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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CUETIS'S 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPEISING THE 



^lantg of tin S^opal (gartieus; of ^t\\). 



OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN; 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

SIR JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., G.C.S.I., 

F.K.S., r.L.S., ETC., 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.l). CANTAB., CORRESPONDEST OF THE INSTITUTE OF FEANCE."* 



VOL. LVL 
OF THE THIKD SERIES. 

(^Or Vol. CXXri. of the Whole Work.) 




**-!«Vv,-. 



SS't^^v^Vi 






■ What thoufrh the passion flower is fafled, 
Still blooms for us the red, red rose, 
Glowing as any we rememher, 

That love's hot summer dnj's rtisplnsr, 
And Elorifies onr life's Dcccmlior." 

II. A. Ilrx;.Kv. 



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To 

MAJOE DAVID PRAIN, M.B., F.R.S.E.. P.L.S. 
{Superintende7it of the Boyal Botanic Gardens, Calcutta.) 

My dear Pkain, 

Your official position as head of the greatest Botanical 
establishment of the British Empire beyond the seas, might alone 
prompt me to offer to you the dedication of a volume of the 
Botanical Magazine; but to this I must add the great value of 
your botanical works, whether purely scientific or economic, your 
exertions in contributing to the Ptoyal Gardens and Herbarium of 
Kew, and to the Botanical Magazine, and last, if not least, our 
cordial friendship. 

Believe me, 

Very sincerely yours, 

Jos. D. HOOKER. 
The Camp, Sunningdale, 
December 1st, 1900. 



No. 601. 



TOL. LVI.-JANUAEY., 



fi'ice 3s. 6ft 



OB No. 1355 OF THE EXTTHH t 



VORK. 



CUETIS'S, 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 



OOMPEiaiNO 



THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AND OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WiT 

SUITABLE DESCRIPl'IONS ; 

Br 

SiE JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.c.s.i., c.B, i,ii.a, I, 

XHtt Bircmr of the Botial ISotantt CarHens of Iteto. 




Nature and Art to sdom chb paee combine, 
And flowers exotic grace oarnorthom clime. 



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ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Seriey of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
T>R4WN BY W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., and W. G. SMITH, F.L S. 

an Illuttraied Companion to Bsntham's " Mandbook," and other British Floras. 
4th Edition, with 1315 Wood Enj^ravings, 9*. net. 

■ ; I ilEBVE 4 CO. Lid., S, HENRIETTA STREET, COYEST GARBED. 




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%^cejitBroo>tsX)ay <&.San I.t^i 



L Reeve fi, C<:' London. 



Tab. 7692. 

CORYANTHES maceantha. 

Native of- Ouiana and Venezuela. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^.— Tribe VANDEiK. 
Genus Cohyanthes, Hooi:.; {Bentli. & Sooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 549.) 



CoBYANTHES macTantha ; pseudobalbis 5-6-pollicaribua angustis alte costatis, 
foliis pedalibas oblongo-lanceolatis utrinqae attenuatis, pedunculo valido 
pendnlo bifloro, pedicellis 6-pollicaribuB sulcatis basi bractea 2-pollicari 
spatbacea instructis, floribus amplis expansis 6 poll, longis Hayidis 
macnlia sanguineis fere ubiqiie conspersis, eepalo dorsali 2-pollican 
oblongo-lanoeolato torto, lateralibua maximis 4-6 poll, longis reflexia 
lunatis infra njedium postice gibboso-lobatis apicibus tortis, petalis 
pendulia 2-21 poll, longis laticeolatis undulatis, labelh maximi ungue 
pollicari robusto tereti basi lamellis 2 oblongi^i porrectis_ recurvis aucto 
hypochilio globoso-reniformi inflate l|poll. diam., epichiho maximo 
crateriformi basi in nnguem latum dorse crasse 4-5-lamellatum lamellia 
reflexia angustato, antice truncato quadrilobo, colnmna crassa snpra 
medium recurva dilatata apice contracta bicornuta cornubus obtueis 
incurvis. 

C. macrantha, Hook. Bot. Mag. suh t. 3102. Lindl. Gen. 8r Sja. Orchid, 
p. 159. Lindl. in Bot. Reg. i. 1841. Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. v. p. 31, 
cum ic. Hartinger, Farad. Vindoh. p. 19, t. 32, fig. 2. Linden, Pescatorea, 
t. 30. Bolfe in Orchid. Rev. vol. iii. p. 41. 

GoNGOKA macrantha, Booh. Bot. Misc. vol. ii. p. 151, t. 80, 



The noble Orchid here figured was discovered by the 
late David Lockhart, Superintendent (1823 to 1846) of 
the Trinidad Botanical Gardens, when on a visit to 
Caraccasin 1828, whence he brought plants which flowered 
in those gardens in the autumn of the following year. 
Lockhart's previous career was an eventful one, for he 
was the sole survivor of the staff of Captain Tuckey's ill- 
fated Expedition to the Congo Elver in 1816, to which he, 
then a young gardener at Kew, was appointed by Sir 
Joseph Banks, as assistant to Christian Smith, the 
naturahst to the Expedition. Lockhart sent a flower 
preserved in spirits to Sir William (then Dr.) Hooker, 
who figured and described it in his Botanical Miscellany. 
The specimen here figured, which flowered in a tropical 
house of the Royal Gardens, Kew, in May of last year, was 
received in the previous May from Mr. Hart, F.L.S., Super- 

Jasuary 1st, 1900. 



intendent of the Uoyal Botanical Gardens, Trinidad. The 
flowers remain fresh for about three days. Plants of it 
have also been sent to the Eoyal Gardens from the Demerara 
River by Mr. Jeuman, F.L.S., Superintendent of the 
Botanical Gardens of Georgetown, and Government 
Botanist. 

Descr. — Pseudohulhs five to six inches long, very narrow, 
deeply channelled, and with about eight stout, intervening, 
elevated ribs. Leaves a foot long, oblong-lanceolate, 
acuminate, narrowed to both ends from about the middle. 
Peduncle stout, pendulous, two-flowered; pedicels sub- 
equal, six inches long, stout, grooved, embraced at the 
base by an obtuse sheathing bract two inches long. 
Floivers up to six inches long from the lip to the outer 
margin of the lateral sepals. Sepals membranous, dorsal 
two inches long, oblong-lanceolate, twisted, flesh-coloured, 
speckled with red ; lateral very large, four to five inches 
long by two inches broad, reflexed from the base and re- 
curved, lunate, the dorsal margin dilated below the middle 
into a broad, rounded gibbous lobe, tip twisted, pale. Petals 
pendulous, two to two and a half inches long, undulate, and 
more or less twisted, dull pink, with a few red blotches 
towards the base. Lip clawed ; claw an inch long, stout, 
terete, base with two parallel, white, oblong, obtuse, rather 
recurved, projecting, white lamella half an inch long; 
hypochile globosely reniform, an inch and a half in diameter, 
inflated, and claAV closely streaked and spotted with orange- 
red ; epichile an orange-yellow bucket, spotted with blood- 
red ; truncate and three-lobed anteriorly, narrowed at the 
base into a triangular fleshy neck, which is dorsally fur- 
nished with four or five, reflexed, fleshy transverse lamella. 
Column very stout, greenish white, with a few red spots, 
dilated at the recurved top, which terminates in two short, 
obtuse horns, one on each side of the anther. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Top of the column with anthers ; 2 and 3, pollinia : — All enlarged. 



7698 







Vincent Erooks,Day ScSoTLLt^Irap 



Tab. 7693. 
HAYLOCKTA pusilla. 

Native of Uruguay. 

Nat. Ord. AmaeyllidacejE. — Tribe Amarylle^. 
Genus Haylockia, Herb.; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 723.) 



Haylockia pusilla ; herba pusilla, bulbo globoso tunicato, tanicis fuscia 
appressis, foliis sevotinis solitariis paucisve angustissime linearibus sub- 
acutis flaccidis viridibus supra concavis, floribus bulbo solitariis sub- 
sessilibus erectis, basi spatha bifida instructie, perianthii tubo l^-poUicari 
gracili cylindrico, limbi infundibiilari-campanulati segmentis patenti- 
recurvis oblongis subacutia albis pallide roseis v. primulinis basin versus 
rubro striolatis, staminibus brevibus fauci perianthii insertis, filamentis 
subulatis, antheris lineari-oblongis veraatilibus aureis, ovario spatho 
occluso brevi, stylo filiformi, stigmatibus 3 linearibus obtusis ore 
perianthii breviter exsertis, capsula parva trigona trisulca trivalvi, 
eeminibus dorso convexis, testa nigra. 

H, pusilla, Kerh. in Bot. Reg. t. 1371 ; AmarylUd. pp. 59, 72, 182. Kunth 

Enwm. PI. vol. v. p. 480. 
Stbrnbergia Americana, Hoffmgg. Verz. PJl. p. 197 cum, ic. Gibert, Enum. PL 

Agr. Montevid. p. 107. 

Zephtranthes pusilla, Dietr. Syn. PI. vol. ii. p. 1176, 



Uaijlockia is a monotypic genus, esfcablished by the late 
Dean Herbert of Manchester, upon a little bulbous plant, 
a native of the neighbourhood of Monte Video and Mal- 
donado, which flowered in his garden at Spofforth in 1830. 
It is closely allied to Zephyrajithes. Herbert says of it, 
*' with bulb, foliage, capsule, and seed that are scarcely 
distinguishable from Zephyranth&s, it has a flo^ver which 
is nearly that of a Colchicum.^^ The only distinction 
between Zejjhyranthes and HaylocJcia appears to me to 
be, the almost total absence of a scape in HaylocJda, 
the ovary being, with the spathe, sunk in the very short 
neck of the bulb. Two varieties of it are described, 
found growing together, one with straw-coloured, the 
other with pale rose flowers. The generic name com- 
memorates the valuable services of Mr. Matthew Haylock, 
who had for twenty-two years the charge of the Spofforth 
collection of plants, and '* who brought no small number, 
especially of this natural order, to blossom for the first 
time in this country." 

Januakt 1st, 1900. 



Bulbs of Hayloclcia were received at the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, from Dr. Cantera of Montevideo, in 1898; these 
flowered in July, 1899, and threw up leaves in the following 
August. The flowers appear in quick succession for about 
a fortnight, but are very ephemeral. 

Descr, — A dwarf, perfectly glabrous, bulbous herb. 
Bulb globose, scales brown, appressed. Leaves few, pro- 
duced after the flowers, very narrowly linear, sub-acute, 
flaccid, green, concave above. i'^^OT^ers solitary, sub-sessile, 
erect, white, pale rose-coloured or primrose-yellow, streaked 
with pink at the base of the perianth-lobes externally. 
Perianth-tuhe very slender, an inch and a half long, 
surrounded at the base by a bifid spathe, limb inf undibular- 
campanulate, six-partite ; segments oblong, spreading and 
recurved. Filaments short, subulate, inserted in the 
throat of the perianth ; anthers versatile, linear-oblong, 
golden-yellow. Ovary embraced by the spathe and sheaths 
of the leaves ; style filiform, stigmas three, linear, obtuse, 
shortly exserted from the throat of the perianth. Capsule 
small, trigonous, three- valved. Seeds black, dorsally 
convex. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Three perianth segments and stamens ; 2, stigmas : — Both enlarged. 



760^ 




MS delJ.N.FitGh]atK 



'^iacentBrookE,Day&.SonLt*Iinp 



L Heeve C° LoncLon 



Tab. 7694 
MACLEANIA insignis. 
Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. Vacciniace.*. — Tribe THrBAtrDHiE. 
Genus Macleania, Hook. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 506.) 



Macleania insignis; ramtiHs robustis, foliis l|-2-pol]icaribns brevissime 
crasse petiolatis ellipticis oblongiave obtnsis apiculatia basi rotundatis 
utrinques parsim punctulatis eupra Isete viridibus subtus pallidioribus 
novellis aurantiaco-coccineis, costa subtua crassa, nervis paucis arcuatis 
gracillimis, floribua axillaribus solitariis et fasciculatis foliis subaequi- 
longia, pedicellia crassis medio minute 2-bracteolati8, calycis subob- 
pyramidati 5-alati ore truncate 5-apiculato, corollfe l|^-pollicaris coccineae 
tubo cylindraceo laevi deoraum paullo dilatato, lobia brevibus triangulari- 
bus, antherarum loculis aspens in tubum angnstum uniporosum apice 2- 
denticulatum productia, connective dorse incrassate, bacca globosa ^-| 
poll, diam, 5-costata alba costis rubris. 

M. insignis, Mart. Sf Gal. in Bull. Acad. Brux. vol. ix. (1842) p. 531. Walp. 
Bep. vol. ii. p, 724 ; Ann. vol. i. p. 478. Klotzsch in Linnasa, vol. xxiv. 
(1857) p. 2a 



Fifteen species of the beautiful genus Macleania are 
enumerated in the " Index Kewensis," of which five, in- 
cluding M. insignis, have been figured in this Magazine. 
The earlier ones are M. angulata, Hook,, t. 3979 ; M. fwic- 
fata, Hook., t. 4426 ; M. speciosissima, Hook., t. 5453, and 
M. jmlchra, Hook., t. 5465. The names of three out of 
the six bespeak their exceptionally ornamental character. 

M. insignis is a native of Mexico, where it was dis- 
covered in the Province of Vera Cruz, by Galeotti, in 
1840, growing epiphytically on oaks, at an elevation of 
four thousand to six thousand feet, flowering in April. 
Galeotti describes it as bulbous, referring, no doubt, to 
the tuberous base of the stem, so characteristic of many 
epiphytic Vacciniacese. It has also been collected by 
Linden, and by Jurgensen. Specimens from the latter 
(No. 969) in the Kew Herbarium have much longer leaves 
than those here represented. The species was introduced 
into Europe many years ago, and is not uncommon in 
gardens. The specimen here figured was sent to me by 

January 1st, 1900. 



Mr. Lynch, from the Botanical Gardens of the University of 
Cambridge. It is a green-house plant, flowering in June 
and July. 

Descr. — A small, evergreen, glabrous shrub, with stem 
tuberous at the base. Branches very stout, leafy ; bark 
brown. Leaves one and a half to two inches long, very 
shortly and stoutly petioled, oblong or elliptic, obtuse, sub- 
acute or apiculate, coriaceous, minutely distantly punctate 
on both surfaces, bright green above, paler beneath ; 
young brick-red ; nerves few, very slender, arched. 
Flowers solitary and fascicled in the axils of the leaves ; 
pedicels very stout, one quarter to half an inch long or 
more, minutely bibracteolate about the middle, green. 
Calyx obpyramidal, five-winged, green, mouth truncate, 
minutely five-toothed. Corolla an inch and a half long, 
tubular, terete, slightly dilated downwards, scarlet ; lobes 
small, triangular, spreading. Filaments united in a mem- 
branous tube ; anther-cells prolonged into a single tube 
with an oblong, terminal, anticous pore, and a two-toothed 
tip ; connective dorsally thickened. Berry globose, white, 
with five red ribs.-^-/. Z). S". 



Fig. 1, portion of leaf; 2, calyx and style; 3, four stamens, front view; 
5, a single stamen, eide view : — All eiiJarcjed. 



7605 




M. S. del. J.KFitchlitK 



jksDay&Son lA?rhup 



Tab. 7695. 
DiqSTBA JUiNCEA. 
Native of Chili. 

Nat. Ord. Yeebenace^. — Tribe Vebbene^, 
Genus Diostea, Miers ; (in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvii. 1871) p. 102.) 



DiosTEA juncea ; frntex v. arbuscula fere glaberrima, e basi ramosa, sparsi- 
folia, rarmilis gracilibus virgatis oppositis v. 3-4-riatini verticillatis 
erectia decurvisve, internodiia valde elongatis teretibns fiatulosis, foliis 
parvis oppositis sessilibus oblongis ovato-oblongisve obtusis pauci- 
crenatis crassiusculis, floribus parvis in spicas densifloras pediincalatas 
breves v. demum elongatas dispositis basi bracteolatis, bracteola minnta 
oblonga, calyce brevi tubalosa trtincata breviter S-dentata pnbescente, 
dentibus obtusis sBqualibns v. postico longiore, corolla tubo calyce 
ter quaterve longiore tnbulosa decnrva supra medium gibboBO-inflata 
pallide lilacina intus pilosa, ore paullo constricto, limbo parvo patente 
5-lobo, lobis rotundatis, staminibus medio tubo corollse insertis didynamia 
qninto saepe imperfecto v. 0, connectivo dorso incrassato, disco annnlari, 
ovario 2-loculari, loculis 1-ovulatis, stylo gracile apice clavellato, stigmate 
simplici. 

D. juncea, Miers, I.e. p. 103, t. 28. 

D. chamsedryfolia, HoH. Kew. (non Lippia ckamsedryfolia, Stend.) 

Baillonia juncea, Benth. in Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1144. 

DiPYKESA dentata, Pkilippi in Linnsea, vol. xxix. (1857-8) p. 22. 

LiPPiA juncea, Schauer in DC, Prodr. vol. xi. p, 573. 0. Gay, Fl. Chil. vol. v. 

p. 30. Philippi l.c. vol. xxxiii. (1864-5) p. 196. 
Veebena juncea, Soolc. et Gill, in Hook. Bot. Misc. vol, i, (1830) p. 162. 



Diostea is a very curious genus, closely allied to Lippia, 
but differing remarkably in habit, in the slender green 
branches, and in the branchlets being cylindric, fistular, 
with very long internodes. It was founded on Verbena 
juncea. Hook. & Gill., by Miers, who describes seven species, 
all Chilian. 

Bentham, who elaborated the Ve^^henaceae for the " Grenera 
Plantarum," referred D.jimcea with D. infiiHcata, Miers, and 
valdivicna, Miers, as synonyms, to Bocquillon's genus ^ai/- 
lonia^ a Paraguayan plant, of which he had seen no 
specimens. The latter has been acquired for the Kew Her- 
barium, and proves to be generically different from Diodea. 
Miers' other species, D. s^coparia, stenophylla, filifolia and 

.Tanuaky 1st, 1900. 



scirpea, are all referred by Bentham to Verbena, but tbey have 
all precisely the same habit as D. jimcea, and I should 
not be surprised if they proved to be forms of that plant. 
Walpers (Repertorium iv. 16) includes D. juncea and some 
of the others in a section {Junceae) of Verbena, together with 
some other Verhenacese, which, as Miers observes, have no 
affinity with these. 

In D. juncea the teeth of the calyx vary a good deal in 
development, being sometimes hardly perceptible ; the 
stamens vary in number; of the specimens cited by 
Miers, the type, that collected by Gillies, has no fifth, 
which is present in Macrae's and Bridge's specimens. 

B. juncea is a native of the Chilian and Argentine Andes, 
at elevations of three thousand to five thousand feet, from 
the latitude of Mt, Aconcagua to that of Valdivia. There 
are three small trees of it in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 
a bed close to No. 2 House, where they flower in June ; 
they were raised from seed received about ten years ago, 
but there is no record of their source. 

Descr. — A bush or small tree, branching from the base ; 
branches erect, spreading, or recurved, branchlets opposite, 
ternate, or quaternate, internodes very long, green, terete, 
fistular, when dry constricted as if jointed at the nodes. 
Leaves in very distant pairs, rarely one inch long, opposite, 
sessile, oblong or ovate-oblong, obtuse, crenate, green, rather 
fleshy, glabrous, or very minutely puberulous. Flowers 
crowded in peduncled axillary and terminal spikes, one 
inch long or more, spreading and decurved, pale lilac, a 
quarter of an inch long, rhachis of spike pubescent. Calys 
shortly tubular, pubescent, mouth truncate, unequally very 
shortly five-toothed. Corolla three to four times as long 
as the calyx, tubular, inflated beyond the middle, hairy 
within, quite glabrous externally ; mouth constricted ; 
lobes five, very short, rounded, spreading. Stamens four, 
didynamous, with or without a more or less imperfect 
fifth. Ovary two-celled ; style very slender, tip clavellate. 
—J. D. H, 



Fig. 1, flower and bracteole ; 2, portions of corolla with stamens ; 3 and 4, 
anthers; 5, ovary; 6, vertical, and 7, transverse section of the same : — All 
enlarged. 



760S 




M,s.aBLJ.N:Fitickiith 



\i-icenLBroo><:s;3ay ?>. San Lt^Irtip 



L Reeve C°liC!ndoii.. 



Tai!. 7696. 

RHODODENDRON^ akboreum, var. Kingianum. 

Native of Manipur. 



Nat. Ord. Ericace^. — Tribe Rhodore*.. 
Genus EnODODENDKON, Linn.; {Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599.) 



Rhododendron arhoreum, var. Kingianum; frutex robustns, raraulis 
crassis, cortice brunneo, foliis apices veraas ramulorum confertis 2-3- 
poUicaribus breviter petiolatis oblongis v. ovato-oblongis obtusis conyexis 
marginibus late recarvis subcoriaceis supra Isete eaturate viridibua inter 
nervos utrinqne costse 8-10 arcuatos valde impressos bullatis, enbtug 
toinento arete appresso flavido opertis costa nervisque robustis, petiolo 
robusto, floribns in corymbum capitatum amplum mnlti-densiflorum 
congestis breviter crasse pedicellatis, pedicellis glanduloso-pilosis, calycis 
brevia cupularis lobis rotundatis glandnloso-ciliatis, corolla campanulata 
tota saturate coccinea fulgida immaculata, limbo Igpoll. diam. 5-lolato, 
lobis patulis bilobulatie, staminibns 10 declinatia, filamentis tube corollns 
paullo longioribus glaberrimis roseia, antheria parvis brevibus fusco- 
purpureis poria magnis, ovario 10-loculari strigilloso, stylo glabeirimo 
roaeo, stigmate annulate minute 10-lobo. 

R. Kingianum, Watt mss. ex Gard. Ghron. 1899, vol. ii. p. 306, fig. 102. 



A remarkably beautiful member of a genus abounding 
in strikingly handsome species, happily bearing the name 
of Sir George King, the distinguished late Superintendent 
of the Royal Botanic Gardens of Calcutta, who in that 
capacity has rivalled his great predecessor Wallich in the 
advancement of Indian Botany. R, Kingianum, Watt, is 
obviously a form of Ii. arhoreum, ivom. the type of which it 
differs in the crowded, strongly bullate, very dark, almost 
glossy, broader leaves, with broadly recurved margins and 
deeply impressed nerves ; in the well developed five-lobed 
calyx ; in the more deeply two-lobed divisions of the corolla, 
which is of a more intense scarlet, rivalling in that respect 
B. Thomsoni, Hk. f. (tab. 4797) ; and in the rose-coloured 
stamens. 

Var. Kingianum was discovered by Dr. G. Watt, F.L.S., 
Reporter on the Economic Products of India, when on a 
tour of inspection in 1882, upon a mountain called Ching 
Low in Manipiir, at an elevation of nine thousand feet 
above the sea. PJants of it were raised at the Royal 

Jaxuary 1st, 1900. 



Gardens, Kew, from seeds sent by Dr. Watt in 1832, one 
of which flowered for the first time in the Himalayan 
wing of the Temperate House in June, 1899, a flowering 
branch of which is here figured. The leaves attain a 
length of six inches in native specimens. 

Descr. — A robust shrub. Branches very stout, glabrous, 
covered with brown bark. Leaves crowded towards the 
ends of the branches, very shortly petioled, spreading 
and recurvedj two to three inches long, oblong or ovate- 
oblong, convex, above buUate, dark shining green, with 
impressed reticulate nervules, margins recurved, beneath 
clothed with appressed fulvous tomentum ; petiole very 
stout. Flowers very many, crowded in a globose, sessile 
head, five inches in diameter, bright deep scarlet ; pedicels 
very short, glandular-pubescent. Calyx short, broad, 
cupular, five-lobed, lobes rounded. Corolla campanulate, 
bright scarlet, without spots, limb an inch and a half in 
diameter, five-lobed; lobes short, rounded, spreading, 
rather deeply bilobulate. Stamens ten, declinate, filaments 
slender, quite glabrous ; anthers small, dark brown. 
Ovary strigose, ten-celled ; style slender, glabrous, stigma 
annulate, minutely ten-lobed. — J. D. B. 



Fig. 1, calyx and pistil ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, transverse section of ovary; 
—All enlarged,. 



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Tab. 7697. 

EUCALYPTUS ficifolta. 

Native of South-western Australia. 

Nat. Ord. MYUXACEiE. — Tribe Leptosperme^. 
Genus Eucalyptus, L'Eer.j {Benth.& Sook.f. Gen, Plant, vol. i. p. 707.) 



Eucalyptus (Oorymbosse) j^ct/o?m; arbor mediocris, umbrosa, cortice persig- 
tenfce rimoso, ramnlis robustis, foliis petiolatis sparsia v. snboppositis 
4-6-pollicaribu8 ovatis v. ovato-lanceolatis acnminatis in petiolum 
decurrentibas subsequilateria teauiter coriaceis supra saturate viridibiis 
subtus opacis, nervis innumeris patulis circumficiali margini proximo, 
glandulis oleiferia obscaris, umbellis simplicibus v, subpaniculatia 4-6- 
floris, pedicellis subeequalibus teretibus, calycis tubo pyriformi tereti 
f poll. longo ore vix constricto, operculo teuui brevi depresso, filamentis 
coccineis, antheris omnibus fertilibus, fructu ovoideo v. urnseformi 1-1 J 
poll, longo 3-4-loculari, oris margine acuto, valvis demum depressis, 
seminis ala decarrente nucleo longiore translucida. 

E. ficifolia, F. Muell. Fragm. vol. ii. p. 85 ; EucalyptograpJiia, Dec. vii. cum 
ic. ; Rep. Forest Region of W. Australia, p. 6, t. 3 ; Benth. Fl. Austral. 
vol. iii. p. 256 ; Hemsl. in Qard. Ghron. 1883, vol. ii. p. 465 fruct. 
View of scenery with E. ficifolia, in North Gallery, Royal Gardens, Kew, 
No. 789. 



According to the late Baron Sir F. Mueller, the author 
of E. ficifolia, " hardly any thing can be more gorgeous 
than forests of this tree seen at the end of January and 
beginning of February, when the flowers diffuse a rich red 
hue over the dark green foliage of the landscape." It is 
a native of a very narrow area in the extreme south-west 
point of Australia. There, according to Muir and Max- 
well (as cited by Mueller in his Report on the Forest 
Region of Western Australia) it is restricted to a narrow 
belt extending from the west side of Irwin Inlet, to the 
mouth of the Shannon River, hardly reaching the coast, 
and not beyond eight miles inland ; there it forms a tree 
seldom exceeding fifty feet in height. The quality of the 
timber is unknown. Mueller, in his ** Fragmenta," gives 
Broken Inlet as the habitat. 

The nearest ally of E. ficifolia is the geographically 
contiguous W. Australian E. calophylla, Br. (t. 4086, 
E. splachnicarpon. Hook.), the Red gum of King George's 

February 1st, 1900. 



Sound, which differs chiefly in having nearly white 
filaments. 

The specimen here figured was sent to the Director of 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, by General Abadie, C.B. It 
was taken from a plant growing in a cool Palm House in 
the gardens of Mrs. Fitzroy Fletcher, of Letham Grove, 
Arbroath, N.B., where it was raised from seed sent from 
Australia about seven years ago. Mrs. Fletcher informs 
me that the young plant grew very fast, soon flowered, 
and has continued to do so yearly in August. 

Descr. — A moderate-sized, umbrageous tree, with stout 
branches, and persistent, furrowed bark. Leaves scattered 
and sub-opposite, four to six inches long, ovate or ovate- 
lanceolate, finely acuminate, base narrowed into a red 
petiole one to two inches long, thinly coriaceous, very 
dark green above, with a yellow-green midrib and margins, 
paler and not shining beneath ; nerves very numerous, 
slender, transverse. Umbels very large, simple or sub-com- 
pound, four to six-flowered ; pedicels terete, slender, an 
inch to an inch and a half long. Calyx about three- 
quarters of an inch long, pyriform, green, mouth not or 
hardly contracted, lobes connate in a depressed conical,- 
deciduous cap. Stamens very numerous, forming a scarlet 
cup two inches in diameter, with minute, dark red anthers. 
Fruit ovoid or urn-shaped, an inch to an inch and a half 
long, an inch and a quarter in diameter, mouth contracted 
with a narrow rim, valves deep down in the body of the 
fruit, connivent. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, cap of sepals ; 2, section of ovary with style :— Enlarged. 



7698 




M. S.del'J.N.Fildi litk. 



Rseve &. C^ioTidoj^ 



Tab. 7698. 
lomatia longipolia. 

Native of South- Eadern Australia, 

Nat. Ord. Pkoteace.e. — Tribe EMBOTHRiBiB. 
Grenus Lomatia, Br. (Benth. & Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p, 183.) 



LoMATiA longifoUa; frutex v. arbnscala fere glaberrima, ramulis novellis et 
inflorescentia minute strigillosis, ramis gracilibus, foliis 4-8 poll, longis 
sessilibus v. breviter petiolatie linearibus et lineari- v. oblongo-lanceolatis 
acuminatis basi acutis remote dentatis supra lajte viridibua subtus 
pallidis glaucescentibus, nervis distantibus tenuissimis, costa eubtus 
prominula, racetnis apices versus ramnlorum numerosis axillaribus et 
terminalibus foliis brevioribus v. longioribus erecto-patentibus multi- 
laxifloris, rhaclii gracili pedicellisque J-| poll, longis viridibus, perianthii 
^ poll, expans, pallide albi virescentis segmentis linearibus patenti- revo- 
lutis apicibuB ovato-dilatatis, antberia parvis late ovatis sessilibus, 
glandulis hypogynia 3 globosis, ovario ellipsoideo glaben-imo, stipite 
curvo elongate, stylo stfpite breviore decurvo, stigmate dilatato poltato 
trigone, foUiculo pollicari stipitato decurvo gibboso oblongo-lancoolato 
glaberrimo tenuiter coriaceo polyspermo, stylo persiatente, seminibus 
oblongis imbricatis ala nucleo longiore. 

L. longifolia, Br. in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. x. p. 200. Lindl. in Bot. Beff. t. '\42. 
Meissn. in DC. Prodr. vol. xiv. p. 447. Benth. Fl. Austral, vol. v. p. 637. 

Embotiirium myricoides, Gxrtn.f. Fruct. vol. iii. p. 215, t. 218. 

E. longifolium, Poir in Lam. Did., Suppl. vol. ii. p. 651. 

TiiicoNDYLUS myricEefolius, Knight, Proteac. p. 122. 



Lomatia longifolia is an evergreen shrub, or small tree, 
attaining the height of twenty to twenty-five feet, with 
very variable foliage. It is a native of New South Wales, 
from the neighbourhood of Sydney westward to the Blue 
Mountains, and southward to Two-fold Bay, near Cape 
Howe. It has also been found by F. Mueller on the King 
River, Mitta-Mitta and Buffalo ranges of the Victoria 
Alps. According to Lindley (in the *' Botanical Register," 
quoting Sweet's " Hortus Britannicus ") it was introduced 
into England in 1816. It has long been in cultivation in 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it flowers, in the Temperate 
House, in July. 

Descr. — An erect shrub or small tree, glabrous, except 
the young parts, which bears a scattered, ferruginous, 
deciduous, appressed pubescence; branches f^kn(k)r. 

FjEJJKUAEY 1st, li)00. 



Leaves very variable, four to eight inches long, sessile, or 
very shortly petioled, from narrowly linear to oblong- 
lanceolate, acuminate, distantly toothed, base acute; 
midrib beneath stout ; nerves few, very slender. Racemes 
peduncled, axillary in the uppermost leaves and terminal, 
longer or shorter than the leaves, erecto-patent, laxly many- 
flowered ; peduncle and rhachis slender; pedicels one- 
fourth to one-third of an inch long, often binate; bracts 
none. Flowers about half an inch broad, greenish white. 
Perianth-segments linear, revolute beyond the middle, tips 
dilated, broadly ovate, obtuse. Anthers small, sessile ; 
cells divaricate, meeting at their tips. Ht/pogynous glands 
three, globose. Ovary on a long stout stipes, ellipsoid, 
glabrous, narrowed into very stout incurved style with a 
broad peltate obtusely trigonous stigma. Capsule an inch 
long, thinly coriaceous, stipitate, gibbonsly oblong-lanceo- 
late, laterally compressed, smooth, glabrous, many-seeded. 
— J, D. H. 



Fig. 1, flower and pedicel; 2, pedicel, glands, and pistil; 3, capsule; 
4, interior of the same with one wall removed, showing the seeds; 5, embrjo 
(tigs. 8-6 from Gsertner) :— All but figs. 3 and 4 enlarged. 




7Gdd 



M.Sdel.JWHlcKhlJi 



^fccGT* B,"o okr4 J) ay dc Son Lf^Jmp 



LRefiT/ie C? London 



Tab. 7699. 

PELOMIS LUNARIFOLIA. 
Native of Asia Minor. 

Nat. Ord. Labiate. — Tribe STACHYDEiE. 
Genus Phlomis, Linn. ; {Benth. & HooTe.f. Gen. Flant. vol. ii. p. 1214.) 



Phlomis (Dendrophloraides) lunarifolia ; frntex erectua, cano-tomentosus, 
caule ramisque 4-goni8, foliis oblongis ovato-oblongisve obtusis inferiori- 
bus longe petiolatis baai truncatia cuneatis v. cordatis superioribus 
sessilibus supra viridibua reticulatia subtua cano-virescentibus nervia 
utrinque costse ad 5 ascendentibus supra impressis subtua prominulis, 
nervuHs validis reticnlatis, capitulo amplo ad 4 poll. diam. depresao 
multifloro foliis 2 deflexis anguste oblongis suffuJto, bracteis parvia 
inibricatis orbicularibus cuspidatis pilosis, calyce fere recto stellatim 
pnbescente, lobis 5 breviasimis latis retusis, siaibus cuspide patula 
instructis, corolla l§-poll. longa aurea, galea villosa alte obtuse bicarinata 
apice retusa, labio inferiore bialato alis rotnndatis, filamentis infra medium 
pilosis longioribus appendiculatis, nuculis glabris. 

P. lunarifolia, Sihth. & 8m. Prodr. Fl. Grsec. vol. i. p. 414 {excl. hah.). 
Benth. in BG. Prodr. vol. xii. p. 541 {excl. hah.), linger Sc Kotschy, 
Die Insel Gypern, p. 275. Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. iv. p. 785 (lunariaa- 
folia). 

P. imbricata, Boiss. in Bourg. PI. Lye, exaicc. (1H60). 



A very handsome Labiate described as shrubby, though 
more probably an undershrub, attaining in its native 
country six feet in height, with flowering branches a foot 
long. It is described by Boissier as a native of Lycia, 
Cilicia, and the Island of Ehodes, but I suspect that the 
latter is a mistake for Cyprus, for the collector's name 
given for Rhodes is Kotschy (No. 678), and the precise 
habitat Chrysochu ; and there is a specimen of P. lunari- 
folia in the Kew Herbarium with the same number and 
habitat, ticketed as from Cyprus, by Kotschy. The species 
is also included in linger and Kotschy's " Die Insel Cy pern '* 
(published in 1865), a record overlooked by Boissier. 
The habitat of Peloponnesus, given in Sibthorp and 
Smith's Prodromus, repeated in DO. Prodr., &c., arose, as 
Boissier points out, from a confusion of the species with 
F. samia, L. 

The Royal Gardens are indebted to B. Whittall, Esq., 
of Smyrna, for seeds of [\ lanarifulla, collected in the 
FiiJJKUAKy 1st, 1900. 



Davas Dagh in 1895 ; a plant raised from which flowered 
in the open border in June, 1899. 

Descr. — An erect, branching undershrub, attaining six feet 
in height, with appressed-tomentose, green branches and 
leaves. Lower leaves long petioled, oblong or ovate-oblong, 
obtuse, base acute, truncate, or cordate, upper smaller, 
sessile by a narrow base, all rather dark green above, with 
four or five pairs of impressed ascending nerves, and copious 
reticulations, beneath paler, almost hoary with very strono- 
nerves and anastomosing nervules. Head of flowers a 
depressed sphere four inches in diameter, with two pendu- 
lous narrowly oblong leaves, three or more inches long, at 
the base. Bracts small, orbicular, cuspidate, membranous, 
more or less stellately hairy. Calyx three-fourths of an 
inch long, erect, nearly tubular, ten-ribbed, hirsute, with 
stellate hairs ; mouth truncate, rather oblique ; lobes five, 
short, very broad, membranous, retuse, alternating with as 
many cuspidate spreading teeth. Corolla one inch and a 
half long, golden-yellow ; upper lip villous, with two dorsal 
elevated obtuse keels extending to the retuse tip ; lower 
Hp expanded at the end into two orbicular wings. 
Filaments hairy below the middle. — J. D. E, 



Figs. 1 and 2, bracts; 3, calyx and style; 4, stellate hairs of calvv • 
5, portion of corolla and stamens ; 6 and 7, anthers ; 8, disk and ovary -—All 
enlarged. •' 



1700. 




L-I-odel.J.lsPitxJtto>i 



""fincartt Bro ciUsXl ey "5' 



L. Reeve 4.0^ LariAon 



Tab. 7700. 

ARIS^MA FLAVUM. 
Native of the Western Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Aroide^. — Tribe Arine^m, 
Genus Aris^ma, Mart. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 965. 



AuisJEUk (Pedatlsecta)^a.vMm ; monoicum, rhizomate globoso, vaginis appres- 
sia petioHsque. pallide rufo-brunneis striatis, foliie binis pedatisectis, 
foliolis 7-11 sessilibus vel petiolulatis oblongo- v. lineari-lanceolatis 
acuminatis cuspidatisve laste virescentibus basi cuneatis intermedio 
majore, vagina elongata, pedunculo petiolo subsequilongo viridi, spathaa 
viridis intus pnrpureo-fasciatEe tubo subgloboso cancellato, limbo tube 
longiore v. sequilongo late ovato v. orbiculari incnrvo cnspidato, cnepide 
erecto v. recnrvo marginibus basi vix recurvis, spadice subeessili brevi 
oblongo V. conico incluso, ovariis pauci- v. multi-seriatis obovoideo- 
globosis, stigmata pulvinato, antheris dense congestis obovoideis, appen- 
dice brevi clavato, baccis cuneato-obovoideis. 

A. flavum, ScAott, Prodr. Syst. Aroid. p. 40. Engler, Arac. in Alph. & Gas. 
DG. Monog. Phan. vol. ii, p. 548. Hook.f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. vi. p. 503. 

A. abbreviatnm, Schott in CEster. Bat. Zeitschr. 1857, p. 382 ; Prodr. p. 39. 

Engler, I.e. et Ic. ined. No. 7. 
DocHAFA flava, Schott, Syn. Aroid. p. 24 ; Gen. Aroid. App. 
Arum flavum, Forsk. Fl. JEgijpt. Arab. p. 167. 



Arisse.ma flavum is a remarkably variable plant, from six 
inches to nearly twenty-four inches in height, with a root- 
stock from the size of a small nut to that of a walnut ; a 
stem sometimes as thick as the thumb ; leaves four to 
nearly twelve inches span, with seven to eleven sessile or 
petiolulate leaflets varying greatly in breadth ; a spathe one 
to three inches long, of a green to yellow colour. The 
ovaries are often numerous, ripening into an oblong 
infructescence sometimes three inches long and two in 
diameter. Its Himalayan distribution is a wide one, from 
Garwhal, at an elevation of eight thousand to nine thousand 
feet, to Kashmir at six thousand five hundred feet, and in 
the Kurrum Valley (Afghanistan) at seven thousand to 
nme thousand feet. It has' not been collected at any 
locality between that last given and Arabia, where it was 
discovered by Forskal in 1763. The latter author de- 
scribes it as 2-3-leaved, with a yellow spathe two inches 
long, and spadix an inch long. 

February 1st, 1900. 



The specimens here figured were raised from seed sent 
to the Royal G-ardens, Kew, by Mr. Diithie, F.L.S., 
Director of the Botanic Department, Northern India, in 
1896. They flowered in a greenhouse in June, 1899. 

Descr. — Very variable in the size of all its parts, but the 
spathe rarely exceeding an inch in length. Sheaths 
embracing the petiole and peduncle, pale red brown, 
streaked with darker brown. Leaves two, pedatisect ; 
leaflets seven to eleven, usually lanceolate, acuminate, 
bright green, the central largest and broadest ; petiole pale 
brown, striated, its sheath very long. Peduncle about 
as long as the petiole, green. Spathe short, green, or 
yellowish, purple within, streaked with green ; tube globose, 
striate and trellised; limb open, very broadly ovate or 
orbicular, incurved, cuspidately acuminate, with the tip 
ascending or recurved. Spadix sub-sessile, short, included, 
androgynous. Fern. infl. of few rows of obovoidly globose 
ovaries with pulvinate stigmas. Male infl, longer, of 
crowded anthers. Appendage clavate, much shorter than 
the inflorescence. — /. D.H. 



Fig. 1, base of spathe and spadix; 2, antbers ; 3, ovary; 4, the same 
vertically halved ; 5, an ovule : — All enlarged. 



77^/ 




MSd9lJ.NPitck.Hlh. 



^6\cantBi-oo]<sI)ay.^ ScmLl?;^-! 



Ij.RflOve '5. C^London. 



Tab. 7701. 

iris obtusifolia. 
Native of Persia. 

Nat. Ord. lEiDEiS. — Tribe MoRiEE^. 
Genus Tkis, Linn.; [Benih. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Iris (Pogoniris) obtusifolia ; rhizomate robusto breviter repente, foliis 6 
distichis laxis caule brevioribus ligalatis obtuaia pallide viridibas, 
caule simplici subpedali capitulo unico terminali unico lateral! eessili 
preedito, spathae valvis magnis cblongia obtusie valde ventricosis, pedi- 
cellia brevissimis, perianthii sulphurei tubo brevi cylindrico, limbi 
segmentis exterioribas obovato-cuneatis e medio recnrvatia barba 
aurantiaca densa praeditis, segmentia unguiculatis erectia interioribus 
sequilongis, styli ramia perianthio distincte brevioribua cristis deltoideis 
irregtilariter dentatis. 



This new Iris is nearly allied to /. lutescens. Lam. (Bofc. 
Mag. t. 2861), and 7. Statellw, Todaro (Bot. Mag. t. 6894), 
frona both of which it differs by its laxly arranged obtuse 
leaves, very ventricose spathe-valves, and by having a 
sessile lateral cluster of flowers in addition to the end one. 
It was discovered by the late Lieutenant-Colonel Henry 
Lake Wells in the year 1895, in the province of Mazan- 
deran, on the south of the Caspian Sea. Colonel Wells 
describes this province as " a lovely country, full of 
beautiful flowers, and amongst others I found a yellow 
Iris, growing beside the streams at an elevation of about 
seven thousand feet above sea-level." He sent it in 1897 
to the Royal Gardens, Kew, in a living state, and our 
drawing was made from a plant that flowered in the bulb- 
house in April, 1899. 

Descr. — Eootstoclc robust, shortly creeping. Leaves six, 
distichous, mostly basal, pale green, ligulate, obtuse, the 
largest six or eight inches long at the flowering season, by 
an inch broad. Stem a foot long, bearing one terminal 
and one sessile lateral cluster of flowers. SpatJie-\a\vea 
oblong-navicular, very ventricose, two or three inches 
long, pale green at the flowering season ; pedicels very 
short. Perianth sulphur-yellow ; tube very short ; outer 
segments of the limb obovate-cuneate, two inches by an 

February 1st, 1900. 



inch broad above tbe middle, reflexing from the middle, 
furnished with an orange-yellow beard more than halfway 
up; inner segments erect, as long as the outer, cordate- 
orbicular, with a short, narrow claw. Style-branches pale 
yellow, an inch long ; crests deltoid, irregularly toothed on 
the outer edge. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, front view of anther; 2, back view of anther; 3, apex of style- 
branch, with crests: all enlarged ; 4, entire plant: much reduced. 



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Tab. 7702. 
STANHOPEA Rodigasiana. 

Native of New Grenada. 

Nat. Ord. OfiCHiDEjii:. — Tribe Vande^. 
QenuB Stanhopea, Frost; {BentJi. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 549.) 



Stanhopea Sodigasiana; pseadobulbis ovoideis parvis monopliyllis, foliis brevi- 
ter petiolatis lanceolatis acuminatis trinerviis, scapis elougatia pendulis uni- 
floris, bracteis spathaceis oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis membranaceis, 
floribua amplis, sepalis patentibus ovato-oblongis subobtasis concavis 
dorsali angustiore, petalis triangulari -lanceolatis superne attenuatis et 
recarvis sepalia sequilongis, labello carnoso sepalis paullo longiore, 
hypochilio elongato superne paullo dilatato basi ecornuto, mesocbilii 
cornibua valde prominentibus apice utrinque dilatatis triangularibus 
acutis antice longe unisetosis, epicliilio articulate triangulari-elongato 
obtuse canaliculate basi paullo dilatato et saccato, columna elongata 
inferne teretiuscula deinde utrinque alata, alia angustis denticulatis 
apice utrinque in cornu breve oblongum denticulatum extensis, rostello 
longiuscule et divergente bisetoso, anthera generis. 

S. Rodigasiana, Glaes, ex Cogn. in Chronique Orchideenne, p. 134 Gard. Ghron. 
1898, vol. ii. pp. 14, 31, 32, fig. 9. Gard. Mag. 1898, p. 492, with figure. 



The genus Stanhopea was established in the present 
work in T829, on a plant which flowered in the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, and was dedicated to the Right Hon. Earl 
Stanhope, President of the Medico-Botanical Society of 
London. It now numbers upwards of forty species, eight of 
which have been illustrated in the '' Botanical Magazine,*' 
namely : — 8. insignisj Frost (t. 2948-2919), S. ehurnea, 
Lindl. (t. 8359), S. tigrina, Batem. (t. 4197), 8. ecornuta, 
Lindl. (t. 4885), 8. Bucephalus, Lindl. (t. 5278), 8. Wardii, 
Lodd. (t. 5289), 8. oculata, Lindl. (t. 5300), and 8. Hase- 
loviana, Reichb. f. (t. 7452). All are remarkable for 
great complexity in the structure of their flowers, and the 
present one is no exception, though in several respects it 
is so anomalous in character that it cannot be compared 
with any other, and may almost be said to constitute a 
distiuct section of the genus. The flowers are solitary, 
borne on rather long pendulous scapes, and the middle 
portion of the lip — the mesochile — bears no approach to 
anything hitherto known. 
Makcji IsT, 1900. 



S. Rodigasiana is a native of New Grenada, and was dis- 
covered in the State of Antioquia, in 1896, by Mr. Florent 
Claes, of Brussels, and first flowered in the celebrated 
collection of Sir Trevor Lawrence, Bart., at Burford, 
Dorking, in June, 1898, from which plant the present 
illustration was prepared about a year later. 

As regards culture it agrees with other species of the 
genus in its requirements. 

Descr. — Pseudobulhs ovoid, monophyllous, one to one 
and a half inches long, light green. Leaves shortly 
petiolate, lanceolate, acuminate, eight to ten inches long, 
bright green above, paler beneath, with three prominent 
nerves. Scape pendulous, about nine inches long, one- 
flowered ; bract spathaceous, acute, membranous, an 
inch or more long; pedicel three inches long. Flowers 
nearly six inches in diameter. Sepals spreading, ovate- 
oblong, sub-obtuse, concave, three inches long, more or 
less marbled with dull purple below, and bearing large 
bright maroon blotches above. Petals triangular-lanceo- 
late, attenuate above and recurved, three inches long, 
very pale green. Lip rather longer than the sepals, 
very fleshy; hypochile narrow at the base, dilated and 
concave above, basal half suffused with maroon purple, 
the rest similarly blotched on a paler ground ; arms of 
mesocliile suddenly dilated and hatchet-shaped* with the 
front angle prolonged into an acuminate bristle, the other 
acute ; spotted with dull purple on a pale ground ; epichile 
delicately articulated, triangular, elongate, obtuse, chan- 
irelled above, dilated and saccate at the base, spotted with 
dull purple on a paler ground. Column as long as the 
lip, curved, winged from the middle upwards, and extend- 
ing into a pair of curved oblong teeth at the apex, 
coloured like the lip ; rostellum extending in a pair of 
diverging bristles, about half an inch long. — R. A. Bolfe. 



Fig. 1, epichile of lip; 2, column j 3, anther; 4 and 5, pollinia :— 4^^ 
enlarged. 



7705 




M,SdelJN,Fitchlit>. 



AanoentBrool<s,'Da;y &SonUfInip 



L. Reeve &.C°Lonaorv 



Tab. 7703. 
MATTHIOLA sinuata, var. oyensis. 
Native of Western France. 



Nat. Ord. Crucifer^.— Tribe Arabtde«. 
Genus Matthiola, Br.\ {Benth. & Sook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. i. p. 67.) 



Matthiola sinuata, var. otjensis ; berba annua vel biennis, ramosa, circiter 
sesquipedalis, snblignosa, viridis nndique glandulis stipitatis sparsis 
vestita, nee incano-tomentosa, foliis caulinis oblongo-lanceolatis linean- 
lanceolatis vel superioribus linearibus maximis 4-6 poll, longis paucilo- 
bulatis sinuatiBqne vel integris obtugis deorsum in petiolum attenuatis, 
floribus albis U-l| poll, diametro odorem gratum emittentibus, sepahs 
basi intequalibus anguste oblongis obtusissimis, petalorum laminia 
cuneato-oblongis sursum dilatatia ainuatisapice emarginatis velbilobulatis, 
siliqua angusta recta 2-3 poll, longa, seminibus ovalibus valde compreaais 
pallide brunneia ala angusta scariosa cinctia. 

M. sinuata, Br. in Ait. Hort. Kew. ed. 2, vol. iv. p. 120, vbx. foliis glahris, 
grandifiara, Lloyd, ex Nym. Oonsp. Fl. Europ. Stippl. 2, p. 19. 

M. oyensis, Menier ef Viaud in Bull, Soc. Bot. France, vol. xxiv. (1877), 
p. 203. 

M. sinuata, var. oyensis, Bouy et Foucaud, Fl. de France, vol. i. p. 193. 



This fragrant annual or biennial Stock }ias such a differ- 
ent appearance from typical M. sinuata, that one would at 
first sight pronounce it a distinct species, and it was de- 
scribed as such by Messrs. Menier and Viaud-Grand-Marais, 
in the publication cited above, in 1877. Subsequent writers 
have taken a different and probably correct view of its 
status, and there is Httle doubt that it is a white-flowered 
variety of M. sinuata, differing from the typical or ordinary 
condition in the total absence of a dense, greyish tomen- 
tum. Several other species of plants exhibit the peculiarity 
of densely hairy and glabrous individuals growing inter- 
mixed. Borrichia arhorescens, and B.frutescens, also sea- 
coast plants (CompositaB) , inhabiting the West Indies, Florida, 
and Bermuda, are among the most remarkable instances. 
Usually their leaves are clothed all over with hairs or a 
dense, soft down ; but side by side with plants thus 
clothed with hairs others occur, having perfectly glabrous, 
glossy foliage. Another species of Matthiola — M. iiicana, 
Br. — is represented by a variety analogous to the one under 
consideration. At least, that is the view taken by 
Mabch 1st, 1900. ' 



botanists who, like Caruel (in Pari. Fl. Ital. vol. ix. 
p. 795), regard M. glabra, DO. {M. glabrata, DC), as a 
variety of M. incana, Br., the parent of the Brompton and 
other races of garden Stocks. 

M. simcata, var. oyensis, is a native of the He d'Yeu 
(latine Insula Oya), off the coast of La Vendee, where it 
grows associated with the typical form ; thus strongly 
favouring the view of its affinities here adopted. Seeds of 
it were received at Kew from Messrs. Vilmorin-Andrieux & 
Co., of Paris, early in 1899, and the plants raised flowered 
in the open ground in June of the same year. Mr. R. I. 
Lynch also sent flowering specimens from the Cambridge 
Botanic Garden. It may be mentioned that the name 
oyensis has been corrupted in gardens to " ohiensis " and ^ 
'^ chinensisj' Both M. incana and M. sinuata are now 
found growing wild in Britain ; the former on cliffs in 
the Isle of Wight, and the latter on the coasts of Devon, 
Cornwall, and Wales ; but neither is regarded as indigenous 
or aboriginal. 

Descr. — An annual or biennial, branching, green herb, 
one to two feet high, somewhat sparsely furnished with 
stalked glands on the stems, leaves, calyces and pods, but 
quite destitute of the dense, felt-like, greyish tomentum, 
characteristic of typical M, sinuata. Leaves alternate (of 
the stem only present in our specimens) oblong-lanceolate, 
linear-lanceolate, or the upper ones quite linear, furnished 
with two or three small lobes on each side, or quite entire, 
obtuse, narrowed downwards into a more or less distinct, 
though short petiole. Flowers white, very fragrant, espe- 
cially in the evening, about an inch and a half in diameter, 
in stiff, terminal racemes. Sepals unequal at the base, 
narrowly oblong, very obtuse. Petals having a very narrow 
claw, and a wavy limb, dilated upwards, and notched or 
shallowly two-lobed at the top. Pod straight, two or 
three inches long, many-seeded. 8eeds oval, much com- 
pressed, uniformly pale brown, and furnished with a 
narrow, white, membranous or scarious, marginal wing. — 
W, Butting Hemsley. 

Fig. 1, a flower-biid; 2, portion of sepal; 3, audroeoiam and gyij^eceum ; 
4, a stamen ; 5, pistil : — All enlarged. 



i 



1704-. 




MSdel. JlTFitohlith 



Vmcent Brooks,Day & Sonlt^lrnp 



L ReevB & G°LondoTi.. 



Tab. 7704. 
CEROPEGIA WooDii. 

Native of Natal. 

Nat. Ord. Asclefiade.e. — Tribe Cebx)pegiej«. 
Genus Cebopegia, Linn.; {Benth. & Boole, f. Gen. Plant, vol. ij. p. 779.) 



Ceropegia. Woodii; herba tuberosa, glabra, ramia gracilUmis decnmbentibns 
vel pendentibus ad nodoa ssepe tuberiferis, foliis petiolatis i— 1 poll, longis 
et latis late cordato-ovatis vel orbiculari-reniformibns acutis vel obtusia 
carnosis supra albo-venosie, cymis axillaribus pedunculatis 2-3-flori.s, 
pedicellia 3-3^ lin. longis, sepalis f lin. longis lineari-lanceolatis acutis, 
corollse tnbo 7-9 lin. longo basi globoso-inflato superne cylindrico ore 
leviter infundibuliforxni rnbro-purpureo Jineato, lobis erectis apice oo- 
haerentibus angustis replicatis ciliatis atro-purpureis, coronae exterioris 
• breviter cupuliformis lobulis integris, coronae interioris lobis linearibua 
vel lineari-lanceolatis apice recurvis acutis. 

0. Woodii, ScUechter in Engl. Hot. Jahrh. vol. xviii., Beibl. No- 45, p. 34 ; 
aud vol. XX., Beibl. No. 61, p. 49, Oard. Chron. 1897, vol. ii. pp. 357, 
358, fig. 104._ 

This pretty, species of Ceropegia was discovered by Mr. 
J. Medley Wood, the energetic Curator of Durban Botanic 
Gardens, in Febniary, 1881, hanging from rocks on Groen 
Berg, Natal, at an altitude of about one thousand eight 
hundred feet. In 1894 Mr. Wood sent a living plant of it 
to Kew, and subsequently it has been introduced into 
other establishments. It seems to be nearest allied to 
G. africana, Br., and G. Barldeyi, Hook. f. (Bot. Mas*, 
t. 6316), but is a much more slender and more elegant 
plant than either of these. It is admirably adapted for 
basket culture, as it produces a profusion of slender stems 
which hang gracefully down on all sides, and are well 
furnished with small variegated leaves. It flowers freely, 
and ripens fruit under cultivation. The accompanying 
figure was made from plants cultivated in the Botanic 
Garden at Cambridge, and in the Royal Gardens, Kew. 
It flowers under cultivation from February to November. 

Descr. — Glabrous in all parts except the corolla. RooU 

stock tuberous, fleshy. Stems numerous, pendent, or 

trailing on the ground, slender, often producing globose 

tubers at the nodes. Leaves opposite, fleshy, one-third of 

March 1st, 1900. 



an inch to one inch long, and as much in breadth, on 
petioles two to six lines long, varying from broadly cordate- 
ovate to orbicnlar-reniform, acute or obtuse, apiculate, 
dark green, reticulate, variegated with white above, pale 
green beneath. Gymes axillary, pedunculate, two- or three- 
flowered. Peduncle two to five lines long. Bracts minute. 
Pedicels about a quarter of an inch long. Sepals three- 
quarters of a line long, linear -lanceolate, acute. Corolla 
slightly curved ; tube seven to nine lines long, globosely 
inflated at the base^ cylindric above, slightly dilated into 
a funnel-shaped mouth at the apex, streaked with purple ; 
lobes three to three and a half lines long, erect, cohering at 
the tips, narrowly spathulate from a deltoid base, replicate, 
blackish-purple, ciliate with purple hairs. Outer corona 
shortly cupular, with five short, obtuse, pocket-like 
lobules, white. Inner coronal-lobes linear or linear-lanceo- 
late, acute, connivent-erect, recurving at the apex, adnate 
at the base to the outer corona, white. — N. E. Brown. 



Fig. 1, corolla; 2, corona; 3, one of the inner coronal-lobes attaclied to a 
stamen ; 4, pollen-masses : — All enlarged. 




IIOS 



"^^IjA^ieTxt Brooks^Day A: oon _7^-L"ti-a 



LHeevie ^C^Londc 



Tab. 7705. 

CEREUS MOJAVENSIS. 
Native of California. 

Nat. Ord. Cactaceje. — Tribe Echinocacte^. 
Genus Cereus, Haw. ; Benth. & Sook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 



Oebeus mojavensis ; glaucescens, caulibus dense ceespitosis 2-6 poll. longis l|-2 
poll. diam. ovatis vel cylindricis 8-11-costatis, costis sinuato-tuberculatis, 
areolis 5-6 lin. distantibus orbicularibus junioribus tomentosis, acnleis 
radiantibus 7-8 inseqnalibus intertextis centrali solitario omnibus subtereti- 
bus curvatis, floribua prope apices caulium enatis 2 poll, longis 1 J poll, 
diam. rubro-cinnabarinia, calycis tubi pulvillis 18-20 panci-spinulosis, 
sepalis oblongis obtusis, petalis oblongo-obovatis obtusis, staminibas 
petalis fere sequantibus purpnreis, stigmatibns 7-8 radiantibus viridibus. 

C. mojavensis, Engelm. & Bigel. in Pacif. Rail. Pep. vol. iv. p. 33. Engelm. 
in Proc. Amer. Acad. vol. iii. p. 281 ; ^ Pot. Works, pp. 137, 158, 174. 
Whip. Ann. Pot. vol. v. p. 43. Orcutt, Rev. Cact. United States, p. 22. 

0. Bigelovii, Engelm. in Pacif. Pail. Sep. vol. iv. pi. 4, f . 8 ; ^ Sot. Works 

{Cact. of Whipple's Exped.), pi. 4, f. 8. 
0. mohavensis, 8. Wats. Sihl. Ind. p. 398. 
Echinocereus mojavensis, Sumpl. in Forst. ffandb. Cact. ed. 2, p. 803; 

K. Schum. Monogr. Cact. p. 297. 



The Gereus here figured is one of the dwarf, tufted 
species, and is nearly allied to G. Fendleri, Engelm. (Bot. 
Mag. t. 6533), from which, as maybe seen by a comparison 
of the plates, it differs entirely in its longer radiating spines, 
and smaller, differently coloured flowers. It is a native of 
the dry Mohave district between the Rio Colorado and 
Mohave Creek in California, where it was discovered in 
March, 1854, by Lieut. Whipple, whilst making the survey 
for the Pacific Railway, although, by some oversight, it is 
altogether omitted in S. Watson's Botany of Galifornia. 
The plant from which our figure was made was procured 
from Mr. Orcutt, of San Diego, California, in 1897, and 
flowered at Kew in June, 1899. 

Bescr. ^Old. plants densely tufted. Stems two to six 
inches high, one and a half to two inches in diam., ovate or 
cylindric, eight- to eleven-ribbed, light green, slightly 
glaucous. Ribs obtuse, sinuately tubercled. Areoles about 

Makch 1st, J900. 



half an inch distant, orbicular, tomentose when young. 
Spines slightly bulbous at the base, the radial seven to 
eight unequal, more or less interwoven, three-quarters of 
an inch to one and a half inches long, the central one single, 
one and three-quarters of an inch to two inches long, all 
sub-terete, and more or less curved, pale greyish. Mowers 
produced near the apex of the stems, about two inches 
long, and one and a half inches in diam., bright reddish- 
scarlet. Calyx-tube bearing about eighteen to twenty 
small pulvilli, with two to six short, bristle-like, ascending 
spines to each. Sepals oblong, obtuse. Petals oblong- 
obovate, obtuse, entire, closely placed. Stamens nearly 
as long as the petals, purple -mauve. Stigmas seven to 
eight, radiating, green. — N. E, Brotvn. 



Fig. 1, a tuft of spines, of the natural size. 




M.S.del,J.N,-Pitx:h.]tth 



Vmcen.tBrool<B,T)ay&3oJi L.U^ Imp 



-L 'Reeve 8c. '■ 



Tab. 7706. 
KNIPHOFIA EUPA. 
Native of Natal. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace*!. — Tribe HEiiEBOCAiLE.f:. 
LJenus Kniphofia, Mcenck ; {Benth. & Sook.f. Gen. Plant. vi;l. iii. p. 775.) 



Kniphotia rw/a; acaulis, foliis linearibus paucis viridibus firmis dorso acute 
carinatis margine laevibus, pedancalo modice validofoHis£8quilongo,racenio 
laxo, pedicellis brevissimis cernuis, bracteis ovato-laaceolatis pedicellie 
superantibus, floribus inferioribus citrinis superioribas rufo tinctis, peri- 
anthii cylindrici lobia orbicularibuB patulis, staminibua demum exsertis. 

K. rufa, Sort. Leichtlin. 



This pretty little new species of Knii^hojia is nearly 
allied to K. laxlflora, Kunth, from which it differs in its 
shorter, smooth-edged leaves, shorter perianth, and exserted 
stamens. It was introduced alive from Natal not long ago 
by Mr. Max Leichtlin, of Baden Baden, and was drawn 
from plants that he sent to Kew in Jane, 1899. 

Descr. — Acaulescent. Leaves linear, few, firm, green, 
acutely keeled on the back, a foot or a foot and a half 
long, a third of an inch broad low down, tapering gradually 
to the point. Peduncle terete, moderately stout, as long as 
the leaves. Raceme lax, four to six inches long ; pedicels 
very short, cernuous ; bfacts ovate-lanceolate, much longer 
than the pedicels, scarious, white, with a brown keel ; 
lower flowers primrose-yellow ; upper tinged with red. 
Perianth cylindrical, three-quarters of an inch long ; lobes 
orbicular, spreading. Stamens and sft/le finally exserted. — 
J. G. Baker. 

Fig. 1, perianth with pedicel and bract; 2, front view of anther; 3, back 
view of anther ; 4, pistil : — ^U enlarijed. 



March 1st, 1900. 



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X. Ir^aeve & G .? IjorxcLoaT. 



Tab. 7707. 
VERBASCUM longifolujm. 

Native of 8. Italy and the Balkan. 

Nat. Ord. Scrophularine^. — Tribe VerbascEjK, 
Genus Yekbascum, Linn. \ {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 928.) 



Verbascttm (ThapBUs) longifolium ; elatutn, robustum, bienne, albido- v. luteo- 
floccosum, foliiB dense Buperpositis undulatis canlem eimplicem velantibns 
oblongo-ovatis-lanceolatisve acuminatis infimis majoribus patulis 1^2- 
pedalibus breviter petiolatis superioribus angustioribus auberectis sesaili- 
bus basi amplexicaulibus,* racemo inter folia sessili pedali spicaeformi 
stricto cylindraceo 3^ poll. diam. obtuso, ramulis appressis v. raro elon- 
gatig, bracteia filiformibus, floribns dense congestis breviter pedicellatis, 
calycis stellatim tomentosi lobis lanceolatis acuminatis, corolla explanato- 
concava aurea pollicem lata, filamentis 3 brevioribua albido- r. violaceo- 
lanatis, antberis parvis connectivo villoso, 2 longioribas glaberrimis 
antberis multo majoribua Innatis ochraceia nudis, ovario hirtello basique 
styli stellatim tomentoao. 

Y, longifolium, Tenore Fl. Neap. Prodr. p. 16 ; Si/ll. PI Vase. Fl. Neap. 
p. 110 ; Fl. Napol. vol. i. p. 89, t. 21. Bertoloni Fl. Ital. vol. ii, p. 595. 
Benth. in DG. Prodr. vol. x. p. 228. Parlat. Fl. Ital. vol. vi. p. S79. 
Arcang. Compend. Fl. Ital. p. 504. Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. iv. i>. 304. 
BaUacci in Nuov. Oiom. Bot. Ital. vi. (1899) 338, 

Y. pannosnm, Vis. ex Pane, in Mem,, 1st. Venet. vol. xii. (1866) p. 475. 

Velenovsky, Flor. Bulg. Suppl. i. 207. 
Y. montanum, tomentosum, &c., Tilli, Gat. PI. Sort. Pisan. p. 171 (1723). 



Verhasciim longifolium is a stately species, remarkable, 
under the form here figured and described, for its extra- 
ordinarily abundant undulate sinuate foliage, and the 
massive columnar inflorescence of which the branches are 
closely appressed to the axis. This, however, may be only 
an extreme^form, for the inflorescence is said by Boissier 
to be either'*simple or branched. The woolly hairs of the 
short filaments are both figured and described by Tenore 
as purple in the Italian plant, but by Bertoloni and 
Arcangeli as white; by Grussone as white below and 
purple above ; Boissier says white, but his description 
probably applies to Macedonian or Servian specimens. 

Its habitats recorded by Boissier are mountains near 
Bitolia, in Macedonia, at an elevation of three thousand 
five hundred to four thousand six hundred (French) feet, 
Servia, and Southern Italy. In the last named country 

* Not " cordatis," as might be supposed from the figure. 
April 1st, 1900. 



Tenore gives the mountain pastures in the Abruzzi, 
Bentham gives near Rome, on the authority of Mauri, and 
there is a specimen so ticketed in the Kew Herbarium, but 
it is not tlie true plant. Its nearest ally is the common 
S. of Europe V. phlomoides, in which the leaves are crenu- 
late, and the corolla-lobes are spreading, not, as in 
longifolium, forming a cup. 

V. longifolium was raised in the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
from seed procured from Messrs, P. Barr & Sons, Thames 
Ditton, in 1898. As it flowered in the Herbaceous ground 
in July, 1899, it must be an annual, though described as 
a biennial by Boissier. 

Descr. — Whole plant as here described, three or four feet 
high, clothed, except the corolla, with white or yellomsh 
flocculenfc tomentum mixed with stellate hairs, forming a 
low conical mass of leaves crowned with a sceptre-like 
columnar inflorescence. Leaves innumerable, densely 
superposed, gradually diminishing upward in size and 
breadth ; lower one and a half to two feet long, spreading, 
narrowly ovate, or oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, base 
narrowed into a short petiole, upper sessile, base am- 
plexicaul, all quite entire, with strongly waved margins. 
Inflorescence sessile, a foot high, by three and a half 
inches in diameter, of innumerable short, stout appressed 
flowering branches ; bracts filiform, green. Flowers 
shortly pedicelled. Calyx stellate-tomentose ; lobes lan- 
ceolate, acuminate. Corolla cup-shaped, an inch broad, 
golden-yellow. Three short filaments and connectives of 
the small, short anthers, villous, with simple, clavellate 
white or violet hairs ; two longer filaments quite glabrous, 
anthers twice as large, lunate, quite naked. Ovary hispid, 
base of style stellately hairy. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, calyx with style and stigma ; 2, stellate hairs of foliage, &c. ; 
3, base of corolla and stamens ; 4 and 5, anthers of two long stamens ; 6 and 
7, short stamens ; 8, hair from do. ; 9, ovary and base of style -.—all enlarged ; 
10, view of whole plant reduced. 



1708 




del.J.NPitc>.lLi}, 



"VLriccTilBrooks J>3^ & SoTi.L#lTr.p 



LBfieve StCOLoiadon 



Tab. 7708. 

DBUTZIA DISCOLOR, var. puepurasoens. 

Native of Western China. 



Nat. Ord. Saxifragace^. — Tribe HvDRANGEiB. 
Genus Deutzia, Thunb. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 612.) 



DEUTzrA discolor; frutex 6-7-pedalis, ramia tereti^ms, cortice briinneo, 
ramulis lateralibua prfBcipue floriferis, foliis breviter petiolatia 2-6^ poll, 
longis ovatis oblongisve acutis acumiaatisve basi rotundatis subcordatia 
V. cuneatis stibdiscoloribua supra Isete viridibns glabria scaberulis v. sparse 
stellatim puberulis subtus pallidia glabris v. plus minus stellatim pnbes- 
centibus, petiolo §-^ poll, longo, nervis primariis 4-5 arcuatis, paniculia 
densi- vel laxi-floris, ramis ramulis pedicellisque sparse stellatim lepidotia, 
pedicellis brevibus v. elongati'^, tloribus |-1 poll, latis, calycis stellato- 
pubesceatis segmentis oblongo-lanceolatis ^-^ poll, longis, petalis oblongis 
induplicatim valvatis dorso stellatim-puberulis marginibus late metn- 
branaceis glaberrimis, nlameutis complanatis linearibus suba^qualibua 
5 longioribus petalis alternis furcatis cruribus apice crenulatis anthera 
sinu inserta, o brevioribus linearibus anthera facie inserta, disco expla- 
nato glabro v. stellatim puberulo, sty lis 3 apicibus paullo inciassatis 
stigmatibus decurrentibus. 

D. discolor, Hemd. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. (1887) p. 275. 

Var. purpurascens ; panicula ramis ramulis pedicellis calycibusque rubro- 
purpureis, petalis dorso roseo-purpnreis. Franchet ex L. Henri/ in Le 
Jardin, 1894, p. 147, fig. 64. Gard. ^ Forest, vol. vii. (1894) p. 281. & 
287, fig. 48. Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. ii. p. 45, fig. 25. 



The species of Deutzia are very difficult of discrimination, 
and have not hitherto been carefully studied. D. discohr 
was founded in 1887 by Mr. Hemsley on herbarium speci- 
mens collected in the Patun^ districts of the Hupeh 
province by Dr. Henry, who has more recently sent 
specimens of it from Szechuen. Its most distinctive 
character is that of the elongate calyx- lobes, in contrast 
to those organs in the Himalayan and Chinese D. staminea^ 
Br., which is its nearest ally. The otlier characters 
assigned to it of discolorous leaves, densely stellately 
squamulose beneath, very long, slender pedicels, white 
flowers, and densely stellately lepidote crown of the ovary, 
are all most variable. Except in the purplish red colora- 
tion of the inflorescence and flowers I can find no differ- 
ential characters for war. jmrjmrascens, the figure given of 
April 1st, 1900. 



whicli in Garden Sf Forest differs widely from that liere repre- 
sented in the very lax inflorescence with very long pedicels, 
much larger flowers, and narrower petals. It was dis- 
covered in the Province of Yunnan, at an elevation of six 
thousand to seven thousand feet by the Abbe Delavay, 
who sent seeds in 1888 to Messrs. Vilmorin of Paris. 

Plants of var. purpurascens were first received by the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, from the Jardin des Plantes, Paris, 
but the figure here given was taken from a specimen 
purchased in 1897 from Mr. J. Smith, of Newry, which 
flowered June, 1899. 

Descr. — Var. purpiirascens. A shrub six to seven feet 
high; branches covered with light brown bark. Leaves 
two to three and a half inches long, ovate or oblong, acute 
or acuminate, finely serrate, glabrous, scaberulons, or 
minutely stellately lepidote above, sparsely lepidote be- 
neath, base rounded, sub-cordate or cuneate, nerves four 
to five pairs ; petiole one-eighth to one-sixth inch long. 
Inflorescence of terminal rounded panicles terminating the 
lateral branchlets, peduncles and pedicels and calyces dark 
red-brown, sparsely lepidote. Flowers three-fourths to 
one inch in diameter. Calyx-lobes linear or oblong- 
lanceolate. Petals broadly ovate-oblong, dorsally 
thickened, stellately pubescent and red-purple, margins 
very broad, white, membranous. Filaments ten, linear, 
five opposite the petals shorter, simple, with the anthers 
on the inner face, five longer opposite the sepals forked, 
with the anther in the sinus. Styles three, with linear, 
thickened stigmatose tips. — /. D. H, 



Fig. 1, calyx and styles ; 2, stellate scale ; 3, petal, dorsal view ; 4, longer 
and 5, shorter stamens : — All enlarged. 



770d 




aff.Sdel.J.lJKta}-.! 



"WnaentBroo]^,Da>'& SonLt^^ 



-L Reeve &. C '^ Lo.^_do/x 



Tab. 7709. 
ANTHOLYZA Sohweinfuethii. 

Native of Abyssinia. 



Nat. Ord. Ieide^. — Tribe Ixie^b. 
Genua Antholyza., Linn.; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 710.) 



Antholyza Schweinfurthii; cormo globoso mediocri, caule folioso, foHis 
6-6 alternis pedalibus ensiformibns ad | poll. latis acuminatis plicatis 
nervosis, spica laxiflora decnrva, spathis exterioribus erectis angustis 
acuminatis scariosis convolntis inferioribus 1-2 pollicanbns rubro tinctia, 
superioribus brevioribus inflatia acutis, spathis interioribns tnbo 
perianthii paulo longioribus ovato-lanceolatis, floribus spathas longe 
superantibus, periantbii l|-pollicaria angusti decurvi coccinei baai aurei 
tubo brevi limbo dilatato subgibboso breviore et angustiore ore valde 
obliquo 6-fido, lobo dorsali ovato-oblongo obtuso galeato diraidium 
perianthii asqaante, lobis 4 lateralibus dorsali terquaterve brevioribus 
lineari-oblongis subacutis, lobo antico minimo, staminibus atyloqne 
perianthio aequilongis, stylo gracili apice trioruri, craribus recorvis, 
stigmatibus capitatis. 

A. Schweinfurthii, Baker in Gard. Ghron. 1894, vol. i. p. 588 ; in Fl. Trop. 
Afr. vol. vii. p. 375. 



Antholyza is a wholly African genus, extending from the 
Cape of Good Hope to Abyssinia, but found only at con- 
siderable elevations in the tropical zone. A. Schweinfurthii 
is the most northern species hitherto discovered. It in- 
habits the mountains of Erytrea (Italian Abyssinia) at 
three thousand to six thousand five hundred feet elevation. 
Only three species (of nearly thirty described) have been, 
before the present, figured in this magazine, namely, A. 
sethiopica, L., t. 561, and its variety B, t. 1172; A. quad- 
rangularis, Burm., t. 567 {Gladiolus) ; A. WatsonioideSy 
Baker, Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. vii. p. 376 {G. Watsonioides, 
Baker, Bot. Mag. t. 6919) ; for A. Meriana, L., t. 418, is a 
Watsonia, and A. Merianella, L., t. 441, is a Gladiolus, 
A. Schweinfurthii flowered in a greenhouse in the Koyal 
Gardens, Kew, in May, 1899. The bulbs were purchased 
from Messrs. Dammann & Co., of Naples, in 1884. 

Descr. — Corm globose, an inch to an inch and a half in 
diameter. Stem about two feet high, slender, leafy. 
Leaves five or six, alternate, narrowly eusiform, acuminate, 

Apkil 1st, 1900. 



about three-quarters of an inch broad, plicate, costate 
for about half their length, bright green. SjnJce lax- 
flowered, decurved when flowering in the upper half, four 
to five inches long, rhachis stout, dark green, lower flowers 
an inch or more apart. Outer spathes of lower flowers 
up to two inches long, narrowly lanceolate, acuminate, 
scarious, pale green clouded with red, of upper flowers 
shorter, oblong, acute, inflated; inner spathe lanceolate, 
about half as long as the perianth-tube. Perianth about 
one-third longer than the outer spathe, narrow, decurved, 
scarlet when exposed, yellow towards its base, tube short, 
cylindric, suddenly dilated into a gibbous, very unequally 
six-cleft tubular limb ; dorsal lobe nearly as long as the 
rest of the perianth, ovate-oblong, concave, sub-acute ; 
lateral lobes two on each side, erect, oblong-lanceolate, 
longest of each pair (those next the dorsal) about one- 
fourth the length of the dorsal, anticous lobe much the 
smallest. Stamens and style as long as the perianth ; 
anthers linear-obloQg, yellow. Style very slender, trifid at 
the apex, arms spreading, stigmas capitate. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, flower with, inner spathe ; 2, anther ; 3, ovary, style, and stigmas :- 
All enlarged. 



1710 




XS.d«lJN.Fitd-,l;tK 



■Vmcerd.Brooka.Day & SorvLf^lTOp 



L Reeve &. C°X,oTi.<iar 



Tab. 7710. 
CLEMATIS ORiENTALis, var. tangutica. 

Native of Central Asia. 



Nat, Ord. Eanunculace^. — Tribe Clematidb^. 
Genus Ranunculus, Linn. {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 3.) 



Clematis (Flammula) orientalis, var. tangatica; caule scandente, raraulia 
glabris v. sparse sericeo-pilosis, foiiis loDge petiolatis glauco-viridibus 
pinnatisectis, segmentia longe petiolulatis 2-2J poll, longis lineari- 
lanceolatia acuminatis grosse serrato-dentatis incisiave basi saepe lobatis, 
terminali simplici 3-lobo v. trisecto, pedunculia solitariis valde elongatia, 
ad 6 poll, longia erectia apice decurvis unifloris, floribus magnis anreis 
cernuis, sepalis fere bipollicaribas ovato-lanceolatis apicibus fere caudatig 
dorso alte tricoatatis intna glabria marginibus late villosis, filamentis 
infra medinm dilatalia ovariisque minatis villosis. 

0. orientalia, Linn., var. tangutica, Maxim. Fl. Tangut. p. 3. 



Clematis orientalis is the most widely distributed of the 
known species of the genus, extending from the Cjclades 
and Caucasus Mts., eastward through North Persia to 
Aifghanistan, and in the Western Himalaya as far as the 
confines of Nepal ; and from Soongaria and the Pamir to 
the Altai Mountains, Manchuria, and North China. It 
varies greatly in the size of the flowers ; and so much in 
the form of the sepals, that I suspect the Himalayan 
C. graveolens, Lindl. (tab. nostr. 4495), which is said to be 
distinguishable by its fetid odour, will prove to be a variety 
of it. 

Living plants of var. tangutica were received by the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, from the Imperial Gardens of St. 
Petersburg in 1898, which flowered in the Arboretum in 
August, ]899. 

Descr. — A glaucous-green scandent shrub, sparsely pilose 
with silky hairs. Leaves three to five inches long, long- 
petioled, pinnatisect, segments up to two and a half inches 
long, long-petiolulate, lanceolate, or linear-lanceolate, 
acuminate, coarsely serrate toothed or incised, base acute, 
often lobed in one or both sides, terminal segment entire, 
April 1st, 1900. 



tliree-lobed or three-partite; petiole one to two inches 
long, petiolules about half as long. Flower solitary, very 
large, cernuous, golden -yellow ; peduncle six inches long, 
erect, arched at the tip. Sepals nearly two inches long, 
ovate-lanceolate, sub-caudately acuminate, tips recurved, 
dorsally strongly three-ribbed, glabrous within, margins 
broadly tomentose. Filaments dilated, and sparsely villous 
below the middle, anthers linear. Ovary minute, villous, 
style plumose. — J, D. E. 



Fig. 1, stamen ; 2, carpel : — both enlarged. 



- i 




^rSdet JrTPitchiih 



oT<B,Day &SaJT Ll4liiip 



Reove &i.O° London. 



Tab. 7711. 
RENANTHERA Imschootiana. 

Native of Assam. 

Nat. Old. OechidKjE. — Tribe Yandex, 
GeTuis Eenantheha, Lour.j {Benth.Sc Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 577.) 



Eenantheba Imschootiana; rhizomate J-l-pedali crassitie pennaa anserinje, 
ramis brevibas folioais, foliis 2-4 poll, longis lineari-oblongia ad 1 poll, 
latia recurvis apice inajqnaliter bilobis lobis rotundatia Ijete viridibus 
marginibus recurvis, pedunculo axillari |-l-pedali vaginis panels brevibua 
ancto, racemo multifloro basi tantum iaterdum ramoso, ramia pedicellia 
pollicjaribus bracteia ovariiaqne rubris, brauteis parvis rotnndatis concavis, 
sepal o poatico | poll, longo lineari-oblanceolato obtuso flavo, lateralibus 
nnguiculatia IJ poll. longia ovalibus obtuaia enpra cinnabarinis subtus 
ochriceo-rubris, petalis anguste spathulatis sepalo dorsali brevioribua 
flavin rabro maculatis, labello miniito 3-lobo aureo sanguineo maculate, 
lobo antico recurvo fere orbiculari crasao basi tritubercalato, lateralibus 
brevibua triangularibusobtusis, disco criatato, calcare brevi aaccato obtuso, 
columna brevi truncata aanguinea, antheria hemispherica. 

R. Imscbootiana, Rolfe in Kew Bulletin, 1891, p. 200 ; in Orchid Review, 
vol. iii. (1895) p. 208; vol. iv, (1896) p. 229; iu Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. i. 
pp. 41, 42, fig. 17. 

R. Papilio, King Sr Prain in Journ. As. Soe, Beng. vol. Ixiv. (1896) p. 328. 



Mr. Rolfe, in describing this beautiful plant in the Kew 
Bulletin, informs us that it was sent to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in 1896, by Mr. A. Van Imschoot, of Ghent, who 
had received it from Messrs. F. Sander & Co., of St. 
Albans, as presumably a native of Cochin China. It has, 
however, since been found by Lieut. E. Lugard and others 
in Assam, which must be regarded as its native country. 
Plants of it were sent by the latter officer to the Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Calcutta, which were described by Sir 
G. King and Dr. Prain, under the name of B. Papilio. 
It is remarkable in the genus for its dwarf stature. The 
specimen here figured flowered in a tropical house in the 
Royal Gardens in June, 1899 ; the flowering lasting for 
about a month. 

Bescr. — Stem as much as a foot long, as thick as a goose- 
quill, tortuous, sending out stout roots and short leafing 
and flowering branches. Leaves close-set, distichous, 

April 1st, 1900. 



linear-oblong, about two to four inches long, and an inch 
in breadth, rather deeply unequally two-lobed at the tip, 
with an acute sinus, lobes rounded, margins recurved. 
Peduncle axillary, a foot long, slender, bearing a few short 
acute sheaths, and a raany-fld. inclined raceme or panicle 
up to one ft. long; rachis of panicle, branches, pedicels and 
ovaries bright red; bracts small, rounded. Dorsal sepal 
linear-oblanceolate, obtuse, dull yellow, three-fourths of an 
inch long ; lateral one and a half inches long, clawed, oval, 
obtuse, cinnabar-red above, beneath ochraceous. Petals 
rather shorter than the dorsal sepal, narrowly spathulate ; 
yellow with blood-red spots. Lip minute, three-lobed ; 
midlobe nearly orbicular, yellow, with scarlet blotches, 
two auricled at the base, and with three basal tubercles ; 
side-lobes triangular, erect; disk complicately crested ; 
spur a short, obtuse sac. Column scarlet, anther hemi- 
spheric. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1, lip and column ; 2, anther ; 3 and 4, pollinia : all enlarged; 5, view 
of plant, reduced. 



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Tab. 7707— verb ASCUM LONGIFOLIUM:. 
„ 7708.— DEUTZIA DISCOLOR. 
„ 7709.— ANTHOLYZA SCHWEINFURTHIL 
„ 7710.- CLEMATIS ORIENTALIS. 
„ 7711.— RENANTHERA IMSCHOOTIANA. 



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HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns indigenous 

to or NatUf adzed in the British Isles. 

By GEORGE BENT HAM, F.R.S. 

6th Editiou, Revised by Sir J. D. Hookhe.C.B.. Q.C.S.I., F.R.S..&C. 9«. net. 

ELDSTRiTIONS OF THE B&ITI8H FLORA. 

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1712 




'V^nfX'j"\t, J5i"ook,'-;,D -iy & S on I \.. im; > 






Tab. 7712. 

aloe abyssinioa. 

Native of Abyssinia. 

Nat. Ord. LiLiACfi^M. — Tribe AloinEvB. 
Genae Aloe, Linn,; (Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Flaut. vol. iii. p. 776.) 



Aloe (Eualoe) ahyssinica-, caudice sitnplici 6 ped. alto ad 3 poll. diam. leviter 
cicatricato, foliis ad 20 apice caulis rosulatia quaquaversia 2-3 ped. longia 
engiformibus sensim in. apicem pollicarem cylindraceum obtasum afctenna- 
tis concavis basi 4-5 poll, latis crassitie | poll, medio ad 3 poll, latis Jzeto 
viridibus supra basin versus maculatis, dentibus marginalibus ad f poll, 
distantibua majnsculis deltoideis iucurvis viridibus apicibua corneia 
brunneis, pedunculo foliis breviore ramose, ramis erectis bracteis \ poll, 
longis subiilatis membranaceis onustis, racemis ad 6 poll, longia 3-4 poll, 
diam. oblongis densifloria, bracteia floralibua rameis consimilibus, floribus 
pollicaribus nutantibus, pedicellis ^-1 poll, longis, periaathio angaste 
campannlato supra tabum integrum leviter constrictoprimulino (alabastro 
viridi infra medium cinnabarino), segmentis tubo duplo longioribua 
oblongo-lanceolatis apicibua intus aureis recurvis, genitalibus exsertis, 
antheris breviter oblongis ochraceis. 

A. abyssinica. Lam. EncT/cl. vol. i. p. 86 [excl. syn.). Roem. Sr Sch. Syst. vol. 
vii. p. 695. Salm-Dyck, Aloe, sect, xviii. fig. 1, Kunth, Enum. PI. 
vol. iv. p. 521. ?A. Rich. Tent. Fl. Ahyss. vol. ii. p. 324. Baker in 
Journ. Linn. Soe. vol. xviii. (1881) p. 174; in Fl Trop. Afr. vol. vii. p. 467. 
Engl. Hochgehirysfl. Trop. Afr. p. 16 i. Schweinf. in Bull. Herb. Boise. 
vol. ii. app. II. pp. 66, 110. 

A. vulgaris, var. abyssinica, DC. PL Grasses, sub t. 27 ; Poir Encycl. Suppl. 
vol. i. p. 294. 

Aloe abyssinica is a plant of historic interest, having 
been brought to Europe by the celebrated Bruce, on his 
return from Abyssinia in 1771, and was no doubt presented 
by him to Louis XV. of France, for it was first described by 
Lamarck in 1 783, from a specimen in the Jardin du Roi, 
given by that traveller. According to Baker, in the " Flora 
of Tropical Africa,*' it has a wide geographical range in 
N.E. tropical Africa, at elevations of three thousand two 
hundred to nine thousand four hundred feet, between 
Suakin and Berber in Nubia, to Ery trea and Abyssinia. In 
the same and in other works the stem is described as short, 
but in the plant here figured it is fully six feet high. The 
A. abyssinica of A. Richard, in his " Tentamen Florae Abys- 
sinicae," is cited under it by most authors, but as the 

Mat 1st, 1900. 



perianth is described in that work as sexfid at the apex 
only, I have queried that citation. 

There is no record of the source whence the specimen 
now in the Succulent House in the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
was procured. It has been there for many years, together 
with var. Peacoclcii, Baker {A. elegans, Todaro, Hort. Bot. 
Panorm. vol. ii. p. 25, t. 29), of which the leaves are 
eighteen to twenty-one inches long, and five to six broad 
near the base, and the flowers bright yellow ; its stem is 
more slender, five feet high. 

Descr. — Stem (of the specimen figured) six feet high, 
three inches in diameter, cylindric, faintly marked with 
transverse scars. Leaves about twenty, rosulate at the 
top of the stem, erect, spreading, or deflexed, two to three 
feet long, ensiform, gradually narrowed into a cylindric 
obtuse brown tip, nearly an inch long, four to five inches 
broad at the base, with the thickness of about half an inch, 
bright green, with oblong, pale, narrow blotches on the 
upper surface towards the base; marginal teeth about two- 
thirds of an inch apart, deltoid, incurved, green, tips 
cartilaginous, brown. Peduncles two or more, rather 
shorter than the leaves, erect, branched ; branches loosely 
covered with subulate, pale, membranous bracts about a 
fourth of an inch long. Raceme up to six inches long, 
and three in diameter, very dense-fld., cylindric, bracts 
like those on the peduncle, but rather longer ; pedicels 
longer than the bracts, erect, arching at the tip. Floivers 
pendulous, about an inch long, narrowly campanulate, 
slightly constricted above the short, entire tube, pale 
yellow (buds cinnabar-red below the middle, greenish- 
yellow above it) ; segments twice as long as the tube, 
narrowly oblong; tips recurved, golden-yellow within. 
Stamens and style exserted; anthers ochraceous, shortlv 
obloncr.—J. R H. 



Fig. 1, flower ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, pi-itil -.—All enlarged. 



711: 




L Reeve &C? London 



Vin.ecr,lJi(oo>s,Day«^3onLt^Imp 



Tai3. 7713. 
COTYLEDON (Echeveiua) Pukpusii. 

Native of California. 



Nat, Ord. Crassul.^ce.e. 
Genus CoiyLEDON, Linn.; {Be7ith. Sc Hooh.f. Gen. Flant. vol. i. p. 659.) 



Cotyledon (Echeveria) Purpusii; acaulis, glaberrima, foliis dense rosnlatis 
crasse carnosis ellipticis ovatisve acarninatis apicibus pungentibus leviter 
incurvie supra concavis dorso rotundatis glauco-vindibusprajcipue apices 
versua rubro tinctis, exterioribus in fasciculo li-2.pollicaribus mtenonbus 
dense congestia minoribus glaucis, pedunculo vahdo paUide rubro intra 
medium foliis paucis alternis radicalibus consimilibus sed multo mmonbus 
ovatis acuminatis instructo, cjma 4-5 poll, lata dichotoma, ^^arais 
primariis divaricatis recurvis, ramuHs pedicellisque roseis, flonbus 4 poll, 
longis suberectis, pedicellis ^-^ poll, longis basi bracteola parva carnosa 
instructis, calycis basi rotundati lobis ovatis obtu'is, corollai coccineaj 
laciniis lineari-lanceolatis apicibus acutie recurvis intus aureis in tubum 
basi integrum anguste conicum dispositis, staminibus 10, filamentis 
basi laciniarum insertis glaberrimis, antheris inclusis, ovario ovoideo, 
carpellis in stylum brevem 5-aulcatum attenuatis. 

Echeveria Pnrpusii, Schumann in Gartenfl. 1896, p. 609, fig. 97 {ic. xylog.); 
Gard. Chron. 1896, vol. ii. p. 698, fig. 123. 



Cotyledon Purjmsii is a native of the Sierra Nevada of 
California, wliere it was discovered at an altitude of seven 
thousand to eight thousand feet on Mt. Whitney, by the 
gentleman to whom it is dedicated by the author in the 
" Gartenflora." Nine Californian species of the genus 
are given by S. \Yatson in the " Flora of CaHfornia," with 
the descriptions of one of which, G. nevadensis, Wats., 
G. FuTjjnsii so closely agrees, that it is possible that the 
latter is a synonym, especially as Sonora and the Yosemite 
Valley (the habitats for nevadensi,^) are, though much 
lower in elevation, in the same botanical region and group 
of mountains as Mt. Whitney. Referring to the Her- 
barium, I find it impossible from dried specimens to settle 
this point, which must be reserved for study when living 
specimens of G. nevadensis are available for comparison. 
Another very similar species is Eohf^veria Desmetiana, L. de 
Smet {ex Mormi in Belg. Ilortic, 1874, p. 159; 111. llorl.^ 
ser. 6, ii. p. 93, f. 13), which is recorded as a native of 
Mexico. 

May Isi, 1900. 



The specimen here figured of G. Purpusii was sent to 
me by Mr. K. J. Lynch, for figuring in this work from the 
Botanic Gardens of the University of Cambridge, where 
it flowered in the open air in June, 1899, having been 
subjected, without injury, to at least 12° below the 
freezing point in the previous winter. 

Descr. — Quite glabrous. Leaves crowded in a sessile 
rosette, four inches in diameter, thickly fleshy, of a dull, 
rather pale, more or less glaucous-green colour, tinged 
with dull red towards the margins and tips, outer one and 
a half to two inches long, ovate or elliptic-ovate, acumi- 
nate, tip pungent, inner densely crowded, narrower, paler, 
more glaucous. Peduncle four inches high, ascending 
from the base of the rosette, stout, and, as well as the 
cyrae-branches and pedicels, pale, rose-coloured, bearing 
below the middle scattered, ovate, acuminate leaves like the 
radical, of which the lower are an inch long, the upper 
gradually smaller. Cyme twice dichotomous, branches 
divaricate, primary two and a half inches long, spreading 
and recurved ; bracts small, obtuse, fleshy. Flowers erect, 
pedicelled, three-fourths of an inch long. Sepals short, 
broadly ovate, obtuse. Corolla conical-tubular ; tube very 
short; segments linear, scarlet, with spreading, acute, 
golden-yellow tips. Stamens included ; filaments sub- 
equal ; anthers linear-oblong. Ovary ovoid-oblong, nar- 
rowed into a short style with five minute stigmas. — 
J.D.H, ^ 



F]g. 1, portion of corolla and stamens ; 2, tip of pedicel and ovary -.—Both 
enlarged. 



77H 




ks.Day&.S- 



Tab. 7714 
CAMPANULA mirabilis. 
Native of the Western Caucasus, 

Nat. Ord. Campandlace*. — Tribe Campanule*. 
GenuB Campanula, Linn. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 661.) 

Campakula (Medium) mirabilis; biennis P, radice, fusiformi, caule robusto 
pyramidatim densissirae ramoso, ramis patentibus foliosis multifloris, 
foliis glabris coriaceis inferioribus 6-pcllicaribu8 obovato-spathulatis 
obtusis in petiolum alatum angnstatis grosse insequaliter crenato-serratis 
marginibus spinuloso-ciliolatis saturate viridibus, saperionbus minonbus, 
ramis sessilibua ovato-cordatis, race mis confertis simplicibus v. ramosis 
pauci-multifioris, pedunculis 1-2-floris, pedicellis brevibus erectis brac- 
teatis, bracteis minutis, calycis tube turbinate, lobis erectis ovato- 
lanceolatis appendicibusque ovatis deflexia spinuloso-ciliolatis, corolla 
ampla late campanulata ad 2 poll, lata 5-loba pallide lilacina, lobis ovato- 
rotundatis obtusis pilis longis flaccidis ciliatis, filamentis filiformibus 
basi in laminam |-orbicularem dense papilloso-ciliatam abrupte dilatatis, 
antheris elongatis liberis, stigmatibus 3 linearibns, capsules valvis 
basilaribus, seminibus anguste alatis. 

C mirabilis, Alboff in Bull. Herb. Boiss. vol. iii. (1895) p. 228, t. 3. Gartenji. 
1898 vol. xlvii. p. 192, fig. 57. Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. ii. p. 616; 1898, 
vol i'i. p. 33, fig. 10, p. 108 ; 1899, vol. ii. p. 275, figs. 92, 93. Correvron in 
Bev. Sortie. 1895, p. 677. ^__ 

The very remarkable Campanula here figured was dis- 
covered by Mr. N. Alboff on limestone rocks in the 
Western Caucasus. The precise habitat which its dis- 
coverer gives for it is Arbika-Akhegoesh, in the province 
of Abkasia, at an elevation of two thousand one hundred 
feet. Though belonging to the same sub-division of the 
genus in Boissier's arrangement of the Oriental species to 
which G. alliarisefolia, Willd. {macrophylla, Sims, Bot. 
Mag. tab. 912), and G. collina, Bieb. (t. 927) both 
Caucasian species belong, it differs from them, and all 
others of the genus, in the singular, rather low conical form 
of the whole plant, its dense ramification, and the profusion 
of large flowers which almost hide the stem, branches, and 
leaves. 

The Eoyal Gardens, Kew, are indebted to their old 
correspondent, the distinguished horticulturist, Mr. Max 
Leichtlin, of Baden Baden, for the plant of G. mirabilis 
here figured, which flowered, when two years old, under a 

May IsT, 1900. 



sunny wall in the open air. It lias hence proved to be a 
biennial under cultivation, though said to be annual by its 
discoverer. 

Descr. — Whole plant forming a low, broad cone of 
crowded branches, leaves, and flowers, a foot or more in 
diameter at the base. Root fusiform. Lower leaves four to 
six inches long, spathulately obovate, obtuse, narrowed into 
abroad winged petiole, irregularly coarsely crenate-toothed, 
glabrous, except the minutely spinulosely ciliate margins ; 
upper leaves one to two inches long, sessile, ovate-cordate, 
crenate. Floiuers two or more, erect, shortly stoutly 
pedicelled on the short spreading branches. Galyx-tuhe 
turbinate ; lobes lanceolate, half an inch long, and together 
with the deflexed, ovate, acute appendages spinulosely 
cihate. Corolla broadly campanulate, two inches broad 
across the mouth, pale lilac ; lobes orbicular-ovate, margins 
and back sparsely ciliate with long hairs. Filaments 
slender, suddenly dilated at the base into a very broad, 
papillosely ciliate lamina ; anthers narrowly linear, free. 
Stigmas three, linear, recurved. — /. D. E. 



Fig. 1 , portion of leaf, showing the Bpinulose margin ; 2, stamen: — Both 
enlarged. 



715 





''^m& 



MS.ae.i,j NPiirf-a-iiii 



A C-'X-orLcLoT'L 




Tab. 7715. 

LILIUM SUTOHUEKSE. 
Native of China. 

Nat. Old. LiLiACE^, — Tribe Tolife^. 
Genns LiLiuM, Linn.; {Benth, Sc Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 816.) 



LiLiUM (Martagon) sufchuense; bulbo mediocri, sqnamia appressis, canle 1^- 
2 ped. alto erecto gracili folioso luride viridx rufo-brnnneo marmoi-ato 
plurifloro basi nudo, foliis numercsis sparsis 3-5-pollicaribus an^uste 
linearibus acuminatis ^-J poll, latispatenti-recurvissuperioribusgradatim 
brevioribus supra saturate viridibus medio canalicalatis subtus palli- 
dioribus carinatis, axillis ebnlbiieris, pedicellis robustis 3-4 poll, longis 
horizontalibus cauli concoloiibus folio parvo recurvo medium versua 
instractis, floribns peadulis 3-polI. diam., perianthii flavo-miniati medio 
rubro punctati basi campanulati segmentis ovato-lanceolatis obtusia 
revolntis expanses 3-poll. lougia dorso supra medium crasse carinatis 
intus versus basin multinerviis, nervis validis flexuosis apinulis carnosis 
obsitis, sulco nectarifero bilamellato lamellis saperne rugnlosis inferne 
fimbriatis, filamentis divergentibua aurantiacis, antheris perianthio fere 
concoloribua, stylo ovario lineari-oblongo triple 4-plo longiore, stigmate 
parvo obscure trilobo. 

L, sntcbuense, Franrh. in Journ. de Bofaniqiie, vol. vi. (1892) p. 318, Mottei 
in Bev. Horticofe, v;d, Ixxi. (1899) p. 4.76, tig. 201. 

L. tentiifolium, Fisch. var. punctatum, Bur. S,- Franch. in Herh. Mus. Paris, 
ex Franch. I.e. 

Hong pee ho, nom. Sin. 



The nearest and indeed very near ally of Lilium sufchu- 
enm is L. terndfolium, Fisch., a native of Central Asia, 
from the Altai to Amur-land and N. China, which differs 
in its smaller size, slender stem, narrower leaves, unspotted 
perianth, and shorter style. 

L , sutchu ens e w'ds raised from seed sent by the Abbe 
Farges to Mr. Maurice Vilmorin, of Paris, from Eastern 
Szechuen, where it has also been collected by Prince 
Henri of Orleans. It is one of the twenty-four species 
of Chinese and Tibetan Lilies enumerated by Franchet 
in the " Journal de Botanique " (I.e. p. 804). 

The plant here figured was received by the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, from Messrs. Vilmorin & Co. in 1897. It 
flowered .in an open border in July, 1899. 

Descr. — Bulb about an inch in diameter; scales narrow, 
fleshy, appre.ssed. Ste.m a foot and a half to two feet 

May 1st, 1900. 



high, erect, slender, dark green mottled with brown, leafy 
except towards the base. Leaves many, scattered, de- 
creasing upward in size, three to five inches long, by one- 
sixth to one-fourth of an inch broad, spreading and 
recurved, narrowly linear, acuminate, deep green above, 
channelled from the base to the middle, paler, and strongly 
keeled beneath, axils not bulbiferous. Floicers two to four, 
pendulous ; pedicels long, stout, horizontal, three to four 
inches long, of the same colour as the stem, and carrying 
a short, revolute leaf about the middle. Perianth about 
three inches in diameter ; segments three inches long, 
two-thirds to three-fourths of an inch broad about the 
middle, conniving in a short, campanulate tube, then 
spreading and revolute, bright orange-scarlet, with small 
black spots about the middle, oblong-lanceolate, obtuse, 
stoutly keeled dorsally for half their length, ventrally fur- 
nished below the middle with many flexuous, stout nerves 
bearing fleshy spinules; nectarial fossa linear, margins 
produced into fleshy ridges, which are crenulate in their 
upper part, and hairy in their lower. Filaments orange- 
yellow, diverging ; anthers orange-yellow. Stigmas small, 
obscurely three-lobed. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, base of perianth-sesfraent, inner surface ; 2, anther ; 3, ovary ; 
4, top of style and stigma : — All enlarged ; 5, reduced view of whole plant. 



77ii:. 




'&\ceiitBrooks^ay '■- 



Tab. 7716. 
rubus kbflexus. 
Native of China. 

Nat. OrJ. Rosacea. — Tribe EubevE. 
Genus Bubus, Linn.; Benih. & SooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 616.) 



EiUBus refiexus; eglandulosus, caule scandente, ramis robustis sparsim acule- 
atis unaoum petiolis foliis subtas et inflorescentia cianamomeo-villosis, 
aculeia compresaia rectia v. unciuatis, foliis amplis 3-8 poll, longis 
eimplicibus e basi cordato-orbicularibus ovatis v. oblongo-ovatia obtusis 
integris v. 3-5-lobati8, lobis latis terrainali elongate ovato v. oblongo 
marginibas denticulatis, supra saturate viridibus nervis impreasis, aubtiis 
valide 3-nerviis, nervis primariis viridibus nervulis prominulis reticu- 
latis, petiolo robusto, stipulia pectinatis, racemis parvis axillaribus 
decurvis densifloris, bracteis serratis, floribus breviter pedicellatis ^-f 
poll, latie, calycis dense villosi lobis late ovatis grosse serratis intua 
sericeis fructu erectis, petalis parvis albis, stamioibus brevibns, anlheris 
minutis rufescentibus, stylis capillaribus filamentis multotiea longioribus, 
fructu paryo globoso, receptaculo villoso, carpellis maturis rubria pur- 
pureis v. nigris, putamine rugose. 

E,. reflexus, JKer in Bot. Beg. t. 461 {non R. rugosas, /9. reflexus, Wall. Cat. 
sub n. 748). DC Prodr. vol. ii. p. 566. . Hook, et Am., Bot. Beech. Voy. 
p. 184. Benth. Fl. Hongk. p. 104. Seem. Bot. Voy. Herald, p. 376. 
Maxim, in Mel. Biol. vol. viii. p. 378. Kunze, Methodik, p. 63, Forbes 
4" Hemsl, in Journ, Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. (1886-8) p. 236. 



Bubus reflexus belongs to a group of tropical Asiatic 
Brambles that are extremely difficult to distinguish, of 
which B. moluccmius, L. (B. moluccus lafifolius, Rumph. 
Herb. Amboin. vol. v. t. 47, f. 2) is the type. Benthara 
(Fl. Hongk. I.e.) regards it (reflexus) as the same as 
B. rugosus, Sm., a widely distributed species from the 
Himalayas to the Malayan Islands, in doing which he 
follows Wallich, who refers reflexus as a var. /S. to rugosus. 
After some remarks on variation in the inflorescence and 
bracts of B. rugosus, Bentham concludes with, " if united 
the B. rugosus, that is the older name; unless indeed the 
whole be considered as varieties of the Linnean B. moluc- 
canus'' This last name is the one I adopted in the " Flora 
of British India " (ii. p. 330), where the most prominent 
differential characters of the varieties are indicated. It is 
impossible in this work to enter further into the subject 
than to point out that B, reflexus is perhaps the most 

Mat 1st, 1900. 



distinct form of the group, best distinguished bj the 
elongated mid-lobe of the leaf, combined with the very much 
decurved axillary panicles and densely villous calyx. It is 
confined to China, where it was first collected by Sir G. 
Staunton at Kwang-tung during Lord Macartney's Em- 
bassy in 1816. Besides being common in Hong Kong 
it inhabits Lo-fan-Shan, Hainan, and. the North river. 

According to Ker (Bot. Reg. I.e.) B. refiexus was in 
cultivation in Lee's Nursery, Hammersmith, in 1820, in 
which year it flowered in Mr. Kent's of Clapton. The 
drawing here given is from a plant clothing a pillar twenty 
feet high, in the Mexican wing of the Temperate House 
of the Royal Gardens. It was received in 1886 from 
the Royal Botanic Garden of Calcutta. It flowers in 
August, but does not ripen fruit. 

Descr. — A tall, stout climber ; branches, petioles, leaves 
beneath, and inflorescence covered with a cinnamon- 
brown villous pubescence. Prickles few, scattered, straight 
or curved. Leaves three to eight inches long, broadly 
ovate or ovate-oblong from a cordate base, obtuse, entire 
or three to fivelobed, with the terminal lobe elongated, 
margins toothed, palmately three- to five-nerved at the 
base, nerves sunk above, very prominent beneath ; stipules 
pectinate. Floivers one half to three-fourths of an inch 
broad, crowded in small, decurved panicles, very shortly 
pedicelled. Bracts and sepals toothed. Petals white or 
pink. Styles fihform, much longer than the stamens. 
Fruit small, globose, red-purple or black. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, portion of stem and prickles ; 2, the same with baao of petiole 
and stipuli'x; 3. flowers and bvacta ; 4, carpel: — All enlarged. 



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Tab. 7717. 
CON^VOLVULUS maceostegius. 

Native of Lower California. 



Nat. Ord. CoNVOLVULACEai. — Tribe CoNVOi.vuLEiB. 
Genus Convolvulus, Linn.; {Benth. & Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 874.) 



Convolvulus macrostegius ; sufPrutescens, fere glaberrimus, canle graclli 
tereti fusco, ramulia annotinis elongatis volnbilibus viridibns, foliis lon^o 
petiolatis late ovato- v. deltoideo-cordatia 4-5 poll, latis obtuse acutia 
V. acnminatis margine recurvia undulatis grosse crenatis y. basin versna 
fere lobulatis sinu late v. angusto rotundato, basi palmatinerviis, nervis 
lateralibus paucis, nervuiis laxe reticulatis, petiolis gracilibns 3-5-poll. 
longis, peduncalis axillaribus 6-10-poUicaribu8 1-3-floris infra apicem 
bibracteatam pubescentibus, bracteis orbicularibus concavis apiculatis 
membranaceis f poll, longis, sepalis |-§ poll, longis oblongis trnncatia 
apice retusis costa valida in mucronem subulatum producta, corollsa 
albse roseo tinctse tubo late infundibulari, limbo 3-poll. diam. explanato, 
ovario strigilloao, stigmatibus linearibus teretibua obtusis. 

C macrostegius, Oreene in Bull. Calif. Acad. vol. i. (1885) p. 208. A. Gray 
Synoft. Fl. N. Am,, vol. ii. part i. p. 435. 

C. occidentalis, S. Wats, in Proc. Am. Acad. vol. xi. (1876) pp. 89, 118; Bot. 
Calif, vol. i. p. 5'6'd parliTn (non A. Gray). 



There are very few species of Convolvulus indigenons 
in North America, as compared with Europe and Western 
Asia, — a dozen in all, including G. sejnum, L. and G. 
Soldanella, L., which are common to the Old World. 
Except G. arve'rins, L., no species native of Europe has been 
naturalized in N. America, and that very sparingly. Seven 
species are Californian, all of them, except G. Soldanclhi, 
confined to the west of the Eocky Mountains. Two of 
these, G. occidentalism A. Gray, and G. macrostegius, Greene, 
are closely allied to G. sepium, differing from it in the 
shape of the leaves, and conspicuously in their very long 
petioles and pedicels. G. macrostegius is the larger and 
handsomer of the two ; it is indeed one of the finest species 
of the genus, and being quite hardy, and flowering 
copiously for many weeks continuously, it has all the 
qualities requisite for becoming a great favourite. It 
appears to be a rare plant in California, the only hitherto 
recorded localities for it being San Clemeate Island, one 

June 1st, 1900, 



of a group of islets off the coast of California, near 
Los Angeles, in lat. 33°-34° N., and Guadalupe Island, 
upwards of two hundred and fifty miles further south, and 
one hundred and fifty from the coast of Lower California. 

A plant of G. macrostegius was, in 1896, presented by 
W. E. Gumbleton, Esq., of Belgrove, Queenstown, to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, where, being planted against a wall 
in the Herbaceous ground, it flowers freely throughout the 
summer months. 

Descr. — A slender, climbing, glabrous undershrub, with 
brown stem, and long, twining, pale green, annual 
branches. Leaves very long-petioled, four to five inches 
long and broad, ovate or deltoidly cordate, with a deep 
rounded sinus at the base, obtusely acute or acuminate, 
margins recurved, undulate and coarsely crenate, the basal 
lobes sometimes lobulate, light green above, paler beneath, 
palmatinerved at the base, lateral nerves three to five 
pairs, nervules loosely reticulate ; petiole up to five inches 
long, very slender. Feduncle up to ten inches long, slender, 
terete, puberulous upward, bearing at the top a pair of 
large, hemispheric., membranous, green bracts, which 
enclose one to three sub-sessile flowers. Gahjx-segments 
one-half to two-thirds of an inch long, narrowly oblong, 
truncate, retuse, cuspidate. Corolla white, tinged with 
pink ; tube broadly funnel-shaped ; limb two and a half to 
three inches in diameter. Ovary hispidly hairy. Stigmas 
linear, terete, obtuse. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, calyx, style, and stigma s ; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, ovary : — All enlarged- 



1718 




AfincentBi-oakE.Day &. Son Lt^lDip 



X ReevB iCoLondon 



Tab. 7718 

MAMILLAEIA vivipaea. 

Native of the HocJcy Mountains. 

Nat. Ord. CACTEiE. — Tribe Eciiinocactea!. 
Genus Mamillaria, Hmv.j (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. j). 817.) 



Mamillaeia (Coryphantha) vivipara; caule brevi depresso-globoso ovoideo v. 
ovoideo-oblongo simplici v. cajsjiitoso luride viridi, tuberculis ad | poll, 
longis laxis oblongo-ovoideis teretibus v. leviter sulcatia, aculeis 12-36 
gracilibus \-% poll, longis rectis rigidis exterioribus pateutiesime radianti- 
baa albis v. pnrpureo-fuscis, centralibus 3-12 robustioribus, floribus sub- 
terminalibus Ij poll, diam., sepalis linearibua oblanceolatisve fuscia 
fimbriatip, petalis roseis lineari-oblanceolatis acuminatis margine fim- 
briatis apice setuliferia, stigmatibus numerosia anguste lineraribus, baccia 
sublateralibua ovoideis viridibus, seminibus obovatis scrobicnlatis fulvis. 

M. vivipara, Haw. Syn. PI. Succ. Suppl. p. 72. DC. Prodr. vol. iii. p. 459, 
Torr. ^ Gr. Fl. N. Am. vol. i. p. 554. Leavemo. in Am. Journ. Sc. ser. 1, 
vol. xlix. (1845) p. 130. Engelm. in Gray, PL Fendl. p. 49 ; PI. Lind/i. p. 197 ; 
PI. Upper Miss. p. 192; Si/n. Oact. U. St. p. 269; Cact. Mex. Bound. 
p. 15, t. 74, f. 3-5 (aem.) ; in Trans. Acad. St. Louis, vol. ii. p. 197; iu 
S. Wats. PL Wheeler, p. 9 ; in King's Hep. vol. v. p. 115; Rayd. liep. 
1871, p. 484; Simps. Rep. p. 436. Salm. Cact. Hort. Dyck. p. 156. 
Lab. Monogr. Cact. p. 79. Porter Sf Coult. Fl. Colorad. p. 48 ; Coulter, 
Man. Bot. Rochy Mts. p. 109. F"6rst Handb. Cact. Ed. ii. p. 302. LTirscht. 
in Sckum. Gesamfb. Kakt. p. 547. Bot. Works, Engelm. p. 113, &c. 

M. arizonica, Engelm. in S. Wats. PI. Wheeler, p, 9. 

K. missouriensia, Scheer, in Seem. Bot. Voy. Herald, p. 287 {nan Sweet). 

Cactus viviparuB, Nutt. Gen. vol. i. p. 295. Poir Encycl. Suppl. vol. v. 
p. 587. Torr. in Ann. Lye. N. York, vol. ii. (1828) p. 202. 



I have some difficulty in reconciling the characters of the 
plant here figured with the descriptions of M. vivipara 
given by Engelmann in the numerous American railway 
and other reports in which lie has alluded to it. I gather 
from these, however, that the species is a very variable 
one in size, form, and especially in the number and dis- 
position of the spines, some or all of which are described 
by him as being white, others purple, or mottled with 
purple ; all are dark coloured in the specimen here figured. 
Coulter, in the " Rocky Mountain Flora " also describes 
the spines as variously coloured; "five to eight reddish- 
brown, surrounded by fifteen to twenty greyish ones in a 
single series." Both authors say that the flowers are 
pnrple, whereas in our plant they are distinctly rose-red. 
June 1st, 1900. 



M. vivipam has a wide distribution on the plains and 
the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains, from the 
Missouri River in Dakota, to Texas, S. Utah, and Arizona. 
The specimen figured was purchased for the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, from Mr. D. M. Andrews, IS'urseryman, of 
Boulder, CaHfornia. It has proved to be so far hardy 
as to have, along with M. Nuttallii, Engelm., flowered in 
July, in the open air, between the buttresses of the 
Palm House, after having been exposed to the winter of 
1898-99. 

^Bescr. — (Of the specimen figured.) SteTn four inches 
high, and. three in diameter, solitary, ovoid, lurid 
green. Tubercles about an inch long, sub-erect, ovoid- 
oblong, terete, smooth. Spines twelve to thirty-six, one- 
half to three-quarters of an inch long, slender, stif¥, outer 
radiating more or less horizontally, a few central, stouter, 
more erect, all purplish-brown. Floiuers towards the top 
of the plant, several opening together, about an inch and 
a half in diameter. ^epaZs rather short, linear-oblong, or 
oblanceolate acute, pale brown, recurved, margins fim- 
briate. Petals much longer, narrowly oblanceolate, acumi- 
nate, with a minute, terminal bristle, margins fimbriate. 
Anthers yellow. Stigmas about thirteen, narrowly linear. 

Fig. 1, group of spines ; 2, petal ; 3, style and stigmas :—All enlarged. 




-mtA^mm^-. 



Vincent,Braoks,Day 



Tab. 7719. 
CRYPTOCOEYNB Geiffithii. 

Native of the Malayan Peninsula. 

Nat. Ord. Aeoide^. — Tribe Aeinejs. 
Genns Crtptocortne, Fisch. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 963.) 



Cbttocortne Chifflthii ; stoloniferum, foliis ad 3 poll, longis anbcamosis 
ovate- V. orbiculari-obiongis obtusis basi rotundatis v. cordatis marginibus 
subundulatis supra laete viridibas rubro-striolatis anbtus pallidioribus 
creberrime striolatis, nervis utrinque costge validaa ad 6-8 gracillitniB 
arcuatis, petiole 6-8-pollicari basi anguste vaginante, spathae breviter 
pedunculatse tube 3-4-pollicari albo basi oblongo tumido dein oylin- 
draceo ad ^ poll. diam. superne sensim ampliato in limbum recnrvum 
1-1^ pollicarem lanceolatum caudato-acaminatum intus papillosum rufo- 
brannenm dilatato, inilorescentia g^-pollicari, mascula gracile stipitata 
oblonga membrana operculiformi velata, appendice parvo clavato, in fi. 
fern, ovariis 8 connatis glandalosis pistillodia cingentibns, stigmatibns 
sesailibus reniformibus. 

C. Griffitbii, Schott, Svn, Aroid. p. 1 ; Prodr. Syat. Aroid. p. 14 ; in Bonplandia, 
1857, p. 220. JEngler, in DC. Monogr. Phanerog. vol ii. p. 631. 
JV^.^. Br. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. (1880) p. 244. HooJc. f. Fi. 
Brit. Ind. vol. vi. p. 493. 

Cryptocoryne, sp., Griff. Notul. vol. iii. p. 139; Ic. PI. Asiat. t. 173, fig. 3 
(ovula). 

Though described by Griffith (without a specific name) as 
having only six ovaries, I think that the plant here figured 
is certainly that to which Schott gave the name Griffithii. 
The genus consists of six-and-twenty described species, all 
East Indian or Malayan ; of which one alone has been pre- 
viously figured in this work (Arumspirale, Retz.,tab. 2220). 
It is remarkable for the curious hood in the interior of 
the tube of the spathe, which envelops the male inflores- 
cence, and is, no doubt, concerned in the operation of 
pollinization. Mr. Motley, in a MS. description of a 
closely allied Bornean species (cited by Mr. Brown in 
Journ. Linn. Soc, 1. c), describes the tube of the spathe 
as depending for length on the depth of the water in which 
the plant grows, thus performing the ofiice of the peduncle 
in other water-plants ; and observes that after the pollen 
is shed the inflated portion of the tube generally contains 
half a dozen living insects, attracted probably by the slight 
carrion smell of the limb of the spathe. 
June 1st, 1900. 



C. OriffifMi was discovered in fresh-water pools in 
Malacca by Dr. Griffith. In 1898 Mr. H. N. Eidley sent a 
plant of it, by favour of Mr. Glasgow, from the Botanical 
Gardens of Singapore to the Royal Gardens, Kew, where 
it flowered in a warm-water tank in September, 1899. 

Descr, — Stemless ; base emitting stout, simple roots and 
stolons. Leaves long-petioled, about three inches long, 
ovate, or orbicular- oblong, obtuse, rather fleshy, base 
rounded or cordate, dark green above, and striolate with 
minute wavy-red lines, which are more copious on the 
paler under-surface, margins waved ; midrib stout ; nerves 
six to eight pairs, very slender, arching ; petiole six to 
eight inches long, greenish-brown, narrowly sheathing at 
the base. Peduncle short, stout, red-brown. Spathe with 
an oblong basal swelling about half an inch long, suddenly 
narrowed above it into a white membranous tube three 
inches long, which dilates upwards into a lanceolate 
caudate-acuminate recurved limb an inch and a half long, 
purple and papillose within. Inflorescence in the tumid 
base of the spathe ; male infl. an oblong stipitate head of 
crowded vertical anthers, terminated by a minute appendage, 
and enclosed in a membranous calyptra which is adnate 
to the wall of the spathe ; female infl. a whorl of about 
eight, confluent, sessile, glandular ovaries, with large reni- 
form stigmas, surrounding many crowded pistillodes. — 



Fig. 1, interior of base of spathe with inflorescences ; 2, male infl. ; 3 and 
4, anthers ; 5, fern. infl. ; 6, vertical section of an ovary, with ovules : — All 
enlarged. 



IT' 




MSdeUNPitdWitfi 



Vinc.?-i-,H;-ooks,Day ASorili^iET 



Tab. 7720. 
DIPLADENIA eximia. 
Native of Brasil. 

Nat. Ord. Apocynace^. — Tribe Echitide^, 
Genus DiPLADENiA, A.BC. {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 726.) 



DiPirADENiA (Eiidipladenia) eximia; caule gracili volnbili roseo minute 
puberulo, foliis parvis 1-1 g^ poll, longis breviter petiolatis late ovatia 
ovalibuB V. fere orbiculatis abrupte obtuse acuminatis v. caspidatis papy- 
raceis basi rotundatis glaberrimis supra leete viridibus snbtus pallidis, 
nervis utrinque 8-10 divaricatis snbtus prominulis, petiolis vix ^ poll, 
longis, paribus basi glandulis interpetioU; ribus erectis snbulatis utrinque 
4-6 connexis, oymis pseudaxillaribus longiuacnle pedunculatis, pedunculo 
1-2 poll, longo torto viridi, bracteis pedicelUs brevioribus subulatis deci- 
duis sangnineis, calj'cis segmentis parvia subulato-lanceolatis sanguineis 
intua basi glandulis snbulatia instrnctis, corollae tubofere 2-pollicari infra 
medium cylindraceo dein anguste inf undibulari intus medio infra staminnm 
insertionem pilis deflexis onusto, limbi 2|— 3 poll. diam. laete roaei lobig 
explanatis rotundatis obtuse apiculatis, staminibus medio tubo insertia, 
antheris linearibua, connectivo in laminam ovato-oblongam producto, disci 
glandula solitaria oblonga, ovariis glaberrimis, stigmate pentagono. 
D. eximia, Hemsl. in Gard. Chron. 1893, vol ii. p. 120. 



The beautiful plant here figured was imported by Messrs. 
F. Sander & Co., in 1889 or 1890, but from what country 
is rather uncertain. In answer to my request for informa- 
tion on this point, they promptly informed me that they 
believe it came from the Lselia pnrpurata country, with 
plants of that Orchid, of which the habitat is known to be 
the Province of Santa Catarina in South Brasil. It is 
a stove plant, flowering freely in the summer months. 

Descr. — A very slender, twining, nearly glabrous climber. 
Stem flexuous, rose-red, minutely puberulous. Leaves in 
distant pairs, very shortly petioled, an inch to an inch and 
a half long, from broadly ovate to elHptic or nearly orbi- 
cular, abruptly obtusely cuspidate, quite glabrous, bright 
green above, pale beneath, base rounded ; nerves six to 
eight pairs, widely spreading, together with tlie midrib 
prominent beneath ; petioles with four to five interpetiolar, 
subulate, erect glands on each side of the stem. Cymes 
axillary, six- to eight-flowered ] peduncle one to two inches 
June 1st, 1900. 



long, tortuous, green ; bracts very small, subulate, bright 
red, shorter than the stout pedicels. Calyx small, segments 
erect, subulate-lanceolate, acuminate, bright red, furnished 
at the base within with about five subulate minute fleshy- 
glands. GoroUa-tuhe nearly two inches long, cylindric 
below the middle, dilated and narrowly funnel-shaped above 
it, furnished within below the middle with copious deflexed 
hairs ; limb two and a half to three inches in diameter, 
bright rose-coloured; lobes orbicular, obtusely cuspidate. 
Stamens inserted at the top of the cylindric part of the 
corolla-tube; filaments very short, flat; anthers linear, 
connective produced in an oblong-ovate terminal claw. 
Disk a solitary oblong gland. Ovary glabrous, stigma 
five- angled — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, portion of steni, with bases of petioles and interpetiolar glands ; 
2, portion of calyx witb the gland of the disk and two carpels; 3, portion of 
corolla- tube and stamens ; 4, three stamens ; 5, top of style and stigma : — All 
enlarged. 



77' 




M-Sdfil^JU.'FitAiitK 



■WncentBrooVEjJsyiSon. Lt^Si? 



LRjeevo (S. C.Lonion 



Tab. 7721. 

HELENIUM TENUIFOLIUM. 
Native of the Eastern TJ. States. 

Nat. Ord. Gomfosite^. — Tribe Helenie^e. 
Genus Helenitjm, Linn. ; {Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 413.) 



Helenium; (Euhelenium) tenuifolium ; herba annua, erecta, fastigiatim ramosa, 
glaberrima, foKosa, mnltidora, foliis alternis et ternatim fasciculatis 
sessilibns anguste linearibua l5-2-pollicaribns vix j^ poll, latis acuminatis, 
pedunculis eloogatis gracillimis, capitulis 1-lg^ pull, diam., involucri 
bracteis oblongo-lanceolatis, receptaculo angusto tamido, fl. radii nuinero- 
sia tubo brevi ligula cuneiformi 3-loba aureadeHexa baai dorso pubescente, 
fl. disci in capitulum globosumaureum congestis, corolla tubulosa breviter 
5-loba pubescente, antheris liaearibus inclasia connectivo unguiformi 
terminatis, acbEeniis obconicis hirsutis, pappi squamis a,<i 6 Jichajaio 
seqnilongis orbiculatis v. late ovatig seta rigida elongata terminatis. 

H. tenuifolium, Nutt. in Joum. Acad. Philad. vol. vii. (1834) p. QQ. Hook. 
Gomp. Bot. Mag. vol. i. p. 98. Torr & Gr. FL N. Am. vol. ii. p. 385. 
Chapman, Fl. S. U. States, p. 239. Meehan Nat. Fl. U. States, vol. ii. 
p. 37, t. 10. A. Gray, Synopt. Fl. N. Am. i. 2, p. 347. 



Selenium tenuifolium is described bj Gray as a very 
common plant in river bottoms and on roadsides, from 
Arkansas to Mississippi, Florida, and Texas, being a 
naturalized weed throughout the Southern Atlantic States. 
A variety, hadium^ A. Gray, from Texas, has dull, purplish- 
brown disk-flowers. Under the name of Sneezei.vort it is 
reported to be poisonous to men and cattle, and to give a 
bitter taste to milk. Horses will not touch it unless 
pressed by hunger. It has no effect on sheep. It has 
been long cultivated in the Royal Gardens, Kew, where its 
profuse golden flowers renders it very conspicuous in 
autumn. 

Descr. — An erect, slender, fastigiately branched, copiously 
flowering, leafy, glabrous annual ; branches erect, sub- 
corymbosely fascicled. Leaves sub-erect and spreading, one 
and a half to two inches long, by about one-twelfth of an 
inch broad, sessile, usually fascicled in threes, very narrowly 
linear, acuminate, bright green. Peduncles terminal, very 
slender, erect, naked. Heads an inch to an inch and a 
half in diameter. Involucral bracts oblong-lanceolate. Be- 

JUNE 1st, \ 900. 



ceptacle narrow, tumid. Bay-florets twelve to fifteen, 
spreading and deflexed, golden-yellow ; tuoe very short, 
limb cuneiform, three-lobed, dorsally hairy towards the 
base; style short, arms linear, recurved. Dislc-fl^orets 
forming a globose or hemispheric golden-yellow head ; 
corolla tubular, shortly obtusely five-lobed, papillosely 
hairy ; anthers included, linear, connective unguiform ; 
style exaerted, arms as in the ray -florets. Achenes of ray 
and disk-florets short, obconic, hirsute, crowned with five 
or six, broadly ovate or orbicular, erect pappus scales, each 
terminated by a rigid bristle as long as itself. — J, B. H. 



Fig. 1, bract of involucre ; 2, base of ray-floret ; 3, disk-floret ; 4, anthers ; 
5, style-brancliee ; 6, achene ; 7, scale of pappas : — All enlarged. 



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7722 




MS,deVJ"N Filch UUi 



I. Reeve Al O? Loivd-OTx 



Voneent Bro o^is D ay &. Son Lt* imp 

ilHii 



Tab, 7722. 

LILIUM Brownii, var. leuoanthum. 

Native of China. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^.— Tribe TuMPBiS. 
Genns Lilittm, Lmn.\ {Benth. & Soohf. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 816.) . 



LiLiTJM (Ealirion) Brownii; bnlbo globoao, sqtiamis arrte adpressis oblrmgia 
carnosis all>idis, caule 3-6-pedali rol'usto viridi folioso toliia (snpremis 
Bubverticillatis exceptis) altemia c^nfertis patenti-recarvis 8nhaequilona;is 
3-5 poll, longis Ij-lJ latia ovato-lanceolatis acominatis S-S-neryiis bnai 
constrictis t^upra saturate viridibus sobtns pallidis alte S-S-costatis axillis 
bnlbiferis Hupremis brevionbns et Utioribus, floribas in txillis supremis 
paucis maximiH pendulis, pedicellis robiistis arcuatis, perianthii 6-7- 
p Uioaris segmentis infra medium in tnbum cylindricnm alte et late 
6-co8tatum dein angnste int'undibnlare diepositis dorso branneis apicibus 
dilatatis apice rotundatis revolutis 2-2| poll, latis albis, nectarii margini- 
bus papilloso-pubescentibus, Blamentia robustis vx declinatis styloque 
robusto inferne papillosis, antheria |-f poll, longis flavo-bmaneis, atjlo 
apice capitato costia stigmatosis decnrretiti''>U8. 

L. Brownii, OAeldo/f, Gat. (cum descript.) ex Bev. Snrtie. Ser. II. vol. ii. 
(184;{-44) p. 495. F. & E. Brown ex Spae in Ann. Soc. Roy. d'Agric. et de 
Bot. Gand, vol. i. (1845) p. 437, t. 41 ; Mem. Lis, p. 11. Miellez in Fl. 
des Serves, vol. i. (1845) p. 110, cum tab. col. 

L. Browni, Franch. in Morot, Journ. Bot. Paris, vol. vi. (1892) p. 312. Elwe$, 
Monog. Lil. t. viii. {excl. syn. L.japonicum). 

L. japonicutn, Bury, Select. Hevandr. PL t. 2. 

L. japonici forma, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. (1874) p. 230. 

L. longifloram, Franch. PI. David, pars I. p. 307 {non Thunb.) 

L. odorum, Planch, in Fl. des Serres. tt. 876-7. 

L. japonicnm, var. Qolchesteri, Van Hautte in Fl. des Serres, t. 2193-4. 

Var. LETJCANTHUM, Baker in Oard. Ohron. 1894, pt. 2, p. 180. The Garden, 
1895, p. 97, cum ic. ; foliis latioribaa, perianthii segmentis albidia dorso 
coata valida viridi percursis. 



Though described as a distinct species nearly sixty years 
ago, it is only comparatively recently that Lilium Brownii 
has become well known to botanists and horticulturistfs. 
This is owing to its having been supposed to be a native of 
Japan, and hence confounded with L. japonicnm ^ tab. 1591, 
and L. longiflorum, Thunb. According to Spae's mono- 
graph of Lilium, cited above, it was obtained from England 
by Mr. Miellez, of Liege, in 1837 ; and at about the same 
time the Messrs. Brown, of Windsor, in writing to Mr. 
Schurmans-Steckhoven, Director of the Botanical Gardens 
of Leyden, mention it as a new Lily, with flowers as large 
July 1st, 1900. 



as those of L. jajponicmn^ but with a dark band on the 
back of the petals. That it was known at an earlier date 
in England is proved by its being figured in Bury's 
magnificent folio on Hexandrian plants, which was published 
in the years 1832-1834, where it is named L. japonicum, 
with Japan as its native country. 

Var. leucanthum was first described by Mr. Baker in the 
Gardener'' s Chronicle, from a plant the bulb of which was 
sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by Dr. Henry in 1889, 
•along with those of L. Henryi (tab. 7177) from Ichang, 
in the province of Hupeh. The specimen here figured was 
raised from seeds sent also by Dr, Henry, in 1897. It 
flowered in August, 1899. 

Another variety of L. Broivnii, called viridulum, is de- 
scribed by Mr. Baker in tlie Gardener's Chronicle (1885, vol. 
ii. p. 134) as having only a faint dash of claret-brown on 
the perianth-segments, and is recorded as a native of Japan. 

Descr. — Var. leucanthum. Bulb globose, white, four 
inches in diameter; scales appressed, oblong, fleshy. Ste^n 
three to six feet high, robust, green, leafy from the base 
upwards. Leaves very many, crowded, spreading and 
recurved, sessile, alternate, and uniform in size, except 
the terminal, which, are whorled, shorter and broader, 
ovate-lanceolate, three to five inches long by one and a 
quarter to one and a balf broad, dark green, with about 
five deeply impressed parallel nerves above, which are 
strongly raised beneath, axils bulbilliferous ; bulbils the 
size of a pea, dark brown and green. Blowers two or 
more in the axils of the uppermost whorled leaves, stoutly 
pedicelled ; pedicels green, decurved, shorter than the 
flowers. Perianth five to seven inches long, very narrowly 
funnel-shaped ; segments nearly white, each with a stout, 
broad, green dorsal midrib, dilating into a rounded revo- 
lute white limb, two to two and half a inches broad. 
Nectary linear, margins papillosely pubescent. Filaments 
very stout, sub-declinate, green ; anthers half an inch 
long or more, linear-oblong, yellow-brown. Style very 
stout, green, tip capitate, six-lobed ; stigmas decurrent on 
the lobes.—/. I). H. 



Fig. L portion of stem with bnlbils of vat. size; 2, antlier ; 3, head of style 
and stagmas, both enlarged ; 4, greatly reduced view of whole plant. 



it^Jl 







IfincentBrookspjay it SonLt^inip 



Tab. 7723. 

HESPERALOE ¥UcciEroLiA. 

Native of Texas. 

Nat. Oi-d. LiLiACEiB. — Tribe Drac^xe^. 
Genus HESPEEAiaE, Engelm.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 778.) 



Hesperaloe yuccsefolia ; glaberrima, caudice elongato interdum ramoso, 
foliis confertis erecto-patentibus et recurvis S-pedalibus elonj^ato-lineari- 
Buhulatis crasse coriaceis ]jEte viridibus supra concaris sabtas rotandatts 
marginibas albis fiiameatoais, scapo 6-pedali roseo, inflorescentia pedali- 
angusta paniculata rhachi rarnis pedicellisque strictis roseis, floribus in 
fascicules bracteatos secus rbachim dispositis, bracteis herbaceis late ovatia 
acuminatia viridibus margimbus late membranaceis albia v. roseia, 
bracteolis minntis, pedicellis ^-l-poU. longia, floribus suberectis cum pedi- 
cello articulatis, p rianthto pollicari cylindraceo v. aaguste ca.Tipanulat > 
rubro basi constricto, segmentis antrustis apicibus patentibus obtusis 
exterioribus ntrinquefere concoloribns interioribus intas aureia, filamentis 
basi segmentorum adnatis, antheris versatilibns linearibua basi sub- 
eagittatis, ovario oblongo in stylnm crassiasculum attenuate, stigmate 
minuto 3-lobo. 

H. yuccaefolia, Efigehn. in S. Wats. Bot. King's Exped. p. 497; Coll. Bo6. 
Works, p. 277. S. Waif, in Proa. Amer. Acad. vol. xiv. p. 250 (1879>. 
Baker in Journ, Linn. Soo. vol. xviii. (1880) p. 231. 

H. Engeltnanni, Kraushopf, ex Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. I.e. 

Yucca? parviflora, Torr. in Bot, Mex. Bound, p 221. Baker in Oard. Chron. 
1870, p. 923. 

Aloe yuccaefolia, A. Gray in Proc. Amer. Acad, vol. vii. (1868) p. 390. 



A very singular plant, described by Engelmann as re- 
sembling a Yucca in habit, in the filamentose margined leaves, 
and in the scape, pollen, and seeds; an J.Zoe in the perianth 
and pistil; and an Agave in the filaments being adnate at 
the base to the perianth-segment, and geniculate upwards. 
By which latter term I suppose that incurved at the apex 
is intended, a character which I cannot confirm on ex- 
amination of living specimens. 

Mr. Baker regards H. Engelmanni, Kraiiskopf, as a form 
with the style included, larger anthers, more slender 
flexuous branches of the panicle, and smaller bracts. 

H. Engelmanni was discovered in Western Texas by 
Charles Wright, and is No. 1908 of his Herbarium. 
Seeds of it were received by the Eoyal G-ardens, 
Kew, from its old correspondent, Mr. W. Thomson, of 
Ipswich, in 1888, plants from which were grown in an 

JULT IST, 1900. 



unheated frame, along with Cape bulbs. One of them 
flowered for the first time in July, 1899, and from it 
the accompanying figure was made. It ripened a few 
seeds. 

Bescr. — Stem (not developed as yet in the Kew indi- 
vidual) two to four feet high, simple or branched. Leaves 
a yard long, by an inch broad towards the base, spreading 
and recurved, linear-subulate, acuminate, rigid, thickly 
coriaceous, concave ventrally, rounded dorsally, deep 
bright green, with white filiferous margins, the threads an 
inch long. Scape with panicle six feet high, stout, erect. 
Panicle narrow, branched at the base ; rhachis and branches 
stout, strict, terete, rose-purple. Flowers sub-erect, an 
inch long, fascicled in bracts along the rhachis and 
branches ; bracts up to an inch long, herbaceous, ovate, 
acuminate, green with broad, thin, white or red margins ; 
pedicels up to an inch long, rose-purple. Perianth bright 
rose-red, articulate on the pedicel by a short, contracted, 
solid base, cylindric, or narrowly campanulate; segments 
linear-oblong, obtuse ; tips spreading, outer concolorous, 
or very narrowly bordered with yellow, inner golden-yellow 
within. Stamens included, filaments with nearly straight, 
slender tips ; anthers linear-oblong, dorsifixed. Ovary 
ovoid, narrowed into the rather slender style; stigma 
minutely three-lobed. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, front, and 2, dorsal view of portion of base of periantli and stamen ; 
3, base of perianth and pistil ; all enlarged :— 4, reduced figure of the whole 
plant. 




MS.dalJNTitiLJiittt 



Tab. 7724. 
DENDROBIUM Hodgkinsoni. 

Native of New Guinea. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide^. — Tribe EpiDENDHEiS, 
Genus Dendeobium, Sw. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498.) 



Dendrobium (Stachyobium) Hbt/jrHwsowi ; pseudobulbis 6-10 poll, loiipria an- 
guste clayatis caiialiculatis apice 2-3-phyllis, foliia 4-7 poll, longis elliptico- 
lanceolatis subacatia subcoriaceis, scapo ad 4 poll, longo terminali erecto, 
raceme brevi 6-7-floro, pedicellis pollicaribus, bracteis \-^ poll, longis 
oblongia subacutia, floribua nutantibas aubcampanulatis, aepalis petalia- 
que ad 1-1^ poll, longia suberectia pallida viridibna triangnlari- 
lanceolatis acuminatia dorso carinatis, labello aepalia paullo longiore 
3-lobo pallide viridi radiia purpureia ornato, lobia lateralibua erecfia 
rotundatia crennlatis, terminali ovato-cordato subacuto, diaco callo 
magno albo nitido tricarinato basi utrinqae nnilobulato instructo, 
mento i-poll. longo late conico obtuao, columna latiuscula bicornata, 
anthera depreesa. 

D. Hodgkinaoni, Bolfe in Kew Bullet, ined. 



New Guinea, the native country of Dendrohium Eodgkin- 
soni, will probably prove to be the most productive of 
those hitherto unexplored areas of the globe which abound 
in Orchids. About a dozen species, many of them very 
imperfectly known, are contained in Miquel's " Fl. Ind. 
Bat.," published in 1859, to which must be added very 
many more recently discovered. 

D. Hodgkinsoni is, according to Mr. Rolfe, who has 
kindly given me his unpublished description of it, allied 
to D. atroviolaceum (tab. 7371) also a New Guinea species, 
from which it differs, amongst other characters, in the 
elliptic-lanceolate leaves, unspotted flowers, acuminate 
sepals, lanceolate petals, and the large callus on the disk 
of the lip. It was introduced by Messrs. Sander & Co., 
of St. Albans, from whom the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
obtained the specimen here figured, which flowered in 
1S99. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs tufted, five to ten inches long, 
narrowly clavate, deeply channelled. Leaves two or three 
terminal on the pseudobulb, four to seven inches long, ellip- 
tic-lanceolate, sub-acute, coriaceous, bright green. Scape 
terminal, erect, about four inches loQg, terminated by a 
July Isi, 1900. 



short five- to seven-flowered raceme. Bracts one-fourth 
to one-third of an inch long, oblong, sub-acute. Flowers 
nodding, sub-campanulate ; mentum short, broadly conical, 
obtuse ; pedicels an inch long. Sepals and petals an inch 
and a quarter long, sub-erect, triangular-lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, dorsally keeled, pale green. Lip rather longer than 
the sepals, three-lobed, pale green, with broad, radiating, 
purple nerves ; side-lobes erect, broad, rounded, crenulate ; 
terminal ovate-cordate, sub-acute; disk with a large pro- 
minent white, three-keeled callus . Column large and broad 
for the genus. Anther depressed on the broad top. — J.D. H. 



Fig. 1, base of lip with callus; 2, column and mentum; 3, anthers; 
4, pollinia : — All enlarged. 



1125 




Tab. 7725. 

DIPLADENIA pastoeum, var. tenuifolta. 

Native of Brasil. 



Nat. Ord. Apocynacb*. — Tribe Echitidea. 
Genue Dipladenia, A.BG. ; {JBenth. & Hooh.f. Oen. Plant, vol. ii, p. 726.) 



DiPLADKNiA (Erythrochites)^as<or«w, var. tenuifoUa; glabra, radice tnberoso, 
caiilibua gracilibus flexuosis berbaceis, foliis anguste liiiearibus 2-3- 
pollicaribus yo~^ poU- 'atia sessilibud subacntis l-nerviis marginibus 
subrecurvis supra Isete viridibus subtus pallidis, pedunculis axillaribus 
foliia brevioribus v. longioribus gracilibns 2-3-flori8, calycis ^ poll, longi 
segmentis subulato-lanceolatis basi intus glaadulis sabnlatis instrnctia, 
corollas hypocrateriformis tube gracili pollicari apicem versus inflate 
ellipsoideo dein breviter constricto intus pubescente, ore annulari aureo, 
linibi rosei 1| poll. diam. plani lobis rhomheo-ovatis eubacutie, antberis 
oblongig apiculatis, disci glandulia majusculia oblongis obtusis, foUiculia 
linearibna 2-pollicaribus teretibua acuminatia erecto-patulia. 

D. paetorum, tenuifolia & peduncnlaris, A.DG. in DG. Prodr. vol. viii. p. 482. 

D. polymorpha, var. a teuuifolia, Muell. Arg. in Marl. Fl. Bras. vol. vi. para, 

I. p. 121, t. 36. 
Echites tenuifolia, Mikan, Fl- et Faun. Bras. Fasc. 3 (1820) ; Stadelm. in 
Flora, vol. xxiv. para i. (1841) Btibl. p. 53. 

E. peduncularis, Stadelm. I.e. p. 54. 

E. paatorum. Mart, ex Stadelm. I.e. 52. Mart. Syst. Mat. Med. Veg. Bras. 
p. 90 (e* Ic. ined. t. 63 ex A.DG.) 



According to Mueller, in Martius' ** Flora Brasiliensis," 
I.e. Dipladenia polymorpha is a very variable plant, of which 
he describes four forms, to which may possibly be added a 
plant badly figured in Flore des Serres, vol. ii. t. 74 (Aug. 
1846) under the name of D. vincmflora. It is widely 
distributed in Brasil, from the littoral province of Bahia 
to that of San Paulo, and is found also in those of Minas 
Geraes and Goyaz. Martius describes it as having purga- 
tive properties, and being known to the Portuguese as 
Purga do pastor. 

Tubers of var. tenuifolia were presented to the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in 1896, by Mr. E. Hansen, Florist, of 
Mile End Road, London, which flowered in a stove in 
May, 1897, and again in Midsummer, 1898. 

Vescr. — Var. tenuifolia. A very slender, glabrous, 
tuberous-rooted herb, with twining, flexuous stem. Leaves 

.It.'LY 1st, IWO, 



opposite, in distant pairs, two to three inches long, by one- 
tenth to one-sixth of an inch broad, very shortly petioled, 
sub-acute, one-nerved, margins slightly recurved, pale 
bright green. Flowers two or three, pedicelled on slender 
axillary peduncles as long as the leaves or longer. Calyx 
one-sixth of an inch long ; segments erect, linear, acute, 
with subulate glands at the base within. Corolla-tube an 
inch long, very slender, with a small ellipsoid dilatation 
below the apex which is hairy within, and contains the 
stamens ; limb an inch and a half in diameter, flat, rose- 
coloured, with a narrow, golden, five-cleft ring at the 
mouth, the lobes of which are emarginate ; segments 
rhombic-ovate, sub-acute. Anthers sessile, linear-oblong, 
apiculate. Dish with two, erect, oblong, obtuse, or truncate 
fleshy glands. Stigma mitriform. — J. D. H, 



Fig. 1, calyx, style and stigma ; 2, ventricose upper part of corolla-tube laid 
open, showing the stamens ; 3, tip of pedicel with calycine glands, diak-glauda 
and ovary : — All enlarged. 



it:^ 




J'fS d^MNPiitj, 



Tab. 7726. 
robinia neo-mexioana. 

Native of the Hocky Mountains. 

Nat. Old. Leguaiinos,*:. — Tribe Galege*. 
Genus RoBlNiA, Linn. ; (Benth. & ITook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 499.) 



RoBiNiA neo-mexicana ; frutex v. arbascula ramosa, ramulis hiepidic, foliie 
6-12-pollicaribus, foliolia mnltijugis ellipticis obtnsis apicnlatis primn 
supra albo-puberuHs subtiis tomentellis demam glaberrimis pallide viri- 
dibiis, stipulis brevibus sericeis demum spinescentibus rectis v. recurvi.s, 
racemis breviter peduncnlatis foliis brevioribus confertifloris, rhachi 
pedicelHsque brevibus glanduloso-hispidis, bracteis lineari-oblongis cadn- 
cis, calycis tubo hispido dentibus subulato-lanceolatis glandnloso ciliatic, 
legumine 3-4-pollicari angaste alata glandnloso-bispida, valvis setis 
rigidia erectia onustis. 

R. neo-mexicana, A. Gray^ JPl. Tliurh. in Mem. Am,, Acad. N. Sc. vol. v. 
(1865) p. 314. Turcz. in Pacif. Bail. Rep. vol. iv. p. 79; Bot. Mex. Bound. 
p. 53. S.. Wats, in King's JRep. vol. v. p. 419. Porter, Fl. Colorad. p. 23. 
Coulter, Man. Bot. Rocky Mts. p. 69. Rev. Hortic. 1895, p. 112. Gartenjl. 
t. 1385. Sargent, Si/lva of N. Amer. vol. iii. p. 43, t. 114. 



Rohinia neo-mexicana marks the we.stern limit of the 
genus, which reaches the eastern slopes of the Kocky 
Mountains, along the chain of which it extends from 
Southern Colorado to New Mexico, Southern Utah, and 
Arizona, at elevations of four thousand to seven thousand 
feet. It is very closely allied to, and is, indeed, the 
western representative of B. viscosa^ Vent. Zard. (^els. t. 4 
(R. glutinosa, Sims. t. 560) a native of the mountains of 
Carolina; and which, according to Sargent, is one of the 
rarest trees of the United States. The only other species 
of the genus are the well-known Locust Tree, or False 
Acacia, B. Pseudacacia^ Linn., and the Rose Acacia, H. 
hispida, L. (t. 311), both natives of the Eastern United 
States. I collected B. neo-mexicana in fruit, when visiting 
the Rocky Mountains, in company with Dr. Gray, near the 
town of La Veta, in Colorado. The tree, from which the 
specimen figured was taken, has been in cultivation in 
the ICew Arboretum for the last twelve years, flowering 
in June. It was received from the Botanic Gardens of 
Harvard, U.S.A., in 1887. 

JuLT 1st, 1900. 



Descr. — A busb, or small tree, with spreading, hispid 
branches drooping at the tips. Leaves shortly petioled, 
six to twelve inches long, impari-pinnate, quite glabrous 
when mature ; leaflets in fifteen to twenty-one pairs, about 
an inch long, elliptic, obtuse with a terminal mucro, pale 
green, young puberulous above and pubescent beneath, 
membranous, rhachis very slender, glabrous; stipules at 
length spinescent, a quarter to half an inch long, straight, 
or sub-recurved. Racemes shorter than the leaves, shortly 
peduncled; peduncles and rhachis hispid ; flowers crowded, 
about an inch across ; bracts lanceolate, membranous, 
caducous ; pedicels short. Galyx-iube rounded at the base, 
hispid ; lobes sub-equal, triangular-lanceolate, acute, ciliate 
with gland-tipped hairs. Corolla pale rose-pink. Pod 
three to four inches long, by half an inch broad, nearly 
straight, linear, obtuse,^ narrowly winged; valves thickly 
clothed with gland-tipped hairs and rigid bristles. 8eeds 
oblong.—/. I). //. 

Fig. 1, calyx laid open and ovary; 2, stamens and style, both enlarged; 
3, pod of the natural size ; 4, poition of the same enh.rged. 



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Tab. 7727. 

CATTLEYA x White:. 

Native of Bahia. 

Nat. Ord. Orcuide^. — Tribe Epidendre.k. 
Genns Cattleya, Lindl. ; {Benth. & Hodk.f. Oen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 531.) 



Cattleta X Wkitei; pseudobulbis foliisque G. labiafse, inflorescentia 2-flora, 
sepalis lineari-oblongis acutis v. aciiminatis apicibus vireacentibas, petalis 
latioribus oblongis obtusis undulatis decurvisj lahelli laciniis lateralibus 
late triangulia columnam velantibus extus pallidis marginibus reflexia 
laete purpureis, fauce aurantiaca purpureo lineata, terminali renifornii 
rotundata dilatata lobukta denticulata et crispata. 

C. X Wbitei, Beickb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1882, vol. ii. p. 586. Warner ^■ 
Williams, Orchid. Album, vol. iii. t. 115. Garten^, vol. xxxiii. p. 197, 
t. 1159. Veiich, Man. Orchid. Part ii. p. 87. Bolfe in Orchid. Rev. vol. 
vii. (1899) p. 292; in Journ. Hort. Soc. vol. xxiv. (19i)0) p. 192. 

C. X RusselliaQum, Mantin ex Rolfe in Journ. Hort. Soc. vol. xxiv. p. 192. 



So great has been the interest sbown by Orchidologists 
in the natural hybrid here figured, that I have yielded 
to their wish that it should appear in the Botanical Maga- 
zine, as one of the few exceptions to the rule which excludes 
hybrids in favour of pure species, so long as these are press- 
ing for illustration. Not that it is the only known wild 
hybrid Orchid, for Mr. Rolfe has given me a list of nineteen, 
all of which, including 6\ x Whitei, have had their mule 
origin proved, by having been artificially reproduced in 
Europe, and most of them in English gardens. These 
belong to eight genera, five American, Cattleija,, Ladia, 
Odontoglossum, MasdevaUia and Anguloa, and three Asiatic, 
Phalx'nopsisy Calanthe, and Dendrobium. 

A special interest is attached to 6\ x Whiter irom its 
being one of the earliest of supposed wild hybrid ^^/^^^^^'J'"- 
It was discovered in the Bahia province of Brasil by Mr. 
White, collector for Messrs. Hugh Low & Sons, with 
whom it flowered in 1882, when it was described by Keich- 
enbach, who suggested its being a hybrid between (. 
labiata and C. ScUlleriana. The only objection to this theory 
was, that the supposed parents were believed to inhabit 
localities some eight hundred miles apart. Some years 
later Mr. Rolfe, investigating the history of G. x \\hitei, 
August 1st, 1900. 



ascertained from Mr. Boxall, another collector for Messrs. 
Low, that C. Whitei was a natiVe of Bahia, where it was 
found growing on a tree in company with G. Schilleriana, 
a plant whose real habitat had not previously been re- 
corded. 

Up to the year 1 899 the specimen described by Reichen- 
bach was the only wild one known in Europe, but in tliat 
year a re-iraportation of specimens took place, amongst 
which was the fine one here figured, which flowered in the 
rich Orchid collection of Sir F. Wigan, Bart., D.L. of 
Clare Lawn, E. Sheen, who kindly sent it to Kew for 
illustration in this work. 

For an instructive paper on natural and artificially pro- 
duced hybrid Orchids and other plants, I may refer 
botanists to Mr. Rolfe's Essay on " Hybridization viewed 
from the standpoint of systematic Botany," published in 
the journal of the Royal Horticultural Society in April of 
this year. 

It remains to give the diagnoses of C. x Wliitei and of 
its parents. 

C. Warneri, T. Moore, ex Warner Sel. Orchid, vol. i. t. 8. 
Floral Mag, 1871, t. 516. C.labiata, var. Warneri, Veitch, 
Man. Orchid. Part II. p. 27 ; flowers six to eight inches 
diam., sepals linear-lanceolate, petals ovate, three times 
broader than the sepals, lip obscurely 3-lobed, side lobes 
entire, midlobe deeply eraarginate. 

C. Schilleriana, Beichb f. in Berlin Allgem. Gartenzeit. 
1857, p. 335. Fl. des Serves, t. 2286 ; Veitch, Man, Orchid. 
Pars ii. p. 45 ; flowers four to six inches in diam., sepals 
and petals similar oblong-lanceolate, lip ovate-oblong, 
deeply three-lobed, side lobes triangular, acute, midlobe 
reniforra. 

C. X Whitei ; flowers six to eight inches in diam., 
sepals and petals most like (7. Warneri, lip most like that 
of 0. Schilleriana.— J. D. H. 

Fior. 1, column ; 2, anther; 3, poUinium and strap : —All enlarged; 4, whole 
plant greatly reduced. 



1728 




■WncentBrooksPay 3.Son U*B"P 



Tap. 7728. 

ASPARAaUS TERNIPOLIUS. 
Native of Natal. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Tribe Asparage^b, 
Gentis Asparagus, Linn. ; (Bentk. & ITook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 7G5.) 



Asparagus (Asparagopsis) fernifolius ; alte scandena, caule volubili, gracile 
tereti sulcato, ramulis flexuosis patulis v. deflexis sulcatie angulatis 
angul's ragulosia, spinia ^-^ poll, longia pxiDgentibus, claiodiia 3-8-nati8 
linearibus v. angaste lineari-lanceolatis rectis v. falcatia f-1 poll, longis 
T^2~5 poll- latis acutis v, acuminatis planis, raceaiis solitariia v. 1-3- 
natia 1-2 poll, longis fere ad basin multifloris, rhachi stricto 6-gono 
angulis rutjulosis apice nudo v. oladodiis iastructo, pedicellis ^-| pill, 
longis medio versus articulatia, bracteis parvia Lmceolatis, perianthio ad 
i poll. diam. segnientis patenti-recarvis obovato-oblongia obtusis, filaraen- 
tia perianthio ad ^ brevioribus, antheris majuaculis oblongia aurantiacia, 
ovario ad 12-ovulato. 

A. aethiopicus, Linn. var. ternifolins, Baker in Saunders, Befug. Bot. t. 261. 
Gard. Ohron. 1872, p. 1588. fig. 338. 

A. falcatns, Baker in Jourii. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. (1875) p. 626 ; in Flor. Trop. 
Afr. vol. vii. p. 435 {non Linn.) 



The species of Asparagnf<, of which one hundred and 
forty are enumerated in the Index Kewensis, are often very 
diflacult of discrimination; that which I here describe as 
A. ternifoUus, was regarded by Mr. Baker first as a variety 
{ternif alius) of A. xthiopicus, Linn., from which it differs 
in the larger broad cladodes, angular rhachis of the 
raceme, larger flowers, shorter filaments, and oblong 
anthers, and subsequently as the same as A. falcatm, 
Linn., of Ceylon, which has much fewer and smaller flowers 
in the raceme, the rhachis of which is very short, and quite 
smooth, its pedicels are jointed far below the middle, its 
bracts are cymbiform, its filaments are nearly as long 
as the perianth-segments, and the anthers smaller and 
globose. 

A. ternifoUus was first described from specimens that 
flowered in the late Mr. Wilson Saunders' rich collection 
of Cape plants at Reigate, the seeds of which were sent 
from Natal by Thouias Cooper (Mr. Saunders' collector). 
The only native specimen of it which I have seen is in 

Aguusi Ut, 1900. 



the Kew Herbarinni, collected by Mr. J. M. Wood, A.L.S., 
Curator of the Durban Botanic Garden, ticketed as found 
on Durban Flats in 1887. A closelj allied species, also 
referred to A. falcatus by Mr. Baker, but I think differing 
from that plant, though more resembling that plant, has 
been sent by several collectors from Natal. 

A. ternifolius has been in cultivation in the Succulent 
House of the Royal Gardens for a long period, and was, 
no doubt, procured from Wilson Saunders, F.R.S., about 
the time ot its publication in the " Ref ugium " (1871). 
It flowers in August, but has not fruited at Kew. 

Descr. — A slender, twining shrub, with a fiexuous, 
smooth, woody stem, long, spreading or drooping, sul- 
cate branches and branchlets, which are angular towards 
the tips, with minutely roughened angles. Spines short, 
stout, usually slightly recurved, pungent. Cladodes often 
in threes towards the tips of the branches, but up to eight 
occur lower down on the plant, linear or linear-lanceolate, 
acute or acuminate, variable in length and breadth, three- 
fourths to one inch long, by one-sixth to one-eighth of an 
inch broad, flat, bright green. Racemes one to two inches 
long, solitary, binate, or ternate, many- and rather dense- 
fld., rhachis striate, rather rigid, six-angled, with the 
angles roughened by prominent cells; pedicels one-sixth 
to one-fourth of an inch long, jointed about the middle ; 
bracts lanceolate, one-nerved. Flowers about a fourth of 
an inch broad, faintly odorous; perianth-segments ob- 
oyate-oblong, obtuse, spreading, and recurved, white. 
Filaments about half as long as the perianth-segments ; 
anthers oblong, orange-yellow. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, portion of stem an 1 spines ; 2, portion of rhachis of raceme ; 
Atil^ i^nd bract ; 4, bract ; 5, periauth-aegment and stamen ; 6, ovary :— 




1729 



ABamard del, J.N.Pit*litK 



■VlncantBrooksDay 4 SanLf^Inif' 



X. Reeve Si C 9 London. 



Tab. 7729. 
PH^ONBCEON MoLONEYi. 

Native of Lagos. 

Nat. Ord. Melastomace^. — Tribe Dissoch«te^. 

Genua Ph^oneuron, {Gilg in Engl. ^ Prantl Natiirl. Pfianzfam. Nachtr. 

p. 267.) 



Ph^oneuron Moloneyi ; herba caule apicem verstis quadrangulo et pnrpureo- 
furfuraceo, inferne terete et glabrato, foliis ovatis vel ovato-ellipticis sub- 
acaminatis basi rotundatis vel subcordatis repando-serrulatis 4-6 poll, 
longis 2-3| poll, latis primo sapra satnrate viridibus pilis crispulis pur- 
pureo-rufia tenuibus obtecta mox basi excepta glabratia anbtus pallidis 
primo in nervis venisque dense villoso-tomentosis deinde glabratia e basi 
7- (ramis 5-) nervibus venis transversis aubhorizontalibua crebris, petiole 
1-2 poll, longo, panicula terminali pnrpurec-furfuracea minuti-bracteata, 
pedicellia brevibua gracilibusi, calyce hemisphaerico truncato parce criape- 
pubescente demum glabrescente, petalis 5 oblique-obovatia apicnlatia fere 
eemipoUicaribus, ataminibus 10 eeqiialibus, antheria lineari-lanceolatia, 
eonnectivo basi hand producto antice appendicibus 2 brevibas antheraj 
Bubcontiguis postice calcare subtrilobo latiusculo brevi ancto, atigmati 
subcapitato, fructn bacciformi pericarpio irregnlariter (P) rumpente, semi- 
nibus subrhombeis, embryo recto cylindrico, rhaphe apongioea embryone 
multo latioi-e. O. Staff. 



Tlie genus Phseoneuron, founded by G-ilg on a tropical 
W. African plant closely allied to Bicellandra^ has, together 
with other allied Melastomacem from the same region, been 
studied by Dr. Stapf, with the result that the generic 
charai^ters of the first-named genus must be modified, and 
both enlarged by characters afforded by their seeds. In 
anticipation of a paper on the subject which he proposes 
to publish, he has given me the following diagnoses of 
both genera, with a list of the species appertaining to 
eacb : — 

DiCELLANDEA, Hk. /. Stem 4. angled. Cal^x 5-toothed. Stament in 2 
Beta differing in shape and aize; baaal appendages of connective filiform, 
pointed. Seeds obovoid, appendaged at the upper posticous end ; testa thin, 
brittle, granular an ticously above; raphe hollow wall", thin. Embryo snh- 
ovoid, placed beneath the granular portion of the teata. D. Barten, Hk.f, 
Fernando Po. 

FEJEOHEUROtt, GUg. Stem terete. Caly.r entire. S/amw.? all alike, or 
nearly so; basal appendages of connective short, tips thickened Aeerf* .siib- 
curieiForm ; testa smooth ; rhaphe large, spongy or corky. Mmbryo sub- 
cylindric, occupying the whole anticons side of the seed. 

1. P. dicellandroidep, Gi/(/, Cameroona. 
August Ist, 1900. 



2. P. setoBum, Stapf. {Dicellandra sefosa,, Hk. f. D. Uherica, Gilg.) Sierra 
Leone, Liberia. 

3. P. Molone3'i, Stapf. (Tab. no^tr.) Lagcs. 

4. P. Schweinfarthii, Stapf. (P. dice llandr aides, Gilg, partim). Central 
Africa. 

Phseoneuron Molaneyi was raised from seeds sent from 
Lagos to the Royal Grardens, Kew, by Sir Cornelius 
Moloney, K.C.M.G., when Administrator of that colony. 
It flowered in September, 1884, in a Tropical House. 

Descr. — Stem herbaceous, terete ; branches obtusely 
tetragonous, and petioles and panicles covered with pur- 
pUsh furfuraceous pubescence. Leaves four to six inches 
long, ovate or elliptic-ovate, sub-acuminate, base rounded 
or sub-cordate, young, puberulous above, with crisped 
hairs, mature, glabrous, or nearly so, nerves five to seven, 
tomentose beneath in the young leaves ; petiole one to 
two inches long Panicle terminal, lax-flowered ; bracts 
miuute. Floivers shortly pedicelled, about an inch broad. 
Calyx hemispheric, faintly furfuraceous, mouth truncate, 
entire. Petals obliquely obovate, pale rose-purple within. 
Stamens 10, equal; anthers linear-lanceolate, basal appen- 
dages short ; tips thickened. Style slender, stigma capi- 
tellate. Berry globose. Seeds many, rhombic-cuneiform ; 
testa rather rough. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, vertical section oP flower; 2, calyx; 3, staoieas; 4, upper half of 
Btyle aud stigma ; 6, seeds :— All but fig. 2 enlarged. 



77,W. 






^^m) 



%:Mim0^ 













L Reeve &. C9Lon<ion 



\tn.centBrooks,Day &- Son Lt*Imp 



Tab. 7730. 
HUE_RNIA soMALiCA. 

Native of Somaliland. 



Nat. Ord. Asclepiade^. — Tribe Stafeueje. 
Genus Huersia, Br. ; (Benth. & HooTc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 784.) 



HuERNiA Bonialira ; caulibns brevibas crassis pentagonis glabris palhde vindi- 
buH, angulis crassis grosae sinuato-dentatis, dentibus ad i poll, longis 
deltoideo-subulatis lateraliter compressis apicibus spinescentibus, fjoribua 
basin versus ramorum erratis breviter crasse pedicellatis, sepahs subulatia 
i-poU. longis, coroUaj tubo parvo snbgloboso-campanulato glabro Iirabo 
U-2 poll. diam. patenti-recurvo glabro fuBCo-pnrpureo remote 5-lobato, 
lobis deltoideis acutis ochraceis papillis rubris ornatis, sinubus latia 
medio dentiferis, corona? exterioris lobis subqaadratis bihdis glabris san- 
guineis, interioria lobia late subulatia incurvis conmventibns luteia, 
antherarnm ioculis augustis pallidis, polliniia clavatis glandula bialata 
eessilibas. 

H. Bomalica, N.E. Br. in Kew Bulletin, Nov., 1898, p. 309. 

The genus Hiiernia, Br., consists of about sixteen species 
of South African and Tropical African plants, distinguished 
from Stapelia chiefly by the toothed sinus of the corolla 
and adnate outer corona. Nine of these, including H. 
somalica, have been figured in this work, some of them 
under Stapelia. I am indebted to Mr. N. E. Brown for 
the following enumeration of /them : — H. venusta, U. Br. 
(St lentiginosa, Sims, 't. 50/). E. campanulata, R. Br. 
( S campanuJata, Mass. t. 1227). H. davigera, Haw. (as 
S. campajudata, Mass. t. 1661, and S. barhata, Mass. t. 
2401) H. reticulata. Haw. {8. reticulata, Mass. t. 1662). 
H Hystrix, N. E. Br. {8. Hystrix, Hk. f. t. 5751), H. brevi- 
rostris N. E. Br. (t. 6379) ; all from South Africa ; and 
H, oculata, Hk. f. (t. 6658), and 71. aspera, N. E. Br. 
(t. 7000), from Tropical Africa. vi .:i u tvi 

Huemia somalica was brought from Somaliland by Mrs. 
Lort Phillips, who presented living specimens, both to the 
Koyal Gardens, Kew, and to the Gardens of the University 
of Cambridge, with the information that it was called 
"Anahrob " by her Somali boy. It flowered for the first 
time at Cambridge in July, 1897, and in the following year 
at Kew. The figure is of the Cambridge specimen. 
AuGusi 1st, 1900. 



Descr. — Stems short, two to tliree inches high, about an 
inch in diameter, simple, sub-erect, five-angled, glabrous, 
pale green ; angles deeply, regularly sinuate-toothed ; teeth 
about a fourth of an inch long, subulate-deltoid, laterally 
compressed, green, pungent. Flowers from the lower part 
of the stem stoutly pedicelled, one and a half to two inches 
in diameter ; pedicel sigmoidly curved, stout. Sepals 
subulate, about a fourth of an inch long. Corolla-tube 
small, globosely campanulate, glabrous ; limb spreading 
and recurved, forming an annulus around the mouth of the 
tube, dark purple, glabrous, remotely five-lobed ; lobes del- 
toid, spreading, acute, ochraceous, studded with purple 
papillae ; sinus with a minute tooth. Corona very small ; 
outer lobes sub-quadrate, bifid, glabrous, blood-red ; inner 
broadly subulate, incurved, with their tips connivent, 
golden-yellow, bases tumid. Pollinia narrowly clavate, 
seated on a two-winged gland. — J. D. H. 



Fisr. 1, stamina! corona ; 2, the same, with the inner lobes removed ; 3 and 
4, pollinia : — All enlarged. 




7731 



"VSncentBrookspay & Son Lt^lmp 



L Reeve & C? London 



Tab. 7731. 
senecio aurioulatfssimus. 

Native of British Central Africa. 

Nat. Ord. CoMPOSiTiB. — Tribe Senecionide-S. 
Genus Senecio, Linn. ; {Benili. & Hooh.f, Qen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 446.) 



Senecio auriculatissimus ; frutex scandens, glaberrimus, divaricatim ramosus, 
ramis ramulisque teretibus levibus, foliis gracile petiolatis transverse 
oblongis obrenilormibua v, late reuiformi-rotundatis late crenatis palma- 
tim nervosis aupra l^te viiidihus nervis obscuris sabtus pallidis nervia 
validioribng, petiolo supra canalicnlato basi in auriculam magnam ova- 
tam profunda cordatara amplexif^aulem convexam dilatato, capitulis 
ad apices ramulorum laxe corymbosis gracile pedicellatis ad pollicem 
diametro, pedicelJis minute braceteolatis, involucri cylindracei basi rotun- 
dati nndi bracteis linearibus acuminatis, floribus aureis radii 12-15, lignla 
lineari apice 3-crenata, disci tubnlosis 5-dentatis, antherarum loculis basi 
acutis, styli ramis revolutis obtusis ex-appendiculatis, achseniis lineari- 
bus alte 5-co8tati8 costis puberulis, pappi mollis albi setis snbscaberulis. 

S. anricnlatissimus, Britten in Trans. Linn. Soc. ser. ii. vol. iv. pars i. p. 21. 
Engler PJlanzemo. Ost. Africa, Theil C. p. 418. 



This very remarkable groundseJ is a native of Nyassa- 
land and of the Shire Highlands, in British Central 
Africa. It was discovered in 1887 by Mr. J. T. Last, 
near Milangi, and has subsequently been sent from the 
Zomba Plateau, alt. five thousand feet, by Sir Ii. H. 
Johnston, K.C.B., from Namapi, in Ny;iss;il;md, by Mr. 
Cameron, from Mt. Bombo, alt. four thou.sand feet to six 
thousand feet, by Mr. Whyte in 189G, and by Mr. J. 
Buchanan from the Shire Highlands. In habit and the 
auricled petioles it r<sombles sev(>ral Indian species, and 
the garden Clmrorio. 

,S. iiurioilntissimus was raised in the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, from seeds sent by Mr. John Mahon, Government 
Botanist, British Central Africa, in 1898. It flowered in 
the Conservatory in February of the present year, where 
it began to climb one of the pillars, and is a very attractive 
object. 

Descr. — A perfectly glabrous, climbing shrub, with 
terete, smooth stem, and divaricating branches. Leaves 
petioled, spreading, broader than long, transversely oblong 
August 1st, 1900. 



or obreiiiform or orbicular-reniform, two to two and a half 
inclies broad, coarsely crenafce, bright green above, with 
faint, spreading nerves, which are strongly raised on the 
pale under surface ; petiole one to two inches long, very 
slender, channelled above, suddenly dilated at the base 
into an ovate, amplexicaul, convex, green auricle, upwards 
of an inch long. Heads pedicelled in lax terminal corymbs, 
an inch in diameter, pedicels short ; with scattered subu- 
late bracteoles. Involucre cylindric, smooth, green, base 
ecalyculate ; bracts linear, acuminate. Florets golden- 
yellow ; of the ray twelve to fifteen ; lignles linear, tip 
three-toothed ; of the disc tubular, campanulate above, 
with five short teeth. Arms of style linear, revolnte, 
obtuse, not appendaged. Achenes linear, strongly five- 
ribbed, ribs pubescent. Pappus hairs soft, faintly scaberu- 
lous, white. — J. D. H. 



rig. 1, floret of ray; 2, its style-arms ; 3, floret of disk; 4, anthers; 5, its 
style-arms; 6, hairs of pappus; 7, ripe aehene. — All enlarged. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 668, AUGUST, 1900. 



Tab. 7727.— CATTLEYA x Whitei. 

„ 7728.— ASPARAGUS ternifolius. 

„ 7729.— PH^ONEUEON Moloxeyi. 

„ 7730.— HUERNIA somalica. 

„ 7731. — SENECIO adriodlatissimus. 



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Tab. 7732. 
COLOCASIA ANTiQUORUM, var. Fontanesii. 
Native of Tropical Asia. 



Nat. Ord. ABACEiE. — Tribe Oolocasie^. 
Geuu» CoLOCASiA, ScAott; {Benth, & Hook.f. Qen. Plant, vol, iii. p. 974.) 



CoLOCASiA Aniiquorum, var. Fontanesii; rhizomate brevi caruoso vix tuberoso, 
turionibua bipedalibus, foliis 1-2-pedalibus cordato-ovatis v.- oblongis 
acutis V. cuBpidatis saturate viridibus marginibns nervisque violaceis 
Bubtus pallidis, petiolo 3-5-pedali scapo que breviore et robustiora rubro- 
purpureis v. violaceip, spathee tubo 3-pollicari 1^ poll. diam. obloago- 
cylindraceo rubro-purpiireo collo aureo, lamina aperta lO-poUicari 4 poll, 
lata oblonga candato-acuminata primnlina, spadicis appendice parvo 
conico, infl. raasc. quam f(Bin. paullo longiore neut. fosni. sub^quilonga, 
ovariis minutissimis. 

C. antiqnorum, var. Fontanesii, Schott Si/n. Aroid. p. 42. Prodr. Syst. 
Aroid. p. 140. Engl, in DG. Monogr. Phanerog. vol. ii. p. 491. 

C. Fontanesii, ScJiott in CEstr. Bot. Wochenbl. 1854, p. 409. K. Koch in 
Berlin. Alfgem. Gartenzeit. 1858, p. 362. 

C. violacea, Hort. 

Caladium colocasioides, Hort. Par. ex Brongti. in Nouv. Ann. Mus, Par. 
vol. iii. (1884) p. 156. Kunth Enum. PI. vol. iii. p. 43. 

C. violaceum, Hort. ex Engl. I. c. p. 492. 

Arum colocaaioides, De^^f. Oat. Hort. Par., pp. 7 et 385. 



CoJocasia antiquorum, figured at t. 73G4 of this work, is 
an exceedingly variable plant, of which four forms (in- 
cluding Arum nymphasifolium) are considered by Roxburgh 
to be indigenous in India, and two or three others are cul- 
tivated. Engler enumerates seven varieties, distinguished 
chiefly by the length of the suckers given off from tlie 
tuber, the length of the appendix of the spadix and the 
colour of the leaves and petioles. 

That here figured, which was named G. Fontanesii by 
Schott, was founded on the Arum colocasioides of Desfon- 
taines, who gives the following character, " Affine A. colo- 
casise, petioli violacei geque ac Colocasia, differt lobis 
posticis productioribus, nervis violaceis, venulis ^ paginas 
inferioris paucioribus iiec arcuatim pateutibus ut in Golo- 
casia. Non floruit." According to Schott it differs from 
G. antiquoram proper in the shortness of the suckers, 
violet petioles, and more oblong, obscurely green blade of 

SZPTEMBEK 1st, 1900. 



tte leaf with violet margins. He adds that it was known 
in Holland as early as 1680 to 1690 as ** Arum Colocasia 
dictum zeylanicum pediculis punicantibus." This would 
indicate Ceylon as the origin of var. Fontanesii, which is so 
far confirmed by Trimen, who describes the petioles of 
C. a7itlquorum as being green or violet. Roxburgh 
mentions a variety with leaves and petioles more or less 
tinged with purple as wild in India. The only other 
description of it is by Karl Koch, according to which the 
leaves are brownish, and the petiole violet-purple. 

The plant here figured differs from any form of 0. anti- 
quorum known to me in the red-purple petioles and 
peduncles, and in the great size of the spathe, the tube of 
which is three inches long, of a bright red-purple colour, 
and in the oblong limb ten inches long by four broad, very 
flat after expansion, and of a bright primrose colour. 
The appendage of the spadix is a very small cone. This 
character of the large open spathe has not been figured, 
described, or seen by me in any other form of 0. antiquorum, 
in which the spathe is normally much narrower, erect, and 
convolute, or very concave. It has been for many years 
in cultivation in Kew and elsewhere in Britain. The 
specimen figured was sent to me from the University 
Botanical Garden, Cambridge, bv Mr. Lvnch in July, 
1899.— J. i). if. 6 J J 



Fig. 1, spadix slightly enlarged; 2, stamens, and 3, ovary, both mucli 
enlarged; 4, reduced view of whole plant. 



7733 




■ JNFitohlilh 



VLnecnt Broo'kSrDay St. Son Lt'^Irop 



L Reeve &.0?LnTidorv. 



Tab. 7733. 
asparagus umbellatus. 

Niitive of Madeira and the Canary Islands. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Tribe AsPAKAGEiB. 
Genus Asparagus, Linn. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 765.) 



AsPABAGus (Asparagopsis) umbellatus; caule gracili scandente, ramia deflexia 
elongatis snlcatis v. polygonis scaberulis, internodiis brevihus, foliia 
brevibus deltoideo-calcaratis v. obsoletis, cladodiis fasciculatis S-lO-natia 
acicularibua v. fere filiformibus obscure trigonis acuminatis glabria v. 
subscaberulia luride viridibus, pedicellis axillaribus solitariia et ad apicea 
ramulorum umbellatis 5-^ poll, longia longe infra medium articulatia, 
bracteis minutis subulatia, floribua pro genere magnis, perianthii cam- 
panulati segmentia 5 poll, longia anguste oblongia obtusis albia recurvia, 
filamentia supra basin segraentorum inaertia illia brevioribua, antherig 
majusculis oblongia aureia, ovario imperfecto fnaiformi perfecto obo- 
voideo atylo elongato, stigmatibus S-recurvis, ovulia numeroaia, bacca ad 
^ poll, diara. monosperma, aemine nigreacente. 

A. umbellatus, Linlc in Buck, Beschreib. Ganar. Ins. p. 140. Buck, AlJgem. 
Uebericht. Fl. Canar. Ins., p. 162. Webb & Berth. Phyt. Ganar. vol. iii. 
part iii. p. ,827, t. 227, KuntA, Enum. PI. vol. v. p. 79. 

A. umbellatu?, var. acaber, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. (1875) 
p. 611. 

A. grandiflorua, Willd. Herb, ex Webb. & Berth. I. c. Bresl. Qen. Asparag. 
Hist. n. 23. 

A. dichotomua, Broiiss. ex Webb. & Berth. I, c. 

A. scaber, Loice in Trans. Camb. Phil. Soc. vol. iv. (1831) ; Primit. et Novit. 
Fl. Mader. p 11. 

A. Lowei, Kunth, I. c. 

AsPAEAGOPSis umbellata & grandiflora, Kunth, I. c. pp. 73, 79. 



Asparagus umhellatus is remarkable for the large size of 
its flowers, which are usually collected in simple umbels at 
the tips of the branchlets. It is a native of rocky places 
in the Island of Madeira and the Canaries, where it was 
discovered (in the Canaries) by Francis Masson, F.L.S., the 
first collector sent out from the Royal Gardens, Kew, under 
Sir Joseph Banks' auspices in 1778, to that Archipelago 
and the Azores. It was subsequently found in Madeira. 
It has for many years been cultivated in the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, where, in the Temperate House, it is trained up one 
of the pillars for about twelve feet, flowering in September, 
and ripening its fruit in the same month of the following 
year. 
September 1st, 1900. 



Mr. Baker {Journ. Linn. Soc. I.e.) regards A. scaler ^ 
Lowe, as a variety of A. umhellafus, but Webb and 
Berthelot do not ; and I fail to find sufficient characters 
whereby to distinguish it. The cladodes attain a greater 
length under cultivation than I find them to be in any 
specimens preserved in the Kew Herbarium. 

Descr. — Ste^n slender, climbing, woody and terete 
below ; branches flexuous, drooping, angled and grooved ; 
internodes short, angles of the branchlets minutely 
scaberulous. Leaves minute, deltoid, or 0. Cladodes in 
fascicles of three to ten, one half to one inch long, acicular 
or filiform, tips rounded or pungent, terete, or obscurely 
angled, smooth or sparsely scaberulous, very dark green. 
Flowers three to six in an umbel at the tips of the branch- 
lets, with often a few axillary in the fascicles of the cladodes, 
white ; pedicels one-third to half an inch long, jointed 
considerably below the middle ; bracts minute. Perianth 
campanulate ; segments narrowly oblong, obtuse, recurved, 
one-third of an inch long. Filaments inserted above the 
bases of the segments, rather shorter than these ; anthers 
large, oblong, golden-yellow. Berri/ globose, about half 
an inch in diameter, bright red, one-seeded. Seed nearly 
black.— J. D, H. 

Fig. 1, portion of branchlet and cladodes ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, ovary -.—All 
enlarged. 




713^ 



M.S.delJJJ.Prtchiitj, 



Vincent Bro oVcsDay & SojiLt.*Imp 



'L.'El^e-^ii &C?Londc 



Tab. 7734. 
iris stenophylla. 

Native of Asia Minor. 

Nat. Ord. laiDE.E. — Tribe More*. 
Genus Inia, Limi.; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Ieis (Juno) stenophi/Ua ; bulbo ovoideo, tunica extima brunnea primnm fissa, 
interiorum 3 exterioribus in vaginas elongatas pallidas obtusas folia basi 
amplectentes prodactis, radicibus crassis, foliis 6-7 temp, florent. tube 
floris vix longioribus demtim elongatia 8-10 poll, longis anguste linearibua 
in apicem acuminatam angustiitis concavis, scapo brevi unifloro, flore 
4 poll, expans., spathse valvis herbaceis, perianthii tubo 2^-pollicari 
exserto ovario pluries longiore lilacina, limbi aegmentis exterioribus 2J 
pollicaribus stipitatis, stipite ^-pollicari suberecto cra^sso, limbo late 
ovato-oblongo baai cordate coeruleo parte reflexa rotundata apice late 
saturate violacea et macalis paucia violaceis conspersa, crista media 
angusta aurea, interioribus parvis vix pollicaribus patenti-deflexis 
obovato-spatlialatis obtusis paliide coeruleis, styli ramis amplia seg- 
mentis fere seqnilongis, 1^ poll, latis bilobis crenatia caeruleis, filamentia 
liberis, 

I. Btenophylla, Hausshn. mss. ex Baker in Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. i. p. 170, fig. 
65. 

I. Heldreichii, Sort. 



This singularly beautiful plant is a near ally of Iris 
persica, L., the figure of Avhich (tab. 1) is the first of the 
7733 which precede that of /. stenoj^hylla in this Magazine. 
It belongs to the section Jimo of the^ sub-genus Xiphion^ 
which consists of about fourteen species, all natives of 
Western Asia, characterized by the bulbous rootstock, and 
very small spreading or deflexed inner segments of the 
perianth. As in I. persica and others, the leaves are not 
fully developed till long after flowering. It was discovered 
in the Cilician Taurus, by Heldreich I assume, as the bulbs 
which were purchased by the Royal Gardens, Kew, from 
Mr. Siehe, of Mersina (near Tarsus) in 1898, were labelled 
/. Heldreichii. It flowered ia a sheltered sunny border, in 
the open air, in February of this year. 

Descr. — Bulh ovoid, about an inch in diameter, with very 
stout vermiform roots ; outer coat short, dark brown, cleft 
to the base, three succeeding elongating, imbricating, 
obtuse, very pale, forming a neck two inches long, sheath- 

Septembek isT, 1900. 



ing the bases of the young leaves. Leaves at the flowering 
time rather longer than the perianth-tube, after flowering 
elongating to eight or ten inches, narrowly linear, gradually 
contracted to an acuminate point, concave. Scajye very 
short. Spathe bright green, nearly as long as the periantli- 
tube. Floiver solitary; four inches broad. Perianth-tube 
two and a half inches long, pale lilac ; outer segments 
stoutly stipitate, stipes half an inch long ; blade two'^inchea 
long, very broadly ovate-oblong, base broadly cordate, pale 
blue, the reflexed portion rounded, deep violet-blue on the 
upper fourth, and with a few large deep violet spots lower 
down, crest narrow, golden-yellow ; inner segments hardly 
an inch long, spreading and reflexed, spathulately ovate- 
oblong, obtuse, concave, pale blue. Filaments free. St//Ie- 
arms nearly as long as the outer perianth-segments, one 
inch and a half broad, nearly orbicular, two lobed and 
u-regularly crenate, blue.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1 and 2, anthers, enlanjed. 




MS.dal.j.N.FitcKlith. 



■WncentBrooJreDay *. SonLt'^Iinp 



L fieevo & Oficmdarv 



Tab. 7735. 
PEBICULARIS, cuEviPEs. 

Native of the Silchim Himalaija. 

Nat. Ord. ScROPHULAEiNJSiK. — Tribe EuPHRASiEiK. 
Genus Pediculakis, Linn.\ {Benth. Sc Hook./. Gen. Flant. vol. ii. p. 978.) 



Pedicularis (Rhyncolophse) curvipes ; caule gracili primo suberecto demum 
elongate decumbente pubescente simplici v. basi ramoso, foliia sparsis 
petiolatis ovatis oV)longisve pinnatifidis v. pinnatisectis segmentis 3-6- 
jugis cum imparl oblongis obtusis marginibus lobulatis crenatisve glabris 
puberulisve, petiolo lamina breviore, floribus axillaribas fere racemosis ad 
1 poll, loiigis, pedicellis erectia calyce longioribus fructiferis decurvis, 
calycis tubo oblongo antice triente fisso puberulo, limbi lobulis 2 auricn- 
Iffiformibus obovatis crenatia cum tertio postico dentiformi interjecto, 
coroIlEB tubo calycem sequante recto cylindraceo, labio sessili rn^eo 
|-poll. lato paullo latins quam longo3-Iobo niembranaceo, lobis lateralibus 
rotundatis intermedio parvo rotundato emarginato, galea arcuato-incurva 
inflata puberula erecta dein medium versus incurva etin rostrum decurviim 
apice integrum lobum lateralem labii spectantem attenuata, staminibus 
medio tubo coroIlEe insertis, filamentis glaberrimip, capaulis pendnlis 3-^ 
poll, longis oblongis falcatis calycia tubo ad medium vestitis, seminibiia 
paucis ellipsoideis vix reticulatis. 

P. curvipes, Sook.f. Ff. Brit. Ind. vol. iv. p. 316. Maxim. M6l. Biol, pars xii. 
p. 919. O/arJce in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxv. (1890) p. 51. Brain in 
Ann. B. Bot. Oard. Calcutta, vol, iii. p. 151, t. 35, tig. A, 



The genus Pedicularis is widely spread in the temperate 
and alpine regions of India. Thirty-seven species are de- 
scribed in the " Flora of British India," published in 1884, a 
number increased to sixty-nine by Dr. Prain in his admirable 
memoir on the genus published in the Annals of the Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Calcutta, in 1891 ; this great accession 
being mainly due to the discovery of new species by the 
activity of collectors for those gardens in the Eastern 
Himalaya, Assam, and Burma. P. curvipes was discovered 
by (y. B. Clarke at Tumbok, alt. ten thousand feet, in the 
Sikkim Himalaya, and was subsequently collected by him 
on Jakvo in the Naga hills, bordering Assam on the south, 
at a little lower elevation (nine thousand feet to nine 
thousand five hundred feet). On both occasions fruiting 
specimens alone were obtained, which led to its being 
referred (doubtfully) to a wrong section of the genus, in 

Septembee 1st, 1900. 



both the " Flora of British India " and in Dr. Prain's 
monograph. In Dr. Prain's system its proper place is in 
Division Long Irostres, Siphonanlhese, B. Brevitubse-, where it 
forms of itself a sub-division characterized by its slender, 
decumbent habit, and its capsules. It has no near ally as 
a species. 

I am indebted to A. K. Bulley, Esq., of Ness, Weston, 
Cheshire, for the specimen here figured of this very 
interesting plant. It was raised from seed sent by Dr. 
Prain from the Royal Grardens, Calcutta, and flowered in 
May of the present year. 

Descr. — Stems very slender, at first sub-erect, then 
elongating to a foot or more, flexuous and decumbent, 
simple or branched at the base. Leaves scattered, spread- 
ing and recurved, one to two inches long, oblong or ovate- 
oblong, pinnatisect (or the lowest pinnatifid), glabrous or 
puberulous ; segments seven to eleven, spreading, oblong, 
obtuse, margins irregularly crenate or lobulate ; petiole 
puberulous. Flowers solitary, axillary, pedicelled, about 
one inch long ; pedicels erect, longer than the calyx, 
puberulous, fruiting decurved. Calyx-tube one-third of an 
inch long, narrowly oblong, split for one-third of its length ; 
limb of two small obovate-obloug crenate auricles. Gorolla- 
tube not longer than the calyx ; lower lip sessile, two-thirds 
of an inch broad, pale rose-colrd., white towards the 
mouth, glabrous, three-lobed, lateral lobes obliquely 
rounded, median much smaller, orbicular, emarginate or 
obcordate ; upper lip puberulous, bright rose-red, erect 
and inflated, then arched, and forming a decurved, rather 
slender beak. Filaments inserted about the middle of the 
corolla-tube, very slender, quite glabrous. Capsule a third 
of an inch long, falcately oblong, acute, clothed for half its 
length by the calyx. — J. D. II. 



Fig 1, leaf; 2, flower; 3, calyx and style ; 4, calyx laid open and ovary; 
i) and 6, anthers -.—all enlarged ; 7, portion of Ktem leavee and capsule of nat. 



Size 




MSdd.JNRtAluh 



'^ncen.tBrooks^ay ScSon L(?-In>P ' 



U?eeV6 ScC9 London 



Tau. 7736. 

CORYLOPSTS PATTOiFLOiu. 

Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Hama.meltde.*:. 
Genus Co RYLOPSis, Sieh.Sc Zucc; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol.i.p. 067). 



CoRYLOPSis fauciflora; frutex ramia ramulisqae gracilibus glabris, foliia 
distichis cordato-rotnndatia acutis membraaaceo-chartaceis 7-9-nerviis 
nervis supra depressia subtus prominulis in raucrones marginales 
excurrentibus supra lajte viridibus marginibus fusco-rubris plagis iu- 
tercostalibns tumidis medio sericeo-pilosip, subtus pallidis pubescenti- 
bus, petiolis gracilibus \-\ poll, longia, stipulia h. poll, longia oblongo- 
lanceolatis acuminatis concavis albis, tioribus ^-poll. diam. in racemulos 
breves 2-3-floro3 secus ramuloa gracillimos aphyllos dispositis lirevissime 
pedicellatis, racemulis subsessilibus bracteis orbicularibus merabranaceis 
concavis intus pilosis onustis, calycis tube brevi lobis parvis rotundatis, 
petalis obovato-rotandatis concavis primulinis, disci glandulia conicis 
obtusis, antberis oblongis bilocularibus, connective apice conico obtuso. 

0. pauciflora, Sieh. ^ Zucc. Fl. Jap. vol. i. p. 48, t. 20. Walp. Hep. vol. ii. 

p. 434. Miquel, Ann. Mus. Bot. Lugd.-Bat. vol. iii. (1867) p. 21. Francli. 

Sf Sav. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. i. p. 163. Gard. Chron. 1899, vol. ii. p. 24. 

Gartenfl. 1899, t. 1467. 
Hinga-miduki, Jap. 

Gorylo'pns is a genus of six species of shrubs, natives 
of the Eastern Himalaya, China, and Japan. It is 
closely allied to Hamamelis, of which there are two species, 
one, the N. American " Witch Hazel," H. vlrginiana, 
L. (tab. 6684), the other Japanese, H. japonica, Sieb. & 
Zucc. (tab. 6659). One species of Cort^lopsis has been 
figpred in this work, G. spicata^ Sieb. & Zucc. (tab. 5458) 
which differs from 0. pauciflora in the much larger leaves, 
longer, many-flowered racemes, and longer petals; it is 
also a native of Japan. 

The figure of G. pauciflora is made from a plant pro- 
cured from Messrs. Veitch & Sons, which flowered in the 
Temperate House of the Royal Gardens, Kew, in March of 
the present year. It is a native of Japan, whence there 
are specimens in the Kew Herbarium, from Yokohama, in 
the Island of Nipon, collected by Bisset and Dickins, and 
from Kisurio, near Nagasaki, in the island of Kiusiu, by 
Maximovicz. 

September 1st, 1900. 



Descr.—A small shrub, flowering before leafing ; branches 
and branchlets very slender, glabrous. Leaves distichous, 
one and a half to three and a half inches long, often 
as broad as long, orbicular-cordate, acute or acuminate, 
bright green above, margined with red-brown, glabrous 
above, except in the margins, and in the silkily hairy 
centre of the interspaces between the sunk nerves, of 
w^hich there are seven to nine pairs; beneath pale, with 
raised, pubescent nerves ; petiole very slender, one half to 
one inch long. Stipules half an inch long, oblong-lanceo- 
late, acuminate, membranous, concave, white, hairy within, 
caducous. Flowers bracteate and bibracteolate, about two- 
thirds of an inch in diameter, disposed in small distant 
two- or three-flowered short, sessile racemes, which are 
scattered along very slender, flexuous, leafless branches. 
Brads crowded, one-fourth to one-third of an inch long, 
orbicular or oblong, concave, very pale green, membranous, 
hairy within. Calyx-lobes very small, rounded. Petals 
orbicular-obovate, primrose-yellow. — /. -P. S. 



Fig. 1, portion of leaf ; 2, calyx, stamens, and base of bract ; 3, calyx with 
two lobes removed, showing the disk-glands and ovaries ; 4 and 5, anthers :— 
all enlarged. 



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Tab. 7737. 
HIPPEASTEUM Haerisoni. 

Native of Uruguay. 



Nat. Ord. Amaktllide^.— Tribe Amakylle^. 
Genus HrrPEASTKUM, He}-b.; {Benlh. Sc Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 724.) 



HippEASTRTJM (Habranthus) Harrisoni; bulbo gloloso 2-poll. diam. atro- 
branneo, collo perbrevi, foliis ad 6 lovatis 1-U-pedalibus li-l| poll, latis 
apice rotundatis supra subconcavia laite viridibua albo marginatis 
ecostata subtna pallide viridibus costa apicem versus lata craasiuscnla, 
scapo bipedah cylmdraceo glauco-viridi, bracteis 2 oblongo-lanceolatis 
bipoUicaribus membranaceis paliide brunneis, nmbella 3-4-flora, pedicellis 
l-l2-pollicaribu8 suberectis, floribna subdeflexis, ovario brevi perianthio 
4-polhcari anguste infundibular! tubo vireacente lobis tubo brevioribus 
oblongis subacutis mtus albis striatis Banguineis infra medium ornatia, 
stamimbus dechnatis lobis perianthii brevioribua, antheris i-pollicaribus 
lineanbus falcatisaurezs, stylo filamentis multo longiore! stigmatibuB 
3 lineanbus recurvis obtusia. ^ 

HiPPEASTHUM Arechavaleta3, Saker in Kew Bulletin, 1898, p 226 Gard 
Chron. 1899, vol. i. p. 332. 

Amaryllis Harrisoni, Lindl. in Bunj, Hexandr. PI. t. 27. 



I am indebted to Mr. W. Watson for pointing out to me 
the identity of tlie plant here figured with the Amaryllis 
Harrisoni of Mrs, Bury's magnificent folio volume on Hex- 
andrian plants, published upwards of sixty years ago. In 
the "Kew Index Plantarum " it will be found in the 
Addenda, p. 1264) referred to nipjieaslrnm, solandriflorum. 
Herb., on the faith of an observation in Baker's Handbook 
of the AmaryUideas, p. 53. But IL solandrlflorum is, as 
may be seen from tab. 2573 of this work, a. very different 
plant, a native of French Guiana and N. Brazil, with a 
much longer perianth-tube, no markings on the lobes, 
small anthers, and an almost capitnte stigma. It con- 
stitutes the sub-genus Macrojpodastruvi of Baker. Accord- 
ing to Lindley in Bury's work, Amaryllis Harrisoni was 
imported by Mr. Harrison, of Aigburth, near Liverpool, 
from Peru ; but I think this must be an error, for our 
plant, which differs in no respect from that figured by 
Bury, except in having a narrower white margin of the 
leaf, is certainly a native of Uruguay. 
OcTOBEE 1st, 1900. ^ 



Bulbs of the specimen here fig-.ired were received at tlie 
Royal Gardens in 1898 from Monte Video. They were 
forwarded by Mr. C. B. Cantara, with the compliments of 
Professor Arechavaleta, and flowered in a warm greenhouse 
in May, 1899. 

Descr. — Bulb about two inches in diameter, globose; 
scales dark brown ; neck scarcely any. Leaves about six, 
a foot and a half long by one and a half to two inches 
broad, linear, but rather narrowed below, tip rounded, 
bright green above, with narrow, white margins, paler 
beneath, with a broad, low thickened costa towards the 
tip. Scape two feet high, stout, cylindric, dull glaucous 
green, three- or four-flowered. Pedicels sub-erect, stout, 
green, an inch to an inch and a half long. Bracts two, 
oblong-lanceolate, membranous, pale brown. Ovary short, 
green. Perianth four inches long, narrowly funnel-shaped ; 
tube green ; lobes oblong, sub-acute, spreading and re- 
curved, pure white, with irregularly placed broad blood- 
red streaks below the middle. Stamens sub-declinate, 
much shorter than the perianth; anthers large, a third 
of an inch long, golden-yellow. Style much longer than 
the stamens, declinate; stigmas three, linear, recurved. — 
/. B. II. 



Fig 1 and 2, anthers ; 3, top of style and stigmas; all enlarged; 4, view 
01 whole plant reduced. 




773S 



■V^cerita-oolcaDay ftSonLfyn*. 



1 R«ve &C9Landnn 



Tab. 7738. 

LTNDENBERGIA graxdifloea. 

Native of the Himalaya. 

Nat, Old. ScEOPuuLAEiNE^. — Tribe GiiAXiOLEiE. 
Genus Lindbnbergia, Lthm. {Bentk. ^- Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 948.) 



LiNDENBERGiA g randiflora ; herba annua, foliosa, vage ramosa, subscandens, 
niolliter villoso-pubescens, ramis flexaosis, foliis amplis 2-8 poll, longis 
floralibus (bracteis) brevioribus oblique ovatia acutis v. acuniitiatis 
detitatis, petiolis g-l poll, longis, floril/us ia spieas terminates laxifloraa 
elongatas dispositis subsecundia brevigbime pi dicellatis, calycia cam- 
panulati glanduloso-villosi lobia rotundatis, corollge aurese tubo pollicari 
calyce dnplo-triplo longiore piloso, limbi 1 poll, expans. labio superiore 
brevi rotuudato emargina^o, iuferiore triplo luajore 3-lobo, lobis laterali- 
bus ublongo-rotundatis terminali orbiculaii, fauce tumoribua 2 oblongia 
parallelia rubro-puacticulatis instructa, filainentia basi pilosis, ovario 
sericeo-villo.^o, capsnla ovoidea apice exserta. 

L. grandiflora, Benth. Scroph. Ind. p. 22; et in DC. Prodr. vol. x. p. 376. 
Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. iv. p. 261. 

Stemodia graDditlora, Ham. in Don, Prod. Fl. Kep. p. 89. Wall. Cat. n. 
3924-. 



Linchnhergia grandijlora is much tlio handsomest known 
species of tbe genus., of which there are fourteen described, 
natives chiefly of India, with a few Malayan and tropical 
African. It is a common phmt on the foot-hills of the 
Himalaya, from Simla to Bhotan, at elevations of two 
thousand to six thousand feet, and has also been found in 
Pegu. It probably extends further east, but it has not 
hitherto been found in China. 

The specimen here figured was sent by Mrs. Lynch 
from the Cambridge University Botanical Gardens, wliero 
it flowered in a warm house in March of the present yeai-, 

Descr. — A villously pubescent, much-branched, sub- 
scandent herb, annual, or with stem woody at the base ; 
branches slender, flexuous, leafy, straggling, six to twenty 
inches long. Leaves all opposite, petioled, lower up to eight 
inches long, upper or floral (bracts) much smaller, all 
ovate, acute or acuminate, crenate-seri'ate, pale green, 
nerves six to ton pairs ; petiole of lower up to four 
inches long. VIowcvh sub-secund, sub-sessile in the floral 
leaves, in long, loose leafy spikes, sometimes jfix inches 

OCTOBEl; IST, lOUO. 



long. Calyx campanulate, about one-third of an inch 
long, glandular- villous ; lobes equal, spreading, orbicular. 
Corolla-tube two to three times as long as the calyx, laxly 
hairy, golden-yellow ; upper hp short, orbicular, emar- 
ginate, lower an inch broad, broader than long, three- 
lobed; lateral lobes orbicular-oblong; median smaller, 
orbicular, emarginate ; mouth with two large, oblong, 
parallel swellings which are speckled with red. Filaments 
hairy below the middle ; anther-cells obliquely superposed, 
oblong. Ovary silkily villous. — J. D. H. 



Kg. 1, portion of calyx and ovary; 2, tube of corolla laid open and stamens ; 
o and 4, stameoB : — All enlarged. 




Wnuanlflrooks^ay &Son Ll^Imp 



LRfvys «iO?LondoTi. 



Tab. 7739. 
GREVILLEA oenithopoda. 

Native of Western Australia. 

Nat. Ord. PEOTEACEiE, — Tribe G-eevilleejj. 
Genus Gb-evillea, Br. ; {Bentk. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 180.) 



Gkevillea (Manglesia) ornitAopoda ; frutex glaberrimus, ramis ramulisque 
gracillimis peiidulis, foliis anguste cuneatis in petiolum sensim angustatis 
alte trilobis coriaceis supra laete viridibus subtus pallidis trinerviis, 
nervis subtus validis, lobis 1-1| pollicaribus lineari-Ianceolatis acuminatis 
lateralibus quam terminali paullo minoribus falcatis, raoemis axillaribus 
pedunculatis 1-lJ poll, longis foliis brevioribus ssepissime simplicibus 
multiflons, pedunculo rhachique gracillimis, floribus parvis albis, 
pedicellis J-| poll, longia filiformibus, perianlhii ^ poll, longi tubo 
fusiformi recto, limbo parvo snbanthesim globoso, glandula hypogyna 
minnta semicirculari, ovario minuto stylo nmlto minore longe stipitato 
eibboso-globoso, stylo turgido ellipsoideo infra stigma magnum conoideum 
basique constricto, fructu obliquo rugoso. 

G. ornithopoda, Meissn. Lehm. in PI. Preiss. vol. ii. p. 256 : in DC Prodr vol 
xiv. p. 391. Benth. Fl. Austral, vol. v. p. 486. 



Grevillea ornithopoda belongs to one of two small closely 
allied sections of this very large genus, characterized by a 
straight perianth-tube and conical stigma. These sections, 
which have been regarded as genera {Anadenia, Br., with 
nine species, and Manglesia, EndL, with ten), are both 
Western Australian, with the exception of one species of 
Anadenia, which inhabits New South Wales. G. ornitho- 
poda belongs to the section Manglesia, so named (as a 
genus) in comphment to Capt. James Mangles, R.N., and 
his brother, Robert Mangles, Esq., of Sunningdale, through 
whose exertions many Western Australian plants were 
introduced into this country half a century ago. Lindley 
almost simultaneously named a myrtaceous shrub after the 
brothers Mangles (Swan River App. t. 3) which has been 
since referred to Beaufortia. 

G. ornithopoda is a native of the south-western district 
of the Swan River Colony, between the river of that name 
and King George's Sound. The specimen figured was 
sent from the Botanical Gardens of Cambridge, where it 
flowered in a conservatory in April. 

Descr.—A small, perfectly glabrous shrub, with very 

OcTOBEii 1st, 1900. 



slender, droopingbranches and brancLlets. Leaves about four 
inches long, very narrowly cuneiform, gradually narrowed 
from above the middle into a petiole, trifurcately cleft 
into narrowly lanceohite acuminate lobes one to one and 
a half inches long, of which the median is nearly straight, 
the lateral rather shorter, divergent and sub-falcate, 
dark green above, paler beneath, with a stout median 
costa. Flowers small, white, in short, oblong, ped uncled, 
axillary, very many-flowered, one to one and a half inch 
long, pale greenish-yellow racemes ; peduncle and rhachis 
filiform; pedicels capillary, one-third to one half of an 
inch long. Perianth (unopened) one-sixth of an inch long; 
tube fusiform, straight; segments reflexed from the base, 
staminiferous portion elliptic, with an incurved cusp. 
Anthers sessile, shortly oblong. Hypogyjwus disk minute, 
semi-annular. Ovary erect, on an erect, slightly curved 
stipes, nearly half as long as the perianth-segments, 
obliquely globose ; style fusiform, stout, contracted beneath 
the broadly conical stigma. — /. B. H. 



Fig. 1, unexpanded, and 2, expanded flower; 3, hyj ogyuous di.ik and pistil 
on its stipes -.—All enlarged. 



774(9 




M.S.deU.N.HLctviitJi 



'£j\centBrooa<sJ3ay&SanLt^Itnp 



L Reeve a.O<? Lonitm. 



Tah. 7740. 

CROCUS Alexandri. 

Native of Servia and Bulgaria. 

Nat. Ord. Ib,ide;e. — Tribe SisyeinciiEvE. 
Genus Caocus, Xiw«. ; {Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 693.) 



Crocus Alexandri ; cormo globoso parvo, tmiicis rigidis pallidis ad basin 
circumscentibus, ?patha baeali nnlla, folii.s 3-1 synanthiis anenste lineari- 
biis al'io-vittatis niargine revolutis, spathapropria diphylla, perianthii tubo 
e ppatba longe exserto, limbi segraentia oblongis interioribus utrinqne 
albis, exterioribus facie albis dorso saturate lilacinis vel albis striis tribns 
lilaciais plumosis ornatis, antheris pailide luteis, filamentis brevibos 
glabris, styli ramis integris fiilvis. 

C. Alexandri, Vehn. Fl. BiiJgar. VIerte Nachir. (1894) p. 26. 

C. biflorus, var. Alexandri, Velen. FL Bulgar. Sup;pl. (1898) p. 264. 



Crocus Alexandri is, in a broad sense, a variety of 
C. biflorus, nearly allied to the Caucasian and Crimean 
G. Adam.i, J. Gay. In its extreme form it has larger 
flowers than the type, and the outer segments are flushed 
with bright lilac all over the back, with a narrow band of 
white round the margin ; but as our plate shows, they often 
show three feathered lilac stripes on a white ground, as in 
ordinary biflorus. It was first collected by Skopil at 
Dragalerain 1892. It was introduced into cultivation by 
Mr. Max Leichtlin in 1899. Our drawing was made from 
plants that flowered in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in March, 
1900, in the open ground. 

Descr. — Gorm small, globose; tunics pale, rigid, cut 
round the base. Basal spatJie absent. Leaves three or 
four, produced at the same time as the flowers, narrowly 
linear, with revolute edges, and a white band down the 
centre. Proper spathe small, membranous, diphyllous. 
Perianth-ttd)e much longer than the spathe, white or tinged 
with lilac; segments of the limb oblong, above an inch 
long, tlie three inner white on both surfaces, the three 
outer white inside, flushed with lilac all over the back, 
except a narrow, white, marginal band, or marked on a 

OcTOBEE 1st, 1900. 



white ground with three- feathered lilac stripes. Anthers 
pale yellow; filaments short, white, glabrous. Style- 
branches entire, bright saffron yellow. — /. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, section of leaf; 2, proper spathe; 3, anther; 4, branched apex of 
style : — All enlarged. 



^ 



c^^. 



i^M^ 



11'} I 




-fincentBrooksDay &.Son I.t*lrtiJ 



i Re eve &. C? Lon.don. 



Tab. 7741. 

DENDROBIUM Jekdonianum. 

Native of Malabar. 

Nat. Orel. Orchide.I!:. — Tribe EpiDENDREyK. 
Genus Demdrobium, Swariz ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498.) 



Dendkobium Jerdonianum ; caulibus fastigiatis simplicibus subflexuosis basi 
attenuatis, internodiis polHcaribas cylindraceis snlcatis, vagiuis pilis 
brunneis hiapidulis, foliis 2-25-pollicaribus subdistichis patenti-recurvis 
lineari-oblongis apice bidentatis coriaceip, floribus in racemos breves sub- 
terminales subsessiles pauciHoros dispositis longe pedicellatis, rhachi 
brevissimo, bracteis minutis obtasis, pedicellis cum ovariis li-poUicaribus, 
sepalispetalisqiieconsimilibus l|-lf pollicaribus anguste lineari-lanceolatis 
acut'.s erecto-recurvis aurantiacis, mento sepalis quater breviore truncato, 
labello sepalis breviore concolore erecto incurve, lobis lateralibua 
brevibus emarginatis, epichilio elongate anguste linguseformi obtuse 
marginibua profunda sinuato-crenatis, disco 3-carinato, carina media 
epichilio crenato, colamna longiuscula. 

D. Jerdoniauum, Wight Ic. PL 2nd. Or. vol. v. pai-t I. (1852) p. 6, in jiart 
(non t. 1644). Rchb.f. in Walp. Ann. vol. vi. p. 292, in part. Hook. J. Fl. 
Brit. Ind. vol. v. p. 734, excl. Ic. Wight. 

D. villoBiilum, Lindl. Oen. i^" Sp. Orchid, p. 86 ; in lAndl. Sc Paxi. Fl. Gard. 
vol. ii. p. 82, ic. xylog. n. 175, non Waliich. 



Wight, in describing Dendrohhim Jerdonianum, gives 
two habitats for it, namely, Coorg jungles, Jerdon, and 
lyamally Hills (which are in the ISTilgherry district), adding 
that '' the specimens from the two stations differ in the 
size of the flowers, but in both they are spurred, and have 
the same long narrow form, and agree in colour, hence I 
consider them mere varieties." Ot these two forms, that 
figured by Wight is the smaller flowered, with a spur-like 
mentum half as long as the sepals, and is, I think, identical 
with the Cingalese D, nutans, for a good figure of which 
see "Annals of the Royal Botanic Gardens of Calcutta," 
vol. xii. t. 18. The other, with the larger flowers and very 
short mentum, here figured, is the Coorg plant of Jerdon, 
as proved by a sketch of the flower made by that naturalist 
which is preserved in the Kew Herbarium. 

D. Jerdonianum was introduced into England previous 
to 1852, when it was described by Lindley (in Paxton's 
" Flower Garden," as D. villoi^uluin) from a plant sent 

OciOBER 1st, 1900. 



from Tillicherry in Coorg (Jerdon's habitat), which flowered 
in the garden of the Right Honourable Lady Ashbnrton. 
The specimen here figured was presented by Sir Trevor 
Lawrence, Bt., to the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it 
flowered in 18-9, and continued in flower for nearly a 
month. 

Baser. — Stems ten to twelve inches high, fastigiate, 
simple, rather flexuons, internodes about an inch long, and 
one-sixth of an inch in diameter, cylindric, grooved, not 
swollen in the middle, clothed with sheaths that are 
hispidulous with dark brown hairs. Leaves sub-distichous, 
spreading and recurved, two to two and half inches long, 
linear- oblong, two-toothed at the tip, coriaceous, yellowish- 
green. Flouwrs large, in few-flowered short, sessile, sub- 
erect racemes from the uppermost leaf-axils ; rhachis of 
raceme very short, green ; bracts minute, obtuse, green ; 
pedicels very slender, with the ovary about an inch and a 
half long, orange-yellow. Sepals and petals all alike, rather 
longer than the pedicels, erect and recurved, narrowly 
linear-lanceolate, tips obtuse. Mentum a quarter of an 
inch long, truncate. Lip rather shorter than the sepals, 
and of the same colour, erect and incurved ; lateral lobes 
short, rather narrow, notched, or two-lobed at the anterior 
margin ; epichile narrowly tongue-shaped, obtuse, margins 
deeply sinuously crenate, almost lobulate; disk with three 
acute keels, of which the median is crenate on the epichile. 
Column long for the genus. Anther tumid, anterior margins 
ciliate.-— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, lip with one lateral lobe removed ; 2, column ; 3, anther; 4, pollinia ; 
— All enlarged. 



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7742 




ItS.del J.MPitchliCh. 



'WjioantBraoks^DayeiSonLl'^Imp 



1. ■Reeve & C° London 



Tab. 7742. 

MICHAUXIA TCHIHATCHEFII. 
Native of Asia Minor. 

Nat. Ord. Campanula.ce/E. — Tribe CAMPANULEiK. 
Genus Michatjxia, Lher.; {Benth. & Sooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 561.) 



MiCHAUXiA Tchihatchmoii; herba biennis, elata, erecta, robusta, patule hispida, 
caule simplici 6-7-pedali setoso-hispido inferne folioso in spicam densi- 
floram elongatam colnmnarem basi subpaniculatam terminante, foliis 
patulis et deflexis oblongis lineari-oblongis v. lyratis acutia obtusisve 
irregulariter inciso-dentatis v. lobulatis et serratis costa craasa infimia 
6-pollicaribus in petiolum angustatis Eoperioribus sessilibus y. amplexi- 
caulibus, floribus magnis in fasciculos confertos dispositia inferioribus bre- 
viter ctasse que pedicellatis superioribus aessilibus, bracteis e basi cordata 
triangnlari-ovatis acnminatis, calycis setaceo-hispiduli laciniis lanceolatis 
acumiuatis, appendicibus deflexia ovato-v. trianaulari-lanceolatis, corollae 
albae tubo hemisphasrico | poll, diam., lobis 8 tubo aequilongia ovato- 
lanceolatis obtusis recurvia, filamentis triangulari-oyatis fimbriatis, stylo 
hispido, stigmate maximo oblongo v. ovoideo ima apice 8-lobulato. 

M. Tchihatchefii, Fisch. et Mey. in Ann. 8c. Nat. Ser. iv. vol, i. (1854) p. 32. 
Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. iii. p. 892. Gartenf. 1896, p. 173. Gard. Chron. 
1897, vol. xxi. p. 182, fig. 53. 

M. columnaris, Boiss. in Serb. Kotschy. 



A majestic biennial, discovered in the Cilician Taurus 
by the late eminent traveller and explorer of Asia Minor, 
P. de Tchihatchef in 1849, the exact habitat being between 
Tchataloglou and Yailadjii in Cataonia. More recently it 
has been collected by the botanical traveller, Kotschy, in 
the same district, at elevations of two thousand eight 
hundred feet to five thousand feet above the sea, and 
amongst other localities in the celebrated defile of Giilek 
Boghas, by which Alexander the Great entered Cilicia. 

The specimen here figured was raised from seed pur- 
chased for the Royal Gardens from F. Sundermann, of 
Lindau, in 1896. It flowered in a sheltered border in 
June, 1899, and died shortly afterwards. 

Descr. — A tall, more or less hispid annual, six to seven 
feet high. Stem very stout, erect, simple, leafy below, 
passing upwards into a long, erect, cylindric, very dense- 
fl<h spike, four to five inches in diameter, which is some- 

Nov£AiB£K 1st, 1900. 



times shortly branclied at the base. Leaves six to eight 
inches long, spreading and deflexed, narrowly oblong, 
obtuse, or acute, margins more or less irregularly lobulate 
or toothed and serrate, lower sometimes lyrate, or narrowed 
into a short, broad petiole, upper sessile or semi- 
amplexicaul, midrib very thick. Flowers binate, or in 
fascicles of three, rarely more, two and a half inches in 
diameter across the corolla-limb, lower shortly pedicelled, 
upper sessile. Calyx hispidly setose, lobes half an inch 
long, ovate-lanceolate ; appendages similar, but smaller, 
broader, and deflexed. Corolla white, tube cup-shaped; 
lobes eight, ovate-lanceolate, margins fimbriate. Stijle 
hispid with spreading hairs ; stigma very large, oblong 
or obovoid, tip eight-lobulate. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, stamen ; 2, stigma : — Both enlarged. 



1143 




■Wneenl Brooks Day 3^ Son lit^Iinf 



Tab. 7743. 

ERiaERON LEIOMEBUS. 
Native of the Rochy Mountains. 

Nat. Ord. CoMPogiTE.«. — Tribe Asteroide.*. 
Genus Erigerom, Linn.; (Benth. & Rooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol, ii. p. 279.) 



ERiGERON(Euerigeron) leiomerns; lierba perennis, humilis, e basi ramosa, fere 
glaberrima, ramis spithameis asceudeutibas simplicibas monocephalis 
iufra medium foliosis, foliis patenti-recurvis angaste lineari-spathulatis 
in petiolum angustatis iategerrimis laete viridibaa apice rotundatis, 
capitulia 1 poll, diam,, iavoluori hemispherici i poll, longi bracteia 
appressia linearibus obtasis pruinosia, floribus radii numerosia suh- 
triseriatis tube brevi, ligula lineari-oblonga pallide roseo-purpurea apice 
obscure crenata, disci flavis, achajniis teretiusculis pubescentibua, pappi 
setis albia. 

E. leiomerus, A. Gray, Si/nopt. Fl N. Am. vol. ii, pt, i. p, 211. Coulter, 
Man. Bot. Rocky Mi. Region, p. 171. 

Aster glacialis, Eaton in Bot. King's Exped. p. 142. 



Erigeron leiomerus inhabits the alpine regions of 
Colorado, Utah, and j^evada, ascending to eleven 
thousand feet, where it was discovered by Dr. Parry. I 
gathered it in company with Dr. Gray on Gray's Peak, 
and in the Sierra Blanca of the Rocky Mountains in 1877. 
Its habit is that of a dwarf Aster, as may be seen by 
referring to the figure of the Himalayan A. Stracheyi:, 
Hook, f, (tab. 6912), from which genus Erigeron is only 
distinguished by the ray-flowers being in several series. 

The figure here given is that of a plant purchased in 
1895 of Mr. Siiudermann, Nurseryman, of Lindau, which 
flowered in the Herbaceous ground of the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in June of the present year, 

Descr. — A glabrous, dwarf, perennial herb, copiously 
branched from the root. Branches abour a span long, 
ascending-, slender, each bearing a solitary peduncled 
J^^ad, leafy from the base to about the middle, and with a 
few narrow linear leaves on the peduncle. Leaves spread- 
^*^g and recurved, an inch to an inch and a half long, very 
narrowly spathulate, narrowed into a petiole, quite entire, 
^^V rounded, bright green. Heads about an inch in 

^^OVEICBER 1st, 1900. 



diameter. Involucre nearly hemispheric, a quarter of an 
inch long ; bracts linear, acute, appressed, green, pruinose. 
Bay-floivers about forty, in two to three series ; ligule 
narrowly oblong, pale rose-purple ; disk flowers yellow. 
Achene nearly terete, pubescent. Pappus hairs white. — 
J. D. H, ___________ 

Fig. 1, bract of involucre; 2, ray -flower; 3, disk-flower; 4, style-arms : — 
.ill enlarged. 



n 




MS-dAJ.-N.PitdKlalK 



^>lj\c«nb Broolo.E d. 



LHeev« A (J'^Lo 



Tab. 7744. 
POTHOS LouEEiEi. 

Native of China and Tonlcin. 

Nat. Ord. Aeoide^. — Tribe OHONTiEiB. 
Genus Pothos, Linn. ; (Benth. & Sook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 999.) 



PoTHOS (Eupothos) Loureiri ; frutex alte scandens, ramulis floriferig paucis 
gracilibus, interuodiis brevibus, foliorum petiolo 4-5-pollicari l~\ 
poll, lato lineari stricto basi et apice rotundato v. trnncato laete viridi, 
lamina 1^-2 poll, longe angnste lanceolata acuminata recurva, pedunculis 
2-3 poll. longia gracilibus arcuatis, spatba l|-2-pollicari lineari v. lineari- 
lanceolata, spadioe 2-4 pollicari stipitata gracili frnctifera elongata ad 
6-pollicari cylindracea, floribus minutis confertis, filamentis dilatatis 
infra apicem repente conatrictis, antheris minimis, baccis ellipsoideis § 
poll, longis coccineis. 

P. Loureiri, Hook. & Am. Boi. Beechey Voy. p. 220. Schott Aroid. vol. i. 
p. 23, t. 49. Prodr. Aroid. p. 569. Engler in DG. Monogr. Phanerog. 
vol. ii. p. 87. 

P. terminalis, Hance in Ann. Sc. Nat. Ser. V. vol. v. (1866) p. 247. 

riagellaria repens, Lour. Fl. Cochinch. p. 212 ; Hd. Willd. vol. i. p. 263. 



Of the genus Pothos, numbering about fifty species, 
all natives of the tropics of the Old World, P. Loureiri is 
the first figured in this magazine, for the six bearing that 
generic name all are referable to other genera. These 
are — 

P. cannsefolius, Dryand. (t. 603), which is SpathipKyllum cannsefolium, 
ScAott. 
P.fcetidus, Ait. (t. 836), is Symplooarpua ffstidus, Salisb. 
P. pentaphyllus, Willd. (t. 1375), is Anthurium pentaphyllum, G. Don. 
P. macrophyllua, Willd. (t. 2301), is Anthurium cordifolium, Kunth. 
P. microphallus, Hoot. (t. 2953), is Anthurium microphyllum, Endl. 
P. crassinervius, Hook. (t. 2987), is Anthurium Hookeri, Kunth. 

P. Loureiri is a native of Southern China ; where it was 
collected by Loureiro, and described by him as a Flagellaria 
in his " Flora of Cochinchina," published in 1790. There 
are specimens in the Kew Herbarium from Macao 
(Millett), from Tingushan, on the West River (Samp- 
son), and from Tonkin (Balansa). A living plant of it 
was received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, from that 
of Hong Kong in 1888, which flowers annually in the 
Aroid House, where it is trained for twelve feet on a 
pole. It fruited freely this year for the first time. 

November 1st, 1900. 



Descr. — A rather slender, branching' climber, with 
aerial roots ; flowering branches short ; internodes about 
half an inch long. Leaf-petioles four to five inches long 
by a third to a half inch broad, linear, flat, strict, rounded 
at both ends, bright green ; blades deciirved, much shorter 
than the petiole, linear-lanceolate, acuminate. Peduncles 
two to three inches long, slender, decarved. Spathe one 
and a half to two inches long, linear or linear-lanceolate. 
Spadix stipitate, two to four inches long, cylindric, green, 
about one-sixth of an inch in diameter. Flowers minute, 
densely crowded. Berries ellipsoid, smooth, scarlet, about 
two-thirds of an inch long, one-seeded. — J, D. H. 



Fig. 1, portion of spadix; 2, periaQth-segraent; 3 and 4, stamena ; 5, ovary; 
seed :—All enlarged. o » , , j , 



77^5 




^Vmcem Br o oks Day ScSojiLl'^IinP 






Tab. 7745. 
BENDROBIUM in^quale. 

Native of New Guinea. 

Nat. Ord. ORCUiDE.^i. — Tribe Epidendse^. 
Genus DENDROBitJM, Stc.\ {Benth. Ss Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498). 



Dendrobitjm (Breviflorae ?) insequah; pseudobulbis erectis quasi diraorphig, 
aliis foliiferis e basi gracili in laminam oblongam tetragouam valde com- 
pressam apice 2-3-foliatain dilatatis, iaternodiis vaginis oratis acuminatia 
albis indutis, aliis locgioribus aphjUis e basi i^Tacili in rhachin fiiriferara 
3-4 poll, longam | poll, latam en.siforniem subfalcatam tetragonam valde 
compressam productis, foliis 3-pollicaribus oblongolanceolatia acurainatis 
coriaceis, floribus 1^ poll, expans.secundis faciebns alternis internodionitn 
rhachidissolitariisnutantibtis(a,labastrisfoveoIi8internodiorumimrrersis), 
pedicellis ^-^ poll, longis decurvis bracteis parvis orbicnlaribus irabricatis 
tectis, sepalis petalisque coaformibtis oblongo-lanceolatis acutis recurvis 
albis, mento 0, labeili basi intnsbicornnti lobis lateralibua in tabnm extus 
flavescentem intus purpureo striatum convoluti.s, tubi ore obliq e trun- 
cate in apicem (lobum terminale) late triangularem acutam Bensica 
angustato, columna brevi apice bicornuta. 

D. inaequale, Bolfe in Kew Bulletin, 1900, ined. 



A very singular Dendrobe, regarded by Mr. Rolfe as 
an anomalous species, apparently most allied to D. eu- 
phlehhim, Eeichb. f., of Java, though much larger flowered, 
and very difi'erent in the shape of the lip. Anomalous as 
the inflorescence certainly is, it would not be difficult 
to reduce it to the type of other species of the genus 
with compressed pseudobulbs ; as for example, D. anceps, 
Svv. (Aporum anceps, LindL, see tab. 3C0S), were the 
flowering pseudobulbs of that plant leafless, and tetrago- 
nous as well as compressed. On the other hand, the 
cavities in which the flower buds of D. insequale are im- 
mersed, and the position of these on the faces, instead of 
the angles of the pseudobulb, are peculiar features. 

The plant of D. i^isequale here figured was presented to 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, by Messrs. Sander & Co., of St. 
Albans. It flowered iu a tropical house in May of this 
year. 

Desci\ — Leafivff pseudobulbs six to ten inches higb, 
erect, very sfender and terete below, dilated upwards, 

^^OVEXBER 1st, 1900. 



becoming tetragonous, very strongly compressed, and 
bearing from the uppermost nodes two or three leaves; 
upper internodes clothed with white, ovate-lanceolate, 
acuminate sheaths ; flowering psendobulbs longer than the 
leafing, very slender and terete below, dilating upwards 
into a strongly compressed, sub-clavate, tetragonous, sub- 
falcate, green rhachis three to four inches long by about 
one-third of an inch broad ; internodes about as long as 
broad, margins acute. Leaves about threeinches long, ovate- 
lanceolate, acuminate. Flowers secund on one face of the 
rhachis, solitary, arising alternately from oblong depres- 
sions towards the margins of the internodes ; pedicels very 
short, clothed with minute, rounded, imbricating bracts. 
Sepals and petals sub-similar, spreading and recurved, 
obloDg-lanceolate, acuminate, white. Lip shorter than the 
sepals, lateral lobes convolute, forming a cylindric tube, 
pale yellow, streaked with purple within ; mouth of tube 
obliquely truncate, with a short triangular tip repre- 
senting the terminal lobe ; disk with two, stout, erect, 
basal spines. — J. D. 11. 



Pig. 1, lip; 2, lip with one side-lobe removed; 3, column; 4, anther; 
5, polliuia: — All enlarged. 



1146 




iis.a<ajN,Pitihii«h 



I.. Rjft«ve &- C9 Lond-or.. 



Tab. 7746. 

CYPRIPEDIUM GUTTATUM. 
Native of N.B. Europe, Asia, and N. W. America. 



iS'at. Ord. Oechide^. — Tribe Cypripediej!. 
Genus Cypripedium, Linn-; {Bent/i. & Hook. ■" 'J^n. Plant, vol. iii. p. 634.) 



CyPBiPEDiUM (Diphyllse) guttatum; rhizomate repente, caulibus 6-r2-pollioari- 
bus laxe pilosis, loliis 2 alternis sessilibus ellipticia v. orbiculari- 
ellipticis acuminatis v. apiculatis marginibua ciliatis 6-7-nervii9, floribua 
solitariis albis purpureo macalati^, bracta pollicari ovate- lanceolata 
foliacea pubescente, sepalo dorsai_'*amplo hemisphasrico, lateialibus in 
laininam angustam bideutatam v. bifidam viiidem labello suppositam 
connatis, petalis lineari-oblongis sigmoideo-falcatis deflexia, labello fere 
globose sepalum dorsale asquante ore constricto, columnEB stamineas lobia 
lateralibus patentibus 2-lobulatis antheriferis, stamina sterili galeato 
aureo apicem versus creaulato, stylo decurvo crasso apice dilatato 
truncate. 

0. guttatum, Sw. in Vet. Acad. Handl. Stochh. 1800, p. 251. Lindl. Gen. et 
Sp. Orchid p. b29. Eeickb. le. PI. Grit. vol. iii. p. 8, t. 210; FJ. Germ. 
vol. xiii. pp. 16fi, 186, t. 495, 620. L(dth. Fl. AH. vo'. iv. p. 174; Fl. Boss. 
vol. iv. p. 88, Book. FL Bar. Am. vol. ii. p. 205. Fl. des Strres, vol. vi. 
p. 131, t. 673. 

C. orientale, Bpreng. Syst. Veg. vol. iii. p. 746. 

C. variegatum, Georgi, Itin. vol. i. p. 232, vel. ii. p. 719 (ex Ledeb.). 



The most remarkable character of this beautiful little 
Lacly's-slipper is its extraordinarily wide distribution. It 
inhabits Central Russia, from the longitude of Moscow 
to the Ural Mts., thence it extends through northern 
Asia to Kamtschatka, Manchuria, and the mountains of 
China from Peking southwards ; crossing Behring's Straits 
by the Aleutian Islds. (in one of which, TJnalaska, it has 
been found) it inhabits Alaska, and extends eastward to 
the Mackenzie River, where, at Fort Franklin, in N.W. 
Canada, it was collected by Richardson during his and 
Franklin's perilous Arctic journey. Nor is its distribution 
in latitude less notable, being from close upon the Arctic 
circle in N.E. Asia, and in N.W. America, southward 
in Asia to the mountains of Szechuen, in China, about 
lat. 30° N., and to the Eastern Himalaya, in the Tibetan 
province of Chumbi, between Sikkim and Bhotan, where 
it has been quite recently discovered by a collector from 
the Royal Botanical Gardens of Calcutta. 

November 1st, 3900. 



The specimen of G. guttatiim here figured was kindly 
commnnicated by H. J. Elwes, Esq., F.R.S., from his 
garden at Colesborne, Gloucestershire, in June of the present 
year. Roots of it were brought by him from the Altai 
mountains in 1899, where it was growing in an almost 
impenetrable forest of Pinus Gemhra^ on the- west shore of 
Lake Teletskoi. The specimen figured is smaller than the 
average of those in the Kew Herbarium ; as in all of 
these, the leaves turn black in drying. 

Bescr. — Uootstoch creeping and rooting. Stem six to 
twelve inches high, softly pubescent with flaccid, spread- 
ing hairs. Leaves two, alternate, three to five inches long 
by two to three broad, sessile, broadly or narrowly elliptic, 
acute, or apiculate, ciliate on the margins, five- to seven- 
nerved. Flowei's solitary, bracteate, white blotched with 
purple, about one and a half inches long from the tip of 
the dorsal sepal to that of the lip. Bract an inch long, 
ovate-lanceolate, green, pubescent. Dorsal sepal hemi- 
spheric, lateral united into a two-toothed or bifid, narrow, 
green blade, placed under the lip, and shorter than it. 
Petals linear-oblong, deflexed, sigmoidly falcate. Lip about 
as large as the dorsal sepal, tumidly saccate, mouth con- 
tracted. Column with a large, arched, golden-yellow, 
sterile stamen, crenate at the tip ; lateral arms two-lobed, 
spreading, overhanging the anthers, stigma decurved, 
stout, tip dilated, truncate. — J. D. H. 



Fipr. 1, rootstock, of the natural size ; 2 and 3, front and side views of the 
column : — Enlarged, 



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\5inoentBroolrs,Day &Son Lf^Liif 



1 ReevB S. C^London. 



Tab. 7747. 

DENDROBIUM spectabile. 

Native of New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide.b. — Tribe Epidendre*. 
GenU8 Dendeobium, Sw.-, {Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498.) 



Dendrobium (Latonria) spectabile \ pseudobalbis 1-2-pedaIibua cajspitosia 
simplicibus subclavatis flexaosia apice 3-6-phylli8, internodiis sulcatia 
supremis vaginis hyalinia deciduia tectia, foliia 6-8-pollicaribu8 sabseaaili- 
bxi3 ovato- v. lineari-oblongis obtnaia crasae coriaceia aupra Ifete-aubtna 
flavo-viridibua nervis obacaris, pedunculo infra-foliaceo aacendente elon- 
gate viridi baain versna vaginia paucia appreaaia viridibua obtuaia aucto, 
racemo aoberecto laxe multifloro, bracteia ovato-lanceolatia herbaceia, pedi- 
celliacum ovariia 2-pollicaribtis viridibua, floribus 3 poll. latis albia purpareo 
striatia et maculatia, aepalia petalisqne IJ poll. longia patenti- recur vis 
flexuoaia marginibua criapato-undulatia, aepalia e baai lata aabulato- 
lanceolatia, petalia anguatioribua, labello aepalia paullo longiore, loins 
lateralibua brevibua lunatis creuatia columnam cingentibua, terminali 
anguste panduriformi in apicem recurvam angnatatia marginibua valde 
nndulatia, diaco baai 3-caIlo80 et lamellia erectia carnosia crenulatis 
inatrocto, mento brevi craaao, polliniia 2. 

D. apectabile, Miq. Fl. Ind. Bat. vol. iii. p. 645. Bolfe Orchid. Rev. vol. iv. 
(1896) p. 356. Gard. Ghron. 1899, vol. ii. p. 491, fig. 162. Journ. Hort. 
ser. III. vol. xxxix. p. 662, fig. 97. Goffn. Diet. Icon. Orchid. Dendr. t. 22. 
JTetr Bulletin, 1900, App. II. p. 43. Sanders Cat. Orchid. &o., 1899, p. 7, 
cum ic. 

D. tigrinum, Rolfe ex Semsl. in Ann. Bot. vol. v. (1891) p. 507. 

Latouria spectabilis, Bfume, Rutnph. vol. iv. p. 41, t. 19.5, fig. 1, and 1. 199, 
fig. 0. F. Mikell. in Victorian Naturalist, vol. i. (1884) p. 62. 



This magnificent Dendrobe was discovered in New 
Guinea by Leschenaiilt de La Tour, naturalist of Baudin's 
voyage to the Pacific in search of La Peyrouse's Jost 
expedition. La Tour made a drawing of it, upon which 
Bhime founded the genus Lafonria, which he distinguished 
from Dendrobium by the lateral lobes of the lip, erro- 
neously supposing them to be connate. 

More recently it has been found in the easternmost islets 
of the Solomon Archipelago, namely, in Malaita, whence 
plants were obtained by Sir Trevor Lawrence, and in San 
Christoval, where it was collected by the Rev. R. B. 
Comins in 1890. The specimen here figured was kindly 
lent by J. T. Bennett-Poe, Esq., of Holmewood, Cheshunt, 
in January of this year. 

Decembeb 1st, 1900. 



Descr. — Pseudohulhs one to two feet liigh, tufted, 
narrowly clavate, terete, grooved. Leaves three to five, 
terminal, five to eight inches long, ovate- or linear-oblong, 
obtuse, flat, coriaceous. Peduncle ascending from the 
pseudobulb below the leaves, stout, terete, green, bearing a 
few distant, small, oblong, obtuse sheaths. Panicle broad, 
loosely many-flowered. Bracts about half an inch long, 
oblong-lanceolate, obtuse. Pedicels with the ovary about 
two inches long. Flowers three inches broad, white 
streaked and spotted with dark purple. Sepals and 
petals subequal in length, spreading and recurved, almost 
twisted, margins crispedly undulate ; sepals narrowed from 
a broad triangular base into a subulate-lanceolate tip; 
petals much narrower, strap-shaped. Lip rather longer 
than the sepals, lobulately undulate; side-lobes small, 
lunate, together forming a cup around the stout column; 
mid-lobe narrowly panduriform, terminating in a long, 
narrow, subulate-lanceolate recurved tip ; disk with many 
thick, crenate ridges, and with three parallel pyriform calli 
at the base. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1 and 2, portion of lip allowing the calli ; 3, column ; 4, polllnia : — 
all enlarged ; 5, reduced view of whole plant. 



748 




VmcentBrooltS.Dcy &■ SonLt*Irnp 



L Reeve & C°I,<: 



Tab. 7748. 

ADESMIA B0K0NI01DE3. 
Native of South-Eastern Patagonia. 



Nat. Ord. LkguminosEvK. — Tribe Hedysab,e.b. 
Genus Adesjiu, DC. ; {Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 517.) 



Adesmi\ horonioides ; frutex liuraili?, petalis exceptis glandulis magnig seBsilibns 
verrucosus, ramulis robustis, foliis breviter petioiatis linearibuR, foliolia 
10-1 2-jugis cum imparl subconfertis fere orbicularibus 5- poll. diam. grossa 
crenatia supra luride viridibiis, petiolo rhachique craasiusculis, racemis 
elongatis erectis multifloria rbachi robaata viridi, floribna i poll, longis, 
pedicellis brevibus crassinscuHs, bracteolis in pulvillnm tuberculatum 
mutatis, calycis campanulati glandulosi et pilosuli lobia obtusia, vexillo 
orbiculari aurantiaco infra medium pnrpnreo striato, alis oblique oblongia 
aureis, carina brevi vireaceote, legnmine 3-5-articulato debiacente 
glanduloso-piloso et punctia nigris adsperao. 

A. boronioides, Hook./. Fl. Antarct. vol. i. pars ii. p. 257. G. Gay, Fl. Chil. 
vol. ii. p. 182. 

Adesmia is a large South American genus of plants, con- 
sisting of about 170 species, according to the " Kew Index," 
of which, however, many are no doubt synonyms, for 
Bentham, in the "Genera Plantarum," says of the 110 
species supposed to be known, " plares a diversis auctoribus 
bis terve repetitee et vix ultra 80 species bonse in herbariia 
nostris servantur." The fact is that the genus has not 
been monographed since 1825, when nine species only were 
known to De Candolle, and published in his " Prodromus." 
One only has been figured in this work, A. halsamica, 
Bert., which yields an exquisite balsamic odour. 

A. horonioides is a native of South- Eastern Patagonia, 
where it was first collected at Cape Fairweather, in about 
lat. 62° S. by Capt. King, R.N., during his survey of the 
extreme south of Chih, Patagjonia, and Fuegia. It has 
since been collected on the hills at the entrance of the 
Straits of Magellan on the N. side, at Cape Possession, 
at Mt. Direction, and at Port Deseado. It is described 
by Dr. Cunningham, in his " Notes on the Natural History 
of the Straits of Magellan," as forming a shrub with 
a stem eighteen inches high, covered with glands that 
yield a viscid substance having a balsamic odour. 

The specimen figured was sent to Kew for the determina- 

Dbcembkr 1st, 1900. 



tion of its name in May of the present year by A. K. 
Bulley, Esq., of Ness, Neston, Cheshire, who raised it from 
seeds collected by Mr. T. T. Austin in Patagonia. The 
species has been for some years in cultivation in the open 
air at Kew, where, however, it has never flowered. Mr. 
Bulley informs me that with him it forms a hardy ever- 
green, never suffering from storm or frost, and flowering 
profusely. 

Descr. — A small shrub, warted all over except the petals 
and leaflets with large balsamiferous glands. Leaves one 
and a half to two inches long, by half an inch broad, 
shortly petioled, linear, impari-pinnate ; leaflets ten to 
thirteen pairs, close together, sessile, orbicular, coarsely 
crenate, rather thick in texture, very dark green above, 
paler beneath ; petiole and rhachis stout ; stipules obscure. 
Bacemes terminal on the branches, erect, three to five 
inches long, many-flowered ; petiole and rhachis stout, 
green; bracts represented by tubercled cushions at the 
bases of the very short pedicels. Calyx about one-sixth of 
an inch long, green, hairy and glandular ; lobes one-third, 
the length of the tube, obtuse, erect. Corolla about three 
times as long as the calyx. Standard, bright orange-yellow, 
with purple streaks from the base to the middle. Wings 
golden-yellow. Keel small, pale green. Fod an inch to an 
inch and a half long, glandular hairy, and covered with, 
black spots ; joints three to five, tumid. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, portion of rhachis of leaf with a pair of leaflets; 2, portion of 
rhachis of raceme, with bract, pedicel, calyx, and ovary ; 3, stamens and 
ovary ; 4, ovary laid open -.—all enlarged ; 5, pods of nat. size. 



7749 




M.S.delJ.N.Rt<ihli+H 



AiT.ce7xtBi-ool<s,Day&SonI.t*^P ' 



1 Reeve &. C"?Lan.do 



Tab. 7749. 
DASYLIRION quadrangulatum. 

Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Tribe Djia.cjene^. 
Genus Dasylirion, Zu.ce. {Benth. ^- Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 780.) 



Dastliriont quadranyuJatwm; caudice robusto, foliis numerosissimis den- 
sissime confertis 2-pedalibu8 exterioribns recurvis infcerioribus erectig 
rigidia tetragonis e basi dilatata ad medium compressis deinde 
aequilateris in apicem pungentem sensim attenuatis tactu aeperiilis 
marginibus subscaberulis, scapo 5-pedali robusto foliia setaceia elongatia 
inferioribus longioribus defleiis superioribus brevibus erectis ornato, in- 
florescentia paniculata e racemia confertis cylindraceis amentifortnibua 
erectis bracteis inimixtis constante, bracteis 6-8 poll, longia spathaceia 
ovato-lanceolitis acuminatis pallide brunneis albo-marginatia deciduia, 
racemia 4 poll, longis 1 poll. diam. breviter pedunculatis apico rotundatis, 
floribua densissime confertis imbricatis, pedicellia vix \ poll, longis supra 
medium articulatis basi bracteolatia, bracteolia pedicellia brevioribna 
cupulilormibus hyalinis erosis, perianthii segmentis late oblongis apice 
rotundatis, ovario compresso, stigmatibua renifortnibua stipitatis, fructu 
\ poll, longo orbiculari-oblongo trigono valde compresso coriaceo inde- 
hiscente basi periantbio induto apice rotundato bilobo stigmatibua sinu 
insertis, alls amplis, nuce parvo 1-spermo, semiae § poll, longo ovoideo 
compresso-trigono, testa pallida coriacea nucleo adhjerente. 

D. quadraDgulatum, ;S^. Wats, in Proc. Amer. Acad. vol. xiv. (1879) p. 250. 
Gard. Chron. 1900, vol. i. p. 244. 

Agave striata, var. recurva, Zuccarini, ex Baker in Gard. Ghron, 1877, vol. ii. 
p. 556. 

This very remarkable plant is a native of the mountains 
of the Tamaulipas State of Mexico, at elevations of seven 
thousand to nine thousand feet, where it was collected bj 
Dr. E. Palmer. It was first described in 1879 by Sereno 
Watson. But it must have been discovered and seeds 
sent to Europe before that time, for it was in cultiva- 
tion in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1877, in which year 
Mr. Baker mentions it in the Gardeners Caronide, under 
the name of Agave striata, var. recurva, of Zuccarini. In 
its native country the trunk is described as three feet to 
eight feet in height, and the flowering stalk five feet to ten 
feet; but the latter attains much larger dimensions in 
Europe, for Mr. Watson mentions a specimen growing in 
the Jardin d'Acclimatation of Hyeres (under the name of 
XantJwrrJixa hastilis), with a scape and panicle together 
December 1st, 1900. 



eighteen feet liigh, and another also of great size, but not 
in flower, at the Casino of Monte Carlo, named D. junci- 
folium. The latter specimen was subsequently seen by 
Mr. Baker in a flowering state, with leaves three feet to 
six feet long, and scapes fifteen feet to twenty feet high. 

The origin of the specimen so long cultivated in the 
Succulent House of the Royal Gardens, Kew, is unknown. 
It is a female plant, of very slow growth, the stem being 
only eighteen inches high; the tuft of leaves is six feet in 
diameter, the scape eight feet high, and inflorescence two 
feet. 

Deser. — Trunh stout, cylindric. Leaves (in the Kew 
specimen) two feet long, exceedingly numerous, densely 
crowded in a globose head, the outer recurved, inner erect, 
rigid, tetragonous, flattened from the base to about the 
middle, narrowed, and equilateral from thence to the 
pungent tip, surfaces rough to the touch, margins rather 
rough. Scape very stout, clothed with short leaves, the lower 
of which are deflexed,the upper erect. Panicle of numerous, 
strict, erect racemes of imbricating small green flowers 
mixed with large white, spathaceous, deciduous bracts, six to 
eight inches long. Racemes about four inches long, shortly 
peduncled ; pedicels about half an inch long, jointed above 
the middle; bracteoles minute, cup-shaped, membranous, 
erose. Segments of 'perianth broadly oblong, obtuse. 
Ovary compressed, crowned with three reniform stigmas. 
Fruit orbicular-oblong, trigonous, compressed, about one- 
third of an inch long, winged all round, tip notched with 
the stigmas in the sinus, one-seeded. Seed minute, ovoid, 
trigonous — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, transverse section of leaf; 2, flowers and bracteole; 3, portion of 
periantli with stamens : — all enlarged ; 4, reduced view of plant 






:7r,v 




%i.can.LBrooa<s Day *.Son Lt jJ. F 



i 



Tab. 7750. 
MATTHIOLA coronopifolia. 

Native of Sicily. 

Nat. Ord. CuuciFER^. — Tribe Arabidea, 
Genus Matthiola, R. Br. ; {Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Flant. vol. i. p. 67.) 



Matthiola coronojnfolia ; herba perennis v. suffruticulus ramosns, pllis stellatis 
cano-i)aberulus et sparse glandulo'o-pubescens, foliia lineari-oblongis in- 
sequaliter pinnatilobatis v. sinuato-deutatis rarius intcgria lobulia iocurvid 
obtusis, racemis spiciformibus, pedicellis brevissimis, sepalis lineari- 
oblongis obtusis, petalorum lamina | poll, longis, lineari-oblonga imdulata 
vinoso-purpurea, siliqna giacili subtereti, stigmate 3-loba v. breviter 2-3- 
cruri, seminibus oblongis anguate alatis. 

M. coronopifolia, DC. -Sj/st. Veg. vol. i. p. 173 ; et ProAr. vol. i. p. 134 {exd. 
cit. Sibth. <§• Sm.) Presl, Fl. Sic. vol. i. p. 41. Guss. PI. Bar. Sic. p. 275. 
parlim; FL Sic. Symps. vol.ii. pars i. p. 176. Bertol. FL ItaL vol. vu. 
p. 103. Tenore, SylL FL Neap. p. 321 ; FL Nap. vol. v. p. 66. Arcang. 
Gomjp. FL ItaL p. 31. 

M, tristis forma, Farlat. Fl ItaL vol. ix. p. 801. 

M. trietis, var. bicornis, Pojero, FL Sic. vol. i. pars i. p. 101. 

Leacojiim montanum, &c , Bocc. Mus. Plant Bar. Sic. p. 147, t. 111. Rai/, 
Hist Plant, vo!. iii. p. 407. 

L. minus purpureuro, «fec., Barrel. Plant. Gall. Ic, t, 999. 

Hesperis Sicula coroncpifol. &c., Tournef. Insiit. vol. i. p. 223. 



Though referred by Parlatore and Pojero to a form of 
M. tristis, Br., M. coronopifolia is retained as a distinct 
species by most Italian botanists, including the latest of 
these, Arcangeli. Its sole constant distinctive character 
is that of the beautiful vinous purple colour of the petals, 
which was recognized by Boccone (1697), and has been by all 
subsequent authors, in contrast to the dull yellow or Imd 
often greenish purple of M, tristis. It is singular that 
De OandoUe, and following him some other authorities, 
whilst recognizing the colour of the peta s as distinctive 
should cite Cheiranthus cororiopifolia of the F ora (xra3ca 
as a synonym, the beautiful plate in which work is certainly 
M. tristis. Boissier, who unites coronopifolia and tn.stis m 
his "Flora Onentalis " with the character "petahs lividis 
vel vinoso-purpureis," overlooks the normally pinnatifid 
character of the leaves of coronopifolia, to which it owes 

December 1st, 1900- 



its name, describing these as "integris v. utrinque 
1-2-dentato-lobatis." 

M. coronopifolia appears to be a very local plant, confined 
to Sicily, and though some authors cite localities for it in 
Continental Italy, Arcangeli gives only one, " Parcoe a 
Cattolico." The specimen here figured was raised from 
seed supplied by Mr. SUudermann of Lindau, Bodensee, 
Bavaria; it flowered freely and ripened seeds in the 
rockery of the Eoyal Gardens, Kew. 

Baser. — A small, branching, perennial herb, or almost 
an undershrub, covered uniformly with a hoary pubescence 
of stellate hairs, with here and there a few gland-tipped 
hairs ; branches leafy, straggling, and ascending. Leaves 
two to three inches long, linear-oblong, very irregularly 
sinuate-lobed or sub-pinnatifid, rarely (except in young 
plants) entire ; lobes usually more or less incurved, obtuse. 
Racemes spiciform from the shortness of the pedicels, few- 
er many-fld. Sppals narrow, obtuse, one half to three- 
quarters of an inch long; margins membranous, glabrous. 
Petals with the limb of a clear, vinous purple colour, deeper 
towards the claw, as long as or longer than the sepals, 
hnear-oblong, obtuse, strongly waved. Filaments naked ; 
anthers narrow. Pod three to four inches long, slender, 
flexuous, sub-terete ; stigma three-lobed, or with two or all 
the lobes produced into short horns. Seeds oblong, com- 
pressed, with a narrow, hyaline wing. — J. D. H. 



hafr?-" 9' Kw° of leaf showing the stellate pubescence and gland-tipped 

7 ut^nW ^^ ^'"'/' ^^^y^' ^' '^^°^^°^ ^"d pistil; 5, anther; 6, pod ; 
/,XQtenorofpodandseeda:— all but fig. 6 enZar^ec/. ' >^ > 







M. S.delJNTiS^, htj 



-^cent Broo^sPay&SonU-^-liti^ 



"L Reeve iS^ C ? Londor 



Tab. 7751. 
PASSIFLORA OAPsuLARis. 

Native of Brasil. 

Nat. Ord. PASsiFLORACEiB. — Tribe Passifloee.b. 
Genus Passiflora, Linn. ; {Benth. & JECooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 810.) 



Passifloka (Decaloba) capsularit-, cirrifera, ramia gracilibas angnlatis pnbe- 
scentibus, foliis cordatis antice lunato-bilobis sinn mncronatis lobis 
divaricatis ovatis v. ovato-oblongis apice rotundatia trinerviis supra 
pilosis subtus tomentosis, petiolo poUicari, stipulis parvis aubulatis falcatia 
deciduis, pedicellis 2-3 poll, longis, alabastris oblongia obtusia, perianthii 
rosei tubo cylindraceo pilose basi intruso lobula^o, sepalis lineari-oblongis 
obtnsis 3-nerviis, petalis sepalis conformibua sed pallidioribus et panllo 
angustioribna, corona exteriore erecta e filis snbclavatia erectia j^etalis 
multo brevioribus, interiore brevissima incurva alba plicata crenata, ovario 
hirsnto, fructu siliquaeformi elongato-ellipaoidea hexagona, seminibas 
ovoideis profnnde sulcatis flavescentibus. 

P. capsnlaris, Unn. Sp. PI. p. 957 (non Bot. Mag. t. 2868), DC. Prodr. vol. iii. 
p. 325. Masters in Mart. Fl. Bras. vol. xiii. pars i. pp. 552 et 589. 

P. rubra, Lamh. Diet. vol. iii. p. 35 {non Linn.). Griseb. Fl. Brit. W. Ind. 
p. 292 {in part). 

P. pubescens, H. B. & K., Nov. Gen. & Sp. vol. ii. p. 132. 

P. bilobata. Veil. Fl. Flum. vol. ix. t. 78 {non Juss.). 

P. lunata, Veil. I.e. vol. ix. t. 80. 

P. piligera, Gardn. in Hook. Lond. Journ. Bot. vol. i. (1842) p. 173. 

P. foliis bilobis, &c., Plum. Plant. Am. p. 120, t. 138, f. 2. 



The accompanying figure is that of the true Passiflora 
cajmilaris, distinguished by its dehiscent, elongate, ellipsoid, 
hairy fruit ; the plant figured under that name at tab. 2868 
of this work being P. rubra, L., a widely spread native of 
tropical America. P. capsularis appears to be a common 
plant in Brasil, and has been collected in other parts of 
the continent of S. America and in the West Indies, but 
whether in a wild or cultivated state may be doubted. It 
was introduced into this country by the late Mr. Isaac 
Anderson Henry, of Trinity, Edinburgh, who sent specimens 
to Kew in 1880. 

The figure is taken from a plant presented to the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in 1896, by the late Professor AUman, 
F.R.S., of Parkstone, Dorset. It flowers freely all the 
summer in a stove. 
December 1st, 1990. 



Descr. — A fcall, slender climber, with grooved, villously 
pubescent branches, and axillary red tendrils. Leaves 
three to four inches broad. Innately two-lobed, with a 
mucro in the sinus, deeply cordate at the base, pubescent 
above, tomentose beneath; lobes divaricate, obliquely 
ovate-oblong, obtuse, three-nerved ; petiole about an inch 
long; stipules small, subulate, falcate. Flowers solitary, 
axillary, about two inches broad, rose-red ; pedicels two to 
three inches long, curved, pubescent, jointed one-quarter 
to half an inch below the flower, green below the joint, red 
above it. Galijx-tuhe about half an inch long, cylindric, 
hairy, twelve-lobed at the intruded base ; sepals narrowly 
linear-oblong, obtuse. Petals rather narrower and paler 
than the sepals. Outer corona much shorter than the 
petals, formed of white, sub-clavate threads of equal 
length ; inner short, lobulate, incurved, white, membranous. 
Ovary hairy. — /. D. E. 

Fig. 1, calyx-tube cut open, showing tbe two coronas ; 2, portion of inner 
corona ; 3 and 4, stamens ; 5, ovary -.—All enlarged. 



INDEX 

To Vol. LVI. of the Third Series, or Vol. CXXVI. of 
tlie whole Work. 



77 tS Adesmia boronioides. 

7712 Aloe abyssinica. 

7709 Antholyza Schweinfarthii. 
7700 Arissema flavum. 

7728 Asparagus ternifolius. 
7733 „ umbellatus. 

7714 Campanula mirabilis. 
7727 Cattleya x Whitei. 
7705 Cereus mojavensis. 
7704 Ceropegia Woodii. 

7710 Clematis oiientalis, var. tan- 

gutica. 
7732 Colocasia antiquorum, var. 

Fontanesii. 
7717 Convolvulus macrostegius. 
7692 Coryanthes macrantha. 
7736 Corylopsis pauciflora. 

7713 Cotyledon (Echeveria) Pur- 

pusii. 

7740 Crocus Alexandri. 

7719 Cryptocoryne Griffithii. 

7746 Cypripedium guttatum. 
7749 Dasylirion quadrangulatura. 

7724 Dendrobium Hodgkinsoni. 
7745 „ inaequale. 

7741 „ Jerdonianum. 

7747 „ spectabile. 
7708 Deutzia discolor, var. pur- 

purascens. 
7695 Diostea juncea. 

7720 Dipladenia eximia. 

7725 ,, pastorum, var. 
tenuifolia. 

7743 Erigeron leiomerus. 



7697 Eucalyptus ficifolia, 
7739 Grevillea ornithopoda. 
7693 Hay lock ia pusilla. 

7721 Helenium tenuifolium. 
7723 Hesperaloe yuccffifolia. 

7737 Hippeastrum Harrisoni, 

7730 Huernia somalica. 

7701 Iris obtusifolia. 

7734 „ stenophylla. 

7706 Kniphofia rufa. 

7722 Lilium Brovvnii, var. leucan- 

thum. 

7715 Lilium sutchuense, 

7738 Lindenbergia grandiflora. 

7698 Lomatia longifolia. 
7094 Macleania insignis. 
7718 Mamiilaria vivipara. 

7750 Matthiola coronopifolia. 
7703 „ siiiuata, var. 

oyensis. 
7742 Michauxia Tchihatchefii. 

7751 Passiflora capsularis. 

7735 Pedicularis, curvipes. 
7729 Pbseoneuron Moloneyi, 

7699 Pblomis Innarifoh'a. 
7744 Pothos Loureiri. 

7711 Renanthera Imschootiana. 
7696 Rhododendron arboreum, var. 

Kingianum. 
7726 Robinia neo-mexicana. 

7716 Rubus reflexus. 

7731 Senecio auriculatissimus. 

7702 Stanbopea Rodigasiana. 

7707 Verbascum longifolium. 



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Tab. 7747.— DENDROBIUM SPECTABILE. 
„ 7748.— ADESMIA BOKOMOIDES. 
„ 7749.— DASYLIRIO'N QUADRANGULATUM. 
„ 7750.— MATTHIOLA CORONOPIFOLTA. 
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