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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 

COMPRISING THK 

plants; of tfte Bopal 4£ar&en£ of luto, 

AND 

OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN ; 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

SIR JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., G.C.S.I., 

F.R.S., F.L.S., etc., 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D. CANTAB., MEMBER OF THE INSTITUTE OF FRANC*. 

VOL. LVIL 
OF THE THIRD SERIES. 

{Or Vol. CXXFIL of the Whole Work.) 




" A thousand flowers, each seeming one 
That learnt by gazing on the sun 
To counterfeit his shining." 

E. B. Bkowitiitg. 



LONDON : 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., LTD., 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments . 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 
1901. 

[All rights reserved.] 



Mo.Bot. Garo , 



To 

THE HONOUKABLE CHAELES ARTHUK ELLIS, F.L.S., 

Of Frensham Hall, Shottermill, Haslemere. 

Dear Mr. Ellis, 

As Editor of the Botanical Magazine, it is my privilege 
and pleasure to offer the dedication of the volumes to those whose 
intelligent and ardent love of Horticulture have contributed to a 
knowledge of Scientific Botany. 

That such has been the result of your devotion to gardening, the 
plant portraits in this Magazine bear good testimony, and I therefore 
ask you to accept the dedication of this volume in grateful acknow- 
ledgment. 

Believe me, 

Very sincerely yours, 

Jos. D. HOOKER. 
The Camp, Sunningdale, 
December 1st, 1901. 



€i)trt> Jjtn'rs. 

No. 673." 

VOL. LVII.— JANUARY. Price 3s. 6d. 

OB NO. 1307 ° F ™ E B5TIEE WQUK, 



2s. 6. 



CCRTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 



COMPRISING 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN. WITH 

S ITABLE DESCRIPTIONS ; 



Sir JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.C.S.L, C.B., F.R.S., 

Xatc Birrrtor of the i&nval botanic (Sarficns o( Uetn. 




>aicre ana Art to adorn the page combine, 
And flowers exotic grace onr northern clime. 



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BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

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OF THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 

PTIONS OF ALL THE SPECIES, VARIETIES, AND HYBRID8. 

lLFBED I'RYEE, A.L.S. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

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ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
PITCH, F.L.S. . avi> W. g. SMITH, F.L.S 



1WS BY \V 



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Tab. 7752. 
HIBISCUS Manihot. 

Native of China and Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Malvace.e. — Tribe Hibisce^b. 
Gentis Hibiscus, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 207). 



HiBlscr/8 (Abelmoschus) Manihot; herba annua v. 2-3-ennis, erecta, robusta, 
sparse pilosa, caule simplici v. ramoso, ramig erectis, foliis amplia palraatim 
5-7-lobatis lobia lineari-oblongis lanceolatisve grosse dentatis serratia v. 
lobulatis, petiolo robuato, stipulia lanceolatia, bracteia parvis pinnatifidis 
deciduis stipulia persistentibus instructis, pedicellia robustis florentibns 
deflexia, involucelli bracteolia 4-6 ovatis v. ovato-lanceolatis hirsutia 
persistentibuB, calyce Bpatbaceo 5-dentato baai circtimscisao hiapido, 
corolla 2-5£ poll. diam. salpbnrea fundo purpurea, tabo staminifero 
undique laxe v. confertim antherifero, stigmatibus clavatis decurvis 
purpureis apice dilatatis retusis, capsula oblonga acuminata pentagona 
hispida. 

H. Manibot, Linn. Sp. PI. p. 696. Cav. Diss. vol. iii. p. 172. Thunh. Fl. Jap. 
p. 272. Ait. Sort. Keiv. Ed. ii. vol. iv. p. 229. Bot. Mag. t. 1702, et t. 
3152 (var. 0). DC. Prodr. vol. i. p. 448. Franch. et Sav. Enum. PL 
Jap. p. 64. Miq. Ann. Mus. Bot. Liu/d. Bat. vol. iii. p. 19. Masters in 
Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. i. p. 341 ; in Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. ii. p. 249, fig. 74. 
TV. Wats, in The Garden vol. liii. ( 1898) p. 127, cum ic. 

H. palmatus, Cav. Diff. p. 168, t. 63, fig. 1. 

H. papyriferaa, Salisb. Prodr. p. 384. 

H. pentaphyllus, Roxb. Hort. Beng. p. 52 ; Fl. Ind. vol. iii. p. 212. 

H. pungens, Hort. 

H. fol. palmato-digitat., &c, Linn. Hort. Uptal. p. 206. Sort. Cliff, p. 350. 

Bamia Manihot, Wall. Cat. n. 1926. 

Abelmoschus Manihot, Medic. Malvenfam. p. 46. 

Ketmia, fol. Manibot,, &c, DHL Hort. Eltham. p. 189, 1. 156, fig. 189. 

Alcea, fol. Manihot., &c, Pluk. AmaHh. p. 7, 1. 155, p. 2. 



The specimens of II. Manihot, from which the figures 
published on Plates 1702 and 3152 of this work were 
taken, give no idea of the size and beauty of the flowers 
as here represented. It is a native of China and Japan. 
Linnseus and, following him, Cavanilles and De Candolle, 
give India as its native country, overlooking the testimony 
of the " Flora Japonica" and other works. It is, indeed, 
commonly cultivated in Indian gardens, having been intro- 
duced, according to Roxburgh, from China. The roots, 
which are large and soft, yield a mucilage used for stiffening 
January 1st, 1901. 



paper in Japan, on which account Salisbury unjustifiably 
rejected Thunberg's name for that olpapyriferus. 

II. Manihot must have been introduced into England 
before the year 1732, when Dillenius described it as a bi- 
triennial, growing in Sherard's garden at Eltham. Aiton 
mentions its being cultivated in the Chelsea Garden in 
1812, whence a specimen was sent to the Royal Society as 
one of the fifty plants claimed annually by the Society as 
a condition under which that garden was held by the 
Society of Apothecaries (see Phil. Trans, n. 333, p. 417, 
n. 64). The specimen here figured is from a plant in the 
Mexican compartments of the Temperate House of the 
Koyal Gardens, which made in three months shoots nine 
feet high, flowered for two consecutive months, and 
ripened seed. 

Descr. — A tall, erect, stout, sparsely hairy, annual or 
bi-triennial, four to nine feet high ; branches terete, erect. 
Leaves up to a foot in diameter, orbicular or orbicular- 
ovate in circumscription, palmately five- to seven-lobed, 
lobes linear-oblong or lanceolate, acuminate, coarsely 
toothed serrate or lobulate, dark green ; petiole stout, 
about as long as the blade ; stipules lanceolate or subulate. 
Bracts at the base of the pedicels small, pinnatifid, stipu- 
late, deciduous, except the stipules. Flowers two to five 
and a half inches in diameter, pedicels deflexed when 
flowering, erect in fruit. Involucel of four to six ovate- 
or ovate-lanceolate, acute, persistent, hirsute, bracteoles 
half an inch to an inch long. Calyx rather longer than 
the involucel, spathaceous, five-toothed, circumsciss at 
the base. Corolla pale yellow, purple at the base, lobes 
rounded. Staminifewas column loosely or closely covered 
with anthers. Stigmas decurved, purple, tips dilated, 
retuse. Capsule oblong, acute, one to two inches long, 
acuminate, hispid.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, portion of carpels and of staminal tube with style and stigmas; 
2 and b, anthers ; 4, seed {nat. size) ; 5, seed :— All but fig. 4 enlarged. 



7.5.? 




: '!Pitchlfth 



YmceatBronte.Day&i; I 



L Reeve & C? London 



Tab. 7753. 
LHOTSKYA ibiooides. 

Native of King Georges Sound. 

Nat. Ord. Myktacb*. — Tribe Ckam-Elaucie.*. 
Genua Lhotskya, Scliau.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 699.) 



Lhotsyka ericoides ; fruticulus erectus, foliosus, ramulis erectis virgatia 
glanduloso-pilosulis, foliis |-pollicaribus erecto-patentibus subconferda 
anguste linearibus fere acicularibaa teretibus strictis obtnsis vel apiculatis 
glaberrimia, floribus axillaribus sessilibue secus ramuloa confertia in 
fasciculos cylind raceos diapositis 2-bra.cteolatis, bracteolis stibulatia 
calycis tubum elongatam 5-costatum costis scabemlia subaequantibus, 
calycis lobis parvis ovato-rotundatis, petalis calyce fere duplo longioribna 
lineari-lanceolatis acutia, stamiuibus numerosia petalis sequilongis, 
antheris minimis flavis. 

L. ericoides, Schauer in Lindl. Introd. Nat. Syst. Bot. Ed. ii. p. 439 ; in 

Linneea, vol. x. (1835-6) p. 309; in Nov. Act. Acad. Nat. Cur. vol. xix. 

Suppl. II. (1841) p. 235 ; Plant. Preiss. vol. i. p. 103. Benth. Ft. Austral. 

vol. iii. p. 55. 
L. scabra, Turcz. in Bull. Soc. Nat. Mosc. 1862, vol. ii. p. 324. 
L. hirta, Eegel, Gartenjl. vol. xii. (1863), p. 337, t. 415; in Trans. JSort. Soc. 

Buss. 1863, t. 141 ic. it. 



Lliotshja is a genus of eight species, natives of South 
and Western Australia, from Victoria westwards, of which 
L. ericoides is confined to the King George's Sound and 
the adjoining district. The genus is so closely allied to 
the much larger one of Calythrix (see tab. 3323), differing 
only in the absence of a bristle terminating each calyx- 
lobes, that it might well be regarded as a section of the 
latter. The name it bears is that of Johann Lhotsky, a 
traveller and naturalist who collected in Madeira (where I 
met him in 1839), Brasil, Australia, and Tasmania. He 
was author of a paper on the Botanical Geography of New 
Holland, published in " Hooker's London Journal of 
Botany," vol. ii. (1843), p. 135. 

The specimen here figured was raised from seeds col- 
lected in Australia by Mr. James Veitch in 1893, and was 
presented by him to the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it 
flowered in a cool house in June, 1900. It was then about 
two feet high. 

Descr. — A small, erect, nearly glabrous shrub, with 
slender, strict, erect branches, covered with needle-like 
January 1st, 1901. 



leaves ; branches sparsely glandular-hairy. Leaves about 
half an inch long, erecto-patent, strict, very narrowly 
linear, almost acicular, terete, obtuse or apiculate, bright 
green, quite glabrous. Flowers small, axillary, solitary 
from each leaf axil, but together forming cylindrical 
fascicles about the middle of the leafing branchlets, sub- 
sessile, bibracteolate. Bracteoles subulate, about as long 
as the calyx- tube. Calyx-tube narrow, cylindric, five-ribbed, 
ribs scaberulous ; lobes very small, orbicular. Petals 
about twice as long as the calyx-tube, subulate, acuminate, 
white or nearly so. Stamens very many ; filaments rather 
longer than the petals ; anthers minute, very pale yellow. 
Style very slender. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, portion of branch and leaf ; 2, flower and bracteoles ; 3, the same 
with the petals removed ; 4 and 5, anthers :— All enlarged. 



n&i 




Gff.S.fieUHPitehttfh 



Vincent Brooks DayA Son Lti*Imp 



L Beeve & C° London 



Tab. 7754. 
SARCOCHILUS lilacinus. 

Native of the Malayan Peninsula and Islands. 



Nat. Ord. Orchidb<e. — Tribe Vande.x. 
Genus Sarcochilus, Br.; (Benth. & Soolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 575.) 



Sarcochilus (Cuculla) lilacinus ; glaberrimus, caule scandente subrobusto 
elongato basi decumbente, radicibus elongatis vaginas foliornm perforan- 
tibus, foliis carnosulis alternia oblongia v. ovato-oblongia patenti-recurvis 
apicibus subacutis recurvis basi cordatis amplexicaulibua dorso carinatia 
enerviis pallide viridibus, pedanculis 8-10-pollicaribus robustis vaginia 
2-3 obtu9is ornatis, racemo 1-8-pollicari pauci- v. multifloro, rhacbi 
crassa compressa, bracteia distichis ovatis obtusis carnosis, floribua breviter 
pedicellatis ad 1\ poll, latis pallide roseo-lilacinis, sepalis petalisque 
patulis late ovatis subacutis, labello sepalia dimidio breviore stipitato 
eaccato, lobis lateralibus brevibus incurvia terminali rotundato, disco callo 
truncato pubescente instructo. 

S. lilacinus, Griff. Notul. vol. iii. p. 334 ; Ie. PI. Asiat. t. 320, f. 2. Sook.f. Fl. 
Brit. Ind vol. vi. p. 40. Ridley in Trans. JAnn. Soc. Bot. per. ii. vol. iii. 
(1893) p. 371. 

S. lilacinus & amplexicaulia, lleichb.f. in Walp. Ann. vol. vi. p. 499. 

Dendrocolla amplexicaulia, Blume Bijdr, p. 288. 

brides amplexicaule, Lindl. Gen. & Sp. Orchid, p. 239. 

Orsidice amplexicaulia and lilacinus, Beichb. f. in Bonplandia, vol. ii. p. 93. 

Thrixspermum amplexicaule & T. lilacinum, Beichb. f. Xen. Orchid, vol. ii. 
p. 121. 



Sarcochilus lilacinus is a native of swamps in the 
Malayan Peninsula, from Perak southward to Singapore ; 
also of Java, where it was described by Blume in 1825. 
Its habit of growth, climbing amongst bushes, is very 
unusual in the Order to which it belongs. The specimen 
figured was sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, from 
Singapore by Mr. H. N. Ridley, M.A., F.L.S., Director 
of Forests and Gardens, Singapore. It flowered in a 
warm house in June, 1900, the individual flowers lasting 
only one day. 

Descr. — Stem about as thick as a crow-quill, decumbent 
below, then ascending and more or less scandent, by aid 
of the long vermiform white roots, which perforate the 
tubular, closely appressed leaf-sheaths. Leaves alternate, 
one and a half to two inches long, oblong or ovate-oblong, 

January 1st, 1901. 



base cordate and amplexicaul, tip sub-acute, recurved, 
pale green, keeled beneath. Peduncles eight to ten inches 
long, erect, bearing two or three tubular, appressed, obtuse 
sheaths. .Raceme one to eight inches long ; rhachis very 
stout, compressed, few- or many-flowered ; bracts dis- 
tichous, ovate, obtuse, fleshy. Flowers very shortly pedi- 
celled, about an inch and a half broad, pale rose-lilac. 
Sepals and petals sub-equal, ovate, sub-acute. Lip much 
shorter than the sepals, shortly clawed, saccate ; lateral 
lobes short, obtuse, incurved, terminal much broader, 
rounded ; disk with a broad, linear, truncate, pubescent 
callus. Pollinia two perfect, oblong, each with an imper- 
fect, much smaller one, adnate to it, seated on a lobulate 
gland.— J. D. H. 

"Fief. 1, lip ; 2, vertical section of same ; 3, column ; 4, anther ; 5 and 6, pollinia : 
— All enlarged. 



V 5 







Tab, 7; 

PYRU8 TIANM'HAMrA. 

.\ <</<>< ,.j Ot frsi Asia. 

Nat. OrJ. Rosaceje. — Tribe Vour.m. 
Genu* i / mn.;(lfr*lh. A Ilvok.f. Ce*. Plant. ffoL i- | 



Ptara (Sorbui) fuiiur Annim ; arbor purr*, foliU impari-pinnatU RlaWrrimi* 
(norellia tomentoait), foliolte 6-7>iagti lunc<*>latiii toamilUttU mti 
baaia rtnnn integerrimiii unbooMaeii *apni tatnrtto riridibiiH opaci* 
niMM paHkIin. ctipulm Uncroliitia brSMMil cadacit, paoicalia corymbo- 
•ik Mfllaribw KliU'rrimin laxiflorU. BocibM ad } \h>\\. d'am. b • 
pedicellati*, l>rnetn« niinutia ■iibnlntio raduci*. calyci« pubcicenlis l<>bi« 
lato triangnUribm acatifl, petalis albif, carpellu 5 hinutit, fructu 
globoao i poll. diam. 

P. tiaatchanica, Pr mm ek . in Inn. Sc. X<it. Her. ri. toI. xvL (1883) p. 287. 

P. thianichanica, liupr. > <nfl. ?ol. xl. (l^'.'l) p. 7, f. 4. 

Sorbin iianicbaaica, Baipr. &?//. Tiantck. p. 46. 



The Mountain Ash here figured i- tlio close ally and 
I rral Asiatic representative of the European /'. \u<-u- 
l>aria $ from which it differs in the perfectly glabrous 
(when mature) leaTOSj lanceolate, serrate, fin 
leaflet! of a thicker texture, and not •hining above, in 
t lie larger flowers and fivs carpels. It is a native of tho 
Tiansehan range, which bounds Turkestan on the north, 
where it was i .) by Baron Oaten Sacken and I)r. 

A. Kegel, during their expedition to the Tianaohan 
in 1 soted in about the Bane 

ode, but much Ua of tho 

Chii 108 of Kansu (north of tho Gobi desert), by 

Pnsewalski. 

Tho specimen figured is from I small tree in the 

Arboretum of rdeos, Kcw, which was pur- 

cd in 1806 from Mess: ion Bros., ms, 

nee, which <\ in M . 1 • »0, and fruited in tho 

following July. 

Itrgcr. — A small itfa the habit of / ■/./, 

young shoots tometitose. / (MS about six inches to 
shortly pet&oled, impan-pinn;. six to seven pi 

and B terminal, two inches long, lanceolate, acumin 
serrulate, quite glabrous, rather thick in texture, upper 

J«M «*T I*T. IS 



surface dark green, not shining, tender, pale green. 
Stipules half an inch long, lanceolate, pale brown, cadu- 
cous. Panicles axillary, together forming a terminal 
corymb, loosely many-flowered, quite glabrous. Bracts 
minute, subulate, deciduous. Flowers shortly pedicelled, 
three-fourths of an inch in diameter. Calyx pubescent, 
lobes broadly triangular, acute. Petals white. Carpels 
five, hirsute. Berries globose, one-third of an inch in 
diameter, bright right. — J. D. R. 



Fig. 1, flower; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, carpel : — All enlarged. 




KStoV.T.U.Pitdilith 



.■-.>oknlJay&3onI. ,, >-"r 



Tab. 7756. 

ALLIUM Ostrowskianum. 

Native of Western Turkestan. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^:. — Tribe Allied. 
Genus Allium, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 802.) 



Allium (Schamoprasum) OstrotrsJcianum ; bulbo subgloboso, tunicis tenuibus 
integris, foliis 2 supra-basilaribus nmbellam superantibus ad ?} poll, latis 
linearibus acuminatis concavis flaccidis glaucis, spathse valvis ovatis 
acaminati8 pedicellis filiformibus pollicaribus multoties brevioribus, um- 
bella globosa multiflora capsulifera, perianthii segmentis basi connatis 
ellipticis subacutis ad -| poll. longis laste roseis interioribus majoribus, 
filamentis supra basin segmentorum insertis ima basi connatis exteriori- 
bus triangnlaribus brevissime mucronatis interioribus angustioribns, 
antheris oblongis apiculatis, ovario substipitato late ovoideo trilobo, 
stylo brevi, stigmate minuto 3-lobo. 

A. Ostrowskianum, Begel in Act. Hort. Petrop. vol. vii. (1880) p. 545; 
Gartenft. vol. xxxi. (1882) p. 225, t. 1089. 



The very handsome Allium here figured was discovered 
in Western Turkestan by Mr. Fetisow, who sent bulbs of it 
to the Imperial Botanical Gardens of St. Petersburg, 
where it was described by the monographer of the genus, 
Dr. Kegel. It bears the name of the Russian Minister of 
Imperial Domains, Michael Nicolajewitsch von Ostrowski, a 
liberal promoter of science. It has long been in cultivation 
in the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it flowers annually in 
an open border, but the specimen figured was communicated 
by the Hon. Charles Ellis, of Trensham Hall, Haslemere, 
in June of last year. 

Descr. — Bulb sub-globose, outer seeds thin, entire. 
Leaves two, a foot and a half to two feet long, by two- 
thirds of an inch broad, linear, acuminate, concave above, 
flaccid, pale green, glaucous. Scape much shorter than 
the leaves, slender, terete. Umbel globose, laxly many- 
flowered, about three and a half inches in diameter. 
Spathes two, very short, ovate, acuminate. Pedicels an 
inch long, very slender. Flowers cup-shaped. Perianth- 
segments half an inch long, bright rose-red, with a green 
median nerve, elliptic, sub-acute, connate at the base, 
inner much smaller. Stamens half the length of the 

January 1st, 1901. 



perianth-segments, inserted above the bases of the seg- 
ments; filaments connate at the very base, of the outer 
stamens triangular, with a minute, subulate tip, of the 
inner much narrower; anthers small, oblong, apiculate. 
Ovary shortly stipitate, broadly ovoid, three-lobed ; style 
very short, stigma minutely three-cleft. — J. I). H. 

Fig. 1, three perianth-segments and stamens; 2, ovary. 



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Tab. 7757. 
AGAVE Peaoockii. 

Native of Central Mexico, 

Nat. Ord. Amakyllide*:. — Tribe Agaves. 
Genus Agave, Linn. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 738.) 



Agave (Littrea) Peacockii; acaulis, foliis densissime rosulatis in catervam 
subhemisphericam 4 ped. diatn. congestis extimis patalis intimis erectis 
omnibus ensiformi-oblanceolatis coriaceo-carnosis medio 4 poll, latis 
apice in spinam rigidam fere pollicarem brunneam productis basin 
versus angustatis saturate viridibns medio versus pallidis, marginibus non 
comeis, spinis marginahbus inasqualibus irregulariter subdistanter insertia 
brunneis roajoribus e basi elongata nunc fere \ poll, longa repente 
incurvis pungentibus, scapo cum inflorescentia 14 ped. alto viridi inferne 
bracteis lanceolatis pparsis aucto, inflores entia valde angrusta subspicae- 
formi stricta e fasciculis innumeris crasse pedunculatis 3-5-fl<>ris constaute, 
pedicellis brevibus crassis, bracteis 1-3-polliearibus sulmlato-lanceolatis 
bracteolisque minoribus brunneis membranaceis, floribns 2-2^ poll, longis 
erectis, ovario fusiformi tereto saturate viridi, perianthii segmentis ovario 
paullo brevioribus lineari-oblongis obtusis medio crasse cori^ceis dorso 
viridibus sangumeo punctatis marginibus membranaceis, filamentis seg- 
mentis fere duplo longioribus robustis pallide viridibus, antheris magnis 
| poll, longis viridibus, stylo robusto filamentis longiore, stigmate clavato. 

A. Peacockii, Croucher in Gard. Chron. 1873, p. 1400, fig. 283. Baker, Handb. 
Amaryll. p. 171. 



The flowering of a previously unfigured Agave is a satis- 
factory event, because without good figures made from 
specimens in a flowering condition, the determination 
by descriptions alone of the species of this large and econo- 
mically important, genus is never satisfactory. As re- 
gards A. Peacockii such a figure was especially needed, 
for the original description, made from a young flower- 
less specimen, is quite insufficient for the identification 
of the species. Fortunately there can be no doubt as 
to the Agave here figured being that to which the 
name Peacockii is given, for it is the type specimen pur- 
chased by the Royal Gardens at the sale in 1889 of the 
rich collection of Succulents formed by the late Mr. 
Peacock, of Hammersmith. It flowered in the Palm House 
of the Royal Gardens in December, 1899, having thrown 
up a scape which, with the inflorescence, was fourteen and 

Febuuabv 1st, 1901. 



a half feet high. It is a native of the province of Tehua- 
can, in Central Mexico, whence it was imported by Mr. 
Roezl. 

Descr. — Stemless. Leaves densely rosulate, forming a 
snb-hemispheric cluster nearly four feet in diameter, the 
outermost spreading horizontally, the innermost erect, all 
about two feet long by four inches broad above the middle, 
oblong-ensiform or oblanceolate, contracted above the base, 
terminated by a rigid brown, strict spine an inch long, 
thickly fleshy, strict, rigid, slightly convex above, more 
so beneath ; upper surface very dark green, paler to- 
wards the centre ; margins not cartilaginous in an old 
state, beset rather distantly and irregularly witli unequal, 
short, brown spines, the largest of which consist of an 
elongate base, sometimes half an inch long, suddenly con- 
tracted into an incurved, pungent tip. &e<tj>e with the 
very narrow, spiciform panicle, fourteen and a half feet 
high, strict, erect, clothed below with distant subulate- 
lanceolate bracts. Inflorescence of innumerable very short, 
stout, sub-erect, green, bracteate peduncles, bearing clusters 
of three to five bracteolate, shortly, stoutly pedicelled, 
sub-erect, green flowers two to two and a half inches long. 
Bracts one to three inches long, and smaller bracteoles 
subulate-lanceolate, membranous, brown. Ovary f usiformly 
cylindric, green, smooth. Perianth-segments not as long 
as the ovary, linear-oblong, obtuse, thickly fleshy, green 
with blood-red spots, margins rather broadly winged, 
membranous, pale green. Filaments about twice as long 
as the perianth, very stout, erect; anthers half an inch 
long. Style rather longer than the stamens, stigma clavate. 
—J.D.H. * 



Fig. 1, upper third of leaf; 2, cluster of Howers, both of nat. size-, 3, leal 
half nat, size; 4 and 5, stamens \ 6, tip of style and stigma:— All enlarged 
7, bgnre of whole plant ^th of nat. size. 




wk 






M.S.dd.J.'tl.Fitchlrfh 



-at^mf 



X. Reeve .Jd^Ltinrtcm 



Tab. 7758. 
NEILLIA Torreyi. 
Native of the Rocky Mountains. 

Nat. Ord. Kosace,e.— Tribe SriEiEE^. 
Genus Neillia, D. Don\ (Benth. & Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 612. 



Keillia (Physocarpus) Torreyi; frutex humilis, raraia robuatis cortice tiigro 
tectis, foliis ad l| poll, latis breviter petiolatia orbicalari-ovatis apice 
rotundatis basi profunde cordatia breviter tidlobia crenulatia glabris vel 
sparse pnberulis supra saturate viridibua nervis impressia aubtus pallidis 
nervis prominulis, stipulia linearibus petiolo paullo brevioribus, floribns 
in corymbos fere globosos terminalea breviter pedunculated congestia 
brevissime pedicellatis, calycis stellato-tomentosd tubo hemispberico lobis 
ovatis obtusis intus glabris, petalia orbicularibus calycis loboa vix 8uperan- 
tibus, st-i minibus ad 30 triseriatia petalia brevioribus, carpellia 2 slipite 
brevi insidentibns stellato-tomentosia connatis apicibua liberi.s in stylos 
filiformes attenuatis, maturia coriaceia ventro dehiscentibus, oligospermia, 
seminibna obovoideo-oblongis, testa pallida nitida. 

N. Torreyi, S. Wats, in Proc. Am. Acad. vol. xi. (1876) p. 136. Brew. & 
Wats, in Bot. Calif, vol. i. p. 171 in note. 

N. malvacea, Greene in Pittonia, vol. ii. (1889) p. 30. 

N. monogyna, var. malvacea, Jones in Zoe, vol. iv. (1893-4) p. 43. 

Spirsea monogyna, Torrey in Ann. Lye. N. York, vol. ii. (1828) p. 194. Eaton 

& Wright, N. Am. Bot. p. 441. 
S. opulifolia, var. y. Hook. Fl. Bnr. Am. vol. i. p. 171. Torr. $ Gray, Fl. N. 

Am. vol. i. p. 414. Porter, Fl. Colorado, p. 33 (var. parvifolia.) 
S. pauciflora, Nutt. in Torr. & Gr. I.e. 
Physocarpu8 Torreyi, Maxim, in Act. JTort. Petrop. vol. vi. (1879) p. 221. 

Coulter, Man. Bot. Rocky Mount., p. 78. 8. Wats, in Bot. Calif, vol. ii. 

p. 443. 

Opulaster malvacea, O. Kuntze, Rev. Gen. vol. ii. p. 949. 
Epicoatorus montanus, Bafin. At/ant. Journ. 18:J2, p. 144. 



Neillia Torreyi ranges over a considerable area of North 
America, from British Columbia, along the Rocky Moun- 
tain region, at elevations of six thousand ft. to ten 
thousand ft., to New Mexico. I collected it when travel- 
ling with Dr. Gray in 1879, at La Veta, in Colorado, at 
above nine thousand ft. elevation. It forms, with other 
American species and a Manchurian (N. amurensis) a very 
distinct section of Neillia with corymbose flowers and 
other characters, regarded as a genus and named 
Physocarpa by Rafinesque, altered to Physocarpus and 
retained as a genus by Maximovicz and others. 
February 1st, 1901. 



A plant of A". Torreyi was received by the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in 1897, from Professor Sargent, of the 
Arnold Arboretum, near Boston, which now forms a bush 
about three feet high, which flowered in the Arboretum 
in July, 1900. 

Descr.—k robust shrub ; bark black. Leaves one to one 

and a half inches long, orbicular-ovate, shallowly three- 

lobed, lobes and tip rounded, crenate, base deeply cordate, 

sinus narrow, sparsely stellately pubescent, dark green 

above, with deeply impressed nerves, pale beneath, with 

prominent nerves ; petiole much shorter than the blade. 

Stipules linear, nearly as long as the petiole. Flowers 

about half an inch broad, in dense, terminal, shortly 

peduncled corymbs, one to one and a half inches 

in diameter, shortly pedicelled, white. Calyx stellately 

tomentose ; tube hemispheric ; lobes ovate, obtuse, glabrous 

within. Petals orbicular, as long as the calyx-lobes. 

Stamens about thirty, triseriate. Carpels two, on a short 

stipes, turgidly oblong, united at their ventral sutures to 

above the middle, narrowed into filiform styles, mature 

dehiscing. Seeds not numerous, obovoid, pale, smooth, 

polished. — J. D. II. 

Fig. 1, unexpanded flower; 2, section of calyx with stamens and carpels; 
3, ripe carpelB ; 4, stellate hairs of the flowers ; 5, seeds :— all enlarged. 



Postscript.— As this sheet was passing through the press I received from 
my friend Mr. B. L. Robinson, Keeper of the Gray Herbarinm, Harvard 
University, U.S.A., to whom I had applied for information as to the specific 
validity of JV. malvacea as distinct from JV. Torreyi, a note to the effect, that 
" though the distinctions between them do not sound very Btrong, there seems 
to be little difficulty in distinguishing them." The characters of each which 
he gives me are : — 

JV. malvacea; carpels 2-3, leaves finely pubescent upon both surfaces, 
usually becoming tawny in drying. 

JV. Torreyi ; carpels 1-2, leaves smaller, essentially glabrous. Mr. Robinson 
adds that the two forms have a pretty definite range, JV. malvacea, from 
Oregon and the northern Rocky Mountains, Washington, and Idaho, to Utah, 
Nevada and Western Texas ; N. Torreyi from S. Dakota, Wyoming, and the 
Rocky Mountains of Colorado, to New Mexico. 

From this it may be concluded that the figure here given is of the form 
JV. malvacea, though the leaves are glabrous above and only very sparsely 
puberulous with deciduous hairs beneath.— J.D.H., January 2bth, 1901. 



1759 




deiJ.NFitdUifl 






I."Rhhv.. I 



Tab. 7759. 
VERONICA glauca. 

Native of Greece. 

Nat. Ord. ScROPHULARINEiE. — Tribe DlGlTALEJE. 

Genns Veronica, Linn. ; (Benth. fy Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 964.) 



Yeronica (Yeronicastrum) glauca; annua, subevecta, ramosa, caule rarnisque 
oppositia gracilibns subbifariam laxe pubescentibus, foliis breviter 
petiolatis late ovatis obtusis crenato-dentatis basi rotundatis vel snbcor- 
datia supra glabris subtus pilosulis, fioralibus bracteiformibus parvis 
angustia 2-3-lobatia Bupremia integria, racemis laxifloria, pedicellia filit'or- 
mibua calyce 3-5-plo longioribus fructiferis patalis apice recurvis, cilycis 
segmentis ellipticis obtusia pubescentibus paribus valde insequalibus 
longioribus corolla brevioribus, corolla? lobis sulsequalibna cseruleia basi 
albis, capsula orbiculata truncato-aubretusa glabra v. parce pilosa, loculis 
6-7-spt'rmia, seminibna cyathiformibua concavo-coavexis. 

Y. glauca, Sibth. <fc Sm. Fl. Greec. i. p. 6, t. 7. Benth. in DC. Prodr. vol. x. 
p. 484. Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. iv. p. 461. 

V. grajca, Sprun. PI. Grdec. exsico. ex Boiss. I.e. 

Y. amoena, Heldr. Herb. Norm, ex Nym. Consp. p. 548, non Stev. 



Bentham, in De Candolle's " Prodromus," doubts V. 

glauca being specifically distinct from V. amoena, Bieb. 

This arises from imperfect knowledge of the latter plant, 

which he confounds with V. grseca, Sprun., and hence 

erroneously describes it as having pedicels twice or thrice 

as long as the calyx. The fact is that V. grseca is 

a synonym of V. glauca. V. amoena has very short 

pedicels, and further differs from V. glauca in its small 

fcize (two to three inches high), glandular hairs, lanceolate 

sepals, and native country (Armenia). V. peduncular is, 

Bory & Chaub. (non Bieb.), also cited in the " Prodromus " 

under V. amcena, differs both from that plant and from 

V. glauca in the glabrous capsule two-lobed to the middle. 

Veronica glauca is a native of sandy fields in Attica, 

where it was discovered by Sibthorp, on Mount Hymettus, 

near Athens, and it has also been collected in Crete. The 

specimen figured here was raised from seeds presented to 

the Royal Gardens, Kew, by the Hon. Charles Ellis, of 

Frensham Hall. It flowered in June in the Herbaceous 

ground, and is an annual. The flowers are smaller than 

Fkbkuabt 1st, 1901. 



in the native specimens, in which, according to Boissier, 
the corolla is three times as long as the calyx. 

Deser. — A slender, much-branched annual, branches 
opposite, loosely subifariously pubescent. Leaves one half 
to three-fourths of an inch long, shortly petioled, broadly 
ovate, obtuse, crenate-toothed, glabrous above, puberulous 
beneath ; floral bracteiform, smaller, narrower, two to 
three-lobed, uppermost entire. Pedicels half to one inch 
long, very slender, fruiting spreading, tips recurved. 
Calyx one-third to half an inch long, pubescent, divided to 
the base into two very unequal elliptic pairs of segments. 
Corolla three-fourths of an inch in diameter ; lobes bright 
blue, white at the base, three upper orbicular- ovate, lower 
rather longer, spathulately obovate. Filaments shorter 
than the corolla-lobes. Capsule sub-orbicular, retusely 
truncate. Seeds concavo-convex. — /. V. H. 



Fig. 1, calyx; 2, corolla and stamens; 3, ovary; 4, capsule -.—All enlarged. 



im 






M.S.deUNFrtdiOith 



^cen t B rt oK3Pay* SaIllt3:IroP 



Tab. 7760. 
ECHIDNOPSIS Bentii. 

'Native of Southern Arabia, 

Nat. Ord. Asclepiade^e. — Tribe Oebopegie^:. 
(Janus EcuiDNoi-sia, Hook. f. ; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 781 ) 



EcaiDNOPsis, Bcniii; caulibus fascia 7-8-eostatis coatis rnamillatis, mamil- 
lis unisoriatis folio minuto ovato cuspidato concavo coronatis, tioribus 
apices versus ramorum binis breviter pedicellatis, calycia segmentis del- 
toideo-ovatis glabri?, corolla vix \ poll. diam. extus viridi-purpureo 
maculata intus velutina saturate purpurea, tubo brevi canipanulata, limbi 
patentis lobis late ovatis apiculatis marginibus revolutis, corona exteriore 
cupulari pentagona truucata purpurea angulis acutis parum productis, 
interioris lobis erecto-conniventibus breviter clavatis obtuaia basi fundo 
exterioris adnatis. 

E. Bentii, N. E. Brown in Kew Bulletin, ined. 



The genus Echidnopsis was established in this Magazine, 
tab. 5930, on a South African species, E. cereiformis, of the 
same habit as E. Bentii,h\it much larger, of a bright green 
colour, with yellow flowers. Recently other species have 
been added to the genus, one of which, E. Dammanniana, 
a native of Arabia, is, according to Mr. N. E. Brown, 
closely allied to E. Bentii, differing in the corona. 

E. Bentii was found in Southern Arabia, the exact 
locality unknown, by the intrepid traveller whose name it 
bears. It was sent to Kew by him shortly before his 
death, together with fragments of other plants collected 
during his last expedition, probably in the Hadramaut 
district, to the East of Aden. It flowered in a warm 
house of the Royal Gardens, Kew, in June, 1899. 

Descr. — Whole plant at present five to six inches high, 
consisting of a short stem, with ascending branches of a 
pale brown colour. Stem and branches one-half to three- 
quarters of an inch in diameter, the latter narrowing 
upwards, seven to eight-ribbed, each rib consisting of a 
single series of mamillae, each of which is crowned by a 
minute, ovate, concave, cuspidate leaf, about one-twentieth 
of an inch long. Flowers in pairs towards the tips of the 
branches, very shortly pedicelled, half an inch in diameter. 
Calyx-segments ovate-lanceolate, acute. Corolla with a 
Fbbhuabv 1st, 1901. 



short, campanulate tube, and five spreading lobes, exter- 
nally green, spotted with purple, internally velvety, of a 
rich, deep, vinous-purple colour; lobes ovate, apiculate, 
margins revolute. Outer corona cupular, acutely five- 
angled, trnneate, purple; inner of five erect and conniving, 
shortly clavate lobes, which are adnate at the base to the 
base of the outer corona. — J. D. H. 



Fie. 1, portion of a mamilla and leaf; 2, back, and 3, front view of flower; 
■i, corona; 5, pollinia : — All enlarged. 



7761 




MS del.^fPucKb.th 



VmeaitBrooks.Day* 



I 



7757 




ncent-Brooka D-ny &.CJ011 Lt*£u; 



Tau. 7761. 
ROSA Seraphim. 

Native of Italy. 

Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Rose*. 
Genus Rosa, Linn.; (Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 625.) 



Rosa (Rubiginosso) Seraphini; frutex bumilia, erectus, ramoaiasimus, ramia 
ramuliaque crebre armatia, acnleisinajqualibuafalcato-decurvia compresaia 
baai dilatatia, foliis 1-2 poll, longis, petiolo brevi rhachique gracili, 
foliolia 7 parvia orbicularibna late ovatisve glanduloso-dentatis supra 
saturate viridibua, subtus pallidia glandulis inter nervos paucis, atipulis 
linearibus acuminatia, floribus solitariis ad \\ poll, diam., pedunculo 
brevi tnboque calycis ellipaoideo glaberrimia, sepalis petalis paullo breviori- 
bua patentibus parca glandulosia post anthesira reflexia appendicibus 
anguate oblongo-lanceolatia, petalia lsete rcseis, ovariis sericeo-piloaia 
pisiformibu8 rubris demum nigris aepalis persistentibus coronatie. 

R. Serapbini, Viviani, Fl. Gorsic. Sp. Nov. p. 8; Fl. Lyb. Spec. p. 67 
(Serafini). Bertol. Fl. Ital. vol. v. p. 194. DC. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 625 
{Serafinii). Gussone Fl. Sic. Prodr. vol. i. p. 574; Fl. Sic. Synop. i. p. 5(54. 
Moris, Fl. Sardoa. vol. ii. p. 40. Arcang. Gompend. Fl. Ital. p. 226. 
Crepin in Coinpt. Bend. Soc. Roy. Bot. Belg. 1892, p. 88. Pojero, Fl. Sic. 
vol. i. para II. p. 187. 

R. apennina, Woods, Tourist's Flora, p. 123. 

B. cretica, var. Serafini, Wallr. Ros. PI. Gen. p. 145. 

R. glutinosae, Sibth. & 8m. forma, Parlat. Ft. Ital. vol. x. p. 26. 

R. graveolens, var. y. coraica, Gren. & Godr. Fl. Fr. vol. i. p. 561. 

R. parvifolia, Sanguin. Cent. Fl. Rom. p. 70 (ear Moris, I.e.). 



R, Seraphini is a dwarf rose of peculiar habit, closely 
allied to R. agrestis, Savi, which differs from it in habit, 
in the leaves narrowed to the tip, with many glands 
beneath, and in the eglandular reflexed caducous sepals. 
It was published as Seraphini and Serafini in the same 
year by its author, of which names the former is that 
usually adopted, though, according to a note by J. Gay in 
the Kew Herbarium, Serafino is that of the botanist after 
whom the species is named. The habitats recorded for it 
by Arcangeli are stony places above one thousand six 
hundred ft. elevation in the Apuan Alps, Corsica, Sar- 
dinia, and Sicily; and, for two varieties, the Maritime 
Alps. 

The specimen figured is from a plant raised from seed 
received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1894, from the 

Fkhruabt 1st, 1901. 



Innsbruck Botanical Gardens, which flowered in June, 1900, 
in the Arboretum, it being then a foot high. 

Descr. — A low, densely branching and leafing bush, with 
spreading or deflexed branches, closely covered with un- 
equal, hooked, flattened prickles. Leaves one and a half to 
two inches long ; petiole and rhachis slender ; leaflets 
seven, orbicular, or very broadly ovate, tip rounded or 
acute, acutely toothed, lateral about half an inch long, 
terminal larger, all dark green, sparsely glandular beneath ; 
stipules narrow, acuminate. Flowers solitary, shortly 
peduncled, about an inch and a 'quarter in diameter ; 
peduncle and ellipsoid calyx-tube quite smooth. Sepals 
rather shorter than the bright, rose-coloured petals, margins 
sparsely glandular; appendices oblong-lanceolate. Fruit 
pisiform, red, at length black, crowned with the persistent 
sepals.—,/. D. H, 

cJuf'd' leaflet; 2 ' anex panded flower; 3 and 4, stamens; 5, ovary.— All 



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T AB . 7757.— AGAVE PEACOCKII. 
„ 7758— NEILLIA TORREYI. 
, 7759.— VERONICA GLAUCA. 
ti 7760.— ECHIDNOPSIS BEHTtl. 
.. 77t',l.— ROSA SERAPHIM. 



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7762 




M ii de 



* *mmj m »mw*m» --- - - 



"Wrunarrt- Bvo oka,D ay A^Son. "Lt^Imp 



Tab. 7762. 
HYMENOCALLIS schizostephana. 

Native of Brazil. 



Nat. Ord. Amahylllde^. — Tribe Amabtlle.e. 
G«nus Hymenocallis, Salisb.; (Benlh. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 734.) 



IIymenocallis scliizostepliana ; bnlbo ovoideo, foliis ad 8 distichia oblongo- 
lanceolatia 1-H ped. longia 2i-3^ poll, latia in petiolum latum concavum 
auguatatia laete viridibus costa subtua craaaa, nervia numerosia nervulis 
oblique trabeculatis, pcapo terminali nltrapedali valido compresso pallide 
viridi, umbella mult ; flora, spathis extimis 8-10 lineari-lanceolatis obtusi3 
1-2 poll, longia membranaceis albis, interioribus paucis aequilongis 
linearibus, floribus aesailibus, perianthii tubo 2~2|-pollicari viridi, seg- 
ments 3-pollicaribua loriformibus albis, staminum corona \ poll, longa 
infundibulari 6-fida v. -paitita, lobis edentatia, filamentia gracilibua, 
aatheria linearibua h poll, longia, stigmate capitellato. 

II. schizostephana, WorsUy in Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. i. p. 386. 



A very distinct species of a genus numbering upwards 
of thirty species, natives of the New World, and chiefly 
tropical. It is a near ally of H. tubiflora, Salisb. (Pancra- 
tium guianense, Gawl. in Bot. Reg. t. 265), a native of 
Demerara, from which it differs in the paler leaves with 
trabeculate nervation, in the compressed not two-edged 
scape, in the more numerous, shorter, white spathe-valves, 
in the much shorter perianth-tube and segments, and in 
the shorter six-fid or six-partite corona. It is also closely 
allied to H. angustum, Herb. (Pancratium angustum, 
Gawl. in Bot. Reg. t. 221, referred to H. caribaea, Herb., 
by Baker), in which the corona has triangular lobes between 
the stamens, and which has more slender filaments, a 
shorter perianth-tube, and narrower perianth-segments. 

A bulb of H. schizostephana was presented to the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, by A. Worsley, Esq., of Mandeville House, 
Isleworth, the possessor of a fine collection of bulbous 
plants and of drawings of the same. It flowered in 
a warm greenhouse in June, 1899. The flowers are 
fragrant. 

Descr. — Bulb ovoid. Leaves about eight, distichous, 
twelve to eighteen inches long by two and a half to three 
and a half inches broad, oblong-lanceolate, narrowed into 

March 1st, 1901, 



a broad petiole ; nerves trabeculate. Scope about a foot 
high, stout, compressed. Umbel many-fld. ; outer spathes 
eight to ten, one to two inches long, linear-lanceolate, 
obtuse; inner as long, narrower ; flowers sessile. Perianth- 
tube two to two and a half inches long, green ; segments 
rather longer, loriform, white. Staminal crown infundi- 
bular, half an inch long, six-fid or -partite, edentate; 
filaments slender; anthers linear. Stigma capitellate. — 
J. D. II. 

Fig. 1, staminal crown ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, top of style and stigma :— all 
enlarged ; 5, reduced view of whole plant. 




M.S.del,«J.N.FitchH(K. 



TEncantBrooT^DayA Sonl^* 



L Reove *. C°. London 



Tad. 7763. 
MODECOA sinensis. 

Native of Mozambique and JDelagoa Bay. 



Nat. Ord. Passiflokk.k. — Tribe Modbcce/E. 
Genus Modecca, Lam.; (Bentk. & llook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 813. 



Modecca (Microblepbaris) scnensis ; glaberrima, caulegracili ramo30 scandente 
tereti, ioliiw amhitu late ovatis palmatim 5-partitis Bnpra saturate 
viriuibus subtus glaucia, segmentis lateralibas paribus oppositis dispositia 
sessilibus lineari-oblongis obtusis integerrimia, terminali mujore ti'ilobo 
basi cuneato in petiolulum canaliculaturn anguatato lobis oblongia 
obtusis, petiolo lamina breviore canaliculato apice utrinque glandula magna 
instmcto, stipulis mituitis subulatis caducis, cyrnia axillaribua dichotomia 
laxirloris cirrhil'eris, bracttis minutis aparais, rloribus masc. pollicaribus, 
calyce anguste campanulato in pedicellum brevem articulatum attenuate 
stramineo brcviter 5-lobo basi intua puberulo et glandulis 5 stipitatia 
ornato, lobis ovato-oblongia obtuais recurvia, petalia medio tubi insertis 
parvis lineari-oblongis inclusis, filamentiB in tubum apice 5-fidum 
eonnatis, antheris lineari-oblongis. 

M. scnensiB, Mast, in Oliv. Fl. Trap. Afr. vol. ii. p. 513. 

(JJeinanthua senensis, Klotzsvk in Peters Naluridss. Jieise in Mussambiq. Bot. 
p. 143. 

Modecca is a genus of tropical African Asiatic, and 
Australian plants, containing nearly forty known species. 
It is almost unknown in cultivation, only one having 
hitherto been figured in any English Horticultural work, 
the M. lobctta, Jacq. (Bot. Reg. t. 433), also a tropical 
African species. All are unisexual climbers. 

M. senensis was discovered in Mozambique by the late 
Professor Peters, of Berlin, when engaged in his scientific 
exploration of that unhealthy district. More recently it 
has been found at Delagoa Bay, whence seeds were sent to 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1884, by Mrs. Monteiro, from 
which plants were raised that flowered in 1899. The 
specimen from which the figure is taken is that of a 
male plant which climbs the rafters of the Succulent House 
of the Royal Gardens, Kew. The flowers are fragrant. 

Descr.— A tall, slender, perfectly glabrous, rather 
glaucous climber. Stem and branches terete. Lmves 
broadly ovate in circumscription, three to four inches long, 
palmately five-partite, pale green, glaucous beneath; 
lateral segments in opposite pairs, sessile, linear-oblong, 

Makui 1st, 1 



obtuse, quite entire, the basal pair smallest ; terminal 
segment much larger, three-lobed, base cuneate, narrowed 
into a channelled petiolule ; lobes oblong, tips rounded ; 
petiole shorter than the leaf, deeply channelled in front, 
and with two large, oblong glands, one on each sidejof the 
apex. Cymes axillary, dichotoraous, few-fld., with a 
slender tendril in the fork. Male flowers shortly pedicelled, 
an inch long. Calyx narrowly campanulate, pale yellow, 
five-lobed ; lobes spreading and recurved, ovate, sub-acute ; 
tube pubescent within, and with stipitate glands at the 
very base. Petals very small, linear-oblong, inserted half 
way down the tube of the calyx. Filaments united in a 
slender tube, bearing five linear anthers. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, base of leaf and apex of patiole showing the glands; 2, vertical 
section of male flower ; 3 and 4, stamens .—all enlarged. 



1764 




-M.S.del JN.Fitd\lrth 



.Brooks^y*- 80 * 1 *** 



L. Reeve & C° London 



Tab. 7764. 
CCELOGYNE Veitchii. 

Native of Neiv Guinea. 

Nat. Ord. Okciiide.k.— Tribe Epidendre.e. 
Genus CiELOGYNE, LindL; (Benth. & Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii.p. 518). 



Ccklogyne (Eucoulogyne) Veitchii; pseudobulbis fasciculatis 3-4-pollicaribu8 
oblongo-l'usif'ormibua nndis profunde sulcatia demum alte costatia 
dij>hyJ li«, surculia vaginis branneis tectis, foliis 5-9-pollicaribus elliptico- 
lanceolatis acntis subcoriaceig 3-nerviis supra saturate viridibus basi in 
petiolum brevem brunnenm auguatatis, tcapo basi vaginato cum racemo 
laxe multifloro pendulo 1-2-pedali, rhachi gracili, bracteis §-f poll, longis 
obloagis acutia convolutis brunneis diu persistentibus, pedicellia cum 
ovario bracteia aoquilongia, p -rianthio subgloboso \ poll. diatn. albo, 
sepalis petali<que erectia concavis incurvia, sepalo poatico oblongo- 
lanceolato acuto lateralibus connatis, petalis sepal is minoribus lauceolatis 
demum reflexia, labello sepalis paullo longiore trilobo basi rotundato lobis 
lateralibua obtusia columuam vclantibus terminale late ovato acuto 
revoluto, disco basi 3-carinato, columna brevi apice dilatata et crenata. 

0. Veitchii, Rolfe in Ketc Bulletin, 1895, p. 282. 



A very distinct species of a genus of which nearly 
a hundred species are now known. Mr. Rolfe indicates 
the absence of markings on the lip, which bears three 
rather obscure basal keels, and the short column as 
characters quite different from those of any known con- 
geners. It was introduced from western New Guinea by 
Mr. Burke, collector for Messrs. Veitch & Sons, who pre- 
sented the specimen here figured to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, where it flowered in a hot-house in August, 1900. 
The anthers bore no pollinia. 

Descr. — Fseudohulbs three to four inches long, oblong- 
fnsiform, green, naked, when old deeply grooved and 
strongly ribbed, two-leaved, emitting from the base stout 
surculi, clothed with red-brown imbricating scales. Leaves 
five to nine inches long, elliptic-lanceolate, acute, rather 
coriaceous, narrowed at the base into a stout brown 
petiole, dark green above, with three impressed nerves, 
paler and three-ribbed beneath. Raceme terminal, pendu- 
lous, with the scape one to two feet long, laxly many- 
flowered; rhachis slender. Pedicels with the ovary one 
March 1st, 1901. 



half to three-fourths of an inch long, slender. Bracts as 
long, oblong, acute, convolute, pale red-brown, very per- 
sistent. Perianth white, nearly globose, the sepals and 
petals being incurved and dorsally very convex, about two- 
thirds of an inch in diameter. Sepals oblong-lanceolate, 
acute; lateral connate. Petals smaller than the sepals, 
lanceolate, acuminate, at length recurved. Lip rather 
longer than the sepals, three-lobed; base rounded, hardly 
saccate; lateral lobes concealing the column, obtuse; 
terminal short, very broadly ovate, revolute, disk with 
three obscure basal keels. Column short, with an orbicular, 
dilated, crenate summit. — J. D. 11. 



Fig. 1, lip; 2, column ; 3, anther .—all enlarged. 







M S del.J.N.Fitdhlrtk 



VmcenLBrookspay&.SonL^Intp- 



L "Reeve C° London 



Tad. 7765. 
KALANCHOE Benth. 

Native of Southern Arabia. 

Nat. Ord. CftASSULACJi.K. 

Genua Kalaxciioe, Adans. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 659 ) 



Kalanciioe Bentii; frutex erectus, glaberrimna, caule elongato simplici tereti 
foliisqne fusco-viridibus, foliis glancis decussation oppositis sessilibus 3-6- 
poll. longia pateoti-recurvis pugioniformibua crasse carnosis a latere 
compreasia dorso rotundatis facie sulcatis ima basi tumidis semi-amplexi- 
canlibus medio ad £ poll, latis dein eensim ad apicem acntam attemiatia, 
pamcuuB, ramulis subcorymbosia multifloris, bi'acteis bracteolkque 
angastia carnosis, floribus erectis pedicellatis, sepalia 4 patulis ovato- 
l.inceolatis ^-| poll, longis carnosulis Inride viridibua, corollaa alba? tubo 
li poll, longo subtetragoao a basi tumido virescente 5 poll. diam. sensim 
attennato, limbi lobia | poll, longis patenti-recarvis ovatis albis iotus 
papillosis alabastro roseis, disci squamnlis filiformibus, antheris minutis 
oblongis, carpellis angustia in stylos graciles attenuates. 

K. Bentii, G. IT. Wright mst. 



Kalanchoe Bentii was raised from seeds collected by the 
late Mr. Theodore Bent in the Hadramaut district of 
Southern Arabia in 1894, and sent to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew. It flowered in June, 1900. As a species it differs 
from all others in the form of the leaves. 

Descr. — Stem in the specimen figured quite simple, three 
feet high, erect, sleuder, one inch in diameter, scarred at 
the closely set internodes, leafy for the upper third, terete, 
smooth, dull olive-green; upper internodes about an inch 
long. Leaves decussately opposite, thickly fleshy, three to 
six inches long, spreading and recurved, dagger-shaped, 
gradually contracted from the middle to the tumid, sessile, 
semi-amplexicaul base, and to the acute tip, laterally com- 
pressed, about half an inch thick in the middle, dorsally 
rounded, deeply grooved on the upper surface, margins 
rounded, dirty olive-green in colour, and glaucous. Panicle 
erect, many-fld., eight inches high ; rhachis, branches and 
branchlets erecto-patent, terete ; pedicels short ; bracts 
and bracteoles linear, fleshy. Flowers sub-corymbose on 
the branches of the panicle, erect, an inch and a half long, 
white, with pink unexpanded corolla-lobes. Sepals ovate- 
lanceolate, a quarter to half an inch long, spreading, olive- 
Makcu 1st, 1901. 



green, fleshy. Corolla-tube obscurely four-angled, about 
one-sixth of an inch in diameter in the middle, gradually 
dilating downwards to the tumid base, which is one-third 
of an inch diam. ; lobes ovate, half an inch long, spread- 
ing and recurved. Anthers minute. Disc-scales filiform. 
Carpels slender, narrowed into almost filiform, erect styles, 
with minute capitate stigmas. — J. I). IF. 

h SoeV. r h n fi T rSe8eCti 7/° f , leaf l 2 ' corol,a I** open; 3 and 4, anther* ; 

b, carpels , b, stigmas -.-all enlarged ; 7, reduced viev: of whole plant. 



1766 



- 









■> 




M-SdeVJNTxUavUth 



Vincent Brooks Day &Son 



Tab. 7766. 
MASDEVALLIA deorsum. 

Native of New Grenada. 

Nat. Ord. Okchideje.— Tribe Ei'idendrk.k. 

iienns Maspevai.ua, Ruiz & Pav. ; (Benth. & Tlook.f. Oen, Phnit. rol. iii. 

p. 492.) 



Masdevallia (Coriaeea?) deorsum; caaspitosa, acaulis, pendula, folio 10-13 
pollicari oblanceolato obtuso coriaceo enervi medio sulcato supra virbli 
margiuibus rufescentibm jtmioribus subtus rubro adspersig, pedunculo 
foliis broviore robusto pallido rubro-punctato medio vagina oblonga 
concolore instructo, periantbii anrei rubro maculati tubo brevi £ poll, 
diam. basi giljbo, sepalo dorsuli reflexo e basi brevi late ovato repeute in 
caudam 2i poll, longam constrieto, lateralibna ovato-lanceolatis in caudas 
canda doraali breviores sensim angustatis, petalis parvia spatlmlato- 
obovatis pa'.lidis, labello oblongo-obovato obtuso supra ultra medium 
papillis, elongatis sanguineis villoso, basin versus maculis luteis ornato. 

M. deorsa, Rolfe in Orchid Rev. vol. viii. (1900) p. 255. Gard. Chron. 1900, 
vol. ii. p. 395, fig. 121, and p. 419. 

A very remarkable species of a genus abounding in 
curious forms, distinguished from all others, in so far as 
at present known, by its strictly pendulous habit, likened 
by Mr. Rolfe to that of C at tie y a cifrina, Lindl. (tab. 3742). 
Several plants of it were imported from New Grenada in 
1894 by Consul Lehmann, of Hamburg, of which two 
flowered in 1900, one at Glassnevin, with Mr. Frederick 
Moore, A.L.S.; the other in Sir Trevor Lawrence's unique 
Orchid collection at Burford Lodge, Boxhill. The figure 
here given is from the latter specimen, kindly forwarded 
to me by Sir Trevor for the purpose in November last. 

Descr. — Whole plant pendulous, tufted. Leaf ten 1o 
thirteen inches long, oblanceolate, obtuse, coriaceous 
bright green above, with pale rufous margins, when young 
copiously dotted beneath with red. Peduncles one-flowered, 
much shorter than the leaf, stout, sprinkled with red spots, 
bearing an appressed sheath about the middle. Flower 
very large, yellow, blotched with bright red. Tube of 
perianth one-third of an inch in diameter, base rounded. 
Dorsal sepal broadly ovate, very short, reflexed, suddenly 
contracted into a slender tail two and a half inches long. 
Lateral sepals ovate-lanceolate, an inch and a half long, 
March 1st, 1901. 



gradually narrowed into slender tails shorter than those 
of the dorsal sepal. Petals obovate-spathulate, obtuse, 
pale greenish-yellow. Lip obovate-oblong, densely villous 
from beyond the middle to the tip with blood-red, elongated 
papillre. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, petals and lip; 2, lip ; 3, column; 4, anthers; 5 and 6, polliaia :— 
all enlarged. 






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Tvk. 7702.— HYMEXOCALLI3 SCHIZOSTEPHANA. 
„ 7763— MODEL* A SEN'ENSIS. 
„ 7764.— CCBLOGYXE VEITCIIII. 
,, 7765.— KALANCHOE BENTIE 
„ 77(>»;._ MASDEVALLIA DEORSUM. 



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7767 




M 5 del J.TT PiUHUQv 



Vincent-Brook^ Day &Son Ld Imp 









Tab. 7767. 
CLADKASTIS tinctoria. 

Native of the Western United States. 

Nat. Ord. Leguminos-e. — Tribe Sophore3£. 
Genua Cladrastis, Baf. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 554 ) 



Cladbastis tinctoria ; arbor 50-60-pedalis, fere omnino glabra, cortice lasvi, ligno 
flavo, ramulis pendulis lenticellatis glabrescentibus, folds impari-pinnatis 
8-12 poll, longis, rbachi gracili basi turnido cavo alabaBtrum claudente, 
foliolis 7-13 ovatis oblongisve 3-4 poll, longis apice rotunrlatis basi acutip, 
stipulis obsoletis, racems paniculisve terminalibus 12-14 poll, longis 
pendulis laxiflorie, rhacbi gracillimo, bracteis minutis caducis, floribus 
expansis ad 1 poll, longis pedicellatis albis, calyce 5-dentato, vexillo 
rotundato reflexo, alis oblique oblongis, carinas petalis liberis dorso arete 
imbricatis, etaminibus fere liberis, legumine lineari plano-compresso, 
seminibus oblongis compressis estrophiolatis. 

C. tinctoria, Baf. Fl. Kent. 1324 {ex 8. Wats. Bill. Ind. N. Am. Bot. p. 210) ; 
Neogenyt. (1825); Med. Fl. vol. ii. p. 210; New. Fl. N. Am. vol. iii. p. 83. 
Torr. & Gr. Fl. ZV. Am. vol. i. p. 391. Chapman, Fl. S. U. St. p. 113. 
A. Gray Man. Bot. N. U. States, E J. 1880, p. 143. 

C. lutea, Koch, Dendrol. vol. i. p. 6. Sargent, Gard. & Forest, vol. ii. p. 375 ; 
SUv. N. Am. vol. iii. p. 57, t. 119, 120. 

Virgilia lutea, Michx. fit. Hist. Arbr. Am. Sept. vol. iii. p. 266, t. 3; Pursfa 
Fl. Am. Sept. p. 309. Nutt. Gen. N. Am. Fl. vol. i. p. 284. Loisel. 
Herb. Gen. de VAmat. t. 197. B.C. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 98. Spach. Hist. 
Veg. vol. i. p. 163. Eaton, Man. Bot. N. Am. Ed. 6, p. 395. 'Eaton 
& Wright, JV. Am. Bot. Ed. 8, p. 480. Loud. Arboret. Brit. vol. ii. 
p. 565. 



Cladrastis tinctoria, the "yellow" or "Gopher" wood 
of 1ST. America, is one of the rarest trees of the United 
States, being confined to the western bases of the Alle- 
ghany Mts. in Kentucky, Central Tennessee, and N. Carolina. 
It is remarkable for its silvery closely appressed bark, like 
that of the Beech, pendulous brittle branches, and pro- 
fusion of delicately fragrant white flowers. Only two 
other species of the genus are known, G. amurensis, Benth. 
(see tab. 6551) a native of Manchuria, and C. sinensis, 
Helms., of China. It is remarkable as one of the most 
striking evidences of the affinity of the Flora of N.E. Asia 
with that of N.E. America (to the exclusion of both Japan 
and W. America). According to Eaton the bark yields a 
yellow dye. According to Loudon it was introduced into 
England in 1812 by John Lyon, a Scotchman, who 

Aphil 1st, 1901. 



travelled in Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, returning twice 
to England with large contributions to our gardens. He 
died in 1818, in America. 

The Gopher wood is not uncommon in plantations in 
various parts of Europe, floweriug abundantly in the 
warmer climates, but rarely in the northern. There is a 
largo tree of it in the Royal Gardens, Kew, which flowered 
in June, 1900, and from which the foliage and panicle of 
the accompanying figure was taken. 

Descr. — A tree fifty to sixty feet high, with smooth bark, 

yellow wood and glabrous branches, foliage and flowers. 

Leaves eight to twelve inches long, impari-pinnate ; petiole 

short, much thickened at the base, and there enclosing an 

axillary bud ; rhachis slender, terete ; leaflets seven to 

thirteen, three to four inches long, shortly petiolulate, 

ovate or oblong, obtuse, rather thin, terminal largest, with 

a longer petiolule ; stipules 0. Panicles or racemes twelve 

to fourteen inches long, terminal, pendulous, laxly very 

many flowered; rhachis and branches slender; bracts 

minute, caducous; pedicels slender. Flotvers white, with a 

yellow speckled spot at the base of the standard. Calyx 

obtusely five-toothed, green. ■ Standard orbicular, reftexed. 

Wings obliquely oblong. Keel-petals free, concave. Stamens 

nearly free. Ovary hairy. Pod three to four inches long, 

linear, flattened. Seeds oblong, compressed.— J. D- #■ 



Fig. 1 calyx laid open and stamens j 2, wing-petal ; 3, keel-petal ; 4, ovary : 
-«U enlarged; 5, legume; 6, seed : both of nai. size. 



7768 




M.S.d*I.j. NPltch]lth 









L Reeve & C° London. 



Tab. 7768. 
AMORPHOPHALLUS leonensis. 

Native, of Western tropical Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Aroidk.k. — Tribe PrTUOxiE.E. 
Genua Amorhioi'ijallus, Blume; {Benih. 8f llook.f. Gen. Plant, vol i i i _ j *. 970.) 



AMOHi'iiorHALMJS (Corynopballm) leonensis; tubere oblato, folio hysterantho, 
petiolo 3-3| pedale, lamina ampla triae^ta, aegmentis primanis dichotomis 
l-2-pinnatifidi8 ultimie 6-8 foil, longis elmigato-lineari-oblougiH acutis 
acuminatisve, pedunculo crasso 2-S poll, longo vaginis 2-4 poll, longis 
1 asi instructo, sp;ithaj crassa 1 4-6-pollicaria campaiinlati» tubo l|-poll. 
diam. brevi pallidoiu larain im inflatam apice rotunditam atro-purpuream 
aUx)-striatam et maculis paueis rotundatia omatam ampliato, ore lamina) 
obliquo marginibuB saturate pnrpureis incurvis, ipadiefl Bp&thfi snb- 
eeqnilongo bn-viter crasse stipitato, infl. fem. £ in. longa, masc. latiore et 
paullo longinre, appendice magna crasae stipitata obovoidea apice 
rotundata 4 poll, longa 3 poll. diam. flavo-brunnea cancellata, staminibus 
dense confertis, antheris quadratis, ovariia lageniformibua in atylum 
attennatis, stigmate capitato, baceia oblongiB \ pjll. lougia oblongo- 
obovoiieis flavidis. 

A. leonensis, Lemaire i?i Hort. Van Hoxtte, fasc. i. p. 1, t. 3, fig. 2, A et 2 B ; 
ex. Ft. des Serres, Ser. J. vol. ii. (1846), t. 161. 

Corynopballu8 leonensis, Engl, in DO. Monogr. Phan. vol. ii. p. 326. 

C. Afzelii, Seho't in (Estr. Bot. Wuchenhl. 1857, p. 389; Gen. Avoid, t. 32; 
Prodr. Aruid. p. 132. Masters in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 1619, fig. :H:5 
(sphalm. quoad spadicem). 

Hydrosme leonensis, Engl. JaA.rb.t6L i. (1881) p. 187. Durand et Schinz, 
Comp. Ft. Afr vol. v. p 17*-- 

Arnm aphyllum, Hook, in W. Gray, Travels in Western Africa, p. 386, t. A. 

Amorphophattus leonensii was discovered in Sierra 
Leone by Dr. Afzelius, afterwards Professor of Botany at 
Upsala. It was first introduced into Europe by Van Hontte 
in 1845. Tubers were sent from Sierra Leone to the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, by Mr. Walter Haydon, Curator of the 
Botanic station in that colony, early in 1899, which 
flowered in a tropical house in March of the same year, 
and matured their leaves in the following May. It has 
also been collected in Senegal and Gambia. Dr. Masters 
describes four varieties of it as occurring in cultivation, 
namely, a. spectabilis, in which the petiole is marked with 
obscure linear-oblong spots; /3. elegans with a green 
petiole, bipinnatisect leaf-segments, the ultimate of which 
are very narrow, and y. latifolia, in which the petiole is 

A iiiii, 1st, IU01. 



green, the leaf-segments pinnatisect, the ultimate broader 
and confluent. 

Descr. — Tuber oblate. Leaf solitary, appearing after the 
flowering; petiole stout, about three feet high ; blade about 
a foot across, trisect ; primary segments spreading, pinna- 
tifid or bipinnatifid ; ultimate narrowly linear, acute or 
acuminate. Peduncle three to eight inches high, very 
stout. Spathe erect, six inches high, pyriform ; tube cam- 
panulate, an inch and three-quarters in diameter, white, 
gradually dilated into the concave limb, which is convolute 
from its lower half, three and a half inches broad about 
the middle, rounded at the top; mouth oblique, dark 
purple, streaked with dirty white, and marked with a few 
orbicular spots of various size; lips almost black purple, 
incurved. Spadix shortly stoutly stipitate, gradually 
broader upwards for about two inches, when it suddenly 
develops into the large, stoutly stipitate, pyriform, pitted, 
brown, mottled appendix, the rounded top of which reaches 
to the top of the spathe, and is about two and a half 
inches in diameter. Fem, infl. about half an inch long, of 
many, green, flagon-shaped, one-celled, one-ovuled ovaries, 
each narrowed into a style with a capitate stigma. Male 
infl. as long as the fem., but broader, of crowded, sub- 
quadrate anthers. Berries yellow, oblono--obovoid, half an 
inch long—/. D. H. 



Fig 1, section of tube of spathe with baae of spidix, about twice the nat. 
nze ; 2, stamen ; 3, ovary ; 4, vertical section of do. : all greatly enlarged. 



nm 




(tRWhlrth 



entBrooksDay&SonW* 1 ' 



J. Roeve &.C° London 



Tail 7769. 
KALANCHOE faeinacea. 

Native of Socotra. 

Nat. Ord. Ukassui.ace*. 
Genus Kalanciioe, Adam. \ (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 659.) 



K\h\srnoy,furinacea ; fruticuluH robustus, 6-12-pollicaria, caule crasso erecto 
v. baBi decumbente subtereti transvrrae ruguloao, foliis 1 J-2-pollicaribus 
confertis decuBsatim oppositis BessilibuB obovatis apice rotundatis basi 
angustati* ctukbo carnosia pallide viroacentibus albo-pruinatia utrinque 
concoloribus mnrginibus subroaeia, floribuu in paniculas pedunculataB 
terminalea siibeorymbosas diapoaitia breviter pedicellatia, calyciH mimiti 
s.'gmi-ntia triangularibua, corolbo i-poll. longao tub ) tercti infra up- limn 
Havo dein lobiaque oblongia obtusis recurvia flammeis filamentia brevibua, 
antoeria parvis seriei superioris vix exBertis, disci aqoamulia lineari- 
oblongia obtusia, camellia angustis tubum corolla? aequantibus ia stylos 
graciles attenuatis, sugmatibus minutiB. 

K. f.irinacea, Balf.ftf. in Proc. Roy. Soc. Edinb. vol. xi. (188:2 ,i p. 512; et in 
Trans, vol. xxi. (1888) p. '.'J. 



A. fariuacea is one of the many new and interesting 
plants discovered in Socotra by Dr. I. B. Balfour, 
during his exploration of that island in 1880, where he 
describes it as being common in crevices of limestone rocks. 
It is one of four species found there by him, of which 
three were new to science. More recently, in 1897, seeds 
of it, from which the specimen here figured was raised, 
were sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by the late Mr. 
Theodore Bent. It flowered in a greenhouse in August, 
1900, and continued flowering for two months. 

Descr. — A stout, erect, sparingly branched, succulent 
shrub, with mealy white branches, leaves, and panicle. 
Leaves crowded towards the ends of the branches, sessile, 
spreading, one and a half to two inches long, obovate, 
narrowed at the base, concave, quite entire, tip rounded, 
very thick, pale green beneath the thin covering of mealy 
pubescence, margins faintly rosy. Panicle terminal, sub- 
corymbiform; rhachis and branches stout; bracts small, 
oblong, fleshy. Ffowen shortly pedicelled, erect, one-half to 
three-quarters of an inch long. Calyx minute, obtusely 
four-lobed. Corolla narrowly campanulate ; tube about 
Aran. 1st, 1901. 



half an inch long, terete, yellow below the middle, bright 
scarlet above it, as are the ovate, sub-acute, spreading lobes. 
Stamens small, the upper series hardly exserted ; filaments 
very short ; anthers broadly oblong! Scales of the disk 
small, linear-oblong. Carpels narrowed into slender styles 
with minute stigmas. — J". D. H. 



Fi£ 1, portion of leaf with mealy pubescence ; 2, calyx ; 3, corolla laid open ; 
4, scales of the disk and carpels -.—all enlarged. 



7770 




M.S del, J"N Pitch. liOx 









Tab. 7770. 

ROSA Fedtschenkoana. 

Native of Turkestan. 

Nut. Ord. Rosace*. — Tribe Rose*. 
Genua Rosa, Linn \ (licnth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 625.) 



l;<ps\ (Cinnaniomeae) Fedlzchenkoana; frutex erectus, vage ramosus, ramis 
ramulisque crebre armatis, aculeis stipularibus rigidis rectis v. recurvis 
binin renal paullo dilatatis et compre^sis ceteris setiformibus rectis, foliis 
glauceHcentibns 5-7-foliolatis, rhachi gracili sparse setaceo, foliolis polli- 
Odtribaa ellipticis acutis simpliciter serrulatis terminaii paullo majore, 
Kiipulis acumiiiatis petiolo ailnati.i apicibus liberis H jribus solitariis v. 
2-4-nis albis malodoris, pedunculis ovariis ellipsoideis sepalisque glandu- 
loso-pilosis, Bepalis lanceulatis apicibus linearibus apice simplicibm v. 
paullo dilatatis, petalis Bepalis bis terve longioribus, carpellie stylisque 
pilis longis sparse hirsutis, fmctibus ellipsoideis v. subpyrforuribus setulosis 
rubris sepalis persistentious coronatis. 

R. Fedtschenkoana, Regit. Del. Sem. Hurt. Petrop. 1876", p. 30; et in Acta 
Horti Petrop. vol. v. (1877) p. 314. 



A very handsome white rose, with almost black bark on 
the older branches, red brown on the younger. It was 
discovered in the Turkestan and Kokan regions of Central 
Asia, by the Russian travellers, Fedtschenko & Korolkow, 
by whom it was introduced into the Imperial Botanic 
Gardens of St. Petersburgh. A plant of it was procured 
for the Royal Gardens, Kew, from Mr. T. Smith's Nursery 
at Newry, in 1890, which has developed into a rambling, 
very glaucous shrub of free growth, and flowered in June, 
1900, fruiting in the following September. 

According to Dr. Kegel it is a variable plant, of which 
he describes four forms, differing from one another chiefly 
in the amount of glandular hairs in the calyx, and in the 
form of the fruit, from globose to lageniform. The scent 
of the flowers is unpleasant. 

I'rsrr. — A free-growing, very glaucous, much-branched, 
closely prickly shrub ; stipular prickles straight, or slightly 
recurved, compressed, and somewhat dilated at the base, 
other prickles on the branches reduced to bristles, glandular 
hairs none. Leaves four to five inches long ; rhachis 
sl'iider, sparsely setose ; leaflets five to seven, an inch long, 
elliptic, acute, simply serrulate, glaucous; stipules adnate 
Amu. 1m, 1 001. 



to the petiole, their acuminate tips only free. Flowers 
solitary, or two to four on a peduncle, large white; 
peduncles and ellipsoid ovaries more or less glandular- 
hairy. Sepals lanceolate, tips linear or slightly dilated. 
Petals twice or thrice as long as the sepals. Carpels and 
styles sparsely hirsute. Fruit ellipsoid or sub-pyriform, 
crowned with the persistent sepals, red. — J. B. H. 



Fig. 1, bad; 1 and 3, anthers ; 4, cartels : — all enlarged — 5, fruit of the 
natural size. 




; deX J.UPjtdiTilK 



TfineauL Brooks 3ay & 3on *** 



L Reeve & C°Loj\doT\. 



Tab. 7771. 
STAPELTA nobilis. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Asclepiade*. — Tribe Stapeliejk. 
Genus Stapelia, Linn.; (Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 784.) 



Stapelia (Tridentea) nobilis ; caule decumbente basi ramoso tetragono 
pubescente angulia dentatis faciebus concavis, foliornm rudimentis 
dentibus insertia fa poll, longis erectis ovatis acutis pubernlis, floribus 
Bolitariia binisve basin versus ramulorum insertis, pedunculo crasso polli- 
cavi velutino, sepalis £ poll. loDgis ovato-lanceolatis acutis velntinis, 
corolla ampla extus rubro-purpurea puberula intns ochracea pilis longis 
laxe villosa et lineis sanguineis trabeculata, tubo campanulato l£ poll, 
diam., lobis 2$ poll, longis ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis reflexis pilis 
purpureis ciliatis, coronas exterioris brunneo-purpureaa lobis ^ poll, longis 
ascendentibus linearibus 3-dentatis glabris, interioris lobis inaequaliter 
bipartitis segmentis subulatis triquetris suberectis. 

S. nobilis, N.E. Br. mas. 



Mr. N. E. Brown, from whose description of this plant, 
prepared for the forthcoming part of the Kew Bulletin, 
the above is taken, says that it is closely allied to 
S. gigantea (tab. 7068) ; differing in the stems not being 
so stout, and their angles much less compressed. The 
flowers are similar in colour, but those of S. nobilis are 
much smaller, have a distinctly campanulate tube, and are 
more hairy within. 

The plant here figured was sent to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in 1897, by Mr. T. G. Griffiths of Port Elizabeth, 
Cape Colony, but of its exact native habitat I have no 
information. It flowered in the Succulent House in May, 
1900. 

Descr. — Stem decumbent, branched at the base, about two- 
thirds of an inch in diameter, pubescent, four-angled; angles 
toothed, their faces concave. Leaves rudimentary, erect, 
inserted on the teeth of the angles, about one-twelfth of 
an inch long, ovate, acute, puberulous. Flowers solitary, 
or two on the lower part of the branches ; peduncle an 
inch long, stout, velvety. Sepals about one-fourth of an 
inch long, ovate, acute, velvety. Corolla large, red-purple 
externally, internally villous with long hairs, ochraceous, 
Apeil 1st, 1901. 



trabeculate with blood-red cross-lines; tube campauulate, 
half an inch in diameter ; lobes two and three-quarters of 
an inch loug, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, reflexed, ciliate 
with purple hairs. Outer corona purple-brown, glabrous ; 
lobes a quarter of an inch long, linear, ascending, three- 
toothed. Inner corona with unequally bipartite lobes. — 
J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, corona ; 2, lobe of outer corona ; 3, inner corona ; 4, poilinia : — 
all enlarged. 



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Tab. 7767.— CLADRASTIS TINCTORIA. 
„ 7768— AMORPHOPHALLUS LEONENSIS. 
„ 7769.— KALANCHOE FARItfACEA. 
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7772 







LBrooImllHy &.SanLt,4Imp 



Tab. 7772. 
WYETHIA mollis. 

Native of California. 

Nat. Ord. Gomposit.*.— Tribe HklianxhoIde^. 
Genus Wvktuia, JVuit.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 374). 



Wvethia (Alarconia) mollis; herba 2-3-pedalis, erecta, robnsta, floccoso- 
tomentoaa, demum glabrescena, radice crasso, cattle aimplici v. parce 
ramoso, foliia inferioribua pedalibus ovatia oljlongis v. lineari-oblongi* 
acatis v. apice rotundatis basi rotundatis caneatis vel in petiolum crassuiii 
angustatia coriaceia nerris numeroHis patalia nervulia reticulatis superiori- 
bus ovato-lanceolatia, petiolo 2-4 poll, longo, capitulia panels amplu 
inferioribua longe BUperioribua breviter pedicellatis, pedlcellis craasia, 
involucri cupulart8 pollicaria bracteia 10-12 oblongo-'anceolatis subacutia 
herbaceia, reccptaculi bracteolia lineari-oblongis, noribus aorantiacis radii 
10-15 ligula lj poll, longa \ poll, lata patenti-recurva apice bidenticulata, 
acha3niis lineari«oblongis compressia marginibu8 oiliolatis, pappi aetia 
brtvibua anbulatia rigidia scabridia ldteralibua aaepias longioribua. 

W. mollia, A. Gray in Proc. Amer. Acad. vol. vi. (1865) p. 544; Synogt. Fl. 
N. Am. GamopeL p. 2o8 ; et in Bot. Calif, vol. i. p. 349. 



Wyethia, a genua confined to Western North America, 
consists of about a dozen species. It is nearly allied to 
Helianthiis, differing in having fertile ray-flowers and in 
the pappus. A. Gray describes the species as having a 
balsamic odour, adding that the thick roots and the seeds 
were used as food by the Indians. The name is a tribute by 
Mr. Nuttall to the memory of Nathaniel J. Wyeth, who 
collected the species upon which the genus was. founded, 
and who subsequently accompanied its founder in one of 
the first journeys made across the whole continent of 
North America. 

The sectional name of Alarconia is adopted from De 
Candolle (Prodr., vol. v. p. 537), who gave it as a 
generic one to a species, W. helenioides, previously described 
by Nuttall. It is dedicated to the memory of Fernando 
de Alarcon, a noble Spanish navigator, who, in 1540, 
first visited and carefully surveyed the coast of California. 
W, tnollvs is a native of the Sierra Nevada, especially on 
the eastern side, from Sierra Valley to Virginia city in 
Nevada, thence westward to the Yosemite and other valleys 
of the Sierra in California. 

May 1st, 1901. 



For the specimen here figured I am indebted to my 
friend the Rev. Canon Ellacombe, of Bitton, in whose rich 
collection of hardy plants it flowered in June, 1900. 

Descr. — A stout, perennial herb, one to three feet high, 
covered with a white, floccose tomentum. Leaves few, 
coriaceous, radical a foot long, ovate- or linear-oblong, 
acute, obtuse or rounded and apiculate at the tip, base 
acute, rounded or narrowed into the stout petiole, upper 
leaves ovate or lanceolate, acute. Heads few, shortly 
stoutly pedicelled, four to five inches in diameter. Invo- 
lucre cupular ; bracts ten to twelve, narrow, acute, erect. 
May-flowers ten to fifteen ; ligule an inch and a half long 
by a quarter of an inch broad, spreading and recurved, 
golden-yellow, as are the disk-flowers. Scales of the 
receptacle linear. Achenes linear-oblong, compressed, 
margins ciliolate. Pappus of a few unequal, rigid, scabrid, 
persistent bristles. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1. bract of involucre ; 2, ray -flower ; 3, diak-flower ; 4, stamena ; 5, stjJe- 
arinB of disk-flowers : — all enlarged. 




7773 



M -S-<lel.J.N.Ht eh ] lt j 1 



T &TcentBrcoks;Qay &Son Lt«rap 



Tab. 7773. 
pyrus alnifolia. 

Native of Japan and China. 

Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Pomejs. 
Genus Pyrus, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. i. p. 626.) 



Pyrus (Sorbus) alnifulia ; arbor parva, ramis lenticellatis cortice fusco 
vestitis, foliis breviter petiolatis ovato-rotundatis acutis vel acuminatis 
argute duplo-triplicato-serratis basi rotandatis cordatisve submembrana- 
ceis glabria penninerviis, nervis numerosis parallelis supra impresses 
eubtus gracilibuB prominulis, nervulis tenuissimis, corymbis breviter 
pedunculitis multifloris, pedunculi ramis pedicellisque brevibus puberu- 
lis, floribus ad £ poll. diam. albis, calycis tomentoai lobis obtusis, 
petalorum ungne barbato, fructibus ellipsoideis v. Bubglobosis \ poll. 
Iongis basi et apice rotundatis rubris. 

P. alnifolia, Franch. & Sav. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. ii. p. 350. 

Sorbu8 alnifolia, C. Koch in Ann. Mus. Lugd. Bat. vol. i. (1864) p. 249. 
Maxim. Mel. Biol. Dec. ix. (1872) p 173. 

Crataegus alnifolia, Sieb. & Zucc. in Abhandl. Akad. Muench. vol. iv. pars II. 
(1843) p. 130. Miquel, Ann. Mus. Bot. Jjugd. Bat. vol. iii. p. 40. Franch. 
4" Sav. I.e. vol. i. p. 141. 

Aria tiliasfolia. Decne. in Ofouv. Arch. Mus. Par. Ser. I. vol. x. (1874) p. 166. 

A. alnifolia, Decne. I.e. 



Pyi-us alnifolia is a small tree, first described from 
Japan, where it was discovered by Siebold. It inhabits 
the upper limit of the forest region in many parts of the 
Archipelago, including that of the celebrated mountain 
Fudji-yama. Maximovicz found it in Eastern Manchuria, 
and Dr. Henry at elevations of seven thousand feet to nine 
thousand five hundred feet in the Hupeh province of 
China proper. 

The specimen here figured is from a plant which flowered 
in the Arboretum of the Royal Gardens, Kew, in May, 
1900. It was purchased from Mr. L. Spatb, Nurseryman 
of Berlin, in 1896. 

Descr. — A small tree, glabrous except the corymbs. 
Leaves two to three inches long, shortly petioled, broadly 
ovate or almost orbicular, acute or acuminate, sharply, 
doubly or trebly serrate, base rounded or cordate, bright 
green above, with many parallel immersed nerves, which are 
prominent, but \ery slender on the pale under surface, 
May Isy, 1901. 



very thin in texture ; petiole one half to three-fourths of an 
inch long, slender. Corymbs two to three inches in diameter, 
shortly peduncled ; peduncle, branches and pedicels 
puberulous. Flowers white, about half an inch in diameter. 
Calyx tomentose ; lobes short, obtuse. Petals with a 
bearded claw. Styles three. Fruit about halt* an inch 
long, ellipsoid or subglobose, bright red. — J. B. H, 



I"ij?. 1, Tin expanded flower; 2, vertical section of calyx with stamens and 
2 styles -.--both enlarged ; 3, fruit, of the natural size. 




M-S.d e i.j.N. FltoKllth 



Vincent BrooVs,Day & Sonlt^P 



L-Reeve &.C?Lonfl<- 



Tab. 7774. 

LONICERA PYRENAICA. 
Native of the Pyrenees. 

Nat. Ord. CaprifoliacEjB. — Tribe Lonicere*. 
Genus Lonicera, Linn.-, (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 5.) 



Lonicera (Xyloateum) pyrenaiea; frutex dumosus, erectus, glaberrimus, 
ramulia patentibua, foliia apices versus ramulorum faaciculatia seasilibua 
obovato-cuneatia oblanceolatisve acutis glauciB cadncis, pedunculis foliis 
diraidio breviuribua, bracteis 2 foliaceis, bracteolis 4 minutis ovatia, 
ovariis snbglobosis basi tantum connatia, calycis dentibua minutis, 
corollfB pallide roseaa tubo § poll, longo basi gibboso lobis ovato-rotundatis, 
genitalibus breviter exsertia, stylo villoso, baccia pisiformibu8 fere liberis 
rubria. 

L. pyrenaiea, Linn. Sp. PI. p. 174. JDuham. Arb. vol. ii. t. 110; Ed. 
II. vol. i. t. 15. DC. Fl. Fr. vol. iv. p. 272; Prodr. vol. iv. p. 335. 
Ait. Hort. Eew, E<1. II. vol. i. p. 379. Benth. Gal. PI. Pyren. p. 97. 
Allioni, Fl. Pedem. vol. i. p. 128. Poll. Fl. Veron. vol. i. p. 285. Reichb. 
Ic. Fl. Germ. vol. xvii. t. 1175, fig. 2. Parlat. Fl. Hal. vol. vii. p. 127. 
Willk. & Lange, Prodr. Fl. Hisp. vol. ii. p. 353. Gren. $ Godr. Fl. 
de France, vol. ii. p. 11. 

Caprifolium pyrenaicum, Lam. Fl. Fr. vol. iii. p. 366. 

Lonicera pedunculis bifloria, &c, Royen, Fl. Leyd. Prodr. p. 238. 

Xylosteon pyrenaicum, Tournef. Instit. p. 609. Magnol Hort. Reg. Monsp. 
p. 209, cum Ic. Rand, Hort. Med. Chele. ed. 1739^ p. 211. 

Periclymenum vel Xyloataeum Pyrenaicum, Ray, Hist. PI. vol. iii. ; Dendrol. 
p. 29. 

Lonicera pyrenaiea is a very old garden plant, having, 
according to Philip Miller, been in cultivation in England 
since 1793. It is a native of the Eastern Pyrenees, 
and of the larger Balearic Islands, at elevations in the 
latter of twelve hundred feet to fourteen hundred feet. 

In the Royal Gardens, Kew, it forms a small shrub in 
the Rock garden, flowering profusely in May and June. 

j) eS cr. — A small, much-branched, glabrous shrub, with 
close-set, short branchlets. Leaves crowded towards the 
ends of the branchlets, sessile, spreading, about an inch 
long, oblanceolate or cuneiformly obovate, acute, glaucous, 
deciduous. Peduncles about half as long as the leaves, 
each bearing two bracteate sessile flowers, shortly united 
by the bases of their ovaries. Bracts leaf-like, spreading ; 
bracteoles two to each flower, minute. Ovary sub-globose. 
Calyx-teeth minute, triangular. Corolla pale rose-coloured 
May 1st, 1901. 



or nearly colourless ; tube half an inch long, gibbous at the 
base ; lobes shorter than the tube, orbicular-ovate. Stamens 
very shortly exserted. Style slender, tomentose. Berries 
pisiform, nearly free, brick-red. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, peduncle bracts bracteoles and two flower?, one nnexpanded, the 
other with the corolla removed; 2 and 3, anthers:— all enlarged; 4, berries 
of the natural size. 




MS -del,J.N.F;tohiith 



VInc e ntBrooksP^y&3°" L1;lI, 



L R«svn & O.O T.rvnrlr,r, 



Tab. 7775. 
MESEMBRYANTHEMUM calamifobmb. 

Native of South Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Ficoide^. — Tribe Mesembrye.*. 

Genua Mesembryanthemum, Linn.', (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. 

p. 853.) 



Mksembbyantkemum (Calamiformia) calamiforme ; glaberrimnm, caule brevi 
robnato lignoao, foliia 6-8 oppoaitia basi lata insertia 2-3 poll, longia 
cylindraceis obtusia mucronalati*v>} carnosia ad g poll. diam. Rubglaucia 
tenuissime punctatia, floribna paendo-terminalibua Bolitariia 2- lh poll, 
latia br«-viter cra8ae pedunculatis, calyciatubo brevi craaso lobis 5inaeqaa- 
libna 3 majoribus craase carnosia marginibus dilatatis quasi bialatia alia 
trancatia apice prodncto obtuso 7. acuto, 2 miaoribua aubmeiiibrana- 
ceis, petalia nnmenwaaimia sepalis 2-3-plo longioribaa sub 3-seriatia 
linearibaa angaatieaimia albia apicibus pallida roaeis, fllamentia inaeqai- 
longia petalia multo brevioribua 6-8-8eriatia pallidia, antheria parvia 
aurantiaci^, ovario conioo, atigmatibaa 5-8 erectis CUBpidatia intua 
barbatis, capsala polysperma. 

M. calamiforme, TAnn. Sp. PI. p. 481. Haw. Obs. Gen. Mesenib. p. 140; Misc. 
Nat. p. 26 ; Syn. PI. Succ. p. 208 ; Revis. Plant. Succ. 105. DC. PL Grasses, 
t. 5 ; Prodr. vol. iii. p. 424 Ait. Hort. Kew. ed. 2 vol. iii. p. 215. Salm. 
Dycl; Monogr. Mesembr. § 10, fig. 1. Harv. & Sond. Fl. Gap. vol. ii. 
p. 405. 

M. calamiforme, Ac, Dillen. Hart. Elth. p. 228, t. 186, fig. 223. 

Ficoidea capenaia, humilis, &c., Bradley, Hist. PI. Succ. Dec. ii. p. 10, fig. 19. 



The genus Mesembryanthemum holds an important place 
in the history of Horticulture. Dillenius, who treats of 
the species known to him at great length, gives an interest- 
ing account of the successive introduction of those known 
to his predecessors. Of these he says 15 were known to 
Bobart (1648); 20 to Breyn (1680); 39 to Ray (1686) ; 
23 to Herman (1687); 21 to Plukenet (1696); 30 to 
Bradley (1716) ; 36 to Tournefort. Dillenius himself 
describes and figures 47 species, all cultivated in Sherard's 
garden at Eltham in 1732. Following Dillenius, Linneus 
in the " Hortus ClirTortianus " (1737) gives 30 species ; and 
in the " Species plantarum " (1753) 35, where he reduces 
some of Dillenius's species to varieties. Coming down to 
later times, Aiton's "Hortus Kewensis " (ed. I. 1789) 
contains 70 species, and Ed. II. (1811) 175. Haworth's 
" Revis. Plant. Succ." (1821) describes 310. Harvey & 
May 1st, 1901. 



Sonder's " Flora Capensis " 293, exclusive of imperfectly 
known species. In the " Index Kewensis " (18i>5) 375 
species are enumerated, of which 113 were, in 1899, in 
cultivation in the Royal Gardens, Kew. Lastly, 25 are 
figured in this Magazine. 

The specimen of M. calamiforme here figured was re- 
ceived in 1898, with other interesting plants, from Mr, 
Chalwin, Superintendent of the Cape Town Botanical 
Gardens, with the information that it is a native of the 
Karroo district. It flowered in a greenhouse of the Royal 
Gardens in June, 1900. 

Descr.— Glabrous. Stem short, stout, woody. Leaves 
six to eight, opposite, sessile by a much-thickened base, 
two to three inches long, cylindric, obtuse, about one-third 
of an inch in diameter, sub-glaucous. Flowers solitary, 
terminal, very stoutly peduncled, two to two and a half 
inches in diameter. Calyx-tube short ; lobes five, unequal, 
two larger, fleshy, broadly winged, wings truncate; tip 
elongate, acute or obtuse; two smaller thinner. Petals 
innumerable, sub-triseriate, very narrow, white with pink 
tips. Stamens much shorter than the petals; anthers 
small, yellow. Ovary obconic, stigmas five to eight, erect, 
cuspidate. Capsule many- seeded.—/. D. H. 



alJll'la, °ed ^ ^ ^^ 8epal8 ! 2 ' Stamen ; 3 ' OVary ' 8tyle *"* Sti8ma8 **" 




MS.a e lJ.KF, tchKt} ., 



VmeantBrooXsDay^oaLL^ 



L Reeve & C ° Loadc 



Tar. 7776. 

M'ANKTTlA BICOLOK. 
Native i>i Bt'asil, 

Nat. Orel. Rubiack*,.— Tribe CiNcnoxEJK. 
fJenns SfAtfBTTIA, Mutis; (Heath. & Huok.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 37.) 



Makkttia (lleterochroa) hieolor\ frutex scandens, gracilis, ramo<ms, ramnlis 
teretibns puberulis, foliis 2-6 poll, longis breviter petiolatia ovatis ovato- 
lanceolatisve acuminatis supra subscaberulis subtua pallidis nervia 
tomentellis, stipulis parvis late ovatis, fioribus axillaribus et terminalibus, 
pedicellia corollas subtequilongis puberulis, calycis tvibo parvo turbinato 
cinereo-tomentoso, lobis 5 poll, longis ovatis oblongisve acutis reflexis 
viridibus extus puberulis, corolla sepalis bis longiore cyliudracea tereti a 
medio ad basin sensim ampliata setulis rigidis hispida coccinea apicem 
versus nuda aurea intus basin versus anuulo pilorum instructa, ore 
paullo dilatato 4-fido lobis parvis triangularibus patulis, autheris lineari- 
oblongis infra medium tubi insertis, disco pulvinari, stylo gracili 
stigmatibus 2 linearibus, capsula globoso-pyriformi tomentosa. 

M. bicolor, Pad. Mag. Bot. vol. x. (1843) p. 27. Flore de* Serves, vol. ii. 
p. 445, t. 6. Dietr. Fl. Univers. t. Ii. Rev. Ilort. Belg. vol. xxi. (1895) 
p. 49. 

M. lateo-rubr&, Bentk. in Linnaea, vol. xxiii. (1850) p. 44< r >. Schumann in Mart. 
FL Bras. vol. vi. pars vi. p. 174. 

M. filicaulis, Waters in OSttr. Hot. Zeitse/ir. vol. xxxi. (1881) p. 281 ; in Bot. 
Reis. Pr. Sax L'obnrg, p. 118, t. 17. 

M. pubescens, pai-tim, Cham. & Sekleekt. in Linnaea, vol. iv. (1829) p. 170. 

M. scabra, Herb. PoAl. 

Guaguebiua hiteo-rubm, Fell. Fl. Flttm. vol. i. t. 121 ; textn Ed. Xi>tto, p. 4fi. 



The beautiful and now well-known stove-climber here 
figured was imported into Europe from the Organ Mts. in 
Brasil by Mr. James Veitch, grandfather of the partners in 
the celebrated firm of that name, and founder, I believe, of 
the business, which was then carried on at Mount Radford, 
near Exeter. This was about sixty years ago, when 
William Lobb, then collecting for his firm in Brasil, 
sent home seeds. It appears to have a very wide range 
of distribution, for there are specimens in the Kew 
Herbarium from Uruguay, Paraguay, St. Catherine, 
Rio de Janeiro, and Minas Geraes all in Brasil. In the 
Royal Gardens, I am informed that it is never out of 
flower. 

The genus Manettia is a very large one, consisting 
of upwards of thirty species, spread over tropical America. 
May 1st, 1901. 



Only one has previously been figured in this work, M. cordU 
folia, Mart, t, 3202, for M. micans, Pcepp. & Endl. t. 5495, 
is only a robust form of that species. 

Deter. — A slender, much-branched, more or less puberu- 
lous climber. Leaves two to six inches long, shortly 
petioled, ovate or ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, sub-scaberu- 
lous and bright green above, paler beneath, with sub- 
tomentose nerves; stipules very small, broadly ovate. 
Flowers axillary and terminal, tetramerous ; pedicels about 
as long as the corolla. Calyx-tube small, turbinate, tomen- 
tose; lobes ovate or oblong, acute, reflexed, green. 
Corolla-tube three-quarters of an inch long, cylindric, 
terete, dilated towards the base, hispid with scarlet hairs, 
except towards the apex, which is naked and golden- 
yellow; lobes very short, broadly triangular. Anthers 
sessile in the middle of the tube of the corolla, above 
a ring of hairs. Style slender, stio-mas two, linear.— 
J. D.E. 

««Sf" 1 \ C &^ iv ^i disk ' st y le an <* stigmas: 2, section of corolla with 
anthers; 3, hairs of the surface of the corolla :^aU enlarged. 



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„ 7773— PYEUS ALNIFOLIA. 
„ 777L— LOtflCERA PYRENAICA. 
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7778 




Tab. 7777-3. 

CRINUM RHODANTHCM. 
Native of N garni Land. 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllide,*. — Tribe Amarylle^. 
Genua Crinuu, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. J. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 726 ) 



Criscm (Stenaster) rhodanthum ; bulbo ovoideo 4 poll, diam., foliis 12-15 
bipedalibus ad 2 poll, latis distichia loratis carnosulia fragilibus glauces- 
centibu8 enerviis apice rotundatis marginibus angustissimescariosis erosis, 
pednnculo bTevi lato valde compresso, Bpathia 1-2-pollicaribus deltoileis 
acnmiuatis, umbella hemispbaerica fere 2-ped. diam, multiflora, pedicellia 
l|-2 poll, longis, perianthii tubo 3-pollicari fere rect ■> angusto cylindraceo, 
limbi saturate rosei segmentis patenti-revolutis loratis 2£ poll, longis, 
filamentis erectis periantbii segmentis aequilougis, antheris } poll, longis 
fuscis, stylo gracili recto filamentis aa pilongo, stigmate capitellato. 

C. rbodanthum, Baker in Dyer, Flora of Tropical Africa, vol. vii. p. 397. 



The term Ngami Land indicates the country around a 
lake of that name, situated in the heart of Africa, in 
about lat. S. 20°, and approximately half way between the 
Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Though long known by 
reports from the Bechuana tribes of S. Africa, it was 
not visited by Europeans till 184-9, when the intrepid 
travellers, Oswell and .Livingstone, reached it after a 
perilous crossing of the desert intervening between it and 
Bechuanaland. 

Though situated within the tropics, the vegetation of 
Ngami Land is South African, as exemplified by a most 
beautifully preserved herbarium made there by Lieut, (now 
('apt.) and Airs. Lugard, and presented to Kew, of which 
an account will be communicated to the Liunean Society 
by Mr. N. E. Brown. This herbarium is rich in novelties, 
and is rendered exceptionally valuable from being accom- 
panied by a series of coloured drawings, with analyses of 
many species, by Mrs. Lugard, which are of rare excellence 
in point of execution and scieutific accuracy, and of which 
that lady has kindly allowed copies to be taken for the 
Kew collection of botanical drawings. 

The exact locality of the Crinum is Mt. Kwebe, situated 
a little to the eastward of the lake, which is described 

Jtne 1st, 1901. 



as being -conspicuous for the number of Baobab trees 
growing upon it. The bulb was presented by Mrs. Lugard 
to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1899, where it flowered 
in a tropical house. 

Descr. — Bulb four inches in diameter, ovoid. Leaves 
twelve to fifteen, distichous, lorate, two feet long by two 
inches broad, glaucous ; rather fleshy, brittle, tip rounded ; 
margins narrowly scarious, erose. Peduncle short, flat- 
tened, an inch broad. Spathes two, deltoid, acuminate, 
two to three inches long. Umbels hemispheric, laxly very 
many-flowered, nearly two feet in diameter ; pedicels 
half to one inch long. Perianth-tube three inches long, 
very slender, cylindric, nearly straight, pale red ; segments 
of limb spreading and revolute, two and a half inches long 
by one-sixth of an inch, broad, lorate, obtuse, bright red. 
Filaments about as long as the segments of the limb, red, 
very slender; anthers one-sixth of an inch long, brown. 
Style as long as the filaments, very slender, red ; stigma 
capitellate.— J. D. H. 

Tab. 7777, umbel with top of peduncle and spathe of not. size. 
Tab. 7773, reduced view of whole plant ; fig. 1, portion of margin of leaf ; 2 and 
3, anthers ; 4, top of style and stigma -.—all enlarged. 






770 




Lt d bnp- 



Tab. 7779. 
BESCHCORNERIA Wrightii. 

Nat ire of Mexico ? 

Nat. Ord. Amakyllide.e;. — Tribe Agave,e. 
Genus Bescuorneku, Kunth; (Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Plant vol. iii. p. 738.) 



Beschornerta Wrightii ; trunco robasto, foliis ad 50 dense confertis patenti- 
recurvia ensii'ormibua 4-5 ped. longis cmsse coriaceis medium versus 
2-poll. latis baai dilatatis crassissimis margine denticulatia apice in 
acumen brunneum elongatum angustitis utrinque la?te viridibus dorso 
coata lata percursis, pedunculo brevi robusto foliis paucis abbreviatia 
erectia inatructo, panicula? 8-pedalis pyramidalia rhachi ramulisque 
patenti-recurvia glaberrimia roseia, floribua secua ramuloa in fasciculos 
2-4-flores diapositis nutantibua breviter pedicellatis pubescentibus, 
bracteia £-1 poll. longi8 ovato-lanceolatis bracteoliaqne miuoribus 
Brarioaia albia rosea atriatis, pedicellis glaberrimia, ovario f poll, longo 
cylindraceo, perianthii tubo ovario paullo longiore et latiore, i-egmentis 
lineari-spathulatis viridibus marginibus flavidia apicibua patuliB intus 
fliivis, autberis linearibua apicibua exsertis. 



Beschovneria Wrightii is much the largest, species of the 
five that have as yet flowered at Kew, and been figured in 
this work (tabs. 4642, 5203, 6641, 6091, 6768). Of these 
it is most nearly allied to B. Dehosteriana, C. Koch, 
Wochenschr. vii. (1864), 187 (B. Decosteriana, Baker, tab. 
6768), which differs in the quite glabrous flowers. Of its 
native country, or the date of its introduction into the 
Royal Gardens of Kew, wljere it bore the erroueous name 
of Furcrsea Bedinghausti ? a very different plant, there is 
no record. With the exception of a Texan species 
(//. dubia), Mexico is the native country of the genus. I 
have given it the name of Mr. Charles EL Wright, A.L.S., 
Assistant in the Kew Herbarium, who had examined and 
distinguished it from its congeners. It flowered in tin* 
Mexican division of the Temperate House of the Royal 
Gardens in June, 1900. 

Descr. — Stem (of the specimen figured) eighteen inches 
high, six inches in diameter. Leaves about fifty, densely 
crowded, spreading and recurved, ensiform, coriaceous, 
four to five feet long by two inches broad about the middle ; 
tip narrow* d into a brown, dagger-like tip; base dilated, 

June 1st, 1901. 



very thick, bi-convex ; margins very narrowly scarious, 
denticulate. Peduncle short, stout, bearing a few short, 
erect leaves. Panicle pyramidal, eight feet high ; rhachia 
stout ; branches and branchlets spreading or recurved, quite 
glabrous; bracts and bracteoles scarious, white, streaked with 
red. Floivers fascicled on the branchlets, shortly pedicelled, 
nodding, green, pubescent. Ovary three-fourths of an inch 
long, cylindric. Perianth-tube rather longer and broader 
than the ovary ; segments erect, linear-spathulate, green, 
with broad, yellow margins, yellow within ; tips obtuse, 
spreading. Anthers linear, tips only exserted. Stigma 
capitellate, three-lobed. — J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, portion of margin of leaf ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, top of styla and 
stigma: — all enlarged; 5, reduced view of whole plant. 






7780 




M-S.de'l.J.ir.Fitdiaith 



-WncentBrooks.Day &Son U^&np- 



L Reeve &. C° London. 



Tab. 7780. 
CALANTHE madagascariensis. 

Katire of Madagascar. 



Nat. Ord. Ohcuide^. — Tribe Ei'iDENDRcac. 
Genns Calantiie, Br. ; (Denth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 520.) 



Calanthe (Veratrifolise) madagascariensis; foliis paucis ad I asm caulis con- 
fertis sessilibua v. petiolatis elbpticis v. ovato-oblongis acuminatia 
marginibu8 undulatis inter-nervos profunde impresses sublacunosis, 
pedunculo 6-12 poll, longo erecto rolmsto puberulo vaginis pancis laxia 
mstructo, racemo brevi erecto laxe niultiHoro, bractei* lanceolatis acutia 
pedicellia paullo brevioribna Tiridibtu, fluribus 1-1^ poll, latis, aepalis 
petalisque patentibus concoloribus albis margines verauB purpareo suffusip, 
eepalis ellipticis acutia apicibus dorso viridibus, petalis paullo minoribua 
subacutis, labello Bepalis paullo breviore piano trilubo ad | poll, longo et 
lato aureo lilacino v. purpureo 3-lobo, lobia lateialibus divaricatia oblongia 
v. lineari-oblorjgis apice rotundatia terminali late obsordato lobulia 
divaricatia, disco basi aureo tuberculia 2 majuaculis veruccisque minoribua 
aucto, calcare gracili incurvo. 

C. madagascariensis, Rolfe tnss. 

C. sylvatica, Rolfe in Joum. Linn. Soc. vol. xxix. (1891) p. 52, non Lindl. 



Calatithe madagascariensis is a near ally of G. veratrifolia, 
Br. (tab. 2015) a species of very wide distribution, from 
North and South India to Japan and Australia. It differs 
from that plant in size, in the undulate leaves, in the much 
broader sepals and petals, and in the more verrucose disk 
of the lip with two large tubercles. The, flowers v.irv 
much in colour; a prevalent variety has white sepals and 
petals, clouded with pink, and a rose-purple lip ; others 
have pure white sepals and petals and a yellow lip. 

Mr. Warpur, a Belgian collector, was the introducer 
into Europe of C. madagascariensis. The Royal Gardens, 
Kew, are indebted to him for the specimen here figuied, 
which flowered in a warm house in August, 1890. There 
are others in the Kew Herbarium from the East Betsileo 
district, collected by the Rev. R. Baron, and from Fort 
Dauphin by Mr. Scott Elliot, M.A., F.L.S. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs small, clustered, cylindric, annulate. 
Leaves few, crowded, all radical, spreading and recurved, 
three to five inches long, sessile or shortly petioled, 
elliptic or oblong-ovate, acuminate; margins undulate; 

Junk 1st, 1901 



upper surface raised between the nerves and pitted ; under- 
surface deeply pitted. Peduncle six to twelve inches high, 
robust, puberulous, bearing a few lax sheaths. Raceme 
short, erect, many-flowered ; bracts lanceolate, recurved, 
green. Flowers an inch or more in breadth. Sepals and 
petals alike, spreading, elliptic-ovate, acute ; petals rather 
smaller, and more obtuse. Lip adnate to the top of 
the column, rather shorter than the sepals, flat, deeply 
three-lobed ; lateral lobes spreading, oblong, tips rounded; 
terminal broadly obcordate, with spreading, rounded 
lobules, and an acute sinus; disk yellow, with two large 
tubercles, and many globose warts at the base ; spur longer 
than the flower, slender, incurved. Column short, broad. 
— /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, base of lip and column ; 2, anther ; 3, pollinia -.—all enlarged. 



7781 




M.S.del J.N.PiwJilUh 



Tfincent Broods Day&Scn LtS-W? 



.Reeve & C? London 



Tab. 7781. 

KYMPH^EA FLAVO-VIRENS. 
Native of Mexico ? 

Nat. Ord. Nymph.eace.e. — Tribe Nympuje.*:. 
Genus Nympiijsa, Linn.; (Bentk. <$• Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 46.) 



Nympii^a flavo-virem; foliis natantibus orbicuLttia ad 10 poll. diam. grosse 
ainuato-crenatia basi eagittatis aegmentia acutia, ainu clanao v. aperto 
supra laete viridibua unicoloribua v. tiigro maculatia subtua pallidioribua 
brunneo suffusis v. atro-sanguineis, pednnculo Ionge emerso, floribus 5 
poll. diam. suaveolentibus, sepalis oblongo-lanceolatis obtnsia extus 
viridibus, petalis numerosia sepalia aequilongia v. panllo longioribus 
anguste lanceolatia subacutia, staminibua anb 3-seriatis, filamentia 
exterioribns lineari-oblongis, antheria fere pollicaribus longioscule appen- 
dieulatis anreis, stigmatilms 12-14 conicis obtusia demam patentibna. 

N. flavo-virena, Lehm. Tnd. Sem. Ilort. Hamb. 1852, p. 9, et in Ann. Sc. Nat. 
Ser. III. vol. xix. (1853) p. 361. 

N. mexicana, Ilort., non Zucc. 



Nymplisea jlavo-virens is a near ally of the Mexican 
N. gracilis, Zucc., differing from that plant in its larger 
size, in the segments of the leaf being pointed, in the 
narrower, sub-acute (not acuminate) petals, in the fila- 
ments not being so dilated at the base, and in the more 
numerous stigmas. It has been long in cultivation in 
Europe, having been first described in 1852, from a plant 
that flowered in the Botanical Garden of Hamburg, and 
in July last a specimen was sent to be named by Mr. 
Moore, A.L.S., Keeper of the Glasnevin Botanical Garden. 
There is a specimen of it in the Kew Herbarium from 
the Hamburg Garden, named by Professor Caspary, who 
made a special study of the genus. This specimen 
has black blotches on the leaves, and the species is 
described as having the under surface of the leaves of a 
blood-red colour. In the Kew plant the leaves are very 
pale green beneath, clouded with brown ; in Mr. Moore's 
they are also pale, but pure green. 

The native country of N. flavo-virevs is unknown, but is 
probably Mexico, both because of its affinity with N. 
gracilis, and because the Kew plant was received from 
W. N. Pike, of the Floral Park, New York (in 1892) as 

Jr.\E 1st, 1901. 



" iV. mexicana true." This last statement is an error, for 
N. mexicana belongs to a section of the genus with 
muticous anthers, and has, according to a description in 
the "Wiener lllustr. Gartenzeit.," 1889, p. 413, yellow 
flowers. 

Descr, — Leaves orbicular, six to ten inches broad, 
coarsely sinuate-crenate, bifid at the base nearly to the 
centre ; segments with pointed tips, sides parallel or divari- 
cate, bright green above, paler beneath. Flowers five 
inches broad. Sepals oblong-Janceolate, obtuse, externally 
yellowish green, white within. Petals narrowly lanceolate, 
tips sub-acute. Stamens nearly an inch long; filaments of 
the outer oblong; anthers longer than the filaments, narrow, 
terminated by an acute elongation of the connective, 
golden-yellow. Stigmas twelve to fourteen, conical, obtuse. 
—J. D. E. 

Fig. 1 and 2, stamons ; 3, enlarged ; -4, stigma*, of the natural size. 



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7782 




M. S.delJ.N Pttchlith. 



Vincent Broo'ks.Da.y&Son Lt^Imp 



L. Reeve &. c' 



Tab. 7782. 

RHODODENDRON oiliicaltx. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. EaiCACEiB. — Tribe Rhodoee*. 
Genus Rhododendron, Linn. ; (Benlh. & Eoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599.) 



Bhododendeon (Eurhododendron) ciliicalyx; arbuacula, foliis coriaceis 3-4 
poll, longis ellipticis v. obovato-lanceolatis utrinque acutis supra pallida 
yiridibus subtus glaucescentibus squamulis minutis brunneis lepidotis, 
junioribns basi ciliatis, nervis utrinque 6-8 subtus prominulis, petiolo 
brevi robusto lepidoto pilis decidais hirsuto, floribas 3-10 corymbosis mox 
cernuis, bracteis parvis cymbiformibus ciliatis brunneis, pedicellis brevi- 
bus calycibusque dense lepidotis, calycis cupularis £ poll, longi lobia 
rotundatis erectis lotige setoso-ciliatis, corolla 4 poll, lata alba v. roseo 
suffusa e basi breviter tubulosa aperte campauulata extus inferne parce 
lanuginosa 5-6-loba, lobis rotundatis marginibus undulatis, staminibus 
10-12, filamentis leviter declinatis basin versus pilosis, ovario oblongo- 
ovoideo 5-loculari dense lepidoto, stylo gracili glabro, stigmate capitate 

R. ciliicalyx, Franch. in Bull. Soc. Bot. France, vol. xxxiii. (1886) p. 233. 
Remsl, in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxvi. (1889) p. 21. 



The plant here figured is closely allied to the Indian 
B. fonnosum, Wall, (see tab. 4457), and may indeed have 
to be considered as a form of that plant. In the absence 
of fruit, however, it would be premature to pronounce 
upon a species established by so excellent a botanist as the 
late Mr. Franchet. The most prominent characters of 
B. ciliicalyx, as distinguished from R. formosum, are, its 
robust habit, larger flowers, and the long bristle-like cilia 
on the lobes of the calyx. Unfortunately the calyx of B. 
formosum is an exceedingly variable organ in development, 
and in being glabrous, hairy, or hirsute ; and there is 
in the iCew Herbarium a robust form of it, collected by 
Dr. Watt in Muneypore and the Naga Hills, at elevations 
of six thousand to nine thousand feet, and called by 
him B. Johnstoneanum, in which the calyx is represented 
by a ring of bristles, like those of the calyx-lobes of R. 
ciliicalyx. 

B. ciliicalyx is a native of the Teechapo mountains of 
Yunnan, near Mo-so-yn, at an altitude of seven thousand 
four hundred feet, where it was discovered by the Abbe 
Delavay, who sent seeds of it to the Jardin des Plautes, 

Ji m.y 1st, 1901. 



Paris. From these plants were raised and distributed, 
one of which, received in 1892 at the Royal G-ardens, Kew, 
from the late Prof. Max Cornu, flowered in the Himalayan 
division of the Temperate House in May, 1900, being then 
three feet high. 

Descr. — A nearly glabrous shrub, or small tree, with 
robust branches. Leaves coriaceous, three to four inches 
long, elliptic or obovate-lanceolate, acute at both ends, 
pale green and smooth above, beneath glaucous, and 
covered with scattered, minute, broad, lepidote scales ; 
petioles short, stout, and often the leaf-base also, ciliate, 
with long hairs. Flowers three to ten, in a terminal, very 
shortly peduncled corymb ; bracts short, oblong, brown, 
ciliate ; pedicels short, lepidote. Calyx about one-sixth 
of an inch long, cupular, five-lobed, lepidote; lobes 
rounded, ciliate, with long, erect, unequal bristles. Corolla 
with a short tube, dilating into an infundibular campanu- 
late,five- to six-lobed limb, which is four inches broad across 
the lobes, white, or suffused with pale rose ; lobes rounded, 
margins undulate ; base externally more or less woolly. 
Stamens sub-decimate, hairy from below the middle to the 
base. Anthers small. Ovary densely lepidote, five-celled ; 
style glabrous. Stigma capitate. 



Fig. 1, portion of under-snrface of leaf with lepidote scales; 2, calvx and 
ovary; 3, scale from do. ; 4, and 5, stamens : — all enlarged. 



7783 




M S.<M.J.NRt a h] 1 th 



VmcentBrcoloiDay &Soii L^inf 



Tab. 7783. 
OHELONOPSIS moschata. 

Native of Japan and China. 

Nat. OrJ. Labiate. — Tribe Stacuyde.e. 
Genus Chelonopsis, Miq. ; {Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1204.) 



Ohelonopsis moschata; herba moscbum spirans, rhizomate lignoso, canle 
eubsimplici ascendente anaotino 4-gono puberulo, foliis 3-6 poll, longis 
breviter petiolatis ovato-lanceolatia aouminatis aerratia supra saturate 
viridibns niarginibus pnrpureis floralibus conformibua, vertioillnatria 
pauci-laxiflorisi, bracteis bracteoliaque linearibus, floribus l£ poll, longis 

fiatulis, calyce inflato campanulato breviter bilabiato 5-dentato puberulo 
ructifero accrescente dentibua erectia, corolla calyce triplo longiore 
roseo-purpurea, tubo fere a baai ampliHto tereti labiia brevibuB patulis 
postico retuso anticique lobis lateralibua pallide flavidis, antici lobo 
terminali ceteria multo majore roaeo, filamentia graeilibua erectia baain 
versus hirsutis, antberia parvia fasciculi's stellatis 3 pilorura omatia 
quorum nno ad. apicem antherai duo ad baain loculorum aitis disco 
postice tumido, atyli glaberrimi lobis insequalibus subulatis, nuculis basi 
calycis aucti campatmlati sessilibus oblongis lata alatis atria. 
C. moacbata, Miq. in Ann. Mus. Lugd. Bat. vol. ii. (1865) p. 111. Maxim. 
Mel. Biol. Dec. ii. p. 443. Franch. & Sav. Enum. PL Jap. vol. i. p. 378. 
Hemsl. inJourn. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. (1890) p. 298. 



The genus Ohelonopsis consists of two species, that here 
figured and G. Beuthamiana, Hems]., a native of China. 
It is allied to the beautiful Melittis Melissophyllum (tlio 
Bastard Balm of the British Flora) which it resembles in 
its lax axillary inflorescence and large flowers, but from 
which it differs in the lobing of the calyx, which is grcifly 
enlarged in fruit, and contains nutlets and seeds of a very 
different character from those of Melitlis. The singular 
tufts of stellate hairs on the anthers of G. moschata do 
not occur in the European genus. 

C. moschata is a native of the mountains of the interior 
of Japan, at elevations of two thousand to seven 
thousand feet, and of those of Ningpo in China. It is 
described by Mr. Hemsley as very variable in the shnpe 
and toothing of the leaves. The specimen figured was 
raised from seeds sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 
1898, by A. K. Bulley, Esq., of West Kirby, which 
flowered, when two feet high, in October, 1900, in the 
Temperate House, but did not mature seed. 

Jrr/r 1st, 1901. 



Descr. — A perennial herb, with musky odour, hootstoch 
woody. Stem ascending, four-angled, puberulous. Leaves 
three to six inches long, shortly petioled, ovate-lanceolate, 
acuminate, finely or coarsely serrate, green, with purple 
margins ; floral leaves like the cauline, but smaller. 
Flowers few, in loose, false-whorls. Bracts and bracteoles 
linear. Calyx campanulate, shortly two-lipped, 5-toothed, 
puberulous, much enlarged, and thinly coriaceous 
in fruit. Corolla an inch and a half long ; tube terete, 
ventricose from the base upward ; tips short, spread- 
ing, the posticous and lateral lobes of the anticous lip 
pale yellow, terminal much the largest, rose-purple- 
coloured. Filaments slender, erect, hirsute towards the 
base ; anthers small, with a star-like fascicle of hairs 
at the top, and one at the base of each cell. Fruiting 
calyx one half to three-fourths of an inch long, oblong- 
campanulate, coriaceous, striate. Nutlets one-third of an 
inch long ; produced upward into a coriaceous wing. Seed 
orbicular, compressed, black. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, calyx ; 2, base of corolla and stamens ; 3 and 4, front and back views 
of antbers ; 5, disk and pistil : — all enlarged. 



7784 




JtS.w,,.- . 



Tab. 7784. 
iris chrysantha. 

Native of Persia ? 

Nat. Ord. iRiDEiK. — Tribe Mor^ee-k. 
Genus Iris, Linn.; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Iris (Pogomria) chrysanlha; rhizomate breviter repente, foliis linearibua 
craasia erectia pedalibus glaucescentibus margine stramineis, peduticulo 
elongato monocephalo, spathse valvia magma lanceolatia acnminatia 
chartaceia pallide viridibua, periantbii magni pallide lutei tubo 
cylindrico pollicari, aegmentis exterioribus oblongia emarginatis e basi 
recurvatia deorsum conspicuo barbatia, segmentis interioribus Jatioribus 
erectia obovatis, ovario magno clavato distincte atipitato, styli ramis latis 
cristia quadratia integris. 



This fine species of 7m belongs to the section Pogoniris, 
and is easily distinguished from the species already known 
by its narrow leaves, long peduncle with a single cluster 
of flowers, large spathe-valves and large, pale yellow 
flower, with a short tube. Its native country is rather 
uncertain. Kew received it from Mr. R. I. Lynch of the 
Cambridge Botanic Garden, with whom it flowered last 
June. He received it from Mr. C. G. Van Tubergen, Jr., 
of the Zwanenburg Nurseries, Haarlem, under the name 
of Oncocyclus, species. Mr. Van Tubergen has not himself 
flowered it, and it seems likely that it was introduced 
accidentally, along with a fine new species of the Onco- 
cyclus section, which he has lately distributed under the 
name of Iris urmiensis, and which was collected in the 
neighbourhood of Lake Urmiah, in North-west Persia. 

Descr. — Rhizome shortly creeping. Leaves linear, a foot 
long, erect, glaucescent, thick and firm in texture, with a 
narrow, pale margin. Stem slender, as long as the leaves, 
bearing a single terminal cluster of flowers. Spathe-valves 
lanceolate-acuminate, four inches long, pale green, charta- 
ceous. Perianth pale yellow, with a cylindrical tube above 
the ovary, nearly an inch long ; outer segments oblong, 
emarginate, three inches long, reflexing from near the 
base, furnished in the lower half with a bright yellow 
beard ; inner segments erect, obovate-cuneate, as long as 

July 1st, 1901. 



the outer, and rather broader. Ovary distinctly stipitate, 
clavate, narrowed gradually to both ends, not distinctly 
ribbed ; style-branches convex, an inch broad, the same 
colour as the perianth ; crests large, quadrate, entire. — 
J. 0. Baker. 



Tab. 778 1, whole plant, life size. 



7785 




M -S.d<aj.N.RLdhl a i> v 



LFUev.&C?L< m d 



Tar. 7785. 
CYANOTIS hirsuta. 

Native of Abyssinia. 

Nat. Ord. Commelinace,b. — Tribe Tradescantiej:. 
Genus Ctanotis, D. Don.; (Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 851.) 



Ctanotis (Eucyanotis) hirsuta; tnberibus globosis, caulibua erectia ramosis 
foliisque laxe villosis v. glabra tia, foliis 2-12 poll, longis J-J poll, latis 
linearibna ciliatis, apicis densifloris terminalibua et axillaribns 8essilibii8 
v. breviter pedunculatis, bracteia foliaceia lineari-lanceolati^ciliatia spicas 
aaepissime longe superantibus, bracteolis oblongis falcatis acutis viridibns 
ciliatis, calyce ad medium 3-fido lobisovatis acutia, pet alia roaeis unguibug 
baain prope connatis lamina fere or!>iculari \ poll, dtatn., filamentia 
usque ad apices pilia azureis dense barbatis, autheris minutia aureia, 
ovario oblongo styloque villoso, capsula clavata 3-lona glabra valvulis 
placentas unitia axi centrali 0, Beruinibua quadrato-pyramidatia obscure 
foveolatis et rugosis. 

0. hirauta, Fisch, Mey. 8f Ave-Lall. Ind. Sent. Hort. Petrop. vol. viii. (1841) 
p. 57. Clarke in A. & C. DC. Monog. Pkan. vol. iii. p. 254, et in Fl. 
Trop. Afr. vol. viii. ined, 

C. abyasinica, A. Rich. Fl. Abyss, vol. ii. p. 344, tab. 98. Hassle. Commel. 
Ind, p. 139. 

Commelina hirsuta, Hochst. in Herb. Abyss. Schimp. n. 14, nan alio rum. 

Zygomeues abyasinica, Hassfr. in Scliwsinf. Bsitr. Fl. JEthiop. p. 211. 



Cyanotis hirsuta was discovered on Mt. Chire, near 
Adoa, in Abyssinia, in about 1840, by Schimper, who 
describes ifc as having" eatable tuberous roots, about the 
size of a chestnut, called Burko by the natives. Tubers 
were presented to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by A. B. 
Wylde, Esq., the Abyssinian traveller, who collected them 
at a high elevation, where the plant is said to be abundant. 
The species is very variable in size, and in the length and 
breadth of the leaves. It flowered almost throughout the 
year in a greenhouse. 

Descr. — Tubers globose, an inch or more in diameter. 
Stem erect, a foot or more high, branched, and leaves and 
bracts villous, with soft hairs. Leaves two to twelve 
inches long by a quarter to three-fourths of an inch 
broad, linear, flaccid. Spikes terminal and axillary, sessile, 
or shortly peduncled, much shorter than the leaf-like bracts ; 
bracteoles densely imbricate, oblong, falcate, acute, green, 
ciliate. Calyx 3-lobed to the middle ; lobes ovate, acute. 

July 1st, 1901. 



Petals with long, nearly free claws ; blade orbicular, rose- 
coloured, half an inch broad. Filaments densely bearded 
throughout their length with articulate azure hairs ; 
anthers minute, golden-yellow. Ovary oblong; style 
villous. Capsule clavate, three-lobed, valves confluent 
with the placentas leaving no free axis where the capsule 
dehisces. Seeds pyramidal, four-sided, obscurely pitted. — 
J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, bract with spike after the fall of the corollas and stamens ; 2, calyx ; 
3, stamen; 4, pistil; 5, hair from stamen; 6, seed: — all enlarged. 



778L 




M. S . del, J.N Fitcii lith 



^fi^ent-Brook^Xlay *Son U&W 



X, Reeve &. C9 Lundor 



Tab. 7786. 

IMPATIENS CHRYSANTHA. 
Native of the Weiletn Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Geraniace.k — Tribe Balsamine.k 
Genus Impatiens, Linn. ; ( Benth. 6c Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 277). 



IairATiENS chrysantha ; annua, glaberrima, caalo crassiascnlo raraoso, foliis 
alternis ovato-oblongis-lanceolatisve acnminatis serratis crenatisve baai 
in petiolum atigustatis, glandulis stipularibus tnrgidis, pedunculig 
apices versus ramorum subcorymbosis erectis, floribus majusculis um- 
bellatis aureis, bracteis £ poll, longis verticillatis ovatis subacutis 
herbaceis, pedicellis |-f poll, longis, sepalis lateralibus 2 A-i poll, longis 
late ovatis vix cuspidatis, postico (Iabio) saccato v. late infundibulari in 
caleem iocurvum abrupte attenuato, petalo antico (vexillo) orbiculari v. 
transverse oblongo apice retaso cuspidato dorso gibbo incragsato, 
lateralibus (petalis) rubro striolatis, lobo basilari superne in lobulum 
faleatum pati3nti-recurvum producto, terminali oblongo obtuso, auricula 
dorsali rotundata, capsulis 1-H-pollicaribus linearibus erectis, seminibus 
|— \ poll, longis obovoideis oblongisve lasvibus fuscis. 



The genus Impatiens abounds in the temperate and sub- 
tropical regions of the Himalaya, and contains many 
singularly beautiful species that have not been brought 
under cultivation in England. Amongst these is /. 
chrysantha, which inhabits forests at elevations of five 
thousand to eight thousand feet, from the district of 
Pangi, on the Sutlej river, north of Simla, to Kashmir, and 
westward to Mirza, in Chitral, where it was collected by 
Colonel (now General) Gatacre, K.O.B. 

It is a variable plant as to the margins of the leaves, 
which are coarsely crenate, with lateral or basal cusps on 
the crenatures, or serrate with terminal cusps. It varies 
also in the form of the lip, and size and form of the seeds 
A closely allied species is I. Edgeworthii, Hook. f., & 
Thorns., a native of Kulu (a province bordering on 
Kashmir), which differs in the much larger lateral sepals, 
with the midrib thickly keeled dorsally. 

I. chrysantha was raised from seeds collected in Pangi, 
and sent from the Saharunpore Gardens to Kew by Mr. 
Duthie early in 1900, plants raised from which flowered 
profusely in the Herbaceous ground in October of the 
same year, and fruited abundantly. 

July 1st, 1901. 



Descr. — An annual, glabrous herb, two to three feet 
high, with rather stout, branched, terete, succuleut stems. 
Leaves alternate, three to six inches long, acute or acuminate, 
crenate with terminal or lateral cusps on the crenatures, or 
serrate with terminal cusps ; petiole of lower leaves long, of 
upper short ; stipular glands globose. Peduncles numerous, 
corymbosely disposed towards the tips of the stem and 
branches, naked below, terminated by short racemes, of 
which the flowers are often more or less whorled, or sub- 
umbellate ; bracts ovate or ovate-lanceolate ; pedicels one 
half to one and a half inches long. Flowers golden-yellow. 
Sepals small, ovate or sub- orbicular, one-tenth to one- 
eighth of an inch long, obtuse or obtusely cuspidate. 
Standard orbicular, two-lobed, costa dorsally thickened or 
subalate. Wings with basal lobe produced upwards as 
a third lobe or lobule, terminal dolabriform ; dorsal auricle 
rounded. Lip two-thirds of an inch long, exclusive of the 
incurved spur, infundibular or saccate. Ovary with a long 
beak. Capsules an inch to an inch and a half long, sub- 
erect, linear, obtuse, torulose, few- or many-seeded. 
Seed obovoid-oblong or orbicular, compressed, nearly 
smooth — J. D. H. 



i wini', «? r i i0U . °l Stem with base of P etiole and stipulary glands ; 2, sepal ; 
>. wing-petal; 4, stamens; 5, capsule; b, seed -.-all enlarged. 



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7787 




"Vincent-Brooks Day & Soil LfHjnr 



U.FrtchTith 



L TF^.oevi3 &-. C" f 



Tab. 7787. 
BULBOPHYLLUM grandiflorum. 

Native of New Guinea. 



Nat. Ord. Orchideje. — Tribe EpidendrejE. 
Genus Buxbopiiyllum, Thou. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 501.) 



Bulbophyllum (Eulmlbophyllum) grandiflorum; caudice valido repente, 
pseudobulbis distantibus prismaticis monophyllis, folio 5-10 poll, longo 
1-2 poll, lato elliptico v. lineari-oblongo apice emarginato basi in 
petiolum brevem angustato crasse coriaceo supra saturate viridi lucido 
costa subtus obtuse carinata, scapo folio breviore robusto unifloro vaginis 

f>aucis laxis instructo, bractea pollicari spathacea, flore ad 8 poll, 
ongo, pedicello robusto cum ovario bractea subduplo longiore, 
sepalis maximis multinerviis internervos plagis pallide brunneis albieque 
tessellatis, dorsali late ovato-oblongo obtuso arcuatim incurvo lateribus 
recurvis, lateralibus lineari-oblongis obtusis deflexis ultra medium incurvis, 
petalis minimis triangularibus, labello minuto trilobo, lobis lateralibus 
orbiculatis, terminali linguseformi ci'asso profunde sulcato sanguineo 
punctato marginibus basin versus longe ciliatis, columna crassa antice 
truncata apice contracta, antbera bemisphaerica, polliaiis 4, 2 dimidiato- 
oblougis, 2 minutis facie interiore majorum adnatis. 

B. grandifloram, Blume, Rumphia, vol. iv. p. 42 (non Rchh. /.) ; Rolfe in 
Orchid Rev. vol. iii. p. 104 ; in Qard. Ghron. 1895, vol. i. p. 422, fig. 
429. 

B. burfordiense, Hort. ex Orchid Rev. vol. iii. p. 135. 

Ephippium grandiflorum, Blume, I.e. t. 195, fig. 3 and t. 199, fig. B. 



The gigantic Bulbophyllum here figured was discovered 
in New Guinea by Zippel, a naturalist who, in 1828, 
accompanied an expedition consisting of two ships (the 
Triton and Iris), which was commissioned by the Dutch 
Government, under the command of Dr. Marklot, to 
establish a civil and military settlement in that Archi- 
pelago. It is remarkable for the colouring of the sepals, 
the contrast between the size of these and the minuteness 
of the petals which are only a small fraction of an inch 
long and broad. The pollinia are peculiar, though perhaps 
not normally developed in the cultivated plant ; they are 
four in number, two large, oblong and strongly com- 
pressed, and two very minute attached to the inner faces 
of the larger. Its only near ally is B. Cominsii, Rolfe, a 
native of the Solomon Islands, the flower of which is much 
smaller. 
August 1st, 1901. 



B. grandiflorum was introduced into cultivation before 
1895, when a flowering specimen was exhibited at the 
Royal Horticultural Society by Sir Trevor Lawrence. The 
specimen here figured was purchased for the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in 189tf, from Messrs. F. Sander & Co. It 
flowered in a tropical orchid house in October, 1900, and 
the flower lasted for three days. 

Descr. — Iiootstock creeping, as thick as a small goose- 
quill, nodes with short sheaths. Pseudobulbs prismatic, 
two to three inches long, sheathed. Leaf seven to ten 
inches long by one to two broad, very coriaceous, obtuse, 
tip emarginate, base narrowed into a short petiole, bright 
green and shining above, costa dorsally obtusely keeled. 
Peduncle six to eight inches long, suberect, stout, bearing 
two to three broad sheaths, one-flowered. Brad one and 
a half inch long, spathaceous, obtuse, green ; pedicel with 
ovary three inches long. Perianth about eight inches 
long. Sepals very broad, many-nerved, tessellated with 
alternating large pale brown and yellow spots, which are 
orbicular quadrate or oblong and placed between the nerves. 
Dorsal sepal broadly ovate-oblong, obtuse, arcuate, and 
incurved (sickle-shaped), sides reflexed, keeled dorsally; 
lateral sepals deflexed, linear-oblong, incurved and con- 
niving beyond the middle. Petals very minute, triangular. 
Lip minute, three-lobed, lateral lobes orbicular, terminal, 
Jinguiform, deeply channelled above, spotted with red, 
margins cihate towards the base. Column short, stout. 
Anther hemispheric. — J. B. H. 



ix>nb g ia?lfu7 r ^fj a %5 pals removed; 2 ' petal; 3 ' anther; 4 and 5 ' 



7788 




ide'.-lNFitditoh 



"\5ncentBrooks Day & Soh Lt?I 



L Reeve &.C? London. 



Tab. 7788. 

P^EONIA LUTEA. 
Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Ranunculace^e. — Tribe PyEONJJE,£. 
Genus P^onia, Linn.; (Benth. $ Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 10.) 



Pj20Nia_ lutea ; suffrutex glaberrimus, caule brevi Iignoso, foliis ternatisectis 
coriaceis valide nervosis subtus glaucescentibus, scgmenfcis obovato- 
oblongis basi cuneato-decurrentibus petiolulatis v. confluentibus supra 
medium varie incisis et lobulatis, floribus ad apices ramulorum solitariis 
2-4 poll, latis, sepalis extimis foliaceis lineari-lanceolatis acuminata 
intimis orbicularibus valde concavis longe cuspidatis rlavo-virescentibus, 
petalis 6-10 orbiculatis concavis aureis integris v. extimis irregulariter 
crenatis, filamentis brevibns, antheris lineari-elongatis aurantiacis, disco 
crasso lobato, carpellis 3 turgidis glaberrimis, stylis brevibus recurvis, 
carpellis maturis ^ poll, longis dehiscentibus cymbiformibus, seminibus 
ovoideis angulatis brunneis. 

P. lutea, Francli. in Bull. Soc. Bot. France, vol. xxxiii. (1886) p. 382. Henry 
in Le Javelin, 1897, p. 216 cum ic. ; in Joum. Soc. Nat. aVHortic. Ser. III. 
vol. xiv. p. 320, et xv. p. 274. Gard. Ghron. 1900, vol. i. p. 404 in 
nota. 



Pceonia lutea is an interesting species on account of its 
woody stem and yellow flowers, both rare characters in the 
genus. In the first of these it resembles the Chinese 
P. Moutan, Sims (tab. 2175), and in the second only P. 
Wittmanniana, Stev. (tab. 6645), the yellow in the petals 
of which latter is, however, more inclined to white. 

The figure of P. lutea here given was taken from a 
plant sent from the Jardin des Plantes, Paris, by the late 
Professor Cornu to the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it 
flowered in the Himalayan division of the Temperate 
House in June, 1900. It is a native of the mountains of 
Yunnan, where it was discoved by the Abbe Delavay in 
1882. Single and double flowers occur in both native and 
cultivated specimens. 

Descr. — Quite glabrous. Stem short, woody. Leaves 
ternatisect, coriaceous, strongly nerved, glaucous beneath ; 
segments obovate-oblong, petiolulate or confluent below, 
incised or lobulate beyond the middle. Flowers terminal, 
solitary, two to four inches broad. Sepals, outer 
foliaceous, linear-lanceolate, acuminate, inner orbicular, 

August 1st, 1901. 



concave, cuspidate, yellowish, green. Petals six to ten, 
orbicular, concave, golden yellow, entire or the outer 
crenate. Anthers linear, yellow. Carpels three, turgid, 
glabrous, cymbifortn after dehiscence. Seeds ovoid, 
angular, brown. — J. D. H. 

Figs. 1 and 2, stamens enlarged ; 3, disk and imperfect carpels of natural 
size. 






7789 




MS.del.J.NFLtdilith. 



Vincent Brooks Day &. Son Lt?&ap 



Tab. 7789. 

HELICHRYSUM Gulielmi. 
Native of Eastern Tropical Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe InuloidEjE. 
Genus Helichrysum, GseHn.\ (Benth. & Book./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p, 309.) 



Helichrysum (Xerocblsena) Gulielmi; herba perennia, robnsta, foliosa 
lanuginosa, foliis 3-5 poll, longis sessilibus obloDgo- v. lineari-lanceolatis 
obtnsis inferioribus recurvis superioribua patnlis, costa subtus craesa, 
capitulia corymbosi3 pedicellatia 1-1| poll, latie, pedicellis robustis 
bracteatis, involucri bracteis numerosis multiaeriatia albis v. extus roeeis 
intus albis exterioribua brevibu8 lanceolatia patulis interioribus grada- 
tim longioribua §-$ poll, longia lineari-lanceolatia acuminatia patenti- 
incurvis, receptaculo latiusculo \ poll, lato planiusculo glabro nndo, 
disci latiusculi aurei floribus extimis paucis foemineis anguste tubnlosis, 
ceteris masculis numerosis breviter 5-dentatis, antheraram candicnlia 
ciliatia, pappi setis sigillatim deciduia scabernlis, acheniis brevibus 
glabris. 

H. Gulielmi, Engler, Ueber die Hochgebirgsjtora des trop. Afv'ik. p. 426 
(1892). Gumbleton in Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. ii. p. 333, fig. 103. 



The very handsome plant here figured is a conspicuous 
member of the flora of Kili-manjaro in German East 
Africa, where it is found with two other species at elevations 
of 5000 to upwards of 0000 ft. The genus Helichrysum 
is characteristic of the vegetation of the loftiest moun- 
tains of tropical Africa, several inhabiting the Cameroon 
mountains in the Gulf of Guinea, one of which, //. Mannii, 
is figured on Tab. 5431 of this work. Others are found 
on Mt. Kenia in British East Africa, and a considerable 
number may be expected to occur on the lofty and snow- 
capped range of Ruwenzori in Uganda. 

I am indebted to W. Gumbleton, Esq., of Belgrove, Co. 
Cork, for the specimen here figured of II. Gulielmi, which, 
together with the two other species from the same 
locality, he raised from seeds which were collected by Dr. 
Hans Meyer of Leipsic, and distributed by Mr. Max 
Leichtlin. Mr. Gumbleton informs me that it attains a 
height of two feet, one specimen bearing six branches, 
each with fourteen to eighteen flower-heads, to be followed 
by others. It flowered in a greenhouse, in October, 1900, 
August 1st, 1901. 



and continued to flower for about three months. The 
name it bears is that of the German Emperor. 

Descr. — A robust, leafy, branching, perennial herb, 
about two feet higli, covered, with the exception of the 
flower-heads, with white wool. Leaves three to five inches 
long, sessile, linear-oblong or -lanceolate, obtuse, lower 
recurved, midrib stout, beneath. Flower-heads corym- 
bose, an inch to an inch and a half broad ; pedicels stout, 
bracteate. Involucre hemispheric ; bracts in many series, 
linear, outer short, spreading, inner linear-lanceolate, an 
inch to an inch and a half long, spreading and incurved, 
white or rose-red on the outer surface. Receptacle half an 
inch broad, glabrous. Florets all tubular, outer series few, 
female, the rest male. Anther cells with ciliate tails. 
Pappus hairs scaberulous. Achenes short, glabrous. — 
J.D.I1. 



Fig 1, inner involucral bract; 2, male flower ; 3, pappus-hair ; 4, anthers ; 
o, style-arms of female flower -.—all enlarged. 






7790 










Accent BrooJcs Day & Son L 



Tab. 7790. 
STROBILANTHES gossypinus. 

Native of the Nilghiri Hills. 



Nat. Ord. Acanthace;e. — Tribe Bi/ellie.*:. 
Gi-nus Stkobilantiies, BZwne; (Benth. & Jlool'.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p, 108G.) 



Strobilantiies (Endopogon) gossypinus; frutex erectas, tomento falvo dense 
lanuginoso, ramis tetragonis, foliis subcoriaceis 3-7 poll, longis ovatia 
ellipticisve acutia v. acuminatis supra demum glabrescentibus, nervis 
utrinsecus 10-13 confertis subtua validis, petiolo 1-li poll, longo robusto, 
spicis apice8 versus ramorum paniculatis brevibua oblongis 3-6-floris, 
bracteis ^-J-poll. longis ellipticis obtusis, bracteolia lineari-oblongis, 
calycis |-pcll. longi segmentia erectis lineari-lanceolatis inreqnalibus intus 
glabria, corolla J-poll. longa oblonga oblique ventricosa baai in tubum 
brevem curvum angustata intuspostice fascia decurrente pilosa instructa, 
lobis patulis subrequalibus pallide coeruleis, staminibus 2 inclusis, 
filameutis laxe pilosis, ovario glabro apice piloao, stylo glaberrimo, 
3tigniate lineari decurvo. 

S. gossypinna, T. Anders, in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol ix. (1867) p. 466. 
Clarke in Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. iv. p. 434-. Bedd. Ic. PI. lnd. Or. p. 45, 
tab. 198. 



Though a native of so long and well known an Indian 
botanical station as Sisparah Ghat, in the Nilghiri Hills, 
Strobilanthes gossypinus seems to have escaped the notice of 
Wight and all collectors, till Thos. Lobb found it at the 
above locality, and sent dried specimens to Messrs. Veitch, 
which are now preserved in the Kew Herbarium. It 
appears to be a rare plant, for except from Col. Beddome, 
who published an excellent figure and description of it in 
his " Icones," cited above, there are no other specimens at 
Kew. That botanist gives " common about Sisparah, at 
4-5000 ft.," as the one localized habitat, though adding 
that he " has specimens from other localities in our 
Western Mountains." 

As with others of its congeners, a plant of 8. gossypinus 
flowers only once in its lifetime, on reaching its maturity, 
which in its native country takes six or seven years, and 
then dies. Col. Beddome mentions 1869 as one such year. 
The specimen here figured is from a plant now four feet 
high and wide growing in the Mexican division of the 
Temperate House of the Royal Gardens, Kew. It was 

August 1st, 1901. 



raised from seed sent by the late Mr. Jamieson, of 
Ootacamund, in 1887, and flowered for the first and last 
time in November, 1900. It has hence, according to Col. 
Beddome's estimate, taken twice as long a period to 
mature at Kew as it would have done had it grown in the 
Nilghiri Hills. 

Descr. — An erect shrub, covered with a matted fulvous 
tomentum. Brandies four- angled. Leaves three to seven 
inches long, ovate or elliptic, acute or acuminate, at length 
glabrous on the upper surface; nerves about twelve 
pairs, arched, close-set ; petiole stout. Spikes panicled 
towards the ends of the branches, oblong, few-flowered ; 
bracts elliptic, obtuse ; bracteoles linear-oblong. Calyx 
half an inch long, segments unequal, linear-lanceolate, 
erect. Corolla about three-quarters of an inch long, 
gibbously ventricose, contracted below into a short curved 
tube ; lobes subequal, spreading, pale blue. Stamens 2, 
filaments sparsely hairy ; anthers included. Ovary and 
style glabrous ; stigma linear, decurved. 



Fig. 1, calyx with style and stigma; 2, corolla laid open showing stamens ; 
3 and 4, anthers ; 5, disk and ovary : — all enlarged. 



7791 




M-Sdal, J.NPitoh hlh 



VmcentBrc oks^ay & Si 



nLt?Invp 



Tad. 7791. 
GLADIOLUS sulphureus. 

Native of the Transvaal. 

Nat. Ord. Iride*. — Tribe Ixie^. 
Genus Gladiolus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p, 709.) 



Gladiolus (Eugladiolus) sulphureus ; caule 1-1J pedale, foliis l£-2-pedalibus 
ensiformibua medio ad 1 poli. latis firmia pallide viridibus nervis prominalig 
inaaqualibus costatis, floribua 6-8 suberectis secundis pallida aureis viridi 
tinctis, spica erecta, rhachi valido, Bpatha3 valvis exterioribus 1^-2 poll. 
longiB lanceolatis erectia viridibus, perianthii tubo 1^-pollicari anguste 
infuadibulari paullo' decurvo, limbi eegmentis tubo aiquilongis oblongia 
obtusis apiculatisve patenti-recurvis interioribus paullo minoribus, stami- 
nibus tubo corolliB longioribus, antheris fere £ poll, longis linearibus 
arcuatis sulpbureis, Btigmatibus clavellatia recurvis. 

G. sulphureus, de Oraaf ex Mollcenb. inJaarboelc Tuinbouw, 1850, p. 39, cum 
ic. color, (non Baker). 

G. Adlami, Baker in Gard. Chron. 1889, vol. i. p. 233 ; Handb. of Irid. p. 219 ; 
in Dyer, Fl. Capens. vol. vi. p. 15b\ 



The publication of this very distinct species of Gladiolus 
in the Jaarboek Tuinbouw so long ago as 1850, has been 
overlooked hitherto by all succeeding authorities, though it 
was accompanied by an excellent coloured figure. It 
does not appear in the M Kew Index," the periodical in 
which it is described being so very rarely occupied with 
the description of new species of plants that it was not 
consulted during the laborious search for names involved 
in the preparation of the " Index." There is, however, 
an excellent specimen of the plant bearing tlie above 
name in the Kew Herbarium, presented in 1893 by Mr. 
Max Leichtlin, which was raised from Capo seed twenty 
years earlier. 

Mr. Molkeuboer, the author of the article in the Jaar- 
boek, who cites de Graaf as the author of the species, 
regards it as a hybrid between G.fioribundus and natalensis, 
alluding no doubt to the floribundus of the Dutch gardens 
(= G. tiabellifer, Tausch.) and natalensis, Reinw., which is 
a synonym of G. psittacinas. That this is an error is now 
clear. 

In the description in " Flora Capensis" of G. Adlami, 
August 1st, 1901. 



the upper perianth-segment is said to be " granulated all 
over with minute red dots." These were not observed 
in the specimen here figured, though a red spot may be 
seen at the junction of the segments. 

G. sulphur eue is a native of the Transvaal. Corms of it, 
from one of which was produced the specimen here figured, 
were obtaiued by the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1900, from 
Mr. Max Leichtlin. It flowered in a cool house in July of 
the same year. 

Descr. — Stem a foot to a foot and a half high. Leaves 
one and a half to two feet long, about an inch broad in the 
middle, ensiform, erect, strict, firm, strongly nerved. 
Flowers six to eight, subsecund, pale golden yellow faintly 
tinged with green; rhachis of spike stout, erect; spathe- 
valves lanceolate, acuminate, green. Perianth-tube slightly 
decurved, two inches long, narrowly infundibular above; 
segments about as long as the tube, oblong, obtuse or 
apiculate, spreading and recurved. Filaments longer than 
the perianth-tube ; anthers about half an inch long, linear, 
curved. Style decurved ; stigma recurved, clavellate.— 
J. D.H. ° 



Figs. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3, stigma ; both enlarged. 






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7792 




MS del.JN.Fitdi li'.K 



"VLnceirt Brooks Day &. Son Lt4Jmp 



Tab. 7792. 

EPIDENDRUM osmanthum. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Orcitideje. — Tribe Epidendre*. 
Genus Epidendrum, Linn. ; (Benlh. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 528.) 



Epidendrum (Encyclium) osmanthum ; pseudobulbis 3-5 poll, longia obpyri- 
formibus teretibus 2-pbyllis vaginia acarioaia tectis demum nudia, foliia 
8-18 poll, longis l|-poll. latia aeasilibua loriformibua apice rotundatis 
coriaceia enerviia medio aulcatia coata subtua gracili, acapo gracili fusco- 
viride roseo maculato laxe paniculatim ramoao ramis elongatis apices 
veran8 paucifloria, bracteis brevisairaia triangularibua late acarioais, 
ovario cum pedicello lj-pollieari viridi, perianthio l£-2 poll, lato 
explanato, sepalia petaliaque aequilongis carnoaia incurvia concavia apiei- 
bus rotundatis flavia rabrolineatia, aepalia obovato-oblongis, petalia 
orbicularibua unguiculatia unguibus luteia, labello submembranaeeo 
aepalia triente longiore ungaiculato trilobo, ungue columnam amplec- 
tente, lobia lateralibus explanatis rotundatis groase crenatis albia roseo 
suft'usis, terminali late obcordato crenato lateribus deflexis albo roseo 
lineato, diaco breviter costato, columua aurea apice auriculis 2 quadratia 
porrectis instructa, antbera depressa. 

E. osmanthum, Rodrig. Gen. et Sj>. Orchid. Nov. vol. ii. (1882) p. 134. Rolfe 
in Orchid Rev. vol. iv. (1896) p. 291. Cogniau.r in Martins Fl. Bras. 
vol. iii. pars V. p. 64, t. xix. fig. 2. 

E. Godseffianum, Rolfe in Gard, Ghron. 1892, vol. i. p. 136. L. Orchidoph. 1892, 
p. 289. Rolfe in Orchid Rev. vol. ii. (1894) p 323. 

E. Capartianum, L. Lind. in Lindenia, vol. vii. p. 93, tab. 333; in Journ. des 
Orch. vol. vii. (1896) p. 209 ; Orchid. Exot. p. 758. 



The Brazilian species of Epidendrum have quite lately 
been described in detail by Cogniaux, in a monograph 
of the Orchidese of that country, now appearing as a 
volume of Martius's " Flora Brasiliensis." This admirably 
executed work will undoubtedly prove, when finished, the 
most valuable contribution to American Orchidology that 
has hitherto appeared, and it has the best wishes of all 
botanists for its completion. The Brazilian species of 
Epidendrum (of which there are one hundred and forty-one) 
are grouped under five sections, to one of the largest of 
which, Encyclium, E. osmanthum is mfprrprl Tt iV * native 
of forests in the pruvlncco 01 Minas Geraes, and of Pernam- 
buco, from which latter province it was introduced by 
Messrs. Sander & Co. in 1899, from whom the fine 
specimen here figured was purchased for the Royal 

September 1st, 1901. 



Gardens, Kew. It flowered in the Cattleya House in 
October, 1900; the flowers, which are odoriferous and 
aromatic, last about two months. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs obpyriform, two-leaved, three to 
five inches long, smooth. Leaves eight to ten inches long 
by one and a half inches broad, loriform, tip rounded, 
deeply channelled in the middle, coriaceous, sides convex, 
nerves obscure, costa beneath slender. Peduncle with 
sparingly branched panicle two feet long, slender, greenish 
speckled with red ; branches spreading, few-flowered ; 
pedicels with ovary an inch and a quarter long, spreading, 
green ; bracts minute, triangular. Flowers one and a half 
to two inches broad. Sepals and petals widely spreading 
and incurved, concave, fleshy, yellow streaked with red ; 
sepals linear-oblong; petals as long, orbicular, clawed. 
Lip one-third longer than the sepals, rather membranous, 
three-lobed, claw sheathing the column ; side-lobes sub- 
orbicular, spreading, crenate, white suffused with rose ; 
midlobe much larger, broadly obcordate, sides deflexed, 
white with crimson streaks, coarsely and irregularly 
crenate; disk shortly ribbed. Column two-auricled at 
the top, auricles quadrate, projecting forward. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, front and side views of the column; 3, anther; 4, pollinia :— all 
enlarged; 5, reduced, view of whole plant. 



7513 




M.S.ael,J.N.RuJihtK 



"Vincent Brooks .Day ASonLt^Imp 



i. Reeve & C° London 



Tab. 7793. 

IRIS Taum. 

Native of Asia Minor, 

Nat. Ord. Iride2E. — Tribe Mosmje. 
Genus Iris, Linn.; (Benth. & Hooic.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Iris (Juno) Tauri ; bulbo ovoideo 3-floro, tunica extima pallide brunnea, radici- 
bus crassis, foliis 6-7 per anthesin tubo floris multo brevioribus demum 
elongatis Itete viridibus 3-5 poll, longis ad h poll, latis linearibas acumi- 
natis apice obtusis marginibus scaberulis, spathas valvis subherbaceis, 
flore 3 poll, expaus., perianthii tubo 4-pollicari violaceo, limbi segmentis 
exterioribus 2-poll. longis obovato-spathulatis ultra medium reflexis 
lateribus erectis extns sordide viridibus intus saturate violaceis striis 
latis albis utrinque costae ornatis, crista aurantiaca albo marginata, 
interioribus pollicaribus patenti-reflexis obovato-spathulatis undulatis 
violaceis, styli ramis segmenta perianthii superantibus oblongo-obovatis 
crispato-undulatis violaceis, filamentis liberis. 

I. Tauri, Siehe ex G. B. Mullet in Gard. Ghron. 1901, vol. i. p. 190, fig. 74, et 
p. 313. 



According to a note in the Gardener's Chronicle (I.e. p. 
313) by Mr. Siehe of " Hortus Orientalis," Mersina (near 
Tarsus), the discoverer of this beautiful little species, it is 
a native of alpine pastures in the Eastern Taurus, at six 
thousand five hundred feet elevation, and of the upper 
forests of Juniperus excelsa at four thousand five hundred 
feet, where it flowers, on the melting of the snow at the 
end of February and the beginning of March. As stated 
under I. stenophylla, Hausskn. (tab. 7734), Mr. Siehe was 
the discoverer of that plant also, and in the article cited 
he gives as its exact habitat (of which I had previously 
no information), " in undergrowths of Pinus Laricio, 
var. Bruttia, especially preferring dry, overgrown, hilly 
slopes of fine red loam." A third Iris of the same 
section discovered by Mr. Siehe, is J. Bolleana, Siehe, 
Gard. Ghron. I.e. a hitherto undescribed species, except 
in so far as that the leaves are said to be narrow and 
curled, with white, membranous margins, and the flowers 
clear yellow. It inhabits limestone rocks near the sea at 
elevations of six hundred and fifty feet to nine hundred 
and fifty feet. 

A plant of J. Tauri was received at the Royal Gardens, 

September 1st, 1901. 



Kew, in 1900, from Mr. Siehe, in a batch of bulbs of 
I. stenophylla. It flowered in a frame in January of the 
present year. 

Descr. — Bulb ovoid, three-flowered ; outer coat pale 
brown ; roots very long, stout. Leaves six to seven, very 
short at flowering time, at length three to five inches long 
by half an inch broad, linear, narrowed to an obtuse tip, 
bright green. Spathe-valves sub-herbaceous. Perianth- 
tube four inches long, violet ; segments obovate-spathulate, 
outer two inches long, reflexed from beyond the middle, 
sides erect, dark violet, with broad streaks of white; crest 
orange-yellow, bordered with white ; inner segments an 
inch long, spreading and reflexed, undulate, violet. Style- 
branches longer than the perianth-segments, oblong-obovate, 
crisped and undulate, violet. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1 and 2, anthers ; 3, portion of style-arm and stigma :— all enlarged. 



7794 




Tab. 7794. 

oxalis mspar. 

Native of British Guiana. 

Nat. Old. Geraniace*. — Tribe Oxalide^. 
Genus Oxalis, Linn.; (Bent/i. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p, 276.) 



Oxalis (Thaninoxys) dispar; frnticulus cano-tomentellus, ramulis gracilibus 
teretibus, foliis longe petiolatis pinnatim 3-foliolatis, foliolis 2£-3 poll, 
longis lateralibus sessilibus oppoaitis terminali petiolulato ovato-lanceo- 
latis acutis supra puberulis subtus molliter tomentellis basi cuneatis 
6-10-nerviis nervis fere rectis, petiolis 3-4 poll, longis, petiolulo § poll, 
longo gracili, pedunculis axillaribas gracilibus pubescentibas apice 
breviter bifidis 5-10-floris, floribus subcapitals brevissime pedicellatis 
foliolis parvis suffultis, sepalis erectis g poll, longis oblongo-lanceo- 
latis obtusis eglandulosis puberulis, petalis |-poll. longis obovato- 
rotnndatis aureis marginibus basin versus coalitis et puberulis, filamentis 
basi connatis edentatis interioribus pilosis, ovario glabro stylis 5 brevibus 
glabris recurvis, stigmatibus capitellatis, capsula 5-cornuta, 15-costata 
costis 5 primariis puberulis. 

O. dispar, N.E. Br. in Kevo Bulletin, ined. 



The genus Oxalis, of which upwards of four hundred 
and fifty speeies are known, is largely represented in Brazil 
and Guiana, from which countries more than one hundred 
species are described by Prognel in the second volume of 
Martius' " Flora Brasiliensis." Amongst the latter, the 
nearest (and very near) ally of 0. dispar is O. Laureolse, 
Progn., which has shorter petioles and leaflets, much 
smaller, more racemose flowers, and filiform, pilose styles. 
Another near ally is 0. Noronhx, Oliv. (in Hook. Ic. PI. 
t. 1226), a native of Fernando de Noronha, a small group 
of oceanic islands which lie two huudred and ten miles 
N.-E. of Cape St. Roque, the easternmost point of Brazil. 
A description of this group, the largest island of which is 
a penal settlement, is to be found in the *' Naturalists' 
Voyage " of Mr. Darwin, who was, I believe, the first man 
of science that ever landed on it, and make a collection 
of its plants. 0. Noronhse differs from 0. dispar in its 
shorter, broader leaflets, small flowers, slender styles, and 
glabrous filaments. 

0. dispar was obtained for the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
from Messrs. F. Sander & Co., of St. Albans. It flowered 
September 1st, 1901. 



freely all the year round in a stove. It is a native of 
Guiana. 

Descr. — A small, softly-pubescent undershrub, about two 
feet high, woody at the base, with slender, spreading 
b anches. Leaves alternate, long-petioled, trifoliolate. 
Leaflets two and a half to three inches long, ovate-lan- 
ceolate, acute, base cuneate ; lateral opposite, sessile ; 
terminal rather larger, petiolulate, all puberulous above, 
finely tomentose beneath ; nerves six to ten pairs, nearly 
straight, prominent beneath. Petiole three to four inches 
long, very slender; petiolule two-thirds of an inch long. 
Mowers an inch across, golden-yellow, crowded at the bifid 
top of the peduncle, very shortly pedicelled, sub-tended by 
a few small leaflets ; peduncle about as long'as the petiole, 
and as slender. Sepals half an inch long, lanceolate, 
pubescent. Petals orbicular-obovate, connate above the 
base by their margins. Inner filaments pilose. Styles 
short ; stigmas capitate. — J. D. PL. 

Fig. 1, calyx; 2, bases of three petals; 3, disk, stamens, and stigmas; 
4, ovary : — all enlarged. 



7795 




* B dal 



Afti\oaritBrooJ<s,Day &SonLt-. !*■ 



LRoeve iCPiona™ 



Tab. 7795. 
IMPATIENS Thomsoni. 

Native of the Himalaya Mountains. 

Nat. Ord. Gehaniacejk. — Tribe Balsamine;e. 
Gemi.s Impatiens, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 277). 



Impatiens Thomsoni; annua, glabra, caule siniplici v. ramoso erecto superne 
tetragono angulis remote muriculatis, foliis alternis 3-5 poll, longis 
ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis cuspid ato-serratis basi acutis supremis 
sessilibns inferioribus pettolatis, glandulis stipularibus magnis, pedun- 
culis apicem versus caulis Bubcorymbosis strictis erectis paucifloris, 
floribus inter minores in racemos breves terminales dispositis roseis, 
bracteis iV j poll, longis e basi angusta lanceolata linearibus acuminatis 
v. in cornu attenuatis apice glandulosis, pedicellis §-f poll, longis 
fructiferis apice decurvis, sepalis 2 lateralibus %-\ poll, longis oblique 
ovatis falcatisve obtuse cuspidatia herbaceis, postico (labello) saccato v. 
late infundibulari in calcar incurvum abrupte attenuato, petalo antico 
(vexillo) orbiculari baBi et apice retuso costa vix incrassata apice apiculato, 
petalis lateralibus (alis) bilobis lobo basilari oblongo rubro-punctato 
angulo superiore acuto terminali subaequilongo oblongo v. dolabriformi 
apice rotundato, auricula dorsali obscura, capsulis pollicaribus pendulis 
lineari-clavatis 5-gonis subacutis polyspermis, seminibus %-\ poll, longis 
oblongis laavibus fusco brunneis. 

I. Thomsoni, Hook.f. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. iv. (1860) p. 128 ; Fl. Brit. 
Ind. voL i. p. 469. 

J. Thomsoni is one of the commonest sub-alpine species 
of the genus in the Western Himalaya, at elevations of 
eight thousand feet to twelve thousand feet, from Kumaon 
to the Indus River. It also occurs rarely in Sikkim, 
and no doubt inhabits the intermediate ranges of Nepal, 
though it has not hitherto been collected there. It is a 
very attractive plant, from the abundance of its rose- 
coloured flowers amongst the deep green foliage, followed 
by the red, drooping pods. 

Seeds of I. Thomsoni were received at the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, from Mr. Duthie, in 1900, plants raised 
from which flowered in the Herbaceous Ground in Auo-ust 
of the same year, and continued flowering till October. 

Bescr. — A perfectly glabrous, erect annual, eight to 
twelve inches high. Stem simple or sparingly branched, 
four-angled towards the top with muricate angles. 
Leaves alternate, crowded towards the top of the stem, 

September 1st, 1901. 



three to five inches long, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, 
cuspidately serrate, base acute, dark green, upper sessile, 
lower petioled ; stipular glands large, shortly stipitate, 
globose. Peduncles axillary, sub-corymbosely crowded at 
the top of the stem, stout, erect, naked, unequal in height, 
bearing terminal, short, few-flowered racemes ; bracts 
narrowly lanceolate, very variable in length and breadth, 
one-tenth to one-fourth of an inch long ; pedicels about 
twice as long. Flowers half to three-quarters of an inch 
long, pale rose-coloured. Sepals obliquely ovate, cuspi- 
date, green. Standard erect, orbicular, notched at the 
base and apex. Wings twice as long as the standard ; 
basal lobe acute, yellow, speckled with red, terminal dola- 
briform, deep rose-coloured. Lip rather longer than the 
wings, broadly funnel-shaped or saccate, suddenly narrowed 
into a slender, incurved spur. Capsule three-fourths 
of an inch long, narrowly sub-clavate, five-angled, pendu- 
lous from the decurved apex of the pedicel, many-seeded. 
Seeds about an eighth of an inch long, linear-oblong, 
smooth. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, portion of top of stem with stipular glands; 2, portion of margin of 
leaf; 3, bract; 4, wing-petal ; 5, stamens -.—all enlarged, 



779i 




VLS.dd.JiJ.KtdKlj.tfL 



6 * 

Vincent Brooks Day A.SonLL«*vp 



Tab. 7796. 
ARCTOTIS Gumbletoni. 

Native of Namaqualand. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Arctotide^e. 
Genus Arctotis, IAnn.; (Benth. & Koolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 458 ) 



Arctotis (Euarctotis) Gumbletoni; tota capitulis exceptis tenuiter albo- 
lanata, caule brevi folioso, foliis 8-12-pollicaribus erectis petiolatis 
angustis pinnatifidia v. pinnatisectis lobis ad 1 poll, longis oblongis apice 
rotundatis integris terminali latiore crenato v. lobulato, pedunculo 
robusto nudo cavo, involucri hemispberici bracteis herbaceia rigidia 
extimis brevibua deltoideis in acumen setaceum pubescentem angustatis 
intermediis apice ala brevi scariosa rotnndata terminatis intimis longe 
alatis, receptaculo lato piano setifero, fl. radii tubo brevi glabro, ligula 
pollicari saturate rubro-aurantiaca basin versus maculis linearibus dis- 
tinctis v. confluentibus rubro-brunneis ornata, fl. disci tubo pilis paucia 
articulate instructo, loborum apicibus incrassatis triponis violaceis 
demum atris, aehamiis (immaturis) radii discique extimis uno latere 
lanatis et basi pilis sericeis longe barbatia, pappi paleis 3-seriatis extimis, 
brevibus laceris, intimis oblongis hyalinis. 



I have in vain endeavoured to identify this beautiful 
plant with any of the numerous species of Arctotis, whether 
described in published works, or preserved in the Her- 
barium of the Royal Gardens, Kew, but the descriptions 
are so imperfect, and the herbarium specimens, in many 
cases, so unsatisfactory, that it is not without hesitation 
that I describe it as new to science. About thirty species 
of the genus are described in Harvey & Sonder's " Flora 
Capensis," but as I find characters which have been over- 
looked by authors, I feel convinced that the whole genus 
needs a searching analysis. In the meantime I have the 
pleasure of naming this beautiful plant after my friend, 
W. Gumbleton, Esq., of Belgrove, Queenstown, Ireland, 
who raised and flowered it, and to whom horticulture in 
general and the Botanical Magazine in particular are in- 
debted for procuring and liberally distributing many new, 
rare, and interesting plants. 

There are two characters of the disk-flowers in Arctotis 
which deserve notice ; one is the curious, almost purple- 
black, thickened, pendulous tips of the corolla-lobes ; the 
other the irritability of the style, which protrudes the 
September 1st, 1901. 



stigmatic arms above the anthers for the purpose of fer- 
tilization by the pollen from other flowers, which being 
effected, the arms are withdrawn to their former position. 
This latter fact was, I believe, first made known by 
Lindley in a note under his description of A. aureola (Bot. 
Reg. t. 32). The singular, dark, finger- like marks at the 
bases of the lignles are not peculiar to the species here 
figured. 

A. -Gumbletoni is a native of Namaqualand, whence 
seeds of it were sent to Mr. Gumbleton by Mr. Ayres. 
It is a very free grower, and keeps flowering for months 
in a cool house. 

Descr. — Stem very short, clothed, as are the leaves and 
peduncles, with a thin, white, densely-matted tomentum. 
Leaves basal, six to twelve inches long by one to one and a 
half broad, long-petioled, pinnatifid or pinnatisect ; lobes 
oblong, tips rounded, quite entire or obscurely crenate, 
sinus rounded ; lower lobes small, distant, and often 
decurrent ; terminal broader, ovate lobed or lobulate. 
Peduncle eight inches to a foot high, stout, striate. Head 
three inches in diameter. Involucre hemispheric, two- 
thirds of an inch in diameter ; outer bracts green, coria- 
ceous, broadly ovate, cuspidate or tips setaceous, closely 
appressed, tips hairy; intermediate longer, acute or 
obtuse, herbaceous, with scarious tips and margins ; inner 
twice as long, base green, terminating in a broad, scarious 
wing, rounded at the tip. lioy-floivers deep orange-red, 
tube very short ; ligule with finger-like red-brown marks 
at the base. Achenes short, hairy ; outer pappus scales 
short, lacerate, inner much longer, oblong. — J.D.H. 

Fig. 1, outer bract of involucre ; 2, ray-flower with part of ligule removed ; 
3, base of inner ray-flower with imperfect stamens ; 4, disk- flower ; 5, top of 
corolla-lobe of disk -flower ; 6, stamens; 7, tip of style of disk-flowers with 
the style-arms appressed : — all enlarged. 



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Tab. 7792.— EPIDENDRUM OSMANTHUM. 
„ 7793.— IRIS TAURI. 
„ 7794.— OXALIS DISPAR. 
„ 7795.— IMPATIENS THOMSONL 
„ 779^6.— ARCTOTIS GUMBLETONI. 



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7797 




llS.rl' 






•t-Bi-ooJrsPDayi 



Tar. 7797. 
EXORRHIZA Wendlandiana. 

Native of the Fiji Islands. 

Nat. Ord. Palm<h. — Tribe Arece.*. 
Genus Exorrhiza (Beccari in Ann. Jard. Buitenz. vol. ii. (1885) p. 128.) 



Exorrhiza Wendlandiana ; trunco excelso erecto stricto annulato basi radicibus 
epigasis spinulosis sustentato, foliis breviuscule petiolatis lineari-oblongia 
10-12 ped. longis patenti-recurvis pinnatisectis petiolo rhachique dorso 
rotundatis facie acute angulatis, segmentis 2-pedalibua asq uidistantibu8 
anguste lineari-lanceolatia costatia 8-10-nerviis, nervo niarginali 0, 
spadice longe infra-foliaceo erecto breviter crasae pedunculato pedali 
ovato-oblongo stricto confertim ramoao, ramis 8-10 pollicaribua erecto- 
patulia strictis albis basi abrupte in globnm pollicem diam. incrassatis, 
laxifloris fructiferis kermesini?, floribus bracteatis et 2-bracteolatis ternis 
2 <?, intermedio ?, superioribus in ramis solitariis $, spathis 2 oblongia 
crasse coriaceis diu persistentibup, fl. $ symmetricia ovoideis, sepalia 
3-gonis,. petalis oblongis obtusia valvatis, staminibua 6, filamentis petalia 
brevioribu8 subulatis, antheris lineari-oblongia, piatillodio ovoideo apice 
trifido, fl. ? multo minoribus subgloboaia, aepalis maris persistentibus, 
petalis orbicularibus imbricatis, ovario oblongo 1-loculari stigmate crasso 
ovoideo coronato, ovnlo solitario parietali, fructu globoso \ poll. diam. 
laevi, stigmate laterali, albumine aaquabili. 

E. Wendlandiana, Beccari, l.c. 

Kentia exorhiza, H. Wendl. in Bonpland. vol. x. (1862) p. 191 (excl. descr. 
fruct.) et in Seem. Fl. Vitiens. p. 269, t. 78. 

Areca ? exorhiza, H. Wendl. in Bonpland vol. ir. (1861) p. 260 (nomen). 



Exorrhiza Wendlandiana is a native of the Fiji Islands, 
where it was discovered by Dr. Seemann, when accom- 
panying Col. Smythe in his mission to that archipelago in 
1800-1. It appears to be a very local Palm, its only known 
habitat being in humid forests, at a considerable elevation 
on the mountains of Somososo, in the islet of Taviuni. In 
his account of Col. Smythe's Mission, p. 370, Dr. Seemann 
mentions Kentia ? exorrhiza as being also a native of New 
Caledonia ; but this is an error, the palm alluded to being 
probably Gyphosperma Vieillardii, Benth. & H.f. ; so also 
with regard to Tonga, as another habitat, there is no 
evidence whatever of the palm alluded to being a Fiji one. 

For living plants of Exorrhiza Wendlandiana the Royal 

Gardens, Kew, are indebted to the late Sir J. B. Thurston, 

K.C.M.G., who, when Governor of the Fijis in 1881, sent 

to Kew living plants in a Ward's case, one of which, 

October 1st, 1901. 



tTi at here represented, flowered in the Palm House in 
February, 1901. Its height to the bases of the leaves is 
sixteen feet, to the top of the crown twenty-four. 

Descr. — A noble palm, attaining, in its native country, 
sixty feet in height, with a straight annulate trunk, two 
to three feet in girth towards the base, where, above 
ground, it emits stout, spinous supporting roots. Leaves 
ten to twelve feet long, shortly petioled, linear-oblong, 
spreading and recurved, pinnatisect ; leaflets very many, 
close-set equidistantly, two feet long by about two and a 
half inches broad, narrowed from the middle to the acumi- 
nate tip, costate, and eight to ten-nerved, bright green 
above, pale yellow-green beneath ; petiole and rhachis 
sub-trigonous, with a flattened upper surface and rounded 
under. Spadix maturing several nodes below the lowest 
leaf, shortly peduncled, erect, ovoid ; branches close-set, 
eight to ten inches long, slender, strict, erecto-patent, 
suddenly swollen above the base into a gibbus an inch in 
diameter, white, scarlet when fruiting. Spathes two, oblong, 
much shorter than the spadix. Flowers sessile, scattered in 
threes along the branches of the spadix, each three con- 
sisting of two males, about an eighth of an inch long, and 
an intermediate minute female ; upper flowers on the branch 
solitary, ^ male. Bracts and bracteoles minute. Male fl. 
symmetric, sepals minute, trigonous ; petals oblong, obtuse, 
valvflte; stamens 6; pistillode trifid. Fern. fl. ovoid; 
sepals of male; petals imbricate; ovary ovoid, one-celled, 
crowned by a sessile ovoid stigma ; ovule solitary, parietal. 
Frmt globose, half an inch in diameter, stigma lateral — 



„ JJj. }' Ppr^ons of spattie and spadix with g and 5 flowers; 2, stamens; 
d,pi8tillodiam;4,_? flower with calyx removed ; 5, ovary ; 6, vertical section 
ot ovary; 7, Win* branch of spadix; 8, fruit with remains of perianth; 
view I I"' J 10 « timbl yo:-all except 7 enlarged : 11, reduced 




7798 



> <M J.N 



MneentBro oks.D ay & SoruLtA In- 



I. Reeve &C°-Landcn 



Tab. 7798. 

HABENARIA Lugardii. 
Native of Bechuanaland, 

Nat. Ord. Orchides. — Tribe Ophridb^. 
Genus Habknabia, Willd.\ (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p, 624.) 



Habenaria (Ate) Lugardii ; foliis 2 radicalibus aub-oppositia terras appressia 
Bessilibus orbicularibuB 6-8 poll. diam. carnosia fragilibua breviter acutatia 
multinerviis, acapo robuato vaginia paucia lanceolatia pollicaribua 
instructo, racemo 1-2 ped. longo 4-10 poll. diam. multi-Iaxifloro, bracteia 
|-1£ poll, longia lanceolatia, pedicellia 1^-2 poll, longis arcuatia, floribus 
albis, Bepalo dorsali £ poll, longo erecto ovato acuto concavo, lateralibus 
erecto-patentibu8 dorsali panllo longioribus ovato-lanceolatia acutis, 
petalia bipartitis segmento poatico oblongo falcato erecto aepalo doraali 
cohairente, antico fere filiformi pendulo pollicari, labello ad basin 3- 
partito aegmentis nliformibus l£ poll, longis pendnlia intermedio breviore, 
calcare 5-6 poll, longo, stigmatis procesanbns elongatis apicibna spathu- 
latis porrectis viridibus, staminodiia minutis pyriformibus grannlatis 
aureis, rostello pronrinulo acuto, antberarum tubulis brevibus*, polliniia 
anguste oblongis caudiculia paullo brevioribus, glandnla parva orbicu- 
lari. 

H. Lugardii, Rolf e in Dyer, Fl. Trop. Afrie. vol. vii. p. 228. W. Wats, in 
Gard, Ghron. 1900, vol. ii. p. 322. 



In habit and in the orbicular leaves appressed to the 
earth, this stately Habenaria resembles two Indian 
species, H. platyphylla, Spreng., and H. plantaginea, Lindl., 
from both of which it differs in the form of the petals, which 
are cleft to the base into very narrow segments, a character 
which refers it to the genus Ate of Lindley (reduced by all 
recent authors to Habenaria). It was discovered by Major 
Lugard, with Crinum rhodanthum (tab. 7777) and other 
bulbous plants in Botletle Valley, Ngamiland. Tubers of 
it were presented by that distinguished traveller to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, in February, 1899, one of which 
flowered in the tropical Orchid House in October of the 
following year, and is here figured. 

Descr. — Leaves two, radical, sessile, appressed to the 
ground, orbicular, four to six inches in diameter, fleshy, 
fragile, bright green, base amplexicaul, very many-nerved. 
Scape stout, with a few lanceolate acuminate sheaths. 
Raceme six to twelve inches long, very many-flowered, six 
inches in diameter ; rhachis stout, acutely angled ; bracts 

October 1st, 1901. 



about an inch long, lanceolate, acuminate, white or 
greenish. Floivers white, with green sty lodes and yellow 
anther and staminodes ; pedicel with beaked ovary one and 
a half inch long, twisted, green. Sepals ovate, acute, 
dorsal erect, half an inch long ; lateral rather longer, sub- 
erect. Petals cleft to the base into two slender segments, 
one of which is erect and coheres to the dorsal sepal, 
the other is an inch long and pendulous. Lip cleft nearly 
to the base into three filiform pendulous segments an inch 
and a half long, and with two projecting spathulate green 
sty lodes at its base; spur five to six inches long, pendulous, 
very slender. Anther-cells linear, tubes short, upcurved ; 
pollinia linear-oblong, rather shorter than their caudicles. 
Stylodes (or stigmatic processes) very large, spathulate, 
green. — .7. D. B. 

Figs. 1 and 2, lateral and front views of column ; 3, polliuium :— all enlarged. 



7199 




M.S.del.J.N.Fiwhlith 



-VrrvoentBro(d« Day &Soiatfii* 



JL Reeve &.C° London. 



Tab. 7799. 

CINERARIA PENTACTINA. 
Native of South Africa ? 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Senecionide^s. 
Genus Cineraria, Linn. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 445.) 



Cineraria (Eucineraria) pentactina; glaberrima, caule gracillimo scandente 
ramoso, ramis ramulisque pendulis pallide rubris, foliis parvis gracile 
petiolatis semi-orbiculatia £ poll. diam. breviter 5-lobia basi truncatis 
pallide viridibus, lobis late triangularibus 3-crenatis obtusis, paniculis 
elongatis ascendentibus laiifloris ramis ramulis distantibns pedunculisque 
gracillimiB pallide rubris, pedicellis squamulis sparsis minutis subulatia 
instructis, involacri cylindracei 5 poll, longi eealyculati bracteis 6-10 
linearibus acuminatis v. lineari-oblongis acutiB 3-5-nerviis marginibus late 
hyalinis, receptaculo parvo convexo, floribus ra'lii5, ligulia lineari-oblongia 
\ poll, longia apice rotundatis aureis, floribus disci aurantiacis, acheniis 
radii minutis vix ^ poll. longiB late oblongis compreBBis brunneis 
marginibuB longe villosis, disco medio pubescente, pappo albo achaenio vix 
dnplo longiore, pilis margine cupula? persistentis inaertis mollibus 
ecaberulis caduciB. 



The native country of Cineraria pentactina is unrecorded, 
though it may with little doubt be regarded as South 
Africa, from its close affinity with C. lobata, L'Herit. 
(Sert. Angl. t. 34) which has a wide range of distribu- 
tion in the southern districts of Cape Colony. From that 
plant C. pentactina differs chiefly in its very slender climb- 
ing habit, less divided leaves, and lax paniculate inflores- 
cence, with very long branches, peduncles, and pedicels. 
It is a very elegant plant, as seen climbing a pillar of the 
greenhouse in the Royal Gardens, Kew, of which it is 
a very old inhabitant, flowering profusely in the summer 
months. 

Descr. — Quite glabrous. Stem very slender, about as 
thick as a sparrow's quill and branches dull red ; branch- 
lets pendulous. Leaves alternate, distant or fascicled on 
short lateral shoots, semi-orbicular in outline, three-fourths 
of an inch in diameter, shortly, broadly five-lobed, base 
truncate, pale green on both surfaces ; petiole slender, 
about as long as the blade, base not auricled. Flowers in 
lax, ascending, terminal panicles ; peduncles and pedicels 
very slender, pale red ; bracts on the pedicels minute, 

October 1st, 1901. 



distant, subulate, greeu. Involucre cylindric, about a third 
of an inch long, ecalyculate ; bracts six to ten, linear, 
acute, or acuminate, three- to five-nerved, green, with 
scarious margins. Bay-flowers five, golden-yellow ; ligule 
half an inch long, linear-oblong, tip minutely three-toothed. 
Disk-floivers orange-yellow. Achenes minute, broadly ob- 
long, compressed, red-brown, margins densely villous, disc 
pubescent in the middle. Pappus-hairs inserted in the 
mouth of persistent cup, rather longer than the achene, 
white, scaberulous, caducous. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, ray- and 2, disk-flowers ; 3, hair of pappus ; 4, stamens ; 5, stigmas of 
ray-flower; 6, achene with pappus: — all enlarged. . 



7806 





is 






•^i«>eritBrcoks,Day& SonLtMr 



L Reeve &.C CJ LoTi.dor 



Tab. 7800. 
CALORHABDOS cauloptera. 

Native of China. 

Nat. Old. SCEOPIIULARINEiE. — Tribe DlGITALEiE. 

Genus Calorhabdos, Benth.; {Benth. $ TTook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 963 (e* 

parte.) 



Calor.ha.bd os cauloptera: berba erecta, fauce corollsa excepta glaberrima, 
canle gracili subsimplici anguste tetraptero, foliis alternis breviter petio- 
latis ovatn-lanceolatis ncnminatis argute serrulatia basi acutia, raoerao 
epiciforme terminali erecto 6-8 poll, longa multi-deusifloro, rhachi tetra- 
gona, noribus brevissime pedicellatisunibracteatis bractea ovato-lanceolata 
calyce subaequilonga, calycis i poll, longi segmentis lanceolatis erecto- 
patulis, corolla deflexa £ poll, lata ad medium 5-loba rubro-pnrpurea, 
fauce annulo lato villoso ancto, lobo postico late ovato depresso apice 
bident cidato, ceteris minoribus ovatis acuminatis patulis, staininibns 2 
erectis, antheris didymis aureis, capsula calyci aequilonga ovoidea 
bisulcata polysperma loculicida, valvis bipartite, semitiibus ovoideis. 

C. cauloptera, Hance in Trimen Journ. Bot. vol. xv. (1877) p. 298. Hemsl. in 
Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxvi. (1890) p. 195 ; in Hook. Ic. PL vol. xxvii. 
sub t. 2669. 

The genus Galorhabdos was founded by Bentham on a 
Nepalese plant closely allied to Veronica, G. Bruno- 
niana (see Hook. Ic. Plant, t. 2669), to which was 
subsequently added a Chinese and Japanese, G. axillaris. 
Of these the latter has been regarded as the type 
of a distinct genus (ttotryopleuron) by Mr. Hemsley, 
differing from G. Brunoniana in habit and in its axillary 
spikes. Three additional species of Botryopetalum, 
all Chinese, have since been discovered, confirming 
the validity of the genus (see Hemsley, I.e. t. 2670) ; 
and the Nepalese C. Brunoniana has been found by the 
Abbe Delavayin the province of Yunnan, in China, though 
in no intermediate locality, and a second species of Galor- 
habdos, the subject of this plate, has been added to it. 

G. cauloptera is a native of the provinces of Ichang and 
Kwangtung. Seeds of it were sent to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in 1896, by Dr. Henry, plants raised from which 
flowered in a greenhouse in August, 1900. It is remarkable 
for its four-winged stem and four-angled rachis of the 
spike ; those organs in G. Brunoniana, and in all the species 
of Botryopleuron being perfectly terete. 

OCTOBBB 1st, 1901. 



Descr. — A slender, erect herb, everywhere glabrous, 
except on the throat of the corolla. Stem unbranched, 
narrowly four-winged. Leaves very shortly petioled, alter- 
nate, three to five inches long, ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, 
acutely serrulate, with the serratures inflexed, base acute, 
deep green above, beneath pale, with prominent nerves. 
Inflorescence terminal, shortly ped uncled, spiciform raceme 
from six to eight inches long, very slender, half an inch 
broad, densely many-flowered ; bracts lanceolate, about as 
long as the calyx, green. Flowers very shortly pedicelled. 
Calyx about an eighth of an inch long, divided nearly to 
the truncate base into five sub-equal, lanceolate, acuminate 
lobes. Corolla deflexed, tube short, limb about one-third 
of an inch broad, five-lobed to the middle, dark red- 
purple ; posticous lobe largest, depressed, broadly ovate, 
tip two-toothed ; lateral lobes spreading, ovate, acuminate ; 
mouth with a broad ring of purple matted hairs. Stamens 
2, exserted ; anthers oblong, didymous, yellow. Ovary 
compressed, two-celled ; style shorter than the filaments, 
erect; stigma minute. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, portion of margin of leaf ; 2, flower ; 3, calyx and bract ; 4, corolla 
laid open and stamens ; 5, ovary : — all enlarged. 



7801 




M-S.Asl.J.N.PitcKUth 



•A^ Broo^s.'Day &. Son U*Imp 



L Reeve St C ? London 



Tad. 7801. 

RUB US PALMATUS. 
Native of Japan and China. 

Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Rube.*:. 
G.nus Rubus, Linn; (Benth. & Roolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. G16.) 



Rub us palmatus ; frutex fere glaberrimus, ramosus eglandulosus, ramis elonga- 
tis gracilibus scandentibus, aculeis sparsis rectis, foliis in ramulos abbre- 
viates fasciculatis supremis solitariis louge graciliter petiolatis ambitu 
orbicularibus et palmatim 5-fidia vel late ovatis pinnatifido-5-7-lobis 
subcaudato-acuminatis laate viridibus lobis segmentisve ovatis v. lanceo- 
latis acuminatis inciso-serratis subtus pallidis, petiolo 1-2 poll, longo 
distante setoso v. aculeolato, stipulis supra-basilaribus lineari-lanceolatis 
obscure denticulatis, floribus axillaribus solitariis, pedicellis gracilibus 
sparse setulosis, calycis glabri v. pilosuli tubo hemisphaerico lobis lan- 
ceolatis acuminatis parce serratis intus glabris, petalis patentibus sepalis 
vix duplo longiovibus ellipticia obtusis albis, antheris aureis, carpellis 
summo toro cylindraceo confertis glaberrimis, stylis elongatis filiformibus 
erectis stigmate capitellato, fructu globoso flavo sapido. 

R. palmatus, Thunb. Fl. Jap. p. 217; Ic. PI. Jap. Dec. iv. tab. 6. Sieb. & 
Zucc. FL Jap. Fam. Nat. face. i. p. 18. Miqs Ann. Mus. Bot. Lugd. 
Bat. vol. iii. p. 35; A. Gray, Bot. Japan, p. 387, pro parte. Maxim, in 
Bull. Imp. Acad. Sc. Peiersb. vol. xvii. (1872) p. 154 ; (Mel. Biol. viii. p. 384). 
Franch. & Sav. Fnum. PI. Jap. vol. i. p. 126. Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. 
Soc. Bot. vol. xxiii. (1886-8) p. 234. 

R. coptophyllus, A. Gray, Bot. Perry Exped. Japan, p. 311. 



lluhus palmatus is a very elegant species, differing from 
the typical forms of the genus in the elliptic shape of its 
white spreading petals. It has several allies in Japan and 
China with similar flowers, especially R. incisus, Thunb., 
which differs in its leaves being only 3-lobed, and in the 
tomentose inner surface of the calyx-lobes. Thimberg's 
figure of palmatus is excellent; De Oandolle has doubtfully 
referred it to B. mwrophyltus, Linn, f., also a native of 
Japan, which has recurved prickles, and a villous calyx. 

The plant of B. palmatus>ivom which the accompanying 
figure was made, was obtained from Messrs. Veitch & Sons, 
of Chelsea, in 1899. It is now twenty feet high, trained 
against a pillar in the Himalaya wing of the Temperate 
House of the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it flowered in 
April of this year. There are specimens of it in the 
Kew Herbarium from Yokohama, Nagasaki, and the 
central mountains of Japan, ascending to seven thousand 

October 1st, 1901. 



feet ; also from Corea, and from Ghekiang in China. It 
has so far proved hardy in my garden near Sunningdale, 
as to have survived without injury the winter of 1900-1. 

Descr. — A glabrous, m uch branched, eglaudular shrub, with 
slender, climbing branches. Prickles scattered, straight, 
compressed. Leaves one to three inches long, orbicular 
and palmately five or six-lobed, or broadly ovate and sub- 
pinnatifidly lobed, base sub-cordate, lobes ovate or lanceo- 
late, acuminate, inciso-serrate, bright green above, pale 
beneath ; petiole one to two inches long, bearing a few 
scattered minute bristles; stipules inserted above the 
base of the petiole, linear, acuminate, sparingly denti- 
culate. Flowers solitary, axillary, one to one and a half 
inches in diameter ; pedicels very slender, sparsely setose. 
Calyx-tube hemispheric; lobes linear-lanceolate, about half 
as long as the petals, acuminate, sparingly serrate. Petals 
elliptic, obtuse, pure white. Filaments slender, erect, 
anthers yellow. Carpels crowded on the top of a short, 
cylindric column, oblong, smooth; style very slender. 
Fruit globose, nearly an inch in diameter, yellow, succu- 
lent,—/. D. II. 



Fig. 1, base of petiole and stipules ; 2, base of calyx, stamens, and carpels ; 
3, carpel :— all enlarged. 



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BOTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

CONTENTS OF No. 682. OCTOBER, 1901. 



Tab. 7"97.— EXORRHIZA WENDLANDIANA. 
„ 7798— HABENARIA LUGARDII. 
„ 7799.— CINERARIA PENTACTLNA. 
u 7800.— CALORHABDOS CAULOPTERA. 
„ 7801.— RUBDS PALMATUS. 



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Tab. 7802. 
musa oleracea. 

Native of New Caledonia. 

Nat. Ord. SciTAMiNEiB.— Tribe Muse*. 
Genua Musa, Linn. ; (Benlh. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 655.) 



Musa (Eumusa) ohraeea; tubere subterraneo magno napiformi pluricauli 
caudice mediocn vmdi-violaceo glaucescente, foliia petiolatis 1-2-pedalibus 
oblonsfiB acuminata basi rotundatia snpra saturate viridibus subtus 
pallid is glaucescentilms, nervia prirnariis distinctis aubremotis impressis 
arcnatis petiolo pedali crasao, spica cernua ad 8 poll, longa breviter 
et crasse pedunculata, pedunculo rhachique viridi, bracteis paucifloria 
infenoribus 6 poll, longis linearibus v. lineari-oblongia obtusia recurvia 
extus fusco-purpureis glaucia intua flavo-rubria clathratim rubro atriatis 
apice yiridibua, ovario teretiusculo viridi, perianthio 1 poll, longo, calycis 
flayidi f usco picti nervosi lobis 2 exterioribus oblongis obtusis dorao infra 
apicem calcaratis, interiorum lobis lateralibua dorao infra apicetn 
calcaratis intermedio latiore ecalcarato, corolla calyce triente breriore 
quadrata pallide purpurea raargiue superiore medio ligula iustructa 
v. abrupte acuminata, stigmate clavato apice lobulato. 

M. oleracea, Vieill. in Ann. Sc. Nat. Ser. IV. vol. xvi. (1861) p. 46. 

M. eapientum, Linn. var. oleracea, Baker in Kew Bulletin, 1894,, p. 250. 

Poiete incol. 

Musa oleracea is a very interesting species, being, as far 
as is known, unique in the genus in having a very large 
underground tuber, replete with starch, winch is boiled, 
toasted, or baked as an article of food by the natives 
of New Caledonia, its flavour, according to M. Vieillard, 
resembles that of the yam. The tuber has " eyes " like 
a potato, and the plant may hence be propagated by 
division. 

From M. paradisiaca, M. oleracea is easily distinguished 
by the tuber, the short leaves glaucous beneath, with very 
well defined arching primary nerves, about three-quarters 
of an inch apart, and impressed on the upper surface ; the 
short spike with very few-flowered, long, narrow bracts, 
which are glaucous purple externally, and red within, the 
much shorter calyx, which is dull yellow stained with 
pale brown or purple, and the colour of the corolla. 
It is said by M. Vieillard never to flower in New Caledonia, 
where it perhaps is known only as a cultivated plant. It 
did not ripen fruit at Kew. 
November 1st, 1901. 



M. oleracea was received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
from Mr. W. Souter, Superintendent of tlie Gardens of the 
Brisbane Acclimatization Society. It flowered in the 
Mexican wing of the Temperate House in August, 1900, 
but did not ripen fruit. 

Descr. — Stem four to seven feet high, rising from a 
large underground turnip-shaped corm, green and violet, 
glaucous. Leaves one to two feet long, rather shortly 
stoutly petioled, oblong, acuminate, base rounded, dark 
green above, pale and glaucous beneath ; lateral nerves 
very distant, about three-quarters of an inch apart, 
arching. Spilce decurved, shortly ped uncled ; rhachis 
stout, dark green. Bracts few-flowered, lower remote, 
six inches long, linear or ligulate, dull purple, and very 
glaucous, externally bright pale red within, somewhat 
tessellately mottled with darker red, tips obtuse, green. 
Calyx about an inch long ; segments strongly nerved, dull 
yellow, suffused with pale, dirty purple or brown. Corolla 
about one-third shorter than tlie calyx, quadrats, abruptly 
cuspidate, or with the cusp sometimes produced into 
ligule, pale dull purple. — /. D. H. 



Fig. ], Irad; 2, flower ; 3, corolla j 4 and o, stamens ; 0, top of style and 
Btigma:— all enlarged. 



7803 




M.S.dal J.KEiloHkth 



VmcmtBv-ooksDay & Son LL a In* 



Tab. 7803. 

SENECIO MAGNIF1CU8. 
Native of Australia. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Senecionide.e. 
Genus Senecio, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 446). 



StNEt 10 (Radiati) magnijicus ; snfErutex glaberrimns, glaucua, caule erecto 
robusto ramisque teretibua foliosis, foliis grosse aubremoto dentatia 
acutis ad i-pedalibus obovato-oblongis oblanceolatiave basi angustatif, 
Bupcrioribus minoribua lanceolatis eemi-ampiexicaulibus, costa aubtus 

f>rom inula, nervia obscuris, capitulis longe pedunculitis in corymbos 
axoa aphylloa dispositis, pednnculia bracteia Bubalatis auctis, involucri 
| poll, longi cylindracei basi obscure calyculati bracteis linearibua obtusis 
herbaceis, receptacnlo piano Isevi, fl. radii 8-12 lignlis % poll, longis liueari- 
oblongis apice obtusis obscure crenatis aureis, styK ramis fnscia, fl. disci 
numerosis involucro paullo longioribus aureia, achaeniis puberulis, pappi 
albi Betis scabemlis. 
S. magnificus, F. Muell. in Linneea, vol. xxv. (1852) p. 418 ; Key Syst. Vict. PI. 
vol. i. p. 340. Sonder in Linnxa, I.e. p. 526. Benth. Fl. Austral, vol. iii. 
p. 665. 

Though hardly meriting the grandiose specific name 
given to this plant by the late Baron Mueller, it is a very 
conspicuous member of the enormous genus of groundsels, 
and in this respect heads the list of the twenty-eight 
Australian species. It is a mountain plant, native of the 
Grampians in Victoria, and of the Flinder's Range in 
South Australia. Seeds of it were received at the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in 1899, from Mr. Maiden, F.L.S., Director 
of the Botanic Gardens of Sidney, from which plants were 
raised which flowered in the Temperate House in October, 
1900. 

Descr. — A tall, stout, quite glabrous, glaucous, erect, 
sparingly branched under-shrub, stem and branches terete, 
leafy. Leaves rather coriaceous, coarsely sub-crenately 
toothed, lower about six inches long, oblong-lanceolate or 
oblanceolate, narrowed at the base ; upper smaller, lan- 
ceolate, semi-amp'exicaul, costa thickened beneath, nerves 
obscure. Heads m loose, peduncled, leafless corymbs ; 
pedicels slender, bearing scattered subulate bracts. In- 
volucre half an inch long, cylindric, green, base obscurely 
calyculate ; involucral bracts linear, obtuse, herbaceous, 

yoVEMBEK 1ST, 11)01. 



green. Receptacle flat, smooth. Bay -flowers eight to 
twelve, ligules two-thirds of an inch long, linear-oblong, 
golden-yellow, tips obscurely ere n ate ; style-arms pale 
brown. Dish-flowers very many, rather longer than the 
involucre, five-toothed. Achenes short, smooth, puberulous. 
—J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, ray-flower with portion of ligule removed ; 2, disk-flower; 3, hair of 
pappus ; 4, anthers ; 5, arms of style :— all enlarged. 



7804 




CS.cUJ J.K.Rtoh lith 



, vLioc!'iBroo><S.Bo.y«<.SonL*. i iivp 



Tap. 7804. 

liparis tricallosa. 

Native of the Malay Peninsula and Sulu Archipelago. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide.*. — Tribe Epidendre^. 
Genus Liparis, Rich. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 495.) 



Liparis (Mollifolia) tricallosa; caule brevi vix pBeudobulboso, foliis 3-5 
sessilibus 4^8 poll, longis ellipticis v. oblongo-lanceolatia acnminatis 
6-7-nerviis membraaaceis pallide viridibus marginibua undulatia nerviaque 
eubtus rubria, pedunculo rhachiqne racemi clongati laxe-multiflori 
angulatia rubris, bracteis parvia ovato-lanceolatis, pedicellis cum ovario 
1-1 1 poll, longis rubris, sepalis pollicaribus loriformibua obtnsis citrinis 
lateralibua infra labellum positis, petalis sepalis paullo brevioribua recurvis, 
ob margines revolutos filiformibus rubris, labelli breviter unguiculati 
lamina suborbiculari subacuta plana deflexa £ poll, lata aurea lineia 
saturate rubris creberrime picta, ungue tricalloso, callis lateralibua 
reniformibua intermedio minuto globoso, columna minuta incarva 
marginibus supra medium dilatatis, capsula ellipsoidea. 

L. tricallosa, Echb. f. in Qard. Ghron. 1879, vol. i. pp. 225, 68 i et 1901, fig. 85. 
Ridley in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xxii. (1886) p. 275. 

L. venosa, Ridley I.e. vol. xxiv. (1888) p. 350, et vol. xxxii. (1896) p. 224. 



A very well-marked Liparis, discovered by Mr. Bur- 
bidge, F.L.S., Curator of the Trinity College Botanic 
Gardens (author of "The Gardens of the Sun"), in the 
Sulu Archipelago ; and more recently found in the Malay 
Peninsula, at Perak, Johore, and Singapore. The sepals 
vary in colour, being lemon-yellow in the specimen here 
figured. The petals and striations of the lip are lake red, 
rather than carmine as described by Mr. Ridley in his 
L. ve?iosa, which is unquestionably conspecific. 

L. tricallosa was introduced into cultivation by Mr. 
Bull, who in 1879 flowered a plant of it received from 
its discoverer which was described by Reichenbach as 
cited above* "T^e specimen here figured was presented to 
the Royal GawKcs, Kew, by the Right Honourable Joseph 
Chamberlain, Secretary of State for the Colonies, in full 
flower, in June, 1900. 

Bescr. — Stem short, stout, hardly pseudobulbous. Leaves 
three to five, sessile, four to eight inches long, elliptic- or 
oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, five to seven-nerved, mem- 
branous, margins waved, and nerves beneath red. Raceme 

November 1st, 1901. 



pcd uncled, six to eight inches long, loosely many-flowered, 
rhachis acutely angled, red; bracts small, lanceolate; 
pedicel and ovary together one to one and a half inches 
long, slender, twisted, red. Sepals an inch long, strap- 
shaped, obtuse, lemon-yellow, two lateral placed under the 
lip. Petals rather shorter than the sepals, arched, re- 
curved, filiform, red. Lip deflexed, sub-orbicular, flat, 
three-fourths of an inch broad, golden-yellow, closely 
striped with red, claw very short, with two lateral 
reniform calli, and a minute, globose, intermediate one. — 
J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, claw of lip; 2, side, and 3, front view of column and anther; 
4, anther ; 5, polliuia : — all enlarged. 




7801 



[.S.del J.N. 



Tab. 7805. 

TREVORIA Chloius. 

Native of the Andes of Colombia. 

Nat. Ord. Orciude/k. — Tribe Vande/E. 
Genas Trevoria, (F. C. Lehm. in Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. i. p. 345.) 



Trevoria Ch/oris; paeudobulbis fascicalatis cylindraceis v. elongato-pyri- 
formibus ecostatis 1-foliatis infra medium vaginis lanceolatis bmnnei3 
rigidia obtectis, folio bubaeasili oblongo-lanceolato plioato, pedunculo e 
baai pseudoljulbi robuato decurvo flexuoso vasjinia polIicaribu8 lanceolatis 
branneiB striatis ornato, epica pendula pauciflora rhachi robnsta, hracteis 
triangularibua brevibus cucnllatis cuspidatia, floribna ad 2£ poll, latis 
viridibus, ovario brevi, perianthio aubcampanulato, sepalia columnar basi 
oblique insertiB late ovatis aubacutia concavis carnosnlis, petalia aepalis 
multo angustioribus oblongo-lanceolatia patenti-recarvia pallidia, labello 
carnoso baai columnar adnato 8epalis breviore 3-lobo, lobia lateralibua 
auriculiformibua erectia disco proceasu lingua3formi colnmnre anppoaito 
revoluto aucto, terminali stipitato ovato medio 5-sulcato, stipite tumido 
obtuao callo bilobo inatructo non articulato, columna brevi craasa 
clinandrio terminali, antbera parva hemiBpbaerica 1-loculari, polliniis 
pyriformibus apicem versua caudiculue elongataa affixis, gland nla orbiculari 
demum longe extrusa, stigmatis fovea tranaversa. 

Trevoria Chloris, F. G. Lehm. in Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. i. p. 345, fig. 128. 
Rolfe in Orchid. Rev, vol. viii. (1900) p. 335. 



The very remarkable Orchid here figured was discovered 
by Mr. F. C. Lehmann in moist woods at four thousand 
eight hundred feet to five thousand five hundred feet 
elevation on the western slope of the Andes of Colombia, 
near Popayan, flowering in September and November. 
Its nearest but not very close ally is, according to Mr. 
Rolfe, Goryanthes, from which it differs conspicuously in 
the structure of the lip. The name Trevoria recalls the 
great services rendered to horticulture, and especially to 
a knowledge of Orchids, by Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., 
M.P., President of the Royal Horticultural Society of 
London, to whom I am indebted for communicating the 
specimen from which the accompanying figure was made. 

Descr.—PseudobHlbx tufted, three inches long, cylindric, 
one half to one inch in diameter, smooth, green, one- 
leaved ; sheaths brown, rather rigid, striate. Leaf oblono-. 
lanceolate, acuminate, plicate, seven-nerved, narrowed into 
a very short petiole, bright green above, yellowish-oreen 

.November \vt, 1W1. 



beneath, with strong nerves. Peduncle from the base of 
the pseudobnlb, four to five inches long, decurved, very 
stout, flexuous, green, with brown-streaked sheaths, of 
which the lower are short, appressed, the upper nearly an 
inch long, loose, lanceolate. Spike pendulous, few-fid. ; 
rhachis stout, flexuous, green ; bracts like the upper 
sheaths of the peduncle. Ovary short, curved, green. 
Perianth sub-campanulate, about two and a half inches 
broad, base rounded. Sepals inserted in the base of the 
column, broadly ovate, obtuse, concave, fleshy, green. 
Petals as long as the sepals, but much narrower, oblong- 
lanceolate, obtuse, spreading and recurved, pale yellow- 
green. Lip adnate to the base of the column, rather 
shorter than the sepals, very thick, fleshy, nearly white, 
three-lobed; lateral lobes short, ear-shaped, erect, with a 
revolute tongue-shaped process at the base ; terminal lobe 
ovate, shortly stipitate, with a two-lobed callus on the 
stipes ; disk five-grooved. Column very short, broad and 
thick, green. Anthers hemispheric, with an upcurved 
beak ; pollinia pyriform, on a long inflexed strap ; gland 
orbicular. — /. D. H. 

Fig. 1, upper part of ovary, lip, and column; 2, side view of column; 
3, hypochile with stipes of epichile ; 4 and 5, pollinia : — all enlarged. 



7801 




M 3 d«t.<J.NRtahlith 



TfincentBrooloDfcY * 



SonU^"* 



CJjirtf jstrits. 

No. 684. 



<y 



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Tab, 7807. 
CY11TOPODIUM iwlmifkons. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Orchid e.«. — Tribe Vande.k. 
G. nus Cyktopodium, Br.\ (lienth. & H»ok. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 541). 



Ctrtopodium palmifrons ; caulibus 2-pedalibus fasciculatis suberectis com- 
pressis infra medium vaginia citrinia purpureo marginatis imbricatis arete 
adpressiB velatis dein fidiatis (folinm pinnatum referentibus) foliia 6-8 poll, 
longis diatichis lineari-lunceolatis acuminati8 3-nerviis basi angustatia 
laete viridibua aubtua pallidis, vaginia caulinia consimilibus, pednnculis 
basilaribus canlibus brevioribas ad^cendeotibus vaginis disticbia oblongia 
acutia coloratia imbricatis laxe tectis, panicula ampla 15 poll, longa 10 
lata oblonga nutante multiflora, rachi ramisque gracilibus viridibua, 
bracteia axillaribus floralibusque oblongia v. ellipticia albia roseo mar- 
ginatis caducia his g-| illis f-l poll, longis, floribua ad 1 poll, latis 
Lreviter pedicellatis, sepalis suborbieulatis apice rotundatis labelloque 
citriuia roseo inaculatia, petalia paullo latioribu8 citrinia, labello sepalis 
breviore geniculatim unguiculato subaequaliter 3-lobo, lobiB lateralibus 
erectia reniformi-rotnndatis, termiaale 2-lobulato lobulia margines versus 
di-icoque baai callis globosis confertis instructo, columna parva, antbera 
antice appendiculata, polliniis oblongis caudicula lata sessilibus. 

C. palmifrons, Reichb.f. et Warm, in Ot.Bot. Hamb. fasc. ii. p. 88. Warm, in 
Vidensk. Med. Nat Foren. Kjobenh. 1884-7, p. 87, t. 6, f. 3 ; Symb. ad Fl. 
Bras. Centr. vol. xxx. p. 850, t. 6, f. 3. 



This very remarkable Orchid was discovered growing 
on trees in the forests of Lagoa Santa, in Central Brazil, 
by the Danish traveller and botanist, J. E. B. Warming. 
For the beautiful specimen here figured, which flowered 
in a tropical house in April, 1901, the Royal Gardens are 
indebted to Dr. E. A. Heath, of Eaton Square. The 
specific name palmifrons is in allusiou to the resemblance 
which the leafing stem bears to the leaf of an Arecoid 
Palm, the leafless part of the stem answering to the petiole, 
and the distichous narrow leaves to the pinnules of the 
palm. 

Deser. — Stems tufted, ascending, about two feet high, 
straight or curved, compressed, closely invested by the 
short, uniform sheaths of fallen leaves, each sheath is 
about halt' an inch long, lemon-coloured, with purple 
margins, the latter giving the effect of a zigzag purple 

December 1st, iroi. 



line running up the stems. Leaves six to eight inches long, 
distichous ; blade sessile on the sheath, linear-lanceolate, 
acuminate, narrowed at the base, bright green. Peduncle 
basal, stout, ascending, branching into a spreading, in- 
clined, many-flowered panicle fifteen inches long by ten 
inches broad. Bracts, axillary and floral elliptic or oblong, 
membranous, caducous, white with rose-coloured margins, 
floral one-third of an inch to half an inch long, axillary 
much larger. Flowers about an inch broad, shortly pedi- 
celled. Sepals sub-orbicular, lemon-coloured, spotted with 
rose-pink. Petals rather broader, lemon-coloured. Lip 
colour of the sepals, geniculately clawed, three-lobed; 
lobes sub-equal, lateral erect, broadly reniform, terminal 
broadly bilobulate ; disk and margins covered with globose 
calli. Column very short. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, portion of panicle of nat. size ; 2, side view, and 3, front view of 
column and lip; 4> anther; 5, pollinia : — all enlarged; 6, reduced view of 
whole plant. 



Tab. 7806. 

SYRINGA OBLATA. 

Native of North China. 

Nat. Ord. Oleaceje. — Tribe Syringe.*;. 
Qenus Syringa, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 075.) 



Syringa (Eusyringa) oblata; frutex fere gla.be rrimup, 8-10-pedali?, foliis sub- 
hysteranthiis 2-3J poll, latis snbcoriaceia rhombeo-ovatis orbicularibusve 
acntis v. subcnspidatis basi rotundatis v. late cordatis supra Itete viridibus 
margiiiibus ssepe roseo tinctis subtua pallidioribus demum rufescentibus, 
petiolo |-1 poll, longo, thyrso breviter pedunculato globoso v. oblongo 
dense-multifloro, ramis ramulis calycibusque puberulis, floribus breviter 
pedicellatis pallide lilacinis, calyce T V poll, longo ad medium inseqnaliter 
4-fiJo, lobis ovatis v. ovato-lanceolatis acutis, corollse ttibo J poll, longo 
nin 1 © v. subglanduloso, limbi § poll, lati lobis orbiculatis v. late elliptieia 
planis v. subconcavia. 

S. oblata, Lindl. in Oard. Chron. 1859, p. 868. Fortune, I.e. 1860, p. 170. 
Naud. in Fl. des Serres, vol. xiii. (1858, in 1860 public.) p. 126 (sub JEsculo 
indica) Dippel, Handb. Laubliolz. vol. i. p. 113. Sargent, Gard. & For. 
vol. i. (1888) p. 221, fig. 39. Decne in Nouv. Arch. Mus. Paris. Se>. IT. 
vol. ii. p. 40. Henisl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Pot. vol. xxvi. (1889) p. 83. 
Franch. PI. David, p. 205. 

S. chinensia, Bunqe in Mem. Sav. Etr. Petersb. vol. ii. (1835) p. 116 (non 
Willd.). 

Syringa oblata is so closely allied to 8. vulgaris, t. 183, 
that Prof. Sargent (Gard. & Forest, I.e.) who has given a 
good resume of the characters of the Chinese species of 
the genus, says that it is, perhaps, a geographical variety 
of that plant. He points out as differences, its thicker 
leaves, its flowering twelve days later, and the leaves 
turning a dark russet-red in autumn. Before, however, 
accepting this view, it is necessary to compare the fruits 
and seeds of the two plants, of which those of 8. oblata 
are as yet unknown to me. 

Fortune was the introducer of S. oblata into Europe. 
He found it in a garden at Shanghai. Some years later 
the Abbe David procured specimens from a garden in 
Peking ; and more recently it has been collected in a wild 
state in Western Kansu by Potanin, and at Moukden, in 
Shingking, by the Rev. J. Webster. A plant of it was 
obtained by the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1899, from Mr. 
Lemoine's Nurseries of Nancy. It flowered in the 
Temperate House in April of this year. 

November 1st, 1901. 



Descr.—A nearly glabrous shrub, eight to ten feet high. 
Leaves not fully developed till flowering time, rhomboid al- 
ovate or orbicular, two to three and a half inches in dia- 
meter, cuspidately acute or acuminate, rather coriaceous, 
green, with often reddish margins, base rounded or openly 
cordate, russet red on maturing ; petiole one half to one 
inch long. Flowers in a shortly peduncled, broadly oblong 
or globose, dense-flowered thyrsus, very shortly pedicelled, 
branches, pedicels, and calyces puberulous. Calyx one- 
tenth of an inch long, cleft nearly to the middle into four 
unequal, ovate-lanceolate, acute lobes. Corolla pale lilac, 
tube about half an inch long, glabrous or slightly 
glandular ; limb two-thirds of an inch broad ; lobes flat 
or slightly concave, orbicular or broadly elliptic. Fruit 
unknown. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, calyx, st)le, and stigma; 2, section of corolla; 3, pistil : — all en- 
larged. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 683, NOVEMBER, 1901. 



Tab. 7802.— MUSA OLERACEA. 
., 7803.— SENECIO MAGNIFICUS. 
,. 7804.— LI PARIS TRICALLOSA. 
< t 7805— TREVOR1A CHLORIS. 
., 7806.— SYRINGA OBLATA. 



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\5noant.Broak»,D» !.. Jor. U^iop 



Tar. 7808. 
EUCALYPTUS Guxnit, 

Var. MONTANA. 
Native of Tasmania and Victoria. 

Nat. Old. Myrtace.*. — Tribe Leptosperme^. 
Genus Eucalyptus, L'lier. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 707.) 



Eucalyptus (Strongylanthera) Gunnii; arbor altitudine varia nunc valde 
elata, glaberrima, trunci cortice fragili inferne rngnloso auperae ramo- 
ramqae loevi, ramis patulin, foliis alternia petiolatis ovatia v. ovato- 
lanceo'atis acnmiDatis rectis rigidis ntrinqne pallide viridibus basi 
acuminatis cuneatiave, nervis glanduliaqne obscaris, primariis oppoaitis 
sessilibos rotundatis pruinosis, umbellis axillaribus lateralibusque 
3-pluri-floris sntseasilibus v. pedicellatis, calycis tubo ad $-{ poll, longo 
obovoideo v. turbinate, inargine acuto, operculo tabo mnlto brevioro 
bemispherico vel conicoet umbonato, filamentia £-£ poll, longis alabaBtro 
inflexis, antheria brevibus oblongis obovatisve rimia elongatia dehiacenti- 
bus, stylo brevi, capsula pyriformi truacata ore paullo constrict a tereti 
3-5-loculari margine angusto, valvis brevibua deltoideis leviter immer.-:is, 
seminibus inappendiculatis. 

Var. montana; arbor parva, foliis ad 2 poll, longia, umbelliB pauciflori.*. 

E. Gunnii, Hook. f in Hook. Lond. Journ. Bot. vol, iii. (1844) p. 499; Fl. 
Tasman. vol. i. p. 134, t. 27. Benth. FL Austral, vol. iii. p. 216 F. 
Muell. Eucalyptogr. Dec. iv. ; Key Syet. Fid. PL i. 240. E. lign»trina, 
Miq. in Ned. Kruidk. Arch. vol. iv. (1859) p. 134 (non D.C). Tab. nostr. 
7808. 

Var. elata ; arbor elata, foliis longiorihns, umbellis plnrifloris. E. Stnartiana, 

F. Muell. ex Miq. I.e. vol. iv. (1859) p. 13 1 ; Eucalyptogr. Dec. iv. E. 
persisifolia, Miq. I.e. p. 137 (non Lodd.). E. Biueriana, Miq. I c. ]>. 
(won Schati.) E. falcitolia, Miq. I.e. p. 136 (partim.) E. acervula, l> 

f. Fl. Tasman. vol. i. p. 135 (non Sieb.). E. Gunnii, F. Muell. Fragment. 
vol. ii. p. 62 (non Hook.f.). 



The species of Eucalyptus are notoriously variable, and 
difficult of discrimination. E. Gunnii forms no exception, 
and has given rise to a difference of opinion as to its 
limits of variation between Mr. Bentham and Baron 
Mueller, both able monographers of the genus. The 
species was discovered by myself in 1840, forming a 
forest of small trees in a swampy soil at elevations of 
three thousand to four thousand feet in the centre of 
Tasmania, where it was known to stock-keepers as yielding 
abundantly an agreeable sap; and hence called cider-tree 
or swamp-gum. This Tasmanian mountain form w r as sub- 
sequently found in the Victorian Alps, on the summit of the 
December 1s>t. 1901, 



Baw-Baw mountains, by Mueller, at an elevation of five 
thousand feet. It is characterized by its small stature, 
leaves about two inches long, and three- to four-flowered, 
shortly peduncled umbels. In 1859 Miquel published an 
allied species, E. Stuartiana, inhabiting low levels, charac- 
terized by its great size, attaining two hundred and 
fifty feet in height, longer leaves, more slender pedun- 
cles, with more numerous flowers in the umbels. It is 
the E. Gunnii of Mueller's Fragmenta cited above, the 
E. aceroula of my " FloraTasmanica " (not of Sieber), and 
has other synouyms. Bentham retains both species, but 
Mueller, being informed by Mr. Abbot, of Tasmania, a 
very competent observer, that E. Gunnii, in descending 
from the mountains to low levels, passes gradually into 
E. Stuartiana, has united the two, and in so doing has 
greatly added to the geographical range of the species, 
for the Stuartiana form not only ranges over Tasmania, 
but from Lake Bonney and Guichen Bay, in South 
Australia, to Gipp's Land in Victoria, and to Bathurst 
Plains and Two-fold Bay in New South Wales. 

E. Gunnii is the only species that has withstood the 
climate of the east of England. A small tree of it 
(formerly misnamed E. polyanthemos) stood for many years 
on a mound by the pond opposite the Palm House, in the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, where it was cut almost to the 
ground by severe cold in several winters, but as often sent 
up from the trunk one or more branches from ten feet to 
twenty feet high. A specimen in my garden, near Sun- 
ningdale, at an elevation of about two hundred feet, is 
now thirty feet high. It has suffered severely by frosts, 
but has survived them. In the West of England and of 
Scotland it is quite hardy. As a species it is remarkable 
for the obscure development of oil glands, and faint odour 
of the foliage, which is hence browsed upon in Australia 
by cattle and sheep. Mueller gives several Colonial names 
for it, besides that under which I knew it, as Red gum- 
tree of Tasmania, Gumtop-tree of Sealer's Cove, and 
But-But, or Apple-scented Gum. The specimen here 
figured is taken from the plant that flowered in the 
Temperate House at Kew. 

Descr. — A rather slender tree, variable in height, from 
twenty feet to thirty feet in the mountains of Tasmania, 



to two hundred and fifty feet in the low levels ; bark rather 
rough, flakeing. Leaves or young plants opposite, sessile, 
ovate, very glaucous ; on old plants petioled, ovate-oblong 
to lanceolate, three inches to four inches long, acute, 
coriaceous, pale green on both surfaces ; base acute, with 
the sides equal, or nearly so; nerves and oil glands very 
obscure. Peduncles solitary, axillary, short, stout, sub- 
terete, one- to three-flowered in the mountain form, 
longer, and four- to ten-flowered in the lowland. Calyx- 
tube urn-shaped, turbinate or obovoid, tapering at the 
base, one-sixth to one-fourth of an inch long. Oper- 
culum much shorter than the calyx-tube, hemispheric 
or conical and umbonate. Filaments about as long as 
the calyx-tube, inflexed in bud ; anthers short, with long 
slits. Style short. Ca^>5w/epyriform, terete ; mouth trun- 
cate, slightly constricted, margins acute ; three- to five- 
celled; valves short, deltoid, incurved. Seeds inappendi- 
culate. — /. D. H. 

Vig. 1 and 2, calycine cup and operculum : enlarged ; 3, umbel with 
unexpanded flowerB, and 4 f with expanded flowers of var. elata, of nat. tize. 



7809 




M.S.daWNFitoKIiUr 



Tah. 7809. 

IMPATIENS PSITTACINA. 

Native of Burma. 

Nat. Ord. Gehaniace*. — Tribe Balbaminejs. 
Genus Impatiens, Linn.; (Benin. & Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 277.) 



Impatiens (Uniflorae) psittacina; annua, erecta, foliosa, ramulis teretibua 
coloratis, foliia alternis breviter petiolatis ovatia argute serrulatia, denti^us 
eglandnlosis, basi rotundatia subtus ad insertionem petioli glandulia 2 
clavellatis erectis instructia, petiolo basi eglandnloso, floribus axillaribus 
solitaries 2 poll, longis pallide lilacinis roseo et kermesino picfcis, pedi- 
cello pollicari decurvo basi v. supra basin bracteolis 1 v. 2 minutia 
Bubnlati8 instrncto, sepalis 2 herbaceis oblongo-rotundatis, vexillo orbicu- 
lari § poll, lato emarginato concavo ecostato pallida roseo, alia 1% poll. 
longis lobo basilari rotundato concavo erecto terminali paullo longiore 
recurvo oblique oblonpo apice rotuudato roseo fasciato, labello amplo 
incurvo conico-campannlato albo dorso kermeBino basi in calcar breve 
uncinato-incurvum kermesinum abrupte conBtricto, tilatnentis elongatia 
gracilibus decurvis antheris brevibus, ovario elongato. 

The Cockatoo Balsam. 



In the absence of fruit, which did not ripen in the plant 
at Kew, I am unable to determine the affinity of this 
strikingly beautiful Balsam. It is described by Mr. 
Hildebrand, its discoverer in the Shan States of Upper 
Burma, as a pretty, compact plant, from one and a half 
feet to two and a half feet high, covered with flowers 
which resemble a Cockatoo suspended by a string from the 
shoulders, whence its name. I find no specimen at all 
resembling it in the Kew Herbarium, or in that of the 
Herbarium of the Koyal Gardens, Calcutta, of which the 
Balsams have been entrusted to me for study and verifica- 
tion. Unfortunately good collections of the Balsams of 
Burma have never been made, and those that have been col- 
lected (about twenty species are known to me) are mostly 
dried without sufficient care. Sir Dietrich Brandis, who 
spent much time on forest duties in Burma, tells me that 
the genus swarms in that country, and that a rich harvest 
remains for a botanist who will devote his attention to 
them. 

/. psittacina was raised from seed presented to the Rovnl 
December lvr, 1901. 



Gardens in 1899 by A. H. Hildebrand, Esq., CLE. ; it 

flowered in a stove in October, 1900. The flowers assume 
a bine colour on fading. 

Descr. — An erect, much-branched, leafy herb. Stem 
and branches rather stout, terete, coloured. Leaves two 
to three inches long, ovate, acuminate, serrulate, base 
rounded, with two clavate, erect glands on the under- 
surface at the point of attachment of the petiole which is 
eglandular. Floivers axillary, solitary, two inches long, 
pendulous from an arching peduncle an inch long, which 
bears one or two minute setaceous bracteoles, near, or 
above the base. Sepals two, orbicular-oblong, obtuse, 
green. Standard orbicular, concave, pale rose-coloured, 
two-thirds of an inch broad. Wings one and a half inches 
long ; basal lobe orbicular, concave, erect ; terminal longer, 
obliquely oblong, recurved, suffused and streaked with 
red. Lip as long as the wings, conico-campanulate, in- 
curved, narrowed at the base into a short, hooked spur, 
white with an irregular dash of bright carmine on the 
convex surface towards the base ; mouth large, with an 
obtuse apex. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, undersurface of base of leaf, showing the glands; 2, wing-petal; 
3, stamens ; 4, young pistil : — all enlarged. 



7810 




Ms.a.uuPrtdkiith 



L Hum i C London 



Tab. 7810. 
SPIRAEA Millefolium. 

Native of California. 

Nat. Ord. Rosace.b. — Tribe Spir.ee.*;. 
Genus Spir.*;a, Linn.; (Benth. fy RooTc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 611.) 



Spik-Eia (Chamaebatia) Millefolium i fmticuluB folioaus, erectna, ramosas, 
totua petalia exceptia glandulosus et pilis atellatia pubescens, ramia 
ramulisqne robustis, foliis sparsia et versua apicearamulorumfascicnlatis 
8ubse«silibua linearibus lineari-oblongia v. ovato-lanceolatia 2-3 poll, 
longia §-1 poll, latis pinnatia, segmentia creberrimia lineari-oblonois 
obtusia crenato-lobulatia anpra aatarate viridibns subtus pallid i8, 
atipulia linearibua integerrimis, floribus in panicnlaa terminales erectaa 
ramulosas densifloraa dispositia breviter pedicellatia £-3 poll, latis, brac- 
teolis oblongis, calycia tubo hemispherico v. turbinato, lobis erectia 
ovatis obtusia v. subacutis, petalia orbiculatia albia retusia calycia lobis 
duplo lotigioribua, filamentia brevibua, carpellia 5 pilosis 6-8-ovulatis, 
stylis gracilibus glabris, seminibua j^-^ poll, longis. 

S. Millefolium, Torr. in Pacif. Bail. Sep. vol. iv. (1856) p. 83, t. 5. Coulter 
in Hayd. Bep. 1872, p. 76 i. S. Watson, PI. Wheeler, p. 8. Brew, f 
Wats. Bot. Calif, vol. i. p. 170. W. J. B. in Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. ii. 
p. 237, fig. 72. Micheli in Bev. Hortic. 1900, p. 514, fig. 233. Sargeant, 
Gard. & lor. vol. ii. (1889) p. 608, fig. 137. 

Chamaebatiaria Millefolium, Maxim, in Act. Hort. Petrop. vol. vi. (1879) 
p. 225. Coulter, Man. Sot. Socky Mt. Segion, p. 78. 

Chamaebatia {Sphalm. pro Chamaebatiaria) folioloaa, Neivberry in Pacif. Bail. 
Bep. vol. vi (1873) p. 73. 



The Spiraea here figured differs much in habit from its 
congeners, and is remarkable for emitting an odour of 
creosote. It was discovered in West Arizona, in 1853, 
by Dr. J. M. Bigelow, and has since been collected on 
the Sierra Nevada of California, at ten thousand feet 
elevation, in latitude 36° 30' N., in S. Utah, and as far 
north as W. Wyoming Territory, but does not appear to 
extend further north on the Sierra Nevada, or south along 
the Rocky Mountains of Colorado than the positions 
here given. Its resemblance in foliage to Chamaebatia 
foliosa, Benth., t. 5171, also a native of California, is very 
striking. 

The specimen of 8. millefolium here figured, which is 
from a bush three feet high, was raised in the Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Kew, from seeds sent by Professor 

Decembkr lbT, 1901. 



Sargent from the Arnold Arboretum, near Boston, U.S.A., 
in 189 J. It flowered in the open air in July, 1901. 

Descr. — A stout, erect shrub, covered with glandular 
hairs and a minute stellate pubescence. Leaoes two inches 
to three inches long, scattered or crowded towards the 
ends of the branchlets, sessile, linear-oblong or ovate- 
lanceolate, very closely pinnatisect, rhachis stout ; pinnules 
linear, obtuse, very dark green above, pale beneath, pinna- 
tifid; lobes short, obtuse, pale green beneath. Stymies 
linear, quite entire. Flowers crowded in erect, terminal, 
branching panicles, the lower branches of which are sub- 
tended by leaves, very shortly pedicelled, one half to 
two-thirds of an inch broad. Calyx-tube hemispheric or 
turbinate; lobes ovate, obtuse or sub-acute. Petals orbi- 
cular, white. Filaments short, anthers yellow. Carpels 
hairy, with glabrous styles, six- to eight-ovuled. Seeds 
about one-tenth of an inch long. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, unexpanded flower and bracteoles ; 2, stellate hairs ; 3 and 4, stamens ; 
6, pistil -.—all enlarged. 



76// 




M.RlehlitH 



TfinomfcBroofcs.Day iS-*^ 1 "* 



Tab. 7811. 
MEGACLINIUM liuogbhaohis. 

Native of Lagos. 

Nat. Ord. ORCHiDEiE. — Tribe Epidendrk.b. 
&mni Mbgacuxium, Lindl.; {Benth. 8f Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 505.) 



Miigaci,I2«ium leucorAachis ; rhizoraate valido repente, pseudobulbis 2-3-polli- 
caribus ovoideo-oblongis compres80-4-gonia Isevibus 2-foliatia, foliis 4-7 
poll, longis 1—1^ poll. Iati8 linearibua v. anguste oblanceolatis obtuaia 
craase coriaceis lsete viridibus rubro marginatia, pednnculis ascendentibus 
■ubfalcatis 4-6 poll, longis vaginis remotis spathaceia appreBsia J 
poll, longis brunnei8 instructiB, rhachi florifera 3-5-pollicari falcata 
enBiformi |-£ poll, lata leviter compressa alba multiflora, inter- 
nodiis ad y poll, longis, bracteis distichia £ poll, longis patenti- 
reflexis late ovatis acutis membranaceis brunneis peraistentibus, floribus 
distichis breviter pedicellatis £ poll, longis decurvis velutinis croceis, 
sepalo doreali erecto lineari-lanceolato, lateralibus brevioribus oblique 
late ovatis subacutis, petalis sepalo dorsali seqnilongis linearibiis 
erectis falcatis, labello parvo linguaeformi recurvo basin versus utrinque 
firabriato, columna latiuscula apice angustata bidentata. 

If. leucorhacbis, BoJfe in Keiv Bulletin, 1891, p. 198; et in Dyer Fl. Trop. 
Afr. vol. vii. p. 37. 



The genus Megaclinium is wholly African ; it is closely 
allied to Bulbophylhim, differing chiefly in the dilated, 
flattened rhachis of the inflorescence, distichous flowers, 
and in the dorsal sepal being much longer than the lateral. 
Twenty species are described in the "Flora of Tropical 
Africa," of which three have been previously figured in this 
work, namely, M. maximum, Lindl. Gen. Sf Sp. Orch. p. 47 ; 
(M. purpuratum, Lindl. in Joum. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. vi. p. 
128, tab. nostr. 5936) in which the lateral sepals are nearly 
as long as the dorsal, M. Lindleyi, Rolfe (M. maximum, 
Lindl. in Bot. Reg. tab. 1959, tab. nostr. 4028, and M. 
minutum, Rolfe (tab. nostr. 7314). All are natives of 
West Tropical Africa. 

M. leitcorhachis was sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 
1896, from Lagos, in the Gulf of Guinea, by Mr. H. 
Millen, Curator of the botanical station in that colony. 
It flowered in a tropical house in April of this year. 

Descr. — Rootstock stout, creeping. Pseudolulhs two 
inches to three inches long, obovoid-oblong, compressed, 
Drckmbek 1st, 1901. 



smooth. Leaves two, four to seven inches long, one to 
one and a quarter inch broad, linear or narrowly oblanceo- 
late, obtuse, coriaceous, bright green, margined with red. 
Peduncle ascending, bearing brown, distant, appressed, 
spathaceous bracts, half an inch long. Spike three to five 
inches long, by a third to half an inch broad, falcate, 
compressed, many-flowered, white ; internodes one-sixth of 
an inch long. Bracts a quarter of an inch long, spreading, 
and reflexed, broadly ovate, acute, membranous, brown. 
Flowers one-third of an inch long, shortly pedicelled, 
decurved, velvety, yellow. Dorsal sepal erect, linear- 
lanceolate, lateral shorter, broadly ovate, sub-acute. 
Petals as long as the dorsal sepal, erect, linear, falcate. 
Lip small, tongue-shaped, recurved, fimbriate towards the 
base. — J, D. H. 



Fig. 1, flower; 2, lip and column; 3, front view of column; 4 and 5, pol- 
linia : — all enlarged. 



INDEX 

To Vol. LVII. of the Third Skbirs, or Vol. CXXVII. of 
the whole Work. 



7757 Agave Peacockii. 
7756 Allium Ostrowskianum. 
7768 Amorphophallus leonensis. 

7796 Arctotis Gumbletoni. 

7779 Beschorneria Wrightii. 
7787 Bulbophyllum grandiflorura. 

7780 Calanthe madagasearietisis. 
7800 Calorhahdos cauloptera. 

7783 Chelonopsis moschata. 
7799 Cineraria pentactina. 
7767 Cladrastis tinctoria. 

7764 Ccelogyne Veitchii. 

7777 Crinum rhodauthum. 

7778 do. do. 

7785 Cyanotis hirsuta. 

7807 Cyrfcopodium palraifrons. 
7700 Echidnopsis Bentii. 

7792 Epidendrum osmantliura. 

7808 Eucalyptus Gunnii. 

7797 E-corrhiza W^ndlandiana. 
7791 Gladiolus sulphureus. 

7798 Habenaria Lugardii. 
7789 Helichrysum Gulielmi. 
7752 Hibiscus Manihot. 

7762 Hymenocallis schizostephana. 

7786 Impatiens chrysantha. 

7809 „ psittacina. 
7 795 „ Thomsoni. 

7784 Iris chryeantlia. 

7793 „ Tauri. 

7765 Kalanchoe Bentii. 



7769 Kalanchoe farinacea. 

7753 Lbotskya ericoides. 

7804 Liparis tricallosa. 

7774 Lonicera pyrenaica. 
7776 Manettia bicolor. 
7766 Masdevallia deorsum. 
7811 Megaclinium leucorbachis. 

7775 Mesembryanthemum calami- 

forme. 
7763 Modecca senensis. 

7802 Musa oleracea. 
7758 Neillia Turreyi.* 

7781 Xvmphaea flavo-virens. 
7794 Oxalis dispar. 

7788 Peeonia lutea. 
7773 Pyrus alnifolia. 
7755 „ tiansclianica. 

7782 Rhododendron ciliicalyx. 

7770 Rosa Fedtsclienkoana. 
7761 „ S»;raphini. 
7801 Rubus palmatus. 

7754 Sarcochilus lilacinus. 

7803 Senecio magnificus. 
7810 Sphsea Millefolium. 

7771 Stapelia nobilis. 

7790 Strobilanihes gossypinus. 
7806 Syringa oblata. 

7805 Trevoria Ghloris. 
7759 Veronica glauca. 

7772 Wyethia mollis. 



* N, mah-acta in poitsoript. 



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