(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



9 COMPBISING THE 

plants; of ti)e Ixopal #artifng of lulu, 

OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN; 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS} 

BT 

SIR JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., G.C.S.L, 

F.E.S,, F.L.S., ETC., 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D. CANTAB., MEMBER OF THE INSTITUTE OF FKANCK. 

VOL. LVIII. 
OF THE THIRD SERIES. 

(Or J-ol. CXXrin.qfthe Whole JFork.) 




" lie .«]iake of plants that hourly i linnc-c 
Their blossoms throuf?h u boti'iKllcas mnge 

Of intermingling hues ; 
Wii h biKldinK, fadins:, failed flower.*. 
They stand the wonder of the lx;werK 

From morn to c\eninp dews." 

WOllDSWOiiTK. 



LONDON : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., LTD., 

Puhlishers tn the Home, Colonial, mid Indian Ooi-ernmcnis. 

6, Hb^NRlET'J'A STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 
1002. 

[A^J rig 'i . !•• fervej. ] 

Mo. Bot. Garden 

l90fS 




To 

AUGUSTINE HENRY. ESQ.. M.A., L.E.C.R EDIN.. F.L.S.. 
Late of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs. 

My dear Mb, Henky, 

I have great pleasure in dedicating to you a volume of 
the Botanical Magazine, a work which has of late years heen so 
greatly enriched through your indefatigable exertions in exploring 
the Flora of the interior of China, which have resulted in the 
discovery and introduction into cultivation of a host of plants of 
as great botanical as horticultural interest. 

Believe me, 

Very sincerely yours, 

Jos. D. HOOKER. 
The Camp, Sunningdale, 
December \st, 1902. 




Cj^trlr Merits. 

No. 685. Ub 

VOL. LVIII.- JANUAEY. Prict 3i. U. coloured, 28. 6d. plo 

OR No. 1370 "*' "^^^ KNTIEB WQEK. 

CDKTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COUFBISIM& 
THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITH 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BT 

Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.C.S.L, C.B., F.E.s., r.L.S. 

taie Siifcior of the filonal ISotantc ffiatiitns of ISetn. 




Nasare and Art to iKlom the page Aombine, 
And flowera exotic grace our northern elime. 



LONDON; 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd. 

PtTBUSHEEJ TO THB HOMR, COLONIAL AND INDIAN OOVERNMBXTS 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1902. 

[All rights reserved.] 



1 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



Part ir., with 10 Coloured Plates, 21s. nee. 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACIDiE. 

By GEORGE BOWDLER BUCKTON, F.B.S., F.L.S- 

To he completed in 5 parts. Subscription for the whole icorJr, £4 14.s. Qd. 

The family of the Memhracid(B has claims on the notice of both the scientific and 
general public. Owing to the advance of agriculture, climatic variation, and other 
influences, organic forma are constantly undergoing transformation, while some may 
even become extinct. The present time, therefore, affords opportunities for studying 
and recording these forma, which may not occur again. . , 

The general public will find interest in the bizarre forms of these insects, while the 
speculations of the scientific mind will be exercised on the questJwn of their utility. 

The Menihracidce are also interesting from their mimetic forms, which will " 
considered in this Monograph. 



Parts I. — XXV., each 7s. 6d. coloured, 5s. uncoloured, net. 

THE HEPATIC-aS OF THE BRIIISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

Issued to Subscribers for the complete work only, in 28 Monthly Parts, 

each with 8 Plates. 

Prospectus on application.. 

Now ready, Parts 7—9, with 12 Plates, 15». plain, 2lf . coloured, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BKITISH ISLES. 

With Descriptions op .all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 

By ALFRED FRYER, A.L.S. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The work will be issued in 5 quarterly sections of 3 parts each. 
FiipspectUB on application. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Oescripiion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

Br GEORGE BE NT HAM, F.K.S. 

Tiii r..uc.un, Uevised by Sir J, D. Hookbb,C.B., G.C.S.L, F.H.S.,&c. 9*. net. 



ILLUSTMTIOHS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. , 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W, G. SMITH, F.L.S 

rming an llluttratei Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Flora*. 
5th Edition, *wifch 1315 Wood Engravings, 9». net. 

LOVELL SEEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, HENRIBTTA STREET, CUYENT GARDES. 



781Z 




M".r3 ael.JN.Fi^£h.lit>i 



"^5noent. Broo3<s 13 ay &. oonXL*lrr^ 



'^''^S&^rii^^^. ' ".^ 



"T^tfi^^SSB 



Tab. 7S12. 

CEmUM JOHNSTONI. 
Native of British Central Africa. 

Nat. Old. AMABYLLiDEiK — Trile Amarylle,b. 
Genus Cbinuji, JAnn.\ {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 726.) 



Crinum (Codonocrinum) Johnstoni ; bulbo ^loboso magnitudine mediocri collo 
hand prod ucto, foliis circiter 20 viridibas apicem versus longe atteouatis, 
exterioribus ensiformibus 6-6-pedahbus, interioribus linearibna, scapo 
modice valido elongate, umbelUs multifloria, pedicellis brevibus, spathaa 
yalvis lanceolato-deltoideis, perianthii tube leviter curvato 4 poll, longo, 
limbo tubo^ breviori, segmentis ovatis vel oblongis aoiitia dorso leviter 



rubro tinctis, genitalibas declinatis limbo vix brevioribus. 



A number of bulbs of this new Grinum were sent from 
Mount Zomba, forty miles north of Blantyre, in British 
Central Africa, in January, 1899, to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, by Mr. McClonnie, chief of the forest department 
in that Colony. It is now clear that Tropical Africa is 
the head-quarters of the genus, as it has yielded nearly 
forty species. We do not know from what height on 
Mount Zomba the bulbs came, but the mountain reaches 
an altitude of five thousand one hundred and thirty-five 
feet. The present plant is intermediate between the 
Tropical Asian G. latifolium, which it resembles in the 
flowers, and the Cape G. longifolium, Thunb., which it 
resembles in its long narrow leaves attenuated very 
gradually to the point. In C Johnstoyii, however, the 
leaves are bright green, whilst in G. longifolium they 
are glaucous. It has flowered freely in the Succulent 
House at Kew, but has not been tried in the open air. 
The name it bears is commemorative of the great services 
rendered to civilization in Tropical Africa by Sir Henry 
Hamilton Johnston, ■ g.C.lT ^ late (1891-7) H.M. Com- 
missioner and Consul-General for territories north of the 
Zambesi, subsequently Administrator of the Uganda Pro- 
tectorate. 

Descr. — BuJb globose, three or four inches in diameter, 
without any produced neck. Leaves about twenty to a 
bulb, bright green, narrowed gradually to a long point, 
January 1st, 1002. 



the outer ensiform, five or six feet long by two or two 
and a half inches broad low down, the inner linear. 
Peduncle moderately stout, about two feet long. Flowers 
many in an umbel ; pedicels about an inch long ; spathe- 
valves two, lanceolate-deltoid, two or three inches long. 
Perianlli4uhe slightly curved, tinged with green, four 
inches long ; limb shorter than the tube, its segments 
ovate or oblong, acute, slightly tinged with pink on the 
back. Stamens declinate, nearly as long as the limb ; 
anthers linear, a third of an inch long. Style just over- 
topping the anthers. — J. G. BaJcer. 



Fij?. 1, front view of anther; 2, back view of anther; 3, apei of style and 
stigma : — all enlarged. 



7S13 




M-S.iolJU EitohKOv 



TfinecntBrooWfcDayi-Soiitt^iii? 



Tab. 7813. 

ANGR^CUM ElCHLEEIANUM. 
Native of Calabar, 

Nat. Ovd. Orcuides. — Tribe Vande.*. 
Genus ANGEiECUM, Thou. ; {Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 583.) 



Angr^ctjm (Enangrsectim) Eichlerianutn; scandens, caule elato Tobuato 
compresso \ poll, lato ancipiti, radicibas longisaimis, foliis sessilibas 
distichis 4-5 poll, longis oblongis apice obtusis inajqnaliter emarginatis 
cragae coriaceia supra saturate viridibus subtus pallidis, vaginis l-H 
poll, longia, peduncalis decurvis foliis suboppoaitis gracilibns viridibus 
3-4 poll, longia 1-3-floris ima basi vaginis paucis brevibus arete amplec- 
tentibua instructis, bracteis parvis oblongis coriaceis pedicelloa arete 
vaginantibus, pedicellia cum ovariia poUicaribua viridibus, floribua 
amplis, sepalis fere 2 poll, longia anguste lineari-oblongia obtuai.** 
strictia eneiviis flavo-viridibus, petalia sepalis consimilibas et concoloribua 
sed brevioribus, labello amplo subreniformi-quadrato late cuapidato albo 
lateribua recurvia disco flavo-viridi basin versus bicarinato, ealcare 
sepalis breviore saturate viridi ultra basin infundibularem constricto 
gennflexo dein elongato angusto fusi forme subacuto. 

A. Eichlerianum, Krdnzh in Berl. Gart. Zeit. vol. i. (1882) p. 434, tig. 102 ; 
in Miith. Beutsch. SehiUz. Geh. vol, ii. (1889) lo9, et in BeicUb. f. Xen. 
Orchid, vol, iii. p. 128, t. 273, fig. 2. Balfe in This. B^er, FL Trop. Afr. 
vol. vii. p, 143. 



The localities given for A. Eichlerianum in the "Flora 
of Tropical Africa" are Soutli Oanieroons region, and 
near Kapamba, in the gorge of the Loango River, both 
in the Gulf of Guinea. The first of these localities is not 
far distant from Old Calabar in Nigeria, whence the 
specimen here figured was sent to the Royal Gardens in 
1900 by Mr. J. H. Holland, Superintendent of the Botanic 
Gardens at that town. It flowered in a tropical house 
in June, and kept in flower till September. In the form 
and colour of the flower it closely resembles A. Gijriama^y 
Rendle, but in habit, stature, foliage, and the form of 
the spur, these species are very unlike. 

Descr. — Stem elongate, stout, compressed, obtusely two- 
edged, leafy, emitting roots a foot long. Leaves alternate, 
sessile, distichous, four to five inches long, oblong, obtuse 
or rounded, and emarginate at the tip, thickly coriaceous, 
deep green above ; sheaths an inch to an inch and a half 
Januakt 1st, 1902, 



long. Peduncles leaf-opposed, slender, decurved, three to 
four inches lono^, naked, except a few short, tubular, 
truncate sheaths at the base, one- to three-flowered. 
Brads oblong, sheathing, one-half to three-fourths of an 
inch long, coriaceous, green. Pedicel with ovary an inch 
and a half long. Flowers three and a half inches broad 
from the tip of the dorsal sepal to that of the lip. Sepals 
linear, spreading, oblong, convex, pale green, dorsal two 
inches long, lateral rather longer. Petals rather shorter 
than the sepals, linear-lanceolate, acute, pale green. Lip 
sub-reniformlj quadrate, two inches in diameter when 
spread out, abruptly narrowed at the tip into a broad 
cusp, white, with a yellow green disk, and two short keels 
near the base, margins strongly recurved on the basal half ; 
spur shorter than the sepals, very dark green, campanu- 
late at the base, then constricted, geniculate, and ending 
in narrowly fusiform, acute dagger. Column very short, 
its sides dilated into two parallel ovate-lanceolate auricles. 
—.7. D. H. 



Fig. 1, base of lip and columo ; 2, anther ; 3 and 4, poUinia .—nU enhmjeJ. 



7SI4 




M. S dal JJ'TKt.ihliet 



-Vln<:ert>BroaksPay ■tS""^ 



Tab. 7814. 

BAUHINIA YUNNANENSIS. 
Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. LiGDMiNOSiE. — Tribe BAuniNiEiB. 
Genus Bauhinia, Linn. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. i. p. 575.) 



Bauiiinia (Phanera) yunnanensis \ frntex scandens, cirrhifera, glaberriina, 
glauca, ramis raraulisque gracilibus teretiljiis, cirrhis complanatis, foliis 
parvis coriaceis bipartitis basi oordatia siau angusto acuto, segmentia 
oblique elUpticis 1^ poll, lonsris basi et apice rotandatia 3-4 uerviig 
pallide viridibus, petiolo gracili, racemiM oppositifoliis elongatis laxe 
multifloris pendulis, pedicellis 2-3-pollicaribu8, bracteia minntia caduciB, 
calycis tubo 5-5 poll, longo cylmdraceo, limbo tube Bubasqoilongo 
bipartito s^gmentis cymbiformibus, petalis spathulatis ad } poll, longia 
pallide roseis apicibus lanuginosie 3 superioribus sanguineo-striatia, 
staminibus 3 perfectis petalis paullo longioribus, filamentis arcuatis 
kertnesinis, antheris lineari-oblongisciliatis, iraperfect.ia multo brevioribua 
ovario glabro stipitato, legumine anguste lineari 6 poll, longo leviter 
arcaato polysperma, valvis planis rugulosis. 

B. yunnanensis, Franch. PI. Delav. 1890, p. 190. 



The subject of this plate is a very graceful green- 
house climber, a native of Western China, where it 
was discovered by the Abbe Delavay on wooded hills 
of Lokoshan, in the districts of Tapin-tze, in Yun- 
nan ; and on mountains south-west of Mengtze, in the 
same province, at an altitude of six thousand feet, by 
Dr. Henry. A plant of it in the Temperate House of 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, receiv^ed in 1893 from the Royal 
Botanic Gardens of Edinbugh, flourishes and flowers 
freely, but the specimen here figured was sent from the 
Cambridge Botanical Gardens, where, Mr. Lynch informs 
me, it rambles over the roof of a conservatory fifteen feet 
above the ground, flowering in July. 

Descr, — A climbing, glabrous, glaucous shrub. Stem and 
branches very slender, terete ; tendrils flattened. Leaves 
small, coriaceous, bipartite, pale green; segments an inch 
and a half long, obliquely elliptic, three- to four-nerved, 
sinus narrow, acute, base and apex rounded ; petiole an 
inch to an inch and a half long, slender, swollen at the 
base. Racemes terminal and leaf-opposed, pendulous, four 
to six inches long, many-flowered ; bracts minute, cadu- 

January Ut, 1902. 



cous ; pedicels two to three inches lon^, slender. Flowers 
one to one and a half inches broad. Cahix-tuhe one-fourth 
to one-third of an inch long, cylindric, terete ; limb bipar- 
tite ; segments orbicular, concave, green, the anticous three- 
toothed. Pttals three-fourths of an inch long, spathulate, 
pale pink, three upper with three streaks of carmine from the 
base to the middle, two lower with one median streak. Per- 
fect stamens three, declinate ; filaments carmine ; anthers 
oblong, cells with ciliate margins ; staminodes seven, 
very short ; anthers imperfect, globose. Ovary stipitate, 
glabrous, linear, narrow, contracted into a stout incurved 
style ; stigma small, capitate. Legume six inches long, 
linear, many-seeded ; valves flat, rough. — J. D. IL 



Tig. 1, calyx, stamens, and ovary, with style reraoTed ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 
4, imperfect atauieus : — all enlarged. 



18^5 




y 



MSd^..jnp,„..,,^jj, 



V£iioent.Brool<s,Day-4f?aiiT.L*Imp 



Tab. 7815. 

SCHOMBURGKIA Thomsonia>ja. 
Var. ill NOR. 

Native of the Cayman Islands, W. Indies. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide.^j. — Tribe Epidendre^. 
GenuB ScHOMBUKGKiA, Lindl.; {Benth. & Sook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 534), 



SCHOMBTJRGKIA Thomsoniana; pseudobulbis 2-3 poll, longis oblongia v. 
ovoideis oompressis sulcatis vaginia brevibus late ovatis membranaceis 
striatis laxe tectis, foliis 2|-3-pollicaribas ellipticia obtusis crasse 
coriaceis pallida viridibus, scapo 10-pollicari remote vaginato, vaginis ad 
^ poll, longis late ovatis appressia membranaceis albia brunneo striolatis, 
racemo 4-12 poll, longo simplici v. paniculatim ramoso laxe 6- oo-floro, 
bracteis pedicellis multo brevioribus erectis lanceolatis membranaceie, 
pedicellis 1-1^ poll, longis gracilibus decurvis viridibus, ovario brevi, 
perianthio 2h poll, diara., sepalis petalisque lineari-oblongis obtusis 
citrinis marginibus undulatis, labelli lobis lateralibus oblongo-rotundatis 
intus flavis roseo striolatis, terminali obcordato, ungue lato primulino, 
disco 5-costato, limbo dilatato 2-lobo, lobis crispato-undulatis liete riibro- 
purpureis, columna leviter incnrva marginibus integris, anthera breviter 
biloba. 

S. Thomsoniana, Rrhb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. ii. p. 38. Veitch, Man. 
Orchid. Part II., p. 102. 



The beautiful Orcliid here figured is, as far as hitherto 
known, confined in its native condition to the Cayman 
Islands, or rather Islets, in the Caribbean Sea. Of *these 
islets there are two groups, nearlj one hundred miles 
apart, situated respectively, the large or Grand Cayman, 
two hundred miles W.IST.W., and the lesser or Cayman 
Brae, one hundred and forty miles N.W. of the Western 
point of Jamaica, of which they are dependencies. They 
are clothed with forest, and inhabited by ^Turtle-fishers. 

There are two varieties of 8. Thomsoniana, namely, 
atrojmrpurea, with large cream-coloured and purple 
flowers, the lip with a deep purple throat, and slightly 
recurved terminal lobe ; and minor, with smaller 
canary-yellow flowers, and less purple on the throat of 
the lip, which has a strongly reflexed terminal lobe. Both 
vars. grow on the Grand Cayman, where atrojmrjmrca 
is most abundant. Var. minor is confiined to Cayman 
Bt-ac. Our figure represents var. minor. 
Ja.suari- 1st, iy02. 



S. Thomsoniana was sent to tlic Roval Gardens, Kew, 
by Mr. W. Fawcett, B.Sc. F.L.S., Director of Public 
Gardens and Plantations in Jamaica, in 1888. It 
flowered at Kew for the first time in June, 1901, as did 
another specimen simultaneously in Sir Trevor Lawrence's 
collection. It is named in compliment to Mr. Robert 
Thomson, formerly Conservator of Cinchona Plantations 
in Jamaica. 

Descr. — Pseudohulhs two to three inches long, oblong 
or ovoid, deeply grooved, bearing a few short, broad, 
membranous sheaths. Leaves two and a half to three 
inches long, elliptic, obtuse, pale green. Scape ten inches 
long, with a few distant membranous white sheaths, 
streaked with brown. Baceme or panicle four to twelve 
inches long, loosely six- or more-flowered ; bracts short, 
lanceolate, membranous ; pedicels one to one and a half 
inches long, decurved, green. Floivers two and a half 
inches broad. Sepals and petals linear-oblong, obtuse, 
lemon-coloured, margins waved. Lip rather longer than 
the sepals, lateral lobes shortly oblong, yellow within and 
streaked with red ; terminal lobe broadly clawed, orbicular, 
two-lobed, crisped and waved, bright rose-purple. Colnran 
slightly incurved, margins entire, tip two-lobed. Anther 
obscurely two-lobed. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, front, anrl 2, side view of column; 3 and 4, front and back view 
of poUinia : — all enlarged. 



7816 




J^-S.deXJ.N.Rtchlio. 



^■feoejrt-Broo-ks.Da-y S-SonLtS-Imj? 



L Reeve &. C 9 L oTidoji. 



Tai!. 7816. 
HIBISCUS ScoTTi. 

Native of Socdtra. 

Nut. Ord. MalvacevE. — Tribe Hibisce.e. 
fiennH Hibiscus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 207.) 



Hibiscus (Ketraia) Scoiti; frutex v. arbuscula, ramia erectis riinniliH(|iio 
stellatim tomentojtis, foliia petiolatis ellipticis ovatis Biibrliombeisve 
obtusis integns v. subtrilobia dentais crenatisve basi cordatis cnneatis 
V. rotundatis palmatim 3-5-nervii8 supra saturate viridibus stellato- 
pubescentibus subtus pallidis pilis stellatis S-furcatis immixtis hispidis, 
petiolo g— 1 poll, longo. stipulis subulatis, floribus axillaribua, pedanculis 
validis erectia 2-3-pollicaribas 1-3-iloris, bracteis cadacis, involucelli 
bracteis 10-12 ^g^-pollicaribus lineari-lanceolatis stellatim hispidulis 
calyce cynthiforrai involucello jequilongo irregulariter fisso, corollaj 2|-3| 
poll. diam. saturate auresQ fundo sauguineo, lobia rotnndatis, columna 
staminea tota antherifera apice truncata, antheris orbicularibus, stylo 
stigmatibaaque globoais atro-sanguineis, capaula globosa v. late ovoidea, 
^ poll. diam. glabra, valvis 5 laevibus, semimbas renifortnibus piloais. 

H. Scotti, Balfour fil. in Proc. Hoy. Soc. Edinh. vol.xi. (1882) p. 603; in Trans. 
vol. xxxi. p, 32, tab. v. A. 



The very beautiful plant here figured was discovered 
by Mr. Scott, who accompanied Dr. J. B. Balfour, F.R.S., 
during his exploration of the Island of Socotra, under llio 
auspices of the Royal Society of London and the British 
Association in 1879. Dr. Balfour describes it as a sinall 
tree, growing on the slope of Haghier, near Adho Dunckd, 
and elsewhere, at considerable elevations. 

Seeds of H. Scotti were received by the Eoyal Botanical 
G-ardens, Edinburgh, in 1899, from Dr. H. 0. Forbes, 
Curator of the Free Public Museum of Liverpool, who 
visited Socotra in 1898-9. From these plants were raised 
that flowered in those gardens June, 1901, which 
furnished the specimen here represented. 

Judging from native herbarium specimens, the plant 
has greatly benefited' by its. transport from the arid 
rocks of Socotra to a hot-house in Scotland. Its nearest 
aUies are if. KirJcii, Mart., of Mozambique, and the widely 
spread Indian and African H. pandurasformis, Burm. 

Descr. — A large bush or small tree more or less 
Jancary 1st, 1902. 



hispidulous, except the corolU, with steUate hairs. Leaves 
shortly petioled, elliptic, ovate, or sub-rhomboid, entire or 
three-lobed, crenate or toothed, palmately three- to five- 
nerved ; base cuneate, rounded or cordate, dark green 
above; stipules small, subulate. Flowers one to three, 
on axillary, stout, erect peduncles, shortly pedicelled, 
three and a half inches in diameter. Bracts of the in- 
volucel ten to twelve, about half an inch long, lanceolate. 
Calyx as long as the bracts, cup-shaped, variouslj^ 
cleft. Corolla bright golden-yellow, with carmine at the 
base of the tube within, lobes orbicular. Stamina! tube 
covered throughout witl: pale yellow anthers. Stigma 
three-lobed, lobes globose., blood-red. Capsule about half 
an inch long, globose or ovoid, glabrous ; valves smooth. 
Seech reniform, hairy. — ./. D. TI. 



Fig. 1, pedicel with involucel, calyx and ovary; 2, stellate huirs ; 
3, anthers -.—all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, A ) FOREIGN FLORA. 



HANDBOOK of the BRITISH I ORA; a Descriptioii of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigen s to, or naturalized in the British 
leles. For the use of Beginners anu Amateurs. By Georgk Bentham, 
F.R.S. 7th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9». net. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of Britifih Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Conipanion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and oth(»r British Floras. 1315 Wood Fin- 
gravings. 5th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9a. net. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By Geoeqb, Bentham^ F.ll.S., President of the Linmn^U) 
Society. New Edition, la. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsbnd, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, If s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSISES, containing all that are 
known to be natives of the British isles. By the Rev. M. J.BERKKr.Kv. 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with locali ^,ies of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. BJ^ Chaulgs I'. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, Ac. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 3s. 6d. net. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. IMonographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illnstrated by Plates of all the species, with jncroscopical 
details of their strncture. By R. BEAriHWAiTE, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. 1., 
with- 45 Plates, 50». Vol. II., 42». 6d. Parts XVII,— XX., 6*. each. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. Bv Sir J. D. Hookek, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12 net. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Benthvm, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20?. each. Vol. VII., 24». Published 
nnder the auspices of the several Gover.iments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES : a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Bakkk, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s, Published under the anthoiity o( t}:e 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Plants ot 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. Hakvet.M.D., 
F.R.S., and Otio Wilhelm Sondeb, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III., 18«, each. 
Vol VI., 24s. net. Vol. VII., 35s. net. Vol. V., Part I., 9.?. net. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Damej. Olivek, F.R.S. 

Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published un'dcr the authoriry of the First 
Commissioner of Her Majesty's Works. Vol. VII., 27s. Gd. net. Vol. V., 
25s. 6d. net. Vol, VIII., Parts I. and II., 8s. net. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, atid the 01 ait, n.. 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbeirs, and Macquanie's IbLt 
Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Gov 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISIANDS, By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Publishec; niider the auspices of the Scire- 
tary of State for the Colonies. 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flowernig 
Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By Gkobbe Bkntiu^), 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement by D? "*^'' -'s. 
Published under the authority of Her Majesty's Secretary o. ' e 

Colonies. The Supplement, separately, 2s. 6d. «. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA ; its Origin, Affimi'es, and 
Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. 12s. „^t.ti, i 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MEN'lOp, and 

to a Winter Flora of the Riviera, including the coast from MarfeeiUes tr 
Genoa. By J. Teaheknk MoesMDOE. Royal 8vo. Complete >= i ^*> 
99 Coloured Plates, 63». 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Lid.. 6, Henrietta Street, CovibI CukI. .,. 



■ IP 

BOTANICA > MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF 1 . 685, JANUARY, 1902. 



Tab. 7812.— CEINUM JOHNSTONI, van minor. 
„ 7813.— ANGRiECUM EICHLERIANUM. 
„ 7814.— BAUHINIA YUNNANENSIS. 
„ 7815— SCHOMBUKGKIA THOMSONIANA, 
„ 7816.— HIBISCUS SCOTTL b«''- ^^^'o^- 



LovEtL Rkkve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



Completion of the FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

Now ready, Parts XXI II., XXIV. (compleinff the work), 18s. net. Vol. VII., cloth, 38s. net. 

FLORA OF EJRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vole. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V,, 88s. Vol, VI., 36s. 

* Persoas having incomplete Sets are adviaed to complete their Copies without delaj, 
HH ...e Parts will be kept on Sale for a limited time only. No Part or Vol. will be sold 
wkhoat its continuation to the end of the work. 



v ready, Vol. VIIL, Parts I. & II., 8,^ net. Vol. V., 25s. 6d. Vol. VII., 27s. Gd, net, 

FLORA OF T«OPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to ni., 20s, each, net. 
By D. OLIVER, F.B.S. 

The Continuation by various Botanists edited by Sir W. T. THI8ELT0N-DYEE, P.R S. 
I'nhlished under the authoriiy of the First Commissioner of Her Majesty's Works. 

Now Ready, Vol. V., Part I., 9s. net. Vol. VI., 24?. net. Vol. VII., 33s. net. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of tte Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 

Edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.6., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Qardens, Kev. 
Published under the authority of the Qovemments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 

Vols. I. to III. ISs. each. 

liv WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in th- 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTG WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 



Now ready, Part LXXXVI., with 4 Colonred Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

Br CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 
Vol. 1. 12s. ; large paper, with 40 Colonred Plates, 53s. 
Vols. II. — VII. 12s. each; large paper, each with 48 Colonred Plates, ^3^- 

Prospedtus may be had on appUeatim terthe PuhliBhers. 
LovBti. Eeeve * Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



?»I!riSl> BT SILBSKT AKD WVISBTOS, ID., Si. JOHB'a HOfSK, CMKKSSWBI.L, « t 




^ijivtt i eri'es. 

No. 686.% 

VOL. LVIII.—FEBRUARY. Price Ss. Gd. eolowed, 2«. 6d. plain. 

OB No. 1380 **' """^^ EITTIKB WOBK. 

CUBTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

OOMPBISIl^e 

THE PLANTS OF THE BOYAL GARDENS OF KKW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS- IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITH 

SUIT;aBLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.c.s.l, C.B., F.K.s., F.L.S. 

Tau QiirctoT of tf)t IRonal ISoianit GaTfitns of Titta. 




Namre and Art to adorn the page ootobme, 

And fl(>wer6eionc arace our northern clime. 



LONDON: 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd. 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDLiN iiOrE9S'^K-<T- 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVE>^T GARD::. . 

1902. 

[All rights reserved.} 



LOVELL REEVE & 30.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



Part II., with 10 Coloured Plates, 2)s. juir. 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACID^. 

By GEORGE BOWDLEB BUCKTOX, F.E.S., F.L.S. 

To he completed in o parts. Suhncrijption for tic " ' [';';:■' 



The family of the Membrari(icE has claims on the notice of both vhe scientific am! 
general public. Owing to the advance of agriculture, climatic variation, and othc 
intlnences, organic forms are constantly undergoing transformation, while Boino 
even become extinct. The present time, therefore, affords opportunities for stui 
and recording these forma, which may nbt occur again. 

The general public will find interest in, the bizarre forms of these insecfea, while the- 
■- -aculations of tho scientific mind will be exercised on the question of their utility, 
"he Memhracidcc are also interesting from their mimetic forms, which will b< 
^;,t,^rod in this Monograph. , 



Parts I. — XXVL, each 7s. Gd. coloured, 5s. uncoloured, net. 

THE HEPATICiE OF THE BRITISH ISLES, 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

Issued to Subscribers for the complete work only, in 28 Monthly Parts, 
each with 8 Plates. 

ProspeetiLs on application. 



Now ready. Parts?— 9, with IJ) Plates, 15*. plain, 21«, coloured, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

fIF THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 

With Descriptioks of all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 

By ALFRED FRYER, A.L.S.. li ustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The work will be issued in I quarterly sections of 3 parts each. 
Prospect .18 on application. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

^ Description office Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Natutalizad in the British Isles. 

Br GEORGE BE XT HAM, F.R.S. 

Tth Edition, iievisedby Sir J. D.BiooKKB.C.B.. G,C.S.I.,F.R.S.,&c. 9*. net. 



ILinSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S 
^rminii an Illustrated Companion to Bimthain' s "Handbook," and other British Floras. 
5th Edition, with lc>15 Wood Engravings, 9*. net. 

LOVELL SEEVE & CO. Ltp., 6, E.ENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



7611 




KdolJ.N.FitJJith 



"VSnoejrlBrooJcs.Da.y&Son.Lt^Imp 



Jj Rjeeve gt-C? LoTidan 



Tab. 7817. 

MONTRICHARDIA aculeata. 

Native of the West Indies and Amazons Biver. 



Nat. Ord. AROiDEiE. — Tribe PniLODENDiiEiK. 
Gunus MONTHICHARDIA, Grxig.; {Benth. & Roolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 982). 



MoNTKicHAHDiA aculeuta ; caudice elongate robusto tereti annulate laevi 
V. hie illic spimiloao, foliis padalibus ovate- v. deltoideo-oblongia 
acunoinatis fere ad medium sagittatis supra Igete viridibas costia nervisque 
pallidis subtus flavo-viridibu3 nervnlo marginali tenuissimo, lobis 
posticia inajqualibua valide costatis obtuse acumiuatis sinu lato v. 
angusto antico pauUo breviore late triansrulari-ovato, petiolo lamina 
breviore supra concave dorso rotundato, vagina marginibus petioli longe 
adnata dein libera elongata lanceolata, peduncule brevi crasBO § poll, 
diam., spathfB 8 poll, longae tube bipollicari fere globoso If poll. diam. 
flavo-viridi intus roseo, lamina explanata ovato-lanceolata acuminata 
extus flavo-viridi intu3 pallida citrina, spadice 4| poll, lon^o crasso apice 
rotundato, infl. 3 fere poUicem diam. colore spathge, antheris sessilibTis 
crassia subtrigonig truncatis rimis brevibua extua dehiacentibua, infl. ? 
quam S triplo breviore fuaco-viridi, ovariis gubprismaticis truncatis 1-locu- 
laribus, stigmata sphinctriformi centre umbenato. 

M. aculeata, Griig. in Bot. Zeit. vol. xii. (1854) p. 25. Schott, Syn. Avoid. 
p. 72; Prudr. Syst. Avoid, p. 217. 

M. arborescens, Schott, Arac. Betveff. (1854) p. 4; Sijn. Avoid, p. 71 ; Prodr. 
Syst. p. 215. Engl, in Mart. Ft. Bras. vol. iii. para II. p. 127, t. 25 ; in 
DC. Monogr. Phanerog. vol. ii. Arac. p. 288. 

M. arborea, Schott, Syn. Aroid. p. 72 ; Prodr. p. 217. 

M. arborescens et aculeata, Griseb. Fl. Brit. W. Ind. p. 510. 

Arum arborescens, Plumier, Descr. PL Amir. t. 204. Veil. Fl. Flum. vol. ix. 
t. 109. 

Caladiura arborescens, Vent. Jard. Gels, sub t. 30. 

C arborescens et C. aculeatum, G. F. W. Mey. Prim. Fl. Fsseq. p- 274. 

Philodendron arboreum, Kunth, Enum. PI. vol. iii. p. 48. 



A noble tropical Aroid, native of various localities 
near the coast from the West Indies to the Amazons River. 
The late Hermann Criiger, Superintendent of the Botanical 
Gardens of Trinidad, who founded the genus, named it 
after his friend, Count Montrichard, of that island, a 
zealous promoter of science. He described it as formmg 
thickets in moist places near the sea. 

The plant here figured was sent to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, by Mr. Jenraan, F.L.S., Superintendent of the Botan- 
ical Gardens, and Government Botanist, British Guiana, in 

February 1st, 1902. 



]890, it is now eight feet high. It flowered in tbe 
Tropical Aquatic House in June, 1900, and again in 1901. 
JJescr. — Stem tall, robust, terete, annulate, smooth 
or here and there spinulose. Leaves a foot long, ovate 
or deltoidly oblong, hastate to the middle, with a broad 
or narrow sinus, bright green above with pale yellow 
midrib and nerves ; basal lobes unequal, stoutly costate, 
dimidiately ovate-oblong, obtusely acuminate, terminal 
broadly deltoid, cuspidate, intra-marginal nerve slender. 
retiole very stout, concave above ; sheath adnate to the 
margins of the petiole, with a long, free, narrow limb. 
redunde short, yerj stout. Spathe eight inches long; 
tube two inches long by one and three-quarters in 
diameter, yellow-green externally, red within, base rounded ; 
lamina six inches long, ovate-lanceolate, open and recurved, 
acuminate, yellow-green externally, lemon-yellow within. 
Spadix four and a half inches long, sub-sessile, cylindric, 
nearly one inch in diameter, top rounded. Mole in- 
florescence three inches long; anthers closely packed, 
trigonous, truncate; cells linear, extrorse. Female in- 
florescence an inch long. Ovaries sub-prismatic, truncate, 
one-celled, one-ovuled. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, section of tube of spathe with gpadix ; 2, anthers ; 3, ovary ; 4. por- 
tion of truncate surface of ovary ; 5, vertical section of ovary -.—all en- 
liirged :— 6, reduced view of whole plant. 



7S/8 




MS.del, J.N.FxtATith. 



• Raer^e & CP London 



-VmceTitBrcoks,r)ay&SoivLt*W!i? 



] 



Tar. 7818. 

PLEOTRANTHUS Mahonjt. 

Native of British Central Africa, 

Nat. Ord. La.bia.t.e. — Tribe Ocimoidk^. 
Genus Plectkanthus, UHer.; {Benth. <^ Hook,/. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1175. 



pLECTRAXTiius (Germauea) Mahonii; herba perennis, erecta, ramosa, ramnlis 
puberulis, foliis 3-5-poll. longis petiolatis ovatis obtusis groase crenatis in- 
ferioribus in petiolum augustatis superioribus basi cordatis supra glabris 
laete vindibus subtus puberulis pallidis, racemis sessibbus J5-8-pollicaril)ns 
simplicibus laxifloris puberulis, verticillastris 3-6-flori8, pedicellis ^-^ 
pollicaribus, bracteis parvis ovatis viridibus, calyce J poll: longo cam- 
panulato ad medium bilabiato, labio superiore late ovato erecto, iuferiore 
3-dentato dentibus deltoideis, corolla declinata puberula violacea, tubo 
cal-^ce pauUo longiore, faiice tumido, limbi f poll, longi laliio postico 
3-lobo, lobo Ruperiore erecto b'lobula+o lateralibus rotuDdaiis niiillo 
niajore, inferiore cymbiformi, filamentia liberis, antheris dorao glaudu- 
loais, disco crasso lobato. 

P. Mahonii, iV. JS. Brown mss. 

ColeuR Mahonii, Baker in Dyer, Fl. Trop. Afr. vol, v. p. 434. 



The genus Plectranthus, a very large one, confined to 
the Old World, is represented in the "Flora of Tropical 
Africa," by seventy-eight species, a number rapidly 
being added to as collections arrive from that botanical ly 
little explored country. Owino- to the difficulty of deter- 
niining in herbarium specimens the freedom or connation 
of the filaments, the characters that separate FlerAraitthii.<i 
from Col ens (of which there are seventy-seven described 
African species), P. Mahonii was first described under 
the latter genus. 

The specimen here figured was raised from seed sent to 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1898, by Mr. John Mahon, of 
the Botanical Department of British Central Africa, from 
Zomba, a mountain up^vards of five thousand feet liigh, 
situated a little to the West of Lake Shirwa, in lat. 15^^' S. 
It flowered in a greenhouse in November, 1000, and 
continued in flower throughout the winter. 

Bescr. — Stem three feet high, acutely four-angled, and 
branches puberulous. Leaves three to four inches long, 
the lower narrowed into the petiole, the upper cordate, 
February I&t, 1902. 



ovate, sub-acute, coarsely unequally creuate-serrate, bright 
green and glabrous above, puberulous beneath. Racemes 
three to eight inches long, simple, sessile, loosely many- 
flowered ; whorls three- to six-flowered ; bracts minute ; 
pedicels slender, one-eighth to one-sixth of an inch long. 
Calyx about as long as the pedicel, puberulous, campanu- 
late, two-lipped, upper lip broadly ovate, lower with three 
small ovate teeth. Corolla puberulous externally, violet- 
blue, tube hardly longer than the calyx ; lips widely 
divaricate, upper lip broadly three-lobed, midlobe bilobu- 
late, erect, lobules rounded, lateral lobes very short, 
rounded ; lower lip cymbiform. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, side view of flower; 2, Bection of calyx showing disk and ovary; 
3, corolla seen in front ; 4 and 5, anthers : — all enlarged. 



I8id 




"M 3. del, J.N.PitdvitK 



VmoentBrooks,Day &SorvLtfImp 



Tab. 7819. 

MINKELERSIA bifloea. 

Native of Mexico, 

Nat. Ord. Leguminos^. — Tribe Phaseole.b. 
Genus Minkelersia, ilfarf. <fe Gal.', {Benth.^ HooJc.f. 6fe?i. PZan^ vol. i. p. 539.) 



MiNKELEESTA, Mflora ; herba gracilis, volnbilis, radice tnberoso, canle 
pubescenti-pilos, internodiis longiuscnlis, foliis pinnatim trifoliolatie, 
fere glabervimis, petiolo elongate, foliolis l-lj poll, longie BubsequaUbuB 
obtusis lateralibus obliqne ovato-rotandatis, intermedio longius petiolu- 
lato, ovato jequilatero, stipulis ^ poll, longis ovato-rotundatis obtnsis, 
stipellis subulatis, pednnculia axillaribus foliis longioribus erectis apice 
bracteatis et bibracteolatis bifloris, bracteis stipuliB consirailibuB, floribus 
sessilibus ad \\ poll, longis, calyce pnbescente \ poll, longa, tubo lobis 
erectis inaequalibus oblongis obtusis breviore.vexillospathnlatoconcavo.alis 
longe nnguiculatis carinae leviter cohajrentibus lamina oblique rotundata 
basi semicordata recurva purpurea, carina angusta apice cum styli apice 
filamentisque spiraliter involntis, ovario angnsto piloso ad 20-ovnlato, stylo 
gracili glabro apice torto piloso, stigmate parvo ovato, legumine lineari 
apice pungente teretiusculo polyspermi, valvis subtorulosis. 

M. biflora, Remsl. JDiagn. PL Nov. pars II. p. 48 ; Biol. Cent. Amer. vol, i. 
p. 308, t. xvi. fig. 1-7. 



Three species of Minlcelersia are known, all Mexican ; 
namely, M. galactioides, Mart, et Gal., a native of the 
Cordillera of Oaxaca, at four thousand to six thousand 
feet elevation ; that here figured, which was discovered by 
SchaflPner in the Valley of ^Mexico, and a third from the 
Sierra Madre. The genus is considered by Bentham to 
be little more than a section of Fhaseolus, distinguished 
by its longer calyx-lobes, and the elongate petals. It was 
named in compliment to the Professor of Physics in the 
University of Louvain, Dr. Minkelers. 

Seeds of M. hijlora were sent to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in 1897, by Dr. J. N. Rose, Assistant Curator of the 
National Herbarium of the United States of America, at 
Washington, plants raised from which flowered in a cool 
house in October, 1900. 

Descr. — Boot tuberous. Stem elongate, very slender, 
twining, sparsely hairy. Leaves trifoliolate, petiole two 
to three inches long ; leaflets sub-equal, orbicular-ovate, 

FzBRUAKr IST, 1902. 



obtuse, lateral sub-sessile, uuequal-sided, stipellate, ter- 
minal shortly petiolulate, sub-cordate at the base, 
obscurely stipellate on the petiolule ; stipules one-fourth 
of an inch long, nearly orbicular, persistent, deflexed, 
glabrous ; stipella) very minute, subulate. Feduncles axil- 
lary, longer than the petioles, erect, two-flowered. Bracts 
like the stipules, but smaller. Flowers very shortly pedi- 
celled, erect, one and a half inches long, pale red-purple. 
Calyx half an inch long, oblong, hairy, cleft to below the 
middle into five, unequal, erect, linear-oblong, obtuse lobes. 
Standard spathulate, concave, slightly incurved. Wings 
long-clawed, orbicular, as long as, but much broader than 
the standard, spreading and recurved. Keel petals very 
narrow, rather shorter than the standard, tips spirally in- 
volute, with the tips of the filaments and of the style 
which they enclose. Staminal tube long, narrow, filaments 
very short, contorted ; anthers minute, oblong. Ovary very 
hairy, produced into a filiform style, which is hairy, aud 
twisted at the tip. Pod linear, straight, sub-terete, tip 
pungent ; valves sub-torulose. Seeds very small, obtusely 
^ub-cubical. — /. D. H. 



Vig, 1, bracts, calyx, and keel enclosing stamens and ovary; 2, stamens; 
3, ovary ; 4, bracts, calyx, and pod of nat. size ; 5, seed : — all except 4 enlarged. 




MS.^^J.K.Rl/J,Tiai 



X.'Reove it C "? T.on do 



Tab. 7820. 
CALATHEA crocata. 
Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Scitamine.m. — Tribe Marakte^*. 
Genus Calathea, G. F. W. Mey ; (Benlh. & ITook.f. Oeii. Plant, vol. iil. ]\ 653.) 



Calathea (Pseudophryniurn) crocata; pumila, c<B8pitosa, glaberrima, rliizo- 
mate hynoga3o ramoho, foliis suhdistichia erectia longiuscule petiolatw 
6-10 poll, longis ovato- v. oblongo-lanceolatis subacutis v. acnmirmtis 
Bupra saturate viridibus subtua roseo-i^urpureis baai obtuais vel rotnmlatia, 
petiolo lamina breviore fere ad apicem anguste vaginunte. vagina pallida 
striata folii intinii interdum crocea, pedunculo foliis breviore valido 
erecto luride viridi superne paullo incrassato, spica brevi ad 2i polL 
longa et lata erecta, bracteis l-lj poll, longis quinquefariis ovato-lan- 
ceoiatiH patenti-recurvis aurantiacis nitidis, spiculis |-g poll, longis, 
2-3flori8, bra'!teolia lineari-oblongia floi-es ajqaantibu*', wepalis 3 lineari- 
lanceolatis roseis, cor( lla3 aurantiacae tubo brevi aegmentia liaeari-oblongia 
acumitiatis, staminodi'a 3 tubo corollEe adnatis bicallosis, callo niajore 
laterali triangulari, fHamento petaloideo 2-partito, stylo crasao cdrvo 
flavo, stigrnate iudusiato, ovario gloDoao 3 luculare loseo. 

C. crocata, E. Morr. et Joi-iss. in BeJg. Hortic. vol. xxv. (1875), p. lH, t. 8, 
Floral World, 1876, p. 161. Gard. Ghron. 1900, Vol. ii. p. 113, fig. 29, 



The genus Calathea.^ of which only about sixty species 
were known a quarter of a century ago, now numbers 
nearly twice as many ; all, except a few tropical African, 
are xVmerican, and are very difficult of determination from 
Herbarium specimens. The excellent figure of G. crocata 
in the Belgique Horticole alloAvs of no doubt as to the 
name of the plant here under consideration, and the accom- 
panying description given by the authors of its complicated 
sexual organs is very complete. The species was intro- 
duced from Brazil in 1874 by Messrs. Jacob Makoy of 
Liege. The specimen here figured was purchased at an 
auction sale for the lloyal Gardens, Kew. It flowered in 
May, 1901. 

Descr. — Whole plant ten to twelve inches high. Roof' 
stock short, branching. Leaves sub-distichous; petiole two 
to three inches long, sheathing nearly throughout its 
length, hardly auricled at the mouth of the sheatli, pale 
green or purplish, that of the uppermost leaf bright 
orange ; blade four to five inches long, erect, ovate-lan- 

Fkbruaey 1st, 1902. 



ceolate, sub-acute or acuminate, rather undulate, dark 
green above, bright rose-purple beneath. Peduncle shorter 
than the leaves, slightly thickened upwards, dull green. 
Sjpike short, erect, two to two and a half inches broad 
and long; bracts quinquefariously spreading and recurv^ed, 
ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, bright orange-coloured ; spike- 
lets about half as long as the bracts, two- to three- 
flowered ; bracteoles linear-oblouof, as long as the flowers, 
orange-coloured. Sepals linear-lanceolate, rose-red. Co- 
rolla orange-yellow, tube short, lobes linear-oblong, 
acuminate. Staminodes adnate to the corolla-tube. 
Stamen petaloid. — J, D. H. 



Fig. 1, bracteoles and flowers ; 2, staminodes, antVier, style and stigma 
3, staminode ; 4 style, anther and stigma : — all enlarged. 



7821 




^.tS.ael, J.N.PitcKlitK 



TSrLoerABrooics, 



SoTiLl<5^Imp 



L Reeve & C? LoT\doTi 



Tab. 7821. 
SOLANUM Xanti. 

Native of California, 

Nat. Ord. Solana.ce«:. — Tribe SoLANEiE. 
Genus Solanum, Linn. ; {Benth. & Sooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 888.) 



SoLANUM (Pachystemon) Xanti; suffrutex v. herba basi lignosa, inermis, tota, 
corolla excepta, plus miousve pilis simplicibus glandulosisque pubescens, 
ramis gracilibus, foliia polymorphis ^-4 poll, longis ovatis ovato-oblongia 
V. lineari-oblongis obtusis subacutisve integris repaadisve basi rotundatis 
cordatis v. rarius auriculato-bilobis submembranaceis pallide flavo-viri- 
dibus, nervis utrinsecus 6-8 arcuatis, petiolo ^-f poll, longo, cymia um- 
belliformibuB lateralibas v, terminalibua, ramulis infra pedicellos 
tuberculo minuto cupuliforme instruotis, pedicellis gracilibus 1-1|^ poll, 
longis, floribus nutantibua, calycis campanulati lobis triangulari-ovatig 
obtusis, corolla rotato-campamilata pentagona l-l^^ poll, lata violacea 
basi intus plagis 5 albis centro viridibus ornata, filamentis brevibus 
pilosis, antheris lineari-oblongis obtusis rimis elongatis dehiscentibua, 
oyario glabro, stylo gracili recto, bacca globosa purpurea calyce pauUo 
dilatato sufEulta. 

S. Xanti, A. Gray m Proc. Amer. Acad. vol. xi. (1876) p. 90 ; in Bot. Calif. 
vol. i. p. 639, ii. p. 471. 



A very beautiful plant, native of Southern California, 
■where it was first collected by Mr. L. J. Xantus de Vesey, 
extending as far north as Sta. Barbara and eastward into 
Nevada. A variety, Wallacei, A. Gray, I.e., has larger 
leaves and flowers, and the cymes are villous with longer, 
viscid, jointed hairs ; it is a native of Santa Catalina 
Island, off the coast of California in about 33° lat. 

The specimen here figured of 8. Xanti was sent to me 
from the Botanic Gardens of the University of Cambridge 
in July, 1900, by Mr. Lynch, who informs me that he 
received it from Dr. Franceschi, of the Southern Cahfornian 
Acclimatisation Association, Santa Barbara. 

8. Xanti is remarkable for the extraordinary variability 
of the leaves. In some native specimens these are only 
half an inch long and oblong, in others much longer 
and linear, oblong or ovate, in others four inches long, 
ovate, entire or with two broad unequal basal auricles. 
The minute cup-shaped tubercle in each branch of the 
cyme, beneath the insertion of the pedicels, is a character 
February 1st, 1902. 



common to several American species. The purple fruit is 
sometimes as large as a cherry. 

Descr. — Whole plant, except the corolla and ovary, more 
or less pubescent, with simple and gland-tipped hairs. 
Stem branched, woody at the base. Leaves soft, poly- 
morphous as described above, obtuse or acute, pale yellow- 
green, base acute, rounded or sub-cordate ; nerves many, 
strong. Cymes terminal or on short, lateral branchlets, 
umbelliform, shortly peduncled; pedicels slender, one to 
one and a half inch long, spreading, decurved. Calyx 
small, campanulate, green, lobes triangular-ovate, obtuse. 
Corolla an inch to an inch and a half broad, between rotate 
and campanulate, limb five-angled or very shortly and 
broadly five-lobed, pale purple, base with five orbicular, 
white spots, each with a green centre. Filaments short, 
hairy ; anthers linear-oblong, dehiscing throughout their 
length. Ovary quite glabrous ; style filiform. Berry 
globose, purple. — J. D. E, 



Fig. 1, portioTi of branch with simple and glandular hairs ; 2, calyi ; 3, base 
of corolla, and stamens ; 4, ovary -.—all enlarged ; 5, fruit of nat. size. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 



HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Ifilea. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By Gborge Benth.am, 
F.R.S. 7th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawixigs by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Com})Rnion 
to Bentbam's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 5th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F. R.S., President of the LinriHan 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wi-lif, "Rith 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsrnd, W.A., K.L S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British lelee. By the Rev. M. J.Bkkkei-k», 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer oupr) foiind in Cisat 
Britain and Ireland. By Chaklks P. Hobkirk, F.L.S. , Ac, Ac. >"ew 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. net. 

THE liRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Famihes of 

Britigh Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Micr<).scopn aJ 
details of their structure. By R. Bkaithwaite, M.I)., F.L.S. Vol. ]., 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II., 42s. 6ct. Paiis XVII.— XX., 6s. each, 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J.D. Hookkk, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vole., £12 net. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bkntiiam, F.R.S., F-L.S., assisted bv F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols, I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. PubliHhed 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES : a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Bakyk, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the authoiily o( the 

t Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description of the Phvis <>{ 
the Cape Colony, Caffvaiia, and Port Natal. By William H. Hakyj. y, M.D., 
F.R.S., and Otto Wilhkim Bonder, Ph.D. Vole. I.-III., 18s. each. 
Vol VI., 24s. net. Vol. VII., 35s. net. Vol. V,, Part I„ 9s. net. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. Bv Daniel Omvkk, F.R.S. 

Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of tie First 
Commissioner of Her Majesty's Works. Vol. VII., 27«. 6d. net. Vol. V., 
25s. 6d. net. Vol. VIII., Parts I. and II., 8s. net. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic- 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chathnu,, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Catupbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J, D. HooKKK. F.K.S. Published under the auspicesof the Govermneni 
of that Colony. ComyiJete, 42s 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. r>y 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the S. , re- 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

FLORA HONOKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flowering 

Plants ST . f the Island of Hongkong. By George Bf.nthav', 

i^-L.S, V. p of the Island and Supplement by Dr. HA^^K. 2ls. 

Publishea iiikht tne authority of Her Majesty's Secretai7 of Stute foi the 
Colonies. The Supplement, separatelv, 2s. 6d. 
ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, -axk} 

Distribution. By .'^ir J. J). Hooker. F.B.S. 12s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE, ami 

to a Winter Floia of the Riviera, including the coast from Mart-eiHes to 
Genoa. By J. Tbameenb Moggbidge. Royal 8vo. Complete in 1 vol., 
99 Coloured Plates, 63«. 

LOYELL EEEYE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, 



BOT A N 1 C A L MA (t A Z I X K. 

CONTENTS OF No. 686, FEBRUARY, 1902. 



Tab. 7817.— MOJTTRICHARDIA ACULEATA. 
„ 7818.— PLECTRANTHUS MAHONII. 
„ 7819.— MmKELERSIA BIFLORA. 
„ 7820.— CALATHEA CROCATA. 
„ 7821.— SOLANUM XANTE 



LovELii Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Gardeii. 

Completion of the FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

Now ready.Parts XXIII., XXIV. {completing the work), 18s. net. Vol. VII., cloth, 38s. net. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV. , 32s. each. Vol. V. , 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
*#* Persona having incomplete Seta are adrised to complete their Copies withont delay, 
as the Parts will be kept on Sale for a limited time only. No Part or Vol. will be sold 
without its continuation to the end of the work. 



Now ready, Vol. VIII., Parts I. & II., 8s. net. Vol. V., 25s. 6d. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. net. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. 1. to HI.. 20s. each, net. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Coutinnation by various Botanists edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYEK, F.E.S. 

Fuhlished under the authority of the First Commissioner of Her Majesty's Worhs. 



Now Ready, Vol. V., Part I., 9s. net. Vol. VI., 24.». net. Vol. VII., 33s. net. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Cafifraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.6., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. — 

Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 
^"ols. I. to III. ISs. encli. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 

Now ready. Part LXXXVII., with i Coloured Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 
Vol. 1. 12n. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s, 
Vols. II. — VII. 12s. each; large paper, each with 48 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Pro&pectus may be had on application to the Publishers. 



LoVKLL Eeete & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



PBIHTBB BY SlLBBBt AMD BIVIlTSTOir, tB., ST. JOHS'S HOITSB, Ct.BBKUl''''"^^' '*'' 



No. 687.:' 

VOL. LVIlI.-MAIirn. Price 3,. 6,2. ,-.Io«>yc/, 2s. 6d. pU'^ 

on No. 138X ^^ ^^^ EjsriKB woek. 

CDETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COUPBISIZTO 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KliW, 

AND OF OTHEli BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BKITAL 

SUITABLE DESCRIPnONS; 

Siii JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D.. G.C.s.l.. C.B., F.i; 

Xnte Bircctor of the Bopal IBotanic ©arhtns of ^m. 







ffL^;^^ 



Nature and Art to adorn tbe page combine, 



LONDON; 

LOVELL REEVE & CO, L; 

PUBLI6HEBS TO TP - > nLO>nAL AND " 

6, HENRIt_... . .UEET, COVE. . 
1902. 

[All riffhis r . 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



Part II., with 10 Coloured Plates, 21 s, uei. 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACID^. 

By GEORGE BOWDLER BD-CKTO:Nr, F.E.S., F.L.S. 
To he completed in 5 parts. Subscription for the whole work, £4 14s. 6d. 



The family of the Memhracidm has claims on th? notice of both ';ha scientific and 

cal public. Owing to the advance of agriculture, climatic variation, and other 

ences, organic forms are constantly undergoing transformation, while some may 

<vtn become extinct. The present time, therefore, affords opportunities for studying 

and I'ecording these forms, which may not occur again. 

The general public will find interest in the bizarre forms of these insects, while the 
speculations of the scientific miud will be exercised on the question of their utility. 
mi.., ^'nnhj-acida are also interesting ^ from their mimetic forms, which will be 
t in this Monograph. 



Parts I.— 4CXVII., each 7s. Qd. coloured, 5s. uncolonred, net. 

THE HEPATIC-ai OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

^ Issued to Subscribers for the complete work only, in 28 Monthly Parts, 

each with 8 Plates, 

Prospectus on, application. 

Now ready. Parts 7—9, with 12 Plates, 15*. plain, 21«. coloured, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OP THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 

"With Descriptions op all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 

By ALFRED FRYER, A.L.S. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The work will be issued in 5 quarterly sections of 3 parts each. 
Prospectus on application. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Descn'piion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naiufalised in the British Isles. 

Br GEORGE BENTHAM, F.R.S. 

7th Edition, Revised by Sir J, D. Hookee,C.B.. G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9«. net. 



ILIDSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawk by W. H. fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

■mj an lUuttrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 
5th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9*. net. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Lt»., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDENS 



1872 




KSaelJNPitdhUth 



"«ncej^tBrooWs,nay &SonI,t*Tmp 



I. TlBov-e &C° London 



Tad. 7822. 
PASSIFLORA AMBiGUA. 

Native of Nicaragua. 

Nat. Ord. Passiflore,1£. — Tribe Pa8SIFL0[ie.k. 
Genus Passiflora., Linn. ; {Benth. & IlouJc.f. Gen. Plaut. vol. i. p. 810.) 



Passifi.ora (Oranadilla) amhigua ; glaberrima, ramis ramulisque subteretibni?, 
foliis petiolatis oblongo- v. ovato-lanceolatis cuapidcitj-acuminatia auperi- 
oribus 3-5 inferioribus 8-10 poll. loni,as coriaceis basi rotandatia iitrinque 
6-l()-nevvus, petiolo |-1 poll, longo medio v. infra medium 2-gIanduloso, 
stipulis tiliformibus caducis, cirrhis simplioibus, peduuculis solitariia v. 
2-nis axIUaribua l-J-2 poll, lontjis, bracteolis 3 infra apicera pedunculi 
sitis poUicaribns fere orbiculatis concavis erosis eglandulosis, iloribus 5 
poll, diam., perianthii carnosi tubo oblato basi intrusosub 10-lobo, sepalig 
5 anguste lineari-oblongis dorso costatia et infra apicem obtusum 
caudicalatis extua albis intus rubro-purpureo creberritne i>anctatiH, 
petalis Bepalis angustioribus lineari-lanceolatis sabacutis albia margiuea 
versus roseo-punctatis, corona3 exterioris segmeatis 2-Heriatis, extimia ad 
^-pollioaribus gracilibus rubris albo variegatis intimis 2-2| poll, longis 
crassioribua complanatis subacutis violaceis albo I'asciatis, coronio inter- 
mediae fere basilaria pilia brevibus uniseriatis, corona intima anaulari 
recurva fimbriata. 

P. ambigua, Hemsl. mss. 



The above description of Passiflora amhirfua is taken 
almost wholly from one kindly lent me by Mr. Ilemsley. 
It was drawn up by him from a specimen which was raised 
from seed received in 1896 from Mr. E. Gr. Stnrridge, 
Nurseryman, of Blewfields in Nicaragua, which flowered 
in the Palm House of the Royal Gardens, Kew, in May, 
1901. Mr. Hemsley regards its affinity so close witli /'. 
laurifolin,\jmn. (Jacq. Hort. Vindb. ii. t. 162) and P. titn/i- 
formU, Linn. (Bot. Reg. t. 94), as to suggest the possibility 
of its being of hybrid origin. Premising that /'. amhhjua 
is a very much larger plant, with flowers more than 
double the size, and with a differently co'i'ur. d p.i i.-m! h, 
it further differs from F. laurifolia in the petiole being 
biglandnlar in the middle, not at the apex, in the brncteoU'S 
beino: eglandular, in the leaves not being conlat(» at the 
base, and in the long filaments of the corona having obtuse^ 
not subulate tips. From P. mal if onnis it differs in ilio 
same characters of the lcaf-!>ase, size of flower and long 
M.\acn "isT, 1902. 



filaments of the corona, and also in the stipules being 
linear, not ovate with subulate tips. 

Descr. — A glabrous, stout, climbing shrub, with sub- 
terete stem and branches. Leaves eight to ten inches 
long, oblong- or ovate-lanceolate, cuspidately acuminate, 
base cuneate or rounded ; petiole one half to one inch long, 
biglandular about the middle. StijJules very slender, about 
four-tenths of an inch long, deciduous. Tendrils un- 
branched. Peduncles solitary or binate, axillary, one and 
a half to two inches long. Bracteoles inserted beneath the 
apex of the peduncle, about an inch long, nearly orbicular, 
concave, green, eglandular. Flowers ^ve inches in diameter ; 
perianth fleshy, tube oblate, deeply intruded, and almost 
ten-lobed at the base. Sepals 5, narrowly linear-oblong, 
obtuse, dorsally white and costate, with a short horn 
below the apex, ventrally pale pink, closely punctulate 
Avith rose-purple. Petals shorter and much narrower than 
the sepals, linear-lanceolate, sub-acute, white, dotted with 
rose-purple towards the margin. Corona nearly two' 
inches long ; outer filaments about one-third as long as the 
inner, very slender, red, banded with white ; inner filaments 
stout, fleshy, obtuse or sub-acute, violet, banded with 
white; innermost corona very short, basilar, recurved, 
ciliate.— J. D. E. 



^'g- 1. joxmg leaf and stipules of the natural size; 2, vertical section of 
base of perianth with [..istil, stamens, and some of tlie coronal filaments ; 
.3. portion of innermost corona ; 4, dorsal view of anther and tilaraents :— u// 
enlorged. 



7S23 




r 



M S delJ.NHtfiKlith. 



VinaanlBrookHriffyi. •''•■^-''- "■ * 



LRee-ve &.C9 London 



Tam. 7823. 
JASMIXUM Maingayi. 
Native of Penang. 

Nat. Old. OLEACE.ic. — Tribe Jasmine.e. 
Genus JasMINUM, Linn.; {Benfh. & Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 674). 



Jasminum Main(fayl\ frutex scandens, gracilis, ramosus, ramnlis superne 
pedunciilis pedicellia calycibasqiie pubsrulia, foliis superiorilma 
breviter inferioribus longius petiolatis ovato-oblongis-lanceolatisvo 
acutis acuminatisve 3-5 poll, longis 1^-2 poll, latis basi acutis rotuuJatis 
cuneatisve supra saturate viridibus nervis utriuque coatoe 6-8 obscui'is, 
Bubtus pallidis nervis prominulis, petiolis fusco-viulaceis, cyinis 
termmalibus sessilibua, pedicellis brevibus erectis, bracteolis parvis 
liuearibus, calycis tiibo subcampanulato | poll, longo segmentis 
erectis lanceolatis tubo snbduplo longioribus, corollic tubo pollicari, 
limbi albi 1^ poll. diam. segmentis 8-10 anguate oblougis acuminati.s, 
anlheris lineari-oblongia apiculatis, stylo gracili, stigmatis lobis lineari- 
bus, carpellis maturis solitariia dimidiato-oblongis J poll, longis mono- 
spermia. 

J. Maingayi, G. B. Clarke in Hook. f. FL Brit. Ind. vol. iii. p. 594. 



Jasminum is exclusively an Old World genns of very 
wide distribution, from the Azores and Canaries in the 
West, across Africa and Asia, to the Islands of the 
Pacific, chiefly in tropical latitudes. India (or perhaps 
China) is the headquarters of the genus, forty-five 
of the one hundred and thirty recorded species being 
described in the "Flora of British India," of which 
four have been figured in this work; two with entire 
leaves and white flowers, /. l^amhac, L. t. 1785, and 
,/. puhescens, Willd. {hh'siUum, Wiiid. t. 1991) ; and two 
with pinnatisect leaves, the yellow flowered, J. Jmmile, 
Linn. (./. revolutum, Sims, t. 1731), and the common 
white-flowered Jessamine of our gardens, /. ojicinalef 
Linn. (t. 31). With regard to the last named species, 
it is a remarkable fact, that for upwards of two hundred 
and fifty years after its first introduction into English 
gardens (in 1548) its native country was unknown. 
i:>ims, in tliis Magazine, in 1787, cites Miller's " Gardener's 
Dictionary " for its " grooving naturally in Malabar and 
several parts of India ; " Alton, '* Hortus Kewcnsis " 
March 1st, 1902. 



(1810), gives no native country ; Alpli. De Candolle (1844) 
cites the Caucasus, Imiretia, Canton, and India? It is 
only comparatively recent authors who have recognized it 
as indigenous in the Himalaya, where it is found at 
elevations of seven thousand feet to eight thousand feet in 
Kumaon, and three thousand feet to nine thousand feet 
in Kashmir, whence, no doubt, it has spread under 
cultivation, or in a semi-wild state westward to the 
Mediterranean, and eastward to China. It is worthy of 
remark that there is hardly any variation from pure 
white or yellow in this large and widely diffused genus. 

J. Maingayi is a native of Penang, where it was found 
hy the late accomplished botanist. Dr. A. C. Maingay, 
who was killed when quelling an outbreak of prisoners at 
Rangoon in 1869. The figure is from a plant ])resented 
to the lloyal Gardens, Kew, by Messrs. F. Sander & Co. 
of St. Albans, which flowered in a tropical house in Jnue, 
1901. 

Descr. — A slender, scandent shrub, with pubescent 
branchlets, cymes, and calyces. Leaves three to four 
inches long, ovate-oblong or -lanceolate, acute or acumi- 
nate, base acute, cuneate or rounded, dark green above, 
pale beneath, nerves six to eight pairs ; petiole of upper 
leaves short, of lower an inch long or more. Cymes 
terminal, sessile, fascicled ; pedicels short, erect ; bracteoles 
very small, linear. Calyx-tube about an eighth of an inch 
long, sub-campanulate ; segments about twice as long, 
lanceolate, erect. Corolla white; tube an inch long; 
limb an incli and a half in diameter, segments eight to 
ten, narrowly oblong, acuminate. Anthers linear-oblong, 
apiculate. Style slender; stigmatic lobes linear. Fruit of 
one dimidiate-oblong, one-seeded, dry carpel half an inch 
long.— J. D.E. ^ 



Fig 1, calyx, style and stigma ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, ovary -.-all enlarged ; 
o, trait, of tlie nal. size. > » j 



7SZi 




■ 



^i:;/=-^r-r^^- 



il.S.de; J.U.Pit/iKKlX 



V.....MB.ooUspa-y&3-I'i'^I^^ 



L R«e/e &. C9 Lojidor 



Tab. 7824. 
MASDEVALLIA elepitanticeps. 

Native of New Grenada. 



Nat, Ord. Okchide,«. — Tribe Epidendre^. 

Genus Masdevallia, Buiz & Pav.; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 492.) 



Masdevallia (Coriceao) elephanticeps ; foliia 6-10-pollicaribn8 lineari-oblongis 
oblanceolatiave iu petiolum crassum angustatis crasae coriaceis supra 
luride viridibuB, petiolo antice sulcato basi vaginis 1-2 tubulosis mem- 
branaceis laxis pallide brnnneis instructo, pednnculis petiolo 8uba!qni- 
longis subflexuosia deorsnm attenuatis monocephalis internodiis ^-f poll, 
longis, vaginis bracteisque basi tabulosis dein campannlatis acuminatia 
membranaceis, floribus subhorizontalibus 3-4 poll, longia crasse coriaceis, 
perianthii tubo saccato basi rotundato flavo-viridi purpureo suffuso, sepalo 
dorsali porrecto a basi late ovata in caudam validam bipollicarem flavi- 
dam angustato, lateralibus intus rubro-purpureis ultra medium connatis 
in Cauda 3 flavidas recurvas pollicares angustatis, petalis spathulatia 
obtusis dorso crasse costatis, labello oblongo obtuso densissime papillose 
luride purpureo. 

M. elephanticpps, Reichb.f. et Warsc. in Bonplandia, vol. ii (1854) p. 116, ct 
Xen. Orchid, vol. i. p. 6. t. 3 ; Fl. des Serres, vol. x. t. 997 (I.e. Ken. 
Orrh. it.). Veitch, Man. Orchid. Masdev. p. 40. Woohc. Masdev. p. 47, 
t. 16. 

M. Gar?antua, Eeie^i. /. m Gard. Ghron. 1876, vol. ii. p. 516. Veitch, I.e. 
p. 43. 



This, one of the most remarkable species of a ^enus 
distinguished for the variety of the fantastic forms assumed 
by its flowers, is very closely allied to M. Mooreona, 
Reichb. f., figured at t. 7015 of this work. It was dis- 
covered by the collector Warscewicz in 1850-1, on the 
Eastern Cordillera of New Grenada, between Ocana and 
Pamplona, at elevations of six thousand five hundred feet 
to ten thousand feet. It has been in cultivation in the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, for about twenty years, flowering in 
the winter, and is remarkable for the"^ foetid odour of the 
flowers. 

Descr. — Leaves six to ten inches long, linear-oblong or 
oblanceolate, obtuse, narrowed into a very stout petiole, 
thickly coriaceous, bright dark green and shining above, 
pale beneath ; petiole with one or two lax, scarions, tubular, 
brown, striate, membranous sheaths. Feduncles one or 

March Ist, 1902. 



more, as long as tbe petiole, stout, sub-fiexuons, rather 
thickened upwards ; internodes sheathed ; lower sheaths 
short, tubular, upper, more campanulate, acute. Flowers 
inclined, three to four inches long. Pevianih thickly 
coriaceous ; tube two-thirds of an inch long, saccate, base 
rounded, yellow green, suffused with purple. Dorsal 
sepal sub-erect, narrowed from a broadly ovate base into 
a stout pale yellow tail two inches long ; lateral sub- 
similar, but with larger limb, dark red purple within, and 
a shorter recurved yellowish tail. Petals spathulate, 
midrib dorsally very stout. Lip oblong, obtuse, densely 
clothed with very dark purple, elongate papillaa. — /. D. H. 

Fip. 1, flower with the sepals removed; 2, column; 3, pollinia :— a^^ 
enlarged. 



7825 




M.S.ael,J_Tf.HtcKli»>, 



Vinoenl Broo.<s 



,'^,B3.-.&SonI.t^'&« 



L Reeve fie O? I. an do 



Tab. 7825. 
ASTER Tradescanti. 

Native of Eastern N. America. 

Nat. Ord. CoMPOSiTiE. — Tribe Asteroide*. 
GenuH Aster, Linn.; {Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 271.) 



Aster (Enaster) Tradescanti ; herba glaberrima, 2-4-pedalia, ramoasima, 
ramis erectis v. ascendentibns foliosis, foliis 2-3 poll, lonpis sessilibua 
linearibus v. lineari-lanceolatis obtusis v. subacutis integerrimis v. medio 
pauci-serratis saturate viridibus costatis, nervis pancis obscuris, mar- 
ginibus pcaberulia, capituUs perplurirais ad |-1 poll, diatn. racemositn v. 
corymbosim dispositis sessilibus v. breviter pedicellatis, involacri tur- 
binati hirtelli ad ^ poll, longi bracteis plurieeriatis coriaceis appressis 
lineari-lanceolatis acutis inappendiculatia rigidis viridibus, radiis albis v. 
rarius parpnreo tinctis ^-\ poll, longis, floribus disci aureis, achsoniis 
ad iV poll- longis obovato-oblongis compressis lasvibus pubernlis. 

A. Tradescanti, Linn. Hort. Clijf. p. 408 ; <Sp. PI. p. 876 {non herb, et excl, 
Syn. Hort. Ups.) Ait. Hort. Kew. vol. iii. p. 204 var. floribus albis; ed. II. 
vol. V. p. til. Nees, Gen. & Sp. Ast. p. 103 {non Syn. Ast.) Torr. & Oray 
Fl. N. Am. partim. A. Gray, in Proc. Am. Acad. vol. xvii. p. 166; Man. 
Bot. N. Un. St. ed. V. (1880) p. 232; Synopt. Fl. Am., Gamopet. p. 187. 
Chapm. Fl. S. Un. States, p. 2i i3. 

A. artemisiasfolius, Pair. Encycl. Suppl. vol. i. p. 500. 

A. fragilis, Willd. 8p. PI. vol. iii. p. 2051 (non Bot. Beg.), 

A. leucanthemua, Desf. Cat. Hort. Par. p. 102; Poir. I.e. 

A. miser. Ait. Hort. Kew. ed. T. vol. iii. p. 206 {non Linn.) var./. albis. 

A. parviflorua, Kees. Gen. Sp. Ast. p. 99. 

A. tenuifolius, var. Torr. & Gr. I.e. 132 {partim, non alior.). 

A. virginianns parvis floribus albis Tradescanti, Ifomon, PL Hist. Univ. Oxon. 
vol. iii. (1699) p. 121, sect. 7, t. 21, f. 42. 



The historic interest of the original Michaelmas Daisy, 
together with the fact that (except by the rude cut in 
Morison's " Historia ") it has not hitherto been figured, 
under either its own name or that of any of its synonyms, 
are sufficient reasons for paying it the tribute of a plate 
in the Botanical Magazine, To these reasons may be 
added the difficulty of recognizing it without a figure, 
for, according to Asa Gray, it is one of three species 
which are "seemingly confluent in a series." The 
other members of this series are A. paniadatiis. Lam., a 
polymorphous species with acuminate, sharply toothed or 
serrated leaves, looser, larger, paniculate bands and longer 

Mai;cu 1st, 1902. 



li^ules; ^nd. A. salicifolius, Aifc. (Lara.?), which has shorter, 
often scabrous leaves, reticulately veined, and longer, 
usually purplish or violet li^ules. The same author adds, 
that some forms of A. Tradesranti, both wild and culti- 
vated, show an affinity witb 4. dumosns, Linn., A. vimineus, 
Lam., and A. diffusus. Ait., all of which may be distin- 
guished by having more regularly and closely imbricating 
non-coriaceous involucral bracts, and leaves mostly whitish 
beneath. All of the above-named species of Adf^r are 
cultivated in the Herbaceous ground of the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, where, about twenty years ago, they were cintically 
examined and named by Prof. Asa Gray, who had devoted 
years to the Asters of his native country. 

A. Tradeficanti is the first of the many N". American 

Asters cultivated in Europe, having been introduced prior 

to 1633 by John Tradescant, Gardener to Charles I., into 

his garden, Lambeth. It was, no doubt, bronght over by 

his son, who travelled in Virginia, and who, on his return 

to England, brought many new plants with him. It is a 

native of open ground in the Eastern United States, from 

Canada to Virginia, and westward to Ilinois and the 

Saskatchewan river. Two varieties of it are described in 

Aiton's " Hortus Kewensis ; " one with blue flowers, called 

Tradescant's dwarf Star-wort or Michaelmas Daisy, which 

A. Gray refers to A. jpaniculatus ; the other, with wiiite 

flowers, Tradescant's tall Star-wort, to which A. Gray 

confines the name. The latter is frequent in Botanic 

Gardens, varying a little in the size of the heads. The 

specimen figured is from the Cambridge Botanical Garden, 

where, as at Kew, it has been in cultivation probably 

ever since these gardens were established. It flowers in 

September and October. — /. D, E. 



Fig. l.liorul with unexpanded flowers; 2, ray-flower; 3, diak-flower ; 4, hair 
ol pai.i-us ; o, sUtueus ; t>, style-arma of dit,k-flower :— a^Z enJanjcd. 



782r^ 




M.S.d^l.T.N.FiteKlith. 






LTlB-,^e A C? Londc 



Tab. 7826. 

IMPATIENS GRANDIFLOEA. 
Native of Madagascar. 

Nat. Ord. Geramace^. — Tribe BALSAMlNEiU. 
Genua Impatiens, Linn. ; {Benih. & Hooh.f. Oen. Plant, vol. i. p. 277.) 



Impatiens (Ilniflorfe) grandiflora ; herba 4-5-pedalig, raraosa, glaberriraa, 
ramis ramulisqne crassiuscalig teretibus, foliis alternis petiolatia 4-6 poll, 
longis ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis crenato-serratis inter nervoa bullatia 
marginibuH basin versus petioloqne glandulis paucis crasse stipitatis 
inntructis, floribus axillaribus solitariis maximis snberectig roaeis; pedun- 
ciilis 2-2^ poll, longis crassis erectis basi bracteola minnta triangulari 
instnictis, sepalis 2 herbaceis ovato-rotiindatis ^-1 poll, longis obtusia 
V. acutis apice mucronatis, vexillo erecto orbiculari l-lj poll- diam., 
dorso infra apicem corniculato, alis i^-2 poll, longis, lobis patnlis basi 
sanguineo pictis, basali rotnndato retuso, terminali longiore 1-1| poll, 
lato obliqne obovato intus margine interiore sinuate lobulato, labello. 
inflato l-l:j diam. albo roseo reticulato abrnpte in calcar album incurvum 
lh-2 poll, longum attennato, filamentis brevibus, antheris oblongia, ovario 
obtuse. 

I. grandiflora, Hemd. in Book. Ic. Plant, t. 2655. Gard. Chron. 1901, vol. i. 
p. no, fig. 47. 



This is by far the largest flowered Balsam hitherto dis- 
covered, the flowers of native speciraeos being quite half as 
large again as are those of the cultivated plant here figured ; 
and very much larger than those of the Ceylon I. Hoolceriana, 
Arn. (tab. 4704), which has long been known as exceeding 
all others in this respect. Though differing from /. Eooher- 
iana in inflorescence and colour of flower, /. Hooheriana, 
having sub-umbellate, nearly white flowers, these species 
agree fairly closely in the form of the standard and 
wings, the latter of which show red streaks at the base of 
the terminal lobe. They differ in the sepals, which are 
small and lanceolate in Hookeriana, and in the lip, which 
is not inflated in that plant ; the glands on the petiole in 
Hookeriana are only two, and situated at the top of the 
latter. In the absence of fruit of both these species, it ia 
impossible to speculate on their affinities. 

Impatiens grandiflora was discovered by Mr. Gt. Warpur, 
a botanical collector, in Madagascar, where it inhabits 
swampy places to the N.W. of Tamatave, at twelve 

March 1st, ]9u2. 



hundred feet elevation. As the stems are said to root at 
the nodes when the plant is thrown down, there should be 
no difficulty in propagating it. The plant from which the 
figure is taken was presented to the Royal G-ardens, 
Kew, by Mr. Warpur, where it flowered in a greenhouse 
in November, 1900, and continued flowering for some 
months. 

TJexcr. — A glabroiis, stout, branching, perennial herb. 
Stem and bravches terete. Lenrpf^ alternate, petioled, 
three to six inches long, ovate-lanceolate, sinuate-crenate, 
bullate above between the nerves, with a few stoutly 
stalked glands on the margins towards the base and on 
the petioles. Flowers axillary, solitary, two and a half 
to three inches broad, bright rose-red, with crimson stripes 
towards the bases of the lobes of the wings. Peduncle 
stout, erect. Sepals two. very variable in size, orbicular- 
ovate, green. Standard orbicular, erect, shortly spurred 
dorsally below the tip. Wings very large ; basal lobe 
orbicular, terminal obliquely obovate. Lip one to one and 
three-quarters of an inch long, turgid, white, reticulated 
with purple, suddenly narrowed into a stout incurved 
. white spur an inch or more lono-. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, liase of leaf and petiole with glanda -.—enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the Britiah 
Isles- For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Bentham, 
F.E.S. 7th Edition, revised by Sir J. D, Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S.,and W. G. Smith, F.L.S,, forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 5th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. net, 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By Georgb Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnseaii 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, I6s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Kev. M. J.Bkhkelet, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21«. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo,6b. 6d. net. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. By R. Braithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Yol. 1., 
with 45 Plates, 50«. Vol. II., 42s. 6d. Parts XVII.— XX., 6s. each. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12 net. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory. By G. Bkntham, F.R.S., F.L.S., aBsisted by F, 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24». Published 
under the auspices of tlie several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES: a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baker, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the authoiity of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. Harvey, M.D., 
F.R.S., and Otto Wilhflm Sondeb, Ph.D. Vols. L— III.. 18s. each. 
Vol VI., 24s. net. Vol. VII., 35s. net. Vol. V., Part I., 9s. net. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S. 

Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the antliority of the First 
Commissioner of Her Majesty's Works. Vol. VII., 27s. Gd. net. Vol. V., 
25s. 6d. net. Vol. VIII., Parts I. and II., 8s. net. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA ; a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chathan,, 
Kermadeo's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
larv of State for the Colonies. 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flowering 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By Gkorge Bkmjiav, 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement bv Dr. Ha.nce, 21s. 
Published under the authority of Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the 
Colonies. The Supplement, s'eparstelv, 2s. 6d. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, and 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Hookek. F.R.S. 12s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE, and 

to & Winter Floia of the Riviera, including the coast from Marseillee to 
Genoa. By J. Teahernk Moggridgk. Royal 8vo. Complete in 1 vol., 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd.. 6, Henrietta n i . 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 687, MARCH, 1902. 



1 



Tab. 7822.— PASSIFLOEA AMBIGUA. 
„ 7823.— JASMINUM MAINGAYI. 
„ 7824.— MASDEVALLIA ELEPHANTICEPS. 
„ 7825.— ASTER TRADESCANTI. 
„ 7826.— IMPATIENS GRANDIFLORA. 



LovELL Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



Completion of the FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

Now ready, Parts X'XIII., XXIV. (completing the work), 18s. net. Vol. VII., cloth, 38s. net. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV,, 32s. each. Vol, V., 38s, Vol. VI., 36*. 

*^* Persona having incomplete Sets are advised to complete their Copies without delay, 
Ski Dne Parts will be kept on Sale for a limited time only. No Part or Vol. will be BoLf 
without its continuation to the end of the work. 



Now ready, Vol. VIII. , Parts I. & II., 8s. net. Vol. V., 25s. 6d. Vol. VII., 27s, 6d, 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III.. 20s. each, net. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 
The Continuation by various Botanists edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
Fuhlished under the authority of the First Commissioner of Her Majesty!s Works. 




Now Ready, Vol. V., Part I., 9s, net. Vol. VI., 24*. net. Vol. VII., 33s. net. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of tlie Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Ketv. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Qood Hope 

and Natal. 
Vols. I. to III. jss. each. 

hy WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 

Now ready, Part LXXXVII., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5«. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

Vol. 1, 12». ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 

Vols. II. — ^VII. 12s. each; large paper, each with 48 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Prospectus may be had- on appliccdum to the Publishers. 



LoTKLt Beeve k Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



PttlHTBO BT SILBKET ASD SIVUTSTOir, fcD., BT. JOHS's HOCSB, CI.«KK«»^»I'''» "•*'• 



Cf)irj3 Series. 

No. 688.-^: 

V OL. LVIII.— ^ 'RIL. Price 3*. 6d. colovred, 2«. 6d. plmr 

OR No. 1B82 •'^ '^^^ KNTIBB WOSK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KBW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITH 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



SiB JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D.. G.c.s.L, C.B., F.B.s., F.l.s. 

■£«it iBirtctor o( tbc IRoual botanic daHJcna of Hfto. 




Nfttare and Art to adorn the p*g8 oow bme. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd. 

Pa^LISHEES TO THE HOME. COLONIAL ANT) ' •^OTSRXMBNI 

6, HENRIEITA STREET, COVL. .iDEN. 



1902. 



[4« 



ed.] 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



Part. III., witli 10 Cok 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACID^. 

By GEORGE BOWDLER BUCKTOX. F.E.S.. F.L.S. 
T., '■•: ■■■■• iplet^d iii u part-i. Subscription j 



Uo I.Temhracidm has claims on the notice of both the scieutific and 

')wiiig to the adTance of agriculture, climatic variation, and other 

:e forms are constantly tmderg-oing transformation, whilo some niay 

eome txtiuct. The present time, therefore, affords opportunities for studyiri!?; 

i:ording these forms, which may not occttr ajijaiii. 

1 If general puhlic ^v" ■ ' ' ' '' ■ -.^v- hisecis, while the 

peculations of ihe sci- '.heir utility. 

^' ' ' ■■■ ;usv) ititi're.sriMu ri-(irii ttu-u i;iiijifin;, tuiiiis, which will be 

r,graph. 



Parts I. — XXYIL, each 7s. Qd. coloured, 5s. uncolonred, net. 

THE HEPATIC^ OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. E[. PEARSON. 

Issued to Subscribers for the complete work only, in 28 Monthly Parts, 
each witr 

Frospcdus ■-, n. 

Now ready, Parts 7— 9, with 12 Plaies, lo^. pluin, ai?. coloitred, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF IHK 

BRITISH ISLES. 

With DEscrapTioNS op all, the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 

By ALFRED FRYER, A.L.S. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The work will be iesued in 5 quarterly sections of 3 parts each. 

ProBpecCns on application. 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

^ DeschpHon of the F/owering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naiufalised in the British Isles. 

T>Y GEORGE BE NT HAM, F.R.S. 

visedbySirJ. D. HooKKE,C.B..G.G.S.I., F.K.S.,&c. 9*. net. 

ILLUSTEATIOHS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of Brnish Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

1 •.rming an Illustrated Companion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 
fith Editiou, with 1315 Wood Engt-avings, 9*. net. 

I-OVELL EEEVFi & CO, Ltd., 6, HENKIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



m 



18TI 




W- P, d"l,^1.N i'^ikicJi litK 



\finceni Bro ol<s p ay & Son Lt* Imp 



I. R^a-f* fltC? I.or^aoTT 



Tab. 7827. 
PHILODENDRON calophyllum. 

Native of Brazil and Guiana. 



Nat. Ord. Aroide^. — Tribe Philodendre,*. 
Genus Puilodendkon, Scliott.; (JBenih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 378). 



Philodendron (Bauraia) calopliyllum ; glaberrimum, caudice brevissimo v, 0, 
catapViyllis viridi-zebrinis roseo-marginatis, foliia perplurimis confertis 
erecto-patentibus 2-3 ped. longis b-Q poll, latis lineari-oblongia acu- 
minatis apicibus recurvis crasse coriaceis basin acutum versus angus- 
tatis, supra saturate viridibus costa applanata, marginibua undulatis 
angustissime rubris, subtus glauco-viridibus costa crassa punctis irapresais 
elongatis quasi striolata, nervis numerosia arcuatia, nervo collectivo 
margini proximo, petiolo 2-3 poll, longo crassissimo l-poU. diam. obtuse 
trigono antice bicostato, pedTinculis axillaribus 6-10 poll, longia patenti- 
deflexis teretibus | poll. diam. viridibus, spatha erecta 6 poll, longa crasse 
coriacea extus pallida flavo-viridi intus saturate kermesina marginibua 
albis, medium versus paullo donstricta, infra medium in tubum ovoidea 
convoluta, supra medium cymbiforme obtusa, spadice spatha? ajqui- 
longo crasse stipitato cylindraceo apice obtuao v. subacuto, infl. masc. 
quam fern, quadruplo longiore, antheris majusculis pallida flavis, ovariis 
minimis viridibus, stigmatibus pulvinatis sesailibus. 

P. calophyllum, Brongii. ex, Andr4, III. Hort. vol. xviii. (1881) p. 172, t. 76. 
Engl, in Mart. Fl. Bras. vol. iii. pars II., p. 150 ; in D.G. Monoffr. 
Phanerog. vol. ii. p. 367. 

P. niveo-cbermesinum, Linden ^ Andre, I.e. sub t, 76. 

P. Prieureanum, Brongn. ex Andre, I.e. 

P. nobile, Hort. Bull. 



A very striking species of Philodendron, conspicuous 
from the deep brilliant carmine colour of the interior surface 
of the spathe which is edged with white. It was discovered 
by Wallis, in the Valley of the Rio Branco, an affluent of 
the Rio Negro in North Brazil. It is also, according to 
Linden and Andre, a native of French Guiana. Tlie 
specimen here figured was purchased for Kew from Mr, Bull, 
of Chelsea, in 1897, under the name of Philodendron nobile. 
It flowered in the Aroid house of the Royal Gardens, in 
April, 1901. 

Descr.—Gaudex or very short.' Leaver very many, 
erect and spreading all round, forming a dense head four 
to five feet in diameter, very shortly petioled, linear-oblong, 
two to three feet long, and five to six inches broad at the 
middle, acuminate, tips recurved, base rounded or acute, 

Ai'jUL 1st, 19u2, 



coriaceous, sides undulate, deep green and shining above, 
paler and sub-glaucous beneath ; costa dorsally as thick aa 
the thumb towards the base, marked by linear depressions 
giving a striate appearance, nerves very many, spreading ; 
petiole obtusely trigonous, an inch in diameter. Peduncle 
inclined, six to ten inches long, terete, half an inch in 
diameter, pale green. SpatJie six inches long, erect, coria- 
ceously fleshy, constricted about the middle, below vrliich 
it is convolute, ovoid, tapering to the base, above it 
cymbiform, obtuse, pale yellowish-green externally, bright 
carmine within, with white margins. Spadix as long as 
the spathe, shortly and stoutly stipitate, cylindric, obtuse, 
male portion four to five times longer than the female. 
Anthers yellow, rather large, truncate. Ovaries very minute, 
densely crowded ; stigmas large, sessile, capitate — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, base of spadix ; 2, anthers ; 3, ovaries j 4, vertical section of ovary :— 
all enlarged ; 6, reduced view of whole plant. 



7628 




M.S. del. J.N Pitch lith 



>a«,arxtBroateDay«.Sa 



,. Reeve &.C"? Lorvdon.. 



Tab. 7828. 

VISCUM CRUCIATUM. 
Native of Spain, N,E. Africa, and Syria. 



Nat. Ord. LoRANTHACEiK. — Tribe Visck/e. 
Genus ViscuM, Linn.; {Benth. ^ Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 213.) 



ViscDM (Euviscum) cruciatum, ; dioicum, canle tereti e basi ramoso saturate 
viridi, foliis subsessilibus oblongis ellipticis linearibusve obtusis basi 
angustatis coriaceo-carnosis obscure S-nerviis flavo-viridibna, fl. masc. 
majusculis terminalibus, petalis ad i poll, longis lineari-oblongis obtusis 
pateoti-recurvis, antheris lineari-oblongis, fl. fem. minutis ad apicom 
peduncuU brevissimi ternis, ovario turbinate, petalis triangularibus, baccis 
pedicellatis globosia fusco-rubris. 

ViscuM cruciatum, Sieb. ex Sprenq. Syst Veg. vol. i. p. 488 (in syn.). BoUa. 
Voy. Bot. Esp. ii. p. 274 ; Fl. Orient, vol. iv. p. 1068. Post, Fl Syr. Palest. 
and Sinai, p. 712. Wilkomm & Lange Prodr. Fl .Hispan. vol. i. p. 25, ct 
Suppl. p. 6. 

V. orientale, DC. Prodr. vol. iv. p. 278, partim. 
V. album, Webb, Iter Hispan. p. 42 {non Linn.). 
Yiscum baccis purpureis, Belon. Oba. des Singularites tronveSs en Grke, Afie, 

Judee, 4"c. (1554), lib. II. cap. Ixxxiii. Glusius, Rar. Stirp. Hispan. (lo7C) 

p. 47. 

Viscum cruciatum was first recognized as distinct 
from V. album, by De I'Ecluse (latine Glusius), who dis- 
covered it growing on Olive trees around Hispali, in 
Granada, and described it in 1576. In his description of 
it, he ol3serves that it appeared to him to be the same 
as a plant noticed by Pierre Belon (latine Belonius 
sen Bellonius), who, having visited Greece, Judasa, 
Egypt, and Arabia, published a work in 1554 with the 
title cited above. That this supposed identity should 
prove a real one is singular, when it is considered that the 
plant in question has been found in no other countries than 
the extreme east and the extreme west of the Mediterranean 
Sea. Other examples of this same dislocated distribution 
are, however, familiar, of which Rhododendron poiilin-nt, 
is one, but this last is not a parasite, neither is it dioecious. 
Viscum cruciatum appears to be a common plant in Granada, 
growing usually on Olive trees, which it sometimes 
injures and sterilizes; but it also occurs on Crtii;rrjii% 
Popnlvs alha, and Piaus Pinaster. In Syria, Po-st, in his 
April Ist, 1902. 



excellent " Flora of Syria," gives as its range, Central 
and Southern Palestine, where I ha%^e myself collected it 
on Olive trees, and there are specimens in the Kew Her- 
barium from the Garden of Gethsemane, from the Temple 
area in Jerusalem, from Nablous, and from Moab. As in 
Spain, so in Syria, it sometimes is found on a Cratasgus. 

In foliage and female flowers V. cruciatum closely re- 
sembles V. album, which is also both a Spanish and Syrian 
plant, but the large male flowers at once distinguish 
V. cruciatum. Stress has been laid on the more distinct 
nerves of the leaves of the latter, but in a dried state 
V, album is almost as strongly nerved. The colour of 
the fruit, white in album, and dull red in cruciatum, is 
distinctive. 

It is due to the skill of the Hon. Charles Ellis, of Fren- 
sham Hall, Shottermill, Haslemere, in grafting the seeds of 
Viscum cruciatum on Olive plants, that I owe the means of 
figuring this interesting plant, of which he has sent living 
plants, and flowering specimens of both sexes, and 
fruit, to the Eoyal Gardens, Kew. The secret of his 
success was, he informs me, the keeping the bark of the 
root moist till germination and attachment were secured ; 
rather a tiresome job, for it means syringing every day 
for nearly two years. He received the seeds from the 
Consul at Tetuan, which, assuming that they were taken 
from plants native of Morocco, indicates that country 
as (a previously unknown) habitat for it ; apropos of 
which I may add, that V. album has not been recorded as a 
native of Morocco, and that it is said to be an exceedingly 
rare plant in Algeria. The Viscum album ? of Munby's 
list of Algerian plants is probably V. cruciataim, for Mr. 
Munby, who was an excellent British botanist, must have 
known the true V. album well. He probably never saw 
the fruit of his Algerian plant. Mr. Ellis informs me that 
the Olive plants which formed the stocks were seedlings 
which arrived from the Riviera at the same time as the 
Viscum seeds ; and that he is prosecuting his experiments 
with the seeds of a red-berried Loranthus from the Trans- 
vaal, and they have germinated with him on Olive and 
Hawthorn. Of two plants of V. cruciatum, presented by 
Mr. Ellis to the Royal Gardens, the female has more slender 
branches, and smaller, narrower, thinner leaves. 



Descr. — Habit, foliage, and inflorescence of V. album, 
except in the leaves being very pale yellow green, and 
tliree-nerved, the male flowers much larger, and the 
berries larger, longer pedicelled, andof a red-brown colour. 
—J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, male plant on a branch of olive; 2, branch of female plant; both 
of vat. size; 3, petal and anther of male flower; 4, female inflorescence; 
5, petal of female ilower ; 6, young fruit : — all enlarged j 7, ripe fruit of 
natural size. 




MS.del.J.TTPittJiHth. 



\?ncojitBraoks,D9y &ScmLt*Ijr^. 



L R(?«rve & C° Lcondor 



Tab. 7829. 

TUPISTRA GEANDIS. 

Native of the Malayan Peninsula. 

t 

Nat. Ord. Liliacb^. — Tribe Aspidistre*. 
Genus Tupistra, Ker-Gawl, ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 772.) 



TupiSTRA grandis ; glaberrima, caudice brevi, foliis 2-3-ped. longis 3-5 poll, 
latis lineari-lanceolatis longe acuminatis coriaceis supra laste viridibns 
basi in petiolum crassum angustatis, pedunculo craaao ^ poll. diam. geni- 
culatim declinato bracteisque fusco-purpureia, spica 8-10 poll, longa 
aBcendente multiflora, bracteis triangulari-ovatis acutis concavia coroUao 
tubo subsequilongia, bracteolis lanceolatis, perianthii tubo campanulato 
\ poll, lato fusco-rubro, lobis 6 ovatia ^ poll, longis revolutia atro-jiur- 
pureia, antheris parvis medio tube subseaailibus oblongia, ovario ovoideo 
in stylum craasum album elongatum longe exsertnm eensim angustato, 
atigmate umbraculaeformi 5 poll, lato piano radiatim sulcato margine 
crenulato. 

T. grandis, Ridl. in Journ, Bof. xxxviii. (1900), p. 73. 



The species of the small tropical Indian genus Tupistra 
are confined to the Eastern Himalaya, Burma, and the 
Malayan Peninsula. Seven are described in the *' Flora 
of British India," and no doubt others, besides that here 
described, will be discovered when the interior of the 
Malayan Peninsula is explored. The genus may further 
be expected to occur in Sumatra and China. Three species 
have been already figured in this work, T. squalida, Ker 
(t. 1655), fromAmboyna; T. nutans, ^aW. (t. 3054), and 
T. macrostigma. Baker (t. 6280), both the latter Hima- 
layan. 

Tupistra grandis differs from its congeners in so far 
as these have been fully described (some are very imper- 
fectly known) in the long, columnar, white style, and orbi- 
cular, thin, peltate stigma, with furrows radiating from 
the centre to the crenulate margin. Living plants of it 
were sent to the Hoyal Gardens, Kew, in 1899, from 
Singapore, by Mr. H. N. Ridley, M.A., F.L.S., Director of 
Forests and Gardens in the Straits Settlements, which 
flowered in a tropical house in October of the same year. 
It is a native of Perak, where it was found in the dense 
forests of a hill called Bujong Malacca. 

Apkil 1st, 1902. 



I 

Descr. — Quite glabrous. Caudex short, stout, annulate. tj 

Leaves tufted, two to tliree feet long, by three to five 

inclies broad, lanceolate, elongate-acuminate, base narrowed 

into a short, stout petiole, dark green and shining above ; 

costa beneath stout; nerves many, parallel. Peduncle 

stout, terete, geniculately decurved about the middle, 

then ascending, nearly half an inch in diameter, uniformly 

red-brown. Spike eight to ten inches long ; rhachis rery 

stout, up-curved. Flowers sub-sessile, crowded. Bracts 

triangular-ovate, acute, concave, coriaceous, about as long 

as the perianth-tube ; bracteoles as long, lanceolate. 

Ferlantli campanulate ; tube turgid, half an inch long, 

red-brown ; lobes six, ovate, revolute, dark red-purple. 

Anthers sub-sessile in the middle of the tube, small, pel- 

tately inserted by a very short, thickened dorsal filament. 

Ovary ovoid, narrowed into a long, columnar, white, exserted 

style ; stigma very broad, peltate, crenulate, radiate!/ 

furrowed. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, sectioa of portion of perianth, witli stamens ; 2, dorsal view oi 
anthers; 3, pistil: — alt enlarged; 4, reduced view of plant. 



7S:i 




„tBcuok.s,i:)ay&Son.Lffin,R 



;de: .T.NPrtdlhL\ 



X.Heeve&C<?Loixaor. 



Tab. 7830. 
corydalis thalicteifolia. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Fumariceje. — Tribe FuMAaiUiK. 
Genus CoHYDALis, DC; {BentJi. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 65.) 



CoRTDAlis thalietrifolia ; herba perennis, flaccida, glaberrima, pallide viridis, 
rhizomate lignoso, ramis suberectis pedalibus, foliis alternis longe petio- 
latis pinnatisectis, pinnnlis 5-7 amplis oppositis paribus distautibus 
petiolulatis cuneato-obovatis rarius oblongia eaepissime insequaliter 2-3- 
aectie, eegmentis obtuse crenato-lobulatis, petiolo 2-4 poll, longo, racemis 
oppositifoliis et terminalibus longe crassiuscule pedunculatis 3-6 poll, 
longis laxe mnltifloris, bracteis ellipticis lanceolatisve acumiaatiB pedi- 
cellis mnltoties longioribua herbaceis peraistentibus inferioribus fere 
pollicaribus, floribus breviter pedicellatis 1 poll, longis pallide aureis, 
sepalis minutis deltoideis, calcare limbo breviore leviter recurvo apice 
rotundato, petalia eiterioribus subaequalibua ovato-lanceolatis subacutis 
dorso medio breviter alatis, interioribns multo minoribus spathulatis 
coBta marginibnsqne incrassatis, stigmate bicruri cruribus divaricatis 
apice capitellatis, capsulis ad J poll, longis gracilibus falcatis teretibus 
polyspermis, seminum strophiolo cupulari. 

C. thalietrifolia, Franch. in Journ. de Botanique^ vol. viii. (1894) p. 291 (non 
Jameson). 

The mountain region of China promises to be even more 
prolific in species of Corydalis than is the Himalaya, whence 
fifty have been described. In Hemsley's enumeration of 
Chinese plants, published in 1886, twenty species are in- 
cluded, and others have since been published, or deposited 
in the Kew Herbarium, bringing the number up to sixty. 

Another and very different G. thalietrifolia was published 
as long ago as 1861. It is G. thalietrifolia, Jameson ex Kegel 
in Bull. Soc. Nat. Mosc. xxxiv. II. 148, a Himalayan 
plant, erroneously entered as Chinese in the Kew Index, 
and it is a synonym of G. cornuta, Royle. It was over- 
looked when the genus was described in the "Flora of 
British India," and is not mentioned by Prain, in his 
"Novitiae Indicss" (Journal of the Asiatic Society of 
Bengal, Ixv. II. 31), where some additional synonyms of 
0. cornuta are given. 

Corydalis thalietrifolia is one of the largest Chinese species 
of the genus, though far from rivalling some of its great 
congeners in the Rocky Mts., which have no known allies 

April Ist, 1902. 



Mo. Bot. Crrdon 
irD3 



in habit in the Himalaya or China. One of these (that I 
have myself gathered) G. BroMdegei, Wats., attains five 
feet iu height ; its introduction into English gardens is much 
to be desired. Eev. Dr. E. Faber, who is the discoverer 
of so many new Chinese plants, appears to have been the first 
to find C. thalictrifolia ; this was in the mountains of Mngpo. 
Dr. Henry has sent specimens from Ichang, at the mouth 
of the great gorge of Yangtze Kiang, in Hupeh, and from 
Yunnan, collected by Father Ducloux. Mr. W. Hancock 
found it at Mengtze in Yunnan. 

The specimen here figured was from a plant growing 
luxuriantly, and flowering in July, 1901, in the rock 
garden of Kew, which was obtained from Messrs. Veitch 
& Sons, of Chelsea. 

Descr, — Whole plant flaccid, pale green. Bootdock 
woody, giving off many inclined or almost decumbent, leafy 
stems a foot or more long. Leaves four to six inches Jong, 
the long petiole bearing towards the top usually five, 
petiolulate, oblong or cuneiform, entire or bi-trisect lobu- 
late leaflets which are often as broad as long. Baceme,^ 
long-peduncled, three to six inches long, leaf-opposed or ter- 
minal, loosely many-flowered. Bracts much longer than the 
pedicels, elliptic or lanceolate, spreading, green, persistent. 
Floivers an inch long, pale gold-coloured. Sepals minute, 
deltoid. Spur shorter than the petals, stout, incurved, 
tip rounded. Larger petals sub-equal, ovate-lanceolate, acu- 
minate, recurved, coata with a short dorsal wing ; smaller 
petals spathulate, with a much thickened costa and 
margins. Ovary very slender; stigma transverse, of two 
capitate, diverging arms. Capsule an inch and a half long, 
slender, falcate, terete, acuminate. Seeds many, half 
immersed in the cupular strophiole. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, bract and flower; 2, sepal; 3, stamens; 4, Tjiatil; 5, seeds:— aZ^ 
enlarged ; 6, portion oi fruiting raceme, of nat, ske, '' 



7831 




M S4„:. .T.N. Fjtf}, 1,0^ 



\-;nr,..nirh-:..Vfi,"; 



L Reev« & C . T.ojidon 



Tab. 7831. 
KALANCHOE somaliensis. 
Native of Somaliland. 

Nat. Ord. Oeassulace^. 
Genus Kalanchoe, Adam.; (Benth. ^ Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 659.) 



Kalanchoe somaliensis ; glaberrima, caule robasto tereti ramoao foliisqne 
pallide glanco-viridibus, foliis inferioribua 6 poll, longia basi lata 
sessilibug obovatis apice rotundatia crenato-serralatis crasse coriaceia 
ntrinque concoloribus, nervia obacuris, superioribus lineari-oblongis apice 
crenatis, cyma ampla trichotoma 6-10 poll, alta et lata, ramia ramalisque 
eloagatis robustis, bracteis \~^ poll, longis ovatis oblongis obovatisve 
patulis integria albo-virescentibus, pedicellia ^-1 poll, longis, alabastris 
roseo-tinctis, sepalis erectia lanceolatis acutis ^-g poll, longia pallide 
fusco-rubris, corolla alba flavo tincta, tiibo 2| pollicari, limbi segmentia 
ovato-lanceolatia acuminatia, antheris subsessilibna oblongis, disci procea- 
subua filiformibua sepalis paullo longioribus, carpellia anguatis, stylis 
filiformibua elongatis. 



The plant from whicli the accompanying drawing was 
made was, as Sir Edmund Loder informs me, collected by 
himsfelf in 1890, while hunting for big game in the Golis 
range, near Argan, in Somaliland. He adds that on the 
same day he killed a specimen of the Greater Koodoo and 
a Lion. It flowered in a warm house of the Royal Grardens, 
Kew, in February, 1901. Specimens of the same species, 
collected by Miss Edith Cole, when accompanying Mr. and 
Mrs. Lort Philhps in the same country, are in the Herbarium 
of the Royal Gardens. K. somaliensis is the sixth species of 
the genus figured in this work within the last ten years, 
of which two, K, flammea, Stapf, t. 7595, and that here 
figured are natives of Somaliland; one, K. marmorata, 
t. 7333, is Abyssinian ; two are Arabian, K. Bentii, C. H. 
Wright, t. 7765, and K. farinacea, Balf. f. t. 7769 ; and 
one, K. thyrsiflora, Harv. & Sond., t. 7678, is S. African. 

Descr. — An erect, stout, branching shrub, of a uniformly 
glaucous, greenish- white colour, except the flowers. Leaver 
four to six inches long, sessile by a broad base, obovate 
or oblong-obovate, crenate-serrulate, tip rounded, thickly 
fleshy, nerves very indistinct, uppermost at the base of 
the inflorescence much smaller, linear-oblong, entire or 
April 1st, 1902, 



crenate at tlie tip. Cyme yery large, open, six to ten 
inches long and broad, trichotomously branclied ; bracts one 
quarter to one inch long, oblong, ovate or obovate, fleshy ; 
pedicels very variable in length. Sepals one half to two- 
thirds of an inch long, erect, lanceolate, acute. Corolla 
white, faintly tinged with yellow ; tube two and a half 
inches long, pale rose-coloured in bud ; segments of limb 
two-thirds of an inch long, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate. 
Anthers oblong, sub-sessile. Dish with four erect fila-. 
ments rather longer than the sepals. Styles very long and 
slender. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, calyx, filaments of the disk and pistil ; 2 and 3, anthers :—all 
enlarged. 



/ 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AMD FOREIGN FLORA. 



HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George Benthaii, 
F.R.S. 7th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Benthams "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 5th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, aa Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnajan 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, JI.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Behket-kt, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2Ed Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 2U. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., &c., &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. net. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Fmnilies of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their strncture. By R, Bbaithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. 1., 
with 45 Plates, 50s. Vol. II., 42s. 6d. Parts XVII.— XX., 6«. each. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookkk, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £l2'net. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of tiie 

Australian Territory. Bv G. Bentham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
MuEtLER, F.R.S. Vols. i. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. Published 
under the auspices of tlie several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES: a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Bakeb, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the aulhoiity of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA-CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 
the Cape Colony, Caffraria, a"nd Port Katal. Bv William H. II.^hvey, M.D., 
F.R.S., and Otto Wilhelm Sondeb, Ph.D.' Vols. I.— IIL, 18s. each. 
Vol VI.,24.s. net. Vol. VII., 3os. net. VoL V., Part I., 9s. net. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Olh ki;, F.B.S. 

Vole. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of the First 
Coramisaioner of Her Majesty's Works. Vol. VII., 27fi. Bd. ret. To!. V., 
2os. 6d. net. Vol. VIIL, Parts I.— III., 8s. net. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA: atic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealnnd, aud lie Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarrie's Islands. By 
Sir J, D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Gbisebach. F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tarv of State for the Colonies 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flowering 
Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By George Bentham, 
F.L.S. With a i5ap of the Island and Supplement by Dr. HaSCE, 21«. 
Published under the authority of Her Majesty's Secretary o! Mate for the 
Colonies. The Supplement, p'eparatelv, 2s- dd. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRAIJA : its Origin, Affinities, and 
Distribntion. By Sir J. D. Hookek. F.R.S. 12s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE. and 

-.o a Winter Floia of the Riviera, including the coast from Marseilles to 
Genoa. By J. Tkaheenb MoeesiDGE. Royal 8vo. Complete in 1 vol., 
99 Coloured Plates, 63g. 

LOYELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



LOVELL REEVE & CO/S PUBLICATIONS. 



Part III., with 10 Colonred Plates, 21s. net. 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACID^. 

By GEORGE BOWDLEK BUCKTON, F.E.S., F.L.S. 

To he completed in 5 parts. Subscription for the whole worh, £4 14s. 6d. 

The family of the Memhracidce has claims on the notice of both the scientific and 
•general public. Owing to the advance of agriculture, climatic variation, and other 
influences, organic forms are constantly undergoing transformation, while some may 
even become extinct. The present time, therefore, affords opportunities for studying 
and recording these forms, which may not occur again. 

The general public will find interest in the bizarre forms of these insects, while the 
speculations of the scientific mind will be exercised on the question of their utility. 

The Membracidee are also interesting from their mimetic forms, which will be 
considered in this Monograph. 



Farts I. — XXVII., each 7*. 6d. coloured, os. uncoloured, net. 

THE HEPATIC-aB OF THE BEITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

Issued to Subscribers for the complete work only, in 28 Monthly Parts, 

each with 8 Plates. 

Prospectus on application. 



Now ready. Parts 7— 9, with 12 Plates, 15«. plain, 21». coloured, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 

With Descriptions op all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 

By ALFRED FRYER, A.L.S. lUustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The work will be issued in 5 quarterly sections of 3 parts each. 
Prospectus on application. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Descripiion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British isles. 

Br GEORGE BENT HAM, F.R.S. 

7th Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. HooitBJt,C.B.. G.C.S.I., F,R.S.,&c. 9*. net. 



ILLDSTfiATIOflS OF THE BllITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

Pormirtg an lUuttrated Companion to Bentham'a " Handbook," and other British Floras. 
5th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9*. net. 

LOVELL REEVE A CO. Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA. STREET, COVENT GABDEN. 



7S32 




mmm 



VirLcoiibBi-ooks.Day A t^^oT\ ZJ^lnip. 



\^ liKc c^tk it- O'^ l-or-c 



Tab. 7832. 

KNIPHOFIA MULTIFLOEA. 
Native of Natal. 

Nat. Old. LiLiACB.*;. — Tribe Hemeuocallide^. 
Genus Kniphofia, Mcench; {Benth. Ss Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 775). 



KNiPHoriA muUiflora ; data, foHis S-C-pedalibus loratis rigidis snpra medium 
1-1^ poll, latum Bensim in apicem acuminatum angustatis supra pro- 
funde canaliculatis l^te viridibus nervosis subtus alte carinatis subglaucis 
marginibus serrulatis, pedunculo foliis breviore sui^erne bracteia paucis 
sparais ingtructo, spica 2-pedali l^-S poll. diam. cylindrica, bracteia 
minutis ovatis acuminatis scario^is, floribus numerosisaimis aessilibua 
densissime congestis erectia, perianthio \ poll, longo e baai tumido angiiate 
infundibulari albo nunc viride tincto, lobis parvis rotundatia costa fiisca, 
filamentis perianthio subduplo longioribus albis, autheris breviter oblongis 
aureia. 

K. mnltiflora, Wood & Evans in Journ. Bot. vol. xxxv. (1897) p. 353. H^. 
Wats, in Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. ii. p. 334. Wood, Natal Plants, vol. iii. 
Pars I. t. 206. Tlie Garden, vol. Ivi. (1899) p. 348, cum ic. col. 



No South African genus of plants has supplied within 
late years so rich a harvest of novelties of horticultural 
interest? as Kniphofia. Dr. Harvey, in the second edition 
of the " Genera of Cape Plants," pubhshed in 1868, gives 
only seven or eight as the number of species. In the 
"Genera Plantarum" (1883), the number given for all 
Africa, including Madagascar, is sixteen. Mr. Baker, in 
the "Flora Capensis" (1896), describes thirty-two, to 
which have nx)w to be added E. rufa, Leicbtl., tab. 7706, 
and the species here figured ; making thirty-four in all, of 
which sixteen have been figured in this Magazine. 

K. multijlova is one of the very few known species with 
erect flowers. Its nearest affinity is with K. modr.sfa, 
Baker (tab. 7293), which differs in its much narrower 
leaves, loose spike, larger drooping flowers, and much 
shorter filaments. The only other known species wiLli 
truly erect flowers is K.pallidifiora, Baker, of Madagascar. 

A', midtiflora was discovered by Mr. J. M. W. March, 
growing in swamps on the summit of the Drakensburg 
range, in Natal, between Van Reenan and Nelson's Kop, 
at an elevation of five thousand to six thousand feet 

Mat Ibt, 1902. 



Tbe specimen here figured was presented to the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in 1898, by its valued correspondent, Mr. 
Max LeichtliD, of Baden-Baden. It flovyered in an open 
border, under protection, in November, 1900. 

Descr. — Leaves three to six feet long by an inch broad 
in the middle, from whence they taper to a long, acumi- 
nate tip, rigidly coriaceous, deeply channelled above, 
strongly keeled dorsally, many- and strongly-nerved, 
bright-green above, sub-glaucous beneath, margin serrulate. 
Peduncle stout, as long as the leaves or shorter, with a few- 
scattered ovate bracts below the inflorescence. Spike two 
feet long, cylindric, one and a half to two inches in diameter. 
Flowers most numerous and densely crowded, very shortly 
pedicelled, erect, white, or suffused with green, buds 
yellowish. Bracts minute, ovate, acuminate, scarious. 
Perianth one-half to two-thirds of an inch long, swollen at 
the base, narrowly infundibular; lobes small, rounded, 
erect, midrib brown. Filaments almost twice as long as 
the perianth, white. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, margin of leaf; 2, portion of spike; 3, flowers; 4, pistil :—«^^ 
enlarged ; 5, and <6, flowers witli bracts of the natural size. 



7833 




M S.dti JNiitd-.LtK 



T^_jo^r^°^j^^ 



Tap. 78S3. 

BERBERIS DICTYOPHYLLA. 
Native of Yunnan. 

Nat. Oi'd. Beiii5erii)E.t:. — Tribe Behberk.k, 
Genus Berberis, Linn. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 43.) 



Berberis dictyophylla; frutex erectus, glaberrimus, ramis ramulisqae sub- 
erectis giacilibus angulatis fuacis, spinia ^-f poll. longia validis fuRcis, 
foliis ^-§ poll, longis in ramulos laterales brevissimos fasciculatia bre- 
vissime petiolatia obovatia mucronatis parce spiauloso-serratia coriaceia 
subtus glauco-viridibus demum albidis elevato-reticulatis, Horibns in 
ramulos solitariis v. binis globosis ad | poll, diam., pedunculis filiia 
brevioribus, sepalis exterioribus oblongo-obovatis interioribus orbiculatis, 
petalis sepalia interioribus duplo minoribua obovatis apice emarginatis, 
glandulis basilaribus magnis ellipsoideis liberis vel confluentibna, antheria 
oblongis, baccis globoso-ellipsoideis rubris, stylo crasso stigmate magno. 

B. dictjophylla, Franch. Plant. Belav. p. 39, t. 11. 



Mr. Franchet riglitlj regarded B. dlctyophjlla as nearly 
allied to the Himalayan B. angulosa. Wall., from which 
it differs in the glabrous young shoots, much smaller 
glabrous leaves, glaucous beneath, and with strongly 
reticulate nervation, in the bicuspidate petals and larger 
glands. B. didyophylla was discovered by the Abbe 
Delavay at an elevation of three thousand feet on Fanyang 
shan, a mountain above Mosoyn in Yunnan, in 1886, 
flowering in May, and fruiting in October. The specimen 
here figured was taken from a plant presented to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, by Messrs. Vilmorin, Andrieux & 
Co., in 1897, which flowered in the Arboretum in May, 
1901, and ripened its fruit in the following September. 
Its flowers are smaller than in the native specimen 
deso'ibed by Mr. Franchet, in which they are six-tenths of 
an inch to seven-tenths of an inch in diameter. 

Descr. — An erect, glabrous bush, six feet high, with 
sub-erect, angular, rather slender branches and branch- 
lets covered with brown bark. Spines one half to two- 
thirds of an inch long, strong, dark brown. Leaver in 
small, uniform tufts, from the axils of eveiy spine along 
the branchlets, shorter than the spines, sessile, obovate, 
May 1st, ll»u-J. 



cuspidate, or mucronate, with two or more long spinulose 
teeth on each margin, pale green above, glancous-whifce 
beneath ; nerves reticulate on both surfaces, strongly be- 
neath, especially when fading. Flowers solitary, or two in 
each fascicle of leaves, about half an inch in diameter, 
pale yellow ; peduncles shorter than the leaves. Outer 
sepals oblong, about half the size of the orbicular inner. 
Petals about one-third shorter than the inner sepals, orbi- 
cular, notched at the tip ; glands large, ellipsoid. Berries 
drooping, globosely ellipsoid or ovoid, bright red ; style 
very distinct, stout ; stigma large, peltate. — /. D. H, 



Fig. 1, leaf ; 2, petal ; 3, stamens ; 4, pistil : — all enlarged. 




M.S.del,J.N.Fitdilith 



L.Reeve &C? London. 



Tab. 7834. 
aloe oligospila. 
Native of Abyssinia, 

Nat. Oi-d. LiLiACE^. — Tribe Aloinejs. 
Genns Aloe, Linn. ; {Benih. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 776.) 



AiOE oligospila; acaulis, foliis multis dense roaulatis aacendentibus lanoeo- 
latia acnrninatia obscure lineatis parce albo-maculatia facie deoratim 
planis apice concavis dentibus raarginalibos ascendentibus maguitudine 
mediocribus, pednncalo simplici foliis panic longiore, racemo oblongo denso, 
pedicellia cernuis flore sequilongi?, bracteia ovatis magnia, perianthii 
cylindrici pallide rosei apice viriduli lobis tubo longioribua, genitalibus 
breviter exsertia. 

A. Bakeri, Hooh.f., mss. 



This new Aloe was raised by Mr. R. Irwin Lynch, A.L.S., 
Curator of the Cambridge Botanic Garden, from seeds sent 
from Abyssinia by Dr. Schinz, of Zurich. It was grown 
at Cambridge, under the name of Aloe Schimperi, but is 
totally different from that species. It comes nearest the 
well-known Cape species Aloe ohscitra of Miller {A. pida, 
Thunb., ex parte; Sims in Bot. Mag. t. 1323), but differs 
by its sparingly-spotted leaves, shorter pedicels and 
smaller pale red flowers, with lobes longer than the tube. 
Amongst the Abyssinian species its nearest affinity is with 
A. macrocarjm, Todaro, and A, commutata, Todaro. 

Descr. — Acaulescent. Leaves many, in a dense rosette, 
ascending, lanceolate-acuminate, under a foot long, two 
and a half inches broad low down, sparingly spotted with 
white, obscurely lineate, flat on the lower part of the face, 
concave tow^ards the point ; marginal teeth pale, ascending, 
moderately large and close. Peduncle simple, rather longer 
than the leaves. Raceme dense, oblong, three or four 
inches long ; pedicels cernuous, the lower as long as the 
flowers ; bracts ovate, rather shorter than the pedicels. 
Perianth cylindrical, pale, red tipped with green, under an 
inch long ; lobes linear-oblong, longer than the tube. 
Stamens and style a little longer than the perianth. — /. G. 
Baker. 

Fig. 1, a flower ; 2. front view of anther; 3, back view of anther; 'i, pistil :— 
o// eiilarged; o, whole plant, much reduced. 
May 1st, 19(>_'. 



\ 




V-^antBroo.<s,Day&3onl 



lA. S.delJMPitchlLtK 



L Reeve &. C<? London 



Tab. 7835. 
EUCALYPTUS co|idata. 

Native of Tasmania. 

Nat. Ord. MyrtacejK. — Tribe LEPTOSPEKMBiE. 
Genus Eucalyptus, L. Hkr. ; (Benih. & Eook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. i. p. 707.) 



Eucalyptus (Normales) cordaia ; frutex v. arbor parva, foliosa, albo-glauca, 
cortice tenni, ramulis erectis tetragonis rigidulis, foliis 3-4 poll, longia 
oppositis sessilibus orbicularibus v. late ovato-rotundatis crenulatia 
apiculatis basi Bobcordatis rigidulis utrinque concoloribus nervis gracil- 
limis patulis, pedunculia axillaribus brevissimis 2-4-floris, floribns 
majusculis sessilibus, calyce hemispberico v. late campanulato ad ^ poll, 
diam. basi rotundato glauco-viridi punctulato ore aperto margine acute 
sub lente crenulato, opercnlo calycis tubo breviore depresso-conico v, 
-bemispherico albo roseo sufFuso, Btamiuibus calyci Eequilongis filamentis 
seativatione inflexis, antheris rainutis fere globosis glandula dorsali magna, 
loculis parallelis, stylo brevi crassiusculo, stigmate simplici, fructu calyci 
consimili sed pauUo majore crasse coriaceo, capsulse valvis immersis parvis 
trigonis. 

E. cordata, Lahill. PL Nov. Soil. vol. ii. p. 13, t. 152. DC. Prodr. vol. iii. 
p. 221 (in part). Hooh.f. Fl. Tasman. vol. i. p. 132. Benth. Fl. Amiral. 
vol. 111. p. 224. F. Muell. Eucali/ptogr. dec. viii. 



The nearest ally of Eucalyptus cordata is E. pulverulenta, 
Sims, tab. 2087 of this work, where E. cordata is doubt- 
fully referred to it. Both these species have opposite, 
sessile, cordate, semi-amplexicaul, farinaceous leaves and 
branches, and normally ternate flowers on very short 
peduncles; they differ in the leaves of E. cordata being 
crenulate, and the calyx-tube rounded at the base, whereas 
the leaves of 77. pulverulenta are entire or obscurely crenu- 
late, and the calyx-tube narrowed at the base ; moreover, 
the first is confined to Western and Southern Tasmania, 
the latter to New South Wales. 

The plant of E. cordata, from which our figure is taken, 
was raised from seed sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by 
Mr. Abbott, of the Hobarton Botanic Gardens, Tasmania, 
in 1901. It is now a pyramidal tree fifteen feet high, 
which flowers annually in autumn in the Mexican House. 

The species has been grown out of doors in various 
parts especially of the south of England, and as far north 
as the Isle of Arran in the Clyde. 1 remember a plant of it 

May 1st, 1002, 



trained against a wall at Kew more than fifty years ago, 
of which there is a specimen in the Kew Herbarium, 
gathered in 1851. It had a remarkable appearance, 
and was visible from a very great distance. It was killed 
eventually by frost. 

JDescr. — A shrub or small, leafy, mealy, glaucous-white 
tree, with strict, erect, stifif, four-angled branches ; bark 
thin. Leaves sessile, opposite, three to four inches long, 
orbicular or ovate-rotundate, apiculate, crenulate, thinly 
coriaceous, concolorous, base sub-cordate; nerves very 
inconspicuous, spreading. Peduncles very short, axillary, 
three- rarely two- or four-flowered ; flowers rather large, 
sessile. Calyx hemispheric, or broadly campanulate, 
about one-third of an inch in diameter, smooth, glaucous- 
green, punctulate, mouth open, margins thin, minutely 
crenulate. Operculum shorter than the calyx, depressed- 
conical or -hemispheric, smooth, white sutfused with red. 
Stamens inflexed in bud ; filaments about as long as the 
calyx; anthers minute, with a large dorsal gland, cells 
parallel. Style short, stout ; stigma simple. Fruit rather 
larger than the flowering calyx, smooth, coriaceous ; 
valves of the capsule trigonous, immersed. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3, section of calyx showing the ovary : — all enlarged ■ 
— +, fruit of the natural size. 




M. SdelJ J4 Filch JilK 



Vmce.*Bro.K=Day&SonI 



Tab. 7836. 

HONC KENYA ficifolia. 

Native of tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. TxLiACE*.— Tribe Tilie.k. 
Genus HoNCKENYA, Willd. ; (Bentk. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 2;55), 



HoNCKENyA^ct/fZut; frutex v. arbor parva, stellato-pubescens, ramis robustis, 
cortice fusco, Poliis breviter petiolatis amplis late oblongo v. ovato- 
rotundatis 3-7-lobatis crenato-dentatis, lobis latis obtusis basi 3-7- 
plinerviis supra Isete viridibus scaberulis subtus tomentellis pallidic, 
petiolo robusto supra concavo dorso rotuudato, stipulis parvis lanceolatis 
caducis, fioribus ampb's 2-3-ni8 v. snbraceaioso-paniculatis roseis, sepalis 
4-5 linearibus petaloideis, petalis sepalis JBquilontjis orbiculatis late 
ungiiiculatit^, staminibusS-lO filamentis filiformibus iaa^quilongisantheris 
variis uliis sagittnto-bilobis aliis minoribus, loculis parallelis, staniino- 
diis perplurimis confertis staminibus brevioribus interne filiformibus 
subevectis Huperne in clavellam angustatn elongatam auream glaberrimam 
desinentibns, ovario 4-6-Ioculari, loculis muItioFulatis, stylo simplici, 
stigmata denticulate, capsula oblonga echinata loculicide 4-6- valve 
poljsperma, seminibus horizontalibus compressis, testa Crustacea mem- 
brana tenni involuta. 

H. ficifolia, Willd. in Usteri, Delect. Opusc. Boi. vol. ii. (1793) p. 201, t. 4; e< 
Sp. PI. vol. ii. p. 325. DG. Prodr. vol. i. p. 506. Oliver, Fl. Trop. Afr. 
vol. i. p. 260. 

Ciappei-tonia ficifolia, Decne. in Deless. Ic SeL PL vol. v. p. 1, t. i. WaJp. 
Ann. vol. i. p. 110. 

HoncJcenya ficifolia is a common West African shrub or 
small tree, found in watery situations, from Seuegambia to 
Angola, which has also been collected in the Xiam Niam 
country, in Central Equatorial Africa, by Dr. Schwein- 
furth. According to Sir Cornelius Moloney, K.C.M.G., 
who, when Governor of Lagos, sent specimens from that 
colony to Kew, it is there known under two names ; one 
the Bolo-bolo plant, the word meaning slippery, in allusion 
to a slippery juice given out by the leaves when bruised ; 
the other Agbourin Ilassa, or rope plant, from the use 
to which its fibrous bark is put by the Haussas. 

There are probably several species of Ihnirl-miia in 
Western tropical Africa. One, E, minor. Bail!. (Adans. x. 
1872, 183), is described as a small shrub a foot high, wiih 
the habit of a THumfetta, and leaves an inch to an inch 
and a half long. There are specimens in Kew Herbarium 
of what appears to be a third species, of still smaller size, 

May 1st, 1902. 



from Monrovia (Krause), and from dry places in Sienna 
Leone (G. F. Scott Elliot) ; it has leaves glabrous on botji 
surfaces, except for a few scattered bristles, and bears the 
name of K. parva. Oliver, in Fl. trop. Afr. 1. c, mentions 
a possible new species collected by Afzelius, and preserved 
in the British Museum, with whip-like branches, and leaves 
not exceeding one inch long. Seeds of Uonck^.nya ficifolia 
were sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1898, by Mr. 
Millen, when he was in charge of the Lagos Gardens, 
plants raised from which flowered in a stove in September, 
190L 

Descr. — A stellately pubescent shrub, or small tree, 
rarely twenty feet high, with stout branches, and fibrous 
brown bark. Leaves very variable, shortly, stoutly petioled, 
two to four inches long, broadly oblong or ovate oblong,, 
variously but not deeply three- to seven-lobed, base cor- 
date, three- to seven-nerved ; lobes rounded, obtuse, 
coarsely crenate, scaberulous above, beneath softly, ap- 
pressedly tomentose ; stipules lanceolate, caducous. 
Flowers sub-solitary, or in short racemes, shortly pedi- 
celled, two to three inches broad. Sepals four or five, 
linear, one and a half to two inches long, petaloid, pubes- 
cent. Petals as long as the sepals, orbicular, broadly 
clawed, purpHsh pink. Stamens eight to ten. Filaments 
very unequal, some nearly as long as the petals, puberu- 
lous. Staminodes very many, multiseriate, erect, filiform, 
puberulous, with clavate, glabrous, yellow tips. Ovarij 
six- to eight-celled, cells many-ovuled ; style sim.ple, stigma 
six- to eight-toothed. Capsule au inch long or less, 
oblong, echinate all over, loculicidally six- to eight- valved, 
many-seeded. Seeds horizontal, sub-orbicular, compressed. 



Fig. 1, receptacle with stamens, starainodes, and ovary : 2, 3, a-id 4, anthers ; 
Stuminodes -.—all enlarneA 



5, stuminodes -.—all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 



HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of lli€ 

Flowering Plants ai\d Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Begiuuera and Amateurs. By Geobgk Bentham, 
F.fi.S. 7th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8to, 9s. net. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Piauts, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood Kn- 
gravings. 5th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

OUTLINES of ELEiMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras, By George Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnsean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.Ii.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that av« 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. BEKKKi.cr, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Houkihk, F.L.S. , Ac, Ac. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. net. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with MicroecopiVal 
details of their structure. By R. BEAriHWAiTE, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50s. Vol. II., 42s. 6d. Parts XVII.— XX., 6s. each. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookek, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12 net. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS: a Description of the Plants of tie 

Australian Territoiy. Bv G. Bkntham, F.R.S., F.L.S., assisted V>y F, 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 2is. Published 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES: a Inscrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G Baker, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s, Published under the autlioiity ol the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plunts of 
the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By WiLLrAM H. H*KVKy, M.D., 
F.R.S. , and Otto Wiihet.m Sondes, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III., 18». each. 
Vol VI., 24s. net. Vol. VII., 35s. net. VoL V., Part I., 9s. net. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Damei. Omvkk, F.R.S. 

Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the autlioriiy of tlw First 
Commissioner of Her Majesty's Works. Vol. VII., 27«. 6i. net. Vol. V., 
25s. Gd. net. Vol. VIIL, Parts I.— III., 8s.net. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA: a Systf matic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealnnd, and the Chaihan., 
Kermadec'a, Lord Auckland's, Camptell's, and Mnctjuarrie's IcIohIr Bv 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the ( 
of that Colony, Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLAM '.^. in 

Dr. Grisebich. F.L.S. 42s. PuWished under the auspices of il.e S". re- 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flowering 

Plant* fcnd Ferns of the It-land of Hongkong. By GfOaeE Benthaw, 
F.L.S. With & Map of the lelaiid and Supplement by Dr. Hance. 21». 
Published under theautlionty of Her Majesty's Secretary of State for the 
Colonies. The Supplement . f^epai^telv, 2s. 6d. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, and 

DistriViution. Bv Sir J. D. Hookf.e. F.R.S. 12*. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE. and 

^o a Winter Fkita of the Riviera, including the ooaet from Mar^eilies to 
Genoa. By J. Tbahebkb Mo6GRii>ge. Royal &vo. Complete in I vol-, 
99 Coloured Plates, 63«. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd.. 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Gunhn. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZlNi:. 

CONTENTS OF No. 689, MAY, 1902. 



Tab. 7832.— KNIPHOFIA MULT[FL0RA. 
„ 7833.— BERBERIS DICTYOPHYLLA. 
„ 7834.— ALOE OLIGOSPILA. 
„ 7835— EUCALYPTUS COR DATA. 
„ 7836.— HOi^TCKENYA FIC1F0LL4. 



LovELL Rekve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

Completion of the FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

Now ready, Parts XXIII., XXIV. (completiDgthe work), 18s. net. Vol. VII.,oloth,38s. net. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36*. 
*#* Persona having incomplete Sets are adrised to complete their Copies without delaj, 
as trie Parts will be kept on Sale for a limited time only. No Part or Vol. will be soU 
without its continuation to the end of the work. 



Now ready, Vol. VIIL, Parts I. -III., 8s. net. Vol. V., 25s. 6d. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. net. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to HI.. 20s. each, net. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The CoDtiuuation by various Botanists edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER: F.R.S. 

Published under the authority of the First Cominissioner of Her Majesty's Works. 

Now Ready. Vol. V., Part I., 9s. net. Vol. VI., 24?. net. Vol. VII., 33s. net. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by Sir W. T. THiSELTON-DYER, C.JVI.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Keic. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Gape of Q-ood Hope 

and Natal. 

Vols. I. to III. 18s. esich. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDBK, Ph.D. 



Now ready, Part LXXXVIII., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

Bt CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 
Vol, I. 1.2s. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vols. II. — VII. 12s. each; large paper, each with 48 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Prospectus may be had on application to the Publishers. 



LovELL Eeeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

VKIWTBll BT AILBIKT AHD KITINSTOIT, ID,, 8T. lOVS'S HOWBB, CtK8K«"W»I.l., l.C. 



C]^ir» Merits. 

No. 690. ei 

5?L.' LTIII.— JUNE. Price 3*. 6d. eolonred, 2s. 6d. plain. 

OR No. 1384 ^' '''^'^ BNTIHK WORK. 

CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



OOHPaiSINO 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN. WITH 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 



Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.C.s.L, C.B., F.K.s., ¥.l. 

Xatt director of the ^onal IBotantc Ciartrcns of %ta. 




Nature and Art to adorn the page combine. 
And flowers exotic grace onr northern olime. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd. 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVERNMENT- 

6, HEXRIETTA STEEET, COVE^'T GARDEN. 

1902. 

[All rights reserved.] 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



Part III., with 10 Coloured Plates, 21s. net. 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACID^. 

By GEORGE BOWDLER BUCKTO:^^, F.E.S., E.L.S. 
To he completed in 5 parts. Subscription for the wliole vjork, £i Us. 6d. 



The family of the MembracidiB has claims on the notice of both the scientific and 
general public. Owing to the advance of agriculture, climatic variation, and other 
influences, organic forms are constantly undergoing transformation, while some may 
even become extinct. The present time, therefore, affords opportunities for studying 
and recording these forms, which may not occur again. 

The general public will find interest in the bizarre forms of these insects, while the 
speculations of the scientific mind will be exercised on the question of their utility. 

The Memhracidce are also interesting from their mimetic forms, which will be 
considered in this Monograph. 



Now Ready. 

THE HEPATICiE OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £7 10s. Plam, £11 2s. Qd. Coloured, net. 



Now ready, Parts 7—9, with 12 Plates, 15s. plain, 21«, coloured, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 

With Descriptions of all the Species, Varieties, and Htbrius. 

By ALFRED FRYER, A.L.S. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The work will be issued in 5 quarterly sections of 3 parts each. 
Prospectus on application. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Descripiion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BE NT HAM, F.R.S. 

7th Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. Hookeh, C.B.. G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. 9*. net. 



ILLDSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, -with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 
Formmg an llluitrated Companion to Bentham's " Handbook," and other Britith Floras. 
Stb Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9*. net. 

LOVELL REEVE i CO. Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



7831 




M.sai j>(Fndxiia\ 



Tab. 7837. 
aloe pendens. 
Native of Arahia. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace*. — Tribe Aloine^. 
Genns Aloe, Linn. ; {Benth. & Hoolc.f. Oen. Flant. vol. iii. p. 776.) 



Aloe pendens ; fruticosa, sobolifera, pendula, foliia Bubdistichia deflexis et 
patenti-recurvatis anguste ensiformibua sensim acuminatia ima apice 
Bubteretibns integris supra leviter turgidis subtus inferne valde convexis 
Iffite viridibna, dentibus parvis remotis deltoideis, scapo adscendente 
gracili 3-4-rainoso, racerais elongatis cylindraceis, pedicellis bracteis late 
ovatis acuminatis striatis longioribue, perianthii cylindracei subtrigoni 
luteo-rubri segmentis parvis ovatis tube triple longioribns. 

A. pendens, Forslc. Flor. ^gypt. Arab. Descr. p. 74. Baher in Journ. Linn. 
Soc vol. xviii. p. 181. Engler, Notizbl. Bert Bot. Gart. vol. i. p. 5 
(1897). 

I am indebted to ray old friend Sir Thomas Hanburj, 
F.L.S., for specimens of the very interesting Aloe here 
figured, together with a photograph, and excellent descrip- 
tion drawn up from the living plant by his Curator, Mr. 
Alwin Berger. It is a native of Southern Arabia, where 
it was discovered by Forskal growing on rocks at Hadjeh. 
It has been collected by Schweinfurth on Djebel Bura, at 
about three thousand feet elevation. The plant from 
which the figure is taken was received by Sir T. Hanbnry 
from the Botanical Gardens of Berhn, and it flowered at 
the Palazzo Orengo, Mortola, for the first time in March, 
1902. 

Mr. Berger remarks that in his opinion its nearest allies 
are the Arabian A. inermis, Forsk., and two South African 
species, A. microstigm.a and A. consohrina of Salm Dyck, 
all related by their small, cylindric flowers in elongate 
racemes, and narrow, ensifbrm, often spotted leaves. 
He observes that Forskal describes the flowers as of a 
yellow colour, and feels convinced that this is the case 
only in plants growing in shady places, as may be seen 
under such conditions, both in Naples with Mr. C. 
Sprenger, and in the Botanic Garden at Palermo. 

Descr. — Shrubby ; suckers many. Stem solitary, about 
sixteen inches long, and an inch and a quarter in 
JuNB 1st, 1902, 



i 



diameter, pendent ; bark scaly ; internodes about 
inch long. Leaves seventeen to eighteen inches long, b 
one and a half to two inches broad, and three-quarterl 
of an inch thick towards the base, patent, deflexe 
and recurved, very fleshy, narrowly ensiform, acuminate, \ , 
slightly turgid above, convex beneath, margin very |\ 
narrowly horny and reddish or yellow ; teeth four to six- 
tenths of an inch apart, small, deltoid, about one-tenth of 
an inch long, tip edentate for two and a half to three 
inches, terete or semi-terete ; leaves of young shoots 
distichous, on older branches convex on both surfaces, 
especially towards the base, sheath spotted and striped 
with white. Inflorescence about thirty inches long ; scape 
ascending, slender, twice or thrice branched; scales tew, 
deltoid. Racemes erect, cylindric, many-flowered, aboufc 
six to eight inches long and two broad, the terminal 
longer; pedicels five to six-tenths of an inch long, erecto- 
patent ; bracts shorter, deltoid, ovate, acute, marcescent. 
Flowers drooping, nearly an inch long, cylindric, sub- 
trigonous, not constricted, dull yellowish-red ; segments 
connate for one-third their length, yellow within, tips 
slightly recurved, with paler margins, and three dark 
central streaks. Stamens and style very shortly exserted. 
A. Berger, 

Fig. 1, flower; 2 and 3, stamens; 4, piatil; all enlarged; 5, reduced view of 
whole plant from a photograph. 




M-S-del, J N.FitcKlitK 



"\ancervt. Brooks JJ.'y 



D..,yacSonU^W 



i- Raeve &. C ° Londorv. 



Tab. 7838. 

EUKYOPS SOCOTEANUS. 
Native of Socotra. 

Nat. Ord. Composit^e. — Tribe Senecionide^. 
Genus Euryops, Cass.; {Benth. 8j- Jlook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 452.) 



EuRTOFS socotranus; sufFrutex S-pedalis, glaberrimus, dichotome raraosus, 
ramis robustia folioi-utn basibus persi.steatibus tessellatim cicatricatis, 
ramulis herbaceis, foliis cum petiolis 2-2J poll, longis sparsis t. ad apicea 
ramulorum confertis 3- rarius 4-partiti8 ia petiolum gracilem plano- 
compressum angustatip, segmentis auguste linearibus obtusis 1-nerviia 
sinubus acutis Isete viridibus, capitulis axillaribus solitariis vel in 
corymbos foliosos terminales aggregatis, pedunculis folia aaquantibas 
gracillimis nudis, involucii hemispherici basi nudi, bracteia 8-10 oblongia 
erectis ad medium connatis apicibus rotundatis herbaceia, receptaculo 
foveolatim dentate, fl. radii ad 12 tubo brevi ligula \ poll, longa lineiiri- 
oblonga revohita aurea apice 3-crenata, fl. disci croceis brevibus tubo 
superne late campanulato 5-fido, antheris exsertis, achgeniis oblongiB 
compressis pubescentibug, pappi setis brevibus hirsutis. 

E. socotranns, Balf.fil. in Proc. Roy. Soc. Edinb. vol. xi. (1882) p. 841; Bot. 
Socotr. p. 141, t. xli. 



The genus Euryops is a large one in South Africa, from 
which country it extends northwards through tropical 
Africa to Abyssinia and Arabia. One species alone has 
hitherto appeared in this magazine, namely, -E7. pedinatuSj 
Cap. {Othonna pectinata, Linn., tab. 306), a handsome 
conservatory plant, with snow-white cottony foliage, intro- 
duced in 173-1, and still flourishing in the Cape House at 
Kew. The genus is closely allied to Senecio, differing 
chiefly in the pappus and connate involucral bracts, 

E. socotramis was found in the higher regions of Mt. 
Haghier, in Socotra, by Dr. I, B. Balfour, F.R.S., when 
on his memorable expedition to that island in 1880, the 
botanical riches of which he was the first to describe. 
It has also been collected by Dr. Schweinfurth on Wadi 
Kischer. The specimen figured was raised in the Iloyal 
Botanic Garden of Edinburgh, from seeds brought by Dr. 
H. 0. Forbes, now Curator of the Public Museum, Liver- 
pool, who visited Socotra in 1898-9. It differs from the 
native specimens in having rather distant, scattered, much 
longer leaves and long brauchlets, which do not show the 
June 1st, 1902. 



i 



n 



curiously tessellated character of those of the native plan t, 
so well illustrated in Dr. Balfour's figure, in which als(^ ■■^) 
the leaves are crowded at the end of the branches. The ' 
flower-heads, too, are twice the size of those of native ' 
specimens. These differences are the effects of the wide]; f 
'\yerse conditions of the plant on the arid scorched vocki ? 
of its island home, and in the temperate warmth and i^p. 
moisture of a house in Scotland. J 

Descr. — A glabrous, dichotomously branched undershrub, 
about three feet high ; bracts woody, closely tessellately 
scarred. Leaves two to two and a half inches long, 
narrowed below into a long, flattened petiole, three- rarely 
four-partite ; segments narrowly linear, obtuse, one-nerved, 
bright green. Heads axillary, solitary, or in terminal 
corymbs ; peduncles slender, as long as the leaves. 
Involucre hemispheric, ecalyculate ; bracts eight to ten, 
oblong, erect, connate to the middle, tips rounded, her- 
baceous. J^ecepfacZe minutely toothed. May -flowers about ^ 
twelve ; tube short ; ligule half an inch long, linear-oblong, i 
recurved, golden-yellow. Disk-flowers orange-yellow, five- j 
lobed, tube broadly campanulate above the middle ; ' 
anthers exserted. Acliene oblong, compressed, pubescent ; 
pappus short, bristles hirsute. — J, D. H. 



Fig. 1, ray-flower; 2, disk-flower ; 3, hairs of pappus ; 4, stamens; 5, sty lo- 
arnifi of dissk-flower :— a^/ enlarged. 




M.S.ael, J.NTildviiUv 



VincBAtBrooJ^Pa^" 



■^SiiifibJbai^^iS&^Sfi. 



Tab. 7839. 

ERANTHEMUM ateopuepureum. 

Native of the Solomon Islands. 



Nat. Ord. Acantiiaceje. — Tribe Justicie.b, 
Genus Eranthemum, Linn.; {Betifh. & Mook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1007). 



Erantiiemtjm: atropurpureu/m ; suffrutex corollis exceptis glaberrimns, ramia 
tetraquetris, foliis ovatis oblongisve obtuse acumiuatis basi acutis supra 
atropurpureia nitidis subtus pallida virescentibus purpureo tinctis, nervia 
utrinque ad 8 supra impressis subtus costaqne prominulis ptirpureis, 
petiolo brevi, floribus in panicnlam spiciformem obloTigam erectam C- 
pollicarem di^positia, ramulis paniculse brevissimia oppositis multi-densi- 
floris, pedicellis calyce brevioribus, bracteolis subulatia, calycis ^ poll, 
longi segmentia lanceolatia, corollae tubo pollioari gracili fere recto albo 
intus pubescente, limbi segmentia tubo paullo brevioribus albis basi roseis 
lineari-oblongis obtusis ciliatis, 2 auperioribua erectis 3 inferioribua 
deflexis, antheris exsertis, loculia basi rotundatis ecalcaratis, disco tubu- 
loso, ovario glaberrimo in stylum gracilem attenuate, etigmatibus 
minutis. 

E. atropurpurenm, Hort. Bull, ex Gard. Ghron. 1875, vol. i. p. 619. 



The flowering of this well-known stove plant is a rare 
occurrence, though it has been in cultivation for upwards 
of a quarter of a century. It is one of the many new and 
interesting novelties procured from the Pacific Islands by 
Mr. Charles Moore, F.L.S., when Director of the Botanical 
Gardens of Sydney, New South Wales, and which were 
imported by and distributed from the Royal Gardens, 
Kew. It is said to be a native of the Solomon Islands. 

Two other species, probably allied to E. atropurpurenm, 
have been recorded from the Solomon Islands ; but the 
descriptions of them are so meagre, being founded chiefly 
on the coloration of the leaves (their flowers being un- 
known) that they have little claim to specific rank. One 
is E. nigrum, Lind. 111. Hortic. vol. xxvii. (1880), 165, 
t. 404, with terete branches and nearly black foliage ; the 
other, E. Moorei, Hort Bull., having leaves with a mottled 
green centre and a broad yellowish margin. Other allied 
species are E. Whartonianum, Hemsl. in Kew Bullet. 1894, 
p. 214, and E. pacificum, Engl. Jahrb. vii. p. 475, which is 
perhaps E. nigrum. 

The specimens of E. atrojmrpureum here figured 
June 1st, 1802. 



\ 

\ 

flowered in a stove of the Royal Gardens, Kew, in July 
lyOO. 

Descr. — A glabrous, leafy shrub ; branches erect, acutely 
four-angled. Leaves four to six inches long, ovate or 
oblong, obtusely acuminate, base acute, very dark red- 
purple and shining above, pale green, tinged with purple 
beneath ; nerves about eight on each side, purple beneath,-; 
petiole short. Panicles six inches long, erect, spiciform ; 
branches very short, many- and dense-flowered ; pedicels 
shorter than the calyx ; bracts subulate. Calyx one-sixth 
of an inch long, segments lanceolate. Corolla-tube an inch 
long, straight, slender, white ; lobes rather shorter than 
the tube, linear-oblong, obtuse, white, rose-coloured at 
the base, ciliate, two upper erect, three lower deflexed. 
Anthers exserted, base rounded, ecalcarate. Dish short, 
tubular. Ovary glabrous, narrowed into a slender style; 
stigmas minute. — /. D. H. 



>5 i 



Fig. 1, bracts, calyx, style and stigma ; 2, bui laid open ; 3, dorsal view of 
stamen ; 4, disk and ovary : — all enlarged. 






3*. 




M.S. del, J.>I-Fitehllth. 



.Broo-te.Day&SonLl^In?' 



LPeev-e ft. CLo 



Tab. 7840. 

ECHINOO ACTUS miobospebmus. 
Native of Argentina. 



Nat. Ord. Cacte*:. — Tribe EcniNOCACTKa. 

Genus EcuiNOCAcrus, Link 4" Otto; {Benth. & Hoolt.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. 

p, 848.) 



EcniNocACTUs microspermus ; caule hemispherico v. subgloboao 2-4 poll. diam. 
ecostato viridi mamillafco, mamillia spiraliter dispositis liberis depresso- 
hemisphericis obscure hexagonis ad I poll. diam. Isevibus glabris, areolis 
glabris, spinia externis radiantibna 10-14 inaequilongis ]-^ poll, longis 
gracilibus albis, centrali ^-| poll, longa gracillima siginoidoo decurva 
apicera versus plus minusve hamata fusco-rubra, floribus numerosis 
fere 2 poll, diam., calycis tubo pollicari piloao et aculeato, sepalis petalis- 
que multiseriatis lineari-lanceolatis acnminatis aureis aiiraatiacisve, 
ovario squamoso et lanuginoso, stigmatis flavi lobis ad 15 linearibus, 
semiriibus numerossimis minntis. 

E. microspermus, Weher in Bois, Diet. D'Hort. p. 469. Schum. Monatsschr. 
fur Kakt. vol. vii. (] 897), p. 104, cum ic. ; Gesamtbeschr. XakUp. 397, f. 68 ; 
Bliihend. KaTct. t. 1. 



A very distinct and attractive species of the immense 
genus Fjcliinocactns, well figured by Schumann, both in 
his Monatsschr. by a woodcut, and in his Bluehemler. Kakt. 
by a beautiful coloured plate. It is a native of Catamarca, 
a district in the province of Tucuman, in Northern Argen- 
tina, to the south of the great mountain of Aconcagua, 
whence it was sent by Mr. Schickendantz. The seeds, 
which I have not seen, are described as being so small 
as to resemble a powder. 

The plant figured was procured by purchase. It 
flowered in a frame of the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 
September, 1901. 

Desc7\ — Stem hemispheric or sub-globose, two to four 
inches in diameter, dark green, ecostate, mamillate. 
Mamillx spirally disposed, very regular, about one-third 
of an inch in diameter, depressed hemispheric, very 
obscurely hexagonal, smooth, quite glabrous. Outer spines 
ten to fourteen, radiating, slender, very unequal in length, 
a fifth to a third of an inch long, straight or flexuous, 
white ; central one half to two-thirds of an inch long, 
very slender, decurved, hooked towards the tip, red-brown, 

JpsK 1st, 1902. 



sometimes sigmoidly flexuous. Floivers many, crowdec 
at the top of the stem, golden- or orange-yellow, nearly 
two inches in diameter. Calyx-tube about an inch long, 
hairy and sparsely aculeate. Sepals and ]jetals very many, 
in many series, linear-lanceolate, acuminate. Filaments 
short, reddish, anthers yellow. Ovary scaly and woolly^ 
stigmatic lobes about fifteen, pale yellow. Seeds very 
numerous and very minute. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, spines of one areola ; 2 and 3, stamenB; 4, stigmas : — all enlarged. 




MS ad J.NKtdhlitK 






l^'!R.e&\'e ScC^Londoji 



Tab. 7841. 
PLECTRANTHUS saccatus. 

Native of Natal. 

Nat. Ord. Labeat.e. — Tribe Ocimoide^. 
Genus Plectra ntiius, Viler.; {Benih. ^- IlooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1175.) 



PLECTKiNTuiJs (Germanea) saccatus; caule suffraticoso, ramis patulis pedall- 
bas herbaceis tetragonis foliipque crassiuscalis patentim pilosis, foliis 
2-3 poll, loiigis late ovatis rhomboideisve grosse crenati-* otrinque pilosis 
basi ciineatis v. truncatis floralibus minutis, racemis laxifloria simplicibus, 
verticillastris 2-4-flons, pedicellis ^-J poll, longis fusco-rubris, calycibus 
minutis late campanulatis hirtellis, dentibus acutis, supremo ovato 
lateralibus snbulatis inferioribus ovatis acutis, corolla azureao tubo f 
poll, longo inflato compresso basi gibboso intus ciliato, ore angnsto, labio 
superiore maxiino erecto semicirculari apice emarginato basi subhasfcatim 
truncate lobis lateralibus brevibus rotundatis, labio inferiore parvo 
oblongo obtuso concavo deflexo, filamentis liberis, antherarum loculia 
ovoideis divaricatis. 

P. saccatus, Benth. in E. Key. Comment, p, 227; in DG. Prodr. vol. xii. p. 62. 
Wood, Cat. Plant. Natal. Bot. Card. (1890) p. 69 : Prelim. Cat. India. 
Natal PI. (1894) p. 28. 



Plectronihus saccatus is much the largest-flowered species 
of the genus known to me, which character and the lovely 
azure blue of the corolla render it a very ornamental 
plant. Mr. Lynch, to whom I am indebted for the 
specimen figured ^ describes it as remarkable for the 
horizo]itally spreading branches, about a foot long, the 
succulent stem and leaves, and for the manner in which 
the leaf-blades are brought into the best position for the 
incidence of light by the action of the petioles. It is a native 
of Katal, where it was discovered by the Collector Drege in 
1836, at Omsamwubo or St. John's River, a place I do not 
find in any map. There is a single specimen of it, numbered 
4777 of Drege's Catalogue, in the Kew Herbarium, but 
none from any subsequent collector. A hving plant of it 
was received at the Botanical Gardens of the University 
of Cambridge, from Mr. J. Medley Wood, A.L.S., Curator of 
the Natal Botanical Gardens, in 1899, which flowered m 
October, 1901. According to Wood's Catalogue of the 
Indigenous Plants of Natal, it affects elevations of from 
June 1st, 1902. 



:s4 



one thousand to tlii-eo tlious.ind feet. The stem is erro4J 
neously described as procumbent by Bcntham. 

Vescr. — Suffruticose, sparsely hairy on the stem and 
leaves, rather succulent ; branches about a foot long, 
horizontally spreading. Leaves two to three inches long, 
broadly ovate or rhombic, coarsely cremate, laxly hairy on 
both surfaces, base cuneate or truncate; floral small. 
liacemes erect, simple, rhachis stout, obtusely four-angled ; 
whorls two- to four-flowered; pedicels a fourth to a third 
of an inch long, red-brown. Calyx minute, broadly cam- 
panulate, two-lipped, five-toothed ; upper tooth broadly 
ovate, lateral and two lower very small, ovate, acute. 
Corolla large, pale blue ; tube two-thirds of an inch long, 
inflated, compressed, gibbous at the base.; upper lip erect, 
more than half an inch broad, semicircular, with a trun- 
cate, sub-hastate base, notched at the top ; side lobes very 
narrow ; lower lip small, oblong, obtuse, concave, deflexed. 
Filaments free, glabrous ; anthers small, with ovoid, 
divaricate cells. — /. D. H. 



Tig. 1, cal^fx and style; 2, interior of corolla-tube and stj^mens; 3 and 
4, anther^ ; 5, disk and ovaries •.—all enlarged. 




BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

ANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the Biitieh 
Isles. For the use of Beginnere and Amateurs. By Gkobob Bentham, 
F.E.S. 7th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9«. net. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wc.d 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings hy W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. Q. Smith, F.L.S., forming an lllustrnted romjmnioB 
to Benthaine "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 \V (il I'n- 
gravings. 6th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, ds. ir' 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introd. 

Local Floras. By Georgk Benxham, F.E.S. , President 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wiglit, witi. 

localities of the less common species. By F. Tuwnse.nd, M..\., F.I >^. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing nil tJint uve 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. 'I 
M.A., F.L.S, 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21.t. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Desmpuoi,- . . 

ail the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in (ii-;.t 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkikk, FT * * ^ ^ 

Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. Qd, net. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monoj^raphs c - 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with 51 1 
details of their structure. By E. Bbaithwaitk, M.D., F.L>. 
with 45 Plates, 50s. Vol. II,, 42s, 6d, Parts XYII.— XXI.. 6*. wicb. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Bookkk, F I! ^ , 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12 net. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS: a Description of the Plai;: 

Australian Territory. Bv G. BisnthaM, F.R.S., F.L.S., a8Bisrt(i 1.. i . 
MuELLEK, F.E.S. Vole. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. VuhlM . .* 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Anstnilia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES: a Deficnj- 

tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Bakkk, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the autlioiiiy of th.. 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By Wili.hm I 
F.E.S., and One Wilhklm Sondeb, Ph.D. Vols 
Vol VI., 24^. net. Vol. VII., 35s. net. Vol. V , ?. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By 1 

Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under ','"' 

Commissioner of His Majesty's Works. Vol. V,, -oi:- t- • ee". 
27s, 6d. net. Vol, VIII., 2r>s. 6d. net- 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND 1 T ' " 

Description of the Native Plants of New Z 
Kerniaidec'a, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, ami 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.E.S. Published nnder tht 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INL 

Dr. Gkisebich, F.L.S. 42s. Published under 
tarv of State for the Colonies. 

FLORA H0NGK0NGF:NSIS: a Description of t 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkoi 
F.L.S. With a:. Map of the Island and Pin 1 
Published undp ority of the St 

The SuppiemP! v, 2s. 6d. 

ON the FLORA oi .AUSTRALIA: ^^ onu . 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Hooker. F.R.S. 12s, 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of V' 

to a Winter Floia of the Eiviera. includinfr the wx 
Genoa. By J. Tbaherm* Mogg"-'^-' p.,,. Svo 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

T.OVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Hen. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 690, JUNE, 1902. 



Tab. 7837.— aloe PEIS ; . 
„ 7838.— EUEYOPS SOCOTRANUH. 
„ 7839.— ERANTHEMUM ATKOPURPUREUM. 
„ 7840.— ECHINOCACTUS MICROSPERMUS. 
,, 784L— PLECTRANTHUS SACCATUS. 



LovEtl. Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



Completion of the FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 
Nowready,PartsXXIlI.,XXIY. (completingths work), 18s. net. Yol. VII.,oloth,38s. net. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, P.R.S., &t. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 385. Vol. YI., 36*. 
*,-.*' Persons having incomplete Sets are adrised to complete their Copies wifchont delaj, 
as tne Parts will be kept on Sale for a limited time only. Xo Part or Vol. yi^l be sold 
without its continuation to the end of the work. 



FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each, net. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

Continnation by various Botanists edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.E.S. 

Vol. v., 25s. M, Yol. VII., 27s. 6<i. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6i. net. Published under 

the authority, of the First Commissioner of His Majesty's WurTcs. 

Now Eeady, Vol. V., Part I., 9». net. : ;. net. Yol. VII., 33s. net. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER. C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Rjyal Gardens, Kew, 
Publisiied under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Naxa.1. 

Vols, I. to IIJ. ISs. each. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDES, Ph.D. 

Now ready. Part XC, with 4 Coloured Plates, os. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

Br CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

Vol. 1, 12s.; large paper, with 40 Colonred Plates, 53s. 

Vols. II.— VII. 12«. each; large paper, each with 48 Colonred Plates, 63s. 

Prospectus may he had on applieation to the Publishers. 
LoTRLT. Reeve k Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

»SI»XKT> BT 61I.B«Wt AJTB »ITIjr«TOS, ID., 81. JOHS'S HOFSB, CLEKKSM WBlt, » C , 



No. e9iJ^ 

VOL. LVIII.— JULY. PriceSt.Qd colovred,2».Gd.plai'» 

OB No. 1385 ^^ ^^^ ENTIBS WOBK. 

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COMFBI8IN& 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KKW, 

AND OF OTHEB BOTAJJICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, V\ 11 f! 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BT 

SiE JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.C.s.L, C.B.. F.lc.8., ^ i 

Xflte ©irtctot of tfct 3£lo»al IBoianic GarUenB d( Htm. 




Natnre and Art to adorn the page ccmome. 
And flowers exotic ^race onr northern clime. 



L O N I> O N : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd. 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME. COLONIAL AND INDIAK GOVEBNME. 

6, HENRIETTA STEEET, C0VE5T GAEDEN. 

1902. 
[All rights re$ervei.] 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



Part III., with 10 Coloured Plates, 21s. net. 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACID^. 

By GEJKGE BOWDLER EUCKTON, F.E.S., F.L.S. 

To he completed in 5 parts. Subscription for the ivhole work, £i 14s. 6d. 



f tlio MeDilracidce hriH claims on tlio notice of both the scientific and 

_,,„vi,ii i,u...iO. Owing to the advance of agriculture, climatic variation, and other 

inflaences, organic forms are constantly undergoing transformation, while some may 

.'■-•(■!. liccome extinct. The present time, therefore, affords opportunities for studying 

'diuf? these forms, which may not occur again. 

nrral pnhli(^ will find interest in the bizarre forms of these insects, while t'nc 
umd mil b« ex:oroised on the question of their utility, 
interesting from their mimetic forms, which will he 



Now Ready. 

THE HEPATICJE OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 V>.I.s., 2LN rLu>-.s. C7 !'%•. Plain, £11 2s. 6d. Coloured, net. 



N )w reinly, Pana 7—9, with 12 Plates, 15s. plain, 21». coloured, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 

\n Descuiptioxs of all the Species, Varieties, and Htbkius. 

FRED FEYEK, A.L.S. Illustrated by ROBERT MOKGAX, F.L.S. 

1 iie work will be issued in 5 quarterly sections of 3 parts each. 
Prospectus on application. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA; 

A Descripiion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in tfie British Isles. 

'^ •- r O R G E B E N T H A M , F. R.S. 

S:r J. I). HooKEB,C.B.. G.C.S.I.,F.R.S.,&c. 9«.tiet. 



ULUSTRATIOHS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

4 Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
'" fl. FITCH, F.L.S., AND W. G. SMITH, F.L.S 

< OTO.Pfitiion to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Fiorai. 
r.th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9#. net. 

LOVELL RBEVE & CO. Ltd., 6 HENRIETTA STREET, COTENT GARDKN' 



7sr: 




M-S.deliJ.NPiijrlvlitK 



Vincent Bro okn,13ay *. Son ln^ Imp 



L RoovB Si C9 Loniori 



Tab. 78.42. 

BEGONIA ANGULAEIS. 
Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Begoniacea. 
Genus Begonia, Linn, \ {Benih. & Hook.f, Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 841.) 



Begonia (Pritzelia) angularis; elata, robusta, ramosa, glaborrima, foliis 6-8- 
pollicaribna oblique ovato-lanceolalis subacutis basi bilobia lobo altero 
niaximo rotundato altero rotundato v. truncate marginibus nndulatia 
crenulatis basi 4-5-plinerviia dein penninerviis nervis crassinsculis, stipra 
saturate viridibus secus nervos pallidioribus, subtus pallide viridibus 
roBeisve, stipulis polHcaribua ellipticis acutia caducia, bracteia ad baaio 
peduncnlorum l^-pollicaribus e basi cordata lanceolatis herbaceis peraia- 
tentibus, pedunculis foliia mnlto longioribua roseis apice plnriea dichoto- 
mis, bracteolis minutis, floribus \-% poll, latia capitellatis albia vel roseis, 
fi. masc, eepalis 2 orbiculatia medio concavia, petalia triente minoribua 
oblon^is, ataminibua toro parvo sessilibua, antheria filamentia longioribns 
linean-oblongis connective breviter excurrente obtuse, /?. /cent., sepahs 
4-5 orbiculatis, stigmatibua sesailibua late reniformibua undique papil- 
loaia, capsula ^ poll, longa 3-alata, ala dorsali oblique rotundata, 
lateralibus multo minoribus, placentis integris undique ovuliferia. 

B. angularis, Baddi in Mem. Moden. vol. xviii. Fis. (1820) p. 407. A-DC. in 
DC. Prodr. vol. xv. pars I. p. 358 : in Mart. Fl. Bras. vol. iv. para I. 
p. 358. ^ 

B. crenulata, Schoit in Hmt. Vindoh. ex A. DC. I.e. 
B. zebrina, Sort. Angl. ex Lond. Encyc. PI. Suppl. 2, p. 1506. 
B. haatata. Veil. Fl. Flum. vol. x. t. 54 ? 

Pritzelia zebrina, Klotzsch, in Monatsh. Bert. Akad. (Maerz, 1854) p. 126; 
et in Ahhandl. Akad. JBerl. (1855) p. 110, t. 103. 



Though differing a little from A. de CandoUe's excellent 
description in the smaller size of the petals of the mule 
flower, and in the somewhat larger capsules, I cannot 
doubt this being Raddi's Begonia angularis, which is said 
(A.DC. I.e.) to have been introduced into English gardens 
in 1845 from San Gabriel, in the Sierra d'Estrclla of 
Brazil. There are specimens of it in the Kew Herbanum 
from the Organ Mountains, collected by Barchell, and 
from Rio (probably the Organ Mountains) by Glaziou. 
Martius gives the Province of Rio de Janeiro and Mmas 
Geraes ; and A. de Candolle in the Prodomus cites Schott 
as its discoverer in 1822, at San Joao Marques. 

B. angularis is a magnificent species, of shrubby habit. 
The plant from which the figure is derived is eight feet 

JuLT 1st, 1902. 



high. It is planted in a bed in the Mexican division of 
the Temperate House of the Royal Gardens, where it 
flowers freely throughout the year. It has been long in 
cultivation at Kew. 

Descr. — Sfera eight feet high, copiously branched, 
branches spreading or drooping, as thick as the little 
finger, green. Leaves six to eight inches long, obliquely 
ovate-lanceolate, unequally two-lobed at the base, very 
dark green above, paler along the nerves, pale green 
beneath, and sometimes suffused with red, margins undu- 
late and crenulate; petiole rather short, stout; stipules 
one to one and a half inches long, ovate-lanceolate, her- 
baceous, green, persistent. Feduncles long, rather slender. 
Floivers in heads on the terminal branchlets of a very large 
repeatedly dichotomously branched panicle, white, about 
two-thirds of an inch in diameter; male fl.y sepals 2, 
orbicular, depressed in the middle; petals one-third as 
large, oblong; stamens crowded in a small receptacle, 
filaments very short, anthers linear-oblong, connective 
obtuse; fem. fl,, sepals 4-5, orbicular; stigmas sessile, 
broadly reniform, papillose all over. Capsule three-winged, 
an inch broad across the wings ; dorsal wing obliquely 
rounded, lateral much shorter.—/. D. U, 



Figs. 1 aud 2, stamens; 3, fruit; 4, transverse section of ovary:— a?^ en- 
larged. 




Vmoent Brook3,D»y & SonLt^I^P 



Tab. 7843. 

MUSCART LATIFOLIUM. 

Native of Asia Minor. 

Nat. Ord. LiLiACE.E. — Tribe Scille.k. 
Genus MusCAEi, Mill.; {Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p, 811.) 



MuscARi (Botryanthus) latifolium; bulbo parvo ovoideo, foliis 1-2, G-12 poll, 
longis 1-2 poll, latis lineari- v. obovato-oblongia v. oblongo-lauceolatiu 
snbacutis planis basi anguatatis scajjum vaginantibus, scaix) robiiHto 
foliia longiore viridi, racemo 3-4 poll, longo cylindraceo detiHiliani, 
floribus pendulia J poll, longis saturate atro-violaceis supremis niinoribiiH 
pallidioribus clausis neutris, bracteis raiuutis, perianthio oblongo euhnr- 
ceolato intus et extus glaucescente, lobis brevibus erectis concavis rotmi- 
datia dorao incrassatis deranm recurvis, staminibns medio tubo insertis 
uniseriatis, antheria inclusis cajruleis, ovario ovoideo ia etylum 3-lobura 
attenuate, capsula membranacea, seminibua compressis. 

Jr. latifolium, J. Kirk in Jameson Eclinb. New. Phil. Journ. toI. vi. (]8.j8) 
p. 80; in Trans. Bot. Soc. Edinh. vol. vi. (1860) p. 30. Boiaa. Fhr. 
Orient, vol. v. p. 294. Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. Boi. vol. xi. (1371) 
p. 415. 

Bellevalia monopliylla, J. Gay ex Boisx. Ft. Orient, v. p. 29t. 

B. muscaroidea. Masters in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. voL iii. (1859) p. 113. 



Muscari latifolium was discovered and brought to 
Europe from Mt. Ida in Asia Minor by Dr. (now Sir John) 
Kirk, F.R.S., and Dr. Armitage, when em])loyed in tlie 
military hospital at Renkioi, during the Crimean War. 
It has more recently been found in pine woods of the 
Mouraddagh Mts. in Phrygia and in the Troad. The 
specimen here figured differs greatly from the native ones, 
and from the descriptions of Kirk, Masters, Boissier and 
Baker, in its much larger size, the presence of two leaves, 
the longer raceme, and much larger flowers, differences pro- 
bably all due to cultivation. The Royal Gardens, Kew, 
are indebted to those of Berlin for bulbs of this plant, 
received in 1886. Like most other species of the genus, 
it is an early flovverer. 

Dcscr. — Bnlb small, ovoid. Leni-p.s one or two, six to 
twelve inches long, by one to two broad, linear- or obo- 
vato oblong or oblong-lanceolate, sub-acute, flat, narrowed 
to the sheathing base, bright green. Scape longer than the 
leaves, stout, naceme th°'ee to four inches long, cylindric, 

JULT IST, 1902. 



dense-flowered. Flowers pendulous, about a quarter of an 
inch long, very dark violet-blue, uppermost smaller, erect, 
pale blue, neuter. Perianth oblong-urceolate, glaucescent ; 
lobes short, erect, orbicular, concave, dorsally much 
thickened, at length recurved. Stamens inserted about 
the middle of the tube, uniseriate ; anthers included, violet- 
blue. Ovary ovoid, narrowed into the style; stigma 
three-lobed. Capsule membranous. Seeds compressed. — 
J. R n. 



Pig. 1, flower; 2, portion of perianth laid open ; 3, ovary ; — all enlarged. 




M. S.de:, J JJ FitchTiOi 



-riTj^era Broote,Da.y&So" 



jt^itip : 



L Reeve 'i.C'? London 



Tah. 7844. 
IMPATIENS cuspiDATA. 

Var, ARTHRITIOA. 
Native of the Nilghiri Mts. 

Nat. Ord. Geraniaceje. — Tribe Balsamine«. 
Genus Impatiens, Linn.; {Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 277.) 



Impatiens (Uniflorae) cusfidaia; fruticosa, fere glaberrima, ramia ramulis 
petiolisque cylindraceis niveo-farinoais, foliis alternis superioribus rarins 
oppositis longe petiolatis 3-5 poll, longis lanceolatia v. oblongo-lanceolatia 
acuminatis serrulatis flaccidis laete viridibus basi acutis v. aiigustatis, 
nervis valde obliquis subtus pilosulis, petiolia 1^-2 poll, longis setis 
sparsis glanduliferia anctis, glandulis stipularibuo 0, pedtinculis axillaribus 
l-floris solitariis binisve petiolo longioribus ebracteolatis, sepalis 2 e basi 
ovata longe subulatis, corolla pallida rosea % poll, diam., vexillo erecto 
rotundato bifido dorao cornuto, alia vexillo paullo longioribns lobo basilari 
oblongo obtuso quatn terminalo oblique oblongum apicalatum triente 
breviore, labello cymbiforme acuto, calcare filiforme alia duplo longiore 
recto V. paullo incurvo apice non v. vix incrassato, capsula § poll, longa 
ovoidea utrinque attenuata glabra. 

I. cuspidata, Wight et Am. in Hook. Comp. Bot. Mag. vol. i. (1835) p. 321. 
Wight, le. PI. Ind. Or. t. 741 ; Cat. n. 2242. 

I. latifolia, Linn, partim, Hook. f. <§• Th. in Joum. Linn. Soc. vol. iv. (180O) 
p. 124; Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. i. p. 450. 

I. flaccida, Am, partim, Hook.f. Fl. Brit. 2nd. i. p. 457. 

"Var. arthritica; nodia inferioribua valde incrassatis. 



Though not in all respects agreeing with the description 
of L cuspidata given by Wight & Arnott, or with Wight's 
tab. 741, I have no hesitation in referring to that species 
the plant here figured. It differs from both figure and 
description in the conspicuous snowy-white farina on the 
stem and branches, which give it a very remarkable 
appearance. There are several Peninsular, Indian and 
Ceylon species, to which it is closely allied, and with 
which it has been more or less confounded by Thwaites, in 
his " Enum. Plant. Zeyl." by myself in the " Flora of 
British India," and by Trimen in his *' Handbook of the 
Ceylon Flora," all distinguished by the alternate exstipu- 
late leaves, axillary one-flowered peduncles with no trace 
of bracts or bracteoles, cymbiform lip abruptly narrowed 
into the spur, and ellipsoid capsule narrowed (in a^^;) f5 
both ends. Such are /. latifolia, Bot. Mag. tab. o6Zo 



July Ibt, 1902. 



(an Linn.?), I. flacrJda, tab. 5276 (an Arn. ?), /. hipartita, 
Arn., and /. lucida, Heyne, all requiring study with better 
material than has hitherto been available, but I think all 
distinct. From all these I. cuspidata differs in the 
snow-white stem and branches, &c., a character which 
escaped both White and Arnold. 

Impatiens cuspidata is a native of Conoor in the Nilghiri 
Hills, at about five thousand feet elevation, where it was 
first found by Wight. It has been in cultivation in 
England since 1877, when specimens were sent by Messrs. 
Veitch to the Kew Herbarium. The plant here figured 
represents a most remarkable state of it, drawn in July, 
1891, by Miss Smith, in a conservatory of the Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh, in which the base of the 
stem was nearly an inch in diameter, the lower branches 
nearly as thick at the base, the upper with the nodes 
thickened and elongated into cylinders of a pale pinkish 
white colour, contrasting remarkably with the white inter- 
nodes, and the upper nodes quite normal. I have given it 
the varietal name of arthritica, from its gouty appearance ; 
but am disposed to regard it rather as a diseased condition, 
well worthy of study by a vegetable anatomist. 

Descr. — A shrub four to five feet high, with spreading 
branches, covered with a snow-white farina, the lower 
nodes elongate, and thickened into cylinders of a pale 
reddish colour. Leaves alternate, or the uppermost oppo- 
site, three to five inches long, lanceolate or oblong- 
lanceolate, finely acuminate, serrulate, flaccid, bright green, 
base acute ; nerves obUque, more or less pilose beneath ; 
petiole slender, with a few soft, scattered, gland-tipped 
bristles. Pedimcles solitary or binate, axillary, longer than 
the petioles, ebracteolate, quite naked, one-flowered. 
Floioers about an inch broad, very pale red. Sepals two, 
very small, ovate, narrowed into long, slender points, 
green. Standard orbicular, two-lobed, erect, with a dorsal 
horn. Winga two-lobed ; terminal lobe obliquely oblong, 
apiculate, much larger than the oblong, deflexed basal one. 
I/ip boat-shaped, acute, abruptly narrowed into a nearly 
straight, slender spur, about twice as long as the wings. 
Capsule ovoid, narrowed at both ends. — J. D. II. 

Fig. 1, bud, showing sepal; % lip and spur 5 3, petal -.—all enlarged i 4, fruit, 
and 6, base of stem 4 both of uat. size. 



IS'L", 




~. "[' .^ p^ 



M,S del.J-KPitchlah 



Tab. 7845. 
CYNORCHIS viLLosA. 

Native of Madagascar. 

Nat. Ord. O11CUIBE.M. — Tribe Opiiryde^. 
GenuB Cynorcuis, Thouars; {Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 628.) 



Cynorchis villosa ; herba erecta, infloreBcentia glanduloso-villosa, radicibua 
crassia pilis atris comatis, caule brevi vaginia orbicularibus tecto, foliis 
paucis gessilibus 4-8 poll, longia elliptico-oblongis oblongo-lanceolatisvo 
acntis acuminatis v. cuspidatis planis 7-oo-nerviis margine undulatis.scapo 
S-lO-pollicari erecto viridi glanduloBO-villoso vaginis paacis 1-1^ poll. 
longis lanceolatis instructo, racemo spicasformi oblongo-cylindraceo 3-4 
poll.longo obtuso densifloro, bracteis ^-\ poll, longis ovato-lanceolatis 
ovarium strictum glaDduloso-pubescentem sequantibus, pedicellis ad ^ 
poll, longis villosis, perianthio \ poll, longo deflexo oblongo roseo, sepalia 
petaligque conniventibus, sepalis ovato-oblongis apicuktia concavis 
glanduloao-villosis, petalis minoribus auviculasformibns glabris, labello 
sepalis breviore glabro oblongo-pandurreformi aplce trilobo lobis rotan- 
datis, calcare labello Eequilongo obtuso inflato intus glanduloso, anthera- 
rum tubalia iV poll, longis rectia parallelis. 

0. villosa, Bolfe in Kew Bulletin, ined. 



Of the genus Cynorchis, whicli in the "Genera Plan- 
tarum," that is in 1883, was credited with about twelve 
species, there are now at least thii-ty in the Kew Her- 
barium, the majority of them from Madagascar, from 
which country, as from tropical Eastern Africa, a rich 
harvest of species is to be anticipated. Hitherto tlie 
genus, which is found as far South as Natal, has not been 
discovered in Western Africa. Only two have previously 
been figured in this work : one under the name of C. imr- 
immscens, tab. 7651, which, as has lately been shown, is 
not the true plant, but should have borne the name G. 
Lowiana, which Reichenbach gave it ; the other is C. gran- 
dijlora, Eidley, tab. 7564. A figure of the true G. pur- 
purascens, Thouars, will shortly appear in this work. 

GynorcMs villosa is one of the smallest flowered species 
of the genus, it is a native of N.E. Madagascar, where it 
was discovered by Mr. G. Warpur, in ravines at Tanaiibe. 
Its nearest ally is, according to Mr. Rolfe, G. (jibhosa, 
Ridley (in Journ. Linn. Soc. xx. (188 t) 331), which has 
JuiT 1st, 1902. 



solitary leaves, larger, glabrous flowers and a long spur. 
The plant figured flowered in a stove of the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in September, 1901. 

Descr. — Roots of fleshy fibres covered with black bairs. 
Stem very short, clothed with orbicular sheaths. Leaves 
few, spreading, four to eight inches long, elliptic- or 
oblong-lanceolate, acute or acuminate, flat, many-nerved, 
margins undulate. Scape eight to ten inches long, erect, 
green, glandular-villous ; sheaths few, ovate-lanceolate. 
Raceme spiciform, three to four inches long, oblong, 
cylindric, dense-fld. ; bracts ovate-lanceolate, and ovary 
glandular-villous; pedicels about half an inch long. 
Perianth rose-purple, about half an inch long, deflexed ; 
sepals and petals connivent. Sepals glandular-villous, 
ovate-oblong, apiculate, concave. Petals rather shorter, 
ear-shaped, glabrous. Lip rather shorter than the sepals, 
oblong-panduriform, glabrous, with three spreading, 
rounded terminal lobes. Spur about as long as the lip, 
inflated.— /.D.S^. 



Fij?. 1, flower with the Bcpi; removed; 2, petal; 3, lip and column; 
4, pollinium : — all enlarged. 



7,^-} (I 




M.&iiI,J.NPit<i..HtK 



"VinoentBrooJrs^ay&SonLt imp , 



Tab. 7846. ' 

BYBLIS GIGANTEA. 
Native of Western Australia, 

Nat. Ord. ? 
Genus BiBLls, Salisb. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 664). 



Byblis gigantea ; herba erecta, pilis glanduliferis operta, viscida, canle simjili- 
ciusculo basi lignoFO, foliis 6-12 poll, longis anguste linearihus teretibiiH 
V. eupra canalicnlatis vernatione involatip, pednncnlis axillaiibus nni- 
floris, sepalJs lanceolatis candato-acumiiiatis 6-7 nerviis, petalis cuncato- 
obovatis crenulatis disco tenui hypogyno insertis alabastro contorti.", 
flabellatim multinerviis ima lasi primtim cohserentibus demxim marces- 
centibus, staminibus 5 hypopynia subdeclinatis, antberis filaroentis cra?- 
eiusculis longionbus irsequalibus basifixis lineari-oblongis, loculis demum 
ab apice ad basin dehiscentibus, ovario 2-loctilare, stylo simplici, stigniate 
capitellato, ovulis septo affixis, capsula subglobosa gepalis persistentibus 
breviore loculicida polysperma, seminibns minntis ovoideis, testa cras- 
siuscula rugulosa, embryone immerse, cotyledonibus brevibns. 

B. gigantea, Lindl. in Swan River App. p. 21. Lehm. in Plant Preiss. vol. i. 
p. 257. Plamh. in Ann. Sc. Nat Ser. 3, vol. ix. p. 306. Benih. Fl. 
Austral vol. ii. p. 470. Barrciv in Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. n. p. 409, 
et 1900, vol. ii. p. 351, fig. 109. Lang in Flora, vol. kxxviii. (1901) p. 149, 
t. 12. 

B. Lindleyana, Planch. I.e. p. 307. 



The genus ByhUs has been referred to the Order Bro- 
seracese, from which it conspicuously differs in the simple 
style, two-celled ovary, and other characters. Bentham, 
in the " Flora Australiensis," points out the resemblonce in 
the structure of its flowers to those of Cheiranthera, an 
Australian genus of the Order Pittosjporew, of very different 
habit and foliage ; the likeness to which genus is evidenced 
in the corolla, declinate stamens, anthers, two-celled ovary, 
single style, and loculicidal capsule. 

Very recently B. gigantea has been made the subject of an 
elaborate study by Mr. F. L. Lang, in a paper cited above, 
who, after a close comparison of it with Folypompholyx, 
Lehm., an Australian water-plant of the Order Lentil^" 
lariesi, unhesitatingly refers it not only to the same Order, 
but to " close proximity " with that genus. _ The point 
upon which Mr. Lang most strongly dwells is, that the 
glandular hairs of B. gigantea are structurally different 



July 1st, 1902. 



from those of Broseracess proper, and closely agree with 
the glands of Finguimla. In support of this affinity, other, 
often most minute, structural characters common to the 
two genera are described, but the value of such characters 
in a classificatory point of view has not been established, 
and the presence of some may be fortuitous where they 
occur. On the other hand, the differences between Byhlis 
and any genus of Lentibularieae are too glaring to need 
mention. My own impression is, that until the other species 
of Bijblis {B. liniflora^ Salisb.), and the allied Cape genus 
Boridida, Linn., have been studied with the same care as 
Mr. Lang has devoted to B. gigantea^ a pronouncement on 
the immediate affinities of the latter must be regarded as 
premature. Nor would it surprise me to learn that 
B, gigantea was generically distinct from the typical 
B. liniflora of tropical AustraHa, of which I have made only 
a cursory examination. In one point my description of 
B, gigantea differs from that of others, in which the 
petals are described as united at the base ; I find them in 
B, gigantea to be obscurely coherent at the very base 
in a very young state only, and perfectly free in their 
mature condition. 

The plant of B. gigantea here figured was raised from 
seeds sent in 1899 to the Royal Botanical Gardens, Edin- 
burgh, by Mr. A. Morison, of the Agricultural Department, 
AYest Australia. It flowered first in 1900, since when 
Dr. Balfour has sent plants to the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
and has^ often kindly supplied me with flowers for 
examination and description. 

Descr.— Whole plant, except the corolla, stamens and 
pistil, cloth ed with multicellular gland-tipped hairs. Stem six 
to twenty-four inches high, simple or sparingly branched, 
stout, rigid ] rootstock woody. Leaves six to twelve inches 
long, very narrowly linear, terete or channelled above, 
involute m vernation. Flowers solitary, on axillary 
pedunc es shorter than the leaves, very variable in size. 
^epats lanceolate, caudate-acuminate, usually much shorter 
than the petals, but very variable in length. Petals 
cuneate-obovate, contorted in bud, inserted on a narrow, 
hypogynous disk, red-purple, flabellately many-veined, 
tip rounded, crenulate. Stamens much shorter than the 
petals, unequal, sub-declinate ; anthers basifixed, linear- 



oblong, mucli longer than the stout filamentg, cells de- 
hiscing from the tip eventually to the base. Ovary small, 
globose, two-celled; style slender; stigma capitellate; 
ovules many, axile on the septum. Gapsule small, globose, 
two-celled, crustaceous, loculicidally two-valved. Seeds 
many, minute. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, stamens and pistil ; 2, stamen ; 3, pistil ; 4, glandular hair ; 5, trans- 
verse section of ovary ; 6, capsule and portion of calyx ; 7, seed ; 8, section of 
seed : — all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 

HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Mowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By Geohgk Bentham, 
F.R.S. 7th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's " Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 5th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By Geobgk Bentham, F.R.S., President of the Linnaean 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of "Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Eev. M. J.BERKELEr, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Chaisles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, Ac. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. net. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. Bv R. Bbaithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Yol. II.,"'42s. 6d. Parts XVII.— XXI., 6s. each. 

FLORA of BRITISH WDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookek, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Y'>ls., £12 nat. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENS^'S : a Description of the Plants of tlie 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.E.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Yois, L to VI., 20s, each. Vol. VII., 24s. Published 
under the auspices of th^ several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAU'^ITIUS and the SEYCHELLES: a Descrip- 
tion of the Flovering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baker, 
F.L.S. Comolete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the authority of the 
Colonial Govarument of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants ot 
the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. Harvey, M.D., 
F.R.S., itr.d Otto Wilhelm Sondeb, Ph.D. Vols. L-III., 18s. each. 
Vol VI., 24:s. net. Vol. VII., 3os. net. Vol. V., Part I., 9s. net. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. Bv Daniel Oliver, F.R.S. 

Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of the first 
Commission"! of His Majesty's Works. Vol. V., 25s. 6d. net. Vol. ML, 
27s. 6d. net. Vol, VIII., 25s, 6cL net, ., 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Systematic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Macquarne s Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspices of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. ^^_ . titt-io t> 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Gkisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tarv of State for the Colonies. _,, 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS : a Description of the Flowering 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By ^eokge l^^y"^^'. 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement by Dr.^A>CE, ais. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the uoioniea. 
The Supplement, separately, 2s. 6d. . /r -x' J 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA: its Origin, Affinities, and 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Hooker. F.R.S. 12s. .iTmr\Tv-T? i 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MElSlOAl-. and 

to a Winter Flora of the Riviera, including the coast from SlarseiUes to 
Genoa. By J. Teahernb Moggbidge. Royal 8vo. Complete in i vol., 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGA/INE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 691, JULY, 1902. 



Tab. 7842.— BEGONIA AXGULAKIS. 
„ 7843.— MUSCAEI LATIFOLIUM. 
,, 7844.— IMPATIENS CUSPIDATA. 
,, 7845.— CYNORCHIS YILLOSA. 
„ 7846.— BYBLTS GIGANTEA. 



LovELt Beeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

Completion of the FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

Now ready, Parts XXIII., XXIV. (completingthe work), 18s. net. Vol. VII.,dloth,38s. net. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. " Vol. V,, 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
*^* Persona having incomDlete Seta are advised to complete their Copiea without delay, 
as the Parrs will be kept on Sale for a limited time only. No Part or Vol. will be sold 
without its continuation to the end of the work. 



FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III.. 20£. each, net. 

By D. OLIVER, 7.R.S. 

The Continuation by various Botanists edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Vol. v., 25s. 61. Vol. VII., 27s. fid. Vol. VIII., 2os. 6d. net. Published under 

the authority of the First Commissioner of ilip H^ajesty^s Works. 

Now Ready, Vol. V., Part I., 9s, net. Vol. VI., 24«. net. Vol. VII., 33s. net. 

FLORA CAPENSiS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. 
Pabliahed under the authority of the Govemments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Kaiiul. 

Vols. I. to III. 18s. each. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM BONDER, Ph.D. 

Now ready, Part XCI., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

Vol. 1. 12*. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 

Vols. II.— VII. 128. each ; large paper, each with 48 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Prospectus may he had on appUeation to the Publishers. 
LoTBLL Rekve & Co. LTD., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



lEIiriBB BY eiLBBST XB» UVIVftTOB. IB., 81. JOHH's HOUSE, CLKRK«HWBil, E.C 



:/. 



No. 692." 

VOL. LVIII.— AUGUST. Price St. 6d. eelevred, 2«. 6d. plain. 

OR No. 133G °^ ^^^ BNTIEK WORK. 



CDETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



0OUPBI8IK6 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITH 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.cs.L, C.B., F.E.S., f.l.S: 

Xate SSitectoi of the IRopal 13otantc ffiar&ens of TSitta. 




"'^e^&s.J 



Nature snd Art to adorn the page eombine, 
And fioirers exotic gnuse our northem clime. 



LONDON^ 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd. 

PUBLISHERS TO THK HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVEBNMENTS 

6, HENRIETTA STKEET, CO VENT GARDEN. 

1902. 

[All rightt reierved.] 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



Part III., with 10 Colonred Plates, 21s. net. 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACID^. 

By GEORGE BOWDLER BUCKTON, F.E.S., F.L.S. 

To be completed in 5 parts. Subscription for the luhole work, £4 14s. 6d. 



The family of the Membracidte has claims on the notice of both the scientific and 
general public. Owing to the advance of agriculture, climatic variation, and other 
influences, organic forms are constantly undergoing tranaformation, while some may 
even become extinct. The present time, therefore, affords opportunities for studying 
and recording these forms, which may not occur again. 

The general public will find interest in the bizarre forms of these insects, while the 
speculations of the scientific mind will be exercised on the question of their utility. 

The Membracidm are also interesting from their mimetic forms, which will be 
considered in this Monograph. 



Now Ready. 

THE HEPATICiE OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £7 10s. Plain, £11 2s. 6d. Coloured, net. 



Now ready, Parts 7— 9, with 12 Plates, 15«. plain, 21». coloured, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 

With Descriptions of all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 

By ALFRED FRYER, A.L.S. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The work will be issued in 5 quarterly sections of 3 parts each. 
Prospectus on application. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description office Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F.R.S. 

7th Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. Hooeee.C.B.. G.C.S.I,, F.R.S., &c. 9».net. 



ILLUSTRATIOHS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

4 Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S 

f ormwj a» Illustrated Companion to Bentham'a " Handbook," and other British Floras. 
5th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9s. net. 

LOTELL l.>.o7B A CO. Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



iml 







M-3 ael.JIT.pTt^H lith 



■'^njcwTvl.'BraoVB^ay &, Son Lt^lmp 



Tab. 7847. 
ECHICTM WiLDniBTiL 

Native of the Canary Islcinds. 

Nat. Ord. Boragine.e. — Tribe Bor\gbjB. 
Genus lElomuM., Linn. ; {Benth.Sc EooTc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 803.) 



EcHiuM Wildpretii ; bienne, molHter pilosa, caale 2T3-pedali simplice stricto 
erecto a basi paullo incrassato crebre folioeo, foliis 6-8-pollicaribu8 
patentibus segsilibus lineari-lanceolatis acumina^is utriiique pilis mollibas 
Bubsericeis vestitia costa latiuscala nervis obacuris, cymis multifloris in 
thyrsiim terminalem elongatum foliosnm dispositis, foliia floralibus 
lineai'ibus patenti-incurvia cymas pedanculatas longe snperantibus, 
floribus breviter pedicellat^, calycis | poll, longi segtpentis aequalibus 
lanceolatis acumiuatis pilosis, i5o<;olla infuudibulari-campannlata pallida 
rubra tiibo calyce paullo longiore basi iatiw annulo pilorutn instructo, 
lobis EequalibuB late ovatis obtusis, iilaBflcntis erectis corolla duplo 
longioribus pallide sanguineis, antheris parvis oblongig, stylo piloao 
apioe bipartite. 

E, Wildpretii, Pearson in Hort. Sew. (nomen). 



The species of EcJiium, of which more than eighty are 
catalogued in the Kew "Index Plantarum," are very difficult 
of discrimination. This applies especially to the species of 
Madeira and the Canary Islands, of which twenty have 
been described, but of which not a few will probably be 
reduced to synonyms or varieties when they shall be 
collated and critically examined. Of the plant here figured 
seeds were sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by Mr. 
Wildpret, Curator of the Botanic Gardens of Orotava, 
Teneriffe, under the name of E. cnndicans, Linn, f., a very 
different plant, as may be seen by a reference to tab. 6868 
of tbis work. The seeds germinated freely, and tlio young 
plants ripened their seeds in 1897. From these a bfitch of 
plants was raised, which flowered in May, 1899, and dying 
after flowering, proved the species to be biennial. In the 
first year the plant formed a dense rosette of long, narrow, 
silvery, silken leaves, and the stem elongates after about 
sixteen months. The only other species known to nie 
with the habit, thyrsoid inflorescence, and floral leaves 
much exceeding the cymes, is E. callithyrsum, Webb (ex 
Bolle in Ind. Sem. Hort. Berol. 1867, App. i. p. 6), a 
Canary Island plant, of which there are specimens (if 
August 1st, 1902, 



correctly named) in the Kew Herbarium, from the garden 
of the late Eev. Henry Harper-Crewe, M.A., of Drayton 
Beauchamp. This differs from E. Wildpretii in being a 
much more robust, hispidly hairy plant, with strongly 
nerved leaves, very unequal calyx-segments, and a shorter, 
broader corolla-tube. It is further described as being a 
small tree. 

Descr. — A tall, softly hairy biennial, with a simple, 
erect, leafy stem, two to three feet high, terminated by a 
dense-flowered thyrsus of innumerable shortly peduncled 
cymes, which are very much shorter than the linear, up- 
curved floral leaves. Leaves six to eight inches long, 
sessile, narrowly linear-lanceolate, acuminate, spreading, 
softly hairy on both surfaces, costa stout beneath, nerves 
faint ; lower floral leaves three to four inches long, linear. 
Flowers sub-sessile. Calyx about one-fifth of an inch long ; 
segments equal, lanceolate, acuminate, hairy. Corolla 
between funnel- and bell-shaped, pale red ; lobes rounded. 
Filaments far exserted. Style hairy, tip bifid. — /. D, S, 



Fig. 1, flower ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, piatil ; — all enlarged. 



I 



18^8 




J^H 



•iel..J>iFil^lith 



-V5nC6ntBro=ksPayiS<JALL*I« 



■HHiiiiii 



Tab. 7848. 
DEOAISNBA Faegesii. 
Native of China. 

Nat. Old. Bekbeeide^.— Tribe Lardizabalej:. 
Genus Decaisnea, Rooh.f.; [Benth. Sf HooJe.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 42.) 



Decaisnea Fargesii; frutex erectus, glaberi-imus, polygamo-dioicns, caulibua 
strictis erectis param divisis apicem versus foliosis, foliis pedalibus 
patalis impari-pinnatis, petiolo gracili tereti, foliolis oppositis multijugis 
petiolulatis ovatis oblongisve subcaudato-acuminatia, racemis axillaribas 
elongatis decurvis, bracteis ^ poll, longia elongato-subulatis patulia 
caducis, floribng pendulia viridibua, sepalis lanceolatis, longe acuminatis, 
petalis 0, fl. masc. filamentia in tubum elongatum cylindracenm apice 
antheriferum connatis, antheris tubo adnatis linearibns connectivo in 
unguem erectum producto, fl. foem. ataminodii tubo brevissimo antheria 
longe cuspidatis, carpellis lineari-oblongis, fructua carpellis 3-4-poni- 
caribus lineari-oblongie rectis cylindraceis j poll. diam. Isevibua aubtorulosis 
C8Qruleis, seminibus oblongis ad 5 poll, longis atris. 

D, Fargesii, Franch. in Journ. de JBot. vol. vi. (1892) p. 233. D. Bois in 
Journ. Soc. Nation. d'Horiic. France, Ser. IV. vol. i. (1900) p. 190 ; et m 
Bev. Hortic. 1900, p. 270, figg. 122, 123, 124. 



Becaisnea Fargesii, is a very interesting plant, a second 
species of a very remarkable Eastern Himalayan genns, 
thus affording a conspicuous example of the affinity of the 
Himalayan and Chinese mountain Floras. The type species, 
D. insignis, Hook, f., is figured at t. 6731 of this work, 
where its position in the tribe Lanlizahalese of Berbcridex 
is indicated. The resemblance of B. Fargesii to D. 
insignis, in habit, foliage, inflorescence and flowers is very 
close indeed, the principal difl'erences in fohage and 
flowers being, that the leaflets of D. Fargesii are of a 
darker green, and have rather longer tips, the sepals liavo 
longer, much narrower tips, and the bracts are longer and 
more persistent. The remarkable distinction between these 
species lies in the fruit, the carpels of which in 1). uisiU'H-'^ 
are three to four inches long, by an inch and a half hi diame- 
ter, strongly falcately incurved, golden-yellow, with a some- 
what mamillate surface, and the seeds are Jialf an mcli 
long, and brown ; in D. Fargesii the carpels are only two 
and a half to three inches long, by half an inch in diameter, 
are nearly straight, dull blue in colour, and are said to 
resemble blue caterpillars, and the seeds are much smaller 

August I&t, 1902.J 



and black. There are some differences in tlie length and 
breadth of the produced connectives of the anthers, but 
these appear to be inconstant, judging from the published 
drawings and cultivated specimens. 

D. Fargesli is a not uncommon plant in the mountain 
forests of Western China, at elevations of nine thousand 
feet to thirteen thousand feet. It was discovered in the 
province of Szechuen, by Father R. P. Farges, Missionaire 
Apostolique, by whom seeds were sent to Messrs. Vilmoriii 
& Co., who flowered it at Barres, Loiret. The plant here 
figured was presented to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by Mr. 
Maurice L. de Vilraorin in 1897 ; it flowered in April, 1901, 
and again in 1902, in the Temperate House, where, planted 
in a border, it forms a sturdy shrub, seven feet high. It 
has never fruited. There are specimens in the Kew Her- 
barium collected by Dr. Henry, F.L.S., and others, in the 
mountains of the provinces of Szechuen, Hupeh, and 
Yunnan, at elevations of nine thousand feet to thirteen 
thousand feet, as far West as the borders of Tibet. 

All collectors agree as to the fruit being eatable, but 
details of its qualities are wanting. The main distinctions 
between the present plant and D. insignis being in the 
fruit, as indicated above, no further description is here 
required. — /. D. E. 

Fig. 1, stamens of male fl.; 2, interior of base of do. sliowing the pistiliodes; 
3, portion of fem. infl. ; 5, fruit ; 6, seed :— figs. 1, 2, 4,, enlarged ; 3, of nat. 
size ; 5 and 6, nat. size, from Rev. Horticole. 



7S49 




<S d«i,trN FiicJiitH. 



"/uicentBrooJffi;5ay iSoj^Xf^Imf 



L Reeve .iC» London 



Tab. 7849. 
HETEROTOMA lobelioides. 
Native of Mexico and Guatemala. 

Nat. Ord. Campanulace^. — Tribe Lobelik^. 
Genus Heterotoma, Zucc; {Benth. ^ Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vol, ii. p. 663.) 



Heteeotoma lobelioides ; herba erecta, ramosa, raraulia gracilibus cum petioHs 
foliorum marginibus nervisqae subtus pubeacentibus, foliis 3-4 poll, 
longia ovato-lanceolatis acuminatia subremote dentatia basi rotundatia 
cuneatisre pallide viridibus nervia utrioque 5-7, petiolo gracili 1-2 poll, 
longo, supremia aessilibua minoribua Hneari-lanceolatis, pedunculis axil- 
laribus 2-polliearibu3 gracilibus glaberriraia, floribua ad 2-poll. longia 
falcatim incurvis, calycia dentibus viridibus aubulatia 3 ad basia corollae 
ad I poll, longia divaricatis, 2 ad apicem calcaris corollas minoribua 
inflexis erectia, corollae caloare tubiformi sangnineo limbo calcare panllo 
breviore oblongo aureo trifido, lobia seqailongis lateralibus linearibus 
intermedio oblongo, columna staminea corollae limbo asquilonga. 

H, lobelioides, Zucc. in Flora, vol. xv. (1832) pars II. Beihl p. 101. DC- 
Predr. vol. vii. p. 350. Endl. Iconogr. t. 53. Van Eoutta in Flore det 
Serres, Ser. II. vol. iv. (1861) p. 163, t. 1454. Garuel in Ann. Sc. Nat. 
Ser. IV. vol. xi. p. 270. JSemsl. Biol. Cenir. Am. Bot. vol. ii. p. 270 ; iv. 
r- QQ. 8. Wats, in Proe. Am. Acad. vol. xviii. (1883) p. 1 U. Benih. PI. 
Sartw. p. 89. 

Myopsia mexicana, Presl, Prodr. Monogr. Label, p. 8. 

Lobelia calcarata, Bertol. Fl. Guateinal. p. 9. 



Heterotoma is a very singular genus, consisting of seven 
Mexican and Central American species, of which E. lobe- 
lioides is the type. Its distinctive character consists in 
the base of the corolla being produced downwards into a 
horn, to the back of which the narrow lower lip of 
the calyx is adnate nearly to its tip. In E. lobelioides the 
two lobes of the lower lip of the calyx are represented by 
two green subulate spurs, contrasting curiously in colour 
with the dark blood-red of the spur itself. The upper 
lip of the calyx consists of three green, subulate, spreading 
spurs at the base of the corolla. 

H. lobelioides is a mountain plant, discovered by Karwin- 
ski in Southern Mexico, at eight thousand feet elevation, 
on the Cumbre de St. Antonio. It has also been collected 
in Costa Rica by Herbst ; in Guatemala, at Acatenango, by 
Hartweg ; and on the Volcan de Santa Maria by tlie late 
Mr. O. Salvin, one of the authors of the magnificent 
August 1st, 1902. 



" Biologia Centrali Americana." For the plant figured I 
am indebted to the Botanical Gardens of Cambridge, where, 
as Mr. Lynch informs me, it was received from Mexico with 
the name of the Bird-plant. 

Descr. — An erect ramous herb, with pubescent stem, 
branches, petioles, and leaf-margins. Leaves three to 
four inches long, alternate, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, 
remotely toothed, petiole slender ] floral small, linear-lan- 
ceolate, entire. Peduncles solitary, sub-erect, axillary, 
two to three inches long, slender. Floiver about two inches 
long, falcately incurved. Oalyx-teeth small, subulate, 
green, three at the base of the corolla, spreading, two 
smaller erect at the apex of the tube of the corolla. Corolla- 
tube corniform, blood-red ; limb golden-yellow, three-lobed 
beyond the middle, lobes equal in length, side ones narrow, 
Imear, middle one oblong. Staminal column as long as 
the limb of the corolla, erect. — J, D. H, 



Fig. 1 Bower with the limb of the corolla removed : 2, anthers ; 3, top oE 
vie aud atierma: — all enlarnc'l. 



style aud atigma: — all enlarged. 



7850 




U.S.d.X J.N,Fit<ih litK 



\5Tvce,^tBrooks,Day &SonLt4i 



"LKe"5\re Sc C9 lai\dor.. 



Tab. 7850. 

FRITILLARIA askabadensis. 
Native of Central Asia. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Tribe TvhitRM. 
Genus Fb.itillaria, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 817.) 



FniTiLLARiA (Petilium) asJcahadensis ; elata, robnsta, foliosa, bulbo magno 
globoso squamoso, caule superne coma foliorum floribusque coronato, 
foliis leete viridibus sessilibus inferioribus sparsis lineari-oblongis lan- 
ceolatisve aubacutia 4-5 poll. longis, superioribus 5-6 poll, longis sub- 
verticillatis lineari-lanceolatis acuminatis, snpremie fasciculatis minoribus 
angustioribua flexuosis, floribus 5-8 inter folia stiprema subverticillatia 
cernuis inodoris, pedicellis i-| poll, longis decurvis bracteis parvis linear!- 
bus, perianthii campanulati pallide flavo-viridia aegmentis poUicaribns 
oblongis obtneis, basi dorso gibbia, nectario parvo depresso viridi, fila- 
mentis brevibus, antheris lineari-oblongis erectis obtuse apiculatis aureis, 
ovario trigone, 

F. askabadensia, Micheli in Journ. Soc. Sort. France, vol. iii. (19r2) p. 145. 
Baker in Gard. Ghron. 1902, vol. i. p. 237, fig. 238. Journ. Eort. Ser. 3, 
xliv. p. 293. 

The Askabad Fritillary is a very interesting plant, from 
being a member of the Section Petilium, hitherto repre- 
sented by a solitary species, the well-known Crown- 
Imperial, "i^. imperialis, Linn. (tab. 194 and 1215), from 
which it differs notably in the smaller campanulate flowers 
of a greenish yellow colour. It was discovered by Mr. 
Sintenis near Askabad, in the Eussian Transcaspian 
region, not far from the north frontier of Persia, growmg 
in a calcareous soil, at an elevation of about one thousand 
two hundred and fifty feet above the sea level. Micheli 
describes the flowers as proterandrous, and I suspect they 
are dichogamous, for he describes the filaments as long, and 
style elongate, with a tricuspid stigma, whereas the stamens 
are short in our specimen, and the style short, trigonous, 
and papillose. . .„ , 

I am indebted to Miss WiUmott, V.M.H., of Warloy 
Place, Essex, for the specimen here figured, whicU 
flowered in her garden in March, 1902. 

Descr.—Bulb large, globose, scaly. Stem tall, stout, 
sparingly leafy below, crowned with a whorl of many 
spreading, bright green leaves. Lower leaves scattered, 
August 1st, 1902, 



four to five inches long, linear-oblong or lanceolate, acumi- 
nate ; uppermost forming a whorl-like cluster, each five 
to six inches long, linear-lanceolate. Floivers five to eight, 
axillary, pendulous from amongst the uppermost leaves ; 
bracts small, linear, green ; pedicels one-fourth to half an 
inch long, decurved. Perianth about an inch long, cam- 
panulate, pale yellow-green; segments oblong, obtuse, 
gibbous at the base. Nectary a small green depression. 
Filaments short; anthers linear-oblong, erect, obtusely 
apiculate, yellow. Ovary trigonous ; style rather stout, 
sub-clavate, three-grooved. — /. D. H. 

Fig 1, base of perianth segment and nectary; 2 anl 3, stamens; 4, pistill- 
ate enlarged. 



7651. 



^^r 




Vrn.cen+. Brooira,Day ■ 



Tab. 7851. 

GELSEMIUM sempeevikens. 

Natiiw of the Southern United States. 

Nat. Ord. Loganiacb^.— Tribe Gelsemiejs. 
G. nils Gelsemium, Juss.; {JDentli. & Eook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 789). 



Gelsehium semper viretis ; frutex volubilis, alte scandens, gracilis, glaberri- 
mus, fere sernpervirens, ramulis peridulis fnsco-rubris, foliia i|-2 poll, 
longis oppositis breviter petiolatia oblongia v. laaceolatis acuminati« 
supra luride viridibos subtus pallidis rubro tinctis, stipulis obsoletia, 
peduticulia axilkribus vix i poll, longis 1-3-floris squamulosis, floribus 
erectia dichogamis, calycis i poll, longi lobis ovato-lanceolatis, corollse 
aureae tubo poUicari infundibulari-campanulato lobis tabo brevioribus 
patulia ovato-rotundatia obtasis, staminibua tubocorollaj inaertis, ant'ieria 
lineari-oblongis, stylo elongate, stigmate brevi bilabiato labile inaeqaalibua 
2-lobi3, lobis linearibus, capsula ellipsoidea compressa cuspidata septicida, 
valvia apice bifidis, seminibus alatig. 

G. sernpervirens, Ait. Sort. Kew. Ed. II. vol. ii. p. 64. Elliot, Sketch Hot. 8. 
Carol, &a., vol. i. p. 311. Mesh. Fl. U. St. t. 3. Rep. U. St. Dep. Agric. 
1884, p. 134, t. 16. A. Gray Man. Bat. N. U. St. (Ed. 1867) p. ii91 ; 
S,>/nopt. Fl. N. Am. voL ii. pars I. p. 107. Chapm. Fl. S. U. St. p. 183. 
Hemsl. Biol. Cent?: Am. vol. ii. p. 338. 

G. lucidum, Poir. Eneycl. Suppl. vol. ii. p. 714. Delaun. Rerb. Amaf. (1819) 
vol. iii. t. 169, 

G. nitidum, Michx. Ft. Bor. Am. vol. i. (1803) p. 120. Pursh, Fl. Am. Sept. 
vol. i. p. 184. Bentl. & Trim. Med. PI. vol. iii. p. 181, t. 181. 

Jeffeesonia sernpervirens, BricheH in Med. Bepos. N, York, v^l. L (1800) 
p. 555. 

BiGENONiA sernpervirens, Linn. Sp. PI. p. 623. 

BiGNOxiA foliis ovato-lanceolatis, &o., Boy^n, Fl. Leyd. Prodr. p. 290. 

Gelseminum, sive Jasminum lateum odoratum, Parkins. Theatr. Bui. p. 

1465. Gatesb. Nat. Hist. Carolin., &c., vol. i. p. 53, t. 53. /Jay, i/iv/. 

Plant, vol. ii. p. 1600. 
Syringa volubilis virginiana, &c. PluJc. Almag. p. 359, t. 11'2, fig- 5. 
Auonymos sernpervirens, Walt. Fl. Carolin. p. 98. 
The Carolina Jasmine, or yellow Jessamine of the Soutliera U. States. 



It is remarkable that so handsome a greenhouse cHraber, 
and one that has been so long in cultivation, should not 
have been figured in any modern English horticultural 
work. It was introduced into England by Tradescant, was 
cultivated by Parkinson in his garden in Long Acre in 
1640, and figured in his " Theatrum Botanicum " in the 
same year. 

The genus Gelseminm was founded in 1789, by Jussieu, 
on Bignonia sernpervirens, Linn., the Gelseminum^ sive Jas- 

August 1st, 1902. 



mill am, &c., of Parkiiison, the name being derived from 
tbe Italian for Jessamine. In 1803 Michaux published 
it as G. nitidum, and in 1786 Poiret as G. hwiduvi, and 
Alton in 1811 as G. sempervirens. The only other known 
species is G. elegans, Benth., a native of Burma and China. 

G. se7nj)ervireus is a common plant in the woods and 
low grounds of 'the Southern United States, from Virginia 
to Florida, and westward to Texas and Southern Mexico.. 
Bentley and Trimen include it in their " Medicinal Plants," 
where the dried stems and roots prepared by the Shakers 
of New Lebanon are stated to be in common use in America 
as a sedative. The drug in large doses poisons by asphyxia. 
It is not recognized in the British Pharmacopoeia. 

The plant figured flowers annually in the winter months 
in a conservatory in the Royal Gardens, Kew. 

Descr. — A slender, glabrous, nearly evergreen, tall, 
twining climber ; young branches pendulous, bark red- 
brown. Leaven opposite, one and a half to two and a half 
inches long, oblong or lanceolate, acuminate, dark green 
above, pale and somewhat reddish beneath ; petiole very 
short ; stipules obsolete. Flowers solitary, or two to 
three on a very short, axillary, scaly, erect peduncle, 
fragrant, dichogamous, with either short filaments and 
long style, or vice versa. Calyx short, lobes ovate- lanceo- 
late. Corolla golden-yellow in bud, paler when expanded ; 
tube between funnel- and bell-shoped, an inch long, 
orbicular-ovate. Anthers linear-oblong. Style slender; 
stigma small, with four linear arms in opposite pairs of 
unequal length. Capsule elhpsoid, cuspidate, compressed, 
septicidal. Seeds winged. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, calyx and style; 2, portion of corolla and stamens o£ flower with 
short filaments ; 3, stamen ; 4, ovary ; 5, stigma :~-all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 



HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenouB to, or naturalized in the British 
leleB. For the use of Begiuners and Amateurs. By George Benthasi, 
F.R.S. 7fch Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9$. net. 

ILLUSTEATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings hy W. H . 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W, G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Couipanion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Florae. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 5th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s, net. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By Georgb Bkntham, F.R.S. , President ol the Linnanu 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of WigL' 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townbbnd, M jt. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all tl,.. 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J.Bhi 
M.A., F.L.S. 2rid Edition, 24 Coloni-ed Plates, 21*. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descripfi 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found . 
Britain and Ireland. By Chakles P. Hobkiek, F.L.S., &c., ic 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. net. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monograpiis of n„ Vmi 

British Mosses, illusti-ated by Plates of all the species 

details of their stmcture. By R. Bhaithwavie, M.i ■ 

with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II., 42s. 6d. Parts XVll.-XXi., t).. ^fch. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hookkk, l^.K.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12 net. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the PK 

Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.E S., F.L^-> *' 
MuELLEK, F.R.S. Vols, I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VlL, ^i 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES : a Descrip- 
tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. <». - >> ^ - • 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 245. Published under the authouty 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. _ . c i.\, V} 

FLORA CAPENSIS: a Systematic Description ot the 1 i 

the Cape Colony, CaflFraria, andPort Natal. By Wi"'*« ^/''Z, . , 
P.R.S.fand OiTO Wilhet.m Sondeb, Ph.D. Vols. I;-]"' ^^■^- ^-'^^ ' 
Vol VI., 24s. net. Vol. VII., 80s. net. Vol. V., Part L.Qs. net. ^ ^ 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Dat^iei, Oi.n 

Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the auihnrit; 
Commissioner of His Majesty's Works. Vol. V.. 2as. b<(. n' 
278. 6d. net. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d. net. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and ' 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and TV(i..r„.„rn« 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the ai 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. .r,.TT^T « a- 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIA^ < 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the au- 

lary of State for the Colonies. . , ^ „ 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description c 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By 
F L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of blu.. - 
The Supplement, separately, 2s. 6£L r\ • • » fPn^f ' 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA :itBOrHm. Af^nt. 

Distribution. By Sir J. D- Hookee F.t.S. 1 — 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE ^LOR^^ ,,'^,-^,, f„„ ^i,. 

to a Winter Flora of the Riviera, incluo.n.' ^t^T'comSeta ' 
Genoa. F \ Tkaheenk Moggkidse. Eoya! &vo tomptete 

99 Colon iateB,63s. 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd.. 6, Heiuietia cu^^^, " ■ 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 692, AUGUST, 1902. 




Tab. 7847.— ECHIUM WILDPRETIL 
„ 7848.— DECAISNEA FAKGESII. 
„ 7849.— HETEROTOMA LOBELIOIDES. 
„ 7850.— FRITILLARIA ASKABADENSEH. 
„ 7851.— GELS EMIUM SEMPERYIRENS. 



LovELL Reeve & Ccft Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



Completion of the FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

aw roaa,, Parts XXIII., XXIV. (completingthe work), 18s. net. Vol. VII.,olofch,38s. net. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 385. Vol. VI., 36s. 
*,* Persous having incomplete Sets are advised to complete their CopieB without delay, 
as tne Parts will be kept on Sale for a limited time only. No Part or Vol. will ' 
Tri hmt its continuation to the end of the work. 



be sold 



FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to HI., 20s. each, net. 
By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

nation by various Botanists edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYEE, F.R.S. 
., 25,s. 8.1. Vol. VIT., 27s. 6d. Vol. VIII., 2os. M. net. Puhlished under 
the authority of the First Commissioner of His Majesty's Works. 

Now Ready, Vol. V., Part I., <)s. net. Vol. VI., 24«. net. Vol. VIL, 33s. net. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria. 

and Port NataL 
Edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Tiireetor of the Royal Gardens, Kern. 
Pablished under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 
Vols. I. to m. 18s. each. 

F.v WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDBR, Ph.D. 

Now ready, Part XCII., withTcoloured^lateB, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G, BARRETT, F.RS. 

Vol. 1. 12». ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Platee, 53s. 
VoU. II.— VIL 128. each; large paper, each with 48 Colonred PlateB, C3s. 
Prospectus may he had. on appUcatim to ihe Publishers. 

LovKiL Bekve a Co. Ltd.. 6, Henrietta Street. Covent Garden. 



.«!TT«i» BY WLBSBT AiTD n^is^tos. iD,, ST. ions's Hors., qi«««»w»i.i-. 



CJirt Strits./ 

No. 693. 

VOL. LVIII.— SEPTEMBER. Prict 8i. U. coUurtA, 2». U. flair. 

OE No. 1387 °' ^^^ ENTIBI WOEK. 

CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

0OMPEI8IN6 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF XBW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITTi 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BT 

Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G cai., C.B., P.R.S., F.L.S. 

Xate SBirritor of tf>e %opal botanic Sar&ens of iStis. 




Nature and Art to adorn the p«kge comMne, 
And flowerB exotic grace onr nortbern clime 



LONDON. 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd. 

PUBLISHEBS TO THE HOMB, COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVBBNHINK 

6, HENRIETTA STEEET, COVENT GARDEN. 
1902. 

[All rights reicrved.] 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 



Part III., with 10 Coloured Plates, 2!is. ].«t, 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACIDiE. 

By GEORGE BOWDLEE BUCKTON, F.RS., F.L.S. 

To he completed in 5 parts. Subscription for the whole worlc, £4 14s. 6d. 



The family of the Memhracidx has claims on the notice of both the scientific and 
general public. Owing to the advance Of agricaltn.re, climatic variation, and other 
influences, organic forms are constantly undergoing transformation, while some may 
even become extinct. The present time, therefore, affords opportunities for studying 
and recording these forms, which may not occur again. 

The general public will find interest in the bizarre forms of these insects, while the 
speculations of the scientific mind will be exercised on the question of their utility. 

The Memhracidce are also interesting from their mimetic forms, which will be 
considered in this Monograph. 



Now Ready. 

THE HEPATIC-ae OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 228 Plates. £7 10s. Plain, £11 2s. 6d. Coloured, net. 



Now ready. Parts 7— 9, with 12 Plates, 15s. plain, 2U. coloured, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OP THE 

BRITISH IST^ES. 

With Descriftioks of all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids ^ 

By ALFRED FRYER, A.L.S. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The work will be issued in 5 quarterly sections of 3 parts each. 
Prospectus on application. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Descnpfion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Naturalized in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENTHAM, F.R.S. 

7th Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. Hookee,C.B.,G.C.S.I., F.R.S.,&;c. 9*. net. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S, 
ryrrnv:g an Illustrated Companion to Sentham's "Handbook," and other British Florai. 
5th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9^. net. 

LOYELL EEEVB & CO. Ltd., 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COYENT GABDEN. 



Tab. 7852. 

CYNOHCHIS PURPUEASOENS. 
Native of the Mascarene Islands. 

Nat. Ord. Oechide^. — Tribe Ophryde.?:. 
Genus Cynorchis, Thou.; {Benth. & HooTc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 628.) 



G^'so^cms purpurascens ; epiphytica, caule brevi, foliis solitariis v. nunc binia 
et valde inEequalibus majore 1-2-pedali sessili oblongo v. oblongo- 
lanceolato acuminato supra laete viridi multinervi, nervisparallelis subtua 
crassis, scapo pedali valido erecto vaginis 1-2 lanceolatis recurvis instrncto, 
floribuB racemosis v. in capitulum 6-7 poll. diam. congeatis cum paucia 
inferioribus dissitis, bracteis pollicaribus lanceolatis erectis vaginantibaa 
pallida viridibus, ovario fere bipollicari gracili, perianthio 1^ poll, lato roseo 
labelli disco albido, sepalo dorsali brevi ovate obtuso galeato, lateralibua 
multo majoribus orbionlari-ovatis patulis, petalis lineari-ianceolatis 
ascendentibns sepalo dorsali sequilongis, labello amplo sessili subiequaliter 
4-fido, lobis late cuneatis patulis apice crenulatis, calcare gracili ovario 
subaequilongo leviter incurve, columna brevissima alba. 

C, pnrpurascens, Thou. Orch. lies Afric. t. 15 {Cynosorchis). Lindl. Gen.SfSp. 
Orchid, p. 331 {non tab. nostr. 7551). Baker, Ft. Maurit. p. 337. Rolfe 
in Orchid. Rev. vol. ix. (1901) pp. 10, 20. W. Watsoa in Gard. Ghron. 
1900, vol. ii. p. 335 ; Weathers I.e. 1901, vol. i. p. 86, fig. 37. Garden, 
1900, p. 375. 

C. calantboides, Krsenzl. in Bremen Abhandl. Naturwiss. Verein. vol. vii. (1882) 
p. 260. 

Gymnadeaia pnrpurascens, A. Rich, in MSm. Soc. Hist. Nat. Par. vol. iv. 
(1828) p. 27. Bojer, Eort. Maurit. p. 311. 



The plant erroneously figured in this work as Gj/norchis 
jpurpurascens, tab. 7551, though agreeing with Thouar's 
meagre description of that plant, proves, now that the 
latter is known, to be an entirely different species, which 
must retain the name that Keichenbach gave it of 
G. Lowiana. The true C. purpurascens, though varying 
greatly in size, never appears to assume the very slender 
character of C. Lowiana, from which it differs, m its 
fully developed state, in the leaf, which is perhaps the 
largest of any Orchideous plant, in the very many- 
flowered inflorescence, much larger bracts, and larger, 
broader flowers, with a slender spur. The structure ot the 
column is very much the same in both, but the rostellum, 
which is decurved in G. Loidana, is sub-erect in C. ]m>'- 
Jpurascens, so far as can be judged from the specimens 
figured. 

SiPTEMBER 1st, 1902. 



Cynorcliis purpurascens isanativeof tlieMascarenelslands, 
where it was first found by Mr. G. Warpur, who describes 
it as growing at an elevation of one thousand to one thousand 
two hundred feet, on branches of Pandanus Candelabrum, 
sometimes in tufts of Asplenium Nidus y hanging over 
streams, and often accompanied by Impatiens grandiflora, 
Hemsl. (tab. 7826). It is, according to Bojer, also a 
native of the Mauritius, in marshes of the Plaines-Wilhems 
and Moka, and Dr. Balfour collected it in Bourbon, where 
it was discovered by Thouars. In the Eoyal Gardens, 
Kew, it grows and flowers freely in the same house by 
OdontogloHsum crispum, and it continues flowering for 
upwards of six weeks in winter and early spring. 

Descr. — Stem very short. Leaves solitary or two, when 
one is very small, the other attaining two feet in length 
and eight inches in breadth, sessile, oblong, acuminate, 
bright green above, nerves eight or more, parallel, very 
stout on the pale undersurface of the leaf. Peduncle a 
foot high, stout, strict, erect, bearing two large lanceolate 
acuminate sheaths, two inches long. Flowers very many, 
in a short, spiciforra raceme or globose head, which is 
sometimes seven inches in diameter, with a few flowers 
lower down in the peduncle. Bracts an inch long, lan- 
ceolate, acuminate, very pale green, convolute, much 
shorter than the very slender strict ovaries, which are two 
inches long. Perianth an inch and a half broad, rose- 
coloured, with the disk of the tip white. Dorsal sepal 
small, oblong, galeate, lateral much larger, orbicular- 
ovate, spreading. Petals very small, linear-lanceolate, 
ascending along the margins of the dorsal sepals. Lip 
large, an inch broad and long, sub-equally four-lobed, 
lobes cuneiform, w^ith crenulate anterior margins; spur 
about as long as the ovary, slender, slightly incurved. 
Lolumn very short ; rostellum sub-erect.—/. D. H. 



ricr. 1 . petal ; 2, side, and 3, front view of column and anther ; 4, pollinium : 
-all enlar</ed. 



7^53 




lf.S,del,J.N,FiUJviitK 



Vincent BrooT^s,Day acSonlt^l-i-p 



Tap. 7853. 

DISCHIDIA HIRSDTA. 
Native of Malaya. 

Nat. Ord, Asclepiade^. — Tribe Marsdenie.b. 
Genus Dischidia, Br. ; (Benih. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 777.) 



DiscHiDiA hirsuta; scandena, tota floribus exceptis papillosa canlibns tenuibus 
flexuosis fusco-purpureis nodis radicantibns, internodiis foliis longioribns, 
foliia pollicaribus brevissime petiolatis orbiculari-ovatis mucronatis plus 
minusve papillosis et hispido-pilosis, subtus inter nervoa lacunosis fuBCo- 
viridibus, nervia utrinque ad 4, racemia intra-petiolaribus paucifloria 
brevissime pedunculatia, floribus breviter pedicellatis, calycia lobia 
minutis ovatis obtusis, corolla glabra ^ poll. longa carnosa urceolata.tubo 
inferne globoso atro-sanguineo superne constricto roseo apice 5-fido lobia 
ovatis ereotis, intus annulis 2 pilorum uno fauci altero sito inbtructo, 
coronae exterioris squamis erectia malleiformibua. 

D. hirsuta, Decne. in DG. Prodi: vol. viii. p. 632. Rook.f. Fl. Brit, Ind. vol. 
iv. p. 60. W. "Watson in Gard Ghron. 1896, vol. ii. p. 182. 

D. Brunoniana, Griff. Notul. PI. Asiat, pars IV. p. 44, Ic. PI. Asiat. vol. iv. 
t. 410 A fig. 1. (polliniis et squamia erroneis). 

D. fasciculata, Decne. I.e. 

Leptostemma hirsutum & fasciculatum, Blume, Bijdr. p. 1058. 



Dischidia is a tropical Asiatic and Australian genus, of 
about twenty-five species, of which that here figured is the 
first known to me as having flowered in Europe. One 
species, B. Rafflesiana, is remarkable for the conversion of 
its leaves into water-holding ascidia, into which the roots 
at tbe nodes descend. It is a widely distributed species 
from E. Bengal to Australia, and is grown at Kew, where, 
however, it has never flowered, but forms abundance of 
leaf-pitchers. D. hirsuta is one of the smallest leaved of 
the genus ; it inhabits the southernmost provinces of 
Burma, Tenasserim, the Malayan Peninsula, and Java. 
Plants of it were sent to the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, from 
Singapore, by Mr. Ridley. The stem clings, like ivy, to 
the wall of the Nepenthes house in the Royal Gardens. 
It flowers in spring and summer. 

Descr.—Stem very slender, scandent, covered with 
papillae ; internodes longer than the leaves; nodes rooting. 
Leaves about an inch long, very shortly petioled, orbicular- 
ovate, acute, base rounded, lacunose between the nerves 

September 1st, 19C2. 



beneath, dull green, papillose and more or less scab rid on 
the upper surface; nerves about five pairs, spreading, 
prominent beneath. Raceme very short, intra-axillary, 
very shortly peduncled, two or three-flowered. Sepals four, 
minute, ovate, obtuse. Corolla about one-third of an inch 
long, pitcher-shaped, globose below the middle, narrowing 
upwards into a quinquefid tube, glabrous or very sparsely 
papillose, the globose portion very dark blood-red, the 
tubular and ovate teeth rose-coloured ; within the corolla 
are two rings of hairs, one at the mouth of the corolla, 
the other at about the middle of the globose portion. 
Older scales of the corona hammer-shaped ; inner linear- 
oblong, bifid.— J. D. n. 



Fig. 1, flower; 2, vertical section of the same ; 3 and 4, outer scales of the 
corona; 5, colTimn of anthers; 6 and 7, inner" scales of the corona: — all 
enlarged. 



785^ 




Tab. 7854. 

PODOCARPUS PECTINATA. 
Native of New Caledonia. 

Nat. Ord. CoNiFEREiE. — Tribe Podocabpe^. 
Genus Podocaepus, L'ffir.; {Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 433.) 



PoDOCARPUS (Dacrycarpus) pectinata; arbor 50-60-pedaHs, trunco robngto, 
ramuHs craasiusculis viridibua flexaosis, foliis hiformibus, aliis spareis 
parvis squamiformibuSi^o-j poll, longia ramis ramiilisque appressis ovatia 
acuminatis, aliis in ramulos breves terrain ales sessilibus bifariis confertis 
ascendentibus linearibus acutis v. obtusis crassiusculis saturate viridibuB 
fascia alba ntrinque costae ornatis marginibus recurvis, spicis masculia 
1-3 terminalibus decurvis 1-1^ poll, longis cylindraceis | poll, diam., 
antheris dense imbricatis late deltoideis angalis rotundatia ad ^ poll, 
latis, loculis ad basin connectivi membranacei divaricatis, pedunculia 
femineis 2-3 terminalibus incurvato-reflexis i poll, longis unifloris inferne 
gracilibus bracteis membranaceis imbricatis ovato-triangalaribug decur- 
rentibus stipatis, superne incraasatis bracteis 5-6 distantibus basi decur- 
rente carnosis mamillosis, bractearum limbo abbreviato triangulari, 
ultima sola latiore seminifera, semine immaturo ovoideo extus carnoso 
sulcis plexisque undique excavate, hilo basilari lato, micropjle infra 
apicem sito 2-labiato labio anteriore producto. 

P. pectinata, Panch. mss. ex. Brongn. & Gris in Bull. Bot. Soe. France, vol. 
xvi. (1869) p. 330. Benth. ^- JTook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 433. 
Maders. in Gard. Ghron. 1892, vol. i. p. 113. ^rtw Bulletin, April, 18&2, 
p. 105. 

Dacrtdittm Pancheri, Brongn. Sc Gris I.e. 



The position of the plant here figured, whether under 
Dacrydium or Podocarpus, is as yet unsettled, from the 
absence of female flowers and ripe fruit. Brongniart and 
Gris describe the micropjle of the unripe seed as sub- 
terminal, which would indicate Dacrydium as its genus; 
but its discoverer, Mr. Pancher, referred it to Podocarpus, 
of which it has the habit, but in which the micropjle is 
basal. In the " Genera Plantarum " it is placed with 
another New Caledonian species (Dacrydium faxoides, 
Brongn. & Gris) in the sections Dacrycarpus, of Podocarpus, 
of which that work sajs, '' nobis tam fructu quam habitu 
ad Podocarpum referenda videntur"; and this view is 
adopted bj Dr. Masters. It maj form a genus, Dacry- 
carpus, distinct from both, for its authors point out as two 
remarkable particularities, the seed being drupaceous, and 
wanting the cupula of Dacrydhnn, 

September 1st, 1902. 



p. ijedinata is a native of rocky places in New Cale- 
donia. The Eoyal Gardens, Kew, received the plant from 
which the figure here given was taken from Mr. Moore, 
Director of the Botanic Garden, Sydney, in 1891 ; it 
flowered in a greenhouse in January, 1902. 

The descriptions of the female inflorescence and fruit 
are taken from the Bulletin of the Botanical Society of 
France, cited above. 

Bescr. — A tree fifty to sixty feet high ; trunk attaining 
sixteen inches in diameter ; branches spreading ; branch- 
lets rather stout, bifarious, flexuous, green. Leaves of 
two forms ; (1) minute, scale-like, appressed to the branches 
and branchlets, one-tenth to one-fourth of an inch long, 
ovate, acuminate, green ; (2) sessile on to the ultimate 
branchlets, bifarious, crowded, linear, half an inch long, 
obtuse or acute, straight or sub-falcate, dark green 
with a broad white stripe on each side of the midrib. 
Male inflorescences spiciform, one to three on the tips of 
the branchlets, an inch to an inch and a half long, one- 
sixth of an inch in diameter, recurved, densely covered with 
imbricating, triangular, ovate anthers, each about one- 
tenth of an inch broad ; cells diverging at the base of the 
broad, thin connective. Fern, inflorescence of two to three 
terminal, incurved, bracteate peduncles three-fourths of an 
inch long, each bearing a single ovule in the terminal 
bract. Immature seed ovoid, with a fleshy coat, broad 
basilar hilum, and two-lipped micropvle below the apex. — 
J.D.E. 



Fig. 1, leaves ; 2, male inflorescence; 3, dorsal, and 4, front view o£ anther: 
— all enlarged. 



7855 




M.S.a«l,J.W.Fit<ihlrfK. 



ASr^ent Br 



Li?i-* 



I^ Reeve 3lC I.ondo" 



Tab. 7855. 
EPIDENDRtJM Endresn. 

Native of Costa Eica. 

Nat. Ord. Okchide^. — Tribe Efidendre^. 
Genus Epidendbum, Linn.-, {Benth. & Hooh.f. Oen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 628.) 



Epidendrum (CBrstedella) Endresn; caulibus casspitosis strictis rigidia 
suberectis crassitie pennae columbinse vaginia foliorum verracoaia 
undique tectis, veraccia rubro-brunneis, foliis bifariis sessilibus 1 poll, 
longia patenti-recurvis oblongia apice rotundatis v. 2-lobia coriaceis basi 
semi-amplexicaulibua aupra saturate viiidibna aubconvexis nitidis, costa 
impresaa, subtua pallidis, racemo terminali breviter pedunculato erecto 
laxifloro, bracteia lineari-lanceolatia pedicellia pollicaribua dimidio 
brevioribus, sepalis ad ^ poll, longia oblongia obtusia albis, petalia sepalia 
SBquilongis obovato-oblongis apiculatia albia, labello aepalis longiore 
3-lobo, lobis lateralibus oblongia unolatere al bia altero pallide roseis, ter- 
minali obcordato sinu lato, diaco macula sanguinea notato, columna 
apice truncata 4-fida, antbera mitriformi. 

E. Bndresii, Rchb.f. in Gard. Ghron. 1883, vol. i. p. 432. O'Brien, I.e. 1885, 
vol. i. p. 504, fig. 91. 



E, Endresii is a peculiar-looking little species, with 
box-like leaves, of one of the largest American genera of 
Orchids. It is a native of Costa Rica, where it was 
discovered bj Endres, and whence it was imported by 
Mr. Lehman in 1878. The plant figured flowers annually 
in an intermediate Orchid house of the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in the winter months, and has the odour of a freshly 
sliced cucumber. 

Descr. — 8tems tufted, about a foot high, slender, about 
as thick as a pigeon's quill, stiff, sub-erect, clothed 
with green leaf-sheaths, which are thickly studded with 
minute red-brown warts ; internodes a quarter to half an 
inch long. Leaves about an inch long, bifarious, sessile, 
spreading and recurved, coriaceous, broadly oblong, tip 
rounded or emarginate, deeply channelled along the 
middle, sides convex, very dark green and shining above, 
pale green beneath. Raceme terminal, very shortly 
peduncled, erect, three to five inches long, lax-flowered ; 
bracts narrowly lanceolate, acuminate, green ; pedicel with 
ovary about an inch long, slender. Perianth an inch 
broad. Sepals oblong, obtuse, white. Petals as long, 

SErxE-MBEK 1st, 1002. 



obovate-oblong, white. Lip three-Iobed, lateral lobes 
oblong, spreading, half white and half pale pink ; midlobe 
broadly obcordate, with a very open sinus, white suffused 
with pink, and with a bright red blotch at the base of the 
midlobe. Column truncate, four-cleft at the top. Anther 
mitriform. — J. B. H. 



Fig. 1, column and lip ; 2, side, and 3, front view of column ; 4, anther ; 
5 and 6, poUinia : — all enlarged. 



^7856 




M. S . del, J,N FiLdi JitK 



AStloenfcBroote D ay & So^ 



..*fr--F 



I. Ree-^ & C? 1-or Icj 



T^B. 7856. 
BRYOPHYLLUM ckenatum. 

Native of Ceiiiral Madagascar. 



Nat. Ord. Chassulace^. 
Genus Brtophtllum, Salish. ; [BentJi. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 658). 



BETOPHTLLrM crenafuTTi] glaberrimum, caule 3-5-pedale erecto v. basi decum- 
bente baai simpliciusculo terete apice trichotome ramoso, internodiis 
ionginscalis, foliis oppositis crassia oblongig v. late orato-oblongia basi 
cordatis v. biauricalatis auriculis incurvis sinuato-crenatis supra Jeete 
viridibus subtns pallidis, costa subtns valida, nervis utrinque 3-5, 
floralibua rainoribus linearibua, petiolis validis 1-2 poll, longis teretibns, 
cymis terminalibas corymbiformibus laxifloris, floribus nutantibuB rubro- 
aurantiacia, pedicellis gracilibus decurvia J-f poll, longis, calyce inflate 
i poll. diam. globose 4rdentato dentibns deltoideis basi rotundato v. 
mtruso, corollae tubo f poll, longo subcylindraceo medio paullo constricto, 
lobis 4 brevibus late oblongia apice rotundatis uniseriated ataminibus 
8-medio tubd insertis, antheris inclusis minutis oblongis, diBci glandulis 
minutis, ovarii carpellis in stylos localia subseqailoogis graciles attenuatis. 

B. crenatum, Baker, in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xr. (1884) p. 139. 

Of Bryophyllumy Salisb., only five species are known, 
all, no doubt, indigenous in Africa or its islands only, 
though, one of them, the well-known B. calydnum, 
Salisb. (t. 1409), has, through its property of propagating 
itself by fragments of its succulent leaves, become so 
widely spread in the tropics of both hemispheres, as to 
have been regarded as a native of both America and Asia, 
The filaments vary in length in the genus, in B. calycinum 
and B. crenatum the anthers do not project beyond the 
mouth of the corolla, which they do in B. proliferum, 
Bojer (t. 5147). 

B. crenatum is a native of Central Madagascar, where it 
was first collected by Mr. Lyall, who sent specimens to 
Sir ^Y. Hooker sixty years ago. More recently it has 
been collected by the Rev. R. Baron, in 1881-2, and by 
Mr. Scott Elliot at Angalampena, A living plant was 
presented to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1900, by 
Messrs. Yilmorin, which is now five feet high, m th* 
Succulent House. 

Descr.—Stem stout, erect, cylindric, trichotoraousl^ 
> branched above. Leaves opposite, long-petioled, succu^ 
Sbptembee 1st, 1902. 



¥ 



two and a half to three inches long, oblong or ovate-oblong, 
sinuate-crenate, tip rounded, base cordate, biauriculed 
by the usually incurved basal lobes, bright green, with 
three to five nerves on each side of the midrib which is 
very stout beneath ; floral leaves small, linear ; petiole one 
to two inches long, stout, terete. Cymes corymbiform, 
lax-flowered ; pedicels slender, decurved. Flowers nod- 
ding, orange-red, about two-thirds of an inch long. Calyx 
inflated, globose, four- toothed, teeth deltoid. Corolla-tube 
twice as long as the calyx, or more, lobes four, oblong, 
tips rounded. Stamens unisereate ; anthers included. 
Dish-glands minute. Styles slender, about as long as the 
cells of the carpels. — J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, corolla laid open; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, pistil : — all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 



HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By Georgk Bentham, 
F.K.S. 7th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F,L.S., and W. G. SMtTH,F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham's "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 5th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 
Local Floras. By Gboegb Benthasj, F.R.S., President of the Linna?an 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wid-t, w;iV; 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsknd, Jl 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16*. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that ir,e 
known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J.BKRKEt^v, 
M.A., P.L.S, 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptioii- f 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkibk, F.L.S., &o,, &c, Ndw 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6i. net. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Fanulie. rf 

British Mosses, illnstrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscop f-a! 
details of their structure. By R. Bbaithwaite, M.t>.. F.L S. Vol. I . 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II., 423. 6d. Parts XVII.— XXI., 68. each. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J.D. Hookhk, F.E.S, 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12 net. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of tU 

Australian Territory. Bv G. Bentham, F.B.S., F.L.S., aseistpfl »>y F 
Mueller, F.E.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES: a iu - 

tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of thoee Islands. By J. G. B.a 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the antliou'^ ■" 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the J 

the Cape Colony, Cafifraria, and Prtrt Natal. By Willfam H^ Harv 
F.R.S., and Otto Wilhelm Sondbb, Ph.D. Vols. T-TIT. 
Vol VI., 24s. net. Vol. VII., 35.<;. net. Vol. V., Pai 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Dam k 

Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Publiebed und^r the : 
Commissioner of His Majesty's Works. Vol. IV., Par 
25s. 6d. net. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. net. Vol. VIIL. -'t <. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLOllA : 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, -al- 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Jlacquarrn 
Sir J. D. HooKEK, F.E.S. Published under tbe auspice ^ c! 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. _ . _ . 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN 

Dr. Geisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the n 

tary of State for the Colonies. . , . k h 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description oi^e^ 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. ^J >1 tfr "li^ .. . 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island aud Supp-ement bv m. i^.. .. _ -^ 
Published under the authority of tho Secretary of State for the Colonic.. 
The Supplement, sepai-ately, 2s. 6(i. r\ • ■ A«;r.i't-^xic ..v.rl 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, ,aA 

Distribution. By Sir J. D. Bookkb. F.RS. IS*- ,,T-vTr*A: 5.' -r \ 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of ^^'fl^ ^^;^^;::\l 

to a Winter Flora of the Riviera, '^^^"-^"^ f^ T C mn e*^e S V/ 
Genoa. By J. Teaheen* MogGEIESe. Royal 8vo. C.n.plete in 

99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

LOYELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Strcf 



^BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 693, SEPTEMBER, 1902. 

Tab. 7852.-CYNOKCHIS PTJRPURASCENS. 
„ 7853.— DISCHIDIA HIRSUTA. 
„ 7854.— PODOCAEPUS PEGTINATA. 
„ 7855.— EPIDENDRUM ENDRESII. 
„ 7856.— BRYOPHYLLUM CRENATUM. 



LovELL Reeve & Co. Lid., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



Completion of the FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

Nowraady,Part8XXriI,,XXIT. (completing the work), 18s. net. Vol. VII.,oloth,38s. net. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
Persons having incomplete Seta are adviaed to oonaplete their Copies without delay, 
aa tno Parts will bo kept on Sale for a limited time only. No Part or Vol. will be sold 
without its continuation to the end of the work. 



Now ready, Vol. IV,, Part I., 8s. net. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each, net. 
By D. OLIYER, F.R.S. 
m by various Botanists edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYEE, F.R.S. 
, -^.. 6'i. Vol. Vir., 27s, Gd. Vol. VIII., 25s. 6d. net. Published under 
the authority of the First Co'inmissioner of His Majesty's Works. 

Now Eeady, Vol. V., Part I., 9s. net. Vol, VI., 24*. net. Vol. VII., 335. net 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

' Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G,, F.R.8., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Kew. 
Published under the authority of the QovemmeivtB of the Cape of Good Hope 

and Natal. 
Vols. I. to III. 18s. each. 

WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 
University of Dublin, and 
OTTO WILHELM BONDER, Ph.D. 



Now ready, Part XCII., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS, 

Br CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 
' ■.! . 1. 12s. 5 large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vole. II.— VII- 12.5. each ; large paper, each with 48 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Proipeetus may be had on application to the PvMishers. 
LoTKLt Besve k Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



»E1KTJB *X 0II.BSBT t.KJt XmHATOlT, I.9., M. lOWS'S HOBSB, CI<««K«If wat*. K^- 



No. 694. 

YOL. LVIIT.— OCTOBEK. Price 3*. 6d. colofred, 2. 

OB No. X383 *" "^^^ ENTIRB WOBK. 

CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COMFRIBING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, Wl'L'R 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



SiE JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D.. G.c.s.i.. C.B., F.R.S., i .L.^. 

taif SirtftOT of the ^onal Botanic ©aritrns of ^ero. 




Natnro and Art to adorn tfae page oombiiie. 
And flowersexoUc grace our northern clinic-. 



LONDON: 
LOVELL JiEEYE & CO. Ltd. 

PUBLISHERS TO THE HOME, OOLOIIIAL AND INDIAN GOVERNMENT! 

6, HENRIETTA STlJEET, COYENT GARDEN 
1002. 



r.f' 



trved.] 



LOVELL REEVE & CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 

Part III., with 10 < "i^^s, :.Ms. net. 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACID^. 

By GEORGE BOWDLER BUCKTON, F.E.S., F.L.8. 

To he completed in 5 parts. Subscription for the 

'•: oi the Meuihracida has claims on tliG notice of both the soientifio and 

„^i .1 i^uijlic. Owing to the advanco of agriculture, climatic variation, ami other 

ilttoiices, organic forms are constantly undergoing transformation, while some may 

■ I. become extinct. The present tinTe, therefore, affords opportunities for studying 

■ording these form.-!, which may not occur again. 

;oneral public will find interest in the bizarre forms of these. insects, while the 
ovulations - ntific mind will be exercised on the question of their utility. 

The Me-v! also interesiing from their mimetic forms, which will be. 

uraph. 



Vow ill 

THE HEPATICJE OP THE BRITISH ISLES 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Yois., 22S Plat-" 'r"' ^'^.. Plain. £11 2^. 6d. Coloured, net. 
Now ready, Parts?— 9, with 12 Plates, lof. plain, 21«. coloured, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BlilTlSil ISLES. 

^VlTn Descriptions of all the Species, Vabieties, and Htbrids, 
!y ALFRED FRYER, A.L.S. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 
The work will be issued in 5 quartarly sections of 3 parts each. 
Prospectus on application. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

4 Oescripiion of the Flomring Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or Natufolized in the British Isles. 

Br GEORGE BENTHAM, F.R.S. 

. iitiou, KevisedbySivJ. D. HooKEE.C.B.. G.C.S.I., F.Pw.S.,&c. 9*:net. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, -with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 
; an Uliutrated Companion to Bentham't " Eandbook," and other British Floras. 
3th Editaon, with 1315 Wood Kogravings, 9*. net. 

•EEVE & CO. Lti... 6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GAill>E^' 



NOW READY, complete in Two Vols., Super Royal 8vo., with 
228 Plates, price ^11 2s. 6d., Coloured; £j los. od., 
Uncoloured, net. 



THE 



HEPATIC^ 



OF THE 



BRITI5H I5LE5, 



BY 



W. H. PEARSON. 



PRESS NOTICES. 



"The descriptions of the species are clear and full, and the shorter notes which accom- 
pany many of them are interesting and often of critical value The geographical 

distribution of each species is mentioned, and frequently the actual localities also. .... 

A glossary, table of literature, and a good index complete the volume The 228 

plates form a splendid adjunct to the text, and will prove of material service in the proper 
identification of the various species, each generally includes a life size representation of the 
species, as well as drawings on a large scale, of dissections, fructifications, &c. The cellular 
structure of the leaves is also depicted, and this will often be found of much value in deciding 

between doubtful cases Mr. Pearson has laid British botanists under great 

obligations, and has succeeded in producing a book that ought to serve to rescue from com- 
parative, though altogether unmerited oblivion, a family by no means the least interesting of 
the vegetable kingdom."— J. B. Farmer, M.A., F.R.S., F.L.S., Prof. Bot. Royal College of 
Science, South Kensington, in Nature. 

"The admirable descriptions drawn up by one who is familiar with the plants m the 
field and fully illustrated as they are on the plates, together with the observations in which 
similar species are contrasted and separated, will be of the greatest service for the identiK- 
cation of the .species of this difficult family of plants."--C. H. Waddell, in the Irish 
Naturalist. 




gonbotx : 

LOVELL REEVE & Co,, Limited, 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial and Indian Governments, 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COYENT GARDEN. 



7851 




■fcicent, BrooltE,D^&Sorv Iit4 Imp 



M r, d.i! IN.'Fil.ix Uth. 



L"RBev, 8i C° I.onda 



Tab. 7857. 
STREPTOCARPUS Mahoni. 

Native oj British Central Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Gesnerace^e. — Tribe CYRTANDREiE. 
Genua Streptocarpus, LlndL; {Benfh. ^- Eook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii, p. 1023.) 



Streptocarpus Mahoni ; acaulis, nionophyllas, folio amplo pedali terra? 
appresso ovato-oblongo crenulato basi subcordato apice rotundato glabio 
V. parce piloso multinervi inter nervos rugose supra Isete viridi snbtus 
pallidiore, scapis secns basin costa? seriatim evolutis confertis 4-6-polli- 
caribus robustis dense pilosis, cymis compositis multifloris, ramis 
ramulisque decurvis v. pendulis calycibusque pilosis, sepalis ^ poll, longis 
linearibus, corollsB violacese tubo § poll, longo pubescente decurvo supra 
medium inflate, limbi lobis rotnndatis, lobis labii superioris pauUo minori- 
bus, filamentis brevibus curvis uno latere sparsim glanduloso-pilosis, 
antherarum loculia ovoideis divaricatis, ovario pubescente, stigmate 
2-lobo, capsulis 2|-polliearibus gracilibus pendulis pubeacentibus. 

S. Mahoni, Hook.f. 



Streptocar;pus Mahoni is allied to ^S'. Saundersii, Hook., 
of Natal, figured at tab. 5251 of this work, in habit and 
inflorescence, but does not appear to attain the dimensions 
of that majestic species, nor has it the dark, rose-red 
undersurface of the leaves. It further differs from S. 
Saundersii in the much more compound and pendulous 
cymes, and in the violet-blue colour of the flowers, the 
more slender tube and broader lobes of the corolla, and in 
the almost sessile stigma. Twenty-three species of Strepto- 
carpus are enumerated in the " Index Kewensis," and twelve 
have been figured in the Bota7iical Magazine, all South 
African, except S. MaJioni and two others from tropical 
East Africa; while two others {S. caulescens, Vatke, 
t. 6814, and ^S'. KirJcii, Hook. f. t. 6782) differ remarkably 
from the rest in having erect stems with solitary axillary 
cymes. The ten South African species are S. Bexii, Lmdl. 
{Didymocarpits Bexii, t. 3005; S. polyanthus, Hook, 
t. 4850 ; S. Gardenii, Hook. t. 4862 ; S. Saundersii, Hook, 
t- 5251; 8. Dnnnii, ^Rook. t. 6903; ^\ lutea, Clarke." 
(S, parviflora, t. 6636, non Meyer) ; S. parviflora, Mey. 
^•7036; S. Galpini, Hook. f„ t. 7230; S. Wendjandv, 
Hort. Damm. t. 7447, and the subject of this plate. 
OcTOBiR Ux, 1902. 



There are eight Madagascar species described, but the 
genus is otherwise Continental African. 

8, Mahoni was raised from seed sent to the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, by Mr. John Mahon, Assistant Curator of 
the Botanic Station, Uganda. It flowered in tlie Succulent 
House in June, 1900, and died after flowering, as 
do all the monophyllous species of the genus so far as 
is known. 

Descr. — Stemless. Leaf solitary, a foot or more long, 
appressed to the ground, sessile, ovate-oblong, crenulate, 
tip rounded, base cordate, many-nerved, bullate between 
the nervules, pale green beneath. Scales many, crowded 
in one series on the base of the costa of the leaf, stout, 
erect, densely pilose. Cymes much-branched, effuse ; 
branches and branchlets and pedicels decurved and pen- 
dulous, densely pilose, as is the calyx. Flowers long- 
pedicelled. Calyx-segments one-third of an inch long, 
decurved, pubescent, inflated below the mouth ; limb an 
inch broad ; lobes violet-blue, orbicular. Filaments very 
short, glandular-hairy on the convex side ; anther-cells 
divaricate. Ovary pubescent ; style very short. Capsule 
two and a half inches long, very slender, pendulous, 
pubescent. — J. D, H. 



Fig, 1, calyx and pistil ; 2, tube of corolla laid open ; 3 and 4, stamens 
o, p:f3til : — all enlarged; 6, reduced figure of whole plant. 



7858 




M-S.aii.J.N.Fiichlith 



X.Roev-e &.C?Loyvdojx. 



Tab. 7858. 
ANEMONE OBRNUA, 

Native of Manchuria and Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Eanunculace^. — Tribe ANEMONEifi. 
Genus Anemone, Linn. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 4.) 



Anemoxk (Pulsatilla) cernua ; herba 6-lO-pollicaris sericeo-pilosa v. villosa, 
rhizomate lignoso erecto, foliis radicalibua longe gracile petiolatis late 
ovatis piunatisectis, segmentis 2-3-jugis oppositis pollicaribus late ovatis 
oblongisve inciso-Iobatis basicuneatis, involucrifoliolis sessilibus trisectis, 
laciniis demum patulis linearibus subacutis obtasisve apicibus sajpe 
trifidia v. trilobis lobis inasqualibas, pedunculo laxe sericeo-tomentoso, 
flore cernuo late campanulato l|-2 poll, lato sepalis ovato-oblongis 
oljtusis intus pallida v. saturate brunneo-rnbris dorso pallidis denge sericeis, 
staminibus numerosissimis, stylis azureis, carpellie maturis l|-2 poll, 
longis longe sericeo pilosis. 

A. cernua, Thunb. Fl.Jap.ip. 238. BC. Prodr. vol. i. p. 16. Miquel, Ann. 
Mils. Bot. Lugd. Bat vol. iii. (1867) p. 2. Franch. & Sav. En. PI. Jap. 
vol. i. p. 4. Baker Sc Moore in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol.xvii. (1879) p. 376. 
Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. (1883) p. 10. Somulcii Zusetzu, 
vol. X. fol. 36. Honzo Zttftt, vol. vi. fol. 23. 



The genus Anemone presents flowers of many colours, in 
both the xanthia and cyanic series, from red to blue, but 
no other species known to me shows the remarkable dis- 
position of colour seen in the variety of A. cernua, hero 
figured, in which the inner surface of the sepals is red- 
brown, the anthers yellow, and the styles blue. The 
genus (including Pulsatilla and Eepatica) appears to be 
exceptionally large in Japan, twenty-three species being 
enumerated by Franchet and Savatier as natives of that 
Archipelago, which is rather more than inhabit Europe. 
Ledebour enumerates twenty-six as natives of the Russian 
dominions ; fifteen are described in the " Flora of British 
India." 

A. cernua is a native of the Island of Nipon, Japan, 
in open sunny situations, as also of the Island of Saghalin, 
of Corea, and is found all over Manchuria. It varies 
greatly in size, in the greater or less abundance of the 
beautiful soft, white, silky hairs that clothe it, and in the 
darker or lighter colour of the sepals. The specimen 
figured was procured from Mr. Max Leichtlin in 1900 ; 

OCIOBER 1st, 1902. 



it flowered in the Alpine House of the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in April, 1902. 

Descr. — Whole plant clothed with soft, white, spreading 
hairs. Bootstoch erect, woody, sometimes as thick as the 
middle finger. Badical leaves with the slender petiole a 
few inches to a span long, broadly ovate, pinnatisect ; 
segments two or three pairs, opposite, about an inch long, 
broadly ovate or oblong, sessile or shortly petiolulate, 
inciso-lobate and coarsely toothed, base cuneate ; invo- 
lucral leaves sessile, pinnatifid ; segments linear, sub-acute 
or obtuse, trifid to multifid. Peduncles long, one-flowered. 
Floioer nodding, very variable in size, one to two 
inches in diameter. Sepals ovate, obtuse, spreading, pale 
purplish externally, and there clothed with long, silky 
hairs, glabrous and dark red-brown within. Stamens 
crowded, anthers yellow. Styles dark violet-blue. Fruit 
of many achenes, the ovary and long slender styles clothed 
with long, silky hairs. — J.D.H. 



Figs. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3, immature achene : — all enlarged. 



7859 



\ 




-WTO»ntBrcoks.Dy*SonI^ 



ij.Raave Si. O. London. ' 



Tai3. 7859. 
MASDEVALLIA Schecederiana. 

Native of Peru ? 

Nat. Old. Ob.chide.1;. — Tribe Epidendrej;. 

Genus Masdevallia, Buis iS: Pav.\ (Benth. ^- HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

1>. 429.) 



Masdevallia (Coriace^) Sc/inederiana; folio 5-6-pollican crasse coriaceo 
oblongo-lanceolato apice 3-denticulato dorso carinato basi in petiolum 
vaginatum angustato saturate viridi, vaginis l^-l-poll. longis mem- 
branaceis, pedunculo foliis paulJo longiore basi vagina folii inclusa, 
gracili erecto viridi l-floro, bractea f poll, longa tubulosa appressa 
pallido viridi, floribus subdecurvis, perianthii tubo ^-pollicari aurantiaco 
purpureo tincto, sepalis sanguineo-purpureis obtuse 3-carinatis in caudas 
2^ poll, longas filiformes recurvaa aureas abrupte constrictis, dorsali 
porrecto ^ poll, longo triangulari-ovato, lateralibus recurvis dorsali 2-3- 
plo longioribus ovatis dimidiato albis et sanguineis, petalis ^ poll, longis 
carnosis spathulato-oblongis obtusis pallide roseis punctatis, labello 
petalis patillo longiore oblongo basi hastato medio paullo constricto, disco 
medio obtnse bicarinato apice recurvo roseo-pnnctato. 

M. Schroederiana, ITort. Sander, ex Gard. Ghron. 1890, vol. ii. p. .M. Woolv:. 
Masdevall. p. 143, t. 56. J-mrn. Horde 1890, p. io7, fig. 71. Cogn. 
Diet. Ic. Orchid, t. 16. 

il. fulvescena, Holfe in Gard. Ghron. 1890, vol. ii. p. 325, fig. 65, Woolw. I.e. 
p. 135, t. 62, forma colore florum pallidiore. 



Of Masdevallia upwards of thirty species have been 
figured in tbis Magazine ; of which, M. Wageneriana, Lindl., 
in 1856 (t. 4921) was the first of the many now intro- 
duced into Europe in a living state, for M. fenestrala, 
Lindl., t. 4164 {Grifptojihoranthus atroimrpiweiia, Kolfe) is 
not a congener. No fewer than 175 species are enumerated 
in the *' Index Kewensis " as known up to the year 1885, 
and to that may probably be added as many described 
since, which would bring the total up to 200. About 
ninety species are figured by Miss Wool ward in the Marquis 
of Lothian's sumptuous work, " The Genus Masdevallia " ; 
the cessation of which is greatly to be regretted, for without 
such plates, accompanied by analyses, it is impossible to 
study the genus satisfactorily. 

M. Schrcederiana differs much from any species previously 
described ; it was imported by Messrs. Sander & Co. of St. 
Albans, who inform me that it was sent by their collector, 
Mr. Hubsch, probably in 1884, and, as far as they can 

October 1st, 1902. 



recollect, from Peru. On the other hand, according to 
Miss Woolward, M. fulvescens was imported from New 
Grenada in 1890 by Messrs. Horsman & Co. of Colchester, 
and has become very popular. The specimen figured was 
presented to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by Mr. F. W. Moore, 
A.L.S., Keeper of the Royal Gardens, Glasnevin, in 1893. 
It flowers annually in a cool house. The flowers vary a 
good deal in colour. 

Descr. — Stems tufted. Leaf five to six inches long, 
thickly coriaceous, oblong-lanceolate, minutely three- 
toothed at the tip, base narrowed into a short petiole ; 
scape rather longer than the leaf, emerging from the 
short, cylindric, membranous sheath at the base of the 
leaf, slender, terete, one-flowered. Flotcers nodding. 
Perianth tube about half an inch long. Sepals abruptly 
contracted into a slender, recurved, bright yellow tail; 
dorsal half an inch long, oblong, arched ; lateral twice as 
long, ovate, connate, strongly recurved, thickly three- 
nerved, dimidiately white and red, buUate, and with a white 
streak on the red portion. Petals oblong-spathulate, 
fleshy, obtuse, rather longer than the column. LijJ 
oblong, rather longer than the petals, base hastate. — 
J,D.H. 

Fig. 1, flower with the sepals removed; 2, lip and column; 3, anthers; 
4, poUinia -.—all enlarged. 



^seu 





^^-:,%^ 
u 



Vun-cerit BroiJ-' 



Tab. 7860. 
GLADIOLUS Mackindeei. 

Native of British East AfHca. 

Nat. Ord. Iridej:. — Tribe IxiE^. 
Genus GrlADiOLUS, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p, 709.) 



Gladiolus (Homoglosaum) Maekinderi; caule gracili bipedali laxe folioso, 
foliis anguate linearibus inferioribus pedalibua ^-l poll, latis acuminatis 
rigidis aubglauco-viridibus, costa concolore valida, spica 6-pollicari 
5-6-flora, spathis oblongo-lanceolatis acutis herbaceis couvolutis iniima 
l^-poUicari, floribua secundis, perianthii tubo l-ll-pollicari anreo, 
segmentis consinailibus, sessilibus late ovato-orbicularibus apicibns rotan- 
datis concavis coccineis exterioribas pgiullo tnajoi'ibiis, staminibus seg- 
mentis triente breviovibus flavis, antheris ad ^ poll, longis basi et apice 
breviter bilobis. 

The genus Gladiolus is a characteristic feature of the 
hilly and mountainous country of Eastern tropical Africa, 
whence about thirty-five species have been obtained, 
all but two of these endemic ; the two exceptions being 
found also on the Western side of the continent, whence 
ten species have been described. From the data given by 
Mr. Baker in the " Flora of Tropical Africa," the elevation 
the genus affects in tropical Africa is two thousand to eleven 
thousand feet. The species most closely allied to G. 
MacMnderi is G. Watsonioides, Baker, t. 6919; a much 
taller and longer-leaved plant, with flowers two inches 
broad, ovate, flat, sub-acute perianth-segments and sagit- 
tate anthers. It was found on Kilimanjaro, at elevations of 
eight thousand five hundred feet to eleven thousand feet by 
Mr. Thomson and Sir Harry Johnston, who sent seeds of 
it to Kew, from which plants were raised that flowered in 
1886. According to Mr. Baker, G. Watsonioides is also a 
native of alpine pastures on Kenia, at ten thousand to 
eleven thousand feet elevation, whence I have not seen 
specimens. 

Mr. Baker, in the Fl. Trop. Afr. vii. 374, refers his G. 
Watsonioides to the section Homoglossum of Anthohjzn, 
characterized by the equal or sub-equal segments of the 
perianth. But section Homoglossnm appears to me to be 
referable to Gladiolus (in which it is placed in his " Hand- 

OcTOBt:R 1st, 1902. 



book of Irideos," p. 226, as a sub-genus), of which it has 
the large bracts, and funnel-shaped perianth not suddenly 
contracted into a slender stipes as in the typical species of 
Antliolyza, of which examples are figured, under Gladiolus ^ 
namely, A. mtliiopica^ L.,t. 561,^. fjuaclrangnlaris, Grawl. t. 
5G7, and A. asthiopica, L., var. viUigeraj Salisb. t. 1172. 

Seeds of G. Macldnderi were procured at an elevation of 
ten thousand feet on Mt. Kenia by Professor Mackinder, 
of Christ Church, Oxford, during his ascent, in 1900, of 
that remarkable mountain ; plants raised from which 
flowered in a greenhouse in August, 1901. 

Descr. — Stem about two feet high, slender, laxly leafy. 
Leaves narrowly linear, the lower about a foot long, and 
one-sixth to one-fourth of an inch broad, rigid, rather 
glaucous green, midrib stout. Spike six inches long, 
secund, five- to six-flowered. Brads oblong-lanceolate, 
acute, the lower an inch and a half long. Perianth-tube 
longer than the bracts, narrowly infundibular, yellow; 
limb an inch and a half broad, scarlet ; segments broadly 
orbicular-ovate, concave, all nearly equal, the three inner 
rather shorter than the outer. Stamens about one-third 
shorter than the perianth-segments, yellow ; anthers one- 
sixth of an inch long, base and apex shortly bifid. — /. D. 11. 

Figs. 1 and 2, anthers ; 3, atigma: — all enlarged. 



7(567. 




W.J.N.-FiiohUlK 



\!nceT-ABrooks,DayiSor.Lt.'^J«P 



LHeeve&C9T,o,:do 



Tab. 7861. 

IRIS Leiohtlini. 
Native of Bokhara . 

' Nat. Ord. Iridbjs. — Tribe MoEEiK. 

GanuB This, Linn.; {Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant. ro\. iii. p. 686). 



Ibis (Regelia) Leichtlini; rhizomate valido repente, caule 1-1^ poll, alto 
valido monocephalo basi folioao, foliis 1-lJ ped. longis ad 3 poll. latia 
ensiformibas obtusis sat. firmis pallida viridibug plus minusve glauces- 
centibua marginibus hyalinis, spathaa valvis 2-3 poll, longis oblongo- 
lanceolatis herbaceis apicibus scariosis 2-3-flori8, floribus breviter 
pedicellatis, perianthii tubo ovario loagiore ad 1^ poll, longo tereti a 
basi ad apicem seasim ampliato, litnbi segmentis subsequalibus cuneato- 
obovatis apice rotundatis undnlatis margiaibua crispatis a basi ad 
medium flavo-barbatis medio violaceis venis saturatioribus pictis, lateribus 
late brunueis, exterioribus a medio recurvis, interioribus erectis, styli 
ramis oblongis perianthii I obis dimidio brevioribua cristis brunneia apice 
bifidis, antheria valde elongatis anguste liaearibus filamentis pluries 
longioribus. 

I. Leichtlini, Begel in Act. Sort. Petropol. vol. viii. (1884) p. 680 ; Descr. vol. ix. 
p. 40. Baker, Handh. of Iridese, p. 20. 

I. vaga, Fast, ex Begel, Gartenfl. p. 201, 672, 1. 1244, f. 7. 



Iris Leichtlini is very closely allied to I. Eulefeldi, 
Kegel (tab. 6902), a species referred to by Baker as a 
variety of I. scaiHosaj Willd. ('*Handb. of Iridese," p. 32), 
which differs notably in the plane margins of the perianth- 
segments and bipartite crests of the style-arms. J. Korol- 
kovi, Kegel, (tab. nostr. 7025), is another nearly allied 
plant, but it differs from I. Leichtlini by the same 
characters of perianth-segments and style-arms as does 
/. Eulefeldi. All three are natives of Russian Turkestan, 
and are variable in colour, but I. Leichtlini is the most 
beautifully variegated of the three, and is the only one of 
them (as far as yet figured) with brown and violet periauth- 
segments. 

Central Asia is probably the head-quarters of the genus 
L-is, about thirty species are enumerated by Baker as 
inhabiting this region, whence, and especially from Tibet 
and the regions bordering China, many novelties may 
be expected; about forty species are European, sixteen 
Himalayan. 
October 1st, 1902. 



Plants of L Leichtlini were purchased for the Eoyal 
Gardens, Kew, in 1893, from Messrs. Herb and Wulle, of 
Naples, which flowered in an open border in May. It was 
introduced into cultivation by Dr. Kegel, of the Imperial 
Botanic Gardens of St. Petersburgh, who received it from 
Bokhara, where it was found by Korolkov. 

Descr. — Whole plant twelve to eighteen inches high. 
Bootstock stout, creeping. Stem leafy at the base, simple, 
bearing one head of two to three flowers. Leaves about 
as long as the stem, half an inch broad, ensiform, obtuse, 
pale green, more or less glaucous. Valves of spathe two to 
three inches long, herbaceous, with scarious tips. Flowers 
very shortly pedicelled. Perianth-tube an inch and a half 
long, terete, gradually dilated from base to tip ; segments 
of limb sub-equal, three inches long, cuneate-obovate, all 
with a narrow beard of yellow hairs from the claw to 
about the middle ; margins undulate and crisped, tips 
rounded, violet-blue in the middle, with broadly, copper- 
coloured margins and darker veins, outer segments 
recurved from the middle, inner erect. Anthers very long 
and slender. Style-arms half as long as the perianth- 
segments, erect, ovate, tip bifid.— J. B. H. 



Fig. 1 and 2, anthers ; 3, npper part of style-arm with eteati—all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 



HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in tie British 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By George BentH;4M, 
F.R.S. 7th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9.s. net. 

ILLUSTEATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and VV. fr. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated Companicn 
to Benthams "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 5th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By George Bentham, F. R.S., President of the LinnsBan 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Rev. M. J. Bekkklev, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21,?. 

SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charles P. Hobkirk, F.L.S., Ac, &c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6d. net. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monograph? of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Microscopical 
details of their structure. By R. BraithwaitE, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II., 42s, 6(J, Parts XVII.— XXI., 6s. each. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12 net. 
FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 
Australian Territory. By G. Bentham, F.K.S., F.L.S., asBJated by P. 
Mueller, F.R.S. Vols. I. to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24s. Published 
under the auspices of tlie several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES : a Descrip- 

tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baker, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the authority of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants ot 
the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By WiLLTAit H. Harvey, M.D. , 
F.R.S. , and Otto Wilhelm Sondeb, Ph.D. Vols. I. — III., 18s. each. 
Vol VI., 24s. net. Vol. VII., 35s. net. Vol. V., Part I., 9.'^. net. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Da>iei. Oin kk, F.R.S. 

Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the authority of the first 
Commissioner of His Majesty's Works. Vol. IV., Part J., 8s. net. Vol. V., 
25s. 6d. net. Vol. VII., 27s. Gd. net. Vol. VIII., 2.5s. 6d. net. 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : a Sy^teniatic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Chatham, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Canipbell's, and Macqunrrie's Islands. By 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the auspicew of the Government 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN LSf^ANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Store- 
lary of State for the Colonies- 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flowering 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong. By Gkorge liKMHAM, 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement by Dr. Hance, 21s. 
Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 
The Supplement, separately, 2s. 6d. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, and 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. 12s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE, and 

to a Winter Flora of the Riviera, including the coast from Marseilles to 
Genoa. By J. Tkahernk Moggridge. Royal 8to. Complete in 1 vol., 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

LOVELL EEEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

CONTENTS OF No. 694, OCTOBER, 1902. 

Tab. 7857.— STRBPTOCARPUS MAHONI. 
„ 7858.— ANEMONE CERNUA. 
„ 7859.— MASDEVALLIA SCHRCEDERIANA. 
„ 7860.— GLADIOLUS MACKINDERL 
„ 7861.— IRIS LEICHTLINI. 



LovELL Reeve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



Completion of the FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

Now ready. Parts XXIII., XXIV. (completing the work) ,18s. net. Vol. VII., oloth, 38s. net. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sh- J. D. HOOKER, E.R.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
*^* Persons having incomplete Sets are advised to complete their Copies without delay^ 
as the Parts will be kept on Sale for a limited time only. No Part or Vol. will be sold 
without its continuation to the end of the work. 



Now readv, Vol. IV., Part I., 8s. net. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each, net. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

Tho Continuation by various Botanists edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 

Vol. v., 25s. 6d. Vol. VII., 27s. Qd. Vol. VIII., 2os. 6d. net. Published imder 

the authority of the First Commissioner of His Majesty's Works. 

Now Ready, Vol. V., Part I., 9s. net. Vol. VI., 24*. net. Vol. VII., 33s. net. 

FLORA GAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.6., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Keiv. 
Published under the authority of the Governments of the Cape of Q-ood Hope 

and Natal. 

Vols. I. to III. ISs. eticli. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 



Now ready. Part XCIII., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5«. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 
Vol. I. I2s. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vols. II.— VII. 12s. each; large paper, each with 48 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

ProBpedus maij he had on application to the Publishers. 
LovEtn Rebve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

»EIMT«» BT »Tr,B«ET ABD BIVIITBTOW, ID., 8T. JOHW'S HGITB*, Cl.««K««"»^'' ** " 



No. 695.. 

VOL. LVIII.—NOVEMBER. Price Ss. 6d. coloured, 2s. V" j^. a in, 

OB No. 1389 °' "^^^ KNTIEl! WOBK. 

CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

aoHPBistire 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN. WITH 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIOxNS ; 

BT 

Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.C.s.L. C.B., F.R s., f.l.S. 

Tmu Bittctot oi tbt Bonal )3otanit Ciarticn» of %ca>. 



■ffi.'^'^^ 



w^' mism 



msmamnvmmiamei' 



''^•**. ,. 



,^.^^, 



g^.- *^' 



And flowei"! exotic grace onr northern ciime. 



1j U v^ i' U > ■ 

LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd. 

PUBLISHERS TO THK HOME, COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVBRNMEXTS, 

6, HENRIETTA STKEET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1902. 

\_AIX rights reserved.] 



LOVELL REEVE &, CO.'S PUBLICATIONS. 

Part IV., with 10 Coloured Plates, 2l8. net. 

MONOGRAPH OF THE MEMBRACID^. 

By GEORGE BOWDLER BUCKTON, F.R.S., F.L.S. 

To he completed in 5 parts. Subscription for the whole work, £4 14s. 6d. 



The family of the Meinhracid(je has claims on the notice of both the scientific and 
genera! public. Owing to the advance of agriculture, climatic variation, and other 
inflaejices, organic forma are constantly undergoing transformation, while some may 
even become extinct. The present time, therefore, affords opportunities for studying 
and recording these forms, which may not occur again. 

The general public will find interest in tbe bizarre forms of these insects, while the 

eculations of the scientific mind will be exercised on the question of tlieir utility. 

t'he Memhyacida; are also interesting from their mimetic forms, which will be 
ihis Monograph. 



Now Ready. 

THE HEPATIC-ffi OP THE BRITISH ISLES. 

By W. H. PEARSON. 

2 Vols., 22S Plates. £7 10s. Plain, £11 2s. Qd. Coloured, net. 



Now ready. Parts 7— 9, with 12 Plates, 16». plain, 21*. coloured, net. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BR-ITISH ISLES. 

With Descriptions op all the Species. Varieties, and Hybrids. 

By ALFRED FRYER, A.L.S. lUustrated bj ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The work will be issued in 5 quarterly aections of 3 parts each, 
ProBpeotus on application. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Oescn'pilofi of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 

to or N at uf adzed in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENT SAM, P.E.S. 

7th Edition, Revised by Sir J. D. Hookkb,C.B.. G.C.S.I., F.R.S.,&c. 9s. net. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BBITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Woofi Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plant . 
Drawn by W. H. PITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

rming an IHuttraied Compa»ioit to Bentham's " Mandbook," and other Britith FUrai. 
5th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engravings, 9«. net. 

K / EEEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, HEJfRIETTA STKEET, COVENT GABDil*. 




7i^62 



L Reeve & C? London 



Tab. 7862. 

CJyNUM NATANS. ' ■• 

Native of Guinea. 

Nat. Ord. AmaryllidEvM. — Tribe Amaryllej;. 
Genus Crinum, Linn.; {Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 726.) 



Crinum (Platyaster) iiatann \ herba aqiiatioa, bulbo parvo anguste ovoideo 
estolonifero, collo elongato, foliia STibmersis loratis 4-5-pedalibus \\ poll, 
latis apice angustatis subacutis uadulatis supra saturate subtus pallide 
viridibus, costa crassa utiinque prominula, scipo robnsto pedali erecto 
cotnpresso, spathse valvis 2|^-pollicaribug ovato-lanceolatia membranaceia 
coloratis, floribus umbellatis erectis, ovario f-pollicari oblongo, corollaj 
tubo 6-pollicari cylindraceo pallide viridi, eegmentia tubo dimidio 
brevioribus patenti-reflexis auguste lineari-lanceolatis falcatis subacutis 
albis, filamentis filiformibus segmentis corolla3 fere sequilongis, antheris 
\ poll, longia anguste linearibus aureis, stjli parte exserto iilamentia 
pauUo longiore ascendente sigmoideo, stigmate fimbriato. 

C. natans, Baker in Dyer, Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. vii. p. 396. 



Crinum natans, the only hitherto described species with 

submerged leaves, is very closely allied to G. piirpurascens, 

Baker, t. 6525, a native of the same region of Africa, 

and described as amphibious. G. piirpurascens differs in 

being a much smaller plant, with narrower, less undulate 

leaves, having an undefined costa, a much more slender 

scape and perianth-tube, which latter is purplish below 

the middle and yellow above it, shorter perianth-segments, 

rose-purple filaments, and green anthers. It is apparently 

a more local plant, being confined to the Bight of Biafra, 

whereas G. natans has been found in Fernando Po, where 

it was discovered by G. Mann in 1862, in the Niger Delta, 

Gold Coast, and Sierra Leone, always in gently flowing 

fresh-water streams. Sir John Kirk, who collected it in 

the Niger waters in 1895, and sent bulbs and seeds to 

the lloyal Gardens, Kew, describes it as affecting the 

margins of rivers with an average temperature of 80'' — 

82° Fahr. The bulbs which he sent in that year flowered 

in a tropical tank in September, 1900. 

Descr. — Bidh about three or more inches long, narrowly 
ovoid, tapering into a long neck, not stoloniferous. Leaves 
very numerous, submerged, four to five feet long by one 

>OV£MBER IsT, 1902. 



and a half to two incbes broad, sessile, strap-sliaped, 
strongly waved on both sides of the stout, broad, well- 
defined midrib, which is prominent on both surfaces, deep 
green above, pale beneath, tip narrowed to a sub-acute 
point. Scape a foot high, stout, compressed, three-quarters 
of an inch broad. Spathe-vahes two and a half inches 
long, ovate-lanceolate, pale brown. Flowers umbellate, 
erect, sessile. Ovari/ half to three-quarters of an inch 
long, narrowly oblong. Perianth- tube six inches long, 
cylindric, pale green ; segments half as long as the tube, 
spreading and recurved, narrowly linear-lanceolate, falcate. 
Filaments spreading, rather shorter than the perianth- 
segments, slender, white ; anthers narrow, yellow. Style 
very slender, declinate, then upcurved, rather longer than 
the filaments. — J. I>. fl". 



Figs. 1 and 2, anthers ; 3, upper part of style and etigma : — all enlarged ; 
4, reduced view of whole plant. 




fm 



W.SddJNFitdilith 



AK^c^t Brocl<^ Day & Saarf^.^f 



LHetr^o &C° London 



Tab. 78G3. 
CYMBIDIUM SiMONsiANUM. 

Native of Sikhim and Assam. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^. — Tribe Vande^. 
Genus Cymbibium, Sw.; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 536.) 



Ctmbididm (Eucymbidium) Simonsiavum ; epiphyticuni, foliis 2-3-pedalibua 
eessilibns anguste linearibns ad | poll, latis acutis v. acuminatis basi 
non dilatatis, pedunculo breviusculo decurvo basi vaginia striatis dis- 
tichia imbricatis 1-2-pollicaribns instructo, racemo pendulo laxe 10-12- 
floro, bracteia subulatis appressis 5 in. longis, pedicel lia cum ovariia 
1-1 2 poll. _ longis, florib us odoratlsjsepalis patulis lineari-oblongis subgriseo- 
albist'aacia media sanguinea ornatis, petalis sepalia consimilibus et con- 
coloribus sed paullo minoribns, labello sepalia dimidio breviore loblg 
sanguineo ornatis lateralibua brevibus columnae asquilongis obtnsis, inter- 
medio revoluto ovate apiculato, disco inter loboa lateralea 2-carinato, 
cariuis glandnloso-pilosip, columna atro-purpurea, polliniis obtuse 
deltoideis sessilibus glandula brevi lata. 

C. Simorsianum, King & Pantl. in Joum. As. Soc. Beng. Ixiv. para II. (1895) 
p. 338, et Ann. Bot. Oard. Calcutta, vol. viii. (1898) p. 188, tab. 250. 



According" to King and Pantling in tlie works cited 
above, Gymbidium Simonsianum was discovered in Assam 
by the late Dr. J. C. Simons, who sent very large 
collections both to the Botanical Gardens of Calcutta and 
to Sir W. Hooker in 1830-40. Jt has since been found 
at the foot of the Sikkim Himalaya, in the Teesta Valley, 
by Mr. Pantling, flowering in August. It is well described 
in the Annals of the Koyal Botanic Gardens of Calcutta, 
except that the pollinia are described as falcately ovoid, 
with a narrow gland (rather strap), whereas in the draw- 
ing, figs. 6 and 7, they precisely resemble those represented 
in our plate, figs. 3 and 4. Its nearest ally is C. Imuji- 
folium^ Don, a native of the sub-tropical Himalaya from 
Kumaon eastward, and of the Khasia Mts., which has a 
broader midlobe of the tip spotted with red. The plant 
here figured was purchased as G. Dayaninn for the Koyal 
Gardens, Kew, from Messrs. Barr & Sons, Covent Garden, 
in 1900, with other Orchids, said to have come from Japan. 
It flowered in a cool house in October, 1901, and was 
sweet-scented. 

Descr. — Leaves sessile, very narrowly linear, two to 

^uvEiiBER 1st, 1902. 



three feet long, by about half an inch broad, narrowed 
into a sub-acute point, base not dilated. Peduncle short, 
decurved, clothed with imbricating, distichous, oblong, 
acute, cymbiform sheaths, one to two inches long. Raceme 
pendulous, loosely ten- to twenty-flowered. Bracts small, 
subuhite. Pedicels with the ovary one to one and a half 
inch long. Flowers two inches broad. Sepals and petals 
spreading and recurved, linear-oblong, acute, similar in 
form and colour, but the petals smaller, greyish white, 
with a blood-red, central streak. Lip about half as long 
as the sepals ; side-lobes short, rounded, as long as the 
column, white, streaked with blood-red; terminal ovate, 
revolute, white with a yellow blotch, disk with two 
glandular- hairy ridges between the side-lobes. — J. D. H, 



FiiT. 1, lip with one side-lobe removed; 2, culumn; 3 and 4, pollinia :— a^Z 
enlarged. 




M-Sdel-J.-NPild, Jith 



LBro=ks,Day&SonLl^I^ 



Ll^eeve C . Loxxdon. 



Tab. 7864. 
CATASETUM quadridens, S, 

Native country ? 

Nat. Ord. Orcuide*. — Tribe Vande^. 
Genus Oatasetum, Rich. ; (Benih. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Flant. vol, iii. p, 651.) 



Catasetum quadridens; pseadobnlbia ovoidela annulatis 3-5-pbyllis, foliis 
6-12-pollicaribus oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis 3 nerviis basi angustatis 
l^ete vividibus, ijjjl. masc. scapo robusto pauci-vaginato cum racemo 
multifloro decurvo pedali, rhachi robusta, floribus secuudig ascendentibus, 
bracteis lanceolatis ^ poll, longis pedicelHs robustis duplo longioijbus 
appressis, sepalis petalia conformibus pollicaribua oblongia acuminatis 
viridibus maoulis magnis atro-parpureis ornatis, sepalo dorsali erecto, 
lateralibns deflexis, petalis erectis sepalo dorsali oppositis, labello sepalis 
panllo breviore breviter unguicalato lamina inflexa aurea purpureo 
punctata ovata infra apicem obtnsum angustata, margin ibus infra 
medium fimbiiato-dentafis, disco supra basin umbonato infra medium 
depresso, columna clavata f poll, longa rostrata, clinandrio antice 
2-dentato, rostelli antennis subulatia incurvis, anthera rostrata, polliniis 
ellipsoideia, stipite lineari marginibus incurvis, glandula quadrata. 

C. quadridens, Bolfe in Kew Bulletin, 1901, p. 149; app. III. 1902, p. 80. 



Of this remarkably beautiful Orchid, the male plant only 
is known. It was first described in 1898 by Mr. Eolfe, 
from a plant purchased by the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, 
at the sale of the Hon. Walter Eothschild's collection, 
and it flowered in December of that year. The said 
plant appears to have been a very poor one, for the 
leaves were only about six inches long, and the sub-erect 
scape bore four flowers. That here fi.:^ured was bought 
for the Royal Gardens at an auction in 1900. It flowered 
in the Tropical Orchid House in February of this year. 
Its native country is unknown. Mr. Eolfe regards it as 
nearest in affinity to G. cornutum, Lindl., Bot. Reg. vol. 
xxvi. (1840) Misc. p. 77, and xxvii. t. 5, fig. 2 (flower) — a 
native of Demarara. According to Lindley's description 
and figure of the flower of C. cornutmn the two species are 
very closely allied indeed, the chief difference being, that 
Lindley describes the lip as green, with the whole margin 
broken up into slender processes, and bearing a strict 
iuflexed spur at the base, and that he does not describe 
any teeth on the clinandriura. 
November 1st, ltKJ2. 



Since the foregoing was set up I have learnt that the 
same plant has produced a female inflorescence, but the 
flowers are not quite fully developed. They are green, and 
apparently present similar difiPerences from the male as 
those of G. Bandii, Rolfe, plate T470. 

Descr. — Pseudobiilbs ovoid, annulate, three to five-leaved. 
Leaves six to twelve inches long, oblong-lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, with three principal nerves, base narrowed into a 
short, concave petiole. Peduncle stout, decurved, together 
with the secund raceme about a foot long ; rhachis of 
raceme very stout. Bracts half an inch long, lanceolate. 
Pedicels twice as long as the bracts. Flowers two inches 
long across the sepals, which are sub-equal, oblong, acute, 
the dorsal erect, the lateral deflexed, all pale green, with 
large, dark, red-purple blotches. Petals erect, placed 
opposite to the dorsal sepal, and of the same size, shape, 
and colour. Lip shorter than the sepals, shortly clawed, 
broadly ovate, decurved, golden-yellow, speckled with 
dark purple, margins fimbriate-dentate ; disk saccate at 
the base, depressed about the middle. Column an inch 
long, very stout, with a long, incurved beak; antenn93 
subulate, deflexed, incurved. Anther with a long obtuse 
beak.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, column ; 2, anther; 3 and 4, pollinia ■.—all enlaryed ; 5, reduced view 

wholft nla.nf;. 



of whole plant. 



7865 




M.S.ael.J.N.FitAUth 



LRee.^eacG°T,n,.Hn 



Tah. 7865. 
LAVATERA aceetfolta. 

Native of the Canary Islands. 

Nat, Ord. MALVACEiE. — Tribe Malve^. 
Genus Layateba, Linn. ; {Benfh. Sc Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 200.) 



Lavatera (Olbia) acerifolia ; frntex multicaulia 4-8-pedali8 foliis longe 
petiolatis rotandatis 2-3 poll, latia 5- v, sub 7-lobi8 basi profunde cordatia 
sinu angnsto lobis late ovatis obtnsia v. subacutia erenato-dentatis 
Bupra glabresceutibua subtus Btellato-tomentellis, stipulia setaceia, 
petiolo ^-2 poll, longo, floribus axillaribua solitariis v. rariua binis, 
pedicellis 1-1^ poll, longia gracilibus basi minute bibracteolatia infra 
florem articulatis, floribua 2-3 poll, diam., involucelli 5-lobi tomentelli 
lobis late ovatia acatis calyce brevioribus, calycia tomentelli Jobis 
late ovatis acntis, petalis late spathulatim obovatis orbicularibuave 
retusis pallide lilacinia v. roseis basi sanguineis, staminum tubo pubea- 
cente, ovarii carpellia 12-15 orbicularibua stylo gracili stigmatibua fili- 
formibus, capsula orbiculari complaaata, coccia 12-16 orbiculari-oblongia 
^ poll, longis margine acutis glabris chartaceia, columella in conum 
profunde sulcatum expansa. 

L. acerifolia, Gav. in Anal. Cienc. Nat. vol. vi. (1803) p. 339; Eleneh. Hort. 
Madrit. p. 20. Brouss. JElench. Hort. Monsp. p. 84. Lois. Herb. Amat. 
vol. V. t. 322. DC. Prodr. vol. i. p. 438 ; Cat. Hort. Monsp. p. 131 
(Ic. 56 ined.). 

L. ph(Bnicea, WiJld. Enum. Hort. Berol. Suppl, p. 49 (non Vent.). 

Savihiona acerifolia, Wedd et Berth. Phytogr. Canar. vol. i. p. 31, t. 2 B. 



Lavatera acerifolia is a native of moist places in the 
sylvan region of the Canary Islands, where it was first 
collected by Broussonet. There are specimens in the 
Kew Herbarium from the Grand Canary, Teneriffe, and 
Gomera. It was raised to generic rank by Webb and 
Berthelot, on quite insufficient grounds, under the name 
of Saviniona, in honour of Dr. Savinion, a physician of 
eminence in the Archipelago. The specimen figured was 
from a plant introduced from the Canaries into the 
Botanical Gardens of Cambridge by Walter Gardiner, Esq., 
F.R.S., Fellow and Bursar of Clare College, communicated 
by Mr. Lynch, A.L.S., in July of the present year. 

Bescr. — A shrub four to eight feet high, branching from 
the base ; branches, leaves beneath, involucel and calyx 
stellately tomentose. Leaves orbicular, two or three inches 
in diameter, five- or almost seven-lobed, deeply cordate, 

KOVEIIBJEK IST, 1902. 



with a narrow sinus, palmately five-nerved, minutely 
pubescent above; lobes variable in length, crenate-toothed, 
obtuse or sub-acute; stipules small, narrow, tomentose, 
caducous; petiole half an inch to two inclies long. Flowers 
axillary, solitary or rarely binate, three inches in diameter ; 
pedicel one and a half to two inches long, slender, In- 
volucel three-lobed or -partite, segments ovate, acute, 
shorter than the five-lobed calyx. Petals broadly spathu- 
lately obovate, tips rounded, retuse, variable in colour, pale 
violet or rose-coloured, with crimson base and claw. 
Ovary twelve- to sixteen-celled ; styles slender, stigmas 
filiform. Capsule orbicular, depressed, of twelve to sixteen 
thin coriaceous cocci, surrounding a central axis Avhich is 
dilated at the top into a free, broad, deeply furrowed, 
peltate cone. — /. I). IL 



Figs. 1 aad 2, antliera ; 3, pistil and disk : — all enlarged. 



78UG 




MS.dal.J.N.RtcKith 



'^■""~ r-.'-r _,_ 



Tab. 7866. 

BAUHINIA ACUMINATA. 
Native of tropical Asia. 

Nat. Ord. Leguminosjs. — BAtrmNisa. 
G-enus Bauhinia, Linn. ; {Benth. & RooTc.f. Oen. Plant, vol. i. p. 675). 



Bauijinia (Paaletia) acuminata; frutex v. arbor parva, S-lO-pedalie, ramis 
patentibus, foliis bifariis 3-5 poll. Jongis ellipticis supra medium bifidis 
lobis obtusis acutisve 7-ll-nervii8 nervo medio apice eicurrente basi 
rotundatia v. cordatis supra Isete viridibus glaberrimis subtus primiim 
pubeecentibus, petiolo 3-4 poll, longo apice incrassato, stipulis anguste 
semisagittatiB, racemis breviter pedunculatis extra- axillaribus terminali- 
busve paucifloris, pedicellis ^-| poll, longis bibracteatis et bibracteolatig, 
floribus inodoris caljce pollicari spathaceo viridi longe rostrato, rostro 
pubescente apice penicillato, petalis calyci aequilongis oblongis albia, 
staminibus 10, filamentis alternis brevioribnf, antheris aeqaalibus, ovario 
angnsto piloso longe stipitato, stylo J poll, longo incurvo, legumine 
stipitato 4f-6 poll, longo lineari-oblongo piano margine 3-caiinato 8-12- 
spermo, aeminibus turgide ellipsoideis brunneis nitidis. 

B. acuminata, Linn. 8p. PI. p. 375. Roxb. Fl. Ind. vol. ii. p. 324. Wight 
et Arn. Fredr. Fl. Penins. Ind. Or. p. 295. DG. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 513. 
Baker in Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. ii. p. 276. Kurz, For. Fl. Brit. Burm. vol. i. 
p. 396. Brandts, For. Flor. N. W. & Gentr. Ind. p. 169. Miqtul, Fl. Ned. 
Ind. vol. i. Para I. p. 74. Semsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. (1S86) 
p. 212. 

B. Candida, Ait. Sort. Xetv. ed. 1, vol. ii. p. 49 ; ed. 2, vol. iii. p. 23 (non 
Willd.). Velutta mandaru, Rheede Eort. Malah. vol. i. p. 61, t. 34. 
Ham. in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. liii. p. 497. 



As is the case with raany fine exotic plants cultivated 
more than a century ago in our tropical houses, and 
flowering there, Bauhinia acuminata has never been 
figured in any work since the publication of Rheede' s 
"Hortus Malabaricus," that is since 1678. According to 
Aiton's " Hortus Kewensis " (1789), it was introduced from 
India into England by Dr. Francis Russell, F.R.S., and 
flowered at Kew in the mouths of May and June. In 
recent times it has been an occupant for many years of 
the Palm House in the Royal Gardens, but was never 
known to flower till October of last year. It is a 
plant of wide Asiatic distribution, being common in India 
from the lower Himalaya southward, and found in the 
Malay Peninsula, Burma, and China. It is not, however, 

November 1st, 1902. 



indigenous in Ceylon. Trimen, in his " Flora of Ceylon," 
(ii. p. 116) says of it, "only known here in gardens, where 
it is an old introduction ; there are specimens in Hermann's 
Herb., and he gives (Mus. 8) the native name of 
' Mayilla' for them, which rightly belongs to B, racemosa^ 
Lam." Roxburgh remarks that the pistil is often minute 
and abortive. 

Descr. — A shrub or small tree, eight to ten feet high, with 
a short trunk, spreading branches, and grey-brown bark. 
Leaves bifarious, three to five inches long, elliptic, bifid 
nearly to the middle, lobes acute or obtuse, seven- to eleven- 
nerved, median nerve produced into a sharp point, glabrous 
and shining above, more or less downy beneath ; petiole 
three to four inches long, swollen at the top, stipules semi- 
sagittate. Floivers solitary, or few in a short raceme, two 
and a half inches broad, pure white, shortly pedicelled ; 
bracts and bracteoles minute. Calyx an inch and a half 
long, spathaceous, narrowed into a hairy beak, lacerate at 
the tip. Petals oblong, tips rounded. Dish-glands five, 
globose. Stame7is ten ; filaments alternately long and 
short; anthers equal. Pistil geniculate, ovary linear, 
hairy, narrowed into a slender stipes and beak. Pod 
stipitate, four to five inches long, linear-oblong, flat, 
smooth, glabrous, eight- to twelve-seeded, margins three- 
keeled. Seeds turgidly ellipsoid, brown, shining. — 
/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, calyi, disk, and pistil; 2, and 3, antters; 4, pod; 5, seed; all but 
fig- 4, enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 



HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plaiats and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized in the Britieh 
Isles- For the use of Beginners and Amat eure. By George Benthak, 
F.R.S. 7th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker. Crown 8vo, 9«. net. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with DissectionB, of Britieb Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L. S., fornniing an Illustrated Companion 
to Bentham'e "Handbook," and other Brirish Floras. 1315 Wood En- 
gravings. 5th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9*. net. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras. By GisoRoe Bemtham, F.E..IS., President of the LinneBan 
Society. New Edition, 1«. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, including the Isle of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. Townsend, M.A., F.L.S. 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, I6s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that are 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By the Bev. M. J.Bbbkklbt, 
M.A., F.L.S. 2nd Edition, 24 Coloured Plates, 21«. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptions of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer ones) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland. By Charleis P. Houkikk, F.L.8., Ac, &.c. New 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6s. 6<jI. net. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs of the Families of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all *he species, with Wicroscopiral 
details of their strncture. By R. Bbaithwaite, M.D., F.L.S. Vol. I,, 
with 45 Plates, 50*. Vol. II,, 42s. 6*. Parts XVII.— XXI., 6». each. 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By SirJ. D. Hooker, F.R.S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vole., £12 net. 

FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of tl.e 

Australian Teriitory. By G. Bentham, F.K.S., F.L.S., assisted by F. 
MuELiEK, F.R.S. Vols. L to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 24«. Published 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES: a Descrip- 

tion of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. G. Baker, 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s. Published under the autboiity of the 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the Plants of 

the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By WiLtrAH H. Hakvky, M.D. , 
F.B.S., and Otto WitnEi-M Soubeb, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III., 18s. f^nch. 
Vol VI., 24s. net. Vol. VII., 35s. net. Vol. V., Part 1., 9s. net. 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Daniel Oliver, F.R.S, 

Vols. I. to III., each 20s. Published under the nuthority of tho first 
Commissionerof His Majesty's Works. Vol. IV., Part J. " "•■!. V., 

25s. 6d. net. Vol. VII., 27f^. 6d. net. Vol. VIII., 26s. € 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA: a.,. »matic 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, and the Charhan., 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and M»f" ■'■'";►'►; r-,.. iK. i^y 
Sir J. D. Hooker, F.R.S. Published under the ausi 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIAN ISLANDS. By 

Dr. Grisebach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspices of the Secre- 
tary of State for the Colon i«^fl. 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Flwerins- 

Plants and Ferns of the Isknd of Honfjkong. By (• 

F.L.S. With a Map of the Island and Supplement I.; 

Published under the authority of the Secretary of State lor in« i.o;f,tueg. 

TL«^ Supplement, eep&ratelv, 2s. 6d. 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA; its Origin, Affinities, and 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. Hookee, F.E.S. 12s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MENTONE, ' 

to a Winter Flora of th» Riviera, indndirfr the coast ftrom Maree-i. 
Genoa. By J. TaAHERSK MotiOSiCGK. Rcyal 8to Cnninlpte ir, 
99 Cdonred Plates, 63». 

LOYELL REEVE & CO. Lid., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Gwuen. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 695, NOVEMBER, 1902. 

Tab. 7862.-CRmUM NATANS. 
„ 7863.— CYMBIDIUM SIMONSIAl^UM. 
„ 7864.— CATASETUM QUADKIDENS. 
,, 7865.— LAVATERA ACERIFOLIA. 

„ 7866,--BAUHINIA ACUMINATA. 



LOTELL Bbbvb & Co. LTD., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Gardeti. 



Completion of the FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

Now ready. Parts XXUL.XXIV. ( completing the work), 18s. net. Vol. VII., oloth, 38». net. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.R.S., &c. 
Vols. I. to IV,, 32«. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36«. 
•^* Persona having incomplete Sets are advised to complete their Copies without delay, 
as trie Parts will be kept on Sale for a limited time only. No Part or Vol. will be sold 
wichoab ica continuation to the end of the work. 

Now ready, Vol. IV., Part I., 8s. net. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I, to III., 20s. each, net. 

By D. OLIVER, F.R.S. 

The Contiuaation by various Botanists edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-bVER, F.R.«. 

Vol. v., 25s. 6.1. Vol. VII., 27s. Qd. Vol. VIII., 23s. (id. net. Puhlisked -under 
Vie aikilwrity o/ the First Commissioner, of His Majesty's Works. 

Now Ready, Vol. V., Part I., 9s. net. Vol. VI., 24*. net. Vol. VII., 3,3s. net. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by Sir W. T. THI8ELT0N-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

Director of the Royal Gardens, Keic, 
Published under the authority of the Governments of tlie Cape of Qood Hope 

and Natal. 

Vols. I. to III. ISs. each. 

By WILLIAM H. HARVEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 

University of Dublin, and 

OTTO WILHELM SONDER, Ph.D. 



Now ready, Part XCIII., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5s. 

THE 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS. 

By CHARLES 0, BARRETT, F.E.S. 
'.'oi. i. 12.-. ; large paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, 53s. 
Vols. II.— VII, 12s. each; arge paper, each with 48 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

Proipecius may he had on applieati&n to the Publishers. 



LovELi. Bebve i Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Cuvent Garden. 

?1UHTID »T BltBiaT ABB MVlirSTOH, !,»., WI. IOUV'b BOPSK, CtmBKISW. 



. J 

No. 696.: 

VOL. LVIIL— DECEMBER. Price Ss. 6d. coloured, 2s. 6a 

OE No. 1300 *^^ "^^^ ENTIHB WOBK. 

COETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

C0MPBI8IN& 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WlTii 

SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BT 

Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.c.s.i., C.B., F.rc.s., F.L.^ 

Xatc ©irtttor of xbt ISonal 3Smanic Gartitns of IScm. 




Namre ana Art to adc 
And flowers exotic gra* 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd. 

PUBLI8HKHS TO THE HOMB, COLONIAL AND INDIAN GOVERJOslENTa. 

6, HEXRIETTA STEEET. COVENT GARDEN. 

1902. 

[AU rights /-- 



LQVEi-L REEVa iSL uu. o Putsi-iCATIONS. 

:ONOGRAPH Oj7 THE MEMBRACID^. 



agriculture., cliniatic va 



^1 of thei 



xlx^ HEPATIC-aE OF THE BRITISH ISLES. 

.C11-2S. 6d. Co- 



THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF Tilt: 

VAHIETIEii, AND HyBRILS. 

t^iilEK ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

rij.'c ivill „.. . . , „ ocions of 3 parts pach. 

i'roavH^ -iicatioa. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Df^scnpiion of the Flowering Plants and Fer; ' --'■-••- 

to .•?>■ MafurnHzfd jr fhp, Bn'ffsh Is 

■ (..F.U.S. 

"OISTRATinss or THE BRITISH FLORA. 

^ Wn-r'^ • -7, ::'!fh Dir-ffcfhns, of British Plants, 

W. G. SMITH, F.L S. 



:tta STi> 



786'} 




Afijinejit Bi'Oolc3,Day& San.] .L'^Imfi 



T.T^onv.- (V.C°Lorvdo 



Tah. 7867. 
IRIS Gatesh. 

'Native of Kurdistan. 

Nat. Ord. Ibide*:, — Tribe Mou.EEiE. 
Genus Ibis, Linn. ; {Bent/i. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Ikis (Oncocyclns) Gatesii; rhizomate crasso, foliis radicalibns 4-5, 1-1| 
pedalibus ^-5 poll, latis linearibns acuminatis planiuBculis jiallide glauco- 
viridibus, canle 2-3-pedali robutto tnonocephalo, spathis 4^5-pollicaribu8 
pallide viridibas, flora maximo, pedicelio brevi, perianthii tubo brevi, 
Begmentis exterioribus reflexis 3 poll, latis orbiculari-obovatis creberrime 
etriolatia pallide roseo-lilacinia medio flavo suffusis striis punctia 
miuntia discum versus majoribus conspersis, basi et ungne pilis 
erectis fiisco-pnrpureis ornatis, se^meutis interioribus longioribus 
eiectis incurvis late obovatis disco albo-flavido margines versus pallide 
azureia azureo-punctatis et a basi ultra medium costis 3 purpurascentibus 
percurris, stylo 2-poll. lato bipartite segmeotis quadratia divaricatis 
dentatis sinu acuto, capaula 5-pollicari. 

I. Gatesii, Fast, in Lecture on Iris, May lUh, 1889, ex Journ. Hort. Soc. Land. 
si. (1890), p. 144, noinen ; in Garcl. Ckron. 1890, vol. ii. p. 18, f. 3 ; in Garden, 
vol. xliii. (1893), p. 132 cum ie. color., et ic. xylog. reduct. Mickeli, in 
JBicll. n. Soc. T08C. Ort. Ser. II. vol. vii. (1892), p. 296, t. 10; in Rev. 
Mortic. vol. Ixiv. (1892), p. 302. Baker, Handb. Irid. p. 18.- 



In point of size of flowers, I. Gatesii is, as far as is at 
present known, the monarch of the Irises. It belongs to 
a section {Oncocyclns) of the genus conspicuous in tliis 
respect, of which five have been figured in this magazine, 
namely, I. susiana, Linn. t. 91 ; I Lortetii, Barb. t. 7251 ; 
J. Sari, Schott. var. hcrida, Boiss. t. 6960; /. iherica, 
Hoffm. t. 58 i7, and /. 2^aradoxa, Stev. t. 7081. All of 
the section are Oriental, ranging from Asia Minor and 
Syria to Persia. 

I. Gatesii was introduced into cultivation by Mr. Max 
Leichtlin, who obtained it from Mr. Sintenis, its dis- 
coverer in the mountains of Kurdistan, in Mesopo- 
tamia, near the town of Mardin, about sixty miles south of 
Diarbekir. It is named by Sir Michael Foster after his 
friend, the Rev. F. S. Gates, of the American Mission at 
that town. Mardin is described as situated on a lofty 
limestone hill, overlooking a large fertile plain, and is 
distinguished for the salubrity of its climate, and for con- 
taining substantially built Chaldean, Syrian, Catholic, 

DjJC£iIBEK liT, 1902. 



Armenian, and Jacobite cHurclies. Tt is not in Armenia 
(the hitherto reputed habitat of /. Gatesii) which lies to the 
northward of it. 

Plants of I. Gatesii were obtained in 1901 by the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, from Messrs. WuUe of Naples ; they 
flowered in an open border near a south wall in June, 
1902. The colour of the flowers is difficult of description 
and probably variable. 

Descr. — Rootstuch very stout, short, creeping. Stems 
two to three feet high, stout, one-flowered. Leaves four 
to five, radical, a foot to a foot and a half long, by one 
half to two-thirds of an inch broad, linear, acuminate, 
nearly flat, pale, glaucous-green, nerves faint. Sjyathes 
four to five inches long, pale green. Floicer shortly 
pedicelled, five to seven inches broad. Perianth-tube short ; 
outer segments orbicular, recurved, three inches broad, 
very pale rose-lilac suffused with yellow towards the 
disk, covered with innumerable close-set darker veins, and 
sprinkled with minute purplish spots, that are larger 
towards the base of the disk, which is furnished with long, 
erect, purple-brown hairs ; inner segments longer and 
more spathulate than the outer, erect and incurved, with 
recurved margins, similarly striate and speckled, but of a 
bluer colour, and with three stout purple ribs from the 
base to beyond the middle of the disk. Style nearly two 
inches broad, bipartite, segments divaricate, quadrate, 
closely striate, with the perianth-segments acutely toothed. 
CajJsale described as five inches loner. — J. D. H. 



Figs. 1 and 2, anthers : — enlarged. 



78G8 




■ S.del. J.N.RtcKlitK 



-Wncen.! Broo>s,Day &SGAU*fiof 



L T?eev« &. C*? London 



Tab. 7868. 
ARISTOTELIA eacemosa. 
Native of New Zealand. 

Nat, Ord, TiLiACBiB.— Tribe El^ocarpk^. 
Genus Aristotelia, L'Her,; (Benth. ^ Book.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 239.) 



AiusTOTBLTA racemosa ; frutex v. arbuscula dioica, ramulis petiolis foliis imma- 
turis paniculisque pubescentibus, foliis longe petiolatis oppositis sub- 
oppositisve oyatis acuininatis argute serratis basi rotnndatis subcordatisve 
niembrauaceis, pauiculis axillaribus oppositis et ramulos breves tertni- 
nantibus breviter pedunculatis confertidoria, floribus breviter pedicellatis 
^-J poll, latis, sepalia 4 oblongis, petalis late cuneatis apice obtuse 3-4- 
lobis roseis rarius integiis, disci glandulis globosis, filamentis antheris 
oblongis brevioribus puberulis, ovario 3-4-loculari, stylis basi connatis, 
Bupra medium liberie gracilibus decurvis sigmoideie, haccis pisiformibua 
3-4-locuIaribu8 3-4-spermis rubris demum nigris, seminibua sub trigono- 
globosis, testa dura extus carnosula. 

A. racemosa, ITooi:. f. FL N. Zel. vol. i. p. 33; Handb. N. Zeal Fl p. 33. 
T. Kirk, For. FL N. Zeal. p. 223, t. 113 ; Student's Fl. N. Zeal. p. 76, z»W. 

Friesia racemosa, A. Cunn. in Ann. Nat. Hist. vol. iv. (1840), p. 24. Hook./, 
in Hook Ic. PI. t. 601. 

Triphalia rubicunda, Banks <fe Sol. mss. cum ic. 

Makoroako incolarum. Wineberry, Colonorum. 



Aristotelia is a small genus, common to Australia, New- 
Zealand, the New Hebrides, and temperate S. America. 
It was founded in 1784; upon the Chilian species, 
A. Macqui, L'Herit. (Stirp. Nov. p. 31, t. 16). 

A. racemosa is one of the commonest shrubs or small 
trees in New Zealand, from the northern districts to 
Stewart's Island, chiefly in lowland districts, but ascending 
to two thousand feet, flowering in October and November. 
The late Mr. Kirk, in his admirable "Forest Flora of 
New Zealand," describes it as being " the first shrub to 
make its appearance after the forests have been cleared, 
especially in the southern parts of the islands," adding 
that, " in many parts of the colony its straight stems may 
be found growing by road-sides or in abandoned clearings, 
in a way that at once calls to mind the hazel copses of 
Europe." The wood is light, often figured, and used for 
cabinet work, as also in the manufacture of gunpowder. 
It has long been in cultivation at Kew, where it flowers 
annually in the Temperate House in May. The figure 

D£C£MBEK 1st, 1902. 



here given is of a plant growing in the open air in 
the Isle of Wight, kindly sent by Mr. Charles Dew of 
Ventnor. 

Descr. — A dioecious shrub or a small tree, reaching 
thirty feet in height, with pubescent branchlets, young 
leaves and panicles. Leaves two inches long, opposite or 
sub-opposite, ovate, acuminate, sharply serrate, mem- 
branous, pale green, base rounded or sub-cordate ; petiole 
slender. Panicles three to five inches long, axillary and 
opposite, or terminating short lateral branchlets, shortly 
peduncled, erect, very many-flowered. Flowers shortly 
pedicelled, about a quarter of an inch in diameter. 
Sepals oblong, obtuse, green. Petals broadly cnneate, 
shortly and obtusely three- to five-lobed at the broad end, 
rose-red. Dish-glands globose. Anthers linear-oblong, 
longer than the hairy filaments. Ovary oblong, three- to 
four-celled, narrowed into a three- to four- grooved style, 
which divides above into as many decurved, slender, sig- 
moid branches. Berry globose, pisiform, three- to four- 
celled and seeded. Seeds globosely trigonous ; testa 
crustaceous, with a fleshy coating. — J. I), H. 



rig. 1, male flower; 2, stamens and disk gland; 3, female flower (from 
herbarium specimen) ; 5, ripe fruit ; 6, seed : — all hut fig. 5 enlarged. 



:s6o 






<//. 



Vi^c=enlBro<.l«. Day & SonLf^^^P 



I. Reeva &C?Lo7ido 



Tab, 7869. 
CIRRHOPETALUM Hookeri. ^ 

Native of the Western Himalaya, 

Nat. Old. OacuiDE.B, — Tribe Epidendre«. 
GenuB CiRRUOPETALUM, Lhidl. ; (Benth. & EooJe.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 50i) 



CiRRHOPETALUM, SooJceri ; pseudobulbis confertis pollicaribns ovoideis obtnsia 
sulcatia griseo-viridibus l-foliatis, folio bipollicari elliptico-oblongis 
lanceolatove apice bidentato in petiolum brevem angustato coriaceo supra 
saturate viridi costa impressa, pedunculo folio longiore gracillimo vaginis 
pancis lanceolatis instructo, umbella 6-10-flora, bracteis verticillatis \ 
poll, longis subulatis, pedicellis cum ovariis bracteis longioribus, floribua 
pollicaribus ochroleucis, sepalo dorsali i-poll. longo oblongo obtuso infra 
medium purpureo striate, lateralibas lineari-lanceolatis acuminatis con- 
vexis basi auriculatis, petalis sepalo dorsali brevioribus ovatis apice 
rotnndatis, labello decurvo marginibus incrasaatis incurvia carnosia 
crenatis, columna apice bicuspidata. 

C. Hookeri, DutMe in Journ. As. Soc. Beng. vol. Ixxi. pars II. (1902) p. 38 ; in 
Ann. Bot. Gard. Calcutt. vol. x. ined. 



Cirrhopdalum Hookeri is a very recent discovery, of 
interest as occurring in the province of Garwlial, which is 
further to the west in the Himalaya than the genus was 
supposed to reach. Two species had long been known to 
be natives of Kumaon, the adjoining province to the easfc 
of Garwhal, namely, G. maculosum, Lindl., and C, refrac- 
tnm, ZolL, and many species are found in the Eastern 
Himalaya. Its nearest ally is, as Mr. Duthie has pointed 
out, G. c3Sspitosum, Wall., a native of the Sikkim-Hiraalaya 
and the Khasia Hills, in Eastern Bengal, which differs in 
being of a much smaller size, and having proportionately 
much larger, erose, dorsal sepal and petals ; the flowers 
are yellow in both, but much paler in G. casspitosum, and 
showing no purple markings. This latter is, however, a 
variable character in G. IlooJceri, the cultivated specimen 
here figured wanting the bright red veins on the lateral 
sepals described by Mr. Duthie in the native specimens, 
and figured in an unpublished plate prepared for a forth- 
coming volume of the " Annals of the Royal Botanic 
Garden of Calcutta." G. Hookeri was discovered by 
Mr. Mackinnon's collector, growing epiphytically on 
Iihodode7i(lron arhoretim, at elevations of five thousand feet 

December 1st, 1902. 



to six thousand feet. Specimens sent early in 1902 to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, by Mr. Duthie, flowered in July of 
the same year. 

Ihscr. — Pseudobulbs tufted, an inch long, ovoid, obtuse, 
grooved, greyish green. Leaf two inches long, elliptic- 
oblong or -lanceolate, tip bidentate, coriaceous, dark 
green above, with an impressed costa ; base narrowed into 
a very short petiole. Peduncle very slender, longer than 
the leaf. Umbel six- to ten-flowered. Bracts whorled, a 
quarter of an inch long, subulate. Pedicels with the ovary 
longer than the bracts. Flowers an inch long, ochro- 
leucous. Dorsal sepal a quarter of an inch long, obtuse, 
streaked with purple ; lateral liuear-lanceolate, acuminate, 
convex, auricled at the base. Petals shorter than the 
dorsal sepal, ovate, tip rounded. Lip decurved ; margins 
thickened, fleshy, crenate. Column bicuspidate. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, flower ; 2, the same, with the sepals and petals removed; 3, column ; 
4, anthers ; 5 and 6, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



1S10 




V ."^-.n,! .'.N.Fiiclih'h 



Tab. 7870. 

CROWEA ANGUSTIFOlilA. 
Native of West Australia. 

Nat. Ord. RuTACE^. — Tribe BoRONiEiE. 
Genus Ckowea, 8m. \ [Benth. 8f Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 293.) 



Crowea, angustifoUa ', ffaticulusglaberritnaa, ramulis vzrgatia erectis gracili- 
bns angulatis, foliis sparsis l-2-pollicaribu8 seasilibua linearibus integris 
dentatis subserratisve acutis acmninatisve enerviis glandulis miuutip, 
floribus axillaribiis solitariis rariua 2-3-iiis, pedicellia brevilmg basi 
minute bracteolatis, sepalis miDutia rotundatis, petalia ^ poll, longia 
lineari-oblongis obtusis roseia v. albia, filamentia pilosulia, antheria 
lineari-oblongia dorso hispidulis connective in rostrum elongatum hispi- 
dulum erectura producto, ovario breviter stipitato glabro, stylo valiJo 
piloaulo, stigmate lobulato, coccis tranaverse rugoais. 

C. angustifoUa, Turcz. in Bidl. t^oc. Nat. Mosc. vol. xxii. (1849), p. 13. Benth. 
Fl. Austral, vol. i. p. 330. 

Eiiostemon Turczaninovii, F. Mwell. PI. Vict. vol. i. p. 120. 



Crowea is a small Australian genus of four species, 
very closely allied to the much larger one of Eriostemon, 
from which it differs only in the much larger hairy appen- 
dage terminating the anther. It was named by Sir James 
Smith in compliment to James Crowe, Esq., F.L.S., of 
Lakenham, near Norwich, a zealous British Botanist, 
especially Cryptogamis, and an ardent cultivator of the 
"Willows. He died in 1807. One species alone has hitherto 
been figured in this or any other work, the G. salignaf 
Andr. tab. 989. 

G. angustifoUa is a native of King Gleorge's Sound, 
where it was first collected by James Drummond. The 
plant figured was raised from seed sent from Albany to 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1899 by Sergeant-Major 
Goadby, which flowered in the Temperate House in March 
of the present year. 

Descr. — A slender, glabrous shrub, with erect stem and 
angular branches. Leaves scattered, one to two inches 
long, sessile, linear, entire toothed or sub-seriate, acute 
or acuminate, nerveless, studded with minute oil-glands. 
Flowers many, axillary, solitary, or two to three together, 
about an inch broad. Pedicels short, with minute bracts 
at the base. Sepals minute, orbicular. Petals half an 
Decbmber IsT, 1902. 



inch long, spreading, linear-oblong, obhuse, wliite or rose- 
coloured. J9i67i; annular. Filaments hairj, anthers linear- 
oblong, dorsally hispidiilous, connective produced into an 
erect, hispid beak, one- third shorter than tiie cells. Ovary 
shortly stipitate, glabrous ; style stout, hairy ; stigma five- 
lobed. Cocci transversely rugose, truncate. — J. 1). H. 



¥\g. 1, Tinder-surface of tip of leaf; 2, flower with the petals removed; 
3, 4, and b, anthers ; 6, pistil :—ai^ enlarged. 



7871 




V;w»rtl3r.ol«,-Day' 



Bfidffi. 



Tab. 7871. 
KALANCHOE Kireii. 

Native of Nyassaland. 

Nat. Ord. CRASSULACEiE. 

G.'uus Kalanxiioe, Adans.; {Benth. & Eooh,f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p, 659). 



Kalanchoe, Kirkii; caule robusto tereti laxe glanduloso-piIoRO aimplici v. 
ramoso, foliis oppositis petiolatia patenti-decurvis 3-i poll. longis ovatis 
oblongis V. ovato-lanceolatis obtngis crenatis carnosis utrinque pilosulia 
basi rotundatis, nervis utrinqne 5-6, snpremia angnatioribas floralibua 
linearibna supra lj«te viridibus subtBS pallidiB, petiolo valido supra con- 
cave, cymis trichotomia snbcorymbosis, glanduloso-pubescentibua multi- 
floria, doribua confertis sessilibus secandis, bracteia linearibns, bracteolia 
Bubulatis, sepalis ^ poll, longis lineari-oblongis aubacntis liberis gland u- 
loso-pubescentibus, corollas tnbo | poll, longo, Hmbi |-J poll. diam. lobis 
oblongis aurantiaco-rubris, etaminibua 8 v. 10 biseriatia v. 4 nniseriatis 
antheris incluais, disci glandulia subulatia, carpellis 3-4 in stylos breves 
attenuatis, stigmatibas capitellatia. 

K. Kirkii, N.E. Br. in Gard. Chron. 1902, vol. ii. p. 110. 

K. coccinea, Welw. var. subsesailis, Britt. in OUv. Fl. Trap. Afr, vol. ii. p. 
395. 

Species of Kalanclioe of horticultural as well as botanical 
interest have been introduced into cultivation of late with 
remarkable rapidity. Of the nine species figured in the 
Botanical Magazine, seven have been introduced within the 
last ten years ; three from N.E. tropical Africa (Soma- 
liland), K. marmorataj t. 7333, K, flammea, t. 7595, and 
K. soinaliensis, t. 7831 ; one, S. Kirkii, from Central 
Africa ; one from S. Africa, E. fhi/rsijlora, t. 7678, and 
two from Arabia and Socotra, K. Bentiij t. 7765, and K, 
farinacea, t. 7769. 

K. Kirkii is allied to K. crenata, Haw. (Cotyledon 
n-enata, t. 1436), a native of Sierra Leone, with which it 
is nearly identical in habit, foliage, calyx, and pubescence, 
but K. crenata differs in the much longer and narrower 
tube of the golden-yellow corolla. According to Mr. N. E. 
Brown, it appears to be the same as a plant discovered 
by Sir John Kirk, G.C.M.G., in 1858, near Shupauga, on 
the Zambesi River, in Portuguese E. Africa, and found 
afterwards in Nyassaland by Mr. Meller in 1861. The 
specimen here figured was raised from seed in the garden 
of Earl Fitzwilliam, Wentworth, Rotherham, from whom 

DfCEHBEB 1st, 1902, 



a cutting was received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 
1898, which flowered freely in April, 1902. 

Descr, — Whole plant more or less glandular-pubescent, 
with long, spreading hairs. Stem tall, simple or sparingly 
branched, stout, terete. Leaves opposite, spreading and 
decnrved, oblong or ovate-lanceolate, obtuse, crenate, 
fleshy, slightly hairy, base rounded, upper narrower ; floral 
linear, bright green above, paler beneath; petiole very 
stout, concave. Cymes terminal, trichotomously branched, 
glandular-pubescent, many-flowered ; bracts linear ; brac- 
teoles subulate. jF'/oziJ<?rs crowded, sessile, secund. Sepals 
free, a quarter of an inch long, linear-oblong, acute, 
glandular-pubescent. Corolla-fuhe a third of an inch long ; 
limb nearly half an inch broad, segments oblong, orange- 
red. Stamens eight Or ten in two series, or four in one series ; 
anthers included. Dishglands subulate. Carpels three or 
four, narrowed into short styles with capitellate stigmas. — 



Fi^. 1, calyx; 2, octandrous ami tetrandroua coroUag lail open; 4, disk- 
glauds and carpels i—all enlarged. 



BRITISH, COLONIAL, AND FOREIGN FLORA. 



HANDBOOK of the BRITISH FLORA; a Description of the 

Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous to, or naturalized iu the Britiah 
Isles. For the use of Beginners and Amateurs. By Gbohqe Bknthaw, 
F.R.S. 7th Edition, revised by Sir J. D. Hooker, Crown 8vo, 9». net. 

ILLUSTRATIONS of the BRITISH FLORA ; a Series of Wood 

Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants, from Drawings by W. H. 
Fitch, F.L.S., and W. G. Smith, F.L.S., forming an Illustrated ConiimnioD 
to Bentham'a "Handbook," and other British Floras. 1815 Wood En- 
gravings. 5th Edition, revised and enlarged, crown 8vo, 9s. net. 

OUTLINES of ELEMENTARY BOTANY, as Introductory to 

Local Floras, By GeobuB Bbmhau, F.R.S., President of tho liinna'ar 
Society. New Edition, Is. 

FLORA of HAMPSHIRE, includiDg the Me of Wight, with 

localities of the less common species. By F. TownsEiND, M.A., I . l.S, 
With Coloured Map and two Plates, 16s. 

HANDBOOK of BRITISH MOSSES, containing all that ^re 

known to be natives of the British Isles. By tlie Rev. M. J. Bekkklky, 
M.A„ F,L.S, 2nd Edition, 24 Coloui'ed Plates, 21*. 
SYNOPSIS of BRITISH MOSSES, containing Descriptioni. of 

all the Genera and Species (with localities of the rarer once) found in Great 
Britain and Ireland, By Chaules P, Houkikk, F.L.S., &c., ic. Few 
Edition, entirely revised. Crown 8vo, 6*. 6d. net. 

THE BRITISH MOSS-FLORA. Monographs ol the Fan)ilie8 of 

British Mosses, illustrated by Plates of all the species, with Slicroscopu nl 
details of their structare. By R. BBAninvArrK, U.I)., F.L.S. Vol. I., 
with 45 Plates, 50j». Vol. II,, 42«, 6d. Parts XVIL— XXI <i— -v 

FLORA of BRITISH INDIA. By Sir J. D. IIooj. S., 

and others. Complete in 7 Vols., £12 net. 
FLORA AUSTRALIENSIS : a Description of the Plants of the 

Australian Territory, By G. Bkntham, F.K.S., F.Ii.S., assiste'i ' ■ "*' 
MuKLtER, P.R,8. Vols. I, to VI., 20s. each. Vol. VII., 248. I 
under the auspices of the several Governments of Australia. 

FLORA of MAURITIUS and the SEYCHELLES : a 1 

tioD of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of those Islands. By J. ( 
F.L.S. Complete in 1 vol., 24s, Published under the authon 
Colonial Government of Mauritius. 

FLORA CAPENSIS : a Systematic Description of the I 
the Cape Colony, Caffraria, and Port Natal. By William H. Hakv 
F.R.S., and Otto Wilhklm Sondes, Ph.D. Vols. I.— III.. 1 
Vol VI., 24s. net. Vol. VII., 35s. net. Vol, V., Part J., 9s. net 

FLORA of TROPICAL AFRICA. By Da> ■ ■ *^' - 

Vols. I, to III., each 20s. Published under t' 

Commissioner of Bis Majesty's W^ork 8. Vol. IV., - 

Vol. v., 25s. 6c?, net. Vol. VII., 27s. 6d. net. Vol. Vill., 25s. f 

HANDBOOK of the NEW ZEALAND FLORA : ;. S^ 

Description of the Native Plants of New Zealand, 
Kermadec's, Lord Auckland's, Campbell's, and Jfafo 
Sir J. D. Hookkk, F.R.S. Published under the ax. 
of that Colony. Complete, 42s. 

FLORA of the BRITISH WEST INDIA.n ijm- 

Dr, Gkiskbach, F.L.S. 42s. Published under the auspjcf 
tary of State for the Colonies- /. i t-i 

FLORA HONGKONGENSIS: a Description of the Fiowenng 

Plants and Ferns of the Island of Hongkong, By GeoBge 1 
F.L.S. With a Map of the Island ana Supplement by Dr. Ha 

Published under the authority of the Secretary of State for the , 

The Supplement, peparaieiy, 2s. 6d. ^ . , . /t' •.. • ^ 

ON the FLORA of AUSTRALIA ; its Ongm, Affinities, and 

Distribution. Bv Sir J. D. HooKKB, F.RS. 12s. 

CONTRIBUTIONS to THE FLORA of MLNHM. 

to a Winter Floia of the Riviera, including the coaet froi: 
Genoa. By J. Traheenb MoGaaiDGE. Boy:u 8vo. Conu 
99 Coloured Plates, 63s. 

I'DVELL REEVE & CO. Ltd., 6, Henrietta .street, lovm. u,!.!,u. 



BOTANICAL MAGAZIiNE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 696, DEOEMBEE, 1902. 



Tab. 7867.— IRIS GATESII. 
„ 786S.— AEISTOTELIA RACEMOSA. 
„ 7869.— CIRRHOPETALUM HOOKERI. 
„ 7870.— CROWE A ANGUSTIFOLIA. 
„ 7871.— KALANCHOE KIRKII. 



LovElit Rebve & Co. Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 

Completion of the FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA, 
.-..'.v ready, Parts XXIII., XXIV. (completingthe work), 18s. net. Vol. YII., cloth, 38s. net. 

FLORA OF BRITISH INDIA. 

By Sir J. D. HOOKER, F.E.S., &c. 

Vols. I. to IV., 32s. each. Vol. V., 38s. Vol. VI., 36s. 
.j,* Persons having incomplete Sets are adrised to complete their Copies without delay, 
ns Dtio Parts will be kept on Sale for a limited time only. No Part or Vol, will be sold 
without its continuation to the end of the work. 



Now ready, Vol. lY., Parts I. and II., 8s. net. 

FLORA OF TROPICAL AFRICA. 

Vols. I. to III., 20s. each, net. 
By D. OLIVER, E.R.S. 

.uiuation by various Botanist s edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, F.R.S. 
:1, V,, 25s. 61. Vol. VIl., 27.s. dd. Vol. VIII., 253. 6d. net. Published under 
the avAhority of the First Commissioner of His Majesty's Works. 

Now Ready. Vol. V., Part I., 9^. net. Vol. VI., 24:s. net. Vol. VII., 33;;. net. 

FLORA CAPENSIS; 

A Systematic Descriptioa of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffraria, 

and Port Natal. 
Edited by Sir W. T. THISELTON-DYER, C.M.G., F.R.S., 

T>ireotor of the Royal Gardens, Kew. 
kblished nnder the authority of tlie Governments of the Cape of Good Hope _ 

and Natal. '^ 

Vols. I. to III. 18s. each. - 

VILLI AM H. HAKYEY, M.D., F.R.S., Professor of Botany in the 
University of Dublin, and 
OTTO WILIIELM SONDEE, Ph.D. 



Now ready, Part XCIV., with 4 Coloured Plates, 5«. 

LEPIDOPTERA of the BRITISH ISLANDS 

By CHABLES G. BARRETT, F.E.S. 

\- i' ^TT^*' ' ^^^^^ paper, with 40 Coloured Plates, o3s. 

V ols. Il.—vil. 12s. each ; large paper, each with 48 Coloured Plates, 638. 

Frosmrtus may he hud on ajipUcatioJi to the Publishers. 
Go, Ltd., 6, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden. 



it ttlLBBST AJfD MVIJfarOH, LB., 6T. JOHW'S BOF9E, clEKK 8> WM.»" 




INDEX 

To Vol. LVIII. of the Third Series, or Vol. CXXVIII. of 
the whole Work. 



7834 Aloe oligospila. 

7837 „ pendens. 
7858 Anemone cernna. 

7813 Angraecum Eichlerianum. 

7868 Aristotelia racemosa. 
7825 Aster Tradescanti. 
7866 Bauhinia acuminata. 

7814 „ yunnanensis. 
7842 Begonia angularis. 
7833 Berberis dictyophylla. 
7856 Bryophyllara crenatum. 

7846 Byblis giganfcea. 
7820 Calathea crocata. 
7804 Catasetum quadridens. 

7869 Cirrhopetalum Hookeri. 
7830 Corydalis thalictrifoHa. 
7812 Crinum Johnstoni. 

7862 „ natans, 

7870 Crowea angustifolia. 

7863 Cymbidium Simonsianum.* 

7852 Cynorchis purpurascens. 
7845 „ villosa. 
7848 Decaisnea Fargesii. 

7853 Dischidia hirsuta. 

7840 Echinocactus microspermus. 

7847 Echium "VVildpretii. 
7855 Epidendrum Endresii. 
7839 Eranthemum atropurpureura. 

7835 Eucalyptus cordata. 

7838 Euryops socotranus. 
7850 Fritillaria askabadensis. 



7851 Gclsemium serapervircns. 

7860 Gladiolus Mackindcri. 
7849 Heterotoraa lobelioidea. 

7816 Hibiscus Scotti. 
7836 Honekenya ficifolia. 

7844 Impatiens cuspida'a, var. 
arthritica. 

7826 Impatiens grandiflora. 
7867 Iris Gatesii. 

7861 „ Leichtlini. 
7833 Jasminum Maingayi. 
7871 Kalanchoe Kirkii. 

7831 „ somaliensis. 

7832 Kniphofia niulti flora. 
7865 Lavateva acerifolia. 

7824 Masdevallia elephantif-epi. 
7859 „ Scliicjelcriaua. 

7819 Minkelersia biflora. 

7817 Montrichardia aculeata. 
7843 Muscari latifolium. 
7822 Passiflora ambigua. 

7827 Philodendron calophyllum. 

7818 Plectranthus Mahonii. 
7841 „ saccatus. 
7854 Podocarpus pectinata. 

7815 Schomburgkia Thonisoniima, 

var. minor. 
7821 Solanum Xanti. 
7857 Streptocarpus Mahoni. 
7829 Tupistra grandis. 

7828 Viscum cruciatum. 



• Mr. RoJfe- has determined this to be C. Paycinum. Rohb. f., Gard. CLron. 
(I86y), p. 710, a plant erroneoasly referred to C. «fearneum, LmdJ.