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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."



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°\ CURTIS' S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

Ml 

ILLUSTRATING AND DESCRIBING 

pants of xty Iftogal botanic tortus of lUto, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; 

EDITED BY 

D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

DIRECTOR, ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, KEW. 



VOL. IV. 

OF THE FOURTH SERIES. 

(Or Vol. CXXXIV. of the Whole Work.) 




So in this pleasant vale we stand again, 
The fields of Enna, now once more ablaze 
With flowers that brighten as thy footstep falls. 

Tennyson. 



LONDON : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., LTD., 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments, 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1908. 

[All rights reserved.} 



*'°- B <* Garden 
1909 



LONDON : 

PRINTED IiY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SON ! LIMITED 
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TO WHOSE KNOWLEDGE AND CARE 
THE BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 



SO LARGELY OWES 

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IN THE GARDENING WORLD, 

THIS VOLUME 

IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED. 



Royal Botanic Gardens, Keiv, 
Dec. 1, 1908. 




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No. 37. 



VOL. IV.— JANUARY. 



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OB No. X451 OF THK ENTlKE WORK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINi 

CONTAINING HAND-COLOURED FIGURES WITH DESCRIPTIONS, STRUCTURAL AND HISTORII 

OF NEW AND RARE 

PLANTS FROM THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS, K 

AND OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 



EDITED BT 



D. PRAIN, CLE., LL.D., F.R.S., 

Uirrctor, 3Ronal ^Sotantc ffiaioens, T&tto. 




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"And all rare blossoms from every clime 
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8th Edition, Revised by Sir J. I). Hookek.C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., Ac. 9*. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Flora*. 
6th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9*. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



a/72 




~M. S delJNFitcKltK 



L.Reeve &C°Xcmikm- 



\'LnctintBruol<s.Day liSanLtJ 1 imp. 



Tab. 8172. 

x FHILODENDRON Corsinianum. 

Garden Hybrid. 



Abaceae. Tribe Philodendeeab. 

Philodendbon, Schott ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 978 ; Engler 
in DC. Monogr. Phaner. vol. ii. p. 355. 



Philodendron Corsinianum, Makoy ex Rev. Hort. Beige, 1887, vol. xiii. p. 140, 
et 188, vol. xiv. p. 134 ; hybrida parentibus adhuc ignotis. 

Caules scandentes, 2 '5-6 -5 cm. crassi, superne cataphyllis fibrosis induti. 
Folia sparsa, '2 '5-7 "5 cm. sejuncta; petiolus 37-68 cm. longus, teres, leviter 
subrugosus ; lamina 37-68 cm. longa, 28-45 cm. lata, alte cordato-ovata, 
acuta, breviter et obtuse pinnatifido-lobata, lobis basalibus sinu angusto 
acuto sejunctis, supra viridis, subtus inter venas purpureo-tincta, demum 
viridis. Spatha breviter pedunculata; tubus 7-5 cm. longus, ellipsoideus, 
extra saturate purpureo-kermesinus, sparse rubiginoso-maculatus, punc- 
tisque numerosis albidis notatus, intra laete kermesinus ; lamina 10-11 "5 
cm. longa, cymbiformis, subulato-apiculata, extra viridis rubro-macnlata, 
intra kermesina rubro-maculata, marginibus albida. Spadix 15-16 cm. 
longus, 1-2-1 "6 cm. crassus, albidus. 



This ornamental stove Aroid is a hybrid raised by the 
firm of Messrs. Makoy of Liege, for which they were awarded 
a Certificate of Merit by the Royal Agricultural and Botanical 
Society of Ghent in 1887. Its parentage is not mentioned, 
but judging from the purple tint on the under surface of its 
leaves, a coloration which is unusual in the genus, it is 
possible that P. verrucosum, Mathieu, may have been one of 
its parents. When young the leaves are deeply tinged with 
coppery brown, but as they become older this colour almost 
disappears, as in the leaf figured. For a climbing species it 
appears to be of comparatively slow growth, since the plant 
at Kew, from which our figure was made in May last, was 
acquired in 1898, and is now only about 8 feet high, with a 
spread of about 6 feet. 

Description. — Stem climbing, rooting, l-2£ in. thick, 
clothed with brown fibrous scale-leaves on the upper part. 
Leaves spreading, 1-3 in. apart ; petiole 1^-2^ feet long, in 
the larger leaves about J in. thick at the middle, terete, 
with a slightly rough surface, green ; blade lj— 2J feet long, 
Januaey, 1908. 



il-18 in. broad, deeply cordate-ovate, acute, shortly 
pinnatifidly lobed, with the roundish basal lobes separated 
by a narrow acute sinus 4|-7 cm. deep, bright deep green 
above, dull purple between the green veins beneath, 
changing to green with age; midrib flat above, very 
prominent beneath ; primary veins about 7 on each side of 
the midrib, with the 2 basal ones close together, the others 
distant; impressed above, prominent beneath; basal lobes 
with 5-6 primary veins, all united into one at the base, 
where it is shortly denuded at the sinns. Inflorescence 
solitary in each axil. Peduncle short, green, with whitish 
lines. Spathe with an ellipsoid tube 3 in. long, of a rich 
purple-crimson, with scattered spots of crimson-brown and 
numerous rows of minute white dots outside, and bright 
deep carmine inside ; limb 4-4£ in. long, 2^-2f in. broad, 
boat-shaped, with a short convolute point, light green, 
spotted with red outside and carmine, with darker spots 
inside, shading into white at the margins. Spadix 6-6^ in. 
long, ^-f in. thick, terete, acute, slightly curved forwards, 
creamy-white. — N. E. Brown. 

Cultivation. — While in the genus Anthurium hybrids of 
garden origin are numerous and in the genus Rickardia there 
are several, the plant now figured is the only hybrid Philo- 
dendron that has been raised artificially. This plant, which 
was purchased for Kew as an ornamental foliage plant, has 
been grown under moist tropical conditions in the Aroid 
(No. I.) House, where it has climbed up the stem of a tree- 
fern to the height of about 8 feet, and it was not until it 
developed flowers at Kew that the decided attractiveness of 
its inflorescence, both as regards size and colour, were 
revealed. Most of the Philodendrons have large, handsome 
and fragrant flowers, and are excellent plants for clothing 
pillars, palm-stems and back-walls in tropical houses, 
purposes for which they are largely employed at Kew both 
in the Palm House and in the Aroid House, near the 
main entrance. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, spadix, with the spathe removed; 2, two stamens; 3, ovary:— 
Leaf reduced ; Jig. 1, natural size; 2 and 3, enlarged. 



&173 




M.S.del J.N Ktckiiih. 



VLnceii Broo«s^ay &Scm.Lt? i«tp 



I-Hee-vc * C?IandarL. 



Tab. 8173. 
PAEONIA Mlokosewitschil 

Caucasus. 

Banunculaceae. Tribe Paeonieae. 
Paeonia, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 10. 



Paeonia Mlokosewitschii, Lomakin in Trud. Tifl. Bot. Sad. (Act. Hort. Bot. 
Tifl.) ii. (1897), p. 282; affinis P. Wittmannianae K Stev., foliolis supra 
glaucescentibus subtus glaucis breviter pubescentibus, noribus apertis, 
carpel lis albo-tomentosis distincta. 

fferba perennis, caule glabro. Folia biternata ; foliola late oblonga vel 
subelliptica, lateralia obliqua, apice brevissime acutata vel acuminata, basi 
obtusa, 8-10 cm. longa, 4-(5 cm. lata, supra glaberrima glaucescentia, subtus 
glauca et breviter pubescentia, margine nervisque rubris; petiolus et 
petioluli glabri. Flares aperti, circiter 12 cm. diametro, pedicello glabro 
rubescente 10 cm. longo. Sepala inaequalia, alteram oblongo-lanceolatum, 
acutum, supra basin constrietum, alteram suborbiculare, basi breviter 
contractum, obtusissimum, utrumque glabrum. Petala circitor 8, 
rotundata, concava, flava. Stamina numerosissima ; fllamenta antheris 
subduplo longiora. Carpelta 3, oblonga, albo-tomentosa ; stigmata 
snbsessilia, purpurea. 



This is one of a group of yellow-flowered Paeonies from 
the Caucasus, the others being P. Wittmanniana, Stev., 
which was figured on Tab. 6645, and P. macrophylla, 
Lomakin. All three are very closely allied, and their 
discrimination in the dry state is difficult, if not, indeed, 
sometimes impossible. Alboff in his Prodromus Florae 
Colcbicae (in Act. Hort. Bot. Tifl. vol. i. p. 14) went even 
so far as to treat P. Wittmanniana and P. macrophylla as 
forms of P. corallina, Retz., and he would no doubt have 
dealt with P. Mlokosewitschii in the same way. As, how- 
ever, no experiments have been made to test, the constancy 
of the characters which have been relied upon in dis- 
criminating between those forms, and as they appear readily 
distinguishable when seen in the living state it is certainly 
more expedient to treat them at present as distinct species. 
P. Mlokosewitschii was discovered by Mlokosewitsch near 
Lagodekhi in the eastern part of the Central Caucasus, 
whilst typical P. Wittmanniana is a native of Adsharia in 
the basin of the Tshorok River, south of Batum. Lomakin 
(in Act. Hort. Bot, Tifl. vol. ii. p. 283) described, however, 
Januahy, 1908, 



a variety of P. Wittmanniana from the Talysh with carpels 
tomentose as in P. Mlokosewitsckii. The distinctive charac- 
ters of P. Wittmanniana and P. Mlokosewitsckii are thus 
reduced to differences in the colour and pubescence of 
the leaves and possibly in the extent to which the petals 
open out ; at the same time the area of the former is 
extended right across the Caucasian region from the Black 
Sea to the Caspian. The specimen figured was communi- 
cated by Mr. Griimbleton of Belgrove, Queenstown, Ireland, 
where it flowered in May. Mr. Grumbleton obtained the 
plant from Mr. Max Leichtlin of Baden-Baden. Since then 
young plants have been raised at Kew from seeds received 
from the Tiflis Botanic Garden. 

Description. — Herbaceous, perennial ; with stout glabrous 
stems. Leaves biternate ; leaflets broad-oblong or subelliptic, 
the lateral oblique, tips very shortly pointed or acuminate, 
base obtuse, 3-4 inches long, 1^-2| inches broad, glabrous 
and dark blueish-green above, shortly pubescent and pale 
glaucous below, margins and nerves red ; petioles and 
petiololules glabrous. Flowers open, about 4-5 inches in 
diameter ; pedicels glabrous, reddish, 4 inches long. Sepals 
unequal, one oblong-lanceolate, constricted above the base, 
the other suborbicular, very obtuse, both glabrous. Petals 
about 8, roundish, concave, yellow. Stamens very numerous ; 
filaments twice as long as the anthers. Carpels 3, oblong, 
whitish-tomentose ; stigmas subsessile, purple. — 0. Stapf. 

Cultivation. — This, the most handsome of the yellow- 
flowered Paeonies, thrives under the treatment suitable for 
the other forms belonging to the herbaceous section of the 
genus, and appears as hardy and as satisfactory under culti- 
vation as they have proved. The glaucous leaves with their red 
veins and margins contrast sufficiently with the more purely 
green leaves of P. Wittmanniana (B. M. t. 6645) to attract 
attention, and it is certain to become a favourite with 
gardeners. The fine sulphur-yellow flowers are more striking 
than the whitish-yellow blooms of P. Wittmanniana, though 
the latter are as a rule larger and more decidedly yellow than 
was the case in the plant figured at t. 6645. — W. Watson. 



Figs. 1 and 2, sepals ; 3, stamen ; 4, gynoecium :— all slightly enlarged. 



8174 




M-S.delJiT.Fiteh.kA. 



VincantBrooJ<s,I>a5-& SonJ^irnp 



i Reeve &.C? LojuLotl 



Tab. 8174. 
VIBURNUM utile. 

China. 



Capbifoliaceae. Tribe Sambuceae. 
Vibubncm, Linn. ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 3. 



Viburnum (§Thms) utile, Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 356; 
species inter affines foliis crassis supra glabris subtus dense tomentosis 
facile distinguitur. 

Frutex 1-1 5 m. altus, ramulis floriferis elongatis rectis primum stellato- 
pubescentibus cito glabrescentibus. Folia persistentia, breviter petiolata, 
crassa, coriacea, lanceolato-oblonga vel interdum ovato-oblonga, saepius 
2*5-8 cm. longa, rarius usque ad 15 cm. longa, obtusa, integerrima, supra 
glabra, nitida, subtus pilis stellatis multiradiatis incano-tomentosa, venis 
primariis paucis supra impressis subtus elevatis. Mores onmes conformes, 
circiter 1 cm. diametro, dense cymosi; cymae compositae, umbellatae' 
terminates, densae.hemisphaericae, 5-8 cm. diametro, breviter pedunculatae • 
pedicelli ovario breviores, pubescentes. Calyx glaber, nitens, dentibus 
ovatis obtusis circiter 1 mm. longis. Corolla rotato-campanulata, vix 
1 cm. diametro, lobis rotundatis. Stamina breviter exserta. Ovarium 
1-loculare, 1-ovulatum, ovulo ab loculi apice pendulo; stylus brevis, 
crassus, carnosus, pilis stellatis paucis ornatus, stigmate capitate Fructw 
fere siccus, oblongus, compressus, circiter 8 mm. longus, laevis, glaber. 



Specimens of this species were first recorded by Hance 
(Journ. Bot. 1882, p. 6) as V. cotinifolium, Don, var. y, 
Hook. f. & Thorns. ; but Hooker and Thomson, so far as our 
investigations go, never published such a combination ; nor 
do we find herbarium specimens thus designated. V. cotini- 
folium, Don, is indeed a very different species, closely 
resembling the native V. Lantana, Linn. It is figured in 
the Botanical Register, 1834, t. 1650. 

The present drawing of V. utile was made from materials 
supplied by Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, who raised it 
from seed sent home by their collector, Mr. E. H. Wilson ; 
but it was first discovered near Ichang by Mr. T. Watters, 
of the British Consular Service, in 1880. Kew now 
possesses dried specimens from numerous localities in Hupeh 
and Szechuen. V. utile var. suaveolens, Franch. mss., from 
Yunnan, collected by Delavay and Henry, is regarded by 
Mr. A._ Render as a distinct species; but the differences are 
not evident, and he has not yet published a description. 
Januaby, 1908. 



Upwards of fifty species of Viburnum have now been 
recorded from China and the area of the genus encircles the 
northern hemisphere in temperate regions, and extends into 
the southern hemisphere in Madagascar as well as the Andes, 
where there are species so like some of the Chinese ones as 
to be easily mistaken for these in a dried state. 

Description - .— Shrubby, 4-5 ft. high, with long, straight 
flowering-branches, at first clothed with a stellate pubescence, 
later glabrescent. Leaves persistent, shortly stalked, thick, 
leathery, lanceolate-oblong or ovate-oblong, usually 1-3 in. 
long, sometimes 6 in. long, obtuse, quite entire, smooth and 
shining on the upper surface, lower surface densely clothed 
with a white indumentum composed of multiradiate, stellate 
hairs ; primary veins few, impressed above, elevated below. 
Flowers all similar, \~^ in. across, densely cymose ; cymes 
compound, umbellate, terminal, 2-3 in. across, shortly 
stalked ; pedicels shorter than the ovaries, pubescent. 
Calyx smooth ; teeth small, obtuse, about ^ in. long. 
Corolla rotate-cam panulate ; lobes broad, rounded. Stamens 
a little longer than the corolla. Ovary 1-celled, 1-ovuled. 
Fruit dry, oblong, flattened, smooth, black, about | in. long. 
— W. B. Hemsley. 

Cultivation. — As seen growing in the Coombe Wood 
Nursery last spring, this shrub gave the impression that it 
would eventually prove one of the most desirable of recent 
introductions from China. The habit was neat and bushy, 
and the flowers very freely borne. Like the other species of 
the genus, it can, no doubt, be increased easily by cuttings, 
and like them, too, it will thrive in ordinary well-cultivated 
ground, especially where the soil can be kept from getting 
excessively dry during the summer months. Mr. Wilson 
records the species as growing on limestone. — W. J. Bean. 

Fig. 1, portion of a young branch; 2, a stellate hair from the same; 3, a 
partially expanded flower ; 4, a corolla laid open showing the attachment of the 
stamens ; 5, calyx and pistil : — all enlarged. 



8175 




M_SdaUJ.N.Ei£chSfh. 



•Vmcent Br o oka ,T> ay & Son-L^"^- 



IRevee &-CSXondon- 



Tab. 8175. 

HERBERTIA amatorum. 

South America, 



Iridaceab. Tribe Mobaeeab. 

Herbertia, Sweet, Brit. Flow. Oard. series 1, 1827, t. 222, et ed. 2, 1838; Benth. 
et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 691, sub Alophia. 



Herbertia amatorum, C. H. Wright in Kew. Bull. 1907, p. 321 ; a speciebus 
H. amoena, Griseb., et H. coerulea, Herb., ungue macula obcordata notato 
nee punctato differt. 

(Jormus globosus, tunicis brunneis vestitus. Folia linearia, ad basin attenuata, 
18-20 cm. longa, 5-8 mm. lata. Scapus cylindricus, glaber, 1-2 mm. diam. 
30-50 cm. altus ; rami tenues, circiter 14 cm. longi. Spathae herbaceae, ad 
apices brurmeae, virides ; exterior 25-32 mm. longa, interior 42-48 mm. 
longa. Perianthium 5 cm. diam.; tubus glaber, viridis; segmenta 
exteriora obcuneata, obtusa, atroviolacea ; unguis macula alba obcordata 
notatus; interiora lanceolata, acutiora, violacea, basi brunneo-maculata. 
Antherae luteo-virides. Stylus carnosus; rami filiformes, acuti, 2 mm. 
longi. 



The germs Herbertia is confined to Southern and Central 
America, and includes, so far as is known, some fourteen 
species whereof, in addition to that now figured, the only 
ones hitherto met with in cultivation appear to be H. 
coerulea, H. Drummondiana and H. 'pulchella (B.M. t. 3862). 
Some authors have preferred to employ for this genus the 
name Alophia., given by Herbert in this work at t. 3779, 
regarding Herbertia as a synonym. According to Dalla- 
Torre and Harms the date of publication of Alophia was 
1838 ; as a matter of fact this name was not published till 
Feb. 1840, whereas in the reissue of Sweet's British Flower 
Garden, which is dated 1838, there is a figure of H. pulchella, 
while the plate itself bears the signature :— Pub. by R. 
Sweet, Oct. 1827. 

For seeds of the species now figured Kew is indebted to 
Dr. C. B. Cantera, of the Natural History Museum, Monte- 
video, who collected and forwarded them in 1903. Corms 
raised from these seeds flowered here for the first time in a 
greenhouse in May, 1907. 
January, 1908. 



Description. — Corm globose, brown. Leaves linear, 
attenuate towards the base, 7-8 in. long, -|— § in. broad. 
Scape cylindrical, glabrous, about y 1 ^ in diameter, 12-20 in. 
high ; branches slender, about 5 in. long. Spathe herbaceous, 
green with brown tip; outer 1-1 | in. long, inner about 
2 in. long. Perianth 2 in. diam. ; tube glabrous, green ; 
outer segments obcuneate, obtuse, dark violet; claw marked 
with a white obcordate spot ; inner segments lanceolate, 
acute, violet with a brown spot at the base. Anthers 
yellowish green. Style fleshy ; stigma branches filiform, 
acute, -jJg in. long. — T. F. Chipp. 

Cultivation. — Herbertia amatorum is the most handsome 
species of this genus so far brought into cultivation. The 
beautiful dark porcelain -blue flowers are very fugitive, but 
the plants bloom continuously for several months. The 
Herbertias call for the same treatment as Rigidella and 
Ferraria, to which they are nearly allied ; they require 
protection from frost, a light sandy soil, and a sunny 
position in a frame or greenhouse. It is possible that in 
the warmer parts of the United Kingdom this and some 
of the other species could be grown in a sheltered sunny 
border in the open air. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, base of outer perianth-segment; 2, base of inner perianth-segment ; 
3, stamens and style-arms; 4 and 5, anthers; 6, whole plant : — 1-5, enlarged ; 
(>, about one-fifth nat. size. 



8116 




.del- JJCFitakliUv 



"Vine ent BuoaiS D ay & Sar_ l^r rntg 



L.Reero ^C 9 Landaii, 



Tab. 8176. 
PSEUDOLARIX Fortunei. 

China. 



Conifebae. Tribe Abietineae. 
Pskudolaiux, Gord. ; Benth et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 442, in nota sub 

Larice. 



Pseudolarix Fortunei, Mayr, Monoqr. AUet. Jap. 1890, p. 99 ; Mast, in Journ 
Linn. ^-1902, vo i. xxyi . p . 557j et 1906j yo , xxxy]i 424 & H m 

in Gard. Chron. 190 f, vol. xlii. p. 344; species unica. 
Arbor interdum usque ad 35^0 m. alta, aspectu Laricis europame 
sed ramis magis divancatis, monoecia. Folia acicularia, decidua 
ima basi articulata, 2-8 cm., sed saepius 3-4 cm. longa, 1-5-2 mm. lata' 
glabra, tenuia, flexiha, vix acuta, subtus obscure 2-sulcata, costa supra 
leviter elevata, canalibus resiniferis 2 intramarginalibus et 1 (vel interdum 
2 ?) mediano instructa, in ramis lateralibus valde abbreviatis 30-40 vel 
pauciora, intra perulas parvas obtusas scariosas totidem biseriatim quasi- 
verticillata, confertissima, recta, stellatim radiata, in ramis primariis dissite 
spiralia, basi semi-torta, internodiis brevibus ; cataphylla intra folia 
numerosa, lineari-acuminata. Amenta mascula oblongo-cylindrica, in 
ramulorum lateralium brevissimorum aphyllorum apicibus numerosa 
(plerumque 25-30), fasciculata, graciliter stipitata, recurva, cum stipite 
aequilongo circiter 1 cm. longa; fasciculi bracteis tenuibus scariosis 
obovatis stipites fere aequantibus involucrati; ramuli floriferi nunc cum 
ramuhs omnino similibus foliiferis intermixti, nunc separati. Antherae in 
quoque amento circiter 20, biloculares, transversim bivalvatim dehiscentes 
connectivo non producto vel sursum in appendicem filiformem apice 
integram vel dentatam extenso. Amenta feminea globosa, 1-5-2 cm 
diametro, ad ramulorum lateralium apices terminalia, foliis paucis plane 
spirahbus fulta. Ovula 2, prope squamae basin affixa, reversa. Strobilm 
ovoideo-oblongus, 4-5 cm. longus, erectus. Bracteae ovato-lanceolatae, 
5-8 mm. longae, mtegrae vel obscure denticulatae, squamis basi adnatae et 
clemum cum us deciduae. Squamae seminiferae ovatae, 2-3 cm. longae, 
l*o-l*o cm. latae, obtusae vel bifidae, leviter undulatae, coriaceae, basi 
iignescentes, breviter stipitatae, laxae, divergentes, cum seminibus maturis 
adnatis deciduae. Sernina sub quaque squama 2, samaroidea, alata, squamam 
aequantia. Kmbryo clavatus, in albuminis centro rectus, circiter 4 mm. 
longus, infra cotyledones leviter constrictus; cotyledones 4, circiter 1 mm. 
g oz£ Y?kZ conniventes.— Abies Kaempferi, Lindl. Gard. Chron. 1854, 
pp. Jooet455, cum figura coni, quoad plantam Fortuneanam tantum etexcl. 
synon. Kaempf. et Lamb., non Lindl. in Penny Cyclop. 1833, vol. i. p. 34; 
fortune, A Residence among the Chinese, 1857, p. 274, cum figura habitus, 
m Jr%k Ch r 0n - 1860 ' P- 17 ° J Ml ^ray, The Pines and Firs of Japan, 1863, 
pp. Ml-LW Lanx Kaempferi, Carr. in Flore des Serres, 1856, vol. xi. p. 97; 
Miq.Prol.Fl. Jap. 1867, p. 389; Franch. et Savat. Enum. PI. Jap. 1875, 
vol. i. p. 466, excl. synon. Kaempf. et Lamb. ; Franch. PL David, i. p. 286. 
lgnx amabilis Senilis [E. Nelson], Pinaceae, 1866, p. 84. Pseudolarix 
kaempferi Gord. Pinetum, 1858, p. 292, excl. synon. Lamb. ; Eichler in 
Engl. & Prantl Natiirl. Pflanzenf. 1889, vol. ii. 1, p. 77, f. 33; Mast, in 
c icS*- 1884 ' voL xxi - PP- 581 et 5 84, ff. 112 et 113; Journ. Linn. 
°P°". t^ 6 ' voL xxii - P- 208, tt. 9 et 10. Laricopsis Kaempferi, Kent in 
Veitcns Man. Conif. new ed. 1900, p. 403, ff. 105 et 106. 

Januaby, 1908. 



More than forty years ago Andrew Murray pointed out 
that this Chinese tree, introduced by Fortune, was not, as 
at first supposed, the Japanese " Larix conifera, nuclei's 
pyramidatis, foliis deciduis " of Kaempfer ( Amoen. Exot. 
p. 833) ; therefore Pinus Kaempferi, Lamb. (Grenus Pinus, 
ed. 3, 1832, p. 7) and the original Abies Kaempferi, Lindl. 
(Penny Cyclop. 1833, vol. i. p. 34) are not synonyms of 
Pseudolarix Fortunei. Moreover, these names were applied 
to the Japanese tree twenty years before the Pseudolarix 
was discovered. Lindley's identification has caused much 
confusion in the synonymy of this species, but although 
Murray cleared it up, he did not introduce a new name. 
Kaempfer's tree is Larix leptolepis, (lord., yet Franchet & 
Savatier, following others, cite it under Larix Kaempferi, 
Carr. (Pseudolarix Fortunei, Mayr), which is not a native 
of Japan, and was not, up to a few years ago, even cultivated 
in that country. It is true that Franchet & Savatier record 
it, on the authority of Miquel, as being in cultivation in 
Japan, adding that it was also very probably wild ; but 
Mayr states positively that it was not in cultivation there 
up to 181)0. Mayr has taken the step rendered necessary 
by Murray's elucidation of the facts, and the late Dr. M. T. 
Masters has accepted Mayr's name in the most recent 
revision of the Chinese Coniferae (Journ. Linn. Soc. Nov. 1, 
1906, vol. xxxvii. p. 424), as he had previously done in the 
place cited above. But as long ago as 1847 Endlicher 
(Synopsis Coniferae, p. 130) cited Kaempfer's Larix conifera 
under his Pinus leptolepis, syn. Abies leptolepis, Sieb. & 
Zucc, having apparently overlooked the publication of 
Pinus Kaempferi, Lamb. 

Fortune discovered this tree in the mountains of Chekiang, 
and sent seeds to England in the winter of 1853. He had 
formed a high opinion of its value as an ornamental tree, 
and took infinite trouble to ensure its introduction. Writing 
in 1860 he says : M I used every means in my power to 
introduce its seeds in large quantities and in good condition. 
They were sent by the overland mail, some in letters and 
some in small packages, for several years in succession, 
and were often sown in England in less than two months 
from the time they were gathered from the tree in China. 
Out of all sent home only one despatch vegetated freely ; 
all the others were complete failures. All the plants of 



any size now in England were dug up in the woods of 
China and sent home in Wardian cases. In cultivation 
this species, like many of its race, prefers a loamy soil and 
a hilly or undulating situation. I would advise the 
possessors of very small plants to keep them in shady 
places during the hot summer months. In nature the 
young plants are all reared under the shade of trees." 

Pseudolarix Fortunei is apparently a rare tree in its 
native country. Fortune found it only in the Province of 
Chekiang ; Pranchet records it, with doubt, from Kiangsi, 
and Wilson states that it occurs wild on the Lushan, 
Kiangsi, where, however, he found only a few small trees. 
In this country it is still uncommon ; the finest specimen 
we have seen is in the gardens at Penjerrick, near Falmouth. 
Although perfectly hardy, it cannot be said to flourish at 
Kew, where there are several trees. One of these, near the 
chimp of Celtis australis and Quercus Ilex, to the left on 
entering the gardens from Kew Green, flowered profusely 
in June, 1907, when the drawing was made. Fully 
developed cones followed in abundance on the uppermost 
branches, containing apparently fully developed seeds, 
even to the albumen, but no embryo was formed. The 
only perfect seeds we have seen are some of Fortune's 
collecting, preserved in spirit at Kew, from one of which 
was obtained the previously undescribed embryo. 

Description. — A tree with the habit and appearance of a 
larch, sometimes as much as 120-130 ft. high ; branches some- 
what stratified, as in the Cedar of Lebanon. Leaves deciduous, 
needle-shaped, usually 1-1 ^ in. long, sometimes as much as 
3 in. long on vigorous shoots, thin, flexible, not prickle- 
pointed, whorled and stellately spreading in the lateral 
spurs, spirally arranged in the primary branches. Male 
catkins clustered at the tips of lateral spurs without any 
leaves below, recurved, including the slender stalk about 
.V in. long. Anthers about 20 in each catkin. Female 
catkins globose, about § in. in diameter, borne at the tips of 
lateral spurs, with a few spirally arranged leaves below. 
Cone ovoid-oblong, l§-2 in. long. Scales 2-seeded, ovate, 
§-lj in. long, obtuse or notched at the tip, leathery, woody 
at the base, shortly stalked, loose, spreading, falling with 
the seeds. Seeds winged, equalling the scales, and, as the 



scales open, the wings project beyond them, giving them 
the appearance of having a white margin. Embryo straight, 
club-shaped, about *- in. long ; cotyledons 4, about one-third 
as long as the radicle. — W. B. Hemsley. 

Cultivation.— As a garden tree the Golden Larch is 
perhaps the most beautiful of the Larix group. It is easily 
distinguished from the true Larches, even in the absence of 
cones, by the larger size and greater substance of the leaves. 
At all times attractive, it is especially so in spring, when 
the young foliage is a beautiful shade of tender, yellowish 
green, and again in autumn, when the leaves turn a rich 
golden colour before falling. It thrives best in a good 
well-drained loamy soil. At Kew the natural soil of the 
gardens is too poor for this tree to succeed well. It is only 
by mixing with it a large proportion of stiff loam that 
Pseudolarix Kaempferi can be made to develop its char- 
acteristic beauty. — W. J. Bean. 



_ Kk. 1, a branch bearing male flowers ; 2, a male catkin; 3 and 4, anthers; 
6, ,i branch bearing female flowers; 6, a scale and its subtending bract; 7, a 
scale seen from the mside bearing two scales; 8, a cone ; 9, a seed :— -figs. 1, 5, 
ana 8, natural size, the others enlarged. 



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Tab. 8177. 
REHMANNIA angulata. 

China. 

Scbophulariaceae. Tribe Digit at-ieae. 
Uehmannia, Libosch ; Benth. et Hook./, Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 960. 



Rehmannia angulata, Ilemsl. in Joum. Linn. Sue. vol. xxvi. p. 193; Gard. 
Chron. 1903, yoI. xxxiii. p, 290, cum fig. p. 296; species R. glutinosae, 
Libosch, majus affinis, ab ea tamen differt partibus omnibus majoribus, 
foliis gro?Sr! dentato-lobatis et floribus roseo-purpureis. 

llerba b : ennis vel perennis, glanduloso-hirsuta, etatura valde variabilis, exem- 
plaria sylvestria 15 cm. ad 1 m. alta, culta caulibus interdum usque ad 
2 m. longis. Caulea teretes. subsimplicus. Folia alteraa, tenuia, papyraeen, 
ovato-oblonga, petiolata, inferiora usque ad 15 cm. longa, sursum gradatim 
minora, suprema parva, hracteiformia, sessilia, inferiora irregulariter 
duplicate- dentato-lobata, superiora paucidentata, dentibus acutissimis, 
omnia glabrescentia. Flares rosei, fauce luteo-tincti f-t rubro-maculati, 
axillares, solitarii, pedunculati, nutantes, 9-10 cm. longi, pedunculis 
longiores. Calyx glanduloso-hirsutus, oampanulatus, circiter 3 cm. Jongus, 
alte 5-lobatus, lobis acuminatis acutis inaequalibus, postico longiore. 
( 'orolla declinata ; tubus latus, ventricosus, curvatus, intus basin versus 
puberulus et fauce pilis panels longis instructus ; limbus bilabiatus, 
6-7 cm. diametro, lobis rotundatis divergent ibus. Stamina didynamia, 
inclusa, fere basilaria ; filamenta filiformia, l'5-2 cm. longa; antherae per 
paria approximatae, loculis divergentibus. Ovarium glabram, imperfecte 
2-loculare, loculis multiovulatis; stylus filiformis, inclusus, stigmate 
inaequaliter bilabiato. Camula non visa. — Ii. gluiinwa, Libosch, var. 
angulata, D. Oliv. in Hook. Ic. PL t. 1589. 



This is another of the numerous ornamental Chinese 
plants introduced by Messrs. James Veiteh & Sons, through 
Mr. E. H. Wilson. It is an exceedingly free-growing 
subject, and seedlings exhibit a considerable amount of 
variation in colour. Dried specimens of it were at first 
associated, as a variety, with the original E. chinensis, 
Fisch. & Mey. (B. M. 1838, t. 3653), which is the same as 
R. glutinom, Libosch ; but fully developed cultivated plants 
present a very different appearance. Unfortunately it is 
not so hardy as the older one, which inhabits the northern 
province of Ohihli in the neighbourhood of Peking, whereas 
E. angulata is a native of the central provinces of Hupeh 
and Kweichau. There are several other species of this 
genus, which is confined to the Chinese region. E. rupes- 
tris, Hemsl. (B. M. 1891, t. 7191) is very different, and 
should perhaps be separated generically, 
February, 1908. 



Description. — Biennial or perennial, clothed with glandu- 
lar hairs. Stems in cultivation 4-6 ft. long. Leaves 
alternate, stalked, ovate-oblong, lower 6 in. long, gradually 
smaller upwards, uppermost bract-like and sessile, irregu- 
larly lobed and toothed or only toothed ; teeth very acute. 
Mowers pink, tinged with yellow and beset with darker 
spots in the throat, axillary, solitary, distinctly stalked, 
nodding ; stalks shorter than the flowers. Calyx campanu- 
late, about 1 in. long, deeply 5-lobed ; lobes narrow, pointed, 
uppermost longer than the others. Corolla 3-4 in. long ; 
tube broad, ventricose, curved ; limb 2-lipped, 2^-2§ in. 
across, lobes rounded, spreading. Stamens 4, didynamous, 
much shorter than the corolla; filaments slender; anthers 
connivent in pairs with divergent cells. Ovary glabrous ; 
style included. Capsule not seen. — W. BOTTING HEMSLEY. 

CULTIVATION. — This handsome herbaceous plant is pro- 
bably a perennial, but under cultivation it is most satisfactory 
when treated as a biennial. The seeds are sown in a little 
warmth in May, and the young plants are grown in a frame 
till the following May, when they are planted in an open 
horder, where by July they are from 4 feet to (> feet high 
and in full flower. Or they may be grown in pots and 
treated as greenhouse plants. In the warmer parts of the 
country this plant has proved hardy. It ripens seeds freely 
at Kew. — W. Watson. 



Pig. 1, portion of base of corolla-tulie and stamens; 2 anrl 3, front and back 
view of anther; 4, pistil : — all enlarged. 



8118 




K.SaeL.JN,Fi+c3i.lilh. 



ViricentBr oo>.s,D ay & Scm.L^ ing> 



XReevB & C 9 LarulaiL 



Tab. 8178. 

CODONGPSIS OONVOLVULACRA. 

Eastern Asia. 



Campanulackae. Tribe Campanultcar 
Codonopsis, Wall; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 557. 



Cotlonopsis eonvolvulacea, Kurz in Journ. Bot. 1873, vol. xi. p. 195 ; 
Hook. !<■. Plant, t. 2385; Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Hoc. vol. xxxvi. p. 468 ; 
species calyce manifesto supero, corolla lobis ad basin usque sejunetis 
insignia 

Herba pere-mis. Cattle* volubiles, graciles, glabri, laxo ramosi. Folia mem- 
hranacea, saepius sparsa, ovata vel ovato-lauceolata, 2-5 cm. louga, 
0*5-3 cm. lata, apice subaoata vcl acuta vel acuminata, basi cuneata vel 
truncate vel internum cordate, margine subintegra vel minute denticulate, 
utrmque saepissime glabra' petioli gracilliini, 0*25-1 "25 cm. longi. 
PtduHcttli glabri, elongati, volubiles. Calyx snporus, 5-sectus, tnbo 
obconico glabro 1)75 cm. lo.igo, lobis triangulis lanceolatisve saepius 
acutis 0*5-1 cm. longis 0*25-0*5 cm. latis glabris vel raro parce ciliatis. 
Corolla cauipanulat*, 5-parlita, 2 4 cm. louga, limbo 3-5 cm. lato, coerulea, 
lobis tiiangulis vcl oblanceolatis acutis et saepe mhmtissirne mncronu- 
latis. h'ilamenta glabra, radiatim refracte, extra props basin appeudicibus 
ovatis margine ciliatis indute ; antherae oblongae, glabrae, introrse 
dehiscent es. Stigma 3-lobum. Copt-ala truncate vel subconica, 3-valvis, 
()*5-0*75 cm. longa. 



The species of Codonopsis, of which twenty-two are now 
known, have been critically examined by Mr. T. F. Chipp, who 
considers that they admit of arrangement in four sections dis- 
tinguished by the relative position of the floral whorls. In 
one section, limited to the single species C, Tangshen, figured 
at t. 8090 of this work, the calyx is inferior. In another, 
represented by C. rotundifolia, figured in two varieties at 
t. 4942 and t. 5018, but including ten other species, the 
calyx is half-superior while the corolla is superior. In a 
third section, including seven species, none of which have 
yet been figured in this work, the calyx and corolla are both 
half-superior. In the last section, which includes only three 
species, the calyx is superior. It is to this section that C. 
eonvolvulacea, the plant now figured, belongs ; within the 
section our plant stands alone in having the corolla-lobes 
free to the base. 
Fbbruaky, 1908. 



Like the other species, C. convolvulacea is confined to 
Eastern Asia, but its area of distribution within the region 
is somewhat wide, for it extends from the Shan Plateau in 
Central Indo-China northwards into Yunnan and Szechuan 
and thence westward into Central Tibet; the flowers in 
Tibetan examples are smaller than in the Chinese and Shan 
specimens, but do not materially differ in other respects. 

Extensive as the area from which specimens have been 
reported actually is, it seems possible that it may prove to 
be wider than these indicate. The plant from which our 
figure was prepared was presented to Kew by Mr. M. 
Leichtlin of Baden-Baden in 1906 and flowered here in 
August, 1907. Its flowers were larger than those of 
Burmese specimens and than those of all the Chinese speci- 
mens except in a single gathering communicated by Mr. A. 
Hosie from between Batang and Tachienlu, and thus 
differed as much from these, in a converse direction, as the 
flowers of Tibetan specimens do. But, like the Tibetan 
ones, they agree with the Chinese and Burmese flowers in 
every character save that of size. 

When Mr. Leichtlin sent this plant to Kew he suggested 
that it might be a Campanulaceous species new to cultivation, 
but added no note as to its origin. With a plant sent by 
him at the same time to Mr. H. J. El wee, in whose collection 
at Colesborne it flowered contemporaneously with the plant 
at Kew, Mr. Leichtlin gave a locality in the North- West 
Himalaya. In response to a request for more definite 
information, Mr. Leichtlin has most obligingly stated that 
these plants were derived from seeds communicated to him 
by the late Mr. W. Gollan, Superintendent of the Botanic 
Garden at Saharanpur in Northern India ; these seeds were 
obtained in the North- West Himalaya by one of Mr. 
Gollan's native collectors. Hitherto no Indian botanist has 
communicated herbarium specimens of C. convolvulacea 
from any portion of the Himalaya, but, when regard is had 
to the care which characterises the work of Mr. Leichtlin 
and characterised that of Mr. Gollan, the possibility that 
C. convolvulacea may occur in the North- West Himalaya 
should not be overlooked by botanical travellers. 

Description.— A perennial herb. Stems slender, smooth, 
twining, sparingly branched. Leaves membranous, usually 



quite glabrous, mostly alternate, ovate-lanceolate or ovate, 
f-2 in. long, -5— lj in. wide, subacute or acute or acuminate, 
with cuneate or truncate, or sometimes cordate base, the 
margin subentire or faintly toothed ; petioles slender, -^-^ in. 
long. Peduncle* smooth, long, twining. Calyx superior, 
the tube obconic, smooth, \—\ in. long, the limb 5-lobed, 
lobes triangular or lanceolate, usually acute, -£~f in. long, 
- 8 — -1- in. wide, usually glabrous, sometimes sparingly ciliate. 
Corolla campanulate, blue, 5-partite to the base ; lobes 
\-\\ in. long, triangular or oblanceolate, acute and often 
finely mucronulate ; limb l$-2 in. across. Filament* 
glabrous, spreading, each with an ovate ciliate appendage 
at the base on the outer side ; anthers oblong, glabrous, 
their dehiscence introrse. Stigma 3-lobed. Capsule trun- 
cate or subconic, 3-valved, ^-\ in. long. 

Cultivation". — Though the individual flowers are striking, 

C. eonvolvulacea cannot be reckoned a showy plant ; the 
Kew plant had indeed only one flower open at one time. 
It does not, however, compare unfavourably with the other 
species that have been in cultivation, most of which, 
as stated by Dr. Lindley, are plants with dull-coloured 
flowers recalling those of an Atropa, with the habit of a 
miniature Canarina. From its behaviour Mr. Leichtlin is 
inclined to think that the present species may be a biennial. 
It has been grown at Kew as a pot-plant, in a cold frame. — 

D. PUAIN. 



Fig. 1, a flower from which the corolla and part of the calyx have been 
emoved ; 2 and 3, stamens with appendage : — all enlarged. 



8170 




Tin^ix Broils 1. c 



L Reeve 81. C"? Landau 



Tab. 8179. 
PYRUS Tschonoskil 

Japan. 



Rosaceae. Tribe Pomeae. 
Pykus, Linn. ■ Benth. <t Ecok.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 626. 



Pyrus Tschonoskii, Maxim. Mrl. Biol, pars ix. p. 165; Bidl. Am,}. Petenb. 1874, 
vol. xix. p. 169; Sargent, For. Fl. Japan, p. 40, 1. 14; 1'. yannanerm, 
Franch., affinis, sed inflorescentiis paucifloris, foliis fructibusque majoribus 
et calyce persistente distincta. 

Arbor 10-12 m. alta, trnnco 30 cm. diametro, cortice laevi pallido, coma 
angusta rotundata; ramuli teretes, crassiusculi, primo laxe incano- 
tornentosi, deinde nigrescentes, lcnticellis spams punctiformibus. 
(iem mar bibemantes ovoideae, obtusae, 5 mm. longae, peralis latis 
castaneis vol aurantiaco-rubescentibus dense ciliatis. Folia late ovata, 
acuta vel acute acuminata, basi rotundata, irregulariter dentata dentibus 
glandulosis, 5 12 cm. longa, 3 -5-7 cm. lata, firma, supra primo floccoso- 
villcVa, deinnm plabrata, viridia, intra albo-tomentosa mature subglabrata, 
pallida, nervis lateraliluis utrinque 6-10 recti's Valde obliquis; petioli 
$>raciles, 2-3 cm. lou^i. llacemi mnbclli formes 4-6-flori, incano-villosuli; 
pediceili 1—1*5 cm. longi. Iteceptaculum eampanulato-obconicum, incano- 
yillosulum, 5 mm. longum. Calycit dente* ovati, acuti, 3 mm. longi, dorso 
iueano, facie copiose albo-villosi, sub antbesi patentes, deinde erecti cum 
fractal persistentes. PeiaJa alba, apicem versus roseo-suffusa, circiter 
12 mm. longa. Stamina circiter 40. tityli 5, basi coaliti, infra medium 
albo-yillosi. Fruetm globosus vel globoso-obovoideus, ad 2 - 5 cm. diametro, 
viridi-flavescens, uno latere rubescens, lcnticellis pallidis verruculosus, 
papore austere, came granulis duris permeata.— A'nWo&ws Tschonoskii, 
Bender in Sargent, Trees and (Sbrubs, vol. i. p. 73, t. 37. 

This is apparently a rare tree in Japan, so far only found 
in woods in Central Hondo. It was named after Tschonoski, 
one of Maximowicz's collectors, who discovered it at Siba- 
siri at the foot of Fujiyama; subsequently in 1892 it 
was collected near Nikko and at the foot of Asamayamo 
north of Tokio by Professor Sargent, who introduced the 
tree into the Arnold Arboretum and, in 1897, presented 
plants to Kew. It belongs to the section Eriolobu.s which 
was originally proposed as a genus by Boemer and recon- 
stituted as such by Render, I.e., who includes in it four 
species, all Asiatic. 

t Description.-— A tree, 30-40 ft. high, trunk 1 ft. in 
diam. ; bark smooth, pale ; young brancblets whitish- 
Febbuaey, 1908. 



tomentose, at length glabrous and dark with small lenticels ; 
winter-buds ovoid, obtuse, brown to bright orange, ciliate. 
Leaves broad, ovate, acute or acuminate, rounded at the 
base, irregularly dentate, from 2 to over 4 in. long, 
1J-3 in. wide, firm, floccose-tomentose above when 
young, ultimately glabrous, whitish-tomentose beneath, 
lateral nerves straight, very oblique, 6—10 on each side; 
petioles slender, about I in. long. Racemes umbel-like, 
4-6-fiowered ; pedicels about ^ in. long, whitish-villous. 
Receptacle ^ in. long, whitish-villous. Calyx-teeth ovate, 
acute, spreading in flower, erect and persistent in fruit. 
Fruit more or le?s globose, about 1 in. in diameter, greenish- 
yellow and more or less red on one side with small lenticels ; 
tlesh austere, gritty. — Otto Stapf. 

CULTIVATION. — The most striking character of this rare 
and interesting tree is its erect, open, and rather formal 
habit. It has been grown at Kew quite unprotected for 
ten years, and may therefore be considered hardy. Like 
the other members of the same genus it enjoys generous 
treatment. It has grown well at Kew in a border of rich 
loam. It flowered in the spring of 1907 better than it had 
done previously, this being partly due to increasing age 
and partly, no doubt, to the splendid ripening weather of 
the previous autumn. — W. J. Bkax. 



Fig. 1, part of young leaf (upper surface); 2, section of calyx with pistil 
3 and 4, anthers ; 5, part of the peel of the fruit with lenticels :— all eularyed. 



8180 




'■Incerb 3nocJ-^ r Da^&.Son.I.t imp 



T."R««W» !>,C.° T m,J, 



Tab. 8180. 
POTENTILLA concolor. 

Ghina. 



Eosaceae. Tribe Potentilleae. 

Potentilla, Linn.; Benth. et Hook. f. Quit. Fluid, vol. iii. p. 620 ; C'l>. Lehm. 

llevis. Potattill. p. 1. 



Potentilla concolor, Solfe; a P. GriffUh.ii, Hook, f., foliolis duplo majoribus 
concoloribus, floribus duplo majoribus differt. 

llerba peretinis, circa 3 cm. alta. Caules suberecli, validi, pubescentcs. Folia 
radicalia non vidi; caulina petiolata vel superiora subsessilia, pinnata 
vel superiora trifoliolata ; rhachis pubescens ; foliola obovato-elliptica, 
inciso-dentata, basi attenuata, 2-5 cm. longa, concoloria, pubescentia ; 
stipulae ovato-oblongae, obtusae vel subacutae, integrae, tenuiter pubes- 
centes, 1-3 cm. longae. Gymae laxae, pauciflorae. Flore* speciosi, 4 cm. 
lati, lutei. Calyx 2-5 cm. latus, 5-bracteolatus; lobi ovato-oblongi, acuti, 
lenuiter pubescentes. Bractclae calycis lobis similes. Petala latissime 
obcordata, apiee biloba, 1*5-2 cm. lata. Antherae purpureo-margiuatae. 
Achaenia et styli glabri. — Potentilla Griffithii, var. concolor, Franch. PI. 
Delav. p. 213. 

The handsome Potentilla here figured is a native of the 
province of" Yunnan, in south-western China, where it was 
discovered by the Abbe' Delavay about twenty years ago, 
growing in calcareous soil on Mt. Yen-tze-hay, at about 
10,500 ft. elevation. It was described as a variety of the 
Himalayan Potentilla Griffithii, Hook, f., by Franchet, who, 
however, pointed out that it has much larger concolorous 
leaflets, not white-tomentose beneath as in the typical form ; 
also larger foliac^ous stipules and much larger golden 
yellow flowers. It has now appeared in cultivation, having 
been submitted for determination in May last by Messrs. 
Bees, Ness, Neston, Cheshire, with the information that it 
had been received from Yunnan. Now that living speci- 
mens are available it is evident that the plant referred to 
cannot be P. Griffithii, Hook. f. ; though a member of the 
same group, it is quite unlike the Himalayan plant in 
general aspect, and is clearly a distinct species, for which 
the varietal name, concolor, may be retained as the specific 
appellation. P. Griffithii has leaflets of about half the 
size of the present species, and these are invariably densely 
white-tomentose beneath, and the tomentose character also 

Februauy, 19C8. 



extends to the sepals and bracteoles, while the flowers 
generally are not half as large. P, concolor is probably the 
finest yellow-flowered species known, and promises to be a 
very showy garden plant. It will probably prove as hardy 
as its Himalayan congeners. 

Description. — A perennial herb over a foot high. 
Branches suberect, stoutish, pubescent. Radical leave* not 
seen ; cauline leaves petiolate or the upper subsessile, 
pinnate or the upper trifoliolate ; rachis pubescent; leaflets 
obovate-elliptical, deeply toothed, attenuate at the base, 
1-2 in. long, concolorous, pubescent ; stipules ovate-oblong, 
obtuse or subacute, entire, slightly pubescent, |-1 in. long. 
Cymes lax, few-flowered. Flowers very large, over 1^ in. 
across. Calyx spreading, 1 in. broad, with five bracteoles 
alternating with the sepals and similar to them in shape; 
lobes ovate-oblong, acute, slightly pubescent. Petals 
broadly obcordate, bilobed at the apex, £— -| in. broad, deep 
yellow, with an orange-coloured blotch at the base. Anthers 
elliptic-oblong, margined with purple. Achenes and style 
glabrous. — R. A. ROLFE. 

Cultivation. — Only a few of the numerous species of 
Potentilla have won recognition as garden plants, and the 
best of these is P. Russelliana (B. M. t. 3470) which is a 
hybrid, said to have been raised at least 75 years ;igo by 
a Mr. Russell of Battersea, from P. atrosanguinea and 
P. nepalensis. The plant here figured is. in habit and 
general characters, very similar to P. Russelliana; but 
whilst the latter has rich blood-red flowers, those of the 
present plant are bright yellow. These are produced in 
May, and the plant is evidently quite hardy, thriving under 
the treatment that answers for the garden representatives 
of Geum and Geranium. — W. Watsox. 



Fig. 1, calyx and bracteoles; 2 and 3, anthers; 4, a young carpel:— all 
• nlarged. 



8181 



\ I 




deUXEhchliflv 



Ymcer^BroolssIlay&Son-Lt^intp 



L.Eceve &_C° Ionian. 



Tab. 8181. 
LARIX Griffith!!. 
Sikkim and Bhutan. 



Coniferae. Tribe Abietineae. 

Larix, Mill. ; Benth. >t Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 442 ; Ekhl. in Engl, et 

Prantl, Naturl. Pflanzenfam, vol. ii. i. j). 75. 



Larix Griffithii, Hook. f. in Him. Journ. vol. ii. p. 44 (nomen) et tig. p. 55 ; 
111. Himal. PI. t. 21 (excl. fig. 1-4); Qammie, in Pup. Bat. Sure. Ltd. 
vol. i. no. 2, p. 11; rjambh, Man. hid. Timh. eel. 2, p. 720; a L. decidua, 
Mill., differt conis multo majoribus cylindricis, earpellis oblongis 
subulato-caudatis a medio reflexis squamas ovuligeras dtiplo superantibus. 

Arbor G-20 ni. alta, truiico gracili, coma pyramidal), ramis longis subdeflexis, 
ramulis Iongissimis Hexilibus penduhs, primo pilosis citi'ssimc glabratis 
viridi-alutaceis vel pallide brunneis demum nigrescentibus, pulvinis parvis 
truncatis decurrentibus verrucosis. Gemmae hibernanles globoso-ovoiclcae, 
perulis intimis hyalinis latis unguiculatis floccoso-villosis. Folia decidua 
in brachycladiis cylindricis 5-8 mm. longis 4-6 mm. latis 30-50 patentia, 
acicularia, acutiuscula, 25-35 mm. longa, 0*5 mm. lata, complanata, 
utrinque leviter 2-sulcata, viridia, superne glauca. StrobUi matculi 
ovoid i, lntei, rubescentes, eirciter 8 mm. longi, pedicellati, baai 
sqnamis hyalinis unguiculatis Hoeeoso-villosissuffulti; connectivi appendix 
parva, ovata. StrobUi feminei breviter cylindrici, atro-purpurei, ad 
3 cm. longi, vix 15 cm. diametro, basi uti masculi squamis hyalinis 
suft'ulti. Carpel/a lanceolata, ob costam excurrentem subulato-caudata, 
a medio retlexa, margine superne repanda. Squamae ovuliferae latissime 
rotundatae quam carpella duplo breviores. Qoni maturi in ramulis 
pendulis erecti, cylindrici, ad 7 cm. longi, 3 cm. lati, purpureo-brmmei, 
squamae late truocato- vel subemargiiiato-obovatae, ad 1 em. Jongae et ultra 
1 cm. latae. Semen obovoideum, vix 3 mm. longnm, ala oblique elliptica 
duplo longiore.— Larix sj>. Griffith, It. Not. p. 189; Priv. Journ. p. 287. 
L. Griffithiana, Gord. Pinet. p. 126. Abie* Gritfithana, J. Hook, et Lindl. 
ex Gord. in Journ. Hort. Soc. vol. v. p. 214 (nomen). Pinus Griftithii, 
Pari, in DC. Prodr. vol. xvi. pars ii. p. 41 1. 



This Larch was discovered in 1838 by Griffith in Bhutan 
on the mountain slopes above Woollakoo, a village some- 
what south-west of Punakha, between 6000 and 9600 feet. 
In 1848 it was found by Sir Joseph Hooker on the slopes 
of Nango Mountain in Eastern Nepal, and in the follow- 
ing year in the Lachen Valley in Sikkim. More recently 
it has also been recorded from the Chnmbi Valley at 
10,000 feet. Its western limit lies, according to Nepalese 
sources, near the headwaters of the Kosi Eiver. In Sikkim 
it appears, according to Mr. Gammie, at 8000 feet, becomes 
February, 1908. 



plentiful at 0500 feet and ascends to 12,000 feet. Griffith 
describes it as a small tree, and so Sir Joseph saw it in 
Nepal; but in Sikkim it is as much as 65 ft. high. In 
its natural habitat it prefers dry, rocky soil and grassy 
slopes, and is, like our larch, a light- loving tree. It is 
known in Sikkim as ' Sah ' or ' Saar,' and is cut up in 
planks which Sir Joseph describes as soft and small but 
very durable. The drawing was made from specimens in 
cultivation at Kew, with the exception of the male catkins 
which were figured from a specimen supplied by Sir 
Edmund Loder of Leonardslee, Horsham, Sussex. 

Inscription".— Tree 20-65 ft. high, with slender trunk, 
long hranches and very long, cordlike, pendulous branchlets, 
pilose when quite young, pale at first, then dark, rough 
from the small persistent leaf-cushions. Winter buds 
globose-ovoid, inner scales hyaline, very broad, clawed, 
floccose-villous. Leaves needle-shaped, those on the cylindric 
short-shoots fascicled, 30-50, and spreading, subacute, about 
1 in. long, ^3- in. wide, flat, bisulcate on both sides, 
bright green, with glaucous lines above. Male flowers 
ovoid, yellowish, tinged with red, about I in. long, shortly 
pedicel led ; appendage of connective small, ovate. Female 
flowers cylindric, dark-purple, over 1 in. long. Carpels 
(bracts of the older authors) lanceolate, subulate-caudate, 
reflexed from the middle ; ovuliferous scales very broad, 
rotundate, half as long as the carpels. Cone cylindric, up to 
almost 8 in. long, over 1 in. in diameter, purplish-brown ; 
scales broad, truncate or subemarginate-obovate, up to ^ in. 
long and broad. Seed obovoid, scarcely i in. long; wing 
broad, obliquely elliptic, J- in. long. — Otto Stapp. 

Cultivation.— None of the other Larches and very few 
Conifers have proved so difficult to cultivate in Great 
Britain as this Himalayan specie.-. Seeds have been 
imported to Kew on several occasions, and as a rule they 
have germinated freely. But the young plants rarely live 
more than a few years. The average climate of Great 
Britain is doubtless unsuited for it, and the resulting ill- 
health renders it peculiarly subject to the attacks of the 
Larch-blight (Chermes abietis). During the last twenty 
years it has not lived to attain a greater height at Kew 



in the open than 3 ft. Apart from its susceptibility to 
insect attack it ought to thrive in the gardens of the milder 
parts of England and in many parts of Ireland. The tree 
at Leonardslee is, indeed, apparently quite healthy. Yet 
it still remains the fact that this Larch is one of the rarest 
of cultivated Conifers, although numerous young plants 
have been distributed from Kew. — W. J. BfiAN, 



Fig. 1, anther ; 2, back view of carpel and ovnliferous scale ; '3, front view of 
the Pame : — all enlarged. 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 38, FEBRUARY, 1908. 

Tab. 8177.— REHMANNIA ANGULATA. 

„ 8178.— CODONOPSIS CONVOLVULACEA. 
„ 8179— PYRUS TSCHONOSKII. 
M 8180.— POTENT/ILL A CONCOLOR. 
„ 8181.— LARIX GRTFPITHTI. 

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8182. 







M. 3 . <L?"L J.K.FitdUiJH. 



L Reeve &.C°. Ionian. 



"WncenfcBroo^ DsjrScSarvU^imf 



Tab. 8182. 

SINNINGIA Regina. 

Brazil. 



Gesnebiaceae. Tribe Gesnbrieae. 
Sinningia, Nees ; Benth. et Hook. /. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1004. 



Sinningia Regina, Sprague in Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxvi. p. 87 ; affinis 
S. speciosae, Hiern, a qua foliis subtus purpureis, calycis lobis minus 
acuminatis corollaeque forma recedit; aspectu 8. discolori, Sprague 
(Gloxiniae discolori, Decne), similis, sed indumento, calyce, corolla, glan- 
dulis diversis. 

Herba caraosula, tubere crasso, caule erecto pubescente purpureo circiter 
15 cm. longo, fuliorum paribus 4-6. Folia ovata vel elliptico-ovata, basi 
auriculato-cordata, apice obtusiuscula, crenata, 10-22 cm. longa, 6-18 cm. 
lata, supra subtiliter velutina, in venis albo-variegata, subtus minute 
puberula, purpurea. Pedunculi 4-6 in axillis superioribus una orti, 
8-10 cm. longi, patenter hirsuti. Flores penduli. Calycis loin patentes, 
ovato-lanceolati, 1*5-2 cm. longi. Corolla violacea, intus antice pallide 
flavescens et puipureo-guttata; tubus 4-5 cm. longus, supra basin leviter 
contractus, dein ampliatus, antice veutricosus ; lobi patuli, 1 cm. longi, 
ultra I cm. lati. Stamina inclusa, antheris connatis, lobis haud confluen- 
tibus. Disci glandulae 5, oblongae, 2 posticae ceteris crassiores. Ovarium 
dense villosum. — Gesneria Regina, Hort. ex Sprague, I.e. 



Sinningia Regina resembles S. discolor in the colour of 
its foliage and flowers, but is more closely allied to S. speciosa, 
the wild ancestor of our modern " Grloxinias." Nothing is 
known of its habitat, except that it was introduced from 
Brazil. S. speciosa, however, grows on rocks by the sea- 
shore in the State of Rio de Janeiro, according to Gardner, 
Travels in Brazil, edition 2, p. 22 ; and Gardner's No. 184 
in the Kew Herbarium was found " on rocky places in 
woods in the Rio Comprido valley " near the town of Rio 
de Janeiro. S. speciosa is recorded also from the Organ 
Mountains and from Pernambuco, whilst S. discolor is known 
only from the rocky banks of the river Macahe, in the State 
of Rio de Janeiro, where it was collected by Riedel. See 
Martius, Flora Brasiliensis, vol. viii. pars 1, pp. 388-389. 

Description. — Stem erect, about 6 in. long, springing 
from a stout tuber, and bearing from 4 to 6 pairs of leaves. 
Matich, 1908. 



Leaves ovate or elliptic-ovate, 4-8 in. long, 2^-6 in. 
broad, convex, finely crenate, velvety with short hairs on 
the upper surface and variegated on the veins, minutely 
puberulous and purple on the lower. Peduncles 3-4 in. 
long. Flowers pendulous, 4-6 in each of the upper axils, 
from 15 to 20 flowers being out at the same time on a well- 
developed plant. Calyx-lobes spreading, ovate-lanceolate. 
Corolla pale violet, with a pale yellowish band inside which 
is spotted with purple ; lobes patulous, less than ^ in. long. 
Stamens included ; anthers connate, lobes not confluent. 
Glands of the disk oblong, the two posticous ones broader 
than the others. Ovary densely villous. — T. A. Spragup;. 

Cultivation. — Sinningia Regina was introduced as a 
chance seedling from Brazil by Mr. de Sinet-Duvivier, a 
nurseryman in Ghent. He exhibited plants of it in flower 
at the Grhent Quinquennial Exhibition in 1903. With the 
exception of one plant which was purchased for Kew the 
stock afterwards became the property of Messrs. Benary, 
seed merchants, Erfurt, by whom seeds were distributed, 
not only of S. Regina, but also of hybrids between it and 
garden forms of S. speciosa, popularly known as " Gloxinias." 
The hybrids which were raised by Messrs. Benary are 
intermediate between the two species. For its cultivation S. 
Regina requires exactly the conditions necessary for " Gloxi- 
nias " generally. It is very free-flowering and when well 
grown is a decidedly showy plant. It seeds freely. Cuttings 
of the leaves may be used for its propagation as for other 
Gesneriads. It also has a permanent fleshy tuber from 
which offsets may be taken. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, base of corolla-tube laid open, showing stamens; 2, anthers ; 3, pistil 
and glands of disk :— all enlarged. 



28 




M.S.deLo.V.acKbJch. 



IReevs &. C "London- 



VincantBroOjiE.Dar^ Sar-Et^inm 



Tab. 8183. 

CYPRIPEDIUM DEBILE. 

China and Japan. 



Orchidaceae. Tribe Cypeipedieae. 

Cypripedhjm, Linn.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 634; Pfitzer in 
Engl. PJlanzenreich, Orch. Pleon. p. 28. 



Cypripedium debile, Beichb. f. Xen. Orch. vol. ii. (1874), p. 223; Oard. 
Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 442, fig. 166; Rev. Gen. Pot. 1901, t. 13, 
fig. 1-10; Franch. et Savat. Rnum. PI. Japon. vol. ii. p. 788; Matsumura 
Index PI. Japon. vol. ii. p. 241 ; species nana, diphylla, foliis late ovatis, 
caulibus scapisque gracilibus glabris, florilras parvis. 

Htrba terrestris, 10-15 em. altus. Oaulu gracilis, glaber, diphyllus. Folia 
opposita, late ovata, acuta, membranacea, 3-6 cm. lata, 3-5-nervia, venis 
secundariis reticulatis. Scapi 2-4 cm. longi, arcuati. Bracteae lineares, 
acutae, 1-5-2-5 cm. longae. PedieeUi 1 cm. longi. Flares parvi; sepala et 
petala pallide viridia, basi brunneo-maculata, labellum album ore purpureo- 
striatnm. Sepa lum posticum ovatum, acuminatum. 1 -3-1-5 cm. longnm. 
Sepala lateral ia connata, ovato-oblonga, subobtusa, l*2-l*4 cm longa. 
Petala oblonga, acuminata, 1*3-1 '5 cm. longa. Labellum ovoideo-globosum, 
1-1-2 cm. longum, ostio angusto. Staniinodium spatliulatum, cucullatum. 
— Calypso borealix, Somoku Zusetsu, 1856, xviii. t, 85, non Salisb. C. cardio- 
phyllum, Francli. et Savat. Enum. PI. Japon. 1879, vol. ii. pp. 39 et 521. 



An anomalous little species, which was originally figured 
in the Japanese work, Somoku Zusetsu, in 1856, under the 
name of Calypso borealis, a mistake which was pointed out 
by Eeichenbach, in 1874, when he briefly described the 
plant under the name of Cypripedium debile ; his descrip- 
tion being based solely upon this old figure. Five years 
later Franchet and Savatier described a species under the 
name of C. card iophy Hum, basing it chiefly on a specimen 
collected on Fudsiyama, in the province of Nippon, by 
Savatier. They cited, however, the old figure above 
mentioned, and a still earlier one, in the Japanese work, 
Honzo Zufu, published in 1828, where it appeared without 
any botanical name. A reference to the work, however, 
shows a thoroughly characteristic coloured figure, with both 
flowers and young fruit. It is now known from several 
Japanese localities, and has also been found by Pere Farges 
March, 1908. 



in Western China, in the Tchen-ke'ou-tin district of the pro- 
vince of Szechuen. A single plant has also been collected 
by Mr. E. H. Wilson, at an altitude of 7,000 feet in the same 
province, though the precise locality has not been stated. 

Description .—Herb, terrestrial, 4-6 in. high. Stem slender, 
glabrous, two-leaved. Leaves broadly ovate, acute, mem- 
branous, H-2J in. broad, with three to five primary nerves, 
secondary veins reticulated. Scapes f-lf in. long, arching. 
Bracts linear, acute, ^-1 in. long. Pedicels over -*- in. long. 
Flowers small, with pale green sepals and petals, each 
bearing a dark brown blotch at the base, forming a zone 
round the column, sometimes striped with brown, and with 
a white lip streaked with purple round the mouth. Dorsal 
sepal ovate, acuminate, |-| in. long ; lateral sepals connate 
into an ovate-oblong, subobtuse limb, slightly longer than 
the dorsal. Petals oblong, acuminate, as long as the dorsal 
sepal. Lip ovoid-globose, nearly ^ in. long, much narrowed 
at the mouth. Staminode spathulate, cucullate. — R. A. 

ROLFE. 

Cultivation. — Roots of this interesting little orchid 
were purchased from the Yokohama Nursery Company. 
They were planted in pans of leaf-mould and chopped 
sphagnum and kept in an unheated frame where they flowered 
in April. Although lacking the attractions of size and 
colour so usual in the genus, Cypripedium debile has charms 
of its own, and is quite worthy of a place among select 
11 Alpines." It is probably sufficiently hardy to be grown 
permanently in the open air, although, owing to their 
pose, the flowers would be practically hidden unless the 
plants were set on the high ledge of a rockery, or grown, 
as at Kew, in a pan and placed whilst in flower on the stage 
of a greenhouse. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, side of lip, in section ; 2 and 3, side and front views of column : — 
all enlarged. 



sm 




L Rfeve &.C ° Larukui 



: 3Y&Sar^W 



Tab. 8184. 
PYRUS Aria, var. majestica. 

Garden Origin ? 

Eosaceae. Tribe Pomeae. 
Pykus, I Ann. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 626. 



Pyrus (Sorbus) Aria, Ehrh., var. majestiea; varietas ab aliis varietatibus 
specie! aliquauto variabilis foliis floribusque majoribus distinguenda. 

Arbor erecta ramis ascendentibus, 10-15 m. alta; cortex primo tomento pallido 
obsitus, cito tamen glabrescens, demum glaber, nitidus, fuscus. Folia 
decidna, ovata vel elliptica vel obovata, 8-18 cm. longa, 4-9 cm. lata, apice 
obtusata, margine inordinaliter duplicato-serrata, supra primo floccosa 
demum glabra, nitida, intense viridia, subtus dense albo-tomentosa, nervi 
prominuli plus minusve parallel]'. Mores 2 cm. laid, in corymbos terminalos 
axillaresque aggregati ; corymbi plani, 8-10 cm. lati ; pedicelli lanati ; 
bracteae subulatae, cito deciduae. Calyx campanulatus, 5-lolius; limbus 
1 cm. latus; lobi trianguli, persistentes. Petala patentia, subconcava, 
ovato-orbicularia, albida. Stamina stylos excedentia. Stylus basi lanatus. 
Poma in corymbos laxiupcnlos demum nntantes disposita, globosa, 
1*25 cm. lata, matura intense rubra. — <\ lanata, Hort. non D. Don. 
P. Decaisneana, Nichols, in Kew Hand-list of Trees and Shrubs, ed. 1, 
p. 187. Aria majestiea, Lavall. in Arb. Seg. Enum. p. 98. A. Decaisneana , 
Lavall. I.e. Icon. 1. 18. Sorbus Aria, Crantz, var. majestiea, Zabel in Beissner, 
Handb. der Laubholz Benennung, p. 198. — J). Prain. 



There is no more characteristic tree on the chalk hills of 
west and south Britain than the Whitebeam, Pyrus Aria. 
Its flowers are attractive and its fruits are especially so, but 
its beauty and distinctness are never greater than when 
the wind, by lifting the branches, reveals the white under- 
surface of the leaves. Pyrus Aria is only surpassed in this 
respect among British trees by the Abele, Populus alba. 

As here, and as generally limited, Pyrus Aria includes 
numerous varieties, some of which are so distinct as to be 
regarded by some authors as separate species. The one repre- 
sented in our plate is, perhaps, the most ornamental of 
them all ; its leaves, corymbs and fruits are larger than in 
any other variety. 

The origin of this fine variety is unknown. The state- 
ment that it is a native of Nepal appears to be without 
March, 1908. 



confirmation, and probably arose from its confusion with 
P. lanata, D. Don., a tree absolutely distinct. There is no 
specimen in the Kew Herbarium from North India that 
matches the plant now figured. It is identical with Aria 
Decaisneana, Lavall., which is known to have existed in the 
Arboretum of Segrez in 1858. The late Mr. Lavallee states 
that his tree was known in the nurseries near Paris as the 
" Sorbier du Nepaul." The most probable explanation of 
its origin is that it is an improved variety raised under 
cultivation. The tree from which the figure was made has 
long been growing in the Kew Arboretum, where it 
flowers and fruits freely almost every year. The severest 
cold does not hurt it. 

Description.— Tree, ultimately 40 ft. or more high with 
suberect branches. Bark at first covered with a pale tomen- 
tum, finally glabrous and dark lustrous brown. Leaves 3-7 
in. long, half as much wide, ovate to oval or obovate, obtuse, 
irregularly serrate, white-felted beneath, flocculent above 
when young, but lustrous-green and glabrous later; veins 
parallel, prominent. Flowers in terminal and axillary 
corymbs three to four inches across, pedicels woolly. Bracts 
subulate, fugacious. Calyx f in. in diameter, woolly, with 
triangular persistent lobes. Corolla £ in. across ; petals 
ovate-orbicular, concave, dull creamy white. Style woolly 
at base, shorter than stamens. Stamens about twenty. 
l<ruit in loose corymbs, ultimately nodding, globose, I in. 
in diameter, bright red.— W. J. Bean 



excel 



Fig. 1, bud; 2, section of calyx and pistil; 3 and 4, seeds .-all enlarged 




8185 



VLSAtL J.-T.FitcKlid-. 



-.ceri 3ro al<s B ay&Scn LtHmp 



L.Reeve &.G°Iandcn.. 



Tab. 8185. 

BERBERIS ACUMINATA. 
China. 

Berberidaceae. 
Bekberis, Linn. ; Benth. et [look,/. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 43. 



Berberis acuminata, Franrh. in Hal/. 8oc Bot. France, vol. xxxiii. p. 387; 
B. Wallichianae, DC, aftinis, sed foliis angiistioribus longe acutatis vel 
acuminatis magis et longius spinoso-serratis, spinis firmioribus differ!. 

Frutex sempervirens 1-2 m. altus, glaberrimus; rami cortice pallido vel 
cinerascente tecti. Folia lanceolata, longe acutata vel acuminata, spinoso- 
serrata, 5-10 cm. longa, 0" 6-2 cm. lata, coriacea, anguste calloso-marginata, 
spinulis 1*5-3 mm. longis prorsns directis firmis; spiuae tripartitae, 
10-15 mm. longae, patentes. Florum fasciculi 2-15 (plerumque 5-9)-flori, 
perulis ovatis acuminatis sobpungentibus ; pedicelli graciles, 15-20, raro 
ad 30 mm. longi. Sepala 6, exteriora 2-2*5 mm. interiora 5-6 mm. 
longa, omnia snborbicularia. Petala obovato-orbicularia, sepala interiora 
aequantia, luride aurea. Stamina quam petala triente breviora. Stigma 
subsessile, pileiforme. Bacca nigra, glauco-pruinosa, ellipsoidea, 8-10 mm. 
longa, 5-6 mm. diametro. 



Berberis acuminata was discovered by Delavay in woods 
near Tcheng-fong-chau, Yunnan, in 1882. Since then it has 
been collected by Dr. A. Henry and Mr. E. H. Wilson in the 
mountains of Western Hupeh, where it is, however, according 
to the latter collector, who found it growing on grassy slopes 
at from 5,000 to 6,000 feet above sea-level, very rare. The 
specimens from which the plate was prepared were com- 
municated by Messrs. James Veitch and Sons, who raised 
plants from seeds obtained on their behalf by Mr. Wilson. 
These plants flowered at Coombe Wood in May, 1907. The 
most nearly allied species, Berberis Wallichiana, is a native 
of the Temperate Himalaya, from Nepal eastwards. It 
differs mainly in having relatively broader leaves with less 
tapering tips and much smaller marginal spines. 

Description. — Shrub, evergreen 3-6 feet high ; bark of 
the young branches pale or greyish. Leaves lanceolate, 
long tapering towards the tips or acuminate, spinous-serrate, 
March, 1908. 



2-4 in. long, ^-| in. broad, coriaceous, with a narrow 
callous margin and numerous sharp spines which are 
directed forwards and are up to -^ in. long ; spines at the bases 
of the leaf-tufts tripartite, |— § in. long. Flowers in fascicles 
of 2-15, usually 5—9, from winterbuds the scales of which are 
ovate, with sharp points ; pedicels slender, f-2 in. long, or 
even longer. Sepals 6, the outer y 1 ^ in. long, the inner up 
to | in. long, all suborbicular. Petals obovate-orbicular, as 
long as the inner sepals, brownish yellow. Stamens one-third 
shorter than the petals. Stigma subsessile, pileiform. Berry 
black with a glaucous bloom, ellipsoid, *— § in. long, | in. 
wide. — Otto Stapf. 



Fig. 1, leaf margin; 2, flower; 3, petal and stamen; 4, petal; 5, pistil :- 
all enlarged. 



S/SG 



V 




M.S.daLJN.?itchlrth.. 



1 &ncent Brooks Day-^Sia ihtfiv^ 



L Reeve &_C lend.™ 



Tab. 8186. 

ROSA "WlLLMOTTIAE. 

China. 



Eosaceae. Tribe Eoseae. 
Eosa, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 625. 



Rosa (§ Cinnamomeae) Willmottiae, J/cmsl. in Kew Bull. 1907, p. 317, 
descriptio hie iterata ; species ex affinitate R. Webbianae, Wall., a qua 
aculeis aequaiibus, calyce eglanduloso, sepalis quam petalis multo brevio- 
ribus et petalorum colore differt. 

Frutex dense ramosus, 1-5-3 m. altus, praeter stipulas fere glaber, ramis 
gracilibus brunneo-rubris. Acvhi in ramis floriferis geminati, recti, 
8-10 mm. longi. pallidi, setis nullis. Folia conferta, 2-3 cm. longa ;' 
rhachis gracillima, minutissime setulosa; stipulae minutae, supra medium 
liberae, apice obtnsae, margine eximie glanduloso-ciliatae. Foliola sae- 
pissime 9, brevissime petiolulata, oblonga, obovata vel interdnm fere 
orbicularia, 4-8 mm. longa, praecipue supra medium subduplicato-denti- 
culata. Flores roseo-Hlacini vel roseo-purpurei, alabastris saturate rubris, 
3 - 5-4 cm. diametro. in ramulorum brevium apicibns solitarii, brevissime 
pednncnlati. Sepala lanceolata, caudato-acuminata, circiter 1 cm. longa, 
mtegra. intus albo-tomentosa. Petala subintegra. Fit amenta brevi'ssima' 
antheris aureis. Styli hirsuti, liberi. Achaenia dorso villosa. Fructus 
maturus nobis ignotus. 



This very pretty rose was raised by Messrs. James 
Veitch and Sons from seed collected by Mr. E. H. Wilson 
in the Sangpan mountains, near the Tibetan frontier of 
Western China, at elevations of 9500 to 11,000 ft., and the 
plate was prepared from specimens communicated by that 
firm, from plants which flowered at Coombe Wood in May, 
1907. The most nearly allied species, E. Webbiana, is a 
native of the drier regions of the western temperate 
Himalaya. 

Description.— Shrub, densely branched, 5-10 ft. high, 
nearly glabrous, except the stipules. Branches slender, 
red-brown. Prickles in pairs on the flowering branches, 
straight, f— g- in. long, pale ; bristles none. Leaves 
crowded, |-1^ in. long; midrib slender, obscurely 
setulose; stipules small, fringed with glandular hairs. 

March, 1908. 



Leaflets usually 9, very shortly stalked, oblong, obovate or 
sometimes nearly orbicular, £-£ in. long, toothed above 
the middle. Flowers purple-rose, bright red in bud, 
1-11 i n> across, solitary on short, lateral branches, very 
shortly stalked. Sepals lanceolate, taper-pointed or caudate, 
about ^ in. long, entire, clothed with a white felt inside. 
Petals entire or obscurely notched. Filaments very short ; 
anthers yellow. Styles hairy, free. Achenes hairy on the 
back. Fruit not seen. — W. Bottixg Hemsley. 



Fig. 1, base of a leaf and stipules ; 2, section of a flower from which the 
petals have been removed; 3, a carpel:— all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA j a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
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ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
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OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

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Tab. 8182.— SINNINGIA REGINA. 

„ 8183.— CYPRIPEDIUM DEBILE. 

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8187 




M.SiLel.J.NKtcIditIt 



■VfmcenfcBcochsD^- &SarO.-£EraF 



L Reeve &_ C °. London. 



Tab. 8187. 

BULBOPHYLLUM Binnendijkii. 

Java. 

Orchidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 

Bulbophyllum, Thonars ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 501 ; Pfitzer 
in Engl. PJlanzenf. vol. ii. 6, p. 286. 



Bulbophyllum Binnendijkii, J. J. Smith, Orch. Jav. (1905), p. 442 : Rothschild 
in Gard. Chron. 1907, vol. xlii. p. 161 ; species insignia, a B. Ericssoni, 
Kraenzl., partibus fere omnibus majoribus differt. 

Herba epiphytica. Rhizoma validum ; internodia circa 15 cm. longa, vaginis 
ovato-oblongis acutis tecta. Pseud>bulbi oblongi, circa 13 cm. longi, basi 
vaginis spathaceis acuminatis tecti, monophylli. Folia petiolata, late 
oblonga, acuta, circa 3') cm. longa, 13 cm. lata; petiolus 4 cm. longus. 
Scapi e basi pseudobulbi producti, patentes, circa 15 cm. longi, vaginis 
spathaceis acutis tecti. Flores umbellati, speciosi, virides, brunneo- 
maculati, labello pallidiore facie rubro-suffuso et ornato. Bracteae ovatae, 
acuminatae, 1*5-2 cm. longae. Pedicelli circa 2 cm. longi. Sepalum 
posticum erectum, late lanceolatum, caudato-acuminatum, apice spiraliter 
tortum, 7-9 cm. longum; sepala lateralia patentia, oblongo-lanceolata, 
caudato-acuminata, apice spiraliter torta, 7-9 cm. longa. Petala basi 
oblongo-lanceolata, apice longe caudato-acuminata et spiraliter torta, 
3-4 cm. longa. Labellum recurvum, basi late oblongum, apice longe 
acuminatum, circa 2 cm. longum. Oolumna brevis, lata, dentibus brevibus, 
basi in pedem longum attenuatum producta — Cirrhopetalum leopardinum, 
Teijsm. et Binn. in Nat. Tijdschr. Ned. Ind. 1862, vol. xxiv. p. 309. 
Bulbophyllum Ericssoni, Eolfe in Orch. Rev. 1907, p. 233, fig. 27 (non 
Kraenzl.). 



This striking species has a curious history, and its identity 
is by no means certain. It was exhibited by Messrs. Sander 
& Sons at the Temple Show in May, 1907, under the 
name of Bulbophyllum Ericssoni, and it was also figured 
from a photograph ; but the Hon. Walter Rothschild, who 
possesses the original type plant, did not admit the determina- 
tion, and considered it to be identical with B. Binnendijkii, 
J. J. Smith. A dried flower of Messrs. Sander's plant has 
been sent to Mr. Smith, who replies that his description of 
B. Binnendijkii was made from a dried specimen in the 
Leiden Herbarium, the colour being added from a plant that 
was in cultivation at the Buitenzorg Botanic Garden some 
eighteen years ago. It had been brought in by a native 
April, 1908. 



collector, probably from Mt. Salak, near Buitenzorg, and it 
flowered once and then died. Cirrhopetalum leopardinwn, 
Teijsm. and Binn., came from Mt Salak, and Mr. Smith says 
that the two must be identical. Kecently Mr. Smith 
received an inflorescence of a Bulbophyllum from Soekaboemi 
which he considers identical with the one preserved at 
Leiden, and of which he sends a dried flower. This is 
smaller than that of the plant figured, which Mr. Smith 
remarks has the dimensions of his B. virescens, but he adds : — 
" I am very much inclined to believe that B. virescens and 
B. Ericssoni are only colour variations of the same species, 
and perhaps B. Binnendijkii will hardly be maintained as a 
species." Except in the larger dimensions, the present plant 
is so similar to that previously figured in this work (t. 8088) 
that it seems advisable to wait for more complete materials 
before attempting to decide the question. It is unfortunate 
that the type specimens are not available for comparison. 
Cirrhopetalum leopardinwn was originally met with on 
Mt. Salak, growing on the trunks of trees in the high 
forest. The altitude is not stated, but the mountain is said 
to be 6970 ft. high. The specific name first employed had 
to be changed because there is an earlier B. leopardinwn, of 
Lindley. It is curious that so striking a plant should 
have so long remained practically unknown. 

Description. — Herb, epiphytical ; rhizomes strong, creep- 
ing ; internodes about 6 in. long, covered with ovate-oblong 
acute sheaths. Pseudobulbs oblong, about 5J in. long, 
covered with spathaceous acuminate sheaths at the base, 
1-leaved. Leaves petioled, broadly oblong, acute, about 
1 ft. long, by 5 J in. broad; petiole § in. long. Scape 
produced from base of pseudobulb, spreading, about 6 in. 
long, with a few spathaceous, acute sheaths. Flowers 
umbellate, about seven to ten, very large, light green, 
spotted with dark brown, the lip paler, suffused and 
marbled with reddish purple on the face. Bracts ovate, 
acuminate, about I in. long. Pedicels nearly 1 in. long. 
Dorsal sepal erect, broadly lanceolate, caudate-acuminate, 
spirally twisted at the apex, 3-4 in. long; lateral sepals 
spreading, oblong-lanceolate, caudate-acuminate, spirally 
twisted at the apex, 2§-3 £ in. long. Petals oblong-lanceolate, 
spirally twisted at the apex, l£-2 in. long. Lip strongly 



recurved, broadly oblong at the base, long acuminate at the 
apex, nearly 1 in. long. Column short, broad, with short, 
broadly oblong teeth, base prolonged into a long attenuated 
foot. — E. A. Rolfe. 

Cultivation.— The section of Bulbophyllum to which 
B. Binnendijkii and B. Ericssoni belong does not grow well 
at Kew. Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, who grew 
the fine example shown at the Temple Show last year from 
which the present figure was prepared, state that this species 
grows well in a moist tropical house where during the 
season of growth it is kept saturated and allowed a fair 
amount of sunshine and air on favourable days. When at 
rest only sufficient water is given to keep the soil from 
becoming quite dry. In a dry atmosphere the leaves are 
attacked by " spot," especially during winter. The mixture 
used is sphagnum moss with a small portion of peat fibre, 
dead leaves, small crocks and silver sand. The best plants 
were grown in shallow teak baskets, suspended near the 
glass in a house containing Coelogyne pandurata, Arach- 
nanthe Lowii, etc. All the Bulbophylla with thin 
rhizomes and pseudobulbs and papery leaves appear to 
require the conditions here given, and even then they 
are not always healthy. Of the many plants of the allie'd 
B. Ericssoni imported by Messrs. Sander & Sons it is 
doubtful if a score are now alive. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, lip and column; 2, anther cap; 3, pollinia :— all enlarged- 4 whole 
plant, from a sketch by Worthington G. Smith :—much reduced. 



8188 




M.SdeLJ.NHtchliO. 



T &ncent Brooks, Day &SanLt a Imp 



L Reeve &. C° London 



Tab. 8188. 

KAEMPFERIA Kirkii, var. elatior. 

Rhodesia. 



Zingjberaceae. Tribe Hedychieae. 



Kaempferia, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 641 ; K. Schi 
in Engler, Pflanzenreich, vol. iv. pars 66, p. 64. 



Kaempferia Kirkii, K. Schum., var. elatior, Stapf; a typo (Cienkowskia 
Kirkii, Hook, f.) statura elatiore, foliiB longioribus pro ratione angus- 
tioribus basi longius attenuatis, pedunculis elatioribus, labelli maculo 
fauciali aureo utrinque purpureo-notato differt. 

Ilerba perennis cum foliis ad 45 cm. alta. Folia oblanceolata vel oblanceolato- 
oblonga, acuminata, basi saepe longe attenuata, lamina ad 30 cm. longa, 
5-8 cm. lata, amoene viridia, subtus pallidiora; petioli inferne vaginantes' 
ad 15 cm. longi. Caulis florens cum foliis coetaneus, ad 35 cm. longns; 
spica brevis, 4-5-flora ; pedunculus paucisquamatus; bracteae lanceolatae,' 
cymbiformes, 2-3 cm. longae; pedicelli iuferiores ad 1-3 cm. longi. Calyx 
superne leviter dilatatus, 3-dentatus, 10-12 mm. longus. Corolla albida ; 
tubus ad 15 mm. longus; lobi oblongo-lanceolati, inaequilati, circiter 
25 mm. longi, latissimus 10 mm. latus. Staminodia oblique obovata, 
rosea, parte libera 3-3-5 cm. longa, ad 3 cm. lata. Labellum roseum' 
latissimum, 4 cm. longum, 7 cm. latum, bilobum, sinu ad 15 mm. alto, 
basi maculo aureo utrinque late purpureo-marginato ornatum. Fi/amentum 
breve ; connectivum ultra antheram 6 mm. longam in appendicem apice 
subemarginatam ad 18 mm. longam 8 mm. latam superne auream pro- 
ductum. Ovarium vix 10 mm. longum. 



This beautiful plant belongs to a group of very closely 
allied forms which are spread all over tropical Africa. They 
are unfortunately very difficult to discriminate in the dry 
state unless prepared with particular care and represented 
by very complete specimens ; and next to nothing is known 
about their range of variation under natural conditions. 
K. Schumann, in his elaboration of the Zingiberaceae in 
Engler's Pflanzenreich, recognises three species in this 
group, whilst Gagnepain in a recent paper (Bull. Soc. 
Bot. France, 1905, p. 537) treats two of them, K. rosea and 
K. Kirkii, as synonymous ; but if this is correct, K. Carsoni 
will also have to be reduced to K. Kirkii. A fourth species 
with very narrow leaves was described simultaneously 
(July, 1906) by N. E. Brown as K. Cecilae and by 
Apbil, 1908. 



G-agnepain as K. kilimanensis, from Portuguese East Africa. 
It differs much more from the three other forms of the 
group than these differ from each other, and has con- 
sequently a better claim to the status of a species. Whether 
the plant figured here, so far only known from a single 
specimen, is actually more than a state of a very polymorphic 
and plastic species can only be decided by observation in the 
field and by experiment. The flowers of K. Kirkii, as 
figured in B. M., t. 5994, have a slightly emarginate 
labellum with a simple yellow blotch at the throat, while in 
the variety elatior the labellum is bilobed with a narrow 
sinus up to 15 mm. deep and a yellow blotch bordered 
on both sides by a purple marking. A coloured sketch, 
however, drawn on the spot by Sir John Kirk, shows the 
labellum of the type 2-lobed with a simple yellow blotch. 
The same marking is present in the Kew specimens of 
K. Kirkii from British and German East Africa and of the 
cultivated plant, whilst all the specimens of K. rosea and 
K. Carsoni have purple lateral markings as in the var. 
elatior figured here. 

The drawing was made from specimens presented by 
Mr. H. J. Elwes of Colesborne, Cheltenham. 

Description. — Herb, perennial, 12-18 in. high. Leaves 
more or less oblanceolate, acuminate, long attenuated at the 
base, bright green above, paler below ; blade up to 12 in. 
by 2-3 in. ; petiole sheathing below, up to 6 in. long. 
Flowering stem appearing with the leaves, about 14 in. 
long ; peduncle with few scales ; spike 4-5-flowered, short ; 
bracts lanceolate, boat-shaped, 1 in. long ; lower pedicels 
up to J in. long. Calyx 3-toothed, J in. long. Corolla 
whitish ; tube oyer ^ in. long ; lobes oblong-lanceolate, the 
largest under 1 in. long, less than £ in. broad. Staminodes 
and labellum bright rose-colour, the latter 1| in. long and 
almost 3 in. broad, two-lobed, with a narrow sinus and a 
yellow blotch bordered by a purple marking on each side. 
Filament short; connective petaloid, slightly emarginate, 
yellow in the upper part ; anthers \ in. long. Ovary less 
than £ in. long. — Otto Stapf. 



Fig. 1, stamen; 2, ovary; 3, stigma; 4, whole plant :— all enlarged, 
excepting fig. 4, which is reduced. 



8189 




M S.del.J.NFitchhlh 



Vmcent Brodte Day Mtanit?«5 



L.Reeve &. C?LonAoi 



Tab. 8180. 

SAXIFRAGA Brunoniana. 

India. 



Saxifragaceae. Tribe Saxikrageae. 

Saxifraga, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 635; Engl. Monogr. 

p. 223. 



Saxifraga (§ Trachyphylluni) Brunoniana, Wall. Cat. n. 444 ; Sternb. Revis. 
Saxifr. Suppl. t. 23 ; Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. ii. p. 397 ; Engl. Monogr. 
p. 223; species ex affinitate 8. .flagellaris, Willd. (13. M. t. 4621), a qua 
habitu graciliore, floribus minoribus longius pedicellatis et petalis oblongo- 
spathulatis diflfert. 

Herba perennis, caespitosa, stolonifera, praetor setulas ad foliorum margines 
fere omnino glabra, caulibus stolonibus pedicellisque gracillimis rubris. 
Caules floriferi. 5-15 cm. alti. Folia rigida, cartilaginea, lineari-lanceolata, 
0"5-2*5 cm. longa, mucronata, setuloso-ciliata, inferiora conferta, caulina 
minora, sparsa, interdum in axillis gemmifera. Pedunculi pedicellique 
obscure glandulosi, floribus multo longiores. Calycis seqmenta ovata, 
obtusa, circiter 2 mm. longa. Ptfala lutea, angusta, oblonga, 7-8 mm. 
longa, obtusa. Stamina petalis dimidio breviora, alternis brevioribus; 
antherae rubrae. Capsula globosa. — S. Brunonis, Wall, ex Ser. in DC. 
Prodr. vol. iv. p. 45. 



As explained by Bngler in his admirable monograph 
published thirty-five years ago, S. Brunoniana, S. pilifera, 
Hook. f. & ThomS. and the widely distributed S. flagellaris 
differ from all the other species of the section Trachyphyllum 
in developing from the axils of the lower leaves thread-like 
runners, which bear leaf-buds at their tips and strike root, 
finally becoming independent plants, which flower the 
following year. S. Brunoniana has a wide range in the 
Himalaya mountains at elevations of 9000 to 13,000 ft., 
from Sikkim to Kashmir. In the Flora of British India it 
is recorded from 16,000 ft., but this is probably a slip, as 
none of the numerous specimens in the Herbarium are noted 
from so high a level. S. pilifera, its nearest ally, differs in 
having obtuse leaves and smaller flowers, the petals scarcely 
exceeding the sepals ; it has only been found in Sikkim, at 
elevations of 14,000 to 15,000 ft. 

April, 1908. 



Description. — Herb, perennial, tufted, producing numer- 
ous, very slender runners, which give rise to independent 
plants ; with the exception of the marginal bristles of the 
leaves,- almost glabrous. Stems, runners, and flower-stalks 
very slender, bright red ; flowering-stems 2-6 in. high. 
Leaves stiff, cartilaginous, narrow- lanceolate, |—1 in. long, 
sharp-pointed, margin fringed, lower ones crowded, upper 
smaller, scattered, sometimes bearing bulblets in the axils. 
Flower-stalks much longer than the flowers, furnished with 
small inconspicuous glands. Sepals ovate, obtuse, about 
y 1 ^ in. long. Petals yellow, narrow, oblong, about I in. 
long, obtuse. Stamens ten, shorter than the petals, 
alternate ones shorter; anthers red. Capsule very small, 
globose. — W. Botting Hbmsley. 

Cultivation. — Seeds of this charming little Saxifraga 
were received in 1903 from the Eoyal Botanic Gardens, 
Sibpur, Calcutta. The plants have proved hardy at Kew, 
growing freely in the rock garden, but they are seen at 
their best when cultivated in a pan of light stony soil in a 
cold frame and placed in a greenhouse whilst in flower. 
The bright crimson colour of the stems and stolons is at 
least as attractive as the flowers. The stolons, which are 
slender, twist about in such a manner as to produce the 
effect of one of the dodders growing over a dwarf Saxifraga. 
Another species with the same habit is S. flagellaris, but in 
that the stems and stolons are green. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, a leaf from a rosette ; 2, a stem-leaf; 3, calyx and pistil ; 4, a petal 
5 and 6, stamens :— all enlarged. 



8190 




M-S.deLJN.Fitchlith. 



"Vincent BrooJos Day& Son Lt4-fep 



LTleeve 8^0° London. 



Tab. 8190. 
rheum inopinatum. 

Tibet. 



Polygonaceae. Tribe Rumiceae. 
Rheum, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 100. 



Rheum inopinatum, Prain; species B. racemifero, Maxim., magis affinis, 
statura tamen minore, thyrsis omnibus simplicibus, staminibus calycis 
lacinias baud carinatas apice nequaquam cucullatas manifesto excedenti- 
bus, fructusque alis rigidulis disco latioribus differt. 

Ikrba pereuuis, rhizomate valido 2 cm. crasso. Caulis gracilis, ruber, parce 
scabridus, 25-35 cm. altus, - 5 cm. crassus. Folia coriacea, plus minusve 
bullata, plurima basilaria, subrosulata, caulina saepe 0, nonnunquam 1, 
raro 2, supra nervis rubesceutibus parce scabridis exceptis pallide viridia, 
subtus nervis rubidis scabridis exceptis viridi-glauca, basi truncata vel 
cordata, ibique 3-5-nervia, nervo primario medio secundarios 8-10 pinnatim 
emittente, lateralibus secundarios 4-6 versus marginem excurrentes emit- 
tentibus, apice rotundata, margine parum sinuata et minute crenulata, 
8-15 cm. longa, 5-12 cm. lata ; petiolus semicylindricus, rubidus, 4-10 cm. 
longus, praesertim siibtus scabridus. Inflorescentia paniculata, e thyrsis 
racemiformibus e quavis axilla solitariis 5-12 cm. longis composita, florifera 
fastigiata, fructifera pyramidata, 15-25 cm. longa, 7-12 cm. lata. Flores 
fasciculati, pedicellis gracilibus 4-5 mm. longis infra medium articulatis 
breviores. Calycis laciniae oblongae, obtusae, 3 mm. longae, staminibus 
breviores. Stamina saepissime 9, quorum 3 exteriora interioribus 6 parum 
longiora. Achaenia e basi cordata orbicularia, triptera, rubra, 10-12 mm. 
longa lataque, alis margine subintegris, nervo a margine remote. 



The late Mr. Maximowicz in promising a review of the 
species of Rheum (Mel. Biol. xi. 686, footnote) which his 
untimely death prevented him from completing, has sug- 
gested as useful the subdivision of the genus into two 
groups ; the Monticolae with leafy stems and membranous 
leaves, and the Desertkolae, with stems leafless, or nearly so, 
and firm leaves. 

It is to the latter group that the species here figured 
belongs. In habit and general facies it much resembles 
another species of the same group, R. racemiferum, Maxim., 
from Southern Mongolia, but diners in its smaller size and 
in the other particulars already noted. Another species, 
Apbil, 1908. 



also of this group, which has much in common with 
R. inopinatum, is R. Delavayi, Frauch., from Yunnan, but 
in this species the leaves differ in shape, the stamens are 
included and the achene-wings are thinly membranous. 

Description. — Herb, perennial ; rootstock | in. thick. 
Stem slender, red, 10 in. to a little over 1 ft. high. Leaves 
firm, somewhat bullate, mostly basal and spreading, occasion- 
ally one or two on the stem above the base ; nerves red 
and scabrid on both sides, otherwise smooth and rather pale 
green above, glaucous green beneath ; truncate or cordate 
at the base where 3-5-nerved ; middle nerve pinnately 
8-10-branched, lateral nerves 4-6-branched on the outer 
side only ; rounded at the wide apex, very slightly sinuate 
and throughout finely crenate, 3-6 in. long, 2-5 in. wide; 
petiole flattened above, reddish, 1^-4 in. long, somewhat 
scabrid, especially on the rounded lower side. Inflorescence 
paniculate ; branches simple ; raceme-like thyrses of fascicled 
flowers with slender pedicels jointed below the middle ; 
panicles 6-10 in. long, 2^-5 in. across ; branches 2-5 in. 
long fastigiate in flower, in fruit forming a pyramidal mass; 
pedicels about \ in. long. Calyx-\ohe& oblong, obtuse, \ in. 
long. Stamens usually 9, 3 outer rather longer than the 
other six, all exserted. Nutlets orbicular, cordate below, 
three-winged, rather bright red, nearly | in. across ; wings 
subentire with a strong nerve some distance with the edge. 

Cultivation. — R. inopinatum was raised at Kew from 
seeds collected by Capt. H. J. Walton at Gyantse in 
Tibet in September, 1904, during the Tibet Mission, 
and presented by the Director of the Botanical Survey 
of India in 1905; it flowered in a herbaceous border in 
July, 1906. In this open border it has proved an attractive 
little plant, the grey-green leaves forming an excellent foil 
to the bright red or crimson inflorescence, which continued 
at its best for several weeks. Being quite hardy and 
capable of holding its own by reason of its fleshy rootstock 
it ought to find favour as a border plant. — D. Prain. 



Fig. 1, a flower; 2 and 3, front and back view of anther; 4, pistil; 5, cluster 
of fruit : — all enlarged; 6, entire plant: — about £ nat. size. 



8191 



^H\i% 




M.3del.JNFitckhth. 



4 3f 

•^ncentBrooks.Day&.Son.Lt'hwp 



"L 'ReevR &.C° Loudon 



Tab. 8191. 

OLEARIA ciliata. 

Australia and Tasmania. 

Compositab. Tribe Asteroideae. 
Olearia, Moench.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 276. 



Olearia ciliata, F. Muell. Fragm. Phyt. Auslr. vol. v. p. 79, in syn. ; Benth. 
Fl. Austral, vol. iii. p. 488 ; foliis linearibus ciliatis, pedunculis longiusculis 
distincta. 

Suffrutex dumiformis, 20-30 cm. altus, ramis pluribus suberectis vel ascenden- 
tibus plus ininusve hirsutis. Folia conferta, arcuato-recurva, linearia, 
inferne longiuscule ciliata, supeme sparse minute ciliolata tantum, 1-3 cm. 
longa, basi l"5-2 - 5 mm. lata, apice acuta, margiuibus superne revolutis. 
Capitula in ramis solitaria, terminalia, radiis inclusis circiter 2*5 cm. 
diametro, pedunculis 2-^0 cm. longis apice lanato-tomentosis. Involucrum 
anguste campanulatum, in sicco hemisphericum ; bracteae lauceolatae 
usque lineares, 4-8 mm. longae, ciliatae, exteriores interioribus breviores. 
Flores radii feminei, 15-20. Vorollae lilacinae tubus 3 mm. longus, limbus 
circiter 1 cm. longus. Ovarium pilosum. Pappus uniserialis; setae 
subaequales vel paucis brevissimis interjectis, barbellatae. Flores disci 
hermaphroditi, numerosi, involucrum paullulo excedentes. Corolla lutea ; 
tubus 3-5-4 mm. longus; lobi brevissimi. Antherae ecaudatae. Styli 
appendices breves, deltoideae. — Eurybia ciliata, Benth. in Hueg. Enum. 
p. 58. Aster Huegelii, F. Muell. Fragm. Phyt. Austr. vol. v. p. 79. 



Olearia ciliata inhabits deserts and sandy places at 
various elevations in West Australia, South Australia, 
Victoria and Tasmania, and seems to be rather polymorphic. 
It reminds one in habit of an Aster or Felicia (B. M., 
t. 8049), genera which are distinguished by critical 
characters, such as the degree of compression of the achenes 
and the numbers of rows of pappus-bristles. Olearia is 
confined to Australasia, and Felicia to Africa, whilst Aster 
is widely distributed in America, Europe and Asia, with 
also a few species in South Africa. 

Description.— Shrub, 1-2 ft, high, with ascending or 

nearly erect, pubescent branches. Leaves crowded, recurved, 

linear, acute, long-ciliate in the lower third or half, sparsely 

and very minutely ciliate above, J-l in. long, about T T ^ in. 

April, 1908. 



broad at the base, margins revolute above. Heads solitary 
and terminal on each branch, about 1 in. in diameter 
including the ray ; peduncles 1-8 in. long, woolly-tomentose 
at their apex. Involucre narrowly campanulate ; bracts 
ciliate, the outermost ones lanceolate, about ^ in. long, the 
innermost ones linear, about ^ in. long. Ray-flowers female, 
15-20. Corolla lilac ; tube ^ in. long ; limb under ^ in. long. 
Ovary pilose. Pappus bristles in a single row, subequal or 
with one or two much shorter ones in between. Disk- 
flowers hermaphrodite, hardly longer than the involucre. 
Corolla yellow ; tube about \ in. long ; lobes very short. 
Anthers not tailed. Style-appendages short, deltoid. — T. A. 
Sprague, 

Cultivation. — Kew is indebted for this plant to Sergt. 
Groadby, R.E., Albany, West Australia, who whilst stationed 
in that State collected specimens and seeds of many interest- 
ing plants for Kew. In 1899 he forwarded seeds of this 
Olearia, and a plant flowered in the Temperate House in 
April last year. It forms a twiggy bush of aster-like 
appearance, and is quite worthy of a place among cool 
greenhouse plants. Whether it would thrive in the open 
air in any part of the British Islands remains to be tested. 
It is not easy to propagate from cuttings, and it has failed to 
mature seeds. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, a leaf ; 2, ray-flower ; 3, disk-flower ; 4, pappus-bristle ; 5, authors ; 
b, style-arms : — all enlarged. 



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Tab. 8187.— BULBOPHYLLUM BINNENDIJKII. 
„ 8188.— KAEMPFERIA KTRKII, var. ELATIOR, 
„ 8189.— SAXIFRAGA BRUNONIANA. 
„ 8190.— RHEUM INOPINATT7M. 
„ 8191.— OLEARIA CILIATA. 
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8192 




M.S.daWN.Fitchlith 



L. Reeve 8t C . London. 



^finc«ntBroo"ks,Day iSon Lt^ 



1TOJ) 



Tab. 8192. 
TILLANDSIA Blokil 

South America. 



Bbomeliaceae. 

Tillandsia, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 669; Mez in DC. 
Monogr. Phaner. vol. ix. p. 633. 



Tillandsia Blokii, Hort., Oard. Ohron. 1898, vol. xxiii. p. 254 ; Journ. de la 
Soc. d'Hort. de France, 1898, vol. xx. p. 479 (nomen tantum) ; species ex 
affinitate T. reginae, auctorum, a qua differt foliis latioribus rubro- 
maculatis, bracteis sanguineis, floribus minus divergentibus et petalis 
luteis biligulatis. 

Planta perennis, monocarpiea, florigera circiter 2 m. alta, caule simplici crasso 
brevissimo. Folia numerosa, densissime rosulata, crassa, coriacea, lineari- 
oblonga, usque ad 1 m. longa, infra medium circiter 15 cm. lata, apice 
abrupte longeque acuminata, integra, inermia, recurva, maculis rubro- 
purpureis ornata. Inflorescentia terminalis, erecta, pinnatim paniculata, 
circiter l - 5 m. longa; scapus bracteis amplis coriaceis sanguineis ovato- 
acuminatis diu persistentibus vestitus ; rami laterales circiter 14, quaqua- 
versi, curvati, recurvi, 20-30 cm. longi, flexuosi, sanguinei, usque ad 
12-flori. Bracfeae florigerae ovatae, acutae, quam calyx dimidio breviores, 
sanguineae, calyci arete appressae, persistentes. Flores distichi, breviter 
pedicellati, inter se 1 ' 5-2 cm. distantes, circiter 10 cm. longi. Sepala 3, 
lanceolata, 4-5 cm. longa, acuta, sanguinea, coriacea, persistentia, capsulae 
longiori arete appressa. Petala 3, linearia, circiter 10 cm. longa, acuta, intus 
basi ligulis binis dentatis instructa, cito marcescentia. Stamina 6, petala 
aequantia. Stylus trifidus, stamina vix excedens. Capsula (plane matura 
non visa) 3-locularis, oblonga, 5-6 cm. longa, acuminata, subcarnosa, nitida; 
loculorum parietibus intus atro-purpureis nitidis. Semina numerosissima, 
cylindrico-clavata, ferruginea, cum cauda terminali demum in pilos dissoluta 
comiformi circiter 2 cm. longa, basi coma pilorum obversorum ex ovuli 
integumento dissoluto ornata; rhaphe valida, demum libera. — Vriesia 
Blokii, Hort. 



The species of Tillandsia (or Vriesia) of the group 
to which T. Blokii belongs have been much confused, 
partly in consequence of authors attempting to identify 
different species with the very rude, diagrammatic figure of 
T. regina, Yell. (Fl. Flum. Ic. vol. iii. t. 142), partly from 
the fact that Lemaire figured (Illustr. Hort. vol.xiv. t. 516) 
one species, the one generally accepted as T. regina, and 
described another, the Vriesia imperialis, Morr. ( V. Glazio- 
veana, Carr. in Rev. Hort. 1881, p. 50, with a coloured 
plate), partly also from differences of view as to specific limits. 
Mat, 1908. 



Mr. J. G. Baker (Handbook of the Bromeliaceae, p. 22) 
included V. imperialis, Morr., and V. geniculata, Wawra, 
under T. regina (V. Glazioviana, Lena, in 111. Hort. 1867, 
t. 516); but Mez, with complete specimens before him, 
i-estored them to specific rank (DC. Monogr. Phaner. vol. 
ix. p. 615), and unravelled their very much involved 
synonymy. V. imperialis differs from the others in having 
secund, not distichous, white flowers, and in stature, some- 
times attaining a height of 16 to 18 ft. T. regina, as 
known to us, has distichous, white bracts and flowers, only 
the lower bracts being tinged with red ; and the flowers 
are given off at nearly right angles to the axis. But there 
is a drawing in the Morren collection at Kew of a Tillandsia 
having a red scape, green bracts, red inside, a green calyx and 
yellow petals, which Morren himself named Vriesiagigantea, 
a garden name for T. regina. 

The history of T. Blokii is obscure and its origin appar- 
ently unrecorded. A very fine plant of it was exhibited in 
flower at the Ghent quinquennial meeting in 1898, but the 
name of the exhibitor is not given in any of the contem- 
porary papers. In the Gardeners' Chronicle report we 
read : " The giant of the family was a huge specimen of 
Tillandsia ( Vriesia) regina, shown as V. Blokii. It was as 
tall as a man and in flower.'' And practically the same 
statement appeared in the Journal de la Societe National 
a" Horticulture de France. Mr. F. W. Moore, to whom we are 
indebted for the specimen figured and for photographs of the 
entire plant, writes : " I purchased the plant in question 
from l'Horticulture Colonial, Pare Leopold, Brussels, in 
April, 1903, under the name of Vriesia Blokii. It was a 
healthy little plant, about twelve inches high, and I was 
given to understand that it was a seedling of the original, 
shown at Ghent, and quite distinct from T. regina. It did 
not flower with me until last year. The whole plant is 
about 6 ft. high, and the diameter of the inflorescence from 
tip to tip of the branches is 2 ft. 3 inches. I think it is a 
finer plant than T. regina, and the large bracts retain their 
colour through the fruiting stage." 

The seeds of many of the Bromeliaceae are very singular 
and beautiful objects. Those of Tillandsia Blokii are 
exactly like those of Vriesia imperialis, Morr., as figured by 
Mez (Fl. Bras. vol. iii. pars 3, t, 105). They are narrow, 



cylindrical or clavate bodies, tailed at the distal end and 
furnished with a reversed coma at the base enveloping the 
lower half of the seed. When the seed is ripe the tissue of 
the tail is broken up into hair-like rows of cells similar to 
the pappus of a composite. The basal coma, in the same 
manner, is the result of the breaking up of the outer 
integument or testa of the ovule. The integument breaks 
up in a variety of ways in different species of the genus. 
In T. Hegnellii, Mez (Fl. Bras. t. 110), for example, it breaks 
up into a reversed coma at each end, the hairs of which 
overlap each other and completely clothe the body of the 
seed. Unfortunately we did not receive the seed of 
T. Blokii until after the plate was printed. 

Description. — Shrub, flowering only once, though of 
several — sometimes twenty — years' duration. Stem very 
short, unbranched. Leaves numerous, densely tufted, thick, 
leathery, narrow-oblong, 2^-3^ ft. long, about 6 in. across 
in the widest part above the broad base, tapering upwards, 
abruptly long-pointed, entire, unarmed, recurved, beset 
with oblong, purple-red blotches. Inflorescence crimson, 
terminal, erect, pinnately paniculate, 4 ft. 6 in. to 5 ft. long ; 
scape stout, clothed with broad, sheathing bracts ; lateral 
branches about 14, spreading in all directions, recurved, 
8 in. to 1 ft. long, ziz-zag, 10-12-flowered. Floral bracts 
ovate, acute, half as long as the calyx, closely appressed, 
persistent. Flowers in two rows, very shortly stalked, |-| 
in. apart, about 4 in. long. Sepals 3, lanceolate, lf-2 in. 
long, acute, leathery, crimson, persistent, closely appressed 
to the capsule. Petals 3, yellow, linear about 4 in. long, 
acute, furnished with two small, toothed scales near the base 
on the inside, marcescent. Stamens 6, equalling the petals. 
Style shortly 3-lobed, a little longer than the stamens. 
Capsule 3-celled, oblong, 2-2J in. long, acute, leathery, 
shining. Seeds very numerous, comose at both ends, the 
basal coma reversed. — W. Botting Hbmslet. 

Cultivation. — The large Tillandsiae are handsome 
stove plants. Several of them have long been conspicuous 
objects in the tropical houses at Kew, and one of them, 
T. regina, flowered in the Victoria house last year, where 
also the gigantic Brocchinia cordylinoides flowered about 



twenty years ago. They require tropical conditions, enjoying 
plenty of moisture at the root, the healthiest plants at Kew 
being those that stand on the tank in which the Victoria 
regia is cultivated, their pots being partly in the water. 
Here they receive full sunshine and as much moisture as 
they would get in a tropical forest. In the palm house the 
conditions are too dry for these plants. It is unfortunate 
that the whole of the upper portion of the plant dies 
immediately after flowering, but suckers are usually 
developed from the base of the stem, and these afford means 
of obtaining fresh stock. Under cultivation it takes these 
big species of Tillandsia about twenty years to reach the 
flowering stage.— W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, a petal and stamen from the inside; 2, lower part of the same; 
3 and 4, front and back views of an anther ; 5, ovary ; 6, top part of style : — 
all enlarged. 



8193 




ALS.deL J-N.KlcMith 



Vincent Bro oksjD^ & Son. L#J mp 



I. Reeve &_C<? Lan_dar\ 



Tab. 8193. 

x PHILADELPHUS purpureo-maculatus. 

Garden origin. 



Saxifragaceae. Tribe Hydrangeas. 
Philadexphus, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 642. 



Philadelphus purpureo-maculatus, Lemoine, Catal. Automue, 1904, n. 158 
J. Veitch & Sons, Catal. Hardy Trees and Shrubs [1904], p. 144; stirps 
hybrida origine incerta ; x P. Lemoinei similis, sed floribus albo-rubris 
differt ; etiamque a P. mexicano var. Coulteri, Hort. (cujus flores quoque 
albo-purpurei) foliis floribusque minoribus, petalis ovatis, stylis glabris et 
stigmatibus capitatis recedit. 

Frutex 1-2 m. altus, glabrescens, floribundus, ramis primum rubris gracilibus, 
primariis elongatis, secundariis lateralibus floriferis brevissimis. Folia 
brevissime petiolata, papyracea, ovata, in ramis floriferis saepius 1-1 "5 cm. 
longa, maxima 2 "5-3 cm. longa, apiculata, basi rotundata, integra Tel 
utrinque 1-denticulata, primum pilis appressis parce instructa. Flores 
pulchelli, in ramorum lateralium brevissimorum apicibus saepissime 
solitarii, 3*5-4 cm. diametro. Cahjcis lobi 4, crassi, ovati, 6-7 mm. 
longi, apicnlato-acuminati, 3-nervi, extus parcissime puberuli, intus albo- 
tomentosi. Petala 4, rotundato-ovata, circiter 1-5 cm. longa, glabra, vel 
pilis paucissimis extus instructa, alba, basi rubro-purpurea. Stamina 
numerosissima. Styli glabri. Cay>s\da ignota. — P. Lemoinei var. maculatus, 
Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxvi. p. 14. 



Lemoine states that this remarkable novelty was the issue 
of P. Lemoinei " fantasie " ; itself the result of a cross in 
which P. Coulteri was one of the parents. In consequence 
of there being two, or possibly three, different kinds of 
Philadelphus in cultivation having red and white flowers, 
considerable research was necessary to establish the identity 
of the present one, and this brought to light some interesting 
facts which may be put on record here. It may be premised 
that the wild forms of Philadelphus are very difficult of 
discrimination, and the cultivated ones still more so in 
consequence of complicated intercrossing. 

P. mexicanus, Schlecht., was described (Linnaea, 1839, 
vol. xiii. p. 418) from specimens collected by Schiede and 
others ; all having large, semi-double flowers, solitary or in 
threes. In the same place the author describes his P. affinis, 
from specimens in fruit, in racemes of five. Nothing is said 
as to the colour of the flowers of the former, so we may assume 
that they were white. The same year Hartweg collected 

May, 1908. 



specimens which Bentham subsequently referred (PI. Hartw. 
p. 61) to P. mexicanus. Judging from the dried specimens, 
the petals had a large, dark spot or centre. Hartweg also 
introduced a Philadelphus with wholly white flowers from 
Mexico, which Lindley figured (Bot. Reg. vol. xxviii. t. 38*) 
as P. mexicanus ; see also B. M. t. 7600. In 1887-8, S. 
Watson described (Proc. Am. Acad. vol. xxii. p. 472 ; Garden 
and Forest, vol. i. p. 232, f. 40) P. Coulteri as differing 
from P. mexicanus in its dense pubescence, non-acuminate 
leaves, and the hairy summit of the ovary. The flowers 
are described as very fragrant and an inch or more across ; 
but the colour is not given. Writing from Dublin in 1891, 
the late F. W. Burbidge sent a Philadelphus to Kew, with 
the following note : " Can you kindly give me the name of 
the enclosed ? I cannot find it in the books. It exists in 
one or two old gardens here, where it is called Rose Syringa. 
Its sweet fragrance and purple-centred flowers are remark- 
able." Returning to the subject in 1903 (Gard. Chron. 
vol. xxxiv. p. 218), Burbidge says: "There is a variety of 
P. mexicanus, called P. m. Coulteri, introduced, it is said in 
Nicholson's Supplement, as recently as 1888 ; but probably 
this is a mistake, as the shrub has existed for many years in 

old Irish gardens It rarely flowers except during or 

after very hot summers, and it differs from all other species 
or varieties of Philadelphus inasmuch as each of its four 
white petals has a purplish blotch at its base which contrasts 
well with the central tuft of yellow stamens." Commenting 
on this, Schneider (Illustriertes Handbuch der Laubholz- 
kunde, 1906, vol. i. p. 363) states: "There is yet another 
kind in which the petals have a red eye at the base. The 
shrub is of unknown origin, and was to be found in the 
Botanic Garden at Leipzig, where I saw it in June, 1904. 
Prof. Koehne wrote me that this obscure variety, which he 
had provisionally named P. maculiflorus, was quite different 
from P. Coulteri." In answer to our inquiry, Prof. Koehne 
replied that he could not decide from the imperfect specimen 
sent whether P. purpureo-maculatus was the same as his 
P. maculiflorus. 

How, when, or by whom, the name Coulteri was given to 
what we may call the Irish Philadelphus, we have not been 
able to ascertain ; but it is the same as Hartweg's specimens 
referred to above, and apparently different, as to the colour 



of the flowers, which Nicholson describes as white, from 
typical Coulteri. Mr. W. E. Gumbleton, who grows them 
side by side, informs us that Coulteri differs only in the 
colour of the flowers from the form commonly cultivated 
under the name of mcxicanus. Neither Koehne nor Schneider 
was clear as to the identity of P. Coulteri. 

Description. — Shrub, 3-6 ft. high, glabrescent, very free- 
flowering. Branches slender, red when young, primaries 
elongated, secondaries lateral, very short, usually 1-flowered. 
Leaves very shortly stalked, papery, ovate, 4-f in. long on 
the flowering branches, larger on the leafy shoots, apiculate, 
rounded at the base, entire or furnished with one tooth on 
each side, at first sparsely furnished with appressed hairs. 
Mowers solitary, terminal on very short lateral shoots of the 
main, long branches. Calyx lobes 4, ovate, about J in. long, 
acuminate, 3-nerved, puberulous outside, tomentose inside, 
white. Petals 4, ovate-rotundate, £— § in. long, glabrous or 
furnished with a few scattered hairs on the outside, white 
with a bright purple-red base. Stamens very numerous; 
anthers yellow. Styles and top of ovary glabrous ; stigmas 
capitate. — W. Botting Hemsley. 

Cultivation-. — The plant here figured is a very distinct 
addition to the hardy sorts of Philadelphus. The fine 
purple blotch which stains the base of each petal gives a 
colour effect which is lacking in the other hardy species, all 
of which have pure or nearly pure white flowers. Judging 
by the young plants in the Kew collection it appears to be 
of low or medium habit. A mode of cultivation which 
answers exceedingly well for Philadelphus Lemoinei at Kew 
may be adopted for this plant also. This is to cut away the 
shoots that have flowered as soon as the blossoms are over, 
thus leaving behind nothing but the young growths of the 
current year. These grow quickly and make long flowering- 
shoots for the following year, to be cut away in their turn. 
Propagation is most readily effected by cuttings made of the 
young shoots whilst they are still in a semi- herbaceous 
condition. Placed in a brisk bottom-heat they strike root 
in a few days. The plant from which the figure was 
prepared was purchased from Messrs. Yeitch in 1905.— 
W. J. Bean. 



Fig. 1, a leaf ; 2, calyx and pistil ; 3 and 4, stamens \—all enlarged. 



#m 




vliflv 



"VmceniBi:o<iLsJ3ay-&.Sori-. 



I.£in«- 



Tab. 8194. 

puya violacea. 

Chile. 

Bbomeliaceae. 

PtJTA, Molina ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 666; Mez in DC. Monogr. 
-"*" Phaner. vol. ix. p. 466. 



Puya violacea, Mez in DC. Monogr. Phaner. vol. ix. p. 476; species P. 
caerultae, Lindl. (Bot. Beg. vol. xxvi. t. 11) valde affinis, differt bracteis 
floralibus multo minoribus integris et floribus minoribus. 

Planta perennis, florigera circiter metralis, caule pauciramoso brevi. Folia 
numerosa, conferta, rigida, linearia, maxima vix 0"5 m. longa, longissime 
filiformi-acuminata, margine aculeis inter se 1-2 cm. distantibus sursum 
spectantibus armata, striata, dorso minute obscurissimeque lepidota, 
lepidibus stellatis. Jnflorescenlia termiDalis, erecta, pinnatim paniculata, 
45-50 cm. alta ; scapus graciliusculus, bracteis linearibus 3-4 cm. longis 
acutis marcescentibus fuscis per totam fere longitudinem vestitus ; rami 
laterales circiter 12, quaquaversi, patentes vel deflexi, 15-20 cm. longi, 
usque 25-flori. Dradeae florigerae ut in scapo, calyce breviores, glabrae 
vel glabrescentes. Flores spiraliter dispositi, breviter pedicellati, inter se 
demum 0*5-1 cm. distantes, circiter 6 cm. lorgi. Sepala 3, viridia, lanceo- 
lata, circiter 3 cm. longa, acuta, persistentia. Pttala 3, violacea, oblongo- 
spatbulata, circiter 6 cm. longa, apice obtusa, breviter recurva, intus basi 
2-squamata. Stamina 6, petala subaequantia, antheris luteis vel auran- 
tiacis. Stylus inclusus. Capsula " perfecta ellipsoidea, circiter 1-5 cm, 
longa, nitida, apice obtusa, et septicide et loculicide in partes 6 dehiscens. 
Semina 3 mm. longa, cuneiformia, dorso apiceque anguste alata " (Mez). — 
Pitcairnia violacea, Brongn. in Ann. Fl. et Pomon. 1847, vol. i. p. 116, 
cum fig. ; Baker, Brom. p. 118. Pourretia violacea, Linden Cat. 1853, n. 8, 
p. 31. Puya paniculata, Pbilippi, in Linnaea, vol. xxiii. p. 247. Pitcairnia 
Philippii, Baker, Brom. p. 122. 



The Annales de Flore et de Pomone, in which Puya 
{Pitcairnia) violacea was first published, are not in the 
Kew library, but from an extract from the same in Otto and 
Dietrich's Allgemeine G-artenzeitung, 1847, vol. xv. p. 299, it 
appears that Puya violacea was first raised from seed in the 
Jardin des Plantes, Paris, in 1833 and flowered for the first 
time at Neuillv in 1847, a long time to wait for flowers, 
though they are brilliant when they do appear. But many 
Bromeliaceae flower only once or at distant intervals. The 
conflicting views of different writers on some of the genera 
of the Bromeliaceae are somewhat puzzling. Bentham and 
Hooker retain Pitcairnia, Puya (including Pourretia) and 
May, 1908. 



Tillandsia (including Vriesid). Baker's limitations are 
much the same ; but Mez keeps up both Tillandsia and 
Vriesia ; the latter having free petals ; the former connate or 
closely conglutinated petals. Apart from this, a very large 
proportion of the Bromeliaceae in cultivation have names 
under at least two genera. 

Mez has also revised the synonymy of som , of the allied 
species of Puya. Lindley adopted the name caerulea for 
the plant he figured and described in the place cited above, 
believing it to be the same as that mentioned in Miers's 
Travels in Chile and La Plata, vol. ii. p. 531, as Pourretia 
caerulea ; but Mez refers the latter to Pitcairnia alpestris, 
Poepp., to which he also refers Puya Whytei, Hook. f. 
B. M. t. 5732. Pourretia rubricaulis, Miers, Travels, p. 531, 
he regards as the same as Pitcairnia caerulea, Lindl. 

He distinguishes Puya, Molina (including Pourretia, 
Ruiz and Pavon), from Pitcairnia, L'heritier, by the com- 
pletely superior ovary, and he divides Puya into three 
subgenera : Eupuya, Pitcairniopsis and Pourretia. 

Description. — Shrub, flowering more than once, including 
inflorescence about 3 ft. high. Stem short ; branches few. 
Leaven numerous, crowded, stiff, linear, largest 20 in. long, 
tapering upwards and very narrow, margin furnished with 
small prickles, A-| in. apart and directed upwards, finely 
striated, underside clothed with microscopic stellate scales. 
Inflorescence terminal, erect ; pinnately paniculate, 18-20 in. 
high ; scape rather slender, clothed with brown linear bracts 
1-2 in. long, which shrivel and persist; lateral branches 
about twelve, spreading in all directions, deflected, 5-8 in. 
long, 20-25-flowered. Flowers spirally arranged, shortly 
stalked, £-J in. apart. Sepals 3, green, lanceolate, 1—1 J in. 
long, acute, persistent. Petals 3, deep violet, oblong-spathu- 
late, about 2£ in. long, obtuse, shortly recurved, furnished 
with two scales inside near the base. Stamens 6, nearly 
equalling the petals ; anthers orange. Style included. — 

W. BOTTING HEMSLEY. 

Cultivation'. — Puya and that section of Pitcairnia which 
Mr. Baker separated under the name of Puyopsis are all 
hard prickly-leaved plants which appear to be happiest 
when cultivated under the same condition as Cacti, Aqave, 



etc. They do not suffer if kept dry at the root, and the 
poorer the soil the healthier they are ; but they must be in 
a position where they can get plenty of sunlight and air. 
The handsomest of them is P. caerulea, which has flowered 
several times at Kew. Between this and P. violacea there 
is a close resemblance, but the flowers of the latter are 
smaller. Tl;^ latter flowered on the rockery at the south 
end of the Mexican House in June last year, where it has 
stood since the house was built, in 1897. The plant was 
presented to Kew in 1879 by the late Mr. J. Anderson 
Henry, Hay Lodge, Trinity, Edinburgh, who had it under 
the name of Puya paniculata. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, a petal and a stamen ; 1, a pistil — both enlarged ; 3, whole plant 
about k nut. size. 



81d5 




M.S.del.J KJUchliGi 



"Vincent Bcooks.Day & Son Ijt? imp 



Ree-vB&.C°lQnion. 



Tab. 8195. 

liparis tabularis. 

Penang. 

Orchidaceae. Tribe Epiden dreae. 

Liparis, L. 0. Rich. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 495 ; Ridl. in 
Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xx. p. 244. 



Liparis tabularis, Bolfe in Kew Bulletin, 1908, p. 68 ; species insignis, a L. 
macrantha, Rolfe, labello orbiculari obtuso et venis regulariter flabellatis 
rliffert. 

Pseudobulbi anguste conici, 8-12 cm. longi, circa 2 cm. lati, vaginis mem- 
branaceis albidis venosis imbricatis tecti. Folia membranacea, ovato- 
elliptica, breviter acuminata, undulata, plicata, 9-14 cm. longa, 4-5 cm. 
lata; petioli dilatati, in vaginis imbricatis spathaceo-oblongis acutis 
carinatis et striatis inclusi. Scapun erectus, acute 5-angulatus, purpureus, 
circa 15 cm. altus ; racemus laxus. Bracteae triangulari-subulatae, acutae, 
2 mm. longae. Pedicelli angulati, purpurei, 1 ■ 5 cm. longi. Flores magni, 
purpurei. Sepalum posticum oblongo-lanceolatum, acutum, 1 ■ 5 cm. longum ; 
sepala lateralia oblonga, acuta, circa 1 ■ 2 cm. longa, marginibus revolutis. 
Petala filiformia, 1 ■ 5 cm. longa. Labellum orbiculare, crobre denticulatum, 
leviter recurvum, 1*5-2 cm. latum, ima basi callosum. Columna clavata, 
incurva, 8 mm. longa. 



The genus Liparis is not often met with outside Botanic 
Gardens, as few of the species can be called showy. There 
are, however, a few exceptions, and among them-the subject 
of the present plate. L. tabularis flowered in the collection 
of Mr. H. T. Pitt, Kosslyn, Stamford Hill, in April, 1906, 
and was exhibited at a meeting of the Royal Horticultural 
Society. Shortly afterwards a plant was presented to Kew, 
where it flowered in the following June, when the annexed 
drawing was made. After some correspondence it was 
ascertained that it had been sent by Mr. C. Curtis, of the 
Forest Department, Penang, to Mr. H. A. Tracy, of 
Twickenham, so that it is probably a native of the region 
mentioned. It is most nearly related to the Formosan 
L. macrantha, Rolfe, from which, however, it differs in 
having an orbicular lip, with regularly radiating veins. Its 
large reddish purple flowers with strongly denticulate lip 
render it very attractive. 

Liparis is a large and widely diffused genus, being found 
throughout the tropics, and in subtropical, and even 
May, 1908. 



temperate regions ; a single species, L. Loeselii, Rich., 
being represented in a few British localities. The species 
are most numerous in the mountains of India and the 
Malayan Archipelago. Four other species have been figured 
in this work, namely : — L. tricallosa, Reichb. f. (t. 7804), 
a large-flowered Malayan species, closely striped with purple 
on the lip ; L. atropurpurea, Wight (t. 5529), a native of 
South India, having dark purple flowers ; L. Walkeriae, 
Graham (t. 3770), a Ceylon species with small green and 
purple flowers; and L. foliosa, Lindl. (t. 2709), a species 
with small green flowers, now known to be a form of the 
Australian L. reflexa, Lindl. 

Description. — Pseudobulbs narrowly conical, 3-5 in. long, 
about | in. broad, covered with white membranous veined 
imbricating sheaths. Leaves membranous, ovate-elliptical, 
shortly acuminate, undulate, plicate, 3-5 J in. long, nearly 
2 in. broad ; petioles broad, included within the basal 
imbricating sheaths. Scape erect, about 6 in. high, acutely 
5-angled, purple ; raceme lax, many-flowered. Bracts 
triangular-subulate, acute, 1 in. long. Pedicels angled, 
purple, about \ in. long. Flowers large, reddish purple. 
Dorsal sepal oblong-lanceolate, acute, over ^ in. long ; 
lateral sepals oblong, acute, rather shorter and broader than 
the dorsal, revolute at the margins. Petals filiform, over 
}> in. long. Lip orbicular, closely denticulate, slightly 
recurved, about § in. broad, with a thickened callus at the 
base. Column clavate, incurved, nearly | in. long. — R. A. 
Rolfe. 



Fig. 1, lateral petals arid base of lip, with column; 2, anther cap; 
3, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



8196 




2AS.d*IJ.NJ-\ 



^5ncent±iro 



i.Reeve &. C?Xcm.dcm.. 



Tab. 8196. 

prunus tomentosa. 

China. 

Rosaceae. Tribe Pruneae. 
Pkunus, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 609. 



Pruuus tomentosa, Thunb. Fl. Jap. p. 203 ; Schneider, Laubholzk. vol. i. 
p. 601 ; affinis P. Jacquemontii, Hook, f., sed foliis ramisque novellis 
tomentosis, sepalis utrinque glabris et petalis plerumque albis distincta. 

Frutex dense divaricato-ramosus, cultus vix ultra 1'5 m., spontaneus ad 3 m. 
altus; rami virgati, novelli fulvo-tomentelli, deinde glabrescentes, tandem 
cortice saturate castaneo tecti. Gemmae foliiparae ovatae, acatae, brunneae. 
Folia elliptica vel obovata, breviter subito acuminata, basi obtusa, serrato- 
crenata, ad 7 cm. longa, ad 4 cm. lata, supra sparse pilosa, saturate viridia, 
subtus cinereo- vel fulvo-tomentosa, nervis lateralibus utrinque 5-7, 
obliquis; petiolus 4-5 mm. longus, tomentellus; i-tipulae filiformi-subu- 
latae, ad basin bifidae, glanduloso-timbriatae, ad. 8 mm. longae. Flures 
e gemmis unifloris in brachycladiis brevissimis cum foliis fasciculati ; 
gemmae solitariae vel saepius geminatae vel in planta spontanea plures, 
pernlis brunneis ovato-rotundatis ciliolatiscaeteruni glabris vel subglabris; 
pedicelli tomentelli, demum 3-4 nun. longi. Receptaadum breviter tubu- 
losum, superne paullo latius, extus glabrum, intus ad filamentorum inser- 
tionem pilosulum. SepaJa late ovata, subacute vel obtusa, herbacea, 
1'5 mm. longa, utrinque glabra. Pelala alba vel roseo-suffusa, late 
obovata, unguicnlata, circa 8 nun. longa. Stamina circa 25. Ovarium 
apice pilosulum. Drupa cerasum parvum ellipsoideoglobosum referens, 
12 mm. longa, rubra, sparse pilosula; putamen ad 7 mm. longnm.— 
P. trichocarpwn, Bunge in Mem. Sav. Etr. Petersb. vol. ii. (1835), p. 96. 



The home of this dwarf cherry is in the mountains of 
Northern and Western China, from Mandslmria to Szechnen. 
According to Bretschneider it is much cultivated at Peking- 
tor its edible, cherry -like fruits. It became, however, first 
known from Japan, where it is also frequently grown in 
gardens. Specimens of it were collected by Moorcroft in 
Ladakh and by T. Thomson in the valley of Kashmir. The 
former was named Cerasus tomentosa by Wallich in his 
Catalogue. It is very probable that those specimens were 
also taken from cultivated plants. 

Description. — Shrub, divaricately branched, dense, 4-5 

ft. high or, in the wild state, as much as 9 ft. high; 

young branches fulvous-tomentose, at length more or less 

glabrescent ; bark deep chestnut brown. Leaf buds ovoid, 

May, 1908. 



acute, brown. Leaves elliptic or obovate, shortly and 
suddenly acuminate, obtuse at the base, serrate -crenate, the 
largest almost 3 in. long and 1^ in. broad, sparingly hairy 
on the upper side, greyish- or fulvous-tomentose below, with 
5-7 oblique lateral nerves on each side; petiole \ in. long; 
stipules filiform-subulate, bifid almost to the base, glandular- 
fimbriate, I in. long. Flowers from one-flowered buds, 
1 or 2, rarely more, fascicled with the young leaves on 
very much shortened branches ; bud scales ovate-rotundate, 
brown, ciliolate. Pedicels tomentose, up to -g- in. long. 
Receptacle short, tubular, slightly widened above, glabrous 
without, hairy within at the insertion of the stamens. 
Sepals herbaceous, broad-ovate, subacute or obtuse, glabrous 
on both sides. Petals white or tinged with pink, broad- 
ovate, clawed, about l in. long. Stamens about 25. Ovary 
hairy in the upper part. Fruit a small, sparingly hairy 
cherry, | in. long, bright red. — Otto Stapf. 

Cultivation. — Primus tomentosa is one of the earliest- 
flowering species of its genus. It is usually in full blossom 
during March, and is one of the most attractive of hardy 
shrubs at that season. The species is not common in 
gardens, but is well worth cultivating for its early flowers 
and its neat habit. It makes a low, rounded, dense bush, 
somewhat wider than it is high. Its only defect as a garden 
shrub is that its beauty is rather fleeting. The petals are 
fragile and unable to withstand the pelting showers which 
frequently prevail in late March and early April. The 
plants at Kew occasionally ripen a few fruits, but these are 
too infrequent to afford a reliable means of increase. The 
species can, however, be propagated by means of cuttings. 
The plant from which our figure was made has long been 
in the collection at Kew.— W. J. Bean. 



Fig. 1, a young leaf; 2, a stipule; 3, receptacle and calyx laid open to show 
the pistil ; 4, ovary :— all enlarged. 



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81S1 




M.S.aeUH.PitcKWh 



X,Rs<rve & 0°. LcmdoTi, 



^ncP5\t.BrocK3,Day,A Scji_lt d i 



Tab. 8197. 

PANDANUS Houlletii. 

Singapore. 

Pandanaceae. 
Pandanus, Linn. ; Benth. et Eooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 949. 



Pandanus Houlletii, Oarr. in Rev. Hort. 1868, p. 210, fig. 23 ; Ridley, Mat. 
Fl. Mai. Renins, ii. p. 224; inter species sectionis Ryckiae syncarpio 
solitario cylindrico pedali distinctus. 

Truncus (in planta spontanea) 2-2*5 m. altus, simplex vel basi tan turn 
divisus, 10 cm. diametro, radicibns aeriis 5 cm. crassis. Foliorum bases 
persistentes ; laminae lineares, sensim longe in acumen tenne ad 15 cm. 
longum attenuatae, ad 2'5 m. longae, 10 cm. latae, coriaceae, saturate 
virides, saepe cupreo-purpurascentes vel juniores purpureae, spinis mar- 
ginalibus parvis curvatis apice purpureis vel fuscis 1 cm. distantibus. 
Raniculae masculae ad 1 m. longae; bracteae inferiores late lanceolatae, 
acuminatae, in margine spinulosae, 30 cm. longae, 7*5 cm. latae, summae 
15 cm. longae, 2-5 cm. latae; spicae densae, cylindricae, 15-20 cm. longae, 
1"8 cm. diametro. Staminum filamenta fere at apices in columnam 6 mm. 
crassam connata; antherae 2 mm. longae, apiculatae, tota longitudine 
dehiscentes. Spica femina solitaria, matura cylindrica, 30 cm. longa, 
aurantiaca, carnosa. Dru-pae angulatae, 12 mm. diametro, vertice truncato 
piano. — R. Houlletianus, Eidley, I.e. p. 222. 



This fine screw pine was introduced from Singapore by a 
Mr. Porte in 1865, and flowered in the Jardin des Plantes in 
Paris for the first time in 1868. It was a male plant, like 
the Kew specimen from which the accompanying figure 
was drawn. According to Mr. Eidley, who gave a complete 
description of it in the wild state, it is endemic in the 
Southern part of the Malay Peninsula (Singapore and 
Johore), where it grows in dense forests. The fruit is 
according to him eatable and tastes like a pineapple. 

Description.— Stem 7 or 8 ft. high in the wild state, 
simple or at least not branched at the top, 4 in. across; 
aerial roots 2 in. thick. Leaves numerous, their bases 
persistent ; blades linear, gradually tapering into a long 
slender acumen, sometimes 8 ft. long and 4 in. broad, 
coriaceous, dark green, tinged with copper-red or the young- 
ones purple, marginal spines small, curved, with brown or 
Joke, 1908. 



purple tips. Male panicle 2 or more feet long; bracts 
lanceolate, acuminate, the lower 14 by 3 in., the uppermost 
6 in. by 1 in., margins spinulous ; spikes cylindric, dense, 
6-8 in. long, § in. in diameter. Filaments united almost to 
their tips into columnar fascicles, £ in. thick ; anthers y 1 ^- in. 
long, apiculate, dehiscing all along. Female spike solitary ; 
in fruit cylindric, 1 ft. long, orange-coloured, fleshy. 
Drupes angular, £ in. across, with a truncate, flat top. — 
Otto Stapf. 

Cultivation. — The plant figured was received at Kew 
in 1905 from the Botanic Gardens, Singapore. It was 
evidently a seedling. It grew very rapidly under tropical 
treatment, as all the Pandani do, and flowered in April last 
year. The Kew collection of Pandani is rich in species, and 
some of them flower fairly regularly. In the Palm-house 
they grow to a large size, with stems as much as 20 ft. 
high, bearing enormous crowns of leaves. They are easily 
kept in health, enjoying great heat and plenty of water, 
whilst they are not particular in regard to soil. In a wild 
state they grow most luxuriantly in swamps or by the 
side of rivers, and they are equally happy when treated as 
sub-aquatics under cultivation. There is a fine collection of 
them in the Botanical G-arden at Brussels, where they are 
grown in the same tank as the Victoria regia. Some of the 
species are grown as pot plants tor decorative purposes, 
particularly P. Veitchii, P. Sanderi, P. inermis and P. 
utilis. Owing to their being dioecious they have never 
ripened fruits at Kew, but they are easily multiplied by 
means of offsets which are freely developed by many of the 
species, and they strike root readily. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, fascicle of stamens; 2 and 3, anthers; 4, a whole plant: — 1-3 
enlarged, 4 reduced. 



8138 




"M.S.ci«lJ.N.Fitdvli i J-. 



VinceriBrooltSjDay &SanXr*nS> 



L Reeve &.C? Landau 



Tab. 8198. 
RHODODENDRON micranthum. 

Northern China and Manchuria. 



Ericaceae. Tribe Bhodobae. 
Khododendbon, Linn.; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron (§ Graveolentes) micranthum, Turcz. in Bull. Soc. Nat. Hose. 
1837, no. 7, p. 155; Fl. Baic.-Dah. vol. ii. 2, p. 208; Maxim. Shod. As. Or. 
p. 18; Forbes et Hemsley in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 27; species ex 
affinitate li. parvifolii, Adams, a qua floribns racemosis et longissime 
pedicellatis differt. 

Frutex parvus. Rami juniores pubescentes, sparse lepidoti, vetustiores glabri. 
Folia biennia, breviter petiolata, oblanceolata, obtusa vel subacuta, basi 
cuneata, superne glabra, nigro-punctat*, subtus densissime lep dota, 
3-5 cm. longa, 0*5-1 cm. lata ; petioli 3-5 mm. longi. Bacemi terminates, 
multiflori ; pedicelli 1-1-5 cm. longi. Calyx persistens, extra lepidotus ; 
tubus 5 mm. longus ; lobi lineares, acuti, ciliati, 2 mm. longi, 05 mm. lati. 
Corolla rotato-campanulata, lactea, extra lepidota; tubus 2 mm. longus; 
lobi oblongi vel subrotundi, obtusi, 4 mm. longi, 3 mm. Iati. Stamina 
exserta ; filamenta cylindrica, glabra, basi parum dilatata ; antberae dorsi- 
fixae. Ovarium 5-locuIare; stylus elongatus. Capsula oblonga, elongata, 
ab apice dehiscens, (5 mm. longa, 2 mm. diam. 



Turczaninow, in his original description of this species, 
describes the inflorescence as being in lateral corymbs, and 
when correcting himself, Flora Baic.-Dah., says, " racemi . . . 
axillares, multiflori." The racemes are however distinctly 
terminal, as stated by Maximowicz in his classification of the 
Oriental Rhododendrons. 

In distribution the species extends from Manchuria in the 
north, to Kansuh in the west, and Hupeh in the south, but it 
is only rarely met with, and is noted by all the collectors as 
being found only on the very tops of the mountains. In 
its native habitat, Franchet states that it flowers in June 
and July. 

Description-. — Shrub of small dimensions. Branches 
pubescent and sparingly glandular-scaly when young, 
glabrous when old. Leaves oblanceolate, obtuse to subacute, 
cuneate at the base, glabrous and pitted above, densely 
scaly below, 1-2 in. long, ^-^ in. broad; petioles about 
June, 1908. 



\ in. long. Racemes terminal, many-flowered ; pedicels 
\ in. long. Calyx persistent, scaly, T V~i in. long; lobes 
linear, acute, ciliate. Corolla rotate-campanulate, milky 
white, scaly without, \ in. long ; lobes subrotund. Stamens 
exserted ; filaments cylindrical, glabrous, slightly dilated 
towards the base. Ovary 5 -celled, style elongated. Capsule 
oblong, elongate, dehiscing from the apex, \ in. long, \ in. 
broad.— T. F. Chipp. 

CuLTiVATioisr. — The plant figured was grown in the 
garden of J. 0. Williams, Esq., Caerhays Castle, G-orran, 
Cornwall, a most enthusiastic collector and cultivator of 
Rhododendra, and was presented to Kew through Messrs. 
James Yeitch & Sons, by whom it was introduced into culti- 
vation through their collector, Mr. Wilson. He described it 
as a bush from 4 to 8 ft. high, with white flowers, growing 
at from 5,500 to 8,000 ft. At Coombe Wood this plant has 
proved hardy, and Mr. Harrow, Messrs. Yeitch & Sons' 
manager there, says it appears to prefer a rather shaded 
position and a light loam rather than peat. It is, he says, 
very free-flowering, small plants of it being now covered 
with flower buds. The plant first flowered at Coombe 
Wood in May, 1904. In Mr. Williams's garden also the 
flowers were developed in May. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, portion of under surface of leaf ; 2, a scale from the same ; 3, calyx 
and pistil; 4 and 5, stamens; 6, cross section of an ovary : — all enlarged. 



8W9 




KS.daJ.K.FtfrMtB-.. 



\5ncerx Brooks Hay ^SoaW^ 



I..R£eve &C c I,arjlarL 



Tab. 8199. 
BULBOPHYLLUM fascinator. 

Anna in. 



Obchidaoeae. Tribe Epidendreae. 
Bulbophyllum, Thouars ; Benth. et Hool-.f, Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 501. 



BulbophyUum fascinator, Bolfe; a B. appendiculato, Bolfe, floribus multo 
majoribus, segmentorum appendicibus linearibus non foliaceis differt. 

Herla epipliytica. Rhizoma repens, validum. Pseudobulbi ovoideo-oblongi, 
obscure tetragoni, nitidi, 1-5-2-5 cm. longi, monophylli. Folia sessilia, 
coriacea, elliptico-oblonga, obtusa, 5 cm. longa, 1*5-3 cm. lata. Scapi 
patentes, circa 10 cm. longi, unifiori. Bracteav spatbaceae, apice acuteae, 
1 cm. longae. Flores magni, pallide virides, purpureo-punctati et ornati. 
Sepalum posticum ovatum, acuminatum, 2*5-3 cm. longum, supra medium 
ciliatum et appendicibus filiformibus amethystino-purpureis ornatum; 
sepala lateralia connata, oblongo-lanceolata, longi^sime caudato-acuminata, 
13-18 cm. longa, basi coriacea, crebre verrucosa, marginibus revolutis. 
Fetal i falcato-oblonga, rabacuta, circa 2 cm. longa, margine et apice 
appendicibus filiformibus amethystino-purpureis ornata. Labellum re- 
curvum, oyato-oblongum, subobtusum, canaliculatum, bicarinatum, carinis 
et marginibus puberulis. Columna lata, 8 mm. longa, marginibus acutis, 
dentibus subulatis, basi obscure tridenticulatis. — Cirrhopetalum fascinator, 
Bolfe in Kew Bulletin, 190S, p. 69. 



The remarkable species here figured is a native of 
Annam, where it was discovered by Mr. W. Micholitz, 
when collecting for Messrs. Sander & Sons. Living plants 
were sent home, one of which flowered at Kew in September, 
1907, when the species was described under the name of 
Cirrhopetalum fascinator, Rolfe. The genus Cirrhopetalum, 
however, merges so imperceptibly into BulbophyUum that 
the two are now regarded as indistinguishable, hence the 
adoption here of the older generic name. BulbophyUum 
fascinator is nearly allied to the Himalayan B.appendiculatum, 
Bolfe (Cirrhopetalum ornatissimum, King & Pantl. in Ann. 
R. Bot. Gard. Calc. vol. viii. p. 95, t. 133, not of Reichb. f.), 
but has much larger flowers, with various structural 
differences. It is a member of a small group characterised 
by its solitary-flowered scapes, containing the following 
additional species : — BulbophyUum merguense, Par. & Reichb. 
f., B. lasioglossum, Par. & Reichb. f., B. antenniferum, 
June, 1908, 



Reichb. f., B. maxillare, Reichb. f., B. breviscapum, Ridl. 
(Cirrhopetalum breviscapum, Rolfe, Bot. Mag. t. 8033), and 
two or three imperfectly known Malayan species. All of 
these were formerly considered to be anomalous species of 
Cirrhopetalum, having the floral structure though not the 
remarkable umbellate inflorescence of the genus. The 
elongation of, and frequently the union of the lateral 
sepals constituted the most marked character of Cirrho- 
petalum, and it is unfortunate that the occurrence of 
species of intermediate character should render it un- 
tenable. 

Description. — Epiphyte with stout creeping rhizome. 
Pseudobulbs approximate, ovoid-oblong, obscurely tetra- 
gonous, shining, |-1 in. long, 1 -leaved. Leaves sessile, 
elliptical -oblong, obtuse, coriaceous, about 2 in. long, over 
1 in. broad. Scape suberect, about 4 in. long, 1-flowered. 
Bracts spathaceous, acute, -^ in. long. Flowers large, pale 
green with crimson markings. Dorsal sepal ovate, acumi- 
nate, about \\ in. long, with crimson filiform appendages 
above the apex, ciliate towards the base ; lateral sepals 
united, oblong-lanceolate below, then prolonged into long 
caudate appendages, about 7 in. long, the basal part 
coriaceous, verrucose, with revolute margin. Petals falcate- 
oblong, subacute, under £ in. long, the margin and apex 
bearing numerous crimson filiform appendages. Lip 
recurved, ovate-oblong, subobtuse, channelled, bicarinate, 
with the keels and margins puberulous. Column broad, 
\ in. long, with acute margins and acute slightly tridenticu- 
late teeth. — R. A. Rolfe. 

Cultivation. — This is one of the many introductions for 
which we are indebted to Messrs. Sander & Sons, St. Albans, 
who presented a plant of it to Kew in 1905, which flowered 
for the first time in September, 1907. The genus Bulbo- 
phyllum is popular with orchid fanciers in this country, owing 
no doubt to the quaintness of form and beautiful coloration 
in the flowers of many of the species. They are tropical or 
subtropical, and with few exceptions they enjoy the con- 
ditions of a moist stove all the year round with plenty of 
water about their roots whilst growth is being made and 
very little during their resting season, generally the winter. 



They may be grown either in shallow teak baskets suspended 
near the roof-glass in a shaded house or on blocks of tree 
fern stem, and what little compost they require about 
their roots should be sphagnum moss and peat fibre. — 
W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, flower, with sepals and petals removed ; 2, fringe of sepals; 3, anther- 
cap ; 4 and 5, pollinia, seen from side and front : — all enlarged. 



8; 







"SncerABrcolcs^ay ! 



X. Reeve &C° London 



Tab. 8200. 

CHIRITA BARBATA. 

India. 



Gesneraceae. Tribe Cyrtandreae. 

Chirita, Ham.; Benth. et Book. f. G,n. Plant vol. ii. p. 1022: C. B. Clarke in 

DC. Monogr. vol. v. pars 1, p. 109. 



Chirita barbata, Sprague ; habitu similis C. hamosae, R. Br., a qua calycis 
forma et antheris barbatis recedit. 

Herba erecta, circiter 60 cm. alta, caule crassiasculo pubescente. Folia ovato- 
oblonga, 7-14 cm. longa, 3-6 cm. lata, apice subacuta, recurva, basi sub- 
cordata, utrinque villoso-pubescentia, venis lateralibus utrinque 8 -10, 
supra in vivo impressis, subtus prominentibus ; petioli 0"5-3 cm. longi, 
cum pedunculis conjuncti. Pedicelli liberi, 4-8 pro folio, petiolis insidentes, 
ut calyces breviter villosi, usque ad 2 cm. longi. Calyx fere ad basin 
partitus, segmentis lanceolato-oblongis subacutis in basin angustatis 
circiter 1-2 cm. longis 3 mm. latis superne patulis. Corolla oblique infundi- 
buliformis, paullo supra basin antrorsum- curvata, antice ventricosa, intus 
antice lutea ceterum caeruleo-lilacina, tubo 2*5-3 cm. longo, limbo patulo 
2 • 5-3 cm. la to. Stamina 2, antica ; filamenta circiter 6 cm. longa, vix 1 cm. 
supra basin corollae inserta ; antherae parallelae, connectivis versus latera 
corollae spectantibus, apice leviter depressae, appendiculatae, appendiculis 
confluentibus, dense lanatae, praesertim facie interiore. Staminodia 
3, filiformia. Discus annularis. Ovarium dense villosum ; stylus stamina 
superans, stigmatis Jobis ellipticis basi leviter conoatis intus dense pube- 
scentibus. Capsula immatura 5 cm. longa, villoso-pubescens. — C. hamosa 
E. Andre, in Rev. Hortic. 1895, p. 492, tig. 161 ; I.e. 1896, p. 184, cum tab. 
col. ; non R. Br. 



Chirita barbata is like C. hamosa in having the peduncles 
united with the petioles, so that the flowers seem to spring 
from the latter, but there the resemblance ends. The two 
species differ in the leaves, in the size and shape of the calyx 
and corolla, and. in the anthers, which are very woolly "in 
C. barbata and glabrous in C. hamosa. 

C. barbata was brought into commerce as C. hamosa in 
1895 by Mr. J. Sallier of Neuilly, Seine, France, who in 
reply to^ an inquiry has courteously given us all the 
information at his disposal. He obtained the species from 
the late Prof. H. Baillon, who informed him that it had 
been introduced by seed from the " mountains of India." 
There are no wild specimens of C. barbata in the Kew 
Herbarium, and it seems probable that it is a native of one 
of the French possessions in the East Indies. C. hamosa 
June, 1908. 



and other species occur on damp rocks by the side of 
streams. 

Description. — Herb, perennial. Stem erect, 2 ft, high, 
pubescent. Leaves ovate-oblong, 3-6 in. long, 1-2J in. 
broad, apex subacute, recurved, base subcordate, villous- 
pubescent on both surfaces, nerves 8-10 on each side of the 
midrib, impressed on the upper surface, prominent on the 
lower; petioles ^-1 in. long. Peduncles connate with the 
petioles ; pedicels free from one another. 4-8 on each 
petiole. Calyx deeply divided, segments lanceolate-oblong, 
about ^ in. long. Corolla funnel-shaped, ventricose, bluish 
lilac with a yellow band in front; tube 1 in. or more 
long ; lobes slightly spreading. Stamens 2, anterior ; 
anthers parallel, slightly depressed at the apex and joined to 
one another by a common appendage, connectives facing 
outwards. Staminodes 3, filiform. Dish annular. Ovary 
densely villous ; style exceeding the stamens. Capsule 
(unripe) 2 in. long, villous-pubescent. — T. A. Sprague. 

Cultivation.— Chirita barbata has been cultivated at 
Kew for the last twelve years, being treated as a biennial 
and grown along with such plants as Sinningia, Achimenes, 
etc. The seeds, which are matured freely' by cultivated 
plants, are sown in early spring, and under liberal treatment 
the seedlings grow to a good size by the autumn. Leaf- 
cuttings also may be used for propagation as with Sinningiae 
and other Gesneraceae. They flower freely the following 
spring, well-grown plants being quite attractive when in 
full flower. As a garden plant C. barbata is less beautiful 
than C. Moonii from Ceylon, which grows a yard high and 
has purplish flowers, 4 in. across, freely produced In the 
axils of the whorlecr ovate-lanceolate leaves ; nor is it as 
charming as the Chinese C.depressa, which has the habit of 
a Sinningia and long-tubed blue flowers nestling among the 
fleshy leaves. Both of these plants are grown in the stoves 
at Kew. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, section of calyx, showing ovary and disk ; 2, corolla- tube laid open, 
showing attachment of stamens and staminodes; 3, back of anthers; 4 stigma; 
5, young fruit :— all more or less enlarged. 



820] 




del J.N Fiichliih. 






Vincen.tBroo'ks D ay «. SanLt^anip 



Tab. 8201. 

GENISTA GLABRESCENS. 

Central Europe. 



Leguminosae. Tribe Gknistae. 

Genista, Linn. ; Bettth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 482; Tauhert in Engl, et 
Prantl. Naturl. Pjlanzenfam. vol. iii. i. p. 231. 



G-enista (§ Lembotropis) glabrescens, Briq. in Les Cijtises des Alpes Maritimes, 
1894, p. 123; De Wildeman in Icon. Hurt. 'Then. vol. ii. t. 52; G. 
nhpicanti, Scheele, affinis, sed floribus solitariis vel geminatis, non 
racemosis, differt. 

Frutex circiter 1 m. altus, ramulis junioribus quadrangularibus parce pilosis. 
Folia trifoliolata, petiolis usque ad 3 cm. longis sparsiuscule sericeo- 
pubescentibus ; foliola subsessilia, obovata vel oblonga, 10-15 mm. longa, 
4-7 mm. lata, apice rotundata vel interdum leviter emarginata, supra 
glabrescentia, subtus tenuiter sericeo-pubescentia, nervis lateralibus in- 
conspicuis. Flures axillares, solitarii vel geminati ; pedicelli petiolos 
aequantes. Calyx subcampanulatus, 4 mm. longus, breviter bilabiatus, 
labiis quam tubo brevioribus, extus parce villosus ; labium superum 
bidentatum; infernm tridentatum. Vexillum subrotundatum, multi- 
nervium, circiter 1 cm. diametro, ungue 3 mm. longo. Alae obovatae, 
1 cm. longae, - 5 cm. latae, 7-nerviae, unguibus 3 mm. longis. Carina 
1 cm. longa, rostrata, ungue 3 nun. longo. Tubus staminalis glaber, 1 cm. 
longus. Antherae oblongae, 1 mm. longae. Ovarium glabrum, stylo 
0"5 cm. longo, stigmate minuto. Legumen 3-4 cm. longum, 6-8 mm. 
latum, glabrum. Semina 5 vel 6, reniformia, estropluolata. — Cijtisus 
glabrescens, Sartorelli, Alb. Indig. Ital. Sup. 1816, p. ^82. — C. emeriflorus, 
Beichb. Fl. Germ. Excurs. 1832, p. 524. Laburnum glabrescens, Parlatore, 
Flora Ital. 189 J, vol. x. p. 128. 



The species here figured is confined to the Lepontine 
Alps in the vicinity of Lake Como on the borders of Italy 
and Switzerland, where it grows on mountain sides at high 
altitudes. It forms by itself the subsection JEmeroides, 
Briquet, characterised by the solitary or geminate, axillary 
flowers, just as G. nigricans is the solitary species of the 
subsection Eulembotropis, Briquet, which has the flowers 
arranged in terminal leafless racemes. 

The limits of Genista and Cytisus have been variously 
drawn by botanists, and some, including Baillon, combined 
them. Briquet, however, in his Les Cytises des Alpes 
Maritimes, places the species with a well-developed strophiole 
in Cytisus, and those with a rudimentary strophiole, or 
none, in Genista. 
June, 1&0& 



Description. — Shrub about 3 ft. high. Young branches 
quadrangular, sparingly pilose. Leaves trifoliolate ; petioles 
1-1£ in. long; leaflets subsessile, obovate or oblong, 
about ^ in. long, ^~\ in. broad, rounded or slightly 
emarginate at the apex, glabrescent above, thinly clothed 
with silky hairs beneath ; lateral nerves indistinct. Flowers 
yellow, axillary, solitary or two together ; pedicels equalling 
the petioles. Calyx subcampanulate, \ in. long, shortly 
two-lipped, lips shorter than the tube, sparingly villous 
outside ; upper lip bidentate ; lower tridentate. Standard 
somewhat rounded, many-veined, scarcely ^ in. across, claw 
\ in. long. Wing petals obovate, ^ in. long, |- in. broad, 
7 -nerved, claw \ in. long. Keel petals ^ in. long, claw ^ in. 
long. Staminal tube glabrous, ^ in. long ; anthers oblong. 
Ovary glabrous; style £ in. Jong, stigrna minute. Pod 
1-1J in. long, J-1 in. broad, glabrous. Seeds 5 or 6, reni- 
form, without a strophiole. — J. Hutchinson. 

Cultivation. — Although Cytisus glabrescens is not a 
newly discovered plant, it has only appeared in cultivation 
during comparatively recent years. The plant from which 
the accompanying plate was prepared was obtained for the 
Kew collection in 1896, from Mr. Spath of Berlin. It has 
proved to be quite hardy and one of the most attractive of 
the dwarfer Brooms, flowering in May, and thriving well in 
a light loamy soil, in a position exposed to full sunshine. 
It is of a close, dense habit, and is admirably adapted for the 
Rock Garden or for any position where it is not in danger 
of being overgrown by plants of stronger habit. The 
original plant at Kew, after twelve years, is still not more 
than 18 in. high. It can be increased by cuttings, 
dibbled in sandy soil under a cloche during; August. — 
W.J. Bean. * ° 

Kg. 1, calyx and stamens; 2, calyx laid open with pistil; 3, wing-petal; 
4, keel-petal; 5 and 6, anthers; D, seed:— till enlarged; 7, fruit; 8, seed:— 
natural ti 



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Tab. 8197.— PAND ANUS HOULLETII. 

„ 8198.— RHODODENDRON MICRANTHTTM. 
„ 8199.— BULBOPHYLLUM FASCINATOR. 
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H202 




Vincarrt Broo"ks Day & Sonl,t d imp 



L Reeve 5t C°- London 



Tab. 8202. 

BEGONIA CATHAYANA. 

China. 

Begoniacjeae. 
Begonia, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 841. 



Begonia (§ Platycentrum, A.DC.) eathayana, Hemsl. ; species ex affinitate 
B. Bowringianae, Champ. (B. M. t. 5182) et B. laciniatae, Boxb. (B. M. 
t. 5021), ab utraque caulibus foliisque sanguineo-velutinis et floribus 
miniatis differt; ab ilia stipulis linearibus elongatis acuminatissimis et 
pedunculis multifloris petiolos excedentibus recedit. 

Herba subcarnosa, ramosa, erecta, 0* 5-1-0 m. alta, pilis leprosis sanguineis 
patentibus mollibus paucis albis intermixtis vestita, ramis teretibus 
articulatis. Folia longe petiolata, oblique cordata, absque petiolo usque 
ad 25 cm. longa, pins minusve lobulata, simul denticulata, longe acuminata, 
lobis basilaribus rotundatis, subtus sanguinea, supra praeter venas 
sangmneas viridia cum zona pallidiore; petioli teretes, usque ad 15-18 
cm. longi; stipulae lineares, acutissimae, circiter 3 cm. longae. Cymae 
axillares, solitariae, 8-10-florae, pendulae, foliis breviores, bracteis parvis 
mconspicuis. Flores hirsuti, uni-exuales, monoici, miniati, 3-5-4-5 cm. 
diametro. Flores masculi : perianthii phylla 4, patentissima, 2 exteriora 
ovato-elliptica, apice rotundata, 1-75-2 cm. longa, 2 interiora anguste 
ovata, vix 1 cm. longa ; androecium globosum, breviter stipitatum, circiter 
7 mm. altum. Flores feminei: perianthium fere aequaliter 5-phyllum, 
phylhs oblongo-ovatis ; styli 2 basi connati, apice bicrures, cruribus 
tortuosis. Capsula pendula, pedicello subito recurvo setuloso, inaequaliter 
d-alata; alae rotundatae, major circiter 2 cm. longa, minores 6-7 mm. 
longae.— B. Bowringia, Hort.; Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. xxxiii. p 245 
cum fig. suppl., non Champ. 



This and the two species with which it is compared in 
the above description are very closely allied in structure. 
Indeed B. Rowringmna and B. laciniata have been treated 
as varieties of one species by De Candolle and others ; but 
the plants cultivated and figured in this Magazine under 
these names are quite distinct. The cultivated B. eathayana 
is exactly the same as dried specimens in the Kew Herbarium, 
bearing the numbers 9198 and 13516, collected by Dr. A. 
Henry near Mengtze, Yunnan, at an elevation of 5*, 000 ft. 

Description.—^^, 2-3 ft. high, with fleshy stems and 
leaves, clothed with long, crimson, soft, scurfy hairs, 
interspersed on the branches with a few white ones! 
July, 1908, 



Leaves long-stalked ; blade obliquely cordate, as much as 
10 in. long, more or less distinctly lobed, minutely toothed, 
lateral lobes and tip sharp-pointed, basal lobes rounded, 
crimson below, green above except the crimson nerves, with 
a paler zone ; stalks as much as 6-8 in. long ; stipules 
narrow, pointed, about an inch long. Clusters axillary, 
8-10-flowered, pendulous, shorter than the leaves ; bracts 
small, inconspicuous. Flowers coarsely hairy, unisexual in 
the same clusters, vermilion, l^-lf in. across. Male flowers : 
perianth of 4 petaloid leaves ; 2 exterior nearly oval, about 
| in. long ; 2 interior narrow-ovate, less than \ in. long ; 
stamens numerous, in a stalked head. Female flowers : 
perianth nearly equally 5-leaved ; leaves oblong-ovate ; 
styles crested. Capsule hairy, pendulous from a sharp bend 
at the top of the stalk, unequally 3-winged, wings rounded, 
larger one § in. long, smaller £ in. long. — W. Botting 
Hemslet. 

Cultivation. — Begonia cathayana was introduced into 
cultivation by Mr. A. K. Bully of Ness, Neston, by means 
of seeds collected for him in China by Dr. A. Henry. The 
stock passed into the hands of Messrs. F. Sander and Sons, 
St. Albans, from whom the plant figured was obtained for 
Kew. Messrs. Sander and Sons have raised a batch of 
hybrids from B. cathayana and B. Rex which are remarkable 
for richness of leaf coloration. B. cathayana is a handsome 
stove plant. Under liberal treatment it develops numerous 
stems 18 in. high, bearing in September numerous clusters 
of flowers. It ripens seeds under cultivation. Cuttings of 
the stems and leaves root freely. — W. Watson. 

Fig. 1, a stamen; 2, stigma; 3, cross section of a capsule; 4, a pseudo- 
hermaphrodite flower with a superior ovary ; 5, a hair from the perianth :— 
all enlarged. 



8203 




teS.dsLJ.KEitch.lith.. 



"Vincent Br- C ^ Tn * 



LR.BveA;:°t,and( 



Tab. 8203. 

COELOGYNE perakensis. 

Perak. 



Oechidaoeae. Tribe Epidendeeae. 

Coelogyne, Lindl.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 518; Lindl. Fol. 

Orch. Coelog. p. 1. 



Coelogyne perakensis, Bolfe; a C. sulphurea, Eeichb. f., pseudobulbis 
majoribus, scaporum vaginis longioribus et bracteis manifeste angustioribus 
differt. 

Herba epiphytica, circa 30-40 cm. alta. Pseudobulbi approximati, ovoideo- 
oblongi, 4-5 cm. longi, monophylli. Folia longe petiolata, anguste 
elliptica vel oblonpo-lanceolata, subaeuta, coriacea, 12-17 cm. longa. 
Scapi sub anthesi ad basin pseudobulbi longius imbricato-vaginati, 15-22 
cm. longi, erecti ; racemi laxi, multiflori. Bracteae lineares, acutae, mox 
reflexae, deciduae, 2-2-5 cm. longae, carneae. Pedkelli graciles, circa 
1 cm. longi. Sepala patentia, lanceolato-oblonga, subobtusa, paullo 
concava, 13-1 5 cm. longa, orhracea. Petula linearia, obtusa, revoluta, 
sepalis breviora, pallide viridia. Labellum trilobum, sepalis brevius, 
pallide flavum, medio macula aurantiaca ornatum; lobi laterales lineares, 
subfalcati, obtusi, patentes ; lobus intermedins obcordato-bilobus, segmentis 
latis obtusis ; discus lamellis 2 carnosis laevibus ornatus. Colurnna clavata, 
arcuata, late alata, circa 5 mm. longa. Pollinia 4, ad glandulam latam 
adnata.— Coelogyne sulphurea. Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. v. p. 833 (non 
lieichb. f.); Ridl. Mater. Fl. Malay Penins. part 1, p. 132. 



Two quite distinct species have been confused under 
the name Coelogyne sulphurea. The original whs based 
upon Chelonanthera sulphurea, Blume, Bijdr. p. 283, a 
native of Java, but Sir J. D. Hooker afterwards included 
under the name a Perak plant which had been collected by 
Scortechini and Wray, and in this he was followed by Mr. 
H. N. Ridley, the latter pointing out that in some respects 
the species was almost intermediate between the genera 
Coelogyne and Pholidota. The late Dr. E. Pfitzer, in mono- 
graphing the Coelogyne group, proposed several new genera, 
and among them Chelonistele, in Engl. Pflanzenreich, Orch. 
Coelog. p. 136, to include Coelogyne sulphurea, Reichb. f., 
and four other species, Chelonanthera being retained for 
Blume's original Chelonanthera gibbosa and one other; but 
the differences between them are so slight that the old name 
July, 1908. 



Coelogyne is here preferred. Should Chelonistele be 
ultimately retained, however, the name Chelonistele perak- 
ensis will apply to the present plant. Pfitzer does not 
cite either the Perak plant or the Flora of British India 
under his Chelonistele sulphurea, so probably did not include 
it, but the only other species with which it could be con- 
fused are Coelogyne tenuiflora, Rid!., a native of Borneo, and 
C. lurida, L. Lind. and Cogn., whose habitat is not recorded. 
Both are figured, however, and as Ridley treats the former 
as distinct, while the latter has the bracts and side lobes of 
the lip relatively twice as broad, the only possible course is 
to consider the present one as distinct. 

The Javan Coelogyne sulphurea, Reichb. f., has long been 
cultivated at Kew, "and in 1903 the Malayan plant was 
received from the Royal Botanic Garden, Grlasnevin, under 
the same name. The two species flowered together during 
January of the present year, thus affording an opportunity 
of clearing up the confusion between them. 

Description. — Epiphyte, 1-1 1 ft. high. Pseudobulbs 
approximate, ovoid - oblong, 1^-2 in. long, 1-leaved. 
Leaves long-petioled, oblong-lanceolate or narrowly ellipti- 
cal, subacute, coriaceous, 5-7 in. long ; petiole 2-4 in. long. 
Scapes erect, borne with the young growths from the base 
of the old pseudobulbs, ^-| ft. high, the basal half covered 
with imbricating brown sheaths ; raceme lax, many- 
flowered. Bracts linear, acute, soon reflexed, and decidu- 
ous, f-1 in. long, rose-pink. Pedicels slender, nearly ^ in. 
long. Sepals spreading, lanceolate-oblong, subobtuse, some- 
what concave, about \ in. long, light buff. Petals linear, 
obtuse, revolute, rather shorter than the sepals, light green. 
Lip strongly 3-lobed, rather shorter than the sepals ; light 
yellow with a deep yellow blotch on the disc ; side lobes 
linear, slightly falcate, obtuse, spreading ; front lobe obcor- 
dately 2-lobed, with broad obtuse segments ; disc with a 
pair of smooth fleshy keels. Column clavate, broadly 
winged, somewhat curved, less than half as long as the lip. 
Pollinia 4, attached to a broad viscus. — R. A. Rolfe. 



Fig. 1, flower, with sepals removed and 1 petal uncurled; 2 and 3 pollinia, 
seen from front and back; 4, whole plant: — 1-3 enlarged, 4 much reduced. 



8204 




M.S.dd.JH.fi.tehlitk 



"Vancent-Br o oks , D ay&. S on. LtP- 1 



ZReew &_C° London. 



Tab. 8204. 

DIDYMOCARPUS cyanea. 

Malay Peninsula. 

Gesneraceae. Tribe Cyrtandreae. 

Didymocarpus, Wall. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1021 ; C. B. 
Clarke in DC. Monogr. vol. v. pars 1, p. 70. 



Didymocarpus cyanea, Bidl. in Journ. Bot. 1900, p. 68 ; affinis D. lacunosae, 
Hook. f. (B. M. t. 7236), a qua omnibus partibus majoribus differt. 

Ihrba acaulis. Folia pluria, rosulata, patula vel ascendentia, ovata, elliptica, 
vel obovata, apice subobtusa, basi rotundata vel plus minusve angustata, 
7-15 cm. longa, 4-7 cm. lata, crenato-serrata, utrinque subtus longius 
molliter pubescentia, venis lateralibus utrinque 7-8 supra impressis subtus 
prom inenti bus; petioli 2-6 cm. longi. Scapi 2 vel plures, erecti, circiter 
15 cm. longi, 4-5-flori, pechmculis villoso-pubescentibus 6-7 cm. longis. 
liracteae lineares vel anguste oblanceolatae. PediceUi circiter 2*5 cm. 
longi. Calyx usque ad basin partitus, segmentis suberectis lineari- 
subu'atis circiter 12 mm. longis extra pubescentibus. Corolla cyanea, 
tubiformis, circiter 3'5 cm. longa, lobis pa tubs. Stamina duo antica 
perfecta, lilamentis infra medium tubi insertis, antheris connatis; 
staminodia tria, posticum lateralibus minus. Diums annularis, crenatus, 
vix 1 ■ 5 mm. altus. Ovarium elongatum, ut stylus glanduloso-pubescens. 



There are no authentically named specimens of Didymo- 
carpus cyanea in the Kew Herbarium, but the plant figured 
agrees so well with the original description, except as 
regards the scapes, which are described as 2-flowered, that 
there is little doubt as to its belonging to that species. 

D. cyanea was collected at Kasum, in the Siamese part of 
the Malay Peninsula, by Mr. C. Curtis, Superintendent of 
the Botanic Gardens, Penang. 

Ridley remarks that the number of Didymocarpi in the 
Siamese-Malayan region seems endless, every district sup- 
plying one or more new kinds ; and the same holds good 
for many other genera of Gresneraceae in different parts of 
the world, as for example the Tropical American genus 
Columnea, of which more than twenty species have been 
described from Costa Rica alone. 

Description. — Herb, stemless. Leaves in a rosette, 
July, 1908. 



spreading or ascending, ovate, elliptic or obovate, apex 
rather obtuse, base rounded or narrowed, 3-6 in. long, 1^-3 
in. broad, crenate-serrate, softly pubescent, lateral nerves 
7-8 on each side of the midrib, impressed above, prominent 
below ; petioles f-2 J in. long. Scapes 2 or more, 4-5- . 
flowered ; peduncles villous-pubescent, 2 J in. long. Calyx 
divided to the base ; segments suberect, linear-subulate, 
j| in. long, pubescent outside. Corolla deep blue, trumpet- 
shaped, about 1^ in. long, lobes patulous. Stamens 2 only 
perfect, anticous ; filaments inserted below the middle of 
the tube, broadened towards the middle, white ; anthers 
connate ; staminodes 3, the posticous smaller than the 
lateral ones. Disk annular. Ovary elongated, glandular- 
pubescent. — T. A. Sprague. 

Cultivation. — Didymocarpus cyanea was first grown at 
Kew in 1902, when seeds of it were received from Mr. 
C. Curtis, Superintendent, Botanic Gardens, Penang. It 
has also been received from Professor Costantin, Jardin des 
Plantes, Paris. It flowers in the autumn, the pretty dark 
blue flowers opening in slow succession in a tropical house, 
where it receives the same treatment as Sinningia and the 
Streptocarpi. Although the Malayan species of this genus 
have been again and again tried as garden plants at Kew, 
they have never been a success. Probably they require to 
be treated as annuals, and as they do not mature seeds 
under cultivation, they soon die out. They are quite as 
pretty as their allies the Streptocarpi, which were at one 
time generically united with them, S. Rexii having been 
figured in this work, t. 3005 (1830), as Didymocarpus Rexii, 
while D. malayana, B. M. t. 7526, has all the appearance of 
a yellow flowered Streptocarpus. — W. Watson. 

Fig. 1, section of calyx showing the disk and pistil; % ba?e of corolla laid 
open showing the staminodes; 3, immature fruit:— 1 and 2 enlarged, 3 natural 



8205 




3jLS.de!. J. N.Btcklitk 



"ViRoantBr-ooksDayft-SanX^nT 



T,.Reevw & C? Larulrm. 



Tab. 8205. 

OLEARIA ramulosa, var. communis. 

Australia. 



Compositae. Tribe Asteroideae. 
Oleabia, Moench.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 276. 



Olearia ramulosa, var. communis, Benth. Flora Austral, vol. iii. p. 476 ; 
affinis 0. floribundae, Benth., a qua foliis longioribus et capitulis minoribus 
paucionbus differt. 

Frutex ramosus, 1-2 m. altus, ramis gracilibus teretibus magis minusve 
scabrido-pubescentibus. Folia lineari-lanceolata vel oblaneeolata, Integra 
usque ad 1 cm. longa et 2 mm. lata, supra glaberrima vel muricato-scabrida, 
subtus lanata, margmibus recurvis. Capitula circiter 1-5 cm. diametro 
ramulos breves laterales terminantia. Involucri brarteae 3-seriatae' 
oblongae, usque ad 4 mm. longae et 1 mm. latae, apice pubescentes 
margmibus scanosis cihatis. Elores radii circiter 9, albi: corollae 
tubus 3 mm longus extus parce pilosus; lamina elliptica, 4 mm. longa, 
4-nervia obtusa. Flores disci circiter 12; tubus 2 '5 mm. longus lobis 
acutis 1 mm longis Antherae apiculatae, 1 mm. longae. Styli rami 
papillosi. Achaema 1 mm. longa, leviter compressa, parce pilosa Pavvi 
setae 2" 5 mm. longae.— Aster ramulosus, Labill. PI. Nov Holl vol ii 51 
t 19H. A aculeatus, Labill. I.e. 52, t. 200. A. exasperate, Link,'Enum' 
Hort. Berol. n. 328. Diplostephium acuhatum, Nees Gen et Sp 192* 

D. ramulosum, Nees, l.c 193 , Enrybia ramulosa, E.propinqua, E. aculeata, 

E. epileia, DC. Prod. vol. v. 270. E. ericoides, Steetz in PI. Preiss 1 423 



About fifteen species of this exclusively Australasian 
genus are now cultivated in this country, and of these the 
plant here figured is probably the most graceful. It is 
widely spread in New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania 
and teouth Australia, and fs frequently found growing in 
waste places. 

Bentham, in the Flora Australiensis, distinguishes two 
forms, a. microphylla and b. communis, and whether these be 
separable as species it is difficult to decide without a know- 
ledge of the plants in the wild state. Those grown at Kew 
are strikingly uniform in habit, as well as in the shape of 
the leaves and size of the flowers, but the dried specimens 
preserved in the Herbarium show great variation. 

Description.— Shrub, 3-6 ft. high with slender, terete, 
more or less scabrous, pubescent branches. Leaves linear- 
Jult, 1908. 



lanceolate or oblanceolate, entire, largest J in. long and 
y 1 ^- in. broad, almost glabrous or muricately-scabrid above, 
woolly below, margins recurved. Flower-heads about } s in. 
across, terminating sbort, lateral branchlets. Bracts of 
the involucre in 3 series, oblong, longest 1 in. long, 
pubescent at the apex, margins scariose, ciliate. Ray-flowers 
about 9 ; tube •£- in. long, sparsely pilose outside, limb 
elliptic \ in. long, 4-nerved, obtuse. Disk-flowers about 12 ; 
tube -£% in. long, lobes acute. Anthers apiculate. Style- 
branches papillose. Achenes y 1 ^ in. long, slightly com- 
pressed, sparsely pilose ; setae of the pappus y^- in. long. — 
J. Hutchinson. 

Cultivation. — Olearia ramulosa is an old garden plant 
which has been grown at Kew many years for greenhouse 
decoration. It forms an elegant shrub a yard or so high, 
and the long freely branched shoots when clothed in early 
spring with white aster-like flowers are particularly orna- 
mental. Grown in pots out of doors during summer and 
wintered in a greenhouse it is easily kept in health, and if 
afforded a little extra heat in December it will flower 
readily some weeks earlier than its usual time. Like all 
the species of Olearia it is easily propagated by means of 
cuttings. In the South of England and Ireland it may be 
seen here and there treated as a wall shrub, the main shoots 
being trained against the wall, and from these there is 
annually produced a thick crop of long branchlets which 
flower freely in spring. After flowering, these shoots are 
spurred back. — W. Watson. 

Fig. 1, branchlet bearing an unopened flower head; 2, a ray-flower; 3, a 
disk-flower; 4, a bristle of the pappus ; 5, anthers ; 6, stigma : — all enlarged. 



8206 




M.S 



tahith. 



AfincentBroolfflJlssr&SorJ.AD?' 



L Reeve &.C? LoruLm. 



Tab. 8206. 
EHODODENDRON Mariesii. 

Central China. 

Ericaceae. Tribe Rhodobeae. 
Rhododendron, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron (§ Azalea) Mariesii, Hemsl. et E. II. Wilson in Kew Bull. 
1907, p. 244; affinis R. rhombico, Miq., a quo ramulis glabris, foliis ovato- 
lanceolatis pilis longissimis appressis subtus vestitis, squamis latioribus 
et corolla albo-roseo-maculata differt. 

Frutex 1-2 m. altus, ramis nitidis glabris. Folia ovato-lanceolata, acuta, 
5-7 cm. longa, 2-3*5 cm. lata, basi magis minusve cuneata, juniora supra 
longe sericeo-pubescentia, subtus parce pubescentia, adulta demum glabra, 
nervis lateralibus utrinque 3-4, inferioribus oblique ascendentibus 
superioribus subpatulis subtus elevatis, venis arete anastomosantibus ; 
petioli 3-8 mm. longi. Gemmae ovoideae, squamis late ovatis vel oblongis 
apiculatis extus apice pubescentibus. Flores saepe geminati (rarius 
ternati), albo-rosei, purpureo-maculati ; pedicelli erecti, 0*5-1 cm. longi, 
liispidi. Calyx annularis, dense setosus. Corolla alte 5-lobata, utrinque 
glabra, tubo 5-10 mm. longo, lobis 10-20 mm. longis patulis elliptieis 
obtusis. Stamina 10, breviter exserta, filamentis 2-2 " 5 cm. longis glabris, 
antheris 2 mm. longis. Ovarium 3-5 mm. longum, ovoideum, dense 
setosum, stylo 3-3*5 cm. longo glabro. — B. Farrerae, var. Weyricliii, Diels, 
in Engl. Bot. Jahrb. vol. xxix. p. 513. 



Rhododendron Mariesii is very closely allied to R. rhom- 
bicum, Miq., figured at tab. 6972 of this Magazine, but the 
two species inhabit widely distant regions. R. rhombicum, 
which is distinguished from the species here figured by 
having pure lilac flowers without any spots, ovate leaves, 
and hairy branches, has so far only been recorded from 
Japan, where it grows in mountain forests ; whereas 
R. Mariesii is confined to Central China. 

According to Wilson, R. Mariesii, R. indicum and R. 
sinense are the only species of Rhododendron which occur 
below 4,000 ft. in Central China. Between this altitude 
and 15.000 ft. other species are found in great abundance. 

Description-. — Shrub, 3-6 ft. high; branches shining, 
glabrous. Leaves ovate-lanceolate, acute, 2-2§ in* long, 
f-1^ in. broad, more or less wedge-shaped at the base, in 
July, 1908. 



the young state with long silky hairs on the upper surface, 
sparingly pubescent, below, at length becoming glabrous ; 
lateral nerves 3-4, suberect at the base, more spreading in 
the upper part, raised below ; veins closely reticulated ; 
petioles J— -J- in. long. Buds ovoid ; scales broadly ovate or 
oblong, apiculate, pubescent outside towards the apex. 
Flowers usually in pairs, pale pink with purple spots on the 
upper segments ; pedicels erect, \-\ in. long, hispid. 
Calyx annular, densely setose. Corolla deeply 5-lobed, 
glabrous on both sides ; tube |— | in. long, lobes ^— f in. 
long, spreading, elliptic, obtuse. Stamens 10, shortly 
exserted ; filaments glabrous ; anthers T T ^ in. long. Ovary 
ovoid, densely setose ; style l|-lj in. long, glabrous. — 
J. Hutchinson. 

Cultivation. — Rhododendron Maries li was raised from 
seeds received at Kew in 1886 from Dr. Henry when at 
Ichang. The plants have received protection ; that figured 
having flowered in the Himalayan House in April, 1907. 
The deciduous Rhododendra from China to which this species 
belongs are handsome spring-flowering shrubs, the best 
known of these, R, sinense, being one of the most popular of 
garden plants. It is probable that R. Mariesii will bear 
the temperature of the warmer parts of the British Islands ; 
it ought to be quite at home in Devon and South Cornwall. 
— W. Watson. 

Fig. 1, calyx and pistil ; 2 and 3, anthers -.—enlarged. 



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CONTENTS OP No. 43, JULY, 1908. 



Tab. 8202.— BEGONIA CATHAYANA. 
„ 8203.— COELOGYNE PERAKENSIS. 
„ 8204.— DIDYMOOARPUS CYANEA. 
„ 8205.— OLEARIA RAMULOSA, var. COMMUNIS. 
„ 8206.— RHODODENDRON MARIESII. 

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8201 




M.S. del J.N.Fitcb.litK 



Vmcent BrooJc9;Da)r& San.HA 



vsb 



J-. Reeve &. C 9 L artdcxn. . 



Tab. 8207. 

CAESALPINIA japonic a. 

Japan and China. 

LE3UMINOSAE. Tribe CAESALPINIEAE. 
Caesalpinia, Linn.; Benih. et Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 565. 



Caesalpinia japonica, Sieb. et Zucc. in Abh. Akad. Muench. 1843, vol. iv. 2, 
p. 117; Franch. et Savat. Enum. PI. Jap, vol. i. p. 114; affinis 0. sepian'ae, 
Roxb., a qua racemis laxioribus glabris vel glabriusculis et pedicellis 
longioribus differt. 

Frittex circiter 2 m. altus, diffuse ramosus, rauiis longis aculeis recurvis 
armatis. Folia bipinnata; pinnae 3-8-jugae; nodi rhachis triaculeati, 
aculeis duobus recurvis in facie inferiore, unica adscendente in facie 
superiore ; internodia rhachis inermia vel armata ; foliola 5-10-juga, 
elliptico-oblonga vel obovato-oblonga, apico rotundata, basi rotundata vel 
obtusa, 1-2 cm. longa, 4-10 mm. lata, dense pellucide glanduloso-punctata, 
supra glabra, subtus puberula. StipuJae parvae, caducae. Hacerni, pedun- 
ciilo brevi incluso 20-25 cm. longi, laxifiori, 25-85-flori, rbachi glabra 
rarins puberula; pedicelli graciles, circiter 3 cm. longi. Calycis tubus 
brevissimus; lobi ovato-oblongi, rotundati, circiter 7 mm. longi, tandem 
reflexi. Petala antica et lateralia lutea, late obovata, brevissime unguiculata, 
circiter 1 • 5 cm. longa et 1 cm. lata vel ultra; petalum posticuin luteuin, 
rubro-striolatum, obovatum, breviter unguiculatum marginibus supra 
unguem inflexis auriculiformibus, 1 cm. longum ungue 2 mm. longo 
excluso. Stamina 10, rubra, alterna breviora, filamentis inferne dense 
villosis. Ovarium oblongum, compressum, vix 4 mm. longum, stylo 
tubulari apice truncato ciliolato extus glabro. Legunmi oblongum, rectum, 
7-8 cm. longum, spinoso-ciispidatum, dorso carinatum. Semina 6-9, oblonga, 
laevia. — O. crista, Thunb. Fl. Jap. p. 179. C. sepiaria, JkOq. Prol. p. 242 ; 
Maxim. FI. As. Or. Fragm. p. 5 ; Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. 
xxiii. p. 206 ; non Roxb. 



There has been considerable difference of opinion amongst 
botanists from time to time as to whether Caesalpinia 
japonica should be united with C. sepiaria or not, but for 
gardening purposes it is certainly distinct. The racemes 
are much laxer in C. japonica and the pedicels are longer, 
whilst the uppermost petal has red markings, which 
apparently do not occur in C. sepiaria. 

The colouring of the corolla recalls that of C. vernalis, 
B. M. t. 8132, which is, however, much less showy. 
August, 190S. 



Description. — Shrub, about 6 ft. high, straggling. 
Branches long, armed with recurved prickles. Leaves 
bipinnate, with 3-8 pairs of pinnae ; rhachis furnished with 
two recurved prickles on the lower surface and one straight 
ascending prickle on the upper surface at each node, inter- 
nodes of rhachis armed or unarmed ; leaflets 5-10 pairs, 
elliptic-oblong or obovate-oblong, rounded at the apex, 
rounded or obtuse at the base, ^-| in. long, \ ~ ig in. broad, 
densely dotted with pellucid glands, glabrous on the upper 
surface, puberulous on the lower. Stipules small and 
caducous. Bacemes about 9 in. long, shortly peduncled, 
lax-flowered ; rhachis usually glabrous ; pedicels slender, 
over 1 in. long. Flowers about 30. Calyx'tube very short ; 
lobes ovate-oblong, rounded, about | in. long, finally 
reflexed. Petals lemon-yellow, obovate, the uppermost one 
smaller than the others, striped with red, and provided with 
two auricles above the short claw. Stamens 10, red, alter- 
nately shorter ; filaments densely villous below. Ovary 
oblong, compressed, hardly \ in. long ; style tubular, trun- 
cate, fringed at the apex, glabrous elsewhere. Legume 
oblong, straight, about 3 in. long, with a spine-like cusp at 
the apex of the ventral suture, and a prominent dorsal keel. 
Seeds 6-0, oblong, smooth. — T. A. Sprague. 

Cultivation. — Caesalpinia japonica first flowered in 
England in 1887 in the Coombe Wood nursery of Messrs. J. 
Veitch & Sons, by whom the plant had been introduced from 
Japan a few years previously. It is hardy only in sheltered 
positions in the south of England, the plant from which the 
present plate was prepared being one of a group established 
in a recess under the south wall of the Temperate House at 
Kew, where it has grown practically uninjured by frost for 
about five years. In some Cornish and Irish gardens it is 
quite at home, one of the largest specimens, which flowers 
freely every year, being in the garden of Lord Barrymore 
at Fota, near Cork. Whilst the species generally are 
strong climbers, this forms a somewhat straggling deciduous 
sh^ub, the shoots being comparatively short ; the flowers 
are borne in terminal racemes on the young growths in 
June. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, node of the leaf rhachis, seen from above; 2 and 3, stamens; 
4, pistil : — all eitlaryed. 



8268 




hxh 



Afoneenfc Brooks, D ay &- SanitHc: 



IRteve &-C?I*o:ruLcm.. 



Tab. 8208. 

INDIGOFERA hebepetala, 

Himalaya. 

Leguminosae. 
Indigofera, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 494. 



Indigofera hebepetala, Benth. ex Bak, in Hook:/. Fl. Brit. Tnd. vol. ii. p. 101 ; 
species ex affinitate I. atropurpureac, Ham. (B. M. t. 3065) a qua stipellis 
majoribus, bracteis latioribus alabastra involventibus cito temen deciduis, 
corolla pallidiore kermesina, legumineque magts rostrato differt. 

Frutex sylvestris elatior; rami juniores parcissime pilis appressis obsiti, demum 
glabri. Folia alterna, 3-5 cm. remote, imparipinnata, 18-20 cm. longa, 
petiolis 4 cm. longis; foliola 5-9, rarissime 11, terminale excepto oppo^ita 
paribus 2 '5-3 "5 cm. remotis, membranacea, oblonga vel ovata, basi late 
cuneata vel subrotundata, apice obtusa vel subretusa, mucronulata, nervis 
8-10-jngis, supra intense viridia, juniora parcissime appressc pilosa, cito 
glabrescentia, subtus pallidiora, parce sed persistenter appresse pilosa, 
3*5-6 cm. longa, 2 5-4 cm. lata, petiolulis 3 mm. longis; rachis petioloque 
parce appresse pilosa, cito glabrescens ; stipulae lanceolatae vel subulatae, 
4 mm. longae, caducae ; stipellae 2 mm. longae, subulatae. Floret 
racemosi; racemi axillares, 8-20 cm. longi, 20-40-flori, pedunculis l - 5-5 
cm. longis rachibusqiie 6-16 cm. longis parce appresse pilosis ; pedicelli 
2 mm. longi; bracteae parce hirsutae, cymbiformes, intense kermesinae, 
6 mm. longae, 4 mm. latae, alabastra obtectentes, in cuspidem reuirvam 
abeuntes, cito deciduae. Calyx oblique campanulatus, 3 mm. longns, 
dentibus triangulis tubo duplo brevioribus, extus parce appresse pilosus. 
Corolla 1 * 23 cm. longa, vexillo intense kermesino extra parce serieeo, alis 
roseis, petalis carinae versus apices kermesinis ibique extra parce sericeis. 
Legumen cylindricum, rectum, glabrum, apice acuto subrecurvum, 4-5 cm. 
longum, 5 mm. crassum, seminibus 8-10. 



Indigofera hebepetala is widely distributed in the North- 
Western Himalaya, at elevations of 6,000-8,000 ft., from 
Hazara, where it was first collected by Dr. J. L. Stewart, 
and Kashmir, where it was originally obtained by Mr. Y. 
Jacquemont, to Kamaon, where it was first seen by Dr. T. 
Thomson. So far it has not been recorded from Nepal, but 
it reappears in Inner Sikkim where it was first found by 
Sir J. D. Hooker in the Lachen Yalley at 7,000 ft. The 
species is very closely allied to /. atropurpurea, Ham., which 
is met with as a rule at slightly lower elevations and has a 
somewhat wider distribution, since it extends to Indo-China 
and is believed to occur also in Southern China. /. atropur- 
August, 1908. 



jmrea, figured in this work at t. 3065, differs most markedly 
from /. hebepetala in the darker colour of its flowers, in the 
narrower and smaller bracts, and in the number of its leaflets, 
never fewer than 11, usually 13-17; in I. hebepetala the 
maximum number, very rarely met with, is 11, the usual 
number being 5-7, though leaves with 9 leaflets are not 
uncommon. Though long ago segregated by Mr. Bentham, 
no description of this species was published till the Indian 
Leguminosae were taken up in the second volume of the 
Flora of British India. Owing to the inclusion in the 
species of what was then taken for a sub-alpine form with 
smaller leaflets, but is now known to belong to another 
species, the number of leaflets in the original description is 
given as 13-17, and the range of elevation is stated to be 
from 6,000 to 15,000 ft. The actual number of leaflets is, 
however, as stated above, 5-11, and the known range of 
elevation of the species is from 6,000-8,000 ft. 

Description. — Shrub, of considerable size. Branchlets at 
first sparingly beset with adpressed hairs, soon glabrous. 
Leaves alternate, l|-2 in. apart, including the 1J in. long 
petiole 7-8 in. in length; leaflets 5-9, very occasionally 11, 
opposite except the distal leaflet, the pairs 1-1^ in. apart, 
wide cuneate or rounded, obtuse or subretuse, mucronulate, 
nerves 8-10-paired, dark green at length glabrous above, 
paler more persistently adpressed pilose beneath, 1|-2| in. 
long, l-li in. wide, the petiolules \ in. long ; petiole and 
rachis soon glabrous ; stipules lanceolate or subulate, ^ in. 
long, caducous; stipels T \ in. long, subulate. Flowers in 
axillary 20-40-flowered racemes 3-8 in. long; peduncles 
£-2 in. long; pedicels T \ in. long; bracts deciduous, 
crimson, sparingly hairy, boat-shaped and enclosing the 
b'ids, 5 in. long, ^ in. across, ending in a recurved cuspidate 
tip. Calyx sparingly pilose, obliquely campanulate, \ in. 
long the lobes triangular, half as long as tube. Corolla 
i in. long, with dark crimson standard sparingly silky out- 
side, rose-coloured wing-petals and keel-petals with dark 
crimson sparingly silky tips. Pod cylindric, straight, 
glabrous, with a sharp slightly recurved tip, 11-2 in. long, 
J in. thick, 8-10-seeded.—b. Praix. 

Cultivation. — So far as Kew is concerned this species is 



not new, for the plant from which the plate was prepared 
was one of the many species bequeathed to this establish- 
ment by the late Mr. Gr. C. Joad in 1881. It is, however, 
scarcely known in gardens generally. Like its better 
known congener, 1. Gerardiana, its shoots at Kew die back to 
the ground when the plant is grown in the open. Every 
year, however, a crowd of slender, erect or suberect stems 
about 4 ft. iu length is sent up from the rootstock, and 
these flower freely during August and September. The 
shoots are not naturally of annual duration, and if the plants 
were grown against a wall they would probably survive 
our winters. The number of hardy shrubs which flower 
at the same season as this is so limited that every addition 
to them is welcome. — W. J. Bean. 



Fig. 1, buds envelojwd by the deciduous bracts; 2, a single flower, partially 
laid open; 3, calyx and stamens ; 4, a keel-pe'al ; 5, pistil; <>, fruits :—Ji<js. 1-5 
enlarged. 



8209 




MS. del, J M.PitcKMK 



ISnaentBrodhsDav &.San.L&m<P 



^..Reeve &. C °Lan.aan_. 



Tab. 8209. 

EUCRYPHIA CORDIFOLTA. 

South Chile. 



EUCBTPHIACEAE. 

Euceyphia, Cav. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 615 ; Focke in Engl. 

et Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenf. vol. iii. vi. p. 131. 



Eueryphia cordifolia, Cav. Ic. vol. iv. p. 49, t. 372; C. Gay, Hint. Chile, Bot. 
vol. i. p. 351; ab E. Bilhirdieri, Spach, specie affini tasmanica, differt 
foliis subtus molliter pubescentibus crenulatis vel serrato-dentatis, ovariis 
glabris et carpellis numerosioribus. 

Arbor sempervirens, in patria sua ultra 15 m. alta, trunco recto, 30-60 cm. 
diametro, superne copiose ramosa. Rami juniores fulvo-tomentosi, tandem 
glabrescentes, vetustiores cortice fusco tecti. Folia late oblonga vel elliptico- 
vel ovato-oblonga, obtusa vel rarius acuta, basi magis minusve cordata 
vel truncata vel rotundata, margine repando-crenulata vel serrato-dentata, 
4-8 cm. longa, 2"5-i cm. lata, coriacea, primo utrinque pilosa, supra mox 
glaberrima, lucida, saturate viridia, infra cinerea, etiam matvira molliter 
pubescentia, nervis lateralibus utrinque 7-11, venarum reticulatione snpra 
conspicua, areolis minutis ; petiolus crassiusculus 4-6 mm. longus, 
tomentosus. Flores in foliorum axillis solitarii, e gemmis perulatis orti, 
perulis ovato-rotundatis tomentosis; pedicelli tomentosi, 1-2 cm. longi, 
vel demuni paiilo longiores. Sepala 4, late oblonga, tomentella, unacum 
calyptratim delabentia. Fetala 4, obovato-rotundata Tel rotundata, 
vix unguiculata, tenuia, lactea, ad 2 • 5 cm. longa. Stamina numerosissima ; 
filamenta basi efigiirationibus thalami breviter tubulosis ciliatis cincta. 
Ovarium glabrum, carpellis stjiisque 10-12. Capsvla 12-15 mm. longa. 



Eueryphia cordifolia is a native of Chile, south of Lat. 
38° S. and particularly common in the humid forests of 
Chiloe and the provinces of Yaldivia and Llanquihue. It 
is a most ornamental tree, known to the Chilians as Muermo 
or Ulmo. It was described and figured in 1797 by 
Cavanille, who established on it the genus Eueryphia, 
the systematic position of which has always been doubtful. 
First Sprengel suggested an affinity with Rosaceae, then 
Choisy attached it as an anomalous genus to Hypericaceae. 
Endlicher removed it to Chlaenaceae, whilst Spach was the 
first to point out a relationship with Ternstroemiaceae, 
particularly with Laplacea. Then in 1846 C. Gay made 
Eueryphia the representative of a new order Eucryphiaceae, 
which he placed near Chlaenaceae. Planchon, on the other 

August, 1908. 



hand, was inclined to refer it to Saxifragaceae, among 
which Belangera seemed to him to approach Eucryphia. This 
view was adopted by Bentham in the Flora Australiensis ; 
but in Bentham and Hooker's Genera Plantarum Eucryphia 
was transferred to the Rosaceae-Guillajeae, to which group 
Baillon also assigns it as an anomalous type. Quite 
recently Hallier came to the same conclusion from an 
examination of the morphology and anatomy of the genus. 
Meanwhile Maximowicz had pointed to the Tiliaceae, and 
more especially the Sloaneae and Elaeocarpeae, as possible 
allies. Focke, however, the monographer of the Rosaceae 
in Engler and Prantl's Natlirliche Pflanzenfamilien, restored 
C. Gray's Eucryphiaceae as a distinct family allied to 
Ternstroemiaceae and the other members of Engler's sub- 
series Theineae, and it is accordingly placed between 
Dilleniaceae and Ochnaceae in Engler's system. Under 
these circumstances, and pending a more comprehensive 
examination of the genus, it seems expedient to follow Gay 
and Focke and treat Eucryphia as a distinct phylum with 
the status of a family. 

Loudon gives 1878 as the year of introduction of 
Eucryphia cordifolia into English horticulture, but G. Don 
has a paragraph containing directions for its cultivation 
and propagation as early as 1831. However that may be, 
it remained practically unnoticed until 1897, when it 
flowered in Messrs. Veitch's nurseries at Coombe Wood, 
and a figure of it, together with a note by G. Nicholson, 
was published in the Gardeners' Chronicle. The leaves 
are shown here as obtuse and elliptic to elliptic-oblong. 
Subsequently another figure of Eucryphia was produced in 
the same Journal, representing the leaves as very acute. 
The specimen from which it was drawn came from the garden 
of Mr. Gumbleton, who had obtained his plant from the 
Coombe Wood nurseries, whence the branch figured on plate 
820!) was derived. From the dried material at Kew it seems 
that whenever acute leaves appear it is generally the first 
leaves of a shoot which assume the acute shape, and in this 
they resemble the leaves of the seedling plant. 

According to Gay the wood of Eucryphia is much used 
for joinery and light carpenter's work and also for fuel. 

Description. — Tree, attaining in its native country over 



40 ft. in height, with a straight trunk, 1-2 ft. in 
diameter. Branches tomentose when young, at length 
glabrescent ; old branches with a brownish bark. Leaves 
broad-oblong, obtuse or sometimes acute, with crenulate 
or serrate-dentate margins, 2-3 in. long, 1-lf in. broad, 
coriaceous, when mature quite glabrous, dark green and 
shining above, softly pubescent and greyish below, network 
of veins very close and distinct above ; petiole tomentose, 
\-\ in. long. Flowers solitary, axillary, from perulate 
tomentose buds ; pedicels tomentose, ^-1 in. long. Sepals 
4, oblong, velvety, thrown off together. Petals 4, obovate- 
rotundate, up to 1 in. long, thin, milk-white. Stamens 
very numerous. Ovary glabrous; carpels and styles 10-12. 
Capsule J— | in. long. — Otto Stapf. 

Cultivation. — This shrub is essentially one for the 
milder parts of the British Isles. It has never succeeded 
at Kew even when planted against a sheltered wall. But 
for the gardens of the south and west of Ireland, the west 
of Scotland, Cornwall and similar localities, where the 
winters are mild and the summers equable and moist, it 
ought to prove a most charming acquisition. Like E. 
pinnatifolia (B. M. t. 70G7), another but hardier species 
from Chile, it should be given a peaty soil such as Rhodo- 
dendreae love. In fact, wherever such species of 
Rhododendron as R. grande and R. Grijjithianum thrive, 
there, both as regards climate and soil, will this Eucryphia 
be very well suited. — W. J. Bean. 



Fig. 1, part of upper surface of very young leaf; 2, l>ud ; 3 and 4, stamens ; 
5, pistil: — all enlarged* 







"VSnoent Brooks ,T)ay & Son.Li.4imp 



.Reeve A C?LamAaR 



Tab. 8210. 

RHODODENDRON kamtschaticum. 

N.E. Asia and N. W. America. 



Ericaceae. Tribe Rhodobeae. 
Rhododendron, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron (§ Therorliodion) kamtschaticum, Pall. Fl. Boss. vol. i. p. 48, 
t. 33; Hook. Fl. Bor.-Am. vol. ii. p. 43 ; Maxim. Bhod. As. Orient, p. 47 ; 
affinis B. Bedowskiani, Maxim., a quo foliis obovatis ciliatis et stylo stamina 
superante differt. 

Suffrttiex parvus, ramis abbreviatis crassis, ramulis longe pilosis. Folia annua, 
sessilia, obovata vel spatulato-obovata, apice rotundata, mucronata, basi 
attenuata, 3-6 cm. longa, 1*6-2*5 cm. lata, chartacea, marginibus longe 
ciliatis, nervis lateralibus utrinque 2-3 arcuatis subtus longe pilosis, venis 
laxe reticulars utrinque conspicuis. Flores solitarii, ramulos breves 
terniinantes ; pedicelli usque ad 2 cm. longi, longe parceque glanduloso- 
pilosi. Calyx 5-partitus, segmentis herbaceis oblongis obtusis 10-15 mm. 
longis 3-6 mm. latis 3-nerviis in nervis et marginibus glanduloso-pilosis. 
Corolla sanguineo-purpurea ; tubus 3-6 mm. longus; lold patuli, oblongo- 
elliptici, obtusi, circiter 2 cm. longi et 1 cm. lati, extus tenuiter villosi, intus 
basi tantum villosi. Stamina 10; filamenta inaequalia, usque ad 1*5 cm. 
longa, basi villosa, antheris 2 mm. longis glabris. Ovarium ovoidcum, 
parce pilosnm ; stylus circiter 2 cm. longus, basi villosus, stigmate capitato 
breviter 5-lobo. Capsula oblonga, circiter 1*3 cm, longa. — Bhodoihamnue 
kamtschaticus, Lindl. in Paxt. Fl. Gard. vol. i. t. 22. 



Rhododendron kamtschaticum is found abundantly in the 
islands and along the coasts in the neighbourhood of 
Behring Strait. It extends southwards to Sachalin and the 
north of Japan, and eastward to Banks's Island off the coast 
of British Columbia. According to Pallas it occurs in 
muddy mountainous places, and begins to flower about the 
end of June. 

This pretty species, which in general appearance reminds 
one of some of the Rock Roses, has been in cultivation for 
at least a hundred years, but, owing probably to the 
difficulty of its cultivation, it is still comparatively rare. 

Description. — Undershrub about 6 in. high; branches 
thick ; branchlets clothed with long hairs. Leaves annual, 
sessile, obovate or spathulate-obovate, rounded at the apex, 
narrowed to the base, 1^-2^ in. long, £-1 in. broad, paperv, 

August, 1908 



long ciliate ; lateral nerves 2-3 on each side of the midrib, 
arched, pilose below ; veins conspicuous on both sides. 
Flowers solitary, terminating short branchlets ; pedicels |- 
| in. long, glandular-pilose. Calyx 5-partite ; segments 
herbaceous, oblong, obtuse, l-^ in. long, 3-nerved, nerves 
and margins pilose. Corolla carmine purple ; lobes spread- 
ing, oblong-elliptic, obtuse, about \ in. long and \ in. broad, 
thinly villous outside. Stamens 10 ; filaments unequal, 
villous at the base, about - 1 in. long; anthers ^ in. long, 
glabrous. Ovary ovoid, sparingly pilose ; style villous at 
the base ; stigma capitate, shortly 5-lobed. Capsule oblong, 
about I in. long. — J. Hutchinson. 

• Cultivation. — This interesting and remarkable Rhodo- 
dendron is not one of the easiest to cultivate in this country, 
and it cannot be accommodated so readily as most of the 
species. It is quite capable of withstanding any degree of 
winter cold it is likely to experience in the British Isles ; 
but it is deciduous and, like many other deciduous plants 
from North Asia, is excited into growth early. In conse- 
quence it is liable to have its young growths injured by 
late spring frosts. Then it is, even more than most species 
of Rhododendron, a moisture-loving plant. At Kew it has 
succeeded best when grown in a mixture of peat and silver 
sand to which a certain spongy consistency has been given 
by adding a little chopped sphagnum. It should be given 
a position where it is shielded from early morning sun in 
spring, though otherwise fully exposed, and where the soil 
is, naturally or artificially, kept always moist. The plant 
from which our figure was prepared is one of a batch raised 
from seeds obtained from the Botanic Garden at St. Peters- 
burg in 1900.— W. J. Bean. 



Figs. 1 and % stamens ; 3, pistil :— all enlarged. 



8211 




M.S.del.JKFitchlith. 



"Went BrooT<sPay&-3oaLl?inp 



1 ReevR & C? London 



Tab. 8211. 
POLYSTACHYA Lawrkncrana. 

East Tropical Africa. 



Oechidageae. Tribe Vandeae. 
Polystachya, Hook. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 540. 



Polystachya Lawrenceana, Kraenzl. in Oard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 150; 
Rul/e in Thiselton-Dyer, Ft. Trop. A/r. vol. vii. p. 124 ; inter species affined 
labello roseo distincta. 

Herba epiphytica. Pseudobulbi ovoideo-oblongi, subcompressi, 2 5-4 cm. longi, 
vaginis membranaceis imbricatis tecti, 2-3-phylli. Folia lineari-oblonga, 
subobtusa, recurva, 6-11 cm. longa, l - 3-2 cm. lata, subcoriacea. Scapi 
terminales, 8-15 cm. longi, pubescentes, 4-8-flori. Bracteae late rhomboideo- 
ovatae, abrupteacuminatae.puberulae, 6-8 cm. longae. Fedicelli puberuli, 
circa 1 cm. longi. Flores speciosi, flavido-virides labello roseo, inversi. 
Sepala subpatentia, puberula ; posticum ovatuin, acutum, concavum, 8 cm. 
longum, lateralia ovata, acuta, concava, 1 cm. longa. Petala subconniventia, 
incurva, oblanceolato-oblonga, subobtusa, 8 cm. longa. Labellum superum, 
3-lobum, 1 cm. longum ; lobi laterales late rotundati vel obscure angulati, 
subobtusi, breves ; lobus intermedius obovato-orbicularis, apiculatus, 
carnosulus, canal iculat us, circa 7 mm. latus ; discus medio callo rotundato 
obscuro instructus, basi puberulus. Columna brevissima, lata, exalata. 



Polystachya is a large and polymorphic genus, widely 
diffused through the warmer regions of the globe, though at 
present it is not known to occur further east than Borneo 
and the Philippine Islands. Its headquarters are in Tropi- 
cal Africa, from which country 74 species were known 
when the Flora of Tropical Africa was published, and the 
number has since been increased to over one hundred. 
Very few of the species can be considered showy, and only 
three have hitherto been figured in this work, namely, 
P. grandiflora, Lindl., t. 3707, P. bracteosa, Lindl. (now con- 
sidered to be synonymous with P. ajjinis, Lindl.), t. 4161, 
and P. pubescens, t. 5586, the two former being from 
Tropical Africa, 'the latter from extra-tropical South Africa. 
The one now figured is very distinct from these, and indeed 
from all others in cultivation, in its rose-pink lip, which 
renders the plant very attractive. It was discovered in the 
Upper Zambesi district by Mr. John Buchanan, who sent 
August, 1908. 



plants to Mr. James O'Brien, though from some misappre- 
hension the habitat was recorded as Sierra Leone when the 
species was originally described from the collection of Sir 
Trevor Lawrence, Bart., Burford, Dorking, where it flowered 
in July, 1893. The former locality has since been confirmed, 
for the species has also been collected on the Zomba Hills, 
Nyasaland, at 6,000 feet elevation, by Lieut.-Col. W. H. 
Manning, in November, 1900. It is one of a group of 
Tropical African species, which are for the most part known 
only from dried specimens. 

Description. — Epiphyte, about 6 in. high. Pseudobulbs 
ovoid-oblong, somewhat compressed, 1-1^ in. long, covered 
with membranous imbricating sheaths, 2-3-leaved. Leaves 
linear-oblong, subobtuse, recurved, 2J-4J in. long, J- § in. 
broad, subcoriaceous. Inflorescence terminal, 3-6 in. long, 
pubescent ; raceme 4-8-flowered. Bracts broadly rhomboid- 
ovate, abruptly acuminate, puberulous, \-^ in. long. 
Pedicels puberulous, under £ in. long. Flowers medium- 
sized, inverted, yellowish green with a rose-pink lip. 
Sepals somewhat spreading, puberulous; dorsal ovate, 
acute, concave, about } in. long ; lateral ovate, acuminate, 
concave, rather longer than the dorsal. Petals subconni- 
vent, incurved, oblanceolate-oblong, subobtuse, about ^ in. 
long. Lip superior, 3-lobed, nearly \ in. long ; side lobes 
rounded or obscurely angled, subobtuse, short; front lobe 
obovate-orbicular, apiculate, fleshy, channelled, nearly \ in. 
broad; disc with an obscure rounded callus about the 
centre, puberulous behind. Column very short and broad, 
without wings. — R. A. Rolfe. 

Cultivation. — Kew is indebted to the Royal Botanic 
Gardens, Grlasnevin, for a plant of this pretty species of 
Polystachya, which was received in 1903 and flowered in 
June, 1906. There are not many of the numerous species 
of Polystachya that are sufficiently attractive to hold a 
place among garden orchids. Twenty-four of them are in 
cultivation at Kew, and of these the largest flowered is 
P. grandiflora, whilst the brightest coloured is the yellow- 
flowered P. pubescens. The species here figured is at least 
as attractive as either of these. Polystachyas generally 
are easily kept in health if grown in a warm, moist house, 



and afforded the same treatment as answers for Dendrobium 
nobile, namely, a small teak basket filled with a mixture of 
peat fibre and sphagnum for the roots, which should be 
kept wet during the growing season and dry whilst the 
plant is at rest. The flowers are developed in summer. — 
W. Watson". 



Fig. 1, lip, with one side lobe cut off; 2, column ; 3 and i, pollinia, sejn from 
front and back : — all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By Geoeqe Bentham, 
F.K.S. Revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
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OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

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8212 




M.S.M JN.Fitchlitl,. 



"Went Brooks Bay & Soji J .tAmp • 



L Reeve & C^Lon-don.. 



Tab. 8212. 

RHODODENDRON Maddeni, var. obtusifolia. 

„ issato. 



Ericaceae. Tribe Bhodoreae. 
Rhododendron, Linn.; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron (§ lOurhododendron) Maddeni, Hook./. Shod. Sikkim Hinvxl. 
1849, t. 18; Bot. May. t. 4805; Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. iii. p. 472, var. 
obtusifolia, Hutchinson ; a typo foliis obtusis basi rotundatis et calycis 
segmentis longioribus recedit. 

Frutex robustus, 1-3 m. altus, ramulis pedicellis petioli.s foliisque subtus 
ferrugineo-lepidotis. Folia elliptica vel oblongo-elliptica, 7-12 cm. longa, 
3 "5-5 "5 cm. lata, utrinque obtusa, supra riitida, subtus glauca, nervis 
lateralibus utrinque 7-9 conspicuis ; petioli 1-2 cm. longi. Pedicelli crassi, 
usque ad 1 cm. longi. Calycis seymenta oblonga, circiter 1*5 cm. longa et 
5 mm. lata, obtusa, extus parce lepidota. Corolla alba, circiter 10 cm. 
diametro; tubus campanulatus 2-3*5 cm. longus. fauce circiter 3 cm. 
diametro, extra lepidotus, lobis 4-4*5 cm. longis 2*5-3*5 cm. latis apice 
rotundatis. Stamina 10 ; filamenta infra medium pilosa, antberis exsertis 
5 nun. longis. Ovarium oblongum, 1 cm. longum, 0*5 cm. diametro; stylus 
lepidotus, (5-7 cm. longus, stigmate capitate Capsula oblonga, 2 cm. longa. 



The Rhododendron here figured was first collected by 
Sir George Watt in the mountains of north-east Manipur, 
on the eastern frontier of India, and it is undoubtedly one 
of the finest forms of the genus. It differs from typical 
R. Maddeni (I>. M. t. 4805) in having much longer calyx 
segments and obtuse leaves, which are somewhat rounded 
at both ends. It is treated, therefore, as an eastern form 
of this species, which has so far only been recorded from 
Sikkim and Bhotan. It also resembles R. Dalhousiae, 
Hook, f., the calyx segments of which, however, are much 
broader and are usually ciliated. 

Description. — S/wub, 3-10 ft. high, robust. Branchlets, 
pedicels, petioles, and the under surface of the leaves 
covered with brown scales. Leave* elliptic or oblong- 
elliptic, 2I-4 1 in. long, 1-J-2J in. broad, obtuse at botli 
ends, shining above, glaucous below, lateral nerves 7—9 on 
each side of the midrib, conspicuous; petioles .*.--£ in. long, 

SEPTEMBER, 1908. 



stout. Pedicels stout, nearly ^ in. long. Calyx-segments 
oblong, obtuse, about i in. long and i in. broad, lepidote on 
the outside. Corolla white, about 3^ in. in diameter ; tube 
campanulate, f-l£ in. long, about l£ in. in diameter at the 
throat, lepidote on the outside, lobes l|-lf in. long, l-li in. 
broad^apex rounded. Stamens 10; filaments pilose below 
the middle, anthers exserted, \ in. long. Ovary oblong, 
I in. long, I in. in diameter. Style lepidote, 2^-3 in. long, 
persistent, stigma capitate. Capsule oblong, | in. long. — 
J. Hutchinson. 

Cultivation. — Rhododendron Maddeni, var. obtusifolia, 
was raised from seeds forwarded to Kew in 1882 by Sir 
George Watt, who collected them in Manipur during the 
Demarcation Commission of 1881-2. The plant figured 
has been grown under glass, and is now planted in a border 
in the Himalayan House, where it has formed a well- 
furnished bush about 10 ft. high. It differs in habit and 
several other characters from the Himalayan R. Maddeni as 
represented in gardens. It has not been tried out of doors 
at Kew, where R. Maddeni is not hardy, but judging by 
its behaviour in the Himalayan House the treatment that 
answers for the majority of the Himalayan species of the 
genus, including R. Maddeni, will suit the plant now 
figured. — W. Watson. 



I ig- 1, portion of upper surface of leaf; 2, portion of under surface of leaf; 

I;' S 'i U , Z?™^ und + e 1 1 ' sur £ lcc of ] eaf ; 4, bracts and pistil; 5, calyx and pistil; 

II «SSfc ' ^ f r; !' 0Yar - Y: - 9 ' section of ovary ; 10, one cell of same; 
11, capsule:— all enlarged. 



8213 




J.N.Fitehlith. 



\5ncent Brooks Da-vSc-SaaL^uu? 



L. Reeve fie C° Landau. 



Tab. 8213. 

ROBINIA Kblseti. 

North America. 



Leguminosae. Tribe Galegeae. 
Robinia, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 499. 



Robinia Kelseyi, Hort., ex Cowell in Bail. Oyd, Am. Hort. vol. iv. 1902, 
p. 1538; affinis B. hispidae, Linn., a qua foliolis angustioribus et floribus 
minoribus differt. 

Frutex 1-3 m. altus, ramis divaricatis flexuosis glabris. Folia pirmata, petiolo 
eommuni usque ad 15 cm. longo subglabro supra leviter cjmaliculato, 
stipulis subulatis pilosis ; foliola 4- vel 5-juga, oblongo-lanceolata, subacute 
vel breviter apiculata, basi magis minnsve rotund ata, 2-4 cm. longa, 
1-1 "5 cm. lata, venis utrinque 4-5 supra indistinctis subtus prominulis; 
petioli 2-3 mm. longi, stipellis subulatis 2 mm. longis. Bacemi 5-b'-flori, 
usque ad 8 cm. longi, rhachi glanduloso-pilosa ; pedicelli 4-5 mm. longi. 
Oalycis tubus campanulatus, 5 mm. longus, extra glanduloso-pilosus, 
dentibus subaequalibus triangulari-subulatis acutissimis usque ad 8 mm. 
longis. Corolla rosea. Veaillum erectum, rotundatum, apice leviter 
bifidum, fere 2 - 5 cm. diametro, ungue 4 mm. longo. Alae oblongo- 
ellipticae, 2 cm. longae, 1 cm. latae, unguibus circiter 7 mm. loDgis. Carina 
circiter 1 cm. longa, ungue 7 mm. longo. Tubus staminalis 1*5 cm. longus, 
glaber. Ovarium leviter complanatum, glandulis rubris ; stylus recurvatus, 
apicem versus villosus, stigmate subcapitato. Legumen oblongum, acutum, 
4-5 cm. longnm, dense glanduloso-pilosum. Semina 3-4, fnniculo 1 mm. 
longo. 



Robinia Kelseyi, like most other species of the genus, 
is highly ornamental; it is very similar in habit to R. 
viscosa, Vent., var. macrophylla, the flowers being of the 
same colour, but smaller. The only reference we have 
found to this hitherto imperfectly described species is in 
the publication cited above, where it is stated that R. 
Kelseyi is a new species discovered and introduced in 1901 
by Mr. Harlan P. Kelsey ; that the bark much resembles 
that of R. Pseudacacia ; that the plant is sparingly pubes- 
cent ; and that it is a compact shrub of distinctive habit. 

Description. — Shrub, 3-10 ft. high, spreading. Branches 
glabrous. Leaves pinnate ; common petiole usually 4-6 in. 
long, nearly glabrous, with a small groove on the upper 
side ; stipules subulate, pilose ; leaflets in 4-5 pairs, oblong- 

September, 1908. 



lanceolate, subacute or shortly apiculate, more or less 
rounded at the base, ^-1| in. long, J-£ in. broad ; lateral 
nerves 4-5, prominent below ; petiolules about ^ in. long ; 
stipels subulate, T \ in. long. Racemes 5-8-flowered, up to 
3-^ in. long, rliachis glandular-pilose; pedicels J in. long. 
Calyx-tube campanulate, | in. long, glandular-pilose on the 
outside, teeth 5 or 6, subequal, triangular-subulate, very 
acute, about \ in. long. Corolla rose-coloured; standard 
erect, rounded, about an inch in diameter, claw \ in. long; 
wing-petals oblong-elliptic, 1\ in. long, J in. broad, claw 
about \ in. long; keel-petals I in. long, claw J in. long. 
Staminal-tube glabrous. Ovary slightly flattened, with red 
glandular hairs ; style recurved, stigma subcapitate. Pod 
oblong, acute, 1^-2 in. long, densely clothed with glandular 
hairs. Seeds 3-4, funicle very short.— J. Hutchinson. 

Cultivation'. — Robinia Kelseyi was purchased for the 
Kew collection from Mr. H. F. Kelsey of Boston, Mass., 
U.S.A., in the spring of 1903. Although its affinity with 
R. hspida is apparent, it is quite distinct in habit and 
appearance. At present it seems likely to form a small 
tree, and has not the rank growth of R. Hspida, which 
renders that species so liable to injury by wind. It flowers 
regularly in early or mid-June, and is then a most attractive 
object, the shoots of the previous year being covered with 
numerous short racemes of rose-coloured flowers. Its fruits 
also are ornamental. In June last a specimen in the 
* ruticetum of Mr. Maurice de Vilmorin at Les Barres in 
France was quite striking from the number of seed-pods it 
carried, each densely covered with reddish bristles. Pro- 
pagation can be effected by grafting on the roots of R. 
Pseudacaaa.—W. J. Bean. 

an/jstn- 4 a ni^i a ? at T ] r af ; , 2 > sti P» le s; 3, calyx laid open, with stamens 
and pistil ; 4, pistil ; 5, pods ; 6, glandular hairs of pod :-2-4 and G enlarged. 



8214. 




.dfil.JN.PiLch.lith. 



VincentBroaksDay&Saril^S 



L."Rfiev« &-C LaRdflTL 



Tab. 8214. 
AGAVE Watboni. 

Central America ? 

Amaryllidaceae. Tribe Agaveae. 
Agave, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 733. 



Agave (§ Littaea) "Watsoni, J. B. Drummond et C H. Wright, in Keiv Bull. 
1907, p. 322; species A. expatriate; J. N. Rose, maxime affinis, a qua 
inflorescentia breviore sed latiore, foliorum pagina superiore vix concava et 
spinis marginalibus minoribus parum uncinatis differt. 

Oaulis perbrevis. Folia 15-20 densius rosulata, laete viridia; exteriora sub 
anthesin patentia, anguste oblongo-lanceolata, circa 50 cm. longa, basi 
tumescente 8 mm. crassa ibique 9 "5 cm. lata, cervice facie superiore 
convexa 5 - 5 cm. lata, iude facie superiore fere plana, versus apicem grada- 
tim expausa medioque 7" 5 cm. lata; interiora erecta, angustiora, in 
bracteas sensim abeuntia; omnia vitta marginali castatiea tandem cinerris- 
cente ornate, marginibus aculeis circiter 5 mm. longis basi compressis vix 
uncinatis inter se 2 cm. remotis apiceque spina obtusiuscula 1*8 cm. 
longa armata. Scapus fere 2'5 m. altus, ad basin 3 5 cm., sub spicam 
fioriferam 2 cm. crassus, cylindricus, bracteis imis exceptis patentibus 
subtiliter sulcatis albidis instructus. Flores viridescentes, staminibus pur- 
piirascentibus, in spicam densiorem fere 10 cm. latam aggregati. Bractea* 
inter alabastra inconspicuae, vix 1 cm. longae, supra basin abrupte con- 
strictae, conduplicatae, in setas firmas subulatas scariosas abeuntes. 
Ovarium inferxim 13-14 mm. longum, 5 mm. latum, subtriquetrum. 
Perianthii tubus supra ovarium abrupte constrictus, manifeste 6-sulcatus ; 
lobi ovario aequilongi, subcarnosi, viridescentes, marginibus albido-pellu- 
cidi. Stylus robustior, 3- 5 cm. longus, albido-pellucidus, purpurascens ; 
stigma papillosum. 



The Agave here figured flowered at Kew in the spring 
of 1907. As regards inflorescence it is nearest to A. densi- 
jiora, Hook. (B. M. t. 5006), which has also somewhat the 
same type of leaf, but with different, far more closely set 
margin-prickles ; the apple-green leaf, with an almost 
convex neck, and flat upper surface of the blade, resembling 
that of A. (Euagave) decipiens, Baker, should serve to 
distinguish A. Watsoni from all known Littaeae, not 
excluding A. expatriata, Rose, which is only known to us 
from the author's photograph and description. 

Description. — Stem very short. Leaves apple-green, 
15-20 in a moderately dense rosette, the outer, at the time 
September, 1908. 



of flowering, spreading, narrowly oblong-lanceolate, about 
20 in. long, dilated base over ^ in. thick, and 3| in. broad, 
neck about 2£ in. broad, convex on its upper surface, 
greatest width of leaf, at about 9 in. from the base, about 
3 in., upper surface almost flat upwards, except just below 
the tip, which bears a rather blunt, finely grooved spine, 
less than | in. long; margins with an extremely narrow 
ribbon, brown when young, ashen grey with age, armed at 
intervals of about § in. with prickles under \ in. long, 
compressed at their bases, narrowly triangular in outline, 
tips not obviously hooked. Flowering stem not quite 9 ft. 
high, diameter 1-^ in. at the base, less than an inch just 
below the spike of greenish flowers, with purplish filaments 
and anthers, which before withering give the spike a 
diameter of a little less than four inches. Bracts suddenly 
narrowed above their bases and folded into a firm, awl- 
shaped scarious bristle, whitish and conspicuous on the 
scape, but hidden by the buds and blossoms. Ovary rather 
more than J in. long by £ in. broad ; tube sharply constricted, 
plainly six-furrowed. Perianth-lobes about the same length 
as the germen, rather fleshy, green with white translucent 
edges ; style robust, suffused with purple ; stigma papillose. 
—J. R. Drummond. 

Cultivation". — Agave Watsoni was purchased in 1906 
from Mr. Justus Corderoy, Blewbury, Didcot, who obtained 
it originally from the Ghiesbreght Collection as an unnamed 
species. It flowered at Kew in 1907 under the usual 
conditions of cultivation. Unless there are other plants of 
it elsewhere it is likely to be lost to cultivation, as it has 
produced neither seeds nor offsets. — W. Watson. 



Figs. 1 and % anthers; 3, style apex; 4, whole plant :— 1-3 enlarged, 
1 reduced. 



8215 




YincejU Brooks DaykScn-U 1 uup 



^LoTldCTL 



Tab. 8215. 
ZALUZIANSKYA maritime 

South Africa. 

Sckophulabiaceae. Tribe Manuleae. 

Zaluzianskya, F. W. Schmidt ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 944 
(Zaluzianskia) ; Hiem in Dyer, Ft. Cap. vol. iv. sect. 2, p. 333. 



Zaluzianskya maritima, Walp. Rep. vol. iii. p. 307; Hiem, I.e. p. 335; 
Gumbleton in Gard. Chron. 1907, vol. xlii. p. 161, fig. 64; species Z. lych- 
nideae, Walp., simillima, sed robustior, foliis latioribus trinerviis, floribus 
majoribus et limbi lobis saepe latioribus differt. 

Herba perennis siccitate nigricans. Caulis erectus, decumbens vel adscendens, 
basi saepe paulum suffruticosus, simplex vel parce ramosus, sat dense 
foliosus, pubescens vel puberulus, 15 cm.-l m. altus. Folia tenuiter 
coriacea, obtusa, glabra vel puberula, saepius trinervia, integerrima vel 
remote denticulate; inferiora subsessilia vel breviter petiolata, basin 
versus valde angustata, anguste elliptica, obovato-oblonga vel lanceolato- 
oblonga, 2 "5-7 cm. longa, 6 mm.-2 cm. lata; superiora sessilia, sensim 
minora, saepe adpressa; floralia sessilia, amplexicaulia, late lanceolata, 
1-2*5 cm. longa. Spicae elongatae, sat dense floriferae. < 'alyx tubulosus, 
1-1 "5 cm. longus, profunde bilabiatus, pubescens vel ciliolatus; dentes 
jmrvi, ovato-deltoidei vel ovato-lanceolati, obtusi. Corolla marcescens, 
extra glanduloso-puberula, saturate rubra vel purpureo-brunnea, intus 
vivide alba, interdum limbi lobis roseo-marginatis ; tubus gracillimns, 
3 "5-5 cm. longus; limbus patens, 5-partitus, 12-18 mm. diamctro, lobis 
obovatis bifidis. Stamina glabra, 2 longiora paulura exserta. Stylus 
nliformis, exsertus. Capsula coriacea, oblonga, 1U-12 mm. longa.— Erinus 
maritimus, Linn. f. Suppl. p. 287. Nycterinia maritima, Benth. in Hook. 
Comp. Bot. Mag. vol. i. p. 369, et in DC. Prodr. vol. x. p. 348. N. coriacea, 
Benth., ll.ee. N. spathacea, Benth., ll.ee. Zaluzianskya coriacea et Z. 
spathacea, Walp. Bep. vol. iii. p. 306. N. nataleusn, Bernhardi ex Krauss in 
Flora, 1844, p. 834 ; Harv. Thes. Cap. vol. i. p. 37, t. 58. Z. mtalensis, 
Bernhardi, I.e. 



Mr. Hiern's monograph of Zaluzianskya in the Flora 
Capensis includes 32 species, all of which are confined to 
South Africa. The difficulty of distinguishing some of 
them is considerable, and it is questionable whether all are 
really distinct. Bentham suggested that the plant here 
figured might be only a variety of Z. lychnidea, which, as 
Erinus lychnidea, is depicted at t. 2504 of this work, and 
Mr. Hiern suspects the identity of Z. lychnidea and Z. 
capensis, Walp. Both are recorded as being in cultivation, 
Sbptbmbeb, 1908. 



the former as long ago as 1823, while Z. selaginoides, Walp. 
(= Z. villosa, F. W. Schmidt) also finds a place in some of 
our horticultural dictionaries. It is probable that they soon 
disappeared, for like many Scrophulariaceae with strikingly 
attractive flowers the species of Zaluzianskya do not appear 
to thrive for long when removed from their native environ- 
ment. The flowers of Z. maritima, as in other species of 
the genus, open only in the evening or in dull weather. 
When expanded they are very fragrant. 

Z. maritima is widely spread in South Africa, and is met 
with at a low level near the sea as well as far inland at 
elevations up to 4,000 ft. or more. Mr. Hiern records 
five varieties, one of which (var. grandiflora, Hiern) has 
the limb of the corolla as much as an inch across. 

Description. — Herb, perennial. Stem erect, decumbent 
or ascending, often slightly shrubby at the base, simple or 
sparingly branched, rather densely leafy, pubescent or 
puberulous, ^— 3 ft. high. Leaves thinly coriaceous, 
obtuse, glabrous or puberulous, usually 3-nerved, quite 
entire or remotely toothed; lower subsessile or shortly 
stalked, very much narrowed towards the base, narrowly 
elliptic, obovate-oblong or lanceolate-oblong, 1-3 in. long, 
|-| in. broad ; upper sessile, gradually becoming smaller, 
often adpressed ; floral -leaves sessile, amplexicaul, broadly 
lanceolate, i-1 in. long. Spikes elongated, rather densely 
flowered. Calyx tubular, £-§ in. long, deeply 2-lipped, 
pubescent or slightly ciliate ; teeth small, ovate-deltoid or 
ovate-lanceolate, obtuse. Corolla marcescent, glandular- 
puberulous and deep red or purple-brown outside, shining 
white inside, or the lobes of the limb sometimes bordered 
with rose ; tube very slender, 1J-2 in. long ; limb spread- 
ing, 5-cleft, i-| in. across ; lobes obovate, bifid. Stamens 4, 
glabrous, the 2 longer slightly exserted. Style filiform, 
exserted. Capsule coriaceous, oblong, about J in. long. — 
S. A. Skan. 

Cultivation. — This Zaluzianskya was presented to Kew 
by Mr. W. E. Gumbleton, who raised plants of it from 
seeds obtained by him from Mr. Thorncroft of P>arberton. 
It has behaved here as an annual, for plants tried in the 
herbaceous department, as well as others grown in the Cape 



House, died after flowering ; they also failed to produce 
seeds. The treatment most suitable for such half-hardy 
annuals from South Africa as Mhodanthe, Diascia, and 
Nemesia would probably also suit this Zaluzianshya. 
W. Watsox. 



Fig. 1, longitudinal section of flower ; 2, longitudinal section of upper part 
of corolla-tube, showing stamens ; 3, upper portion of style : — all enlarged. 




8216 



MLSdaUNPtlchMv 



VmceiABrodVs,D^rScSorLLt?intp- 



LRfieve <5cC London 



Tab. 8216. 

BULBOPHYLLUM galbinum. 

Malay Peninsula. 



Obchidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 

Bulbophyllum, Thouars ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant vol. iii. p. 501 

Pfilzer in Engl, et Prantl, Pflanzenfam. vol. ii. 6, p. 286. 



Bulbophyllum galbinum, Bidl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxxii p 267- 
Materials Fl. Mai. Penins. part 1, p. 64 ; Qard. Ohron. 1907, vol. xlii. p. 42. 
tig. 14 ; habitu B. Beinwardtii, Eeichb. f., pedunculis bifloris differt. 

Herha epiphytica. Bhizoma longe repens, validum. Pseudobulbi 9-11 cm 
custantes, anguste oblongi, subcompressi, 5-8 cm. longi, vaginis rnembra- 
naceis acutis tecti, monophylli. Folia petiolata, oblonga vel elliptica 
acuta, coriacea 12-20 cm. longa, 4-7 cm. lata; petioli 2-3 cm. longi' 
canalicular Scapi 12-22 cm. longi, graciles, 2-flori. Flares magnY 
speciosi explanati, olivaceo-flavi, sepalis purpureo-punctatis, petalis pur- 
pureo-stnatis, labello purpureo. Bracteae ovatae. acutae, circa 2 cm 
longae. Pedicelli circa 2- 5 cm. longi. Sepalum posticum late lanceolatum 
acuminatum 4-5 cm. longum; lateralia basi late triangulari-ovata, dein 
longe caudato-acuminata, 4-4-5 cm. longa, basi 15 cm. lata. Petala basi 
ovata, longe acuminata, apice setacea, 2"5 cm. longa. Labellum longe 
unguiculatum cordatum, acuminatum, oamosum, apice reenrvnm basi 
^XTSbtusS 1 - latUm ' ° 0lUmna Ma ' 8 mm - Io ^clentibu S brevibus 



Bulboplu/llum galbinum, is a native of the Malay Peninsula 
and was described about twelve years ago by 'Mr. Ridley' 
Director of the Singapore Botanic Garden, from materials' 
collected on Maxwell's Hill, Perak, where it is said to be 
abundant, climbing on trees in dense jungle. It was com- 
pared with B. Beinwardtii, Reichb. f., to which it bears a 
general resemblance in habit, though it is readily dis- 
tinguished by its two-flowered peduncle. It had previously 
flowered at the Royal Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, and was 
at first referred to B. Beinwardtii. Mr. J. J Smith refers 
(Orch Java, p. 443) both B. Beinwardtii, Reichb. f , and 
B. galbinum, Ridl., to B. uniflorum, Hassk., though the one 
now^ figured does not at all answer to the name, and several 
species of the section Sestochilos are persistently 1-flowered 
Whether B. Beinwardtii be in cultivation is doubtful, 
though Remwardt's original drawing and a dried specimen 
collected by Thomas Lobb, in Java, which Lindley con- 
Septembeb, 1908. J 



sidered identical, are preserved in the Herbarium of the 
latter, now at Kew. Micholitz also collected plants appa- 
rently of the same species in Sumatra, and carefully noted 
the peduncles as being 1-flowered, and all the four present 
are in this condition. Having regard to these facts it is 
difficult to regard all these forms as one species, and the 
species of this affinity certainly require careful revision from 
living specimens, or at all events from more complete 
material than is yet available. 

DESCRIPTION. — Herb, epiphytic, with stout, long-creeping 
rhizome. Pseudobulbs 3^-4^ in. apart, narrowly oblong, some- 
what compressed, 2-3£ in. long, covered with membranous 
acute sheaths, L-leaved. Leaves petioled, oblong or elliptical, 
acute, coriaceous, 4^-8 in. long, 1-2*} in. broad ; petioles 
|-1£ in. long, channelled. Scapes 5-8 in. long, slender, 
2-flowered. Flowers large, open, greenish-yellow, the 
sepals dotted and the petals striped with purple-brown, 
and the lip purple. Bracts ovate, acute, about § in. long. 
Pedicels about 1 in. long. Sepals spreading ; dorsal broadly 
lanceolate, acuminate, nearly 2 in. long; lateral with 
broadly triangular-ovate base, caudate-acuminate above the 
middle, about 2 in. long, over -^ in. broad at the base. 
Petal* with broadly-ovate base, setaceous-acuminate above, 
about 1 in. long. Lip long unguiculate, cordate, acuminate, 
fleshy, with recurved apex, and somewhat concave base, 
nearly £ in. long. Column broad, £ in. long. — E. A. Rolfe. 

Cultivation. — Bulbophyllum <jalbinum was presented to 
Kew by the Hon. Walter Eothschild along with other 
orchids, including B. Ericssonii, B. virescens and B. 
Binnendijkii. These four resemble each other closely in 
habit; consequently they are treated alike under cultiva- 
tion. B. Binnendijkii was figured at t. 8187 of this work, 
and the cultural directions there given may be followed 
for B. '/albinum, which flowered at Kew in May this year. 
— W. Watson. j j 

Via. I, column, with its Foot, and the Up; 2, whole plant:— 1 enlarged, 

_ i n 



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Tab. 8212.— RHODODENDRON MADDENI, var. OBTUSIFOLIA. 
„ 8213.— ROBINIA KELSEYI. 
„ 8214.— AGAVE WATSONI. 
„ 8215.— ZALUZIANSKYA MARITIMA. 
„ 8216.— BULBOPHYLLUM GALBINTJM. 

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8217. 



\ 



k ti y 




JSfclt 






% 



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"VmcentBrooks^ay&SonlA^ imp 



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Tar. 8217. 

ECHINOPS Tournefortii. 

Armenia and Persia. 

Compositae. Tribe Cynaboideae. 

Echinops, Linn.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 462; Boiss. Fl. 0> 

vol. iii. p. 423. 



Echinops Tournefortii, Ledeb. in Trautv. Diss, de Echinope, cap. 2 (1833), 
p. 21, f. 7; Jaub. et Spach, 111. PI. Or. vol. v. t. 427; Bourn. Fl. Or. vol. iii. 
p. 438 ; Mott. in Rev. Hort. 1906, p. 523, f. 200 ; species e grege Pntro 
capituli conrpositi magnitudine insignis. 

Herba perennis, spinosissima. caule pauciramoso usque ad 1 ' 5 m. alto. Folia 
ampla, pinnatisecta, inferiora tripinnatisecta, 30-40 cm. longa, caulina 
~* sursum i-ensim minora et minus secta, omnia segmentis ultimis valide 
spino-a, snpra scaberula, subtus cano-tomentosa. Capitula uniflora, 
numerosissima, in glomerulos globosos capituliformes amplos (interdum 
usque ad 12-15 cm. diametro sed saepius dimidio minores) terminates 
longe pedunculatos aggregata. Bracteae involucri communis numerosae, 
setiformes et cochleariformes, arete reflexae, breves, capitulis absconditae. 
Bracteae involucrorum partialium niimerosissimae, introrsum gradatim 
majores, omnes inter se liberae, trimorphae, scilicet : exteriores setiformes, 
pappiformes, intermediae cochleariformes vel spathulatae, apice ciliatae vel 
setulosae, interiores rigidiores, lanceolatae, longe acuminatae, pungeotes, 
margine setuloso-ciliatae, flores fere aequantes. Flores omnes tubulosi, 
hcrmaphroditi, circiter 3 cm. longi, pallide lilacini, antheris caerulei vel 
fere nigri. Corolla regularis, tubo tenui; limbus alte 5-lobatus, lobis 
linearibus obtusiusculis reflexis. Antherae ex?ertae, basi barbatae. 
Achaenia setulis longis rectis arete appressis per totam longitudinem 
densissime vestita ; pappi paleae 5, squami formes, fimbrillatae. — Echinopus 
orientalis Acanthi aculeati folio capite magno spinoso coeruleo, Tournef. Inst. 
Eei Herb., Coroll. p. 31, fide Jaubert et Spacb, 111. PI. Or. vol. v. ad 
t. 427. 

This is perhaps the handsomest of* the Glohe Thistles in 
cultivation. It was originally described from cultivated 
plants raised in the Dorpat Botanic Gardens from seed 
collected on Mount Ararat, and Kew possesses what may be 
considered a type specimen, communicated by Ledebour to 
the late Sir William Hooker. The one flower-head is larger 
than any other we have seen of this species, being, as 
flattened out, 6 in. across. Incidentally it may be mentioned 
here that the apparent flower-heads are agglomerations of 
one-flowered capitula, each invested by an elaborate 
involucre of bristles and bracts. 

OCTOBEB. 1908. 



Echinops is a genus of upwards of seventy species, 
ranging from Europe and North Africa, across Asia to 
China and Japan, and a few species are peculiar to the 
mountains of Tropical Africa. The European, Asiatic and 
North African species present no striking contrasts, and 
have either white or blue flowers ; but some of the Tropical 
African species are very different from each other and from 
the rest of the genus. Thus E. amplexicaulis, Oliv., has 
pink or crimson flowers; E. giganteus, A. Rich., grows as 
much as 16 ft. high, and E. chamaecephalus , Hochst., is 
almost stemless with huge solitary heads of flowers. 

The process of the dispersal of the pollen of Echinops 
is the same as in Centaurea. It is discharged into the 
cylinder formed by the connate anthers before the expansion 
of the corolla and the elongating style pushes some of it out 
at the top, whilst the rest is ejected by a sudden contraction 
of the filaments, which pulls the anthers down. But the female 
stage, the divergence of the style-arms, sometimes follows so 
quickly in E. Tournefortii, that self-fertilisation seems possible. 

Description. — Perennial, from 3-5 ft. high. Leaves 
large, pinnately divided, lower ones tripinnate, 1 to lt| ft. 
long, gradually smaller and less divided upwards, ultimate 
lobes ending in strong spines, slightly rough on the upper 
surface, clothed with a white felt beneath. Flower-heads 
few, globose, 2^-3 in. or sometimes as much as 5 in. in 
diameter, terminal on long stalks, each flower surrounded 
by an involucre of bristles and sharp-pointed bracts. 
Corolla white, tubular, slightly overtopping the bracts; 
limb 5-parted; lobes linear, reflexed. Anthers exserted, 
blue. Achencs densely clothed with long, straight, coarse 
hairs. Pappus of five small scales, concealed by the hairs. 

— W. BOTTING HEMSLEY. 

Cultivation. — Echinops Tournefortii grows freely and 
flowers in August along with the other Globe Thistles and 
appears to be quite as hardy as any of them. It came 
originally from Canon Ellacombe's garden at Bitton, where 
the plant figured was grown in 1906.— W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, a flower-head of one flower ; % a flower ; 3 and 4, pappus ; 5 and 6, 
anthers ; 7, style-arms : — ail enlarged. 



8216 




ir DayASc 



1. Reeve &. C°. London. 



Tab. 8218. 
ROSA sericea, var. pteracantha. 

Western China and Manipur. 



Rosaceae. Tribe Roseae. 
Rosa, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 625. 



Rosa (§ Caninae) sericea, Lindl., var. pteracantha, Franch. Plant. Delavay. 
pars i. 1889, p. 220; Gard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 260, figs. 98 et 99 ; 
a typo aculeis ramorum compressis basi valde dilatatis confluentibus 
recedit. 

Frutex robustus, ramosus, .circiter 3 m. diametro. Jin mi saepius dense setulosi, 
aculeis magnis rubris compressis decurren'ibus basi elongatis 2-4 cm. 
longis armati. Folia viridia, 9-13-foliol ita, us^ue ad 7 cm. longa ; foliola 
elliptico- vel obovato-oblonga, 1-1 • 5 cm. longa, 5-7 mm. lata, ^errata, 
glabra; rliachis parce aculeolati. Stipulae angustatae, adnatae, circiter 
1 cm. longae, glabrae, parte libera acuta. Flores in ramis brevibus 
lateralibus solitarii, albi, 4-5 cm. diametro; pedunculi breves, glabri. 
Beceptacuhim glabrum, obconicum. (Jalycis (obi ovato-laneeolati, circiter 
1 cm. longi, basi 3 mm. lati, acuti, apicem versus paucidentati, extra 
parce intus densius sericei. Petalu saepius 4, obovata, emarginata. 
CarpeUa pilosi. Fructua subgl>bosus, ultra 1 cm. diametro, saturate 
ruber. 



Rosa sericea, var. pteracantha, occurs in company with the 
typical form which is abundant at elevations of from 3,000- 
11,000 ft. Of the Indian specimens which represent the 
true species at Kew, only those collected in Manipur by Sir 
George Watt have prickles as large as in this Chinese 
variety, though it is understood that occasionally shoots 
with broad prickles are to be met with in the Eastern 
Himalaya. 

The plant here figured differs from that described by 
Franchet in having glabrous leaves, but the specimens at 
Kew show intermediate forms which link the two. The 
stems are sometimes devoid of the setulose bristles which 
accompany the remarkably large, red, translucent prickles ; 
and the latter are often absent from the branches which bear 
the flowers. 

Description. — Shrub, robust, much branched, forming a 
bush as much as 10 ft. in diameter. Branches often densely 
setulose ; prickles large, red, compressed, decurrent, elongated 
October, 1908. 



at the base, |-1| in. long. Leaves green, the largest about 
2| in. long; leaflets 9-13, elliptic-oblong or obovate-oblong, 
}—^ in. long, -£-1 in. broad, serrate, glabrous, axis usually 
furnished with a few small prickles. Stipules narrow, 
adnate, nearly £ in. long, glabrous. Flowers solitary, 
white, terminating short, lateral branches, 1J-2 in. across. 
Peduncles short and glabrous. Receptacle glabrous, obconic. 
Calyx-lobes ovate-lanceolate, about £ in. long, \ in. broad at 
the base, acute, dentate towards the apex, outside sparingly, 
inside more densely silky. Petals usually 4, obovate, 
emarginate. Fruit subglobose, a little over J in. in 
diameter, bright red. — J. Hutchinson. 

Cultivation. — Hitherto Eoses have been grown in 
gardens chiefly for the beauty and fragrance of their 
flowers and for their fruits, but in this new Chinese variety 
the large, beautifully coloured prickles provide a new and 
additional source of attraction. They constitute the most 
striking feature of the variety, for the flowers are not so 
large as in the typical R. sericea. The plant from which 
our figure was made was purchased from Messrs. Paul of 
Cheshunt in 1906, but European gardens owe its first 
introduction to Mr. Maurice L. de Vilmorin, in whose 
Fruticetum at Les Barres it has for some years been the 
most remarkable of a numerous series of Chinese forms of 
R. sericea. Like Eoses in general this needs a good strong 
soil to bring out its full attractions; it should preferably be 
grown in a rich, rather stiff loam. The beauty of its 
prickles is most marked on strong vigorous shoots of the 
current year; the second year they become errey and 
woody.— W.J. Bean. 



Fig. 1, receptacle and calyx ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, carpel :— all enlarged. 



8210 




. 



L Rcevfe &C? Lan-dorv 



Tab. 8219. 
ANISOTES DIVERSIFOLIUS. 

Socotra. 

ACANTHACEAE. Tribe JCSTICIEAE. 

Anisotes, Nees ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1111; 0. B. Clarke in 
Dyer, Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. v. p. 226. 



Anisotes diversifolius, Balf. fil. in Proc. Boy. Soc. Edinh. vol. xii. 1884, p. 88 ; 
Trans. Boy. Soc. Edinh. vol. xxxi. p. 223 ; ab A. trisulco, Nees, foliis minus 
confertis et calyce extus tantum puberulo recedit. 

Fntticulus erectus, glabrescens, circiter 0' 5 m. altus, cortice griseo, ramulis striatis 
puberulis. Folia patentia. elliptica, ovata vel obovata, apice obtusa, 
rotundata vel emarginata, basi cuneata vel rotundata, l*5-4 cm. longa, 
1-2 '5 cm. lata, tenuiter coriacea, glabrescentia, cystolitbis numerosis in 
sicco prominentibus ; petioli - 5-2'5 cm. longi. Cymae breves, axillares, 
pauciflori, bracteis bi acteolisque minimis. F/ores penduli. Calyx 6 mm. 
longus, extra minute puberulus, segmentis erectis lineari-lanceolatis acutis. 
Corolla iiammea vel citrina, 4-5 cm. Jonga, conspicue bilabiata, extus 
pubescens ; tubus angustus, cylindricus ; labium posticum levittr 
curvatum, breviter bilobatum, »nticum revolutum, apice breviter 
tjilobatnm. Stamina 2, postica, labium posticum corollae subaequantia, 
filamtn*is complanatis venula media prominula; antherarum lobis 
aequalibus inaequialte aflBxis basi acutis. Ovarium glabrum, disco crisfo 
cinctum; stylus minute puberulus, praesertim infeme. Capsula oblonga, 
stipitata, cum stipifce vix 2 cm. longa. 



Anisotes is a small genus allied to Justicia, and includes 
one Arabian and four Tropical African species in addition 
to the endemic Socotran A. diversifolius. 

According to Balfour (I.e. p. xliii.), the family of 
Acanthaceae attains a remarkable development in Socotra, 
where it forms about one-twentieth part of the flora, com- 
prising 27 species which are included in 15 genera. Three 
of the genera and 21 species are endemic, so that over 
one-seventh of the endemic genera of Socotra and one-tenth 
of the endemic species belong to the Acanthaceae. 

The venation of the corolla in Anisotes diversifolius is 
peculiar : three veins start from the base of the corolla-tube, 
one corresponding to the lower lip and two to the upper, 
and the two latter each divide into three a short distance 
above the base as shown in fig. 3. 
October, 1908 



Description. — Shrub, erect, glabrescent, about 1^ ft. high, 
with greyish bark and striate puberulous branchlets. Leaves 
elliptic-ovate or obovate, obtuse rounded or emarginate at 
the apex, wedge-shaped or rounded at the base, §-l§ in. 
long, |— 1 in. broad, thinly coriaceous, becoming glabrous, 
conspicuously dotted with numerous large cystoliths in the 
dried state; petioles £-1 in. long. Cymes short, axillary, 
few-flowered ; bracts and bracteoles minute. Flowers pen- 
dulous. Calyx \ in. long, minutely puberulous outside ; 
segments linear-lanceolate, acute. Corolla flame-coloured 
or yellow, l|-2 in. long, conspicuously two-lipped, pubescent 
outside ; tube narrow, cylindric ; upper lip slightly curved, 
lower revolute, slightly three-lobed at the tip. Stamens 2, 
nearly equalling the upper lip ; filaments flattened, with a 
fairly prominent middle nerve ; anther-lobes acute at the 
base, one attached higher than the other. Ovary glabrous, 
surrounded at the base by a thick disk ; style minutely 
puberulous, especially in the lower part. Capsule oblong, 
stipitate, about |- in. long, including the stipe. — T. A. 

SP HAGUE. 

Cultivation. — Kew is indebted to Colonel Beddome for 
a plant of this little shrub which grew about 18 in. high 
and flowered in April in a warm greenhouse, where it 
continued to develop flowers till July. It is similar in its 
habit and requirements to some species of Justicia, Jacobinia 
and Peristrophe, and as it agrees with these in being easy to 
propagate by means of cuttings it may well be grown along 
with them for conservatory decoration in spring. It also 
matures seeds under cultivation. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, calyx and style; 2, section of calyx; 3, part of corolla-tube ; 4 and 5, 
nnthers :—al( enlargt d. 



8220 




L Reeve icC" 



Tab. 8220. 
LEWISIA Cotyledon. 

North America. 

POBTULACACEAE. 
Lewisia, Pursh; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 159. 



Lewisia Cotyledon, Robinson in A. Gray Synop. Ft. N. Am. vol. ii. p. 268; 
species L. Tvjeedyi, Robinson (B. M. t. 7633), proxima, differt peduncnlis 
plurifioris, bracteis ciliatis et pefa'is contiguis. 

TTerba peretmis, acaulis, praeter glandulas stipitatas glabra, caudice incrassato. 
Folia carnosa, rosulata, oblonga, oblanceolata vel spathulata, 4-6 cm. longa, 
margine primum glanduloso-ciliata. Pedunculi 10-12 cm. alti, 8-12-flori, 
bracteis ovato-oblongis circiter 1 cm. longis glandulost -ciliatis infra flores 
instructi ; pedicelli cymosi, 1-2 cm. longi, primum recurvi. Flares circiter 
3*5 cm. diametro, albi, roseo lineati. Sepalt 2, libeia, tmncata, apice fere 
1 cm. diametro, glanduloso-ciliata, marginibus in alabastro late obtegentia, 
unum exterius, unum interius. Petala numero variabilia sed saepius 9 vel 
10, spathulata, erosa, recurva. Stamina 7-10, petalis triente breviora; 
filamenta basi connata. Ovarium uniloculare, circiter 20-ovulatum ; stylus 
stamina aequans, trifida. — Calandrinia Cotyledon, S. Wats, in Proc. Am. 
Acad. Sc. vol. xx. (1885), p. 355. Oreobroma Cotyledon, Howell in Erytbea, 
vol. i. (1893), p. 32. 



The delimitation of the genera Lewisia and Calandrinia 
is a subject as to which authors are by no means in agree- 
ment. Robinson in the place cited above extends Lewisia, 
and includes under it the Oreobroma of Howell, and he is 
followed here, as he was by Sir Joseph Hooker under 
t. 7633. But we are not convinced that this is a good 
solution of the difficulty. Lewisia rediviva, Pursh (B. M. 
t. 5395), the species on which the genus was founded, 
differs from the present plant in having usually seven 
sepals, numerous petals, indefinite stamens and about eight 
style-branches, and has perhaps valid claims to independent 
generic rank. 

Lewisia Cotyledon is a very attractive plant ; its flowers 
remind one strongly of those of some species of Oralis. 

Description. — Perennial, stemless, with a thickened 
root-stock. Leaves fleshy, rosulate, oblong-spathulate, 
1^-2^ in. long, glandular on the margin when young. 
October, 1908. 



Flower-scapes 4 to 5 in. high, 8-12-flowered, bracteate 
throughout. Bracts about a third of an inch long, glan- 
dular on the margin. Pedicels curved downwards before 
the flowers expand. Flowers about 1^ in. in diameter, 
white with crowded red lines. Sepals 2, broad, fringed 
with stalked glands, overlapping in bud. Petals variable 
in number, usually 9 or 10, spathulate, notched. Stamens 
7 to 10, shorter than the petals. Ovary 1-celled ; ovules 
few; style equalling the stamens. — W. Botting Hemsley. 

Cultivation. — Lewisia Cotyledon was presented to Kew 
in 1906 by Mr. P. B. Bandulph, Seattle, Washington; the 
plant came from the Siskiyou Mountains, Oregon. It grew 
well and flowered freely in May after being potted in sandy 
soil and placed in an unheated frame. Possibly it will 
prove hardy in a sheltered position in the rockery. So far 
it has failed to produce seeds, but it has developed basal 
offsets which when removed soon grew into plants. — 
W. Watson. 

Fig. 1, pedicel bearing bracts and flower-bud; 2, stamens and pistil; 3 and 
anthers ; 5, pistil : 6, longitudinal section of ovary : — all enlarged. 



Tab. 8221. 
RAPHIONACME utilis. 

Angola. 

Asclepiadaceae. Tribe Periploceae. 
Raphionacme, Harv. ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 745. 



Raphionacme utilis, Brown et tttapf in Kew Bulletin, 1908, p. 215 cum tab. ; 
affinis R. Wdwitschii, Schleebt. et Eendle, sed planta humilior, foliis 
latioribus oppositis vel subrosulatis rotundatis ellipticis vel oblongo-ovatis 
et corona biseriata. 

Herba nana, tuberosa. Tuber napiformis, 5-14 cm. diametro. Cau'les annui, 
2-10 cm. longi, erecti vel decumbentes, herbacei, puberuli. Folia opposita 
vel subrosulata, 3"5-8'5 cm. longa, 32-4 - 5 cm. lata, orbiculata, elliptica 
vel oblongo-ovata, obtusa, apiculata vel subacuta, basi cuneata, rotundata 
vel subcordata, petiolis 4-8 mm. longis. Cymae terminates vel axillares, 
sessiles, conl'ertae, pluriflorae, puberulae. Bracteae 2-4 mm. longae. 
Pedicelli 3-6 mm. longi. Sepala 2 mm. longa, lanceolata, acuta, pur- 
purascentia, apice viridia. Corolla 12-15 mm. diametro, profunde 5-loba, 
extra minutissime puberula, intus glabra, purpurea, lobis oblongis 
subacutis. Corona biseriata, segmentis exterioribus 1 5 mm. longis ovato- 
oblongis bifidis albis apice purpuras, segmentis interioribus 3 mm. longis 
subulatis incurvo-erectis purpureis. 



This interesting little plant is likely to prove of consider- 
able economic importance, since its tubers yield a large 
quantity of Rubber said to be of good quality. It has bjfen 
identified by Dr. Stapf with the " Ecanda " or " Marianga " 
Rubber- plant, first recorded by Professor Greraldes in his 
"Estudo sobre os latex borrachiferos," pp. 143-172, pub- 
lished at Lisbon in 1906, and a full account of it is given 
in the Kew Bulletin above quoted, from which, according 
to Professor Geraldes, the plant is a native of the interior of 
Angola, growing in the drier parts of treeless, sandy and 
alluvial areas between the River Kwanza and the River 
Zambesi, at an altitude of from 4000 to 5500 ft. above 
sea-level. 

It is seldom that a species of Raphionacme is seen in 
cultivation in Europe, this being the first to be figured in 
the Botanical Magazine, although no fewer than 25 species 
have been described, nine of them natives of South Africa, 
the remainder Tropical African. R. divaricata, Harv., one 
October, 1908. 



of the South African species, sometimes produces tubers 
15 in. in diameter and has a very wide range in that 
region. 

Description. — Herb, perennial, with a turnip-shaped 
tuber 2-5 in. in diameter, clothed with a dark brown flaky 
bark. Stems annual. 1-4 in. long, erect or decumbent, 
puberulous. Leaves in 2-5 pairs, opposite or forming a 
small rosette close to the ground ; petiole ^— ^ in. long, 
blade 1^-3^ in. long, 1^-lf in. broad, orbicular, elliptic or 
oblong-ovate, obtuse and apiculate or subacute at the apex, 
cuneate or rounded to subcordate at the base, thinly and 
minutely puberulous on both sides, green above, purple 
beneath. Flowers in small terminal and axillary cymes or 
clusters, puberulous except on the inside of the corolla. 
Bracts about l in. long, subulate. Pedicels \-\ in. long. 
Sepals \ in. long, lanceolate, acute, purplish, with green 
tips. Corolla about ^ in. in diameter, deeply 5-lobed, 
bright purple, minutely puberulous on the back, glabrous 
on the inner surface ; lobes oblong, subacute, with recurved 
margins. Corona biseriate ; outer segments T *g in. long, 
ovate-oblong, bifid, white, with purple-tipped teeth ; inner 
segments \ in. long, subulate, in curved-erect, dark purple. 
Follicles (according to Geraldes) as much as 4 in. long, 
spindle-shaped, acuminate. Seeds about ^ in. long, with a 
tuft of hairs § in. long. — N. E. Brown. 

Cultivation. — Raphionacme utilis was presented to Kew 
in 1007 by the Companhia de Mozambique, who forwarded 
tubers of it, stating that " Bitinga " rubber was extracted 
from them. They were at once planted in soil and placed 
under tropical conditions where they quickly started into 
growth and flowered in March this year. The tubers do 
not shrivel or suffer when kept dry, and they root and'grow 
readily when placed in heat and moisture. Particulars as 
to the field culture of this plant are given in the Kew 
Bulletin for 1908, p. 214.— W. Watson. 



Figs. 1 and 2, flowers ; 3, a flower from wbicli the calyx and corolla have been 
removed, showing the corona; 4, part of the corona spread out, with two 
stamens; 5, longitudinal section of the ovary, with style and glands of the 
pollen-carriers : — nil enlarged. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 46, OCTOBER, 1908. 

Tab. 8217.— ECHINOPS TOURNEPORTII. 

„ 8218.— ROSA SERICEA, var. PTERACANTHA. 
„ 8219.— ANISOTES DIYERSIFOLIUS. 
„ 8220.— LEWISIA COTYLEDON. 
„ 8221— RAPHIONACME UTILIS. 

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it garden. 



82ZZ 




M.S.dd. J.1T. Rt^kliik 



IRewi & C? Lonion. 



Vincent Bro aksjjay & SaaLi^jr. 



Tab. 8222. 

MUSSAENDA erythrophylla. 

Tropical Africa. 



Rubiaceae. Tribe Mussaendeae. 
Mussaenda, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 64. 



Mussaenda erythrophylla, Schum. et Thonn. PL Guin. p. 116 ; Hiern in Oliv. 
Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. iii. p. 69 ; species prae folio calycino producto maximo 
puniceo insignis. 

Frutex alte scandens vel vagans vel in campo aperto suberectus, fere 
undique plus minusve molliter pubescens vel villosus, rarais floriferis 
tenuiusculis teretibus saepe pilis rubris vestitis. Folia ambitu valde 
variabilia, petiolata, membranacea vel papyracea, ovata vel elliptica, rarius 
lanceolata vel paene orbicularia, cum petiolo usque ad 18 cm. longa, sed 
saepius minora, basi nunc rotundata nunc cordata, rarius cuneata vel longe 
attenuata, apice acuta, attenuate vel abrupte acuminata, margine integro 
ciliato, in utraque pagina pubescentia, venis primariis lateralibus con- 
spicuis interdum rubris ; stipulae bifidae vel trifidae, circiter 1 cm. longae. 
Flores absque folio calycino circiter 8 cm. diametro, in cymas parvas 
dichotomas densas terminales dispositi, alii sessiles alii breviter pedicellati, 
extra pilis longis patentibus puniceis dense vestiti, intus flavi, demnm 
rubescentes. Calycis tubus florum centralium saepius sterilium breviter 
obovoideus, limbi lobis omnibus inter se aequalibus ; is florum exteriorum 
plerumque fertilium oblongo - cylindricus, limbi lobis nunc omnibus 
aequalibus lanceolatis acutis 1-1 • 5 cm. longis, nunc, plerumque unius 
floris in quaque cyma, quatuor aequalibus lanceolatis, quinto in folium 
amplum coccineum vel puniceum jam ante anthesin producto; hoc folium 
calycinum, ut folia propria, ambitu variabile, interdum usque ad 12 cm. 
longum et 10 cm. latum, nervis 5-7 percursum, inconspicue parce 

Suberulum. Corolla hypocrateriformis ; tubus cylindricus, sursum modice 
ilatatus ; limbi lobi ovati, 1-1 • 5 cm. longi, obtusi, patentes, fauce pilis 
longis atropurpureis dense barbata. Stamina 5, fauci corollae adnata, 
filamentis brevissimis; antberae inclusae, acutae. Discus annularis. 
Ovarium 2-loculare, loculis multiovulatis ; stylus glaber, bifidus, inclusus. 
— M. splendida, Welw. in Trans. Linn. Soc. 1869, vol. xxvii. p. 36, t. 13. 



This showy shrub was first described as long ago as 1827, 
from specimens collected by Thonning on the Grold Coast, 
but the oldest herbarium specimens at Kew were collected 
by Mr. Gustav Mann in February, 1862, in the Cameroons, 
at an elevation between 3,000 and 4,500 ft. It has since 
been collected by numerous travellers in various localities, 
from Sierra Leone to Angola and eastward r to Uganda, 

NOVEMBKB, 1908. 



forming- one of the most striking objects on the outskirts of 
forests. Most of the wild specimens are of more compact 
habit than the plant figured, and have smaller leaves 
on quite short stalks, and the larger calyx-leaves are 
even more brilliantly coloured, due doubtless to greater 
light. 

Mussaenda comprises about fifty species which inhabit 
tropical Asia, Africa and Polynesia, but few of them are in 
cultivation. The best known is M. frondosa, L., figured in 
the Magazine (t. 2099), from a weakly plant, under the 
name of M. pubescens. The only other one figured in this 
publication is M. luteola, Del. (t. 5573), a very pretty 
species from the upper Nile region. 

Not all of the species of Mussaenda have a leaf-like, 
coloured calyx-lobe, and usually only one flower in each 
partial cyme of an inflorescence possesses this appendage ; 
but this characteristic is shared by several other genera 
belonging to different tribes of the Rubiaceae. They 
are : Calycophyllum, Monadelphantha, Capirona, Schizocalyx, 
Pinkneya, Pogonopus (Howardia caracasana, Wedd., B. M. 
t. 5110), Pallasia and Warscewiczia ; all American. 

Description. — Shrub, either suberect or climbing on trees 
to a height of forty feet or more. Branches, leaves and 
flowers more or less clothed with soft hairs. Leaves thin, 
very variable in outline, from lanceolate to nearly orbicular 
and with the stalk sometimes as much as 6 or 7 in. long, 
but usually smaller, rounded, cordate or wedge-shaped at 
the base, gradually tapering or abruptly acuminate at the 
tip, margin entire, minutely fringed, both surfaces slightly 
hairy ; primary veins conspicuous, often coloured red ; 
stipules bifid or trifid, about J in. long. Flowers about 
l\ in. across, in dense terminal cymes, some sessile, others 
shortly stalked, clothed with long spreading crimson hairs 
on the outside, yellow within changing to red, crimson in 
the centre. Calyx-lobes 5, all lanceolate, i-£ in. long, 
acute, or one leaf-like oval (variable in wild specimens), 
sometimes as much as 5 in. long by 4 in. broad, brilliant 
crimson, longitudinally 5- or 7-nerved, slightly hairy. 
Corolla salver- shaped, bearded in the throat. Stamens 5, 
included. Ovary 2-celled ; cells many-seeded ; style in- 
cluded. W. BOTTING HEMSLEY. 



Cultivation. — Kew is indebted to Mr. H. N. Ridley, 
Director of the Singapore Botanic Gardens, for this hand- 
some plant, which he forwarded in a Wardian case in 1907. 
It was first introduced into cultivation by Mr. Gustav Mann 
in 1863 ; at any rate, there is a note written by him on a 
sheet in the Kew Herbarium to the effect that living 
plants brought by him from West Africa were in the 
Garden at that time. But it does not appear to have 
become established then. Nor was it successfully grown in 
England when the late Mr. W. Bull distributed it twenty 
years later. It was included in his Catalogue of New Plants 
in 1888, p. 8, where it was described as "a remarkable 
introduction from the Congo." Mr. W. Micholitz, collector 
for Messrs. Sander & Sons, of St. Albans and Bruges, 
writes : — " 1 found Muswenda erythrophylla on the banks of 
the Kwilu, Loango, French Congo, in 1886, it being then 
new. The plants that I brought to England in May or 
June of that year were handed over to Mr. W. Bull, the 
Chelsea nurseryman, who distributed them as M. erythro- 
phylla, but I am not aware that any of them flowered. Ix 
is usually of a somewhat creeping or trailing habit, and 
only attains the shrubby character of M. frondosa when 
growing in the open with full exposure to the sun. As I 
found it, growing in partial shade in tall virgin forest on 
the water's edge, it reached the tops of the trees, and, 
forming as it did long stretches of a high, solid wall of 
dazzling scarlet, was a sight not easily to be forgotten." 
At Kew the plants received from Singapore have been 
grown in a moist tropical stove, where they have formed 
shapely, well-furnished shrubs about 2 ft. high, and 
were in flower for about two months. This Mussaenda is 
likely to become a popular garden plant, the red calyx- 
leaves being quite as effective as the bracts of Poinsettia, 
and they appear to be quite as persistent. — W. Watson. 



Fig. l,part of calyx, disk and style; 2, section of corolla; 3, hairs from the 
throat of the corolla ; 1 and 5, anthers ; 6, upper part of style : — all enlarged. 



S223 







'.'nuoitBEootePssr&.Sor 



I Bfievs &. r°T.^Ti^np 



Tab. 8223. 

MECONOPSIS sinuata, var. latifolia. 

Himalaya. 



Papaveraceae. Tribe Eopapavereae. 

Meconopsis, Vig. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant. vol. i. p. 52 ; Prantl & Kiindig 
in Engl. & Prantl Pflanzenfam. vol. iii. 2, p. 141. 



Meconopsis (§ Eumeconopsis) sinuata, Praia in Journ. As. Soc. Beng. vol. Ixiv. 
2, p. 314; Ann. Bog. Bot. Gard. Calcutta, vol. ix. 1, p. 5, t. 6; Ann. Bot. 
vol. xx. p. 347 ; species a M. aculeata, Royle, foliis minus lobatis capsulaque 
obconica recedens; var. latifolia, Prain; a forma typica foliis latioribus 
capsulaque breviore differt. 

Herba, ut videtur monocarpica; caulis simplex, scapiformis, 0-35-1-2 m. altus, 
sparse aculeatus. Folia radicalia evanida ; caulina alterna, utrinque parce 
aculeis simplicibus induta,lineari-oblonga vel lanceolata, vel (var. latifolia) 
oblonga, apice obtusa, basi cuneata, margine irregulariter lobata sinuatave, 
lobis integris, supra viridia, subtus glaueescentia ; lamina 10-18 cm. longa, 
2-3 cm. vel (var. latifolia) 3-5 cm. lata ; petioli inferiores 4-6 cm. longi, 
gradatim breviores, summi bracteis proximi subobsoleti. Flores in cymas 
racemiformes dispositi; pedicelli 2-6 cm. longi, aculeati, fere omnes 
bracteati; bracteae foliis conformes sed minores sessilesque. Sepala % 
ovata, 1'5 cm. longa, extra parce aculeata. Pttala 4, coerulea, ovato- 
rotundata, saepe subcuspidata, 3 cm. longa, 2 -75 cm. lata. Stamina 
indefinita, pluriseriata ; filamenta glabra, discreta, intense coerulea ; 
antherae oblongae, luteae. Ovarium e carpellis 4 compositum, ovoideum, 
5-7 mm. longum, densius aculeatum ; stylus glaber, 3 m m . lungus ; stigma 
coloratum, saepius puniceum, nonnunquam aurantiacum. Oapsula oteonica, 
3-3*5 cm., vel (var. latifolia) 2 -5-2 '75 cm. tantum longa. 



Meconopsis sinuata, not known in gardens, and rare in 
Alpine Sikkim and Bhutan at 10-12,000 ft., is closely allied 
to M. aculeata, Royle (B. M. t. 5456), the North-west 
Himalayan prickly "Blue Poppy," but has narrower, slightly- 
lobed leaves and longer capsules, widest above the middle. 
The plant here figured, whose introduction we owe to 
Lt-Col. H. Appleton, is rare in Northern Kashmir at 
10-14,000 ft., where it had previously only been met with 
by Falconer in 1838, by Winterbottom in 1847, and by 
Clarke in 1876. Its leaves are as wide as in M. aculeata, 
but as slightly lobed as in M. sinuata; its flowers differ 
from those of M. aculeata in having a narrower, more 
prickly ovary, and a deep pink or bright orange instead of 
November, 1908. 



a pale green stigma ; its capsules are, though shorter, 
obconic as in M. sinuata, not widest below the middle as in 
M. aculeata. It may prove distinct, but, till it can be com- 
pared with living plants of M. sinuata, is best treated as a 
variety, latifolia, of that species, with wider leaves and 
shorter fruits. Clarke met with M. aculeata as well as this 
plant in Kashmir, and in the field has noted that they 
differ. 

Description. — Herb, apparently monocarpic ; root stout, 
fusiform ; stem simple, scapose, 1-4 ft. high ; sparsely 
covered, like all parts of the plant except the petals, stamens 
and style, with spreading prickles. Leaves many ; radical 
soon disappearing; cauline alternate, linear-oblong or 
lanceolate, or (var. latifolia) oblong, with obtuse tips, 
irregularly shallowly lobed or sinuate margins, and bases 
gradually tapering into the petioles, green above, somewhat 
glaucous beneath, 4-7 in. long, %-l\ in., or (var. latifolia) 
I5— 2 in. wide; lower petioles 1^-2J in. long, gradually 
shorter upwards and suppressed as the leaves pass into 
bracts. Flowers in raceme-like cymes ; pedicels f-2 \ in. 
long, bracteate except the uppermost ; bracts leaf-like, sessile. 
Sepals 2, ovate, ^ in. long. Petals 4, blue, wide-ovate, 
often slightly cuspidate, 1^ in. long, l£ in. wide. Stamens 
numerous, several-seriate ; filaments slender, distinct, deep 
blue ; anthers yellow or pale orange. Ovary 4-carpelled, 
rather closely prickly, ovoid ; style glabrous ; stigma usually 
deep-pink, less often bright orange. Capsule obconic, 
sparingly prickly, 1|-1£ in., or (var. latifolia) 1-1| in. 
long. 

Cultivation. — Seeds of Meconopsis sinuata, var. latifolia, 
were sent to Kew from Kashmir by Lt.-Col. Appleton in 
February, 1906; the plants flowered in June, 1908. The 
treatment suitable for M. aculeata, which succeeds best in 
most shady places, planted in a peaty soil, should be 
adopted for this plant also, which loses its crown of leaves 
during winter. — D. Prain. 



Fig. 1, anther; 2, pistil ; 3, young fruit:— figs. 1 and 2 enlarged. 



8224 




LReeve«<.C London. 



Tab. 8224. 

BERBERIS TTJNNANENSIS. 
China. 

Berberioaceae. Tribe Berbereae. 

Berberis, Linn.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 43; Schneider in Bull. 
Herb. Boiss. ser. 2, vol. v. p. 33. 



Berberis yunnanensis, Franeh. in Bull. Soc. Bob. France, vol. xxxiii. 1886, 
p. 388 ; Schneider, Laubholzk. vol. i. 1904, p. 306 ; affinis B. macrosepalae, 
Hook, f., a qua ramulis glabris, petalis acutioribus, glandulis minoribus 
differ!. 

Frni,., ■ 1-2 m. altus, ramis angulato-striatis cinereis. Folia obovato-cuneata, 
apice rotundata, mucronata, 2-4 cm. longa, 0'8-l # 5 cm. lata, integra vel 
spinuloso-serrata, spinulis 1 mm. longis ; venae laxae, utrinque conspicuae ; 
spinae 3- vel 5-partitae, 1-2 cm. longae, pafcentes. Flores solitarii vel 
fasciculati, circiter 2 cm. diametro, perulis ovatis; pedicelli graciles, 
15-2 cm. longi. Sepafa 6 vel 7, subaequalia, ovata vel elliptica, 6-8 mm. 
longa, 4-5 mm. lata. Betala late obovata, subacuta, leviter emarginata, 
5-6 mm. longa, 3-4 mm. lata, pallide flava, glaadulis 2 ellipticis 75 mm. 
longis intus b*ri instructa. Stamina quam petala dnplo breviora. Stigma 
subsessile, capitatum. Baeca rubra, ellipsoidea, 10-15 mm. longa, 7-8 mm. 
diametro. 



Though very closely allied to Berberis macrosepala, 
Hook, f., B. yunnanensis is nevertheless distinguishable by 
more characters than are indicated by Schneider in the 
places cited above. He states that the only difference he 
could find between the two species was that the young 
branches of B. yunnanensis were glabrous and those of 
B. macrosepala shortty pubescent. In B. yunnanensis, how- 
ever, the petals are acute and scarcely emarginate, and bear 
small rounded glands ; whereas in B. macrosepala they are 
obtuse with a broad, widely emarginate apex, and the glands 
are larger and more elongated. 

B. yunnanensis was first discovered by Delavay in 1885 
near Lankong, Yunnan, at an altitude of 10,000 ft. Since 
then it has been collected in Western China by Wilson, who 
also gathered B. macrosepala in the same region ; thus 
greatly extending the known range of that species, which 
was known only from the Sikkim Himalaya. 
November, 1908. 



Description.— Shrub, 3-6 ft. high ; branches angular- 
striate, greyish. Leaves obovate-cuneate, rounded at the 
apex, mucronate, f-lj in. long, J-| in. broad, entire or 
spinose-serrate ; veins few, conspicuous on both surfaces ; 
spines three- or five-partite, f-f in. long, spreading; scales 
of the winter-buds ovate. Flowers solitary or in few- 
flowered fascicles, § in. in diameter ; pedicels slender, ^-| in. 
long. Sepals 6 or 7, subequal, ovate or elliptic, about I in. 
long. Petals broadly ovate, subacute, very slightly emar- 
ginate, \ in. long, pale yellow ; glands of the petals elliptic. 
Stamens half the length of the petals. Stigma subsessile, 
capitate. Berry red, ellipsoid, |-^ in. long, about £ in. 
wide. — J. Hutchinson. 

Cultivation. — Berberis yunnanensis is one of the new 
Barberries introduced to cultivation by Mr. Maurice L. de 
Vilmorin, and it is to him that Kew is indebted for^ the 
plant from which the plate was prepared. It was received 
in February, 1907. It is a bush of dense rounded habit, at 
present 2 to 3 ft. high. The flowers are large as compared 
with those of other cultivated Barberries, as is also the 
fruit. The species is a welcome addition to a beautiful 
group of hardy shrubs. Barberries are not fastidious as to 
soil ; in the sandy soil of Kew they thrive better than most 
shrubs, and they produce seeds sufficiently plentifully to 
afford a simple means of increase. — W. J. Bean. 



Tig. 1, stamen and petal, showing the two glands near the base of the latter 
2, stamen with the anther-valves still closed; '6, pistil : — all enlarged. 



8225 




•T-.lilh 



"'fincent Brooks X)a^&. Son I 



L Reeve 5c C° London. 



Tab. 8225. 

COLUMNEA MAGN1FICA. 

Central America. 

Gesnebiaceae. Tribs Coltjmneae. 

Columnea, Linn.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1009; Fritsch in 
Engl. & Prantl, FJlanzenfam. vol. iv. 3 b, p. 169. 



Columnea magniflca, Klotzsch et Hanst. ex Oerst. in VidensJc. Selsk. Skr. ser. 5, 
vol. v. 1861, p. 134; Hanst. in Linnaea,\6l. xxxiv. p. 401 ; Spraguein Gard. 
Chron. vol. xliii. 1908, p. 66; affinis C. rotundi/o/iae, Salisb., a qua foliis 
oblongis vel oblanceolatis discique glandula emarginata recedit. 

Herba erecta, circiter 80 cm. alta, hirsuto-villosa. Folia oblonga usque 
oblanceolata, acuta, 3-6 cm. longa, 1-2 cm. lata, obscure serrulata, supra 
asperule appresseque hirsuta, subtus praecipue in \enis hirsuta; petioli 
vix 1 cm. longi. F/ores in parte superiore caulis axillares, solitarii vel bini, 
pedicellis circiter 1*5 cm. longis. Calyx basi dense villosus; segmenla 
lanceolata, ptctinato-serrata, circiter 1*5 cm. longa. Corolla flammea, 
circiter 6 cm. longa ; tubus circiter 3 cm. longus; limbusvalde inaequaliter 
bilabiatus; lobi 4, laterales ultra medium cum postico integro connati ; 
anticus lineari-lanceolatus, 2-2 ' 5 cm. longus, tandem deflexus. Antherae 
connatae. Disci glandula unica, postica, emarginata. Ovarium villosum. 



Columnea magnifica was discovered about sixty years ago 
by the orchid collector, Warscewicz, in the province of 
Veraguas, Panama, and does not seem to have been collected 
again until 1906, when it was discovered in the mountains 
of Costa Rica by Carlos Werckle', at an altitude of between 
6,000 and 7,000 ft. 

Although placed by Hanstein in the section Pentadenia, 
its real affinities seem to be with C. scandens, Linn., and 
C. rotundifolia, Salisb., which are placed in the section 
Eucolumnea. 

The headquarters of the genus are in Central America, 
where it attains its maximum development in Costa Rica. 
Numerous species are endemic in the South American 
Andes, and a faw in the West Indies. 

Description. — Herb, erect, about 1 ft. high, villous- 
hirsute. Leaves oblong to oblanceolate, acute, l-2£ in. 
long, |-| in. broad, obscurely serrulate, roughish with 

November, 1908. 



scattered appressed hairs on the upper surface, veins hirsute 
on the lower ; petioles under ^ in. long. Flowers axillary, 
solitary or two together, borne on the upper part of the 
stem; pedicels <|-f in. long. Calyx densely villous at the 
base ; segments lanceolate, pectinate-serrate, over ^ in. 
long. Corolla flame-coloured, about 2^ in. long; tube 
about 1\ in. long ; limb very unequally two-lipped ; lobes 4, 
upper orbicular-oblong much exceeding the others, lateral 
adnate to upper for more than half their length ; lower 
linear-lanceolate, f-1 in. long, finally deflexed. Anthers 
connate. Disk represented by a single large posticous 
emarginate gland. Ovary villous. — T. A. Spragde. 

Cultivation. — This plant was introduced into cultiva- 
tion by Messrs. V. Lemoine & Sons, Nancy, about 4 years 
ago. It first flowered at Kew in 1906. The figure here 
given has been prepared from specimens presented by 
Col. Beddome and by Mr. W. E. Gumbleton. Like the 
other species of Columnea in cultivation this grows and 
flowers freely in a warm house under conditions such as suit 
Gesneraceae generally. Compared with C. scandens (B. M. 
t. 5118) and C. Schiedeana (B. M. t. 4045) it is not a robust 
grower, but it is likely to prove useful for pot culture. — 
W. Watson'. 



Fig. 1, part of calyx, gland and pistil; 2, base of corolla laid open and 
stamens ; 3, a jointed glandular hair from the corolla : — all enlarged. 



'.8226 







LR»evfj &<J° London. 



Tab. 8226. 

PYRUS sinensis. 
Manchuria and Korea. 

Bosaceae. Tribe Pomeae. 

Pyrus, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 626 : Focke in Engl. 
& Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenfam. vol. iii. part 3, p. 22 (Pirus). 



Pyrus sinensis, Lindl. in Trans. Hort. Soc. Land. vol. vi. (1826), p. 396 ; Bot. 
Beg. t. 1248; C. Schneider, Handb. Laubholzk. vol. i. p. 663; P. communi, 
Linn., accedens, sed foliis fere sempervirentibus setoso-serratis distincta. 

Arbor 10 m. vel ultra alta, ramis novellis glabris vel fugaciter pilosulis saturate 
brunneis vel purpurasccntibus demum nigro-fuscis ; gemmae glabrae, 
ovoideae, perulis acutis. Folia ovata, plerumque e basi lata acuminata, 
dense setoso-serrata, 5-9 cm. longa, 3-6 cm. lata, subcoriacea, diu psrsis- 
tentia, novella ochraceo-araneoso-lanata, mox glabrata; petioli 2-6 cm. 
longi ; stipulae snbulatae, ciliatae. Flores in brachycladiis foliatis 4-9 in 
corymbos dispositi; pedicelli glabri vel magis minusve lanati, ad 4 cm. 
longi. Calyx extus uti receptaculum glaber vel lanato-pilosus, intus 
semper lanatus ; sepala lanceolato-triangularia, denticulata, acuta. Peta/a 
alba, obovata vel ovata. Antherae purpureae. Fructus in planta silvestri 
globosus, calyce subpersistente diu coronatus, olivaceus, crebre lenticellatus, 
2*5 cm. diametro, sapore adstringente, in planta culta major, interdum 
obovoideus, sapore grato. — P. communis, Thunb. Fl. Japon. 207, non L. 
P. chinensis, Eoxb. Hort. Beng. (1814), p. 38 (nomen tantum); Fl. Ind., 
ed. Carey (1832), vol. ii. p. 511. P. ussuriensis, Maxim, ex Maack in Bull. 
Acad. Petersb. vol. xv. (1857), no. 22, p. 132, et Prim. Fl. Amur. p. 102, 
P. Simonii, Carr. in Eev. Hort. 1872, p. 28, fig. 3 ; P. Sieboldii, Carr. I.e. 
1880, p. 110, cum tab. col. 



This pear has been in cultivation in Northern China and 
Japan for a considerable time, and according to Siebold 
several varieties have been raised from it in Japan. It was 
introduced into this country by Captain J. P. Wilson in 
1820. A fruit produced from a graft in 1823 was described 
by Lindley as measuring nearly 3 in. in length and 2^- in. 
in diameter, forming almost a perfect oval, covered with a 
pale dull yellow skin with numerous rough brown spots, 
and possessing a white crisp flesh with the flavour of an 
apple rather than of a pear, and of no particular excellence. 
A very savoury and aromatic variety was sent by Mr. Simon 
to the Jardin des Plantes at Paris in 1861. It was described 
as P. Simonii by Carriere. Dr. Bretschneider remarks that 
Simon's pear is very likely the pai-li (white pear) of the 
November, 1908. 



Chinese, which is much cultivated in the Province of Chili 
for its delicious, pale yellow, apple-shaped fruit. Otherwise 
P. sinensis is known in China as sha-li (sand pear) and 
was mentioned as such by Roxburgh in his Hortus 
Bengalensis in 1814. According to him it was introduced 
into the neighbourhood of Calcutta before 1794, but it pro- 
duced little fruit and that of very bad quality. He figures 
the pear in an unpublished drawing as much depressed at 
the top. On the other hand, a very fine coloured Chinese 
drawing in the Kew collection shows the pear almost 
globose, of a dull yellowish -brown and with whitish spots. 
It may be remarked that the basal nerves of the leaves are 
sometimes much more oblique, more conspicuous, and more 
produced towards the apex than the others, giving the leaf 
the appearance of being triplinerved ; but, as a rule, the 
lateral nerves are more or less parallel and uniform. In 
the wild state the sand pear was found by Maack, Maximo- 
wicz, and others in the valleys of the southern tributaries of 
the lower Amur and the Manchurian littoral. Here the 
fruit is smaller and very astringent. 

Description. — Tree, 30-40 ft. high, with glabrous or 
fugaciously hairy branchlets which at first are of a warm 
brown or purplish colour, but at length turn dark or 
greyish-brown. Leaf buds glabrous, ovoid, with very acute 
scales. Leaves ovate from a broad base, acuminate, densely 
serrate, the teeth running out into tine almost bristle-like 
points which may at length fall off, 2-4 in. long, 1^ to 
over 2 in. broad, subcoriaceous, of a rich green when 
mature, long persistent, glabrous or when young more or 
less covered with a cobwebby brownish tomentum, particu- 
larly along the edges and midrib ; petiole 1-2 in. long ; 
stipules subulate, ciliate. Flowers in 4-9-flowered corymbs 
on sparingly leafy short shoots ; pedicels glabrous or more 
or less hairy, sometimes almost 2 in. long. Calyx like the 
receptacle, glabrous or cobwebby, woolly without, always 
woolly within ; sepals ovate-lanceolate or triangular, denti- 
culate. Petals white, obovate to ovate, |-f in. long. 
Anthers purple. Fruit in the wild plant globose with a sub- 
persistent calyx, olive-brown with numerous lenticels, 1 in. 
in diameter, in the cultivated plant much larger, as much 
as 3 in. across, and sometimes obovoid. — Otto Stapf. 



Cultivation. — This interesting pear has been cultivated 
at Kew since 1875. In the spring of that year a valuable 
collection of grafts of Pyrus was presented to Kew by the 
late Prof. Decaisne. It was from one of these that the 
plant now figured was raised. It flowers freely almost 
every year early in April, but rarely produces a large crop 
of fruit. This species thrives very well in the ordinary soil 
of Kew. — W. J. Bean. 



Fig. 1, a flower from which the petals and stamens have been removed: — 
enlarged. 



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BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

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T.f.S.a Q l.J.N.Rtdh.litk 



"VLnceri Brooks ,Day-&. StmLt^imr, 



L. Re eve &.C? LotuLxtl 



Tab. 8227. 
EUPATORIUM Raffillh. 

Central America f 



Compositae. Tribe Eutatoiueae. 
Eupatokium, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 245. 



Eupatorium Raffillii, ITemsJ., species ex affinitate E. ianthini, Hemsl. (Zfrfte- 
clinium idftthinurn, Hook., B. M. t. 4574), a quo inflorescentia araneoso- 
tomentosa, capitulis majoribus subumbellatis et involucri bracteis 
paucioribus differt ; etiamque E. sordido, Less., arete affinis, a quo foliis 
cito glabreseentibus et capitulis majoribus subumbellatis recedit. 

Frutex 0"5-l m. altus, ramis rectis teretibus primum rubro-brunneis 
tomentosis. Folia opposita, longe petiolata, crassiuscula, ovata basi 
rotundata vel inferiora oblanceolata, basi cuneata, absque petiolo 12-15 
cm. longa, 7-10 cm. lata, acuta, supra basin quintuplinervia, primum 
utrinque parce obscureque setulosa, margine minute calloso-denticulata ; 
petioli teretes, 3-8 cm. longi. Capitula numerosa, circiter 2 cm. diametro, 
in cymas compositas terminales erectas subglobosas 10-15 cm. diametro 
dispositi; pedunculi breves, rtgidi, ferrugineo-tomentosi vel lanati, sub- 
umbellati. Involucri bracteae circiter 40, 3-4-seriatae, tenues, rubro- 
brunneae, birsutae, lineares, exteriores breviores, filiformes, omnes acutae, 
interiores corollis aequates. Corollae lilacinae, omnes tubulosae; tubus 
supra medium inflatus, lobis parvis piliferis. Stamina inclusa. Styli 
longissime exserti. Achaenia glabra; pappi setae molles, albae, quam 
corolla tertia parte breviores. — Ifeheciinium ianthinum, Hort. nonnull., 
non Hook. 



The history of the introduction of this Eupatorium into 
cultivation is not known. Mr. C. P. Raffill, of the tropical 
department at Kew, who procured a plant of it from the 
Birmingham Botanic Garden, called attention to it as being 
different from E. (Hebecliniuni) ianthinum, under which 
name it was there grown. Whether it be really an unde- 
scribed species, it is difficult to say. It is certainly very 
near the two species with which it is compared above, and 
is also very near a specimen in the Kew Herbarium, 
collected at Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico, by C. Gr. Pringle, 
n. 8048, issued as " E. subtriplinervium, Kl.," doubtless in 
error for E. septuplinervium, Klatt, published in Leopoldina, 
1884, vol. xx. p. 90, where Hebeclinium sordidum and H. 
macrocephalum, Schulz-Bip., non Benth., are given as 
synonyms. 
December, 1908, 



Description. — Shrub, 1^-3 ft. high. Branches straight, 
round, clothed with a red- brown felt when young. Leaves 
opposite, on long stalks, rather thick, almost fleshy, base 
ovate and rounded or sometimes lanceolate and wedge- 
shaped, 4J to 6 in. long without the stalk, 2J to 4 in. 
broad, acute, 5-nerved above the base, at first sparsely 
furnished with small bristles, margin minutely toothed ; 
stalks round, 1£ to 3 in. long. Flower-heads numerous, 
nearly 1 in. across, in terminal, erect, compound clusters, 
4 to 6 in. across ; stalks umbellately arranged. Bracts of 
the involucre about 40, in 3 or 4 series, thin, hairy, red- 
brown, linear, outer ones shorter, filiform, all acute, inner 
ones nearly as long as the corollas. Flowers all tubular, 
lilac. Stamens included. Styles exserted, very long, filiform, 
divergent. Achenes very small, glabrous ; bristles of the 
pappus soft, white, about a third shorter than the corolla. — 

W. BOTTING HEMSLEY. 

Cultivation'. — This species has long been cultivated in 
the Biimingham Botanic Gardens under the erroneous name 
of Hebeclinium ianthinum. It is, however, superior, in a 
decorative sense, to E. (H.) ianthinum, the heads of flowers 
being fuller and richer in colour, while the leaves also are more 
handsome. It grows quickly into a shapely specimen 2 ft. 
or so high and is in full flower in mid-winter. Although 
it will grow and flower in an ordinary greenhouse this plant 
is seen at its best under good cultivation in a tropical house. 
Cuttings rooted in early summer and grown on in pots in a 
moist stove quickly grow into handsome specimens; they 
last in flower a month or more. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, a flower-head; 2, and 3, bracts of the involucre; 4, a flower; 5, a 
bristle of the pappus ; 6, anthers; 7, an unopened flower :—all enlarged. 



82: 




u.s.<w i 



L Reeve <5cC° Larularv 



Tab. 8228. 

CORYTHOLOMA macropodum. 

South Brazil. 

Gesneriaceae. Tribe Sinningieae. 

Corttholoma, Decaisne ; Fritsch in Engler & Prantl, Pflanzenfam. vol. iv. 3b, 
p. 180.— Gesnera, Mart.; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1003; 
nee Gesneria, Linn. 



Corytholoma macropodum, Sprague in Kew Bull. 1908, p. 20; affinis 
C. canescenti, Fritsch, a quo indumento sparsiore necnon glandulis disci 
omnibus evolutis recedit. 

Eerba 16-22 cm. alta, e tubere depresso-globoso perennans. Oaules 1-2, 
simplices, paria 1 vel 2 foliorum gerentes, ut petioli, pedunculi, pedicelli, 
calyces extra pilis glauduloso-capitatis et paucis eglandulosis patenter 
hirsuti. Folia suborbicularia, basi cordata, 8-13 cm. diametro, obtuse 
serrata, ciliata, supra nitidula, pilis erectis glandulosis inspersa, venis 
impressis, subtus in venis et venulis valde prominentibus hirsuta, ceterum 
glabra; petioli 1-2 cm. longi. Cymae in axillis solitariae, pedunculis 
5-10 cm. longis. Flores 5-7, pseudo-umbellati, penduli, pedicellis 1-2 cm. 
longis. Calyx intus nitidulus, puberulus ; tubus brevissimus ; lobi ovati, 
acuminati, circiter 5 mm. longi. Corolla cinnabarina; tubus 2*5-3 cm. 
longus, fere cylindricus, basi annulatim inflatus; superne Ieviter ventri- 
cosus, extra densiuscule pubescens; lobi patuli, inferiores rubro-guttati 
vel maculati, superiores concolores. Disci glandulae quinque, duae 
posticae in ephippium connatae, laterales et antica liberae. Ovarium 
densiuscule pubescens, stylo glanduloso-puberulo ; placentae bilamellatae. 



The genus Gesneria, the type of the family Gesneriaceae, 
was founded by Linnaeus on two West Indian species, 
G. humilis and G. tomentosa, published in his Species 
Plantarum, ed. 1, 1753, p. 612. During the succeeding 
70 years many additional species were described, and it at 
length became evident that species belonging to several 
distinct genera were included under Gesneria. Martius 
(Nov. Gen. et Sp. vol. iii. 1829, p. 27) accordingly dis- 
tinguished three genera, one of which was based on G. 
humilis, and a second on G. tomentosa, whilst the third 
included the great majority of the described species, namely, 
those provided with tuberous rootstocks. Instead of 
retaining the name Gesneria for one of the original species, 
Martius proposed the new generic names Conradia and 
Rytidophyllum for G. humilis and G. tomentosa, respectively, 
and applied Linnaeus's generic name, modified to Gesnera, 

December, 1908, 



to the subsequently described species possessing tuberous 
rootstocks. By common consent among botanists the name 
Gesneria is now retained for G. humilis and its allies, and 
Rytidophyllum for G. tomentosa and its allies, whilst the 
name Corytholoma is applied to the species with tuberous 
rootstocks. The latter are, however, still commonly known 
in gardens under the generic name Gesnera, and include the 
following which have been figured in this magazine : — 
G. aggregata, t. 2725, Lindleyi, t. 3602, Marchii, t. 3744, 
cardinalis, t. 8167, and many others. 

The plant of Corytholoma macropodum here figured 
differed from those originally raised in having a single pair 
of large leaves instead of two pairs of small leaves, and 
blotches on the lower lip of the corolla as against small spots 
in the original plants. Like many other Gesneriaceae it 
appears to be highly plastic and may in time give rise 
to garden races unlike the wild species. 

Description.— Herb, 6-9 in. high, glandular - hirsute, 
tuber subglobose, perennial. Stems one or two, annual, 
unbranched, bearing one or two pairs of leaves. Leaves 
suborbicular, cordate at the base, 3-5 in. in diameter, 
obtusely serrate, ciliate, upper surface pilose with short 
erect glandular hairs, lower surface with very prominent 
hirsute veins, otherwise glabrous; petioles about \ in. 
long.^ Cymes solitary, axillary, 5-7-flowered ; peduncles 
2-4 in. long. Flowers subumbellate, pendulous; pedicels 
2-| in. long. Calyx-tube very short ; lobes ovate, acu- 
minate. Corolla cinnabar-red, pubescent outside; tube 
1 in. or more long, nearly cylindric, with an annular swelling 
at the base and slightly ventricose above 5 limb two-lipped, 
the upper lip consisting of two, the lower of three lobes ; 

a- T * !° Wer hp blotched with purple. Glands of the 
disk 5 the two posticous ones united in the form of a 
horseshoe. Ovary rather densely pubescent ; style glandular- 
puberulous; placentas bilamellate.— T. A. Sprague. 

Cultivation.— Corytholoma macropodum was raised from 
seeds collected in Sao Paulo, by Mr. G. H. Weigt, Director, 
-botanical Parks, Piracicaba, Brazil, and forwarded to Kew 
m 18U6 with a recommendation of the plant as a £ood 
decorative species. It grew freely under the treatment 



given to other tropical gesueriads and flowered at Kew in 
April. There are other Gesnerias with flowers of the same 
shape, colour and arrangement as C. macropodum, but none 
of those in cultivation have the remarkable bifoliate stems 
which characterise this species. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil; 2, base of corolla-tube laid open; 3, anthers 
4, ovary; 5, whole plant :— 1-4 enlarged, 5, much reduced. 



8Z'0 




•j 



■BncentHrodks.DaviS. 



LRe«ve &. C 1 London- 



Tab. 8229. 

eria hyacinthoides. 

Java. 

Orchidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 
Eria, Lindl. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 500. 



Eria hyacinthoides, Lindl. Gen. & Sp. Orch. p. 66 ; Miq. Fl. Ind. Bat. vol. iii. 
p. 660; J. J. Smith, Orch. Jav. p. 410; affinis E. bicristatae, Lindl., sed 
racemis triplo longioribus et multifloris differt. 

Ilerba epipliytica, circa 30 cm. alta. Pseudobidbi erecti, oblongi, subcompressi, 
6-7 cm. longi, vaginis brnnneis vestiti, 2-3-phylli. Folia petiolata, elon- 
gata, subobtusa, coriacea, 20 30 cm. longa, 3 '5-4 "5 cm. lata, basi attenuata. 
Pedunculi axillares, erecti, 10-15 cm. longi; racemi multiflori, rachi et 
pedicellis albido-tomentosis. Bracteae ovatae, acutae, concavae, pubes- 
centes, 4-6 mm. longae. Pedicelli 7-10 mm. longi. Flores pubescentes, 
albi; anthera flava. Sepalum posticum oblongum, obtusum, circa 1*3 cm. 
longum; sepala lateralia ovato-oblonga, obtusa, 1"3 cm. longa; mentum 
oblongum, obtusum, circa 6 mm. longum. Petala ovato-oblonga, obtusa, 
circa 1 cm. longa. Labelhim trilobum, circa 1 cm. longum; lobi laterales 
erecti, triangulares, acuti ; lobus intermedius reflexus, ovato-oblongus, 
obtusus; discus pruminenter longitudinaliter bicallosus, canaliculars. 
Columna clavata, 7-8 mm. longa. 



Eria hyacinthoides, Lindl., is a Javan species which was 
originally described by Blume in 1825 under the name of* 
Dendrolirium hyacinthoides ; the two genera cannot, 
however, be separated. The species was recorded as a 
native of Mt. Salak. Lindley probably only knew it from 
description, for his herbarium contains but a single flower, 
marked as authentic, which was afterwards sent to him by 
Reichenbach. The plant here figured was obtained from 
Leiden by Mr. F. W. Moore, Grlasnevin, under the name of 
E. bicristata, Lindl., but that species according to the original 
description has a short, few-flowered inflorescence, and 
Mr. J. J. Smith, author of Die Orchideen von Java, con- 
siders our plant to be E. hyacinthoides, Lindl.; it certainly 
agrees better with the description of the latter. Smith, 
however, describes the side lobes of the lip as deep violet 
brown, a character not mentioned by Blume. He further 
considers E. ebulbis, Lindl. (Dendrolirium ebulbe, Blume) 
and E. Endymion, Ridl., as synonymous ; this point requires 
confirmation, for Blume placed the former in a different 
section from E. hyacinthoides, and the latter is a native of 

December, 1908. 



Singapore. Further material is necessary to clear up these 
points. Several of the Javan species are very imperfectly 
known, and Smith enumerates eight out of thirty -five as 
doubtful. Eria is a large and difficult genus, bearing a 
considerable general resemblance to Dendrobium, from which 
it is readily separated by its eight pollinia. The species are 
not commonly cultivated except in botanical gardens, and 
as the fleshy crests of the lip shrink greatly in drying they 
are unusually difficult to discriminate. They are chiefly 
concentrated in the Indo-Malayan region. 

Description. — Epiphyte, about a foot high. Pseudobulbs 
erect, oblong, somewhat compressed, 2|-3 in. long, 
clothed with brown sheaths, 2-3-leaved. Leaves petioled, 
elongate-oblong, subobtuse, coriaceous, 8-12 in. long, about 
1J in. broad, somewhat attenuate at the base. Peduncles 
axillary, erect, stoutish, 4-6 in. long ; racemes elongate, 
many-flowered. Bracts ovate, acute, concave, pubescent, 
about \ in. long. Pedicels about J in. long, white- 
tomentose as is the rachis. Flowers pubescent, white, with 
a yellow anther. Dorsal sepal oblong, obtuse, over ^ in. 
long ; lateral ovate-oblong, obtuse, over ^ in. long ; mentum 
oblong, obtuse, about £ in. long. Petals ovate-oblong, 
obtuse, about £ in. long. Lip 3-lobed, about J in. long ; side- 
lobes erect, triangular, acute ; front-lobe reflexed, ovate- 
oblong, obtuse ; disk with two prominent fleshy keels, 
channelled. Column clavate, about ^ in. long. — E. A. Eolfe. 

Cultivation. — Eria hyacinthoides was presented to Kew 
in 1903 by Mr. F. W. Moore, Keeper of the Eoyal Botanic 
Gardens, Glasnevin. It is a sturdy grower and produces in 
May several spikes of white flowers which last a long time. 
Like the rest of the genus this species enjoys liberal treat- 
ment during its growing period, which is from April to 
September, and a lower temperature with little or no water 
at the root during its resting period. It thrives in a 
mixture of peat fibre and sphagnum in a pan or teak basket 
suspended near the roof glass in the tropical orchid house. — 
W. Watson. 

. Fi ?:. 1 .' collimi i with lip attached; 2, lip seen from front: 3, anther-cap; 
4, pollinia :— all enlarged. 







itS.dd.IKBtcKlitH. 



\5rmwfc Bxooks, Day & SanJ.tSisg 



X.Re«VE &.V."? JjCD-dSflTi. 



Tab. 8230. 

CYTISUS DECUMBENS. 

South Europe. 



Leguminosae. Tribe Genisteae. 
Cytisus, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 484. 



Cytisus (§ Alburnoides) deeumbens, Spach in Ann. Soc. Nat. 1845, ser. 3, 
vol. iii. p. 156; Briq. Leu Cystises des Alpes Maritimes, 1894, p. 159; 
C. procumbenti, Spreng., affinis, sed foliolo utrinque longe piloso, legumine 
undique longe piloso differt. 

Fruticuhis deeumbens, 10-20 cm. altus, ramis junioribus pentagonis pubes- 
centibus demum glabris. Folia unifoliolata ; foliolum sessile, oblongo- 
obovatum, apice rotundatum vel vix subacutum, basi attenuatum, 1-1 ■ 5 
cm. longum, - 3-0 - 5 cm. latum, utrinque longe pilosum, ciliatum, nervis 
lateralibus indistinctis. Flores solitarii vel 2-3-fasciculati ; pedicelli 
usque ad 1 cm. longi. Calyjc subcampanulatus, 4-5 mm. longus, bila- 
biatus, labiis quam tubo brevioribus, extus parce pilosus; labium superum 
bidentatum; inferum breviter acuteque tridentatum. Vexillum late 
obovatum, multinervium, circiter 1 cm. latum, ungue 2 mm. longo. Aloe 
oblongae, 1 cm. longae, 0'5 mm. latae, 6-7-nerviae, unguibus 4 mm. 
longis. Carina 1 cm. longa, ungue 4 mm. longo. Tubus siamineus glaber, 
7 mm. longus. Antherae 1-1 • 5 mm. longae. Ovarium villosum, stylo 
circiter 6 mm. longo, stigmate minuto. Legumen l - 5-2 cm. longum, 
4-6 mm. latum, undique longe pilosum. Semina 3-4, rotundata, 3 mm. 
diametro, strophiolata, stropbiolo rotundato 1 mm. diametro. — Spartium 
deeumbens, Durande Fl. de Bourgogne, 1782, vol. i. p. 299. Genista 
pedunculata, L'Herit. Stirp. Bar. 1784-85, p. 184. G. prostrate, Lamk, 
Encycl. Meth. 1786, vol. ii. p. 618. G. Halleri, Eeyn. ex DC. Prodr. 1825, 
vol. ii. p. 152. Corothamnus Halleri, Presl. Bot. Bemerk. 1844, p. 137. 
C. Kitaibelii, Vis. Fl. Dalm. 1850, vol. iii. p. 269. 0. deeumbens, var. 
Halleri, Beichb. Ic. Fl. Germ, et Helv. 1869, vol. xxii. p. 8. 0. deeumbens, 
C. Koch. Dendrologie, 1869, vol. i. p. 44. Genista Kitaibellii, Janka in 
Termesz. Fuzetek, 1884, vol. viii. 2, p. 60. Cytisus prostratus, Simonk. Cyt. 
Hung, in Termesz. Kozlem. 1888, vol. xxii. p. 364, non Scop.— Synonimia 
omnino secundum cl. Briquet in loco supra citato. 



Cytisus deeumbens has a very wide range in the South of 
Europe, extending from France to Albania. It belongs to 
the sub-section Corothamnus, Briq., which is chiefly dis- 
tinguished by having all the leaves unifoliolate. Two other 
species besides the one here figured, C. procumbens, Spreng., 
and C. diffusus, Vis., possess this character, all the others 
being trifoliolate. Grodron, Fl. de France, 1848, i. p. 360, 
indicates three varieties, characterized by the length of the 
pedicels and the size of the flowers. 
Beoember, 1908. 



Description.— Shrub, 4-8 in. high, procumbent; young 
branches 5-angled, pubescent, at length glabrous. Leaves 
unifoliolate ; leaflet sessile, oblong-obovate, rounded at the 
apex or slightly acute, narrowed to the base, i-f in. long, 
y §-\ in. broad, pilose on both surfaces, ciliate, lateral nerves 
indistinct. Flowers solitary or two to three together; 
pedicels £-i in. long. Calyx subcampanulate, \ in. long, 
two-lipped, lips shorter than the tube, sparingly pilose out- 
side ; upper lip bidentate ; lower lip shortly tridentate, 
teeth acute. Standard broadly obovate, many- veined, about 
I in. broad, claw -J- in. long. Wing-petals oblong, \ in. 
long, 6-7-veined, claw -i- in. long. Keel-petals \ in. long. 
Staminal-tube glabrous, £ in. long. Ovary villous; style 
about I in. long, stigma minute. Pod ^-f in. long, pilose 
on all sides. Seeds 3 or 4, rounded, with a distinct, rounded 
strophiole. — J. Hutchinson. 

Cultivation. — Cytisus decumbens is a charming small 
trailer, the stems keeping close to the ground and forming 
a cushion not more than 6 in. high, which in May is 
studded all over with bright yellow flowers. It may be 
grown in a border so as to form a carpet below other taller 
shrubs, or in a sunny position in the rock garden. The 
Kew examples were originally raised from seeds received in 
1895 from the Goettingen Botanic Garden.— W. Watson. 



«jS?: \ lea , fle V % ca J yx with stamens and pistil ; 3, calyx laid open with 
pistil; 4, standard; 5, wing petal; 6, keel-petal; 8, seed:— all enlarged 
<, iriut: — natural size. 




M.S.-ielJXRMh.Ktfc. 



■Vincent Brooks.Day A Sanit^mip 



L"Re«rvB & C?Ianaan_. 



Tab. 8231. 

HIBISCUS APONEURUS. 

Tropical East Africa. 



Malvaceae. Tribe Hibisceae. 

Hibiscus, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 207; Hochreutiner in 

Ann. Conserv. & Jard. Bot. Geneve, vol. iv. 1900, p. 23. 



Hibiscus aponeurus, Sprague et Hutchinson in Kew Bull. 1908, p. 54 ; affinis 
H. crassinervio, Hochst, a quo bracteolis lineari-subulatis calyce manifeste 
brevioribus calycisque venatione recedit. 

PJanta erecta, fruticans, 0-3-1 m. alta, stricte ramosa, caule inferne denudato, 
rami's gracilibus dense asperule stellato-pubescentibus. Folia ovata vel 
elliptica, interdum subtrilobata, apice rotundata vel obtusa, basi rotundata, 
2 '5-4 cm. longa, 2-3 cm. lata, serrulata, utrinque sed subtus densius 
asperule pubescentia ; petioli 1-2 cm. longi. Stipulae filiformes, 5-9 mm. 
longae. Flores plantae cultae in axillis solitarii, pedunculis 3 cm. longis 
circiter 8 mm. infra apices articulatis. Bracteolae 9-13, ascendentes, 
inaequales, Iineari-subulatae, 4-6 mm. longae, antrorse hirsutae. Calyx 
extra dense stellato-hirsutus, intus superne minute pubescens, inferne 
glaber ; tubus 3 mm. longus, 15-nervius ; lobi e basi triangulari-subulati, 
vix ultra 5 mm. longi, basi 2 mm. lati, trinervii, superne refiexi. Corolla 
vivide coccinea, 2'5 cm. diametro, extra stellato-pilosa. Columna staminea 
curvata (au semper?), apice 5-dentata, staminum verticillos quatuor 
alternantes gerens, quorum infimus oppositipetalus, pentandrus, ceteri 
decandri ; fllamentella 1-2 mm. longa. Ovarium 5-loculare, minute albo- 
tomentellum, loculis 5-7-ovulatis ; stigmata capitata, penicillata. Capsula 
ellipsoidea, vix ultra 1 cm. longa, 8 mm. diametro, nitidula, pubescens. — 
H. crassinervius, T. Thorns, in Speke, Journal, p. 627, non Hochst. 
H. gossypinus, Mast, in Oliv. Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. i. p. 205, partim, non 
Thunb. H. gossypinus, var., Oliv. in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xxix. p. 37, 

t. 14. r 



Hibiscus aponeurus belongs to the section Bombycella, 
which is characterized by relatively small flowers and 
woolly seeds, and includes about forty species, nearly two- 
thirds of which are natives of Africa. H. aponeurus is 
intermediate, both geographically and in technical characters, 
between H. crassinervius, Hochst., and H. Ilildebrandtii, 
Sprague & Hutchinson, and has been found over a wide 
area in Uganda, British East Africa and German East 
Africa, occurring at elevations of 4,000-6,000 ft. According 
to Grant, it grows both in the valleys and on the bills of 
Karague'. 

Comparatively few species of the section seem to have 
come into cultivation, among them being H. phoeniceus, 
Decembeb, 1908. 



Jacq., figured in the Botanical Register, vol. iii. t. 230, and 
H. hirtus, L., I.e. iv. t. 337, as H. Bosa-malabarica. The 
former may be distinguished by its long spreading bracteoles, 
and the latter by the coarsely serrate, acute, relatively 
glabrous leaves. 

Description. — Plant erect, shrub-like, 1-4 ft. high ; 
branches slender, strict, harshly stellate-pubescent. Leaves 
ovate or elliptic, sometimes slightly three-lobed, rounded or 
obtuse at the apex, rounded at the base, 1-1£ in. long, 
§-1 j in. broad, serrulate, harshly pubescent on both surfaces, 
more densely so below ; petioles ^—| in. long. Stipules 
filiform, J- 4 in. long. Flowers solitary, axillary ; peduncles 
over 1 in. long, jointed -i in. below their apex. Bracteoles 
9-13, sharply ascending, unequal, linear-subulate, ^-^ in. 
long, antrorsely hirsute. Calyx densely stellate-hirsute 
outside, minutely pubescent inside in the upper part, 
glabrous below ; tube \ in. long, 15-nerved ; lobes subulate 
from a triangular base, -^ in. long, T T ^ in. broad at the base, 
3-nerved, reflexed above. Corolla brilliant scarlet, 1 in. 
across, stellate-pilose outside. Staminal column curved, 
5-toothed at the apex, bearing 4 alternating whorls of 
stamens, the lowest one consisting of 5 single stamens 
opposite the petals, the others of 5 pairs each ; partial 
filaments fa in. long or less. Ovary 5-celled, minutely 
whitish tomentose ; cells 5-7-ovuled ; stigmas capitate, 
penicillate. Capsule ellipsoidal, -§ in. long, \ in. across, 
slightly shining, pubescent. — T. A. Sprague. 

Cultivation. — Hibiscus aponeurus was raised from seeds 
collected in British East Africa by Lady Hindlip, who 
kindly presented cuttings of it to Kew in 1905. It forms a 
neat little shrub, and in June is gay with numerous bright 
scarlet flowers. At Kew it has been grown in a warm 
house, but it would probably be quite at home under 
ordinary greenhouse treatment. Like the majority of the 
species of Hibiscus it is very easy to cultivate, thriving in 
ordinarv soil. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, a flower-bud; 2, portion of calyx; 3, staminal column and pistil; 
I, partial filaments and anthers:— all enlarged. 



INDEX 

To Vol. IV. of the Fourth Series, or Vol. CXXXIV. 
of the whole Work. 



8214 Agave Watsoni. 


8205 


8219 Anisotes diversifolius. 




8202 Begonia cathayana. 


8173 


8185 Berberis acuminata. 


8197 


8224 „ yunnanensis. 


8193 


8187 Bulbophyllum Binnendijkii. 




8199 „ fascinator. 


8172 


8216 „ galbinum. 




8207 Caesalpinia japonica. 


8211 


8200 Chirita barbata. 


8180 


8178 Codonopsis convolvulacea. 


8196 


8203 Coelogyne perakensis. 


8176 


8225 Columnea magnifica. 


8194 


8228 Corytholoma macropodum. 


8184 


8183 Cypripedium debile. 


8226 


8230 Cytisus decumbens. 


8179 


8204 Didymocarpus cyanea. 


8221 


8217 Ecbinops Tournefortii. 


8177 


8229 Eria hyacinthoides. 


8190 


8209 Eucryphia cordifolia. , 


8210 


8227 Eupatorium Eaffillii. 




8201 Genista glabrescens. 


8212 


8175 Herbertia amatorum. 




8231 Hibiscus aponeurus. 


8206 


8208 Indigofera hebepetala. 


8198 


8188 Kaempferia Kirkii, var. ela- 


8213 


tior. 


8218 


8181 Larix Griffithii. 




8220 Lewisia Cotyledon. 


8186 


8195 Liparis tabularis. 


8189 


8223 Meconopsis sinuata, var. 


8182 


latifolia. 


8192 


8222 Mussaenda erythrophylla. 


8174 


8191 Olearia ciliata. 


8215 



Olearia ramulosa, var. com- 
munis. 

Paeonia Mlokosewitschii. 

Pandanus Houlletii. 

X Philadelphus purpureo- 
maculatus. 

X Philodendron Corsinia- 
num. 

Polystachya Lawrenceana. 

Potentilla concolor. 

Prunus tomentosa. 

Pseudolarix Portunei. 

Puya violacea. 

Pyrus Aria, var. majestica. 
sinensis. 
Tschonoskii. 

Kaphionacme utilis. 

Rehmannia angulata. 

Rheum inopinatum. 

Rhododendron kamtschati- 
cum. 

Rhododendron Maddeni, var. 
obtusifolia. 

Rhododendron Mariesii. 

,, micranthum. 

Robinia Kelseyi. 

Rosa sericea, var. pteracan- 
tha. 

Rosa Willmottiae. 

Saxifraga Brunoniana. 

Sinningia Regina. 

Tillandsia Blokii. 

Viburnum utile. 

Zaluzianskya maritima. 



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Tab. 8227.— EUPATORIUM RAFFILLII. 

„ 8228.— CORYTHOLOMA MACROPODUM. 
„ 8229.— ERIA HYACINTHOIDES. 
„ 8230.— CYTISTJS DECUMBENS. 
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