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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CUETIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPEIS1NG THE 



plants of tin liopi (©aiUma of &elu, 



OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN; 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BT 

SIR JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., O.B., G.C.SJ., 

F.K.S., F.L.S., etc., 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D. CANTAB., CORRESPONDENT OF THE INSTITUTE OF FRANCE. 



VOL. LV. 
OF THE THIRD SERIES. 

(Or Vol. CXXr.qfthe Whole Work.) 




■ lie spake of plants that hoi 
Their blossoms thr 

Ofim hues; 

With buddiiiur, fading, ted 
They stRiil the tronder of i.l,e b 

From morn to evening A 

Woi!i 8HOKTH. 



LONDON : 



T AA r T7 r r 1> I. 



6, HENRIETTA STREET, GOV EXT GARDEN. 



To 

Tin: \i i:\fonv ok my t.att n:n-\i>. 

lli:xi;v l£v£qUE DB VILMOBIN, 

UhBUWOM, runs 
WHO DIKD I IMtj 

i in'Uii \ri mi Of nn "BOXAVM LI HAGAZIHB, 

iKirrri: 

III- WORTH VM> HI: 



.!. I). HOOKER 



YOL. LV 



No, (549. 

Price 3*. tid. coloured, 2e. 6d> 
OR No. lO'io OF THE ENTIRE WORK. 

CU BUS'S 



BOTANICAL MAGAZINE 



COMPEISIh-a 



THE BLA W THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

AM) OF OTHEIi BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, u 

I'ABLi' RIPTION8; 



Sis JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.C.S.L, c.B., F.ks., f.L 

late Qtmtor of ihe ffiepai Stannic Ciarfiens of • 




LON 



LOVF.LL 
ro THB 

ETA ! 



THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

13 I SH ISLE 

With Varieties, akd Htbk! 

Bv ALFI; I by ROBERT MOBG 

Tha work wiil be ir> 1 parta etch. 



OUTLINES OF BRITISH FUNGOLOGY. 

M. J. B] I 

.nging 




INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. B > Britiah Asiocia ion 

for tb© advancement of Science a- ) 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 
I R< \ U ! ■ ' , 21m, 

Now ready, txnnplt 

Foreign Finches in Captivity. 

By ER, Ph.K 

rsu a large a : between 300 »nd 400 page*, with 90 Vln\t». by 

9. W, FROWli: 

HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 
to or Naturalise. British Isles. 

By 

8th Edition, Revised by Sir J. I >. } : >., 4c. 9*. net. 



ILLDSTEATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 



ated Companion ■ hitUk Florat. 

4th ; ;15 Wood Ensmmxxrs 



- f ;x 




VuT.centBroo'ks,Day&.SoiiLt d J]rii 



Tab. 7632. 
ACALYPHA hispida. 

Native of New Guinea. 

Nat. Ord. Euphorbiace.e. — Tribe Crotonejs. 
Genus Acalypha, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 311.) 



Acalypha (Euacalypha) hispida; f'rutex dioicus, 10-15-pedalis, foliis longe 
petiolatis late ovato-coivlatis v. rhorabeo-ovatis, acuminatis subacute v. 
obtuse crenato-serratis basi rotucdatis vel late cuneatis utrinque glabria 
puberulisve supra laete viridibus subtus pallidis, petiolo lamina breviore 
pubescenti-tomentellis, spicis femineis longiasimis pendnlis fere a basi 
densissime floriferis, floribus in glomerulus bracteatos et bracteolato3 
confertissimis, bracteis inconspicuis, bracteolis minutis subulatis lan- 
ceolatisve, sepalis 4 ovatis acutis hispidis, ovario minuto pilis albis 
stellatim hispido, stylo brevi, stigmatibus 3 longissimis sanguineia in 
lacinias valde elongataa capillares tissia. 

A. hispida, Burm. Fl Ind. p. 203 (sphalm. 303), t. 61, fig. 1 (excl. cit. Rheede). 
Benth. in Hook. Lond. Joum. Bot. vol. ii. (1813), p. 232 ; Muell. Arg. in DC. 
Prodr. vol. xv. pars. II. p. 815. Schum. in Notizblatt K. Bot. Gart. et 
Mus. Berl. vol. ii. p. 127. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. v. p. 417. 

A. densiflora, Bl. Bijd. p. 628. Miq. Fl. Ind. Bat. vol. i. pars II. p. 405. 

A. Sanderi, N.E. Br. in Gard. Ghron. 1896, vol. ii. p. 392; 1898, vol. i. 
p. 248, fig. 93. Andre in Rev. Sortie, vol. lxx. (1898), p. 458, cum ic. 
Gartenfl. 1898, p. 276. 

A. rubra, Noronh. ex Hassle, in Hoev. et de Vr. Tijdschr. Nat. Qes. vol. xi. 
(1844), p. 216 nomen tantum. 

Caturus spiciflorus, Roxb. Fl. Ind. vol. iii. p. 760. A. Juss. Tent. Euphorb. 

pp. 45, 115, t. 14, fig. 45 (non Linn.). 
Cauda feliB, Humph. Herb. Amb. vol. iv. t. 36. 



It is singular that so remarkable and ornamental a plant 
as that here figured, and one so long known in cultivation 
in India and the Malay Islands, should have been only quite 
recently introduced into Europe. Rumphius, writing in 
1690, described and figured it for his " Herbarium Amboy- 
nense " (published in 1750), as rare in Amboyna, and 
known only in gardens and where planted in shrubberies. 
Roxburgh, upwards of sixty years ago, described it (under 
the wrong name of Caturus apidfiorus, Willd.) from speci- 
mens growing in the Garden of the Honourable East India 
Company, Calcutta. It is entered in works on Malayan 
botany as cultivated in Singapore and Java ; and Bentham 
is the authority for its being found in the Fiji Islands, 
of which it has never been proved to be a native. Under 
Jant/aby 1st, 1899. 



these circumstances its discovery, no doubt in a wild Btate, 
on the shores of the Bismarck Archipelago, in Eastern 

New Guinea, by Mr. Micholitz, when collecting for Messrs. 
Sander in 1&96, is a notable one in the annals of horticul- 
ture. Hitherto, only the female plant has been described, 
for it appears to me doubtful whether that figured at 
tab. 37 of Herb. Amboin., which has been considered to be 
the male (but which is not described as such by Ruiuphius) 
can safely be referred to the same Bpecies. 

Atalypha hispidd cannot fail to become an exceptionally 
popular stove plant, not only because of its great beauty 
and striking habit, but from it- flowering literally all the 
year round. The largest plant now at Kew, procured 
from Messrs. Sander in 1898, has been in fine condition 
ever since, having now upwards of fifty flowering spil 
and others still to expand. It must, however* be borne in 
mind, that the introduction of the male plant and pollina- 
tion of the female thereby, would in all probability check 
further flowering of the female for a definite period 
devoted to the maturation of seed. 

Descr. — An erect, dioecious shrub, ten to fifteen feet 
high, with brown bark, and spreading leafy green branches. 
Leaves eight to ten inches long, opposite and alternate, 
broadly ovate or rhombic-ovate, acuminate, base rounded 
or broadly cunoate, often notched at the insertion of the 
petiole, surfaces glabrous or puberulous, upper dark green* 
lower pale, margins irregularly acutely or obtusely crenate- 
toothed ; nerves eight to ten pairs, petiole one-lift.h to one- 
fourth shorter than the blade, terete, tomentosely pubescent. 
Female splices axillary, pendulous, twelve to eighteen inches 
long by one in diameter, terete, shortly peduncled, obtuse, 
flexuous, scarlet. Flowers minute, sessile in densely 
crowded glomerules, minutely bracteate and bracteolate. 
Sepals four, ovate, hispidly pubescent. Chary three- 
lobed, hispid with white, stellately spreading hairs, style 
very short, stigmas three, each forming a brush of very 
long capillary scarlet filaments. — •/. IK ff. 

Fig. 1, Female flowers, with bract and bimoteotal ; 2, Mfpth ; 8, ovary with 
style and stigmas ; 4, calyx and ovary with stigmas removed; •>, transverse 
section of the same : — AH enlarged. 




on^Day&Suj 



Tab. 7633. 
LEWISIA Tweedti. 

Native of Washington Territory. 

Nat. Ord. Portulacee. 
Genus Lewisia, Pursh. ; (Bentk. So Hook.f, Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 159.) 



Lewisia. (Oreobroma) Tweedyi; herba acaulis, glaberrima, multiflora, caudice 
brevissimo radiceque elongate carnoso, foliis omnibus radicalibus 
patenti-recurvis late ovatis obovatisve carnosulis apice rotundatis basi 
in petiolnm crassum anguste alatum angustatis, supra saturate viridibus 
subtus pallidis, pedunculis foliis paullo longioribus 1- rarissime 2-floris 
eglandulosis hinc illinc bracteatis, floribus amplis, sepalis orbiculari- 
oblongis, petalis 8 l|-2-pollicaribus sepalis quadruplo longioribus anguste 
obovato-oblongis obtusis, staminibns ad 20, filamentis basi pilosis, 
antherig parvis aureia, ovario oblougo, stylo gracili, stigmatibus 3 
brevibus recurvis, capsnla polysperma basi circumscisse 3 valvi, valvis a 
basi ad apicem dehiscentibus, semiuibus globosis granulatis, arillo laxo. 

L. Tweedyi, B. Robins, in A. Gray, Synopt. Fl. N. Am. vol. i. p. 268. 

Oalandrinia Tweedyi, A. Gray, in Am. Acad. Arts §• Sc. vol. xxii. (1887), 

p. 277. 
Oreobroma Tweedyi, Howell in Erythea, vol. i. p. 32 (1893). 



Owing to the difficulty of defining the limits of the 
closely allied genera Lewisia, Pursh, and Oalandrinia, 
H. B. K., the plant here figured has by American 
authors been placed under both, and also referred to a 
separate genus, Oreobroma, Howell. I have here adopted 
Mr. B. Robinson's view, who, after an examination of all 
the N. American species of the two genera, separates 
them according to the dehiscence of the capsule, which in 
Oalandrinia dehisces from the apex to the base, and in 
Lewisia in the opposite direction. Oreobroma, the chief 
character of which is the fleshy roots (eaten by the Indians), 
he reduces to a section of Lewisia. 

The type of the genus Lewisia is L. rediviva, figured at 
tab. 5395 of this work. It differs greatly from L. Tweedyi 
in the leaves being cylindric, the bracts of the peduncles 
collected in a whorl, the very numerous petals, and the 
eight filiform style branches. 

L. Tweedyi is a native of the alpine region of the 
Wenatchee Mts. in Washington State, at an elevation of six 
thousand to seven thousand feet. The specimen figured 

January 1st, 1899. 



was purchased from Mr. A. J. Johnson of Columbia 
Nursery, Astoria, Oregon, in January, 1808. It flowered 
in the following May in the Alpine House of the Royal 
Gardens, Kew. 

Descr. — A glabrous, rather succulent, many-flowered, 
stemless herb, with a stout fleshy root. Leaves many, nil 
radical, two to three and a half inches long, including the 
short, narrowly winged petiole, spreading and recurved, 
blade one and a half to two inches long, broadly ovate or 
obovate, obtuse, base narrowed into the petiole, bright 
green above, paler beneath. Peduncles rather longer than 
the leaves, one- rarely two-flowered, bearing one or a few 
small green bracts. Flowers three inches in diameter. 
Sepals about half an inch long, orbicular-oblong, obtuse, 
green, clouded witli pink. Petals eight, one and a half to 
two inches long, narrowly obovate-oblong, obtuse. s1 raw- 
coloured, passing into bright pink in the tips and sides 
above the middle. Stamens about 20, filaments hairy, 
anthers small. Ovary oblong, style long, slender, stigmas 
three, very short, recurved. Oapsule not seen — ./. /'. H. 



Fig. 1, Stamens; 2, a stamen, showing insertion of filament; :'., ov;irv: 
4, longitudinal section of the tame, showing ovules : — All enlarged. 



. w . 




Tab. 7634. 

lilium rubellum. 

Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Liliaceje. — Tribe Tulipe*. 
njenus Lilium, Linn.; (Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 816. 



Lilium (Euliriou) rubellwm ; bulbo globoso squamis maltis lanceolatis, canle 
gracili ad apicem foliato, foliis alternis laxe diapositis oblongo-lanceolatis 
vel lanceolatis viridibus glabris distincte 3-5-nervatis, floribns paucis 
corymbosis, perianthio infundibulari rubello immaculato segmentis 
oblanceolato-oblongis obtusis supra medium patulis, staminibxis perianthio 
2-3-plo brevioribus, stylo staminibus longiore. 

L. rubellnm, Baker in Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. ii. p. 321, fig. 128. 



This beautiful Lily is allied most closely to L. japonicum, 
Thimb. (L. Krameri, Hook. f. in Bot. Mag. t. 6058), from 
which it differs by its broad leaves, like those of L. speciosum, 
and smaller pink flowers. Although it is new to cultivation, 
and had not received any botanical name, there is a good 
figure of it in the Honzo Zufu (vol. Ii., tab. 6), a work of 
coloured drawings in ninety-six volumes, published in 
1828 by the Japanese artist Iwasaki Tsunemasa, for an 
account of which see Dickins in Journal of Botany, 1887, 
p. 147. Kew first received it in flower from Messrs. 
Bunting of Chelmsford in February, 1*98. Their stock of 
the plant was purchased by Messrs. Wallace of Colchester, 
by whom it was exhibited at the Temple show of the 
Royal Horticultural Society in May. Probably it will 
grow larger under cultivation. At any rate, it is a very 
distinct plant, and sure to be a general favourite. 

Descr. — Bulb globose, middle-sized; scales many, lan- 
ceolate. Stem slender, terete, green, spotted with red- 
brown, laxly leafy from the apex to the base. Leaves all 
alternate, about twenty to a stem, oblong-lanceolate or 
lanceolate, two to three inches long, firm, bright green, 
distinctly three-nerved or five-nerved. Flowers few, 
corymbose. Perianth funnel-shaped, pink, unspotted, 
three inches long, three inches in diameter when expanded ; 
segments oblanceolate-oblong, obtuse, spreading in the 

January 1st, 1899. 



upper half, the three inner an ineh broad, the outer 
narrower. 8tamen$ leu than half afl longafl the perianth; 
antheni small, linear, bright yellow. StyU arcuate, much 
oyertopping the anthera. —/. (? , B ber. 



Kg. 1. Front view of anther; J, bark view of anther; 3, pfcrtfl -—All tmre 

■ Im-yed. 



7635 







Tab. 7635. 

GAULTHERIA trichophilla. 

Native of the Himalaya and W. China. 



Nat. Ord. Ericaceae. — Tribe Andromede^e. 
Genus Gaultheria, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. j>. 582.) 



Gaultheria trichophilla ; fruticulus sempervirens, humilis, coespitosns, 
ramosiasimus, caulibus subterraneis riliiomribus vnge raraosis elongatis 
intertextis repentibus nudia, emerais erectis setosis foliosis 4-6-pollicaribus, 
foliis £-| poll, longis, subsessilibus patulis ovato-oblongis subacutis 
obtusisve obscure crenato-dentatis coriaceis supra saturate viridibus 
nervis impreasia, subtus pallidis nervis prominulis, crenis setula nigra 
decidua instructis, floribus axillaribus solitariis breviter pedicellatis 
roseis, pedicellis bracteolatis calyeeqne glabris, sepalis ovatia, corolla 
globosa rosea ore conatricto, lobis parvia ovatia revolutis, filamentis 
globosis pubcrulis, antherarum loculis aristato-acuminatia, connectivo 
dorso 2-cuapidato, disci dentibus 10 obtusis, ovario glaberrimo, baccia 
parvia pendulis turbinatis obtuse 5-lobis azureis. 

G. trichopbylla, Royle, 111. Bot. Himal. p. 260, t. 63, f. 3. DO. Prodr. vol. 
vii. p. 592. Clarke in Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. iii. p. 457. 



This, the smallest known species of its genus, is a 
common plant in the alpine and sub-alpine regions of the 
Himalaya, from Kashmir to Bhotan, in moist peaty places, 
at elevations of ten to thirteen thousand feet, where it 
sometimes forms bright green patches of considerable area, 
studded with pink bells, followed by dark blue berries. 
Quite recently it has been collected on the mountains of 
Western Szechuen, on the Tibetan frontier of China, at 
elevations of nine to thirteen thousand feet by Mr. A. E. 
Pratt. Therefore it no doubt extends continuously from 
Bhotan to this region, as do many other Himalayan 
plants. 

The Royal Gardens are indebted to the Hon. Charles 
Ellis, of Frensham Hall, Haslemere, for this interesting 
little plant. It flowers both in the Arboretum and in the 
Rock Garden early in May. 

Descr. — A dwarf, tufted, evergreen shrub, with wiry, 
much-branched, creeping, underground stems, and erect 
leafing dark brown slender branches, bearing scattered 
black bristles. Leaves one-sixth to half an inch long, 
very shortly petioled, spreading, ovate-oblong, subacute or 

January 1st, 1899. 



obtuse, entire or obscurely crennlate, with a rigid black 
deciduous bristle on the margin, or in each crenuture, 
coriaceous, dark green Bhining above, with impressed 
nerves, pale beneath, with prominenl nerves. Flowers very 
shortly pedicelled, solitary, axillary, nodding, pink, about 
as long as the leaves; pedicel bracteolate. 8epals ovate. 
Corolla globosely oampannlate, mouth contracted, with 
five revolute teeth. / je, puberulous, anther- 

cells Bub-aristately aonminate, connective with ;i bifid 
dorsal spur. Berry tnrbii -lobed, blue.—./. /'. II- 



Fig. 1, Leaf; 2, Bowei witli '•'.■•! and bmd let] 8 tnd I. fcameMj 

il and disk; 6, transverse section of ovary :— J// mlir u r.l ; 7, fruit of 
the jVa£. size. 




M.S.dal,JN.PLtdihth. 






Tab. 7636. 

MECONOPSIS HETEEOPHYLLA. 
Native of California. 

Nat. Ord. PapaveracEjE. — Tribe EuPAPAYEKEa:. 
Genus Meconopsis, Tig. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 52.) 



Meconopsis lieterophylla; herba erecta, fere glaberrima, carnosula, pallida 
viridis, caule 1-2-pedali gracili parce ramoso, foliis radicalibus 3-5- 
pollicaribus patentibus petiolatis linearibus pinnatipartitis sparse pilosis 
segmentia J- 1-pollicaribus suboppositis ovalibas oblongis lineari-oblongisve 
obtusis integerrimis v. grosse pauci-crenatis rbacbi valida, foliis caulinis 
majoribus, supremis longioribus simplicibus integris v. crenatie, fioribus 
longe pednnculatis 2 poll, latis, sepalis lineari-oblongis glaberrimif, 
petalis orbicularibus rubro-anrantiacis basi rubro-purpureis. filamentis 
brevinsculis, antheris parvis oblongis aureis, capsula turbinata crasse 
costata vertice convexa, stvlo brevi, stigmate capitato 4-6-lobo, seminibns 
orbicularibus compressis. 

M. heteropbvlla, Benth. in Trans. Hort. Soc. Ser. II. vol. i. (1835), p. 408. 

Torr. 4" Gray, Fl. N. Am. vol. i. p. 61. Hook. 8f Am. Bot. Beech. Toy. 

p. 320. Hook. Ic. PI, t. 732. Brew. & Wats. Bot. Calif, vol. i. p. 22. 
M. crassifolia, Benth. I.e. Torr. fy Gray I.e. Hook. #■ Am. I.e. 



Meconopsis heterophylla is the sole American representa- 
tive, as M. cambrica is the sole European, of a genus which 
is well represented only in the loftier Himalaya and the 
mountains of W. China. Both the European and American 
species are of very limited range, the former to Wales, 
Ireland, and the Pyrenees, the latter to a very few 
localities in W. America, from Clear Lake, in lat. 42° N. to 
San Quintin Hay in the California Peninsula, lat. 30|° N. 
It also inhabits the Humboldt range in W. Nevada. As 
might be anticipated from the remoteness of its native 
country from those of its Old World congeners, and 
especially from its inhabiting so much hotter and drier a 
climate than these do, it exhibits some structural pecu- 
liarities. Such are the pinnatipartite foliage, the re- 
markable elongate obconical truncate smooth capsule, and 
smooth, orbicular seeds. 

David Douglas was the discoverer of M. heterophylla, 
during his journey across the continent of N. America in 
1883. Though covering so wide a range of latitude it 
cannot be a common plant, few collectors having met with 

January 1st, 1899. 



it. The specimen figured was raised at the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, from seeds received from a Californian nurseryman. 
It flowered in the month of June in the Herbaceous 
ground. 

Descr. — A. pale green, rather succulent herb. Stem 
one to two feet high, erect, sparingly branched, glabrous. 
Leaves linear-oblong, pinnatipartite, radical two to four 
inches long, spreading, sparsely hairy, soon withering, 
segments sub-opposite, three to six pairs, and a terminal, 
about half an inch long, ovate-oblong or linear, obtuse, 
entire, or distantly crenate, rhachis pilose ; cauline leaves 
much larger, with longer segments, uppermost linear. 
Floivers on very long slender peduncles, two inches in 
diameter. Sepals linear-oblong, glabrous. Petals orbi- 
cular, orange-red, dark red-purple towards the base. 
Stamens numerous, anthers short, yellow. Capsule 
narrowly turbinate, truncate, crown tumid, four to six- 
lobed, terminated by the short style, stigma globose, four 
to six-lobed. Seeds small, orbicular, compressed, smooth. 
—J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Ovary ; 2, ripe capsule ; 3, seed :— All enlarged. 



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ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 



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1631 



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. 



Tab. 7637. 

GENTIANA Burseiu. 

Native of the Pyrenees and Western Alps. 



Nat. Ord. Gentianace^e. — Tribe Sweeties. 
Genna G-entiana, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 815.) 



Gentiana (Ccolanthe) Burseri; elata, robusta, glaberrima, foliis infimis 
maximia breviter petiolatis elliptico-oblongia 7-nerviis marginibusla3vibus, 
caulinissessilibusacutisacumiuatisve, floribusinaxillia foliorum superioram 
cymoso-fasciculatis l§-pollicaribus breviter pedicellatia, calycia mem- 
branacei tubo corolla breviore sacciforme ad basin fisso, ore truncato 
5-denticulato, coi'olla clavato-campanulata pallide anrea 5-7-loba, lobis 
tubo basi intua eglanduloso ter brevioribus late ovatis obtusis, plicarum 
lobnlia brevibus rotundatis, filamentis gracilibus, antheris lineari- 
oblongia primurn cobrerentibus, loculis extrorsum dehiscentibns, ovario 
cylindraceo basi dilatato 5-7-lobo apice in stylum robustum attenuato, 
stigmatibus brevibus, capsula stipitata anguste ellipsoid ea roatrata. 

G. Burseri, Lapeyr. Hist. Abr. PI. Pyr. p. 132. Griseb. Gen. et Sp. Gent. p. 298, 
et in DG. Prodr. vol. ix. p. 116. Duly, Bot. Gall. p. 326. Loisel. Fl. 
Gall. vol. i. p. 178. Gren. & Godr. Fl. Franc, vol. ii. p. 89. Benth. Gat. 
PI. Pyren., &c, p. 81. 

G. punctata, Vill. Hist. PI. Dauph. vol. ii. p. 512 (non Linn.). 

G. biloba, DC. Fl. Ft. vol. iii. p. 653 ; Ic. PI. Gall. Bar. t. 15. 

G. macrophylla, Bertol. Fl. Ital. vol. iii. p. 79 {non Pall.). 

CoBlanthe Burseri, G. Don, Gen. Syst. Gard. vol. iv. p. 185. 



This noble Gentian is a very near ally of G. punctata, 
a native of mountain regions, from Provence to the 
Carpathians, thence extending to the Balkans of Roumelia. 
It differs from that plant chiefly in the larger leaves, with 
more (seven) nerves. Forms occur of both with the corolla 
speckled with black dots. The headquarters of G. Burseri 
are the Pyrenees, where, according to Benthara, it is " assez 
commune." It also occurs in the Alps of Piedmont, Pro- 
vence, and Dauphine. Bentham recognized two varieties 
of it in the Pyrenees, the type, with punctate corolla, and 
B, hyhrida, with impunctate corolla, which, though a much 
rarer plant, is Lapeyrouse's type. This var. /3 he found 
near Mont Louis, where it grew intermixed with the type 
and G. lutea, Linn., and as he there found every 
intermediate between these two species, he regarded var. 
|8 as a hybrid, and so designated it. I may remind the 
reader that G. lutea is a very widely distributed plant 
February 1st, 1899. 



belonging to a totally different section of the genus, with 
a rotate corolla, sessile ovary, and winged seeds, and that 
it hybridizes freely with various other species of the 
Gcelanthe section. Of these hybrids Grisebach (in DC. 
I.e. p. 86) enumerates five, but that with Q. Burst ri ifl not 
amongst them. The latter is, however, included in the 
hybrids of Intea by Focke (Pflaauk ^Mischlinge, p. 256). 

I am indebted to the Rev. Canon 0. .1. Parker, of Upton 
Cheyney, Bristol, for the specimen here figured of this 
fine Gentian, which flowered in his garden in -l"ly, 1808. 
That gentleman informs me that he found the plan! 
in quantities on damp, decaying wood, near the top of 
Hue d'Enfer, fn the Val de Lys, above Luchon, where one 
fine specimen was actually growing on a fallen tree. The 
roots which he sent home he planted in half paraffin tubs, 
full of leaf mould and the debris of a faggot pile, which 
he placed on a slope twenty feet above a brook, and there 
they have thriven amazingly. 

Descr. — Stem three to four feet high, robust, terete. 
Lower leaves eight to ten inches long, elliptic-ovate, 
obtuse, seven-nerved, narrowed into a short, stout petiole, 
nerves very strong beneath ; upper and floral leal jile, 

ovate, sub-cordate, five-nerved. Flowers in very short 
cymes, densely crowded in the axils of the upper leaves, 
very shortly and stoutly pedicelled ; bracts elliptic, sub- 
acute, three-nerved, an inch long, or longer. Calyx thi 
quarters of an inch long, membranous, split to the bi 
mouth truncate, five-toothed, and denticulate. Corolla* 
tube one and a half inches long, between clavate and 
campanulate, pale yellow, clouded with green ; lobes five 
to seven, one-third the length of the tube, broadly ovate, 
very obtuse, pale golden-yellow, speckled (as is the throat) 
with minute black dots, lobules in the sinus about a tenth 
of an inch long and broad, rounded. Anthers shorter than 
the slender filaments, bursting outwardly. Hypogyi 
glands 0. Ovary narrow, cylindric, tapering into a BtOUt 
style, with reflexed, short, broad stigmas, bate dilated into 
five to seven spreading lobes. Ofl itipitate, narrowly 

ellipsoid, valves beaked. Seeds minute, sub-orbicular. — 
J. D. If. 

Fig. 1, Calyx and ovary ; 2, portion of corolla laid open, and four stamens ; 
3, fruit ; 4, seed : — All enlarged. 



belonging to a totally different section of the genus, with 
a rotate corolla, sessile ovary, and winged seeds, and that 
it hybridizes freely with various other species of the 
Ccelanthe section. Of these hybrids Grisebach (in DC. 
I.e. p. 86) enumerates five, but that with Q. Burst ri is not 
amongst them. The latter is, however, included in the 
hybrids of Idea by Focke (Pfla -Mischlinge, p. 25G). 

I am indebted to the Rev/ Canon C. J. Parker, of Upton 
Cheyney, Bristol, for the specimen here figured of this 
fine Gentian, which flowered in his garden in July, 1898. 
That gentleman informs me that he found the plant 
in quantities on damp, decaying wood, near the top of 
Rue d'Enfer, in the Val de Lyg, above Luohon, where one 
fine specimen was actually growing on a fallen tree. The 
roots which he sent home he planted in half paraffin tubs, 
full of leaf mould and the debris of a faggot pile, which 
he placed on a slope twenty feet above a brook, and there 
they have thriven amazingly. 

Bescr.Stem three to four feet high, robust, terete. 
Lower leaves eight to ten inches long, elliptic-ovate, 
obtuse, seven-nerved, narrowed into ;I short, stout petiole, 
nerves very strong beneath ; upper and floral leaves sessile, 
ovate, sub-cordate, five-nerved. Flowers in very short 
cymes, densely crowded in the axils of the upper leaves, 
very shortly and stoutly pedicelled ; bracts elliptic, sub- 
acute, three-nerved, an inch long, or longer. Calyx thi - 
quarters of an inch long, membranous, split to the 1 
mouth truncate, five-toothed, and denticulate. OoroUa- 
tube one and a half inches lone-, between olavate and 
campanulate, pale yellow, clouded with green ; lobes five 
to seven, one-third the length of the tube, broadly ovate, 
very obtuse, pale golden-yellow, speckled (as is the throat) 
with minute black dots, lobules in the sinus about a tenth 
of an inch long and broad, rounded. Anthers shorter than 
the slender filaments, bursting outwardly. Hypogynou* 
gtands 0. Ovary narrow, oylindric, tapering into a' stout 
style, with reflexed, short, broad stigmas, bate dilated into 
hve to seven spreading lobes. Oapkk stipitate, narrowly 
ellipsoid, valves beaked. Seeds minute, sub-orbicular. — 
«/. LJ, it. 

Fig. 1, Calyx and ovary ; 2, portion of corolla laid open, and four stamens ; 
.5, triut ; 4, seed :— All enlarged. 



7638 




Tab. 7638. 

ELiE AGNUS macrophylla. 
Native of Japan and Formosa. 

Nat. Old. ELiEAGNACE.E. 

Genus ELiEAGNiis, Linn. (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 204.) 



El.eagnus macrophylla ; frutex v. arbuscula inermis, rarais cortice fusco obtec- 
tis, ramulis folds subtus et inflorescentia copiosissime argenteo-lepidotis ; 
foliis 3-4-pollicaribus breviter petiolatis late ovatis obtusis utrinque sub 
6-nerviis, nervis subtus marginibusque undulatis rubro-brunneis, supra 
saturate viridibus sparse argenteo-lepidotis, petiolo ad ^-poll. longo, 
floribus | poll, longis confertis nutantibus v. pendulis, pedicellis J-J 
polJ. longis, gracilibus decurvis, basi squamis parvis brunneis instrnctis, 
perianthii tubo anguste ellipaoideo terete, apice constricto et in Hmbum 
campanulatum obscure tetragonum repente dilatato, limbo intus basi et 
ore annulato, lobis limbo tequilongis triangulari-ovatis obtusis intus 
stellato-puberulis, stylo gracili, stigmate elongato obtuso recurvo, drupis 
§ poll, longis ellipsoideis roseis lepidotis limbo perianthii griseo coronatis, 
putamine tenui fibroso-coriaceo sulcato. 

E. macrophylla, Tlmnh, Fl Jap. p. 67, Schlecht. in DO. Prodr. vol. xiv. 
p. 614. Maxim, in Bull. Acad. Imp. P6tersb. vol. xvi. p. 377; Mel. Biol. 
Pars. vii. p. 560. 

Of the genus EUeagnus, of which there are upwards 
of twenty-five reported species, only one lias previously 
been figured in this work. It is the E. mvMiflora t 
Thunb. (tab. 7341) also a native of Japan. Eight 
species, including that here figured, are cultivated in the 
Arboretum of the Royal Gardens, Kew, the fruit of one of 
which, E. angustifolia, L., is a favourite ingredient in the 
sherbet of some Eastern countries. 

Elaeaymts macrophylla has a wide, far Eastern distribu- 
tion, from the Korean Archipelago to Japan and Formosa, 
where, according to Mr. Maries, it ascends to seven thousand 
feet elevation. The specimen here figured was com- 
municated by Messrs. Veitch, from their nursery at Coombo 
Wood, where the plant flowers in October, and fruits in the 
following May. Mr. Veitch informs me that it was im- 
ported from Japan through their collector, Mr. Maries, in 
1879, and that their largest plant is six feet high, and but 
for pruning would have been higher. As with other 
species of the genus, the lepidote scales on the young 
FxBRrARr 1st, 1899. 



branches, leaves, and flowers are beautiful microscopic 
objects. The fruit is very ornamental. 

Descr. — A shrub, or small, ramous, thornless tree; 
branches covered with grey brown bark ; branohlets, leaves 

beneath, inflorescence and fruit silvery white, with a 
dense clothing of lepidote scales, branchlets speckled with 
red-brown. Leaves three to four inches long, shortly 
petioled, ovate, obtuse, deep green above, and Bparsely 
lepidote, midrib and six pairs of nervefl beneath wy\ brown, 
as are their Undulate margins ; petiole Btout, about half an 
inch long. Flowers very many, in axillary clusters, nod- 
ding and drooping; pedicels slender, about three-quarters 
of an inch long, with small, brown, linear bud-scales at the 
base. Perianth two-thirds of an inch long, tube narrowly 
ellipsoid, suddenly dilated into a campannlate limb, which 
is cleft about halfway up into four triamrular-ovato. ob1 
lobes, pubescent on their inner faa -. .1 nthi T$ small, oblong. 
Style slender, stigma elongated, obt OUTVed. I 

two-thirds of an inch long, ellipsoid, bright rose-red, Lepi- 
dote, crowned with the persistent withered limb of the 
perianth. — J. D. II. 

Fig. 1, Flower; 2, half of the perianth viewed from within ; 8, itigmft and 
portion of style ; 4, ripe fruit ; 5, lepidote scales :— All but fig. 1 



1633 




Tab. 7639. 
DENDBOBIUM capillipes. 

Native of Burma. 

Nat. Ord. Obchide*. — Tribe DENDEOBiEiE. 
Genus Dendeobium, Swartzj (Benth. & lloak.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 498.) 



Desdrobittm (Eudendrobium) capillipes; pseudobulbis 2-3-pollicaribus erectis 
adultis fusiformis-clavatis ad \ poll. diam. leviter compressis, internodiia 
5-6 vaginis pallidis membranaceis rubro-fusco marginatis velatis, foliis 
paucis 5-6 poll, longis ad J poll, latis obtuse aeuminatis laste viridibus, 
peduncnlo gracili laterali erecto foliis subaaquilongo 4-floro vaginis parvis 
distantibus instructo, floribus nutantibus, bracteis lanceolatis pedicellis 
(cum ovario) \ poll, longis gracilibus diraidio brevioribus, perianthio 
explanato pollicem diametro aureo, sepalis lineari-oblongis acutis quam 
petalis orbicularibus bi - evioribus, mento subcorniforme obtuso, labello orbi- 
culari emarginato, ima basi convoluto et in unguem brevem latam 
angustatos, disco basin versus costa crassa lata elevata postice rotundata 
instructo, authera mitriforme apice truncata 3-loba. 

D. capillipes, Reichb. f. in Gard. Chron. 1867, p. 997, and 1880, vol. i. p. 
743 ; Xen. Orchid, vol. ii. p. 164, t. 169. Hoofc.f. Fl. Brit. Lid. vol. v. 
p. 751. Veitch, Man. Orchid. PI. Dendrob. p. 26. 



A very attractive little Dendrobe, procured by the late 
Rev. C. Parish, from hills north of Thayet-myo (PThayetpa- 
mein, on the Sittang river), and of which he sent to Kew 
living and dried specimens in 1872. It has probably a 
wide range in the Burmese mountains, for, on a ticket 
attached to other specimens, he gives as habitat, <( Yanza- 
lin district, 1875, latterly on Ta-ok," and Sir H. Collett 
collected a large flowered variety of it on the Shan Hills, 
at 3000 feet elevation. 

It may be seen from all the descriptions previously pub- 
lished, that the specimen here figured represents a much 
finer state of D. capillipes than those hitherto cultivated, 
in which the pseudobulb has three or four internodes, and 
the leaves are small and lanceolate. Further, the lip is 
described as having an orange blotch, or as in capillipes, 
var. flegans of Reichenbach (in Gard. Chron. 1880, vol. i. 
p. 743) Las a dark orange base, which in our plant is 
replaced by a few red streaks on each side of the base 
above the claw. 

Febbuaby 1st, 1899. 



T). capillipes has been for many years in cultivation in 
the Orchid House of the Royal Gardens, Kew, where it 
flowers annually between April and July. 

Descr. — Pseudobulb erect, fusifonnly clavate, about four 
inches long, by half an inch thick, of six to eight inter- 
nodes, clothed with pale membranous sheaths bordered 
with red-brown. Leaves five to six inches long, by about 
half an inch wide, acute, bright green. Peduncle lateral 
on the pseudobulb, very slend' ing two to four 

nodding flowers, and a few distant, small sheaths. Itr<>rf* 
lanceolate, half the length of the Blender, deenrved pedicel 
and ovary. Perianth about an inch in diameter, golden- 
yellow, segments spreading. Sepals linear-oblong, acute, 
shorter than the orbioular petals. Mentum stout, about 
half as long as the sepals, conico-cylindrie, obtuse. Lip 
nearly as large as the rest of the perianth, orbicular, 
emarginate, explanate, base narrowed into a very short 
claw, with an orange blotch at the base, or a few red 
streaks on each side, disk with a short, broad, thickened 
ridge at the base that ends posticously in a rounded knob 
over the claw. Anther mitriform, top broadly truncate 
and three-lobed. — J. D. H. 



Fig 1, Base and claw of lip j 2, interior of mentum. column, and anther ; 
3, auther ; 4 polhnia :— All mturgtd. 



7640. 




Tab. 7640. 

CEANOTHUS integeeeimus. 

Native of California. 

Nat. Ord. Rhahnace,b. — Tribe Rhamne^k. 
Genus Ceanothus, Linn.; (Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 378.) 



Ceanothus (Euceanotbus) integerrimus ; frutex erectns, inermis, glaber v. 
partibus novellis puberulis, ramis gracilibus, foliis alternis gracile petiolatis 
oblongis ovatis v. ovato-cordatis acutis v. obtusis integerrimis supra 
saturate viridibus subtus pallidis, stipulis parvis subulatis, floribus 
minutis in glomerulos pedunculatos confertis, glomerulis cylindricis 
axillaribus et in paniculos terminales dispositis albis v. pallide cceruleis, 
sepalis late ovatis, petalis duplo longioribus ungue laminam cymbi- 
formem asquante, antheris rubro-purpureis, capsula subglobosa Isevi. 

C. integerrimus, Hook, et Am. Hot. Beech. Voy. p. 329. Torr. & Or. Fl. N. 
Am. vol. i. p. 686. A. Gray, Synopt. Fl. vol. i. part II. p 411. Benth. 
PI. Hartw. p. 302. Durand, PI, P ratten, p. 85. Torrey, Pacific Railr. 
Rep. pp. 4, 75; Newb. I.e. pp. 6, 69. Boland. Gat. PL Calif, p. fi. 
S. Watson, in Proc. Am. Acad. vol. x. p. 334; Bihl. Ind. jV~. Am. Bot, 
p. 165. JAndl. in Gard. Chron. 1856, p. 36, cum ic. xylog. 

C. californicus, Kellogg in Proc. Calif. Acad. vol. i. 1855, p. 55. 

C. nevadensis, Kellogg, I.e. vol. ii. 1863, p. 152, fig. 45. 

C. thyrsiflorus, var. macrotbyrsus, Torr. Bot. Wilkes Exped. p. 263. 



C. integerrimus is a native of the Sierra Nevada of Cali- 
fornia and British Columbia, at elevations of two thousand to 
four thousand feet, from Washington to St. Bernardino and 
S.E. Arizona. It is one of the many discoveries of David 
Douglas in 1833, who collected a small-leaved variety, 
that occurs at various points of the range of the species. I 
found it when travelling with Dr. Gray, fruiting in Septem- 
ber, 1877, in Strawberry Hill Valley, near Mt. Shasta, and 
in the Wellingtonia Grove of Calaveras. It was intro- 
duced into this country by Mr. Robert Wrench, who gave 
seeds of it to the Royal Horticultural Society, in whose 
gardens it flowered in 1856, and was figured at the time 
by Lindley in the Gardeners 1 Chronicle, cited above. It 
has been in cultivation in the Arboretum, Kew, for many 
years, growing in a sheltered position, and flowering freely 
in June. 

Descr. — An erect shrub, with very slender branches, 
young branches puberulous, quite glabrous in maturity. 

February 1st, 1899. 



Leaves all alternate, shortly petioled, one to three inches 
long, ovate, ovate-cordate or oblong, obtuse or acute, quite 
entire, deep green above, pale, and sometimes pubescent 
beneath; stipules very small, subulate. Flowers minute 
white or pale blue, on very slender pedicels, which are 
collected m globose, sessile or peduncled heads, which 
again are disposed in axillary and terminal panicled, 
globose or cylindric thyrsi, two to four inches long! 
Sepals tmangular-ovate, incurved. Petals twice aa Ion-, 
their claw as long as the boat-shaped limb. Anthers recU 
purple. Capsule nearly globose, quite smooth.— J. D. II. 

Fig. 1, Rowm ; 2, petal , 3, ovary -.-All enlarged. 



7641 




Tab. 7641. 

EPILOBIUM OBCORDATUM. 

Native of California. 

Nat. Ol'd. ONAGEARIEiE. 

Genus Epilobium. Linn. ; (Benth. & llooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. f. p. 787.) 



Epilobium (Scbizostigma) obcordatum ; glabrum, caulibus e rhizomate decnm- 
bente ramoso ascendentibus 6-8-1 o\\. longis teretibus, internodiis 
brevibus, f oliis pollicaribus oppositis patulis sessilibns v. breviter petiolatis 
orbiculari-ovatis subacutis obscure dentatis basi rotundatis saturate 
viridibus glaucis opacis, floribus magnis I5 poll, exp ins. in axillis 
eupremis quasi corymbosiB, alabastria nutantibus, pedicellis brevibus, 
ovario pruinoso, calycis tubo ultra ovarium producto infundibnlari, 
lobia lineari-oblongis obtnsis, petalis laste saturate roseis profunde 
biridia patentibus, antheris flavis, stylo longe exserto declinato, stigmate 
4-lobo puipureo lobis revolutis, capsulis l-l|-pollicaribus linearibus 
robustis obtusis, seminibus minute papillosis. 

E. obcordatum, A. Gray in Proc. Am. Acad. vol. vi. (1865) p. 532. Wat*, 
in King's Rep. vol. v. p. 104. Brew. 8f Wats. Bot. Calif, vol. i. p. 218. 
Barbey, Epilob. t. 3. Trelease in Second Report Missouri Bot. Gard. 
p. 83, t. 6. Hausskn. ATonogr. Epilob. p. 250, 1. 15, f. 69. Joum. Horde. 
Ser. 3, vol. xxvii. t. 179. 



Epilobium obcordatum is decidedly the most attractive 
species of the genus in cultivation, if not in nature ; and 
as a rock-garden plant it has few rivals. It is a native of 
the Sierra Nevada of California, at elevations of eight 
thousand to eleven thousand feet, from the Tulare County 
(the Sequoia gigantea region) in lat. 36° N., northward to 
the head waters of the Sacramento River, in 42° N. In 
company with Dr. Gray I found it in fruit in rocky places 
on Mt. Stanford, above Truckee, where the railroad crosses 
the Sierra Nevada, in September, 1877. It also inhabits 
the East Humboldt Mts. in Nevada. The capsules are 
described by all authors as clavate, but they are truly 
linear, and rather stout, previous to dehiscence, when the 
valves contract. The Royal Gardens, Kew, received a 
living plant of E. obcordatum in 1894, from H. Selfe 
Leonard, Esq., of Hitherbury, Guildford, which has 
flowered annually in the rock-garden in July. 

Descr. — Quite glabrous. Stems six to eight inches high, 
ascending from a decumbent, branching rootstock, rather 
stout, terete, leafy. Leaves rather longer than the inter- 
February 1st, 1899. 



nodes, opposite, sessile, or sub-sessile, about an inch long, 
orbicular-ovate, sub-acute, obscurely toothed, deep green, 
opaque, base rounded. Flowers from the upper leaf axils, 
corymbosely arranged, an inch and a quarter in diameter, 
pedicels shorter than the rather stout pruinose ovary, 
which is produced at the top into a funnel-shaped limb. 
Calyx-lobes linear-oblong, dull red. Petals broadly ob- 
ovate, spreading, bright rose-coloured, deeply bifid. 
Anthers included, yellow. Style elongate, slender, decli- 
nate; stigma purple, lobes four, revolute. Capsule an 
inch and a half long, rather stout, obtuse. Seeds few. — 
J. D. E. 



Figs. 1 and 2, Anthers ; 3, top of style and stigmas ; t, ripe capsule, of nat. 
size ; 5, seed :—All but fig. 4 enlarged. 



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7642 










Vincent Brodks,Day<5cScmLt?'IlIip 



Tab. 7642. 
DRYANDRA calophylla. 

Native of King George's Sound. 

Nat. Ord. Proteace,e. — Tribe Banksie.*. 
Genus Dryandra, Br. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 185.) 



Dryandra (Aphragmia) calophylla ; fruticulus depressus, caule petiolis costis 
foliorum subtus bracteis extus receptacnloque villis rubro-aurantiacis 
dense vestitis, caule brevi crasso, foliis pedalibus stellatim patentibus 
breviter petiolatis coriaceis linearibus pinnatifidis v. pinnatisectis, supra 
glabris nervis subtus sparsim rufo-villosis, pinnis lobisve 30-50 J-1J poll, 
longis triangulari-ovatis ovato-lanceolatisve obtnsis 3-5-nerviis inferiori- 
bus seDsim minoribus, sinubus acutis v. obtusis, petiolo brevi basi 
incrassato, floribus in capitulum basi involucratum 2-3 poll. diam. 
congestis aureis, reeeptaculo longe villoso, involucri bracteis exterioribus 
elongatis foliaceis, interioribus parvis ovatis, perianthii 1^-1 \ poll, longi 
tubo brevi angusto sericeo, lobis lineari-elongatis obtusis aureo-villosis, 
saepe rubro tinctis, antheris linearibus cnspidatis, ovario glabro, stylo 
perianthio longiore, stigmate elongato cylindraceo apice oblique truu- 
cato. 

D. calophylla, Br. Prodr. Suppl. I. Profeacese, p. 40. Meissn. in DC. Prodr. 
vol. xiv. p. 481. Benth. Fl. Austral, vol. v. p. 583. 

D. Drummondii, Meissn. in Lehm. PI. Preiss. vol. ii. p. 267, et in DC. I.e. 



The genus Dryandra, of which forty- seven species are 
described in Bentham's Flora Australiensis, is one of the 
most striking proofs of the endemic character of the 
Western Australian Flora, not a single species being found 
elsewhere in the Australian continent. Of these nine are 
enumerated in Aiton's a Hortus Kewensis,' as being in cul- 
tivation in the Royal Gardens in 1810, almost all of them 
raised from seeds collected in 1802-3 by Peter Good, the 
gardener who accompanied Brown on Flinder's voyage. 
None of these now exist at Kew. Nine species have pre- 
viously been figured in this Magazine, the last, J), nobilis, 
tab. 4633, so early as 1852, an evidence of the decline 
of interest once taken in the cultivation of Australian 
plants. 

B. calophylla was raised in the Royal Gardens, Kew, from 
seeds presented by Messrs. Veitch in 1893, and flowered in 
the Temperate House in May, 1898. 

Descr. — A small depressed shrub. Stem very short, 
erect, or prostrate, thickly clothed with thick, bright, 
March 1st, 1899. 



orange-red, villous hairs, as are the petiole and riiaehis of 
the leaves, the outer surface of the bracts and the receptacle. 
Leaves about a foot long, Btellatelj spreading, linear, 
pinnatifid or pinnatiseet, dark green above, pale beneath; 
lobes or pinna) an inch long or less, triangular-ovate to 
ovate-lanceolate, obtuse, three- to five-nerved beneath, witb 
the nerves loosely villous, sinus between the Lobes obtuse or 
acute. Inflorescend a sessile bracteate head of Rowers two 
to three inches in diameter, golden-yellow, outer bracts 
passing into leaves, inner very boo btuse. 

Flowers densely crowded ; perianth with a short, slender, 

silky tube, and four long, very narrow, obtUSC, slui^y 

lobes, each bearing a linear, cuspidate, sessile anther on 

the inner face towards the tip. Style Longer than the 
perianth-lobes, slightly thickened towards the tip, which 
is obliquely truncate.--/. />. //. 



Figs. 1, 2, ana 3, inner bracts of nnt. size; 4, flower; ft, hairs of rMgptook 
and ovary with three innermost bracts ; 6, inn. rm.^t braota : 7. tip of j-erianth- 
K>De and anther : 8, section of ovary with ovules : -All Ut 1 I I *U*fi. 



7643 




Tab. 7648. 

PASSIFLORA peuinosa. 
Native of British Guiana. 



Nat. Ord. Passiflore*. — Tribe Eupassifloee^. 
Genus Passielora, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 810.) 



Passielora (G-ranadilla) pruinosa ; frutex glaberrimus, scandens, ramis tereli- 
bus fistuloais rufo-brunneis, foliis longiuscule petiolatis orbiculari-ovatis 
ad medium 3-lobis supra saturate viridibus subtus glaucis, nervia 5 
rufescentibus, iobis ovato-oblongis v. lanceolatis acutia v. obtusis, petiolo 
subpeltatim affixo glandulis cupulatis sparso, stipulis magnis dimidiato- 
oblongis foliaceis, floribus 2g poll, latis solitariis cum cirrho valido rufo- 
brunneo enatis,pedunculo2-pollicariviridi,bracteia parvis ovato-lanceolatis 
acuminatis, calycis tubo brevi basi truncato, aepalis pollicaribus oblongis 
viridibus, petalis 5 oblongis obtusis pallide lilacinis, coronfe filaraentis 
pluriaeriatis infra medium in annulum intus glandulosum connatia, filia 
exterioribus infra medium violaceia apicibus cirrhosis, intimis brevioribus 
crassioribus apicibus dilatatis 3-4dobis, gynophoro brevi cylindraceo, 
fructu ? seminibus oblongis obtusis. 

P. pruinosa, Mast, in Gard. Cliron. 1897, vol. ii. p. 393, fig. 17. 



A handsome evergreen stove climber, raised from seed 
sent to Kew in 1897 by Everard im Thurn, C.M.G., Govern- 
ment Agent, N.W. District, British Guiana, a gentleman 
well known for his many contributions to a knowledge of 
the natural history of his adopted country, and especially 
for his having accomplished the ascent of the previously 
unconquered precipitous table-mountain of Roraima ; and 
also for his admirable description of the very peculiar vege- 
tation of that mountain and of the surrounding district, 
which is published in the " Transactions of the Linnean 
Society " (Ser. II. Bot. ii. 249). 

Passiffora pruinosa is a species of remarkably rapid 
growth, plants raised from seeds sent to the Royal 
Gardens in 1897, having flowered in September, 1898. 

Descr. — A tall, stout, glabrous climber. Branci hex 
terete, fistular, red-brown ; tendrils strong, red-brown. 
Leaves three to four inches in diam., orbicular-ovate in 
outline, five-cleft to the middle, dark green above, with 
five spreading pale nerves from the base, glaucous beneath, 
with red-brown nerves, lobes ovate-oblong or -lanceolate, 

March 1st, 1899. 



obtuse, acute, or acuminate; stipules foliaceous, one to two 
inches long, dimidiate-oblong, acuminate ; petiole three 
inches long, sub-peltately attached, green, with a few 
scattered cupular glands. Flowers solitary, axillary, two 
and a half inches broad ; peduncle shorter than the 
stipules, green ; bracts small, lanceolate, acuminate. 
Calyx-tube short, cup-shaped, base truncate and intruded, 
lobes an inch long, oblong, obtuse, green, white within. 
Petals rather longer than the sepals, oblong, obtuse, re- 
flexed, white, suffused with lilac. Corona Longer than 
the petals, of several series oi many spreading violet 
filaments, with white bases and cirrho.se tips, all connate 
at the base in a membrane that is glandular within, inner- 
most filaments stouter, with sub-clavate tin.- to five- 
lobed tips. Qynovhore short, ojlindrio. Antlers large, 
yellow. Ovary oblong, styles and large globose stigma- 
streaked with red. — J. /). //. 

Fig. 1, Longitudinal section of calyx-tube with portion of the corona; 
2, base and innermost filaments of the corona -.—Both ■ 



Tab. 76U. 
KNIPHOFIA Tuokii. 

Native of Cape Colony. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^e. — Tribe Hemerocalle.*. 
Genus Knieiiofia, Moench ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 775.) 



Kniphoeia Ttickii ; foliis deDse rosulatis recurvatis linearibus acuminatis 
viridibus tirmis acute carinatis margine serrulatis, pedunculo stricto 
erecto foliis breviore, raoemo denso oblongo-cylindrico, floribus omnibus 
deflexis expansis sulphureis in statu juniore rubro tinctis, pedicellis 
brevissimis, bracteis oblongo-lanceolatis scariosis albidis, perianthio 
anguste infundibulari supra ovarium leviter coufetricto, lobis brevibus late 
ovatis, staminibus biseriatis omnibus distincte exsertis, stylo stamiuibus 
lon^iore. 

K. Tuckii, Baker in Gard. Chrun. 1893, vol. i. p. 68; Fl. Cap. vol. vi. 
p. 278. 

This very distinct species of Kniphojia is a native of 
Colesberg, the central province of Cape Colony, all of 
which is at least four thousand feet above sea-level. It 
is allied most nearly to E. pumila, Kunth. {Aletris pumila, 
Gawl. in Bot. Mag. t. 764) a species which was early 
introduced into cultivation in this country, but is now lost. 
From this it differs by its more robust habit and broader 
leaves. It was collected for Mr. Max-Leichtlin by Mr. W. 
Tuck about 1892. The Kew plant, from which our draw- 
ing was made, was received from the Cambridge Botanic 
Garden in February, 1897, and flowered for the first time 
in the Temperate House in April, 1898. 

Descr. — Leaves densely tufted, reflexed, linear, acumi- 
nate, above two feet long in cultivation, an inch broad 
low down, green on both surfaces, acutely keeled, firm in 
texture, serrulate on the margin. Peduncle moderately 
stout, stiffly erect, furnished with several erecto-patent 
rudimentary leaves. Raceme oblong-cylindrical, half a foot 
long, very dense ; flowers all deflexed, sulphur-yellow when 
mature, tinged with crimson in an early stage ; pedicels 
very short; bracts oblong-lanceolate, scariose, whitish. 
Perianth narrowly funnel-shaped, above half an inch long, 
slightly constricted above the ovary ; lobes short, broadly 
March 1st, 1899. 



reo 



ovate. Stamens biseriate, all distinctly exserted, the tii 
longest half as Ions again as the perianth. Style much 
overtopping the anthers. —./. '/. li 



Fig. 1, Margin of leaf; 2, ■ Hower, with [>edicel and bract; 3, pistil : All 
enlarged; J, whole plant: Muet rtimeti. 



764< 




Tab. 7645. 
GYNOPLEURA humilis. 

Native of Chili. 

Nat. Ord. Passiflore.e. — Tribe Malesherbie^. 
Genus Gynopleura, Gav. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 810.) 



Gynopletjra humilis ; herba annna, humilis, gracilis, pa tentim ramosissima, 
foliosa, pubescens, foliis pollicaribus obovato-oblongis obtusis grosse 
crenato-serratis utrinque pubescentibus v. villosis, basi angustatis vix 
petiolatis pallide viridibus, floribus ad apices ramulorum subcorymbosis 
breviter pedicellatis § poll, diam., calycis sericeo-villosi tul>o dilatato, 
lobis oblongis obtusis rubro striatis, petalis calycis lobia aequilongis late 
ovatis subacntis albis, corona faucem calycis coronante brevi crenata, 
gynophoro cylindraceo, filamentis elongatis, ovario ellipsoideo hirsuto. 

G. humilis, Roem. Syn. Pepon. p. 211. 

G. dilatata, Walp. Rep. vol. ii. p. 223. 

Malesherbia humilis, D. Don in Edinh. N. Phil. Journ. 1831-2, p. 111. Hook, 
et Am. in Hook. Bot. Miscell. vol. iii. p. 327. 0. Gay, Flor. Chile n. vol. ii. 
p. 425. 

M. dilatata, Phil. f. Cat. PL Vase. GUI. p. 81. 



The small genus Gynopleura inhabits the dry Sierras of 
Peru and Chili. G. humilis has a wide range in distribu- 
tion, chiefly along the seaward ranges of the Andes, from 
the neighbourhood of Arica in S. Peru (lat. 18^° S.) to 
Concepciou in Chili (Jat. 37° S.), and probably further in 
both directions. Even the desert of Atacama is not too 
dry for it. There it forms hemispherical masses a foot 
in diameter. Only one species has previously been figured 
from living specimens, namely G. linearifolia, Cav., tab. 
3362 of this work, where it is described under the generic 
name of Malesherbia, with which Oynopleura had been 
confounded. 

The plant here figured was raised from seeds sent to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, from the Botanic Garden of San- 
tiago in Chili, in 1898. It flowered in the herbaceous 
ground in September of the same year. 

Descr. — A low growing, excessively branched, slender, 

leafy, pubescent or villous annual. Leaves about an inch 

long, obovate-oblong, obtuse, coarsely crenate-serrate, 

narrowed to the base, but hardly petioled, pale green, 

March 1st, 1899. 



villously pubescent with silky hairs on both surfaoes. 
Flowers about two-thirds ol an inch in diameter, oorym- 
bosely crowded at the tips of the branches, very shortly 
pedicelled. Calyx tube villously-hairy, funnel-shaped, mem- 
branous; lobes oblong, obtuse, white, streaked with 
purplish-red. Corona a very low, crenate membrane, 
surrounding the mouth of the calyx-tub . Q 
much shorter than the calvx-tuhe, eylindtic, glabrous. 
Filaments erect, very slender; anthers yellow, Ovary 
ellipsoid, hirsute; styles three, filiform, divergent, inserted 
on the sides of the ovary b flow its summit ; stigmas small, 

dilated.-./. />. //. 

Fig. 1, Blower laid Opea i 8 ii.ii I :<. anthers; 1, ovary -.—AH ■ 




' 1641 



Tab. 7646. 

ROSA acicularis, var. xipponensis. 

Native of Japan. 



Nat. Ord. Rosace*. — Tribe Rose*. 
Genus Rosa, Linn,; (Benth. S. Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. Q8&.) 



Rosa (Pimpinellifoliae) acicularis; frutex erectus, ramosna, trunco setoso v. 
subinerme, ramia raniulis gracilibua pedunculisqne setosis, foliis 2-4- 
pollicaribua, rhachi gracile setoso, foliolis ellipticis, stipulia oblongis, 
tioribus Bolitariis gracile pedunculatis ebracteatis, ealycis tubo oblongo, 
lobis araguste linearibns corollam asquantibus v. superantibtis integerrimis 
tomentosia apicibua dilatatia, petalia sanguineo-roseia, fructibus ovoidein 
suberectia glaberritnis calycis lacinii3 conniventibus coronatis. 

R. acicularis, Lindl. Monog. Itos. p. 44, t. 8. C. A. Meyer in Mim. AcaJ. 

Pttersb. Ser. 6, vol. vi. p. 15. Reqel in Act. Hort. Pttrop. vol. v. p. 54 

&525. ' 

R. Gmelini, Bunge in Ledeb, Fl. Altaic, vol. ii. p. 228. Bong. Teg. Saisang- 

Nor. Pfl. 33. Fl. Ross. vol. ii. p. 75. Karel. & Kiril. in Bull. Soc. X<\t. 

Mosc. (1841), p. 419. C. A. Meyer, I.e. p. 17. 

R. alpina, Pall. Fl. Ross. vol. ii. p. 61 (non Linn.). 
R. carelica, Fries, Summ. Veg. Scand. p. 171. 

R. acicularis, var. £ Gmelini, Regel ex Maxim, in Herb. It. Secund. (nomen). 
Var. Nippon en's rs ; ramulis pedunculisqae glanduloso-setosi8. 
R. nipponensis, Crepin in Bull. Soc. Bot, Belg. vol. xW. (1875), p. 7, nomen 
in textu. 

Not being a specialist in the genus Rosa, I give 
my determination of the name and synonymy of the 
beautiful plant here figured with some hesitation. Rosa 
acicularis appears to me to be a high North European 
and North Asiatic plant, extending from Finland ( 
carelica, Fries) through Siberia to Japan. II. Gw 
Bunge, of Siberia, seems to be the same tiling, or 
to differ only in the colouring of the under surface of 
the leaves. It has been confounded by Do Candolle (Prodr. 
ii. 611) and others with II. alpina, L., of the Alps, 
Pyrenees, &c., of which it is the northern rej itive, 

and which is distinguished, amongst other oharacters, by 
its nodding oblong or ellipsoid fruits. 

The var. nipponensis has no other character than the 
glandular prickles of the young branches and peduncles. 
These glandular prickles I find on Siberian specimens of 

March 1st, 1 



E. acicularis, and they are described by Fries as occurring 
in the peduncles of R. carelica. 

Lindley's figure of R. acicularis , taken from a cultivated 
specimen, represents a plant with much larger and paler 
flowers than the Japanese specimen, or than the Finland 
one, which Fries describes as " sanguineo-rosei." 

Seeds of this rose were received at the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in 1891, from the Botanic Garden of Copenhagen, 
under the name- of R. nipponensis. Plants raised from 
these flowered in June, 1898, and fruited in the following 
August. The name has been obligingly verified by Mr. 
Crepin. The only Japanese habitat in the Kew Her- 
barium is the mountain Fujiyama, in Nippon, collected by 
Tschonoski. 

Descr. of var. nipponensie, — An erect bush, trunk naked 

or prickly ; branches slender, and peduncles more or less 

covered with glandular bristles. Leaves two to four inches 

long, petiole short and slender, rhachis setulose, leaflets 

five to nine, rarely three, one half to two-thirds of an inch 

long, thin, elliptic, finely serrulate, pale green ; stipules 

oblong, obtuse, entire. Flowers solitary, an inch and a 

half in diameter; peduncle very slender, one to one ami a 

half inches long. Calyst-iube oblong, glabrous, lobes an 

inch long, very slender, linear, tips dilated, pubescent or 

i tomentose, erect in fruit. Petals rather shorter than the 

calyx-lobes, deep rose-coloured. Fruit sub-erect, about 

three-fourths of an inch long, ovoid, smooth, crowned by 

: the long conmvent calyx-lobes.— J. D. If. 



Fig.l. Portion of peduucle; 2, stamen; 3, ovary; 4, ripe achene:-^ 



enlarged 



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7647 




■RoCVC 1.C" 1hjii,I... 



Minoont Brool s !\iv-"< . tori ' 



Tab. 7647. 

IMPATIBNS ROYLEI, var. pallidiflora. 

Native of the Himalaya, 



Nat. Ord. Geeaniace^e. — Tribe Balsamine.e. 
Genus Impatiens, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 277.) 



I. Roylei, Walp. Rep. i. 475. Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. i. p. 468. 

1. glandulifera, Boyle Illustr. Bot. Himal. p. 151, t. 28, f. 2 (non Am.) 

I. glanduligera, Lindl. Bot. Reg. 1840, t. 22. Hook. Bot. Mag. t. 4020. 

Var. pallidiflor a; elatior, 5-6-pedalis, foliis majoribus 6-8 poll, longis, floribus 
majoribus in corymbos amplos 6-10 poll, latos dispositis pallide roseis 
rubro maculatis. 



The plant here figured may be assumed to be Himalayan, 
but of this I have no certain knowledge. It appeared for 
the first time in the shrubberies of my garden near 
Sunningdale three or four years ago, and rapidly increased, 
so as to become a weed, until 1898, when the long- 
continued drought decimated the plants, and prevented the 
seeding of the few that were spared. How or whence it 
was introduced T cannot form an idea. I have never raised 
an Indian Balsam in .my garden, nor had I at that time 
received the seeds of any, and it is not in the Kew collec- 
tion, or in that of other botanical gardens to which I have 
directed inquiries. On the other hand, I have seen it in 
several cottage gardens, one at Marlow being the nearest 
to my place (about fifteen miles in a straight line). Also I 
saw it growing in profusion in a cottage garden near Mr. 
Mitford's residence, Batsford Park, Worcestershire, but 
not a specimen of it was to be found in that gentleman's 
fine garden, or in his magnificent miscellaneous collection 
of hardy trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants, where 
I. Roylei abounds in a naturalized state. In stature, 
foliage, inflorescence, flowers and fruit, my plant altogether 
agrees with one which I found in the upper valleys of 
the Sikkim Himalaya, and of which I made a coloured 
drawing on the spot, differing only in having subulate 
stipuliform glands, whereas in the Sikkim plant these are 

April 1st, 1899. 



fiat or putvinate. The latter I referred, on this account, 
to WaUich'a /. sulcata,* 

Since the publication of the first volume of the "Flora 
of British India" in 1-7:!. wry large collections of 
Himalayan species of Impatu ns have been received at 
Kew, which, together with those of the Herbaria of the 
Calcutta and Snharunpore Gardens, kindly lent by Messrs. 
Prain and Duthie, will. I ho ble me to revise the 

species (12 1-) published in that work, introducing some 
new ones, and correcting the characters and synonymy of 
others. Unfortunately the plants of this genua wither so 
rapidly after being gathered, and Buffer bo greatly from 
the pressure in transformation into Herbarium specimens, 
that a great many examples in all herbaria are quite 
insufficient for correct determination. Furthermore, fruit- 
ing specimens are essential, and it is only from living 

ones, or carefully executed drawings, that dependable 
characters can be obtained. 

De8CT. — Habit, foliage, inflott flowrr and fruit of 

1. Hoy hi, but leaves larger, attaining eight inches in 
length, with petioles of the lower three to four inches 
long, corymbs of flower much larger, more spreading 
sometimes ten inches in diameter, peduncles longer, ^d 
more robust, bracts and flowers larger, the latt. r \ i vy l>^ e 
rose, speckled with dark red, especially on the standard* 
and lip dorsally. — J. b. II. 

* In "PI. Brit. tnd. M /. rred to I. i 

neously if the Sikkim plsat is H K htlv named . -. I *•?• 

elongated pods, Wallicli'i •pecimoa of / tulcata \ in fruit, the 

identification of the Sikkim plant with it i, 

Fig 1, Section of lower part of stem; 2, one wing petal ; 3, itaaWBI ; I 
capsule; 5, seeds on placentas; 6, one cotyledon with plumule and radicte; >» 
seed -.—All enlarged, except 4, which ia of nat. size. 



7648 



ml 




Tab. 7648. 
CEREUS Paxtonianus. 

Native of Brasil? 

Nat. Ord. Cacte.3. — Tribe Echinocacte.*. 
Genus Cereus, Haw.; (Benlh. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 819.) 



Cereus (Colubrini) Paxtonianus; caule gracili colnmnari 5-6-gono flexuoso 
ad 1 poll. diam. parce ramoso luride viridi, costis compressis obtusis 
sinuatis vix lobatis, pulvillia subconfertis vix \ poll, distantibus par- 
vnlia glabris, aculeis 8-10 acicularibas radiantibus lasvibus 2 interiori- 
bus longioribus inrequilongis longiore \ poll, longo, floribus araplis, 3-1 
poll, diam., calycis tubo 2h poll, longo cylindraceo §■ poll. diam. hcvi 
glabro pallide viridi bracteolis paucis dentiformibus brunneis instructo, 
perianthi segmentis 4— 5-seriatis patenti-incurvis lanceolntis snbacntis 
exterioribus dorso vividibus brunneo marginatis et variegatis, interionbu 
albip, filamentis brevibas, antberia miaatis, stylo valido exserto, stigmati- 
bus 12 linearibus fei - e h poll, longis obtusis radiantibus. 

C. Paxtonianus, Monv. ex Safm-Di/ck, Cart. Wort. DjfGk, Ed. IT. p. 2U. 
Foersf. Jfaiidb. Gact. p. 727. Labourct, Monogr. Gael. p. 37 L K. 
Srlwmann, Gesam. Bcsc/ir. tier Kakieen, p. 135. 

C. Cavendishii, Monv. I.e. Rev. Hurtle. 1857, p. 521. 



The name Cereus Paxtonianus first appeared in Mon- 
ville's trade catalogue of Gactex, from which it was taken 
up by Prince Salm-Dyck, together with C. Gavendishii, 
which was assumed to be a different species. Of course 
both came from the magnificent collection of the Duke of 
Devonshire at Chatsworth, of which Mr. (afterwards Sir 
Joseph) Paxton was the keeper, whence the names. 
Their native country was and is unknown. Differing a 
little in habit and colour, they came to be regarded as 
different species, and it was many years before either 
flowered ; and until C. Paxtonianus did so at Kew, 
G. Cavendishii alone had done so. The flower of the latter 
is briefly described in the " Revue Horticole," 1857, p. 
521, and the description precisely accords with that of the 
plant here figured. Schumann was the first to unite the 
two plants under the one name. 

The specimen here figured of Cereus Paxtonianus was 
purchased for the Royal Gardens, Kew, from Mr. A. 
Benecke, dealer in Cacti, &c, Birkenwerder, near Berlin, 
April 1st, 1899. 



in whose catalogue-it appears as " 0, Paafonumttf, Monv., 
Syn. C. Cavendtshii, Monv." It flowered for the first time 
in the Cactus House in September, 1898. 

Descr. — Stem of the Kew specimen four feet high, and 
about an inch in diameter, erect, flexuous, branching to- 
wards the top, five to six angled, very lurid green, angles 
compressed, sinuate, studded with spine-bearing pulvilli at 
intervals of about a quarter of an inch, the larger spines 
of which cross one another. PulviUi glabrous, bearing 
about twelve radiating, smooth, straight, dark brown 
spines of unequal length, two of which are more than 
twice as long as the others, the longest being about a 
quarter of an inch long. Floicert three to four inches in 
diameter, white. Calyx- tube two and a half inches long by 
about half an inch in diameter, cylindric, funnel-shaped 
below the sepals, quite smooth, unarmed, pah; bright 
green, bearing few distant minute brown tooth-like scales, 
winch become much longer upwards passing into the outer 
sepals. Peri'iiiih-,. Us very many, in Beveral sei 
linear-lanceolate, sub-acute, spreading and incurve! ; 
outer segments (sepals) dorsally green, edged, ami clouded 
towards the tip, and sometimes on the inner surface also 
with light brown, inner segments (petals) quite white. 
Stamens very numerous, many-seriate, filaments slender, 
shortly exserted at the mouth of the perianth, anthers 
minute, yellow. StyU stout, much longer than the Stamens, 
bearing a dozen lunar obtuse stout, radiating stigmas, 
about half an inch long.— J. I). If. 

enfar'ed' PalviUuS with 8 P ine9 > 2 > »»mmit of style and stomas t—BoA 



ItrtV 




Tab. 7019. 

SILENE FoOTTOK. 
Native of China and Formosa. 

Nat. Ord. CARYoriiYi.i.AfE v.— Tribe Btumm. 
Genus Silene, Linn. ; (Benth. A Book./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 1 17.) 



Silene (Italicse) Fortunei ; pereanis, erecta, basi suffruticoFa, cattlibsi 1 ;: - 
pedalibus numerosis apices versus vi^cosis gracilibus folif hih ml 
puberulis, foliis 1—21 pulJiearibuB caepissime pat^nti-reeiirvis linrari- 
oblanceolatia subacutis acnminatisve, basi anunstatis ciliolatia v. in 
petiolam brevem desinentibas enerviia casta in micula ai 

floribus erectis oppoaittl v. ad apiOM rarnornm ternis brevit' r p 
padioelKa ad A-polHcarii>us infra medium bibnotaolatia, br a o t e ott i p 
linearibuH obtom, calycia tubo 1 J-po]lioari aaguato crliadraoeo sti 
ban rotnadato fractifero Bapra medium inflate-, dent 
ovatis albo-marginati* at oiliolatia, ]"<:ilin albis v. ro*ei«, rir. 
madrata deatata, lamina Baballifbrmi \ poll, loan bifida ba-i ntrinque 

■!i'a liueari qnasi aiirirnlata, lobiw rnullindis, anllx ris breviboa ex 
pynophoro elongate rapsulaoblonjja bis longiore. Gapeoba dentibus recurvis, 
serninibus tubercutatis dorso canaliculars v<ntne plania. 

S. Fortusri. Pit. Tnd. . vol. xxiv. 

]>. 181. Bokrb. Mnnoft ■ Ft. As. <> p. •!. 

Frovh. I'l David, pars i. p. 17. Worbet >f KeauL in Jimm. Linn 
vol. xxiii. (1886) p. 85. Williams in Juurn. Linn. Soc. vol. xxxii. (] 
p. 178. 

S. fissipetala, Turrz. in Bui ' roL xvii. (1854-) pars II. p. 371. 

? S. sinensis, Hook, ex Basse, ILandb. Blume<<fjxrt. Ed. 2, vol. ii. p. 371, ex 
W Mam* I.e. 

? 8. chinensis. Hook, ex Boss!, I, c. Ed. 3, vol. iii. p. 445. 

Lychnis Fortunei, Ilort. 



Silent Fortunei appears to be a common plant in 
China, where it was first found by Fortune. It also ooctm 
in the Island of Formosa, on Bandy downi mar Tan; 
One of its nearest allies in the neat genus Silene (numb 
390 species in Mr. Williams excellent monograph i 
Linnasan Journal) is the W * European S. ital%ca, a denizen 
of some southern English counties. With regard to the 
authority " Hook." given by Bosse for hi 
chinensisj Mr. Williams has suggested to me that it is 
bly an error for Hort. It is a garden name not 
introduced into the Index Kewei 

The plant here figured was raised from seeds collected in 

April 1st, 1809. 



the Province of Shensi by Father Piccoli, of the Jesuit 
Mission in Hankow, which were received at the lloyal 
Gardens through George Murray, Esq., F.RS., Keeper 
of the Botanical Department of the British Museum. 
It flowered in the Herbaceous collection in September, 
1898. 

Deser, — An erect, nearly glabrous, slender perennial, one 
to three feet high, branching and puberulous below, 
above and flowering branches very viscid, Leaves one 
to two and a half inches long, spreading and recurved, 
linear-oblaneeolate, sub-acute or acuminate, nervel 
midrib deeply impressed above, base ciliate, contracted 
sometimes into a very short petiole. /'/ rect, in 

rather large panicles with opp recto-patenl branches, 

in axillary pairs, or ternate al the tips of the branches; 
pedicels about half an inch Long, with two small 
opposite linear obtuse braoteolea below the middle. & . 

an inch and a quarter long; tube narrow, cylindric, striate 
with close-set neires, when fruiting inflated above the 
middle, base rounded; teeth -mail, erect, OTate, obtuse, 
margins white, ciliolate. Petals white or rose-red, claw 
rather broad, margins toothed ; limb fan-shaped, half an 
inch long or more, bifid, base with a long linear segment 
on each side; lobes unequally lacerate. Anthers shortly 
exserted, broadly oblong. Gynophore twice as long as the 
capsule, slender, glabrous. Styles three, ?ery sh< »ii . - s '' " /v 
oblong, flat on one surface," tubercled on the other.— 
«/. JJ. 1 1 . 



Fig. 1, Calyx-tube laid open with gynophoiv and ovary; 2, petal and 
stamen ; 3, stamen :— all enlarged; 4, calyx and rij 



7650 




ittfxiUu 



Tab. 7G50. 

YUCCA ELATA. 

Native of the Sotrih-Western United Statet. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace/E. — Tribe Drac.exi i . 
Genus Yucca, Linn. ; (Benth. & ILook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 77^ 



Yucca elata; caule fruticoso interdum furcato, foliis dense rosulatiB lineari- 
bus strictis pallide viridibus pnngentibus margine copiose filiferis, 
pednnculo foliis subduplo longiore, racemis multis laxis in panienlam 
densam rhomboideam dispositis, bracteis ovato-lanceolatis scav 
cellis longioribua, periantbio amplo albo extus leviter virido tincto, 
8taminibus periantbio gubtriplo brevioribus filamentia pubescentibnH, 
stylo brevi colnmnari pnbescente, fructu raagno oblongo coriaceo tarde 
dehiscente, seminibua discoideis nigris. 

Y. elata, Engelm. in Coult. Hot. Gaz. vol. vii. (1832) p. 17; CWfcefcd ■• 

p. 209. Sergeant in Garden & Forest, 1889, p. r>68, fig. MG. Tfi V — in 
Report Missouri Gard. 1893, p. 201, tab. 10, 15, 22. 

Y. angnstifolia var. elata, Engelm. Rotes on Yucca, p. 50. S. Wats, fa 
Amer. Acad. vol. xiv. p. 263. 

Y. constricta, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. p. 229, «"» Bwl-hy. 



This shrubby Yucca is peculiar to the desert region of 
Arizona and the neighbouring states west of the Rocky 
Mountains. In the wild state the stem reaches a length 
of ten or twelve feet. In leaf and flower it closely 
resembles Y. angnstifolia, Pursh (Bot. Mag. tab. 2236), 
but that is more hardy, and never has a long stem. The 
peduncle of the present plant is longer, and the inflores- 
cence much more compound. It was first discovered by 
the botanists of the Mexican boundary survey more than 
thirty years ago, but has only lately been introduced into 
cultivation. The plant in the Royal Gardens, Kew, from 
which the present drawing was made, is growing in the 
large Temperate House, and flowered for the first time in 
the summer of 1896. It was purchased, along with other 
luccas, in 1893, from Mr. J. N. Gilcrease, of Sierra 
Blanca, Texas. 

Descr.— Trunk, of the Kow plant, about a yard long, 
forked at the top, covered down to the base with reflexed 
withered leaves. Leaves densely rosulate, stiffly erect or 
April 1st, 1899. 



spreading, linear from a suddenly-dilated base, one 
and a half or two feet long, pale green, pungent, 
copiously filiferous on the margin. Peduncle twice as long 
as the leaves, furnished with copious spreading, linear 
bracts leafy. Inflorescence an ample, dense, rhomboid 
panicle ; racemes lax, the lower six or nine inches long ; 
pedicels in pairs, articulated at the apex ; bracts ovate- 
lanceolate, scariose, longer than the pedicels. Perianth 
white, two inches long, hardly at all tinged with green on 
the outside when mature. Stamens one-third the length 
of the perianth ; filaments pubescent. Ovary with a short, 
pubescent, columnar style. Capsule oblong, coriaceous, 
two inches or more long, finally dehiscent. Seeds large, 
black, discoid. — J. G. Baker. 



Pig, 1, Stamen ; 2, pistil, both enlarged; 3, whole plant, much reduced. 



1651 




rS.deLJKFilcklith.. 



Tab. 7651. 

INCARVTLLEA variabilis. 

Native of Western China. 

Nat. Old. Bignoniaceje. — Tribe Tecomea. 
Genua Incarvillea, Juss. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. |>. 10-19.) 



Incarvillea variabilis; perenuiy, caule gracili erecto ramoso augulato 
folioso glabro v. puberulo, foliia omnibua alternis, ambitu ovatia pin- 
natis, foliolis oppositis ovato-larjceolatis pinnatifidis pinnatisectisve 
incisis, floribus in racemos gracilea dispositia breviter pedicellatis, pedi- 
cellis basi foliolo tripartito bracteatia, calvcis brevis tabo obconico 
pentagono, lobia brevibus in tuberculos crassoa globosoa seta valida 
bcabrida instructos desinentibns et cum lobulis late ovatis membranaceis 
alternantibus, corollas tubo pollicari infundibulari, limbi 1—1 J poll, lati 
lobi8 rotundatia patenti-recurvis, staminodiis 0, stigmatis lobis orbiculatia, 
capsula bipollicari anguate fusiformi utriaque altenuata terete terminer 
coriacea, seminibus ala hyalina cinctis. 

Incarvillea variabilis, Batalin in Act. Hort. Petrop. vol. xii. (1892) p. 177, 
et vol. xiv. (1895) pp. 178, 18 \ 



Of the beautiful genus Incarvillea only one species was 
known in 1876, the date of the publication of the third 
part of vol. ii. of the "Genera Plantarum;" since which 
time, so great lias been the influx of new plants from 
Western China and Eastern Tibet, that Dr. Batalin 
enumerates nine species from Eastern Tibet and China 
alone, in a paper published three years ago in the " Acta " 
of the Imperial Botanical Gardens of St. Petersburg. 
Amongst these is his 2. variabilis, a well-named species, of 
which he enumerates 4 varieties, distinguished chiefly by 
the amount of the division of the leaves, and the form of 
their segments. With none of these varieties does the 
plant here figured perfectly accord, whilst approaching 
nearest to var. y fumariasfolia, itself a protean form in 
foliage as the suite of authentically named specimens in the 
Kew Herbarium demonstrates. From this the plant here 
figured differs in the shorter, more equally pinnate leaves, 
with the leaflets much shorter, broader, and more uniform 
in shape and incision. The curious character of the seti- 
form or horned calyx-lobes, each lobe seated on a large 
tubercle, is common to several species. L variabilis is 
remarkable in having no trace of a staminode between 

April 1st, 1899. 



the shorter stamens, in either the cultivated or wild 
specimens. 

I. variabilis was discovered by Mr. Potanin on the 
mountains of the Chinese provinces of Szechuen and 
Kansu. A yellow-flowered variety is described by Mr. 
Batalin as inhabiting the valley of the Po-ho river in 
Eastern Tibet. The Royal -Gardens received seeds of 
I. variabilis from Mr. W. Thompson of Haslemere, Ipswich, 
plants from which flowered in the Herbaceous ground in 
August, 1898. Its nearest ally is L sinensis, Lamk., which 
has smaller flowers and a much larger pod. 

Descr. — A slender, perennial, glabrous, or faintly pubes- 
cent herb, twelve to eighteen inches high. Leaves all 
alternate, two to four inches long, shortly petioled, ovate 
in outline, pinnate ; leaflets six to eight pairs, opposite, 
shortly petiolulate, ovate-lanceolate, pinnatifidly cut into 
obtusely toothed pinnules. Flowers in loose, erect racemes, 
shortly pedicelled, with a tripartite leafy bract at the base 
of each pedicel. Calyx small, tube obconic, five-angled, 
lobes setiform, as long as the tube, scabrid, seated on 
a globose tubercle, alternating with as many short, mem- 
branous teeth. Corolla bright rose-purple, tube an inch 
long, slightly curved, limb more than an inch across the 
orbicular spreading and recurved lobes. Follicle an inch 
long, narrowly fusiform, acuminate. Seeds surrounded 
with a hyaline wing. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Calyx, style, and stigma ; 2, portion of calyx laid open, showing disk 
and ovary; 3, portion of corolla laid open and stamens; 4, anther '.—All 
enlarged. 



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Tab. 7652. 

NICOTIANA SYLVESTRIS. 

Native of Argentina. 

Nat. Ord. Solaneace. — Tribe Cestrine.e. 
Genus Nicotiaxa, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 906.) 



Nicotiana sylvestris; herba elata, robusta, foliosa, ramosa, glanduloso- 
puberula, foliis pedalibus amplis omnibus basi cordatis semi-amplexi- 
caulibus lyrato-obovatis-oblongisve obtusis v. cuspidatis costa crassa, 
nervis patulis subtus prominulia, iDflorescentia subcapitata, e cymis 
brevibus fasciculatis multidoris subsessilibus composita, floribus breve 
pedicellatis mitantibus, calyce ovoideo 5-fido baai rotundato, lobis tubo 
brevioribus erectis insequalibus lanceolatis ovatis v. triangularibus, 
corollas albaj tubo gracili 3-pollicari tereti glauduloso-puberulo medium 
versus paulo inflato, limbi 1| poll, lati lobis triangularibus obtusiusculis 
patenti-recurvis, filaraentis medio tubi insertis filiformibus glabris, 
antheris vix exsertis oblongis, capsula corolla paulo longiore. 

N. sylvestris, Spegaz. et Comes in Gartenflora (1898) p. 130, fig. 38. 



Nicotiana sylvestris belongs to the group of tall her- 
baceous species that abound in South America, but 
amongst which I find none with the characters above 
described. In foliage it closely resembles -V. tomentosa, 
Ruiz & Pav., figured at tab. 7252 of this work, but in 
inflorescence and flowers it entirely differs. 

N. sylvestris is a native of the Province of Salta, a 
country of lofty mountains with fertile valleys, on the 
confines of Bolivia, in lat. 26° S., where it grows at an 
elevation of 5000 to 6000 feet above the sea. Seeds were 
received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, from Messrs. 
Dammann & Co. of Naples, in 1898, plants raised from 
which flowered in the herbaceous collection in August of 
the same year. 

Descr. — A tall, stout, branching, closely leafy, glandular- 
puberulous herb, five feet high. Leaves a foot long and 
upwards, lyrate-obovate from a cordate semi-amplexicaul 
base two inches broad, cuspidate, upper part six inches 
broad, dark green above, paler beneath, midrib very stout, 
and spreading nerves prominent beneath. Jej' 
terminal, peduncled, almost hemispheric, formed of sub- 

May 1st, 1899. 



' 



sessile fascicles of short, many- and dense-flowered nod- 
ding cymes, two to three inches long, flowering to the 
base ; pedicels shorter than the calyces, except the lowest 
in the cyme. Calyx one-half to two-thirds of an inch long, 
ovoid, terete, cleft to about one-third into five, unequal, 
broad or narrow, erect lobes. Corolla white, tube three 
inches long, very slender, terete, glandular-pubescent, 
slightly inflated about the middle; limb an inch and a half 
broad, of five triangular, sub-acute, spreading and re- 
curved lobes. Stamens inserted where the inflation of the 
corolla-tube commences ; filaments very slender, glabrous ; 
anthers oblong, tips hardly exserted from the mouth of 
the corolla. Style very slender, glabrous, stigma included. 
Capsule four-toothed. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and style; 2, portion of corolla-tube and stamens; 3, imma- 
ture capsule ; 4, calyx and capsule : — All enlarged. 




M.S.dolJ.W.Fitchlith 



m 



Tab. 7653. 
CYRTANTHUS parviflorus. 
Native of Cape Colony. 

Nat. Ord. AtfABTUJDE.lt. — Tribe Amarylle*. 
Genus Cyrtanthus, Ait. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 729.) 



Cybtanthus (Monella) parviflorus ; bulbo globoso timicis membranaceis supra 
collum productis, foliia 3-6 linearibus viridibus suberectis floribns 
cosetaneis facie canaliculatis, scapo gracili tereti elongato, umbellis 
6-12-floris, pedicellis flore aequilongis vel brevioribns, spatha? valvis 2 
parvis oppositis lanceolatis, rluribus inodoris splendide rubris. perianthii 
tubo subcylindrico curvato ad basin attenuato, lobis brevissimis late 
ovatis, ataminibus biseriatis filameatia brevissimis, stylo perianthio 
aeqnilongo apice stigmatoso tricuspidato. 

C. parviflorns, Baler in Gard. C'kron. 1891, vol. i. p. 104; et in Dyer FL Cap. 
vol. vi. p. 221. 



) 



This pretty little Cyrtanthus was first introduced into 
cultivation by Mr. James O'Brien of Harrow, in 1889. 
In a wild state it is widely distributed through the 
eastern provinces of Cape Colony, from Port Elizabeth 
northward to the Transvaal, where Mr. E. Galpin has 
found it at an altitude of 4500 feet above sea-level. It 
is nearly allied to the well-known 0. angustifolius, Ait. 
(Bot. Mag. t. 271), but the flowers are much smaller and 
brighter in colour. It flowers freely in a cool house at 
Kew in April and May. The bulbs were presented to the 
Royal Gardens by E. H. Woodall, Esq., of St. Nicholas 
House, Scarborough. 

Descr. — Bulb globose, about an inch in diameter, with 
the outer brown, membranous tunics produced some 
distance above its neck. Leaves three to six to a bulb, 
contemporary with the flowers, linear, sub-erect, green, 
channelled down the face. Peduncle slender, terete). 
Flowers inodorous, bright red, six to twelve in an ambeJ ; 
pedicels as long as, or shorter than the flowers ; spatlu-- 
valves two, small, opposite, lanceolate. Perianth sub- 
cylindrical, curved, about an inch long, narrowed to the 
base; lobes very small, broadly ovate. Stamens inserted 

May 1st, 1899. 



\ 



in two rows above the middle of the perianth-tube ; 
filaments very short. Style reaching to the tip of the 
perianth, distinctly tricuspidate at the stigmatose apex. 
— /. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, A flower opened out to show the stamens ; 2, back view of anther; 
3 front view of anther ; 4, pistil : — All enlarged. 



/ 



7654 




S.del J.N.Titehlirt, 



Tab. 7654. 

ALNUS NITIDA, 

Native of the Western Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Cupulifek./*:. — Tribe Beivlem. 
Genus Alnos, Gsertn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 404.) 



Alnus (Clethropsis) nitida; arbor elata, ramulis brunneig noveilis puberulis, 
foliis ovatis v. ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis integerrimis v. crenato- 
serratis glaberrimis laste viridibus lucidis basi rotundatis v. cuneatis 
eubtus pallidioribus punctulis resiniferis notatis, axillis nervorum bar- 
bellatis, infl. masc. et fern, coa?taneis, spicis masc. apices versus 
ramulorum solitariis v. paucis elongatis filiformibus puberulis, floribus 
glomeratis bracteatis minutis tetrandris, sepalis 4 obovatis apicibus 
dentatis, spicis fem. 1-2-pc llicaribus axillaribus solitariis binieve erectis 
breviter pedunculatis florentibus sangnineis maturis oblongis obtusis 
viridibus, bracteis minutis arete imbricatis, bracteolis qnadrifidis demum 
in laminam 4-fidam stipitatam connatis, ovariis minimis orbicularibus 
compressis, stylis 2 linearibus obtusis complanatis, nuculis orbicularibus 
obcordatisve stylis coronatis marginibus incrassatis. 

A. nitida, Endl. Gen. PI. 8uppl. iv. pars II. p. 20. Regel in DC. Prodr. 

vol. xvi. pars I. p. 181, et Monogr. Bet. p. 82, t. 14, fig. 23-30. Brand. War. 

Fh>r. p. 460, t. 57. Gamble Man. Ind. Timbers, p. 373. Hook.f. Fl. 
Brit. Ind. vol. v. p. 600. 

Cletbropsis nitida, Spach in Ann. Sc. Nat. Ser. II. vol. xv. p. 202 ; et in 
Jacquem. Voy. But. p. 158, t. 159. 



The Western Himalayan Alder (A. nitida) is a very 
handsome tree, that does not occur east of the Sutlej river, 
but extends from thence westward, at elevations of 4000 to 
9000 ft., to Kashmir and Afghanistan. In the Eastern 
Himalaya it is replaced by A. nepqlensis, Don, which, 
commencing from a little westward of the Sutlej (in 
Chamba) extends thence throughout the range to Burma 
and Western China. It has not as yet been introduced 
into England. The wood of A. vifirfa is used in the 
manufacture of bedsteads, and the lithe branches form 
ropes for the construction of suspension bridges, and for 
tying loads of wood. The bark is used for dyeing and 
tanning purposes. 

Seeds of A. nitida were sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
together with those of many other western Himalayan 
plants, by the late R. Ellis, Esq., of the Forest Depart- 
ment, from Pangi, in 1882, from which the plant here 

May 1st, 1899. 



figured was raised. It flowered in the Arboretum ia 
September, 1897. 

Descr. — A tall, fast-growing, deciduous tree, attaining 
a hundred feet in height, with a trunk ten to fifteen feet in 
girth, covered with rough brown furrowed bark ; wood soft, 
reddish. Leaves four to five inches long, ovate, acuminate, 
entire or serrate, bright green, and polished above, pale 
beneath, nerves eight to ten pairs, arched ; petiole about 
an inch long, slender. Male and fem. inflorescence cre- 
taneous. Male spikes solitary or few, towards the tops of 
the branchlets, shortly peduncled, four to six inches 
long, very slender, pendulous. Flowers small, in globose 
clusters, surrounded by minute green bracts ; perianth- 
scales four, obovate, tips toothed. Stamens four, anthers 
didymous, red. Fem. spikes axillary, and at the base of 
the males, one to two inches long, sub-sessile, strict, 
linear, blood-red. Floiuers minute, in broad, short, im- 
bricating bracts ; bracteoles four, orbicular, which even- 
tually coalesce, and are raised on a hardened stipes. 
Ovary very minute, orbicular, compressed, with two 
linear, flattened stigmas. Nutlets orbicular or obcordate, 
crowned with the persistent stigmas. — J. I). H. 



Fig. 1, Clusters of male fl. ; 2, bracteole; 3, male fl. and sepals; 4 fem 
flowers and bract; 5, two fem.fl., 6, a fem. fl.; 7, young fruit in bracts;' 
8, nutlets; y, connate bracteoles; 10, longitudinal section of nutlet -—All 
greatly enlarged. 



7635 



K , / / // 




S 



M.S deUN.Pitrhlath 



Vmr-«»Tit Rrnnl, 



Tab. 7655. 

DAHLIA Maximiliana. 

Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Helianthoide.e. 
Genus Dahlia, Cav.\ (Benth. 8c Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 386.) 



Dahlia Maximiliana; elata, raraosa, caule fistuloso ? lenticellato, foliis 
plerisque bipinnatis superioribus pianatis v. 3-foliolatis, summis interdam 
miifoliolatis, petiolo gracili inferiorum fistuloso, i'oliolis paucis 3-5-poll. 
Iongis sessilibus v. graciliter petiolulatis ovatis ovato-oblongisve acutis 
acuminatis caudatisvn grosse serratis basi acutis obtusis v. repente 
angustatis et in petiolulum decurrentibus glabria v. utriuque puberulis, 
terminali paullo majore oblongo sessili v. (interdum longe) petiolulato, 
floribus in axillis superioribus solitariis et ad apices ramuJorum sub- 
corymbosis, pedunculis elongatis gracilibus, capitulis ad 3-poll. latis, 
involucri bracteis exterioribus 5-7 herbaceis lineari-oblongis patentibus 
tortis 3-nerviis basi tumidis, interioribus erectis oblongis snbmembrana- 
ceis obtusis acutisve, fl. radii ad 8 tubo brevi puberulo, limbo elliptico 
obtuso multinervi roseo-purpureo, disci floribus aurantiacis. 

D. Maximiliana, Hort. in Gard. Chron. 1879, vol. i. p. 216 ; Hemsl in Gard. 
Chron. 1879, vol. ii. p. 525, et Bioloq. Cent. Am. Bot. vol. ii. p. 197. 



The earliest notice which I find of this plant is that 
specimens of it were exhibited at a show of the Royal 
Horticultural Society in February, 1879, by Mr. Green, 
gardener to Sir George Macleay, K.C.M.G., of Pendel 
Court, Bletchingly. There are excellent specimens, com- 
municated by Sir George, preserved in the Herbarium 
at Kew. As stated in the Gardener'' s Chronicle of that 
date, it attains eight feet in height, four feet in diameter, 
and blooms for a long time. This was followed by Mr. 
Hemsley's notice of the plant as I). Maximiliana, Hort., 
in October of the same year, in his account of the 
known species of Dahlia, with the observations that the 
stem, seven feet high, is lenticellate, the leaves bipin- 
nate, with relatively slender petioles, and the flowers 
nnknow^n. In December of the following year I received 
some flowers of it as D. Maximiliana?, from E. H. 
Woodall, Esq., of St. Nicholas House, Scarborough, with 
the information that the plant producing them was eight/ 
feet high, had excited great admiration, from the delicat/ 
mauve colour of its anemone-like flowers, and that, a^it 

May 1st, 1899. 



succeeds the chrysanthemum, it should prove a valuable 
addition to winter-flowering conservatory plants. Up to 
the present time there has been no description of the 
species but that I here give. Of the origin or introduction 
of the species I have found no record. It is regarded as 
Mexican, probably correctly, as that country is the head- 
quarters of the genus. 

As a species it is difficult to assign to D. Maximiliana 
botanical characters that would by words distinguish it 
from some of the forms of the common D. variabilis, Desf ., 
than which it is a very much larger plant, with a more 
branching:; fistular ? stem : the foliage more resembles that 
of D. imperialis, but is less divided, and with comparatively 
slender petioles. The flowers are totally unlike those 01 
D. imperialis, and, except in the lovely colour, resemble 
those of D. variabilis. 

The specimen from which the accompanying figure was 
made was kindly sent in February of this year (along with 
other interesting plants to be figured in this work) by 
Commendatore Hanbury, F.L.S., from his unrivalled 
garden at Palazzo Orengo, La Mortola, Ventimiglia. 

De*cr. — Stem six to eight feet high, copiously branched, 
fistular, glabrous, green, lenticellate ; branches long, 
spreading, leafing and flowering. Leaves spreading, lower 
two to three feet long, bipinnate, with slender, fistular 
petioles, and few sessile or petiolulate leaflets, one to three 
inches long ; leaflets few, ovate, or oblong-ovate, coarsely 
serrate, from acute to caudate-acuminate, thin, glabrous or 
puberulous on both surfaces, terminal rather the largest, 
oblong, base rounded, obtuse, or acute, or suddenly 
narrowed and decurrent on the petiole. Flowers copiously 
produced in the axils of the upper leaves, and in loose 
corymbs terminating the main stem and branches. In- 
volucre, mi/, and tZ/.s-Lflorets as in J), variabilis, with rays 
of a lovely mauve colour. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Inner involucral bract and disk flower; 2, ovary, tube, and part 
of the corolla with Btyle of a ray-flowar; :j, stamens:—.!// enlarged. 



\ 



7CS6 





... «■- *-> i 




Tab. 7656. 
VERONICA DrEPPBNBACHii. 

Native of the Chatham Isluiuls. 

Nat. Ord. Scrophularine.e. — Tribe Digitai.e.e. 
(ienus Veronica, Linn.; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 964.) 



Veronica (Hebe) Dieffenbachii ; frutex glaber v. puberulus, ramohun, raiuis 
elongatis divaricatis teretibus viridibus, foliis 3-4-polficaribus sessilibus 
patenti-recurvis lineari-oblongis acutis coriaceis enerviis basi late cor- 
datis semiamplexicaulibus costa valida marginibus recurvis supra 
laevibus subtus pallidis, racemis axillaribus oppositis foliis a3quilongis 
breviter pedunculatis cylindraceis obtusis densitioris, rhachi robusto 
viridi, floribus parvis, pedicellis ad | poll, longis basi bracteis minutis 
ovatis instructis, sepalis J^ poll, longis ovata oblongis obtusis ciliolatis, 
corollas lilacinae tubo calyce duplo longiore, limbi $ poll, lati lobis 
lateralibus et dorsali orbiculatis, antico minore, filamentis corolla? 
lobis paullo longioribus, antheris oblongis caeruleis, Btylo brevi, capsulis 
parvis ovatis obtusis dorso compressis, seminibus orbiculatis plano- 
convexis. 

V. Dieffenbachii, Benih. in DC. Prodr. vol. x. p. 459. Hook. f. Fl. Nov. 
Zel. vol. i. p. 191 ; Handb. Fl. N. Zeal. p. 206. F. Muell. Vegetation 
of Chatham Isfds. (sub V. salicifolia) p. 45. Armstrong in Trans. N. 
Zeal. Instil, vol. riii. ,1880) p. 351. Kirk, I.e. xxviii. (1895) p. 531. 
Gard, Chron. 1898, vol. ii. p. 154, fig. 41. 



A very handsome and well-marked, shrubby Speedwell, 
confined to the Chatham Islds., where it was discovered by 
Dr. Dieffenbach, the first naturalist who visited that in- 
teresting dependency of New Zealand, now nearly sixty 
years ago. As a species it stands between V. speciosa, R. 
Cunn. (see tab. 4057), and V. macroura, Hook. f. (a plant 
not hitherto figured), and, as I have observed in Fl. Nov. 
Zel., it quite resembles what a cross between these two 
species might yield. The only indigenous specimen that 
I have seen is Dieffenbach's in Herb. Kew, and I have 
no other information as to the habit of the plant in its 
native country than an observation by Kirk, in his 
enumeration of the N. Zealand species of Veronica, in 
the " Transactions of the New Zealand Institute," who 
says of it, " The rather stout branches are given off in 
a divaricating manner, so that a single specimen may 
cover an area many yards in diameter. The stem and 
leaves are sometimes pubescent." 

May 1st, 1899. 



Sir F. von Mueller, in his little volume on the " Vegeta- 
tion of the Chatham Islds.," has the hardihood to refer this 
and twenty other well characterized New Zealand species 
of Veronica to V. salicifolia ! Under the same inspiration, 
in the same work, he reduces thirty- five species of Epilo- 
bium, including E. alpimim, L., to E. tetragonum, L. It 
is unfortunate that Mueller never visited either New 
Zealand or the Chatham Islds., for a little knowledge of 
the species of both genera in their native countries might 
have modified his views. 

The figure of V. Dieffenbachii was made from a specimen 
sent me by Robert Lindsay, Esq., of Kaimes Lodge, 
Murray- field, Midlothian, in August, 1898. The plant is 
cultivated at Kew, where it flowers freely in a sheltered 
border in October. 

Descr. — A glabrous or puberulous shrub, with long, 
divaricating, terete, green, leafy branches. Leaves sessile, 
spreading, and recurved, three to four inches long, linear- 
oblong, acute, coriaceous, midrib stout otherwise, veinless, 
base broadly cordate, semi-amplexicaul, margins recurved, 
bright green above, pale beneath. Flowers very small, 
bright lilac, crowded in axillary, opposite, shortly pedun- 
cled, sub-erect, cylindric dense racemes; peduncle and 
rhachis stout, terete ; pedicels about one -tenth of an inch 
long, with a minute bract at the base. Sepals about as 
long as the pedicels, narrowly oblong, acute, ciliolate. 
Corolla tube longer than the sepals, funnel-shaped, limb a 
quarter of an inch broad, lateral and dorsal lobes sub- 
equal, orbicular, anterior lobe smaller. Filaments about as 
long as the corolla-lobes, anthers blue. Capsule very small, 
ovate, obtuse, or acute, dorsally compressed. Seeds 
minute, orbicular. — J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Two flowers, with pedicels and bracts ; 2, two sepals, ovary, and 
base of style; 3, portion of raceme and capsule; 4, calyx and capatilo ; 
5, seed ; all but 3 (which is of the natural size) enlarged. 



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M 7653.— C ARYIFLOKUS. 



7655. — DaHLI \ MAXIMILIANA, 
7656.— VJ IBACHII. 



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I-id., 6, B TA STREET, COYEST 6, 




7657 




ViricantBrooka.b i 



Tab. 7C57. 
BEOONIA venosa. 

Native of Bradl. 

Nat. Ord. Begoniace.e. 
Genus Begonia, L. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen, Plant, vol. i. p. 841.) 



Begonia (Rachia) venosa; caule erecto elato valde robusto folioso sublanugi- 
noso, foliis amplis subpeltatim petiolatis aariformibus obtusis basi late 
bilobis margine undulatis palmatinerviis crassiusculis supra lurida 
viridibus pilis flaccidis albis rufisque sublanatis, subtus densius lanatis 
nerds subsimplicibas validis, stipulis marimia (2-pollicaribus) inter- 
nodio aequilongis erectis oblongis subacutis inflatis tenuiter rigide 
membranaceis pallide runs parallelinerviis venulis trans versis reti- 
culatis, pedunculis valde elongatis erectis, cymis corymbif'ormibus medio- 
cribus bisexualibns, bracteis parvis lineari-oblongia caducis, rloribns 
breviuscule pedicellatis ad f poll, latis albis, masc. sepalis 2 orbiculatis 
dorso tomentosis v. glabratis, petalis 2 minoribus et angustioribus, 
Btaminibus numerosis, filamentis brevissimis, anthem oblongis, connective 
producto crasso apice rotundato, rl. fern, sepalis 4 orbiculatis, petalo 
unico minora oblongo, ovario 3-loculari, placentis bipartitis segmentis 
nndique ovuliferis, stylis brevibus hippocrepiformibua undique stigma- 
tosis cornubus brevibus tortis. 

B. venosa, Skan in Kew Bulletin, 1899, ined. 



A magnificent and very distinct species, remarkable for 
the frosted, silvery appearance of the upper surface of the 
leaves, and the very large iuflated stipules, which are of 
a membranous, transparent, but firm consistence, and 
are traversed by strong, straight, parallel veins, the inter- 
spaces being crossed by capillary reticulating venules. They 
contrast by their pale, reddish colour with the bright green 
of the stems which they embrace, all but concealing the 
internodes. The flowers are comparatively inconspicuous. 
B. venom falls into none of the sections of the genus 
as these are defined by Klotzsch and A. de Candolle, but 
its close affinity in habit, indumentum, foliage, stamens, 
stvles and placentation with />. incana, Lindl., deter- 
mines its place to be with that plant in sect. Bachia, 
A. DC, providing that the character hitherto given to 
Rachia, of sepals 3, petals 2, be altered to sepals 2-4, 
petals 1-2. B. incana is a native of hot, dry, sunny 
places in Mexico. The native country of B, venosa is not 
satisfactorily known. Mr. Thos. Christy, F.L.S., who 
sent to Kew Herbarium the specimen here figured, together 
June 1st, 1899. 



with a living plant for the Royal Gardens (which has already 
flowered), informs me that it was discovered by Professor 
Lofgren, head of the Botanical Dept. of the state of 
Sao Paolo, in an island off the coast of Brasil, but whether 
off Para, or off the mouth of the river Santos (Prov. Sao 
Paolo), Mr. Christy cannot inform me. That gentleman 
has observed that the female flowers are not fully developed 
until the males have fallen away. 

Descr. — Stem tall, erect, very robust, upwards of half 
an inch in diameter, and as well as the leaves covered with 
a cottony white or reddish tomentum. Leaves long- 
petioled, thick in texture, ear-shaped, with a deeply 2- 
lobed base, six inches long, dull green, frosted above with 
sparse white tomentum, mixed with rufous hairs, more 
densely rufously tomentose beneath, margin undulate; 
nerves few, strong, radiating from the sub-peltately 
attached petiole, which is three to five inches long, stout, 
terete, and like the peduncle sparsely clothed with hairs; 
stipules two inches long, oblong, ventricose, sub-acute, 
almost concealing the internodes of the stem, of a very 
thin but rigidly membranous texture, pale rufous, with 
about eight parallel strong nerves, and very delicate anas- 
tomosing cross nervules. Cymes about four inches broad, 
on rather slender, erect, axillary, red peduncles, eight to teu 
inches long, bisexual ; bracts small, linear-oblong, caducous. 
flower* shortly pedicelled, about three-fourths of an inch 
broad, pure white ; males with two orbicular sepals, and 
two much smaller, narrowly oblong petals ; female of four 
orbicular sepals and one oblong petal. Stamens many, 
crowded on a small receptacle ; anthers oblong, much longer 
than the filaments, connective thickened upwards, with a 
produced rounded top, cells narrow, diverging upward. 
Styles very short, horse-shoe shaped, with short, erect 
arms, terminating in twisted tips, all clothed with papillose 
hairs. Omnj trigonous, narrowly three-winged ; placentas 
bipartite, segments covered with ovules on both faces.— 
t/. 1J. ll. 



Fig. 1. Stamen; 2, fern, flowers; 3, ovary and styles-, 4, transverse section 
of ovary :— Alt enlarged. 



7666 



' 



X.J.KF 




itchJifh 



tPiT-nnVsCa^SonLt 



Tab. 7G58. 

MORiEA SULPHUREA. 

Native of Cape Colony. 

Nat. Ord. Iride/E. — Tribe Mor.ee*. 
Genus Mor^ia, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 688.) 



Morjea sulphured; oormo globoso parvo, foliia productis Knearibus firmis 
glabris canlis basin vaginantibus, caule gracili monocephalo, spathaj 
C3'lindrica3 valvis linearibus viridibus inseqaalibus, exteriore miaore, 
perianthio sulphureo segmentis omnibus e medio reflexis ad basin limbi 
anrantiaco maculato punctis et lineis brunneis decoratis, exterioribus 
obovato-cuneatis, interioribus paulo angustioribus, styli ramia brevibus 
sulphureis appendicibus lanceolatis. 



This new, slender little Morsea belongs to a group dis- 
tinguished by the stems bearing only a single terminal 
cluster of" flowers, and resembles in habit M. Baurii, 
Baker, and M. lurida, Ker. Corms were received from 
Mr. J. Matthews, of Capetown, in 1896, and which 
flowered for the first time in a cool stove at the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in April, 1898. Very few of the Morasas 
are now in cultivation, but the number of species 
known has gone on, of late years, steadily increasing, 
till it has reached forty-seven species at the Cape, and 
eighteen in tropical Africa, in addition to the gigantic 
M. Robinsoniana of Lord Howe's island. Many of them 
are very fine plants, with leaves as broad, and flowers as 
large as in the European Irises, whilst in others the flowers 
are small and fugitive. 

Descr. — Cortn small, globose. Produced leaves two, 
sheathing the base of the stem for some distance, linear, 
firm, dark green, glabrous, three or four inches long. 
Stem slender, terete, under a foot long, bearing a single 
terminal cluster of flowers, and two small sheathing leaves. 
Spathe cylindrical, under an inch long; outer valves firm, 
linear, green, the exterior one small. Perianth sulphur- 
yellow, an inch long, segments all reflexing from the 
middle, and marked at the throat with a spot of darker 
yellow, with radiating brown lines and spots ; outer 
segments obovate-cuneate, a third of an inch broad ; inner 

June 1st, 1899. 



rather narrow. Ovary clavate, small; style-branches 
pale yellow; appendages large, lanceolate, erect.— J. G. 

Baker. 



Fig 1, Stamen, front view; 2, stamen, back view; 3, style-branch, with 
appeudages : — All enlarged. 



76 "5$ 




/ 



&4 * ' 



•- 



^Sdfil.JXHtchlith. 






Tar. 7659. 

KLEINIA PENDULA. 
Native of Somaliland and Arabia. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Senecionidea. 

Genius Kleinia, Linn. ; Senecio (Klei.via) (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. riant. 

vol. ii. p. 449.) 



Kleinia pendula; gJaberrima, fere aphylla, caule decumbente carnoso miro 
modo tortuoso e articulis paucis crasse carnosis divaricatis constante, 
articulis cylindricis 4-15 poll. longis |-f poll. diam. incurvis v. inflexis 
sparse spinulosis luride viridibas striatis basi rotundatis apice attenuatia 
superiore areola parva inferiori infra apicem adnata, foliis apicibus 
nascentibus articulorum fasciculatis | poll. longis teretibus carnosis 
demum in spinulas rigidas decurvas basi tumidas mutatis, ppdnnculis 
1-2 terminalibus, unifloris bracteis paucis linearibus sparsis, capitulo multi- 
tloro, involucri pollicaris cylindrici basi nudi bracteis anguste linearibus 
acutis striatis tubis riorum brevioribus, floribus miniato-aurantiacis, 
styli ramis fl. radii lineari-elongatis obtusis, fl .disci brevioribus conoparvo 
terminatis, acbasniis hirtulis, pappi setia tenuissimis subscaberulis albis. 

K. ? pendula, DC. Prodr. vol. vi. p. 339. 

Cacalia pendula, Forsk. Fl. JFjQypt. Arab. p. 145. Vahl, Symb. vol. iii. p. 90. 

Senecio penduluB, ScA. Bip. in Flora, vol. xxviii. (1845) p. 500. 

S. Gunnisii, Baker in Kew Bullet. 1895, p. 217. 

Notonia tracbycarpa, Klotz. (PI. Bind.) in Sitzb. Acad. JFien. Maih.-Xat. Ii. 

Abth. ii. (1865) 370, t. 8. Otiv. Fl. Trap. Afriv. vol. iii. p. 408, excl. eyn. 

omn. 
Kaad, Arab. 



A very singular plant, the distorted form of which, as 
shown in the reduced figure given in the accompanying 
plate, suggests the idea of its not being merely tortuous, 
but distorted. The serpentine branches of the stem are 
divaricate at all manner of angles, are curved or twisted in 
various ways, and are superposed on one another, with the 
upper never terminating the lower, but attached at its 
side below the apex by a very narrow point of junction. 

K. pendula is a native of dry, rocky mountains in Arabia, 
Abyssinia, and Somaliland. It was discovered in Yemen 
by the Swedish naturalist Forskoel, in 1762, and has been 
collected in Hadramaut by Bent, in Abyssinia by Schim- 
per, and in Somaliland by Hildebrandt, and by Mrs. Lort 
Phillips and Miss Edith Cole. 

A specimen was brought by these ladies to the Cam- 
bridge Botanical Gardens, where it flowered in October, 
189tf, and was kindly sent to Kew for figuring in this 

J use lsr, I89y. 



work by Mr. Lynch. Specimens from both Mr. Bent and 
Mrs. Lort Phillips are growing most luxuriantly at Kew, 
and have attained much longer stems than the native ones, 
or than that figured in the plate. The joints root freely 
at the articulations, and often at the tips also. As to the 
genus of this plant, that depends on the value attached to 
Kleinia, Linn., as distinct from Senecio. Of absolute dis- 
tinction between these there is none, but Kleinia forms a 
fairly circumscribed group, distinguished by a succulent 
habit, cylindric, ecalyculate involucre, long, narrow, uni- 
seriate bracts, and homogamous discoid flowers, the outer 
of which have small conical appendices to the style-arms. 
For horticultural usage the name is very convenient. 
Notonia, DC, is absolutely identical with Kleinia. 

Deser. — A decumbent, almost leafless, fleshy perennial. 
8 tern consisting of a few superposed curved or crooked, 
fleshy, cylindric joints, the upper of which is laterally arti- 
culate with that below it by a very narrow area below the 
point ; joints four to fifteen inches long, by one half to 
three-quarters of an inch in diameter, sparsely spinulose, 
incurved or inflexed, dull green, striated, base rounded, tip 
narrowed, obtuse. Leaves produced only at the growing 
tips of the young joints, about a quarter of an inch long, 
filiform, terete, fleshy, transformed into shining recurved 
spinules, with a swollen base as the jointdevelops. Peduncles 
one or two, terminal, erect, deflexed, or horizontal, three 
or more inches long, furnished with a few small, narrow 
bracts. Involucre about an inch long, by half an inch in 
diameter, cylindric, naked at the base ; bracts narrowly 
linear, acute, shorter than the flowers, striate. Flowers 
forming a depressed head, much broader than the in- 
volucre, about an inch and a half in diameter, of a bright 
vermilion colour mixed with orange-yellow.— J. D. H. 

Fig 1, Ray-flower; 2, di?k-flower ; 3, hair of pappus ; 4, stamen ; 5, style- 
arms of raj -flower :— All enlarged :— 6, reduced view of the Cambridge Garden 
specimen. 



7660 




* S -del.J.N.Rtehhth 



Tab. 7660. 

CHRYSANTHEMUM nipfonicuu. 
Native of Japan. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Anthemide/e. 
Genus Chrysanthemum, Linn. / (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 424.) 



Chrysanthemum nipponicum ; fruticulus 1-2-pedalis, erectus, canle eimplici 
robusto paucifloro, foliis conferfcis 3-4-pollicaribus, sessilibus oblongo- 
obovatis oblanceolatisve obtusis basi angustatia integerrimis suivum 
crenato-serratis coriaceis supra lrete viridibua subtus pallidis, pedunculis 
monocepbalis robustis foliis paucis abbreviatis instructis, capitulis 2-3J 
poll, diam., involucri hemispberici bracteis late ovatie obtusis herbaceis 
t'usco marginatis, il. radii lignlis linearibus albis apice 5-dentatis, fl. 
disci tubuloais pallide flavido-virescentibus, tubo tereti, dentibus brevibus 
erectis, antheris breviter appendiculatis, styli fl. fem. ramia brevibua 
apicibus truncatis stigmatosis, acbseuiis teretibus glabris, pappo sqnamu- 
loso. 

C. nipponicum, Wien. III. Oartenzeit. 1895, p. 12. W. Watson in Gard. 
Gkron. 1897, vol. i. p. 46 ; 1898, vol. ii. p. 348, fig. 104. 

Leucantheraum nipponicum, Franch. ex Maif'tm. in Bull. Acad. Petcrsb. 
vol. xvii. (1872) p. 420 ; Mel. Biol. vol. viii. p. 512. 

Somoko Zusetsu, vol. xvii. t. 15 (13 litt. Jap.) 

Hama-gikn, Jap. 

A very distinct species, cultivated in the gardens of 
Japan, where, according to a note by Maximowicz 
attached to specimens collected by him at Jedo on 
his second journey (1862), it is considered to be a plant 
introduced into Japan, but from what country is not 
known. There are specimens in the Kew Herbarium 
from Father Faurie, ticketed " Yokohama," probably pro- 
cured from a nursery. The species was introduced into 
Europe by Messrs. Damman & Co. of Naples, from whom 
the plant grown at Kew, from which the accompanying 
figure is taken, was purchased. 

13ut for its sensitiveness to frosts, G. nipponicum would 
be a very valuable open border plant. The specimen 
figured flowered in the Temperate House of the Royal 
Gardens in October, 1898. This year, owing to the 
absence of frosts, it has flowered freely in the open air in 
the same month; but it has in former years been so often 
cut down by early frosts that it cannot be regarded as 
hardy. 
June 1st, 1899. 



Descr. — A stout, glabrous undersbrub, one to two feet 
high, with a simple leafy stem, woody at the base, and 
few-fid., corymbose inflorescence. Leaves crowded, three 
to four inches long, oblanceolate, or obovate-oblong, 
obtuse, narrowed into an entire sessile base, crenate- 
serrate above it, rather thickly coriaceous, dark green 
above, pale beneath. Head variable in size, up to three 
and a half inches in diameter, on long, stout one-flowered 
peduncles, that bear a few very short leaves. Involucre 
hemispheric ; bracts short, broadly ovate, obtuse, her- 
baceous, green, with broad, red-brown, scarious margins. 
Hay-flowers very many, ligules linear, tips minutely five- 
toothed. Dish-flowers greenish-yellow, tube terete, lobes 
minute, erect. Anther with short tips. Style-arms of 
disk-flowers with truncate, papillose tips. Achenes (imma- 
ture) terete, crowned with a minute paleaceous pappus.— 
J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Ray-flower ; 2, disk-flower ; 3, stamens ; 4, style-arms of disk-flower : 
All enlarged; 5, reduced view of whole plant. 




M.S.delJNPjtdilith 



VinoantBrobksPajr&Sor 



Tad. 766\. 
IRIS Delavayt. 

Na t ive of Yun nan. 

Nat. Ord. Irwem. — Tribe T&.QBMBM. 
Genqs Iris, Linn.; (Benth. & Ilooh.f. Gen. riant, vol. iii. p. G8G ) 



Ibis (Apogon) Delavayi; rhizomate repente elongato, foliis 2-2^ ped. longis 
J— | poll, latis strictis erectis linfaribus acuminatis costatis glauco-viridi- 
bus, peduticulo 3-1 pedale valido erecto fistuloso foliis 1-2 minoribus 
angustioribus instructo superne furcato paucifloro, spathia 2|-3 poll, 
longis, foliaceis lanceolatis acuminatis carinatis apicibua scariosis, pedi- 
cellis bracteis subsequilongis, perianthii 2-2^ poll, expans. tubo ad \ 
poll, longo, segmentis exterioribus reflexis, limbo oblongo obtuso 
saturate violaceo basin versus albo striolato, ungue limbo axpiilongo nudo 
viridi late alato alis violaceis albo-punctatis, interioribus erectis oblongo- 
lanceolatis subacutis, stigmatibus oblongis apice 2-!obis violaceis lobis 
orbicularibus crenulatis, antheris aureis, capsula 2£ poll, longa trigona. 

I. Delavayi, Micheli in Rev. Hortic. 1895, p. 399, fig. 128, 129 ; Jard. du 
Crest, p. 189. 



As pointed out by its author, Mr. Micheli, Iris Delavayi 
is closely allied to L sihirica, which has a very wide range, 
from Central and Southern Europe to Eastern Siberia and 
Japan. No further evidence of this is necessary than a 
reference to the figure of the latter plant at tab. 50 of this 
work. The differences indicated by Mr. Micheli are, that in 
J. Delavayi the peduncle is longer than the leaves, the 
spathes are foliaceous, not scarious, the flowers are longer 
pedicelled, the tube of the perianth is longer, and the 
capsule larger and triquetrous. Of which characters, 
however, that of the longer pedicels does not hold good. 
It is also very near the Japanese 1. laevigata, Fiscfa & Mey. 
(I. Kcempferi, Sieb.), to winch 7. sihirica, var. sanguinea t 
Ker (I. sihirica, var. orient alis, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. 
Bot. vol. xvi. (1878) p. 139), tab. 1<;04 of this work is re- 
ferable, in which the spathes are herbaceous, and perianth 
tube long. 

I, Delavayi i* a native of marshes in the Yunnan pro- 
vince of China. It was introduced into the Jard in des 
Plantes in 1889 by seeds sent by the Abbe Delavay. 
The specimens figured here are of plants raised from 

June 1st, 1899. 



given in the cre^ of f ^ *? Ascription there 
deltoid). t& ° f tho ■**»»• b «ng orbicular (not 

anfT'nTl? °t^, ? t0B \ ""J** £ «™» t*o to two 

an inchb'/oa C t r t S ' ere b c y t ■£»*? , to *«-«** of 
fooglj ribbedl ftM^STffi I'-" aenminate, 
flexuous, with two or three Zlf , leaves ' erect ' 

the top. Spathes La n I * ""T " ieaves > forkc ' d ■* 
lanceolate, herbaeeonI° I "\t nd a half inones l°"ft 
about as long TKS ?* D°»?° Ua ^ P ^» 
and a halt ineLs acrl, T lcn " n "' tw0 to *"«• 

long ; outer ZS^STZ^JTTV"** halt a " in0h 
violet-blue, with tortuon , I7v * "" b , Mo ^' oht ™'> d «*P 
daw as long as \h hnh 6 - ? in the ,0wer half ! 

*i«g» ! inner segments ere^T,' "^ Vi °' et ^''te-spotted 
Paler violet. ,l°Me flino" ' ° b ^"'anceolate, sub-acute, 
violet, crests orb"cZ Sf **•.***» oblong, pale 
mohea long, triquetmag^Suf; /W * fe tw ° and a Imlf 

^■«*iS?l5 StameM iVi. W «r iattlTrtM,,. .., , , , , 

1 "•'"" "' ™'gma:— enlarged; i, reduced 






prospectus. 



AnnePrattS 

lowehincJPlants 

Grasses. Sedges, s fERjfS 

OF 

GKJSAT BRITAIN 




ANNE PRATT'S 

FLOWERING PLANTS, 

GRASSES, 

SEDGES & FERNS 

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[Specimen Page.] 

CISTINE^E SO 

clumps on the garden beds. On the rocks of Greece, as well as those of 
Palestine, the Cistus shrubs are very abundant, and all the genera abound 
most on dry and elevated spots, some of them being natives of almost all the 
countries of the world. The balsam called Ladanum, which is so much 
used as a perfume in Greece and in Oriental countries, and which is prized for 
its tonic and stomachic properties, is produced by the Cistus creticus. South ey 
has described the fragrance of the Cistus plants : 

"The forest or the lonely heath wide spread, 
Where Cistus shrubs sole seen, exhaled at noon 
Their line balsamic odour all around, 
Strevv'd with their blossoms, frail as beautiful, 
The thirsty soil at eve ; and when the sun 
Relumed the gladden'd earth, opening anew 
Their stores exuberant, prodigal as frail, 
Whiten'd again the wilderness." 

1. Rock-rose (Jlelidnthemum). — Sepals 5, the two outer either smaller or 
wanting ; petals 5 ; stamens numerous ; capsule 3-valved. Named from the 
Greek kelios, the sun, and anthos, a flower, because the flowers expand in 
the sunshine. 

1. Rock-rose (Helidnthemum). 

1. Common Rock-rose (//. virfgdre). — Stem shrubby, prostrate ; leaves 
with fringed stipules, opposite, oblong, green above, hoary beneath ; calyx of 
five leaves, the two outer very small and fringed ; seeds black. Plant 
perennial. Anyone used to roam over the chalky or gravelly soils of this 
country must have often seen, early in spring and late in autumn, the pros- 
trate branches of this Rock-rose, covered with their leaves. In spring these 
are of a tender verdant tint ; but late in the year they are rigid, of a dark 
myrtle-colour, and shine with the deepest green hue on the reddened leaf- 
stems. When the sunshine of July pours down on the grassy slopes, and 
tinges their sides with its gleams, the clumps of brilliant yellow flowers are 
1 night, as if the sun had turned them into gold. They are truly, as the 
ancients called them, Beauties of the Sun, or, as some country people term 
them, Sun-Roses j never opening save when skies are bright, and never 
lingering on till the late autumnal season. Their petals are crumpled and 
fragile, and the little unblown buds are very pretty, standing by thousands 
as they do among the grass on a cloudy day, waiting for the morrow's sun. 
The stamens are very sensitive, and if only touched by the wing of an insect 
or the point of a needle, they all lie down on the petals. It is long before 
they resume their erect position, and in some cases they appear not to do 
so at all. The bees seem very fond of these flowers, flying from one clump 
to another, with their deep joyous humming, passing by their favourite wild 
thyme, to rob the Cistus flower, which first invited them ; for these sagacious 
insects keep throughout the morning to the same kind of blossom as that 
from which they first gathered the honey, and never mingle the sweets of 
the thyme and the Cistus. 

Many writers on the flowers of Scripture consider that a variety of this 
Rock-rose is the plant alluded to in the Canticles, as the Rose of Sharon. It 
does not appear that the Hebrew word, Chabazzeleth, which our translators 
have rendered by "rose," is ever applied to that flower; and as the plains of 



ANNE PRATT'S FLOWERING PLANTS, 

GRASSES, SEDGES AND FERNS OF 
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766Z 













Tab. 7662. 
YUCCA Whipplei. 

Native of California. 



Nat. Ord. LiLiACEJi. — Tribe Dracene*. 
Genus Yucca, Dill.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. in', p. 778.) 



Yucca (Hesperoyucca) Whipplei ; caule brevissimo prostrato stolonifero, 
foliis numerosissimis densissime confertis patentibus lineari-subulatia 
falcatis v. strictis rigidis 10-20 poll, longis a basi \ poll, lata sensim 
angustatis glaucis striatis dorso carinatis, apicem trigonum pungen- 
tem versus concavis, marginibus serrulato-asperis, scapo 4-12-pedaIi 
robusto stricto, bracteis 6-9 poll. longis e basi lata foliaceis recurvis 
inferioribus confertis foliiformibus, supremis ad basin panicula? latioribus, 
panicula cylindracea densiflora, perianthii 2-4 poll. diam. subglobosi seg- 
ments incurvis albo-virescentibns apices versus rubro-purpureo margina- 
tis exterioribus oblongo-lanceolatis acuminatis interioribus mul to latioribus, 
filamentis erectis sursum incrassatis laavibus, antheris didymis, ovario 
oblongo, stylo brevi, stigmate crasso trilobo, capsula globoso-ovoidea 1-2 
poll, longa, erecta, obtusa, loculicide 3-valvi, valvis integris, seminibus 
parvis valde compressis bevibus anguste marginatis. 

Y. Whipplei, Torr.in Bot. Mex. Bound, p. 222 (textu). Bot. Ejrped. Ives, p 29. 

Bot. Works Engelmann, pp. 277, 296, 297, 298, 307. Gard. Ghron. 18W, 

vol. ii. p. 197, fig. 42. S. Wats. in. Bot. Calif, vol. ii p. 164. et in PfOC. 

Amer. Acad. vol. xiv. p. 254. Baker, Rivist. Yucchi, Reaucam. e Dasylir. 

in Bull. B. Soc. Tosc. di Oriic. 1881-2, p. 23. TJte Cactus Journal, 

June, 1899, p. 73 cum <V. 
T. graminifolia, Wood in Proc. Acad. Sc. Philadelph. 1868, p. 167. 
Y. aloifolia, Torr. Pacific R. Rep. vol. iv. p. 147. 
PAgave californica, JJort. Kevo. e.c Jacobi, Agave, App. p. 117. Lemaire, 111. 

Hortic. 1863, tub tab. 372. 



Yucca Whipplei is a native of rocky mountains in 
California, from San Bernardino to Monterey, extending 
thence eastwards to X.W. Arizona. It is a very stately 
species, attaining twice the height of an ordinary man, 
with copious bright green foliage, a stout, bracteate 
scape, and a noble panicle of large, sub-globose flowers. 
The figure here given was drawn by Lady Thiselton-Dyer, 
during a visit to the Commendatore Hanbury, Palazzo 
Orengo, Ventimiglia, in April, 1891, when the plant was 
flowering for the first time in that gentleman's magnificent 
garden. From a record, preserved at the Palazzo, and 
communicated to me by Commendatore Hanbury, it appears 
Jui/r 1st, 1899. 



that ripe seeds of this Yucca were received in January, 
1882, from Ludwig Winter, of Bordighera. These would 
give the age of the specimen at first flowering as nine 
years. It flowered a second time in the autumn or winter 
of 1896, but not since, though it is alive and well. 

Descr. — Stoloniferous. Stem very short and prostrate, 
or none. Leaves most densely crowded, in an almost 
globose mass, two to three feet in diameter, spreading on 
all sides, linear-subulate, ten to twenty inches long, sud- 
denly tapering from a base about half an inch broad to a 
trigonous pungent tip, rigid, straight, or curved, glaucous- 
green, striate, dorsally keeled, margins minutely serrulate. 
Scape four to twelve feet high, very stout, erect, loosely 
covered above, densely below, with erect or recurved 
foliaceous bracts, six to nine inches long. Panicle erect, 
cylindric, dense-flowered, two to four inches in diameter, 
quite glabrous ; branches many-flowered ; floral bracts 
small. Flowers globose, two to two and a half inches in 
diameter, pendulous from stout, decurved pedicels, an inch 
and a half long ; perianth-segments incurved, concave, 
acute, greenish-white, margined with dull purple, outer 
broadly oblong-lanceolate, inner narrower. Stamens about 
half as long as the perianth-segments ; filaments stout, 
thickened in the middle, quite smooth ; anthers didymous. 
Ovary oblong, laterally six-lobed ; style very short, stigma 
three-lobed. Capsule two and a half inches long, broadly 
oblong, trigonous — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Stamen; 2, ovary; 3, capsule -.—All enlarged; 4, reduced view of 

plcLUXi 



. -.- /; i .-.»-., 



7663 




H.T.D.del,J.K.Pitchliih 



^nceiit Brooks,Day&.SoRLt J l"'. 



Tab. 7663. 
acacia spile rocepha la. 

Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. Leguminosj. — Tribe Acacie.e. 
Genus Acacia, Willd.; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 594.) 



Acacia (Gummiferse) sphserocephala ; frutex rigidua, ramosus, stipnlis 
spinescentibua demum maximis l^-pollicaribua corniformibus rectis 
curvisve ima baai connatis, foliis bi-pinnatis, pinnis 2-3-jugia, foliolia 
• 20-30-jugis oblongis subacutia |-f poll, longis glaberrimis saturate 
viridibus apicibus nudia v. appendicula fusifornii carnoaula caduca flavida 
instructis, spicis globosis ochroleucia in paniculaa ramosaa ramiB ramnlis- 
que robuBtis glaberrimis dispoaitis breviter pedicellatis, floribus deDaissime 
congestis, sqiiamnlis peltatia gracillime stipitatis immixtis, calycia 
urceolati puberuli lobis brevibus rotundatia, corolla calyce paullo longiore 
ore vix lobato, staminibus breviter exaertis. 

A. sphaerocephala, Cham. Sr Schlecht. in Linnsea, vol. v. (1830), p. 594. 

Benth. in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xxx. p. 514. Hemsl. Biol. Centr. Am. 

Bot. vol. i. p. 355. 
Acacia No. 12, Mill. Gard. Diet. Ed. III. (1737). 
Acacia spinosa, &c, Mill. Fig. Plant, vol. i. p. 4, t. 6 (1755). 
PMimosa campeachyana, Mill. Gard. Diet. Ed. viii. (1768) No. 20 ; ed. Mar tun, 

No. 75 (1807). 

M. cornigera, Linn. Sp. PL p. 520, pro parte. 

Arbor cornigera, Cotnmel. Hort. Med. Amstelod. vol. i. p. 209, t. 207. 



This is one of the two plants long known in cultivation 
under the name of Mimosa cornigera, the intricate syno- 
nymy of which I have discussed under Acacia spadicigera, 
tab. 7395. Though very different in inflorescence, these 
two species come from the same country, closely resemble 
one another in habit of growth, foliage, the stipules, 
and in the more remarkable character of bearing on 
the tips of some of their leaflets, fleshy, oblong appen- 
dages, that supply food to stinging ants which nest in 
the accrescent hollow stipules. Under the same tab. I 
have extracted from the late Mr. Belt's " Naturalist in 
Nicaragua," that gentleman's fascinating description of 
the habits of these ants, of which there are at least two 
species belonging to different genera. To that full 
description I must refer for the functions of the organs of 
A. sphcprocpphala. 
July 1st, 1899. 



Whether A. sphaerocephala or A. spadicigera was the 
species cultivated as the Cuckold tree so long ago as 1692, 
in the Royal Gardens of Hampton Court, remains doubtful ; 
as also whether or no it is the " Arbor cornigera " of Her- 
nandez, " Rerum Med. Nov. Hisp. Thes.," p. 86, published 
in 1651 . The former species was certainly known to Breyn 
in 1680, and it maybe reasonably surmised that the Hamp- 
ton Court plant was procured from Amsterdam. It has long 
been known in European gardens, and there are specimens 
in the Kew Herbarium from the Montpellier and Liverpool 
Botanical Gardens, collected early in the century ; how long 
it has been at Kew is not known. The A. cornigera of 
Aiton's " Hortus Kewensis " is certainly A. spadicigera, 
for the spadix-like inflorescence is described in that work. 

A. sphaerocephala is a native of Mexico and Central 
America, and there are specimens in the Kew Herbarium 
collected in Texas. 

Descr. — A shrub with the habit and characters of A. 
spadicigera, Cham. & Schlecht. tab. 7395, but with fewer 
leaflets, and with panicled, globose heads of flowers ; the 
fruit is unknown. — J. D. K. 



Tig. 1, Spinous stipules, of the nat. size ; 2, flower; 3, stamens ; 4, pistil.— 

All enlarged. 



7664 




■TD.del,JNFitch]ith 



"'Sricen.t Bi-ookriDay&SonXlflny 



Tab. 7664, 
MASDEVALLIA muscosa. 

Native of Colombia and Ecuador, 

Nat. Ord. Ohchide,*. — Tribe Epidendrejb. 

Genua Masdevallia, Ruiz & Pav.;(Benth. ScHook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 492.) 



Masdevallia muscosa ; caespitosa, folio l|-2 pollicari ovato-oblongo v. oblan- 
ceolato in petiolum ^-1 poll, longum sulcatum angnstato coriaceo 
glaberrimo supra papilloso saturate viridi subtuB pallidiore pnrpureo 
suffuso petiolo ima basi vagiuato, scapo uuifloro 5-6-pollicari gracillimo 
pilis glanduligeris laxis patentibua obsito, medium versus vagina parva 
cylindracea obtusa glaberrima instmcto, bractea vagina simili } poll, 
longa membranacea brunnea, pedicello brevi decurvo glaberrimo, 
ovario hispido, sepalis basi pallide flavis purpureo striatis in tubum 
campanulatum gibbum connatis sursum in caudas pollicares apicibus 
clavellatis productis, petalis J poll, longis linearibus apicibus rotundatis 
margine superiore supra medium unidentatis, labelli J poll, longi ungne 
limbo aequilongo tomentoso anreo rubro punctulato, limbo triangulari- 
obovato velutino lateribus rotundatis purpureo basi aureo marginibus 
incurvis setulosis, columna anguste alata, anthera dorsali. 

M. muscosa, Reichb. f. in Oard. Chron. 1875, vol. i. p. 460; 1881, vol. ii 
p. 336. Bean in Gard. Chron. 1887, vol. i. p. 836. Veitch Man. 
Orchid, part v. p. 54. Woodward, Masdevall. t. 39. F. Oliver in Ann. 
Bot. vol. i. (1887-8), p. 237, tab. xii. 



M. muscosa is a very interesting plant, being the only 
one of the seventy or eighty species of Masdevallia that 
have been described or enumerated, in which the lip has 
been shown to be sensitive, and to entrap insects in the 
flower. This discovery was made by Mr. Bean, when 
foreman of the Orchid Collection of the Royal Gardens in 
1887, and is described by him in the Gardeners Chronicle 
for that year (vol. i. p. 836) ; and later by Prof. F. Oliver, 
in an elaborate paper, illustrated with anatomical details, 
which appeared in the "Annals of Botany" of the same 
year. It may briefly be described as follows. The claw 
of the lip is sensitive, and on being touched, however 
lightly, by an insect alighting on the blade, the latter 
springs up, imprisoning the insect between it and the 
column. The insect is then in a position to detach the 
pollen, which on its release by the blade falling back, is 
carried off. On visiting the lip of another flower the insect 
July 1st, 1899. 



is in a position to place the pollen on its stigmatic surface, 
and thus effect cross-fertilization. 

In the Australian genus Pterostylis (see tab. 6351) the 
lip plays the same part as iu this Masdevallia. The 
filament of the stamen in Stylidium is similarly irritable. 

M. muscosa is a native of the Andes of Colombia and 
Ecuador, at elevations of 5850 to 7475 ft., where the 
mean temperature ranges from 59° to 62° Fahr., flowering 
in September and October. The specimen here figured 
flowered in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in May, 1887. 

Descr. — Leaves one and a half to two inches long, oval- 
or -oblanceolate-oblong, coriaceous, deep green and papil- 
lose on the surface, clouded with purple beneath, tip 
minutely three-toothed, base narrowed into a channelled 
petiole shorter than the blade. Scape five to six inches 
high, one-flowered, very slender, covered with flexuous, 
glandular hairs, girt at about the middle by a small, 
tubular, obtuse, brown, membranous sheath. Bract a 
quarter of an inch long, like the sheath on the scape ; 
pedicel rather longer than the bract, glabrous. Ovary 
decurved, hispid. Sepals yellow, streaked with purple, 
united into a campanulate tube gibbous at the base, then 
suddenly narrowed from a triangular base into slender, 
erect, or recurved tails one inch long, with clavellate tips. 
Petals small, linear, yellow, with a red midline, tip rounded, 
outer margin toothed above the base. Lip small, claw as 
long as the blade, tomentose with yellow hairs; blade 
triangular, golden-yellow towards the base, purple beyond 
it. Anther dorsal on the top of the column.— J. D. H. 



Fig ], Lip; 2, transverse section of flower, showing the dorsal position of 
e anther: — Both. enlnrtuA D 



the anther; — Both enlarged 



7661 







Ddel.JN.RichHth 



VSncentBrookspjW&Swl^fwP 



Tab. 7665. 

crassula pyeamidalis. 

Native of the Cape of Good Hope. 

Nat. Ord. Crassula.ce,e. 
Genus Crassula, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 657.) 



Crassula (Pyramidella) pyramidalis ; nana, caulibus 2-8 pollicaribus foliis 
omnino velatia cum foliis tetragonis simplicibus vel ramulia brevissi- 
mis instructis, foliis qnadrifariam irabricatis horizontalibus arctissiiue 
imbricatis carnosulis trlangulari-ovatis basi subcordatis liberis semi- 
am plexicaulibus marginibus puberulis, floribus pentameris, in capitula 
glocosa terminalia ^-1 poll. diam. confertis albis pentameris, sepalis 
parvis anguste spatbnlatis marginibus ciliatis, corollse glaberrimae 
tubo ovoideo sepalis duplo longiore, lobis tubo longioribus linearibus 
obtusis recurvis, filamentis brevibus, antheris longiusculis ovato-oblongis, 
squamulis e stipite gracili sursum dilatatis truncatis rubro-aurantiacis, 
carpellis ovoideis, stylis brevibus. 

C. pyramidalis, Linn.f. Suppl. p. 189. T/mnb. Fl. Cap. p. 287, et in Nov. Act. 
Nat. Cur. vol. vi. p. 336, t. 5 b. DC. Prodr. vol. iii. p. 388. Karr. et 
Sond. Fl. Cap. vol. iii. p. 338. Burbidge in Gard. Chron. 1872, p. 289, 
fig. 108, et 1885, vol. i. p. 545, fig. 1U1 {icon. Herat). 

C. quadrangula, Endl. ex Walp. Rep. vol. ii. p. 253. 

Tetraphyle pyramidalis & quadrangula, Eckl. & Zeyh. Enum. p. 292, 293. 



The plant here figured is that known in gardens as 
Crassula pyramidal is, Linn. f. and of Thunberg's " Flora 
Capensis," but it differs from the description of these 
authors in the leaves being much larger than one line 
long, and not being connate, as also in the heads of 
flowers being sometimes upwards of an inch across, and 
not merely M larger than a pea." It is possible that in its 
native state the plant never assumes the size which it does 
under cultivation, but this small size would not account 
for the leaves being connate. It must be left to Cape 
botanists to settle the question by a visit to the spot where 
Thunberg discovered G. pyramidalis, namely, near Olifant's 
River, by the thermal springs, " ( Juxta flum. Olyfant's 
orientalem, prope thtrmas," fl. Octob.). Other habitats 
given by Harvey in the " Flora Capensis " are Karroo, 
between Uitenhage and Graaf Reynet; Kleplaat river; 
Jvtr 1st, 1899. 



Driekoppen, Zwaanepoetsport berge, and Gamka river, all 
in the South-western region of the Cape Colony. 

0. pyramidalis has been long in cultivation at Kew, 
where it flowers in the Succulent House in May and June. 

Descr. — Stems two to three inches high, entirely hidden 
from base to tip by the leaves, which are most densely 
quadrifariously imbricate, together forming a rather 
acutely four-angled, green column. Leaves spreading 
almost horizontally, nearly half an inch broad, those 
of each series being closely appressed to one another, 
broadly triangular, with rounded sides, thinly fleshy, 
green, margins puberulous in a young state, base con- 
tracted and semi-amplexicaul, with a semi-lunar insertion. 
Flowers capitately corymbose, forming a sessile head an 
inch in diameter or less, pentamerous, very shortly pedi- 
celled, white. Sepals very small, narrowly spathulate, 
with ciliate margins. Petals united below into a tube 
twice as long as the sepals ; free portions as long as the 
tube, linear, obtuse, sub-flexuously spreading. Stamens in- 
serted in the corolla-tube, filaments very short, anthers 
large, ovate-oblong. Eypogynous scales dilated upwards 
from a very narrow base, truncate. Carpels narrowed into 
short styles. — J. D. E. 



Fi wL 1 ' T ° P of 1 8te 1 m a " d lcave s; 2, flower; 3, sepal; 4, corolla laid open; 
o. nypogyiwiw glands and carpels -.-All enlarged. 




I '.tr-h 1,0, 



Tab. 7066. 
rosa xanthina. 

Native of Central Asia and Afghanistan. 



Nat. Ord. Rosace*. — Tribe RoaE.E. 
Gonna Eosa, Linn. ; (Benth. & llook.f. Gen. Pla?it. vol. i. p. 025.) 



Rosa (Pimpinellifoliae) xanthina; frntex 3-4-pedalia, erectus, ramoaissimus, 
spinosus, fereeglandulosus, ramulia rubris glabris, aculeia Bemipollicanbus 
homomorphis confertis rectis rigidis baai compressis et valde dilatatis, 
foliis ramulia tioriferis confertia £-1 poll, longis (M)-foliolati<>, foliolia 
ovato-oblongis oldongis v. orbicularibus ad J poll, longis serrulato-dt>ntatis 
subtua praecipne glandulosis, stipulia oblongia eubacutia integerrimis, 
floribus in ramulos brevissimoa terminales solitariis ad 1 poll. diam. 
aureis-', pedunculia brevibus glaberrimis v. glanduloso-pilosia, aepali8 
lanceolatis integerrimis v. apices versus paucidentatia extua glandulo-is 
intus tomentod*, petalia Bepalia longioribus obovato-oblongia, stylis 
liberia lanaginosia apicibus glabri«, fructibua globosia ad ^ poll. diam. 
gracile pednneulatis glaberrimis nitidis sepalis reflexis coronatis, 
acheniiB primum villosis deraum glabris. 

R. xanthina, Lindf. Bos. Monog. p. 132 (nomen). Crepin in Comptcs rendu* 
Soc Bot. Belg. vol. xxv. pars ii. p. 14. Franch in Nouv. Arch. Mas. 
Par. Ser. II. vol. v. {Plant. David,), p. 117, t. 15/2. Forbes ct Uernsl. in 
Journ. Linn. Sue. Bot. vol. xxiii. p. 255. Koehne, Beutsch. Bendroloj. 
p. 300. 

R. platvacantha, Schrenk in Bull. Acad. Petersb. vol. x. (1842), p. 254. 
Ledeb. Fl. Boss. vol. ii. p. 75. 

R. pimpinellifolia, var. platyacantha, Crep. Mater., fasc. v. p. 319. 

R. Ecae, Aitcliis. in Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xviii. (1880), p. 54. et xix. (1882), 

p. 162, t. viii. Oliv. in Hook. Ic. Plant, vol. xiv. p. 21, t. 1329. Christ, in 

Boiss. Ft. Orient. Suppl. p. 207. 



The discovery of Rosa xanthina, & centml Asiatic species, 
in a single valley of Afghanistan, is a noteworthy fact 
in geographical distribution, for no other collector in 
that country had met with it. In the Kuram Valley of 
Afghanistan it abounds, both wild, and cultivated (for 
hedges), forming with AmygdcUlu eburnea the greater part 
of the scrub in the stony ridges of the TIarieb district, 
at an elevation of six thousand to seven thousand feet, 
where it was found by the late Dr. Aitchison, F.R.S.,when 
accompanying General (now Lord) Roberts, on the survey 
of that valley. It is a plant of very wide distribution. 
Lat. 33° Ts r . is its southern as well as its western limit, 

July 1st, 1899. 



so far as is known, but it reappears in Turkestan, and 
spreads into Soongaria, the Altai Mts., Mongolia, and N. 
China, its northern limit being probably about lat. 45° 
N. The specific name Ecae is derived from the initials 
of Mrs. Aitchison's name, given before the plant was 
identified with Lindley's Rosa mnthina. The specimen 
figured is from a plant raised at the Royal Gardens from 
seed sent by Dr. Aitchison in 1880. It flowers in June. 

Descr. — A rigid, erect shrub, three to four feet high, 
stem and branches armed with crowded, straight prickles 
about half an inch long, with dilated, compressed bases, 
branches and branchlets leafy, glandular, red when young. 
Leaves small, hardly an inch long, crowded on the branch- 
lets, rhachis eglandular, stipules oblong, entire, sub-acute', 
leaflets five to nine, about a quarter of an inch long, from 
oblong to orbicular, serrulate-toothed, glandular beneath. 
Flowers peduncled, solitary at the base of the branchlets, 
about an inch in diameter, golden-yellow ; . peduncles 
glabrous, or glandular-hairy. Calyx tube globose ; sepals 
lanceolate, entire, or toothed towards the tips, glandular 
externally, tomentose within. Petals orbicular. Styles 
free, tomentose, tips glabrous. Fruit globose, about a 
quarter of an inch in diameter, glabrous, crowned with the 
reflexed sepals. Achenes at length glabrous. /. D. B> 

Fig. 1 and 2, Petals; 3, fruit, both of not size; i, carpel, enlarged. 



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Tab. 7667. 

ALOE ScHWEINb'URTUU. 
Native of tropical N.E. Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Liluce^b. — Tribe Aloixe.k. 
Genus Aloe, Linn.; (Benih. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 776.) 



Aloe (Eualoe) Schweinfurthii ; acaulis v. caulescens, foliis perplurimis con- 
fertis incurvo-erectis 2-2|-pedalibus a basi compressa biconvexa 7 poll. 
lata sensim in apicem angustatis medium versus 2 poll, latia plano- 
convexis pallide viridibus marginibus rubris et aculeis brevibns remotis 
deltoideia incurvis rubris armatis. scapis pedalibus, inflorescentia3 pani- 
culate ramis ascendentibus siraplicibus robustis fusco-rubria apicibin 
floriferia infimis 6-pollicaribus, oranibua bracteis parvis late ovatis 
acuminatis conspersis, florum racemulia 3-4-pollicaribus erectis densi- 
floris, pedicellis gracilibus erectis apice decurvis, bracteis iis ramtiloram 
consimilibns, floribua \\ poll. lon?is pendulis, perianthio cylindraceo recto 
v. lente curvo basi rotnndato infra medium corallino dein aureo, lobis 
parvis ovatis recurvis, anthei-is exsertis flavidis, ovario oblongo, stylo recto 
deflexo, stigmate punctiforme, capsula parva late oblonga obtusa obtuse 
trigona, valvis coriaceis transverse reticulatis, semiuibus parvis late alatis. 

A. Schweinfurthii, Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. (1885) p. 175; in Fl. 
Trop. Afr. vol. vii. p. 4(57. Gard. Ghron. 1898, vol. i. p. 197, fig. 76, 



Aloe Schweinfurthii is certainly the handsomest of all 
the species hitherto figured in this work. Of these its 
nearest tropical African ally is A. Kirlii, Baker, tab. 
7386, which differs conspicuously in the short pedicels of 
the flowers, and in the spines of the leaves. Amongst the 
South African species it comes nearest to A. virens, Haw. 
tab. 1355, a much smaller plant, with a simple raceme, 
leaves dorsally tubercled, and bright red flowers, with 
perianth-segments longer than the tube. 

The discoverer of this stately plant is Dr. Schwein- 
furth, who found it in the granite hill of Makporvu, in 
the Nvam Nyam county of N.E. tropical Africa, lat. 4° 45' 
N., long. 28° 30' E. ; that is on the confines of the Bain- el 
Ghazal. 

It was described originally by Mr. Baker, from dried 
specimens (distributed by its discoverer, Ser, iii. n. 167 of 
his Herbarium) as being caulescent; with close set mar- 

AOGUSX Ul, 1699. 



ginal teetli on the leaves, a compressed peduncle, and a 
short, campanulate perianth-tube. 

For the specimen from which the accompanying figure 
was made, and for a sketch of the whole plant, I am in- 
debted to Commendatore Hanbury, F.L.S., who flowered 
it in his renowned garden of Pal. Orengo, La Mortola, in 
February of this year. I have also received a photograph 
of the whole plaut through the kindness of Miss Wilmott, 
of Gt. Warley, Essex, with which Mr. Hanbury's sketch 
given here, perfectly corresponds. 

Descr. — Stemless (as grown at La Mortola). Leaves two 
to three feet long, very numerous, all radical, sub-erect and 
incurved, tapering from a compressed base seven inches 
broad to an acute tip, section above the base biconvex, 
about an inch thick, and across the middle plano-convex, 
pale green, margins red, armed with rather distant 
short deltoid incurved red spines about one-sixth of an 
inch long, and as broad. Peduncle about a foot high, 
terete, red-brown, naked, branching above into a panicle 
as long as the leaves ; branches of panicle rather distant, 
ascending, pale red-brown, lower a span long, girt at 
the very base by two short appressed bracts, an inner 
annular, and an outer broadly ovate acute, bearing above 
solitary acuminate bracts a quarter to a third of an inch 
long, of the colour of the branch. Flowers in short, 
oblong racemes, three to four inches long, terminating 
the branches, crowded, pendulous ; pedicels about as long 
as the flowers, very slender, erect with decurved tips; 
bracts like those on the branch, but narrower and paler. 
Perianth about an inch long, cylindric, straight or slightly 
curved, bright red in the lower half, golden-yellow in the 
upper; lobes very short, obtuse, recurved. Stamen* 
shortly exserted, anthers dull yellow. Capsule two-thirds 
of an inch long, broadly oblong, obtuse at both ends, valves 
very coriaceous, transversely wrinkled. Seeds many, one- 
fifth of an inch long, oblong, surrounded by a hyaline 
wing.— J. ]J. II. 



Fig. 1, Transverse section of a leaf towards the base; 2, upper part of » 

tea*! .-.portion of a panicle :— all of the nut. size; -i, a dower; 5, l» lbtl1 : " 
LjIIi enlarged. 




^a 



"VSncert Br.'cjkjDavA.Saal't^Inf. 



Tab. 7668. 
HELIOPHILA scandens. 

Native of Natal. 

Nat. Ord. Crucifer*. — Tribe Sisymbrie/K. 
Grenns Heltopiiila, Linn. ; (Benth. & Ilooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 81.) 



HELiopniLA (Selenoearpcea) scandens; perennia, glaberrima, caule elon^ato 
gracili volubile ramoso folioso, foliia sparsis ellipti;o-oblongia v. lanceolatia 
acuminatis in petiolum angustatia, racemis sub^orymboaia laxiiloris, 
pedicellis gracilibns ebracteatis, floribus fere 1 poll, diaoi., sepalis aub- 
ajquilongis oblongis obtusis 2 lateralibus malto latioribns dor.so breviter 
crasse alatis, petalia apathulatia albis v. pallideroseia, filamentis nudis, 
antberia 4 majoribus recurvis, ovario subgloboso, stylo brevi, stigmata 
didymo, silicula l|-pollicari elliptico-oblonga utrinque acuta 1-3-sperma 
complanata, valyis membranaceia enerviig, aeminibua orbicularibus valde 
compresais £ poll, latis. 

H. scandena, Harv. Thes. Capens. vol. ii. p. 44, t. 166. 



In the whole large natural Order of Gmcifcrx, embracing 
about 180 genera, only two of these are recorded as bearing 
scandent species. They are the S. African genus Helio' 
phila, and the Peruvian Cremolobus, DC, and in these the 
scandent habit is quite exceptional. Heliophila itself is 
rather an anomalous genus. It consists of nearly seventy 
species, confined to Africa South of the tropic, and as 
monographed in the " Flora Capensis " of Harvey & Sonder, 
it presents so much variety in the form of the fruit, as to 
have been broken up into six genera, some of which will, 
no doubt, be re-established. Amongst these is Seleno- 
carpaea, Bckl. & Zey., to which II. scandens belongs, dis- 
tinguished by its flat pods. These are beautiful objects in 
II. scandens, the membranous valves being veined, and the 
septum between the cells, one of which is usually empty, 
is of a silvery appearance, of extreme tenuity, and nerve- 
less. The orbicular flat seeds have a membranous testa, 
with a very narrow, delicate, hyaline border. The con- 
torted and convolute narrow cotyledons are exceedingly 
curious. 

H. scandens inhabits shady places amongst shrubs 

near D' Urban, and at Inanda, in Natal. A plant of it was 

received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, from Mr. .1. Medley 

Wood, Curator of the Botanical Garden of D'Urban, in 

August 1st, 1899. 



1885, which flowered in the Succulent House in the follow- 
ing year, and has continued to do so about midwinter ever 
since. It now forms a climber on one of the rafters of 
the house, about fifteen feet high, with a woody stem 
covered with brown bark. The fragrant flowers are said 
to vary from white to pinkish, and the racemes are some- 
times ten to fifteen-fld. 

Descr. — A tall, slender, sparingly branched, woody 

climber, with pale brown bark ; young branches terete, 

green. Leaves scattered, one and a half to two inches 

long, elliptic- or oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, pale green, 

penninerved ; base acute, narrowed into a slender petiole. 

Flowers in pendulous or ascending sub-corymbiform, loose 

racemes, fragrant ; pedicels ebracteate, slender, one half to 

■nearly an inch long. Sepals pale green, oblong, obtuse, 

two lateral with thickened dorsal wings. Anthers large, 

those of the longest stamens recurved, tips exserted. Petals 

spathulate, white, limb oblong, longer than the claw. 

Style short, stigma capitate. P.od one to two and a half 

inches long, elliptic-oblong, quite flat, very shortly stipi- 

tate, one- to two-seeded, tipped by a short, straight style; 

valves membranous, delicately veined, septum hyaline. 

Seeds orbicular, flat, about one-eighth of an inch in 

diameter, shortly thickly winged; embryo convolute and 

contorted, green.—/. D. H. 



Fig 1 Calyx and stamens; 2, top of pedicel and pistil; 3, ripe fruit; 
4, seed; 5, embryo :— all enlarged, except fig. 3, which is of nat. size. 



766$ 




M. S.del. J. N.FitcKliCh 






Tar. 7GG9. 
ASTER Piccoltt. 

Native of Northern China. 

Nat. Ord. Composite.— Tribe Asteroifie.e. 
Genus Asteii, Linn. ; (Be-nth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 271.) 



Aster (Hisutsua) Piccolii; herba perennis, 3-pedalig, suberecta, ramosa, 
foliosa, ramulis pedunculisque teretibus scaberulo-jinberulisj. foliis sessili- 
bus inferioribas 3-4 poll, longis oblongo-oblanceolatis acutis apiculatis 
grosse subinrequaliter serratis, superioribus minoriliua ovatis subintegris, 
omnibus supra saturate viridibus nervis impressis margines versus 
scaberulis, subtus pallidis alte 3-costatia nervis grosse reticulata, capitulis 
subcorymbosis lJ-2-poll. diam., pedunculis 3-4 poll longis robustis foliis 
1-2 parvis oblongis bracteatis, involucro subhemispbcrico basi foliolo 
instructo, bracteis exterioribus 3-4 seriatis, superioribus sensim longioribus 
late oblongis herbaceis apicibus rotundatis recnrvis purpureis, interioribus 
1-2-seriatis obovato-oblongis obtusis albis marginibus late membranaceis 
scariosis fimbriatis, receptaculo conico-hemispherico, fl. radii biseriatis, tabo 
gianduloso-puberulo, ligula incurvo-patula lineari-oblonga apice 5-denti- 
culata pallide lilacina, fl. radii tnbulosis aareis, tubo glanduloso-puberulo, 
lobis revolutis glabris, acbeniis immaturis obovato-oblongis compressia 
annulo minuto coronatis, pappo 0. 



Aster Piccolii is a very interesting as well as handsome 
plant, being referable to the much misunderstood Chinese 
genus Hisutsna, which was founded by De Candolle (Prodr. 
xi. 44) on Matricaria cantoniensi*, Lour., an epappose 
plant, erroneously but doubtfully referred by its author to 
the tribe Scnecionidese. Hisutsua was next taken up by 
Hooker & Arnott ("Fl. Bot. Beech. Voy.," p. 265), 
who referred to it as If. serraia, a plant which belongs 
to Blume's genus Asteromoea. Bentliam followed,, in the 
" Flora of Hong Kong," p. 174, where he brings together 
as synonyms of //. cantoniensis, two very different plants, 
H. serrata, H. & A., and Asteromoea indica, Blume, referring 
all three, erroneously, I think, to the N. American genus 
Boltonia (as B. indica, Benth.). With regard to Asteromoea, 
it was founded by Blume on Aster indicus, L., a plant 
differing from Aster and Hisutsua in its imperfect pappus. 
It has been referred by Schult. Bip. to the genus Calimeris 
of Nees, which does not differ from Aster ; quite 
recently it has been rightly regarded as a section of the 
latter genus by Mr. Makino in the Tokyo Botanical ITarja- 

ArursT 1st, 18P3. 



zine (July 20th, 1898, p. 60, English part). Hitsusoa re- 
mains as a sectional name for a few species of Aster 
wholly, or almost wholly, wanting a pappus, and which 
includes besides II. cantoniensls, DO. (syn. H. pehinensis, 
Hance), A. Piccolii, one, or perhaps more, unpublished 
Chinese plants. 

Aster Piccolii was raised at the Royal Botanical Gardens, 
Kew, from seeds collected in the province of Shensi, in E. 
China, by Father Piccoli, of the Jesuit Mission, Hankow, 
and which were sent to Kew in 1897 by G-. Murray, Esq., 
F.R.S., Keeper of the Herbarium of the British Museum. 
It flowered in the Herbaceous collection in September, 
1898, and is quite hardy. 

Bescr. — A stout, leafy, hispidly scaberulous, sub-erect, 
perennial herb, two to three feet high; stem and branches 
terete, green. Leaves three to four inches long, sessile, 
oblong, or oblong-lanceolate, acute or apiculate, coarsely 
unequally serrate, dark green above, paler beneath, three- 
nerved at the base, nerves impressed above, very stout 
beneath. Heads many, sub-corymbose, two inches in 
diameter ; peduncles with a small oblong leaf at the base 
of the involucre, otherwise naked, or with one or two 
sessile leaves at or above the middle. Involucre sub- 
hemispheric, outer bracts three- to four-seriate, broadly 
oblong, herbaceous, with purple, reflexed, rounded tips ; 
inner one- to two-seriate, obovate-oblong, obtuse, margins 
broadly scarious, fimbriate. Receptacle conico-hemispheric. 
Eaij-flowers biseriate, tube (and of the disk-fl.) glandular, 
ligule linear, lilac-purple. Disk-floivers golden-yellow, 
pappus 0. — J. D. H. 



tig. 1, Section of involucre showing tie receptacle ; 2, inner bract ; 3, ray- 
flower; -i, disk-flower; b, stamens; 6, style-arms of disk-flowers v—AU 
enlarged. 



7670 




- $ Jith 



Went Broo^X^* SanlA^P 



Tab. 7670. 

EPHEDEA ALTISSIMA. 

Native of N. Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Gnetace^e. 
Genus Ephedra, Linn.; (Benth. & Sook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 418.) 



Ephedra altissima; suffrutex dioica, scandens, ramossissima, caule basi 
lignoso, ramis dependentibus ram absque divaricatis oppositiB et ternatim 
verticillatis gracilibus glancis aliis persistentibus teretibus aliis tenuiori- 
bus compressis et tetragonis, foliis 2-natis v. 3-4 natim verticillatis 
linearibus v. setaceis basi breviter connatis, spicis masculis solitarts 
biuis ternatis fasciculatis v. paniculatis ovoideis v. subglobosis ad £ poll, 
diam., bracteis floralibus plurimis late ovatis orbicularibusve memljrana- 
ceis basi connatis, perianthio obovoideo bilabiato, staminum columna 
exserta, antheris 1-3 sessilibus, galbulis fosmineis solitariis globosis ad ^ 
poll, diam., fructiferis majoribus, bracteis 2-3 paribus, infimis minutis 
supremis multo majoribus ad f connatis herbaceis obtusis ruargiuibus 
menibranaceis fimbrillatis demum carnosis rubris, integumento angu^te 
ellipsoideo, apice exseito, tubillo elongato recto v. torto, seminibns 1-3 fere 
% poll, longis, solitariis trigonis v. angnlatis, binis plano-convexis. 

E. altissima, Deaf. Ft. Atlant. vol. ii. p. 371, t. 253. Pari, in DC. Prodi: vol. 
xvi. pars ii. p. 356. C. A. Meyer, Epied. p. <>7. Endl. Sj/n. Conif. p. 261. 
Ball, Spirit. Fl. Marocc. (Journ. Linn. Soc. Bot. vol. xvi ) p. 669. Stapf, 
JEpked. p. 46, t. ii. et ix. fig. 1-15. Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. i. p. 791, fig. 129. 



Upwards of thirty species of Ephedra have been described, 
of which seven are cultivated in the Koyal Gardens, but 
not E. altissima, which is not hardy. Of these, the latter 
is the only one figured from living specimens in any 
English botanical work: first in the Gardeners' Chronicle 
(I.e.), nine years ago, and now in this magazine; in both 
cases from a plant cultivated in Commendatore Hanburv's 
garden at La Mortola, where it is a very attractive shrub 
when in fruit in December. Jt is a native of the North 
African coast, from the city of Marocco to Sus, on the 
Atlantic side, and extending to Tunis on the Mediterranean 
Descr. — A tall, dioecious, glabrous, scandent, excessively 
branched, green, almost leafless glaucous green shrub; 
stem woody at the base, very slender, branches and branch- 
lets drooping or pendulous, opposite or ternately whorled, 
the ultimate opposite, divaricate, compressed, and four- 
angled, bearing small ovate acuminate brown scales 
at the axils. Leaves minute, linear or setaceous. Male 
A.UG1 st l-i. 1899. 



cones in very lax panicles, solitary, binate, or ternate 
at the ends of decurved branchlets, sessile, ovoid-oblong, 
about one-sixth of an inch long, many-fld., yellow, with 
red-brown anthers ; bracts in several series, orbicular ; 
stamens 1-3, exserted from a bilabiate tubular perianth. 
Fern, cones much larger, solitary at the ends of the 
branchlets, one-half to three-quarters of an inch long; 
bracts in about three pairs, orbicular, lower pair or pairs 
very small, uppermost pair much larger, connate for two- 
thirds of their length, swelling greatly, and forming a 
red fleshy cup as the seed ripens. Integument of the seed 
thin, tip exserted, terminating in a usually twisted tubulus. 
Seeds one to three, ellipsoid, if solitary angular, if binate 
plano-convex, if three trigonous. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Male cone \ 2, bracts of the same ; 3, bract and perianth ; 4, nnripe 
fem. cone ; 5, ripe ditto, with peduncle and portion of stem ; 6, single ripe fern, 
cone j 7, seed : all enlarged ; 8, panicle of male spikes of the nat. size. 



7671 




Aftnoent Bro 6ks D ay 



/ 



Tap. 7G71. 

MUSS/EN DA CAl'SCJLIFERA. 
Native of Socotra. 

Nat. Ord. Rubiace.e. — Tribe AIuss.ende.e. 
Genus JIuss^enda, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 61.) 



Muss.enda eapsulifera ; frutex, raraulis teretibus calycibus tnboque corolla? 
strigilloso-puberulis, foliia H-2-J poll, longis elliptico-oblongis obovatis v. 
rarius oblongo-lanceolatia acutis obtasisve subcoriaceis glaberrimia v. 
subtua secus nervos puberulis basi in petiolum brevem angustatis la?te 
viridibns, stipulis minutis ntrinqne solitariis dentiformibus integerrimis, 
floribus corymboso-cymosis breviter pedicellatis pentameris albis odoris, 
bracteolis minimis, calycia tubo ovoideo, limbi segmentis linearibus nequali- 
buapersistentibus, corollas tubo 1-1| poll, longo gracili tereti intus piloao, 
fance paullo dilatato strigoso-piloso, limbi f poll. diam. segmentis patulis 
cuneiformibua cordatiave apice retusis sinu obtuse cuapidatis alabaatro 
apice 5-cornuto reduplicatim valvatis, staminibus infra faucem corolbe 
insertis, fllamentis brevissimia, antheris linearibus, connectivo apice pro- 
ducto, disco pulvinari, stylo filiformi, sti^matibua brevibua oblongia intus 
papillosis, capsula parva breviter oblonga calycis Begmentia coronata, 
loculicide polysperma, valvia coriaceis, seminibus striatis angulatia et 
foveolatis. 

M. capsulifera, Balf.f. in Proc. R. S Edinb. vol. xi. (1882), p. 830, et in Tram*. 
Soc. ejusd. vol. xxxi. (1888), p. 116, Tab. xxix. 

Od el Kseh, Arab. 



A very interesting plant, discovered by Dr. Balfour on 
hills about 800 feet high in Socotra, in 1880, and since 
then collected there by Dr. Schweinfurth, and in 1887 by 
Mr. Bent, from whose specimens seeds were taken, which 
produced in the Royal Gardens, Kew, the specimen here 
figured. As pointed out by Dr. Balfour, it differs from the 
type of Musssenda, not only in the absence of a dilated 
calycine segment, but in the loculicidal capsule. Its very 
near ally in the latter character is the M. luteobi, Del., of 
Nile land. In the obconic flower-bud crowned by the five 
cusps of the lobes of the corolla, it is quite peculiar. 

M. capsulifera has been described as a tree ; but judging 
from the dried specimens I should think it was rather a 
small shrub, especially as the Kew specimen is fully deve- 
loped and flowering at eighteen inches high in a stove, 
first in April, 1899, and now in July. The latter further 
differs from the description in the quite entire stipules, and 

August 1st, 1899. 



white, not yellow corolla. There is a remarkable difference 
between the hairs in the outer and inner surfaces of the 
tube of the corolla. The former are stiff, subulate, acute, 
the latter are cylindric, flaccid, very thin- walled tubes, 
surmounted by 1-3 very minute globular cells. 

Descr. — An erect shrub, branches slender, terete, as well 
as the pedicels, calyx, and corolla-tube minutely strigillose. 
Leaves one and a half to two and a half inches long, 
opposite, oblong-lanceolate or obovate, obtuse or acute, nar- 
rowed into a very short petiole, nerves five to six pairs, very 
slender. Stipules very small, triangular, glabrous, eciliate. 
Flowers in terminal corymbose cymes, very shortly pedi- 
celled. Calyx tube ovoid, limb of five equal, linear, erect, 
green segments. Corolla many times longer than the 
calyx-limb, tube very slender, one to one and a half inches 
long, hairy within, throat slightly dilated; limb three- 
fourths of an inch broad, of five, cuneiform, or obcordate, 
truncate, spreading segments, with an obtuse conical tooth 
in the middle of the sinus of the apex, white, fragrant ; in 
bud the lobes are deeply induplicate-valvate, and together 
form a deeply five-lobed clavate body, with a truncate, 
intruded top. Stamens sub-sessile in the throat of the 
corolla-tube, included, linear, connective produced as a 
short, papillose horn. Style very slender, tip cleft into 
two shortly exserted oblong arms Fruit a loculicidal 
capsule.—/. I). H. 



«m£ \'l ovt ;? n °t*ten, with bases of petioles ami stipule; 2, calyx a * d 

6 7 WtLf^ lai V pen;4 ' hairfrom *»*«*<* of corolla-tube; *»*",? 

nlar^d ° D ° f ° V&ry aad disk i 7, transverse section of oW iW 



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767Z 




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AaruD0n.tBrooks,"Day&SoTi. bt&Emp 



Lan.a«n 




Tab. 7672. 
coleus thyrsoideds. 

Native of British Central Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Labiate. — Tribe Ocimoide*. 
Genus Coleus, Lour.; (BentA. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1176.) 



Coleus (paniculate) thyrsoideus ; suffrutex elatus, ramosus, caule ramis petiolis 
aque inflorescentia laxe pilosis, foliis longe petiolatis amplis ovatis ovato- 
cordatisve subacutis marginibus grosse inciso- v. lobulato-crenatis, crenis 
obtusis, supra laete viridibus, utrinque puberulis, subtus pallidioribus, 
ramnlos inflorescentia elongata paniculrefornii, cymis, multifloris peduu- 
culos ^-1-pollicares terminantibus, pedicellia brevibus, calycis tubo brevis- 
eimo setuloso, segmentis obtusis postico oblongo-obovato lateralibus 
anticisque lineari-oblongis fere duplo longiore, corollas §-poll. longse tubo 
medium versus defracto, fauce modice ampliata, Iimbi Irate casrulei labio 
inferiore cymbiformi acuto, superiore 4-lobulato lobulis rotundatis, fila- 
mentis basi monadelphis labium inferius corolla; sequantibus. 

C. thyrsoides, Baker in Kew Bulletin imd. 



Recent collectors in Eastern and Central tropical Africa 
have largely extended our knowledge of the Flora of those 
regions, in every case tending to prove its close affinity 
with that of British India. In respect of the natural 
order Labiatse this affinity is very marked, as evidenced by 
the ocimoid genera Coleus and Plectranthus, of which there 
are many undescribed African species in herbaria, over 
and above those published of late by Schweinfurth and 
Engler in their monographs of African plants. 

Coleus thyrsoideus inhabits the plateau east of the 
northern extremity of Lake jYyassa, in the Mozambique 
district, at elevations of six thousand to seven thousand 
feet, and the Tanganyika plateau at two thousand feet to 
three thousand feet. Plants of it were raised at the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, from seeds taken from a Herbarium speci- 
men collected by Mr. A. Whyte in British Central Africa. 
These, sown in April, 1897, produced bushy plants throe 
feet high, that flowered in a stove in February of the 
following year. It is a very ornamental plant ; the copious 
branches terminating in racemes six inches to ten inches 
long, of bright blue flowers. 

Descr. — A rather tall, leafy, much branched perennial 
undershrub, two to three feet high, the branches termi- 

Septembee 1st, 1899. 



nating in narrow, erect, panicle-like racemes six to ten 
inches long, of bright blue flowers. Stem, petioles and inflo- 
rescence sparsely pubescent, with spreading hairs. Lower 
leaves up to seven inches long by four broad, ovate-cordate, 
acuminate, margin coarsely tabulate and crenate, bright 
green above, and reticulately nerved, paler beneath, with 
prominent pubescent nerves, base decurrent on the petiole, 
which is two inches long, or more, stout ; upper leaves 
and lower floral smaller, shorter-petioled, margins more 
deeply cleft. Raceme about three inches broad ; branch- 
lets sub-erect or spreading, one inch long or less, 
bearing dense fld. dichotomous cymes of ten to fifteen 
shortly pedicelled flowers ; bracteoles minute, green. 
Calyx very small, tube sub-globose, hispidulous with 
stellately spreading hairs; dorsal sepal linear-oblong, 
puberulous, nearly as long as the corolla-tube below its 
flexure, lateral about half as long, and two small anticous 
segments linear, obtuse. Corolla about half an inch long, 
tube suddenly deflexed a little above the short base, then 
ascending, and again deflexed forming a sub-campanulate 
laterally compressed throat ; mouth two-lipped ; upper lip 
reflexed, obovate, broadly shortly four-cleft, lobes rounded ; 
lower lip rather longer, cymbiform, sub- acute. Filaments 
connate at the base, forming an open concave lamina 
adnate to throat and base of the lower lip of the corolla.— 



inferlti™ ^T 5 £ the 8ame ' with half the lower % removed, showing the 
ovZy --Ml c ; 8t T nS ; 3 ' 8eCti ° n 0f Cal ^ 8howi "S the dif * and 



7673 




VtnjoentBrooks,DayiSan.I 



I 



Tab. 7673. 
BEGONIA sinensis. 

Native of China and Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Begoniace.e. 
Genus Begonia, Linn. ; (Benth. & Sook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 841.) 



Begonia sinensis; pilosula, tubero subgloboso, caule annuo erecto herbaceo 
ramoso, foliia 3-5-poll. longis oblique ovato-cordatis longe acuminatis 
basi palmatim 5-9-nerviia grosse sublobulato-dentatis creberrime in- 
sequaliter argute serratis serrulatisque membranaceis supra laste viri- 
dibus eubtus pallidia junioribua roseo irroratis, petiolis 1-2-poll. longis, 
stipulis majusculis ovatis acuminatia herbaceis recurvis, axillis ssepe 
bulbilliferis, pedunculis dichotomis inferioribus petiolis longioribus, 
cymis bisexualibus, bracteis ovato-lanceolatia caducis, floribus roseia 
breviuscule pedicellatis ad f poll, latis, fl. masc. bibracteolatis, sepalis 2 
fere orbiculatis concavis, petalis 2 multo minoribus ovalibus, fl. fern, ebrac- 
teolatis, sepalis 2, petalis 1 v. 2 parvis, staminum columna breviasima, 
fila mentis brevibus, antheria oblongis, ovario obconico 3-gono, stigmatibus 
rcniformibus undique papillosis, placentis 3 bipartitis, segments extus 
tantum ovuliferia, capsula 3-alata, alis 2 angustis tertia trigona. 

B. sinensis, A.DC. in Ann. Soc. Nat. Ser. iv. vol. ii. p. 125 ; in DG. Prodr. 
vol. xv. para i. p. 313. Kance in Journ. Bot. vol. xii. (1874) p. 260. 
Hemsl. 8f Forbes in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. (1887) p. 323. 

?B. Evansiana, Andr. Bot. Rep. t. 627, non Bot. Mag. t. 1473, nee Bonpl. 
Malm. t. 63. 

begonia Bine nomine, Buc'hoz, Qoll. Free, des Fleurs, Part i. t. xxxv. 

Begonia sinensis is well described by A. de Candolle, but 
is placed in the section KnesebecMa, from his character of 
which it differs in the segments of the placentas being 
ovuliferons on the outer faces only. He rightly compares 
it with B. Evansiana, Andr. (non Bot. Mag. t. 1473), but 
overlooks the fact that two plants are confounded under 
that name. One, the original, figured by Andrews (Bot. 
Rep. t. 627) said to have been found at the waterfall of 
Penang, with hardly any stipes to the head of stamens ; 
the other, that of Bonpland (Jard. Malm. t. 63, and of this 
magazine, t. 1473), a much larger-flowered plant, with a 
long stipes supporting the head of stamens. Unfortunately 
de Candolle has selected the latter as Andrews' species. 
Clarke, in " Flora Brit. Ind.," vol. ii. p. 638, cites B. 
sinensis (from the description) as a synonym of B. Evan- 
siana, with which he unites the Bot. Mag. plant and 
B. obliqua, Thunb. With regard to "the waterfall in 
Penang" which Andrews gives as the habitat of B. Evan- 
siana, this is no doubt an error; for 0. Curtis, in his 
Catalogue of the Flowering Plants and Ferns of that 
September 1st, 1899. 



Island, says, "The plant has not been met with here, and 
could hardly be overlooked." Aiton (Hoi't. Kew, ed. II. 
v. 313), who describes B. Evansiana as B. discolor (quoting 
both Bot. Rep. and Bot. Mag.), gives China as the native 
country whence it was introduced in 1804 by the Hon. 
E. I. Company. 

Though retaining the name of B. sinensis for this plant, I 
do not feel sure that it is not B. Evansiana of Andrews, from 
the figure of which it differs only in the deeply irregularly 
cut margins of the leaves. It is a widely diffused Chinese 
plant, there being specimens in Kew Herbarium from the 
neighbourhood of Peking, the provinces of Hupeh and 
Kwangtung, and Island of Formosa. 

Seeds of B. sinensis, collected in Yunnan by Dr. Henry, 
M.A., F.L.S., of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs, 
were received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1898 ; plants 
raised from which flowered in October of the following 
year in a greenhouse. 

Descr. — Tuber brown, about the size of a large cob- 
nut, giving off copious long flexuous brown fibres from 
its crown. Stem one and a half to two feet high, rather 
slender, glabrous or sparsely pubescent, simple or sparingly 
branched, pale green. Leaves three to five inches long, more 
or less unequal-sided, ovate-cordate, acuminate, margin 
acutely lobulate, lobules coarsely, very irregularly, acutely 
serrate and serrulate, palmately five to nine-nerved at the 
base, thin, bright green above, paler, and often rose-colrd. 
beneath, with hairy veins, axils often bulbiferous ; petiole 
one to two inches long; stipules ovate, or ovate -lanceolate, 
acuminate, green. Flowers monoecious, in axillary and 
terminal pedimcled cymes, male rather shortly pedicelled, 
lemale with much longer decurved pedicels. Male ft> 
three-fourths of an inch in diarm, bright rose-red ; sepals 
two, orbicular-ovate ; petals two, very much smaller, oblong ; 
stamens numerous, in a very shortly stipitate head, anthers 
oblong, obtuse. Female ^/rather larger, sepals and petals 
like the male, but petals broader, very unequal, or one 
only; styles short, stigmas reniform, papillose all over. 
Wary with two short and one long wing; placentas bifid, 
arms ovuliferous on the outer surfaces.— J. D. H. 

Fig 1, Portion of stem with stipules and bulbils; 2, staminal columns; 
the n t a - Stlgmas • 4 ' tr ansverse section of ovary : all enlarged; 5, tuber of 



7674 




Tab. 7674. 
CALATHEA picta. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Scitaminejg. — Tribe Marantej:. 

Genus Calathea, G. F. W. Met/; (Benth, & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii 

p. 653.) 



Calathea (Eucalathea) picta ; caule robusto basin versus paucifoliato dein. 
elongato nudo infra pedunculum terminalem crassum bifoliato, foliis 
6-8-pollicaribus patentibns petiolatis ovato-oblongia lanceolatisve acumi- 
natiB supra saturate viridibus costam versus albo-variegatis, subtus rubro- 
purpureis, petiolo crasso fusco-purpureo, vaginae aariculis rotundatis, in- 
florescentia terminali strobiliforrni 4 poll, longa ad 1^-poll. diam., bracteis 
quaquaversum laxe imbricatis, 1-1 £ poll, latis late obovato-rotundatis 
acutis erecto-patentibus basi breviter vaginantibus stramineis rubro 
marginatis infima majore, floribus ad 1| poll, longis bracteis paullo 
longioribus albis, eepalis liDearibus acutis, corollas tubo aepalis aaquilongo 
lobis aaquilongis late ovatis obtusis postico paullo latiore suberecto 
lateralibus patenti-recurvis, androecii breviter exserti lobis subasquilongis, 
labello apice 3-lobo. 

C. picta, Hook.f, 

Maranta (Oalatbea) picta, Bull. Cat. New PI. (1898) No. 324, p. 6, et ic. p. 4. 



A very handsome species of a large tropical chiefly 
S. American genus, of which nothing more is known than 
that it was imported from Brazil by Mr. Bull, when it re- 
ceived an Award of Merit from the Royal Horticultural 
Society. The figure given by Mr. Bull in his Catalogue is 
evidently of a plant in a very young state, with much 
broader leaves than those of the flowering specimen here 
figured, and with much more pronounced white markings 
on the leaves, extending in a fan-shape from the midrib 
more than half way across the blade. It flowered in a 
stove in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in December, 1898. 

Descr. — Quite glabrous. Stem three to four feet high, 
very stout, with a few leaves towards the base, above 
which it is naked till just below the peduncle of the in- 
florescence, where two smaller sub-opposite leaves appear. 
Leaves (lower) six to eight inches long, by two to two and 
a half broad, oblong or oblong-lanceolate, acuminate, base 
sub-acute, rather thick, dark velvety green above, with 
September 1st, 1899. 



pale, fan-like blotches of pale green, extending between the 
nerves from the midrib to about half way across the blade, 
beneath of a fine vinous purple ; petiole about an inch long, 
very stout, purplish brown, auricles of sheath rounded. 
Spike cylindric, four inches long by one and a half in 
diameter, erect ; peduncle two inches long, stout, terete, 
dirty green. Bracts large, loosely imbricate, one to one 
and a half inches broad, orbicular-obovate, suddenly acute, 
base shortly sheathing, bright straw-coloured, margined 
with red.. Flowers rather longer than the bracts, white. 
Sepals linear, acute. Corolla-tube one and a half inches 
long, lobes broadly ovate, obtuse. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Mower-bud with the corolla-lobes spread out ; 2, androecium ; 
3, stammode; 4, top of style and stigma -.—All enlarged. 5, Eeduced view of 



whole plant 



7675 







I Brooks Uay^' 



Tab. 7675. 

ASPARAGUS scandens. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. LiliacejK. — Tribe Aspakage^:. 
Genus Asparagus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 765.) 



Asparagus (Aspargopsia) scandens; glaberrimus, gracilis, scandens, caule 
tereti ramoso, ramis dependentibus gracillimis, ramulis simplicibns $-3- 
poll. longiu multinodis, internodiis cladodiis brevioribus, foliis ad basin 
ramulorum minutis subulatis vix spinescentibus, cladodiis i—% poll, longis 
ternis (floriferis srepius solitariis) lineari-subulatis leviter incnrvis 
acuminatis trigonis, floribus solitariis, pedicellis cladodiis fere dnplo 
longioribus medio articulatis, floribus ad i poll, latis bisexualibus, 
perianthii segmentis exterioribus obovato-oblongis obtnsis, interioribus 
paullo anguBtioribus, staniimbus segmentis perianthii aequilongis, antberis 
oblongis, baccis globosis £-£ poll. diam. rubris apiculatis monospermis. 

A. scandens, Thunh. Prodr. Fl. Cap. p. 63 ; Ft. Cap. ed. Sch. p. 334. Ait. 
Hort. Kew. ed. II. vol. ii. p. 273. Baker in Saund. Befug. Bot. vol. i. t. 
21 ; in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xiv. p. 622 ; in Fl. Capens. yol. vi. p. 268. 
Wats, in Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. i. p. 178. 

A. pectinatus, Bed. Liliac. vol. vii. t. 407. 

Asparagopsis scandens, Kunth, Enum. PI. vol. v. p. 78. 

Dracaena volnbilis, Linn.f. Suppl. p. 204. 



It is noteworthy that of a genus containing nearly 150 
reputed species, some long known as ornamental green- 
house plants, easy of culture, not one should have hitherto 
found a place in " The Botanical Magazine." Fourteen are 
recorded as cultivated at Kew in 1811, by Aiton, in the 
second edition of the " Hortus Kewensis." There are now 
twenty-five in cultivation in European gardens, as enume- 
rated in Mr. "Watson's list, published last year in the 
Gardener 's Chronicle. The headquarters of the genus is 
South Africa, from which country Mr. Baker describes 
forty-four species in the " Flora Capensis" (1896). 

A. scandens is a native of the coast region of the Cape 
Colony, extending from Capetown itself to King William's 
Town, and inland no further than Somerset. It was in- 
troduced into England by the Kew collector, Mr. Mason, 
in 1795, aud flowers and fruits annually in the Royal 
Gardens in summer and winter respectively. The figure 
was made from a fruiting specimen sent by Mr. Leech, of the 
September 1st, 1899. 



gardens, Woodhall, Dulwich, under the name of A. deflexus; 
but it is not 'the A. deflexus, Baker, of Angola, nor the var. 
deflexus, Baker, of A. scandens, which has zigzag branches 
and smaller cladodes. 

Descr. — A very slender, diffusely branching, unarmed 
climber, with dependent filiform branches. Ultimate 
branchlets simple, one half to three inches long, sub-tri- 
gonous, with few or many internodes bearing normally three 
cladodes in a whorl, which are longer than the internodes. 
Leaves at the axils of the branches and branchlets, minute, 
membranous, rarely sub-spinescent. Cladodes one-third 
to half an inch long, rather broadly subulate, acuminate, 
trigonous, slightly incurved, the flower-bearing often soli- 
tary. Floivers solitary, rarely binate, axillary, pendulous ; 
pedicels about twice as long as the cladodes, but very 
variable in length, filiform, jointed about the middle; 
perianth about a fourth of an inch in diameter, outer 
segments oblong-obovate, obtuse, spreading and incurved, 
inner rather smaller and narrower. Stamens not longer 
than thelperianth-segments, anthers oblong, yellow. Ovary 
oblong, stigma erect. Berry globose, one-sixth to one- 
fourth of an inch in diam., apiculate, bright red, one- 
seeded. — J. D. H. 



Fig 1, Portion of branchlet with cladodes ; 2, flower ; 3, ovary ; 4, seed ; 
i>, section of do., showing embryo :— All enlarged. 



7676 




M S daLJNPitchiith 



"ffincentBro ote,Day &. Son it£Imp 



Tab. 7676. 
DORSTENIA Phillipsijs. 

Native of Somaliland. 

Nat. Ord. Urticace.k. — Tribe Morkah. 
Genus Dorstenia, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 366.) 



Dorstenia PhilUpsiss ; caule 3-4-pollicari crassitie digiti minimi erecto 
lignoso cylindrico basi dilatato conico l£ poll, diam., superne £ in. diam., 
undique grosse cicatricato, apice in ramos breves crassos cylindricos 
desinente, ramis foliis et infloreecentia terminatis, foliis 1^-2-pollicaribua 
breviter crasse que petiolatis lineari-oblongis acutis argute dentitis satu- 
rate viridibus glaberrimis, costa valida, nervis utrinque 8-10 patulis, pedun- 
culis axillaribus lJ-2-pollicaribns, receptaculo carnoso late campanulato 
puberulo, disco piano £-f poll, lato margine incrassato in lacinias 6-8 
crassas subulatas radiatas flexuosas pollicares fis.so, fl. masc. non immei-sia, 
perianthio minimo papilloso, staminibus 2, fl. fem. alveolis profundis 
immersis, stylo filiformi integro exserto, stigmate punctiforme. 

D. Phillipsiae, Hook. f. 



This remarkable plant belongs to a section of the genus 
Dorstenia, the species of which have the habit of diminutive 
trees, with very stout, leafless, cylindric, scarred trunks, 
sparingly, shortly branched above, and terminal clusters oi: 
leaves. The type of the section is D.fcetida, Schweinf. & 
Bngler (Monogr. Afr. PI. p. 26) which is Kosarlafcetida of 
Forskahl's Fl. iEgypt. Arab., well figured at tab. 20 of his 
Icones, a native of Arabia Felix. (Other synonyms are 
Cosaria Forskahlii, Grmel., and Dorstenia radiata, Lamk.). 
A few other species are natives of Nileland, Abyssinia, 
and Arabia. Amongst the latter is D. arabica, Hemsl. 
(Hook. Ic. PI. t. 2503), collected in S/W. Arabia by the 
late Mr. Bent. D. Phillipsise is closely allied to D.foetida, 
but differs in the stern being erect from a dilated conical 
base, in the sharply toothed leaves, in the long peduncles 
of the receptacle, and in the much larger size of the latter, 
which has thickened margins, and fewer, much longer rays. 

D. Phillipsias is another of the new and very interesting 
plants brought by Mrs. Lort Phillips and Miss Edith Cole 
from Somaliland, of which Kleinia pendula, t. 7659, and 
Kalanchoe flammea, t. 7595, are other examples. A plant 
was presented to the Botanic Garden of the University 

September 1st, 1899. 



of Cambridge, which flowered there in November, 1898, 
and was sent to me for figuring* by the Curator, Mr. 
Lynch, A.L.S. 

Descr. — Stem three and a half inches high, erect from a 
conical base an inch and a half in diameter, thence tapering 
upwards to half an inch diam., terminating in short, thick, 
spreading branches with leafy tips, whole surface of 
stem pale brown, covered with large quadrate scars. 
Leaves one and a half to two inches long, shortly stoutly 
petioled, linear-oblong, acute, sharply toothed, dark green, 
glabrous, paler beneath, nerves eight or ten pairs, spread- 
ing, prominent beneath. Peduncles axillary, one and a half 
to two inches long, stout, smooth. Receptacle broadly 
campanulate, with as many ribs as there are arms, disk 
one half to three-quarters of an inch in diam., flat, margins 
thickened all round, giving off six to eight subulate, 
tortuous or flexuous arms an inch long. Male fl. minute, 

superficial on the disk, two-lipped, thickly papillose; 

stamens two. Fern. fl. Ovaries sunk in cavities of the 

disk; style basal, filiform, quite entire, glandular, exserted. 

JD.U. 



Fig 1 Section of receptacle with male and fern, fl ; 2, upper portion of style; 
i, male fl. ; 4, ovary -.—All enlarged. 



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Tab. 7672.— COLEUS THYRSOIDEUS. 
9t 7673.— BEGONIA SINENSIS. 
n 7674.— CALATHEA PICTA. 
M 7675,— ASPARAGUS SC AND ENS. 
7676.— DORSTENIA PHILLIPSIiE. 



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"677 




MS. del J"N ."Fi 



Vincent Brco;- 



M 



L, "Roe v. 



Tab. 7677, 
lonicera hlldebeandiana. 

Native of the Shan Hills, and Munnepore. 



Nat. Ord. Caprifoliace^. — Tribe Lonicere,*:. 
Genus Lonicera, Linn.; (Betiih. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 5.) 



Lonicera (Xylosteum) Hildebrandii ; frutex glaberrimus>, alte seandens, 
ramis ramulisque teretibua, foliis amplis breviter petiolatis late ovatis 
ovalibus v. orbiculari-oblongis cuspidatis, remote glandulosis, basi rotun- 
datis v. acutis et in petiolum decurrentibus, supra laete viridibus subtus 
pallidis, nervis utrinque costaa 4-5, peMolo ad |-poll. longo, floribus 
geminis pedunculo tereti petiolo subduplolongiore, bracteis dentiformibus, 
bracteolis minutis ciliolatis, calycis tubo oblongo, limbo 5-dentato, corollte 
tubo 4 poll, longo cylindraceo, limbi bilabiati tubo triente breviore, 
labiia revolutis, superiore cuneiformi 4-fido lobis apice incurvip, inferiore 
anguste lineari, filamentis gracilibus sparsim puberulis, antkeris versatili- 
bus lunatis, stylo glaberrimo, stigmate capitato. 

L. Hildebrandiana, Coll. & Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxviii. (1891) 
pp. 6 and 64, t. xi. N. E. Br. in Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. ii. p. 210, rig. 
58. Kew Bulletin, 1898, p. 317. 



It is remarkable that by far the largest flowered species 
of Rose and of Honeysuckle, both almost exclusively 
genera of temperate climates, should inhabit the same 
country, and that a thoroughly tropical one (lat. 21° ]N.). 
The Rose, liosa gigantea, Collett, has not hitherto flowered 
in England, though it has been in cultivation since 1888, 
when it was introduced by seed collected by Col. Sir 11. 
Collett, K.C.B., in the Shan hills. Its discoverer was Dr. 
George Watt, F.L.S., who found it in Munnepore in 1882. 

Lonicera Hildebrandiana, of which also Sir H. Collett 
is the discoverer, has proved more amenable ; it 
flowered with Mr. Moore, A.L.S., in the Royal Botanic 
Gardens, Glasnevin, in August, 1898 ; and profusely in 
the new south wing of the Temperate House of the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in the present year. The plant in the 
latter case was received in 1894 from A. H. Hildebrand 
Esq., CLE. Its nearest ally is L. Braceana, Hemsl! 
(Journ. Linn. Soc. I.e. in footnote) a native of the Khasia 
hills, at elevations of 3000 to 5600 ft., which differs in 
the much smaller, narrower, acutely acuminate longer 

October 1st, 1899. ' Q 



petioled leaves, smaller flowers with larger calyx-lobes, 
and a corolla-tube of less than three inches long. 

The flowers of L. Hildebrandiana change colour with 
age, which has given rise to strange discrepancies 
in the descriptions of them. Sir H. Collett was 
told that the flowers were crimson, and much used for 
decorating temples. Those of Mr. Moore's plant are 
described in the Gardener's Chronicle, at p. 210, as of 
a brilliant flame colour, and under fig. 58 as orange- 
scarlet. In the Kew plant the buds are white, faintly 
tinged with pink, the fully opened flowers a golden-buff 
(as in the figure here given) passing into yellow-brown in 
age. Referring to Mr. Moore, that gentleman kindly 
informs me that at Glasnevin the flowers were of a soft 
yellow when first opened, gradually getting darker, so 
that the fully opened were reddish-orange on the sides 
fully exposed to the light, and almost wholly of that colour 
when they fall off. 

L. Hildebrandiana is a native of the Shan hills, at an 
elevation of about 5000 ft., near Pwehla, lat. 21° N., long. 
97° E., and, as stated above, of Munnepore. 

Descr.—A tall, woody, glabrous climber, with terete 
branches and branchlets. Leaves five to six inches long, 
broadly ovate, oblong or orbicular-oblong, broadly cuspi- 
date, bright green above, paler beneath, marked with a few 
distantly scattered brown glands ; base rounded, or shortly 
narrowed into a petiole half an inch long or more ; nerves 
four to five pairs. Flowers geminate, on a stout terete 
peduncle about twice as long as the petiole. Bracts very 
sdiort, tooth-like ; bracteoles very minute, ciliolate. Galyx- 
tube oblong, terete; limb very shortly five-toothed. 
Corolla seven inches long; tube four inches, cylindnc ; 
»ps revolute, upper cuneate, shortly four-lobed, lobes 
with incurved tips ; lower narrowly linear. Filaments 
and style very slender ; anthers crescent-shaped. Stigma 
globose. Fruit an inch long, ovoid— J. D. H. 

Fl g- h Top of peduncle, with bracts, bracteoles. and an ovary; 2, top or 
Wament and anther ; 3, top of style and stigma i— All enlarged. 



7678 



r 






\ 




M.S. dol, J.N 



ViriM"., iSonL^Imp 



Tab. 7678. 

KALANCHOE thyrstflora. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Ceassulacej!. 
Genus Kalanchoe, Adans. ; (Benth. & ffook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 059.) 



Kalanchoe thyrsiflora ; berba crasse carnosa, glaberrima, glanca, canle erecto 
tereti foli'oso, foliis decussatim oppositia sestdlibus obovato-spathulatia 
obtueia integerrimia enerviis utrinque concol oribtifl inferioribas 3-4 poll, 
longis Buperioribua gradatim minoribna, infloreacentia terminali sesaili 
oblonga cylindracea 6 poll, longa glauca e racemulis auberectis axi 
communi densissime confertis constante, floribua £ poll, lougis breviter 
pedicellatis, bracteolis parvis oblongia obtusis, sepalis corolla ter breviori- 
bua linearibua obtusis, corollse tubo ovoMeo-oblongo tereti glauco-viridi ore 
constricto, lobis 4 parvis orbiculari-ovatis subaeuti-patenti-reciirvis intua 
aureis, disci glandulis oblongia retusip, staminibua 8 ore corolhe biaeri- 
atis, filamentia brevibu?, autheria fere rotundatis apiculatia, carpelMa 3 
elongatia in styloa breves attenuatis, stigmatibua parvis subsimplicibus 
truncatis. 

K. tnyrsiflora, Harv. 8f Sond. Fl. Capens. vol. ii. p. 380. 

K. alternans, EcJct. § Zey. ex Harv. So Sond. I.e. 



Kalanchoe thyrsiflora was introduced from the Cnpe of 
Good Hope into the gardens of Commendatore Hanbury, 
La Mortola, by whom seeds were distributed to various 
botanical gardens in 1891. It has been in cultivation at 
the Royal Gardens, Kew, since 1891, and was first flowered 
in the Cambridge University Botanical Gardens by Mr. 
Lynch, to whom I am indebted for sending me the fine 
specimen here figured. It is a native of the eastern 
districts of the Cape Colony, where it was found first by 
Ecklon & Zeyher. There are also specimens in the Kew 
Herbarium from the Kei and Vaal rivers, from Basutoland, 
and from Inanda in Natal. In its native country it flowers 
in May ; in England, in December. 

Descr. — A very stout, erect, pale glaucous green, quite 
glabrous, leafy herb, one to two and a half feet high. 
Stem simple, terete, smooth, nearly an inch in diameter 
below the middle, and half an inch below the inflorescence. 
Leaves decussately opposite, in rather close pairs, lowest 
three to four inches long, gradually smaller upwards, 
sessile, obovate-spathulate, quite entire, tip rounded, thick* 

October 1st, 1899. 



fleshy, uniformly coloured on both surfaces. Inflorescence 
an erect, sessile, cylindric, tliyrsiform, most dense-flowered 
glaucous panicle, six to twelve inches high, and three in 
diameter, formed of crowded, few-flowered, bracteate 
racemes ; bracts oblong or cylindric, obtuse. Flowers 
shortly pedicelled, about half an inch long. Sepals about 
one- third the length of the corolla, linear, obtuse, fleshy. 
Corolla-tube ovoid-oblong, terete, glaucous green, mouth 
constricted ; lobes small, broadly ovate, spreading and 
recurved, bright yellow within. Stamens eight, in two series 
at the mouth of the corolla ; filaments very short, anthers 
small, broad. Glands oblong, truncate, retuse. Carpels 
three, narrowed into short, recurved styles, with truncate 
stigmas. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Top of pedicel with two sepals, hypogynous glands and ovaries ; 
2, corolla laid open; 3, stamen:— All enlarged. 



767B 




Tab. 7679. 
STYLIDIUM CBASSIFOLIUM. 

Native of South-western Australia. 

Nat. Ord. Stylidie^:. 
Genus Stylikium, Br. ; {Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iv. p. 29.) 



Sxylidium (Thyrsiformes) crassifolium ; perennee acaule, rhizomate indurato 
ebulboso, foliis coespitosis radicalibus 4-8-polIicaribus anguste lineari- 
oblanceolatis acutis crasse coriaceis glaberrimis, supra saturate viridibns 
enerviis, subtus pallidis obtuse subcarinatis, scapo robusto, inflorescentia 
angusta valde elongata 1-2 pedali glanduloso-pubescente multi-laxiflora 
basi ramosa, ramis brevibus paucifloris, bracteis bracteolisque parvis 
subulatis, floribus breviter pedieellatis, ovario stricto |-f poll, longo, 
calycis bilabiati lobis brevibus acutis, petalis paribus oppositis patulis 
dispositis subasqualibus oblongo-laneeolatis acutiB roseis basi appendi- 
cibus setaceis instructis, labello parvo oblongo decurvo appendicibus 
utrinque 2 patentibus setiformibus instructo, columna apice (ad basin 
antherarum) fimbriata, capsula lineari v. lineari-oblongi £-f poll, longa. 

S. crassifolium, Br. Prodr. p. 571. DC. Prodr. vol. vii. p. 335. Sond. in Lehm. 
PL Preiss. vol. i. p. 384. Benth. Fl. Austral, vol. iv. p. 29. 

S. leptobotrys, DC. I.e. p. 783. Sond. I.e. p. 384 P 

Dampiera? innandata, Be Vriese in Lehm. PL Preiss. vol. i. p. 404. 



Of nearly ninety species of SU/lidium described by Ben- 
tliam in the " Flora Australiensis," 8. crassifolium is the 
twelfth that has been figured in this magazine. It is a 
native of the south-western extremity of Australia, extend- 
ing from Phillips flats on the south coast, westward and 
northward to Fremantle on the west coast. 

It was raised at the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, from seeds 
received in 1898 from Quartermaster- Sergeant B. T. 
Goadby, of the West Australian Engineers, collected at 
Albany, King George's Sound, where it grows on wet 
land, flowering in November. It thrives in a greenhouse, 
producing in spring racemes nearly two feet high. Bcn- 
tham describes it as having no appendages, or very 
small ones on the lip, but there is a pair of long setiform 
ones on either side of that organ in the specimen here 
figured. 

Descr. — A tall, rigid, erect, nearly glabrous herb, with 
radical leaves four to eight inches long, and a narrow 
inflorescence up to two feet long. Leaves tufted, narrowly 

October 1st, 1899. 



linear-oblanceolate, acute, thickly coriaceous, hard, as much 
as half an inch at the broadest part, concave, dark green, 
and shining on the upper surface, pale, and almost green 
beneath. Scape with the sub-paniculate raceme erect or 
inclined ; branches very short, rather distant, about three- 
flowered ; bracts and bracteoles small, coriaceous, green. 
Calyx-tube three-quarters of an inch long, cylindric, 
pubescent, limb small, two-lipped, lobes free, dentiform. 
Corolla of four spreading, oblong, pink lobes in opposite, 
spreading pairs, each about half an inch long, bearing a 
setiform appendage, and a very small, obovate, deflexed 
lip, armed with a pair of bristles on either side towards 
the base. Column sigmoid, about as long as the petals, 
white. Anthers brown. Capsule narrow, half an inch 
long, or rather longer. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Branch of panicle with buds and flower; 2, fruit, and 3, dorsal 
view of anthers -.—All enlarged. 



7660 




; 'itcMith 



"«ncentBrooVtsI)ay& Hanif 1 ^ 



Tab. 7680. 
BERLANDIERA tomentosa. 

Native of the Southern United States. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Helia:nthoide.s, 
Genus Berlandieka, DC. ; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 350.) 



Berlandiera tomentosa; tota pannoso-tomentosa, canescens v. glabrata, 
caule 1-lg-pedali simplici v. ramoso, foliis inferioribus oblongis v. ovato- 
oblongis obtusis crenatis basi in petiolum srepissime elongatum super pe 
anguste alatum angustatis, supra laate viridibus, nervis subtus validis, 
supremis sessilibus dentatis, capitulis subcorymbosia lg-2 poll, latis, 
involucri hemispherici bracteis orbicularibus herbaceis villosis, fl. radii 
1 ad 8 fern., corollae tubo brevissimo limbo aureo ovali-oblongo 2-lobo, 
lobis rotundatis, styli ramis filiformibus elongatis obtusis brunneis, fl. 
disci masc, ovario gracili stipitiformi elongato piloso, corolla) tubo 
cylindraceo glaberrimo lobis 4 brevibus intus pnbescentibus brnuneis, 
antheris exsertig, stylo columnari integro pulescente, acha3iiiis lute 
obovatis compressis facie inteiiore viilosis. 

B. tomentosa, Nutt. m Trans. Am. Phil. Soc. Ser. ii. vol. vii. (1841) p. 31,7. 
Torr. & Gr. Fl. N. Am. vol. ii. p. 282. Ckapm. Fl. S. U. St, it, 
p. 221. Gray Synopt. Flor. N. Am. vol. ii. pt. i. p. 213. 

B. pumila, Nutt. I.e. 

Silphium pumilum, Miclix. Fl. Bor. Am. vol. ii. p. 246. 

S. tomentosum pumilum & reticulatum ? Pursh. Fl. Am. Sept. vol. ii. pp. 578, 
579. 

S. asteriscus, var. pumilum, Wood, Class-book of Bot. p. 442. 

Polymnia caroliniana, Poir. Diet. vol. v. p. 505. 



J. L. Berlandier was a Genevese botanist who explored 
parts of Texas and Mexico, and who died at Matamoros on 
the Gulf of Mexico in 1851. The genus named after 
him consists of four species, natives of the south-eastern 
United States. B. tomentosa inhabits Pine barrens from 
1ST. Carolina to Florida, and westward to Arkansas and 
Missouri. Seeds of it were presented to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, in 1898, by the Rev. L. H. Lighthipe of Jackson- 
ville, Florida, plants from which flowered in a cool green- 
house in May and June of this year. The flowers proved 
very persistent. 

Descr. — A slender, herbaceous, sparsely leafy perennial, 
twelve to twenty-four inches high, more or less hoary or 
cottony, or glabrate. Lower leaves oblong, or ovate- 
oblong, obtuse, eremite, narrowed into a petiole two to 
OtioBtK 1st, 1899. 



three inches long, which is winged above the middle, pale 
green above, with a reddish costa, and five to seven pairs of 
slender nerves, paler beneath, with stouter nerves ; upper 
leaves small, sessile, acutely toothed. Heads few, in a ter- 
minal corymb, rather shortly peduncled, one and a half to 
two inches in diameter. Involucre of about three series of 
orbicular, green, spreading, tomentose bracts. Bay-flowers 
about eight, tube of corolla hardly any; limb broadly ovate- 
oblong, ending in two rounded lobes ; style-arms two, 
filiform, brown. Disk-floivers enveloped in green bracteoles, 
stipitate by the imperfect, slender, cyltndric, hairy ovary ; 
corolla-lobes four, dark red-brown, pubescent. Style 
columnar, entire, pubescent. Achenes broadly obovate, 
compressed, villous on the inner surface. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Invol. bract and ray-flower; 2, bracteole of outer series of disk- 
flowers ; 3, inner disk-flower and bracteole; 4, anthers; 5, style of disk- 
flower : — All enlarged. 



768! 







Tar. 7681. 
RHODODENDRON dilatatum. 

Natire of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Ericace.e.— Tribe Bhodore^e. 
Genus Rhododendron, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599.) 



Rhododendron (Azalea) dilatatum; frutex fere fclaben-imus, ramis ramulisque 
ternis gracilibus cortice atro-fusco indutis, novellis roseis, foliis apicibus 
ramulorum solum evolutis ternis petiolatis l|-2-pollicaribus rhombeo- 
ovatis subacutiB basi acutis tenuiter chartaceis supra la;te viridibus 
saDguinco-tiucti.o, subtns pallida viridibus subglaucis, nei-vis iitrinque 
oostae 3—5 supra gracillimis subtus prominnlis ultimis reticularis, petiolo 
i-% poll, longo gracile roseo, floribus pruecooibus apicibus ramulorum biuis, 
gcminis apbyllis bracteis multiseriatim imbricatis ovatis viridibus de mum 
recurvis tectis, pedicellis breviusculis rubria setnlosis et glandulosis, calyce 
truncato glanduloso, corolla profunde bilabiata rosea 2-poll. diam., intus 
baBin versus ecolorata, tubo brevi campanulato, Jabio superiore ad 
medium trifido lobis ovato-oblongis obtains, inferiore bipartite segmentis 
oblongis obtusis, staminibus 5 declinatis filameDtis 3 corolla longioribus 
2 brevioribus omnibus glaberrimis roseis, antheris parvis fuscis, ovario 
oblongo lepidoto, stylo filiformi declinato Btigmate minuto. 

R. dilatatum, Miq. Ann. Mtts. Bot. Lugd. Bat. vol. i. p. 31. Franrh. Sf Sav. 
Enum. PL Jap. vol. ii. p. 1(54. Maxim. Shod. As. Or. in Mem. Acad. 
Petersb. ser. vii. vol. xvi. No. 9, pp. 25, 27. 

Azalea dilatata, Hart. 



The nearest, and indeed very near ally of Rhododendron 
dilatatum is B. rhombicum, Miq. (see tab. 6972), also a 
native of Japan, which differs in being of a stouter habit, 
with more persistent pubescent leaves, hirsute branchlets, 
smaller flowers, ten much shorter stamens, and the ovary 
and lower part of the style villous. 

Ii. dilatatum was discovered by Siebold early in the 
century. There are native specimens in the Kew Her- 
barium from the mountains of Okayama and Hakone, 
in the province of Sagami, Nippon ; and a cultivated 
one from Messrs. Veitch, dated April, 1885, who were, 
no doubt, the introducers of the species into England. 
The drawing here given is from a plant which flowered 
in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in April, 1899, and was in 
full leaf in June of the same year. It was procured in 
1893 from the Yokohama Gardeners' Association in 
Japan, and appears to be hardy. Both foliage and 
flowers are quite inodorous. 
October 1st, 1899. 



Descr. — A small, much- branched, nearly glabrous bush. 
Branches very slender, leafy at the tips only, covered with 
a very dark brown bark, young branchlets red. Leaves 
ternate, one and a half to two inches long, rhombic-ovate, 
sub-acute, base cuneate, thin in texture, bright green 
above clouded with blood-red, very pale beneath, nerves 
three to five pairs, very slender above, stouter, and with 
reticulate branches beneath ; petiole one-third, to one-half 
an inch, long, very slender, red. Inflorescence terminal, 
clothed with imbricating, ovate, pale green, recurved, 
glabrous bracts. Floivers geminate ; pedicels short, red, 
setulose, and glandular. Calyx truncate. Corolla two 
inches in diameter, deeply two-lipped, bright rose colour, 
fading to white towards the base within, tube very short ; 
lips divaricate, upper erect, three-cleft to the middle, lobes 
shortly ovate-oblong, obtuse ; lower lip deflexed, bipartite, 
segments oblong, obtuse. Stamens 5, declinate and in- 
curved, filaments very slender, rose-red, three longer than 
the corolla, two upper shorter ; anthers small, pale brown. 
Ovary oblong, truncate, glandular; style very slender, 
stigma minute. — J. D. H. 



a n ig '}' Pe , dicel > cal J*. and ovary ; 2 and 3, back and front view of anther :— 
All enlarged. 



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76S? 



Tab. 7682. 
CYPHOMANDRA betacea. 

N. Grenada and Peru. 

Nat. Ord. Solanacej:. — Tribe Solane.e. 
Germs Cypiiomandra, Sendtn.; {Benth. & Hook.f, Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 889.) 



Cypuojiandra betacea; arbuscula molliter pubescens, contusa odore ingrato, 
caule superne ramoso, cortice pallido, ramis crassis, foliis atuplis longe 
petiolatis 4-8 poll, longis ovato-cordatis acuminatis raollibus supra luride 
viridibus subtus pallidis, nervis utrinqae costae 5-9 subtus prominulis 
pallidepurpureis, petiolo 4-12 poll, longo crassiusculo tereti, cyuds saepius 
supra- vel extra-alaribus corymbiformibus laxe di- tri-chotome ramosis, 
pedunculo valido petiolo breviore viridi, floribus longiuscule peilicellatis, 
pedicellis flexnosis fructiferis elongatis crassis, calyce parvo crateriforme 
5-lobo, lobis rotundatis, corolla pollicem diametro rotato-campanulata alba 
roBeo pallide tincta, segmentis lanceolatis recurvis, filamentis brevibus, 
antheris oblongis corolla dimidio brevioribus, stylo brevi columnaii, 
stigmate simplici, bacca carnosa 2-3-pollicari ovoidea Havida v. aurea 
rubro-tincta 2-loculari polysperma, seminibus orbiculanbus compressis. 

C. betacea, Sendtn. in Flora, vol. xxviii. (1845) p. 172, t. 1 ; et in Mart. 
Fl. Bras. vol. x. p. 119. Dunal in DC. Prodr. vol. xiii. pars i. p. 393. 
Morris in Qard. Chron. 1884, vol. i. p. 510; 1887, vol. i. p. 386, tipr. 77; 
1899, vol. i. p. 1C5, fi£. If )4 (the Kew plant). Journ. Hortic. mr. 3, vol. 
xxxi. p. 470. Kew Bulletin, Aug. 1887, p. 2. Maiden in Agric. Gazette 
N.S. Wales, vol. v. (1894) p. 214, cum ic. 

Solaxum betaceum, Cav. Ic. vol. vi. p. 15, t. 524. Anal. Hist. Nat. Madr. vol. i. 

(1799) p. 41-. Ait. Ilort. Kew. ed. ii. vol. i. p. 400. Dunal, Hist. Solan. 

p. 169. Andrews, Bot. Rep. vol. viii. t. 511. Rev. Hortic. 1880, p. 150; 

1881, p. 470. 
S. crassifolium, Ortega, Hurt. Matr. Dec. ix. p. 117. 
S. obliquum, Bert, in Herb. DC. ex Dunal in DC. Prodr. I.e. 
Pionaxdra betacea, Miers in Hook. Lond. Journ. Bot. vol. iv. (1845) p. 358. 



Cyphomandra betacea is the Tomate de la Paz of 
Mexico and Central America, known also as the Tree 
Tomato and Vegetable Mercury in the West Indies, the 
latter name being given for the real or supposed value of 
the fruit in relieving disorders of the liver. It is a native 
of New Grenada, and Peru, whence it has been intro- 
duced into other parts of tropical and sub-tropical 
S. America, the West Indies, Spain, and, of late vears, 
into India, China, Australia, and S. Africa. Its ex- 
tended cultivation is due to the facility with which it 
is grown, adapting itself to many soils and climates, to 
the great beauty of its abundantly produced edible fruits, 
November -1st, 1899. 



and to the value of these, when perfectly ripe, as a sub- 
stitute for the Tomato, for making preserves, and even for 
dessert. In the latter case it is the sub-acid pulp alone 
which is eaten. This resembles that of Passiflora edulis, 
Sims (t. 1989), but whereas the rind of the fruit of the 
Pass 'flora is tasteless, that of Gyphomandra is very dis- 
agreeable. Other differences between the fruits of these 
plants are that the pulp of that of Gyphomandra is less 
watery, more acid, and has an aromatic flavour. 

According to Aiton, Gyphomandra betacea was introduced 
into England in 1803, by Sir James Edward Smith. It 
has been long (perhaps ever since that date) in cultivation 
at Kew, where it flowers and ripens its fruit abundantly 
in the Temperate House. 

Descr. — A small, erect tree, with pale bark, soft wood, 
and stout branches. Leaves four to eight inches 
long, ovate-cordate, acuminate, softly puberulous, lurid 
geeen above, paler beneath, with five to nine pairs of 
spreading nerves ; petiole four to twelve inches long, stout, 
terete, pubescent. Cymes up to five inches broad, sub- 
corymbiform, di- tri-chotomously divided; peduncle shorter 
than the petiole, green ; pedicels an inch long, flexuous, 
fruiting thickened upwards. Flowers an inch in diameter. 
Calyx cupular, obtusely 5-lobed. Corolla campanulate- 
rotate ; segments recurved, lanceolate, white with a pink 
tinge. Filaments much shorter than the oblong anthers, 
which are about half as long as the corolla. Style short, 
columnar, stigma small. Berry two to three inches long, 
ovoid fleshy, orange-yellow, often suffused with red, two- 
celled, many-seeded. Seeds orbicular, compressed, nar- 
rowly winged all round.—/. D. E 



l Sd of S 3 ? ^f™' and 6t y ]e ; 2 - stamen; 3, pistil : all enlarged; 
h seea ot nat. size ; o, the same, enlarged. 



7C83 




^•daL-J.NFStAlith 



Brooks Day^SonLl^trnp 



■iHmH^H^nHBHnHBgHBVMPDOHCMHHe^HHBHnHlfri'; 



Tab. 7683. 
CARLUDOVICA Laucheana. 

Native of New Grenada, 

Nat. Ord. PanoA-Ne^e. — Tribe Carludovice.e. 

Genus Carludovica, Ituiz & Pav. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 953.) 



Cabludovica Laucheana ; caule brevissimo, foliis subdistichis cuueifornii- 
oblongis basi acutis laate viridibus coriaceis profundebifidis laciniis lineari- 
oblongis acuminatis plicatim 5-7-costatis, petiolo lamina breviore in 
vaginam raargine scariosam brunneam sensim desinente, pedunculo brevi 
crasBO, cataphyllis oblongo-lanceolatis acutis scariosis brunneis, spadice 
4-6-pollicari oblongo cylindraceo 2-2i poll. diam. staminodiis flexnosis 
albis densissime cririito, spathis spadice subajquilongis oblongo-lanceolatis 
acnminatis pallide primulinis apice fuscis, fl. niasc. basi compresso 
cuneato, perianthii segmentis ad 12 brevibus ovatia recurvis, staminibus per- 
plurimis, antheris oblongis filamento basi mammillseformi paullo longiori- 
bus, fl. fern, perianthii segmentis 4orbiculari-ovatis cuspidatis, stigmatibus 
4 sessilibus brevibus uncinatim recurvis marginibus glandulosis, stamino- 
diis longissimis filiformibus flexuosis apicibus incrassatis. 

Sai.mia Laucbeana, Hort. Sand, ex Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. i. pp. 442, 481, 
fig. 72. Rev. Hort. Belg. vol. xix. (1893) p. 194, fig. 39. 



Of tlie large and curious genus Carludovica, containing 
thirty-eight described species, according to the census in 
the Kew Index, very few are to be found in cultivation. 
Five only before that here figured have appeared in this 
Magazine, namely, G. latifolia, Ruiz & Pavon, t. 2950-1 
(Ludovia latifolia, Pers.), G. ensiformis, Hk. f. t. 6418, 
C. rotundifolia, Wendl. t. 7083, G. capnt-Medusse, t. 7118, 
and G. microcephala, Hort. Berol. t. 7263. In the character 
of the bifid leaf G. Laucheana agrees with G. ensiformis, 
but it differs in the much shorter, broader leaf -lobes with 
many more nerves in each, in the stouter, shorter petiole 
and peduncle, in the very much larger spadix, and in 
the uncinate stigmas. Another nearly allied species is 
G. plicata, Klotzsch (Linnaea, vol. xx. (184-7) p. 468), 
which has more oblong leaves, with longer petioles. 

G. Laucheana was imported from Antioquia, New 
Grenada, by Messrs. Sander & Co., of St. Albans. A 
plant of it received from that firm by the Royal Gardens, 

XoYKMBEtt 1st, 1899. 



Kew, in 1895, flowered in a stove in May, 1897. As in 
other species of the genus, it is remarkable for the envelope 
of milk-white, thread-like staminodes of the female flowers, 
which thickly clothe the spadix, wholly concealing the 
flowers. The function of this envelope may possibly be, 
like the spathe of mauy Aroidese, to protect the flowers 
from the attacks of insects from without, whilst fertilization 
is effected under it by minute pollen-feeding insects. 

Descr. — Stem very short. Leaves eight to twelve inches 

long, cuneiformly oblong, coriaceous, bright green, split to 

the middle or below it into two linear-oblong, acuminate 

lobes, each plicately five to seven-ribbed, base acute ; 

petiole stout, shorter than the blade, dilating gradually 

downwards into a coriaceous sheath, with narrow, scarious, 

brown margins. Peduncle very short, stout, erect, bearing 

below several brown, scarious sheaths, and under the spadix 

two oblong-lanceolate, acuminate spathes, six inches 

long, of a pale yellowish colour, with scarious tips. 

Spadix as long as the spathes, oblong, cylindric, two to 

two and a half inches in diameter, including the dense 

envelope of waving, white, filiform staminodes. Male fl. 

cuneiform, fleshy, with about twelve marginal, broadly 

oyate, short, recurved lobes. Stamens very many, crowded, 

filaments rather shorter than the oblono- (swollen, with 

short tender tips) anthers. Fern. fl. with°four, small, very 

broadly ovate, cuspidate, erect, fleshy lobes ; staminodes 

our upward of an inch long, white, flexuous, tips 

uuckened. hhgmas four, uncinate, laterally compressed, 

glandular on the margin.—/. D. II. 



4 fern \' V nn°^i and , infl ? rescence of nat. she- % ma le fl. ; 3, stamens; 
% lent H. . all enlarged -.-5, reduced view of whole plant. 



7? 




Vincent BrocTka.DcLy & S 



Tab. 7684. 

HIDALGOA Wekcklei. 

Native of Costa Itica. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Heliantiioide.e. 
Genus Hidalgoa, Llav. # L(x.; (Benth. & Huok.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 38G.) 



Hidalgoa WercMei; herba suflxuticosa, ope petiolorum scandens, fere 
glaberrima, foliis oppositis longe petiolatis ternatim pinna tisectis supra 
parce pilosis, piunulis 3 late ovatis trisectis grosse dentato-serratis, 
dentibus apice discoloribus, petiolo If- 2-pollicari basin versus volubili, 
stipulis orbicularibus herbaceis, capitulis 2\ poll. diam. axillaribus soli- 
tariis, pedunculo 3— 1-pollicari nudo, involucri bracteis herbaceis biseriatis 
linearibus, exterioribus 5 stellatim patentibus, interioribus duplo longiori- 
bus et latioribus obtusis in tabum cylindricum dispositis, fl. radii ad 10 
femineis, corolla? tubo brevissimo, limbo patente oblongo 3-dentato miniato, 
fl. disci capitulo exsertis flavidis, tubo angusto elongato lobis 5 revolutis 
intus papillosis, antheris elongatis basi obtusis connectivo apice breviter 
unguiculato, styli fl. radii ramis filiformibus longe exsertis, fl. disci stylo 
nisi basin versus ubique papilloso apice breviter bilobo, achseaiis apice 
bicornutis, disci angustis sterilibus, radii latioribus compressis. 

Childsia WercMei, Child.% Cat. Rar. Fl. &c, 1899, p. 1 cum ic. (New York.) 



The genus Hidalgoa is closely allied to Dahlia and 
Coreopsis, but differs from both in habit, in the large fertile 
achene of the ray-flowers, and in the sterile disk-flowers, 
the styles of which are entire or very shortly two-lobed. Only 
two species have hitherto been recognized, the II. ternata, 
Llav. & Lex. of Mexico and Central America, and a closely 
allied one (or possibly a variety) from Guayaquil. From 
both of these H. WercMei differs in its more compound 
leaves and much larger heads, the ray-flowers of which are 
bright scarlet. 

According to Mr. John Lewis Child s, of Floral Park, 
New York, who published it as Childsia Wercklei, with a 
coloured illustration, on the back of his sale-catalogue, cited 
above, it is a native of Costa Rica, where it was discovered 
on a mountain, by Mr. Carlo Werckle, in 1898. A plant 
was sent to the Royal Gardens, Kew, by Mr. J. L. 
Childs, which flowered in a greenhouse in July, 1899. 

De&cr. — A tall, suffruticose, much-branched herb, climb- 
ing by means of the petioles, which twist round objects of 
support, glabrous, except for a slight pubescence on the 

November 1st, 1899. 



upper surface of the leaves. Leaves opposite, long petioled, 
broadly ovate, pinnately ternatisect, one and a half to two 
and a half inches long, by two across the two lower 
pinnules, which are ternatisect and deeply toothed or 
serrate, the teeth tipped with red-brown, which colour 
sometimes extends all round the leaf-lobes ; petiole one and 
a half to two inches long, coiled at the base. Peduncle 
axillary, solitary, as long as the leaves or longer, erect, 
naked, bearing a solitary head two and a half inches in 
diameter. Involucral bracts herbaceous, biseriate, linear, 
obtuse ; outer series five, stellately spreading, about half 
as long and broad as the inner, which are erect, connivent 
in a cylindric tube three-fourths of an inch long. Ray- 
flowers about 10 ; corolla-tube very short, limb spreading, 
oblong, two-nerved, three-toothed, bright scarlet above, 
dirty yellow beneath ; style-arms long, very slender ; 
achene fertile, oblong, flattened, tip two-horned ; pappus 0. 
Dish-flowers many, yellow ; corolla-tube long, slender, lobes 
five, recurved ; anthers elongate, base obtuse ; style slender, 
pubescent, except towards the base, tip shortly bifid; 
achene slender, cylindric, barren ; pappus Q.—J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Ray-flower and invol. bract, with limb removed; 2, disk-flower; 
•3, stamen ; 4, style -.—All enlarged. 



\ 7685 




"MNPrtchULK 



VincentBroota, Day & Son Ltfirtip 



Tab. 7685. 
BEGONIA HEMSLBrANA. 

Native of Yunnan. 

Nat. Ord. Begoniace.e. 
Genus Begonia, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 811.) 



Begonia (Platycentrum) Hemsleyana; dense coespitosa, radice tuberosa, tuberi- 
bus carnosis fasciculatis fusiformibus, cauhbus 1-lJ-pedalibus parce ra- 
mosis petiolisque gracilibus elongatia erectis puberulis pallide roseis, foliis 
palmatipartitis, segmentia radiatis lanceolatis acuminatis remote serratia 
sessilibuB v. in petiolulum brevem angaatiitis glaberrimis supra laste virt- 
dibus rubro anguste marginatis penuinerviis, atipulis ovato-lanceolatia 
herbaceis, pedunculis axillaribas petiolis longioribus glaberrimia, cymis 
dicbotornis paucifloris, bracteia lanceolatia caducis, floribus roseis, masc. 
sepalis 2 ovato-rotundatis snbacutis, petalis 2 multo minoribns oblongo- 
ovatis, staminibus in capitulum globosum brevissime stipitatum dense 
confertis, filamentis gracilibus antheris pyriformibus apice rotnndatis 
sequilongis, loculis lateralibua, fl. fem. longius pedicellatia nutantibas, 
perianthii segmentis 5 asqualibua oblongis obtusis, ovario 2-loculari 
3-alato, ala uua multo majore oblonga apice rotnndata, stylis 2 subseasili- 
bua stigmatorum crucibus brevibna spiraliter incurvis, fascia stigmatosa 
coutinua, phicentis septo medio iDsertis bipavtitis undique ovuliferis, 
capsula latiore quarn longa pendula 3-alata, alis 2 brevibus tertia fere 
pollicari oblonga apice rotundata nervis validis costata, dehiscentia inter 
alas breviores imperfecte operculari. 



The discovery of a palinatipartite-leaved Begonia in the 
Old World is a very remarkable one, the few known 
species with this character being all American. B. Hems- 
leyana has, however, no affinity with the latter; it belongs 
to the section Platycentrum of A. de Candolle (Prodr. vol. 
xv. p. 347), which is represented by eighteen species in 
India, and is regarded as a sub-genus by C. B. Clarke, in 
his paper on Indian Begonias (Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. 
p. 118). Its nearest ally is an undescribed Chinese species, 
also discovered by Dr. Henry, in which the leaves are 
orbicular, and seven to nine-lobed to the middle. 

l>. Hemsleyana was raised in the Koyal Gardens, Kew, 
from seed collected at Mengtse, in Yunnan, at an elevation 
of four thousand to five thousand feet, by Dr. Henry, 
F.L.S., in 1898, who describes it as a very pretty plant, 
a foot to a foot and a half high. It flowered freely and 
November 1st, 1899. 



continuously in a warm greenhouse, from April, 1! 
onwards, forming a compact mass of foliage, suggestive of 
a well-furnished Hellebore. I have named it in com- 
memoration of the services rendered to botanical science 
by the researches into the Chinese Flora of my friend. 
Mr. W. B. Hemsley, F.R.S. 

Descr. — Roots of fleshy, fascicled, fusiform tubers, with 
copious, black rootlets. Stem one to one and a half feet 
high, densely tufted, erect, sparingly branched, leafy, 
succulent, rose-pink, slightly hairy. Leaves erect, long- 
petioled, orbicular, four to five inches in diameter, palmati- 
partite" or sub-pedate ; segments seven to nine, radiating' 
from the top of the peduncle, sessile or narrowed into a 
short petiolule, lanceolate, acuminate, irregularly, rather 
distantly serrate, lateral pair sometimes lobulate, bright 
green above, pale beneath, young sometimes edged with 
red ; petiole three to four inches long, erect, glabrous, 
rose-pink ; stipules half an inch long, oblong-lanceolate, 
herbaceous. Cyme dichotomous, few flowered, monoecious ; 
bracts lanceolate, caducous ; pedicels of fern, lengthening 
and decurved in fruit. Male Ji. one and a quarter inch 
diam. ; sepals orbicular-ovate, pale pink, darker coloured 
towards the tips; petals half as large, oblong. Stam 
very many, capitate, filaments short, crowded on a -very 
short stipes; anthers pyriform, tip rounded, slits narrow, 
lateral. Fern. ft. :— perianth rather larger than the male; 
segments five, sub-equal, oblong, obtuse ; style very short, 
stigmas two, hippocrepiform, with circinately incurved 
horns, stigmatic band continuous. Capsule on an elongate, 
decurved pedicel two inches long, broader than long, 
coriaceous, three-winged, dorsal wing much the longest, 
oblong, tip rounded, strongly many-ribbed, dehiscence 
imperfectly opercular between the narrow wings.- 

u . JJ, tl. 

e Jawed ^ * Anthers ; 3 ' sti g m as; 4, section of ovary; 5, capanle:— Ml 



7686 










MS.del.J.KFi^h! 






Tad. 7686. 

RHODODENDRON modestum. 

Native of the Siltkim Himalaya. 

Nat. Ord. Ericaceje.— Tribe Eiiodore^k. 
Genus Khododendron, Linn.; (Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599.) 



Bhododendrox (Eurhododendron) modestum; frutex glaberrimus, ramulis 
erectis foliosia, foliis 2-3-pollicaribus breviter petiolatis oblongis acutis 
apiculatis basi acutis cuneatisvecoriaceis, stipra saturate viridibus sparsim 
glanduloso-puberulis, subtus fulvo-viridibus lepidotis, nervis utrinque 
costae 8-10 supra inconspicuis subtus vix prominulis costa subtus valida in 
mucronem obtasum producta, gemmis floriferis basi foliatia pauci- 
bracteatis, floribus 6-10 laxe umbellatis pendulis, pedicellis ad f-poll. 
lot)gi8 calyceque lepidotis, calycis segruentis inasquilongis oblongis aris- 
tato-acuminatis posticis i-poll. longis, anticis fere duplo brevioribus, 
corolla infundibulari 5-loba pallide rosea, lobis rotundatis tubo panllo 
brevioribus 3 posticis sanguineo maculatis, staminibus 10 corolla paullo 
brevioribus subdeclinatis, filamentis basin versus villosis, antheris brun- 
neis, stylo declinato stigmate clavato truncato. 



R. modestum is a singularly beautiful addition to the 
list, of about thirty species, of Sikkim Himalayan Rhodo- 
dendrons now described. Though not nearly allied to 
any of those known to me, it is perhaps most nearly to 
B. cihatum, which differs in being very hairy, in its more 
erect flowers, campanulate corolla, and its sub-equal, 
obtuse calyx-segments. These latter in B. modestum are 
very unequal, and all aristulate, a character which I have 
not seen in any other Sikkim species. It is also remark- 
able for the brilliant spotting of the dorsal half of the 
corolla, which coloration is, from the drooping habit of 
the flower, exposed to the eye, and is very effective. Its 
exact habitat is not known. It came up amongst seedlings 
raised from a packet of seeds of Sikkim Rhododendrons 
(ticketed R. pendulum, a totally different plant), which was 
sent from the Royal Gardens of Calcutta to Kew by Sir 
George King in 1887. It flowered for the first time in 
May of this year, in the Himalayan wing of the Temperate 
House. 

Descr. — A small, glabrous, much-branched, leafy shrub, 
bark of old branches brown, of young green sparsely 
November 1st, 1899. 



lepidote. Leaves rather crowded, very shortly petioled, 
two to three inches long, coriaceous, elliptic-oblong, acute, 
tip apiculate, base acute, above yellowish-green, opaque, 
sparsely glandular, puberulous, beneath greenish -yellow, 
closely lepidote ; costa yellow above, produced beyond the 
tip of the leaf as a stout, obtuse mucro ; nerves eight or 
ten on each side of the costa, very slender above, more 
prominent beneath ; petiole about an eighth of an inch 
long. Floivers six to ten, loosely umbelled at the leafy 
tips of the branches, drooping ; bud-scales few, linear- 
oblong, deciduous; pedicels one-half to one inch long, 
decurved, lepidote. Calyx deflexed, very oblique, lepidote ; 
segments five, oblong, obtuse, the tips acuminate and 
aristulate, dorsal one-third of an inch long, anterior 
about half as long, two lateral intermediate in size. 
Corolla broadly infundibular, pale pink, with bright, blood- 
red spots on the dorsal half of the tube, extending hah 
way up the dorsal lobe ; lobes nearly half the length of the 
tube, orbicular, recurved, but not strongly. Stamens ten, 
sub-declinate, upcurved, shorter than the corolla, filaments 
villous towards the base; anthers small, pale brown. 
Ovary short, five-celled, lepidote ; style rather longer than 
the stamens, declinate, glabrous, stigma clavate— J. D. B. 

srvS'."^ ^P °f leaf underside, showing the produced midrib and lepidote 
scales , 2, lepidote scales ; 3, calyx and style -.-All enlarged. 



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Tab. 7682.— CYPHOMAXDRA BETACEA. 
„ 7683.— CARLUDOVICA LAUCHEANA. 
„ 7684.— HIDALGOA WERCKLEI. 
„ 7685.— BEGONIA HEMSLEYANA. 
tf 7686.— RHODODENDRON MODESTTJM. 

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7687 




■ OteSr i n. .,,.., 



\5noont Brooks ,Day & San L* Tnij, 



Tab. 7687. 

ODONTOGLOSSUM biievifolium. 

Native of Peru. 



Nat. Ord. Orchlde/E. — Tribe Vande.e. 

Grenas Odontogloss um, H. B. et K.; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Oen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 561.) 



Odoxtoglossum brevifolium; caudice robusto vaginato, vaginis ovatis acumi- 
natis bi - utineis, pseudobulbis approxiruatis ovato-oblongis compressis 
marginil/us acutis unifoliatis, folio 6-10 poll, longo ovato-oblongo obtuso 
v. retuso basi in petiolum brevem crassum canaliculatum constricto 
cras3e coriaceo, supra saturate lurile vh'idi, sabtus pallidiore, nevvis 
numerosis, scapo simplici robusto squarnis ovafcis scariosis bruiineis 
disfontibns \ poll, longis instrucfco, racemo fere pedali cerouo v. in- 
clinato multifloro, rachi robusto viridi, bracteis Kquamis pedunculi con- 
similibus, pedicellis cum ovariis 2-pollicai-ibus, floribas 2-2| poll, diatn. 
ambitu orbicularibus, sepalis petalisque consimilibus orbicularibus 
breviter unguiculatis crassiuscnlis castaneo-rufis verrucosis marginibus 
crispatis auteis, labello sepalis breviore unguiculato late obovato v. 
obcordato, ungue rubro basi utrinque auriculato medio calloso, columna 
brevi crassa bialata alis obtusis, clinandrio apice denticulato. 

O. brevifolium, Lindl. in Benth. PI. Hariiverj, p. 152; Fol. Orchid , Odonfo- 
(/loss. p. 21. Andre in Illustr. Hortic. vol. xxi. (1874) p. 74, t. 170. 
Walp. Ann. vol. vi. p. 846. Warn. 8, Williams, Orchid. Album, vol. i. t. 
27. Cogn. Diet. Icon. Orchid., Odontogloss. t. 18. 

O. coronarium var. miniatum, Veitch, Man. Orchid, part i. p. 2.'!. 

O. miniatum, Sort, ex Veitch I.e. 

O. Candelabrum, Hort. Linden ex Veitch. 



Opinions differ as to the claims of Odontogloss v >n brevi- 
folium to be considered specifically distinct from 0. coro- 
narium, Lindl. They are regarded as varieties in Veitch's 
excellent " Manual ; " to which is added as another variety 
0. chiriquense, Reichb. f., but which latter, as Rolfe has 
pointed out (Orchid. Rev. vii. p. 49), differs far more from 
both than these do from one another. Referring to Mr. 
Rolfe, who kindly aids me in all my labours on Orchids for 
the Magazine, he informs me that 0. brevifolkim is well 
distinguished from 0. coronarium. by habit, by the closer 
pseudobulbs, larger (not smaller, as stated in Veitch's 
"Manual") flowers, and shorter column. Theyfnrther come 
from different countries, 0. coronarium from New Grenada, 
0. brevifolium from Peru, near Loxa, and differ in the first 
December 1st, 1899. 



named being a very shy, and the latter a very free flowerer. 
The figure of a flower of 0. coronarium in the " Manual " 
exactly corresponds to that of our plant, except in being 
rather smaller, and having a longer column. It should be 
borne in mind that 0. breuifolium had not flowered in 
Europe when the "Manual*' appeared, and that the size 
of its flowers was presumably taken from the original 
Herbarium specimens of Hartweg. How the name 
miniatum, Hort., arose is unknown, it would imply that 
the flowers were vermilion coloured or scarlet. 

0. brevifolium was introduced by Linden, under the 
name of 0. Candelabrum. For the loan of the magnificent 
specimen here figured I am indebted to Sir Trevor Law- 
rence, Bt., M.P., in whose unique collection it flowered in 
April of this year. 

Bescr. — Rootstoch prostrate, almost as thick as a swan's 
quill, clothed with distichous, imbricating, brown, ovate, 
acuminate, imbricating scales an inch long. Pseuclohulbs 
two inches long, rather crowded, ovate-oblong, compressed, 
with acute margins, smooth, green. Leaf solitary, six 
inches long by three broad, ovate-oblong, tip retuse, base 
contracted into a very stout, short, channelled petiole, 
thickly coriaceous, lurid green and shining above, paler 
beneath. Peduncle stout, green, with a few ovate or lan- 
ceolate, scanous, red brown sheaths an inch long. Raceme 
a foot long, inclined or drooping, many -fid., rhacbis green ; 
bracts like the sheaths on the peduncle; pedicels with 
ovary two inches long. Flowers orbicular in outline, two 
to two and a half inches broad. Sepals and petals sub- 
Bimilar, nearly orbicular, shortly clawed, bright reddish- 
chestnut coloured, with narrow" crisped golden margins. 
Lap shorter than the sepals, clawed, limb broadly obovate 
or obcordate, golden-yellow ; claw with two short basal 
winery am | a complicate lobed callus between them. 
"""">' very short, red-brown, two- winged.— J. D. //. 



4nmf\ 1 ', L i? * nd co !" mn; 2 ' * ide vkw of bas e of lip and column; 3, anther 
* aucl o, pollmia ;— All onlaraed. 



7688 







^.aelj.NRtchltth 



Vincent Rroolra.DdV &.Sor 



Tar. 7688. 

CEKEUS VIRIDIFLORUS. 

Native of New Mexico and Colorado. 

Nat. Ord. CactejE. — Tribe Echinocacte^:. 
Genus Cekeus, Haio.; (Bentli. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 849.) 



Ceeeus (Bchinocereus) viridiflorus ; subglobosus ovoideus oblongus v. demum 
cylindraceus, parce ramosus, ad 13-sulcatus, laste viridis, areolis ovato- 
lanceolatis oblongisve, aculeis 12-18 arete radiantibus cum superioribus 
2-6 setaceis rubris albis variegatisve, lateralibus caeteris longioribus, 
eentralibus 1-2 robustis rarius 0, floribus ad \\ poll. diam. apicem versus 
caulis lateralibus e flavo virescentibus, calycis tubo brevi aculeato, petalis 
apice bilobis, baccis parvis ellipsoideis spinulosis, seminibus tuberculatis. 

C. viridiflorus, Engelm. in Gray PI. Fendl. in Mem. Am. Acad. vol. iv. (1849) p. 
50; Syn. Gael. U.S. in Proc. Am. Acad, vol.iii. (1856) p. 278, et Addend, in 
Trans. Acad. St. Louis, vol. ii. p. 199; Cact. Whipple Prcped. p 32; Oact. 
Mex. Bound, p. 28, t. xxxvi. ; Gact. in King's Kxpl. Rep. vol. v. p. 118; 
in. Simpson's Hep. 440. Bigeloic, Pacif. Pail. Rep. vol. iv. pp. 32, 36. 
S. Wats. PL Wheeler, p. 9. Porter & Coulter Fl. Colorad. p. 48. Coulter 
Man. Rochy Mt. Bot. p. 110. Salm. Cact. Hort. Byck. p. 192. Lab. 
Monogr. Cact. p. 319.— Bot. Works Engelm. pp. 124, 136, 158, 224,227, 
231. 

Ecbinocereus viridiflorus, Engelm. in Wisliz. Tour N. Mexic. p. 91. Fbrst. 
Handb. Cact. Ed. 2, p. 811. Schum. Gesamtbeschr. Kaht. p. 267. 

E. Labouretianns, Lem. Cact. p. 57. 

E. Laboureti, Fbrst. I.e. 



Cereus viridiflorus is an interesting plant, as being the 
most northern representative of the vast genus to which 
it belongs, and which numbers upwards of 300 species. 
It is a native of Rocky Mountains of N. America, and its 
subsidiary chains, from the upper Platte River in Wyoming 
(about lat. 43° IS T .), south to the Rio Grande del Norte 
in New Mexico (about lat. 35° N.), Colorado being its 
headquarters. It would be interesting to know to what 
elevation it is found, but of this I find no record. Plants 
of it were received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1897, 
along with other Cacti, from Mr. D. M. Andrews, Nursery- 
man, of Boulder, Colorado; they have proved to be so 
far hardy as to require the protection of a screen only in 
very cold weather. They flower in July. 

l)escr. — Plant subglobose or ovoid, or elongating into 

December 1st, 1899. 



oblong or cylindric, two to eight inches high, by one and a 

half to two in diameter, simple or sparingly branched ; 

furrows about thirteen, separated by obtusely triangular 

ribs, one-third to one-half of an inch broad at the base. 

Areolae of spines ovate-lanceolate or oblong, about their 

own length apart. Spines twelve to eighteen, with often a 

few much shorter and more slender at the apex of the 

areole, pectinately spreading, about a sixth of an inch long, 

with usually one (rarely two) stouter, longer, central, erect 

spines; colour of spines very variable, from red-brown 

to white, or variegated, especially the central. Flowers 

laterally produced on the ribs above the middle of the plant, 

an inch and a half in diameter. Calyx-tube short, spinose, 

green. Bepals and petals narrowly cuneiformly oblong, 

yellow, with a faint pink or greenish tinge, tip two-lobed. 

Anthers yellow. Stigmas green. Fruit small, ellipsoid, 

spinulose. Seeds tu'bercled.— J. D. H. 



Figs. 1 and 2, Areolae with spines ; 3, petal ; 4, stamen '.—All enlarged. 



689 




el JKHtchlith. 



av&SonLt^Imp 



Tab. 7689. 
MINA LOBATA. 
Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. Ooxvolvulace^. — Tribe Convolvule.e. 

Genus Mina, La Llav. & Lex. Ipomceas sect. Qnamoclit (Benf/i. & Hook. f. 
Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 871.) 



Mina lobata ; suffrutex glaberrimus, caule gracili volubili ramoso tereti, foliis 
longe petiolatis late ovato-cordatis acuminatis integris v. late 3-5-lobis 
integerrimis supra laete viridibus subtus pallidis, nervis utrinque costa? 
5-6 arcuatis, nervulis laxe anastomosantibus, noribus numerosis in 
racemos adscendentes simplices v. bifidos longe pedunculatos sub-recurvos 
secundis breviter pedicellate, pedicellis basi minute bracteatis, calycis 
tubo brevi, segmentis ina^quilongis ereetis ovatis apiculatis v. subulatis 
basi dilatatis, corolla? coccineae demum aureaa tubo brevi valde constricto 
limbo elongato ampullseformi subpentagono curvo ore constricto, lobis 
parvis rotundatis, staminibus basi tubi insertis, filamentis gracillimis 
inasquilongis corolla duplo longioribus basin versus puberulis, antheris 
oblongis, disco sub 5-lobo, ovario 4-loculari, stylo staminibus requilongo, 
stigmate capitate 

M. lobata, Cerv. in La Llav. & Lex. Nov, Veg. Descr. fasc. i. p. 3 (1821). Lindl. 
in Bot. Reg. vol. xxviii. (1842) Misc. p. 5, et t. 24. Chois. in DC. Prodr. 
vol. ix. p. 337. Paxt. Mag. Bot. vol. xvi. p. 100, cum to. pict. QarcL 
Chron. 1886, vol. ii. p. 684, figs. 232, 233. Hegel, Gartenfl. 1886, p. 644, 
cum ic. ex Gard. Chron. Herat. Perringin Dcutsch. Gartcnzeit. 1866, p. 644, 
cum ic. ex Gard. Chron. Herat. Morren in Ann. Soc. Agric. Gand., vol. v. 
(1849) p. 211, t. 259. Bull. Soc. Tosc. Hort. 1889, p. 106. Duren in 
Rev. Hort. Belg. 1891 , p. 60, cum ic. pict. 

M. cordata, Miclieli in Rev. Hortic. 1898, p. 554, ei 1899, p. 308, cum ic. jnrf. 

Quamoclit Mina, G. Don, Gen. Svst. vol. iv. p. 259. 

IpoiiffiA versicolor, Meissn. in Mart. Fl. Bras. vol. vii. p. 220. Hcmxl. Biol. 
Centr. Am. Bot. vol. ii. p. 395, iv. p. 74. 



I have no reason to doubt that the plant here figured is 
Mina lobata,, Cerv., and of Lindley in the Botanical 
Register ; but there is such discrepancy between the de- 
scriptions and figures of some later authors who have taken 
it up, that it might be supposed that two or more species 
have been included under the name. Of the authors re- 
ferred to above, Pnxton describes the leaves as slightly 
villous beneath, and the corolla limb as five-angled. 
Morren also says of the leaves that they are villous beneath, 
and the limb of the corolla he represents as strongly five- 

Decemker 1st, 18i'S>. 



ribbed and five-lobed at the base; more different from any 
other figure is his of the tube of the calyx, which is repre- 
sented as perfectly globose, crowned with a lobed limb, 
the whole resembling the inferior ovary and calyx of a 
Eubiaceous plant. G. Don describes the corolla-limb as 
five-angled; Meissner does not, but says that the raceme 
is a scorpioid cyme, which it appears to be on a hasty 
glance, but it is only at first slightly recurved, with secund 
flowers. Micheli's M. cor data represents a very weak, 
undeveloped state of the species, with all the leaves cor- 
date and undivided, and the very short racemes very few- 
flowered. 

I have retained the generic name of Mina for this plant, 
whilst recognizing its very close affinity with the section 
Quamoclit of Ipomcm, from which it differs in inflorescence, 
in the ampulliform limb of the corolla narrowed upwards 
to the mouth, and in the very small lobes of the limb. 
Meissner reduced Mina to Ipomoca, and being obliged to 
discard the specific name (lobata) as being preoccupied, 
gave that of versicolor as descriptive of the change of 
colour in the corolla from red to yellow. 

Mina lobata is a native of Mexico, where it is frequently 
cultivated. There are specimens in the Kew Herbarium 
from Mr. Parkinson, late Consul-General in Mexico ; from 
San Luis, Potosi, collected by Schaffner, and from a 
garden in Orizaba, by Botteri. Prof. Micheli's plant 
(M. cordafa) was raised from seeds collected in the States of 
Michoacan and Guerrero, in Western Mexico, whether 
from an indigenous plant is not stated. 

Descr. — A tall, very slender, branching, leafy climber, 
with terete, green, twining stem and branches. Leaves 
long-petioled, one to four inches long and broad, ovate- or 
orbicular-cordate, acuminate, entire or broadly three- to 
five-lobed, quite entire, thin, bright green above, pale be- 
neath, with arching nerves, and loosely anastomosing 
nervules. Racemes three to five inches long, terminal, 
ascending, slender, curved, simple or forked at the base, 
many-flowered. Flowers secund, about an inch long, 
shortly ped i celled ; pedicels minutely bracteate at the base. 
Calyx-tube short ; lobes five, more or less unequal, from 
subulate with a dilated base to ovate and apiculate. 
Corolla bright red, passing into orange-yellow ; tube very 



short, narrow, contracted ; limb long, narrowly am- 
pulliform, truncate at the base, narrowed upwards to a 
small mouth with five short rounded lobes. Stamens 
twice as long as the corolla ; anthers oblong, yellow. 
Stigma capitate. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and pistil; 2, portion of corolla laid open, and stamens; 
3 and 4, anthers ; 5, base of calyx, disk and ovary ; 6, stigmas : — All enlarged. 



7680. 






M.S.dHl.TNV,+ , 



Tab. 7690. 

EPIPAOTIS GIGANTEA. 
Native of Western N. America and Temperate Asia. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^. — Tribe Neottie^e. 
Genus Epipactis, Holler; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 619.) 



Epipactis gigantea ; caule elato robusto folioso, foliis inferioribus ovatis oblong- 
isve superioribus 4-8 pollicaribus sensim in bracteas abeuntibus lanceo- 
latis acuminatis acutisve glaberrimis v. nervis subtus subscaberulis, 
racemo glabro v. puberulo, bracteis foliaceis inferioribus 3-4 poll, longis 
lanceolatis acuminatis, floribus remotis breviter graciliterque pedicellatis, 
sepalis f poll, longis viridibus rubro striatis, doreali late ovato erecto 
subgaleato/lateralibus ovato-lanceolatis subacutis, petalis sepalis breviori- 
bus oblique ovatis obtusis pallide roseis rubro-striatis, label! o roseo 
sepalis aequilongo, hypochilio saccato lobis lateralibus erectis late ovatis 
apiee rotundatis, epichilio ovato v. ovato-lanceolato subacuto rubro, 
capsula patula v. pendula brevi et ellipsoidea, v. longiore lineari-oblonga. 

E. gigantea, Dougl. ex Hook. Fl. Bor. Am. vol. ii. p. 220, t. 202. S. Wats. 
Bot. King's Exped. p. 341 ; Bot. Calif, vol. ii. p. 137. Coulter, Man. Rock* 
Mt. Flor. p. 343. Hemsl. Biol. Cent. Amer. Bot. vol. iii. p. 304. Lindl. 
in Benth. PI. Harticeg. p. 53. 

E. americana, Lindl. in Ann. Sc. Nat. vol. iv. (1840) p. 385 ; Gen. &. Sp. 
Orchid, p. 462. 

E. Royleana, Lindl. in Boyle, III. Bot. Himal. p. 368 ; Gen. & Sp. Orchid. 
p. 461 ; in Joum. Linn. Soc. vol. i. (1857) p. 174. Hook. f. Fl. Brit. Ind. 
vol. vi. p. 126. 

PE. Thunbergii, A. Gray, in Perry Exped. Japan, vol. ii. p. 319. 

Cephalanthera Royleana, Begel in Act. Hort. Petrop. vol. vi. (1879) p. 490. 
Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. v. p. 63. 



The species of Epipactis have never been satisfactorily 
discriminated or described. They are extremely variable, 
both in foliage and floral characters ; as many as seventeen 
forms, varieties, or species having been referred to the 
European E. latifolin, All. One alone, E. gigantea, is 
known as a native of N. America, and it is there confined 
to the western half of the continent, ranging from British 
Columbia to California and Mexico, and further east from 
Idaho to Texas. It reappears in the Old World in the 
Corea (and Japan, if A. Gray's E. Thunbergii is conspecific), 
and Manchuria, and thence extends to the mountains of 
Western China, and along the Himalaya at elevations of 
seven thousand to twelve thousand feet to Kashmir. It is 
quite hardy at the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, flowering in June. 
December 1st, 1899. 



Descr. — Stem tall, stout, leafy. Lower leaves ovate or 

oblong, upper much longer, four to eight inches long, 

lanceolate, acuminate, glabrous, or with the nerves beneath 

minutely scaberulous. Raceme glabrous, or minutely 

puberulous, elongate; flowers distant; bracts foliaceous, 

lower three to four inches long, lanceolate, acuminate; 

pedicels with the ovary one- sixth to one-fourth of an inch 

long. Sepals three-fourths of an inch long, green, 

streaked with dull red. nerves ; dorsal erect, broadly ovate, 

concave; lateral ovate-lanceolate, sub-acute, recurved. 

Petals rather shorter than the sepals, erect, obliquely 

ovate, obtuse, pale pink, with red nerves. Lip as long as 

the sepals ; hypochile saccate, its lateral lobes erect, broadly 

ovate, strongly nerved, tip rounded, pale rose-coloured 

tuft streaked with dark red externally, deeper red within ; 

epichile ovate or ovate-lanceolate, from a dilated, almost 

two-lobed base, sub-acute, dark red. Column stout, with 

two bluish lateral horns below the clinandrium. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Lip; 2, aide, and 3, front view of column and anther:— All enlarged. 




m 1 



MS.aeWNK 



"\7r-n^tf>nt R-nnnlfR Dd 



Tab. 7691. 
KLEINIA Grantit. 

Native of E % trop. Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Sexecionide*. 

Genus Kleinia, Haw.; Senecio sect. Kleinia (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant. 

vol. ii. p. 419.) 



Kleinia Grantii; glaberrima, carnosa, rhizomate nodoso, caule robusto 
decumbente folioso dein adscendeute, foliia confertis 2-2| poll, longis 
ovalibus v. spathulato-oblongis obtusis (exsiccitatis apiealatis) integerrimis 
in petiolum crassum angustatis crasse carnosia pallide viridibua utrinque 
concoloribus, pedunculo terminali 10-pollicari robusto nudo infra medium 
pallide purpureo snperne pallide viridi ramoao, ramis 3 3-4-poIlicaribus 
erectis viridibus monocepnalis squamia pauci8 parvis lanceolatis mem- 
branaceia deciduis inatructia, capitulis erectia magnis, involucro § poll, 
longo cylindraceo \ poll. diam. herbaceo basi nudo rotundato v. subin- 
truso, bracteis ad 12 i poll, longis glaberrimis lasvibus (exsiccatis anlcatis) 
marginibus cohasrentibus apicibus liberia lanceolatia acuminatia, floribus 
bracteis longioribuB in capitulum hemispbaericum sanguineum 2 poll. diam. 
confertia radii femineis disci hermaphroditis, corolla3 tubo elongato gracili, 
lobis lanceolatia obtusis papulosis, antherarum connectivo elongato, 
Btylorum ramis fl. fem. elongatis longe penicillatis recurvis, fl. hermaph. 
brevioribue, achseniis teretibus glabris, pappo albo involucro vix excedente. 

Notonia Grantii, Oliv. Sf Hiern, Fl. Trop. Afr. vol. iii. p. 407. 

N. sempervirens, Aschers. in Schweinf. Beitr. Fl. Mthiop. p. 152. 

Senecio (Kleinia) longipes, Baker in Few Bulletin, 1895, p. 217. 



Kleinia Grantii was discovered by the late Lt.-Col. 
Grant, during his adventurous journey with Capt. Speke, 
in the TJsagora district, or province, of what is now German 
East Africa. The precise locality of the specimen in the 
Kew Herbarium is M'biimi, lat. 6° 56' 30* S., which is on 
the coast range. The species is not indicated in Col. 
Grant's enumeration of his collections in the M Linnean 
Transactions " (vol. xxix. 1875), but in a note attached 
to the specimen he refers to the Appendix to Speke's 
narrative, where the plant is alluded to as " Kleinia ? sp., 
diminutive, with pale port- wine flowers. Alt. 1750 ft., 
fl. October." It has since been found in Abyssinia by 
Schweinfurth and de Riva ; and more recently in Somali- 
land, on the Golis range, by Miss Edith Cole, whose 

December 1st, 1899. 



specimens were described by Mr. Baker as Senecio 
(Kleinia) longipes. A plant of it, given by Miss Cole to 
the Botanic Garden of the University of Cambridge, 
flowered there in June, 1899, and was sent for figuring in 
this Magazine by Mr. Lynch. 

Descr. — A fleshy, perfectly glabrous herb. Bootstoch 
nodose, emitting stout vermiform roots. Stem six to eight 
inches long, decumbent, copiously leafy, pale purplish. 
Leaves crowded, spreading and recurved, thickly fleshy, 
two to two and a half inches long, oval, oval-oblong, 
or spathulately oblong, obtuse (apiculate when dry), quite 
entire, very pale green, concolorous on both surfaces, base 
narrowed into a short, very stout petiole. Peduncle ter- 
minal, ten inches high, stout, quite naked, pale, grey- 
purple below the middle, green above it, dividing at the 
top into three stout branches or pedicels, each bearing a 
solitary large head of flowers. Pedicels green, bearing 
scattered, small, lanceolate, membranous, deciduous scales. 
Involucre quite naked at the rounded and slightly intruded 
base, bright green, cylindric, two-thirds of an inch long 
by half an inch in diameter ; bracts about twelve, cohering 
in a smooth tube for two-thirds of their length, above it 
free, lanceolate, acuminate, quite smooth and green to the 
tips, grooved when dry. Flowers forming a hemispheric 
scarlet head two inches in diameter, all much longer than 
the bracts, outer female, inner hermaphrodite. Corolla- 
tube slender, lobes lanceolate, obtuse, papillose. Style- 
arms of fern. fl. very long, with long, linear penicillate tips, 
of hermaph. fl. much shorter, with shorter tips. Anthers 
with the connective produced into a subulate erect append- 
age nearly half as long as the cells. Achenes quite smooth, 
cylindric, glabrous. Pappus copious, white ; hairs flexuous, 
shorter than the corolla-tube.—/. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Female flower; 2, hermaph. do. : 3, stamens ; 4, styles of herm.iph. 
flower i— All enlarged. 



INDEX 

To Vol. LV. of the Third Series, ov Vol. OXXV. of 
the whole Wbfk. 



7663 Acacia sphaerocephala. 
7632 Acalypha hispida. 

7654 Alnus nitida. 

7667 Aloe Schweinfurthii. 

7675 Asparagus scandens. 

7669 Aster Piccolii. 

7685 Begonia Hemsleyana. 

7673 „ sinensis. 
7657 ,, venosa. 
7680 Berlandiera tomentosa. 

7674 Calathea picta. 

7G83 Carludovica Laucheana. 

7640 Ceanothus integerrimus. 
7648 Cereus Paxtonianus. 
7688 „ viridiflorus. 

7660 Chrysanthemum nipponicum. 
7672 Coleus thyrsoideus. 
7665 Crassula pyramidalis. 
7682 Cyphomandra betacea. 
7653 Cyrtanthus parviflorus. 

7655 Dahlia Maximiliana. 
7639 Dendrobium eapillipes. 

7676 Porstenia Phillipsiae- 
7642 Dryandra calophylla. 
7638 Elseagnus macrophylla. 

7670 Ephedra altissima. 

7641 Epilobium obcordatura. 
7690 Epipactis gigantea. 
7635 Gaultheria trichophylla. 
7637 Gentiana Burseri. 
7645 Gynopleura liumilis. 



7668 Heliopliila scandens. 
7684 Hidalgoa Werekk-i. 
7647 Impatiens Roylei, vdr. 
pallidiflora. 

7651 Incarvillea variabilis. 
76l>1 Iris Delavayi. 

7678 Kalanchoe thyrsiilora. 
7691 Kleinia Grantii. 
7659 „ pendula. 
7644 Kniphofia Tuckii. 

7633 Lewiaia Tweedyi. 

7634 Lilium rubellum. 

7677 Lonicera Hildebrandiana. 
7664 Masdevallia musco-t. 
7636 Meconopsis heterophylla. 
7689 Mina lobata. 
7658 Moraea sulphurea. 
7671 Mussaanda capsulifera. 

7652 Nicotiana sylvestris. 

7687 Odontoglossum brevifolium. 
7013 Passitlora pruinosa. 
7 'HI Rhododendron dilatatum. 
7686 ,, modestum. 

7646 Rosa acicularis, rar. 

nipponensis. 
7666 Rosa xanthina. 

7649 Silene Fortunei. 

7679 Stylidium crassifolium. 
7656 Veronica Piell'enbachii. 

7650 Yucca elate. 
7662 „ Whipplei. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 660, DECEMBER, 1899. 



Tab. 7687.— ODONTOGLOSSUM BREVIFOLIUM. 
„ 7688.— CEREUS VIRIDIFLORUS. 
„ 7689.— MINA LOBATA. 
„ 7690.— EPIPACTIS GIGAXTEA. 
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