & II., 9s. each. Vol. VI., 24*. Vol. VII., 33s. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oi .*vkr, F.R.S., 

and continued by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Byer, F.R.S. Vols. I. to III., each 

20s. Vol. IV., Sect. I., 30s. Vol. IV., Sect. II., 27s. Vol. V., 25s. 6d. 

Vol. VI., Sect. I., Parts I. & II., 8s, Vol. VII.., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIIL, 25s. 6d. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA: a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Gkisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

INSULAR FLORAS. A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. 

Hooker, C.B., before the British Association for the Advancement of 
Science,' at Nottingham, August 27, 1S66. 2s. 6d. 

L0VE.LL RE! 0., Ltd. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 72, DECEMBER, 1910. 

Tau. 8347. — PINUS . th-western China. 

3348.— NEOGLAZIOVIA CONCOLOR, Brazil. 
,. 8349.— CORYLOPSIS VEITCHIANA, Central China. 
„ 8350.— JACOBINIA SUBERECTA, 
„ 8351.— DENDROBIUM SANDERAE, Sovi 

Loteij, Se$vb & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



JUST PUBLISHED, PRICE 21s. 

A NEW AND COMPLETE INDEX TO THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

VOLS. I.— CXXX. 

Comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Series. To which is prefixed a History of the 
Magazine by W. Botting- Hemsley. 

MONOGRAPHS 

From the Third Series of the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bringing together in one wrapper the plates and the structural and historical descrip- 
tions, illustrating each of the 1,457 genera which may be had separately. Prices 
from Is. to 51s. List of Genera on application. 

BOTANICAL PLATlzS 

From the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

Beautifully-coloured Figures of new and rare Plants. 6d. and Is. each. Lists of 
over 3000. Three Stam 

NOW REAIA Is I. & II., 8s. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to HI., 20s. each. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 
nation edited by Sir W. T. THIS ELTON- DYER, F.R.S. 
Vol. V., 25s. bVZ. Vol. fll., :. 
25*. (id. 
ty of the Secretary of Stab; for the Colonics. 

NOW READY. Vol. V., Sect. I., Part II., 9s. 

■ t FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Vols, i, to III., 20s. each. 
BLARVEY and SONDER. 
ontinuation edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
: VoL *»., Sect, Vol. V., Pan 1.. 9*. Vol. VL, 24.. 

Publish Vo1 ' YIL ' 33s " 

ed Af , authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope, 

Natal and Transvaal. 
Lo. Ltd., ti, :reet, Covent G. 

5TEBM, *■»■