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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



ILLUSTRATING AND DESCRIBING 



pant* ot t!)e &opaI Botanic (Sarfcenss of &rto, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; 



SIR JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., G.C.S.L, 

F.B,.S.,T7L.S., etc., 

ASSISTED BY 

WILLIAM BOTTING HEMSLEY, F.R.S., F.L.S., etc. 

VOL. LX. 
OF THE THIRD SERIES. 

( Or Vol. CXXX. of the Whole Work.) 




1 Bind me, ye woodbines, in your twineB, 

Curl me about, ye gadding vines, 
And oh ! so close your circles lace, 

That I may never leave this place : 
But, lest your fetters prove too weak, 

Ere I your silken bondage break. 
Do you, O bramblers, chain me too, 
And, courteous briars, nail me through ! " 

Marvkll. 



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To 
WILLIAM WATSON, A.L.S., F.B.H.S.. 

Curator, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 

Dear Mr. Watson, 

The dedication to you of the last volume of the Botanical 
Magazine which I am privileged to conduct, gives me the welcome 
opportunity of expressing my sense of the value of the services which 
you have rendered to this work during your Curatorship of the Royal 
Botanic Gardens. This is due to the skill and knowledge which 
you have devoted to raising and flowering an unprecedentedly large 
proportion of the rare, interesting and beautiful plants portrayed 
in the last twenty volumes of the Magazine, and to the valuable 
information which you have so often given me of the habits, history 
and mode of culture of these and of many other species whose 
portraits accompany them. 

In conclusion, let me congratulate you on the recognition you have 
so fairly earned as an authority on the culture of Cacti, Palms, Aloes, 
Agaves and other large groups of plants, in your study of which 
you have displayed as accurate a knowledge of their physiological 
characteristics as of their requirements under cultivation. 

Believe me, 

Very sincerely yours, 

Jos. D. HOOKER. 
The Camp, Sunningdale, 
December 1st, 1904. 



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SUITABLE FOR THE GARDEN, STOVE, OR CONSERVATORY, 

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ASSISTED BT 

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CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

IELrST RATING AND DESCRIBING 

PLANTS OF THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS, 



Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, m.d., g.c.s.l, c.b., f.r.s., f.l.s., 

Xntt Director of the IRotial Botanic CT.artcns of Uta, 

A.SSISTKD BY 

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liccpn of ii>c Brifiaiinm, 
BGYAL BOTANIC f4AR]>KXS OF KEW. 




Nature aim Arr tu adurn tne page combine, 
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Tab. 7932—7933. 

CYMBIDIUM liHODOCHILTJM. 
Native of Madagascar. 

Nat. Ord. Orchidem. — Tribe Vande-«. 
Genus Cymbidium, Sk. ; (Benth. et Rooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 536.) 



Cymbidtum rhodochilum ; herba, ut videtur, semper in arboribns excelsis supra 
Platycerii madagascariensis candices crescense, psendobulbis fasciculatis 
oblongo-conieis 3-5 poll, longis demura nigropurpureis, foliis 8-10 
distichis loriformibus 2-3 ped. longis acutis flexilibus recurvisatroviridibus, 
scapis simplieibus solitariis infra pseudobnlbos enatis erectia folia fere 
sequantibus multifloris (scapus solus visus 20-florus), bracteis lanceo- 
lttis aeutis deflexis quam pedicellis brevioribus, pedicellis cum ovario 
circiter 3-pollicaribns, floribus sanguineo-viridibus splendidis circiter 4 
poll, diametro maximo, sepalis oblongo-lanceolatis pallida viridibus reflexis 
circiter bipollicaribus, petalis sepalis similibus erectis apiculatis macnlis 
atroviridil>us conapersis, labello trilobo lobis lateralibus margine sanguineo 
excepto petalis coneoloiibus et 4-plo brevioribus, lobo intevmedio obcordato 
circiter 2 poll, diametro sanguineo medio luteo viridi-maculato. 

C. rbodocbilum, Solfe, Orchid Review, vol. ix. (1901) p. 10; x. (19021 p. 184 
(descriptio). Le Jardin, 1901, p. 276", fig. 133 ; 1902, p. 351. The Garden, 
1902, vol. i. p. 383 cum habitus fujura. 



It will be generally admitted that Cymbiclium rhodochilum 
is one of the most striking of recently introduced Orchids. 
It is still very rare in cultivation, and the plant figured 
was purchased for Kew from Mr. G. Warpur, the dis- 
coverer, in 1900. Mr. Warpur states (Orchid Revieiv, 
vol. ix. p. 10) that it always grows on masses of Platy- 
cerium, on the branches of tall trees, mostly of Albizzia 
fastigiata, Oliver, along the rivers and on the higher 
forest-slopes, at elevations of 1,800 to 2,100 feet. He 
adds that it seems to prefer a moderate degree of heat 
and humidity, and much light. In its native country it 
flowers from October to December, but the Kew plant 
flowered in May. 

The Kew plant is still attached to, and growing on the 
Platy cerium, as it was imported. 

Only two other species of Cymbidium have been recorded 
from Madagascar, namely, C. flabellatum, Lindl., and 
G. Humbloti, Rolfe; both very different from G. rhodo-. 
chilum. On the authority of Mr. Warpur, C. Humbloti, 

January 1st, 1904. 



which is also in cultivation, invariably grows in a wild 
state on a palm, Baphia madagascariensis . 

With regard to G. rliodochilam always growing on 
Platy cerium, itself an epiphyte, it may be mentioned that 
it is not at all unusual for one epiphyte to grow on 
another, but it is rare for the associated plants to be con- 
stantly the same. The same phenomenon is, however, not 
unknown among true parasites. For example, so far as is 
known, all the species of Phacellaria, a small genus of 
shrubby parasites belonging to the Santalaceze, are para- 
sitic on different species of the equally parasitic genus 
Loranthus. 

Desor. — A tall, epiphytic herb. Pseudobidbs clustered, 
oblong-conical, three to five inches long, at length purple- 
black. Leaves about eight to ten on a pseudobulb, dis- 
tichous, strap-shaped, two to three feet long, acute, 
flexible, recurved, dark green. Scapes simple, solitary, 
from below the pseudobulbs, nearly as long as the leaves, 
many-flowered. Bracts lanceolate, acute, deflexed, shorter 
than the pedicels. Pedicels with the ovary about three 
inches long. Flowers crimson and green, very striking, 
about four inches in their greatest diameter. Sepals 
oblong-lanceolate, pale green, reflexed, about two inches 
long. Petals similar to the sepals, erect, apiculate, be- 
sprinkled with dark green spots on a light green ground. 
Labellum three-lobed ; lateral lobes, except the crimson 
margin, of the same colour as the petals, and about a 
quarter as long ; intermediate lobe obcordate, about two 
inches in diameter, crimson, with a central, longitudinal, 
yellow band, spotted with green. — W.B. H. 



Tab. 7932. 
Fig. 1, part of Up; 2, column ; 3 and 4, pollen-masses: — all enlarged. 

Tab. 7933. 
Sketch of entire plant growing on Platycerium : — about one quarter natural 
size. 



;//.;/ 




M S.delJ-N.FitchHth 



VmoentBrooL-B.Day -4. Si 



L .Reeve &. C 9 London. 



Tab. 7034 
PROSTANTHERA denticulata. 

Native of Eastern Australia. 



Nat. Ord. Labiat.e. — Tribe Prostantiikre.e. 
Genus Prostanthera, Labill.; {Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1217.) 



Prostanthera denticulata; frutex ramosus, paucipedalis, hispidulus, flovi- 
bundus, caulibus ramisqtie oppositis gracilibuB rectis, foliis brevissime 
petiolatis rigidis lineavi-lanceolatia maximis vix pollicaribus vix acutis 
marline rigide setosis nee vere denticulatia supra hispidia subtxia fere 
levibus, rloribus purpureis in ramulorum apicibus snbracemoais in foliornm 
ant Lractearum axillia solitariia brevissime pedicellatis, bracteolis 2 fere 
filiformibus juxta calycem positis et quadrnplo brevioribus, calyce hispi- 
dulo alte et fere aequaliter bilabiato, labiis rotundatia superiore majore 
margine basi recurvo, corolla glabra valde inaaqualiter bilabiata circiter 
6 lin. diametro roaximp, tubo brevi basi cylindrico subite inflato, labio 
superiore erecto breviter bilobato lobis obscure 3-lobulatis, labio iuferiore 
recto insequaliter 3-lobato lobis lateralibus ovato-rotnndatia lobo inter- 
medio longiore obcordato, staminibus 4 inclnsis, iiUmentis glabris, 
antheris 2-locularibus loenlis basi in caudam brevissimatn productis 
connectivo etiam basi producto, stylo incluso, nuculis ovoideis punctatis. 

P. denticulata, R. Br. Prodr. Fl. Nov. Soil. p. 509. Benth. in DG. Prodr. 
vol. xii. p. 561; Fl. Austral, vol. v. p. 97. Moore, Sandb. Fl. N.8. 
Wales, p. 351. 



Prostanthera denticulata, R. Br., is a member of a tribe 
of the Labiatse, consisting of five genera, and about 100 
species, mostly shrubby, restricted to Australia. Pros- 
tanthera itself comprises about forty species, spread all 
over Australia, except the extreme north, and P. denti- 
culata has a wide range on the eastern side of the country. 
Some of the species are described as tall shrubs, but they 
are mostly bushes, three to six feet high. 

The plant figured was raised from seed sent to Kew by 
Mr, J. H. Maiden, Director of the Botanic Gardens, Sydney, 
]S r . S. Wales, in 1.900. It is in the Temperate House, and 
is now about three feet high, growing and flowering freely, 
beginning in April. 

Altogether some half-a-dozen species of Prostanthera 
have been in cultivation, mostly early in the last century, 
when " hard wooded " plants were more in vogue. The 
species figured was originally introduced in 1824. 

Three have previously been figured in the Magazine, 
January 1st, 1004. 



namely : P. lasianthos, Labill. (t. 2434) ; P. empetrifolia, 
Sieb. (t. 3405), and P. nivea, A. Ounn. (t. 5658). Another 
species, P. violacea, R. Br., is figured in the " Botanical 
Register," t. 1072. 

Descr. — A much-branched, free-flowering, hispid shrub, 
a few feet high. Stems and the opposite branches slender, 
straight. Leaves very shortly petioled, stiff, linear-lan- 
ceolate, the largest scarcely an inch long, subacute, margin 
beset with short, rigid bristles, but not toothed, hispid 
above, naked below. Flowers purple, subracemose, soli- 
tary in the axils of the leaves or bracts. Pedicels very 
short, bearing two very short, filiform bracteoles close 
under the calyx. Calyx hispid, deeply two-lipped; lips 
almost equal, rounded, the upper slightly larger, with the 
margin recurved near the base. Corolla glabrous, very 
unequally two-lipped, about half an inch in its greatest 
diameter ; tube very short, cylindrical at the base, then 
suddenly inflated ; upper lip erect, shortly two-lobed, lobes 
obscurely 3-lobulate ; lower lip straight, unequally 3-lobed, 
lateral lobes ovate-rotundate, intermediate longer, obcor- 
date. Stamens 4, included ; filaments glabrous ; anthers 
2-celled, cells produced at the base in very short tails; 
connective also produced at the base. Style included' 
Nutlets ovoid, pitted.— W. B. II. 



Fig 1, a leaf ; 2, calyx and style ; 3, corolla; 4 and 5, anthers; 6, fruit — 
ail enlarged. ' ' **""• 







M.S.delJTIRU-hKtfi 



AfaicentBrookE Day&Soi 



C. Londo 



Tab. 7935. 
ARETHUSA. sinensis. 

Na/ive of Western China. 

Nat. Ord. ORCirmE.E. — Tribe Neottie^. 
Genus Akethusa, Linn. {Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 614.) 



Arethijsa sinensis; herba terrestris, tuberosa, scaposa, 4-9 poll, alta, glabra, 
tubere parvo subgloboso, foliis 3 vel 4 inferioribns vaginii'ormibus vel 
laminis parvis itistructis 2 vel 3 superioribus lanceolatis acutis maximia 
in exemp'ariis cultis 6 poll, longis et 1J poll, latis in exemplariis sylves- 
tribus fere dimidio minoribus multinerviis tenuibns, acapis solitariis 
erectis 1-7-floris folia paullo exoedentibus infra flores nudis, bracteis 
membranaceis lineari-lanceolatis 2-3 lin. longis acutis, pedicellis circiter 
3-4 lin. longis, floribus albo-rubris 9-12 lin. longis nutantibus, sep;ilis 
petalisque lanceolatis acutis erecto-incurvis labello paullo brevioribus, 
labello erecto indiviso e basi angusta columnaa brevissime adnato sursum 
valde dilatato marginibus involuto fimbriato intus longitudinaliter trila- 
mellato lamellis fimbriatis, columna clavata labello dimidio breviore. 

A. sinensis, Rolfe in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxxvi. p. 46. Orchid Review, 
1896, p. 211. 

The history of the introduction of this interesting little 
Orchid is obscure. It was first sent to Kevv by the Editors 
of the " Gardeners' Chronicle " in May, 1896, and in June 
of the same year it was received from Sir Trevor Law- 
rence, without any indication of its origin. Sir Trevor 
sent it again in June, 1900, when he exhibited it at a meeting 
of the Royal Horticultural Society. Subsequently Mr. 
Rolfe identified these cultivated fragments with specimens 
collected by Dr. A. Henry near Mengtze, in the Province 
of Yunnan, Western China. 

The plant figured was presented to Kew by Mr. H. J. 
Elwes, F.R.S., and it flowered in a greenhouse in July of 
last year, under ordinary treatment. 

Arethusa, as now limited, comprises four other described 
species ; one is native of Japan, one of Mexico, one of 
Guatemala, and A. bulbom, Linn. (Bot. Mag. t. 2204), the 
species on which the genus was founded, is a native of 
North America. 

Descr. — A terrestrial, tuberous, scapose, glabrous herb, 
four to nine inches high. Tuber small, ovoid or globose. 
Leaves two or three, lanceolate, acute, the largest six 

January 1st, 190i. 



inches long and one and a half broad, thin, many-nerved, 
with three or four lower ones almost reduced to sheaths. 
Scapes solitary, erect, 1-7-flowered, scarcely taller than 
the leaves, naked below the flowers. Bracts membranous, 
linear-lanceolate, acute, two to three lines long*. Pedicels 
about three lines long. Flowers white and red, nine to 
twelve lines long, nodding. Sepals and petals lanceolate, 
acute, erect, incurved, slightly shorter than the labellum. 
Labellum erect, undivided, narrow at the base, obscurely 
saccate, almost free from the column, much widened 
upward, with involute, fimbriate margins and three longi- 
tudinal, fringed crests on the upper surface. Column 
clavate, about half as long as the labellum. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, labellum and column; 2, labellum laid open; 3, column; 4, cliuan- 
drium ; 5, pollen : — all enlarged, 



7936 




M-S . del, J.'N.Fitch Jith 



L Reeve & C ? London 



'VinoeTi.tBrool,T:,Day&..Soaa.t i Im». 



Tab. 7936. 

PASSIFLOUA vitifolia. 

Native of Tropical America. 

Nat. Ord. Passiflorace.k. — Tribe Passiplore^. 
Genus Passiflora, Linn. ; (Benth. et Houh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 810.) 



Passtfi.ora (§ Granadilla) vitifolia; species P. quadriglandulosse, Rodsch. 
(Tacsonia sanguined, DC, Bot. Mag. t. 4674) simillima, sed bracteolis 
amplis coloratis et florum colore iutensiore sat distiucta; caulibus graci- 
liusculis debilibus ope cirrhorum simpliciam alte scandentibus, novellis 
pins minusve tomentosis in sic o saepe ferrugineis, foliis petiolatis (inter- 
num longe) demum coriaceis glabrescentibus sajpissime ultra medium 
trilobatis, interdum lobis 2 basilaribus pirvis additis, maximisvfi-7 poll, 
diametro basi cordatis, lobis ovato-oblongis acutis grosse crenato-dentatis 
vel foliomm superiorum denticulatis, pedun;ulia quam foliis brevioribus, 
bncteolis coloratis venosis glanduloso-detitatis circiter pollicaribus in- 
volucrum prope calycis basin formantibus, floribus cum cirrhis in folio- 
rum axillis solitariis in exemplariis nonnullis sylvestribus usque ad 6 poll, 
diametro sanguineo-coccinei-s tubo circiter 5 lin. lato altoque extus 
10-sulcato, sepalis petalis similil)us oblongro-lauce >latis dorso infra apicem 
cornutis, cornu viridi, corona exteriore (fauciali) tilamentosa triseriata 
erecta filis seriei primse liberis saaguineis quam petalis dimidio breviori- 
bus, filis seiiei secundae etiam liberis quam exterioribus tertia parte 
brevioribus, filis seriei tertiae albis alte connatis quam intermediis paullo 
longioribus, corona intermedia (operculo) membranacea e floris tubo versus 
apicem emergente deflexa deinde ascendente tubum brevissimum apice 
fimbriatum formante, corona interiore (vel disco nectarifluo) squamis 
parvis denticnbitis consistente, gynandrophoro circiter 2 poll, alto viridi 
sanguineo-maculato, antberis viridibus, ovario viridi, stylis brevibus 
sanguineis, stigmatibus amplis disciformibus, fructu ignoto. 

P. vitifolia, H. B. K. Nov. Gen. et Sp. vol. ii. (1817) p. 138. Masters in Mart. 
Fl. Bras. vol. xiii. pars 1, p. 607, t. 121; Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvii. 
(1871), p. 637. Karst. Fl. Colomb. vol. i. p. 103, t. 51 (var. bracteosa). 
Hemsl, in Salv. et Godm. Biol. Centr.-Amer. Bot. vol. i. p. 481. 

P. sanguinea, Sm. in Bees's Cyclop, vol. xxvi. (1819), n. 45. 

P. punicea, Ruiz et Pav. ex DC. Prod. vol. iii. p. 329. 

P. servitensis, Karst. in Linnsea, vol. xxx. p. 163. 

Tacsonia Buchanani, Levi, in Illust. Hort. vol. xiv. (1867), t. 519. 

P. Buchanani, Planch, et Triana in Ann. Sc. Nat. 5me seYie, vol. xvii. p. 141. 



Passiflora vitifolia, H. B. K., appears to have been first 
introduced into Europe from Panama in 1851 ; but it has 
never got into general cultivation, probably because it 
requires tropical treatment to produce its magnificent 
flowers. At Kew it is cultivated both in the Palm House 
and the old Lily House, where it flowered in June, 1903. 
It is certainly one of the most brilliantly coloured species 
in a genus abounding in gorgeous forms. 

It has a wide distribution in tropical America, ranging 

January 1st, 1904. 



from Nicaragua to Peru, Guiana and Brazil, and from 
sea-level in Nicaragua to ^,000 feet in Colombia, where 
Lelimann (n. 1268) observed stems forty feet long. 

In the Kew Herbarium there are dried specimens of 
flowers of this species from Panama (Fendler, 118) fully 
six inches across. 

Descr. — A tall shrubby climber similar to P. qundri- 
cjlandulosa, Rodsch. (Tacsonia sanguined, DC, Bot. 
Mag. t. 4674), but differing in the less diversified foliage, 
large coloured bracts and the deeper colour of the 
flowers. Stems slender, toraentose, as well as the 
leaves, when young. Leaves petiolate, at length coria- 
ceous, glabrescent, usually deeply three-lobed, some- 
times with two additional small, basal lobes, cordate at 
the base, the largest six to seven inches in diameter ; lobes 
ovate-oblong, acute, coarsely crenate-dentate or only 
denticulate. Peduncles shorter than the leaves. Bracteoles 
3, coloured, veined, glandular-dentate, about an inch long, 
and forming an involucre close under the flower. Flowers 
solitary with solitary, unbranched tendrils in the axils of 
the leaves, five to six inches in diameter, crimson-scarlet. 
Tube about half an inch across and deep, ten-furrowed. 
Sepals similar to the petals, oblong-lanceolate, furnished 
with a short, green, dorsal horn, just below the tip. 
Older corona filamentose, in three series ; filaments of the 
first series free, crimson, half as long as the petals ; 
filaments of the second series also free, shorter than the 
outer or first series; filaments of the third series white, 
united in a tube to above the middle, somewhat longer 
than the second or intermediate series. Intermediate 
corona membranous, emerging from near the top of the 
flower-tube, deflexed, and then ascending, forming a very 
short tube, fringed at the top. Inner corona (or honey- 
secreting disk) consisting of small, dentate scales. Gynan- 
drojphore (columu bearing the stamens and ovary) about 
two inches long, green, spotted with crimson. Anthers 
green. Ovary glabrous, green; styles short, crimson; 
stigmas large, circular, compressed. Fruit unknown.— 
W. B. H. 

Fig. 1, a bracteole; 2, a section through the coronas; 3, a portion of the 
intermediate corona; 4, a portion of the inner corona or disk: 5 and G, ventral 
and dorsal view ot an anther: — aU enlarged. 



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Tab. 7937. 
LYSICHITUM camtschatcense. 
Native of N.E. Asia and N.W. America. 



Nat. Ord. Aroide,e. — Tribe Okontie^:. 
Genus Lysichitum, Sclwtt; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 994.) 



Lysichitum camtschatcense ; herba paludosa, robusta, rbizomate repente, 
foliis amplis 1-3 ped. longis sessilibus v. crasse petiolatis oblongo-ovatis 
v. -lanceolatis acutis obtusisve crasse coriaceis lsete viridibus petiolo lato 
concavo, nervis gracilibus arcuatis, pedunculo crassitie digiti minoris, 
cataphyllis paucis primum involutis albis, spatba 4-6 poll, longa cymbi- 
formi acuta membranacea flavida basi in pedunculum longe producta 
spadicem jnniorem totum includente, demuui stipitem ejus valde 
elongatum inferne involvente deniqne decidua, spadice longe stipitata 
2-3 poll, longa \-% poll. diam. cyliodracea apice rotundata densiflora 
sursum floi'ente tloribus omnibus fertilibus densissimis, perianthii seg- 
mentis 4 insequalibus crassissimis truncatis oblongis trigonisve apica 
fornicatis ovarium velantibus, staminibus 4 injBqualibusi, filamentis late 
complanatis, antheris minutis exsertis didyinis, ovario conico-ovoideo 
viridi basi constricto apice attenuate, stigmate sessili capitellato flavo, 
loculis 2 basilaribus interdum confluentibus 1-2-ovulatis, baccis 2-locu- 
laribus dispermis, seminibus exalbuminosis, embryone macropodo. — 
J. D. S. 

L. camtschatcense, Schott in (Esterr. Bot. Wochenbl. vol. vii. (1857), p. 62 ; 
Miq. Ann. Mus. Lvgd.-Bat. vol. i. p. 285, ii. p. 202. Engl, in DC. Monoffr. 
Phaner, vol. ii. p. 210. Macoun, Gat. Gonad. PI. vol. ii. p. 73. Franch. & 
Savat. Enum. PL Jap. vol. ii. p. 9. Honzo Zufu, vol. xxiv. t. 18. tiomoku 
Zusetsu, vol. xix. t. 10 (Japonice 13). 

L. canitscbaticum, Sc/tott, Gen. Aroid. t. 91. 

L. kamtfchatcensis, S. Wats. Bot. Californ. vol. ii. pp. 187, 48k 

L. japonicum, Schott ex Miq. Gat. Mus. Bot. Lugd.-Bat. p. 96. Franch. & 
Sav. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. ii. p. 9. 

Symplocarpus kamtschaticus, Bong, in Mem. Arad. Petersb. 8e"r. 6, vol. ii. 
(1833), p. 169 ; Ledeb. Ft. Boss. vol. iv. p. 12 (Simplocarpus). 

S. camtschaticus, Kunth, Enum. PI. iii. p 84. 

Arctiodracon japonicum, A. Gray in Mem. Amcr. Acad. ser. 2, vol. vi. 
(1858-9), p. 408. 

Pothos camtschaticus, Spreng. Syst. Veg. vol iii. p. 767. 

Dracontium foliis lanceolatis, Linn. Amnen. Acad. vol. ii. p. 3G2. 

Dracontium camtschatcense, Linn. Sp. PI. p. 968. 



Lymchiium, or Lysichilon, which is better, and as Schott 
himself wrote it in a note in the place where he published 
the description, is a monotypic genus of remarkable dis- 
tribution. In Asia it inhabits Eastern Siberia, Kamt- 
schatka, Saghalien, and the Kurile Islands, southward to 
Central Japan ; and in America it ranges from the 

February 1st, 1904. 



Aleutian Islands and Alaska southward to California, to 
about 40° of latitude. The high latitudinal extension, or 
rather existence, of this plant, is accounted for, partly, at 
least, by its being an inhabitant of swamps. 

C. A. Geyer, who collected specimens on the Coeur 
d'Alene River, Idaho, states that it grew in deep, rich, 
vegetable mould, and that its scarlet fruit was a favourite 
food of the bear. 

Lysichitum camtschatcense, Schott, varies very much in 
size from different localities ; the leaves being from a foot 
to nearly three feet in length, and the spathe, including 
peduncle, is sometimes as much as eighteen inches long. 
The fertile part of the spadix is from one inch and a half 
to nearly six inches long. The late Professor H. N. 
Moseley, who collected a specimen in Oregon, labelled it 
*' skunk cabbage," a name applied in Canada and the 
Eastern United States to the closely allied Symplocarpus 
fcetidus, Salisb. The latter is figured in the Botanical 
Magazine, t. 836, under the name of Pothos fcelidus, Ait., 
and also t. 3224. 

Symplocarpux, as well as Lysichitum, is a monotype, and 
it inhabits Japan as well as Eastern N. America. But, 
improbable as it seems, there are many more plants 
common to Eastern Asia and Eastern N. America than 
there are common to Eastern Asia and Western N. 
America. 

The figure was prepared from a clump growing in a 
wet, shady corner of the Himalayan section of the Tem- 
perate House, Kew, and Mr. "Watson notes that it had 
previously been unsuccessfully tried in the Bog Garden in 
the open air. In its present position it is flourishing, and 
perfectly at home. 

Kew is indebted to Mr. James R. Anderson, Deputy 
Minister of Agriculture, British Columbia, for tubers, sent 
in 1901. The plant of previous cultivation, referred to by 
Mr. Watson, was apparently of Japanese origin, as there 
is a leaf in the Herbarium labelled: " Lysichiton japonicus 
from North Japan, garden specimen,' Aug. 5, 1886." 
This leaf is about two feet six inches long, so that the 
plant was not wanting in vigour. The reason why it did 
not flower is not easily explained, because M. W. Gorman, 
who collected the plant in Alaska, notes on the label that 



the spathes sometimes appear through the snow. Possibly 
the local conditions were unfavourable. The same col- 
lector states that it grows in moist places and on the 
banks of creeks. — W. B. II. 

Descr. — A stout, glabrous marsh-herb, with a creeping 
rootstock, giving off erect, sessile tufts of leaves and 
inflorescences. Leaves erect, one to two feet and a half 
long, subsessile or base narrowed into a very stout, 
concave petiole, oblong-ovate or -lanceolate, acute or 
obtuse, thickly coriaceous, costavery broad, nerves spread- 
ing and arching. Peduncle shorter than the leaves, stout, 
pale green, nearly white, obscurely transversely wrinkled. 
Spa the four to six inches long, erect, deeply boat-shaped, 
elliptic in outline, acuminate, membranous, pale yellow, 
base narrowed into and resembling the peduncle for some 
length, but fissured in front. Spadix stipitate, four to six 
inches long by one-half to three-quarters of an inch in 
diameter, top rounded, dense-flowered, green, at first 
enclosed in the spathe, flowering from the base upwards ; 
stipes inserted far down in the contracted, terete base of 
the spathe, terete, green, elongating after flowering of the 
spadix to six inches or more, and freeing itself and the 
latter from the spathe. Flowers all fertile, very densely 
spicate. Perianth~segmenta four, very unequal, variously 
compressed, fleshy, truncate, tightly embracing the stamens 
and ovary. Stamens four; filaments very unequal, broad, 
flat; anthers minute, didymous. Ovary conic-ovoid, 
fleshy, base constricted, cells two, sometimes confluent, 
one- or two-ovuled ; stigma capitellate, yellow. Berries 
partially sunk in the rhachis of the spadix, 2-celled, 
2- seeded. Seeds concave-convex, exalbuminous ; embryo 
having a large radicle. — J, D. II. 



Fig. 1, three flowers detached from the spadix; 2, two lobes of the perianth, 
two unequal stamens and pistil; 3, section of 2-celled ovary showing the 
solitary ovules ; — all enlarged ; 4, much reduced figure of entire plant. 



7938 




MSdelJN.RtchHth 



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L Reeve &.C London 



Tab. 7938. 
BULPOPHYLLUM auricomum. 

Native of Burma. 

Nat. Old. Orcuide^e.— Tribe DendrobpE/K. 
Genus Bulbopiiyilum, Thou. ; [Benth. et Eook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. Hi. p. 501.) 



Bulbophyllum (Eubulbophyllum) auricomum; rhizomate repente crassitie 
penna? anserinfe squamis brevibus arete imbricatis brunneis vaginato, 
pseudobulbis J-l 5-pollicaribus confertis anguste ovoideis oblongisve 
teretibus nudis fusco-viridibus aphyllis, foliis rhizoraa termiuantibus 
solitariis binisve 3-4 poll, longis sessilibus lineari-oblongis obtuaia 
coriaceis basi vaginis brevibus viridibns cinctis supra laate viridibus 
subtus pallidis, scapi8 basi pseudobulborum insertis racemo iucluso 4-10 
poll, longis gracillimis, vaginis paucis angustis appressis auctis, racemo 
elongat.o decurvo multifloro, rbachi puberulo, bracteis minutis subulatis, 
floribuB subsessilibus cernuis, ovario brevi, sepalis patulia £ poll, longis 
lineari - lanceolatis acuminatis 3-nerviis membranaceis albis dorsali 
paullo breviore, petalis parvis oblongis obtusis 1-nerviis ciliatis, labello 
Hngugeformi recurvo supra papilloso apice rotundato aurantiaco, columna 
brevi truncata bidentata, anthera mitraeformi apice obtusa puberula. — 
J.D.H. 

B. auricomum, Lindl. in Wall. Gat. n. 1935; Gen. & Sp. Orchid, p. 50. 
Parish in Mason's Burma, ed. nov. 1883, vol. ii. Bot. p. 154. Jiook.f. Fl. 
Brit. Ind. vol. v. p. 765. 

B. foenisecii, Par. ex Reichb.f. in Bot. Zeit. vol. xxiii. (1865) p. 99. 

Dendrobium tripetaloidea, Boxb. Fl. Ind. vol. iii. p. 478, et icon. ined. in 
Bibl. Keiv., n. 2359. 



Bulbophyllum auricomum was discovered by the Rev. F. 
Carey in the forests of Rangoon, whence living plants 
were sent by him, before 1832, to the Botanical Gardens 
of Calcutta, where it was cultivated under the name of 
Dendrobium tripetaloides, which was published by Dr. Rox- 
burgh in his "Plora Indica." It has more recently been 
collected in Tenasserim by William Gomez, one of Wallich's 
collectors, and by the Kev. C. Parish in Moulmein. The 
plant figured was obtained by Kew from Mr. J. O'Brien, 
Harrow-on-the-Hill, in 1894, and Mr. Watson observes 
that it flowers annually in a stove in June. But this 
season it is flowering freely at the end of December, and a 
very pretty and graceful little thing it is, and its agreeable 
fragrance adds to its attractiveness. 

Parish collected numerous specimens, which he presented 
to Kew in 1872, and in an accompanying note he states 

FEBRUARY 1ST, 1904. 



that it was a great favourite with the Burmese^ girls to 
put in their hair, as it is pleasantly fragrant, like new- 
made hay. He adds that he had found a golden-coloured 
variety in the mountains. Parish does not take up the 
name B.feenisecii, credited to him by Reichenbach in the 
place cited above, and it has not been found in his manu- 
scripts at Kew ; but there is no doubt of its identity with 
B. auricomum, Lindl. Reichenbach drew up his description 
from a plant introduced and cultivated by Messrs. Low & 
Co. 

Since Miss Smith's drawing was lithographed we have 
found another in the Kew Collection, made by W. H. 
Fitch in 1871, from a plant cultivated by Messrs. James 
Veitch & Sons. It is endorsed : " Buller, Stevens's sale, 
1849." Fitch's drawing represents a more robust con- 
dition of the plant. 

B. suavissimum, Rolfe (Gard, Ghron, 1889, vol. i. p. 297) 
is a closely allied species from Upper Burma, which Mr. 
Rolfe thinks may be the plant regarded by Parish as a 
yellow variety of B. auricomum. 

Descr. — A vhizomatous, pseudobulbous herb, less than a 
foot high. Rhizomes creeping, short-jointed, about a 
quarter of an inch thick, clothed with short, brown, closely 
imbricated scales. Pseudobulbs clustered, three-quarters 
to one and a quarter inch long, narrow-ovoid or oblong, 
leafless when the flowers are produced. Leaves usually 
two in the formation of each succeeding pseudobulb, 
oblong, obtuse, about four inches long, deciduous. Scapes 
solitary from the base of the leafless pseudobulbs, very 
slender, four to ten inches long, recurved from above the 
middle, about two-thirds floriferous. Bracts minute, per- 
sistent. Flowers very fragrant, numerous, nearly sessile, 
nodding, white, with an orange labellum. Sepals linear- 
lanceolate, acuminate, about three-quarters of an inch 
long, three-nerved. Petals small, ovate-oblong, obtuse, 
1-uerved, ciliate. Lip tongue-shaped, somewhat longer 
than the petals, hinged at the base and motile, arched, 
papillose on the upper surface. Column short, truncate. 
Anther mitre-shaped, puberulous at the top. — W. B. H. 

Fig. l,a flower from which the sepals have been removed; 2, the same 
from which the petals have also been removed; 3, anther-cap; 4, pollen: — 
a?l enlarged. 



7939 





KSdeijimtchink 



"Wnceni B ro oJ< s ,1) rv & P or 



X IH.e e ve & C c 



Tab. 7939. 
CORYDALIS Wilsoni. 

Native of Central China. 

Nat. Old. FumariacEjE. — Tribe Fumarie^e. 
Genus Corydalis, DC; (Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 55 ) 



ConmAUS Wilsoni ; acaulis, glaberriroa, foliis 3-5-pollicaribus patenfcibus 
flaccidis pinnatis petiolo breviusculo rhachequegracilibus, pinnis utrinque 
4-6 f-1-pollicaribus sessilibus petiolulatisve ovato-oblongis pinnatifido- 
lobatis lobis apice obtusis v. rotundatis enerviis glauco-viridibua, pedun- 
culo brevi robusto, racerno 4-5-pollicari laxe multiiloro, bracteis lanceolatia 
pedicellis J-J poll, longis brevioribus, floribus pollicaribus aureis, sepalia 
J poll, longis ovatis caudato-acuminatis brunneis, petalis exterioribus 
acuminatis superiore tasi in calcar 5 poll, longum iacarvum apice 
rotundatum leviter compressum producto inferioris disco excavato 
mavginibus recurvis, interioribus stipitatis obovato-spatbulatis costa 
crassa exserta, ovario lineari stigmate 2-cruri cruribus incurvia apice 
2-lobis, capsula lineari arcuata. — J. D. IT. 

0. Wilsoni, N.E. Br. in Gard. Ohron. 1903, vol. ii. p. 123. 



Corydalis Wilsoni was raised by Messrs. James Veitcli 
& Sons from seed sent home by their very successful 
collector, Mr. E. H. Wilson, after whom it is named. 
They at first cultivated it in a greenhouse, where it 
flowered in March of last year, and one of the plants so 
raised is represented in our plate. The plant in question 
was presented to Kew, and in May it was turned out in 
the Rock Garden, where it has flourished and flowered 
throughout the summer and autumn, and in the middle of 
December, as Mr. Watson pointed out to us, it was still 
flowering under the shelter of an overhanging rock. The 
dimensions of the plant were considerably beyond its 
condition when Miss Smith made the drawing. Although 
the plant was past flowering, the leaves were still green 
at the end of the first week in January. 

In reply to inquiries, Messrs. Veitch state that the 
habitat of Corydalis Wilsoni is given in Wilson's notes 
as: "dry rocks at 10,000 ft., Fang"; which is in the 
Province of Hupeh. Its hardiness, in so far as temperature 
is concerned, is therefore unquestionable. Whether it will 
bear onr often mild, humid winters, time will prove. 

February 1st. 1'iO-i. 



There are many other new species from the same region 
deserving of a trial in our gardens. — W. B. II. 

Descr. — Stemless, perfectly glabrous. Leaves all radical, 
three to five inches long, spreading, flaccid, ovate-oblong 
in outline, glaucous green, pinnate ; petiole short, and 
rhachis slender ; pinnae four to six on each side, three- 
fourths to one inch long, rather distant, sessile, on the 
lower part sometimes free and petiolulate, ovate-oblong, 
pinnatificlly lobed, lobes rounded, lobulate, lobules obtuse 
or rounded at the tip. Peduncles short, robust, with the 
raceme four to five inches long, bright green. Raceme 
loosely many-flowered ; bracts lanceolate, shorter than 
the pedicels, which are one-quarter to half an inch long. 
Flowers about an iuch long. Sepals ovate, caudately 
acuminate, pale brown. Petals golden-yellow. Outer 
petals linear-oblong, acuminate, tips recurved, upper pro- 
duced at the base into a very broad, incurved, slightly 
flattened spur rounded at the apex ; lower with a deep 
groove on the disk bounded by a crenulate ridge, margins 
recurved. Petals narrow, stipitate, spathulately obovate, 
costa very thick, protruded beyond the rounded apex. 
Ovary very slender; stigma horse-shoe-shaped, with the 
tips of the incurved arms 2-lobed. Capsule very slender, 
arcuate. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, flower; 2, sepal; 3, anthers ; 4, ovary :— all enlarged; 5, capsule of 



the natural size 



7940 




M. S . dal^ JT.FitcHJith 






L Reeve &. C. London 



Tab. 7940. 
SAUROMATUM brev^es. 

Native of the Siklcim Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Akoide*;.— Tribe Arine^e. 
Genus SaUJROMATUM, Schott; (Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 966.) 



Saukomatum brevipes ; acaule, tubere parvo oblato tul erculis perplnrimis 
coronato, foliis 1-3 longe petiolatis pedatim 5-9-partitis segmentia 4-6 
poll, longis anguste lanceolatis cauJato-acuminatis supra Isete viridibus 
Bubtus pallidis costa utrinque rubra, petiolo 4-15 poll, longo erecto 
tereti roseo, spathis confertis breviter pedunculatis, pedunculo curvo 
hypogaeo, spathre tubo 1| poll, longo ampullteformi basi ioflato fere polli- 
cem uiametro dein in collum breve cylindraceum apice fissum in laminam 
desinense constricto extus pallide flavo-virescente rnaculis pallide roseis 
ornato faace basique limbi intus rubro-purpurea, limbo 4-5 poll, longo 
basi ad J poll, lato arcuato anguste lineari-lanceolato acuminato convoluto 
torto extus pallide sordide roseo v. griseo, spadice sessili spathaa seqnilonga 
gracili parte fiorifera 1-1| pollicari in ventre spathasinclusain appendicem 
gracilem exsertam ascendentem cylindraceam apice obtusarn infra 
medium roseam dein auvantiacam desinense, ovariis minimis in 
culutnnam oblongam viridem ad J poll, longam densissime confertis 
ovoideis 1-locularibus 2-ovulatis stigmate minuto sessili, ovulis 2 basi- 
laribus erectis, organis neutris paucis clavatis, antheris minutis 
2-locularibus in columnam cylindraceam confertis infimis minimis 
deformatis papillceformibus, loculis globosis. 

S. brevipes, N.E. Br. in Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. ii. p. 93. 

Typbonium pedatum, Schott in (Eslerr. Bot. Wochenbl. 1857, p. 262, partim. 

T. brevipee, Hook.f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. vi. p. 511. 



The genus Sauromatum consists of about five species of 
E. Indian and tropical African plants closely allied to 
Arum. Of these one has been previously figured in this 
work, S. guttatum, Schott, tab. 4465, a N.W. Indian 
species, conspicuous for its large spathe spotted with dark 
purple. S. breviyes was first found by myself near Dar- 
jeeling, in the Sikkim Himalaya, in 1848, but in fruit only. 
It has since been collected in flower by Mr. C. B. Clarke, 
F.R.S., and Mr. G. A. Gammie, now Professor of Botany 
at Poona, in the same neighbourhood, at elevations of 
7,000 to 7,500 feet. Owing to the difficulty of ascertaining 
the true nature of the spathe in dried specimens it was 
referred to the genus Tt/phonium (see tabs. 339, 2324, Arum, 
and 6180), with which it agrees in all other points, except 

FjtBRTJAHY l&T, 1904. 



that the tube of the spathe is entire, not convolute, which 
latter character brings it to Sauromatum. On the other 
hand, the leafing of S. brevipes being coetaneous with the 
flowering, is opposed to the character of Sauromatum, and 
suggests the expediency of the two genera being united. 

For this interesting plant I am indebted to the rich, 
collection of the University Botanic Gardens of Cambridge, 
where it flowered in June, 1902. A tuber of it was 
received from the Sikfcim Himalaya, along with others of 
Itemusatia vivijpara, Thomsonia nepalensis, and Arisxma 
speciosum. 

Mr. Lynch writes that he has a number of healthy small 
plants growing from daughter-tubers produced by the 
mother-tuber, which perished after flowering. He adds : 
" The formation of a number of small tubers upon the 
crown of the old one appears to be characteristic of the 
species, for even the tubers of the young plants, only 
three-eighths of an inch across, have already a conspicuous 
ring of tiny buds." 

Descr. — Tuber small, oblately spherical, giving off 
coetaneously sub-sessile spathes, and a few long-petioled, 
pedatipartite leaves, and from the crown innumerable 
tubercles by which the species is propagated, as well as by 
seed. Petiole four to fifteen inches long, erect, cylindric, 
rose-coloured, unspotted ; segments of limb five to nine, 
four to six inches long, narrowly linear-lanceolate, caudate- 
acuminate, bright green above, with a dark red costa. 
Spathes very shortly peduncled ; peduncles hypogseous; 
tube an inch and a half long, ampullgeform, quite entire, 
pale yellowish green, faintly spotted with rose, globose 
below, an inch in diameter, then narrowed into a short, 
cylindric tube split at the throat and passing into the 
long, narrow, convolute, twisted, acuminate, arching limb, 
four to six inches long, of a pale greyish or rosy colour, 
bright red at the base and inside the throat. Spadix 
as long as the spathe, slender ; flowering part about an 
inch and a half long, enclosed in the inflated portion of 
the spathe, terminated by a very slender, terete, smooth, 
ascending appendix, which is rose-coloured towards the 
base,_ and orange-yellow above it to the obtuse tip. 
Ovaries crowded in an oblong mass at the base of the 
spadix, minutely ovoid, green. Anthers in a cylindric 



mass at the top of the flowering portion, very minute, 
2-celled, the lower reduced to papilla* on the neuter space 
between the anthers and ovaries, which bears a few 
stipitate, clavate, neuter organs. — /. JJ. II. 



F , lg ", 1 i 1 ba ^ e ° f tube of ^P ath e laid open, inflorescence and peduncle: 2, male 
part ot the inflorescence ; 3, anther; 4, ovary ; 5, the same bisected, showing 
the ovules : — all enlarged. h 



W4I 




MS delJU.Fitohlith 



VincenLBroo>a Bay JiSonLtMno;- 



I. P.eove &. C° London. 



Tab. 7941. 
MELALEUCA uncinata. 

Native of Temperate Australia. 

Nat. Ord. Myrtace.e. — Tribe Leptospeume.*. 
Genus Melaleuca, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Flant. vol. ii. p. 705.) 



Melaleuca (Capitatas) uncinata; frutex erectna rarnia gracilibus, ramnlis 
junioribus aericeo-pubescentibus, foliis sparsis 1-4-poll. iongis sessilibus 
iVre filiformibns teretiuaculis pallide viridibus apicibus subulatis recurvia 
rarius obtusis Ibrunneis, floribus minutisincapitula parva axillaria sessilia 
globosa densissime congestis, bracteis ovato-Janceolatis acuminatis ^ poll. 
Iongis caducis, bracteolis late obloDgis, calycis hemispherici tubo vix 
•jV poll, longo sinuato-5-dentato, petalis orbicularibus parvis staminibua 
crescentibus disjunctis et provectis, stamiuum j)tialangis ad \ poll. Iongis, 
filamentis 5-7, ovario hirsuto superiore, stylo gracili flexuoso basi in- 
crassato, capitulis fructiferis ad % poll. diam. globosis, capsulis compactis 
angulatis truncatis. 

M. uncinata, R. Br. in Ait. Hort. Kew. ed. 2, vol. iv. p. 414. DC. Prodr. vol. iii. 
p. 213. Sckau. in Lehm. Fl. Preiss. vol. i. p. 138. Benth. Ft. Austral. 
vol. iii. p. 150. Bail. Queensland Fl. p. 602. 

M. hamata, Field. & Gard. Sert. PL t. 74. 

M. Drummondii, Sckau- I. c. 138. 

M. semiteres, Scliau. I. c. p. 143. 



Of the large Australian genus Melaleuca, numbering 
ninety-seven species in Bentham's " Flora Australiensis " 
(since increased to upwards of a hundred), M. uncinata is 
one of the only three which inhabit both Eastern and 
Western Australia. It has indeed a wider distribution 
within Australia than any of its congeners, namely, New 
South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, and Western 
Australia, advancing northward in the latter colony to the 
Murchison River, and in New South Wales to the Lachlan 
River, but apparently does not cross the Blue Mountains 
to the eastward. It has also been collected in Queensland 
by Mueller, according to Bailey's " Queensland Flora," and 
in King's Island, Bass Strait, but not in Tasmania. It seems 
natural to attribute this most remarkably wide dispersion 
for an Australian shrub to the hooked tips of the leaves. 
The genus is all but confined to Australia, and nearly two- 
thirds of the species are restricted to Western Australia. 
One of the few tropical species, M. Leucadendron, Linn., 

February 1st, 1904. 



is found in the Malayan Archipelago, and as far North- 
west as Southern Burma. It is also cultivated in India, 
and yields the Cajuput oil of commerce. 

The plant figured was raised from seed taken from 
herbarium specimens in 1896, collected by the Elder 
Exploration Expedition (1891-2) from South Australia 
through the Victoria Desert into Western Australia. Ifc 
iiowered in the Temperate House in April, 1902. There 
are many ornamental species of Melaleuca, though few are 
so brilliant as those of the allied genera Gallistemon and 
Calothamnus. Only five have previously been figured in 
the Magazine, the last being M. Wilsoni (t. 6131). The 
history of the cultivation of the genus at Kew is singular. 
In 1789 there was only one species in the garden (Aiton, 
Hortus Keivensis). By 1812 (Ilortus Keivensis, ed. 2) the 
number had increased to twenty-four. In 1850, as Mr. 
Watson informs me, there were only five species, and now 
there are thirty. 

M. uncinata was first raised at Kew in 1803, from seed 
sent home by Peter Good, who accompanied Robert Brown 
on Flinders's voyage, and died at Sydney, N.S. Wales, in 
1803. It is noteworthy in the genus for having a free or 
superior ovary. 

Descr. — A dwarf, erect shrub, with slender branches, 
silky-pubescent when young. Leaves scattered, one to 
four inches long, sessile, terete, very slender, pale green, 
tips hard, sharp, recurved. Floivers minute, pale yellow, 
clustered in small, axillary, sessile, dense, globose heads. 
Jiracts ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, a quarter of an inch 
long, caducous. Bracteoles broadly oblong, villous. Calyx 
hemispliEerical ; tube minute; limb of five very short, 
rounded lobes. Petals very small, nearly orbicular, cilio- 
late, carried up and thrown off by the unfolding stamens. 
Stamens in five bundles of five to seven each; filaments 
free to below the middle. Ovary hairy, free; style slender, 
glabrous. Capsules densely clustered, long, persistent.— 
J.D.H. r 



Fig. 1, tip of leaf; 2, bracteole ; 3, expanding flower, the petals on the top 
ot the unfolding stamens; 4, portion of flower kid open ; 5, petal ; 6, pistil ; 
7, portion of branch and head of fruit; 8, tube of calyx :— all but fi«*. 7 
evlaraed. ° 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 710, FEBRUARY, 1904. 



Tab. 7937.— LYSICHITUM CAMTSCHATCENSE. 
„ 7938.— BULPOPHYLLUM AURIC OMUM. 
„ 7939.— CORYDALIS WILSONI. 
„ 7940.— SAUROMATUM BREVIPES. 
„ 7941.— MELALEUCA UNCINATA. 



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%noeji±Broolcs Day olSonlt^Imp. 



Tab. 7942. 
OLDENBURGrIA arbuscula. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Mutisiace^b. 
Genus Oldenburg ia, Less. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 494.) 



Oldenbxjrgia Arbuscula; frutex robustissimns, arboriformis, usque ad 6 ped. 
altus, caule simplici usque ad 6 poll, crasso, foliis confertis subsessilibua 
patentibas crasse coriaceis rigidissimis obovatis vel oblongis 9-18 poll, 
longis 4-9 poll, latis integris basi cuneatis apice rotundatis junioribus 
densissime albo-lanatis supra cito glabrescentibus nitidisque venia 
primariis numerosis costiformibus, ramo florifero (interdum 2) subter- 
minali crasso rigidissimo densissime lanato 1-5- saepius 3-cepbalo erecto 
folia superaute foliis compluribus parvis oblon^is, breviter petiolatis acutis 
munito post fructescentiam deoiduo, pedunculis brevibus etiam foliiferis, 
capitulisamplis albo-purpureis, involucri bracteis numerosissimis multi- 
seriatis linearibus acutissimis rigidis basi dense albo-lanatis cetera glabris 
purpureis, florum alborum exteriorum corollis distincte bilabiatis labio 
exteriore 3-lobato labio interiore emarginato, interiorum corollis bipartitis 
segmentis revolutis, achaeniis gracilibus circiter semipollicaribus striatis 
glabris, pappi setis numerosis uniseriatis quam staminibus exsertia 
brevioiibus brevissime phimosis. 

O. Arbuscula, DG. Prodr. vol. vii. pp. 12 et 306 ; Mem. Gomp. t. 12. ffarv. et 
Sond. Fl. Cap. vol. iii. p. 512, excl. synon. North Gallery, Kew y pict. 403 
et 408. W. Wats, in Gard. Chron. vol. ii. 1903, p. 178, et vol. i. 1904, 
p. 9, f. 4. 

O. grandis, Baill. Hist. PI. vol. viii. p. 97, in nota, excl. synon. 



Oldenburgia is a genus of three known species, all native 
of South Africa, and comparatively local, inhabiting the 
mountains from Swellendam to Albany. It was named in 
memory of S. Oldenburg, a Dutchman, who accompanied 
F. Masson on his first journey collecting for Kew in 
1772-3. O. paradoxa, Less., on which the genus was 
founded in 1830 (Linnaea, vol. v. p. 252), is an almost 
stemless shrub, with a thick, woody rootstock. It has 
smaller flower-heads than 0. Arbuscula, and they are at 
first nestled close to the clustered leaves, but as the heads 
mature the peduncle elongates a foot or more, according 
to a note accompanying a specimen collected by Prof. 
MacOwan. Elongation of a fruit-bearing branch or stalk 
is not an uncommon occurrence, but such a very great 
prolongation is rare. One of the most remarkable in- 
stances of this phenomenon is exhibited by a slender, 
Makcii 1st, 1904. 



saprophytic orchid (Didymoplezris fallens), which in the 
flowering-stage is only about six inches high, but as the 
capsules ripen the pedicels elongate until they are often as 
long or longer than the whole plant was when in flower. 
In this case it would probably facilitate the dispersal of 
the seed.* 

The third species of Oldenburgia, 0. Papionum, DC, 
is figured in Hooker's " Icones Plantarum," t. 1723. 

The plant figured here was raised from seed collected 
and brought home from South Africa, in 1887, by Mr. W. 
"Watson, the Curator of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 
when he returned happily restored to health, which was 
the main object of his visit. As may be imagined, it has 
ever since been one of his pets, and it was a great 
satisfaction when the first flowers appeared in September 
last. 

0. Arbuscula inhabits the mountains of Uitenhage and 
Albany, and it is a specially striking feature in the vegeta- 
tion of the mountain sides and tops near Grahamstown, 
where it ascends to an altitude of 2,000 feet. 

Harvey and Sonder, in their work cited above, describe 
0. Arbuscula as a shrub or small tree, twelve to fifteen 
feet high, with a trunk one foot and a half in circum- 
ference, but all the collectors' notes that we have seen give 
no dimensions to equal these. Burchell, who was a most 
careful observer, describes it as " arbor nana, 2-4-pedalis, 
truncus 2-6 pollices crassus ; " therefore it should pro- 
bably have been two to five feet, though Mr. Watson has 
the impression that it sometimes attains a height of six 
feet. 

The Kew plant is still unbranched, and it has taken six- 
teen years to reach a height of about three feet. We have 
found no previous record of the species having flowered in 
Europe. But it was in cultivation at Kew as long ago as 
1873 — how much longer is uncertain, because we have 
not been able to trace the history of any previous 
introduction. 

It is not probable that Oldenburgia Arbuscula will ever 
become familiar in our gardens ; but it is a remarkable 



t. 28 



* See Journal of the Linnasan Society, " Botany," vol. xx. (1883), p. 308, 
28. 



plant, even in the Tribe Mutisiacea3, which includes many 
singular and beautiful forms. Kreupel-boom, meaning 
dwarf tree, is the Dutch name. The finest dried specimen 
we have seen is in the British Museum, and was collected 
by Francis Masson. 

Descr. — A very robust, tree-like shrub, three to six feet 
high. Stem simple, four to six inches thick. Leaves 
crowded, nearly sessile, spreading, very thick, coriaceous 
and stiff, obovate or oblong, six to eighteen inches long, 
and three to eight inches broad, entire, cuneate at the 
base, rounded at the top, younger ones covered with a 
dense white wool, upper surface soon becoming smooth 
and shining; primary veins numerous, prominent, and 
rib-like. Flowering-branch (sometimes there are two) or 
common peduncle, sub-terminal, thick, rigid, densely 
woolly, erect, bearing one to five, but usually three heads 
of flowers, and, as well as the peduncles proper, a 
number of small, oblong, shortly-stalked, acute leaves, 
deciduous after fruiting. Flower-heads large purple and 
white. Involucral bracts very numerous, in many series, 
linear and tapering into very fine points, hard, tough, 
clothed with a dense white wool at the base, thence 
glabrous and purple. Flowers white ; corolla of the outer 
ones distinctly two-lipped, with the outer lip three-lobed, 
inner lip notched ; corolla of the inner flowers bipartite, 
segments rolled up outwardly. Achenes very slender, 
cylindric, about half an inch long, striate, glabrous ; 
pappus-bristles numerous, uniseriate, shorter than the 
exserted stamens, very shortly plumose. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, an outer flower; 2, a bristle of the pappus; 3, an anther; 4, upper 
part of atyle and stigma from the same; 5, an inner flower; 6, anther; 
7, upper part of Btyle and stigma, from the same : — all enlarged ; 8, plant 
about i of natural size. 



7943 




M. S .del. J -N. Btdvifti. 



Vincent Br o oils D : iy & S OIL Lt^lm? 



Tab. 7943. 
TANAK^EA badioans. 

Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Saxifeagacb^:. — Tribe Saxifrages. 
Genus Tanak^a, Franch. et Savat. Snwm. PI. Jap. vol. ii. p. 352. 



TanaKjEa radlcans; herba dioica, vel fortasse interdnm monoica, exigua, 
modesta, scaposa, stolonifera, stolonibus gracilibus foliiferia radicantibus, 
foliis longe petiolatis crassis subcarnosisdemum coriaceis cum petiolo 4-8 
poll. longis oblongo-lanceolatis vel ovato-lanceolatis basi rotundatia vel 
subcordatis apice acutis, utrinque parce setulosia demum glabrescenti- 
bns subduplicato-serratis, scapis gracillimia pyramidatim ramosia 6-7 
poll, altis parce mhiuteque setulosia, braeteia primariis linearibus acutis 
1^-3 lin. longis, floribus minimis breviter pedicellatis, bracteia calycem 
ajquantibus, sepalia 5 obloDgo*lanceolatis circiter J lin. longis fere liberis, 
petalis nullis, fl. $ staminibus 10 alternis brevioribns filamentis filiformi- 
bus sepala dimidio excedentibus, antheria unilocularibus, gynascei 
rudimento minuto, fl. <j? staminibus rudimentariis nullis, ovario glabro 
fere omniDo libero 2-loculare, sty lis 2 divergentibus, ovulis numerosis, 
capsula ignota. 

T. radicans, Franch. et Savat. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. i. (1875) p. 144 (ubi nomen 
tanium et ephalmate Tanakea), et op. cit. vol. ii. p. 352 {ubi descriptio et 
nomen emendatum) . Honzo Zufu, vol. xxxvi. t. 23. Somoku Zusetsu, 
vol. viii. t, 17 (18 (japonice). Few Hand-list Herb. PL ed. 2, 1902, 
p. 1127. Fngler & Prantl Natiirl. Pflanzenf. vol. iii. 2, A. pp. 48 et 49. 
Hemsl. in The Garden, vol. Ixiii. (1903) p. 334 Qard. Chron. 1903, 
vol. i. p. 269 (errore Janekea) et p. 288. 



Tanalcsea is a monotypic genus confined to Japan in a 
wild state, so far as our present knowledge goes; but 
exact localities are not given in the works cited. It was 
named after Yoshio Tanaka, a Japanese botanist and a 
member of the House of Peers. 

Our figure was prepared from a plant exhibited by 
R. H. Beamish, Esq., Ashbourne, Glounthaune, Cork, 
Ireland, at a meeting of the Koyal Horticultural Society, 
where it was awarded a Botanical Certificate. When I 
wrote the article in " The Garden," referred to above. 
I was under the impression that it was not at Kew in a 
living state; but, as Mr. "W. Irving, the Foreman of the 
Herbaceous Department, has informed me, a plant was 
presented to Kew by Mr. W. H. Stansfield, Nurseryman 

March 1st, 1904. 



of Southport, Lancashire, in 1899. It is still alive, and 
apparently healthy, although it is not very big ; and it 
produced a very small inflorescence in 1900. Since then 
it has not flowered. 

Tanakdsa radlcans is not one of those plants with a 
probable future in gardens, but it is highly interesting 
from a botanical standpoint. The individual plants bear 
only unisexual flowers, and the one depicted bore only 
female flowers; the inflorescence having the appearance of 
a miniature Astilbe japonica. The figure in the " Honzo 
Zufu" represents a male plant, having runners like those 
of the strawberry plant. The figure in the " Zomoku 
Zusetsu " is of a female plant with an enlarged male 
flower by its side, which is reproduced in our plate. 

Franchet and Savatier, in the place cited above, give no 
locality for Tanaksea, and the only specimen in the Kew 
Herbarium is from the Science College, Imperial Univer- 
sity of Japan. It is labelled " Mt. Amagi, Prov. Idn." 
I have not been able to fix this locality, and the 
transliteration may not be correct. 

The genus Tanalcsea is most nearly related to Leptar- 
rhena pyrclifolia, R. Br., a native of North America and 
Kamtschatka, which it strongly resembles in foliage, but it 
differs essentially in floral structure. 

Descr. — A lowly, dioecious, or perhaps sometimes monoe- 
cious, scapose herb, producing runners similar to those of 
the strawberry-plant. Runners very slender. Leaves 
petiolate, thick, almost fleshy, at length coriaceous, in- 
cluding the petiole four to eight inches long; blade 
oblong-lanceolate or ovate-lanceolate, rounded or some- 
what cordate at the base, acute, spariugly setulose 
on both surfaces, doubly serrulate. Scapes exceedingly 
slender, branched, pyramidal, six or seven inches high. 
Brads at the base of the branches linear, acute, one and a 
half to three lines long. Flowers exceedingly small, 
greenish white, shortly stalked, solitary in the axils of 
bracts of about the same length as the calyx. Sepals five, 
almost free, oblong-lanceolate, about a quarter of a line 
long. Petals none. Male flowers : stamens ten, alternate 
ones shorter; filaments filiform, twice as long as the 
sepals ; " anthers one-celled ; " rudimentary ovary minute. 



Female flowers : rudimentary stamens none ; ovary glabrous, 
almost entirely free, two-celled; styles two, divergent; 
ovules numerous. Seed-vessel unknown. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, a male flower, copied from the " Zomoku ZuBetsu; " 2, rudimentary 
gynaeeenm, from the same source; 3, branch of a female inflorescence; 4, a 
female with some of the sepals removed; 5, vertical section of the ovary: — 
all enlarged. 



7dU 




M.S.ddJ.Ni^t2h£*. 



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Tab. 7944. 
KIRENGESHOMA palmata. 

Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Saxifragace,e. — Tribe Hydra\ge/E. 
Genus Kirexgeshoma, Yatabe, Bot. Mag. Tokyo Bot. Soc. vol. v. p. I. 



Kirengeshoma palmata ; herba peremiis, compacta, in horto kewensi culta 
circiter 2-pedalis, in sylvia indigenis 3-4-pedalis, caulibus graciliusculis 
glabris purpureis, foliis papyraceis prater superiora petiolatis cordato- 
rotundatia palmatilobatis utrinque pilis brevibus rigidis appressia in- 
structs caulinis saspius oppositis inferioribus 7-10-Jobatis interdum 6-7 
poll, diametro petioliB 9-10 poll, longia sursum gradatim minoribus 
supreinis sessilibus Ianceolatis omnium lobis acutis grosse dentatis, 
pedunculis axillaribus terminalibusque saapissime trifloris folia super- 
antibus, bracteis linearibus acutis 2-4 lin. longis/pedicellis calycibusque 
pubernlia, floribus luteis campanuliformibus ljj-lf poll, diametro sub- 
nutantibus, calyce bemisphserico circiter 5-6 lin. diametro 5-dentato 
dentibus snbacutis, petalis 5 liberis crassinsculis fragilibus oblongo- 
lanceolatis supra medium recnrvis sinistrorsum contorto-imbricatis, 
staminibus 15 triseriatis petalis basi adnatia sei - iei exterioris longioribus 
quam petalis brevioribus, seriei interioris brevioribus, filamentiB filiformi- 
bus, antberis bilocularibus fissuris longitudinalibus dehiscentibus, 
ovario temisupero glabro triloculari (vel interdum quadriloculari, 
Yatabe}, loculis multiovulatis stylis glabris fere a basi liberis inclusia, 
capsula loculicide dehiscente stylis persistentibus divaricatis coronata, 
seminibus numeroais planis oblique alatis, embryone recto in albuminis 
carnosi axe, cotyledonibua ovatis radiculam teretem ajquantibus. 

K. palmata, Yatabe in Bot. Mag. Tokyo Bot. Soc. vol. v. (1590), no. 46, p. 1, 
t. 18 ; Iconogr. Fl. Jap. vol. i. (1891), p. 5, t. 2 (icon et descriptio Tok. Bot. 
Mag. ibi iterata). W. Wats, in Gard. Chron. vol. ii. 1903, p. 187. W. 
Irv. in The Garden, vol. ii. 1903, p. 245, cum figura plantoe kewensis in 
situ. Engl, in Engler & Prantl Naiiirl. Pfianze7if. Nachtr. p. 180. 



Kirengeshoma is, we believe, the first genus founded by 
a Japanese Botanist that has been figured in this Maga- 
zine ; and it may be news to some of our readers that 
botanical work has been conducted in Japan for some 
years past on the same lines as in western countries. 
Most branches, too, have attained an equally high position. 
Both descriptive and illustrative work is excellently done, 
and descriptions of new plants are published in Latin or 
in one of the leading European languages, as well as in 
Japanese. 

This genus was first published in the " Botanical 
Magazine of Tokyo. " The name is compounded of the 

March 1st, 1904. 



Japanese words : hi, yellow, and rengeshoma, the name of 
Anemonopsis macrophylla, Sieb. & Zucc. ; but it is de- 
sirable that this example should not be followed. Similar 
compounds in European languages are generally regarded 
as inadmissible ; but Dr. Yatabe had a precedent, though 
not a parallel, in Aucuba, a Japanese name adopted by a 
European botanist. 

Dr. R. Yatabe discovered this plant in flower, in 1888, in 
open woods, at an elevation of over 5,000 feet, on Mount 
Ishizuchi, in the province of Iyo, and in 1890 Mr. E. 
Yoshinaga sent him seeds from the same locality. As we 
learn from Mr. Watson's note in the " Gardeners' 
Chronicle," Dr. Yatabe sent seeds to Kew in 1891, from 
which, however, only one plant was raised. " This," he 
adds, " has been grown for ten years or so in a rather 
moist, sunny situation in the rock-garden, and it has now 
and then made an attempt to flower, but from some cause 
or other it has never revealed its true character until this 
year. Probably the excessive wet and other peculiarities 
of weather may have suited. At any rate it has made 
strong stems two feet high." It flowered freely in Sep- 
tember and October, though some of the flowers fell before 
attaining full expansion, and it is certainly a very distinct 
and attractive plant. But it evidently has not yet found 
the most favourable conditions at Kew, as it grows three 
to four feet high in its native woods. The reduced figure 
in " The Garden " gives a good idea of its habit. 

It is a noteworthy event the figuring of two mono- 
typic genera of the same natural order, from the same 
country, in the same number of the Magazine. And 
it emphasizes the richness of the Japanese flora as com- 
pared with the British flora, 

Descr.—A compact, perennial herb, about two feet high, 
as grown at Kew. Stems slender, glabrous, purple. 
Leaves papery, except the uppermost stalked, rotundate- 
cordate, palmately lobed, beset with rigid, appressed hairs 
on both surfaces, cauhne mostly opposite, lower ones seven- 
to ten-lobed, sometimes six to seven inches in diameter, 
with petioles nine to ten inches long, smaller upwards, 
uppermost sessile, lanceolate; lobes of all acute, coarsely 
toothed. Peduncles axillary and terminal, usually three- 
flowered, overtopping the leaves. Bracts linear, acute, 



two to four lines long. Pedicels and calyx puberulous. 
Flowers yellow, campanulate, one and a half to one and 
three quarters of an inch in diameter, more or less nodding. 
Calyx hemispherical, about five or six lines in diameter, 
five-toothed. Petals five, free, thick, brittle, oblong- 
lanceolate, recurved above the middle, contorted in aestiva- 
tion, overlapping to the left. Stamens fifteen, in three 
series ; outer series longest, shorter than the petals ; inner 
series shortest; filaments filiform; anthers two-celled, 
dehiscing longitudinally. Ovary half-superior, three- 
celled (or sometimes four-celled, Yatabe), glabrous ; cells 
many-ovuled ; styles glabrous, filiform, free to the base, 
included. Capsule dehiscing loculicidally, crowned by 
the persistent, spreading styles. Seeds numerous, flat, 
obliquely winged ; embryo straight in the axis of the 
fleshy albumen; cotyledons ovate, about as long as the 
terete radicle. — W. B. H. 



Fig- 1> gynseceura and part of calyx ; 2, a petal and adherent stamens ; 
3 and 4, anthers ; 5, cross-section of ovary ; 6, vertical section of the same : — 
all enlarged. 



1945 




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V^centBrocksPay &.SoruLt d feP 



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Tab. 7945. 
SOLANUM GLAUcopnyLUjM. 

Native of South Brazil and Uruguay. 

Nat. Ord. Solanacb*. — Tribe Sola.ne.e. 
Genus Solanum, Linn.-, {Benth. et Huolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 888.) 



Solanum glaucophyllum ; frutex erectus, pluricanlis, usque ad 6 ped. altns, 
fere omnino glaber, caulibus rectis subsimplicibus glaucis, ramulis frnoti- 
feris demum rubescentibus, internodiis quam foliis multoties brevioribus, 
foliis deciduis petiolatis crassiusculis glaucis lineari-Ianceolatis ssepins 
cum petiolo 4-8 poll, longis utrinque attennatis acatis venis immersis 
inconspicuis, floribus roseo-purpureis circiter 1 poll, diametro in cymas 
laterales laxas 5-6 poll, latas dispositis, braeteis minutis cito deciduis, 
pedicellis graciliasculis curvatis, calycis parvi lobis rotnndatis apiculatis 
ciliolatis, corollse subcampannlatse lobis ovatis apiculatis incurvis extus 
leviter pnberulis, antheris aurantiacis pulverulentis, ovario glabro, stylo 
stamina eeqnante, fructu oblongo-ovoideo 9-10 lin. longo purpureo- 
violaceo. 

S. glaucophyllum, Desf. Gat. Sort. Par. ed. 3 (1829), p. 396. 

S. glaucum, Dun. in DC. Prodr. vol. xiii. (1852), pars 1, p. 100. Bertol. Afise 
Bot. vol. xii. p. 46. Belg. Jloriic. vol. iii. (1853), p. 165, cum jig. color. 
Bettfreund, Fl. Argent, vol. iii. t. 152. 

S. glaucophyllum et S. glaucum, hortulanorum, fide Dun. in DO. Prod. loc. 
cit. 



Solanum glaucophyllum was cultivated in Paris three- 
quarters of a centurj- ago, and it was described, though 
not very fully, by Desfontaines, in the publication referred 
to above. Duna], when preparing his monograph for the 
" Prodromus," seems to have been unaware that a descrip- 
tion of the plant had appeared, and chose the shorter of 
two names then current in gardens. 

A year later Prof. Ch. Morren figured and described it 
in the " Belgique Horticole," where he attributes its intro- 
duction, in 1833, to the botanist Gaudichaud ; but most 
probably it was originally introduced by Auguste de Saint- 
Hilaire, who travelled in South America between 1816 and 
3821, and was apparently the first to discover this species. 
The only wild specimen in the Kew Herbarium is of his 
collecting, and from Uruguay. It is also recorded from 
South Brazil and the Argentine Republic. 

It is singular that such a very attractive Solanum should 
have scarcely become known outside of botanic gardens 

Makcu 1st, 190i. 



during the long period it lias been cultivated. Morren 
describes it as one of the most beautiful and most elegant 
species of this large genus, " which may be cultivated in 
the open air.*' He probably meant during the warmer 
months, though he adds that it is an ornament in our 
gardens throughout the whole year. It certainly looks 
like a plant that would repay careful cultivation. Another 
species, which has proved an excellent roof-climber for 
the conservatory or greenhouse, is S. Wendlandi, Hook. f. 
(B. M. t. b,914) and deserves mention here. 

The history of the plant figured is unknown, but 
the species has been in cultivation at Kew for many 
years, and it flowers and fruits annually in the Temperate 
House. 

Descr. — An erect, almost wholly glabrous shrub. Stems 
numerous, straight, usually almost unbranclied, glaucous; 
fruiting branches tinged with red. Internodes many times 
shorter than the leave3. Leaves deciduous, petiolate, 
rather thick, glaucous, linear-lanceolate, usually four to 
eight inches long, tapering to both ends; venation im- 
mersed and inconspicuous. Flowers rose-purple, with 
orange-yellow anthers, about an inch in diameter, arranged 
in loose, lateral cymes, five to six inches across. Bracts 
very small, and early deciduous. Pedicels rather slender, 
curved. Calyx small; lobes rounded, apiculate, ciliolate. 
Corolla broadly campanulate ; lobes ovate, apiculate, in- 
curved, very slightly hairy on the outside. Anthers 
pulverulent. Ovary glabrous; style not exceeding the 
stamens. Fruit oblong-ovoid, about three-quarters of an 
inch long, purple-violet. Seeds flattened, kidney-shaped, 
about a quarter of an inch long, finely reticulated.— 
W.B.H. 5 J 



„ Fig. 1, calyx and gjnaeceum; 2 and 3, anthers; 4, ovary and disk 
5, iruitmg-branch ; 6 and 7, seed :— all except 5 and 6 enlarged. 



idn 




M.S.4el,J.N.EftcKlitK 



VmcervtBrools.Day^San ^^ 



Tab. 7946. 
MEGACLINIUM platyrhachis. 

Native of British Central Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Orchidace.*. — Tribe Epidendrea. 
Genus Megaclinium, Lindl.; (Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 505.) 



Megaclinitjm platyrhachis ; inter species bucusque cognitis rhacbis amplitu- 
dine insignia; rbizomate crasso lignoso, pseudobulbis spams oblongo- 
ovoideis acute 5-vel 6-angulatis 2-3 poll, longis bifoliatis, basi squamis 
paucis dimidio brevioribus instructis, foliis crassis oblongis obtusis 5-6 
poll, longis eveniis, scapis basilaribus solitariis, pedunculo tereti 
circiter semi-pedali erecto bracteis vel squamis paucis ocreiformibua 
oblique truncatis ornato, rhachi luteo-viridi albo-brunneo-punctulata 
valde complanata loriformi (medio incrassata utrinque alata) undulata 
crenulata utrinque secus medium florifera per antbesin gradatim evo- 
luta perfecta circiter 1 ped. longa et medio l^poll. lata plus minnsve 
tortili apice acuminata basi attenuate, bracteis triangnlaribus acutis 
circiter 3 lin. longis et inter se 4 lin. distantibus primum supra flores 
arete appressis deinde arete retroflexis, floribus in rhacbe utrinque 
uniseriatisnumerosis luteo-viridibus pnnctis brnnneo-pnrpureis conspersis 
circiter 6 lin. diametro in bractearuin axillis solitariis subsessilibus 
a basi versus apicem ordinatim evolutis retroflexis ad rhachem respicien- 
tibup, sepalis ovato-lanceolatis acutis dorsali longiore, petaliB sepalia 
similibus sed minoribus, labello cum pede columnae articulato crasso 
carnoso linguiformi recurvo margine infra medium minute papilloso- 
fimbrillatolobis lateralibus parvis, columna brevi basi lata biauriculata. 

M. platyrbacbis, Rolfe in Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. vii. p. -43 ; Orch. Rev. vol. xi. 
(1903), p. 284. 

Lindley founded the genus Megaclinium on M. falcatum 
in 1826 (Bot. Reg. t. 989). This was sent from Sierra 
Leone to the Horticultural Society of London by George 
Don, in 1822, and it was some years before a second 
species became known. Now already twenty-five species 
are on record from tropical Africa, two or three from 
extratropical S. Africa, and one has been reported from 
Madagascar. In floral structure Megaclinium offers no 
constant difference from Bulbophyllum, but the dorsal 
sepal is usually longer than the lateral ones, and the 
genus is always easily recognized by the flattened axis of 
the inflorescence, which suggested the generic name. It 
is a remarkable fact that the flowers face the rhachis, in 
other words, open towards it in a downward direction. 

The other species figured in the Magazine are M. maxi- 
mum, Lindl., in part (t. 4028) = M. Lindleyi, Rolfe; 
March lsi, 1904. 



M. purpuratum, Lindl. (t. 5936)= M. maximum, Lindl., 
on the authority of Mr. Rolfe; and M. minutum, Rolfe 
(t. 7314), the smallest of the genus. M. platyrhachis is 
the largest, though perhaps not the most attractive species. 

The plant figured was received at Kew from Zomba, 
British Central Africa, in 1899. It begins to flower in 
July, and the same inflorescence, Mr. Watson states, goes 
on flowering for three months. 

Descr. — Readily distinguished by the large size of the 
flattened axis of the inflorescence. Rhizome thick, woody. 
Bulbs produced at intervals, oblong-ovoid, acutely 5- or 
6-angled, two to three inches long, two-leaved, invested to 
the middle by large, brown, acute scales. Leaves thick, 
oblong, obtuse, five to six inches long ; veins immersed, 
inconspicuous. Scapes from below the bulbs, solitary ; 
peduncle terete, erect, about six inches long, furnished 
with a few closely sheathing, obliquely truncate bracts ; 
rhachis greenish-yellow, spotted with white and brown, 
finally changing to a red-brown, verymucli flattened, strap- 
shaped, undulate, crenulate, lengthening during the flower- 
ing period, bearing flowers in one row on each side, fully 
developed about a foot long, and an inch and a half broad 
in the middle, more or less twisted, acuminate, tapering to 
the base. Bracts triangular, acute, about three lines long 
and about four lines apart, at first closely covering the 
flower-buds, then closely recurved on to the rhachis. 
Flowers numerous, yellowish green, about half an inch in 
diameter, thickly spotted with purple brown, in lines along 
the lateral sepals, about half an inch in diameter, solitary and 
nearly sessile in the axils of the bracts, opening successively 
from the base of the rhachis upwards, strongly reflexed 
and facing the rhachis in a downward direction. Sepals 
ovate-lanceolate, acute, dorsal longer than the lateral. 
Petals similar to the sepals, but smaller. Labelhim hinged 
to the foot of the column, thick, fleshy, tongue-shaped, 
recurved, margin minutely papillose or fringed below the 
middle; lateral lobes very small. Column short, broad 
at the base, two-winged or auricled at the sides. — 
17. B. H. 



Fig. 1, a flower; 2, the same from which the sepals and petals have been 
removed ; 3, anther-cap ; 4 and 5, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



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Tab. 7942.— OLDENBURGIA ARBUSCULA. 
„ 7943.— TANAKiEA RADICANS. 
„ 7944.— KIREXGESHOMA PALMATA. 
„ 7945.— SOLANUM GLAUCOPHYLLUM. 
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/kC^Lon-i 



Tab. 7947. 
ARUNDINARIA Faloonem. 

Native of the Temperate Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Gkamixe^s. — Tribe Bambuses:. 
Conns Artjndinaria, Mich.; (Benfh. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant vol. iii. p. 1207.) 



Abundinakia Faleoneri ; culmis perennibus gracilibus ad 30 ped. altis olivaceo- 
viridibus versus internodiorum basin plerumque purpurascentibus. 
foliis imperfectis vaginis apice breviter attenuatis in marginibus convexis 
minute ciliolatis glabriB vel primo pilosis iutus snpra medium venis 
transversis prominulis notatis purpurascentibus ligulis brevissimis trnn- 
catis laminis pavvis angustis, foliis perfectis vaginis angustis arctis ligulis 
brevibus rotundato-truncatis laminis lanceolatis acuminatis 2|- 3 poll, 
longis 3~| poll, latis lsete viridibus glaberrimis dense tenuiterque striatis 
venis transversis vix nllis, inflorescentiis in culmis foliis destitutis pani- 
culato-fasciculatis, spiculis in racemos basi bracteis suffultos secundum 
ramulos solitarios vel fasciculatos collectis unifloris 1 poll, longis, 
rbacbilla in setam producta, glumis subsequalibus inferiore 1-3-nervi, 
superiore plerumque 5-nervi spieuke dimidium magis minusve sequantibas, 
valva (gluma florente) prominenter 7- vel sub-9-nervi superne ciliata, 
palea valvam cequante vel superante superne in carinis ciliata prominenter 
nervosa, antheris purpureis. 

A. Faleoneri, Gamble in Ann. Bot. Gard. Calc. vol. vii. p. 20. 

A. falcata, Riviere in Bull. Soc. d'Arclim. 3me b6t. vol. v. (1878) p. 791-797, 

fig. 60-62, non Nees. 
A. nobilis, Mitford, The Bamboo Garden, p. 178-180. 
Thamnocalamus Faleoneri, Munro in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. (1868) p. 34. 



This Bamboo has been in cultivation in Europe ever since 
1847, when Ed. Madden, then a Captain in the Bengal 
Artillery, and an enthusiastic explorer of the North- 
western Himalaya, forwarded a quantity of seed to Sir 
William Hooker. It was collected by him on the Upper 
Pindari Eiver, North-west Kumaon, in September, 1846, 
and was supposed to be the seed of Arundinaria falcata, 
Nees. Under this name it was soon introduced, mainly 
through Van Houtte's establishment at Ghent, into 
the parks and gardens of western Europe, the Riviera 
and Algeria, and into the greenhouses of the climatically 
less favoured parts of Europe. It first flowered in Europe 
in 1875-1877 ; 1876 being the year when its flowering was 
almost universal, and when it flowered at Kew. In the 
Himalaya it ranges from Kumaon to Sikkim at altitudes of 
8000-10,000 feet, and it is perfectly hardy in the maritime 
parts of western Europe, the Riviera and Algeria, forming 

Ami. 1st, 1904. 



tall clumps of great beauty. It seems to be monocarpic, 
dying after seeding. 

The specimen from which the drawing was made was 
communicated by J. C. Hawkshaw, Esq., of Hollycombe, 
Liphook, Hants, where five or six plants, all originally 
taken from one, flowered last spring. The sheath or 
"imperfect leaf," however, was added from a specimen 
at Kew, received as A. nobilis from Lord Eedesdale. 

A more complete account of the introduction of this 
bamboo, and the characters distinguishing it from A.falcata, 
Nees, with which it has long been confused, will be 
published in the Gardeners' Chronicle. 

Descr. — Perennial, monocarpic. Calms slender, tallest 
thirty feet high, olive green, with a tinge of purple, par- 
ticularly towards the base of the internodes, without any 
waxy bloom. Imperfect leaves of the young culms more or 
less purplish, shortly attenuated at the upper end with 
convex, minutely ciliolate margins, otherwise glabrous, or 
soon glabrescent; transverse nerves raised on the inner 
side ; ligules short, truncate ; limb small, subulate. Perfect 
leaves lanceolate, acuminate, bright green, glabrous, 
usually edged with purple, contracted at the base into 
a short purplish petiole ; ligule short, rounded or truncate, 
purplish. Inflorescences on leafless culms, forming large, 
loose, compound panicles, bearing solitary racemes or 
clusters of racemes of spikelets on slender branches, each 
raceme being supported by several bracts, and resembling 
a 5-7-flowered spikelet. Spikelets about one inch long, 
one-flowered, with a bristle-like production of the rhachilla, 
bearing a rudimentary floret. Glumes about half the 
length of the spikelet, sub-equal, lower one- to three-, 
upper usually five-nerved ; valve (flowering glume) oblong- 
lanceolate, prominently seven- or nine-nerved, with ciliate 
margins near the tip ; pale as long as or longer than the 
valve, with the keels ciliate near the tip, and a pair of 
prominent nerves on each side between the keel and 
margin. Anthers purple. Lodicules ciliate. Style filiform, 
longer than the three plumose stigmas.— Otto Stapf. 

^ ¥i k 1 ». i ™P e , rfe ct leaf from a specimen cultivated at Kew ; 2, portion of the 
sheath of the leaf represented in fig. 1, inner side; 3, ligule of a perfect leaf; 
4, partial inflorescence consisting of six spikelets ; 5, spikelet; 6, upper glume; 
/.lower glume; 8, valve; 9, palea ; 10, anther; 11, lodicale ; 12^ pistil :— «Z? 
enlarged, except fig. 1. . . . 



7948 




M. S. del. J N.Fitchliflv 



VincantBrooloTiay ScSonLtSirey 



X Reeve <3tG?Londctn- 



Tab. 7948. 

ALOE Baumii. 

Native of South-west Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Liuaceje.— Tribe Aloine.*:. 
Genus Aloe, Linn,; (Benth. et HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii, p. 776.) 



Aloe Baumii) acaulis (fere acaulis Engl, et Gilg) foliis circiter 15-20 dense 
rosulatis lanceolatis patentissirais 9-12 poll, longis basi 2-2£ latis 5-6 lin. 
crassis apice in plantis cultia cito plus minusve marcescentibus supra 
planis maculis nnmerosis albidis oblongis longitudinalibnsornatis margine 
regulariter dentatis dentibus e basi lata rigidissimis corneis pungentibus 
fere rectis circiter 3 lin. longis inter se 4-6 lin. distantibus, scapo solitario 
erecto graciliusculo 3-5-pedali supra medium laxe simpliciterqne ramoso 
ramis 3-10 erectis laxifloris, bracteis herbaceis albidis lanceolato-caudatis 
sursum gradatim minoribus supremis pedicellis paullo longioribus, pedi- 
cellis vix 3 lin. longis, floribus rubro-coccineis (flavido-rubescentibus 
Engl, et Gilg.) 1-1£ poll, longis pendulis, perianthii tubo supra ovarium 
valde eonstricto lobis tubo brevioribus erectis (an semper?) interioribua 
latioribus omnibus subobtusis, staminibns styloque brevissime exsertis. 

A. Baumii, Engler & Gila, in Warburg (Baum's) Ktmene-Sambesi Exped. 
pp. 136, et i91-2, fig. 90. 



We are indebted to Sir Thomas Hanbury for the oppor- 
tunity of figuring this handsome dwarf Aloe. Excellent 
specimens were sent to Kew by Mr. A. Berger, his 
enthusiastic gardener, together with notes, and a photo- 
graph of the plant, as growing in the beautiful gardens 
of La Mortola. This was in November of last year, and 
in the previous April specimens and a photograph of 
another plant were received from the same source under 
the name of A. hereroensis, Engl., of which also a drawing 
was made. At Kew we are unable to distinguish them 
specifically, but Mr. Berger maintains that they are 
different, and states, amongst other things, that the seeds 
are totally different. The seeds of A. hereroensis, he says, 
are among the smallest of the genus, and quite wingless, 
whereas those of A. Baumii are relatively large, and 
prominently winged. We have no seeds for comparison ; 
but Engler describes the perianth of his A. hereroensis as 
" perianthio supra ovarium haud eonstricto" and it is very 
decidedly constricted in the plant received under that 
name. In both of the cultivated plants the tips of the 
leaves are crippled and shrivelled ; those of the plant 
Apbil 1st, 1904. 



named A. hereroensis, crippled much earlier, and the leaves 
consequently very short. There is no crippling of the 
leaves in the figures of the wild plants of either of the 
species in question. 

Sir Thomas Hanbury obtained his plant from the Berlin 
Botanic Garden, whither it was sent by Mr. Baum, the 
discoverer, now Curator of the Botanic Garden at Rostock. 
In the narrative of Mr. Bauni's journey, as cited above, it 
is stated that this Aloe is extremely common, ranging from 
the Sheila mountains eastward to beyond the Kuito River 
in Angola ; that is between about 14° and 20° E. long., and 
about 16° to 18° S. lat. The plant photographed in the book 
named was at Chirumba, on the Kubango River, growing 
in sandy, gravelly soil, at an elevation of nearly 4,000 ft. 

The Kaffirs of Humbe, on the Kunene River, in the 
west, make cakes of the flowers of Aloe Baumii. They 
boil and press the flowers for this purpose ; but we are not 
told whether Europeans relish the said cakes. 

Descr. — Stemless or nearly so. Leaves from fifteen to 
twenty, densely rosulate, lanceolate, spreading, nine to 
twelve inches long, two to two and a half inches broad at 
the base, nearly half an inch thick, more or less shrivelled 
at the tip in the cultivated plants, upper surface flat, 
beset with whitish, oblong spots, margin regularly toothed; 
teeth almost straight from a broad base, very rigid, horny, 
sharp, about a quarter of an inch long, a quarter to half 
an inch apart. Scape solitary, erect, rather slender, three 
to five feet high, loosely, simply branched above the 
middle; branches three to ten, nearly erect; bracts her- 
baceous, dirty white, lanceolate, long-pointed, gradually 
smaller upwards, uppermost slightly exceeding the pedi- 
cels, about a quarter of an inch long. Flowers loosely race- 
mose, orange-red, one to one and a half inch long, pendulous. 
Perianth conspicuously constricted above the ovary ; lobes 
shorter than the tube, erect, inner ones broader, all 
somewhat obtuse. Stamens and style very shortly exserted. 
— W. B, H. J J 



Fig 1 and 2, anthers; 3, gynasceum :— all enlarged; 4, whole plant, as 
cultivated in bir 1 nomas Hanbnry's garden -.—about one-sixth natural size. 



7949 




M.5.ael J.NFitcKIitK 



\5ncent HrooteJJay *Son.Lt^fc¥ 



T - R — " P01 



Tab. 7949. 

CROSSOSOMA CALIFORNICUM. 
Native of California. 

Nat. Ord. DlXLENiACEiE. 
Genus Crossosoma, Nutt. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 15.) 



Chossosoma californicum ; frutex 3-4-pedalis, tortuoso-ramosus, fere undique 
gluber, pallide viridis, ramis graciliusculis, cortice amarissimo, internodiis 
brevibos, foliis alternis brevissime petiolatis exstipulatisdemum subcoria- 
ceis oblongo-lauceolatis maximis 3| poll, longis 1 poll, latis integris basi 
cuneatis apiceobtusis costaexcuv rente apiculatis venis immersis inconspi- 
cuis, floribus albis (antheris lateis) circiter 2 poll, diametvo ramulis ter- 
njinarjtibns solitariis, pedunculis brevibus, sepalis 5 basi connatis tabum 
hemispbEerieum formantibns, limbi lobis orbicularibus concavia imbricatia 
petalis mnlto brevioribus, petalis 5 perigyniis orbicularibus undnlatia 
breviter imguiculatis imbricatis, staminibus numerosis perigyniis 3-4- 
seriatis quani petalia multo brevioribus, filameutis brevissimis, antheris 
lougitudinaliter dehiscentibus, pistilli carpellis 3-6 basi in stipitem con- 
natis cetera inter se liberis biseriatim multiovulatis, stylis brevisairnia 
stigmatibus capitatis, fructus i'olliculis 1-6 maturescentibus recurvis 
maximis pollicaribus ventre dehiscentibus, seminibus numerosis reni- 
foruiibus arillo longe fimbrillato-multirido vestitis, testa crastacea nigra 
nitida, embryone clavato parvo leviter curvato in albumiue juxta hilum 
posito, radicuJa cotyledonibns paullo longiore. 

C. californicum, Nutt. in Journ. Acad. Philad. n.s. vol. i. (1847), p. I-j'K t. 22. 
Turr. U.S. Pacif. Railr. Rep. vol. iv. t. 1 (fig. 1 tantum). A. Gr. Synopt. 
Fl. N. Am. vol. i. p. 57. Rev. Hurt. 1902, p. 103. M. T. M. in Gurd. 
Chron. 1903, vol. ii. p. 130, fig. 50. Mngler in Engl. & Prantl Nattirl, 
Pjianzenf. Nachtr. vol. i. p. 185 (Crossosomatacea:). 



CYossosoma was founded by Nuttall on a specimen oi' 
the present species collected by Dr. W. Gambel in the 
Island of Santa Catalina, oft' the coast of California in 
about 33° N. lat. Much finer specimens were subsequently 
collected by Dr. E. Palmer and others in the far more 
isolated Guadalupe Island, off the coast of Lower California, 
in about 29° N. lat. A second species, 0. Bvjdowii, 
S. Wats., was published in 187(3, having previously been 
confused with 0. californicum by Torrey, and figured as 
such. It inhabits the mountains of the mainland of Cali- 
fornia. A third species, G. parviflora, Robins. & Fern., of 
more recent discovery, is a native of Sonora, North-west 
Mexico. 

The floral structure of Crossosoma is somewhat anoina- 

Avml lbX, 1904 



lous, and Nuttall compared it with Pseonia, adding that it 
might be regarded as the type of a new group, which he 
called the Crossosomeas. The late Dr. Asa Gray, writing 
to Dr. (now Sir Joseph) Hooker in 1859, says : " I told 
Torrey long ago I thought the plant was Dilleniaceous ; 
what do you say to it ? " Bentham & Hooker placed it 
doubtingly at the end of the Dilleniaceaa. Engler {pp. sup. 
cit.) treats it as the type of a new natural order, which 
he places between the Platauacese and Rosaceaa, laying 
great stress on the perigynous position of the petals and 
stamens. 

For my own part I can find no better place for it than 
the Dilleniaceae. In habit and flowers G. californicum is 
very much like some species of the Australian genus 
Ilibbertia; the follicular fruit is very similar to that of 
Dillenia subsessilis, Gilg, as figured in Engler & Prantl's 
" Natiirlichen Pflanzenfamilien," vol. iii. 6, p. 107, f. 56, 
and the fringed aril of the seed has an almost exact counter- 
part in Tetracera Assa, DC, figured in the same place. 

Again, the small embryo and relatively copious endo- 
sperm is a further bar to an alliance with the Rosacese. 

Exceptional perigyny occurs in so many natural orders 
that I attach less importance to it than the sum of the 
other characters. 

The specimen figured flowered in the garden of 
W. GumbletoD, Esq., at Belgrove, near Cork, in August 
of last year, and it is believed to be the first occasion of 
this shrub flowering in Europe. What the future of this 
plant may be in European gardens it is impossible to 
predict, but it is likely to prove a difficult subject. It 
should be placed in the driest, warmest and most open 
situation possible out-of-doors, but it would probably 
succeed better in a warm, rather dry conservatory. 

Descr.—A dwarf, tortuously-branched shrub, three to 
tour feet high, glabrous in nearly all parts; bark and 
leaves pale green. Branches slender; internodes short; 
bark very bitter. Leaves alternate, very shortly stalked, 
exstipulate, at length coriaceous, oblong-lanceolate, the 
largest three inches and a half long by one inch broad, 
entire, cuneate at the base, rounded at the tip with the 
midrib running out into a fine point, veins immersed, 
inconspicuous. Flowers white (anthers yellow), about two 



inches in diameter, solitary at the ends of the branches ; 
peduncles short. Sepals five, connate at the base, forming 
a hemispherical tube ; lobes of the limb orbicular, concave, 
imbricate, very much shorter than the petals. Petals five, 
perigynous, orbicular, wavy, shortly clawed, imbricate. 
Stamens very numerous, perigynous, in three or four 
series, much shorter than the petals ; filaments very short ; 
anthers dehiscing longitudinally. Pistil of three to six 
carpels, connate at the base on a common stalk, otherwise 
free ; styles very short ; stigmas capitate. Fruit follicular ; 
follicles one to six, recurved, the largest about one inch 
long, dehiscing by the inner or ventral suture. Seeds 
numerous, in two rows, reniform, enveloped in a fringed 
aril ; testa crustaceous, black, shining. Embryo small, 
clavate, slightly curved, immersed in the albumen near the 
hilum; radicle slightly longer than the cotyledons. — 
W. B. H. 

Fig. 1, tricarpellary pistil with part of calyx-tube and base of stamens ; 
2 and 3, stamens ; 4, fruit and persistent calyx ; 5, a seed enveloped in the aril ; 
6, the same divested of the aril : — all except 4 enlarged. 




1S50 



A J-N.Fjt.di.1iOv 



Vine ant, Br o aks,D ay &ScnvLt*lra]3 



1. Reeve &. C° London. 



Tab. 7950. 

CROTALARIA capensis. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Legtjminose^s. — Tribe Genisteje. 
Genus Cbotalakia, Linn. ; {Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 479.) 



Ckoialabia capen*i$; frutex ramosus, sempervirens, 3-6-pedalis, cito glabres- 
cens inter species africanas australes extratropicas stipularum obovata- 
mm amplitndine insignis, ramis gracilibus aericeo-puberulis, internodiis 
quam foliis niulto brevioribus, foliis trifoliolatis graciliter longeque 
petiolatis in speci minibus cultis cum petiolo usque ad 6 poll, longia sed 
nepius pra3cipue in specimiuibus sylvestvibus 1^-2 poll, longis, foliolis 
breviter petiolulatis papyraceis obovatis oblanceolatisve majoribus 2 poll, 
longis basi cuneatis apice rotundafcis simul apiculatis cito glabrescentibus, 
petiolo sericeo-pubescenti, stipulis foliaceis foliolis similibus sed minori- 
bus, racemis terminalibus folia superantibus circiter 7-15-floris, bracteia 
linearibus acutissimis pedicello dimidio brevioribus, pedicellis circitei' 
semipolliearibus calyceque parce puberulis, floribus suaveolentibus luteis 
striis rubescentibus variegatisdiametromaximo circiter sesquipoliicaribus, 
calycis tubo amplo subgloboso (totoque mellis pleno, fide Jacquin), lobis 
fere aequalibus ovato-lanceolatis acutis pateutibus 8-4 lin. longis, vexillo 
orbiculato apicolato reflexo circiter 1 poll, dianietro, alia parvis oblique 
ovatis, carina? falcataa longe rostratse petalia interne liberis superue 
connatis stamina et stylum includentibus, antheris omnibus basifixis, 
ovario stijritato puberulo multiovulato, stylo geniculato unilatei'a liter 
ciliato, legumine turgido pergameneo duro lasvi cum stipite circiter 2 J 
poll, longo clavato supra medium crassiore apice breviter rostrato, 
seminibus circiter 20 oblique reniformibus compressis circiter 2 liu. latis 
nitidis longiuscule f uniculatis. 

C. capensis, Jacq. Hort. Vindob. vol. iii. (1776-7), p. 36, t. 64. Harv. So Bond. 
Fl. Gap. vol. ii. p. 46. Melliss, St. Helena, p. 258. Wood, Natal PL vol. i. 
t. 92. 

C. arborescens, Lam. Encycl. vol. ii. p. 199. DO. Prudr. vol.ii. p. 130. Nuuv. 
Duham. vol. iv. t. 49. Rev. Hort. 1868, p. 11. 

0. incanescens, Linn. f. Suppl, (1781) p. 323. Ait. Hurt. Kei<\ ed. 1, vol. iii. 
p. 20. 

According to Aiton, this ornamental, free-flowering 
shrub was introduced into Kew Gardens by Masson, in 
1774; and N. J. Jacquin, who was the first to describe and 
figure it (1776) states that it was raised from seed sent 
from the Cape to Royen, without any information. Royen 
gave the seed to Jacquiu several years (" plures annos ") 
before the latter published his description, when it was 
already a branching shrub ten feet high, " . . . maximam 
partem anni floribus numerosis onustus." 

At-kil 1st, 1904. 



In spite of its attractions this shrub does not appear to 
have got into general cultivation in Europe ; but it was 
early introduced into the island of St. Helena and eastern 
extra-tropical South America, where it has become 
naturalized. There is a specimen in the Kew Herbarium 
from the Montpellier Botanic Garden taken in 1.821. 

Crotalaria capensis, Jacq., inhabits the south-eastern 
districts of Cape Colony, and extends northward to Natal. 
It is most nearly related to G. Natalitia, Meisn., which has 
distinctly angular branches and lanceolate stipules. 

The plant figured is growing in the Temperate House at 
Kew, where it flowers freely in the autumn. The pod 
figured is from a wild specimen, collected in Fish River 
Heights, Albany, in 1880, by H. Hutton. One of the 
seeds taken from the pod began to germinate after being 
a week in water. 

Descr. — A branching, evergreen shrub, five to ten feet 
high, but flowering when quite small, early glabrescent. 
Branches slender, at first clothed with a silky tomentum ; 
iuternodes usually much shorter than the leaves. Leaves 
alternate, petiolate, trifoliolate, in cultivated specimens 
sometimes as much as six inches long, usually smaller; 
leaflets shortly petiolulate, thin, obovate or oblanceolate, 
the largest two inches long, cuneate at the base, rounded 
at the tip, apiculate, soon glabrous. Stipules similar to 
the leaflets, but smaller. Racemes terminal, overtopping 
the leaves, seven- to fifteen-flowered ; bracts linear, very 
acute, about half as long as the pedicels ; pedicels about 
half an inch long, slightly puberulous as well as the calyx. 
Floivers fragrant, yellow, striped with red-brown, about an 
inch and a half in their greatest diameter. Calyx-tube 
almost globular (filled with honey, according to Jacquin) ; 
lobes nearly equal, ovate-lanceolate, acute, spreading, 
three to four lines long. Standard-petal orbicular, apicu- 
late, reflexed, about an inch in diameter; wing-petals 
relatively small, obliquely ovate; keel-petals strongly 
curved, beaked, free at the base, connate above, enclosing 
the stamens and style. Anthers all attached by the base. 
Ovary stalked, puberulous ; ovules numerous; style sud- 
denly curved upwards, hairy along the upper edge. Pod 
inflated, thin, hard, tough, glabrous, club-shaped, thicker 



above the middle, shortly beaked at the tip, including the 
stalk about two and a quarter inches long. Seech about 
twenty, distinctly stalked, obliquely kidney-shaped, about 
two lines broad, dark brown, shining. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1 portion of a branch; 2, calyx, stamens and pistil; 3, a wing-petal; 
4, a keel-petal ; 5 and 6, anthers ; 7, pistil with the ovary laid open ; 8, a pod 
—ail except 8 enlarged. *^ 



1951 




M- 5. del J.U"Fitdhli£k. 



Mincer a. Biro oks Day & SojLlt 4 Imj) 



iRe<?ve&C?I.anao 



Tab. 7951. 

DIPODIUM pictum. 

Native of Malaya. 

Nat. Ord. Orchidk*. — Tribe Vande.w. 
Genus Drpommr, R. Br. ; (Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 539.) 



DrPODlUM pictum ; herba perennis, canlescens, scandens, undique glaberrinia, 
"ad arborum truncos septem pedes altior"foliis snbcoriaceis crebre distichis 
pquitautibusque tricostatis cum nervis intermediis tenuioribus parte vagi- 
nante peisistente lamina lineari-lanceolata 0-12 poll, longa acuta ab vagina 
truncatim disjuncta, inflorescentiis axillaribus folia superantibus simplici- 
bus vel pauciramosis multifloris, pedunculo bracteis vel equamis paucis 
parvis ovatis instructo, racemo (vel panicula) laxo, pedicellis cum ovario 
circiter pollicai-ibus, floribus sanguineo-pnrpureo maculatis circiter 
2 poll, diametro, sepalis petalisque similibus oblongo-obovatis lan- 
ceolatisve obtusis 9-12 lin. longis, labello erecto ima basi columnre adnato 
sepalis sequiiongo trilobo, lobis lateralibus parvis dentiformibus, lobo 
intermedio amplo obovato apice rotundato basin versus attenuato supra 
basi apiceque et secus medium pilis longis crassis densissime vestito, 
columna intus basi pilosa, polliniis 2 ovatis sulcatis segregatim ope 
caudicularum glandule magnge affixis, caudiculis jione pollinia obtuse 
breviterqne productis. 

D. pictum, Reichb.f. Xenia Oreh. vol. ii. pp. 15 et 20, t. 107. Hook. f. Fl. Brit. 
Ind. vol. vi. p. 19. W. W. in Gard. Ghron. 19 03, vol. ii. p. 209. 

Wailesia picta, Lindl. in Journ. Hort. Soc. vol. it. (1849), p. 261. Paxt. Mag. 
Bot. vol. xvi. p. 321, cum ic. col. 

Wailesia rosea, Paxt. errore Beichb. f. Xenia Orch. vol. ii. p 20. Nichols. 
Diet. Gard, vol. iv. p. 191. 

Leopard an tbu-i scandens, Blume, Bump Ma, vol. iv. (1848), p. 47 ; Mux. Bot. 
Lugd.-Bat. vol. i. p. 47, fig. 15. 

Grammatopbvllum pcaudens, Griff. Notul. vol. iii. p. 345 ; Ic. PI. Asiat. t. 324 

Hydranthus scandens, Kuhl et Van Hasselt, ex Beie/ib.f. Xenia Orch. vol. ii. 
p. 20. _J 

Eight years ago a figure of Dipodium paludosum, Reiclib. 
f., appeared in the Magazine (tab. 7464), and the peculiarities 
of the genus were described, and its distribution given. 
There are leafless and leafy species, as the genus is 
defined in Bentham and Hooker's " Genera Plantarum ;" 
and the leafy species are remarkable amongst orchids 
having distichous, sessile leaves, for the disarticulation in 
the blade between two and three inches above their in- 
sertion. Herbarium specimens have the appearance of 
the leaves being clipped off, with the exception of a few of 
the upper ones. In living plants the position where 
disarticulation will take place is easily seen, as the leaf is 
of a darker green below than above the point. 

Records are not very precise, but from the incomplete 

April 1st, 1904 



notes of collectors, Dipodium pictum and D. paludosum 
start in the ground, and grow np against the trunks of 
trees ; the former to a height of at least seven feet. 
Whether in very open woods, or otherwise, we have not 
been able to find out. 

D. pictum was cultivated at Chatsworth by Paxton 
forty-five years ago, and he states that it was attached to a 
block of wood with a little sphagnum, and was suspended 
in the Orchid House, where it grew rapidly, and flowered 
in September and October. At Kew it is grown attached 
to a stump, in a pot, and the plant from which the drawing 
was made is now nearly two feet high. 

Brown does not explain why he chose the name Dipodium, 
literally, two-footed ; but there is little doubt it had re- 
ference to the two stalks of the pollinia, not to the 
two small lateral lobes of the lip, as explained by some 
writers. 

Descr. — A perennial, herbaceous plant. Stems weak, 
attaching themselves to the trunks of trees, sometimes as 
much as seven feet long. Leaves sheathing, closely dis- 
tichous, equitant, linear-lanceolate, six to twelve inches 
long, acute, three-ribbed, with thinner, intermediate nerves, 
sheathing part and about two inches above persistent, the 
rest of the leaf disarticulating in a truncate manner. 
Inflorescence axillary, simple or slightly branched, many- 
flowered, eighteen inches to two feet long ; peduncle about 
as long as the flowering part, furnished with a few small, 
scale-like bracts. Raceme or panicle loose ; pedicels, in- 
cluding ovary, about an inch long. Flowers coarsely 
blotched with crimson on a pale ground, about two 
inches in diameter. Sepals and petals similar, oblong- 
obovate or lanceolate, obtuse, nine to twelve lines long. 
TAp erect, adnate to the base of the column, as long as the 
sepals, three-lobed; lateral lobes very small and tooth- 
like ; intermediate lobe large, obovate, rounded at the tip, 
narrowed towards the base, densely clothed with coarse 
hairs on the upper surface at the base, in the terminal 
half, and along the middle. Pollinia two, separately 
stalked on the large gland ; stalks shortly produced behind 
above the point of attachment of the pollinia. — W. 13. IT. 

Fig. 1, lip and colnmn ; 2, lip detached; 3, column separately; 4 and 
5, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



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«W.N.EitcJLlitK 



VincantBrooksD^ &Sa-nLt a lmp 



1 .Reeve 8t C9 Lanarrrv 



Tab. 7952. 
EPIPREMjSTUM UIGANTEUM. 
Native of the Malayan Peninsula. 



Nat. Ord. Akoidejj. — Tribe Called. 
Genus EpipkbvxuM, Schott ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 993. 



EriFREMNUM giganteum; i'rutex glaber, robustus, ia arborum truueis alfce 
scandens, caulibus pauciraoiosis crassis radices validas usque ad 100 
ped. longas ad terram descendeutes emittentibus, foliis amplis crasse 
coriaceis durissimis cam petolis 0-8-ped. longis Is— 2-ped. hitis crebre 
distichis cordato-oblougia acuminatis integris venis transversis uumero- 
sissimis, petiolo alato crasso apice geniculate laminam fere sequaute 
amplexicauli, spathis solitariis axillaiibus subsessillibus crasse coriaceis 
iu siccis fere lignosis circiter pedalibus spadicem nxcedentibus per 
authesin medio taufcum apertis, spadice sessili cylindrico per totam 
longitudinem florifero, tioribus hermaphroditis vel paucis inferioribus 
femineis creberrimis, perianthio nullo, staminibus 4 quam gynaeoeo 
brevioribus, ovario crasso caruoso apice truueato uniloculari biovulato 
stigmate sessili lineari canaliculato, ovulis basalibus, frnotn ignoto. 

E. giganteum, Schotl in, Bonjjlandia, vol. v. 1857, p. 45; Prodr, Aroid. p. 389. 
Engl, in DC. Monogr. Phanerog. vol. ii. p. 240. Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. 
vol. vi. p. 548. 

Pothos giganteus, Ro,cb. Fl. Ind, vol. i. p. 434. 

Scindajisus giganteus, Schott in Schott et Eitdlieher, Meletem. vol. i. p. 21. 
Kuntli Enum. PI. vol. iii. p. 63. 

Monstera gigantea, C. Koch, ex Ender Index Aroid. p. 74. 



Epypremnum (jig ante am, Schott, was discovered by 
William Roxburgh, Superintendent of the Calcutta Botanic 
Garden from 1793 to 1814, in Prince of Wales Island, 
Penang, and was introduced and cultivated by him in the 
Calcutta garden. He described it under the name of 
Pothos giganteus, and it was published in his posthumous 
11 Flora Indica." It has therefore been in cultivation, 
more or less, for about a century ; but we believe its in- 
troduction into Europe is due to Mr. H. N. Ridley, 
Director of the Botanic Gardens, Singapore, who sent a 
plant of it to Kew in 1897. This plant is now a very 
striking object in the north-west angle of the Aroid 
House, where it flowered in June of last year. 

Roxburgh remarks that it was the stoutest of the 

May 1st, 1904- 



parasitic [sic] Aroideas that he had met with, and it is 
truly very robust and rigid. Its very thick, hard, un- 
divided leaves contrast unfavourably, from an ornamental 
standpoint, with the divided leaves of the allied Monstera 
deliciosa and Rhaphidophora decursiva in cultivation in 
the same house. The Asiatic and Polynesian genera 
Rhaphidophora and Epipremnum are exactly alike in 
vegetative characters, and the structural and morpholo- 
gical differences are not evident and constant. The 
former genus is described as having a two-celled ovary 
with several ovules attached to a central placenta, and the 
ripe berries as confluent ; whereas Epipremnum has a one- 
celled ovary with two basal ovules, and the ripe berries 
are free from each other. But the species of each genus 
present certain modifications of these characters, and Sir 
Joseph Hooker (« Fl. Brit. Ind.," vol. vi. p. 548) suggests 
that it would be better to unite them. The American 
genus Monstera differs from both in having exalbuminous 
seeds and a large embryo; otherwise it is very similar. 
M. Adansonii, Schott (B. M. t. 5086) is an example ; but it 
is somewhat surprising that no figure of the better known 
M dehciosa, Liebm. has ever appeared in the Magazine. 
This is perhaps the only member of the natural order 
bearing an edible fruit. 

Descr.— A climbing, glabrous, robust shrub, which 
attaches itself to the trunks of trees, and ascends, as 
nearly as possible, in a straight line. Stems often a 
hundred leet long, three or four inches or perhaps more in 
thickness, bearing few branches, emitting thick, rope-like 
roots from every growth, the uppermost ones descending 
to the earth, and sometimes a hundred feet long. Leaves 
large thick, coriaceous, rery hard, including the long 
petiole six to eight feet long, one and a half to two feet 
broad, closely two-rowed when attached to the trunks of 
trees, cordate-oblong, acuminate, entire ; petiole winged, 
thick kneed at the top with the blade, stem-clasping. 
Spathes solitary axillary, subsessile, thick, coriaceous, 
almost woody when dry, about one foot long, exceeding 
the spadix. Spadix sessile, cylindrical, floriferons through- 
out. Flowers crowded, hermaphrodite or a few of the 
lower ones female. Perianth none. Stamens four, shorter 



than the pistil. Ovary thick, fleshy, truncate, one-celled ; 
ovules two, basal; stigma sessile, linear, channelled 
Frmt unknown. — W. B. B. 



k™ g ; ' a q ° ?° werS h , om , the s P adix; 2 ' a flower > showing pistil and 
two stamens; 3 and 4, ventral and dorsal views of a stamen; 5, section of 
pistil, showing basal ovules; 6, an ovule; 7, sketch of the Kew plant, about 
rV of natural size -.—all other figures enlarged. ' 




M.S.&aj.NPjtahKai. 



"VincerLtBrooWDay-Sc Son Lt^fop 



L.R£eve&.C?I<mdc 



Tab. 7953. 
MARSDENIA Jmthurnii. 

Native of British Guiana. 

Nat. Ord. Asclepiaoacb/b.— Tribe Marsbenie,*. 
Genus Marsdenia, R. Br.-, (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 772.) 



Marsdenia Inithvrnii; fvutex alte volubilis, M. maculatse, Hook, et M. Bur- 
chelii, Fourn,, affinis, a priore foliis immaculatis, a posteriori floribus 
majoribus, pedicellis longioribns differt, canlibus teretibns primum 
appresse pubescentibus florigeris circiter 3 lin. diametro, internodiis quam 
foliis brevioribus, foliia oppositis longe petiolatis crassinsculis primum 
mollibus cordatis interdnm medio constrictis in ramis florigeris cum 
petiolo 6-9 poll, longis maximis 4 poll, latis abrnpte acuminatis utrinque 
prsecipue subtus primum appresse pubescentibus bullatis venis crassius- 
eulis snbtus elevatis, floribus purpureas 5-6 lin. diametro pubescentibus 
densissime cymoso-umbellatis, cymis axillaribus brevissime pedunculatis 
subglobosis l|-2 poll, diametro, pedicellis pubescentibus 2-3 lin. longis, 
calycis lobis 5 oblongis obtusis corolla? tubo saltern dimidio brevioribus, 
corollae extus pubescentis snbnrceolatse tubo lato limbi lobis longiore, 
lobis ovato-oblongis l-otundatis recurvis, corona? squamis 5 erectis 
crassis carnosis ovatis obtuse acuminatis quam staminibns brevioribus, 
polliniis oblongis erectis stipitatis, ovario bilocnlari mnltiovnlato, frnrtu 
ignoto. 

M, Tmtliurnii, Hems}. 

Like many other genera of the order Asclepiadacese, 
Marsdenia is not very well defined, but there is no doubt 
about the plant figured being a congener of M. maculata, 
Hook. (Bot. Mag. t. 4299), which was founded on a plant 
cultivated at Kew in 1847, received some years previously 
from Santa Martha, Colombia. It is also near the 
Brazilian M. Burchellii, Fourn., and M. mollissima, Fourn. 
As defined in Bentham and Hooker's " Genera Plantarum," 
and in Engler and PrantPs ** Die Natiirlichon Pflanzen- 
familien," the genus comprises about sixty species, very 
widely dispersed in tropical countries ; and there is an 
outlier, M. erecta, R. Br., native of the eastern Mediter- 
ranean region. M. Imthumii was raised from seed sent 
from British Guiana to Kew, in 1882, by E. F. im Thurn, 
C.B., C.M.G., now Lieut.-Governor of Ceylon, but formerly 
of the Civil Service in the country named. Mr. im Thurn 
was an ardent investigator of the Natural History of 
British Guiana, and Kew is indebted to him for many 

May 1st,M904. 



seeds and collections of dried plants. M. Imthurnii is a 
vigorous climber, and covers a considerable space on the 
roof of the Palm House. It has long, hanging branches, 
which occasionally flower in autumn ; the flowers re- 
sembling those of a Hoya. 

Descr. — A tall, twining shrub. Stems rather slender, 
terete; flowering branches about a quarter of an inch in 
diameter ; internodes shorter than the leaves, pubescent. 
Leaves opposite, on long petioles, rather thick, soft, 
cordate, sometimes constricted in the middle, those of the 
flowering-branches including petiole six to nine inches 
long, the largest four inches broad, abruptly acuminate, 
hairy on both sides, especially on the under surface, more 
or less bullate ; veins thick, and raised on the under 
surface. Floivers purple, about half-an-inch across, hairy, 
arranged in dense, globular, axillary, very shortly stalked, 
umbellate cymes, one and a half to two inches across; 
pedicels hairy, a quarter of an inch or less in length. 
Calyx-lobes five, oblong, obtuse, about half as long as the 
corolla-tube. Corolla hairy outside ; tube broad, slightly 
inflated, longer than the lobes of the limb ; lobes ovate- 
oblong, rounded at the tip, recurved. Coronal-scales five, 
erect, thick, fleshy, ovate, suddenly and obtusely acumi- 
nate, shorter than the staminal column. Pollinia oblong, 
erect, on long stalks. Ovary two-celled ; ovules numerous. 
Fruit unknown. — W. B. H. ' 



Fig. 1, a flower; 2, corona and staminal column; 3, a pair of pollinia; 
4, style and stigma: — all enlarged. 



r954 




M.S.deL.J.'R.'Prtchlith-. 



^mcra-it Br q oks,.!) ay* 5uS tjn.I*^ m P 



L.R^eve &. C "? JjOi-LdcTt 



Tab. 7954. 

DICENTRA CHKYSANTHA. 

Native of California. 



Nat. Ord. Fumakiacea:. 
Genus Dicentka, Borkk, ; (Benih. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 55.) 



DicExNTKA chrysantha; herba perennis, basi interdum lignescens et per 
hiemein persistans, glabra, glauca, erecta, 2-4 ped. alta, caulibus 
rigidis pauciramosis, foliis amplis bi- vel tripinnatiseetis segmentis 
lobisque ultimis linearibus vel cuneatis acutiuscuhV, paniculis multi- 
ramosis multifloris 1-2 ped. longis, floribui aureis 1-1| poll, diametro 
breviter pedicellatis suberectis, bracteis bracteolisque minutis squami- 
t'ormibus, sepalis 2 parvis late ovatis caducis, petalis 4 dimorphis 
circiter pollicaribus 2 exterioribus basi saccatis rotundatis supra medium 
ovato-oblongis acutis patentibus 2 interioribus oblongis coDcavis dorso 
carinatis per totam lougitudinem conniventibus stamina stylumque in- 
eludentibus, staminibus 6 in phalanges 2 petalis exterioribus oppositas 
connatis, filamentis glabris supra medium riliformibus, ovario unilocu- 
lar! glabro stigmate capitato bilobato, placentis 2 parietalibus linearibus 
multiovulatis, capsula clavata cum stylo persistente 1£-1$ poll, longa 
la3yi polysperma, seminibus numerosis reniformibus compressis circiter 
£ liu. longis laevibus. 

D. chrysantha, Walp. Rep. vol. i. p. 118. S. Wed*. Bot. Calif, vol. i. p. 24. 
W. Irving in The Garden, vol. lxiv. (1903), p. 334. H.N.E. in op. cit. 
vol. lxv. p. 18. 

Dielytra chrysantha, Hook. & Arn. Bot. Beech. Voy. p. 320, t. 73. Paxt Fl 

Gard. vol. iii. (1852-3), p. 151, t. 103. 
Capnorchis chrysantha, Planch, in Flore des Sevres, vol. viii. p. 193, t. 820. 
Bikukulla chrysantha. Coville in Gontr. U.S. Nat. Herb. vol. iv. (1893), p. 60. 



Dicentra chrysantha, Walp., was originally discovered 
by David Douglas, and subsequently by William Lobb, 
who collected for Messrs. Veitch, of Exeter, where plants 
were raised from seed, and flowered for the first time in 
September, 1852. It inhabits dry hills of the Coast 
Range, Southern California, at elevations of 2,500 to 
4,000 feet, and should therefore be given a sheltered 
situation and a southern exposure. At Kew it succeeds 
well under a south wall, and last year, in spite of the 
unfavourable weather, it flowered from July till nearly the 
end of October. Canon Ellacombe, writing in "The 
Garden," sums up his experience of the plant in a few 
words, to the effect that it is hardy, short-lived, and never 
produces seed. 

May 1st, 1904. 



Anyone interested in the history of the generic appella- 
tions Dicentra, Dielytra and Dielytra, should turn to the 
" Botanische Zeituug," vol. xv. (1857), p. 641, and 
vol. xvii. (1859), p. 157. 

Descr. — A perennial, glabrous, glaucous, erect herb, 
two to four feet high, sometimes becoming woody at the 
base, and persistent through the winter. Stems stiff, with 
few branches. Leaves large, pinnately divided to the second 
or third degree; ultimate lobes small, linear or cuneate, 
somewhat acute. Panicles much-branched, many-flowered, 
one to two feet long. Flowers of a brilliant, golden 
yellow, one inch to one inch and a quarter in diameter, 
shortly stalked, nearly erect. Bracts and bracteoles 
minute, scale-like. Sepals two, small, broadly ovate, fall- 
ing in the expansion of the flower. Petals four, of two 
shapes, about an inch long; two outer saccate and 
rounded at the base, ovate-oblong above the middle, acute, 
spreading ; two inner oblong, concave, keeled down the 
back, more or less cohering their whole length, and en- 
closing the stamens and pistil. Stamens six, in two 
bundles of three, opposite the outer petals; filaments 
glabrous, filiform above the middle. Ovary one-celled, 
glabrous ; stigma capitate, two-lobed ; placentas two, 
parietal, very narrow, bearing numerous ovules. Capsule 
club-shaped, including the persistent style one inch and a 
quarter to one inch and a half long, naked, many-seeded. 
Seeds numerous, kidney-shaped, flattened, about three- 
quarters of a line long, smooth.— W. B. H. 



Pig. 1, a flower; 2, an inner petal ; 3, a bundle of stamens; 4, a pistil :— 
all enlarged. 



7955 




M.S.delJ.N.FilcKli£K. 



Vincani E 



Tab. 7955. 
CHLOfLEA OBISPA. 

Native of Chile. 



Nat. Ord. Okciiide.e. — Tribe Neottie.e. 
Genus Chlojmba, Lindl. ; {Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant vol. iii. p. 618.) 



ChioRjEa crista ; herba terrestris 1 usque ad 3 ped. alta, vadicibus carnosis 
elongatia, caule erecto glabro, foliis basalibus oblongis vel lanceolatie 
acutis usque ad 8 poll, longis et 1 poll, latis basi amplectentibus im- 
bricatisque, scapo squamis ovatis vel late lanceolatis acutis vel acuminatis 
distantibus 1-4 poll, lougis instructo, racemis pauci- vel multifloris, 
bracteis lanceolatis acuminatis ovarium asquantibus vel paullo excedenti- 
bus, non reticulatim venosis, pedicellis brevibus, ovario subclavato, 
rloribns fere onmino albis, labello ad latera, petalis ad basin minute 
viridi-maculatis, columna ad basin aurantiaco-maculata, sepalo dorsali 
oblongo obtuso circa 1| poll, longo 7 lin. lato, lateralibus e basi lineari 
obovato-oblongis leviter undulatis apice cochleatis inci - assatis 1£ poll, 
longis 6 lin. latis, petalis ellipticis obtusis sepalo dorsali quarta parte 
brevioribus ad nervos longitudinales sparse verrucosis, labello basi cou- 
tracto superne late oblongo vel fere orbiculari parte superiore crispato- 
dentato lamellis 7-9 finibriatis basi conflueutibus instructo facie inferiore 
prope margines papillis paucis pra^dito, columna circa 1 poll, longa, 
ovario subclavato. 

C. crispa, Lindl. Gen. & Sp. Orch. p. 401. Gay, Flor. Ghil. vol. v. p. 446. 
Orchid Review, 1903, p. 133. Kriinel. Orch.' Gen. et Sp. vol. ii. p. 129, 
t. 15a. 

Cymbidium luteum, Willd. Sp. Plant, vol. iv. p. 106. 

Bpipactis amplo flore luteo. vnlgo Gavilu, Feiullee, Journ. Observ. vol. ii. 
(1714), p. 729, tab. 20. 



Although ,this plant was first described by Feuillee 
nearly two hundred years ago, it appears to have been 
only recently brought into cultivation. Mr. H. J. Elwes, 
F.R.S., collected tubers iu the sandy plain between 
Coronel and Concepcion, Chili, in December, 1901, which 
he presented to Kew, and from them the plant here 
figured was raised, and it flowered in April, 1903. 
Lindley, who first distinguished the genus Chlorsea, knew 
this species in the dried state only. 

It inhabits the plains of Chili, where its long fleshy 
rootlets bury themselves deeply in the sand, and, pro- 
bably owing to different degrees of humidity, it varies 
much in size and the number of flowers produced. 
Feuillee states that the Indian women mix the juice of 

Mat 1st, 1904. 



this plant with their " bouillon " to produce a more 
abundant flow of milk after child-birth. 

When figuring G. longibracteata, Lindl. (t. 7909) we 
gave some particulars of the genus. Since then Dr. F. 
Kranzlin has completed a monograph of the species 
(Orchidearun Genera et Species, vol. ii. pp. 143, tt. 14), of 
which he describes eighty-four. It is curious that the 
name Ghlorsea does not occur in the Dictionaries of 
Gardening, although C. longibracteata was in cultivation 
in 1837, and G. virescens, Lindl. (Bot. Beg. vol. xxxi. t. 49) 
in 1845. 

Descr. — A terrestrial herb, varying from one to three 
feet in height. Moots long, fleshy. Stem erect, glabrous. 
Leaves chiefly basal, oblong or lanceolate, acute, the 
largest eight inches long and one inch wide, sheathing and 
imbricate at the base. Scape furnished with distant, 
ovate or broadly lanceolate, acute or acuminate scales, one 
to four inches long. Racemes few- or many -flowered; 
bracts lanceolate, acuminate, about as long as the shortly 
pedicellate ovary. Flowers white, with numerous very 
minute, green dots near the sides of the lip and base of the 
petals, and a large orange and brown blotch at the base 
of the column. Dorsal sepal oblong, obtuse, about an inch 
and a half long and seven lines wide; lateral sepals 
obovate-oblong from a linear base, slightly undulate, 
cochleate, and thickened at the apex, about as long as the 
dorsal and slightly narrower. Petals elliptic, obtuse, 
three-quarters the length of the dorsal sepal, sparingly 
warted on the longitudinal nerves. Labellum contracted 
at the base, widely oblong or nearly orbicular above, 
entire below, crispate-dentate above, with seven or nine 
fimbriate lamella? confluent towards their base, and a 
few papillae on the under surface towards the margins. 
Column about one inch long. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, column and anther; 2. polliniu :— both enlarged. 



1936 



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M.S aelJ.NJ'itchlith 



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Tab. 7956. 
IRIS (Xiphion) warleyensis. 
Native of Bokhara. 

Nat. Orel. Iride^s. — Tribe Mor^e*. 
(Jenus Irix, Linn.; (Benth. et Rook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Iris {Xiphion) u-o.rhyensis; herba erecta, usque ad 1 ped. alta sed sajpius 
brevior, caule tereti glabro, foliis caulinis lanceolatis acuminatis basi 
arnplectentibus, floribus singulis vel binis ordinatis, spathis duabus viridi- 
bus lanceolatis acutis vel subobtusis 2 poll, longis, perianthii ttibo 2 poll, 
longo infra cylindrico supra anguste infundibuliformi, perianthii segmentis 
exterioribns ungnibus ligulatis 1} poll, longis dilute purpureis apice 
reflexis la minis ovalibus vel fere orbicularibus leviter emarginatis 
obscure purpureis medio aurantiacis marginibus albis crista crenata 
infra purpurea supra aurantiaca instructis, segmentis interioribus 
patentibus violaceis 8 lin. longis trilobis, lobis lateralibus breviter 
triangularibus, lobo terminali longe subulato, styli ramis violaceis 
maculo aurantiaco squama crenata instructis circa If poll, longis usque 
ad 6 lin. bifidis prope apicem obtuse irregulariterque paucidentatip. 
capsulis iis I. buchariae similibus. 

I. (Xiphion) warleyensis, The Garden, vol. lxi. (1902), p. 241; M. Foster in 
Gard. Chron. vol. xxxi. (1902), p. 386, fig. 134; Journ. Hort. ser. 3, 
vol. lxiv. p. 339. 

In the genus Iris the section Xiphion, distinguished by 
its bulbous rootstock, includes several types around which 
cluster very closely related forms, which for garden pur- 
poses are more conveniently regarded as distinct species. 
The present plant is a member of such a group, which has 
for its type I. orchioides, Carr , and bears a considerable 
resemblance to var. csemlea, Hort., of that species. Iu 
structure it is similar to /. bucharica, M. Foster, figured 
in tab. 7914 of this work, which differs in having yellow 
flowers. 

This species was discovered in the neighbourhood of 
Bokhara, whence it was introduced into cultivation by 
Messrs. van Tubergen, of Haarlem. The plant from which 
our figure was made, flowered in the garden of the Hon. 
Charles Ellis in April, 1902. At Kew /. warleyensis has 
not succeeded so well as typical /. orchioides, Carr. 

Descr. — An erect herb, usually six to twelve inches 
high. Stem terete, glabrous. Leaves cauline, lanceolate, 
acuminate, sheathing at the base. Flowers solitary, 

May 1st, 1904.1 



with sometimes a second added just below it; spathes 
two, green, lanceolate, acute or sub-obtuse, two inches 
long. Perianth-tube two inches long, cylindrical below, 
narrowly funnel-shaped above; outer segments with a pale 
purple ligulate claw about an inch and a quarter long, 
reflexed at the apex, blade oval or almost orbicular, 
slightly emarginate, with a central, crenate crest, purple at 
the base, orange above, surrounded by an orange-coloured 
area, the remainder dark violet, except for a narrow, white 
marginal line ; inner segments patent, violet, about eight 
lines long, three-lobed, terminal lobe much longer, subu- 
late. Style-branches about an inch and three-quarters 
long, bifid about six lines down, violet, with an orange- 
coloured spot and crenate scale at the base of the bifur- 
cation, with a few obtuse, irregular teeth near the apex. 
Capsule similar to that of /. bucharica. — C. 77. Wright. 



Fig. 1, stamen, front view; 2, the same, ba --k view; 3, base of bifurcation of 
style-branches ■ — all enlarged. 



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Tab. 7957. 

TUPISTRA Clakkei. 

Native of Sikkim. 

Nat. Ord. Liliacejs. — Tribe Asptdistrea\ 
Genus Tupistra, Ker-Gawl. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 772.) 



Tufistka Clarkei; herba robusta, rhizomate repente crasso, vaginis basalibus 
ovatis vel oblongis acuminatis membranaceis, foliis approximatis oblan- 
ceolatis acuminatis integerrimis glabris nitentibus 4 peel, longis usque ad 
4§ poll, latis, nervis obliquis translucentibus, petiolis rigidis erectis, 
pedunculis teretibus 3 poll, longis, spicis nutantibus vel fere pendulis 
densifloris usque ad 3-4 poll, longis, bracteis quam floribus multo 
brevioribus, floribus circa 1% poll. diam. intus sordide rubro-purpureis 
extus primum (perianthii loborum marginibus purpureis exceptis) viridi- 
bua detnum subfuscia, perianthii tubo breviter campanulato vel fere 
cupulari intus sparse piloso, lobis 6 patentibus late triangularibus obtusip, 
filamentis brevissimis crassis supra medium perianthii tubi affixis, 
antheris oblongis introrsis, ovario parvo trilobo, stylo cylindrico exserto, 
stigmate peltato quam ovario multo latiore trilobo. 

T. Clarkei, Hook.f. Flor. Brit. Ind. vol. vi. p. 325. 



The germs Tupistra was founded by Ker-Grawler in the 
Botanical Magazine, tab. 1655. upon a plant introduced 
by Loddiges from Amboyna, to which the name T. squalida 
was given. Though closely resembling Aspidistra in 
vegetative characters, this genus is distinguished by having 
its 6-merous flowers arranged in usually dense cylindrical 
spikes. 

T. Clarkei was discovered by Sir J. D. Hooker in 
Sikkim at from 2,000 to 5,000 ft. altitude. A water- 
colour drawing of it by Cathcart is in the collection at 
Kew. It flowered at Kew in October, 1877, and again in 
the Aroid House in November, 1903. The latter plant, 
from which our illustration was taken, was received from 
the Royal Botanic G-ardens, Calcutta, in the preceding 
year. It thrives at Kew in a stove, and, on account 
of its tall, shining green leaves, gracefully recurved 
towards the apex, is of considerable value for decorative 
effects. 

T. grandis, Ridl. (tab. 7829) differs from this species 
in having erect spikes, while its peltate stigma has 
numerous radiating ribs on its upper surface, each rib 

June 1st, 1904. 



terminating in a small marginal lobe ; the whole stigma 
much resembling the pileus of some of the smaller species 
of Mycena. T. macro stigma , Baker (tab. 6280) has fewer 
flowers in a drooping spike, and its large, red, imbricately 
lobed stigma is borne on a much shorter style, so as to 
almost close the mouth of the perianth-tube. 

Descr. — A robust, glabrous herb. Rhizome creeping, 
thick; basal sheaths ovate or oblong, acuminate, mem- 
branous. Leaves approximate, oblanceolate, acuminate, 
quite entire, shining, four feet long, four inches and a 
half broad ; nerves obliquely joined to the midrib at varying 
heights, translucent; petioles rigid, erect. Peduncles 
terete, three inches long; spikes nodding or almost 
pendulous, three to four inches long, dense ; bracts much 
shorter than the flowers. Flowers about an inch and a 
quarter in diameter, dull reddish-purple inside, outside 
at first green with purple margins to the perianth-lobes, 
at length entirely buff. Perianth-tube shortly campanulate 
or alniost cupular, sparingly pilose inside ; lobes six, 
patent, broadly triangular, obtuse. Filaments very short 
and thick, inserted just above the middle of the perianth- 
tube ; anthers oblong, introrse. Ovary small, three-lobed ; 
style cylindrical, exserted ; stigma peltate, three-lobed, 
much broader than the ovary. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, part of perianth and stamens ; 2 and 3, front and back views of 
an anther ; 4 pistil :— all enlarged. 



7958 




M-SdsLJ.TTJttdiAK 



k BEMhBjxy&a< 



IReeve &C? London. 



Tab. 7958. 
BULBOPHYLLUM Wedded. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. OrchidacEvE. — Tribe Epidendre.33. 
Genus Bulbophyi.lcm', Thouars; (Benth.et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 501 ) 



BuLBOPHYLLtnt (§ Racemosse) Weddelii; herba epiphytica rhizomate crasso 
elungato, paeudobulbia sparais 4-angulatis unifoliatis circiter 2 poll, 
lougis l-l| poll, latis, folio oblongo 3-4 poll, longo lj-l£ poll, lato 
utrinque rotundato multinervi, seapis basilaribas solitariis, pedunculo 
tereti usque ad 2 ped. longo erecto bracteie paucis rnembranaceis vaginatis 
ochroiformibus apice obliquis instructo, racemo pendulo multifloro denso 
circiter aemipedali, bracteia membranaceis bruuneis lanceolatis acutis 
4-5 longis persistentibus, floribus subsessilibua circiter 2 poll, diametro 
nutautibus, sepalis Hneari-lanceolatis acutissimis 1—1 J poll, longia intus 
albis extua viridibus. petalia linearibus acutis 2 lin. longia, labello albo- 
purpureo maculato mobili cum columnar pede articulato baai aubtus 
gibboso lobia lateralibua minatialobo terminali linguiformi vel spathulato 
circiter 6 lin. longo, columnae bracbiis aetiformibua utrinque infra brachia 
unidentatis. 

B. Weddelii, Beichb.f. in Walp. Ann. vol. vi. p. 251. 

Didactyle "Weddelii, Lindl. Fol. Orch. vol. i. (Didactyle), p. 2. 



Bulbophyllum is one of the most diversified of the 
genera of orchids, and one of the few epiphytic genera 
common to America and the Old World. It is also very 
widely spread, ranging from Central America and the 
West Indies to Brazil in the West, and China to Australia 
and New Zealand in the East. A considerable number of 
species inhabit tropical Africa, the Mascarene Islands and 
India. Probably not less than one hundred species have 
been described, and they present greater variety in size, 
aspect, and structure than any other group of species of 
orchids generally recognized as congeneric. It is true 
that generic distinction has been given to various species 
and groups of species by different botanists, but they are 
not accepted by the leading writers on orchids, and the 
late Dr. Keichenbach even went so far as to unite Cirrho- 
feialum with Bolbophyllum. 

In illustration of this diversity we may refer to souk 1 
of the species figured in this Magazine. Take, for example, 
B. .Dayanum, Reichb. f. (t. 6119); B. lemniscatum, Parish 

June 1st, 1904. 



(t. 5961); B. comosum, Coll. & Hemsl. (t. 7283), and 
B. Beccarii, Reichb. f. (t. 6567). And they by no means 
cover the range of variation. 

The last-named is one of the largest orchids known, 
being a tall climber, with thick rhizomes, leaves two feet 
long by a foot and a half broad, and large clusters of 
flowers. It is a native of Borneo, where also perhaps the 
very smallest orchid hitherto described is at home. This 
is B. Odoardi, Reichb. f . Both of these remarkable orchids 
are named after our old friend, Dr. Beccari, who spent 
some years in the botanical exploration of Borneo. 

Not much bigger is B. minutissimum, F. Muell., an 
Australian species (Fitzgerald's " Australian Orchids," 
under Dendrobium), which has leaves and flowers barely 
one-twelfth of an inch in diameter. 

B. Weddelii, Reichb. f., is a very graceful species, with a 
delicately mobile lip. 

Descr. — An epiphytic herb, with a thick, elongated 
rhizome. Bulbs distant, angular, one-leaved, about two 
inches long. Leaf oblong, three to four inches long, 
many-nerved. Scapes solitary from the base of the bulbs ; 
peduncle one to two feet long, erect ; racemes many- 
flowered, pendulous, about six inches long. Flowers 
nearly sessile, about two inches in diameter, nodding. 
Sepals linear-lanceolate, very acute, an inch or more long, 
green outside, white within. Petals linear, minute. Lip 
spotted purple and white, tongue-shaped, shorter than the 
sepals, hinged to the base of the column and mobile. — 
W. B. H. 

Fig. 1, column, lip, and one petal ; 2, column and base of the lip seen from 
the front and below ; 3, base of the lip seen from above ; 4, anther-case ; 5 and 
6, pollen :— all enlarged. 



7D5d, 




Tab. 7959. 

CHAM^EDOREA pulchella. 

Native of Tropical America. 

Nat. Ord. Palm* — Tribe Ahecea. 
Genus ChaWADOKEA, Wittd. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 910.) 



Ciiam/EDOREA (Collinia) pulchella ; palraa gracilis, caule erecto nudo annulato, 
foliis in canlis apice confertis erecto-patentibus 4-pedalibus, petiolis 
sesquipedalibus levibus, supra concavis linea media elevata instructis, 
subtus convexis, foliolis ntraque circa 30 lineari-lanceolatis ad 1 ped. 
longis et 9 lin. latis ad basin nervorum in facie snperiore sparse squamatis, 
nervis 3quam reliquis crassioribus, panicnlis <? interfoliaceis laxe ramosis 
minute pulveralentis, ramulis ultimis 10 poll, longis, pedunculis circa 
2 ped. longis, spathis basalibus 4-5, scariosis, calycis lobis late ovatis 
marginibus membranaceis purpureis, corollis stipitatis dilute luteis, 
globosis, lobis triangularibus quam tubo quai'ta parte brevioribus, 
staminum tubo quam parte libera longiore, antherarum loculis basi 
paulo divergentibus, ovarii rudimento ovoideo quam staminibns longiore, 
stylo brevi crasso, stigmate ti-ilobo, inflorescentia ? ignota. 

0. pulchella, L. Linden in Gat. Plant. Gomp. Gont. Sort. 1885, p. 4. 



This palm was distributed in 1885 by the Compagnie 
Continentale d'Horticulture, from which a plant was 
obtained for the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, where it 
flowered in 18 ( J1, and again in the autumn of 1903; the 
naked part of the stem having in the meanwhile increased 
from about nine inches to eight feet in height. The native 
country of this species is not known, but most of its 
allies come from the Central American region. In habit 
and in the texture of the leaflets it resembles G. schiedeana, 
Mart., from which it differs in having narrower and 
straighter leaflets. The globose, trifid corolla places it 
in the section Collinia. 

About seventy species have been described in the genus 
Charnsedorea, some of which have been subsequently 
separated to found new genera, based chiefly upon the 
character of the corolla, which varies from deeply lobed 
and widely expanded to very shortly lobed and 
nearly globose, and from sessile to stipitate. These 
characters, however, are generally regarded as insufficient 
to maintain such genera. The species inhabit the 
western side of tropical America, from South Mexico to 

Jcne 1st, 1904. 



Peru. Several have been figured in this work, amongst 
them G. tenella, Wendl. (Nunnezharia tenella, Hook, f., 
tab. 6584), which is one of the smallest palms known, and 
produces fruit when only seven inches high. Most of the 
plants have slender, solitary stems, but G. stolonifera, 
Wendl. (tab. 7265) sends out stolons from which young 
plants arise close to their parent. The flowers and also 
the spadix are sometimes of a bright orange-red, which 
contrasts well with the dark green of the leaves, which in 
G. Ernesti-Augusti, Wendl. (tab. 4831), and a few other 
species are broad and simply two-lobed. 

Descr. — A slender palm. Stem erect, about eight feet 
high, naked, the annular scars of fallen leaves about 
one inch apart. Leaves forming a terminal crown, nearly 
erect, about four feet long; petiole about a foot and a 
half long, smooth, concave, with a central ridge above, 
convex beneath, sheathing at the base; rhachis slightly 
elevated, with an obtuse ridge above, convex beneath; 
leaflets in about thirty pairs, linear-lanceolate, central 
ones one foot long, the larger nine lines wide, but usually 
much narrower, slightly scaly near the base of the main 
nerves on the upper side; nerves slender, about three 
more prominent than the rest. Male panicle from between 
the leaves, much branched, loose, finely powdered; ultimate 
branches ten inches long ; peduncle about two feet long ; 
basal sheaths four or five, scarious. Calyx tripartite ; lobes 
broadly ovate, with membranous, purple margins. Gorolla 
stalked, pale yellow, globose ; lobes triangular, one-quarter 
the length of the tube. Filaments free less than half-way 
down ; anther-cells slightly divergent at the base. Ovary 
rudimentary, ovoid, longer than the stamens; style short, 
Muck ; Btigma three-lobed. Female inflorescence unknown! 

Fig. 1 part of t inflorescence; 2, corolla-lobes; 3, stamens and rudimentary 

S^Wst*£X ion; 5>anther; 6 ' whole plant(mS 



7960 




M S ad, J JT.EitcJv litk 



Vincent Br o 6b*p ay & Sot-U* &"¥ 



Tab. 7960. 
IMPATIENS Oliveri. 

Native of Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Gs&ASEUC&B. — Tribe JBals amines. 
Genus ImfatieNS, Linn.; (Bent/t. el Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 'ill . ) 



IMPAIIBNS Oliveri; herba glaberrima usque ad 4 ped. alta, caulibus erectis 
dilute viridibus supra nodos ssepe iucrassatis,t'oliis irregulariter verticillatis 
oblanceolatis acutis vel acumiuatis setoso-ciliatis usque ad 8 poll, longis 
2j poll, latis, pedimoulis unirlori3 2i poll, longis, pedicellis 1;J poll, longis, 
bracteolis 2 altera 3 lin. longa lauceolato recurva altera £ lin. longa, 
Horibus circa 2\ poll. diam. dilute lilacinis vel roseis dorso pallidioribus, 
scpalis lateralibus ovatis acuminatis apiculatis quam petalis 2-3-plo 
brevioribus, labio ovato infundibuliformi abrupte reflexeque nrucronato 
parte infundibuliformi £ poll, longa, calcare curvato tenui If poll, longo, 
vexillo e basi lata suborbiculari apice recurvato apiculato, alis profunde 
bilobis, lobo termiuali obovato quam laterali Bubcordato paullo longiore, 
fructibus oblongis acuminatis, seminibus 1 lin, longis ovoideis verrucosis. 

I. Oliveri, G. II. Wright ex W. Watsvn in Gard. Chrun. 1903, vol. ii. p. 178. 

I. Thomsoni, Oliv.in Joum. Linn Soc. Bot. vol. xxi. (1886) p. 398, nori Hook.f . 
nee Bot. Mag. tab. 7795. 



This plant was discovered by the late Mr. Joseph 
Thomson, F.R.G-.S., at Lykipia, Tropical East Africa, at 
elevations of 6,000 to 8,000 feet, with flowers scarcely 
more than an inch and a half across, which under cultiva- 
tion have greatly increased in size, and rival those of 
/. grandiflora, Hemsl. (tab. 7826). 

Our illustration was taken from a plant at Kew, raised 
from seeds presented by Sir John Kirk, K.C.M.G., which 
were obtained along the Uganda railway, about 300 miles 
inland, on volcanic rocks or tufa, at an elevation of 
6,800 ft. The flowers of the wild plant are said to be 
white, but under cultivation they assume a pale lilac or 
occasionally rosy tint. They were first produced at Kew 
in July, 1903, and fruit was developed in the following 
November. Flowers were also produced in September, 
and at the end of April of the present year plants were 
in full flower in the Begonia house, where they continue 
to thrive. Being of vigorous habit and a profuse bloomer, 
it is likely to get into general cultivation. 

Descr. — A perfectly glabrous herb, about four feet high. 
Stems erect, pale green, often thickened above the nodes. 
June 1st, 1904. 



Leaves in irregular whorls of from four to eight, oblan- 
ceolate, acute or acuminate, the largest eight inches long 
and two inches and a quarter wide, setose-ciliate on the 
margin. Peduncles one-flowered, about two inches and a 
half long ; pedicels one inch and a quarter long. Bracteoles 
two, one three lines long, lanceolate, curved outwards 
above, the other less than half as long. Flowers about 
two inches and a quarter across, pale lilac, or occasionally 
rosy above, almost white beneath. Lateral sepals ovate, 
acuminate, apiculate, two or three times shorter than the 
petals. Lip ovate, funnel-shaped, with an abrupt reflexed 
mucro, funnel-shaped part about half an inch long, abruptly 
narrowed into a slender, curved spur, about an inch and 
three-quarters long. Lip sub-orbicular from a broad 
base, recurved and apiculate at the apex. Wings deeply 
two-lobed ; terminal lobe obovate, lateral obcordate, 
shorter and wider than the terminal. Fruit oblong, 
acuminate. Seeds one line long, ovoid, verrucose. — G. H. 
Wright. 

Fig. 1, stamens ; 2, fruit ; 3, seed : — all except 2 enlarged. 




VincentBrooks^ayacSarLLeHmp 



X R««ve &l C? Xianitan 



Tab. 7961. 
LYSIMACHIA Heneyi. 

Native of Western China. 

Nat. Ord. PkimuiacEjE.— Tribe LysimachjEj*. 
Genus Lysimachia, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 635.) 



Lysimachia Henryi; herba perennis, robusta, subcarnosa, repetis, radicatis, 
plus minusve ferrugineo-|>ubea3ens, vel villosa, culta fere glabra vel cito 
glabreecens, caulibus elongatis teretibus florifevis adscendentibus interno- 
diis nunc folia excedentibus nunc brevit-simis, foliis plerumque oppositis 
petiolatis lanceolatis vel ovatis cum petiolo 1-4 poll, longis acutia basi 
cuneatis vel interdutn rotundatis integris venis immersis inconspicuis, 
floribus luteis circiter 1£ poll, diametro in axillis foliorum superiorum 
confertorum solitariis vel interdutn subumbellatis pedicellatis, pedicellis 
plerumqae vix semipollicaribus aed interdam elongatis, calycis lohis i'ere 
liberis lineari-lauceolatis acutissimis 3-4 lin. longis, corollae rotatae lubia 
obovato-oblongis, staminibus corollas lobis dimidio brevioribus omnibus 
inaequilongis filamentis fere ad medium connatis papilloaisqne sapra 
medium tiliformibus, ovario villoso stylo capitato stamina vix excedente. 

L. Henryi, Hemnl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxvi. p. 52. W. Irving in 
The Garden, vol. Ixiv. (1903), p. 269, cum habitus figura. W. W. in Gard. 
Chron. 1903, vol. ii. p. 187. 



In the letterpress accompanying the figure of Lysi- 
machia crispidens, Hemsl. (tab. 7919) some particulars 
are given of the composition and distribution of the genus. 
L. Henryi bids fair to become as great a favourite as the 
" Creeping Jenny," L. Nummularia, L., and it is an 
equally vigorous grower, of more robust habit, though 
probably not so hardy. The flowers, too, are of a richer 
yellow. 

It was originally collected by Dr. A. Henry near Ichang, 
in the Province of Hupeh, in lte85, and two years later 
Kew received specimens from the Rev. E. Faber, collected 
in the Province of Szechuen. Dr. Henry found it at 
altitudes of 6,000 to 8,000 ft. More recently Mr. E. H. 
Wilson, collector for Messrs. James Veitch & Sons, sent 
seeds to that firm, in whose nurseries at Coombe Wood 
it was raised last year. A small piece sent to Kew for 
determination was divided and planted in the herbaceous 
ground and rock-garden, where it soon formed large 
patches, and flowered profusely and continuously during 

Jr\E 1st, 1904. 



the summer and autumn. Moist ground would probably 
suit it best, but last season it was moist everywhere, and 
it grew well in exposed, well drained soil. 

Descr. — A vigorous, trailing, somewhat fleshy, peren- 
nial herb, more or less hairy in the wild state, but almost 
glabrous under cultivation. Stems terete, rooting at the 
joints, flowering-branches ascending; internodes some- 
times longer than the leaves, sometimes very short. Leaves 
mostly opposite, lanceolate or ovate, including the petiole 
one to four inches long, acute, cuneate, or sometimes 
rounded at the base, entire ; veins immersed, inconspi- 
cuous. Flowers full yellow, about an inch and a quarter in 
diameter, solitary in the axils of the upper, crowded leaves, 
or sometimes sub-umbellate, pedicellate. Pedicels mostly 
under half an inch in length, but sometimes elongated. 
Calyx-lobes almost free, linear-lanceolate, very acute, three 
to four lines long. Corolla rotate ; lobes obovate-oblong. 
Stamens half as long as the corolla, spirally unequal in 
length; filaments connate and papillose almost to the 
middle, filiform above the middle. Ovary villous; style 
capitate, about as long as the longest stamen.— IF. B. H. 



Fig. 1, floral-leaf, calyx, and pistil ; 2, stamens ; 3, pistil -.-all enlarged. 



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Tab. 7957.— TUPISTRA CLARKEI. 
M 7958.— BULBOPHYLLUM WEDDELII. 
„ 7959.— CHAALEDOREA PULCHELLA. 
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Tab. 7902. 
VELLOZTA TRicnoPHyLLA. 

Native of Eastern Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllidace,*. — Tribe Vellozie^. 
Genus Vellozia, Vand. ; {Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 739.) 



Vellozia trichophylla; frutex caudice vel trunco brevi crassissimo demum 
saltern 1 ped. diametro, ramis primariis paucis crassis, innovationibua 
numerosis brevissimis, foliis numerosis gramineis vix rigidis 3-9 poll, 
longis (in speoiminibus sylvestribus saepe 1-2 ped. longis rigidioribusque) 
medio circiter 6 lin. latis acutis multinerviis distincte costatis utrinque 
moiliter pubescentibus vel fere lanatis in margine non sefculosis, peduu- 
culis saepius ternis unifloris cum ovario tomentoso 2^-4 poll, longis 
Buberectis, floribus rubro-lilacinis fragrantibus 2|-3 poll, diametro, 
perianthii segmentis asqualibus lanceolatis acutis 1J-1| poll, longis 
patentibus.tubo nullo, staminibus 6 antheris subsessilibus 6-6 lin. longis, 
ovario inferiore triloculari multiovulato stylo clavato stamina asquante, 
capsula ignota. 

V. trichophylla, Hemsl. 

V. equisetoide.", var. trichophylla, Baker in Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. vii. p. 411. 

V. equisetoides, W. W. in Qard. Ghron. 1903, vol. ii. p. 425, f. 167. 



Our figure was drawn from one of several fine plants 
sent to Kew in 1903, by Mr. J. McClounie, Head of the 
Scientific Department, Zornba, British Central Africa. 
As will be seen from the above references, Mr. J. G. 
Baker treated this plant as a variety of his V. equisetoides, 
but living plants and further wild specimens offer characters 
that fully justify, as Mr. Baker grants, their specific 
separation. Typical V. equisetoides has much longer 
primary branches ; the leaves are shorter and glabrous, 
except that they are minutely setulose on the margin and 
along the midrib on the under surface. The leaf-bases 
break up early, and present something like the appearance 
of the bristled sheath of an Equisetum. 

Specimens of a third species have been referred to 
V. equisetoides in the Kew Herbarium : — 

V. Kirku, Hemsl. ; caule erecto cylindrico simplice vel 
furcato ^-1 poll, diametro elougato, foliis gramineis sub- 
erectis 6-9 poll, longis medio circiter 3 lin. latis acutis 
ecostatis glabris in margine primum paucisetulosis in siccis 
luteis rigidis, foliorum basibus persistentibus compactis 
July 1st, 1901. 



rotundatis arete imbricatis tarde rumpentibus, pedimculis 
cum ovario 3-4 poll, longis erectis crebre muricato-tuber- 
culatis, perianthii segmentis 2-2|- poll, longis medio fere 
1 poll, latis acutis 3 iuterioribus membranaceis 3 exterio- 
ribus medio incrassatis extus muricatis. 

V. trichophylla was first collected by Dr. (now Sir John) 
Kirk at Zornba, British Central Africa, in 1859, and 
since by Mr. G. F. Scott Elliot on Mount Ndurani, in 
1893-4. 

Authors differ widely in their definition of the allied 
genera Vellozia and Barbacenia. Bentham and Hooker 
(Gen. Plant, vol. hi. p. 739) characterize the former as 
having a tubeless perianth, and six or sometimes numerous 
stamens; the latter as having a more or less developed 
perianth-tube, and six, or in one species, eighteen stamens. 
Pax (Engler Sf Prantl, Natiirl. Pftanzenf. vol. ii. 5, p. 127) 
includes the species having only six stamens in Barbacenia, 
and those having more than six stamens are referred to 
Vellozia. This is perhaps justified by Vandelli's original 
descriptions and figures. 

Both in Africa and South America the members of the 
Velloziese are characteristic in the scanty vegetation of 
granitic rocky regions. Mr. John Mahon, who has spent 
some years in British Central Africa and British East 
Africa, informs us that the various species grow in bleak, 
exposed situations, always preferring the almost bare 
granite rock. He never saw them where there was any- 
thing approaching good soil, or even associated with the 
short grass so common in certain situations. In some 
places they almost clothed the cliffs ; in other places they 
were scattered; growing at altitudes of 6,000 to 7,500 
feet. 

Descr. — A shrub having a thick stock, a foot or more in 
diameter, and short, thick primary branches. Flowering- 
shoots numerous, very short. Leaves numerous, grass-like, 
scarcely stiff in cultivated specimens, three to nine inches 
long (often one to two feet long, and more rigid in wild 
specimens), about half an inch broad in the middle, acute, 
many-nerved, midrib distinct, softly hairy on both surfaces, 
without bristles on the margins. Peduncles usually in 
threes, one-flowered, two and a half to four inches long, 
sub erect, stiffly hairy as well as the ovary. Flowers 



reddish-lilac, very fragrant, two and a half to three inches 
across. Perianth-segments equal, lanceolate, acute, one 
inch and a quarter to one inch and a half long, spreading ; 
tube none. Stamens six ; anthers almost sessile, about half 
an inch long. Style club-shaped, equalling the stamens. — 
W. B. 11. 



Fig. 1, portion of a leaf; 2 and 3, back and front views of a stamen; 
4, style: — all enlarged. 



7d63 




MSdaUNfUtfibth. 



AfincKRt Broaks,Day-& S im I! ,t£In¥ 



■i 



Tab. 7963. 
GEONOMA gracilis. 

Native of Tropical America. 

Nat. Ord. Palm,*:.— Tribe Arece.e 
Genus Geonoma, Willd.; {Benth. et Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 913.) 



Gy.osom a ffracilis ; palma gracilis, cauleerecto 4ped. alto 1§ poll, diametronudo 
annulato, foliis confertis arcnatis 2£ ped. longis, periolia 1J ped. longia 
supra concavis linea media elevata subtns convexis, rhacbibus supra 
obtuse triangularibus subtus convexis, foliolis lineari-Ianceolatis acurai- 
natis ad 1 pod. longis 3-6 lin. latis circa trinervibns facie superiore sparse 
squamatis, paniculis laxis, ramis tenuibus, floribus masculis: Bepalis 
navicularibus scariosis 1 lin. longis apice leviter hirsutis, petalis quam 
sepalis paulo longioribus ovatis obtusis membranaceis hyalinis, stami- 
niim tubo H lin. longo tubuloso-campanulato, filamentorum parte libera 
quam tubo dimidio breviore, antheris lineari-oblongis \ Hd. longis loculis 
basi tantum connatis late divergentibus, ovarii rudimento minuto, 
floribus femineis : sepalis oblongis obtusis scariosis 1 lin. longis petalis 
ovatis acutis submembranaceis, staminodiia cupnlatim connatis quam 
stylo (ramis exclusis) aequilongis, ovario abortu 1-loculari, stylo basali, 
ovulo ascendente. 

G. gracilis, Linden & AndrS in Illustr. Hortic. vol. xxi. (1874) p. 73, t 169. 
H. Wendl. ex Kerchove, Les Palmiers, pp. 245 et 323 (1878). 

G. Riedeliana, IT. Wendl. ex Linden & Andre - , he. cit. 



This palm was first described in 1874 by Linden and 
Andre, who quote as a synonym the previously unpublished 
name of Geonoma Riedeliana, H. Wendl. In Kerchove's 
M Les Palmiers," it is reduced to G. Riedeliana, but a 
G. gracilis, H. Wendl., is retained, which is not described, 
but illustrated by a reproduction (on a reduced scale) of 
Linden and Andre's figure of their G. gracilis. 

Although this palm has long been in cultivation, its 
origin is still obscure. Wendland records it from 
Costa Eica; while Linden and Andre state that it was 
collected in Eastern Brazil by Riedel, and afterwards by 
Binot, who sent it to Europe. It is not mentioned in 
Martius's " Flora Brasiliensis," nor by Tonduz in his 
" Flora de Costa Rica." Its nearest ally is the Brazilian 
G. Schottiana, Mart., which much resembles it in habit, 
but differs in having sub-opposite, decussate flowers. It 
also approaches some of the forms of G. Spruceana, Traill. 

Jri.T 1st, 1904. 



The plant here figured was shown at the Ghent Quin- 
quennial International Horticultural Exhibition in 1902, 
and was afterwards purchased for the Royal Botanic 
Gardens, Kew, where it flowered in the Palm House in 
September and October, 1903. 

The spadices are monoecious, but at the time when the 
maid flowers are fully expanded the female flowers are 
still immersed in the tissue of the spadix ; thus showing a 
form of protandry. 

Descr.—A slender palm. Stem erect, about four feet 
high and an inch and a half in diameter, naked, closely 
ringed. Leaves forming a terminal crown, arching, about 
two feet and a half long; petioles about a foot and 
a half long, concave, with a central ridge above, con- 
vex beneath; rhachis obtusely triangular above, convex 
beneath; leaflets linear-lanceolate, acuminate, the larger 
about a foot long, three to six lines wide, three-nerved, 
sparingly scaly on the upper side. Panicles loose, 
with slender branches. Male flowers : Sepals boat-shaped, 
scarious one line long, slightly hairy at the apex. Petals 
a little longer than the sepals, ovate, obtuse, membranous, 
liyaline. Filaments united for two-thirds of their length 
into a tubiilar-campanulate cup; anthers linear-oblong, 
halt a line long, attached by the base only, widely diver- 
gent Ovary rudimentary, minute. Female flowers: 
bepals oblong obtuse, scarious, one line long. Petals 
ovate, acute, thin. Staminodes united into a cup reaching 
to he base of the style-branches. Ovary by abortion one- 
celled ; style basal, tnfid ; ovule ascending— IF B H 



J^rL^l°"Jkh Be r\ 0i ^ Same ; 3 ' P etals and aTlthe ™ i 4, stamens 
all e**pl 6 ;*5 WetXrged ' P '' °' "^ pUnt mUch red ^ d '- 



7964 




MS.delJN.Fitchlith 



VincentBroalcspay A.Zan.ht.?. 



I>.l-laeve fit C*? L oncUm.. 



Tab. 7964. 
SPATHOGLOTTIS Hardingiana. 

Native of North Burma. 



Nat. Ord. Okciiidace*. — Tribe Epidendee*. 
Genus Spathoglottis, Blume ; (Benih. et Ilooh.f, Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 511.) 



Spathoglottis Hardingiana ; inter spec ; es hucusque cognitas labello lineari 
lobis lateralibus destituto distinctn ; peeudobulb'S late conico-ovoideis ob- 
scure multi-angulatis6-8 lin.longisbi-vel trifoliatissquamis membranaceis 
duplo longioribua instructis, foliis lanceolatis acuminatis basi breviter 
petiolatis 5-7 poll, longis medio ad 1 poll, latis plicatis membranaceis 
circiter 5-7-nerviis nervis secnndariis numerosis, acapis basilaribus soli- 
tariis vel binis erectis f-l| ped. altis ut pedicellis pubescentibus, floribus 
numerosis roseo-purpureis vel interdum lilacinis, pedicellis gracilibus 
cum ovario 10-14 lin. longis, bracteis lanceolatis acuminatis 3-5 lin. 
longis, sepalis lanceolatis subacutis recurvis 6-7 Un. longis, petalis lineari- 
lanceolatis acutis recurvis 6-7 lin. longis, labello oblongo-lineari snb- 
acuto 4-5 lin. longo basi auriculis parvis suberectis instructis, medio 
bicalloso, callis ei'ectis cuneato-obovatis flavis brunneo-punctatis, columna 
gracili arcuata 5 lin. longa supra medium anguste alata. 

S. Hardingiana, Par. et Echb.f. Otia Bot. Hamb. p. 45; Hook. f. Fl. Brit. 
Ind. vol. v. p. 815. Bidl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxxii. pp. 217, 312. 
— Semper sphalmate Handingiana. Parish's Drawings in bibl. Kew. 
vol. i. n. 79. Orch. Rev. vol. xi (1903), p. 319. 



Spathoglottis Hardingiana is a remarkable species, 
described in 1878, and dedicated to Mr. Coles-Harding 
(misspelt Handing), a skilful cultivator of Orchids, who 
resided for some time in Moulmein. He obtained it from 
Bkamo. For a long period it was only known from the 
original specimens and drawing, but at length it was 
rediscovered in the Lankawi Islands, on the western side 
of the Malay Peninsula, by Mr. C. Curtis, Assistant 
Superintendent of Forests, Penang. It is recorded as 
growing on rocks. The plant here figured is from a 
later importation, received from Mr. Curtis in 1902. It 
flowered the following autumn, in a tropical house, and 
again in November last. There were two varieties, one 
having bright rose-purple flowers, and the other very pale 
lilac. Of the latter a single flower is shown, fig. 4. It is 
quite an anomalous species, differing from all others in 
having the side lobes of the lip reduced to a pair of very 

Jcly 1st, 1904. 



small suberect auricles. In other respects it conforms to 
the characters of Spathoglottis. These differences may 
be seen by reference to 8. Petri, Reichb. f. (t. 6354) ; 
S. Vieillardii, Reichb. t (t. 7013) ; 8. ixioides, Lindl, 
(t. 7060) ; S. gracilis, Rolfe (t. 7366) ; and S. Kimballiana, 
Sander (t. 7443). 

It may be mentioned here that we forgot to state in the 
letterpress to tab. 7958 that we were indebted to Mr. 
F. W. Moore, Keeper of the Grlasnevin Botanic Garden, for 
the specimen of Bulbophyllurti Weddelii there figured. 

Descr. — Very distinct from all other species in the lip 
being reduced to a long, linear body without side lobes, 
these being represented by a pair of very small auricles. 
Bulbs broadly conical-ovoid, obscurely many-angled, six to 
eight lines long, two- or three-leaved ; basal, membranous 
sheath about twice as long as the pseudobulb. Leaves 
lanceolate, acuminate, five to seven inches long, and an inch 
broad in the middle, plicate, membranous ; primary nerves 
five to seven; secondary ones numerous. Scapes basal, 
solitary or sometimes two from the same bulb, erect, nine 
to fifteen inches high, loosely pubescent, flowering part 
five to eight inches long. Flowers numerous, rose-purple 
or sometimes pale lilac, about an inch across. Pedicels, 
including the ovary, ten to fourteen lines long, slender. 
Bracts lanceolate, acuminate, three to five lines long. 
Sepals lanceolate, subacute, recurved, six to seven lines 
long. Petals linear-lanceolate, acute, recurved, six to 
seven lines long. Lip linear, subacute, four to five lines 
long, with a pair of small, rounded, suberect auricles at 
the base, and a pair of cuneate-obovate, somewhat com- 
pressed, nearly erect tubercles about the middle, these 
being bright yellow, dotted with brown. Column slender, 
curved, about five lines long, narrowly winged above the 
middle.— R. A. Rolfe. 

Fig. 1, lip and column ; 2, the column ; 3, the pollinia, showing the attach- 
ment to the viscous gland; 4, a flower of the lilac-coloured variety:—^ 
except 4 enlarged. 



1965 




:S.deV.NF*ahlth 



T/incent Bro aks,T> aJ 



L Reeve 5t C? Loiidor 



Tab. 7965. 
CHRYSANTHEMUM obnatum. 

Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Antiiemideje. 
Genus Chrysanthemum, Linn. ; [Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant vol. ii. p. 424.) 



Chrysanthemum omatum ; herba perennis, ramosa, 2-3 ped. alta, caulibug 
ramisque gracilibus angulatis albo-pubescentibus, foliis exstipulatis graci- 
liter petiolatis papyraceis crassis discoloribus subtus albis circuinscriptione 
ovatis in ramis floriferig 1| — 3 poll, lotigia subpalmatinl pinnatifidis 
segmentis obtusis vel rotundatis subtus margineque albo-tomentosis 
supra atroviridibus sparse pubescentibus, capitulis laxe corymbosis 
distincte pedunculitis If— 2 poll, diametro, involucri braeteis circiter 
3-seriatis omnibus similibus ovato-oblongis obtusis medio albo-tomentosis 
margine brunneo-purpureis, achaeniis glabris obliquis. 

C. ornatum, Hemsl. 

C. marginatum, Rajjill in Gard. Chron. 1904, vol. i. p. 51, fig. 22, non 
Pyrethrum marginatum, Miq. Fl. Ind. Bat. vol. ii. p. 86=C. marginatum, 
N. E. Br. in Kew Bulletin, 1888, p. 99. 



The late G. J. Maximowicz, who was a very critical 
Botanist, and whose knowledge of the plants of Eastern 
Asia was based on observations in the country itself, 
enlarges {Melanges Biologiques, vol. viii. p. 519) on the 
difficulties of dealing with the forms of Chrysanthemum, or, 
as he preferred calling it, Pyrethrum sinense, DC, and 
G. indicum, L., although the strictly wild specimens left no 
doubt of there being two distinct species concerned in the 
varieties resulting from over a thousand years' cultivation 
in China and Japan. 

We were in doubt as to the best way of naming the 
plant figured, but arrived at the conclusion that the least 
unsatisfactory way was to give it a single name, without 
attempting to decide whether it should be regarded as a 
variety of G. sinense. 

By some mischance, but probably on account of the 
strong resemblance in the foliage, it has appeared in some 
of the gardening papers under the designation of Chrysan- 
themum marginatum {Pyrethrum marginatum, Miq. Fl. Ind. 
Bat. vol. ii. p. 86), a species having very numerous quite 
small flower-heads usually destitute of ray-flowers. 
July 1st, 1904. 



We have carefully examined the literature of the subject, 
and the nearest approach that we have found to our plant 
is figured in the Japanese " Somoku Zusetsu," under the 
name of Pyrethrum Decaisneanum, Maxim. But the plant 
there figured does not at all agree with Maximowicz's 
original description. 

G. ornatum was raised at Kew from seeds obtained in 
1895 from the University Botanic Garden, Tokyo. It was 
first tried in the open ground, where it made vigorous 
bushes three feet high, but failed to flower before it was 
cut down by frost. Last year it was tried as a pot-plant, 
and the result was so satisfactory that it is confidently 
anticipated that it will come into favour in the greenhouse, 
where it succeeds admirably, flowering about Christmas 
time. It is so distinct from any of the varieties of the 
Florists' Chrysanthemums as not to be brought into 
comparison with them ; yet its parentage or descent is 
uncertain. 

Bescr. — A branching herb forming dense bushes three 
or four feet high, and as much through. Stems and 
branches slender, angular, clothed with a white pubescence 
changing green. Leaves without stipules, slenderly stalked, 
papery, rather thick, clothed with a white felt underneath 
and on the margin, ovate in outline, one inch and a half 
to two inches long on the flowering branches, somewhat 
palmately pinnatifid ; primary segments usually five, 
obtuse or rounded, usually two- or four-toothed ; teeth 
obtuse. Flower-heads loosely corymbose, distinctly stalked, 
an inch and three-quarters to two inches across. Bracts 
of the involucre in about three series, all similar, ovate- 
oblong, obtuse, tomentose, white in the centre, purple- 
brown on the margin. Achenes small, oblique, glabrous. — 
W. B. H. 

Fig. 1, an involucral bract ; 2, a ray-flower ; 3 and 4, disk-flowers ; 5, anthers ; 
6, style-arms : — all enlarged. 



7966 




M.S.d«LJN.FAcKlifr. 



, \5nc<mtBrool<s,D^r«_SariXt5 I {&? 
I 



L.Reeve iCPLondjorL 



Tab. 7966. 

PITCAIRNIA SPATHACEA. 

Native of Argentina. 

Nat. Ord. Brqmeliace,*. — Tribe Picairniejs. 
Genus PlTCAIJEKU, L'Herit.; (Benth. ei HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 665.) 



Pitcairnia spalliacea; acaulis, foliis patentibus vel recnrvis lineari-acuminatis 
usque ad 16 poll, longis 1 poll, latia supra primum furfuraceia demum 
glabris subtua perpetuo albo-aquamatis, spinis sursum curvatis mar- 
ginatis, peduDCulis 1 ped. altis. panieulis fere 2 ped. altis, bracteis 
navicularibus acuminatis dilute roseis, sepalis ovatia valde acuminatis 
pedicello multo longioribus dilute roseis apioe viridibus 1 poll, longi?, 
petali? obovatis obtusis couvolutis basi nudia obscure cseruleia 1\ poll, 
longis, ovario ovoideo, stvlo auam ovario triplo longiore, stigmate brevi 
spiraliter contorto. 

P. spatbacea, Griseb. in Goett. Abh. vol. xxiv. (1879) p. 329 ; Baker, Eandb. 
Bromel. p. 102. 

Puya spatbacea, Mez in DO. Monogr. F/ian. vol. ix. p. 481. 



This is one of the few species of Pitcairnia having petals 
destitute of a basal scale inside. It was discovered by 
Lorentz on the banks of the Rio Primero, Argentina. The 
date of its introduction into cultivation is not known, but 
the plant from which our figure was taken in February 
last was raised from seeds received from the Breslau 
Botanic Garden in 1896, and has been grown with other 
hard-leaved Bromeliaceae in the Succulent House at Kew, 
where they grow better than in a more humid atmosphere. 

The genera Pitcairnia and Puya are very closely allied, 
differing chiefly in the capsule of the former being septi- 
cidal in dehiscence, and more or less adnate to the calyx, 
while in the latter it is loculicidal and quite free. It was 
probably on account of the very slight degree of union of 
ovary and calyx that the present species was transferred 
to Puya by Mez. About 130 species of Pitcairnia are 
known, of which about twenty have been figured in the 
Magazine, some of them under the name of Puya. 
P. atrorubens, Baker (Puya Warsceiviczii, Wendl. — B. M. t. 
5225), is a striking plant with a dense spike of pale yellow 
flowers subtended by large purplish-brown imbricate 
bracts, which again flowered at Kew last year. In other 
species the inflorescence is more lax, varying from a simple 

Jdly 1st, 1904. 



raceme in P. Andreana, Linden (B. M. fc. 6480), to a panicle 
in P. alta, Hassk. (t. 6606) ; the latter species differing 
from P. spathacea in having unarmed leaves and scarlet 
flowers. 

Descr. — A stemless plant. Leaves patent or the lower 
recurved, linear, acuminate, the largest sixteen inches long 
and one inch broad, at first furfuraceous on the upper 
surface, at length glabrous, with persistent, white scales 
on the lower surface ; marginal spines curved upwards, and 
almost parallel with the leaf -margin. Panicle simply 
branched, nearly two feet high, on a peduncle one foot 
high ; bracts boat-shaped, acuminate, pale rose. Sepals 
ovate, very acuminate, much longer than the pedicels, pale 
rose, green at the apex, one inch long. Petals obovate, 
obtuse, convolute, without a basal scale, dull blue, an inch 
and a quarter long. Ovary ovoid ; style three times as 
long as the ovary ; stigma short, spirally twisted. — G. H. 
Wright. 

Fig. 1, leaf-margin; 2, scale from the under surface of leaf; 3, petal; 
4, stamen ; 5, pistil ; 6, Bketch of entire plant : — 1 to 5 enlarged, 6 reduced. 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 715, JULY, 1904. 



Tab. 7962.— 7ELL0ZIA TRICHOPHYLLA. 
„ 7963.— GEONOMA GRACILIS. 
„ 7964.— SPATHOGLOTTIS HARDINGIANA. 
„ 7965.— CHRYSANTHEMUM ORXATUM. 
„ 7966.— PITCAIRNIA SPATHACEA. 



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7967 




MS.del.J.N.HtchlitK 



'Vincent Brooks,D8y&-Str 



L Reeve &_ C°Larulcrn_ 



Tab. 7967. 

ZINGIBER SPEOTABILE. 
Native of the Malay Peninsula. 

Nat. Ord. Scitamine*. — Tribe Zingibere^. 
Genus Zingiber, Adans. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 646.) 



Zingiber spectabile; herba elata, rhizomate repente, caulibns erectis vel 
inclinatis glabris viridibus usque ad 8 ped. altis, foliis fere distichis 
oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis supra glabris subtus sparse pilosis vel 
glabrescentibus 1 ped. longis 3 poll, latis breviter petiolatis, ligula 
rotundata integra margine membranacea, ecapo radicali, spica oblongo- 
cylindrica 6 poll, longa, pedunculo \\ ped. longo, bracteis rotundatis \\ 
poll, latis uninoris pallide viridibus, marginibus aurantiacis involutis, 
calyce spathaceo 1 poll. longo, corollse tubo 1% poll, longo snbcylindrico, 
lobis oblongo-lanceolatis acutis superiore cucullato dilute luteis, labello 
rubro-brunneo luteo- vel albo-maculato, lobo terminali emarginato 
quam lateralibus rotundatis paullo majore, staminodiis lateralibua 
nullis, basalibus anguste lanceolatis, filamento alato apice utrinque 
unidentato, stylo filiformi apice truncato et ciliis marginato. 

Z. spectabile, Griff. Notul. vol. iii. p. 413. Baker in Hook.f. Flor. Brit. Ind. 
vol. vi. p. 247. Maingay mss. vol. v. p. 48. 



This plant, which flowered in the Aroid House at Kew 
in July of last year, bears the most showy inflorescence of 
any species of the genus, the reddish-brown lip spotted 
with yellow forming a conspicuous contrast to the back- 
ground of yellow-edged bracts. The bracts in Z. Parishii, 
Hook. f. (B. M. t. 6019) are also edged with yellow. 

The species was discovered at Veruppe, in Malacca, by 
Griffith, who published a description, without details, of 
the structure of the flower. Subsequently Dr. A. C. 
Maingay collected it in the same region, and drew up an 
excellent description (loc. sup. cit.), which agrees with the 
present plant, except that the bracts are described as 
reddish-pink. He designates it as " a most elegant 
species," an opinion confirmed by Mr. H. N. Ridley, M.A., 
F.L.S., Director of the Botanic Gardens, Singapore, by 
whom the plant here figured was sent to Kew. Speci- 
mens have also been collected in Perak by Mr. L. Wray, 
Jun., and by Sir George King's collector, while apparently 
the same species was found by Kurz in the South 
Andaman Island. 
Acgusi 1st, 1904. 



The nearest ally of this species is Z. inflexum, Blame 
(Enum. PL Javas, p. 43), a very rare Javan species, which 
differs m having the bracts almost keeled in the upper 
part and the lip blackish purple. 

Descr.—A tall herb. Rhizome creeping. Stems erect 
or inclined, glabrous, green, eight feet high. Leaves 
almost distichous, oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, glabrous 
above, sparingly pilose or glabrescent beneath, one foot 
long, three inches wide, shortly petiolate; ligule short, 
rounded, entire, membranous at the margin. Scape 
springing from the rhizome ; flower-spike oblong-cylindric 
six inches long; peduncle one foot and a half long; bracts 
rotundate, one inch and a quarter wide, one-flowered, 
paJe green, margins orange-yellow, involute. Calyx 
spathaceous, one inch long. Corolla-tube subcylindrical, 
an inch and a half long ; lobes oblong-lanceolate, acute, 
the uppermost hooded, pale yellow. Lip reddish-brown, 
spotted with yellow; terminal lobe emarginate, a little 
larger than the roundish basal ones. Lateral staminodes 
none, basal narrowly lanceolate. Filament winged, with a 
lateral tooth on either side near the insertion of the 
anther Style filiform, truncate and surrounded by a 
ring of hairs at the apex.— C. II. Wright. 

B tv^'l' R a ti™ r; V er 7 tical section of basal part of flower; 3, anther and 
style , 4, Btigraa -.-all enlarged ; 5, reduced view of the whole plant. 



7968 




M.S.dea.J.WJittdhUth 



"WjicentBrocks,T)ajra.Sari ua Sii{> 



L.Reeve &_ CTlarvdoiv. 



Tab. 7968. 
VANDA pumila. 

Natiue of Sihkim. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide.k. — Tribe Van DBA 
Genus Vanda, B. Br. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 578.) 



Yanda pumila ; herba «piphytica caulibua brevibns, foliis diatichis confertia 
recurvis linearibua canaliculars 4-8 poll, longia 6-9 lin. latis apice 
oblique 3-dentatis, racemia axillaribus erectia ssepe 3-floris folia vis ex- 
cedentibus, floribus suaveolentibua eburneis, labello aanguiueo striatia, 
circiter 2-poll. diametro, sepalis petalisque similibua oblongo-spatbulatis, 
petalis anguaiioribus, labelli obconico-calcarati lobis lateralibua brevibua 
triangularibus acutis intermedio vittato ovato-oblongo apice obtuse 
breviterque acuminato, capsula clavata alata circiter bipollicari. 

V. pumila, Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. vi. p. 53. King Si Pantling in Ann, 
Gale. Bot. Gard, vol. v. p. 45, t. 68, et vol. viii. p. 216, t. 288. 

V. cristata, var., Lindl. Fol. Orch., Yanda, p. 10. 



Lindley, who treated this species as a variety of his 
V. cristata (B. M. t. 4304), only knew it from Cathcart's 
drawing in the Kew Herbarium ; but it differs from that 
and the allied V. alpina, Lindl., in the longer spur-sac of 
the lip, and the absence of horns on the tip of the lip. It 
was first described as a distinct species by Sir Joseph 
Hooker in the place cited above, and subsequently figured 
by Sir George King and Mr. Pantling twice over; the 
first figure being a very poor one. 

Although V. pumila and its allies cannot compare for 
beauty with V. tricolor, V. insignis and other congeners, 
it is a very pretty, free-growing orchid, having deliciously 
fragrant flowers. It inhabits hot valleys of the Sikkim 
Himalaya, at about 2,000 feet above sea-level, and there- 
fore requires tropical treatment. In its native haunts it 
flowers, or begins to flower, in May. 

The specimen figured was sent to us in June, 1903, by 
Mr. F. W. Moore, the Keeper of the Glasnevin Botanic 
Gardens ; the only place in the United Kingdom, so far as 
we know, where it is in cultivation. 

Descr. — An epiphytical herb. Stems short. Leaves 
densely distichous, recurved, narrow, channelled, four to 
eight inches long, six to nine lines broad, obliquely three- 

August 1st, 1904. 



toothed at the tip. Racemes axillary, erect, usually three- 
flowered, scarcely exceeding the leaves. Flowers very 
fragrant, ivory-white, lip striped with crimson, from two 
inches to two inches and a half in diameter. Sepals and 
petals similar, the latter somewhat smaller, oblong-spathu- 
late, sometimes tipped with crimson. Lip with a pro- 
minent, obconical spur; lateral lobes short, triangular, 
acute, erect; intermediate lobe or main part of the lip 
ovate-oblong, shortly and somewhat obtusely acuminate, 
striped with crimson. Capsule club-shaped, winged, about 
two inches long. — W. B. H. 

•Fig. 1, side view of lip and column; 2, front view of column; 3 and 4, 
pollen-masses : — all enlarged. 



7969 




M.Sad-J.NPitchKtK 



J &&B 



Tab. 7969. 

THUNBERGIA primulina. 

Native of Eastern Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Acanthace2E. — Tribe Thunbergies. 
Genus Thunbekgia, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hodk.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1072.) 



Thunbergia (§ Euthunbergia) primulina ; species nova, fere undique villosa, 
ex affinitate T. sericese, a qua differt floribus majoribns luteis distincte 
pedunculatis ; T. atriplicifolise etiamque similis, sed pedunculis multo 
brevioribus floribus minoribus; candice nano lignoso incrassato, caulibus 
numerosis annnis debilibus sericeo-villosis, foliis breviter sed distincte 
petiolatis crassiusculis rhomboideo-pvatis l£-2§ poll, longis utrinque 
unilobulatis basi rotundatis vel truncatis apice obtusis vel rotundatis 
primum sericeo-villosis demum glabrescentibus, fioribus axillaribus soli- 
tariis luteis Ij-lJ poll, diametro, pedunculis circiter semipollicaribus, 
bracteis ovato-oblongis vix acutis corollas tubum fere aequantibus, calyce 
brevi multifido glanduloso segmentis linearibus, corollas _ tubo snrsum 
leviter dilatato curvato, limbi lobis patentibus obcordatis tubo intus 
pilorum lineis duabus instructo, staminibus brevibus paullo supra tnbi 
basin insertis, antberis mucronatis loculis basi barbulatis calcaratisque. 

T. primulina, Hemsl. 



Thunbergia, including Bexacentvis (B. M. t. 4786), and 
Meyenia (B. M. t. 5013), presents great variety in habit 
and in the shape, size and colour of the flowers. About 
ninety species have been described ; out of which upwards 
of fifty-five are peculiar to tropical Africa. The present, 
species is only known from the cultivated plant raised 
from seed presented to Kew last year by Sir John Kirk, 
who collected it on the main escarpment of the Uganda 
Railway, at an elevation of 8,000 feet. 

The plant figured flowered in a greenhouse in August 
of last year, and promises to develop into a very orna- 
mental subject for a cool house ; but its value can hardly 
be estimated from a young specimen flowering for the 
first time. Apart from the tube of the corolla, the 
flowers are singularly like those of the common primrose, 
both in colour and shape. In general appearance it closely 
resembles the extratropical South African T. atrijjlicifolia, 
Mey., and it was provisionally given that name. 

Among other ornamental species previously figured in 
the Magazine, we may note the old favourite T. alata 
(t. 2591 and 3512) ; T. grandiflora (t. 2360) ; T. laurifolia 

August 1st, 1901. 



(t. 4985); T. natahnsis (t. 5082); T. cocci nea (t. 5124), 
and T. affinis (t. 6975). 

Descr. — Perennial, at first silky-hairy in nearly all 
parts. Rootstock thickened, woody. Stems numerous, 
weak, annual. Leaves shortly stalked, rather thick, 
rhomboid-ovate, one inch and a half to two inches and a 
half long, with one small lobe on each side, rounded or 
truncate at the base, obtuse or rounded at the tip, 
becoming' almost glabrous. Flowers axillary, solitary, 
primrose-yellow, with an orange ring around the mouth of 
the tube, about an inch and a half across ; stalks about 
half an inch long ; bracts ovate-oblong, nearly as long as 
the tube of the corolla. Calyx very short, glandular, 
multifid ; segments unequal, linear. Corolla-tube nearly 
cylindrical, slightly curved ; lobes of the limb spreading, 
obcordate; tube furnished inside with two longitudinal 
lines of hairs. Stamens very short, inserted a little above 
the base of the tube ; anthers mucronate, with the cells 
bearded and spurred at the base. Stigma nearly equally 
two-lipped, included. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, bracts laid open, showing calyx and pistil ; 2, calyx laid open and 
pistil-, 3, corolla-tube laid open, showing the stamens; 4 and 5, front and 
back views of anther : — all enlarged. 



7970 




M-S.delJN.Hl^trth 



"VmceivLBroolffl^ay & t 



L "Reeve &-C°Lan.darL 



Tab. 7970. 

TECOMA SHIRENSIS. 
Native of Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Bignoxiace^:. — Tribe Tecome-j:. 
Genus Tecoma, Juss; (Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1044.) 



Tecoma (§ Tecomaria) shirensis j frutex erectus, 4-10 ped. altus, ramis sub- 
teretibus minute pubescentibus, foliis oppositis vel rariua ternatis 
longipetiolatis 4-9 poll, longis imparipinnatis 4-6-jugis, foliolis ovatis 
acute acuminatis, plus minus serratis supra glabris subtus in venarum 
axillis pilosis ceterum glabrescentibns, racemis termiaalibus simplicibus 
vel ssepius cymas trifloras gerentibus, pedunculo folia sequante vel 
superante, rbachi pedicellisque pubescentibus, bracteis lineari-subulatis 
caducis, calyce tubuloso-campanulato 5-7 lin. longo leviter pubescente 
glanduloso, lobis deltoid eo-ovatia acuminatis tubi dimidium sequantibus, 
corolla anguste infundibuliformi antice curvata valde bilabiata, labio 
postico erecto, antico deflexo, lobis late ovatis obtusis, ataminibus exsertis, 
antherarum lobis supra connatis, disco cupulari, ovario minute lepidoto, 
ovulis in loculis 4-seriatis, capsula 4^ poll, longa rostrata. 

T. shirensis, Baker in Kew Bull. 1894, p. 30. 

T. Whytei, 0. S. Wright in Kew Bull. 1897, p. 275. 

T. nyikensis, Baker in Kew Bull. 1898, p. 159. 

Tecomaria shirensis, K. Schum. in Engl. Pjlanzenw. Ost-Afr.,C. (1895), p. 363. 



The genus Tecoma as founded by Jussieu {Gen. PL p. 139) 
was a heterogeneous assemblage of species. The plant 
from which the name of the genus was derived, Tecomaxo- 
chitl of Hernandez (Nov. PL Hist. p. 408) is almost certainly 
not a member of the Bignoniaeeae at all ; but it has not 
yet been satisfactorily identified, though Dunal (DG. Prodr. 
vol. xiii. pars i. p. 536), refers it to Solandra guttata, with 
the remark that the figure is extremely bad. The other 
species included in Tecoma by Jussieu were Blgnonia starts 
and B. radicans, both having pinnate leaves and a regular 
calyx, and B. pentaphylla, which has digitate leaves and an 
irregularly split calyx. As it was apparent that the 
pinnate- and digitate-leaved species could not be retained 
in the same genus, Bentham and Hooker (Gen. Plant, 
vol. ii. p. 1044) restricted the name Tecoma to the former. 
Unfortunately, however, Bureau, followed by other con- 
tinental botanists, referred the digitate-leaved species to 
Tecoma, so that much confusion now prevails in the 
nomenclature of the genus. This is accentuated by the 
August 1st, 1904. 



fact that the pinnate-leaved set has been split up into no 
fewer than seven genera, based on very slender characters. 
Some idea of these genera may be gathered by comparing 
figures which have appeared in this Magazine, such as 
those of T. stans, Juss. (t. 3191), a native of tropical 
America, T. jasminoides, Lindl. (t. 4004), Australia, and 
T.fulva, G. Don (t. 4896), Chili, with T. capensis, Lindl. 
(Bot. Reg. t. 1117), and T. undulata. Gr. Don (Smith, 
Exot. Bot. t. 19). All of these are retained in Teeoma by 
Bentham and Hooker, and have in common pinnate leaves, 
a loculicidal capsule and a regular calyx. 

Teeoma shirensis is a shrub of vigorous growth, with 
flowers very similar to those of T. capensis, but much 
finer. In company with its nearest ally T. Nyassse, Oliv. 
(Hook. Ic. PI. t. 1351), which differs chiefly in the shape 
of the leaflets, it grows on the high plateau of Nyassaland, 
where it flowers from May to September, at altitudes of 
between 2000 and 7000 feet above the sea. The plant 
from which the present figure was prepared was raised 
from seed sent to Kew in December, 1902, by Mr. J. 
McClounie, Head of the Scientific Department, Zomba. 
It flowered in March of the present year. 

Descr. — An erect shrub, four to ten feet high; branches 
nearly round, minutely pubescent. Leaves opposite or 
three at a node, four to nine inches long, unequally pin- 
nate ; leaflets in four to six pairs, ovate, serrate, tapered 
to a sharp point and glabrous, except on the lower 
surface, where there are tufts of hairs in the axils of the 
veins. Inflorescence terminal, bearing a number of usually 
three-flowered, shortly-stalked cymes ; rhachis and pedicels 
pubescent ; bracts linear-subulate. Calyx tubular-cam- 
panulate, five to seven lines long, pubescent and glandular ; 
lobes triangular-ovate, tapering, acute. Corolla funnel- 
shaped, curved forwards; upper lip erect; lower lip 
deflexed. Stamens exserted ; anther-lobes connate above. 
Ovary scaly ; ovules in four rows in each cell. Capsule 
four and a half inches long, beaked. — T. A. Sprague. 



Fig. 1, half of calyx out away to show pistil ; 2, base of corolla with 
stamens and staminode ; 3 and 4, anthers ; 5, apex of style ; 6, dehiscing fruit ; 
7, a seed: — all except 6 enlarged. 



1311 




MS. del, JKTit<*.lith 



"ASru3«ntBrooKa-D< 



• 



Tab. 7971. 

EUPHORBIA viperina. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. EuPHORBrACE^:. — Tribe Euphorbie^k. 
Genus Euphorbia, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 258 ) 



Euphorbia (§ Euphorbium) viperina; species ex affinitate E. Caput -Medusae 
et E. parvivnammge a quibus foliis minutis sqnamiformibus ditfert; etiam 
E. tridentatos (E. anacanthse, B. M! , t. 2520) affinis, ab ea glandular 
lobis Knearibus recedit ; frntex carnosns, erectus, inermis caule nunc 
brevi obconice incrassato apice plus minusre stellatim ramoso nunc 
elongato cylindrico podarlis carnosis elongato-hexagonis tecto, foliis 
ovatia vix 1 lin. longis acutis cito deciduis, pednnculis brevissimis 
monocephalis, involucri campanulati lobis albis hirtis fimbriatisque, 
glatidalis carnosis lacerato-bilobis, staminibus filamentis phimosis inter- 
mixtis, ovario hirsuto stylo glabro stigmate late trilobato lobis crenulatis, 
f'ructu ignoto. 

E. viperina, A. Berg, in Monatsschr. fur KalcteenJc. vol. xii. (1902), p. 39. 



The genus Euphorbia is one of the largest in the 
vegetable kingdom, numbering five to six hundred species, 
which exhibit the greatest variety in size, habit, duration 
and foliage. They are spread all over the world, except 
the colder regions. The section to which. E. viperina 
belongs is confined to the Old World, and mainly to 
Africa ; and the species are still very imperfectly known. 

The growth of E. viperina and allied species is very 
irregular under different conditions. When propagated 
from seed the primary stem develops as an obconical 
body, which bears numerous branches spreading in a 
stellate manner from near the top. The further develop- 
ment we have not observed. When propagated from 
cuttings the branching is one-sided, and the main stem 
elongates considerably — two to three feet. 

This species comes very near the one figured in the 
Magazine (t. 2520), as E. anacantha, Ait., especially in the 
minute, scale-like leaves ; but the involucral glands are 
very different. E. globosa, Sims (B. M. t. 2624) is another 
species of the same section. E. meloformis, Ait., is very 
much like some of the unarmed species of Melocactus. 

It is a noteworthy fact that although the genus Euphor- 
August 1st, 1904. 



bia is represented by a hundred or more species in Central 
America, the headquarters of the Cactacese, the sections 
Diacanthium and Muphorbium of the genus Euphorbia, 
which simulate the Cactacese so closely, are not repre- 
sented in that region. 

Descr. — A fleshy, erect or straggling, thornless shrub, 
one to two feet high. Stems and branches usually 
cylindrical, clothed with spirally arranged, fleshy " poda- 
ria " or leaf-bases. Leaves minute, ovate, acute, scarcely 
a twelfth of an inch long, falling soon after development. 
Peduncles short, bearing a single head of flowers. Invo- 
lucre campanulate ; lobes white, hairy, fringed ; glands 
fleshy, two-lobed ; lobes crenulate. Stamens (male flowers) 
interspersed with plumose filaments. Ovary hairy; style 
glabrous ; stigma broadly three-lobed ; lobes crenulate. 
Seed-vessel unknown. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, an inflorescence ; 2, part of involucre laid open ; 3, an involucral 
gland ; 4, one of the feathery filaments which are interspersed with the male 
flowers; 5, a male flower; 6, a female flower and bases of stalks of male 
flowers -.—-all enlarged ; 7, whole plant, as it was when drawn : — about half 
natural size. 



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MrLceiit.BrooUs,Day& Sal 



Tab. 7972. 
rosa gigantea. 

Native of Eastern, India, North Burma and Western China. 



Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Rose*. 
Genus Eosa, Linn, ; (Benth. et Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 625.) 



Rosa (§ Indicse) giyantea ; species ex affinitate R. indices, Linn., a qua ramnHs 
soepissime ebracteatis unifljris iloribus fructibusque majoribns differt; 
frutex robustissimus, alte scandens vel vagans, caulibus basi 3-4 poll, 
diametro aculeis fere rectis circiter 3-4 lin. longis armatis, ramulis 
floriferis inermibus vel aculeis paucis recurvis armatis, foliis in ramis 
floriferis 3-7-foliolatis 3-9 poll, longis, petiolis aculeolatis setoso- 
glandulosis, foliolis breviter petiolulatis lanceolatis 1-3 poll, longis 
acuminatis margine calloso-serrulatis glabris, stipnlia integris fere ad 
apicem adnatis parte libera liueari minute glandulosa, pedunculis ssepius 
uiiifloris interdum trifloris srepius elongatis nudis, floribus albis vel 
lutescentibus (petalis in alabastris extus fere aureis) 4-6 poll, diametro, 
sepalis anguste lanceolatis longe acuminatis usque ad 1 poll, longis 
prrecipue intus albo-pubescentibus margine minute glandulosis, petalis 
obovato-rotundatis lf-2| poll, diametro abrupte obtuseque acuminata, 
carpellis pilosis, fructu globoso circiter l£ poll, diametro inermi glabro. 

R. gigantea, Gollett, ex Orgpin in Compfes-Rendus des Seances de la Soc. Bot. 
Belg. vol. xxvii. (1888), pp. 150-154, et vol. xxviii. (1889), pp. H 7 14. 
Oard. Chron. 1889, vol. ii. p. 12, fig. 4. Coll. et Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. 
Soc. Bot. vol. xxviii. (1890), p. 55, t. 9. W. C. Leach in Gard. Chron. 
1903, vol. i. pp. 188 et 211. S. W. F. in diar. cit. p. 278. 

R. macrocarpa, Watt, ex Crepin in Comptes Rendus des Seances de la Soc. 
Bot. Belg. vol. xxviii. (1889), p. 13. 



This remarkable Rose was, we believe, first discovered 
by Dr. (now Sir George) Watt in Manipur, in 1882, 
at an altitude of 7000 ft., and there are excellent speci- 
mens in the Kew and other herbaria collected by him. 
He regarded it as an undescribed species, and named it 
11. macrocarpa, but he never published a description. 
The name, however, has appeared in print in the place 
cited above. 

In 1888 the late Col. Sir Henry Collett discovered the 
same species in the Shan Hills, Upper Burma, some 
five degrees south of the original locality, and he sent 
dried specimens and seeds of it to Calcutta and Kew. 
More recently it has been collected in Mengtze, Yunnan, 
South-western China, by Mr. W. Hancock and Dr. A. 
Henry. The former describes the flowers as white, and 
sometimes fifteen inches in circumference. 

S£PIE31BEK 1ST, 1904. 



Sir Henry Collett was greatly interested in his Rose, 
which impressed him as one of the most striking objects 
in the forests of the Shan Hills, and he was desirous of 
its being published. Accordingly the Calcutta specimens 
were sent to Prof. F. Cre^pin, who described them under 
Collett's proposed name. 

The seed sent to Kew germinated, and the plants grew 
apace. Some were given to other gardens; some were 
tried at Kew under various conditions, but none flowered. 
One was planted out in the Succulent House, where it 
remained, for years, and must have made hundreds of 
yards of stems and branches, but it never flowered. At 
the present time there is a plant in the Temperate House 
with shoots some fifty feet long, showing no signs of 
flowering. 

Albury Park, Guildford, one of the seats of the Duke 
of Northumberland, is the only place, except under glass 
with Mr. Cant, the Nurseryman, we believe, where it has 
flowered in England, and we are indebted to Her Grace 
the Duchess for the opportunity of giving a coloured 
figure of it. Mr. Leach, the Head Gardener at Albury, 
writes that two flowers only were produced in 1903, " the 
first of which was just on six inches across." In Feb- 
ruary of the present year, the same plant bore about a 
dozen flowers, the largest being a little more than five 
inches and a half across. 

Every possible method of propagation has been tried 
ineffectually in order to obtain flowers more freely in this 
country ; yet it flowers profusely on the Riviera. 

The drawing of the fruit was made from a dried 
specimen, soaked out. Sir George Watt tells us that it is 
as large as a small apple, bright yellow, edible, and it is 
sold in the bazaars of Mauipur State. 

Fortune's " Double Yellow," which is very closely allied 
to R. gigantea, is also usually a very shy bloomer, though 
it sometimes flowers freely when worked as a standard. 

Descr. — A very vigorous, climbing or rambling shrub. 
Stems as much as three or four inches in diameter at the 
base, more or less armed with nearly straight prickles 
about a quarter of an inch long. Flowering-branches 
usually unarmed, sometimes furnished with a few curved 
prickles. Leaves usually of five or seven leaflets, upper- 



most often of three leaflets, three to nine inches long; 
petioles furnished with small prickles and glandular 
bristles. Leaflets lanceolate, one to three inches long, 
glabrous, serrulate. Stipules entire, minutely glandular, 
adnate to the petiole almost to the top, free part linear.' 
Peduncles often elongated, naked, one- or rarely three- 
flowered. Flowers white or more or less tinged with 
yellow, almost golden in bud, four to six inches across. 
Sepals linear-lanceolate, acuminate, about an inch long, 
pubescent and white on the inner surface, minutely 
glandular along the margin. Petals orbicular-obovate, 
largest two inches and a half across, abruptly acuminate. 
Carpels hairy. Fruit globose, about an inch and a half in 
diameter, quite smooth. — W.B. H. 



Fig. 1, free part of stipule; 2 and 3, stamens; 4, pistil; 5, fruit; 6, a ripe 
carpel : — all except h enlarged. 



Tab. 7073. - f4**- 

DYSCHORISTE Hildebrandtii, 
Native of East Tropical Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Acanthace.e. — Tribe Buellie.e. 
Genus Dyschoriste, Nees; {Benth. et HooTc. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1077.) 



Dyschoriste Hildebrandtii; frutex ramosissimuB, tripedalis, caulibus quad- 
rangularibus juvenilibus viridibua glandulosis vetustioribus glabris 
pallide brunneis, foliis ovato-lanceolatis obtusia basi breviter attenuatia 
utrinque pubescentibus absque petiolo usque ad 1£ poll, longis 9 lin. latis, 
petiolis 4 lin. longis, cymis axiilaribus breviter pedunculatis paucifloris 
saepius trifloris, calyce 6 liu. longo extus glanduloso intus pilis aimplici- 
bus appressia vestito, segmentis 5 quam tubo aacmilongis lineari- 
lanceolatis longe acuminata, corolla lilacina fauce loboque antico 
violaceo-striato bilabiata, labio postico 2-lobo lobis oblongis obtusia 
3 lin. longis lj lin. latis, labio antico 3-lobo oblongo-spathulatis obtusia 
lobis 5 lin. longis 2 lin. latia, filamentia inferioribua quam superioribus 
paullo longioribus et cum iia breviter connatis, antheris oblongis obtusia 
1 lin. longis prope basiu doraifixis, ovario oblongo 1£ lin. longo glabro, 
stylo filiformi. 

Dyschoriste Hildebrandtii, Lindau in Engl. & Prantl, Natiirl. Pflanzenfam. 
vol. iv. 3 B. p. 302 ; Engl. Pfl. Ost. Afr. 0. p. 367; C B. Clarke in Dyer, 
Ft. Trop. Afr. vol. v. p. 76. 

Calophanes Hildebrandtii, S. Moore in Joum. Bot. 1880, p. 8. 



Dyschoriste consists of about sixty species, twenty-two 
of which are found in Tropical Africa, while a few occur 
in South Africa, Madagascar and India, and the remainder 
in America, from Texas to Peru. Most are small shrubs 
of scrubby habit, and but few have found their way 
into cultivation. Some have been cultivated under Calo- 
phanes, a name published by D. Don in Sweet's " British 
Flower Garden," ser. 2, tab. 181 (1833), which must be 
superseded by Dyschoriste, Nees, published in the pre- 
ceding year. 

Dyschoriste is allied to the well-known genus Ruellia, 
from which it differs in having only two ovules in each 
cell, while the latter has three or more. 

D. Hildebrandtii was discovered by Hildebrandt at 
Kitui, in British East Africa, and it was afterwards 
collected in Usambara by Hoist. The plant here figured 
flowered in the Water Lily House at Kew in October, 1903, 
and it was still in full bloom in June of the present year. 
September 1st, 1904. 



Descr. — A much-branched shrub, about three feet high. 
Stems quadrangular, green and glandular when young, 
pale brown and glabrous in age. Leaves ovate-lanceolate, 
obtuse, shortly attenuate at the base, pubescent on both 
surfaces, an inch and a half long, nine lines wide ; petioles 
two to four lines long. Cymes axillary, shortly pedunculate, 
few-flowered. Calyx six lines long, five-lobed half-way 
down, glandular outside, clothed with simple adpressed 
hairs inside ; segments linear-lanceolate, long-acuminate. 
Corolla lilac with violet streaks in the throat and on the 
lower lip ; upper lip with two oblong, obtuse lobes three 
lines long and a line and a half wide ; lower lip with three 
oblong-spathulate, obtuse lobes five lines long and two 
lines wide. Lower filaments a little longer than the upper, 
and united to them for a little distance above their in- 
sertion ; authers oblong, obtuse, one line long, dorsifixed 
near the base. Ovary oblong, a line and a quarter long, 
glabrous ; style filiform. — C. H. Wright. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil; 2, corolla laid open; 3 and 4, anthers; 5, longi- 
tudiual section of ovary ; 6, stigma : — all enlarged. 



7973 




M.S.d«U.imicJvlith. 



"Vincent Broote^^&SonUttr'S' 



Tab. 7974. 3 LJ* 

DENDROBIUM Williamson.. 

Native of North-eastern India. 



Nat. Ord. Ojichidacej:. — Tribe Epidendueje 
Genus Dendrobium, Sicartz; (Benth. et Uook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498.) 



Dendrobium (§ Formosa^ — Nigro-hirsutas) Williamsoni ; caulibus erectis 
crassiusculis 6-12 poll, altis polyphylliB foliisque pvimum nigro-hirsutis, 
foliia oblongo-lanceolatis 3-4 poll, longis apice oblique bidentatis flores 
excedentibus, pedunculis subterminalibus saepius bifloris, floribus 2|-3 
poll, diametro eburneis labelli lobis lateralibus splendide aurantiacis, 
sepalis petalisque similibus lanceolatis a cutis, labelli barbellati lobi8 
rotundatia ciliatis lateralibus minoribus erecto-incurvis terminali recurvo, 
antbera basi antica puberula, columnar pede piano. 

D. Williamsoni, Bay & Reichb.f. in Oard. Chron. 1869, p. 78. Uook.f. Fl. 
Brit. Ind. vol. v. p. 721. King & Bantling in Ann. But. Gard. Ualc. 
vol. v. p. 6, t. 9. Bay Brau-ings in Bibl. Kew., vol. xiii. u. 77. 



Dendrobium Williamsoni has an interesting history. It 
was discovered in Assam by Mr. W. J. Williamson, a 
nephew of the late Mr. W. Day, to whom he sent a living 
plant in 1868. It flowered in the latter gentleman's 
notable collection in 1869, and it was described by the lato 
Dr. Reichenbach in the place cited above. We are unable 
to trace its course of distribution under cultivation, but it 
is on record that it flowered in the Calcutta Botanic 
Garden in 1879. In March, 1887, an unnamed plant 
flowered at Kew, and Mr. R. A. Rolfe identified it with 
Dendrobium Williamsoni from Reichenbach's description ; 
but the type being locked up at Vienna, absolute certainty 
was unattainable. In 1902, Mrs. Wolstenholrne, sister of 
the late W. Day, presented that gentleman's most valuable 
collection of some thousands of drawings of cultivated 
orchids, and Mr. Eolfe's identification of the plant was 
confirmed by a drawing of the original D. Williamsoni. 

It may be added here that Day's drawings include a 
considerable number of the types of Reichenbach's species 
founded on cultivated specimens, so that the senseless 
provisions of his will are, to some extent, nullified. 

D. Williamsoni flowered again at Kew in 1890, and 
September 1st, 1904. 



flowers are preserved of this and previous dates in the 
Herbarium. In March of the present year, Mr. F. W. 
Burbidge sent flowers of this species to Kew for identifica- 
tion, and as it was flowering at Kew at the same time, the 
accompanying figure was made from the materials offered 
by the two establishments. 

."Nearly six hundred proposed species of Dendrobium 
have been described, and it is estimated that about five 
hundred of them may be valid. They range from North- 
west India to Ceylon, China, Japan, the Malayan Archi- 
pelago, New Guinea, Australia, New Caledonia, New 
Zealand and Polynesia, eastward to Tahiti. The full 
merits of D. Williamsoni have probably not yet been 
brought out, and we can only add that it is very attrac- 
tive. . . 

Reichenbach compares the present species with his 
D. Draconis (Bot. Zeifc. 1862, p. 214; B. M. t. 5459, under 
the name eburneum). Other species of the same affinity 
are: D. Lowii, Lindl. (B. M. t. 5303); D. infundibulum, 
Lindl. (B. M. t. 5446), and D. Wattii, Reichb. f. (B. M. t. 
6715). 

Bescr. — A caulescent specie3. Stems erect, rather thick, 

six to twelve inches high, many-leaved, more or less 

clothed, as well as the leaves, with black hairs. Leaves 

oblong-lanceolate, three to four inches long, obliquely 

two-toothed at the tip, slightly overtopping the flowers. 

Peduncles from the upper joints, usually two-flowered. 

Flowers two inches and a half to three inches across, 

ivory-white, or with a more decided tinge of yellow, and a 

zone of bright orange-red on the lateral lobes of the lip. 

Sepals and petals similar, lanceolate, acute. Lip bearded ; 

lobes rounded, fringed, lateral smaller, erect, involute, 

terminal recurved. Anther hairy in front at the base. 

Column not hollowed in front. — W.B. H. 



Fig. 1, lip ; 2, column, and spur; 3, anther ; 4 and 5, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



1914 




M.S.del J-NPitchHtk 



"WiioentBroaiciJDav&Sar.USInT 




797.5 



M. S.del JJJ.HtcK lith 



Vincent Brooks .Dajr&SoJiXtf 



L. Reeve &. C9Landr)7L 



Tab. 7975. 
pyrus nledzwetzktana. 

Native of Central Asia. 

Nat. Ord. EosacevE. — Tribe Pome<*. 
Genus Piuus, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 626.) 

Pyrus Niedzwetzkyana \ arbor parva (specimen in horto Kewensi cultum jam 
12-14 ped. altum), ramulis floriferis rigidis rectis crassiusculis cortice 
glabro atro-purpureo, foliis longe graciliterque petiolatis in ramis 
fructiferis subcoriaceis rigidis glabrescentibus demum rubescentibus 
lanceolatis oblanceolatis vel oblongis absque petiolo 3-5 poll, longis 
crenato-serrulatis saepius breviter acuminatis subtus pallidioribus secus 
costam saepe etiam puberulis, petiolo usque ad 2 poll, longo venisque 
nitido-roseis puberulis, floribus roseo-purpureis l|-lf poll, diametro 
numerosissimis in ramis lateralibus brevissimis fasciculatis, pedunculis 
gracilibus 6-9 lin. longis, calycis albo-lanati lobis lanceolatis acutis 
demum recurvis 2|-3 lin. longis, petalis obovatis circiter 9 lin. longis, 
staminibus stylos glabros excedentibus, fructu pendulo conoideo If— 2 
poll, longo extus sanguineo-purpureo intus per totam carnem roseo- 
purpureo. 

Pyrus Niedzwetzkyana, Hemsl. 

Malus Medwietzkyana, Dieck. Neuheiten Offerte des Nat. Arb. Zoschen, 1891, 
p. 16. Gard. ' Chron. 1891, vol. i. p. 461. Wiener Illustr. Gartenz. 1891, 
p. 164. 

Malus Niedzwetzkyana, Dieck, diar. cit. 1892, p. 18. Koehne, Bendrologie, 
1893, p. 259. 

Pyrus malus, Durand & Jackson, Index Kewensis Suppl. i. p. 262. 



This remarkably distinct apple is an instance in which 
it seems better, for practical purposes, to avoid the 
theoretical species, and publish it under the single name 
it goes by in cultivation. It might be argued that it is 
only a variety of Pyrus Mains, Linn., but we do not 
propose discussing that question here. It certainly is a 
most striking object, whether in flower or in fruit. 

As to the spelling of the distinctive name, we have 
adopted the one used by the author in his second account 
of the plant, where, however, he gives no explanation of 
the deviation from the first. In each case he states 
that he names it after his patron, who collected it 
wild in the Hi District, South-west Siberia. Mr. Dieck 
further states that this apple is widely spread in Western 
and Central Asia, both in a wild state and cultivated, and 
he believes it is the same as a common wild apple of the 
September 1st, 1904. 



Caucasus, which is highly prized for its fruit by the Swabian 
colonists. He received it from Kashgar and the Plateau 
of Talgar, and the European stock appears to have been 
raised from seed of cultivated trees in the former locality, 
where it is called " Kisil alma," or red apple. With the 
exception of the leaves all parts of this apple are red — 
bark, wood, flowers and fruit, and the leaves turn red 
in autumn. Even the flesh of the nice-tasting fruit is of 
a deep, rosy red. 

Pyrus Niedzuwtzkyana is hardy at Kew, where it 
flowered profusely last spring, and is just ripening fruit at 
the time of writing this. The fruit actually represented 
in the plate is from a drawing made by Mr. George Massee, 
of a very fine fruiting specimen sent to Kew from Bitton, 
in August, 1901, by Canon Ellacombe. 

Descr. — A small, free-growing tree. Flowering-branches 
long, straight, stiff, rather thick ; bark smooth, very dark 
purple. Leaves on long, slender petioles, on the fruiting 
branches rather thick, stiff, nearly glabrous, tinged red, 
lanceolate, oblanceolate or oblong, three to five inches long 
without the petiole, finely crenately-toothed, shortly 
acuminate, slightly hairy along the midrib ; petiole one to 
two inches long, bright red as well as the midrib, slightly 
hairy. Flowers deep rose-purple, an inch and a half to 
an inch and three-quarters across, very numerous, clustered 
at the ends of very short, lateral branchlets ; stalks 
slender, six to nine lines long. Calyx woolly, white ; 
lobes lanceolate, acute, about a quarter of an inch long. 
Petals obovate. Stamens longer than the smooth styles. 
Fruit pendulous, conical, one inch and three-quarters 
to two inches long, skin crimson-purple, flesh rose-purple 
throughout.— W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, section of a flower; 2 and 3, stamens: — all enlarged; i, fruit:— 
natural size. 



7376 




M.S. del- J.N.Fitch litK 



L Reeve &G?LaRdccn. 



Aftnc«ntBro<Jffi J)ayA S<mlt d tap 



Tab. 7976. 
MOR^A Thomsoni. 

Native of Eastern Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Irjdace.e. — Tribe Mor.ee,e. 
Genus Mob./KA, Linn, ; (Benih. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 



Mor^a T/iomsoni; herba rigida Junci habitu, caule erecto usque ad 1 ped. 
alto, foliis teretibus glabris 6-sulcatis 4-7 poll, longis superioribus 
gradatim reductis, fasciculis florum spicatim dispositis, spathis 2 ovato- 
lanceolatis acuminatis rubro-brunneis 2-floris 1-1| poll, longis, floribus 
l|-2 poll, diam., periantbii segmentis pallide lilacinis intns basi luteis 
bmnneo-maculatis costis intus violaceis extus rubro-brunneis notatis 
exterioribus ovatis acuminatis e basi angusta lanceolatis acuminatiB 
interioribus quam exterioribus minoribus.antheris oblongis basi sagittatis 
connectivo apice breviter producto, styli ramis triangularibus obtusis 
emarginatis undulatis, ovario oblougo, capsulis circiter 4 lin. longis 
castaneis. 

Morasa Thomson!, Baker, Handb. Jridese, p. 57, et in Dyer, Fl. Trop. Afr. 
vol. vii. p. 341. 

This plant, which flowered in the Cape House at Kew 
in July, 1903, was raised from seeds sent by Mr. J. 
McClounie, Head of the Scientific Department Zomba, 
British Central Africa, who collected them on the Nyika 
Plateau. It has also been found by Mr. Alexander "YVhyte 
at an altitude of 4000-6000 ft. on Mount Malosa, in 
JSTyasaland ; but it was originally described from a 
specimen discovered by the late Mr. Joseph Thomson, 
F.R.G.S., on the higher plateau in German East Africa, 
north of Lake Nyasa. 

The genus Morasa, consisting of about sixty species, has 
its headquarters in South Africa, while sixteen species 
occur in Tropical Africa, and one, M. Robinsoniana, 
F. Muell. (B. M.. t. 7212) inhabits Lord Howe Island. 

During the early part of the last century, when Cape 
plants were largely imported, many species of Morasa were 
introduced with them, and were figured in the publica- 
tions of that day. A reference to these figures (B. M. 
tabs. 168, 613, 712, 750, 759, 771, 1012, 1276, 5438) will 
show that many are of great beauty, but the fugacious 
nature of the flowers, as in many other Iridacex, has 
prevented them from becoming general favourites. 
September 1st, 1904. 



Descr. — A rigid herb of rush-like habit. Stem erect, 
reaching a height of one foot. Leaves terete, glabrous, 
six-furrowed, the lowest about seven inches long, gradually 
becoming shorter upwards. Floivers in fascicles spicately 
arranged, about an inch and three-quarters in diameter. 
Spathes two to each fascicle, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, 
reddish-brown, an inch to an inch and a half long. 
Perianth-segments pale lilac, the base inside yellow, 
spotted with brown ; midrib of each segment darker lilac 
inside, reddish-brown outside ; outer segments ovate from 
a narrow base, acuminate ; inner smaller than the outer, 
lanceolate, acuminate. Anthers oblong, sagittate at the 
base ; connective shortly produced at the apex. Ovary 
oblong; style-arms triangular, obtuse, emarginate, undu- 
late. Capsule four lines long, chestnut-colour. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, portion of leaf showing cross section ; 2, an outer perianth- 
segment; 3, stamens and style-arms; 4, anther, front view; 5, anther, 
back view : — all enlarged. 



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„ 7973.— DYSCHORISTE HILDEBRANDTII. 
„ 7974.— DENDROBIUM WILLIAMSON!. 
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„ 7976.— MORyEA THOMSONI. 



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A\t ^ 



7977 




M.S.deU.N.Rtchlith 



Vincent Br o olc;,Day & San I .f* In <y 



L Raeve & C° Loruiojv 



Tab. 7977. 

LONICERA etrusca var. superba. 

Native of the Mediterranean region. 



Nat. Ord. CapbifoliacejE. — Tribe Lonicere.b. 
Genus Lonicera, Linn. ; (Bentk. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 5.) 



Lonicera etrusca; frutex alfce scandens, ramosissiraus, caulibus glabris 
primum purpureia teretibus. foliis obovatia vel supremia fere orbiculari- 
bus 2| poll. longia 2 poll, latia iategris supra et ad nervoa subtus sparRe 
pubesuentibus superioribus basi connatis, capitulis flonim saapins ternis 
terminahbus circa 12-noris, floribus biais involucro quadrilubo cinctis, 
calyce viridi 1 lin. longi lobis deltoideia acutis, corolla primum straminea 
demum aurantiaca, tubo 1 poll, longo tubuloso-int'undibnlit'or.jii, labio 
poatico 5 lin. longo 4 lin. lato ad quartam partem in lob)s 4 ovatos iui- 
biicatos diviso, labio antico obiongo 7 lin. longo \\ lin. Ltto, staminibua 
longe exsertis, stylo rilifurmi, baccis rubris. 

L. etrusca, Santi, Viagg, al Montiam. vol. i. p. 113, tab. 1 (1795) ; Savi. Fl. 
Pis. vol. i. (1798) p. 236 ; DO. Prodr. vol. iv. p. 331 ; Reichb. Ic. Fl. Germ. 
vol. xvii. tab. 1172; Willk. & Lange, Prodr. Fl. Hisp. vol. ii. p. 332; 
JBoiss. Fl. Orient, vol. iii. p. 5; Nym. Consp. Fl. Eur. ed. 2, p. 321; 
W. Watson in Gard. Ghron. 19-J3, vol. ii. p. 2Sl ; Rehder in Rep. Missouri 
JBot. Gard. vol. xiv. (1903), p. 194 

L. hetrnsca, Host, Fl. Austr. vol. i. p. 298; Bub. Fl. Pyren. vol. ii. p. 335. 

L. gigantea, Sort, ex Carriers in Rev. Hort. 1882, p. 558; var. superba, 
Sort, ex W. Watson, in Gard. Chron. 1903, vol. ii. p. 281. 

L. Charlotti, Hort. ex Watson, I.e. 

Caprifolium Periclymenum. Gouan, Hort. Monsp. p. 101 (1768), non Linn. 

C etruscum, Roem. & Schidt., Syst. Veg. vol. v. p. 261. 

C. dimorphum, O. Kuntze, Rev. Gen. PL vol. i. p. 27 L 



Amongst about a dozen species of Lonicera figured in 
this work, the present one most nearly resembles the 
North American L. Jiava, Sims (t. 1318), which differs in 
having solitary flower-heads and a shorter, less slender, 
corolla-tube. Render's monograph {lor. sup. oil.) contains 
about 150 well-marked species belonging to this genus, 
grouped in two subgenera, viz. : — Ckamxcerasus, having 
two-flowered, axillary cymes and leaves never united at 
the base, and Pevichjmenum, having terminal, usually 
three-flowered cymes collected into whorls or spikes and 
at least the upper leaves connace by their bases. 

L. etrusca, which belongs to the latter of these sub- 
genera, was mentioned by Gouan (under the name of 
October 1st, 1904. 



Caprifolium Periclymenum) as growing in the garden at 
Montpellier in 1762. In 1795 Santi described it as a 
distinct species from specimens lie saw when on a tour 
in Tuscany. Since then it has been observed at various 
stations on all sides of the Mediterranean and extending 
westwards to Madeira and eastwards to Kurdistan. Ex- 
tending over so wide a range, it naturally presents 
varieties, eight such, founded chiefly on the size of the 
leaves and the nature or absence of their indumentum, 
being enumerated by Render. 

The specimen here figured flowered in the Himalayan 
section of the Temperate House at Kew in August, 1903. 
The plant was purchased from a continental nurseryman 
about ten years previously. The conditions in this 
situation are eminently favourable for it, and its stem has 
attained a diameter of two inches, and its shoots grow 
from six to ten feet in length in a season. These shoots 
bear, for a distance of several feet from the apex, numerous 
short lateral branches terminated by the clusters of 
flowers, and, hanging down from the rafters, present the 
appearance of a graceful cloud of colour. In the open air 
the plant also thrives, but does not flower so freely as 
indoors. It is easily propagated from cuttings. 

Descr. — A lofty, much-branched climber. Stem terete, 
glabrous ; branches purple plum-colour when young. 
Leaves obovate or the upper almost orbicular, at least the 
upper pair joined at the base, sparingly pubescent above 
and on the chief nerves beneath, pale green, about two 
inches and a half long and two inches w r ide. Flowers in 
usually ternate heads terminal on the branches, each head 
about twelve-flowered, borne on a peduncle about one 
inch long, each pair of flowers surrounded by a four-lobed 
involucre, shorter than the calyx. Calyx green, one line 
long ; teeth deltoid, acute. Corolla at first creamy-yellow, 
finally almost orange ; tube one inch long, tubular funnel- 
shaped ; upper lip five lines long, four lines wide, divided 
about a quarter of the way down into four ovate imbricate 
lobes ; lower lip oblong, seven lines long, a line and 
a half wide. Stamens much exserted. Style filiform. 
Bt fries red, not united. — C. II. Wright. 



Fig. 1, flower; 2 and 3, anthers; 4, stigma: — all enlarged. 



1918 




.BroakB.Day&Sar^W 



I~Reeve <5i.C9Lcm.4cm.. 



Tab. 7978. 

mucuna sempervlrens. 
Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Leguminos.e. — Subord. Papilionace^. 
GenuB Mucuna, Allans. ; (Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 533.) 



Mucuna sempervirens ; frutex alte scaudens vel vagans, caule primario basi 
interdum 1 ped. diametro (planta in horto kewensi culta fere 100-pedalis) 
ramulis ultimis volubilibus, foliis trifoliolatis longe petiolatis cum petiolo 
gvacili 9-12 poll, longis floribasque primum pilis urentibus vestitis cito 
glabrescentibus, foliolis petiolatis coriaceia nitidis atroviridibus ovato- 
oblongis lateralibns obliquis, omnibus acuminatissimis integerrimis 
3-5 poll, longis, floribns atropurpureis crassis carnosis circiter 2| poll, 
longis racemosis, racemis densis ssepius in ratnia vetnstiotibus fascicu- 
latis interdum in ramis junioribus productis, pedicellis qnam floribus 
multo brevioribus, calycis subbemispbaarici tubo lato dorso gibboso limbo 
bilabiato labio superiore brevissime bidentato labio inferiore trilobato 
lobis deltoideh acuminatis, petalis fere coriaceis, vexillo erecto cordi- 
formi concavo basi dorso inflexo apice recur vo, alis borizontalibas oblique 
oblongo-spatbulatis intus concavis marginibus superioribusdivergentibus, 
carina ala8 excedente genitalia includente rostrata spinnloso-acuminata, 
staminibus glabris vexillari libero divergente, antheris biformibus alternis 
versatilibus barbatis cito deciduis, ovario styloque pubescentibus, stylo 
stamina paullo superante, ovulis numerosis, legumine lignoso circiter 
pedali 1^ poll, lato inter semina ssepe conatricto puberulo suturis in- 
crassatis, seminibus compressis oblongo-rotundatis vel reniformibus 9-15 
lin. longis hilo velutino ad f circumdatis. 

M. serapervirens, Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxiii. p. 190 ; 
Garden & Forest, vol. ii. (1889), p. 266; Raffill in Gard. Ghron. 1904, 
vol. i. p. 282. 

Mucuna is the Brazilian name of M. pruriens, DC, and 
perhaps of other species, the pods and other parts of 
which are clothed with stinging-hairs, which are used, 
under the name of cowhage or cow-itch, as a mechanical 
anthelmintic. It is almost impossible to handle either 
fresh or herbarium specimens without suffering from the 
stings of these extremely insinuating hairs. Those of 
M* semperoirens are mostly shed at an early stage of the 
development of the parts. 

The plant figured in the Magazine (t. 4945) as M. 
prurita, Hook. (M. pruriens, DC), is not the true plant, but 
M. imbricata, DC, a native of India. M. pruriens is 
figured, though not well, in the "Botanical Register," vol. 

OCIOBEK 1ST, 1901 



xxiv. t. 18, and in Bentley and Trimen's " Medicinal 
Plants," t. 78. 

M. sempervirens was originally described from a dried 
specimen sent to Kew, from Ichang, by Dr. A. Henry, in 
1886. The material consisted of foliage, ripe pods and 
quite young flower-buds. The same year Dr. Henry sent 
seed direct to the Gardens, and one of the plants raised 
was set in a bed in the Temperate House, where it has 
grown to the dimensions given in the description. It 
flowered for the first time in August, 1903. Two large 
clusters of flowers were produced on one of the old stems, 
about forty feet from the ground, and one smaller one on 
a thin branch about two years old. This year none has 
appeared, but the foliage is ornamental and effective. The 
plant is growing at the south end of the central building 
of the Temperate House. 

. In 1895, Mr. E. Ludlow, of " The Firs," Wimbledon, 
sent seeds of If. sem,pervirens to Kew. He was Com- 
missioner of Imperial Customs at Ichang in 1892-3, and 
had actually seen the large specimen from which Dr. 
Henry obtained his specimens, and in his notes accom- 
panying the specimen he states that it is traditionally an 
introduced plant there. This may be so, but we have the 
authority of Dr. Henry that this species is wild in many 
parts of the surrounding mountains. 

t Supplementary to my original description of M. semper- 
vwens, I mentioned that Kew possessed flowers of a 
Mucuna from Ningpo, which I supposed might be the 
same species, and it now proves to be the same. It was 
collected by Mr. C. W. Everard, of the British Consular 
Service, and presented to Kew, with many other plants, by 
the Rev. T. A. Preston. The Rev. E. Faber also collected 
it m the I rovmce of.Kweichau, about the year 1887. 

Descr.-—A very tall, climbing or rambling, evergreen 
snrub, the young parts more or less clothed with stingino- 
hairs. Stem sometimes a foot in diameter at the base°; 
ultimate branchlets slender and twining. Leaves trifolio- 
ate, including the slender petiole nine to twelve inches 
long. Leaflets petiolulate, coriaceous, shining above, 
ovate-oblong, lateral oblique, all tapering to a fine point, 
three to five inches long. Flowers dark purple outside, 
lighter within, and shading off to white at the base of 



the petals,* thick, fleshy, about two inches and a half 
long. Racemes dense, six to nine inches long, mostly 
produced from the old stems. Pedicels shorter than the 
flowers. Calyx broadly campanulate, somewhat two- 
lipped ; tube gibbous above ; upper lip very shortly 
bidentate ; lower distinctly tridentate. Standard erect, 
cordate, shorter than the other petals ; wings horizontal, 
oblong-spathulate ; keel narrow, exceeding the wings, 
beaked, closed over the stamens and pistil. Stamens 
glabrous, the upper one free; alternate anthers versatile, 
bearded, caducous. Pod woody, about a foot long and an 
inch and a half broad, often constricted between the seeds. 
Seeds purple-brown, flattened, reniform, three-quarters to 
an inch long. — W. B. JET. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil: — enlarged. 



* Dr. Henry describes the flowers of the wild plant as flesh-coloured, and 
states that they are much visited by bees and other insects. 



7979 




M.S. del. J.N.Fifcch.l*h 



•\SncanfBrodle: D ayiSoivLt* Irep 



Li.lrtjseve <5cC?Xiandarv 



Tab. 7979. 
LOROPETALUM chinense. 

Native of India and China. 

Nat. Ord. Hamamelidace^. 
Grenns Loropetalum, B. Br. ; (Benth. etHoole.f Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 668.) 



Loropetalum chinense ; frutex usque ad 8-10 ped. altus, dum juvenis copioae 
flovens, dense ramosua, ramis gracilibus foliisque primum atellato- 
pubescentibus, foliis alternis breviter petiolatis subcoriaceis peraistenti- 
bus ovato-lanceolatis 1-2 poll, longia (in speciminibus silvesfcribua saapius 
nrulto minoribus circumscriptione variabilibua) basi leviter obliquia 
apiculato-acutis ciliolatia, stipulis parvia cito deciduis, floribus candidis 
viridi-albis vel pallida luteis circiter 1 poll, diametro in ramulis brevibus 
fa?ciculatis subsessilibus, calycis dense pubesoentis lobis 4 brevibus ovatis 
obtusis, petalis 4 linearibus 9-12 lin. longis, staminibus 4 cum glandulia 
totidem alternantibua filamentis brevissimis conuectivo apice rostrato, 
ovario 2-loculari loculis uniovulatis stylis brevissimi8, capaula ligDosa 
dense pubescente semisupera subglobosa loculicide bivalva, seminibus 
oblongia circiter 2 lin. longia albis laavibus. 

L. chinense, It. Br. in Abel's Narrative of a Journey in China (1818), p. 375, 
in nota. D. Oliver in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 459. ffemsl. in 
Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxiii. p. 290. N. E. Brown in Gard. Chron. 
1880, vol. ii. p. 620 ; 1883, vol. i. p. 152, f. 23; 1894, vol. i. p. 342, f. 42. 
The Garden, vol. Ixv. p. 255, cum 6gura. Joum. of Sortie., aeries 3, vol. 
xviii. p. 235, f. 3.9. Be Wildem. Ic. Hort. Then. vol. ii. t. 58. 

Hamamelis chinensis, It. Br. loc. sup. cif., cum icone nigra. 



Robert Brown published this shrub as a species of 
Hamamelis, but at the same time he pointed out in a note 
some essential differences, and suggested that it might be 
raised to generic rank, under the name of Loropetalum. 
This was adopted by Prof. D. Oliver in the place cited 
above, and he subsequently (1883) reduced [Booh. Ic. PI. 
t. 1417) Bentham's Tetrathyrium subcor datum, published 
in 1861, to the same genus. 

Both are natives of China, and Loropetalum chinense is 
common, ranging from Formosa, Chekiang and Kwang- 
tung to Hupeh and Yunnan, and extending to the Khasia 
Hills in Eastern India. It was introduced into this 
country, in 1830, by the late Mr. Maries for Messrs. James 
Veitch & Sons. In 1894 this firm was awarded a First 
Class Certificate for it ; yet its merits were not at once 

October 1st, 1904. 



recognized. Ifc is quite hardy, and autumn is the flower- 
ing-time usually given, but we believe, that like the species 
of Hamamelis, and some other members of the order, its 
natural time is late winter or early spring, when its flowers 
are liable to be destroyed by frost. But it is very attrac- 
tive when it escapes the cold, and it bears mild forcing 
quite well, flowering freely as a small plant in pots. 
It was very ornamental in this state, in the Temperate 
House at Kew last February, when our drawing was made, 
and it certainly deserves to become more widely known. 

The Hamamelidacese are a comparatively small family, 
but they are pretty fully illustrated in this Magazine, the 
present subject being the twelfth. The INT. American 
Fofhergilla ahrifolia, Linn. (t. 1342) is the first, and 
perhaps the least attractive. Bhodoleia Championi, Hook. 
ft. 4509) is the second, and it is the most showy member 
of the order. 

The others figured are : — Gorylopsis spicata, Sieb. & 
Zucc. (t. 5458); 0. himalayana, Griff, (t. 6779); G. 
pauciflora, Sieb. & Zucc. (t. 7730) ; Hamamelis japonica, 
Sieb. & Zucc. (t. 6659) ; H. vivginiana, Linn. (t. 6684) ; 
II. mollis, Oliv. (t. 7884) ; Parrotia persica, C. A. Mey. 
(t. £744) ; P. Jacquemontiana, Decne (t. 7501), and Tricho- 
cladus grandiflorus, Oliver (t. 7418). The last is a native 
of South Africa, and the only one of them from the 
southern hemisphere, and it has a very strong family 
likeness to our plant. 

Some members of this order are more valuable for the 
brilliant tints of their foliage in autumn than they are 
for their flowers, Liquidambar styraciflua and Parrotia 
persica being especially noteworthy in this respect. The 
former closely resembles a small-leaved maple, but it may 
be recognized by its alternate leaves. 

Descr.—A densely branched shrub, reaching eight to ten 
feet in height, but flowering profusely while still quite 
small. Branches slender, more or less clothed, as well as 
the leaves, with a stellate pubescence. Leaves alternate, 
shortly stalked, somewhat leathery, persistent, ovate- 
lanceolate^ one to two inches long, slightly oblique at the 
base, tapering to a fine point, minutely fringed on the 
margin ; stipules small, falling early. Flowers pure white, 
greenish-white or very pale yellow, about one inch in 



diameter, in clusters of about four at the ends of short 
brartchlets. Calyx small, densely hairy, shortly four-lobed. 
Petals four, very narrow, nine to twelve Hues long. 
Stamens four, alternating with as many glands ; filaments 
very short ; anthers beaked. Capsule nearly globose, very 
hairy, two-celled, with a solitary seed in each cell. — - 
W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, a leaf-node and stipules; 2, portion of under snrface of leaf; 3, a 
flower beginning to unfold ; 4, the same from which calyx-lobes and petals 
have been removed; 5, a longitudinal section of the ovary; 6, a cluster of 
fruits ; 7, a seed : — all enlarged. 



1980 




JLS.doI J.KFitaOitK 



cBroolffiDaj-&.- 



L. Reeve AC "LotuIoxl 



Tab. 7980. 
x. ZYGOCOLAX veitchii. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Orchidace.'e. — Tribe Van t de.<e. 

Zygocolax, Rolfe, genus inter Zygopetalum ? et Oolacem 3 hyhridum, Gard. 
Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 765.) 



Zygocolax Veitcldi ; pseudobulbis ovoideis compressis, foliis 2 vel 3 floribus 
coetaneis anguste lanceolatia circiter pedalibus acutis 7-costatis recnrvis 
inferioribus brevioribus latioribus, scapis basilaribus erectis qnam foliis 
brevioribus 3-5-floris, bracteis amplis ovarium involventibus, floribus 2|- 
3 poll, diametro, sepalis petalisque similibus spathulatis concoloribus 
intus viridi-luteis brunneo-purpureo-maculatis, labello suborbicalari 
albido longitudinaliter rubro-violaceo-striato, polliniis 4 stipitatis ovoideis 
per paria in loculis segregatis. 

Zygocolax Veitchii, Rolfe in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 765; Jour n. Linn. 
Soc. Bot. vol. xxiv. p. 170, t. 4; Orch. Rev. vol. xii. 1904, p. 93. Veitck, 
Manual Orch. PL vol. ix. pp. 66, 67, cum icone ex Journ. Linn. Soc. iterata ; 
vol. x. p. 94. 

Zygopetalum Veitchii, Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 426. 

Zygocolax Veitchii, var. Kromeri, Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. ii. p. 346. Orch. 
Rev. vol. viii. p. 371. 

Zygolax Veitchii, Hansen, The Orchid Hybrids, p. 244. 



Hybrid orchids of reputed bigeneric origin are now 
not uncommon. The first raised artificially, according to 
Veitch's valuable work, cited above, was Phaiocalanthe 
irrorata, Rolfe, a cross effected by Dominy, the celebrated 
orchid-grower of the firm named, between Phajus 
grandifolius. Lour. (Bletia Tanlcervillix, R. Br. — B. M. t. 
1924) and Calanthe vestita, Lindl. (B. M. t. 4671). It was 
originally described by Reichenbach (Gard. Chron. 1867, 
p. 264, with a figure) under the name of Phaius irroratus, 
and a coloured figure of it appeared in the " Floral Maga- 
zine," vol. viii. (1869), t. 426. This was a highly interest- 
ing achievement, both of the parents having long been in 
cultivation, and the former was one of the earliest of 
exotic orchids successfully cultivated in England. A fine 
coloured figure of it appeared in Aiton's " Hortus Kew- 
ensis" (ed. 1, 1789, vol. iii. p. 302, t. 12) under the name 
of Limodorum Tanker villids, Dryander. 

For many reasons, Zygocolax Veitchii, Rolfe, deserves our 
attention and admiration. Messrs. Veitch {Man. Orch. PI. 

October 1st, 1904. 



vol. ix. p. 67) say : " This hybrid, whether in its botanical 
or horticultural aspect, is one of the most interesting we 
have yet raised." 

It was the result of a cross effected by Seden, the 
worthy successor of Dominy, between Golax jugosus, Lindl. 
(B. M. t. 5661) and Zygopetalum crinitum, Lodd. (B. M. 
t. 3402), respectively the male and female parents of the 
hybrid. The seed was sown in September, 1832, and the 
first flowers were produced in March, 1887. Truly the 
gardener has to wait for the flowers of his labour ! 

Zygocolax Veitchii is also noteworthy as having been 
the principal subject of Mr. R. A. Rolfe's excellent 
articles on a uniform plan of naming bigenerio hybrid 
orchids, to which references are given above. He followed 
Dr. M. T. Masters * in combining elements of the names 
of the two genera concerned, and this has now become 
almost universal in practice. 

Another point of special interest and importance in the 
plant figured, is that it is of natural origin, having been 
imported direct from Brazil by Mr. Kromer, Roraima 
Nursery, Croydon, as we are informed by Mr. Young, 
gardener to Sir Frederick Wigan, Bart., in whose garden 
at East Sheen the plant in question flowered in February 
of the present year. But, as Mr. Rolfe has pointed out, 
it does not differ from the original Z. Veitchii, and therefore 
deserves no distinctive name. 

Comparing the flowers of the reputed parents, as repre- 
sented m our illustration, with those of Zygocolax Veitchii, 
one might be sceptical of the hybrid origin, for it seems 
to be nearly all Zygopetalum; but we refer readers 
desirous of fuller details to the publications cited above. 

Descr.—ko. epiphytal herb. Bulbs ovoid, flattened. 
Leaves two or three on each bulb, appearing at the same 
time as the flowers, lanceolate, about a foot long, seven- 
ribbed, recurved, sharp-pointed, lower ones shorter and 
broader than the others. Scapes solitary from below the 
bulbs, erect, shorter than the leaves, three- to five-flowered. 
Bracts large, enfolding the flower-stalk. Floivers two 
inches and a half to three inches across. Sepals and 



Ohi^te2W&* h ^' Q id c bet, ! e 1 e J 1 L«pageria and Philesia, in the " Gardeners' 
onromcle, 1872, p. oo8, figa. 119, 12u. 



petals similar in shape and colour, greenish-yellow, on the 
upper surface blotched with a rich purple brown. Lip 
nearly circular, ground yellowish-white, longitudinally 
striped with red-violet. — W. B. H. 



"Fig. 1, column of Zygocolax Veitchii; 2 and 3, front and back views of the 
pollinia of the same ; 4, a flower of Zygopetalum crinitum, female parent, 
from Warner and Williams's "Orchid Album," vol. ix. t. 410; 5, a flower of 
Colax jugosus, male parent, from B. M. t. 5661 -.—figures 1-3 enlarged. 



SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES. 

Tab. 7972. Rosa gigantea : — We are told that the 
record in the " Gardeners' Chronicle " of this rose having 
flowered in Mr. F. Cant's nursery was based on a mistake, 
so that the first flowering in this country was at Albury 
Park, as set forth in the Magazine for September. 
Messrs. F. Cant & Co., of Colchester, were written to on 
this point, but no reply has been received. The first 
flowering in Europe, we believe, was at Cannes. Sir 
Thomas Hanbury, writing to Sir William Thiselton-Dyer, 
says : " I send you herewith a dried specimen of Rosa, 
gigantea, picked in the garden of the Villa Eleonore, at 
Cannes, where it grows against the house of Lord 
Brougham and Vaux, the owner. He has it in a box 
measuring, perhaps, 2J by 1J by \\ feet." This com- 
munication is dated May 11th, 1898. In a previous letter 
he had mentioned that it was in full flower ; but we went 
too far, perhaps, in saying that it flowers profusely on the 
Riviera. There is also a cultivated flowering specimen in 
the Kew Herbarium (received through Mr. G.Nicholson in 
December, 1899), from Mr. R. Armstrong, Claremont, 
Cape Town. 

Tab. 7973. Dyschoriste Hildebrandtii : — This plant was 
raised at Kew, in 1900, from seed collected in South 
Rhodesia by Mr. John Mahon, then Government Botanist, 
Scientific Department, Zomba, British Central Africa, 
and now of the Imperial Institute, South Kensington. 

Tab. 7974. Dendrobinm Williamsoni : — Mr. W. Day is 
a misprint for Mr. John Day. 

W. B. H. 



1d81 







MS.del.J.N.KuMith 



Vincent Broo^D ay* SoilM*^ 



I^Reevt) &_C<? Larulan- 



Tab. 7981. 

JASMIN UM PR1MULINUM. 

Native of Western China. 

Nat. Ord. Oleace.m. — Tribe Jasmines. 
Genus Jasmin um, Linn.; (B'enth. et Rooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 674. 



Jasminum primulinum ; frutex alte vagans, omnino fere glaber, ramis elon- 
gatis angulatis viridibus, foliis trifoliolatis graciliter petiolatis, foliolis 
eubsesiailibus oblongo-lanceolatis 1-2 poll, longis integris subcoriaceis 
supra atroviridibus nitidis apiculatis, floribua in foliorum axillis solitariis 
vel in ramulis brevibus lateralibus terminalibus lnteia 1^-2 poll, 
diametro, pedunculis vel ramulis bracteis foliaceis integris instructis, 
caiycis lobis lanceolatis aoutis puberulis, corollse lobis ssepius 6 obovato- 
spatbulatis rotundatis interdum duplicatis, stamiuibus inclusis, stylo in 
floribus simplicibus exserto, fructu ignoto. 

J. primulinum, Hemsl. in Kew Bulletin, 1895, p. 109. Oliv. in Rook. Ic. PL 
t. 2384. Journ. Boy. Hort. Soc. vol. xxviii. p. liii. Journ. ofHort. series 3 
vol xlvi. p. 295, cum figura nigra. Gard. Ghron. 1903, vol. i. p. 197, 
/. 83. Veitch, Catalogue of Novelties, 1903, p. 5. Eev. Hort. 1904, pp. 182- 
3,#. 72, 73. 

When I described this species nine years ago from a 
dried specimen, presented to Kew by Mr. W. Hancock, 
F.L.S., F.R.G.S., of the Chinese Imperial Customs, I used 
the following phrase : — " J. nudifloro valde affinis et hivjus 
speciei forsan varietas speciosissima," and Dr. A. Henry, 
who subsequently collected it in the same locality, is of 
the opinion that it is a race of J. nudiflorum, Lindl. (B. M. 
t. 4649). He supplies the following note :— " I found the 
plant both at Szemao and Mengtze, in the Province of 
Yunnan ; but I am of opinion that it occurs always, in the 
districts where it has hitherto been found growing, culti- 
vated or as an escape from cultivation. The shrubs were 
seen in gardens, or more frequently in hedges or amidst 
other shrubs, in the vicinity of villages, and never were 
met with in woods or forests. It apparently never set 
any fruit, as I searched for it- assiduously in vain; but 
propagated itself freely by suckers. Semi-double flowers 
were often seen, and varied very much in size. Several 
other species of Jasminum were plentiful in the woods and 
forests of South Yunnan, and these produced fruit freely 
and never showed any variation in the size of the flowers 

October 1st, 1904. 



nor any tendency to doubling. There is no reference to 
J. primulinum in the ' Chi-wu-ming,' which is rich in 
details concerning Yunnan plants." Dr. Henry is led by 
the foregoing facts, to the conclusion that T. nudijiorum 
was long ago introduced into the district from the north, 
and has become evergreen and larger-flowered under the 
different climatic conditions. 

Whatever its descent, /. 'primulinum is a great acquisi- 
tion, and should it prove as hardy as the old ./. nudijiorum, it 
will doubtless be widely planted. It has withstood sixteen 
degrees of frost against a noi'th wall in Messrs. James 
Veitch & Sons' nursery. It also does well as a pot-plant. 
With regard to its not bearing fruit, the same may be 
said of J. nudijiorum, so far as our knowledge goes. Not 
one of the numerous wild and cultivated specimens in the 
Kew Herbarium bears a single fruit. 

J. primulinum was one of the first plants introduced 
from China by Mr. B. H. Wilson, for Messrs. Veitch, who 
received a First Class Certificate for it last April. It has 
flowered freely at Kew, both indoors and out. 

Descr. — A rambling, evergreen, glabrous shrub. Stems 
and branches quadrangular, slender, green. Leaves tri- 
foliolate, on slender stalks ; leaflets almost sessile, rather 
thick, oblong-lanceolate, one to two inches long, entire, 
dark green and shining above, paler beneath, apiculate. 
Flowers solitary on axillary peduncles or branchlets 
furnished with scale-like or leaf-like, simple bracts, prim- 
rose-yellow, with a darker eye, one inch and a half to two 
inches across. Calyx-lobes lanceolate, acute, slightly 
hairy. Corolla-lobes usually six, obovate-spathulate, 
rounded, sometimes duplicated and the inner ones shorter. ' 
Stamens included. Style exserted in the single flowers. 
Fruit unknown. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, ovary and calyx with one lobe removed -.—enlarged. 



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Tab. 7977.— LONICERA ETRUSCA var. SUPERBA. 
„ 7978.— MUC UNA SEMPERVrRENS. 
n 7979.— LOROPETALUM CHINENSE. 
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7982 




"hLS.acl.i.H.VHU-K'UtK 



Vincent. Brooks,!) ay &Son I.l^Jmp 



3- Psevc & C<? I.arudon. 



Tab. 7982. 
allium albopilosum. 

Native of Southern Turkestan. 

Nat. Ord. Liliacej:.— Tribe Allied. 
Genus Allium, Linn.; (JBenth. et HooJc.f. Gen. Flant. vol. iii. p. 802.) 



Allium (Moliura) albopilosum ; berba robusta, bulba globoso, foliis ligulatis 
vel lanceolatis acumiuatis vel acutis supra glabris sabtus albopilosis ad 
18 poll, longis et 1} poll, latis, scapo 1 ped. alto 5 liu. diam. glabro tereti 
circa 80-floro, spathis 3 latis acurninatis membranaceis, pedicellis 2 poll, 
longis teretibus glabris, periantbii segmontis linearibus acumiuatis 
obscure lilacinis 10 lin. longis 1 liu. latis post anthesin rigidibus, 
staminibus uniformibus quam perianthii segmentis dimidio brevioribus, 
filamentis subulatis basi dilatatis atropurpureis, antberis oblongis, 
pollinis granis ca^sio-viridibus, ovario trilobo minute verrucoao viridi, 
stylo subulato 3 lin. longo. 

S. albopilosum, G. II. Wright in Gard. Ghron. 1903, vol. ii. p. 34, cam fig. ; 
Gardening World, Aug. 29, 1903, cum fig. 



The genus Allium now contains nearly 300 described 
species, and is remarkable for being one of the few genera 
in which three primary colours are represented in the 
flowers. Those of A. Icansuense, Regel (Bot. Mag. t. 
7290) and A. coeruleum, Pall., are blue ; those of A. flavum, 
Linn. (t. 1330), and A. Motif, Linn. (t. 499) are yellow, while 
various shades of red are exhibited by A. acuminatum, 
Hook., A. narcissiflorum, Vill. (t. 6182), and other species. 
Further, not a few are white-flowered. 

A. albopilosum is the largest flowered species of the 
genus, being approached only by the closely allied A. 
Christophi, Trautv. (Iucr. Fl. Phasn. Ross, p. 782) in which 
the filaments are of a different shape. 

This species was collected for Mr. Van Tubergen, Junr., 
of Haarlem, in 1901, by Mr. Sintenis "in the mountain 
range which divides Transcaspia from Persia." It 
flowered in June, 1902, in the garden of the Hon. Charles 
Ellis, Frensham Hall, Shottermill, and he presented 
plants to Kew, which flowered in a border in the herba- 
ceous ground in June of last year, and subsequently 
ripened seeds. 
November 1st, 1904. 



Our drawing was made from a plant that flowered 
at Kew. The delicate, metallic or silky sheen on the 
flowers is difficult of reproduction. 

Descr. — A robust herb. Bulb globose. Leaves strap- 
shaped or lanceolate, acuminate or acute, the largest 
eighteen inches long and an inch and three quarters broad, 
glabrous above, marked with longitudinal lines of white 
hairs beneath. Scape one foot high, about five lines in 
diameter, terete, glabrous, about eighty-flowered ; spathes 
three, wide, acuminate, membranous ; pedicels two inches 
long, terete, glabrous. Perianth-segments linear, acumi- 
nate, deep lilac with a metallic sheen, ten lines long, one 
line wide, rigid after flowering. Stamens all alike, about 
half as long as the perianth-segments ; filaments subulate, 
dilated at the base ; anthers oblong ; pollen greyish-green. 
Ovary three-lobed, minutely verrucose, green; style 
subulate, three lines long. — G. H. Wright. 



Fig. 1, flower ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, ovary -.—all enlarged. 



7983 




M.S.d«I,J^.Fib3h.liih.. 



Vmc ant BrooksPay&Sm uLt?finj 



t C° Lcrnjdiirv. 



Tab. 7983. 

HELIPTERUM splendidum. 

Native of Western Australia. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Ixuloide^. 
Genus Helipteritm, DG. ; {Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 308.) 



Heliptertjm splendidum; herba annua, glabra, erecta, 9-18 poll, alta, caulibus 
gracilibus simplicibus superne aphyllia monocepbalis, foliis glaucia 
sessilibus linearibna maximis aesquipollicaribua obtusis integerrimis, 
capitulis erectis usque ad 3£ poll, diametro, involucri bracteis scariosis 
glabris multiaeriatia seriebns 4 vel 5 exterioribua multo minovibus ovatiB 
obtnaia brunneis extimis minimia ceteria albx8 linenri-lanceolatis 1-1% 
poll, longia vix acutia breviter uaguiculatia ungue leviter incraa8ato, 
paucia interioribus aupra prope basin augnste purpureo-zonatis, lloribns 
nnmerosissimis aureis, corollis omnibus tubuloais lobis erectia, pap pi setis 
circiterlOlongeplumosis corollam requantibus vel superantibua, achajniia 
ciliato-bialatis maturis non visis. 

H. splendidum, Hemsl, n, sp. 



Kew is indebted to Mr. G. F. Berthoud, of Waroona, 
near Drakesbrook, W. Australia, for dried specimens and 
seeds of this handsome plant, which he labelled : — 
" Native of North-western Districts." There are also 
herbarium specimens collected in open plains at Menzies, 
about a hundred miles north of Coolgardie, in about 
29° 30' S. lat. and 121° E. long., by Cecil Andrews. His 
specimens are named Helichrysum Davenportii, F. Muell. 
There is no authenticated specimen of this at Kew, but 
Bentham (Fl. Austral, vol. iii. p. 616) places it as a 
variety of Helichrysum Lawrencella, F. Muell. (syn. 
Lawrencella rosea, Lindl.), remarking that he was disposed 
to rank it as a distinct species. Mueller (Fragm. Phytogr. 
Austral, vol. iii. p. 32) refers it to what he denominates 
section Acroclinium of Helichrysum, from which it would 
appear tbat, at that date, he contemplated uniting Helip- 
terum with Helichrysum. 

As a matter of fact our plant is most nearly related to 
Helipterum roseum, Benth. (syn. Acroclinium roseum, 
Hook., Bot. Mag. t. 4801), from which Mueller's descrip- 
tion differs in essential particulars. 

H. splendidum is indeed a very showy member of the 

NoVEJIBEIi 1st, 1904. 



Australian " Everlastings," and if its cultivation in pots 
should prove as easy as that of Helipterum Manglesii, 
F. Muell. (syn. Rhodanthe Manglesii, Lindl., " Botanical 
Register,' 1 t. 1703) there is a big future before it. Several 
varieties of the latter are represented in this Magazine. 
The typical form (t. 3483) is perhaps the prettiest, and 
tt. 5283 and 5290 are colour variations of an ornamental 
character. 

Unfortunately the plants raised at Kew flowered in April, 
and under unfavourable conditions, as to sunlight, produced 
no seed. 

Descr. — An annual, glabrous, erect herb, nine to 
eighteen inches high. Stems slender, simple, leafless in 
the upper part bearing one head of flowers. Leaves 
alternate, sessile, glaucous, linear, the largest an inch and 
a half long, obtuse, entire. Flower-heads erect, the 
largest three inches and a half across. Bracts of the 
involucre glabrous, scarious, in very many series, those 
of the four or five outer series much smaller than the 
inner, ovate, obtuse, brown, outermost very small, the 
rest white, linear-lanceolate, one inch to one and a half 
long, scarcely acute, shortly clawed, claw thickened, a few 
of the innermost having a narrow, purple band on the 
upper surface near the base. Flowers very numerous, all 
tubular, yellow. Corolla-lobes erect. Pappus of about ten 
very feathery bristles, equalling or slightly exceeding the 
corolla. Achenes 2-winged ; wings fringed. — W.B. II. 



Fig. 1, a flower; 2, anthers; 3, upper part of style and stigmas:— all 
enlarged. 



7984 




K.S.Ael.J.N.Fitah.Iith 



^ncentBroo 1 AE,'Da>'&Son.Li4Litip. 



l.Heeve &C° London. 



Tab. 7984. 
CRYPTOSTEGIA madagascariensis. 

Native of Madagascar. 



Nat. Ord. Asclepiadace^. — Tribe Pemploce^e. 
Genus Cmptostegia, E.Br. ; (Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 742.) 



Ckyptostegia, madagascariensis ; species a G. grandiflora petiolis brevioribus 
viridibus floribus minoribus intus sanguineo-purpureis coronae squamis 
indivisis diversa ; frutex scandens, glaber, ramis ssepius verrucosis, fob is 
breviter petiolatis coriaceis lanceolatis ovatis ellipticis vel interdum fere 
orbicularibuB 2-1 poll, longis obtuse acuminatis basi rotundatis subtus 
pallidioribus venis ultimis minute reticulatis, floribus iu cymas terminales 
dispoaitis distincte pedicellatis 2^-3 poll, diametro, bracteis squamifornii- 
bus cito deciduis, calycis lobis ovatis acutis, corolla? lobis tnbo ampliato 
longioribus ovato-lanceolatis acutis recurvis, coronaa 6quamis 5 subulatis 
infra tubi medium insertis occultis (nnde nomen genericum), pollinis 
massis in utroque loculo geminis appendicibas spathulatis applicitis, 
folliculis lignosis cymbiformibus circiter tripollicaribus divaricatis acutis, 
seminibus numerosissimis longe copioseque pluroosis. 

0. madagascariensis, Bojer, Gat. Hort. Maurit. (1837), p. 212, nomen nudum. 
Decne. in DG. Prodr. vol. viii. p. 492. Miq. Choir de Plantes Bares, t. 9.. 
Jumelle, Les Plantes a Caoutchouc, p. 264, ff. 28, 29 ; Rev. G6n. de But. 
1901, p. 394. 

The genus Gryptostegia was founded by R. Brown in 
the "Botanical Register," vol. v. (1820) t. 435, on a 
cultivated plant, previously published, but not described, 
by Roxburgh, under the name of Neriurn grandiflorum. 
Roxburgh records his plant as a native of India, discovered 
by Dr. B. Heyne in 1804 ; but most subsequent writers 
declare that it exists in India only under cultivation or as 
a colonist. Other writers record it as wild and common 
in certain districts in the Madras Peninsula. There are 
no undoubtedly wild specimens of G. grandiflora, R. Br., in 
the Kew Herbarium ; but there are cultivated specimens 
from Mauritius, Natal, Khartoum, Jamaica, and from the 
most distant parts of India. It is also in cultivation at 
the present time at Kew. 

C. madagascariensis, Bojer, is the only other species 
known, and, until comparatively recently, only from culti- 
vated specimens ; but now Kew possesses dried specimens 
from various parts of Madagascar, besides cultivated ones 

Novembkk 1st, 1904. 



from this country, Hong Kong, and Cape Town. The 
two are very much alike in general characters, and the 
names are sometimes interchanged in gardens. This is 
partly due to the fact that the differences have been mis- 
understood. "When in flower there is no difficulty, the 
flowers of G. grandiflora, although somewhat larger, are 
of a lilac-purple, and the staminodes or lobes of the corona 
are very deeply divided into two filiform segments. 

The date of introduction of C. madagascariensis into 
England is given as 1826, but it has always been rare. Our 
plate was drawn from a plant that flowered at Kew in May 
and June of the present year. It is a very beautiful thing, 
and if it should prove free-flowering, it would well deserve 
a place in a hot-house, as it flowers when quite small. 

Descr. — A climbing, glabrous shrub ; branches often 
beset with small, warty excrescences. Leaves shortly 
stalked, leathery, varied in outline from lanceolate to 
almost orbicular, two to four inches long, obtusely acumi- 
nate, rounded at the base, paler beneath ; ultimate veinlets 
very finely reticulated. Floivers in terminal cymes, dis- 
tinctly stalked, two inches and a half to three inches 
across. Bracts scale-like, falling away early. Calyx-lobes 
ovate, acute. Corolla-lobes longer than the funnel-shaped 
tube, ovate-lanceolate, acute, recurved. Corona-lobes five, 
subulate, attached below the middle of the corolla-tube and 
invisible from the outside. Pollen-masses in pairs in each 
cell, each pair attached to a spathulate appendage. Fruit 
composed of two divergent, boat-shaped carpels containing 
numerous small seeds furnished with a cluster of long, soft 
hairs at one end. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, section of the lower part of: a flower showing the insertion of the 
corona-lobes; 2, longitudinal section of the andrcecium; 3, a pair of polHnia 
attached to the scale ; 4, anterior view of the same ; 5, one of the two carpels 
of which the fruit is composed; 6, a seed : — all except 5 enlarged. 




Vincent Br o olts D ajr&. S on L t^Imp 



LEiisve & Q'rLomion.. 



Tab. 7985. 

DENDROBIUM bellathlum. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Orcwibacem. — Tribe EpidendiiEjM. 
Genus Dexdrobium, Sicartz; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498.) 



Dendrobium (§ Formosa? — Nigro-hirsuta?) bellatulum ; planta nana, ca^spi- 
tosa, pseudobulbis fiorentibas J-2 poll, alfcis, fusiforraibtis longitudi- 
naliter rugoso-costatis 2-4-phyllis 1-3-floris foliisque primum plus 
miunsve _ nigro-hirsutis, foliis oblongis vel ovato-oblongis \-2 poll. 
longis apice oblique obtnseque bidentatis, floribus axillaribus cam pedi- 
cello q nam foliis brevioribus 1^-2 poll, diametro, sepalis petalisque albin, 
labollo miniato, sepalis lateralibus elongato-triangularibus ucutis, sepalo 
postico lanceolato, petalis spatbulatis apice rotundatis apiculatis, labello- 
pandurato-trilobo lobis lateralibus rotundatis lobo intermedio latissime 
obcordato-bilobo disco medio obtuse 5-costato costis tuberculoso-verrucosis, 
mento saccato obtuso. 

D. bellatulum, Rolfe in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bat. vol. xxxvi. (1903), p 10- Orch 
Rev. vol. xi. (1903), p. 103 ; vol. xii. (1904), p. 135; Oard. Chron. 190l! 
vol. i. p. 258; 1904, vol. ii. p. 114, f. 47. 

This charming little Dendrobium is closely , related to 
the recently figured D. Williamsoni, Reich b. f. (B. M. t. 
7974) in structural and vegetative characters, but it is very 
different in its dwarf habit. The species was based upon 
copious dried specimens, collected by Dr. A. Henry, in 
1898, at Mengtze, in the Province of Yunnan, at an eleva- 
tion of 5,000 ft. It was found in the forest to the south- 
east of Mengtze, growing on tree3. In 1900, previous to 
the publication of the description of the species, Messrs. 
James Veitch & Sons presented living plants to Kew, 
sent home by their collector, Mr. Wilson. It was subse- 
quently discovered by Mr. W. Micholitz, collector for 
Messrs. Sander & Sons, of St. Albans, at Lang Bian, 
Anam, at an elevation of 4,500 to 5,000 ft. The plant 
presented by Messrs. Veitch flowered some time ago, but 
not freely, and the plate was prepared from a more robust 
tuft presented by Messrs. Sander. It flowered in April, 
and although very pretty, it was evidently not at its best, 
nor equal to Dr. Henry's wild specimens, in which the 
unexpanded flowers are an inch and a half long, and those 
flattened out are two inches and a half from the tip of the 

NovtiiBEH 1st, 1904. 



lip to the tips of the petals. Judging from the altitude at 
which it flourishes, it requires cool treatment. 

Descr. — A densely tufted plant, two to four inches high. 
Bulbs fusiform, longitudinally ribbed, ribs rounded and 
uneven, two- to four-leaved, one- to three-flowered. Leaves 
leathery, at first more or less beset with black hairs, ovate- 
oblong, one and a half to two inches long, obliquely and 
obtusely two-toothed at the tip. Floivers axillary, slightly 
overtopped by the leaves, one inch and a half to two inches 
in diameter, white with a vermilion lip. Sepals acute, 
lateral elongate-triangular, dorsal lanceolate. Petals 
spathulate, rounded at the tip. Lip three lobed ; lateral 
lobes short, rounded; intermediate lobe broadly obcordate, 
recurved ; disc traversed by five warty ribs : sac obtuse. — 
IF. B. H. 

Fig- 1, portion of upper surface of a loaf; 2, column; 3, anther-cap; 
4, pollen : — all cnlaryed. 



7986 




M. S . del, JVN.FitA Hth. 



~\5ru:e.ni Brook; 



Tab. 7986. 

THIS B1SMARCKIANA. 
Native of Palestine. 

Nat. Ord. Ibidace^;.— Tribe Mor^ee^s. 
Genus Iris, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Iris (Oncocyclus) bismarckiana ; herba circa 18 poll, alta, rnizomate brevi, 
foliis ensiformibus ad 9 poll, longis et 1 poll, latis glaucis, scapo unifloro, 
spathis lanceolatis viridibus 3 poll, longis, periantbii segmentis exteriori- 
bus late ovatis acutis 2± poll, longis fere 2 poll, latis luteis dense 
brnnneo-purpnreo maculatis medio macula purpureo-fusca 7 tin. diam. 
notatis, segmentis interioribus orbicularibus 2| poll. diam. ungniculatis 
dilnte caeruleis venis maculisqne lilacinis, stigmatibuB oblongis cristis 
8 lin. lougis colore perianthii segmentis exterioribus similibus. 

I bismarckiana, Dammann ex Wien. III. Gartenzeit. 1890, p. 352, fig. 72; 
Dammann, Catal. 1892, p. 25, fig. 26 ; Baker, Handb. Iridese, p. 18. 

I. bismarkiana, Sprenger in Gard. Ghron. 1904, vol. n. p. 222. 



The Oncocyclus section of Iris, which is characterized by 
the outer perianth- segments being diffusely hairy on the 
claw and lower part of the blade, contains the most con- 
spicuous species of the genus. On this account many, 
which have been brought into cultivation, have had 
specific names given to them on very slight differential 
characters. The most widely cultivated species of this 
section, as well as the largest-flowered one of the genus, 
is I. silsiana, Linn. (B. M. t. 91), while closely allied 
is L Gatesii, Foster (t. 7867), which differs from the 
present plant in the absence of a distinct blotch or 
" signal " on the outer perianth-segments. I. San, var. 
lunda, Boiss. (t. 6960) is a dwarf plant with smaller 
flowers than I. bismarckiana, and has the anther-cells 
adnate to the filament, instead of being inserted in a small 
pit on the back of the anther near its base. I. Lortetn, 
Barbey (t. 7251) much resembles this species, but it has 
short, truncate, dentate style-arms. 

I. bismarckiana was introduced from Lebanon in 1888 
bv Messrs. Dammann & Co., of Naples, but, like most 
species of the section Oncocyclus from Palestine, is some- 
what difficult to cultivate. The plant here figured was 

November 1st, 1904. 



purchased from Mr. G-eorg Egger of Jaffa, and flowered 
in the Alpine House at Kew in May, 1904. 

Descr. — A perennial herb about eighteen inches high. 
Rhizome short. Leaves ensiform, glaucous, the largest 
nine inches long and one inch wide. Scape one-flowered ; 
spathes lanceolate, green, three inches long. Perianth- 
segments : outer broadly ovate, acute, two inches and a 
half long, nearly two inches wide, yellowish, densely 
spotted with purple-brown and marked in the centre with 
a similarly-coloured spot (signal) seven lines in diameter ; 
inner orbicular, clawed, two inches and a half in diameter, 
pale blue, with numerous lilac veins which bear spots 
towards the margin of the blade. Stigmas oblong ; crests 
triangular, eight lines long, similar in colour to the outer 
perianth-segments. — C. H. Wright. 

Figs. 1 and % anthers ; 3, portion of style-arm : — all enlarged. 



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LReeve & C?Loiudoii- 



Tab. 7987. 
KALANCHOE Dyeri. 

Native of Nya< aland. 

Nat. Ord. Cjiassulace.e. 
Genus Kalaxciioe, Adans. ; {Benth. et IlooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 659.) 



Kalanctioe Dyeri; herba succulenta, 2-2^ ped. alta, glabra, plus minusve 
glauca, foliis oppositis petiolatis ellipticis obtusis basi rotundatis vel 
cuneatia margin© grosse crenato-deatatis petiolo 1^-3 poll, longo alte 
canaliculato lamina 4-7§- poll. Jonga 2J-5 poll, lata, foliis superioribua 
bracteisque multo minoribus spathulato-obovatia vel lanceolatis obtusis 
vel subacutis integris, noribus tetrameris pedicellatia in cymas coryra- 
bosas terminales dispositis, sepalis 3J-6 lin. longia deltoideo-lanceolatia 
obtusis, corollaa tubo If— 2 poll, longo basi 4-angulato pallide viridi, 
limbi lobis f-1 poll, longia lanceolatis acutis albis, staminibus 8 biseriatis 
filamentis brevissimia antheria parvia luteis 8nperioribus breviter exsertis, 
glandulis hvpogynis filiformibus apice plus minusve bifidia albia, car- 
pellis lineari-lanceolatis in styk>3 longos filiformes attenuatis glabris 
stigmatibus capitatis. 

K. Dyeri, N.E. Brown in Gard. Ghron. 1904, vol. i. p. 354. 



This species of KalawJtoe is one of the finest that has 
yet been introduced into cultivation. It is allied to 
K. marmorata, Baker (B. M. t. 7333), K. somaliensis. 
Baker (t. 7831), and K. longiflora, A. Rich. These four 
handsome species are all natives of tropical Africa, and 
form a distinct group, characterized by their large, long- 
tubed, white flowers. 

K. Dyeri was raised at Kew from seeds sent in 1902, 
from Nyasaland, by Mr. J. McClounie, Director of the 
Scientific Department of British Central Africa. The 
plants first flowered in April, 1904, and have ripened 
seeds, from which young plants have been raised. 

Descr. — Plant two feet to two feet and a half high, 
with a stout stem about three-quarters of an inch thick 
at the base, glabrous in all parts and more or luss 
glaucous on the green parts. Leaves opposite, very 
spreading, petiolate ; petiole one and a half to three inches 
long, four and a half to six lines broad and nearly as 
thick, sub-terete, slightly flattened above, dilated at the 
base, green, slightly tinted with purple and. speckled 
with white; blade four to seven and a half inches long, 

De< i:\jd eh 1st. 1904, 



two and a half to five inches broad, elliptic, obtuse, 
rounded or cimeate at the base, with irregular, obtuse 
teeth, two to three lines long, four to six lines broad, 
flat or with the sides more or less incurved, green, with 
a purplish tint on the midrib and principal veins above ; 
leaves and bracts on the inflorescence half to two 
inches long, spathulate-obovate to lanceolate, sub-acute 
or obtuse, entire. Inflorescence a terminal, corymbose 
cyme nine to twelve inches long, six to nine inches 
across, with three or four pairs of three- to ten-flowered, 
sub-erect branches. Pedicels eight to nine lines long, 
three-quarters to one line thick. Sepals three and a half 
to six lines long, half to two lines broad at the base, 
thence tapering to an obtuse point. Corolla-tube one and 
three-quarters of an inch long, three and a half to four 
lines square at the base, pale green ; lobes very spreading, 
one inch long, four and a half to five lines broad, 
lanceolate, acute, pure white. Stamens eight, inserted 
near the top of the tube, the four lower included, the four 
upper just exserted from the mouth of the tube; filaments 
three-quarters to one line long ; anthers small, half to 
three-quarters of a line long. Ht/pogynous glands five 
lines long, filiform, more or less bifid at the apex, white. 
Carpels with a linear-lanceolate ovary three-quarters of 
an inch long, sub-quadrate in transverse section, tapering 
into a filiform style eleven lines long, all twisted together 
at the base, green ; stigmas capitate, white. — N. E. 
Brown. 

Fig. 1, calyx, hypogynons glands and carpels ; 2, part of the top of an 
nnopened corolla and stamens ; 3 and 4, stamens : — all enlarged. 



1988 




Vincent Brooks JlayiSon-lt^Jinp 



iC "London 



Tab. 7988. 
CYDONIA sinensis. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Rosacea.— Tribe Pomace*. 

Genus Cydon7a, Tourn. ; (Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Tlant. vol. i. p. 026, sub 

Pyro). 



Cxdonia. sinensis,' arbor parva, tortuoso-ramosa, foliia petiolatis adultia 
crassiusculia ovatis vel obovatia cum petiolo usque ad 4 poll, longis (in 
rarois florigeris saspius minoribus lanceolatisque) acutis basi cuneatia 
petiolo marginibusque glatiduloso-serrulatis glabrescentibus, stipulia 
pedatis cito deciduis oblongo-lanceolati* 3-4 lin. longis margine glandn- 
losis basi utrinque lobis binis parvis deflexis instructia lobia exterioribus 
rninutis, pedunculis brevibus unifloris basi bracteis nutnerosis ovato- 
oblongis circiter semipollicaribus margine glandulosia ornatie, floribua 
circiter 1J poll, dia metro, caljcis segmentis ovato-lanceolatis 3-4 lin. 
longis acutis recurvis margine gland ulosis piaecipue intus albo-lanatis, 
petalis oliovato-oblongis 7-8 lin. longis apice rotuudatiB roseis basi albis 
et rnbro-zonatis, staniinibus uniseriatis quam petalin dimiclio brevioribus 
stylos excedentibus, ovario 5-loculari, stylis glabris medio connatis, 
stigmatibus capitatis, fructu oblongo-ovoideo circiter 6 poll, longo aureo, 
seminibus numerosissimis subtriangularibas uno angulo rotundato 
compressis 3-4| lin. longis brunneis opacis Isevibus. 

C. sinensis, Thouin in Ann. du Mug. d'Hist. Nat. de Par. vol. xix. (1812), 

pp. 144-153. tt, 8 et 9. Desf. Cat. Sort. Par. 1815. p. 200. DG. Prodr. 

vol. ii. p. 638. Duhamel, TraiU des Arbres et Arbustes, vol. vi. t. 75. 

Herbier General de V Amateur, vol. ii. t. 75. Rev. Horf. 1889, p. 2 J 8, 

cum ic. color. W. B. H. in Kew Bulletin, 1899, p. 221. Wien. Illustr. 

Gart. Zeit. vol. xxvi. (1901), p. 207, t. 2. Hemsl. in Hook. Ic. PL sub 

tt. 2657-8. 
C. chinensis, Lindl. Bot. Beg. vol. xi. (1825), t. 905. 
Pyrus sinensis, Poir. in Lam. Encycl. Suppl. vol. iv. p. 452, npn Lindl. nee 

Auctor. alior. plurim. 
P. cathayensis, Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxiii. (1887), p. 256, pro 

parte. 
P. chinensis, Spreng. Sysf. vol. ii. p. 510. 
P. cbinensis, Poxb. Fl. Ind. vol. ii. p. 511. 
Chsenomeles chinensis, Koehne, Dendrol. p. 262. 



This quince was originally described and figured in 
black and white, by Thouin, from a tree in the Jardin 
des Plantes, Paris, and he states that it was introduced 
into England and Holland during the last decade of the 
eighteenth century. We find no confirmation of this 
statement, and Lindley seems to have been the first to 
December 1st, 190t. 



publish an account of it in this country — see the reference 
above. 

Subsequently another species was introduced from 
China, and it was for many years cultivated at Kew 
under the same name, the genuine plant having apparently 
disappeared from our gardens. The confusion of the two 
species extended to the literature of the subject, including 
the Enumeration of Chinese plants (Journ. Linn. Soc. Bat. 
vol. xxiii. p. 256), under Pyrus cathayensis, Hemsl., where, 
however, it is mentioned that the plant cultivated at Kew 
had much narrower, less hairy leaves than that originally 
described and cultivated in Europe. 

In 1899 the Director of Kew brought a ripe quince, of 
the species here figured, from the garden of Sir Thomas 
Hanbury, at La Mortola, near Ventimiglia, which led to 
further investigations, and the publication in Hooker's 
"Icones Plantarum" (tt. 2657 and 2658) of Cydonia 
cathayensis, Hemsl., as distinguished from G. sinensis, 
Thonin. 

In April of the present year a young plant of the latter 
flowered at Kew, and thus gave us an opportunity of 
completing the description and illustration of the 'two 
species. 

_ C. sinensis is a very pretty plant for the conservatory 
in spring; but, as Mr. Ed. Andre observes, it requires 
such a climate as the Mediterranean to reach perfection, 
lhere it is extensively grown, as it is ornamental, whether 
in flower or fruit. Like all other quinces, it is not a 
dessert fruit, but associated with other fruit, in tarts or 
as a marmalade, it is very palatable, though perhaps not 
to those who cannot relish a new thing in flavours In 
the south the foliage assumes beautiful autumnal tints. 
. C cathayensis, Hemsl., differs from G. sinensis, Thouin, 
in having lanceolate, eglandular leaves; large, foliaceous 
fruit ; ^^ r ° Unded cal J*-l<>bes, and a much smaller 

Ciut^n S f°v a con 1 fusiou of na ™es under Pyrus and 

*fe t - a ii ' ,* n )% be useful t0 mention that p y™ 

nnenm Lindl. (Bat Reg. t. 1248, chmensis in letterpress) 

Pecies U % Pear ' 7 nd tlmt /' Sinka > R °^> is the ***** 
bpeciea. Pyrus chmensis, Roxb. {Fl. Ind, vol. ii. p 511) is 

auother synonym of that species. Pyrvs sinensis, Dum 



(Cours, eel. 2, vol. v. p. 429), is, on the authority of 
Decaisne (Konv. Arch, du Mus. vol. x. p. 154) the same 
as Pyrus spectabilis, Ait. 

There are no wild specimens of C. sinensis in the Kew 
Herbarium, and the only Chinese specimen was presented 
by Dr. Shearer in 1875. His label runs thus: "Mul 
Kwa = wooden cucumber, from its solidity and shape, 
now fruiting, June, 1872. The large, fragrant fruit is 
said to be used for scenting tea and flavouring wine. 
The bark is olive-green, with bald patches, and the trunk 
thick and contorted. Growing in tubs, it is indeed a very 
handsome shrub." 

The only other species of Gydonia figured in this 
Magazine is the well-known, rich-coloured G. japonica, 
Pers. (t. 692). 

Descr. — A shrub or small, tortuously-branched tree. 
Leaves petiolate, becoming leathery and glabrous, lan- 
ceolate on the flowering branches, obovate and larger on 
the barren branches, three to four inches long, glandular- 
toothed as well as the petioles ; stipules falling early, 
pedate, glandular on the margin; basal lobes very small. 
Peduncles short, one-flowered, furnished at the base with 
numerous, oblong bracts. Flowers about one inch and a 
half in diameter. Calyx-lobes ovate-lanceolate, three to 
four lines long, acute, recurved, glandular on the margin, 
woolly on the upper surface. Petals obovate-oblong, 
rounded, seven to eight lines long, pink, white at base, with 
a zone of a deeper red. Stamenshdli as long as the petals, 
and slightly longer than the styles. Ovary five-celled ; 
styles glabrous, consolidated to the middle; stigmas 
capitate. Fruit oblong-ovoid, about six inches long, deep 
yellow. Seeds very numerous, nearly triangular, with 
one obtuse angle, flattened, three inches to four inches 
and a half long, dull brown. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, section of a flower from which the petals have been removed, showing 
the numerous ovules : — enlarged. 



7383 




M.S.daLJ.N£itc>Uith 



"Vincent Brooks Day&.SoiuLt 4 Inij> 



I BMmQ St C ° London. 



Tab. 7989. 

LONICERA SYRINGANTHA. 
Native of North-West China. 



Nat. Ord. Caprifoliace^. — Tribe Lonicere.e. 
Genus Lonicera, Linn. (Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 6.) 



Lonicera (Isoxylosteum) syringantha \ frutex ranaosissimus, circa 4 ped. altns, 
ramis tenuibus quad rati gulari bus glabris foliis ovalibus vel ovati3 
obtusis rarius subacutis basi rotundatis vel subcordatis usque ad 9 lin. 
longis et 4 lin. latis glabris, petiolis 2 lin. longis gracilibus, floribus 
geroinatis, pedunculis 4-6 lin. longis, bracteis lanceolatis breviter 
petiolatis quam calycibus paullo longioribus, bracteolis in cupulatn con- 
nads margine crenulatis, calycibus 3 lin. longis, segmentis lanceolatis 
quam tubo paullo brevioribus, corollia hypocrateriformibus pallide roseis 
intus pilosis, tubo 4 lin. iongo, lobis ovalibus obtusis 3 lin. longis, 
antheris snbsessilibus apiculatis tubi medium vix superantibns, baccis 
liberis ovoideis 4 lin. longis cocciueis. 

L. syringantha, Maxim, in Bull. Acad. Petersb. vol. xxiv. (1878) p. 49 ; Mel. 
Biol. vol. x. (1877) p. 77. Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxm. p. 3b7. 
Wolfe in Gartenfl. vol. xli. (1892) p. 564, tigs. 115-116. Rehder in Rep. 
Missouri Bot. Gard. 1903, p. 46. 

Lonicera rupicola, var. syringantha, Zabel in Beissn. Schelle & Zabel, Sandb. 
Laubholz-Benen. p. 462 (1903). 

Capvifolium eyringanthum, O. Kuntze, Rev. Gen. Plant, vol. i. (1891) p. 274. 



Rehder, in bis monograph of Lonicera (I.e.), classifies 
the 154 species known to him in two sub-genera, viz. :— 
Chamsecerasus, in which the 2-flowered, usually peduncled 
cymes are borne in the axils of the leaves, which are 
never connate; and Periclymenum, in which the 3- 
flowered, sessile cymes are arranged in spikes or whorls 
at the ends of the branches and the bases of the upper 
leaves are usually connate. Of the 131 species of 
Chamsecerasus, eight constitute a well-marked section, 
which Rehder has named Isoxylosteum, to which L. syrin- 
gantha belongs. Unlike most species of Lonicera, those 
belonging to this section have the corolla perfectly 
regular, with a comparatively short, straight tube. Two 
such species have already been figured in this work, 
namely : L. tomentella, Hook. f. & Thorns, (t. 6486), and L. 
Alberti, Regel (t. 7394) ; the latter Rehder regards as a 
variety of L. spinosa, Jacquem. Both of them differ from 

December 1st, 1904. 



the present plant in the shortness of their calyx-lobes, 
while the former has the lower part of the corolla-tube 
pilose outside, and the latter has linear, obtuse leaves, 
about an inch long. 

The plant here figured was received at Kew in 1894 
from the St. Petersburg Botanic Gardens. It forms a 
compact bush, which has proved quite hardy, flowering 
freely in May, and ripening its fruit in July. 

Descr. — A much-branched shrub, about four feet high. 
Branches slender, quadrangular, glabrous. Leaves oval or 
ovate, obtuse, more rarely sub-acute, rounded or slightly 
cordate at the base, largest nine lines long and four lines 
wide, glabrous ; petioles slender, two lines long. Flowers 
in pairs ; peduncles four to six lines long ; bracts lan- 
ceolate, shortly stalked, a little longer than the calys ; 
bracteoles connate into a crenulate cup. Calyx three 
hues long; segments lanceolate, a little shorter than the 
tube. Corolla hypocrateriform, pale rose-coloured, pilose 
inside; tube four lines long; lobes oval, obtuse, three 
lines long. Anthers sub-sessile, apiculate, inserted just 
above the middle of the corolla-tube. Berries free, ovoid, 
four lines long, red.— C. H. Wright. 



anthf;, 1 ' E*!l ° f fl ° WerS Wit - h corolIas removed; 2, corolla laid open ; 3 and 4, 
enlarged ™ TSe 8QCtl ° n ° f ° Vary ; 6 ' branch with *™it i-all except 6 



7990 




JircKWh 



Vinreru rroj>a Usy& 



Tar. 7990. 

X. ODONTIODA VUYLSTEKEiE. 
Of Garden Origin. 

Nat. Ord. Okchidaceb. — Tribe Vande^. 
Odontioda, genus inter Odontoglossum et CocAUodam liybridum. 



Odontioda. VuyhteJcese ; pseudobulbis ovoideis, foliis circiter 3 floribua co- 
setaneis augunte lanceolatis acutis 6-9 poil. lougis recurvis, scapo foliis 
breviore suberecto 6-floro, floribus circiter 1\ poll, diametro, sepalis 
petalis similibns ovato-lanceolatis vix acatis _ leviter undulatis ba=ii 
sanguineis supra medium albidis rubro-maculatis margine roseis, labello 
panduiiformi petalis dimidio breviore basi aureo lobis lateralibus rotun- 
datis sanguineis lobo intermedio latiore rotundato Binuato albo 
sanguineo-maculato, polliuiis non visis. 

Odontioda Vuylstpkese, Gard. Ghron. 1904, vol. i. p. 360, f. 159. Orch. Bev. 
vol. xii. (1904), pp. 189, 209, f. 34. Gard. Mag. 1904, p. 376, cum fig. 
Journ. Hort. 1904, vol. i. p. 487, cum fig. The Garden, vol. Lsv. (1904), 
p. 433, cum fig. 

Under tab. 7980 we gave some particulars of bigeneric 
orchids with references to the literature of the subject. 
Odontioda is recorded as the result of a cross between 
Odontoglossum nobile, Keichb. f., in " Linnaea," vol. xxii. 
(1849), p. 850 (syn. V. Pescatorei, Linden, ex Lindl. in 
Lindlev & Paxton's "Flower Garden," vol. iii. p. 83, 
t. 90)," and Cochlioda Noetzliana, Rolfe (B. M. t. 7474), but 
it is not stated which was the seed parent. Judging from 
other crosses of a similar kind, we venture to suggest that 
it was the Odontoglossum, the bulbs and leaves being very 
similar, and the flowers also, in shape. ^ Indeed the only 
obvious feature derivable from the Cochlioda is the colour. 
But a writer in the " Orchid Review" says: "Beside the 
brilliant colour and partially adnate lip, there is a trace of 
connexity about all the segments which also shows the 
influence of the Cochlioda parent." 

Odontioda was raised by Mr. Ch. Vuylsteke, of Loo- 
christi, Ghent, and he exhibited the spike of flowers at the 
Temple Show, last May. It caused great excitement, and 
was the centre of attraction, and the judges marked their 
appreciation by awarding it a First-class Certificate and 
a silver-gilt Lindley medal. Miss Smith made a sketch of 

DeCESIBEH lsi, 1904. 



the 'spike on toe spot, and Mr. Vuylsteke gave us a 
flower, which has preserved its colour to a remarkable 
extent, and he subsequently furnished a photograph of 
the plant, so that we are able to give its habit. Judging 
from this it is a free-growing subject. 

We understood that a very high price was asked for it, 
and one gentleman told us that he had offered £200 ; but 
it did not change hands. 

Descr. — Plant about a foot high. Bulbs ovoid, bearing 
about three leaves at the same time as the flowers. 
Leaves narrow, lanceolate, acute, six to nine inches long, 
recurved. Flower-spike shorter than the leaves, nearly 
erect, six-flowered. Flowers about two inches and a half 
across. Sepals and petals similar, ovate-lanceolate, slightly 
undulate, crimson at the base, white above the middle, 
and spotted with red, pink around the margin. Lip 
fiddle-shaped, half the length of the petals, yellow at the 
base ; lateral lobes rounded, crimson ; front lobe broader, 
rounded, waved, white, spotted with crimson. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, reduced representation of the plant of Odontioda Vuyhtelcese ; 2, a 
flower of Odontoglossum nobile ; 3, a flower of Gochlioda Noetzliana : — both 
natural size, from plants exhibited wilh the hybrid. 



1991 




Vincent Brooks Day- &.£;- 



Tab. 7991. 
TULIPA Batalini. 

Native of Turkestan. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace.k. — Tribe TulipejE. 
Genus Tulipa, Linn. (Benth. et HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 818.) 



Tulipa Batalini ; herba glabra, bulbo globoso tunica papyracea apice intus 
fusco-lanata, caule 3-4 poll, alto, foliis caulinis circa 7 lineari-lauceolatis 
acnminatis usque ad 7 poll, longis et 6 lin. latis superioribus sensim 
minoribus, pedunculo unifloro 2-4| poll, longo, glabro, floribus pallide 
flavis, perianthii segmentis 1£ poll, longis exterioribua oblon go-ova tis 
acutis interioribus late obovatis quam exterioribus minus acutis, fila- 
mentis 3 lin. longis glabris, antheris luteis, stigmate quam ovario paullo 
latiore. 

T. Batalini, Begel in Gartenfl. 1889, p. 506. t. 1307, fig. 2. Gard. Chron. 
1889, vol. ii. p. 469 ; 1896, vol. i. p. 759, tig. 131. 



In 1876 Kegel (Fl. Turhest. vol. i. p. 132) enumerated 
eleven species of Tulipa as native of Turkestan. Since 
then various collectors, stimulated by the desire of 
obtaining new hardy plants, have visited that region, and 
succeeded in adding several new species to Kegel's list, 
amongst them the plant under consideration, which was 
discovered by the late Dr. Batalin, formerly Director of 
the Botanic Gardens, St. Petersburg. Bulbs were first 
received from St. Petersburg in 1888, and have flowered 
annually in April or May in the herbaceous ground at 
Kew, our figure having been made in May last. 

Tulipa is a very natural genus, and the species there- 
fore difficult of discrimination. This difficulty has been 
increased, both by the variation of the species under 
cultivation, and by the slight grounds on which specific 
names have been given for commercial purposes. The 
flowers here depicted are larger than those in Kegel's 
figures, and have anthers longer in proportion to the size 
of the filaments ; but, considering the length of time the 
plant has been in cultivation, and that it is derived from 
material authentically named, we hesitate to apply to it a 
new name. It bears a certain amount of resemblance to 
T. sylvestris, Linn. (B. M. t. 1202), which differs in having 
December 1st, 1904. 



the perianth greenish outside, and the filaments pilose 
towards the base. 

Descr. — A glabrous herb. Bulb globose ; tunic thin, 
beset with brown hairs inside at the apex. Stem three to 
four inches high. Leaves cauline, about seven, linear- 
lanceolate, acuminate, the longest seven inches long and 
six lines wide, the upper gradually smaller. Peduncle one- 
flowered, two to four inches and a half long, glabrous. 
Flowers pale yellow. Perianth-segments slightly unequal ; 
outer oblong-ovate, acute, an inch and a half long ; inner 
broadly obovate, as long as, but less acute than the outer. 
Filaments three lines long, glabrous ; anthers yellow. 
Stigma slightly wider than the ovary. — G. H. Wright. 



Figs. 1 and 2, anthers; 3, pistil : — all enlarged. 



INDEX 

To Vol. LX. of the Third Srbies, or Vol. OXXX. of the 

•whole Work. 



7982 Allium albopilosum. 

7948 Aloe Bauinii. 
7935 Arethusa sinensis. 
7947 Avundinaria Falconeri. 

7938 Bulbophyllum auricomum. 

7958 „ Weddelii. 

7959 Chamsedorea pulchella. 

7955 Chlorsea crispa. 

7965 Chrysanthemum ornatum. 

7939 Corydalis Wilsoni. 

7949 Crossos ma calif ornicum. 

7950 Crotalaria capensis. 

7984 Cryptostegia madagascarensig. 
7988 Cydonia sinensis. 

7932 Cymbidium rhodochilum. 

7985 Deiidrobium bellatulum. 
7974 ,, Williamsoni. 
7954 Dicentra chrysantha. 

7951 Dipodium pictum. 

7973 Dyschoriste Hildebrandtii. 

7952 Epipremnum giganteum. 
7971 Euphorbia viperina. 
7963 Geonoma gracilis. 

7983 Helipterum splendidum. 

7960 Impatiens Oliveri. 

7986 Iris bismarckiana. 

7956 „ warleyensis. 
7981 Jasminuui piimulinum. 

7987 Kalanchoe Dyeri. 
7944 Kirengeschoma palmata. 



7977 Lonicera etrusca var. superba. 

7989 „ syringantha. 

7979 Loropetaium chinense. 
7937 Lysichitum camtschatcense. 

7961 Lysimachia Henryi. 
7953 Marsdenia Imthumii. 
7946 Megaclinium platyrhachis. 

7941 Melaleuca uncinata. 
7976 Morasa Thomsoni. 

7978 Mucuna sempervirens. 

7990 Odontioda Vuylstekese. 

7942 Oldenburgia arbuscula. 
7936 Passiflora vitifolia. 
7966 Pitcairnia spathacea. 
793 1 Prostanthera dentieulata. 
7975 Pyrus .Niedzwetzkyana. 
7972 Rosa gigantea. 

7910 Sauroniatum brevipes. 
7945 Solauum glaucophyllum. 
7964 Spathaglottis Hardingiaaa. 

7943 Tanaksea, radicans. 
7970 Tecoma shirensis. 
7969 Thunbergia primulina. 

7991 Tulipa Batalini. 
7957 TupistiM Ciarkei. 
7968 Vanda pumila 

7962 Vellozia trichophylla. 
7967 Zingiber spectabile. 

7980 Zygocolax Yeitchii. 



NOTICE. 
CURTIS AND HOOKERS 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COMPLETION OF THE THIRD SEEIES. 

With much regret we have to announce the retirement of Sir Joseph 
Dalton Hooker, K.C.S.I., C.B., &c, from the editorship of The 
Botanical Magazine, after forty years of indefatigable service, 
which advancing years will not permit him to continue longer. We 
can only express our high appreciation of his work, and the deep 
obligation we have been under to him for so long a period. We 
sincerely hope that he may for many years enjoy the peaceful rest 
he has so well earned. The present issue, therefore, completes the 
Third Series of the Magazine, extending to sixty volumes. 



COMMENCEMENT OF A NEW [FOURTH] SERIES OF THE 
BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

We are now privileged to report that arrangements have been 
made for the commencement of a New [Fourth] Series of The 
Botanical Magazine under the auspices of Sir VMJIiam I. 
Thiselton-Dyer, K.C.M.G., CLE., LL.D., Sc D, F.B.S, Director of 
the Boyal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Sir William's well-known high 
standing as a botanist, his interest in Horticulture, and his position 
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great establishment at his command, afford every possible guarantee 
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The first number of the Fourth Series will appear on January 1st, 

1905 - Lovell Reeve & Co. 

November 30th, 1904.