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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



ILLUSTRATING AND DESCRIBING 



Plants of tf)f $*onai HSotaiw Cfrartrms of Ifteto, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; 



EDITED BY 



D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.E.S. 

DIRECTOR, ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW. 



VOL. V. • 



OF THE FOUETH SEEIES. 

(Or Vol. CXXXV. of the Whole Work.) 




i 



And all rare blossoms from every clime 
Grew in that garden in perfect prime. 

SHELLEY. 



LONDON : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., LTD.. 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments, 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GAEDEN. 

1909. 

{All rights reserved.] 



SOT. GARDEN 
1910 



LONDON J 

PRINTED UV WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED, 

DUKE STREET, STAMFORD STREET, S.E., AND GREAT windmill STREET, w. 






To 
F. W. MOOKE, Esq., M.A., A.L.S., V.M.H., 

KEEPEK OF THE KOYAL BOTANIC GABDEN, GLASNEVIN, 

whose sympathy with 

the Botanical Magazine 

is practically manifested in 

the ready contribution 

of interesting subjects, 

this volume 
is cordially dedicated. 



tioya 



Royal Botanic Gardens, Ketc, 
Dec. 1, 1909. 



JPourtl) drrt>#. 

No. 49. 



V.— 3 



price 3s. fid. colovreo 
Annual Subs 



OB No. X403 OF THE ERTlKK w ORK. 

C U 11 T I S ' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 



ffAND-COLOU&ED FIGl 



rRIPTTONS, STRUCTURAL AND 
RAKE 



PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEV 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 



EDITED BY 



D. PRAIN, C.I.E., LL.D., F.R.S., 

director, IKogfal ^Botanic ^TinrDens, Ueto. 




LOVFLL CO. Ltd.. 

THE HOME, COLONIAL. AND INDIAN G0VEBNMENT* 

HENRIETTA STREET, CO VENT GARTH 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATION >. 



MATERIALS FOR A FLORA OF THE MALAYAN PENINSULA. 

By H. N. Ridley, M.A., F.R.S., Director of Botanic Gardens, Singapore. 
Complete in Three Parts, 30s. 



CATALOGUE OF THE PLANTS OF KUMAON 

AND ADJACENT PORTIONS OF GARHWAL AND TIBET. 

lchey and J. F. Duthie. 5s. 



-.N'D- CHEAPER ISSUE. 



THE HEPATIC-ffi OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

■W H. PEARSON, 

Plain. £7 



THE USES OF BRITISH PLANTS. 

quity to the present day, together with the derivations 
By the Key. Prof. Gr. Henslow, M.A., F.L.S. 



THE NARCISSUS : its History and Culture. 

By F. W. BURBIDGE, F.L.S. 

J. G. Baker. F.R.S., F.L.S. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalised in the British Isles. 

Br GEORGE 13 E NTH AM, F.R.S. 

~eb, C.B., G.C.S.I., p.K.s., & c . 9*. 

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA, 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants 
ITCil. F.L.S., ixi) W. G SMITH FT S 

. with 1315 Wood Kngranpga, 9*. 
.0\ELi. A CO. I.tti., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT I 



8232 




KS.ad.Jlf.Fj.lnK Wv. 



I.Bseve &. C° LonRon. 



-oc^.D.jy&SanlArnj) 



Tab. 8232. 
ENCEPHALARTOS Babteri. 
West Tropical Africa. 

CVCADACEAE. Tribe ENCEPHAIiARTEAE. 

Encephalartos, Lehm. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 445. 



Encephalartos Barteri, Carruth. ex Miq. in Arch. NSerl. vol. iii. p. 243; Nieuive 
Bijdr. Gycad. p. 46 ; species K. villoso, Lem., similior, a qua frondium 
segment's brevioribus spinulis mirginalibus minoribus, squamisque 
strobilorum utriusque sexvis margine inferiore integris apice cicatrice 
truncata ornatis differ t. 

Truncus ellipsoideus, 30 cm. altus, 20-25 cm. diametro, frondium basibus griseo- 
hirsutis persistentibus arete imbricatis obtectus. Folia erecta vel sub- 
erecta, 1-1 • 5 m. longa, petiolo 10-25 cm. longo rbachique primum 
griseo-hirsutis subcylindricis, segmentis utrinque circa 80 patentibus 
lineari-lanceolatis basi aliquanto angustatis, 10-12 cm. longis, 1*5-2 cm. 
Jatis, apice pungentibus margine utrinque paucispmulosis, spinulis 
f-aepissime minutis; segmenta inferiora sensim reducta. S'robilus 
masculus distincte pedunculatus pedunculo gracili 4-6 cm. longo, sub- 
cylindricus, 12-18 cm. Iongus, 4 cm. crassus, squamis 2 cm. latis deltoideis 
brevissime stipitatis, apice triangulari subpeltato, margine inferiore sub- 
integro. Strobilus foemineus olivaceus, oblongo-ellipsoideus, 20 cm. Iongus, 
12 era. crassus, squamis majoribus 6 cm. latis stipitatis apice peltiformibus 
lato-rhombeis, angulis lateralibus explanato-deflexis, margine inferiore 
integris. Semina oblongo-ovata, kermesina, 3"5cm. longa, 2 "5 cm. lata; 
embryo anguste subcylindraceus, 5 cm. Iongus in filum spiraliter tortum 
4 cm. longum desinens ; fila sterilia cum fertili consociata saepe breviora, 
X-2 cm. tantum longa. — D. Pbain. 



The African genus Encephalartos includes twenty- four 
species. The precise habitat of four of these is obscure ; of the 
remainder fourteen are South African and six are natives of 
Tropical Africa. Four of the known South African species 
have already been figured in this work : E. Altensteinii 
(B. M. t. 7162); E. Caffer (B. M. t. 4903); a form of 
E. horridus (B. M. t. 5371); and E. villosus (B. M. t. 6654). 
E. Barteri, the Tropical African plant now dealt with, in 
habit and appearance most resembles the South African 
species last named, but is readily distinguished by the 
diagnostic characters given"above. 

E. Barteri, known in West Africa as the Pardi Attar or 
" Ghost Palm," was originally met with during Dr. Bailie's 
January, 1909. 



Niger Expedition of 1858, when it was collected by the late 
Mr. 0. Barter " three miles south of Jebu on the Yoruba 
side." The discovery afforded the first evidence of the 
existence of the genus in Tropical Africa. The name 
proposed for the species by Mr. Carruthers was taken 
up by Professor Miquel and is not invalidated by the fact 
that in his original account Miquel associated with Barter's 
specimens the leaves of another species from Natal. The 
species was again met with on the Upper Yolta in 1865 by 
the Rev. C. Schonfeld of the Gold Coast Basel Mission. 
Schonfeld took advantage of the re-opening of this territory 
after Sir John Glover's campaign to revisit the Upper Yolta 
and bring back with him an old full-grown tree and a 
further supply of botanical specimens which he sent to Kew 
in 1875. Farther material was communicated in 1882 by 
Commander R. M. Rurnsey, R.N., and in 1890 Sir A. 
Moloney sent a supply of living plants which he had secured, 
from Anum on the Upper Yolta, through the co-operation of 
the Basel Mission. In 1898 more material was sent from 
the Gold Coast by Mr. W. H. Johnson ; there is also at 
Kew a leaf obtained in Dahomej', 300 miles from the Coast, 
by the younger Mr. Poisson. Early in 1908 Mr. J. 
Anderson sent to Kew a number of living plants and fresh 
female cones from Labo Labo on the Yolta. One of these 
cones is now figured ; the male cone depicted was collected 
by Barter ; the embryo and suspensors have been drawn 
from a preparation by Mr. Hemsley. 

Barter only met with the plant in one locality " in a dry 
rocky valley " and Schonfeld, in a letter to Sir J. D. Hooker, 
speaks of it as only occurring on rocky hills " shooting out 
of the crevices of the rocks." The stem is described by 
Barter as hardly rising above the surface of the soil, the 
largest seen by him being 1 ft. in height and 9 in. across. 

The striking name of " Ghost Palm," independently 
recorded for the plant by Schonfeld, Rumsey and Moloney, 
is explained by Schonfeld as being used to express the 
absence of all virtues from tin's plant as compared with the 
valued Oil Palm, Elaeis guineeiuis. Moloney, however, 
(Forestry of West Africa, p. 215,) records, as illustrative of 
the difficulty in obtaining reliable information in matters 
of this kind, an alternative explanation which attributes 
malignant qualities to this handsome species, 



Cultivation. — A barrel containing a number of stems of 
E. Barteri was received at Kew in 1890 from the Botanic 
Station, Lagos. Some of these stems were distributed to 
various botanic gardens, others were planted at Kew. The 
plants, however, did not long survive ; nor have stems 
subsequently received lived for more than about three years. 
While, however, this has been the case as regards this 
cj^cad, E. villosus, the species to which E. Barteri appears 
most closely aliied, is perfectly happy under cultivation ; it 
cones regularly in the Palm House at Kew and is one of the 
most handsome of cycads. In both species the stem is conical 
and it may be that in a wild state both are deciduous. At 
Kew E. Barteri rarely has more than three leaves, and 
although carefully grown in a moist tropical house, only one 
of the stems has produced a cone. The largest stems 
received at Kew have not exceeded a foot in height. 

Description/. — Stem short, rarely exceeding 1 ft. in 
height and 9 in. across, closely covered with persistent 
imbricated leaf-bases clothed with grey cottony tomentum. 
Leaves erect or suberect, 3|-5J ft. long, 9-10 in. wide 
towards the apex, bright green ; petiole and rachis sub- 
cylindric, clothed at first with a deciduous grey tomentum ; 
leaflets usually about 80 pairs, opposite or some near the 
apex only subopposite, rather close-set, linear-lanceolate, 
-g— f in. wide, somewhat narrowed at the base, apex pungent, 
margin with few ascending small teeth ; lower leaflets 
diminishing downwards and passing ultimately into weak 
spines. Male cone peduncled, pale, narrow-cylindric, 5-9 in. 
long, 2 in. wide ; scales spreading, deltoid, very shortly 
stipitate, subpeltate, triangular, f in. wide, inferior margin 
entire. Female cone subsessile, dark olive, oblong-ellipsoid, 
8 in. long, 5 in. wide ; scales long-stalked, apex obliquely 
deflexed, peltate, wide-rhomboid with the lateral angles 
explanate, 2| in. across, inferior margin entire. Seeds 
ovoid-oblong, faintly angled, at length protruded between 
the scales of the mature cone, \\ in. long; testa crimson. 



Fi<r. 1, part of a leaf; 2, male cone; 3, male scale; 4, pollen; 5, female cone; 
6, scale with seeds ; 7, section of a seed ; 8, seed with testa removed ; 9, part 
of a seed with embryo attached to suspensor and with barren suspensors:— 
4 and 9 enlarged. 



8235 




^fincent Brooks Day 81.S0 



I Reeve &C<? London.. 



Tab. 8233. 
ANGADENIA nitida. 

Tropical South America. 

Avocynaceae. Tribe Echitideae. 
Angadenia, Miers, Apocyn. S. Amer. p. 173. 

Angadenia nitida, Miers, Apocyn. S. Amer. p. 177; species A. hypoglaucae, 
Miers, affinis ; foliis tamen subtus minutissime papillose- - pruinosis, 
corollae tubo graciliore parte infrastaminali breviore parte supra stand nali 
magis infundibulifoimi clifferfc. 

Frutex scandens, omnino glaber, ramis dextrorsum circumvolventibus gracilibus 
teretibus laevibus. Folia oblonga vel elliptica, basi minute cordata, apice 
acuta vel in cadem planta obtusissima, saepe cuspidulata, 8-15 cm. longa, 
3-G cm. lata, chartacea, supra laete viridia, nitida, subtus ob papillas 
minutissimas creberrimas pruinosa, nervis lateralibus utrinque 12-15 
patulis, venis Iransversis pulchre arcuatis supra prominulis; petiolus 
flexuosus, 1-1 • 5 cm. longus. Infiorescentiae axillares, racemoso-cymosae, 
cum pedunculo gracili flexuoso 8-12 cm. longae, floribus superne approxi- 
matis, nutantibus ; bracteae ovatae, ttnues; pedicelli 1-1 '5 cm. longi. 
Sepala ovata, obtusa, superne membranacea, 4-5 mm. longa, intus glandula 
ad basin trifida instructa. Corolla praeter annulum cinnabarinum ad 
staminum insertionem situm sulplmrea, 4 cm. longa ; tubus basi angustus, 
ad staminum insertionem constrictus, abhinc in flore plane aperto gradatim 
infundibuliformiter ampliatus et magis minusve tortus, ad limbi sinus 
3 cm. longus, limbi segmenta oblique rotundato-ovata, brevissime sub- 
acuminata, 1'25 cm. longa. Stamina 8 mm. supra corollae basin inserta; 
atitherae subulatae, dorso scaberulae, basi breviter sagittatae, 6 mm. 
longae. Discus cupularis, breviter 5-lobatus, ovarium ad medium cingens. 
Ovarium glabrum ; stylus filiformis; stigma ellipsoideum, basi annulo 
cinctum. Folliculi anguste lineari-lanceolati, paralleli, teretes, ad 20 cm. 
longi, • 5 cm. lati, pericarpio laevi, tenui. Semina fusiformia, 2 ' 25-2 • 5 cm. 
longa, rostro tenui 0*6-1 cm. longo incluso ; coma sordide alba, 5 cm. longa. 
Echitcs nitida, Vabl. Eel. vol. ii. p. 19, t. 13. Odontadenia nitida, Muell.- 
Arg. in Mart. Fl. Bras. vol. vi. pars 1, p. 118. 0. cordata, A.DO. Prodr. 
vol. vii. p. 360.— O. Stapf. 



Dr. Stapf finds that the South American Echitideae, more 
particularly those referred at one time or another to Echites 
and the more nearly allied genera, are in a state of such 
confusion as to stand in urgent need of revision. The most 
recent attempt to elucidate the affinities of the species in 
this group was that of Miers, whose memoir, " Apocynaceae of 
South America," based on somewhat scanty material, is not 
Januaby, 1C-09. 



altogether satisfactory. Dr. Stapf points out that Odonta- 
denia, to which Mueller has referred the plant here figured, 
is characterised by the very short, almost subglobose infra- 
staminal portion of the corolla-tube, the densely tomentose 
anthers and the very firm wooily follicles explanate when 
they dehisce and then over 2^ in. across. Within his 
Angadenia, Miers has aggregated 26 species which are far 
from uniform in appearance. Dr. Stapf therefore proposes 
to treat Angadenia in a narrower sense, limiting the name 
to a smaller group of obviously allied forms more or less 
resembling A. nitida in facies. This restricted Angadenia 
includes Miers' species A. hypoglauca, A. coriacea, A. tlegans 
and A. geminata and appears to be confined to North- 
Eastern Brazil, Guiana and Trinidad. 

Cultivation. — A. nitida, which extends from Para 
through Guiana to Trinidad, was received at Kew in 1906 
from the Trinidad Botanic Gardens where it was known as 
Echites neriandra. It has grown freely in a tropical house, 
its shoots extending for several yards along the rafters 
under the roof, and flowering freely in July, when it had 
the appearance of a small-flowered yellow Dipladenia. The 
flowers although not brightly coloured are pleasing and the 
leafy shoots always look healthy. A useful plant for 
clothing a pillar in a tropical house, it ought in tropical 
countries to be as serviceable on a trellis as the Passifloras. 

Description.— Shrub, glabrous, climbing ; branches twin- 
ing to the right. Leaves oblong or elliptic, acute or obtuse, 
often slightly cuspidate, entire, slightly cordate, lateral 
nerves 12-15 on each side, bright green and shining above, 
pruinose beneath, chartaceous, 4-6 in. long, 1^-2^ in. wide ; 
petiole slender, J-J in. long. Inflorescence of axillary, 
racemiform cymes, their peduncles slender, 3-5 in. long, the 
flowers approximate upwards, nodding ; bracts ovate ; 
pedicels \-\ in. long. Sepals ovate, obtuse, membranous 
above, under £ in. long, glandular at the base within. 
Corolla yellow with a vermilion band opposite the insertion 
of the stamens, 1| in. long ; tube narrow below and con- 
stricted at the staminal insertion, above narrowly funnel- 
shaped, somewhat contorted ; lobes oblique, ovate-rotund^ 
subacuminate, ^ in. long. Stamens inserted -3- in. above base 



of corolla-tube ; anthers subulate, seaberulous behind, shortly 
sagittate, I in. long. Disk cup-shaped, shortly 5-lobed, 
surrounding lower half of ovary. Ovary glabrous; style 
filiform ; stigma ellipsoid, annulate at base. Follicles narrow 
linear-lanceolate, parallel, terete, up to 8 in. long, ^ in. 
wide; pericarp thin, smooth. Seeds fusiform, about 1 in. 
long, beak slender ; coma dirty white, 2 in. long. 



Fig. 1, section ol corolla-tube; 2, sepal; 3 and 4, anthers; 5, ovary; G, stigma: — 
all enlarged. 



8234 




NJ 









Tab. 8234 

ERIA RHYNCHOSTYLOIDES. 

Java. 

Okchidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 
Eria, Lindl.; Benth. et Hodk.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 509. 



Eria rhynchostyloides, O'Brien in Qard. Chron. 1907, vol. xlii. p. 370; Kew 
Bulletin, 1908, App. iii. p. 87 ; aff. E. leucostachyae, Lindl., sed pseudo- 
bulbis brevibus et crassis, pediccllis longionbus, ct labelli lobis lateralibus 
auriculatis diifert. 

Ilerba epipbytiea. Pseudobu'bi aggregati, oblongi, subcompressi, 5-10 cm. 
longi, 2-4 cm. lati, vaginis membranaceis ve^titi, 3-4-pbylli. Folia 
oblongo-lanceolata vel elongata, acuta, erecta vel rccurva, coriacea, 
15-30 cm. longa, 2-3 cm. lata. Scapi axillares ^el subterniinales, brcviter 
pedunculati, crassiusculi, 15-20 cm. longi ; racemi arcnati, cylindrici, 
densiflori, pubescentes. Bracteac elliptico-oblongae, obtusae, subconcavae, 
refiexae, 5-7 mm. loDgae. PedicelH graeiles, sparse pubescentes, 6-8 mm. 
longi. Flores parce pubescentes, albidi, columnis purpureis. Sepalum 
poslicum elliptico-oblongum, obtusum, subconcavum, erectum, 5-6 mm. 
iongum ; sepala lateralia late triangulari-ovata, obtnsa, 5-6 mm. lata; 
meutum 5-6 mm. Iongum. Pelala Janceolata, obtusa, 5-6 mm. longa. 
Labellum trilobum, 5 mm. Iongum; lobi laterales auriculati, concavi, 
parvi; lobus intermedins unguiculatus, late ovato-orbicularis, obtusus, 
3 mm. latus, marginibus reeurvis. Columna lata, 2 mm. longa, purpurea. — 
E. A. Rolfe. 



Eria rhynchostyloides is a recent addition to the genus 
which belongs to the section Urostachya, Lindh, and is allied 
to E. ftoribunda, Lindl., and E. leucostachya, Lindl., but is 
remarkable in the section for its short stout pseudobulbs. 
A photograph of this species was first sent to Kew from 
Paris in 1894 by Mr. G-odefroy-Leboeuf who stated that it 
had been obtained from Java. It could not be identified, 
but in the absence of specimens it was not described. There 
are several species from Java which are imperfectly known, 
but none of them appear to Mr. Rolfe to resemble the one 
now described. 

Cultivation.— The plant now figured, which is that on 
which the original description was based, was presented to 
Kew early in 1908 by the Hon. Walter Rothschild, Tring. 
January, 1909. 



It flowered in August, producing three spikes like the one 
shown ^ in plate 8234, and was, for an Eria, decidedly 
attractive. As cultivated in a tropical house, where it is 
planted in a pot filled with peat fibre and sphagnum, it has 
grown vigorously. Its behaviour at Kew suggests that it 
is likely to prove an easily managed and freely flowering 
species. 

Description. — Herb, epiphytic. Pseudobulbs clustered, 
oblong, sub-compressed, 2-4 in. long, f-1^ in. wide, clothed 
with membranous sheaths. Leaves 3-1, oblong-lanceolate 
or elongate, acute, erect or recurved, coriaceous, 6 in.-l ft. 
• on o> i~H in. wide. Scapes axillary or subterminal, short- 
peduncled, rather stout, 6-8 in. long; racemes curved, 
cylindric, dense-flowered, pubescent ; bracts elliptic-oblong, 
obtuse, subconcave, reflexed, J-^ in. long ; pedicels slender, 
sparingly pubescent, slightly longer than bracts. Flowers 
sparingly pubescent, whitish with a purple column ; sepals 
about \ in. long, obtuse, posterior elliptic-oblong, subcon- 
cave, erect, lateral wide triangular-ovate ; mentum as long 
as sepals. Petals lanceolate, obtuse, under £ in. long ; lip 
3-lobed, as long as petals, its lateral lobes auriculate, concave, 
small, the mid-lobe clawed, widely ovate-orbicular, obtuse, 
J in. wide with recurved margins. Column wide, T \j- in. 
long, purple. 



Tigs. 1 and 2, flowers; 3, column and lip; 4, anther-cap: 5, pollinia:— all 
enlarged. 




YmcentBrooJ<s Day* S<mXt 



Ti.Reeve & wLanilan. 



Tab. 8235. 

CLERODENDRON ugandense. 

Tropical Africa. 



Verisenaceae. Tribe Viticeae. 
ClxbodbHDBON, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1155. 



Clerodendron (Cyclonema) ugandense, Pram; species C. myricoidi, K. Br., 
qmun maxime affinis, calycis lobis multo minoribus, corollae tubo maui- 
ftste breviore aliisque notis s=atis diffeit. 

Frutex 1-3 m. altus, rami's glabris. Folia saepius opposifa, elliptica \el 
anguste obovata, grosse ^errata, apice acuta, basi in petiolum brevem 
migustata, 4-12 cm. longa, 2-6 cm. lata, glabra vel glabrinscula. 
Cymae laxae, pauci florae, paniculatae. Calyx glaber, 6-7 mm. longns, 
campanulatus ; lolii rotnndati, apice rubescentes. Corolla valde zygo- 
morpha; tubus 5-6 mm. lougus, sursum curvatus; lobus anticus 2 cm. 
longus, concavup, ambitu pyriformis, caeruleo-violaceus ; ceteri 1 cm. longi, 
plani, obovati, pallide caerulei. Filamenta purpurea, valde exserta, 
ascendentia, incurva, interne barbata; antherae caerulescentes. Ovarium 
orbiculare, 3 mm. diametro ; stylus filamenta paullo superans, apice 
inaequaliter 2-fidu?.— D. Pkain. 



The species of Clerodendron referable to the section 
Cyclonema are characterised by having the lowest corolla- 
lobe considerably larger than the other lobes. The section 
includes ten or twelve distinct forms, all of which are 
African. Of these only one has hitherto been figured in 
this work (B. M. t. 5838) as Cyclonema myricoides, Hochst. 
{Clerodendron myricoides, R. Br.), itself, as at present under- 
stood, a somewhat variable species. From C. myricoides as 
there delineated the form now figured diifers in having 
much shorter semi-orbicular calyx-lobes, a shorter corolla- 
tube and larger more deeply coloured corolla-lobes. 

Cultivation. — Seeds of C. ugandense were forwarded 
to Kew in 1906 by Mr. M. T. Dawe, who had collected 
them in Voi, Uganda, at 2,000 ft. above sea-level. The 
plants have grown freely in an intermediate house, quickly 
forming shrubs from 2-3 ft. in height, with long slender 
leafy branches terminated by loose racemes of beautiful 
blue flowers. Cuttings formed of the young shoots root 
Januaby, 1909. 



readily, and some plants raised in this manner flowered 
freely in October, the one figured having flowered in 
August. Its behaviour under cultivation and the elegance 
and attractive colour of its flowers afford promise that the 
plant may prove useful in gardens, more especially as a 
winter-flo weiring decorative greenhouse shrub. 

Description. — Shrub, 3-10 ft. high ; branches glabrous. 
Leaves usually opposite, elliptic or narrow-obovate, acute, 
coarsely toothed, base narrowed to a short petiole, 1^-4^ in. 
long, |-2^ in. wide, glabrous. Cymes lax, few-flowered, 
paniculate. Calyx glabrous, about \ in. long, campanulate ; 
lobes rounded, with reddish tips. Corolla irregular ; tube 
-g- -\ in. long, curved upwards; anterior lobe § in. long, 
concave, pyrifbrm in outline, violet-blue, the others \ in. 
long, flat, obovate, pale blue. Filaments purple, much 
exserted, arched upwards, bearded towards base ; anthers 
blue. Ovary orbicular, \ in. across ; style rather longer 
than filaments, unequally 2-lobed. 



Fig. 1, caljx and ovary; 2, flower, laid open; 3 and 4, stamens; 5, apex of 
style showing stigrua: — all enlarged. 



823b 




■kith. 



"Vine en ill 



X.RjScvr & C° liO-ndo-iv 



Tab. 8236. 
LONICERA Giraldtt. 

China. 

Capbtfoliaceae. Tribe Lonicereae. 
Lonicera, Linn. ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 5. 



Lonieera (Nintooa) Giraldii, Behder in Bep. Missouri Bot. Gard. vol. xiv. 
1903, p. 150; 8, Mottet in Bev. Hort. 1907, p. 299, fig. 98; affinis 
L. acuminatae, Wall., a qua foliis augustioribus dense hirsutis differt. 

Frutex, rami's gracilibiis junioribus dense flavo-tomenfcnis. Folia oblongo- 
lanceolata vel lanceolata, acuminata, basi cordata, 3-9 cm. longa, 1 ■ 5-2 ' 5 cm. 
lata, utrinque dense hirsuta; petioli usque ad 1 cm. longi, tomentosi. 
Paniculae terminates, breves ; pedunculi breves ; bracteae subulatae, 
pilosae, circiter 3 mm. longae ; bracteolae ovatae, ciliatae. Calycis denies 
lanceolatae, 1 mm. longae, longe pilosae. Corolla bilabiata; tubus 1 cm. 
longus, extus dense flavo-pilosus ; labium superum 3-4-lobatum, 1 cm. 
longum, lobis ovatis subacutis 2 mm. longis; labium inter um oblongum, 
vix 1 cm. longum, 2 mm. latum. Stamina subaequalia, filamentis infra 
medium parce pilosis, antheris exsertis 4-5 mm. longis. Stylus exsertus, 
2 cm. longus, pilosus. Fr actus globosus, atropurpureus, 5 mm. diametro, 
calycis dentibus persistentibus. — J. Hutchinson. 



For the introduction of this striking Hone^ysuckle horti- 
culture is indebted to Mr. M. L. de Vilniorin, by whom 
seeds were first obtained from Szechuen in 189D and with 
whom it first produced flowers in 1903. The plants which 
yielded the specimens from which the present figure was 
prepared flowered in 1908 in the establishment of Messrs. 
Yilmorin-Andrieux at Verrieres-le-Buisson, whence material 
was sent to Kew in June, and again in October last. 
Although very nearly allied to L. acuminata, Wall., a 
Himalayan species, this Chinese plant, Mr. Hutchinson 
points out, is readily distinguished by the somewhat narrower 
leaves which are clothed on both surfaces with a dense, 
yellowish, somewhat stiff indumentum. 

In his careful synopsis of the genus Lonicera, Render has 

proposed a new subsection of the section Nintooa for the 

accommodation of L. Giraldii and ten other species that are 

distributed from Central Asia and the Himalaya south-east- 

Januaby, 1909. 



ward to the Malayan Archipelago. The species of this 
subsection, the Breviflorae, are characterised by small flowers 
about an inch long and by purplish-black fruits. 

Description. — Shrub; branches slender, when young 
tawny-tomentose. Leaves oblong-lanceolate or lanceolate, 
acuminate, base cordate, 1-3^ in. long, ^-1 in. wide, densely 
hirsute on both surfaces; petiole £-4- in. long. Panicles 
terminal, short; peduncles short; bracts subulate, pilose, 
i in. long; bracteoles ovate, ciliate. Calyx-teeth lanceolate, 
very short, with long hairs. Corolla 2-h'pped ; tube % in. 
long, densely yellow-pubescent outside ; upper lip 3-4-lobed, 
as long as tube; lower lip oblong, rather shorter than 
upper. Stamens exserted, subequal ; filaments sparingly 
hairy below' the middle; anthers about -^ in. long. Style 
exserted, i in. long, pilose. Fruit globose, purplish-black, 
^ in. across, crowned by the persistent calyx-lobes. 



Fig. 1, flower; 2 and 3, anthers; 4, style :— all enlarged. 



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Tab. 8237. 
alpixia bracteata. 

Eastern Himalaya. 



Scitamlveae. Tribe Ztngibeliaceak. 

Alpima, Linn. ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 648; Petersen in Engl. 
& Pranil, Nat. Pflanzenfum. vol. iii. pars vi. p. 23. 



Alpinia bracteata, lloxb. Hort. Beng. p. 2 (1811); Fl. Ltd. ed. Carey and Wall, 
i. p. 61(1820); Baker in Hooh.f. Fl. Brit, hid. vol. vi. p. 255; K. Schum. in 
Engl. Pflanzenr. Zingib. p. 336; species A. nutanti, Bosc, affinis, raeemo 
simplici, bracteolis viridibus differt. 

Herba perennis. Gaulis erectus, 1-2 ra. altus. Folia ad 60 cm. longa, 15 cm. 
lata, ovato-oblonga, acuminata, superiora lanceolata, supra glabra, subtus 
tomentosa pallidiora, marginibus dense ciliatis ; vagina circiter 20 cm. 
longa; Iigula obtusa, glabra; petioli 2 cm. longi, alte canalicrdati. Iiacemi 
terminates, erecti, simplices, 12-20 cm. longi ; rhacliis dense hirsuta ; 
pedicelli breves, hirsuti ; bracteae viridcs, ellipticae. Calyx campanulatus, 
unilateraliter fissus, 8 mm. longus. Corollae tubus infundibuliformis, 
8 mm. longus; lobi oblongi, 3 - 5 cm. longi, 1*5 cm. lati, albi roseo tincti. 
Labellum corollae lobis paullo longius, ovatum, concavum, 4 cm. longum, 
2*5-3 cm. latum, extra dilute roseum, intus rubro-purpureum, propo 
apicem luteum, ad margines dilute roseum. Filamentum complanatum, 
pubescens; staminodia subutata, 4 mm. longa. Ovarium subglobosnm, 
dense sericeo-villosum. — A. Roxburghii, Sweet, Hort. Brit. ed. 2, p. 493 ; 
Horan. Monogr. Scit. p. 34. — C. H. Weight. 



Alpinia bracteata belongs to a group of rather closely 
allied species, and most resembles A. nutans, Rose, which is 
readily distinguished by its more compound inflorescence, 
and A. Henryi, K. Schum., which has the indumentum on 
the rhachis more silky in texture. It must not be 
confounded with the species described as A. bracteata by 
Koscoe in the Transactions of the Linnean Society, vol. xi. 
p. 281 (1815) " from a Chinese drawing belonging to the 
Right Hon. Lord Stanley, F.L.S." which has been referred 
by Schumann both to A. alata, A. Dietr., and also, as Mr. 
AVright points out, to A. calcaraia, Roxb. 

The plant from which the figure now given was made, 

was raised at Kew from seeds received from the Roval 

Botanic Garden, Calcutta, in 1882. It flowered at Kew for 

the first time in a tropical house in May, 1908. The species 

Februaby, 1909. 



was, however, first introduced to European cultivation in 
1820, and a plant had already flowered at Kew in 1864. 

Cultivation. — The species- now figured, like the other 
Alpinias, thrives well when grown as a swamp plant in a 
strong loamy well-manured soil with a constant supply of 
moisture and a high temperature. An ideal place for such 
plants is a tropical aquatic house where the soil about the 
roots can be kept in a mud-like condition while the stems 
are exposed to abundant sunshine. The flowers of the 
various species of Alpinia are somewhat fugacious, but while 
fully open they are very effective. 

Description. — Herb ; perennial. Stem erect, 3-7 ft. high. 
Leave* up to 2 ft. in length, 6 in. wide, ovate-oblong, the 
uppermost lanceolate, acuminate, glabrous above, paler and 
tomentose beneath, the margins closely ciliate ; leaf-sheaths 
about 8 in. long with an obtuse, glabrous ligula ; petioles 
§ in. long. Racemes terminal, erect, simple, 5-8 in. long, 
with densely hirsute rhaehis and short hirsute pedicels ; 
bracts green, elliptic. Calyx carapanulate, split on one side, 
}, in. long. Corolla-tube funnel-shaped, I in. long ; lobes 
oblong, ls| in. long, | in. wide, white with a pink tinge. 
Labellum rather longer than corolla- lobes, ovate, concave, 
1| in. long, 2-2£ in. wide, pale rose without, within reddish- 
purple, with pale rose margins and yellow tip. Filament 
flattened, pubescent ; staminodes subulate, \ in. long. 
Ovary subglobose, densely silky. 



Fig. 1, flower, corolla-lobes removed ; 2, epigynous disk and style-base ; 
3, style-apex and stigma ; 4, entire plant, showing habit : — 1-3 enlarged, 4 much 
reduced. 



8238 







o oUs* Day &. S on-L 



X.. Reev.- 



Tab. 8238. 
OLIGOBOTRYA Henryi. 

China. 



Liliaceae. Tribe Polygonateae. 
Oligobotrya, Baker in Hook. 1c. PI. t. 1537. 



Oligobotrya Henryi, Baler, I.e. ; species unica. 

Hf,ha. Caulis erectus, ad 10 dm. altus, 4 mm. diametio, flexuosus, pubescens, 
viridis, purpureo-maculatus. Folia oliovato-oblonga vel ovata, breviter 
acuminata, 10 cm. longa, 4" 5 cm. lata, s-essilia vel breviter petiolata, basi 
rotundata, plus minusve pubesceutia praesertiru ad n* rvos, multincrvia. 
Racemi terminales, simplices vel ramo.-i; pedicelli tenues, 2 mm. longi ; 
bracteolae miimtae, ovatae, pubescentes. Perianthium album vel dilute 
luteum ; 1 nbus cylindricus, 8 mm. longns, 3 mm. diameti o, basi obtnsus ; lobi 
patentee, oblongoovati, obtnsi. Stamina ad corollae faucem affixa 
filamenta brevissiina; antherae oblonpae, obtusae. Ovarium ovoideum; 
i-tylus snbulatus, ovario paullo longior; stigma lobis 3 tr.'arjgularibus 
instructum. 

Var. violacea, C. II. Wrljld, var. now Perianthii tubus extra violaceus, lobi 
palUdiores.— C. H. Wbight. 



The genus Oligobotrya is intermediate between Smilacina, 
of which it has the habit and the terminal inflorescence, 
and Polyc/onatum, with which it agrees in having a gamo- 
phyllous perianth. The specimens on which the original 
description of 0. Henryi was based were sent to Kew in 
1886 by Mr. A. Henry, who had obtained them at Patung 
in Hupeh, Central China. Since then the species has been 
met. with in the adjoining provinces of Hunan and Szechuan. 
The specimens here figured were received from Messrs. J. 
Yeitch & Sons, for whom it had been obtained by Mr. B. II. 
Wilson. The original description states that the leaves are 
glabrous, but Mr. Wright finds that although the leaves of 
the specimens first communicated bear comparatively few 
hairs, these are not entirely absent. In other specimens, 
however, the leaves bear numerous hairs as shown in the 
figure. Some of the wild specimens in the Kew collection 
are of very vigorous habit and have a much -branched 
inflorescence. 

FEBRUABr, 1909. 



Cultivation. — The plants from which the plate here 
given has been prepared were grown, Messrs. Yeitch 
inform us, at their Coombe Wood Nursery in a very shady 
and moist border of leaf-mould and peat. They find that 
the same treatment as that accorded to the hardy Cypri- 
pediums appears to suit this plant. 

Description. — Herb. Stem erect, sometimes over .3 ft. 
high, ^ in. thick, ilexuous, green with purple blotches, 
pubescent. Leaves sessile or shortly petioled, ovate-oblong 
or ovate, shortly acuminate, rounded at the base, many- 
nerved, more or less pubescent especially on the nerves, 
4 in. long, l|-2 in. broad. Racemes terminal, simple or 
branching ; pedicels slender, -^ in. long ; bracteoles very 
small, ovate, pubescent. Perianth usually white or pale 
yellow, or (var. violacea) with violet tube and pale violet 
lobes ; tube cylindric, -l in. long, J in. wide, base truncate ; 
lobes spreading, oblong-ovate, obtuse. Stamens adnate to 
corolla-throat ; filaments very short ; anthers oblong, obtuse. 
Ovary ovoid ; style subulate, rather longer than ovary ; 
stigma 3-lobed, lobes triangular. 



Tig. 1, section of flower (var. violacea); 2, section of flower (var. typica); 
3, pistil (var. violacea) ; 4, pistil (var. typica) : — all enlarged. 



82Z9 




"Vincent Ike 0>sj 



XReeve &_C°XarirLaJi- 



Tab. 8239. 
ERANTHEMUM Wattii. 

Northern India. 

AcanthACEAE. Tribe Ti.UKi.UKAK. 

Erantuemdm, Linn.; B. Br. Frodr. p. 477; Linduu in Engl. & Frantl, Nat. 
Pflanzenfam. vol. iv. pars iii. B, p. 311. 



Eranthemum Wattii, Stapf; affinis E. ntrvoxo, Eoem. & Scb., sed statura 
humiliore, spicis brevioribus, corollis purpureis, staminibus inclusis, 
filamentis antheris duplo brevioribus differt. 

Iferba perennis, 20-25 cm. alta, ramosa, ramis quadrangularibus ad angulos 
minute puberulis. Folia ovata, breviter acuminata, basi abrupte cuneata 
vel rotundata, 6-10 cm. longa, 4-5 ■ 5 cm. lata, Simula, saturate viridia, ad 
margines et infra secus norvos scabiidula, nervis Jateralibus utrinque 8-9, 
subtus vtnisque transversis piominentibus ; petiolus l-3 - 5 cm. longus, 
superno ob lam : nam snepe decurrentem magis minusve alatus. Sjricae 
superne in panicnlam foliatum aggregatae, subanthesi ciroiter 2 cm. longae, 
demum ad 6-7 cm. elongatae, densae; bracteae ovatae vel superioresovato- 
lanceolatae, acuminatae, htmaceae 2-2*5 cm. longae, ad margines ciliato- 
fimbriatae ; bractcolae albidae, auguste lanceolatae, circiter 5 mm. longae. 
Calyx albidus, 8 mm. longus, ad medium 5-fidus, segmentis subulato- 
lanceolatis ad margines scaberulis. Corolla purpurea vel violacea; tubus 
anguste cylindricus, ad 2 cm. longus, sub apice paulo lalior; limbus ad 
2" 5 cm. cliametro. Stamina in tubo corollao inclusa; antherae vix 
2 - 5 mm. longae, filamentis duplo brevioribus suffultae; staminodia minuta 
capitata supra stamina in plica in*identia. Ovarium glabrum; stylus 
glaber, stigmate os corollae attingente vel breviter exserto. — Daedalacantltus 
parvus, C. B. Clarke in Kew Handlist Tend. Dicot. 1899, p. 5225 (nomen). 
D. Wattii, Pedd. in Grard. Mag. 1901, p. 644 cum ic. ; Journ. Hort. Soc. 
vol. xxxiv. 1908, pars i. p. 67. 



Horticulture is indebted to Col. R. H. Beddome for the 
introduction of this distinct species, raised by him from 
seeds received from Northern India. Its original discovery 
is attributed to Sir Gr. Watt, to whom it has-been dedicated 
by Col. Beddome in the original description, accompanied 
by a good figure, in the Gardeners' Magazine for 1901. 
No precise locality is given for the wild plant. In habit it 
most resembles E. nervosum, figured in this work (t. 1358) 
as Justicia nervosa. 

The use of the name Eranthemum for the genus to which 
these two species belong is explained by Dr. Stapf as 
February, 1909. 



follows. In recent works the name has usually been 
applied to a group of forms not closely allied to the original 
Eranthemum of Linnaeus. A century ago R. Brown 
pointed out that the Eranthemum of Linnaeus in the Flora 
Zeylanica and in all the editions of that author's Genera 
Plantarum is a Ceylon species allied to Vahl's Justicia 
nervosa and J. rosea {Eranthemum nervosum and E. roseum). 
To this Ceylon plant Linnaeus, in his Species Plantarum, 
owing to some confusion of synonymy, gave the inappro- 
priate name E. capense. Roxburgh, like Brown, had also 
taken up Eranthemum in the sense of the Flora Zeylanica, 
describing as E. montanum the plant which Linnaeus had 
already termed E. capense. 

The conception of Eranthemum as a genus based on 
E. capense, Linn. (E. montanum, Roxb.), was accepted until 
1865, when T. Anderson revised the Indian Acanthaceae. 
Anderson, some years before, had established a genus 
Daedalacanthus on a Ceylon plant which he knew to be 
E. montanum, Roxb., but did not know to be also the species 
(E. capense, Linn.) on which Eranthemum, Linn., was 
based. When, in his subsequent revision, Anderson with 
good reason broke up into two genera the incongruous 
aggregate of forms till then included in Eranthemum, he 
placed in Daedalacanthus all the congeners of D. montanus, 
T. And. (E. capense, Linn.), on which Eranthemum, Linn., 
had been founded, and retained the name Eranthemum for 
the residual species none of which had been included in 
Eranthemum by Linnaeus. 

The confusion thereby created was pointed out in 1883 
by Radlkofer who, in reverting to the usage of Brown, 
Roxburgh and Linnaeus himself as regards Eranthemum 
proper, proposed for the new Eranthemum, T. And. (not of 
Linn.), the name Pseuderanthemum. This rectification was 
overlooked at the time, but has since been repeated by 
Lindau. 

The error has mainly been limited to descriptive works; 
in horticultural literature Anderson's separation of the 
genera has not always been recognised, and the name 
Eranthemum is still in common use for the congeners of 
the plant now described. This separation is nevertheless 
necessary, for while the two genera have somewhat similar 
corollas — a circumstance which may explain their treatment 



as one genus until Anderson pointed out how they differ — 
their characters are so distinctive as to place them in 
different -tribes. Eranthemum, Linn., one of the liuellieae, 
has contorted corolla-lobes and foveolate pollen ; Pseuder- 
anthemum, Radlk., one of the Justicieae, has imbricate 
corolla-lobes and banded pollen. There is another and 
more obvious, though less important, difference in the bracts ; 
in Eranthemum these are usually large, in Pseuderanthemum 
they are very small. 

Cultivation'. — The species of Eranthemum are easily 
cultivated in a warm house. They are best raised annually 
from spring-struck cuttings, and if the tops be pinched back 
during the growing season they quickly form shapely little 
pot-shrubs and flower freely. The well-known E. nervosum 
flowers in winter ; the species here figured is at its best in 
Julv and August. 

Description. — Herb ; perennial. Stem brandling, angled, 
8-10 in. high. Leaves ovate, shortly acuminate, base 
shortly cuneate or rounded, 2|-4 in. long, 1^-21 in. wide, 
rather firm, dark green, main-nerves 8-9 pairs and secondary 
nerves conspicuous beneath, margins and nerves beneath 
slightly scabrid ; petiole -A— 1^ in. long, somewhat winged 
upwards. Spikes paniculate, at first about | in., ultimately 
2\ in. long, dense ; lower bracts ovate, upper narrower, 
acuminate, herbaceous, |~l in. long, with ciliate margins; 
bracteoles whitish, narrow-lanceolate, -§- in. long. Calyx 
whitish, I in. long, 5-partite, lobes subulate-lanceolate with 
margins scaberulous. Corolla purple or violet ; tube narrow 
cylindric, about § in. long, slightly expanded below the 
1 in. wide limb. Stamens included ; anthers short ; 
filaments very short ; staminodes minute, inserted above the 
stamens. Ovary and style glabrous ; stigma reaching 
the corolla-throat or slightly exserted. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil ; % part of corolla-tube laid opeiij showing stamens ; 
3, ovary ■ 4, stigma : — all enlarged. 



824C 




■&LS.deUJ.N.B.tdkli.ih 



\SncentBroo:i<s,Ds/-A-San.;- 



..Reeve 4.C? Lorulor. 



Tab. 8240. 
pinus bungeana. 

North China. 

Coniferae. Tribe Abietineae. 
Pinus, Linn. ; Be nth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 438. 



Pinus Bungeana, Zucc. ex Endl. Syu. Conif. p. 166; Parlat. in L)C. Prodr. 
vol. xvi. p. 398; Kent in Veitch Manual of the Conif erae, p. 316; Mast, 
in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. xviii. p. 8, fig. 1-2 ; Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. 
vol. xxxv. p. 590; affinis P. Gerardianae, Wall., sed foliis saepe paulo 
crassioribus brevioribusque et amentis in spicam terminaleni nee infra 
apicem ramotum dispositis differt. 

Arbor 17-30 m. alta, pyramidalis vel ovoidea, inferne saepe in ramos erectos 
vel ascendentes divisa, juvenilis cortice t'usco griseo-variegato, adulta 
cortice albido squamis latis caducis denudato. J&amuli viridi-brunnei, 
laeves. Folia terna, rigida, 5-10 cm. longa, 1'75 mm. lata, facie carinata, 
dorso convexa, marginibus minute serrulata, atro-viridia, subnitida ; 
fasciculi inrerdum subvertieillatim approximate basi primum squamis 
lanceolatis acutis deciduis 7-14 mm. longis membranaceis brunneis vestiti. 
Amenta mascula plurima, 5-7 mm. longa, in spicam compositam bracteatam 
terminalem 2-6 cm. longam conferta; bracteae 7-9 mm. longae, late- 
ovatae, cuspidato-acuminatae, apice recurvae, submembranaceae, pallide 
brunneae, nitidae. Strobilus maturus 4-5 cm. longus, 3 - 5-4 cm. diametro, 
conico-ovoideus ; squamae obovatae, apice transverse rhomboideo-incras- 
satae, transverse carinatae et breviter recurvo-mucronatae. Semina im- 
matura ala parva munita, matura exalata, 8 mm. longa, 7 mm. lata, 
compresso-ellipsoidea vel suborbiculata, pallide brunnea. — N. E. Brown. 



Pinus Bungeana is a very distinct species readily recog- 
nised in old examples by its white flaking bark ; when 
young, however, the bark is dark smoky-brown with dull 
greyish patches where it has flaked off. It is specifically 
most nearly allied to P. Gerardiana, Wall., from which it 
is distinguished by its whiter bark, rather shorter and 
somewhat stouter leaves, and male catkins that form a 
compound terminal spike instead of being clustered below 
the apex of the branchlets. These two species, with 
P. chihuahuana, Engelm., and P. Lumholtzii^ Robins. & 
Fern., form a small group which the late Dr. Masters looked 
upon as distinct from the other species of the genus owing 
to the deciduous leaf-scales and the leaves in bundles of 3 
with minutely serrulate margins. 
February, 1909. 



Cultivation. — The Pines at Kew as a whole succeed 
better and resist the evil influences of London smoke and 
fog more successfully than the majority of Conifers do, and 
P. Bungeana, which has long heen in cultivation, is no 
exception to this rule. This species grows very well in the 
ordinary gravelly soil characteristic of that part of the 
Pinetum in which it is planted. At Kew the trees assume 
in habit two distinct forms ; an erect pyramidal form and a 
rounded bushy one. The figure here given was prepared 
from a tree of the former type, which is now 25 ft. high, 
with a trunk 23 inches in girth at 3 ft. from the ground. 
The trunk is covered with a smooth bark which peels off 
very much after the manner of the common Plane. A 
distinct and striking tree, P. Bungeana is also attractive 
from the deep vivid green of its foliage. 

Description. — Tree, 60-100 ft. high; crown pyramidal 
or ovoid ; stern often dividing low down into erect or 
ascending branches ; young bark tawny with grey patches, 
old bark whitish flaking ; young branches greenish-brown, 
smooth. Leaves in threes, rigid, 2-4 in. long, fa in. wide, 
keeled below, convex above, with finely serrate margins, 
dark green and somewhat shining ; fascicles at times sub- 
verticillate, their bases clothed at first with lanceolate, acute, 
brown, membranous deciduous scales |-^ in. long. Male 
catkins numerous, -§— ^ in. long, aggregated in compound, 
bracteate, terminal spikes f-2£ in. long ; bracts £- ^ in. 
long, wide ovate, cuspidately acuminate and recurved at the 
tips, pale brown, shining, submembranous. Cone when 
mature 1^-2 in. long, l£-l£ in. across, ovoid-conical; scales 
obovate, transversely rhomboidly thickened at the tips, 
transversely keeled and shortly reflexed mucronate. Seeds 
when young slightly winged ; when ripe wingless, ^ in. 
long, i in. wide, compressed, ellipsoid or almost orbicular, 
pale brown. 



Fig. 1, section of a leaf; 2, stamen; 3 and 4, female bract with scale; 
5, cone ; G and 7, female bract with scale, in fruiting stage ; 8, seed : — all 
enlarged except Jig. 5, which is of natural size. 



8241 




MLS-del J N Fitch lift 



Wr J =entBTooks,D-7&3oT^ 



&n-f 



L. Reeve <5^C? LcmAan 



Tab. 8241. 

SORBUS ViLMORINI. 

China. 

Rosaceae. Tribe Pomeae. 
Sokbus, Linn. ; Schneider, IV. Handb. Laubholzk. 1904, vol. i. p. 667. 



Sorbus (Aucuparia) Vilmorini, Schneider in Bull. Herb. Boiss. 1906, ser. 2, 
vol. vi. p. 317; affinis S. microphijUae, Decne, sed foliolis supra medium 
serratis, floribusque minoribus differt. 

Arbor parva, circiter 3-5 m. alta. Rami striati, glabri vel leviter ferrugineo- 
hirtelli. Gemmae ovatae, acuminatae, apice plus minusve hirtellae. Folia 
gracilia, imparipinnata, rbacbi leviter alata subglabra ; foliola 9-14-juga, 
opposita vel subalterna, oblongo-elliptica, apice apiculata, l - 5-2 cm. longa, 
5-7 mm. lata, supra medium acute serrata, utrinque glabra, laxe reticu- 
lata; stipulae subulatae, circiter 5 mm. longae. Inflorescentiae pauciflorae, 
ferrugineo-hirtellae. Ftores parvi, circiter 6 mm. diametro. Receptaculum 
hirtellum. Sepala subglabra, triangularia, obtusa, 1*5 mm. longa. Petala 
obovata, breviter unguiculata, 3 mm. longa, 2 mm. lata. Stamina circiter 
20. Styli 3, obtusi, subglabri. Fructus globosus, ruber, circiter 8 mm. 
diametro. — Cormus foliolosa, Franch. in Vilm. Frutic. Cat. prim. 1904-5, 
p. 102 (non Spach). — J. Hutchinson. 



The plant from which our figure was prepared was pre- 
sented to Kew in the autumn of 1905 by Mr. M. L. de Vil- 
morin, in whose collection of shrubs at Les Barres the 
original specimen is now a wide-spreading" bush or small 
tree about 10 ft. in height. S. Vilmorini is very distinct 
from the other species of the genus now in cultivation and 
is certainly one of the most elegant. It is a native of 
Szechuan and Yunnan in South-western China, whence 
specimens, collected on the summit of Mount Omei, were 
sent to Kew by the Rev. E. Faber in 1887 ; others from 
the same locality were communicated by Mr. A. Henry a 
few years later, and still others from near Tachienlu were 
received from Mr. A. E. Pratt. 

Schneider has enumerated thirty -four species of Sorbus 
as now in cultivation, seventeen of these being members of 
the section Aucuparia. He recognises two varieties of 
S. Vilmorini, a typical variety to which the plant here 
figured belongs, and a variety, var. setschwanensis, with 

Febbtjabt, 1909. 



smaller and more numerous leaflets, which approaches so 
closely to S. microphylla {Pyrus microphylla, Wall.), a native 
of Sikkim, that it mighfc readily be regarded as a geogra- 
phical form of that species. 

Cultivation. — The Kew plant of S. Vilmorini, now a 
bush about 6 ft. in height, has grown well in a border of 
loamy soil. It forms a most attractive object in early June 
when the elegant pinnate foliage is at its best and every 
shoot bears a terminal corymb of pretty white flowers. 
The fruit is in good colour by September, and the seeds 
should afford a ready means of propagating what is one of 
the most attractive of the new shrubs received from China 
in recent years. 

Description. — Shrub or small tree, 10-20 ft. high ; 
branches striate, glabrous or sparingly rusty-pubescent ; 
buds ovate, acuminate, with somewhat pubescent tips. 
Leaves slender, unequally pinnate, rhachis slightly winged, 
nearly glabrous ; leaflets in 9-14 pairs, opposite or sub- 
alternate, oblong-elliptic, apiculate, 1^-1^ in. long, ^- \ in. 
wide, sharply toothed beyond the middle, glabrous above 
and below, wide-reticulate ; stipules subulate, about ^ in. 
long. Inflorescence few-flowered, rusty-pubescent. Flowers 
small, about \ in. across ; receptacle pubescent. Sepals 
almost glabrous, triangular, obtuse, y 1 ^ in. long. Petals 
obovate, short-clawed, \ in. long, -^ in. wide. Stamens 
about 20. Styles 3, obtuse, almost glabrous. Fruit globose, 
red, about ^ in. across. 



Fig. 1, flower-bud ; 2, partial section of flower, the petals removed ; 3 and 4, 
upper portion of filaments and anthers:— all enlarged. 



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Tab. 8237.— ALPINIA BRACTEATA. 
„ 8238.— OLIGOBOTRYA HENRYI. 
„ 8239— ERANTHEMUM WATTII. 
„ 8240.— PINITS BUNGEANA. 
M 8241.— SORBUS VILMORINI. 

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8241 




.N.FitshivtH. 



Vmce-ntHroo>:;. : >agr& San Lt d imv 



Tab. 8242. 

CYC AS Micholitzii. 

Indo- China. 

Cycat>aceae, Tribe Cycadeae. 
Cycas, Linn. ; Benth. et Ilooh.f. Gen. Plant. vol. iii. p. 445. 



Cycas Micholitzii, Dyer in Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 142, figs. 48, 49 ; 
foliis paucis pinnulisque subdicbotomis in genere insignis. 

Cattdex nonnvmquam subterranens 20-60 cm. longus, 4-5 cm. vel imo basi 
10-12 cm. crassus. Folia 2-3, 2-3-metralia, parte basalt metrali 1*5 em. 
lata aculeis brevibus latioribus arcnata, sursum pinnulis inter se 4 cm. 
remotis 20 cm. lon^is subdicbotomis Begmentis 2-2-5 cm. latis saepissime 
iternm divisis induta. Strobilus mascnlus breve pedtmculatus, pedunculo 
3 cm. longo 1*5 em. crasso, subcylindricus, 15-18 cm. longus, 4 cm. orassus, 
squamis subspatbulatis glabris flavis margine aurantiacis 1 cm. longis, 
apice brevissime apiculatis 8 mm. latis. Oarpophylli basi aurantiaci, 8 cm. 
longi, lamina terminalis viridis obovato-rhombea, 3 cm. lata, superne 
profunde pectinato-lacera. — D. Pbain. 



Cycas Micholitzii was discovered in Annam by Mr. W. 
Micholitz, wlien collecting on behalf of Messrs. Sander & 
Sons. A plant sent home by him in 1904, and a complete 
series of herbarium specimens were placed at the disposal of 
Sir W. T. Thisel ton -Dyer, whose formal description of the 
species was published in the following year. Complete 
material had also been communicated to Mr. H. N. Ridley, 
Director of the Botanic Gardens, Singapore ; this, along with 
the drawings made under Mr. Ridley's supervision, which 
were published with the original diagnosis, was also made use 
of by Sir William in his study of the species. The most 
remarkable feature of the plant is the repeated dichotomy 
of the pinnules, a character which, however, is met with in 
an imperfectly known Cycas from China, so nearly allied to 
C. Micholitzii that the two may prove to be forms of the same 
species. C. Micholitzii is a member of a small group, confined 
to an area which extends from Nepal to Annam, in which 
the margins of the carpophylls are pectinate. The original 
plants were described by Mr. Micholitz as having the stem 
Maboh, 1909. 



subterranean, but the imported stems now in cultivation at 
Kew, and shown in plate 8242, are similar in habit to those 
of other species of Cycas except in being more slender and 
in having usually a decidedly thickened base. 

Cultivation.— At Kew this species is not unlike C. 
pectinata in behaviour, the leaves being practically annual. 
It would appear therefore that the conditions most favourable 
for its healthy growth are a liberal allowance of root-room, 
a good loamy soil, a plentiful supply of water whilst the 
leaves are being formed, and a tropical temperature with 
abundant sunlight. In winter the soil about the roots 
should be kept drier. 

Description - . — Stem sometimes subterranean, 8 in.-2 ft. 
in height, 1| in. thick above, sometimes 4 in. thick at the 
base. Leaves 2-3, terminal, erect, 8-10 ft. long, their lower 
third beset with short rather flat yellow spines, elsewhere 
hearing two rows of subdichotomous pinnules 8 in. long and 
lg in. apart, their segments green above, paler beneath, 
f-1 in. wide, usually again divided. Male cone narrow- 
cylindric, on peduncles 1 in. long with a few narrow triangular 
acute bracts, the cones 6-7 in. long, 1| in. thick, with yellow 
glabrous subspathulate scales, orange at margin, }. in. long, 
^ in. wide at the shortly apiculate apex. Carpophyll* 3 in. 
long, with narrower yellow base and obovate-rhomboid green 
terminal limb l£ in. wide, deeply pectinately fringed. 



Fig. 1, sketches of two entire plants ; 2, male cone ; 3, portion of leaf showing 
an entire pinnule; 4, 5, scales from male cone; 6, 7, anthers ; 8, carpophyll :— 
1 much reduced, 4-8 enlarged, 



8213 




M.S.deLi'.tiHldxHth. 



IRfieva &.C? LotuLoj-u 



Tab. 8243. 
SAXIFRAGA scardica. 

Balkan Peninsula. 

Saxipragaceae. Tribe Saxifrageae. 
SaxifkAGA, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 635. 



Saxifraga scardica, Griseb. Spirit. Fl, Rumel. vol. i. p. 332; Engl. Monogr. 

Saxifraga, p. 261 ; affinis S. Rocheliauae, Sternb., a qua foliis acutis recedit. 

Herba caespitosa caudiculis dense foliatis. Folia inferiora patula, oblonga, 
acuta, 6-10 mm. Ionga, 2*5-3 mm. lata, rigida, supra leviter concava, 
subtus convexa in sicco carinata, margine cartilagineo in planta culta 
inferne ciliato superne serrulato, foveis intramarginalibus 9-15. Caules 
floriferi erecti vel asceudentes, 7-11 cm. longi, 3-11-flori, glauduloso-pilosi, 
rubro-tincti, floribus corymbosis ; folia caulina spai\«a, anguste oblouga, 
acuta, 6-7 mm. louga, 1*6 mm. lata, glauduloso-ciliata praeter partem 
tertiam vel quartam superam. Calyx extus glanduloso-pilosus ; lobi 
ovati, acutiusculi, circiter 3 mm. longi. Fetala oblanceolata, 5-nervia, 
vix 1 cm. Ionga, 4 mm. lata. Stamina longiora stylos aequuntia. — 
T. A. Sprague. 



In 1905 (B. M. t. 8058) a figure was given of the form 
of S. scardica that is most usually met with in alpine 
gardens. This figure was accompanied by a description 
applicable to the species as a whole, and it was pointed out 
by Mr. Sprague that the form there figured is not the 
typical state of the species. It did not then, however, 
appear desirable to press the point, or to suggest the 
recognition in the plant figured at t. 8058 of a new variety, 
more especially as Halacsy had recently (Consp. Fl. Grraec. 
vol. i. 1901, p. 598) interpreted the species in a very wide 
sense. 

To Mr. R. Fairer, of Ingleborough, English horticulture 
is we understand indebted for the introduction of the rare 
typical S. scardica, a living plant of which was presented to 
Kew in 1908 by Mr. E. H. Jenkins of Hampton Hill. When 
this plant was grown alongside the form figured in 1905 it 
was evident that the latter is well entitled to the rank of 
a variety. The differences exhibited by the two forms may be 
briefly stated. In S. scardica proper, here figured, the lower 
Makch, 1909. 



leaves are acute, with 9-15 intramarginal pits; the 3—11- 
flowered stems are reddish, and the reddish, subacute calyx- 
lobes are distinctly glandular-pilose. In the form figured at 
t. 8058, for which Mr. Sprague proposes the name S. 
scardica, var. obtusa, the lower leaves are subacute, with 5-11 
intramarginal pits ; the 1-3-flowered stems are green, and 
the green, obtuse calyx-lobes are relatively free from 
pubescence. 

Cultivation - . — Like its variety obtusa, the typical 
S. scardica is quite hardy at Kevv, and has flowered 
freely, standing a moist atmosphere better than some of the 
Saxifragas of similar habit which are grown under the 
conditions that prevail in the Rock Garden. 

Description. — Herb, densely tufted. Leaves below 
spreading, oblong, acute, J— § in. long, xV~i * n - wide, rigid, 
somewhat concave above, convex and when dry keeled 
below, with cartilaginous edges ciliate towards base and 
serrulate upwards, submarginal pits 9-15. Stems bearing 
flowers erect or ascending, 3-4^ in. long, corymbosely 
3-11 -flowered, glandular-hairy, reddish; leaves scattered, 
narrow-oblong, acute, about J in. long, r V in. wide, 
glandular ciliate except towards apex. Calyx glandular- 
hairy outside ; lobes ovate, subacute, about \ in. long. 
Petals oblanceolate, 5-nerved, about f- in. long, | in. wide. 
Stamens with longish filaments, anthers almost level with 
stigmas. 

Fig. .1, leaf; '1, calyx and pistil ; '6, stamen : — all enlarged. 



8244 




lalJ.N.fiia-iliiJi. 



"Virieervt Brooks,Dajr& S 



L .Reeve 4-C < ?Lcn<icm. 



Tab. 824-1. 
PSEDDERANTHEMUM seticalyx. 

Tropical Africa. 



AcAXTHACEAE. Tribe JtfSTIOIEAE. 



Pse ode rant hemtjm, Badlk. ; Lindait in Engl. & Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 
vol. iv. pars iii. B, p. 330. 



Pseuderantheirmm seticalyx, Sta/>f; species P. subviscoso, Stapf (JEranihtmo 

suboiscoso, C. B. Clarke) arete affinis, sed ab eo indumento inflorescentiae, 
calycis segmentis subulatis longe attenuatis, capsulisque majoribus 
distincta. 

Suffrutex erectus, laxe ramosus, sparse vel superne densius pilis albis rigidulis 
birsutiusculus, ramis teretibus. Folia ovata, acuminata, basi breviter 
eontracta et anguste cuneathu decurrentia, 5-12 cm. longa, 3 5-9 cm. lata, 
tenuia, saturate viridia, pilis pleramqne persparsis, nervis lateralibus 
utriuque 6-7 obliquis; petiolus gracilis l"5-4 cm. longus. Inflorescentiae 
spiciformes in rarais terminates vel nonnullae ex axillis foliorum superiorum 
additae, inennte anthesi plerumque densae, mox elougatae et interne 
interruptae, deinum ad 10 cm. longae, juniores apice ob bracteas 
calycumque segmenta subulata longa attenuata breviter comosae; rhachis 
magis minusve hirsutiuscula; cymae 3-1-florae, sessiles; pedicelli cras- 
siusculi, breves vel obsoleti; bracteae subulatae, 5-6 mm. longae, parce 
albo-pilosulae ; bracteolae bracteis similes nisi breviores. Calyx 5-6 mm. 
longus, glaber vel glabriusculns, prof undo 5-fidus, segmentis subulatis 
longe tenuiter attenuatis. Corolla liypocrateriformis ; tubus angustus, 
subrectus, pallide ruber, parce minute glanduloso-pilosus; limbus superne 
cinnabarinus, subtus pallidior, 2"5 cm. diametro, segmentis oblongis vel 
obovato-oblongis obtusis 4-5 mm. latis. Antherae breviter exsertae; 
filamenta ad 2'5 mm. longa. Capsukt glabra, clavata, 2*5-3 "8 cm. longa, 
superne 7-8 mm. lata, stipite angusto 1*3-2*8 cm. longo, parte seminifera 
a latere compressa inter semina leviter constricta. Semina lenticularia, 
6-8 mm. longa, juxta basin dente aucta, uno latere laevia, altero comigata, 
circumcirca obtuse marginata. — Eranihemum ietkxdyx, C. 1>. Clarke in 
JJyer, Fl. Trop. At'r. vol. v. p. 172. — 0. Staff. 



PseuderantkeuLiim seticalyx, the species now figured, is a 
native of Nyasaland where it was first discovered by Dr. 
(now Sir J.) Kirk fifty years ago. The specific name lias 
reference to the attenuate calyx-lobes, not to the presence of 
setae, for the calyx is glabrous or nearly so. For seeds of 
this species Kew is indebted to Mr. J. M. Purves, who 
obtained them on the Fuchila Plateau, Mlaugi, British 
Central Africa, at an altitude of 6,000 ft., in 1904; the 
resulting plants flowered in March, 1905. 
March, 1WJ. 



An explanation of the nomenclature and systematic 
position of the genera Eranthemum and Pseuderanthemum 
has already been given in this work (B. M. t. 8239). The 
genus Pseuderanthemum comprises between 60 and 70 
species, inhabiting the tropics of both hemispheres ; they 
are most numerous in the Indo-Malayan and Polynesian 
regions. The genus is very homogeneous, and the species 
much resemble each other in general appearance. 

Cultivation. — The treatment most suitable for a large 
number of subtropical Acantltaceae answers well for the 
species here described. Cuttings are put in early in spring ; 
the plants are grown on under liberal treatment, and the 
growths are stopped as often as is necessary to make them 
bushy. Plenty of sunshine and moisture must be allowed 
while growth is being made. Many of the species of 
Pseuderanthemum may be grown so as to get them in flower 
in winter, when they are of considerable decorative value. 
Among those best suited to this purpose are P. albiflorum, 
Radlk. (B. M. t. 4225) ; P. Anderson'd, Lindau (B. M. t. 
5571) ; P. cinnabarinum, Radlk. (B. M. t. 5921) ; P. igneum, 
Stapf {Eranthemum igneum, Linden) ; and the species now 
figured, which last may also be grown so as to flower in late 
summer. 

Description. — Undershrub, erect, lax, somewhat hirsute 
with stiffish white hairs ; branches terete. Leave* ovate, 
acuminate, base contracted and cuneately decurrent, 2-5 in. 
long, 1^-3| in. wide, thin, dark green, sparingly hairy, main 
nerves oblique, 6-7-paired ; petiole slender, -f-l-g- in. long. 
Inflorescences spiked, terminal or also in upper leaf-axils, at 
first dense, afterwards elongating and interrupted below, 
ultimately 4 in. long, when young comose from the slender 
calyx-lobes and bracts ; rhachis somewhat hirsute ; cymes 
3-1 -flowered, sessile ; pedicels rather thick and short or 
obsolete ; bracts subulate, sparingly whitish hirsute, i in. 
long, bracteoles similar but smaller. Calyx £ in. long, 
glabrous or nearly so, deeply 5-lobed, lobes slender subulate. 
Corolla salver-shaped ; tube narrow, nearly straight, pale 
red, sparingly glandular hairy ; limb cinnabar red above, 
paler beneath, 1 in. across ; lobes oblong or subobovate 
obtuse nearly \ in. wide. Anthers slightly exserted ; fila- 



ments T V in. long. Capsule glabrous, clavate, 1-1 V in. long, 
about * in. wide above, with a narrow stipe J-f in. long; 
fertile portion laterally compressed and somewhat constricted 
between the seeds. Seeds lenticular, J-J in. long, toothed 
near the base, smooth on one side, corrugated on the other, 
with a blunt margin . 



Fig. 1, bracteole, calyx and style; 2, section of calyx, showing ovary and base 
of style; 3, part of corolla laid open, showing- stamens; 4, anther; 5,'stia;ma:— 
all enlarged. 



8245 




Nr 1 " ^.--T 1 






w 






"Vincent Brooks, 



L. Reeve &.C°loruiart, 



Tab. 8245. 

nigella integrifolia. 

Turkestan. 



Kanunculaceae. Tribe Helleboreae. 
Nigella, Linn. ; Benth. et Eooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 8. 



Nigella integrifolia, Tiegel in Enum. PI. Semenov. Suppl. 2, p. 10 ; Bull. Soc. 
Nat. Mosc. vol. xliii. 1870, p. 246; Aitch. in Trans. Linn. Soc. Bot, ser. 2, 
vol. iii. p. 30, t. 2; Fedtschenko in Gentralbl. Beih. vol. xviii. 2, 1905, p. 212; 
JTemxl. in Oard. Ohron. 1908, vol. xliv. p. 226 ; species ab omnibus 
hucusque cognitis floribtis campanulatis insigniter recedens. 

Jlerba gracilis, annua, primum obscurissime puberula, in statu sylvestri erecta, 
pauciramosa, vix ultra 30 em. alta ; in hortis major caulibus multiramosis 
45-60 cm. longis gracilibus debilioribus plus minusve vagantibus et 
tortuosis. Folia subbasalia lineari-spathulata, integerrima, ad 10 cm. 
usque vel ultra longa; caulina inferiora linearia, indiviea, acuta, intermedia 
superioraque subsessilia, palmatim 3-9-partita, segmentis perangustis, 
acutissimis, saepius 3-5 cm. longis; summa involucrum formantia flores 
singulares includentia. Flores coerulei, campanulati, circiter 2-2*5 cm. 
L»ngi. Sepala saepius 5, petaloidea, oblonga, marginibus arete approxi- 
mate, petala stamina et carpella includentia, apice rotundata, leviter 
recurva. Petala seu nectaria saepius 8, linearia, ad medium usque bifida, 
obscure ciliata, intus basi nectarifera. Stamina circa 20. Carpella 
saepius 3, circiter 1 cm. longa, ultra medium connata, breviter rostrata, 
rostris induratis divergentibus. Semina trigono-compressa, papilloso- 
rugosa, dorso tricostata, albida. — N. diversifolia, Francli. in Ann. 8c. Nat. 
ser. 6, vol. XV. 1883, p. 220, t. 10. Komarojfia diversifolia, O. Kuntze in 
Act. Hort. Petrop. vol. x. p. 144; Engl. & Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. 
vol. iii. pars ii. p. 274 ; Ind. Kew. Suppl. i. p. 234 (sphalm. divaricata). — 
W. B. Hemsley. 



Nigella integrifolia has been in cultivation at Kew since 
1894 when seeds were received from the Imperial Botanic 
Gardens, St. Petersburg ; specimens in flower were also 
received in July, 1907, from Mr. W. E. Gumbleton. Four 
of its congeners have already been figured in this work : 
N. damascena, Linn. (t. 22); N. orientalis, Linn. (t. 1264); 
N. hispanica, Linn. (t. 1265), and the inconspicuous N. 
Garidella, Spenn. ; the last named appearing (t. 1266) 
under the name Garidella Nigellastrum, Linn. From these 
and all the other species of Nigella the plant now figured is 
readily distinguished by its bell-shaped flowers which 
strongly resemble those of a Campanula. 
Mabch, 1909. 



Cultivatiox.— N. integrifolia is grown as an annual 
and thrives quite as well as the elegant Love-in-a-Mist (N. 
damascena) or the Spanish Fennel-flower (A /T . hispanica) 
under the treatment suitable for these species. The seeds 
are sown under glass in early spring, and the young plants 
are transferred to the open border in May. 

Description. — Herb, annual, slender, very sparingly 
puberulous ; wild plants erect, little branched, rarely over 

1 ft. high ; cultivated examples more slender, weaker, 
somewhat spreading, much branched, l-g-2 ft. long. Leaves 
at base linear-spathulate, entire, 4 in. long or longer ; lowest 
stem-leaves entire, linear, acute, the rest subsessile, 3-9- 
palmatipartite, lobes very narrow, very acute, usually lj- 

2 in. long, the uppermost involucrate round the solitary 
flowers. Flowers blue, campanulate, f-1 in. long. Sepals 
usually 5, petaloid, oblong, closely applied by their margins, 
tips rounded, slightly recurved. Petals or nectaries usually 
8, linear, bifid half-way, obscurely ciliate, nectariferous at 
the base within. Stamens about 20. Carpels usually 3, 
about f in. long, connate above the middle, shortly beaked ; 
beaks hardened, spreading. Seeds trigonously compressed, 
rugose, 3-ribbed behind, whitish. 



Fig. 1, an upper-leaf; 2, a petal ; 3, stamens; 4, pistil:— all enlarged. 



824* 




MS.cbI,J.2p'i=chiith 



Vmcen* lirooVs.Day fi-SanXtShmp 



L Reeve BcC^Landcn. 



Tab. 8246. 

rubus koehneanus. 

Japan. 

Bosaceae. Tribe Eubeae. 

Etjbub, Linn. ; Benth. et Eook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 616; Focke, in Engl. & 
Prantl. Pflanzenfam. vol. iii. pars iii. p. 28. 



Rubus (Batothamiius) Koehneanus, Focke in Spath Cat. 1908-9 , p. 123; a 
It. inciso, Thunb., foliis et floribus multo majoribus et sepalis duplo 
latioribus differt. 

Frutex suberectus, circa 1 m. altus ; rami itermii ramosi, striatuli, purpurei, 
pruinosi, laeves vel parce aculeati. Folia petiolata, simplicia, 3-5-loba vel 
interdum subintegra, crenata vel denticulata, 3-12 cm. longa, 2-12 cm. lata, 
basi saepissime profunde cordata lobis acutis vel subacutis, supra viridia, 
subtus albido-tomentosa, venis distincte reticulatis ; petioli 1-8 cm. longi, 
parce aculeati. Flores ad apices ramorum laxe cormybosi, pauces ; 
bracteae lincari-lanceolatae, acuminatae, 4-6 mm. longae; pedunculi 
graciles, laeves, 1-2 cm. Iongi. Calyx extra glaber, intus albido-tomentosus, 
segmentis late triangulari-ovatis acutis vel acuminatis 5-6 mm. longis, 
apice recurvis. Petala elliptico-oblonga vel obovata, obtusa, alba, circa 
8 mm. longa. Stamina numerosa, incurva, in annulum disposita ; filamenta 
glabra, 4 mm. longa, basi saDguinea, apice alba. Carpella glabra; styli 
2 mm. longi, glabri ; stigma capitatum. Drupae paucae, aurantiacae. — 
E. A. Eolfe. 



The plant from which the figure now given has been 
prepared was purchased from Mr. Spath of Berlin in 1900 
under the garden name of R. moriifolius ; it differs, however, 
from Siebold's species so named, and Dr. Focke has found 
it necessary to treat it as a distinct species referable to a 
small East Asian group, the Corchorifolii, of the section 
Batothamnus. To the same group belong R. corchorifolius, 
Linn. f. ; R, crataegifolius, Bunge ; and R. palmatus, 
Thunb., which has already been figured in this work (B. M. 
t. 7801). It is considered by Dr. Focke to be most nearly 
allied to R. incisus, Thunb., from which it differs in its more 
robust habit and in the larger size of all its parts. 

Cultivation. — R. Koehneanus at Kew has proved per- 
fectly hardy and has formed a rounded bush 3 ft. high. 
It blossoms towards the end of May and its fruits are ripe 
in July. The plant thrives vigorously in a border of 
Mabch, 1909. 



loamy soil, and can easily be increased by means of suckers. 
Its attractions as a shrub for the garden lie in its fine 
lobate leaves and in its abundant, pretty and distinct 
flowers. 

Description. — Shrub, suberect, 3-4 ft. high ; branches 
again branching, somewhat striate, with a purplish bloom, 
smooth or sparingly prickly. Leaves petioled, simple, 3-5- 
lobed or sometimes almost entire, crenate or toothed, 1^-5 in. 
long, f-5 in. wide, base usually deeply cordate, the lobes 
acute or subacute ; green above, white-pubescent beneath, 
distinctly reticulate ; petioles J-3 in. long, sparingly prickly. 
Flowers few, in loose terminal corymbs ; bracts linear- 
lanceolate, acuminate, i~£in. long; peduncles slender, smooth, 
f-f in. long. Calyx glabrous externally, white-pubescent 
within, its lobes wide triangular-ovate, acute or acumi- 
nate, £-£ in. long, their tips recurved. Petals elliptic- 
oblong or obovate, obtuse, white, about £ in. long. Stamens 
many, incurved, disposed in a circle ; filaments glabrous, 
I; in. long, red below, white upwards. Carpels glabrous ; 
styles -j^ in. long, glabrous ; stigma capitate. Drupes 
few, orange. 

Fig. 1, flower, petals removed; "2 and 8, stamens; 4, carpel : — all enlarged. 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 51, MARCH, 1909. 



Tab. 8242.— CYCAS MICHOLITZII, Indo-China. 
„ 8243.— SAXLFRAGA SCARDICA, Balkan Peninsula. 
„ 8244.— PSEUDERANTHEMUM SETICALYX, Tropical Africa. 
„ 8245.— NIGELLA INTEGRIFOLIA, Turkestan. 
„ 8246.— RUBUS KOEHNEANUS, Japan. 

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•'I'j-'N.Fitdilith 



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VinmntErocfeDirr.''. Sanlit&IIifi 



Tab. 8247. 
IMPATIENS Hawkbrl 

Eastern New Guinea. 

Balsamineae. 

Impatiens, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 277. 



Impatiens Hawkeri, Bull, Cat. 1886, p. 8, icon. p. 3 ; Gard. Chron. 1886, vol. 
xxv. p. 760, fig. 168; Ulmt. Horl. vol. xxxiv. 1837, p. 9, t. 2 ; herba ekta, 
ramosa, grandiflora, foliis 3-5-natim verticillatis, inflorescentia simpliciter 
pedicellata, sep.ilis ovato-lanceolatis, labelli cymbiformis calcare elongato. 

Herb% 5-6 dm. alta, robusta, ramosa, grandiflora, partibus novellis exceptis 
glaberrima, ramis patentibus. Folia 10-15 cm. longa, inferiora opposita, 
superiora 3-5-natim verticillata, firma, ovato-oblonga, acuminata, argute 
serrulata, subtus pallida, basi acuta iute^errima inula vel ciliis elongatis 
pancis margin ita, in petiolum robustum 2-3 cm. longum nudum angustata, 
nervis utrinque 8-10 ; jdandulae interpetiolares jjaucae, crasse setaceae. 
F/ores in axillis superioribus simpliciter pedictHa^i, solitarii, ampli, 6-8 cm. 
expansi, fulgide rubri; pedicelli 7-10 cm longi, ebracteati, robusti. 
Sepala 2, ovata vel ova^o-lanceolata, 12-18 mm. longa, 5-7-nervia, viridia. 
Vexillum ob3va f o-rotundatum, apice retusum bilobum vel obcordatum, 
costa dors> carinata apiculata. Alae se-siles, 2-5 cm. longae ; lobus 
basalis late oblongus, apice retusus vel obcordatus ; distalis duplo major, 
late oblongus, apice bilobus; auricu'a rosalis 0. Labelli Hmbus ovatus vel 
ovato-lanceolatus, cymb formip, aristatim acuminatus, 12-18 mm. longns ; 
calcar 5-7 cm. longum, gracile, lente incur vum. Filameida brevissima, 
superne incrassata et in connectivos antheraium confluentia; antherae 
orbiculares, introrsae. Ovarium rectum, obtusum.— J. D. Hooker. 



Impatiens Hawkeri is one of the only two species of 
Balsamineae hitherto discovered in New Guinea, the other 
being the closely allied /. Herzogii, K. Schum. (? = /. 
cordipetala y Zipp.). These are the most easterly members 
of the family in Asia, from which continent and its islands 
about 500 species are preserved in the principal European 
Herbaria. The most remarkable feature of these Asiatic 
species, Sir Joseph Hooker points out, is the very restricted 
geographical area to which they are confined. There are 
five such areas, each of great extent : the Himalayan ; the 
Burmese, including Assam ; the Western Indian Peninsular, 
including Ceylon ; the Chinese ; the Malayan, from Sumatra, 
Java and Borneo eastward to New Guinea and the Philip- 
pines. No two of these areas contain more than half-a* 
April, 1909. 



dozen species in common and one species alone, T. Balsamina, 
Linn., the origin of the garden Balsam, is a native of all. 
The plant now figured is a native of the last mentioned 
area, in which about 60 other species have been found ; of 
these species /. platypetala, Lindl., from Java, is a typical 
member. Salient characters of these are the whorled ieaves 
and simply pedicelled flowers met with in many of them, 
together with more or less obcordate standard and wing- 
lobes, a long spur and very short filaments with confluent, 
broad, nearly erect, introrse anthers. 

I. J fawheri was discovered by Lieut. Hawker, R.N. There 
is a specimen in the Kew Herbarium, which was received 
in November, 1884, from Dr. Schomburgk of the Adelaide 
Botanical Gardens — some two years prior to the earliest 
publication of the name— ticketed as from Lieut. Hawker 
and as native of one of the South Sea Islands, the name of 
which was forgotten. From this it appears that in all 
probability the plant was first raised in Adelaide and thence 
transmitted to Mr. Bull, of Chelsea, in whose catalogue it 
was included for the first time in 1886. A second herbarium 
specimen was communicated by Messrs. Yeitch in 1897; it 
was collected by Mr. Burke. A third was sent from the 
Singapore Botanical Garden, ticketed as from "E. Brit, 
New Guinea. W. Micholitz, 1898." There is also a specimen 
in the British Museum Herbarium, collected by Mr. H. (). 
Forbes "near South Cape on the mainland." 

In Mr. Bull's Catalogue 1. Hawkeri was described as a 
handsome species of free growth and good habit, flowering 
in great profusion from March until October. For a time 
it enjoyed considerable popularity, but it suffered so 
frequently from attacks of the Begonia mite (Tarsonymm) 
that it went almost entirely out of cultivation. When in 
good health it grows vigorously, forming a shapely plant 
about 2 ft. high, well furnished with leaves and flowering 
freely and continuously during the summer. It requires 
tropical conditions with plenty' of atmospheric moisture and 
shade from bright sunshine. 

Description.— Herb, 1J-2 ft. high ; stem stout, branches 
spreading, quite glabrous except on the young shoots. 
Leaves 4-6 in. long, opposite below, whorled above, firm, 
ovate-oblong, acuminate, sharply serrate, pale beneath, base 



cuneate, entire, naked or with a few marginal cilia and 
tapering to a petiole |-1 in. long ; main-nerves 8-10 pairs ; 
interpetiolar glands few, setaceous, stout, Flowers in the 
upper axils, large, simply pedicelled, solitary, 2|-3 in. 
across, bright red; pedicels 2f-4 in. long, stout; bracts 0. 
Sepals 2, ovate or ovate-lanceolate, |-1 in. long, 5-7-nerved, 
green. Vexillum rounded-obovate, tip retuse 2-lobed or 
obcordate, with an apiculate rib, keeled on the back. Wings 
sessile 1-2 in. long ; basal lobe wide oblong, retuse or 
obcordate; distal twice the size, wide oblong, 2-lobed. 
Labellum with limb ovate or ovate-lanceolate, cymbiform, 
sharply acuminate, £-§ in. long ; spur 2-2§ in. long, slender, 
slightly curved. Filaments very short, thickened upwards 
and confluent in the connectives of the orbicular, introrse 
anthers. Ovary straight, obtuse. 



Fig. 1, portion of branch with base of leaf and interpetiolar glands; 2, bu 1 ; 
3, lip ; 4, stiminal column ; 5, ovary : — all enlarged. 



8248 




J.K.RLMifli. 



^ScuDtS-trop 



l.HeevB &, C London. 



Tab. 8248. 

MIOROLOMA TENUIFOLIUM. 

South Africa. 



ASCI.EPIADACEAK. 

RltORCLoMA, R. I'.r. ; Btnth, e' Hook./, dm. Plant vol. »i. p, 717. 



Microloma tenuifolium, K. Schum. hi Engl, if* Prantl, Pjhtnzcnfam. vol. iv. 
pars ii. p. 222; A'. E. Br. in Dyer, EI. Cap. vol. iv. Beet, i. p. 550; species ob 
lob. is corollae cordato-orbiculares etiamquc ob fasciculos pilorum deflexorum 
in faucem corollae dispositos insignis. 

Ilerba caule volubile gracile glabro. Folia opposita, patentia vel deflexa, 
breviter petiolata, 2' 5-7 cm. longa, 1-3 mm. lata, linearis, acuta, saepe 
marginibus revolutis, glabra. Cymae ad nodos sublaterales, 3-7-florac. 
Peduncvli 4-6 mm. longi. PedicelH 4-7 mm. longi, tenniter adpresse 
puberuli. Sepala 5 mm. longa, lineari-lanceolata vel oblongo-lanceolata, 
acuta, tenuiter puberula vel subglabra. Corolla urceo^ta, subcarnos-a, 
extra glabra, intra ad faucem fasciculi's pilorum deflexorum 5 onusta, 
kcrmesina; tubus 5 mm. Iongus, pentagonus, inferne inflatus ; lobi 2 mm. 
longi et Itti, cordato-orbiculares, obiusissimi, imbricato-coutorti. Coronae 
tuberculae parvae, ad medium corol'ae insertae. Columnae staminum ad 
medium 5 calcaratae. FolUcuU solitarii, 5"5-7"5 <m. longi, 7-8 mm. 
era si, fusit'orn es, longe acuminati, glabri. Semina 4 mm. longa, ovata, 
concavo-convexa, tuberculata, apice comosa. — Microloma linear?, K. Br. in 
Mem. Wern. Soc. vol. i. p. 53. M. linearis et M. tenuijlora, 0. Kuntze in 
Jahrb. Bot. Gart. Berl. vol. iv. p. 268. Periploca tenuifolia, Linn. Sp. PI. 
ed. i. p. 212. Ceropegia tenuifolia, linn. Mant. ii. pp. 215, 316. C. sinuate, 
Poir. Encycl. Meth. Suppl. vol. ii. p. 178.— N. E. Bkown. 



The genus Microloma, which is endemic in South Africa, 
includes ten species, most of which are confined to the 
Central and Western Regions of Cape Colony. The leading 
exceptions are M. sagittatum, R. Br., which is common in 
the Coast Region as well as in the Western, and the species 
now figured, which nppears to be confined to the Coast 
Region but is widely distributed therein from the Van 
Rhynsdorp to the Port Elizabeth Divisions. Mr. Brown 
points out that the only species with which M. tenuifolium 
might be confused is M. namaquense, Bolus, a species 
restricted to the Western Region, in which the deflexed 
tufts of hairs are situated near the middle of the corolla- 
tube. The remaining species have the corolla-lobes more or 
less laterally compressed, longer than broad and often 
dorsal ly gibbous. 
Aibil, 1909. 



M. tenuifolium, the Coral Climber of South Africa, 
though it can be grown at Kew, never succeeds satis- 
factorily under the conditions that obtain here, and we 
are indebted to Mr. W. E. Gumbleton for the specimen 
now figured which was grown in his garden. In a note 
in the Gardeners' Chronicle for 1908, vol. xliii. p. 79, 
Mr. Gumbleton records the receipt of three healthy well- 
grown plants of this species from Port Elizabeth, where it is 
found growing wild at the base of low scrubby bushes 
round the branches of which it twines its slender, wire-like 
stems. The evidence to be obtained from herbarium 
specimens indicates that the wild plant flowers more 
profusely and bears more brightly coloured corollas than is 
the case in this country. These flowers, which are waxy 
and Hoya-like, are produced in axillary bunches. The plant 
requires greenhouse conditions. 

Description. — Herb, stems twining, slender, glabrous. 
Leaves opposite, spreading or defiexed, short petioled, 
1-2| in. long, 1-1^ lin. wide, linear, acute, glabrous; 
margins often revolule. Cymes sublateral, 3-7-flowered ; 
peduncles ^-£ in. long; pedicels l~l in. long, faintly 
adpressed-puberulous. Sepals ^ in. long, linear or oblong- 
lanceolate, acute, faintly puberulous or nearly glabrous. 
Corolla urceolate, somewhat fleshy, crimson, glabrous out- 
side, and with 5 tufts of defiexed hairs in the throat within ; 
tube ^ in. long, pentagonal, inflated below; lobes 1 lin., 
rounded-cordate, blunt, contorted-imbricate ; corona-tubercles 
small, attached to middle of corolla-tube. Staminal column 
")-spurred at the middle. Follieler solitary, 2^-3 in. long, 
about I in. thick, fusiform, long acuminate, glabrous* Seeds 
} in. long, ovate, tubercled, concave on one side, very 
convex on the other, with comose tips. 



Fig. 1, a flower; '2, corolla, laid open; 3, staminal column; 4 and 5, 
anthers : — all enlarged. 



8249 




'dnhfh 



VmcanbDrooJc.Dar* . 



London 



Tab. 8240. 
ARBUTUS Mexziesii. 
Western North America. 

Ericaceae. Tribe Arbuteae. 
Arbutus, Linn.; Benth. et Hook, f, Ge». Plant, vol. ii. p. 581. 



Arbutus Menziesii, Pursh, /•'/. Am. Sejtt.vol. i. p. 282 ; DC. Prod r.xol. \ii. 
p. 582 ; Hook. FL Bor.-Am. vol. ii. p. 36; Hook. <fc Am. Bot. Beechey's Voy. 
p. 143; Gray, Brewer & Wat*. Bot. Calif, vol. i. p. 452, partim; Cray, 
tfynop. Pi. N.Am. vol. ii. p. 27, partim ; Sargent, Silva, vol. v. p. 123, t. 231 ; 
Elwes & Henry, Treat of Great Brit. & Ireland, vol. iii. p. 565; species 
A. Andrachne, Linn., similis, seel foliis amplioribus subtus pallid'oribus et 
connectivo antherarum loculos leviter superante differt. 

Arbor 6-15, rarissime ultra 30 m. alta ; trillions 3-1 "25 interduin ad 2 m. 
diametro, omnino vel partim nt rami vetusti cortice deglubente deinde 
laevissinms, cinnamomeus; coma latissiina ; ramuli pi-imo pallide rubri, 
virides \el auraniiaci, glabri vel interdum pilis conspersis ci'o evanescenti- 
bus vestiti. Folia elliptica vel oblonga, 7-13 cm. longa, 4-8 cm. lata, apice 
rotnndata vel brevissime cuspidata, basi rotundata, snbeordata vel cuneata, 
integerriira vel interdum (praecipue plardaium juvenilium) serrata, 
coriacea, s-upra saturate viridia, nitida, subtr.s g'auca; petioli crassi, 
1 2 25 cm. lougi, supra caiialiculati. Flores in paniculis erectis tcrmina- 
lil us puberulis 12-15 cm. longis latisque dispositi ; pedicclli 4-5 mm. 
fructiferi ad 1 cm. longi, bracteis scariosis ovatis brevioribus subtendentes. 
Calyx albidus, parvus, scarioius, 5-lobatus. Corolla urceolata, alba, 
circiter 5 mm. longa. Staminum filameiita pilosa, basi dilatata; antberac 
recurve biaristatae, connectivo loculos leviter superante. Ovarium 
glabrum, 5-locnlare, loculis pluriovulatis. Fruetus drupaceus, granulatus, 
saepius subglobosus, lucide aurantiacus, ad 12 mm. longus. A. procera, 
Dougl. ex Lindl. Bot. Peg. vol. xxi. t. 1753; DC Prodr. vol. vii. p. 582; 
Paxt. Mag. Pot. vol. ii. p. 147 cum tab. col. A. laurifolia, Hook. Fl. Por.- 
Am. vol. ii. p. 36, non Lindl.— S. A. Skan. 



Under the name of Arbutus procera this handsome 
evergreen tree was introduced into this country by the 
Horticultural Society of London through their collector, 
David Douglas, in 1825. It appears never to have become 
common, and the specimens usually seen have not reached 
any considerable size. Mr, Elwes, however, records some 
fine trees known to him, the largest being that in the 
gardens of Mr. J. R. Anderson, at Bassetwood, near 
Southampton, which is 50 ft. high. 
ArBiL, 1909. 



The species, which bears the vernacular name of Madrona, 
is distributed from the British Columbia coast at Seymour 
Narrows southward through the coast region of Washington 
and Oregon, and through the California coast ranges to the 
Santa Lucia Mountains. Professor Sargent describes it as 
the noblest of all its race, and refers to a magnificent 
specimen growing on the slopes of Mount Tamalpais, near 
the town of San Rafael, Marin County, California, which is 
upwards of 100 ft. high and has a trunk measuring 23 ft. 
in girth at 3 ft. from the ground. An illustration of this is 
given in the Garden and Forest, vol. v. p. 151. South of 
the Bay of San Francisco Arbutus Menziesii is often 
shrubby. Its heavy, hard and close-grained wood is used 
in the making of furniture, and largely also in making- 
charcoal for gunpowder. 

Arbutus Menziesii is one of the few hardy Ericaceous 
plants which attain to tree-like dimensions in this country. 
The specimen from which the flowers figured in the 
accompanying plate were taken has stood for many years 
on the north side of the Broad Walk at Kew. It is 
now a spreading, bushy tree about 20 ft. high, with a short 
trunk 4 ft. 8 in. in girth. It has an interesting and 
conspicuous appearance because of its smooth cinnamon- 
coloured branches. The species is quite hardy at Kew, 
although the shoots of young seedlings, which grow 
vigorously and late into the autumn, are apt to be cut back 
by frost. Plants should be given a permanent place early, 
because of their impatience of disturbance at the root. 
Once established, they grow quickly. The soil should be of 
a peaty nature or, failing that, a sandy loam. 

Description.— Tree, stem 20-50, rarely up to 110 ft. 
high, 1-4 or sometimes up to 7 ft. in diameter, bark generally 
or at least partly flaking as it also does on the larger 
branches, then very smooth and cinnamon-coloured ; crown 
spreading ; young twigs pale red, orange or green, smooth 
or sparsely clothed with hairs that soon disappear. Leaves 
elliptic or oblong, 2^-5 in. long, 1^-3 in. wide, apex rounded 
or shortly cuspidate, base rounded, subcordate or cuneate, 
entire or sometimes (especially in young specimens) serrate, 
coriaceous, dark green, shining above, glaucous beneath; 
petioles thick, channelled above, 4-1 in. long. Flowers in 



erect, terminal, puberulous panicles 5-6 in. across; pedicels 
|— £ in., in fruit § in. long; bracts scarious, ovate, shorter 
tlian the pedicels. Calyx whitish, small, scarious, 5-lobed. 
Corolla white, urceolate, about \ in. long. Filaments pilose, 
dilated at the base ; anthers recurved, biaristate, the connec- 
tive rather longer than the anther-cells. Ovary glabrous, 
2-celled ; cells many-ovuled. Fruit drupe-like, granular, 
usually subglobose, bright orange, ?.-| in. long. 



Fig, 1, flower-bud; 2, flower ; 3 and 4, anthers ; 5, pistil :- all enlarged. 



8250 




L Raovo ^t^'IonAo 



Tab. 8250. 
STROPHANTHUS Pkeussii. 

West Africa. 

Apocynaceae. Tribe Echitideae. 
Strophantus, DC; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 714. 



Strophantus Preussii, Engl, tfc Pax in Engl. Jahrb. vol. xv. p. 369; Slap/ in 
Dyer, Ft. Trap. Afr. vol. iv. pars i. pp. 176, 603; Gilg in Engl. Monogr. Afr. 
Pfi. vii. Strophanthus, p. 21 ; affinis & Barter i, Fran -h., sed sepalis exteriori- 
bus basi late ovatis et corollae co'ore distinctus. 

Frutex scandens vel savmentosns, ad 4 in. altus, ramis glabris brunnescentibus, 
allio-lenticellatis. Folia elliptica vel oblonga vel ovata vel obovata, 
abrupte acuminata, basi rotundata vel acuta, 5-10 cm. longa, 3 "7-5 cm. lata, 
lnembranacea, glabra, venis secundiriis utrinque 6-7. Cymae terminates, 
pedunculatae, plerumque multiflorae, corymbosae, minute puberulae ; 
brack ae foliaccae, ovatae vel lanceolatae, obtusae vel acutae, basi angus- 
tatae, 8-16 mm. longae; pedicelli ad 1 cm. longi. Calyx ibliaceus, 
1*4-2 cm. Jongus; sepala exteriora e basi lata ovata linearia vel lineari- 
oblon^a, interiors etiam basi angusta, glabra. Corolla minute pulveru- 
lenta, albo-lute-cens vel paliide auranliaca, tubo rubescente squamis 
faucialilms caudisque sauguineis, parte infrastaminali 1 cm. longa, 
soprastaminali campanulata 8-10 mm. longa, lobis ova'is abrupt e caudatis, 
caudis filifornubus ad 30 cm. long?s. Jutherae 3 mm. longae, ckwfO 
tomentosae. Ovarium pilosum. Foilicnli lanceolati, apice incrassati, 
25 cm. longi, 3 cm. lati, i'usci, lent'cellis albidis clougatis notati. Semitta 
ambitu tbiptica, acuminata, 9-12 mm. longa, 3 mm. lata, fusco-pubes- 
centia, coma stipiti undo 5-8 mm. longo, axi plumosa, 15-20 mm. longa, 
pilis ad 5 cm. longis candidis.— 0. Staff. 



Strophanthus Preussii is a species which extends from the 
Gold Coast to Angola and eastwards to the Middle Congo. 
It is closely allied to S. Barter/', Franch., from Lagos, but in 
that plant all the sepals are narrow and rather spathulate. 
It has been identified by Dr. Grilg with S. bracteatus, 
Franch., a species of which there is no authentic specimen 
at Kew. Dr. Stapf however explains that the description 
originally given of S. bracteatus points to that plant being 
distinct from S. Preussii. According to Franchet, 8. 
bracteatus has glabrous inflorescences and white corollas 
streaked with red, while the tails of the corolla-lobes are 
only 10-12 cm. long. The figure here given has been 
made from a specimen which flowered in the tropical 
Apbjl, 1909. 



collection at Kew. The description now for the first time 
given of the follicles and seeds has been based on a specimen 
collected in Lagos and communicated to the Kew herbarium 
by Sir T. R. Fraser, Edinburgh. 

Strophanthus Preussii is grown as a stout climber 
ngainst the roof of the Palm House at Kew. It was raised 
from seeds forwarded in 1902 by Mr. W. H. Johnson, 
from the Botanic Station at Aburi, Gold Coast. It 
flowered for the first time in July, 1908. As a garden 
plant it is not so attractive as the South African S. grandi- 
florus (B. M. t. 7390) formerly treated as a variety of S. 
Peternanus, or as S. gratus (B. M. t. 4466) formerly known 
as Rowpellla grata. These are all tropical climbers which 
grow freely when planted in a loamy soil and afforded 
ordinary tropical Louse treatment. 

Description. — Shrub, climbing or straggling; stems up 
to 12 ft. long, branches glabrous, brownish with white 
lenticels. Leaves elliptic, oblong, ovate or obovate, sharply 
acuminate, base rounded or cuneate, 2-4 in. long, 1^—2 in. 
wide, membranous, glabrous ; secondary nerves 6-7 pairs. 
Cymes terminal, peduncled, usually corymbosely many- 
flowered, finely puberulous ; bracts leafy, ovate or lanceolate, 
obtuse or acute, base cuneate, ^— § in. long; pedicels -f in. 
long. Calyx |-| in. long ; sepals leafy, the outer wide-based, 
ovate-linear or linear-oblong, the inner contracted at the 
base, glabrous. Corolla finely pulverulent, yellowish-white 
or pale orange, the tube reddish, the scales within the throat 
and the tails purple ; infrastaminal portion under \ in. 
long, suprastaminal portion campanulate rather shorter, 
lobes ovate suddenly contracted into filiform tails up to 1 ft. 
in length. Anthers \ in. long, tomentose on the back. 
Ovary hairy. Follicles lanceolate with thickened tips, 
10 in. long, 1£ in. wide, tawny and marked with elongated 
white lenticels. Seeds elliptic, acuminate, |-J in. long, 
|- in. wide, tawny-pubescent ; coma with a naked stipe 
J— \ in. long and a plumose axis |—f in. long ; hairs of the 
coma J in. long, white. 



Fig. 1, section of calyx; 2, section of corolla-tube, slowing anthers; 
3, stigma: — all enlarged. 



8251 




2/u5.<LeIJ.N.fit,-3ilifh 



t Br ooiffi.Day^SciiLKHn^ 



L, Rfievs &. C °. L urukin 



Tab. 8251. 

AOTHURIUM TRINERVE. 

Brazil and Guiana. 

Abaceak. 
Anthurium, Schott; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 998. 



Anthurium trinerve, Miq. in Linnaea, vol. xvii. p. 66 ; Schott, Prodr. Avoid. 
p. 439; En f/Ier in DC. Monoyr. Phanerof/. vol. ii. p. 109; species A. violaceo, 
Schott, valde affinis sed ovario apiee conico exserto et baccis distincte apicu- 
latis differt. 

Herha, caulis erectus, radicans, 10-30 cm. altos, 6-10 ram. crassus, supeme fibris 
cataphyllarum lanceolatarnm decompositarum vistitus, internodiis 1-2 cm. 
longis. Foiiorum petioli 2 "5-10 cm. longi, subteretes, antice plani vel 
leviter canalicular, basi brevissime vaginati, incrassati, apice geniculo 
,1-8 ram. longo in struct i ; lamina 11-17 cm. longa. 2 "5-7 cm. lata, lanceo- 
lata, utrinque acuta, trinerva, supra atr viridia, impunctata, subtus 
pallidiora, minute punctata. Pedunculi solitarii, erecti, 3-9*5 cm. longi, 

~ 3 mm. crassi. Spatha erccta vel erecto-patens, 1-5-2 cm. longa, 1 cm. lata, 
ovata, acuta, viridis. Spadix scssilis, 1*5-5 cm. longus, basi 6-8 mm. 
crassus, superne leviter at'enuatus, albus. Flores 2-5-3 mm. diametro ; 
ovarium t-xsertum, apice conicum, 2-looulare, loculis 2-4-ovulat'S. Saceae 
longe exsertae, 9-11 mm. longae, 5-7 mm. diametro, ellipsoideae, bieviter 
apiculatae, pallide violaoeae; semina 4-7. — Anthurium brqchyitpathum, 
K. Koch ex Schott, Prodr. Aroid. p. 439.— N. E. Brown. 



Anthurium trinerve is a native of Brazil and Guiana, in 
which countries it is not uncommon. It is very nearly 
allied to A. violaceum, Schott, but it usually has broader 
leaves than that species ; the stem too is rather more robust 
and is more densely clothed with the fibrous remains of the 
cataphyllary leaves. The chief distinction, however, as 
Mr. Brown poinfs out, is that the ovary in A. trinerve 
tapers into a conical style-like portion exserted far beyond 
the sepals; this feature is absent from A. violaceum. It is 
to be noted that the species here described must not be 
confounded with the similarly named A. trinervium t Kunth, 
a plant totally different in appearance, with much larger, 
cordate leaves. The plant from which the figure now given 
has been prepared has long been in cultivation at Kew ; it 
flowers freely every year and fruits copiously, the flowers 
being evidently self- fertile, 
Apkil, 1909, 



From the cultural standpoint A. trinerve is interesting 
among the many species cultivated at Kew as being one of a 
group the members of which are attractive on account of the 
bright colour of their fruits. Foremost among these stands 
A. Bakeri, Hook, f., figured at plate 6261 of this work, 
which has bright crimson berries. Two members of the 
group, A. violaceum, Schott, alluded to above, and A. 
margaritaceum. Baker, agree with the species now figured 
in having lilac berries. The cultural requirements of the 
plant are those suitable for A. Scherzerianum, Schott 
(B. M. t. 5319), and a number of other well-known species 
that are grown as ornamental stove-plants. 

Description. — Herb, stem erect, rooting, 4-12 in. high, 
4-f in. thick, clothed upwards with the fibrous remains of 
lanceolate cataphyllary leaves ; internodes f— £ in. long. 
Leaves distinctly petioled ; petioles 1-4 in. long, subterete, 
flat or slightly channelled above, the base shortly sheathed 
and thickened, the apex with a geniculate swelling £— \ in. 
long ; leaf-blade 4-7 in. long, 1-3 in. wide, lanceolate, 
acute, basecuneate, 3-nerved, dark green and uniform above, 
paler and finely punctate beneath. Peduncles solitary, 
erect, i$-3^ in. long, * in. thick. Spathe erect or slightly 
spreading, f-f in. long, ^ in. wide, ovate, acute, green. 
Spadix sessile, £-2 in. long, \— \ in. thick at the base, 
slightly narrowed upwards, white. Flowers yV~8 in. across ; 
ovary exserted, with a conical apex, 2-locular, the cells 2-4- 
ovuled. Berries far exserted, I— ^ in. long, 1-^ in. across, 
ellipsoid, shortly apiculate, lilac, 4-7-seeded. 



Fig. 1, flowers ; '2, perianth-segment and slan.en ; 3, section of pistil ; 4 and 
5, ovaries in sections ; (i, fruit ; 7, seed : — all enlarged. 



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„ 8248.— MICROLOMA TENUIFOLITJM, South Africa. 
„ 8249.— ARBUTUS MENZIESII, Western North America. 
„ 8250.— STROPHANTHUS PREUSSII, West Africa. 
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Tab. 8252. 
DENDR.OBIUM Bronckartii. 

Indo- China. 



Orchidaceae. Tribe Kpidendreae. 
Dendrobicm, Swartz; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498. 



Dendrobium Bronckartii, Wildem. in Gard. Chron. 1906, vol. xxxix. p. 380 ; 
Rev. Hort. Beige, 1907, p. 369, fig. 67 et ic. col. ; a B. fhyrsifloro, Reichb. f., 
racemis auiplioribus et laxis, bracteis pedicellisque fere duplo longioribus, 
et floribus roseis differt. 

Herba epiphytiea, elata. ('aides elongati, teretes, sulcati, foliosi, circa 60-90 cm. 
longi, vaginis merabranaceis vestiti. Folia ovato-oblonga, subacute, 
coriacea, 10-12 cm. longa, circa 4-7 cm. lata. Bacemi axillares, penduli, 
circa 30 cm. longi, laxitlori, multiflori, basi vaginis tubulosis imbricatis 
vestiti; bract eae lineari-oblongae, obtusae, siibmembranaceae, 1 " 5-3 cm. 
longae; pedicelli graciles, 4-5 cm. longi. Flores speciosi, dilute rosei, 
labelli disco macula aurantiaca magna ornato. Sepala patentia, late 
elliptico-oblonga, obtnsa, circa 2*5 cm. longa. Petala elliptico-ovata, 
obtusa, 2* 5 cm. longa. Labellum breviter unguiculatum, sulxtrbiculare, 
obtusissimum, 2 ■ 3 cm. longum, margine minute denticulato, disco yelutino, 
lobis Jateralibus involutis. Columna oblonga, lata. — R. A. Rolfe. 



A recent addition to tlie genus, B. Bronckartii is most 
closely allied to the familiar B. thyrsijloram, Reichb. f., but 
is readily distinguished by its larger size, its ampler and 
laxer inflorescence and its light rose-coloured flowers. The 
species was introduced from the mountains of Annam in 
Indo-China by the collector whose name it bears, and the 
plant from which the drawing now given has been made 
was purchased in 1906 from Mr. Verdonck of Ghent. 

Its general resemblance and evident affinity to B. thyrsi- 
florum had led to its cultivation under the conditions suitable 
lor that species ; abundance of heat and moisture, with very 
little shade during summer when the plants were in growth, 
an intermediate temperature with very little moisture from 
October until the flower-buds showed signs of activity, when 
a good soaking at the root and tropical conditions were 
again aiforded. Like B. thyrsiflorum, B. densiflorum, B. 
Farmer i and the other members of the same group, this 
species is remarkable for its large, handsome flowers disposed 
May, 1909. 



in decurved racemes. It is a striking addition to the group, 
and as, like the other members, it is not difficult to grow, 
it ought to share their popularity as garden orchids. 

Description. — Herb, epiphytic. Stems long, terete, 
channelled, leafy, 2-3 ft. long, clothed with membranous 
sheaths. Leaves ovate-oblong, subacute, coriaceous, 4-5 in. 
long, 1^-2^ in. wide. Racemes lax, axillary, pendulous, 
many-flowered, about 1 ft. long ; rhachis clothed at the base 
with imbricate tubular sheaths ; bracts linear-oblong, obtuse, 
almost membranous, \-\\ in. long; pedicels slender, 
1^-2 in. long. Flouws large, pale rose, the disk of the lip 
with a large orange blotch. Sepals spreading, wide elliptic- 
oblong, obtuse, about 1 in. long. Petals elliptic-ovate, 
obtuse, 1 in. long. Lip shortly clawed, suborbicular, 
obtuse, nearly 1 in. long, the margin finely toothed, the 
disk velvety, the lateral lobes involute. Column broad, 
oblong. 

t Fig. 1, part of lip; 2, column ; 3, polliiiia; 4, whole plant: — 1-3 enlarged, 
i much reduced. 



8253 




M.S.a<iJ.KFib*.litk 



-VSneentBrooMDay&Sonl^in? 



I* Reeve &. C ° London 



Tar. 8253. 
larix occidentals. 

Western North America. 

Conifebae. Tribe Abietxnkae. 
LASIX, Mill.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 442. 



Larix occidentalis, Nidi. Sylva, 1849, vol. ii. p. 143, t. 120 ; ei. 1805, p. 199, 
t, 120 ; Sargent in Gard. Ohron. 1886, vol. xxv. p. 652, f. 145, et Silva of 
iV. Am. 1898, vol. xii. p. 11, t. 594; Kent in Veitch Man. Conif. n. ed. 1900, 
p. 400, I 104 ; Elwes <fc Henry, Trees of Great Brit. <fc Ireland, vol, ii. p. 895, 
t. iii. ; species ex affinitate L. Lycllii, Pari., a qua ramulis haud tomentosis, 
foliis longioribus, squamis ovuliferis glabris et conis maturis breviter 
stipitatis differt. 

Arbor saepe usque ad 75 m. alta, trunco 1*8-2 "4 m. diametro, coma parva 
anguste pyramidali (Saryent) ; exempla maxima in liortis britannicis vix 
11 m. alta. Rami dimorphi, brachycladiis multifoliatis. Folia angus- 
tissima, tetragona, utrinque bisulcata, acuta, costa infra alte carinata, 
brachycladiorum longiora, interdum, ut in icone, 5-6 cm., sed saepius 
3-4 cm. longa, 0" 5-0* 75 mm. lata, ramorum sterilium rigidiora, usque ad 
1-1 "25 mm. lata, omnia saepius canalibus 2 intramarginalibus instructa. 
Strobili (vel floret) musculi subglobosi, circiter 1 cm. diametro, lutei, 
subsessiles, basi squamis (vel bracteis) latis rubiginosis floccoso-ciliatis 
ornata. Strobili (vel flores) feminei ovoideo-oblongi, circiter 2 cm. longi. 
Carpella circiter 1 cm. longa, longe caudata, cauda viridi acuta, recurva. 
Squamae ovuliferae fere orbiculares, 2-3 mm. latae. Coni maturi subsessiles, 
suberecti, oblongo-cvlindrici, maguitudine variabiles, usque ad 4 cm. longi, 
fnsci ; carpella caudata quam squamae seminiferae longiora. Seminu 
oblique alata, 8-10 mm. longa. — Pinua Nuttallii. Pari, in DC. Prodr. 
vol. xvi. 2, p. 412.--W. Botting Hemslev. 



Larix occidentalis, according to Professor Sargent, was 
first observed by Lewis and Clark in the forests of the upper 
Clearwater River. It was seen also by D. Douglas in 1827 
near Fort Colville on the upper Columbia, but was mistaken 
by him for the European Larch. Thomas Nuttall therefore 
is to be regarded as its real discoverer ; he collected it in the 
Blue Mountains in 1834 and first described it in the place 
cited above. It was first planted in the Arnold Arboretum 
in 1881 and a number of seedlings were sent to Kew by 
Professor Sargent in the autumn of that year. From one 
of these, which is now a tree 36 ft. high with the trunk 
2G in. in girth near the ground, and is one of a group in 
the Pinetum at Kew, the figure now given was prepared. 

Considerable interest is at present being taken in this 
American Larch by British foresters ; it is hoped that it may 
May, 1909. 



prove useful as a substitute for the European Larch, whose 
value in many districts is impaired by its susceptibility to 
the attacks of Peziza Willkommii. The rate of growth 
indicated above may not compare favourably with that of the 
average European Larch in British plantations, but when the 
dryness and poorness of the soil in which the trees grow are 
taken into account, the figures afford a not unfavourable 
augury for the success of the species as a forest tree in Britain. 
The trees at Kew fruit freely, but the cones have never yet 
been found to contain fertile seed. A tree in the garden of 
Mr. P. L. de Vilmorin at Verrieres-le-Buisson, near Paris, 
also cones freely but has never yet given good seed. Larix 
occidentalis does not appear to be so hardy as L. europaea. 
According to Mr. Hesse it has proved too tender to be worth 
growing at Weenen in north-west Hanover, where the 
European Larch succeeds. It is, however, quite hardy at 
Kew. 

Description. — Tree, often reaching 250 ft. in height, 
with a stem 6-8 ft. thick, and with a small narrow- 
pyramidal head ; in British collections the largest examples 
as yet hardly exceed 36 ft. in height; branches dimorphic, 
the abbreviated branchlets many-leaved. Leaves very 
narrow, quadrangular, 2-sulcate on both faces, acutely and 
widely keeled beneath, those of the abbreviated branchlets 
the longer and sometimes, as here shown, 2-2^ in., but 
often only 1^—1^ in. long, \-\ lin. wide; those of the 
sterile twigs more rigid and J-f lin. wide, all usually 
2-canaliculate. Male flowers in yellow, subsessile, subglobose 
clusters, about f in. across, surrounded by broad reddish 
floccose-ciliate scales or bracts. Female flowers in ovoid- 
oblong cones about f in. long. Carpels about § in. long, 
recurved, acute, the tips long, green. Scales bearing ovules 
nearly orbicular, 1-1^ lin. wide. Ripe cones subsessile, 
suberect, oblong-cylindric, rather variable in size, the largest 
up to Ijr in. long, brown; carpels tailed longer than the 
seed-bearing scales. Seeds obliquely winged, \-f in. long. 



Fig. 1, a barren shoot; 2, a branch bearing male flowers; a branch bearing 
female flowers ; 4, a branch bearing mature cones ; 5, a stamen ; 6 and 7, upper 
and lower views of young carpel and ovuliferous scale ; lower view of mature 
carpel and seminiferous scale; 9, seed:— Figs. 1-4 natural size: the rest 
enlarged. 



8264 




ichhfr. 



■WncentBroote,Day&Son Lt a irap 



L.Resve A C9L onion 



Tab. 8254. 

MUSSAENDA Treutleri. 

Tropical Himalaya and Khasia. 

Rubiaceae. Tribe Mussaendeae. 
Mussaenda, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 64. 



Mussaenda Treutleri, Stapf; affinis M.frondosae, Linn., et M. maerophi/Uae, 
Wall., sed ab ilia (typica, i.e. vars. zeylanica et ingrata, Hook, f.) indumento 
sparsiore rudiore, foliis magnis, stipulis latis, sepalis magis herbaceis et 
praeter margines setoso-ciliatas subglabris, alabastris 5-cornutis, corolla 
majore, ab hac indumento breviore sparsiore, sepalis multo angustioribus 
alabastris 5-cornutis distincta. 

Frutex, ramis superne pilis brevibus hirsutis. Folia ovata vel ovato-elliptica 
breviter acuminata, basi plerumque breviter contracta, 15-30 cm. longa^ 
7-15 cm. (rarius ultra) lata, utrinqne ad nervos hirsuta, imprimis interne 
et ad costam, caeterum sparse rudiuscule pilosa; petioli 1 • 5-4 cm. longi; 
stipulae late ovatae vel triangulares, acuminatae, saepe bifidae, l-i-2em! 
longae, ad 6 mm. latae, herbaceae. Corymbi congesti, terminates, saepe 
cymis in axillis foliorum superiorum ortis aucti, multiflori; bracteae 
inferiores latae, interdum parce laciniatae, superiores sepalis similes ; 
pedicelli brevissimi. Sepala linearia vel subulata, longe tenuiterque 
attenuata, herbacea, praeter margioes setoso-ciliatas subglabra, 7-10 mm. 
longa, ad paulo nltra 1 mm. lata, sematophora nivea, caeterum forma 
foliorum. Corolla ante anthesin 2-3 cm. longa, adpre?se tomentosa vel 
adulta saepe subglabra; limbus aurantiacus, in alabastro 5-cornutus, 
cornubus saepe longiusculis, segmentis ad 6 mm. longis latisque apiculo 
caudafo tenui; tubus fauce pilis aureus farctus. Bacca globosa, siccata, 
1-1 • 2 cm. diametro, mox glabrescens. M. frondosa var. yrandifolia, Hook, f., 
Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. iii. p. 90. M. macrophylla, Wall. PI. As. Rar. tab. 180 
vol. xii.; Lindl. in Bot. Reg. vol. xxxii. tab. 24; Paxt. Mag. Bot. tab. c! 
p. 197, non Wall, in Roxb. Fl. Ind. ed. Car. vol. ii. p. 228.— 0. Stapf. 



Mussaenda Treutleri, to which Dr. Stapf has now for the 
first time accorded its proper status as a distinct species, is 
an old and well-known garden plant. It was originally 
discovered by Dr. Wallich in the mountains of Nepal, but 
was at first mistaken for a form of M. frondosa, and issued 
by him under that name in the Hon. E.I. Tompany's Herb- 
arium (Cat. Lith. 6250 E in part), but was subsequently 
confused with M. macrophylla, under which erroneous name 
it is usually cultivated. ' In the Flora of British India, 
(vol. iii. p. 90) Sir Joseph Hooker first pointed out that it is 
distinct alike from M. macrophylla and M. frondosa ; it is 
there treated as a variety, var. grandifolia, of the latter. 
May, 1909. 



A note on the relationships of these three plants and their 
immediate allies will shortly appear in the Kew Bulletin. 

M. Treutleri was introduced into cultivation by Messrs. 
Knight and Perry about 1840. It flowered with them in 
1844 and again in 1845, and was figured both in the Botanical 
Register and in Paxton's Magazine of Botany, in the belief 
that it was M. macrophylla, Wall. The area of the species 
extends from Lower Nepal to Sikkim and the Khasia Hills 
at elevations of from 2,000 to 6,000 ft. above sea-level. In 
Sikkim it was collected by Sir Joseph Hooker in 1848, and 
again by Dr. Treutler in 1860, in dense forest below Birch 
Hill, near Darjeeling. 

At Kew M. Treutleri is grown as a stove-plant and 
forms a shrub about 3 ft. high, with numerous branches 
which produce terminal heads of flowers in July and 
August. After flowering the plants are rested dry, and are 
started into growth again in spring by the application of 
heat and moisture. Seeds do not mature, but cuttings of 
the young shoots readily strike roots. 

Description. — Shrub, branches shortly pubescent upwards. 
Leaves ovate or ovate-elliptic, shortly acuminate, usually 
shortly cuneate at base, 6-12 in. long, 3-6 in. wide, hirsute 
on the nerves on both sides, especially beneath and on midrib, 
elsewhere sparsely harshly hairy ; petioles f-1^ in. long ; 
stipules wide-ovate or triangular, acuminate, often 2-fid, J-J 
in. long, I in. wide, herbaceous. Corymbs many-flowered, 
dense, terminal, often with additional cymes in the upper 
axils ; lower bracts broad, sometimes slightly laciniate, upper 
bracts like sepals ; pedicels very short. Sepals linear or 
subulate, much and gradually narrowed, herbaceous, almost 
glabrous except the setose-ciliate edges, -J— J in. long, J-J lin. 
wide, or rather wider ; leafy sepal white, otherwise like the 
leaves. Corolla before opening §-l£ in. long, adpressed 
pubescent, when old often almost glabrous; limb orange, in 
bud 5-horned, the horns often rather long; lobes \ in. long 
and broad with slender caudate tips; tube with a lining 
of orange hairs in the throat. Berry globose, dry, ^ in. 
across, soon glabrescent. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil ; 2, corolla, laid open ; 3 and 4, stamens :— all 
enlarged. 



8255 




:.rs.daLj.NEfcoh.ittk. 



\SaotntacooI»J)ffl' > SanU»ii5 



X Reeve &-C?LanjJon 



Tab. 8255. 
deutzia setchuenensis. 

China. 

Saxieragaceae. Tribe Hydrangeae. 
Deutzia, Thumb, ; Benth. et Hook.f. Got. Plant, vol. i. p. 642. 



Deutzia setchuenensis, Francli. in Journ. de Dot. 1896, vol. x. p. 282 ; affiuis 
I), utamineae, R. Br., a qua foliis longioribus acuruinatis, rainulis floriferis 
longioribus, inflorescentia corymbiformi recedit. 

Suffrutex, rami's cinereis glabris, cortice deciduo; raumli floriferi stellato- 
puberuli. Folia lanceolata vel ovato-lanceolata, longe acuminata, basi 
rotundata, 5-10 cm. longa, 15-3 cm. lata, cbarfacea, serrulata, utrinque 
stellato-puberula, nervis primariis utrinque 3-4 arcuatis supra obscuris 
subtus leviter elevatis; petioli 3-5 mm. longi, stellato-puberuli, supra 
profimde sulcati. Inflorescentia corynibiformis, multiflora, ramis quadran- 
gularibus, bracteis linearibus usque ad 5 mm. longis. Flores albi, circiter 
1"5 cm. diametro. Heceptacul um l - 5 mm. longum, extra dense stellato- 
tomentosum. Cah/cis tubus brevis, segmentis late iriangularibus subacutis 

1 mm. longis basi 1"5 mm. latis. Petala ovato-elliptica, subacuta, 6-7 mm. 
longa, 5-6 mm. lata, extra breviter stellato-pilosa, pilis 8-10-radiatis, intus 
glabra. Stamina antisepala 4 mm. longa, apice alte bilobata, antipetala 

2 mm. longa, apice laciniata. Styli distincti, 2 - 5 mm. longi. Capsula 
subglobosa, circiter 5 mm. diametro, stellato-puberula. D. corymbiflora, 
Lemoine in Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. xxiv. p. 265. — J. Hutchinson. 



Deutzia setchuenensis is closely related to the Himalayan 
D. staminea, R. Br., but is distinguished from that species 
by the larger and more acuminate leaves, the longer lateral 
flowering branchlets and the more spreading inflorescences. 
The form described as D. corymbiflora, Lemoine, has been 
identified by Mr. Franchet with this species; Mr. 
Hutchinson, however, points out that Lemoine's plant, as 
figured in 1902 (Rev. Hort. Beige, vol. xxviii. p. 157) 
appears to have smaller, less acuminate leaves and pinkish 
white flowers. 

One of the most beautiful members of the genus, D. 
setchuenensis, like many other North Asian shrubs, is often 
excited into premature growth by warm days in early spring, 
and on this account its young shoots and flower-buds are 
frequently destroyed by late frosts. This seriously affects 
its value as a garden-shrub, though it is perfectly hardy in 
May, 1909. 



other respects. The plant from which our figure was prepared 
was presented to Kew in 1897 by Mr. M. L. de Vilmorin, 
and since then it has never been seriously damaged by 
genuine winter cold. It will probably have some value as 
a shrub for forcing into early flower for greenhouse decora- 
tion, and will certainly prove a charming acquisition in 
climates where a sharper line divides winter from spring 
than is the case at Kew. Like the rest of the Deutzias, it 
thrives in good loam and is easily increased by means of 
cuttings made of half-ripened wood. It flowers early in 
July. 

DESCRIPTION. — Undershrub, branches ash-grey, smooth, 
with deciduous bark ; flowering twigs stellate-puberulous. 
Leaves lanceolate or ovate-lanceolate, long acuminate, 
rounded at the base, 2-4 in. long, f- 1| in. wide, papery, 
their margins serrulate, stellate-puberulous on both surfaces; 
main nerves 3-4-paired, indistinct above, slightly prominent 
beneath ; petioles £— £ in. long, stellate-puberulous, chan- 
nelled above. Inflorescence corymbiform, many-flowered, 
branches 4-angled ; bracts linear, -1- in. long. Flowers 
white, about f in. across ; receptacle f in. long, densely 
stellate-tomentose. Calyx-tube short ; lobes wide-triangular, 
subacute, \ lin. long, nearly 1 lin. long at base. Petals 
ovate-elliptic, subacute, \-\ in. long, \-\ in. wide, stellate- 
pilose without, glabrous within. Stamens 2-seriate, those 
opposite the sepals 2 lin. long, deeply 2-lobed, those 
opposite the petals 1 lin. long, with laciniate tips. Styles 
distinct, ■Ac in. long. Capsule subglobose, about ^ in. across, 
stellate-puberulous. 

Fig. I, calyx and pistil; -2, stelJate hair from receptacle; 3 and 1, louger 
stamens ; 5 and 6, shorter stamens :— all enlarged. 



8256 




itS.dai 



Tmcertt 3ro oks JixrtCSailiriiag 



HReeve &f" Iojv&ju. 



Tab. 8250. 
PYRUS Pashia, var. Kumaoni. 

Himalaya. 

Eosaceae. Tribe Pomeae. 
Pyrus, Linn.; Benth. et Tlool-.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 626. 



Pyrus Pashia, var. Kumaoni, Stapf; a P. Pashia, Ham. ex Don (typica) 
rami's foliis corymbis et calyce extus glabris vel si juventute maids 
minusve gossypinis mox glabratis et sepalis saepe latius triangularibus 
et apice minus productis distinguenda. 

Arbor humilis vel mediocris, ramulis glabris vel citissime glabratis exsiccaudo 
nigricantibus ; gemmae conicae, glabrae, 3-5 mm. longae. Folia ovata ad 
rotundato-ellipticum vel ovato-lanceolatum virgentia, apice sensim 
attenuata vel obtusa, basi rotundata, margine minute cienulata, plurima 
5-9 cm. longa, 3-5 cm. lata, glabra vel citissime glabrata, matura papy- 
racea, nigro-viridia ; petioli graciles, plerumque 3-5 cm. longi. Cvrymbi 
multiflora in xamis abbreviatis, glabri vel cito glabrati ; pedicelli circiter 
1 cm. longi. Iieceptacnlum glabrum. Sepala demum decidua. triangularia 
vel ovata, obtusa vel acuta, raro in apiculum producta, extus glabra, 
intus magis minusve gossypino-villosa, villis secundum margines gland n- 
loso-ciliolatas diutius persistentibus caeterum interdum evandis. Petala 
primo roseo-suffusa, deinde alba. Stamina ultra 25. Styli plerumque 5. 
Fruclus globosus vel obovoideo-globosus, brunneo-viridis vel brunneus, 
lenticellis pallidis crebris notatus, ad 3 cm. diametro. P. Kumaoni, 
Dene, Jard. Fruit, vol. i. sub tab. vii.; Hook, f., Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. ii. 
p. 374.— O. Stapf. 

It has alreacty been suggested by Dr. Schneider (111. 
Handb. Laubholzk. vol. i. p. 665) that the tree cultivated in 
European collections as Pyrus Pashia, which Decaisne has 
distinguished from the typical form of that species as 
P. Kumaoni, may be no more than a glabrous variety of 
P. Pashia proper. A careful study of the material in the 
herbarium at Kew has enabled Dr. Stapf to completely 
confirm this view. P. Pashia, taken in its wider sense, 
ranges throughout the whole of the temperate Himalaya 
from Kashmir to Bhutan, and extends thence to the Khasia 
and Naga Hills, to Manipur and northern Burma and into 
western China. The form now figured was described by 
Decaisne from a specimen collected by Strachey and 
Winterbottom in Kumaon between 5,000 and 8,000 ft. 
above sea-level, where it is said to be common. The form 
which constitutes the type of the species is one with densely 
cottony leaves and calyces, which was collected in Nepal by 
Mat, 1909. 



Buchanan (afterwards Hamilton) and again by Wallich 
The bulk of the specimens in the Kew herbarium are more 
or less intermediate between the Nepal and the Kumaon 
forms, the amount and degree of persistence of the tomentum 
showing considerable variation. 

According to Loudon (Encyc. of Trees and Shrubs, 
p. 124) P. Pashla was first introduced into England in 
L825, but the precise history of the tree from which the 
plate now given was prepared is not known. It has been 
growing in the collection of Rosaceae at Kew for many 
years ; it is a grafted plant, but is in vigorous health, being 
now 25 ft. high, 20 ft. in spread of branches, with a 
trunk 2 ft. 3 in. in girth. It flowers with all the pro- 
fusion characteristic of its kind, but is more attractive than 
the majority because of the compactness of its flower-clusters 
and the full-rounded contour of the individual blossoms. 
The deep-red anthers, too, show up strongly against the 
pure white petals, and the tree is worthy of more notice 
from arboriculturists than it has yet received. 

Description. — Tree, small to medium in size, with 
branchlets that blacken on drying, glabrous or soon be- 
coming so ; buds conical, glabrous, |— \ in. long. Leaves 
ovate tending to rounded-elliptic or ovate-lanceolate, gradu- 
ally narrowed or at times obtuse at the tip, rounded at the 
base, finely crenulate, usually 2-3^ in. long, 1^-2 in. wide, 
glabrous or soon becoming so, when full-grown papery, 
very dark green ; petioles slender, 1^-2 in. long. Corymbs 
many-flowered, on short branchlets, glabrous or soon be- 
coming so ; pedicels about \ in. long. Receptacle glabrous. 
Sepals at length falling off, triangular or ovate, obtuse or 
acute, or occasionally apiculate, glabrous without, more or 
less cottony-pubescent within, the hairs on their margins 
glandular and more persistent elsewhere, sometimes dis- 
appearing. Petals at first suffused with pale rose, at length 
becoming white. Stamens exceeding 25. Styles usually 5. 
Fruit globose or obo void-globose, brownish green or brown, 
dotted with numerous pale lenticels, over 1 in. in diameter. 



Fig. 1, flower about to open; 2, vertical section of flowers, the petals 
removed, showing bases of filaments and styles; 3 and 4, stamens: — all 
enlarged. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 53, MAY, 1909. 

Tab. 8252— DENDROBIUM BRONCKARTII, Indo-China, 

„ 8253.— LABEX OCCIDENTALIS, Western North America. 

„ 8254.— MTJSSAENDA TREUTLERI, Himalaya and Khasia. 

„ 8255— DEUTZIA SETCHUENENSIS, China. 

„ 8256.— PYRUS PASHIA, vab. KUMAONI, Himalaya. 

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ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 

Drawn bx W. H. PITCH, * L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

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8257 




MS. del, J.N. Fitch hth. 



Vincent Brooks^) ^r&. Sanigf ury 



X-BeevB 4.C?iondon-. 



Tab. 8257. 
PINUS Jefpreti. 

Western North America. 



Coniferae. Tribe Abietineae. 
Pjnus, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 438. 



Pinus Jeffreyi, Greu. et Balf. ex Andr. Murr. Bep. Oregon Exped. [1853] p. 2, 
cum ic. color.; Pari in DC. Prodr. vol. xvi. pars' 2, p. 393; Hook. f. in 
Gard. Chron. 1884, vol. xxii. p. 813, fig. 141 ; Mast, in Gard. Chron. 1889, 
vol. v. pp. 360, 369, figs. 65, 68; Lemmon, Handbook of West American 
Cone-Bearers, ed. 3, p. 34 ; species P. ponderosae, Laws., arete affinis et 
botanicorum nonnulldrum ejus varietas, differt innovationibus glaucis foliis 
saepius longioribus rigidioribus din persistentibus, floribus masculis flavo- 
viridibus et corn's majoribus purpuras. 

Arbor in horto kewense hie illustrata circiter 12 m. alta, ramis floriferis 
ciMSsissimis. Folia primaria seu cataphylla squamiformia, lanceolata, 
2-3 cm. longa, longe acuteque acuminata, scariosa, brunnea, nitida, eleganter 
capillavi-fimbriata ; secundaria vel vera terna, acicularia, rigida, 15-25 cm. 
longa, pungentia, dorso convexa, facie interiore biconcava carinata, margine 
denticulate, scabrida, ductis resiniferis duobus marginalibus instructa; 
vaginae foliiferae circiter 3 cm. longae, truncatae, primum argenteae, dein 
nigresceutes, marcescentcs. Strobili (flores) masculi numerosi, ad innova- 
tionum basin in axillis cataphyllorum solitarii, confertissimi, involucrati, 
clavato cylindrici, 3-5 cm. longi ; cataphylla scariosa, brunnea, lanceolata, 
l'5-2 cm. louga, acuminatissima, fimbriata. Involucri squamae circiter 
10-12, cataphyllis similes nisi minores, integrae, haud acuminatae; antherae 
numerosissimae. Strobili (flores) feminei pseudoterminales, solitarii, 
erecti, stipitati, stipite squamis numerosis vestito ; carpella parva, demum 
fere evanescentia ; squamae ovuliferae e basi rotundato caudatae. Coni 
maturi vel fere maturi laterales, penduli, inaperti oblongo-cylindrici, 
15-18 cm. longi, aperti fere ellipsoidei, brunnescentes, squamis seminiferis 
pungentibus. Stmina samaroidea, cum ala circiter 3 cm. longa. — P. 
ponderosa, var. Jeffreyi, Vasey Hep. Dep. Agric. U.S. 1875, p. 179 ; Brewer 
& Watson, Bot. Calif, vol. ii. p. 126; Sargent, Silva, vol. xi. p. 79, tt. 562, 
563. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



The Pine which is here figured was discovered by 
J. Jeffrey in the Shasta Valley in North California when 
collecting for an Edinburgh association in 1852. Seeds 
were sent by him to Edinburgh in the same year, and in a 
circular to the subscribers issued by Andrew Murray it is 
explained that these were distributed by the committee 
under the names given to them by various botanists, the 
figures and descriptions of the cones, leaves and seeds of the 
June, 1909. 



Ctmiferae included in the report being supplied by 
Dr. Greville and Professor Balfour. This report appears 
to be rarely met with, and has been little consulted, for the 
new species with which it deals have been by some 
attributed to Murray, by others partly to Balfour and 
partly to Jeffrey. The coloured plate representing P. 
Jeffreyi bears the signature of Dr. Greville. Opinions are 
divided as to whether this tree deserves specific rank ; there 
is no difficulty in distinguishing the form now described, 
the account of which is based exclusively on material from 
a tree in cultivation in the Arboretum at Kew, from culti- 
vated examples of P. ponderosa, but it is stated that inter- 
mediate wild forms have been met with. 

Opinions appear to be similarly divided as to the relative 
ornamental value of P. Jeffreyi and P. ponderosa. Sir 
Joseph Hooker, in the passage referred to above, describes 
it, as seen by him in a wild state, as inferior to P- ponderosa 
and as by no means a handsome tree ; his figure bears out . 
this judgment. Yet, as met with in cultivation, the longer 
leaves and the larger cones serve to render P. Jeffreyi 
perhaps the more striking of the two. Though neither of 
these near allies can be considered among the handsomest 
of Pines, in habit they are both notable in the parks and 
gardens of this country for their tall, stately, column-like 
trunks — as a rule, perhaps, too thinly set with branches to 
make them perfect specimen trees ; for their deeply fissured, 
rugged bark ; for their long rigid leaves arranged in a 
brush-like cluster on the terminal portion of each year's 
growth ; and, more especially as regards P. Jeffreyi, for the 
fine, handsomely coloured cones. Young trees are best 
reared from imported seed. 

Description. — Tree, the one here figured about 40 ft. 
high, with very stout flowering branches. Cataphyllary 
leaves scale-like, lanceolate, f-l| in. long, narrowly long 
acuminate, scarious, brown, shining, finely fimbriate ; leaves 
proper ternate, acicular, rigid, 6-10 in. long, pungent, 
convex on the back, biconcave and keeled on the face, 
margin finely toothed, scabrid, with two marginal resin-ducts ; 
sheaths about 1 £ in. long, truncate, at first silvery, at length 
blackish, persisting. Male cones many, at the bases of 
young shoots, each solitary in the axil of a cataphyllary 



leaf, densely clustered, involucrate, clavate-cylindric, 1^-2 
in. long; the cata]>hyllaries scarious, brown, lanceolate, 
very acuminate, fimbriate, f-f in. long. Involucral scales 
10-12, like the cataphyllaries but smaller, entire and not 
acuminate ; anthers very many. Female cones spuriously 
termiual, solitary, erect, stipitate, the stipe clothed with 
many scales ; carpels small, at length almost disappearing ; 
ovule-bearing scales caudate, with rounded bases. Fruit- 
cones when ripe or nearly so lateral, pendulous, oblong 
cylindric before opening, 6-7 in. long, almost ellipsoid 
after opening, becoming brownish ; seed-bearing scales 
pungent. Seeds samaroid, including the wing about 1J in. 
long. 

Fig. 1, two clusters of mature leaves; 2, a shoot bearing male flowers and 
young leaves; 3 and 4, anthers; 5, a shoot bearing young leaves, a female 
flower and a nearly mature cone ; 6, 7 and 8, carpel and ovuliferous scale in 
different positions; 9, a female flower, somewhat advanced; 10, a seed-bearing 
scale with a trace of the undeveloped carpel ; 11 and 12, seeds :— 1, 2, 5 and 10, 
of natural size, the other figures variously enlarged. 



8258 




.delo.N.Fjtdhbth.. 



""BncentBroa-sD^" 



. Reeve &. C*? £ artdon. 



Tab. 8258. 
BEGONIA modica. 

Tropical West Africa. 



Begoniaceae. 
Begonia, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 841. 



Begonia (Scutobegonia) modica, Stapf in Kew Bull. 1908, p. 259; species 
It. calabaricae, Stapf, affinis sed ab e.x foliis minime cordatis, ovarii alis 
supernc (saltern duabus) latissimis et fructu obpyramidato distincta. 

Uerba sub.icaulis. Foliorum petioli 3-4 cm. longi, rube-centes, hirsuto-villosi ; 
laminae oblique lateque peltato-ovatae, 5-8 cm. longae, 4-6 cm. latae, 
leviter crenatae et undulatae, carnostilae, praeter margines obscure rubentes 
laete virides, supra glaberrimae, subtus molliter hirsntae, nervis 6-8 radi- 
antilms, umbone ubi margini proximo ab eo 1-1 "5 cm. romoto. Pedunculi 
paucirluri, 2-3 cm. longi, sparse pilosi. Flores nmbellati, lutei, 2 masculi 
pedicel lati, 1 femineus subsessilis : masculorum pedicelli ad 18 mm. longi, 
glsbri ; sepala 2, rotundato-elliptica, 1 cm. longa, supernm extra rubro- 
suffusum, intus maculo fere sanguineo ornatum, iuferum utrinque sulphu- 
reum ; petala 0; stamina 12-13, filainentis basi in colnmnam connatis : 
foeminei sepa'a ut in masculis sed sul orbicidiria; petala ; styli 4, basi 
breviter connati ; stigmata reniformia papillarnm serie continua, 1*5 mm. 
lata ; ovarium sub anthesi rubens, 9 mm. longum, 4-5 mm. latum alis 
inferno paid; attenuate inclusis. — 0. Stapf. 



Begonia modica is a member of the section Scutobegonia, 
which includes a small group of species all of them confined 
to West Africa from Liberia to the Congo. The species of 
this section are small herbs mostly with peltate leaves and 
yellow flowers. The plant from which the figure here given 
has Leen prepared was raised from one of a number of tubers 
of the species received at Kew in 1907 from Mr. J. Anderson, 
Curator of the Botanic Station, Kumasi, who had found them 
growing in the Gold Coast Colony on rocky ground at an 
altitude of 600 ft. above sea level. Under the treatment 
ordinarily accorded to Begonias these tubers developed their 
leaves and flowered for the first time in September, .1908. 

Description - . — Herb, almost stemless. Leaves petioled ; 

petioles lj— 1£ in. long, reddish, hirsute; blades obliquely 

widely peltate-ovate, 2-3 J in. long, 1^-2^ in. wide, slightly 

crenate and undulate, somewhat fleshy, bright green, except 

June, 1909. 



for the faintly reddish margins, quite glabrous above, 
softly hirsute beneath, nerves 6-8 radiating from the 
petiole which joins the lamina about ^-f in. from the base. 
Peduncles few-flowered, f-lj in. long, sparingly hairy. 
Flowers umbelled, yellow ; each umbel of 2 stalked males 
and a single subsessiie female; the males on glabrous 
pedicels § in. long, with 2 rounded- elliptic sepals -| in. long, 
the upper flushed outside with red and with a bright red 
blotch within, the lower yellow on both sides ; petals ; 
stamens 12-13, their filaments connate below in a column : 
the female sepals like those of the male flowers, but almost 
orbicular ; petals ; styles 4, shortly connate below ; stigmas 
reniform with an unbroken series of papillae, l lin. wide ; 
ovary in flower reddish, }. in. long, ^--^ in. wide including 
the wings, slightly narrowed towards the base. 



Fig. 1, stamen ; 2, pistil ; 3, stigma ; 4, cross-section of young fruit : — all 
enlarged. 



8259 




M.S.deLJ.N.EitoKlitK 



\5n C antBMolB^«r* SariL * in P 



I/Reeve &.C?IaiuIan. 



Tab. 8259. 

SORBUS CUSPIDATA. 

Himalaya. 

Bosaceae. Tribe Pomeae. 
Sorbus, Linn. ; Hedlund in Svensk. Vet. Akad. Handl. 1901, vol. xxxv. pp. 1-147. 



Sorbus cuspidata, Hedlund, Joe. cit. p. 89; K. C. Schneider, 111. Handb. Lamb' 
ho 7 zk. p. 683 ; species S. lanata comparanda, sed foliis baud vel indistincte 
lobulatis, petiolis intus lanatis, stylis a basi liberis supra medium glabris 
recedens. 

Arbor culta mediocris, spontanea interdum peralta, novellis niveo-lanatis, ramis 
mox magis minusve glabratis purpureo-fuscis lenticellis conspersis ; 
gemmae ovoideae, subacutae, glabrae. Folia elliptica, basi rotundata vol 
breviter cuneata, apice breviter acuminata subacuta vel obtusa, margine 
simpliciter vel duplo dentata dentibus irregularibus, interdum brevissime 
lobulata, 12-20 cm. longa, 7-10 cm. lata, matura firma, supra primo albo- 
araneosa tandem glabrata, inferne niveo-tomentosa, nervis lateralibus 
utrinque 12-15 subrectis in dentes excurrentibus ; petiolus 1-2 • 5 cm. 
longus, robustus. Corymbi breves, ad 6 cm. diametro, multiflori, densius- 
culi, undique niveo-tomentosi ; pedicelli breves vel brevissimi. Recepta- 
culum fundo glabro viride excepto et sepala triangularia vel e basi 
triangulari lanceolato-subulata albovillosa. Petala alba, intus villosa. 
Stamina circiter 25, antheris purpureis. Carpella inter se et cum 
receptaculo plane connata ; styli 3-5 ima basi connata et hie et paulo ultra 
lanugine floccosa vestiti. Fructus globosus ad 2 cm. diametro, calyce 
persistente coronatus, in planta spontanea ruber, exsiccando fuscescens, 
lenticellatus, endocarpio tenuiter papyraceo. — Pyrus vestita, Wall. Cat. 
Lith. 679 (nomen tantum); Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. ii. p. 375. F. 
crenata, Lindl. in Bot. Beg. t. 1655; non D. Don. Crataegus cuspidata, 
Spach, Hist. Veg. vol. ii. p. 106.— O. Staff. 



The Nepalese Whitebeam, sometimes met with in collec- 
tions under the garden names of Sorbus nepalensis or Pyrus 
nepalensis, is not confined to the country from which its most 
familiar name is derived, but extends throughout the temper- 
ate Himalaya, at elevations of 8000-10,000 ft. above sea- 
level, from G-arhwal to Sikkim. According to a manuscript 
note placed by Dr. Schneider in the herbarium at Kew, the 
tree from the Khasia Hills treated as a variety, khasiana, 
of this species and characterised by the possession of very 
membranous leaves, is better referred to the genus 
Micromeles. 

According to Loudon this species was first introduced 
into European collections in 1820 ; the tree from which the 
plate now given has been prepared was purchased for the 
June. 1909. 



Kew collection from Messrs. Fisher, Son & Sibfay of 
the Handsvvorth Nurseries, Sheffield, in January, 1904, 
under the name of Pyrus Aria himalaica. As a garden- 
tree it is, in some respects, the finest of all the Whitebeams 
in cultivation, especially in regard to the size of its foliage 
and flowers. The fruits, although large, are not so brightly 
coloured as in various forms of P. Aria itself. This species 
is somewhat uncertain in its behaviour under cultivation. 
After growing quite well for a number of years it will, 
without any ostensible cause, and sometimes in the middle 
of the active growing season, suddenly droop and soon 
afterwards die. To this unfortunate circumstance is probably 
due the fact that although the species came into cultivation 
in England nearly eighty years ago, there are few, if any, 
fully grown trees in this country. 

DESCRiPTioisr. — Tree, of medium size under cultivation, 
sometimes of large dimensions in the wild state ; innovations 
white-woolly, branches soon becoming glabrous, purplish- 
brown and lenticelled ; buds ovoid, subacute, glabrous. 
Leaves elliptic, rounded or shortly cuneate at the base, 
shortly acuminate or subacute or obtuse at the apex, 
irregularly simply or double toothed and sometimes slightly 
lobulate, 5-8 in. long, 3-4 in. wide, firm when full grown, 
at first loosely white-pubescent but soon glabrous above, 
persistently white-tomentose beneath, lateral nerves 12-15 
on each side ending in the mai'ginal teeth ; petiole stout, 
^-1 in. long. Corymbs short, 2£ in. across, many-flowered, 
rather dense and white-tomentose ; pedicels short or very 
short. Receptacle with a green glabrous base, elsewhere 
white-villous as are the triangular or lanceolate-subulate 
sepals. Petals white, villous within. Stamens about 25; 
anthers purple. Carpels connate and at the same time 
adnate to the receptacle ; styles 3-5, connate at the base 
and woolly below. Fruit globose, -f in. across, tipped by 
the persistent calyx, red in the wild state, reddish-green in 
cultivated examples, brownish as it ripens, lenticelled ; 
endocarp thinly papery. 

Fig. 1, longitudinal section of a flower, the petals removed; 2, petal, seen 
from upper side; 3, transverse section of receptacle and ovary; 4, branch of 
fruiting corymb; 5, longitudinal section of fruit:— 1-3 enlarged, 4 and 5 of 
natural size. 



8260 




M-S.del, J.NPitcRlith. 



^Vincent BroQ^.D^rS-SonX^in?) 



X.Rfievi3 &_C?Lon.3:m. 



Tab. 8260. 
PKUNUS japomca. 

China and Japan. 

Kosaceae. Tribe Pbuneae. 
Prcnus, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. i. p. G09. 



Primus (Cerasus) japoniea, Thunb. Ft. Jap. 1784, p. 201; Sieb. et Zucc. Fl. 
Jap. p. 172, t. 90; Bot. Beg. i. 27 (var. floribus p!enis) ; Schneider, 111. 
Handb. Laubholz. kvoL i. p. 612; affinis P. humili, Bunge, i-ed ramis 
glabris, foliis majoribus, petabs integris differt. 

Frutex, ramis et rain ul is plabris, co.iice cinereo-fusro glabro. Folia ovaio- 
lanciolata vel lanceolata, basi rotumlata vel cum ata, acuminata vel acuta, 
usque ad 7 cm. longa et 3 cm. lata, duplo-serrata, utrinque glabra, nervis 
utrinque 3-6 supra leviter immersis subtus elevatis; pctioli usque ad 
7 mm. longi. Stipulae lineari-sctaceae, circiter 5 mm. longae, ciliatae. 
Gemmae subglobosae. Peduncnli 1— 3-flori ; bracteae oblongae, obtusao. 
serrulatae. Beceptaculum subcampanulatum, 2 mm. Iougum, glabram. 
Calycis tegmenta ovato-oblonga, obtusa, 2-3 mm. longa, 2 mm. lata, 
patentia, ghmdnloso-cfliata. Fetala obovata, basi attenuate, 7 mm. longa, 
5 mm. lata, glabra, rosea, boiizontaliter patentia. Stamina circiter 25; 
filamenta glabra, inaequalia, suberecta. Carpella 1-2, oblique elliptica, 
superr.e parce pilosa : stylus 5 mm. longus, inferne parce pilosus, superne 
gliber, stigmate parvo cap.tato. Drvpa globo, c a, vix ultra 1 cm. diametro, 
saturate coccinea. — Primus f/landulosa, Thunb. Fl. Jap. p. 202, quoad 
plantam florcntem, fide Maxim. P. sinensis, Pers. Sjn. PI. vol. ii. p. 36. 
P. chinensis, Blun.e, Bijdr. p. 1104? Cerasus japoniea et 0. tjlandvlom, 
Loiscl. in Nouv. Duliam. vol. v. p. c3. Amygdalus jumila, Sims in Bot. 
Mag. t. 2176; non I our.— J. Hutchinson. 



Primus japoniea is nearly allied to P. Iiumilis, Bunge, 
figured in this work at plate 7335, but is readily distinguished 
by the glabrous branches, larger leaves and entire petals. 
More familiar in its double-flowered form, which has long- 
been one of the most popular of hardy shrubs, especially for 
forcing into early flower for greenhouse decoration, the 
species in its natural condition, here figured, is nevertheless 
very pretty, and has, in its bright red cherries, an attraction 
which its more showy variety does not possess. The double- 
flowered form, figured at plate 2176 of this work under the 
name Amygdalus pumila, is said by Bretschneider to have 
been in cultivation in the Jardin des Plantes at the end of 
the eighteenth century, though, according to Nicholson, it 
,Tune,"~1909. 



was not introduced to English gardens till 1869. At first 
it was imagined that this double-flowered cherry was a form 
of P. humilis. This impression was dispelled when the 
typical variety here figured was introduced to western 
horticulture. According to Bretschneider it first became 
known in British gardens in 1835, when it was introduced 
from China by a son of Mr. John Reeves. It was not 
however obtained for the Kew collection until November, 
1902, when the plant from which the present plate has 
been prepared was presented by Messrs. Veitch from their 
Coombe Wood nursery. This plant is now about 3 ft. 
high, and thrives in a sunny border in loamy soil. It has 
produced fruit in great abundance during the last three 
years, all the younger parts of the bush being plentifully 
furnished with its bright cherries, which are extremely acid 
and astringent. The plant can be propagated by seeds, 
cuttings and layers, but of the three methods the last is 
found to be the most satisfactory for obtaining good plants 
quickly. 

Description. — Shrub, the branchlets, branches and 
greyish-brown bark glabrous. Leaves ovate-lanceolate or 
lanceolate, acuminate or acute, with rounded or cuneate 
base, 2-2§ in. long, 1-1£ in. wide, the margins doubly 
serrate, both surfaces glabrous, nerves 3-6 on each side 
slightly depressed above and prominent beneath ; petioles 
£-* in. long ; stipules linear-setaceous, ciliate, about ^ in. 
long. Buds subglobose. Peduncles 1-3-flowered ; bracts 
oblong, obtuse, serrulate. Receptacle almost campanulate, 
1 lin. long, glabrous. Calyx-lobes ovate-oblong, obtuse, 
1-1 5 lin. long, 1 lin. wide, spreading, glandular-ciliate. 
Petals obovale, narrowed to the base, I in. long, J- in. wide, 
glabrous, rose-pink, spreading horizontally. Stamens about 
25 ; filaments glabrous, unequal, suberect. Carpels 1-2, 
obliquely elliptic, slightly hairy above; style ^ in. long, 
slightly hairy below, glabrous above ; stigma small, capitate. 
Drupes globose, about f in. in diameter, bright red. 



Fig. 1, bud ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, carpel : — all enlarged. 



8261 




M.5 a^IJ.KHtahlith 



Vine eri Brooks J) iy&.5 



X. Reero &. C?Iaadoiu 



Tab. 8261. 
cornus macrophylla. 

Eastern Asia. 

COKNACEAE. 
Cornus, Linn. ; Benin. e< Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 950. 



Cornus maerophylla, Wall, in Boxb. Fl. Ind. ei. Carey & Wall. vol. i. (1820), 
p. 433; G. B. Clarke in Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. to!. li. p. 744, exempl. foliis 
alternis et Tar. Stracheyi exclus. ; Gillett, Fl. Si ml. p. 219; Brandts, For. 
Fl. p. 252, t. 32; Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. toI. xxiii. (1888), p. 345; 
J. Veich in Journ. B. Hort. Soc. 1902-3, vol. xxvii. p. 8(31, cum habilus 
figura ; non C. macrophylta, Koe'me, Shirasvwa et botanicorum hortulano- 
rumque aliorum nonnulloruni ; inter species sinenses foliis oppositis 
C. Mombeiyii, Hemsl., proxima, differt inipiimis in fere omnibus partibus 
minus liirsutis pilis argenteis arctisVme appressis obscuris et foliis nun- 
quam fere orbiculanbus. 

Arbor saepius 5-10 m., interdum usque ad 15 m. alta, nisi floi-es glabrescens Tel 
obscure puberala. Rami florigeri graciliusculi, rubescentes. Folia opposita, 
petiolata; lamina papyracea, saepius ovata, interdum lanccolata Tel 
elliptica, saepius 10-15 cm. longa, nunc longiora nunc breviora, caudato- 
acuminata, acutissima, basi cuueata vel rotundata, interdum iuaequalia, 
supra glabra vel cito glabrescentia, infra pallida vel glauca, pilis argenteis 
medio affixis arctissime appressis plus minusvc vestita, raro glabrescentia ; 
nervi primarii utrinque saepius 5-7, rarius in eodem ramo 4-8, sat 
conspicui ; petiolus gracilis, 3-5 cm. longus. Flores tetrameri, alba-lutei, 
l - 25-1* 5 cm. diametro, in cymas compositas stipitatas terminales et 
laterales dispositi. Cyrna-i 6-12 cm. diametro ramis glabris vel glabrescen- 
tibus, ebracteatae, ebracteolatae ; pedicelli quam flores breviores. Calyx 
pilis argenteis densitsime vestitus, 2-3 mm. longus; tubus distincte 
costatus dentibus minutis. Petala valvata, lanceolata, obtusiuscula, 
patentia vel recurva, extra pilifera. Stamina quam petala breviora, 
antberis dorso affixis. Drupa globosa, 5-7 mm. diametro, apice baud 
excavato. — G. brachypodu, C. A. Mey. in Mem. Acad. Petersb. 1845, vol. vii. 
p. 223, et in Ann. Sc. Nat. ser. 3, vol. iv. p. 74 ; Koebne in Gartenfl. 
vol. xlvi. p. 94; Eebder in Sargent, Trees & Shrubs, vol. i. p. 81, t. 41. 
C. sanquinea, Thunb. Fl. Jap. p. 02 ; non Linn. C. Thelicanis, Lebas in 
Pvev. Hort. 1875, p. 394, f. 64. O. crispula, Hance in Journ. Bot. 1881, 
toI. xix. p. 216. C. iynorata, Shirasawa, Ic. Ess. For. Jap. vol. i. p. 121, 
t. 77, figs. 1-12 ; non K. Koch. C. corynostylis, Koebne in Gartenfl. 1896, 
vol. xlv. p. 286, fig. 51 ; Mitt, der Dcutsch. Dendrol. Gesellsch. 1903-1905, 
pp. 33, 36, 44. G. Theleryana, C. Beliyiana, Hort., et C. yluuca, Blunie 
Mss.— W. Botting Hemsley. 



Cornus macrophylla is the largest of all the Cornels that 

are hardv in the average climate of Great Britain. It is 

represented in the Kew Arboretum by several young trees, 

the largest of which, however, is not more than 10 ft. high. 

June, 1909, 



Yeitch has figured a specimen, growing at Coombe Wood, 
which is 17 ft. high by 12 ft. through. As a rule it forms 
a bushy tree branching from the base ; according to Yeitch 
it flowers very freely in alternate seasons. In the wild 
state C. macrophylla has an unusually wide range from the 
North- West Himalaya eastward to China and Japan, and 
varies very little except in the size and shape of its leaves 
throughout this area. Though introduced into English 
collections as long ago as 1827, it is by no means frequently 
met with, and while in this country — owing to the fact, per- 
haps, that authentic specimens of Wallich's C. macrophylla 
have been readily available for examination, and that these 
all undoubtedly belong to the species now figured — there has 
been no confusion with regard to the name it should bear, 
matters have been otherwise in continental and American 
collections. Mr. Hemsley, who has carefully disentangled 
the confusion that has found its way into dendrological 
literature, points out that the cause of this confusion is due 
to the existence in collections of two species of Conms, one 
with alternate and one with opposite leaves. That with 
opposite leaves, as a reference to the original specimens at 
once shows, is Wallich's C. macrophylla. This opposite- 
leaved species was, however, a quarter of a century after 
the publication of the original description, again described 
by Meyer as C. brackypoda. On the Continent and in 
America Meyer's name has been adopted for the opposite- 
leaved species, and Wallich's name has been erroneously 
applied to that which has the leaves and branches alternate. 
In British collections the identity of the opposite-leaved 
species has never been in doubt, but by a converse error 
the name C. brachypoda has been applied to that with 
alternate leaves and branches. Koehne and Render indeed 
would treat the Japanese form of the species now figured, 
on which C. brachypoda, C. A. Mey., is based, as distinct 
from the Himalayan form, but owing to the erroneous 
impression that the plant which Wallich described has 
alternate leaves, they employ for what is undoubtedly 
C. macrophylla, Wall., a new name, C. corynostylis, Koehne. 
As a matter of fact, it is the species with alternate leaves 
and branches, grown in English collections under the 
erroneous name C. brachypoda and in the collections of 
other countries under the equally erroneous name C. macro- 



phyila, that stands in need of a distinctive name. For this 
alternate-leaved Cornel Mr. Hemsley proposes the name 
C. controversa. 

C. macrophylla thrives best in good loamy soil in a sunny 
position, and the only special treatment called for is the 
jjruning away of the lower branches, so that a clean trunk 
5 or 6 ft. high may form. If this be done, it makes a 
very handsome small tree of distinct and striking aspect. 
The most suitable use for it in the garden, perhaps, is as an 
isolated specimen on the lawn. 

Description. — Tree, usually 15-30, sometimes up to 50 ft. 
high, all parts except the flowers glabrous or obscurely 
puberulous; flowering branches rather slender, dull reddish. 
Leaves opposite, usually ovate, sometimes lanceolate or 
elliptic, generally 4-6 in. long, but at times longer or shorter, 
tapering to a caudate-acuminate apex, base rounded or 
cuneate sometimes unequal, papery, glabrous or soon 
glabrescent above, beneath pale or glaucous usually more 
or less beset with small closely adpressed centrally attached 
hairs ; main-nerves conspicuous, usually 5-9 on each side, 
occasionally on leaves of the same branch 4 or 8 ; petiole 
slender, lj-2 in. long. Mowers 4-merous, yellowish- white, 
l-h in. across, in compound stipitate terminal and lateral 
cymes 2^—5 in. across, with glabrous or glabrescent branches 
and without bracts or bracteoles ; pedicels shorter than the 
flowers. Calyx 1-lJr liri. long, densely covered with silvery 
hairs ; tube distinctly ribbed, teeth minute. Petals valvate, 
lanceolate, somewhat obtuse, spreading or recurved, hairy 
without. Stamens shorter than the petals ; anthers dorsi- 
fixed. Drupes globose, 2^-3^ lin. across, the tip not 
hollowed. 



Fig. 1, a flower-bud; 2, an expanded flower; 3, calyx and pistil; 4 and 5, 
anthers : — all enlarged. 



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8262 




xs.&a jjjjitdKiitk 



IRaevp ^CJlonaan. 



"^n«ntBroQks,D^-&.SanI|?. 



ruip 



Tab. 8262. 
COELOGYNE venusta. 

Yunnan. 



Obchidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 

Coelogyne, Lindl. ; Benth. el Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 518; Pfitzer in 
Engl. PJlanzenr. Coelogyninae, p. 20. 



Coelogyne venusta, Itolfe in Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxv. p. 259; Orch. Rev. 
1904, p. 135; Pfitzer in Engl. PJlanzenr. Vvelog. pp. 71, 72, fig. 26 B; a 
C. Dayana, Reichb. f, labelli lobis lateral ibus oblongis, lobo jntermedio 
obovato-oblongo, carinis 2 sulco profundo disjunctis, additis utrinque 
2 brevioribus differt. 

Iferba, pseudobulbi elliptico-oblongi, subtetragoni, sulcati, basi vaginis lanceo- 
latis vestiti, in rhizomate repente satis distantes, diphylli, 4-6 cm. longi, 
2-2 '5 cm. crassi. Folia in petiolum brevem angustata, elliptico-oblonga 
vel lanceolata, acuminata, supra nitida, 12-18 cm. longa, 2* 5-4 "5 cm. lata, 
nervis 3 subtus prominentibus percursa. Scapi penduli, graciles, multiflori, 
25-35 cm. longi, basi vaginis lanceolatis acutis obtecti. Bracteae late 
ellipticae, obtusae, convolutae, persiste rites, circa l - 5 cm. longae. Pedicelli 
graciles, circa l'5cm. longi. Flo* pallide lutescens, labellum album, lobi 
laterales uti centrum lobi medii lutei, carinae brunneo-maculatae. Sepala 
ovato-oblonga, apiculata, concava, dorso carinata, 1'2-1'5 cm. longa. 
Pe'ala lineari-oblonga, acuta, 1*2-1*6 cm. longa. Labellum trilobum, 
concavum, 1*2-1*5 cm. longum; lobi laterales erecti, semioblongi, antice 
rotundati; lobus medius late obovato-oblongus, undulatus, emarginatus; 
carinae 4, undulatae, quarum 2 ad basin extensae, sulco profunde separatae, 
2 brevioribus utrinque extra additis. Columna arcuata, late alata, 1 cm. 
longa.— E. A. Rolfe. 

Coelogyne venusta is a very distinct species which 
Mr. Rolfe would refer to the section Toraentosae, but 
which the late Dr. Pfitzer was inclined, on account of the 
remarkable lip, to treat as the type of a separate section, 
the Venustae. A smaller plant than most of its nearer 
allies, it is distinguished from all of them by the relatively 
greater size of the anterior as compared with the lateral 
lobes of the lip. For its introduction to this country, from 
S.W. China, horticulture is indebted to Messrs. Sander of 
St. Albans ; a plant supplied by them flowered in 1904 at 
Grlasnevin, whence came the material on which the original 
account of the species was based. It thrives well under the 
conditions suited to the Himalayan Coelogynes. 
July, 1909. 



Description. — Herb, pseudobulbs elliptic-oblong, silicate 
and slightly 4-angled, their bases clothed with lanceolate 
sheaths, 2 -leaved, about 2 in. long and § in. wide, about 
an inch apart on the creeping rootstock. Leaves narrowed 
to a short petiole, elliptic-oblong or lanceolate, acuminate, 
shining above, 5-7 in. long, 1-lf in. wide, prominently 
3-nerved beneath. Scapes slender, many -flowered, pendulous, 
10-14 in. long, clothed below with acute lanceolate sheaths ; 
bracts wide-elliptic, obtuse, convolute, persistent, 7 lin. 
long ; pedicels slender, about equalling the bracts. Flowers 
pale yellow; lip white, lateral lobes and centre of mid-lobe 
yellow, the keels with brown markings. Sepals ovate-oblong, 
apiculate, concave, keeled behind, 6-7 lin. long. Petals 
lineai'-oblong, acute, 6-7 lin. long. Lip 3-lobed, concave, 
6-7 lin. long ; side-lobes erect, semi-oblong, rounded at the 
apex ; anterior lobe wide obovate-oblong, undulate, emar- 
ginate ; keels 4, undulate, two extending along the disk to 
near the base with a deep channel between, with two shorter 
lateral ridges. Column curved, broadly winged, about 
5 lin. lone:. 



Fig. 1, lip ; 2, column ; 3, anther-case ; 4, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



O/C&tt 




Vincent Br o ol<s,D ^r&-S on Lf"f imp 



L Reeve &.C° Lcndaa 



Tab. 8263. 

aloe rubrolutea. 

Tropical South-west Africa. 

Liliaceae. Tribe Aloineab. 

Aloe, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 476; Dyer, Ft. Trop. Afr. 
vol. vii. p. 454. 

Aloe rubrolutea, Schinz in Bull. Herb. Boiss. vol. iv. App.iii.(1896),p. 39 ; Bak. in 
Dyer, Ft. Trop. Afr. vol. vii. p. 460 ; Berger in Engl. Pftanzenr. vol. iv. 
38, 3, ii. p. 221, fig. 80; species ex affinitate A. pergrassae, Tod., a qua 
differt praesertim trunco columnari, et A. littoralis, Bak., quae folia habet 
angustiora et longiora. 

Cautis validus, simplex, circa 1-2 5 m. et ultra altus, foliorum rosula copiosa 
coronatus foliisque exsiccatis deflexis onustus. Folia lanceolato-ensiformia, 
basi planiuscula, ex medio sensim acuminata et canaliculata, carnosa, epider- 
mide coriacea, glauco-viridia vel saepe rubescentia, 55-60 cm. longa et 
9-11 cm. lata, juniora erecto-patentia, seniora deflexa, ad margines obtusos 
aculeis basi crebrioribus et superne remotioribus deltoideis uncinatis 
corneis validis 4-5 mm. longis instructa Inflorescentia ramosa, pedunculo 
robusto inclusa folia vix vel paullum superans 60-65 cm. longa; rami 
erecto-patentes superne bracteis vacuis pluribus muniti ; racemi subdensi, 
elongati, erecti, 30 cm. longi ; bracteae ad racemi apicem imbricatae, 
demum patulae et deinde reflexae, lanceolatae, 3(-5-8)-nerviae, acutius- 
culae, scariosae, 15-18 mm. longae; pedicelli bracteis breviores, 5-10 mm. 
longi, erecti, fructiferi demum elongati. Periantliium laete rubrum, 
30 mm. longum, subcylindraceum basi rotundatum, supra ovarium vix 
constrictum etfaucem versus paullum ampliatum ; segmenta exteriora basi 
breviter vel usque medium connata, 3- vel plurinervia, interiora obtusiora 
pallidiora, apice fusco uninervio in faucem erectam angustam conniventia. 
Stamina stylusque vix vel breviter exserta. Capsula oblonga, grisea, 
25 mm. longa, 10-12 mm. lata, erecta. Semina numerosa, oblonga, fosca, 
ala lata membranacea grisea cincta. — A. Schinzii, Bak. in Dyer, Fl. Trop. 
Afr. vol. vii. p. 459. — A. Berger. 



Aloe rubrolutea appears to have a wide range in the 
Kalahari desert and in Grerman South-west Africa where it 
has been collected by several travellers. It is said to be 
plentiful in the neighbourhood of the Etasa Lake and on 
the mountains near Klein Windhoek. Dr. Schinz gives 
the stems as from 3^-5 ft. in height, but Mr. Dinter reports 
them as reaching 8 ft., and judging from photographs even 
taller individuals are not infrequent ; indeed in the wild 
state it appears to come nearest in size to A. dichotoma. It 
has been repeatedly introduced to Europe by Dinter, and 
seems to have also been collected by Dr. Baum during his 
Kunene-Zambesi expedition. The plant from which the figure 
now given was made was sent alive as a young specimen 
by Dinter from Windhoek, in 1904, to the late Sir T. 
July, 1909. 



Hanbury in whose garden at La Mortola it flowered for the 
first time in November, 1907 ; this is possibly the first record 
of the species having flowered in Europe. The same plant 
flowered again in November, 1908, and afforded the material 
utilised for our plate. Seedlings of this species are now 
probably frequent in gardens. They look rather unlike the 
adult plant as their leaves are densely covered with round 
white spots, whiclr gradually become less frequent and 
ultimately disappear as the plants grow larger. Even at 
La Mortola the species is not quite hardy ; though rather 
quick-growing and otherwise presenting no cultural difficulty, 
it is sensitive to cold. Like many other Aloes, A. rubrolutea 
is a very ornamental green- house plant, and like other 
tropical species may perhaps do well in a temperate house ; 
it should if possible be given a place in a border with rich 
but gravelly soil. Strong and old specimens will certainly 
prove handsome and valuable objects in a collection. 

Description. — Stem unbranched, stout, 8 ft. or more in 
height, covered with old leaves; in the young plant here 
figured only 6 in. high, 2^ in. thick. Leaves about 20 in a 
dense rosette, lanceolate-ensiform, spreading and flat at the 
base, slightly wider at the middle, thence acuminate and 
channelled to the acute tip, thick and fleshy, glaucous-green, 
the margins beset with brown deltoid and somewhat hooked 
spines, about 2 ft. long, 4^ in. wide ; in the La Mortola 
specimen 17 in. long. Panicle much-branched, branches 
somewhat spreading, naked below but with a few empty 
bracts under the raceme. Racemes about 1 ft. long, cylindric, 
slender, with many rather lax, drooping flowers ; bracts 
whitish, lanceolate, acute, 3-8-nerved, ^-§ in long, at first 
imbricate, at length more or less reflexed ; pedicels 3-5 lin. 
long, much elongated in fruit. Perianth straight, cylindric, 
somewhat widened near the top, bright red, 1| in. long ; 
outer segments united at the base or nearly half-way, linear- 
lanceolate, acute, witVi 3 or more veins; inner segments 
obtuse with dark-brown tips. Stamens and style hardly 
exceeding the perianth. Capsule oblong, 1 in. long, many- 
seeded. Seeds with a greyish, oblong, thin wing. 



Figs. 1 and 2, stamens; 3, ovary; 4, an entire plant: — 1-3 enlarged, 4 much 
reduced. 




eU.N.Rt/WitH 



VincentBrooks P ay-&Sonii~imp 



L. Reeve &.C?Iaruloru 



Tab. 8264. 

RUBUS CANADENSIS. 

Eastern North America. 



Bosaceae. Tribe Eobeae. 

Eubxjs, Linn.; Benth. et Hook. /. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 616; Focke in 'Engl £ 
Prantl. Pflanzenfam. vol. iii. pars iii. p. 28. 



Eubus (Eubatus) canadensis, Linn. Sp. PL ed. 1 (1753), p. 494 ; Torr. & (hay. 
Fl. N. Amer. vol. i. p. 455; Bailey, Cyclop. Amer. Sort. vol. iv. p. 1583;. 
Robin*. Jb Fernald in Gray, New Man. N. Amer. Bot. ed. 7, p. 490; inter 
species Americanas caulibus inermibus vel leviter acnleblatis, foliis sub- 
glabris, floribus in racemis dispositis distinetus. 

Frutex erectus vel suberectus. Catties inermes vel interdum leviter aculeolati, 
subteretes, crassiusculi, brunnei ; novelli minute puberuli ; internodii 
5-7 cm. longi. Folia 3-5-foliolata ; j>etioli glabri, 4-8 cm. longi ; foliola 
ovata vel elliptico-ovata, acuta vel caudato-acuminata, crebre et argute 
dentata, utrinque glabra, lateralia subsessilia, 5-8 cm. longa, 2-5 cm. lata, 
terminaiia longe petiolulata, 10 cm. longa, 5-6 cm. lata ; stipulae lineares, 
acuminatae, circa 1 cm. longae. Bacemi 6-8 cm. longi, laxi. Bracteae 
lanceolato-oblongae, acutae, 7-8 mm. longae. Pedicelli graciles, sub-, 
pubescentes, 2-3 cm. longi. Florts 2-3 cm. lati. Sejxila deltoideo-ovata?, 
acuminata, 5 mm. longa, puberula, albo-marginata. Petala obovata, alba, 
1—1*5 cm. longa. Stamina numerosissima ; filamenta glabra, 5-7 mm. 
longa. Carpellae glabrae; sty li glabri, 2 5 mm. longi. Drupae succulentae, 
nigrae. — B. Millspaughii, Britton in Bull. Torr. Club. vol. xviii. (1891), 
p. 366; Britt. & Br. 111. Fl. N. Amer. vol. ii. p. 203, witb fig. B. amabilis, 
Blancbard in Rhodora, vol. viii. (1906), p. 173.— B. A. Bolfk. 



The plant here figured is one of the most distinct and 
attractive of the many Rubi recently brought into cultiva- 
tion. The Kew example was presented to the national 
collection by Professor Sargent of the Arnold Arboretum 
in 1902, and has since its introduction been cultivated 
under the name R. Millspaughii proposed by Dr. Britton. 
Professor Bailey has, however, definitely identified it with 
the true R. canadensis of Linnaeus, and this name is here 
accordingly adopted. Popularly known as the " Thornless 
Blackberry," R. canadensis appears to extend in a wild 
state from Eastern Canada, through the highlands of New 
England, New York and Michigan to the mountains of 
North Carolina. In habit our plant resembles the common 
Raspberry, forming sturdy, erect stems 6 or 7 ft. high; The 

July, 1909. 



flowers are produced in June in large, racemose inflorescences 
which spring from each node on the upper part of the 
previous year's growth. The plant thrives well in an 
ordinary border of loamy soil, and the only special attention 
it requires is the cutting away of the old stems after 
fruiting. 

Description. — Shrub, erect or suberect, stems unarmed 
or occasionally slightly thorny, roundish, rather thick, 
brown ; new shoots finely puberulous; internodes 2-3 in. 
long. Leaves 3-5-foliolate ; petioles glabrous, 1^-3 in. 
long; leaflets ovate or elliptic-ovate, acute or caudate- 
acuminate, closely sharply toothed, glabrous on both sur- 
faces, the lateral almost sessile, the distal distinctly 
stalked, 2-4 in. long, 1-2^ in. wide; stipules linear, 
acuminate, | in. long. Racemes lax, 2J-3 in. long ; 
bracts lanceolate-oblong, acute, i in. long ; pedicels slender, 
slightly pubescent, §-H in. long; individual flowers %-l{ 
in. across. Sepals deltoid-ovate, acuminate, nearly £ in. long, 
white-margined, puberulous. Petals obovate, white, f-f in. 
long. Stamens very many ; filaments glabrous, ^— i in. long. 
Carpels glabrous; styles glabrous, t l in. long. Drupes 
black, fleshy. 

Fig. 1, section of flower after fall of petals and stamens ; 2, stamens ; 
3, carpel : — all enlarged. 




!t£S.deLJ.N.EUckIiffv 



"Vine ent Br o o J*sJD ay&. San. L t£ i mp 



J— H«3eve &.C "LoTKioTi. 



Tab. 8265. 

PJRUS Eingo. 

Japan. 

Eosackae. Tribe Pomkab. 
Tykus, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 626. 



Pyrus Ringo, Wenzig in Linnaea, vol. xxxviii. p. 37; affinis P. spectabili, 
Ait., seel foliis maturis ipsis subtus tomentosis latiorilms grossius serratis, 
receptaculo calyceque extra tomentosis, petalis minus rubicundis, fructu 
basi pleramque depresso distincta. 

Arbor parva ramulis junioribus magis minusve tomentosis mox glabratis 
nigro-brunneis. Folia elliptico-ovata, basi rotundata vel brevissime 
cuneata, subacuta vel subacuminata, argute crenato-serrata, 6-10 cm. 
longa, 3-6 cm. lata, matura firmnla, supra juniora parce pilosa, mox 
glabrata, subtus ipsa matura magis minusve tomentosa ; petioli 1-2 cm. 
longi, demum glabri ; stipulae foliaceae, lanceolatae. Corymb* sessiles, 
2-6-flori; bracteae subulatae, lanatae; pedicelli 2-5-3 cm. longi, lanato- 
villosi, demum glabrati. Peceptaculum sub anthesi magis minusve villo- 
sum deinde glabrescens. Calycis laciniae linear i-lanceolatae, acuminatae, 
6-7 mm. longae, utrinque villosulae. Petala late elliptica, breviter ungui- 
culata, alba, in alabastro et extra rubicunda. Styli basi villosi. Fructus 
ovoidei, ad 3 cm. longi, ad 2-5 cm. diametri, flavidi, calyce persistente 
coronati.— Mains Riwjo, Siebold, Catal. Eais. 1856, p. 5 ; Koehne, Deutsche 
Dendrol. p. 260 ; Schneider, Handb. Laubholzk. vol. i. p. 716.— 0. Staff. 



The name Ringo first appeared in Siebold's " Catalogue 
raisonne'" of 1856, which records a considerable number of 
new introductions from Japan. Though we employ here 
for this Japanese Crab the name that accords with the 
treatment of the Pomeae adopted in the " Genera Plantarum," 
it is to be noted that Siebold in the first instance referred 
the Ringo to Mains, and there is much to be said in favour 
of treating the group of forms to which this term is 
applied as a distinct genus ; this treatment is accorded to 
Malus in the recent authoritative works of Koehne and 
Schneider. The latter dendrologist records the examination 
by him of specimens from a tree in the Jardin Plantieres 
the introduction of which is said to be traceable to Siebold, 
and the conclusion to which he has been led is that the 
Ringo represents a cross between P. spectabilis and some 
form of the common apple. 
Jolt, 1909. 



The tree from which the present plate was prepared 
has long been in cultivation at Kew and is now about 14 ft. 
high, and no form of Pyrus m the collection is better worth 
cultivating for the beauty of its fruits than this. These 
hang from the branches in great abundance, and when they 
have acquired the bright yellow colour characteristic of the 
ripe condition, there are few of our smaller trees that make 
so charming an autumn picture. Among the specimens in 
the Kew herbarium there is one from a tree grown in the 
Arboretum which has the general appearance of the Ringo, 
but has leaves tbat, when mature, become glabrous beneath. 
Koehne has described, as P. Ringo fastigiata bifera, another 
variety characterised by a pyramidal habit, and, as regards a 
form with more glabrous leaves than usual, suggests that 
the peculiarity may be due to the presence of a strain of 
P. prunifolia. He describes also a hybrid between P. Ringo 
and P. spectabilis. 

The Ringo requires no special soil or treatment, except 
that like other allied species it is subject to the attacks of 
" American Blight " (Schizoneura lanigera). This, however, 
is easily kept down by an occasional spraying with an 
emulsion of paraffin and soap. 

Description. — Tree, of small size ; young branches more 
or less tomentose, but soon becoming glabrous and dark 
brown. Leave* elliptic-ovate, rounded or shortly cuneate at 
the base, subacute or shortly acuminate, sharply crenate- 
serrate, 1^-4 in. long, 1-2^ in. wide, firm when mature, 
when young sparsely pilose, but soon becoming glabrous 
above, beneath more or less tomentose even when mature ; 
petiole §— § in. long, at length glabrous; stipules leafy, 
lanceolate. Corymbs sessile, 2-6-flowered ; bracts woolly, 
subulate, pedicels 1-1 £ in. long, woolly tomentose, at 
length glabrous. Receptacle more or less villous, becoming 
glabrescent after the petals fall. Calyx-lobes linear-lanceo- 
late, acuminate, 3-4 lin. long, villous on both faces. Petals 
wide elliptic, shortly clawed, nearly white when the flowers 
are fully open, reddish in bud. Styles villous at the base. 
Fruit ovoid, \\ in. long, 1 in. across, yellow, tipped by the 
persistent calyx. 

Fig. 1, flowers ; 2, fruit in longitudinal section : — of natural size. 



8266 




"Bnoanfc Brooks L ay Scnl^imp 



*R«evi3 &.CS London.- 



Tab. 8266. 

MAHONIA ARGTTTA. 

Central America ? 

Bebberideae. Tribe Bebbereae. 

Mahonia, Nutt. ; Benth. et Book. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 43 (sub Berberide) ; 
Fedde in Engl. Bot. Jahrb. vol. xxxi. 1901, p. 30 ; Schneider, III. Handb. 
Laubholzh. vol. i. p. 316. 



Mahonia arguta, Hutchinson in Oard. Chron. 1908, vol. xliii. p. 82 ; affinis 
M. paniculatae, Oerst., sed foliolis angustioribus integris vel dentibus 
spinosis 1-5 munitis, reticulatione utrinque prominente, petalis minoribus 
differt. 

Frutex, ramis glabris. Folia 4-6-juga, quam inflorescentia breviora; rhachides 
sulcatae 8-20 cm. longae; stipulae subulatae, 4-5 mm. longae ; foliola 
lanceolata vel oblongo -lanceolata, subsessilia vel brevissime petiolulata, 

2 ■ 5-9 cm. longa, ■ 5-2 cm. lata, coriacea, spinoso-terminata, integra vel 
1-5-spinoso-dentata, utrinque nitida, venis et venulis utrinque conspicuis. 
Paniculae ad apicem ramorum congestae, suberectae, laxae, 30-40 cm. 
longae, ramulis elongatis 3-4-floris rigidis compressis usque ad 4 cm. 
longis. Bracteae ramorum et pedicellorum ovato-lanceolatae, acutae, 
2-4 mm. longae. Sepala 3 externa parva, elliptica, 3 mm. longa, 3-nervia ; 

3 intermedia et 3 interna oblongo-elliptica, 6 mm. longa, 3 mm. lata. 
Petala 6, oblonga, apice biloba, basi biglandulosa, 4 mm. longa, 3 mm. 
lata. Stamina 6; filamenta 2 mm. longa; antherae 1 # 5 mm. longae. 
Ovarium oblongum, 2 mm. longum. Bacca globosa, 6-8 mm. diametro, 
atro-coerulea.— J. Hutchinson. 



A study of the careful revision by Dr. Fedde of the group 
of species to which the name Mahonia is popularly applied 
leaves little room for doubt that, from the scientific stand- 
point also, this group is more satisfactorily considered 
generically distinct from Berberis proper. The distinctions, 
as pointed out by Fedde, are that in Berberis the leaves are 
simple while the inflorescence springs from the axil of a leaf- 
thorn, whereas in Mahonia the leaves are compound and the 
inflorescence arises from the axil of a winter bud-scale. 
M. arguta, the species now dealt with, is most nearly allied 
to M. paniculata, but is readily distinguished by the narrower, 
entire or few-toothed leaflets which are more prominently 
veined on both surfaces, and by the smaller petals. 
July, 1909. 



The plant from which our figure has been prepared had 
been in cultivation in a warm-house at Grlasnevin for over 
thirty years, and had developed into a tall lanky shrub with 
terminal leaf-tufts. Mr. Moore, to whom we are indebted 
for the material used, and for this information, has been 
unable to trace the history of the plant or to find any clue 
to its native country, but from the fact that the more nearly 
allied forms are all natives of Central America, where they 
occur on the slopes of volcanic mountains in Guatemala and 
Costa Rica at altitudes of from 8,000 to 12,000 ft., it is possible 
that M. arguta may also have originally been obtained from 
this region. In 1906 the plant was removed to a cool airy 
house, and during the summer was placed out of doors, 
being again brought under glass in October. It responded 
to the new treatment by flowering in May, 1907, and again 
in 1908 as a result of a repetition of the treatment of 
wintering in a cool airy house and plunging in the open 
air during summer. Potted in good heavy loam with a 
little sand the plant is now healthy in appearance and is 
making vigorous growth. It is, indeed, possible that in the 
milder parts of Ireland and in the south-west of England 
the species may prove to be hardy. 

Description. — Shrub, branches glabrous. Leaves 4-6- 
jugate, shorter than the inflorescence ; leaf-rachis sulcate, 
3-8 in. long ; stipules subulate, about 2 lin. long ; leaflets 
lanceolate or oblong-lanceolate, subsessile or shortly stalked, 
l-3£ in. long, •£-- 1 in. wide, coriaceous, spine-tipped, entire 
or with 1-5 spinescent teeth, shining on both surfaces and 
with conspicuous secondary nerves and veins. Panicles 
clustered at the tips of the branches, suberect, lax, 12-16 in. 
long, with elongated 3-4-flowered, rigid, compressed branch- 
lets 1-1 J in. long; bracts ovate-lanceolate, acute, 1-2 lin. 
long. Sepals, three outer small, elliptic, 3-uerved, 1J lin. 
long, three intermediate and three inner oblong-elliptic, 
3 lin. long, 1| lin. wide. Petals 6, oblong, with 2-lobed tips, 
2-glandular at base, 2 lin. long, 1^ lin. wide. Stamens 6 ; 
filaments 1 lin. long ; anthers rather shorter. Ovary oblong, 
1 lin. long. Berry globose, \-\ in. across, dark blue. 



Fig. 1, flower; 2, petal and stamen; 3, petal; 4, stamen; 5, pistil:— 
all enlarged. 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OP No. 55, JULY, 1909. 

Tab. 8262.— COELOGYNE VENUSTA, Yunnan. 
„ 8263.— ALOE RUBROLUTEA, Tropical Southwest Africa. 
„ .8264.— RUBUS CANADENSIS, Eastern North America. 
„ 8265.— PYRUS RINGO, Japan. 
„ 8266.— MAHONIA ,ARGUTA, Central America f 
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8261 




MiS.ael.J-.N.'EtL^Wilk 



"VincentBrools Day&Sonlt^imp 



l^lieeve & C^Ioiulon.. 



Tab. 82G7. 
CARALLUMA Nebrownii. 

German South-west Africa. 

AsCLEPIADACEAE. Tribe CEROr-EGIEAE. 
Caralluma, B. Br.; Benth. et Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 782. 



Caralluma Nebrownii, Berger in Natizbl. Bot. Oart. Berlin, vol. iv. p. 249 ; 
species C. lateritiae, N. E. Br., affinis, a qua pedicellis multo longioribus 
corolla intense atro-kermesina rugosiore ct coronae lobis majoribus differt 

Caules succulenti, apbylli, subconferti, erecti, tetragoni, grosse dentati, 8-15 
(vel interdura ad 25) cm. alti, 1-8-3 cm. (dentibus exclusis) crassi, glabri, 
virides vel purpureo-maculati. Flares prope basin ramorum fasciculate 
Pedicelli 4-9 cm. longi, 4-5 mm. crassi, glabri. Sepal a 7-8 mm. longa, 
ovato-lanceolata, acuminata, glabra. Corolla rotata, 9-11 cm. diametro' 
extra laevis, rubro-purpurea, intra granulato-rugosa, intense atro- 
kermesina punctis parvis luteis disco et basi loboram maculata, glabra 
nisi lobis pilis longis clavatis ad apiccm parce ciliatis; discus leviter 
depressus; lobi 3-6-4-3 cm. Iongi, 1-7-1-9 cm. lati, lanceolati, acuminati, 
basi subplani, superne marginibus recurvis. Corona exterior cupularis, 
profunde 5-loba, atrata vel atro-brunnea ; lobi 3 mm. longi, 4-5 mm. lati, 
transverse rectangulari, apice dentati. Coronae interiorin lobi inaequaliter 
bicornuti, enm corona exteriore dorsaliter connexi, atro-bmnnei, cornul.us 
interioribus 4 mm. longis subulatis erectis apice recurvis, exterioribus 
0-5-1-5 mm. longis dentiformibus vel subulatis erectis.— N. E. Brown. 



Caralluma Nebrownii is one of the largest-flowered species 
in the genus, and is most nearly related to C. lateritia, 
N. E. Br., a native of the northern Kalahari desert, from 
which the plnnt now figured differs in having much longer 
pedicels, a more rugose corolla of a blackish-crimson colour 
flecked with very small yellowish spots on the disk and at the 
base of the lobes instead of a uniform brick red ; the corona 
in the present plant is also larger than that of C. lateritia. 
C. Nebrownii is allied also to C. huillensis, Hiern, an 
Angolan species, and to C. lutea, N. E. Br., a species from 
South Africa. In both of these plants the pedicels are 
shorter than in the subject of our plate ; C. huillensis has 
moreover pubescent stems, while in C. lutea the flowers are 
yellow and the stems have a different facies. 
August, 1909. 



The species now described was discovered by Mr. Dinter 
near Barmen in German South-west Africa {Dinter, n. 1502). 
Living plants sent by him to the late Sir Thomas Hanbury 
at La Mortola flowered there in July, 1907, and again in 
November, 1908, when the specimens from which our 
drawing was prepared were forwarded to Kew. The plant 
calls for very dry treatment, more especially in winter, when 
little or no water should be given to it. 

Description.-- Herb ; stems succulent, leafless, somewhat 
clustered, erect, 4-angIed, the angles coarsely toothed, usually 
^-o occasionally 10 in. in height, j-lj in. thick not in- 
cluding the teeth, glabrous, green or blotched with purple. 
lowers fascicled near the bases of the branches ; pedicels 
H-di m. long, 2-3 lines thick, glabrous. Sepals J-J in. 
oT g ;i° Vate " lanceolate > acuminate, glabrous. Corolla rotate, 
^2~H m. across, smooth and reddish-purple outside, within 
rugose-granular and deep blackish-crimson with some small 
yellow specks on the disk and at the base of the lobes, 
sparsely beset with long clavate hairs along the lobes, other- 
wise glabrous ; disk slightly depressed; lobes 1J-1| in. long, 
:! 4 in. across, lanceolate, acuminate, almost flat at the base, 
with the margins higher up somewhat recurved. Outer 
corona cupular, deeply 5-lobed, blackish or blackish -brown, 
tne lobes U lin. long, 2-2£ lin. wide, toothed at the tip, 
transversely rectangular. Inner corona with unequally 

hi I l"? i ] ° beS ' dorsall y united to the outer corona, 
Blackish-brown, the inner horns 2 lin. long, subulate, erect 
and recurved at the tip, the outer under a line long, erect 
subulate or tooth-like. 



3 the^nl'i^r. °; orolla - lob e with four vibratile hairs; 2, a vibratile hair; 

it's attK'Vmio.H- t° na ,' r a stamei b with one of the inner corona-lobes, showing 
wimuit to a lobe of the outer corona ; 5, pollen-masses :— all enlarged. 



8268 




MncentBrQoJfflD^r&SanDtSinf 



• Heev* &.( 



Tab. 8268. 

CYCNOCHES DENSIFLORUM. 

Colombia. 



Oechidaceae. Tribe Vamdeae. 
Cycnoches, Lindl.', Benth, et Movie, f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 552. 



Cycnoches densiflorum, Rolfe in Kew Bull. 1909, p. 63 ; Orch. Rev. 1909, 
p. 104, fig. 9; a 0. Bossiano, Rolfe, racemis maseulis multo brevioribus 
et (lensifloris diversum. 

1I< rha, pseudobulbi crecti, teretes, circa 15 era. longi, vaginis membranaceis 
vestiti. Folia oblongo-lanceolata, acuta vel acuminata, recurva, sub- 
undulata, circa 12-16 cm. longa, 3-4 cm. lata. Fiona monoici. ltacemi 
masculi penduli, multiflori, densiflori, circa 35 cm. longi. Bracteue lanceo- 
latae, acuminatae, membranaceae, circa 1 cm. longae. Pedicelli graciles, 
circa 2 cm. longi. Scpala et petala membranacea, oblongo-lanceolata, 
subacuta, recurva, viridia purpureo-maculata, 2-2 '5 cm. longa. LabeUum 
unguiculatum, circa 1*5 cm. longum; lamina cochlearis, apice longe 
acuminata, margine digitis clavatis vel capitatis utrinque instructa. 
Columna gracilis, incurva, 2 5 cm. longa. fiacemi feminei suberecti, 
breves, biflori, circa 5 cm. longi. Brarteae oblongo-lanceolatae, acutae, 
circa 1*7 cm. longae. Pedicelli crassi, arcuati, circa 4 cm. longi. Sepala 
et petala carnosula, patentia, oblonga, acuta, viridia, 3 5-i '5 cm. longa. 
LabeUum breviter unguiculatum, ovatum, acutum, integrum, crasso- 
eamosum, eburneum, 3 cm. longum, 2 cm. latum, basi callo transverso 
instructum. Columna crassa, clavata, incurva, circa 1-3 cm. longa.— 
C. maculatum, Gard. Chron. 1909, vol. xlv. pp. 26, 27, fig. 19; non Lindl. 
— It. A. Rolfe. 



This remarkable Colombian orchid flowered in the collec- 
tion of the Rev. J. C. B. Fletcher, Mundham Vicarage, 
Chichester, in November, 1908, shortly after having been 
obtained from Messrs. Hugh Low & Co. It appeared 
unexpectedly among some species of Mormodes collected at 
Simacota, near the River Opon, Colombia, by Mr. J. 
Birchenall. It is interesting on account of the great 
diversity between the sexes, which, as in the present 
instance, are occasionally borne together upon the same 
pseudobulb, the females being many times larger and 
heavier than the males, and different not only in the shape 
of the sexual organs, but also in the shape, texture and 
colour of the perianth. The column of the male is long 
and slender, bearing the anther at the summit, while in 
Avgust, 1909, 



the female it is very short and stout, with a pair of 
triangular fleshy wings at the sides of the stigma. The 
lip in the female is a large, ovate, fleshy body, but in 
the male it is reduced to a small circular disk, surrounded by 
a number of clavate marginal appendages. The sepals and 
petals are membranous in the males, and very fleshy in the 
females; the differences in size and colour are weli shown 
in the figure. These differences do not extend equally to 
every species in the genus, nor were they known to be 
differences of sex until comparatively recently, as may be 
seen by the account given at plate 4054 of this work. The 
history of the genus has been reviewed by Mr. Rolfe in a 
recent paper in the Kew Bulletin for 1909 (pp. 268-277). 

Description.—//^, with erect terete pseudobulbs about 
6 in. high, clothed with membranous scales. Leaves oblong- 
lanceolate, acute or acuminate, recurved, somewhat undulate, 
about 5-7 in. long, 1-1£ in, wide. Flowers monoecious. 
Male racemes pendulous, many- and dense-flowered, about 
14 in. long; bracts lanceolate, acuminate, membranous, 
about i m. long; pedicels slender, about § in. long. Sepals 
and petals of male flowers membranous, oblong-lanceolate, 
subacute recurved, greenish with purple blotches, f-1 in. 
ong. Lip of male flowers clawed, about f in. long; the 
lamina cochleate, long acuminate, its margin beset with a 
innge ot clavate or capitate processes. Column of male 
nowers slender, incurved, 1 in. long. Female racemes short, 
suberect, 2-fiowered, about 2 in. long* bracts oblong- 
lanceolate, acute, about § in. long; pedicels stout, curved, 
about i. m. long. Sepals and petals of female flowers 
almost fleshy spreading, oblong, acute, green, 1J-1| in - 
<>ng. Lip ot female flowers clawed, ovate, acute, entire, 
luck and fleshy ivory-white, 1J in. long, $ in. wide, with a 
transverse basal callus. Column of female flowers thick, 
clavate, incurved, about $ in. long. 



flow« g; titoHHiSl Tl e inflor ^cence; 3, a female flower; 4, lip of male 
^ii KM eiSfSLa SketCh ° f - ^^ V^U-U'of natural 



8260 



—'•'-. .. y ( 'V't, 




M.S.<biJNPitch]idi. 



-r-BroQksDay&.SoT,Lt?imp 



L Reeve &.C°LaniinT 



Tab. 8269. 
EKLANGEA tomentosa. 

Tropical East Africa. 



CoMrosiTAE. Tribe Vernomeae. 
Erlangea, Sch.-Bip. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 225. 



Erlangea tomentosa, S. Moore in Journ. Bot. vol. xlvi. p. 158; species E.fuscae, 
S. Moore, afflnis sed foli'is supra viridibus, cymis tomentosis, involucri 
bracteis marginibus scariosis differt. 

Frutex, ultra 1 m. alta, rami's sulcatis parce villoso-tomentosis, ramulis dense 
villoso-tomentosis. Folia oblonga vel oblongo-lanceolata, basi leviter 
rotundata vel cuneata, subacuta, 5-13 cm. longa, 2-4*5 cm. lata, duplo- 
serrata, membrauacea, supra pubescentia, subtus villoso-tomentosa, nervis 
lateralibus utrinque 8-13 subtus conspicuis ; petioli usque ad 3 cm. longi. 
Panicula capitulorum laxe subcorymbosa, circiter 14 cm. diametro. 
Capitula campanulata 1 cm. diametro, lilacina. Pedunculi usque ad 6 cm. 
loDgi. Involucri bracteae 3-4-seriatae, elliptico-ovatae vel lanceolatae, 
acutae vel subacutae, 3-5 mm. longae, 1-2 mm. latae, marginibus scariosis, 
extra villoso-tomentosae. Corollae tubus ultra medium leviter ampliatns, 
arcuatus, 4 mm. longus, lobis lanceolatis 2 mm. longis. Achaeuia sub- 
turbinata, 1 mm. longa, glabra. Pappi setae circiter 2 mm. longae, 
caducissimae. — Bothriocline Schimperi, var. tomentosa, Oliv. et Hiern in Fl. 
Trop. Afr. vol. iii. p. 266. — J. Hutchinson. 



The subject of our plate appears to be a somewhat 
polymorphic species which is rather widely spread in 
Tropical Africa from British East Africa to the Zambesi. 
The genus Erlangea, to which Mr. Moore has referred it, 
differs from the genus Vernonia only in respect of its 
reduced achenes, and in having the pappus reduced to a few 
short, very caducous hairs. Till a few years ago it was 
deemed a monotypic group ; now it is believed to consist of 
at least thirty-two species, several of which, however, had 
formerly been included in Vernonia. With the exception of a 
single species from New Guinea which has been referred to 
this genus all the Erlangeas are African. The nearest 
ally of E. tomentosa is E.fusca, S. Moore, from which, as 
Mr. Hutchinson points out, it is readily distinguished by 
the bright green leaves and the scariously edged involucral 
bracts. 
August, 1909. 



The plant from which the figure now given has been 
prepared was presented to Kew in April, 1907, by Mr. R. 
Diespecker, Adstock House, Winslow, who had raised it 
from seed received from British East Africa. It has formed 
a shrub, in habit much resembling some of the Eupatoriums, 
attaining a height of 5 ft. ; it flowers freely and con- 
tinuously during winter and spring. It admits of easy 
cultivation in a green-house, and requires the treatment 
most suitable for the winter-flowering species of Eupatorium. 

Description. — Shrub, attaining a height of 5 ft., branches 
furrowed and sparingly villous, branch lets densely villous- 
tomentose. Leaves oblong or oblong-lanceolate, base 
cuneate or slightly rounded, apex subacute, 2-5 in. long, 
f-lf in. wide, doubly serrate, membranous, pubescent above, 
villous-tomentose beneath, nerves 8-13 on each side, pro- 
minent beneath; petioles 1-1 \ in. long. Heads lilac, 
campanulate, each about § in. wide, arranged in lax, almost 
corymbose panicles which are about 6 in. across ; peduncles 
2—2^ in. long. Bracts of the involucre 3-4-seriate, from 
elliptic-ovate to lanceolate, acute or subacute, \-% in. long, 
^-1 lin. wide, villous-tomentose outside, and with scarious 
edges. Corolla \ in. long, the tube curved and somewhat 
enlarged beyond the middle, 2 lin. long, the lanceolate lobes 
1 lin. long. Achenes somewhat turbinate, \ lin. long, glab- 
rous. Pappus composed of a few very caducous setae 1 lin. 
lone:. 



Fig. 1, section of a capitulum ; 2, flower; '6, pappus-seta; 4, stamens; 
5, style : — all enlarged. 



8270 




KS.dUa.JTC.K-tdiHth. 



Vmc&ntBroo]<s Day&.Sun.Hfi-uwp 



L.Reeve&.C?LonJn 



Tab. 8270. 
SPIRAEA Henryi. 

Central China. 

Eosaceae. Tribe Spireae. 
Spiraea, Linn. ; Benth. et LTook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 611, 



Spiraea (Chamaedryon) Henryi, Ilemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxiii. 
p. 225, t. 6; J. II. Veitch in Journ. Roy. Bort. Soc. vol. xxviii. (1903) p. Gl ; 
species S. canescenti, J). Don, accedens sed foliis majoribus nee molliter 
tomentosis facillime distinguenda ; S. pubescenti, Turcz., sirailior sei 
corymbis compositis statim distincta; S. Wilsoni, Duthie, proxima sed 
pedunculis pedicellisque pilosis differt. 

Fmtex, laxe patuleque ramosissimus, l - 75-2m. altus, ramulis foliiferis anno- 
tinis parce pilosis, demum glabreseentibtis vel glabris, ranmlis floriferis 
graciliusculis glabrescentibus. Folia in ramis baud floriferis 6-9 cm. 
longa, breviter petiolata, oblanceolata, supra glabra vel parco pilosa, subtus 
pubescentia, subcoriacea, supra medium 3-7-dentata, ceterum integra ; 
in ramis floriferis minora, 2-4 cm. longa, obovata vel oblonga interdum 
truncata apice saepius 3-7-dentata nonnunquam integra. Flores mediocres 
6-7 mm. lati, in corymbis compositis 5 cm. latis, ramulos breves ramornm 
anni praecedentis terminantibus ; podunculi pedicellique pilosi. Fetala 
orbicularia, alba. Calyx 5-lobatus, lobis triangulis integris mucronulatis. 
Ovaria parce pi'osa, 2-ovulata. Frudus in corymbis dispasiti ; carpel I a 5, 
matura 3 mm. longa, membranacea, latere ventrali debiscentia. — W. J. Bean. 



Spiraea Henryi was discovered bj Mr. A. Henry in 
Hupeh, near Ichang, in 1885, and later in Szechuen, but 
for its introduction to cultivation our gardens are indebted 
to Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons of Chelsea, whose collector, 
Mr. E. H. Wilson, found it in 1900, also in Hupeh. It 
belongs to the section Chamaedryon (Ser. in DC. Prodr. ii. 
p. 542), and, like many of its allies, is a very charming 
acquisition. Among older species it is most closely related 
to S. canescens, D. Don, and its flowers, as in that species, 
are arranged in rounded corymbs on the upper side of long 
arching branches; its nearest ally is, however, *S. IVHsoni, 
Duthie (Hort. Veitch. p. 379), which is also described as 
having the peduncles and pedicels covered with silky hairs, 
but is in reality almost glabrous. In mid- June, 1908, it 
was one of the most beautiful deciduous shrubs in flower 
at Kew. Mr. Henry observes that its leaves are used by 
the poorer natives as a substitute for tea. 
August, 1909. 



The plant from which our figure was taken was obtained 
from Messrs. Veitch in 1905. Since then it has grown 
excellently in a border of loamy soil, and is now a bush 
7 ft. high and 10 ft. in diameter. Having passed through 
the winter of 1908-9 without any injury, the species may 
be regarded as absolutely hardy. It can be increased by 
means of cuttings made from half-ripened wood. From the 
cultivator's point of view, shrubby Spiraeas may be divided 
into two great groups, viz. those that blossom on the shoots 
of the current year, and those that do so on the shoots of 
the previous one. S. Ilenryi belongs to the latter. What- 
ever pruning, therefore, may be necessary, should be done 
as soon as the flowers are past, and it should be a process of 
thinning out rather than a general shortening back of the 
branches, the leading idea being to produce long, uncrowded 
branches, and, by preserving a loose, open habit, thereby to 
display to the best advantage the numerous white corymbs 
with which they will in due time be garnished. 

Description.— Shrub, of lax, spreading habit, 7 to 8 ft., 
or perhaps more, high ; branches sparsely pilose the first 
season, glabrous or nearly so the second. Leaves on the 
barren shoots 2|-3| in. long, oblanceolate, glabrous or 
slightly pilose above, tomentose beneath, coarsely dentate 
near the apex ; those of the flowering shoots smaller, J-l| 
in. long, obovate or oblong, usually with three to seven 
teeth at the apex, but occasionally entire. Flowers \ in. in 
diameter, produced in compound corymbs 2 in. across, which 
are terminal on short twigs springing from the branches of 
the previous year ; peduncles and pedicels pilose. Petals 
white, orbicular. Calyx with five triangular lobes. Ovary 
pilose, two-ovuled. Fruit in corymbs ; carpels 5, -J- in, long 
when mature, membranaceous, dehiscing ventrally. 

Fig 1, flower; 2, section of ditto; petals remove .1 : 3, carpel; 4, fruit; 
o, single fruit :— all except 4 enlarged. 




8271 



KS.a*LJN.fltchlith. 



A&^entBroolssJ3a.y&San-Tjt*irci|s 



L.Rfieve &_C?LaruLm. 



Tab. 8271.- 

AG-AVE Wrightit. 

Central America. 

Amakyllidaceae. Tribe Agaveae. 
Agave, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 738. 



Agave (Littaea) "Wrightii, J. !•'. Drumm.; species e grege A. g>- mini florae, 
Scannag., a qua foliis subulatis nee super basem linearibus augusteque 
loratis et laevigatis nee sulcato-striatis, perigoniique lobis baud purpura- 
scentibus conspicue differt ; A. un-gustissimae, Engelm., et A. Knight ianae, 
J. R. Drumm., maxime afflnis; ab ilia ob folioruw basem in pulvinum 
valde incrassatum, partem vero apicalera ad marginem utramque canalicu- 
latam et antheras aureas nee purpureas distinguenda; a hac filamentis 
baud coloratis, foliorumque basi latiore magis gibboso recedit. 

Truncus perbrevis, foliis numerosis modice congestis rosulatim dispositis 
vestitus. Folia carnoso-coriacea, subulata, 40-45 cm. longa, basi primum 
tenui lateral iter dilatato mox antice gibboso, postice leviter excavato, 
ultimum in pulvinum obliquum expanso, ad 3 cm. ultra imam basem in 
collum contracta, dein ad apicem argutissimum in s-pinam vix 1 cm. longam 
abeuntem attenuata; ima basi 3-5 cm., pulvini medio fere 4 cm., collo 
2-25 cm., laminae verae medio vix 0-5 cm. lata; pulvini medio 2*5 cm., 
collo 1*5 cm., laminae verae medio vix 2 mm. ciassa; facie anteriora sub- 
carinate convexa, obtuse et irregulariter pauci-sulcata, facie posterior© 
primum carinate convexa mox propter laminae margines plus minusve 
involutas mediumque simulac obtuse costatnm versus marginem utramque 
canaliculata ; utrinque laevigata, laete viridia sed maculis minutis albidis 
numerosis notata; ipsis marginibus subcorneis snbfulvidis primum integns 
per aetatem in filamentis paucis remotioribus dilacerata. Scapus ad 3 m. 
altus, pedunculo 1 m. longo bracteis subscariosis tunc acicularibus 6-9 cm. 
longis instructo. Flora geminati in spicam 2 m. longam digesti ; pedicelli 
doliiformes, perbreves. Perigonii lold margine pallide lactei, ceterum 
viridescentes, ultra 1 • 5 cm. longi, 6 mm. lati, medio subcarinati ; perigonii 
tubus 1-25 cm. longus, inferne parum constrictus ibique 0'25 cm. latus. 
Stamina fere recta, 6 cm. longa, filamentis albidis, antheris luteis basi 
demum 2-fidis. Ovarium 1'25 cm. longum ; stylus 6 cm. longus. — 
J. R. Drummond. 

The subject of our plate is a member of the Littaea section 
of Agave and is allied to A. geminiflora, Scannag. (Littaea 
geminiflora, Tagliabue), the species on which the genus 
Littaea was originally based. The plant now figured was 
acquired for Kew from the collection of Mr. T. H. Kellock 
in 1903 under the name A. Taylori. That it is not the 
true A. Taylori, Hort. Williams (Grard. Chron. 1874, vol. i. 
p. 418)— which is stated (Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. viii. p. 621, 
August, 1909. 



fig. 125, and Baker, Handb. Amarylfid. p. 186) to be a 
garden hybrid whereof A. geminiflora is one parent and 
A. filamentosa is probably the other — was at once recognised, 
and our plant was therefore tentatively treated as possibly a 
variant of A. geminiflora until it flowered in the Mexican 
House at Kew in November, 1908. Mr. C. H. Wright, by 
whom the plant was then examined, found it to differ from 
A. geminiflora in the colour of its flowers as well as in its 
leaves, which are smooth and subulate in place of being 
narrowly loriform and striate. It appeared to Mr. Wright 
that its nearest ally is A. angustissima, Engelm., first 
named, but not then fully characterised (Trans. St. 
Louis Acad. Sc. vol. iii. p. 306) in 1876, but that it is 
specifically distinct from Engelmann's plant. A comparison 
with specimens to which Dr. Trelease has attached the name 
A. angustissima, and a study of the figure and description 
of that species supplied by Dr. J. N. Rose (Garden and 
Forest, vol. iii. pp. 5 and 6) in 1893 have satisfied Mr. 
Drummond that Mr. Wright's conclusions are justified. 
Though allied to A. angustissima, A. Wrightii differs from 
that plant by the shorter, less constricted perianth-tube, by 
the yellow in place of purple anthers, by the less flattened 
leaf-blade which has the upper face channelled inside either 
margin, by the broader leaf-neck and by the much wider 
and much more abruptly shouldered leaf-base. As regards 
floral structure, Mr. Drummond points out that A. Wrightii 
approaches most closely to the plant figured as A. gemini- 
flora (Bot. Eeg. t. 1145) in 1828 ; from that plant 
A. Wrightii is readily distinguished by its much wider and 
more gibbous leai-base ; but, except in having white in 
place of coloured filaments, hardly differs as regards flowers. 
The plant thus depicted by Lindley is not, however, A. 
geminiflora, Scannag., and to distinguish it Mr. Drummond 
suggests the employment of the name A. Knightiana. It 
may be added that this species has remained not only 
unnamed, but undescribed, for the description associated 
with it in the Botanical Register has not been based on, 
and does not apply to, the plant there figured, but has been 
taken, unmodified, from the reprint in the second volume of 
the Journal of Science (1817) of the original account of 
Littaea geminiflora published by Tagliabue (Bibl. Ital. vol. i. 
p. 9) in 1816. 



Description. — Trunk short, hidden by the rather close 
rosette. Leaves between fleshy and leathery, somewhat 
flexible, more or less erect when young, at length drooping, 
16-18 in. long, tapering evenly to a fine point tipped with 
a short stoutish spine, from a gibbous base 1^ in. wide at 
its origin, 1^ in. wide at the shoulder whence it is_ gradually 
rounded to "the unconstricted neck, nearly 1 in. thick ; 
lower surface uniformly triangular-convex, bluntly keeled 
with a few irregular blunt creases ; upper surface for 
about 4^ in. above the neck depressed-convex with a blunt 
somewhat obliquely placed keel, above shallowly channelled 
with a rounded ultimately obsolete central ridge ; smooth 
and dull apple-green flecked with minute white spots on both 
surfaces; margins sharp without teeth or prickles, but with 
a fine horny border ultimately shredding into hair-like 
whitish filaments. Scape about 10 ft. high, peduncular 
portion about 3 ft. long, with involute acicular more or less 
scarious bracts about 2§ in. long gradually diminishing 
from the base upwards. Flowers in pairs arranged in a 
rather dense spike about 7 ft. long, on very short barrel- 
shaped pedicels, bracteolate. Perianth lobes about 8 lin. 
long, 3 lin. wide, revolute, dark green with creamy-white 
borders ; tube 5-6 lin. long, little constricted. ^ Stamens 
subulate ; filaments almost colourless, nearly 2 J in. long ; 
anthers bright yellow, their cells at length free at the base. 
Ovary oylindric, 5-6 lin. long ; style 2 J in. long. 



Figs. 1 and 2, anthers ; 3, apex of style, and stigma ; 4, sketch of entire 
plant, showing habit :— 1-3 enlarged, 4 much reduced. 



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Tab. 8272. 

APHELANDRA tetragon. 

Tropical South America. 

Acanthaceae. Tribe Aphelandeeae. 
Aphelandra, IL Br.; Benth. el Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1102. 



Aphelandra tetragona, Nets in DC. Prodr. vol. xi. p. 295; ab A. puldu-rrimu , 
Kunth, quacum olim confusa erat, foliis basi minus decurrentibus subtus 
parce pubescentibus vel fere glabris, minime tomentosis, corollis majoribus 
distincta. 

Fruticans ramis teretibus fistulosis ad 1 cm. crassis glabris. Folia ovato- 
lanceolata vel late ovato-elliptica, basi lata et breviter cuneatim decur- 
rentia vel cuneatim attenuata, apice longiuscula vel breviter acuminata, 
margine leviter undulato-crenata, 20-25 cm. longa, 10-15 cm. lata, 
papyracea, supra glabra, infra in gemma albido-pubescentia, citissime 
glabrescentia ; petiolus 4-5 cm. longus. Spicae ad apices ramorum 
1-3-5-nae, terminalis ad 15 cm. longa, corollis demptis 1 cm. crassae, 
densissimae; bracteae ovatae, acutae vel subacuminatae, 10-12 mm. longae, 
viridi-brunnescentes, subcoriaceae, ima basi albo-lanatae, secundum mar- 
gines villoso-ciliatae, caeterum glabrae, inferne prominule-striatae, 
glandulis obscuris ; bracteolae lanceolatae, albo-villosae, 1 cm. longae. 
Sepal* scariosa, lanceolata, acuta, 13 mm. longa, apice subvillosa. Corolla 
pulcherrime coccinea, puberula ; tubus supra basin constrictus, deinde 
sensim ad os ampliatus, hie circiter 6-8 mm. latus; labium superum 2 en 
longum, bifidum, lobis acutissimis 6 mm. longis; labium inferum ex ovato 
longe attenuatum, 22-24 mm. longum, explanation 9 mm. latum, lobis 
lateralibus ad marginem 2 mm. latum superne in dentulum productr a 
redactis. Antherae 7 mm. longae, in dorso minute pilosulae. — A. tetragona, 
var. imperialis, Wittmack in Gartenflora, vol. xl. p. 449, t. 1354. Justicia 
tetragona, Vahl. Symb. vol. iii. p. 5. J. cristata, Jacq. Hort. Schoenbr. 
vol. iii p. 38, t. 320.— O. Stapp. 



Aphelandra tetragona, as here figured, is a native of 
G-uiana and Venezuela, which has long been in cultivation 
at Kew. It is, without doubt, the species described by 
Vahl in 1794 as Justicia tetragona, from specimens collected 
by Dr. Rohr near Cayenne, and is exactly the plant figured 
by Jacquin in 1798 as Justicia cristata, though it is some- 
what uncertain as to whether it be the plant figured as 
Aphelandra cristata at t. 1578 of this work. The plant 
September, 1909. 



represented on that plate agrees precisely with specimens 
from Trinidad, Tobago and British Guiana, all of which 
have bracts that are only half the size of those in the plant 
now depicted, have quite short flowering spikes and have 
uniformly smaller leaves. 

At Kew A. tetragona is grown in a tropical house. It 
flowers at various seasons according to the age of the plant 
and the treatment it is given ; the plant from which the 
present figure was made flowered in September, 1908, but 
an even finer example came into flower in May, 1909, the 
head of flowers, borne on a single stem nearly 4 ft. high, 
consisting of 13 spikes, each from 4-7 in. long. The 
plant in question was two years old, and had been raised 
from a cutting ; older plants do not flower so well. A rich 
loamy soil and an abundant supply of water at the roots, 
with a tropical temperature, are the most suitable conditions. 

Description. — Shrubby; branches round, hollow, smooth, 
up to § in. thick. Leaves ovate-lanceolate to widely ovale- 
elliptic, abruptly narrowed to a cuneate or decurrent base, 
apex shortly or considerably acuminate, margin faintly 
undulate-crenate, 8-10 in. long, 4-6 in. wide, papery, 
glabrous above, whitish pubescent in bud, but soon becomes 
glabrous beneath ; petiole If— 2 in. long. Spikes usually 
3-5-nate, occasionally solitary, rarely 9-13-nate at the ends 
of the branches, the terminal 6-7 in. long, f in. thick 
without the corollas, very dense; bracts ovate, acute or 
snbacuminate, 5-6 lin. long, greenish-brown, firm, woolly 
white at the base and villous along the margins, else- 
where glabrous, markedly striate below, faintly glandular ; 
bracteoles lanceolate, white villous, 5 lin. long. Sepals 
scarious, lanceolate, acute, ^ in. long, slightly villous at the 
tips. Corolla brilliant pink, puberulous; tube narrowed 
above the base, thence gradually widening to the limb and 
there 3-4 lin. wide ; upper lip § in. long, bifid, lobes acute, 
3 lin. long ; lower lip gradually narrowed from a wide 
limb, f-1 in. long, 4-5 lin. wide, the lateral lobes reduced 
to a margin 1 lin. wide, ending upwards in a small tooth. 
Anthers 3-4 lin. long, finely pilose on the back. 



o» K |ar«irf braCtj 2 ' bracteole ; 3 ' flower ; 4 , anther; 5, ovary; 6, stigma:— 



8Z73 




MS.delJ.N.Ktchlith 



Vincent BrooKS Dayi Son I - 



i Reeve &_ C ° Loi. cfcm. 



Tab. 8273. 
MEG-ACLINIUM purpureorachis. 

Congo. 



Orchidaceae. Tribo Kpidevdreae. 
Megaclinium, Lindl.; Benth, et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 505. 



Megaclinium purpureorachis, Wildem. Not. PL Utiles, Congo, p. 126; Etude* 
Fl. Bas et Moyen Congo, vol. i. pp. 116, 235, t. 29 ; Rol/e in Orch. Bev. 
1909, p. 155 ; Card. Chron. 1909, toI. xlv. p. 293, fl«r. 126 ; a M. vmximo, 
Lindl., foliis et rhachi fere duplo latioribus et floribus scabrido-velntinis 
distinctum. 

Ilerba epiphytica, rhizomate crasso lignoso. Pseudobvlbi elliptico-oblongi, sub- 
compressi, 6-8 cm. longi, 2 5-3 5 cm. lati, diphylli, basi vaginis ovatis 
conduplicatis membranaceis striatis obtecti. Folia subsessilia, oblonga vel 
elliptico-oblonga, subobtnsa, coriacea, 20-30 cm. longs, 4-6 cm. lata, subtus 
minute nigro-puncticulata. Scapi laterales, validi, suberccti, 30-35 cm. 
longi, basi vaginis ochreatis numerosis obtecti; rbachis complanatus, latns, 
subtortus, undulatus, copiose purpureo-punctatus, scabrido-pnberulus, 
15-20 cm. longus, 3-4 cm. latus, multiflorus ; bracteae ovatae vol ovato- 
oblongae, apiculatae velacuminatae, apice recurvae, basi ntrinque transverse 
decurrentes, 8-10 mm. longae; pedicelli circa 4 mm longi. Floret brunnei, 
extus scabrido-velutini. Sepalwn posticum ovato-oblongum, subacutnm, 
concavum, incurvum, apice reflexum, circa 8 mm. longuin; sepala lateralia 
obliqua, triangnlari-ovata, acuminata, apics falcata, circa 8 mm. longa. 
Petala lineari-falcata, acuminata, 5-6 mm. longa ; labellum orbiculari- 
ovatum; recurvum, obtusum, complanatum, 4 mm. longum. Columna 
lata, 4 mm. longa ; dentes validi, apice bidentati. Capsulae oblongae, circa 
2-5 cm. longae. — M. Bufo, Hort., Gard. Chron. 1909, vol. xlv. p. 239; non 
Lindl. — R. A. Rolfe. 



Megaclinium purpureorachis, much the largest species of 
this genus yet known, was first met with by Mr. G-entil on 
the Upper Lomami, a tributary of the Congo, in January, 
1903, and was described and figured by Professor de 
Wildeman from fruiting specimens. The flowers remained 
unknown until September, 1908, when the plant from 
which our plate has been prepared came into flower at 
the Royal Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, whence material 
was supplied by Mr. Moore. A plant was subsequently 
exhibited by Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., at a meeting of 
the Royal Horticultural Society in April, 1909 ; in this 
instance under the name M. Bufo. It is, however, very 
different from the plant thus designated, which was 

September, 1909. 



described by Lindley from the inflorescence only, and 
which has recently reappeared in cultivation. The 
nearest ally of the plant now described is M. maximum, 
Lindl., a species figured at t. 5936 of this work under the 
name M. marmoratum, Lindl. The present species is 
readily distinguished from M. maximum by its considerably 
larger size and its very hairy brown flowers. Mr. Moore 
informs us that the plant from which our material was 
derived was obtained from Messrs. Sander and Sons in 1905 ; 
it thrives vigorously in an intermediate house, with a 
minimum night temperature of 55° F. ; it requires light, 
and has to be grown close to the glass. The strong stiff 
rhizome does not bend readily ; it is therefore advisable to 
grow the plant in fairly shallow pans rather than pots. 
A few chopped oak-leaves added to the compost appear to 
encourage growth. 

Description. — Herb, epiphytic, rhizome stout, woody ; 
pseudobulbs elliptic-oblong, somewhat flattened, 2g-3 in. 
long, 1-1^ in. wide, 2-foliate, the base clothed with 
membranous striate ovate conduplicate sbeaths. Leaves 
subsessile, oblong or elliptic-oblong, rather obtuse, 
coriaceous, 8-12 in. long, l|-2 in. wide, finely dark- 
punctate beneath. Scapes lateral, stout, suberect, 12-14 
in. long, clothed at the base with numerous ochreate 
sheaths ; rachis broad, flattened, undulate and slightly 
spirally twisted, freely dotted with purple spots and 
scabridly puberulous, 6-8 in. long, l^-l^ in. wide, many- 
flowered ; bracts ovate or ovate-oblong, apiculate or 
acuminate, recurved at the tips, their bases transversely 
decurrent on both sides, 4-5 lin. long; pedicels about 2 lin. 
long. Flowers brown, scabridly velvety outside ; posterior 
sepal ovate-oblong, subacute, concave, incurved with a 
reflexed tip, about 4 lin. long ; latei'al sepals oblique, 
triangular-ovate, acuminate, with their tips falcate, about 
4 lin. long. Petals linear-falcate, acuminate, 2^-3 lin. 
long; lip orbicular-ovate, recurved, obtuse, flattened, 2 lin. 
long. Column broad, 2 lin. long; teeth distinct, 2-fid at 
the tip. Capsule oblong, about 1 in. long. 



Fig. 1, a flower; 2, the same, sepals removed; 3, anther-cap; 4, pollinia: — • 
all cnluryed. 



8274 




KS.delJ.FJ5[ttWitK 



"Vine ent Brc dlo^D ay & SonE 'Amp 



Tab. 8274. 

EXOSTEMMA subcordatum. 

West Indies. 

Eubiaceae. Tribe Cinchoneae. 
Exostemma, Rich. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 42. 



Exostemma subcordatum, Krug et Urban in Urb. Symb. Antttl. vol. i. p. 421 ; 
affinis E. florihundo, Boem. et Schult., sed foliis subcordatis calycis- 
que segmentis longioribus differt. 

Frutex, 2-3 m. altus (Jacquemont'). Rami teretes, juniores brevissime vel 
minutissime puberuli, demum glabri, cortice cinereo. Folia ovata vel 
ovato-lanceolata, basi plus minusve subcordata, apice acuminata, 5-8 cm. 
longa, 2 - 5-4 cm. lata, margine revoluta, tenuiter coriacea, utrinque 
minutissime puberula, nervis lateralibus utrinque 6-8 supra impressis 
subtus elevatis; stipulae ovato-triangulares, acutae, 3 mm. longae. Inflo- 
rescentia terminalis, laxe subcorymbosa ; ramuli puberuli ; pedicelli 6-8 mm. 
longi, graciles; bracteae lineares vel subulatae. Receptaculum elongato- 
ellipsoideum, minute puberulum. Calycis segmenta linearia, obtusa vel 
subacuta, 5-8 mm. longa, fere glabra. Corolla alba ; tubus anguste cylindri- 
cus, 1*5-2 cm. loDgus, extus glaber ; lobi lineares, obtusi, circiter 2 5 cm. 
longi, 2 mm. lati. Filamenta filiformial'o cm. longa; antherae exsertae, 
fiavae, 1 cm. longae. Stylus exsertus, gracilis, 4-5 cm. lougus, glaber ; 
stigma ovoideum. Fructus oblongo-obovoideus, circiter 12 mm. longus, 
superne 5 mm. diametro. — J. Hdtchinson. 



The genus Exostemma includes nearly forty described 
species, whereof twenty are known to occur in the West 
Indies, chiefly in Cuba. E. subcordatum, the species now 
figured is, however, a native of San Domingo, and is met 
with in the more mountainous parts of that island. The 
plant from which our plate has been prepared was presented 
to Kew in 1903 by Professor Hansen, Director of the 
Botanic Gardens, Gh'essen, under the name E. floribundum, to 
which species it is indeed most nearly allied, but from which 
it chiefly differs, as Mr. Hutchinson points out, in having 
longer calyx-segments ; from this and all other known 
species of the genus it is, moreover, readily distinguished 
by its subcordate leaves. Under cultivation the Kew plant 
has formed a loosely-growing shrub about 3 ft. high ; 
it flowers freely in autumn, the flowers being pure white 
September, 1909. 



and very fragrant. It thrives well in a tropical house 
under the treatment suitable for Ixoras. Two other 
members of the genus are in cultivation ; these are 
E. caribaeum, Roem. and Schult., and E. longiflorwn, Roem. 
and Schult. ; the latter has been figured at t. 4186 of this 
work. 

Description. — Shrub, as grown at Kew about 3 ft. high, 
according to Jacquemont attaining in the wild state a height 
of 10 ft. ; branches terete, when young shortly puberulous, 
at length becoming glabrous ; bark grey. Leaves ovate or 
ovate-lanceolate, more or less subcordate at the base, acumi- 
nate at the apex, margin revolute, 2-3 in. long, 1-1^- in. 
wide, thinly leathery, finely puberulous above and below ; 
lateral nerves 6-8-paired, somewhat depressed above, 
prominent beneath ; stipules ovate-triangular, acute, 1^ Iin. 
long. Inflorescence terminal, leafy, subcorymbose ; branchlets 
puberulous ; pedicels slender, 3-4 lin. long ; bracts linear 
or subulate. Receptacle long ellipsoid, finely puberulous. 
Calyx-lobes linear, obtuse or subacute, 3-4 lin. long, almost 
glabrous. Corolla white, fragrant ; tube narrowly cylindric, 
£-§ in. long, glabrous outside ; lobes linear, obtuse, about 
1 in. long, 1 lin. wide. Stamens far exserted ; filaments 
filiform, 8 lin. long ; anthers yellow, 5 lin. long. Style far 
exserted, slender, glabrous, l|-2 in. long ; stigma ovoid. 
Fruit oblong-obovoid, nearly ^ in. long, about £ in. wide at 
the apex. 

Fig. 1, calyx and pistil ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, stigma :— all enlarged. 



8Z75 




M.S.de!.J.N.Fi.tch.lTth 



Vince.ntBraoks,Day ScSan.Lt2i.mp 



L Reeve <Jt.C'.'LandoiL 



Tab. 8275. 
EUPHORBIA Ledibnii. 

South Africa. 

Epphorbiaceae. Tribe Euphobbieae. 
Euphorbia, Linn. ; Benth, et HooJc.f. Oen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 258. 



Euphorbia Ledienii, Berger, Sukkulente Euphorb. p. 80 ; affinis E. coerulescenti, 
Haw., sed ramis 5-7-angulatis remote et leviter (nee forte) constrictis et 
spinis minoribus facile distinguenda. 

Frutex succulentus, ramosus, cito apbyllus, 1 m. vel ultra altus, omnino glaber. 
Rami acute 5-7-angulati, 3 "5-5 "8 cm. crassi, leviter constricti, constric- 
tionibus 7*5-20 cm. distantibus; anguli ad acies haud vel leviter vel 
interrupte indurati ; sulci inter angulos concavi. Folia minuta, squami- 
formia, 1 mm. longa, 2 mm. lata, late rotundata, evanida. Spiruu bioae, 
divergentes, 3-7 mm. longae, brunneae, demum cinereae, intervallis 
1-2 cm. longis dispositae. Cymae involucra 3 gerentes, eaepe plures in 
axilla singula aggregatae, brevissime pedunculatae. Pedunculi 2 mm. 
longi. Bracteae squamiformes, 1-2 mm. longae, late rotundatae vel 
oblongae et subtruncatae, apice minute denticulatae. Involucra 3-4 mm. 
longa, obconica, truncata, glabra, lutea, centrale masculum, lateralia 
bisexualia, glandulae transverse oblongae, integrae, 0*6 mm. longae, 
1*5 mm. latae; lobi quadrati, fimbriato-dentati. Ovarium glabrum; 
stylus ad medium trifidus, ramis crassis linearibus apice emarginatis vel 
minute bifidis obtusis. — N. E. Brown. 



The plant from which the figure of Euphorbia Ledienii 
now given has been prepared is one that has been in 
cultivation in the succulent house at Kew since 1868, when 
it was presented by the late Admiral Sir A. Milne, along 
with various other South African succulent and bulbous 
plants received by him from Mr. Morrison. Another 
example of the species, now in the Kew collection, was 
acquired by purchase from Mr. A. Bennecke in 1893. The 
same species is said, however, to have been in the collection 
of Mr. W. W. Saunders at Reigate in 1866, and according to 
Mr. Berger, who first vindicated its right to specific rank in 
1907, E. Ledienii is not uncommon in Continental gardens. 
Its nearest ally, among the species at present in cultivation, 
appears to be E. coerulescens, Haw., from which, as Mr. 
Brown points out, it differs by its more numerous and less 
September, 1909. 



sinuous angles, its more distant and less marked constric- 
tions, and its shorter spines. Like the other species of 
Euphorbia which share its habit, it grows very slowly, but 
it flowers freely every year in late autumn under ordinary 
tropical conditions. 

Description. — Shrub, succulent, branching, soon leafless, 
3 ft. or more high, quite glabrous. Branches sharply 5-7- 
angled, 1^—3 in. thick, slightly narrowed at intervals of 
from 3-8 in. ; angles not or only slightly and at intervals 
hardened along the edge ; grooves between the angles 
rounded concave. Leaves minute and scale-like, \ lin. long, 
1 lin. wide, wide rounded, soon disappearing. Spines in 
pairs, divergent, 2-4 lin. long, brown at first but becoming 
ash-grey, the pairs -|-§ in. apart. Cymes bearing each 
three involucres, usually several in each axil, clustered, their 
stalks about 1 lin. long; bracts scale-like, ^-1 lin. long, 
wide rounded or oblong and slightly truncate, minutely 
denticulate at the tip. Involucres l-g-2 lin. long, obconic, 
truncate, glabrous, yellow ; central male ; lateral bisexual ; 
glands transversely oblong, entire, about \ lin. long, I lin. 
wide ; lobes quadrate, fimbriately toothed Ovary glabrous; 
style trifid to the middle, its arms thick, linear, obtuse and 
emarginate or shortly bifid at the tip. 



Fig. 1, a cyme ; 2, longitudinal section of an involucre ; 3, lobe of involucre ; 
4, male flower, with bracteoles ; 5, entire plant, showing habit :— 1-4 enlarged, 
5 much reduced. 



8276 



% 




c3i 

JtS.daLJtTEtcJLlifli. 



Vincent Brooks Day&SonWSinp 



LReeve ScC9LanScn 



Tab. 8276. 
PELIOSANTHES violacea, var. Clarkei. 

South-eastern Asia. 



Haemodoraceae. Tribe Ophtopogojjeae. 
Peliosanthes, Andr.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. Hi p 678 



Peliosanthes violacea, var. Clarkei, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc vol. xvii. 
p. 504 ; Hook.f. Flor. Brit. hid. vol. vi. p. 266 ; a typo floribus atropurpureis 
differ! 

Ilerba, rhizoma breve. Folia oblongo-lanceolata, acuminata, ad 30 em. longa, 
6 cm. lata, glaberrima, margiuibus corneis leviter crenulatis ; nervi 
primarii circa 20; nervi transversi numerosi.eonspicui; petiolus 12-30 cm. 
Jongus ; vaginae basilares membranaceae, brunneae. Bacemi circa 15 cm. 
longi ; flores solitares, atropurpurei ; bracteae oblongae, acnmiuatae, quam 
pedicelli longiores. Perianthium aperte campamilatuni, 1 cm. diametro ; 
tubus 6-sulcatus; lobi oblongi, apice rotundati. Antherae ovatae, basi 
bilobae. Ovarium conicum; stylus columnaris, trisulcatus. — P. violacea, 
Eidl. Journ. Str. Br. Eoy. As. Soc. vol. xxxi. p. 96.— C. H. Weight. 



The genus Peliosanthes includes about a dozen species, all 
of which are natives of South-eastern Asia. Three of these 
have already been figured in this work ; P. Teta, Andr., at 
t. 1302, P. humilis, Andr., at t. 1532, and P. albida, Baker, 
at t. 7110. The first of these, which has its flowers fascicled 
in the axils of the bracts, has an unusually wide range ; it 
extends from the Eastern Himalaya throughout Western 
Indo-China to the Malayan Peninsula ; throughout this area 
it is subject to remarkably little variation. Among those 
species in which the flowers are solitary in the axils of the 
bracts, that compose the bulk of the genus, the only one 
which is credited with an equally wide range is P. violacea, 
Wall. In the case of this species, however, Mr. Baker 
recognises, in addition to the typical form, which has a deep 
violet perianth and is found in the Eastern Himalaya and 
in the mountains of Assam to the east of the Brahmaputra 
river, also extending to Lower Burma, three distinct 
varieties. Two of these, var. minor, with small green 
flowers and leaves that are only 5-7-nerved, and var. 
Septembee, 1909. 



princeps, a raore robust plant than typical P. violacea, also 
with greenish flowers, are suspected by Mr. Ridley to be 
distinct from P. violacea. The third variety, recognised by 
Mr. Baker as var. Clarkei, which extends from the Khasia 
Hills in Assam southwards to the Malay Peninsula, and 
which is here figured, is believed by Mr. Ridley (Materials 
for a Flora of the Malayan Peninsula, pars ii. p. 89) to be 
the plant intended by Mr. Baker as P. violacea proper. 
This is not, however, the case, for while it is possible that 
Dr. Wallich did not consider these two forms, which hardly 
differ in morphological characters, to be distinct, the name 
P. violacea is restricted by Mr. Baker to the form with 
deep violet perianth ; the form with dark-purple perianth 
here figured is kept apart by Mr. Baker as var. Clai^kei. 
The plant now depicted was presented to Kew by Mr. 
Ridley in 1904; it had been obtained by him in Perak. 
It flowers annually in a tropical house, usually in April, 
and is one of the most attractive of the species of Pelio- 
santhes cultivated at Kew. 

Description. — Herb, rootstock short. Leaves oblong- 
lanceolate, acuminate, reaching 1 ft. in length, 2^ in. wide, 
quite glabrous, margins cartilaginous, slightly crenulate ; 
main nerves about 20 ; transverse veins numerous, con- 
spicuous; petiole 5-12 in. long; basilar-sheaths membra- 
nous, brown. Racemes about 6 in. long ; flowers solitary, 
dark purple; bracts oblong, acuminate, longer than the 
pedicels. Perianth rather wide campanulate, 5 lin. across ; 
tube 6-channelled ; lobes oblong, rounded at the tips. 
Anthers ovate, their bases 2-lobed. Ovary conoid ; style 
columnar, 3-sulcate. 



Fig. 1, a flower, three of the perianth-segments removed ; 2, three of the 
stamens, and pistil ; 3, anther ; 4, section of ovary : — all enlarged. 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 57, SEPTEMBER, 1909. 

Tab. 8272.— APHELANDRA TETRAGOXA, Tropical South America. 

„ 8273.— MEGACLINIUM PURPUREORACHIS, Congo. 

„ 8274.— EXOSTEMMA SI7BCORDATUM, West Indies. 

„ 8275.— EUPHORBIA LEDIENII, South Africa. 

„ 8276.— PELIOSANTHES VIOLACEA, var. CLARKEI, 

South-eastern 

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8277 




MS.ael J.N.Fit^KlitK . 



"Vincent Brocks, D ay &. Son It? imp 



I. RrevE &. C° London- 



Tab. 8277. 

( ) E R E U S AM EC A KENSia 

Mexico. 



Cactaceae. 
Cekeus, Saw.; Benth. et Hook,/. Qen. Plant, vol. i. p. 849, 



Cereus amecamensis, fleese ex Hollar in PrakHscher Ratgeb. vol. \i. p. I l l J, 
cum ic. ; species (J. speciosissimo, DC. valdc attinis, Bed caulilnis ajriee 
pallide viridibus ei floribus albis differ! 

Planta succuleida, liasi ramosa. Rami elougati, creel i, prooumbentes vcl 
penduli, acute 3-5-afigalati, 1*5-3 cm. crassi, pallide virides, angiitis leviter 
dentato-sinuatis et pulvinis albo- vel grisco-tomentosis. Bptnm II 16, 
tenues, aciculares, 7-11 mm. lonpae, primum ajbae, demtun brunneac. 
Flore* magai, 15-17 cm. diam., all>i, late infundibuliformi-oampwiulati, 
tubo supra ovarium pcrbrere. Sepala angiiKtc lauccolata, acuta, interiora 
7-8 cm. longa, exteriora malto minora, pallide viri iia. Petal* 2-3-seriala, 
9-10 cm. longa, 2-5 cm. lata, lanceolata vcl anguste oblongo-laneeolata, 
obtusa vel subacuta, alba. Stamina uumerosa, tilameutis albis, antbeiis 
pallide luteo-albis. Ovarium 4 cm. longum, spinosum et squamosum. 
Stigmata 6-10, pallide luteo-alba. — Cerent amecaeneis, Heese in Hesdorf. 
Monatsheft, Blum.-Gartonfr. vol. i. p. 317 ; K. Schum. Monogr. Cact. p. 154.— 
N. E. Brown. 



The fine species here figured in general character 
resembles the well-known and brilliantly coloured Cereus 
speciosissimus, to which our plant is indeed very closely 
allied. The stems of the two are similar in appearance, 
though those of C. speciosissimus are mostly 3-4-angled, 
whereas in our plant, while the more erect stems are 
3-4-angled, those that grow more or less horizontally are 
often, at least in part, 5-angled, and the growing shoots do 
not show the dull purplish tinge at the tips which 
characterise those of C. speciosissimus. In our plant, 
moreover, the flowers are pure white. C. amecamensis is a 
native of Mexico, where it was discovered by Mr. E. Heese 
on Iztaccihuatl Mountain, near Amecameca, growing as an 
epiphyte in the upper Fir-tree region, at about 7,800 ft. 
above the level of the sea. For its cultivation C. ameca- 
mensis requires the treatment suitable for Phyllocacti ; an 
abundance of heat and moisture with ample sunshine in 
summer, and dryness near the root in winter. The large 

OcTOBKtt, 1909. 



white flowers are produced in May or June. For the plant 
from which our figure has been made, Kew is indebted to 
the generosity of Mr. H. J. Elwes, of Colesborne, who 
presented it to the establishment in 1900 as an unnamed 
Cactus from Mexico. 

Description. — Herb, with succulent stems, branching 
from the base ; branches elongate, erect procumbent or 
pendulous, sharply 3-5-angled, §-l| in. thick, pale green, 
the angles slightly sinuately toothed and with white- or 
grey-tomentose swellings. Spines in clusters of 11-15, 
slender, needle-like, 4-7 lin. long, at first white, at length 
brownish. Flowers large, white, 6-7 in. across, widely 
campanulately funnel-shaped, the tube above the ovary 
very short. Sepals narrow lanceolate, acute, the inner 
about 3 in. long, the outer much shorter, pale green. 
Petals 2-3-seriate, about 4 in. long, 1 in. wide, lanceolate 
or narrowly oblong-lanceolate, obtuse or subacute, pure 
white. Stamens numerous; filaments white, anthers pale 
yellowish white. Ovary 1<| in. long, beset with spines and 
scales ; stigmas 6-10, pale yellowish white. 



Fig. 1, a group of spines ; 2 and 3, anthers from in front and from behind ; 
4, stigmas ; 5, sketch of entire plant, showing habit : — 1-4 enlarged, 5 much 
reduced. 



8218 




M.S.del.J.N.FicKKth. 



^ncarii3roo'ks,Cayat.SanLt' 1 r 5> 



Jj. Reeve &.C? LancLan. 



Tab. 8278. 

CISSUS ADENOPODUS. 

Uganda. 



Ampelidaceae. 



ClSSUS, linn.; Planch, in DC. Monogr. Phaneroi). vol. v. p. 470.— Vitis, Linn. 
Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 387, partim. 



Cissus (Cyphostemma) adenopodus, Spraym in Kew Bull. 1900, p. 247; 
species insignis fobis praosertim junioribiis subtus rubris, paniculis pl&nis 
ambitu tr.'angularibus, pedicellis conspieue glanduloso-pilosis. 

Eerba, opo cirrborum seandens. Radix tuberosa. Oaulis teres, ut petioli 
petiolali cirrbique pilis numerosis multiseptatis et aliis glanduloso-capitatis 
paucioribus induta. Folia trifoliata ; petioli subteretes, 3-6 cm. longi ; 
petioluli 4-15 mm. longi, medius quam laterales longior; foliola ovata, 
acute acuminata, grosse serrata, lateralis basi inequahter rotunrtat-i, ter- 
minate basi obtusum, 5-10 cm. longa, 3-5-5 cm. lata, utriuqne setulosa, 
supra viridia venis depressis, subtus rubra venis protninentihus; stipulae 
falcato-lanceolatae, acutae, usque ad 1 cm. longae. Paniculae oppositifoliae, 
planae, ambitu triangulares, circiter 10 cm. longae pe-1uncu!o 35 cm. 
longo excluso, patule pilosne,rhachi rubra vel viridula, rami's alternantibus ; 
bracteae inconspicuae : peclicelli circiter 4 mm. longi, pilis glanduloso- 
capitatis conspicuis et aliis eglandulosis brevibus inconspicuis mduti, post 
antbesin reourvi. A'abastra circiter 3 mm. longa, apice pilosa. Calyx 
cupularis, usque ad 1 mm. altus, basi puberulus. Petala oblonga, 4 mm. 
longa, apme cucullata. cucullo piloso ceterum glabra, antbesi valde denexa. 
Stamina prima antbesi ad stylum appres«a; filamenta circiter 3 mm. longa; 
antberae late elliptieae, 0'7 mm. longae. Ovarii lobi 7 mm. longi; 
stylus 25 mm. longus. Baeca globus, usque al 1*6 cm. diametro — 
T. A. Sprague. 

Cissus adenopodus is a species that does not appear to be 
nearly related to any form hitherto described. It might 
perhaps be placed beside C. Buchanani, Planch. (Monogr. 
p. 601) which differs in having 5 leaflets and a very 
glandular inflorescence. For the introduction of this plant 
Kew is indebted to Mr. M. T. Dawe, who sent it in 1905 
from the Mnfnkamata Forest, Uganda, as a " species of Vitis 
with red decorative foliage." It has grown very vigorously 
in a tropical house, where its long trailing stems, clothed 
with red leaves, are very attractive in summer. The leaves, 
as in the other species of the section to which it belongs, 
are deciduous ; the measurements given in the text are 
average ones, the largest adult leaves met with reach a 
October, 1909. 



length of 8 to 9 in., including the petiole, and are about 
7 in. broad. At Kew the plant flowers in autumn, while 
the fruits ripen in the following spring. The absence of 
gland-tipped hairs from the inflorescence, apart from those 
on the pedicels, is peculiar. Three kinds of hairs are 
found on C. adenopodus ; subulate, acute, multiseptate hairs 
filled with red cell-sap ; linear, gland-tipped hairs ; and 
bodies which Mr. Sprague terms " pearl-glands." These 
last are met with on the inflorescence, usually near the base 
of the pedicels, on the under surface of young leaves, and 
on the outside of the stipules, near the base. These have 
been observed in numerous species of Ampelidaceae, and 
they seem, at least in certain cases, to serve as "food- 
bodies" for ants. 

Description. — Herb, climbing by means of tendrils. 
Root tuberous. Stem terete, hirsute like the petioles, 
petiolules and tendrils with numerous many-septate, mixed 
with rather fewer gland-tipped hairs. Leaves 3-foliolate, 
petioles almost cyhndric, 1^-2^ in. long; petiolules 2-7 lin. 
long, the median the longest; leaflets ovate, abruptly 
acuminate, coarsely serrate, the lateral obliquely rounded, 
the central obtuse at the base, 2-4 in. long, l|-2§ in. wide, 
setulose on both surfaces, green with sunken nerves above^ 
red with prominent nerves beneath; stipules falcate- 
lanceolate, acute, reaching 5 lin. in length. Panicles leaf- 
opposed, flattened, triangular in outline, about 4 in. long, 
pedunculate, the peduncles 1£ in. long, hirsute with 
spreading hairs, the rachis red or greenish, the branchlets 
alternate ; bracts inconspicuous ; pedicels recurved after 
flowering, about 2 lin. long, clothed with conspicuous 
gland-tipped hairs mixed with short inconspicuous non- 
glandular ones; buds about 1J lin. long, with pilose tips. 
Calyx cup-shaped, only ± lin. long, puberulous below. 
Petals oblong, much deflexed, 2 lin. long, the tips hooded 
and pilose, elsewhere glabrous. Stamens at first adpressed 
to the style; filaments about 1£ lin. long, anthers wide- 
elliptic. Ovary distinctly iobed ; style about 1 lin. long. 
Berry globose, about f in. across. 



Fig. 1, bud ; 2, a petal ; 3, stamens and pistil ; 4, pistil ; 5, fruit ; G, seed :- 



all enlarged. 



8Z79 




M:s.dei jjrEteUak 



"VSncent Broote fi ay S-San-Uffiri 



L Reeve &- C? London 



Tab. 8279. 
LAURELIA serrata. 

Chile. 

Monimiaceae. Tribe Laurelieae. 

Laurelia, J ass. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 145; Perkins & Uilg . 
Monimiaceae in En;//. Pfianzenr. vol. iv. n. 101, p. 76. 



Laurelia serrata, Bertero in Mercur. Chil. 1829, manip. 15, p. 685 et trausl. In 
Am. Journ, Sc. 18cH, vol. xxiii. p. 89 [nomen] ; Castillo <k Bey, Geogr. Veg. 
Rio Vahiiuii, p. 52; a L.eempervirente inflorescentiis abbreviates, perianthii 
segmentis aepualibus, staminibus fertilibus 4 glabris, staminodiis, recepta- 
culo fructigero subgloboso perianthii segmentis persistentilms coronato 
differt, 

Arbor polygamo-moaoica vel for.san dioica, 20 m. vel ultra alta, ligno foetido, 
ramis junioribus quadrangularibus, novellis fulvo-hirtts mox glabrescen- 
tibus nisi pilis in lateribus commissuralibus diutius persistentibus, vetustis 
cortice cinerascente teclis. Folia opposita, late oblongo-lanceolata vel 
lanceolata, obtusa vel subobtasa, praeter basin cuneatara eerrata dentibus 
apioe glauduloso-incrassatis, 5-12 cm. longa, 2-15 cm. lata, crasse coriacea, 
pellucide glandnlosa, aromatica, costa sipra prominula, nervis lateralibus 
obliquis utrinque circiter 9 tenuibus interdum obscuris ; petiolns 5-7 mm. 
longas, sn])ra dense hirtulus et nigricans. Inflorescentiae axillares, 1-1 ■ 5 cm. 
longae, cymosas vel cymoso-panisulatae, 3-9-florae, t'ulvo- vel cinereo- 
sericeae; bracteae calucissioiae, inferiores ovatae ad Ii mm. longae; 
pedicelli 2-4 mm. longi; flores cymarum singularum nanc omnes masculi, 
nunc terminales tan turn masculi caeteri hermaphroditi vel nonnulli rating 
forsan omnes feminei. Receptaculum cupulare, nee tamen altum, extra 
soriceum. Perianthii segmenta 8, 2-seriata, aequalia, oblongo-elliptica, 
viridi-lutea, 2 "5-3 mm. longa Stamina fertilia in floribus masculis her- 
maphroditisque 4, h'lamentis quam antheras brevioribus glabris basi 
utrinque glandula crassa oblonga munitis. Staminodia in floribus mas- 
culis \ staminibus fertilibus minora ceterum praeter antheras redactas iis 
similia ; in floribus hermaphroditis femineisque, quibus stamina fertilia 
desunt, staminodia 24-2S ab extra stamina gradatim redacta referentia, 
interiora plane squamiformia. Ovaria in floribus masculis 0, in floribus 
hermaphroditis femineisque pluria, pilosa, stylis ad medium pilosis. 
Fructui (receptaculum maturum) globosus, apice constrictus, deuiiuii 
irregulariter ruptus et stellatim apertus, cinereus, 7-8 mm. longiis, peri- 
anthio emai'eido eoronatus ; carpella singula ovoidea cum stylo persistent* 
10-12 mm. longa, pilis mollibus patulis inferioribus 5 mm. longis dense 
obsita. — L. aromatica, Card. Chron. 1901, vol. xxxvi. p. 401, fig. 172; non 
Poir.— 0. Stapf. 

The tree here figured is a member of the small family 

Monimiaceae and belongs to a tribe for which the name 

Atherospermeae is sometimes used. The structure of the 

flowers and fruits in the genus Laurelia to which our plant 

October, 1909. 



belongs is, however, so similar to that, met with in Athero- 
sperma, Labill., that the late Mr. Baillon was led to think 
that the two are congeneric. The bracts met with at the 
base of the flowers in Atherosperma, which have been relied 
upon as affording a distinctive character, are also present in 
Laurelia, though there they are soon caducous and not, as 
in Atherosperma, persistent, so that the conclusion formed 
by Baillon is probably just. 

The subject of our plate is a native of the southern parts 
of Chile, where it is known as the Huanhuan tree and is 
prized for its timber, though it is neither quite so common 
nor quite so valuable as another and better-known species 
of the same genus, L. semper vir ens, Tub, the Chilian 
Laurel. The material from which our figure has been 
prepared was communicated to Kew by Mr. F. W. Moore 
of G-lasnevin from a fine tree in the garden of the late 
Mr. Acton of Kilmacurragh, by whom it had been acquired 
from Messrs. Rollison of Tooting about 18G8; an excellent 
figure of a fruiting specimen from the same tree was pub- 
lished in the Gardeners' Chronicle in December, 1904 
(vol. xxxvi. p. 401, fig. 172) as L.aromatica, Poir. Bertero 
had, however, in 1829 pointed out that the species here 
dealt with is quite distinct from L. aromatica, and, although 
Bertero gave no technical description of the tree, Philippi 
subsequently distributed good specimens of the plant under 
the name L. serrata, Bertero. In spite of this, however, 
it became the practice to cite Bertero's name as a synonym 
of L. sempervirens, and this practice was persistently followed 
until in 1894 Castillo and Dey published rough figures of 
both species and drew attention to some of their salient 
differences. Since 1894 it has been generally recognised 
that there are really two Chilian species of Laurelia, but 
the rather inadequate character of the account supplied by 
Castillo and Dey has provided an excuse for an attempt to 
substitute the earlier name, L. aromatica, Poir., for that 
proposed by Bertero. As regards the name L. aromatica, it 
has, however, to be pointed out that Poiret applied it, in 
the first instance, to a specimen in the herbarium of Jussieu 
for which he provided a brief diagnosis which indicates 
that the leaves are quite entire. Tulasne, who saw the 
specimen belonging to Jussieu, has stated that it is in 
every respect identical with L. sempervirens. Moreover, 



the fuller description which follows the brief diagnosis given 
by Poiret appears to have been transcribed by that author 
from the original description of Pavonia sempervirens drawn 
up by Ruiz. With the object of preventing the recurrence 
of past misapprehensions, we have thought it desirable to 
provide here a somewhat full description of L. serrata. 

In the garden at Kilmacurragh, Wicklow, the Huanhuan 
has attained, during its sojourn there of over forty years, a 
height of 33 ft,, and has proved quite hardy ; it is therefore 
likely to thrive in the milder parts of the British islands, 
and should prove an attractive addition to favourably 
situated outdoor collections, on account of its pleasing 
aspect and its aromatic properties. Mr. Moore informs us 
that the climate at Kilmacurragh is very moist and there 
are spring frosts, but as vegetation is late in starting, plants 
generally escape injury. The Huanhuan is of a somewhat 
stiff habit of growth and the leaves are thick and firm, so 
that shelter is an essential condition for its successful 
cultivation ; the Kilmacurragh example has thriven ad- 
mirably on a raised bank in good, stiff loam, well sheltered, 
but not overhung by trees and shrubs. It is very difficult 
to get cuttings of L. serrata to root, and the only available 
method of propagation is by layers. 

Description. — Tree, polygamo-monoecious or perhaps 
sometimes dioecious, in the wild state reaching a height of 
70 ft,; wood foetid; branches at first 4-anglecl; young 
shoots tawny, hairy but soon becoming glabrous save for 
the somewhat persistent hairs along the lateral commissures ; 
old bark ashy-grey. Leaves opposite, widely obJong-lanceo- 
late or lanceolate, obtuse or nearly so, serrate except at the 
cuneate base, the teeth glandular thickened at the tips, 2-5 
in. long, |-1| in. wide, firmly leathery, dotted with pellucid 
glands and aromatic, lateral veins oblique, slender, some- 
times hardly apparent, about 9 on each side, midrib rather 
conspicuous" above ; petiole 2-4 lin. long, rather densely 
hairy above and blackish. Inflorescences axillary, 5-8 lin. 
long, simply or paniculately cymose, 3-9 -flowered, tawny 
or grey silky ; bracts very caducous, the lower ovate nearly 
2 lin." long ; pedicels 1-2 lin. long ; flowers sometimes 
all male, sometimes only the terminal male, the rest 
hermaphrodite or some of them female, perhaps at times all 



female. Receptacle shallowly cup-shaped, silky without. 
Perianth segments 8, 2-seriate, equal, oblong-elliptic, 
greenish-yellow, about 1^ lin. long. Stamens in male 
and hermaphrodite flowers 4 perfect, with filaments 
shorter than the anthers, each with a pair of thick oblong 
basal glands. Staminodes in male flowers 4, smaller than 
the perfect stamens, but otherwise like these save for the 
much reduced anthers; in hermaphrodite and in female 
flowers 24-28, the outer like reduced perfect stamens, but 
gradually more and more reduced so that those of the 
inmost series are scale-like. Ovaries not even represented by 
rudiments in male flowers ; in hermaphrodite and female 
flowers several, hirsute, tipped by long styles hirsute in 
their lower half. Fruit (ripe receptacle) globose, constricted 
at the top, ultimately splitting irregularly and opening star- 
wise, ash grey, 3-4 lin. long, crowned by the withered 
perianth ; carpels ovoid, 5-6 lin. long, including the per- 
sistent style, densely hirsute with soft spreading hairs, the 
lowest of which are 2^- lin. long. 



Fig. 1, part of a cyme, showing a terminal male and a lateral hermaphrodite 
flower with two detached bracts ; 2, half of a male flower, laid open ; 3, diagram 
of a hermaphrodite flower ; 4, hairs from the inflorescence ; 5, fertile stamen ; 
6, 7, 8 and 9, staminodes from a hermaphrodite flower ; 10, carpels and part of 
the shallow receptacle ; 11, section of a carpel; 12, fruits (ripe receptacles); 
13 > a single ripe carpel : — all enlarged except 12, which is of natural size. 



8280 




MS.aelJ.N.Fi+dulitk 



"VfrbcentHrooksBacsr&Scnl.t^irT^-i 



I. Reeve &-C IoruLan. 



Tab. 8280. 

RHODODENDRON ooombense. 

China. 

Ebicaoeae. Tribe Khododenereae. 
Ehododkndbon, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron coombense, Hemsl. ; species nova ex affioitate R. concinni, 
Hemsl., a quo differt calycis lobisparvis haud ciliatis et stylo infra medium 
pilosulo. 

Frutex nanus, dense ramosus, ramis floriferis graciliusculis lepidotis. Folia 
sparsa internodiis quam petiolis saepius paulo longioribus, persistentia, 
coriacea, oblongo-lanceolata, cum petiolo 3-4 mm. longo 3-4 cm. longa, 
apiculata, basi cuneata vel subrotundata, primum utrinque lepidota, supra 
demum glabrescentia, subtus densissirue lepidota, inter lepides pallida, 
venis immersis inconspicuis. Flares 3-4 cm. diametro, 3-5 in ramuloram 
apicibns aggregati, pedicellis gracilibus 0'5-l cm. longis dense lepidotis. 
Calycis lobis brevissimis rotundatis. Corolla late campanulata, pallide 
purpurea, lobis ovatis obtusis leviter recurvis. Stamina 10, alterna 
breviora, longiora corollam haud excedentia; filamenta filiformia, infra 
medium barbata. Ovarium 5-loculare, densissime lepidotum, stylo curvato 
stamina paulo excedente infra medium pilosulo. — W. B. Hems lev. 



The group 'of Rhododendrons to which R. concbinum, 
Hemsl., and the form here figured belong, includes a 
considerable number of very closely allied plants, and 
Mr. Hemsley explains that in proposing a distinctive name 
for the subject of our plate he does so with the object of 
avoiding possible confusion rather than for the purpose of 
expressing a conviction that JR. coombense deserves to rank 
as a species. Messrs. J. Veitch and Sons, who in 1907 
communicated the flowering specimens of R. coombense 
here made use of, have raised a large number of forms 
from seed collected by Mr. E. H. Wilson in China. Most 
of these forms it has been possible to match with the 
herbarium specimens prepared by the same collector ; there 
are, however, others of which Mr. Wilson, when gathering 
the seeds, could obtain no flowering specimens. A com- 
prehensive study of the whole material thus acquired is 
necessary in order to lead to a better knowledge of the 
extent to which seminal variation occurs, and to some 

OCTOBEB, 1909. 



conclusion as to whether natural hybrids are present among 
these obviously nearly related forms. A living plant of 
the form now described, presented by Messrs. Veitch to the 
Kew Collection, flowered there during the spring of 1909. 

Description. — Shrub, dwarf and densely branching, the 
flowering twigs rather slender, lepidote. Leaves sparsely 
set, their internodes usually rather longer than the petioles, 
persistent, coriaceous, oblong-lanceolate, I5-I5 in. long, 
apiculate, bnse cuneate or somewhat rounded, at first lepi- 
dote on both surfaces, ultimately glabrescent and very dark 
green above, beneath remaining persistently densely lepi- 
dote and pale green between the scales ; nerves immersed 
and inconspicuous ; petiole short, 2 lin. long or less. 
Flowers I5-I5 in. across, in trusses of 3-5 at the tips of the 
branchlets; pedicels slender, 3-5 lin. long, densely lepidote. 
Calyx-lobes very short, rounded. Corolla wide campanu- 
late, pale purple ; lobes ovate, obtuse, slightly recurved. 
Stamens 10, alternately shorter and longer, the longest not 
longer than the corolla ; filaments filiform, bearded below 
the middle. Ovary 5-celled, very densely lepidote ; style 
curved, rather larger than the stamens, slightly hairy 
below the middle. 



Tig. 1, portion of tipper surface of a young leaf ; 2, portion of lower surface of 
leaf; 3, scales from the same; 4 and 5, bud-. c cales from the inflorescence; 
G, calyx and pistil ; 7 and 8, stamens :— all enlarged. 



8281 




MS.daLJOTitdhlBbk. 



"Yixicaat Bl-o oks.D ay & S orvLtf'irnj: 



L.Reeve &.C<?La™i3r, 



Tab. 8281. 

BULBOPHYLLUM campanulatum. 

Sumatra, 



Obchidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 
BulbophtlTiUM, Thouars ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen, Plant, vol. iii. p. 501. 



Bulbophyllum (Cirrhopetalum) campanulatum, Bolfe in Kew Bull. 
1909, p. 62 ; a B. aurato, Eeichb. f., sepalis lateralibus brevioribus con- 
natisque et petalis baud falcato-aristatis differt. 

Herba epiphytica. Pseudobulbi approximate ovoideo-oblongi, obscure tetragoni, 
2-2 '5 cm. longi, monophylli. Folia oblonga, obtusa, coriacea, 8-9 cm. 
longa, circa 2 cm. lata, subtus purpurea. Scapi graciles, suberecti, circa 
8 cm. longi, apice decurvi, circa 10-flori. Flares umbellati, radiati, recurvi, 
in inflorescentias subcampanulatas di spositi. Bract eae subulato-lanceolatae, 
recurvae, 4-5 mm. longae. Pedicelli 5 mm. longi. Sepalum posticum 
elliptico-ovatum, acuminatum, longe ciliatum, concavum, 6 mm. longum ; 
sepala lateralia connata, decurva, limbus oblongus, subacutus, convexus, 
apice subrecurvus, 1'5 cm. longus, 8 mm. latus. Petala ovata, subacuta 
vel apiculata, ciliata, 4-5 mm. longa. Labellum recurvtim, carnosum, 
oblongum, subacutum, 3-4 mm. longum. Columna lata, 3 mm. longa; 
stelidia obtusa vel truncata. — R. A. Rolfe. 



The specific name proposed for the elegant little species 
here figured has reference, Mr. Eolfe explains, to the 
shape assumed by the inflorescence in consequence of the 
strong decurvature of the lateral sepals of the individual 
flowers. In referring this plant, and the whole of the 
section Cirrhopetalum to which it belongs, to the genus 
Bulbophyllum, Mr. Bolfe has adopted a comprehensive view 
that is admittedly unassailable on taxonomic grounds. At 
the same time, the recognition of the section Cirrhopetalum 
as a floristic group apart from Bulbophyllum is a measure 
that has, owing to the considerable number of the forms 
that may without dubiety be referred to one as apart from 
the other group, certain practical advantages that appeal to 
cultivators, and it will probably always be found convenient 
from the horticultural point of view to treat this plant as a 
Cirrhopetalum. The species is a native of Sumatra, from 
the eastern coast of which island it was first introduced to 
the Botanic Gardens at Brussels. From that institution the 
October, 1909. 



plant from which our plate has been prepared was commu- 
nicated in 1908 to Kew, and came into flower there in 
October of that year. It thrives satisfactorily under the 
tropical conditions suited to other species of the genus from 
south-east Asia. 

Description. — Herb, epiphytic ; pseudobulbs rather close- 
set, ovoid-oblong, obscurely 4-angled, |-1 in. long, mono- 
phyllous. Leaves oblong, obtuse, leathery, 3-3 1 in. long, 
about | in. wide, purple beneath. Scapes slender, suberect 
with decurved apices, about 3 in. long and about 10-flowered. 
Flowers umbellate, their pedicels 2^ lin. long, radiating, 
recurved so as to form a somewhat campanulate inflo- 
rescence; bracts subulate-lanceolate, recurved, 2-2^ lin. 
ong. Sepals, posterior elliptic-ovate, acuminate, long- 
ciliate, concave, 3 lin. long ; lateral connate decurved, 
oblong, subacute, convex, with subrecurved tips, 8 lin. long, 
4 lin. wide. Petals ovate, subacute or apiculate, ciliate, 
2-2^ lin. long. Lip recurved, fleshy, oblong, subacute, 
1-g— 2 lin. long. Column broad, 1-^ lin. long ; stelidia obtuse 
or truncate. 

Fig. 1, flower ; 2, column and lip ; 3, lip ; 4, column ; 5, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 58, OCTOBER, 1909. 

Tab. 8277.— CEREUS AMECAMENSIS, Mexico. 
„ 8278.— CISSUS ADENOPODUS, Uganda. 
„ 8279.— LAURELIA SERRATA, Chile. 
„ 8280.— RHODODENDRON COOMBENSE, China. 
„ 8281.— BULBOPHYLLUM CAMPANULATUM, Sumatra. 

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With a Scientific Review of the entire Genus by J. G. Baker, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
With 48 beautifully Coloured Plates, 30s. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F. R. S. 

Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9s. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 
7th Edition, with 1315 Wood Eugraviugs, its. 



LOVELL REEVE & CO, Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



828Z 




'S^wiBraoteJ^A^onLtfLiinp 






Tab. 8282. 
MAGNOLIA Delavayi. 

China. 

Magnoliaceae. Tribe Magnolieae. 
Magnolia, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 18. 



Magnolia Delavayi, Franch. PI. Delavay. p. 33, t. 9-10; Find et Gaqncp. 
Contrib. Ft. As. Or. fasc. ii. p. 36; species distincta, imlli arctc affinis, 
foliis iis Talaumae ovatae, St. Hil., similiimis. 

Frutex, 2 '5 to. altus, vel arbor, 4 '5-9 m. alta, cortice lenticelloso. Folia ovata, 
ovato-oblonga vel elliptica, basi rotundata vel obtusa, apice obtusa vol 
rotundata (carina retusa) plus minusve mncronulata, 18-32 cm. longa, 
10-1S cm. lata, persistentia, coriacea, exsiccando creberrime conspicue 
reticulata, supra glabra nervo medio interdum puberulo, subtus puberula, 
pruinosa, nervo medio prominente pubescentc ; nervi secundarii utrinsecus 
11-16; petioli 5-10 • 5 cm. longi, plano-convexi ; stipulae circiter 7 cm. 
longae, extra pubescentes, caducae. Flores gilvi, suaveolentes. Sepal a 
3, oblonga, nsque ad 9 cm. longa et 4 cm. lata, reflexa. Fdala circiter 7, 
anguste obovata vel spathulato-obovata, inaequalia, 8 "5-11 cm. longa, 
3-5 cm. lata. Stamina 2-2*5 cm. longa; filameula circiter 4 mm. longa; 
antherarum loculi sublineares, discreti, connectivo supra loculos in 
appendicem lanceolatam acutam producto. Carpella interne tomentosa, 
superne sensim angustata, glabriuscula, extra sulcata. Fritctus 11-14 cm. 
longi, ovoideo-oblongi ; folliculas subrhomboideae, breviter cuspidatae. 
Semina (ex Franchet) obovata, lucida. — T. A. Spkague. 



It is unfortunate that this fine Magnolia, which is a very 
distinct and striking species, is not quite hardy enough to 
thrive in the open air at Kevv. Its large persistent leaves, 
which closely resemble those of Talauma ovata, St. Hi]., and 
its noble, creamy white flowei's would have made it an even 
more notable tree than M. <jrandiftora, Linn., the only other 
evergreen Magnolia at present available, a form of which is 
figured at t. 1952 of this work. Both at Kew and in the 
gardens of Messrs. Veitch at Coombe Wood M. Delaviyi 
succeeds very well against a wall ; even the late trying 
winter has not injured it at all. The species appears to be 
confined to Yunnan, where it occurs at altitudes between 
5500 and 7000 ft. above sea-level. In rocky places it is a 
shrub about 8 ft. high, but in more favourable situations it 
grows into a tree 15-30 ft. in height. It ought to make a 

NOVEMBEB, 1909. 



fine addition to the garden flora of the milder parts of the 
kingdom, such as Cornwall, South Wales, or wherever the 
large-leaved Rhododendrons thrive. The plant from which 
our figure was prepared flowered at Kew in July, 1908. It 
was presented by Messrs. Veitch in 1902, having been 
introduced by Mr. E. H. Wilson for that firm during his 
first journey in China. The Magnolias like a warm open 
soil tiiat does not readily parch. A mixture of sandy peat 
with the ordinary soil is a help to them when newly planted 
out. 

Description'. — Shrub, 8 ft. high, or a small tree 15-30 ft. 
high ; bark lenticelled. Leaves ovate, ovate-oblong or 
elliptic, somewhat mucronulate and obtuse or rounded, rarely 
retuse, at the tip, rounded or obtuse at the base, 7-13 in. 
long, 4-7 in. broad, persistent, coriaceous, when dry closely 
and conspicuously reticulated, glabrous above except at 
times along the midrib, puberulous beneath, and pruinose, 
the midrib prominent and pubescent, lateral nerves 11-16 
on each side ; petiole 2-4| in. long, plano-convex ; stipules 
about 2 1 in. long, pube&cent outside, caducous. Flowers 
creamy white, odorous. Sepals 3, oblong, 3^ in. long, 
1^ in. broad, refiexed. Petals about 7, narrow obovate or 
spathulate-obovate, unequal, 3£-4j in. long, 1^-2 in. broad. 
Stamens |— 1 in. long ; filaments about 2 lin. long ; anther- 
cells sublinear, discrete, the connective extending beyond 
the cells as a lanceolate acute appendix. Carpels tomentose 
below, gradually narrowed upwards and there almost 
glabrous, sulcate on the outer side. Fruit 4£-5^ in. long, 
ovoid-oblong ; follicles somewhat rhomboid, shortly cus- 
pidate. Seeds, according to Franchet, obovate, shining. 



Fig. 1, anther; 2, carpel; 3, fruit : — 1 and 2 enlarged. 




M.S.del,JN.Fitch litk. 



3 ^ 2 

"Vincent Brool<sDay &San Lti^rmp 



X.Reevs &. C °LonAon . 



Tab. 8283. 

PIERIS FORMOSA. 

India and China. 

Ericaceae. Tribe Andromedeae. 
Pieris, I). Don ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 588. 



Pieris formosa, D. Don in Edinb. N. Phil. Journ. vol. xvii. 1834, p. 159; 
DC. Prodr. vol. vii. p. 599 ; Clarke in Hook.f. PI. Brit. Jnd. vol. iii. p. 4(31 ; 
Qard. Chron. 1881, vol. xv. p. 568, fig. 107; Forbes et l/emsl. in Journ. Linn. 
Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 16; a P. japonica, D. Don, statura robnstiore, foliis lan- 
ceolatis oblongo-lanceolatis vel elliptico-oblongis majoribus, inflorescentia 
et floribus majoribus differt. 

Frutex erectus, sempervirens, vel arbor 3 ' 5-6 ra. alta, ramis vetustis cortice 
laxo passim deglubente, ramulis glaberrimis. Folia apice ramulorum 
paulum conferta, lanceolata, oblongo-lanceolata vel elliptico-oblonga, 
5-13 cm. longa, l"5-4 - 7 cm. lata, acuminata, basi saepius subrotundata, 
crebre serrulata, coriacea, glaberrima, nitida; petioli 5-10 mm. longi ut 
folia juvenilia et gemmae saepe atro-rubri. Flores penduli in paniculis 
terminalibus erecto-patentibus vel interdum paulum pendulis ad 15 cm. 
longis latisque dispositi; rhacbis glaberrima vel minute puberula, 
ramulis numerosis paulum confertis fere glabris; bractae lanceolatae, 
pedicellis saepe leviter breviores, mox deciduae ; pedicelli circiter 5 mm. 
longi, crassi, prope medium bracteolis duabus parvis instructi. CalycAs 
lobi alabastro valvati, coriacei, ovato-Ianceolati vel ovati, 3-4 mm. longi, 
subacuti, minute puberuli vel glaberrimi. Corolla urceolaris, alba vel 
interdum pallide rosea, 7-8 mm. longa, brevissime obtuseque 5-lobata. 
Stamina 10, inclusa; filamenta parce pilosa, basi dilatata; antherae dorso 
retrorse biaristatae. Ovarium deprtsso-globosum, circiter 2 mm. diametro, 
5-loculare, loculis pluri-ovulatis ; stylus corolla leviter brcvior. Fructus 
globosus vel ovoideo-globosus, 4-6 mm. diametro. Semina, subtriquetro- 
fasifonnia, 2-3 mm. longa, testa laxa. — Andromeda formosa, Wall. Cat. 
n. 761, et in As. Ees. vol. xiii. p. 395 ; D. Don, Prodr. El. Nep. p. 149 ; 
AYight, Ic. t. 1200; Lemaire in 111. Hort. vol. v. t. 162 Com-irostaphylis t 
formosa, Lemaire I.e. sub t. 162. Gaultheria sp., Griff. Itin. Not. p. 125, 
n. 430, et Ic. PI. As. t. 517.— S. A. Skan. 



The introduction into European gardens of tin's handsome 
Pieris appears to have taken place upwards of half a 
century ago, for Lemaire, writing in 1858 about what is 
almost certainly the same species, states that it had been in 
cultivation for some years, though its precise history was 
unknown to him. Doubt has to be expressed as to whether 
the plant described and figured by him in the Illustration 
Horticole cited above is the same as that originally named 

November, 1909. 



Andromeda formosa by Wallich, for Wallich's plant has 
several ovules in each cell of the ovary, whereas the plant 
of the Illustration Horticole according to the description 
and the figure has only one ovule in each cell. Apart from 
this there is no reason to question the identity of the two. In 
the Genera Plantarum Pieris formosa is placed in the section 
Portuna, which is characterised as follows : — Sepals valvate 
in bud, coriaceous ; seeds almost all pendulous, sometimes 
winged ; leaves coriaceous, serrate ; racemes simple, axillary, 
or paniculate at the ends of the brandies ; bracts and 
bracteoles caducous. The same section includes P. japonica, 
D. Don, and P . floribunda, Benth. et Hook. f. (Andromeda 
floribnnda, Pursh\ both of which are much smaller in 
stature, with smaller leaves and inflorescences. 

P. formosa is a native of the Eastern Himalaya, from 
Nepal to Bhotan, at elevations of from 6000 to 1 0,000 ft., of 
the Ghombunda Hills in Assam, and of Manipur. It has 
also been recorded from Yunnan in South-west China, and 
specimens of apparently the same species have been collected 
in Hupeh, Central China, by Henry. At Kew this shrub 
appears to be capable of withstanding all but the severest 
frosts. An old plant was cut to the ground in February, 
1895, but afterwards sprang up again, and survived the 
winter of 1908-9 without injury. At the same time it 
certainly prefers warmer conditions, especially in spring, 
and is seen at its best as it grows in gardens in the south- 
western parts of England ; at Pentillie Castle, for example, 
there is a specimen 20 ft. high and 30 ft. through. The 
plant from which the figure now given has been prepared 
was raised from seed sent from the Koyal Botanic Garden, 
Calcutta, in 1902 ; this plant, although only about 4 ft. high, 
flowered profusely in May, 1908. Like most of its allies, 
P. formosa prefers a peaty soil, but will, nevertheless, thrive 
excellently in a warm, open loam, free from calcareous 
matter, in a position where it is not liable to suffer from 
dryness at the root. Seeds afford the best means of 
increase. 

Description. — Shrub or small tree, reaching 20 ft. in 
height, old branches with somewhat peeling bark, twigs 
glabrous. Leaves somewhat clustered at the ends of the 
twigs, lanceolate, oblong-lanceolate or elliptic-oblong, 2-5 



in. long-, ^-1| in. broad, acuminate, base often rather 
rounded, finely serrulate, coriaceous, quite glabrous, 
shining; petiole 3-5 lin. long, usually dark red, as are the 
young leaves and the buds. Flowers pendulous in terminal 
spreading or drooping panicles 6 in long and broad ; rachis 
glabrous or finely puberulous, flowering twigs almost 
glabrous ; bracts lanceolate, often somewhat shorter than 
the pedicels, soon deciduous ; pedicels about 2-J- lin. long, 
with a pair of small bracteoles near the middle. Calyx- 
lobes valvate in bud, coriaceous, ovate-lanceolate or ovate, 
1±_2 lin. long, subacute, finely puberulous or glabrous. 
Corolla urceolate, white or tinged with rose, 3^-4 lin. long, 
shortly and bluntly 5-lobed. Stamens 10, included; fila- 
ments sparingly hairy, dilated at the base ; anthers retrorsely 
2-spurred on the back. Ovary depressed globose, about 
1 lin. across, 5-celled, each cell with several ovules ; style 
rather shorter than corolla. Fruit globose or ovoid-globose, 
2-3 lin. in diameter. Seeds fusiform, faintly 3-quetrous, 
1-1J lin. long; testa lax. 



Fig. 1, flower; 2, section of calyx, showing pistil; 3 and 4, anthers; 5 and 
6, fruit : — all except 5 enlarged. 



82-84 




M.S.ad.J.U.KLchlifh. 



Vmjjt-rj: Brco:_s,I)sjr& SonH^img 



IiReeve &.C? Larukm. 



Tab. 8284. 
COTONEASTER moupinensis, forma floribunda. 

Western China. 



Rosaceae. Tribe Pomeae. 
Cotoneaster, Medik.; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 627. 



Cotoneaster moupinensis, Franch. in Arch. Nour. Mus. Hist. Nat. Par. ser. 3, 
vol. Tiii. p. 224; speciei ex affinitate C. acuminatae, Lindl., f-ed foliis 
bullatis, floribuspaucioribusbrevissime fasciculatis stylisque 2-3 recedentis 
forma floribunda, a forma typica non nisi corymbis plurifloris sejungenda. 

Fruttx ramis junioribus adpresse hirsuto-pul>escentibus deinde glabrescentibus, 
cortice castaneo fuscove tectis. Folia ovato- vel oblongo-elliptica, basi 
obtusa vel rotnndata, apice acuta vel acutissime subacuminata, 5-8 cm. 
longa, 2-5-4 cm. lata, supra saturate viridia, pilis longis tenuissimis 
adpressis sparse conspersa mox ealvcscentia, subtus tenuiter ocbraceo- vel 
griseo-villosula, nervis lateralibus obliquis utrinque 6-8 supra imprcssis 
infra prominentias, parencbymate bullato; petiolus brevis, 2 mm. longus, 
hirtus. Inforescentiae corymbosae ramulos foliates 2-4 cm. (rarius ultra) 
longos terminantes, 20-30-florae, interdum pluriflorae, 3-6 cm. latae, pilis 
adpressis cinereo-hirtae ; pedicelli brevissimi vel sub anthesi ad 3 mm. 
longi. Beceptaculum sub antbesi turbinato-hemisphaericum, laxe pilosum 
vel superne glabratum, 3-4 mm. diametro. Culycit dentes triangulares, 
acuti, dense albo-ciliati, breves. Fetnla rotundato-ovata, in dorso rubes- 
centia, 3*5 mm. longa, sub antbesi erecta. Stamina circiter 30. Styh 5; 
carpel la in vertice pilosula. Fructus rubri, turbinato-globosi vel globosi, 
8-10 mm. longi.— V. bullata, Bois in Yilmor. Frutic. Cat. prim. c. icon. 
p. 119 ; Scbneid. Laubholzk. vol. i. p. 747.— 0. Stapf. 



The Cotoneasters as a rule succeed particularly well at 
Kew, and the species which forms the subject of our plate 
is no exception to this rule. It has very little beauty of 
flower, for only one or two flowers are open at the same 
time on individual corymbs, and the petals of _ these fall 
almost immediately. It is nevertheless an attractive garden 
shrub by reason of its large bullate leaves and its abundant 
crop of brilliant red berries. In September, when these 
berries are ripe and cover the upperside of its long 
arching shoots, there are few hardy shrubs that are more 
ornamental. 

C. moupinensis is a native of Western China, and^ was 
originally discovered near Moupine by the Abbe' David in 
1870. It was found again in 1897 near Tachienlu, not far 
November, 1909. 



from Moupine, by a correspondent of Mr. M. L. de Vilmorin, 
and was once more met with at a later date in the same 
neighbourhood by Mr. E. H. Wilson. The seeds, numbered 
2123, received by Mr. de Vilmorin, yielded a number of 
plants on which Mr. Bois has based the account of his 
C. hullata ; a specimen taken from one of these plants was 
communicated to the herbarium at Kew in 1902 by Mr. de 
Vilmorin, who in 1905 presented to the Kew collection a 
living example, now a vigorous bush 6 ft. high, from which 
has been taken the material on which t. 8284 and the descrip- 
tion by Dr. Stapf have been based. With this material 
the specimen (sern. 2123) communicated in 1902 exactly 
agrees. But that specimen and the specimens taken from 
the plant now figured also agree with the specimen on 
which the late Mr. Franchet based his original account of 
. moupinensis, for an opportunity of examining which we 
are indebted to the courtesy of Mr. Lecomte, except for the 
fact that the number of flowers and fruits in each corymb is 
much greater in Mr. de Vilmorin's plant than in that 
gathered by the Abbe' David. But the suite of specimens 
collected near Tachienlu, within a very limited area, by 
Mr. Wilson prove that tbis character is quite unstable, and 
Dr. Stapf is therefore led to conclude that C. hullata, Bois, 
is only a form, not sufficiently distinct to be considered a 
variety, of C. moupinensis, Franch. There is in the Kew 
collection a specimen presented by Mr. de Vilmorin as 
C. moupinensis, which agrees exactly with the Abbe David's 
plant, but Dr. Stapf points out that the figure of C. hullata 
given in Mr. de Vilmorin's "Fruticetum" seems to be refer- 
able to the type rather than to the florihunda form here de- 
picted. It has, however, to be remarked that both Bois and 
Schneider lay stress on the shape of the calyx-lobes which 
they describe and figure as rounded in C. hullata, instead of 
triangular as in typical C. moupinensis. But an examina- 
tion of Mr. de Vilmorin's specimens, both the dried and the 
Jiving, of the form on which C. hullata was founded shows 
that they are just as triangular as in the type of Franchet's 
species. The indumentum of the receptacle varies from 
"uniformly slightly villous" to " slightly villous below, 
nearly glabrous above." The abundant crop of seeds affords 
a ready means of increase of this plant, and it can also be 
propagated by layers. 



Description 1- . — Shrub, twigs adpressed hirsute at length 
becoming glabrous, bark chestnut-brown or tawny. Leaves 
ovate- to oblong-elliptic, base obtuse or rounded, apex acute 
or sharply subacuminate, 2-3 in. long, 1-1 1 in. broad, dark 
green and sparingly adpressed hirsute but soon becoming 
glabrous above, beneath thinly yellowish or grey hirsute, 
lateral nerves oblique, 6-8 on each side, sunk above, 
prominent beneath, bullate between the nerves ; petiole 
short, about 1 Jin. long, hairy. Corymbs 20-30- (occasion- 
ally more-) flowered, lj-2^ in. across, greyish hirsute with 
adpressed hairs, at the tips of leafy twigs §-i§ in. long, 
rarely longer; pedicels short, reaching 1| lin. in length. 
Receptacle in flower turbinately hemispheric, laxly pilose 
throughout or almost glabrous above, 1^-2 lin. wide. 
Calyx teeth triangular, acute, densely white-ciliate, short. 
Petals rounded ovate, reddish on the back, under 2 lin. 
long, erect in flower. Stamens about 20. Styles 5 ; carpels 
with somewhat hairy tips. Fruit red, turbinately or quite 
globose, 4-5 lin. long. 



Fig. 1, a flower bud ; 2, flower, perianth, partly removed, showing staminal 
insertion and styles ; 3 and 4, stamens : — all enlarged. 



8285 




MS del, J.N.POch_Ii#L 



YLrineji±.BraaksBay-&. Sanlt^-irfj) 



L Reeve & C • LanilarL 



Tab. 8285. 

CEPHALOTAXUS drupacea. 

China and Japan. 

Coniferae. Tribe Taxeae. 

Cephalotaxus, Sieb.et Zucc; Benth.et Hook.f. (>'e?>. Plant, vol. iii. p. 430; PUgtr 
in Engl. Pflanzenr. Taxaceae, p. 100, fig. 19. 



Cephalotaxus drupacea, Sieb. et Zucc. Fl. Jap. Fam. Nat. vol. ii. p. 108, et 
FL Jap. vol. ii. p. 66, tt. 180, 131; Mast, in Journ. Linn. Soc. Hot. 
vol. xxvi. p. 544; species inter affines foliis breviorilms breviter aculeato- 
acutis distinguenda. 

Arbor dioica, omnino glabra, in locis subtropicis usque ad 10-metralis, in 
regionibus temperatis ut in horto Kewensi frutex ramosus paucimetralis 
tantnm. Folia persistentia, alterna, spiraliter disposita sed in una planitie 
expansa, lineari-subulata, iis Taxi similia, crassinscula, 1 ■ 5-3 cm. longa, 
2-3 mm. lata, abrupte aculeato-acuta, basi constricta, breviter petiolata 
petiolo semitorto, costa supra elevata, margine ohtusa. Flares masculi 
circiter 10 in inflorescentiam breviter pedunculatam axillarem solitariam 
globosam 3-4 mm. diametro aggrepati, basi 1-bracteati, pedunculo squamis 
imbricatis dense obtecto ; antherae in quoque flore 5-8, saepius triloculares 
loculis rima longitudinale dehiscentibus. Flores feminei solitarii, ovati, 
circiter 5 mm. diametro, distincte pedicellati ; carpidia carnosa, 2-ovulata. 
Semen saepissime in quoque flore singulum tantum evolutum, nudum, 
ovoideum, circiter 3 cm. longum ; testa exterior crassa, carnosa, interior 
dura, cornea. Embryo parvus, cylindricus, axilis, in parte superiore albu- 
minis situs; cotyledones 2, breves.— Taxus baccata, Thunb. Fl. Jap. p. 275, 
non Linn. ; fide Pilger— W. Botting Hemslev. 



The genus Cephalotaxus, as limited by Dr. Pilger in 
1903 in the Pflanzenreich, includes six recent species 
inhabiting Eastern India, Burma, China and Japan. The 
form distinguished by Siebold and Zuccarini as C. peduncu- 
lata is considered by Pilger to be only a variety of C. 
drupacea, and wild specimens in the herbarium at Kew, 
which are intermediate in character between the two, appear 
to justify this conclusion. Cephalotaxus differs from the 
more nearly allied genera in having a pair of ovules on 
each scale, and Torreya nucifera, Sieb. and Zucc, the 
herbarium specimens of which are extremely like those of 
C. drupacea, may be most easily distinguished by its 
narrowly lanceolate leaves tapering more gradually 
November, 1909. 



towards the tip. The plant from which the figure now 
given has been prepared has long been in the collection at 
Kew. It is a spreading bush, now 10 ft. high and 15 ft. 
through, furnished to the ground with luxuriant dark 
green foliage. In its bolder leaves and larger fruits it 
provides an agreeable contrast with the common Yew, and 
is very well adapted for semi-shaded places in the garden 
or as" part of the undergrowth in thin woodland. The 
fruits are not produced plentifully every year, but they 
usually occur in sufficient quantity to ariord an adequate 
and convenient means of increase. Any goodsoil suits the 
species ; the chief point to be kept in mind in its cultivation 
is that it loves abundant moisture. 

Description.— Tree, dioecious and glabrous throughout, 
in the warmer parts of its area reaching a height of 35 ft., 
in cooler tracts, as in the Kew collection, rather a branching 
shrub about 10 ft. high. Leaves persisting, alternate and 
spirally attached, but assuming a position bringing them 
into one plane, linear-subulate and Yew-like, rather thick, 
|_li i n . long, 1-1 J lin. broad, suddenly sharp-pointed, 
narrowed at the base and shortly petioled, the petioles 
mostly partially twisted, midrib prominent above, margins 
obtuse. Male flowers in short peduncled solitary globose 
axillary inflorescences usually about 10-flowered, 1^- 2 lin. 
wide, bracts 1-flowered, peduncle densely clothed with 
imbricate scales ; anthers 5-8 in each flower, usually 
3-celled, cells dehiscing longitudinally. Female flowers 
solitary, ovate, about 1\ lin. wide, distinctly stalked ; scales 
fleshy, 2-ovuled. Seed almost always solitary in each 
flower, naked, ovoid, about \\ in. long, the outer coat thick 
and fleshy, the inner hard and horny. Embryo small, 
cylindric/axial in the upper part of the albumen ; cotyledons 
2, short. 



Fig. 1, transverse section of a leaf ; 2, a male inflorescence ; 3, bract from 
the base of a male flower ; 4 and 5, anthers ; 6, a female flower ; 7, an advanced 
ovule; 8, section of a ripe seed; 9, embryo :— all except 8 enlarged. 



8286 




M.SaeLJ3sTPitx£h.lflL 



"VmcenfcBr o olcs D ajr&. SarLLi£nrcp 



X Reeve &C9 LaadoTi. 



T^b. 8286. 

KITCHINGIA. uniflora. 

Madagascar. 

Ckassulaceae. 
KitchinGia, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xviii. (1881), p. 268. 



Kitchingia uniflora, Stapf in Rexv Bull. 190S, p. 258 ; affinis A', gracilipcdi, 
Baker, sed foliis brevissime pedicellatis, floribus minoribus saepissime 
solitariis et staminibus in corollae fundo insertis, carpellis maturis lanceo- 
latis distincta. 

Eerba humilis, canlibus prostratis e nodis radicantibus glabris. Folia opposita, 
obovata, obtusa, utrinque 1-2-crenata, 7-15 mm. longa, 6-10 min. lata, 
carnosa, laete viridia ; j^etioli crassiusculi, 1-2 mm. (ravins nltra) longi. 
Flore* terminates, solitarii vel interdum terni; pedicelli filifoi'mes, patule 
tenuiter pubesceates, purpurascentes, florum solitariorum ad medium 
minute bibracteolati. Calyx alte 4-fidus, sogmentis late ovatis minute 
apiculatis, parce pubescens, 3-3 - 5 mm. altus. Corolla inflato-tubulosa, basin 
et os versus constricta, 4-dentata, circiter 2-2 '5 cm. longa, medio 12 mm. 
lata, pulchre carminea, parce et tenuiter glanduloso-pilosa, dentibue late 
ovatis obtusiusculis. Stamina in fundo corollae inserta, nlamenta epipetala 
paulo altius orta et basi dilatata quasi cucullae (nectario ?) incidentia, 
quam episepala longiora, normaliter 8. sed interdum nonnulla abortiva. 
Disci glandulae lineari-oblongae, 2-dentatae. Carpella fere libera, sub 
autliesi conniventia, anguste lanceolata, 6-8 mm. lomia; styli ad 12 mm. 
longi. Folliculi sursum divergentes, 8-9 mm. longi. — 0. Stai'f. 



The genus Kitchingia includes some ten species, all of 
which, except the one here figured, are certainly natives of 
Madagascar. The plant now described was raised from a 
cutting presented to Kew in January, 1908, by Mr. Gr. 
Bouvet, Director of the Jardin des Plantes ;it Angers; it 
resembles in habit some species of Seduni (the stems creep 
on the ground, rooting freely at the nodes), and now forms 
a patch some 12 in. across. In transmitting the plant 
Mr. Bouvet stated that the species appeared to have been 
originally introduced with other plants sent from Madagas- 
car to Dr. Bontemps of Saumure. Since then, however, 
Mr. Bouvet has learned that the original plant was purchased 
in Belgium, and that its origin is not definitely known. 
From the fact that all its congeners are Mascarene there is, 
however, hardly room for doubt that K. uniflora is also a 
Novembeu, 1909. 



native of Madagascar. There is, indeed, in the herbarium 
at Kew a specimen collected by the late Rev. R. Baron in 
Northern Madagascar {Baron n. 6466), growing amongst 
moss and probably on a tree, that appears to be no more 
than a reduced form of our plant. The leaves of Baron's 
specimen are nearly orbicular, very obscurely crenate and 
only 2^-3 lin. long, while the flowers are only 8 lin. long; 
the staminal insertion and the shape of the carpels are, 
however, exactly as in K. uniflora. All the flowers 
originally sent by Mr. Bouvet and all those that have been 
produced at Kew have been solitary as shown in t. 8266, 
but we are informed by Mr. Bouvet that his plants which 
in 1908 had for the most part only solitary flowers, bore 
3-flowered inflorescences in 1909. Normally the epipetalous 
stamens have longer filaments than the episepalous ones, and 
the total number of stamens is eight. But the absolute 
length of the stamens is subject to some variation, and 
occasionally some of the stamens may become much reduced 
or may even he suppressed. In the flowers sent by Mr. 
Bouvet in 1908 the shorter stamens almost reached the 
mouth of the corolla, while the longer ones were slightly 
exserted ; in the specimen which flowered at Kew in 1909 
the shorter stamens only reached the middle of the corolla, 
while the longer only exceeded them by the length of the 
anthers, and were also included. Mr. Bouvet informs us 
that among the flowers examined by him in 1909 he has 
found four with only six perfect stamens, and one with only 
five. Designating the stamens long, medium or short, 
according to whether they reached the mouth, the middle, 
or even a still lower level in the corolla tube, he has 
observed the following combinations : — (a) Five long, one 
medium ; (b) four long, two short ; (c) three long, three 
short ; (d) one long, two medium, two short ; (e) two 
medium, four short. The leaves of K. uniflora are thick 
and fleshy, glaucous green with reddish ' margins ; the 
young stems also are red. Grown in a pan or a suspended 
basket in a mixture of peat and loam in a moist tropical 
house the plant increases rapidly. It flowers in spring. 

Description. — Herb, stems prostrate and rooting at the 
nodes, glabrous. Leaves opposite, obovate, obtuse, 1-2- 
crenate along each side, 4-8 lin. long, 3-5 lin. broad, 
fleshy, bright green ; petioles ^-1 lin. long, rarely longer. 



Flowers terminal, solitary or occasionally ternate ; pedicels 
filiform, thinly pubescent with spreading hairs, purplish, 
minutely 2-bracteolate near the middle when the flowers 
are solitary. Calyx deeply 4-lobed, lobes wide ovate and 
minutely apiculate, sparingly hairy, 1^-2 lin. long. Corolla 
inflated tubular, narrowed below and at the mouth, 4- toothed, 
nearly 1 in. long, 6 lin. wide at the middle, bright red, 
sparingly and finely glandular-pilose, the teeth wide ovate 
and somewhat obtuse. Stamens attached at the base of the 
corolla, the epipetalous filaments springing from a some- 
what cucullate (perhaps nectarial) base at a somewhat higher 
level than the rather shorter episepalous filaments, normally 
8, but occasionally some of them abortive. Disk-scales 
linear-oblong, 2-toothed. Carpels almost free, connivent 
in flower, narrowly lanceolate, 3-4 lin. long; styles about 
6 lin. long. Follicles diverging upwards, 4-5 lin. long. 



Fig. 1, a pair of leaves at a rooting internode ; 2, calvx and pistil ; 
3, corolla, laid open, showing staminal insertion ; 4, a disk-scale : — all enlarged. 



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Tab. 8282.— MAGNOLIA DELAVAYI, China. 
„ 8283.— PJERIS FORMOSA, India and China. 
„ 8284.— COTONEASTER MOUPINENSIS, Western China. 
„ 8285.— CEPHALOTAXUS DRUPACEA, China and Japan. 
„ 8286.— KITCHINGIA UNIFLORA, Madagascar. 

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8281 




IRFitchlith. 



T5ncentBr<jo]<s,Day-&Sori Lt*imr> 



Tab. 8281 
PARTHEN0C1SSUS tricuspidata. 

Japan and China. 



Ampelidaceak. 

Parthenocissus, Planch, in DO. Monogr. Phaneroa. 1887, vol. v. p. 447. — Vitis, 
Bentli. et Book./. Qen. Plant vol. i. p. 8&t, partim; mn Linn. 



Parthenocissus tricuspidata, Planch, in DC. Monogr. Pkanerog. vol. v. 
p. 452; species eirrhis brevibus ramosis discigeris, foliis subtus fere 
glabris polymorphis nunc parvis indivisis nunc majoribus tricuspidatis 
rarius trifoliolatis plerumquo grosse erenato-serratis iiisignis. 

Frutex scandens, ramosissimus, hoterophyllus, niuris arbornmque cortice arete 
adhaerens, eirrhis brevibus ramosis opposititbliis apicibus in discos facie 
inferiore viscosos expansis; ramuli longi, polypbylli, et breves dipbylli 
foliis sul>oppositis. Folia basi cordata, 5-nervia, grossiuscule crenato- 
serrata dentibus plerumquc rotundatis mucronatis rarius aeutis, supra 
nitida, glabra, subtus in nervis parce minute pilosa, ceterum glabra ; folia 
superiora ramulorum longorum parva, circumscriptione ovata, indivisa vel 
levirer tricuspidata tantum,inferiora et folia ramulorum brevium magna — 
ad 25 cm. usque diametro, longe petiolata, circumscriptione suborbicularia, 
compicue tricuspidata, rarius trifoliolata: in plantis juvenilibus folia 
majora plorumque trifoliolata ; stipulae lanceolatae, mem bran a 
deciduae. Cymae plerumque e ramulis brevibus ortae, interdum singulae, 
axillares, versus basin ramulorum lonporum dispositae ; ramuli breves 
cirrho mon deciduo vel cyma aphylla terminati, nunc cymam in quaqne 
axilla gerentes, cyma inferiore aphylla, superiore foliata, nunc cymam in 
axilla inferiore et ramulum longum in axilla superiore, nunc gemmam in 
axilla inferiore et cymam in axilla superiore gerentes; braoteae mem- 
branaceae; flores viriduli. Calyx cupularis fere truncatus. Petala 5, 
induplicato-valvata, apice uncato-inflexa, antliesi patentia marginihus 
inflexis, ovato-oblonga, circiter 4 mm. longa. Stamina erect*, pelalis 
opposite; antberae introrsae, <ior-o giandubgerae. Ditetu ovarii dimidio 
inferiore adnatus, 5-sulcatus, glandularis. Ovarium 2-!ocularc; ovula 
pro loculo •!, collateralia, erecta; stylus vix 1/5 mm. longua stigmata 
inconspicno. Bacca pruinosa, 1-2-sperma. — /'. Veitch i, Graebn. in 
Gartenfi. 1900, vol. xlix. p. 249. Ampehtpria trieutpviota, Sieb. it Zncc. 
PL Jap. 1846, p. 88. A. Eoylei, Kirchn. Arb. Muse. 1864, p. 162. 
A. Vettchii, Hort. ex Qard. Chron. 1808, p. .S14. A. faponica, Hort. ex 
Gard. Chron. 1868, p. 1118. Git9»$ Thnnbergii, Sieb. et Zucc. H. Jap. 
18 16, p. 87. C. Vettchii, Carriers in Rer. Hortic. 1H77, p. 176. Vitit 
incon$tan$, Miq. in Ann. Mus, Bot. Lugd.- at. 1850. vol. i. p. 91. 
V. eapreolata, K. Kocb DendroL 1869, vol. i. p. 556; nee Don. V. IWv/,,7 
et V. triewpidata, Lynch in Journ. Linn. *oc. Bot. 1879, vo 1 . xvii. p. 308. 
V.japonica, Hort ex Nichols. Diet. Gard 1884, vol. i. p. 66; nee Tliunb. 
Qninnrvt tricMtpidata, et Q. VeUciiii, Eoehnu in Gartenfl. 1892, vol. xli. 
p. 403. Pttdera triempidata, Rehder in Rhodora, 1908, vol. x. p. 29. — 
T. A. Spbague. 

December, 1909. 



No climbing plant ever introduced to Great Britain is 
more generally cultivated than the subject of our plate. 
Supporting itself on walls without artificial aid, by the 
viscous at first capitate but ultimately disk-like tips of its 
tendrils, it gives little trouble to grow, and is now more 
frequently planted as a creeper on town and suburban 
houses even than tbe Ivy. The leaves acquire the most 
beautiful of autumn tints, and, being deciduous, do not 
produce the dark winter effect that in some places renders 
Ivy unsuitable. Nearly allied to the familiar Virginian 
Creeper, Parthenocissus quinquefolia, which also has viscous 
tendril-tips, the plant here figured, when brought into 
general cultivation in 1868 by Messrs. J. Yeitch and Sons, 
was distributed as Awpelopsis Veitchil and A. japonica. 
Quite recently, authorities so careful as Koehne and 
Graebner have once more endeavoured to discriminate 
between these two plants, but it is generally conceded that 
they represent no more than two states of a single species 
for which the most familiar garden name is Ampelopsis 
Veitchii. In works which accept the view enunciated in 
the Genera Plantarum, where the genus Vitis is made to 
include all the Ampeh'daceae except the species of Pteris- 
anthes and of Leea, our plant is known as Vitis inconstans, 
a name which is, however, somewhat less familiar than that 
under which it was issued by the Messrs. Veitch. But this 
view is now almost universally considered too comprehen- 
sive, and writers who, like Mr. Sprague, follow the careful 
monograph by Planchon, where the Vitis of the Genera 
Plantarum is subdivided into nine distinct genera, are pre- 
cluded from using either of these familiar names. Our 
plant is neither a Vitis, in the narrower sense in which 
that name was originally and is now again more satis- 
factorily employed, nor a genuine Ampelopsis ; it is a 
member of the genus which Planchon has termed Partheno- 
cissus, readily distinguishable from the other genera of 
Ampelidaceae grown out of doors in this country by having 
viscous tendril-tips, by the absence of tendrils from the 
inflorescence, and by the glandular hypogynous disk being 
entirely adnate to the ovary. P. tricuspidata has shoots of 
two distinct kinds — long shoots and short. The long shoots 
bear several leaves with leaf-opposed tendrils and axillary 
branchlets, two successive leaves having a tendril opposite 



to them, and the third a branchlet in its axil. The short 
shoots produce only two leaves in each year ; these leaves 
are nearly opposite, and each has a branch or bud in its axil ; 
the shoot itself may end either in a tendril, which soon dis- 
appears, or in a cyme. Three combinations are met with as 
regards the axillary branches. There may be a cyme in 
each axil ; or there may be a cyme in the axil of the lower 
and a long shoot in that of the upper leaf,- or, finally, there 
may be a vegetative bud in the lower axil, which will con- 
tinue the growth of the short shoot, in the following season, 
and a cyme in the upper. Trifoliolate leaves are character- 
istic of young plants; in this condition P. tricuspidata bears 
a superficial resemblance to the juvenile state of the Poison 
Ivy, Rhus Toxicodendron, and recently a good deal of 
unnecessary alarm has been caused by the confusion of the 
two in a popular article. The plant now figured is quite 
harmless, and is readily distinguished by its leaves being 
mostly simple; the Rhus never h;is simple leaves. P. 
tricuspidata is most easily cultivated, and will thrive in 
almost any soil. Propagation is effected by means of 
cuttings placed in gentle heat. The young plants should 
be grown in pots until planted out in permanence, as they 
do not transplant well. 

Description. — Shrub, climbing by means of short, much- 
branched, leaf-opposed tendrils with discoid viscous tips; 
twigs of two kinds, long with several leaves and short with 
2 nearly opposite leaves. Leaves polymorphic, cordate and 
5-nerved at the base, rather coarsely crenate-serrate, the 
teeth usually rounded, mucronate, less often acute, glabrous 
and shining' above, finely puberulous on the nerves beneath, 
those of the long shoots mostly small, ovate, entire or 
slightly 3-cuspidate ; the lower leaves of long shoots and 
those of the short shoots much larger, up to 10 in. long, 
with long petioles, nearly orbicular, markedly 3-lobed or 
occasionally 3-foliolate, in young plants still larger and 
usually 3-foliolate ; stipules lanceolate, membranous, de- 
ciduous. Cymes mostly from the short shoots, some also 
from low down on the long shoots, their arrangement regu- 
lated by the mode of growth which is sympodial at two 
succeeding rodes and monopodial at the third ; bracts mem- 
branous; flowers greenish. Calyx cup-shaped, somewhat 



truncate. Petals 5, mduplicate-valvate, indexed at the tip 
spreading m flower, with inturned margins, ovate-oblong 
about 2 Jm. Jong. Stamens erect, opposite the petals- 
anthers mtrorse, glandular on the back. Disk adnate to 
lower half of ovary 5-grooved, glandular. Ovary 2-celled 
cells 2-ovuled ; ovules collateral, erect; style less than 1 lin 
Jong, stigma minute. Berry pruinose, 1-2-seeded. 

cnfalyj.' * h ™ n ° hed ioX)dvil > 2 ' flowers ' 3 «* 4 stamens; 5, pistil :-«» 



8281 




M.S.d. 






-L Reeve &.C° London 



Tab. 8288. 

ASPAEAGUS TETRAGONUS. 

South Africa. 

Liliaceae. Tribe Asparageae. 
Asparagus, Linn. ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Oen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 765. 



Asparagus tetragonus, Bresler, Gen. Aspar. Hist, No. 15; SchuH. f. Syst. Veg. 
vol. vii. p. 329; species ex affinitate A. racemosi, Wilkl., cladodiis breviori- 
bns perianthii segmentis obtusis exterioribus apice eroso-laciuiatis differt. 

Sufrutex sarmentosus. Radix tuberis pluribus translucentibus ellipticis 
3 cm. longis. 1*5 cm. latis instructa. Caulis teres, aculeis decurvis 
robustis bgnosis 12 mm. longis instructus ; ramuli acute triangulares, 
recti, angulis scabris. Cladodia saepius quinatim fasciculata, trigona vel 
tetra.'oiiM, linearia, 14 mm. loaga, mucronata, basi incrassata. Baeemi 
plures, G cm. longi, patentes; bracteae 1*5 mm. longae, mombranaceae, 
brunneae; pedicelli 3 mm. longi, infra medium artieiilati. Perianthii 
segmenta obovata, 3 mm. longa, alba, obtusa, cxteriora eroso-laciniata, 
interiors obscure dentata. Stamina quam perianthium paullo breviora; 
antherae - 4 mm. longae, obtusae, dilate roseae. Ooarium ampullaeforme ; 
stylus brevis, crassus, trilobatus. Bacca globosa, 6 mm. in diametro, 
coccinea. —A. racemosus, var. tetragona, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. 
p. G24, et in Dyer, Fl. Cap. vol. vi. p. 269.— C. H. Wright. 



Asparagus tetragonus is a member of the group of species 
of which A. racemosus, Willd., is the best known example. 
The general resemblance between these two species is con- 
siderable, and it has even been suggested that the subject 
of our plate may be no more than a variety of Willdenow's 
species, which is a native of Tropical Asia and Africa. 
But A. tetragonus, which is a native of South Africa, and 
was first collected by Mund and Mai re in Cape Colony, has 
broader perianth segments, the outer ones at least being 
almost laciniate, than is the case in A. racemosus where the 
perianth segments are oblanceolate, somewhat acute, and 
quite entire. The spines of the two species also differ some- 
what, those of A. tetragonus being stout and decurved, 
whereas those of A. racemosus are often straight and 
slender. In both species the cladodia vary considerably; 
in the case of A. tetragonus some are compressed with a 
thick prominent rib on both faces and others are distinctly 
December, 1909. 



trigonous ; the majority, however, are almost equally 
tetragonous. The plant from which the figure now given 
has been prepared is one that has been grown for many 
years in the Succulent House at Kew, where, planted in a 
shallow border, its stems attain a length of over 10 ft. 
These are woody at the base and armed with rather 
formidable spines. The flowers, which are produced freely 
in autumn and are very fragrant, are succeeded by red 
globose one-seeded berries. Like some allied species, 
A. tetragonus has a root system remarkable for the large, 
whitish, watery, ovate tubers which are formed along the 
principal roots, and are calculated to enable the plant to 
endure prolonged periods of drought, A. tetragonus is not 
difficult to grow, and is a useful plant for clothing pillars 
in a conservatory. 

Description. — Undershrub, climbing ; roots bearing 
numerous translucent, elliptic tubers, l\ in. long, § in. 
thick. Stem cylindric, armed with stout decurved woody 
thorns, 6 lin. long ; twigs sharply triangular, straight, their 
angles scabrid. Cladodes usually in fascicles of 5, 3- or 
4-angled, linear, 7 lin. long, mucronate, their bases 
thickened. Racemes rather numerous, 2| in. lono*, spread- 
ing; bracts under 1 lin. long, membranous*' brown ; 
pedicels lj lin. long, jointed below the middle. Perianth- 
segments obovate, 1£ lin. long, white, obtuse, the outer 
distinctly erosely lobulate, the inner faintly toothed. 
Stamens rather shorter than the perianth ; anthers under 
A Jin. long, obtuse, faintly rose-coloured. Ovary sub- 
globose ; style short, thick, 3-lobed. Berry globose, 3 lin. 
broad, pink. & 

elarj: ***** ° f ****'• * ' *°™> 3 and 4 > stamens J *> &*&'■-«" 



8289 







LJ 



T &ncent J3rcoi<5 . 



Reeve &_( 



Tab. 8289. 

PRUNUS MARITIMA. 

Eastern North America. 

Rosaoeae. Tribe Pruneae. 
Prunus, Linn.; Benth. et Hbok.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 609, 



Prunus (Euprnnus) maritima, Wangenh. Am. 1781, p. 103 ; Brit/on et Brown, 
111. Fl. vol. ii. p. 249; Bailey, Cycl. Am. Hort. 1449; Schneider, III. Hawlb. 
Laubholzk. vol. i. p. 624; affinis B. Gra»esii, Small, a qiia foliorum forma 
et putamine utriuque acuto vel subacute differt. 

Frutex ad 3 m. usque altus, ramis primariis decumbentibns, secundariis erectis 
vel subereetis, cortice plus minusve cinereo glabro. Folia elliptica vel 
obovata, basi plus minusve cuneata vel leviter rotundata, apice plerumque 
subacuta, 4-7 cm. longa, 2-3 • 5 cm. lata, serrata, utrinque p ibescentia vel 
glabra, nervis utrinque 6-8 subttis elevatis; petioli usque ad 8 mm. longi, 
breviter pubescentes ; stipulae oblongae, ciliatae, deci iuae. Corymbae 
breves, usque ad 10-florae ; pedicelli circiter 1 cm. longi, pubeseentes. 
Beceptaculuni fere campanulatum, 2 "5 mm. longum, extus breviter 
pubescens, intus glabrum. C'alycis segment ova^a, apice rotundata, 
1*5 mm. longa, utrinque pubescentia, marginibus inflexis. Petala al'>a, 
latissime obovata vel suborbiculana, 6-7 mm. longa, 5-6 mm. lata, 
superne crenata. Stamina 18-25; filamenta subaequalia. Carpellum 
ellipsoideum, glabrum; stylus robustus, 3 - 5 mm. longus, glaber, apice 
minute bitidus. Drupa oblongo-ellipsoidea vel subglobosa, vix 2 cm. 
longa, rubro-purpurea, putamine utrinque acuto vel subacute— f. 
sphaerocarpa, Miehx PI. Bor. Am. vol. i. p. 284. /'. pubescens, Poir. in 
Lamk Encyc. Meth. Suppl. vol. iv. p. 584. P. littoralis, Bigel. Fl. Bost. 
ed. 2, vol. ii. p. 193. — J. Hutchinson. 



The Shore Plum, here figured, occurs on the sands of the 
Atlantic sea-shore from New Brunswick to Virginia, and is 
also met with at the head of Lake Michigan. Chapman 
indeed (Flora of the Southern United States, ed. 3, p. 131) 
records it from Alabama ; the basis of this record is, how- 
ever, a very imperfect specimen collected by Buckley in 
the Alleghany Mountains, and Sargent (Sylva of North 
America, vol. iv. p. 28) is probably justified in concluding 
that, as no other trace of P. maritima has been met with in 
this now well-explored region, the specimen obtained by 
Buckley merely represents a form of P. alleghaniensis, 
Porter. The nearest ally of P. maritima is P. Gravesii^ 

December, 1909, 



Small, from which our plant appears to differ mainly in the 
shape of the leaves and in having; a stone which is more or 
less pointed at hoth extremities. The plant from which our 
figure has heen prepared has long existed in the Kew 
collection. It flowers in May, and not only produces its 
blossoms iu great profusion, but keeps them in perfection 
longer than most Plums do. At Kew it forms a low 
spreading bush, 4-5 ft. high, and considerably more 
in width. Judging by the localities in which it grows wild, 
it ought to prove useful for planting in fairly exposed 
places near the sea. It appears to possess a very robust 
constitution, and is one of the most accommodating of 
American Plums in regard to soil. It is, however, rather 
subject to attack by the aphis which so frequently infects 
the young shoots of Plums and causes the leaves to curl up 
into shapeless masses. P. maritima produces its fruit in 
sufficient quantity to afford ample means of propagation ; 
it can also be budded on ordinary plum-stocks. 

Description.— Shrub, 4-5 ft, high in cultivated speci- 
mens, reaching 12 ft. in wild specimens; main branches 
decumbent, the secondary erect or nearly so ; bark smooth, 
more or less ash-grey. Leaves elliptic or obovate, more or 
less cuneate or somewhat rounded at the base, acute or sub- 
acute at the tip, l£-lf in. long, §-l£ in. broad, serrate, 
pubescent or glabrous, nerves 6-8 on each side, raised 
beneath ; petiole 4 lin. long or less, finely pubescent ; 
stipules oblong, ciliate, deciduous. Corymbs short, 10- or 
fewer-flowered ; pedicels about 5 lin. long, pubescent. 
Receptacle almost campanulate, 1^ lin. long, slightly pubes- 
cent outside, glabrous within. Calyx-lobes ovate, rounded 
at the tip, under 1 lin. long, with indexed edges, pubescent 
on both sides. Petals white, wide obovate or nearly orbi- 
cular, 3-3£ lin. long, 2|-3 lin. broad, crenate at the tip. 
Stamens 18-25, their filaments nearly equal. Carpel ellip- 
soid, glabrous; style stout, nearly 2 lin. long, glabrous, 
slightly 2-fid at the tip. Drupe oblong, ellipsoid, or nearly 
glohose, about 10 lin. long, red-purple; stone more or less 
pointed at both ends. 

Fig. 1, base of leaf and stipules ; 2, section of a flower, the petals removed; 
6, petal; 4 and 5, stamens; G, stone of the fruit :— all except 6 enlarged. 



8230 




i J.N.RhWith 



Vincent, Brooks.Day kSan Ltfuup 



I. Reeve \ C° London 



Tab. 8290. 

OPUNTIA IMBRIOATA, 

Mexico and South-western United States. 



Cactaceae. Tribe Opontieae. 
Opuntia, Mill.; Benth. et Hook./, tlen, Plant, vol. i. p. 851. 



Opuntia imbrieata, DO. Prodr. vol. iii. p. 471 ; A'. Schum, Monogr. Cad. 

p. 668; s| ecies ex affinitate 0. tunicatae, Link et Otto, sed elat'or et ab ea 
spinis numerosioribus brevioribus floribusque kermesino-purpureis valde 
di versa. 

Frutex 1-2 m. altus vel arbor 3-4 m. alta, trunco 12-25 cm. crasso. Rami 
verticillati, patentissimi vel adsoendentes ; nmuli 4-16 cm. longi, 2-3 cm. 
crassi, cylindrici, glaucescenti-vi rides, tuberculati tubetculis costas breves 
l - 5-3 - 5 cm. longas compressas formantilms. I'ulvilli depress), breviter 
tomentosi. tUia teretia, patula, 12-2 cm. longa. Aculei 8-30, stellatim 
divaricati, 6-20 (raro 25-3' >) mm. longi, cornei vel fusci, vaginis arcle 
vestiti, 1-8 interiores longiores. Flores 5-7*5 cm. diaiuefro, kermesino- 
purpurei. Ovarium 20-26-tuberculatum, superne parce foliosum ; pulvilli 
eetis paucis deciduis instructi. Sepala 8-13, obovata, obtusa vel retusa, 
viridia, purpureo-marginata. Petala 10-12, 2-seriata, obtusa vel retusa, 
breviter vel brevissime apiculata, kermesino-purpurea. Stamina numero- 
sissima; filamenta purpurea; antherae luteae. Stiymata 8-10, lutea. 
Frudus subglobosus vel hemispliaericus,ap]'ce planus vel depressus, circiter 
25 cm. diametro, tubercnlatus, inermis, luteus. — O. rosea, DC. Prodr. vol. 
iii. p. 471; Mem. Mus. Hist. Nat. vol. xvii. p. 66, t. 15; Pfeiff. Enum. 
Diagn. Cact. p. 171 ; Foer.-t. Handb. Cact. ed. 2, p. 986, fig. 13b O. 
arborescent, Engelm. Bot. Wislez. Exped. p. 6; Pacif. Enil. Bep. vol. iv. 
pp. 51 et 58, t. 17, fig. 5, 6: t. 18, fig. 4: t. 24, fig. 12: t. 75, fig. 16, 17; 
Eoerst. Handb. Cact. ed. 2, p. 984. O. rtellata, Salm Dyck, Hort. Dyck. 
pp. 50 et 250; Engelm. in Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist. vol. vi. p. 208 (.sub 
O. arborescente). Cereus imbricatus, Haw. Bev. PJ. Succ. p. 70— N. E. 
Brown. 



Opuntia imbrieata is a native of the dry interior of 
Central and Northern Mexico and of the adjacent regions 
to the north; its range extends through Arizona, New 
Mexico and Western Texas as far north as Pikes Peak in 
Colorado. For the material from which the figure now 
given has heen prepared we are indebted to Sir E. Gr. Loder, 
Bart., in whose collection at Leonardslee, Horsham, a plant 
which he had himself collected in Colorado in 1878 flowered 
early in August, 1908. This species is a member of a 
small group of Opuntias characterised by their cylindric 
December, 1909, 



stems with short ridge-like compressed tubercles and by the 
sheaths that cover their spines. It is the commonest 
member of the group to which it belongs in European 
gardens, and was first introduced to cultivation in the 
earlier years of the nineteenth century. In spite of this, 
however, it is a plant whose flowers, which are very 
attractive but which will only expand under the influence 
of direct sunshine and unfortunately do not last long, are 
not often seen in the United Kingdom. Sir Edmund Loder 
informs us that his example at Leonardslee has but seldom 
flowered; when it did so in 1908 this happened during a 
time of very hot, sunny weather, and individual flowers 
only remained fully open during one afternoon, from about 
midday till sunset. 

Description. — Shrub, 3-7 ft. or a small tree up to 15 ft. 
high, its trunk 5-10 in. thick with whorled spreading or 
ascending branches; twigs 2-10 in. long, about 1 in. thick, 
cvlindric, glaucous green, covered with compressed tubercular 
ribs |-1J in. long ; leaves terete, spreading, J-j in. long ; 
spine-bearing cushions depressed, shortly tomentose ; spines 
in clusters of 8-30, stellately spreading, 3-10 (rarely 12-15) 
lin. long, grey or tawny, closely sheath-clad, the inner 1-8 
longer than the others. Flowers 2-3 in. across, brio-lit 
purple. Ovary with 20-25 tubercles, sparingly leafy in the 
upper part-, the cushions bearing numerous deciduous 
bristles. Sepals 8-13, obovate, obtuse or refuse, green with 
purple edges. Petals 10-12, in two rows, obtuse or refuse, 
shortly or very shortly apiculate, bright purple. Stamens 
very many ; filaments purple ; anthers yellow. Stigmas 
8-10, yellow. Fruit sub-globose or hemispheric, the top 
flat or depressed, about 1 in. across, yellow, tubercled but 
without spines. 



Fig. 1, cluster of spines; 2, stigmas : — hoth enlarged. 



8291 




- 



"Vuuierct BrooJ<s,Day Sc I Son Lif^itip 



L Reeve & ( 



Tab. 8291. 

EURYOPS VIRGINEUS. 

South Africa. 

Compositae. Tribe Se^eoionideae. 
Eubyops, Cass. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 452. 



Euryops virgineus, Less. Syn. Comp. p. 394; DC. Prodr. vol. vi. p. 445; 
Harv. in Harv. et Sond. Fl. Cap. vol. iii. p. 411 ; affinis E. algoenii, DC, sed 
capitulis minoribus acnatniisque glabris differt. 

Frutex virgatus, 30-60 cm. altus, ramis teretibns glabris flavo-viridibus ; rarrmli 
flonferi circiter 10 cm. longi. Folia viridia, cunea'a, alte 3-5-lobulata, 
0" 5-1 cm. longa, ad ■ 5 cm. usque lata, coriacea, glabra. Capitula solitaria, 
axillaris, subcorvmbosa, post anthesin racemosa, 1*5 cm. diametro; 
pi-dunculi erecti, granules, a*i 2 - 5 cm. usque longi, glabri ; involucri bracteae 
basi connatae, ovato-lanceolatae, acutae, 2-4 mm. longae, membranareae, 
glabrae, trinerviae. ^ lores radii 6, flavi ; tubus 1 mm. longus, glaber ; 
limbus obougus, 6 mm. loogus, 2-2' 5 mm. latus, apice tridentatns. Florea 
disci superne campanulati, lobis triangularibus obtusis. Antherae appen- 
dicular, 1 mm. longae. Achaeuia oubteretia, glabra ; pappi getae albae, 
patentes; styli rami 1 mm. longi. — ft', flabelliformis, Cass, in Diet. Sc. Nat. 
vol. xvi. p. 51. Othonna virginea, Linn. f. Suppl. p. 309; Thunb. Prod. PL 
Cap. p. 168.— J. Hutchinson. 



The genus Euryops includes, so far as it is at present 
known, some 40 species, all of which are confined to the 
African Continent and the island of Socotra. It is nearly 
allied to the genera Senecio, Linn., and Othonna, Linn. ; 
from the former Euryops only differs in having connate 
involucral bracts which are not provided with calcvcine 
appendages; from the latter it is distinguished by the fact 
that the florets of the disk are fertile. Most of the species 
of Euryops have thick fleshy leaves. The species now 
figured is a native of the coast region of Cape Colony, 
where it is found on stony veldt from Knysna to Albany. 
It is nearly allied to E. alyoensis, DC, a native of the 
same region which has larger leaves, villous achenes and 
fewer but larger flower-heads. E. virgineus was first intro- 
duced to English gardens about 1821, and can be success- 
fully grown in sheltered situations in the south-western 
parts of Britain. The material from which our plate has 

December, 1909. 



been prepared was communicated to Kew by Mr. T. A. 
Dorrien Smith, in whose garden at Tresco Abbey, Isles of 
Scilly, it thrives luxuriantly and flowers profusely in March 
and April. 

Description. — Shrub, 1-2 ft. high, fastigiately branched, 
the branches cylindric, glabrous, yellowish green ; flower- 
bearing twigs about 4 in. long. Leaves green, cuneate, 
deeply 3-5-lobulate, 3-5 lin. long, 2-2^- lin. broad, coria- 
ceous, glabrous. Heads solitary, axillary, at first nearly 
corymbose, at length raceme-like, 8 lin. across ; peduncles 
erect, slender, reaching lin. in length, glabrous ; bracts of 
the involucre connate at the base, ovate-lanceolate, acute, 
1-2 lin. long, membranous, glabrous, 3-nerved. Ray- 
fiorets G, yellow; tube ^ lin. long, glabrous; limb oblong, 
3 lin. long, 1-1J lin. broad, the tip 3-toothed. Disk-florets 
campanulate above, with triangular obtuse lobes. Anthers 
appendaged, ^ lin. long. Achenes nearly terete, glabrous ; 
pappus hairs white, spreading ; style arms -J lin. long. 



Fig. 1, a leaf; 2, a flower-Viud; 3, ray-floret; 4, disk-floret; 5, anthers; 
6, pappus hair : — (til eiilar<ied. 



INDEX 

To Vol. V. of the Fourth Series, or Vol. CXXXV. 
of the whole Work. 



8271 Agave Wrightii. ' 8286 
8263 Aloe rubrolutea. j 8253 
8237 Alpinia bracteata. ' 8279 

8233 Angadenia nitida. , 8236 

8251 Anthurium trinerve. 8282 

8272 Apbelandra tetragona. 8266 
8249 Arbutus Menziesii. 8273 
8288 Asparagus tetragonus. 

8258 Begonia modica. \ 8248 

8281 Bulbophyllum campanula- i 8254 

turn. | 8245 

8267 Caralluma Nebrownii. 8238 
8285 Cepbalotaxus drupacea. 8290 

8277 Cereus amecamensis. ; 8287 

8278 Cissus adenopodus. ' 8276 
8235 Clerodendron ugandense. 

8262 Coelogyne venusta. ' 8283 

8261 Cornus macrophylla. 8240 
8284 Cotoneaster moupinensis, 8257 

forma floribunda. ' 8260 

8242 Cycas Micholitzii. ! 8289 

8268 Cynoches densiflorum. 8244 

8252 Dendrobium Bronckartii. 8256 
8255 Deutzia setchuenensis. 8265 
8232 Encephalartos Barteri. 8280 
8239 Eranthenmni Wattii. 8264 

8234 Eria rhynchostyloides. 8246 

8269 Erlangea touientosa. 8243 
8275 Euphorbia Ledienii. 8259 
8291 Euryops virgineus. 8241 
8274 Exostemma subeordatum. 8270 
8247 Impatiens Hawkeri. 8250 



Kitchingia uniflora. 
Larix occidentalis. 
Laurelia serrata. 
Lonicera Giraldii. 
Magnolia Delavayi. 
Mahonia arguta. 
Megaclinium purpureora- 

chis. 
Microloma tenuifolium. 
Mussaenda Treutleri. 
Nigella integrifolia. 
Oligobotrya Henryi. 
Opuntia imbricata. 
Partbenocissus tricuspidata. 
Peliosanthes violacea, var. 

Clarkei. 
Pieris formosa. 
Pinus Bungeana. 

,, Jeffreyi. 
Prunus japonica. 

„ maritima. 
Pseuderantbemum seticalyx. 
Pyrus Pashia, var. Kumaoni. 

,, Bingo. 
Pvbododendron coombense. 
Rubus canadensis. 

„ Koehneanus. 
Saxifrage scardica. 
Sorbus cuspidata. 

„ Vilmorini. 
Spiraea Henryi. 
Strophanthus Preussii. 



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CONTENTS OF tfo. 60, DECEMBER, 1909. 

Tab. 8287.— PARTHENOCISSUS TRICUSPID ATA. 
China. 

„ 8288.— ASPARAGUS TETRAGONUS, South Afi 
„ 8289.— PRUNUS MARITIMA, Eastern North America. 
„ 8290.-OPUNTIA IMBRICATA, ^western 

United States. 

<291._EURYOPS VIRGINEUS. South Aft 

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