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Full text of "Curtis's botanical magazine."

CURTIS'S 

BOTANICAL MAGAZINE, 



COMPRISING THE 



plants of tfK &opai <§aroens; of Iteto, 

AND 

OP OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN ; 
WITH SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 

BY 

SIR JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., C.B., GkC.S.L, 

F.R.S., F.L.S., etc., 

D.C.L. OXON., LL.D. CANTAB., CORRESPONDENT OF THE INSTITUTE OF FRANCE. 



VOL. LIV. 
OF THE THIRD SERIES. 

(Or Vol. CXKIV.ofthe Whole Work.) 




" The genuine life 
That serves the steadfast hours, 
Is in the grass beneath, that prows 
Unheeded, and the mute repose 
Of sweetly -breathing flowers." 



LONDON: 
LOVELL REEVE & CO., LTD, 

Publishers to the Home, Colonial, and Indian Governments, 

6, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 

1898. 

[All rights reserved.'] 



TO 



WILLIAM BOTTING HEMSLEY, F.E.S., F.L.S., 

Principal Assistant, Herbarium, Royal Gardens, Kexc. 

My dear Hemsley, 

I have three reasons, each sufficient, for offering 
to yon the dedication of a volume of the Botanical 
Magazine; firstly, as a record of the interest you have 
shown in this work, and an acknowledgment of the 
valuable aid I have received from you in conducting it; 
secondly, the amount and importance of your labours 
in Systematic and Geographical Botany, as especially 
evidenced by your great works on the Flora of Central 
America, and on the Botany of the Challenger Expedition ; 
and lastly, my wish that you should accept this dedication 
as the tribute of a friend to a collaborator for upwards 
of thirty years in the Herbarium of the Royal Gardens. 

Believe me, with esteem and regard, 

Faithfully yours, 

J. D. HOOKER. 

The Camp, Sunmngdale. 
Dec. 1st, 1898. 




No. 687. 

L. LIV.-~ JANUARY. Price 3*. fid. coloured, 2*. OJ. plain. 

OR No. 1331 OF THB ENTIRE WOttK. 

C UBT IS'S 

OTANICAL MAGAZINE. 

COMPRISING 

THE PLANTS OF THE ROYAL GARDENS OF KEW, 

ID OF OTHER BOTANICAL ESTABLISHMENTS IN GREAT BRITAIN, WITH 
SUITABLE DESCRIPTIONS; 



[r JOSEPH DALTON HOOKER, M.D., G.c.s.L, C.B., F.R.S., F.L.S. 

TLzte Bittttox of tfte Hional 33otanic Gartens of !&cta. 




PREPABINT* FOR IMMEDIATE PUBLICATION. 

THE POTAMOGETONS 

(POND WEEDS) 

OF THE 

BRITISH ISLES. 

With Descriptions of all the Species, Varieties, and Hybrids. 

By ALFRED FEYER. Illustrated by ROBERT MORGAN, F.L.S. 

The object of this work is to supply a long-needed set of srood and reliable Illus- 
trations of British Potaniogetons. Both Descriptions and Illustrations will include 
the varying forms and states as well as the generally recognized species. The 
Synonymy, though not aiming at absolute completeness, will be ample for all 
working purposes. An attempt will be made towards a natural arrangement of the 
species founded on the changes of form in their progressive stages of growth rather 
than on the comparatively limited distinctions afforded by the fruit, illustrations of 
which will form a special feature. 

The work will be issued in 15 monthly parts t prospectus on application. 



Now ready, price 2s. 64. 



INSULAR FLORAS. 

A Lecture delivered by Sir J. D. HOOKER, C.B., before the British Association 
for the advancement of Science at Nottingham, August 27, 1866. 






Now ready, Second Edition. 

HANDBOOK OF BRITISH MOSSES, 

Containing all that are known to be natives of the British Isles. 

By the Rev. M. J. BERKELEY, M.A., F.L.S. 24 Coloured Plates, 21s. 



Now n ete in 1 vol., royal 4to, in handsome cloth ca?e, £6 6s. net ; in half morocco, 

£7 net. 

Foreign Finches in Captivity. 

By ARTHUR G. BUTLER, Ph.D., F.L.S. , F.Z.S., F.E.S. 

Hole forms a laTge and handsome volume of between 300 and 400 pages, with 60 Plates by 
F. W. FROWHAWK, beautifully coloured by hand. 



HANDBOOK OF THE BRITISH FLORA: 

A Description of the Flowering Plants and Ferns Indigenous 
to or Naturalised in the British Isles. 
Br G E0B6E BENTHA M. F.R.S. 
Edition, 3. D. Hookeb,C.B., G.C.S.I., F.R.S., &c. W».6d. 



ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE BRITISH FLORA. 

A Series of Wood Engravings, with Dissections, of British Plants. 
Drawn by W. H. FITCH, F.L.S., akd W. G. SMITH, F.L.S. 

an I to Bentham's "Handbook. - British Floras. 

4th Edition, with 1315 Wood Engraving 



REEVE & CO., (3, HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 



7572 




ael.J.N."Fitchlith. 



"Vincent Broo)<s,Day StSonlnip 



L Reeve &. C° Lon-don. 



Tab. 7572. 
CAMOENSIA maxima. 

Native of Western Africa. 

Nat.Ord. Legtjminos^;. — Tribe Sophobe^e. 
Genus Camoensia, Welw. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 557.) 



Camoensia maxima ; frutex alte scandens, ramis pendulis, ramulis petiolig 
et inflorescentia rufo-fusco lanatis, foliis digitatim 3-foliolatis, foliolis 
elliptico-v. obovato-oblongis acuminatis breviter petiolulatis glabris, 
petiolo gracili, Btipulis conicis rigidis nunc evanidis, floribua maximis, in 
racemoa multirloros pendulos breves axillares dispositis crasse pedicellatis, 
bracteis bracteolisque parvis deciduis, calyce elongato anguste campanu- 
lato breviter 2-labiato crasse coriaceo, labio superiore 2-fido inferiore 
3-partito, petalis unguiculatia flabellatim mnlti-costatis lacteis marginibus 
crispatulis aureis, vexillo suborbiculato 3-4-poll. lato in unguem costa- 
tum angustato, ceteris multo minoribus angustioribusque, staminibus 
petalis brevioribus, filamentis conniventibus glaberrimis, ovario lineari 
stipitato rufo-lanato, stylo elongato, stigmate capitellato, legumine lato 
lineari rufo-lanato oligospermo. 

C. maxima, Welw. ex Benth. in Trans. Linn. Soc. vol. xxv. (18G6), 301, t. 36. 
Monteiro, Angola and the River Congo, vol. i. p. 176, t. vi. Ancona, in 
Bull. Soc. Tosc. Hortic. 1886, p. 201, t. 9. Bearing in Deutsch. Gart. 
Zeit. 1886, p. 453, fig. 99. Maury, Le Jardin, 1887, p. 199, fig. 89. Kew 
Btdlet. 1894, p. 402. Gard. Chron. 1895, vol. i. p. 44; 1896, vol. ii. p. 596, 
figs. 105, 106. Baker in Oliv. Fl. Trop. Afric. vol. ii. p. 252. 

Giganthemum scandens, Welw. Apont. p. 585. Hiern, Cat. Afr. PI. 
Welwitsch, Dicot. Pars. I. p. 285. 



This superb climber, though familiar to Botanists, 
chiefly through Dr. Welwitsch's indefatigable labours, was 
discovered as early as 1816, by Christian Smith,* the 
lamented Botanist attached to the unfortunate expedition 
of Captain Tuckey to the Congo River, whose specimens of 
it are preserved to the British Museum. Dr. Welwitsch 
says of it, " Common in the dense forests of Golungo Alto, 
adorning- the loftiest trees of the outskirts with its splendid 
bunches of milk-white flowers, tinged with gold on the 

* I am indebted for this fact to Mr. Rendle, of the British Museum, to 
■whom I wrote respecting the statement by Bentham in the LinriEean Tran- 
sactions, that specimens of Camoensia maxima, collected by Afzelius, were in 
that Institution. Mr. Rendle informs me that this is an error, and that the 
name of Christian Smith should be substituted for that of Afzelius, who 
collected in a part of Africa (Sierra Leone) very far from the Congo region. 

January 1st, 1898. 



edges of the petals." There are specimens in the Kew 
Herbarium from the forest region of West Africa, which 
extends from the Congo at Stanley Pool, lat. about 4° S., 
to where Welwitsch found it in lat. 9° S. Monteiro, who 
saw it on the sides of hills at Quiballa, in lat. 7' 40° S., 
describes it as appearing as soon as he left the gneiss 
formation, and entered that of mica slate, where the stout 
roots spread far in the hard clay of the decomposed rock, 
and shoot out into other plants. 

The name Gamoensia was given by Dr. Welwitsch as a 

tribute to the memory of the illustrious Portuguese poet, 

Louis Camoens, author of the " Lusiade," in which is 

introduced the voyage of discovery of Vasco di Gama, whom 

Camoens had in his youth accompanied as a soldier. 

He had previously, in his " Apontamente," imperfectly 

characterized it as Giganthemum scandens, referring it to 

Robiniacese (presumably tribe Galegese of Leguminosse). 

The name was suppressed, at his own request, and replaced 

by Gamoensia). The genus consists of two species, G, 

maxima and G. brevicalyx, Benth. The second species 

was discovered on the Muni River, in lat. 1° N. by G. 

Mann. Bentham says of the genus, " It stands alone in 

Leguminosse, as combining the lofty climbing woody stems 

and habits of many Dalbergiese, with the digitately trifo- 

liolate leaves of Podalyriese and GenistesB, while the flowers 

place it amongst Sophorex" 

Seeds of Gamoensia maxima were sent to Kew by M. 
Monteiro in 1873 ; these germinated freely, and young 
plants were largely distributed. The first to flower 
(in 1882) was one sent to the Botanical Gardens of 
Trinidad ; the next (1894) was in that of Ceylon, and in 
September of the same year a third flowered with Mrs. 
Euddle of Mythe Castle, Tewksbury. A specimen in 
the Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh bore in 1897 
racemes of 16 to 18 flowers. Our drawing was taken 
from a plant that flowered in the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 
November, 1896. 

Descr. — A gigantic, woody climber, with pendulous 
flowering branches; young shoots, petioles, and in- 
florescence clothed with a scurfy brown deciduous tomen- 
tum. Leaves digitately trifoliolate ; petiole slender, three 
to six inches long ; leaflets about as long as the petiole, 



subsessile, elliptic or obovate-oblong, acuminate, contracted 
to the obtuse base, thinly coriaceous, penninerved ; stipules 
conical, recurved, rigid, or ; stipellas subulate. Flowers 
in short axillary racemes, shortly, stoutly pedicelled, 
sweet-scented ; bracts and bracteoles small, linear-lanceo- 
late, acuminate, fugaceous. Calyx-tube five to seven 
inches long, very narrow, coriaceous, dilating upwards ; 
limb short, 2-lipped, upper lip 2-fid, lower spreading, 
3-partite, segments imbricate, green within. Petals very 
large, milk-white, flabellately closely and stoutly veined or 
ribbed, narrowed into short, stout ribbed claws, margined 
with a crisped band of golden papillaa ; standard nearly orbi- 
cular, three to four inches broad ; wing and keel petals 
shorter and narrower. Stamens shorter than the petals ; 
filaments stout, glabrous ; anthers linear-oblong. Ovary 
rufously woolly ; style longer than the stamens ; stigma 
capitate. Legume six to eight inches long, broadly linear, 
valves tomentose, margins hardly thickened. Seeds few. 
—J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flowers with calyx and petals removed, of the nat. size, 2, section 
of staminal tube and ovary ; 3 and 4, anthers : — All enlarged. 



"573 




L Reew3 & C° London. 



Tab. 7573. 

PAPHIOPEDILUM Victoria-Marine. 

Native of Sumatra. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. — Tribe Cypripedie.£. 
Genus Paphiopedilum, (Pfitzer, Morphol. Stud. Orchid, p. 11.) 



Paphiopedilum Victoria- Marise; foliis late lineari-oblongis apioe rotundatis 
et emarginatis, supra saturate viridibus tessellatis subtus pallidis uni- 
coloribus, scapo valido rufo-brunneo superne inter flores hirsuto, 
racemo plurifloro diu persistente et florente, noribus seriatim evolutis, 
bracteis magnis cymbiformibus obtusis ciliatis herbaceis fusco-rubro 
striatis, ovario breviter pedicellato 2£ pollicari stricto piloso, floribus 
amplis, sepalo dorsali 1| poll, lato eri'cto orbiculari viridi marginibus 
late albis ciliolatis, disco sanguineo bic illic striato, lateralibus in laminam 
labello suppositam late ovatam obtusam viridem conHuentibus, petalis 
sepalis longioribus divaricatis linearibus tortis et undulatis ciliatis viri- 
dibus fusco-purpureo fasciatis et marginatiB, labello elongato sepalo 
dorsali longiore obtuso pnrpureo, ore dilatato, marginibus viridibus, lobia 
lateralibus rostratis, staminodio ovato acuto basi pilosulo. 

P. Victoria-Marias, Bolfe in Orchid. Rev. vol. iv. (1896) p. 364 (Papbiope- 
dium). 

Cypripedium Victoria-Maria3, Solfe I.e. p. 110. 



The time has come, in the opinion of most orchidolo- 
gists, for separating generically the tropical from the 
temperate species of Cupvipedium, and adopting for the 
former the name Paphiopedilum proposed by Dr. Pfitzer 
(" Morphol. Stud. Orchid.," p. 11, 1886). Besides the wide 
difference of geographical distribution, the true Oppripedia 
being all natives of the colder temperate regions, and the 
Paphiopedila of tropical Asia and Australia, the following 
characters distinguish them. In Cypripedium proper the 
leaves are cauline, thin, and plicate in vernation, the perianth 
marcescent, and sepals valvate in aestivation. In Paphio- 
pedilum the leaves are radical, coriaceous, and conduplicate 
in vernation, the perianth deciduous, and sepals imbricate in 
aestivation, the dorsal enfolding the lateral. Dr. Pfitzer has 
further included Reichenbach's (American) genus Selenipe- 
dlum (as,Sdcnipi'illlum)mh]s, Paphiopedilum ; and accepted 
Ascherson's (" Brandenb. Flora," p. 77, 1864) conversion 

Januakj: 1st, 1898. 



of Gypripedium into Cypripedilum, for etymological 
reasons. 

Mr. Kolfe, on the other hand, rightly (" Orchid. Rev./' 
vol. iv. p. 364) retains Selenipedium on the grounds of its 
American habitat, unilocular ovary and globose seeds ; 
but unfortunately, for the sake of uniformity in nomen- 
clature, reduces Paphiopedilum to Paphiopedium. 

As regards the conversion of Gypripedium into Gypripe- 
dilum, it involves a departure from Linnaeus' meaning of 
the generic term, which he derived from Kimpis, Venus, and 
irohiov, afoot (" Phil. Bot.," p. 186), and should have spelled 
Gypripodium. On the other hand, tt&Lov, which would have 
given Gypripedium, is Greek for a plain, and trehikov 
(giving Gypripedilum), for a slipper. The simplest process, 
if change is desirable, would be to end all in podium : — 
thus, Gypripodium, Selenipodium, Paphiopodium, the only 
objection being the aesthetic one that, considering the shape 
of the lip of Gypripodium, the compliment to the goddess's 
foot is not a flattering one. 

Paphiopedilum Victoria-Marise is a native of Sumatra, 
whence it was imported by Messrs. Sander of St. Albans, 
from whom the specimen here figured was procured. 
It flowered in the tropical Orchid-house of the Royal 
Gardens in March, 1897, and continued flowering for some 
months. 

Descr. — Very robust. Leaves a foot long by one and a 
half to two inches broad, coriaceous, tip rounded, emargi- 
nate, with an apiculus in the sinus, upper surface bright 
green, mottled with darker green, under pale blueish green. 
Scape eighteen inches high, as thick as a goose-quill, dark 
purple-brown. Racemes erect, with many flowers, produced, 
one or two at a time, from below upwards on the stout, dark, 
red-brown, hirsute rachis. Bracts an inch long or more, 
cymbiform, obtuse, herbaceous, ciliate, green, with red- 
brown streaks. Ovary with short pedicel two and a half 
inches long, strict, erect, green, hairy. Flowers three 
inches long from the tip of the dorsal sepal to that of lip. 
Dorsal sepal orbicular, ciliolate, green, streaked with red, 
and with a broad, nearly white margin ; lateral sepals united 
in an ovate, obtuse, green blade beneath the lip, about 
a third shorter than the latter. Petals two inches long, 
spreading horizontally, undulate and twisted, green, with 



broad, red purple margins and nerves. Lip two inches 
long, by three-fourths of an inch broad below the broad 
mouth, slightly compressed laterally, dull purple, green 
round the mouth; side lobes erect, produced into short 
green horns. Staminode ovate, acute, hairy on the back 
towards the base. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Staminode and stigma, seen laterally; 2, staminode seen from 
above : — Both enlarged. 



7574 




\SncentBroolc5,DayASoj\Iini' 



L Reeve 5cC° Loadon 



Tab. 7574 
STROBILANTHES Dyerianus. 
Native of Burma. 

Nat. Ord. Acanthace^s. — Tribe Ruellie*. 
Genus Stkobilantues, Bl.\ (Benth. & BTook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 1036*.) 



Strobilanthes (Bracteate) Dyerianus ; frutex erectus, ramoaus, hirtellus, 
foliis sessilibus ovatis ovato-lanceolatisve acuminatis supra basin constric- 
tum panduriformibus serrulatis utrinque sparse hirtelha supra viridibus 
plagis inter nervos albo-roseis variegatis, subtus junioribus praesertim 
roseo-purpureis, spicis axillaribus densifloris calycibusque glanduloso- 
pilosis, bracteis calycibus brevi .ribus spathulatis persistentibus, brae- 
teolis sepalisque linearibus glanduloso-pilosis, corollas 1^-pollicaria 
violacei lente curvi tubo e basi brevi angusto modice ventricoso, limbi- 
. brevis lobis latioribus quam longis revolutis, staminibus 4, 2 longioribns 
perfectis 2 brevioribus antheris cassis, filamentia glaberrimis, ovario 
glaberrimo. 

S. Dyerianus, Sort. Sander, ex Masters in Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. i. p. 442. 
Garden & Forest, vol. vi (1893) p. 194. Martinet in Le Jardin, 1893, 
p. 151, fig. 58. Pynaert in Journ. d , BTortic. Belg. 1894, p. 133. Joum. 
Jlortic. Ser. 3, vol. xxvi. p. 359, fig. 66. Kew Bullet. 1894, App. ii. 
p. 51. 



The history of this beautiful plant, as recorded at Kew, 
is, that it was discovered in Burma by Boxall (Collector 
for Hugh Low & Co.), who presented plants to the 
Botanical Gardens of Singapore, whence it was introduced 
into the Royal Gardens, Kew, in October, 1892, with the 
name " Strobilanthes, sp. nov., Boxall." Young plants 
were distributed from Kew, one of which was exhibited at 
the Ghent Horticultural Exhibition of 1893 by Messrs. 
Sander & Co., of St. Albans, under the name of 8. Dyeri- 
anus, which attracted attention, owing to the beautiful 
rose-purple of the undersurface of the leaves when young. 
Its nearest ally is 8. auriculatus, Nees, figured in 
Wallich's "Plantas Asiaticse Rariores, vol. hi. t. 295, a 
native of Central India and Burma. 

The specimen figured is of two lateral inflorescences 
and a leaf, communicated by Mr. Lynch from the Botanical 
Gardens of Cambridge University, who flowered the plant 
in January, 1894. The figure gives no idea of the beauty 

Jasuahy Isj:, 189& 



of the thyrsiform flowering summit of the stem, the size 
of which far exceeds the dimensions of even a quarto 
plate. 

Descr. — A branching, soft-wooded shrub, rough with 
scattered short hairs on the branches and leaves, and with 
gland-tipped hairs on the inflorescence; branches quad- 
rangular, green. Leaves six to eight inches long, sessile, 
elliptic-lanceolate, acuminate, serrulate, panduriform in the 
lower fourth, with an orbicular, cordate base, bright green 
above, with pale rosy-white bands, of a lucid, satiny lustre 
between the nerves ; rose-purple beneath, especially in a 
young state, with twelve to fifteen pairs of strong, arching 
nerves and cross-nervules. Inflorescence of erect spikes 
leafy at the base ; flowers crowded, an inch and a half 
long; bracts one-eighth to one-fourth of an inch long, 
broadly ovate, acuminate, green, spreading, persistent. 
Calyx one-third of an inch long, unequally 5-lobed to the 
middle ; lobes linear, obtuse. Corolla gently curved, one 
to one and a quarter inch long, gradually dilated and 
ventricose from a short narrow tube, pale violet-blue, with 
a white ventral keel ; limb three-fourths of an inch across 
the mouth ; lobes five, very short, broader than long, 
revolute. Stamens included, two with perfect anthers ; 
two much shorter, with imperfect anthers; filaments 
glabrous. Ovary oblong; style filiform, glabrous.— 

•* Fl f' J i 1, C ^y x and bracteoles ; 2, portion of base of corolla and stamens; 
«J and 4, perfect anthers ; 5, ovary ;-All enlarged. 



7575 







VincentBrooksPayS-Sonlnip 



L Reeve &. C° London 



Tab. 7575. 
LATHYRUS splendens. 

Native of Southern California. 

Nat. Ord. Legttminos^. — Tribe Vicieje. 
Genus Lathyrus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 526.) 



Latiiyrtis splendens ; perennis, scandens, glaber v. parce pubescens, caule 
gracili _ angulato, foliis cirrhiferis, foliolis 4-5-jugis f-1 poll, longis aliis 
ellipticis obtusis subacutisve aliis anguste lineanbua marginibus interdum 
convolutis, stipulis parvis 2-fidis integris v. laciniatis ciliatis, racemia 
elongatis basi bifloris superne 7-10-floris, floribus magnis, petalis saturate 
sanguineis carina pallidiore, calyce fere hemispherico teretiusculo breviter 
5-dentato dentibus 2 posticis ceteris paullo longioribus, vexillo pollicare 
orbiculare marginibus revolutis, alis ovato-oblongig carina acnta brevi- 
oribus et angustioribus, ovario pubescente, legumine 3-pollicari compresso 
glabro 10-20-spermo. 

L. splendens, Kellog in Proc. Calif. Acad. vol. vii. (1876) p. 90. Masters in 
Gard. Ghron. 1893, vol. i. p. 258; 1897, vol. i. p. 315, fig. 106. The 
Garden, 1897, Aug. p. 122, cum 1c. 



This is certainly the most beautiful species of the large 
genus to which it belongs, consisting of about 150 species, 
of which ten are "Western American. Its nearest ally is 
L. vestitus, Nutt., of California, of which indeed S. Watson, 
in his " Botany of California " (vol. ii. p. 442) suspected 
(judging from its description alone) that it was a variety. 
L. vestitus is, however, a much stouter plant, never so 
tall, with many more and larger leaflets, much larger 
stipules, and with smaller, pale rose-coloured or violet 
flowers not half the size. 

Lathyrus splendens is a native of the high desert region 
of Southern California, where it flowers throughout the 
winter, and is called the " Pride of California." It was 
discovered in 1882, in the San Bernardino Valley, by Mr. 
Pringle. There is also a specimen of it in the Kew 
Herbarium, collected in San Diego by Mr. Cleveland. 

Seeds of L. splendens were received at the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, from Professor Greene of the Catholic 
University, Washington, in 1894. A plant raised from 
them was planted in the border of a house devoted to 
Cape bulbs, where it formed a dense mass of stems tea feet 

January 1st, 1898. 



long, that flowered in March, 1897, and has ripened seeds. 
In the previous summer a plant of it had been tried in the 
open air, when it grew freely, but did not survive the 
winter. 

Descr. — Stem glabrous, or sparsely pubescent, six to 
twelve feet high and more, climbing, four-winged, sparingly 
branched. Leaves two to four inches long, petiole short, 
rachis slender, terminating in a forked tendril. Leaflets 
eight to ten, one to nearly two inches long, opposite and 
alternate, from elliptic to narrowly linear, obtuse, flat, or 
with the sides involute, nerves very slender, nervules 
finely reticulate above ; stipules one-tenth to one-eighth of 
an inch long, bifid, lobes diverging, acute, entire, or 
toothed. Raceme elongate, seven to ten-flowered, with a 
pair of flowers at the base; flowers shortly pedicelled, 
nearly two inches long ; petals deep blood-red, the keel 
paler. Calyx shortly tubular, five-toothed, green, upper 
teeth longest. Standard suborbicular when spread out, 
reflexed, tip emarginate, sides revolute, wings two-thirds 
of an inch long, obliquely oblong, obtuse, shorter and 
narrower than the pale, rose-colrd., acute keel, which is an 
inch long or more. Ovary pubescent. Pod three inches 
long, compressed, glabrous, ten- to twenty-seeded. — 
J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Involute leaflet ; 2, caljx and stamens ; 3, ovary : — All enlarged. 



7576 




JX.Marfarlane deU-NFitdilith. 



VmceRtBrooks,Day&- 



i . Reeve & C°_lon don 



Tab. 7576. 
SIEVEKINGIA Reicheneachiana.- 

Native of Ecuador. 



Nat. Ord. Obchide.e. — Tribe Vande-e. 



Genus Sievekingia, Reichb. f.; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. 

p. 477.) 



Sievekingia Seichenbachiana ; pseudobulbis ovoideis costatis monophyllis, 
foliis petiolatis elliptico-lanceolatis acumiuatis plicatis subtns 5-costatia, 
peduncnlo decurvo vaginato sub 6-flore, floribns pendulis corymbosis, 
bractei3 cymbiformibus, sepalis patentibus ovatis subacutis coDcavis 
membrauaceis pallide stramineis, petalis suberectis aureis, sepalis aequi- 
longis linearibus Iabellique lobis laxe longe subpectinatim ciliatis, labelli 
immobilia explanati aurei sanguineo maculati lobis lateralibus dimidiato- 
OTatis erectis, intermedio parvo lineari, disco crista erecta lacera aucto, 
columna aurea supra medium alata, anthera 2-loculari vertice rotnn- 
data, polliniis 2 ellipsoideis, stipite ope glandnlas apice subulato rostello 
affixo. 

Sievekingia Beichenbachiana, Rolfe in Kew Bullet. 1898, ined. 
Gorgoglosstjm Beichenbachianum, F. G. Lehm. mss. ex Gard. CAron. 1897, 
vol. i. p. 346. 



Sievekingia is a genus of the subtribe Oncidiese, estab- 
lished by Reichenbach f. (" Beitr. Syst. Pflanzenk.," p. 3) 
for a Costa Rican Orchid, 8. suavis, Rchb. f . To this three 
species have since been added, namely, 8. fimbriata, Rchb. f . 
(" Flora, 1886," p. 449), also from Costa Rica, 8. Jenmani, 
Rchb. f. (1. c. 450) from British Guiana, and the subject 
of the figure here given. 

8. Eeichenbachiana was discovered in 1879 by Mr. F. C. 
Lehman on the Andes of Ecuador, at an elevation of 2000 
to 3500 ft., when only a single specimen was met with. 
In 1890 its discoverer undertook to search for more, but 
found only five, on his estate at Cauca. Of these one came 
into the possession of Sir Trevor Lawrence, who obligingly 
sent the drawing here reproduced. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs clustered, an inch long, ovoid or 
obpyriform, ridged, young green, old pale, with scattered 
blood-red blotches ; sheaths pale, speckled with red. 
Leaves four to five inches long, petioled, elliptic-lanceolate, 
acuminate at both ends, plicate, dark green on both sur- 

January 1st, 1898. 



faces, with five pale sunk nerves above, answering to as 
many strong pale ribs beneath ; petiole one to one and a 
quarter inch long, pale yellow, speckled with red. Mowers 
about six, in a pendulous corymb, terminating a flexuou3 
sheathed, pale green peduncle, about two inches long ; 
sheaths and bracts a fourth of an inch long, cymbiform, 
subacute, pale green, speckled with red ; pedicel with the 
ovary one to one and a quarter inch long. Perianth an inch 
and a quarter in diameter across the lateral sepals. Sepals 
spreading, subequal, ovate, subacute, concave, membranous, 
pale straw-colrd. Petals as long as the sepals, suberect, 
linear, acute, golden-yellow, and as well as the lip pecti- 
nately margined with long, flexuous, spreading golden hairs. 
Lip explanate, side lobes large, ascending, dimidiate-ovate, 
subfalcate, golden-yellow, blotched with blood-red, midlobe 
small, linear, lacerate ; disk with an oblong plate between 
the side lobes, that is cleft into five subulate teeth towards 
the base of the lip, and two longer awl-shaped ones towards 
the midlobe. Column dilated above the middle. Anther 
produced and truncate in front, tip rounded ; pollinia 2, 
ellipsoid, seated on the dilated apex of the strap, which is 
attached by a gland to the subulate tip of the produced 
rostellum.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Petal ; 2, lip; 3, column and pollinium ; 4, anther, 5 and 6, pollinia; 
—All enlarged. 



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Tab. 7572.— CAMOEXSIA MAXIMA. 
„ 7573.— PAPHIOPED1LUM VICTORIA-MARINE. 
„ 7574.— STROBILANTBES DYERIAXUS. 
„ 7575.— LATHYRUS SPLENDENS. 
M 7576— SIEVEKIXGIA REICHENBACHIANA. 

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7577 







YmcentBrooknjjav & Son Imp. 



Tad. 7577. 
RICHARDIA Elliottiana. 

Native of South Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Aroide^e.— Tribe Philodendee/e. 
Genus Richardia, Kunth ; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 982.) 



Richardia Elliothana; olata, foliia amplis late ovato-rotandatis apiculatis 
basi profunde cordatis lobis approximatis v. incumbentibus albo-maculatis, 
costa crassa, spatha infundibiilari-campanulata apice recurvo subulato 
tertia parte laxe convoluta tota aurea ore expansa intus laevi, marginibus 
recnryis, spadice subsessile, ovarii apice tumido, stigmate sessili, fnictibus 
crassis. 

R. Elliottiana, Knight ex W. Wats, in Gard. Chron., 1892, vol. ii. p. 123 
Eng. de Duren in Rev. Sort. Belg. vol. xxiii. (1897) p. 13. 



B. Elliottiana is much the largest species of the genus 
hitherto described. It is alluded to under Tab. 7397, also 
a golden-spafched species, as a then imperfectly known 
plant, which may be a variety of B. albo-maculata, Hook., 
a suggestion endorsed by M. de Duren when figuring it in 
the " Revue Hort. Belgique," though on comparison of 
these two plants the differences between them are abun- 
dantly manifest. B. albo-maculata (see Tab. 5740) belongs 
to the hastate-leaved section of the genus, and has a 
comparatively small white spathe, with a much longer, 
narrower, tapering limb, and the base of the spathe is 
purple within. From B. Pentlandii (Tab. 7397) the only 
other known golden-spathed species, B. Elliottiana differs 
in its much larger size, broad spotted leaves, more deeply 
cordate at the base, the smooth surface of the limb of the 
spathe within, and the absence of purple colouring at its 
base, also in the large ovaries and sessile stigma. The 
precise habitat of B. Pentlandii, which was not known 
when the species was first published, is the Mapoch 
district, Lydenburg, Transvaal. 

B. Elliottiana was raised from a batch of South African 
seeds by Mr. Knight, gardener to Captain Elliott, of Farn- 
boro' Park, Hants, in 1896, and was exhibited in London 

February 1st, 1898. 



in 1892. The specimen figured flowered in the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in 1897, and formed its large berries in the 
following August. 

Descr. — Tall, very robust. Leaves nearly a foot long 
and seven inches broad, orbicular-ovate, deeply cordate, 
with an open sinus, or with overlapping basal lobes, apicu- 
late, green, with oblong, transparent blotches, margin 
waved, midrib beneath very stout ; petiole dark green, as 
long as the blade, deeply channelled in front. Peduncle 
nearly a yard high, terete, dark green. Spathe six inches 
long, bright golden-yellow throughout (with no purple at 
the base within) ; tube between funnel-shaped and campanu- 
late ; limb three inches long and broad, quite smooth 
within, tip caudate. Spadix sessile, about three inches 
long. Anthers obconic, minute, orange-yellow. Ovaries 
large, green, with a low crown and a small sessile coloured 
stigma. Fruit a cluster of many small, imperfect berries, 
and ten or a dozen large subglobose or misshapen large 
ones, one inch in diameter, with rounded tips, and a minute 
black scar in the position of the stigma. — J. D. H, 



Fig. 1, Base of spathe cut open, and spadix, of the nat. size; 2, anther; 
3, ovary :— both enlarged ; 4, ripe berry of the nat. size. 



isis 







t Brooks Day*. Sonlmp 



Tab. 7578. 
PAPHIOPEDILTJM Chamberlainianum. 
Native of Sumatra. 



Nat. Ord. OkchidEjE. — Tribe Cypripedie^. 
Genus Paphiopediltjm, Pfitzer (Morphol. Stud. Orchid, p. 11.) 



Paphiopediltjm Chamberlainianum ; elatum, robustum, foliis lineari-oblongis 
obtusis tessellatis, scapo robusto fusco-purpureo superne hirsutulo, 
racemo multifloro demum elongato diu florente, rachi robusto glauduloso- 
tomentoso, bracteis magnis herbaceis cymbiformibus apice rotundatis 
viridibus basi purpureis persistentibus, ovario gracile stricto breviter 
pedicellato tomentoso, floribus amplis, sepalis viridibus dorso hirsutis, 
dorsali orbiculari |-poll. lato, apice convoluto, marginibus undulatis 
ciliatis intus basi et nervis 5-7 purpureis, lateralibus in laminam 
ellipticam labello multo breviorem connatis, petalis 2£ poll, longis 
divaricatis linearibus viridibus subtortis marginibus crispato-undulatis 
purpureis ciliatis, disco lineis purpureis interruptis notato, labelli sacco 
inflato roseo-purpureo creberrime punctulato, ore colloque virescente, 
staminodio late ovato, basin versus setuloso. 

P. Chamberlainianum, O'Brien, em Pfitzer in Engl. Bot. Jahrb. vol. xix. (1895) 
41. Bolfe in Orchid. Beview, vol. iv. (189G) p. 4 (Papbiopedium). 
Kerchqf, Livre des Orchid, p. 454 (Paphiopedium). 

Cypripedium Chamberlainianum, O'Brien in Journ. Sortie, vol, xxiv. (1892) 
pp. 104 et 294, fig. 49; in Gard. Ghron. 1892, vol. i. p. 234, fig. 34. 
Pucci in Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. vol. vii. 1892, p 88, t. 3 (ic. Gard. Chron. 
re-pet.). Pynaert in Rev. Hortic. Belg. vol. xviii. (1892) p. 101, fig. 10 
ic. Gard. Chron. repet.). Duren, I.e. vol. xix. (1893) p. 141, cum ic. 
pict. Journ. Hortic. Ser. III. vol. xxx. p. 432. The Garden, vol. xlv. 
(1893) p. 304, cum ic. Williams Orchid. Grower's Man. Ed. VII. 
p. 242. Kranzl. in Beichb. Xen. Orchid, vol. iii. p. 145, t. 284. 



The nearest ally of the magnificent Orchid here figured 
is P. Victoria-Marias, Rolfe (t. 7573) under which species 
I have given the reasons for adopting the unfamiliar 
generic name of Paphio'pedilum. Both are natives of 
Sumatra, in both the raceme is, as it were, perennial, con- 
tinuing for a year or more to give off a succession of 
flowers, of which one, two, or rarely three, are open at a 
time. In this respect, and those of the mottled leaves, the 
stout, dark purple scape, large boat-shaped herbaceous 
bract, orbicular green upper sepal, twisted petals, and 
open mouth of the lip, the two species agree ; but 
P. Chamberlainiamim differs in the much broader, shorter 
leaves, much more inflated lip, the almost orbicular 

Februaky 1st, 1898. 



staminode, and in the coloration of the flower. The 
sketch of the whole plant given in the Gardener's Chronicle 
represents the sceptriform raceme, upwards of twenty 
inches long, with expanded flowers below, followed by a 
series of many empty bracts above, bearing apparently 
neither buds, flowers, nor fruit, quite unlike any other 
orchideous plant known to me. Mr. Rolfe informs me 
that Messrs. Sander showed him a native dried specimen 
with thirty-two bracts on the raceme. The fine figure in 
the Gardener's Chronicle represents a plant with larger 
flowers than that here figured, much broader petals 
strongly twisted, and with margins neither undulate, 
ciliate, nor purple. 

P. Ghartibcrlainianum was imported from Sumatra by 
Messrs. Sander & Co., and named by Mr. O'Brien in 
honour of the Eight Honourable the Secretary for the 
Colonies, who is distinguished no less for his public services 
than for his devotion to horticulture. The specimen figured 
flowered in the Orchid House of the Royal Gardens, Kew, 
in March, 1897. 

Descr. — A very robust, tall species. Leaves eight to 
ten inches long, by one and a quarter to nearly two inches 
broad, obtuse or subacute, coriaceous, bright greeu, 
tessellated with darker green above, pale beneath, with a 
stout midrib. Scape eight to twelve inches high, dark 
purple-brown, hairy upward. Raceme many-flowered, 
continuously flowering ; rachis stout, glandular-tomentose 
with spreading hairs, dark red brown. Bracts one and 
a half inches long, boat-shaped, tips rounded, strongly 
nerved, green; dark purple at the base, ciliate. Ovary 
very shortly pedicelled, one and a half inches long, strict, 
densely glandular-tomentose. Sepals green, dorsally hir- 
sute ; dorsal nearly orbicular, an inch and a half in 
diameter, margins undulate, ciliate with long hairs, seven- 
nerved, red-purple in front towards the base, and with 
red-purple nerves ; lateral sepals connate in an elliptic- 
oblong blade, smaller than the dorsal, and much shorter 
than the lip. Petals two and a half inches long by 
one-third of an inch broad, linear, more or less 
twisted obtuse, green, with strongly waved or crisped 
ciliate, dark purple margins, and with parallel lines of 
purple spots on the disk. Lip an inch and a half long, by 



nearly an inch in diameter, inflated, slightly contracted 
below the open mouth, rose-colrd., speckled with dark red, 
except around the green mouth and subacute posterior 
angles. Staminode rather small, ovate, apiculate, purplish. 
—J. D. J!. 

Fig. 1, Upper and 2, side view of staminode and stigma -.—Both enlarged. 







Afin.ce.nt Brooks Day &. i 



Tab. 7579. 

DAPHNE Blagayana. 

Native of Styria and Carniola. 

Nat. Orel. Thymel^ace^:. — Tribe Eutiiymeltee/e. 
Genus Daphne, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 190.) 



Daphne (Daphnanthes) Blac/ayana ; fruticulas vage ramosus, f oliis glabris 
apices versus ramorum confertis quasi verticillatis subsessilibus obovatis 
v. oblanceolatis obtnsis basi angustatis tenuiter nervosis luride viridibus, 
capitulis sessilibns multifloris, bracteis obovato-oblongis imbricatis sericeis 
intimis angustioribus perianthii tubum subaequantibus, perianthii pallide 
straminei tubo f pollicari subsericeo, lobis ovatis obtusis tube- triente 
brevioribus, ovario longe stipitato pubescente, stylo brevi, bacca carnosa 
alba. 

D. Blagayana, Frazer in Flora, vol. xxi. pars. I. (1838) p. 176. Reichenb. Ic. 
Fl. Germ. vol. xi. t. 555, fig. 1180. Meissn. in DO. Prodr. vol.. xiv. 
p. 534. Begel, Gartenfi. vol. xxix. (1880) p. 228, t. 1020-1. Flore ales 
Serves, vol. xxii. (1877) p. 2313. The Garden, vol. xiv. (1878) p. 200, 
t. 143. Gard. Ohron. 1880, vol. i. p. 245, fig. 47; 1882, voL i. p. 505, 
fig. 80. K. Koch, Dendrolog. vol. ii. p. 377. 



Though discovered in 1837 by Count Blagay, it is only 
comparatively lately that this most sweet-scented little 
Spurge-laurel has been introduced into cultivation in 
England, which was effected by Messrs. Veitch about 
twenty years ago. It belongs to the section Daphnanthes, 
C.A.M., characterized by the coriaceous persistent leaves, 
and terminal more or less capitate flowers, and is nearly 
allied to D. collina, Sm. (see Tab. 428) of the south of 
Europe, which is well distinguished by its villously silky 
branches, short bracts, and much shorter purple perianth. 
According to the analysis in Reichenbach's figure, the 
ovary is nearly sessile, but it is narrowed into a long 
stipes both in the cultivated specimen here figured and in 
indigenous ones. 

D. Blagayana is a native of calcareous rocks, in company 
with Erica carnea, in the Carinthian Alps of Carniola and 
Styria. It is now frequent in English gardens, flowering 
in March. 

Descr. — A small, laxly branched spreading shrub, a foot 

February 1st, 1898. 



and a half high ; branches as thick as a crow-quill, reddish- 
brown, naked except at the summit, where they are sparingly 
silky. Leaves one to one and a half inches long, crowded 
towards the tips of the branches, sessile, spreading, 
oblong-obovate or oblanceolate, obtuse or apiculate, cori- 
aceous, glabrous on both surfaces, dull dark green above, 
pale beneath ; nerves very obscure. Heads of flowers two 
inches across or more, terminal, sessile ; bracts as long as 
the perianth-tube, sessile, obovate-oblong, apiculate, mem- 
branous, pale green, silky, inner narrow. Perianth sessile, 
very pale straw-colrd., almost white, tube three-quarters 
of an inch long, sparsely silky ; lobes one-fourth of an 
inch long, ovate, obtuse, spreading. Stamens included, 
tips of the upper four on a level with the mouth of the 
perianth ; anthers linear-oblong. Dish membranous, about 
half as long as the stipes of the ovary. Ovary narrowed 
into a stipes as long as itself, oblong, silky, style very 
short, stigma capitate. Berry white. — J. D. R. 



Fig. 1, Perianth laid open; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4, pistil and disk:— All 
enlarged. 



A 



1580. 




..del, J"NFitd\lith 



Vincent. Brooks Day &.SanJ 






Tab. 7580. 
DASYSTACHYS Drimiopsis. 

Native of South-east Tropical Africa. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Tribe Asphodei/E;E. 
Genus Dasystachys, Baker; {Benih. & Boole, f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 789.) 



Dasystachys Drimiopsis; fibris radicalibus cylindricis, foliis rudimentariis 
dorso rubro-brunneo maculatis, foliis basalibua 5-6 linearibus viridibus 
recurvatis, pedunculo elongato simplici foliis floribus reductis prcedito, 
racemo denso subspicato oblongo, pedicellis brevissimis, bracteis brutineis 
e basi lata linearibus, perianthio eampanulato albo segmentis ovatis 
supra basin patulis, staminibus exsertis, stylo elongato, fructu acute 
angulato profunde trilobato. 

D. Dri miopsis, Baker, ex Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 789. 

Anthericum Drimiopsis, BaJcer in Journ. Linn. Soc- vol. xv. p. 301. 



This genus is very different in habit from Chlorophytum, 
with which Eng]er has united it. All the species have 
small flowers arranged in dense subspicate racemes. 
Fifteen species are now known, all of which are confined 
to the mountainous regions of Tropical Africa. This is 
the first of them which has been introduced into cultiva- 
tion. The living plant was brought to Kew in 1892, 
along with many others, by the late Mr. John Buchanan, 
O.M.G., who did so much to increase our knowledge of 
the botany of British Central Africa. It flowered at Kew 
for the first time in October, 1896, having been cultivated 
in a warm greenhouse. It was first collected in 1859 by 
Sir John Kirk, in the Zambesi valley, between Shupanga 
and Tette. 

Descr. — Root-fibres many, cylindrical. Sheath-leaves 
spotted on the back with claret-brown. Produced leaves 
about six in a dense basal rosette, linear, bright green, 
moderately firm in texture, the longest above a foot lono\ 
Peduncle terete, erect, two or three feet long, bearing 
several reduced leaves. Raceme very dense, subspicate, 
oblong, three or four inches long ; pedicels very short, not 
articulated; bracts reddish-brown, linear from a dilated 

Pbbb.ua.ky 1st, 1898. 



base. Perianth campanulate, pure white, one-sixth of an 
inch long ; segments ovate, spreading from above the base. 
Stamens exserted ; anthers small, oblong. Capsule acutely- 
angled, deeply three-lobed. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, A flower, with pedicel and bract ; 2, front view of anther ; 3, back 
view of anther ; 4, pistil : — all enlarged ; 5, the whole plant much reduced. 



7.581 







LRavee & C 



Tab. 7581. 
ANEMONE vernalis. 

Native of Mountains of Europe. 



Nat. Ord. Eanunculace^:.— Tribe Anemone*. 
Genus Anemone, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 4.) 



Anemone (Pulsatilla) vernalis ; acaulis, foliis ovatis pinnatisectis, segmentis 
paucis oppositis sessilibus cuneatis v. cuneato-oblanceolatis irregulariter 
3-5-fidis glabris v. laxe pilosis, scapo robusto plus minusve villoso nnifloro, 
involucri villosissimi bracteis sessilibus in segmenta linearia brunnea ad 
basin parti tis, floribus amplis erectis, sepalis 6 elliptico-oblongis obtusis 
concavis dorso villosis pallide lilacinis, staminibus perplurimis extirais 
imperfectis, acheniis villosis in caudas sericeo-villosas graciles productis. 

A. vernalis, Linn. Sp. PI. p. 538. Ait. Hort. Keit\ Ed. 2, vol. iii. p. 337. 

(Eder, Fl. Dan. vol. i. tab. 29. Palmstr. Svensk. Bot. vol. x. t. 337. 

DC. Syst. vol. i. p. 189; Prodr. vol. i. p. 16. Sturm, Deutsch. Flor. vol. 

vi. t. 24 Koch, Syn. Fl. Germ. Ed. 2, p. 7. Gren. & Godr. Fl. Franc. 

vol. i. p. 10. Bertol. Fl. Ital, vol. v. p. 461. Ledeb. Fl. Ross, vol.i. p. 20. 

Joum. Horticult. Ser. 3, vol. xxxii. p. 223. 
Pulsatilla vernalis, Mill. Diet. Anem. No. 3, Lessing in Linnsea, vol. ix. 

(1834) p. 171. Sweet, Brit. Fl, Gard. Ser. I. vol. iii. t. 205. Beirhb. Ic. 

Fl. Germ. vol. iv. t. 59. 



The most curious fact in the history of this beautiful 
plant is that it is not a native of the British Islands, for 
it has a very wide range as an alpine and subalpine plant 
throughout Europe and in North Asia, ascending to 
eight thousand feet in the Alps. Its limits are in the 
West from Norway and Sweden to Central France and the 
Pyrenees ; further East, from Saxony and Livonia to the 
Swiss, Austrian, and Italian Alps ; and still further East 
(according to Ledebour) from the Ural Mts. to Tobolsk in 
Siberia. Thus extending through 20° of latitude and 75° of 
longitude. Its nearest ally is the British A. Pulsatilla. 

Anemone vernalis was introduced into England before 
1752, at which period it was cultivated by Phillip Miller 
at Chelsea. According to Robinson's " Alpine Plants for 
English Gardens," it is rare, and seldom seen in good con- 
dition in this country. The specimen figured here was of 
a pot plant grown in the Herbaceous Department of the 
February 1st, 1898. 



Royal Gardens, which flowered in the middle of March in 
the very early season of 1897. 

Descr. — A more or less hairy or villous perennial. 
Leaves radical, three to five inches long, long-petioled, 
ovate in outline, pinnatisect, pinnules two to three pairs 
with an odd one, opposite, cuneiform, three- to five-lobed ; 
terminal largest, three-cleft, lobes obtuse toothed. 
Peduncle stout, erect, one-fld., green ; involucres an inch 
long, bracts brown, shaggy, cleft to the base into narrow, 
erect, linear segments. Flower erect, or slightly inclined. 
Sepals six, subequal, spreading and incurved, elliptic, 
obtuse, nearly white and glabrous within, dorsally violet- 
purple, with a broad white margin, villous with long 
hairs. Stamens very many, in a dense, globose head; 
anthers small, yellow, those of the outer stamens imperfect. 
Ripe achenes oblong, villous, produced into a long, slender, 
silkily villous tail. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Stamen; 2, 3, 4, imperfect do.: — all enlarged; 5, ovary of the n at. 
size; 6, achene with atyle, enlarged. 



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Tab. 7577.— RICHARDIA ELLIOTTIANA. 
„ 7578.— PAPHIOPEDLLUM CHAMBERLAINIANUM. 
„ 7579.— DAPHNE BLAGAYANA. 
„ 7580.— DASYSTACHYS DRIMIOPSIS. 
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7582 






L Reeve &_C?London. 






Tab. 7582. 

CAMPTOSEMA pinnatum. 

Native of Brazil. 



Nat Ord. Leguminos^e. — Tribe Phaseole^e. 

Genus OaMPTOsema, Hook. & Am.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. 

p. 536.) 



G&mptqsfma pinnaium ; frutex 3-5-pedalis, parce ramosus, glaberrimus, foliis 
alteniis pefciolatis 16-18 poll, longis ; foliolis 3-jugis cum impari, 6-7 poll, 
longis, petiolulatis, ovatis, caudato-acuminatis, petiolo basi incrassato, 
racemo brevi densifloro, rhachi robusto, rioribus breviterpedicellatis fascicu- 
latis nutantibus, calyce § poll, longo late tubuloso basi rotundato glabro, 
dentibuB brevissimis latis obtusis, vexillo 2-pollicari oblongo obtuso 
complicato in unguem i poll, longum angustato nee appendicnlato nee basi 
calloso, alis vexillo fere aequilongis falcato-oblongis obtusis basi cuneatis 
longe unguiculatis, carinas petalis vexillo sequilongie sed angustioribus 
rectis, staminibus monadelphis vexillari a basi soluto, antheris linearibus, 
ovario longinscule stipitato glabro 8-10-ovulato, stylo gracili recto, 
stigmate capitellato, legumine plano-compresso 7 poll, longo 2 poll, lato, 
seminibns pollicaribus reniformibns. 

C. ? pinnatum, Benth. in Mart. Fl. Bras. vol. xv. para. I. p. 325. Wawra, 
Bot. Frgebn. Max. I. p. 6, t. 33. 

Piscidia erythrina, Veil. Fl. Flum. vol. vii. t. 100, text. 304 (non Linn.). 

GoKANl-timbo, Bras. 



Camptosema is a genus of ten tropical South American 
species, belonging to the subtribe Qalactiem of Phaseolese, 
closely allied to Ganavalia and Pueraria. One species has 
been figured in this work, tab. G. rubicundum, Hook. & 
Arn. (tab. 6808) a handsome climber, with small trifoliolate 
leaves, and with long racemes of ruby-red flowers, not 
half the size of those of C. pinnatum. 

C. pinnatum is a native of shady woods, banks of rivers, 
&c, in the Province of Miuas Geraes, Brazil. 

The accompanying figure was made from a plant raised 
from seed sent in 1888 by Dr. Glaziou, Director of the 
Botanical Gardens of Rio de Janeiro, to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, which flowered in the Palm House in July, 1897. 

Descr. — A woody shrub, three to five feet high, glabrous 
in all its parts. Leaves one to one and a half feet long, 
alternate, shortly petioled ; leaflets three pairs and a ter- 
minal, shortly petiolulate, drooping, six to seven inches long 
Makch 1st, 1898. 



by two to three inches broad, oblong or ovate-oblong, 
obtusely caudate-acuminate, base rounded, membranous, 
bright green, paler beneath, nerves six to eight pairs ; 
petiole with a swollen cylindric base, and slender rhachis, 
grooved above. Floivers two inches long, in a short, stout 
raceme, two to three inches long from the old wood ; bracts 
small, deciduous ; pedicels short. Calyx one half to two- 
thirds of an inch long, cylindric, terete, very shortly five- 
toothed, greenish purple ; base rounded. Petals pale, 
bright red-purple, of nearly equal length, straight, narrow, 
obtuse ; standard oblong, narrowed into a slender claw, 
dorsally rounded, sides incurved, wings dimidiate-oblong, 
subfalcate, claw long, slender ; keel-petals like the wings, 
but straight er, as long-clawed. Stamens ten, nine united 
for two-thirds their length in a narrow tube, tenth very 
slender, free ; anthers very small, linear-oblong. Ovary 
stipitate, very slender, narrowed into a filiform straight 
style, with a minute stigma, many-ovuled. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and stamens; 2, wing petal; 3, keel-petal; 4, ovary and 
disk : — All enlarged ; 5, reduced view of leafing branch. 



7583 




Vt. S-del i 



TfinccrctB i 



- &C? London 



Tab. 7583. 
ERYTHRONIUM H&rtwuh. 

Native of California. 



Nat. Ord. Liliace.h. — Tribe Tulipe.u. 

Genus Erythronium^ Linn.; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol iii 

p. 819.) 



Erythronium Hartwegi; tubere parvo ovato-oblongo, foliis oblongo-lan- 
ceolatis _ oblanceolatisve supra saturate viridibus striis pallidioribua 
laxe reticulatim notatis, noribus 1-3 amplis, perianthii segmentis H-2- 
pollicaribus lanceolatis acuminatis patenti-recurvis albis basin versus 
bicarinatis aureis, filamentis quam autberas lineares stramineas multoties 
brevioribus, ovario parvo obovoideo-oblongo triquetro-stylo columnari 
breviore. 

E. Hartwegi, S. Wats, in Proc. Amer. Acad. vol. xiv. (1879) p. 261 ; Bot. 
Calif, vol. ii. p. 170. Card. Chron. 1896, vol. ii. p. 361. 

E. grandiflorum, Benth. Plant. Hartweg. p. 339 (non Pursh.). 



Erythronium Hartwegi is very closely allied to E. grandi- 
florum, Pursh.. of Washington Territory and Northern 
California, of which the leaves are not mottled, the 
perianth segments strongly recurved, yellow, or cream- 
coloured, and the filaments longer and more slender. It is a 
native of the Sierra Nevada, where it was discovered in 
Butte County by Hartweg, and in Plumas County, and 
other localities. 

The genus Erythronium, of which there are seven 
generally recognized species, several doubtful, and many 
spurious, is greatly in need of a careful study and 
illustration by good drawings. This can only be effected 
through cultivation, for the characters, of the flower espe- 
cially, are more or less obliterated in herbarium speci- 
mens. There are various obscure forms in North- 
West America, which is no doubt the headquarters of 
the genus, and I would strongly recommend them to the 
attention of the Botanists, and especially the Botanic 
Gardens, of California. 

The handsome species here figured has for a long period 
been in cultivation at Kew, where it flowers in an open 

March 1st, 1898. 



border in March. The individual specimen was from a 
pot plant, grown in a frame. 

Descr. — Whole plant four to six inches high. Tubers 
small, ovoid-oblong. Leaves sessile, inserted close to- 
gether, about four inches long, lanceolate, acuminate, 
undulate, narrowed to the sheathing base, dark green 
above, with paler green areolar reticulations, uniformly 
green beneath. Scapes one or two, slender, one-fld. 
Floivers about three inches in diameter. Perianth-segments 
spreading and recurved, white, pale golden-yellow at the 
base. Stamens almost included in the connivent bases of 
the segments, filaments very short ; anthers linear, straw- 
coloured. Ovary small, obovoid-oblong, trigonous, shorter 
than the columnar style ; stigmas three, shortly linear, 
revolute. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Base of perianth segment, seen from within ; 2, stamen ; 3, anther 
— All enlarged. 



7584- 




KSdaUKfitchlith 



'focentBrooks.Day &.SonImp 



L "Reeve & C^-London 



Tab. 7584. 
DRACAENA Godseffiana. 
Native of the Coast of Guinea. 

Nat". Ord. Liliacea:.— Tribe Dracaene;e. 
' ; enu8 Dracaena, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 779.) 



Dracaena (Surculosse) Godseffiana ; frntex diffusus rauiosns, ramis gracilibus 
subverticillatis, foliis oppositis v. lernatim verticillatis submembranaceis 
ellipticis acuminatis basi acutis in petiolum brevissimum angustatis albo 
maculatis, racemo brevi breviter pedunculato e ramulo dependente ascen- 
dente, floribus pollicaribus ternatim fasciculatis breviter pedicellatis, 
bracteis lanceolitis membranaceis pedicellos sequantibus, bracteolis 2 
minutiy, perianthii navo-virescentis tubo gracili basi clavato, lobis tubo 
paullo brevioribus linearibus obtusis, filamentis lobis perianthii eequi- 
longis, antheris oblongip, stylo gracili exserto, baccis ^— § poll. diam. 
globosis coccineis. 

D. Godseffiana, Sort. Sander, ex Baker in Gard. Qhron. 1894, vol. ii. p. 212. 
Southron in The Garden, 1896, p. 276, ic Xylog. 



There are in tropical Western Africa a considerable 
number of species of Dracaena, differing in habit from 
their congeners, in having slender scandent, or at least 
rambling, branching stems. Of these the type is 
D. surculosa, Lindl., a spotted-leaved variety of which 
is figured at tab. 5662 of this work ; and there are others 
described and undescribed, which will be published in the 
forthcoming volume of the " Flora of Tropical Africa," a 
work now far advanced by the staflf of the Herbarium of 
Kew. Of these D. surculosa is that to which D. Godseffiana 
is most nearly allied, the great difference between them 
being in the almost capitate inflorescence of D. surculosa. 
Both vary considerably in the form and spotting of the 
leaves. .D. Godseffiana was first sent to Kew in 1892, by 
Mr. Henry Millen, Curator of the Botanical Station at 
Lagos. It was subsequently imported by Messrs. Sander 
& Co. of St. Albans. It forms a very decorative stove 
shrub, flowering in March. 

Descr. — A slender, rambling, branched, subscandent 
shrub ; stem flexuous, about as thick as a crow-quill, pale 
brown, annulate. Leaves three to nearly five inches long, 
opposite, or ternately whorled, very shortly petioled, elliptic 

March 1st, 1898 



or elliptic-oblong or -lanceolate, acuminate, base acute, 
membranous, many-nerved, with a distinct midrib, bright 
green above, with irregularly disposed orbicular large and 
small white spots, paler beneath. Racemes two to three 
inches long, ascending from the tips of the drooping 
branches, peduncle short, with lanceolate, membranous, 
erect bracts, rhachis green ; flowers nearly an inch 
long, in rather distant clusters of three each ; pedicels 
slender, a sixth to a fourth of an inch long, with one 
membranous, lanceolate white bract, and two minute ones 
at its base. Perianth pale green, tube very slender in the 
middle, gradually enlarged to the clavate base and infundi- 
bular limb, which latter is formed of six linear obtuse lobes 
as long as the tube. Stamens nearly as long as the perianth- 
lobes, anthers oblong. Ovary ovoid, style very slender, 
stigma minute. Berries globose, vermilion-red, one half 
to two-thirds of an inch in diameter. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2 and 3, anthers ; 4, pistil ; 5, transverse section of ovary :— 
All enlarged. 



7585 




M.S.de". JNFitchlith 



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.L Reeve &. C 9 London. 



Tab. 7585. 
HACQUETIA Epipactis, 

Native of South Europe and Siberia. 



Nat. Ord. Umbellifer*:. — Tribe Sanicules. 
Genus Hacquetia, Neck. (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 879.) 



Hacquetia Epipactis; glaberrima, rhizoraate pramorso, collo aquaraoso, foliis 
radicalisms longe petiolatis palmatim 3-partitis segmentis cuneiformibus 
serrulatis, lateralibus triangularibus rotundatisve insequilateris sub- 
5-lobis, intermedio angustiore cuneiforme 3-5-lobo, lobis omnibus 
triangulari-ovatis, scapis 2-5 petiolo subsequilongis, capitulis parvis 
multifloris fojiaceo-bracteatis, bracteis 5-10 oblongis stellatim patentibus 
grosse serratis, floribus aliis sessilibus hermaphroditis aliis pedicellatis 
masculis, calycis dentibus ovatis acuminatis, petalis erectis obovatis 
lacinula infracta elongata instructis, filamentis filiformibus petalis 
sequilongis, stylis (in fl. masc. imperfectis) elongatis, fructa ellipsoideo 
laevi bi-sulcato, carpophoro obscuro, pericarpio crassiusculo jugis 
inconspicuis, vittis intra juga 3-5. 

H. Epipactis, DG. Prodr. vol. iv. p. 85. Koch, Syn. Fl. Germ. Ed. II. p. 280. 
Bertol. Fl. Ital. vol. iii. p. 118. Parlat. Fl. Ital. vol. viii. p. 222. 
Reichb. Fl. Germ. Ic. vol. xxi. t. 1842. Bischoff in T. Nees, Gen. Fl. 
Germ,fasc. xxvi. t. 3 (Haquetia). Ces. Pass. Gib. Gomp. Fl. Ital. p. 57 5, 
t. 90, f . 4. r v , 

Dondia Epipactis, Spreng. Umbell. Prodr. p. 21, t. 1. Lodd. Bot. Cab 
t. 1832. Gaud. Fl. Helvet. vol. ii. p. 302, t. 3. 

Dondisia Epipactis, Reichb. in Moessl. Handb. Ed. II. vol. i. p. 493. 
Astrantia Epipactis, Linn. fil. Suppl. p. 177. Scop. Fl. Camiol. Ed. II. 
vol. i. p. 185, t. 6. J acq. Fl. Austriac. vol. v. p. 32, App. t. 11. 

Hacquetia, Neck. Elem. vol. i. p. 182. 

Alpina Eleborine Saniculae et Ellebori nigri facie, Label, Stirp. Hist. (1756) 
378, cum, icy in 1c. Stirp. (1591) p. 164 iterata. 



A singular and rare little European Umbellifer, allied to 
Astrantia in habit, but differing in the terete fruit. It is 
a native of mountain regions in Northern Italy, and in 
Austria, from Silesia to Carinthia and Transylvania. 
Et was named Hacquetia by Necker, in commemo- 
ration of the botanist, Balthasar Hacquet, author of 
" Plantae Alpinas CarniolicaB " (Vienna, 1782). The specific 
name of Epipactis owes its origin to Lobel, who first 
figured the plant, having likened it to Helleborus niger, 
the Eleborine of early herbalists, and eViTra/cTis of 
Dioscorides. 

March 1st, 1898. 



Hacqutitia Epipactis has long been in cultivation in Kew, 
flowering in March, but of its introduction there is no 
record. It is not included in Alton's " Hortus Kewensis " 
(1811), nor in more recent catalogues of garden plants. 

Descr. — A perennial-rooted, quite glabrous, scapigerous 
herb. Rootstoch elongate, praamorse, cylindric, rugose, 
copiously rooting ; crown emitting leaves and scapes, the 
bases of which are clothed with short scales. Leaves on 
slender, often red petioles, three to six inches long, 
palmately tripartite, circular in outline, and two to four 
inches in diameter, bright green ; segments shortly lobed 
and sharply serrulate, lateral orbicular, subflabellately 
triangular, unequally five- or more-lobed, formed of two 
connate segment ; mid-segments much narrower, cunei- 
form three to five-lobed. Scapes two or more, angular, 
about as long and slender as the petioles. Umbels one to 
two inches in diameter, of a small group of yellow flowers, 
surrounded by an involucre of five to ten stellately spread- 
ing, oblong, strongly serrate, green, herbaceous bracts. 
Flowers minute, crowded on a small receptacle, pedicelled 
males and sessile hermaphrodite intermixed. Calyx-teeth 
acuminate. Petals erect, oblong, inflected for two-thirds 
of their length. Stamens about as long as the petals. 
Fruit nearly terete, grooved at the commissure ; carpels 
with five low ridges, each with a solitary canal. Styles 
long, slender, recurved. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of umbel ; 2, Mower ; 3, petal ; 4, fruit ; 5, mericarp seen from 
the ventral face ; 6, transverse section of mericarp : — All enlarged. 



7586 




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Tab. 7586. 
EPIDENDRUM xanthtnum. 

Native of Brazil. 

Nat. Ord. Obchide.e. — Tribe EpidexdrE/E. 
Genus Epidendbttm, Linn.; (Benth. 8c Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 528.) 



Epidendrtjm (Euepidendrum) teantkinitm ; caulibus casspitosis elongatis 
gracilibus polyphyllis, foliis distichis 3-4-pollicaribus lineari-oblougis 
obtusis v. apice obtuse 2-dentatis carnosis, pedunculo caule continuo et 
sequilongo gracili decurvo per totam longitudinem vaginato apice multi- 
floro, floribus xantbinis in racemnm multiflorum congestis, bracteis 
snbulatis persistentibus, sepalis petalisque consimilibus patentibus 
oblongo-lanceolatis acutis, labello usque ad apicem columnae adnato 
3-lobo, lobis snbasqualibus patentibus fere ad medium laceratis, lateralibns 
quadratis, terminate subflabelliforme 2-fido, disco basi callo lato depresso 
4-lobo etalis 2parvis carnosulis instructo, columna aurantiaca, clinandrio 
parvo marginibus serratis, anthera ovoidea rostrata. 

E. xanthinnm, Lindl. in Bot. Beg. 1844, Misc. p. 18 ; Fol. Orchid. Epiden. ? 

No. 229. Walp. Ann. vol. vi. p. 395. Veitch. Man. Orchid. Pars. vi. 

p. 127, cum Ic. 
E. ellipticum, /3 flavnm, Lindl. in Ann. Nat. Hist. vol. iv. (1810) p. 382. 



Epidendrum xanthinum was discovered by Von Martius 
on the Sierra del Frio, in the province of Minas G-eraes. 
It was afterwards collected in the same province by 
Burchell, and more recently (in 1840) by Gardner, who had 
previously (1837) found it in the Organ Mountains, near 
Rio de Janeiro. 

According to Reich enbach in " Walper's Annales," it 
was cultivated in Loddiges' Nurseries, having been brought 
from Caraccas by Linden, but this is no doubt an 
error. It belongs to Lindley's section Euepidendrum, 
characterized by long, leafy stems, without pseudobulbs or 
spathe. It has long been in cultivation in the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, where it forms a bamboo-like tuft, in the 
cool Orchid House, flowering freely in spring. 

Deser. — Stems tufted, one and a half to three feet hi^h. 
as thick as a goose-quill, sub-erect, except when flowering, 
leafy throughout, greenish brown. Leaves distichous, 
uniform, three to four inches long, spreading, linear-oblong, 
obtuse, or tip minutely two-toothed, thickly coriaceous, 

March 1st, 1898. 



bright green above, paler and keeled beneath with a few 
faint nerves parallel to the keel. Peduncle continuous 
with the stem, and nearly as long, decurved, with the 
flowering tip ascending, clothed with rather tumid, pale 
purple and green, appressed, narrowly oblong sheaths one 
to one and a half inches long ; upper part covered with 
subulate, suberect flowerless bracts, a quarter to half an 
inch long. Racemes sub-capitate, two inches in diameter, 
of very many, densely crowded, golden-yellow flowers 
three-quarters of an inch in diameter. Sepals narrowly 
oblong, sub-acute. Petals as long, sub-rhomboidly obovate, 
acute. Lip adnate to the column throughout the length 
of the latter; lobes spreading, sub-pectinately lacerate 
nearly to the middle into subulate lobes ; side-lobes sub- 
quadrate, terminal broadly fan-shaped, two-cleft, disk with 
a broad, depressed four-lobed callus, and two small lobu- 
late wings adnate to the bases of the side-lobes. Column 
orange-yellow ; clinandrium small, with erose margins, 
anther very small, turgidly ovate, acuminate. — J. D. II. 

Fig. 1, Sepal; 2,. lip and column; 3, anther; 4 and 5, pollinia :-aU 
enlarged ; G, plan*, reduced. 



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Tab. 7582.— CAMPTOSEMA PINNATUM. 
„ 7583.— ERYTHRONIUM HARTWEGI. 
„ 7584.— DRACAENA GODSEFFIANA. 
„ 7585.— HACQUETIA EPIPACTIS. 
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7681 




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7588 







.&.C? I 



Tab. 7587-8. 
ALLIUM Schuberti. 

Native of Western Asia. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace^. — Tribe Allied. 
Genus Allium, Linn. ; (Benih. & Hoolt.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 802.) 



Allium (Molium) Schuberti ; bulbo crasso ovoideo v. subgloboso, foliis radi- 
calibus pedalibus 2-poll. latis patentibns late lorato-lanceolatis planis 
plus minus undulatis marginibns scaberulis, scapo foliis breviore terite 
crasso nudo, spatha brevi 2-3-valvi, umbella amplissima globosa 50-200- 
flora saepiuspolygama, pedicellis rigidis flores multoties longioribus valde 
inaequalibus longioribus sterilibus 6-10-poll. longis, brevioribus 2-4- 
poll. longis omnibus apicem versus sensim incrassatis, floribus § poll, 
expansis roseis, segmentis ima basi connatis lanceolatis acutis stamina 
fere duplo snperantibus patnlis post anthesin suberectis, filauientis basi 
connatis subnlatis rubris, antheris oblorigis stramiDeis, ovario obovoideo 
3-lobo, loculis 1-3-spermis, seminibus magnis trigonis atris opacis. 

A. Schuberti, Zuccarini in Abh. Bayer. Alcad. vol. iii. (1843) p. 234, t. 3, f. 1. 
Kunih, Enum. PI. vol. iv. p. 689. Begel, Monog. Allium, p. 239; All. 
Sp As. Centr. pp. 21, 117. Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. v, p. 279. Wien. III. 
Qartenzeit. 1895, p. 283, f. 26. 



This very remarkable species of Allium has an ex- 
tended geographical distribution in Western Asia, from 
Syria and Palestine to Mesopotamia, North Persia, Soon- 
garia, and Western Turkestan. It belongs to a very small 
group of the genus, characterized by having more than two 
ovules in each cell of the ovary, to which the name of 
Melanocrommyum was given by its author (Webb et Berth. 
Phyt. Canar. iii. III. 347) from the fact of A. nigrum, L., 
being the species on which the section was founded. In 
the more generally adopted sectional grouping of Allium, 
A. Schuberti is referred to Molium, which includes those 
species of the huge genus in which the scape and base of 
the leaves are underground, the leaves approximately flat, 
the involucral bracts shorter than the pedicels, and the 
filaments usually simple. As a species A. Schuberti is 
unrivalled for the length of .the pedicels, which, together 
with the colour of the flowers, and broad, long leaves, 
render it a very striking horticultural object. A, 
April 1st, 1898. 



Schuberti was discovered in the Plain of Jezreel, near 
Nazareth, by the traveller whose name it bears. Bulbs of 
it were received by the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1896, 
from Messrs. Herb & "Wulle, Nurserymen, Naples, which 
flowered in a sunny border in June, 1897. 

Descr. — Bulb as large as the fist, or larger, subterranean, 
sub-globose or ovoid. Leaves a foot long by two inches 
broad and upwards, widely spreading, broadly oblong- or 
lorate-lanceolate, acuminate, flat, pale, bright green, 
striated. Scape shorter than the leaves, half an inch in 
diameter, terete, hollow, green. Umbels very large, 
globose, very many-fld. (up to 200) ; involucre of two or 
three bracts much shorter than the shorter pedicels. 
Pedicels very unequal, strict, rigid, thickening gradually 
upwards, the longer up to ten inches long, with sterile 
flowers ; the shorter two to four inches long, with perfect 
flowers. Perianth about two-thirds of an inch broad ; 
segments shortly united at the base, lanceolate, spreading, 
rigid and erect after flowering, rose-red. Stamens shorter 
than the perianth segments, filaments connate at the base, 
simple, subulate, red; anthers oblong, straw-coloured. 
Ovary obovoid, 3-lobed, cells 3- or more-ovuled. — J. D. H. 



Tab. 7587, a quadrant of the umbel of A. Schuberti, and fig. 1 ripe fruL 
of nat. size 

Tab. 7588 ; fig. 1, leaf, of nat. size ; 2, reduced figure of whole plant j 
3, flower ; 4, pistil, both enlarged. 



75M* 







M.S daUN Filch IitK 



Vmceni Bro aVs,D ay « 



Tab. 7589. 
MYOSOTIS DISSITIFLORA, var. Dyerm. 
Native of Switzerland ? 



Nat. Ord. Boragine^e. — Tribe Borages. 
Grenns Myosotis, Linn. ; {Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 858.) 



Myosotis (Stropbiostoma) dissitiflora ; tota pilis gracilibus erectis patulisve 
obsita, rhizomate repente, foliis inferioribns petiolatis ellipticis spatbula- 
tisve acutis apiculatisve, caulinis sessilibus oblotigis ovato-oblongisve, 
racemis elongatis laxifloris, pedicellis ascendentibus calyce inultoties 
long;ioribus, oalycis tubo pilis simplicibas erectis vestito, segmentis 
lanceolatis tubo triplo longioribus, corollae limbo patulo tubum longe 
excedente, ore piloso, antheris apiculatis, nuculis ovatis acutis dorso vix 
carinatis atris nitidis basi stipite albo crasso auctis. 

M. dissitiflora, Baker in Gard. Chron. 1868, vol. i. p. 599 ; 1882, vol. i. p. 307, 
f. 44. 

M. montana, Hort. (non Besser). 

Var. Dyeras, B. J. Lowe ; elatior, floribus majoribus, corollas limbo £ poll, 
expans. 



It is a singular fact, that nothing should be known of 
the history of the beautiful and popular Myosotis dissiti- 
flora, than that it was brought from Switzerland more than 
thirty years ago, by the late Mr. Atkins of Painswick, 
so well known as the successful cultivator of Cyclamens. 
Mr. Atkins was, as I am informed by his friend Mr. 
Baker (the author of the species), a very intelligent botanist, 
possessing an extensive collection of rare and interesting 
plants that were ticketed with scrupulous accuracy ; and 
it is much to be regretted that of the present plant in 
particular he could give no further account. What is to 
me still more surprising is, that though thirty years have 
elapsed since the publication of the species, during which 
interval M. dissitiflora has become one of the most common 
of garden plants, I can find no other reference to it in 
botanical or illustrated horticultural works than that which 
I have cited. 

Though closely resembling in habit and general appear- 
ance the well-known M. alpestris, Schm., and sylvatica, 
Hoffm., M. dissitiflora belongs to a very different section 
of the genus from these, characterized by the nutlets 
being provided with a stout white stipes at the base, 
April 1st, 1898. 



derived from the receptacle. There are but few species of 
this section, all of which are Eastern European or Western 
Asiatic. Of this the only one that approaches M. dissiti- 
ilora is M. amwna, Rupr., a native of the Caucasus, which 
has similar rooting habit, foliage, indumentum and long 
pedicelled flowers, but these are very small, and in the 
absence of nutlets I am unable to say whether ^ or not 
M. amoena (published by Boissier, U F1. Orient.," iv. 241) 
ten years later than dissitiflora, may not be referable to 
this species. Should this prove to be the case, it would 
follow, that if brought from Switzerland, itmust have 
been from a garden. 

The effect of long cultivation of M. dissitiflora has 
resulted in a very great enlargement of the whole plant, 
and of the corolla in particular, from about a quarter of an 
inch in the specimens preserved in the Kew Herbarium at 
the date of the publication of the species, to that shown in 
our plate. The latter represents a very luxuriant form, 
received at the Royal Gardens from E. J. Lowe, Esq., 
E.R.S., of Shirenewton Hall, Chepstow, who desires that 
it should commemorate the interest in horticulture taken 
by Mrs. Thiselton-Dyer, who, during her visits to the 
Alps, has contributed many rare and interesting plants to 
the Royal Gardens. 

Descr. — A rather straggling branching biennial or 
perennial, sparsely clothed all over with soft, erect, or sub- 
erect hairs. Lower leaves petioled, one to two inches 
long, elliptic or spathulate, acute or apiculate, narrowed 
into a petiole an inch long or more ; upper leaves sessile, 
oblong, or ovate-oblong. Racemes elongate, slender, laxly 
many-fld. ; pedicels one half to one inch long, sub-erect. 
Calyx one-sixth of an inch long, tube short, and lanceo- 
late segments clothed with erect straight hairs. Corolla- 
tube about as long as the calyx, mouth hairy within ; limb 
one-fourth to upwards of half an inch broad, flat, lobes 
rounded, sky-blue, yellow at the mouth. Anthers with 
the connective terminating in a blunt process. Nutlets 
ovate, acute, dorsally convex, obscurely keeled, black, 
shining, provided at the base with a short, stout, white 
pedicel. — J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Calyx ; 2, corolla laid open ; 3, anther ; 4, ovary ; 5, 6, and 7, nutlets : 
—AU enlarged. 



7SS0 




MS.del JUEtdxlith 



"tfi\cen.tBrooks,Day &5onIit! 



X Reeve &. G9 London. 






Tab. 7590. 

CROCUS Malyi. 

Native of Dalmatia. 



Nat. Ord. Teide^:. — Tribe Moejse k. 
Genus Crocus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. ifi. p. 693.) 



Crocus (Involucrati) Malyi ; cormo brevi oblate pyriforme, tunicas fibria 
filiformibus parallelis paulo infra apices reticularis, vaginis spatha bre- 
vioribus, foliis glabris i-^-poll. latis florentibus tabum corollas paullo 
superantibus maturis pedalibus, corollas tubo 3-pollicari albo, fauce 
flavida intus pilis aurantiacis barbata, limbi segmentis l^-poll. longis 
albis, staminibus aurantiacis, antheris qnam filamenta duplo longioribus, 
stylo aurantiaco ultra apices filamentoruin 3-fido, lobis fissis, capsula f -polL 
longa, seminibus rufo-brunneis. 

C. Malyi, Visiani, Fl. Dalmat. Suppl. p. 181. Maw in Gard. Chron. 1881, 
vol. ii. p. 303 ; in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xix. (1882) pp. 364, 372 ; Munog. 
Gen. Crocus, p. 127, t. 18. Baker, Handb. of Irid. p. 83. The Garden, 
vol. xxi. p. 67- 



A native of the Dalmatian mountains, Monte Vermay 
and Monte Orjen, above the Bocco de Cattaro, alt. 7260 
ft., where it was discovered by Herr Maly more than half 
a century ago. It belongs, according to Maw's classifica- 
tion, to the spring-flowering section of the involucrate 
group of the genus, and to the sub-division having 
the fibres of the tunics of the corm free, or reticulating 
only in the upper part. In Mr. Baker's " Handbook," 
where the species are arranged under three sections, 
according as the style-arms are entire or more or less 
cleft, it is placed in the section Holostigma, in which these 
are entire ; but I think it should preferably be placed under 
Odontostigma, in which they are variously cleft, though not 
cut into the capillary lobes of sect. Schizostigma. The 
general aspect of the plant is that of C. vernus, from which 
it differs in the bright golden throat of the perianth, and 
the parallel fibres of the corm tunic. 

The Royal Gardens are indebted for corms of this species 

to Mr. Maw, who, when preparing his most beautiful 

Monograph of the genus (published in 1886) presented and 

planted with his own hand in the herbaceous grounds, a 

April 1st, 1898. 



very complete collection of Croci, many of them collected 
by himself during his various expeditions in the South of 
Europe and North of Africa in search of bulbous plants. 
It flowers annually in an open border in the month of 
March. 

Descr. — Corms about three-fourths of an inch in 
diameter, broadly pear-shaped; fibres of coat filiform, 
parallel, reticulated below the summit. Sheaths below the 
leaves six or seven. Leaves four to five, about one-fifth 
of an inch broad, reaching to about the throat of the 
flower, fruiting fifteen inches long, keel about one-fourth 
the breadth of the blade, faces concave. Proper spathes 
one or two. Flowering scape about two inches long. 
Perianth-tube about three inches long, white or straw- 
coloured, throat yellow, with a fringe of golden hairs 
within at the base of the filaments ; lobes one and a half 
inches long, white. Stamens orange-yellow, both filament 
and anthers, the latter more than twice as long as the 
anthers. Style orange-yellow, cleft from the tip down to 
the position of the tips of the anthers, into three irregularly 
toothed and cleft stigmas. Capsule three-fourths of an 
inch long. Seeds about one-sixth of an inch Ions red- 
brown.— J. D. H. 



fh51 g ; *' ,f e ? i0n ° f I eaf; 2 'P r °P er sheaths; 3 and 4, portions of perianth- 
throat and stamens; 5, top of style and stigmas; 6, stigma -.-All enlarged 



7691 




\5ncent 1 1 



LRee-re &.C°Lon.don 



Tab. 7591. 

RHEUM Ribes. 

Native of the mountains of Western Asia. 



Nat. Ord. PoLYGONACEiE. — Tribe Rumice^e. 
Genus Rheum, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 100.) 



Rheum Pibes; caule elato crasso inferne folioso superne aphyllo in paniculam 
amplam fastigiatim ramosam abennte, foliis latis sub-breviter petiolatis 
amplis sub-cordato-orbi -ulatis reniformibusve sub-qmnquenerviis supra 
laete viridibus inter nervos depressos tumidis, subtus pallidis inter nervos 
validos papilloso-scabros lacanosip, marginibus nndulato-crispatis, petiolis 
laminae sub-aaquilongis rubris, paniculas rubra? rachi rainisque erectis 
grosse papillosis, pedicellis filiformibus dense fasciculatis infra medium 
articulatis decurvis, floribus \ in. diam. pendulis, perianthii viridis 
Begmentis oblongis obtusis, staminibus numerosis, antheris rubris, 
achenio fere pollicari ovato-cordato carnoso demum sanguineo, alis semine 
2-3-plo angustioribus. 

R. Ribes, Linn. Sp. PI. p. 372 (1753). Gronov. Fl. Orient, p. 130. LamJc. 
EncycL vol. vi. p. 195. Desf. in Ann. Mus. Par. vol. ii. (1803) p. 261, 
t. 49. Ait. Hort. Kew. ed. 1, vol. ii. p. 42. Meissn. in DC. Prodr. vol. xiv. 
p. 35. Jaub. & Spach, III. PL Orient, vol. v. t. 470. Boiss. Fl. Orient. 
vol. iv. p. 1003. 

Lapatbum orientale, <fec, Billen. Hort. Eltham. 191, t. 158, f. 192 (1732). 
PococJe Fl. Orient. 189, t. 84. Breyne Ephem. Acad. Nat. Cur. Cent. 
vii. p. 7. 

Ribes arabum, Rauw. in Aig. Beschr. Eaiss., p. 266, 282 (1583). Bauh. Pinax, 
p. 455(1623). 



The plant here figured is a very old inhabitant of 
European Botanical Gardens, and, according to Dillenius, 
was cultivated by Sherard, presumably at Eltham, in 
1724. It was discovered by Rauwolf, during his travels in 
the East in 1573-5, whose collections, now at Levden, 
were published by Gronovius, under the title of " Flora 
Orien talis," in 1755, p. 49. Rauwolf published an Itinerary 
of his journey (which was translated into English by 
Staphorst in 1693), also a work on medicinal plants in 
1583. He was a native of Augsburg, and died Physician 
of the Austrian Army in 1606. 

Rheum Ribes is a native of the lofty mountains of 
Armenia, Kurdistan, Syria (the Lebanon), and Persia. 
Boissier adds Beluchistan, but that is an error, R. spici- 
forme, Royle, having been mistaken for it. "Rivas"is 

AmiL 1st, 1898. 



the name given to it by the Arabs and Persians, by whom 
the petioles are eaten ; or " Kibes," according to Rauwolf, 
whence Linnaeus' specific name. It has long been in cul- 
tivation in the Royal Gardens, Kew, flowering in May, and 
fruiting in July and August. 

Descr. — Bootstock stout, branched. Stem three to five 
ft., erect. Leaves all from the lower part of the stem, ten 
to twelve inches broad, orbicular-cordate or reniform, five- 
nerved, bullate between the deeply sunk nerves and 
nervules above, dark green, glabrous, margins crisped and 
undulate, beneath pale green, lacunose between the very 
strong papillose nerves and nervules ; petiole one to two 
feet long, stout, bright red. Panicle two to three feet 
high, erect, rachis and branches papillose ; pedicels 
fascicled, about half an inch long, decurved, red ; fl. about 
one-third of an inch diam., pendulous ; perianth green, 
segments linear-oblong, obtuse. Stamens very many, much 
exceeding the perianth-segments, filaments very short, 
anthers linear, bright red. Ovary obconic, styles reflexed on 
the ovary. Achene nearly an inch long, oblong-cordate, 
blood-red, wings narrower than the nucleus. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Branch of flowering panicle ; 2, unexpanded flower ; 4, stamen ; 
5, pistil ; — all enlarged ; 6, brandies of fruiting panicle of nat. size ; 7, reduced 
view of whole plant. 



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Tab. 7587-8.— ALLIUM SCHUBERTI. 
„ 7589 — MYOSOTIS DISSITLFLORA, var. DYER^.- 
» 7590.— CROCUS MALYI. 
„ 7591.— RHEUM RIBES. 

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7592 




^§H_; 






"^LrtcentBrooltsJDay & - 



Tab. 7592. 

amomum hbhisph^ricum. 

Native of Java. 

Nat. Ord. Scitamine^j. — Tribe ZingiberevE. 
Genus Amomdm, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 644.) 



Amomttm (Nicolaia) hemisphsericum; caulibus csespitosis, foliiferis elatis, 
foliis oblongo-lanceolatis glabris supra vaginam breviter petiolatis apice 
cuspidatis basi inaequaliter rotundatis facie viridibus dorao rubro-branneis, 
ligula magna quadrata, pedunculo foliis rudiraentariis oblongis adpressis 
viridibus vaginato, floribus in capitulum densurn aggregatis, bracteis 
extei-ioribus magnis vacuis ovatis obtusis rubro-brunneo tinctis, interiori- 
bus linearibus viridibus fioresequilongis, calycis et corolla? lobis lanceolatis 
viridibus, labello lingulato emarginato petalis paulo longiore medio 
rubro-brunneo margine lnteo, antherae ecristatas loculis discretis ciliatis, 
stigmate magno capitate 

Elettaria hemisphaerica, Blume Enum. PL Jav. p. 51; Miquel Fl. Ind. Bat. 
vol. iii. p. 600. 

Nicolaia hemisphaerica, Horan. Prodr. Monog. Scit. p. 32. 

Alpinia hemispherica, D. Dietr. Sj/n. PL vol. i. p. 13. 



This plant is entirely new to cultivation in this country. 
Nicolaia was constituted as a genus, and named in honour 
of the late Emperor Nicholas of Russia, by Horaninow, 
who wrote a monograph of the Scitaminese at St. Peters- 
burgh in 1862. The only other species known in cultivation 
is the Mauritian A. imperialis, Horan., which is figured in 
the Botanical Magazine, under the name of Alpinia? 
magnified on plate 3192. This is the finest of all the 
Scitaminese, for the floral effect of the present plant is 
not nearly so decorative. 

Roots of A. hemisphserica were received at the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in 1893, from Mr. H. N. Ridley, M.A., 
Director of the Botanic Garden and Forest Department 
of the Straits Settlements, and flowered for the first time 
in the Tropical Water-lily House in June, 1897. As we 
possess no wild specimens in the Kew Herbarium, and 
the plant has not been figured before, we rely upon Mr. 
Ridley for the correctness of the name. 

Descr. — Stems densely tufted. Leafy stem erect, ten or 
Mat 1st, 1898. 



twelve ft. high. Leaves distichous, shortly petioled above 
the sheathing base, oblong-lanceolate, a foot and a half long, 
three inches broad, cuspidate, unequally rounded at the 
base, glabrous, green on the upper surface, claret-brown 
beneath. Peduncle arising from the rootstock separately 
from the leafy stem, hidden by the adpressed oblong, pale 
green, obtuse sheath-leaves. Flowers very numerous, 
aggregated in a globose head ; outer empty bracts large, 
ovate, obtuse, tinged with red-brown ; inner linear, nearly 
as long as the flowers. Lobes of the calyx and corolla 
lanceolate, green. Lip Ungulate, emarginate, a little 
protruded from the corolla, red-brown in the middle, bright 
yellow at the edge. Anther not distinctly crested ; cells 
ciliated, not touching each other. Ovary 3- celled, with 
many ovules in each cell. Style reaching to the top of the 
anther ; stigma large, capitate. — J. G. Baker. 



Figs. 1 and 2, flowers ; 3, anther and style ; 4, back view of the same ; 
5, apex of style, with stigma : all more or less enlarged; 6, whole plant, much 

vp.(iiir.p.n 



1533 




•WacentBrookE,Day> 



London. 



Tab. 7593. 
STBPHANANDRA Tanaile. 

Native of Japan. 

Nat. Ord. Kosace^e. — Tribe SpiejeejE. 

Genus Stephanandra, Sieb. & Zucc. ; (Benth. & Hook. /. Gen. Plant, vol. i. 

p. 612.) 



Stephanandra Tanakse ; suffrutex 3-pedalis, gracilis, cortice brunneo, foliis 
breve petiolatis triangulari-ovatis 3-lobis, lobis lateovatis acuminatis lobu- 
lars serratisque lateralibus parvis, supra glaberrimis subtus secus nervos 
utrinque 7-9-rectos puberulis, stipulis ovatis acutis calloso-dentatis viri- 
dibus deciduis, floribus in paniculas terminales pendulas dispositis, 
bracteis ovatis acumiuatis, bracteolis pedicellos fequantibus persistentibus, 
floribus parvis, calycis flavi lobis ovatis acutis pubescentibus, petalis 
calyci asquilongis ovato-oblongis albis, disco puberulo, staminibus 15-20, 
filamentis brevibus, ovario oblongo pubescente, stylo breviusculo, stigmate 
capitato, capsula tomentella Crustacea disperma calyce fere immutato 
inclusa, seminibus ellipsoideis politis. 

S, Tanakae, Franch. & Sav. Enum. PI. Jap. vol. ii. p. 332. Maximov. Adnot. 

Spirseac. 114 Gartenfl. 1896, t. 1431 (folia.). 
Neilua Tanakas, Franch. & Sav. I. c. vol. i. p. 121. 



The genus Stephanandra consists of four species, three 
Japanese and a Chinese, and is very closely allied to the 
Himalayan and North American genus Neillia, Don., 
differing in the monocarpellary ovary, with two pendulous 
ovules, and a capsule which ruptures at the base, and con- 
tains only two seeds. Maximovicz describes the style as 
at length lateral, but it is terminal in 8. Tanakse. 

Stephanandra Tanakse is a native of the Hakone Mts., 
in the Sagarai Province of Japan, and was first collected 
in the flanks of Fudzi-yama, where it forms a graceful 
bush. Seeds of it were sent to the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, by the Botanical Garden of the Imperial University of 
Tokio in 1893. The accompanying figure was made from 
a plant which flowered in June, 1897, in the Arboretum. 

Descr. — A slender, nearly glabrous branching under- 
shrub, about three feet high ; bark of branches brown. 
Leaves two inches long and broad, alternate, triangular- 
ovate, 3-lobed, membranous, bright green, colouring 
golden-yellow in autumn ; lobes broadly ovate, acuminate, 

Mat 1st, 1898. 



lobulate and serrate, seven to nine-nerved, the lateral 
smaller than the median, quite glabrous above, puberulous 
on the nerves beneath ; petiole short ; stipules as long as 
the petiole, ovate, acute, green, deciduous, more or less 
toothed, the teeth callus-pointed. Floivers very small, 
about one-sixth of an inch broad, in terminal, pendulous 
panicles three to four inches long, with very slender 
rhachis and branches ; bracts ovate, acuminate, bracteoles 
as long as the pedicels, persistent. Calyx yellow, lobes 
ovate, acute, pubescent. Petals as long as the calyx-lobes, 
ovate-oblong, spreading, white, puberulous. Stamens 
15-20, inserted in the margin of the puberulous disk, 
filaments short. Ovary oblong, pubescent, style short, 
terminal, stigma capitate. Capsule enclosed in the dried, 
unchanged calyx, oblong, crustaceous, dehiscing at the 
base irregularly, 2-seeded. Seeds sub-reniformly rounded, 
compressed, shining, testa crustaceous. — J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Portion of panicle; 2, flower laid open; 3, fruit; 4, seed :— All 
enlarged. 



7534. 




MLS.de1.J.N.RtdiTith. 



VmcentBrooks.Day & 



L Reeve & C°. London 



Tab. 7594. 

SYMPHYANDRA Wanneri. 

Native of Transylvania. 

Nat. Ord. Campanulace.e. — Tribe Campanule-b. 
Genus Symphyandra, A. DC; (Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 563.) 



Symphyandra (Anotocalyx) Wanneri; radice prsemorsa, caule simplici v. 
superne ramoso erecto 2-3-pedali folioso pubescente-piloso, foliis 
radicalibus et inferioribus caulinis oblanceolatis acutis acute inasqualiter 
dentatis utrinque pilosulis basi in petiolum latum angustatia, caulinis 
angustioribus sessilibus, floribus axillaribus et in racemum terminalem 
foliosum dispositis longe pedicellatis cernuis, pedicellis 1-3-pollicaribus 
ascendentibus apice decurvis, sepalis pollicaribus ovato-lanceolatis acumi- 
natis integerrimis v. dentatis nervosia, corolla calyce 5-2-plo longiore 
pilosula violacea, lobia brevibus latioribus quam longis, filamentis basi 
ciliatis, antheris anguste linearibus, stylis brevibus, stigmatibus revolu- 
tia. 

S. Wanneri, Heuff. in Flora, vol. xxxvii. (1854) p. 292. 

Campanula Wanneri, Rochel, PI. Banat. Bar p. 41, t. 5, f. 12. 

C. heterophylla, Baumg. En. Stirp. Transylv. vol. iii. Suppl. p. 342. 



The genus Symphyandra is distinguished from Campanula 
by the sole character of the anthers cohering in a tube. 
Like Campanula;, it is divisible into two sections, according 
to whether the sinus between the calyx-lobes is naked, or 
furnished with a reflexed appendage. It may hence well 
be doubted whether it should not merge into the greater 
genus. Seven species are described, all oriental, inhabiting 
the mountain regions which extend from Transylvania to 
the Caucasus, with one a native of Crete. Of these S. Hof- 
manni alone has been figured in this magazine (t. 7298). 

S. Wanneri has been in cultivation in the Royal Gardens, 
as a biennial, for a good many years, but the record of its 
introduction is lost. It flowers in June, in the open 
border. It was named by Rochel in honour of Herr 
Wanner, Conservator of the Imperial forests of the Banat, 
in which region the plant was discovered. The corolla in 
native specimens varies greatly in length, being sometimes 
very little longer than the calyx-segments. 

Descr. — An erect biennial, two to three feet high, sparsely 
hairy all over. Stem stout, pale reddish brown. Lower 

May 1st, 1898. 



leaves three to four inches long, crowded, spreading, 
oblanceolate, narrowed into a margined petiole, acute, 
coarsely serrate, pale green, upper sessile, shorter and 
narrower, midrib red-brown. Inflorescence a leafy, many- 
fld. terminal raceme ; peduncles axillary, two inches long, 
ascending, slender, one- to two-flowered, and bearing one 
or two small, erect, narrow leaves. Flowers pendulous, 
one and a half to two inches long. Calyx-tube hemispheric, 
segments nearly an inch long, lanceolate, acuminate, entire 
or serrate, green and brown. Corolla campanulate, an 
inch broad at the mouth, violet-blue, pale towards the 
base ; lobes much broader than long, broadly triangular, 
slightly recurved. Filaments with broadly dilated ciliate 
bases ; anthers narrowly linear. Ovary cylindric, glabrous ; 
style short, three-cleft, stigmas short, revolute. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Stamens; 3, pistil -.—Both enlarged. 



7S95 




I J-NHtdilith 



Vincenl E 



L Reeve & 



Tab. 7595. 

KALANCHOE flammea. 
Native of Somaliland. 

Nat. Ord. Crassulace.e. 
Genus Kalanchoe, Adans. (Benth, & Hook. f. Gen. Plant vol. i. p. 659.) 



Kalanchoe flammea; perennis, pedalis, ramosa, folioBa, glaberrima, foliis 
obovato-oblongis obovatisve in petiolum crassnm angustatis crasse 
carnosis apice rotundatis integerrimis v. obscure repando-crenatis pallide 
viridibus vix glaucis, cymis corymbosis densifloris 4-5-poll. longis et latis, 
pedunculo 4-5-pollicari, ramis primariis 2-pollicaribus, pedicellis £-£ 
pollicaribus, bracteis parvis linearibus obtusiusculis caducis, cadycis 
4-partiti segmentis £ poll, longis lineari-lanceolatis subacutis basi liberis, 
corollas tubo calyce duplo longiore 4-gono flavido, limbi f poll, lati lobis 
late ovatis acutis rubro-aurantiacis, glandulis disci linearibus ^ poll, 
longis, carpellis J-poll. longis, stylis brevibus. 

K. flammea, Stapfin Kew Bulletin, 1897, p. 266. 



The genus Kalanchoe numbers about fifty known species, 
chiefly African, with a few Indian, and will probably be 
largely increased, now that the collection of plants in 
tropical Africa is being zealously prosecuted. Only three 
species have been hitherto figured in this work, namely, 
8". crenata, DC. (Cotyledon cfenata, tab. 1436) ; K. marrno- 
rata, t. 7333, and K. grandiflora, t. 5460, none of which 
can compare with K. flammea, whether in the colour of the 
flower, or in the length of time that the plant continues 
in flower (two months), on which account it proves to be 
a notable addition to the Succulent House flora. 

Seeds of K. flammea, collected in Somaliland by Mrs. 
Lort Phillips and Miss Edith Cole, were presented to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, in May, 1895, the plants raised 
from which flowered in a sunny green-house in July, 
1897, and ripened their seeds. 

Descr. — Whole plant a foot high, stout, erect, branching, 
pale green, but hardly glaucous. Leaves two to three and 
a half inches long, including the stout petiole, obovate, or 
obovate-oblong, thickly fleshy, quite entire, or obscurely 
crenulate. Cyme corymbiform, four to five inches long 
and broad ; peduncle four to five inches long, strict, erect, 
Ma.t 1st, 1898. 



primary branches one to two inches long, many-fld. ; bracts 
small, linear, obtuse, caducous ; pedicel one-sixth to one- 
fourth of an inch long. Calyx one-sixth of an inch long, 
segments linear, sub-acute. Corolla-tube two to three times 
as long as the calyx, sub-tetragonous, pale yellow ; limb 
three-fourths of an inch broad, lobes broadly triangular- 
ovate, sub-acute, bright orange-red; glands of the disk 
linear, erect. Stamens very small, biseriate. Styles short. 
—J. D.H. 

Fig. 1 Calyx, disk-glands, and ovary ; 2, corolla laid open ; 3, stamen :— All 
enlarged. 



15if6. 




Tab. 7596. 
ARMERIA c^ispitosa. 

Native of 8pain. 

Nat Ord. Plumb agine.«. — Tribe Statice*. 
Genus Armeria, Willd. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 626. 



Aemeria coespitosa ; radice multicipite, caulibus breviasimia in pulvinos den- 
sissimcs confertis, foliis brevibus pateuti-recurvis inter se couformibus, 
fere acicnlaribus basi dilatatis albo-mucronatia supra planis sabtua 
obscure carinatis rigidia laste viridibus, marginibus scaberulis, scapo 
brevi glabro v. puberulo, iuvolucri bracteis floribus brevioribua scariosis 
brnnneis, extimis oblongis obtuaia concavis mucronatis 1-nerviis, 
interioribus angustioribus acuminatis, bracteis floralibus late obovatis 
obovato-oblongisve membranaceia hyalinis calyce longioribus multoties- 
que latioribus, noribus breviter pedicellatis, calycis tnbo valide costato, 
coetia intervallia angustioribus villosia in aristas scabridaa bracteolas 
excedentes productis, foveolis basi calycis nisi rimis angustis inter 
baseos costarum, calycis limbo hyalino truncato undulato, petalis 
obcordatis pallide roseis, sty lis infi'a medium pilosis. 

A. caespitosa, Boiss.in DC. Prodr. vol. xii. p. 679. 

A. jnniperifolia, Willd. ex Hoffm. & Link, Fl. Portug. p. 442. 

A. humilis, Link in Schrad. Joum. p. 61. 

Statice csespitoaa, Ortega in Quer, Fl. Espan. vol. vi. p. 334, t. 15, f. 1. Cav. 

1c. vol. i. p. 38 (non Poiret). 
S. juniperifolia, Vahl. Symb.fasc. i. p. 25. 



Armeria caespitosa is a native of the lofty mountains of 
Central Spain, the Sierra de Guadarrama, and of the 
Sierra de Estrella in Portugal. It was first described in 
1762 by Ortega, in the " Klora Espanola," of Martinez 
Quer, a remarkable work for its day. 

The plant here figured was raised from seeds received 
at the Royal Gardens, Kew, in 1893, from the Botanic 
Gardens of Madrid. It flowered in the end of April, 1897. 

Descr. — A densely tufted, dwarf perennial, with many 
very short branches from the root, clothed with spreading 
and recurved leaves, and bearing almost sessile heads of 
pale rose-coloured flowers. Leaves one half to two-thirds 
of an inch long, acicular from a dilated membranous base, 
bright green, ending in a pungent white tip, upper surface 
convex, under obtusely keeled, margins scabrid. Flowers 
sub-sessile, in shortly peduncled involucres, forming heads 

May 1st, 1898. 



an inch in diameter ; peduncle slender. Invol. bracts much 
shorter than the flowers, brown, scarious, outer oblong, 
concave, 1 -nerved, nerve ending in a mucro, inner narrower, 
acuminate ; floral bracts (or bracteoles) much larger than 
the involucral, broadly obovate-oblong, membranous, 
hyaline, with a thick midrib from the base to the middle, 
or higher. Perianth half an inch broad. Calyx cam- 
panulate, about one-quarter of an inch long, scarious, 
glabrous, except five narrow pubescent ribs ending in short 
scabrid awns, mouth truncate, undulate. Petals obovate- 
spathulate, 2-lobed, pale rose-coloured. Stamens with 
erect, subulate, glabrous filaments, and oblong, pale 
anthers. Ovary obconic, deeply 2-5-lobed, glabrous, styles 
very slender, spreading and ascending, hairy below the 
middle. Utricle as long as the bracts. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Leaf ; 2 and 3, outer bracts ; 4, inner bract and calyx ; 5, flower ; 
6, pistil -.—All enlarged. 



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Tab. 7592.— AMOMUM HEMISPH^RICUM. 
„ 7593 — STEPHANANDRA TANAKJE. 
„ 7594.— SYMPHYANDRA WANNERI. 
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7591 






L. Reeve & ! 



Tab. 7597. 

CRINUM Woodrowi. 

Native of Central India. 

Nat. Ord. Amaryllidejs. — Tribe A-Maeylle^. 
Genus Crinum, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 726. 



Crinum (Platyaster) Woodrowi ; bulbo globoso magno collo hand producto, 
tunicis exterioribns brunneis, foliis paucia lingulatis obtasis viridibus 
glabris, pedunculo compreeso foliis aaquilongo, nmbellis 6-7-floris, pedi- 
cellis productis, spatha? valvis 2 ovatis, perianthii tubo cylindrico viridulo 
limbi segmentis albis lanceolatis patulis tubo aequilongis, filamentis 
rubellis periantbii segmentis duplo brevioribus, stylo stamina superante. 



Several bulbs of this fine new Crinum were sent to the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, in January, 1897, by Mr. Gr. M. 
Woodrow, formerly of Kew, now lecturer on botany in the 
College of Science at Poona. They were supposed to 
belong to C. brachynema, Herb. (Bot. Mag. t. 5937) a very 
rare endemic Central Indian species, which differs from 
all the other members of the genus by its very short 
stamens, but when they flowered in July they proved to 
be totally different. The present plant belongs to. the 
section Platyaster, and is nearly allied to the Socotran 
C. Balfourii, Baker (Bot. Mag. t. 6570), and the Bornean 
C. Nurthianum, Baker, and of the Indian species to 
C. amcenum, Roxb., and C.pratense, Herb. At Kew it has 
flowered freely under ordinary stove treatment. 

Descr. — Bulb globose, four inches in diameter, without 
any produced neck ; outer tunics brown, membranous. 
Leaves few, contemporary with the flowers, lingulate, 
obtuse, glabrous, bright green, a foot long, three or four 
inches broad, not ciliated on the margin. Peduncle arising 
from the bulb outside the tuft of the leaves, stout, com- 
pressed, a foot long. Umbel six- or seven -flowered ; 
pedicels about an inch long ; spathe-valves two, opposite, 
ovate. Perianth-tube cylindrical, three inches or three 
inches and a half long ; segments of the limb lanceolate, 

June 1st, 1898. 



white, spreading equally, as long as the tube. Filaments 
bright red, half as long as the perianth-segments ; 
anthers linear, a third of an inch long. Style much over- 
topping the anthers. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Front view of anther ; 2, back view of anther; 3, apex of style : all 
enlarged ; 4, whole plant, much reduced. 



1598 




"Vrn.centBrooks^Eay&Sonljnp 






Tab. 7598. 

MORISIA HYPOGJ]A. 
Native of Corsica and Sardinia. 

Nat. Ord. Crvcifebm. — Tribe Cakiline^e. 
Genus Morisia, J. Gay ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 100.) 



Morisia hypogsea ; herba depressa, scapigera, hispidula v. glabrata, radice 
crassa, foliis sessilibus rosulatis lineari-oblongis pinnatifidis, lobis 
oblongis obtusis integerrimis, scapis foliiB brevioribus gracilibns unifloris, 
sepalis lineari-oblongis erectis obtusis basi aequaliter sub-saccatis, petalis 
obovato-spathtilatis anreis, filamentis edentulis, glandulis hypogynis 
2 v. 4, eiliqua terra abscondita 2-articnlata, articnlis secus longitudinem 
2-locuIaribus, inferiore majore oblongo v turgido bivalvi valvis herai- 
Bpbericis tarde deciduis, seminibus 2-seriatis, snperiore minore indebis- 
cente rostrato, loculis l-speimis v. aspermis, stylo breviusculo tereti, 
Btigmate capitato, seminibus late oblongis, cotyledonibus concavis v. fere 
condnplicatis. 

M. hypogsea, J. Gay in Oolla Sort. Rip. App. vol. iv. p. 50. Moris, Fl. Sard. 
vol. i. p. 105, t. 7. Gard. Chron. 1890, vol. ii. p. 503, fig. 

M. acaulis, Gay in Gazette de Turin, 1829, p. 24 (fid. mss. J. Gay) et cf. Colfa, 
in Antoloffia, vol. xxxiv. (Apr., 1829) p. 158, ex Bull. Ferussac. vol. xxi. 
(1829) p. 459. 

Ebucaria hypogaea, Viv. Fl. Oors. Prodr. p. 11, App. p. 3, cum ic. Moris, 

Stirp. Sard. Flench, faso. i. p. 4. 
Rapistrum hypogaeum, Buby, Bot. Gall. vol. i. p. 64. 
Sisymbrium acaule, Sieb. Herb. Oors. (1822). 
S. mouantho8, Viv. Fl. Lyb. Spec. p. 68. 
Monanthemum acaule, Scheele in Flora, vol. i. (1843) p. 314. 
Morisea, seu Morisina, DC. Prodr. vol. vi. p. 90, in nota. 



Morisia hypogsea is a singular little monotypic Crucifer, 
the position of which in the family is rather obscure. I 
placed it in the Tribe CaJcilmese in the " Genera Plantarum," 
which brings it near to Erucaria, a genus in which it was 
placed by Viviani, and by Moris, the latter of which 
authors accepted subsequently J. Gay's constituting of it 
a distinct genus, bearing the name of the excellent author 
of the " Flora Sardoa." It differs in the singular habit 
of decurving the scape after flowering, and burying the 
ripening fruit in the soil, recalling the two other crucifcrs 
Cardamine chenopodifolia, Pers., of Brasil, and Geococcus 

June 1st, 1898. 



pusillus, Drumra., of W. Australia ; as also of the two 
Leguminous plants, Arachis hypogsea, L., and Voandzeia 
subterranea, Thou. 

The rocks and sandy shores of Sardinia and Corsica are 
the only known habitats for Morisia. At the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, it flowers annually in the Rockery in March, and 
earlier in the Alpine House. 

Descr.— A procumbent, sparsely hispid, depressed, 
perennial-rooted herb, stemless, or with one or two short 
stems springing from the crown, but not otherwise inter- 
fering with the habit of the plant. Leaves very many, 
spreading horizontally from the root, two to three inches 
long by about one half inch broad, linear, pinnatifid or 
pinnatisect, bright green ; segments ovate or oblong, 
obtuse or apiculate, quite entire, sinus rounded. Flowers 
very numerous, solitary, or slender, scapes shorter than 
the leaves, about three-fourths of an inch broad, golden- 
yellow. Sepals subequal, linear-oblong, obtuse, scarcely 
saccate at the base. Petals spathulate. Filaments slender, 
with two long glands at the base of the shorter pair, and 
sometimes two smaller between the longer pairs. Ovary 
terete, constricted above the middle, of two joints, each 
two-celled, lower joints with the cells many-ovuled, upper 
with the cells empty, or 1-ovuled; style short, stigma 
capitate. Fruit half an inch long or more, ripening 
underground. Seeds broadly oblong, cotyledons concave, 
radicle incumbent. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of leaf; 2, flower with the petals removed; 3, stamens, 
glands, and pistil ; 4, vertical, and 5, transverse section of ovary ; 6 and 7, 
fruit ; 8, seed, from lower joint of fruit; 9, transverse section of embryo of do. ; 
10, portion of upper joint with 2 seeds ; 11, transverse section of embryo from 
do. :— All enlarged, except 6, which is of nat. size. 



7599 




MS.dal, JJCRtdtlith.. 



VmcentBroata 



XHeeve &.C91an.d©n. 



Tab. 7599. 
CELASTRUS aetioulatus. 

Native of Eastern Asia. 

Nat. Ord. Celastkine^. — Tribe Celastre^k. 
Genus Celastrus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i p. 364.) 



Celastrfs articulatu8 ; frutex 10-15-pedalia, ramosus, glaberrimns, caule 
volubili, cortice pallido verrnculoso, ramulis rectis v. scandentibus, foliis 
petiolatis 3-5-poll. longis oblongis ovatis orbicalaribusve obtuse acutatis 
crenato-serratis viridibus subtus pallidis, stipulis filamentosis, floribus iu 
cymas axillares subsessiles paucifloras dispositis breviter pedicellatis, 
calycis campanulati tubo brevi, lobis brevibus subrotundis, petalis lineari- 
oblongis obtusis recurvis viridibus, filamentis subulatis erectis disco 
5-lobo insertis. ovario ovoideo in stylum columnarem produeto, stigmate 
3-lobo, lobis majusculis recurvis, capsulis globosis, valvis intus flavidis 
demnm reflexis semina arillo coccineo indnta nudantibus. 

C. articulatus, Thunb. Fl. Jap. p. 97. DC. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 7. Franch. et 
Sav. En. PL Jap. vol. i. p. 80 ; PL David, p. 70. Bunge En. PL Gkin. 
bar. p. 97. Miguel, Prolus, Fl. Jap. p. 17. Maxim. Mel. Biol. pars. xi. 
p. 200. Forbes 8r Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxiii. p. 122. Sargent, 
Gard. $r Forest, 1890, p. 551, et ie. p. 550. Gard. Chron. 1898, vol. i. 
p. 28, f. 11. Phony o Zouphon, vol. xxx. fob 2, recto. 

C. auriculatus, Vitm. Summa, vol. ii. p. 31. 

C. orbiculatus, Lam. III. n. 2700. 

C. punctatuB, Thunb. Fl. Jap. p. 97. DC. 1, c. p, 6. 



A strong, rapid -growing, rambling and twining, deci- 
duous shrub, well fitted according to Professor Sargent, 
for clothing ruins, walls ten to fifteen feet high, and waste 
stony places, having the further advantage of thriving 
close to the sea, where it is uninjured by the salt spray. 
It is a plant of very wide distribution in far Eastern Asia, 
from the Island of Saghalin, Manchuria, Corea, and Japan, 
to the Loo-choo Islands and Formosa ; and in China proper, 
in hilly districts of the interior, from the North of Peking, 
tollchang on the Yang-tse-Kiang, and to Amoy on the 
coast. 

Seeds of G. articulatus were received by the Koyal 
Gardens,. Kew, from Professor Sargent, Arnold Arboretum, 
in 1891* plants raised from which grew vigorously, 

Jone 1st, 1898. 



flowered in June, 1897, and fruited in the following 
November. Professor Sargent received the seeds from 
which his plants were raised from Mr. S. H. Parsons of 
Flushing (New York). He had previously obtained some 
from Dr. Bretschneider, collected in the vicinity of Peking. 
Descr. — A rambling shrub, attaining fifteen feet in 
height, copiously branched, quite glabrous all over ; bark 
brown, warted ; branches straight or twining ; branchlets 
green. Leaves petioled, three to five inches long, oblong, 
oval, obovate or suborbicular, acute, tip obtuse, crenate- 
serrate, base cuneate, nerves six to eight pairs ; petiole a 
quarter to half an inch long; stipules a tuft of a few 
filaments. Floivers in short, shortly peduncled, axillary, 
few-fld. cymes, about one-sixth of an inch broad, green, 
with yellow anthers. Calyx small, campanulate, lobes 
five, short, rounded. Petals much longer than the calyx 
lobes, linear-oblong, obtuse, recurved. Stamens 5, fila- 
ments subulate, seated in the margin of a five-lobed disk, 
anthers short. Ovary ovoid, glabrous, narrowed into a 
columnar style, with three broad, recurved stigmatic 
lobes. Capsule pisiform, brown, tipped by the persistent 
style, three- valved. valves golden-yellow within, at length 
reflexed, exposing the seeds enveloped in a shining, scarlet 
aril.— J. D. H. 

Fig. 1, Portion of branch with stipule, petiole, and base of peduncle of 
cyme; 2, flowers ; 3, section of base of calyx, showing ovary, disk and stamens ; 
4, stamen ; 5, contents of a capsule, after the fall of the valves, and the drying 
up of the fleshy aril : — All enlarged. 



7600 




•dd.JNFaLdT.hth. 



^5jicentBrooks,Day & 



L Ree ve &. C ?Ion.dor 



Tab. 7600. 

PHILADELPHITS mexicanus. 
Native of Mexico and Guatemala. 

Nat. Ord. Saxifrages. — Tribe Hydrangea. 
Genus Philadelphtts, Linn. ; (Benih. & Hooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 642.) 



Philadelphia mevicanus; frutex gracilis, ramulis foliis subtus calycibusque 
plus ininusve hirtellis, foliis 1£- 2-pollicaribus ovatis acuminatis 3-nerviis 
remote dentatis, floribus ad apices ramulorum solitariis breviter pedicellatis 
amplis 1-lf-poll. latis pallidesulphureis suaveolentibus, calycis segmentia 
ovato-lanceolatis acuminatis remote dentatis tubo multo longioribus, 
stylo columnari ad medium 4-fido, stigmatibus oblongis obtusis. 

P. mexicanus, Schlecht. in Linneea, vol. xiii. (1839) p. 418. Whip. Rep. vol. ii. 
p. 151. Lindl. Bnt. Beg. vol. xxviii. t. 38*. Decaisne in Rev. Sortie. 
Ser. III. vol. i. (1852) p. 381, fig. 20. Wittmack in Berl. Gartenz. 1883, 
p. 528, fig. 91. Gard. Ghron. 1883, vol. i. p. 753. Hemsl. Biol. Centr. 
Amer. vol. i. p. 384. 



Except by the scented flowers I fail to find a character 
whereby P. mexicanus is distinguishable from solitary- 
flowered specimens of the common P. grandiflorus, Willd. 
(Bot. Reg. t. 570), a native of the Eastern United 
States, from Virginia southwards. It was introduced 
from Mexico by Hartweg, into the gardens of the 
Royal Horticultural Society about the year 1835. 
From the plants there raised Lindley (in 1842) figured it, 
but his figure is from a plant only two feet high, with 
much smaller leaves and flowers than those of Hartweg's 
dried native specimen, or than our plant shows. It 
appears to be common from north to south in its native 
country, growing wild in hedges at elevations of 6-8000 ft., 
in Oaxaca, and about the city of Mexico. There are 
specimens in Herb. Kew, collected in Guatemala, dep. 
Quiche, alt. 6000 ft., by J. Donnel Smith, Esq., and others. 
Schlechtendal considered it to be the Acuiloth, or climbing 
aquatic of Hernandez, who figured it, and speaks of it as 
an inhabitant of wet places, creeping on the ground, or 
scrambling up trees. Hernandez (Nov. Plant. Mex., &c, 
lib. iv. cap. x. p. 107) compares the habits of the plant 
with the musk-rose, and says that a sweet and agreeable 
essence is distilled from its flowers. Schlechtendal is no 

June 1st, 1898. 



doubt right in this identification, but Hernandez's com- 
parison of the habits of the plant to the musk-rose is 
inexplicable. At the Royal Gardens, Kew, P. mexicanus 
is trained on the south wall of the Orchid House, where 
it flowers freely annually in June, but it is not hardy. 

Descr. — A more or less sparsely, hispidulous, or nearly 
glabrous shrub, with spreading or drooping branches, 
covered with pale, red-brown bark. Leaves one to two 
and a half inches long, shortly petioled, ovate, acuminate, 
3-nerved, sparingly serrate or toothed, bright green above, 
pale beneath ; petiole one-tenth to one-sixth of an inch 
long. Flowers solitary, subsessile on the ends of the 
branchlets, nearly two inches in diameter, strongly sweet- 
smelling, pedicel very stout. Calyx-tube hairy, turbinate, 
segments broadly ovate, acuminate, one half to two-thirds 
of an inch long, entire, or sparingly toothed. Petals 
orbicular, white, suffused with yellow. Stamens very 
numerous, filaments glabrous. Style columnar, quadrifid, 
stigmas oblong, obtuse. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1 and 2, stamens ; 3, section through ovary : — All enlarged. 




7601 



KS.dfiUKFitGhljth 



"\%u;en.tJ3rooks,T) ay:&,SorLlmp 



Tab. 7601. 
orchis monophylla. 

Native of the Shan hills of Burma. 

Nat. Ord. Ouchide/E. — Tribe Ophbyde/E. 
Genus Okcuis, Linn ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Oen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 620.) 



Orchis monophylla ; caule infra folia brevi robusto, foliis 1 v. 2 sub-radicalibus 
oblongis ovato-oblongisve subacutis basi vaginantibus carnosulis luride 
viridibus rnaculis rubro-purpureia creberrime aspersia, pedunculo vagiuia 
bracteisque viridibus punctis purpureis elongatia striatis, vaginis paucia 
lanceolatis erectis, racemo 2^-pollicari laxe-multinoro puberulo, bracteia 
lanceolatis ovario sequilongis brevioribusve, sepalis conniventibus parvis 
viridibus, dorsali £ poll, longo oblongo obtuso, lateralibus majoribua late 
ovatis obtusis, petalis obovato-oblongis incurvis convolutis roaeis, labello 
latiore quam longo sepalis duplo longiore 3-lobo pallide roseo lobis sub- 
sequilongis lateralibus patulis truncatis crenulatis immaculatis, inter- 
niedio quadrato discoque labelli pustulis roseis asperso, calcare ovario 
breviore obtuso incurvo, staminodiis magnis, polliniorum glandulis 
sacculis distinctis absconditis. 

Habenakia monophylla, Collett Sf Hemsl. in Joiirn. Linn. Soc. vol. xxviii. 
(1890), p. 134. Hook.f. Fl. Brit. Ind. vol. vi. p. 143. 



In the coloration of foliage Orchis monophylla is a 
very striking object, and resembles no other Orchis 
known to me, though recalling in some degree Hemipilia 
calophylla, Par. & Reiclib. f., figured at t. 6920 of this 
work. In the latter plant, however, the spotting is dark 
brown. 

Orchis monophylla was first described from a single, very 
poor specimen brought by Col. Sir H. Collett, K.C.B., 
F.L.S., from the Shan hills in Upper Burma, at an elevation 
of 4000 ft. Needless to say, it showed no other coloration 
than the uniform brown of a herbarium specimen. It was 
referred by its authors to JIabcnaria, in which genus I re- 
tained it in the " Flora of British India," pointing out its 
affinity with H. Orchidis. An examination of living 
specimens has enabled Mr. Rolfe to detect two membranous 
pouches covering the glands of the pollinia, as in typical 
Orchis ; and Messrs. King and Pantling in their invaluable 
Orchids of Sikkim ("Ann. Bot. Gard.," Calcutt., vol. viii. 
p. 302) have transferred Habenaria Orchidis also to Orchis 
(as O. habenarioides). In the above view of 0. monophylla 
I entirely concur, as also in the remark of the latter 
authors, that the pink or purple colouring of the flower, 

June 1st, 1898. 



as distinguishing Orchis from Habenaria, is a character of 

considerable importance. With regard to 0. habenarioides, 
on the other hand, I am nob altogether satisfied ; its 
pollinia differ from those of 0. monophylla and the other 
Indian species of Orchis, in their glands being very large 
and oblong, and, according both to my own observations 
and the figure and description in the "Annals," are not 
enclosed in pouches. This consideration, together with 
the colour and sweet scent of the flowers, goes far towards 
favouring Lindley's original view, who, when first de- 
scribing the E. Orchidis placed it in Gymnadenia (G. cyUn- 
drostachya, Lindl. Gen. & Sp. Orchid., p. 278). 

Tubers of 0. monophylla were received by the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in March, 1896, from Mr. H. H. Hilde- 
brand, C.S.I., Superintendent, S. Shan States. They 
flowered in May, 1897, in a greenhouse. 

Descr. — Tvbers oblong. Stem very short and stout 
below the leaves, clothed with annular sheaths. Leaves 
one or two, three to four inches long, oblong, or ovate- 
oblong, subacute, narrowed into a broadly sheathing base, 
coriaceous, uniformly lurid green on both surfaces, and 
covered closely with large, red-purple spots. Pedvncle six 
to eight inches long, rather stout, green, speckled with 
short streaks of purple, as are the few lanceolate, erect 
sheaths and bracts. Raceme two and a half inches long, 
many- and lax-fid., pubescent. Bracts lanceolate, shorter 
than the ovary. Flowers about one-third of an inch broad 
across the lip, white, with a faint blush of pink ; petals 
rose-coloured. Sepals small, green, pointing forwards ; 
dorsal oblong, obtuse, one-sixth of an inch long; lateral, 
with their bases distant from the dorsal, larger, obliquely 
ovate, obtuse. Petals included, obovoidly obovate, in- 
curved, one folded over the other. Lip twice as long as 
the sepals, about one-third of an inch broad, flat, broadly 
three-lobed, base contracted, ciliolate, side-lobes spread- 
ing, crenulate, unspotted, midlobe not longer than the side- 
lobes, quadrate, disk and midlobe covered with bright red 
pustular or scurfy points, spur about as long as the lip, 
tip rounded. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Side view of flower; 2, petals, base of lip and spur; 3, petal, 
4, column and base of hp ; 5, pollinium -.-All enlarged. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 642, JUNE, 1898. . 



Tab. 7597.— CRINUM WOODROWI. 
„ 7598— MORISIA HYPOG^EA. 
„ 7599.— CELASTRUS ARTICULATUS. 
„ 7600.— PHILADELPHIA MEXICANCJS. 
„ 760L— ORCHIS MONOPHYLLA. 



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7602. 




Tab. 7602. 
COELOGYNE Swaniana. 

Native of the Philippine Island*. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. — Tribe Dendhobie-e. 
Genoa Coelogyne, Lindl. ; (Benth. & Rook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 518.) 



Coelogyne Swaniana; pseudobnlbis 2-4-pollicaribns fusiformibus 4-6-gonis 
nudis diphyllis, foliis 6-8-pollicaribus petiolatis elliptico-lanceolatis acumi- 
nata marginibus undulatis basi in petiolum angustatis, racemo e basi 
pseudobulbi enato pedali pendulo laxe mnltifloro, pedunculo rhachique 
gracilibus viridibus purpureo punctulatis, bracteis f poll, longis cymbi- 
formibns acutis pallide brunneis pedicellos aequantibus, sepalis pollicanbus 
lineari-oblongis subacutis carinatis, petalis linearibus acutis albis, labello 
3-lobo pallide brunneo lobis lateralibus incurvis apice rotundatis, termi- 
nali recurvo orbiculari-ovato obtuso, disco 5-cristato, cristis apicem non 
attingentibus 2 lateralibus brevioribus intermediis ad basin labelli pro- 
ductis et ibidem in laminas laciniatas eTrectas productis, columna apice 
dilatata trnncata denticulata. 

O. Swaniana, Bolfe in Kew Bullet. 1894, p. 144; in Orchid. Bev. vol. ii. p. 198 ; 
in Sander, Beichenbachia, Ser. 2, vol. ii. t. 92. 



Coelogyne Swaniana is compared by its author with the 
Bomean G.Day anna, Reichb. f. (Williams, Orch. Alb. vi. t. 
247, and Veitch Man. Orch. Part vi. p. 36 and 43, with 
fig.). The resemblance between these species is indeed 
very close, in pseudobulbs, leaves and flowers, but C. 
Dayanna is a larger plant, the sepals and petals have reflexed 
margins, as have the tips of the side-lobes of the lip, and 
there are no lamellas at the base of the crests of the lip. 
These crests appear to vary a good deal in relative length. 

This fine species was discovered in the Philippine Islds., 
by Mr. W. Micholitz, who sent specimens to Messrs. 
F. Sander & Co. of St. Alban's, according to whose wish 
it was named after J. M. Swan, Esq., A.R.A., a highly 
esteemed Artist. 

The specimen figured was obtained by the Royal Gardens, 
Kew, from Messrs. Sander in 1892. It flowered in May 
and June. 

Bescr. — Pseudohdbs three and a half to four inches long, 
fusiform, obtusely four to six-angled, green, naked, the 
brown remains of the sheaths alone persisting on the 
July 1st, 1898. 



mature pseudobulb. Leaves two, six to eight inches long, 
elliptic-lanceolate, acuminate, narrowed into a petiole two 
to three inches long, bright green, strongly nerved beneath, 
margins more or less waved. Peduncle from the base of 
the pseudobulb, slender, with the rhachis of the raceme 
pale green, minutely dotted with dark purple. Raceme a 
foot long, pendulous, loosely many-flowered. Bracts three- 
quarters of an inch long, cymbiform, acute, pale brown, 
caducous. Flowers two inches broad, pedicel as long as 
the bract ; ovary short, green, its six ribs crenulate, and 
clotted with dark purple. Sepals an inch long, linear- 
oblong, obtuse or sub-acute, white. Petals as long, but 
much narrower, white. Lip paie brown, darker round 
the margins and tips of the lobes ; side-lobes short, 
rounded, mid-lobe orbicular-ovate, obtuse, disk with fine 
crested ridges, extending from the base to about the 
middle of the mid-lobe, three of them furnished at the base 
with a short, erect fimbriate lamella. Column yellow, 
broadly dilated at the top into a truncate crenulate hood. 
—J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Lip ; 2, column ; 3, anther ; 4, pollinia \—All enlarged. 




7603 






Tab. 7C03. 
CALLIANTHEMUM RCTiEFOLiuw, var. anemonoides. 

Native of the European and Asiatic Alps. 



Nat. Ord. RanunculacejE. — Tribe Anemones. 

Genus Callianthemum, G. A. Mey.\ (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. 

p. 5.) 



Callianthemum rutsefolium ; herba glaberrima, sub-acaulis, rhizomate 
crassiusculo elongato prasmorso, foliis radicalibus petiolatis ambita 
triangularibus decompositis, pedunculo uuifloro nudo v. unifoliato, sepalia 
5 rotundatia imbricatis deciduis, petaliB 5-15, latia v. angustis. 

C. rutEefolium, G. A Mey. in Ledeb. Fl. Alt. vol. ii. p. 336 ; Fl. Boss. vol. i. 

pp. 48, 734. Schott, CEstr. Ranunc. t. 6. Reichb. Ic. Fl. Germ. vol. iii. 

t. 25. 
0. coriandrifolium, Reichb. Fl. Germ. Excurs. p. 727 ; Ic. Fl. Germ. I. c. 
C. cachemirianum, Camb. in Jacquem. Voy. Rot. p. 5, t. 3. Hook.f. Fl. Brit. 

Ind. vol. i. p. 15. 
C. bipinnatum, Dulac, Fl. Sautes Pyren. p. 216. 
C. pimpinelloides, Hook. f. & Thorns. Fl. Ind. vol. i. p. 26. 
C. acaule, Cambess. mss. in Herb. Jacquem. 
Ranunculus rutaefolius, Linn. Sp. PI. p. 552. All. Fl. Pedem. vol. iii. n. xi. 

t. 27, f. 1. Jacq. Golleetan. vol. i. p. 136, t. 6, 7. Ait. Hort. Kew. Ed. 2, 

vol. iii. p. 355. Poll. FL Veron. vol. ii. p. 233. DG. Syet. vol. i. p. 238; 

Prodr. vol. i. p. 30. Reichb. Ic. Fl. Germ. vol. iii. t. 25. Koch, Syn. 

Deutsch. Fl. 1892, p. 355. 
R. isopyroides, DO. Syst. I. c. 238 ; Prodr. I. c. 
R. pimpinelloides, Don in Royle III. PI. Himal. p. 53. 
R. rutaceofolio, <fec, Bauh. Pinax, p. 181. Moris. Hist. vol. ii. p. 418, f. 4, 

t. 31, f. 54. 
R. praecox rutaefolio, Glusius Hist. vol. i. p. 232. 
R. alp. coriandrifolio, Pona, PL Bald. Mont. Ed. 2. p. 87 (1617). 
Var. anemonoides ; petalia plurimis lineari-oblongis. C. anemonoides, F.ndl. 

ex Heynh. Nom. vol. ii. p. 106. Schott, I. c. Ranunculus anemonoidcH, 

Zahlb. in Flora, vol. vi. (1823), p. 220. Reichb. Ic. Grit. vol. viii. p. 31, 

t. 779. 

After careful examination, in the Kew Herbarium, of 
upwards of a hundred specimens of the five published 
species of Callianthemum, from nearly fifty localities, pro- 
cured by various collectors, between the Pyrenees and 
"VV. China, I have come to the conclusion that all may 
be regarded as forms of one. Of these forms the most 
distinct are, the large flowered, broad leaved C. anemo- 
noides, with narrow petals on the one hand, and on the 
other the G. coriandrifulium, with small flowers, finely 
July 1st, 1898. 



divided leaves, and broad, almost rounded petals. No 
doubt these and other intermediate forms may prove to 
retain their characters under cultivation for an indefinite 
period, due to their long isolation in their individual native 
localities, and as such will be well worthy of cultivation. 
That here figured represents an alpine European form, 
specimens of which from Styria have triangular leaves, 
five inches in diameter, leaflets one and half in. long 
and broad, with three to five linear lobes, and narrow 
petals up to one in. long. Others from Lake Baikal have 
the peduncle twelve to sixteen inches long. The Himalayan 
G. cachemirianum is not distinguishable from the typical 
ruh'folium, it has leaves with short, broad leaflets, 
peduncles shorter than the leaves, and flowers one inch to 
one and half inch in diameter, with cuneately oblong petals ; 
it inhabits the whole Himalayan range at elevations of 
nine thousand to seventeen thousand feet, as also Tibet. 
In the Kurrum Valley, Panjab, Dr. Aitchison describes it 
as reaching the snow line, that is the highest elevation of 
any flowering plant. In Europe it extends from the 
Pyrenees to the Eastern Austrian Alps, at eight thousand 
to ten thousand feet elevation. Its extreme Eastern and 
Southern limit is the mountains of Yunnan in China, where 
it was collected by the Abbe Delavay. 

The specimen here figured of var. anemonoides, a native 
of Styria, flowered in the Royal Gardens in March, 1897. 

Pescr.— A glabrous, subglaucous herb, six to twelve 
inches high, with a stout rootstock, numerous radical 
leaves, and single-flowered peduncles. Leaves long- 
petioled; limb triangular in outline, bipinnatifid, with 
linear or broader lobes varying greatly in size. Peduncle 
naked, or bearing a small sessile leaf. Flowers one to 
one and a half inches broad. Sepals five, orbicular im- 
bricate, deciduous. Petals ten to fifteen, linear-oblong, 
white, or pale rose-coloured. Stamens very many, 
inserted on a hemispheric receptacle; anthers short. 
Carpels many, oblong, 1-celled, 1-ovuled, stigma small, 
sessile; ovule solitary, pendulous from near the top of 
the cell. Achenes coriaceous, oblong, obtuse. Seed pen- 
dulous.— J. D, B. 1 



Fig. 1, Petal; 2 and 3, stamens ; 4 and 5, carpels -.-All enlarged. 



7604 




M.S.dr' 



Vincent . 



L Reeve &C° London 



Tab. 7604 
IRIS Gbant-Duffii. 

Native of Palestine. 

Nat. Ord. Ibidem. — Tribe Mormejb. 
Genua Iris, Linn. (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 686.) 



Ibis (Apogon) Granf-Duffii; rhizomate breviter repente, vagi nig brunneis 
scariosis, foliis 5-6 linearibus firmis glaucis erectis, pedanculo mono- 
cephalo foliis multo breviore, spathae valvis linearibus firmis viridibus, 
pedicello producto, ovario cylindrico rostrato, perianthii pallide lutei 
tubo brevi, aegmentia exterioribua oblanceolato-oblongis supra medium 
patulis deorsum lineis transversalibus purpureis decoratia, segmentia 
interioribus brevioribus erectis concoloribus oblanceolatis unguiculatis, 
styli appendicibus pallide luteis lanceolatis. 

I. Grant-Duffii, Baker Handb. Irid. p. 7. 



This very distinct new Iris was first collected, so far as 
our records show, [in 1864, by Mr. B. T. Lowne on the 
banks of the river Kishon. Several years later it was 
found by Sir M. E. Grant Duff in the plain of Esdraelon, 
recognized as a distinct species, and introduced into culti- 
vation. It comes nearest to two of the North American 
species, I. tenax, Dougl. (Bot. Mag. tab. 3343), and /. Dou- 
glasiana, Herb. (Bot. Mag. t. 6083). Our drawing was 
made from a plant flowered by Mr. W. E. Gumbleton at 
Queenstown in February, 1897. 

Descr. — Rhizome short, creeping. Base of the stem rather 
swollen, surrounded by a truncate scariose brown sheath. 
Leaves about six to a stem, linear, firm, erect, rather 
glaucous, a foot and a half or two feet long at the flowering 
season, flat, with a narrow, scariose, white margin. Stem 
much shorter than the leaves, simple, bearing one or two 
erect reduced leaves. Spathe-v&lves linear, firm, green, 
three or four inches long. Pedicel an inch long. Ovary 
cylindrical, rostrate, as long as the pedicel. Perianth pale 
yellow ; tube very short ; outer segments oblanceolate- 
oblong, three inches long, spreading from the middle, 
furnished with an orange keel, and veined below the middle 
July 1st. 1898. 



-with lilac-brown; inner segments rather shorter, erect, 
concolorous, pale yellow, oblanceolate-unguiculate. Crests 
of the sfyte-branches lanceolate, pale yellow. — J. G. 
Baker. 



Figs. 1 and 2 stamens ; 3, style-branch with stigma and appendages :— All 
much magnified. 



7605 










Vincent Broaks,I)ay &.. Sonlrap 



Tab. 7605. 
eria latjbracteata. 

Native of Borneo. 

Nat. Ord. Orchide*. — Tribe Epidendre^e. 
Genus Eria, Lindl.; (Benth. So HooJc.f. Oen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 509.) 



Eria (Hymeneria) latibracteata ; rbizomate brevi, pseudobulbis confertis 1-3^- 
pollicaribus 2-3-pbyllis obovoideis v. fusiformibus sulcatis, foliis 2-4- 
poll. longis sessilibus ovato-oblongis -lanceolatisve acutis recurvis, pedun- 
cnlo brevi valido bracteis paucis amplis vacuis instrncto, raceino 
dependente puberulo 6-10-floro, pedunculo rhacbique valido ovariisque 
viridibus rubro punctulatis, bracteis §-poll. longis late cymbiformibus 
apiculatia patulis flavo-viridibus, floribus |-poll. longis, sepalis pallide 
flavidis, dorsali galeato, latentlibus late ovatis obtusis in mentum rotun- 
datnm productis, petalis oblongis subacutis, labello sepalis paullo 
longiore trilobo, lobis lateralibus roseis apice rotundatis disco inter lobos 
cristis 2 carnosis apice rugosis aucto, terminale aureo transverse oblongo, 
disco late incrassato carnoso rugoso, colamna apice crenata. 

C. latibracteata, Rolfe mss. 



The genus Eria is one of the largest of Orchids in 
tropical Asia ; nearly 100 species (of which upwards of 
twenty were previously undescribed) are recorded in the 
" Flora of British India," and a considerable number have, 
since the publication of that work, been discovered within 
'the geographical limits of its flora. The total number 
of known species cannot be under 250. E. latibracteata 
belongs to the largest section of the genus, founded more 
on habit than on any definite characters. Its nearest ally 
is E. bractescens, Lindl. (Bot. Reg. 1841, Misc. No. 46 and 
1844, t. 29), a Burmese and Malayan plant, to be dis- 
tinguished by the 2-lobed tips of the leaves, much smaller, 
narrower bracts and flowers, longer and more slender 
pedicels and narrower sepals. 

E. latibracteata was imported from Borneo by Messrs. 
Sander & Co., of St. Albans, who sent specimens to 
the Herbarium at Kew to be named in July, 1895 ; and 
from whom the specimen here figured was received ; it 
flowered in the Royal Gardens in July, 1897. 

Descr. — Pseudobulbs fascicled on a short root stock, one 
to three and a half inches long, ovoid to fusiform, terete, 

July 1st, 1898. 



sulcate, dark green, formed of two to four internodes. 
Leaves two to three, two to four inches long, sessile, oblong- 
lanceolate, acute, spreading and recurved. Racemes from 
the base of the pseudobulb, with the short peduncle four 
inches long, drooping; peduncle and rhachis stout, green, 
and as well as the pedicels and ovary speckled with red. 
Floivers six to ten, loosely racemed ; pedicels with ovary 
half an inch long, curved. Bracts about half an inch long, 
broadly oblong, cymbiform, apiculate, spreading, yellow- 
green. Flowers half an inch long ; sepals and petals con- 
mvent, very pale, dull yellowish. Dorsal sepal galeate ; 
lateral much larger, their gibbous bases together forming 
a large rounded mentum. Petals oblong, sub-acute. Lip 
hardly longer than the sepals, 3-lobed, side-lobes dark 
rose-red, apex rounded, disk between the side-lobes with 
two fleshy ridges ending abruptly in tubercled calli, 
mid-lobe transversely oblong, golden-yellow, with a very 
broad fleshy caruncled disk, tip 3-lobulate. — J. D. H. 



Fig. I, Lip ; 2, column ; 3, anther ; 4 and 5, pollinia -.—All enlarged. 



7606 




itchlrth 






Tab. 7606. 
CALOCHOB/TUS clavatus. 

Native of California. 

Nat. Ord. Llliace.m. — Tribe Tulips.*:. 
Genus Calochortcs, Pursh. ; (Benth. & Houk.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 220.) 



Caiochortus (Mariposa) clavatus ; bulbo ovoideo parvo tunicis exterioribua 
pallidis, caule erecto gracili siuiplici vel furcato, foliis linearibus vel subu- 
latis, sepalis ovatis acuminatia dorso viridibus facie luteis obscure macu- 
latis, petalis latis cuneatis aurantiacis supra medium nudis, ungue lato 
pilis copiosis luteis apice clavatis vestito supra basin foveola orbiculari 
prajdito, antheris linearibus obtusis purpureis filamentis aequilongis, 
ovario cylindrico-trigono. 

C. clavatus, & Wats, in Proc. Amer. Acad. vol. xiv. p. 265 ; Bot. Calif, vol. ii. 
p. 176. 

This species, for garden purposes, is one of the finest of 
all the Galochorti. It belongs to the section Mariposa, 
which is marked by its large, erect, butterfly-like flowers, 
which are white, lilac, or yellow, and often beautifully 
variegated towards the base with spots or bands. Its 
nearest allies are 0. luteus, Dougl. (Bot. Reg. t. 1567), and 
G. Weedii, Wood (G. citrinus, Baker in Bot. Mag. t. 6200), 
from which it is best distinguished by the club-shaped tips 
of the hairs that covet the claw, to which the name refers. 
It was first collected in 1878, by Mr. J. G, Lemmon, near 
San Luis Obispono, and soon afterwards by Mrs. Elwood 
Cooper at Santa Barbara. It has only lately been intro- 
duced into cultivation by Mr. Carl Purdy, of Ukiah, who 
makes a specialty of Frythronia and Galochorti, and it has 
not been previously figured. Our drawing was made from 
a plant that flowered in an open border on the south side 
of the Orchid House at Kew, in June, 1897. 

Descr. — Bulb small, ovoid ; outer tunics membranous, 
pale. Stem erect, slender, a foot or a foot and a half long, 
simple or forked, distantly leafy. Leaves linear or subu- 
late, reaching a length of three or four inches. Flowers 
solitary, erect. Sepals ovate, acute, about an inch long, 
green on the outside, yellow, and obscurely spotted near 
the base on the inside. Petals cuneate, bright yellow, an 
July 1st, 1898. 



inch and a half or two inches broad, naked over the upper 
half of the face, covered over the broad claw with yellow 
hairs with club-shaped tips, and furnished with an orbicular 
hairy nectary. Stamens a third the length of the petals; 
anther linear, obtuse, purple, as long as the flattened 
filaments. Ovary cylindrical-trigonous; stigmas three, 
linear. — J. G. Baker. 



Wrf CluWha P ed tJ P of a hair { ram tbe petal ; 2, stamen ; 3, ovary -.-All 



enlarged 



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7601. 







Tab. 7607. 
CORTADEHIA Jubata, Stapf. 

Native of the Andes-. 

Nat. Ord. Gkamine/E.— Tribe Auuxdine^e. 
Gonus Coataderia; (Stapf in Gard. Chron. 1897, vol. ii. p. 396.) 



CoRTADEaiA jubata; gramen perenne, culmia validia dense coeapitoaia 
biannuia, internodiis aupremia ultra pedalibua, foliia ba^in veraua 
culmum congestis ^-poll. latia tenuisaime caudato-acuminatia, ligula e 
pilis sericeia, panicula plumoaa 1-2-pedali laxiusculaaub-erecta v. nutante, 
ramia inferioribua 1-li-pedalibus gracillimia flexnosia, apiculia unisexua- 
libua nitidia purpureo aubtiliter tinctia, glumia vacuia sub-aequalibua 
anguste linearidanceolatia apicibua acutis v. bidenticulatia 1-nerviis 
nervo infra apicem evanido, glumis floriferis vacnia anb-aimilibua 3-nerviia, 
masculis glabria, fern, copioae et longe piloaia, pilis £ poll, longia, 
palea brevi hyalina 2-nervi, lodicnlia ciliatis, staminodiia fl. fem. gracilibus 
apicibua antheriferia v. clavellatia, ovario glabro, caryopside anguate 
oblonga hilo lineari. 

G. jubatum, Lemoine ex Carr. in Rev. JETorl. vol. xlix. p. 419. 
G. roaenm Rendatleri, The Garden, vol. viii. p. 165 (nomeri). 
?G. argenteum carminatnm Rendatleri, Flore des Sevres, t. 2075. Chron. 
1874, p. 419. 



To those who know Gi/nerium sacckaroides, Humb. & 
Bonpl. (Tab. Nostr. 7352) it will be no surprise to learn 
that the Pampas Grass of our gardens has been removed 
from that genus. This has been done by Dr. Stapf, in the 
Gardener's Chronicle cited above, where the name Gorta- 
deria is given to the Pampas Grass and its congeners, 
from their being known as " Cortadora " by the Spanish- 
speaking people of America. The species of Cortaderia 
are confined to the Andes from Ecuador to Chili, 
together with New Zealand, if the Arundo consjdaui, 
Forst. f. be included. Other species are G. argentta, 
Stapf (the Pampas Grass, which is, however, not a native 
of the Pampas, but of the Cordillera), G. chiloensis, Stapf : 
G. speciosa, Stapf (G. speciosum, Nees), and G. Qnila 
Stapf. 

Cortadenia jubata is a native of the Andes of Ecuador, 

Bolivia, and Peru. It was first collected about 1830, by 

the late Col. Hall, the energetic explorer of Ecuador, in 

ravines near Quila, alt. 10,000 ft. It was introduced into 

August 1st, 1898. 



cultivation in Europe by M. Lemoine, who received seeds 
from Chimborazo. There are, besides Hall's specimen in 
the Kew Herbarium, others collected by Pentland at 
Cnzco, alt. 11,380 ft., and in wet places near Sorata in 
Bolivia, alt. 9-12,000 ft., by Mandon. According to Dr. 
Stapf it differs from G. argentea in the rather laxer, more 
graceful panicle, with longer, more flexuous, nodding 
branches, somewhat smaller spikelets, more delicate 
glumes, and in the longer, very slender staminodes of the 
fern. fl. The colouring of the glumes is neither constant 
in, nor confined to G. jubata. 

The specimen of the latter here figured was sent to me 
by Mr. Gumbleton, from his famous garden at Belgrove, 
County Cork, in October, 1895, with the information that 
it was a far more beautiful grass than G. argentea. The 
panicle, he tells me, more resembles that of Arundo 
conspicua, but is much larger, and of a lovely pale lavender 
colour. Unfortunately the plant did not prove hardy, 
having been killed by 29° of frost in the following winter. 
_ Descr. — A densely tufted, glabrous, perennial grass, with 
biennial culms, and the leaves crowded round their bases ; 
upper internodes more than a foot long. Leaves long, 
slender, drooping on all sides, ending in filiform points, 
margins scabrid, ligule a ridge of silky hairs. Panicle 
one to two feet long, inclined or nodding, laxly plumose, 
pale straw-coloured, suffused with purple, branches fili- 
form, flexuous, lower a foot and upwards long, nodding. 
Spikelets half an inch long, three to five-flowered, male 
nearly glabrous, fem. silky, with very long hairs. Glumes 
hyaline, lower two empty, subequal, narrowly linear-lan- 
ceolate, finely acuminate, glabrous, 1-nerved, tip acute or 
2-toothed; flowering glumes narrowly lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, 3-nerved, male glabrous, fem. bearded with very 
long, silky hairs. Stamens reduced to filiform staminodes 
in the fem. spikelets. Ovary glabrous. Grain narrowly 
oblong, hilum linear.— J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of leaf; 2, male spikelefc ; 3, base of male flowering glume; 
4, palea ; 5, anther; 6, fem. spikelet ; 7, base of fem. floweriug glume; 
8, lodicules and ovary : — All enlarged. 



7608 




M.S.dd.JN.HtchKh. 



Vincent Broo! 



L Reev 



Tab. 7608. 
TCHIHATCHEWIA isatidea, Boise. 

Native of Armenia. 



Nat. Ord. Crucifek^. — Tribe Isatide.e. 
Genus Tcijihatchewia, Boiss. ; {Benth. & Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 93.) 



Tcijihatchewia isatidea; herba perennis, tota pilis elongatis patulis simplici- 
bus brevioribnsque farcatis hispido-strigosa, radice elongata, caule erecto 
humili robusto dense folioso superne ranaoso ramis corymbosia flori- 
bundis, fobis sessilibus v. breviter petiolatis lineari-oblongis obtusis 
patenti-recurvis integerrimis v. remote dentatie, costa lata, floribua 
in racemos breves densifloros ramulos terminantes erectis breviter 
pedicellatis, sepalia linearibus obtusis lateralibus basi saccatis, petalis 
longe unguiculatis, lamina ungue dimidio breviore rosea, fikmentis 
edentulis, ovario breviter^ stipitato oblongo stellatim tomentello 2-locu- 
lare loculis uniovulatis, stigmate sessile bilobo, siliqua majuscula pendula 
ovata obovata v. obcordata obtusa v, apice emarginata late alata alia 
coriaceig, nucleo valde compresso 2-locnlari indehiscente, loculo uno tantum 
eeminifero, semine a fnniculo brevi pendulo orbicular! valde compresso, 
testa coriacea brunnea, cotyledonibus latis planis radicula magna accum- 
bente. 

T. isatidea, Boiss. in Tchihatch. As. Min. Bof. vol. i. p. 292- Fl Orient vol i 
p. 310. 



A no less singular than beautiful Orucifer, discovered by 
the late Count Paul de Tchihatchef during his travels in Asia 
Minor, at an elevation of 5000 to 6000 ft. on the mountains 
near the town of Erzinhan, in the Pachalik of Erzerouin ; 
that is at the sources of the Euphrates. There is an error 
in Boissier's description of the genus, where the pod is 
described as one-celled and two-seeded, there being in fact 
two cells, separated by a membranous septum, one of them 
containing a perfect seed, the other an arrested (? al ways) 
ovule. The genus is closely allied to Peltaria, L., differing 
in the 2-celled ovary. 

Count de Tchihatchef was a famous traveller and writer, 
who, besides his opus magnum in seven volumes, on 'the 
geography, climate, zoology, botany and geology of Asia 
Minor, was the author of works on the Bosphorus, Travels 
in the Eastern Altai, Spain, and Algeria. He was a Cor- 
respondent of the Institute of France, and was well known 
and highly esteemed in scientific and literary society in 
England and throughout the Continent. 
August 1st, 1898. 



Seeds of Tchihatcliewia were received at the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, from the Imperial Botanical Gardens of 
St. Petersburgh, in 1896, plants raised from which flowered 
in the open air in May, 189S. 

Descr. — A stout, perennial rooted, densely leafy herb, his- 
pid, with long simple, and short stellate hairs. Stem six to 
ten inches high, very stout, copiously corymbosely branched 
above, the branches all flowering. Leaves one and a half to 
two and a half inches long, spreading and recurved, the 
upper gradually larger, sessile, linear, sub-acute, hispidly 
hairy on both surfaces, midrib very stout. Flowering 
branches short, densely crowded, many-fld., together forming 
a hemispheric corymb, four inches in diameter. Pedicels 
shorter than the calyx. Sepals erect, linear, obtuse, 
sparsely stellately hairy, lateral gibbous at the base. 
Petals with the oblong, recurved, rose-red limb about half 
as long as the claw. Filaments simple. Ovary oblong, 
stellately tomentose, 2-celled, stigma sessile, 2-lobed, 
anthers oblong. Siliqua an inch long, pendulous, obcor- 
date or ovate, tip notched or 2-lobed, nucleus narrow, 2- 
celled, wings broad, septum membranous, one cell empty, 
the other 1-seeded. Seed orbicular, compressed, cotyle- 
dons acumbent. — J. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, stamens and ovary ; 3, ovary ; 4, hairs from do. ; 5, portion 
of fruiting raceme ; 6, transverse section of sdliqua ; 7, seed; 8, embryo :— All 
but fig. 5 enlarged. 



ie,09 




W.S.del.J.N.FiLcKlith 



Vincent Broote,Day&Sar 



X Reeve &.C? London. 



Tab. 7609. 

BUDDLEIA tariabilis, Hemsl. 
Native of China. 

Nat. Ord. Loganiace^. — Tribe Euloganie^. 
Genus Buddleia, Linn. ; (Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 793.) 



BuddlEia variabilis; frutex polymorpha, ramulis floriferia sub-teretibus 
tetragonis v. tetraquetris foliisque subtus primum plus minua fulvo- 
tomentosis, foliis sessilibus v. sub-seaailibuB oppoaitia paribus basi linea 
elevata aariculave conjuncfcis anguste oblougo- v. ovato-lanceolatis acutis 
obtusis v. caudato-acuminatis integerrimis crenato-dentatis grosse serra- 
tisve diacoloribus, floribus in thyrsos elongatos terminales capitulaque 
axillaria densiflora dispositis brevissime pedicellatis bibracteolatis, calycia 
brevis glabri v. pnbescentis lobis oblongis obtusis, corollae tubo £- poll, 
longo gracili recto cylindraceo intus pilosulo, lobis rotundatis sub-crenatis 
lilacinis ore aurantiaco, antheris medio tubo sessilibus, ovario glabro, 
stylo brevi, capsula anguste oblongo-clavata glabra, aeminibus compressis 
anguste alatis basi et apice in caudas productis. 

B. variabilis, Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. (1889) p. 120. 



A native of the mountains of the provinces of Hupeli, 
Ichang Palung, Nanto, and Mts. to the northward, where it 
was discovered by Dr. Henry. Also found in Mount Omei, 
in Szechuen, at an elevation of 6000 ft. by Faber, and by 
Potani, in the Tibetan province of Kam. Mr. Hemsley, 
from whose description that given above is mainly taken, 
says of *it that its extreme forms, here treated as one 
species, are very different in foliage, but connected by 
every intermediate gradation. From a careful examination 
of a large number of specimens I can unhesitatingly adopt 
Mr. Hemsley' s view. The leaves especially are extraordi- 
narily variable, from a few inches long, broadly oblong- 
lanceolate and obtuse, to upwards of a foot long, narrowly 
lanceolate and caudate-acuminate. In a decorative point 
of view it is a very handsome plant, with rather dark 
green leaves. The flowers, which have been described as 
rose-coloured, are in the Kew individual of a clear lilac 
colour, with the mouth of the corolla orange-yellow. 

The figure here given of Baddleia variabilis is taken 
from a plant received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, from the 

August 1st, 1898. 



Jardin des Plantes in 189o, which flowered against a 
S.E. wall in the open air in July, 1897. In the Jardin des 
Plantes it forms a large ornamental shrub eight feet high, 
flowering freely in July and August. 

Descr. — A tall shrub, very variable in foliage and hairy- 
ness, with leaves and branchlets more or less tomentose in 
a young state, glabrous, or nearly so when old; flowering 
branchlets terete or tetragonous. Leaves opposite, the 
petioles of each pair joined at the base by a raised line on 
the branchlets, or by a small broad, green, recurved 
stipular auricle, four inches to a foot long, from oblong- 
lanceolate and obtuse to linear-lanceolate and caudate 
acuminate, entire, crenate-toothed, or coarsely serrate, 
dark green above, paler beneath ; petiole terete. Flowers 
densely crowded in large, globose heads, which are 
peduncled in the axils of the upper leaves, or collected in 
erect, caudiform thyrsi, four to six inches long, very shortly 
pedicelled; bracts subulate, about as long as the calvx, 
and appressed to it, Calyx about one-tenth of an inch 
long, slender, oblong, cleft into four narrow obtuse lobes. 
Corolla-tube balf an inch long, slender, terete, sparsely 
hairy withm ; limb about one-sixth of an inch in diameter 
lobes orbicular, sub-crenate. Anthers sessile above the 
middle of the tube, very small, oblong. Ooary oblong, 
terete glabrous. Style short, stigma oblong, two-lobed. 
Capsule one-quarter of an inch long, clavate.— -J. D. II. 



5,SS^uZt^^j; corolIa laid opea; 3 ' ovar ^ 4 ' ripe w 



7670 




M.SdelJ-NFitdUith. 



Vbicen; 



Ij RiBeve &.C? London. 



Tab. 7610. 
LEDUM glandulosum, Nutt. 

Native of California and British Columbia. 



Nat. Ord. Erice.e.— Tribe Ehodork.k. 
Oenns Ledum, Linn. ; {Benth. & Ilook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. £99.) 



Ledum glandulosum; frutex robustns, 2-3-padaKa, cortice fusco, rauiulia 
folii'sque glaberrimis, foliifl petiolatis oblongis ellipticiBYe obtusis v. 
sub-acutia 1-2 poll, longis basi acutis supra lurid e viridibns, subtns paUidi- 
oribus punctis reainosis creberrimia fere argentei*, racemia corymbosis, 
bracteis cynibiformibus, floribus longe gracile pedicellatis fere Hk»1L 
latis, aepalis 5 parvis ciliatis, petalis 5 oblongis apices versus ciliatis, 
staminibus 10, iilamentis basin versus pilosis, capsulis kte oblongis 
retusis puberulis et glauduloso-punctatis, seminibus angustis late alatie. 

L. (Ledadendron) glandulosum, Nutt. in Trans. Am. Phil Soc. n. ser vol. viii. 
(1843), p. 270. A. Gray in Bot. Calif, vol. i. p. 459 ; Synopt. Ft. ST. Am. 
vol ii. Part I. p. 43. Coulter, Man. Bot. Rocky Mts. p. 229. Macoun, 
Cat. Canad. PI (1890), p. 239. 

C. californicum, Kelloj in Proc. Calf. Acad. vol. ii. (1863), p. 1*. 



Ledum glandulosum has an extensive range in the 
Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains of Western North 
America, from Tulare County, California, lat. 36° N., where 
it attains an elevation of 8-9000 ft. to 51" N. in the Rocky 
Mts , where it was found by M. Macoun at 6000 ft. eleva- 
tion.' How much further north it extends is not known, 
but it advances southwards along that range to Colorado. 
I collected it in fruit, in company with Dr. Gray, in the 
Silver Mfc. Pass of the Sierra Nevada (California) in 1877. 
Though first made known by Nuttall, who found it in the 
Rocky Mts., it was discovered in about 1826 by Douglas, 
from whom there is a (flowerless) specimen in the Kew 
Herbarium, collected " at the confluence of the Columbia 
River, towards Puget's Sound." 

The plant at the Royal Gardens, Kew, from which the 
accompanying figure was made, was raised from seeds 
received in 1894 from Professor Sargent (the Arnold 
Arboretum), which flowered in the Arboretum of Kew in 
May, 1897. 

JJescr. — An evergreen, erect shrub, two to six feet high, 



jt 1st, 1898. 



brandies covered with dark brown bark. Leaves one to 
two inches long"; oblong or elliptic, acute or sub-acute, 
base cuneate, dark green above, beneath more or less 
silvery, with minute, white, waxy glands, which extend to 
the pedicels of the flowers calyx and capsule ; petiole 
about a sixth of an inch long. Flowers about half an inch 
in diameter, white, in corymbose clusters of simple 
racemes, one-half to one inch long. Brads one-tenth to 
one-fourth of an inch lonoj, boat-shaped, red-brown, deci- 
duous ; pedicels one-half to nearly one inch long, very 
slender. Sepals 5, small, oblong, obtuse, ciliate. Petals 
spathulately oblong, concave, ciliate above the middle, 
punctulate with glands. Stamens longer than the petals, 
filaments slender, hairy towards the base, anthers oblong. 
Ovary conical, densely clothed with white glands ; style 
elongate, glabrous. Capsule one-fourth of an inch long, 
oblong, retuse, puberulous and glandular. Seeds some- 
what sickle-shaped, nucleus linear, surrounded by a 
membranous wingr. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of tipper surface of leaf ; 2, flower ; 3, petal ; 4 and 5, stamens ; 
6, pistil ; 7, portion of fruiting raceme ; 8, ripe capsule ; 9, seed :— All enlarged, 
except fig. 7, which is of nat. size. 



7611. 



) 




deUJT.Fitchlith. 



^^entBi-ootepay&SonttHroP 



IReeve &.C London 



Tab. 7611. 

BJBES villosum, C, Gay. 

Native of Chili. 

Nat. OrJ. Saxifrages. — Tribe Ribesie.e. 
Genus Ribes, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 654.) 



Ribes (Ribesia) villosum, ; frutex erectus, ubique tomentosus, ramnlis robustia 
teretibus, cortice atro-fusco, foliia orbiculari-ovatis sub-integris v. breviter 
3-lobis basi rotundatis cordatiave supra convexia 3-5-nerviis, lobis brevibua 
latis crenulato-dentatis, petiolo |— § poll, longo, racemis spiciformibua 
florentibus foliis brevioribus breviter pedunculatis cylindraceis densifloria 
nutantibus, fructiferis elongatis folia superantibus, bracteis oblongis 
calyce brevioribus, calycis aurei tubo campanulato, lobis brevibus late 
ovatis recurvis, petalis anguste ovatis lanceolatisve calycis lobia brevioribus 
erectis, antberis sub-sessilibua, baccis villosis atro-purpureis. 

R. villosum, C. Gay, Fl. Ghil. vol. iii. p. 33. Waif. Ann. vol, i. p. 975. 

R. Bridgesii & R. Lavallei, Hort. 



The genus Ribes, which is nowhere found to the south- 
ward of lat. 28° N. in the Old World, in the New extends 
from the N. Polar regions to Tierra del Euego. Scarcely 
a dozen species are found in Europe and Asia ; in Europe 
itself eight ; in the Oriental region seven (all but one 
also Western European) ; in the Himalaya, where the 
genus reaches its Southern limits in the Old World (in 
Sikkim), eight (three of them European, and one Oriental) ; 
in China, according to Hemsley's list, eight (three of 
them European, and one Oriental) ; in Japan three, one of 
them European, another American. In the New World, 
on the other hand, twenty-three species are enumerated in 
the United States, and thirty-two in the Andes of S. 
America. Twenty-eight species are cultivated in the 
Arboretum of the Royal Gardens, Kew. 

B. villosum is a native of the Chilian Cordillera, in the 
' rapanas of Quillota and Santiago, at 8000 ft. elevation, 
where the fruit is, according to C. Gay, its author, much 
liked. It has been in cultivation in the Kew Arboretum 
for probably half a century, for I find a flowering specimen 
in the Herbarium, marked as having been collected there in 
1858. Of its origin there is no record. It flowers annually 
August 1st, 1898, 



in June, is perfectly hardy, and retains its foliage through 
ordinary winters. Its nearest ally is B. punctatum, DC. of 
Chili (Lindl. in Bot. Reg. (1834) t. 1658), of which it may 
be only a variety, but which differs in the deeply lobed 
leaves, ciliate petioles, and small, glabrous berries. 

Descr. — An erect shrub, branchlets, foliage, and in- 
florescence, uniformly sub-glandular-tomentose ; branches 
stout, terete, covered with a black-brown bark. Leaves 
petioled, orbicular- ovate, one to one and a half inches 
diam., sub-entire, or broadly shortly 3-lobed beyond the 
middle, crenulately toothed, convex above, 3-5 -nerved 
from the rounded or cordate base, lurid green on both 
surfaces, paler and strongly nerved beneath ; petiole one- 
half to two-thirds of an inch long ; stipules oblong, fuga- 
cious, tips rounded. Racemes spiciform, flowering sub- 
erect or drooping, shortly peduncled, shorter than the 
leaves, cylindric, dense-fld.; fruiting elongate, pendulous. 
Bracts shorter than the calyx-tube, ovate-oblong. Flowers 
sub-sessile, about one-sixth of an inch long, and as broad 
across the mouth, golden-yellow. Calyx tube campanulate, 
lobes small, broadly ovate, recurved. ' Petals minute, lan- 
ceolate, obtuse, erect, shorter than the calyx-lobes. 
Anthers nearly sessile in the throat of the calyx. Styles 
short, recurved. Berries pisiform, violet- black, hirsute.— 
J. D. II. 



fc lg i *' I>ortion of r hachis of raceme, with bracts and flcvers ; 2, flower with 
half the calyx-tube removed ; 'J and 4, anthers :— All enlarged. 



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„ 7608.— TCHIHATCHEWIA ISATIDEA. 
„ 7609.— BUDDLEIA VARIABILIS. 
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7612. 







76 J 3 




MS.deLJ.NJitditeh. 



Vincent Bro oks .Day A-SonU 4 * 



-LReeve&C? London. 



Tab. 7612, 7613. 
EULOPHIELLA Peeteksiana, Krdnzl, 
Native of Madagascar. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide.e. — Trite Vande^e. 
Genus Etjlophiella ; {Rolfe in Lindenia, vol. iii. p. 29.) 



EuLOPHiELLi Peetersiana ; gigantea, rhizomate elongato 1-2-poll. crasso 
cylindraceo repente radicante pseudobulbos foliiferos scaposque emit- 
tente, internodiis brevibus vestigiis squamarum vestitis, radicibus crassia 
vermiformibus, foliis fasciculatis 3-5-pedalibus erectis lanceolatis sub- 
acutis multinerviis, scapo 3-pedali e basi ascendente erecto robusto 
viridi squamoso, squamis brevibus obtusis vaginantibus inferioribus 
basin versus scapi imbricatis superioribus remotis, racemo pedali multi- 
floro erecto, rhachi stricta robusta viridi, bracteis pollicaribus late 
oblongis cymbiforniibus apice rotundatis griseis, tloribus confertis 3^-4 
poll, latis, pedicellis cum ovariis 3-pollicaribus roseis, sepalis petalisque 
subaequalibus orbiculari-obovatis concavis lsete roseo-purpureis basi albis, 
his paullo minoribus, labello petalis breviore, lobis lateralibus late 
oblongis incurvis albis roseo-purpureo marginatis, terminale transverse 
late obloBgo 2-lobulato roseo-purpureo basi albo, disco albo basi 3-lamel- 
lato, inter lobos laterales carinis 5 aureis percurso, carinis 3 interioribns 
ad basin lobi terminalis in dentes 3 erectos aureos productis, colurana 
lobis lateralibus labelli breviore, anthera mitriforme papillosa, polliniis 
hemisphasricis excavatis in glandulam orbicularem sessilibus. 

E. Peetersiana, Krdnzl. in Gard. Ckron. 1897, vol. i. p. 182. Masters I.e. 
1898. vol. i. p. 200, fig. 76, cum Ic. Supjd. Rolfe in Orchid. Rev. vol. v. 
(1897), pp. 67, 101, 206. Journ. Horde. Ser. III. vol. xxxvi. (1898), 
p. 343, fig. 66. 



The superb plant here figured is a native of Madagascar, 
and appears, according to Dr. Kriinzlin, to have been dis- 
covered by Johannes Braun, who died at Antananarivo, and 
•who sent to that botanist leaves of it which measured two 
feet in length. Living plants were subsequently sent by 
Mr. Mocoris to Mr. Peeters of St. Giles, near Brussels, 
who flowered the specimen from which Dr. Kriinzlin drew 
up his description. According to the latter the plant 
bears sub-compressed pseudobulbs eleven inches long, 
covered with decaying leaves. These pseudobulbs are pro- 
bably not yet developed in the magnificent specimen here 
figured (which is another of the many triumphs of Sir 
Trevor Lawrence's successful Orchid culture). The only 
other known species of Eulophiella is E. Elizabethse, Rolfe, 
figured at t. 7387 of this work, also a native of Mada- 

Septf.mbkr 1st, 1898. 



gascar, in which pseudobnlbs such as are described by 
Dr. Kranzlin, as occurring in E. Peetersiana, are well de- 
veloped. The flowering specimen of E. Peetersiana was 
kindly sent for figuring in this Magazine, from Burford 
Lodge, in the middle of April of the present year. The 
reduced view of the whole plant, t. 7613, is adapted from 
the Gardener's Chronicle, and a coloured sketch by Mr. 
W. H. White. 

Descr. — Rootstock cylindric, creeping over rocks, one to 
two inches in diameter, emitting at the nodes stout vermi- 
form roots, and bearing stout pseudobulbs nearly a foot 
long, clothed with leaf-remains ; internodes of rootstock 
very short, clothed with withered scales. Leaves tufted, 
three to five feet long, lanceolate, sub-acute, erect, many- 
nerved. Scape erect from an ascending base, three feet 
high, as thick as the little finger, green, bearing many 
short, appressed, obtuse, sheathing scales, that are im- 
bricating below and distant higher up. Raceme about a 
foot long, erect, of many rather crowded flowers ; rhachis 
stout, terete, green. Bracts about an inch long, oblong, 
boat-shaped, tips rounded, grey. Pedicels with the ovaries 
three inches long, rose-red. Flowers three and a half to 
four inches in diameter. Sepals and petals subequal, 
orbicular-oblong, concave, bright rose-purple with white 
bases, petals rather smaller than the sepals. Lip shorter 
than the petals ; side lobes broad, obtuse, erect and in- 
curved, white, broadly edged with rose-purple ; mid-lobe 
broadly transversely oblong, bilobulate, rose-purple, except 
at the base, where it passes into the white of the disk of 
the lip ; the latter has between the side lobes three broad, 
erect, obtuse laniellas, then five slender golden ribs, which 
extend to the base of the mid-lobe, where they end as 
rather large, triangular, laterally compressed, golden 
teeth.— J. D. H. 



Tab. 7612. Upper portion of leaf and raceme of E. Peetersiana, of the 
natural size. 

JJw l m \ , JW ^ view of whoIe P lant ! Yl S- 1» lip 5 2, column and 
anther ; J and 4, polhma : -All enlarged. 



7614. 




tch htK 



AfincentBrooVs.DayS 



Ii Reeve <5cC° London. 



Tab. 7614. 
RHODODENDRON yunnanense, Franch. 

Native of Yunnan. 



Nat. Ord. Erice.e. — Tribe Riiodore-e. 
Genus Rhododendron, Linn.; (Benth. & llook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599.) 



Rhododendron (Eurhododendron) yimrcanerase ; frutex erectus, ramis robustis, 
ramulia cortice fnsco tectis, foliis breviter petiolatis 2g-3 poll, longia 
elliptico-lanceolatia acutis acumiuatisve coriaceia baai anguatatia supra 
luride viridibus marginibusque setuloais, costa pallida, aubtus palli- 
dioribus glaberrimia sparse lepidotis, nervia utrinque costae ad 9 
gracillimis, petiolo crassiusculo J-J poll, longo, floribua erecto-patentibua 
in corymbos terminales laxuoa dispositia, rhachi glaberrima robuata 
pollicari, bracteis riliformibus.. pedicellis f-l-poll. longis, calyce minuto 
cupalari lepidoto margine undulato, corolla 2 poll, expans. late infundibu- 
lar! alba fauce baain versua loborum posticorum maculia sanguineia 
aspersa, lobia tubo alte 5-costato intus pubescente multo longioribus 
oblongis obtusia patenti-recurvis, 2 antici3 majoribus, staminibus 10 
lobis corollas longioribus patentim declinatis, filamentis exsertis gracilibua 
infra medium barbatis, antheris parvis obloDgis flavo-brunneis, ovario 
oblongo 5-loculari dense lepidoto, stylo gracili glaberrimo, stigmata 
capitellato. 

R. yunnanenae, Franch. in Bull. Soc. Bot. France, vol. xxxiii. (1886), p. 233. 
Forbes & Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xxvi. (1889), p. 32. 



The rapidly increasing number of new species of 
Mhododendron coming from Western China, renders fcbeir 
identification by published descriptions proportionally 
difficult, and it hence becomes the duty of the Botanical 
Magazine to figure as many of these as it can consistently 
with the claims of other interesting plants. A specimen 
of the species here figured was sent to Mr. Franchet (by 
whom a host of Chinese species have been for the first 
time described), and he has identified it with his R. yun- 
nanense, one of the Abbe Delavay's many discoveries, a 
native of Houang-li-pin in Yunnan. The specimen figured is 
from a plant received at the Royal Gardens, Kew, from 
Messrs. Veitch in 1894, and which flowered in April, 1897. 
It differs a little from Franchet's description, in having no 
scales on the upper surface of the leaf, and in the calyx 
not being ciliolate. It is perfectly hardy at Kew. 

Descr. — An erect shrub; branches stout, terete, clothed 

I IKMliKK 1st, \HUH. 



with black-brown bark, branchlets woody, setulose; leaf- 
buds about half an inch long, lanceolate, scales small, 
glabrous.' Leaves two and a half to three inches long, 
shortly petiolecl, elliptic-lanceolate, sub-acute, coriaceous, 
above dark green, opaque, with a pale midrib, covered, as 
are the margins, with short, scattered, stiff sub-erect 
hairs, base acute, narrowed into a rather stout petiole one- 
sixth to one-fourth of an inch long ; beneath pale green, 
quite glabrous, sparsely lepidote, nerves about nine on each 
side of the stout midrib, very slender, spreading. Flowers 
few, sub-racemosely corymbose on a very stout, terminal, 
erect, annulate rhachis, sub-erect or spreading, white, 
with blood-red oblong spots towards the bases of the 
upper corolla-lobes. Pedicels three-fourths to one inch 
long. Calyx minute, cupular, lepidote, margin undulate. 
Corolla two inches across the limb, tube shortly funnel- 
shaped, pubescent within, strongly 5-ribbed; lobes longer 
than the tube, spreading and recurved, oblong, obtuse, the 
three upper rather shorter than the two lower. Stamens 
ten, exserted, nearly as long as the corolla-lobes, filaments 
declinate, spreading, bearded below the middle ; anthers 
very small, pale brown. Ovary conically oblong, terete, 
5-celled, densely lepidote ; style slender, glabrous ; stigma 
capitellate. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Portion of upper, and 2, of under surface of leaf ; 3, lepidote scale ; 
4, calyx and ovary ; 5, (stamen : -All enlarged. 



7675 




dri J.NJitch lith 



"Wncent Broods ,Daya.SonltfI/np 



L Reeve & ( 



Tab. 7615. 

LOBELIA inteetexta, Baler. 
Native of Central Africa. 

Nat. Ord. Campanulace2E. — Tribe Lobelieje. 
Genus Lobelia, Linn.\ (Benth. & Hook. f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 551.) 



Lobelia (Hemipogon) intertexta ; herba tenella, laxe ccespitosa, e basi diffuse 
rainosa, ramis erectis angulatis pilosulis, foliis parvulis sparsis orbicularis 
late ovatis obtusis crenatis in petiolutn lamina breviorem angustatis 
utrinque glaberrimis marginibus ciliatis, supra laate viridibus subtus 
purpurascentibus, snpremis linearibus, floribus 5-poll. diam. apices versus 
ramulorum laxe racemosis longe graciliter pedicellatis, bracteis ad basin 
pedicellorum linearibus crenatis, calycig tubo parvo obconico, lobis 
Bubulatis patentibus corollse tubo brevioribus ciliatis, corol'aa tubo 
cylindraceo ^ poll, longo intus piloso, limbi labio superiore profunde 
trilobo lobis late ovatis sub-acutis patentibus, inferiore multo minore 
bipartito segmentis lanceolatis defiexis, filamentis basi liberis pilosis, 
antheris inclusis parvis 3 apicibus barbatis, ovario brevi turbinato, stylo 
glaberrimo basi late conico, stigmate hemispherico bifido annulo pilorum 
cincto, capsula obconica. 

L. intertexta, Baker in Kew Bulletin, No. 139 (1898), p. 157. 



The little Lobelia here figured resembles very closely the 
common L. Erinus, Linn., of our gardens (tab. 901), a native 
of South Africa, and is nearer still to the variety bicolor 
of that plant (tab. 514, L. bicolor), which has similarly 
hairy stems. It is in fact one of a puzzling group of 
African congeners, extending from Abyssinia to the Cape 
Colony, which includes L. Erinus, L. umbrosa, Hochst., 
L. acutidens, Hk. f'., L. truUifolia, Hemsl., and others, 
all of which require good figures for their accurate 
identification. 

L. intertexta is a native of the Nyika plateau in British 
Central Africa, at an elevation of 6000 to 7000 ft., where 
it was discovered by A. C. Whyte, Esq., F.L.S., Superin- 
tendent of the Forest Department (under Sir H. Johnston, 
K.C.B.), who has further transmitted to Kew an Her- 
barium of 1500 species from the same region. 

The plant figured was raised from seed received in 1897, 
which yielded plants that flowered in a stove in December 
f.ubek 1st, 1898. 



of the same year. It is a very elegant pot-plant, of grace- 
ful habit, flowering profusely. 

Descr. — A very slender, diffusely branched annual, de- 
cumbent below, with ascending, loosely leafy branches 
four to six inches long, sparsely covered with spreading 
hairs. Leaves alternate, rather distant, uniform, one-third 
to half an inch long, broadly ovate, obtuse, coarsely irre- 
gularly crenate, glabrous on both surfaces, but ciliate on 
the margins, pale green above, reddish purple beneath, 
base narrowed into a ciliate petiole shorter than the blade. 
Flowers from the upper leaf axils, and loosely racemed at the 
ends of the branches ; pedicels very slender, lower up to an 
inch and a half long, bracteate at the base. Bracts much 
shorter than the pedicels, linear or lanceolate, crenate, 
green, the lower broader and foliaceous. Calyx-tube 
minute, obconic, lobes a fifth of an inch long, subulate, 
ciliate, spreading. Corolla-tube longer than the calyx- 
lobes, cylindric, hairy within ; limb 2-lipped, lower lip 
half an inch broad, deeply three-lobed, lobes sub-equal, 
broadly ovate, acute, spreading, white below the middle, 
with a violet spot at each sinus, wholly violet beyond the 
middle ; upper lip of two small, oblanceolate, acute, parallel, 
spreading or deflexed violet segments. Filaments free, 
hairy below; anthers small, oblong, three with bearded 
tips. Ovary turbinate, very short, style glabrous, base 
conical, stigma small, hemispheric, bifid, girt with a rino- 
of hairs.— J. D.H. 



Fig. 1, Flower; % ovary, calyx, and stamens ; 3, ovary -.—All enlarged. 



7616 




MSOfiLJOTitehTiG-i 



WncentBrootePay&Sanlt imp 



L Reeve & C° Loiidbn 



Tab. 7616. 
CALLISTEPHUS hortensis, Cass. 

Native of Western China. 



Nat. Ord. Composite. — Tribe Asteroide^e. 
Genus Callistephus, Cass.; (Benth. & HooJc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 270.) 



Callistephtjs hortensis; herba annua, erecta, robusta, ramosa, hirtella, foliis 
alternis ovatis grosse insequaliter et obtuse dentatis lobulatisve basi 
cuneatis in petiolum latum angustatis, capitulis ad apices ramorum 
solitariis sessilibus amplis heterogamis radiatis, floribus omnibus fertilibus, 
radii femineis 1-pluri-seriatis disci hermaphroditis, involucri hemispbaerici 
bracteis multiseriatis exterioribus subfoliaceis sqnarroso-recurvis interiori- 
bus scariosis erectis appressis oblongis obtusis, receptaculo planiusculo 
alveolato, fl. radii ligulis patentibtis obtusis, fl. disci tubulosis, tubo infra 
medium abrupte angnstato, ore breviter obtuse 5-lobo, antheris basi 
obtusis, styli ramis brevibus complanatis obtusis, acbeniis compressi8 
apice annulo minutissimo setuloso coronatis, pappi setis tenuibus 
barbellatis caducis. 

0. hortensis, Cass, in Diet. 8c. Nat. xxvii. (1825), p. 491. Forbes & Hemsl. in 

Journ. Linn. 8oc. vol. xxvi. 407. 
C. cbinensis, Nees, Aster, p. 222. DC. Prodr. vol. v. p. 274. Clarke, Comp. 

Ind. p. 41. Bretschneid. Early Furop. Pes. Fl. China, p. 101. 

Oallistemma hortensis, Cass, in Bull. Philom. 1817, p. 32 ; Opusc. t. 7 ; et in 
Diet. 8c. Nat. vol. vi. Suppl. p. 45 ; Lc. Bot. Dicot. t. 90. 

Diplopappus chinensis, Less. Syn. Comp. p. 165. 

Aster chinensis, Linn. Sp. PI. p. 877. Mill. Gard. Diet. Ed. 8, No. 30. Ait. 
Sort. Kew. Ed. 1, vol. iii. 20. 

Aster Chenopodii folio &c, Dill. Hort. Fltlmm. p. 38, t. 34 (1732). 

Aster 3, Trew, Hort. nitidis*, t. 121, 122 (1786). 



Though the " China Aster " has been repeatedly figured 
under its garden forms, I know of only two really good 
representations of it as found in a wild state, one in the 
" Hortus Elthamensis " of Dillenius, published in 1732, the 
other in Trew's " Hortus nitidissimus " (1786). There is a 
fair one in the " Dictionaire des Sciences Naturelles," but 
it is too much reduced to give a satisfactory idea of 
the plant, which is now rarely seen except in a condition 
with the disk flowers ligulate. 

As a genus Callistephus is distinguished from Aster by 
the inner scarious involucral bracts, to which most authors 
add the crown of minute bristles forming what has been 
considered an outer pappus, but this is sometimes an all 
but imperceptible character. It has no congeners, and its 

September Lst, 1- 



generally adopted name is posterior to that of Callistemma, 
also of Cassini, which that author himself suppressed, in 
consequence of its being so near to Callistemon of Brown. 

The indigenous form of the China Aster appears to be 
common in the rocky hills of Northern China, from 
the neighbourhood of Peking to the Yang-tse-Kiang. 
There are also specimens in the Kew Herbarium from 
Eastern Turkestan, Western Tibet and Afghanistan, but 
in the more western of these localities it is no doubt only 
known as a cultivated plant, as it is in Japan. According 
to Aiton it was introduced into England by Ph. Miller in 
1731 : and Dillenius, who received seeds from Prof. Van 
Royen of Leyden, figured it in 1732. The specimen here 
figured flowered in the Herbaceous grounds of the Royal 
Gardens, Kew, in October, 1897, but did not mature seed. 
It was raised from seeds presented in 1896 by the Messrs. 
Vilmorin & Co., which were obtained from the Abbe 
Farges, who collected them in Eastern Szechuan. 

Descr. — A tall, stout, erect, leafy annual, two to three 
feet high, corymbosely branched above, covered with 
spreading hairs ; stem and branches angular, of a rich 
purple brown colour. Leaves two to four inches long, 
alternate, ovate, deeply, coarsely, obtusely toothed or 
tabulate, contracted at the cuneate base into a winged 
petiole. Heads solitary, terminating the branches, up to 
three and a half inches in diameter. Involucre campanu- 
late, outer bract's many, herbaceous, lanceolate, obtuse, 
spreading and recurved, often margined with red-brown ; 
inner erect, linear-oblong, obtuse, scarious. Receptacle 
nearly flat, pitted. Rayfi. very many, ligulate, 1-2-seriate, 
linear, obtuse, violet-blue, female. Dish fl. very many, bi- 
sexual, golden-yellow, tubular, suddenly contracted below 
the middle, mouth shortly five-toothed. Style branches 
short, oblong, flattened. Achenes of all the flowers fertile, 
oblong, or obovate-oblong, compressed, pubescent, crowned 
with a ring of very minute bristles. Pappus hairs 
barbellate, white. — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Fl. of ray with portion o£ lignle removed ; 2, pappus hair ; 
S, achene of do. ; 4, fl. of disk ; 5, anthers ; 6, top of style of disk fl. ; 7, ripe 
achene of do. :— All enlarged. 



7611 




• 



Vincent! 



Tab. 7617. 

CYRTOSPERMA senegalense, Engl. 

Native of Upper Guinea. 



Nat. Ord. Aroide^:. — Tribe Orontie*. 
Genus Cyrtosperma, Griff. • (Benth. & Eook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 997.) 



Cyrtosperma (Lasimorpha) senegalense ; foliis ambitu hastato-oblongis snb- 
acntia, lobis basilaribua oblongo-lanceolatis obtusis lamina J-g breviori- 
bus sinu angusto, petiolo elongato pedunculoque sparse aculeatis, 
pedunculo robusto petiolo duplo longiore, spatha fere pedali oblongo- 
lanceolata valde acuminata flavo-viridi rubro-brunneo fasciata baBi vix 
convoluta, spadice spatha multo breviore cylindracea obtusa saturate 
violaceo-purpurea, floribus 3-4-meris, periantbii segmentis quadratis 
truncatis, anthera filamento quadra to asquilonga et-lata, ovario oblongo 
in stylum brevem crassum clavatum desiaente, etigmate parvo umbonato, 
baccis mono8permis. 

O. senegalense, Engl. Monog. Arac. p. 270. 

Lasimorpha senegalensis, Schott in Bonplandia 1857, p. 127; Gen. Aroid. 
t. 85, fig. 1-10 ; Prodr. Avoid, p. 406. 



The genus Cyrtosperma consists of nine or ten species 
of tall, tropical Asiatic, African, and American Aroids, 
natives of watery places. It has been divided by Schott 
and Engler into several sections, according to the number 
of parts of the flower and ovules in the ovary. C. sene- 
galense inhabits swamps along the whole west coast of 
tropical Africa from Senegal, where it was discovered by 
the French botanical collectors, Heudelot and Perrottet, to 
Fernando Po and Old Calabar. It is closely allied to 
C. Afzelii, Engl., a much larger species, said to attain a 
height of twelve to thirteen feet, with a spathe twenty 
inches long, and a globose spadix, which, like that of 
C. senegalense, is almost black-purple. 

A drawing of the spathe of C. seTkegalense, sent to Kew 
by Mr. Harold B. Lloyd, Assistant Curator, Bot. Garden, 
Old Calabar, represents that organ as nearly eighteen inches 
long, and the spadix as nearly six inches long. The 
tuberous roots of G. senegalense were sent to Kew in 
July, 1897, by the late Mr. H. W. L. Billington, who as 
Curator of the Botanical station of Old Calabar, fell a 
victim to the malarious climate of the African coast. It 
October 1st, 1898. 



flowered in a stove of the Royal Gardens in March of this 
year, and the spathe continued fresh till the end of May. 

Descr. — Eootstock a large tuber. Leaves long-petioled, 
blade a foot long, sagittately oblong, sub-acute, basal lobes 
one-third to half as long as the blade above them, oblong- 
lanceolate, obtuse, diverging from a narrow sinus, bright 
green above, paler beneath ; nerves many, diverging from 
the stout midrib, lowest pair decurrent in the basal lobes ; 
petiole three to four feet high, sparsely prickly, green. 
Peduncle much longer than the petiole, green, sparsely 
prickly. Spathe a foot to eighteen inches long, oblong- 
lanceolate, long-acuminate, externally dull green, clouded 
with red, within pale yellow-green, with broad indefined 
interrupted bands of maroon brown, tip not twisted, base 
hardly convolute, margins narrowly recurved. Spadix two 
to six inches long by less than half to three-fourths of 
an inch in diameter, shortly stipitate, cylindric, obtuse, 
dark violet-purple. Flowers tetramerous, rarely trimerous. 
Perianth-segments equal or unequal, quadrate, truncate. 
Stamens nearly as long as the perianth-segments, anthers 
didymous, as long and broad as the square filaments. 
Ovary oblong, slightly narrowed into the stout clavate 
style, which is crowned by the umbonate stigma. — J. D. PL. 



Fig. 1, Portion of spadix and flowers; 2, perianth- segment ; 3 and 
4, stumens ; 5, ovary :— All enlarged. 



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Tab. 7618. 

CYTISUS puegaks, Boiss. 
Native of Centr. and S. France and N. Spain. 



Nat. Ord. Leguminos^. — Tribe GenistEjE. 
Genus Cytisus, Linn. ; (Benth. & Hook./. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 484.) 



Cytisus (Spartocytisus^wrvjaMS ; frutex erectus, ramosissimus, mox aphyllus, 
ramis ramulisque sub-ereetis teretibus viridibus, foliis sparsis parvis 
sessilibus ramulis brevissimis insertis 1-3-foliolatis, foliolis linearibus v. 
lineari-oblongis obtusis sub-sericeis basi angustatis, floribus solitariis 
binisve ad nodos Buperiores pedicellatis, basi foliis nrinutis unifoliolatia 
insti-uctis, calyce parvo campanulato bilabiato puberulu, basi minute 
bibracteolato, labiis obtusis, vexillo orbicular! emarginato margimbus 
incurvis basi cordata auriculis inflexis, alia obovato-oblongis vexillo fere 
asquilongo, carina oblonga obtusa, antheris linearibus apiculatis, ovario 
hirsuto, stylo filiformi, stigmate capitellato, legumine pollicari lineari- 
oblongo piloso oligospermo, valvis convexis brunneis, seminibu3 orbiculari- 
bus conipressis olivaceis nitidis, etropliiolo crenato. 

C. purgans, Boiss. Voy. Bot. Esp. (1838-1845) p. 134, lin. 8. Spach in Ann. 
Sc. Nat. Ser. III. vol. iii. (1845) p, 156. Willk. <$f Lange, Fl. Hispan. 
vol. iii. p. 456. 

Spartocytisus purgans, Webb. Sf Berth. Bhyt. Canar. Sect. ii. p. 45 (in nota). 

Sarothamnus purgans, Gren. 8f Godr. Fl. Franc, vol. i. p. 349. 

Genista purgans, Linn. Syst. Ed. x. p. 1157. Lamk. Fl. Franc, vol. ii. p. 618. 

DC. Prodr. vol. ii. p. 149. Bull., Herb. France, p. 117, t. 115. 
Spartium purgans, Linn. Syst. Ed. xii. p. 474. Lodd. Bot. Gab. t. 1117. 

Asso, Syn. Stirp. Aragon. p. 90, t. 10. Ait. Sort. Kew. Ed. ii. vol. iv. 

p. 255. 



Avery handsome dwarf Broom, native of rocky hills in 
France, from the Loire southward, and of the northern 
half of Spain. Though bearing the name of purgans, 
it has no place in any modern Pharmacopoeia ; nor, 
except a bare mention of it, as a purgative and emetic, in 
Planchon and Collins' ''Drogues Simples " (vol. ii. p. 514) 
to which my friend Mr. Holmes drew my attention, can I 
find any other account of its properties than that given by 
Bulliard in his " Herbier de la France " cited above. This 
last author places it in his list of poisonous plants, with 
the French name of Genet Griot, and says of it, that 
besides the emetic and purgative properties of Genista 
tinctoria, it is a diuretic and hydragogue. He evidently 
considers its use as dangerous, for he recommends anti- 
dotes in cases of poisoning by a too free use of it. 

October 1st, 1898. 



According to Ph. Miller Cybisus purgans was introduced 
into England before 1768. It is an old inhabitant of the 
Royal Gardens, Kew, where it flowers in May. According 
to Willkomm and Lange the flowers have the fragrance of 
vanilla, but this was hardly perceptible in our specimens. 

Descr. — An erect, nearly glabrous, copiously branched, 
rigid shrub, three to five feet high, with sub-erect branches, 
often nearly leafless, and erect, striated, sub-sericeous 
branchlets. Leaves hardly half an inch long, scattered, 
sub-sessile, trifoliolate ; leaflets linear- or linear-obovate, 
minutely silky beneath ; stipules 0. Flowers in loose, 
erect racemes at the ends of the branches, solitary or binate, 
from the axil of a minute, persistent, unifoliolate leaf, sub- 
erect, half an inch long, golden-yellow. Pedicels shorter 
than the flowers, minutely pubescent. Calyx one-tenth of 
an inch long, turgid, silky, minutely bibracteolate, at the 
base, 2-lipped, lips broad, obtuse, upper minutely 2- 
lower 3-toothed. Standard erect, orbicular, very shortly 
clawed, concave, margins incurved, base shortly cordate, 
with two small inflexed auricles. Wing-petals about one- 
fourth shorter than the standard, obovate-oblong, concave, 
tips rounded. Keel-petals nearly as long as the wings. 
Staminal-tube shortly ten-cleft, filaments subulate, anthers 
ovate-oblong, apiculate. Ovary villous, narrowed into a 
glabrous style nearly as long as the pod, stigma minute. 
Pod an inch long, linear-oblong, three- to four-seeded ; 
valves thin, hairy. Seeds orbicular, compressed, smooth ; 
funicle crenate. — /. D. H. 



^ig"- 1» Portion of branchlet with calyx bracteoles and stamens ; 2, standard ; 
3 and 4, anthers ; 5, ovary ; 6, pod j 7, seed -.—All enlarged, except fig. 6, which 
is of the nat. size. 



1619 










Tab. 7619. 

AMELANCHIER canadensis, Medic, var. oblongifolia, 

Torr. Sf Or. 
Native of the Eastern United States and Canada. 



Nat. Ord. Rosacea. — Tribe Pome,e. 
Genus Amelanchier, Lindl. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 628.) 



Amelanchier canadensis, var. oblongifolia; frutex v. arbusctila ramulis 
foliisque oblongiB subtus albo-lanatia demum glabratis, racemis brevius- 
culis, calycis lobis ovato-lanceolatia, petalis obovatia calycis lobis duplo 
longioribus, fructu globoao carnoso. 

A. canadensis, var. oblongifolia, Torr. fy Gray, Fl. JV. Am. vol. i. p. 473. 

Torrey, Fl. A. York, vol. i. p. 225. A. Gray Man. Bot. N. U. States, Ed. 

1880, p. 162. Macoun Gat. Canad. PI. 1883, p. 149. Bean in Gard. 

Chron. 1897, vol. i. p. 265, and p. 333, fig. 115. 
A. canadensis, var. obovalis, Sargent, Silva of N. Am. vol. iv. p. 128, t. 195. 
A. ovalis, DC Prodr. vol. ii. p. 632, Loud. Arboret. vol. ii. p. 876, fig. 632. 

Hook. Fl. Bor. Am. vol. i. p. 202. Emmerson, Trees ty Shrubs of Mass. 

p. 444, and Ed. II. vol. ii. p. 504. 
A. intermedia, Spach, Hist. Veg. Phan. vol. ii. p. 85. Wenzig in Linnssa, 

vol. xxxviii. (1874) p. 112. 
A. oblongifolia, Hoem. Syn. Rosifl. p. 147. 

A. spicata, Decne Mem. Fam. Pom. p. 135, t. 9, fig. 5 (non Lamk.). 
Aronia ovalis, Pers. Syn. vol. ii. p. 39. Torrey, Gomp. Fl. N. & Midd. U. St. 

p. 203. 
Pyrua ovalis, Bigel. Fl. Bost. Ed. n. p. 195 (non Willd.). 
PP. Nenmanniana, Tausch. in Flo?-a, vol. xxi. (1838) Beibl. p. 76. 
Mespilus canadensis, var. obovalis, Michx. Fl. Bor. Am. vol. i. p. 291. 
Crataegus spicata, Lam. Bid. vol. i. p. 84. Nouv. Duham. vol. iv. p. 132. 
Swamp Sugar Pear, Swamp Pyrus, U. St. 



Amelanchier canadensis, the June-berry, Shad-bust), Grape 
Pear, or Service-beny, of the United States, is a very 
variable plant, especially in the form and size of the leaves, 
their indumentum, the length of the racemes, and the form 
of the calyx-lobes and of the petals. Torrey & Gray have 
in the Flora of N. America made five varieties. Sereno 
Watson, in his Bibliographical Index to N". Am. Botany, 
has most carefully elaborated the synonymy of these, and 
I have followed, with few exceptions, his synonymy of the 
variety here figured, omitting a few references of no im- 
portance. The species, under one or other form, ranges 
over the whole of temperate N. America, from Florida to 

October 1st, 1898. 



Hudson's Bay, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Of 
these forms, the "Western var. alnifolia, with roundish 
leaves, is the most distinct, and is retained as a species 
by S. Watson in the " Flora of California," though 
reduced by A. Gray. Var. oblong if olia is best known as 
the Swamp Sugar Pear. Macoun, in his " Catalogue of 
Canadian Plants," says that it extends from New Bruns- 
wick to the Rocky Mts., and as far north as the 
Mackenzie River ; but in the U. States it appears to be 
confined to the eastern side of the continent. Accord- 
ing to Sir J. Richardson the variety abounds in the sandy 
plains of the Saskatchewan River, where the wood is 
prized by the Cree Indians for making arrows and pipe- 
stems, whence the name given to it by the Canadian 
voyagers of Bois de Fleche. Its berries, about the size 
of a pea, are eaten by the Cree Indians, both fresh and 
dried, and form a pleasant addition to pemmican ; they 
further form an ingredient in puddings little inferior to 
plum-puddings. Emmerson describes it as one of the 
earliest and most conspicuous ornaments of swampy woods 
in the State of Massachusetts. 

The figure here given was made from a bush in the 
Arboretum of the Royal Gardens, Kew, raised from seed 
sent in 1891 by H. P. Kelsey, Highlands Nursery 
(Mitchell & Co.) Kawana, N". Carolina. 

Bescr. — Amelanchier canadensis, var. oblongifolia, differs 
from typical canadensis in its smaller size, usually shrubby 
habit, leaves less sharply serrate, covered Avith matted 
tomentum beneath, longer racemes, more obovate petals, 
and more juicy berries. — /. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Calyx and bract; 2 and 3, stamens : — All enlarged. 



7620 




delJ.N.Fitchlith. 



VirLcentBraoksJD-ay&Sor; 



L Reeve &.C? London 



Tab. 7620. 
FEIJOA Sellowiaxa, Berg. 
Native of 8. Brasil and Uruguay. 

Nat. Ord. Myktace^. — Tribe Myrte-M. 
Genus Feijoa, Berg; (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 712.) 

Feijoa Stllowiana; frutex v. arbusoula erecta, foliis stibtus et inflorescentia 
albo-tomentosis, cortice brunneo, foliis breviter petiolatis oblongis 
obtusia coriaceis supra Isete viridibus penninerviis nervis patentibus, 
pedicellis uuifloris oppositis axillaribus demum ramulo excrescente quasi 
lateralibus, calycis tubo elongato supra ovarium nou producto anguste 
turbinato basi bracteolis minimis 2 iustracto, limbi segmentis orbiculari- 
bus persistentibus reflexislateribusdemuminvolutis, petalis 4 orbicularibus 
patenti-reflexis extus albis intus sanguineis marginibus albis, staminibus 
perplurimis in alabastro rectis per anthesin elongatis petalasuperantibus, 
filameutia gracilibus sanguineis, antberis parvis orbicularibus dorsifixis 
aureis, loculis pilosis connectivum crassiusculnm cingentibus,_ ovano 
4-locnlari, stylo crassiusculo superne attenuato curvo, stigmate capitellato, 
ovulis numerosis biseriatis placentis angulo interiore loculorum affixia, 
baeca magna late oblonga calycis segmentis coronata pulposa viridi 
aromatica 4-loculari polysperma, seminibns reniformi-rotundatis com- 
pressia, teata coriacea, emhryone spiraliter convoluto, cotyledonibus 
aDgustis, radicula elongata obtusa. 

F Sellowiana, Berg in Linntea, vol. xxix. (1858) 258, et in Mart. Fl. Bras. 
vol. xiv. pars I. p. 616, et Suppl. t. liv. {folium). KiaesJcou, Enum. 
Myrt. Bras. p. 187. Andre, in Rev. Horticol. vol. Ixxv. (1898) No. xi. 
p. '264, cum ic. 

Orthostemon Sellowianna, Berg I.e. vol. xxvii. (1854) p. 440. 

Araca do Brazil ; Arasa do Rio Grande ; et Goyabo del Pays, in col. 

Flowering, and subsequently fruiting specimens of this 
interesting plant were sent to me in 1896, by my friend 
M. Andre, from his Garden, Villa Colombia, Golfe S. Juan, 
as a species of Psidium ? from Uruguay, with an eatable 
fruit, accompanied with the request that I would determine 
its name. This, owing to an important error in the 
description of Feijoa in Martiu's "Flora Brasiliensis," 
proved to be a very troublesome task, and it was not until 
I undertook a systematic inspection of the whole vast tribe 
of Mi/rtesB in the Kew Herbarium that I was able to give 
~M. Andre the name, under which he published it in the 
*' Rev. Horticol." cited above. The error alluded to was 
describing the seed as albuminous, with flat, foliaceous 
cotyledons, characters foreign to the Order Myrtacese. 

With the habit of Psidiam, Feijoa differs from that genus 

October 1st, 1898. 



in the elongated ovary, in the filaments erect in bud (in which 
it differs from all other Myrtacese), and in the hairy anthers. 
Feijoa was discovered by the late Fr. Sellow of Pots- 
dam, who, in 1819, accompanied Prince Neuwied in his 
journey to Brasil as a plant collector, on the recommenda- 
tion of Sir Joseph Banks and Mr. Lambert. After his 
return Sellow's collections were widely distributed, and 
there is a good set of them in the Kew Herbarium, in- 
cluding Feijoa, which was found in the Cocos australis 
region, of the district of Kio Grande do Sol. Since that 
period wild and cultivated specimens have been sent by 
various Brasilian collectors. Specimens communicated by 
Glaziou from the Rio Botanical Gardens are numbered 
6156, 7886. 

The name Feijoa was given in compliment to Don J. 
da Silva Feijo, Director of the National History Museum 
of San Sebastian. Over and above the beauty of the 
foliage and flower of the plant, it is remarkable for the rich 
aromatic odour and flavour of its guava-like fruit. 

Descr. — An erect shrub or small tree, with brown bark, 
and leaves clothed beneath with snow-white appressed 
tomentum. Leaves two to three inches long, opposite, 
shortly petioled, oblong, obtuse, smooth, deep green and 
shining above. Flowers solitary, axillary, stoutly pedi- 
celled, drooping, about two inches broad across the petals. 
Calyx white-tomentose, tube elongate, sub-clavate, bi- 
bracteolate at the base, not produced beyond the ovary, 
lobes orbicular, reflexed. Petals orbicular, spreading, 
externally white-tomentose, internally blood-red, with 
white margins. Stamens very many, filaments erect in 
bud, at length spreading, longer than the petals, blood- 
red, anthers small, yellow, pubescent. Ovary four-celled, 
cells many-ovuled ; style stout, narrowed below the 
capitellate stigma. Berry two inches long, by one and 
three-quarters in diameter, oblong, crowned with the 
calyx-lobes, many-seeded, pericarp thin, green, sarcocarp 
fleshy, aromatic. Seeds reniformly orbicular, compressed, 
testa coriaceous. Embryo spirally coiled. — J.D. H. 

Fig. 1, Bad with perianth removed on one side, showing the erect stamens 
and style; 2 and 3, anthers; 4, calyx-tube and style; 5 and 6, transverse 
sections of ovary at different stages of development ; 7, ripe fruit ; 8, seed ; 
9, embryo : — All enlarged, except 7 and 8, which are of nat. size. 



7621 




M.S.del.J.N.Fitchlith 



VraceniBrooks,Da.y&Son L 



I. Reeve &.G London 



Tab. 7621. 
RHODODENDRON eubiginostjm. Franeh. 

Native of Yunnan. 



Nat. Ord. Ericaceae.— Tribe Riiodore,e. 
Genus Rhododendron, Linn. (Benth. & Hoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 599.) 



Rhododendron rubiginosum ; frutex 3-pedalis, glaberrimus, ramis robastis 
petiolis foliisque subtus flavo-brunneis squamulis rufo-brunneis dense 
lepidotis, gemmis foliiferis parvi?, foliis petiolatia 2-3-pollicaribns 
oblongo- or ovato-lanceolatis utrinque acutis coriaceis supra luride 
viridibus opacis sparse lepidotis, nervis secundariis utrinque costse 6-12 
gracilibus, rloribus 4^8 corymbosis breviter pedicellatis, calyce minuto 
obtuse breviter 5-lobo, corolla 1| poll, expans. laete rosea, tubo late 
infundibulari extus sparse lepidoto, lobis tubo brevioribus rotundatis 
undulatis 2 posticis rubro maculatis, staminibus 10 corolla brevioribus, 
filamentis infra medium pubescentibus, antheris rubris, ovario oblongo 
5-loculari lepidoto, stylo glabro. 

R. rubiginosum, Franeh. in Bull. Soc. Bot. Fr. vol. xxxiv. (1887) p. 282. 
Forbes & Hemsl. in Journ. Linn. Soc. xxvi. (1889) 30. 



This is another of the swarm of Western Chinese 
Rhododendrons discovered by the indefatigable Abbe 
Delavay, and described by M. Franchet in the Bulletin of 
the Botanical Society of France. Its nearest ally, accord- 
ing to him, is R. polylepis, from the same country, which has 
similar coloured lepidote scales on the corolla, and on the 
under surface of the leaf, but has exserted stamens. 

Another near congener is from a very distant country, 
namely, R. punctata m, Andr. (Bot. Rep. t. 36, Bot. Mag. 
t. 2285, Bot, Reg. i. t. 37, Wats. Dendrolog. ii. t. 162 A., 
Vent. Hort. Cels. t. 15) of the mountains of Georgia and 
N. Carolina. A glance at the figure of that plant in this 
work shows how marked the resemblance is between it and 
U. rvbi'jinosum, and bearing in mind that the flowers of 
R. jpundatum vary greatly in size and colour (as the figures 
above cited show), it is difficult to say how the two are to 
be distinguished, except by the much larger flower of the 
Chinese plant, which has also disproportionately large 
highly coloured anthers, and much less hairy filaments. 
Differential characters may be found in the fruit of the 
latter which is not known. 

M. Franchet describes the interior of the corolla-tube 
October 1st, 1898. 



as shortly hairy within, but it is glabrous in the Kew 
plant. 

B. rubiginosum is a native of Tsangshan Mfc., above 
Tali, in the province of Yunnan, at an elevation of 6000 to 
7000 ft. The plant from which the figure is taken was 
obtained by the Eoyal Gardens, Kew, in 1894, from 
Messrs. Veitch. It flowers in April and May, and is quite 
hardy. 

Bescr. — A rigid shrub, three feet high, with stout 
branches and brown branchlets, which, with the leaves 
beneath, petioles, pedicels, calyx and ovary, are densely 
clothed with red-brown circular lepidote scales. Leaves 
two to three inches long, ovate- or oblong-lanceolate, 
acute or acuminate, narrowed into a short petiole, dull 
green, opaque above, with a few lepidote scales, yellowish 
beneath; leaf-bud scales small, orbicular. Flowers few, 
corymbose, shortly pedicelled. Calyx very small, obtusely 
4-lobed. Corolla one and a half inches broad, bright rose- 
red, tube broadly funnel-shaped, rather longer than the 
orbicular, undulate, spreading lobes, the two upper of 
which are spotted with red. Stamens 10, filaments shorter 
than the corolla, minutely pubescent towards the base ; 
anthers large, red-purple. Ovary oblong, 5-lobed ; style 
long, glabrous, stigma pale. 

Fig. 1, Upper, and 2, undersurface of leaf; 3, calyx and ovary; 4, lepidote 
scale; 5 and 6, stamens :— All enlarged. 



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„ 7618— CYTISUS PURGANS. 
„ 7619.— AMELANCHIER CANADENSIS. 
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7622 




'ibchlith 



Vincent Br o oks, D ay A S on t d Imp. 



L.Reeve & C° London. 



Tab. 7622, 
ASTRAGALUS ponticus'. 

Native of Asia Minor. 

Nat. Or J. Leguminos.e. — Tribe Galege.*. 
Genus Astragalus, Linn.; (Benth. & Uooh.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 506.) 



Astragalus (Alopecias) ponticus; herba erecta, 2-3-pedalis, perennis, caule 
robusto simplici tereti glabro v. villoso, foliis alternis pedalibus patenti- 
decurvis brevissime petiolatis, rhachi gracile glabra v. pnbescente, foliolis 
15-25-jugis pollicaribus sub-sessilibus ovato-oblougis obtusis supra glabris 
subtus pilosis pubescentibusve, stipulis liberis triangulari-lanceolatis 
pollicaribus fuscis, capitulis magnis axillaribus sub-sessilibus v. breviter 
pedunculatis, oblongo-globosis multi-densifloris, floribns pollicaribus 
breviter pedicellatis primulinis, bracteis lanceolatis calycis lubo oblongo 
brevioribus, calycis hirsuti dentibus triangulari-ovatis lanceolatis ve tnbo 
triplo v. quadruplo brevioribus, vexillo oblongo retuso alis longe unguicu- 
latis paullo longiore, legumine parvo calyce incluso ovato compresso 
hirto 2-loculari oligospermo, seminibns parvis subreniformibus. 

A. pontious, Pallas, Sp. Astrag. Descrip. p. 14, t. xi. DC. Prodr. vol. ii. 
p. 295. Ledeb. Fl. Boss. vol. i. p. 635. Boiss. Fl. Orient, vol. ii. p. 408. 
Bunge, Gen. Astrag. Geront. p. 95. 

A. polycephalus, Tenore, Sort. Neap, ev Bunge I. c. 



The genus Astragalus is one of the very largest in the 
Vegetable Kingdom, upwards of fifty genera have been 
carved out of it, to be subsequently merged in it. Accord- 
ing to the " Index Kewensis " it contains upwards of 
1600 species, a number which will no doubt be considerably 
augmented when the Floras of China and Tibet are better 
known. Of all these species scarcely a dozen have been 
figured in any work devoted to garden plants, and of those 
that have been, almost all are confined to the plates of 
this Magazine. JNow that rock-gardening is being pursued, 
no doubt many will be brought into cultivation, for not a 
few are remarkable for beauty of foliage and flowers. 

A. ponticus belongs to a section of the genus which 
inhabits South Europe and Western and Central Asia. 
It is found over a wide tract of country in Europe and 
W. Asia, its western limits being Bulgaria and Podolia, and 
Bessarabia in Southern Russia. In Asia Minor it extends 
from Armenia to Kurdistan and thence to Mt. Elwend in 
Western Persia. One of its nearest allies is A. narbonnemis, 
November 1st, 1898. 



Gouan (figured at tab. 3193 as A. alopecuroides, L.), a 
native of the South of Europe. The plant figured, which 
was raised from seed sent by Mr. H. Whittall, of Smyrna, 
in 1895, flowered in the herbaceous grounds of the Royal 
Gardens in June of the present year. 

Descr. — A perennial herb, with erect simple stems as 
thick as a swan's quill, glabrous throughout, or villous 
towards the upper part. Leaves alternate, rather distant, 
six inches to a foot long, spreading and recurved ; rhachis 
slender, glabrous or pubescent, bearing leaflets nearly 
to the base ; leaflets fifteen to twenty-five pairs, about an 
inch long, opposite and alternate, sessile or very shortly 
petiolulate, ovate-oblong, rounded at the base and tip, 
glabrous on both surfaces, or above only, and more or less 
softly hirsute beneath, rather thick, glaucous green, midrib 
slender, nerves very obscure ; stipules up to an inch long, 
subulate-lanceolate. Flowers in dense globose or shortly 
ovoid axillary heads, one and a half to two inches in 
diameter, an inch long, very shortly pedicelled: bracts 
minute, subulate. Calyx-tube about one-third of an inch 
long, oblong, softly hirsute, green, teeth very short, ovate. 
Corolla primrose-yellow ; standard oblong, recurved, shortly 
two-lobed ; wing-petals rather shorter than the standard, 
claw nearly as long as the ovate-oblong obtuse limb, base 
with an incurved auricle ; keel petals like the wings, but 
shorter and broader. Ovary hirsute. Pod very small, 
included in the calyx-tube, ovoid-oblong, beaked, hirsute, 
2-celled ; cells 1-2 -seeded. Seeds sub-reniform, com- 
pressed. — J. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Section of calyx with ovary ; 2, wing-petal ; 3, keel-petal ; 4, stamens 
and ovary ; 5, fruiting calyx ; 6, seed :— All enlarged. 



7623 




itcJiMi 



3rooks,Dayi- 



L Reeve &.C°I.on<lon. 



Tab. 7623. 

KNIPHOFIA LONGICOLLIS. 

Native of Natal. 

Nat. Ord. Liliaceje.— Tribe Hemerocalle^. 
Genus Kniphofia, Moench, {Benth. & SooTc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 775.) 



Kxiphofia longicollis ; foliis multis linearibus acuminatis firmulis viridibus 
margine scabris dorso acute carinatis, pedunculo stricto erecto foliis 
breviore, racemo densissimo oblongo, pedicellis brevissimis cernuis, 
bracteia ovatis scariosis pedicellis longioribus, periantbio luteo elongato 
subcylindrico infra medium leviter constricto, lobis parvis ovatis, 
staminibus styloque demum distincto exsertis. 

K. longicollis, Hort. Leichtlin, ex Baker in Gard. Chron. 1893, vol. xiii. p. 682, 
et in Fl. Cap. vol. vi. p. 284 



This new KnijjJiofia is nearly allied to the old well- 
known K. aloides, Moench (K. Uvaria, Hook, in Bot. Mag. 
tab. 4816), but is dwarfer in habit, with firmer, bright 
green leaves, and bright yellow flowers, without any tinge 
of red. It was imported from Natal by Herrn Max 
Leichtlin, and first flowered at Baden Baden in the summer 
of 1893. Our drawing was made from a plant flowered by 
W. E. Gumbleton, Esq., at Queenstown, County Cork, in 
February, 1897. We have not yet received any dried 
specimen, and do not know at what height above sea-level 
it grows in its native country. If it prove to be as hardy 
as K. aloides, it will be a valuable acquisition to our 
gardens. 

Descr. — Leaves many in a tuft, linear, bright green, two 
or three feet long, tapering gradually to a long point, firm 
in texture, scabrous on the margin, acutely keeled on the 
back. Peduncle stiffly erect, shorter than the leaves. 

ceme oblong, very dense, half a foot long ; pedicels very 

short, cernuous, all the flowers bright, light yellow, tinged 

occasionally with orange, without any tinge of red ; bracts 

ovate, scariose, longer thin the pedicels. Perianth sub- 

Novembek 1st, 3898. 



cylindrical, an inch and a quarter long, slightly constricted 
below the middle; lobes small, ovate. Stamens and style 
finally distinctly exserted ; anthers small, oblong, light 
yellow. — J, G. Baker. 



1, Margin of leaf; 2, flower; 3, front view of stamen; 4, back view of 
atamen ; 5, style, all more or less enlarged. 



7624, 




MS.delJJiPitdhlith 



r AiVS 

■^ ■■■■■■ " ■ . ; \\\Hh« 

•T5nc«ttBrocfcs,Day*S0n 
LRee 



Tab. 7624. 

ALjOE LEPTOPHYLLA. 
Native of Cape Colony. 

Nat. Ord. Liliace.e. — Tribe Aloises. 
Genus Aloe, Linn.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 776.) 

Aloe leptopliylla ; caudice simplici, foliia dense rosulatis recurvatis lanceolatia 
acnminatis pro genere tenuibus viridibus punctia_ et lineis albidis copiosis 
decoratis dentibus marginalibus crebria magnis deltoideis, pedunculo 
simplici stricto erecto foliis longiore, racemo congesto capitato, pedicellia 
longis, bracteis parvis lanceolato-deltoideis, perianthio aurantiaco tubo 
subcylindrico supra ovarium constricto, lobis linearibua tubo brevioribus 
apice viridibus, staminibus styloque brevitev exsertis. 

A. leptophylla, JV. E. Brown, ex Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xviii. p. 165 ; 
Journ. Bot. 1889, p. 44 ; Fl. Cap. vol. vi. p. 313. 



This fine Aloe was collected by Mr. Thomas Cooper in 
his travels in South Africa, about the year 1860, in the 
province of Worcester, not far from the town of Worcester, 
which is about eight hundred feet above sea-level. It is 
nearly allied to A. latifolia, Haworth, but the leaves are 
thinner in texture than in any other species of the group 
Maculatse, which is conspicuous for its copiously spotted 
leaves. The Kew plant, from which our drawing was made, 
was purchased from Mr. Cooper in 1897, and flowered in 
the Succulent House in April, 1898. 

D esC r. — Stem reaching a length of half a foot, and a 
diameter of two inches below the rosette of leaves. Leaves 
twelve to twenty in a rosette, recurved, lanceolate, acumi- 
nate, nine to twelve inches long, three or four inches 
broad, green, or tinged with purple, copiously spotted and 
striped with white, thinner in texture than in any of its 
allies; marginal teeth large, close, deltoid. Peduncle 
simple, stiffly erect, longer than the leaves. Raceme dense, 
capitate; pedicels an inch or more long; bracts small, 
lanceolate, deltoid. Perianth sub-cylindrical, an inch and 
a half long, bright orange-yellow, tipped with green ; tube 
constricted above the ovary ; lobes linear, shorter than the 
tube. Stamens and style slightly exerted. — J. G. Baker, 

Fig. 1, A flower ; 2, front view of (stamen ; 3, back view of stamen ; 4, pistil, 
all enlarged ; 5, whole plant, much reduced. 
Novembek 1st, 1898. 



7625 




MS-delJlfFitcMith. 



;rooks,Day 



L Reeve &C° London.- 



Tab. 7625. 

PODOTHECA CHRYSANTHA. 

Native of Western Australia. 

Nat. Orel. Composite. — Tribe Inuldide.e. 
(ienns Podotiieca, Cass.; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. ii. p. 315.) 



Podotiieca chrysantha ; herba annua, 1-lg-pedalis, erecta, ramosa, glabra v. 
scaberula, laxe foliosa, foliis 1-3-pollicaribus basi latis sessilibus linearibus 
obtusis patenti-recurvis utrinque scaberulis, capitulis ad apices ramulorum 
solitariia, pedunculis apice incrassato intus vacuo, involucro late tur- 
binato-campanulato £— § poll, longo, bracteia erectis exterioribus herbaceia 
subaBquilongis lanceolatis obtusis 3-nerviis laxe pilosis interioribus 2-3- 
seriatia linearibus lineari-spathulatisve hyalinis, receptaculo demum 
tumido tuberculato, floribus perplurirnis omnibus hermaphroditis in- 
volucro longioribus, corollas aureas tubo pergracili elongato decurvo, 
lobis ovato-rotundatis, antherarum caudibus tenuissimis laceris, con- 
nectivo apice producto unguiformi, styli ramis elongatis gracilibus 
recurvis, stigmatibus capitellatis, pappi setis 8-10 filiformibus rigidia 
barbellatis, achenio angusto teretiusculo basi subulato bispido- 
pubescente. 

P. chrysantha, Benth. Flor. Austral, vol. iii. p. 602. 
Ixiolasna chrysantha, Steetz, in Plant. Preiss. vol. i. p. 459. 



Podotiieca is a small genus of six species, all confined 
to Western Australia. One only has been, previously 
to this date, figured from plants raised in this country, 
it is the P. gnajihaloides, Grab. (tab. 3920) ; a species 
remarkable for the great length of the involucre, the 
bracts of which are very unequal in length. P. chry- 
santha is a native of Western Australia, from the Swan to 
the Murchison Rivers. It differs from the generic 
character in the filiform pappus hairs, which are barbel late 
(not plumose), and in the achenes wanting a distinct stipes. 
The specimen figured was raised from seeds presented 
to the Royal Gardens in 1896 by Miss Bunbury, of 
Picton, W. Australia. It flowered in a cool house in May, 
1897. 

Descr. — An erect, annual, slender, branching herb, twelve 
to eighteen inches high, glabrous or scaberulous on the 
stem and leaves. Leaves scattered, sessile by a broad 
base, two to three inches long by about one-sixth of an inch 
broad, linear, obtuse, spreading, and recurved. Heads soli- 
tary, terminating the branches, one to one and a half inches 
November 1st, 1898. 



diam. across the flowers, peduncles slender, rather thickened, 
obconical and hollow at the top. Involucre two- thirds of an 
inch long, turbinately campanulate, bracts nearly equal in 
length, outer lanceolate, thinly herbaceous, green, sparsely 
villous with long hairs, inner scarious linear, or linear- 
spathulate, hyaline, glabrous, or sparingly ciliate. Floivers 
very many, much longer than the involucre, outer spread- 
ing all round, golden-yellow. Corolla-tube very slender, 
decurved, about half an inch long ; lobes short, flat, broadly 
ovate, or nearly rounded. Anthers linear, cells with very 
delicate hair-like fimbriate tails; connective produced into 
a nail-shaped appendage. Pappus hairs about 20, equal in 
length, much shorter than the corolla-tube, rigid, filiform, 
barbellate. Achene small, terete, narrowly obconical, 
contracted below into a subulate base, densely hispid. — 
J.D.B. 

Fig. 1, Outer ; 2, inner involucral bracts ; 3, flowers ; 4, pappus hairs ; 
5, anthers ; 6, style arms : — All enlarged. 



7<: ■ 




M.S.del.ethth. 



Tfincent,Broota,Day&Sar 



L. Reeve &.C Lojidon 



Tab. 7626. 

CALLIANDKA fulgens. 

Native of Mexico. 

Nat. Ord. Leguhinos.e. — Tribe Inge.e. 
Genus Callianura, Benth. ; (Benth. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 596 ) 



Calliandra (Unijugaj) fulgens; frutex v. arbuscula, fuliis gracile pctiolatis, 
petiolo glanduloso, pinnia nnijugis, foliolis trijugis 2-2^- pollicaribas 
lineari-oblongis obtnsis 3-nerviis et penninerviis basi cuneati3, jnnioribus 
pallide rufo-brunneis pilosulis, adultis viridibus glabris petiolo rbachiqne 
gracilibus pubernlis, floribus in capitulum b rev iter pedunculatum 
globosum (staminibus inclusis) 2| poll. diam. confertis, calyce minuto 
obconico ore truncato, corollse -fa poll, longaa rosea? lobis brevibus obtnsis, 
staminum tubo breviter exseito membranaceo ore iutus ad basin 
filamentorum squamulis crenulatis aucto, staminibus uniseriatis, iila- 
mentis \\ poll, longis strictis sauguineis, antheris minutis, disco tumido. 



The nearest ally that I can find for this beautiful plant 
is Calliandra hsematocephala, Hassk., figured at tab. 5181 of 
this work, which has a similar head of blood-red filaments, 
but which is perfectly glabrous, and has seven to ten pairs 
of much, smaller dark green and shining leaflets rounded at 
the base. The native country of G. hsematocephala, which 
was first known from being cultivated in the Botanical 
Gardens of Calcutta, has never been discovered. That of 
G. fulgens is believed to be Mexico, whence it was sent to 
the gardens of the Royal Botanic Society in Regent's Park. 
It flowered there in 1888, when a specimen was sent to 
Kew to be named, together with a living plant, which 
flowered in the Palm House in March, 1897, and continued 
in bloom till midsummer. I have repeatedly — but always 
in vain — attempted to identify it with any described 
species, or any plant preserved in the Herbarium at Kew, 
and must therefore regard it as an addition to the one 
hundred and thirteen recorded species of the genus. 

Descr. — A low growing shrub or small tree, with 
spreading branches, covered with brown bark. Leaves 
solitary, or in pairs, each consisting of an eglandular 
petiole, bearing two pinnse each, with three pairs of 
leaflets; petiole one and a half to two inches long, and 
rhachis of the pinnae very slender, pubescent ; leaflets 

November 1st, 1898. 



sessile, opposite, linear-oblong, obtuse, three-nerved from 
the base, with the midrib penninerved, quite glabrous, 
bright green above, pale beneath, base narrowed ; young 
pinnee pendulous, with pale, red-brown, membranous 
white leaflets, the terminal pair largest (all being sub- 
equal in age). Flowers capitate, on a very short peduncle, 
forming with the scarlet stamens a head two and a half 
inches in diameter. Calyx minute, truncate. Corolla four- 
tenths of an inch long, tubular-campanulate, shortly five- 
cleft, quite glabrous, bright pink, lobes short, rounded. 
Staminal tube exserted, mouth with one row of small 
crenate scales at the base of the single row of scarlet 
filaments which are an inch long ; anthers minute, crimson. 
— /. D. E. 



Fig. 1, Flower ; 2, the same laid open, showing the interior of the stamiual 
tube with the scales, bases of the stamens, disk and ovary : — All enlarged. 



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7627 




Ltjchlith. 



"ViriceniBrocfc J)ay 4 SonLt. Imp 



.andon 



Tab. 7627. 

MUSA Bakeei. 

Native of Cochin- China ? 

Nat. Ord. Scitamine^e.— Tribe Musejb. 
Genus Musa, Linn. ; (Benth. & Eook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 655.) 



Musa (Enmnsa) Bakeri; caule 10 pedali cylindrico basi stolonifero, folm dis- 
tincte petiolatis elongato-oblongis facie viridibus dorso pallidis basi 
inajqualibus leviter rotundatis vel subcaneatis, spicis brevibus cernms, 

- bracteis omnibus persistentibus vacuis lanceolatis flonfens lnfenonbus 
oblongis dorso rubro-brunneis intense glaucis intus sanguinis, flonbus 
masculis unaqnaeque bractea 9-12, biseriatis, calycis dentibus brevibus 
obtusis apice cucullatis 2 exterioribus dorso oornutis cornu erect o 6 
intermediis umbonatis centrali ceteris majore, petalo calyce dimidio 
breviore oblongo albo apice 3-lobo, lobo intermedio cuspidate, filamentis 
flavis rubro striatis recurvis staminodiis in fl. fem. cuspidatis, iructu 
immaturo acute trigono stigmate!globoso. 

M. Bakeri, SooJc.f. in Sort. Kew. 



The present plant flowered for the first time in the palm- 
stove of the Royal Gardens, Kew, in October, 189a ». It 
was received from the Jardin des Plantes at Paris in 1890. 
There is some doubt as to its native country, which M. 
Cornu believes to be Cochin-China. It belongs to the 
ff roup of M. sapientum, from which it differs mainly by 
its short spike and brightly coloured bracts, which resemble 
those of M. rosacea, Jacq., which forms a link "of connec- 
tion between the sections Eumusa and RhocUchlamys 
M. rosacea is a much smaller, more slender plant, with 
narrower bracts, few flowers in a cluster, and a linear petal 
as lone: as tne united sepals. 

Descr.-Stem ten feet high, and eight to ten inches in 
diameter at the base, cylindrical, green, stoloniferous 
Leaves distinctly petioled, elongate-oblong, seven feet long 
by two feet broad, bright green on the *VV** **«*<»' P£° 
green beneath, unequal, rounded or Bub-ouneate ^ the 
base; petiole two feet long. 8p*B ^'j^™^' 
sterile bracts lanceolate; lower flonferous bract, oblong, 
half a foot long, reddish-brown, and intensely glaucous 
on the outside, bright crimson side. Male flowers nine 
to twle in a cluster, distinctly bisenate ; sepals united 

December 1st, 1898. 



except at the tip, an inch and a half long, teeth short, 
all cucullate at the tip, the two outer with an erect horn 
as long as the tooth, intermediate umbonate at the apex; 
petal whitish, oblong, three-lobed, cuspidate at the apex, 
half as long as _ the calyx. Stamens a little longer than 
the sepals. Unripe fruit oblong, acutely trigonous, green, 
narrowed gradually to the base, not distinctly stalked 
(in an early stage). — J. G. Baker. 

Fig 1, Lower floriferous bract, life size ; 2, male flower, life size ; 3, apex of 
united sepals, enlarged ; 4, petal, enlarged ; 5, stamen, enlarged ; 6, female 
Mower, life size ; 7, unripe fruit, life size; 8, whole plant, much reduced. 



76Z8 




Tab. 7628. 
CARDAMINE latipolia. 

Native of the Pyrenees and S. Italy. 



Nat. Ord. Crucifer,*:.— Tribe Arabide.e. 
Genus Cardamine, Linn.; (Benth. & Eoolc.f. Gen. Plant, vol. i. p. 70.) 



Cardamine latifolia ; elata, robusta, glaberrima, rhizomate ramoso nodoso, 
foliia 6-10 poll, longis lyrato-pinnatisectis, segmentis deorsum accres- 
centibusrepando-subcrenatis crassiusculis glaberrimis v. ciliatis, lateralibus 
paucis distantibns orbicularis, terminali multo majorerotundato-reniform, 
superioribus trifoliolatis, inflorescentia erecta paniculata multiflora 
floribus f poll. diam. ad apices ramorum subcorymbosis, pedicellis . polli- 
earibus, sepalis oblongis glaberrimis, petalis roseo-lilacinis raro albis, 
antheris oblongis flavis, siliquis 1^ pollicaribus erectis strictis \ poll, latis 
stylo brevi terminatis, stigmate obtuso, valvis enerviis, seminibus 
nnmerosis late oblongis fuscis, radicula obliqua accumbente. 

C. latifolia, Vahl, Symb. vol. ii. p. 77. DC. Fl. Franc. Ed. 3, vol. iv. p. 683. 
Loisel. Fl. Gall. vol. ii. p. 84. Duly, Bot. Gall. p. 32. Lapeyr. Hist. 
Abr&ge PI. Pyren. p. 683. Benth. Cat. PI. Pyren. p. 66. Gren $■ Go&r. 
Fl. Franc, vol. i. p. 108. Willk. 3r Lange, Prodr. Fl. JJisp. vol. iii. 
p. 824 Amo, Fl. Fanerog. Esp. et Port. vol. vi. p. 551. Groenl. in 
Bev. Hortic. 1880, p. 460, 6gs. 93, 94. 

C. Chelidonii, Lam. Diet. vol. ii. p. 183. 

0. raphanifolia, Pourr. in Mem. Acad. Tout. vol. iii. (1788) p. 310. 

0. pratensis, Tenore, Viagg. in Abruz. 1830, p. 77 (ex Gay in lib. Kew). 

C. pratensis, |3. calabrica, Tenore, Syll. Fl. Neap. p. 319. 



Cardamine latifolia resembles a gigantic form of the 
common Lady's Smock (0. pratensis). It is a native of 
the alpine valleys of the Pyrenees, growing by streams, 
and delighting in the spray of cataracts, as on the Prats 
de Mollo, Pas de Roland, Vallee de Viella, and the Republic 
of Andorre. It also occurs in a very remote locality from 
these, namely the mountains of Calabria in the South of 
Italy. It is well distinguished from C. pratensis by its 
great size, and the absence of pinnatifid upper leaves with 
narrow segments. The specimen here 'figured grows in 
the Rock Garden of the Royal Gardens, where it flowers 
annually in May. 

Descr. — Eootstoch branching, nodose. Stem twelve to 
eighteen inches high, stout, green, striate, paniculately 
branched above. Leaves rather fleshy, bright green, lower 

December 1st, 1898. 



six to ten inches long, lyrate-pinnatisect, petiole and 
rhachis stout, terminal segment orbicular, attaining three 
inches in diameter, obscurely crenate, lateral segments few, 
much smaller, alternate, distant, sessile, orbicular, lowest 
very small ; upper leaves trifoliolate, all petiolulate, seg- 
ments entire, or more or less unequally crenately lobulate, 
terminal largest. Flowers many, in erect, short racemes 
terminating the stem and branches, three-quarters of an 
inch in diameter, pedicels one half to one inch long, sub- 
erect. Sepals oblong, obtuse, glabrous. Petals with a 
short, broad, toothed claw, and an orbicular, rosy lilac, 
rarely white, orbicular limb one-third of an inch in 
diameter. Pod half an inch long, one-fifth of an inch 
broad, many-seeded; style short, stigma obtuse. Seeds 
pale brown — J. D. H. 



Fig. 1, Claw of petal; 2, hypogynous glands, stamens and ovary; 3, ovary 
ana glands ; 4 pods ; 5, seed ; 6, embryo ; 7, transverse section of seed -.—All 



enlarged, except 4, which is of nat. size. 




. 






Tab. 7629. 
PAPHIOPEDILUM Mastersianum. 

Native of Java. 



Nat. Ord. Orchide^. — Tribe Cypkifedie^:. 
Genus Paphiopediltjm (Pfttzer, Morphol. Stud. Orchid, p. 11.) 



Paphiopedilum M astersianum ; robustum, foliis late lineari-oblongis obtusis 
supra tessellatia subtus pallidis, scapo valid or ufo-brunneo pilia patentibua 
purpureis hirsuto 1-2-floro, iloribus magnis 4 poll, latis, perianthio 
crassiusculo, bracteis 1J poll, longis cymbiformibus herbaceis, ovario fere 
tripollicari angulis hirsutis, sepalo dorsali erecto 2 poll, lato orbiculari 
ciliolato intus stramineo viridi striato nervis dorso hirsutis, lateralibus in 
laminam minorem viridem late ovatam obtusam labello breviorem con- 
fluentibus, petalis sepalis longioribus divaricatia lineari-oblongis apice 
rotundatis i'usco-purpureis ciliatis basin versus verrucis purpureis ornatis, 
labello sacciformi fusco-purpureo versus orem subdilatatum amplum 
flavido, marginibus inflexis punctatis, staminodio parvo viridi ambitu 
orbiculari hippocrepiformi cuspidibus acutis. 

0. Mastersianum, Tfitz. in Engl. Bot. Jahrb. vol. xix. (1895) p. 40. 

Cypripedium Mastersianum, Reichb. f. in Gard. Ohron. 1879, vol. ii. p. 102, 
Masters, I. c. 1894, vol. i. p. 593, t. 74. Yeitch, Man. Orchid, part. iv. p. 39. 
IAndenia, vol. iv. t. 159. Rolfe in Orchid. Rev. vol.ii. p. 17, rig. 4. 



A very robust and large-flowered species of the ex- 
tensive genus Paphiopedilum, first described by Reichen- 
bacli in 1879, from a plant the native country of which 
was then doubtful, but which country Mr. Rolfe has 
ascertained to be Java, from a communication with Messrs. 
Low, who recently imported it from that island. 

My reasons for adopting Pfitzer's generic name of 
Paphiopedilum are given under Tab. 7573. I think they 
are botanically unassailable, nevertheless I do not object 
to the substitution o£ Cypripedium for it, in common par- 
lance, just as I do of Aster chinensis for the " China 
Aster," though that plant differs by important characters 
from all the species of that vast genus, and is known to 
botanists as Gallisteplms hortensis. The plant of P. Mas- 
tersianum here figured, which flowered in the Tropical 
Orchid House of the Royal Gardens, Kew, in March, 
1898, was obtained from Messrs. F. Sander & Co. It is a 
noble species, named in compliment to Dr. Masters, 
F.R.S., through whose exertions, following those of his 

December 1st, 1898. 



predecessor, Dr. Lindley, the Gardener's Chronicle has done 
more to extend a knowledge of the Orchidese than any other 
periodical. 

Descr. — Tall, very robust. Leaves six to nine inches 
long, by one and a half broad, linear-oblong, obtuse, 
tessellate above with dark and very pale green, very pale 
beneath. Scape stout, a foot to a foot and a half high, 
very dark red purple, hirsute with dark, spreading hairs, 
one to two-fid. Bracts an inch and a half long, cymbiform, 
herbaceous, erect, dark green, dorsally hirsute on the keel 
and towards the base. Flower three inches across the 
petals, segments of perianth of a very thick texture. 
Dorsal sepal erect, orbicular, two inches broad, pale 
yellowish within, streaked with green from the base to 
three-fourths of its breadth, dorsally with hairy ribs. 
Petals spreading, linear-oblong, three-quarters of an inch 
broad, tip rounded, dull purplish brown, green, and 
marked with minute purple warts towards the base. Lip 
a large, inflated sac, of a dull red-purple colour, yellowish 
towards the somewhat dilated truncate mouth, inflected 
margins dotted. Staminode small, greenish, orbicular in 
outline, horse-shoe-shaped, with the incurved cusps acute, 
upper margin bifid. Ovary nearly three inches long, 
narrow, erect, ribs hispid with purple hairs.—/. D. II. 



Fig. 1, Staminal column : — Enlarged. 



1630 




MS.de 



Vincent Brooks,Day&Sor 



L Reev. 



Tab. 7630. 

CALADENIA carnea. 

vae. alba. 

Native of E. Australia and Tasmania. 



Nat. Ord. Oechide^. — Tribe Neottie^k. 
Genus Caladenia, R. Br. ; {Benih. & Hook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 612.) 



Caladenia (Eucaladenia) carnea ; gracilis, sparse pilosa, tuberibus globosis 
folio elongate- anguste lineari, floribus 1-3, sepalis petalisqne lateralibus 
consimilibus pollicaribus lanceolatis subacutis, sepalo dorsali erecto 
lineari-oblongo lateralibus deflexis paullo breviore, petalia deflexis, labello 
parvo sepalis vix dimidio breviore, lobis lateralibus latis apice rotundatis 
glabris, termiDali parvo ovato obtuso recurvo callis clavellatis marginato, 
disco inter lobos laterales callis globosis sessilibus v. stipitatis bi-multi- 
seriatis ornato, columna alata, anthera rostrata, polliniis late obcordatis 
bilamellosis. 

C. carnea, R. Br. Prodr. p. 324. Lindl. Gen. & Sp. Orchid, p. 417. JEndl 
Iconngr. t. 57. Hook.f. Fl. Tasman. vol. ii. p. 29, t. 124 A. Beichb.f. 
Beitr. Orch. p. 28. Bentli. Fl. Austral, vol. vi. p. 386. Fitzgerald 
Austral. Orchid, vol. i. Synops. p. 1. Ic. Caladen. t. 4. 

C. alata, B. Br, I. c. Lindl. 1. c. 418. Hook.f. 1. c. p. 30, t. 125 A. Reichb f. 
I. c. 29. 

0. angustata, Hook.f. I. c. t. 125 B. 

PArethusa catenata, Sm. Fxot. Bot. vol. ii. p. 29, t. 104. 

Yar. alba; sepalo dorsali columnaque virescentibus, sepalis lateralibus 
petali=que albis roseo viridique irroratis. C. alba, Br. I. c. p. 323. Fitz- 
gerald, I. c. 



Caladenia carnea is a widely distributed species in 
Australia from Rockhampton, under the tropic of Capri- 
corn, to the southern shores of Tasmania, and westward to 
St. Vincent Gulf in South Australia, varying a great deal 
in hairiness, and in the size and colour of the flowers, 
in the number of the calli on the disk of the lip, and 
in the breadth of the wings of the column. Bentham 
recognized three varieties ; a typical one with pink sepals 
and petals, transverse bars of rose colour on the lip and 
column, and two rows of calli on the lip ; a var. alba, with 
white flowers, and a var. quadriseriaia, with pink flowers 
and four rows of calli on the lip. In Tasmania, where I 
collected it in 1841, I recognized three forms, regarded 
by myself and by Mr. Archer, whose beautiful drawings 
are reproduced in the " Flora of Tasmania," as species, 

December 1st, 1898. 



which Bentham, rightly, I think, has reduced to G. carnea. 
These are G. carnea, R. Br., with pink sepals and petals, an 
erect dorsal sepal, and several rows of golden glands on 
the lip ; C. alata, R. Br., taller, more robust, with nearly 
white sepals and petals, erect dorsal sepal, and four rows 
of pink calli on the lip ; G. angustata, with rose-coloured 
flowers, an arched dorsal sepal, broader lateral sepals and 
petals, and four rows of calli on the lip. All these have 
transverse bars of pink at the base of the side-lobes of the 
lip, and on the column. The side-lobes are hardly pro- 
duced into lobes in alata and angustata. I have cited 
Smith's Arethusa catenata as a doubtful synonym, because 
the lip is figured as blue. G. carnea is described by 
Mr. Fitzgerald as self-fertilizing. The Royal Gardens are 
indebted to Mr. J. O'Brien, of Harrow-on-the-Hill, for 
tubers of the white-flowered variety here figured, which 
flowered in a stove in February of the present year. The 
figure of the pink-flowered var. is taken from the " Flora 
Tasmania!." 

Descr. — Stem six to twelve inches high, from nearly 
glabrous to more or less hairy and glandular. Leaves 
linear, variable in length. Flowers one to four, an inch 
to an inch and a half broad. Sepals and petals similar, 
white, pink, or greenish clouded with red, linear-lanceolate, 
sub-acute, all but the dorsal sepal more or less deflexed. 
Lip about half as long as the dorsal sepal, recurved beyond 
the middle, lateral lobes broad, obtuse, streaked with 
red, terminal small, ovate, with glandular margins, disk 
with two or more rows of stipitate capitate glands. 
Column winged. — J. D, H. 



Fig. A, White-flowered var. ; A 1, lip; A 2, column^ A 3, pollinia:— All 
enlarged; B, pink-flowered var. (from " Flora Tasmaniae,'' t. 124) ; B 1, roots, 
of nut. size. ; B 2, lip, enlarged. 



7G31 




n&Sanl&hBS 



Londcn. 



Tab. 7631. 
FRITILLARIA pluriflora. 

Native of Northern California. 

Nat. Ord. LiliacEjE.— Tribe Tdlipe^s. 
Genua Fritillakia, Linn. (Benth. & Sook.f. Gen. Plant, vol. iii. p. 817.) 



Fkixillaeia (Theresia) pluriflora ; bulbo magno sqaamis maltis craasis 
oblongis, caule erecto elongato, foliis pluribus confertis ascendentibus 
lanceolatis vel linearibus inferioribus verticillatis vel oppositis superioribus 
alternis, racemo multifloro, pedicellis elongatis apice cernuis, bracteis 
magnis linearibus foliaceis, perianthio late aperto pallide rubro hand 
tessellato, segmentis oblongis obtusis foveola viridi carinata obscura praedi- 
tis, staminibuB periantbio distincte brevioribus, filamentis glabris, stylo 
apice tantum stigmatoso tricnspidato, capsules valvis dorso rotundatis. 

F. pluriflora, Torrey in Frem. PI. Calif. Exsicc. No. 213. Benth. PL LTartweg. 
p. 338 (name only). Baker in Journ. Linn. Soc. vol. xiy. p. 270. S. Wats, 
in Proc. Amer. Acad. vol. xiv. p. 259 ; Bot. Calif, vol. ii. p. 169. 



This rare and little-known Californian Fritillary is- very 
different from the ordinary European and Oriental species 
in its large bulb, widely-opened, untessellated, pale red 
flowers, numerous crowded leaves and style, three-cleft 
only at the very tip. Its nearest alliance is with F. per- 
sica, Linn. (Bot. Mag. t. 1537). but that has comparatively 
dull, bell-shaped flowers. It was first gathered by 
Fremont in 1846, on the banks of the Feather river, an 
affluent of the Sacramento, in the Sierra Nevada, Northern 
California ; and two years later by Hartweg in the same 
locality. It has only lately been introduced into cultiva- 
tion in England. Our drawing was made from plants that 
flowered at Kew in a cold frame last March and April, 
the bulbs of which were presented to the Royal Gardens 
in 1895 by Mr. Carl Purdy of Ukiah, California, who has 
made a speciality of the cultivation of Californian bulbs. 

Bescr.—Bulb large for the genus, globose, with many 
thick, oblong scales, an inch long. Stem terete, moderately 
stout, stiffly erect, a foot or more long. Leaves eight to 
fifteen, crowded, lanceolate or linear, ascending, the lower 
verticillate or opposite, the upper alternate. Flowers four 
to twelve in a lax raceme, pedicels long, cernuous at the 
Decembee 1st, 1898. 



apex; bracts large, linear, foliaceo us. Perianth about an 
inch long, pale red, opeDing widely when fully expanded ; 
segments oblong, obtuse, with an obscure green, linear, 
nectary. Stamens shorter than the perianth; filaments 
glabrous, longer than the anthers. Style long, tricus- 
pidate only at the tip. Capsule oblong, obtuse, deeply 
trisulcate ; valves rounded on the back. — J. G. Baker. 



Fig. 1, Front view of anther; 2, back view of anther; 3, pistil : — All 
enlarged. 



INDEX 

To Vol. LIV. of the Third Series, or Vol. OXXIV. of 
the whole Work. 



7587 Allium Schuberti. 

7588 „ 

7624 Aloe leptophylla. 

7619 Amelanchier canadensis, var. 

oblongifolia. 
7592 Amomum hemisphaericum. 

7581 Anemone vernalis. 

7596 Armeria caespitosa. 
7622 Astragalus ponticus. 
7609 Buddleia variabilis. 
7630 Caladenia carnea. 
7626 Calliandra fulgens. 

7603 Callianthemum rutcefolium, 
vat. anemonoides. 

7616 Callistephus hortensis. 

7606 Calochortus elavatus. 
7572 Camoensia maxima. 

7582 Camptosema pinnatum. 
7628 Cardamine latifolia. 
7599 Celastrus articulatus. 
7602 Coelogyne Swaniana. 

7607 Cortaderia jubata. 

7597 Crinum Woodrowi. 
7590 Crocus Malyi. 

7617 Cyrtosperma senegalense. 

7618 Cytisus purgans. 

7579 Daphne Blagayana. 

7580 Dasystachys Drimiopsis. 
7584 Dracaena Godseffiana. 
7586 Epidendrum xanthinum. 
7605 Eria latibracteata. 

7583 Erythronium Hartwegi. 



7612 Eulophiella Peetersiana. 
7613 

7620 Feijoa Sellowiana. 
7631 Fritillaria pluriflora. 
7585 Hacquetia Epipactis. 
7604 Iris Grant-Duffii. 
7595 Kalanehoe flammea. 
7623 Kniphofia longicollis. 

7575 Lathyrus splendens. 

7610 Ledum glandulosum. 
7615 Lobelia intertexta. 
7598 Morisia hypogaea. 
7627 Musa Bakeri. 

7589 Myosotis dissitiflora, var. 

Dyerse. 
7601 Orchis monophylla. 
7578 Paphiopedilum Chamberlain- 

ianum. 
7629 Paphiopedilum Mastersianum. 
7573 „ Victoria-Mariae. 

7600 Philadelphus mexicanus. 
7625 Podotheca chrysantha. 
7591 Rheum Bibes. 

7621 Bhododendron rubiginosum. 
7614 „ yunnanense. 

7611 Ribes villosum. 
7577 Richardia Elliottiana. 

7576 Sievekingia Reichenbachiana. 

7593 Stephanandra Tanaka3. 
7574 Strobilanthes Dyerianus. 

7594 Symphyandra Wanneri. 
7608 Tchihatchewia isatidea. 



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CONTENTS OF No. 648, DECEMBER, 1898. 



Tab. 7627.— MUSA BAKERI. 

> 7628.— CARDAMINE LATIFOLIA, Vahl. 

„ 7629.— PAPHIOPEDILUM MASTERSIANOM. 

„ 7630.— CALADENEA CARNEA. 

„ 7631.— ERITILLARIA PLURIFLORA. 



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Systematic Description of the Plants of the Cape Colony, Caffrana, 

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