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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CUKTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



■MffffOB 



ILLUSTRATING AND DESCRIBING 

plants of tl)e fcopal Sotanir <§artreit$ of Uriu, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; 



SIR JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., G.C.S.L, 

F.R.S., F.L.S., etc., 

ASSISTED BY 

WILLIAM BOTTING HEMSLEY, F.E.S., F.L.S., etc. 

VOL. LIX. 
OF THE THIRD SERIES. 

(Or Vol. CXXJX. of the Whole Work.) 




**"></•....' 



' Aye, flowers ! The very name of flowers, 
That bloom in wood and glen, 
Brings Spring to me in Winter's hours, 

And childhood's dreams agwin. 
The pjimrose on the woodland lea 
Was more than gold and land to me." 

Clam. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., LTD., 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments. 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 
1903. 

[All rights reserved.] 

Mo. boc. Garden 
1905 



LOJtBON : 
FKIKTF.D BY OII.UtKr AND KITIN'OrOST, T.ID., 

ar. John's holbk, clkkkeswell, k.c. 



To 
GEORGE NICHOLSON, ESQ., F.L.S., 

Late Curator of the Boyal Gardens, Kew. 

Dear Mr. Nicholson, 

It gives me great pleasure to dedicate to you a volume 
(CXXIXth) of the Botanical Magazine, a work in the prosecution of 
which you for so many years took an active part, especially in 
selecting for illustration in its pages subjects of botanical interest 
from amongst the treasures under your supervision in the Royal 
Gardens. 

I would further wish you to regard it as a memorial of our 
official co-operation in the management of those Gardens for 
upwards of twelve years, a period to which I look back with 
unalloyed pleasure; and also as a tribute to the high value of 
your special labours in dendrology, and as the author of the 
Dictionary of Gardening. 

Believe me, 

Very sincerely yours, 

Jos. D. HOOKER. 
The Camp, Sunninqdale, 

December 1st, 1903. 



FORM FOR SUBSCRIBERS TO THE RE-ISSUE. 

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Please send to the undersigned the Botanical Magazine, Third Series, 
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FORM FOR SUBSCRIBERS TO THE CURRENT ISSUE. 

To Messes. LOVELL REEVE & Co., Limited, 

6, Henhietta Street, Covent Gaeden. 

Please seiid the BOTANICAL MAGAZINE monthly, as publiahed, for 
which I enclose 42s. subscription for the current year. 

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So. 697. 

VOL. LIX.— JANUARY. p r { ce 3,. grf. coloured, 2s. 6d 

OB NO. 1391 °' THI ENTIRE WORK. 

CDETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COMPRISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 



AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN. 

8 U I T A B LE D ESCRI PTIONS ; 



Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.C.S.L, C.B., F.B.s., ] 

Xaie UBiitctttT of tfit l^onai Uotanic <&arbtns of "'Rem. 




Namre and Art to adore the page com hirre. 
And flowers exotic grace oar norther: 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd. 

PUBLISHERS TO THI! HOME, OOLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVERNMENTS, 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVEN T GARDEN. 
1903. 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



Part IV., with 10 Coloured Plates, 21«. net. 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACHXffi. 

By GEORGE BOWDLER BUCRTON, F.R.S., F.L.S. 
To b« completed in. 5 parts. Subscription for the whole work, £4 14s. 6<J. 

The family of the > Mewhraci&a has claims on the notice of both the scientific and 

general public. Owing to the advance of agriculture, climatic variation, and other 

ces, organic forms are constantly undergoing transformation, while some inay 

even become extinct. The present time, therefore, affords opportunities for studying 

and recording these forms, which may tint occur again. 

The general public will find interest in the bizarre forms of these insects, while the 
speculations of the scientific mind will be exercised on the question of their utility. 

The M embracida are also interesting from their mimetic forms, which will be 
considered in this Monograph. 



Now Keady. 

THE HEPATTCJ3 OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £7 10s. Plain, £11 2s. 6<Z. Coloured, net. 



Now ready, Parts 7— 9, with 12 Plates, 15$. plain, 21t. coloured, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 

With Descriptions of all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 

By ALFRED FRYER, A.L.S. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The work will be issued in 5 quarterly sections of 3 parts each. 
Prospectus on application. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalised in the British Isles. 

Br GEORGE BE NTH AM, F.R.S. 

7th Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. Hookke.C.B.. G.C.S.I.,F.R.S.,&e. 9*. net. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Forming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 
5th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9s. net. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN.- 



7872 



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Tab. 7372. 
ruellia maceantha. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Acantiiace,e. — Tribe Ruellie.«. 
Genus Ruellia, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1077). 



Ruellia macrantha ; caule 4-6-pedali erecto ramoso, ramulis teretibns glabris 
v. pubesceotibus, foliis 3-5-poll. longis breviter petiolatis ovato- v. 
oblongo-lanceolatis utrinque angustatia acatis v. acuminatis integerrimis 
v. repaado-dentatis supra sub-strigillosis subtus molliter hispidulis nervis 
utrinque costas 7-12 subtus prominnlis, floribns axillaribas v. apices 
versus ramorum confertis v. subspicatim dispositis amplis sessilibus v. 
brevissime p?dicellatis, bracteis 1-1 1 poll, longis liaeari-oblongis obtusis, 
sepalis suboequalibus bracteas subaaqaantibus liaeari-lanceolatis acumi- 
natis glabris, corollas lseteroseo-purpureae tubo 3 poll, longo infra mediun 
gracili curvo subtorto dein infundibulari-campanulato costato, limbi 3-1 
poll, diam.lobia 5 snbaaqualibus patenti-recurvis ciliatis apice emarginatis 
3-nerviis, nervulis transversis remotis, filamentis gractlibus subaequilongis 
inclusis inferne per paria connatis, antheri^ lineari-obtongis, ovario pilo- 
snlo, capsula 1-lj poll, longa tereti, valvis liguosis, semiaibus orbiculari- 
bus complanatis angaste alatis. 

R. macrantba, Mart, ex Nees in Mart. Fl. Bras. vol. ix. p. 37. 

R. speciosa, Schott ex Nees in Mart. I.e. et in DC. Prodr. vol. xi. p. 113 (non 
Mart). 

Dipteracanthus macranthus, Nees in Mart. I.e. ; in DC. I.e. 117. 



This magnificent plant appears to have a wide range in 
Brazil, from the province of Minas to that of St. Paul, 
growing amongst other shrubs in shady places. Of when 
and how it was introduced into Europe I can find no 
trace, nor does it appear in any of the continental garden 
catalogues that I have referred to. It has been in 
cultivation in the Royal Gardens, Kew, for many years, 
where it flowers in midwinter, and is then a very striking 
object. 

A vnriety of it described by Nees (DC. Prodr. vol. 
xi. p. 118) as £ magnified (Ruellia magnifica, Mart, 
herb.), differs in being smaller in all its parts, and 
more glabrous. Nees describes its leaves as being more 
densely strigose; but in all the specimens in the Kew 
Herbarium they are almost glabrous. 

Descr. — A branching, soft- wooded shrub, four to six 
feet high; branches rather stout, obtusely quadrangular; 

January 1st, 1903. 



branchlets glabrous or hairy. Leaves alternate, three to 
five inches long, variable in shape, from ovate to oblong- 
or elliptic-lanceolate, or narrowed at both ends, to lanceo- 
late, acuminate, quite entire to repand-crenate, more or 
less strigillose on the dark green upper surface, pale and 
sub-hispidly pubescent on the under, strongly seven- to 
nine-nerved, base narrowed into the short, often hairy 
petiole. Flowers very large, solitary, sub-sessile in the 
uppermost leaf axils, or fascicled, or sub-spicate in an 
elongate branchlet. Bracts two, sessile, linear-oblong, 
obtuse, acute, or rounded at the tip, an inch to an inch 
and a half long, green. Calyx about as long as the bracts, 
glabrous ; segments erect, linear-lanceolate, finely acumi- 
nate, strongly nerved, green. Corolla bright rose-purple ; 
tube three inches long, slightly decurved, slender, 
somewhat twisted in the lower half, above this inflated, 
between funnel- and bell-shaped, strongly many-ribbed, 
dilated above into a five-lobed limb three to four inches 
in diameter; lobes nearly equal, orbicular, spreading, and 
recurved, emarginate at the tip, strongly three-nerved, 
cross-nervules distant. Stamens four, filaments sub- 
equal, very slender, connate in pairs in the lower third ; 
anthers included, small, linear-oblong. Ovary narrow, 
terete, pubescent, narrowed into a very long, slender, 
glabrous style unequally bifid at the tip. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, bracts, calyx, and style; 2, portion of corolla with stamens; 3 and 
4, anthers; 5, ovary: — all enlarged. 



7S76 




M.S.d«l.J.K.Fitdhli«v 



"Wnoeni BrooksJDay SonLb a 3np 



X.-R.6eve &C° London 



Tab. 7873. 

MUSCARI PARADOXUS. 

Nutioe of Persia. 

Nat. Orel. Liliace*. — Tribe Scille.k. 
Genus Muscari, Mill. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 811.) 



Muscarj (BcUevalia) paradoxu?n ; bulbo majusculo ovoideo 2-4-foliato, foliis 
1-1^-pedalibus 1-1| poll, latis lineari-loriformibuB obtnsiusculia basi vix 
angustatis scapum vaginantibus coriaceo-carnods valde concayis dorso 
rotundatis enerviis marginibus snbtiliter erosis, scapo robusto foliis multo 
breviore, racemo oblongo-cylindraceo deneifloro, pedicelliB cernuis flores 
subajquantibus, periantbio saturate violaceo oblongo-campanulato £ poll, 
longo, lobis rotundatis tnbo triplo brevioribus concavis dorso incrassatis 
apicibus dernum recurvis intus marginibusque viridibus, staminibus supra 
medium tubi insertis filamentis brevissimis, antberarura loculis atro- 
coeruleis, ovario late ovoideo in stylum brevem attenuato, capsuho £ ix>H. 
latse erectaa subgloboso ovoideaa lobis ovoideis venosis dorso rotundatis 
2-3-spermis, seminibuB ovoideo-oblongis. 

M. paradoxum, G. Koch in Linnpea, vol. xxii. (18J9) p. 253. Ledeb. Fl. Ross. 
vol. iv. p. 153. Baker in Journ. Bot. vol. xii. (1874) p. 6. 

M. pyenanthura, Boiss. et Buhse in JVouv. MSm. Soc. Nat. Mosc. xii. (18G0) 
p. 213, ex parte, fide Boissier. 

Bellevalia paradoxa, Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. v. p. 308. 

B. pseudo-muscari, Boiss. et Buhse, Diagn. Plant. Orient. Ser. IT. vol. iv. 
p. 110. 

Hyacinthus paradoxus, Fisch. et Mey. Ind. Sem. Hort. Petrop. ; (1835) p. 30. 
Schlecht. in Linnxa, vol. x. (1836) Lilt. Ber. p. 92. 

Botiyanthus? paradoxus, Eunth Eaum. PI. vol. iv. p. 312. 



The species of the genus Muscari are very difficult of 
discrimination and of recognition from descriptions alone. 
That here figured is well known under cultivation, and it 
agrees fairlywell with the characters of Bellevalia paradoxa 
given by Boissier, which is founded on the Muscari 
paradoxum of Koch, but I have seen no native specimens 
wherewith to confirm the identification, and the definition 
of its author is quite insufficient for that purpose. Mr. 
Baker, in the Journal of the Linnean Society, vol. xi., 
p. 432 (not subsequently in the Journal of Botany), 
unites with it M. montamim,, Koch (which Boissier refers 
to another section of Belle valia), and gives as habitats 
Svria and Palestine ; but M. paradoxum is not included in 
Post's Flora of these countries. 

Muscari paradoxum was discovered by C. Koch in 

Januaky 1st. 1903. 



the Russian (transcaucasian) province of Eriwan, wliich 
borders Persia on the north, and the Caspian Sea on the 
east. Boissier adds the province of Asterabad (Buhse), 
■which is in Persia, on the opposite, south-eastern shores 
of the Caspian. 

The specimen figured flowered in the open air, in a 
south border, in the Royal Gardens, Kew, May, 1898. 
The species is one of the most handsome in the genus. 

Descr. — Bulb ovoid. Leaves two to four, twelve to 
eighteen inches long, by one to one and a quarter inches 
broad, loriform, sub-acute, thickly coriaceous, concave, 
dorsally rounded, nerveless, bases sheathing the base of 
the scape, mnrgins minutely erose. Scape stout, much 
shorter than the leaves. Raceme oblong, dense-flowered ; 
bracts deltoid. Pedicels about as long as the flowers, 
decurved. Peria?ith about one-third of an inch long, very 
dark violet-blue, oblong-campanulate ; lobes about one- 
third the length of the tube, orbicular, dorsally thickened, 
margins .green, at length spreading. Stamens inserted 
above the middle of the tube, included ; filaments very 
short ; anther-cells oblong, blue-black. Ovary broadly 
ovoid, suddenly contracted into a short style. Capsule 
trigonously globose, lobes dorsally rounded. — J. D. II. 



Fip. 1, flower; 2, segmfnt of corolla with stamen ; 3, stamens; 4, ovarv ; 
5, portion of rachis of raceme with capsnles ; 6, seed; all but 5, enlarged; 
7, reduced views of two plants. 



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M.S.A»l,J.N.FilcKlilK 



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Tab. 7874. 
CHRYSANTHEMUM indicltm. 

Native of China and Japan. 

Nat. Ord. CoiirosiTiE. — Tribe Anthemide.b. 
Genus Chrysanthemum, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 425.) 



Chrysanthemum (Pyrethruui) indicum; caule gracili foliisque glabris v. 
pilis albis furcatis laxe sparsis, foliis petiolatis 2-3-poll. longis flaccidis 
ovatis oblongisve acutis pinnatifido- v. bipinnatifido-lobatis pins minusve 
irregulariter dentatis deutibus acutis, capitulis 1-2 poll, latis in corymboa 
terminates oligo- v. polycepbalos dispositis, flosculis disci et radii aureis, 
pedunculis pedicellisque glabris v. pube appressa alba tomentosis, involucri 
glabri hemispherici bracteis appressis interioribus scariosis midio her- 
baceis oblongis orbicularibusve apicibus rotundatis exterioribus breviori- 
bus obtusis acatisve, receptaculo hemisphfeiico, flosculis radii longitudine 
disco capituli brevioribus v. paullo longioribus. 

C. indicum, Linn. Sp. PI. (1753) 889, eorcl. syn. Sabine in Trans. Hort. Soc. 
vol. iv. (1821) p. 326, t. xii. xiii. ; in trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. (1823) 
p. 144. Lindl. Bot. Rig. t. 1287. Roxb. Fl. Lnd. vol. iii. p. 436. Bretschn. 
Early Mist. Europ. Res. Fl. China (1881) p. 158 et Hist. Eitrop. Bot. 
Discov. in China (1898), pp. 39, 85 et 132. Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. 
vol. xxiii. (1888) 437; in Card. Chron. 1889, vol. ii. pp. 521, 555, 585, 652. 
Masters in Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. ii. p 340, fig. 106. Melville in Proc. 
Manchest. Liter. & Phil. Soc. Dec. 16th, 1901, p. xix. Henry in Gard. 
Chron. 1902, vol. i. p. 301, fig. 94. 

C. maderaspatanum, &c, Pluh. Almag. Bot. 1696, p. 101, 1. 160, f. 6. 

C. procumbens, Lour. Fl. Cochinch. p. 499, ex Maxim. 

C. tripartitum, Sweet, Brit. Fl. Gard. vol. ii. (1827) t. 103. 

C. Sabiui, Lindl. in Bot. Beg. sub t. 1287. 

Dendranthema indica, Des Moul. in Act. Soc. Linn. Bordeaux, vol. xx. (1855), 
p. 561. 

Matricaria japonica, flore minore, &c, Breyne, Prodr. Fasc. PL Bar. (1688) 
p. 66. 

M. madraspatana, Petiv. Mus. Petiv. (1695) Cent. viii. p. 76, saltern pro parte. 

M. Chnsan, &c, Petiv. in Phil. Trans, xxiii. (1703) p. 1421, Bretschn. I.e. \ p. 
54 et 158. 

M. sinensis flore minore, &c, Pluk. Amalth. Bot. (1705) p. 142, t. 430, f. 3. 

M. sinensis, &c, Vaillant, Act. (1720) p. 285, ex Linn, et Sabine. 

M. zeylanica horteusis, &c., Linn. Fl. Zeyl. (1747) p. 198. 

M. indica, Hamatuelle in Joitrn. d'Hist. Nat. vol. ii. (1792) p. 240. 

Pyrethrum indicum, Cass, in Diet. Sc Nat. vol. xliv. (1826) p. 149, DC. 
Prudr. vol. vi. p. 62. Maxim. Mel. Biol. viii. (1872) p. 516, excl. 
plenum? Franch. & Sav. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. i. p. *35. Franch. PL 
David, vol. i. p 167, var. lavandulasfolium. Honzo Zufu, vol. xiii. t. 7 (9). 
Somoku Zusetsu, vol. xvii, t. 22 (29). 

P. lavan.lulajfolium, Fisch. ex Trautv. in Act. Hort. Petrop. vol. i. (1871-2) 
p. 181. 
January 1st, 1903. 



Tanacetum indicuni, Schultz. Bip. Tanacet. p. 60. 
Tijetti-pu, RJieede Hort. Mai. vol. x. (1690) p. 87, t. 44. 



The vegetable kingdom offers few instances of floral 
disguises more complete than those under which the two 
plants known to horticulturalists as the Indian Chrysan- 
themum masquerade. 

Until comparatively recently the wild forms of these two 
plants were not even approximately identified, and now that 
we have large series of specimens supposed to represent 
both, from China and Japan, their delimitation appears 
to me, after some study of them, to baffle description, so 
variable are they in habit, foliage, inflorescence, and 
pubescence. In the cultivated forms, on the other hand, 
there is less variety in habit and foliage, with no limit to 
vagaries assumed by the flower-heads, due to the suppres- 
sion of the disk florets in a greater or less degree, and 
their assuming, with more or less variation of form and 
colour, the characters of ray florets. On the other hand, 
it is, in very many cases, impossible to say to which of the 
two species a given cultivated garden specimen is refer- 
able, which may be due, in part, to hybridization. The 
two recognized species are 0. indicnm, Linn, '(partim), of 
which a very widely spread wild Chinese form is here 
represented, and G. morifolium, Earn. (C. sinense, Sabine. 
Their distinctive characters, as given by Mr. Henry (Gard. 
Chron. I.e.), who has collected the plants in various parts 
of China, and studied them at Kew, are : — 

G. indicnm; leaves thin, flaccid, pinnatipartite, serratures acute or macro- 
nate; outer invol. bracts scariou?, except the narrow herbaceous nerve; 
lignles yellow, shorter than the diameter ot the disk.— China and Japan. 

C. vwrifolium ; leaves thick, coriaceous, entire or slightly incised; outer 
invol. bracts short, linear, acute, densely albo-tomentose ; ligules white, longer 
than the diimeter of the disk.— N. China, Mongolia, Japan. 

In a letter, Mr. Henry informs me that he recognized in 
China two status of G. indicnm. 1, A graceful, small, 
delicate plant, growing in coniferous forests, at eight 
thousand five hundred feet elevation; 2, a large straggling, 
weedy, very fragrant plant, common in ditches and^nelds, 
on^the banks of the Yangtze Kiang at Iehang. 

"The Chrysanthemum" is the subject of an essay by 
Mr. W. B. Hemsley, published in the Gardeners' Chro7iicle in 
1889 (cited above) which is a model for the treatment of 



such a subject. He gives the early and later history of 
the two plants under their botanical and horticultural 
aspects, differentiating them much as Mr. Henry has since 
done, but apparently restricting the wild G. morifolium to 
narrower geographical limits, though these include the 
Luchu Islands for a typical form. He also gives a very 
full synonymy and list of references to works in which the 
species are described, figured, or noticed. This latter 
appears to me to be so judiciously compiled that I have 
not hesitated to copy it for G. indicum, adding to it a very 
few later and omitted references. 

It is much to be desired that a series of plates illus- 
trating the forms of these Chrysanthemums as contained in 
the Kew Herbarium should be published, for by no other 
means could they be recognized. It remains to add that 
the two figures entitled G. indicum on tabs. 327 and 2042 
of this work are both referable to G. morifolium, Kam., 
and that G. indicum in a wild state is common from 
Canton and Hong Kong to Pekin, and in Manchuria. 

The specimen here figured is from a plant raised in a 
greenhouse of the Royal Gardens, Kew, from seed pre- 
sented by Col. Birch, of Rickmansworth. They were 
collected by Mr. Grant Birch in the Yangtze Valley above 
the rapids. They differ from the specimen of G. indlcum 
figured in the Gardeners' Chronicle, in having larger flower- 
heads, and in wanting the orbicular three-lobed stipules. — 
J. IK II. 

Fig. 1, forked hairs from the stem ; 2, ray -floret ; 3, disk -floret ; 4, stamens : 
— all enlarged. 



'815 




MSdAJJT Fitch lu)i 



TEncent Brc oks D ay *. Son. L^Irap 



L Reave & 



Tab. 7875. 

ALLIUM Ellisii. 

Native of Khorasan. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace.*. — Tribe Allie m. 
Genua Allium, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 802.) 



Allium (Melanocrommyon) Ellisii ; bulbo magno globoso, foliis 4-5 patenti- 
revolutispedalibus2| poll.latis linearibus lineari-oblongiave acutis palhde 
glauco-viridibus fere planis nervis ob^curis, soapo pedali crasso § poll, 
diam. viridi basi tantuui folioso, spathae valvia deltoideo-ovatis acumi- 
natis membranaceis ad H poll, longis, floribns H poll. diam. in capitulum 
5 poll. diam. oblato-spbaTricum dense congestis, pedicellis subasquilongis 
rlore subdnplo longionbus, perianthii roaei basi intus albi segmentis ovato- 
lanceolatis acuminatis fructiferis^ rigidis erectis, filamantis crassiuscuhs 
rubr 
bosc 




globose, 

parva depresso-globosa perianthii segmentis bis-terve breviore, loculis 
dorso rotuadatis 1-spermis, seminibus subreniformi-oblongis rotundatisve 
ad T V poll, longis, testa atra rugosa. 



Allium Ellisii is a very handsome species, resembling, 
in some respects of foliage, stoutness of scape and dense- 
flowered, globose umbel A. Karataviense, Regel, of Tur- 
kestan, t. 6451, which is a normally two-leaved species, 
with much smaller, paler flowers, narrower, flaccid 
perianth-segments, which are spreading or reflexed in 
fruit, and a much larger capsule. My friend, Dr. Stapf, 
whose travels in Persia and knowledge of the Oriental flora 
are so well known, has carefully examined A. Ellisii, and 
informs me that it belongs to the same group as A. caspium, 
Bieb. t. 4598, A. brahuicum, Boiss., A. Schuberti, Zucc, t. 
7587-8, and A. Bodeanam, Regel, all oriental species, with 
the perianth-segments erect in fruit ; and that it is most 
nearly allied to the last of these. From the first 
three, the shorter pedicels and dense-fld. umbels at 
once distinguishes B. Ellisii, from which A. Bodeanum 
differs (according to the description in Boissier's " Flora 
Orientalis") in the much narrower perianth-segments, 
which are white, with a slender pink midrib, and in the 
shorter stamens only half the length of the perianth, with 
the filaments sub-biauricled at the base. In the few 
capsules of A. Ellisii which I have examined, the cells are 

January lsi, 1903. 



one-seeded. The black, rugose seeds closely resemble 
those of A. Karataviense. 

A. Ellisii flowered in July, 1900, and again in 1902 in 
the garden of the Hou. Charles Ellis, of Frensham Hall, 
Haslemere, who informs me that the bulb came from a 
collector sent out for him from Meshed, by the late Mr. 
Ney Elias. 

Descr. — Bulb globose. Leaves four to five, basal, a foot 
long by two and a half inches broad, spreading and revo- 
lute, linear-oblong, acute, nearly flat, glaucous green. 
Scape a foot high, very stout, two-thirds of an inch in 
diameter, green, bearing a depressed-globose compact 
head of bright rose-coloured flowers five inches iu 
diameter. Spathes an inch and a half long, deltoidly 
ovate, acuminate, membranous. Pedicels nearly equal in 
length, about an inch and a half long. Perianth-segments 
widely spreading, half an inch long or more, ovate-lanceo- 
late, acuminate, white towards the base, stiff and erect in 
fruit. Stamens one-third shorter than the perianth ; fila- 
ments red, swollen and sub-globose at the base; anthers 
linear-oblong, brownish blue. Capsule very small, nob 
half the length of the perianth-segments ; depressed- 
globose ; cells one-seeded. Seeds black, rugose.—/. D. H. 

Fig. 1, stamen and pistil; 2, pistil; 3, fruiting perianth; 4 and 5, seeds ; 
all except 3 and 4, enlarged. 



787( 




M.S.dd.J.'N.FvlAUtK 



Vincent Brook3,Day & SonLt 4 .bnp 



i Rjteva C°Xfmd«m 



Tab. 7876. 

DIERVILLA MlDDENDORFFlANA. 
Native of Mongolia, Manchuria, and Japan. 



Nat. Ord. Caprifoliace.h. — Tribe Lonicere^e. 
Genus Diervilla, Toum. ; (Benth. & Hoole.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 6.) 



Diehvilla Middendorfiana ; frutex ramosus, glabes, raraulis robustis, cortice 
atro-fusco, foliis breviter petiolatis ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis argute 
serratis basi rotundatia supra laste viridibus reticulatim rngosis subtus 
pallidis nervis utrinque costse 6-8 nervuliaque subtus prominulis, cymis, 
breviter pedunculitis multifloris, floribus confertis subsessilibus, bracteis 
subulatis, calycis pollicaris tubo glaberrimo, limbi labiis ciliatis recuivia, 
auperiore oblongo 3-fido lobis lanceolatis, inferiore bipartite segmentis 
linearibus cuspidati.*, corolla} primulinaj tubo incurvo basi cylindraceo 
intua hirsuto, limbo campanulato lobis rotundatia antico fauceque punctis 
aurautiacia conaperso, disci glandula rotundata pubescente, antheris 
cobaerentibua glanduloao-piloais, capaula ad l\ poll, longa anguste 
oblonga, cylindracea, seminibua lanceolatia basi et apice longe alatia. 

D. Middendorfiana, Carr. in Rev. Hortic. Sen IV. vol. ii. (1853) p. 306 ; vol. iii. 
(1854) p. 261, t. 14. Van Houtte, Fl. des Serree,vo\. xi. (1856) t. 1137. 
Gard. Ghron. 1890, vol. i. p. 581, fig. 94. Maxim, in Mel. Biol. vol. xii. 
p. 482. 5. Moore in Journ. Bot. vol. xvi. (1878) p. 129. (var. Maximoviczii). 

Calyptrostiffma Middendoiffianum, Trautv. & Mey. in Middend. Reue Fl. 
Ochot. (1847) p. 46, tt. 25 a, b. , Kegel $■ Tiling. Fl. Ajan. p. 100. Bagel, 
Gartenfl. 1857, p. 3, t. 183. Maxim. Prim Fl. Amur. p. 135; in Mel. 
Biol. vol. xii. p. 482. F. Schmidt, Reis. Amurl. (1868) p. 142. 

Wagneria Middendorfiana, Lemaire in III. Hortic. vol. iv. (1857) sub t. 115. 

Weigela Middendorfiana, Hort. ex Garr. in Rev. Hortic. Ser. IV. vol. ii. (1853) 
p. 306. Lemaire in III. Hortic. vol. iv. (1857) t. 115; vol. xiii. (1866) t. 
495 (var. purpurata). 

Except in the curiously wrinkled leaves and colour of 
the corolla, Diervilla Middendorffiana resembles D.florida, 
Sieb. & Zucc. (Weigela rosea,* Lindl. t. 4396), to which 
species Mr. Hemsley (Journ. Linn. Soc. xxiii. 368) rightly, 
I think, refers D. amabilis, Carr. (W. amabilis, Hort. t. 
4893). D. Middendorffiana is the only Old World yellow- 
flowered species, in which respect it resembles its 
two New World congeners, D. trifula, Moench. (t. 1796, 
I), kmnilis, Pers.), and D. sessilifolia, Buckle, both natives 
of Eastern N. America. It is named after Alexander 
Theodor von Middendorff, whose travels in Northern and 
Eastern Siberia, in 1843-4, were published in St. Peters- 
burg in 1847-56. According to Carriere it was intro- 
duced into Europe in 1850, and found to be difficult of 

January 1st, 1903. 



cultivation. More recently it has been found in the Amur 
district, and in the Island of Saghalien, by the late Mr. 
Maries in the central mountains of Nipon, at elevations 
of two thousand feet to seven thousand feet. 

The specimen figured is from a plant in the Arboretum 
of the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it has been for many 
years, flowering in spring. It was probably introduced 
from Japan by collectors sent out from Kew upwards of 
fifty years ago. 

. Descr.—A glabrous shrub, with black bark and spread- 
ing branches. Leaves two to three inches loner, shortly 
petioled spreading and recurved, ovate-lanceolate, sharply 
serrate, bright green and reticulately rugose on the upper 
surface, beneath pale, with prominent nerves and nervules 
base rounded; nerves six to eight pairs, spreading 
flowers m shortly peduncled cymes, crowded, sub-sessile°; 
bracteoles subulate. Calyx about an inch long, two-lipped 
tube glabrous ; lips ciliate, recurved, upper trifid, lower 
bipartite, with linear, cuspidate segments. Corolla pale 
yellow speckled with orange in the throat and on the 
lower lobe, slightly decurved, tube short, narrow, cylindric 
at the base and hairy within, inflated and campanulate 
above; limb about an inch in diameter; lobes sub-equal, 
orbicular Dnh-gland sub-globose, hairy. Filaments hairy 
towards the base; anthers linear-oblong, glandular-pubes- 
globose ~J. RH St0Ut ; Sdgma ^^ three " lobed J lobes 

Fig. 1, caljxwitt bracteoles, style, and Bti^ma- 9 W* «* n x , , . 

open with stamens and dxsk^la^d^TanS 4 fcld^ a ;' nbe L * ld 
section of ovary -.-all enlarged; 6, fruit ofthen a t U ral7i£ ' ** transverse 



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Tab. 7872.— RUELLIA MACRANTHA. 
„ 7873.— MUSCARI PARADOXUM. 
u 7874.— CHRYSANTHEMUM INDICUM. 
„ 7875.— ALLIUM ELLISIL 
„ 7876.— DIERVILLA MIDDENDOEFFIANA. 



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7877 




J.NPilahlith 



VmcantBroaks,]^* Sunl,t d Imp. 



Tad. 7877. 
SANSEVIERIA grandis. 

Native of Tropical Africa ? 

Nut. Ord. ILeuodorace.e. — Tribe Oi'JiioroGONEJ!. 
Genus Sansevieria, Thunb.; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 679.) 



Sanseviekia grandis; acaulis, radicibus crassie, foliia amplis planis roaulatis 
inaequilongis sessilibus patulis, majoribus 3-4-pedalibus obovato-oblongis 
6 poll, latis rigide coriaceia acutis v. apiculatis utrinque luride viridibus 
fasciis Baturatioribus transversis ornatis, marginibus anguste cartilagineia 
rubro-brunneis, scapo erecto 2-pedali robusto stricto viridi vaginispaucia 
lanceolatia coriaceia instructo, panicula spicasformi tripedali erecta stiicta 
dense multiflora, rachi crassiti digiti minoria viridi, bracteis minutis 
triangularibua acutis scarioais triflori8, floribua seseilibus v. breviter pedi- 
cellatia fere 2 poll, longis albis, perianthii tubo limbo paullo breviore 
basi dilatato ovoideo, limbi segments pollicaiibus Hnearibua aubacutis 
1-nerviis, filamentis segmentia perianthii asquilongis filiformibua, atitheris 
lineari-oblongis loculis contiguis, ovario oblongo tereti, stylo etaminibua 
longiore, atigmate capitellato. 

S, grandis, Hook.f. 

This very noble species of <s Bowstring hemp " was pre- 
sented to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1896, by the Royal 
Botanic Society, Regent's Park, who received it from Dr. 
Heath, F.L.S., of Ebury Street, London. Referring to 
that gentleman, he told me that roots of it were given to 
him by a Cuban merchant, who informed him that the 
plants had been introduced into Cuba by a company formed 
to grow it for its fibre, and that the company had failed, 
owing to the cultivation of the plant not having been 
carried out in a practical manner. The fibre, he adds, is 
fine, white, silky, and is of extraordinary strength, far 
exceeding any other, a few strands of it being sufficient 
to hang a man. 

Referring to the Kew Museum of Economic Botaiw, 1 
was informed by Mr. Hillier that in the Cuban Catalogue 
of textile materials in the Paris Exhibition of 1900, there 
is the following brief allusion to what is, no doubt, 
S. grandis, " 11 y a d'autres plantes textiles, comnie la 
Lengua de Vaca, Sansevieria %p** The term, Cow's tongue, 
appears to be appropriate to the form of the leaf of this 
species. 
Fbb&uast 1st, 1903. 



Regarding the value of the fibre, a specimen of rope 
made from it, given me by Dr. Heath, was submitted by 
the Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew, to Messrs. Ide & 
Christie, Fibre Brokers, of 72, Mark Lane, E.C., who 
report that " it is a good class fibre, much liked ; its value 
to-day (September, 1902) is 35Z. per ton ; but that it is 
not a regular article of commerce, only odd sample bales 
having been received in this country. The plant thrives 
in Cuba, but money is wanted to develop the industry." 

It remains to add that its native country, though un- 
known, may be presumed to be tropical Africa, whence 
ten species have been described, of which six, including 
the ^present, have been figured in this Magazine. 

8. grandis forms a strong tuft in a bed in the Temperate 
House, where it flowered for the first time in July, 1901 
and again in 1902. 

Descr.—Stem 0. Leaves few, very large, rosulate, sessile, 
unequal-sized, the largest three to four feet long, by six 
inches or more broad, spreading, obovate-oblong, acute or 
mucronate, rigidly coriaceous, flat, dull green, crossed by 
broad bands of much darker green on both surfaces, 
margin with a very narrow, red-brown, cartilaginous 
border, bcape about two feet high, stout, green, bearing a 
lew, distant, narrow, lanceolate sheaths. Panicle two to 
three feet high, erect, narrow, spiciform, dense-flowered. 
Bracts minute, ovate, acuminate, scarious, three-flowered. 
Mowers sessile, or very shortly pedicelled, erect, about two 
inches long, pure white. Perianth-tube cylindric, inflated 
at the base ; segments about as long as the tube, linear, 
sub-acute, dorsally costate. Stamens as long as the 
perianth-segments. Anthers linear-oblong. Style slender 
stigma minute, capitate. — J. D. R. 

Fig. 1, flower ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, ovary :— all enlarged. 



7878 




M.s.a<4JirjitchJith 



■WjiceniBrooJ<s,DayS<.SonI."t4Imp 



Tap. 7878. 
BJPATIENS Balfoubii. 

Native of the North Western Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Geraniace^. — Tribe BalsaminejE. 
Genus Impatiens, Linn.; (Benth. #• Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 277.) 



Impatiens Balfourii ; herbacea, glaberrima, caule ramoso ramis obtuse 4-gonis, 
foliis 3-5-pollicaribus breviter petiolatis ovato-lanceolatis lunge acuminatis 
argute serrulatis dentibus recurvis minutis basin versus folii majuribus 
palhde viridibus, nervis utrinque costas ad 8-10 nervulis transversia 
striolatie, petiolo eglanduloao, glandulis stipularibus pulvinatis, pedun- 
culis apices versus ramulorum subumbellatim laxe coufertis graciiibus 
3— 4-pollicaribus roseis, racemis brevibus terminalibus simplicibus o-8-floriB, 
bracteia £-} poll, longis ovato-lanceolatis caducis, pedicellis alternis 
gracillimis £-1 poll. longis, floribus majusculis pallide roseis, sepalis 2 
orbiculan-ovatis niucronatis j-g in. diam., vexillo orbiculari |-§ in. diam. 
reflexo pallido, carina paullo iucrassata rosea, alis patulis f-l?- poll, longis 
lobo basilari oblongo pallide aureo, terminali multo majore late dolabri- 
formi apice rotundato laete roseo, labello l-lj-pollicari campanulato in 
cornu lento incurvum apice obtusum sensira attenuato,capsulis erectis 1-1£ 
poll, longis liuearibus pentagonis viridibus angulis rubris oligospermia, 
seminibua oblongia |- £ poll, longis, testa crassiuscula striulato-puuctulata. 

I. Balfourii, Ilook.f. 



The beautiful Balsam here figured was raised from seed 
sent by Mr. Duthie, F.L.S., Director of the Botanical 
Department, Northern India, to the Royal Botanic 
Gardens of Edinburgh, with no precise habitat attached, 
but no doubt collected in the Western Himalaya, the forests 
of which swarm with its congeners. It is referable to 
Series B in the tentative arrangement of Indian Balsams 
adopted in the " Flora of British India," but does not fit 
into any of the five groups of that Series. As, however, 
these will all undergo great modifications in a further 
study of the genus upon which I am now engaged, it 
would be premature to do more than indicate the salient 
characters of 1. Balfourii. These are the alternate, never 
whorled or opposite leaves, their very minute, recurved 
marginal teeth, short, naked petioles, the large flowers in 
very short, terminal racemes, the very slender pedicels of 
which are never interruptedly placed, or clustered whorled 
or umbellate, and the erect capsules. Of the flower the 
most marked character is the large, horn-like curved spur 
of the lip. This would be regarded as a distinguishing 
February 1st, 1908, 



character, had it not been that with the specimen sent me 
by Dr. Balfour, there came raised from the same packet of 
seeds an altogether similar plant, except that the lip is 
suddenly produced into an incurved spur of a totally 
different character, and so slender that I at once named 
it (whether specifically or as a variety) leptohentron. 
Further materials are required before deciding which 
alternative should be adopted. I. Balfourii flowered in 
the Royal Gardens, Edinburgh, in September and October, 
1901. 

Descr. — A perfectly glabrous, branching herb, two to 
three feet high; branches obtusely angled. Leaves three to 
five inches long, shortly petioled, ovate-lanceolate, almost 
caudate-acuminate, minutely serrulate with recurved teeth, 
basal serratures longer and straighter, but eglandular, 
base rounded or cuneate, pale green above, with eight to 
ten nerves on each side of the midrib, striolate by trans- 
verse close-set nervules ; petiole eglandular ; stipular 
glands pulvinate. Peduncles loosely crowded in the upper- 
most leaf-axils, forming a subumbeliiform cluster, three to 
four inches long, very slender. Racemes very short, at 
the end of the peduncles, simple, six to eight fid. Bracts 
about a fifth of an inch long, ovate-lanceolate. Pedicels 
very slender, one half to one inch long. Sepals 2, nearly 
orbicular, mucronate, about one-fifth of an inch broad. 
Standard orbicular, reflexed, white, suffused with rose; 
keel red, slightly thickened. Wings one to one and a 
quarter inch long, basal lobe oblong, pale yellow ; terminal 
much larger, broadly hatchet-shaped, bright rose, tip 
rounded. Lip an inch to an inch and a quarter long, 
campanulate, gradually narrowed into a horn-like, some- 
what incurved, obtuse horn, with a thickened tip. Cap- 
snles erect, linear, one to one and a half inch long, five- 
angled, the angles red, few-seeded. Seeds oblong, testa 
thick, punctulate. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1 portion of stem and stipulary glands; 2, serratures of leaf; 3, sepal ; 
% »p ; 5, wing ; 6, seed :— all enlarged. 




M.S.delJ.N.RtcKKth 



"\£n.oantBrooksX>ay£ SonlAmp 



Tab. 7879. 
ACIDANTHERA Candida. 
Native of East Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Iride*.— Tribe IxikjE. 
Genus Acidanthera, Hochst.; (Benth $ Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 706.) 



Acidanthera Candida ; herba gracilis, glaberrima, cormo globoso, caule sim- 
plici 2-3-ioliato 2-4-floro basi vaginato, foliis linearibus acuminata I-14 
pedalibus \ poll, latis rigidis costa prominula nervi3 obscuris, spatha 
exteriore 2£ poll, longa lanceolata herbacea, floribns alliis odonferis, 
perianthii tubo fere recto graoili 3i-pollicari, limbi 2 poll. diam. segmentis 
1| poll, longis, ovato-rotundatis subacutis obtusisve, filamentis brevibus, 
antheris \ poll, longis rectis, connectivo dorso ruguloso in appendiceal 
validam pnbernlam conico-subulatam producto, stigmatis raniia magms 
spathulatis fimbriatis patenti-recurvis. 

A. Candida, Bendle in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxx. (1895) p. 404 



Acidanthera Candida is described by Dr. Rendle, F.L.S., 
as a native of woodless, undulating grassy steppes at 
Lairjoro, in the Athi plains, Eastern tropical Africa, 
where it was discovered in 1893 by Prof. J. W. Gregory, 
F.R.S., of the Geological Department of the British 
Museum (now of Melbourne University). Its nearest 
affinity is, he says, with A. laxlflora, Baker (" Handbook 
of IrideaB," p. 188) a native of the slopes of Kiliman- 
jaro, from which it differs in its more robust habit, firm, 
narrow, linear leaves, its more linear outer spathe- valve, 
and broad, pure white perianth-segments. 

The genus Acidanthera consists of about eighteen 
species, chiefly natives of the hilly regions of tropical 
Eastern Africa. It is almost too closely allied to Tritonia, 
through A. capensis, Benth. Two species only have pre- 
viously been figured in this work : A. equinoctial U , Baker, 
of Abyssinia, t. 7393, and A. capensis, Benth., of the Cape 
Colony (Tritonia capensis, Ker), t. 618 and 1531. 

The Koyal Gardens, Kew, are indebted to J. T. Bennett 
Foe, Esq., of Ashley Place, London, for the plant of 
A. Candida here figured, which flowered in the Cape House 
in April, 1902. 

Deter. — A slender, erect, glabrous, leafy herb. Gorm 
globose. Stem a foot to a foot and a half high, slender, 
February 1s>t, 1903. 



green, two- to three-leaved, sheathed at the base, three- to 
four-flowered. Leaves sheathing at the base, a foot to a foot 
and a half long by half an inch broad, linear, acuminate, 
rigid, bright green, midrib prominent on both surfaces, 
lateral nerves none or very obscure. Outer spathe two and 
a half inches long, lanceolate, acuminate, convolute, herba- 
ceous. Flowers white, very sweet-scented. Perianth-tube 
three and a half inches long, slender, nearly straight; 
segments of limb orbicular-ovate, obtuse or sub-acute. 
Filaments short ; anthers half an inch long, linear, con- 
nective dorsally thickened, rugose, produced into an erect, 
stout, subulate, puberulous appendage. Stigmatic arms 
large, spathulate, fimbriate, spreading, and recurved — 
J. D. 11. 



Figa. 1 and 2, stamens; 3, stigma : — both enlarged. 



7S80 




Tab. 7880. 
ASTILBE Davidii. 

Native of China, 8fc. 

Nat. Ord. Saxifragace*. — Tribe Saxifrages. 
Genus Astilbe, Buch.-Ham. ; (Benth. & Eodk.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 634.) 



Asm be Davidii; herba elata, caule tereti laevi paucifoliato, foliia radicali- 
bus rosulatis stipulatis, caulinis distantibns longe graciliterqne petiolatia 
ternatim pinnatis, pinnis lateralibus oppositis longe petiolulatis 3-f>- 
foliolatis, pinnulis lateralibus oppoBitis sessilibus papyraceis l£ poll, 
longis ovatis oblongisve acutis grosse saspe insequaliter argute serratis 
dentibus cuspidatis supra Isete viridibus, termmali petiolulata duplo 
majore basi acuta v. rotundata simplici v. triloba, panicula terminali 
valde elongata angusta, rachi ramisque fusco-tomentosis, ramis simplici- 
bus 2-4 poll, longis erecto-patentibus spiciformibus fere a basi densi- 
fioris, bracteis ad basiD ramorum y-£ poll, longis lanceolatis membranaceis, 
floribus parvis la3te roseis secus rachin ramorum in glomerulos parvos 
dispositis sessilibus bracteolis 2 subulatis, calycis puberuli turbinati 
lobis ovato-oblongis obtusis, petalis loriformibus obtusis calycis lobis 
4 plo longioribus apicibns neutiquam dilatatiH, staminibus 10 petalis 
brevioribns, filamentis violaceis, antheris snbglobosis atro-violaceis, ovarii 
conici carpellis basi c >nnalis in stylos subulatos attenuatis. 

A. Davidii, Henry in Gard. Ghron. 190.1, vol. ii. p. 95, tig. 34. 

A. cbinensis, var. Davidi, Franch. PI. David, p. 121. Henry I.e. The 
Garden, vol. lxii. p. 179, cum ic. 



This beautiful plant has been referred by that excellent 
botanist, the late Mr. Franchet, to a variety, Davidi, of 
Astilbe chinensis, Maximowicz, a species described as having 
a yellowish calyx, with acute lobes and white petals dilated 
at the apex, founding the variety on the vinous colour of 
the inflorescence, and uniformly linear petals. In so doing 
he has overlooked the very long, narrow panicle, with long, 
sub-erect branches regularly diminishing in length up- 
wards, which is a marked character of this plant. Taken 
together, these differences induced Mr. Henry, when 
describing and figuring it in the Gardeners' Chronicle, 
under the name given by Franchet, to adopt that of 
Davidii as the specific name. 

A. Davidii appears to have a wide range in China, 
growing in shaded places and by water-courses. There are 
specimens in the Kew Herbarium collected in Manchuria 
by Wilford in Mongolia, by Pere David, near Peking, 

Februahy 1st, 190". 



by Bretschneider, in Kansa by Potanin, and a fine 
series in Hupeb, by Henry. The specimen figured, which 
was six feet in height, was cominuuicated by Messrs. 
J. Veitch & Sons from their garden at Coombe Wood 
in August, 1902. It was raised from seed sent home by 
their collector, Mr. E. H. Wilson. 

Descr. — Stem with inflorescence four to six feet high, 
stout, terete, smooth, glabrous. Leaves ternately pinnate 
or bipinnate, radical rosulate, petioles long, very slender, 
lower pinnae opposite, petiohilate, bearing one or two 
rather distant pairs of pinnules, and a petiolulate 
simple or three-lobed terminal one ; pinnules an inch 
to an inch and a half long, opposite, sessile, oblong 
or ovate, acute, coarsely unequally acutely serrate, 
papyraceous, bright green above, paler beneath, base 
acute or rounded, terminal pinnule usually twice as 
large as the lateral, and more deeply toothed, base acute. 
Panicle two feet long, narrow, inclined ; rachis brown, 
tomentose; branches very many, alternate, sub-erect, 
spiciform, lower four to five inches long, npper gradually 
shorter, clothed nearly to the base with crowded globose 
fascicles of minute, bright rose-pink, sessile flowers, rachis 
tomentose ; bracts at the base of the branches membra- 
nous, lanceolate, acuminate, half an inch long; bracteoles 
at the base of the flowers minute, subulate. Calyx one- 
sixth of an inch long and broad, turbinate, puberulous, 
lobes oblong-ovate, obtuse. Petals four times as long as 
the calyx-lobes, exactly linear, very slender, one-nerved. 
Stamens shorter than the petals, minute, filaments violet- 
blue ; anthers dark blue. Pistil of two conical, carpels 
connate at the base, each narrowed into an erect style. — 
— J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Flower and bracteoles ; 2, stamen ; 3, pistil : — all enlarged. 



:stn 




"\5ii<»MBrooks r Day< 



Tad. 7881. 
RHODODENDRON beachyoaepum. 
Native of Japan. 



Nat. Ord. Ekice^.— Rhodorejc. 
G«nus Rhododendron, Linn.; (Benth. & RooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 592.) 



Rhododendron (Eurhododendron) brachycarpum; frutex 8-10-pedalis eglandu- 
losus, ramia ramulisque robustis glabris novellis pubescentibus, foliis 
4-6 poll, longis coriaceia oblongis lineari-oblongisve obtusis apiculatisve 
basi cuneatis v. rotundatis supra glabris saturate viridibus subtus glabris 
v. tomento brunneo appresso laxe v. dense stellatim-pubescentibus, nervis 
10-15 utrinque costse tenuibus, petiolo robusto brevi, corymbo terminali 
globoso sessili multi-densifloro, bracteis ovato-rotundatis acuminatis craase 
coriaceia glabris, pedicellis 1-2-pollicaribus, calyce brevissimo cupulari 
puberulo obtuae 5-dentato, corolla infundibulari-campanulata 5-loba, 
tubo brevi, limbo ad 2 poll, lato, lobis orbicularibus patenti-recur7is 
apicibus retusis medio roseo-tinctis, 3 saperioribus infra medium punctis 
majusculis fulvis conspersis, staminibus 10 filamentis basi pilosis, antheria 
parvis brevibua flavis, ovario 5-loculari pabescente, stylo staminibus 
breviore orassiusculo apice truncato cavo stigmatoso, capsula J-2 poll, longa 
tereti lignosa, semiaibus T V poll, longis testa utrinque inaequaliter pro- 
ducta. 

R. brachycarpum, D. Don, ex G. Don, Gen. SysL Gard. vol. iii. p. 843. DG. 
Frodr. vol. vii. p. 723. A. Gray in Mem. Am. Acad. Arts & Sc. Bost. 
vol. vi. (1859) p. 400. Franch. & Sav. Enum. PL Jap. voL i. p. 288. 
Maxim. Bhod. As. Or. p. 22. 

Though apparently unknown to KsBmpfer and Thun- 
berg, Rhododendron brachycarpum is a widely distributed 
shrub in the mountain districts of Northern and Central 
Japan, covering, according to Franchet, vast tracts of Fusi- 
jama, above the forest region. It varies greatly in the 
amount of brown tomentum on the under-surface of the 
leaves, which are sometimes perfectly glabrous. Probably 
the colour of the corolla also varies ; the bright rose-pink 
blush in the middle line of the lobes, becoming deeper 
towards the tip, may spread over the whole corolla, as it 
does in a Japanese figure of a plant that may be a variety 
of this. The name brachycarpum is an unfortunate one, as 
the figure (6) representing the normal size of the capsule 
shows; there are, however, specimens in the Kew Her- 
barium with the capsule less than half an iuch in length. ^ 

Seed of R. brachycarpum, sent by the Imperial Botanic 
Gardens of St. Petersburgh in 1895, to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, produced plants which flowered in the Arboretum at 
February 1st, 1903. 



Kew in June, 1902, from which the accompanying plate 
was made. 

Descr. — A large, very robust shrub, six to ten feet 
high ; branches and branchlets glabrous, or pubescent 
when young. Leaves four to six inches long, shortly 
petioled, oblong or linear-oblong, obtuse or apiculate, base 
cuneate or rounded, dark green and glabrous above, with 
a stout midrib and ten to fifteen pairs of very slender, 
arched nerves, beneath glabrous, or clothed laxly or densely 
with a closely appressed brown tomentum of stellate hairs ; 
petiole very stout. Flmvers in a globose, terminal, sessile 
corymb four to six inches in diameter ; bracts orbicular- 
ovate, acuminate, very coriaceous, glabrous ; pedicels one 
to two inches long. Calyx very small, cupular, obtusely 
five-lobed. Corolla between funnel- and bell-shaped, tube 
short, limb two inches in diameter ; lobes large, spreading, 
orbicular, retuse, white, with a faint rose-pink blush in 
the mesial line reddening towards the tip ; throat and 
three upper lobes closely sprinkled from the base to the 
middle with fulvous spots. Stamens ten, filaments slender, 
hairy towards the base; anthers small, yellow. Ovary 
five-celled, pubescent. Capsule half an inch to one inch 
in length.— J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, portion of leaf, tinder-surface ; 2, calyx and pistil ; 3, stamen ; 
4, summit of style; 5, branched hair of leaf: — all enlarged; 6, capsule of 
nat. size. 



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„ 7881. —RHODODENDRON BRACHYCARPUM. 



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Tab. 7882. 
aloe ■ kubroviolacea. 

Native of Southern Arahia. 

Nat. Ord. LarACE*. — Tribe Aloineje. 
Genus Aloe, Linn. ; (Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 776.) 



Aloe (Eualoe) rubroviolacea; caule crasso monocephalo, foliis dense rusuktib 
bipedalibus patenti-recurvis subfalcatis late lanceolato-ensiformibus ad 
| poll, crassis glauco-viridibus pruinoso-violacea supra planiusculis 
subtus convexis marginibus corneis rubris remote spinoso-dentatis 
dentibus £ poll, longis incurvis rubris apicem versus folii evanidis, scapo 
valido basicompresso adscendente parce ramoso, spici3 bims 2-3-pedah- 
bus 4 poll. diam. cylindraceis densifloris, bracteis 1 7 1£ poll, longis 
lanceolatis siccis infra racemum vacuis, floralibns stnatis albo late mar- 
ginal, floribus brevissime pedicellatis pendulis deorsum imbricatis, 
perianthio lj poll.longo cylindraceo £ poll. diam. palhde rubro.segmentia 
infra medium connatis apicibus deltoideo-recurvis palhdis, stamimbus 
longe exsert's, antheris ochroleucis demum atro-brunneis. 

A. rubroviolacea, Schweinf. in Bull. Herb. Boiss. vol. ii. App. II. (1894) 
p. 71. Notizblatt. Berl. Bot. Gart. vol. i. p. 5 (1897). 



For the opportunity of figuring this noble plant I am 
indebted to ray friend, Sir Thomas Hanbury, F.L.S., of 
La Mortola, who sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 
March, 1902, a flowering raceme, a leaf, a photograph of 
the whole plant made by Sir Edmund Loder, Bart., and an 
excellent detailed description, with notes on its affinities, 
&c, by Sir Thomas's able Curator, Mr. Alwin Berger, 
of which I have largely availed myself. Mr. Berger says, 
" The plant was received from the Berlin Botanic Gardens. 
It flowered for the first time at the Palazzo Orengo in the 
spring of 1900, and produced a few capsules with good 
seed, from which a stock of seedlings has been raised. 
In the severe winter of last year the flowering scape was 
injured by the frost." Mr. Berger adds, " The inflorescence 
is composed at present of two spikes only, but it may 
become more branched in future. Concerning its allies I 
think there can be no doubt it belongs to the group with 
A. Salm-Dyckiana, Schult. fil., A. drepanophylla, Baker, 
and A. chloroleuca, Baker. It cannot be grouped under 
Pachidendron, for the perianth is not at all clavate, its 
March 1st, 1903. 



segments are much longer than the tube, and the bracts 
are much lai-ger than in that group. None of its allies 
are found near its habitat, all being South African. It is 
therefore of high interest in point of view of geographical 
distribution. A further exploration of Arabia may bring 
other allies to our knowledge." 

Dr. Schweinfurth discovered this species on Mt. Schibam 
above Menacha in Southern Arabia, near the old castle, 
at about nine thousand five hundred feet (two thousand 
nine hundred met.) above the sea. 

Descr. — Stem very stout, twenty inches high by four in 
diameter, with a single decliuate head of leaves. Leaves 
about two feet long, by six inches broad, densely rosulate, 
sub-falcate, spreading and recurved, ensiformly lanceolate, 
about three-fourths of an inch thick, narrowed into a 
rather obtuse point, pale green, with a faint, violet bloom, 
nearly flat above; convex beneath, margins horny, red, 
armed, except towards the tip, with rather distant, shortly 
incurved, red spines. Sca/pe ascending, bearing two 
branches terminated by large cylindric spikes, each two to 
three feet long, densely clothed with imbricating, pendulous, 
pale red flowers. Perianth an inch and a half long, 
cylindric, one-third of an inch diameter. Segments connate 
for one-third of their length, tips spreading, pale, outer 
with three darker greenish lines, inner with a broader, 
central, red band. Filaments exserted for about one-fourth 
of their length; anthers oblong, dark ochroleucous, at 
length brownish black. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, bracts; 2, stamen and pistil; 3, pistil: — all except 1 enlarged. 



1883 



1 




M. S.del.J.N.Fitchlrth 



"'Bilo ent Br o o 1<b,D ay & S or. LtS li €h 



Tab. 7883. 
SOPHORA viciifolia. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. LegumenoS;*:. — Tribe Sofhore«. 
Genus Sophora, Linn. ; {Benth. Si HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 555). 



Sopiiora (Ensophora) viciifolia; suffruticosa, spinosa, ramis glabris ramulis 
petiolisqne appresse tomentellis, foliolis 6-7-jagis cum impari sesailibus 
? poll, longis ellipticis v. oblongo-obovatis obtusis apiculatis supra 
glaberrimis subtus parce hirtellis, stipulis minutis tomentosis calloso- 
mucronatis, racemis ramulos terminal] tibus erectis recurvisve breviter 
pedunculitis foliis subasquilongis laxe 6-12-floris, floribus | poll, longis, 
calyce violaceo pedicello sequilongo, cupulari suba?qualiter 5-dentato 
pubescente albis, bracteis minutis, petalis subsequilongis, vexillo 
spatbulato reflexo, carinas petalis basi auriculatis filamentorum 9, alte 
connatis, carpellis nunc binis hirtellis, legumine aptero 1-2-pollicari 
gracili moniliformi rostrato glaberrimo, articulis 3-5 interstitiis elongatis 
valde constrictis, valvis membranaceis demum Hberis, seminibus \ poll, 
longis oblongis flavo-brunneis. 

S. viciifolia, Hance in Joum. Bot. vol. xix. (1881) p. 209. Hemsl. in Jonrn. 
Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxiii. (1887) p. 203. 

S. Moorcroftiana, Benth. var. Davidi, Fratich. PI. David, p. 101, t. 14. 



Sopiiora viciifolia is so very closely allied to S. Moor- 
croftiana y Benth., a native of the dry Tibetan Western 
Himalaya, at elevations of ten thousand to twelve 
thousand feet, that it was referred by Franchet, as a 
variety, to that species. It is, however, specifically very 
different. S. Moorcroftiana having eleven to seventeen larger, 
more tomentose and more obovate leaflets, terminated with 
a long, stiff, awn -like mucro, a longer, narrower calyx, a 
shorter, yellow corolla, and densely pubescent pods, with 
seeds twice as large as those of S. viciifolia. The Chinese 
plant was first described by the late Mr. Hance from 
specimens collected in 1880 by Mr. T. Watters in the 
Province of Hupeh, in the mountains of which province 
it has since been found by Mr. Henry ; it is also a native 
of Shensi, Yunnan, and Szecbuen, where it appears to be 
common on the Tibet frontier, forming, according to Mr. 
Pratt, large heaths, two to four feet high, in barren soils, 
at an elevation of nine thousand to thirteen thousand five 
hundred feet. 
March 1st, 1903. 



The specimen figured was from a plant raised from seed 
sent by Mr. Henry to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1898, 
which flowered in the open air against a wall in July, 
1902. The violet calyces contrasting with the milk-white 
corolla make a very effective and attractive contrast. 

Descr. — A low, much-branched, spinescent shrub, two 
to four feet high, with pubescent branchlets, petioles, 
pedicels, and calyx. Leaves an inch to an inch and a half 
long, shortly petioled ; leaflets six to seven pairs, with a 
terminal one, rather close-set, sessile, a quarter of an inch 
long, elliptic, obtuse, mucronate, pubescent beneath. 
Mowers white, in shortly peduncled, terminal, erect, or re- 
curved, six- to twelve-flowered racemes. Calyx small, cup- 
shaped, shortly five-toothed, violet blue. Petals about half 
an inch long, sub-equal in length. Standard obovate- 
spathulate, reflexed. Keel-petals obtusely auricled at the 
base. Carpels one or two, very slender, hairy. Pod one 
to two inches long, slender, moniliform, long-beaked, 
smooth, glabrous, joints three to five, ellipsoid, interstices 
long, much constricted ; valves free, membranous. Seeds 
about one-seventh of an inch long, ellipsoid.—/. D. H. 



pefaf." 5' SA^T? ^ d sta, ? en8 ; 2 ' 3 standard 5 3, wing-petal; 4, keel- 
^d i 8 5 ftS&^ l SiffiS ,i ' POd; 8 ' 8eed: aUeXC6Pt7 ****** 



7SS- 




M.S.aal,J.K.FitdhlitK 



^Vincent Brooks Day &.Son LtSittp 



i-Reeve 4 n»T. 



Tab. 7884 
HAMAMBLIS mollis. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Or J. Hamamelide.«. 
Genus Hamamelis, Gronov, ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 667.) 



Hamamelis mollis ; frutex v. arbor 10-30-pedalis, cortice atro-fnsco, ramulis 
foliisque subtus stellato-tomentosis, foliis breviter petiolatis 4-5 poll, 
longis obovato-rotundatis oblongisve cuspidatis sinuato-dentatis basi 
msequaliter cordatis sinu acuto supra minute subscabride t-tellato- 
pubescentibus, stipulis f poll, longis lineari-lanceolatis extus tomentosis 
mtus glabris caducis, floribus in pedunculis glomeratis, calycis pubes- 
centis lobis ovato-rundatis rubris, petalis ad £ poll, longis loriformibus 
aureis, filamentis brevibns crassis glabris, antheris reniformi-rotandatis 
ovario villoso, stylis brevibns recurris, capsula tomentosa. 

H. mollis, Oliv. in Hook. Ic. PL vol. xviii. t. 1742. Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. 
Soc. Bot. vol. xxiii. (1887) p. 290. 



Of Hamamelis only three species are as yet known. 
n. virginia?ia, Linn. t. 6684, of the Eastern United States. 
H. japonica, Sieb. & Zucc. t. 6659 (H. Zuccariniana, Ottol. 
in Gard. Ghron. 1874, vol. i. p. 187), and H. mollis, 
which extends the distribution of the genus into Western 
China. Though so widely apart geographically, the three 
species hardly differ in any essential characters of habit, 
inflorescence, or floral structure, but the Japanese and 
Chinese are more akin than either is to the American, 
which is nearly glabrous, and has smaller flowers, with 
the calyx-lobes green within. H. mollis differs from its 
two congeners in the stellate tomentum of the leaves 
beneath, which are rather deeply cordate at the base, and 
in the broader petals. Its calyx-lobes are, as in H.japonica, 
purplish-red. All three flower in winter, and leaf and 
fruit in summer or autumn, the foliage colouring before it 
falls. 

H. mollis was first described and figured in Hooker's 
" Icones Plantarum," from specimens collected by Mr. 
Henry in the Patung district of the Province of Hupeh. 
It has since been found in Kiangsu, in the district of 
Kiukiang by Mr. Maries, who sent seeds to Messrs. Veitch, 
by whom plants were raised and presented to the Royal 
March 1st, 1903. 



Gardens Kew, in 1902. It is, no doubt, a mountain 
plant in China, being hardy in England. 

Descr — A large bush or small tree, sometimes thirty 
feet high, with straggling branches and nearly black bark. 
Leaves four to five inches long, shortly petioled, orbicular- 
obovate or -oblong, cuspidate, toothed, scaberulous above, 
stellate-tomentose beneath, base obliquely cordate, basal 
lobes more or less unequal, sinus acute, nerves eight or 
ten pair; stipules three-fourths of an inch loner, linear- 
lanceolate, externally tomentose, glabrous within, cadu- 
cous. 1< loiver-heads sessile or very shortly peduncled 
uaiyx Lomentose ; lobes broadly ovate, glabrous, purplish- 
red within, about a tenth of an inch long. Petals a 
third ot an inch long by less than one-tenth of an inch 
broad, golden-yellow. Filaments short, stout. Ovary 
hirsute. — ,/. B. H. 

T.is^if • 3' ?t°n3^ - 2 ' S f/ Cti °7 n ° f , ditt °' Sh ° win " ba8es of P etal9 > stamens, and 
piani , 6, stamen : — all enlarged. 



7*6,5 




M.S.del, J.'N.FitcHitK 



Virvoent Brooks Day 4. SoTLLt*Iirij: 



L Reeve & C<? London. 



Tab. 7885. 
PHAL^NOPSIS Kunstleri. 

Native of the Malayan Peninsula. 

Nat. Old. Orchide.e. — Tribe Vande^:. 
Genus Phal.enopsis, Bl.\ (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 573.) 



PiiALiENorsis (Stauroglottis) Kunstleri; subacaulis, foliis 1-3 sessilibus oblongis 
oboyato-oblongisve apice acutis v. rotundatis et mucronatis 3-5 poll, longis 
basi angustatis Isete viridibus, pedunculo 4-6 poll, longo decurvo v. pendnlo 
crassitie pennse corvinae vaginis 1-2 brevibus crassis obtusis instructo, 
racemo terminali 3-6-floro rachi augulatirn flexuoso, bracteis minutis 
ovatis obtusis, pedicellis cum ovariis 1-1^ pollicaribus ascendentibus 
flexuosis, floribus lg poll, latis, sepalis petalisque consimilibua lineari- 
oblongis oblongo-obovatisve apice rotundatis supra convexis lateribus 
recurvis rufo-brunneis apice et basi late aureis, labelli parvi lobis laterali- 
bus incurvis auriculseformibus albis sanguineo striatis, terminali ovato- 
rotnndato obtuso medio alte carinato basi appendice brevi furcata 
instructo, disco inter lobos laterales crasse bicarinato, columna brevi 
superne dilatata anthera biloba multo latiore. 

F. Kunstleri, Hook.Jil. in Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. vi. p. 30 ; et in Ann. Roy. Hot Gard. 
Calcutta, vol. v. p. 38, t. 58. 



I accept Mr. Rolfe's determination of the plant here 
figured being the Phalsenopsis Kunstleri described by me 
in 1895, from dried flowers of a specimen collected in 
Perak by Dr. Kunstler, and a drawing of the whole plant 
made by a native artist in the Royal Botanic Gardens of 
Calcutta. A comparison of that drawing, subsequently 
published in " The Annals of the Royal Gardens," with 
Miss Smith's here produced, shows that, if Mr. Rolfe's 
identification is correct, the species must be a variable 
one, for the Calcutta drawing represents the roots as 
much more slender and terete, the leaves lanceolate, acute, 
without a terminal mucro, and of a very pale green, 
suffused with yellow towards the base, a two-flowered 
raceme, and obovate, nearly flat sepals and petals. 

I am indebted to Sir Trevor Lawrence for the specimen 
here figured, which he informs me he procured in 1899 
from Mr. Curtis, F.L.S., Superintendent of Gardens and 
Forests in Penang, without any definite locality. It 
flowered in a stove at Burford Lodge in April, 1902. 

March 1st, 1903. 



Deser.— Boots broad, flattened. Leaves few, variable, 
the longer four inches long by nearly one broad, oblong^ 
sessile, tip rounded with a strong mucro, the shorter some- 
times nearly orbicular, bright' green. Peduncle a foot 
long, rather slender, green. Raceme terminal, loosely 
seven-flowered, pendulous, rhachis rather stouter than the 
peduncle, zigzag. Bracts very small, broadly ovate. 
1 edwels with ovary, one to one and a half inches lono- 
recurved. Perianth nearly two inches broad. Sepals and 
petals equal and similar, spreading and incurved, linear- or 
obovate-oblong, lips rounded, very convex, margins 
strongly recurved, red brown above, with broad, rr lden- 
yellow tips and bases, dorsally pale yellow. Lip very 
much smaller than the sepals; side-lobes ear-shaped, in- 
curved, white, streaked with blood-red, disk between' the 
side-lobes strongly two-ribbed; midlobe orbicular-ovate, 
obtuse, strongly keeled in the middle, and with a small 
forked appendage at the base, white, streaked with red. 
Column very short and broad, much broader than the small, 
hemispheric anther. — J. D. H. 



r«S , i ,fl Q Wer ^ ith / epa i S e and P etals amoved; 2, lip with one side lobe 
removed ; 3, anther ; 4 and 5, pollinia -.-all enlarged. 






7886 







M S del. J N Fitch JitX 



Viacent Brooks Day 8tSo^Lx 4 In 



X*. Reeve &.C°Loiidoji. 



Tab. 7886. 
CHRYSANTHEMUM geandb. 

Native of Algeria. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Anthemide*. 
Genus Chrysanthemum, Linn. ; {Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 424.) 



Chrysanthemum (Plagius) grande ; herba 2-3-pedalis, perennis, erecta, robusta, 
foliosa, hispido-pilosa v. glabrescens, caule subsimplici, foliis 6-8 polli- 
caribus radicalibus longe petiolatis caulinis sessilibus lyratis lineari- 
oblongis-obovatisve obtnsis repando-crenatis inferioribus basi longe angus- 
tatis et in petiolum alatum remote dentatum basi late auriculatum pro- 
ductis, auriculis profnnde pinnatifidim dentatis dentibus incurvis acutis, 
capitulia terminalibus solitariis If— 2^ poll, latis valde depressis disci- 
formibus homo^arnis, pedunculo valido elongato foliis parvis deformatis 
instructo, involucri crateriformis bracteis numerosissimis 3-seriatis appresis 
£ poll. Ion gis subulato-lanceolatis extimis herbaceis intimis apice mem- 
branaceis brunneis, receptaculo lato piano granulato, flosculis innumeris 
(radii 0) dense compactis bracteia sequilongis aureis, corolla tubuloso- 
campanulata 5-fida lobis ovatis acutis sparse tuberoulatis, achasniis crasse 
stipitatis subcylindraceis lente curvis fulcatis basi oblique truncatis 
apice in squamam unguiformem unilateralem coriaceam concavam corolla 
ter breviorem persistentem producto. 

C. grande, HooJc.f. 

C. grandiflorum, Battand. Flore d' Alger. 1890, p. 464, non Willd. 

Plagius graudiflorus, L'Her. ex DC. Prodr. vol. vi. p. 135. Munhy, Cat. PI. 
Alger. Ed. 2 (1866), p. 19. 

Balsamita grandiflora, Desf. in Act. Soc. Hist. Nat. Par. vol. i. (1792) p. 1; 
Fl. Atlant. vol. ii. p. 262. Willd. Sp. PI. vol. iii. p. 1800. 

Matricaria grandis, Desrouss. in Lam. Encycl. vol. iii. p. 738. 

Tanacetum grandiflorum, Poir. Encycl. vol. vii. p. 574. 

Cotula grandis, Linn. Sp. PI. Ed. II. p. 1257. 



The specific name of grandiflorum adopted for this plant 
by Battandier and Trabut, being preoccupied by Willdenow 
for the Canarian congener, I have replaced it by that of 
grande, under which, as Cotula grandis, it was first 
described by Linnaeus. It is confined to Algiers, where it 
is not uncommon in the Mitidja range, and in the Tell (the 
cultivated districts between that range and the sea), 
growing on roadsides and amongst brushwood. The 
genus Plagius, Desf., to which, as a section, it is referable, 
is founded on the absence of ray-flowers, a very exceptional 
character in the genus Chrysanthemum, there being only 
March 1st, 1903. 



two or three species, all Mediterranean, that are referable 
to it. 

G. grande is not a common garden plant, the specimen 
here figured was obtained by the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
from Mr. T. Smith, Nurseryman, Newry, in August, 
1902. By a curious coincidence only a few days previously 
it was sent to me by a friend in Norfolk, procured from 
the garden of Mr. James H. Reeve, of North Walsham. 
It is perfectly hardy, flowers in autumn, and is a striking 
accession to the herbaceous garden. 

Descr. — A very stout, erect, simple or sparingly 
branched, hispidly hairy or nearly glabrous perennial 
herb, two to three feet high. Stem leafy. Leaves six to 
eight inches long, sessile, lyrately oblong or linear-oblong, 
obtuse, coarsely crenate, contracted in the middle some- 
times for four or five inches, and dilated at the very 
base into broad, pinnatifidly-lobed, spreading auricles. 
Flower-heads terminal, solitary, long-ped uncled, very large, 
one and a half to two inches broad, and so depressed as 
to be disciform, and only one-third or one-fourth as thick 
as broad; peduncle very stout, carrying a few small, 
deformed leaves. Involucre saucer-shaped ; bracts innu- 
merable, subulate-lanceolate, herbaceous below the middle, 
thin and brown above it. Receptacle very broad, flat, 
granulate. Florets forming a compact, slightly convex 
head, most densely packed, as long as the invol. bracts, 
golden-yellow, all tubular and bisexual. Corolla almost 
campanulate above the middle, lobes five, acute. Aclienes 
stout, sub-cylindric, curved, sulcate, obliquely truncate 
at the base, produced above into a unilateral coriaceous 
concave, persistent scale, about one-third as long as the 
corolla,— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, flower ; 2, stamens ; 3, style-arms : — all enlarged. 



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788\ 




M.S.a.el,J.N.FitcKlith 



'innon.t-Hronli:s,Day &-Soj\ Li^tmp 



ive S. C° Lou do 



Tab. 7887. 
CLERODENDRON myrmecophila. 

Native of Singapore. 



Nat. Ord. Veebenace.?!.— Tribe Viticeje. 
Genus Clerodexdhon, Linn. ; (Benth. $ Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1155.) 



Clerodendron (Euclerodendron) myrmecophila; suffrntex 3-pedalis, parce 
ramosa, caule crasso tereti fistuloso glabro internodi s tnmidis, cortice 
albo, foliis oppositis vel alternis pedalibu8 lineari-oblongis obtusis acutisye 
herbaceis glabris saturate viridibus politis basi acutis obtusis vel cordati.% 
nervis utrinqne costse ad 12, petiolo 1-3-pollicari fistuloso, panicula pedali 
terminali erecta pyramidali pubescente multiflora, rachi yiridi, ramis 
ramulis bracteolis pedicellisque fusco-purpureis, bracteolis subulatis, 
p.edicellis brevibus, calycis puberuli jj- poll, longi tubo viridi lobis lanceo- 
latis acutis fusco-purpums, corollas rubro-aurantia a? tubo calyce paullo 
longiore lobis J poll, longis obovato-oblocgis apice rotuudatis superionbus 
paullo loDgioribns, filamentis styloque pollicaribus ascendentibus gracilh- 
mis rubris, antheris parvis, ovario globoso, styli ramis gracilibus, bacca 
globosa J poll. diam. nigra. 

C. myrmecophila, Ridl. in Journ. Sot. vol. xxxiii. (1895) p. 42. 

This very handsome species of the large tropical genus 
Clerodendron was discovered in dense forests of Singapore 
by Mr. H. N. Ridley, M.A., F.L.S., Director of the 
Gardens and Forest Department of the Straits Settle- 
ments, who describes it as approaching in habit G. fistulo- 
sum, Beccari (Malesia ii. 48) of Borneo, a species with 
capitate inflorescence, but as being nearer to C.panicu- 
latum, Linn. (tab. 7141), a common tropical Asiatic 
species, with broad-lobed leaves, an angular stem, and a 
very different calyx. In both C. myrmecophila and 
Jistulosum the hollow stems are swollen at the internodes, 
and there form nests for ants, those of the Singapore plant 
belonging to the genus Pheidole, Fabricus, those of the 
Bornean to Colobopsis. Another ant-fostering species is 
C.formicarum, Giirke (Engler, Bot. Jahrb. xviii. 179) a 
native of tropical Africa. 

A living plant of G. myrmecophila was received at the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, from Mr. Ridley in 1896, which 
flowered in a stove in April, 1.902, when three feet high. 
There are specimens in the Kew Herbarium, of a very 
closely allied species from Borneo, and from the Royal 
Gardens, under the mss. name of G. macroph>/llum, Hook. 

April 1st, 1903. 



^.rden 



(from Java?), which differs only in the rather longer 
corolla tube. 

Descr. — A sparingly branched shrub, about three feet 
high, with very stout, terete, glabrous, fistular stems, and 
white bark ; internodes swollen, hollow. Leaves opposite 
and alternate, a foot long, linear-oblong, acute or obtuse, 
dark green polished, base acute, obtuse or cordate, 
costa stout, with about twelve pairs of nerves ; petiole 
short, stout, fistular. Panicle terminal, shortly peduucled, 
a foot high, pyramidal, very many-flowered, pubescent ; 
rachis green, strict ; branches very many, mauy-flowered, 
slender, spreading, red-brown, as are the small, subu- 
late bracteoles, short pedicels, and lobes of the calyx. 
Calyx puberulous, about one-third of an inch long ; tube 
short, green ; lobes lanceolate, acuminate, erect. Corolla 
ochreous-red ; tube about one-third longer than the calyx ; 
lobes half an inch long, obovate-oblong, tips rounded. 
Filaments an inch long, very slender, ascending, red ; 
anthers very small. Ovary globose; style as long as the 
stamens, red, arms slender. Berry globose, a quarter of 
an inch in diameter, black. — J. D. H. 



"Fig. 1, section of calyx and ovary ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, arms of style :— all 
enlarged. * 




mm. 



Sr- 



1 




&*i w^y tiPA ^ 



- 



7 



?*.■*' ■ ' 



TiS.de! J.K.HUJKK1 



^SnawilBroolm^aylSonUABTip 



I is a, 'o - 



Tab. 7888. 

EUPHORBIA obesa. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Euphorbiace^. — Tribe Euphorbie.b. 
Genus Euphorbia, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hodk.f. Gen. Flant. vol. ii. p. 258.) 



Euphorbia (Euphorbium) obesa; apbylla, caule simplici erecto f> poll, alto 
oblongo-ovoideo 8-costato apice et basi rotundato pallide viridi striia 
transversia pallide purpureis creberrirae fasciato, sulcis verticalibua ad H 
poll, latis haud profundis sinibus acutis, costis acutia a basi creberrime 
tuberculatis, tuberculia uniseriatiB ruguloais brunneis supremis solo 
florentibus, pedunculis vix ^ poll, longia simplicibna monocephalis 
bracteis 5-6 arete imbricatis obtusis carnosis tectis infimis ovatis 3 
supremis (foliia floralibus) longioribus involncri tubura sequaatibus 
ciliolatia, involucro sessili ad T V poll. longo carapannlato fundo glandulia 
numerosis minimis instructo, lobis 5 minutis brevibua latis inenrvis hispi- 
dulis, glandulis interpositia lobis triplo majoribus orbicularibus carno«ia 
integerrimia punctatis, filamentis anantheria hirsntis, ovario breviter 
stipitato, stylo breviuaculo robusto, stigmatibus spathulatis revolutia. 

E. obesa, Hook. fit. 



The very remarkable plant here figured was sent to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1897, by Professor MacOwan, 
D.Sc., F.L.S., Government Botanist, Cape Colony, under 
the name of Euphorbia meloformis, Ait., which is its 
nearest but very different ally. It flowered for the first 
time in July in the Succulent House in 1899, when the ac- 
companying figure was made, and the ovary was pollinated 
from E. meloformis. Subsequently this unique plant dis- 
appeared from the Kew Collection, and I am consequently 
unable to check the description given above, which was, 
for the most part, drawn up shortly after the drawing was 
finished. Possibly its illustration in this Magazine may 
lead to the discovery of its whereabouts. 

A reference to any of the six published figures of the 
well-known E. meloformis, which was introduced in 
1774, shows that it differs greatly in inflorescence from 
E. obesa, bearing its involucres on long, simple, or branched 
peduncles. 

Descr. — Whole plant five inches high, obovoid-oblong, 
simple, erect, rounded at both ends, pale green, crossed 
with bands of innumerable pale purple striae, eight-ribbed ; 
April 1st, 1903. 



ribs vertical, straight, sub-acute, an inch and a half apart 
at about the middle of the stem, closely covered with 
minute, brown, rugulose tubercles in a single series ; sinus 
between the ribs shallow, acute at the base. Involucres 
solitary on the tubercles at the crown of the plant, very 
shortly peduncled ; peduncle about one-tenth of an inch 
long, covered with obtuse, imbricating, fleshy, ciliolate 
bracts, the three upper longest. Involucre about as long 
as the peduncle, campanulate ; lobes five, minute, short, 
broad, incurved, hispid ; interposed glands three times as 
large, orbicular, fleshy, quite entire, punctate. Filaments 
anantherous, hirsute. Ovary nearly sessile. Style rather 
short, stout ; stigmas large, revolute. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, inflorescence ; 2, involucre laid open with the ovary removed • 
3, filaments and glands from the base of the tube of the involucre ; 4, filaments 
and glands at the bottom of the involucre ; 5, ovary : — all enlarged. 




7883 



Tab. 7889. 
iris collettii. 

Native of Burma. 

Nat. Ord. Iride.e. — Tribe Movljeem. 
Genus Iris, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Iris (Evansia) Gollettil ; dense caaspitosa, radicibus crapsis vermiformibus 
annulatis, vaginiB infimis fibrosis, foliis liueari-ensiformibus canle demum 
multo longioribus rigidis alte 5-costatis acumiDatis saturate viridibus, 
caulibus 3-4-pollicaribus nudis 1-2-cephalis, spathis l|-2-pollicaribns 
anguate lineari-lanceolatis acuminatis unifloris viridibus, pedunculo spathis 
paullo lougiore, perianthii tubo brevi, limbi ad lj poll, lati segmentis 
omnibus recurvis obovato-spatbulatis violaceis basin versus albo striatis 
apice retusis exterioribus paullo majoribus crista imberbi angnsta ochro- 
leuca instructis, styli ramis erectis crista ampla fere orbiculari bipartita, 
segmentis dimidiato-ovatis acutis integerrimis. 

I. Collettii, Hook.f. 

I. nepalensis, D. Don, forma depauperata, Collett $ Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. 
Soc. vol. xxviii. (1890) p. 136. 

I. nepalensis, D. Bon, var. Letha, Fost. in Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. ii. p. 458. 



Iris Collettii was discovered, at an elevation of four 
thousand feet, in the Southern Shan hills of Upper Burma, 
by the late Col. Sir Henry Collett, K.C.B., who, in 1883, sent 
herbarium specimens of it to Sir George King at the Calcutta 
Botanic Gardens, some of which were transmitted to Kew. 
From these it was first published in 1890, by Sir Henry 
Collett and Mr. Hemsley, in the Journal of the Linnean 
Society, as a depauperate form of /. nepalensis. In 1891 
Messrs. Ban* received living plants of it from Lieut.-Col. 
Stone, collected near Fort White, also in the Shan hills, 
at an elevation of seven thousand feet. 

Of these latter Sir Michael Foster published a descrip- 
tion in the Gardeners* Chronicle, where, unaware of the earlier 
notice, lie gave it the name of i. nepalensis, var. Letha, 
from that of the mountain on winch it was found. With 
regard to the discrepancy between the elevations at which 
the plant is stated to have been collected, I think that the 
higher, seven thousand feet, is perhaps an error, for Sir 
Henry Collett, in his preface to the account of his plants 
in the " Linnean Journal " (p. 14) emphasizes the fact, 
that though the Shan hills are actually within the tropics, 
April 1st, 1903. 



between 19° and 22° N. Lat., temperate types appear in 
abundance at four thousand feet. 

The resemblance of I. Collettii to I. nepalensis is so 
strong that I can well understand it being regarded as a 
variety of that plant. Its distinguishing characters are 
the dwarf habit (persistent under cultivation), earlier 
leafing, small flowers, very short perianth-tube, sub-equal 
segments all spreading and recurved, beardless crest, and 
comparatively large stigmatic crests, which are bipartite, 
with dimidiate-ovate, quite entire segments. The specimen 
figured was sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by Mr. 
Hildebrand, C.I.E., Superintendent of the Shan States in 
Burma, where it flowered in a greenhouse in April, 1902. 
The flowers were faintly fragrant. Plants of it were 
subsequently planted in a border in the open air, where 
they all died. 

JJescr. — Roots of very many, crowded, large, equal, 
vermiform, brown tubers several inches long, and a 
quarter of an inch in diameter. Leaves narrowly ensiform, 
strongly nerved, dark green, bases surrounded" with rigid 
brown fibres. Flowering stems about six inches high, one- 
to two-flowered. Spathes one and a half to two inches 
long, narrow, acuminate, herbaceous, green. Perianth- 
tube short ; limb an inch and a half in diameter ; segments 
sub-equal, spreading, and revolute, violet-blue, streaked 
with white towards the base; crest of outer bright 
orange-yellow, not bearded. Stigmatic crests large, erect, 
bipartite; segments dimidiate-ovate, acute, quite entire. — 



Figa. 1 and 2, anthers ; 3, stigmatic crest :— all enlarged. 




Sncent Broolcs.Day &.SonLt d ircp 



Tab. 7890. 
AGAVE Bakeri. 

Native of Mexico ? 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllide*. — Tribe Agaves. 
Genus Agave, Linn.; {Benth. & Rooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 738.) 



Agave (Littsea) Bakeri ; trunco 4-pedali, liasi nudo coma 6 ped. diam. 
e foliis perplurimis densissime confertis confecta, foliis 3 ped. longiB 
undique patenti-revolutis medio 5 poll, latis loriformi-lanceolatis haud 
crassis basi angustatis supra planiusculis Bnbtus leviter convexis spina 
pollicavi terminatis, marginibus lajvibus purpureis, pedunculo brevi crasso 
foliis junioribus brevibus erectis cincto, racemo 8-9-pedali stricto erecto 
cylindraceo, floribift densissime confertis, bracteis floribus aiquilongis e basi 
ovata rubro striata anguste linearibus, bracteolis triaugularibus mem- 
branaceis rubro striatis pedicellos crassos |-po!Iicares aequantibus, ovariis 
pollicaribus lineari-oblongis teretibus, perianthii tubo ovario sequilongo 
obconico 6-sulcato, lobis pollicaribus lineari-oblongis obtusis revolutia 
extus viridibns intus albo-viridibus fascia media saturatiore pictis, fila- 
mentis 2-pollicaribus albis, antheris pollicaribus anguste linearibus 
aureis, stylo tilamentis breviore apice sabclavellato 3-lobulato. 

A. Bakeri, Hook. /., ex W. Watson in Garden, 1902, vol. i. p. 240, cum ic. 
reduct. 



A very distinct species of Agave, purchased for the Koyal 
Gardens, Kew, at the sale of the late Mr. Peacock's noble 
collection of Cactuses, Aloes, and Agaves in 1889, with no 
indication of its native country or collector. It flowered 
in the Mexican division of the Temperate House in January 
to March, 1902. I have named it after my friend, J. G. 
Baker, Esq., F.R.S., F.L.S., late Keeper of the Herbarium 
of the Royal Gardens, Kew, author of the Handbooks of 
the Amaryllidese, Irideae, Bromeliacea3, and of other 
works that have been of signal service to Botanists and 
Horticulturalists. 

Descr. — Trunk about four feet high, stout, erect, bearing 
an elongated crown six feet in diameter, of very numerous, 
spreading and recurved leaves, and a very shortly ped uncled, 
dense-flowered cylindrical raceme of nearly nine feet 
high. Leaves three feet long by five inches broad at 
the middle, narrowed towards the base, terminated by a 
spine an inch long, glaucous-green, with a quite entire, 
narrow, purple margin, coriaceous, slightly concave above, 
and convex beneath ; young leaves erect, crowded round, 
April 1st, 1903. 



and concealing the peduncle and base of the raceme. 
Raceme strict, columnar, golden-yellow from the number 
and size of the anthers. Brads as long as the flowers, 
tapering from a broad, pale green, striate base to a very 
slender, almost filiform tip ; bracteoies half an inch long, 
triangular-ovate, about as long as the very stout pedicels, 
membranous, white, streaked with red. Ovary an inch 
long, narrowly oblong. Ferianth-tube as long as the ovary, 
infundibular, six-grooved; segments an inch long, linear- 
oblong, revolute, tip rounded, dorsally green, very pale, 
almost white within, with a median, darker green band 
down the middle. Filaments two inches long ; anthers an 
inch long, very narrowly linear, bright yellow. Style 

shorter than the filaments, tip obscurely three-lobed 

/. D.H. J 

Figs. 1 and 2, flowers of the natural size, with bracta and bracteoies ; 
6 and 4, anthers j 5, apex of style :— enlarged. 




Vrncertt, Broote.Day &.Str n ; J t' i Jwp 



Tab. 7891. 
LATHYRUS pubescens. 

Native of Temperate 8. America. 

Nat. Ord. LeguminoSjE. — Tribe Vicie^e. 
Genus Lathtrus, Linn.; (Benth. ty Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 526.) 



Lathyeus pubescens; frutex molliter pilosus, 3-5-pedalis, diffuse ramosns, 
ramia ramulia pedunculisque alte 4-costatis, foliis bi- rarius 4-foliolatis, 
foliolia l-2ijj pollicaribus ellipticia oblongis v. oblongo-lanceolatis acutis 
subtua 3-5-coatatis, petiolo brevi v. elongato, stipulis latia foliaceis semi- 
sagittatis, cirrhis elougatis trifidis, pedunculo valido 4-6-poll. longo 
rigido, racemo multi-laxe- v. densinoro, floribua 1-1| poll, latis breviter 
pediceilatis, calycis \ poll, longi tubo late campanulato, baai postice gibbo, 
dentibus 2 superioribus acuti8 3 int'erioribus lougioribus longe acuminatis, 
vexillo orbiculari emarsjinato violaceo, lateribua recurvis, alia late oblique 
falcatis patulis fere albis, carina? parvas incurvae petalis apices versus 
rubris, stylo apiceincrassato ad medium, puberulo, legumine 2-2^-poIlicari 
lineari £ poll, lato acuto pubescente, seminibua parvia ellipsoideis ad 
-} poll, longis. 

L. pubescens, Hook. & Am. Bot. Beech. Yoy, p. 21, et in Hook. Bot. Misc. 
vol. iii. p. 198 (non tab. vosir. 3996). Hook. f. Fl. Antarct. vol. ii. p. 2-^9 
(excl. cit. Bot. Mag ). C. Gay, Fl. GUI. vol. ii. p. 148. Benth. in Mart. 
Fl. Bras. vol. xv. pars I. p. 114. Andre in Bev. Hortic. vol. lxvii. (1895) 
p. 40, cum ic. col. 

L. acutifolius, et L. petiolaris, Vogel, in Linnsea, vol. xiii. (1839) pp. 2", 29. 

L. macropus, Gillies, ex Hook, et Am. in Hook. Bot. Misc. I.e. 

Orobus pubescens, Alef. in Bonplandia, vol. ix. (1861) p. 143. 



Lathy rus pubescens is very closely allied to L. tomentosus, 
Lamk., a native of S. Brazil and Buenos Ayres, which 
was figured under this name (pubescens) tab. ^996 of this 
work-. According to Bentham, I.e., L. tomentosus differs 
from L. pubescens in being taller, and having broader 
leaflets and stipules, and fewer, rather smaller flowers; 
differences which are difficult of recognition in herbarium 
specimens. A far more marked distinction between these 
species, as shown by the two plates in this work, is the 
glaucous blue colouring of tab. 3996 (tomentosus), and the 
dark green of 7891 (pubescens). Both appear to be very 
variable plants in the size of the leaflets, and number and 
size of the flowers and stipules. It is further to be observed, 
that Mr. Andre describes his plant as having glaucescent 
foliage. 
Aran, 1st, 1903. 



Lathyrus pubescens has rather a wide distribution in 
extra-tropical South America, from Valparaiso to Chiloe in 
Chili, and from Monte Video to Banda Oriental and Parana 
in the east. Mr. Andre, who was the first to cultivate it in 
Europe, in his garden at La Croix, in Touraine, from 
seeds sent by Mr. Cantana from Uruguay, describes it as 
forming festoons of glaucescent leaves and lilac flowers 
covering the branches of shrubs three to five feet high. 
C. Gay, in his " Flora of Chili," described the corolla as 
yellow (aurea), but this must be an oversight. 

The specimen here figured was from a plant presented 
in 1900 to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by W. Gumbleton, 
Esq., of Belgrove, Queenstown, which flowered in a cool 
house in April, 1902. 

Descr. — A softly hairy, diffusely branching shrub. Stem 
and branches and peduncles four-angled, the angles form- 
ing stout ribs. Leaves with one, rarely two pairs of 
leaflets ; petiole produced into a stout, trifid tendril ; 
leaflets sessile, one to two and a half inches long, elliptic, 
oblong, or oblong-lanceolate, acute, dark green, strongly 
ribbed beneath ; stipules semisagittate, very variable in 
size and breadth. Peduncle long or short, stout, stiff, 
hearing a short, lax- or dense-flowered raceme of large, 
shortly pedicelled flowers, variable in size, sometimes an 
inch and a quarter broad. Calyx-tube broadly campa- 
nulate, five-toothed; two upper teeth short, deltoid, 
three lower much longer, narrowed into subulate points. 
Standard orbicular, notched at the tip, violet-blue, margins 
recurved. Wing-petals broad, spreading, pale lilac dorsally, 
nearly white in front. Keel much smaller, petals falcately 
curved, white, with red tips. Pod two to two and a half 
inches long, linear, about one-third of an inch broad ; 
acute; valves hairy, flat. Seeds very small, ellipsoid. — 
—J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, calyx laid open and stamens; 2, keel petal; 3 and 4, anthers; 
5, pistil; 6, legumes ; 7 and 8, aeeds :— all enlarged, except figs. 6 and 7. 



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7892 




M.S.delJ.N.Fitohlith 



Vincent. Drooks Day &.;_:, 



LRccve & C°Lon.doj\ 



Tab. 7892. 
RODGERSIA pinnata. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Saxifragace^e. — Tribe Saxifrages. 
Gen ns Rodgersia, A. Gray; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. C35.) 



Rodgersia piwnara; herba elata, 6-pedalia, rbizomate craasissirao brevi, caulo 
ascendeute simplici fistuloso, collo nodisque sericeo-pilosia, foliis digitatim 
impari-pinnatis radicalibus longe petiolatia, foliolia bi-tri-jugia amplis 
6-8-pollicaribua obovato-lanceolatis acuminatis inaequaliter argute den- 
tatia multinerviis basi'angustatis foliis superioribus digitatim 3-5-folio- 
iatis, foliolis baai anguatiorilms, inflorescenta terminali 1-2-pedali erecta 
cymoso-paniculata ramosissima, ramia ramulisque hirtellia roseis, floribus 
breviter pedieellatis ^ poll. diam. odoratis, calycis Iobis ovatia aubacutia 
extus roaeis intus albis, staminibas 10 sepalis aubasqnilongis, antheris 
ovoideis purpureia connectivo breviter producto obtuso, ovarii carpellis 
conicia in stylos craasoa attenuatis basi connatia. 

R. pinnata, Franch. PI. David, vol. ii. p. 214, in nota. Henry in Gard. 
Chron. 1902, vol. ii. p. 132, fig. 44. 

Astilbe pinnata, Franch. PI. Delav. p. 231. 



The genns Rodgersia is very closely allied to Astilbe, 
differing chiefly, if not wholly, in the foliage, its leaves being 
digitately pinnate, those of Astilbe ternately bipinnate. 
One species has been already figured in this work, Ii. 
podopfajlla, A. Gray, t. 6691, a native of Japan, upon 
which the genus was founded ; it has digitately five- 
foliolate leaves, very small, yellowish-white flowers, 
slender filaments, didymous anthers, and a depressed, 
orbicular ovary. In an excellent article upon Rodgersia, 
by Mr. Henry, in the Gardeners' Chronicle, the genus is 
described as consisting of four species, 11. podopkylla, 
A. Gray, R. pinnata* Franch., R. xsculifolia, Ratal, in 
Act. Hort. Petrop. vol. xiii. p. 96, a native of China, and 
R. Henrici, Franch. in Rev. Hortic. 1897, p. 174, a species 
brought by Prince Henry of Orleans from Western 
Yunnan. In that article Mr. Henry describes (lie leaves of 
R. pinnata as quasi digitate, consisting of three leaflets 
ternately disposed, then two pairs of opposite leaflets, and 
a terminal solitary petiolulate leaflet ; when only six leaflets 
are present they are disposed in two teruate clusters. 
Mm Wi; ivos. 



The upper leaves on the plant are simply ternate or 
digitately five-foliolate. 

R. finnata appears to be a common plant in the 
mountain region of Yunnan, at elevation of seven thousand 
to eight thousand feet, growing in shaded places by water 
courses, where it was first found by the Abbe Delavay in 
1883. Seeds of it were sent to tbe Royal Gardens, Kew, 
by Mr. Henry, in 1898, from which plants were raised 
that flowered in the Rock Garden in July, 1902. The 
flowers have a delicate, angelica-like odour (Henry). 

Descr. — A tall, unbranched herb, with a large horizontal 
rootstock. Stem hollow, silkily hairy at the leaf axils. 
Leaves long-petioled, digitately pinnate ; petiole stout ; 
leaflets five to nine, towards the apex of the petiole, six to 
eight inches long, obovate or oblanceolate, acute, coarsely 
unequally toothed, narrowed to the base, very many- 
nerved ; lateral leaflets usually four to six in opposite 
pairs or threes, terminal usually three, digitate, leaf-like. 
Flowers in a large, sparsely hirsute, much-branched panicle ; 
rachis and branches rose-red, pedicels very short. Calyx 
puberulous, lobes ovate, sub-acute, externally red, white 
within. Petals 0. Stamens ten, about as long as the 
calyx-lobes ; anthers ovoid, purple. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, flower; 2 and 3, stamens; 4, ovary: — all enlarged. 



7893 




MS.del.J.N.Fitchi.tK 



Vincent B»odkB,Day auSonLlilmj) 



Tab. 7893. 
SEMPERVIVUM urbicitm. 

Native of the Canary Islands. 

Nat. Ord. Crassulaceje. 
Genus Sempervivum, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 660.) 



Sempervivctm {Monmm) urbicum; fruticosum, caale erecto-l-3-pedali robusto 
cylindraceo inferne nudo, cortice ciuereo, cicatricibus rhomboideis 
tessellato, foliis apicem versus caulis dense rosulatis 4-6 poll, longis 1—3 ^ 
poll, latis angnste spathulatis cuspidate crassis glabris ciliato-serrulatis 
sessilibus, v. basi in petiolum tetragonum angustatis ptllide viridibus, 
subtus costa lata percursis, panicula magna pyramidali 2-3-ped. alta, 
ramis patenti-decurvis gracililms basi foliaceo-bracteatis longe nudia 
apices versus ramulosis et foliis paucis parvis ovatis instrnctis viridibua 
multifloris, rloribus £ poll. diam. breviter pedicellatis pallida aureis, 
calyce cupulari breviter 8-10-dentito glaberrimo, petalis 8-10 oblongo- 
lanceolatis acutis, filamentis glabris filiformibus ima basi dilatatis, 
aDtheris oblongis apiculatis, disci glandulis qualratis, carpellis ad 10 
erectis oblong : s viridibus in stylos gr.iciles ovario fequilongis attenuatU. 

S. urbicum, Chr. Smith, ex Hornem. Suppl. Sort. Hafn. p. (JO (non Lindl.) 
Raw. in Phil. Mag. 1827. p. 125. Bach, Pliys. Beschr. Canar. Ins. 
p. 177. DC. Prodr. vol. iii. p. 411. 

JEmiura. urbicum, Webb & Berth. Phytogr. Canar. vol. i. p. 194, t. 29. 



The Atlantic Islands are remarkable for the number of 
indigenous species of Sempervivum which they contain, 
upwards of forty being enumerated in the " Index 
Kewensis" as natives of Madeira and the Canary Islands; 
a singular fact when it is considered that only one species 
has hitherto been collected in the adjacent territory of 
Morocco, and that a very different plant from any Canarian. 
On the other hand, nine species of Sedum are recorded 
from Morocco, and only one, the Mediterranean S. ruberu, 
DC, from the Canary Islands. 

Sempervivum urbicum is described by Webb as inhabiting 
rocks, walls, and roofs in the sylvan region of Teneriffe. 
The specimen here figured was presented to the Royal 
Gardeus, Kew, by Mr. Van den Bosehe, of Tirlemont, 
Belgium, in 1901. It flowered in the Succulent House in 
May, 1902. 

Descr. — Stem erect, three feet high, simple, stout, 
cylindric, covered with rhomboidal leaf -scars. Leaves 
May 1st, 1903. 



many, rosulate on the top of the stem, four to six inches long 
by one and a half broad, narrowly spathulate, cuspidate, 
very thick, fleshy, smooth, pale green, nerveless, margins 
erosely serrulate, sessile, or base contracted into a short, 
stout petiole. Panicle very large, pyramidal, three feet 
high, and nearly as broad ; branches very many, close-set, 
spreading and decurved, with fleshy, oblong bracts at the 
base, naked below, bearing towards the terminal cymosely 
branched inflorescence a few small, ovate, sessile, fleshy 
leaves. Flowers shortly pedicelled, three-quarters of an 
inch broad. Calyx cupular, shortly eight- to many-toothed, 
glabrous, green. Petals lanceolate, acute, pale yellow. 
Filaments slender, dilated at the base ; anthers small, 
oblong, apiculate. Disk-glands quadrate. Carpels ten ; 
styles slender, erect, as long as the narrowly oblong ovary. 
—J. B. H. 



Fig. 1, flower with the petals removed ; 2, petals and stamens ; 3, carpel :— 
all enlarged; 4, reduced view of whole plant. 




'834 



MS.del,j::N .Fitch Mk 



"Sncent Bro oJcs,D^r&.Saji Lt4imp 



.Reeve &C London 



Tab. 7894. 
SPHEDAMNOCARPUS pruriens. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Malpighiace^. — Tribe BannfsteriejB. 

Genus Sphedamnocarpus (Planch, ex Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. 

p. 256). 



Sphedamnocarpus pruriens ; frutex alte scandena, ramnlia tomentellia, foliia 
oppositts 1-4 poll, longis breviter petiolatis ovato-oblongis supra glabris 
subtus marginibusque tomento sericeo argenteis apice rotundatis mncro- 
natia basi rotundatis coi-datiave, petiolo supra medium biglanduloso, 
floribus subcorymbosia 1-1J poll, latia, pedunculis l-l|-pollicaribua 
sericeis supra medium articulatis et bibracteolatis, calycia segmentia ad 
£ poll, longia oblongia apice rotundatis dorso sericeis fructn paulo 
auctis, petalia subaBqaalibus ad ^ poll, longis breviter nnguicalatis 
orbicularibus aureis marginibua crispalis, filamentis calyce eequilongis 
basi connatis, antheris majusculis connectivo rubente, ovario 3-lobo 
hirsnto, stylis elongatis divaricatis, samaris 2-3 sericeis facie interiore 
plana receptacalo applicata lateralibus inflatis, ala ad ^ poll, longa. 

S. pruriens, Szystyl. Polypet. Rekmann. Enum. (1888) p. 2. 

Acridocarpns pruriens, A. Juss. in Arch. Mus. Paris, vol. Hi. (1843), p. 492. 
Harv. & Sond. Fl. Gap. vol. i. p. 232. Walp. Rep. vol. v. p. 289. 



It is remarkable that of the great Natural Order of 
Malpighiacese, which consists of about 50 genera and 
600 species, many of them of great beauty, only eight, 
including that here figured, should have found their way 
into the Botanical Magazine. The others are Malpighia 
glabra, Linn. t. 813, Ilirsea Simsiana, A. Juss. (M. volu- 
bilis, Sims, t. 809), Byrsonima lucida, DC. (M. lucida, 
8w. t t. 2462), Eeteropteris chrysophylla, H. R. t. 3237, 
Acridocarpus natalitius, A. Juss. t. 5738, Stigmatophyllum 
heterophyllum, Hook. t. 4104, and S. littorale, A Juss. 
t. 6632. The reason for their being seldom cultivated, and 
hence rarely figured from living plants, is that they are 
for the most part tropical, rambling, woody climbers, 
unsuitable for cultivation in an ordinary stove. 

The genus Sphedamnocarpus is a considerable one. 
There are as many as ten species of it in the Kew Her- 
barium, including several undescribed ones. With the 
exception of one Madagascar species, and S. pruriens, all 
are from tropical Africa. S. pruriens is a native of Natal, 
Mat 1st, 1903. 



the Transvaal, Rhodesia, and Matabeleland, and of Uiten- 
hage, in the Cape Colony; seeds of it were sent from the 
latter district to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1899, by Mr. 
Charles Howlett, now Curator of the Botanic Gardens of 
Graaf Reinet, formerly of the Royal Gardens, Kew, a plant 
raised from which flowered in the Temperate House in 
October, 1902. 

Descr. — A lofty, climbing shrub, with silkily tomentose 
branches, leaves beneath, peduncles, pedicels, and calyces. 
Leaves one to four inches long, opposite, shortly petioled, 
ovate-oblong, obtuse, tip mucronate, base rounded or 
cordate; petiole short, biglandular above the middle. 
Flowers sub-corymbosely clustered at the ends of the 
branches, an inch to an inch and a half broad, golden- 
yellow; peduncles an inch long or more, bibracteolate 
above the middle. Sepals oblong, tips rounded, enlarged 
in fruit. Petals sub-equal, shortly clawed, orbicular, 
margins crisped. Filaments as long as the sepals, connate 
at the base. Ovary hirsute, styles divaricate. Fruit of 
two or three dry, broadly winged, indehiscent carpels; 
wings about half an inch, long, obliquely obovoicl, 
coriaceous. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, peduncle, bracteoles, and bract ; 2, flower with the petals removed ; 
3 and 4, anthers; 5, pistil; 6, vertical section of ovary; 7, lurked haira of 
tomentum ; 8, fruit from herbarium specimen : — all but fig. 1 enlarged. 



7895 




M. S.del, J.N~Pit£h. Mh 



^nc«4BroolraD^8>.S<mLt a l 



LRoeve &. C°Lon_tiflrL. 



Tab. 7895. 
HEBENSTRETIA comosa. 

Native of 8. Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Selagine^. 
Genus Hebenstretia, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1127.) 



Hebenstretia (Eubebenstretia) comosa; perenuis, erects, fere glaberrima, 
ramosa, caule robusto tereti folioso, ramulis puberulis, foliia ^-2-pollicari- 
bus sessilibus lineari-oblougis-lanceolatisve subacutis acuminatiave grosse 
acute serratis, spicis elongatis 2-6 poll, lotigis densifloris, bracteis ovato- 
lanceolatis corollas tubum subsequantibus herbaceis glabris, calyce oblongo- 
ovoideo ad £ poll, longo 2-nervi costam versus herbaceo, corolla £ poll, 
longa, alba v. pallide flava, fauce rubro, lobis subasquilongis 2 interioribus 
angustioribus. 

H. comosa, Horhst. in Flora, vol. xxviii. pars I. (1845) p. 70 ; Boitr. Fl. Cap. 
und Natal, p. 134. Choisy in DG. Frodr. vol. xii. p. 5. Bolfe in Dyer 
Flor. Cap. vol. v. p. 99. 

H. comosa, var. serratifolia, Bolfe in Gard. Chron. 1892, vol. ii. pp. 34, 188. 



Hebenstretia is a large African genus, of which, thirty 
species have been described in the Flora Capensis, and 
there are others in tropical Africa, some from as far north 
as Abyssinia. Two have been previously figured in this 
work. H. dentata, L , t. 483, and H. fndicosa, Thunb. 
t. 1970. II. comosa has an extended S. African range, 
from Port Natal, where it is found on the plains near 
Durban, at the level of the sea, extending to Pilgrim's 
rest, in the Transvaal, and Griqualand, at elevations of 
four thousand feet. 

The genus was named by Linnaeus in honour of Pro- 
fessor John Ernst Hebenstreit, Professor of Botany in 
Leipzig, who in 1740 proposed a classification of plants 
according to their fruit. 

H. comosa was, according to a statement in the Gardeners' 
Chronicle, by Messrs. Dammann,of San Giovanni, Teduccio, 
Italy, introduced by their firm into Europe in 1889, and 
is entered in their catalogue of plants for that year. It 
was flowered by Mr. Gumbleton at Belgrove, Queen stown, 
in 1892. The specimen here figured was communicated 
by Messrs. Sutton, of Heading, in September, 1902, 

Mai 1st, 1903. 



when specimens were also flowering in the Royal Gardens, 
Kew. 

Descr. — An erect, branching, nearly glabrous herb, two 
to three feet high. Stem rather stout, angular, leafy; 
branchlets puberulous. Leaves half an inch to two inches 
long, alternate, sessile, linear-oblong or -lanceolate, obtuse, 
acute or acuminate, coarsely serrate, rather thick in 
texture, midrib very stout beneath. Flowers small, in 
erect, dense, cylindric spikes, two to six inches long, 
terminating the stem and branches, about one-third of an 
inch long ; bracts as long as the corolla-tube, ovate- 
lanceolate, acuminate, herbaceous, green, persistent. 
Calyx about one-sixth of an inch long, of two very 
unequal lobes, unilaterally connate, the larger boat-shaped, 
finely acuminate. Corolla-tube very slender, open for two- 
thirds of its length ; limb yellow, with a large, red, 
thickened area in the throat, four-lobed ; lobes oblong, 
tips rounded, the two inner the narrower. Anthers large, 
linear-oblong. Ovary oblong, with a small disk-gland at 
the base ; style slender. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, calyx ; 2, corolla and stamena; 3 and 4, anthers ; 5, ovary and disk- 
gland; 6, ovary; 7, transverse, and 8, vertical section of the same:— all 
enlarged. 




MS.d»I.j.if.Pitchiiti l 



Vincent Brooks ,D ay & S<mJ.t. d in¥ 



Tab. 7896. 
DISSOTIS Mahoni. 

Native of Uganda. 

Nat. Ord. Melastomace^. — Tribe Osbbckie^e. 
Genus Dissotis, Benth. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 746.) 



Dissotis (Heterotis) Mahoni; tota hispido-pilosa, canle prostrato ramoso, 
foliis 1-1 \ poll, longis oppositis rotundatis ovato-rotandatisve obtusis, 
petiolis J-j poll, longis, floribus ad apices ramulornm solitariis 2 poll, latis, 
pedicellis foliis brevioribus, calycis hemispheerici noti plumosi tubo setis 
rigidis simplicibus basi bulbosis instracto lobis 5 ovato-oblongis subacutis, 
sina inter lobos appendice filiformi apice bifarcato ramis divaricatis 
instracto, petalis oblique obovatis roseo-purpureis, staminorum majorum 
connectivo antice in appendicem elongatura bituberculatum antice con- 
cavum prodacto, minor um appendice simpliciter didymo, ovario hispido 
tubo calycis profunde immerso. 

D. Maboni, Hook.f. 



The Dissotis here figured so closely resembles the widely 
distributed tropical African D. plumosa, Hook. f. (in Oliv. 
Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. ii. 452), in habit, hairiness, foliage and 
flowers, that I long hesitated before giving it a new- 
specific name. I find, however, in all the specimens of 
that plant which I have examined, whether from East, 
West, or Central Africa, that the bristles of the calyx-tube, 
and the arms of the processes between the calyx-lobes are 
plumose with stellate hairs (whence its specific name) of 
which there are no traces in D. Mahoni. 

The genus Dissotis is a large one, upwards of fifty 
species having been described, all tropical African, except 
one, which is a native of Natal. Two have been previously 
figured in this Magazine, D. incana, Triana (Osbeckia 
canescens, Grah.), t. 3790, and D. Irvingiana, Hook. t. 
5149. 

Seeds of D. Mahoni were sent to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in 1901, from Uganda, by Mr. John Mahon, plants 
raised from which flowered in a stove in September, 1902. 
I have the pleasure of naming it after its discoverer, 
formerly at Kew, now Curator of the Botanic Station at 
Uganda. 

Descr.— Whole plant, except the flowers, hispidly hairy. 
May 1st, 1903. 



Stems six to eight inches long, prostrate, rather stout, 
obscurely tetragonous, branching, leafy. Leaves opposite, 
shortly petioled, one to one and a half inches long, 
orbicular or orbicular-ovate, sub-acute, base rounded ; 
nerves deeply impressed above, stout beneath. Fioivers 
solitary on the ends of the branches, shortly pedicelled, 
two inches broad. Calyx- tube hemispheric, armed with 
rigid, bulbous-based bristles ; lobes ovate, acute ; sinus 
between the lobes armed with a rigid, forked appendage, 
arms of the fork divaricate. Petals obliquely obovate, 
rose-purple. Connective of the larger stamens elongate, 
bifid or two-lobed at the base ; of the smaller reduced to 
two tubercles. Ovary hispid, sunk deep in the calyx-tube. 
—J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, calyx and style; 2, process from between the calyx-lobes; 3 and 4, 
larger stamens ; 5, smaller stamen : — all enlarged. 



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Tab. 7892.— RODGERSLA PIXNATA. , 
„ 7893.— SEMPER VIVUM URBICUM. 
M 7894— SPHEDAMNOCARPUS PRURIENS. 
„ 7895.— HEBENSTRETIA COMOSA. 
„ 7896.— DISSOTIS MAHONE. 



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WjimntBroote DayASonLL^lmp 



Tab. 7897. 
CLEMATIS MisrromNA. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Eanunculace.k. — Tribe Clematide^. 
Genus Clematis, Linn.; (Benth. $ Hook, f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 3.) 



Clematis (Flammula) Meyeniana ; frutex alte scandens, sempervirens, glaber 
v. parce pubescent, cortice fusco-purpureo, foliis 3-foliolutia, foliolis 
petiolulatis 2-l£ poll. loogia coriaceis ellipticis ovatia oblongis lanceo- 
latisve integevrimis obtusis acntis acuminatisve 3-nerviis supra nitidis 
saturate viridibus subtus glabris puberulisve basi rotundatis v. cordatis, 
paniculEe effm-aa laxiflorro ramulis triobotomis basi nudis v. bracteis 1-3 
coriaceis integria lobatisve auctis, alabistris oblongis pallide flavig, 
floribns 1| poll, diara., sepalis lineari-oblongis apice bidentatia albij 
marginibus tomentellip, staminibus sepalis duplo brevioribua, antberia 
linearibus aureis tilamenta glabra subosquantibus, achteaiis ^ poll, longis 
obovoideis compressis villosis tiavo-brunneis, cauda pluraosa li-pollicari. 

C. Meyeniana, Walp. in JSfov. Act. Nat. Our. Misc. vol. xix. Suppl. i. (181-3) 
p. 297 ; Bepert. Bot. vol. v. p. 3. Benth. in Hook. Kew Qard. Misc. vol. iii. 
(1851) p. 256"; FL Hongk. p. 6. Maxim, in Mel. Biol. vol. ix. p. 597. 
Ilemsl. in Journ. Linn. ^Soc. Bot. vol. xxiii. (1886) p. 5. Seem. Bot. Voy. 
Herald, p. 361. 

C. Armandi, Franch. PI. David, vol. ii. p. 2, t. 2. 

C. oreophila, Hance in Walp. Ann. vol. ii. p. 3. 

C. hedysarifolia, Bot. Beg. t. 599, non DC. 

C. hedysarifolia, DC. var. a, j3, 8, Kuntze, Monogr. Gait. Clem. p. 152. 



Clematis Meyeniana is a very variable plant, and it is 
not surprising that so excellent a Chinese botanist as Mt\ 
Hance should have described it under another name 
(G. oreophila), when, according to Walpers, the founder of 
the species, the panicles are said to be shorter than the 
leaves and few-flowered, and the sepals rufous externally. 
The figure in the Botanical Register, under the erroneous 
name of C. hedysarifolia, DC, an Indian species, is very 
good, but represents a form with flowers only an inch in 
diameter, with very pale anthers; it shows the bidentate 
tips of the sepals, which is overlooked by all other authors, 
who describe them as being acute. It appears to be a 
very common plant in S.E. China, from the province of 
Chekiang to Kwantung, and is found also in Cochin China, 
Formosa, and theLuchu Islands. In Hongkong it occurs 
in great abundance in almost every ravine, flowering in 

J ink 1st, 11 03. 



May, and occasionally again in autumn, even so late as 
December. 0. Armandi, Franch., from Moupine, is cer- 
tainly only a form of G. Meyeniana, with small flowers and 
large bracts at the bases of the lower branches of the 
panicle. 

G. Meyeniana was cultivated in the Nursery of Messrs. 
Colvile, in the King's Road, Chelsea, in 1822, whence 
procured was not then known. The specimen figured 
was from a plant received from Mr. C. Ford, Superin- 
tendent of the Hongkong Botanic Garden, in 1885. It 
flowers annually in the Temperate House. 

Descr. — A tall, evergreen, glabrous or sparsely puberu- 
lous climber, with a purplish-brown bark. Leaves 
trifoliolate ; leaflets two to three inches long, petiolulate, 
elliptic- or ovate-oblong or lanceolate, obtuse, acute or 
acuminate, quite entire, coriaceous, base rounded or 
cordate, three-nerved, dark green and glabrous above, 
pale and puberulous beneath. Panicles large, effuse, 
trichotomously branched, lax-flowered ; bracts at the bases 
of the branches minute, rarely enlarged, coriaceous, entire 
or lobed. Buds oblong, pale yellow. Flowers an inch 
to an inch and a half across. Sepals linear-oblong, 
spreading, white, margins tomentose, tips two-toothed. 
Stamens about half as long as the sepals ; anthers as long 
as the filaments. Achenes one-fourth of an inch Ion 
obovate, flat, villous ; style an inch and a half Ion 
feathery. — /. D. H. 



o' 



Pig. 1, flower; 2 and 3, stamens; 4, pistil; 5, achene : — all enlarged; 
6, achene of nat. size. 



7888 




MS.aei J.N.Htchlith 



Vincen.tBrooJci r Day& S<mLt£lmp 



Tab. 7898. 
LABURNUM cakamanicum. 

Native of Greece and Asia Minor. 

Nat. Ord. Leguminos^;. — Tribe Genistfje. 
Genus Laburnum, Oriseb.; (Benth. Sf Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 481.) 



Laburnum (Podocytiaus) caramanicum ; frutex inermis,ramosns, glaberrimua, 
glauco-virens, ratrmlis erectis virgatis, foliis digitatim 3-foliolatis brevius- 
cule petiolatis, foliolia breviter petiolulatis obovatia apice rotundatis 
apiculatis saturate viridibus basi acutia lateralibua ^-pollicaribua termi- 
nali fere duplo majore, racemis terminalibus ekmgatis erectis saepius 
pyramidatim paniculatis laxifloris, floribus nutantibns, pedicellia \ poll. 
loDgis, bracteolis minutis subulatis, calyce pedicellia subsequilongo 
cnpulari breviter bilabiato fusco-rubro, labio superiore 2- inferiore 3-den- 
tato, petalis unguiculatis aureis subasquilongis, vexillo orbiculari ad % 
poll. diam. ima basi cordato, alia oblotigis obtusis, carinas petalis incurvis 
acntis, filamentis omnibus connatis, legumine breviter stipitato lineari- 
oblongo piano papyraceo falcato apice rotundato 3-6-spermo subindehis- 
cente maiginibus undulatis superiore alato, seminibus parvia reniformibus 
estrophiolatis. 

L. caramanicum, Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant. I.e. 

Cytis-us caramanicus, Nym. Conspect. Fl. Europ. p. 155. Lavall. Arboret. 
Segrez. p. 59. 

Podocytisus caramanicus, Boiss. Sf Heldr. Diagn. PI. Or. Ser. I. pars ix. p. 7. 
Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. ii. p. 35. 



The plant here figured was regarded by Boissier as 
generically distinct from the common Laburnum of our 
gardens and plantations, because of its erect branchlets 
and racemes, and membranous, sub-indehiscent, more 
broadly winged pods ; to which might have been added 
the rounded apex of the latter and the very small seeds; 
but Mr. Bentham, the greatest authority on Lrouruino.sse, 
attached less value to these distinctions, and Boissier 
himself says of Podocytisus, " forsan non immerito a cl. 
Benth. & Hook., Labnrno conjungitur, sed praeter legumen 
papyraceum subindehiscens facies et inilorescentia ab eo 
abhorrent." 

L. caramanicum has a wide range of distribution in the 

hilly region of the Balkan Peninsula, from Thessaly and 

Albania to Southern Greece ; and is also a native of the 

Cilician Taurus. Plants of it were procured for the 

June 1st, 1903. 



Royal Gardens, Kew, from Mr. Transon in 1899, where 
it flowered in the Arboretum in October, 1902. 

Descr. — A small tree, with subglaucous, green foliage, 
glabrous in all its parts; branchlets erect. Leaves shortly 
petioled, trifoliolate ; leaflets very shortly petiolulate, 
obovate, apiculate; lateral half an inch long, terminal 
twice as large. Racemes shortly ped uncled, erect, three 
to five inches long, many-flowered. Flowers three-quarters 
of an inch long, golden-yellow, nodding; pedicels a 
quarter of an inch long, bracteolate about the middle. 
Calyx cup-shaped, red-brown, two-lipped ; upper lip two- 
toothed, lower three-toothed. Petals all clawed, about 
equal in length. Standard orbicular, half an inch in 
diameter, base cordate. Wings oblong, obtuse. Keel- 
petals acute. Filaments all united. Foci shortly stipitate, 
two to three inches long, by half an inch broad, flat, 
papyraceous, tip rounded, upper margin narrowly winged. 
Seeds few, about one-fifth of an inch long, reniform. — 
v . u . n , 

rZf «?' °- a ! y i X i aid ? pe ? an J Btamena; 2, standard; 3, wing petal; 4, keel 
petel 5, pistil ; 6, pod ; 7 and 8, oeed -.-all enlarged, except 6 and 7.-Nos. 
o, / and B irora Herbarium specimens. 



7839 




JiS.del.J.N.FitxJvKUi 



'Vincent. BrooksDay &.SonLt£-trap 



L Reeve &. C° London. 



Tab. 7899. 
MIMOSA Spegazzinij. 

Native of Argentina. 

Nat. Ord. Lkguminos*. — Tribe EcjjiijiosEjE. 
Genus Mimosa, Linn. \ (Benth. & JTook.f. Gen. Flant. vol. i. p. 593. 



Mimosa (Eumimosa) Spegazzinii ; frutex gracilis*, scandens, ramosus, 6-10- 
pedalis, spinis infra-i'oliaceiB brevibus oppositis recurvis horridus, ramis 
ratnulis petiolis pedunculisque strigillosis, foliis sensitiviB bipinnatis, 
pinnis 2-pollicaribus breviter petiolulatia basi atipellatis, pinnulis 25-35- 
jugis ad £ poll, longis sessilibus contiguis lineari-oblongis obtusis acutisve 
apice mucronnlatis 3-nerviis supra glabris subtus apicem versus adpresse 
pilosis marginibus setulis rigidis appressis instructis, 6tipulis ovato- 
lanceolatis acutis striatis ciliatis, capitnlis 1 poll. diam. solitariis v. binis 
axillaribus v. in racemum terminalem disposdtis, pedunculis brevibus v. 
elongatis, bracteolis cuneiformibus apice truncatis setosis, seta media 
elongata, corolla 4-loba, filamentis roseie, antheris aureis, legumine im- 
tnaturo pollicari lineari valvis articulatis marginibus spinuloso-setosis. 

M. Spegazzinii, Pirotta in Ann. Inst. Bot. Bom. vol. iii. (1887-8) p. 132, t. xiii. 



The sensitive plant here figured is a native of Missiones, 
Argentine Republic. It was discovered there by the 
naturalist whose name it bears, who sent seeds to Pro- 
fessor R. Pirotta, of Rome, by whom it was described. 

Seeds of it were obtained for the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
in 1900 from Dr. Hans Schinz, Director of the Botanic 
Garden, Zurich, a plant raised from which flowered freely 
in a stove in October, 1902. The leaves are sensitive, as 
in its ally, M. pudica, L., to which it is nearly allied. In 
Prof. Pirotta's description the stem is described as erect, 
and the filaments as pale violet. 

_ Descv. — A scandent, much-branched, pubescent bush, 
six to ten feet high, with short, stout, opposite branches 
armed with recurved spines at the base of the petioles. 
Leaves bipinnate, sensitive; petiole about an inch long, 
bearing two pinnse, each two to three inches long; 
pinnules very numerous, sessile, close set, about one- 
third of an inch long, oblong or linear-oblong, acute 
or acuminate, three-nerved, glabrous beneath, margins 
ciliolate with long bristles ; stipules a quarter of an inch 
long, oblong-lanceolate, acute ; stipellre subulate. Heads 
June 1st, 1903. 



peduncled, an inch and a quarter in diameter, solitary 
or binate, rose-purple, axillary or arranged in a ter- 
minal, sessile, armed raceme six inches long ; peduncles 
opposite, stout, half an inch long or longer. Bracts 
cuneiform, truncate, upper margin spinulosely lacerate. 
Corolla four-lobed. Filaments rose-red; anthers yellow. 
Pods an inch long, linear; valves iointed, spinulose. — 
/. D.H. ' 



Fig. 1, portion of branch with spines, stipules, and portion of a leaf ; 
2, bracteole; 3, corolla and stamens; 4, pistil : — all enlarged; 5, immature 
fruit from Prof. Pirotta's figure, of the natural size. 




M.SdBl.j.N.Fitdhh.tk 



"WentBrooks Day &. SonLt&nip 



L-Reeve & C? London. 



Tab. 7900. 
DENDROBIUM Madonna. 

Native of New Guinea. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe Dendrobie;e. 
Genus Dendrobium:, Ser.; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 488.) 



Dendrobium (Stachyobiuru) Madonnx ; pseudobulbis confertis 6-9 poll, longis 
inferne stipitiformibus, articulis inferioribus gracilibus vaginatis, basilari 
tuberoso, terminali elongato incrassato 2-4 poll, longo fusiformi sulcato 
2-3-phyllo, foliis l|-2 poll, longis Bessilibus oblongis subcoriaceis obtusis, 
pedunculis terminalibaa 1-2 poll, longis trifloriB, pedicellis cum ovario 
pollicaribus, bracteis parvis oblongis subacutis, florilms nutantibus 1\ 
poll, latis albis, sepalis 1-1^ poll, longis oblongis acuminatis, lateralibus 
subfalcatis basi latioribus, petalis sepalis multo majoribas ad 1-J- poll, 
longis £ poll, latis obovato-spathulatis apiculatis, labello f poll, longo, 
concavo explanato oblato obscure 3-loboacumiuato, lobis lateralibus juxta 
margines purpureo maculatis, disco basin versus virescente callo elongato 
bicarinato apice rotundato aucto. 

D. (Stachyobium) Madonnse, Rolfe in Kew Bulletin, ined. 



The nearest ally, and it is a very near one, of B. Madonnse 
is, as Mr. Rolfe points out, D. Fairfaxii, Rolfe (in Bard. 
Ghron, 1889, i. 798) non F. Muell., a native of the New 
Hebrides, which differs in the narrower petals and lip. 
B. Madonnw, on the other hand, is a native of New 
Guinea, whence it was introduced by Messrs. Sanders 
& Co., who flowered it in their Nursery in December, 
1 899, and to whom the Royal Gardens are indebted for 
the plaut here figured. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs crowded, six to nine inches high, 
the lower internodes cylindric, slender, forming a stipes 
to the terminal, which is two to four inches long, fusi- 
form and grooved ; lowest internode tuberous, obpyriform, 
one half to three-quarters of an inch long, smooth. Leaves 
two to three at the apex of the pseudobulb, one and a 
half to two inches long, sessile, oblong, obtuse, coriaceous. 
Peduncles terminal, one to two inches long, slender, three- 
flowered ; pedicels with the ovary an inch long; bracts 
very small, acute. Flowers two and a half inches broad, 
nodding, white, with a few purple spots near the margins 
of the lateral lobes of the lip. Sepals one to one and a 
half inch long, oblong, acuminate ; lateral broad at the 

June 1st, 1903. 



base, sub-falcate. Petals much larger than the sepals, 
obovate-spathulate, tip apiculate. Lip shorter than the 
sepals, concave, when spread out oblate, obscurely three- 
lobed, the midlobe cuspidate ; disk suffused with greeu, 
and bearing towards its base an elongate grooved callus 



ending in a nob. — J, D. H. 



Fig. 1, section of lip and column; 2, front view of column; 3, anther; 
4, pollinia : — all enlarged. 






7307 




M.S. deW.N.Fitchlitfi. 



-^nosntBro oWsD ay & Son L&>*S 



L Reeve &C° Lmio 



Tab. 7£01. 
primula megase2ef0lia. 

Native of Asia Minor. 

Nat. Ord. Primulacm. — Tribe Pkimule^. 
Genus Primula, Linn. ; {Benth. & ffook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 631.) 



Primula (Aleuritia) megasesefolia ; rhizomate crasso, foliis amplis 3-5 poll, 
longis 2-4 latis ovatis ovato-oblongis rotundatisve Bubcordatis obtuaia 
integerrimis v. remote denticulatis convexis glaberrimis laete viridibus, 
marginibus'nervisque subtus papilloso-hirtis, nervis nervuliaque reticulati8 
supra impressis subtus elevatis, petiolis 2-3-pollicaribus scapisque 2-5- 
pollicaribus robustis hirtis, umbella multiflora 3 poll, diam., iuvolucri 
foliis £-5 poll, longis lanceolatis acuminatis pedicellisque |-1| poll, longis 
glaberrimis, calyce J poll, longo paullo inflato teretiusculo 5-costato 
breviter acute 5-dentato, corolla? roseo-purpurese tubo calyce longiore 
ore nudo, limbi § poll, lati lobis obcordatis, capsula calyce paullo loDgiore, 
seminibus glabris angulatis minute tuberetilatis. 

P. megaseaefolia, Boiss. et Bal. in Bal. PI. Pont. Ext. 1866. Bom. Fl. Orient. 
vol. iv. p. 26. Gard. Ghron. 1901, vol. i. p. 223, fig. 84. 



The very remarkable Primrose here figured has hitherto 
been found only near Rizeh (or Rhize) in Lazistan, a 
town on the S.E. shore of the Black Sea, forty miles east 
of Trebizond, where it was discovered by the famous col- 
lector, Balansa, growing in gullies at about one thousand 
feet above the sea. It is referable to the large section 
Aleuritia, Duby, characterized by the sides of the leaves 
being revolute in vernation, and it is placed by Boissier, 
" Flora Orientalis," next to P. grandis, Trautv., an imper- 
fectly known Transcaucasian species, described as having 
leaves four inches long and three broad, a scape nearly a 
foot high, a very large, many-flowered umbel and linear- 
oblong corolla-lobes. 

The specific name megasesefolia refers to the resem- 
blance in the foliage to the species of Sadfraga (8. crasti- 
folia, L., 8. Ugulata, Wall., &c), to which Haworth 
gav £ fche generic name of Megasea. 

The Royal Gardens, Kew, are indebted to Miss Willmott, 
of Warley Place, Great Warley, Essex, for the specimen 
figured, which flowered in a cool house in February of the 
present year. 

Descr.—Iiootstoch stout, oblique, fibrilliferous. Leaves 
Junb 1st, 1903. 



variable in form, ovate, ovate-oblong or orbicular, three to 
five inches long by four broad, glabrous, dark green above 
with deeply sunk nerves and nervules, pale beneath with 
strong papillose nerves, margin entire or remotely denticu- 
late, papillose, base cordate ; petiole two to three inches 
long, and scapes two to five inches long, both very stout, 
hairy. Umbel (sometimes two superposed) very many- 
flowered, three inches in diameter. Bracts one-third of an 
inch long, linear-lanceolate, acuminate, green, glabrous. 
Pedicels one half to one inch and a quarter long, slender, 
glabrous. Calyx half an inch long, terete, somewhat 
inflated, strongly five-ribbed ; teeth short, acute. Corolia- 
tube longer than the calyx, mouth naked ; limb two-thirds 
of an inch broad, varying from rose-red to crimson- 
purple; lobes obcordate. Stamens inserted about one- 
third way down the tube. Style extending nearly to the 
base of the anthers. Capsule rather longer than the 
capsule ; valves revolute. — J. D. H. 



Fig. J, section of the corolla with stamens and pistil ; 2, ovary; 3, calyx and 
capsule : — all enlarged. 



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Tab. 7397. — CLEMATIS MEYEXIAXA. 
„ 7898.— LABURNUM CAR.AMANICUM. 
„ 7899.— MIMOSA SPEGAZZINII. 
„ 7900.— DENDROBIUM MADOXN- 
„ 7901.— PRIMULA MEGASEjEFOLIA. 



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Tab. 7902. 

SENECIO clivokum. 

Native of China and Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Senecionide^s. 
Grenus Senecio, Linn. (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 446.) 



Senecio (Ligularia) clivorum \ herba 4-5-pedalis, robusta, glabra v. inflorcs- 
centia pins minusve araneoso-tomentosa, foliis radiealibus longe petiulatis 
amplis 12-16 poll, latis reniformibus rotundato-cordatisve argute macro 
nulato-dentatis 3-5-plinerviis, nervis nervulisque supra impresaia subtua 
validis, cauliuis paucis parvis petiolo late vaginante inflato, panicula 
maxima 6-8 poll, lata subcorymbosa, rachi ramis pedunculisque robnstis 
ebracteata v. ramis inferioribus foliaceo-bracteolatis, capitnlis 3-4 poll. 
latis, crasse pedimculatis, involucri ecalyculati basi rotundati subintrusi 
pbyllis 8-10, | poll, longis roseis linearibus crassis acutis obtusisve m;ir- 
ginibus scariosia, receptaculo piano, ligulis 12-14 lineari-oblongia 1-lj 
poll, longis apice 2-3-dentatia aurantiacie, tubi fance filamentis 5 anan- 
theris instructis, disci floribua 5-lobis aurantiacis lobia revolutis, achamiis 
linearibus compressis levibus glabria, pappi setis rigidis 8caberulia rufo- 
purpureis. 

S. clivorum, Maxim, in Bull. Acad. PStersb. xv. (1871), p. 374, et Mil. Biol. 
vol. viii. p. 12. Franch. & Sav. Enum. PL Japon vnl. i. p. 247. Hemsl. 
in Joum. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxiii. (1888) p. 451. Henry in Gard. 
Citron. 1902, vol. ii. p. 217 cum tabula sine numero. 

Ligularia clivorum, Maxim. Mel. Biol. vol. vii. p. 555. 



Senecio clivorum is certainly the handsomest of all the 
herbaceous species of the genus, and will no doubt 
become a very conspicuous feature in the hardy her- 
baceous garden. It is referable to the section or sub- 
genus Ligularia, and its nearest affinity is to the Japanese 
L. Hodgsoni, Hook. (Bot. Mag. t. 5417), which differs in 
having lobed, coarsely toothed leaves, and more numerous, 
pale yellow ray-florets. Both are remarkable for their very 
rigid red-purple pappus, of a totally different character 
from the soft, white pappus of typical Senecio. 

Senecio clivorum varies much in the size of the flower- 
heads and ray-flowers, in the amount of pubescence on 
the inflorescence, and in the bracts of the involucre, 
which are obtuse, acute or acuminate. In the Chinese 
specimens, but not in the Japanese, 1 find the ray-corollas 
bearing five filaments (see fig. 1), representing the stamens 
of the disk-flowers, a character which has been observed 
in other species of the section. The species was dis- 

Jult 1st, 1003. 



covered in Japan by the late Prof. Maximovicz, growing 
in mountain meadows of Hakodate, at two thousand to seven 
thousand feet elevation, and has more recently been found 
in the Chinese provinces of Hupeh, Kansu and Szechuen. 
In 1900 plants of it were sent to Messrs. James Veitch & 
Sons from the mountains of Western Hupeh by their 
traveller, Mr. B. H. Wilson. In 1902 a plant of it was 
exhibited at the Royal Horticultural Society by Messrs. 
Veitch, who kindly supplied the specimen here figured. 

Descr. — A robust herb four to five feet high, glabrous 
or the inflorescence more or less clothed with a cobweb- 
like tomentum. Radical leaves on long, stout petioles ; 
blade reniform or orbicular-cordate, twelve to sixteen 
inches across, coarsely callous-toothed, three- or five- 
nerved from the base; nerves depressed in the upper 
surface, and raised on the lower. Stem-leaves few and 
relatively small; petiole with a large, inflated, stem- 
clasping sheath. Inflorescence loosely corymbose-panicu- 
late, six to eight inches across; branches and peduncles 
thick, bractless or the lower branches with leafy bracts 
at the base. Flower-heads erect, three to four inches 
across. Involucre rounded, and broader at the base ; bracts 
eight to ten, thick, red, linear, half an inch long, acute or 
obtuse, margin scarious. Receptacle flat. Ray-floicers 
twelve to fourteen, linear-lanceolate, one to one and a 
half inch long, minutely two- or three-toothed at the tip, 
orange-coloured. Disk-flowers orange, with exserted, 
dark brown anthers. Achenes linear, compressed, glabrous ; 
bristles of the pappus rigid, rough, purple-red.— J". D. H. ' 

Fig. 1 ray-flower with most of the ligule removed; % the same with the 
tube laid open snowing the attachment of the barren stamens ; 3, disk-flower • 
4, hair of pappus ; 5, anthers ; 6, arms of style -.-all enlarged. 



7303 




M.S.del.T.NHtchM 



'VirioontBrool<s,Day &.SonH&imp 



LRai-« A Co T _j 



Tab. 7903. 
HELLEBORUS lividus. 

Native of Majorca. 



Nat. Orel. Eanunculace*. — Tribe Hellebore*. 
Genua Helleborus, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 7.) 

Helleborus (caulescentea) lividus ; erectus, robuatus, caule foliisqae subtas 
pallide rubescentibus, foliis radicalibus simplicibus cordatis, caulinis 
trifoliolatis, foliolis ad 6 poll, longis seasilibus crasse coriaceis ovato- 
oblongia vel oblongo-lanceolatis integris lateralibua basi oblique semi- 
coidatis, terminali basi cuneato petiolulato, supra loete viridibua nervia 
6ubtus reticularis, petiolo crasso, panicula ramosa pauciflora, bracteis 
ovato-oblongis majuaoulis serratis, fljribus cernuia ad 2 poll, latis, 
sepalis rotundatis concavis intus pallide griseo-viridibns, petalis tubulosis, 
ore obliquo, viridibue, filamentis viridibus, antheria aureis, carpellia 4-6 
coriaceia. 

H. lividus, Ait. ex Curt. Bot. Mag. t. 72 ; Ait. Rort. Kew. ed. I. vol. ii. p. 272, 
ed. IT. vol. iii. p. 361. Willk. & Lange, Prodr. Fl. Ilisp. vol. iii. p. 974. 
Trattin. Archiv. tt. 205, 205a. (Joint. Enum. PI. Penins. flisp. Lusit. 
vol. i. p. 69, excl. ayn. If. argutifolius. Schiff. Mowgr. Helleb. p. 63 
(subspecies.) 

H. lividus, var. integrilobns, DC. Prodr. vol. i. p. 47. H. trifolius, Mill. 
Gard. Diet. ed. VI 1 1, n. 4 (non Linn.). 



Helleborus lividus was first published and figured by- 
Curtis in the Botanical Magazine in 1789, and he cites for 
it Alton's " Hort. Kewensis," ined., which work appeared 
in the same year. That figure is so unsatisfactory, and 
indeed inaccurate, representing the sepals as acute, that 
I have deemed it right to introduce a better, together 
with the full synonymy of the species as here restricted. 
When first published its native country was unknown, and 
I'emained so till after the date of the second edition of the 
" Hortus Kewensis" (1811). The plant had, however, 
been in cultivation in England since 1710, according to 
Aiton, who cites for it the " Philosophical Transactions of 
the Royal Society," n. 325, p. 48, implying that it was one 
of a selection of plants sent annually to that Society from 
the gardens of the Apothecaries' Company at Chelsea. 

Botanically H. lividus, Ait , is hardly separable from 
H. corsicus, Willd. (//. argutif alius, Viv.), and it has been 
included under that species by many authors, including 
Lindley (Bot. Reg. xxiv. t. 54) ; but from a horticultural 
standpoint they are quite distinct, as may be proved by a 
July 1st, 1903. 



comparison of our figure with Lindley's. The sharply, 
coarsely, prickly-toothed leaflets and yellowish greeu flowers 
characterize typical H. corsicus. Schiffner, the most 
recent (1890) monographer of the genus, says of H. Hin- 
dus, Ait., that it was only known to him, in a wild state, 
from Majorca, Balearic Islands, but that it might possibly 
occur in Corsica and Sardinia, though he believed the 
records for those islands referred to typical H. corsicus. 
The specimen figured is from a plant brought by Miss 
Fanny Geoghegan to Dublin from Majorca in 1900. It 
flowered in February, 1902, and again this year, in the 
Botanic Garden of Trinity College, and I am indebted to 
Mr. F. W. Burbidge, the Curator, for excellent specimens 
sent both seasons. 

Bescr.— Under cultivation this is a robust plant, with 
thick, fleshy stems, more or less deeply tinged and 
mottled with red, as is also the under surface of the 
leaves. Radical leaves simple, cordate ; cauline trifoliolate ; 
leaflets thick, coriaceous, pale green above, ovate-oblong 
or oblong-lanceolate, about six inches long, entire or 
sometimes obscurely toothed, lateral sessile and semi- 
cordate at the base, terminal shortly petiolulate and 
cuneate at the base. Flowers about two and a half inches 
across, dull purple-grey, tinged with green, nodding, in 
panicles of about six to eight, overtopping the leaves. 
bepals orbicular, concave, paler within. Petals tubular 
with an oblique mouth, green. Anthers vellow. Carpels 

XV-yTn ™™ ™' ^^ Wlth the " lon £> Persistent 

Figs. 1 ami 2, petals ; 3, an anther ; 4, gymeceura .— all enlarged. 



7904 




MSdelJ.N.FitchlitK 



Vincent Bro oks D av &. ScrvLt4feic 



Tab. 7904. 
iris lupina. 

Native of Armenia. 

Nat. Old. Iride^e. — Tribe Mormem. 
Genua Iris, Linn.; (BenCh. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Iris (Oncocyclus) lupina; rhizomate carnoso breviter repenfce, foliis 5-6 
linearibua suberectis pallide viridibus, pedunculo monocephalo foliis 
breviore, spathse valvis magnis lanceolatis acuminatis, perianthii tubo 
elongato, segraentis exterioribus reflexis obovato-cnneatis aordide flavo- 
viridibuB, venis copiosia lilacino-branneis percursia, in lirabi medio macula 
piloaa i'usca decoratis, segmentis interioribus majoribus, arcuatis obovato- 
nnguicnlatis, styli criatia latia magnis, fructu oblongo-trigono, semini- 
bus rubro-brunneis conspicue strophiolatia. 

I. lupina, Foster in Gard. Chron. 1887, p. 738. 



This very interesting new Iris was sent to Professor 
(Sir Michael) Foster about 1886, from the mountains a 
few miles south of Kharput, in Turkish Armenia, by Mrs. 
Barnum, of the American Mission, who also discovered 
the Iris, which has been named after her, as well as other 
novelties. It was also gathered by Sintenis, and distributed 
in his sets of herbarium specimens. It belongs to the 
section Oncocyclus, and is nearly allied to the old, well- 
known Iris susiana (Bot. Mag. t. 91). The Armenians 
call it the " Wolf's Ear," from the tawny tips of the 
outer segments as they emerge from the opening bud, and 
this suggested to Professor Foster its specific name. Our 
drawing was made from plants presented by him to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, which flowered for the first time in 
June, 1887. 

Descr. — Rootstock fleshy, short, creeping. Leaves about 
six in a tuft, linear, weak, sub-erect, pale green, channelled 
down the face, six inches to a foot long at the flowering 
time. Peduncle erect, one-headed, shorter than the leaves. 
Spathe-valves two, lanceolate, acuminate, pale green, the 
outer three inches long. Perianth-tube about two inches 
long ; outer segments obovate-cuneate, reflexing, three 
inches long, marked with copious, fine, lilac-brown, anasto- 
mosing veins on a dull, yellowish-brown ground-work, 
and in the centre with a large pilose spot of dark brown ; 

July 1st, 1903. 



inner segments larger, ascending, obovate, unguiculate, 
without a dark spot in the centre of the blade. Styles 
above an inch long ; crests large, broad. Capsule oblong- 
trigonous, dehiscing in the upper half. Seeds large, 
reddish-brown, with a wrinkled testa, and a conspicuous 
white strophiole. — J". G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Btamen ; 2, apex of style-branch with crest and stigma : — both enlarged. 



7905 













MS.ddj.XFitchlith. 



T fincentBrogks Day &.Son.Lt4-Imp 



Tad. 7905. 
HUERNIA concinna. 

Native of Somaliland. 

Nat. Ord. Asclepiadace^;. — Tribe Stapkliea'. 
Genus Huernia, B. Br. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 784.) 



Huernia concinna; canlibus 1-2| poll, longis caaspitosis 5-gonis, spims ad 
J poll, longis subulatis, floribus solitariis binisve, pedicelhs brevibus 
glabris, corolla late campanulata extus g'abra alba intus ubique pro- 
cessibus subulatis conspersa pallide salpburea punctis rubro-purpureis 
maculata, lobis § poll, longis deltoideis a-uminatia purpureo-margmatu, 
einibus latis Fundo apiculatis, coronas exterioris breviter 5-lobaa velutime 
purpureas lobis transverse oblongis emarginatis, coronaa intenons lobia 
late ovatis conniventibus flavis purpureo punctatis et marginatis. 

H. concinna, N.E. Br. in Dyer, Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. iv. p. 497. 

H. macrocarpa, Taubert in Gartenfl. 1895, p. 353, t. 1416, non alior. 



The genus Huernia, estimated in the " Genera Planta- 
rum " in 1886 to contain eleven species, all South African, 
Las been largely increased by recent discoveries in tropical 
Africa, whence eight additional species have been described 
by Mr. N. E. Brown in the very recently issued Flora of 
that region ; and an Arabian congener, H. arabica, N. E. 
Br., has added Asia to the geographical range of the genus. 
II. concinna was. together with another new species (H. 
Somalica, N. E. Br.) brought from Somaliland by Mrs. Lort 
Phillips, and presented to the Cambridge Botanic Garden, 
where it flowered in the midsummer of 1900, and was 
described by Mr. N. E. Brown, whose description I have 
followed above. The individual specimen is that here 
figured, which was forwarded by Mr. Lynch to the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in June, 1900. 

Vtscr. — Stems clustered, one to two and a half inches 
long, five-angled, spiny; spines about a quarter of an inch 
long, subulate. Flowers solitary or in pairs, on short, 
glabrous pedicels. Sepals a quarter of an inch long, 
gradually tapering from a broad base to fine hair-like 
points, glabrous. Corolla broadly carnpanulate, about one 
inch across, glabrous outside, smooth, yellowish white, 
covered everywhere inside with bristle-like appendages, 
pale yellow, dotted with purple-brown ; lobes about one- 

July 1st, 1903. 



third of an inch long, deltoid, acuminate, not fringed, 
alternating with, as many teeth. Outer corona very shortly 
five-lobed ; lobes transversely oblong, emarginate, velvety, 
purple-brown. Inner coronal-lobes broadly ovate, conni- 
vent in a cone over the tips of the anthers, yellow, edged 
and speckled with purple-brown. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, portion of inner surface of corolla ; 2, corona; 3, the same with the 
inner lobes removed; 4 and 5, poliinia:— all enlarged. 




7906 



Vincent BrooksXIay &SanLt d lmp 



Tab. 7906. 

CALOTHAMNUS bupjsstius. 

Native of Western Australia. 

Nat. Ord. Myrtace.e. — Tribe Leptosperme.ic. 
Geiins Calothamnus, Labill. ; (Benih. & JJoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 706.) 



Calothamnus rwpestris ; frutex sempervirens, robustus cortice brunneo 
priraum pubescente simul pilis paucis longis tenuissimis instructo, foliis 
confertis spiraliter dispositis pollicaribus acicularibus strictis v. incurvis 
rigidis teretibus primurn pilis longis ut iu ramia parce instructis cito 
glabrescentibus glaberrimis pungentibus, fioribus in ramulis sessilibus 
fasciculatis v. breviter spicatis, calycis i poll, longi albo-villosi hemi- 
spherici crassi tubo brevi basi libero rotundato rarao non immerso, lobis 
4 ovatis obtusis coriaceis, petalis 1-4, £ poll, longis ferj orbicularibus 
concavis subtrilobis, disco intus papilloso, staminnm, phalangibus Ij polli- 
caribus filamentis perplurimis infra medium in laminam late lineamm 
coccineam confluentibus, antheris lineari-oblongis aurei?, capsula glabres- 
cente fere globosa vel ellip^oidea §-r$ poll, longa lignosa haud immersa, 
calysis lobis 2 oppositis tantnm auctis incurvis more psittaci rostrum. 

0. rupestris, Srhauer in Nov. Act. Nat. Cur. vol. xxi. p. 26; Lehm. Plant. 
Preiss. vol. i. p. 152. Benth. Flor. Austral, vol. iii. p. 179. 



Of the genus Calothamnus, which consists of twenty- 
two species, all restricted to S. Western Australia, only 
one has been previously figured in this work, namely, G. 
qnatlrifidus, R. Br. (Bot. Mag. t. 1506), which appeared in 
i8 12. One other species, G. villosus, R. Br., is known to 
have flowered in Europe, and it is figured in the Botanical 
BegisteVj t. 1099. Five are cultivated in the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, including rupestris and quadrifidus. I am 
indebted to Mr. R. I. Lynch for the specimen of G. rupes- 
tris here figured, which flowered in the Cambridge 
Botanical Gardens in March of the present year. The 
plant from which it was taken was obtained from Berlin 
in 1896, and is about four feet high, and as broad across 
the branches. Its brilliantly coloured stamens are a con- 
spicuous feature, and Mr. Lynch informs me that they retain 
their beauty for nearly, if not quite, three weeks. James 
Drummond first discovered this, and several other species 
of the genus, in the Swan River district. It is very 
doubtful whether G. pinifolius, F. Muell., can be accepted 
as a distinct species, because the characters relied upon 
are inconstant. C. rwpestris is generally described as 

July 1st, 1903. 



having glabrous leaves, but ou close examination they are 
found to be more or less furnished with long, exceedingly 
fine hairs, which sometimes persist a season or more, 
sometimes fall very soon. 

Descr. — A robust, evergreen shrub, sometimes attaining 
a height of seven or eight feet, but usually less. Branches 
thick, at first pubescent, and at the same time furnished 
with long, thin, deciduous hairs, and densely clothed with 
needle-like leaves, resembling those of a small Pinus. 
Leaves spirally arranged, one to one and a half inch 
long, rigid, straight or curved, sharp-pointed, at first 
more or less furnished with long, very thin, almost in- 
visible hairs, but soon quite glabrous. Floivers crimson, 
one and a third to one and a half of an inch long, 
sessile, in small clusters on the previous year's branches. 
Calyx densely woolly, four-lobed ; lobes ovate. Petals one 
to four, small and scale-like. Stamens forming the 
most conspicuous part of the flower, numerous ; filaments 
crimson, connate the greater part of their length in four 
flattened clusters; anthers yellow. Capsule sessile but 
not immersed in the branch, persistent long after the seeds 
have fallen out, becoming quite glabrous, nearly globose 
or elliptical, one half to three-quarters of an inch long, 
woody and very hard ; two opposite calyx-lobes grow out 
and are incurved, giving them the appearance of a parrot's 
beak. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1, a leaC; 2, section of calyx with gynaeceum; 3, a petal; 4, a cluster of 
stamens in bud; 5, the same fully developed -.—all enlarged. 



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Tab. 7902.— SENECIO CLIVORUM. 
„ 7903.— HELLEBORUS LIVIDUS. 
„ 7904.— IRIS LUPIN A 
n 7905.— HUERNIA CONCINNA. 
„ 7906.— CALOTHAMNUS RUPESTRIS. 



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7907 




(£*>% 



MS. del mKtch"h<h 



VmcsntBrooksJlay &S<m"LiSImp 



L Reeve & C?Lcmdon 



Tab. 7907. 
isoloma erianthum. 

Native of Colombia. 

Nat. Ord. Gesnerace*. — Tribe Gesneke^e. 
Genus Isoloma, Decne. ; {Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1001.) 



Isoloma erianthum ; fruticulus 4-pedalis (Hartweg) sed foraan herba perennia 
rhizomatibua hypogaei8 squamosis, squamis confertis carnoais orbicularibua 
compreaais sanguineis, caulibus erectia aimplicibua crassi8 aubcarnosis 
dense fulvo-lanatis, foliia oppoaitia craaaia longe petiolatis ovato-lanceo- 
latia cum petiolo 4—6 poll, longia acutia basi cuneatia interdum leviter 
obliquia crenato-dentatia supra hispidulia subtua Ianatia costa atque 
venia primariia crassiusculia subtua conapicuia, floribua l§-2 poll, longia 
velutinis cinnabarinia inaxillis foliorutn superiorum fasciculatia pendulis, 
pedicelli8 ebracteatis flores Eequantibua vel longioribua, calycis parvi atro- 
rubri lobia ovatia acutia tubo vix longioribua, corollaa tubo leviter curvato 
ventricoso apice leviter conatricto, limbi lobia parvia rotundatia aub- 
aaqualibua plania divaricatia 3 inferioribu8 maculatia, staminibua 4 didy- 
namia incluaia ima basi corollaa affixia filamentia filiformibua glabria 
antheris glabria per paria cobaerentibua vel conniventibua, ataminodio 
minuto subulato, diaci glandulia 5 reniformibus, ovario apice villosisaimo, 
stylo pubeacente apice leviter recurvo, Btigmate parvo bilamellato. 

Isoloma erianthum, Decne. in Rev. Sort. 1848, p. 465 (nomen iantum). 

Geaneria eriantha, Benth. PL Hartw. (18 16), p. 228. 

Brachyloma erianthum, Hanst. in Linnsea, vol. xxix. p. 573. 

Kohleria eriantha, Hanst. in Linnsea, vol. xxxiv. p. 442. 



The genera of the Gesneraceae have been so diversely 
defined and limited by different botanists at different 
periods that it is difficult to understand what really con- 
stitutes a genus in this natural order. Bentham first used 
the name Isoloma (PI. Hartw. p. 229) to designate a 
section of Gesneria (sic), in which, however, he did not in- 
clude the species here figured. Decaisne (in loco supra 
citato) raised it to generic rank, and enumerated the 
species, previously referred to various genera, which he 
considered to belong to it. Bentham and Hooker adopted 
it, with some modifications in the " Genera Plantarum " 
(vol. ii. p. 1001), and as there constituted it comprises 
between sixty and seventy species, all native of Central 
and South America, ranging from Mexico to Bolivia and 
Peru, and mostly growing at considerable elevations. 

Isoloma is technically distinguished from the neighbour- 
ing genera Diastema and Ilouttea by the open aestivation of 
August 1st, 1893. 



the small calyx and large anthers. I. erianthum, Decne., 
was first discovered by Hartweg between the villages of 
Yilleta and Guaduas, in the Province of Bogota, and the 
species was described from dried specimens sent by him 
to the Royal Horticultural Society of London. There are 
also specimens in the Kew Herbarium collected by the 
late Dr. J. Triana in the same Province, at an elevation 
of two thousand four hundred metres, or nearly eight 
thousand feet. It is a handsome, free-growing plant, and 
the specimen from which the plate was prepared was 
cultivated and presented to Kew by Mr. R. I. Lynch, the 
Curator of the Cambridge Botanic Garden. It flowered in 
March of the present year. 

Descr. — A robust, erect, herbaceous plant, two to four 
feet high, with underground scaly rhizomes, and thick, 
more or less fleshy stems and leaves, more or less clothed 
with soft, fulvous hairs. Scales of the rhizomes crowded, 
fleshy, orbicular, compressed, crimson. Leaves opposite, 
on long petioles, ovate-lanceolate, including the petioles 
four to six inches long, acute, cuneate at the base, some- 
times slightly rough on the upper surface and woolly 
beneath; midrib and primary nerves thick and con- 
spicuous. Flowers one and a half to two inches Ion a-, 
velvety, orange-red or cinnabar, clustered at the axils of 
the upper leaves, pendulous on bractless pedicels of about 
the same length. Calyx small, dark red, equally five- 
lobed; lobes ovate, acute. Corolla slightly curved and 
ventncose; limb almost equally five-lobed ; lobes flat, 
rotundate, about a quarter of an inch across, the three" 
lower spotted. Stamens four, didynamous, included in the 
corolla; filaments filiform, glabrous, attached near the 
base of the corolla; anthers glabrous, connivent in pairs. 
btammode minute, subulate. Dish of five reniform glands. 
Ovary densely villous at the top ; style pubescent, slightly 
recurved at the tip; stigma small, bilamellate.— W. B. 1L 

Fig. 1, portion of calyx, disk and gyn£eceum; 2, poition of corolla tube 



7908 




M.S.aal, 



"Vincent Brooks Bay &Son Lt d Imp 



Tab. 7908. 
SEDUM Stahlh. 

Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. CkassulacEjE. 
Genus Sedum, Linn.; {Benth, et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 659.) 



Sedum Stahlii ; herba perennis, multicaulis, dense ramosa, caulibus vel ramis 
florigeris erectis vel adscendentibus graciliusculis foliisqne primutn 
minutissime puberulis 4-6 poll, longis, foliis oppositis vel suboppositis 
sessilibuscrassis carnosis oblongo-ovoideis ellipticisve |-f poll. longis ambitu 
circiter f poll, rubescentibus vel rubigiuosis, floribus pentameris luteis 
7-9 lin. diametro in cymas terminates pauciramosas diopositis, cymaa 
ramulis recnrvis, pedicellis brevissimis, sepalis puberulis snbcarnosis 
ereetia lineari-oblongis obtusis petalis saltern dimidio brevioribus, petalis 
lanceolatis dorso infra apicem corniculatis divaricatis, staminibus 10 
erectis petalis brevioribus, disci squamis truncatis, carpellis 5 clavatis 
glabris. 

S. Stablii, Solms ; Mehnelt in GartenivcM, 1902, p. 316, ex Wiener Illustrirte 
Gartenzeitung, 1902, p. 220. 



This Sedum was sent by Professor Count H. von Solms 
Laubach to the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in May, 
1900, for identification, with the information that it had 
been collected in Mexico by a Mr. Stahl, of Jena, and 
had been in cultivation several years without producing 
flowers. He was informed that it was different from 
anything at Kew, either in the herbarium or garden. 
Thereupon he sent a living plant to Kew, with the name 
8, Stahlii ; yet he does not appear to have published a 
description of the plant. In an editorial paragraph in the 
Wiener Gartenzeitung, cited above, it is stated that a Mr. 
Rehnelt had described it in the Gartenwelt (1902, p. 316), 
a publication to which I have not access at the present 
time; therefore the description has been wholly drawn up 
from the plant that flowered at Kew. Count Solms states, 
in his original communication concerning this species, that 
the leaves readily fall off, when a bud is soon formed at 
the base and develops into an independent plant. I have 
not been able to ascertain whether the foundation of this 
bud is formed before the leaf falls, but I think it is quite 
probable that it is. 8. Stahlii is a very rapid growing 
species, speedily forming a carpet, planted out or in 

August 1st, 1903. 



shallow pans, and is suitable for a greenhouse. The 
genus Sedum comprises about 150 species, spread all round 
the northern hemisphere, and about thirty are known to 
inhabit Mexico. They present great variety in habit and 
aspect, from the lowly 8. cupressoides to 8. dendroid eum, 
an erect, branching shrub. 

Descr. — A trailing, much-branched, succulent, obscurely 
puberulous, perennial herb, with erect or ascending 
flowering-stems, four to six inches high. Leaves opposite, 
or sub-opposite, sessile, slightly flattened at the point of 
attachment, longer than the internodes, thick, fleshy, 
ovoid or ellipsoid in shape, a quarter of an inch to half an 
inch long, and about three-quarters of an inch in girth, 
becoming red-brown. Flowers yellow, pentamerous, seven 
to nine lines in diameter, arranged in few-branched, 
terminal cymes ; branches of the cymes recurved ; pedicels 
very short. Sepals puberulous, somewhat fleshy, erect, 
linear-oblong, obtuse, scarcely half as long as the petals. 
Petals lanceolate, with a short, dorsal, horn-like appendage 
just below the apex, spreading horizontally from below 
the middle. Stamens ten, erect, shorter than the petals. 
Carpels clavate, glabrous. — W. B. H. 



Fig. l,a leaf; 2, a flower-bnd; 3, an expanded flower; 4 and 5, stamens; 
6, disk and gynaeceum : — all enlarged. 



7909 




M.S.dai. J.N.Fitchliti 



ASr.cen.tBroo"Us,Da.y 3tSon.Lt. i 



Tab. 7909. 
chlor^ea longibkacteata. 

Native of Chili. 

Nat. Old. OkchidEjE. — Tribe Neottie*. 
Genus Chloilea, Lindl. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Flant. vol. iii. p. 618.) 



ChloRjEA longibracteata ; herba terrestris, glaberrima, tuberosa, 12-18 poll, 
alta, tuberibus cylindricis elongatis j— 1 poll, crassis usque ad 6-8 poll, 
longis, caule simplici crasso carnoso infra flores per totam longitudinern 
foliis spathaceis acutis arete appressis vestito, foliis radicalibus subrosu- 
Iatis subcarnosis late obovato-rotundatis 3-5 poll, longis 2-2^ poll, 
latis apice reenrvia pluricostatis inter coatas reticulato-venosis, noribus 
1^-lf poll, diametro albido-aurantiacis deimirn Iaxiuscule spicatis, spicis 
4-8 poll, longis, bracteis lineari-lanceolatis acuminatis noribus paulo 
brevioribus vel in speciminibus agrestibus paulo longioribus, sepalis 
albis dissimilibus, 2 lateralibus majoribns longe cornutis cornu tereti 
carnoso viridi, terminali petalis Bimili, petalis oblique ovato-oblongis, 
labelli aurantiaci sessilis basi cordati supra cristati lobis lateralibus 
brevibue rotundatis lobo terminali sinuato apice incrassato, columna 
labello dimidio breviore. 

Chloraea longibracteata, Lindl. in Brand Quart. Journ. Roy. Inst. n.s. vol. i. 
(1827) p. 48 ; Benth. in Maund Bot. vol. ii. t. 94. 

Asarca sinuata, Lindl. Gen. & Sp. Orch. p. 408 ; G. Gay, Fl. Chil. vol. i. 
p. 468. 



Chlorsea is the characteristic genus of ground orchids in 
extratropical South America, especially on the western 
side. Altogether about eighty species have been described ; 
but many of them are only very imperfectly known from 
dried specimens. Since the drawing of the present species 
was made several other species have flowered at Kew from 
tubers collected and presented by H. J. Elwes, Esq., and 
drawings having been made it is probable that some of 
them may appear in this publication. Chlorasa differs 
from most of the allied genera in having no spur. Our 
drawing of 0. longibracteata was made from a plant pre- 
sented to the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, by Mr. F. W. 
Burbidge, the enthusiastic Curator of Trinity College 
Botanic Gardens, Dublin. It was presented to Trinity by 
Mr. Thornhill, whose father-in-law, Mr. J. W. Warburton, 
formerly H.M. Consul-General at Valparaiso, introduced 
it from Chili. Incidentally it may be mentioned that Kew 
was indebted to the latter gentleman for several interesting 
August 1st, 1903. 



plants during his tenure of office, amongst them the diminu- 
tive, leafless Viscum that grows parasitically on a columnar 
species of Cereus. At Mr. Burbidge's request, Mr. Warbur- 
ton furnished the following particulars of the conditions 
under which Chlorsea longibradeata grows wild: — " Unless I 
confuse two kinds of orchids, it is the commonest I found. 
The ground rises very rapidly from the sea-shore, much 
broken into glens (quebrada) full of serub, and very rocky. 
The rock is all granite or granitic, and the surface much 
decomposed. Here and there you come across little 
plateaux among the rough slopes and rising ground, with 
very little soil on them formed of disintegrated granite, 
clay and gravel. These plateaux usually have a very 
sparse vegetation, consisting of bulbous plants, orchids, a 
little grass, &c. Near the tops and on the tops grew 
what my friends and I called the green orchis, in 
hundreds. It always seemed to us that they grew in what 
were about the driest places possible, where the ground 
was so hard that it was difficult to dig them up with a 
garden trowel." Mr. Warburton goes on to say that this 
orchid, and other less abundant species, were usually of 
stunted, dwarf growth, owing to the great dryness of the 
soil, and the cultivated plants were much more vigorous. 
Evidently, then, this is one of the numerous instances in 
which plants are not found growing naturally where the 
conditions are most favourable to full development. 

Descr.— A terrestrial, glabrous, tuberous-rooted herb, 
twelve to eighteen inches high. Tubers cylindrical, a 
quarter of an inch to one inch thick, the longest six to 
eight inches long. Stem simple, thick, fleshy, clothed 
throughout below the flowers with spathaceous, acute, 
closely appressed leaves. Radical leaves somewhat rosu- 
late, rather fleshy, broadly obovate-rotundate, three to 
five inches long, two to two and a half inches broad, 
recurved at the tip, longitudinally ribbed, with reticulated 
venation between the ribs. Flowers one and a half to one 
and one-third of an inch in diameter, becoming loosely 
spicate ; spikes four to eight inches long ; bracts linear- 
lanceolate, acuminate, somewhat shorter than the flower3 
in cultivated specimens, somewhat longer in wild speci- 
mens. Sepals white, dissimilar, the two lateral larger, 
terminating in cylindrical, solid, fleshy, green, horn-like 



tips ; terminal one similar to the petals. Petals obliquely 
ovate-oblong. Labellum orange-coloured, sessile, cordate 
at the base, crested above ; lateral lobes short, rounded ; 
terminal one sinuate, thickened at the tip. Column half 
as long as the labellum. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, side view of labellum and column ; 2, front view of labellum ; 3, front 
view of column; 4, anther; 5, pollinia: — all enlarged. 



7910 




M.S.deUU Fitch hth. 



Vincent Broolcs Day iSonLtHmp 



L Reeve & C° London. 



Tab. 7910. 
ARISiEMA japoniodm, (?. 

Native of China and Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Aroide*. — Tribe ARiNEiM. 
Genus Aeis^kma, Mart.; (Benth. et Roolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 965.) 



Abis«ma japonicum ; herba dioica, tuberosa, tubere globoso, glaberrimn, 
1-2-pedalis, caulibus ssepissime bifoliatis inflorescentia terminatia, 
foliis pedatisectis longe petiolatis, petiulis ultra medium vaginatis, 
laminae tennis segmentis 5-11 sessilibus vel intermedio interdum ansato 
oblongis vel lanceolatis l£-6 poll, longis sed plerumque 3-5 poll, longis acutis 
vel caudato-acuminatis basi cuneatis integris, spatha peduncalafca folia 
sequante vel saepius superante, spathse 4-poIlicaris viridis longitudinaliter 
albo-striatse tubo cylindrico suvsum leviter ampliato, fauce aperto, limbo 
recurvo, lamina ovata acuta vel acuminata fornicato-incurva, spadiciB 
unisexualis $ appendice stipitata (i.e. paulo supra flores incrassata) 
clavata spathge tnbum paulo superante, floribus masculis acblamydeia 
breviter stipitatis 2-4-andris. 

Arieasma japonicum, Blume, Bumphia, vol. i. p. 106; Sckott, Synops. p. 29, et 
Prodr. p. 40; Engler in DO. Monogr. Phaner. rol. ii. p. 549 ; Franch. et 
Savat. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. ii. p. 5; Somoku Zusetsu, vol. xix. t. 16 (12); 
Honzo Zufu, vol. xxii. t. 19. 

Arum Dracunculus, Thunb. Fl. Jap. p. 233, hand Linn. 

Arisasma latisectum, Blume, loc. eit. p. 110, fide Engler, loc cit. 



The genus Arissema comprises between fifty and sixty 
described species, chiefly inhabiting temperate and sub- 
tropical Asia. One occurs in Abyssinia, and a few. are 
natives of North America, southward to Mexico. Some of 
the species are amongst the most graceful and elegant 
members of the order, presenting great variety in the 
foliage, and more especially in the form and shape of the 
spathe and spadix, and several have been figured in this 
work. In some species, A. concinnum (tab. 5914), for 
example, the spathe is prolonged into a long slender tail ; 
in A. curratum (tab. 5931) the spadix is elongated; in 
A. fimbriatum (tab. 7150) it is plumose. A. costatum has 
both spathe and spadix elongated. A. Griffithii (tab. 
6491) and A. sjpeciosum (tab. 5964) may be mentioned as 
representatives of the more showy, ornamental species. 

A. japonicum is apparently very common in Japan, as it 
is represented in almost every collection of dried plants 
from that country. It also occurs in Formosa, and Dr. A. 
August 1st, 1903. 



Henry collected it abundantly in the Chinese Provinces of 
Hupeh and Szechuen. This species represents a group in 
which neither the spathe nor the spadix is elongated. 
The plant figured was raised at Kew from seeds received 
in 1899 from the Botanic Garden, Imperial University, 
Tokyo, Japan. It flowered in the Alpine House in March, 
1903. 

Descr. — A tuberous-rooted, perennial, dicecious, glabrous 
herb. Tuber globose. Stems one to two feet high, two- 
leaved, terminating in a single inflorescence. Leaves 
pedately compound, on long petioles ; petioles sheathing 
to above the middle, thence free and terete ; leaflets or leaf- 
segments five to eleven, thin, sessile or the intermediate 
sometimes stalked, oblong or lanceolate, one and a half to 
six, but usually three to five inches long, acute or caudate- 
acuminate, cuneate at the base, entire. Spathe pedun- 
culate, equalling or overtopping the leaves, green with 
longitudinal white stripes ; tube cylindrical, slightly widen- 
ing upwards; limb ovate, acute or acuminate, incurved, 
margin recurved below the middle. Male spadix with a 
stalked, clavate appendage, longer than the tube of the 
spathe. Male flowers without a perianth ; stamens two to 
four; filaments confluent. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, a male spadix; 2 and 3, male flowers : — all enlarged. 



7.9/7 







.'Broo]s,Day< 



L Reeve &v, c ~ 



Tab. 7911. 
CISTANCHE violacea. 

Native of Marocco and Algeria. 

Nat. Ord. OkobanchackvB. 

Genus Cistanche, Hoffmg. et Link ; ( Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. 

p. 893.) 



Ci&tanche violacea; herba crasaa, carnosa, in radicibus Chenopodiacearum 
frutescentium, Gypsophilte albce, Staticis monopetala, etc., parasitica, 
caule 6-15 poll, alto (forsan interdum altiore) simplici vel rariua ramoso 
carnoso sjepius 1-2 poll, crasso " sed interdum crassitie brachii," squamia 
carnosia latia deltoideia vel rotundatis densissime imbricatis, supenoribus 
interdum laxioribus longioribus tenuioribus ovatis lanceolatis lineari- 
busve fere foliaceis, omnibus demura exsiccatis marcidisque, floribns 
purpureis vel purpureo-violaceis circiter 1 poll, diametro lj poll, longia 
primum densissime congestis, apicia demum elongatis interdum 6-8 poll, 
longis, bracteis coloratis ovato-oblongis obtuais calycem mquantibus, 
calycis scariosi quinquefidi lobia fere aequalibua oblongia rotundatis, 
corolla arcuata, ore obliquo, limbi lobia fere aaqualibus rotundatis recurvia 
plicis 2 longitudinalibus cristatia aureis inter lobo* lateralea et lobum 
inferiorem ornatis, staminibua vix exsertis, filamentia basi barbatia apice 
incurvis, antheria approximatis barbatia, ovario glabro, stylo staminibua 
paulo longiore apice recurvo, 8tigmate lato obacure btlobo, capsula ovoidea 
obtusa compreesa, seminibus numerosissimis minntis. 

Phelipa?a violacea, Desf. Flor. Atlant. vol. ii. p. 60, t. 145 ; Battand. et Trab. 
Flor. de VAlgkrie,^. 656; Beut. in DC. Prodr. vol. xi. p. 12; Viviani, 
Flor. Lyb. Specim. p. 34. 

Orobanche Phelypsea, Willd. Sp. PI. vol. iii. p. 352. 



The genus Cistanclie, regarded by most authors as a 
section of Phelipdea, is retained in the M Genera Plantarum," 
because of the peculiar habit of the species, the sub-equal, 
obtuse lobes of the calyx, and the dense inflorescence. It 
consists of about a dozen species inhabiting the Mediter- 
ranean region and the Orient, from Portugal and Marocco 
eastward to the Punjab. C. violacea is a rather common 
plant in North Africa, from Marocco through Algeria to 
Tunis, growing both on the sea-shore and in the saline 
districts of the interior. The plant figured here was sent 
to Kew, in March of the present year, to be named by 
Mrs. R. W. Dent, of Flass, Crosby Ravens worth, Shap, 
Westmoreland, who received it from a friend staying at 
Biskra, Algeria, who found it "in the desert growing 
straight out of the sand, where it is brackish." The 
plant reached Kew in fairly good condition, except that 
August 1st, 1893. 



the flowers were partly decayed and discoloured in conse- 
quence of having been packed in wet moss. Otherwise 
it might have gone on growing, and attained complete 
development, as there was a great store of reserve 
food in the thickened caudex. The whole plant weighed 
ten ounces, and the fleshy caudex or stem was eight 
inches in its greatest circumference. From the speci- 
mens in the Kew Herbarium and Desfontaine's de- 
scription in the work cited above, it would appear that 
Cistanche violacea sometimes flowers the first season, when 
the stem grows relatively tall, and only about an inch 
thick at the base ; and sometimes it forms a very thick 
caudex the first season, and flowers the second, after the 
disappearance of the host-plant from which it derived its 
great store of food. The plants that flower the first season 
have altogether the habit and aspect of an ordinary broom- 
rape; and a very careful examination is necessary to 
establish the specific identity of the two conditions. Mrs. 
Dent's friend, who sent the specimen, states that the 
people of Biskra scrape the root, and take it as a remedy 
for colic. At the request of Kew, with a view to cultiva- 
tion, a second consignment was made, but unfortunately 
the specimens were cut off at the base of the inflorescence. 
It should be added that the colour of the flowers in the 
plate is perhaps not quite exact, in consequence of deterio- 
ration in transit. 

Descr.—A fleshy, leafless herb, destitute of chlorophyll, 
and parasitic on the roots of various Chenopodiacese, 
Gypsophila alba, Statice monopetala, &c. Stem six to 
fifteen inches high, simple or rarely branched, usually 
about one inch thick, but sometimes as much as six to eight 
m girth, densely clothed with fleshy, imbricating scales, the 
lower deltoid or rounded, the upper gradually thinner, 
longer, narrower and less crowded, uppermost free and 
bract-like ; at length all dry and shrivelled. Flowers 
purple or violet-purple, about an inch in diameter, and one 
and a half inch long, at first very densely crowded. Spikes 
elongating in development, and sometimes as much as six 
to eight inches long. Bracts ovate-oblong, obtuse, equal- 
ling the calyx. Calyx scarious, five-lobed; lobes nearly 
equal, oblong, rotundate. Corolla curved with an oblique 
limb ; lobes of the limb nearly equal, rotundate, recurved, 



with two longitudinal, crested, yellow folds between the 
two lateral and lowermost ones. Stamens scarcely exserted ; 
filaments and corolla bearded at the point of insertion or 
attachment; anthers connivent, bearded. Ovary glabrous; 
style slightly longer than the stamens, recurved at the tip; 
stigma broad, two-lobed. Capsule ovoid, compressed; 
seeds exceedingly numerous and minute. — /. D. H. 

Fig. 1, part of calyx and gynjeceum ; 2, part of the corolla, showing the 
three lower lobes with the two intermediate, crested folds and the stamens ; 
3, style and stigma ; 4, cross section of ovary :— all enlarged. 



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Tab. 7912. 
senecio tanguticus. 

Native of Western China. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Senecionide,*:. 
Genus Senecio, Linn.; {Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 446.) 



Senecio (Synotis) tanguticus; herba elata, superne raraosa, glabreBcene, caule 
tereti robusto, foliis amplis 5-7-poll. longis, inferioribus longe petiolatis late 
ovatis deltoideisve subdigitatim pinnatifido-lobatia et laceria v. aubbipina- 
tifidia pinnis lobisve argute profunde que serratis basi truncatis cordatia 
v. acutis, supra saturate viridibus subtus pallidis, petiolo lamina breviore 
dilatata serniamplexicauli, capitulia numerosissimis suberectia oliganthua 
in paniculam amplam pyramidatam diapositia, pedicellis brevibus, bracteia 
parvis, involucri auguste tubuloai $ poll, longi basi 3-4-bracteolati 
bracteia 3-4 auguste linearibus obtusis herbaceis viridibua glabris fl. 
radii saepius 3-4 raro 0, corollse tubo elongato, ligula \ poll, longa anguste 
linearia apice 3-crenata, fl. disci ad 3 tubo elongato lobis 5 revolutia, 
antheris auguste linearibus breviter caudatiB flavo-brunneia, pappo 
copioso molli albo, achaeniia parvia oblongia glabris. 

S. tanguticua, Maxim, in Bull. Acad. Petersb. xxvii. (1881) p. 486, et Mil. 
Biol. ri. 244. 

S. Henryi, Hemd. in Jour*. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxiii. (1888) p. 452. 



It is difficult to find something to say that is specially 
applicable to a given species in a genus numbering upwards 
of a thousand species, but Senecio tanguticus belongs to a 
comparatively small section, characterized by having a 
very small number of flowers, rarely only one, in each 
head. Without close examination, the flower-heads of 
S, tanguticus might be taken for separate flowers, with 
three or four petals each. 

A dried specimen of 8, tanguticus was first sent to Kew 
in 1886, by Dr. A. Henry, who collected it near Patung, 
in the Province of Hupeh ; and he subsequently sent 
numerous specimens from various other localities in the 
same Province. In 1887, Kew received specimens of the 
same species, collected by the Rev. E. Faber, at an 
elevation of four thousand feet, on Mount Omei, in the 
Province of Szechuen. Mr. Hemsley, failing to identify 
these specimens, from the description of 8. tanguti- 
cus of Maximowicz, described it under the name of S. 
Henryi. Since then Kew has received an authentic 

September 1st, 1903. 



specimen of 8. tanguticus, and it was Dr. Henry himself, 
as I am informed by Mr. Hemsley, who first recognized 
the identity of the two. 

Mr. Wilson, collector for Messrs. James Yeitch & Sons, 
subsequently sent home seed of this handsome herbaceous 
plant, and our plate was prepared from successfully 
cultivated examples raised at Coombe Wood in 1902. 
Judging from the vigorous plant, between six and seven 
feet high, sent to Kew by Messrs. Veitch, 8. tanguticus is 
a very striking object, suitable both for mixed planting 
and grouping. 

It may be added that since the publication of Forbes' 
and Hemsley's Enumeration of the Chinese Composite 
(" Journal of the Linnsean Society," vol. xxiii.) in 1888, 
the number of known Chinese species of Senecio has been 
raised from sixty-three to nearly 150. Many of them are 
very pretty, and some of a highly ornamental character. 

Descr. — A tall, stout, glabrous or glabrescent, leafy 
herb, six to seven feet high, branching upwards. Stem 
as thick as the thumb below, terete, green ; branches 
erect. Leaves five to seven inches broad and long, lower 
long-petioled, broadly ovate or deltoid, pinnatifidly lobed 
or sub-pinnatifid, lobes linear-lanceolate, acuminate, 
acutely, rather distantly coarsely irregularly serrate, dark 
green above, paler beneath, base truncate or broadly 
sub-cordate, sinus rounded ; petiole of lower leaves 
very long, base dilated and semi-amplexicaul. Heads 
in erect, very many-flowered, pyramidal panicles six 
to seven inches long, terminating the branches; 
bracts small, green, lanceolate; pedicels one-sixth of an 
inch long. Involucre narrow, cylindric, one-third of an 
inch long, calyculate with short, subulate bracts at the 
base; bracts three or four, linear, tips rounded. Ray. 
flowers | three or four, rarely absent; ligule half an inch 
long, linear, three-toothed, four- to five-nerved, golden- 
yellow. Disk-fioivers three or four, lobes revolute. Anthers 
linear, exserted, pale brown ; style-arms revolute. Pappus 
copious, soft, white. Achene short, glabrous.-— J". D. H 



rtfiikJl^H ' I ra y; fl ° wer • 3 ' PW h^r ; 4, disk-flower ; 5, stamens ; 
0, style-aims :— all enlarged; 7, reduced view of upper part of plant! 



7913 




iolJN.Fitohlith 



VmcentBrooks,Day&SonI.tWmp 



lD««n n, rai 



Tab. 7913. 
DRABA Gilliesii. 

Native of Chili. 

Nat. Ord. Crucieer.e. — Tribe Alyssine,e. 
Genus Dbaba, Linn.; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 74.) 



Dbaba (Leucodrabra) Gilliesii; perennis, molliter substellatim pubescens, 
caule pedali erecto basi ramoso folioso, foliis l-lg-poll. longis sessilibus 
v. semiamplexicaulibus patulis ovatis oblongisve acutis undulatis 
remote dentatis infimis nunc breviter petiolatis lrete viridibus, racemis 
elongatis laxe multifloris, no rib us \-% poll, latis longe pedicellatis, petalis 
\ poll, longis oblongis apice rotund atis, petalis sepalis multo majoribus 
ulbis, ovario laxe stellatim pubescente, stylo elongato filiformi, siliculis 
i~i poll- longis ellipsoideis planis acutis stylo persistente terminatis 
tortis, seminibus oblongis ■£$ poll, longis compressis pallide castaneis. 

D. Gilliesii, Hook, et Am. in Hook. Bot. Misc. vol. iii. (1833) p. 137. Walp. 
Rep. vol. i. p. 157. Hook. f. Fl. Antarct. vol. ii. p. 236. C. Gay, Fl. 
Ghil. vol. i. p. 154. Eeiche, Flora de Chile, vol. i. (1896) p. 112. 

D. araucana, Phil, in Anal. Univ. Ghil. 1872, p. 672. 

D. Davila?, Phil. I.e. 

D. rosulata, Phil, in Linneea, vol. xxviii. (1856) p. 669. 

D. stolonifera, Barn, ex G. Gay, I.e. p. 155. 



The foregoing synonymy is that of the " Index Kew- 
ensis," but I have not succeeded in ascertaining on whose 
authority the reductions were made, and I have not been 
able to examine the specimens critically. 1 had hoped to 
get the views of Dr. E. Gilg, of Berlin, who is engaged on 
a monograph of the Andine species of Draba, on this 
point; but as no reply has been received, he was probably 
from home when the application reached Berlin. Iu 
Reiche's recent "Flora de Chile" (vol. i. p. 112), however, 
D. stolonifera, Barn., D. rosulata, Phil., and D. colchaguen- 
sis, Phil., are reduced to D. Gilliesii. On the other hand, 
D. araucana, Phil., and D. Davilse, Phil., are treated as 
distinct species ; the former described as differing from 
D. Gilliesii in having flat pods, and the latter in having 
numerous stems from the same root. D. Gilliesii, as re- 
presented in the accompanying plate, is an interesting 
example of cultivation, being nearly three times the size 
of the wild specimens, and a really attractive plant. 
September 1st, 1903. 



Br aba is one of the few genera amongst the higher 
orders of flowering plants that is well represented through 
nearly 140 degrees of latitude. This is, of course, in the 
New World. Throughout, excepting the low countries of 
Central America, Draba is frequent, at low elevations in the 
north temperate regions, at high elevations in the tropical 
and south temperate, the genus having its maximum 
number of species in the Andes. In the Old World, on 
the contrary, the genus Draba is confined to the north 
temperate zone, bounded on the south by the Mediter- 
ranean in Europe, and the Himalaya in Asia. 

Draba Gilliesii was discovered by Dr. Gillies in the 
Cordillera of Cumbre, at about eight thousand feet eleva- 
tion, and has been collected at various other localities, 
always at a great elevation, of the Chilian chain. It varies 
very much in habit, according to locality. The specimen 
figured was presented to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 
1902, by A. K. Bulley, Esq., of Ness, Neston. It flowered 
in the Alpine House in March, 1903. 

Descr. — A perennial tufted, lax]y stellately hairy herb, 
one to ten inches high, of various habit and leafage. 
Stem stout or slender, simple or branched, leafy. Leaves 
sessile, coarsely toothed, half an inch to one and a half inch 
long, lower or radical linear or ovate-oblong, cauline ovate- 
cordate, more irregularly toothed. Racemes short or long, 
few- or many-flowered, erect, pedicels three-quarters of an 
inch to one and a half inch long, slender, spreading. 
Flowers one half to three-fourths of an inch in diameter in 
large states of the plant, much smaller in others, white. 
Sepals oblong, obtuse, laxly stellately hairy. Petals obo- 
vate-spathulate. Filaments glabrous j anthers rather small, 
oblong. Capsules elliptic-oblong or oblong-lanceolate, 
acuminate, with the persistent style, strongly compressed 
and twisted. Seeds very small. — J. D. H. 



Pig. 1, flower with petals removed; 2 and 3, anthers; 4, gynaeceum and 
disk -.—all enlarged; 5, fruit, nat size. 

Note.— Since the foregoing was set up, a reply has been received from Dr. 
Lrilg, who makes the synonymy the same as ours, with the addition of 
JJ. coleliaguensis, Phil. 



79H 




M.S.delJ.N.Fit£h.ktR 



"Vincent. Broolos,Day &SonLt d inip 



L Reeve ^C°L on iojx 



Tab. 7914. 
iris bucharica. 

Native of Bokhara. 

Nat. Ord. IridEjE. — Tribe Mor^eEjE. 
Genus Iius, Linn. {Benth, et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Iris (Juno) bucharica; ex affinitate I. orchioidei (B. M. t. 7111) et forsan 
hujus species mere varietas, bulbo subgloboso, caule erecto 1-2 ped. alto 
internodiis distinctis, foliis 7-11 lanceolatis acute acuminatis usque ad 
1 ped. longis sed saepe brevioribus arcuatis nitidis, spathis in axillis 
foliorum solitariis 1-doris vix acutis haud inflatis, floribus breviter pedun- 
culatis albido-luteis circiter 2| poll, diametro, perianthii tubo elongato, 
limbi segmentis omnibus longe unguiculatis, exterioribus lamina oblonga 
apice rotundata recurva cristata crista aurantiaca, interioribus parvis 
arete deflexis trilobulatis lobis lateralibus obtusis intermedio acutissimo, 
styli cristis oblique ovatis interdum in margine exteriore irregulariter 
1-lobulatis. 

I. bucharica, Foster in Gard. Ghron. 1902, vol. i. pp. 385-387, tig. 135 ; 1903, 
vol. i. p. 251. Journ. Sort. ser. 3, vol. xlv. p. 260-261. 



This pretty Iris is one of a series of four which Sir 
Michael Poster, one of the first authorities on the genus, 
says might well be regarded as varieties of one species, 
namely, orchioides, Carr. in Rev. Sortie. 1880, p. 337, fig. 
68 (B. M. t. 7111). But he argues that as they present 
distinctive characters, which, from a gardener's stand- 
point, constitute species, they may as well be accepted as 
such. This may be a convenient course so long as there 
are only the four to deal with ; but, judging from very 
scanty material, there is considerable individual variation, 
and I am not quite certain that our plant is exactly his 
I. bucharica. He himself says that one of the four of this 
series, the one known as 1. orchioides ccerulea, was referred 
by Kegel to I. caucasica, Hoffm., and 1 find that Kegel 
(Garten-flora, t. 800) figures a plant exceedingly like ours, 
especially in the three-lobed deflexed inner petals or 
standards, as I. caucasica. 

The plant here figured was purchased from Messrs. Van 

Tubergen, Dutch Nurserymen, and it flowered in the 

Alpine House at Kew in March of the present year. 

Sir Michael Foster obtained his from the same source, 

September 1st, 1903. 



as well as the closely allied, though very differently 
coloured I. ivarleye7isis, described and figured in the 
same place, and which will shortly be figured in this 
Magazine. He describes the standards of I. bucharica 
in the following words: "small, pure white, extended 
horizontally, with a canaliculate claw expanding into a 
broader, flat, distinctly mucronate blade." On the other 
hand, the figure in the " Journal of Horticulture " cited 
above, has distinctly lobed standards. 

Descr, — Closely allied to I. orchioides and I. caucasiea, 
and having a nearly globose bulb. Stem erect, one to two 
feet high ; internodes distinct. Leaves seven to eleven, 
lanceolate, acuminate, acute, lower ones nine to twelve 
inches long, shorter upwards, curved, shining. Spathes 
solitary in the axils of the leaves, one-flowered, scarcely 
acute, not inflated. Flowers shortly peduncled, yellow 
and white, about two and a half inches across. Perianth- 
tube elongated. Petals all having long claws ; the three 
outer (falls) with an oblong, rounded, pendulous, crested 
blade ; the three inner (standards) much smaller, protrud- 
ing between the outer, pendulous, three-lobed ; lateral lobes 
rounded, central one acuminate. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



Figs. 1 and 2, anthers; 3, stigmatio surface -.—enlarged; 4, entire plant, 
reduced. 




7915 



atS.deU.NJHdxith 



Vincent Brooks Day*. SonLt d iinp 



I.. Reeve & C° London 



Tab. 7915. 

ALOE Cameeoni. 

Native of Eastern Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Tribe Aloine^b. 
Genua Aloe, Linn. ; (Beiiih. et Eooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 776.) 



Aloe Cameroni ; frutex caulescens, erectus, omnino glaber (atirps depicta caule 
simplici circiter bipedali), foliis sparsis patenti-recurvis angustis lanceolatis 
9-12 poll.longis infra medium circiter 1| poll, latis acutis concavo-convexis 
plano-convexisve circiter 3-4 lin. crassis viridibua margine remote 
breviterque spinoso-dentatis spinis basi lalis apice incurvis, inflorescentia 
axillari simplici suberecta cum pedunculo elongato circiter pedali, bract eis 
scariosis basi latis acute acuminatis pedicellis brevioribus, pedicellis l§-2 
lin. longis, floribus rubro-luteis ad apicem pedunculi confertis pendulis 
cum staminibus exsertis circiter bipollicaribus, perianthii tubo fere 
cylindrico leviter curvato infra medium leviter constricto, limbi lobis 
oblongis apice tantum leviter recnrvis obtusis vel rotundatis, ovario 
obscure verruculoso, stylo breviter exserto. 

Aloe Cameroni, Hemsl. 

A. macrosiphon, Kew Sand-list of Tender Monocotyledons (1897), p. 173, non 
Bake}' Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. vii. p. 459. 



It is not without some misgivings that I have described 
this Aloe as a new species, but being unable to identify it 
with any of the fifty species described by Mr. J. G. Baker 
in the "Flora of Tropical Africa" (vol. vii. pp. 454-469), I 
must perforce give it a name. There is always a risk in 
dealing with a single species of a large and critical genus 
such as the present, especially as many, probably most, 
of the species are imperfectly known. The plant from 
which our drawing was made was sent to the Royal Botanic 
Gardens, Kew, in 1894, by Mr. K. J. Cameron, of the 
African Lakes Corporation, and was received in 1895, and 
flowered in February of the present year. In a letter to 
the Director, Mr. Cameron says, " At the request and with 
the assistance of Mr. Scott Elliot [whose travels in E. and 
AY. tropical Africa and Madagascar are well known to 
botanists], I have selected the following plants from our 
garden at Mandala." Then follows a list. In con- 
sequence, perhaps, of Mr. Scott Elliot's action in connec- 
tion with sending the plants in question, it was assumed 
before it flowered, that this Aloe was the same as one 
September 1st, 1908. 



which he collected between Urundi and Karagwe, in 
German East Africa. This has been described by Mr. 
Baker (Fl. Trop. Afr., vol. vii. p. 459) under the name of 
A. macrosiphon. The specimen consists of a crumpled, 
imperfect leaf, the upper part of an inflorescence, and 
a few old flowers; and although the species is closely 
allied to A. Gameroni, Hemsl., the material is sufficient to 
prove that it is specifically different. The most pro- 
minent differences are the very much larger bracts and 
longer pedicels. 

Descr. — An erect shrub with an unbranched stem about 
two feet high when the drawing was made. Leaves 
separated by short but distinct internodes, spreading, re- 
curved, narrow-lanceolate or almost linear, nine to twelve 
inches long, about one and a half inch broad below the 
middle, acute, concavo-convex or plano-convex, one-third 
to a half inch thick, green, margin furnished with rather 
distant, spinous teeth having a broad base and an in- 
curved tip. Inflorescence axillary, unbranched, sub-erect, 
including the elongated peduncle about a foot long. 
Bracts small, scarious, broad at the base, sharply acumi- 
nate, shorter than the pedicels. Pedicels about one-sixth 
of an inch long. Flowers almost cinnabar red, passing into 
yellow towards the top, including the exserted stamens 
two inches long, crowded at the top of the peduncle, pen- 
dulous. Perianth-tube nearly cylindrical, slightly curved, 
slightly constricted below the middle; lobes oblong, 
obtuse, recurved at the tip. Ovary obscurely warted ; 
style shortly exserted. — W. Botting Hemsley. 



Fig. 1, a flower; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, gyntecenm : — all slightly enlarged. 



1916 







■ 




K. S . del . J.N.Htd\ Btk 



2 1. 

VmcentBrool^Day&ScmLtA&rq? 



Tab. 7916. 
PSYCHOTRIA capensis. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Rubiace^.— Tribe Psychotrie^:. 
Genus Psychotria, Linn. ; (Benth. et Eooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 123.) 



Psychotria (Mapouria) capensis; frutex compactas, paucipedalis, fere undi- 
que glaber, ramulis teretibus, internodiis foliis multo brevioribus, foliia 
magnitudine ac circumscriptione variabilibns coriaceis petiolatis oblongis 
lanceolatis oblanceolatis obovatis ellipticisve cum petiolo interdum 
elongato usque ad 6-7 poll, longis sed ssepiua 2-4 poll, longis obtusis vel 
rotundatis basi semper cuneatis margine integerrimia venis inconspicnia, 
stipulia amplis subcoriaceis ovato-rotundatis intus pnbescentibus brun- 
neis cito deciduis, floribus fragrantibus luteis pentameris vix semipoll. 
diametro in cymas parvas densas terminates breviter pedunculatas dis- 
positis, pedicellis floribus brevioribus parce puberulis, calycis minuti 
limbo ad annulum fimbrillatum reducto, corollae infundibnlaris tubo 
sursum leviter dilatato vix 3 lin. longo fauce barbato, limbi lobis ovatis 
tubo fere dimidio brevioribus vix acutia leviter recurvis, staminibus 
breviter exsertis, frnctu globoso circiter 2£ lin. diametro 2-spermo, 
seminibus albumine insigniter ruminato. 

Psycbotria capensis, Vatke in QZster. Bot. Zeitschr. vol. xxv. (1875) 
p. 230 

Grumilea capensis, Sond. in Harv. & Sond. Fl. Cap. vol. iii. p. 21. 

Logania capensis, Eckl. in S. Jfr. Quart. Journ. vol. i. (1830), p. 371. 

Grumilea globosa, Hoclist. in Flora, vol, xxvii. (1844), p. 554. 



As limited in Bentliam and Hooker's " Genera Planta- 
m m," the genus Psychotria numbers between five and six 
hundred species, spread over nearly all tropical and sub- 
tropical regions, including Polynesia ; but other botanists 
have variously extended and restricted it. The late Dr. 
Baillon, for instance, reduced {Hist. PL vol. vii. p. 280) 
Palicourea, Ceph&lia, and several other genera, to it, 
bringing up the total number of species to upwards of 
eio-ht hundred. For this unwieldly agglomeration he used 
the earlier Linnean name Uragoga. Schumann, on the 
other hand (Engler & Prantl. Naturl Pflanzenf. vol. iv. 
pp. 111-120) treats Psychotria, Uragoga, Mapouria, 
Grumilea, &c, as distinct genera. A middle course is, 
perhaps, the best. Grumilea, as a genus, stands upon the 
ruminated albumen, which is well developed in the species 
figured. But the disadvantages of being unable to deter- 

Septembek 1st, 1903. 



mine the genus in the absence of seeds are obvious, 
especially where the species are so numerous. 

Psychotria capensis is apparently a common shrub in 
South-eastern Africa, ranging from Somerset, Bathurst, 
and Albany northward to Durban and Inanda. The 
history of its introduction is unknown, but there is a 
specimen in the Herbarium which flowered at Kew in 
April, 1858. Mr. W. Watson, the Curator, to whom the 
Magazine is indebted for much valuable information con- 
cerning the plants figured, notes that it has been cultivated 
for many years in the Temperate House, where it flowers 
freely in spring. Its compact habit and fragrant flowers 
are its greatest attractions. 

Descr. — A dwarf, compact shrub, glabrous in nearly all 
parts. Branches terete, with internodes much shorter 
than the leaves. Leaves very variable in size and outline, 
coriaceous, petiolate, oblong, lanceolate, oblanceolate, 
obovate or elliptical, including the sometimes elon- 
gated petiole six to seven inches long, but usually 
two to four, obtuse or rounded, always cuneate at 
the base, quite entire, veins inconspicuous ; stipules 
large, thick, ovate, or nearly round, hairy within, 
brown, very deciduous. Flowers sweet-scented, yellow, 
pentamerous, about half inch across, arranged in small, 
dense, terminal, shortly-stalked cymes. Pedicels shorter 
than the flowers, slightly puberulous. Calyx-limb reduced 
to a fringed rim. Corolla-lube slightly widened upwards, 
straight, scarcely three lines long, bearded at the top 
within; lobes ovate, about half as loug as the tube, 
scarcely acute, slightly recurved. Stamens slightly pro- 
truded. Style scarcely as long as the stamens. Fruit 
globose, about one-fifth of an inch in diameter, two-seeded ; 
seeds having conspicuously ruminated albumen.— W. 
Hotting Hemsleij. 



Rhoi?;itL *7 ll ' P?'? u ceum; 3 ' n PP er ^-thirds of corolla laid open, 
f2 attachment of the stamens and the hairy throat ; 4 and 5, anther 
6, cluster of fruit ; 7, cross section of a fruit and seed -.-all except 6 enlarged 



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Tab. 7912.— SEKECIO TANGUTICUS. 
„ 7913.— DRAB A GILLIESII. 
„ 7914.— IRIS BUCHARICA 
„ 7915.— ALOE CAMERONI. 
„ 7916.— PSYCHOTRIA CAPENSIS. 



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Tab. 7917. 
ARECA? MiOHOLiTZii. 

Native of New Guinea. 

Nat. Ord. Palm^e. — Tribe Akece^. 
Genus Areca, Linn. ; (Benth. et Eooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 883.) 



A jieca ? Micholitzii ; palma parva, dum jnvenis florens ; stirps hue depicta inter 
5 et 6 ped. alta (interdum usque ad 9 ped. alta, fide Micholitz), caudice 
gracili circiter 1^ poll, diametro levi glabro annulato, internodiis 1-2- 
pollicaribus, basi valde attenuate supra terram omnino radicibus aereia 
.sustentato, foliis glabris petiolatis pinnatisectis apice furcatis circiter 
3| ped. longis, segmentis nunc 5 vel 7 duobus superioribus alte con- 
fluentibus exceptis alternis nunc 6 vel 8 oppositis pauci-vel pluriplicatis 
costatis que basi latis discretis inferioribus falcato-oblongis acuminatis 
integris casteris quadrato-oblongis pluri- vel multifidis apicibus sub- 
acutis, petioli vagina elougata turgida inflorescentiam juvenilem 
vestiente, petiolo supra vaginam subtrigono, spathis evolutis in 
axillis foliorum delapsorum solitariis aimplicibus cymbiformibua 8-9 
poll, longis levibus glabria nitidis flavo-viridibus intua argenteo- 
nitidis longitudinaliter multistriatis breviter valideque stipitatis apice 
rotundatis ante dehiscentiam ventre leviter concavia cito deciduis, apathia 
secundariis ad bracteas parvas vel minimaa reductis, spadice monoico 
arrecto simpliciter ramoso circiter 1 ped. longo 9 poll, lato pallide viridi 
undique minute lepidoto ramia saepius circiter 8 distichia divaricatis 
crassis compressis nexuosis coutinuis suraum gradatim attenuatis (nee 
eubito fere nliformibua ut in speciebus nonnullis Arecse genuinse), bracteia 
bracteolisque minutia vel obsoletis, floribus sessilibus subdistichis in 
ramorum dimidio inferiore ternis quorum 2 exterioribus ^intermedio? 
in dimidio auperiore geminatis utroque <?, floribus $ glabris eburneis 3-4 
lin. longia articulatia inferioribus juxta $ positis ante spathaj dehiscentiam 
expansis cito deciduie, calyce minuto tridentato, petalis 3 valvatis crassis 
oblongo-ovatis obtusis, staminibus 6 petalia paullo brevioribus, pistillodio 
obiongo trifurco, floribus ? glabris viridibus, sepalis 3 crassis coriaceis late 
ovat's obtusis circiter 4 lin. longia arete imbricatis, petalis 3 sepalia 
eimilibus tenuioribus arete imbricatis, staminodiis 6 minutia e basi lata 
subito acuminatis, ovario obiongo glabro uniloculari uniovulato, stigmata 
sessili, ovulo basilari, fructu ignoto. 
A. Micholitzii, Sander, Gat. PI. 1895, p. 46. Kew Bulletin, Additional 
Series, vol. iv. (1900), p. 40 (absque descriptione). 



This palm was discovered in New Guinea by Mr. 
Micholitz, collector for Messrs. Sander & Co., of St. Albans, 
and it was advertised for sale in 1895, when a plant was 
acquired for the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. It flowered 
in March of the present year, but it has produced no fruit. 
In reply to our inquiries, Messrs. Sander report that they 
received only a few seeds and the plants are all dispersed, 
October 1st, 1903. 



and they could give no particulars beyond Mr. Micholitz's 
note that it was very distinct and ornamental, and the 
tallest stems he had seen were about nine feet high. 
Until fruit and seed are known, the genus of this palm 
must remain doubtful ; but it will probably prove gene- 
rically distinct from Areca. A detailed description is 
given above, from which it will be seen that it differs in 
several particulars from the typical species of Areca, such 
as A. Catechu, L. and A. triandra, Roxb., and it is still 
further removed from the section Balano carpus. It is one 
of the comparatively few palms of which the stem or 
caudex is entirely supported by aerial roots from a very 
early stage of growth, if not actually from the first stage 
after germination. 

Descr. — A small palm, glabrous in all parts, flowering 
when quite young. Stem slender, not known to exceed 
nine or ten feet in height, as figured here, between five 
and six feet high, and one and a half inch in diameter, 
tapering at the base, and entirely supported above ground 
by aerial roots, banded, unarmed ; internodes one to two 
inches long. Leaves glabrous, petiolate, pinnatisect, 
forked at the apex, about three and a half feet long ; seg- 
ments either five or seven and alternate, except the 
uppermost confluent pair, or six or eight and opposite, 
usually four- to eight-ribbed and folded, broad at the base, 
distinctly separated or contiguous, lower ones falcate- 
oblong, acuminate, entire, the rest quadrate-oblong, about 
four- to eight-fid, the tips acute ; petiole having an elongated, ' 
turgid sheath usually enclosing a young inflorescence, 
somewhat trigonous above the sheath. Spathes solitary 
in the axils of fallen leaves, shortly and stoutly stalked, 
simple, boat-shaped, eight to nine inches long, outside 
smooth, shining, yellow-green<, inside silvery° shining, 
striated longitudinally, rounded at the tip, slightly con- 
cave on the upper side before opening, falling away almost 
directly after opening; secondary spathes reduced to 
small or minute bracts. Spadix monoecious, ascending, 
simply branched, about a foot long and nine inches across, 
pale green, studded with minute scales ; branches usually 
about eight, in two rows, spreading, thick, compressed, 
Z1 gzag, gradually tapering upwards (not almost thread-like 
as m some of the genuine species of Areca) ; bracts and 



bracteoles very small or obsolete. Flowers glabrous, 
sessile, in two rows, clustered in threes in the lower part 
of the branches, the lateral male, the central female, in 
pairs in the upper part of the branches, both male. Male 
flowers ivory-white, one-quarter to one-third of an inch 
long, the lower ones opening before the spathe; calyx 
minute, three-toothed ; petals three, valvate, thick, oblong- 
ovate, obtuse ; stamens six, shorter than the petals ; pistil- 
lode oblong, trifurcate. Female flowers larger, green, or 
yellow-green ; sepals three, thick, coriaceous, broadly 
ovate, obtuse, about one-third of an inch long, closely im- 
bricate; petals three, similar to the sepals but thinner, 
closely imbricate ; staminodes six, minute, broad at the 
base, and abruptly acuminate; ovary oblong, glabrous, 
one-celled ; stigma sessile ; ovule solitary, basal. Fruit 
unknown. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, a female flower and two lateral male flowers ; 2, a male flower ; 3, a 
section of the Bame, showing the pistillode and some of the stamens; 4, a 
female flower in a more advanced stage attached to the branch; 5, section of 
a female flower showing three staminodes ; 6, gynasceum, with a portion 
of the wall of the ovaiy removed, showing the solitary basal ovule: — all 
enlarged. 



7918 



:-!"\ 



£Z 
















i 



MSdeUNFatcKKtK. 



•V.v ' .> 



vmL 4 



nt Brooks D ay iSon Lt a Imp 



L Reeve &c C ° London. 



Tab. 7918. 

COTYLEDON (Echeveria) pulvinata. 

Native of Mexico. 



Nat. Ord. CfiASSULACE^B. 
Genus Cotyledon, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 659.) 



Cotyledon (Echeveria) pulvinata; frnticulus pedalis, robnstus, carnosus, 
pluricaulis v. a basi ramosus, caulibua ramisve divaricatis J-J poll, 
crassis priraam dense argenteo-velutinis demum ferrugineis, internodiis 
brevibus, foliis patulis 2-3 polL longis sessilibus spathulato-obovatis 
oblongisve obtusis erasse carnosis utrinque convexis densissirne argenteo- 
velutinis pilis demum retrorsis pallide viridibus, floribus f-pollicaribus in 
ramulos simplices elongatos foliosos ascendentes dispositis spicatim race- 
mosis velutiais, bracteis foliaceis inferioribus pollicaribus, pedicellis brevi- 
bns crassis, calycis segmentis ovato*lanceolatis acutis erectis viridibns*, 
corolla calyceduplolongiore urceolato-campanulatorubro-aurantiaco, tubo 
brevi, segmentis oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis apicibas reeurvia dorso 
obtuse carinatis marginibus pallidis, staminibus corolla triente brevioribus, 
antheris lineari-oblongis apiculatis, disei glandulis depressis lunatis, 
ovarii carpellis oblongo-ovoideis teretibua in stylos breves inclusos 
attenuatis, stigmatibus capitellatis. 

C. pulvinata, Hook.f. 

Echeveria pulvinata, Rose, tned. 



Cotyledon pulvinata differs from the majority of its con- 
geners in its branching habit, scattered leaves, spiciform 
raceme and clothing of velvety, silvery, white hairs, which 
turn brown on the branches, and are reflexed in age on the 
leaves. It has slight claims to be placed in the genus 
Echeveria of De Candolle, which is reduced to Cotyledon in 
the " Genera Plantarum," but this rests only on the costato 
corolla-lobes, for it has not the foliaceous sepals upon 
which mainly the genus was established. But I under- 
stand that Dr. J. N. Rose and Dr. N. L. Britton are 
engaged on a revision of the whole of the North American 
Crassulacese, and that they propose considerable generic 
alterations by the creation of several new ones. There- 
fore I will not further discuss the question of generic 
limits here. 

The plant figured was received at Kew in 1900 from the 
United States National Museum, Washington, and it 
flowered in the Succulent House in March of the present 
year. 

October 1st, 1903. 



Descr. — A small, very stout, fleshy shrub, seven to eight 
inches high (in the specimen figured), branching below and 
upwards, sometimes from the root ; covered densely with 
a silvery, velvety tomentum, which becomes rusty on the 
stems, and retrorse on the foliage. Leaves two to three 
inches long, sessile, sub-rosulate towards the tips of the 
spreading branches, spathulately obovate or oblong, obtuse, 
thickly fleshy, convex on both surfaces, nerveless, pale 
green. Flowers three-fourths of an inch long, erect or 
inclined, disposed in a spiciform raceme terminating an 
elongate, ascending, stout, leafy branch, orange^red. 
Bracts leaf-like, the lower an inch long, the upper gradually 
smaller. Pedicels very short and stout. Calyx about half 
as long as the corolla, green ; segments ovate-lanceolate, 
acute, erect. Corolla urceolately campanulate, tube short; 
segments oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, dorsally velvety 
and obtusely keeled, margins nearly glabrous, pale, tip's 
spreading or recurved. Stamens about one-third shorter 
than the corolla-segments ; anthers linear-oblong, apicu- 
late. Dish-glands lunate. Carpels narrowly ovoid, terete, 
narrowed into short, subulate styles ; stigmas capitellate.^ 
*/. i), 11. 

«lSfi 7 fl ;° We / r; 2 ' 8C S me ? t of corolla and stamens; 3, glands of disk and 
pistil :— all enlarged ; i, reduced view of whole plant. 



7919 




M. S. <ial J.N.Rtch ktii. 



TfincentBroolra:DayA:ScmLt£Irap 



Ij.Reevo &.C? LojvAoji- 



Tab. 7919. 
LYSIMACHIA crispidens. 

Native of Central China. 

Nat. Ord. Primulacb^. — Tribe LysihaciiiejE. 
Genus Lysimachia, Linn.; (Benth. et RooJc.f. Gen. Flant. vol. ii. p. 635.) 



Lysimagoia. crispidens; herba perennis, nunc subscaposa, scapis numerosis 
gracilibns, nunc, ut in figura, caule ramose- vere foliato, nndique glaber- 
rima, 5-10 poll, alta, foliis crassinsculis subcarnosis margine crispato- 
dentatis undulatis rubro tinctis radicalibu8 rosulatia obovato-spathulatia 
vel interdarn fere orbicularibaa 1-3 poll, longis deorsum attenuatis vel 
interdum subpetiolatia caulinis interdam nonnullis radicalibas similibus 
saapins omnibus multo minoribus bracteiformibus alternia ovatis vel 
lanceolatis sessilibus semiamplexicaulibus sursam gradatim minoribus, 
floribus numerosissimia in axillis bractearum solitariis longe graciliterque 
pedicellatis nutantibus roseis 6-9 lin. diametro, pedicellis bracteia longiori- 
bna post anthesin arcuatirn reemvis, calycia segmentia fere liberie ovato- 
lanceolatis corollas tubam excedentibua acutis paucidenticulatis, corolla? 
tubo brevi cylindrico lobi8 obovatis rotundatis denticulatis, stamiuibus 
inclusia filamentis medio connatis, antheris pilia paucis instructis, gynseceo 
glabro, stylo stamina vix asquante stigmate parvo capitato, capsula 
globosa glabra 5-valvi valvis calycis segmentis oppositis brevioribus, 
seminibus parvia circiter 20-25 angnlatis minute punctatis. 

Lysimachia crispidens, Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxvi. (1889) 
p. 50, pi. 1. 

Stimpsonia criapidens, ETance in Journ. Bot. vol. xviii. (1880), p. 234. 



Lysimachia, Ghrysosplenium t and several other genera 
represented in the British Flora by two or three species, 
have attained their maximum development in China, where 
the species are numerous and highly diversified. Of Lysi- 
machia alone thirty-five Chinese species are enumerated in 
the work cited above, including thirteen previously un- 
described, and since then twenty-five additional new species 
have been recorded from the same country, making a total 
of sixty species ! They present a great variety in habit, 
foliage, and flowers. Specially remarkable are: L. paridi- 
formis, Franch. (Bot. Mag. t. 7226); L. insignis, Hemsl. 
(Hook. Ic. PI. t. 2034); L. pterantha, Hemsl. (Journ. Linn. 
Soc. vol. xxvi. p. 56, t. 2) ; L. involucrata, Hemsl. (Journ. 
Linn. Soc. vol. xxix. t. 31), and L. alpestris, Champ., the 
last having rosulate leaves, resembling those of a Drosera. 
The genus Lysimachia numbers upwards of one hundred 
species, and it has a wide range in the northern hemisphere, 
October 1st, 1903. 



and it is also represented in South America, South Africa, 
Australia, and the Pacific Islands, including six species in 
the Hawaian group. Some of the last are shrubs five to 
eight feet high. 

L. crispidens, Hemsl., was first collected by Mr. T. 
Watters, near Ichang, Hupeh, and described by Dr. 
Hance, who erroneously referred it to the genus Stimp- 
sonia. It has since been collected in the same Province 
by Dr. A. Henry and Mr. E. H. Wilson, Collector for 
Messrs, James Veitch & Sous. The plant figured was 
raised from seed sent home by Mr. Wilson. It is a very 
pretty and highly floriferous plant, which has not yet, so 
far as I am aware, reached its best under cultivation. 
Judging rather from the wild specimens than those 
cultivated, it ought to have a future in European gardens. 

Descr. — A perennial herb, sometimes sub-scapose with 
numerous slender scapes, sometimes with a branched stem 
(as in the plant figured) bearing true leaves, glabrous 
throughout, five to six inches high. Leaves rather thick, 
and somewhat fleshy, margin crisply toothed, undulate, 
tinged with red ; radical ones rosulate, obovate, spathulate, 
or sometimes nearly orbicular, one to three inches long, 
tapering downwards or sub-petiolate ; cauline some- 
times like the radical in the lower part of the stem, but 
usually all smaller and bract-like, alternate, ovate, or lan- 
ceolate, sessile, more or less stem-clasping, and gradually 
smaller upwards. Flowers numerous, solitary in the axils 
of the bracts, on long, slender pedicels, rose-pink, half to 
three-quarters of an inch in diameter. Pedicels longer 
than the bracts, strongly recurved in fruit. Calyx- 
segments ovate-lanceolate, "longer than the corolla-tube, 
acute, few-toothed. Corolla-tube short, cylindrical ; lobes 
obovate-oblong, minutely toothed . Stamens included in the 
corolla; filaments connate to the middle ; anthers having a 
few hairs near the tips. Ovary glabrous ; style scarcely 
equalling the stamens; stigma small, capitate. Capsule 
small, globose, five-valved, valves opposite to and shorter 
than the calyx-lobes. Seeds about twenty to twenty-five, 
very small, angular, minutely punctate.— W. B. H. 



3 T\}'JJ nSe T m * and V ^ °- Cal - yx ; 2 ' P art of eorolla and three stamens; 
3, amhoxaum ; 4 a stamen showing inner face of anther :— all enlarged. 



7020 




M.S dcl.J.N.Pitchhth. 



AfinceniBrooliBDay&SoTirfliTip 



LReeve&C° London 



Tab. 7920. 
tulipa p1lestans. 

Native of Bokhara, 

Nat. Ord. Liliaces. — Tribe Toxipe.*:. 
Genua Tulipa, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 818.) 



Tulipa prsestans ; species ex affiaitate T. Kaufmannianse, Kegel, a qua differt 

foliis puberulis petalis basi immaeulatid ovario staminibus longiore. 
T. praestans P Mast, in Gard. Ghron. 1903, vol. i. p. 324, f. 126. 
T. praestans, Hoog, loc. tit. p. 364. Journ. Hort. 3rd Series, vol. xxxiv. p. 335. 



The genus Tulipa is now illustrated in the Magazine by 
thirty plates, mostly of distinct species. In .1805 a 
figure (t. 839) was given of T. suaveolens, Roth, then and 
now generally recognized as the Due van Thol tulip of 
the Dutch, the origin of which was unknown. The late 
Dr. E. Regel, who was a specialist in tulips, first recorded 
T. suaveolens (Acta Horti Petropolitani, vol. ii. (1873), 
p. 455) as a native of the South of Europe; but he sub- 
sequently received specimens from his son Albert of the 
plant here figured, from Bokhara, and at once came to the 
conclusion that it was the wild state of T. suaveolens, 
Roth. Among the specimens sent he distinguished three 
varieties (Act. Hort. Petrop. vol. viii. (1884), p. 650), but 
the cultivation of bulbs from the same source caused him 
to modify his views, and he combined the varieties uuder 
the name of Tulipa suaveolens var. sylvestris. 

Following the appearance in the Gardener s Chronicle of 
an uncoloured figure, cited above, of T. praestans, Mr. John 
Hoog contributed a concise history of the plant and its 
affinities. He agrees with other writers in identifying 
T. suaveolens, Roth, with the Due Van Thol tulip, having 
himself examined Roth's herbarium specimens still pre- 
served in the State Museum of Oldenburg. But he regards 
T. praestans as specifically distinct from that species ; a 
view ultimately snared, it seems, by the late Dr. E. Regel, 
who wa3 prevented by bad health from publishing it as a 
new species. Mr. Hoog gives the following description 

October 1st, 1903. 



of T. prsestans, which he considers neither complete nor 
final : — 

"Bulb rounded, about one inch in diameter, with a 
particularly thick, leathery skin, the latter being almost 
glabrous inside. Peduncle varying in height from a few 
inches to one and a half feet, covered, as well as the 
leaves, with minute, closely set, white hairs, and bearing 
from one to many flowers. Flower-segments all uniform 
in shape, pointed, and of a peculiar light, scarlet-vermilion 
colour." Botanically, he says, it is perhaps nearest T. 
Kaufmanniana, Hegel. This is figured in the Magazine 
(tab. 6837), and is very variable in colour, but not 
including scarlet and vermilion shades. 

I must confess that I cannot follow the late Dr. E. 
Kegel and Mr. Hoog in regarding T. prsestans as a tulip 
specifically distinct from T. suaveolens, and " more deserv- 
ing of a specific name than any other ; " but then I am 
not an expert in tulips. Still it doubtless ranks high 
among the early- flowering kinds. 

The plant here figured was purchased by Kew from 
Messrs Van Tubergen (J. Hoog), and it flowered in the 
Alpine House in March of the present year. 

It may be useful to give the corrections here of two 
errors in the names of tulips figured in the Magazine, 
due, in part, it may be added, to conflicting views at 
different periods. Tab. 6635, to which the name T 
Borszczowi is given, is T. Kolpakoivskiana, Regel; and that 
figured under the latter name (t. 6710) is T. Ostrowshiana, 
Kegel, as explained by him (Qartev flora, vol. xxxiii. p. 355). 
1. Borszczoivi, or, as Regel himself afterwards wrote it 
Borsczouu, is a very distinct species, of which no figure has 
yet appeared in tne Magazine.— W. B. H 



Fi 
3, 
enlarged 



Fig. 1, portion of leaf showing the hairs; 2, anclroecium and jjvnieceum- 
n-nt v,ew of a stamen; 4, back view of the same; 5, gyna&am ™li 



7921 




M. S.del. J.N Pitch lith 



Vincent Brool<s,Day8t Son Lt? Imp 



Tab. 7921. 

LISSOCHILUS purfuratus. 

Nut ire of Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Oiichide*. — Tribe Yandex. 
Genus Lissochilus, R. Br.; (Benth. et Booh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 536.) 



Lissochilus, purpuratus ; herba terrestris, tuberosa, glabra, foliis hysteranthns, 
tuberibus reniformibus iis Solani tuberosi similibus in catenas fere tripe- 
dales dispositis (Barter), foliis lanceolatis 1-2-ped. longis medio usque ad 
2 poll, latis acutis plicatis circiter 7-nervis, nervis secundaria numero- 
sissimis, scapis plantaram vetustarum numerosis erectis 2-4£ ped altis, 
parte florente 9-15 poll, longa.basi dense vaginatis vaginis sursum gradatim 
remotioribus minoribusque snpremis bracteiforrmbus acutis, rlonbus 
roseo-purpureis circiter l£ poll, diametro, pedicello cum ovano 9-18 Ira. 
lontro, bracteis membrannceis linearibus acutis pedicello brevionbus 
marcescendbus, sepalis petalisque similibus concolonbus roseis anguste 
oblongis vix acut""s nndulatis, labello trilobate lobis lateralibus brevionbus 
rotundatis pallidis intermedio purpureo ovato-oblongo supra 3-cannato 
carinis cristato-undulatis atropurpurei*, calcare brevi obtuso. 

L. pnrpuratns, Lincll. in Journ. Linn. Soe. vol. vi. (1862) p. 133. Behhh-f.in 
Flora, 1865, p. 188; Otia But. Hamb. vol. n. pp. 75, 114. Bolfe tn M. 
Trop.'A/r. vol. vii. p. 79. 

Limodorum cristatum, Sw. in Schrad. Neues Journ. vol. i. p. 36; Lindl. Gen. 
& Sp. Orch. p. 185. 

Limodorum articulatum, Schum. Sf Thonn. Beslr. Guin. PI. p. 339. 

Eulophia articulata, Lindl. Gen. & Sp. Orch. p. 181 

Galeandra longibracteata, Lindl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. vi. p. 133. 

Eulopbia longibracteata, Darand & Schinz, Conspect. Fl. Afr. vol. v. p. 22. 



Lissochilus and Eulophia, established by R. Brown, 
mainly on characters of the lip, the one smooth the other 
crested, now number between them about one hundred and 
fifty tropical African species, and, altogether, nearly three 
hundred species, very difficult to allocate between the two 
proposed genera. Mr. Rolfe (Fl. Trap. Aft: vol. vii. p. 70), 
notes that Lissochilus " approaches Eulophia very closely, 
but the majority of the species are very easily separated 
by the small spreading or reflexed petals [sepals], and the 
broad, often differently coloured petals." And he retains 
purpuratus in Lissochilus, though it is not one of those 
easily separated from Eulophia, as it has similar sepals and 
petals and a crested lip. However, as Lissochilus is the 
older genus there is no question of a transfer here. 

October 1st, 1903. 



L. purpuratus, Lindl., appears to be very common in 
Upper Guinea, W. tropical Africa, and it has also been 
collected by Dr. Schweinf urth in British East Africa, and 
in the Congo Free State by J. Dybowski. The plant 
figured was sent from Abyssinia to Kew by A. B. Wylde, 
Esq., author of " Modern Abyssinia," with a note that it 
" grows anywhere above seven thousand feet." But con- 
sidering that this plant inhabits the lowlands of western 
tropical Africa, it is very probable that this note was 
intended for some other plant sent at the same time. 

L. purpuratus, Lindl., should not be confused with 
L. Krebsii, var. purpurata, H. N. Ridley (Gard. Chron. 
1885, vol. ii. p. 102 ; Warner's Orchid Album, vol. vi. pi. 
259), a native of South Africa. 

Descr. — A terrestrial, tuberous, glabrous herb, "forming 
large clumps" (Dr. Rowland). Tubers " similar to those 
of a kidney potato, produced in chains nearly a yard long " 
(Barter). Leaves lanceolate, one to two feet long, and as 
much as two inches broad in the middle, acute, plicate, 
about seven-nerved, with numerous secondary nerves. 
Scapes numerous in old plants, erect, two to four and a 
half feet high, flowering-part from nine to fifteen inches 
long, closely sheathed at the base; sheaths smaller, and 
more distant upward; uppermost ones bract-like, acute. 
Floivers rose and purple, about one and a half inch in 
diameter ; pedicels, including ovary, three-quarters to one 
and a half inch long. Bracts membranous, linear, acute, 
shorter than the pedicels, soon shrivelling. Sepals and 
petals similar in shape and colour, narrow-oblong, scarcely 
acute, wavy, rose-pink. Labellum three-lobed ; lateral 
lobes short, rounded, paler coloured; intermediate lobe 
much larger, purple, ovate-oblong, with three crested, 
longitudinal, dark purple ridges. Spur short, obtuse. — 
W. B. H. 

Fig-. 1, labellum and column; 2, anther-case; 3 and 4, pollinia:— all 
enlarged. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 706, OCTOBER, 1903. 



Tab. 7917.— ARECA? MICHOLITZII. 
„ 7918.— COTYLEDON PULVINATA. 
„ 7919— LYSIMACHIA CRISPIDENS. 
„ 7920.— TULIPA PR^STANS. 
,, 7921.— LISSOCHILUS PURPURATUS. 



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7922 




LS.deUUiV 



Vm.centBrool<s,D ay &. £ 



Tab. 7922. 

CLERODENDRON cephalantiium. 

Native of Zanzibar Island. 



Nat. Ord. Verbenace.k. 
Genus Clerodexdron, Linn. ; (Beuth. et Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1155.) 



Clerodendron cephalantiium ; frniex ope petiolorum alte scandens, rmdiqne 
glaber vel cito glabrescens, petiolis noniuillis incrassatis indurati-s spini- 
formibus recurvis armatus ; planta in horto Kewensi culta caulibua 
pluribus fere 20 ped. longis usque ad £ poll, diametro cavis, foliis 
oppositis vel interdum alternis distincte petiolatis teuuibus demum 
coriaceis ovato-lanceolatis vel oblongo-lanceolatis usque ad 10 poll, longis 
• sed sa3pius minoribus acuminatis subobtusis basi cuueatis vel rotundatis, 
venis primariis lateralibus utrinque 3 vel 4 subtus elevatis, petiolis 
nonnullis medio abscissis auctis persistentibus, floribus dense cymoso- 
capitatis albo-roseis cum staminibus exsertis 4-5 poll, longis brevissime 
pedicellatis, inflorescentiis saepius terminalibus interdum 9-10 poll, 
diametro, additis nonnnllis lateralibtfs minoribus, bracteis bracteolisque 
parvis lanceolatis ovatisve, calycis roseo-purpurei lobis oblongo-lanceolatis 
apiculatis tnbo longioribus 4-5 lin. longis, corollas albas tubo gracllimo 
apicem versus curvato 3-3J poll. longo, lirabi lobis oblongis leviter 
recurvis ina?qualibus 6-9 lin. longis, Btaminibus longe exsertis, filamentia 
filiformibus rubris, stylo stamina asquante. 

C. cephalantbum, Oliver in Hook. Ie. PI. t. 1559. Gard. Ghron. 1888, vol. i. 
p. 652. 

C. capitatum var. cepbalantbum, Baker in Dyer Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. v. p. 30o. 



This handsome climbing shrub was brought to Kew by- 
Sir John Kirk from the Island of Zanzibar, in 1886, and 
it grows vigorously and flowers freely in the Palm House. 
There are flowering specimens in the Herbarium from this 
source bearing the dates, May 9th, 1888, and June 19th, 
1889 ; and the inflorescence here figured was produced in 
March of the present year. It is of only medium dimen- 
sions, as our space is insufficient to show the largest ones. 
Though not so brilliantly coloured as some of its con- 
geners, Clerodendron cephalanthum is a very showy object 
where it has space to develop. Mr. J. G. Baker, in the place 
cited above, treats it as a variety of G. capitatum, Solium. 
& Thonn. (Bob. Mag. t. 4355), and it has very slender 
claims to specific rank; but from a horticultural stand- 
point it is quite distinct from typical capitatum. It 
climbs, in part at least, by means of the modified petioles 
of some of the leaves. During development, the lower 

November 1st, 1903. 



half of the petiole thickens, and the upper part at length 
disarticulates, carrying the blade with it. The hardened 
lower part persists in the form of a rigid, woody, recurved 
spine. 

Tropical Africa is the centre of the greatest concen- 
tration of the genus Clerodendron, no less than seventy 
species being already on record therefrom. Noteworthy 
among the African species in cultivation are G. Thomsons, 
Balf., and G. macrosiphon, Hook. f. (Bot. Mag. t. 6695); 
the latter is another of Sir John Kirk's numerous intro- 
ductions. 

Descr. — A tall shrub, climbing by means of modified 
petioles, glabrous or nearly so, some of the branches 
armed with the spine-like, persistent petioles. Stems as 
much as twenty feet long, and half an inch thick, hollow 
between the nodes. Leaves distinctly stalked, thin, at 
length somewhat coriaceous, ovate-lanceolate or oblong- 
lanceolate, as much as ten inches long, but usually smaller, 
acuminate, somewhat obtuse, cuneate or rounded at the 
base ; primary lateral veins three or four on each side. 
Floivers densely cymose-capitate ; cymes terminal, some- 
times with lateral, smaller ones. Bracts and bracteoles 
small and inconspicuous. Calyx showy, about nine lines 
long, red, with oblong-lanceolate lobes. Gorolla white ; 
tube very slender, three to three and a half inches long, 
curved near the top; lobes of the limb oblong, unequal, 
slightly recurved, six to nine lines long. Stamens exserted ; 
filaments filiform, red. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, a young corolla laid open, showing the position of the stamens in 
the bad ; 2, ovary ; 3 upper part of style and stigma : — all enlarged. 



7923 




M.SdflU.N.Eiichlilk 



■Vincent BrooTa'Dayft-SonJiSfirT 



LReeve &_C° "LaniLon- 



. Tab. 7923. 
IMPATIENS PALOIFBR. 

Native of the Silckim Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Geraniaceje. — Tribe Balsamine.e. 
Genus Impatiens, Linn.; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 277.) 



Impatjkns falcifer; berba annua, 1-2 pedalis, gliiberrima, canle decumbente 
ramoso terete folioso, foliis 1-4 poll, longis alternis sessilibus et petiolatis 
ovatis ovato-oblongisve acutis acuminatisve serratis basi acutis, margini- 
bus minute ciliolatis eglandulosis, nervis 6-8-jugi-s petiolo £-1 poll, 
longo, glandulis stipularibus minutis pulvinatis, pedunculis axillaribus 
\~\ poll, longis solitariis 1-rarissime 2-floris medio bracteolatis basi 
ebracteatis fructu d<-flexis, bracteolis setaceia v. lanceolatis viridibus, 
floribus ringeutibus 1-1^ poll, longis aureis vexillo loboque f'alcit'ormi 
alarum sanguineo maculatis, sepalis 2 j-J poll, longis ovatis ovato- 
rotundalisve apiculatis viridibus, vexillo erecto galeajformi costa dorso 
incrassato apice mucronato, alarum lobo basilari parvo roluudato integro 
v. lobulato, distali multo majore bilobubtto lobulis divaricatis laterale 
lineari-oblongo recurvo falcato terminali amplo oblongo apice rotundato, 
auricula dorsali 0, labelli parvi limbo infuudibulari in calcar J-l poll, 
longnm rectum v. incurvum attenuato, filamentis Iinearibus, autheria 
minutis, capsulis 1-1J poll, longis pendulis, Iinearibus cylindraceis, 
seminibua T V-i poll, longis oblongis rugulosis f uniculo carnosulo. 

1. falcifer, Hoolc.f. 

I. serrata, Benth. partim. Hook. f. & Thorns, in Joum. Linn. Soc. vol. iv. 
(1860) p. 136. Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. i. p. 473. Herb. Ind. Or. 
Hook.f. & Thorns, n. 88. 



Impatiens falcifer belongs to a group of the genus with 
axillary, simple or forked, one to three-flowered peduncles, 
which are bracteate usually in the middle, or when forked 
on one of the pedicels, and pendulous, very slender, elon- 
gate capsules. OP this group there are several North 
Indian species, including /. scabritla, DG. (I. tviconui, 
Lindl. ; Bot. Mag. t. 4051). Its nearest ally is /. serrata, 
Benth. in "Wall. Cat. n. 4771, also a Sikkim plant, growing 
at similar elevations, which is so similar in habit, foliage, 
inflorescence, and capsule that it is impossible to dis- 
tinguish them without the flower. The description of the 
latter in the " Flora of British India " includes both. The 
chief differences between them are, that in I, serrata the 
flowers are white, the sepals lanceolate and acuminate, and. 
the distal lobe of the wings quite entire. The condition 
of the flowers of Wallich's specimens of I. serrata in the 
November IsTj 1903. 



Linnsean Herbarium is so bad, that it was with great 
difficulty that I determined their structure. The Sikkim 
specimens were distributed under No. 89, those of Lfalcifer 
are numbered 88. 

Lfalcifer is a rather common species in pastures and 
shaded places of the Sikkim Himalaya, at elevations of 
eight to ten thousand feet. The figure here given is from 
plants raised at Kew from seeds received by the writer in 
1902 from Major Prain, Superintendent of the Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Calcutta, which flowered in a frame in 
May of the present year, but failed to ripen seed. 

Descr. — A weak, glabrous, usually decumbent, branched 
annual, one to two feet high or long. Leaves one to four 
inches long, alternate, sessile, or petioled, ovate, or ovate- 
lanceolate, serrate, acuminate, base acute, or narrowed 
into a petiole an inch long or shorter; margins minutely 
ciliolate, eglandular ; stipular glands minute, pulvinate. 
Peduncles solitary, simple, one-flowered, and bracteolate in 
the middle, never at the base, very rarely forked and two- 
flowered, with a bracteole on one or more of the pedicels, 
cleflexed in fruit. Flowers ringent, one to one and a half 
inches long, golden-yellow, spotted with blood-red on the 
standard, and on the falcate lobule of the distal lobe of the 
lip. Sepals two, one-seventh to one-fourth of an inch 
long, broadly ovate, or sub-orbicular, cuspidate, green. 
Standard erect, galeate, trapezoid when spread out, mucro- 
nate. Wivg-petal with a small basal lobe, and a large, 
spreading distal of two divaricate lobules ; a lower lobule 
linear-oblong, falcateiy recurved, and a much larger, 
oblong terminal one, rounded at the tip. Lip with a 
small, funnel-shaped limb, narrowed into a straight, slender, 
incurved or straight spur, one half to one inch long. 
Capsule one to one and three-quarters of an inch long, 
slender, strict, terete, pendulous. Seeds small, testa 
rucrose. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, portion of stem and petiole with stipulary gland ; 2, portion of leaf- 
margin ; 3, sepal; 4, wing-petal ; 5, young capsule :— all enlarged. 



1924 




M.S.aeYJ.N.HtaklitK 



VincantBroolre DayatSanifHinj) 



X^Rjeeve &-C?X.arLdojv 



Tap,. 7924 
FENDLERA rupicola. 

Native of South-western North America, 



Nat. Ord. Saxifragace.e. — Tribe Hydrangea. 

Genus Fendlera, Ewjelm. & A. Gr.; {Benth, et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. 

p. 643.) 



Fendlera rupicola; frutex erectns, dense ramosns, 3-6 ped. altus, ramig 
rigidissimis cortice striato, foliis in ramulis lateralibus confertis oppositis 
subsessilibns rigide coriaceis deciduis lineari-lanceolatis majoribus circiter 
pollicaribus acutis trinerviis supra scaberulia subtas sericeis fioribus 
albis l^-lf poll, diametro solifariis vel tenuis ramulis brevibus lateralibus 
terminantibus, pedicellis brevibus puberulis ebracteolatis, calycis pubes- 
centis 4-fidi segmentis ovatis subobtusis valvatis, petalis 4 perigynis 
imbricatis extus puberulis ciliolatis ovato-spathulatis unguiculatis venosis 
circiter 9 lin. longis deciduis, staminibus 8 uniseriatia cum petalis in- 
Bertis erectis, filamentis petaloideis apice bicruribus lobis linearibus 
acutis erectis ultra antberam productis antheris introi-sis, ovario serai- 
supero glabra 4-loculari, loculis multiovulatis, Btylo pubescenti, capsula 
fere omnino supera Crustacea vel fere lignosa oblongo-ovoidea 5-7 lin. 
longa septicide 4-valvi, valvis mucronatis, loculis oligospermis, seminibus 
in loculis paucis pendulis imbricatis oblongis 2i-3j lin. longis, testa 
crassa laxa dorso basique alato, ernbryone parvo recto angustissimo 1-lJ 
lin. longo £ lin. lato in albuminis axe posito, cofcyledonibus radicula 
supera longioribus. 

F. rupicola, Engelm. §• A. Gray in Smithton, Contrib. vol. iii. (PL Wright, 
vol. i.) p. 77, t. 5, et vol. v. (PL Wright, vol. ii.) p. 64. Coulter, Man. 
Pot. Pocky Mts. p. 95. Greene in Bull. Torr. Pot. Club, vol. viii. (1881), 
p. 25. Ret). Port. 1891, p. 42, f. 12, et 1899, p. 129, f. 44. Garden $ 
Forest, vol. ii. (1889), p. 112, f. 98. 



Fendlera is a genus of two known species, the second 
being F. utahensis, Greene ( Whipplea utahensis, S. Wats.) 
in the publication cited above. Both, as Prof. Greene 
states, grow on the dry, sunburnt rocks of the interior 
desert region of the south-west — that is of Texas, New 
Mexico, Arizona, and Utah. This information gives some 
clue to the treatment they should receive under cultivation. 
All writers who are familiar with F. rupicola in a wild 
condition, describe it as a very attractive, highly floriferous 
shrub, and Prof. Greene says of it: "A beautiful shrub of 
the mountains of Texas and New Mexico putting forth in 
May a profusion of large white or rose-coloured flowers, 
which give it the aspect of a small peach-tree." 

According to Prof. C. S. Sargent {Garden fy Forest, 
vol. ii. (1889), p. 112, f. 9S) it had already, at that date, 
been some years in cultivation in the Arnold Arboretum, 
where it was quite hardy, flowered profusely, and ripened 

JVu\ I.AiliKK 1ST, 19Uo. 



seed. He describes the petals as bluish white, associated 
with conspicuous', yellow stamens. 

With regard to its introduction into European gardens, 
the date usually given is 1888 ; but there is a specimen 
in the Kew Herbarium, from the garden of Mr. Max 
Leichtlin, of Baden Baden, received through Mr. Gum- 
bleton, of Cork, in 18S2. As will be seen, all our references 
to horticultural publications are of a later date. Mr. 
Ed. Andre, writing in 1899, says "that it succeeds well 
at Lacroix, in Touraine, where it was covered with flowers 
every spring." It has been in cultivation at Kew for 
some years, and it flowered last May, when the drawing 
was made. The plant is growing against the south wall 
of the Orchid House, and is bearing a few more flowers 
now in mid-October. 

There is also a second plant in the Arboretum, four to 
five feet high and three feet through] but it bas, I believe, 
never flowered, and has much deteriorated during the two 
last wet seasons. 

Deter. — An erect, densely branched shrub, three to six 
feet high, with very rigid branches and striated bark. 
Leaves usually clustered on short, lateral branchlets, 
opposite, nearly sessile, rigidly coriaceous, linear-lanceolate, 
the largest about an inch long, acute, three-nerved, scabrid 
above, silky beneath. Flowers white, with yellow anthers, 
one and a quarter to one and a half inches in diameter, soli- 
tary, or in threes, on the lateral branchlets ; pedicels very 
short, slightly hairy, bractless. Calyx pubescent, deeply four- 
lobed ; segments ovate, somewhat obtuse, valvate. Petals 
four, perigynous, imbricate, slightly hairy on the outside 
and ciliolate, ovate- spathulate, distinctly clawed, veined, 
about nine lines long, deciduous. Stamens eight, erect ; 
filaments petaloid, with two narrow, acute, apical lobes 
overtopping the anther. Ovary glabrous at the top, four- 
celled; cells containing many ovules; style hairy. Cap- 
sule almost wholly, superior, crustaceous, or almost woody, 
oblong-ovoid or conical, five to seven lines long, septici- 
dally four-valved ; valves mucronate ; cells several-seeded. 
Seeds oblong, with a loose-celled, thick testa, winged 
dorsally and at the base ; embryo small, straight, in the 
centre of the albumen. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, flower from which the petals have been removed; 2, ventral view of 
a stamen ; 3, dorsal view of the same ; 4, pistil : — all enlarged. 



7925 




deLJ.N.Fitcklith. 



V^^Brooks,!) ay Z-Sm^^ 



Tab. 7925. 
SPH^ROCODON obtusifolium. 

Native of Tropical Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Asclepiadace^e. — Tribe Marsde.vie^. 
Genus SpiiiEaocoDON, Linn. {Benth. et Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 772.) 



Spii.tROCODON, obtusifolium ; planta lignosa caudice nano incrassato perenni, 
caulibus annuis (vel interdum perennis?) nunc (hospitornm absentia P) 
suberectia vel vagantibus nunc volubilibus subsimplicibns florentibus 1-3 
ped. longis pubescentibus, internodii3 foliis saapiua brevioribus (fere 
semper in exemplariis agrestibus), foliis distincte petiolatis molliter 
chartaceis eircumscriptione variabilibus ellipticis ovato-oblongia ovatis 
vel obovato-oblongis saspius 1J-3 poll, longis plus minusve acuminatia 
vel utrinque rotundatia praasipue subtus secus venas pauoas primariaa 
pubescentibus, cymis umbelliformibus ad nodos solitariia breviter pedun- 
culatis 5-15 floris pubescentibus, bracteis minutis, floribus rubro-purpureis 
6-8 lin. diametro pendulis, pedicellis gracilibus 4-8 lin. longis, calycis 
pubescentis segmentis lineari-lanceolatis acutis circiter 2 Tin. longis, 
corollse campanulatae puberulaa lobis deltoideis acutis tubo paullo breviori- 
bus demum recurvis, coronae squamis 5 parvis glanduliformibua tubo 
stamineo supra basin adnatis, staminibus basi corolla? affixis tilamentis 
in tubum connatis, antheris erectis, polliniis in qnoque loculo aolitaiiis 
caudiculia gracillimis, fructu ignoto. 

S. obtusifolium, Benth. in Rook. Ic PI. vol. xii. p. 78, t. 1190. N. E. Brown 
in Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. iv. p. 412. Hiern in Cat. Afr. PI. Welw. vol. i. 
p. 692. K. Schum. in Engl. Pfl. Ost. Afr. 0. p. 326, et in Engl. & Prantl, 
Pflanzenf. vol. iv. pars 2, p. 283, fig. 85. 

S. natalense, Benth. in Hooh. Jc. PI. vol. xii. p. 79. 

S. caffrum, Schlechter in Joum. Bot. 1895, p. 339. 

Tylophora caffra, Meisn. in Hook. Lond. Joum. Bot. vol. ii. (1843), p. 542— 
errore, 442. 

Crongronema Welwitscbii, K. Schum. in Engl. Bot. Jahrb. vol. xvii. p. 145. 



Sphserocodon is a somewhat obscure African genus, of 
which the fruit is unknown. A second species, 8. melan- 
anthus, N. E. Brown, is recorded from W. tropical Africa. 
S. obtusifolium, Benth., inhabits both western and eastern 
regions, ranging in the east from Nile Land to Natal. 

The plant figured was raised from seed sent to Kew 
from Namasi, Nyasa Land, in 1897, by Mr. Kenneth J. 
Cameron, who also sent a dried specimen at the same time. 
The cultivated plant is so much more vigorous than the 
wild, and the flowers so much larger, that they might be 
taken for different species. All the wild specimens are 
November 1st, 1903. 



dwarf in stature, and sub-erect in habit ; but the cultivated 
plant shows a tendency to twining, insomuch as some of 
the branches twine around each other. It is possible that 
it has lost the twining habit so common in the Asclepia- 
clacese through changes in environment in some of the 
districts where it has been collected. 

Descr. — A. perennial, woody plant, with a dwarf, thick 
stock, which produces annual (sometimes perennial ?) 
flowering stems of sub-erect or twining habit. Stems one 
to three feet long, pubescent ; internodes usually shorter 
than the leaves, at least in the wild specimens. Leaves 
petiolate, soft and papery in texture, very variable in out- 
line, from oval to oblong or ovate, mostly from one and a 
half to three inches long, acuminate, or rounded at both 
ends, more or less hairy, especially along the veins 
on the under surface. Cymes or false umbels solitary 
at the joints, shortly stalked, five- to fifteen-flowered, 
pubescent; bracts very small. Flowers purple-red, six 
to eight lines in diameter, pendulous on slender pedi- 
cels. Calyx pubescent ; segments linear-lanceolate, acute, 
about two lines long. Corolla campanulate, puberulous ; 
lobes deltoid, acute, somewhat shorter than the tube, at 
length recurved. Coronal scales five, small, gland-like, 
adnate to the middle of the staminal-tube. Stamens 
attached to the base of the corolla ; filaments connate in a 
tube. Anthers erect ; pollen-masses solitary in each cellj 
with slender caudicles. Fruit unknown. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, an unexpanded flower; 2, corona and gynseceum; 3, pollinia : 
enlarged. 



m 




M. S.3A J.K.FichMh 



Vincent Broola; XW &SonLt d 



X Reeve 4C°LonA. 



Tab. 7926. 
iris geaciltpes. 

Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. IridaceyK. — Tribe Mor^e*. 
Genua Iris, Linn. ; (Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



litis (Evansea) gracilipes; csespitosu, snbscaposa, gracilis, 6-12 poll, alta, 
rhizomate gracili ramoso, caulibus sterilibus brevissimis, foliis, absque 
paucis inferioribus minoribus, membranaceis 3-5 tenuibus linearibus inter- 
num latinsculis 6-12 poll, longis acutissimis circiter 6-nerviis cum inter- 
mediis tenuioribus, caulibus floriferis folia caulorum sterilium vixexcedenti- 
bus 2-vel 3-foliatis 2-vel 3-floris, foliis 2-3 poll, longis, pedunculis gracillimis, 
floribus in spathis brevibus tenuissimis solitariis sessilibus erectis pur- 
pureis vel lilacinis circiter 2 poll, diametro, perianth ii tubo brevissimo, 
limbi segmentis exterioribus oblongis apice emarginatis recurvis medio 
albis purpnreo-striatis 1 uteo- crista tis, interioribus minoribus concoloribus, 
styli cristis concoloribus fimbriato-dentatis, 

I. gracilipes, A. Gray Bot. Jap. in Mem. Amer. Acad. n.s. vol. vi. p. 412. 
Franch. et Savat. Enum. PI. Jap. par3 ii. p. 41. Honzo Zufu, vol. xxiii. 
p. 11, fig. dextr. Baker, Handb. Irid. p. 22. 

I. sibirica, Somohu Zusetsu, vol. ii. p. 10 (11 Jap.), non Linn. 



This elegant little Iris belongs to the small section or 
sub-genus Evansea, distinguished among the rhizomatous 
eeries by having a distinct crest on the lower part of the 
blade and claw of the outer segments of the perianth. 
Mr. Baker, in his u Handbook of the Irideae," enumerates 
eight species, all of which, except the North American 
I. lacustris, Nutt., are, or have been, in cultivation. They 
are : — I. nepalensis, D. Don. (Sweet's British Flower 
Garden, series 2, t. 11); I. speculate ix, Hance (Bot. Mag. 
t. 6306) ; J. cristata, Ait. (Bot. Mag. t. 41.2) ; /. Milesii, 
Foster (Bot. Mag. t. 6889) ; I. tectorum, Maxim. (Bot. Mag. 
t. 6118), and I. japonica, Thunb., syn. I. chinensis, Curt. 
(Bot. Mag. t. 373). With the exception of /. cristata, a 
native of the Eastern States of North America, all the 
species named inhabit Asia, ranging from the North-west 
Himalaya to China and Japan. 

I. gracilipes is in cultivation both at Kew and Cam- 
bridge. Kew procured it from Mr. Max Leichtlin in 
September, 1902, and it flowered in pots in a cold frame, 
and also in an open bed during last spring. Mr. R. I. 
November 1st, 1903. 



Lynch sent flowering specimens from Cambridge in April, 
without any information of their origin. It is one of the 
most graceful species of the genus, and merits attention 
where the larger, more showy ones would be out of place. 
There are several Japanese, not specially localized speci- 
mens in the Kew Herbarium, including one of Gray's type ; 
but there is a note that the species grows in humid 
situations. 

Descr. — A tufted, slender herb, six to twelve inches 
high, with a slender, branching rootstock. Stems of two 
kinds, flowerless and flowering ; the former very short, 
and bearing from three to five narrow, thin leaves, six to 
twelve inches long, very acute, six-nerved, with secondary, 
thinner nerves. Scapes or flowering stems about the same 
height, bearing two or three short leaves, and about the 
same number of flowers. Spathes one-flowered, on very 
slender peduncles. Flowers sessile, erect, purple or lilac, 
about two inches in diameter. Falls oblong, notched at 
the tip, recurved, white in the middle, striped with purple, 
and yellow-crested. Standards smaller, self-coloured. 
Style-crests of the same colour, irregularly fringe-toothed. — 
W. B. H. 



Figs. 1 and 2, ventral and dorsal views of an anther ; 3, a style-crest : — all 
enlarged. 



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7927 







Vmo<>rrt.:Bro<As,Day iSonlt^Imj) 



"L. Reeve 6t C9 Loiuion 



Tab. 7927. 
MERYTA Drkhami. 

Native of New Caledonia and New Hebrides. 



Nat. Ord. Araliace^. 
Genus Meryta, Forst.; (Benth. et Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 940.) 



Meryta Denhami ; arbor parva, dioica, trunco gracili ssepius simplici interdum 
fnrcato vel pauci ramoso (specimen in horto kewensi cultum ? circiter 
17 ped. altum, trunco supra medium fnrcato basi 3 poll, diametro, foliia 
maximis 3| ped. longis), foliis alternis coriaceis glabris dimorpbis vel 
heteromorphis, iis plantarum omnino juvenilium linearibus 6-12 poll, 
longis 4-6 lin. latis, iis plantarum adultarum distincte petiolatis ligulatis 
lanceolatis vel oblanceolatis l§-4 ped. longis 2-9 poll, latis grosse undu- 
lato-crenatis apice acntis. vel rotundatis deorsum attenuatis, costa 
crassa, venis primariis latei'alibus prominentibus in crenas excurrentibus, 
petiolo compresso-tereti, inflorescentiis ? capitato-paniculatis folia fere 
a^quantibus in axillis foliorum superiorum subsessilibus, ramis crassis 
carnosis, capitulis multifloris subglobosis li-lj P°^'- diametro pedun- 
culatis, pedunculis crassis lg— 2 poll, longis basi bractea ampla acuminata 
membranacea cito decidua instructis, floribus ? sessilibus vel arete con- 
fertis ima basi connatis flavo-virentibus, calycis limbo obsoleto, petalis 
circiter 10 (7-12) lignlatis recurvis quam stylis vix longioribus, statninibus 
iroperfectis 10, ovario 10-(7-12-) loculari, stylis late stigmatosis sulcatis 
undulatis recurvis, ovulis in loculis solitariis ab apice loculorum pendulis, 
f rnctu ignoto. 

M. Denhami, Seem. Bonplandia, vol. x. 1862, p. 295. 

Aralia reticulata, Hort. 



There are specimens of Meryta Denhami in the Kew 
Herbarium, from a plant which flowered in the Palm 
House in I860, accompanied by drawings and a brief 
description of the floral structure by A. A. Black, then, 
and for too brief a period thereafter, Curator. He found 
the parts of the flower varying from five to nine, and we 
have found them from seven to twelve in the same in- 
florescence. It was introduced to Kew by William Grant 
Milne, a gardener who was on Captain Denham's Expedi- 
tion to the South Sea. He collected it in the Isle of 
Pines, New Caledonia, in 1853, and what appears to be 
the same species has since been collected by Archdeacon 
Comins in the island of Santa Maria, Banks's Group, 
Northern New Hebrides, where it attains a height of 
thirty feet or more, with leaves one to two feet long. 
Apparently all the plants in cultivation were raised from 

December 1st, 1303. 



\ 



Milne's introduction, and only the female is known. 
According to Seemann, in the publication cited above, it 
flowered at Kew again in 1862, and it has often flowered 
since in the Palm House, and more recently in the warm 
end of the Temperate House. 

There are also flowering specimens in the Herbarium, 
and a photograph of the plant from the Botanic Garden, 
Cork, sent by Professor Hartog in 1890. Mr. Watson 
notes that it is propagated from eyes, and that it is used 
as a stock on which Aralia Veitchii and several other stove 
species are grafted. 

Descr. — A small, dioecious tree. Trunk slender, usually 
simple, sometimes forked or sparingly branched ; the 
female specimen here figured, cultivated at Kew, about 
seventeen feet high, with a trunk three inches in diameter 
at the base, and leaves as much as three feet and a half 
long. Leaves alternate, coriaceous, glabrous, very variable 
in size and shape; of quite young plants linear, six to 
twelve inches long, and a third to half an inch wide ; of 
flowering plants strap-shaped, lanceolate or oblanceolate, 
one and a half to four feet long, two to nine inches broad, 
coarsely undulate-crenate, acute or rounded at the tip, 
tapering to the base ; midrib thick ; primary lateral veins 
running out at the crenatures ; petiole stout, compressed. 
Female flowers capitate, in panicles two or three feet long, 
springing from the axils of the upper leaves. Branches of 
the panicles and the peduncles thick and fleshy. Flowers 
sessile, densely crowded, connate at the very base only, 
yellow-green. Cahjx-limb obsolete. Petals usually about 
ten, ligulate or oblong, recurved, persistent, scarcely longer 
than the styles. Stamens ten, imperfect. Ovary usually 

ten-celled ; ovules solitary, pendulous. Fruit unknown. 

W.B.H. 

Fig 1, a female flower containing imperfect stamens; 2 and 3, stamens 
from the same; 4, another view of a female flower; 5, cross section of an 
ovary; o, tangential section of the same; 7, reduced sketch of plant x—all 
enlarged, except 7, which is about one-fortieth of the natural size. 



7928 




Brooiis,Da 



LTleevu &C° Londr 



Tab. 7928. 
AGAPETES Moobbi. 

Native of Sikkim. 

Nat. Ord. Vac ciniace^;.— Tribe Thibaudie^!. 
GeauB Agapetes, G. Don; (Benth. et Roolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 571.) 



Agapetes Moorei; ppecies fruticosa adspectn A. setigene et A. verticillalis 
simillima, sed calycis tubo supra ovarium producto et stamiuuui 
structura distinctissima ; planta depicta caudice iucrassato terete 4- 
poll. diametro, caulibus 3 erectis rigidis 2| ped. altis pauciramosis, ramis 
brevibus graciliu&culis, foliis nunc subverticillatis nunc sparsis ssepe 
quinatis (verticillis in apicibus innovationum singulis), brevi=isime petio- 
latis crassis coriaceis glabris vel cito glabrescentibns oblongo-lanceolatis 
2-3i p n. longis apicnlatis basi rotundatis vel subcordatis, costa valida, 
venis inconspicuis, floribus coccineis vei rubro-aurantiacis circiter sesqui- 
pollicaribus pendulis 6-9 in racemos axillares subterminales et lateralis 
dispositis, racemis quam foliis brevioribus, pedunculis pedicellis calyci- 
busque molliter breviterque pubescentibus, pedicellis 3-4 lin. longis 
bracteis parvis acutis cito deciduis b.isi 8uffultis, calycis 5-6 lin. longi 
tubo supra ovarium manifeste producto, lobis deltoideis vix acutis, 
corolla subcylindrica circiter l£ poll, longa fere ad medium 5-loba, lobis 
angustis acutis recurvis vel revolutis intus fkvis extus minute puberulis, 
staminibus 10 exsertis a corolla liberis, filamentis liberis planis prope 
basin insigniter geniculars quam antheris longioribus parte antheris 
adnata apicem versus attenuata parce puberula, antheris doraifixia 
adglutinatis basi facie 1-calcaratis parte superiore tnbifera libera, ovario 
5-loculari vel spurie 10-loculari, locnlis multiovulatis, stylo glabro basi 
geniculato disco parvo annulato cincto stamina paullo superante apice 
vix incrassato, capsula ignota. 

A. Moorei, Hemsl. 

This handsome shrub was sent to Kew last March by 
Mr. F. W. Moore, Keeper of the Glasnevin Botanic 
Garden, to be named, with the information that it was 
imported with Cirrhopetaluui liothschildkinum, O'Brien. 
But the habitat of the latter is somewhat obscure, being 
described (Gard. Okron. 1895, vol. ii. p. 608) as " some- 
where beyond Darjeeling." However, there is little doubt 
that it is a native of Sikkim. We have much pleasure in 
giving the name of that eminent horticulturist to one of 
the numerous gems of his successful cultivation. 

In foliage it strongly resembles Agapetes setigera, D. Don, 
a species introduced in 1837, but in floral structure it is more 
closely related to A. buxifolia, Nutt. (Bot. Mag. t. 5012). 

At least two other very showy species of this genu 3 
had previously been figured in the Magazine, namely, 

Deceuuer 1st, 1903. 



X macrantlia, Benth. & Hook. f. (t. 4566), and A. pulcher- 
rima, Benth. & Hook. f. = A. variegata, D. Don (t. 4303) ; 
both under Thibaudia, 

Mr. Moore obtained his plant of A. Moorei in 1900, and 
he cultivates it in a cool orchid house. 

Descr. — A handsome shrub, closely resembling the old 
A. setigera, but very different in the structure of the 
flowers. Caudex of the plant figured four inches in 
diameter, and bearing three slender, stiff stems two and a 
half feet high. Branches slender and stiff, glabrous or 
soon glabrescent. Leaves alternately sub-verticillate, 
and scattered, usually in fives at the tips of the annual 
growths, shortly petiolate, thick, coriaceous, glabrous or 
nearly so, oblong-lanceolate, two to three and a half inches 
long, apiculate, rounded or somewhat cordate at the 
base ; midrib thick ; veins inconspicuous. Flowers scarlet 
or orange-red, about one and a half inch long, in short, 
axillary or sub-terminal racemes. Racemes six- to nine- 
flowered, shorter than the leaves ; peduncles, pedicels and 
calyx softly pubescent. Pedicels three to four lines long, 
furnished at the base with small, acute bracts, which fall 
away early. Calyx five to six lines long ; tube distinctly 
produced above the ovary; lobes deltoid, sub-acute. 
Corolla nearly cylindrical, about one and a quarter inch 
long, five-lobed almost to the middle ; lobes narrow, acute, 
revolute, yellow within, obscurely puberulous on the out- 
side. Stamens ten, exserted, free from the corolla; 
filaments free, flat, with a remarkable knee-like bend near 
the base, longer than the anthers, slightly puberulous on 
the back of the part attached to the anthers ; anthers 
dorsifixed, slightly connate, and produced below the 
attachment in the form of a spur; the upper slender, 
tubular part free. Ovary spuriously ten-celled ; cells con- 
taining many ovules; style glabrous, bent near the base 
similarly to the stamens, slightly exceeding the latter, and 
surrounded at the base by a small, ring-like disk. Capsule 
unknown.— 4F. B. H. 



Fig. 1, long.tudmal section of an ovary with a portion of the calyx and 
base of style; 2, three stamen,, showing the geniculate, glabrous filaments; 
3 two i anthers, showing the basal spurs and the oblique, apical pores; 4, apex 
ot style; 5, cross section of an ovary, showing that it is spuriously ten-celled : 
— all en 'urged. J 



7029 




del.JlsP 



T&u»ni.Brool«Bp^r&So 1 



Tab. 7929. 

ECHIDNOPSIS SOMALENSIS. 

Native of Somaliland. 

Nat. Ord. Asclepiadace.e.— Tribe Stapelie.«. 
Genns EcHlDKOPSIS, Ifook.f. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 781.) 



EcniDNOPSis somalensis ; frutex nanus (planta depicta semipedalis) carnosus 
aphyllus, cereiformis, glaber, caulibus ramisque viridibus cylindricis £-1 
poll, diametro 6-8-sulcatis tessellatis inermibus, floribus subseasilibua sl li- 
tariia vel 2 vel 3 aggregates 4-5 lin. diametro atropurpnreis luteo- 
punctatis pnberulis vel papillosis, calycis lobis ovatis acutia circiter \ lin. 
longis, corollas hemisphgerico-rotataa lobis ovatis incurvis vel deraam 
patentibus acutis, corona? exterioris lobis angastia curvatis apice breviter 
recurvis intus oanaliculatis glabris, coronas iaterioris lobi3 deltoideis 
obtusis antheiis incumbentibus. 

E. somalensis, N. E. Brown in Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. iv. p. 477. 



The get) us Echidnopsis was founded on a cultivated plant 
of E. cereiformis, Hook. f. (Bot. Mag. t. 5930), which is 
very similar to the present species in habit, but it has 
bright yellow flowers. The stems, too, are longer, but 
that may be due to age, and more flexible. E. cereiformis 
was originally recorded as a native of South Africa, but it 
is now known to inhabit Eritrea, Abyssinia and Somali- 
land ; possibly Socotra also. E. Bentii, N. E. Brown 
(Bot. Mag. t. 7760), a native of tropical Arabia, has some- 
what larger, crimson flowers. About half-a-dozen species 
are now known from Eastern Tropical Africa, and the 
genus is also represented in Arabia and the island of 
Socotra. 

The plant figured was cultivated by Mr. R. I. Lynch, 
Curator of the Cambridge Botanic Garden. It was also 
among the plants collected and presented to Kew by Mrs. 
Lort Philips and Miss Edith Cole ; and Cambridge obtained 
it from the same source. 

Descr. — A dwarf, fleshy, leafless shrub, resembling a 
small, columnar Cereus, glabrous, except the flowers ; the 
plant figured, about six inches high. Stems and branches 
green, cylindrical, half to one inch in diameter, six- to 
eight-furrowed, tessellated, unarmed. Flowers nearly 
sessile, solitary, or two or three in a cluster, four to five 
December 1st, 1903. 



lines in diameter, dark purple spotted with yellow, 
minutely papillose or puberulous. Calyx-lobes ovate, acute, 
about half a line long. Corolla almost rotate when fully 
expanded ; lobes ovate, at first incurved, afterwards spread- 
ing, acute. Lobes of the outer corona narrow, sub-erect, 
incurved, tips shortly recurved. Lobes of the inner corona 
deltoid, obtuse, incumbent on the anthers. — W. B. H. 



Fig. 1, a portion of a branch; 2, a flower-bud; 3, a partially expanded 
flower ; 4, coronas and genitalia ; 5, pollen : — all enlarged. 



133Q 




^JsL 



M.S.deU.N.Htchlitk. 






I ■;.,.. - ■ ■ 



Tab. 7930. 

RESTREPIA ANTENNIFERA. 
Native of Colombia. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^e. — Tribe Epidkndre*. 
Genus Kestrepia, H. B- K. ; (Benth. et Hooh.f. Gen.Flant. vol. iii. p. 491.) 



Restrepia. antennifera ; species ex affinitate A. slriatse, Rolfe (Bot. Mag. t. 
7233) sed robustior fioribus folia vix excedentibus, caulibus caespitosis 
6-8 poll, altis vaginis amplia membranaceis albidis inconspicue striatia 
vestitis, foliis crasse coriaceis oblongo-ovalibus 2-3 poll, longis, floribua 
1-3 tenuiter pedicellatis circiter 2| poll, longis purpureo-striatis, sepalo 
doreali e basi latiuscula in fllnm apice leviter incrassatum producto 
incurvo, lateralibus laminam oblongo-Ianceolatam aprce emaryinatam 
labello duplo majorem formantibua, petalis sepalo dorsali similibus sed 
fere dimidio minoribus, labello oblongo apice emarginato lobis lateralibus 
ad aristas parvas basilares recurvatas redactis, columna clavata incurva. 

R. antennifera, H. B. K., Nov. Gen. et Sp. vol. i. p. 367, t. 94. Poir. in Lam. 
Encycl. Meth. Suppl. vol. iv. p. 672, t. 991. Lindl. Gen. et Sp. Orch. 
p. 14. Reichb. f. in Bonplandia, 1855, p. 70. Rolfe Orch. Rev. 1894, 
p. 237. Non Bot. Mag. t. 6288, quee eadem ac R. maculata, Lindl. 



The genus Restrepia was founded in 1815, on the 
present, species, which was the only one known for many 
years. Now nearly forty species have been described. 
For a long time 11. maculata, Lindl., was cultivated and 
figured in various publications, including this Magazine 
(t. 6288), under the name of B. antennifera. Mr. Rolfe 
detected the error, and rectified it in the publication cited 
above. B. maculata, Lindl., with which it has been 
confused, has spotted, not striped flowers. 

B. antennifera was discovered by Humboldt's expedition 
near Pasto, at an elevation of upwards of nine thousand 
feet, and it has since been collected in the Province of 
Ocana (Schlim, 738) at about the same elevation. 

All three of the species mentioned in this connection are 
at the present time in cultivation at Kew. 

Descr.— Similar to B. striata, Rolfe (Bot. Mag. t. 7233), 
but a more robust plant with flowers scarcely, if at all, 
overtopping the leaves. Stems clustered, six to eight 
inches high, clothed with membranous, dirty-white sheaths. 
Leaves thick, coriaceous, oblong-oval, two to three inches 
long. Flowers one to three on each stem, slenderly 

December 1st, 1903. 



stalked, about two and a half inches across, striped with 
dark purple on a whitish ground. Dorsal sepal almost 
filiform from a broad base, thickened at the tip, incurved. 
Lateral sepals conjoined in an oblong blade, notched at the 
tip, and twice as large as the labellum. Petals similar to 
the dorsal sepal, but only about half the size. Labellum 
oblong, notched at the tip ; lateral lobes reduced to small, 
basal, recurved awns. Column club-shaped, incurved. — 
W. B. H. 

Fig. 1, column and labellum; 2, column ; 3, anther-cap; 4 and 5, pollen : 
— all enlarged. 



7931 



K^, 




MS.del.J.UFit^litH 



T&ioentBroola; T>ay A. SonXtfhnp 



Tab. 7931. 
COTYLEDON undulata. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Cra.ssulace«. 
Genns Cotyledon 7 , Linn. ; (Benth. et Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 659.) 



Cotyledon (§ Paniculate) undulata ; species adhuc iraperfecte cognita, 
C. orbiculatse, Linn. (Bot. Mag. t. 321) affinis, a qua differt foliis obovato- 
spathnlatis apice rotuudatis vel fere truncatis grosse undulato-crenatis 
cuspidatisque ; frutex erectus, caruosus, albo-farinosus, caule snbsimplici 
cum inflorescentia circiter 3-pedali, foliis oppositis, internodiis brevibns vel 
brevissimis, crassis carnosis 3§-5 poll, longis maximis supra medium 2J 
poll, latis margine in parte superiore interdum rubrescente, pedunculis 12- 
18 poll, longis nudis vel foliis paucis parvis ovatis subacutis infra medium 
instmctis, floribus subdicbotomo-cymosis longe pedicellatis pendulis 
circiter 1} poll, longis luteo-rabris, calycis segmenfcis parvis deltoideis 
eubacutip, corollas tubo cylindrico lobis duplo longioribus, lobis acntis 
recurvis, staminibus vix exsertis, carpellis 5 glabris, stylis stamina vix 
aequantibus. 

C. undulata, Haw. Suppl. PI. Succ. (1819), p. 20 (" Plantae Kewenses solum 
juveniles"); Revis PI. Succ. (1821) p. 20 (" Siniulat C. orbicularem, at 
longe humilior, foliis incipientibus apice magis undulatis cuspidatisque "). 
BO. Prod. vol. iii. p. 396 (sine riorum descriptione). Harv. & Sond. Fl. 
Cap. vol. ii. 377 ("probably a form of C. orbiculata "). Schonland & 
E. G. Baker in Journ. Bot. 1902, pp. 13 et 17, t. 431. 

Cotyledon foliis latis undulatis, &c, Burin. Bar. Air. PI. Dec. p. 44 t. 19, 
*fig. 2? 

As the above references and quotations show, Cotyledon 
undulata was first partially described by Haworth in 1819, 
from young plants at Kew ; but he adds nothing of im- 
portance to that description in 1821, although a flowering 
specimen in his herbarium, now at Oxford, is labelled : 
" Kew, June, 1820." A drawing of his specimen, by 
Miss M. Smith, with a copy of all the writing on the 
sheet on which it is mounted, is in the Kew Herbarium ; 
and in the collection of old Kew drawings there is a fine, 
bold, coloured figure of this species dated : " Kew, May 
23rd, 1825." The drawing is endorsed: "Raised from 
seeds in 1817, received from Mr. Bowie from the Cape of 
Good Hope." 

Apparently Haworth never described the flowers of 
G. undulata, but there is no doubt that his specimen and 
the old Kew drawing represent the same species. And there 
is little doubt that our plant is the same species, though the 
flowers are purple in the original drawing, the segments of 
Decembek 1st, 1903. 



the perianth more revolute, and the stamens distinctly 
exserted; all of which may, perhaps, be accounted for by 
the advanced stage of the inflorescence. But the South 
African species of Cotyledon are generally badly defined, 
as is fully exemplified by Baker and Schonland's paper 
in the Journal of Botany, cited above ; the one working 
with the advantage of Haworth's types before him, and 
the other in South Africa with living plants under 
observation, they were still unable to define the limits 
of the species allied to C. orbiculata, LindL, and could 
only suggest, in many instances, that certain specimens 
and figures represented the same species. 

Haworth cites, in the first instance, Burman's Cotyledon 
foliis latis sinuosis, &c. (Rariorum Jfricanarum Plantarum 
Decades, p. 44, t. 19, fig. 2) as synonymous with his 
C. undulata; but he subsequently cited it with the sign of 
interrogation. Lamarck (Encycl. vol. ii. p. 142) founded 
his C. mucronata on the same figure. Schonland and 
Baker, Jun. (Journ. Bot. 1902, p. 15), regard C. mucronata as 
distinct from. 0. undulata, and describe a specimen from 
Graaf Reinet as belonging to the former. Burman's 
figure was evidently drawn from a plant bearing an in- 
florescence in a very advanced stage ; but I think myself, 
judging from the variation in the colour and position of 
the flowers at different stages of development, that 
C. undulata and C. mucronata may be the same. 

C. orbiculata was figured in the Magazine (t. 321) as 
long ago as 1795, and it is recorded by Aiton (Hort. Kew. 
ed. 1, vol. ii. p. 106) as having been introduced by a Mr. 
Bentick in 1690. 

A century ago these showy and easily cultivated suc- 
culent shrubs were much in favour, and they certainly 
deserve more attention than they get at the present time. 
Curtis wrote of C. orbiculata that it flowered freely and 
grew rapidly. 

Our plate was prepared from a specimen received from 
Mr. R. I. Lynch, Curator of the Cambridge Botanic 
Garden. 

It may be added that C. gibbiflora, Moc. & Sesse, a 
Mexican species of the section Echeveria, having foliage 
similar to that of our plant, is sometimes met with under 
the name of C. undulata. 



Descr. — A succulent, erect shrub, two to three feet high, 
the young 1 parts covered with a white meal. Leaves oppo- 
site, crowded, very thick and fleshy, obovate-spathulate, 
three and a half to five inches long, the largest two and a 
half inches broad above the middle, rounded at the top or 
almost truncate, usually undulate-crenate above the middle 
with a terminal cusp ; margin often red in the older 
leaves. Peduncles twelve to eighteen inches long, naked 
or bearing a few small, ovate, somewhat acute leaves 
below the middle. Flowers borne in paniculate cymes 
about six inches in diameter, one and a half inch long, 
yellow and orange-red, pendulous. Pedicels usually shorter 
than the flowers. Calyx-lobes small, deltoid, sub-acute. 
Corolla-tube cylindrical, twice as long as the recurved, 
acute lobes. Stamens scarcely overtopping the recurved 
corolla-lobes. Carpels five (ripe ones not seen) glabrous ; 
styles scarcely as long as the stamens. — W. B. II. 



Fig. 1, a petal and three stamens ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, gyna^ceum ; 5, a 
young plant about one-sixth of the natural size: — all the other figures en- 
larged. 



INDEX 

To Vol. LIX. of the Third Series, ov Vol. CXXIX. of the 

whole Work. 



7879 Acidanthera Candida. 

7928 Agapetes Moorei. 
7890 Agave Bakeri. 

7875 Allium Ellisii. 
7915 Aloe Cameroni. 
7882 „ rubroviolacea. 

7917 Areca Micholitzii. 

7910 Arisasma japonicum. 

7880 Astilbe Davidii. 
7906 Calothamnas rupestris. 
7909 Chlorsea longibracteata. 

7886 Chrysanthemum grande. 
7874 „ indicum. 

7911 Cistanche violacea. 
7897 Clematis Meyeniana. 

7922 Clerodendron cephalanthum. 

7887 „ myrmecophila. 

7918 Cotyledon pulvinata. 
7931 Cotyledon undulata. 
7900 Dendrobium Madonnse. 

7876 Diervilla Middendorffiana. 
7896 Dissotis Mahoni. 

7913 Draba Gilliesii. 

7929 Echidinpsis somalensis. 

7888 Euphorbia obesa. 
7924 Fendlera rupicola. 
7884 Hamamelis mollis. 
7895 Hebenstretia comosa. 
7903 Helleborus lividus. 
7905 Huernia concinna. 



7878 Impatiens Balfourii. 
7923 „ falcifer. 

7914 Iris bucharica. 
7889 „ Collettii. 

7926 „ gracilipes. 
7904 „ lupina. 

7907 Isoloma erianthum. 

7898 Laburnum caramanicum. 

7891 Lathyrus pubescens. 
7921 Lissochilus purpuratus. 

7919 Lysimachia crispidens. 

7927 Meryta Denhami. 

7899 Mimosa Spegazzinii. 
7873 Muscari paradoxum. 
7885 Phalseaopsis Kunstleri. 

7901 Primula megaseae folia. 
7916 Psychotria capensis. 
7930 Restrepia antennifera. 

7881 Rhododendron brachycarpum. 

7892 Rodgersia pinnata. 
7872 Ruellia macrantha. 
7877 Sansevieria grandis. 

7908 Sedum Stahlii. 

7893 Sempervivum urbicum. 

7902 Seneeio clivorum. 
7912 „ tanguticus. 
7883 Sophora viciifolia. 

7925 Sphaerocodon obtusifolium. 

7894 Sphedamnocarpus pruriene. 

7920 Tulipa prsestans. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 708, DECEMBER, 1903. 

Tab. 7927.— MERYTA DEXHAMI. 
„ 792S.— AGAPETES MOOREI. 
„ 7929.— ECHIDXOPSIS SOMALENSIS. 
„ 7930.-— RESTREPIA ANTENNIFERA. 
„ 7931.— COTYLEDON UN DLL ATA. 



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