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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."



JFmtrtl) Series. 

No. 25. v 



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VOL. III. 
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1908 



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of Wabley Place, Essex, 

WHOSE SKILL IN GARDENCRAFT 

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IS GRATEFULLY DEDICATED. 



Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 
Dec. 1, 19(17. 



8112 




M.Sdel,JN Fit.iiiHtk 



VinceirtBroolisJ3ay&Si i 



L Reeve & C9 Loj lAotx. 



Tab. 8112. 
lomatia ferruginea. 

Chili and Patagonia. 

Proteaceae. Tribe Embothrieae. 
Lomatia, R. Br.; Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 183. 



Lomatia ferruginea, P. Br. in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. x. p. 200 ; Poem, et 
Schult. Syst. vol. iii. p. 434 ; Book. f. Fl. Antarct. p. 342; Lindl. & Paxt. 
Fl.Qard. vol. ii. p. 165; C. Gay, Hist, de Chile, Bot. vol. v. p. 310; 
Meisner in PC. Prodr. vol. xiv. p. 449 ; Murillo, Plantes Med. da Chili, 
p. 195 ; species distincta, foliis bipinnatisectis vel tripiniiatisectis primum 
dense ferrugineo-velutinis, racemis axillaribus brevibus latisque, alabastris 
valde inflatis. 

Frutex 3-6 m. altus vel interdum arbor parva, valde ramosus, partibas 
junioribus dense ferrugineo-velatinis. Folia brevifcer petiolata, bipinna- 
tisecta, apicem versus bipinnatipartita, patula, coriacea, oblongo-ovata, 
saepius circiter 2 dm. longa, interdum ad 4 dm. longa, 8 cm. — 2 dm. lata, 
proventu fere glabrata ; pinnae saepe oppositae, 5-15-jugae, oblongo-lan- 
ceolatae, generaliter 4-8 cm. longae, breviter stipitatae; laciniae ovato- 
lanceolatae, saepius alternae et decurrenti-confluentes, 1-2 cm. longae, 
revolutae, integerrimae vel lobis 1-6 plus minus ve pungentibus praeditae. 
Pacemi axillares, erecto-patentes, laxe multiflori, foliis multo breviores ; 
pedicelli 4-6 mm. longi. Flores 1-1"3 cm. longi. Calycis segmenta extra 
aurea et coccinea, intra vivide coccinea, basi apiceque lutea, oblonga, 
4'5 mm. lata, 3-nervia, extra ferrugineo-strigillosa. Gynophorium 1 cm. 
longum stylo paulum brevius. Folliculus oblongus, leviter arcuatus, 
2'5-3 cm. longus, apice longe acuminatua. Semina apice ala oblonga 
oblique truncata instructa. — L. pinnatifolia, Hort. ; Annesley, Beautiful 
and Rare Trees and Plants, p. 9, cum tabula. Embothrium ferrugineum , 
Cav. Ic. vol. iv. p. 59, t. 385. Tricondylus ferrugineus, Knight, Prot. 
p. 123. 

This handsome Lomatia was one of the early intro- 
ductions of Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, having been 
collected for them by William Lobb during his travels in 
Western South America in 1845-48. It has been recorded 
from several localities in Southern Chili, in the island of 
Chiloe and the Chonos Archipelago, growing, according to 
Cavanilles, in places occasionally inundated by the sea. 
Dr. R. 0. Cunningham noted its occurrence far down the 
western coast of Patagonia, and Dr. R. W. Coppinger, 
during the voyage of H.M.S. " Alert," in 1878-82, collected 
a specimen at Sandy Point, on the east coast of the Bruns- 
wick Peninsula, in the Straits of Magellan. This point 
appears to be the eastern limit of its distribution. 

The pt-mt has some repute as a medicine among the 

Jaxuarv 1st, 1907. 



Indians of Chili. Gay informs us that a decoction of the 
wood and leaves, and especially of the bark, mixed with 
the Tayu, Chuquiraga leucoxylon, Poepp., is sometimes 
used in Valdivia in cases of abscess of the stomach. On 
the authority of Murillo, Chatterton and Pennesse state 
that the leaves and bark are employed as a cathartic and 
diuretic, and in the preparation of gargles for all kinds of 
inflammation of the throat. 

Lomatia ferruginea is cultivated in the Temperate 
House at Kew, but the plant, now about 4 ft. high, has 
not flowered. The material figured was from "a fine 
specimen growing in the beautiful gardens of the Earl 
Annesley at Castlewellan, Co. Down, Ireland, whence it 
was sent by Mr. T. Ryan in July, 1906, At Castlewellan, 
Earl Annesley informs us, "it is so hardy that the severest 
frost and the most biting east winds do not affect it. The 
plant is_ now about twenty years old, and is 9 ft. high, 
with a circumference of 27 ft. at the largest part." 

Descr. — A much-branched shrub 10-20 ft. high, or 
sometimes a small tree, densely covered on the younger 
parts with a ferruginous velvet-like pubescence. Leaves 
shortly stalked, bipinnatisect, or sometimes tripinnatisect 
at the base, bipinnatipartite towards the apex, spreading, 
leathery, oblong-ovate, usually about 8 in. long, sometimes 
as much as 16 in. long, 4-8 in. broad, finally almost 
glabrous; pinnae in 5-15 pairs, oblong-lanceolate, usually 
lj-3i in. long, shortly stalked; segments ovate-lanceolate, 
J-f in. long, entire, or with 1-6 more or less spinescent 
lobes. Flowers about \ in. long, golden -yellow and scarlet 
outside, bright scarlet, with yellow at the base and apex 
of the segments inside, covered with ferruginous adpressed 
hairs outside. Fruit oblong, stalked, slightly curved, l-l£ 
in. long, acuminate. Seeds with an oblong, obliquely 
truncate wing at the apex. — S. A. Skan. 

Fig. 1, flower; 2, stamen attached to perianth-segment ; 3, pistil ; 4, section 
of ovary ; 5, ovule :— all er.laryeJ. 



8113 




ihKh 



-VSncentBroohs^ay&SonL^iT*. 



XHeeve &C 9 London 



Tab. 8113. 

ACONITUM GYMNANDRUM. 
Tibet and W. China. 

KaNUNCTJLACEAE. Tribe Hellebobeae. 
Aconitum, L. : Benth, et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol, i. p. 9. 



Aconitum gymnandrum, Maxim, in Bull. Acad. Petersb. xxiii. (1877), p. 308 ; 
Flor. Tangut. p. 26, tab. vi. figs. 1-6 ; Stajrf in Ann. Roy. Bot. Gard. 
Calcutta, vol. x. part ii. (1905), p. 178; ab omnibus speciebus generis 
duratione annua et sepalis longe unguiculatis androecium exponentibus 
distincta, sectionem Gymnaconiium, Stapf, sistens. 

Herba annua. Radix fusiformis, gracilis. Caulis simplex vel ramosus, 
erectus, ad 1 m. altus, magis minusve hirsutus. Folia sparsa, rarius in 
speciminibus nanis rosulata, petiolata, birsuta ; lamina ambitu reniformis 
vel ovata, 2-5 cm. longa, 25-6 cm. lata (vel in planta culta majora), 
ternata vel fere ad basin 3-partita divisionibus similiter divisis, laciniis 
inciso-dentatis. Inflorescentia racemosa vel subpaniculata, hirsuta, laxa 
vel densa ; bracteae inferiores folia summa referentes, superiores redactae, 
summae integrae, lineari-lanceolatae ; pedicelli erecti, iufimi ad 6 cm. 
longi, vel omnea breves; bracteolae lanceolatae vel lineares, flori approxi- 
matae. Sepala violacea vel saturate coerulea, pilis longis albis molliter 
hirsuta; eummum brevitergaleatum vel subnaviculare, breviterrostratam, 
longe anguste unguiculatum, 2 ad ultra 2*5 cm. altum ; lateralia abrupte 
in unguem linearem limbum aequantem vel subbreviorem contracta, 
limbo elliptico vel rotundato obtuso vel apiculato, 1*7-2 cm. longo ad 
1'7 cm. poll, lato ; inferiora lateralibus similia nisi minora. Nectaria 
glabra vel sparse pilosula, ungue erecto ultra 1'25 cm. longo, cuculla 
erecta vel suberecfca dorso sub apice gibbosa, labio amplo rotundato denti- 
culate patente. Filamenta longe persistentia, hiapidula, ad vel ultra 
medium alata. Carpella ad 12, parallela, oblonga, abrupte in stylum 
contracta, villoso-hirsuta. Folliculi oblongi, truncati, fere 125 cm. longi, 
magis minusve glabrescente?, superne divergentes. Semina obpyrami- 
data, nigrescentia, 1"25 cm. longa, transverse minute lamellata. 



This peculiar Aconite was discovered by the great ex- 
plorer of Central Asia, General N". M. Przewalski, in alpine 
meadows in the mountains to the north and east of Kuku- 
Nor. It has since been found in Eastern and Southern 
Tibet, and Western China. The specimen figured here 
was raised from seeds gathered at Gyantse by Capt. H. J. 
Walton during the expedition to Lhassa in September, 
1904, and communicated by the Director of the Botanical 
Survey of India. It differs in general aspect considerably 
from all the other species of the genus in the long-clawed 
lateral sepals, the blades of which are twisted sideways, so 
as to show their brightly coloured inner faces, and expose 
Jakuary 1st, 1907. 



the androecium and gynoeoium. The upper sepal (helmet) 
is, except for the coloured margin, herbaceous, and so 
narrow that in the fully open flower the large petaloid lips 
of the nectaries are outside, forming a roof over the 
androecium. The true position of the sepals and nectaries 
is not clearly seen in dried specimens, and is not properly 
shown in the figure of A. gymnandrum published in my 
monograph of the Indian Aconites. 

Descr. — Annual ; roots slender, fusiform. Stem erect, 
simple or branched, 6 in. to 3 ft, high, more or less hairy. 
Leaves petioled, hirsute, reniform to ovate, usually |-2 in. 
long, 1-11 i n# broad, ternate, or deeply tripartite, divi- 
sions similarly divided. Inflorescence racemose or subpani- 
culate, hirsute ; lower bracts like upper leaves, reduced 
upwards ; pedicels erect, lowest 2-3 in. long, or all short; 
bracteoles narrow, close to the flower. Sepals violet to 
deep blue, hairy; upper helmet-shaped, shortly beaked, 
claw narrow, f-1 in. long; lateral abruptly contracted 
into a slender claw, limb turned outwards, about f in. 
long ; lower like lateral, but smaller. Nectaries with a 
claw, erect, almost J in. long ; hood gibbous behind near 
top, with large, denticulate, petaloid lip. Filaments his- 
pidulous, winged to the middle. Follicles usually 10-12, 
oblong, truncate, almost \ in. long, more or less glabres- 
cent, at length slightly divergent above. Seeds inversely 
pyramidal, blackish, x \ in. long, transversely minutely 
lamellate. — Otto Stapf. 



Fjgs. 1 and 2, nectaries; 3, a stamen ; 4, gynoecinm -.—all enlarged. 



8114 




M.S.deUNFitchlith. 



'AacentBrooterDayft 



LRoevo &.C? London. 



Tab. 8114. 
VIBURNUM Oablbsii. 

Corea. 



Camufoliackae. Tribe Sambuceae. 
Viburnum, Linn. ; Benth. et JJook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p, 3. 



Viburnum (§ Euviburnurn) Carlesii, Hemsl. in Jonm. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. 
p. 350 ; Bean in Gard. Ghron. 1906, vol. i. p. 306 ; species ex affini- 
tate V. cotinifolii, a qua tamen foliis rotundato-ovatis cymis densioribus 
et corollae, tubo cylindrico loDgiore differt. 

Frutex laxe ramosus, paucipedalis, stellato-tomentosus, ramis rectis rigidis 
glabrescentibus. Folia breviter petiolata, crassa, papyracea, rotundato- 
ovata vel interdum fere orbicularia 2"5-5 cm. diametro, crenato-dentata, 
supra pai-ce subtus dense tomentosa, venis primariis elevatis in dentes 
excurrentibus. Cymae terminates, subsessiles, densissimae, 4-8 cm. 
diametro, umbellatae ; bracteolae crassae, lineares, calycem aequantes. 
Calycis dentes ovati, erecti, obtusi, obscure puberuli. Corolla glabra, 
hypocraterimorpha, albo-rubra, tubus cylindricus, 1-1*3 cm. longns ; lobi 
rotundati, circiter 1 cm. diametro. Stamina iuclusa. Stylus brevissimus, 
crassus, stigmate capitato. Fructus, immaturus tantum visus, glaber, 
valde compressus, sulcatus, calycis limbo aucto coronatus. 



Viburnum Carlesii was originally described from dried 
specimens collected by Mr. W. R. Carles, C.M.G., and Mr. 
Wykeham Perry in Western Corea. In 1801 Messrs. L. 
Boehmer & Co., nurserymen at Yokohama, Japan, sent a 
cultivated specimen to Kew to be named, with the infor- 
mation that it had been raised from seed obtained from 
Corea in 1885. A living plant was received from the 
same firm in 1902, and this flowered in the Arboretum in 
May, 1906. Le Jar din for August, 1902, p. 229, repro- 
duces a photograph of a cluster of flowering branches 
received from a Mr. T. Eckhardt, also of Yokohama. The 
original description is also repeated, and the remarks : — 
" Tn foliage and general appearance this species closely re- 
sembles the Indian V. cotinifolium, from which it is readily 
distinguished by the strictly cylindrical tube of the 
corolla," have been incorrectly translated : — " En feuillage 
et apparence gene rale, cette espece ressemble beaucoup a 
l'indien V. cotinifolium, duquel il se distingue seulernent 
par la position strictement erigee du tube de sa corolle." 
The same photograph was reproduced in the Gardeners' 
Chronicle, October 11th, 1892. 

January 1m, 1907. 



This shrub is quite hardy at Kew, blossoming as quite 
a small plant, and it is likely to become a general favourite. 
It is easily propagated from cuttings. The pink and 
white, very fragrant flowers remind one of Bondeletia 
versicolor. 

Descr. — A dwarf, loosely branched shrub, clothed with 
stellate hairs. Branches straight, stiff, glabrescent. 
Leaves shortly stalked, thick, soft, densely hairy beneath, 
ovate-rotundate or almost orbicular, 1-2 in. in diameter, 
crenate-dentate ; primary veins prominent 3 running out 
into the teeth. Cymes terminal, almost sessile, very 
dense, 2-3 in. in diameter ; bracteoles linear, thick, nearly 
equalling the calyx. Calyx-lobes ovate, erect, obtuse, 
slightly puberulous. Corolla pink and white, smooth, 
salver-shaped ; tube cylindrical, about \ in. long ; lobes 
rounded, about \ in. in diameter. Stamens included in the 
corolla. Fruit smooth, compressed, furrowed, surmounted 
by the enlarged calyx-lobes. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



Fig. 1, portion of leaf; 2, stellate hair from the upper surface of the same; 
3, pair of flowers ; 4, hair from the under surface of a leaf ; 5 and 6, stamens ; 
7, pistil : — all enlarged. 



8115 




M.S.dei.J.UFttchfcth 



^fincentBro oks X> ay & Son Lt£lmp 



L Reeve 6V C° London 



T. dependens does not occur, to Eugenia planipes, Hook, et 
Arn. The wood of E. planipes is of no use except for 
charcoal, and Gay states that supplies of it have at times 
been ordered by merchants, who were misled by its bearing 
the same native name as T. dependens. 

T. lanceolata was introduced in 1848 by William Lobb 
for Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, and was successively rein- 
troduced for the same firm by Pearce and Downton (see 
The Garden, November 27th, 1880). It nourishes out 
of doors in Cornwall, the south of Ireland, and the west of 
Scotland, and a specimen 18 ft. high was noticed by Mr. 
W. Watson during a recent visit to Ireland. The maximum 
height given by Reiche for T. lanceolata in Chili is 5 metres. 
Mr. Watson has observed that wasps rob T. lanceolata 
of its honey by biting a hole at the base of the corolla. 

The introduction of T. dependens is due to Mr. H. J. 
Elwes, F.R.S., who brought back seeds of it from Chili in 
1902. It is of rapid growth, and one of the specimens in 
the Temperate House at Kew has already attained a height 
of about 10 ft. T. dependens may be readily propagated 
by cuttings. The flowering branch figured was from a 
cutting of the original plant. 

Descr. — A small, compact tree, attaining a height of 
20-30 ft. in its native country. Branches very numerous, 
rather spreading ; young branchlets reddish. Leaves obo- 
vate or elliptic, more rarely ovate, f-2|- in. long, \-l^ in. 
broad, obtuse or rounded at the apex, serrate, thinly 
coriaceous. Flowers 1-3 together in the axils, borne on 
long curved peduncles. Calyx cup-shaped, with five small 
teeth, soon splitting and falling off, or remaining as a 
loose ring round the peduncle. Petals oblong, 3-toothed 
at the apex, about f in. long, white. Stamens 15-18. 
Ovary 3-4-celled ; style subulate. — T. A. Speague. 



Fig. 1, a flower with petals removed ; 2, petal; 3, anther: — all enlarged. 



&116 




M.S.delJUFitdihth. 



VinceniBrooks Daj&Sonlt^Imp 



L Reeve &. C° London. 



Tab. 8116. 

REN ANTHER A annamensis. 

Annam. 

Orchidaceae. Tribe Vandeae. 
Renanthera, Lour. ; Benth. et Hooh. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 577. 



Renanthera annamensis, Rolfe, a R. ImscAootiana, Rolfe, floribus duplo 
minoribus et sepalis maculatis distincta. 

Herba epiphytica, erecta vel subscandens, radicans, 20-30 cm. alta. Radices 
crassae. Folia disticha, patentia, circa 2 cm. distantia, oblonga, obtusaet 
inaequaliter biloba, crasse coriacea, 5-7 cm. longa, 1"5-1*8 cm. lata. 
Racemi interdum ramosi, circa 20-25 cm. longi, multinori. Bracteae ovato- 
oblongae, obtusae, 2 mm. longae. Pedicelli 1 cm. longi. Sepalum po^ticum 
anguste oblongum, obtusum, concavum, circa 1*3 cm. longum, 3"5 mm. 
latum ; sepala lateralia spathulata, subobtusa, 1"8 cm. longa, 6 mm. lata. 
Fetala anguste oblonga, obtusa, snbconcava, 7 mm. longa, 2 mm. lata. 
Labellum trilobum, b' mm. longum ; lobi laterales erecti, triangulares, 
acuti, carnosi, 2 mm. longi; lobus intermedius patens, ccrdato-orbicularis, 
obtusus, 3"5 mm. latus, basi quinque-callosus ; calcar saccatum, oblongum, 
obtusum, 4 mm. longum. Columna lata, 3 mm. longa. 



Renanthera is a small Malayan genus of about ten or 
twelve known species, closely allied to Vanda, and re- 
markable for the brilliancy of tbeir flowers. It was estab- 
lished in 1790, by Loureiro, the original species being the 
handsome B. coccmea, a tall climber, bearing panicles of 
brilliant scarlet flowers, which is a great favourite with the 
natives of Southern China, where it has been cultivated 
from time immemorial. It first flowered in England in 
1827, at Claremont, after having been in cultivation for 
ten years or more, and three years later it was figured in 
the Magazine (t. 2997-8). Two other species have also 
been figured here, namely, R. Storiei, Reichb. f. (t. 7537), 
a native of the Philippines, less scanclent in habit, and 
having larger crimson flowers, blotched with purple on the 
lateral sepals, and R. Imschootiana, Rolfe (t. 7711), a 
dwarf Burmese species, which has the merit of flowering 
when about a foot high. 

R. annamensis, Rolfe, is much like the last-named 
species in habit, and indeed was taken for it until it 
bloomed, when the marked differences in the size and 
colour of the flowers at once proved that it is distinct. 
It was discovered in Annam by Mr. W. Micholitz, a 
January 1st, 1907. 



collector for Messrs. Sander & Sons, and flowered at Kew 
in May, 1906, under tropical treatment. 

Descr. — A dwarf, erect epiphyte, 8-12 in. high, bearing 
a few stout roots on the stem. Leaves in two ranks, 
spreading, nearly ^ in. apart, oblong, obtuse and unequally 
2-lobed at the apex, thick and leathery, 2-3 in. long, 
rather over \ in. broad. Racemes, sometimes branched, 
8-10 in. long, many-flowered. Bracts ovate-oblong, obtuse, 
about ^ in, long. Flowers yellow, spotted with crimson 
on the sepals, spur and lower part of the petals ; lobes of 
the lip and apex of the petals deep crimson. Upper sepal 
narrowly oblong, obtuse, concave, ^ in. long ; lateral 
sepals spathulate, somewhat obtuse and concave, f in. 
long, \ in. broad. Petals narrowly oblong, obtuse and 
somewhat concave, ^ in. long. Lip 3-lobed, \ in. long ; 
side lobes erect, triangular, acute, fleshy ; front lobe 
spreading, cordate-orbicular, obtuse, with 5 fleshy calli at 
the base ; sac oblong, obtuse, \ in. long. Column broad, 
much shorter than the lip. — R. A. Roi/fe. 



Fijf. 1, lip and column; 2, posterior part of lip; 3, anther cap; 4 and 
5, pollen masses: — all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.R.S. 8th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
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Tab. 8117. 
NERINE Bowdeni. 

Cape Colony. 

Ajiakyllidaceae. Tribe Amarylleae. 

Nerine, Herb. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 728 ; Baker in Gard. 
Ghron. 18S5, vol. xxiv. p. 779, & Handb. Amaryll. p. 99. 



Nerine Bowdeni, W. Watson in Gard. Ghron. 1904, vol. xxxvi. n. 365; Flora 
& Sylva, 1905, p. 120, cum icone colorata ; jV. lucidae, Herb., affinis, 
rloribus majoribus pedicellis lcngioribus perianthiique segmentis latiori- 
bus difliert. 

Bulbus tunicatus, affatim pullulascens, magnitudine sat variabilis; bulbi 
maiores corpore ovoidei 5 cm. longi, 4 cm. crassi, sensim in collum 
2 cm. crassum, 5 cm. longum abeuntes ; lamellae extimae tenniares, lacidae, 
brunnescentea. Folia laete viridia, laevia, decidua, supra aliquando canali- 
culata, 15-30 cm. longa, medio l"25-2 - 5 cm. lata, bine apicem obtusum 
ba«em que vaginatani versus attenuata. Sea-pus cylindraceus, fistulosus, 
penna cygnea era sbus, 30-45 cm. altus. Spathae2, scariosae, primo viiides, 
demum punicantes. 5 cm. longae. Flores terminales pedicellati in fasci- 
culos subumbelliformes 6-12-floros, 20-22 cm. latos aggregati, exteriores 
caeteris citius aperti ; pedicelli trigoni, penna, gallinacea ci'assi, 5 cm. 
longi, umbrino-virides. Perianthii segmenta 6, conformia, refracto-paten- 
tia, margine parnm undulata, 5-7'0 cm. lonfra, 1*25 cm. lata, carina 
centrali suffuse rosea ceternm pallidiora. Stamina segmeutis periantbii 
aeqnilonga ; filamenta pallide punicea declinata apicem versus tameu 
sursum spectantia ; antheraebrunnescentes oblongae. 1 cm. longae ; pollen 
viride. Ovarium subglobosum, 3-lobum, 6 cm. longum, extus viride, niti- 
dum ; stylus pallide roseus, more nlamentorum curvatus bisque aequi- 
longus ; stigma parum capitatum. — JV. excellens major tardiflora, 
Gumbleton in Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxv. p. 105. N. lucida, Hackett 
in Gard Cbron. 1904, vol. xxxvi. p. 346, non Herb.— D. Prain. 



This is one of several species which might almost be 
called connecting links between Nerine and Brunsvigia, 
the others being N. lucida which Herbert included in 
Brunsvigia, and N. marginata, Ait. The difference be- 
tween the two genera is chiefly one of size, the shape 
of the capsule — turbinate and acutely angled in 
Bmnsvigia, globose and obtusely angled in Nerine — 
amounting to very little, as B. Sclateriana has a typical 
Nerine capsule. Whether they will intercross does not 
appear to have been tested, although all the Nerines cross 
readily with each other, as was proved long ago by 
Herbert, who paid especial attention to them, and more 
recently by Mr. J. O'Brien, Mr. Max Leichtlia, Mr. Elwes 

FlBftUAKV 1st, 1907. 



and others. The genus bids fair to become as popular iu 
gardens as the Hippeastruras, most of the species growing 
well under cultivation and flowering freely towards the end 
of the year, when their bright-coloured, elegant flowers 
are especially valuable. As is the case with many bulbous 
plants from South Africa, the Nerines are in active growth 
in winter, ripening in May or June, and resting till 
October, when they push up their flower- scapes, generally 
before the new leaves appear. 

For the introduction of N, Bowdeni we are indebted to 
Mrs. Cornish Bowden, of Oaklawn, Newton Abbot, who 
received it from her son in South Africa, and presented 
several bulbs to Kew in 1900. She wrote : — " Some years 
since my son Athelstan sent me some bulbs of a Nerine 
from Cape Colony. I have flowered them for three years, 
and they are very beautiful. Unlike the majority of 
Nerines, this never has a dormant stage, the leaves re- 
maining green until the flowers are well in bloom. I have 
one spike with twelve flowers upon it." Shortly after- 
wards Mr. G-umbleton flowered it, the inflorescence here 
figured having been forwarded to Kew by him (see Gar- 
deners Chronicle, 1904, vol. xxxv. p. 105 ; it also flowered in 
the nursery of Messrs. R. Veitch & Sons at Exeter. The 
Kew plants have flowered annually in November, but they 
have from the first lost their leaves after making their 
growth, as do all the Nerines and Brunsvigias. 

Descr. — Bulbs varying in size, producing offsets freely, 
the largest being bottle-shaped, the swollen portion ovoid, 
2 iu long and 1^ in. in diameter ; the neck narrow and 
2 in. long, the outer tunic thin, smooth, shining, pale 
brown. Leaves 6 in. to a foot long, ^ to 1 in. broad in 
the middle, gradually narrowing downwards and to the 
obtuse apex, slightly channelled, glossy green, deciduous. 
Scape nearly cylindrical, hollow, thick as a swan's quill, 
12 to 18 in. long. Spathes scarious, about 2 in. long, 
green, changing to pink with age. Umbel loose, 9 in. 
across, composed of from 6 to 12 centripetal flowers ; 
pedicels trigonous, 2 in. long, green tinged with brown, 
stouter than in other Nerines. Ovary sub-globose, o- 
lobed, polished green. Perianth subhorizontal, composed 
of six spreading recurved segments 2 to 3 in. long, 1 j 11# 
wide, slightly wavy in the recurved portion, rose pink, - the 



keel a darker shade, giving the flowers a streaked appear- 
ance. Stamens decimate, as long as the segments, up- 
curved at the tips; anthers oblong, £ in. long. Style as 
long as the anthers, stigma capitate. — W. Watson. 



Figs. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3, style : — enlarged ; 4, whole plant, about -\ natural 



8118 




VuicentBro oks D ay &.Son U. d Imp 



I..Reeve & C° Ion don 



Tab. 8118. 

OLE ARIA speciosa. 
Australia. 

Compositae. Tribe Asxkeoioeas. 

Olearia, Moench ; Penth. et HooTc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 276. 



Olearia speciosa, Hutchinson; affinis 0. dentatae, Moench. a qua foliis 
oblongo-elhpticis floribus paucioribus et achaenis fere glabria differt. 

Frv.tex divaricatus, circiter 1 m. altus, ramis teretibns dense tomentosis. 
Folia alterna, potiolata, coriacea, oblongo-elliptica, 4-6 cm. longa, 2-3 cm. 
lata, supra costa pubescenti excepta glabra, subtus dense tomentosa, 
marginibus recurva denticulata, dentibus 5 mm. distantibus ; venae 
anastomosantes prominulaeque; petiolus 8 mm. longus. Capihda corym- 
bos laxos terminates formantia, oblonga, 1*7 cm. longa, 25 cm. diametro ; 
pedunculi usque ad 7"5 cm. longi ; bracteae oblongae, dense tomentosae. 
Involucri bracteae oblongae, extra tomentosae, intra glabrae. Flores 
radii 5-6 ; ligulae albae, oblongo-ellipticae, 12 mm. longae, 6 mm. latae. 
Flores disci 10-12; corollae tubus b mm. longus ; antherae apiculatae, 
4 mm. longae. Achaenia teretia, fere glabra, 4 mm. longa. Pappi setae 
numerosae, breviter pilosae. 



The genus Olearia is closely allied to Aster, and is con- 
fined exclusively to Australasia. Cheeseman, in his recent 
Manual of the Flora of New Zealand, enumerates 35 
species, all of which are endemic. There are about 70 
others, which are confined to Australia and Tasmania, 
with the exception of two recorded from Lord Howe's 
Island. 

The plant here figured was raised from seeds received in 
1888 from the Botanic Gardens, Melbourne, and since 
increased by cuttings. It flowered last May in the Tem- 
perate House at Kew, where it forms a straggling bush 
about 3 ft. high. Its affinity is with 0. dentata, Moench, 
from which it differs in having fewer ray-florets, which are 
white, and almost glabrous achenes. The thick coriaceous 
leaves are also very distinct. 

The genus furnishes a number of excellent plants for 
the cool greenhouse, and some of the more hardy species 
make fine bushes in the open border. Amongst the latter 
O. Haastii, Hook, f., is probably the best known, and it 
succeeds in almost any kind of soil. 

Descr.—A straggling shrub about 3 ft. high, with terete, 
deusely tomentose branches. Leaves alternate, petioled, 

February 1st, 190". 



coriaceous, oblong-elliptic, 1J-2J in. long, f-lj in. broad, 
glabrous above, except the pubescent midrib, densely 
tomentose below, with recurved, denticulate margins ; veins 
closely anastomosing and prominent; petiole £ in. long. 
Gapitula arranged in lax, terminal corymbs, oblong, f in. 
long, 1 in. in diameter; peduncles usually 2-3 in. long; 
bracts oblong, densely tomentose. Involucral bracts ob- 
long, tomentose outside, glabrous within. Bay-flowers 
5-6 ; ligules white, oblong-elliptic, J in. long, -J in. broad, 
Disk~flowera 10-12 ; corolla J in. long ; anthers apiculate, 
i in. long. Aehenes terete, almost glabrous. J in. long. 
Seta of the pappus numerous, shortly pilose. — J. Hutchin- 



SoX 



Figs. 1 and 2 bracts; S.ray-floret; 4, disk-floret; 5, pappus; 6, anthers; 
7, style-arms :— all enlarged. 'fit- 



8iw 




"VSncentBroote.Pay8.Son I.tflnxp 



'London 



Tab. 8119. 
MECONOPSIS punicea. 
Tibet and W. China. 

Pafaveraceae. Tribe Eupai'avereae. 

Mecoxopsts, Vig ; Benth. e.t Hook. f. Cm Plant, vol. i p. 52; Pravtl A 
Kiindig in Engl. & Prantl Pfianzenfam. vol. iii. part 2, p. 141. 



Meconopsis (^ Polychaetia) punicea, Maxim. Flor. Tangut. p. 34, t. 23, 
tigs. 12-21 ; Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. xxxvi. pp. 282, 289, tig. 130 ; Pram in 
Ann. Bot vol. xx. p. 355; species in geuere ob rlores intense puniceos 
insignis, caeterisque exceptis M. integrifolia et if. Oliveriana tantam, 
quibus rlores ambabus sunt lutei, stigmate eessili discrepat. 

Herba monocarpica, acaulis. Folia radicalia caespitosa, pilis barbellatis laxe 
hirsuta, ovato-lanceolata, apice acuta, margine integra, basi sensim. in 
petiolum latiusculum attenuata, 18-30 cm. lorjga. 4-5 cm. lata, utrmque 
viridia. Flores magni, speciosi, alabastrisque nutantes,pedunculis l-floris 
simpbcibus 45-50 cm. altis pilis suhretrorsis indutis. Sepala 2, oblongo- 
ovata, 3 cm. louga, extra hirsuta. Petala 4, rarissime in cultis staminum 
impendio 8-9, ovato-ohlonga, intense punicea, 10 cm. longa, 6 cm. lata. 
Stamina oo , pluri-seriata, filamentis li^ulitormibus glabris discretis. Ova- 
rium e carpellis 4-6 compositum, dense appresse hirsutum, ovatum, 2 
cm. longum, stigmate sessili 4-6-lobo, lobis divaricatis radiantibus 
coronatum; placentae intrusae ; ovula plurima. Gapsula ovata, 2"5 cm. 
longa, T25 cm. lata; semina reticulata. 



The Poppy worts which compose the genus Meconopsis 
are familiar and favourite plants in Alpine gardens. The 
genus is now known to include about twenty-seven dis- 
tinguishable forms, of which seventeen have been intro- 
duced at various times to European horticulture ; about 
twelve of these are now familiar to English growers. 
With the exception of M. cambrica, which is European, 
and two forms, possibly not specifically distinct, from 
California, the species of this genus are confined to the 
Himalayan range, to Western China, and to the eastern 
half of the Tibetan table-land. The following have already 
been figured in the Botanical Magazine : — M. Wallichii, 
t. 4668° M. aculeata, t. 5456 ; Jf. robutta, under the name 
M. nipalensU, t. 5585 ; M. napaulensis, as M. Wallichii, 
var. rubrofusca, t. 6760 ; M. heterophylla, t. 7636 ; and 
M. integrifolia, t. 8027. 

Meconopsis punicea is unlike any species hitherto re- 
ported as regards the colour of its petals. In the majority 
of the species this is either yellow or blue, a few have 

FtblUJAKY 1st, 1907. 



purple oi" red or orange flowers. M. punicea is the only 
species, so far known, in which the flowers after expansion 
remain pendulous. It further differs from the other known 
species, except M. integnfolia and M. Olireriana, both of 
which have yellow petals, in the absence of a style. The 
divaricately radiating stigmatic lobes are characteristic of 
the group Grande*, of which M. punicea is a member. 

Meconopsis pmricea, was first collected in Northern Tibet 
in 1884 by the late General Przewalski; it was obtained 
again in Northern Szechuen, in 1885, by Mr. G. N. 
Potanin. More recently it has been met with by Mr. 
E. H. Wilson, who gathered it in September, 1903, in 
grasslands about Sungpen, in Western China, at from 
11,000-14,500 ft. above sea-level. Plants were raised 
by Messrs. James Veitch & Sons from seed communicated 
by Mr. Wilson. The plant figured, which flowered in the 
Rock Garden at Kew in June, 1906, was raised from seeds 
presented to Kew by Messrs. Veitch & Sons. This species 
is a biennial, flowering in the second year from seed, the 
crown of leaves dying down during the winter that pre- 
cedes flowering. It thrives best in moist soil in a shaded 
situation, and ripens its seeds under cultivation. 

Descr. — A monocarpic herb. Stem 0. Leaves tufted, 
radical, sparsely hairy, ovate-lanceolate, apex acute, mar- 
gin entire, tapering gradually into a rather broad petiole, 
7-12 in. long, l-|-2 in. wide, green above and below. 
Flowers large, striking, remaining pendulous after they 
open ; peduncles slender, simple, 1-flowered, beset with 
spreading or reflexed hairs, 16-20 in. long. Sepals 2, 
oblong-ovate, 1| in. long, hirsute externally. Petals nor- 
mally 4, occasionally in cultivation the outer stamens 
replaced by 4-5 additional petals, very dark pink, 4 in. 
long, 21 in. across, ovate-oblong. Stamens indefinite, 
several-seriate, the outer series sometimes replaced by 
additional petals, filaments flattened, glabrous, free. 
Ovary of 4-6 carpels, densely adpressed-hirsute, ovate, 
| in. long; stigma sessile, 4-6-lobed, the lobes divaricate 
and radiating ; placentas intruded ; ovules numerous. Cap- 
sule ovate when ripe, 1 in. long, i in. wide; seeds with 
reticulated testa. — D. Pbain. 



Fig P 1 and 2, stamens ; 3. pistil, enlarged; 4, an entire plant, about one-sixth 
natural sire. 



8120 




YuujentBrr.oics.Uay&S'an-lt? *** 



Tab. 8120. 
ribes mogollonicum. 

South-Western United Stale*. 

Saxifragaceae. Tribe Ribesieae. 
Ejbes, TAnn. ; Benth. et HooJe.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 654. 



Ribes (§ Ribesia) mogollonicum, Greene in Bull. Torrey Bot. Ghib, vol. viii. 
p. 121 ; species diBtincta R. nevadensi, Kellogg, proxima, sed racemis 
strictis suberectis, calycis viridescenti-albescentis tubo et segmentis 
brevioribus, petalis late obovatis brevioribus differt. 

Frutex robustus, omtiino inertnis, e basi ramosus ; rami 15-3 m. alti, ut ramuli 
erecti vel a^cendentes, novellis minute puberulis. Folia late 5- (rarius 
3-) lobata, suborbicularia, 2"5-7 cm. diam., basi cordata, basi juxta 
venas parcissime pilosa, glandulis sessilibus conspersa ; lobi late ovati 
vel triangulares, crenato- vel bicrenato-serrati ; petioli 2-4 cm. longi, 
dense minuteqne puberuli. Bacemi solitarii, ab apice ramulorum brevis- 
simorum foliatorum orti, stricti, erecti vel erecto-patentes, glandulis 
stipitatis praediti, mnlti- et confertiflori, 1*5-3 cm. longi ; pedunculi 2'5-3 
cm. longi ; bracteae elliptico-oblongae vel oblougo-spathulatae, 3-4 mm. 
longae, margine translucidae : pedicelli 15-4 mm. longi. Calycis virides- 
centi-albescentis tubus 1-1*5 mm. longns; segmenta obloDga, 3 mm. longa, 
circiter 2 mm. lata, paulum patentia, obtusa, conspicue paucivenosa. 
Fetala alba, late obovato-spatbulata vel rbomboideo-obovata, 1*5 mm. 
longa. Stamina petalis paulo longiora. Ovarium glandulis pallide 
luteis breviter stipitatis dense vestituui. Stylus l # 5-2'5 mm. longus, ad 
medium bifidus. Bacca purpureo-nigrescens, ovoideo-globosa, circiter 
7 mm. diam., glandulis stipitatis parce instructa, edulis. — B. Woljii, 
Rothrock in American Naturalist, vol. viii. p. 358, partim. 



There is no question as to the identity of our plant with 
B. mogollonicum, but there are difficulties in the way of 
using this name for it. Mrs. Brandegee in Zoe, A^ol. iv. 
p. 88, appears to have been the first to point out that this 
species is the same as B. Woljii, Rothrock. Reference to 
the description, however, was not convincing. In a number 
of points it is not applicable to B. mogollonicum, especially 
in the red sepals and petals, and the shape of the latter. 
These discrepancies may be explained by Prof. Coville's 
remarks in the Proceedings of the Biological Society of 
Washington, vol. xiv. p. 1. He discovered that the type 
sheet of Jtt. Wolfii preserved in the National Herbarium, 
Washington, consisted of specimens of two distinct species, 
one represented by flowering specimens which Coville 
proposed to regard as the type of B. Wolfii, the other by 
fruiting specimens, which belong to B. coloradense, Coville. 
February 1st, 1J)07. 



But Rothrock, when be drew up his description, also had a 
third plant in mind, for he cites as a synonym of R. Wolfii 
the R. sanguineum var. variegation of S. Watson in King's 
Report of the Geological Exploration of the Fortieth Parallel, 
vol. v. p. 100, which most authorities consider to be 
specifically distinct from R. sanguineum. Tn the Botany 
of California, vol. i. p. 207, Watson adhered to his name, 
and reduced Rothrock's species. A search in the Kew 
Herbarium brought to light the apparent identity of 
Watson's plant with R nevadense, Kellogg in the Pro- 
ceedings of the California Academy of Natural Sciences, 
vol. i. (1855), p. 63, ed. 2 (1873), p. 65, and this view is 
supported by Greene in his Flora Frauciscana, p. 198, 
where he cites R. sanguineum var. variegatum, S. Wats., as 
synonymous with Kellogg' s species, but he implies that 
Watson's name covers more than one plant, for he adds 
" partly." We are satisfied that R. mogollonicuni, Greene, 
is the same as R. Wolfii, Rothrock, as emended and re- 
stricted^ by Coville, but we are doubtful as to the 
advisability of rejecting a name now introduced into 
gat-dens, and about which there is no uncertainty, for one 
which has led to so much confusion. 

The plant from which the accompanying figure was 
prepared was raised from seed received from Mr. H. 
Henkel, of Darmstadt, in 1900. It is now about 2 ft. 
high. Another plant, obtained from the Missouri Botanical 
Garden in 1902, is 4$ ft. high. It flowers in May. 

In habit R mogollonicum closely resembles R. sangui- 
neum, Pursb, and has similar large pink winter-buds. It 
has the odour of the Black Currant (R. nigrum,, Linn.). 
The species is a native of the Mogollon Mountains in New 
Mexico, and of several localities in Colorado and Utah. 

Descr.—k robust, unarmed shrub, branched from the 
base; branches reaching a height of 10 ft., like the branch- 
lets erect or ascending, minutely puberulous on the 
youngest parts. Leaves 5- more rarely 3-lobed, suborbi- 
cular, 1-3 in. across, cordate at the base, sparingly pilose 
on the under side, and sprinkled with sessile glands ; lobes 
broadly ovate or triangular, crenate-serrate or bicrenate- 
serrate; petioles f-lf in. long. Racemes solitary, arising 
at the apex of very short leafy branchlets, straight, erect, 
or erect-spreading, sprinkled with stalked glands, many- 



and dense-flowered, f-lj- in. long; peduncles 1-1 J in. 
long; bracts elliptic-oblong or oblong-spathulate, ^-^ in. 
long; pedicels ^ in. long. Calyx greenish- white ; tube 
about x - 2 in. long ; segments ^ in. long, about ^ in. broad, 
somewhat spreading, obtuse, conspicuously few-veined. 
Petals white, broadly obovate-spathulate or rhomboid- 
obovate, scarcely half as long as the calyx-segments. 
Ovary densely covered with shortly stalked pale yellow 
glands. Berry purplish- or bluish-black, ovoid-globose, 
about ^ in. across, edible, sparingly furnished with stalked 
glands. — S. A. Skan. 



Fig. 1, flower, with bract attached to the base of the pedicel; 2 and 3, 
stamens ; 4, portion of the epidermis of the ovary with gland-tipped hairs ; 
5, seeds : — all enlarged. 



8121 




i£.s.a*Lj:N.FitchJfceh. 



\5nc«*B.ocfl» 1 Dflr*S«avLt»B'» 



L.B«im AcC°Lo]u3on- 



Tab. 8121. 
SACCOLABIUM bubesckns. 
Annam. 

Orchidaceae. Tribe Vandeae. 
Saccolabium, Blume ; Benth. et Hook, f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 578. 



Saccolabiuxn rubescens, Bolfe in Kew Bulletin, 1906, p. 114; Orch. Rev. 
1906, p. 220; a S. ampullaceo, Lindl., caule altiore, foliis latioribns et 
subrecurvis, racemis peJunculatis, sepalis petalisque multo minoribug 
differt. 

Caulis erectus, robustns, circa 25 cm. altus. Folia patentia vel recurva, 
coriacea, oblonga, inaequaliter et brevsssime biloba, 12-15 cm. longa, 
2'5-3"2 cm. lata. S'capi suberecti, 15-17 cm. longi. Bacemi 7'5-10 cm. 
lnnei, multiflori. Bracteae ovatae, obtasae, concavae, 1 mm. longae. 
Bedicelli 18-2 cm. longi. Sepalum posticum late ellipticum, obtusum, 
vix 4 mm. longum; sepala lateralia ovata, quam posticum latiora. 
Petala late elliptica, obtusa, vix 4 mm. longa. Labellmn trilobum; lobi 
laterales transverse obloDgi, obtusissimi, incurvi, breves ; lobus inter- 
medins ovato-oblongus, subacutus, basi patens, apice incurvus, 1 mm. 
longus ; calcar strictum vel subincnrvum, 1 cm. lougum. Gohunna 
brevissima. 

Saccolabium rubescens, Rolfe, is one of the numerous 
novelties discovered in Annam by Mr. W. Micholitz, when 
collecting there for Messrs. Sander & Sons, in 1903. It 
is allied to the North Indian 8. ampullae enm, Lindl., but is 
more robust in habit, and has much smaller flowers. The 
plant figured came from the importers, and flowered at 
Kew under tropical treatment in March, 1905. Shortly 
afterwards it flowered in the Royal Botanic Gardens, 
Glasnevin. 

The genus is a large and polymorphic one, widely 
diffused in tropical Asia, where it practically replaces the 
African genus Angraecum, for though usually so different 
in the colour of the flowers, they are structurally very 
similar, and one or two African species have been de- 
scribed under both genera. Eleven species have already 
been figured in this work, and those which are nearly 
allied to the present one are 8. ampnllaceum, Lindl. 
(t. 5595), from N. India, S. Hendersonianum, Reich b. f. 
(t. 6222) from Borneo, S. miniatum, Lindl. (t. 5326), from 
Java, and S. Mooreanum, Rolfe (t. 7428), supposed to 
be from Sumatra. 8. Huttoni, Hort. (t. 5681), is now 
referred to Aerides. 
February 1st, 1907. 



Descr. — An erect epiphyte, nearly a foot high. Leaves 
distichous, spreading or recurved, coriaceous, oblong, very 
shortly and unequally bilobed, 5-6 in. long, l-l£ in. broad. 
Scapes nearly erect, 6-7 in. high; racemes 3-5 in. long, 
many -flowered. Bracts ovate, obtuse, concave, scarcely 
2^ in. long. Pedicels f in. long. Flowers f in. long, light 
rose-purple. Dorsal sepal broadly elliptical, obtuse, ^ in. 
long ; lateral sepals ovate, broader than the dorsal. 
Petals broadly elliptical, obtuse, ^ in. long. Lip 3-lobed ; 
side lobes transversely oblong, very obtuse, incurved, 
short ; front lobe ovate-oblong, subacute, spreading at the 
base, incurved at the apex, $- in. long ; spur straight or 
slightly curved, obtuse, under ^ in. long. Column very 
short. — E. A. Rolfe. 



Fig. 1, flower ; 2, column ; 3 and 4, pollinarium, seen from front and back : — 
all enlarged. 



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„ 8H8.-^OLEARIA SPEGIOSA. 
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8122 




JN EiloKUS 



Vii^tcvtBrooteCay & Starlit. Ingy. 



L Bjsev« at C° X^atvaajx 



Tab. 8122. 

aloe pallidiflora. 
South Africa ? 

Liliaceae. Tribe Aloineae. 
Aloe, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant vol. iii. p. 776. 



Aloe pallidiflora, A. Berger in Engl. Bot. Jahrb. vol. xxxvi. p. 58 ; A. macra- 
canthae, Biter (B. M. t. 6580), affinis, foliorum spinis marginalibus inter 
se propior.bus, perianthioque extus concolore differt. 

Acaulis, simplex. Folia d>nse rosulata, erpcto-patentii, lineari-lanceolata, 
longe acuminata, circa 35 cm. longa, 6-8 cm. lata et 1*3-1 '5 cm. cras^a, 
faciebns convex>s, supra obscure viridia, maculis albidis lineari-oVdongis 
saepe geminatis vix fasciatim dispositis sed saepissime confluentibus 
maruiorata, lineisqne concoloribus obscurioribusque praesertim secus 
marginea striato-nervata, snbttis pallide viridia, immacnlata; marginea 
pitiuato-dentati, acnleis deltoideis apice corneis brunneis pungentibua 
3-6 mm. longig armati. Inflorescentia 0"8-l*3 m. alia; scapus glaucns, 
infra medium ramoaus, ramis lateralibns8-13, erecto-patentibu*, terminal! 
brevioribus; racemi superne densi. 4^10 cm. longi; pedieelli circa 1*5 cm. 
longi; bracteae scirio~ae, deltoideae, stibulatae, 3-nerviae, 1-1 '5 cm. 
longae. Perianthium pallidum, incarnafcuro, supra ovarium leviter con- 
strictum, i'aucem versus leviter ampliatum et curvatum, 3 cm. longum, 
Bubbexagonnoi ; segmenta ultra medium connata, marginidus albidis, 
medio pallide striato-nervata, apice leviter recnrvula, intus luteola. 
Filamenta vix exserta; antherae obiongae, anrantiacae. 



The plant of Aloe pallidiflora, Berger, here figured 
flowered in the garden of Sir Thomas Hanbury at La 
Mortola in April, 1906. It was obtained some years ago, 
without name, from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Berlin, 
and first flowered in March, 1904. Its native country is 
unknown, but it certainly is not from German iSouth- 
West Africa, nor from German East Africa, neither have 
I seen it in any of the herbaria to which I have had access. 
Possibly it is a native of South Africa, and perhaps of 
the eastern regions, as it seems to me to be related to 
A. Greatheadi, Schoenland, in " Records Albany Museum," 
vol. i. p. 12], and A. transvaalensis, O. Kuuze, in "Rev. 
Gen." vol. iii. 2, p. 314, both natives of the Transvaal. 

So far it has produced a few capsules, but the seeds 
did not germinate, neither has it thrown up suckers as so 
many of its near allies generally do. At La Mortola it is 
quite hardy, though last year the flower-spike and the 
tops of the leaves seem to have suffered from the cold of 
the previous winter. 

March 1st, 1907. 



Descr. — A stemless plant. Leaves in a dense rosette, 
erecto- patent, linear-lanceolate, tapering into a long point, 
about 14 in. long, 2|— 3 in. wide, and \ in. thick, bicon- 
vex in section, dull green above and marbled with long, 
whitish marks, and nerved with similar lines, especially 
near the margin, pale green and unspotted beneath; 
margins sinuate and armed with brown, deltoid, horny, 
sharp spines as much as^in.long. Inflorescence from 2|— 4 ft. 
high; scape glaucous, branched from below the middle; 
branches 8-13, erecto-patent, the terminal one the shortest ; 
pedicels about fin. long ; bracts scarious, deltoid, subulate, 
3-nerved, about 1 in. long. Perianth pale flesh-colour, 
yellowish inside, 1J in. long ; tube slightly constricted 
above the ovary, curved and slightly swollen near the 
throat, somewhat hexagonal ; lobes not quite as long as 
the tube, with whitish margins and central striped area, 
slightly recurved at the apex. Filaments scarcely ex- 
serted; anthers oblong, orange. — Alwin Berger. 



Figs. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3, pistil : — all enlarged. 



8123 




Mti.del JKP* 



TftacentBrooJcs Day A. Son ' u lfTmf 



LHcevt & C° London 



Tab. 8123. 
BLEPHAROCALYX spiraeoides. 

Brazil. 



Myrtaceae. Tribe Myrteae. 



Blepharocalyx, Berg. ; Niedenzu in Engl. & Prantl, Pflanzenf. vol. iii. 7, p. 71, 
Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 715, sub Myrto. 



Blepharocalyx spiraeoides, Stapf; affinia B. angustifolio, sed foliia mino- 
ribus obtusis, panicula densinora, cyinis bitions, sepalis aequalibus vix 
albo-marginatis, petalis majoribus, bacca majore distinctu?. 

Frutex multiramosus, densus, 3 m. altus, ramis gracilibus tenuissime 
puberulis tandem cortice fusco tectis. Folia lanceolato-linearia, utrinque 
obtusa, 1-2 cm. longa, 2-3 mm. lata, tenuiter coriacea, glabra, viridia, 
subtus pallidiora, marginibus recurvis, nervis lateralibus inconspicuis ; 
petiolaa vix 1 mm. longus. Gymae biflorae, in panicalas mnltitioras 
densas (hincinde foliis admixtas) collectae ; pedunculi pedicelliqne graeiles 
puberuli ; bracteae elliptico-ovatae, parvae ; bracteolae ad calycLs basin 
sitae, rotundatae ; pedicelli ]"5-2 mm. longi. Receptaculum obovoi- 
deum, glabrum, 0"8 mm. longum. Galyx receptaculo aequilongus vel 
paulo longior, segmentis 4 rotundato-ovatis ciliatis. Petala 4, late 
elliptica, concava, pallide flava, ciliata, 3 mm. longa. Stamina circiter 
18, longiora petala aeqnautia. Ovarium 2-loculare, ovulis biseriatis, b' in 
unaquaque placenta, placentis vix prominentibus. Bacca globosa, 8 mm. 
diametro, rubra vel tandem violaceo- nigricans. Semen unicum (semper ?) ; 
testa Crustacea, tenuis. Embryo carvatus, glaudulosus, cotyledonibus 
minutis. 

This is a very handsome and freely flowering shrub, 
somewhat of the habit of a Spiraea, and it thrives well 
in a warm house. The plant from which the drawing 
was made was received from Baron Capanema, Director 
of Telegraphs of Brazil, in 1885. There are no specimens 
of the wild plant at Kew, and its exact habitat is un- 
known. The area of the genus extends almost over the 
whole of South America, reaching to 42° S. lat. in Chile. 
It is, however, doubtful whether all the species referred to 
Blepharocalyx belong to that genus, aud even whether it 
should be retained as distinct from Myrtus, from which it 
differs mainly in having a thin, crustaceous testa, instead 
of a thick, bony one. 

Descr. — A much-branched shrub, about 9 ft. high, with 
slender, finely pubescent branches. Leaves lanceolate- 
linear, obtuse at both ends, |— J in. long, ^— fi 4 in. broad, 
thinly coriaceous, glabrous, green, with recurved margins, 
and very short petioles. Cymes 2-flowered, arranged in 
March 1st, 1907. 



dense, many-flowered panicles ; peduncles and pedicels 
slender, puberulous ; bracts elliptic-ovate, small ; pedicels 
up to jr\ in. long. Receptacle obovoid, glabrous, about 3 ^, in. 
long. Calyx as long as the receptacle, with four rotuudate- 
ovate, ciliate segments. Petals 4, broad-elliptic, concave, 
pale yellow, ciliate, -J- in. long. Stamens about 18, the 
longest as long as the petals. Ovary 2-celled ; ovule3 
about six in each cell, in two rows. Berry globose, £ in. in 
diameter, red, or at length violet-black. Seed solitary; testa 
thin, crustaceous. Embryo curved, glandular ; cotyledons 
minute. — Otto Staff. 



Fig. 1, a leaf ; 2, bud ; 3, flower ; 4, fruit ; 5, fruit, cut open ; 6, embryo :- 
all enlarged, excepting fig. 4. 



8124- 




MSdeWNFitdtlith 



T An.o«^BrookKp«y«iS 



L Reeve 3-0° London 



Tab. 8124. 

PRIMULA. DEORUM. 
Bulgaria. 

Pkimula.cf.ae. Tribe Primtjleae. 
Primula, L. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 631. 



Primula (§ Auricula) deorum, Velen. in Vestnik Krai, cesk sjpolein. nauk. 1 890, 
p. 55 (Silzb. Boehm. Gesell. Wiss. 1890) ; Fl. Bulgar. 1891, p. 479 ; Suppl. 
vol. i. 1898, p. 242 ; Hindmarsh in Joum. Roy. Hort. Soc. vol. xxix. (1904), 
p. 32, f. 1 : Flora & Sylva, vol. ii. (19(M), p. 239 ; Masters in Gard. Chron. 
1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 98, f . 4 1 ; Pxx & Knuth in Engler, Pjlanzenr. Primul. 
1905, p. 146; Reuthe in The Garden, 1905, p. 327; species ex affinitate 
P. glutinosae a qua plaata majore eti'oliis saepius omnino integris dififert. 

Perenhis omnino glabra, ad scapum superne et pedicellos valde srlutinifera, 
rhizomate cnsso caraoso interdum ramoso. Folia 6-12, crassa, coriacea, 
spathulato-lauceolata, vel interdum fere linear'a, 3-8 cm. longa, vix acuta, 
integra vel rare supra medium paucidentata. Scapi solitarii, gra< iles, 8-15 
cm. lonei, saepius 5-10-tiori, vel ia culto interdum usque ad 18-22 cm. 
alti et 20-flori, umbella unilaterali. Involucri bracteae lineares, pedicellis 
lon^iores, basi haud saccatae; pedicelli 3-10 mm. longi. Flores purpureo- 
■violacei vel sanguineo-purpurei, epeciosi. Calyx cirnosus, 4-5 mm. longns, 
ad medium fissus, laciniis obtusis. Corolla hjpocraterimorpha ; tubus 
gracilis, circiter 1-2 cm. longus ; limbi circiter 1*5 cm. diametro lobi 
imbricati, bifidi, segmentis rotundatis. Genitalia inclusa. Capsula 
globosa, calyce non accrescente inclusa. 



Dr. J. Velenovsky discovered this fine Auricula in 1800, 
growing in humid, grassy places, within the snows {inter 
nivcs), at the sources of the River Tsker, near the summit 
of the Rilo Dagh, South-western Bulgaria ; and it has 
since been found in the Muss Alia Dagh and the Despoto 
Dagh, in the same region. Mr. H. J. Elwes, F.R.S., 
collected it in the original locality in 1899, at an eWation 
of between •• 4,000 and 7,000 ft." Velenovsky gives the 
altitude as 2,500 metres — about 8,200 ft., whereas Pax 
and Knuth give 2,600 to 2,700 metres, equal to about 
8,500 to 8,850 ft. Some uncertainty prevails as to who 
first introduced this plant into cultivation. Pax and 
Knuth pay " in cultivation since 1904, introduced by 
Messrs. Stansfield," and Mr. Hindmarsh, in whose garden 
at Alnwick it flowered in 1904, states that it had probably 
not flowered before in this country ; but records prove 
that Primula deorum has been in cultivation at Kew ever 
since April, 1892, and Mr. G. Reuthe, in the place cited 
above, gives what is doubtless the true history of its 
introduction into cultivation. According to him, Mr. Max 

March Ut, 1907. 



Kolb, of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Munich, sent [pro- 
bably on the garden account] Mr. Kellerer (now 
Superintendent at Sofia) to Bulgaria in 1891, to procure 
living plants of P. deorum and other Bulgarian rarities. 
Some of these came into his (Reuthe's) possession, and he 
disposed of them to Mr. Thomas Ware, of Tottenham. 
They grew into " magnificent specimens," and flowered in 
18t)2, when they were exhibited at one of the shows of 
the Royal Horticultural Society as well as at the Royal 
Botanic Society at Regent's Park. I have not been able 
to find any record of these events in the gardening papers 
of that date, and Primula deorum is not included in either 
of the Kew Lists of New Plants of that period; but it is 
offered in Ware's Catalogue for 1894. 

The first plant cultivated at Kew was received from the 
Munich Botanic Garden in April, 1892. Subsequently 
another plant, or plants, was obtained from Mr. Thos. 
Ware; in 1904 a further supply was obtained from Mr. 
Max Leichtlin, and it was from one of these plants, which 
flowered in May, 1906, that the drawing for the accom- 
panying plate was made. 

Although the " Primula of the Gods " has been success- 
fully grown in some gardens, it is no doubt a difficult 
subject, and it does not flourish in the open at Kew. It 
flowered in Mr. Hindmarsh's Rock Garden on a north 
exposure, in sandy loam, at the foot of a broad stone. 
Mr. Velenovsky does not explain why he gave this plant 
the specific name deorum, but it was probably not given on 
account of its surpassing in beauty all other European 
species, though at its best it is no doubt very ornamental. 

Descr. — Perennial, glabrous in all parts. Mhizoiue 
thick, fleshy. Leaves from 6-12 in a loose rosette, thick, 
leathery, spathulate-lanceolate, 1^-3^- iu. long. Scape 
solitary, 7-9 in. high, 15-20-flowered, very glutinous in 
the upper part. Bracts about as long as the flower-stalks, 
the longest of which are about an inch long. Flowers violet- 
purple or crimson-purple, about f in. in diameter. Corolla- 
lobes notched. Stamens and pistil included in the corolla- 
tube. Capsule small, enclosed in the calyx which does not 
enlarge. — VV. Botting Hemsley. 

Fig. I, calyx and pistil ; 2, section of corolla showing some of the stamens ; 
t>, ovary :— all enlarged. 







^.S.del,J.N.FiV>.K^ 



^SncantBi oote .Day &3cu iLt^Imp 



L Reeve &C<? London 



Tab. 8125. 

CAIOPHORA CORONATA. 

r- 

The Andes. 

Loasaceae. Tribe Loaseae. 

Caiophora, Presl ; TJrb. et Gilg. in Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. vol. Ixxvi. p. 268. 
Blumenbachia, Benih. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 805, partim. 



Caiophora coronata, Hook, et Am. in Hook. Bot. Misc. vol. iii. (1833), p. 327, 
Urb. et Gilg. I.e., p. 278 ; Beiche, Fl. Chile, vol. iii. p. 251 ; babitu ad C. 
cirsiifoliam, Presl, et C. cymbiferam, Urb. et Gilg, accedit ; ab ambabus 
speciebus loliis magis disseotis, squama nectarifera fila 3 dorsalia gerente 
et staminodiis interioribus exappendiculatis reeedit. 

Herba perennis. Caules plures, satis elongati, basi decumbentes. Folia 
opposita, decussata, infima rosulata, longipetiolata, ambitu ovata usque 
lanceolata, bipinnatisecta, pinnis ambitu ovatis usque lanceolatis, pinnulis 
integris vel serrato-dentatis, utrinque setis longis horridula, subtus 
sabcano-pubescetites. Flores pseudolaterales, peatameri. Calyx dense 
setosus ; lobi pinnatisecti. Fetala cymbiformia, circ. 3 5 cm. longa, extra 
setosa et pubescentia, intus glabra. Squamae nectariferae rectaugulares 
(explanatae), vix 5 mm. longae, circiter 5 mm. latae, leviter trilobatae, lotis 
circ. 0'5 mm. longis, intermedio circ. 3 mm. lato, dorso filatria circ. 15 mm. 
supra basin gerentes. Staminodia interiora exappendiculata. Capsula obo- 
voideo-obconica, decern nervis, recta. — C. absinthiifolia, Presl, Rel. Haenk. 
vol. ii. p. 43. Blumenbachia coronata, Haage et Schmidt in Rev. Hortic, 
1874, p. 58, figs. 9, 10. Loasa coronata, Grill, ex Am. in Edinb. J^urn. Geogr. 
Sc. vol. iii. (1831), p. 274. L. pilosa, Meyen, Reise, vol. i. p. 470. 



The Loasaceae afford a 'good example of discontinuous 
distribution, twelve of the thirteen genera being endemic 
in America, and one, Kissenia, in Africa and Arabia. The 
family is perhaps best known on account of the long, 
stinging bristles which clothe most of the species. 

Another kind of hair, very characteristic of the 
Loasaceae, is much smaller, and provided with numerous 
barbs, by which the hairs readily become fixed in the skin 
of any animal touching them. 

The terete stem of Caiophora, and the much dilated or 
trifnrcate placentas, distinguish the genus from Blumen- 
bachia, with which some authors have united it. The home 
of Caiophora is in the Andes of Chile, the Argentine 
Republic, Bolivia, and Peru ; a single species, however, is 
found in P]cuador, one in Uruguay, and two or three in the 
south of Brazil. 

C. coronata is the most widely distributed species, and 
has been fouud at altitudes of 9,300-14,600 ft. above the 

March 1st, 1907. 



sea in the Andes, from the Argentine Republic to Peru. 
Seeds of it were collected in February, 1902, at about 
10,000 ft., on the Argentine side of the Portillo Pass, east 
of Santiago, by Mr. H. J. Elwes, F.R.S., who raised a fino 
plant in his garden, and communicated the flowering stem 
represented in the accompanying figure. 

C. coronata was first introduced from Chile (in 1872, 
according to Nicholson's Dictionary of Gardening) by 
Messrs. Haage & Schmidt, and was figured by them as 
Blumenbachia coronata in the "Revue Hortioole " for 1874. 
Urban and Gilg, in their monograph of the Loasaceae, re- 
duce B. coronata, Haage et Schmidt, to Gaiophora superba, 
but the figures and description in the " Revue Horticole " 
leave little doubt that it is the true G. coronata, Hook, et Arn. 
Five other species of Gaiophora have appeared in this 
Magazine, namely: G. aequatoriana, t. 6134 (Blumenbachia 
contorta) ; G. superba, t. 6143 (Blumenbachia chuquitensis) ; 
C. lateritia, t. 3632, and C. Pentlandii, t, 4095 (both 
under Loasa) ; and G. canarinoid.es, t. 5022 (under Illairea). 
Descr. — A perennial herb. Stems several from the base, 
decumbent. Leaves opposite and decussate, with a long 
petiole, bipinnatisect, armed on both surfaces with long 
stinging bristles, and whitish-pubescent on the lower sur- 
face with small barbed hairs. Flowers pentamerous. 
Galyx densely clothed with long* bristles ; lobes pin nati sect. 
Petals white, boat- shaped, contracted at the base, about 
1J in. long, bristly and pubescent outside, glabrous inside. 
Nectaries rectangular when flattened out, hardly \ in. long, 
and only slightly broader, bearing three thread-like pro- 
cesses outside, about a third above the base, shallowly 
3-lobed, the middle lobe much broader than the lateral 
ones. Inner staminodes without appendages. Gapsule 
straight, with ten prominent nerves. — T. A. Spkague. 



Fig. 1, hairs from leaf; 2, nectary; 3, an inner Btaminode; 4, top of ovary 
and style : — all enlarged. 



sm 




M.S.del. J.N.FitcHliih 



"Sncenr. Brooks Day&So: 



1.. "Reeve &.C? London. 



Tab. 8126. 
PAPHIOPEDILUM villosum, var. annamense. 

Annam. 



Orchidaceae. Tribe Cypripedieae. 



Paphiopedilum, Pfitzer Morplwl. Stud. Orchideenbl. p. 11 (ex parte) : Rolfe in 
Orch. Rev. 1896, p. 363 (char, restrict.) ; Bentlb. et HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. 
iii. p. 635 (Cypiipedium, § Coriaceae). 



Paphiopedilum villosum, Pfitzer, var. annamense, Rolfe (nov. var.) ; a 
typo i'oliis longioribus et angU3tionbus, sepalo postico gilvo et disco viridi 
atropurpureo-i'asciato diifert. 

Herba caespitosa. Folia suberecta vel arcuata, lineari-oblonga, bidentata, 
coriacea, 20-40 cm. lonca, 2-2'5 cm. lata, saturate viridia, ban branneo- 
maculata. Scapus validus, erectus, villosus, 15-25 cm. altus, viridis, 
brunneo-maculatus, uniflorus. Bracteae elliutico-iblongie, subobtusae, 
conduplicatae, circa 4 cm. longae. Flores ampli. Ovarium villosiastmum. 
Sepalwm posticum erectum, obovato-orbiculare, obtusum, ciliolatum, mar- 
gine prope apicem incurvum, apud basin recurvum, circa 4*5 cm. longum, 
gilvum, disco viride atropurpureo-fasciatum. Petala divaricata, obovato- 
oblonga, obtusa, cilioiata, laeviter uudulata, circa 6 cm. longa, pallide 
flava, brunneo-t'asciata. Labellum calceifbrme, circa 4 cm. longum, ore 
dilatatum, flavum, fronte brunneo-suffusum, lobi lateraies rostrati. 
Columna parce villosa ; staminodium orbiculari-elliptieum, subconcavum, 
circa 1*5 cm. longum, apice tridentatum, basi bilobum, medio papilla 
erecta instructum. 



The typical form of Paphiopedilum villosum, Pfitzer, is a 
native of Burma, which was discovered and introduced to 
cultivation over half a century ago, and for a long period 
has been one of the most popular winter-flowering species 
of the genus. A somewhat different form has now ap- 
peared, having been sent from Annam by Mr. W. Micho- 
litz, when collecting there for Messrs. Sander & Sons. A 
plant in flower was presented to Kew by the importers 
about a year ago, from which the annexed plate was pre- 
pared, and owing to the longer, narrower and more erect 
leaves, together with a marked difference in the colour of 
the dorsal sepal, it was proposed to distinguish it as above. 
A plant exhibited at a meeting of the Royal Horticultural 
Society last March by Messrs. Sander possessed the same 
peculiarity, and we understand that it applies to the whole 
importation. Indeed, when out of flower, it was taken 
for something quite different. It appears to be a distinct 
geographical form, but in the present state of our know- 
fedge it seems best to accord it varietal rank only. These 

March 1st, 1907. 



Annamese importations have proved surprisingly rich in 
novelties, and there are other geographical problems on 
which they may throw light when the results are better 
known, 

Descr. — A dwarf tufted herb, about a foot high. Leaves 
erect or arching, linear-oblong, bidentate at the apex, 
coriaceous, 8-16 in. long, nearly an inch broad, dull green, 
spotted with brown at the conduplicate base. Scape 
stout, erect, villous, 6-10 in. high, green, spotted with 
brown, one-flowered. Bracts elliptic-oblong, subobtuse, 
conduplicate, over 1|- in. long. Flowers large. Ovary 
shaggy. Upper sepal erect, obovate-orbicular, obtuse, 
slightly ciliate, nearly 2 in. long, with the margin some- 
what incurved at the apex and recurved at the base, 
cream-coloured, veined and suffused with dark purple on 
the disc, which is slightly margined with green ; lower 
elliptic-oblong, acute, about as long as the lip. Petals 
spreading, obovate-oblong, obtuse, ciliolate, slightly un- 
dulate, about 2J in. long, light yellow, veined and re- 
ticulated with brown. Lip slipper-shaped, about 1^ in. 
long, yellow, suffused with brown in front, mouth some- 
what dilated, side lobes nearly J in. long. Column some- 
what villous; staminode orbicular-elliptic, ^ in. long, 
somewhat concave, tridentate at the apex, bilobed at the 
base, and with an erect fleshy tooth in the centre. — 
E. A. Rolfe. 



Fig. 1, column, showing stamens, staminode, and stigma; 2, the whole 
plant : — 1, enlarged, 2, much reduced. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 27, MARCH, 1907. 



Tab. 8122.— ALOE PALLIDIFLORA. 
„ 8123.— BLEPHAROCALYX SPIRAEOIDES. 
„ 8124— PRIMULA DEORUM. 
„ 8125.— CAIOPHORA CORONATA. 
„ 8126.— PAPHIOPEDILUM VILLOSUM, var- 

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8121 




ohJith. 



VSw^ntBtodJotD^r&SonitfiitT 



I. .Hit..; & C°Lan.icm. 



Tab. 8127. 

DIOSPYROS Kakt. 
Eastern India, China, and Japan. 



Ebenaceae. 
Diospykon, Linn. ; Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 665. 



Diospyros Kaki, Linn.f. Suppl. 1781, p. V-V.\ j rfc«»&. i<7. ,%>. 1784, p. 157; 
Ait. Hort. Km. ed. 2, 1813, vol. v. p. 478; DC. Prodr. 1844, vol. viii. 
p. 229, excl. var. glabra ; Hiern in Trans. Camb. Phil. Soc. 1873, vol. xii. 
p. 227 ; Wight Ic. PI. Lid. Or. 1842, vol. ii. t. 415 ; Bretseh. Early Ret. 
1881, pp. 5, 23, 29, et Europ. Bot. Discov. in China, 1898, p. 830 ; W. \V. in 
Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiv. p. 682; Sargent, For. Ft. Jap. 1894, p. 50; 
species ex affinitate D. Loti, a qua floribns femineis distincte pedunculatis, 
calyce sericeo, corolla extns tomentosa et fructu majore differt. 

Arbor parva habitu Pyri Mali, dum juvenilis jam fructuosa. Hamuli flori- 
geri pubescentes. Folia, alterna, decidua, breviter petiolata, lanceolata, 
oblonga, elliptica vel interdnm fere orbicularia, interdum usque ad 20 cm. 
longa sed saepius minora, subtns primum pubescentia denique glabra. 
Flores masculi parvi, axillares, term", tetrameri. Calyx campantilutus, 
lobis ovatis vel lanceolatis. Corolla urceolatii, extus pubescent. 
Stamina Faepius 16, pubescentia. Flores feminei axillares, solitarii, 
tetrameri, flavo-virides, circiter 4 cm. diametro. Calycis lobi crassi, late 
ovati vel semiorbiculares, obtusi, fructu valde accrescentes, persistentr-s. 
Corollae coriaceae pilosae lobi oblongo-rotnndati, arete recurvi. Stami- 
nodia saepius 8, pilosa, alterna staminibus fertilibus similia, alterna 
mnlto minora, corollae lobis opposite. Ovarium, 8-locuIare, basi pilosum ; 
stylus inclusus, stigmatibus 4 bih'dis. Fructus saepe magnus, globosus, 
sed forma ac magnitudine valde variabilis. — D. chinensis. Blume, Cat. 
Gew. Buitenz. 1823, p. 110. D. Schiizc, Bunge, Enum. PI. Chin. Bor. 
1834, p. 42. D. costata, Carr. in Eev. Hort. 18*59, p. 284 et 1870, p. 410, 
cum ic. color. D. Roxburghii, Carr. op. cit. 1872, p. 253, If. 28 et 29. 
D. Mazeli, Carr. 1874, p. 70 cum ic. color. D. Lycoperskon, Carr. op. cit. 
1878, p. 470, cum ic. color* 



The genus jDiospyros numbers nearly 200 species, widely 
spread in tropical and subtropical countries; rarer in tem- 
perate regions, and not represented in extra-tropical 
South America, Southern Australia, or New Zealand. 
IK Kaki, as defined by Hiern, Franchet, and Savatier, and 
other botanists, is a very variable species, including a 
number of forms regarded as species by some botanists. 
Whether the numerous and very different varieties of Date 
Plum cultivated in China and Japan have descended from 

* The Bynonyms of the Kaki are numerous, and only the more important 
ones are given here ; but it is proposed to reproduce the complete synonymy, 
together with some gleanings from the literature of the subject, in an early 
number of the " Kew Bulletin." 

April 1st, 1907. 



one or more wild species is a difficult question to answer, 
and it will not be attempted here. Schi-tze is the Chinese 
and Kald the Japanese name of the tree and the fruit of 
D. Kald, and the earliest descriptions and records of it are 
to be found in the writings of the Jesuit missionaries. 
The first is Alv. Semedo, whose work entitled " Kelatione 
della grande Monarchia della Cina " appeared in 1643. 
"We have not seen this book, but Bretschneider quotes the 
author as stating that the best varieties of the Su-tzu (the 
name of the fruit in the Amoy dialect) were grown in the 
colder parts of China, namely, in Honan, Shensi, Shansi, 
and Shantung. The oldest book at Kew in which we find 
a figure and description is Boym's " Flora Sinensis " 
(1656), where it appears under the name Su-pim — " arbor 
et fructus su-pim apud sinas tantum nascitur," etc. On 
this Bretschneider remarks : " The Chinese name given by 
Boym properly denotes the dried fruit, for the second 
character means cake." 

Passing over all other records up to 1813, we find that 
D. Kald was introduced into cultivation in this country 
by Sir Joseph Banks in 1789, under the popular name of 
Japanese Date Plum. B. Lotus, L., and D. vifginiana t 
L., were previously in cultivation, as the European Date 
Plum and the American Date Plum respectively. Per- 
simmon is the name commonly employed in America, but 
Date Plum is also given as a synonym in some American 
books, and the Japanese use Persimmon in their English 
publications. A sheet containing coloured figures of forty- 
five varieties of " Japanese Persimmons " was issued some 
years ago by the Agricultural Bureau of Tokio. 

Although introduced more than a century since, the 
Kaki has never become in the least popular in the United 
Kingdom, and it is doubtful whether it has been con- 
tinuously in cultivation. There are several records, how- 
ever, of different varieties bearing fruit, among them 
p. costata, in Sir William Hutt's garden in the Isle of Wight, 
in 1875 ; but it is not stated whether it was under glass or 
in the open air. From the observations of travellers it 
would seem that some varieties are hardier than others, 
and it is possible that the hardier ones have not been in- 
troduced. But from the experience of French cultivators 
the Kaki succumbs to severe winters in the latitude of 



Paris, and it is only in the Mediterranean region that it is 
really at home out-of-doors. In this country it thrives 
perfectly in an ordinary orchard-house or greenhouse, and 
it is both ornamental and useful. Whether it would pay 
to grow it for market depends upon the public taste. The 
variety figured has a delicious fruit when quite ripe — that 
is when the pulp has become so soft that a spoon is 
needed to take it up. Fruit that commences to colour in 
September or October is not ready for use before February, 
but it is good to look at. 

The plant from which the drawing was made was pur- 
chased in 1890 from C. Sahut, nurseryman at Montpellier, 
and it first bore fruit in 1893. Since then it has fruited 
annually, and this season it bore eighteen fruits. It is a 
standard now only about 7 ft. high, with a stem 2 in. 
in diameter, and a spread of branches of about 4 ft. 
There is no male plant at Kew, so that the fruit is developed 
without fertilization having taken place, but it is quite 
seedless, or only imperfect seeds are formed. We believe 
it to be the same as Carriere's J). Lycopersicon, but some 
of the varieties so closely resemble each other that it 
would be rash to decide from a figure. It is also near the 
same author's D. Mazeli, which may or may not be the 
same as D. Mazelii, Thib. et Ketel. ex E. Morr. in the 
" Belgique Horticole," 1874, vol. xxiv. p. 111. 

Descr. — A small dioecious tree resembling an apple-tree, 
and bearing fruit while quite young. Leaves alternate, 
deciduous, very variable in shape, sometimes as much as 
8 or 10 in. long. Male flowers pubescent, smaller than 
the female, axillary, usually in clusters of three, tetrame- 
rous. Stamens usually 16. Female flowers axillary, soli- 
tary, green and yellow, 1J- 2 in. across, almost leathery, 
hairy, tetramerous. Calyx-lobes broadly ovate, or semi- 
orbicular, enlarging in fruit, persistent. Corolla-lobes 
oblong, rounded, strongly recurved. Staminodes 8, hairy, 
4 large, resembling fertile stamens, 4 smaller, opposite 
the petals. Ovary 8-celled, with a ring of hairs around 
the base ; style included ; stigmas 4, bifid. Fruit often 
large and globose, but very variable in size and shape in 
the numerous cultivated varieties.— W. BoTWNG Hbmsi.RT. 

Fig. I, a corolla kid open, showing the staminodeB; 2, one of the larger 
staminodes ; 3, pistil -.—all enlarged. 



8VZ8 




M.S.Ael, 



7irxeriBi:oolcD^'A,SaRlit*iiT 1 p. 



X. Reeve & 



Tab. 8128. 

ARCTOSTAPHYLOS Manzanita. 
California. 



Ericaceae. 
Arctostaphylos, Adana. ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 581. 



Arctostaphylos Manzanita, Parry in Bull. Calif. Acad. vol. ii. p. 491 ; 
Sargent in Garden & Forest, vol. iv. p. 5G5, fig. 90, p. 571 ; Reader in 
Gycl. Amer. Hortic. vol. i. p. 91 ; ab A. <pungente, H. B. K., quacum saepe 
confusa, foliis latis obtnsis, inflorescentia elongata, fructu majore, et 
tempore fiorendi dilfert. 

Frute.v vel arbor ad 10 m. alta, coma perlata ; truncus et rami vetusti cortice 
laevi rubra in squamas amplas soluta ; rami juniores magis misnsve 
pubescentes, pube cinerea vel nigricante glandulis intermixes, deinde 
glabrati. Folia ovata vel ovato-elliptica, obtnsa vel acuta, 35-4 cm. 
longa, l'5-3'5 cm. lata, coriacea, primo pubescentia, mox glabrata, nervis 
tenuibus ; petiolus 5-8 mm. longus, pubescens. Panicula brevis, ovoidea 
vel corymbosa, multiflora, cum pedunculo brevi ad 4 cm. longa, pedicellis 
plerumque glabria exceptis undique glanduloso-pubescens ; bracteae per- 
sistentes, e baai ovata longe acumiDatae ; pedicelli ad 6 mm. longi. 
Calyx albo-roseus, segmentis 2 mm. lotigis. Corolla urceolata, ovoidea, 
7 mm. longa, alba vel carnea, lobis minntis. Filamenta e basi lata subu- 
lata, pilosa ; antherae purpuieae, elliptico-globoBae uti aristae recurvae 
pnpilloso-asperae. Baccae depresso-globosae, 6 mm. altae, 8-12 mm. 
diametro, primo albidae, demum fusco-rubrae. 



" Manzanita " is the Californian vernacular for Arcto- 
stqphylos generally. Of the ten or eleven species of that 
genus found in California, this is no doubt the handsomest. 
It is a common and characteristic plant from the foothills 
of the coast ranges near the Bay of San Francisco, north- 
wards to the high Sierras on both sides of the Sacramento 
Valley. Within this great altitudinal range it varies con- 
siderably in height and general appearance. At high levels 
a low shrub, it attains the dimensions of a tree at low 
altitudes and in good and well-watered soil ; but more 
commonly it might be described as a tall, sprawling shrub. 
A photograph of a particularly fine specimen was repro- 
duced by Prof. Sargent in " Garden and Forest," I.e. It 
measured between 20 and 25 ft. in height, with a trunk 
nearly 13 ft. in girth near the ground and a crown more 
than 66 ft. in diameter. The specimen at Kew, which was 
raised from seeds purchased from an American nursery- 
man in 1897, measures at present a little over 3 ft. in 
April 1st, 190/. 



height and width. It flowers in its native country accord- 
ing to the situation at any time between Christmas and 
May. At Kew, where it is quite hardy, the flowers are 
produced in early spring and last about a month. Like 
other arborescent species of Arctostaphylos it sheds its 
bark annually. This peels off in May or June in large, 
loose flakes, laying bare the green new bark which soon 
turns red. A. jmngens, H. B. K., with which A. Manzanita 
has been confused, is a native of Mexico, an autumn 
flowerer with narrower leaves and shorter, smaller in- 
florescences. 

Descv. — A shrub or a tree, up to over 30 ft. high, with 
a wide spreading crown ; young branches more or less 
pubescent and glandular, at length glabrescent. Leaves 
ovate or elliptic-ovate, obtuse or acute, shortly mucronate, 
rounded or acute at the base, 1|— If- in. long, -f-1^ in. 
broad, coriaceous, finely pubescent when young, soon 
glabrous ; petiole J— J- in. long, pubescent. Panicle short, 
ovoid or corymbose, many -flowered, with the short 
peduncle up to If in. long, glandular-pubescent with the 
exception of the usually glabrous pedicels ; bracts per- 
sistent, long-acuminate from an ovate base ; pedicels up 
to ^ in. long. Calyx pinkish-white, segments ^ in. long. 
Corolla urceolate, ovoid, somewhat over J in. long, white 
or pinkish, with minute lobes. Berry depressed-globose, 
| in. long, ^-^ in. in diameter, ultimately brownish-red. — 
Otto Stapf. 



Fig. 1, flowei- ; 2, pistil with disk and part of the calyx ; 3 and 4, stamens : — 
all enlarged. 



8129 




^ 










^ 







ltS-daL JJOtahlith. . 



2 ^j 

"VincerJ-. Br.- 3^c:X5av r *Sar'LLtf4r.-ij) . 



i. Reeve & <J r Lor-don. . 



Tab. 8129. 

CALLIANDRA portoricensis, var. major. 

Mexico and Central America. 



Leguminosae. Tribe Mimoseae. 

Calliandea, Benth. ; Benth. ct Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 596 ; lie nth. in 
Trans. Linn. Hoc. vol. xxs. p. 536. 



Calliandra portoricensis, Benth. in Hook. Lond. Journ. Bot. vol. iii. 1844, 
p. 99 ; Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xxx. p. 543, var. major, Hpraguc, var. 
nov. ; a typo calycis lobis deltoideis staminibusqne subduplo longioribus 
recedit. 

Frutex vel arbuscula usque ad 4 - 5 m. alta, ramulis subteretibus sulcatis 
leviter rlexuosis, junioribus plus minusve pubescentibus vel tomeutellis, 
adultis cinereo-corticatis. Stipulae lanceolatae, 4-8 mm. longae. Folii 
pinnae 2-7-jugae, foliolis 12-35-jugis linearibus vel lineari-oblongis 
5-10 mm. longis 1-3 mm. latis apice obtusissirnis interdum minute apicu- 
latis basi trnncatis margine ciliolatis ceterum appresse pubescentibus 
puberulis vel glabris. Pedunculi axillares, solitarii vel geminati, 3-8 cm. 
longi. Cajntula ultra 30-flora, floribus sessilibus, ante anthesin versus 
apicem caulis corymbose disposita. Calyx circ. 175 mm. longus, lobis 
deltoideis 0'5 mm. longis superne pilis eglandulosis longe ciliatis inferne 
glanduloso-ciliatis. Corolla 5-6 mm. Tonga, lobis reflexis 2-3*5 mm. 
longis, 1*25-1'75 mm. latis. Stamina circ. 2'5 cm. longa, basi in tubuin 
1*5-2 mm. longum conData. Legumen 5-10 cm. longum. 



The multitude of slender, pure-white filaments grouped 
together in the heads of flowers of this shrub gives them a 
delicate grace and charm, to which no figure can do justice ; 
and when the most suitable treatment has been ascertained, 
the new variety should come into favour. It is a native of 
Mexico, Guatemala, and Nicaragua, and has been collected 
at elevations varying from 500 to 6,000 ft. above sea-level. 

The Kew plants were purchased in 1906 from a nursery- 
man in Hyeres as "Inga alba," and flowered in the 
Temperate House in June and July of that year. 

The variety major approaches C. tetragona, Benth. (Bot. 
Mag. t. 2651, as Acacia quad,rangularis) in the size of the 
flowers and shape of the calyx-lobes, and is in fact inter- 
mediate between G. tetragona and typical G. portoricensis. 
The relationships of the three plants will be discussed in 
an early number of the "Kew Bulletin." 

Descr. — A shrub or small tree. Branch lets subterete, 
o-rooved, slightly flexuous, more or less pubescent in the 
young state. Stipules lanceolate, up to | in, long. Leaves 

Afbil 1st, 1907. 



bipinnate, with 2-7 pairs of pinnae, each pinna with 12-35 
pairs of leaflets; leaflets linear or linear-oblono-, very 
obtuse, sometimes minutely apiculate, truncate at the base, 
minutely ciliate, appressed pubescent, puberulous or 
glabrous on both surfaces. Peduncles solitary, or two 
together in the axils. Heads about 2 in. in diameter, 
composed of more than 30 sessile pure-white flowers. 
Calyx-lobes deltoid, ciliate with non-glandular hairs in their 
upper half, and with gland-tipped hairs in the lower. 
Corolla about J in. long, with reflexed lobes. Stamens 
about 1 in. long. Pod 2-4 in. long. — T. A. S Prague. 

Fig. 1, leaflets; 2, a flower; 3, pistil:— all enlarged. 



8130. 




M:s.<teu.ixi\tdMi{h. 



Vincent Brcok3,Day& SeXU? 



L.ReevB 8tC9LoTT_doTL 



Tab. 8130. 

MECONOPSIS BELLA. 
Himalaya. 

Papaveraceae. Tribe Eupapavereae. 

Mecosopsis, Via. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 52; Prantl & 
Kundig in Eng. & Prantl Pfianzenfam. vol. iii. 2, p. 141. 



Meconopsis (§ Eumeconopsis) bella, Train, Journ. As. Soc. Beng. vol. lxiii. 
2, p. 82 ; Ann. Boy. Bot. Oard. Calcutta, vol. ix. 1, p. 3, t. 4; Oard. Chron. 
1906, vol. xl. p. 198, fig. 81 ; Ann. Bot. vol. xx. p. 351 ; species in 
genere ob folia 2-3-secta lobulis parvis iusignis ; fiores coerulei, in scapia 
radicalibas singuli. 

Herba polycarpica, acaulis. Folia radicalia, conferta, glabra vel parce pilis 
simplicibus induta, lamina ovato-lanceolata, 2-3-jugim pinnatisecta, 
2 - 5-5 cm. longa, 1-1*5 cm. lata, lobulis 5 mm. longis, 3 mm. latis ; petiolus 
3*5-6 cm. longus versus basin parum vaginatus. Fiores numerosi in 
pedunculis simplicibus 3'5-8 cm. longissinguli. Sepala 2, ovata, 1*5 cm. 
longa, 9 mm. lata, glabra. Petala 4, raro 5, coerulea, ovato-rotundata, 
3 cm. longa, 2*75 cm. lata. Stamina indefinita, pi uriseriata ; filamenta 
filiformia, glabra, discreta, intense coerulea, antheris oblongis aureis. 
Ovarium e carpellis 5-6 compoaitum, pirce setosum, oblongum, 5 mm. 
longnra, stylo 3 mm. longo glabro; placentae intrusae ; ovula nuroerosa. 
Gapsula matura subpyriformis, 1*5 cm. longa. 



Meconopsis bella, the smallest species of the. genus, was 
first met with in two localities on the eastern frontier of 
Nepal by a Lepcha collector employed by Sir George King 
in July, 1888. Seeds obtained that year were sent to 
various alpine gardens in Europe from the Royal Botanic 
Garden, Calcutta, but none of the recipients appear to 
have succeeded in raising plants. The species was not 
met with again for several years ; nor was it rediscovered 
till a special search was made in the original localities, 
Peykiongla, in Jongri, just within Western Sikkim, and 
Nyegu, just across the Nepalese frontier, at from 12,000 
to 14,000 ft. above sea-level. Since 1898 repeated at- 
tempts have been made to introduce the species to Euro- 
pean horticulture. These have at last been successful, 
and plants raised from seed collected on the ISepalcsc 
frontier in 1903, and distributed from the Calcutta garden, 
flowered in the Royal Botanic Garden , Edinburgh, in 
August, 1906. The figure now given is based on one 
of these plants, presented to Kew by Professor Bayley 
Balfour. 

April 1st, 1907. 



The species, so far as is known, is confined to a very 
circumscribed area, though it is possible that it may 
extend westward from the localities where it has been 
found into the forbidden territory of Alpine Nepal. It 
has as yet only been met with in the places where it was 
originally found ; even there it is extremely local, and is 
confined to spots where there are vertical cliffs into the 
clefts of which its stout rootstocks push horizontally, the 
rosette of much-cut Corydalis-\\ke leaves being closely 
applied to the face of the rock. The rocks which it affects 
are moist, but it is not met with in places that are exposed 
to direct rain. 

In cultivation at Edinburgh the rosette of leaves has 
persisted during the winter months. The contrast between 
the golden-yellow anthers and the dark blue filaments is 
the most striking feature in the flowers of this species. 

Descr. — A perennial, almost glabrous herb ; rootstock 
stout, fusiform, the neck clothed with leaf-sheaths. 
Leaves many, radical, 2-4 in. long, 2-3-jugately pinnati- 
sect, with small, ovate-oblong segments, the petiole 1-2 \ 
in. long, somewhat sheathing towards the base. Flower* 
numerous, on simple 1-flowered scapes 1 J— 3 in. long. 
Sepals 2, ovate, \ in. long, glabrous. Petals 4, or casually 
5, pale blue, wide ovate, lj in. long, 1J in. across. 
Stamens numerous, several seriate, the filaments slender, 
distinct, deep blue. Ovary 5-6-carpelled, usually sparingly 
setose, oblong, ^ in. long ; style short but distinct ; 
placentas intruded; ovules many. Capsule, when ripe, 
somewhat pyriform, f in. long ; seeds small, finely re- 
ticulated.— -D. Pkaix. 



Figs. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3, pistil :— all enlarged. 



8131. 




.daLJH.Fitch.litK 



1 Atu5entBrool<sJ)ay-&.SorLLt a in5 



X. Reeve &.C9 London.. 



Tab. 8131. 

CYMBIDIUM ERYTHROSTYLDM. 

Annam. 

Orchidaceae. Tribe Vandeae. 
Cymbioium, Sioartz; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 536, 



Cymbidium erythrostylum, Bolfe in Gard (Jhron. 1905, vol. xxxviii. p. 427; 
1906, vol. xi. p. 286, tig. 115; Orch. Rev. 1900, p. 39; :i C. Parishii, 
Reichb. f., iullorescentiae vaginis angustioribus, sepalis petalisque latiori- 
bus, labello latius apice subaequaliter trilobo et, columna sanguinea 
differt. 

Herba epiphytica, circa 45 cm. alta. Pseudobulbi fasciculati, ovato-oblongi, 
compressi, circa 2'5 cm. longi, basi polyphylli, apice monophylli. Folia 
arcuata, elongato-linearia, 25-38 cm. longa, circa 1*3 cm. lata, basi 
vaginata. Scapi axillares, suberecti, 30-40 cm. longi, vaginis lanceolatis 
acutis obtecti, 4-o-nori. Bracteae lanceolatae, acuminatae, 2-4 cm. longae. 
Pedicelli 3-4'5 cm. longi. Sepala elliptica, apictilata, concava, 4"5 cm. 
longa, 2'5 cm. lata, alba, lateralia paullo carinata. Petala obovato- 
elliptica, apiculata, sepalis paullo breviora, alba, basi minute purpureo- 
punctata. Labellum late obo?atum, apice triloba m, circi 4 cm. longum 
et latum, basi attenuatum; lobi laterales obtuse rotundati; lobus inter- 
medins brevis, latus, obtusus, pallide flavua, purpureo-venosus, margine 
purpureo-punctatus ; discus quinque-carinatus, venis villosis, medio in 
callum trideutatum incrassatns. Columna clavata, arcuata, 2'5 cm. longa, 
sanguinea. 



This graceful and beautiful species is a native of Annam> 
and was discovered and sent home by Mr. W. Micholitz, 
when collecting there for Messrs. Sander & Sous in 1 8 i > 1 . 
It flowered for the first time in cultivation in the Royal 
Botanic Garden, Glasnevin, in November, 1905, when it 
was sent to Kew for determination, and the annexed plate 
was prepared. About a year later it flowered in several 
other collections, and thus is evidently a winter-blooming 
species. Its general habit and few-flowered inflorescence 
place it near to the North Indian G. ebumeum, Lindl. (Bot. 
Mag. t. 5126), and the Burmese C. Parishii, Keichb. f., 
but it is markedly different in the structure and details 
of the lip, while its crimson column is unique in the genus, 
and furnished a very appropriate specific name, [n its 
slender habit it somewhat recalls the allied GyperorcJiis 
elegans, Blume (Bot. Mag. t. 7007), but the inflorescence 
is very different. 

J)escr. — An erect epiphytic herb, about 1J ft. high. 

April 1st, 1907. 



Psendobidbs ovate-oblong, over an inch long, several- 
leaved. Leaves arching, elongate-linear, acute, 10-15 in. 
long, about J- in. broad, sheathed at the base. Scape 
axillary, suberect, arching, 1-1J ft. long, 4-5-flowered, 
with several narrowly lanceolate acuminate sheaths below. 
Bracts lanceolate, acute, 1-1^ in. long. Pedicels lj-lf in. 
long. Sepals elliptical, apiculate, concave, If in. long, 
about 1 in. broad, white, the lateral pair somewhat keeled 
behind. Petals obovate-elliptical, apiculate, rather shorter 
than the sepals, white, with about three rows of minute 
purple dots down the centre of the basal half. Lip broadly 
obovate, 3-lobed at the apex, as long as the petals, 1J in. 
broad at the apex, much narrowed towards the base; side 
lobes obtusely rounded ; front lobe short, broad and 
obtuse ; colour yellowish white, rather deeper towards the 
apex, and lined throughout with red-purple, the lines 
breaking up into dots at the margin of the side lobes; 
veins more or less thickened, and somewhat villous on the 
disk and front lobe ; disk with five slender keels, thickened 
about the middle into a prominent 3-lobed crest, the 
middle lobe exceeding the lateral pair. Column clavate, 
arcuate, an inch long, and wholly crimson in colour. 
Pollinia four, more or less confluent into two, and attached 
by a short, broad stipes to a hippocrepiform gland.— 
R. A. Rolfe. 



Fig. 1, part of the lip ; 2, column ; 3 and 4, pollinarium seen from back 
and front ; 5, whole plant : — 5, much redticed, the rest enlarged. 



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Tar. 8132. 

CAESALPINIA vernalis. 

China. 

Leguminosae. Tribe Caesalpimeae. 
Caesalpixia, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 565. 



Cie3alpinia vernalis, Champ, ex Benth. in Hook. Kew Journ. 18)2, vol. iv. 
p. 77 ; Benth., Fl. Ifongk. p. 97 ; Hemsl. in Journ. [Ann. Soe. But. vol. xiin. 
p. 206; affinis (!. Nugae, Ait., a qua foliolis minoribus ovatis et racemiH 
ferrugineo-tomentosis ditfert. 

Frutex alte scaadens, caule sparse acnleato, cortice longitudinaliter desqua- 
mante. Ramuli et foliorum rhaches jnvenes brunneo-tomentelli, inno- 
vationibns ferrugineo-tomentosis. Bhachis folii subtus valde aculeata; 
pinnne 9-12-jugae, breviter patiolatae, rhachiola inter foliola aculeolata; 
t'oliola 4-8-juga, breviter petiolulata, ovdta, acuti, interdnm leviter 
acuminata, l*5-2'5 cm. longa, 0'5-l cm. lata, snpra nitidula, glabra, 
snbtns pallida nervo medio puberulo. Racemi in axillis superioribns 
orti, circ. 15 cm. lonsri, rhachi ferrugineo-toinentosa. Alabastra nutantia. 
Sepala obovato-oblonga, convexa, ciliata, anticnm quam cetera mijun, 
extra longiuscule ferrugineo-pubescens, vix 1 cm. longum. Petala, 
ovata, lateralia et antica vix 15 cm. longa ungue incluso, posticum quam 
cetera minus, reflexum vel revolutum, coeeineo-maculatum. Stamina 
ileclinata, filamentis inferne villosis, antheris uni- vel biapiculati*. 
Ovarium breviter stipitatnm, pubescens, biovulatum, stylo crasso. 
Legumen oblique eiliptico-oblongnm, 5 cm. longum, 3'5 cm. latum. 



Caesalpinia vernalis attaches itself to the trees on which 
it climbs by means of the numerous backwardly-directed 
prickles on the under surface of the leaf-rhachis. It lias 
hitherto been recorded only from Hongkong, but may 
possibly yet be found on- the mainland; according to 
Mr. W. J. Tutcher, Assistant Superintendent, Botanic 
Garden, Hongkong, of the 159 species recorded as endemic 
for Hongkong by Bentham, only about 50 remain peculiar 
to the island, the remainder having since been discovered 
in other parts of China. Numerous additional species 
have been discovered in Hongkong since the publication 
of the " Flora Hongkongensis," and the endemic clement 
is now estimated by Tutcher (Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot., 
vol. xxvii. p. 59) at about 100. 

Seeds of C. vernalis were received at Kew in 1883 from 
the Botanic Gardens, Hongkong, but the species did not 
flower until May, 1906, when it was figured for this 
Magazine. The Kew plant is trained against one of tin; 
pillars in the Temperate House, where it has made 
May 1st, 1907. 



vigorous growth. The rusty tomentum on the younger 
parts gives the plant a very characteristic appearance ; 
and the flowers, which are lemon-yellow with a scarlet 
blotch, have a singularly pleasing effect. 

Descr. — A tall, climbing, prickly shrub, the younger 
shoots with a rusty-brown coating of hairs. Leaves bipin- 
nate, with 9-12 pairs of pinnules; rhachis armed on the 
lower surface with numerous recurved prickles; leaflets 
4-8 pairs on each pinnule, ovate, acute, j™l in. long, 
£~J in. broad, slightly shining and quite glabrous on the 
upper surface, dull and much paler on the lower ; midrib 
puberulous on the lower surface. Racemes about 6 in. 
long, borne in the upper axils ; rhachis rusty-tomentose. 
Sepals obovate-oblong, ciliate, the lowermost one larger 
than the others, and rusty-pubescent on the back. Petals 
ovate, lemon-yellow, the uppermost one smaller than the 
others, reflexed or revolute, and marked with a scarlet 
blotch. Stamens decimate ; filaments villous in their lower 
half. Ovary shortly stipitate, pubescent, two-ovuled ; 
style stout. Pod obliquely elliptic-oblong. — T. A. 

Sl'KAGUE. 

Fig. 1, flower with lateral and anticous petals removed ; 2 and 3, anthers; 
4, pistil : — all enlarged. 



8133 




M. S. Ael J.N.Fitchktk 



tBrodks Daj'VSanLt^fag? 



L.Reevp, &.C?i,arukm- 



Tat;. 8133. 

X ODONTIODA HEATONENSIS. 
Garden Hybrid. 



Orchidacbae. Tribe Vandkae. 
Opoxtioda, genus inter Cochliodam et Odontoglostum hybridum. 



Odontioda heatonensis, Ganl. Chron. 1906, vol. xxxix. p. 158; Orch. Rev. 

.1906, p. 118 ; inter Cochliadam sanguineam et Odontoglossum cirrhosum 

bybriila. 
Herba epiphytica, circa 25-30 cm. alta. Pseudnbulbi ovoideo-cblongi, snb- 

compressi, apice raonophylli, basi 3-4-phylli, 4-5"5 cm. longi. Folia 

oblouga. subacuta, apice recurva, subcoriacea, 6-15 cm. longa, 2-5 cm. 

lata. Scapi axillarea, erecti, circa 30 cm. lontri; racemi laxi, mnltiflori. 

Bracteae ovato-oblongae, acutae, 4-5 mm. longao. Pedicelli 2-2'5 cm. 

longi. Flores speciosi, caudidi, aegmentis apice roaeo-auffnaia, basi roseo- 

macnlatis. Sepala oblongo-lanceolata, acuminata, 2-2'5 cm. lon^a. 

Petala oblongo-lanceolata, acurniuata, sepalis paullo breviora et latiora. 

f/ibellum liberum, late unguicnlatum ; limbus patens, snbtrilobus, ovatua, 

apice acuminatus et recuivus, l"5-2 cm. lonji-us: diacus bicriatatus, criatia 

late oblongis compresaia et bidentatis. Colitmna clavata, lere 1 cm. 

longa, alia suhulatis. 



About three years ago a hybrid was raised between 
Odontoglossum nobile, Reichb. f., and Cochlioda Noetzliaua, 
Rolfe, to which the generic name of Odontioda was given, 
and the plant was figured in this Magazine (t. 7990). 
Since that time three other members of this artificial 
genus have appeared, one of which is figured in the 
accompanying plate. It was raised by Messrs. Charles- 
worth & Co., Heaton, Bradford, from Odontoglossum cir- 
rhosum, Line!]. (B. M. t. 6317), and Cochlioda sanguvnea, 
Benth. (MesosjAnidium sanauineum, Reichb. f.. B. M. 
t. 5627), the former being the seed-bearer, and flowered 
for the first time in March, 1906, when it was exhibited 
at a meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society, and 
received an Award of Merit. Several seedlings bave 
flowered, and, as generally happens with hybrids, show a 
certain amount of variation in size and colour. One of 
the plants has been presented to the Kew collection. 

The two other Odontiodae are 0. Bohnhojjlap, a hybrid 
between Cochlioda vulcanica, Benth. et Hook. f. (Meso- 
.spinidium vulcanicum, Reichb. f. ; B. M. t. 6001), and 
Odontoglossum cirrhosum, LindL, and 0. Bradshawiae, 
derived from ( 'ochlioda Noetzliana, Rolfe, and Odontoglossum 
Mat 1st, 1907. 



crispum, LindL Both were raised by Messrs. Charles- 
worth & Co. Other seedlings are in existence, and the 
group is likely to extend considerably, as the union of the 
smaller-flowered, but brilliantly-coloured species of Cock* 
liocla with the popular species of Odontoglossum promises 
to yield a race of handsome garden Orchids. 

Descr. — Plant about a foot high. Bulbs ovoid-oblong, 
somewhat compressed, 2—2^ in. long, with one leaf at the 
apex, and three or four at the base. Leaves oblong, sub- 
acute, recurved at the apex, leathery, dark green, 3|~6 in. 
long, 1-1 in. broad. Scape axillary, erect, slender, 1 ft. or 
more high ; raceme loose and many-flowered. Bracts ovate- 
oblong, acute, under 5 in. long. Pedicels about 1 in. long. 
Flowers with a white ground, suffused at the apex of the 
segments, and spotted below with rosy purple. Sepals 
oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, about 1 in. long. Petals 
slightly shorter, and broader at the base than the sepals. 
Lip free, broadly stalked; limb spreading, slightly 3-lobed, 
ovate, acuminate and recurved at the apex, shorter than the 
other segments ; disc with a pair of erect oblong laterally 
compressed crests, slightly toothed at the apex. Column 
clavate, under \ in. long, with a pair of erect, subulate 
teeth at the apex. — R. A. Rolfe. 



Fig. 1, lip and columo ; 2 and 3, pollinarium : — all enlarged. 



S/34 




M-S.del J.N.FitohOith. 



T&ncentBrooks Day&Son.u£iny? 



i..Reeve & C"? London.. 



Tap. 8134. 
aloe campy losiphon. 

Tropical Africa. 

Liliaceae. Tribe Aloineae. 

Aloe, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 77»> ; A. Berger in 

Engl. Bot. Jahrb. vol. xxxvi. p. 42. 



Aloe campylosiphoa, A. Berger in Notizbl. Konigl. Bot. Oart. Berl. vol. iv. 
p. 151 ; Engl. Bot. Jahrb. vol. xxxvi. p. 59 ; A. saponariae, Haw., proxi- 
mas, foliis recurvatis laueeolatia differt. 

Acaulis. Folia circ. 15, dense roaulata, lanceolata, longe acuminata, re- 
curvata, apice subcarinata, circ. 12 cm. longa, baai 6 cm. lata, laete 
viridia macnlis oblongis rotundisve albidis picta, subtus albo-marmorata; 
marlines cartilaginei, purpurei, ninuato-dentati; dentea patentee, inter 
se 4-8 mm. distantes, purpurei, 2-3 mm. longi. Inflorescentia circ. 30 cm. 
alta, ramosa; racemus 10 cm. longus, densiflorus; bracteae 1-2 cm. 
longae, lanceolatae, acnminatae, scarioaae, 3— 5-nerviae : pedicelli erecto- 
patentes, per anthesin 1*5 cm. lougi. Perianthium 3 cm. longum, coralli- 
nnm ; tubus circa ovai'ium globoso-inflatus deinde conspicue constrictua 
et manifeste decnrvatus; lobi oblongi, subacuti, 1 cm. longi, ad margines 
pallidiorea, intus lutei. Filamenta perianthio paullo longiora, basi 
complanata ; antberae lineares, aurantiacae, dorsifixae. Ovarium 
oblongum, profunde trilobatum. 



Aloe campylosiphon was discovered by Dr. A. Engler in 
Usambara, amongst rocks, on the dry summit of Bomule 
Mountain, at an altitude of 3,450 ft., and introduced into 
cultivation by him in 1902. He sent a plant to the late 
Sir Thomas Hanbury, K.C.V.O., in whose garden at La 
Mortola it first flowered in June, 1905, it was from this 
plant, at its second flowering in June, 1906, that our figure 
was taken. Mr. A. Berger writes : " It somewhat re- 
sembles the old A. saponaria, but differs in every way, and 
is a very distinct species." 

In habit this species very strongly resembles A. soma- 
liensis, G. H. Wright (ex W. Watson in Gard. Chron. 1899, 
vol. xxvi. p. 430; Kew Bulletin, 1901, p. 135), but the 
perianth of the latter is not constricted above the ovary. 

Descr. — Stemless. Leaves about 15 in a dense rosette, 
lanceolate, long-acuminate, recurved, slightly keeled at 
the apex, about 4f in. long, 2| in. wide at the base, bright 
o-reen, and marked with oblong or round whitish spots 
above, marbled with white beneath ; margins cartilaginous, 
purple, wavy and toothed ; teeth standing out at right 

May 1st, 1907. 



angles to the margin, £~| in. apart, purple, about x \ in. 
long. Inflorescence about 1 foot high, or slightly more ; 
side branches 8 in. Jong, curved upwards; raceme 4 in. 
long, dense ; bracts ^—| in. long, lanceolate, acuminate, 
scarious, 3-5-nerved; pedicels § in. long, becoming 1^ iu. 
long in fruit. Perianth a little over 1 in. long, coral-red; tube 
inflated around the ovary, then conspicuously constricted 
and curved ; lobes oblong, subacute, about £ in. long, paler 
at the margins, yellow inside. Filaments a little longer 
than the perianth, flattened at the base ; anthers linear, 
dorsifixed, orange. Ovary oblong, deeply three-lobed. — 
C. H. Wright. 



Fig. 1, flower ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, pistil ; 5, whole plant : — 1-4, enlarged, 
5, much reduced. 



8135 




XS.aa.JN-.Fitx+OiJK 



1 finceiiBroo'Vs,Day& Son-Lt^urip 



LReeve &_c ° London. 



Tab. 8135. 

PRIMULA ORBICULARIS. 
China. 

Primulaceae. Tribe Prjmuleae. 
Pbiuula, L. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. 1'Jani. vol. ii. p. 631. 



Primula (§ Nivales, Pax) orbicularis, Hemsl. in Gard. Chron. 1906, 
vol. xxxix. pp. 290 et 403, f. 164; species ex affinitate P. sikkimensis et 
P. Stuartii a quibus foliis fere integris, corollae tubo calycem vix 
excedente et limbo rotato lobis integerrimis differt. 

Folia subcoriacea, oblongo-lanceolata, 5-15 cm. longa, inferiora minora, 
obtusa, longitudinaliter recurva, minute dentata, in petiolum late alatnm 
subvaginantam angustata, primnm minute farinosa. Scapus 15-30 cm. 
nltus, teres, ac flores flavo- vel albo-fariuosus. Involucri bracteae parvae, 
pedicellis breviores, basi incrassatae, connatae. Umbellae usque ad 
20-florae, densae, 7-8 cm. diametro, pedicellis brevil-us. Flores 2'5-3 cm. 
diametro, lutei,fragrantes. Calyx crassup, campanulatus, circiter 1"5 cm. 
lonyus, intus extraque farinosus. Corollae hypocraterimorphae tubus 
puberulus, calycem vix excedens, prope apicem et infra medium ad 
staminum insertionem constrictus, fauce angusta, crenulata ; limbus per 
totam superticiem ruberulus, orbicularis, rotatus, planus, lobis fere orbi- 
cularibus leviter imbricatis integerrimis margine ciliolatis. Stamina ad 
tnbi constrictionem infra medium affixa, filamentis brevissiinis, antheris 
circiter 2 mm. longis. Stylus inclusus, stamina superans. Capsula 
rnihi ignota. 



Among the numerous new species of Primula from 
Western China P. orbicularis promises well, but it is too 
early to predict its future under cultivation. This species 
was raised by Messrs. James Veitch & Sons from seed 
brought home by Mr. E. H. Wilson, and it flowered for the 
first time last May. Mr. Wilson did not collect flower- 
ing specimens, but he was almost satisfied that his dried 
specimens in seed, numbered 3003a, represent the same 
species. He may be right, though they present differences 
which lead to a doubt as to the identification. In the first 
place they are more robust than the cultivated plants that 
I have seen. The leaves are 6 to 8 in. long, and have 
a distinct petiole, nearly as long as the blade, and the 
stout scape is 15 in. high, and bears two distinct tiers of 
seed-vessels. The pretty flowers of P. orbicularis are 
agreeably fragrant. The name is given in reference to 
the outline of the limb of the corolla, as well as of the 
separate lobes of the same. 

Descr. — A more or less mealy perennial. Leaves thick. 

May 1st, 1907. 



leathery or somewhat fleshy, oblong-lanceolate, 2-8 in. 
long, obtuse, margins recurved, minutely toothed or entire, 
narrowed downwards into a sheathing petiole. Scape 6 in. 
to a foot high, terete. Bracts of the involucre small, 
shorter than the pedicels, thickened and connate at the 
base. Umbels dense, 10-20-flowered, 2^-3 in. in diameter ; 
pedicels short. Flowers 1-1 ^ in. in diameter, clear 
yellow, agreeably fragrant. Calyx thick, campanulate. 
Corolla salver-shaped, puberulous ; tube scarcely longer 
than the calyx, constricted near the top and below the 
middle, where the stamens are attached ; mouth narrow, 
crenulated ; limb orbicular, rotate, flat, with almost orbi- 
cular, slightly overlapping, entire, minutely ciliated lobes. 
Stamens attached below the middle of the corolla-tube ; 
filaments very short. Style included, but overtopping the 
stamens. Capsule not seen. — W. Botting Hemslky. 



Fig. 1, part of calyx and pistil ; 2, part of corolla laid open and tbree of the 
stamens : — both enlarged. 




8136 



ttS.aeUTTRtdiKtk 



Vincent Br oaJ<s,D<gr&San.Lt£irnp 



LReev »&-C<?L< m i OTL 



Tab. 8136. 
HOOPIA Odreori. 

Angola. 

Asclepiadaceae. Tribe Stapelteae. 
Hoodia, Sweet; Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 783. 



Hoodia Currori, Decne in DC. Prodr. vol. viii. p. 665; Hooker, Niger FL 
p. 458 ; Dyer in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xv. p. 251, t. 5, f. 2; N. E. Br. in 
Hook. Ic. PI. vol. xx. sub t. 1905, p. 3 ; K. Schum. in Engl. & Prantl 
Pflanzenfam. vol. iv. pt. ii. p. 275; N. E. Br. in FL Trop. Afr. vol. iv. 
pt. i. p. 491 ; Gxrd. Chron. 1906, vol. xl. p. 62, f. 27; affinis H. Gordoni, 
Bed corolla majore intra pilosa facile distinguitur. 

Planta succulenta 45-60 cm. alta, basi ramosa, glauco-virens. Rami erecti, 
4"5-65 cm. crassi, multiangulati, glabri ; angulis spinoso-tuberculatis. 
Flores magni, prope apicem ramorum enati. Pedicelli 1*8-2 cm. loDgi. 
Sepala 6-8 mm. longa, e basi ovata subulato-attenuata. Corolla 9-125 
cm. diam., patelliformis, vix lobata, 5-cuspidata, purpureo-rubra disco 
radiato-ochracea, intra purpureo-pilosa; tubus 6 mm. longus, 8 mm. 
diam., circa orem leviter 5-tuberculatns. Corona exterior cnpularis, 
5-sulcata, 10-dentata, glabra, ptirpureo-brunnea, dentihus deltoideis 
obtusis, 1 mm. longis. Coronae interioris lobi fere 1 mm. longi, oblongo- 
lineavi, obtusi, antheris incumbentes, basi partitionibus cum corona 
exteriore connexi, purpureo-brunnei. — Scytanthus Currori, Hook. Ic. PI. 
vol. vii. tt. 605-606; 8. Burkei, Hook. Ic. PI. vol. vii. sub t. 625. 
Adenium namaquarium, Henslow in The Gardener, 1901, p. 1194, f. 16. 



This is the third out of the six described species of 
this remarkable genus that has flowered at Kew and 
been figured in the Botanical Magazine, the other two 
being H. Gordoni (t. 6228), and H. Bainii (t. 6348), 
whilst, so far as is known to me, no other specimens 
are recorded as having flowered in anj part of the 
world outside their native country. In its stems //. 
Currori differs very little from II. Gordoni and some of 
the other species, but its flowers are larger than those of 
any other, and more hairy on the inner surface ; they are 
also more richly coloured than in the other two species 
which have flowered at Kew. The specimen here figured 
was sent to Kew. in 19u5, from Angola, by Mr. J. Goss- 
weiler, Curator of the Botanic Garden at Loanda. At 
first it was subjected to dry treatment, but as this failed 
to induce active growth, it was placed in a moist stove, 
where it throve and flowered in June, 1906, the flowers 
lasting for about fifteen days. 
May 1st, 1907. 



Descr. — A bushy, succulent perennial, 2-2J ft. high. 
Stems If- 2J in. thick, cylindric, with thirteen or more 
angles formed of contiguous spine-tipped tubercles, 
glabrous, pale glaucous-green. Floicers arising in the 
grooves near the top of the stems, two to four (or more ?) 
together, successively developed. Pedicels -f in. long, |- in. 
thick, glabrous, purple-tinted. Sepals -j-^- in. long, subu- 
late-attenuate from an ovate base, glabrous. Corolla 3|— 5 
in. in diameter, saucer-shaped, obscurely lobed, with five 
subulate cusps, purplish-red, with ochreous-tinted rays on 
the central part, glabrous on the back, covered with erect 
purple hairs all over the inner face; the tube (enclosing 
the corona) very small, about \ in. long, ^ in. in diameter 
outside, raised around the mouth into five dull red or 
sienna-red tubercles, and the orifice thickly roofed over 
with intermingling hairs, so that only very minute insects 
can enter. Outer corona exceeding the style-apex by half 
its length, resembling a five-grooved cup, with five pairs of 
deltoid, obtuse teeth nearly |- line long, glabrous, dark 
purple-brown, shining. Inner coronal-lobes nearly £ line 
long, oblong-linear, obtuse, closely incumbent on the 
anthers and not produced beyond them, dorsally connected 
by partitions with the outer corona, glabrous, dark purple- 
brown, shining. — -N". B. Brown. 



Fig. 1, flower with the corolla removed, showing the corona; 2, mouth of 
the corolla-tube; 3, pollen-masses : — all enlarged. 



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Tab. 8137. 
RHODODENDRON Delavayi. 
China. 



Ericaceae. Tribe Rhodoreae. 
Rhododendron, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Cen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron Delavayi, Franch. in Bull. Soc. Bot. France, 1886, vol. 
xxxiii. p. 231 ; W. W. in Oard. Ohron. 1904, vol. xxxv. p. 262 ; II. arboreo 
arete affine et hujus speciei forsan varietas tantum calyce major« hirsute 
et corolla intus maculis nigris corollae lobis isomeris ornata. 

" Arbor [vel frutex paucipedalisl Folia coriacea, oblongo-lanceolata, superne 
glabra, viridi-glaucescentia, subtns tomento rufidulo brevissimo obsita, 
nervis subinconspicuis. Flores 15-30, dense con^esti, intense rubri. 
Calyx pubescens, parvus, dentibus deltoideis. Corolla *ix ultra pollicaris 
e basi aperta campanulata, lobis 5 rotundatis. Stamina 10, filanientis 
gtabris. Ovarium dense sericeo-villosum, stylo etiam baai glaberrimo." 
Franchet, loc. sup. cit. 



Franchet's description is unaccompanied by any com- 
parison with other species, but, as Mr. Watson remarks, 
B. Delavayi is the same in all essential characters as 
B. arboreum, and the latter, as circumscribed in the 
" Flora of British India," includes forms differing more 
from each other than the plant here figured does from 
Smith's original figure in " Exotic Botany," vol. i, t. 6, 
of B. arboreum. Still, as a cultivated plant, it deserves a 
distinctive name, and as it has one it is retained here. 
B. Delavayi, which is distinguished by the intense red ol* 
its flowers with black blotches on the inside, has been in 
cultivation in Europe nearly twenty years, and at Kew 
previous to 1894, where, however, it has never flowered. 
The drawing for the accompanying plate was made from a 
specimen received, through Mr. Moore, of Glasnevin, from 
Mr. Thos. Acton, Kilmacurragh, Wicklovv, where it first 
flowered in 1904. A plant was sent from Kew to Mr. 
Acton in 1894, and it is now a large bush, producing its 
very showy flowers in profusion. Kew possesses dried 
specimens from Tsangshan, Yunnan, from an elevation of 
upwards of 8,000 ft., collected by the Abbe Delavay ; 
from Mengtze, at 6,200 ft., collected by Mr. W. Hancock, 
and from the same region, collected by Dr. A. Henry at 
elevations of 6,000 to 8,000 ft. It grows in woods and in 
Jttne 1st, 1907, 



open, exposed situations and forms a bush 6-10 ft. high. 
Some particulars of the genus Rhododendron are given 
under i?. Fordii, Hemsl, (B. M. t. 8111), especially in 
relation to the Chinese species. 

TJescr. — A bush, or small tree, with thick flowering- 
branches, at first clothed with a red-brown tomentum ; 
bark of the same colour. Leaves crowded at the tips of 
the branches, distinctly stalked, very thick and stiff, 
oblong or lanceolate, 3-6 in. long, subacute or rounded at 
both ends, glabrous and shining above, clothed with a 
very short, pale brown, felt-like indumentum below ; mid- 
rib and main lateral veins impressed above, elevated 
below ; ultimate veinlets obscure ; stalks J-l in. long. 
Scales of the inflorescence thick, rounded, apiculate, at 
first clothed with red-brown, silky hairs. Flowers crimson, 
in dense stalkless clusters close on to the leaves, 1|— If in. 
diameter. Stamens and style included. Capsule cylin- 
drical, f in. long, clothed with a red-brown tomentum. — 

W. BOTTING HeMSI.EY. 



Figs. 1 and 2, scales of the inflorescence ; o, cah x and pistil : 4- and 5, stamens, 
6, cross section of ovary : — all enlarged. 



8138 




MS. del. JW -Htchirth- 



VmcftntfeooltcDay&SoTLljt^Irnp 



LReeve &.C?icn.dan. 



Tar. 8138. 

TAMARIX PENTANDRA. 
South-eastern Europe and Orient. 

Tamaricaceae. Tribe Tamariceae. 
Tamarix, L. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 160. 



Tamarix pentandra, Pall. Flor. Boss. vol. ii. p. 72, tab. 79, figs. A-D. (excl. 
synonymis et varietate) ; a T. gallica, L., quacum olira confusa, petalis 
persistentibus conniventibus et fila mentis inter lobos disci ortis basi 
baud latioribns distincta. 

Frute.v vel arbor ramosissimns ; rami cortice plerumque purpurascente tecti, 
graciles, ramulos tenues longiores laxe foliatos et ex iis alios breviores 
densissime foliatos emittentes. Folia ramorum longiorum lanceolata 
vel ovato-lanceolata, acuta, basi breviter decurrentia, 2, rarius 3 mm. 
longa, ramulorum breviorum squamiformia, imbricata, ovata, 0"5-0"65 mm. 
longa, appressa, glauco-viridia. Bacemi graciles, densiusculi, 2'5-5 cm. 
longi, e ramis hornotinis orti, in paniculas amplas terminales dispositi, 
alii inter ramos 6teriles additi ; bracteae ovatae, acuminatae vel acutae, 
pedicellos subaequantes vel paulo superantes ; pedicelli longiores vix 
1 mm. longi. Sepala 5, late ovata, acuta, ad margines late albo-byalina, 
0'5-0"6 mm. longa. Petala 5, late elliptico-oblonga, obtusissima, cam- 
panulatim conniventia, persistentia, 1'5-1"75 mm. longa. Discus 5-lobus, 
lobis emarginatis, sinubus extra ad medium decurrentibus intra multo 
minus profundus, ideoqne discus ex interno visus aequaliter leviter 10- 
crenatus. Stamina 5 ; filamenta sinubus extra inserta, 2 mm. paulo 
excedentia, e basi aequaliter filiformia; antherae minute apiculatae, 
5 mm. longae. Ovarium snblageniforme, sub anthesi vix 2 mm. longnm ; 
styli 3, plerumque oblique patuli, brevissimi, apice incurvi, stigmatibus 
obovatis conniventibus ; ovula circiter 30. Capsula 4 mm. longa, valvis 
basi fere 1'5 mm. latis. T. Pallasii, Desv. io Ann. Sc Nat. ser. I. 
vol. iv. (1825), p. 349; DO. Prodr. vol. .iii. p. ( -»6; Bunge, Tent. Gen. 
Tamar. p. 49; Boiss. Fl. Or. vol. i.p. 773 (in parte) ; G-ard. Chron.ser. III. 
vol. xxxviii. p. 229. 



This is one of the most decorative Tamarisks in cultiva- 
tion, flowering in great profusion in July and August. In 
the wild state it ranges from the Balkan Peninsula tjirough 
Southern Russia to° Turkestan, and from Asia Minor to 
Persia, adorning the banks of rivers, particularly in their 
lower reaches and estuaries. Like other species of that 
genus it thrives well in saline soil; but it is by no means 
dependent on a more than ordinary amount of salts in the 
ground. The flowers are usually rose-coloured; some- 
times, however, also white, or nearly so. Bunge described 
no fewer than eight varieties of f. Pallasii in his mono- 
graph, and Boissier added one more. Most of them are 
based on slight, and possibly inconstant, modifications of 
the inflorescences, whilst one or two represent evidently 

June 1st, 1907. 



distinct species. The genus requires careful revision, 
and until this is accomplished it is impossible to define 
accurately the limits and the area of the species. There is 
no doubt that our plant is the common South Russian 
form, the " arbor vulgaris " which Pallas described so 
well as the type of his T. pentandra. The reasou why 
Desvaux dropped Pallas's name was probably that author's 
faulty synonymy, and the inclusion as a variety of another 
form which he rightly considered a distinct species. 
Desvaux's own description of " T. Pallasii " is practically 
useless, and to show how little he grasped the characters 
of Pallas's plants, it may be mentioned that the specimen 
which he wrote up as " T. Pallasii " in the Paris Her- 
barium (Herb. Jussieu) is T. laxa, "Willd., a totally distinct 
species. The variety referred to above as described by 
Pallas is identical with T. hispida, Willd., a singular form 
with very glaucous, minutely hirsute branchlets. It was 
under this name that the Kew specimens of T. p&ntandra 
were purchased from a Belgian nurseryman. The true 
T. hisjpida is a native of the deserts between the Caspian 
and Turkestan. 

Descr. — A shrub, or small tree, with slender, usually 
purple branches ; this year's branchlets, either long shoots 
or short shoots. Leaves of the long shoots distant, lan- 
ceolate to ovate-lanceolate, acute, slightly decurrent at the 
base, fa— J in. long ; those of the short shoots imbricate, 
ovate, fs~i& in- ^ug, appressed, glaucous or pale green. 
Racemes slender, rather dense, 1-2 in. long, from the new 
wood, arranged in large, terminal panicles ; bracts ovate, 
acuminate, or acute, as long as, or slightly longer than the 
pedicels; pedicels up to almost 2 \ in. long. Sepals 5, 
broad-ovate, acute, ^-^ in. long, margins broad, hyaline, 
white. Petals 5, broadly elliptic-oblong, very obtuse, 
conniving, persistent, fa-fa in- lo n #- Discus 5-lobed, 
lobes emarginate. Stamens 5 ; filaments filiform from the 
base, inserted on the outer side of the disc between the 
lobes ; anthers minutely apiculate. Ovary almost lageni- 
form, fa in. long ; styles 3, very short, with obovate, 
conniving stigmas. Capsule J in. long. — Otto Staff. 



Fig. 1, foliage; 2, flowers; 3, flower with sepals and petals removed; 
4, section of ovary ; 5, ovule : — all enlarged. 



8139 




M.S.aeIj;N.Fi.tcKIitk 



"WncenxBro oteJjegr.JoSorJ.lSrig? 



l.ReevB &.C°LorulorL 



Tab. 8139. 

EUPATORIUM GLANDULOSUM. 

Mexico. 

Compositae. Tribe Eupatoriaceae. 
Eupatohium, Linn.; Benih. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 245. 



Eupatorium g-landulosum^.i?.^. Nov. Gen. et Sp. 1820, vol. iv. p. 122, 
t. 346; Bot. Beg. 1835, vol. xx. t. 1723; Pcuct. Bot. Diet. ed. 1, 1840, 
p. 128; non Michx.; inter species hortens-es foliis rhombeo-ovatis vel 
triangularibus grosse crenato-serratis distincta. 

Suffrutex 1-2 m. altus, dense trichotomo-ramosus, ramis graciliusculis glandu- 
loso-pubescentibus, floriferis elongatis subnudis. Folia opposita, tenuia, 
papyracea, longe graciliterque petiolata, rhombeo-ovata vel fere trian- 
gularia, in cultis cum petiolo usque ad 20 cm. longa, superne gradatim 
minora, acuminata, acuta, subtrinervia, grosse serrato-crenata, supra 
glabra vel cito glabrescentia, subtus praesertim secus costam venasque 
viscoso-pubescentia. Corymbi compositi, ternati et snbternatim ramosi, 
polycephali, densi, peduncnlis gracillirnis. Gapitula circiter 1 cm. 
diametro, saltern usque ad 80-flora. Involucri bracteae circiter 20, bi- 
Reriatae, inaequnles, lanceolatae, acutae, quam rlores paulo breviores, 
distincte bicostatae, margine scariosae. Flores albi, fragrantes. Gorollae 
tubus 4-5 mm. longus, gracillimus, prope apicem Bubito ampliatus, lobis 
angustis recurvis. Styli rami elongati, longe exserti, divergentes. 
Achaenia 1*5-2 mm. longa, nigra, glabra, 4-angularia, estriata, leviter 
curvata. Puppi setae circiter 10-12, pubescentes, albae, corollae tubum 
aequantes. — E. adenophorum, Spreng. Syst. Veg. 1826, vol. iii. p. 420; 
DC. Prodr. vol. v. p. 164; Lowe, Mau. PI. Madeira, i. p. 435. E. trapezoi- 
deum, Kuntb, Ind. Sem. Hort. Berol. Anno, 1847, coll. p. 13; Rofl'e in 
Gard. Chron. 1906, vol. xxxix. p. 274. E. Wendlandii, Hort. 



Eupatorium glandulosum, one of the best of the white- 
flowered, greenhouse species, was introduced, according to 
Paxton, in 1826, and it was figured in the " Botanical 
Register" (t. 1723) in 1835. It is there recorded that 
the Horticultural Society received seeds from Mexico some 
years previously through a Mr. Canning. Subsequently, 
" scarcely before 1840," it was introduced into Madeira 
and the Canaries, where it is now excessively common. 
It is a valuable winter plant for the conservatory or 
greenhouse where there is plenty of space. The drawing 
was made from a plant that flowered at Kew in March, 
1906. In its native country it grows in humid situations 
at altitudes of 5,000-8,000 ft. 

In spite of discrepancies in the description, I think there 
is no doubt that E. trapezoideum, Kunth, belongs here. 

Descr. — A much-branched shrub, rising sometimes under 
June 1st, 1907. 



cultivation to a height of 6-8 ft. Branches and panicles 
trichotomous, densely beset with viscous glands. Leaves 
opposite, thin, borne on long stalks, more or less triangular, 
with the stalks as much as 9 in. long, gradually smaller 
upwards to the inflorescence, acuminate, acute, coarsely 
serrate-crenate, glabrescent above, hairy and viscous, chiefly 
along the veins, beneath. Flower-heads numerous, corym- 
bose in ternately branched panicles, white, fragrant, about 
\ in. across. Bracts of the involucre about 20, in two 
series, lanceolate, acute, a little shorter than the flowers, 
prominently 2-ribbed, scarious or thin at the margin. 
Style-branches much exserted, divergent. Achenes about 
^ a in. long, black, glabrous, quadrangular. Pappus of 
about 10 or 12, slightly plumose bristles, as long as the 
corolla-tube. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



Fig. 1, a head of flowers ; 2, a flower ; o, a bristle of the pappus ; 4, anthers ; 
5, style-branches: — all enlarged. 




x-^ 



1 JTsTPitehiih 



L.Beeve & C° T.oxular_. 



.3ru;c!ntEroOrt5.Dav 1 (, :Sor_Lt l Iit v x 



Tab. 8140. 

GENTIANA ornata. 

Alpine Central and Eastern Himalaya. 



Gentianaceae. Tribe Swertieae. 
Gextiana, Linn. ; Benth. ef, Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 815. 



Gentiana ornata, Wall. Gat. 4386 ; Griseb. Gentian, p. 277 ; DC. Prodr. vol. 
ix. p. 110 ; Hook. Fl. Brit. India, vol. iv. p. 116 ; Act. Hort. Petrop. 
vol. xv. p. 268; affinis G. ternifoliae, Franch., a qua ramis brevioribus 
et floribus minoribus differt. 

Herba 13-15 cm. alta. Caules e radice plures, glabri. Folia linearia vel 
inferiora fere ovata, peracuta, 1-2 cm. longa, 1*5-3 mm. lata, basi in 
tubnmbrevem connata. Flores solitarii, terminales. Calycis tubus mem- 
branaceus, 1 cm. longus, glaber; lobi 5, lineares, acuti, circiter 1 cm. 
longi, 1-2 mm. lati, sinnbus 0"5 mm. latis. Corolla caernlea, infundibuli- 
formis, striata, circiter 4'5 cm. longa, fance 7 mm. diametro ; lobi deltoidei, 
acnti, 8 mm. longi, 4 mm. lati, plicis deltoideis subacutis. Stamina 
inclusa, circa medium tubi inserta ; filamenta deorsum leviter dilatata, 
1 cm. longa ; antherae 3 mm. longae. Ovarium glabram, ]'5cm. longum, 
stipitatum ; stylus brevis. Capsula vix 1'5 cm. longa demum e corolla 
multo exsertus. — Pneumonanthe ornata, Don, Gen. Sysfc. vol. iv. p. 194. 

The plant previously figured at t. 6514 of this Magazine 
under the name of G. ornata is evidently not the true species, 
as has been pointed out in the " Gardener's Chronicle," 
1906, vol. xl. p. 182. It differs from G. ornata in having 
the throat of the corolla much more contracted, and in 
having broader leaves. Unfortunately no dried material 
of the specimen figured was preserved, and it has not been 
identified, but it comes near G. nipponica, Maxim. The 
plant here figured was presented to Kew in 1905 by Mr. 
Max Leichtlin of Baden-Baden. It flowered freely in a 
frame in August of last year, but will probably prove to 
be quite hardy. 

This species was first discovered by Wallich's collectors 
in the Central Himalaya, at an altitude of 11-15,000 ft. 
It has since been found in the Tsangpo Valley, north of 
Sikkim, and was recently discovered about ten miles to the 
north of Lhasa, by Capt. H. J. Walton during the Thibet 
Expedition. 

Several varieties of this plant have been described. 
One of the most distinct is G. ornata, var. obtusifolia, 
Franch., with broader obtuse leaves, and a somewhat 
longer corolla than in the type ; it is found in the countrv 
between Batang and Tachienlu in Western China. 
June 1st, 1907. 



Descr. — A herb about 6 in. high. Stems many from the 
root, glabrous. Leaves linear, or the lower almost ovate, 
very acute, J-f in. long, about ^ in. broad, connate at 
the base into a short tube. Flowers solitary and terminal. 
Calyx-tube membranous, \ in. long, glabrous, with 5 linear 
acute lobes about \ in. long. Corolla blue, funnel-shaped, 
striate, about If in. long and J in. in diameter at the 
throat ; lobes deltoid, acute, J in. long, £ iu. broad, with 
subacute, deltoid folds between. Stamens included, in- 
serted about the middle of the tube ; filaments slightly 
dilated downwards. Ovary glabrous, with a stalk about ^ 
in. long; style short. Capsule about A in. long, at length 
much exserted from the corolla. — J. Hutchinson. 



Fip. 1, section of calyx with pistil ; 2 section of corolla; 3 and 4, anthers 
all enlarged. 



8M 




rcS.cbelJ.W.FitehliiK 



"\5ncentBr 



L.Beeve &.C?Icndcn.. 



iciJia.Dayg'-SorLLt^Bip 



Tab. 8141. 
DENDROBIUM Ashworthiae. 

New Guinea. 



Orciiidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 
Denbrobium, SwarU ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498. 



Dendrobium Ashworthiae, O'Brien in Gard.Chron. 1901, vol. xxix. p. 86, 
fig. 36 ; a D. atroviolaceo, Rolfe, floribus ruajoribus, p^diceUia apice 
villosis, segmentis immacnlatis et iabelli callo suberecto differt. 

Herba epiphytica. Pseudobulbi 11-25 cm. long), basi angusti, vaginis sub- 
imbricatis obtecti, supra medium clavati, subcompregsi, sulcati, 2 - 5-3 cm. 
lati, diphylli. Folia ovato-oblonga, subobtusa, coriacea, 9-11 cm. longa, 
5-6 cm. lata. Racemi terminates, erecti, 10-15 cm. longi, basi vaginis 
tubuloso-spatbaceis obtecti, 4-5-flori. Bracteae ovatae, subacntae, cod- 
cavae, l'5-2 cm. longae. Pedicelli graciles, 4-5 cm. loniri, basi laeves, 
apice villosi, pilis retrorsis. Flores straminei, Iabelli basi purpnreo- 
striati. Sepala patentia, circa 3 cm. longa ; posticum elliptico-lanceolatum, 
acuminatum ; lateralia oblique tri ingularia, acuminata, basi circa 8 mm. 
lata. Petala late unguiculata, obovata, apiculata, circa 3 cm. longa, 
l'5-2 cm. lata. Labellum circa 2 cm. longum, trilobum ; lobi lateralis 
erecti, latissime oblongi, obtusi, circa 1 cm. longi; lob us intermedins 
latissime subcordato-ovatus, apiculatus, circa 1 cm. longus ; callus sub- 
erectus, oblongus, apice obscure tridentatus, 4 mm. longus. Golumna 
latissima, circa 4 mm. longa. 



The present species was introduced by Messrs. Sander 
& Sons, St. Albans, through their collector, Mr. W. 
Micholitz, about seven years ago, and it flowered in the 
collection of Mr. Elijah Ashworth, Harefield Hall, Wilms- 
low, in January, 1901, when it received a First-class 
Certificate from the Royal Horticultural Society. Tt is 
said to have been imported with D. atroviolaceum, I). 
Johnsoniae, I), spectabile, and D. Madonnae ; this probably 
fixes its habitat as New Guinea. The plant subsequently 
died, but there is another in the collection of Sir Trevor 
Lawrence, Bart., at Burford, which is believed to be ihe 
only surviving one in Europe, and this was kindly lent by 
Sir Trevor in April of last year-, in order that it might be 
drawn for the Botanical Magazine. It belongs to a section 
of the genus of which five others have been figured in this 
work, namely, D. macrophyllum, A. Rich., var. Veitchia- 
num, Hook. f. (t. 5649), D. atroviolaceum , Rolfe (r. 7371), 
i). Hodghinsoni, Rolfe (t. 7724), D. spectabile, Miq. 
(t. 7747), and D. Madonnae, Rolfe (t. 7U00). They belong 
to the section Deiidrocoryne, originally established by 
June 1st, 1907. 



Lindley to contain the species having a clavate psendobulb 
bearing leaves only at the apex, and a terminal or lateral 
inflorescence. The section was not recognized by Bentham 
and Hooker, but after excluding two or three species now 
known to belong elsewhere it forms a well-characterized 
section of Dendrobium. The genus is remarkably poly- 
morphic, and is now estimated to contain at least five 
hundred species, these being distributed from Japan, 
China, and Northern India to New Zealand. 

Descr.—Au epiphytic herb about a foot high. Pseudo- 
bulbs 4-10 in. long, narrow at the base, with several 
somewhat imbricating sheaths, clavate above, somewhat 
compressed and sulcate, about 1 in. broad, 2-leaved at the 
apex. Leaves ovate-oblong, subobtuse, coriaceous, 3|— 4^ 
in. long, about 2 in. broad, liacemes terminal, erect, 4-6 
in. long, with two or three tubular-spathaceous sheaths at 
the base, 4-5-flowered. Bracts ovate, subacute, somewhat 
concave, over \ in. long. Pedicels 1J-2 in. long, smooth 
and slender at the base, upper part and ovary densely 
villous with reflexed hairs. Flowers cream-white, with a 
few purple streaks at the base of the lip. Sepals spreading, 
about 1^ in. long; the dorsal one elliptic-lanceolate, 
acuminate ; the lateral pair obliquely triangular, acuminate, 
over i in. broad at the base. Petals broadly clawed, obo- 
vate, apiculate, about as long as the sepals, f in. broad. 
Lip f in. long, three-lobed ; side lobes erect, very broadly 
oblong, obtuse, over \ in. long; front lobe very broadly 
subcordate-ovate, apiculate, over -g- in. long ; callus sub- 
erect, oblong, obscurely 3-dentate at the apex, ^ in. long. 
Column very broad, J in. long. — R. A. Rolfe. 



Fig. 1, bairs from ovary; 2, bsse of lip; 3, column; 4, pollinia ; 5, whole 
plant : — 1-J, all enlarged, 5, much reduced. 



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Tab. 8137.— RHODODENDRON DELAVAYI. 
„ 8138— TAMARIX PENTANDRA. 
„ 8139.— EUPATORIUM GrLANDULOSUM. 
„ 8140.— GENTIANA ORNATA. 
„ 8141.— DENDROBIUM ASHWORTHIAE. 

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8142 



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Tab. 8142. 
ODONTOGLOSSUM Leeanum. 

Colombia. 

Orciiidaceai:. Tribe Vaxdeae. 
Odontoglosstdi, H.B. et K. ; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 561. 



Odontoglossum Leeanum, Reichb. f. in Garcl. (Jhron. 1882, vol. xvii. p. 525 ; 
1883, vol. xix. p. 694 ; 1902, vol. xxxi. p. 50 (var. Crawshayannm) ; Will. 
Orch. Alb. vol. iii. t. 101; Journ. Hort. 1901, vol. xliii. p. 193, cum ic. ; 
Rolfe in Orch. Rev. 1893, pp. 172,174; hybrida naturalis, probabiliter 
inter O. gloriosum, Lind. et Reichb. f., et 0. triumphans, lleichb. f., 
producta. 

Ilerba epipbytica. Pseudobulbi fasciculati, ovoideo-oblongi, subcompressi, 
4-5 cm. longi, 2'5-3"5 cm. lati, basi et apice diphylli. Folia coriacea, 
lineari-oblonga, subacuta, 15-20 cm. longa, l"5-2"3 cm. lata, ocapi 
axillares, suberecti, .30-45 cm. longi, racemosi vel laxe panioalati, multi- 
flori. Bracteae ovato-oblongae. acutae, conca*ae, 8-10 mm. longac. 
PedicelU 2-2*5 cm. longi. Flores speciosi, lutei, brunneo-maculati. 
Sepala et petala subaeqnalia, patentia, lanceolata, acuminata, circa 4 cm. 
longa. Ijabellum nngniculatnm ; unguis erectus, circa 8 mm. longns ; 
limbos patens, deltoiJeo-triangnlavis, acuminates, undulatns, (irca 2'"> 
cm. longus, basi 1*8 cm. latns ; discus puberulus, bicallosns, callis lamel- 
latis. Golumna clavata, arcuata, 1"8 cm. longa; alae oblongae, falcatae, 
apice acuminatae, circa 4 mm. longae. — 0. odoratum var. Leeanum, 
Veitcb, Man. Orch. vol. i. p. 56. O. lanceans var. Leeanum, Reicbb. f. in 
Sander, lleichenbachia, ser. 1, vol. i. p. 82. 



This striking Odontotjlossum appeared quite unexpectedly 
as a single plant in Messrs. James Veitch & Sons' Nur- 
sery at Chelsea, in 1882, and was described by Reichen- 
bach as a doubtful natural hybrid, the author remarking 
that it was distinguishable from O. deltoglossum, Reichb. f., 
by its far longer and narrower lip and bright yellow 
ground colour. No clue was given as to the habitat or as 
to the species along with which it was imported, and the 
point is still veiled in obscurity. In 1887 Messrs. Veitch 
reduced it to a variety of O. odoratum, Lindl., though re- 
marking that it was of supposed hybrid origin, while soon 
afterwards Reichenbaeh made it a variety of his 0. lanceans, 
a name which he proposed to include the large and poly- 
morphic series of natural hybrids believed to have arisen 
from the intercrossing of 0. erispum and 0. gloriosum. 
Here it remained for a considerable period, quite anoma- 
lous in its deep yellow ground colour. In 1902 a second 
plant appeared, also unexpectedly, in the establishment of 

July 1st, 1907. 



Messrs. T. Rochford & Co., Broxbourne, and is now in the 
collection of Mr. De Barri Crawshay. Rosefield, Seven- 
oaks. Tt chiefly differs from the original in having fewer 
and rather larger spots on the sepals and petals. The 
plant is now recognized as a natural hybrid between 
0. gloriosum and 0. triumphant, which are known to grow 
together, and whose characters are clearly combined in it. 
A flower of each parent is added to the plate, for com- 
parison. A large number of natural hybrid Odontoglos- 
sums are now known, and they invariably appear 
unexpectedly among importations of the parent species, 
several of which grow intermixed in a wild state. 

The figure was prepared from an inflorescence kindly 
sent by Baron Schroder, The Dell, Egham, in April, 1906, 
the rest of the plant being taken from the "Orchid 
Album." 

Descr. — An epiphytic herb. Pseudobulbs fascicled, sub- 
compressed, 1J 2 in. long, 1-1J in. broad, 2-leavecl at 
apex and base. Leaves coriaceous, linear-oblong, sub- 
acute, 6-8 in. long, about f in. broad. Scapes axillary, 
suberect, l-lf ft. high, racemose, or loosely panicled, 
many-flowered. Bracts ovate-oblong, acute, concave, over 
£ in. long. Pedicels nearly 1 in. long. Flowers showy, 
bright yellow, blotched with brown. Sepals and petals 
spreading, subequal, lanceolate, acuminate, about If in. 
long. Lip clawed, with the erect claw over J- in. long ; 
Hmb spreading, deltoid-triangular, acuminate, undulate, 
about 1 in. long, -J- in. broad at the base; disc puberulous, 
with a pair of erect parallel compressed crests. Column 
clavate, arcuate, nearly f in, long ; wings falcate-oblong, 
acuminate at the apex, J in. long. — R. A. Rolfe. 



Fig. 1, part of base of lip; 2, column; 3, pollinariam :— all enlarged; 
■h whole plant -.—much reduced ; 5, flower of 0. gloriosum ; b", flower of 
U. tnumphuns (the reputed parents) -.—natural size. 



8148 



/ws 



<3&i 







H.S.dri.jN.HtchHtK 



T fincer±Brool<s ; Ijcp"&SarLLt?ta5 



L.Reeve&:C?LcmZn 



Tab. 8143. 
MONTANOA mollissima. 

Mexico. 

Compositae. Tribe Helianthoideae. 
Montanoa, Llav. et Lex. ; Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 3G5. 



Montanoa mollissima, Brongn. in Rev. Hortic. 1857, p. 543; Koch, Wock- 
enschr. vol. vii. p. 408; affinis M. grandiflorae, DC, seel foliis subtus 
arachnoideo-tomentosis supra tion scabridis differt. 

Frute.v ramosus, circiter 2 m. altus. Rami striati, pubescentes, demum fere 
glabri. Folia sessilia, lanceolata vel ovato-lanceolata, 10-18 cm. lontja, 
4-9 cm. lata, apice mucronulata, basi auriculata, crenata, supra viridia, 
glabriuscula, subtus dense albo-arachnoideo-tomentosa, venis utriaque 
sed praecipue subtus distinctis. Capitula circiter 4 cm. diametro, 
pedunculis circiter 6 cm. longis. Involucri bracteae oblongae, sub- 
acutae. Receptaculi paleae e basi lata subulatae, pilosae, 5 mm. 
longae. Flares radii circiter 9, $,albi; tubus 1 mm. longus, glaber ; 
lamina oblongo-obovata, vix 2 cm. longa, 1 cm. lata, 7- vel 8-nervia, apice 
minute 3-dentata, supra glabra, subtus glanduloso-pilosa. tityli rami 
penicillati, glabri, 1*5 mm. longi. Flores disci $?, flavi ; tubus 4 mm. 
longus, extra pilosus, basi 1 mm. constrictus; lobi deltoidei, obtusi. 
Antherae apiculatae, 2"5 mm. longae. Stylus supra medium glanduloso- 
pilosus, ramis planis 1*5 mm. longis, apice penicillatis. Achaenia 
quadrangularia, T5 mm. longa, glabra. Pappus nullus. 



The cultivated species of the geuus Montanoa are used 
in English gardens as sub-tropical bedding plants, and 
are chiefly grown for the beauty of their foliage. 31. bipin- 
iiatifida is used in this manner, and treated in a similar 
way to such plants as Bicinus, Melianthus, and the large- 
leaved Solanums. They do not flower readily in the open, 
but on the Mediterranean they bloom as freely as perennial 
Sunflowers. 

M. mollissima is grown in the gardens of South Europe, 
where it flowers freely, and is very ornamental. At Kew 
it is treated as a greenhouse shrub. It is readily increased 
from seeds sown in gentle bottom heat in spring, or by 
cuttings of roots inserted in autumn, and of the stems or 
shoots in spring. The plant here figured was raised from 
seeds received in 1902 from the late Sir Thomas Hanbury, 
La Mortola. 

This species was introduced into cultivation by Ghies- 
breght, who sent seeds from Mexico to the Paris Botanic 
Garden in 1843. It has been reduced to M. grandiflora, 
July 1st, 1907. 



which has very rough, scabrid leaves, with distinct 
brownish hairs on the under surface, whilst the leaves of 
our plant are quite velvety to the touch, and the hairs 
beneath are of a white, cobwebby nature. 

Descr. — A branching shrub, about 6 ft. high. Branches 
striate, pubescent, at length almost glabrous. Leaves 
sessile, lanceolate, or ovate-lanceolate, 4-7 in. long, 1^-4 
in. broad, apex mucronulate, auriculate at the base, 
crenate, green and almost glabrous above, densely covered 
with a white tomentum below ; veins distinct on both sides, 
especially beneath. Oapiivla about \\ in. in diameter ; 
peduncles about 2^ in. long. Involucral bracts oblong, 
subacute. Palea of the receptacle subulate from a broad 
base, pilose, about -j in. long. Ray-flowers about 9, ?, 
white; tube \ in. long, glabrous ; lamina oblong-obovate, 
scarcely f in. long, ^ in. broad, 7- or 8-nerved, apex 
minutely tridentate, glabrous above, glandular-pilose below. 
Style-branches penicillate, glabrous. Disc-floiuers ?, yellow; 
tube ^ in. long, pilose outside, constricted at the base; 
lobes deltoid, obtuse. Anthers apiculate. Style glandular- 
pilose above the middle ; branches flattened, penicillate at 
the apex. Achenes quadrangular, glabrous. Pajjpus none. 
— J. Hutchinson. 

Tig. 1, involucral bract ; 2, ray-floret; 3, palea of receptacle: 4, clisk-floret : 
5, anthers ; G, style arms : — all enlarged. 



8144 




Orth. 



'foment Brooks X>^ ^Sa^l^^P 



L Reov« &.C? London. 



Tab. 8144. 
KENNEDYA betrobsa. 

Eastern Australia. 

Leguminosae. Tribe Phaseoleae. 
Kennedya, Vent. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 531. 



Kennedya retroraa, Hemsl. sp. nov. legumine densissime retrorso-piloso 
insignita. 

Frute.e volubilis, praesertim in ramis rufescenti-tomentosus. Folia stipulata, 
trifoliolata, distincte petiolata, 8-15 cm. longa. Stipulae ovatae, circiter 
5 mm. longae. Foliola stipellata, petiolulata (terminate longe) crassius- 
cula, inaequalia, elliptica, oblonga, obovata, vel fere orbicularia, 3-12 cm. 
longa, apiculata, supra strigillosa, subnitida, subtus ferrugineo-pubes- 
centia. Stipellae minutae. Flores roseo-piirpurei, circiter 15 era. longi, 
fasciculato-racemosi ; racemi cum pednnculo 5-15 cm. longi yel in speci- 
minibus nonnullis spontaneis usque ad 25 cm. longi, pedicellis 3-5 mm. 
longis. Bracteae ferrugineo-sericeae, ovato-caudatae, alabastra excedentes, 
ante anthesin decidnae. Calyx dense Bericeo-birsutus, bilabiatus, labio 
superiore bidentato; labium int'erius aequaliter trilobatum, lobis triangu- 
lari-acuminatis. Vexillum oblato-orbiculatum, circiter 1*5 cm. diametro, 
breviter ungniculatum, prope basin macula orbiculari unica alba ornatum. 
Alae et carinae petala similia, obovata vel spathulata, apice rotundata, 
circiter 1*2-1*5 cm. longa, longiuscule unguiculata, auriculata, auriculis 
prominentibus acutis. Stamina praeter superius liberum connata; 
antberae uniformes. Ovarium sessile, praesertim secus suturam ven- 
Iralem pilosum, 4-ovulatum. Legumen planum, rectum, 4-5 cm. longum, 
7-8 mm. latum, aculeato-apiculatum, undique densissime retrorso-pilo- 
sum, saepius 4-spermum. Semina fere nigra, reniformia, 6-7 mm. longa. 
strophiolo albo claviformi, circiter 4 mm. longo ornata. 



Although unequal as an ornamental plant to some of 
the other species of Kennedya in cultivation, K. retrorsa is 
very pretty, and, as it is a very free grower, it is deserving 
of attention, especially as the wild specimens are much 
finer than the cultivated ones that we have seen so far. 
It was raised at Kew in 1905 from seed received from the 
Sydney Botanic Garden, under the name of K. procurrens, 
Benth. ; but it is quite distinct from that species, the type 
of which is in the Kew Herbarium. The wild specimens are 
from Mount Dangar Grungal, Merriwa, Brisbane Co., New 
South Wales, in about 32° S. lat., and 150° E. long. The 
fact that the flowers were produced in March may account 
for their being in smaller clusters than the wild ones. 

Descr. — A twining shrub, the young growths clothed 
with reddish hairs. Leaves trifoliolate, distinctly stalked, 
3-6 in. long. Stipules ovate, about \ in. long. Leaflets 
July 1st, 1907. 



stipellate, shortly stalked, rather thick, unequal, oval, 
oblong, obovate, or nearly orbicular, 1-2^ in. long, apicu- 
late, strigillose above, shining, rusty-hairy beneath. 
Flowers rose-purple, with a white eye on the standard, 
about -f in. in the greatest diameter, clustered in racemes ; 
racemes, including stalk, 2-6 in. long, or as much as 
10 in. in some wild specimens ; pedicels J— J; in. long. 
Bracts rusty-hairy, ovate-caudate, longer than the flower- 
buds, falling off before the flowers expand. Calyx densely 
silky-hairy, 2-lipped ; upper lip bidentate ; lower lip 
equally 3-lobed, lobes triangular, acuminate. Standard 
nearly orbicular, shortly clawed. Wing -petals and heel- 
petals similar, obovate, rounded, clawed, auriculate above 
the base. Stamens 10, upper one free. Ovary sessile; 
style included. Pod flat, straight, about 2 in. long, rigidly 
apiculate, densely clothed with reversed hairs, usually 
4-seeded. Seeds almost black, reniform, about \ in. long, 
furnished with a white, clavate strophiole, about J in. 
long. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



Fig. ], calyx and genitalia ; 2, standard ; 3, a wing-petal ; 4, a keel-petal ; 
G, a pod ; 7 and 8, seeds : — all enlarged except G and 7, which are natural size. 



8145 




:N.ri;,i-!ith 



Vincent BrooksDayiSonlt d i«? 



L.iX£evi5 &.C°Larukin_ 



Tab. 8145. 

STEWARTIA Malachodendron. 
Eastern North America. 

Terustboemiaceae. 
Stewartia, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 185 (Stuartia). 



Stewartia Malachodendron, Linn. Sp. PI. ed. 1. p. 698 (sphalmate Mala- 
codendron ; species a S. pentagyna, L'Herit., stylis coimatis, a S. Pseudo- 
camellia, Maxim., floribus subsessilibus differt, ab ambabus petalis 
stellatim divergentibua recedit. 

Frutex ramosus, 2-4 m. altus vel rare- arbor parva, ranralis floriferis gracilibus 
appresse pubescentibus. Folia decidua, alterna, brevissime petiolata, 
lanceolata vel oblanceolata, 5-10 cm. longa, acuminata, praecipue supra 
medium calloso-denticulata, subtus puberula. Flores axillares, solitarii, 
9-10 cm. diametro, brevissime pedunculati ; pedunculis bibracteolatis, 
bracteolis sericeis 3-4 mm. longis. SepalaS, basi connata, ovato-oblonga, 
circiter 1 cm. longa, subacuta. Petala 5, alba, obovata, 4-5 cm. longa, 
apice rotundata, minute crenulata, extus sericea, ima basi connata. 
Stamina numerosa; filamenta infra medium dilatata, superne filiformia, 
basi petalis adnata, purpurea, antheris caeruleis. Ovarium sericeo- 
lnrsutum, 5-loculare, loculis 2-ovulatis; styli connati. (Japsula lignosa, 
ovoidea, vel subglobosa, circiter 1*5 cm. diametro, loculicide dehiscens. 
Semina parva, lenticularia, margine nuda. — Stewartia virginica, Cav. 
Diss. t. 159, f. 2 ; Sprague et A. G-ray Gen. Fl. An. Bor. Illustr. vol. ii. 
t. 138 (Stuartia) ; Gard. Chron. 1877, vol. vii. pp. 433-435, f. 86. Stuartia 
Malachodendron, L'Herit. Stirpes Novae, 1784, p. 153, t. 73 ; Britton & 
Brown, 111. Fl. N. U. States and Canada, 1897, vol. ii. p. 426. Stewartia 
marilandica, Andr. Bot. Hep. t. 397. Steuartia, Catesby, Nat. Hist. 
Carol, ed. 1, vol. ii. (1743?) App. p. 13, t. 13. 



There are three species of Stewartia, namely, S. Pseudo- 
camellia, Maxim. (B. M. t. 7045), from Japan; S. pen- 
tagyna, L'Her. (B. M. 3918), North America, and the one 
here figured, which is better known under the name of 
S. virginica, Cav. Mark Catesby, in his monumental work 
cited above, says of this shrub : ,e For this elegant plant I 
am obliged to my good friend, Mr. Clayton, who sent it to 
me from Virginia, and three months after its arrival it 
blossomed in my garden at Fulham in May, 1742." From 
a letter by Dr. John Mitchell to Catesby, published in the 
place cited above in Catesby's " History " the following 
passage is extracted : " The plant which you showed me 
by the name of Steuartia I take to be a new genus of 
plants, the same that I called Malachodendron" The latter 
had previously been published by Mitchell (Act. Phys. 
Acad. Nat. Gar. vol. viii. App. 1748, p. 216), and repeated 
July 1st, 1907. 



in his "Dissertatio Brevis, &c, Nov. PL Gen.," 1769, 
p. 38. Subsequent authors have frequently misprinted it 
Malacodendron, and Cavanilles (Diss. v. 1788, pp. 302- 
303, t. 158, f. 2, t. 159, f. 2) separated the two American 
species generically, adopting Malachodendron for 8. penta- 
gyna, and Stewartia for S. virginica. On account of this 
confusion the late Dr. A. Gray retained the name virginica 
for the species here figured ; but that did not remove the 
confusion. The mode of spelling the generic name was 
changed by L'Heritier (I.e.) who deliberately adopted the 
form Stewartia. " Stewartiam consecrabat Linnaeus 
memoriae illustriss. Joannis Stuart, Comitis a Bute, Paris 
Angli . . . ergo Stuartia, nee Stewartia dicenda." Most 
English and American writers have followed L'Heritier, 
and Britton and Brown (I.e.) have retained the altered 
form. Even Willdenow (Species Plantarum, 1800, vol. iii. 
p. 840) adopted Stuartia Malachodendron. As Linnaeus 
incorrectly cites Mitchell there is no necessity for con- 
tinuing the typographical error in the specific name, 
especially as the form Malachodendron — mallow-tree, is 
appropriate, whilst Malacodendron — soft-tree, is here 
meaningless. With regard to the generic name it is 
different ; Linnaeus, although he cites Catesby's page and 
plate, does not cite his name. 

This very ornamental shrub has never got into general 
cultivation in British gardens, perhaps partly on account 
of its not flourishing in ordinary garden soil, and partly 
because it does not usually flower freely until it has 
attained a considerable size. Catesby does not say any- 
thing about the size of his plant, which flowered three 
months after it reached England ; but it may be assumed 
that it was quite small. Philip Miller also mentions its 
having flowered before 1756, in Mr. Christopher Gray's 
nursery garden at Fulham ; and there are some recent 
records of its having flowered profusely, notably at Syon 
House. The drawing for the accompanying plate was 
made from specimens communicated by Sir Joseph Hooker, 
in whose garden at Sunningdale it flowered freely last 
year. 

JJescr. — A branching shrub, or small tree, 6-14 ft. high, 
with slender, pubescent flowering branches. Leaves de- 
ciduous, alternate, very shortly stalked, lanceolate or 



oblanceolate, 2-4 in. long, acuminate, minutely toothed 
chiefly above the middle, puberulous underneath. Flowers 
axillary, solitary, almost sessile, 3^-4 in. across. Sepals 
5, connate at the base, ovate-oblong, about § of an in. 
long. Petals 5, white, obovate, rounded, minutely 
toothed. Stamens numerous, purple ; anthers blue. Seed- 
vessel ovoid, woody, about \ in. in diameter, opening down 
the backs of the five cells. Seeds one or two in each cell, 
small, lenticular. — W. B. Hemsle^. 



Cultiv. — Coming from the coast regions of the South- 
eastern United States this shrub should be given a 
sheltered position, for it is more likely to be injured by 
persistent exposure to north and east winds than by tem- 
porary spells of severe cold. At Kew it has passed 
through the winters of the last ten years without suffering. 
A moisture-loving plant, it should be planted only where 
it is not likely to suffer from drought. It loves a peaty 
soil, and if peat is not naturally present in the soil a 
proportion of one-third should be added. — W. J. Bean. 

Figs. 1 and 2, anthers; 3, pistil: — nil enlarged. 



J\s 



8146 








'^S^% 



vK ^ 






'-> 




M.S.daLJ.N.fitchJiei. 



6 3 



L. Reeve &.C?loruiorL 



Tab. 8146. 
PHYLLODOCE Breweri. 

California. 

Ericaceae. Tribe Phyllodoceae. 
Phyllodoce, Salish. Parad. Lond. t. 36 ; Benih. et HooJe.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. 
jfcn p. 595; Maxim, in Mem. Ac. 8c. Petersb. ser. 7, vol. xvi. no. 9, p. 5; 
Drude in Engl. & Prantl, Nat. Pfianzenf. vol. iv. 1, p. 40. 

Phyllodoce Breweri, Maxim. I.e. ; P. empetriformi, Don., affinis, sed fioribus 
majoribus, corolla late campanulata ultra medium 5-fida, staminibus 
exsertis distincta. 

Fruticuliis 20-30 cm. altus, ramis ascendentibus rigidis dense foliatis. 
Folia creberrima, subsessilia, linearia, obtuaa, marginibus arete 
revolutis, 1-1*5 cm. longa, 1-1*5 mm. lata, supra laevia, glaberrima, 
subtus ob costam validam et margines revolutas bisulcata, in sulcis 
glanduloso-pubescetitia. Flores e gemmis hibernantibus versus apices 
ramorum singuli orti, racemose dispositi, saepe plurimi, racemum densuni 
brevem rarius elongatum referentes ; pedicelli tenues, glandulosi, 0"5-l*5 
(plerumque 1) cm. longi. Sepala elliptico-ovata, 3-4 mm. longa, glabra, 
purpurascentia. Corolla late campanulata, ultra medium 5-fida, 5-6 mm. 
longa, rubro-purpurea, lpbis late ovatis obtusis. Stamina normaliter 10 . 
filamenta 5-7 mm: longa; antherae 15 mm. longae. ■Ovarium 5-loculare, 
glandulosum ; stylus 6 mm. longus. Capsula globoaa, ! 4 mm. diam. — * 
BryantJms Breireri, A. Gray in Proc. Am. Acad. vol. vii. p. 367; Syn. 
Fl. N. Am. vol. ii. part I. p. 37. 

P. Bvetveri is a native of the inner Sierras of California, 
between 34° and 40° jST. lat. It was first observed by 
W. H. Brewer, who was attached to Prof. Whitney's sur- 
veying party from 1860-1864. He collected the plant in 
the ordinary state with relatively loose inflorescences on 
Wood's Peak, Eldorado Co., and in the form here figured 
and distinguished by compact racemes, on Mt. Hoffmann, 
on the north side of the Yosemite Valley. It is a 
characteristic plant of the alpine zone from 3,000 to 
over 3,600 m., and in some places forms extensive heather- 
like patches. It is, as might be expected, quite hardy with 
us, but a slow grower. At Kew it flowered in May. Its 
corollas are the largest in the genus, and produce a fine 
effect. Like its allies it prefers a peaty soil. It may 
be propagated from seeds or cuttings or layers. The plant 
figured was raised from seeds presented to Kew in 1896 
by Baron von St. Paul, of Fischbach, Silesia. The question 
whether this plant should be placed in Phyllodoce or 
Bryanthus has been much discussed ; but Maximowicz, 
and more recently Drude, the monographer of the Ericaceae 

July 1st, 1907. 



in Bngler and Prantl's " Natiirlichen Pflanzenfamilien," 
have come to the conclusion that Bryanthas should be 
reserved for the species on which the genus was originally 
based, namely, B. Gmelini, Stell., a plant so far only 
known from Kamtschatka, the adjacent Komander- 
skie Islands and Ochotsk. It is a small shrublet, with 
tetramerous, rather inconspicuous flowers and rotate 
corollas. 

Descr. — A shrublet, 9 in. high, with ascending, rigid, 
very densely leafy branches. Leaves crowded, subsessile, 
linear, obtuse, with tightly revolute margins, \- \ in. long, 
fa-ia in. broad, smooth above, bisulcate and glandular- 
pubescent in the grooves. Flowers solitary from hiber- 
nating buds, arranged in terminal short or long, and 
sometimes very dense racemes ; pedicels slender, glandular, 
^~f (usually ji) in. long. Sepals elliptic-oblong, |— J in. 
long, glabrous, purpurascent. Corolla bright rose colour 
or purple, wide-campanulate, 5-fid beyond the middle ; 
lobes broad, ovate, obtuse. Stamens normally 10 ; anthers 
^g in. long, exserted from the corolla. Ovary 5-celled, 
glandular ; styles up to \ in. long. Capsule globose, \ in. 
in diameter. — Otto Stapf. 



Cultiv. — The plant here figured and described is culti- 
vated in semi-shade in the rock garden at Kew, where it 
has proved quite hardy, but has grown slowly. It is now 
a loose tuft a foot through, the stems 6-9 in. high, and 
covered with heath-like evergreen leaves. It flowered 
freely for the first time in 1906, and in May it was quite 
attractive. There is no marked difference between the 
several species of Phyllodoce and Bryanthus as regards 
cultivation ; they have the same heath-like habit and 
foliage, and they are also alike in their preference for a 
jteaty soir. " The present species is, perhaps, the largest 
flowered, and it is also distinct in the spicate arrangement 
of the flowers on the stem, the other species having them 
in terminal clusters. All of them are very suitable for 
cultivation in the alpine garden or rockery. They ripen 
seeds in favourable seasons, and they may be increased 
by means of cuttings or layers. — W. Watson. 

Fig. 1, lower leaf; 2, upper leaf; 3, calyx and pistil; 4 and 5, anthers; 
(5, ovary : — all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By Geohge Bentham, 
F.R.S. 8th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
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8147 




VincentfirooVs'Dar&SonlitfOTip 



M . S-iel J -^ .FitcK l*th. 



L .ReevB &. O.v London 



Tab. 8147. 

aloe nitens. 
South Africa. 



Liliaceae. Tribe Aloineae. 
Aloe, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. "76. 



Aloe nitens, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. p. 170, et in Thiselton- 
Dyer, Fl. Cap. vol. vi. p. 325, non Schult. f. ; A. africanae, Mill., affinis, 
aqua infiorescentia paniculata perianthioque recto viridi recedit. 

Caulis simplex, circa 3 m. altos, 7"5 cm. diam. Folia prope apicem caulis 
congesta, lanceolata, glabra, 60 cm. longa, 6 cm. lata; spinae curvatae, 
brunneae, 3 mm. longae, inter se 8 mm. distantes. Panicula racemosa; 
pedunculi patentes, circa 35 cm. longa ; spica multiflora, earn Kniphofiae 
alooidis, Moench, simulans ; br.cteae circa 10 cm. longae; bracteolae 
dense imbricatae, lunatae, 5 mm. diam., marginibus membranaceis valde 
recurvis. Flores subsessiles, virides. Perianthium rectum, cylindricum, 
2 cm. longum ; segmenta oblonga, obtusa, 4 mm. lata, exteriora herbacea, 
5-nervia, interiora membranacea, 3-nervia. Stamina perianthio duplo 
longiora ; filamenta complanata, basi 1 mm. lata, in antherae foveoli 
dorsifixa ; antherae oblongae, 4 mm. longae, apiculatae. Ovarium ovoi- 
deum, 6 mm. longum ; stylus staminibua aequilongus. 



For years Aloe nitens has been one of the most striking 
of the many species cultivated in the Succulent House at 
Kew, flowering in midwinter every year when its large 
inflorescence, formed of six or more branches, each 
bearing a cluster of rich crimson flowers, is a great 
attraction. It was sent to Kew in 1877 by Sir Henry 
Barkly when Governor at the Cape, and it is now a fine 
specimen 12 ft. high, the upper half clothed with long 
green leaves. 

Descv. — Stem unbranched, about 12 ft. high, 3 in. in 

diameter, pale brown. Leaves crowded into an apical 

crown, lanceolate, glabrous, about 2 ft. long and 2^ in. 

wide, edged with stout brown upcurved spines ^ in. long, 

and about % in. apart. Panicle bearing about 7 spikes 

racemosely arranged ; peduncles patent, about 14 in. long ; 

spikes densely many-flowered, resembling those of Knipho- 

fia alooides, Moench ; bracts about 4 in. long ; bracteoles 

densely imbricate, lunate, about 3 lin. across, with strongly 

recurved membranous margins ; flowers subsessile. 

Perianth straight, cylindrical, § in. long, green; segments 

oblong, obtuse, \ in. wide, the outer herbaceous and 

August 1st, 1907. 



5-nerved, the inner membranous and 3-nerved. Stamens 
twice as long as the perianth ; filaments flattened, ^ 4 in. 
wide at the base, inserted into a pit at the back of the 
anther near its base ; anthers oblong, \ in. long, apiculate. 
Ovary ovoid, \ in. long ; style as long as the stamens. — 
C. H. Wright. 



Gultiv. — Although the genus Aloe is nob popular in 
English gardens, a considerable number of the species are 
decidedly ornamental ; their flowers are attractive in form 
and colour, and they are among the easiest of plants to 
cultivate. They are generally grown in pots, but where 
space can be afforded they grow more quickly, and are 
much happier when planted in a border of gravelly soil. 
A, nitens is one of the less tropical species ; it would 
probably be an ideal plant for the gardens of the Riviera. 
— W. Watson. 

Fig. 1, flower; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, pistil : -all enlarged; 5, sketch of the 
whole plant : — much reduced. 




L. Reeve &C° London.. 



Vincent Brooks.DairA.Sc - 



Tab. 8148. 
BRUCKENTHALIA spiculifolia. 

Transylvania, Balkan Peninsula, and Northern Asia Minor. 



Ericaceae. Tribe Ericeae. 



Bruckenthalia, Eeichb. Fl. Germ. Excurs. 413; Benth. et Rook.f. Gen. Plant. 
vol. ii. p. 591 ; Brude in Engl. & Prantl, Nat. Pflanzenf. vol. iv. 1, 
p. 62. 

Bruckenthalia spiculifolia, Beichb. I.e. p. 414 ; species unica. 

Fruticulus multiramosue, 10-15 cm. altus, ramis ascendentibus gracilibus 
tenuiter pubescentibus. Folia creberrima, quaterna vel sparsa, sub- 
sesailia, linearia, margine arete replicata, obtusiuscula, apice seta pelln- 
cida imposita, 3-4 mm. longa, 0*5 mm. lata, coriacea, supra sparse setulis 
glanduligeris obsita, subtus ob costam crassiusculam et margines re- 
plicatas bisulcata. Flores in racemos terminates densiusculos congest], 
nutantes ; pedicelli minute asperuli, 3 mm. longi. Calyx campanulatus, 
coloratus. glaber, 4-lobus, lobis late triangularibus, vix 1*5 mm. altus. 
Corolla rosea, campannlata, 3 mm. longa, 4-loba, lobis late ovatis obtusis. 
Stamina 8, incbisa; filamenta ima basi inter se et cum corolla connata; 
antherae 1 mm. baud attingentes, apice bilobae, muticae. Discus 
vix ullus. Stylus longe exsertus. Capsula globosa, c;ilycem persisten- 
tem haud superans. — Erica spiculifolia, Salisb. in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. 
vi. (1802), p. 324; Sibth. Fl. Graeca, tab. 353. E. Bruckenthalii, Spreng. 
Neue Entd. vol. i. p. 271. Menziesia Bruckenthalii, Bautng. Enum. Stirp. 
Transs. vol. i. p. 333. 



Bruckenthalia spiculifolia was discovered by Sibthorp on 
Keshisli Dagh, the so-called Bithynian Olympos, near 
Brussa, in Asia Minor, more than a hundred years ago, 
and described as Erica spiculifolia by Salisbury in 1802. 
Subsequently it was found in the Transylvanian Alps, and 
described by Baumgarten in 1816 as Menziesia Brucken- 
thalii, after Samuel and Michael, Barons von Bruckenthal, 
prominent contemporary Transylvanian noblemen. The 
plant has quite the appearance of a small Erica, but differs 
from that genus in the campanulate calyx and the almost 
complete absence of a disc. Its area covers the greater 
part of the Balkan Peninsula, excepting Greece ; extends 
over the Transylvanian Alps, and reaches its northernmost 
point in the Biharia Mountains in Hungary. In Asia 
Minor it has, so far, been found only on Keshish Dagh, 
and on the mountains between Tireboli and G-umush 
Khane, in the vilayet of Trebizond. Bruckenthalia grows 
either socially in extensive heath-like patches, or scattered 
among species of Vaccinium, dwarf juniper, and similar 

August 1st, 1907. 



shrublets. It ascends to over 2,000 m., but flourishes 
best in the upper subalpine zone, and is a great ornament 
of its native mountains comparable in effect to the Erica 
carnea of the Alps. 

Descr. — A much-branched shrublet, about ■§■ foot high, 
with slender, pubescent, ascending branches. Leaves 
crowded, more or less in whorls of four, subsessile, linear 
with tightly recurved margins, obtuse, with a terminal 
bristle, J-J in. long, J§- in. wide, coriaceous, with scattered 
gland-tipped bristles above, and two grooves beneath. 
Flowers in dense terminal racemes, nodding ; pedicels aspe- 
rulous, ■§- in. long. Calyx campanulate, coloured, glabrous, 
4-lobed ; lobes broadly triangular. Corolla rose-coloured, 
campanulate, ^ in. long, 4-lobed ; lobes broadly ovate, 
obtuse. Stamens 8, included ; filaments united at the very 
base, and attached to the base of the corolla ; anthers not 
quite 2 \ in. long, bilobed. Vise indistinct. Style long, 
exserted. Capsule globose, small. — Otto Stapf. 



Gultiv. — One of the prettiest and daintiest of the 
smaller Ericaceae, JBruclcenthalia sjrictdifolia thrives at 
Kew very well in the open air, planted in a light, peaty 
soil, where it forms close tufts about 6 in. high, and a foot 
or more across. Commencing to flower about mid-June, 
it remains in that state for at least a month, the whole 
plant being covered with the short, erect racemes. It 
produces good seeds yearly, and these afford the best 
means of increase. The species is not often met with in 
gardens, but as seeds have been offered in exchange for 
several years past, and have been freely asked for, it will 
probably become more common. Although quite hardy, 
the plant is too small to withstand rough shrubbery treat- 
ment. The best place for it. is, perhaps, a shelf or 
miniature plateau on the rockery. Failing such a situation 
a front place in a group of the smaller Bricaceous or other 
peat-loving plants might be accorded it. — W. J. Bean. 



Fig. 1, foliage, '2 ; two flowers ; 3, 4, and 5, anthers; 6, pistil : — all enlarged. 




SUB 



M.S.<ULJ.N.Fitch1iih. 



^£r-.cent BroaksDayS-SaAL^-ircf 



L Reeve &. C VIoruian . 



Tab. 8149. 
CALATHEA angustifolia. 

Central America. 

Scitamineae. Tribe Maranteae. 

Calathea, G. F. W. Meyer; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 653; 
K. Schum. in Engl. Pflanzenr., Marantaceae, p. 69. 



Calathea angustifolia, Koern. in Gartenfl. 1858, p. 87, Mitiheil. Buss. 
Garienb. I860, p. 94, et in Bull. Soc. Imp. Nat. Mosc. vol. xxxv. pars i. 
p. 136 ; Peters in Mart. Fl. Bras. vol. iii. pars iii. p. 116; R. Schum. in 
Engl. Pflanzenr., Marantaceae, p. 110 ; 0. varianti, Koern., proxima, foliis 
subtus pilosis difiert. 

Herba acaulis. Folia radicalia, anguste oblonga, acuminata, basi obtusa, 
utrinque pilosa, supra viridia, subtus purpurea, circa 60 cm. longa, 12 
cm. lata; petiolus circa 60 cm. longus, viridis, rubro-maculatus, parte 
superiore 2-3 cm. longa glabra callosa excepta pilis patentibus dense 
vestitus ; vagina membranacea, patentim pilosa, rubro-maculata. Scapus 
15 cm. altus, lutescens, rubro-maculatus ; bracteae lanceolatae.lutescentes 
vel pallide virides, rubro-pilosae ; bracteolae lanceolatae, glabrae, hyalinae ; 
spica 15 cm. longa; flores bini dispositi, 2*5 cm. diam. Sepala lineari- 
lanceolata, acuminata, hirsuta. Corolla dilute lutea ; tubus hirsutus, 
cylindricus, 2'2 cm. longus ; lobi lanceolati, 1'4 cm. longi. Staminodium 
exterius obovato-oblongum, 1*5 cm. longum ; interius exteriori simile sed 
paullo brevius; staminodium cucullatum, 7 mm. longum. Ovarium apice 
luteo-sericeum. — Maranta discolor et Heliconia discolor, Hort. ex Koern. 
in Gartenfl. 1858, p. 87. 



Many of the plants of this order are cultivated on 
account of the beauty of their leaves, and receive names in 
gardens before they produce flowers, upon the structure 
of which the various genera are founded ; hence a com- 
plicated synonymy has arisen. The present species is an 
instance of this, for it was cultivated before 1858 at St. 
Petersburg and Berlin under the names of Maranta discolor 
and Heliconia discolor respectively, but (while its flowers 
were still unknown) was transferred by Koernicke to 
Calathea on account of its great resemblance in habit and 
foliage to his G. varians, an assumption which subsequent 
flowering has justified. The plant here depicted has been 
cultivated at Kew for many years. 

Descr. — A stemless herb, with leaves reaching a height 
of about 4 ft. Leaves narrowly oblong, acuminate, obtuse 
at the base, pilose on both surfaces, green above, purple 
beneath, 2 ft. long, nearly 5 in. wide ; petiole about 2 ft. 
long, green, spotted with red, densely clothed with patent 

August 1st, 1907. 



hairs, except for about an inch below the blade, where it 
is glabrous and swollen ; sheath membranous, patently 
hairy, red-spotted. Scape 6-10 in. high, yellowish, spotted 
with red ; bracts lanceolate, yellowish or pale green, 
clothed with red hairs ; bracteoles lanceolate, glabrous, 
hyaline ; spike about 6 in. long ; flowers in pairs beneath 
each bract, about 1 in. in diameter. Sepals linear-lanceo- 
late, acuminate, hirsute. Corolla pale yellow ; tube hir- 
sute, cylindrical, about 1 in. long; lobes lanceolate, about 
half as long as the tube. Staminodes pale yellow; the 
outer obovate-oblong, f in. long ; the inner like the outer, 
but slightly shorter; the hooded one about J in. long. 
Ovary yellow-silky at the apex. — 0. H. Wright. 



Gultiv. — Both Calatheas and Marantas give a better 
account of themselves when they are planted in a border 
of light rich soil than when kept confined in flower-pots. 
This is abundantly proved by the behaviour of a selection 
of the two genera in the Nepenthes House at Kew, where, 
along with various other plants of similar habit and re- 
quirements, they are used, to furnish a rockery border 
under the Nepenthes, which are grown in baskets 
suspended from the roof. The growth of the Cala- 
theas in this house is so vigorous that some of them 
become quite changed in character. G. angustifolia is 
usually a small and unattractive plant, but here it has 
formed a stately mass of elegant leaves 4 ft. high, dark 
green above, purple below, the petioles prettily mottled, 
whilst the flower scapes are 10 in. high, the upper half 
crowded with cream-yellow flowers, and looking not unlike 
a good yellow hyacinth. All the species enjoy a light 
rich soil, plenty of moisture, shade, and a tropical 
temperature. — W. Watson. 

Fig. 1, sepal; 2, flower ; 3, stamen and staininodes ; 4, cucullnte staminode : 
— all enlarged ; 5, sketch oi the whole plant, much reduced. 



8150 




MScULJ-N Fitch lith 



feoent Broofe^ay&Son.Ltf-in?- 



L.Reev« &.C? London. 



Tab. 8150. 
STREPTOCARPUS Holstit. 

East Tropical Africa. 

Gesxeraceae. Tribe Cyetandkeae. 
Streptocarpus, Lindl. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Qen. Plant vol. ii. p. 1023. 



Streptocarpus Holstii, Engler, Jahrb. vol. xviii. (1893), p. 77, tt. 4 et 5 ; e grege 
S. Kirkii, Hook. f. (B. M. t. 6782) et 8. caulescentis, Yatke (B. M. 
t. G814), sed habitu graciliore, foliorum petiolis longioribus et norum 
colore caeruleo difFert. 

Caules graciles, metrales vel ultra, debiles, quadrangulares, cito glabrescentes, 
nitidi, ad nodos incrassatos primum pilosi. Internodia folia subaequantia. 
Folia tenuia, subcarnosa, longe petiolata, ovata, oblonga, vel fere orbi- 
cularia, absque petiolo T5-4 cm. longa, obtusa,integra, praesertim subtus 
secus costam venasque pilis crassiusculis parce veatita; venae primariae 
laterales utrinque 7-9, Bubtus elevatae ; petiolus laminam fere aequans. 
Cymae 2-0-florae, pilis glandulosis parcissimn instructae, in foliorum 
superiorum axillis griciliter pedunculatae, 10-15 cm. longae, erectae, 
pedicelUs capillaribua quam flores longioribus. Flores " saturate caeru- 
lei," circiter 2-5-3 cm. longi efc 1-5 cm. diametro. Calyx crassus, pilo- 
buIdb, subaequaliter 5-lobus-', lobis oblongis circiter 2 mm. Jongis obtusius- 
culia apice incrassatis. Corollae puberulae labia valde inaequalia, 
superiore bifido quam inferiore 4-plo breviore. Antherae cohaerentes.' 
Ovarium glabrum, stylo incluso. Gapsula glabra, gracilis, 5-6 cm. 
longa. 

This very elegant plant was raised at Kew from seed 
received from the Berlin Botanic Garden in 1905, and 
flowered freely in December, 1906. It is a much more 
ornamental plant than either of the two similar species 
with which it is compared above, and if it retain the 
winter-flowering habit it deserves a future in cultivation. 

Descr. — A slender, elegant branching herb, about 18 in. 
high, and as much through. Stems weak, 4-angled, 
glabrescent, shining, thickened at the pilose nodes. 
Intemodes about as long as the leaves. Leaves thin, 
somewhat fleshy, long-stalked, ovate, oblong, or nearly 
orbicular, including stalk 1|~3 in. long, obtuse, entire, 
slightly hairy, especially on the underside along the mid- 
rib and primary veins. Cymes 2-6-flowered, borne on 
very slender stalks arising in the axils of the upper leaves, 
4-6 in. long, sparingly furnished with glandular hairs ; 
pedicels extremely slender. Moivers mauve-purple, with a 
white throat 1-1-g- in. long, -| in. across. Calyx very 
small, nearly equally 5-lobed ; lobes oblong, obtuse, 

August 1st, 1907. 



thickened at the tip. Corolla glandular hairy, very 
unequally 2-lipped ; upper lip very short. Anthers 2, 
connivent. Ovary glabrous ; style included. Capsule 
slender, twisted, about 2 in. long. — W. Botting Hrmsley. 



Cultiv. — This is the third and, horticulturally, the best 
of the caulescent species of Streptocarpus introduced into 
cultivation. They are less decorative than the stemless 
species, now so popular in gardens, and unless they can 
be improved by crossing and selecting they are not likely 
to become favourites with gardeners. So far, all attempts 
to cross them with species of the stemless section have 
proved unsuccessful. 8. Bolstii has grown quickly from 
seeds, forming in less than a year a bushy plant 18 in. high 
and through. It has been happiest when kept in a moist 
tropical house, and has been at its best in December. It has 
ripened seeds, and is probably an annual, or monocarpic, 
as indeed are all the species in cultivation except 8. Bexii 
and its allies, aud even they do better when renewed from 
seeds than as old plants. — W*. Watson. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil : 2, corolla laid open, showing the stamens and 
staminodes ; 3 and 4, stamens : — all enlarged. 



8151 




MLS.aeLJ.KH.taUi.tJv 



^centBrooks,Day&San.Lt5 J xrap 



L.JSeeve &_C? London. 



Tab. 8151. 

DELPHINIUM MACBOCENTRON. 
Mountains of East Tropical Africa. 

Ranunculaceae. Tribe Helleboheae. 
Delphinium, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. |.. 9. 



Delphinium macrocentron, D. Oliv. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxi. p. 397 ; 
Hook. Ic. PL t. 1501 ; haec species calcaris erecti longitudine insignia. 

Herba perennis, pluricaulis, in olla crescens circiter 1*5 m. alta, fere omnino 
pubescens, caulibns pauciramosis. Folia 3-7-palmatipartita, atro-viridia, 
albo-maculata, circumscviptione fere orbicularia, usque ad 15-18 cm. 
diametro, sursum gradatim minora ; segmenta primaria valde variabilia, 
nunc 2 cm. lata nunc fere linearia, 3-multilobata, lobis ultimis acutis ; 
petioli usque ad 18 cm. longi, foliorum caulinorum sursum gradatim 
minora. Flores pubescentes, viridi-coerulei vel interdum flavo-coerulei 
calcare albido 4-5 cm. longo ; pedunculi quam flores nunc breviores nunc 
paullo longiores, prope apicem abrupte recurvi, bibracteolati, bracteoiis 
angustissimis circiter 5 cm. longis. Sepala petaloidea lata, superioris 
calcaratis limbus cordatus reflexus, omnia alia declinata ; calcar calycinum 
rectum, sursum directum, latum, per totam longitudinem cylindricum, 
obtusissimum. Petala 2 superiora in calcar calcare calycino inclusum 
producta, la.:>ina oblonga sursum leviter dilatata apice truncato-emar- 
ginata ; 2 iuferiora unguieulata, spathulata apice oblique rotundata, 
breviter bifida. Stamina quam petala breviora. Garpella 3, pubescentia, 
stamina aequantia, matura non visa. 



This Larkspur inhabits the mountains of Eastern 
tropical Africa, chiefly in the Uganda Protectorate, at 
elevations of 6,000 to 8,000 ft., and the Hon. Walter 
Rothschild imported it from Mount Elgon. The plant 
actually figured was from Mr. James O'Brien's garden at 
Harrow-on-the-Hill, and Miss O'Brien made the drawing 
illustrating the habit. Mr. J. Thomson first discovered it 
in Lykipia, in the Masai Country, in 1884, and there are 
also specimens in the Kew Herbarium, collected by Bishop 
Hannington, Mr. A. Whyte, Sir Evan James, and Mr. 
C. F. Elliott. The plant figured was cultivated in a 
pot ; Mr. O'Brien is of opinion that it may prove to be 
hardy. 

Descr. — A perennial herb, hairy in nearly all parts. 
Stems as grown in a pot about 5 ft. high, slightly 
branched. Leaves palmately divided into 3-7 primary 
segments varying from ^ to nearly 1 in. across, 3-many- 
lobed ; lobes acute ; petioles of the lower leaves 6-8 in. 
August 1st, 1907. 



long, gradually shorter upwards, uppermost sessile. 
Flowers hairy, blue and green, or yellow and green in 
some of the wild specimens, with a whitish apex, about 
2 in. long; peduncles about the same length, sometimes 
shorter, sometimes longer, abruptly recurved near the 
apex. Sepals 5, petaloid, broad ; spur broad, straight, 
erect, of nearly equal thickness throughout, rounded at 
the end. Petals 4, narrower. Carpels three, hairy, ripe 
ones not seen. — W. Botting Hbmsley. 



Fig. 1, one of the lower petals ; 2, a stamen ; 3, piatil ; 4, whole plant : — 
all enlarged, except 4. 



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8152 




MlS.deLJUiitchlLtK. 



"\£ncenfcBrool«.,J '. 



L.Kenv© &C?Laadon 



Tab. 8152. 
ACONITUM napellus, var. eminkks. 

Rhenish Prusia. 



Ranunculaceae. Tribe Helleeoreae. 
Aconitum, Linn.; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 9. 

Aconitum Napellus, Linn., var. eminens, Wirtgen, Fl. d. Preuss. Rheinpro- 
rinz, p. 21 ; a typo Lmneano aititudine, panicula amplissima, fiore magis 
hiante, galea altiore, nectariis saepe subexsertis, florum et folliculorum 
magnitudine nee non statione distinctum. 

Jlerba Raepe 2 m., interdum ad 2'75 m. alta, praeter inflorescentiam glaberrima. 
Folia laete vel saturate viridia, carnosula, lucidula, inferiora longe petio- 
lata, ambitu reniformi-orbiculata, maxima ad 30 cm. lata, more foliorum 
typi partita nisi segmentis plerumque latioribus ; petioli ad 1'5 cm. 
longi. Panicula maxima, 1-1"25 m. longa, tandem fere e baei ramis 
florentibus longis aucta, pyramidalis, superne adpresse pubescens; 
bracteae inferiores more foliorum sumniorum divisae, summaelanceolatae, 
simplices, pedicellis multo breviores; pedicelli inferiores ad 8 cm. vel 
tandem 10 cm. longi ; bracteolae oblongae, obtusae, pubescentes, flori 
arete approximatae, ad 5 mm. longae, in pedicellis inferioribus medio 
altera saepe trifida addita. Flores intense purpureo-coerulei, rarius 
purpurascentes vel albo-variegati. Galea 2U-25 mm. alta, parce pubes- 
cens vel praeter margines glabra, ungue latiusculo erecto, cuculla 
depressa versus rostrum paulo descendente vel subhorizontali. Sepala 
lateralia oblique orbicularia, latissime unguiculata, 15-18 mm. longa, 
margine superiore a galea remoto, ideoque flore hiante, in facie et ad 
margines sparse longe pilosa; sepala inferiora oblonga, descendentia, 
12-15 mm. longa. Nectaria ungue circiter 20 mm. alto sub galea prorsus 
curvato suffulta, paepe e galea magis mintisve exserta, oblonga, apice 
in dorso gibbosa, 5-7 mm. longa, hinc inde sparse pilosa, labio oblongo 
breviter bilobo incurvo, 4-8 mm. longo apice intense coeruleo. Fila- 
rnenta paulo ultra medium alata, superne pilosa. Carpella 3, rarissime 
2 vel 4, oblonga, glabra, sub anthesi erecta, postea divergentes. Folliculi 
maturi contigui, erecti, post dehissentiam imo apice tantum recurvo, 
magnitudine valde varii, ad 30 mm. longi, 6-7 mm. lati. Semina 3- 
angulari-obpyramidata, angulis acutis vel subalatis, in facie antica 
transverse rugosa, in lateribus sublaevia, 4 mm. longa. — A. eminens, 
Koch ex Reichb. Illustr. Aeon. gen. t. 16 (lxix.) ; WirtgeD, Veget. Eifel, 
p. 201 ; vix ex Reichb. tibers. d. Gatt. Aeon. p. 35 (ubi nomen tantum). 

This is by far the most handsome of the numerous varieties 
or races of Aconitum Napellus. It appears to be confined 
to the limestone zone of the Eifel Mountains. I collected 
the tubers from which the specimen here figured was 
raised on the banks of the River Kyi], some milss above 
Gerolstein, in 1904. There the plant grew most lux- 
uriantly in rich, deep soil, close to the water together 
with willows, the tallest specimens attaining 2 m. or 
slightly more. In another locality, on the slopes of the 
Auburg, to the west of Gerolstein, I found it in almost 
impenetrable thickets of hazel, Gornus sanguinea, Vibur- 

Seftejibee 1st, 1907. 



num Lantana, and other shrubs, sending up its beautiful 
blue panicles here and there where the thicket was lower 
and less compact. The tubers were about 10 cm. below 
the surface among the network of the roots of the shrubs, 
and very difficult to get at. The tallest plants raised in my 
garden attained 2'4 m.in 1905, 2'5 m. in 1906, and 275 m. 
in 1907. The top panicle flowers first, and is followed by 
numerous lateral panicles developing basewards, until in 
some cases the whole plant represents finally one huge 
compound panicle. At Gerolstein the flowering was, in 
1904, at its best in August. At Kew the plant flowers in 
August, whilst it starts sprouting at the beginning of March. 
It is noteworthy that specimens of typical A. Napellus, 
gathered by me at Enorstlenalp, Switzerland, and planted 
side by side with the Eifel plants, sprout at the end of 
March, that is 3 to 4 weeks later, and yet commence to 
flower a fortnight before var. eminens has begun. 

Descr. — A herb, often 7 and even over 9 ft. high, 
perfectly glabrous, with the exception of the inflorescences. 
Leaves bright or dark green, somewhat fleshy and glossy, 
the lower long-petioled, reniform-orbiculate in outline, the 
largest 12 in. across, divided like those of the ordinary 
monkshood of gardens ; petioles up to 6 in. long. Panicle 
very large and compound, 3-5 ft. long, pyramidal, finely 
adpressedly pubescent in the upper parts ; lower bracts 
like reduced leaves, upper lanceolate, entire, much shorter 
than the pedicels ; bracteoles oblong, obtuse, pubescent, 
close to the flower. Flowers intensely purplish-blue, or 
sometimes purple or variegated. Helmet about an iuch 
long, with a broad claw and a depressed hood; lateral 
sepals obliquely orbicular, |-| in. long, their upper 
margins not contiguous with the helmet. Nectaries with 
a slender claw about f in. long, and a much inclined and 
often exserted hood produced into a 2-lobed lip J-£ in. 
long. Carpels 3, rarely 2 or 4, oblong, erect, glabrous, 
divergent after flowering, but ultimately again erect and 
contiguous. Follicles 1-1} in. long, about } in. wide, the 
tips recurved after dehiscing. Seeds 3-angular, obpyra- 
midal, angles acute, or slightly winded, anticous face 
transversely wrinkled, i in. long.— Otto Staff. 

Fig. 1, part of pedicel ; 2, section of now fc r~; 3, nectaries ; \, whole plant :— 
!-->, enlarged, 4, rehiced. 




M. S.dol J.IT.Filr3ilith. . 



T .4ncentSroo>csJ>^&3caLl?-In>p 



Mteeve&_C° London 



Tab. 8153. 
ANGRAECUM infundibulare. 

Tropical Africa. 

Orciiidaceae. Tribe Vaxdeae. 
Angraecum, Thouars ; Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 583. 



Ang-raeeum infundibulare, Lindl. in Journ. TAnn. Soc. vol. vi. n. 136; 

Gard. Ghron. 1904, vol. xxxvi. pp. 82, 130, cum suppl. tab.; Orch. Rev. 

190.% p. 331 ; species distinctissima, habitu A. Eichleriano, KranzL, 

simile, sed labello amplissimo fauce infundibular! et calcare longissimo 

■ differt. 

Herba epiphytica, scandens. Gaides validi, 30-60 cm. longi, radicantes. 
Folia disticha, oblonga, inaequaliter biloba, coriacea, 10-12 cm. longa; 
circa 3 cm. lata; vnginae amplexicaules, striatae, 3-4 cm. longae. 
Pedunculi axillares, 6-7 cm. lonui, uniflori. Bracteae ovato-oblongae, 
acntae, circa 8 mm. longae. Flores magui, speriosi, pallide flavi ; labellutu 
albidum, fauce viride. Sepala et petala linearia, acuminata, 6-7 cm. 
longa ; petala et sepalum posticum reflexa ; sepala lateralia divergentia. 
Labellum magnum, infundibulare; limbus late elliptico-ovatus, apiculatus, 
6-7 cm. longns, circa 5 cm. latns ; calcar fauce infundibulari 5-6 cm. 
longo dein yalde reflexum, cylindricum, 9-11 cm. longum. Golumna 
latissima, circa 5 mm. long;), alis rotundatis ; pollinia 2, stipiti piano 
brevi affixa. — Mystacidium infundibulare, RoH'e in Dyer PL Trop. Africa, 
vol. vii. p. 170. 

Angraecum infundibulare, Lindl., is a very remarkable 
species, which was originally discovered in Princes Island, 
in the Bight of Biafra, West Tropical Africa, by Barter, 
about the year 1858 ; the collector describing it as a 
highly ornamental plant, an exception to African Or- 
chidaceae, and as having large white and fragrant flowers. 
Nothing further was known of it until 1904, but in July 
of that year a plant from the collection of the Eight Hon. 
Lord Rothschild, Tring Park, received a First-class 
Certificate from the Koyal Horticultural Society, and 
this is said to have been collected by Major H. B. 
Rattray, on the Victoria Nyanza, Uganda, in 1902, a 
locality over a thousand miles east of the original one. 
It was also found in Uganda by Mr. M. T. Dawe, Director 
of the Scientific and Forestry Department, Uganda, who 
sent living plants to Kew in 1903, which flowered in 
November, 1906, when the accompanying drawing was 
made. The Uganda plant has rather broader leaves than 
that from Prince's Island, but otherwise the two are sub- 
stantially similar. There is at Kew a dried specimen 

SEPTtMBKR 1ST, 1907. 



collected by Barter at the Brass River, which is identical 
in habit, but the leaves are larger, and the flowers have 
fallen, though apparently it represents the same species. 
Lindley remarked that it belonged to the same set as 
Aiigraecum g lad ii folium, Tbouars, and as the pollen was 
unknown when the Orchids were prepared for the Flora 
of Tropical Africa the species was referred to Mystaci- 
dium, a position which now proves untenable. It is quite 
a distinct and isolated species, though perhaps most allied 
to Angraecum Etchlerianum, Kriinzl. (Bot. Mag. t. 7813), 
which it closely resembles in habit, though the details of 
the flower are very different. 

Mr. Dawe found the plant growing in a hot, moist, and 
shady situation, and under these conditions it has suc- 
ceeded well in cultivation. 

Descr. — A climbing epiphyte, 1-2 ft. high, with aerial 
roots. Leaves distichous, oblong, unequally bilobed, 
coriaceous, 4-5 in. long, an inch or more broad ; sheaths 
tubular, clasping the stem, striate, 1— 1J in. long. 
Peduncles axillary, 2|— 3 in. long, 1-flowered. Bracts ovate- 
oblong acute, about \ in. long. Flowers large, pale 
yellow, except the lip, w^hich is white with a green throat. 
Sepals and petals linear, acuminate, 2-^-3 in. long ; the 
petals and dorsal sepal reflexed, the lateral sepals di- 
verging. Lip large, infundibular ; limb broadly elliptical- 
ovate, apiculate, 2J- 3 in. long, about 2 in. broad; throat 
infundibular, 2-2J- in. long, then sharply reflexed into a 
slender somewhat curved spur, 3J-4-|- in. long, Column 
very broad, about ^ in. long, with rounded wings ; pollinia 
2, attached to a short, broad, and flat stipes. — R. A. 
Rolfe. 



Fig. 1, column; 2, anther-cap; 3 and 4, pollinarium, seen from front and 
back : — all enlarged. 



8154. 




MS. 



: ath. 



AfoismtBrooks^ay-A-San-Llglrap 



-L Re 8vs &.C? London. 



Tab. 8154. 
PODOPHYLLUM VRHSIPELLE. 

China. 

Berbkridaceae. Tribe Beubereae. 
Podophyllum, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Flint, vol. i. p. 45. 



Podophyllum versipelle, Hance in Journ. Bot. vol. xxi. (1883) 362 ; Ilemsl. 
in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 33; Hook. Ic. Plant, vol. xx. (1891), 
t. 1996; affinis P. pleiantJio, Hance, sed foliis altius lobatis et floribus 
minoribus differt. 

Rhizoma perennis. Caules antmi, erecti, glabri, pallide virides. Folia 
caulina 2, inferius longe, superius breviter centrice vel subcen trice 
peltato-petiolata, superius inflorescentiam terrainalem etsessilemsuperans, 
anibitu orbicularia, pins minus profunde 5-9-lobata, usque ad 25 cm. 
diametro, supra glabra, subtus parce pilosa, nervis supra impressis 
subtus leviter promiuulis, lobis ovatis vel ovato-oblongis vel interdum 
letiter trilobatia circ. 10 cm. longis et 8 cm. latis, marginibus subuJato- 
denticulatis. Cymae umbelliformes, sessiles, saepius 8-florae. Pedicelli 
penduli, usque ad 5 cm. longi, apice leviter incrassati, glabri vel breviter 
pilosi. Flores saturate cocciaei. Sepala 6, oblongo-elliptica, l - 5 cm. 
longa, '7 cm. lata, obtusa, extus breviter pilosa, intns glabra. Petala 6, 
oblongo-elliptica, 2-25 cm. longa, '75-1 cm. lata, obtusa, utrinque glabra. 
Stamina 6; filamenta complanata, 7 cm. longa, glabra; antherae circiter 
1 cm. longae, connectivo incrassato apice obtuso. Ovarium ellipsoideum, 
glabrum ; stylus brevis, stigmate magno peltato coronatus. Ovula 
iiiderinita. Fructus ignotus. 



The genus Podophyllum consists of at least six species, 
five of which are in cultivation. One of these, P. pelta- 
tum, is a native of North America, whilst the remainder 
are found in India, China, and the island of Formosa. 
They are all sufficiently hardy to be grown in the open 
at Kew, but P. pleianthum, a native of Formosa, suc- 
ceeds better when afforded a little protection from frost. 
P. versipelle somewhat resembles this species, the flowers 
being more hidden from view by the uppermost leaf. The 
plant from which our illustration was prepared was pre- 
sented to Kew in 1903 by Messrs. J. Veitch & Sons, who 
introduced this species into cultivation through their col- 
lector, Mr. E. II. Wilson. It is found in the woods and 
ravines of Western China. P. peltatum (B. M. t. 1819), 
has been in cultivation for a very long period ; as early as 
1664, according to Evelyn, " Kalendarium," 16h'4, p. 67, as 
Anapodophyllum. It has white flowers, and is commonly 
Septembjbb 1st, 1907. 



known as the May-Apple or American Mandrake. The 
leaves and root of this plant are poisonous, but the fruit is 
edible. 

This species was first collected in fissures of rocks 
in the Lofau Mountains, Kwantung, by the Rev. B. C. 
Henry, and in barren places in the same region by the 
Rev. E. Faber and Mr. C. Ford; and it has since been 
collected in several localities in the Provinces of Hupeh 
and Szechuen, by Dr. A. Henry and Mr. E. H. Wilson. 

Descr. — Rhizome perennial. Stems annual, erect, 
glabrous, pale green. Catiline leaves 2, lower long, upper 
shortly, centrally or subcentrally peltate, the upper one 
overtopping the terminal and sessile inflorescence, orbi- 
cular in outline, more or less deeply 5-9-lobed, largest 10 
in. in diameter, glabrous above, sparsely pilose beneath; 
nerves impressed above, slightly prominent below ; lobes 
ovate, ovate-oblong, or sometimes slightly trilobed, about 
4 in. long and 3 in. broad, margins subulate-denticulate. 
Cyme umbelliform, sessile, often 8-flowered. Pedicels 
pendulous, up to 2 in. long, slightly thickened at the apex, 
glabrous or shortly pilose. Flowers deep crimson. 
Sepals 6, oblong-elliptic, J- in. long, J in. broad, obtuse, 
shortly pilose outside, glabrous inside. Petals 6, oblong- 
elliptic, J-l in. long, ^-\- in. broad, obtuse, glabrous on 
both sides. Stamens 6, filaments flattened, J in. long, 
glabrous; anthers about \ in. long, connective thick, 
obtuse at the apex. Ovary ellipsoid, glabrous ; style short, 
stigma large, peltate. Ovules indefinite. — J. Hutchinson. 



Fig. 1. margin of leaf; 2, anthers' and pis-til : — all enlarged. 



8155. 



'Vywi 







M.S.dsl.xu-^'itch.BJv 



"AnceiUBroo3<BDay-&Scr.: - 



I.-Beeve &.C° Landcji. 



Tab. 8155. 
BIGELOVIA GRAVEOLENS. 

North America. 

Compositae. Tribe Astekoideae. 
Bigelovia, DC. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1232. 



Bigelovia graveolens, A. Or. in Proc. Am. Acad. 1873, vol. viii. p. 61 1 ; Sun. 
Fl. N. Am. vol. i. pt. 2, p. 139; inter affines ramis junioribus albo- 
tomentosis et pappo molli distinguitur. 

Frutex in culto usque ad 3 m. altus. Caulis basi 5 cm. diametro, dense 
ramosas, ramulis ultimis corymbosia pendulis. Folia alterna, conferta, 
glabrescentia, crassiuscula, linearia, 3-7 cm. longa, acuta. Capitula 
bomogama, discoidea, numerosissima, coryml>osa, brevissime pedunculate, 
5-flora, angusta, circiter 1*6 cm. longa. Involucri bracteae circiter 6- 
seriatae, lancenlatae, acutae, carinatae, scariosae, infimae minores, 2-3 mm. 
longae. Flores flavi. Corolla regularis, tubulosa, 5-striata, lobis sub- 
erectis vix acutis. Antherae exsertae, apice appendkulatae. Styli rami 
elongati, pubescentes, longe exserti, divaricati. Achaenia subcylindrica, 
hirsnta. Pappi setae numerosae, inaequales, longiores corollae tubum 
nequantes, molles, puberulae. — Chrysocoma graveolens, Nutt. Gen. N. Am. 
PI. vol. ii. p. 136. LAnosyris graveolens, Torr. & Gray Fl. N. Am. 
vol. ii. p. 234. Chrysocoma nauseosa, Pursh, Fl. Am. Sept. vol. ii. p. 517. 
Chrysothamnus nauseosus, Britton in Brit. & A. Br. Fl. N. U.S. & Can. 
vol. iii. p. 326 cum figura. 



Bigelovia graveolens, as defined by A. Gray, is a very 
variable plant, of which he distinguishes five varieties, 
and he gives the height as 1 to 3 ft. Britton and Brown 
say 1 to 6 ft., and under cultivation, trained to a wall, 
grows considerably higher. At Kew it is grown against 
the wall at the north end of the Herbaceous ground, and 
it is pruned every season. At present the plant covers 
about 8 square yards, and it is very conspicuous when 
covered with its large clusters of bright yellow flower- 
heads. It has a wide range of distribution, extending 
from British Columbia to New Mexico, and it grows 
naturally in sterile and especially alkaline soils. Mr. W. 
Watson contributes the following notes : — " Kew is in- 
debted to the Rev. Canon Ellaconibe for this shrub. He 
sent a small plant for identification in 1900, and it has 
now stood four winters without protection. Last year it 
was in full flower in mid-October, and so continued about 
a month. It might be called a shrubby Golden Rod, the 
big crowded corymbose clusters of yellow flowers being 
September 1st, 1907. 



not unlike those of some of the Solidagos. The leaves 
have a strong aromatic odour, not unlike tansy. At Kew 
the plant requires the protection of a wall, but further 
south it would no doubt be quite hardy in the open. It 
is easily propagated from stem-cuttings, and it is quite 
the sort of shrub for collections of showy and interesting 
plants ; its habit of flowering so late in the year giving it 
a special value. B. Douglasi, a smaller flowered species, 
is also cultivated at Kew." 

Descr. — Shrubby, growing to at least 6 to 8 ft. high in 
cultivation. Stem as much as 2 in. in diameter at the 
base, much branched upwards ; flowering branches corym- 
bose, pendulous, tomentose, white. Leaves alternate, 
crowded, glabrescent, rather thick, linear, 1-3 in. long, 
acute. Flower-heads very numerous, corymbose, shortly 
stalked, 5-flowered, narrow, about -f in. long. Bracts of 
the involucre in about 6 series, lanceolate, acute, the 
lowest smallest, about ^ in. long. Flowers yellow, all 
tubular. Corolla regular, 5-striped, lobes nearly erect, 
scarcely acute. Style-branches elongated, pubescent, much 
exserted, spreading. Achenes nearly cylindrical, hairy. 
Fapjms of numerous, unequal bristles, the longest equal- 
ling the corolla-tube. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



Fig. 1, a head of flowers ; 2, a flower ; 3, a bristle of the pappus ; 4, anthers ; 
6, style-arms : — all enlarged. 



<S75tf 




eel JNFitcix hth 



•Vincent BroaksJW A.Son,Lt*in* 



X. Reeve &.C? ] .anxLon. 



Tab. 8156. 
PRUNUS Besseyi. 

North-Western United States. 

Rosaceae. Tribe Pruneae. 
Prunus, Linn.; Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 609. 



Prunus (§ Cerasus) Besseyi, Bailey in Bull. Cornell Agric. Exp. Stat. No. 70, 
p. 261 (1894) ; Britton & Brown, Illustr. Flora N. United States, vol. ii. 
p. 251, tig. 2019; Be Wild., Icon. Hort. Then. vol. iii. t. 112; Spath. in 
Gartenfl. 1903, p. 551 ; P. pumilae et Pi cuneatae arete affinis, ab ilia 
tamen habitu majus coinpressa foliisque basin versus latioribus, ab hac 
foliorum laminis firmulis petiobsque brevioribus et fruetn majore satis 
recedit. 

Frutex nanus, compactus, interdum prostratus, *6-l'2 m. altus, omnino glaber. 
Folia decidua, elliptica, elliptico-lanceolata vel parum subobovata, 2*5-6 
cm. longa, 1*5— 1 '75 cm. lata, niargine basi cuneata nonDuuquam integra 
excepta minute serrata, supra viridia, subtus pallidiora, utrinque hebetia, 
distincte petiolata ; stipulae 3-4 mm. longae, serratae, Flores in fasciculos 
2-4-floros ad ramulorum anni superioris nodos congesti, singuli 1*5 cm. ■ 
lati, pedicellis floriferis 1*25 cm. longis. Galyx campanulatus, 5-lobus; 
lobis ovatis glanduloso-serratis demum reflexis. Petala ovato-oblonga, 
alba, 8 mm. longa, 5 mm. lata. Drupae late ovatae, 1*5 cm. longae, 1 cm. 
diam.. primo pruinosae, purpurascentes, demum nigricantes ; pedicelli 
fructigeri plus minusve refracti, 2 cm. lougi. — P. pumila. var. Besseyi, 
Waugh ; Bailey in Cyclop, of Amer. Hort. p. 1451 (1901).— D. Pkain. 



There are three dwarf Cherries of North America that 
constitute a well-marked and homogeneous group. They 
are Prunus pumila, L., P. cuneata, Raf., and P. Besseyi, 
Bailey. All three are known as " Sand-Cherries " in the 
United States, and in a strictly botanical sense can only 
be regarded as varieties of one species. Professor Bailey 
himself, in the Cyclopedia of American Horticulture, 
p. 1451 (1901), has adopted this view. In geographical 
distribution, P. Besseyi is the most western of the group, 
being found in the States of Colorado, Nebraska, Kansas, 
Utah, &c. It is a characteristic undershrub of the 
Nebraska sand-hills. P. pumila differs in its taller, less 
compact habit, and in its oblanceolate or spathulate leaves ; 
and P. cuneata is distinguished by its smaller fruits, its 
longer petioles, and thinner leaves. 

In the hot, dry plains east of the Rocky Mountains, 
P. Besseyi promises to become a valuable fruit-bearing 
shrub. It had already been cultivated to some extent in 
September 1st, 1907. 



Colorado, under the popular name of "Dwarf Rocky 
Mountain Cherry," previous to its recognition as a species 
by Prof. Bailey. The fruit is variable in quality, with a 
flavour comparable to that of a Morello Cherry. Cultiva- 
tion and selection will, no doubt, eliminate whatever may 
be excessive in the bitterness and astringeney of the wild 
fruits. Mr. C. E. Pennock, Fort Collins, Colorado, who 
was one of the first to detect the economic value of this 
Cherry, mentions, as evidence of its wonderful productive- 
ness in that State, that he has picked sixteen quarts of 
fruit from a three-year-old bush, and eighty cherries from 
a branch 12 in. long. It will not be of any economic 
value in the British Isles, but it is worth the notice of fruit- 
growers in South Africa and Australia, or wherever the 
summer conditions approximate to those of Colorado. 

The plant from which our figure was prepared is one 
of a batch sent to Kew by Professor Sargent, in 1900, 
from the Arnold Arboretum. They have flowered during 
the last three years, and in early May, when the growths 
of the preceding summer are crowded with fascicles of 
white flowers, make a charming display. The fruit has 
not, hitherto, been produced in sufficient abundance at 
Kew, to count among the ornamental qualities of the plant. 
The species is quite hardy. 

Descr.—A dwarf, compact, sometimes prostrate shrub, 
2 4 ft. high, deciduous, glabrous in every part. Leaves 
elliptic to elliptic-lanceolate or slightly obovate, 1-2J in. 
long, serrate, or the basal part often entire, greyish green. 
Stipules subulate, serrate. Fascicles of 2 to 4 flowers pro- 
duced in May at the nodes of the previous season's 
branches. Flowers f in. in diameter, on pedicels J in. 
long. Calyx green, 5-lobed ; lobes ovate, glandular-ser- 
rate, finally reflexed. Petals white. Drupes on stout, 
more or less depressed pedicels, j in. long, at first covered 
with a purplish bloom, black when quite ripe. — W. J. 
Bean. 



Fig. 1, a partially expanded flower; 2, section through the receptacle; 
3 and 4, anthers :— all enlarged. 



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„ 8153.— ANGRAECUM INFTTNDIBTJLARE. 
„ 8154— PODOPHYLLUM VERSIPELLE. 
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8157 




KSaelJ.N.FitcJvliav 



" Ancent Bro olo J) ay 5c S oil Ltr iraj) . 



URoeveStC? LaiuUm 



Tab. 8157. 
FERULA communis var. brevifolia. 

Mediterranean Coun tries. 



Umbellifeeae. Tribe Peucedaneae. 
Ferula, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 917. 



Ferula communis, Linn., var. brevifolia, Mariz, in Bol. Soc. Brot. vol. xii. 
(1895), p. 207; a typo foliorum segmentis ultimi ordinis brevioribus 
(interdum brevissimis) differ! 

Herha perennis, gigantea, ad 3 m. alta, glaberrima, caule basi ad 10 cm. crasso. 
Folia ampla, laete viridia, pinnato-multisecta, laciniis ultimi ordinis 
tenuibus lineari-filiformibus, nunc 3-5 mm. nunc 10-20 mm. longis sed 
in eodem folio subaequalibus acutis ; petioli foliorum basalium inferne 
longe dilatati, superiorum in vaginam amplam semiamplexicaulem 
abeuntes ; vaginae summae subaphyllae. Umbellae compositae in thyrsum 
1 m. vel ultra longum collectae, centrales breviter, laterales longiuscule 
pedunculatae, 16-24-radiatae, radiis subaequalibus 2-3 cm. longis, 
involucro nullo vel oligophyllo phyllis quam radiis multo brevioribus 
membranaceis lanceolatis. Umbellulae 20-(vel ultra) radiatae, radiis 
5-8 mm. longis, involucello mono- vel dipbyllo, pbyllis linearibus vel 
setaceis brevibus. Sepala ad dentes minutos redacta. Petala ovato- 
oblonga, lutea, inflexo-acuminata, integra. Styli divergentes, demum 
reflexi. Fructus ambitu ellipticus vel obovato-ellipticus, adorsovalde com- 
pressus, 12-16 mm. longus, 7-11 mm. latus; mericarpia margine dilatato 
compresso cincta, jugis 3 dorsalibus filiformibus, lateralibus 2 in marginem 
immersis, vittis in valleculis 2-3, in commissura 4-6; carpophorum 
bipartitum. Semina plano-convexa. — F. brevifolia, Link in Roem. & Scbult. 
Syst. Veg. vol. vi. p. 592 et in Hoffmansegg & Link, Flore Portug. p. 416, 
t. 108, a. F. nodiflora, Guss. Syn. Fl. Sic. vol. i. p. 353, non Linn. 
F. nodiflora, var. monspeliensis, Gren. & Godr. Fl. Franc., vol. i. p. 692. 
F. Linkii, Webb & Berth., Fl. Canar., Phyt. iii. p. 160, t. 75. F. communis, 
var. nodiflora, Fiori & Paol., Fl. Anal, d'ltal. vol. ii. p. 176. 



The plant figured here was raised from a rootstock 
communicated by Vice-Consul Gr. P. Hunot, from Saffi, 
Marocco, in 1886, which flowered in December, 1892. It 
represents a form of Ferula communis, characterised by 
shorter ultimate leaf segments, which occurs along with 
the typical form almost throughout the area of the species. 
This area extends from the Canaries and Portugal to 
Constantinople and Syria, excluding North-east Africa. 
The leaf chosen for the accompanying plate represents a 
condition somewhat intermediate between the two forms, but 
in other leaves of the same individual plant the length of 
the ultimate segments varied from } to l of an inch. 

October, 1907. 



Similar and even greater variations are evident in another 
specimen of this plant, of unknown origin, which was 
grown at Kew as Ferula Linkii, but there is no doubt that 
specimens occur in which the ultimate segments of all 
the leaves are reduced to J to j of an inch. Such speci- 
mens were originally described as distinct species, e.g. 
F. brevifolia, Link, and F. Linhii, Webb & Berth. This 
form with short segments seems to prevail in certain 
localities and bears the character of a well-established race. 

Particular interest attaches to this plant, for the problem 
of the origin of the gum ammoniac (Fashook) of Marocco 
has been solved owing to its successful cultivation at 
Kew. This gum was originally referred to Ferula orientally, 
L., a plant confined to the Orient, and later on to F. 
tingitana, which is a native of Marocco. But the figure 
given by Jackson, Account of Marocco, ed. 3, p. 136, t. 7, of 
the leaf of the Fashook plant made this identification very 
doubtful. Sir Joseph Hooker, and afterwards Sir William 
Thiselton-Dyer, therefore enlisted the services of Mr. G. P. 
Hunot, then British Vice-Consul at Saffi, amongst others, 
to procure authentic specimens of the plant yielding the 
Fashook gum, with the result that its source is now traced 
to Ferula communis. A full account of the history of the 
drug will be given shortly in the Kew Bulletin. 

Descr. — A herb, sometimes 10 feet high, quite glabrous. 
Stem 4 in. thick at the base. Leaves bright green, very 
large, much dissected, ultimate segments linear-filiform, 
|— f in. long, lower petioles widened at the base, upper 
replaced by large sheaths. Umbels compound in a thyrse, 
3 feet or more long, the central shortly, the lateral longer 
peduncled, with 16-24 rays about 1 in. long and with or 
without an involucre of a few short membranous leaves. 
Umbellules of 20 or more rays, J—J in. long ; involucel of 
1 or 2 linear or filiform short leaves. Petals ovate- 
oblong, entire, yellow with an inflexed tip. Styles at 
length reflexed. Fruit elliptic or obovate-elliptic, dorsally 
very much compressed, J-f in. long, £~J in. broad ; meri- 
carps with 3 filiform dorsal ridges and a narrow thickened 
margin ; intrajugal oil-tubes 2-3 ; commissural oil-tubes 4-6 ; 
carpophore bipartite. Seed plano-convex. — Otto Stapf. 

Cultiv. — The plant raised from the rootstock presented 
by Mr. G. P. Hunot in 1886 has been cultivated in a pot in 



a greenhouse, except during summer, when it has stood in 
the open air exposed to full sunshine. The leaves have 
always died in the autumn and new ones have started in 
winter, but no flowers were developed except in December, 
1892, when the present figure was made. Like the ordinary 
state of Ferula communis, this variety is a highly ornamental 
plant even when it is not in flower. Although the Kew 
plant has received glass-house treatment, it is possible that it 
would thrive out of doors, as typical Ferula communis does, 
but it has not been tried owing to the time of year when 
the new leaves are developed. The soil used for it is a 
sandy peat, and whilst the plant is at rest it is kept quite 
dry. The plant is one that ought to thrive in countries 
such as the Cape of Good Hope and California. — 
W. Watson. 

Fig. 1, male flower ; 2, hermaphrodite flower ; 3 and 4, fruits (semimature) ; 
5, cross-section through a carpel ; 6, cross-section through a semimature fruit ; 
7, whole plant : — 1-6, enlarged ; 7, reduced. 



8158 




MS delJ-.NFitch.lith 



T&ncentBEooksJJayr&SanXl^imp 



L.Rfieve A-C^Lanckm-. 



Tab. 8158. 
rosa soulieana. 

Western China. 



Rosaceae. Tribe Roseae. 
Rosa, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 625. 



Rosa (§ Systylae) Soulieana, Crepin in Bull. Soc. Bot. Belg. 1896, vol. xxxv. 
Comptes Rendus, p. 21; species R. moschatae, Mill., proxima; differt foliis 
minoribus, foliolis ovalibus utrinque rotundatis, pedunculis minus glandu- 
losis et sepalis breviter acuminatis. 

Frutex robustus, habitu R. caninae, 2-3 m. altus, aculeis rectis vel in ramis 
floriferis curvatis basi latis crebre armatus, praeter glandulas parvas 
breviter stipitatas glaber. Folia pallide viridia, 5-9-foliolata, plerumque 
7-foliolata, maxima 10 cm. longa sed saepius 6-8 cm. longa. Foliola ovalia, 
ovata vel ovato-oblonga, interdum usque ad 3 cm. longa, brevissime 
petiolulata, minute serrulata ; rhacbis aculeolata. Stipulae latae, adnatae, 
minute glanduloso-marginatae, parte libera acutae. Flores eburnei, circiter 
4 cm. diametro, in corymbos compositos amplos densos terminales dispositi, 
vel interdum in ramis brevibus lateralibus solitarii; pedunculi graciles, 
glandulis minimis instructi. Calyx inconspicue glandulosus ; lobis breviter 
acuminatis integris vel paucidentatis. Petala emarginata. Ovaria pilosa, 
stylis persistentibus. Fructus ovoideus vel fere globosus, circiter 1*5 cm. 
diametro maximo, aurantiaco-cinnabarinus. 



Rosa Soulieana is one of the most desirable of the single 
white roses, both in flower and fruit. Kew received it from 
Messrs. de Vilmorin in 1899, and it may be seen to great 
advantage in the Rose Valley near the Pagoda. It differs 
from R. moschata in the smaller leaves, usually oval leaflets 
rounded at both ends, shortly stalked glauds on the 
peduncles and in the shorter tails of the sepals. 

R. Brunonii, Lindl. (B.M. t. 4030) often erroneously 
written Brunonis, and quoted as a synonym of R. moschata, 
Mill., is easily distinguished by its very hairy peduncles. 
There are wild specimens of this species in the Kew 
Herbarium from various localities in the province of 
Kwangtung. In foliage it is much nearer R. Soulieana 
than it is to R. moschata. 

On the authority of the late Professor Cre'pin, in Bull. 
Soc. Bot. Belg., 1905, vol. xxxiv. Comptes- Rendus, p. 57, 
the plant figured in the Magazine (t. 7421) as R. Luciae, 
Franch. et Rochebr., is not that species, but is his R. 

OCTOBEE, 1907. 



Wichuraiana. On the other hand, the plant described by 
Bentham, Ft. Hongk., p. 106, under the name of R. moschaia 
is R. Luciae. 

Descr. — A very robust species of suberect habit, 
forming bushes at least 8 ft. high and as much through, 
armed with curved prickles or with straight ones in the 
barren branches. Leaves pale-green, usually with seven 
leaflets, the largest 4 in. long, usually 2j to 3 in. long. 
Leaflets oval, ovate or ovate-oblong, rarely more than 1 in. 
long, minutely serrate, axis usually furnished with a few 
small prickles. Stipules adnate, acute, with marginal glands. 
Flowers ivory-white, about \\ in. across, very numerous, in 
compound, dense, terminal corymbs, or sometimes solitary 
on short lateral branchlets. Peduncles slender, slightly 
glandular. Calyx-lobes shortly tailed, entire or furnished 
with a few small teeth. Petals emarginate. Ovaries pilose ; 
styles connate. Fruit orange-vermilion, ovoid or nearly 
globose, a little over J in. in its greatest diameter. — 

W. BOTTIXG HEMSLEY. 

Cultiv. — One of the most vigorous of all Roses, this new 
Chinese species is, in consequence, better adapted for semi- 
wild places than it is for the more trimly kept parts of the 
garden. On young plants the growths of a single year 
are sometimes 10 feet to 12 feet long. In June, when its 
numerous clusters of white flowers are open, it is very 
beautiful, as it is again in autumn, when the clusters of 
small fruits have turned to a soft red. But apart from 
these, the luxuriant mass of smooth grey foliage out of 
which are thrust the long, arching shoots of the year, is in 
itself attractive. Roses are notoriously gross feeders, and 
R. Soulieana is not one of the exceptions. It should be 
planted in good, rather heavy loam, in a position fully 
exposed to the sun, with abundant space to grow in. — 
W. J. Bean. 

Fig. 1 portion of a flowering-branch showing the prickles; % longitudinal 
section ot a receptacle; 3, a young carpel -.—all enlarged. 



815d 




M. S dfiL J7N" RteK luth. 



insert Broo>s,D«ff-iSan.Li?m5' 



XTteeve&C "London. 



Tab. 8159. 
ibis verna. 

United States. 



Ibidaceae. Tribe Moeaeae. 
IetSj Linn.', Benth. et Hooh.f. Oen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686. 



Iris (Pardanthopsis) verna, Linn. Sp. PL ed. 1. p. 39 : Ait. ITort. Kew. ed. 1, 
vol. i. p. 73; Lodd. Cab. t. 1855; Sweet, Brit. Fl. Oard. ser. 1, t. 68; 
Britt. & Brown, III. Fl. N. TJ. S. vol. i. p. 452 ; a speciebus reliquis hujus 
sectionis foliis linear ibus scapoque unifloro differt. 

Ilerba acaulis. Radix fibrosa. Folia linearia, 15-20 cm. longa, 6 mm. lata. 
Scapus uniflorus; spatbae 5-6 cm. longae, lanceolatae, virides; pedicclli 
breves. Perianthii tubus viridis, violaceo-tinctus, 4 cm. longus ; segmenta 
exteriora oblanceolata, acuta, imberbia, dilute violacea, 4 cm. longa, 1 cm. 
lata ; ungues aurantiaci ; segmenta interiora oblanceolata, acuta, violacea, 
3 cm. longa, 1 cm. lata. Styli rami 2 cm. longi ; cristae 8 mm. longae, 
3 mm. latae. — I. virginiana pumila, sive Chamaeiris verna an gust i folia, flore 
purpureo-caernleo odorato, Pluk. Almag. p. 198 ; Pliytogr. t. 19G, f. 6. 



Although Iris verna was cultivated by Philip Miller as 
long ago as 1739, and has been re-introduced from time to 
time, it has never become a familiar plant in English 
gardens. This may be due to its having been confused by 
some of the earlier botanical and horticultural writers with 
the well-known and popular Iris cristata, but in that 
species the outer perianth lobes are crested, whereas in 2. 
verna they are naked. The home of /. verna is in the 
Eastern States of North America, from Pennsylvania to 
Yirginia, Kentucky, and Georgia. I. cristata is figured in 
this work at t. 412. 

Descr. — A stemless herb with fibrous roots. Leaves 
linear, finely veined, 6-8 in. long, ^ in. broad. Stem none. 
Scape 1-flowered ; spathes 2-2J in. long, lanceolate, green ; 
pedicels short. Perianth-tube green tinted with violet, 
1J in. long ; falls oblanceolate, acute, glabrous, pale violet, 
1^ in. long, f in. broad ; claws orange ; standards oblanceo- 
late, acute, violet, 1J in. long, | in. broad. Style arms § in. 
long ; crests J in. long, | in. broad. — T. F. Chipp. 

Cultiv. — The specimen figured was forwarded by Mr. R. I. 
Lvnch, A.L.S., Curator of the Botanic Gardens, Cambridge, 
with the explanation that it had been grown under glass, 

October, 1907. 



At Kew also it is cultivated in pots in a cold frame and 
exhibited when in flower, usually in April, in the Alpine 
House ; for, although it is hardy and grows quite freely out 
of doors both in the rock-garden and in the Iris beds, it 
rarely flowers there. In this respect it differs from the 
remaining members of the Pumila section, to which it 
belongs, as they flower profusely in the open air every 
spring. Probably /. verna would be more at home in the 
warmer parts of England, such as South Devon and Corn- 
wall. The flowers are fragrant. — W. Watson. 



Figs. 1 and 2, anthers ; 3, stigma : — enlarged. 



8160 




MSAeL-INFitchJith 



VincentBrooksDayiSonXt^iB* 



L .Reeve &. C?Lan.don 



Tab. 8160. 
BULBOPHYLLUM dichromum. 

it— 

1 1 nnam. 



Orchidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 
Bulbophyllum, Tkouars; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 501. 



Bulbophyllum dichromum, Rol/e in Kew Bulletin, 1907, p. 128; a B.fusco- 
purpureo, Wight, sepalis latcralibns apice connatis et petalis brevibus 
ciliatis nee longe setii'eris differt. 

Iltrba epiphytica. Rhizoma validum. Pseudobulbi ovoideo-oblongi, obscure 
tetragoni, circa 5 cm. longi, monophylli. Folia pctiolata, coriacea, oblonga, 
obtusa, circa 17 cm. longa, 4 - 5 cm. lata ; petiolus 5 cm. longiis. ticapus 
suberectus, circa 25 cm. longus, basi vaginis oblongis subobtusis tectus ; 
racemus laxus, circa 12-florus. Bracteae ovato-oblongae, acutae, 8-10 mm. 
longae. Pedicelli subgraciles, 2 - 5-3 cm. longi. Flora speciosi, vitellini, 
labello purpureo. Sepal urn posticnm ovato-oblongum, subacutum, concavum, 
2 cm. longum; sepala lateralis lanceolata, acuta, apice connata et leviter 
recurva, facie minutissime puberula. Petala patentia, oblique triangularis, 
breviter acuminata, ciliata, 4 mm. longa, basi latissinia, columnae pedi 
adnata. Labellum carnosum, trilobnni, 8 cm. longnm ; lobi laterales oblongi, 
recurvi, 3 mm. longi, apice denticulati ; lobus intermedins recurvus, late 
oblongus, obtusus, convexus, minutissime papillosus, 5 mm. longus; disens 
bicarinatns, profunda canaliciilatus. Columna latissima, 5 mm. longa, alis 
crassis acutis ; pes 5 mm. longus. 



Bulbophyllum is a large and remarkably polymorphic 
genus, extending throughout the tropics of both hemispheres. 
Upwards of five hundred species have already been described, 
and although the great majority are not sufficiently attractive 
for general cultivation, there are numerous striking excep- 
tions. Already more than twenty species have been 
figured in the Botanical Magazine, several of them being 
very remarkable in character. B. Beccarii, Reichb. f. 
(t. 6567), a Bornean species, is the giant of the genus ; 
it has an odour that is extremely disagreeable. B. grandi- 
florum, Blume (t. 7787), a native of New Guinea, is 
equally remarkable for the size of its individual flowers. 
B. barbigerum, Lindl. (t. 5288), a native of West Tropical 
Africa, is remarkable for its large hairy lip, so delicately 
balanced as to oscillate in the slightest breeze. B. lemnis- 
catum, Lindl. (t. 5961), a native of Burma, has a long- 
club-shaped appendage suspended from the back of each 
October, 1S07. 



sepal, and is quite unique in structure. B. Weddettii, 
Reichb. f. (t. 7058), from Brazil, has a very curiously marked 
and delicately mobile lip. Other interesting peculiarities 
characterize B. auricomum, Lindl. (t. 7938), B. comosum, 
Coll. & Hemsl. (t. 7283), B. macranthum, Lindl. (t. 7208), 
B. Ericssoni, Kranzl. (t. 8088), B. crenulatum, Rolfe 
(t. 8000), B. reticulatum, Batem. (5605), and B. Dayanum, 
Reichb. f. (t. 6119). 

The species now figured, if less remarkable in structure 
than several of the preceding, is more showy in colour, and 
promises to be a very attractive garden plant, the dark 
purple lip forming a striking contrast to the bright yellow 
sepals and petals, while the inflorescence is very graceful. 
It was introduced by Messrs. Zander & Sons, St. Albans, 
about two years ago, and flowered at the Royal Botanic 
Garden, (xlasnevin, in February last, when it was sent to 
Kew for determination by Mr. F. W. Moore, A.L.S. 

Descr. — An epiphytic herb with stout woody rhizome. 
Pseudobulbs ovoid-oblong, obscurely 4-angled, about 2 in. 
long, 1-leaved. Leaves stalked, coriaceous, oblong, obtuse, 
about 6 in. long, 1| in. broad ; petiole 2 in. long. Scape 
suberect, 9-10 in. long, with 2 or 3 oblong, obtuse sheaths 
at the base; raceme lax, about 12-flowered. Bracts ovate- 
oblong, acute, I in. long. Pedicels rather slender, 1 in. or 
more long. Flowers conspicuous, deep yellow with a dark 
purple lip. Dorsal sepal ovate-oblong, subacute, concave, 
I in. long ; lateral sepals lanceolate, acute, connate at the 
apex and slightly recurved, minutely puberulous on the face. 
Petals spreading, obliquely triangular, shortly acuminate, 
ciliate, -J- in. long, base very broad, adnate to the foot of the 
column. Lip fleshy, 3-lobed, 4 in. long ; side-lobes oblong, 
recurved, J inch long, denticulate at the apex; front-lobe 
recurved, broadly oblong, obtuse, convex, minutely papillose, 
3- in. long ; disc with two keels separated by a deep channel. 
Column broad, -^ in. long; wings fleshy, acute; foot J in. 
long. — R. A. Rolfe. 



Fig. 1, flower, with sepals partly removed ; 2, column ; 3, anther-cap ; 4 and 5, 
pollinia :■ — «W enlarged. 




8161 



M S del, J-N.Fiidi.vrfh. 



*&icejitBpooHS.Dasr&SonLAn¥ 



L. Reeve &.C° London 



Tar. 8161. 
PAEONIA Cambessedesii. 

Balearic Islands and Corsica. 

Eanttnoclaceae. Tribe Paeonieae. 
Paeonia, Linn.; Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 10. 



Paeonia Cambessedesii, Willk. IUustr. Fl. II/'sp. et Ins. Balear. vol. i. p. 104, 
t. 65 a; affinis P. corallinae, Retz, sed foliis subtus pulchre pu rpurascenti- 
bus et carpellis erectis glabris purpurascentibus differt. 

Perennis, herbacea, circiter 0*5 m. alta, caulibus glabris erectis flexuosis 
simplicibus sulcatis unifloris. Folia ternato-pinnatisecta ; segmenta ovato- 
laiiceolata vol oblonga, acuta, integra, glabra, supra intense viridia, 
subtus purpurascentia, nervis utrinque distinctis supra impressis subtus 
leviter elevatis. Floret rosei, solitarii, erecti, circiter 9 cm. diametro. 
Sepala inaequalia, viridia. Petala 5-10, rosea, late obovata, membranacea, 
marginibus crenulata. Stamina numerosa, filamentis purpureis, antheris 
flavis. Carpella 5-7, erecta, demum divergentia, glabra, purpurea, nitida, 
stigmate recurvato. — P. corallina, var. fructibus glabris, Cambess. Fnum. PI. 
Balear. p. 33 ; Costa Fl. de Catal. p. 9; Eodrigu'Catal. PI. Men. p. 2 et 100; 
Mares et Vigin. Catal. Pais. PI. Balear. p. 12. — P. corallina, var. Oambes- 
sedesii, Willk. Oesterr. Bot. Zeitschr. et Ind. PI. Vase. Balear. in Linnaea, 
vol. xl. p. 133 ; Barcelo, Flora de las Balear. p. 18. 



There are two distinct sections of Paeonia in cultivation, 
both of which are exceedingly ornamental and useful for 
garden purposes. The well-known Moutan, or Tree Paeony, 
P. Moutan, Sims, is the only representative of one section, 
whilst the other consists of numerous herbaceous species. 

About twenty-five species are recognised in the genus ; 
all are natives of Europe and Asia, except P. Brownii, 
Dough, a relatively inconspicuous species, which inhabits 
Western North America from San Bernardino, in California, 
to British Columbia. 

P. Cambessedesii is a native of the Balearic Islands and 
Corsica, and we are indebted to Miss Fiances Geoghegan, 
of Grlasnevin, Dublin, for the introduction of this pretty 
species to cultivation. It was collected by her in the 
Island of Majorca, where it was found in 1896, growing in 
a rocky, almost inaccessible spot on Cape Formentor. Our 
drawing was made from an offset of Miss Geoghegan's 
original plant, which flowered in April of the present year, 
October, 1907. 



in the Royal Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin. P. corallina, 
Retz, its nearest ally, differs in having glaucous-green, 
never purple, leaves, and hairy carpels. 

Descr. — A herbaceous perennial, usually about a foot and 
a half high. Stems glabrous, erect, flexuose, simple, one- 
flowered. Leaves ternately pinnatisect ; segments ovate- 
lanceolate or oblong, acute, entire, glabrous, deep-green 
above, purple below ; nerves distinct on both sides, im- 
pressed above, slightly elevated below. Flowers deep rose- 
pink, solitary, erect, usually about three and a half inches 
in diameter. Sepals unequal, green. Petals five to ten, 
broadly obovate, membranous, crenulate. Stamens nume- 
rous; filaments purple; anthers yellow. Carpels five to 
seven, erect, at length divergent, glabrous, purple, shining ; 
stigma recurved. — J. Hutchinson. 

Cult iv. — -As a garden plant P. Cambessedesii has the 
same claims as P. officinalis, P. peregrina, P. corallina and 
the other species of the herbaceous section which are now 
represented in gardens by a host of hybrid and seedling 
forms. For its cultivation the treatment that answers for 
these, a rich deep soil and a fair amount of moisture, will be 
found suitable. It is perhaps not generally understood that 
herbaceous Paeonies will grow almost as well under the 
partial shade of trees as they do in the open, exposed to full 
sunshine. They are therefore serviceable for grouping 
along with hardy ferns and the like. — W. Watsox. 

Figs. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3, young carpel ; 4, ripe fruit :— 1-3, enlarged ; 
i, natural size. 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OP No. 34, OCTOBER, 1907. 

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M S.del.JlfPitxJiMi. 



Vin.centBroaks ,Day &Uon] .l^irap 



L.Reeve &-C? London 



Tab. 8162. 

ARCTOTIS DECURRENS. 

South Africa. 

Compositae. Tribe Abctotideae. 
Aectotis, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 458. 



Arctotis decurrens, Jacq. Hort. Schoenb. vol. ii. p. 20, 1. 165; Ait. Hort. Kew. 
1813, vol. v. p. 172; Harv. & Sond. Fl. Gap. vol. iii. pp. 452, 457; Gard. 
Chron. 1901, vol. xxix. p. 214 ; species ex affinitate A. angustifoliae, Linn., 
a qua bracteis involucratis glabris vel ciliatis et ligulis superne albis 
differ! 

Herba pilosa, 60-90 cm. alta. Folia inferiora lyrata, parce pilosa, sub- 
amplexicaulia, 30-40 cm. longa, 5-7 cm. lata; lobi integri, terminales 
obtusi, marginibus venisque subtus arachnoideo-tomentosis ; superiora 
sessilia, plus minusve integra, lanceolata, acuta, parce pilosa. Capitula 
solitaria, 8 cm. diametro. Bracteae iuvolucri herbaceae, adpressae; 
exteriores oblongae, in caudam longam villosam attenuatae; interiores 
obtusae, glabrae vel ciliatae. Flores radii supra albi, basim versus 
atropurpureo-maculati, subtus purpureo-rubri. Flores disci 5-dentati; 
dentes atropurpurei ; tubus luteus. Achaenia (immatura tantum visa) 
oblonga, basi acuta et pilis longis sericeis densissime instructa. Faleae 
pappi oblongae, obtusae, undulatae, hyalino-purpurascentes. 



We are indebted for specimens of this fine species of 
Arctotis to Mr. W. E. Gumbleton, of Belgrove, Queenstown, 
Ireland, who also furnished the specimens of Arctotis 
Gumbletoni, figured in t. 7796. Writing in the Gardeners' 
Chronicle in 1901, Mr. Gumbleton states that from a 
packet of seeds sent him from Namaqualand, he only 
succeeded in getting one to germinate. This plant, how- 
ever, has flourished, and has bloomed for the sixth time 
this year. In a recent letter, Mr. Gumbleton states that 
though the plant blooms freely, it has not yet produced 
mature seeds. He has tried by using its pollen, which it 
has produced abundantly, to fertilise A. aspera, so far without 
success. 

Arctotis decurrens was originally introduced into this 
country from the Cape, in 1794, and is mentioned by Aiton 
in the Bortus Kewensis as being in cultivation at Kew in 
1813. It is to be hoped that Mr. Gumbleton will shortly 
be successful in obtaining mature seeds, as a species so 

NOVKMBEB, 1907. 



distinct and ornamental certainly deserves to resume the 
place it formerly held in our gardens. 

Descr. — A herbaceous perennial 2-3 feet high, densely 
pilose towards the top of the peduncles. Lower leaves 
lyrate, sparsely pilose, 12-16 in. long, 2-2^ in. broad ; 
lobes entire, obtuse, margins and undersurface of the veins 
woolly. Upper leaves sessile, more or less entire, lanceolate, 
acute, sparsely pilose. Mower-heads solitary, 3 in. in 
diameter; involucral bracts herbaceous, appressed, outer 
ones oblong, tapering into a long villous point, inner ones 
obtuse, glabrous or ciliate. Ray flowers white above, with 
a dark purple spot towards the base, reddish purple under- 
neath. Disk-flowers 5 -dentate ; teeth dark purple ; tube 
yellow. Achenes (immature only seen) oblong, acute, 
furnished at the base with a dense tuft of long, silky hairs. 
Scales of the pappus obtuse, undulate, transparent, purple 
in the centre. — T. F. Chipp. 

Cultiv. — This handsome plant is a useful addition to the 
several species of Arctotis which are grown in pots for the 
decoration of the greenhouse in winter and spring, namely, 
A. aspera, A. aureola and A. revoluta. These form shrubs, 
the tallest 6 feet high, and with a little management they 
become well furnished with branches which flower freely. 
They are propagated by means of cuttings and grow vigorously, 
reaching 4 to 6 feet in height in about two years. They 
thrive in a loamy soil, enjoying plenty of water at the root, 
except in winter, when water must be given sparingly. 
Like most of the plants of the order, they require plenty of 
sunshine ; the flowers close in dull weather. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, a ray-flower ; 2, pappus-scales ; 3, an outer disk-flower ; 4, pappus-scale 
oftheisame; 5, anthers; 6, style-arms ; 7, an intermediate disk-flower ; 8, disk- 
flower from centre: — all enlarged. 



8163 




M b.dri.J.N.Htahirth. 



'AicentBrool<sDa)r&. Son.Ll?in? 



L Reeve ,VC° Lorukai 



Tab. 8163. 
RHODODENDRON intricatum. 

China. 



Ebicaoeae. Tribe Rhodobkae. 
Rhododendbon, Linn. ; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599. 



Rhododendron (Osmothamnus) intricatum, Franch. in Journ. de Bat. 1895, 
vol. ix. p. 395 ; Hemsl. in Gard. Chron. 1907, vol. xli. p. 262, f. Ill ; inter 
species sinenses hujus sectionis staminibus inclusis R. thymi/olio, Maxim., 
proxima, ab eo tamen differt imprimis floribus majoribns saepissime 
quinatis. 

Frutex densissime ramosus, demum 10-30 cm. altus, sed plantae cultae 10-15 cm. 
altae jam florentes. Rami primum ferrugineo-squamosi. Folia persis- 
tentia, crassa, breviter petiolata, ovali-oblonga vel interdum fereorbicularia, 
cum petiolo 0*5-1 cm. longa, utrinque densissime lepidota, subtus alba. 
Ferulae trimorphae, ciliatae, exteriores fere orbiculares, intermediae 
spathulatae, exterioribus longiores, interiores lineares. Corymbi terminales 
saepissime 5-flori. Flores brevissime pcdunculati, violacei vel lilacini, 
antheris aurantiacis, circiter 2 cm. diametro. Calycis dentes brevissimi, 
inaequales, triangulares, parce lepidoti. Corollae tubus brevis, intus 
puberulus; lobi aequales, oblongi, rotundati, patentes, leviter undulati. 
Stamina 10, corollae tubum vix excedentia. Ovarium lepidotum ; stylus 
glaber, quam stamina dimidio brevior. Capsula circiter - 5 cm. longa. — 
Rhododendron nigro-punctatum, Hort., Gard. Chron. 1907, vol. xli. p. 225 ; 
Journ. Hort. 3rd series, 1907, vol. liv. p. 343 cum fig., non Franch. 



Nearly a score of species of Rhododendron belonging to 
the section Osmothamnus have been collected in China, and 
at least half-a-dozen of these are closely allied to R. 
intricatum, and are with difficulty distinguished in the dried 
state. In foliage, especially, the resemblance is very strong ; 
but they differ, some in having solitary flowers, some in 
having long, exserted stamens, and in other not very 
obvious characters. The species here figured was at first 
taken to be R. nigro-punctatum, Franch., and Messrs. James 
Veitch and Sons, to whom Kew is indebted for the plant 
from which the present figure has been made, were awarded 
a First Class Certificate for it under that name at a meeting 
of the Royal Horticultural Society on April 2 of the present 
year. Subsequently Prof. H. Lecomte kindly lent to Kew 
the types of the numerous species described by the late 
Mr. A. Franchet, and has thus made it possible to identify 
our plant with R. intricatum. 
Novkmbkb, 1907. 



Descr. — A dwarf, densely branched shrub, flowering when 
only 4 to 6 in. high, though eventually attaining, under 
favourable conditions, a height of 18 in. Branches at 
first clothed with red-brown scales. Leaves persistent, 
thick, shortly stalked, oval-oblong or sometimes almost 
orbicular, ^ to ^ in. long, densely scaly on both sides, 
white beneath. Scales of the inflorescence trimorphic, 
fringed ; outer almost orbicular ; intermediate spathulate, 
longer than the outer; inner linear. Trusses terminal, 
usually 5-flowered. Flowers very shortly stalked, violet or 
lilac with orange-coloured anthers, about -§- in. across. 
Calyx-teeth very short, unequal, triangular, sparsely scaly. 
Corolla-tube short, hairy within ; lobes equal, oblong, 
rounded, spreading, slightly undulate. Stamens 10, scarcely 
exceeding the corolla-tube. Ovary scaly ; styles smooth, 
half as long as the stamens. Capsule about -^ in. long. — 
W. Botting Hemsley. 

Cultiv. — This new Chinese species promises to be a most 
valuable acquisition. The dwarf alpine Rhododendrons 
introduced from North India have not proved of much 
value in Great Britain, being too tender and uncertain in 
any but the milder parts of the kingdom. R. intricatum, 
from its behaviour at Coombe Wood, is evidently hardier 
than the Indian forms ; and of its beauty ample evidence 
was afforded by the group of plants exhibited at the 
Horticultural Hall last spring by Messrs. Yeitch. It will 
no doubt thrive in soils similar to those that have been 
found to suit its congeners from North India — either peat 
and sand, or a sandy loam with peat added. The neat low 
habit of the plant points to its suitability for the rockery 
and alpine garden. It will also be a charming addition to 
the Ericetum, where it can be associated with other 
members of the familv similar in habit. — W. J. Bean. 



Fig. 1, a leaf, showing the under surface ; 2, a scale from the same ; 3, an 
outer scale of the inflorescence ; 4, an inner scale of the inflorescence ; 5, calyx 
and pistil; 6, part of corolla and stamens ; 7, stamen : — all enlarged. 




8164 



it-S.deLJ.N.Fiic-JhfK 



"Wncent'SroaJis.^ayiSonL^-tDyg 



L .Reeve 3cC?LaR&or_. 



Tab. 8164. 

COELOGYNE Lawrenceana. 

Annam. 

Okchidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 
Coelogyne, Lindl.; Benth. et Haok.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 518. 



Coelogyne Lawrenceana, Bol/e in Oard. Chron. 1905, vol. xxxvii. p. 227; 
Gard. Mag. 1905, p. 354, cumic; Orch. Rev. 1906, p. 39; a C. specitsa, 
Lindl., scapo terminali multo longiore et labelli carinis fimbriates differt. 

Herba epiphytica. Rhizoma validum. Pseudobulbi ovoideo-oblongi, 5-7 cm. 
longi, 2*5-3 cm. lati, diphylli. Folia lanceolata, acuminata, basi attennata, 
20-27 cm. longa, circa 3 cm. lata. Scapi, terminates, 17-20 cm. longi, 
uniflori. Bracteae spathaceae, Ianceolatae, striatae, 3-5 cm. longae. 
Pedicelli circa 4 cm. longi. Flores speciosi. Sepala patentia, lanceolato- 
oblonga, subacuta, dorso carina ta, 5-7 cm. longa, 2-2 • 5 cm. lata, flava. 
Petala patentia, linearia, acuta, 5-7 cm. longa, 4-5 mm. lata, flava. 
Labellum trilobum, 5-6 cm. longum, basi subsaccatum; lobi laterales 
erecti, oblongi, obtusi, 3 cm. longi, brunnei; lobus intermedins recurvus, 
late ovatus, apiculatus vel obtusus, undulatus, circa 3-3*5 cm. latus, albus, 
infra apicem sulphureus; discus brunneus, apice tricarinatus, basi quinque- 
cristatus. Columna clavata, incurva, circa 4 cm. longa, apice alata. 



This handsome Coelogyne was discovered by Mr. W. 
Micholitz when collecting in Annam for Messrs. Sander 
& Sons, St. Albans, and living plants were sent home, one 
of which flowered in the collection of Sir Trevor Lawrence, 
Bart., at Burford, in March, 1905, when it was exhibited at 
a meeting of the Royal Horticultural Society, and received 
an Award of Merit. It is a very distinct species, best 
comparable, among cultivated ones, to Coelogyne speciosa, 
Lindl. (B.M. t. 4889), though readily distinguished by 
its longer scape, which, moreover, is borne at the apex of 
the mature pseudobulb, not from the centre of the young 
growths. The details of the lip and keels are also quite 
different. The plant here figured was presented to Kew by 
Messrs. Sander, and it has since been grown in a warm 
house. 

The genus is widely diffused in India and the Malay 
Archipelago, and a good many species are in cultivation, 
varying considerably in habit and in the colour of the 
flowers. Among those figured in this work may be 
mentioned C. pandurata, Lindl. (t. 5084), a striking species 

NOVEMBEB, 1907. 



with green and black flowers ; C. Parishii, Hook. f. (t. 5323), 
somewhat similar but much smaller; C. Veitchii, Rolfe 
(t. 7764), bearing drooping racemes of pure white flowers ; 
C. Massangeana, Reichb. f. (t. 6979) ; C. testacea, Lindl. 
(t. 4785) ; C. Schilleriana, Reichb. f. (t. 5072) ; C. Cumingii, 
Lindl. (t. 4645); C. cory mbosa, . Lindl. (t. 6955); C. elata, 
Lindl. (t. 5001); C. odoratissima, Lindl. (t. 5462); C. 
Rossiana, Reichb. f. (t. 7176) ; C. Swaniana, Rolfe (t. 7602) ; 
C. graminifolia, Par. and Reichb. f. (t. 7006) ; and several 
others. The section Pleione, of which six species have also 
been figured, is now regarded as a distinct genus. 

Descr. — An epiphytic herb, with stout rhizomes. Pseudo- 
bulbs ovoid-oblong, 2-3 in. long, l-l£ in. broad, 2-leaved. 
Leaves broadly lanceolate, acuminate, attenuate at the base, 
8-11 in. long, about 1£ in. broad. Scape arising from the 
apex of the matured pseudobulb, 7-8 in. long, 1-flowered. 
Bracts spathaceous, lanceolate, striate, 1 J-l J in. long. Pedi- 
cels 1J in. long. Sepals spreading, lanceolate-oblong, sub- 
acute, 2-2J in. long, f-1^ in. broad, keeled at the back, 
greenish yellow. Petals spreading, linear, acute, 2-2| in. 
long, under \ in. broad, yellow. Lip 3-lobed, 2-2 \ in. long, 
obscurely saccate at the base ; side-lobes erect, broadly 
oblong, obtuse, \\ in. long, bright brown ; front lobe 
recurved, broadly ovate, obtuse or apiculate, slightly 
undulate, about \\ in. long, white, with a sulphur-coloured 
tint near the apex ; disk marbled with bright brown, with 
three fimbriate keels extending to the base, where two 
additional smaller keels occur inside the lateral pair. 
Column clavate, incurved, about \\ in. long, winged near 
the apex. — R. A. Rolfe. 



Fig. 1, column; 2, anther-cap; 3, whole plant: — 1 and 2 enlarged', 3, much 
duced. 



reduced 



8165 




M.S.4a;jJviFitck! 



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Tab. 8165. 

OLDENLANDIA dolichantha. 

East Tropical Africa. 



Rubiaobak. Tribe Hedyotideae. 
Oldenlandia, Linn.', Benth. et Eooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 58. 



Oldenlandia dolichantha, Stapf in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxxvii. (1906), 
p. 518; affinis 0. rotatae, Baker, a qua foliis multo latioribus et corolla 
multo majore ore villosa distincta. 

Berba annua, erecta, ad 40 cm. alta, plerumque glabra ; caulis quadrangularis 
vel subalatus, ramis nonnullis ad vel ultra 15 cm. longis, aliis ad foliorum 
fasciculos reductis. Folia sessilia, e basi lata rotundata, lanceolata vel 
linearia et tunc interdum breviter petiolata, acuta, 2 - 5-6 cm. longa, 
2-10 mm. lata, patula vel deflexa ; stipulae ad commissuram brevem 
membranaceam parce fimbriatam redactae. Mores axil! ares, sessiles, 
solitarii, vel 2-3-nati. Beceptaculum turbinatum, glabrum. Calycis segmenta 
4, lineari-subulata, 7-8 mm. longa, maturitate haud aucta, aequalia. 
Corolla hypocrateriformis, alba; tubus tenuis, ad 10 cm. longus, vix 1 mm. 
diametro, sub limbo infundibuliformis et hie extus albo-papillosus, intus 
ore pilosus ; lobi 4, lanceolati, acuminati, 9-10 mm. longi. Antherae sub 
ipso ore sessiles. Ovarium vertice conicum; stigma clavatum, vix 
2-lobum, exsertum. Capsula ellipsoideo-ovoidea, 4-costata, apice dentibus 
4 angustis dehiscens. Semina oblique ovoidea, laevissima, - 6 mm. 
longa. 

This species was discovered by Mr. M. T. Dawe, Officer 
in Charge of the Forestry and Scientific Department of the 
Uganda Protectorate, in the Nile Province, Uganda, in 1905. 
It claims attention chiefly on account of the pure milk-white 
corolla-limbs which are almost au inch across and rest "on an 
unusually long and slender tube. On it and on 0. rotata the 
writer established (I.e.) a new section (Conostomium) of 
Oldenlandia, and pointed out at the same time that a closer 
examination of Oldenlandia may probably result in the 
breaking up of that genus into several genera, one of which 
would be Conostomium. Since then his attention has been 
drawn to a new genus, Pentanopsis, described by Dr. Rendle 
in 1898 and placed next to Pentas. Specimens of Pentanop- 
sis recently received at Kew from Somaliland leave no 
doubt as to the generic affinity of Pentanopsis and of Olden- 
landia, section Conostomium; but at the same time they 
confirm the view that they must either be placed in Olden- 
landia or next to it. So far the species figured here is the 
November, 1907. 



only one of this group the fruits and seeds of which are 
known. For this reason and pending a general revision of 
Oldenlandia it is preferable to leave open the question of the 
status of Pentanopsis or Conostomium. The species of this 
genus, subgenus or section, range from the Upper Nile and 
Lake Rudolf to British Somaliland. 

Descr. — An erect annual, generally glabrous, 1 foot high, 
with quadrangular or slightly winged stems, branches some 
long, some reduced to tufts of leaves. Leaves sessile, lanceo- 
late from a broad rounded base, or shortly petioled and 
linear, 1 to 2 in. long, -j^- to almost J in. wide ; stipules 
reduced to a membranous slightly fimbriate commissure. 
Flowers sessile, axillary, solitary or in pairs or threes. 
Receptacle glabrous. Calyx of 4 linear-subulate segments, 
I in. long. Corolla salver-shaped ,• tube about 4 in. long, 
extremely slender, widened and externally papillose near 
the mouth ; limb almost an inch across, pure milk-white, of 
4 lanceolate, acuminate lobes, villous at the mouth. Anthers 
sessile just below the mouth of the corolla. Stigma club- 
shaped, exserted. Capsule ellipsoid-ovoid, 4-ribbed, the 
conical top dehiscing with 4 narrow valves. Seeds numerous, 
obliquely ovoid, quite smooth, very small. — Otto Stapp. 

Cultiv. — Although this plant as represented here does not 
appear to have any great claim to favour as a garden plant, 
it may prove as useful as many other plants of similar 
character which form masses of stems and flower freely. 
Mr. Dawe, who collected it in Uganda, has described it as 
an attractive white-flowered herb. At Kew, grown in a 
tropical house, it throve well and soon formed a plant 
18 iuches high, flowering freely in midsummer. The 
flowers are fragrant. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, portion of stem, showing stipules and axillary sessile flowers (corollas 
cut off); 2, part of corolla, showing the throat and insertion of stamens; 
3, stamen, from the back; 4, stigma:— all enlarged. 




-WlS.delJ.NI'itdh.liflu 



L Reeve &. C° Loti&jjl. 



"v5ncenLBroolE5j3ay&.ScniLt?-3TOp 



Tab. 8166. 

SHORTIA TJNIFLORA. 

Japan. 

DrAPKNSiACEAE. Tribe Galacineae. 
Shobtta, Torr. et A. Gr.\ Bentli. et Hook./, Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 620. 



Shortia uu.ifl.ora, Maxim, in Bull. Acad. Petersb. vol. xvi. (1871), p. 225; 
Mel. Biol. vol. viii. p. 20, in nota ; Hindmarsh in Gard. Ghron. 1902, 
vol. xxxi. p. 337, f. 116 ; Flora & Sylva, 1905, vol. iii. p. 246, cum figura 
nigra; a S. galacifolia, Torr. et A. Gr., habitu prostrata, pedunculis 
brevioribus a basi arcuatis et floribus majoribus roseis recedit. 

Fruticulus sempervirens, repens, omnino glaber, 8-15 cm. altus. Folia conferta, 
longe petiolata, rigida, cordato-orbicularia, saepius latiora quam longa, 
2-3 cm lata vel interdum in exemplaribus silvestribus usque ad 8 cm. 
lata, crenato- dentata, crenis apiculatis. lucida, intra marginem zona rubra 
ornata; petioli graciles, 2*5 interdum ad 10 cm. Iongi. Scajri numerosi, 
semper uniflori, in exemp'aribus cultis folia superantes, in exemplaribus 
silvestribus saepius quam folia breviores, basi incra^sati, foliis paucis 
spathulatis 1-2 cm. longiset prophyllis 3 erassis lanceolatis acuminatissimis 
circiter 1 cm longis suffulti, superne prope calycem bracteolis 3 e basi 
lata cordata ovato-lanceolatis acutis 6-8 mm. longis instructi, saepius 
singula paullo inferioi e addita. Flores rosei, 4-4 • 5 cm. diametro, subnutattes. 
Galycis segment a crassa, fere libera, persistentia, valde imbricata, inaequalia, 
lanceolata vel ovata, vix acuta, interiora altius inserta. Corolla late 
campanulata; tubus brevis; limbi lobi 5, imbricati, leviter recurvi, ambitu 
rotundati, irregulariter dentati. Stamina 5, petalis alterna, inter se 
libera, tubo corollae usque ad apicem adnata, quam corollae lobi breviora; 
antherae breves, dorso filamento adnatae. Staminodia 5, squamiformia, 
incurva, ovarium velantia. Ovarium globosum, 3-loculare ; stylus filiformis, 
stamina superans, stigmate obscure trilobo. Ovula in loculis numerosa, 
placentis augulo interiori afQxis inserta. Capsula globosa, loculicide 
dehiscens, polysperma. — Schizocodon unifiorus, Maxim. Mel. Biol. vi. p. 274 ; 
Honzo Zufu, vol. xvii. p. 27. 



The Diapensiaceae consist of about half-a-dozen genera 
and twice as many species of dwarf herbs and shrubs 
inhabiting the temperate and arctic regions of the northern 
hemisphere, but chiefly mountain pine-woods in temperate 
latitudes. They now only occur in widely separated areas, 
and some of them are very rare, which is suggestive of a 
former more general distribution. Most of the genera are 
or have been in cultivation, and are illustrated in this 
Magazine ; but from some cause they are rare in gardens. 
Pyxidanthera barbulata, Michx (t. 4592), is a very small 
trailing plant, a native of the Pine Barrens of New Jersey. 
November, 1S07. 



Diapensia lapponica, Linn. (t. 1108), is the only member oi 

the order having a wide range : it resembles a Draba, and 

occurs in high latitudes in all three continents. The only 

other species of Diapensia is restricted to the Himalayan 

mountains. Shortia galacifolia, Torr. & Gr. (t. 7082), is an 

exceedingly rare plant, found only in North Carolina. S. 

sinensis, Hemsl. {Hook. Ic. Pl.t. 2624), is a recent discovery 

in Western China. Scliizocodon soldanelloides, Sieb. & Zucc. 

(t. 7316), has elegantly fringed flowers and is a native of 

Japan. S. ilicifolius, Maxim., is a closely allied species from 

the same country, and the only other species, S. rotund if olius, 

Maxim., is recorded as endemic in the Yaeyama Archipelago, 

near Formosa. Galax aphylla, Linn. (t. 754), has leafless 

scapes a foot and a half high and numerous small racemose 

flowers. It is also confined to the mountains of eastern 

North America. Finally there is Berneuxia thibetica, Decne 

(Bull. Soc. Bot. France, 1873, vol. xx. p. 159) from Mou- 

pine, Szechuen, which differs from both Shortia and 

Schizocodon in having numerous small, almost capitate 

flowers, and in little else. Franchet reduces it (Nouv. Arch. 

2me serie, vol. x. p. 54, t. 1 3, B— " Davidi ") to Shortia ; but if 

we accept this reduction, Schizocodon must also be merged in 

Shortia, which, as thus constituted, would, it is true, present 

less range of variation than the genus Primula and many 

others. 

Descr. — An evergreen, creeping, glabrous undershrub 
3-6 in. high. Leaves stalked, rigid, orbicular-cordate, 
usually broader than long, usually about an inch broad, but 
sometimes as much as 3 in. across, crenate-dentate, teeth 
apiculate, shining, encircled by a red marginal band ; stalks 
slender, 1-4 in. long. Scapes numerous, 1-nowered,^ in 
cultivated plants overtopping the leaves. Flowers pink, 
veined with white, 1^— If in. across. Sepals 5, unequal, 
lanceolate. Corolla broadly campanulate ; tube short ; 
lobes 5, broad, rounded, irregularly toothed. Stamens 5, 
alternating with and shorter than the corolla-lobes. Stami- 
nodes or nectaries 5, scale-like, incurved and covering the 
ovary. Ovary 3-celled; style filiform, overtopping the 
stamens. Capsule globose, splitting into 3 valves. Seeds 
numerous, small, globose. — W. Botting Hemsley. 

Cultiv. — Shortia uniflora is as interesting as S. galacifolia 
and is quite as beautiful. It is said to be rare in Japan, and 



until recently it had scarcely been known in English 
gardens, notwithstanding the desire of many to possess it. 
The Kew examples were purchased from a firm of nursery- 
men in Yokohama and flowered freely last April in an 
unheated frame, where they were grown to preserve their 
flowers from spring frosts, although the plant itself is quite 
hardy. It likes a moist peaty soil and a fairly open 
position where it can get some sunshine. The leaves of this 
species, like those of S. galacifolia, assume a rich crimson 
colour in autumn and winter. — W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, base of scape with small leaves and scales; 2, pistil and part of 
the bracteoles and sepals; 3, part of corolla showing attachment of stam ns 
and basal scales ; 4, stigma ; 5 and 6, stamens : — all more or less enlarged. 



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8167 




M.S.deLJ.N.PitchIith 



L. Reeve 6cC? London. 



"VincarttBrooWs.Day&SojiltiViinp 



Tab. 8167. 

GrESNERA CARDINALIS. 

Brazil. 

Gesneraceae. Tribe Gebnereae. 
Gesnera, Mart. ; Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1003. 



Gesnera cardinalis, Lehm. in E. Otto, Garten- und Blumenzeitung, Hamburg, 
vol. vi. (1850), p. 454; Hanst. in Mart. Fl. Bras. vol. viii. pars i. p. 373; 
species corolla laete coccinea, labio postico oblongo et calycis lobis erectis 
insignis. 

llerba 20-25 cm. alta, asperule velntina, tubero depresso-globoso, caule sat debili. 
Folia late ovata, basi cordata, 10-15 cm. longa, 8-12 cm. lata, crenata, 
inferiora longiuscule petiolata, superiora minora, subsessilia, suprema 
approximata, ad bracteas redacta. Flores in axillis superioribus 1-4 
aggregati, pedunculis longiores. Calyx, dense velutinns ; lobi erecti, 
triangulari-lanceolati, circiter 8 mm. longi, corollae stricturam supra - 
basalem superantes, apice leviter recurvi, praesertim post anthesin. Corolla 
tubulosa, circiter 6-7 cm. longa, antice late bisulcata, lineamento antico 
subrecto, postico leviter curvato ; labium posticum oblongum, lobis 
subtruncatis ; anticum manifeste trilobatum, lobis ascend entibus vel 
patulis. Filamenta hirsnta. Disci glandulae 2 posticae tantum evolntae, 
rotundatae vel subtruncatae, 1*5 mm. longae, ima basi 2 mm. latae. 
Placentae undiqne ovnliferae, in sectione fere semicirculares facie interna 
leviter concava.— G. macrantha, Hort. ex Lehm. I.e., non Spreng. Bircaea 
cardinalis, Eegel, Gartenfl. vol. ii. (1853), p. 35, t. 41. Oorytholoma 
cardinale, Pritsch in Engl, et Prantl, Pflanzenfam. vol. iv. pars 3 b, p. 181. 



Gesnera cardinalis belongs to a natural group of species 
for which Decaisne proposed the genus Dircaea. The most 
striking characteristic of the group is the great disproportion 
between the upper and lower lips of the corolla. The upper 
lip is very large and is bent over in bud so as to form a lid 
which completely covers the mouth of the corolla ; as the 
flower expands the lip rises, turning through considerably 
more than a right angle and finally assuming an erect 
position. The lower lip is comparatively small. 

The remarkable mode of union of the anthers in a disk, 
shown in figures 2 and 3, is characteristic of Gesnera ; many 
,0ther genera of Gesneraceae, however, have more or less 
connate anthers. 

A number of the plants cultivated at Kew as G. 
cardinalis, including the one here figured, agree exactly 
with the figure in Gartenjbra and with Hanstein's detailed 
Decembeb, 1907. 



description in the Flora Brasiliensis, but another batch of 
them, while possessing exactly the habit of cardinalis, differs 
in the calyx, corolla and disk, and is undoubtedly of garden 
origin. The extreme form observed had infiexed calyx-lobes, 
refuse glands of the disk, and corolla-lips of very different 
shape from typical G. cardinalis, the lower lip consisting of 
a narrow, slightly reflexed rim, showing no obvious lobing, 
and the upper being ovate, with a slight constriction two- 
thirds of the way up. 

Descr. — A velvety herb, about 9 in. high. Stem rather 
weak, springing from a slightly flattened, nearly globose 
tuber. Leaves broadly ovate, cordate at the base, 4-6 in. 
long, 3-5 in. broad, crenate, the lower ones long-petioled, 
the upper sessile and gradually decreasing in size. Flowers 
1-4 together in each of the upper axils, often crowded 
together near the apex of the stem owing to the suppression 
of the uppermost internodes. Calyx-lobes erect, recurved 
at the apex. Corolla 2 J-3 in. long ; tube with two grooves 
in front, running up to the point of union of the median and 
lateral lobes ; upper lip oblong ; lower lip distinctly 3-lobed, 
lobes ascending or spreading. Filaments hairy. Glands 
of the disk 2, posticous, rounded or nearly truncate. — 
T. A. Sprague. 

Cultiv. — Gesnera cardinalis is a popular stove plant com- 
paratively easy of cultivation. It is undoubtedly the best 
of the Gesneras from the decorative standpoint, and is 
distinguished from all the species in cultivation by its habit, 
and by the pose and colour of its flowers. The rootstock is 
a stout tuber, and from this there spring annually herbaceous 
stems, rarely more than a foot high, which mature and 
flower within six months of starting. In this respect the 
plant resembles the Sinningias (Gloxinias) and in fact the 
treatment that suits the one suits the other. By a little 
management in resting and starting the tubers it is possible 
to have this Gesnera in flower either in winter or summer. — 
W. Watson. 



Fig. 1, section through calyx, showing pistil and glands; 2, stamens and part 
ot corolla, showing attachment; 3, anthers, seen from above; 4, stigma: — 
all enlarged. 



8168 




M J S.dei,J.KPttcK.TitK 



VincentBrooks Day SiSan-Lt^inip 



L Reeve & C "? Xcrulon.. 



Tab. 8168. 
primula muscarioides. 

Western China. 



Primuxaceae. Tribe Primuleae. 
Primula, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 631. 



Primula (§ Soldanelloideae) musearioideB, Hemsl. in Kew Bull. 1907, p. 319 ; 
ex affinitate P. cernuae, Franch., et P. dejlexae, Duthie, ab ilia foliis 
distincte crenatis, ab hac foliis majoribus crenatis, calyce efarinoso et 
corollae lobis vix emarginatis differt. 

Folia rosulata, subcarnosa, laete viridia, obovato-spathulata, 10-12 cm. longa, 
apice rotundata, deorsum attermata sed non vere petiolata, crenato-dentata, 
ciliolata, supra pilis mollibus obscuris parce vestita, subtus glabra vel cito 
glabrescentia, inter venas primarias leviter bullata, costa carnosa crassa. 
Scapi erecti, quam folia fere duplo longiores. Bracteolae lineares, calyce 
breviores. Flores numerosi, densissime capitato-spicati, deflexi; spicae 
2 "5-3 "5 cm. Iongae. Calyx campanulatus ; lobi erecti, inaequales, ovato- 
oblongi, posteriore latiore 2- vel 3-dentato florum superiorum atropurpureo. 
( 'orolla anguste infunrlibularis, vix 1 cm. longa, saturate purpureo-coerulea 
vel fere violacea ; lobi quam tubus cylindricus dimidio breviores, stib- 
truncati, suberecti, obscure emarginati, circiter 3 mm. lati. Antherae 
subsessiles, tubo infra medium affixae. Stylus tubum paullo excedens. 
Capsula ignota. 



At first sight this striking Primula was taken for P. 
deflexa, Duthie, which, however, has fewer and larger flowers, 
with the limb of the corolla broader and cup-shaped, while 
the lobes are broader and distinctly notched. As stated in the 
Kew Bulletin, P. cernua, Franchet, P. pinnatifolia, Franchet, 
P. deflexa, Duthie, and the present species are very closely 
allied and perhaps not all deserving of specific rank, but 
with the material we have before us it is preferable to keep 
them separate. Wilson's dried specimen, n. 4036, is quite 
similar in aspect, but the leaves are much more hairy and 
the calyx is mealy. P. muscarioides has, so far as the Kew 
material goes, almost sessile anthers near the base of the 
corolla tube, and the stigma projects slightly from the 
mouth of the tube. P. cernua, in the only specimen examined, 
has the anthers attached near the top of the tube and the 
style is only about -£$ of an inch long. In Wilson's 4036, 
which has been referred to P. dejlexa, the anthers are 
attached a little above the middle of the corolla-tube and 
December, 1907. 



are overtopped by the slightly exserted style. Thus there 
is trimorphism of the genitalia in this very distinct group 
of Primula. P. deflexa is apparently a taller plant, both 
under wild and garden conditions, some of the Kew 
examples having scapes two feet and leaves one foot long. 

Our drawing of P. muscarioides was made from specimens 
received from the "Bees, Limited," Neston, Cheshire, 
in May of the present year, and Mr. Gr. Forrest, who 
collected for Mr. A. K. Bulley, has kindly communicated 
the following particulars of the habitat : — " The seed of this 
species was collected in Yunnan, in December, 1894, on the 
summit of Mao Niu Chang (Wild Yak Pass), situated on the 
dividing range between the Yangtze Valley and Chung 
Tien Plateau, at 14,000 to 15,000 feet, in lat. 27° 40' to 28°. 
It inhabits moist, open, grassy situations, on the margins of 
pine forests." 

Descr. — Leaves rosulate, rather fleshy, light green, ob- 
ovate-spathulate, 4 to 5 in. long, rounded at the tip, 
gradually tapering downwards, but not distinctly stalked, 
crenate, obscurely fringed, sparsely clothed with soft hairs 
on the upper surface, glabrous or soon glabrescent below, 
bulging between the primary veins ; midrib thick, fleshy. 
Scapes erect, about twice as long as the leaves. Bracteoles 
linear, shorter than the calyx. Flowers numerous, densely 
capitate, turned downwards ; spikes 1— If in. long. Calyx 
campanulate, of the upper flowers purple ; lobes erect, ovate- 
oblong, unequal, the upper one broader, 2- or 3-toothed. 
Corolla-tube narrow, less than J in. long, deep purple-blue or 
almost violet ; lobes slightly spreading, truncate, obscurely 
notched, i— \ in. across. Anthers sessile near the bottom 
of the corolla-tube. Style scarcely exceeding the tube. 
Capsule not seen. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



Fig. 1, a bracteole; 2, calyx, laid open, and pistil; 3, section of corolla:— 
all enlarged. 



8169 




M.S.dfiLJ.N-.Htdvliih- 



Vinrent Brooks . D ay A Son Lt£xmp . 



L.Reeve 6c C "London. 



Tab. 8169. 
picea morindoides. 

Eastern Himalaya. 

Conifebae. Tribe Abietineae. 
PlCEA, Link; Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 439. 



Picea morindoides, Rehder in Sargent, Trees and Shrubs (1903), p. 95, t. 46 ; 
Henry in Gard. Chron. 1906, vol. xxxix. pp. 132, 219; Masters, I.e. p. 213, 
fig. 34 et p. 274, fig. 113 et 1907, vol. xli. p. 388; ex affinitate P. ajanensis, 
Fisch. ex Trautv., sed habitu multo graciliore, conisque multo majoribus 
foliorumque anatomia distincta. 

Arbor coma conica regulari, ramis verticillatis patulis, ramulis glabris gracilibus 
pendulis nisi apicem versus magis minusve patentibus, junioribus 
flavescentibus tertio anno cinerascentibus, pulvinis e basi ima lata 
abrupte contractis subcylindrieis 1 mm. longis cicatrice terminal! rhoiw- 
boidali haud obliqua lateribus concavis. Gemmae foliorum ellipsoideae vel 
obovoideae, obtusae, 5-6 mm. longae, pallidae, panlo resinosae, squamis 
tenuiter scariosis obovatis obtusissimis. Folia acicularia, gracilia, apice 
spinnlosa, pnngentia, 2* 5-3 "5 cm. longa, 0'7-l - 2 mm. lata, a dorso 
complanata, sectione transversa rkomboideo-elliptica, marginibus costisque 
obtusis, dorso viridia, facie lineis duabus albo-glaucis ; stomata in facie 
secundum costam utrinque 4-6-seriata; ductus resiniferi duo dorsales, 
band piocttl a margine siti, bypodermati appositi, fibris sclerenchymaticis 
tnnicati, interdum breves vel nulli ; bypoderma sclerenchymaticum supra 
subtusque ad costam strato duplice. Strobili masculi rosei, elongato- 
ellipsoidei, ad 2 cm. longi, 8-9 mm. lati, basi squamis eis gemmarum 
foliorum simillimis suffulti ; connectivi appendix orbicularis, circumcirca 
lacerato-denticulatus. Strobili feminei laterales (an semper?), oblongo- 
ellipsoidei, ad 2 cm. longi, 1 cm. diametro, purpurei, basi ut masculi 
squamis suffulti ; carpella e basi lata ovata cuspidato-acuminata, 1*5 mm. 
longa, obscure denticulata; squamae ovuliferae ovato-rotundatae, sub- 
denticulatae, sub anthesi carpello dnplo longiores. Coni maturi oblongo- 
cylindrici, obtusi, 6-9 cm. longi, 3 cm. diametro, badii, vix nitiduli ; 
squamae basi magis minusve in unguem obtriangularem vel obovatum 
contraction, supra unguem late ovatae, obtusae, apicem versus obscure 
striatae, inferiores majores ad 20 mm. longae (ungue incluso), 10-14 mm. 
latae. Semen ambitu obtriangulare, 2-5 mm. longum, testa alutacea, ala 
oblique obovato-oblonga, tenuissima, 6-12 mm. longa. 



Picea morindoides was described in 1903 from specimens of 
unknown origin in cultivation in Mr. Allard's arboretum at 
Angers in France. Subsequently, a tree growing in the 
Earl of Annesley's park at Castlewellan, Co. Down, was 
recognised by Dr. A. Henry as identical with it. This tree 
was raised from seed received by the Earl of Annesley from 
Chumbi in 1889. Another specimen of unknown origin 
Decembee, 1907. 



occurs in Sir Edward Loder's garden at Horsham, Sussex, 
where Picea morindoides has produced cones for the first 
time in this country. 

Dr. A. Henry identified Picea morindoides with the spruce 
collected by Sir Joseph Hooker in the Lachen Valley in 
Sikkim, which is referred to in the Himalayan Journal (vol. ii. 
p. 32) as Abies Smithiana ; also with a spruce collected in 
Chumbi by Sir J. Ware Edgar, who was then (in 1877) accom- 
panied by Sir George King's collector, Dungboo, — obtained 
again by Mr. H. E. Hobson, when stationed at Yatung, and by 
Mr. E. H. C. Walsh during the Tibet Exhibition. To these 
specimens another collected by Dungboo in Chumbi in 1878 
and one obtained by Mr. R. Pantling in Sikkim (Herb. 
C. B. Clarke 46482) might be added, and it is also evident 
that Gammie's Picea Morinda from the Lachung Valley 
(Rec. Bot. Surv. hid. vol. i. No. ii. pp. 11, 19) is the 
same tree. In my opinion, there can be little doubt that 
Dr. Henry is right in his identification of those specimens 
with Render's P. morindoides, although this implies the 
admission of a considerable range of variation in the shape 
of the leaf-points, the density of the foliage, the shape of 
the cone-scales, and to some degree also in the more minute 
details of the leaf anatomy. I have not accounted for this 
variability in the description above, which is drawn up from 
the cultivated tree, but do not consider it greater than that 
observable in the common European spruce. Dr. Henry, 
however, has gone one step farther and includes Griffith's 
Abies spinulosa {Journ. pp. 259, 265 ; Itin. Not. p. 145, 
No. 694, and Ic. PL Asiat. t. 363) in Picea morindoides, 
which, if proved, would entail the change of the latter 
name into Picea spinulosa. Unfortunately there are no 
specimens of Griffith's tree at Kew or at the British Museum. 
and it is very doubtful if there be any now in existence. 
I have therefore retained for the present Rehder's name; 
but I must admit that there is much to be said in favour of 
Dr. Henry's view. Griffith's description, so far as it goes, 
agrees well with Picea morindoides, and his figure tallies 
strikingly with a sketch of the Lachen spruce made by 
Sir Joseph Hooker. He collected " Abies spinulosa " on the 
slopes of the Rodoola Pass and the Tung-chiew Valley in 
Northern Bhootan (about 91° 30' E. long., and almost 
1 50 miles east of the Sikkim frontier), and describes it as a 



beautiful tree, disposed in beautiful groups and growing 
between 9,000 and 10,500 feet, which agrees fairly well with 
the limits of the spruce of the Lachen Valley in Sikkim. 

Picea morindoides belongs to the section Omorica which 
is chiefly developed in the countries bordering on the 
Northern Pacific, but, in the Old World, extends in dis- 
continuous areas as far as the Balkan Peninsula, where it is 
represented by P. Omorica, Pane. It is the only member 
of the section known from the Himalaya. The nearest 
species, a link between it and P. ajanensis, appears to be 
P. complanata, Mast., from Szechuen. As I know it only 
from Dr. Masters' description and figures in the Gardeners 
Chronicle (3rd ser. vol. xxxix. p. 146, fig. 57), I have 
refrained from referring to it in the diagnosis; but the 
resemblance seems to be very great indeed. P. complanata 
was discovered by Mr. B. H. Wilson in Western Szechuen, 
where it forms forests at an elevation from 5,000 to 8,000 
feet. 

To judge from the photograph of the Earl of Annesley's 
tree which is reproduced in the Gardeners' Chronicle for 
May 5th, 1906, Picea morindoides will certainly be a 
valuable addition to our hardy trees. 

Descr. — A tree of regular conical growth with spreading 
whorled branches ; branchlets glabrous, slender, pendulous 
or the upper spreading, yellowish when young, turning 
grey after the third year; leaf-cushions abruptly sub- 
cylindric from a broad base, with a terminal rhomboid scar 
and concave sides. Leaf-buds ellipsoid or obovoid, obtuse, 
\ in. long, pale brown, slightly resinous ; scales obovate, 
very obtuse, thinly scarious. Leaves needle-shaped, slender 
with fine sharp points, 1-li in. long, 5 \ - fa in. broad, dor- 
sally compressed, rhomboid-elliptic in transverse section, 
with obtuse edges and midrib, green on the back, with two 
whitish-glaucous lines on the (morphologically) upper side, 
the lateral always turned by a twist of the leaf-cushions, so 
as to expose the green side to the light maximum ; stomata 
on the glaucous side in 4-6 rows on each side of the midrib ; 
resin canals 2, dorsal, near the edges and close to the 
sclerenchymatic hypoderma, sometimes very short or absent. 
Male strobili rose-coloured, elongate-ellipsoid, up to f in. 
long, I in. in diameter, with scales at the base resembling 
those of the leaf-buds ; connective with an orbicular, irregu- 



larly denticulate appendix. Female strobili lateral (always ?), 
oblong-ellipsoid, up to § in. long, ^ in. in diameter, purple, 
scales at the base as in the male strobili ; carpels (bracts of 
older authors) wide-ovate, cuspidate-acuminate, -^ in, long, 
obscurely denticulate, ovule-bearing scales ovate-rotundate, 
subdenticulate, twice as long as the carpel (in flower). 
Cones oblong-cylindric, obtuse, 2-3^ in. long, over 1 in. in 
diameter, light brown, very slightly shining; scales con- 
tracted at the base, claw obovate or inversely triangular, 
wide-ovate above the claw, obtuse, indistinctly striate 
towards the apex, the lower (larger) up to {: in. long, about 
J in. broad. Seed obovoid or broadly cuneate, T V— fV m - 
long, testa pale ; wing obliquely obovate-oblong, J— r V in. 
long, very thin (the maxima according to Render). — 
Otto Stapf. 

Fig. 1, leaf; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, carpel and ovnliferons scale from flower; 
5, cupel and scale from fruit; 6, carpel; 7, fruit-scale, seen from within; 
S, seed: — all enlarged, 



8170 




tdvKtK. 



Wicertt Brooks J3ay&3anl.i5 l vm$> 



XEjreve & C?LoTuLon. 



Tab. 8170. 
DELPHINIUM candidum. 

Tropical Africa. 

Ranuncuxaceae. Tribe Helleboreae. 
Delphinium, Linn. ; Benth. et Booh./. Gen. -Plant, vol. i. p. 9. 



Delphinium (Macrocentra) candidum, Hemel.; species ex affinitate D. macro- 
txntri, D. Oliv. (B. M. t. 8151), a quo differt racerais subtrifloris, floribus 
albis, sepalis omnibus aequaliter divergentibus, calcare gracili curvato ei 
filamentis ciliatis. 

Berba perennis, nana, obscure puberula, caulibus subtrifloris. Folia radicalia 
longe peiiolata, ambitu orbicularia, palmatim alte 5-lobata, Iobis Iatis 
3-lobulatis dentatisque, circiter 10-12 cm. diametro; petioli teretes, basi 
tantum leviter dilatati, 20-36 cm. longi. Folia caulina pauca, similia, 
prof undius partita, Iobis augustioribus. Flores candidi, antheris purpureis, 
suaveolentes, circiter 6 cm. diamotro, obscurissime puberuli ; pedicelli 
pubescentes, graciles, 3-4 cm. loDgi, bracteolis 2 linearihus 5-7 mm. longis 
instructi. Sepa/a fere aequalia, orbiculari-ovata, 2-2 ■ 5 cm. lata, patmtia, 
superius et 2 inferiora abrupte obtuseque acuminata, omnia pilis longis 
albis obscuris parce vestita et extus prope apicem macula viridi incrassata 
ornata; calcar gracile, bis eurvatum, acutum, rugulosum, 4-5 cm. longum. 
Petalorum 2 superiorum calcaratorum (Dectaria auctorum nonnullorum) 
limbus glaber, obliquus, dolabriformis, inaequaliter bifidus, l - 5 cm. longus, 
8 mm. latus, stamina superans. Petala 2 lateralia (staminodia auctorum 
nonnnllorum) puberula, ligulata, apice Iatiora, 3-dentata, quam stamina 
breviora. Staminodia vera (?) 3, linearia, antica, quam stamina breviora 
(an semper adsunt ?). Stamina numerosissima ; filamenta membranacea, 
ciliata, diverse dilatata, exteriora Iatiora, interdum unilateraliter dilatata 
et apice 1-dentata, interiora fere omnino filiformia. Carpetta (matura non 
visa) 3, dense tomentosa, quam stamina breviora. 



Delphinium candidum belongs to a small group of species 
confined, so far as is at present known, to the mountains of 
tropical East Africa. It is compared above with D. macro- 
centron, D. Oliv., because that species is in cultivation ; but 
it is more nearly allied to D. Leroyi, Franch. [Engl Jahrb. 
vol. xx. p. 474) and D. Wellbyi, Hemsl. (Km Bull. 1907, 
p. 360). The former differs in having more hairy flowers, 
obovate-spathulate sepals and glabrous filaments ; the latter 
is a more robust plant with very hairy, blue flowers, rounded, 
not acuminate, sepals, entire lateral petals and less dilated 
filaments. 

The plant figured was raised in the gardens at Hindlip 
Hall, Worcester, from seed collected by Lady Hindlip, in 
December, 1907. 



1904, one day's march from Mumias, between Mount El gon 
and Kisumu, Uganda. Only one plant flowered, we believe, 
and our drawing has been made from leaves and flowers, 
and from a painting and a photograph furnished by 
Lady Hindlip. It is a very beautiful species, and it is to be 
hoped that it has been permanently secured to cultivation. 

There is a monograph of the genus Delphinium by Dr. E. 
Huth in Engl. Jahrb. vol. xx. (1895), pp. 322-499, tt. 6-8, 
in which the author describes 198 species. 

Descr. — A dwarf, slightly hairy perennial ; branches 
usually 3-flowered. Leaves palmately 5-lobed, largest 4 to 
5 in. across ; lobes broad, usually 3-lobulate and toothed, 
smaller and narrower upwards; stalks of the lower ones 
8-15 in. long. Flowers sweet-scented like the primrose, 
pure white with purple anthers, about 2 J in. across, obscurely 
hairy. Stalks slender, pubescent, 1 J-lf in. long ; bracteoles 
usually 2, linear, about J in. long. Sepals almost equal, 
orbicular-ovate, f-1 in. across, each having a thickened, 
green spot near the top on the underside. Spur slender, 
curved upwards and recurved at the tip, 1^—2 in. long. 
Limb of the upper spurred petals glabrous, oblique, un- 
equally notched, ^-| in. long, overtopping the stamens. 
Lateral petals slightly hairy, Iigulate, 3-toothed, shorter 
than the stamens. Filaments variously flattened, sometimes 
on one side only with a tooth at the top, fringed, outermost 
broadest, innermost nearly filiform. Carpels three, densely 
hairy, shorter than the stamens. Seed not seen. — W. Botting 
Hemslky. 



Pig. 1, one of the upper petals or nectaries ; 2, anclroccium and lower petals ; 
3 and 4, stamens; 5, carpels: — all enlarged. 



8171 




M.S.diiJir.HiQKJitK. 



"VinoentBroaHsijay &Sor. Lt*imp 



L Reeve &.C?Xanjdai\. 



Tab. 8171. 
eria longispica. 

Borneo. 



Orchidaceae. Tribe Epidendreae. 

Eria, Linn.; Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 509 ; Hook.f. Fl. Brit. Ind. 

vol. v. p. 785. 



Eria longispica, llolfe; species E. latifoliae, Reichb. f., affinis sed floribns 
majoribus, labello circumscriptione orbiculari, nee obovato differt. 

Tfttrba epiphytica, epseudobulbifera. Caules erecti, robusti, circa 15 cm. alti, 
6-8-phylli. Folia disticha, coriacea, ligulato-oblonga, apice obliqua, 
inaequaliter biloba et acuta, 30-40 cm. longa, 3-4 • 5 cm. lata. Bacemi 
terminates, graciles, valde e'ongati, albido-pubescentes, 25-40 cm. longi, 
densiflori. Bracteae reflexae, ovatae, acutae vel acuminatae, 2 mm. longac. 
Pedicelli graciles, 7-8 nun. longi, tomentosi. Sepalum posticum elliptico- 
oblongum, obtusum, 5 nun. longum; sepala lateralis oblique ovata, obtusa, 
5 mm. longa, 4 mm. lata, reflexa. Fetala Jineari-oblonga, obtusa, 4 mm. 
longa. Labellum trilobum, orbiculare, 5 mm. longum, 5 mm. latum ; lobi 
laterales lati, subobtusi ; lobus intermedius parvus, quadratns, obtuse 
bilobus, interdum denticulatus ; discus tricarinatus, carinis lateralibus 
oblongis glabris, carina media farinacea, apice in cristam orbicularem 
expansa. Columna brevissima, alis brevibus truncatis. 



The species of Eria are difficult to discriminate, because 
so many of them are only known from dried specimens, and 
the crests and other details of the lip are not readily restored 
by maceration after they have been dried. The present 
species has for some years been in cultivation at Kew, though 
not under its present name, a plant having been presented 
to the establishment by Messrs. Linden, of Brussels, in 1898. 
It had, however, been previously submitted for determination 
by them in September, 1893, with the record that it had 
been imported from Borneo. It belongs to the section 
Eriura as defined by Lindley {Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. iii. 
p. 55), and is most nearly allied to a species originally 
described by Blume as Mycaranthes latifolia (Bijdr. p. 353). 
When Blume's genus Mycaranthes was reduced by Lindley 
to a section of Eria he excluded M. latifolia as belonging 
to Eriura though, since it is the only species figured, it might 
have been considered typical of the section Mycaranthes, 

Decembbb, 1907. 



especially as Lindley admitted that he did not know the 
other two species. It is perhaps for this reason that J. J. 
Smith retains Blume's generic name for the section ( Orch, 
Jav. p. 391). 

Eria longispica is very nearly allied to E. latifolia, Reichb. 
f., though it is distinct in the characters indicated. It is 
an exceptionally sturdy plant, with erect habit, broad leaves, 
and long spikes of very numerous flowers, which are light- 
yellow blotched with reddish purple. The lateral keels of 
the lip are yellow, but the central one is covered with a 
loose powdery pubescence, which is removable with the 
slightest touch. E. pamculata, Lindl., belonging to the 
same section, which is also in cultivation, has a pendulous 
habit, and very narrow leaves. 

Descr. — A stout epiphytic herb, without pseudobulbs. 
Steins erect, stout, about six inches high, witli six to eight 
leaves. Leaves distichous, coriaceous, ligulate-oblong, 
with the apex obliquely 2-lobed and acute, 12-16 in. long, 
1|-1| in. broad. Racemes terminal, slender, clothed 
with a whitish pubescence, 10-16 in. long, densely many- 
flowered. Bracts reflexed, ovate, acute or acuminate, y 1 ^- in. 
long. Pedicels slender, about | in. long, densely white- 
tomentose. Dorsal sepal elliptical-oblong, obtuse, -^ in. 
long ; lateral sepals obliquely ovate, obtuse, i in. long by 
nearly as broad, reflexed. Petals linear-oblong, obtuse, 
jr in. long. Lip 3-lobed, orbicular in outline, 3- in. long; 
side lobes broad, subobtuse ; front lobe small, quadrate, 
obtusely 2-lobed or sometimes denticulate in front ; disk 
3-carinate, with the central keels oblong and glabrous, and 
the central one narrowed behind, expanded into a rounded 
crest infront,and covered with a loose, farinaceous*pubescence. 
Column short, with broad truncate wings. — R. A. Rolfe. 

Cultiv. — Eria longispica has been in cultivation at 
Kew since 1898. It is a plant of exceptionally free 
growth, with Iris-like habit, and it produces its tall 
not unattractive flower spikes in May in a tropical house 
where the conditions are those suitable for Cypripediums. 
Very few of the numerous species of Eria can be 
included among popular garden orchids, five only having 
been previously figured in this work, none of them being ot 
striking merit from the cultural standpoint, although E. 
extinctoria and E. vestita are two distinct and pleasing 



orchids. E. longispica thrives in a mixture of peat and 
sphagnum, kept moist at all times except for about eight 
weeks in midwinter, when the plant should be allowed to 
rest. — W. Watsox. 



Fig. 1, flower; 2, white papillae from centre of lip; 3, column; 4, anther 
cap ; 5, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



SUPPLEMENTARY NOTE. 

Tab. 8163. Rhododendron intricatum. The plant figured 
was raised from seed collected by Mr. E. H. Wilson, in 
Szechuen, at elevations between 11,000 and 15,000 ft. above 
sea-level. Among his herbarium specimens, those numbered 
3934, in flower, belong to this species. These specimens 
were collected in June, 1904; thej are not precisely 
localised, but it is noted that they were found inhabiting 
grassland. 



INDEX 

To Vol. III. of the Fourth Series, or Vol. CXXXIII. 
of the whole Work. 



8113 Aconitum gymnandrum. 

8152 „ Napellus var. emi- 
nens. 

8134 x\loe campylosiphon. 

8147 „ nitens. 

8122 „ pallidiflora. 

8153 Angraecum infundibulare. 

8128 Arctostaphylos Manzanita. 
8162 Arctotis decurrens. 

8155 Bigelovia graveolens. 

8123 Blepharocalyx spiraeoides. 

8148 Bruckenthalia spiculifolia. 
8160 Bulbophyllum dichromum. 
8132 Caesalpinia vernalis. 
8125 Caiophora coronata. 

8149 Calathea angustifolia. 

8129 Calliandra portoricensis var. 

major. 
8164 Coelogyne Lawrenceana. 
8131 Cymbidium erythrostylum. 

8170 Delphinium candidum. 
8151 „ macrocentron. 
8141 Dendrobium Ashworthiae. 
8127 Diospyros Kaki. 

8171 Eria longispica. 

8139 Eupatorium glandulosum. 
8157 Ferula communis var. brevi- 

folia. 

8140 Gentiana ornata. 
8167 Gesnera cardinalis. 
8136 Hoodia Currori. 
8159 Iris verna. 



8144 Kennedya retrorsa. 
8112 Lomatia ferruginea. 
8130 Meconopsis bella. 
8119 „ punicea. 

8143 Montanoa mollissima. 

8117 Nerine Bowdeni. 

8133 x Odontioda heatonensis. 
8142 Odontoglossum Leeanum. 

8165 Oldenlandia dolichantha. 

8118 Olearia speciosa. 

8161 Paeonia Cambessedesii. 
8126 Paphiopedilum villosum var. 

annamense. 
8146 Phyllodoce Breweri. 
8169 Picea morindoides. 
8154 Podophyllum versipelle. 
8124 Primula deorum. 
8168 „ muscarioides. 
8135 „ orbicularis. 
8156 Prunus Besseyi. 
8116 Benanthera annamensis. 

8137 Ehododendron Delavayi. 
8163 „ intricatum. 

8120 Bibes mogollonicum. 
8158 Bosa Soulieana. 

8121 Saccolabium rubescens. 

8166 Shorfcia uniflora. 

8145 Stewartia Malachodendron. 
8150 Streptocarpus Holstii. 

8138 Tamarix pentandra. 
8115 Tricuspidaria dependens. 
8114 Viburnum Carlesii. 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 36, DECEMBER, 1907. 

Tab. 8167.- IRA CAKDlNALtS. 

„ 8168.— PRIMULA MtJSCAJRJOIDES. 

8169.— PICEA MORINDOIDES. 
„ 8170.— DELPHINIUM CANt>IDUM. 
„ 8171.— ERTA LONGISPICA. 

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